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No 62,637 



^Pj>\ tj 9 * J 



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WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 



1 % &J&*A 


erition Persuasion 


Reaganmen fly in 


jfe» 


**.i ■* ^ 



rebuild trust 


George ShStJ^P a w*? tate V» Mr * Vice-Admiral John Poindexter 

mL Mr V&vmm 1 tt0rney i 3e 1 ?- *** Lientenant-Colonel Oliver 

Drfence sSZLJPtE “ d the North again claimed the proto- 
Mr . Caspar bon of the Fifth Amendment 

restore Sth hTi SV * iP""*?. to * HonSe of Representatives 

restore faith in US foreign policy. Foreign Affairs Committee. 

By Michael Evans and Andrew McEwen 

nior memlKraofhS cabinet JJ^ ,S jJ°J^ usla r natteroflaJk i n e Howe, rtie Foreign 
London tohSinSS IS' *£ i P ™* 55 of and his French In 
2 confidence <rf the Euro? ai*K«to£T counterparts, M Jes 
an allies in his fiJSSn ?«£;..« i! us “* BOn .of our Raimond and H 
I icy, it was adraittS ^°lH'S n Po' lc ?', be raid. Dietrich Genscher. 

adramed The operation was timed to held a private meet! 


• Mrs Thatcher vigorously urged 
a critical European Parliament to 

build up the Atlantic alliance 
rather than viewing links with 
Washington only through ‘the 
prism of commercial disputes*. 


wm 


Sunday 
racing 
backed 
by Hurd 




*njor members of his cabinet 
to London to begin restoring 
the confidence of the Euro- 
pean allies in his foreign 
policy, it was admitted 
yesterday. 

The damage limitation ex- 
ercise has involved a spate of 
meetings with British min- 
isters and will be continued in 
Brussels from today to Friday. 

The admission that the 
London visits were co- 
ordinated emerged in a press 
conference by Mr Edwin 
Meese. the US Attorney Gen- 
eral. He said that he, together 
with Mr Georac Shultz, the 
US Secretary of Slate, and Mr 
Caspar Weinberger, the De- 
fence Secretary, had come to 
London “to lay out what the 
President's plan was and what 
his future plans were" in 
relation to Iran. 

A comparable admission 
was made by Mr Shultz speak- 
ing to reporters travelling with 
him from Washington. 

“I have a rebuilding job to 
do and that is what I am going 
to do on this trip, but of course 


Critics close in 
Patrick Buchanan 
Carrington interview 
Leading article 


take advantage of the presence 
in London yesterday of the 12 
EEC interior and justice min- 
isters for anti-terrorist talks. 
The Brussels mission makes 
use of a crucial Nalo meeting. 


se oi a crucial rxaio meeting. 
Confidence was initially 


Tomorrow 


Mission 

impossible? 



badly shaken within the Alli- 
ance by the revelation that 
Washington broke its own 
cardinal rule of not selling 
aims to nations engaged in 
state-sponsored terrorism, 
while at the same time telling 
the Europeans not to do so. 

A determined effort to 
present a united front was 
made both at last week's Nato 
defence ministers* meeting in 
Brussels and at the EEC 
summit in London at the 
weekend. Despite this, both 
Whitehall and Nato head- 
quarters identified the need 
for a greater effort by 
Washington. 

A high Nato source said 
yesterday: “No one in going to 
rock the boat. The ministers 
will want to hear warm 
comforting words of reassur- 
ance from Washington. No 
one hasany interest in Reagan 
being a lame dude" 

Mr Shultz's “rebuilding** 
efforts began at a lunch yes- 
terday with Sir Geoffrey 


Howe, the Foreign Secretary, 
and his French and German 
counterparts, M Jean-Bernard 
Raimond and Herr Hans 
Dietrich Genscher. Later he 
held a private meeting with Sir 
Geoffrey. 

Today Mr Shultz flies to 
Brussels to continue the effort 
in the North Atlantic Council, 
the principal annual meeting 
of Nato foreign ministers. 

On Monday Mr Weinberger 
held separate talks with the 
Prime Minister, Mrs That- 
cher, Sir Geoffrey and the 
Defence Secretary, Mr George 
Younger, in London. 

Meanwhile two more mem- 
bers of the Administration 
were due in London late last 
night to join Mr Clayton 
Yeutter, the US Trade Repre- 
sentative, who held a round of 
talks yesterday. Mr Richard 
Lyng, the US Agriculture Sec- 
retary, and Mr Malcolm 
Baldrige. the US Commerce 
Secretary, are to meet their 
British opposite numbers to- 
day before the three men fly to 
Brussels together. 

American sources said that 
although die three were not 
part of the same exercise their 
presence was bound to show 
that Washington took very 
seriously the need to consult 
Whitehall. 

On Friday Mr Shultz is to 
lead the three to a meeting 
with the European Commis- 
sion, headed by M Jacques 
Delors, 

Another senior U§ official, 
Mr Richard' Murphy^ who is 
assistant Secretary ofSlate for 
Middle East Affairs, held a 
meeting in London yesterday 


Stronger 
links 
urged by 
Thatcher 


m 


IT 


iJ. 





Fran Richard Owen 
Strasbourg 

Mrs Thatcher yesterday 
urged the EEC to “build up the 
Atlantic relationship" rather 
than viewing European links 
with the United Slates only 


“through the prism of com- 
merriaT disputes”. 

She told a stormy session of , 
the European Parliament that 
Britain was now in the fore- 
front of European affair s and 
“leading the pack" where 
other EEC states had shown 
lack of political willpower. 

In a vigorous address to a 
largely critical European Par- 
liament Mrs Thatcher said she 
was “very very disturbed” by 
anti-Americanism in Europe, 
which had to stand up for its 
trade interests and ensure that 






By Philip Webster 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

Mr Douglas Hurd, the 
Home Secretary, is encourag- 
ing the racing and betting 
industry to launch a sustained 
campaign to win support for 
horse racing on Sundays. 

Mr Hurd has declared his 
personal support for Sunday 
racing, although no Govem- 
^ mem legislation is planned. 

The Home Secretary is hop- 
ing that, during the next 
Parliament, a private 
member's Bill can be in- 
troduced to legalise betting on 
Sundays. 

By that time, providing 
public opinion has been won 
over, it could, with Govern- 
ment support, have enough 
backing to become law. 

Mr Hurd, who spoke Iasi 
night to the Gimcrack dinner, 
held every year in York and 
attended by influential figures 
in the racing world, is firmly 


against the proposal, floated in 
the racing world to go ahead 




the racing world to go ahead 
with an experiment in Sunday 
racing without changing the 
law. 


Prince William, following in the footsteps of his father, a famous amateur actor, took the 
part of a shepherd yesterday when his nursery school in London produced a nativity play. 


The Times Profile: 
Professor Bhadra 
Ranchod, South 
Africa's first 
coloured 

ambassador, who 
takes up his post in 
Brussels tomorrow. 


Ex-Reagan aides 
refuse to testify 


From Michael Binyoo, Washington 


To the palpable annoyance 
of the congressional invest- 
igating committee and of mil- 
lions of Americans watching 
on televison, Vice-Admiral 
John Poindexter, the former 
National Security Adviser, 
and his former aide, Ueu ten- 


face of an individual who had 
had to testify before this 
committee." 

Nevertheless, with an edge 
of hostility in his voice, one 
member masted on asking the 
colonel whal he knew about 
the transfer of funds to the 


IdMoS Paisley protest 

There was a brief uproar in the 
Shultz is to European Parliament yes- 

0 a meeting wben Mrs Thatcher’s 

an Comm is- addrera was disrupted by a 

M lamiies .protest by Dr Ian Paisley,- the 
^ Ulster Unionist ks»derj(Rich- 

• US official *"* 0wea writes >* 7 
rphy, whot Photograph, report page 2 

y ofSlate for arms control deals did not 
aus, held a damage European security, 
on yesterday The Prime Minister called 
on the Twelve to meet chaL 
J lenges within Europe, such as 

Ifl^G - unemployment, as well as 
challenges to the EEG from 

1 a outside, such as drugs and 

terrorism. 

1 1 y She was given a sceptical 

w and at times hostile reception 

by Euro MPs, many of whom 
i „i abused her of avoiding the 

ual who had ^ ^ch aTTarm 

before this spending and the budget crisis. 


Tebbit takes US 
stage for defence 
blow at Kinnock 


Labour’s 
soaring 
rent debt 


By Robin Oakley, Political Editor 


Mr Norman Tebbit, the 
Conservative party chairmfm, 
yesterday stepped up the Tory 
attack on Labour's non- 
nuclear policies before an 
American audience. 

He was . speaking at the 
River Qub, New York, a day 
after Mr Neil Kinnock re- 
turned from the United States 
having failed to persuade a 
single Senator or Congress- 
man to endorse his 
unilateralist defence policies. 

Mr Tebbit said that 
Labour's policies would lead 
to appeasement in Europe, 
isolationism in America and 
the increased risk of war. 

He told the American-Euro- 
pean Community Associ- 


Mrs Thatcher replied that. ation: ~ An irresponsible 
Britain was fully comnutted to British Government, one hos- 


ant-Colonel Oliver North yes- Contras, so that he could hear, 
today refused to answer any on the record, Colonel North’s 


The £4,000 daily prize 
The Times Portfolio 


in The Times Portfolio 
Gold competition was 
shared yesterday by 
two readers. Details 
page 3. • 

• There is a further 
£4,000 to be won today. 
Portfolio list page 25; 
how to play, information 
service, page 18. 


TIMES SPORT J 


Hopes dashed 


Any hopes of English clubs 
returning to European com- 
petition within the next two 
vears were dashed by the 
president of UEFA, Jacques 
Georges. in Zurich 
yesterday Pa 8® 38 


Crusader blow 


The British yacht White Cru- 
sader was beaten by America 


questions on their roles in the 
Iran arms affair. 

As in their earlier closed- 
door appearance before the 
Senate intelligence commit- 
tee. they both invoked their 
Fifth Amendment rights 
against self-incrimination. 

Members of the House for- 
eign affairs committee were 
clearly frustrated that they 
were unable to question the 
two men who are generally 
considered the key figures in 
the whole affair. Several mem- 
bers said they were deeply 
upset to find two serving US 
officers invoking the Fifth 
Amendment - the first time a 
serving admiral had ever done 
so in the history of the US, one 
member said. 

Admiral Poindexter and 
Colonel North, who have both 
been the subject of intense 
speculation and vilification 
over the past month, were 
equally distressed at not being 
able to speak out “I don't 
think there is another person 


statement that “respectfully 
and regretfully” he declined to 
answer. 

Admiral Poindexter said he 
understood the committee's 
concerns, and firmly believed 
it and the American people 
bad the right to know all the 
relevant facts on the affair. He 




, .s- 



Europe. It was the fault of 
other EEC states that issues 
like farm reform and air fares 
had been played down or ig- 
nored at the London summit. 

She referred repeatedly to 
“our European community", 
raising eyebrows among Euro 
MPs, who do not regard her as 
being committed to the EEC. 

Mr AJf Lomas, leader of the 
British Labour MEPs, said the 
summit had been a charade 
which avoided the main EEC 
issues, such as surpluses. 

M Jacques Delors, the EEC 
Commission President, said 
the London summit bad given 
rise to only moderate satisfac- 
tion and much disillusion- 
ment. but the lack of progress 
toward European integration 
was not only Britain’s fault 

Mrs Thatcher said it was 
vital for the Twelve to act to- 
gether on terrorism, as they 
had done in the face of Syrian- 
backed terrorism, and there 
must be “no concessions un- 
der duress to terrorists or their | 
sponsors". 

She confirmed that she had 
wanted farm reform to be in 
the London communique, 
which bad been “singularly 
deficient" on agriculture and 


tile to the nuclear deterrent 
which is fundamental to 
Nato's strategy, would have 
appalling consequences not 
just for Britain but for our 
Nato partners: indeed for the 
whole world, since peace de- 
pends upon the stability of 
Nato and Europe". 

Labour's belief in uncondi- 
tional disarmament was sin- 
cere but it flew in the face of all 
human experience. When it 
had been tried before with 
chemical weapons the Soviets 
bad responded by a huge 
build-up. 

Mr Tebbit said: “Whilst Mr 
Kinnock says firmly that he is 
in favour of British member- 


ship of Nato. his policies 
would seem to make that 
membership impossible. In- 
deed. it seems to me that they 
would wreck Nato”. 

While in America Mr 
Kinnock had made an im- 
portant pitch on Labour's 
willingness to spend more on 
building up conventional 
forces as Bri fain’s contribu- 
tion to Nato. Mr Tebbit said 
that the savings made from 
cancelling the Trident missile 
system, as Labour promised, 
would be small. They would 
buy no more than 300 extra 
tanks when the Warsaw Pact’s 
superiority was 30,000 tanks. 

Ignoring Mr Kinnock's at- 
tempts to present Mrs 
Thatcher and her Govern- 
ment as obstacles to the drive 
for disarmament, Mr Tebbit 
declared: "Only those pre- 
pared to ignore history, only 
those deaf to what the Soviet 
Union still proclaims, believe 
that the Soviets pose no 
threat". 

He added, in a direct re- 
sponse to Mr Kinnock: “Con- 
ventional weapons alone have 
never deterred 

In the Commons yesterday, . 
Mr John Biffen, Leader of the 
House, answering for the 
Prime Minister in her absence, 
welcomed Mr Kinnock’s re- 
turn and stated officially the 
Tory view that defence would 
be a central issue of the next 
election. Letters, page 15 


By Richard Evans 
Political Correspondent 
Brent council failed to col- 
lect rent from almost two 
thirds of its tenants last year, 
according to confidential fig- 
ures prepared for the Depart- 
ment of the Environment. 

The west London authority, 
the leaders of which jiave been 
labelled “loony lefties" by 
Conservative MPs, had rent 
arrears of £1 1 million for the 
12 months up to April 1 this 
year - 63 percent of the total 
payable. 

. The latest figures, compiled 
for Whitehall by local authori- 
ties, show that council rent 
arrears in England and Wales 
increased by £12 million dur- 
ing the year to a new record of 
£210 million. But they reveal 
! that a mere 20 councils, all of 
them Labour controlled and 
most in London, are respon- 
sible for half the debL 
Mr John Patten. Minister 
for Housing, Urban Affairs 
and Construction, is under- 
stood to be outraged by the 
arrears. 

The Audit Commission, the 
local authority spending 
watchdog, will face pressure to 
look at the bad record of the 
20 councils when the report is 
published. 


Under such a plan there 
would be credit betting facil- 
ities only, to avoid breaking 
the law. But Mr Hurd believes 
that such an experiment 
would lead to illegal betting on 
an unacceptable scale. 

Mr Hurd's personal support 
for Sunday racing comes as a 
big boost to the racing in- 
dustry, but he is making ciear 
that he believes the cause has 
been set back by the defeat, 
earlier this year, of the 
Government's attempt to 
legalise Sunday trading. 

He is therefore challenging 
the supporters of Sunday rac- 
ing to embark -on a long 
campaign, perhaps running 
for a lew years, to stimulate 
support. 

He is not standing in the 
way of an MP introducing an 
early Bill but dearly believes 
thal it would have a better 
chance of success if left until 
the next Parliament 


Zambian town 
in uproar over 
food price rise 


A wave of rage swept 
through the northern Zam- 
bian town of Kitwe yesterday 
as thousands of people took to 
the streets in violent protests 
over price increases for basic 
foods of up to 50 per cent (Jan 
Raath writes from Harare). 

Residents contacted in the 
town, the main urban cenLre 
in the country’s copper- 


producing region, said police 
opened fire on ramoaejne 


opened fire on rampaging 
mobs and fought them with 
tear-gas and baton charges. 

The Government had made 
no comment by late yesterday. 


Showdown over Ryman 
seat ends in acrimony 


Your'key- 


ready' 


office suite 


Richard Evans, Political Correspondent 

A showdown meeting be- ered a lecture on my duties as 


hdUCI WiW i-v * , r T - . , 4a |l 1 ~ _ ■ 1 ■ mu naivimuiu cuiu 

11 vesterday stud now has only in America that wants to teu said Britain would not shy 

a remote chance of qualifying this story as much as I do, Promised he would co-operate a decisions 

vmi-final5 of the Colonel North said,, his brow with the committee at the hifre Vhoiohar Mi/fl it uroc 


for the semi-finals of the 
America's Cup Page 35 


Oxford won the 105th Univer- 
sity rugby match when they 
beat Cambridge 15-10 before a 
crowd of 40.000 a* Twick- 
enham Repo rt 


furrowed and his voice low. appropriate time. 

Dressed in full Marines Bui under tough quest- 
uniform. he said he was ioning, his lawyer. Mr Richard 
anxious to pul the matter to Redder, refused to say when 
rest fully and quickly. But that lime would come. He said 
despite his “strong desire" to he was “extremely concerned" 
give his recollection of the by the criminal investigation 


Mrs Thatcher said it was 
now up to EEC farm ministers 
to tackle the “absurdity" of a 
situation in which farm in- 


that lime would come. He said «> mes were decreasing while 
he was “extremely concerned" budgetary costs were increas- 


etve ms recouctuuu ms - — “ — 

facts, his lawyer had advised set in motion with the 


mg. 

She said research spending 


TIMES -BUSINESS- 


Set for takeoff 


BAA. formerly the British 
Airpons Authority, cntaits 
on an advertising campaign 
this week to win mvestors m 
the run-up to pnvauauion 
next summer ra S e 


him to say nothing. 

Indeed, his dilemma 
prompted one congressman to 
say that he had “never seen 
more anguish or distress in the 


appointment of an indepen- and regional spen 


investigator. 


poorer southern 


for the 
states 


counselling silence he was could not co-exist with surplus 
only doing what any good storage charges or the cost of 


lawyer would do 


exporting food to Russia. 


tween officials of the Labour 
Party and Mr John Ryman, 
MP for Blyth Valley, ended in 
an acrimonious confrontation 
yesterday which kept alive his 
threat of forcing a potentially 
embarrassing by-election in 
the marginal seat 

Mr Ryman. who is demand- 
ing an official investigation 
into his local pony which he 
claims has been taken over by 
the extreme left, discussed the 
situation with Mr David 
Hughes. Labour's national 
agent, and Mr Andy McSmith, 
a party press officer. 

He said afterwards: “There 
were some quite angry words. 
Some chap, a press officer - 1 
didn't get his name - deliv- 


an MP. 

“He obviously means well 
but I'm not going to be 
dictated to by some flunkey 
from head office. " 

Mr McSmith said: “I tried 
to find out whether he in- 
tended to resign or not He i 
told me it was none of my 
business." Mr Hughes is plan- 
ning to spend two hours on 
Friday interviewing Blyth 
party members. 

Labour MPs and party of- 
ficials are adamant that while 
Mr Ronnie Campbell, chosen 
as Blyth's parliamentary can- 
didate after Mr Ryman said he 
would not be standing at the 
next general election, is a left 
winger, he is certainly not a 
member of Militant. 



Bank issues 
warning on 
credit terms 


New drug stops accidental poisoning 


Tricentrol. ihe debt-ridden in- 
dependent British oil com- 
pany. announced third 

atiaiiter pretax losses of £5.6 
million, bringing the ; toss for 
the first nine monlhs “ 5 ,9 

million ^ 


Individuals who had bor- 
rowed too much were finding 
it difficult to repay loans as 
banks offered more generous 


irreparable liver 


By Pearce Wright that cause irreparable liver 

Science Editor damage. 

A pamkflling drug that con- , f* «“ a W™ ved . 

uins its own antidote against 


poisoning from an accidental 


credit terms, the Bank of or deliberate overdose was 
England said yesterday. introduced in Britain 

. - m ■ A..: uorfoivbiir 


Home News 2-5 I~*P"> g 

Overseas 15 

11 Parliament ^ 

nurnanes ** J7 

JSr- ,9 t ST JMH) 


Mr Brian Quinn, head of 
banking supervision, said, in a 
speech to the 12th World 
Banking Conference in 
London, the rapid growth m 
the use of credit cards was 
adding an extra layer to many 
people's borrowing commit- 
ments- “There are signs of 


Court .a jy £ Radio 37 

TSJg l8 


****** 


!$ itients. “There are signs of 
w growing distress among bor- 
37 rowers who have over- 
18 sketched themselves, he 
- aid. Credit warning, page 19 


yesterday. 

The new pills are a version 
of paracetamol, one of the 
most popular 

analgesics.However. 
paracetamol claims 200 
deaths a year and is involved 
in 2000 admissions to hospital 
a year, from accidental and 
deliberate drug overdoses. 

The new drug has a second 
ingredient which counteracts 
the poisons from an overdose 


Medicines three years ago, 
doctors have been unable to 
prescribe it 

A Department of Health 
and Social Security committee 
rejected an appeal to include 
the drug on the restricted list 
of medicines which the Na- 
tional health Service pays for. 

The drug, called Pametoru 
will be available to doctors 
who want to issue prescrip- 
tions to patients prepared to 
pay for iL 

The new painkiller will be 
more expensive than com- 


parable analgesics. It costs 
£2.77 for 60 lableis. 

The decision to exclude it 
from wider use in the National 
health Servicewas regretted by 
the Professor Andre McLean, 
the drug's discoverer, who 
said: “Until a safe form of 
paracetamol is widely avail- 
able, we will go on seeing 
paracetamol overdose with 
severe and lethal effects to 
patients." 

The new drug is based on 
research by Professor 
McLean, at the department of 
clinical pharmacology. 
University College, London, 
where a method was tested of 
incorporating a second sub- 
stance that would neutralise 


the toxic by-products pro- 
duced by an excess of 
paracetamol. 

Paracetamol poisoning is 
unusual in that the fatality 


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to the liver. 

Professor McLean’s team 
discovered how to reinforce 
protection of the liver from 
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stimulating the body to make 
extra amounts of the 
neutralising biochemicals. 

The key lies in the addition 
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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986, 


Athens could be weak link in EEC initiative 


New lease 
of life 


Young hints at Greeks stay away in terror drive for assault 

^ * _ _ 1 .. ... *7 ™ rwpmhrr 3L the EEC foreign ministers 10 belp 


more union laws 

Trade muons that abuse their powers can expect farther 
sumon against them. Lord Young of Graffham, the 
Secretary of State for Employment said last night (Our 
Employment Affairs Correspondent writes). 

™ ft™ the Institute of Chartered Secretaries and 
Administrators that reports continued of flawed balloting 
Procedures, of evasive rule dffl n ps and mass discipline of 
union members who declined to put onion solidarity before 
their Jobs. The Government was considering farther 
proposals for action. 

Air fare Bribe duo 


By Michael Evans 
Whitehall Correspondent 

A secret EEC document 
outlining the first comprehen- 
sive analysis of terrorist 
organizations and operations 
in Europe, was drawn up and 


the Trevi Group on terrorism mean that Greece would be- 
yesterday. come the back door route far 

Only one country, Greece, terrorists planning to mount 
refused to put its signature to attacks against European tar- 
the document, underlining gets. He admitted, though, 
fears that Athens could re- that it was “sad” that Greece 


main the weak link in could not agree to sign the 
Europe's drive to combat the document, 
terrorist threat on a co- The Greek government did 
ordinated basis not even send a ministerto the 

meeting. It was represented by 
But Mr Douglas Hurd, a civil servant who apparently 

Home Secretary, who chaired did not have the authority to 
the Trevi Group meeting in sign anything. 

London, said that this did not The meeting yesterday was 
mean that Greece would be- the final session on terrorism 
come the back door route far by the Trevi Group under the 
terrorists planning to mount chairmanship of Mr Hurd, 
attacks against European tar- With Britain ending its six 


The meeting yesterday was 
the final session on terrorism 
by the Trevi Group under the 
chairmanship of Mr Hurd. 
With Britain ending its six 


isiere on December 31, the 
chairmanship will be handed 
over to the Belgians. 

Mr Hurd, who has made 
great play of the fact that he 
wanted a strong British initia- 
tive on terrorism during the 
six months, appeared to be 
pleased with the achievements. 

He said that the secret 
document contained an analv- 
sis of the terrorist threat which 
would help afl EEC ann- 


months in the presidency of terrorist agencies' The docu- 
the European Council of Min- meet will now be shown to 


EEC foreign ministers to belp 
form a concerted political 
strategy against terrorist 
activities. 

Although he would not give 
details of what the document 
contains, he indicated that it 
listed the main terrorist 
organizations and networks 
which would have to be 
continually updared. He 
would not say whether the 
document named countries 
involved in state-sponsored 
terrorism. . . 


progress convicted Nurses to 

Weeks of lobbying by Two businessmen were -m 

ritish transport ministers yesterday convicted of brib- GOplf TIO V 

ave succeeded in edging ing Government officials at ijvvjx 

urope closer » accepting the Fas lane submarine • _ _ 

reater competition in the base on the Clyde, Strath- mScS Li) 

ir Clyde. They paid £22,000 to v 

Mr John Moore, Sec- employees at the base as an IrAAfi cfOTT 

ftary of Slate for Trans- inducement to allow the KUE O UU1 

wt, uuu Mr Michael unauthorized removal of JJT 

nicer, the aviation min- waste oiL Edinburgh High By Snemraa 


Weeks of lobbying by 
British transport ministers 
have succeeded in edging 
Europe closer » accepting 
greater competition in the 
air 

Mr John Moore, Sec- 
retary of Slate for Trans- 
port, and Mr Michael 
Spicer, the aviation min - 
ister, have succeeded in 
convincing Greece and Por- 
tugal that it could be in 
their interests to allow 
greater competition. 

However Spain and Den- 
mark are still refusing to 
yield in what they see as an 
essential battle to protect 
their own national airline. 


Two businessmen were 
yesterday convicted of brib- 
ing Government officials at 
the Fas lane submarine 
base on the Clyde, Strath- 
clyde. They paid £22,000 to 
employees at the base as an 
inducement to allow the 
unauthorized removal of 
waste oil, Edinburgh High 
Court was tohLThey were 
also convicted of stealing 
waste oil. 

John Nixon, aged 54, of 
Rainhill, and John 
Ca'ckett, 43, of Scans brick, 
both Merseyside, had de- 
nied the charges. 

Both men were re- 
manded in custody 


Stamps controversy 

The Post Office yesterday defended its Christmas 
discount stamp offer, as supplies began to dry up in post of- 
fices around the country. 

Royal Mail spokesmen ruled oat issuing new packs of 
the second class stamps and said the offer had been an 
overwhelming success. 

They also rejected criticisms made by Mr Roy Hughes, 
the Labour MP for Newport East, who claimed the way the 
discounted booklets had been rationed negated any savings 

College 
is sued 

A student is to make 
legal history by taking 
High Court action against 
the college at Cambridge 
University which sent him 
down, in an attempt to win 
reinstatement. 

Mr Dominic Oakes, 
aged 21, of Burlington 
Road, Sherwood, Notting- 
ham, believes his image as 
a folk-singer with long hair 
tied in a pony-tail and 
support for CND led coll- 
ege authorities to discrimi- 
nate against him. 

Sydney Sussex College 
has refased to comment. 

Mr Oakes, who had passed 
his first and second year 
examinations, is now 
studying mathematics at 
Warwick University. 

An Eye for an Eye 

Mr Robert Maxwell's tit-for-tat battle with Private Eye 
backfired yesterday when W H Smith, the country's largest 
news wholesaler, announced that it would not be 
distributing spoof copies of the satirical magazine doe to be 
published by Mirror Group Newspapers (MGN) today. 

The announcement came just 24 honrs after refusals by 
W H Smith and John Menses, the second largest news 
wholesaler, to handle a bumper Christmas edition of 
Private Eye designed to replenish its coffers after the costly 
libel suit between the two old adversaries. 

W H Smith said last night that the company's decision 
not to distribute MGP^s Not Private Eye magazine had 
been taken on legal advice. 



Jaguar plan to 
employ extra 
300 workers 

By Tim Jones 
Jaguar Cars has announced 
plans to hire an extra 300 
workers to boost production 
of its hugely successful new 
saloon from 280 models a 
week to 500. 

'Demand for the car is so 
strong that some customers 
are prepared to pay £4,000 
more than the £25,000. 

The company 15 also prepar- 
ing to launch the new model in 
the United States and believes 
success there could mean even 
more new jobs. 

The 1 1,000 Jaguar employ- 
ees are the highest paid car 
workers in Britain, earning 
about £200 a week. 

The management of Land 
Rover near by will decide in 
the next two days whether to 
announce hundreds of lay offs 
because of an overtime ten by 
600 workers in the company’s 
East works, in Solihull. 

The Transport and General 
Workers' Union members 
want management to with- 
draw a warning of possible 
disciplinary action if there is a 
repeal of April's walkout. 


£2.4m design 
workshop sets 
up jobs boost 

By Charles Knevitt 

Sir Ralph Halpern, chair- 
man of the Burton Group, 
yesterday announced that he 1 
was setting up a £2.4 million 
design workshop at Felling, 
Gateshead, to bring 300 new 
jobs to the North-east. 

He was speaking to more 
than 200 businessmen and 
women at the annual meeting 
of Business in the Commu- 
nity, at Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Civic Centre, chaired by the 
Prince of Wales, its president. 

O In his closing remarks to 
the meeting, the Prince re- 
ferred to a report in The Times 
yesterday about the election 
victory of Mr Rod Hackney as 
the next president of the Royal 
Institute of British Architects. 

The report likened Mr 
Hackney to a terrier and the 
Prince said that he had been 
told that dogs were the best 
deterrent to burglary. Terriers 
were the best type of dog for 
the job. he said, when one of 
the delegates excused himself 
from the meeting because his 
home had been burgled. 


Health unions .are seeking a 
large basic increase for student 
nurses and auxiliaries in next 
year's pay award; to avoid 
dangerous shortages in nurs- 
ing staff. j 

Yesterday, in their evidence 
to the Nurses and Midwiyes 
Pay Review body, staff side 
organizations made a claim 
for nurses to be brought into 
line with other public service 
workers. 

They also sought an in- 
crease in additional payments, 
such as for working unsocial 
hours. 

Next year's award should 
include a flat rate underpin- 
ning to favour the lower paid 
and percentage increases for 
other staff whichever was the 
greater, they said. 

Nursing leaders refused to 
put a figure on the rises 
needed but pointed out dif- 
ferences of 30 per cent be- 
tween policemen and some 
nursing staff. - 

Mr Trevor Gay, general 
secretary of the Royal College 
of Nursing, said a police 
constable's starting salary was 
£7,752 a year while a qualified 
nurse with five years' experi- 
ence received only £7.750. 

Nursing leaders also gave a 
warning of the impending 
crisis in nurse recruitment 
because of difficulties in 
attracting and retaining staff. 

Mr Hector Mackenzie, the 
staff side chairman, said that 
Iasi year there was a 20 per 
cent fall in nurse recruits. 

“Unless pay levels rise 
significantly there will not be 
enough nurses to care for 
patients in the future," he 
said. 

School Bill anger 

The Association of County 
Councils, which represents 
nearly half the local education 
authorities in England and 
Wales, has joined the growing 
opposition to the Bill which 
would give the Government 
control over the negotiation of 
teachers’ pay and conditions. 

In a letter to MPs on the eve 
of today’s debate on the Bill's 
committee stage, the associ- 
ation, which speaks for nearly 
all the Conservative-con- 
trolled authorities, says its 
provisions “mark an immense 
move towards central control 
of the education service”. 

It condemns the Bill as 
inconsistent with the spirit of 
the 1944 Education An and 
says there could be “no worse . 
prescription for the future 
development of education”. 

It complains that the Bill 
“removes the employers from 
any decision-making machin- 
ery on such items of pay and 
other conditions as the Sec- 
retary of State may decide to 
keep to himself”. 



The Rev Ian Paisley interrupting Mrs Thatcher's speech at Strasbourg yesterday to protest over the Anglo-Irish agreement 


Airbus 

sales 

windfall 

By Harvey Elliott 
Air Correspondent 

_ The Government is set to 
cash in on the success of the 
Airbus A 320 short to me- 
dium-haul jet 
After this week’s decision by 
Japan's All Nippon Airways to 
buy 10 A 320-200S, the Trea- 
sury is certain to get a good 
return on the £250 million it 
advanced to British Aerospace 
to help launch the project 
Airbus is now beyond the 
point at which it is certain to 
break even on sales of the 
A320. That means that the 
Government will not only gel 
the £250 million back quickly 
but that it will receive royal- 
ties on every other aircraft . 
sold, bringing in many mil- . 
lions of pounds in unexpected 
revenue to Treasury funds. 

British Aerospace has been 
able to tell ministers that with 
389 firm orders so far and 
more certain before the 
aircraft's first flight in March 
next year, the first £50 million 
lump-sum repayment will 
definitely be made in 1990 
with similar amounts to fol- 
low over the next three years. 

The success of the A 320 is 
being used as a strong argu- 
ment in British Aerospace's, 
attempt to persuade the 
Government to provide a 
further £750 million in launch 
aid for the long-range A340. 
with which it hopes to chal- 
lenge the supremacy of 
Boeing. 


Liverpool goes to 
war on Militant 

By Ian Smith, Northern Correspondent 


The deposed leader of 
Liverpool City Council yes- 
terday broke his self-imposed 
political silence to declare war 
on the Militant Tendency and 
its supporters within the city's 
Labour group. 

Mr John Hamilton, who at 
64 is the group’s elder states- 
man. said that he will spear- 
head a revival of democratic 
socialism in a city be claims to 
have seen ripped apart by 
political extremists. 

Two men he singled out for 
criticizm were Mr Derek 
Hatton, who has just resigned 
as deputy council leader, and 
Mr Tony Byrne, who two days 
ago kept fas position as La- 
bour group leader by defeating 
a vote of no confidence. 

Mr Hatton, said the man 
once considered to be his 
stooge, has become an irritant 
to extremists who now con- 
sider him a spent force and 
expendable. Mr Hamilton de- 
scribed the former Labour 
group leader in everything but 
name as “a not very bright but 
very ambitious and egotistical 
lover of the limelight”. 

Mr Tony Byrne, he said, 
was a former trainee Jesuit 
priest with Stalinist leanings, 
far more intelligent, dan- 
gerous and devious than Mr 
Hatton. 

He criticized the party's 
national executive committee 
for worsening an already sen- 
sitive situation and urged it 
not to interfere further in local 
affairs. 


Mr Hamilton said; “The 
gloves are off and these people 
masquerading as socialists are 
in for the shock of their lives. 

“For years I have kept my 
mouth shout and turned a 
blind eye to things I have 
known to be wrong just to 
keep some semblance of party 
unity . But from now on I will 
shout the truth from the 
rooftops. 

“Ordinary people in Liver- j 
pool are heartily sick of being 
misused and abused by people 
who hide their real political 
selves. 

“The extremists have 
landed us in a terrible mess 
and betrayed the trust pot in 
them by every honest voter in 
this city. But now a very 
determined group of true 
socialists, about half those 
comprising the council's La- 
bour group. have emerged and 
vowed to take no more lies or 
deceit. 

“Every time the NEC sends 
an inquiry team into Liver- 
pool they do very little except 
prove their incompetence. 
Much better leave it 10 the 
people on the spot who know 
who the enemy are and how 
best to defeat them.” 

Already, Mr Hamilton said, 
in-fighting has broken out 
between extremists groups 
within the city's Labour 
group. And be forecast it was 
only a matter of time before 
they destroyed eacb other. 


Fowler sees European Aids campaign 


By Thomson Prentice 
Science Correspondent 

The grim realities of the 
Aids epidemic among Britain's 
European neighbours yes- 
terday confronted Mr Norman 
Fowler, the Secretary of State 
for Social Services, who is on a 
fact-finding mission to West 
Germany. 

Mr Fowfer toured an Aids 
hospital where many of the 
Federal Republic's 770 cases 
have been treated, including 
some of the 365 men, women 
and children who have died of 
the disease so far. Britain has 
had 600 cases so far of whom 
almost half have died. 


Mr Fowler discussed the 
inexorable spread of the epi- 
demic with doctors, health 
officials and staff at an Aids 
centre which offers advice to 
homosexuals, drug addicts 
and prostitutes. 

Mr Fowler's trip, will be 
followed today by a similar 
visit to Amsterdam, illustrat- 
ing the urgency of the 
Government's search for 
Information and ideas. 

He received one of the 
bleakest possible forecasts 
from Professor Hans Pohle, 
West Germany's leading Aids 
specialist. The professor be- 
lieves that millions of people 


wiD die from Aids within the 
next five to 20 years. 

“It's impossible to put all 
the infections people in a 
concentration camp. Talk of 
compulsory measures is there- 
fore nonsense.” 

He warned that 70 per cent 
of Aids patients develop 
dementia, with loss of memory 
and other severe mental 
disturbances. The luckier ones 
died from an opportunistic 
infection fairly quickly. 

West Germany is In some 
respects both ahead and be- 
hind Britain in its public 
education campaign. Last 
January every household re- 
ceived an Aids information 


leaflet, a measure that will 
soon be carried out in Britain. 

However, the Federal 
authorities have spent only 
£2.4 million on their campaign 
compared with more than £20 
million being spent by the 
British Government. 

The Federal government 
has published Aids warnings 
in newspapers and on -street 
posters but so far has not 
taken to television. 

When Mr Fowler visits 
Amsterdam today he will see 
the city's exchange system of 
free needles for drag addicts. 

Aids poster dash, page 5 
Need for a strategy, page 14 


Paisley 
in Euro 
protest 

By Richard Owen 

There was uproar yesterday 
when Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher’s address to the 
European Parliament was dis- 
rupted by a protest by the Rev 
Ian Paisley, leader of the 
Democratic Unionist Party. 

The Prime Minister had 
been on her feet for only a few 
minutes when Mr Paisley, a 
European MR, strode down to 
the rostrum and held a poster 
declaring: “Ulster says- no” in 
front of her face. 

Mrs Thatcher ignored him j 
and continued, to laughter and ; 
catcalls from the left-wing ; 
benches. Mr Paisley then 
shouted: “Mrs Thatcher, you 
are a traitor to the loyalist 
people of Northern Ireland for 
denying them the right to vote 
on the Anglo-Irish agree- 
ment." 

His fellow Unionist, Mr 
John Taylor, waved a similar 
poster from the back of the 
chamber, and British Conser- 
vative Euro MPS tried to 
snatch it from him. 

Mr Paisley was removed by 
I half a dozen parliamentary 
ushers while M. Pierre 
Pflimlin. aged 79, President of 
the Parliament, suspended the 
sitting for 10 minutes and 
apologized to Mrs Thatcher. 

A spokesman for the Prime 
Minister said that it had been 
beneath her dignity to notice 
the interruption, which was “a 
minor inconvenience” com- 
pared to some happenings at 
Westminster. 

Mr Paisley was unrepentant 
afterwards, denouncing the 
European Parliament as a 
body dominated by “com- 
munists and Roman Cath- 
olics”. He was later re- 
admitted to the chamber. 

Mr Paisley boasted that the 
Prime Minister had been 
“visibly scared", by bis pro- 
test, though in' fact she neither 
responded nor looked in his 
direction. 

Mr Tom King, Secretary of 
State for Northern Ireland, 
said that Mr Paisley had 
disgraced the image of the 
Province and he warned of the 
damage being done to pros- 
pects of further investment 
He said that Mr Paisley’s 
-action typified his inability to 
resist the opportunity for a 
publicity stunt. 


I ships 

By Peter Davenport 
■ Defence Correspondent 

t Mr George Younger, Sec- 
t rotary of State for Defence, 
i announced yesterday that the 
Government had decided to 
i retain the amphibious warfare 
capability of the Royal 
Marines.’ 

The Commons statement 
was the outcome of a debate 
that has raged in the Ministry 
of Defenre for three years. 

At present Britain’s amp- . 
htbious capability is centra] 
around the assault ships Fear- 
less and Intrepid, which 
played vital roles in the Falk- 
land campaign. 

As a first procurement step 
the Ministry of Defence yes- 
terday placed a £250.000 con- 
tract with Swan Hunter for a 
feasibility study into extend- 
ing the life of the two ships, 
which were due to be phased 
out in the mid 1990s. The 
study is expected to take about 
six months. 

The two ships each weigh 
11.060 tons and went into 
service in the mid-1960s. 
When built Intrepid cost 
£10.5 million and Fearless 
£ 1 1. 25 million. Building 
replacements today would 
cost more than £100 million 
each. 

The ships are equipped with 
landing craft for vehicles and 
men. upto 1 5 tanks. 23 trucks 
and five helicopters and are 
armed with missiles and Bo- 
fors guns and can carry up to 
500 marines. 

In 1981 it was announced 
that both ships were to be 
taken out of service — In- 
trepid in J 982 and Fearless in 
1984 — but in February 1982 
they were reprieved, a de- 
cision more than justified by 
their role in Falklands 
conflict 

Mr Younger also an- 
nounced yesterday that the 
Minisiery of Defence is invit- 
ing industry to participate in 
feasibility studies for a new 
design for their eventual 
replacement. 

At the same lime the min- 
istry will also be looking at the 
concept of an aviation support 
ship. 

Mr Younger told the Com- 
mons yesterday: “I know this 
decision will be very well 
received both in the House 
and by our Nato partners who 
attach considerable im-_ 
portance to the contribution 
of our amphibious capability? 

. Parliament, page 4 

Lawyers warn 
council over 
ban on Times 

Glasgow's 59 Labour coun- 
cillors have been warned by 
lawyers that they could face 
the threat of legal action, and 
the possibility of personal 
surcharges, if they continue to . J 
ten The Times and The Sun 
from public libraries. 

But so far there has been no 
move to lift the bon. A 
number of Labour-controlled 
Scottish councils imposed 
tens on News International 
j publications after the start of 
the Wapping print dispute 
nearly a year ago. But now- 
most have quietly stopped the 
boycott. 

A High Court ruling in 
England last month effectively 
ended similar bans by local 
authorities. The judge ruled 
them unlawful. 

Scottish lawyers have ad- 
vised councils that a similar 
view would likely be taken 
north of the border and that 
individual councillors could l 
be liable to personal sur- 
charges. 

News International has so 
far made no move to begin an 
action in the Scottish courts. 

Correction 

Solicitors working for lay 
employers under proposed re- 
vised practice rules would not 
be able to do legal work for the 
public as reponed on Monday, 
but the Law Society will re- 
examine the matter later. 



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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


‘GP murdered first 
wife and cut his 
second wife’s throat’ 


HOME NEWS 


and nuuSered * 01 !^ tilled her by injecting her with injecting herself with 

slit the throat ofhis !£t “fe morph,nc - P^ne because die wi 

y ^ rs iater ' it was allied , *' He 56111 for an elderly local 
L? e 9 51,1131 Criminal Court 2 0Ct0r 30(1 told him Ruby had 
yesterday. been suffering fiom heart 

trouble. The 


. . Dr John Baksh. aeed 53 
tolled his first wife. Ruby, to 
be tree to marry his new lover, 
Madhu, Mr Allan Gran, for 
the prosecution, said. 

He then tried to murder 
Madhu three years later to 
solve his financial problems.** 
He stood to gain £215,000 

from her death. 

After his arrest Dr Baksh is 
alleged to have told police 
who questioned him about the 
knife attack on his second 
wife: “It was the animal in me 
that made me do it.” 

Dr Baksh, a general 
praciioner, of Gloucester 
House, Bickley Road, Brom- 
ley, south-east London, denies 
murdering Ruby Baksh on 
New Year’s Day 1983 and 
attempting to murder Madhu 
Baksh earlier this year. 

Mr Green told the court that 
Dr Baksh had practised as a 
GP in Etham and Chisle- 
hurst, south-east London, for 
several years. His first wife. 
Ruby, was a doctor in the 
practices. They had two 
children. 

“In 1979 a young Indian 
woman doctor, Madhu, joined 
the practice. She was also 
married with two children, but 
separated from her husband,” 
Mr Green said. 

“The defendant fonnd 
Madhu most attractive and 
wanted to have an affair, but 
she refused.” 

But she did say that she 
would be prepared to marry 
him if he divorced Ruby, Mr 
Green said. 

But at the end of December 
1982 Dr Baksh went on holi- 
day to Spain with his wife. 

“Early on New Year’s Day 
the defendant drugged Ruby 
with a tranquillizer. He then 


. . Spanish doctor 
certified she had died from a 
heart attack,'’ Mr Green said. 

Ruby was buried in Spain 
and Dr Baksh returned to 
England “to continue his 
courtship of Madhu. In due 
course they were manied”. 

Mr Green said that by this 
year Dr Baksh was in serious 
financial difficulties. 

“On the afternoon of Sat- 
urday, January 4, he drugged 

6 Dr Baksh told 
police It was the 
animal in him that 
made him attack his 
second wife 9 

Madhu and then injected her 
with morphine. 

“He put her in his car, drove 
to Keston Ponds in Kent and 
dragged her into a holly bush. 
He slit her throat and left her 
to die,” Mr Green said. 

Afterwards be allegedly 
drove Madhu’s car into Brom- 
ley, then called the police 
claiming she bad been 
abducted. 

“Later that night her body 
was discovered by a passing 
naturalist who went for help,” 
Mr Green said. 

“She was taken to hospital 
and almost miraculously she 
recovered. 

“Madhu told police that the 
defendant admitted be had, in 
fact, killed Ruby,” Mr Green 
said. 

He added: “Police went to 
Spain and arranged fin* Roby’s 
body to be exhumed. A 
pathologist confirmed her 
death was due to an overdose 
of morphine and not from any 
heart attack.” 

Dr Baksh told police that 
Ruby committed suicide by 


mor- 
was un- 
happy over his association 
with Madhu. 

Mr Green said that Dr 
Baksh had inherited some 
money on his first wife’s 
death. When he married 
Madhu he took out several 
insurance policies. If Madhu 
died, he stood to get £2 1 5,000. 

Dr Baksh was seen several 
times about the attack on 
Madhu. but be stuck to the 
story that his wife had been 
abducted by someone, Mr 
Green said. 

He was eventually arrested 
and allegedly told police: “1 
plead guilty, I harmed my 

wife.” 

Mr Green claimed he in- 
sisted on speaking to officers 
before his solicitor arrived, 
telling them: “Please help me, 
I want to tell the truth. It was 
the animal in me that made 
me do it” 

Describing himself as a 
good Christian, whose father 
was a clergyman. Dr Baksh 
allegedly said be had injected' 
Madhu in her thigh with 
morphine. Then he had car- 
ried her downstairs and put 
her in the car, taking a kitchen 
knife with him. 

He drove her to the 
and put the knife to her 
Mr Green said. 

He said that although she 
was drugged, she had tried to 
push the knife away. “It was 
the bad in me, it was the 
animal in me that wanted to 
kill her,” be allegedly said. 

He asked police to give 
Madhu a note when she was in 
hospital. It read: “My darling 
Madhu. I am very sorry for 
what happened — that I put a 
knife to your throat- 1 did not 
know what I was doing and 
hope you soon recover. 
Children are fine. Love, ever, 
John.” 

The trial continues today. 



Dr John Baksh with his first wife Ruby (fop) and his second wife, Madhu. 


Rape girl’s 
mother 
6 a victim’ 

By Michael Horsnell 

The woman who is pro- 
secuting a doctor for the 
alleged rape of her daughter 
aged nine told Chelmsford 
Crown Court yesterday that 
she had, hersd£ been raped at 
the age of 14. 

But she said that in spite of 
the experience she was not 
immediately alerted to the 
possibility her daughter had 
been a victira. 

The woman also told the. 
jury of four women and six 
men that her boy friend had 
warned her before the alleged 
incident that the doctor was 
perverted. 

He had told her that the 
doctor had encouraged her 
daughter to perform _ cart- 
wheels and handstands in his 
garden in order to see her 
knickers, and filmed her. 

Mr Anthony Ariidge, QC, 

for the defence; suggested to 

the woman that she bad more 
reason than most for being 
concerned when she suspected 
that her daughter's nightdress 
was stained with blood and 
semen.. 

The woman said: Yes, I 
was raped in Australia. I was 
nowhere near as young as my 
daughter. The circumstances 
were totally different. 

“Later on in the evening 
after my daughter had re- 
turned home, my boy friend 
said it was phlegm on her 
nightie and 1 was satisfied. I 
am not lying to you.” 

The woman was giving 
evidence on the second day of 
the trial in which the doctor, 
aged 50, has denied raping the 
girt, then aged eight, when she 
was staying at his home last 

year. . , 

The prosecution was brou- 
ght after the Director of Public 
Prosecutions decided not to 
initiate proceedings .and i »* 
being paid for by The Sun 

newspaper. 

The woman denied a 
suggestion that she had exag- 
gerated her desenpfion other 
daughter's internal injuries 
when she gave an interview to 
The Sun earlier this year. 

Dr Jeremy Wright, aconsul- 
tant Gynaecologist, said it urtts 
extremely unfitefr j* e 
little girl had injured herself. 
The mother’s boy friend, a 

self-employed painter and 
decorator, said that be had 
Sten an instant dislike :u>the 

accused doctor from the mo- 
ment he saw him two years 

^Hewld the court: “I said I 
thought he was a pervert the 
first time I saw him. 

lie pteas^to j"™ 
son. "aged four, to watch bra 

Pl1 dm Itfftlym'iMd Newman, 
graphed the girl and lus own 

SsssftfS* 

The case continues totwy 


Doctor accused of 
aiding drug trade 


A Harley Street doctor was 
accnsed yesterday of boosting 
the dri^s Made market by 
prescribing hundreds of ad- 
dicts with the heroin sub- 
stitute methadone. 

Dr Ann Dally, a psychi- 
atrist, was brought before the 
General Medical CoundTs 
disciplinary committee over 
her private treatment of ad- 
dicts from ail over Britain. 

Dr Dally, aged 60, whonms 
a practice in Devonshire 
Place, central London, is ac- 
cused of serious professional 
misconduct by prescribing 
drugs for fees and in one case 
not checking the background 
of her patient. 

Mr Timothy Preston, QC, 
counsel for the GMC, said: 
“She prescribed privately in 
return for fees to some people 
who cannot be expected to 
have the means to meet the 
chemists' fees without re- 
course to crime -that is, 
supplying others”. 

Dr Dally charges a consulta- 
tion fee of £30. The addict 
then has to pay up to £25 to 
the chemist before being pro- 
vided with the drugs. 

Adding that the present 
hearing was not a political 
debate about the best way to 
combat and treat drug addic- 
tion, Mr Preston said: “Dr 
Daily treats and has treated so 
great a number of addicts that 
it has blunted her capacity to 
treat them all conscientiously 
and property”. 

He told the committee that 
some addicts travelled hun- 
dred of miles to see Dr Dally 
although they had good na- 
tional health facilities in their 
own towns. 

Dr Dally prescribed doses of 
100 milligrams of methadone 
- higher than the 80 minjgrams 
recommended in the Depart- 
ment of Health's guidelines of 
good clinical practice. 

She is alleged to have 
abused her position by issuing 
methadone and other drags 
for fees in an irresponsible 
manner, in particular to one 
patient whom, it is claimed. 


she did not examine carefully 
enough before prescribing the 
drug. It is also alleged that she 
did not question the patient 
thoroughly as she repeated the 
weekly prescription. 

Dr Dally was first inter- 
viewed by Home Office drugs 
officers in spring 1983 about 
her methods, the hearing was 
told. 

They were said to have 
trapped one of her patients by 
marking 43 capsules of metha- 
done which he got on prescrip- 
tion and found he had only 
nine left that day. He was later 
arrested and charged with 
supplying drugs. 

Mr Preston said: “Clearly 
he had been involved -in 
unlawful supply”. 

Dr Dally was said to have 
told Mr Donald McIntosh, a 
Home Office inspector “If an 
addict is involved like that I 
discharge them. I find it 
extremely worrying that the 
pharmacist did not inform 
me”. 

Dr Dally told the Home 
Office: “Z refuse more addicts 
than 1 pickJ am in a transi- 
tional stale of retirement 
Running a house of this size I 
cannot reduce my income. I 
need income of £75,000 to 
keep staff Addicts make 
about 50 per cent of my total 
list”. 

Dr Dally was brought before 
the Home Office again in 
March 1985, the hearing was 
told. 

Dr Dally justified her meth- 
ods by telling the Home 
Office: “A lot of addicts say 
they can’t give up, but once 
they get tbetr life in ordeT they 
can”. Her aim was to sort out 
the addict's lifestyle while 
stabilizing him on a steady 
dose. 

Her solicitor told the Home 
Office that Dr Dally always 
did her utmost to satisfy 
herself that the patient could 
afford the £30 consultation 
fees, Mr Preston said. 

The healing continues to- 
day. 


Euro link 
airport 
for sale 

By Harvey Elliott 
Air Correspondent 

Britain's nearest airport to 
fee Continent is for sale with a 
price tag of £23 motion. 

Airlines and tour operators 
from around the world have 
been sent a glossy package 
offering them nearly 600 acres 

including hangar s, pawngw 
terminal, runways ami mainte- 
nance areas, at Lydd airport in 
Kent 

The sale comes after the 
collapse of Hards Travel Ser- 
vice, a firm based in Solihull, 
Bi rmingham, which owned the 
airport and went into liquida- 
tion in Angnst 
The company had rm the 
airport for four years as a 
take-off point for 91,000 pas- 
sengers a year taking chart er 
trips, mamfy to Austria. 

Lydd airport was built ia the 
1950s and is the only post-war 
paipose buQt airport ia south- 
ern England. For many years 
it was owned and used by 
Silver City airlines, which 
made regular flights to 
Europe. 

When Hards went into Hq- 
nidatioa it owed £3 millioa and 
5J100 holidaymakers were left 
stranded. 

Now Mr Teiry Carter, the 
liquidator, wants to sefl the 
airport and recoup the losses. 

The sale has been backed by 
local authorities including 
Shepway District Council, 
which owns part of the land 
and Mr Michael Howard, the 
local MP, who yesterday de- 
scribed the sale as “exciting”. 

Already more than 300 in- 
quiries have been received 
from potential buyers. 

And the Government's re- 
cent decision to give the Civil 
Aviation Authority powers to 
ban tight aircraft and business 
jets from busy airports, such 
as Gatwick and Heathrow, is 
bound to add to the interest. 

The Department of Trans- 
port is anxious to develop 
airports in the southern part of 
Britain, especially near 
London, for business use and 
the development of the Chan- 
nel tunnel is expected to bring 
even greater demand for 
freighting facilities in Kent. 


Judges wait 

Judgement was reserved in 
the Cost of Appeal yesterday 
on an appeal by Margaret 
Livesey who is serving a life 
sentence for the murder of her 
son Alan, aged 14. The judges 
said they would consider new 
evidence highlighted in the 
BBC Rough Justice pro- 
gramme. 


Simple language 

Plain guide to obfuscation 


In plain English, the users 
of nonsense speak were de- 
feated yesterday. And had 
awards to prove it 
Lawyers were singled out for 
partiadar p unishm ent for 
their economies of panctnation 
and interminable sentences. 
Consider this from the Na- 
tional Westminster Bank: 
“The Bank may without any 
consent from the inHwimifia ' 
and without affecting flu 
Indemnifier’s liability here- 
nnder renew vary or determine 
any accommodation given to 
the Debtor or any other person 
indnding any signatory of this 
Guarantee and Indemnity in 
respect of the liabilities hereby 
secured and grant time or 
indulgence to or compound 
with the Debtor or any such 
person and this Guarantee and 
Indemnity shall not be dis- 


charged nor shall the 
Indemaifier’s liability under it 
be affected by anything which 
would not have discharged or 
affected the Indemnifier's 
liability if the Indemnifier had 
been a principal debtor to the 
Bank.” 

The Golden Bull Awards, 
run jointly by the Plain Eng- 
lish Campaign and the Na- 
tional Consumer Conncfi, were 
yesterday presented by Esther 
Bantan, of the television pro- 
gramme, Thafs Life. 

Exeter Health Authority, 
which did not attend, won an 
award for the following: “As 
the new services for the El- 
derly Confused begin to take 
shape, it is desdy felt by those 
involved in it’s (sic) develop- 
ment thata mtiqne opportunity 
exists. 

“It is in this spurt that foas 


has been attentioned towards 
the conduct and natnre of a 

needs assessment in providing 
the navigational guidance to a 
new service if it is to begin to 
truly reflect the locality needs 
of the elderly.” 

The Department of Educa- 
tion and Science, Kent County 
Council, the Halifax Budding 
Society, the Motor Insurers’ 
Bureau and Extol Statistical 
Services Ltd also received 
Golden Bell Awards. 

Plain English Awards, for 
dearly written, well laid out 
documents, went to the Mid- 
land Bank, the London and 
Edinburgh Insurance Com- 
pany, Hie Chest, Heart aid 
Stroke Association, the 
Health Education Conned, 
Westminster CHy Council, the 
DHSS and the Department of 
Employment 


Police woo drivers 
in soft drink offer 


By David Sapsted 


Cut-price soft drinks will be 
offered to drivers in hundreds 
of English and Welsh public 
houses this Chris tmas in an 
attempt to reduce the in- 
cidence of drinking and 
driving. 

Three Welsh police forces - 
South Wales, Gwent and 
Dyfed-Powys - announced 
yesterday that they would be 
supporting a designated 
drivers’ scheme during the 
festive season while, in Eng- 
land, Lincolnshire and Nor- 
folk. police are planning 
similar campaigns. 

With few forces expected to 
put extra patrols on the roads 
to catch drinking drivers this 
Christmas, the designated 
driver scheme is seen as one 
way of encouraging motorists 


to stay dry. 

In all the campaigns pub- 
licans are to distribute badges 
(Tm in Charge - I’m a TT 
Driver’ in Wales; ‘No Thanks, 
Fm Driving’ in Norfolk) to the 
member of a group appointed 
to drive home. 

The driver will then be 
entitled to cut-rate soft drinks 
but win not be served alcohoL 

Lincolnshire police, who 
pioneered a similar scheme in 
the Gainsborough area last 
year, have decided to extend it 
across the county this year. 

Mr Arthur Leslie, chairman 
of the South Wales Brewers' 
Association, said the Welsh 
campaign was aimed at getting 
people to accept a socially 
responsible attitude towards 
drinking. 


Scheme to 
check on 
solicitors’ 
ability 

By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 

Solicitors doing civil litiga- 
tion should have to be accred- 
ited as to their competence 
and experience before being 
allowed to do legal aid work or 
to qualify for other 
“privi!ege$”under proposals 
from the London Solicitors' 
Litigation Association. 

The association, which 
represents 400 solicitors 
practising in civil litigation 
from' the suburban sole prac- 
titioner to the big city firm, 
says such a scheme is needed 
to ensure the public is served 
by “competent practioners”. 

In the field of litigation a 
“considerable amount of pub- 
lic money is expended on the 
legal profession,” it says in a 
submission to the Law 
Society. 

“It cannot be considered 
unreasonable for the pay- 
masters to demand some ev- 
idence of reasonable 
competence as a condition for 
provision of these moneys.” 

The association proposes a 
national scheme or associ- 
ation of litigation specialists, 
qualified by practical experi- 
ence and obliged to undergo 
compulsory continuing educa- 
tion courses. 

The scheme would embrace 
all areas of civil litigation with 1 
solicitors in one of two groups: 
general civil litigation 
practioners. as usually found 
in smaller firms, of which it is 
estimated there are some 
1 5.000 qualified solicitors. 
And second, the expert — 
usually found in larger firms 
and thought to total 1.000 — 
who builds up expertise in a 
specific field, such as insur- 
ance and banking. 

The general practitioners 
would have to show that they 
had spent at least one quarter 
of every year in the past three 
years on civil litigation; and 
the experts that they were 
engaged full-time. 

Elected members would 
then qualify for certain privi- 
leges: only they would be 
allowed to conduct civil litiga- 
tion under the legal aid 
scheme, including personal 
injury work; and only firms 
with a partner or admitted 
solicitor as a member would 
be able to advertise their 
expertise. 

The proposals, drawn up by 
Mr Stephen Jakobi, the associ- 
ation president, come in the 
wake of the report from a 
government scrutiny team. 


Christmas 
cheer for 
2 winners 

Two housewives share 
yesterday's Portfolio Gold 
prize of £4,000 and are plan- 
ning special Christmas treats. 

Mrs Sandra Potter, aged 24, 
of Hemel Hempstead, 
Hertfordshire, has played the 
Portfolio Gold game since it 
started in The Times. 

“I am very happy to have 
won,” she said. 

Mrs Potter said she will 
spend the winnings on Christ- 
mas presents for her children. 

Mrs Eunice Wymer, aged 
55, of Great Cressingham, 
Thetford, Norfolk, has played 
the game for the last three 
months. 

“1 could not believe my lock. 
I checked the numbers several 
times before I was sure that 1 
had won.” she said. 

When asked how she in- 
tended spending the prize 
money, Mrs Wymer said: “1 
am going to have a lovely 
Christmas party.” 

Readers who wish to play 
the ga m e can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Tima ; 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 


Plea against 
dismissal 
after marriage 

Mrs Olga Longden, a coll- 
ege official, yesterday asked 
the High Court to stop 
Bedfordshire Comity Council 
dismissing her after marrying 
her rice-printipaL 

She claims she was treated 
“outrageously” when the 
council decided to dismiss her 
as chief administrating officer 
at Barnfield College, Luton, in 
June, at the request of the 
governors, who said it was 
“inappropriate” for her to 
work alongside her husband, 
Mr Wilson Longden, aged 50. 

Mrs Longden, aged 44, of 
Turnpike Drive, Luton, is 
seeking iqjunctions restrain- 
ing the council from dismiss- 
ing her because of her 
marriage and forcing them to 
complete the grievance proce- 
dure, which she Haims was 
never property heard. 

The council china there 
were managerial reasons for 
her dismissal. 

The bearing was adjourned 
until today. 


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December 9 1986 


PARLIAMENT 


MPs pile on the 
pressure in 
Nimrod’s support 


Ministers came under pressure 
m>m all sides during Commons 
Question time to buy the British 
Nimrod airborne early warning 
system for the RAF and not the 
rrval Boeing Awacs. 

It was made clear that a 
Cabinet decision still bad to be 
made but that an announcement 
was likely before Christmas. A 
suggestion that Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher had already come 
down in favour of the Boeing 
system was rejected. 

Mr David Steel, Leader of the 
Liberal Party, said during Prime 
Minister's question time that 
failure to proceed with the 
Nimrod early warning system 
would be seen as an act of 
industrial surrender and would 
undermine Britain's efforts to 
remain at the forefront of high 
technology. 

He asked for an assurance 
that the decision whether to 
order Nimrod or the American 
Awacs for the RAF would be 
made by the Cabinet as a whole. 
Mr John Biffen, Lord Privy Seal 
and Leader of the House, 
answering for the Prime Min- 
ister who was in Strasbourg, said 
that Mr Steel would not expect 
him to answer his first point. 

“I realize that the Liberal 
Party is at some distance from 
Cabinet government but a de- 
cision orihis magnitude would 
necessitate the proper consid- 
eration that he mentions.” 

Dr Keith Hampson f Leeds 
North West C) asked Mr Biffen 
to convey to the Prime Minister 
that there would be deep con- 
cern on all sides of the House if a 
decision not to buy Nimrod 
were made. 

Already £800 million had 
been spent and Nimrod bad 
been designed for a wider job 
than Awacs, which would cost 
£1 billion more and lose Britain 
core technology forever. 

Mr Biffen said that he would 
pass on those comments to the 
Prime Minister. 

Mr Douglas Hoyle (Warrington 
North, Lab): “On Nimrod, did 
the Leader of the House not see 
in The Observer last Sunday that 
it was reported that the Prime 
Minister is firmly in the Boeing 
camp, and as a decision is soon 
to be made on a system and 
many jobs are at risk, and the 
future of many parts of the high- 
technology industry, will Mr 
Biffen ask the Prime Minister 
when she returns to make a 
statement making it dear 
whether she is batting for 
Britain or batting for Boeing?” 

Mr Biffen: “That is an allega- 
tion of partiality which I reject”. 
This was a major decision with 


DEFENCE 


industrial and defence con- 
sequences for Britain and it 
would be taken in the appro- 
priate and detached fashion 
necessary. 

Earlier, Mr Archibald Hamil- 
ton, Under-Secretary of State for 
Defence Procurement, also re- 
fused to comment on the merits 
of the competing systems. 

Mr Martin Flannery (Sheffield, 
Hillsborough, Lab): We want 
the best we can get for the RAF, 
but will he take account of the 
fan that many British jobs are in 
jeopardy here, and that our 
defence system throughout the 
world will be watched closely as 
a result of this, and there are 
exports in British electronics. 
Mr Hamilton: I have very much 
taken on board what he is 
saying, but we are in the final 
stages of competition and I 
prefer not to comment on the 
relative merits of the two 
tenders. 

Mr Hngh Dykes (Harrow East, 
Ch Nimrod is overwhelmingly 
right for British jobs, on cost 
grounds and for British exports, 
and is better for procurement I 
hope be appreciates the gravity 
of the decision he has to make. 
Mr Hamilton: Mr Dykes is 
trying to draw me. The Secretary 
of State hopes to make an 
announcement before the 
House rises. 

Mr Janies Wallace (Orkney and 
Shetland. L): Boeing have of- 
fered 130 per cent onset What 
is the quality of those jobs? 

Mr Hamilton: We are looking 
closely at the quality of the 
offset offered by Boeing. 

Mr Michael Colvin (Romsey 
and WatersideX); Can he re- 
assure us that the 130 per cent is 
not just opportunities to tender, 
but real contracts and work 
which would be high technology 
and not just tin-bashing? 

Mr Hamilton: We are looking at 
the quality of what is offerea by 
Boeing. That is part of our 
consideration. 

Mr Douglas Hoyle (Warrington 
North, Lab): 'Mil be take ac- 
count of press reports that the 
Government has already made 
up its mind to buy Boeing? 

A Conservative MP: Do not 
believe everything you read in 
the Morning Star. 

Mr Hoyle:- Boeing is oki-fash- 
ioned. but Nimrod offers not 
only British jobs but something 
for the future with export 
potential 

Mr Hamilton: Mr Hoyle should 


not believe everything he reads 
in newspapers. No final decision 
has been made. 

Mr Thomas Sackrille (Bolton 
West, Cy. If there are no 
problems with Nimrod it would 
be madness to give away British 
industry's lead in this technol- 
ogy and crazy to give yet another 
monopoly to Boeing. 

Mr Hamutoo: We have to take 
account of the RAF and of value 
for money. No final decision has 
been made. 

Mr Lewis Carter-Jones (Ecdes, 
Lab) suggested that in Nimrod 
the “dutter” problem bad been 
overcome and that targets could 
now be dearly identified. “Will 
Mr Younger make a statement 
about the success of the mission 
he went on in Nimrod?” 

Mr Hamilton: The Sec r et ar y of 
State will refer to those matters 
when be makes the announ- 
cement. 

Mr Nicholas W inte r te a (Mac- 
clesfield, C): Many Conser- 
vative MPs are very much in 
support of Nimrod and GEC 
Avionics. 

Before making a final de- 
cision, will be ensure that the 
Secretary of Slate is aware of the 
high technology of the latest 
mark Nimrod. 

Mr Hamilton: The Secretary of 
Suite will take that into account 
Mr DenzH Davies. Opposition 
spokesman on defence: While 
appreciating that be dare not 
comment on the merits of the 
two systems, the Secretary of 
State has commented. He said 
on December S that both sys- 
tems, Nimrod and Awacs, now 
work, so there is no case for 
buying American, but a valid 
case for buying British. 

Mr Hamilton: No. There are 
still many different assessments 
to make on the different sys- 
tems. No final decision has been 
made. 

• Mr NeB Eimtock, Leader of 
the Opposition, whose return to 
the Commons after his visit to 
the United States was greeted 
with ironical cheers from the 
Conservative benches, ques- 
tioned Mr Biffen about Iranian 
arms deals. 

He asked whether, in the light 
of the European Community 
agreement on anti-terrorist poli- 
cies and common necessity, the 
Government was taking mea- 
sures to ensure against London’s 
being used as a location for 
making arms deals similar to 
those between the United States 
Administration and Iran. 

Mr BSfien: 1 have no reason to 
believe that there is a situation 
which validates his anxiety. 



Promotion 
for blacks 
‘by merit’ 

Soldiers of ethnic origin would 
want to gain promotion on 
merit and not because there was 
discrimination in their favour, it 
was said during question time in 
the Commons. 

The issue was raised by Mr 
Alfred Dobs (Battersea. Lab), 
who asked for a statement on 
progress of ethnic monitoring in 
the Army. 

Mr Roger Freeman, Under- 
secretary of State for the Armed 
Forces, said that arrangements 
were well in hand for the Army, 
in common with other Services, 
to introduce ethnic monitoring. 
Mr Dobs asked how the min- 
ister answered criticism that 
that would not cover possible 
discrimination against black sol- 
diers over promotion. 

How would monitoring deal 
with instances where soldiers 
wanted to join the Brigade of ] 
Guards but were diverted by 
recruiting officers to other 
regiments'? 

Mr Freeman said that promo- 
tion in the Armed Services, now 
as in the past, was on merit, 
aptitude and motivation. Mon- 
itoring among those already in 
the Services was considered 
unnecessary. 

There were no examples 
known to the Ministry of De- 
fence of racial discrimination. 
Also, it would be inappropriate 
because it would be divisive. 


I 



Mr John Biffen gets an early warning from the Honse of Commons. 


Study ordered on future 
of Navy’s assault ships 


Mr Alan Berth (left), Mr James Hamilton and Mr Kenneth 
Hargreaves holding the Ohmraatod address that they are to 
present to the Pope in Some on behalf of an inter- 
denominational and cross-party group of 100 backbenchers. 
The address thanks him for the lead he has taken in defend- 
ing tiie family and the right to life. 


The Government has derided to 
retain an amphibious force in 
the longer term and as a first 
step is having a feasibility study 
made of the future of the assanlt 
ships nsed by the Royal Ma- 
rines. The shipbuilding industry 
is being asked to study designs 
for replacements. 

Announcing that to the Com- 
mons, Mr George Younger, 
Secretary of State for Defence, 
said: At present the Royal 
Navy's amphibians Bft is 
centred on the assault ships 
HMS Fearless and HMS In- 
trepid. As a first proc urem ent 
step, we have today placed a 
contract with Swan Hunter for a 
feasibility study into extending 
the life of these ships. 

At the same time we are 
inviting indusby to participate 
in feasibility studies for a new 
design option for their replace- 
ment by briKiffig new ships. 

In parallel with this work, we 
shall also address the means of 
providing helicopter Eft, includ- 
ing die concept of an aviation 
support ship. 

I know this decision win be 
very well received both in the 
House and by our Nato partners, 
which attach considerable im- 
portance to the contribution of 
oar am p hib ious capability. The 
steps I am announcing today will 
secure its future. 

Mr Cyril Townsend (Bexley- 
heath, Ck The House will be 
grateful to hhn, as wiB those who 
have responsibility for the 
Northern flank, but I hope the 
tdy he mentioned will take 
place as quickly as possible. 

WEI he confirm that the 
landing at San Carlos in 1982 
woald never have taken place if. 
Britain bad not had these sort of 
ding ships? Dees be agree 
that if Britain is to have a strong 
conventional capability it must 
certainly include a proper as- 
sault ship capability? 

Mr Younger: 1 entirely agree. I 
share his appreciation of the 
great importance of an ampliati- 
ons capability for our defence 
posture and our Nato contribu- 
tion. This announcement will be 
a major reassurance that we 
intend In con t h roe that cap- 
ability. 

Dr David Owen, Leader of the 
SDP: While warmly welcoming 
this derision, may I ask bow he 


ROYAL NAVY 


thinks it is possible to extend the 
fife of Fearless and Intrepid? 
Regarding the new ship designs, 
is this a modi cheaper ship and 
is he going to have amphibious 
lift capacity with a flat top or 
exactly what designs are en- 
VlS3|£CCl? 

Mr Younger: Regarding the fife 
iff Intrepid and Fearless, this 
study will be looking info foe 
feasibility bf extending their Ifife. 
should that be the preferred 
option of the Government. 
Clearly, the calculation of cost 
and feasibility will be relevant in 
making that deriskm. 

Regarding the possibility of 
new vessels, this study wifi he 
looking into the most effective 
way of malting a new vessel to 
fulfil this role. 

Sir Anthony Buck (Colchester 
North, C): Many MPs on both 
sides of the Honse are devoted to 
die concept of maintammg a 
substantial amphibious capabil- 
ity. Will be reassure us that the 
life of the old ships will be able 
to be retained until we have new 
ones ready to take their place? 
Mr Younger: Yes, I can give that 
assurance. The expected fife of 
Intrepid and Fearless stretches 
into the mid 1990s and that 
should give us ample time to 
work out the best method of 
replacing them. 

Mr Edward Garrett (WaUseod. 
Lab): This decision will be 
welcomed nowhere more than an 
Tyneside. But when tire feasibil- 
ity study is completed, will Swan 
Hunter be paid? Iu the past 
there has been pave doubt as to 
whether they got full value for 
die time, money and effort spent 
on such studies. 

When the study is complete I 
would like to see two new vessels 
being built and be should con- 
sider bringing those orders to 
Tyneside. 

Mr Younger: That cannot be 
determined until I have the 
results of the study. I am pleased 
that Swan Hunter competed for 
this feasibility study contract 
and they have now got it- 1 can 
certainly assure him that they 
will be paid for their work in 
accordance with the contract 
terms. 


Tory onslaught 
on Kinnock 
defence policy 


Mr Neil Khmock and Labour s 
defence policy came under fire 
from Conservative MPs on bis 
return from the United States. 
Mr David .Am ess (Basildon. Cl, 
during Prime Minister's ques- 
tions. asked Mr John Biffen. 
Lord Priw Seal and Leader of 
the House, to ask the Prime 
Minister when she relumed 
from Strasbourg to restate the 
Government’s policy of multi- 
lateral rather than unilateral 

disarmament. 

To protests from the Labour 
benches, he said: “Will Mr. 
Biffen ask her quickly to repair 
the damage done following 
statements made in the United 
xviqg the impression that 
we will abandon our allies and 
renege on our Nato commit- 
ments?” 

Mr Biffen said that he would 
convey ibai point to Mrs 
Thatcher. 

“Jt must be a matter for the 
judgement of the House to 
just bow influential was 
Mr Kinnock's visit- These are 
matters which are a fair point in 
the political debate which 
commences now and will con- 
tinue until the time of the 
eneral election. 

“We hope that the Labour 
Rxrtv set out their non-nuclear 
defence policy in this country as 
they have sought to do in the 
United States because we be- 


lieve the popular judgement will 
he with us.” 

Mr Robert Adley (Christchurch. 
Cl: Contrary to the view being 
propagated in some quarters, 
would Mr Biffen confirm that 
indeed the Government is more 
than happy for the House and 
the country to spend as much 
time as it likes discussing de- 
fence and the nation's security* 1 
Mr Biffen said that there could 
be no question of there bring as 
much time as the House Kked 
on these matters because of 
other commitments, but he 
agreed that defence would be a 
central feature at the forthcom- 
ing election. 

"We know perfectly well whai 
a non-nudear policy in the 
hands of Labour implies. We 
know the extent to which it is a 
retreat from the socialism of 
Aneurin Be van and that the 
dependable alternative that we 
offer would be decisive in the 
outcome of t bat election.” 

Mr waiiam Cash (Stafford O 
said that this Government had a 
policy of ensuring that this 
country was property defended, 
unlike the policies the Leader of 
the Opposition had been 
perpetrating in the United 
States. 

Mr Biffen said that the Govern- 
ment had such a policy, which 
commended itself to treaty al- 
lies. 


Rifkind announces 
big spending rise 

Big increases in public expen- teaching costs associated with 
diture in Scotland had been standard grade and action plan- 
achieved while the proportion Capital expenditure on local 
of national income devoted to authority education projects 
public spending was a tribute to was planned to rise by £5 mil- 
the Government's success in the lion im 1 987-88. to cover prior- 
control of the economy, Mr jty building work and equip- 
Malcolm Rifkind. Secretary of mem for science and technology 
State for Scotland, said when he projects. 


Sir Patrick Wall (Beverley, C): 
How long will this study take? 
The ships a re ageing very 
rapidly. 

Mr Younger: I appreciate his 
concern. The MoD is taking the 
appropriate steps to deride t 
best this capability can be 
continued m plenty of time to 
make sore whatever replacement 
is derided upon wifi be ready 
when Intrepid and Fearless 
reach the aid of their useful 
fives. 

Mr Patrick Dnfly (Sheffield, 
AttercEffe, Lab): When does he 
expert to be in a position to place 
an enter? 

Mr Younger: We will make a 
derision on placing an order 
when I have the results of the 
feasibility stody, which I hope 
wfll be aratflaltie towards the end 
of next year. We wffl make a 
decision m very good time for the 
new ships or the extended-life 
ships to be available and ready 
when Intrepid and Fearless run 
out of time. 

Miss Janet Fookes (Plymouth. 
Drake. C): While I very much 
welcome this statement, tfaoogh 
it is long overdue, may I press 
him more closely on the 
timescale? When we have 
stripped oat all the nice lan- 
guage, jost when can we expert 
the new ships? 

Mr Younger It is our intention 
that the new or refmhisbed 
ships wffi be ready by the mid 
1990s when the present ships 
reach the end of their useful 
fives. I think that is sensible 
planning. 

Mr Nicholas Brown (Newcastle 
npon Tyne East, Lab): I welcome 
the pucement of the feasibility 
study at Swan Hunter^ but they 
were treated pretty shabbily 
after doing a similar study on the 
AOS fanaaEary oO-repleaish- 
nent vessel J. What guarantees 
does Tyneside have that history 
will not repeat itself and that 
expediency will not cut across 
rational decision- making ? 

Mr Younger I take exception to 
his suggestion that Swan Hunter 
have not been treated well over 
the AOR. Although they were 
not successful in die competition 
for the AOR Type 1, they were 
offered an inside track for the 
AOR Type 2. 


presented to the Commons 
Scotland's expenditure budget 
for the next three years. 

Mr Donald Dewar. Opposition 
spokesman on Scotland, said 
that Mr Rifldnd's pride in his 
statement was unjustified and 
Scotland had done badly com- 
pared with other territorial 
departments: 

Mr Rifkind said that total 
expenditure on programmes 
within his responsibility would 
be £7,957 million in 1987-88. 
£390 million or 5.1 per cent 
higher than provision for this 
year, and £540 million higher 
than the plans for 1987-88 
published in the public expen- 
diture White Paper last January. 


An additional £6.1 million 
was being provided for the 
central institutions and colleges 
of education in higher ed- 
ucation. 

Central government expen- 
diture on the arts was being 
increased by £1.1 million, or 
5.5 per cent He had authorized 
a start on planning the second 
phase of the new building for the 
National Library at Cause- 
wayside (Conservative cheers). 

There would be an increase of 
£25 million, or 10.8 per cent in 
provision for industry in 1987- 
88. compared with plans pub- 
lished last year, an increase 
which would go almost entirely 
to direct grants to industry to 


He had given high priority to meet a continued upsurge 


foe health service to enable it to 
meet growing demand over the 
next three years. Spending on 
foe health programme would be 
increased by £130 million, or 
2.5 per cent more than forecast 
inflation, to £2J216 million in 
1987-88. 


in 

demand bringing valuable jobs 
That followed a recent increase 
of MTmiliion in the amount 
available this year for such 
grams, mainly to provide for 
higher than expected invest- 
ment during the transitional 
period for payment of old 


For hospital and community regional development grant 


health services next year, there 
would be £1,540 million, about 
£87 million or 6 per cent mare 
than for this year. A small 
amount of the extra would be 
held in band for specific service 
developments. 

Capital investment in foe 
health service would be about 
£370 million over foe next three 
years and would maintain the 
programme of major hospital 
projects, continue the upgrading 
of foe NHS estate, and allow for 
spending on new technology 
and computer hardware. Pro- 


ne had made available an 
additional £750,000 in each of 
1987-88 and 1988-89 for agri- 
cultural advisory services. 

Total net provision for hous- 
ing in 1987-88 would be 
£696 million, an increase of 
£51 million over provision for 
foe current year, and £23 mil- 
lion higher than previously- 
planned provision for that year. 

He intended to concentrate 
housing resources on invest- 
ment to meet the needs identi- 
fied in local authorities' own 
stock and to accelerate payment 


vision for local authority capital of private sector improvement 
spending on social work bad grant claims already approved, 
also been increased- He had therefore increased net 

His plans provided £625 mil- capital provision by £90 mil- 
lion to meet fully the needs of lion, or 20 per cent, to £548 mil- 
law and order services in 1987- lion for 1987-88 compared with 


88. That included sufficient for a 
modest increase of pr ese nt pol- 
ice establishment and for in- 
creased costs of the prison 
service, including recruiting an- 


the current year. 

When investment financed by 
net capital receipts was taken 
into account, foe housing pro- 
gramme would allow for gross 


other 126 officers next year, capital investment next year of 
Capita) expenditure would be £720 million, an increase of 
nearly £150 million, providing a £82 million over foe planned 
new prison at Peterhead and level of £638 milllion m 1986- 
new or improved court houses. 87. He had made significant 
There youfa be a total in- extra provision available for foe 
crease of £214 million. 12 per Housing Corporation, foe Scot- 
cem oyer the current year, for tish Special Housing Associ- 


education. That included the 
extra they had said would be 
available for an acceptable deal 
on pay and conditions of service 
for schoolteachers: foe £50 mil- 
lion unallocated education mar- 
gin already announced and 
£6 million for additional Don- 


ation, and the new towns. 

He was pleased to be able to 
recognize in a tangible way the 
importance of preserving the 
heritage by increasing the re- 
sources available for historic 
building grants by 80 per cent 
next ' year. 


Select committees dispute 


Constitutional clash looms 


By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 


A serums constitutional 
dash between Downing Street 
and Parliament was heralded 
yesterday in a report which 
flatly rejected the arguments 
behind Government's pro- 
posed instructions to civil 
servants not to, answer select 
committee questions about 
their conduct. 

The Treasury ami Civil 
Service committee made dear 
that if the Government did not 
thick again dvfl servants who 
obeyed the instructions could 
be reported to the Honse of 
Commons for contempt 

The proposed instructions 
were tagged on to the end of 
the Government's response to 
the defence committee's in- 
vestigation into the Westland 
affair, daring which MPs 
grilled Sir Robert Armstrong, 
the Secretary of the Cabinet 
bnt were denied access to other 
senior civil servants at the 
heart of the affair, including 
Mr Bernard Ingham, the 
Prime Minister's press sec- 
retary. 

The forcefully argued report 
will provide further ammu- 
nition for select committee 
chairmen, who are determined 
to resist any attempt by the 
Government to corb 


com m i tt ees' powers and who 
are now negotiating with the 
Government 

Mr John Biffen, Leader of 
the Honse, has given an 
undertaking that the instruc- 
tions will not be issued for- 
mally until both the Tiafauvn 
and the Treasury and CivO 
Service committees had con- 
sidered foe matter. 

The report rejects the 
Government's assertion that 
select comntittees derive their 
powers through the accoun- 
tability of ministers to Par- 
liament stating that they 
“exercise their formal powers 
to inquire into policy and 
actions of departments be- 
cause Parliament is sovereign 
and has established the select 
committees to monitor gov- 
ernment departments on its 
behatt. giving them the tra- 
ditional powers to send for 
persons and papers”. 

It goes on to outline how 
witnesses who refuse to appear 
before committees or answer 
their questions can be reported 
to the House and held guilty of 
contempt and continues, hi a 
key sentence: “The proposal 
by the Government-to inhibit 
civil servants in the scope of 
the evidence they give to select 


committees, though it might 
make the nse of this procedure 
more frequent, cannot alter the 
underlying position.*' 

The report asks the Govern- 
ment to confirm that it is not 
seeking to prevent rivfl ser- 
vants answering questions on 
actions undertaken with min- 
isterial approval and in ac- 
cordance with government 
policy. 

It assranes that the govern- 
ment instructions apply to the 
conduct, or “misconduct”, of 
civil servants anderteken with- 
out ministerial knowledge, and 
reasserts select committees' 
rights to question civil ser- 
vants on “the very rare 
occasions” where investiga- 
tion of such conduct is thought 
necessary. 

Government arguments to 
foe contrary are dismissed as 
unconvincing and the report 
concludes: “Any instruction 
which, however rarefy, op- 
erated so as to make this more 
difficult is certainly un- 
desirable”. 

launching the report yes- 
terday, Mr Austin Mitchell, a 
Labour member of the 
committee, described the 
Government's arguments as 
“downright wrong” 


Articles on 
brain death 
deplored 

Sunday newspaper articles 
seeming to cast doubt on foe 
concept of brain death were 
deplored by Mrs Edwina Currie, 
Under-Secreta r y of State for 
Health and Social Security, 
when she replied to a Commons 
debate on Monday night. 

She said that there was no 
evidence foal anyone anywhere 
in the world bad ever survived 
after brain stem death according 
to the criteria for establishing ft. 

She complained of the “emo- 
tional and unfounded” remarks 
of people attacking foe trans- 
plant pro g r am me. They had 
been repeatedly challenged to 
produce evidence and had 
repeatedly foiled to do so. 

“I am satisfied that what we 
are doing is not evil and not 
reprehensible”, she said. “Far 
from it. This is good work that 
saves lives and is worth 
pursuing.’' 

Mr Michael McNair- Wilson 
(Newbury, C) had referred to 
reports in a Sunday newspaper 
and some national newspapers 
that organs were being taken 
from brain-dead people when 
those people could not be 
described as dead. 

He said he did not see how the 
allegation that their lives were 
being shortened by foe removal 
of their organs could be sus- 
tained against the criteria for 
brain death agreed. 


Schools problems have to 
be resolved, says Baker 


The following is a summary of 
the Commons debate on the 
second reading of the Teachers' 
Pay and Conditions BiU that 
appeared in later editions of this 
newspaper yesterday. 

There must be a resolution of 
the problems of the schools on 
terms promising an early return 
to the past standards of commit- 
ment and professionalism a- 
mong all teachers, Mr Kenneth 
Baker, Secretary of Stale for 
Education and Science, said 
when he moved the second 
reading. 

Mr Gfleg Radke, Opposition 
spokesman on education and 
science, said that, although the 
Opposition favoured reform of 
Burnham machinery, they 
strongly opposed legislation 
which removed bargaining 
rights. 

This so-called Teachers’ Pay 
and Conditions Bill gave the 
Secretary of State new and 
sweeping powers to impose a 
settlement. 

Equally disturbing, it re- 
moved the ability of local 
authorities and teachers* or- 
ganizations to negotiate about 
teachers’ pay and conditions. 

The background against 
which this potentially damaging 
Bill -was being introduced was 
more promising than it had 
been for a number of years. 

The encouraging features 
were, first, that for greater 
attention was now being de- 


voted to education by the 
public, partly because of foe 
teachers' dispute. Second, the 
Government had at last swi- 
tched policy over teachers' pay. 
After two years of claiming that 
the nation simply coukl not 
significantly improve teachers’ 
pay, the resources had been 
found after alL 

Third, local employers and 
unions representing the major- 
ity of teachers had agreed on a 
for-reaching package covering 
pay and conditions and even Mr 
Bairer had had to admit that the 
talks made useful progress. 

The Opposition's fear was 
that the introduction of this Bill 
would scupper the prospect of a 
negotiated solution to the dis- 
pute and make long-term peace 
in the schools harder to achieve. 

The Secretary of State pro- 
vided 46 per cent of teachers’ 
pay and so he. should have a 
proper position ax the negotiat- 
ing table. But that was not a 
reason for taking away negotiat- 
ingrights altogether. 

The Bin was dangerously 
authoritarian. It infringed basic 
rights. It gave unacceptable 
powers to the Secretary of State. 
It would also make a long-term 
solution to foe teachers’ dispute 
for harder to attain. This was a 
thoroughly bad Bill and Labour 
would oppose it every inch of 
the way. 

Mr Clement Frend (North East 
Cambridgeshire. LI moved an 


amendment ' condemning foe 
Bill for _ making no positive 
contribution to settling the dis- 
pute and for representing a 

drastic centralization of power 
in the Secretary of State. 

He said the Bill was flawed in 
motive and in execution, ft 
threatened to create for teachers 
a uniquely discriminatory sys- 
tem of settling questions of pay 
and conditions. 

It created a structure where 
the pay of a large and important 
section of society was deter- 
mined without reference to their 
employers or to their union 
representatives. 

The Bill would make teachers 
a second-class group, punishing 
them because they had exposed 
the Government’s shabby treat- 
mem of education. 

Mrs Angela Rum bold. Minister 
of State for Education and 
Scie nc e, said the Government 
must begin to put in place new 
machinery which would allow 
the teachers’ dispute finally to 
be brought to a close: 

There was no point in 
perpetuating the negotiating 
process which had produced 
never-ending talks. Even now 
these fell short of delivering 
sensible final agreement. 

The amendment was rejected 
by 251 votes to 193 — Govern- 
ment majority, 58. and foe BiU 
read a second time by 250 votes 
to 195 - Government majority. 


Inquiry on 
MI5 ‘plot’ 
called for 

The controversy over Ml 5 
continued in foe Commons 
when Mr David Winnick (Wal- 
sall North. Lab) said that if it 
was true that some M15 officials 
had mounted a political opera- 
tion against Mr Harold Wilson 
when he was Prime Minister in 
1974, a full parliamentary in- 
quiry was needed. 

“If there remains in MIS 
some criminal and subversive 
elements responsible for what 
occurred in 1974, they should 
no longer be in the service.” 

Mr .Iqfe Biffen, Lord Privy Seal 
and Leader of foe House, 
“asweriqg questions for Mrs 
That cher, said these points con- 
cerned matters being argued* 
Mr Nicholas Baker (North Dor- 
set, C) referred to the Gov- 
ernment’s action in Australia to 
suppress publication of the book 
a bout M15 and said there was a 
wortd of difference between a 
decision whether or not to take 

proceedings against an indepen- 
dent journalist such as Chap- 
man Pmchcr as opposed 
former MI5 employees. 


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anti- Aids poster in Blackfriars Road, Southwark, south London, provides a contrast of messages for a passing mother. The Aids poster urges all sexually active people to protect themselves by using condoms (Photograph: Nick Rogers) 


Clashes of 
images in 
Aids drive 

By Ronald Faux 

Advertisers paying pre- 
mium rates for prime poster 
sites may find themselves in 
the shade as the 
Government’s anti-Aids cam- 
paign takes oft. 

Clashes of message are 
likely as the blunt posters 
being put up by the Depart- 
ment of Health compete for 
attention with more sophis- 
ticated advertising campaigns. 

“Unfortunate." was how a 
director of Young and 
Rubicam. the agency that 
produced Sid, ■ described the 
juxtapositioning of posters in 
Blackfriars Road, Southwark, 
south London. 

He said that agencies nor- 
mally try to ensure, in their 
carefully thought out cam- 
paigns, that posters do not 
clash with their neighbours. 

“We simply have to accept 
that there will be some diffi- 
cult placings with the Aids 
campaign. It is so essential to 
get the message across about 
the dangers of the disease that 
normal advertising camp ai gns 
simply have to take second 
place." 

Other advertising designers 
agreed that the Aids advertise- 
ments would have to be 
accepted as a public necessity 
however much they disturbed 
the image other posters were 
trying to create. One optimist 
commented: “It might not be 
entirely bad for us or damag- 
ing. After all, the contrast 
between these two ^adverts is 
so stark and odd it might help 
both campaigns. It is certainly 
hard to ignore." 

Slimming aid 
products are 
criticized 

A grapefruit pill and a gel 
which both claim to help 
sli miners are today criticized 
in the Advertising Standards 
Authority's monthly report 
The authority expresses sur- 
prise that “after more than 
100 years of compulsory 
education" it is still possible 
for buyers to be so gullible. 

The report says that at a 
time when half the adult 
population seems to have just 
completed a diet or is about to 
embark on one, the market is 
“as populated as ever with 
peddlers of the still numerous 
pseudo-scientific products 
and services" of the type once 
sold by Victorian quacks. 

Thirteen slimming products 
were brought to the 
authority’s attention by dis- 
gruntled consumers and 12 
complaints were upheld. 

Only one company was able 
to justify its claims and that 
was as a result of the number 
of testimonials received rather 
than evidence of the efficacy 
of the product. 


NSPCC report 


Child sex abuse cases 
more than doubled 


The number of children 
sexually abused increased by 
more than 125 per cent during 
the past year, a report released 
yesterday states. 

The report, compiled by the 
National Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Chil- 
dren. also highlights a rise in 
other forms of cruelty, includ- 
ing a 68 per cent increase in 
children who were seriously or 
finally injured. 

The society further dis- 
closed that an estimated four 
children died every week of 
abuse and neglect. And, 
according to the society's 
statistics, about 9,1 14 children 
were physically hurt by their 
parents last year. 

Reports of physically in- 
jured children had increased 
by 28 per cent, while those 
who suffered general emo- 
tional abuse and neglect, not 
involving physical injury, shot 
up by 71 per cent 

Overall, the numbers of 
children placed on local child 
authority registers kept by the 
society in England and Wales 
showed a 42 per cent rise. 

Dr Alan Gilmour, director 
of the society, said he was 
concerned about the rise in 


reports of children who sus- 
tained serious or fatal injuries 
as a result of abuse at the 
hands of their parents. 

“This aspect is particularly 
sad and worrying. However, 
ihere is now considerable 
public and professional aware- 
ness to the possibility of 
children being abused in an 
extreme way. 

“There has been an upsurge 
in reporting of child abuse 
everywhere in recent months, 
especially by the public. This 
has obviously been a signifi- 
cant factor in these figures," 
he said. 

Less than half of the 1,586 
children on the society’s child 
abuse register were living with 
both natural parents at the 
time of the abuse. 

Only 23 per cent of the 
neglected children, 32 per cent 
of the emotionally abused and 
39 per cent of the physically 
injured were living with their 
natural parents. 

“Marital problems" were 
most often recorded as the 
stress factor which may have 
precipitated sexual and emo- 
tional abuse. Statistics showed 
a dramatic 125 per cent in- 


. crease in reports of sexual 
abuse. 

“Inability to deal with nor- 
mal child behaviour” was 
recorded most frequently as 
the cause of physical injuries 
to children, while “inability to 
respond to the matu rational 
needs of the child", was 
thought to be the main cause 
of neglect of children. 

External stress factors such 
as unemployment, debts and 
poor housing were recorded 
quite frequently by workers, 

- but were not judged as im- 
portant as parent-child 
relationship problems. 

Dr Gilmour praised the ' 
vigilance of parents, the public 
and professionals who had 
come forward to report cruelty 
to children. 

He said: “More children are 
being protected. But we can- 
not escape the reality -so 
many children continue to 
suffer. Neglect can scar for life 
and it can Irifl.” 

• The society is talking to 
the Government about setting 
up a national register of child 
abuse cases, and Dr Gilmour 
said more accurate statistics 
were essential 

Letters, page 15 


Blyth Valley troubles 


Pairwho are worlds apart 


By David Sapsted and Howard Foster 


. Mr Ronnie Campbell, an 
unemployed miner, retains a 
deep pride in the met that his 
grandfather took part in the 
burger marches of the 1930s 
and Mr John Ryman, a bar- 
rister, remains equally proud 
of his Oxford degree and love 
of horses. 

Both are members of the 
same constituency Labour 
party — Mr Ryman is the MP 
for tiie marginal seat of Blyth 
Valley and Mr Campbell his 
heir apparent — bat other 
similarities are at best coin- 
cidental. 

And, after Mr Ryman’s 
allegations that Mr Campbell 
is a member of Mititant 
Teodency.tbere Is a gulf be- 
tween them which appears 
unbridgeable. 

The MFs threat to call a 
by-election in a constituency 
where Labour’s majority is 
tittle more than 3,000 over the 
Alliance has prompted the 
party to despatch a senior 
official to Tyneside to conduct 
an inqmry into local links with 
the left-wing organization. 

Mr Ryman, aged 56, and a 
former Harmsworth Law 
Scholar, decided to retire at 
the next election amid allega- 
tions that the local party had 
been infiltrated by Mititant 

The one-vote majority Mr 
Campbell achieved in the 


weekend selection for 
Labour’s next general election 
candidate pat the titde-known 
north-east constituency in the 
centre of the political map. 

Mr Campbell, aged 42, 
roundly rejects accusations 
that he is a member of 
Mititant although he admits 
to being “a left-wing demo- 
cratic socialist" and an ad- 
mirer of both Mr Derek 
Hatton and Mr Arthur 
Scargill — he proved his 
credentials by being fined £75 
for bread of the peace when, 
as NUM chairman of the now 
closed Bates colliery, he 
grabbed a policeman oa a 
picket line dining the miners’ 
strike. 

The Mititant tag still per- 
sists although he points out he 
is a practising Roman Catholic 
with six children — religions 
views that scarcely tally, he 
says, with a TrotskyKe 
approach. 

However, Mr Ryman insists 
that even if Labour's prospec- 
tive candidate is not a member 
of Militant itself; he has 
become little more than “a 
stooge" of supporters of the 
organization who have taken 
control of Che local party. 

Mr Ryman, who was edu- 
cated at Pembroke College, 
Oxford, and called to the Bar 
in 1957, has not been free of 


controversy. Local party work- 
ers have accnsed him of spend- 
ing too little time in the 
constituency, dismissing his 
constituency secretary withont 
apparent reason and cancel- 
Sb local surgeries. 

A well-known moderate on 
the Labour back benches, he 
entered Parliament in the 1974 
election. BGs campaigns have 
included efforts to save Bates i 
colliery, where Mr Campbell 
worked until its closure earlier 
this year. 

He has accused Militant id 
“physical intimidation" of lo- 
cal Labour party workers and 
of falsifying brand member- 
ship numbers to gain more 
seats on the constituency party 
executive. He also says the 
organization has packed meet- 
ings with its own supporters 
from non-existent groups and 
fixed the reselection process to 
prevent moderates from being 
nominated. 

Mr Campbell, who entered 
politics 17 years ago as a_ 
councillor on the oU Blyth' 
council, foiled last year when 
he contested Mr Ryman’s 
reselection. He also at- 
tempted, unsuccessfully, to get 
the Labour nomination for roe 
Berwick seat this summer. 

“I am not a member of 
Militant and never have 
been," he says. 


Violence 
hits clergy 
in cities 

By Clifford Longley 
Religions Affairs 
Correspondent 

The growing incidence of 
crime and violence directed 
against the clergy in some run- 
down inner city areas is to be 
raised at national level in the 
Church of England by the 
Bishop of Whitby, the Right 
Rev Gordon Bates. 

He has collected evidence 
from the area for which he is 
responsible, including central 
Middlesbrough, Cleveland, of 
a rising level of personal 
attacks in the past five years. 
“The dog collar is no longer 
much protection,” he said 
yesterday. 

Breaking and entering 
church property, including 
vicarages, was the most com- 
mon form of crime the church 
encountered, followed by 
vandalism, and then by street 
violence. 

The bishop said many 
clergy had had to fortify their 
premises with high walls 
topped by broken glass and 
floodlights, and in some cases 
barbed wire. 

But the problem appears to 
be patchy. In the English city 
with the highest level of clergy 
in the inner areas, Liverpool, a 
Roman Catholic spokesman 
said there did not appear to be 
an increase in violence to- 
wards the clergy on the streets. 

The central authorities of 
the Church of England are 
only just becoming aware of 
the problem, and there is 
growing Interest in training 
dergy to defuse potentially 
violent situations. 

The latest clerical victim, 
the Rev Alan Hughes, of 
Kirkbymoorside, North York- 
shire, recently lost £650 worth 
of lead from his church roof 
He is installing razor-wire, 
non-set paint and infra-red 
detection devices. 


Highland 
relic may 
be saved 

By Gavin Bell 
Arts Correspondent 

A Scottish museum has 
been given an opportunity to 
save a Celtic bronze armlet, 
found locally at the turn of the 
century, from being exported 
by an American dealer. 

Mr Richard Luce, Minister 
for the Arts, has recommended 
that an application to export 
the Achavrail Armlet be de- 
ferred until May 2 next year, 
to allow bids by public collec- 
tions to keep it in Britain. 

The leading contender is the 
Inverness Museum and Art 
Gallery, supported by the local 
district council, which hopes to 
raise the market value of 
£100,000 before the deadline. 

The armlet, dating from the 
first or second century, was 
kept for generations in the 
Dunrobin Castle museum. 

However the Duke of 
Sutherland sold it at auction in 
London last summer for 
£67,000 — for outstripping the 
Inverness museum’s bid of 
£24,000. It was subsequently 
acquired by an American 
dealer. 

Mrs Catherine Niven, cu- 
rator of the museum, said 
yesterday that the local coun- 
cil had since promised £753)00 
towards its pnrehase, and she 
hoped the balance could be 
raised from government and : 
private sources. 

The well-preserved armlet, 
weighing almost two p ound s, 
is decorated with an abstract- 
pattern and is likely to have 
been worn by a Celtic chieftain 
to display states and power. 

At least 16 similar artefacts 
are known to be in collections 
in Britain, bat each is unique 
as the metalworkers used in- 
dividual wax moulds — and 
there is none in the Scottish 
Highlands where they were 


Prison drug tests 
to fight smugglers 

By Peter Evans; Home Affairs Correspondent 


Drug barons wbo put pres- 
sure on prisoners going on 
borne leave to bring narcotics 
into jails, face a new weapon. 

The Home Office has 
bought two drug detection 
systems for use in the medical 
departments at Risley Re- 
mand Centre, Warrington, 
and Parkhurst Prison. Isle of 
Wight. 

The system. Syva Erait-st, is 
used for urine analysis in 
many penal institutions in the 
United Slates and by British 
customs officers to detect drug 
smugglers. 

Its use in British penal 
establishments on people who 
are ill to discover whether they 
are on drugs or to test addicts, 
is voluntary. The Prison 
Officers’ Association is seek- 
ing some sort of sanction for 
prisoners who do not agree to* 
take the test. 

The association says that 
about half of Britain's prison 
population is caught up in 
drug abuse and only tough 
action by the Government will 
begin to correct it. 

The association says that 
pressure is put by drug barons 
on prisoners about to be 
allowed home for readjust- 
ment before release, to bring 
back a supply of drugs. 

h adds that the prisoner 
could be afraid to return, will 
abscond and get into further 
trouble; he will bring the drugs 
back; or he will return empty- 
handed and then have to be 
segregated for his own protec- 
tion. Youngsters are also being 
turned into addicts, according 
to the association. 

Emit-st’s manufacturer, 
Syya UK, claims that onsite 
urine testing in the United 
States has left some prisons 
drug-free. The detectors will 
fit into brief cases and can test 
any one of 10 drugs in about 
90 seconds. 


“It's two yea is since we 
produced a report calling for 
action and all we have seen 
during that time is a gradual 
deterioration in what was 
already a horrific situation," 
Mr Phil Hornsby, the 
association's assistant general 
secretary, said. 

“Drugs have become the 
main form of currency in 
prisons and as organized 
searching has not halted the 
upward trend, new measures 
will have to be considered to 
stop the rot." 

He wants a detection system 
to stop drugs entering prisons. 
Some sort of test is also sought 
to establish whether a prisoner 
has been taking drugs. Thai is 
the only way to prove involve- 
ment in abuse, Mr Hornsby 
says. 

“The penally for someone 
judged to be a drug abuser 
should be losing remission of 
sentence and that would put a 
useful anti-drug abuse weapon 
into our hands." 

Mr Hornsby has much sym- 
pathy for the young person, 
and his family who find 
themselves caught up in the 
drug scene. 

He said: “It’s difficult 
enough for the offender's fam- 
ily to have to cope with the 
fact that an offspring is de- 
tained for committing a crim- 
inal offence, but when he 
returns to them a fully-fledged 
addict this is an additional 
burden they should not have 
to carry." 

• Boy George, the pop singer, 
has disclosed in Woman 
magazine that he decided to 
give up heroin because he 
could not bear to see the hurt 
he was causing his mother. 

He said: “She knew some- 
thing was wrong. She never 
really came out with it, but 
one day she just burst into 
tears and it was terrible.” 




' V V 

* ? 


Taunts led I Moor hunt 


loaMttuzshfo 

Idkowav&Mid 

ajtouyhM: 
Wei® pasting you* 



mm 






Letter post to EEC countries now 
costs the same as first class post in 
the UK. . . .Makes it easier to greet 
friends and relatives in Europe this 
Christmas and New Year! 


H 

^ cards (up to 20g ) tof 18p ro these countries, 
ttu can now GREECE • HOLLAND • ITAIY 


to killing 
at school 

Rustum Ali, aged 14. wbo 
stabbed a boy to death in a 
playground fight over racial 
taunts, was sentenced to up to 
three years youth custody at 
. Birmingham Crown Court 
yesterday. 

Ali, of Wilson Road, 
Handsworth, Birmingham, 
admitted manslaughter after 
his plea of not guilty to 
murder was accepted by the 
court. 

Mr Douglas Draycott, QC, 
for the prosecution, told the 
court that Ali had been consis- 
tently taunted and bullied by 
Sean Keyes, aged 15, of 
Carpenter Road, Lozells, 

Bir ming ham 

Last May there was a fight 
between them at Holte com- 
prehensive school. New 
Town, Birmingham, where 
they were both pupils. Mr 
Draycott said that Sean Keyes, 
22 months older than Ali and 
physically stronger, had been 
accidentally kicked by Ali 
during a football match caus- 
ing “bad blood" between 
them. At one stage the boys 
were separated, but an on- 
looker handed Ali a knife. 

Mr Justice Ouen, sentenc- 
ing Ali to detention not 
exceeding three years, said the 
treatment be had received 
from Sean Keyes had been 
gross provocation. 


half-way 

through 

By Ian Smith 

Police are half way through 
their search for the bodies of 
two children thought to have 
been buried on the Yorkshire 
moors more than 20 years ago 
by Myra HindJey and Ian 
Brady. 

Hopes were high that eight 
specially trained body detec- 
tion dogs would unearth the 
graves of Keith Bennett and 
Pauline Read within days of 
starting their sweep of 
Saddleworth Moor. 

After 14 days the dogs have 
found nothing but non-human 
remains, but the man leading 
the search. Det Chief Supt 
Peter Topping, joint head of 
Greater Manchester’s CID, 
remains optimistic. 

“I believe we have a reason- 
able chance of finding the- 
bodies," he said yesterday. 

While Mr Douglas Hurd, 
Home Secretary, delays a 
decision over a police request 
that Hindley be escorted from 
Cookham Wood Prison in 
Kent to the moor, Mr Topping 
disclosed he might for a 
second time see Ian Brady at 
Park Lane special hospital on 
Merseyside, where he is 
undergoing psychiatric 
treatment 

Weather on the moor 
has been atrocious. 





mX* - ,p»if 




TWO THINGS HAVE PUT the small town 
of Lynchburg, Tennessee on the map. One is the 
distillery you’re looking at, the oldest registered 
distillery in America. The other is the unique 
whiskey that’s produced here, Jack Daniel’s. 

Its always been distilled here, and only ever 
here. . And it’s been a way of life for over 100 
years. So no wonder people call it good of 
Tennessee sippirf whiskey 


• i-VV^L O iti X TX'-'t;: 


4ri 

A 


Wife'Sl 

.> . '-'V- j 


DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY JACK DANIEL DISTILLERY, LYNCHBURG (POPULATION 361), TENNESSEE. USA. EST. & REGD. IN 1866. 
IF YOU'D LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT OUR UNIQUE WHISKEY, WRITE TO US FOR A FREE BOOKLET. 







THF TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


THE LOCKHEED C-130 HERCULES 
WITH GEC AVIONICS AEW SYSTEM. 



It is not the AEW Nimrod you see 
above but a potential off-spring, the C-130. 

A mission system being developed 
jointly by GEC Avionics and the Lockheed 
Georgia Company. 

But if GEC Avionics does not win the 
defence contract for the British airborne 
early warning system, this development 
of the AEW Nimrod will never leave the 
drawing board and take to the air. 

That would be a great loss. 

Sales of the C-130 are already being 
negotiated in no fewer than 28 overseas 
countries. Export business that is worth, 
quite literally, billions of pounds. 

And export business that will safe- 
guard the future of Britain’s independent 
avionics industry. 

Not that this potential export bonanza 


is the only reason to favour the GEC 
solution. We guarantee that the AEW 
Nimrod will work. 

Our contender is also half as costly 
as its rival And the Boeing offering will 
take much longer to develop to full 
RAF specification. 

Then there are the 2,500 jobs that 
buying American will put at risk. 

Jobs that the offset trade from Boeing 
will not save. 

Of course, Boeing can well afford to 
barter. Having effectively killed off their 
only serious opposition they would be set 
to cream off profits around the world. 
Whichever way you look at it, the AEW 

Nimrod is by far the best option. 

It alone will protect British livelihoods 
as well as British lives. GEC AVIONICS 






OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 



WORLD SUMMARY 


Poland says no 
to Kennedy trip 

reDortetl^^rJf^ 111 s Pp k ®®»an, Mr Jeray Urban, told 
intentions are. S vis -?, to ^* oIa,1(I ’ 00 natter what his 

schedule nf n ■ becanse of the overloaded 

sUfESS! events.- ^ 

infenSIiL oflke ™ Washington said he had 

y ” l * r TI5ltm 8 Mr Walesa in Gdansk. 
Walesa. me tnp ’ “P 81 * ft*® meeting Mr 
hnra^riehis t aS^ l f!» t HL 1 ? 86 Ro £ rt KeaBe *y Memon»i 

Helsinki Aids 

»***» (R«der) - Several Africans studying in Fiahuid 
lave r^urned home suffering from Aids, DrJakka Suni of 
the Helsinki Aurora Hospital said. 

ArS^'tS? 8 ? arrift * ®®t in the past two years on abort 60 
Ain can students, mainly from Zambia, which shares 
projects with Finland, showed that 10 per cent carried the 
Aids vims. 

_Those who had returned to Africa were suffe r in g from ac- 
tual symptoms of Aids while others showed minor or no 
symptoms. 

Gulf war 


Envoy 

returns 

Vienna — Austria has 
decided to send its Ambas- 
sador to Israel back to 
TelAviv after withdrawing 
him earlier this autumn 
(Richard Bassett writes). 

Herr Otto Pleinert was 
recalled to Vienna after the 
Israeli decision not to re- 
place immediately their 
Ambassador to Vienna, Mr 
Michael Elizur, who has 
retired. 

The decision was widely 
seen as reflecting Israel's 
disenchantment with the 
Austrians after die election 
of Dr Kim Waldheim as 
Austria's President last 
summer.' 


bombing 

Nicosia (AP) - Iraq said 
yesterday its aircraft had 
bombed a power station at 
Hamadan in western Iran 
causing serious damage. 

The state-run Iraqi News 
Agency, monitored here, 
described the plant as a 
“vital'’ power station but 
Iran did not comment on 
the Iraqi daim. 

Earlier, the official Is- 
lamic Republic News Ag- 
ency said Iran fired three 
missiles at Iraq’s port city 
of Basra, hitting industrial 
and economic targets. Iran 
also shelled Basra and 
three towns in southern 
Iraq killing 59 people. 


Sikh wife Price of 
charges 

_ -ihi | - - - - 

; wffei 
Sikh 
linjs^ , 


freedom 

Boon — West Germany 
last year Nought freedom 
for a record total of more 
than 2£00 political pris- • 
oners in East German jails, 
Herr Heinrich Windden, 
the Minister for Inner- 
German Relations, dis- 
closed yesterday (John 
England writes). ' 

The figure is the highest 
annual total since Bran's 
money-for-peopfe trade be- 
gan In 1963, since when 
about £900 million has 
bought freedom for some 
25 s ®)0 people. Herr Win* 
delen said it would not be 
reached this year. 

British mechanic to 
be deported from US 

Los Abgdes - Mr Harvey Rader, a British Rolls-Royce 
mechanic, once charged with the murder of two families in 
California, has been ordered deported to Britain (Ivor Davis 

writes). ..... «_ 

Mr Rader, aged 44, who runs a car-hire business m a sub- 
urb of Los Angeles, was arrested by feraipatioai and 
naturalization agents who accused him of lying ab out a 1 977 
robbery conviction in Britain when he applied for permanent 
residence status in the US in 1980. 

Mr Rader was first arrested m November 1983 m 
connection with the disappearance of an Israeli family' Mr 
Sol Salomon, his wife, Elaine, and tlnar two chfldren, rad 
Foolish immigrant couple, Mr Pete- Davis and hu wife, 
JeanTPolice said Mr Rader was the last person to see the 
Salomons alive. The bodies of both families have never been 
found. 


Delhi/ — Mrs Kuldeep 
Kaur, wffeof DrPart Bedi, 
the Sikh president of 
Britains Asian Conser- 
vatives. is being investi- 
gated for possible involve- 
ment in a plan to blow up a 
Hindutemple, according to 
the United News of India 
news ' agency (Michael 
Hamlyn writes). 

She is also being accused 
of having an elaborate plan 
for assassinations, train 
derailments and attacks on 
army convoys, and is said 
to have met “hardcore 
terrorists" here, tiie agency 
reported./ 

• I • 


McFarlane testimony contradicts White House statement 


White House 
in trouble on 
discrepancy as 
critics close in 

From Michael Binyon, Washington 


The extraordinary revela- 
tions by Mr George Shultz, the 
Secretary of State, on Mon- 
day, of the way he was 
in the Iran arms 
have caused consterna- 
tion in the embattled Whim 
House, but more threatening 
questions were raised by the 
testimony of Mr Robert 
McFarlane, the former Na- 
tional Security Adviser. 

In particular, his statement 
that President Reagan specifi- 
cally authorized the shipment 
in August 1985 of arms to Iran 
by Israel contradicts the re- 
peated insistence by the White 
House that Mr Reagan knew 
of this only after the event 

The White House was un- 
able again yesterday to rec- 
oncile the discrepancy as more 
and more critics asserted that 
Mr Reagan, oral least another 
senior official, must have 
authorized the shipments. 

Suspicions continued to 
swirl around the roles of Mr 
William Casey, the Director of 
the Central Intelligence 
Agency, and Mr Donald 
Regan, the White House Chief 
of Staff. 

Mr McFarlane flatly contra- 
dicted statements made by the 
President in an interview with 
Time magazine two weeks ago 
in which he said “another 
country" overcharged the Ira- 
nians for arms and put the 
proceeds into the Contra bank 
accounts. “It wasn't US 
funnelling money to them,” 
Mr Reagan said men. 

But Mr McFarlane told the 
committee that Lieutenant- 
Colonel Oliver North had told 
him in May, while they were 
both on an arms delivery 
mission to Tehran,' that “the 
US Government had applied 
part of the proceeds” from the 
arms sales to helping the 
Contras. He would not answer 
when asked why be had not 
told Colonel North that this 
might be illegal. But he 


em phas i ze d that be believed 
the President did not know 
about this. 

In another controversial 
disclosure Mr McFarlane said 
that he considered Mr Rea- 
gan's oral approval in August 
1985 of the arms shipment 
from Israel to Iran had the 
same legal authority as a 
written intefligepce “finding” 
— an authorization which Mr 
Reagan officially gave in Janu- 
ary 1986 for arms deliveries. 

Pail of the controversy 
surrounding the whole affair is 
the question whether the Au- 
gust shipment violated the US 
embargo which specifically 
forbids either the US Govern- 
ment, or individuals or even 
third countries from exporting 
US-made arms to Iran or Iraq. 

Without an official “find- 
ing”, oral approval by the 
President would appear legally 
to be insufficient. 

Mr McFarlane said Mr 
Edwin Meese, the Attorney- 
General, has voiced the opin- 
ion that such unwritten 
authority by the President was 
legal. 

Mr Reagan, according to Mr 
McFarlane, tokl his senior 
aides, singly and in private 
conversation, about his auth- 
orization. 

This raises extremely im- 
portant questions which go to 
the heart of the credibility of 
the White House and of Mr 
Reagan personally. 

Did the President give such 
authorization, as claimed by 
Mr McFarlane? If so, did he 
then genuinely forget about it 
afterwards? If on the other 
hand, Mr Reagan gave no 
such order, who did? 

Mr McFarlane suggested a 
“climate of opinion had been 
created in the White House 
which looked favonrably on 
the shipment of arms to Iran 
and may have led to the 
diversion of funds from the 
profits”. 



Two men at the heart of the Iran arms debate: Mr John Kelly, the recalled US Ambassador to Lebanon; and, right, Vice- 
Admiral John Poindexter leaving home yest e rday to appear before the Horae Foreign Affairs Committee. 

Envoy lacked ‘hands-on’ expertise 


From Mohsin All, Washington 

Mr John Kelly, the US Ambassador to 
Lebanon, who has been summoned home 
to explain his involvement In the Iran 
arms sale operation, went to Beirut only 
abort four months ago and previously had 
no important assignment in the Middle 
East 

Mr Kelly, aged 47, is a respected career 
officer who joined the Foreign Service in 
1965. He has held a variety of posts with 
American missions in Turkey, Thailand 
and France before being Dominated as 
Ambassador to Beirut by President 
Reagan in Jrty. 

Mr Kelly's brother, Mr James Kelly, is 
a director for Asian affairs on President 
Reagan's National Security CoandL 


Mr John Kelly's Foreign Service record 
does not fist any postfag in the Arab 
world. Diplomatic observers thought that 
one reason be may have been chosen for 
tiie Lebanon assignment — a dangerous 
post for American diplomats and their 
families — is that he Is single. 

However, he has much knowledge of 
Middle East developments having worked 
in the State Department's Bureau of 
Intelligence and Research in 1972-73 
before going to the Pentagon as a special 
assistant for Thailand in the Defence 
Secretary's office. 

He nsed the Central Intelligence 
Agency (CIA) communications network to- 
pass messages from Beirut to the National 
Security Council staff, hot there is no 


suggestion that he has any links with the 
CIA. Indeed, Western governments are 
extremely careful about not appointing 
intelligence officers as heads of dip- 
lomatic missions abroad. 

Mr Kelly was political-military officer 
at the Paris Embassy during 1976-80 ami 
was later principal deputy assistant 
secretary for European affairs in the State 
Department. 

Besides having lengthy experience of 
administrative rad public affairs, Mr 
Kelly has also attended the Armed Forces 
Staff College at Norfolk, Virginia. 

Colleagues described him as a “very 
competent person” who had found himself 
in difficult situations before and re- 
sponded weU. 


Portuguese channel for Israel-Iran arms traffic 


From Martha de la Gal 
Lisboa 

Portugal's 20 a rmam ent 
companies export arms legally 
to Iran, Iraq and other coun- 
tries with prior approval of the 
ministries of Defence and 
Foreign Affairs, but during the 
past few years Portugal has 
also served as an intermediary 
for trans-shipping arms from 
Israel to Iran by importing 
them, adding local content 
and sending them on with 


shipments of Portuguese ar- 
ms. 

An official in the Ministry 
of Defence in Lisbon told The 
Times: “We sell arms to both 
Iran and Iraq. Last year we 
had a big contract with Iran.” 
He admitted that shipments 
go through “in transit”, but 
said no one in government 
knew of any illegal operations. 

Portugal has sold a total of 
£94 milli on of arms legally to 
Iran during the past three 
years and a total of £23 


million during the first six 
months of 1986. 

The companies which ex- 
port the greatest amount are 
the state-owned Indep (In- 
dustrias de Defesa Port- 
uguesas). Fabrics Nacional de 
Municoes e Armas Ligeiras, 
Com etna and Extra-ExpL 
osivos de Trafaria . 

Indep, which exports 95 per 
cent of its production, pro- 
duces automatic rifles, ma- 
chine-guns, mortars and am- 
munition. Cometna is making 


mortars for Iran, and Extra is 
loading grenades and mortars 
in shell cases received from 
Israel and Italy. 

The attitude of the Ameri- 
can Embassy in Lisbon is that 
the United Stales would be 
interested in Portugal's arms 
trade with Iran only if it were 
receiving US military equip- 
ment and turning around and 
selling it to Iran or if it 
involved nuclear or super- 
sophisticated equipment 


Gringos fight language invasion 

US move to preserve English 


From Christopher Thomas 
New York 

An overwhelming vote in a 
California referendum in fa- 
vour of making English the 
official language has fired a 
national movement to fight 
bilingualism, pro voking alarm 
among Spanish speakers and 
Asians and creating havoc in 
schools with bilingual pro- 
grammes. 

Nebraska, Illinois, Indiana, 
Kentucky, Virginia and Geor- 
gia have declared English their 
official ^ similar 

legislation is pending in 
California and 1 5 other states, 
including New York and Flor- 
ida, which have enormous 
Hispanic populations. 

The movement has clearly 
inflamed intense passions 


among English-speaking Am- 
ericans about the steady drift 
towards bilingualism in states 
like Texas and California. 
Demographers have spec- 
ulated that both could have a 
Spanish-speaking majority' 
within a few generations. 

US English, the main na- 
tional organization behind the 
movement with 250,000 
members, believes 30 states 
will be debating language leg- 
islation by next year. Already, 
dozens of cities and counties 
have adopted English-only 
laws. 

The English language move- 
ment is widely regarded as an 
adjunct to the movement for 
immigration control Accusa- 
tions of racism are common 
from Asians and Hispanics, 
the two groups most 


California is discussing leg- 
islation to ban bilingual 
education, already in 600,000 
state schools, following the 
November 4 referendum. Co- 
incidentally, current bilingual 
• programmes end in 1987 and 
Governor George Deukmej- 
ian has vetoed a Democra tic- 
sponsored Bill to extend them 
for five years. (Bilingual pro- 
grammes are very expensive.) 

Attempts are under way in 
Congress to pass a constitu- 
tional amendment declaring 
English the official language, 
but that is bound to be an 
uphill battle. Most of the fight 
against bilingualism is being 
staged at the local and state 
level. In Florida for example. 
20 municipalities have ad- 
opted English as their official 
language during the past year. 


A plea for 
rights in 
Indonesia 


Jakarta — A leading Indo- 
nesian human rights group 
yesterday called on the 
Government to install two 
human rights bodies — one in 
the country’s Parliament and 
the other in the Attorn ey- 
GeneraTs office — to enable a 
more systematic monitoring 
of human rights (Our Corres- 
pondent writes). 

the Institute for LegaT'Aki 
(LBH), a privately-funded 
organization, said the human 
rights situation in 1986 was 
“neither better nor worse” 
than in 1985. But it said 
freedom of expression had 
worsened. 


Rights group to focus 
on women and children 


By Caroline Moorehead 
human rights present fall outside the work 
or mandates of UN and non- 


A new 
organization. Rights and Hu- 
manity, was launched in 
London last night, the eve of 
International Human Rights 
Day, to focus on the “plight of 
men, women and children 
who face starvation, racial 
discrimination, or unprovok- 
ed violence and who are un- 
able to defend themselves”. 

The purpose of the new 
body, which is backed by a 
prestigious international 
council and includes such 
people as Professor Theo van 
Boven, Professor Sir James 
Fawcett, QC, and Sir Brian 
Urquhart, is not to set new 
laws or new standards but to 
make existing legal machinery 
work for people who need it. 

“Too many people 


at 


governmental bodies,” says its 
director and founder. Miss 
Julia Hausermann, a lawyer 
with long experience of over- 
seas and refugee work. 

“Certain categories of peo- 
ple — dissidents, ethnic minor- 
ities - are protected, while 
people who belong to no easy 
category get left out.'” 

The new group has drawn 
up a list of projects aimed at 
finding ways to help people 
understand their rights and 
how to enforce them. It does 
not intend to duplicate work 
already being carried out. 

At a moment of unprece- 
dented human rights interest, 
the question is how effective it 
can be at carving its own 
niche. Spectrum, page 12 


Moscow professor draws grim picture 


From Christopher Walker 
i Moscow 

A brutally frank picture of 
the man j severe social prob- 
lems beirig faced by the Soviet 
Union his been outlined here 
at a rare press conference by 
professor Igo r Bestuzhev- 
Lada, ode of Moscow s lead- 
ing sociologists. 

Among the “neptiye ten- 
dencies] repeatedly ignored 
bv Sovpi sociologists in tne 
pLrt. Professor Besruzhev- 
Lada named a growing drugs 
problem, alcoholism on a 
chronic scale, family break- 

dols'excessive bureaucracy 

when dealing with youth s 
out-dated system of 
education- and specific 
women's problems. 

He said that for demo- 

evident in Asia ana 


Africa 


criticism for his fellow social 
scientists in the communist 
state. He accused them of 
being afraid of the country's 
problems and therefore reluc- 
tant to release accurate statis- 
tics on them. 

“I am for the publication of 
all sorts of figures, but un- 
fortunately ray opponents 
have their own ideas,” he said. 
“They are afraid to publish, 
particularity out of fear of our 
communal problems. I am 
sure that if such data on 
negative issues were pub- 
lished. people would rapidly 
become bored with it as they 
did with pornography in 
Scandanavia when it was le- 
galized there.” 

The academic spoke with 
remarkable openness about 
the “personality cult of 
Stalin”, which he said was 
largely responsible for re- 
tarding the science of sociol- 
ogy in the Soviet Union and 


nroblemsphich exist in West; ^venting for many years the 
em countries”- He said that oroper analysis of m 
fheir soWtions lay i? bemg 

!-o^“?ouUheire«s« D ce. 

The sj-vear-old professor. 

also one of Moscow s 

"^ci r^Decied futurologists, 

^gpf his harshest 


proper analysis of many 
problems. 

Apart from the outspoken 
nature of his remarks, the 
press conference — orj^nized 
by the Soviet Foreign Ministry 
- also was marked by the lack 


of buck-passing to the West, 
which in the past has been 
often blamed for exporting its 
drugs and prostitution prob- 
lems to the Soviet bloc. 

Among the many statistics 
thrown out during the 90- 
minute session, some of the 
most revealing concerned the 
increasing instability of the 
Soviet family. One in every 
two marriages in the main 
cities and one in three in rural 
areas are doomed to end in 
divorce, with alcoholism and 
woefully inadequate housing 
the main complaints. 

The professor, who has 
written widely on the prob- 
lems of Soviet family life, said 
the high number of divorces 
was one reason why an in- 
creasing. although still stat- 
istically small, number of 
young people in the atheistic 
state were turning to religion. 

He said the gradual religious 
revival had begun as early as 
the 1930's and that its other 
main cause was the over- 
bureaucratic nature of Com- 
munist Party youth organ- 
izations, such as the Young 
Pioneers and Komsomol. 

The professor attributed 


many of the current social 
the breakdown of traditional 
values and the rigid family 
discipline inherited from old 
Russia when 82 per cent of its 
people lived in the country- 
side. 

“Now, almost all the old 
traditions are destroyed and 
new customs are not yet 
developed,” he said. “We are 
in a transition period. There 
was an unprecedented rise in 
alcoholism, and when we 
fought that, drugs became a 
problem, but not on a scale 
which can be compared with 
the West.” 

The professor blamed pre- 
vious Kremlin administra- 
tions for boosting the state 
coffers by mass producing 
vodka, -which was cheap to 
manufacture and easy to sell, 
without considering the “ma- 
terial, moral and social costs”. 

Steps had at last been taken 
to reverse this trend, he re- 
ported, with state revenue 
from vodka sales recently cut 
by about £8.5 million, 
problems, which under the 
leadership of Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov are getting an 
airing in the state media, to 


labels count successes after Kabul reshuffle 

l/V ister of Defence, who became a reported rocket activity from along the road towai 


Frois Hami511 

Delhi 

The of s ™ ,er d^S 

usually activity 

asSSsai 

success of the 
The } ac . , ftrtverrun enf *** 
Soviet-backed GJShv-ne 
wl,ar ',f M ine cflectfe 
diplomats r‘r ol onef-Gener a l 

j - nttl, n of c * the Mh*“ 


ister of Defence, who became a 
Depaty Prime Minister in a 
reshuffle announced last week. 

The diplomats also suggest 
that there has been a shake-op 
within the Defence Ministry 
itself^ with as many as 20 
senior officers arrested and 


sympathizers. 

Activity In Kabul has bees 
marked, they say, by fresh 
guerrillas moving into the area 
armed with “new weapons” 
which are said to include anti- 
aircraft missiles and an Oer- 
likon machine gnu, reputed to 
be thoroughly effective against 
helicopter gunships. 

Certainly Kabul residents 
daring the past week have 


reported rocket activity 
the insurgents and artillery 
reaction fry the government 
forces almost every day. 

A number of successes in 
bringing down helicopters and 
feed-wing planes has been 
reported. Helicopters have 
been reported in trouble both 
close to Kabul and in the east 
of the country. One fixed-wing 
plane has been reported by 
Afghan sources to have been 
brought down in Shewaki, 
south of die capital, and 
another to have crash-landed, 
killing 40 passengers, short of 
Kabul airport. 

Around Kandahar, heavy 
fighting has been reported 


towards 

Ghazni. 

An Afghan source reported 
that 82 Afghan Army officers 
and neos have been brought 
back wounded to Kabul from 
the Kandahar fighting. Dip- 
lomats also say that Soviet 
are bwng flown 
directly to foe Soviet Union. 

As a result of the ministerial 
changes Dr Muhammad Naj- 
ib. the Afghan leader, has 
strengthened his position 
against any come-back by the 
dismissed former President, 
Mr Bahnik KannaL 
Reports are circulating in 
Kabul that Mr Karma] wfil be 
offered the post of Ambas- 
sador in Czechoslovakia. _ . . 


ADVERTISEMENT 

HUMAN RIGHTS FOR ALL 

CYPRIOTS 

The words ‘‘human rights” have been used so frequently that it is often forgotten that they 
involve the fates, the daily lives and the happiness of ordinary men and women. 

The restoration and protection of the human rights of all Cypriots is an essential prerequisite 
for a just, viable and lasting solution of the Cyprus problem. 

We believe that Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots should enjoy the basic rights to return to 
their homes and to live wherever they wish throughout Cyprus. There should be no segregation 
according to religion or language or culture. Each and every Cypriot should have the right to 
own property anywhere and the right to move freely across the length and breadth of our small 
country. 

The Turkish troops who occupy 37% of Cyprus prevent 200,00 displaced Greek Cypriots from 
returning to their homes. The few hundred Greek Cypriots still there are being squeezed out 
and the properties of the displaced Greek Cypriots have been distributed to Turks. On the 
contrary, the homes of Turkish Cypriots in the free part of the Republic of Cyprus are still 
officially considered to be their own properties, but the Turkish military occupation regime 
which forced or lured them away from their homes does not allow them to return there. 

About 60,000 settlers from the Turkish mainland have been brought to Cyprus and have been 
granted “political rights” by the Turkish Cypriot “authorities”. Thus, in the area of Cyprus 
under Turkish military control there is now one mainland Turk, civilian or soldier, for every 
Turkish Cypriot Hie people of Cyprus have the right to reject the massive imposition of 
foreigners on their homeland. 

Turkey is preventing the investigation into the fete of the 1619 Greek Cypriots who have been 
missing since the Turkish invasion in 1974. Their families have die right to know whether they 
are alive or dead The prolonged uncertainty about the fete of their “disappeared” is nothing 
less than a subtle form of cruel torture. 

We claim the human right of every Cypriot to live free of the fear of foriegn invasion and the 
suppression of foreign occupation. There are over 35,000 Turkish troups in Cyprus and recently 
their numbers have been increased and the quality of their armoured forces improved Concern 
at this development has bom expressed even by Turkey’s allies. All these occupation troops 
should be withdrawn. They have no place in an independent Cyprus and. they prevent the 
restoration of the human rights of its citizens. 

The violations of human rights as a result of the Turkish military occupation of part of Cyprus 
have been authoritatively verified by impartial international organs, including the Commission 
of Human Rights of the Council of Europe. This intolerable situation must not be allowed to 
continue. We appeal to the international community and particularly to human rights 
organisations to take all steps necessary to put an end to the tragedy of Cyprus. 

THE COMMITTEE FOR THE RESTORATION OF 
HUMAN RIGHTS THROUGHOUT CYPRUS 


Nazar 



8 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


Paris hopes time will cool student tempers 

Chirac backs down and defers 
debate on controversial Bill 


In what looked like a further 
Government retreat yester- 
day* M Jacques Chirac, the 
French Prime Minister, an- 
nounced that there would be 
no extraordinary session of 
Parliament in January, as 
originally planned, after Par- 
liament breaks up for its 
Christmas recess on Decem- 
ber 21. 

That means there will be no 
debate on the Government’s 
controversial French citizen- 
ship Bill — making it more 
difficult for resident im- 
migrants to obtain French 
nationality — until the open- 
ing of the ordinary session of 
Parliament next April. 

The Government evidently 
hopes that this will leave time 
for passions to cool down 
following the violent student 
demonstrations of the past 
fortnight and the death of a 
student, who significantly 
happened to be of Algerian 
origin, after being beaten up 
by police during demonstra- 
tions on Friday night. 

Although M Chirac has 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 


been complimented for his 
“wisdom" and “reasonable- 
ness" in deciding to withdraw 
foe university reform Bid, his 
image as a tough law-and- 
order politician and as a likely 
future presidential candidate 
has been badly dented by foe 
Government’s capitulation in 
foe face of foe student 
demonstrations. 

Many of foe hardliners in 
his Gaullist RPR Party fed 
badly let down, although 
solidarity with foe Govern- 
ment requires them to hold 
their tongues. But M Jean- 
Marie Le Pen, leader of the 
extreme-Right National 
Front, spoke for more than 
just his own supporters when 
he accused the Government of 
unforgjveablc weakness. 

Meanwhile, the Socialists, 
who from the outset have 
supported the students' call 
for a total withdrawal of foe 
university reform Bill, have 
taken care not to become too 
closely associated with the 
students’ protest, fearing that 
they would be accused of 


exploiting the movement to 
their own party political ends 
and would also become identi- 
fied in the public eye with the 
associated violence. 

Despite foe Government’s 
abandonment of its planned 
reforms in the universities and 
foe lyc&s, foe students are 
planning to go ahead with 
foeir demonstration today, 
which will now be held in 
memory of foe student who 
died after being beaten up by 
police and in protest against 
alleged police brutality. 

A black banner bearing foe 
photograph of foe dead stu- 
dent, Malik Oussekine, will 
lead the students, who are due 
to march peacefully and in 
silence from Denfert-Rocher- 
eau in the south of Paris to the' 
Place de la Nation in the east, 
thereby avoiding the “flash- 
points” of past student vi- 
olence — the National 
Assembly, the Paris Hotel de 
Ville. and the Boulevard St 
Michel Demonstrators will 
wear badges bearing the leg- 

i amnia rd/v" 


end “Plus jamais celeu 
(“Never again that!”). 


The public prosecutor's of- 
fice. which had originally 
opened a ample inquiry into 
the causes of M Qnssekine’s 
death, has now started legal 
proceedings against “X" on a 
charge of manslaughter. The 
National Assembly is setting 
up its own committee of 
inquiry into foe incident. 

All but the communist-led 
CGT union have called off 
strikes planned today in sup- 
port of the students' demands 
for foe withdrawal of the 
university reform BUL How- 
ever, several organizations, 
including the mam teachers’ 
union, foe largest parents' 
federation, foe French Com- 
munist Party, and 100 leading 
“intellectuals" and entertain- 
ers plan to participate in 
today's march in protest 
against police violence. 

With universities set to 
break up for two weeks on 
December 19, foe main stu- 
dent protest movement seems 
set to fizzle out. However, foe 
reawakened hard core of stu- 
dent militants may not fade 
away so easily. 


Students shun the personality cult 


From Michael McCarthy, Paris 

The young man who came closest to 
being leader of the successful French 
student revolt of 1986 announced its end 
to the television cameras yesterday with- 
out giving his name. 

He is David Assooline, a short, sallow- 
faced, graduate student of history, but be 
gave details of today’s final mass march 
through Paris — slogan: Never Again — 
merely as an anonymous member of the 
student national ctHardinating committee, 
flanked by his fellow members from the 
French capital and the provinces. 

The absence of visible leaders has been 
as strong a feature of this student 
movement as its spontaneity and deter- 
mination not to be captured by outside 
political interests, all in stark contrast 
with the events of 1968. 

Then, student leaders like Daniel 
Cohn-Bendit and Jean-Jacqnes Sauva- 
geot became household names, but in the 
past three weeks those at the head of the 
present movement who gave way to the 
cult of the personality have done so to 
their cost. 

Isabelle Thomas, a pretty law student 
from VHletaneuse University in north 
Paris, was the first to be seized on by the 
French press as a convenient leader 
figure, but after allowing herself to be 
described as “the symbol of the revolt” 
she found herself unpopular and was not 
elected to the miwmI co-ordinating 
committee. 

Phillipe Darriulat, the president of a 



David Assouline: anonymous among 
French student leaders. 

socialist-aligned student muon, foe 
UNEF-ID, was also spoken of as a poss- 
ible leader and encountered similar un- 
popularity. It was not he who declared an 
end to the agitation yesterday: he was not 
present. 

The man making die victory speech, as 
it were, was denounced as a Trotskyist by 


a leading right-wing potitidan at foe out- 
set, but the fact that he was there at the 
end as well as foe beginning means he 
read c or r e ctly the 1986 student move- 
ment's anti-personality and virtual apolit- 
ical character. 

David Assooline is 27, considerably 
older than most of those about him, with a. 
master’s degree in history, now studying 
for his doctorate (his thesis is on 
Immigration into France between the two 
world wars). 

M Jacques Taboo, foe general sec- 
retary of M Jacques Chirac’s RPR party, 
hinted that M Assooline was a member of 
the Trotskyist Revolutionary Communist 
League, but M Assooline refused to 
disclose his political opinions to 77*« 
Tunes yesterday. He said: “The press has 
said things, bat as part of the movement 1 
don’t want to taflrabont it Everyone has 
his ideas.” 

He read out a scrupulously non-pofitic- 
al agenda for today's mass march through 
Paris which was intended to be part of a 
general strike to force the Government's 
band, bat is now obsolete of purpose and 
has become half victory procession and 
half memorial service for Malik Oossek- 
ine, the student killed in last week’s riots. 

Asked if he felt that the 1986 student 
revolt could perhaps have achieved more 
rtun just the . withdrawal of the- 
Government’s university ref o im plan. M 
Assooline said: “No. It had no other 
objective than the withdrawal of foe 
plan." 


Wounded soldier and his gun 



Senor Jesus Guerrero, a Nicaraguan soldier, lying wounded in hospital after an air attack 
which injured eight people a foe town of Wiwffi. 156 miles north of Managua. 

Hon duran-Nicaragiian relations 

Envoys play down conflict 


From Alan Tomlinson 
Tegucigalpa 

Honduras and Nicaragua 
appear anxious to prevent 
several days of border clashes 
between their troops from 
developing into open conflict 

On Monday, as American 
military helicopters shuttled 
Honduran 'troops to near the 
combat zone, diplomats from 
the two embattled Central 
American countries played 
down the seriousness of the 
situation. 

Senor Daniel Abud Vivas, 
the Nicaraguan Ambassador 
to Honduras, said the affair 
was being handled with care, 
while a Honduran Foreign 
Ministry official said the air 
strikes against Sandinisia po- 
sitions were a limited response 
in proportion to the alleged 
Nicaraguan incursion. 

Fighting began at the week- 
end when several hundred 
Nicaraguan troops, pitted 
against l/S-backed Contra 
rebels based in southern Hon- 
duras. clashed with Honduran' 
soldiers. 

Honduran jets retaliated on 
Sunday, by ; bombing San- 
dinista positions in mid. 


around the Honduran village 
of Capire in the bean of what 
has been dubbed “new 
Nicaragua” because it is occu- 
pied by thousands of anti- 
Sandinisla rebels. 

Managua said the jets had 
strafed foe garrison town of 

Peru's main opposition, tire 
United Left coalition, yes- 
terday called for a break in 
diplomatic relations with the 
US and Hosdnras over what it 
called Tegucigalpa's armed 
intervention in Nicaragua 
(Renter reports from Lima). 

The coalition, which holds a 
quarter of theseats in Con- 
gress, said it would support the 
formation of volunteer bri- 
gades to fight for Nicaragua. 

President Garda of Porn is 
a strong supporter of foe 
Sandimsta Government. 

Wiwili, 13 miles inside 
Nicaragua. 

President Azcona of Hon- 
duras called on foe Americans 
to lift several hundred local 
troops. 

It was me second time this 
year that the 1500-man US 
contingent in -Honduras car- 


ried out combat support. 

US officials said American 
involvement ceased late on 
Monday and General John 
Gavin, the chief of US forces 
in Panama who had been 
supervising foe operation, left 
Honduras. 

Senor Guillermo Caceres, 
foe acting Foreign Minister of 
Honduras, said developments 
on the border would deter- 
mine whether further Ameri- 
can assistance would be 
requested. 

Senor Azcona said that he 
had telephoned President Or- 
tega of Nicaragua on Saturday 
to advise him to withdraw his 
troops from Honduran terri- 
tory. He said that according to 
his' country’s military intelli- 
gence. they had been operating 
there for at least 10 days. 

The Sandinisia Array is 
believed to have set up a 
cordon of troops several miles 
inside Honduras to prevent 
foe Contras infiltrating Nic- 
aragua. 

Nicaragua says that about 
6,000 Contras are based in 
Honduras. US officials and 
the rebels put the number as 
high'asl 5,000. ' 


Bulgarian 
champion 
disappears 

Svdney (AFP) - The world 
champion weigh tiifter. Neuin 
Shalamanov of Bulgaria, has 
disappeared to Melbourne 
and there is speculation that 

he has defected 

SfojiamanoY. 19, a feather- 
weight who is the only man to 
have lifted three times his own 
weight, was reported mistily 
by officials of the Bulgarian 
team which competed in the 
World Cup on Sunday. 
Australian weighlifting of- 
ficials appealed on television 
for information. 

Chinese open 
Xavier island 

Macao (Renter) - China 
has lifted a 37-year travel ban 
to Shangchuan Island, where 
the Jesuit leader, St Francis 
Xavier, died more than 400 
vears ago. church officials 

said _ . 

They quoted Chinese of- 
ficials as saying: “China's 
open policy on rctigkm is 
reality. Christians are wel- 
come' to worship at the place 
where Xavitr died" 

Paper fury 

St Louis (AP) — Nathan 
Hicks, aged 35. upset because 
his younger brother, Herbert, 
used six rolls of toilet paper in 
two days, shot him dead 

Dawn clashes 

Montalto di Castro (Reuter) 
— Six people , were injured 
when Italian police used tear 
gas to break up a dawn anti- 
nuclear demonstration at an 
atomic power plant here. 

1,200 freed 

Abu Dhabi (Reuter) - The 
State Security Minister of 
South Yemen, Said Saleh 
Salem, said to an interview 
that 1, 200 jailed snpporteis of 
former President Ali Nasser 
Mohammed had been freed 

Quake victims 

Vienna (Reuter) — Three 
people were killed and more 
than 30 injured in an earth- 
quake which nearly destroyed 
foe town of Strazhitsa, 150 
miles north-east of Sofia, the 
official BTA news agency said 

Prison bribes 

Belgrade (Renter) — Sixteen 
officials at Srem&ka Mitrovica 
Prison were arrested and 
charged with taking about 
$20,000 (£14.000) in bribes 
from relatives of jailed for- 
eigner^ the official Tanjug 
news agency said _ 


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9 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 

Toll mounts in clashes with Israeli troop s 

Army told to keep low 
as violence spreads in 




profile 

Gaza 


w,« 0r . t { ,e sixth consecutive 
S’" 54 * 1 trough 
the Occupied Territories y5- 
today, despite instructions to 
the Israeli Army to keep a low 
profile and attempts by 
Palestinian leaders to cool 
tempers. 

The worst troubles were in 
the Gaza Strip, where Pales- 
tinian sources said three dem- 
onstrators were wounded by 
gunshot and 30 others beaten 
with dubs as the Army broke 
up demonstrations. 

At Deir Am mar camp, near 
Bethlehem, another man was 
said to have been wounded by 
gunfire, while in Manger 
Square in the town, where the 
Christmas decorations had 
started to go up. there were 
clashes between students and 
security forces. 

in a well-disciplined dem- 
onstration yesterday, around 
1.000 students and staff of Bir 
Zeit University held a mile- 
long silent protest march from 
their new campus on a hill in 
the countryside to their old 
one in the town, which has 
now been shut until the New 
Year. The march paused for a 
moment at the spot where one 
of the two students from the 
university was shot dead by 
Israeli troops last Thursday. 

The current wave of pro- 
tests is one of the most 
sustained and widespread in 
the 19-year occupation of the 


From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 

West Bank and Gaza, with 
young teenagers taking full 
advantage of the tense and 
angry atmosphere to throw 
stones at the Israelis they have 
learned to hate white living in 
the teeming refugee camps 
and slums of the Territories. 

Stoned-throwing is the usual 
reason given by the Israeli 
Army for troops for firing live 


the BBC and Reuter, I was 
driving to Bir Zeit when we 
noticed 100 or so youngsters 
on the hillside, a quarter of a 
mile or so from the main road, 
which was protected at that 
point by a patrol of soldiers 
from the Givati Brigade in 
their purple berets. 

We turned down a side-road 
to reach the hillside and found 


Mr Ira Rappaport, a US-born leader of Israel's Jewish 
settlement movement, was indicted yesterday in Jerusalem 


the legs of Mr Basaun Shakaa, die Palestinian Mayor of 
Nablus, in June 1990. Israel Radio said (AP reports from 
Jerusalem). He was charged with me mb ership in a terrorist 
organization and aggravated assault 


ammunition at demonstra- 
tors. It has been the excuse for 
all four occasions in the past 
week m which people have 
died. 

In an attempt to stop it 
yesterday, troops going in to 
break up a demonstration ai 
the Jabalia camp on die Gaza 
Strip arrested a number of 
youngsters and made them sit 
on their vehicles as they rode 
in. This human screen stop- 
ped anyone in the camp even 
thinking of throwing stones. 

Before shooting they are 
meant to be in “imminent 
danger" and on a rocky hill- 
side outside A mar i camp, 
south of Ra mallah, yesterday 
I learned how real that danger 
can be. With colleagues from 


Wiese! faces war 
of words in Oslo 

Fran Tony Samstag, Oslo 

MrElie Wiesel, the man of caust, what his response was 


peace, was visibly discom- 
forted yesterday to find that be 
had walked straight into a war 
of word s. 

Mr Wiesel, who is to receive 
the 1986 Nobel Peace Prize at 
the University of Oslo today, 
was bombarded daring an 
introductory press conference 
with hostile questions con- 
cerning his attitudes, as a Jew 
and a Zionist, towards the 
Palestinian question. 

When one friendly question 
finally emerged — that was, 
how did he feel about the 
hostile line of questioning with 
which he had been greeted? — 
the guest of honour com- 
plained: “You are asking me 
questions because I am a Jew 
that you would not have 
otherwise asked mew” 

Norwegian and Goman 
journalists repeatedly 1 return- 
ed to the theme of Israeli 
treatment of die Palestinians, 
several times asking Mr 
Wiesel, whose reputation as a 
writer is based on his personal 
experiences during the holo- 


to the recent deaths of cliildien 
shot by Israeli soldiers. 

Patiently, the Nobel laure- 
ate reiterated that he was a 
man of peace, not a politician, 
and deplored all violence. 

“I cannot defend any 
death,” he said, “particularly 
the death of children. I do not 
believe any Israeli officer 
wanted to kid] children/ 

Norwegian feelings nm high 
on the Palestinian question 
and a demonstration is 
planned by anti-Israeli poops 
dnring Mr WieseTs visit. 

Mr Wiesel plans to use the 
£200,000 prize money to 
establish a foundation for 
peace studies, which would 
bold a conference next year in 
Hiroshima. 

In reply to a final question — 
what made him happy? — Mr 
Wiesel had the last word on 
the press conference itself: “I 
belong to a special generation; 
ora- joy is never complete.” 
There had been no champagne 
in his hoise, he said, when be 
was told he had won the prize. 


Washington abstains 
in UN censure vote 

From Zoriana Pysariwsky, New York 


Israel's violent response to 
ales ti man demonstrators on 
ie West Bank was strongly 
ensured by tbe United Na- 
ons Security Council last 
ight, when it called for raaxi- 
ium restraint to prevent 
msions escalating further. 

In a rare departure from its 
olicy of shielding Israel from 
>rmal criticism, the United 
tales reinforced the Council’s 
iew that the Israelis’ show of 
jrce could only fuel confron- 
ition and inspire rioting. 
Fourteen Council members 
pproved of the resolution 
nd the Reagan Admraistra- 
on showed its displeasure by 
bstaining. 

The American acquiescence 
> a resolution it would haw 
ormally blocked angered the 
iraelis. who maintained 
irougbout the two-day de- 
ate that their soldiers were 


forced to fire at the protesters. 

Mr Benjamin Netanyahu, 
the Israeli representative, said 
there was a conspiracy to pro- 
voke violence in the region, 
which the Israeli Government 
sought to pacify. 

But tbe US decision was 
seen as an attempt to restore 
its credibility with moderate 
Arab countries after the de- 
bacle over disclosures of arms 
shipments to Iran. 

• JERUSALEM: Mr Shimon 
Peres, the Israeli Foreign Min- 
ister, said yesterday that he 
regretted the American de- 
cision to abstain (Ian Murray 
writes). An American veto 
would have slopped the 
resolution. 

He said this was the second 
time “over the last period" 
that the US had abstained on 
an issue involving Israel. 





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an old bath tub and some 
rocks had been put up to Nock 
the way to the camp. As we got 
out of the car one of the 
youngsters spotted us and 
shouted. Tbe whole group 
turned and ran down the hill 
towards u& As they ran they 
began to throw stones. 

Bernard Fdinger, from Reu- 
ter, shouted in Arabic “Eng- 
lish journalists." But the 
stoning continued. Two Arab 
women from a nearby house 
rushed out to try to stop the 
charge, but in vain. We turned 
back to the car as stones began 
to ram down. One hit the bock 
of my leg and slowed me to a 
walk. 

We reached the car but as 
we accelerated away the rear 


side window seemed to ex- 
plode and a brick-sized rock 
hit Mr Edinger on the back of 
the head, momentarily knock- 
ing him out, ripping off a 
patch of hair and opening an 
ugly gash behind the ear. 

With hindsight it bad been 
stupid to go towards the 
youngsters. They were only 12 
to 16 years old, intent on 
declaring their camp a “no- 
go” area and the troops had 
wisely kept out of range until 
they grew bored. We provided 
tbe target tbe youngsters had 
been waiting for. 

But under that bail of stones 
it was easy to understand, just 
how simple it would be for a 
young soldier with a gun in his 
hand to lose control and fire. 

It was aiso easy to see that 
the youngsters were enjoying 
their moment of power. For a 
short while they could feel 
they had restored a kind of 
Palestinian role on the full- 
side, where they openly defied 
the Israeli troops. 

At the university the disci- 
plined demonstration bad 
chanted, “Reagan, Reagan, 
you must know, we support 
the PLO" and had briefly 
flown tbe illegal Palestinian 
flag. But it was their ill- 
disciplined younger brothers, 
and a few sisters, who had, 
however briefly, recaptured 
the land. 


. * * £ V ^ ^ 



Lady Pamela Yoade placing a wreath on the 
coffin of her husband. Sir Edward Yoade, 
during the funeral service of Hong Kong’s 
former Governor in the colony’s St John's 
Cathedral yesterday. 

The funeral was conducted with honours 
almost equivalent to those appropriate for a 
head of state. Ten Coldstream Guardsmen 
carried the coffin from a military vehicle intn 
the cathedral (David Bona via writes). 

Two 17-gun salutes were fired in the course 
of the day. After the moving service. Sir 
Edward’s body was driven to the crematorium 


at Cape Collinson, where it was cremated. 

Lady Pamela accompanied the cortege with 
her two daughters. Prominent officials, 
businessmen and diplomats were among those 
invited to the cathedral bat the cremation 
ceremony was for dose friends and family 
members only. 

Old Hong Kosg hands were amazed at the 
degree of affection and interest shown by 
ordinary Chinese. Some of the bystanders 
watching the funeral cortege pass wept No 
other British dignitary in living memory has 
elicited such a strong emotional response. 


Chinese 
students in 
march for 
democracy 

Peking (AP) - Thousands 
of university students in the 
east China provincial capital 
of Hefei marched on govern- 
ment headquarters yesterday 
demanding greater democ- 
racy, city residents said. 

The protest, the first mass 
demonstration for democracy 
since the 1978-1979 Peking 
Spring, coincided with the 
anniversary of a 1935 anti- 
Japanese student movement 
that has traditionally marked 
a tense period on Chinese 
campuses. 

One witness said about 
3,000 students with banners 
saying “We demand demo- 
cracy” marched through the 
streets, chanting “No democ- 
racy, no modernization". 

Residents said the students 
gathered on the steps of the 
Anhui provincial government 
headquarters to make spee- 
ches calling for greater democ- 
racy in tbe selection of 
representatives for the Peo- 
ple's Congress. 

Agitation in Hefei began on 
Friday with a 5.000-strong 
campus demonstration agai- 
nst the Communist Party 
vetting of candidates to the 
Anhui Provincial People's 
Congress, a foreign student 
there said. 

A hilly province that is not 
normally a focus of political 
developments in China, An- 
hui includes some of the 
country's poorest districts. 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


The MIS hearing: former spyc atcher ends his testimony 

Wright claims taking 
part in many illegal 
but deniable operations 


Mr Peter Wright said yes- 
terday be bad taken part in 
“lens, possible hundreds” of 
illegal operations during his 
employment by MI5, for 
wbich be might have been sent 
to prison if detected. 

He did not give details of 
these “deniable operations” 
by the security service, which, 
he said, were secretly author- 
ized but would have been 
publicly disowned. 

But later, alter completing 
his cross-examination in the 
MIS book hearing, he re- 
sponded bitterly at a news 
conference to accusations that 
in writing a book about his 
career as a counter-espionage 
officer he had betrayal 
Britain. 

He described the attack on 
him by Mr Norman Tebbit, 
the Conservative Party chair- 
man, as “absolute rubbish,” 
and said his record, in war 
time and afterwards, would 
show he had done “far more 
for my country than most 
people”. 

He would like to visit 
Britain, be added, but could 
not while he was under threat 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 

of prosecution under the Of- 
ficial Secrets Act, which he 
said was “absolutely outr- 
ageous”. 

“I would be arrested and 
put in jail,” he said. 

He had always made clear 
to Whitehall that he was 
willing to remove anything 
from his book which might 
damage national security. 

The Thatcher Government 
was embarrassed, be said, 
because it bad “made a mess” 
of the case. 

The Prime Minister’s refer- 
ral of the matter to the 
Security Commission was 
pointless, Mr Wright added. 

What was needed, and what 
he had been trying to get for 
years, was a judicial or par- 
liamentary inquiry into his 
allegations of Soviet penetra- 
tion of the British establ- 
ishment 

Asked if he could name 
members of the establishment 
who were Soviet agents, Mr 
Wright's counsel, Mr Mal- 
colm Turnbull, interjected; 
“He can not answer that" 

Earlier, Mr Wright's rel- 
atively brief cross examina- 









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tion by Mr Theo Sim os, QC, 
counsel for the British 
Government came as some- 
thing of an anti-climax. 

After pointing out lo Mr 
Wright one contradictory ele- 
ment in his testimony, the 
British side abandoned any 
form of interrogation, appar- 
ently to Ml back on the claim 
that in writing his book he had 
breached the duty of confid- 
entiality. 

Mr Justice Powell refused to 
allow cross-examination on 
two points, including whether 
Mr Wright had had any assist- 
ance in writing his book. The 
judge said a ruling on this 
subject which be made during 
preliminary proceedings in 
August, and which had not 
then been contested by the 
Government, left no opportu- 
nity for further probing. 

Mr Wright was also cross- 
examined on missing corres- 
pondence with Mr Chapman 
Pinch er, the author and 
journalist Some weeks ago Mr 
Wright gave a written answer 
about the whereabouts of the 
papers in which he said he 
believed they had been lost It 
subsequently transpired that 
they had been in the pos- 
session of his former lawyers. 

When Mr Sim os asked 
whether Mr Wright had made 
any attempt to correct his 
original written answer, Mr 
Justice POwell said: “If the 
allegation is of some de- 
ficiency or misdemeanour, a 
far more severe allegation 
could be made against (the 
British Government) ” 

Mr Simos asked if, when he 
was providing information for 
Mr Fincher’s book. Their 
Trade is Treachery, he had 
been “terrified” of possible 
punishment 

No, Mr Wright replied, he 
had not wanted to get into 
trouble, but he had not been 
terrified. 

Mr Simos then directed him 
to a statement which he issued 
last week in which he de- 
scribed being introduced to 
Mr Pincher by Lord Roth- 
schild, and said he had been 
“terrified of getting into 
trouble". 

Mr Wright “I can’t say 1 do 
remember, (that). I remember 
a statement being issued. I 
don't know what was in it.” 

Later Mr Turnbull asked if 
he had apprehended any pos- 
sible risk in providing inform- 
ation to Mr Pincher. 

Mr Wright “Not really, I 
had tremendous faith in Lord 
Rothschild.” 

Mr Turnbull: “And if Lord 
Rothschild had disowned 
your 

Mr Wright “That would 
have been too bad.” 

Mr Turnbull: “Too bad for 
you?” 

Mr Wright “Yes.” 



14 die in ambush 
as anarchy grows 
in north Uganda 

From A Correspondent, Nairobi 


Mr Wright T have done far more for my country than most people.’ 


A disturbing picture of wide- 
spread anarchy is emergmg 
from northern Uganda after 
ambush of a large rdjel 
convoy returning from the 
southern Sudan last weekend. 

Ten Kenyan drivers and at 
[east four military escorts were 
jailed by anti-government 

rebels. . .. 

Mr Rajinder Singh, the 
Kenya-based owner of some of 
the trucks, said yesterday that 
rebel guerrillas had returned 
to the ambush site and burned 
many of the vehicles stranded 
there wbich indicates that they 
are operating with impunity in 
the area east of the Nile. 

Mr Singh said the escort 
provided by the Ugandan 
Army consisted of only a few 
teenage soldiers, and some 
were only about 10 years old. 
The Army seemed incapable 
of providing adequate protec- 
tion for vehicles in northern 
Uganda, he said. 

Meanwhile, some Kenya- 
based lorry drivers are now 
refe sang to cross Into Uganda. 
Vehicles bound for towns in 
northern Uganda and south- 
ern Sudan are blocking the two 
pmin crossing points from 
Kenya at Busia and Malaba. 

Their drivers are demanding 
assurances from the Ugandan 
authorities that they will pro- 
vide thwn with stronger mili- 
tary escorts in Uganda, es- 
pecially on the hazardous 
route north-west into southern 
Sudan. 

The 49-truck convoy which 
was attacked was returning 
from delivering relief supplies 
to Juba, the capital of south- 
era Sudan, which has been 
under siege for mo nths by the 
Sudanese People's liberation 
Army (SPLA). 

Juba has recently been un- 
able to get relief supplies in by 
air because of the danger of 
air cra ft being shot down fay the 
SPLA and the alternative 
overland route through Kenya 


and Uganda now also seems 
blocked by rebel acting # 

4t a ceremony yesterday in 
Arna. in West Nile Province, 
2.(KK) guerrillas of the Uganda 
National Rescue Front handed 
over their arms to the Uganda 
Minister of State for Defence, 
Kir Ronald Bata. 

The men were led by Briga- 
dier Moses AIL who has just 
been appointed Minister for 
Tourism. He wa s Fin ance 
Minister in the regime of 
former ruler, Mr Idi Amin, 
during the 70s, but went into 
exile after Dr Milton Obote 
returned as president. 

Brigadier Aki recen tly ag - 
reed to co-operate with Presid- 
ent Museveni's Government 
and the merger of his Uganda 
National Rescue Front with 
the National Resistance Mov- 
ement (NRA) is likely to lead 
to a large influx of Ugandans 
from Zaire and the Sudan 
back into the West Nile area. 
• KAMPALA: Mr Robert 
Elangot, the Depot) 1 Governor 
of the Central Bank of 
Uganda, has been arrested by 
the security forces and is being 
held in custody in the eastern 
town of Mbale, the official 
New Vision newspaper said 
yesterday (AFP repeats). 

Mr Ekmgot was picked up 
at his country home in the 
eastern town of Soroti on 
Sunday. 

The bi-weekly said that 
security ofikials were in- 
vestigating whether Mr Elan- 
got may nave been bolding 
clandestine meetings against 
the Uganda Government along 
with Mr Ben Etoun, the 
former Deputy Minister for 
Housing and Urban Develop- 
ment under the Obote regime. 

The newspaper also said 
that two sokfieirs were killed 
on the eastern Malaba-Kam- 
pala highway at an impromptu 
road-block mounted by an 
armed gang on Thursday 
night. 


7 killed and 400 hurt in 
Bangladesh local polls 


From Ahmed FazL Dhaka 


At least seven people were 
killed and more than 400 
wounded as aimed clashes 
between government and op- 
position supporters wrecked 
voting on Monday in local 
council by-elections in 31 sub- 
districts in central and south-, 
eastern Bangladesh. 

Three polling officers were 
abducted at gunpoint by 
masked men who raided vot- 
ing centres near the resort 
town of Cox's Bazar, about 
240 miles from Dhaka. 

Mr Chowdhury Masud, the 
Chief Election Commissioner, 
said the vote was “peaceful”, 
but that violence stopped 
balloting in at least 30 centres. 

Police opened fire in four 
sub-districts to prevent armed 
gangs snatching ballot boxes 
and three people died in 


shooting between supporters 
of rival candidates in districts 
in the south-east 
A man was axed to death in 
Gazipur district, in the capi- 
tal's northern suburbs, and 
three other people, including a 
young boy, were killed 
Authorities said candidates 
of the ruling Jatiyo Party were 
leading in more than 25 cons- 
tituencies as votes were being 
counted in the party-less 
election. 

Sheikh Hasina Wazed, lead- 
er of the opposition Awami 
League, accused the Govern- 
ment of unleashing “terror- 
ism" to gain control of all the 
local council offices. 

“The Government has em- 
ployed the same technique to 
win the election as they have 
done before,” she said. 


Jackson warns Nakasone 


Blacks hold key to $210bn 


From David Watts, Tokyo 

Black Americans area 5210 
billion (£150 billion) market 
that will be threatened if 
Japan does not become “sen- 
si the to the frictions and 
agendas of the other nations 
and peoples of the world." 
This warning came yesterday 
from the Rev Jesse Jackson 
who flew into Tokyo this week 
to tell the Prime Minister, Mr 
Yasuhiro Nakasone, and Jap- 
anese executives of the extent 
of the damage done by re- 
marks in which the Prime 
Minister disparaged the int- 
elligence levels of blacks, 
Mexicans and Hispanics and 
to criticize Japan's reluctance 
to cut back on its investments 
in South Africa. 

Mr Jackson is also meeting 
representatives of Japanese 


minorities: Koreans, Bura- 
kumin outcasts and the Ainu. 

“I am here to announce that 
we have enough intelligence to 
support those who support 
us,” Mr Jackson said. 

He told the Japanese that 
their country had not begun to 
face .the realities of being a 
world power. 

At a press conference yes- 
terday Mr Jackson said there 
were high moral expectations 
of Japan as a country that had 
suffered under the atomic 
bomb and the effects of racial 
bigotry 

He said Hitachi had bene- 
fitted from IBM’s withdrawal 
from the South African com- 
puter market and called on 
Japanese firms to move their 
operations to the frontline 
states, accusing Japan of not 
responding “to the moral 


challenge of disinvestment in 
South Africa or to the chal- 
lenge for h uman rights from 
its minorities at home.” 

Mr Jackson said that when 
he met Mr Nakasone, the 
Prime Minister did not apolo- 
gize to him personally for the 
racial slur but he added that 
his apology to Congress did 
not address the problem. 

“In a real sense Mr 
Nakasone opened up an area 
of concern that will not go 
back in the box now," he said. 

He said he had been 
“traumatized” by the sight of 
an identification card which 
all foreign residents of Japan 
must cany as well as hundreds 
of thousands of Koreans boro 
in Japan. 

“To see the same passbook 
used as in South Africa chilled 
me somewhat,” be said. 


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RAV COONEY 

Over 1.600 ^ili ijltllhie peris 
“SHOULD RUN FtMrUFp* 3. Ex 
Oood seat* avail TW, mate. 


WI1ULOC -S' 938 2292 CC 

■National Theatre - * small audi- 

torium) TonT Moil Tue 7.30 
THE B AY AT MCE 
WRECKED EG6S by David 

Hare. Tomor. FH 7 JO. Sal 2J0 

A 7.30 THE MOTHER. 


9862. ALL Ml CC Mugs 
CALL a*hr 7 day on 836 2428 HO 
■oarnise FEE Op Salto 930 
6123 

DAVE CLARK** 

TIME 

THE ULTIMATE EXPEHMMCE 

CUFF RICHARD 

AS -THE ROCK STAR* 

THE PORTRAYAL OF 'AKASH* 

LAURENOE OLIVIER 

Moo-Frl 7.30 Thu Mal 2-30 Sal 4 
A 8.15. At Thun mats only “The 
rock Star” will be per f o rm ed by 

John Christie SPECIAL OUNCES- 

MOHS at £7 an peril except Frl A 
Sot eves for GAP'S UB40V. stu 
dents A under 16*a avail 1 N 
before perf. Reduced prices Tlwra 
mats only £7 & CIO 
New BeeU m le Agj *87. 
SEATS AVAR. FOR HE ‘ 


_ 240 

8230 CC 579 6566/6433 TB lO 
Jat Eves 8pm. Sat mad Bob 


DRURY LANE THEATRE ROYAL 

Box Office a OC 01-836 8106.01 

240 9066/7. First Can 24hr 7 day 

cc bkgs on 01 240 7200 (no Meg 

fee)- TMutmaocr Ol 379 6433 
(no bkg he) 


42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL TIE F A 


voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE OLIVIER AWARD 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

PLAYS K PLAYERS 


AWARD 

Evgs ao Maa Wed 3.0. Sal ao A 

3-30 Reduced price mat Weds. 

Studenla and OAP1 sundb 

Croon Bales 930 6123 

BOOK NOW FDR XMAS 
Special matinee Dec 26 3pm 


DUCHESS S 836 8243 CC 240 
9648 CC 379 6433 A OC 24 
ltr/7 day 240 7200 Evgs 8 Wad 
mat 3 Sot 6 A S 


DUKE OF YORKS 836 5122 CC 

836 9857/741 9999/379 6433 

24hr 240 7200. Eves 8. Thu 3. 
Sot S A 8.30 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Standard Drama Award HM 

STEPPING OUT 

HU Comedy by Richard Harris 
P I retie d by Julia McKenzie 
“T RIU M PH ON TAP** Sid 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


roHTUWE BO/CC 836 2238/9 

Agy F.CALL 7 day 24hr 240 

7200 (BhO fee) Orpa 930 6123. 

BUNT MBS 


Miv wnfl 

TeSdwt'i 


Orel UK 
JJUL 


( PUB TONKHT AT 7PM. 

Thun A Frt at 2m A 7 -90pm. 

SM 2pm. 6pm A 8pm, 


RREEHWKH THEATRE 01-866 
7755. Flnt Cap « 24 hr* 240 
7200 (bkg fm. From Tomor 
Even 7.4o. Mats Sal 2-30 (Dec 
15 at 7.0) Dec 26 at 4.0 A 7.45 

Nmrr must fall bv emum 

WUUaon. 


GARRICK SOI 5796107. IN call 

24/hr 7 day 240 7200. ere Salea 

9306123. Tlcftemustar 379 6433 

Eves 7.30. sat s A 8 Turn mal at 

JUDI TflCHAEL 
DENCH WILLIAMS 

“Ctass or theft- own" Sid 

MR and MRS NOBODY 

by Krtth Waterhouse 

Directed by Ned Stwreln 

The beat ■ ■■■» to mdi H 

Wee* EMI Us >W Tunes 

•EVERYItOOT MOST SEE TM 
NOBODY” D.MaB 
No perf Christmas Eve 


GLOBE «37 1692 CC OPEN ALL 

HOURS 379 6433 IN Cal] 24 hr 

240 7200 i no bkg feci 7a i 9999 

(no bkg feel Orp Sales 9306123. 

This (ram w H Smith Travel 

Branches Eves 8 Mats wed 3 Sat 4 


COMtUT OF DIE YEAR 
anuc* OHiter Award* UMS 

LEND ME A TENOR 

It’s laniriter you're after... 

then (he fun comes nowhere 

thicker and faster” SM 
A Comedy by Ken Ludwig 

Directed by David Ctbnore 


HAMPSTEAD 722 9301. Eves 8. 

Bat M al 430. SELLHK THE 

•NTT ! F, A Haw Ceaeft Car 
FeC a r Mft fc "Ctorkm s H» 
fare* perfut minces from 
Dimdate Landen and David 
ThrHfalT' Tunes. "Very 
funny" DErp. 


MAYMAJMST THEATRE ROYAL 

BOX office ACC 01-930 9832. 1st 

CaU 24hr/7 day oc bkgs 240 7200 

nckeunaster 379 6433 Eves 730 
Wed A Sal mala 2-SOpm 


“A 


Truly Milan rising 

•* »**■•■"-■ ** STtanes 


BREAKIN G the C ODE 

by HUGH WSUIUttMte 
JPwald 


Dtr by CLIFFORD WILLIAMS 

“IMS HUMAN, HUMANE, 

SERIOUS A*R> 6MFVMG 

PLAY— VERY HKW.Y 
HECOMMLHDED** S.TUnes 
No Peril Christmas Eve 


HER MAJESTYS Haymarkri 839 

2244 CC OPEN ALL HOURS 

379 6131 First Call OC 240 

7200 

ANDREW uuorra 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

WINNER BEST MUSICAL 1S16 
LAURENCE -OLIVER AWARD 

EVEHMC STANDARD AWARD 

Starring 

‘ CRAWFORD 
aal 

— 11 — 

Sarah Steve 

Brighbnan Barton 

Ctatre Moore plays Chnstuie 
at certain Mtomsnm 
Directed by HAROLD PRINCE 

Eves 7 46 Mala Wed A Sat 3 

Postal bkgs only ror apt to Oct 


LONDON FALLAOSUM 437 7373. 

741 9999 wo bkg feet. Fust Can 

34 H r 7 p ay QC 240 7200. (NO 

BHS FEE) Ore Sales 930 6125. 
TMwtm aster 379 6453 

cnrcxaM Fsaro *« 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
_ COMEDY 

OCOROE HEARN 
6 OEMS otai.i rv 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 


AFFNOVAL** S.Tel 
Mon-frt 7.30. Matt Wed 2.00 
Sat 2J0 A 800 

Skint conce a atoea avail, at door 
Mon-Tri * Rat man 
lUnaVUMURMRSUW 
New h ea ths to Apift 2ft, IM7 


Ln iu-TON "S' 928 22S2 CC 

<N*tton6l Theatre's proscenium 

Mn gpjTon't- Tomor 7.46. TONS 
OF MOIWY by Win Evans and 

VMefthOe. Frl 7.46. Sal 2-lS 

SKbSSWE 0 * 7 46 ™ 


231 1 From Sat Eves 7.30. Wed 
Matt 2-30 (Opens Dec 18 
7pm. Dec 24 at 6.30 only! 

adapted by Mm Wells, wuh 
nnsic by Carl Dnk. 

STUDIO Eves 8pm THE 


LYRIC 

Ave W1 01-457 3686/7 01-454 
1680. 01-434 tooa 01-734 

6166/7 

COLIN BLAKELY 
"A briUant & loyoiobr 
comic per f ormance" F. Times 
In 

The Natio nal Thea tre's acriaftned 
production of 

ALAN AYCKBOMUrS 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

"llannhranunNy funny" Odn 
"Hilarious-.- S. Times 
"A rare e v ening of 
comic exhilaration" Tunes 
Evgs 7.3a Mats Wed and Sal 3.0. 
Croup SUes 01-930 6123. 

Reduced price mats Student & 

OAP Stand -tiv 

FIRST CALL 24HR 7 DAY 
CC 8OOMMQ8 OH Ol 240 72RO 
(NO BOOKMS FEE) . 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL *87 


MAYFAHt Ol 629 3037 
From Dm 16 lo Jan 3 
Twice daffy 2-0 a 4.0 
weds & Seta 1030. z.o A 4.0 

SOOTY’S XMAS SHOW 


MAYFAHt 8 CC 629 3036. Mon- 
Thu 8 Frl /Sal &40 A B.IO 

RICHARD TODD m 

"The Hast ThriRar far ynare” S M 

- THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER _ 

“An mabasbed winner" S Exp 


6TH 


THEATRE Ol 236 

6668 1st CaU 240 7200379 6453 
741 9999 CUT Sales 930 61Z3 
Kenneth Grahame'B wonderful 

THE WIND IN THE 
WILLOWS 

Opens December 15 for 4 weeks 
only- Twice dally at 2.0 A 6.0 


NATIONAL THEATRE Sth Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 

COMPANY 


DL1VIEH /LYTTELTON / 


tana days < 

from lO am. REbTAlHWfr («28 

2053). E ASY C AN row *. Mo 

633 0880. ABtCOND 


NEW LONDON Dim UM TO 

406 0072 CC OPEM ALL HOURS 

379 6433.TMB Mn W H South 

Travel B ra ncnea. Evm 7.46 Tue A 

Sal 3JOO * 7.46 

THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
/ T-S- ELIOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 

FOR RCTUNMi Croup Boofthnm 

406 1667 OT 950 6123. HOW 

BOOKHM TO MAY 30 1M7 

MB available in Jan 


OUVKH V 928 2202 CC (Na- 
tional Theatre's open sage) 
Preview Toni 7.00 pranaM 
opens Tomor 6-40. Frl 7.00 
prompL S« SLOO now prior 
mat) Be 7.00 prompt! 

LEAR by Shakespeare. 


OLD VIC 928 7616 cc 261 1821 
Eves 7.30. wed Mata 2.30. Sab 
4.00 & 7 AS 



GEORGINA HALE 
PATTY LOVE 

DIANA QUICK 

WALKER 


SUSANNAH YORK hi 

THE WOMEN 

by Clare Boothe Luce 
“AH female ritzy «b 
FT. "DEUCSOUSLY 
Times. "Witty, wicked woo 
world" SXxB- “STYLISH, SI 
S T UD DED PRODUCT ION* 1 
Ml iiw 

LAST S WEEKS - MUST E 
JAM ao 


PALACE THEATRE 454 0909 CC 

OPEN ALL HOURS 379 6433 

FU9I CaU 24HT 7Ehor cc 240 7200 

Cre Saieo 930 6123. Tkts (TOm w 

H smith Travel Branches 


LES MISERABLE 

“F YOU CJUFT OCT A 


Eve a 7.30 Mata Thu A Sal 2-30 

MMEatra CtarMma* mat* 22 A *4 1 

Pec at £30 Lafecomm not ad- 

* mined uncar the ineervaf ro 
■CAT THE TOUTS BY KMQURt^ 

RM FOR RETURNS AT THE BOX 


HmbMUttb Say* *87 


PICCADILLY 457 4506 CC 579 
6566/ 579 6433/ 240 7200. 
croup Sales 930 6123/ 836 3962. 
Evee Spa. Wad matt A. Sao 4 JO 
A 8.16 


“A Master down" Times 

PATRICK CAHOLL 


DEREK HOYLE In 


"Broad farce with Stephen 

Sondheim's sonoar OJMaU 

A FUNNY THING 

HAPPENED 

ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM 

24 Dec 3pm only- 26 Dec Dm. No 

perf 20 Dec. 


■ P RD I CC EDWARD Box Office H 

73« 8961 Fi rst Call 24 Hr 7 Pay 

MHBMNKS6 3464 CTO «b» 

930 6123. M a w Sat 7— 


CHESS 

Haw besftfas to Keeab 28, US7 

MAT SEATS SOMETIMES 
■ AVAILABLE ON DAY 


PRBKE OF WALES W1 9308681 

/2 cc Hotune 950 0844/6/6. Ore 

Sales 930 6123. Keith Prowse 

74 1 9999. TMietma*er 5796433 

1st CHI g4hr/7d ay 24 0 7200 (HO 
gjyC PEE) 

’ALL 0 * A L L O 

with the TV SHOW STARS 
Eves 8. Frl A sat 6 JO A UO 

EXTRA PERFS 30 A 31 Dec at 

a jo 


QUEEN'S 01-734 1166/7/ ■ 

0261/0120. 24ftr CC 240 7200/ 
579 645 3/Grp Sales 930 6I22L 


■A WONDERFUL STAR’ 

MAUREEN LIPMAN 


WONDERFUL TOWN! 

■'It ripples with excnmauU" 
^..TTnws “Just wtmderfid" CLEim 

Mon-Sal 8 Mata Wed 2-30 Sat 6 


ROYAL COUNT S CC 730 1 746/ 

1857 cc 24hr 7 da F 240 7200 

Arks feel Eves 8pm. Sat Matt 
4pm JaW SWdt prese nt A 
MOUTHFUL OF 8WPS by 

Caryl Churchia a David lan- 


ROYAL COURT UPSTAIR! 730 

2664 Eves 7 jo. Sat Mata 3JO 

Uy - " 


ROYALTY 01-831 0660 2JTur cc 

240 7200 379 6433 741 9999 

Croup Sal es 93 0 6123 

JOSEPH AMD THE AMAZ1 . 

TECHNICOLOR DHEAJNEOAT 

From 16 Dec twice dally at 2-30 A 
7 JO BOOK NOW ■ 


SAVOY THEATRE 01 836 8888 
CC 379 621 9. 836 0479. First Call 
24 hr 7 day i no bkg feet 240 7200. 
Keith Prowse 741 9999 uio bkp 
fee). Eves Mon -Frl Bpm. Sat B A 
8-30. wed Mats 5pm 
PATRICK HACKEE 

DAVID 


In 

A Mystery Thrujre nsr 

Jdl the Family 

KILLING JES SICA 

Directed by BRYAN FORB ES 
TtaaUas «Wl ‘Stouts* tor n . 
prtoe AftwanMur DJkfalL “to tba 


*"««« A SURE-FIRE 
WIHHER" Lsnr 


SHAFTE SBURY THEATRE OF 
LUMEPVOl 379 6399 CCOl 579 
6433/ 741 9999.. First can 24 hr 
240 7200 (bkg fee). Grp Sales 930 
6123 

Mon-Fri 8- Wed 3. Sal 6. 16 A 8 JO 


THE THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COT 

LanrtHi ne w prod u ction 
TDM C ONTI In 

AN ITALIAN STRAW HAT 

adapted by SIMON MOORE 
From Labfche 
wtm CUVE DUNN 
and STRATFORD JOHNS 
Directed by ANTON RODGERS 

Previews to Dee 18. Opens Dec 19 

at 7.00 


ST MARTIN'S 01-836 1445. Spe- 
cial OC No. 379 6433. Evgs B.O 
TUCS 246. Sat ttO and so 

358 . f M ACAT HA CH f US T W a 

THE MOUSETRAP 


— — 836 2660 OC », 

4143/6190. 741 9999. First CHI 

24 Hr 7 Day cc 240 7200 Ore 

Sides 930 6125 

CABARET 


WAYNE SLEEP 

Directed A Owreomamied by 


Mon-Fri 7.45. Mat WM 5.00 
Sat 4JO A 8,15 


Spec perf New yeara eve 7pra 


107891 


295623. 


ROYAL 
" ol 


WMtori* Tala TooMM 

7.30 HIcbmH 8 Tomor. SM 

l.sa Macbatk Tomor, Frl 7.30. 

Dream Sal 7 .50. tow TTintn. 

■vary Man Torugni 1-50- Kina 
aw Tamgni 7-50. Fair MaM 

Tomor. Frt 7.5a Sat 1.30. 

Sat 7 JO. 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

**ThB very bast Of Britain's 

comic talent" DaRy Mau 

See s eparat e e ntries under: 

CM I O BON THEATRE 


VICTORIA PALACE Ol 240 7200 

BOOHING NOW 24 hr 7 day 


NATASHA MGHAHttfON 


HIGH SOCIETY 

Directed by mchan Eyre 
Piw Feb 13 let Night Feb 25 
Mon-Fri 7.46 Wed Mat 3 Sal 4 M 
A 845- Gp Sales 930 6123 


VAUDEVILLE Box Office A CC. 

836 9987/5646 Flnt call CC 24 

nrs 340 7200 tbkg - fee) 

Ttcketmaster 379 6433 (bkg fee). 

Evgs SjO. Mate Wed 2-30. Sal 6.0. 

830. No perta Dec 24.25. Dee 26 

at S A 8. Dec 27 at B & jua 


UT ACTRESS OF THE YEAR 
Standard Drama Award 


PETER BLYTHE 


WOMAN fN MIND 


PLAY m LONDON. IT IS ALSO 

. - s.Td 


BW AT IRS BEST* S-TUnee 


VrCTORlA PALACE 01-834 1317 

Eves 7 JO Man Wed A Sat 2-45 

EXTRA XMAS MATINEES 
December 26J29JO Jan 1 A 2 

24hr 7 day cr bkgs (no extra 

charge) on FIRST CALL 240 7200 

A NIGHT OF SHEER SONG A 

DANCE MAGIC WUy Now* 

CHARLIE GIRL 
ONLY 5 WEEKS LEFT TO 
SEE THIS FABULOUS 
CAST. LAS T . PERF JAN 10 

PAUL NICHOLAS 

CYD CHARHSE 


CHARLIE GIRL 

Pup s a les oz uwfl 
Hbq party imc o u n ti M 

I amo book, ncketmaat e r 3796435 

or any W H Smith Travel Branch 


Ol 836 0283/4 

cr 834 0048. cc nckeunaster 379 

6433. Today. Tomor. Tue 10 30 

am A 2.0a Fri. Mon 2.00 A 6Ja 

Sal 5-00 A 6J0 

SKSt 


th?Vj 

by CjS. Lewis 


, _ Sqoi 

950 7766/ 839 4456 CC Ol 379 

6666/579 6455. 741 9999. Grp 

sales 930 6123/836 3962 



SCOTTISH GALLERY 

Presents 

- T WELVE p o st war 
SCOTTISH ARTISTS 
At 14 Moroni Yard. Duke 
Stnrrf. st Jameu’a.rnam De- 
cember am - 19th. open lO- 
6pm Mon - Frt. oi- 930 4215 


178 BramMon Road. SW3. Teh 
684 7B66. Fine British and Euro 
neon padnungs and scidpture. 

HlBh eftea, HL M ae r m, «L SMto 
Labi, Sir M atthew Sadth. L.5. 

Lanurry. J-HHro, M. Marini. Rat 

R- Doty, Grata, ate. TTirough Dec. 

Mon-Fri [106 Sat 104. 


ITla <1« floor) Stoane Street. 

SWl. .Tek 235 2464. tarty En- 


> etc. Mon-Fri 106 Sal 104. 


and cnro/EACHUS - sue of 
Passage until 23 Dec. 

Mon-Fri 106.50. 


Gretnam 


ART GALLERY 

Street. TM 

riv ■ tr iHUI ry. 

cember 1019 utctuslve Open 

dauy (not Sundays) 10am to 

5pm AOmJnton and eacakiaoe 

live. Donaaons welcomed for 

SAVE UK SUMATRAN RH - 


UFEm GALLERY. 30 Bruton 

a-Wl. 01-493 210 7- IMP OR- 

TANT XI X A ND XX C ENTURY 
ftokh and ntnsH paintj 


-19 B tn i diy . Moo 

- FTl 106. Sou ta 12-30. 


OSCAR A PETER JOtMSOH, 27 1 

_ Lowndes St. SWl. 01-236 646 

Ngy-J» Dec . 12- RECOfTI 
WILDLIFE PAOTHCS BY 


PAMUN.OALLEKY 11 Motromb 

gt SWl. 01-236 8144. LOUS 

WAIN. 18601959. 


PRINTS FOR CI 8 US TMAS. Ortgl- 

“1 edUlon prlntt from 

£50. Ckaphlc works by Modern 

SSSfiS.* Brora Sculpture by 
PEBU RAH STERN CCA TnBar 

toe (Christies CMitemparary 

Ait) a. Dover sl wi. 17 
Princes Arcade SWi ,499 6701, 

ROYAL ACADEMY . Pkxadfffy 01 

734 9062 Open dally 106 Inc. 


Sun. (rawed rat e Su n, ■moi 


WYMHUUn s 836 3028 « 579 

6565/ncfcetraaSter 379 6433/1N 

CHI 24 hr 7 days 240 7200/741 

9999/Crp Salea 930 6123/836 

3962. Eves 7.30. Sal matt 3 
Far a tunned season 
'A 


indent. 

VANESSA REDGRAVE 

TOM WILKINSON In 

The T«bi Vk p rod aiM an of 

GHOSTS 

By Henrik Risen 
Directed by David Thadkor 

“MUIMT PRDOU C TMH. 

DON'T mss r city umis 


YOUNG VK 928 6363 OC 379 

6453. LAST Z WKS JULIUS 
CAESAR, “Vigorous * 
e aUUn a" Ctdn. "Cartt 
frad|i ■»■*■ exreilnit Bratus" 
FT “FTOnlc Crones' warm, 
charismatic Antony- Odn. Dir 
by Dav Id Thacker. Evee 7JO 
Wed mat 2pm 


YOUNG VK STUOW 9OT 6363 

taper Oeeto Tl. CO In 

arnmn^n 

8pm. Wed mat a.SOpm 


ART GALLERIES 


AMTWBiY dPOFPAY 9 * 33 


Ssasssa 


•uwmvRxE a OminH. n 

^SSK^iuS 37 “ l4 - 


TRAD. JAZZ. AND MOD An Exto- 
omon of European Arctutec- 

°f the 1920** 

and 14301 r«6ari * ai ii bo 
55 DJto|J' London swi. 01-930 
164S. Mon-Fri l 


CINEMAS 


nim at 2-26 4.30 6.40 8J5 


CMELSEA riHEMA Kings Road 

Si? *5™ 1161 FH * n 

a 2-aa 4.30 6 .ao ana. 


0“«toMAYPAH» Canon S> 
ggSJpraaudeLannnann's 
Part 1 Tum a 

Thu™ 046 sata liJOam a 

* 2S ^ 2 Mon - Wca * fri 

BAG Sundays Part 1 at 

to l 52J2L B * ,t 2 M &4a ■TWM- 

ly abrorotng.. jaw I he nim" Std. 


OURZON WEST END Stuftabura 

Avenue Wl 439 4805. Mangle 
&rtth. Dmhobn EflkMVjS 
Sgj2> A «00M WITH A 
JPC). mm at 150 (Not 
Sun 1. 346. G IO tk 84a 

iro IU !S.y. T * r *? wrfccagn aa 
ri w«lt to concrfve" 
Aksmnder Walker. SOL 


LEICESTER SQUARE THEATRE 

930 5292 I Fro 1/930 7615 124 
hr Aeons/ Visa/ AmEx 800 k- 
tnqsi BIO TROUBLE to LITTLE 
CMMA (PS) in 70mm Dolby 
Stereo. Sep Prog* Dally 1.0 
336 6 to a so All prog* 
bookable In advance. 


LUMIEHE CtNEMA St MartUfa 
Lane WC2. 379 3014 / 836 
□691 “ROUND MUHUGHY '151 
rum al 1.00 330 6.00 8.53 
Dotty Stereo. LATE SHOW Frt 
& Sat only at 11. 1 Bpm. AD- 
VANCE BOOKING Eve Perfs. 
Acoeas/vtaa. 


... 235 

422S HANNAH AND HER SIS- 
TERS 1 IS) Dally: 3.0 60 7D 
9.0. MUST END THUHS 11 
DEC. FROM FRI 12 DEC. 
Ororge C Scott Nigel Davenport 
Frank Finla y Susannah York In 
A CHRISTMAS CAROL (Ul Dal- 
ly: 3.0 A S O. A ROOM WITH A 
VIEW fPCT Dally: 7.0 A 9.13 
Sean bookable in advance lor 
7 0 & 9.15 


. . _ »839 

7697) MONA USA (18) Geo 
Drags Daily 2.15 6.00 840. All 
seats booiuixe In advance. 
Access and Vtta letoptuma 
bookings welcome. 


H yunr 

1930 611 li Info 930 4250 / 

4299. LASYMNTH OD Sep 

progs Doors open Dally 2-15 

5.158.15. All progs bookable in 

advance. Credit Card Hot Line 

lAcceto/ Visa/ AmEx) 930 
3232/ 839 1929. 24 hour ser- 
vice. £2-60 seats available 
Monday all perfs. 


MARBLE ARCH f723 

20111 WaH Disney Pictures 

Sgenta BASIL THE GREAT 
MOUSE DETECTIVE (Ul Sep 

Dregs Doors open Daffy 2.48 

9*5 7.45. Reducad price* for 

DAP's. UB40 holders. Student 

card holders. Under I6-*. 


■•SS" °PP. Russell So. Tube 

IMOOI I I TALK 

<191 nim a( 2JQ4J 6 6.45 9.00 

® ROSA LOXUUURS iPC) 

FUm al 5.30 6.00 8.35 


TO PLACE YOUR 
PERSONAL 
ADVERTISEMENT 
IN 

THE 

TIMES 

TRADE 

ADVERTISERS 
TEL01-481 1920 
ADVERTISING 
FAX NO. 
01-481 9313 
TELEX 
925088 
PRIVATE 
ADVERTISERS 
TEL: 01-481 4000 
USE YOUR 
ACCESS 
OR 

BARCLAYCARD 



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Prorinc*. 
’St! 3B34* 
art fcic-itd 
K l Eaafi* 
x Ifcleoce. 

1 3)? Bnjt- 
4> tte JS4I 
tak.’er for 
> t isyujoe 
vt&ssx cf 
kli .Uaic, 
•rtfet ifift 
tec Obwr 
1L 

n ztix a j* 
sh Presw- 
awasec! 

R Ipadi 
r«« »i;h 

MK¥ Mu*. 
rJ* to irad 
IfixUiu 
hr Sain 
Nik? *rci 
1 Kabert 
' Gtiwraar 

Bank of 

rmt«S b« 
stf** bring 

hr wtatrra 

lx dfkiai 
•per ssrf 
JT!%} 

picked Bp 
k « l^r 
Some 08 

■mid ifcrt 
•rtt i*. 
Ml FJ*n- 
a teidas 

nrttl Xiust 
fa**. lie 

i SSk*l*1 r -\-T 

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«■ rsrjctj&r 
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-EFT ktljrtl 

ahw-fc**- 

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?T?*r*sea< 


bn 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


THE ARTS 


■v-Vses 


, - : ■*>••• . ■ 








Suffering 
dressed up 

Ab»»t4M00 child™, wot die 
today. T he same number $ 1 *$ 
yesterday. The same will die 
tomorrow, of nmlmSw 
dehydration. 

other prerentabk^Ss. ^ 
Ttes outrage fa what Unkef 

is out to stem, as weD aHhe 
abuse of children in sw^ 
shops, brothels, war. In 
Presenting a marathon docu- 
mentary to mark UnkeTs 40tb 
Denis Tnohy «. 

TOkedUespmfoTBMdAIdto 
stress tint “No child should 
|*J« gnef of as mother 

To us a Child (Thames) »$ 
peobabb 1 too long ftrits oma 
good. Taking eigfes children 
roimd the world, from the 

■Hwhoiul. oev lr 


UarifJPopQ&r 



Fiddler on the hoof 


JUfling fieids of Nicara™ 

Tuohy told the same story over. 

1 TELEVISION | 

again, underpinning it with 
resis table statistics and Peter 
George's often beautiful 
camerawork - footage which 
seemed for too arty for the 
subject matter. 

This lack of reality was 
..compounded by an absence of 
passion and indignation in 
Tnohy’s presentation. At 
times he might have bam 
fronting an educational bul- 
letin made by the Central 
Office of Information. We 
could also have done without 
Nigel Hess's inappropriately 
sentimental music. 

Hess's composition's were 
to be found contaminating the 
first part of All Passion Spent 
(BBC2), a lavish adaptation of 
a middling novel by VHa 
SackriUe-West (some critics 
would say the title too well 
describes the content). 

Forsaking James Last as 
his muse in the Unicef celebra- 
tion, Hess seems to have taken 
up the baton of Bert 
Kaemfert's grandfather for 
‘ this 1930's tale of a distin- 
- finished widow who decides to 
live alone in Hamsptead. « 
Admittedly, tfeere were 
some longueurs which needed 
filling in Peter Bachman’s 
ponderous dramatization. 
Nevertheless, beneath the 
over-melodious euphony, 
Wendy Hiller was immacu- 
lately mschierons as the be- 
reft Lady Slane while Maurice 
Denham gave a nice rendering 
of Mr Bncktront, an estate 
agent with imminent poofs of 
the end of the world. 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 







Wired for sound: Nigel Kennedy, at home with his 
“Cathedral" Stand and electric violin on the floor 


Stone dead, but 
lively as ever 


I d his modest basement flat in 
Tufnell Park, north London. 
Britain's most celebrated young 
violinist displays some prized 
possessions. “That's the one you 
can leave lying around,*’ says Nigel 
Kennedy of the electric violin at his 
feet, all “hooked up" to amplifier and 
pedal modulators and ready to hurtle 
Kennedy into some new-wave classic 
at the flick of a switch. 

Handled with considerably more 
delicacy is his latest acquisition: the 
“Cathedral" Stradivarius, so called 
because of its rich, sonorous timbre. 
It is this instrument that Kennedy 
will coax through the Elgar Violin 
Concerto at the Festival Hall tonight. 

He considers himself lucky to have 
it “In Germany it’s almost automatic 
that if you’re into concertos some 
local council -will buy you a good 
instrument, and in America there are 
foundations that help. Here it's very 
tough. I wrote to MPs — both parties; 
even all three, I was so desperate — 
but in the end it was a private 
individual, a real music-lover, who 
bought the Strad so I could use it" 
The two contrasting instruments 
neatly symbolise the unique manner 
in which the Brighton-born Kennedy, 
now approadiing 30, has juggled 
several musical careers simulta- 
neously. So does his relationship with 
EML he has separate contracts with 
the pop and classical divisions. “The 
good thing about being contracted to 
a vast multinational is that there's 
usually someone there who under- 
stands what I'm about on any 
particular day." 

Nevertheless, knowing how to 


Tonight the young pop and classical violinist 
Nigel Kennedy will play the Elgar Violin 
Concerto at the Festival Hall Richard Morrison 
spoke to him about his mixed tastes in music 


market Kennedy's latest album must 
have taxed even EMI's corporate 
resourcefulness. One side is fi&d by 
Bartok’s Solo-Violin Sonata, the 
other by Kennedy's own arrangement 
for violin and double bass (played by 
Alec Dankworth, son of John and 
Cleo) of numbers from Duke 
Ellington's suite Black, Brown and 
Beige. EMI's uncertainty about 
whether this constitutes a classical or 
popular release has resulted in the 
record bearing the memorable num- 
ber “NIGEL 1”. 

Kennedy’s version of Elling ton is 
haunting, sparse and te chnically bril- 
liant — but it is a long way from the 
big-band original. What prompted 
him to record it? “I was locking fora 
composer who had Knlcs with 
Bartok.” (Ellington made his first 
recording of BB&B in the year of the 
Bartfik’s premiere, and both works 
could be said to be folk-derived.) 

“Scaling Ellington down from the 
original was not so difficult. His 
melodies and harmonies are very 
strong, so even though 1 don't have 
those fantastic arrangements which 
are, like, amazing, I still bad strong 
ideas to work off And I was inspired 
by Ray Nance’s really beautiful vioHn 
playing on the 1958 Ellington 
recording." 


Kennedy made his first foray into 
the jazz field forChandos Records: an 
album called “Strad Jazz". Unfortu- 
nately, the tide misled many jazz 
buffs into expecting something in the 
mould of Grappelli, Kennedy’s early 
jazz mentor. “A lot of people were 
disappointed because it didn't sound 
like Sleph. You know it was called 
'Strad Jazz? Well, they thought that 
meant trad’.” 


H is insistence on mixing his 
classical career with jazz 
and rock has disconcerted 
some in the music busi- 
ness, perhaps even more 
than his consciously cultivated “or- 
dinary bloke” or his London- 
cabbie accent and his endearing faith 
in the permanent usefulness of early 
1970s “hip" slang. He does not 
pretend to be leading any crusade 
against class or culture barriers 
hindering musical enjoyment; never- 
theless, he thinks it is certainly 
“ealfy” that “people now, especially 
young people, are just into good 
music, rather than any- particular 
category.” 

Any impression of Kennedy as a 
kind of talented dilettante, dabbling 
in whatever takes his fancy, is quickly 
dispelled by a glance at his working 


routine. He practises daily for a solid 
five hours, of which about 90 minutes 
is devoted to technical exercises alone 
(many of them evolved by himself). 
This maintains “a certain physical 
well-being on the instrument", and 
supports a concert schedule of around 
120 engagements every year - or one 
public ordeal every three days. 

He was, however, marked out and 
rigorously trained as a potential solo 
violinist from a tender age, and the 
prolonged attentions of a BBC TV 
documentary team ensured that his 
growing-up process was accom- 
plished in highly public circum- 
stances. He spent nearly ten years at 
one of Britain's “specialist music 
schools" (the Yehudi Menuhin 
School), and an equally intense three 
years at the Juilliard School in New 
York. Now he has mixed views on 
this sort of hothouse education. 

“On the one hand, it might have 
stopped me being a really good pop 
musician by the time I was 20, 
because we simply didn't bear much 
pop. But the Menuhin School helped 
me develop very quickly as a classical 
musician. When I went to the 
Juilliard I found that the guys who 
had studied in Europe had more 
general appreciation of music than 
the Americans, who were much 
further ahead in the technical 
exploitation of their instruments.” 
Was there one major thing Kennedy 
learnt from the “New York" style of 
violin-playing — from Stern, 
Perhnan, Zukerman? “Yes. Those 
guys all have big ideas about music, 
and they aim ro put ibe big ideas first 
That's definitely nibbed off on me.” 



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by myself V 

BOBGEIOOF 




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Candida 

King’s Head 

Candida is a good example of 
Slaw’s mysterious capacity to 
write topical plays that some- 
how achieved lasting 
existence. 

In 1897 he judged the time 
appropriate for a pre-Rapha- 
elite comedy. He saw that 
religion was alive again “com- 
ing back even upon clergymen 
with such power that not even 
the Church of England itself 
could keep ft out.” 

He also seized the moment 
for turning Ibsen’s A Doll’s 
House inside out and showing 
a husband in the role of a 
domestic pet I do not see any 
of today's male feminists try- 
ing that one on; still less 
anyone getting the Christian 
Socialist bandwagon back on 
the road. Topically speaking, 
the play is stone dead; but the 
piece itself remains as lively as 
ever. 

What can undermine it is to.’ 
mistake it for an emotional 1 
drama. When this happens, 
Candida becomes a muscle- 
bound demonstration of 
moral one-upmanship be- 
tween a pugilistic Christian, a 
fiery young poet, a Virgin 
mother, inset in a framework 
of comedy. 

In Frank Hauser’s beauti- 
fully judged production it is 
comic through and through. 
From the first sight of Karen 
McMullen’s Prossy savagely 
licking her envelopes and 


THEATRE 


Nicholas Amefs bleary old 
Burgess subsiding under an 
avalanche of pious rhetoric, it 
is dear that the supporting 
ente rtainment is in safe hanrta 

As for the central action, 
Hauser unfolds it with maxi- 
mum darity and contrast as a 
succession of unmasking 
games; by which Morrell first 
calls Bmgess's bhif£ only to be 
caught out himself by 
Marchbanks and then by Can- 
dida herself The interest of 
the earfy scenes before her 
arrival is so strong that you 
almost forget that It is her 
play. 

David Rintoul’s Morrell is 
everything she says about him 
in the last act He looks tike a 
splendid bead boy, as much a 
sporting hero as crusading 
parson; overflowing with gen- 
erous public emotion and 
ready to switch from indigna- 
tion to open friendship on the 
smallest pretext This is an 
excellent performance along 
orthodox tines. 

The other two performances 
make a spectacular departure 
from Shavian stereotypes. The 
main shot comes from Rupert 
Graves's Marchbanks; a part 
so soaked in synthetic poeti- 
rism as to defeat most actors. 
Mr Graves, instead of trying 
to upgrade Marchbanks into 
Shelley, plays him as a callow, 
miserably shy weed, forever 




Maoreen O’Brien as Candida and David Rfmnnl as Morrell 


twisting his hands together, 
crumbling into little boy 
apologies, and stumbling over 
the furniture. 

His poetry is supposed to 
sound dreadful. What turns 
him into an active theatrical 
presence is his understanding 
of the Morrell marriage. De- 
spite his physical cowardice, 
some inner force compels him 
to keep blurting out home 
truths that make Morrell want 
to wring his neck. He does not 
wholly negotiate the stickier 
passages in the last act, but it is 
worth the price of a ticket 
simple to hear his anguished 
howl at the mention of a 
scrubbing-brush. 


St George's. Hanover Square, W1 

Friday 12 December at 7.30pm 

ALESSANDRO SCARLATTI.— g. CBS 

The popular CHRISTMAS CANTATA 
also Sinfbnia di concert! grossi Noi m D. 

GM & Tebm’. Coocciti Grand NoU in P. NoA <a B 

LONtSoN^bSWd^L^BCHESTRA deador Boy Goodman) 
Conductor Denys Darlow 

£*00, £6.00. £3/0 (TeL 01-828 6913 or at the door from 6.45pm) 


LoneSness is just one problem 

SS&-Jtt25ttSS£Stt M 

i in all parts of the world. . jHj 

I To give this help we depend entirely # .‘ItjaAfa i « 
i upon voluntary contributions. Please gtijggtehrfl 

| help us to continue the Anglican 
! Church's ministry lo se afarer s by a 
l Baacy or please send whatever you can to'-. * ^8 

' ^Missions to Seamen, Freepost, London, EC4 ABP. m 


Long wait for laughs 


SLMichaei Paternoster Royal, College HiH^ 
London EG4R 2RL. 


every penny helps 

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Sy for over eighty years. Everyper.nyhdpsa t 

suchLrknromentsTheseaneproudddpeople 

who want to stay in their own homes despite 

eV %!*s?be a friend and send a donation - today 
You cim be sure it will be used efficiently to provide 
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The flutes of Ben Travers are 
like the games of childhood. 
Play them again after many 
years and the awful feeling 
steals over you that more 
satisflictary ways of spending 
an evening exist than sliding 
down snakes or watching gal- 
lant actors working to raise 
laughter from the comic lines 
of SO years ago. 

Roger Rees, alert to these 
reservations, on the. 

presence in this story of two 
fugitives from a conceit party 
to preface the play proper with 
1 0 minutes of a fairly dire end- 
of-pier show. 

Janet Henfrey — seen only 
| the previous night calling 
down the wrathful finger of 
God upon the infant Dennis 
Potter — now rips newspaper 
into shapes. Robert East 
glumly tells jokes. A trio 
whistles in unison. By the time 
the houselights dim and the 
Pierrots have arranged the 
rarniture for Mr Edwin 

Siegfried Jerusalem’s Winr 
terreise may well go down in 
history as tiie longest, coldest, 
weariest journey m London’s 
mildest winter. For two hours 
the chill set in: tempi slow 
friKHigh to make even the 
deepest of bassi prqfondi 
q uake; a t rancfe Jike distancing 
of the voice from anything 
which might approach word- 
painting; and a numb, frozen 
deliberation in the frost-bitten 
fingers of his accompanist, 
Siegfried Mauser. 

There is little doubt that 
Schubert’s cycle was imagined 
for the baritone voice. The 
very tinta of a tenor, however, 
can bring a strange, wan light 
to the work: think of Patzak 
and Fears; think, more re- 
cently, of Schreier. 

Jerusalem was sensitive 
enough to the colour of his 
own tenor, exploiting it in the 
lightly-scented legato of his 
“Lmdenbaum”, placing high 
in the bead the howl of 
“Wasserflut's” test, agonized 
“Haus” and making the most 


Turkey Hme 

Bristol Old Vic 

Stoatt's dining room in 
Duddwater-on-Sea we have 
been softened up, taken bade 
to 1931, and now we should 
tike to laugh, please. 

The laughs are slow to 
emerge from the lace- thin 
muddle of two young men, 
hitched to the wrong young 
women, who occupy three 
shortish acts switching them 
around against a frieze of irate 
landladies baying for their 
rent and the over-familiar — 
and here under-used — bat- 
tle-axe matron and battle-axed 

spouse. 

It is a quaintly far-off world, 
a time when mugging meant 
kissing and a girl joyfully 
flicked a 1% back when 
mugged. 

In the first two acts the 
laughs are thinly, spread, one 

A touch 
too 

chilling 

| RECtTAL | 

Siegfried 
Jerusalem 
Wigmore Hall 

of the narrow, rising phrases 
of the penultimate song’s vi- 
sion of the three ghostly suns. 

But Jerusalem’s is an heroic 
tenor, too, and this rare qual- 
ity made all too little man: on 
the. cycle. However weary this 
traveller, he is perpetually 
“Oboe ruh, und stK*e rub” — 
“Without rest, seeking rest” — 
and it was thin sense of 


Patience brings reward 


As tbe one character who 
escapes the unmasking pro- 
cess, Candida is prone to 
elevation into the untarnished 
ideal of her two menfolk. That 
is not Maureen O’Brien’s ap- 
proach. She may have tbe 
faculty of enabling her lovers 
to return to childhood, but she 
is also Burgess's daughter with 
strong echoes of his east 
London speech and sly eyes 
belying her humerous mouth. 
And when she reveals that it is 
she who deals with tbe trades- 
men and refuses appeals for 
money, we know where she 
learnt how to run a household. 

Irving Wardle 


of them comes with the arrival 
of Mrs Gather, tbe Irish 
landlady, whom Robert East 
greets with: “Who is all this?” 
Delivered as here, as though 
this impossible g rammar was 
entirely sound and dear, it is a 
very funny line. 

The third act offers rather 
more material for laughter. 
Earlier, the production 
showed inert gaps between the 
beginning and the end of 
moves, as if the cast had 
expected tbe space to be filled 
with the sound of an audience 
creasing itself 

Tbe stem feet is that 30 
years of comic education has 
left us hungry for longer scenes 
than the brief exchanges Tra- 
vers gives us, impatient with 
the merely flippant, and ir- 
ritated by unmotivated 
complication. 

Jeremy 

Kingston 

torment, of feverishly re- 
newed then wasted energy, 
that was lacking in Mr 
Jerusalem's dream-tike perfor- ! 
mance. j 

It is vital to the work’s 
structure: the centrally placed 
“Die Post” simply cannot be 
delivered as second-class mail, 
and the last lines of H Im 
Dorfe” should be due enough 
to propel rather than jerk me 
voice forward into “Der 
sturmische Morgen”. 

The performance was not 
without its moments of inten- 
sity. But the voice was only 
fiifiilly able to sustain them. 
The constricted topis increas- 
ingly problematic, and the 
piano’s viewpoint was often 
idiosyncratic and myopic. 

Jerusalem and Mauser were 
not untroubled: the incessant 
whooshing of noisily turned 
translation sheets, and a door 
haunted, it seemed, by its own 
creaking will o* the wisp, were 
obvious distractions. 

Hilary Finch 


OPERA 


Samson 

Co vent Garden 


This still may not be a 
production quite to bring the 
house down, but the sage 
elegance of Elijah Moshin- 
sky’s Handel is now more 
evident than, by all accounts, 
it was last year, when Samson 
was staged as the Royal 
Opera's tercentenary tribute. 

You just have to be patient 
The first act is sluggish, even 
in this considerably oft ver- 
sion, and the grand manoeu- 
vres of architectural features 
begin to be wearisome, much 
as me might sympathize with 
Mr Moshinsky’s wish to add 
movement 

But the second act begins to 
move more purposefully, not 
only in the encounter between 
Samson and Dalila, but also in 
the verbal duel between the 
Israelite and. Philistine cham- 
pions. each wheeled about on 
a trolley. 

Then the third act, taking 
place behind great black 
doors, entirely justifies the 
decision to stage what Handel 
wrote as an oratorio. Here is 
the robust theatre of the feast 
to Dagon, seen takin g place 
through the doors under tan- 
gerine light; here also are such 
telling moments as that where 
the messenger slips out to 
bring news of the catastrophe. 

Originally the production 
was • mounted around Jon 
Vickers. Robert Tear, appear- 
ing now, is of course a Samson 
of a vary different sort: a much 
more natural Handdian, and 
highly musical in all he does, 
but not a magnificent, ruined 
victim. Shuffling about in 
chains and a grey overcoat, he 
looks more an Ivan Deniso- 
vich than a warrior for God, 
and his beautiful singing never 
quite makes up for an in- 
evitable im plausibility. 

Die Fledermaus 
Coliseum 

In tbe early years of the 
century Mahler rebuked the 
Vienna State Opera, of which 
-he was then director, with the 
remark “Tradition is 
slovenliness”. 

There is — thank heavens — 
still plenty of Viennese 
slovenliness left in the English 
National Opera’s production 
of Die Fledermaus. A setting 
that holds on to the traditional 
period and style, as Strauss 
la tended, has much to be said 
for it, however tiresome some 
■ of its comic business may 
become on repetition. 

It is especially beneficial to 
the singers. While other recent 
operetta productions here 
have tended to trap the solo- 
ists in a concept for which they 
may have no sympathy, this 
one leaves them free to de- 
velop Strauss's characters 
within the right ambiance. 
There is even real champagne. 









Robert Tear and Carol Var 

Carol Van ess repeats a 
Dalila of as much radiant 
pride as seductive allure. In 
her bearing and in her vocal 
demeanour she projects a 
believably 18tlw*ntury image 
of sensuality: an awareness of 
existing as an emblem. 

Her echo quartet with the 
three virgins was ravishing in 
this perfectly mannered way, 
and it was good to hear more 
of her brilliant upper register 
in the opening song of the 
P hilistin e Woman, and at the 
end in “Let tire bright 
seraphim”. 

Sarah Walker as Micah was 
a feeling comforter, although 
she had some trouble in 
negotiating the bottom of her 
voice. Gwynne Howell also 

The very 
best of 
tradition 

courtesy of Moet and 
Chandon. 

This year’s vintage is above 
average. Valerie Masteison, 
singing Rosalinda here for the 
first time, is tbe epitomy of 
Viennese elegance. She looks 
lovely in the period costumes 
and those early years with the 
D’Oyly Carte have left her a 
well-practised comedienne 
with a quick feeling for comic 

timing . 

Her only problem is the size 
of the house. The czardas, in 
particular, sounded vocally 
thin, as she tried to make up 
for the lack of well nourished 
tone by spitting out the con- 
sonants. Her husband Eisen- 
stein is the baritone Alan 


nr 


LONDON STANDARD DRAMA AWARD 1986 
LAURENCE OUVIER AWARD 1986 

BEST ACTRESS: LINDSAY DUNCAN 

LAURENCE OLIVIER AWARD 1986 

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liimriiDb* HOWARD DAVIE&^\m>iGwuBi BOB CROWLEY 

THEATRE I "Ow Rmcaiioi24072oo 


ess a purposeful encounter 

sounded unusually strained as 
Manoah in the fixst act, al- 
though in the third he was 
firmly back on form, seeming 
only too young to be Samson’s 
father. Donald McIntyre of- 
fers a swaggering portrait of 
the Philistine Harapha, and 
makes much of his words. 

Not for the first time, the 
orchestra sounds less than 
happy under tbe brisk, crisp 
direction of an “early music” 
specialist, Roger Norrington. 
There are phrases that go with 
a romantic suavity, but much 
is as yet sketchy or poorly co- 
ordinated. The chorus, too, 
needs to five always at the 
level of its best strength. 

Paul Griffiths 


Opie, apparently having no 
troubles with the high 
tessitura. 

The rest is much as before. 
Lillian Watson and Chris- 
topher Booth-Jones make a 
sparkling, engaging couple as 
Adele and Dr Falke, though 
her high D’s sounded a bit 
raw. Fiona Kimm is the one 
Orlovsky and Eric Shilling the 
regimental prison governor. 
The prison scene was not 
funny, but at least it is shorter 
than usual 

The conductor, Herbert 
Prikopa, milks the music 
affectionately for every drop 
of its sentiment, but stage and 
orchestra were all over the 
place in matters of ensemble. 
Viennese slovenliness in this 
department is not welcome. 

Richard Fairman 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


SPECTRUM 


Behind the closed frontiers of fear 


PRISONERS! 


On International 


OF CONSCIENCE 


Human Rights 

Day, Caroline Moorehead reports 
from the Soviet Union on the 


Jews who face jail and torture for 
trying to leave the country 


As the fourth meeting to review 
tiie Helsinki Final Act — which in 
1975 laid down, among other 
things, conditions for emigration 
from the USSR — continues this 
month in Vienna, the predicament 
of the refuseniks, the Jews who 
have applied to leave the country 
and been refused, remains 
appalling- 

Twenty-six are in prisons or 
labour camps; 25 more have 
served sentences on meaningless 
charges of“slander” or “malicious 
hooliganism'’. Some 10,000 oth- 
ers, suffering various degrees of 
persecution, wait. Though there 
has been no arrest in Moscow 
since February, a young computer 
mechanic called Albert Burshtein 
was sentenced last month in 
Leningrad to 1 5 days for “interfer- 
ing with the police and refusing to 
obey them'*. He had been caught 
phoning America from a post 
office. During the beating up that 
went with his arrest, police con- 
centrated on his legs because he 
has a painful bone condition. 

It is not difficult to meet the 
refuseniks, but it is sometimes 
unnerving, for imminent trouble 
encircles them. Though talking to 
westerners is not encouraged for 
ordinary people, those who have 
applied to leave no longer have 
anything to lose. Visitors repre- 
sent attention and therefore hope: 
those who are rarely contacted 
worry that they are being forgot- 
ten. It is a dored, intense, para- 
noid world. 

In 1979, four years after the 
Helsinki agreement was signed, 
the doors appeared to open wide 
for people who wished to emi- 
grate. That year, 51,000 Jews 
received exit visas, as did many 
hundreds of Soviet Germans, 
Baptists, Armenians and 


Yuri Kosharovsky is a wry, neat 
man with a trim beard and large 
spectacles, a radio electronics 
engineer with four children. 
Seventeen years ago he applied to 
leave, but was turned down for 
having once had access to “classi- 
fied documents”. Kosharovsky*s 
real difficulties began only when 
be started giving Hebrew lessons. 
He lost his job in a shop, to which 
he had been reduced the moment 
he filed his application; then came 
intermittent employment as a 
sweeper, cleaner and watchman. 

Soon house searches began, 
then interrogations and repeated 
short spells in detention. His son 
Mikhail was called a “dirty Jew” 
at school; he was beaten up; his 
wife was threatened; then his 
students. Four years ago, he gave 
up; the threats had become too 
intense. 

Kosharovsky has not been sent 
to labour camp: other Hebrew 
teachers, on less provocation, 
have. Sasha Kholmiansky is a 
slight, serious young man with a 
soft brown beam. He is one of the 



Sharansky’s new 
shades of grey 


H e is growing ■ 
fat and he has - 
altered his 
name, but his mind is 
as lean and hungry as V^aj 

ever and Natan F . ^ 

Sharansky (right), is . 
httttffng for hranan 
rights as fiercely as ' 
when he captoed 

world attention from ^ 

his Soviet prison cell 
under the name of 
Anatoly Shcharensky. Today he 
is in Washington to comm Quo- 
rate International Homan Rights 
Day alongside Presided Reagan; 
a year ago he marked the day by 
going on hunger strike alongside 
irisfeOow pri s on ers, and he can 
scarcely credit how much has 
happened to him in between. 

“The difference is so fantastic 
yon can't believe**, be says in his 
Jerusalem office. “It is so many 
lives away." 


E ach rimming he tries to 
ton his mind back, strag- 
gling to remember, for his 
memoirs, his 12 years in prison. 
He has found it can take four or 
fire horns to recall the at- 
mosphere of those years so that 
he can write about them. The 
daily diversions are many and, 
since his baby daughter Rachel 
arrived last month, he has found 
he no longer knows when the 
nights end and the days begin. 

He is happily dissatisfied. His 
daughter interrupts his sleep and 
his wife, A vital, tries to impose a 
diet “I enjoy everyday and every 
hour living here in freedom. But 
life is much more complicated 
and in some sense more difficult 
H»»n is prison. In prison every- 
thing is black and white and yon 
only have to keep a distance 
between yourself mid die KGB. 
Here it is necessary to five with 
the grey." 


In waiting: (from left) Oksana Kholmiansky, Yuri Kosharovsky, Ales. Joffe and Mbcha Kholmiansky 


A wish to leave 
became a mark 
of treason 


refuseniks' more recent releases 
from Siberia. In appearance seem- 
ingly too fragile to have endured 
so much, he tells bow he was 
arrested while on a Bible-reading 
holiday in Estonia, how his flat 


was searched and drags and a gun 
planted, how he went on a five- 
month hunger strike, continu- 
ously force-fed after the first 17 
days, and how he spent seven days 
in a punishment cell wearing only 
underpants, so cold that he would 
have died had he not kept moving. 

He tells his story dis- 
passionately, without the ve- 
hemence of Natasha Magarik, a 
frantic, agonizingly thin woman, 
wife of Alexey, a cellist and 
Hebrew teacher now in a “special 
regime" camp in Onnsk. Alexey, 
too, was arrested canying drugs, 
which bad been planted in a 
suitcase: In October, Natasha 
visited her husband. She found 
him injured, his lips split open, his 


body bruised from two weeks in 
the camp's Block 16, filled with 
men considered “uncorrectable” 
He had been raped many times. 

If arrests are designed to intimi- 
date, they do so effectively. There 
is something so random about the 
persecution, so sudden, that those 
who live “in refusal” remain ever 
alerL The women look strikingly 
tired, but it is the children and the 
teenagers who seem to suffer most, 
their feces pinched and wan. 

Even for those not arrested, 
intimidation is persistent and 
pervasive. From the moment the 
application for an exit visa is 
made — a long elaborate ritual, 


into force next month when, for 
the first time, precise require- 
ments for emigration are to be 
spelt oul In appearance this law is 
more restrictive than anything 
before: only imme diate family ties 
are to be considered reasons for 
emigration. But then there are 
other clauses, murkily expressed, 
other “valid and satisfactory 
reasons”. The refuseniks gather, 
question, wonder. Will it be better 
or worse? What does it mean? 


250.000 became successful final 
applications. Some 350.000 to 

400.000 never followed up their 
initial enquiries. Among the 

10.000 thought to live in the 
greyness of repeated refusal, there 
are’ perhaps 1.000 “active" in 
Moscow, another 800 in Lenin- 
grad. 


Peniacostalists. But then, just as 
suddenly, the numbers felL In 


suddenly, the numbers felL In 
1980, Jewish visas dropped to 
21,500, and in the first nine 
•months of this year to only 631. 

In place of possible freedom 
came an extraordinary campaign 
of vilification. A wish to leave 
became a mark of treason^ 
“Slander" and “anti-Soviet 
propaganda” were made reasons 
for arrest The people most ha- 
rassed among the Jews have been 


the teachers of Hebrew, among 
whom there are many stories of 


whom there are many stories 
tragedy. 


involving many permits and sig- 
natures — the entire femily sinks 
into a limbo. The low level anti- 
semitism that has marked much of 
Soviet life for so long becomes 
more overt. 

The first year “in refusal” is, 
they say. the worst. After that 
comes a strange and beady sense 
of liberation: some friends drift 
away, but new ones, fellow 
refuseniks, turn into close 
companions. “At last it becomes 
possible to behave with dignity”, 
explains Miscfaa Kholmiansky, 
Sasha's brother. “You have noth- 
ing to lose. Spiritually, morally, 
you become stronger.” 

Attention at the moment is 
focused on a new law, due to come 


‘We believe that 
only the West 
can save as’ 


“We are all big lawyers now”, says 
Alex Joffe. a central figure among 
refuseniks in Moscow. 


What is most poignant, among 
e refuseniks, is the feeline of 


There is. though, one thing on- 
which all agree: that without the 
interest of the West their case 
would be entirely lost. Nadezhda 
Fradkova, a mathematical linguist 
who applied to go to Israel, has 
since suffered eight years of 
persecution. She has just returned 
from two years in a labour camp. 
However, but for Western interest 
in her case, she is sore that she 
would still be there, victim of what 
is known as the “Andropov law”: 
Article 1S33. which allows camp 
commandants to extend 
prisoners' sentences without a 
fresh trial 


N atan believes there is an 
urgency. Things have got 
worse in the Soviet gulags 
since he was freed last February, 
be sayi There has been a damp- 
down on those who might have 
been encouraged by his release, 
with greater isolation and more 

people under arrest — only a 
relatively small number are 
Jews, he estimates. 

By his calculation there are 
now some five mfllkm people in 
labour camps with another two 
million awaiting trial and six 
million “half slaves" forced to 
work in dangerous factories or on 
construction sites. 

The Soviet Union of Mr 
Gorbachov, he says, is already 
tougher than die one he knew, 
but the new Soviet leader is so 
talented at using the western 
media that be has succeeded in 
creating the opposite impression. 


the refuseniks, is the feeling of 
confusion. Will it do more or less 
good to reapply? Is it better to be 
conciliatory or outspoken? There 
are no rules. 

No one is even quite certain 
how many refuseniks there are 
left, nor how many others would 
apply were the doors to open 
again. Of the 670,000 invitations 
sent over the last 15 years by 


Each one to whom I spoke made 
the request — politely, tryire hard 
not to sound insistent - thai their 
particular name, their particular 
story, be publicized. “We may be 
wrong, but we believe thai only 
you in the West can save us”, 
Galina Zelichenok said. For some 
of the refuseniks, driven to the 
very edge of despair, it is hard to 
see what else is left. 


He was ought in tire grey area 
last month when he agreed to 
meet an Arab jonrnafist to talk 
about I mi i mn rights found 
himself with Faisal Hussemi, a 
known supporter of the Palestine 
Liberation Organization. Furi- 
ous at a published story ria iming 
he had agreed to help the PLO, 
he paid for large newspaper 
advertisements to say: “The 
barbarous methods of this 
organization of cnt-throats vi- 
olate every hnnwn standar d.” 


In the same terms as the 
Israeli government he rejects the 
PLO as “supporters of terror* 1 
ready to kill any moderate 


Ian Murray 


• At noon today protesters will gather 
outside the Aeroflot offices in London to 
complain about a new law making 
emigration from the Soviet Union yet 
harder and about Soviet gross violations 
of the Helsinki Accord. 


• There are to be rallies, speeches, 
petitions, a protest to the Foreign Office 
in London, an attempt to presort letters 
of protest to Gorbachov in Moscow. 


• Also today, there wiD be protest 
meetings , organized by friends of the 
refuseniks, the Jews who have been 
refused permission to leave, in all major 
cities in Britain and the United States. 


• Tania Znnsbein, wife of a refnsenik 
-serving a three-year sentence in Bazoi 
in Eastern Siberia, has telephoned 
friends in the West with the words: 
“Today the voices of people in the free 
world are just a whisper. Why are they 
not shooting for us?” 


Taking dirty money to the cleaners 


M oney is one of 
the occupational 
hazards of being 
a successful drag 
trafficker in the 
United Stales. Under Ameri- 
can law, banks have to notify 
the authorities of any cash 
deposit over $10,000'yet drug 
dealing generates an estimated 
S50 to $60 billion every year. 


THE TIMES UMBRELLA 


A British customs 


man has helped 
break a money 
laundering scandal 
that has brought to 
book a racketeer 



fe. ^ 










f: ^ 




It is a problem men like 
Oscar Cuevas had a solution 
for. They offered their fidu- 
ciary skills for a percentage of 
the money they handled. 

And the scheme only foun- 
dered because of the sus- 
picions and investigatory 
skills of a British customs 
officer (see below). 

Cuevas, aged 34, is one of 
i the sons of a Bogota lawyer. 
The Cuevas femily business, • 
which is long established, is 
described as “money 
exchanging”. It has made 
them wealthy and influential 
in the area around file Colom- 
bian town of CalL 


The laundry men: Cuevas (left), Guzman Zawadski 


Early in the 1980s, some 
members of the Cuevas femily 
opened up in business as 
contractors for the Colombian 
gangs dominating the expand- 
ing cocaine trade to the 
United States. If Cuevas is to 
be believed, he brought special 
qualities to the task as a 


trained economist with a the- 
sis on South American agri- 
culture to his credit 

The money gets cleaner as it 
gets further from its source; 
shuttled through a network of 
accounts, it can eventually be 
returned to anonymous ac- 
counts belonging to its owners 
bad: in the country of origin. 

The Cuevas network, run by 
Oscar and his brother, 
Eduardo, offered to handle the 
whole operation from start to 
finish in return for between 5 
per cent and 9 per cent of the 
cash in transit They serviced 
cocaine traffickers in Miami 
and Los Angeles. 

Eventually their system in- 
cluded 36 “shell” companies 
and 49 bank accounts. Some 
of the companies led back to 
Bogota, where Castela. 
limitada, which had the telex 
answer back call sign 
“Cashco", sat like a Queen 
Bee. 


Simplicity was they key. 
Money went by a freight 
subsiduary of the Delta Krool 
group from Miami to Swiss 
bank accounts, travelling in 
sealed envelopes as high-sec- 
urity documents transported, 
unwittingly, by Brinks, the 
American security firm. 

I n 1983, one of the en- 
velopes was opened by 
Swiss authorities so the 
Colombians switched to 
couriers and the destina- 
tion switched from Switzer- 
land to London. 

Cuevas and his brother 
spent a lot of time in London 
processing the money. Oscar 
Cuevas did weO from his 
work, taking a £500 a week fiat 
in Eaton Square or staying at 
the Grosvenor House. 

The money began its jour- 
ney in Los Angeles where the 
network employed Ernesto 
Zawadski, an expatriate 


Colombian in his fifties, as 
warehouseman. Dealers or 
•traffickers would give their 
money to him. 

Zawadski would count the 
'money with special money 
counting machines and pack 
the cash in air mail envelopes, 
which he stored in a spare 
apartment near his home. The 
money would be flown to 
London in a suitcase carried 
by one of the network’s nine 
couriers. ’ 


Each of them would be 
given the special government 
forms which have to be filled 
in and presented when money 
over 510,000 is taken out of 
the United States. If the 
courier was stopped on his 
way out he could produce the 
form and claim he was acting 
legitimately, but had simply 
overlooked passing on the 
form. 

As soon as the courier had 


-s 


;M® Palestinian who 
« wants to open a di- 
3 atogne. There is, he 
.JZ says, no lack of a 
W desire in Israel to talk 

M bat a lack of anyone to 

T . talk to. “People mast 
*• find ways of talking to 
f,. . ’ ■ one another so that we 
can live together,**_he 
' - t says, without knowing 
: : : Jr. what those ways might 
be. 

Hie contradictions of firing m 
a democracy puzzle him. “Free- 
dom of expression is something 
that is very surprising. In the 
Soviet Union the right to be able 
to criticize the state is the acme 
you strive for. Here criticism of 
the government is the most cheap 
thing . It is mndh more difficult to 
criticize your friend than fee 

government.” 

In Washington he wants to 
mobilize in army of critics 
against new Soviet emigration 
rales which come into force m the 
New Year. They have been 
introduced, he says, to create the 
impression that there is a more 
liberal regime ready to help 
emigration. In reality he resists it 
will make Jewish emigration 
“practically impossible'*. 

His own criticism erf fee Israeli 
government is that it has failed to 
take a lead in patting p re ssur e on ■ 
. fee Soviet Union. “Qriet diplo- 
macy only helps to undermine 
our straggle. There can be no 
improvement in relations without 
solving fee problem of Soviet 
•Jewry.” 


£ 


left, Zawadski telephoned 
London to give the time of 
arrival for the flight Once it 
had landed. Cuevas began the 
next task of funnelling the 
money through the hanking 
system. 

He paid the cash into a 
branch of Citibank in the 
Strand. From there it was 
wired back to American ac- 
counts. Citibank staff b ecame 
familiar with Cuevas who 
appeared two or three times a 
week just before closing time. 

B ut the bank became £ 
worried by the trad- 
ing pattern, suspect- 
ing they were being 
used to provide a 
“wash account”. They closed 
the Cuevas account. 

Although they were sus- 
picious, banking law on client 
privacy prevented them going 
to the police. Cuevas moved 
to a branch of the American 
Express Bank in Grosvenor 
Square. Money from that 
account passed to a second 
account at the Republic Na- 
tional Bank of New York, 
which was used to wire the 
cash oh in to nominee 
accounts. 

It seemed perfect, but • 
thanks to a British customs 
man called Bob Snuggs it was 
all to coming c rashing down. 

Stewart Tendler 


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HOW A CUSTOMS MAN CLOSED THE LAUNDRY 


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Bob’ Snuggs is the customs 
man whose alertness led to 
the collapse of the dirty 
money operation. Patient 
work and a lucky break was 
i to show that such networks 
can be unravelled. 

In the autumn of 1984 he 
stopped a Columbian called 
Carlos Guzman, who was 
carrying $300,000 and appar- 
ently worked for a firm called 
International Business and 
Trade Inc. Guzman was Os- 
car Cuevas's main courier. 

Customs were running an 
exercise aimed at halting 
Colombian cocaine smug- 
glers from Florida. 

Guzman was allowed to go 
but Snuggs suspected ha had 
stumbled on cocaine money. 
The Colombian had begun his 
journey In Bogota and 
stopped over in Miami. A few 
months before, another 
Colombian, working for the 
same company, had been 
stopped at Heathrow. He was 


carrying $170,000. 

The US Customs were 
alerted. Guzman was ar- 
rested at Los Angeles airport, 
along with Ernesto 
Zawadski, the network's 
warehouseman. 

Alerted in London that 
something was wrong, Oscar 
Cuevas and his toother had 
flown by Concorde to New 
York and caught a flight to 
Los Angeles, which they 
readied before the agents 
could get warrants to search 
Zawadaskl's apartment, 
where they eventually 
discovered $1,083 mtffiort 
stacked In cupboards ready 
to travel. 

Zawadski’ s records took 
agents to another courier 
whose travel details led 
Snuggs to a man called 
Gomez living in Eaton 
Square. By the time the 
customs man arrived, Gomez 
— also known as Oscar 
Cuevas — had fled, but 


Snuggs found connections to 
the Citibank operation. 

Cuevas was now flitting in 
and out of London operating 
from a second London flat, 
stiO trying to operate. But a 
third courier was stopped in 
London. Cuevas flew to 
Switzerland to empty his 
accounts and the police were 
waiting. 

The Americans had 
cracked codes In ZawadskTs 
records which showed the 
existence of Swiss accounts. 
The Swiss authorities traced 
and froze them. Cuevas ar- 
rived in Geneva, unaware of 
this, to draw money. Refused 
cash, he travelled to his 
Zurich bank to find out why 
and was held. 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 128 


'I'd: 


I Make useless (8) 

5 Snatch (4) 

9 Jewelled eggs maker 

10 Swindle (S) 

11 Be superior (5) 

12 Bare people (5) 

13 Insane (5) 

15 Ecbolocarion device 
(5) 

16 Keepsake (5) 

18 Irritate (5) 

20 Departing (5) 

21 Egnxian pillar (7) 

23 Always {4) 

24 Edible soail (8) 


ri 

ifV-.i .[‘fir 

: hi!’’— i- 1 ' 


In all, $3 minion was recov- 
ered — but the customs 
officers know $25 mTOion 
moved through tiie system in 
five months in 1984. The 
search is stM going on along 
the many conduits. 


1 Make less hard (6) 

3 SeamanO)™™ ^ 8 m 15 Wen-groomed C6) 

4 Casement doors (6,7) u Alienate /R? **** ® *7 Coffin (6) 

6 Sunk f4) W Yearn (4) 

14 Agreeabfe(8) 22 Epoch(3) 




SOLUTION TO NO 1 127 


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oil-? 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


WEDNESDAY PAGE 


Empress of 
all she 
surveys 

Starting a business is one thing, bmjrfingr an 
empire is another. Sally Brompton met three 
women who thought big and made it big 

M aureen Foers decided and if I wanted people to be able to 
to Start up her own work for me or my clients I ought to 
a ^ r ^ was make provision for young 
fired from her job as children” She bought a former 

minimal ft oYnm.iI T . > ». 


RmDrinkmtar 


M aureen Foers decided 
to stan up her own 
business after she was 
fired from her job as 
managing executive of 
an employment agency for being 
“too ambitious”. Her aunts lent her 
£300, she rented an office in Hull for 
£200 a quarter and hired someone 
to help her two mornings a week. 

Fifteen years on, her company is 
the largest private commercial 
training organization in the coun- 
try, incorporating four different 
enterprises, with an annual turn- 
over of more than £250,000. 

The fact that she was ambitious, 
as well as possessing the necessary 
energy and experience, earmarked 
47-year-old Foers for success. It 
was, however, her ability to di- 
versify which enabled her to excel. 
For Foers belongs to a rare breed of 
women Who have the courage to 
utilize their skills in more than a 
single direction and who, by so 
doing, create not just a business but 
an empire. 

They thrive, these empresses, on 
a cross-section of challeng es without 
losing touch with their original base. 
Their empires can be large or small; 
what counts is the fact that they 
have the nerve to indulge their 
imaginations and the skill to come 
out on top. 

Maureen Foers’s resourcefulness 
led her from one bright idea to the 
next. “Having opened the staff 
bureau, I found I had more jobs 
than people, so I decided that if I 
couldn't find the person to fit the 
job Td create the person”, she says. 
She re- trained, for nothing, women 
who had quit their careers and then 
found than work afterwards. She 
then discovered that while some 
companies wanted work done only 
occasionally, there were women 
who wanted to work just a few hours 
a day; so by employing them herself 
on a temporary basiSjshe was able to 
offer organizations a complete of- 
fice service ranging from typing and 
book-keeping to photocopying and 
taking telephone messa g es. 

Then she decided to go into the 
direct mail business, providing 
specialist facilities for bulk mail, 
direct mail, direct mail advertising 
and- sending out companies' 
marketing literature. 

At this stage, she had another 
idea. “I was under the impression 
that there was a big need for creches 


and If I wanted people to be able to 

work for me or my clients I ought to 
make provision for young 
children.” She bought a former 
children's nursery and reopened it 
as a creche catering for around 30 
toddlers. To her surprise the vast 
majority of people who used ft were 
not working mothers, but simply 
parents who wanted to pursue their 
social lives or have a rest from their 
young offspring. 

Foers’s empire blossomed — 
based primarily on her employment 
agency — until the mid-seventies, 
when the economic depression 
meant there were no jobs in the 
north. “The bottom totally feD out 
of my staifbureau”, she recalls, “but 
because people were cutting bade on 
their staffs my office services and 
mailing services started to develop 
quite considerably.” Even so, she 
had a “horrendous” two years — 
“but if you can survive that sort of a 
crisis you can go on forever**. 

All of a sudden the training side of 
her business took off because with 
so few jobs around, only well- 
qualified applicants had a chance. 
So she stalled charging to train 
people, but now does her utmost to 
find them a job free subsequently. 

Looking at her career objectively 
she says: “I should probably have 
concentrated on erne thing, but if I 
had I wouldn’t still be around. I'm 
certain about that It's very rare that 
all four of my enterp ris es are 
crippled at the same time: At least 
two, if not three, are always very 
healthy.” 

S ylvia Holder laid the 
foundations of her empire 
in the tiny spare bedroom of 
her North London flat. She 
was 37, with an impressive 
track record in public relations in 
Britain, Hong Kong and South 
Africa, bat admits she was daunted 
at the p ros p ec t of starting up in 
business on her own in London. 

She and her partner each invested 
£250 in the company and began 
writing letters to everyone they 
' could think o£ “Even though I was 
nervous I was still fairly arrogant 
about it”, recalls Holder, now 47. 
“It never really occurred to me that 
we might have to sit there twiddling 
our thumbs.” 

Their first PR account, a leading 
Chelsea restaurant, came from 
answering a classified advertise- 



Whose fight is 
it, anyway? 


Violence between 
spouses, says 
Barbara Amiel, 
is a problem for 
them to resolve 


Perhaps I am alone in this, but ^ spouse's testimony. But in 
1 couldn't help feeling some faci, most spouses who do not 
empathy with the silly spec- want to testify against their 
tacle Mr and Mr Shilton husbands still do not; they go 
made of themselves recently, jam the witness box as hostile 
There but for the grace of witnesses, rev ealing as little as 
being a sound sleeper, I they possibly ran 


For many of us, this was a 
truly black moment both in 
the development of British 
jurisprudence and in the integ- 
rity of the family. For hun- 
dreds of years, society had 
valued the strength of the 
family unit to such an extent 
that it was felt better a man go 
innocent of higi treason - 
never mind socking his wife - 
rather .than be convicted on 
his spouse's testimony. But in 
fact, most spouses who do not 
want to testify against their 
husbands still do not; they go 
into the witness box as hostile 


of success: Sylvia Holder (left) and Lindsay Swan, empire builders in PR and sandwiches 


mem in The Times. A Mayfair 
hairdresser and Trusthouse Forte 
followed “I suppose a lot of it was 
simply having the confidence” 
recalls Holder. “We were extremely 
lucky but didn’t realise it” 

Her partner left after having a 
baby and Holder joined forthwith 
Lindsay Swan, with whom she had 
worked in South Africa. “We never 
wanted a Mayfair-type of success 
with a big staff”, says Holder, “but ft 
mattered very much that Holder 
Swan succeeded — and that we 
succeeded by doing the kind of work 
we enjoy, which is basically travel 
PR.” 

They moved to an office in north 
west London which had a leaking 
roof bat enough space to employ a 
secretary — which gave them the 
idea of starting up an answering 
service. “We really didn't have 
enough work to keep a secretary 
occupied full-time, ami as we could 
never leave the office unattended it 
occurred to us that we might as well 
take other people's calls at the same 
time,” says Holder. “It did seem a 
bit like money fra* old rope.” 

They advertised the service in 
Yellow Pages and '’business 
blossomed — not enough to keep us 
going on its own, but we didn’t want 
it to become too huge”. Today the 
service has around 50 clients who 


pay an average subscription of £18 a 
month. 

Spurred on by the simplicity and 
success of the answering service, 
they decided to buy a sandwich bar. 
They paid £7,000 for the five-year 
lease on a sandwich bar off Fleet 
Street “We decided to make it a bit 
more upmarket with decent bread, 
home-made soup and good meals,” 
says Swan, aged 33. 

Within weeks turnover trebled, 
but then they began having prob- 
lems with the people who were 
managing it. “It soon dawned on us 
that you have to be there yourself to 
run something like that property”, 
says Holder. “We still reguded PR 
as our priority but we were spending 
every weekend making soup. 

“I remember once we got a call 
from the sandwich bar manager 
who had cut bis arm and wanted us 
to rush down there just as we were 
about to run a press conference fora 
major client. Things like that hap- 
pened all the time and PR always 
won.” 

After two years they decided they 
had had enough and sold the bar for 
more than twice the sum they had 
originally paid for it “Overall we 
lost about £1,500 on the entire 
episode,” says Swan. “It taught us 
that you run your own show — 
which is what we do in PR.” 

By now their PR business was 


flourishing, concentrated mainly 
around the travel industry. Their 
accounts included the English Tour- 
ist Board, a safari tour operator, a 
consortium of South Coast seaside 
resorts and the Chichester Theatre. 


E ven so, the temptation to 
extend their talents re- 
mained, and since they 
already had the necessary 
infrastructure they de- 
cided to start a humorous greetings 
card company producing initially 
over 100,000 raids, which they sold 
through agents assisted by their own 
publicity. With their empire 
expanding they began a weekly 
publication called Travel Commu- 
nique , charging other travel PRs a 
fee to insert their clients' press 
releases, and then sending it to 
Britain's top 500 travel writers. 

While ixiblic relations, which 
now brings them a turnover of 
£100,000 a year, remains their first 
love, Holder admits; “I suppose I’ve 
always bad this insatiable appetite 
to flirt with something else although 
Lindsay is more cautious. What 
matters to us more than anything is 
that we’re doing things we enjoy — 
and that goes for the type of PR 
account we handle, too. The great 
thing about being on your own is 
that you can choose.” 

® TlnM Hwp^W Ud 19B8 


thought, go L 

It seems that Mr Peter 
Shilton, the 37-year-old 
Southampton goalkeeper who 
has also captained England, 
awarded himself a late night 
out after his team finally 
managed a first division win. 
His early morning return was 
not greeted enthusiastically by 
his wife. Sue, and after an 
exchange which may have 
involved some physical blows. 
Mis Shilton made a 999 rail 
and Mr Shilton spent a few 
hours in the local police cells. 

Come morning, when Mr 
S hilton might have been ex- 
pected to lay assault charges, 
she was repentant. “I did not 
understand the implications 
of my actions”, she is reported 
to have said. “I regret them 
now.” The police sent the 
goalkeeper home, and he was 
later photographed snuggling 
up to his wife: “There was an 
incident — I'm not denying 
that”, the tabloids had Shilton 
confessing, “but my wife and I 
are very happy together.” 

For my money, whatever 
domestic violence took place 
between the Shiltons is their 
own business. The feet that 
they called in the police and 
spent some of my tax pounds 
having an enforced cooling off 
period is unfortunate, but at 
least the state acted in a 
reasonably benign role. Of 
course, there is a different sort 
of domestic violence for ug- 
lier, frightening, and sys- 
tematic which requires a more 
serious response from society. 


This being so, the emphasis 
in obtaining domestic vi- 
olence convictions has now 
shifted to the police. In the 
past, the police have been 
allowed great discretion in 
charging spouses with assault. 
It was this discretionary factor 
that saved Mr Shilton's neck. 
Now there is a movement 
afoot to put the onus on foe 
police to lay charges regardless 
of whether or not spouses 
change their minds after the 
black eye subsides. 

Whether this is effective or 
not is anyone's guess. The 
Americans say that cases of 
domestic violence are reduced 
now that the police are readier 
to lay charges, but this may be 
because fewer people call the 
police when they need help in 
cooling down a situation. 

Paula Youens 



Not many wives want to see. 


The problem is that some of their husbands in jafl. 


foe new initiatives now being 
proposed to deal with it may 
create more problems than 
they solve. 


To start encouraging the 
police to lay chaiges when 
spouses are unwilling to do so 
seems to me an ill-advised 


I have always felt that one of policy. Allowances ought to be 
the great myths of our time is made for the fact that people 


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A round-up of news, 
views and nformation 


Twinning 

ways 

Multiple births are mare com- 
mon now than ever before, 
rtwlre to fertility drugs and 
test-tube tediniqnes. Bnt while 
twins may spell twice the 
happiness for a new mother, 
they can also be doable the 
trouble; two babies need extra 
equipment, clothing and often 
the entistment of paid help to 
assist an overworked mum. 
The Twins and Multiple 
Berths Association exists to 
give support and encourage- 
ment to those harassed par- 
ents, as weO as to pro m ote 
understanding within the 
medical pro fe ssion of foe 
problems of nmftiple births. 
The association can be con- 
tacted c/o Mrs Dee Hoseason, 
54 Broad Lane, Hampton, 
Middx TW12 3BG. 

Tycoon tips 

“Most housewives are very 
good cooks, very good at 
sewing, very good at knitting 

and at amusing chUdren — aH 
these things are fn short 
supply in Britain and can be 
put into a business if only you 
think about it” That is the 
view of Patricia Grant who 
put her own homely skBis to 
good use by setting up a 

From Christina McLelian, 
MusrveUHiU, London. 

Unlike Barbara Amiel 
(Wednesday Page, November 
19), I am a woman who has a 
child. I am also a solicitor who 
deals with a very large amount 
of matrimonial work, includ- 
ing child maintenance 

by wives and ex-wives. Bar- 
bara Anders article ignores 
several important fads of 
modern life. . 

She quotes the husband in 
the case of Paten versos 
British Pregnancy Advisory 
Trustees and Another, who 
attempted to prevent his wife 
having mo abortion by 
of injunction, as saying; “All 1 
am asking her to do is to have 
it painlessly delivered and 
then band it over to me to be 


freezer business. Her com- 
pany, Norfrost Freezers, had 
a turnover of £5.9 million in 
1985 and she employs 120 
people. 

Her skffls have made her a 
female tycoon, and an Insight 
into how she has made it to 
-the top in business is to be 
found hi a book pubfished this 
week caBed, aptly. Female 
Tycoons (Rosters, £4.95}. Au- 
thor Rosemary Burr has inter- 
viewed Anita Brodtfick, Prue 
Leith, Patricia Grant and tone 
others in an attempt to un- 
earth what makes successful 
businesswomen tide, and 
there is ample advice for the 
ambitious on how to join 
them. 

Quote me . . . 


French polish I ( Friday 



French skincare experts 
Lancdme have added luxury 
hair care to their comprehen- 
sive range of body products. 
The Fluance One, which costs 
from £6.75 to £12.50, in- 
dudes two shampoos, a 
Satin Milky Conditioner, and 
the highlight of the range, 
Creme Substantielle, an eff- 
ective revitalizing condition- 
ing treatment 

Staying put 

The appeal of foreign travel 
bay become sli^fedy tarnished 
in the face of sbdsng exchange 
rates — so don’t overlook home 
attractions. The British Tour- 
ist Authority has just pub- 
lished its annual 
recommendations of country 
hotels, restaurants and 
guesthouses in the 1987 Com- 
mended Guide; find it at 
bookshops, or by post from foe 
Finance Department BTA, 
Thames Tower, London W6 
9EL (£4.50 in clu di ng p&p). 

Quick cooks 


The mothers 
who are 
giving birth 
to death 


that modem society is indif- 
ferent to domestic violence. It 
is true that long ago women 
were regarded as chattels; but 
violence against one's spouse 
was only condoned in times 
when defacing Westminster 
Abbey or consorting with 
gypsies was punishable by a 
penalty close to death. Today 
the shockingly light punish- 
ments for spousal assault are 
often simply another example 
of foe permissive sentencing 
attitudes that have affected all 
crimes in the past 20 or 30 
years. 

Some people believe that 
the solution to ending vi- 
olence between married cou- 
ples was to make it legal for 
husbands and wives to testily 
against each other in court and 
so, in 1984. spouses were 
made compellable witnesses. 


have different sorts of relat- 
ionships with one another, 
some of which may well be 
more volatile than others.' 
Cbmmon sense suggests that if 
the incident is not severe or 
does not involve weapons, it is 
far more conducive to a good 
relationship to let the spouses 
resolve foe situation by 
themselves. 

This does not mean a policy 
ofbenign neglect to all domes- 
tic rows; counsel couples by ah 
means, encourage the tes- 
timony of battered wives and; 
give meaningful guarantees of 
safety to women who are, 
really scared of their hus- 
bands. But an anns-length 
attitude to the complexities of 
foe human heart, as the 
Shiltons would probably 
agree, is eminently sensible. 

©TtoBsMew ap ap OT Ltd 1386 


TO TEAR OUT OUR SHOP-FRONT, 
WE’RE BEING FORCED TO TEAR 
UP OUR PRICE LIST-r-r— , 


“Denis can say many of the 
things I could not possibly say. 
I sometimes roar with buqghier 
when I hear his views canting 
oat into foe ope*. It's te rr ifi c, 
because they are foe views so 
many people have and I think 
that, while I have to be a bit 
more drcamspect as Prime 
Minister, thank goodness 
someone has expressed them” 
— Margaret Thatcher. 


TALKBACK 


brought up in the bosom of a 


tor who ChiUnB is not 
amount and is quite dangerous. In my 
fndnd- case, foe nain was awamag in- 
! claims able. It could do enormous 
s. Bar- psychological damage to a 
ignores woman to be farcei to go 
ids of through such an experience. 

The words of foe father m 

band in the Patoa case also caused me 
versos wry amnsement When be 
dvisory sp®ie of foe baby being 
r, who “brought np in foe bosom of a 
tls wife huge, loving family" he was 
means not referring to an upbringing 
;“AHI by hunsetf. Despite a change 
to have in fashion and male attitudes 
d and to parenting, when, a baby is 
^ to be born out of wedlock or when a 


Arthritis can easily turn 
the joy of cooking into a 
nightmare. The charity Arthri- 
tis Care has compfled a 
cookbook of practical, quick 
recipes - mainly tasty 
combinations of convenience 
foods. Priced £2.95, available 
from WH Smith and other 
leading newsagents, its 
simplicity is ideal for anyone 
with a long-term disability - 
and the dever easel design 
means it stands up for easy 
reading. 

Josephine Fairley 

marriage breaks op, in the 
overwhelming majority of 
cases foe respoasuntity for 
npbrmgiDg rests with the 
woman. 

The excitement of prospec- 
tive fathers at the birth of their 
baby is freqaentiy short-lived 
and very rarely develops into a 


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for them to be prepared to 
make the sacrifices necessary 
to assume the major or sole 
responsibility. 

Another point of which Ms 
Amiel seems to be unaware is 
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THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Second 

thoughts 

Did Mrs Thatcher, despite TV- 
am’s opinion poll, suffer a mo- 
mentary crisis of confidence 
yesterday? In her address to the 
European Parliament in Stras- 
bourg she noted with pleasure that 
she was the first European head of 
government to serve two six- 
month terms as president of the 
EEC council of ministers. An early 
draft of her speech reveals that she 
originally intended to add that she 
was looking forward to a third 
term in 1992; in the event she 
passed on to other matters. Has 
the Wright affair clouded her 
conviction that she can lead the 
Tories to another election victory? 

Smoked out 

Sacked from his £1 1.500 commu- 
nity liason officer job with 
Knowsley council, stripped of his 
Labour Party membership and 
deputy leadership of Liverpool , 
council (worth £4,000 in allow- 
ances), Derek Hatton now faces 
further h umilia tion. Richard Pine, 
Liberal deputy leader on Uver- 
- pool council, is concerned that 
Hatton is still picking up £3,000 a 
year as chairman of the Mersey- 
side Fire Service Joint Board. 
Hatton is supporting industrial 
action over the loss of 88 jobs in 
the fire service resulting from a 
recent reorganization. Next week. 
Pine will propose that Liverpool 
council withdraw Hatton's nom- 
ination to the board. “The Labour 
councillors have promised to have 
nothing more to do with Hatton. 
Since he is no longer part of the 
Labour group he cannot possibly 
be its nominee.” Pine says. 

Really... 

It has taken 400 years, but 
someone has got his revenge on 
Sir Walter Raleigh for defacing 
Queen Elizabeth's palace windows 
by scratching them with amorous 
messages. Less creative vandals 
have made two large hides in a 
stained glass window in St 
Margaret’s Church, Westminster, 
dedicated to Sir Walter. 

Name game 

Members of the Commons select 
committee on the Treasury and 
Civil Service are rubbing their 
eyes over the name plate on the 
desk of their chairman. They are 
convinced it used to read Terence 
Higgins. Now it says T.L. Higgins. 
Could Higgins, noted for his 
sympathetic attitude to homosex- 
ual rights, be embarrassed at 
sharing his name with an Aids 
charity? “There has been no 
change at all," Higgins says. I 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 

North: a hero traduced 


BARRY FANTONI 



‘May I request a brief recess, 
mind? It seems a Mr Kin nock 
is on die telephone' 

In the know 

Sir Edward Gardner’s private 
member’s bill proposing a British 
human rights bill has attracted 
interest from an unlikely quarter. 
On Monday he was visited by 
Valeri Krasnov, a Soviet embassy 
official, who told him of the 
Kremlin’s plan to stage an inter- 
national conference on humani- 
tarian issues and asked if the 
relevant papers on the Gardner 
bill could be sent to the Soviet 
ambassador in Vienna. “And 
could you tell us the British 
government's reaction to "the 
conference?” asked Krasnov. “I 
suggested he might better be able 
to inform me,” says Gardner. 

Eye to eyeball 

I gather that the compilers of 
Robert Maxwell's spoof mag Not 
Private Eye — out today — had 
planned to give former Private Eye 
editor Richard Ingrams a taste of 
his own medicine by publishing 
his home number. They were 
dissuaded, I hear, only after Peter 
Jay, Maxwell's right-hand man, 
received a call from I ngrams — a 
pal of Jay’s from Oxford days. Eye 
editor Ian Hislop says: “Ingrams 
threatened, if provoked, to print 
the numbers of all Maxwell's 
family, his doctor and dentist" 

Off the cuff . 

Ronald Reagan’s plummeting 
popularity does not seem to have 
affected interest in one of his old 
dinner jackets — now on offer 
through a classified ad in the San 
Francisco Chronicle. The owner, 
sports writer Greg Wooldridge, 
bought the jacket made by Albert 
Maria ni, in a Beverley Hills 
second-hand shop for S5. He tells 
me that offers of up to $900 are 
pouring in but he is holding out 
“Ten thousand seems like a tidy 
sum.” Odd that the jacket should 
have been thus neglected: one of 
Nancy’s first telephone calls after 
the assassination attempt on her 
husband was to Mariani ordering 
a new suit PHS 


Washington 

Of all the lurid features in the 
tapestry of Contragate, perhaps 
the most revealing is the behav- 
iour of the Republican Party 
establishment, which owes all it 
has and all it is to Ronald Reagan. 

| With a few honourable exceptions 
— Senators Strom Thurmond and 
Ted Stevens come to mind — they 
have all gone virtually into hiding. 

Men wbo are Chairman This 
and Senator That only because of 
Reagan are now making their 
fbture support of this embattled 
president conditional on their 
con-negotiable demand that be 
sack some of his oldest and closest 
friends. 

Before the midterm elections 
only one month ago, this 75-year- 
old president was travelling the 
nation as no other [Resident 
before him. fighting to save the 
Senate for these selfsame incum- 
bent Republicans. Among those 
he personally supported were 
some who had cut and nin on him 
in every major engagement he las 
fought since he came to the White 
House. 

Is this how they repay the leader 
wbo has done more for the 
Republican Party than any Ameri- 
can since Theodore Roosevelt, 


by Patrick J. Buchanan 


who brought it back from Water- 
gate to become the party of vision 
and opportunity, the party of 
Middle America and the young — 
when ail the pundits were saying it 
was finished for a generation? 

If elemental loyalty cannot con- 
vince these Republicans to stand 
up and speak ont for Reagan, what 
about basic self-interest? Do they 
truly think the investigative en- 
gines of a hostile Congress and the 
artillery of an adversary press are 
again being wheeled into position 
simply “to get at the truth"? Do 
they seriously believe those pious 
declamations from the Demo- 
cratic left that “we must not have 
another failed presidency”? That 
is exactly what they want: the 
destruction of a Republican presi- 
dency for the second time within a 
generation 

“This is the most fun we’ve had 
since Watergate,” Ben Bradlee, 
editor of the Washington Past, is 
reported as saying. Bradlee is 
echoed by columnist Michael 
Kinsley: “The fall of Reagan is a 
laughing matter. The only irritat- 
ing aspect of the otherwise delight- 
ful collapse of the Reagan 


administration is the widespread 
insistence that we must all be 
poker-faced about iL” 

“People in my position have 
been known to ran for cover," 
declares Republican Senator Rudy 
Bosch witz in one of the great 
understa t ements of the episode. 

In recent years, Republican 
candidates have taken to {Rattling 
at election time about their devo- 
tion to “family values”. The first 
of those values, surely, is family 
loyalty. So when a mob gathers in 
the front garden, howling for the 
bead of the household, the sons do 
not force him to sit at a table and 
write a list ofhis “mistakes”. They 
start firing from the upper floors. 

But we are a nation founded in 
law, and Colonel Oliver North has 
broken the law, comes the Repub- 
lican retort; surely, we cannot 
condone that- But we don't know 
that North did in fact break the 
law. 

We do know of some Americans 
who broke the law: those wbo, a 
century ago, ran escaped slaves up 
tbe Underground Railroad to 
Canada — they broke the Law, so 
did Franklin Roosevelt when he 


secretly ordered American 
destroyers *o hunt down German 
submarines in the Atlantic during 
the Second World War and to 
relay the information to the 
British fleet; so did those Ameri- 
cans who ran guns to the Jews in 
Palestine in 1947 and 1948. 

But how are they seen today? 
Not as law breakers bat as heroes. 
And Oliver North isa hero, a man 
who saw further than othe rs and 
took risks with his own career 
because he knew that is helping 
the anti-Sandinista army in Nica- 
ragua be was braying time for his 
own distracted and indifferent 
countrymen — “hold the fort 
alone, till those who are half blind 
are half ready.” 

Oliver North is now disparaged 
as a “cowboy” a rogue, a “soldier 
of fortune” by our lords t empora l 

in Congress and our lords spiritual 

in the press. Well, the day the 
United States ceases to produce 
soldiers of the kidney and spleen 
flnrf heart and soul of Oliver North 
is the day it begins an irreversible 
decline. 

The president was right Oliver 
North is an American hero; and I 
am proud to know him as a friend. 
The writer is White House 
communications director. 


Alastair Kilmarnock 

A strategy 
for Aids 


Andrew McEwen on the .dilemma facing Nato’s foreign ministers 


Rarely has an isue of such 
fundamental importance failed so 
completely td penetrate the 
consciousness of the western pub- 
lic as that facing Nato tomorrow. 

The foreign minis ters of the 
alliance meet in Brussels to con- 
sider the future of conventional 
arms reductions talks. The big 
question is how to respond to a 
Warsaw Pact proposal that one 
million troops should be with- 
drawn from Europe, from tbe 
Atlantic to the Urals. Presented in 
those simplistic terms the ques- 
tion seems to answer itself Who 
could be against it; who would 
dare speak against it? 

Indeed, has the point been 
conceded already? There are those 
who argue that as Nato took the 
initiative last May, It can hardly 
backtrack now. Meeting in Hali- 
fax. Nova Scotia, the North 
Atlantic Council called for “bold 
new steps in the field of con- 
ventional arms control”. The - 
Warsaw Pact responded with its 
“Budapest Appeal" which greatly 
raised the stakes. In reality, how- 
ever, it is the Brussels meeting that 
will determine whether Nato is 
ready to talk in such ambitious 
terms. 

Many believe that the issues at 
stake are as important as those 
confronted at the Reykjavik sum- 
mit. Nuclear arms control may 
bold a monopoly of glamour but, 
without parallel progress in con- 
ventional force reductions, it is 
unlikely to enhance European 
security. 

Lord Carrington, the Nato sec- 
retary general, commented in an 
interview this week: “No one 
seems to worry about con- 
ventional weapons any more. So 
many nuclear disarmers seem 
concerned only with nuclear 
weapons; they almost seem to 
suggest that conventional warfare 
is acceptable. No one who lived 
through the last world war would 
agree”. 

The risk at Brussels is that more 
time will be spent on forums than 
fundamentals. Before focusing on 
the forum for arms talks, the 
ministers need to consider 
whether the West can risk thinking 


Can we trust 
Moscow over 
troop cuts? 



along the lines proposed in the 
Budapest Appeal at all. 

After 13 years of stalemate in 
the existing mutual balance force 
reductions talks (MBFR) in Vi- 
enna there are those who argue 
that both the Halifax and the 
Budapest lines of thought are 
wildly over-ambitious. 

George Shultz, Sir Geoffrey 
Howe and 14 other foreign min- 
isters have to decide whether 
Gorbachov essentially wants 
agreement or not If so, the 
Budapest Appeal will be wel- 
comed; if not, the West risks being 
drawn into a public relations trap. 

A considerable leap of faith will 
be required at Brussels to over- 
come two fundamental objections. 
First, the Soviet Union has always 
opposed all attempts to verify 
conventional arms reductions. It 
is on this issue that the MBFR 
talks are currently deadlocked. As 
the Vienna talks involve only 
token force reductions, how can 
the West hope for a breakthrough 
when a million troops are in 
question? 

Secondly, there is strong but 
unproven suspicion in Whitehall 
that Moscow may have hidden 
motives for proposing such dra- 
matic cuts. Last December Nato 
submitted proposals designed to 
unblock the MBFR talks, which 
for years had been deadlocked 
over differences between Nato’s 
estimate of the number of Warsaw 
Pact troops in Central Europe and 
the Pact’s own figures. 

Without agreement on what was 
called the “data question”, it was 
impossible to name a starting 
point from which troop cuts 


should be counted. The new 
British-sponsored Nato plan swal- 
lowed these doubts and switched 
the focus to verification. White- 
hall analysts now say the Pact is in 
a comer if it is in earnest it has no 
reason to refuses 

Tbe same sources see the Buda- 
pest Appeal as a diversion in 
which the key issue is the forum 
for future talks. Hie Appeal 
offered three suggestions. O ne was 
an expanded version of MBFR, 
the other two involved offshoots 
of the 35-nation CSCE (Con- 
ference on Security and Co- 
operation in Europe) forum which 
grew out of the 1975 Helsinki 
conference initiated by Brezhnev. 

Subsequent statements by 
Eduard Shevardnadze, the Soviet 
foreign minister, have shown a 
wish to wrap up MBFR and switch 
the talks to CSCE or another 
forum generally known as CDE-2. 
The latter would be modelled on 
the Stockholm talks which last 
year produced an agreement to 
give advance warning of military 
exercises. 

Tbe point made by the sceptics 
is that by “moving the goalposts” 
Moscow avoids conceding the 
vital verification issue. Switching 
to a forum that includes non- 
aligned nations, Moscow could 
reasonably hope for a more 
sympathetic attitude on verifica- 
tion. The argument is certain to 
appear unduly suspicious and 
over-technical. 

But the sceptics have a second 
point They see Moscow’s tactics 
on nuclear and conventional arms 
proposals as part of a single 
strategy to gain the moral high 


ground in western public opinion, 
pointing toGorbachov’s refusal to 
accept a nuclear arms deal at 
Reykjavik unless Washington 
abandoned the Strategic Defence 
Initiative. 

Since the summit it has become 
dear that Moscow, Western 
Europe and Washington could 
agree on far-ranging nuclear cuts 
without co m promising tbe British 
and French deterrents and with- 
out stripping away the American 
strategic nod ear umbrella. 

Lord Carrington Is not among 
the sceptics tat he did declare 
himself troubled by the >mlr with 
SDL Without sharing tire view 
that Moscow’s refusal so far to 
accept verification within . the 
MBFR talks und ermin es its 
credibility. Lord C arring t on be- 
lieves it would be dangerous folly 
to accept any agreement dial 
excluded iL 

“The whole problem is one of 
distrust on both sides. The only 
way you can build up confidence 
is through a gre e m e n t s in which it 
is c er t ain that neither side can 
cheat. Verification is foe nub of 
die issue”, he said. 

Lord Carrington, in common 
with high Whitehall sources, be- 
lieves that the Budapest Appeal 
will find a positive response at 
Brussels, that there will then 
be a long wrangle over the forum 
issue. The ministers will not want 
to end the MBFR talks, he thinks , 
but win see them as the wrong 
forum for an Atiantic-to-tbe-Urals 
discussion. The need to include 
France, which has always refused 
to have anything to do with 
MBFR, lends support to the CSCE 
or CDE-2 suggestions. 

Whitehall sources predict that it 
will not be posable to make Soviet 
acceptance of verification a pre- 
condition for talks within a new 
forum. The best that can be 
expected is “good verification 
language” in foe terms of ref- 
erence. The importance of Brus- 
sels, say foe sceptics, is that it may 
be the West’s last chance to 
prevent verification slipping from 
its grasp. 

The author is Diplomatic Corres- 
pondent of The Times. 


Cory’s peace talks balancing act 


President Corazon Aquino of the 
Philippines today embarks on foe 
first attempt to bring about a 
negotiated settlement to a com- 
munist insurgency in Asia since 
foe end of foe war in Vietnam. 

If both sides follow the schedule 
on which they have agreed, the 
guns of foe New People’s Army 
(NPA) and the Philippines armed 
will fail silent at the start of a 60- 
day renewable ceasefire. It will be 
a preliminary to negotiations on a 
comprehensive peace settlement 
which could end the insurgency 
which has plagued foe Philippines 
for the past 17 years. 

Mrs Aquino is the third leader 
to fry to talk foe guerrillas out of 
the hills. Twice before — in 1948, 
under President Quirino, and in 
1954, under President Magsaysay 
— the government sought peace 
with foe Hukbalahap, foe Stalinist 
People's Liberation Army, from 
which the current Maoist Com- 
munist Party of foe Phili ppines 
(CPP) broke away in the mid- 
1960s. 

The CPP and its military wing, 
the NPA, grew out of a clandestine 
meeting north of Manila in 1968. 
That meeting gave birth to what is 
today tbe most formidable and 
durable of communist movements 
in South-East Asia. It ha« in- 
fluence beyond its relatively s mall 
size with only about 23.000 
followers, about half of whom are 
aimed guerrillas, in a country of 
55 millions. 

Already, however, Mrs 
Aquino's interim ceasefire agree- 


ment is balancing on a knife-edge. 
Tbe NDF recently asked her to 
revoke foe claim by General 
Ramos, tbe army chief of staff 
and foe new defence minister, 
Rafael Deto, that the army still has 
the right to carry out patrols in 
rebel-held territory and arrest 
guerrillas bearing armsThe insur- 
gents insist that the ceasefire 
agreement precludes such action 
by either side, but the army is 
adamant that it must be able to 
maintain law and order. 

Although the dismissal of Juan 
Ponce Entile effectively rules out 
any military coup in the near 
future, foe risk wil] reappear. 
While Enrile has been forced to 
retire from national politics he 
almost certainly plans to return. 
Convinced that he, not Mrs 
Aquino, was responsible for 
overthrowing Ferdinand Marcos, 
he feels deprived of his rightful 
place at foe top. Since his dis- 
missal, he has also privately 
accused Ramos of underestimat- 
ing foe exent of hostility wi thin 
the army to a negotiated settle- 
ment with the communists. 

Although Ramos has officially 
expressed the army’s support for 
the Aquino peace initiative, the 
army remains riddled with pro- 
Marcos, pro-Emile and anti- 
Aquino elements ready to exploit 
any pretext to sabotage the nego- 
tiations. Disaffected officers will 
not be short of oportunities to 
provoke a renewed outbreak of 
hostilities. 

The negotiations will have to 





Mrs Aquino: still having to take 
the army into account 

find solutions to the problems of 
integrating foe NDF into the 
fabric of national politics, deal 
with the catalogue of past abuses 
by both the rebels and the army 
and decide the future of foe US 
dark and Subic military bases. 
These discussions are likely to be 
conducted against a background of 
assassinations and low level 
confrontations which each side 
will attempt to blame on the other. 

Despite her limited room for 
manoeuvre. President Aquino 
could yet swing the balance of 
advantage in her favour. She has 
gambled that the NDF is basically 
a non-ideological movement for 
agrarian reform, albeit disciplined 
by a hard core of Mandst- 
Leninists. If most of its members 
can be persuaded to accept mea- 
sures tor economic and land 
reform, a legitimate role in politics 
and assurances of human rights. 


she could well isolate them from 
the extremists. 

- The role played by her new 
cabinet, whose composition is still 
to be announced, will play a 
pivitol role in ensuring the army’s 
confidence. Much of its hostility 
to the civilian government is foe 
result of previous appointments. 
Aquilino Pimentel, the former 
Minister for Local Government, 
for example, appointed dozens of 
left-wing focal government of- 
ficials who did their best to 
impede foe army’s anti-insurgency 
campaign. 

A stong cabinet would en- 
courage General Ramos to under- 
take the wide-ranging reforms 
needed to purge the army of its 
endemic cronyism, corruption 
and factionaUm, and turn it into a 
professional fighting force: If dis- 
affected officers feared a purge 
from above they would have far 
less energy for undermining the 
peace negotiations. 

The ceasefire is designed to 
extend beyond the .February 2 
plebiscite on the new constitution. 
If it hdlds, it will be the first time 
since the introduction of martial 
law that tbe Philippine electorate 
will go toa ballot free from fear of 
die gi»n- Should Mrs Aquino get 
that far, foe Philippines will have 
taken the first real step, towards 
political stability and eventual 
economic recovery. 

David Watts and 
Michael Dynes 


Aids is not a plague in the 
medieval sense since it is 
transmitted only through certain 
identified routes. Though insid- 
ious and lethal, it is not yet a 
catastrophe. But it could become 
one. 

When they debate Aids today, 
the Lords must be aware that this 
catasiophe can be averred only if 
foe campaign against it is con- 
ducted simultaneously on three 
fronts — educational medical and 
scientific — within the framework 
of a national strategic plan. 

The government has begun well 
on one front, public education, for 
which it is giving £20 million. But 
from this welcome initiative a 
number of consequences flow. In 
some hospitals foe voluntary de- 
mand for testing hfr g already 
increased fourfold. After 23 mil- 
lion leaflets have been posted, 
backed up by television advertis- 
ing. this figure could well qua- 
druple again. A successful 
cam paign will inevitably exert 
increasing pressure on foe already 
underfunded and overstretched 
clinics treating sexually transmit- 
ted diseases and on voluntary 
bodies. To meet these pressures, 
steps must be taken now. 

Immediate action is also nec- 
essary to deal with foe growing 
number of Aids victims. The 
number of people in Britain 
carrying foe Aids virus is now put 
at anywhere between 30.000 and 
100.000. Estimates vary of foe 
number likely to contract the 
disease, but even at foe lower level 
foe system will face inevitable 
demands over the next five years, 
even if a vaccine were discovered 
tomorrow. 

This year there have been 600 
Aids patients and the number is 
expected to double annually. That 
means there will be nearly 20,000 
cases by 1991. 

The most reliable current 
calculation of foe total cost of an 
Aids patient to foe NHS is 
£18,000; therefore 20,000 cases 
will cost £360 milli on, against foe 
1936 expenditure of £11 million 
(not all of which has been met 
from special funds). 

Tbe Social Services Secretary 
has asked all health authorities to 
submit their plans for dealing with 
Aids by the end of this month. 
They will find this difficult be- 
cause their plans must depend 
largely on Ins. They want training 
grades opened op to provide foe 
staff that will be needed for the 
many thousands more patients; 
they want facilities which match 
each phase of foe disease, includ- 
ing new in-patient clinics with day 
beds. But they fear these wil) be 
provided only at the expense of 
other commitments, which would 
set colleague against colleague and 
could lead to a public backlash. 

The Secretary of State must 
therefore make totally dear that 
Aids funding will not just be 
carved out of the main NHS 
budget New money must be 
committed and an efficient and 
speedy system must be devised 


within the national strategic plan 
- which does not yet exist - to 
target it effectively. 

The action initiated on the 
public information from is on the 
right lines but foe medical and 
scientific fronts are seriously 
under-resourced and under- 
manned. 1 would therefore pro- 
pose something on the following 
lines. The DHSS should remain 
foe lead department, with its Aids 
Unit foe national command post. 
To avoid the present mismatch 
between rapidly c han g in g health 
authority needs and set allocations 
from above, foe authorities should 
be able to tell the Aids Unit bow 
much they need, and the unit to 
respondin line with the national 
plan. . , 

This plan would be negotiated 
by foe Secretary of State with the 
Cabinet on foe recommendation 
of a National .Aids Council, con- 
stituted from elements of the 
Chief Medical Officer’s present 
advisory committee, supplement- 
ed by health economists and 
presided over by tbe Minister for 
Health. Is mam job would be to 
recommend, on the basis of all the 
national and international facts 
available, the level of Aids-related 
funding on a medium- term basts 
of not less than three years. 

Once this was approved or 
modified at Cabinet level, it would 
be the task of the Aids Unit to 
ensure that allocations were made 
rapidly and applied by the regions 
and districts. Expen sub-commit- 
tees should recommend foe level 
of government-funded research 
and deal with the needs of 
voluntary bodies, possibly in li- 
aison with a new fund-raising 
charity. 

Of course, someone in govern- 
ment might devise a better model 
Bui some such strategic structure 
is essential. To any accusation of 
over-centralization I would re- 
spond that bids will come from the 
bottom np and implementation 
will owe everything to personal 
responsibility and local effort. 

On funding, my guess is that in 
1987/88 NHS revenue costs, plus 
some capital spending and in- 
creases of say £5 million each for 
research and voluntary bodies, 
would indicate a total of about 
£60 million (including tbe £20 
million information campaign). In 
time appropriate levels would 
emerge from the framework I am 
suggesting because we would be 
asking the right questions and 
getting closer to the right answers. 

This is foe sort of a pp roach, not 
panicky but alert and determined, 
that tbe public will expect fiom 
government of whatever hue, or 
indeed of mixed hue, as we head 
into the 199%. This way we have a 
good chance of avoiding catas- 
trophe. Without a strategy and the 
money to back it tbe prospects are 
grim indeed. 

© Than Nmnpafwm, 

Lord Kilmarnock is deputy leader 
of the SDP peers and its spokes- 
man in (he Lords on health and 
social services. 


Philip Howard 

Muezzin of the 
paperback 


Men have authority over women 
because God has made them 
superior, and because they sup- 
port foe women financially. Men 
are better than women. Good 
women are obedient They guard 
their private parts because God 
has guarded them. If you have 
women you suspect are going to 
disobey you, admonish than, 
send them to a separate bed, and 
beat them. 

Those hearty precepts come 
from foe chapter on women in the 
Koran, which is full of much other 
helpful advice. Of course there is 
also such obsolete prescription in 
Leviticus, and other private parts 
of the Bible. The difference is that 
not even the most fanatical Jews 
or Bible-bett Christians follow to 
tbe letter laws designed for a 
primitive nomadic tribe. It is 
depressing that so many people 
stiD take as infallible even tbe 
dottier words of Allah, as revealed 
to Mahomet by the Angel Gabriel 
more than 13 centuries ago. 

Napoleon said that Moham- 
medanism was less ridiculous 
than Christianity. But he was on St 
Helena and depressed at the time; 
and in any case he was sounder on 
artillery than theology. These are 
matters of personal taste and 
cultural conditioning. Perhaps foe 
Western European subconscious 
is still haunted by the threat of 
Islam, and folk memories of the 
Battle of Tours, where Charles the 
Hammer turned the Saracen tide. 
If he hadn't, “perhaps the inter- 
pretation of the Koran would now 
be taught in the schools of Oxford, 
and her pulpits might demonstrate 
to a circumcised people the sanc- 
tity and truth of foe revelation of 
Mahomet” 

I am a Western European. And 
to me Mahommedanism seems, if 
not quite as silly as Buddhism, nor 
as mischievous and mad as the 
extreme, enthusiastic sects of 
Christianity, nevertheless the 
most harmful and dangerous of 
tbe First Division monotheistic 
religions. 

You can judge for yourselves, in 
one of the success stories of the 
book game, which is celebrating its 
prodigious 30th anniversary: N J. 
Dawood's translation of foe Ko- 
ras in tiie Penguin Classics. 
Nessim pa wood was born in 
Baghdad is 1927, and came to 
London on an Iraq state scholar- 
ship to read English at London 
University. His tutor in classical 
Arabic was a distinguished poet: 


young Nessim planned to go home 
to B a gh dad after graduating, and 
devote his life to translating 
Shakespeare (for whom he had 
developed a passion as a boy, 
having read The Merchant of 
Venice first, looking up most 
wonts in a dictionary) into Arabic. 
But he fell is with Dr EV. Rieo, 
then busily translating Homer and 
editing the inchoate Penguin 
Classics. And as a very young man 
Da wood translated the Koran 
treated as lilerature rather than the 
words of God. 

All other En glish t ranslat ions 
are pompous, archaic, reverential 
and unreadable, except by the 
enthusiast Across the language 
barrier Da wood captured the 
founder and poetry of the original 
in such passages as those dealing 
with the Day of Judgement and 
Heaven and Hell Not even lively, 
idiomatic English can camouflage 
the longueurs of the nit-piddng, 
Logic-chopping bits. Rieu and 
Penguin thought it would run to a 
single edition. In the event it is 
now in its 31st edition, and has 
sold more than a milli on copies 
around the world. Pirated editions 
have been published in Iran and 
foe Lebanon. NJ. Da wood has 
carried on translating, and runs 
his London company, which is tbe 
major centre for Arabic transla- 
' tions and typesetting outside foe 
Middle East 

Judging literature in translation 
is tike looking at paintings in a 
smoke-filled room without your 
contact lenses. Even the best 
translation is a lie. But from the 
English translations, the Koran 
comes third in tbe league table of 
holy writings. The Rig Veda is 
unreadable. The Analects are 
weird. The Bible in Greek and the 
Vulgate is second-rate as lit- 
erature I cannot speak for the 
Hebrew, Aramaic, Syriac, or Cop- 
tic. But in English in the Au- 
thorized Version, because of the 
accidents of history, it is one of the 
supreme glories of world lh- 
erature; which is not a charge you 
could make against subsequent 
versions. The Bible comes second. 

But the trouble with both the 
Koran and foe Bible is that they 
lack wil I cannot believe in a God 
who does not laugh. Considered as 
literature, the best scriptures 
about foe gods are dearly those 
about the gods and goddesses of 
Ancient Greece, later translated to 
Rome, and written about by 
masters from Homer to Ovid. 




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THF. TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 



Saleroom 


COURT AND SOCIAL £160,000 for Boucher 

picture a ‘surprise’ 


OBITUARY 

MR CHRISTOPHER SYKES 


\ i 

i * m 

1 ' ■■ 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
December 9i His Excellency 
Senhor Cetso de Souza e Silva 
was received in audience by The 


S ueea and presented the Letters 
'Recall of bis nredecessor and 


relinquishing his appointment 
as Ambassasor Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary from Uru- 
guay to the Court of St James's. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. 
President of the federation 
Equestre Internationale, 
accompanied by The Princess 
Anne. Mrs Mark Phillips, «- 


of Recall of his predecessor and 
his own Letters of Credence as 
Ambassador Extraordinary and 
. Plenipotentiary from Brazil to 
the Court of St James's. 

His Excellency was accompa- 
nied by the following members 
of the Embassy, who had the 
honour of being presented to 
Her Majesty: Dr Jose 
Guflhenne Merquior (Minister 
Counsellor), Senhor Synesio 
Sampaio-Goes (Minister Coun- 
sellor), Senhor Oto Agripino 
Maia (Minister — Consular Af- 
fairs), Captain Ayrton de 
Medeiros Cabral (Naval Atta- 
che). Colonel Jose Ary Lacombe 
(Military Attache), Colonel 
Guilherme Sarmento Sperry 
(Air Attache), Senhor Frederico 
Cezar de Araujo (Counsellor, 
Administrative Affairs) and Se- 
nhor Ricardo Lutz Vienna de 
Carvalho (Counsellor, 
Commercial Affairs). 

Senhora de Souza e Silva had 
■ the honour of being received by 
The Queen. 

Mr Ewen Fexgusson (Deputy 
[Jnder Secretary of State for 
Foreign and Commonwealth 
Affairs), who had the honour of 
being received by Her Majesty 
was present, and the Gentlemen 
of Lne Household in Waiting 
were in attendance. - 

His Excellency Ciiroyen 
Mukamba Kadiat a Nzemba and 
doyenne Mukamba were re- 
ceived in farewell audience by 
The Queen and took leave upon 
His Excellency relinquishing his 
appointment as Ambassador 
Extraordinary and Pleni- 


tended the FEI Bureau Meeting 
and Hearines at the Waldorf 


and Hearings at the Waldorf 
Hotel today. 

Mr Brian McGrath was in 
attendance. 

The Queen was represented 
by Sir David AJceis-Jones (Act- 
ing Governor of Hong Kong) at 
the Funeral of His Excellency 
Sir Edward Youde (Governor 


of the National Association of 
Youth Clubs at the Royal Opera 
House, Covent Garden. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Brian 
Anderson was in attendance. 

The Princess of Wales, Pa- 
tron. London City Ballet, this 
evening attended a Gala Perfor- 
mance of Gisdlenvea by the 
Company at the Theatre Royal, 
Nottingham, in aid of London 
City Ballet Trust LttL 

Her Royal Highness, attended 
by Miss Anne Beckwi ib-Smith 
and Lieutenant-Commander 
Richard Ayfard. RN, travelled 
in an aircraft of The Queen's 
Flight 

December 9: The Duke of 


By Huos MaUalieu 


A remarkably successful sale on copper and dated 1715, by the 
of Old Master paintings made elder Jan Peter Tan Bredael 


£1,153,79®, with just 2 per cent reached £74409. going to the 
bought in, at Phillips yesterday, same overseas bidder (estimate 


There was one considerable 

sm p ris e when a painting ex- 


£35,000 to £50,000). 

A morning session of OU 


pected to make between about Master drawings at Christie's 
£4,000 and £6,000 sold to an produced £779,548 with 7 per 


anonymous London dealer for cent bought in. The London 
£159,500. It was catalogued as dealers Basked & Day paid 


“Studio <rf Francois Boucher" 
and was said to “bear sig- 
nature", meaning the cataloguer 


£93300 for a drawing of a 
musical party in red and Mack 
cHi by the eighteenth century 


did not trust it The subject was Jacques Andre PortaiL winch 


and Com mander-in-Chief of Gloucester this morning visited 


Hong Kong) which was held in 
St John's Cathedral, Hong Kong 
this morning. 

Lady Susan Hussey has suc- 
ceeded Lady Abel Smith as Lady 
in Waiting to The Queen. 
CLARENCE HOUSE 
December 9: Lady Elizabeth 
Basset has succeeded Mrs Pat- 
rick Campbell- Preston as Lady- 
in -Waiting to Queen Elizabeth 
The Queen Mother. 


poienciary from the Republic of 
Zaire to the Court of St James's. 

His Excellency Senor Luis M 
dc Posadas and Senora de 
Posadas were received in fare- 
well audience by The Queen and 
took leave upon His Excellency 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
December 9: The Prince of 
Wales, President, Business in 
the Community, this morning 
visited the South East Northum- 
berland Enterprise Trust Work- 
shop, Green Lane, Asbington. 

His Royal Highness sub- 
sequently visited the Newcastle 
Youth Enterprise Centre, 25 
Low Friar Street and the St 
Thomas Street Stables Project, 
St Thomas Street, Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne. 

In the afternoon The Prince of 
Wales attended the Business in 
the Community Annual Gen- 
eral Meeting at the Civic Centra, 
Newcastle- u pon-T yne. 

His Royal Highness lat er le ft 
Newcastle Airport in an aircraft 
of The Queen's Flight For Royal 
Air Force NortholL 

Sir John Riddell, Bl and the 
Hon Rupert Fairfax were in 
attendance. 

The Prince of Wales this 
evening attended a Gala Perfor- 
mance of The Magic Flute to 
celebrate the 75th Anniversary 


Weeiabix Limited and later 
opened The Weeiabix Manage- 
ment Centre, Tresham College, 
Kettering. 

His Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Li Col Sir Simon Bland. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
December 9: The Duchess of 
Kent, Patron, this afternoon 
attended the Annual Christinas 
Party of the “Not Forgotten’ 
Association at the Royal Mews, 


the Muse Potymnia whose func- 
tion is to inspire heroic hymns. 

An anonymous overseas bid- 
der pud £85.800 for a pleasing 
pair of Bbineiand landscapes, 
one with travellers, painted on 


had carried a modest estimate of 
between £4400 and £6,000. 

At Sotheby’s, a morning ses- 
sion of ancient Chinese bronzes 
and ceramics proved yet ag a in 
that this is one of the more 


copper by the eider Jan Griffier chancy markets by producing a 


(estimate £40400 to £60400). A 
frozen winter landscape, again 


total of £357462 and a bought- 
in figure of almost 50 per cent. , 


Dinners w 

Zealand, the Ambassador of Sou in 

Women's Advertising Chib of AMm and me enrnew char* 


the other 

Tbe High 


Tbe^Rev Roger Royle was the MacRobert Trusts 
guest speaker at the Christmas T <J J ndns *SL 


SEneravn by the Women's celebration dinner Was heWlasi 
Advertising Club of London at evening a t btmmongrs^ Hall 
the SavoyHotel yesterday. Mrs sponsored by the MacRobert 
i vnriu Povtu> nrMrinii nf the Trusts, to which had been 


Buckingham Palace. 

imorarag Mrefetcr WUmot-SitweU was 

S3S: * j2sesi : 

ihington. Lady Lucinda Beliviile gave 
ness sub- birth to a son on November 28. 
Newcastle Dr Yvonne Burne, Head of 
‘entre, 25 Modem Languages at North- 
id the St wood College, has been ap- 
s Project, pointed Head of St Helen’s 
Newcastle- School, North wood, from Sep- 
tern her 1987. 

' in^fin A celebration for the life and 
imdGen- work of Mr Stuart Young will be 
nV Cmtra " held « Guildhall at 11 am 
' today. 

slater left A service of thanksgiving for the 
an aircraft lives of Miss Elizabeth (Betsy) 
for Royal Profumo and Major Philip 
Profuino will be held in the 
II and the Grosvenor GhapeL South Aud- 
were in ley Street, at 1 1.30 today. 

A service of thanksgiving lor the 
/ales this life of Lord Crawshaw of 
ala Perfor- Ain tree will be held at St 
: Flute to Margaret's, Westminster, at 
miversary noon today. 


Lyndy Payne, president of the Trust* to which had tx*x 
dub. was m the :hair. mvned all previous wurnos of 

W« India Committee the MacRobert Award. Air Mar- 


ti T _,„ .j shal Sir Richard Wakrford, 
^ Chairman of the MacRobert 

Trusts, and Sir Denis Rooke. 


^Sr^di^atTe Patient of the 

yesterday at a dinner at the Engineering, received the guests. 

Inner Temple in honour of the *3,. ,h/va« nrmit mw 


Governor of Puerto Rico and 
Mrs Colon. Mr Arnold Ship, 
Phairman of the West Indies 
Trade Advisory Group, pre- 
sided. Among others present 



were: 

The Chairman of me West India 
Conuntnee and Mre Thornton. Mrs 
SiiD. Mr and Mrs Antonio Colorado 
and Mr and Mrs F de Jests Sciiuck. 


Forthcoming 

marriages 


MrO.G.Leed LUOCheOllS 

and Miss SJ- C unningham Royal Humane Society 

The engagement is announced Uoitenant-Colonel R. W. G 

betwc fP A ° w ?L G< ??^ Chariton, Deputy Chairman of 

son of Mr and Mis DA Leed, of ,ha Cnvul Humane Sorierv. and 


European- Atlantic Gromi 
Sir Antony Buck, QC, MP. 
sponsored a meeting of the 
European-Atlantic Group held 
yesterday at the House of Com- 
mons. Sir Curtis Keeble was in 
the chair. A dinner was held 
afterwards at the St Ermin's 
Hotel for Viscount Whitelaw, 
CH, Mr Tom Clarke. MP. and 
Mr Alan Berth, MP, who were 
the speakers. Lord Layton, 
president of the group, presided. 


Stnneham Lasgton & Passmore 
On Tuesday evening the Part- 
ners of Siooeham Langton & 
Passmore held a dinner at tire 
Savoy Hole] to mark the retire- 
mem of Mr John Nilsson as the 
senior partner and die appoint- 
ment of Mr J. Grant Middleton 
as his successor. 1 


Westland pic 

Mr PJC Levene, Chief of De- 
fence Procurement for the Min- 


Mr Christopher Sykes. 
FRSJU author, died on De- 
cember 8. He was 79. 

Christopher Hugh Sykes 
was born in Yorkshire on 
November 17. 1907. A Ro- 
man Catholic, he was educat- 
ed at Downside, the quality of 
whose religious education was 
infliignpal throughout his life. 
He next spent a year at the 
Soibooue where, be later re- 
called, "I sat for no exams, 
knowing I would fail." He 
then went to Christ Church, 
Oxford, leaving, in 1928, with- 
out a degree. 

As a young man Ire showed 
talent as a draughtsman and 
cartoonist. He was also a keen 
huntsman. 

That year he joined the 
Foreign Office and was posted 
to Berlin as bon attache. Two 
years later be went to Tehran 
as private secretary to Sir 
Robert Clive. These experi- 
ences together convinced him 
that his future lay not in 
diplomacy - but in writing. 

By now he enjoyed re ad i n g 
French classics and spoke 
some German. Bar he had to 
accept that his speed) in any 
language would always be 
afflicted by an incurable stam- 
mer. He set about writing his 
first book and called it 
Changed. It never saw the 
light of day, suppressed on the 
grounds that it libelled the 

He put himself through a 
course of Persian studies at the 
School of Oriental Studies, 
and in 1933 left for two years’ 
travel in Persia and Afghani- 
stan, where be was, for a time, 
a correspondent for The\ 
Times. He afterwards wrote 
(1936-9) for The Spectator and 
The Observer. 

He published his first book, 
Wassmuss. in 1936. This trag- 


Versatile man of letters 

venial broadcast by another 







istry of Defence, was tire guest of ic tale. iDustrated by t he 
honour at a dinner held at the author, of a German diplomat 


Yeovil factory of Westland pic 
on Thursday. December 4. He 
presented awards to prize win- 
ners from the Westland Appren- 
tice and Student Associations. 


Mr N.CW. Campbell 
and Miss N.M. Montagu 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, youngest son 
of the late Professor Wilson 
Campbell and of Mrs Wilson 
Campbell, of Warkworth, 
Northumberland, and Nicole, 
daughter of the Hon David and 
Mrs Montagu, of London. 


The Hague. Holland, and Sarah 
Jane, daughter of Mr and Mrs A. 
Cunningham, of Hayes, Kent. 


the Royal Humane Society, and 
tire committee gave a luncheon 
yesterday at Haberdashers' HalL 


MrCW. Barnes 
and Miss M J. Eades 
The engagement is announced 
between Christian, son of Mr 
and Mrs O.E. Barnes, of Great 
Houghton Hall, Northampton- 
shire. and Melanie, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs K.R. Eades, of 
Sherwood. Nottingham. 


Mr P. Wingfield 
and Miss ELM-R. Scott 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul, only son of Mr 
and Mrs John Wingfield, of 
Selby, North Yorkshire, and 
Elizabeth, only daughter of Dr 


yesterday at Haberdashers HalL 

Major-General Sir Leonard Atkinson, 
v Lee- Admiral Sir Peter Cornpsian. 
Mbs Mona MHetwll. Mr PKMnra., 
Mr F H Hunter. Curtain A G Bussefl. 
Or B G B Lucas. Mr R K Lloyd, 
colonel SMB Coals and Major A J 
Dickinson. 

British Council 

Sir John Burgh. Director-Gen- 



who tried to raise the Persian 
nationalists against the British 
during the First World War, 
was Sykes's firs "study in 
loyalty." Despite hs stylistic 
excesses, it was wen received. 

Later that year, under the 
uninspired pseudonym Rich- 
ard Waughbunon, be wrote, 
with Robert Byron, Innocence 
and Design. Stranger Wondas 
- Tales of Travel appeared the 
following year. These experi- 


Thomeycreek, Cambridge. host at a luncheon held yes- 


Mr JJL Zcalley 
and Miss FJVLB- Cooper 
The engagement is announced 
between John, son of Dr and 
Mrs T.S. Zealley, of Colyton, 


terday at 10 Spring Gardens in 
honour of Mr Christopher Pat- 
ten. Minister for Overseas 
Development. 

Reception 


Corporation of the Sons of the i gyron, in nocence 

rj Jz. and Design. Stranger Wonders 

Institute of Cha rtered Sec- fire Treasurers of the Corpora- - Tales of Travel appeared the 
J?* 0 ? 5 ““ tion of the Sons of the Clergy following year. These experi- 

held a luncheon yesterday ax the ences of Englishmen abroad 
Army and Navy Club in honour arc journevs as much through 
of Mr Paul Griffin to mark his the J m ind 'as through temtin! 

the P a2S^ dinner of*foe In- Oftberivo companions, Sykes 

stituie of Chartered Secretaries j nc j u ^^ ) presen was by fog better linguist 


he was engaged in diplomatic 
duties at Tehran. 

He returned to Cairo in 
1943 to work for SOE. That 
vear he published High Mind- 
ed Murder, a book about the 
organization which he casti- 
gated as being too wrapped up 
m internal intrigue which had 
tittle to do with fighting the 
Germans. It was, he main- 
tained. "the greatest hoax of 
the war." For this effort his 
superiors recommended that 
he be court-martialled. 

He returned to England 
where he joined the 2nd 
Battalion SAS- The following 
year be was parachuted into 
France behind enemy lines. 
According to his commanding 
officer (recalled in John 
Hislop’s autobiography Any- 
thing but a Soldier ), Sykes was 
“in most respects unsuited to 
conditions of extreme physi- 
cal hardship. 

“As a parachutist he was 
inordinately clumsy, and as 
one of a small party usually 
surrounded by Gentians he 
was inordinately noisy. His 
fluent French was invaluable. 
He showed great courage and 
his morale never flagged. He 
was ready to take anything 
that was coming to him, 
including my cigarettes." He 
was subsequently mentioned 
in despatches and awarded the 
Croix de Guerre. 

In 1946 he was back in 
Persia, covering the Azerbai- 
jan campaign for the Daily 
Mail. Thereafter he worked 
for the BBC first as deputy 
controller of the Third Pro- 
gramme (1948). and then in 


close friend. Evelyn Waugh. 

All this left him ample time 
for his writing, to which he 
increasingly devoted himself. 
The most 'enchanting of his 
books is Tour Studies in 
Loyalty (1946). A set of bio- 
graphical portraits, the book 
won almost unanimous 
praise, though some were 
slightly shocked that he had 
shown a member of his family 
in an unfavourable light. 

Two Studies in Virtue 
(1953). a book about the 
endless vacillations of a Vic- 
torian clergyman between An- 
glicanism and Roman 
Catholicism, and about 
Sykes's father. Sir Mark, is 
another skilful work. 

Crossroads to Israel ( 1965) 
will for a long time remain 
standard reading for students 
of the Arab-Israeli conflict. 
The narrative is clear and 
vivid, despite the complexity 
of the subject, and although 
the author was, perhaps, mar- 
ginally biassed towards Zion- 
ism. the treatment is 
scrupulous eno ugh t o give 
satisfaction to extreme parti- 
sans on neither side. 

In his later years Sykes 
mainly concentrated on biog- 
raphy. His life of Orde Win- 
gate (1959), whom he greatly 
admired, laid the ground for 
further studies, though it dis- 
tressed Wingate’s surviving 
relatives by its frankness. In 
1968 he published Troubled 
Loyalty: A Biography of Adam 
von Troll, the anti-Nazi Ger- 
man patriot who was one of 
those killed by Hitler after the 
July plot on 1944. 

At the request of her literary 
executors he successfully un- 
dertook the life of Nancy 
Astor (Nancy, 1972), showing, 
as a Roman Catholic, remark- 
able magnanimity towards 
one who reviled his faith. He 
then turned to the more 
complex subject of Evelyn 
Waugh. 

Although it is an excellent 
book. Evelyn Waugh (1975) 
should not perhaps, have 
been the official biography. Ir 
is more a memoir based upon 
intimate friendship. But al- 
though it contains some mis- 
takes of detail it is a book 


the features department whose merits no younger writ- 
( 1949-68). For a while, too, he er could have matched. 


Employment, were present at 
the annual dinn er of the In- 
stitute of Chartered Secretaries 
and Administrators held at 
Gufldhall last night Mr Bernard 
Brook-Partridge, president of 
the institute, presided. Among 


drew cartoons for the Sunday 
Dispatch. 

At the BBC he was able to 


Sykes was a serious-minded 
man who valued above all else 
friendship and loyalty. Ebul- 




iSyaHTBrtqadier anb Mr*' m'cnffi I At the outbreak of war he 
w I joined the Yorkshire regi- 


pot his knowledge of music to lient and a bon v/vrar, he had a 
good use. The Birth of an gift for introducing hilarity 


and Mrs CtirtstbotMT Luacb. 


Mr C CoaMwell 
and Miss R.M. House 
The engagement is announced 
between Clive, son of Mr and 
Mrs L. Could well of Clcveleys. 


Devon, and Fiona, daughter of London Schools’ Horae Society 
Mr and Mrs G.B. Cooper, of ^ Harry GreenwayTMP. 


Gifford, East Lothian. 


Lincoln’s Inn 


Lancashire, and Rosalind Mary, 
dauahter of Mr and Mrs D. 


daughter of Mr and Mrs D. 
House, of St Leonards-on-Sea, 
Sussex. 


Miss Lesley Eliz a b et h Appleby, 
QC, and Mr Roy Douglas Amlot 


Chairman, and members of the 
committee of the London 
Schools' Horse Society gave a 
reception at New Zealand 
House last night in honour of 
Lord Oaksey, president Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Sir John Miller, 


University news 


Oxford 

Dr Richard von Weizsdcker, 
President of West Germany, has 
been elected to an honorary 
fellowship ofBalliol College. 


have been elected benchers of TXI 

I Crown Equerry, was among the 


Cambridge 

Mr Alistair Cooke and Sir Alan 


Cottrell have been el ected into 
honorary fellowships of Jesus 
College. 

Liverpool 

Grant 

British Coal; £180000 to Dr J S 
Wanersoo for the devdoproems of 
methods of protection at peo fo g lrat 
structure data In caaSkkk. 


ment. The Green Howards, as 
a lieutenant, and was a staff 
captain at GHQ Cairo in 
1940-1. For the next two years 


Opera, a series of 20 pro- 
grammes, was entirely his own 
work. He also produced pro- 
grammes based on the novels 
of his ftiend Ivy Compton 
Burnett, as well as a contro- 


mto the most tedious occa- 
sions. 

He married, in 1 936. Camil- 
la Russell, who died in 1983. 
He is survived by their only 
son. 


SIR EUGENE MELVILLE 


Rhubarb. Rhubarb. Rhubarb. 

No doubt you’re sick and 
tired of reading about what you 
should and shouldn't eat. 

You’re probably already aware of 
the need for fibre in the diet. 

But. did you also know that there 
are two kinds of fibre? 

Insoluble and soluble. 

Insoluble fibre gives your body 


Just try starting the day with a 
bowl of porridge oats lyour Granny 
was right all alongl. Oats are one 
of the best natural 
sources of soluble 
fibre alongside 
kidney beans and 
, baked beans (but 
with none of the well known side 
effects I. And don’t worry about 


Birthdays today 

Sir Eric Berthond, 86; Viscount 
Boyne, 55; Miss Rumer God- 
den, 79; Mr Cecil Haflett, 87; 
Lord Harris of High Cross, 62; 
Sir Clifford Jamen, 77; Mr 
Michael Jopling. MP, 56: Miss J. 
M. Keuwonhy, 53; Mr Nicolas 
Kynaston. 45; Mr Michael 
Manley. 62; Mr Oliver Mes- 
siaen, 78; Sir Jeremy Morse, 58; 
Sir John PeeL 82; Mr T. S. 
Roberts, 75; Mr M. T. Wright, 
50. I 


If you’re not getting 
BOTH types of 
fibre in your diet, 
digest this page. 


Meeting 

Chartered Institute of Transport 
Mr P. Capon, Product Develop- 
ment Director of Leyfand 
Trucks Limited, delivered the 
Henry Spurrier Memorial Lec- 
ture, “Technology, servant of 
commerce", to the Chartered 
Institute of Transport at Aston 
University, Bi rmingham, on 
Monday evening. The presi- 
dent, Mr G. Myers, Vice-Chair- 
man of British Rail. {Resided. 


the roughage it 
needs, in order to 
digest properly. 

You’ll find it in 
many foods, like 
potatoes, bread and. 
of course, rhubarb. 

But what about 
soluble fibre? 

Well, recent medical research 
has indicated that soluble fibre 
can be helpful in lowering choles- 
terol levels in the blood. And 
cholesterol, as you won’t need re- 
minding, is a major factor when it 
comes to heart disease. 

z**, Unfortunately, 


calories. A how! 
of porridge oats 
contains no more 
than a bowl of 
cornflakes. 

Now, we're not 
? going to start 

y. j r >, iy f > telling you here, 

V ,' what you can and 


Memorial Service 

Miss R. Scott Addis 
A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Miss Robina Scott Addis 
was held yesterday at St 
Columba's Church of Scothmd. 
The Rev W.A. Cairns officiated. 
Mr David Addis, nephew, read 
the lesson and Miss Joanna , 
David read a poem by Pan 
Lang. Lady Brngley led the i 
prayers and Professor Fred 
Stone, Chairman of the Child 
Guidance Trust, gave an ad- 
dress. Among those present 


Sir Eugene Melville, 
KCMG, economist and diplo- 
mat, died yesterday. He was 
74. 

He was born at Dundee on 
December 15, 1911, and edu- 
cated at Queen’s Park School, 
Glasgow, and St Andrew's 
University, where he was one 
of the first Harimess scholars. 
He took Fxisis successively in 
classics and economics. 

He entered die Colonial 
Office in {936. During the war 
he was in charge of the 
Colonies Supply Mission in 
Washington, on which the 
survival of the Colonies large- 
ly depended. 

He retamed to London in 
1945 as private secretary to 
Lord HalL Secretary of State 
for the Colonies. Four years 
later be was seconded to 
Germany as financial adviser 
to the control commission 
under General Robertson, in 
Berlin and Bona There he 
dealt with the Allies' legisla- 
tion for the reform of Goman 
banking mid industry after the 
war. 

In 1952 be returned to the 
Colonial Office as assistant 
under-secretary in charge of a 
group of economic depart- 
ments. After the 1956 reorga- 


nizaHon, he had responsibility 
for principal stratqpc bases, 
including Gibraltar, Cyprus, 
Malta and Singapore. 

During 1955 be was secre- 
tary-general of the Malta 
Round Table Conference 
which drew up a new constitu- 
tion for the island. 

He elected to move to the 
FCO in 1961; but almost 
immediately returned to West 
Germany as Minister (Eco- 
nomic) at the Bonn embassy. 

In 1965 he was posted to 
Geneva as UK delegate to Efta 
and Gait, becoming in addi- 
tion ambassador to the UN 
the following year. In this post 
he made a notable contribu- 
tion to the conclusion of the 
Kennedy round of tariff nego- 
tiations. 

From 197! to 1973 be acted 
as special adviser to the 
Anglo-French consortium 
working on a feasibility study 
for the Channel Tunnel. His 
training .for this joint role of 
watchdog and negotiator lay 
in his experience in Geneva: 
detailed technical work, a 
head for figures, and patience 
enough for cooperation with 
the French. At that time the 
project fell by the wayside. 


On retirement in 1973 be 
opted for something less tame 
than the path into commerce 
and industry trodden by other 
high-ranking diplomats. He 
became dumor-general of the 
National Association of Prop- 
erty Owners (later the British / 
Property Association), which ■ 
claimed to represent Britain's 
most unloved industry. 

Melville, admitting that he 
was no expert in property, was 
charged with the task of 
rescuing the image of the 
British property developer. A 
counter-attack on their many 
critics was, he felt, long over- 
due. He built useful bridges 
between the association and 
Whitehall, leaving the post in 
1980. 

In 1976 he had made his 
home at Aldebuigh, Suffolk. 
There he was far from 
inactive. That year, at the invi- 
tation of Lord Britten, he took 
on the chairmanship of the 
newly-formed Aldeburgh 
Foundation, becoming its ( 
president in 1981, and resign- 
ing only because of ill health. 

He married, in 1937. Eliza- 
beth Maxwell Stracban, who 
survives him with their 
daughter and two sons. 


. . 


AHMAD BEY al-KHALIL 


Ahmad Bey al-Khalil, who 
died in Amman on December 
7 at the age of 72, was one of 
the few surviving Palestinians 
who played an important role 
in die events of 1948 and their 
immediate aftermath. 


cannot eat. 

IF you‘d like to help your family 
and yourself keep Tit and healthy, just 
cut out the coupon below. 

We’ll send you a booklet, with all 
the relevant information, including 
some delicious oat recipes. It’s just 
the Ihing to get your teeth into. 


soluble fibre is 
* found in far fewer 
St foods, so there’s 
f J \ one magic word 

-Lm-OATSs — you should 
INFORMATION never forgei. 
— BUREAU^ Horridge . 

No. we’re not suggesting you go on 
some crack- pot prison diet. 


T"Vo: OIB. depl. Q32fi. Mount Farm, Milton 


Keynes MKI l HQ. 

Please send me a free booklet with more 
■ nrormalion on soluble fibre and recipes 
using oats. 

Name 



Born in Haifa on May 17, 
1914, into a wealthy and 
leading family/ be went to 
school in Jerusalem and then 


as judge or advocate, was 
proverbial. 

He became a Jordanian 
senator in 1973, and retired 
•eleven years later. He was 
nearly always a member of 
Jordanian parliamentary dele- 
gations overseas and his pen- 
chant for public relations was 
a valuable asseL 

Al-Khalil did not involve 


MR MAURICE 
DOCKRELL 


to the American University of 
Beirut where he graduated in 


Lud in 1935 and studied “ d 


& Ue ^ tha i, t te5L estinian 

bridge.^ graduating m 1939, lde °S y ** be ™- r P«®- 
was served and promoted in the 


and in the same year was 
called to foe Bar by foe Inner 
Temple. 

On his return to Palestine 


Jordanian context This policy 
was unpopular at one time, 
but he remained loyal to it and 
combined his support for the 


he was appointed a stipeadary Jord anian regime with con- 
magistrate, and occupied that cent for the Palestinian peo- 


post until foe end of the 
British' Mandate. In 1 948 King 
Abdullah appointed him mili- 
tary governor of Nablus, and 
three years later he became 
governor of Jerusalem and 
head of foe Jordanian delega- 
tion to the mixed Jordanian- 
Israeli Armistice 

Commission. 


pie. 

He was decorated by Jordan 
and was a close friend of King 
Husain and of successive Jor- 
danian prime ministers. But 
he never lost the common 


Mr Maurice DockreU, busi- 
nessman and Lord Mayor of 
Dublin in I960, the first 
Protestant to be elected to the 
office in 60 years, died yester- 
day. He was 78. 

Bora in Dublin in 1908. and 
educated at St Andrew's CoU- ; 
ege and Trinity College, Dub- 
tin. 

The family business (in 
Ulysses there is a reference .to 
“Dockrell’s ninepenny 
wallpaper,") was one of the 
first Dublin firms to re-em- 
ploy those of its staff who had 
been gaoled for participating 
in the 1916 Rising. 

In 1943 be took his seat as a 
Fine Gael deputy in the DaiL 
retaining it until 1977. In 
1948, when his party was in 
government, he declined to 
support foe decision to take 
the Republic out of foe Com- 
monwealth. During a visit .to 
London in i960 he laid a 
wreath at the Cenotaph, an act 


Sev*--.- „ 


* - 'i s> 


of Arab-British friendship, al- w app ?K3 


■Address 


Latest wills 


In 1953 he became a mem- ]v -is?, , 
ber of foe Court of Appeal m 10 „ 

Amman but stayed for only a {^3^ d 
year, resigning to set up a law 
practice which became one of Al-Khali 
foe most successful in Jordan, 


though he was at times severe- 
ly critical of some of Britain's 
policies towards the Arabs and 
towards the Palestinians in 


Postcode 


Mr George Gordon Hole, of 
Hu mpi erp o mt, West Sussex, 
left estate valued at £1,000,932 
net. . . =- 


AI-Khalzl was a man of great 
charm and abundant human- 
ity; with a capacity for getting 
to foe heart of the m alter. His 
incisive wit in court, whether 


Al-Khalil was an excellent 
sportsman and twice won 
Jordan's tennis doubles cham- 
pionship. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Sumaya, and two sons and a 
daughter. 


political risk. 

It was a mark of his public 
stature that he was appointed 
by De Valera, a political 
opponent, to foe Council of 
State, on which he served until 
his death. 

He was very ge nial, and his 
salty wit combined with prac- 
tical wisdom enriched any 
gathering. A talented pianist, 
he was agovemor of the Royal 
Irish Academy of Music. - 

He is survived by his wife 
Iso be L, and their son and three 
daughters. 


. '• 'if, 




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i i I ** CH w I a>'*V» 3 MCI xi »LVft ») a« 3vT, I :j a ;« 1C m-l 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


bSmSST ST r^Sf Dt »^;r 2 nd. peace- 

, ... * 

BnrTHS I B£g M^^ ^Ser rtceai si brown «jmu£v^ucy may 

rvf??L^.°^ T,CTB - ta noon Monday aRO^»«B«i£Y. WB^wiiucoeTTw 
BARTLETT U eca |'J*r 22nd. Donations. to Save Oki Peoric*' Hone. Damhall 

. , V" December 70i »986. Children * ia!t S‘° C rescent. acnorough. Notttogharahtee 

« 5ESM 1 * ^houm and Phil; Fund). uc “ Schotaraiito ^ Them on 22na FrtjrtiaryiiT 

Ip.UiegmofadaughierJesdajSe. «£***«■ atom* C 12 A 00 ) 

°" i December 7U » • — °T- OecenAw 6lh. HARMS. CHARLES HAROLD PAOGETT 

ivoo. to Gerry irW* Kteiyj and 7/“*°°^ Quinine (im Stanley) HARiiis Me of 33 Hxi-berough Rood, 
®™' 1 a daughter Ed win a. (Jantsl ARIBA.. AA , Db a f <a OarOnt. uttuirr etna Tims on or about 

BROOK - On December L » e . -*"«ai(m SunonM £>J? 50w 1986 

^ P^nKSCU.S N» n-^^ASB “» 

nek. a daughter. ““ ”* jj™*- funeral at 12.46 « St h orne r. Frederick matthew 

Bsovnui . On aih . Botnlpht. Luliingaone. on 12 De- S£T^ , ^ ER ^LL w ^Ji?5 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


births 


1M6 T^n Member 7U» «• December 6th. 

iw». lo Gerry me* Klely) ana in«Wora Christine (rice Stanley) 
■£5Sf‘ a dauqh,er EUwina. V ARIBA.. AA.. DtolofSl 

■5P"L ‘ ®" December Bth. at St jKS 5 ^ ni ^ ct "-_ S unon at Hone. 
MaryS Paddington, is Rosie and Pat , lm *^5. n ° wpn * or mounting, 
nek. a daughter. 1 tfease funeral at 12.46 at si 

B *°'* WE ■ On December 4th to ^L‘^’ S Jj^ 3S,0n ^ on 12 De- 

Jennifer (ntc Beestom^ut ,0 cwn oer. Donathm. if desired, lo 

-^■WaSK’ 11 ^ - t£S£& 347 

COFRK - On December 6j h t «6 at - 

*55™ - On Friday December 6th. 
Edwant ^ Ruy. a soil Thmnas Corona Academy are sad to an- 
cSnbbkt^ _ Sf 4 *"" B* »°« Of Iheir Gating 

' 011 D«etnber John. Sadly missed by wile 

inn' anVcfS?!!" 4 ^ Hos Wial to All Muriel and all coUegues and friends, 
swi^ana Simon, a daughter. Eleanor Pnvate Funeral. 

COOPER - On Deremtw aik *« ■ *OKSOII ■ On December 4th. sudden- 
naand Thomas, a son. Si 


died There on 22 m February 1980 

tEsuie about C12A0a 

HARRIS. CHARLES HAROLD PAOOETT 
HARRIS Me of 33 HariMRugh Road, 
aadur. Lemsur dtoo Them no or about 
SOW March 1986 

(CD ate about C38S009 

H ORNE R. FREDERICK MATTHEW 
CLIFFORD HORNER lata of 1 White Han 


oember. DonatftHU if dednS m v ““Sf • Hwllew»l. Owaabd 

AF A.SJ L WeJt.y y- • - ®* a Thr " ** *** February 1986 

L^SnEci 347 CCWr * 1 Markrt8 - about £300001 

SAGGCRSothirwur dunstau. former 

Corona December Sth. Ka 5^S^ sSSoSg^ 

Corona Academy are sad to an- mary mum dumctaix othenSe 
n«m« Ihe fans of their Casting LUCv mary dunstall Formerly 
Manager John. Sadly missed by wife dunstall dob Holmes, smgle 


Muriel and all coUcsun and friends. 
Pnvale Funeral. 


uSaK" 1 *^ 

CKOOME - On November t9th 1986. 

,n «H«Phi and Richard, a 
son Oliver Roderick. A brother for 
Joanna EUaabelh. 

°ah?tM? , ^Ji 0, L. FrllIay Dcc « nbf r 
OblW&ilowM, and Mark, a son 

' 0,1 NWCTMIW 2-Wt 
•1986. ai Cleneagles Hospital. Singa- 
pore. lo Elizabeth tnee Newell Price] 
a nd And rew, a son Thomas Charles, 
a brother for Sarah. 

HOWCH - On December. 4th 1986. at 
SI Lukes Hospital. Guildford, to CaUv 
ertne (nee Locki and David 3 
daughter Char] one Elizabeth Rene 
HOU LBS WORTH - On December 8th 
to Melanie and Nigel, a daughter. 
KORTH - on November t8th 1986. lo 
Helen tnee Besti and Jeremy, a son 
Joseph. 

RICHARDSON ■ On Decrmber 4ih ]«S 6 

C^vHlrnnam 10 Suvui inre Faimarml 

meSSm* “ ,#r 10 Jim ” TTlomM 

•WOOISOII - on December 7th. to Ma- i 
rla 1 nee Gay nor) and John, a 
daughter Nancy Katarina. 

SMITH On December 6th 1986. at the 
Elsie Ingles Maternity Hospital Edin- 
burgh. to Nicole tnee English) and 
Pg jgr- a s on Mainew McGregor. 
STAFFORD - On December 7th. at 
Hcaihcrwood Hospital. Ascot to Sue 
and Andy, a daughter. Gemma 
Rachel. 

TRATT - On December 6th 1986. at 
Lewisham Hospital, to Hilary and 
Richard, a beautiful daughter. Hazel 
Yvonne. 

THISS on December 6 U 1 1986. In 
Vienna, la Jacoul and Jonathan, a 
daugnier victoria Joy. iWooUenom) 

MfOOD-ALLMOMD - On December 6th 
1986. to Patricia and Michael, a son 
Beniamin Douglas 


CALL!— ZUGARtMtEPPER - On 6th 

December in Italy. Paulo to Jonquil. 
Thefr address is Via Archimede 19S. 
Flat 9. 00197 Rome. 

PERRY : STRICKLAND- On Friday 
December 5th. quietly in London 
Anthony FhWTy to Valerie Strickland 
tnee Wood bridge). 


BOND - On December 7U» 1986. at 
Kestrel Grove Nursing Home, after a 
long Illness. Marjorie Elizabeth aged 
79. Cremation at Putney Vale Cre- 
matorium on Friday December 12th 
at twelve noon, no flowem. no letters 
please. 

CAMLLERI - On December 8th. sud- 
denly. at King Edward vn Hospital. 
MldhursL Frank John, beloved hus- 


St. James' Parish Church. Bushey at 
12 noon on Friday. December 1 ?Ul 
tfentttohs If de- 
sired to N&p.cc or Chlidline. 

"®WPHY - On Drcentber 4Ui.'Michaef. 
beloved husband of Marle-Louise. ra- 
ther of Helen and Peter, and 
grandfather of David. DantePe and 
Victoria, peacefully and with dignity 
ai his home. Much loved by all Ids 
family and friends. Funeral service 
? RU? 5 * King Church. W Irani e- 

2“ on Frt oay 12 m December 
at t 30pm. followed by iiUormenl at 
Putney Vale Cemetery. 

PARRISH - On December Sth. after a 
shori tUness. Lt./Ckndr. Joseph Regi- 
nald DSC RN (retired). Cremation on 
Friday December 12th at 3.30pm ai 
Mo make Crematorium. Donations if 
desired to the R.N.L.I.. or tf preferred 
flower* to T.H. Sanders. 28-30 Kew 
Rd.. Richmond, Surrey. 

PENMAN • On December 8 U 1 1986. at 
the Radcliife infirmary. Oxford. 
Bruce Penman. M.A.. Translator, 
aged 69 yeans of Caversham. Read- 
ing. Darting husband of Jennifer, 
loving iaUier of Amanda and Guy 
and much missed master of Reg his 
dog. Funeral Service at Reading Cre- 
matorium on Tuesday December 
16th at 2 pm. Family flowers only, 
donations If desired to the RSPCA 
(Reading Branch) c/o A B Walker & 
Son Ltd. 36 Eldon Ro<kL Reading. 
RGl 4DL. 

PETIT - On December 7th. W Ohara 
Harold <Bfll>. after a long We. lived 
with enthusiasm, dearly loved hus- 
band of Peggy, loved and loving 
unde of Joan. Miranda. Alex. Hugh 
MacPhaU fUSA). and Bryan Magee. 
Funeral at St Marytebone Crematori- 
um. East End Road. N2. at 11.30 on 
Monday 1 5th December. Family 
flowers only. If wished, donations to 
St Joseph’s Hospice. Mare Street 
London E8. 

POWLES - On December Bth. suddenly 
and peacefully at Sutton Scotney 
Manor. Barbara, aged 83. widow of 
Stephen date of Chorllm. Kenya) 
mother of Frank. John. Peter and 
Richard and granchuother of twelve. 
Private funeral at SnaOwelL New- 
market. on Friday X2U> December. 
Family flowers only. 

ROBINSON . On December 7th 1986. 
Ruth Milner RoMnson. wife of the 
late Dr valentine Charles Robinson. 
Enquiries lo Mr J. M Robinson Tel: 
0242 44810. 

SAVAGE - On Decem be r 6 U 1 1966. 
David Michael of 24 The Reddings. 
Welwyn Garten City. Hals, aged 
42. Dearly loved husband of Rose- 
mary and very loving father of 
Dominic. Richard and Ben. Service 
at the Holy Family Roman naiiwHf 
Church. KmghtsnekL Welwyn Gar- 
den City, on Monday December tsm 
at 2 pm. AH enquiries to W Austin & 
Sons. (Funeral Director) ^wmohniK 
Welwyn Garden CUy. Tel: 0707 
331077 


of Jane. Service at St I * C07T - On December 7lh.tiatfcany 


Banhotomew's Church. Hastemere. 
Surrey. Monday 15th December at 
12 noon. Flowers to Harris & Barnes 
Lid . 28 HasJemere Road. Liphook. 
Tel: 0428 722180. 

CM.LW - On December 8th. at SL 
Peter's Hospital. Jack Henry of 
Woking, aged 74. Deegrly loved ra- 
ther of Rosemary. Service at St. 
John's Crematorium. Woking Friday 
December 12Ui at 3.30 pm. Family 
flowers only. Donations. If desired, 
to The PhylUsTuckwell Hospice, c/o 
The Woking Funeral Service. 
1 19/121 GoldsworUi Road. Woking. 
Surrey. GU21 1LR. 


in a motor accident. David beloved 
son of Karin and John, brother of 
Samantha. Service on December. 
11th al 10am at The Holy Family 
Church. Alma lane. Hale. Famham, 
Surrey. 

SXELLERN - On December 5th. after a 
short Illness. Flora, aged 86 of 
Alresford Road. Winchester. Mother 
of Margaret. Elizabeth and the fate 
Eileen. Funeral service in Winches- 
ter Cathedral tomorrow December 
Uth 1.30pm. No flowers please, do- 
nations If desired to Age Concern c/o 
John Steel & Son. Cheril House. 
Winchester. 


COLLINS On December 9th 1986. af- {SPRAY -OnDecembo-6iW. p«cefolly 
ipr a hrirf Illness, at home tai I ^ Marlborough soon after her 94th 


ter a brief Illness, ai home in « rv«n«xougn sow aner iict -« ui 
Crowcombe. Somerset. Jean Wright d ^Si«^fi»K »^ omhtr 

aged 82. widow of Douglas H Collins 

and much loved mother of Charles ?L ,1 

and Catherine. A Cremation Service nd^MkSSS'l 

will take place ai the Crematorium. 

Taunton on Friday l2Ui Deconber ?Mi^nmiroUier of dare. BenJa- 
ai i.30pm. jnm an dAtoi; 

CRISP - On December Sth 1986. in S T55^S5^i^ , M^2'c»2fFrt^' 
hospital. Dorothy Violet, aged 88 of M?^ «* O"®" 

Newnham. Cambridge and formaiy 12Ul 

of 16 Kings Parade Cambridge. Fu- . ^ 1 ^ 

neral service at All Saints Church. SY **® ‘ 0,1 De SS7SS r ^ h * 


Harston. Cambs. at 12.30pm on Fri- 
dai' December 12 th. Flowers may be 
sent and enquiries 10 Harry WtUlams 
and Sons. 7 Victoria Park. Cam- 
bridge. Tel: 0223 359480 
DALE On December 6 U 1 . suddenly al 
King Edward vn Hospital. MtdhursL 
Tony, of Grayshott. Hlndhead. Sur- 
rey. Beloved husband of Elizabeth 
and dear faiher of Carolyn and Su- 
san. Funeral service al Guil dford 
Crematorium on Thursday Decem- 
ber llth at 12.30pm. No no were at 
his request, donations If desired to 
the Arthritis and Rheumatism Coun- 
cil for Research. 41 Eagle Street. 
London. WC1R 4AR. 

FLEM1N6 - On December Sth. peace- 
fully in her sleep at Portsmouth 
Hospital. Hester Leonie. much loved 
mother of Susan and Belinda and 
wonderful grandmother to her six 
grandchildren. Funeral 10 be 
arranged. 

GREENOAK - On December 7lh. 
peacefully in hospital. Francis Bu- 
chanan of Lelsion. Suffolk. Dearly 
loved husband of Lorraine and father 
or Francesca. Gavin and Adrian and 
grandfather of Robert. Joanna. Alice 
and Ho warth Cremation al lps»jch 
Wesi Chapel. 12.30pm on 12th De 
cumber No flowers please. 

GUNNERY - On December 8 U 1 1986. 
peacefully al home. Will, beloved 
husband of Verity. Private crema- 


al Sled mere. Christopher Hugh, in 
his 80th year. Family funeral only. - 
Flowers to H Naylor and Sons. East 
Gate. Driffield (Tel: Driffield 433 

30 1_ 

THOMSON - On December 7th. sud- 
denly. William Unton. Dearly loved 
father of Penny and falher-UHaw of 
Jonathan, sadly missed by his many 
rrfends. Private cremation. Memorial 
Service al Christchurch. Christ- 
church Street toff Flood Street) 
London SW3. on Monday December 
I 6 U 1 at midday. Rowers to Harrods 
Funeral Service. 49 Martoes Road. 
WB. 01 937 0572. Or donations. If 
preferred 10 the British Heart Foun- 
dation. 

WACHMAM - On December 2nd. trag- 
ically in New York. Edward 
Lawrence. Dearly loved younger son 
of Patricia and Alfred and brother of 
Richard. Cremation al CoidereGreen- 
Cremaiorium. Hoop Lane. London. 
Nwu at 3 pm Wednesday Decem- 
ber I0th. No flowers. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


A MEMORIAL SERVICE - for those 
who lost their lives In the helicopter 
tragedy of Sumburgh on 6 U 1 Novem- 
ber 1986. will be held In the Kirk of 
St Nicholas. Aberdeen, on Friday 
I 21 h December at 1.30pm. 


hon. Details of Ice of Thanks hq£e . Frank WUTJam. O.BJE.. JA, of 
Giving to be announced laier. Worth Court. Worth. Sandwich. A 

HARKNESS - On December Sth two. Memorial Service is to be held 00 FW- 

Sheila Mary aged 92. wife of Uje tele ^ December 19th at SL Clements 
Robert Consul Harkness FJt.cs. church. Sandwich at 3 uil 
M other of Christine and Linda and 

sisier of Fiona McMillan. Funeral pn- — — — w 

vale Family flowers only. IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE I 

HOLLAW - On December 8 th. sudden- 

TrtvSwn to’ved^hSawS"^ COVEN - In cherished m arioty o f Rale^ 

S££1£lfamer of Charles. Cram- very loved mammi Owomber to 
SlngCremalortum 1 1.30 1957 . Frank and Edwtna. 

am Fridas' 12th December. FamUy ROFP E R ■ David, tn cheris hed memory 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


flowers only please and If derired do- 
ndUons lo ihe Pilgrims Hospice. 
Canterbury 

LEIGH - On December SU» 1986. »" 
Hospital. Dr Stanley LHgh. bdO'« 1 


of my Father. December llth 1974 
and my Mother. Beatrice. January 
20 Ui 1954 and my Brother. Basil. 
December 10th 19S2. Always re- 
member Ihe happy times. Alexander. 


husband of Lrz Cremation al Golders (UNO - Frank. Treasured memorie s o f 
GreCTrtVest Chaplei. Thursday De- our nramktafen^ 


c ember 1 1th at 12 noon. No ftowrtS 
please. Donations if desired, to The 
Charing Cross Hospital. Holiday Di- 
alysis Trust Fulham Palace Road. 
London -Wo 


us on December 10W J968. SOU so 
terribly missed by us aH. unforgot- 
ten. unforgettable. Sylvia. Alan. 
Barbara and both our families. 


Science report 


Soviets sweeten straw 
for use as cattle feed 

By Andrew Wiseman 


Soviet agronomists bfc de- 
veloping a form of fodder, cheap 
io produce, yet rich tn esseotraJ 
bvdro-cartHHis and other nuin- 
enis by concentrating on r*" 
materials previoustv coo ^ er ™ 
to be waste: straw, wood and 

even peat. 


bydrobarothennal method, sub- 
jecting the straw simultaneously 
to water, pressure and tem- 
perature in an autoclave. 

Bales or straw, whose mfrfs- 
mre content was first raised 70 
per cent, were placed in the 
autoclave. Pressure was set at 


e TcSag to the Soviet Acad- between 6 to 63 ajinwpbera 
.rriv^f Sriences, of the temperature at I55-165C 

SSStrsa/s: 

wJmS composed iniosugar.tbecontMt 
stemsof sMware ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

drj, and anumus cuearrd straw was orach easier 

cjHing them. . . - f“^T eir an d digest. Cattle took 

Grinding tU ■jSHlI dM o ^he new fodder, milk yields 
tour additives or steimmgrt^hd by over 10 per cent 

not improve icnntnMiB J^ f a( and protein contents 

Mixing «: with brae, fJLfSJ jJ^ffected) and the weight of 
and liquid JJ ^imals rose by nearly 15 


WOMAN Ufa Of 14 St. Manrs houw. 
Fwwnic. Drvtm. wuuiure DM There an 
or about Sth March iM6 

(EatMo about C7.000) 

THOMSON. nSDCRICK OEOROE 
T homs on, tw of 135 Smhre rom. 
Owtaatort. Eatx Oku There on JZJh 
May 1986 

■Outo about Cbl.ooo) 

TURNER. LEONARD TURNER Me of 
SSI MR MI. Road. Genome. B wmmm. 
w«d Ciaraorgan idea There oo or about 
20th February 1985 

(Estate about ClAOOoj 

WARD. CHARLES ERNST WARD tale 
of The WmsMb Nuraag Home, 3t Crook 
Loo- anttwmllL Kent <bed There oo 
nth September 1986 

fgqi*lfi CAtMOi 

w ICONS formerly CREWES nee 

S ENNEH . EVA MARY WIGGINS fanner. 

iy Crewcs nee SCnno*. widow late se 
Violet Harmer Loupe, swaaboreuph 
Drive. Brtonfon. East Suaoi died There 
oo 29UI March 1984 

(COM* about £10000) 
The aln at me above-named are requeued 
lo apply lo the Treasury Seucuor (B-Vj. 
Oueen Anne's Chambers. 28 Broadway. 
London SWIM 9JS. fatkoo winch um 
T reosury Sodcuor may take mops to ad- 
(lUnMIer Ihe Mbit. 

ANDERSON. WILLIAM ANDERSON late 

I of tl Vtcaraor Dane. Ran runr-onTTrm. 

I Nodnonam died There on I9tn Feoruary 
1986 

irrefahBiy estate about £129.0001 
TMe kin of Ihe above named are requested, 
lo apply to Murs . Johnstone. Sharp a 
W ood. Sodotor* of RosuU House. Tudor 
Square. West Bndoford. NOUlnShara NG2 
6BT 


NMD • Gome beck soon. Sarah 


! AYUUCTEAM - the link* between North 
Aina and lietand. The oriptnal award- 
winning trUoqy of fllme las seen on 
Ch.ai now available on 180 nun VH 8 in 
a I united edition UOO) signed by the 
Wrller /Director. (£651 Enqulrtes to.- 
Cine pa eL Carraroe, Co. Galway. Tel 
Galway 96158. 

H E N L E Y REOATTA Business or Msaaimi 
eniertaizunp. Lnciouve use of elegant 

- m etude hotel near Bridge lor a party or 
up lo 24 daily. Plmras / caurapogne re- 
cepUan. enriosure ackets. suherb 4 
course luncheon, cabin cruiser, private 
party. Regency House. Henley. (0491)- 
571133 f 671741. 

B AL L! ZU QA IH h H BProi del BaitM P. 
GalUZugsm. vu ArrhUnede 195. Roma 
00917. holy. Mrs. J. F. Hrpper. The 
marriage took place on December 6 th 
between del Boronl Pmdo GalU Zugaro 
Mid Mrs. Jonquil llepper in Gerfhdo. 
Uaty. 

W Beryl utte wnuama) the late David 
Darners couHn*s daughter will on Ui 
touch wllh w H Jones. 17 Pthwuse 
Avenue. Romford. RM 6 4QB Hie may 
hear of something to her edvanthge. 


WANTED 


SPINK 

Buy War Medals 

Including Orden & Dctoranom 
Soink & Son Limned 
6-7 King Street. SLJames's 
Lanaon SWiv 6 QS 
Tel 01-930 7888 (24 hoare) 

ESablisM 1666 


CASH IN ON 
HIGH PRICES 

by selling your 
Jewellery-CoM-Gus etr 

GANCE 

Rear of 24 Hatton Garten. 
London EC 1 N 880 


01-242 3151 


wamtis tdwmnuan. vioortan and ah 
palmed furniture Mr Ashton oi 947 
6946. 667-049 Garraa Lane. EarMrid. 
SWI7. 

WANTED DESPERATELY 3 Uckrta 
Ptaddo Dendngo OteOo. Geveeu Car- 
den. any date, fulfil 80 year old's 
amunaiB. aa«06 2747 evening*. 

Ct WANTED Large Vic wwtfrobes. 
chaim. extending UMes. 

daks, bookcases, bureaus & oo gUMSw 
etc. OI 946 7685 day OI 7U9 047I eves. 


FOR SALE 


YOU’LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RES 1ST A CARPETS 

Wieanders beau ttfu natmi cork ui«s. 
Cxtrecnaty hard wearmp ihe bed am. 
ev can buy £8 96 per sg yd ♦ vaL 
Moauion vefver pile carpel 14 plain 
colours. Bull! m unoenay 12* wide 
from Hoc*. 7 year wear guarantor far 
home or office. C4 76 per sq yd vaL 
Plus the largest selection of plain car- 
peting in London. 

182 Upper Mcnmond Road 
London Swt4 

TekO I -876-2089 

Free Esti m a tes Expert Fining 


THE HOLLY & THE IVORIES 
THE BEST THAT YOU CAN TRY 
IF YOU WANT A TUNE 
THAT WILL MAKE YOU SWOON 
WE SELL & ALSO HIRE ! 

(from only £ 16 pmj 
MARKSON PIANOS 

Albany SL NWi 
01 936 8682 
Anuery Place. SEI8 
01 854 4517 


BROADWOOO Oand N0.4S4OT. Mahoga- 
ny over st r u ng. £1 .ooo.nx : Walton oo 
Thames (0932) 243596. 


HARP Erard double • action. Authenticat- 
ed IB37 V A A records. Beautiful 
condition- Oners tovltad. Teb 0464 
612448. 


hear of something lo her advantage. STEMWAY naewood. 5 ft 10 Inch grand 

me PlNio for sale. Approx 60 years old. 

TiBSCIWWIMAl please Help etr Oialr- _ ruoo TeC 01- 458 3032 
man. Lord Tonypandy. provide more w* 

care, comfort and comoacuonsnip for — „ , l in „ ■ 

many tooeiy edd peoplf po aitt ow fliini ROSCnOQu Otning Table with 
please to the NaUonal Ben«vokfU Fond Hsttpraiy pearl inlay. Grrubr buf n- 
for the Agea New Broad 9 House. 36 lendMe to oMimg to som a. Ste chairej- 
New Broad Street Jjandeo EC2M 1NH. 2 carvers Included. Retail value £4.600 
E, my love. Only we know the troth, so w Ttf! J> Ph ‘“ ,w 

private, lust you and roe ki a life we 

Ar fiif ryl oi now we have. Better €PO Red telephone b ff i s i completcty re- 


FLATSHARE 


COBNAM r pre it rred lo share various 
cottage m cooseevaston a.-a SO mm 
watertdo. O/R. AO mod cons. £40 pw + 
tails. Tri. Cobhom 62800 alter 6pm. 
FLATMATES Sriectlvr Sharing Well 

nut intend ucior> service. PKe let for 

apgt: 01 589 6491. 313 BrontMon 
Rood. SW5 

twit Prof female N/S far O/R and own 
bath in levels home. Ail mod ton Cx- 
reUenl transport £48 Pw. (mon-in also 
Doss J Tri OI 871 1827 revel. 

W DULWKK Pro t m/I to snare lux flat 
dose Sin. v snaewus ♦ well lurtusned. 
£40 PW exrt ret tO) 01-761-0900 iH) 
01 -671-9648 after 6JS0pm 

SSIBOil moil I'llll HI Ill I 

house. Ship » other Nr tube £60 p-w. 
Die. TM:01 834 8000 IdaM <TJ 

CUWHM tOtmi Prttf N/S to snare me 
O/R Nr Tube £40 pw oca. Tri. Ql- 
222-9011 fWf or 01-6736114 (Hi. 

E. SHEEN (SW14J Prof N/S. own room. 

Clow BR to Waterloo. £40 pw loc. Tri. 
01 878 2993. 

IWBI I) 3rd person to share mod aenri. 
30 mins Moorgak. N/S. O/R. 
£14&cm. Teb OI 366 7148. 
HtBMBUWT.'M UM CTOW Nr Tube. N/S. 
O/R in share mixM Use. GCH. £136 
pan eoicl Tel: 01-6090060 after ipm 
MtMDTON N1 Female to share loc maced 
use. O/R. aB mod com. 6 mm tube. 
£S6 pw mrt Tri. OI 700 4416 avet 
NW2 Girl, own room m luxury flat. Tv. 
CH. video Communal gardens £46 pw 
Tel: 01 461 8841. 

OWN ROOM. Prof mat* /female In luxury 
shared house in Cambcrwrii. 10 mins 
from city £40 pw. Ta. oi-70i ow. 
PUTNEY HILL Ctrl 26*. n /%. share hot 
Ibrt O/nn. £200pcre Inc Teh 01 789 
8796 esc 

BJiCN Own entrance, charming single 
room, en wine ahowar etc. CSS P.w. TeL 
OI 375 S7&5 

SO large own roam supwsar flat near 
Oval tube. SuK young profeauonal non 
smoker. OO pw met. Tri: 01-701 0741 
4TB PERSON to Ware looc flat overlook- 
ing Bapenea Park. £68 pw esCL Tel. 
0963 622192. 

W2 Room lo M sharing m large house. 
CbOpw. Tel Ot 002 2137 (day) OI 727 
1007 (eves it weekends!. 

W4 3rd person to share house near river. 
Own siuS bedroom. 065 pan auS 
Tri. oi 9<M 3102 after to am. 
mnfdBI mml . Near Tune and BR. Own 
Roam in large house. Prof 24+. N/S. 
£139pcm. 946 0087 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


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London W86CJ 

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Long- Haul 01 -603 1516 
Europe A jSA 01-937 5400 
Ist/Busness 01-938 3444 

Govern men) Uc rw wl/ B onewl 
ABTA IATA AT OL/ 1458 


DISCOUNT FUGHTS 


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O/W 

£490 

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DISCOUNTED FARES 

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Del/Born £335 Rangoon £350 

Hong Kong £5JO Calcutta £428 

Huge Dnoome Avan on 1st & Club Ora 

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21 Swallow SI. Lomum Wl - 
01-439 2100/437 0537 


WINTER SPOUTS 


SKI WHIZZ 

ITS SNOWING! ITS 
ARRIVEDLSO GET V'OUR SKI'S 
ON: NOW! 

EXCITING BARGAIN PRICES 

20 DEC 1 WK. £149 

27 DEC I WK £190 

3 JAN I WK — -.^.£159 

Caned drains inckoive ofDqta 71c up 
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mlcv. retgdn A froupv 

RING 01-370 0256 
(24 hnU0999/0997 
Agents for AioJ 1820 


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20 DEC FROM £149! 

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-other dales £50 off 
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VAL Dttsrac & Tlgnre catered chalet 13 
Per <7 gays riu Mgj. Return coach only 
£12500 20 Oee £I6Sm> Uic return 
ntgnn. No surcharges also some Xmas 
availaMUly Leo Ares A Merujri Ski val. 
01 200 faOBOl24hrs) OT OJ 903 4444. 

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ski hotadays tn Uie best French resorts. 
Rmg lor new brochure now. 

Tri 01-789 2892. 

ABTA 69256 Aid 1383. 


DUX TO CAMCCULATIOM. Staffed chatri 
avalbriMr ut Switzerland iw Jan at £199 
Inclusive of fUghl iHeattirOwi H/B 
accom. Chimes. Tri: OI 223 0601 


. LEGAL NOTICES 


















PARLIAMENTARY 

NOTICES 


LONDON REGIONAL TRANSPORT 

Nonce is hereby given ttui apoHraaon Is 
bring made lo PBrtianwnl in the promt 
Session by London Regional Transport 
i— llic Corporauon"> lor leave lo Introduce 
a BUJ under the above name or snon uue 
lor purposes of wtueft the (oUowtng » a 
conoae summary 

To empower the Corporation and Lon- 
don Underground unwed r-Dir 
Company*^ lo rooslrucl works and ac- 
n litre lands and lor other purposes, us 

fOJIOVVS- 



5X1 WEST - MOW Offering superb Christ- 
mas specials to France and Switzerland 
SAVE up lo £200 lor Oetn. On 20/27 
Dec OI 7BS 9999. 


UX HOLIDAYS 


KENT Aims house, garden ransom. 
Win/Sum. Tri: OI 736 0602 or Sand- 
wich 613270. 


XMASs Srots/Border. S/C railage for 3 
£200 gw. Wing of lofty mansion for 9. 
£328 pw. Both 04. Idyllic. 089-084- 
609 


LUXURY HOME, furnished: holiday lets: 
four bedrooms: Lymington: £400 per 
week: write: 7 South Grove. Lymington. 
Hampshire. 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS WANTED 


COOK 


than any drea m , so full of love and Ma- 
rines*. just getting better all me uon. 
Always. R. 

THE ASMKALL COLLECTION opens to- 
day. Wednesday, al the Otdkmall Art 
Gallery. Gresham Street afternoon 
only, tram 2pm. From tomorrow dally 
106 rnol Sunday) taufl December 19. 
(See Art Galleriea). 

JOHN AMD MTU WHOM 81 II I ot 
Beichton. Cheshire, win pm be sending 
Qutsfman carts ms year but wtsh an 
Ihrirmany mends a Very Merry Oirtri- 
tnas and a Happy New Year. 

I MY LOVE. Its a mystary how afire 12 
predoas years nothing and no-aae in 
my Mfb ever compares with our love. 

. Never let K go Sweets. Love for ever. E. 

WAYNE DAVES and Lachlan Deuchar 
are the greatest doubles pair ever. 
WD/LD. 

P-F. Please telephone FRANCE 93 99 04 

63 


SERVICES 


IMBED EXAMS? TXUng a -gap yeari? 
Join ore 6 we ek whMre course In naty. 
Tri Art History Abroad. OI 244 8164. 


aiAMF A B M E OVY unmet owe wllh 
Style! Send an elegantly MR wrapped 
bottle, magnum or Jeroboam wfih a dis- 
tinctive card bearing yore personal 
message an ywhere tn the UK. Just 
phone 0233 89 208. 


8JLE. ta Beauriiamp PI. SW3. 01-267 
6066. Essex area. Oi 504 4142. wpi 
success rale. Man «M5+ In demand. 

MATHS COMMON DfTHANCE Inienstve 
Revision n*ei 3 mornings or S after- 
noons 15 to 19 December or B lo 9 
January 576. Tel 689 2627. 

riu'lMf CVS Ltd snhgpaml curricu- 
lum vitae documents. Details: 01-631 
3388. 

nriHMMl SERVICE. Flats A hies 
cleaned in London, very competitive 
quotes. 01361 7533 (T) 

CONVETANCMG by fully quaHtlM 8oUd- 
tors. £180 VAT and standard 
flirimme m e nt-v ring 0244 31939S. 

nUNDSMT. Love or Marriage AU ages, 
areas. Datritn*. Dept 10161 23 AMngdon 
Road. London W8. Tri: 01-930 1Q11. 

MARRIAGE & ADVICE Bureau Katharine 
Anen (ex Foreign Offtcei personal Inter- 
views. 7 Sedtey Pi. Wl. OI 499 2666. 

VISAS: USA. France. India. Aradratta + 
many odw countries. TRAVCOUR. 
Teb 01 223 6966 

CA9TTAL CVs prepare tdgh qoailly curric- 
ulum vboes. 01-607 79CO. 

BROKE. Loodon School of Bridge and 
Club. 38 Kings Road. SWS. 01-689 
7201. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 

We put 
an ad in the 
small print 
so you could 
stop 

another child 
making 
the headlines. 


Please .send a donation to 

Dr. A. Giltnour, NSPCC, 
Ref: 7!.«0, FREEPOST, 
London EClBIQQ.Qj^jg 


YOU CAN HELP 
OUR OPERATION 
BE A SUCCESS. 
OurSuigica] Research Fund 
relies sorely on do nano ns 
from the public. 

PJeasehefpusrocondnuc 

this vital worit by sending 
your donations 10: 

THE SURGICAL 

RESEARCH FUND 

Royal CoUese of Surgeons 
41 UpceinTInn Fields London 

WCZA3PN j 


irebiBiMd. deruned. lepainird rtc. 
U noted amount available. £640 each. 
Dellwry axtra. Oonacf M. Flaherty. It. 
Lmg Drive, ugmwaier. Suney. 

TME 1IMTI (1814-1986) This Xmaa give 
someone an an ornuial tour dated ihe 
very date they were born. £1 1.96 (Plus 
free 1870's Dewspaperi) Yesterdays 
News. 43 DundonaM Road. Cotwyn . 
Bay. TeL 0492 631 196/53 1303. 

DIAMOND: 4 a. soutane diamond sat Id 
18 ct. gold with diamond baguettes to 
shouldera. A bargain M £3JOtt Private 
sale. Tel: Hazri Sapcofe on Ot 734 
1330. 

FMEST ouaitty wool carpets. Ai hade 
prices and under, also avaBable 100*1 
extra. Large roam On remnants under 
half normal price. Chancery Carpets OI 
405 0453. : 

BtLLASD HIM Table 7ft mahogany. 
EJ. Riley. Recently re-vetveirt. £1.660. 
Tri 01-734 8181 (Offtcei 876 2230 
(Home) 

BMUIII I or METTLEBED manual Wlnter 
ode of repilra and reproductKm form- 
lure oonepences Saiuraay 2Ttn 
December. 

CANNON no wllh 28 mm lene plus fUrr. 
Vtv flash Folly auto. As new. £630 
ono Tel: OI 736 6644 after 5pm. 

SCATTBNMERS. Beil tickets for aU sold 
out events. Ore cUenls indude most 
major companies. Oedll rents accepted. , 
01-828 167a 

SHERATON STYLE Dining Tables, chairs, 
sideboards and desks. Catalogues Rom 
William Titunon. Cro u ch Lane. Borough 
Green. Kent- 0732 8832TB. 


TME TIMES 1785-1986. Other lines 
avail. Hand bound ready for presena- 
uon - also “Sresdays". £12.60. 
Remember When, OISBB 6323. 
T1CIUCTS POD ANY EVOrr, Phamom.- 
Cau. surilghi Exp. Chess. Les MB ad 
ttwnbn and eparta-Tei: B21-6616/828- 
0496JLEx / visa / Diners. 
KCHS1EM Grand. 1914. 6 ft. Ebon tod. 
Musicians Instrument. £4-200. 01 386 
4961. T. 

BUfGERE 3 piece suJIe. beauttfUDy 
carved ikw d He cane. ExceUem condlbon. 
£3,500 TeL 01 806 1322. 

BUOniini Boudoir Grand. Rosewood. 
Leipzig 1906. Excellent condibon. 
£3.750. Tel: (Balh) 0226 833152 
CATS, CMEH, Les Mtoand Phantom. AH 
theatre and sport. Tri 439 1763. Afl mo- 
tor credit cds- 

DWONT Fountain Pen. Unwanted otfl. 
RSP £264 - oners Inv tteo. Tel: (0784) 
63710. 

, PE — / RMBMS . Oeokres. eic. Can 
you buy cheaper? 8 4c S Lid. 91 229 
1947/8468 

KrtOffT Kit upritfit piano. Mahogany. 
New 1981. MlnL £1800 ono. Tri 0462 
713000. 

MASON AND HAMLIN m 7fl Grand Pl- 
ano. VGC Often around £5000. Teh 
0226 862323. 

PHANTOM OF THE OPERA Tickets aval 
Wimbledon. Rugby. Pop. Soon A all 
theatres. OI 240 8609/01 836 9910. 

RACOON coat ■ Sliver full length star to- 
12. Modern design, as new. £2 .250. Tel: 
Ot 387 9680 

SPMET Good randUMo but Deeds tuning, 
mnea forces sale. £1200 ono. TeL 0734 
733206 iraondnps only). 

TW PIAMO WORKSHOP Free credit over 

1 year ten* APRl on tho beat mtadlon of 
new A restored Planog.Law tnterest over 

2 yrs & 3 yrs. Wrinen guhhnVitri. Free 
cwaiogue. 30a Htgngate Rd. NWS. 01- 
267 7671. 


FLATSHARE 


CMSWICK Luxurious mansion flaL Ail 
facilities. Garage 10 nuns Tube. O/R. 
Prof M/F. N/S. £65 PW nxCL Tel: 01 
994 6126 wra/ wends) 


TWO Professional MUc/Fcmaie. non 
smoker » share new fantasy country 
house near Chrtfl Haspttal Station. All 
mod cons. £60 pw + bUla. Tel. 0403 
731984 (keep trytagl) 


5W19 2 mtm. Comers wood lube. Prof 
M/r. N/S O/R. Lust nat, C/H. 
£170pcm exc. 03727 29565 (days ref. 
CKI 01 503 0659 (eves). 


Ml IFA 2 to snare, lovely rm hi lovely 
mas., all mod cons, gd traoeporl. £38 
pp pw. 352 3932 


WANDS WORTH COMMON. Stunning mt 
des. flaL prof F req 1mm. O/r. nr trans- 
port. £46 pw. 01 874 4198 after 6pm. 

■UTCHAM m/.f. n/ s, o/.r. ComfortaSiie 
flat in ronservauen area. Nr b-anspon. 
Share (acuities 1 other. £130 pan nd, 
Tel: 685 0259. alter dpm 


AM T1CIIETS Specialists N York £229. 
LA/San Fran £329 Sydney /Melbourne 
£769. AH cured dally rooms Oartaw 130 
Jerrayn SlreeLOl 839 7144 


coaicui HJO ON nioMs/hols U> Eu- 
rope. USA 6 most destinauons. 
Diplomai Travel: 01-730 2201. ABTA 
LATA ATOL. 


AFRICAN SEAT SPECIALISTS. World 
Travel Centro. OI 8T78 8146. ABTA. 
IATA 


SPAM Faro. Xmas a. New Vear nights fr 
£109. n iggles Ol 736 8191. Alol/AMa. 


1ST 6 CLUB CLASS FUGHTS: Hu ge Dts- j 
counts. Sun world Travel. (057271 1 
26097 /27 109/27638. 


S. AFRICA From £466. 01-684 7371 
ABTA. 


TAME TMK OFF to ParN. Amsterdam. 
Brussels. Bruges. Geneva. Berne. Lau- 
sanne. Tunrtt. The Hague. Dublin. 
Rouen. Boulogne 6 Dieppe. Time Off 
2a. Oieewr Close. London. SW1X 7BO- 
01-236 BOTO. 

CMBSTMAS In Lanarate. 4wks for Ihe 
price oi 2. £339. Limbed avauabimy (or 
2 wks £339. 109231 778344. Tbnsway 
Holidays. ABTA- ATOL 1107. 

B OM B ABROAD? Alrry A Wheeler 
special Ur in ready-to-wear dghtwewhl 6 
tropical suu*.tuke<loaJioe»ory A aoraeeo- 
■M. 129 Regent Si London WI. 

ONE CALL for some of the beat deals tn 
flights, apartments, hotels and car hire. 
Tel London 01 636 6000. Manchester 
061 832 2000. Air Travel Advisory 
Bureau. 

SICILY FROM CHS Taormina hotels. 
Slrily a la Carte. Grand Tour. FUght 
only from £89 rm BLAND SUN Ol -222 
7462. ABTA/ATOL 1907. 

TRAVEL CCNIRE spectaUstng In Flret and 
Chib Class travel wortwide Budget 
Farrs Aussie. NZ. S. Africa. USA and 
Portugal wuhacrotn. Tel OI 66S HOI. 
ABTA 73196. 

AM BROKERS of fering cheapest fares 

available worldwide. Only a Phone cun 

away. CTW 01-960 0033 HO Unes) 
ABTA/ ACCESS- 

CHRISTMAS avaUabUKy- Gatwlek/Faro 
18 Dec £146 Malaga 2? December. 
£169. vaeunre. Ol 723 6964. Abla 
Aim Acccsa/visa. 

HAVE YOU GOT Your Turkey -87 bra- 
chure yen Ring Treklsh Dettoni 
Holidays new on Ol S9> 6901. AUd no 
20*7 

LATW PMKRICA, Low coot (bghls eg. 
RM £48G Lima £495 rlA. Also Small 
Group Holiday Joumeva leg Peru from 
£3501 JLA 01-747-3108 
LOW FARES WORLDWSJE . USA. N/S 
America. Far East. Africa. Aimne Aped 
Agt Trayvale. 48 Margaret Street. Wl. 
Ol 580 2928 iVba Accepted) 

PEW YORK, LA . USA. Worldwide desti- 
nations. For the cheapest farm, try us 
Id. Richmond Travel. I Duke Street. 
Richmond Surrey. ABTA 01-940 4073. 
MPPONAMt Sent sale lo U&A-Oulbbean- 
Far East Australia Call the 
professtanato abta IATA oc excepted. 
Tri 01 25* 5788 

WBRER SUN Specials price* lo Cyprus. 
Malta. Morocco. Greece. Malaga 6 Te- 
nerve Nov « Dec. Pan World Hobdays 
Ol 734 2562. 

XMAS, winter. Summer. Algarve. Tener- 
ife. Greece. Turkey. Spam. Cans. Sri 
Lanka and many more Iwb/Ushb. 
Ventura 0742 331 100. ATOL 2034 
talma. 
1783. 


SYD/MEL £636 Penh £0 66 All malor 
camera lo Aus/NZ- Ol 384 7371 
ABTA. 


CHEAP FLIGHTS worldwide. Haymarkct 
OX 930 1366. 


D IS CO UN T FARES Worldwide: 01-434 
0734 Jupller Travel. 


DKCDDNIED A RHODE F AMES World- 
wide. Tri U.TXL (07631 867036. 


FUGHTBOOKERS DtscouM Fare# world- 
wide. l st/economy. 01-387 9100 


MALAQA. CAMAIOES — Ol 441 nil. 
Travel wipe. Abla. AtoL 


BOROCCO SOUND. Regent SI. Wl. Ol 
73* 5307, ABTA/ A Id. 


LOWEST Air Fare*. Gcheduled Europe A 
Worldwide. Med Star TrtveL Ol 928 
3200 

LOWEST Air Fares. Europe and world 
wide. Ol 836 8622. Buckingham 
Travel. 

MOROCCAN MASK - Houdays. flights, 
acctim. car hire. Cafl Sra g nll Hobday*. 
Ol 629 9712 ABTA ATOL « 178 

ALL us CITIES. Lowest lares on major 
scheduled carriers. 01-5B4 7371_ABTA 


ALOARVC 4 lux tiUMde villas. s/pooL len- 
m court, maid r e rvt c e . magnaflceni 
views- 30 mine Faro airport. Slpa 6 A 6 
Tei Ol 867 3291 

BRITTANY Lovely vlUa. Sea 400 yards. 
Superbly equipped. Sleeps 12. Te*.- 01- 
226 7500. 

LANZAROTE. Lux apt* o/tooktno beach. 
Puerto del amm. + windsurfing, jan 
Availability. 01-540 1418 or 643 6443. 


WINTER SPORTS 


Enthusiastic responsible person re- 
quired to create Interesting menus 
for small holri restaurant. Formal 
catering training not necessary, but 
cooktng experience essential. 40 
hour week Including some week- 
ends. no evenings. 

Contact Fiona on 
727 2777 
after 10.30am. 

(No Agencies) 


truer HAMIT B 32*. from Janu- 
ary. wnn axpanence, 2 cnunroi f3 
years and 6 monthsi Id Hsmpalead 
home. Nursery duties only, as other 
staff kepi. TWO days s week and one 
weekend per month. First class refer- 
ence* essemlal. Plaase telephone Mrs 
Hayward on: 01-495 9369 (between 9 
are and 2 pm weekdays). 


TEMPORARY HOUSE KEEPER wanted 
. as soon as posable. London Wo. lot con- 
valesrenl bostness man and working 
wife. Live OUL flood cook, no cleaning 
req u mwl. Hours 10-5 pm approx. Ple oa e 
telephone 01-741 1272. 


CHALET OML required Unmed • 
Courchevel. Cooking eap nec. Tele- 
phone SklWhlZE 01370 0999/0266. 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
The Oiwcii ConnMMMn have ore- 
pared a draft redundancy scheme . 
providing for the venting of the church of 
Salnl Lennart. Colchester in im Redun- 
dant Churches Fund for care and 
maintenance iChrimsford diocese). Copies 
of the draft scheme may be obtained from 
the Church Conummoners. 1 MUtbaok. 
London SWIP 3JZ lo whom any reore- 
sentaboiu should toe sent within 28 days 
of the puMi cation of this notice. 

I LEGAL NOTICES 


*-A CLOS A Z Ptrach SM Chalet. Resident 
staff. Superb, trad, accom. S/cw apis. 
Tel 100 * 2 ) 603695 IdayV 602776 
tevask 

TAKE AOVAMTACE of us in January- 
VeriUer. VUIara. MerttoeL Megeve. SU 
LOS AtPCS. Ol tO 2 9766. 

V E R Birw . Devs jan. Maned chalet in ex- 
cellent IdcbUoo oflers dalcRXB food A 

service, guide from £iOOpppw. SM 
Erttngum. Ol STS 5997. 

ONLY £17Bpp 20 Dec. Lovely catered 
chalet Pones du soteU. Ski TotaL (09331 
251113. 

SKI FUCHTS. Daily U> Geneva. Zurich. 
Munich eic. From £59. SKI WEST. Tel , 
Ol 786 9999 

SIUWORLD Xmas HoH from £99 Andor- | 
ra 6 Ttgnes Brochure Ol 60C 4826 
24hr. ABTA. j 

COURCHEVEL OFFERS with Le SM. Dec 
13L99/£249 2wks Xmas £187 Jon 3 
L129/£199. 2 wks Jan to £129. All 
prices by coach. Add £40 by air. AU 
include half board/free wine m quality 
chalets, free guiding & hjiuon . For bro- 
chure caU Le SM 0484 548996. 

DON'T BOOK a ski holiday until you've ' 
read ev informative brochure, been 
overwhelmed by me valise A stunned hv 
Die Special Oners 6 FREE CMJd places 
reran an Krase* NY.) SU Freedom Ol- 
741 4686/4471 (2«hre) * Manchester 
061-236 0019 lAiot 432L 


FB5T/ CLUB Oass Concorde. Dtscotoilrd 
Cares. ■ Dunue Travel. 01-488 901 1 
ABTA 

MR I AND Daily (UghtB. £35 O/W. £66 
Rtn. FTanklurt from £69 Miracle Jrt 
Ol 379 3322 

HONE KONG £488, BANOKOK £369. 

Singapore £457 Ottter FEctncs. 01-68* 

651* ABTA 


CHRtSTOUS Departures. 1 week bi 
France £99 (S/O. Austria £1 19 (MoteD. 
Raly £109 cs/ca. MCI return flights. 
Many other bargains available.- CaU 
Nelisons. 0532442980 ABTA 
SHOW BITRAFOI South Tyrol. I week by 
coach ISO) December. £69 Hntf-BoanL 
Visa/Access. Also Christmas avatlBbU- 
Ry. Ring Edwards Holiday*. Ot 360 
9241. ABTA 70944. 

CHATEL FRANCE. Comfortable apart- 
ment. alee pi seven. Lovely view, 
available from 3rd Jan. Tri: 01 393 
943b lev esl. 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


CLEAR OFF FOR CHRISTMAS 


l 

.ALICANTE 

21,28/12 

FROM 
1 99 

ARRECIFE 

24,31/12 

£149 

FARO 

• 22^9/12 

£119 

MALAGA 

22,29/12 

£119 

PALMA 

20,28/12 

£]29 

TENERIFE 

24,26,31/12 

£129 

TEL AVIV ' 

22,24.30/12 

£139 


WHBU90N SWLBl Prof M/F, 2025 hr 
o/r ui mixed shared tea Gdn. 
waHi/mach. 10 mins BR/ruoe. £170 
pan. Tel 01236 4080 esn 272. fDbv) 
ot -5*3 065 8 after 7, so pm iEvmi 
WIM tll rrnftll. House mare, lux non 
smotana praresrionaL Near BriiHft Rau 
DWixt and Sort hen lines. £;to pan 
inrnmi e Telephone Tony after 6 pun. 
weekdays on 01 640 3023. 

CH I S WICK Prof M 26*. N/S. Own spa- 
Oot* rtn. m romlonabie friendly home. 
vmk>. CH. auto washer. £180 pan me. 
TW; 747 4780 riler 4pm 


SPEEDWING 
01-629 3368 


ABTA 8I53X 


ATOL 1824 


WANTED 


AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK 

Antique and Modern Jewellery. Watches. Sliver and Plate. Furniture, Bronzes, 
Enamels. Konev. Jude. Pewirr. Otria. Painttnp. Porrelatn. Glass. Old Doits. Toys 
and Teddy Bears etr. Antique 6 Pre 19409 CtoHvs. PaHey and other. Shawls, 
ntenworit Quills, samplers Costume Jewellery. Lace. Linens, all Masonic item.. 
Old musical boxes A Instruments and an other InleresUng articles. Intnudiale cash 
by irtum lor Jewencrj- and other Article) sew ay post. 

Our expert can tali on you. or call penonaOy uiuhou obbsailon. 

Gucd Mon - Sal 9.00 - 5.30 pjn, 

Greens AnUque Gaflerie*. 1*7 Kmsin^on Church Streri: 

London W8 7LN. Tri O* 229 9618 
(Atsp tn New York! 


VEBBER 

MOUBEL 
COL RMAYELIR 


| WINTER SPORTS j 

BLADON LINES 
The Biggest Choice on Skis 
CHRISTMAS CRACKERS 

Deps. 20/St December 7 nights 

CnaM Parties & Chalri Kotete 
from 1149 SAI^ VfGflJO 
from £149 VAL D'iSERE 
from £149 CRANS MWJTANA 
SELF CATERING From £99 


from £»49 
from £189 
from £149 


01-785 7771 

Self Catering A Hoick 


01-785 3131 

Cfrriri Parlies 


March Deps. 
0422 7B121 


GENERAL ENOUIRES 

01-785 2200 


ABTA 16723 
ATOL 1232 


MACMILLAN BLOEDEL HOLDINGS 

lUKl LIMITED 

Nonce is hereby preen pursuant u> 
Section 1 75 Cumpanles Act 1985 that: 

iai The above-named Company has 
approved a payment out of capital lor the 
purpose of acauumg Its own shares by 
redemption: 

<W The amount af the permtadWe eapUaJ 
payment B £2.974^56 in respect M me I 
redemption al par at 3 000.000 of the 
648S.B64 Issued 12 per cenl redeemable 
nod-cumulative preference shares of £1 
each In ihe Company wpo w wl In the 
name ot MacMillan BMedel Limited. A 
special resolution approving ihe payment 
out ol capital was passed al an extraordi- 
nary Genera) Meeting of the Company 
held on 4lh December 1986: 

rr> The atnutory dedanaiano made by 
all me dlrectora for the brae bring of tne 
Company and tne report of Messrs Price 
Waternoute. auditors to the Company, 
addressed lo the directors of the Commny 
and required by section 173 of the Compa- 
nies Art 1985 are available tor Inspection 
on any weekday (Saturday* and pubuc 
holidays excepted) unui 9ih January. 
1987 ai me itsa u rni office of ihe 
Company ab 

Lion House. Red Uon Street. 

Richmond. Surrey. England TW9 1RF 
id) A creditor of tne Company may. 
wtlhln 5 weeks Immediately foilowtng am 
December 1986. apply U) the court under 
section 176 Companies Act 1985 for an 
order protUMUng the payment. 

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD 
J.C. STEFF 
SECRETARY 

MACMILLAN BLOEDCL HOLDINGS (UK) 
LTD 


IN THE MAI I LH OF NOTEWORTHY 
ENGINEERS (SALES) LIMITED 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
Notice is hereby given that the credlto re 
of the above-named Company, which Is 
bring voluntarily wound up. are required, 
on or before the 2nd day of January 1987. 
lo send kn their fun ChnsUan and sur- 
names, Iheir addresses and descriptions, 
full particulars of their debts or claims, 
and Ihe names and addresses of iheir 
Solicitors ui any), to the undersigned Peter 
Schodey Dunn. FCA of 30 Eastbourne 
Terrace. London W2 6LF. the Liquidator 
of the sou Company, and. II so reowred 
by nonce tn wrung from Ihe said i kndda- 
t«r. m persomBy or by tftrir Sobctiors. 

lo come In and prove their debs or claims 

td such ume and glare as mall be nsedned 
in such notice, or In Default thereof they 
wfu be excluded (Tom the benefit of any 
distribution made before such debts are 
proved. 

DATED this 21M day of November 1986 
PS. DUNN 
LIQUIDATOR 


COWLARD COMPUTER SERVICES 
-LIMITED 

nn Creditors' Voluntary Lhnadauant 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Del tile 
credliars of the above-named Company 
are required, on or before the Jut day ot 
December 1986. to send their names and 
addresses, with particulars of tiutr debts 
or claiiTri to Ihe under si gned Ned Hunter 
Cooper, al Robson Rhodes. 186 City Road. 
London EC1V 2NU. the Uqmdarar ol the 
Company: ana it so required by notice in 
writing tram the said LMtadaior ettner 
personally or by iheir Sotiaicra. lo come 
in and prove Ihrir tutus or claims al such 
ume and place a* shall be specified in such 
police and m default thereof. Ihey wfU be 
excluded from me benefit of any dKtrtbu- 
uon made before ouch debts are proven. 
DATED Una Shift day of November 1986 
NEIL H. COOPER 
LIQUIDATOR 


COWLARD FLEET SERVICES LIMITED 
(In Creditors' voluntary Liquidation! 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Ihal the 
creditors of the above named Company 
are required, on w before the 31 S day of 
December 1986. lo send their name and 
addresses, wiut particulars of their debts 
or ciaiim to (he undersigned Net! Hunter 
Cooper, of Reborn Rhode*. 186 (biy Road. 
London EC IV avu. the LMuMalor of the 
Company: and if » required by notice in 
writing (ram ihe said Liquida t or el I Her 
personally or by Ehetr sottcliors. to come 
in and prove mar debts or claims at suen 
nine and place as shall be opecmed la such 
nouo- and In default thereof, ihey will be 
excluded from Ihe beneftl of any distribu- 
tion made before such debts are prtvw 
DATED ihfe 26111 day of November 1986 
NEIL H. COOPER 
LIQUIDATOR 


works u be constructed by me Company - 
Work No. 1 • A subway and UI shaft at 
the Company's Angel station In the Lon- 
don borough of WlnglMi: 

works Nov. 2 and 5 - Two railways <244 
metres and 227 metres in lenguik being 
additional sidings souih and north respec- 
bietv of the Company's Finchley Central 
Station m the London borough of Barnet : 

Work No. 4 . A radway <210 metres m 
length), being additional sidings in the 
Company's Stonebridge Park Depot In ihe 
London trarough of Bnmc 
works lo be con st ructed by Die corpora- 
tion - 

Work No. 5 - A railway 1410 metres in 
lenqUiial Pudding Mill Lane in the London 
borough of Newham lo form part of Work 
No l betng constructed under Uie London 
Docklands Railway Act 1986. 

2. Special proviMam In connection with 
ihe ronstrunlon. of me p r oposed works, 
inrtuaing the bridging by Work No. 6 of 
Pudding Min Lane and Marehgale Lane. 
Newham. 

3. AcuuMttan by the Company for Work 
No. t and by Hie Corporation for Work 
No. 5 of lands, or suomii or new rights 
only, and power lo me lands, in the areas 
aforesaid, inctiatiog provmon for arqulst- 
Uon of subsoil or new nghn only in 
certain cased temporary possession of 
land by the Company to enable them lo 
construct Work No. 1: extinction of rights 
of way over (he Lands lo be aoautred or 
used and special provisions aa to entry and 
compensation. 

4. Further power for me Company lo 
acquire lands in Uie London boroughs at 
Southwark and Tower Hamlets for Ihe 
purpose at reconstructing and enlarging 
the tictert lulls al Elephant and Castle and 
wapping stations re s pectively. 

5. Power for me Company to open up 
me surface ot Torrens Street In tfta Lon- 
don borough of htingmo. to stop up 
temporarily part of that street and lo nar- 
row and hop up a farther pan of that 
street: and power for the Corporation lo 
interfere with Ihe surface of. and to stop 
up temporarily, parts of Pudding MUI 
Lane and Marsngaie Lane In use London 
borough of Newham. 

6. Power for the Corporation te make 
prevision for ihe payment of addmonal 
lares on the proposed railway comerMng 
work No. «k 

7. Appllcalkai of section 168 01 thr Road 
Traffic Act 1972 lo the British Transport 
Ponce Force in respect of an alleged of- 
fence at a level crossing or on a road 
forming an access or approach to premises 
of Ihe Corporatrao. 

8- Provision for me amalgam Mon Into a 
olntfe Scheme of the London Tran sp ort 
Pensi on Fund and the London Transport 
1970 Superannuation Fund. 

And Notice ta further given that Mans 
and sections of the intended works. Includ- 
ing plans of the lands proposed to be 
acquired or used comnuisomy. together 
wilti a book of reference lo such plans, 
have been deposited for public Inspection 
wiih the Chief Exrcuttve and Town Cterk 
ol the London Boroucdi of Barnet ol Town 
Han. The Burroughs. Hendon. London 
NW4 48C. with meChM Executive ofthe 
London Borough of Breni al Brent Town 
Hall. Forty Lane. Wemotay HA9 9 HD. 
wilh Uie Chief Executive of the London 
Borough ol Islington al Town Hau. Upper 
Street. London Nl 2UD. with the Chief 
Executive of the London Borough of New- 
ham ai Town Hail. Barking Road. London 

E6 2RP. with the Chief Executive of ihe 

London Borough of Southwark ai Town 
Hall. Prrkham Road. London SEB BUB 
and with the Chief Executive of the Lon- 
don Borough of Tower Hamlets al me 
Town Hau. Pan-Mi- Square. London E2I 
9LN 

On an after 4Ui December 1986 a copy 
of uie Bui for ihe inunged Act may be 
Inspected and copies obtained at the price 
of 50g each at the under -mention rd 
ofllcea. 

OMecaon lo the Bm may be made by 
depositing a Petition against it. If me BID 
mgiulri in Ihe House of Commons, the 
teles! uaie for Depositing suctra Petition tn 
the Pnvale BID Office of that House will be 
30th January 1987 If il oriwnaies in Die 
House of Lords. Uie latest dale tor deposit- 
ing vurh a Petition In Uw Office of tile 
Clerk ol Uie Parliaments In Dial House will 
be 61h February 1987. Further Informa- 
tion may be obtained from me Office of 
me Clerk of the Parliaments m me House 
of Lords, ihe Private Bid Office of ihe 
House of Commons or Ihe under -men- 
tioned ParUBmeniory Agents. 

DATED 3rd December 1986 
I.C- UNO 
London Regional Tl an n um 
66 Broadway 
Westminster 
London SW1H OBD 
Solid lor 

SHERWOOD ft GO.. 

Queen Anne's Chandlers 

- 3 Dean Farrar Streri 
Westminster 
London SWIM 9CO 
Parliamentary Agents 


IN PARLIAMENT 
SESSION 1986-87 
LONDON DOCKLANDS RAILWAY 
rBECKTON) 

Notice Is hereby given that application k 
being made lo ParUamem in Ihe prasenl 
Session by London Regional Transport 
(“Die Corporation ”i tor leave to introduce 
a BU under the above name or short title 
for purposes of which the raitowtng Is a 
concise summary.- 

1 ■ Construction of works in me London 
Boroughs gf Newham ana Tower Hamlets 
to provide an exten sion of the Docklands 
Railway to Beck (on comprttang connec- 
tions (Works Noo. I and 2 respectively 566 
metres and 871 metres In length) with the 
Docklands Railway, as aumorHad by the 
Londo n nork i ai Kta Railway Acts 1984 
and 1985. a now railway (Work No. 3. 
7.763 metres In MnOUi) 16 Becfcton and Bn 
exfemdon (Work* Nos. 4 and 6 respective- 
ly 687 metres and S6 metres In length) 
bilo die site of the former Beckton Holder 
Station gas works: Including special provi- 
sion in connection wllh me construction, 
use and maintenance of me proposed 
werla and as id Ihe use of electrical power 
on ihe proposed railways and Ihe bridging 
of a pan of the river Lett known as Bow 
Creek: 

2. A condition of lands, or new rights 
only, and power lo use lands. In the areas 
aforesaid Extinction' of rkiiis of way over 
Km lands to be acquired or used and spe- 
cial provtatons as to entry and 
compensation. 

3 . Power for the corporation to ctoo up. 
diver! or narrow pans of specified Streets 
or roads In the London boroughs of New- 
ham and Tower Hamlets; to open im the 
surface of parts of soecUled streets m the 
said London boroughs and to divert Die 
footpath In the London barourii of Now- 
ham between Tidal Baton bowl and 
victoria Dock Road and which crosses uie 
North Woolwich tin* of tne British Rail- 
ways Board by meant or a bridge. 

4. Power for the Corporation |q make 
provision tor the payment of additioaal 
fares on me proposed railways. 

And Notice M further given that plans 
and sections of Die inlendM works, includ- 
ing puns or tne land* proposed to be 
acquired or used compulsorily, together 
with a book of rrirrenr* to such Dions, 
havr been depostlrd iot public inspection 
with Ihe Chief Executive of the London 
Borough of Newham al Ms office al the 
Town HaiL Barking Road. London E 6 
2RP and wfih Ihe Chief Executive of tne 
London Borough of Tourer Hamlets at his 
Mflrc oi Die Town HalL Pamoi Square. 
London E2 9LN. 

On and after 4Ui December 1986 a copy 
of the BUI tor the intended Act may be 
Inspected and coptrs obtained at Ihe price 
of SC* each ai Die under -mentioned of- 
fice*. Otnection lo the Bill may or made by 
depositing a Petition against it. If Uie BUI 
onguiates in the House of Commons, me 
lauu dale tor dcpusumg such a Petition id 
the Private Bill Office of Ihrf House will be 
30(h January 1987. H it ongiiuies ui ihe 
House of Lords. Ihe tales) dole for decant- 
ing such a Petition in Ihe Office of Ihe 

Clerk of Hu- Partiamenis in mal House will 
he 6 U 1 February 1987. Further informa- 
tion may be obtained from the office of uie 
Clerk of tne Parliaments ui thr Hoioc of 
Loros, the Pnvale BUI Ofice of Ihe House 
of Commons or the under mentioned Par 
llamenianr Agents. _ 

dated 3rd December 1966 
LE. KING 
London Regional Transport 

66 Broadway 
Westminster 

London- SWIH OBD 
SobMor 

SHERWOOD ft CO- 
Oueen Anne's Chambers 
Westminster 

London SWIH 9LO 
PMUttncniary Agents 











Relatives of dead to see new Sir Galahad launch 


By Peter Davenport, Defence Correspondent 


Relatives of the Welsh 
Guardsmen who died in the 
bomted landing ship Sir Gata- 
. had in the Falklands war have 
been invited to attend the 
launching ceremony for her 
replacement 

Fifty men died in the worst 
single tragedy of the conflict 
and the television pictures of 
the desperate efforts to rescue 
those trapped on board were 
among the most vivid legacies 

of the fighting. 

The subsequent docum- 
entary on the ordeal of one of 
the survivors. Guardsman Si- 
mon Weston, horrifically 
burned and straggling to re- 
turn to a life as near norma] as 
possible, also ensured that 
memories of the Sir Galahad 
disaster did not fade. 

On Saturday her successor 
win be launched at the Swan 
Hunter yard at WaUsend, on 
Tyneside, by Lady Tippet 
wife of the Chief of Fleet 
Support, Vice Admiral Sir 
Anthony Tippet 

The event will be watched 
by 23 relatives of the men who 
died, most of than Welsh 
Guards, and by Mr Ken 
Adams, her former chief en- 
gineer, who was awarded the 
Queen's Gallantry Medal for 
removing a 10001b bomb from 
the l anding ship just days 
before she was fatally hit 

The earlier Sir Ga l ahad 
sailed for the Sooth Atlantic 
on April 6, 1982 with 250 
Marines on board. On May 
24, three days after arriving at 
the Fa lklands . she was hit by 
the bomb whidi lodged in the 
battery charging room but 
failed to explode. 

On June 8 she sailed to the 


Fitzroy settlement and it was 
while preparing to land her 
party of Welsh Guards at 
Bluff Cove that she and the 

landing ship Sir Tristram were 

bombed by an Argentine air- 
craft. They immediately 
caught fire, and the Sir Gala- 
had was still burning on Jane 
25 when she was towed out to 
sea and sunk as a designated 
war grave. 

Yesterday the lessons 
learned by her loss were 
outlined by Mr Alex Marsh, 
the joint managing director of 
Swan Hunter. 

The £40 million vessel will 
be bigger, stronger and more 
powerful, with improved 
firefighting facilities, d a m a g e 
control, escape routes and 
fireproof materials to protect 
the 339 Marines and 52 
sailors she can cany. 

The earlier Sir Galahad had 
aluminium deckhouses which 
melted in the fire and soft: 
furnishings which gave off 
lethal fumes. Her successor 
has an all-steel super- 
structure, flame-resistant fur* 
niture and a system to 
disembark troops quickly. 

The vessel, 140 metres long, 
can also bold 18 Chieftain 
tanks, 20 heavy vehicles ami 
launch large helicopters and 
assault craft. 

Mr Marsh said: “We can- 
not say that the tragedy of the 
first Galahad would not hap- 
pen again but the lessons of 
the FaDdands have been incor- 
porated into the design. 

“From the point of view of 
the architects it showed how 
designs that were developed 
over the past 25 years actually 
performed in practice." 


\ r ;rfx 

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Nyerere predicts 
bleak short-term 
future for Africa 


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LAGOS (Reuter) - Africa 
cannot throw off the burdens 
of poverty, neo-colo nialisrn 
and human rights abuses until 
it stops apologising for its 
existence, Mr Julius Nyerere. 
one of the continent's most 
respected elder statesmen, 
said here. 

The former Tanzanian 
President in an address stud- 
j ded with unsparing self-enti- 
; cism. predicted a shon-terra 
fin ure for Africa which was 

gloomy both economically 
and politically. 

“Until now Africa has not 
admitted, even to itself, the 
truth about its post-indepen- 
dence status in the world- 

“Even regional political 
unity has proved very difficult 
to achieve. The Founding 
Fathers of independent Africa 
— of whom I am one — have 
failed our people in this 
important respect," he said. 

The optimism at indepen- 
dence 25 years ago had been 
replaced by pessimism, he 
said, as the continent re- 
mained tied to its old colonial 
masters, powerless to prevent 
its foreign debt from piling up 
and unable to fulfil its people's 
hopes for democracy and hu- 
man rights. 

Mr Nyerere, at 64 white- 
haired but fit and sparkling 
with humour, kept his audi- 
ence enthralled for over two 
hours on Monday night at the 
Nigerian Institute of Inter- 
national Affairs. 

The Mwalimu (teacher in 
Swahili) was delivering the 
keynote address at the think- 
tank's 25th anniversary 
celebrations, the high point of 
a five-day private visit to 
Nigeria. 








Indonesian warning on 
human rights curbs 


*!* 


I? 




II 




Jakarta (AFP) - A leading 
Indonesian human rights law- 
yer said yesterday that govern- 
ment actions against freedom 
of expression in Indonesia had 
become a state habit and may 
be getting worse. 

Mr Muiya Lubis, director of 
the Legal Aid Institute, said a 
human rights commission 
should be set up in Parliament 
and a directorate of human 
rights should be added to the 
Attorney-General's office. 
Monitoring of human rights 
coaid then be carried out more 
comprehensively. 

Referring to the closnre of 
two newspapers and the black- 
ing out of foreign press articles 
in the past six months, he 
said:“It seems to have become 
a state habit carried out in the 


name of national interest” 

Mr Lubis' recommenda- 
tions were contained in a 
Legal Aid Institute report on 
the state of human rights in 
Indonesia during 1986 re- 
leased yesterday. 

He "said overall human 
rights fared neither better nor 
worse than in 19S5. with a 
positive move in Indonesia's 
signing the United Nations 
Convention against torture 
and other cruel, inhuman or 
degrading treatment or pun- 
ishment in October 1985. 

But with regard to press 
freedom, he said the most 
worrying development was 
the closure of the country's 
second largest daily. Sinar 
Harapan, last October. 



Despite the bfeak realities 
he painted. Mr Nyerere saw 
better times ahead if Africa 
began by collectively 
acknowledging its present 
neo-colonial status. 

“Then we will reject that 
status and begm to struggle 
against it. 

“We will stop apologising 
for our existence, our poverty, 
or our demands for justice.” 
he said. 

He drew roars of laughter 
from the political military 
and diplomatic elite gathered 
to hear him. when he mocked 
the way African countries had 
been fobbed off at indepen- 
dence with the trappings of 
nationhood, but not the 
substance. 

“We had presidents, flags, 
national anthems. I used to get 
a 21 -gun salute, and it looked 
fine. 

“But too many of us are still 
satisfied with that status. It is 
ridiculous, we’re unfree." 

Mr Nyerere, who stepped 
down as' president last year 
after 23 years but retained the 
chairmanship of Tanzania's 
sole political party, gavea roll- 
call of the economic handi- 
caps crippling the continent. 

After the rapid progress of 
the 1960s in combatting pov- 
erty. disease and under- 
development. per capita 
income in real terms bad 
declined since 1981. Africa's 
debt burden was the highest of 
any region in the world once 
related to the size of its 
economy, he said. 

Many countries, including 
Tanzania, had less foreign 
exchange than could pay for a 
single month's imports, be 
added. 


Is*’!: 

I 2 - >■ 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 

The Duke of Edinburgh, Presi- 
dent of the International Eques- 
trian Federation attends a 
dinner and presents the prizes 
for the TARMAC/FE3 Inter- 
national Showjumping Com- 
petition at Saddlers’ Han, 7.15. 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother dines with the Benchers 
at the Middle Temple. 7.45. 

The Prince of Wales visits the 
Royal Fine Art Commission. 7 


St James's Square. 3: and at- 
tends a reception to mark the 
twenty-fifth annivesary of the 
Knightsbridge Association at 
Knightsbridge Barracks, 6; and 
as President of the Prince’s 
Trust, accompanied by the Prin- 
cess of Wales, attends a charity 
concert given tor the Euryth- 
mics. in aid of the trust, at 
Wembley Arena, 8. 

The Duke of Gloucester visits 
the United Biscuits Factory at 
Waxlow Road, Harlesden, 
NW10. 11. 

The Duchess of Gloucester. 
Patron of the Foundation for the 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,225 


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ACROSS 

1 Correa suit for London 
society (6,4). 

9 Support for what is laid on 
the table (3-3). 

10 Witticism by Jim sounds 
cheap (8). 

11 Basis for the diviner studies 
of the Romans (8). 

12 The spirit of Japan echoed 
by this writer (4). 

13 Fterris takes seat in man- 
ually-controlled vehicle 
00 ). 

15 Schoolman returns annota- 
tion to Scots boy (7). 

17 Collage size increased (5-2). 

20 Psychiatrist can be liable to 
contract (101 

21 Assistant gets the wrong 
idea (4). 

23 TuDy, born dragoman (8). 

25 Gipsy gent with money for 
health food (3,5). 

26 Exit the anonymous Dark 
Lady (6). 

27 Pooh's there, representing a 
believer in divine intuition 

' 00 ). 

DOWN 

2 A problem one doesn't be- 

to imagine, somehow 

3 Naiad concealed by sea 
monster from islander (8). 

4 Early riser gets a work 
medal perhaps (6,4). 


5 Lucerne, for example, is al- 
lowed a little water (7). 

6 Bowed to talent (4). 

7 Busy outside at start (8). 

8 Address A postal order to 
half die chorus (10). 

12 Material witness to a shoot- 
ing (10). 

14 Editorial reduced — there's 
do one in the van (10). 

16 Written down about the best 
performance (2,6). 

18 Rent reduction greeted with 

this? Surety oot (4-4). 

19 Head's side gives old boy 
some lines (7). 

22 The cost, commonly, of in- 
jury (6). 

24 Kind of house where love 
finds a way (4). 

Solution to' Puzzle No 17,224 


n G H E 
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asBiaarai 
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aittagBEE c^HUEGGiil 

iLSLS 5 n m m 

ra g b ra n ie e> 
iUSGSEiiOEGra 

-'JImSUS ® 151 e. h 

rJggr&Eg; aisnnuiHisa 


Concise Crossword page 12 



Study of Infant Deaths (Cot 
Death Research and Support) 
attends the premiere of "An 
Italian Straw Hat” at the The- 
atre of Comedy, Shaftesbury 
Avenue, 7.55. 

The Duke of Kent opens the 
new tunnel for the AI (M) in 
Hatfield, 11.45; and a new 
extension to the Hertfordshire 
Police Headquarters, Welwyn 
Garden City, 12: then opens the 
new offices for the Broxbourae 
Borough Council, Hertforshire, 
2.45. 

The Duchess of Kent, Presi- 
dent. attends the Congregation 
of Awards Ceremony at the 

1 Royal Northern College of 
Music, Manchester, 12.25. 

Last chance to see 
A Reputation Amongst Art- 
ists: work by 8-10 new artists, 
Norwich School of Art Gallery, 
St George Street. Norwich; Mon 
to Sat 10 to 5 (ends Dec 2). 
Music 

A Concert of Carols by The 
Bristol Junior Choir St Geor- 
ge's. Brandon Hill, Bristol. 7. 

Recital: Thomas Trotter, Bir- 
mingham Town Hall, i. 

Carols in the Courtyard: Na- 
tional Trust.' Ctinons Ashby 
House, Canons Ashby, Dar- 
en try, 7 30. 

Geoffrey Chaucer School 
Carol Service: Nave, Cathedral 
Church of Christ, Canterbury, 7 
3ft 

Bournemouth Symphony Or* 
Chester play Haydn, Bartok and 
Dvorak, Wessex Hall, Poole, 7 
30. 

Strathclyde University C ham , 
her Orchestra in conceit at 
Assembly Hall University of 
Strathclyde, Montrose Sheet, 
Glasgow, 8. 

Concert by Ladies of the HalI6 
Choir: includes Sibelius, Mozart 
and Holst. Free Trade Hall 
Manchester, 7 30. 

Hampshire Fire Brigade Car- 
ol Service: Winchester Cath- 
edral 7 30. 

The London Brass Virtuosi: 
the world’s first professional 
brass band appear at Wigan's 
Mill Wigan, 7 30. 

Talks, lectures 
Stepping Out Into The Uni- 
verse: by Dr T Shanks am) Dr J 
R Lucey on distances in the 
Universe, James Duff Lecture 
Theatre, University of Durham, 
Physics Dept, South Road, Dur- 
ham. 7 30. 

General 

Visual Arts at Plymouth Arts 
Centre: Christmas cracker crafts 
[ for sale, 38 Looe Street, Plym- 
; oath, (ends Dec 24). 

It’s Christmas: Bexhill Floral 
Group Demonstration, De La 
Warr Pavilion, Bexhiri-oa-Sea. 

23 a 

Beauty and the Beast: pre- 
sented by Tweed Theatre Com- 
pany. High School, 'Peebles, 
(until Dec 13). 

1 7th and 1 8th century Eng- 
lish sculpture, 12. and 17th 
and 18th century dress in the 
Dress Collection 2 30, V and A 
Museum. Cromwell Road en- 
trance. 

A life in Movies: Michael 
Powell ICA. The Mall SWl. 
1. 


Books - hardback 

The Literary Bfitoris selection of In terest in g books published this week: 
AphrotSsias, (Sty of Venus Aphrxxfte, fay Kenan T Erin (Muller, 
EHondfi White. £35) 

Falconry and Hawking, by Phillip Glasier (Batsford, £25) 

Head Above Water, by Buchl Emecheta (Ogwugwu Afo, E1SL95) 

Print and Cutture in die Renaissance, Essays on the Advent of Printing in 
Europe, edited by Gerald P Tyson and Sylvia S Wagonhebn (Associated 
University Presses, £2050) 

The British School at Athens, The Rrst Hundred Years, by Helen 
Waterhouse (Thames & Hudson, £18) 

The Ststine Chapel Michelangelo Rediscovered, edited by Massimo 
Giacometti (Muller, Blond & White, £40) 

Us and Them, A Study of Group Consciousness, by WA. Effiott (Aberdeen 
University, £125(9 

Victorian Jews through British Eyes, by Anne and Roger Cowen (Oxford, 

Whitaker's Almanack 1987 (Whitaker. £13.95) 

Working Dress, A History of Occupational Clothing, by Diana de Marly 
(Batsfora, £17.50) 

PH 


( WEATHER ridge win move E as fronts approach W districts. 

^ / Most places will have a crisp and frosty start to the day. 

Clearer showery weather will reach NW. Temperatures will be dose to normal bat 
it will become windy. Outlook for tomorrow and Friday: Omthming unsettled. Ram 
clearing, followed by colder weather with showers bit further rain reaching W 
parts later. 


HIGH TIDES 


The pound 


AnatnSaS 

Austria Scb 
Belgium Fr 
Canada $ 

DenmaifcKr 
Finland Mck 
France Fr 
Gentian* Dm 
Greece Or 
Hong Kong $ 

Ireland Pt 
Italy Lira 
Japan Yen 
Nemananasua 
Norway Kr 
PortugalEse 
Sooth Africa Rif 
Spain Pta 
Sweden Hr 

USAS 

Yugoslavia Qnr 

Bates for sreal denomination bank notes 
onh ss supplied by Barclays Bar* PLC. 
Different rates apply to traveHers" 
cheques end other foreign currency 


Bated Pries todne 3884 
London: The FT Index doa 
1264.4. 

Anniversaries 


as op at 


BirthsCfesar Franck, Lfcge, 
1822; Em3y Dickinson, poet, 
Amherst, Massachusetts. 1830. 

Deaths: Paolo Uccello, pain- 
ter. Florence, 1475; Alfred No- 
bel chemist and industrialist, 
founder of the prizes bearing his 
name. San Remo, Italy. 1896: 
Sir Joseph Hooker, director of 
the Royal Botanic Gardens 
1S65-85, Sunningdale, Berks, 
1911; Charles Rennie Mack- 
intosh, architect, London, 1928; 
Lnigi Pirandello, Rome, 1936; 
Damon Runyon, writer, author 
of Guys and Dolls, 1946; Henry 
Cowell composer. New York. 
1965. 

Parliament today 

Commons (2-30): Teachers' Pay 
and Conditions Bill remaining 
stages. 

Lords (2.30): Debates on the 
housing situation and on. 
Government measures to com- 
bat Aids. 

Christmas Post 

Today is the last recom- 
mended date for posting Christ- 
mas airmail parcels and packets 
to most European and eastern 
European countries, and for 
surface mail to BFPO 15-49, 
Exercises In Europe, 861 - 809, 
811, 813, 825. and HM Ships in 
European waters. 


Roads 

London and. the South-east 
A3(k Delays in Staines near 
Shorts Lane. A404: Delays near 
Wembley Hill Road. AIM: 
Hatfield tunnel opens lunch- 
time, reducing delays. 

The Midlands: M5: Roadworks 
junctions 5 (Droitwich) to 6 
(Worcester). No access north- 
bound at junction 6. A456: 
Bypass construction at Bewdley 
is disrupting route to Bir- 
mingham. AI: Roadworks nor- 
thbound between Peterborough 
and Huntingdon. 

Tbe North: M6: Lane closures at 
junction 23 (Merseyside). M61: 
Roadworks northbound junc- 
tions 3 to 6 (Greater Manch- 
ester) 9: Lane and entry/exit 
closures between Leven Valley 
viaduct and Cralhorne 
interchange. 

Wales and West MS: Lane 
restrictions northbound bet- 
ween junctions 20 (Ctevedon) 
and 21 (Weston super Mare); 
lane closures both directions 
between junctions 26 and 27 
(near Wellington). A30: East- 
bound lane closed for resurfac- 
ing, Camborne bypass. 

Scotland: A720: Width restric- 
tions Drum brae Road South, 
Edinburgh. Inverness: Width 
restrictions at Kenneth Street 
roundabout. A81: Repairs on 
Rednoch Bridge, east of port of 
Montieth, delays. 


TODAY 

AH 

HT 

PU 

HT 

London Bridge 

827 

b.O 

922 

82 

Aberdeen 

9-03 

3J> 

9.05 

3.7 

AuOCBIJOOttl 

1.42 

10i> 

2.18 

109 

Bettsot 

6.Z7 

3.0 

6.43 

33 

Cardiff 

fZt 

a.a 

2.03 

102 

Devosport 

12L38 

4J> 

V228 

4.7 

Dover 

5-53 

6l/ 

U56 

5-5 

Fata, safe 

12.08 

42 

1Z2B 

43 

Glasgow 

751 

4.1 

8.12 

43 

narwjcn 

6.38 

3J> 

724 

06 


5^3 

12-42 

4b 

64 

tm 

2.06 

43 

63 


12j48 

72 

1 23 

73 

Lean 

10.04 

4 M 

1022 

43 

Liverpool 

6^4 

VjB 

6.43 

8.1 

Lowestoft 

3.46 

SL3 

6J3 

2.1 

Margate 
HHotd Haven 

R39 

1.07 

42 

5^ 

749 

138 

4.1 

53 

ttewquuy 

12.07 

Mi 

1238 

S3 

Oban 

1.12 

22 

um 

34 

Pfloxinw 

- 

- 1 

12.14 

4.7 

Porttend 

1.40 

1 JS 

149 

1.7 

Portsmouth 

<L39 

42 

7.1fl 

33 

SborefaBm 

6.14 

5.4 

660 

5.0 

SotsHsampSon 

6^7 

4.0 

647 

33 

Swansea 

1.12 

7J 

147 

7.7 

Tees 

11J0 

42 1129 

4 J 

WTton-on-ftoe 

6.19 

3.6 

7.17 

3.6 


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Sun Rain 
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LIGHTING-UPTIME 


London 432 pm to 736 am 
Bristol 442 prato 7.35 am 
EdHmgh 4.09 pm to &03 am 
Mnnrtinutc r 4.20 pm to 7.45 am 
Panzaace 4£0 pm to 7Af am 


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755 am 


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1-30 am 1.13 pm 
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C YESTERDAY ) 

Tempwaures at midday yesterday: c, 
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C F CF 

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Our address 

u*j$jnnatk»n for Inclusion to Thr 
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geffisiered as a newspaper at the Post 


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business and finance 


THE 




TIMES 


WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


STOCK Market 


FT 30 Share 
1284.4 (+8.9) 

FT-SE 100 

1635.9 (+12.5) 
Bargains 
35432 (33250) 

thepound 


US Dollar 
1.4215 (+0.0050) 

W German mark 
2.8700 (+0.0228) 

Trade-weighted 
68.3 (+0.3) 


Imperial 
Tobacco 
cuts jobs 

The Imperial Tobacco 
Company is to cut about 350 
jobs at its head office in 
Bristol. 

The company will consoli- 
date administration, produc- 
tion and distribution in a 
single building. Including cuts 
announced last year. 550 non- 
manufacturing jobs will go 
over the next 12 months. 

The company said yes- 
terday that it expected all job 
losses to be absorbed by 
normal or early retirement or 
voluntary redundancy. It said 
also that its cigarette sales 
were under continuing pres- 
sure from high tobacco taxes 
and the growth of cheap own- 
label imports. 

Gas shares 
active again 

Trading in British Gas 
shares was extremely active 
yesterday, but it did not match 
the record-breaking volumes 
of Monday's debut A total oi 
301 million shares changed 
hands by 5.30 pm, compared 
with 821 million on Monday. 
Dealings towards the close 
were struck at 61%p, Ip down 
on Monday's close. 

Norcros up 

Norcros. the building 
materials and packaging 
group, reported pretax profit 
up 8.6 per cent to £20.1 
million in the half year to 
September 30. Turnover rose 
2 per cent to £312 million and 
the interim dividend was in- 
creased by 7 per cent to 3p net. 

Tempos, page 26 

Magnet buys 

Magnet and Southerns, the 
manufacturer and retailer of 
timber products, has bought 
more than 1 million shares, or 
approximately 1 per cent of 
the equity, in its fellow timber 
and builders' merchanting 
group, Meyer International, 
which announced increased 
pretax profits, in the first half 
— from £13.2 million to 202 
million. 

Tempos, page 26 

Granada leaps 

Granada Group, the tele- 
vision to bingo and motorway 
services combine, is looking 
for further acquisitions after 
pretax profits leapt 41 per cent 
from £64.4 million to £92.4 
million in the year to Septem- 
ber 27. 

Tempos, page 26 

Strong pact 

Strong and Fisher, the 
leather manufacturer, has un- 
dertaken not to increase its 
stake in Gamar Booth above 
17 per cent during the course 
of the Monopolies and Merg- 
ers Commission investigation 
into its bid. 


Wail Street 70 
Co News 2023 
Comment 21 
Stock Market 21 
Money Mrkts 23 
Foreign Exeb 23 


Traded Opts 
Uni! Trusts 
Commodities 
USM Prices 
Share Prices 
Tempos 


23 

24 
24 

24 

25 
.26 


Bank sees ‘signs of distress’ 

Warning on 
credit cards 


By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 

The Bank of England gave a given by the Governor of 
warning to banks and other Bank or England, Mr Robin 

Lcigb-PeraberiOD, 


lending institutions yesterday 
that the rapid growth in 
lending to personal customers, 
particularly through credit 
cards, could prove dangerous 
to the individuals and the 

institutions concerned. 

Mr Brian Quinn, head of 
banking supervision, said: 
“There are certain signs of 
growing distress among bor- 
rowers who have over- 
stretched themselves, 
attracted by greater availabil- 
ity of credit and easier terms. 

“The rapid growth, in 
particular, in the use of credit 
and charge cards is adding 
another substantial and partly 
invisible layer of commit- 
ments to the individual 
borrower." 

Banks, he said, should con- 
sider slowing their personal 
lending before the volume of 
arrears became a matter of 
concern. 

In a speech to the twelfth 
World Banking Conference in 
London, Mr Quinn com- 
mended the innovative poli- 
cies of the basks but said that 
they may find themselves 
moving at too fast a pate. The 
danger signals were beginning 
to emerge already despite 
more sophisticated lending 
policies and a relatively low 
level of defaults on loans. 

This comes after warnings 


that per- 
sonal lending on mortagages 
could lead to hardship amot 
borrowers who could not 
ord the repayments. 

Mr Quinn also cautioned 
banks against lending too 
much to individual commer- 
cial customers under the pres- 
sure of greater competition. 

Some banks were revising 
upward their internal limits 
on the acceptable maximum 
facility they could offer to 
corporate customers. 

But the threshold at which 
the Bank takes an active 
interest in a large exposure — 
10 per cent of a bank's capital 
— would remain strongly in 
force 

If banks wanted to be told 
the precise number of large 
exposures they would be 



Brian Quinn: danger to 
to individuals 


allowed without having to 
increase their capital, they 
were likely to receive an 
“ultra-cautious" answer. Any 
bank wanting inflexible super- 
visory rules would cause the 
Bank to question the quality 
and style of its management 

Mr Quinn said that he was 
troubled by a shift towards the 
insistence by some banks on 
the letter rather than the spirit 
of supervisory rules. 

The Bank has traditionally 
regulated the City by the spirit 
of the rules but it may be 
losing ground to a different 
philosophy of market behav- 
iour. 

Banking supervisors in dif- 
ferent countries were moving 
to harmonize their regulatory 
systems in many areas, 
particularly in securities busi- 
ness which was becoming an 
increasingly important part of 
most banks operations. 

Mr Quinn said that the 
loosening, of dose relation- 
ships between banks and their 
clients could damage the 
prudential framework of 
banking business. Greater 
securitisation, when debt 
could be sold easily to another 
lender, led to “a more im- 
personal way of doing things. 

“If nothing else, such a 
trend would seem to me not to 
be helpful in maintaining high 

ethical standards." 

Comment, page 21 


Cambrian 
‘ignorant 
of dealings’ 

By Lawrence Lever 
The directors of Cambrian 
and General Securities, the 
investment trust formerly 
chaired and managed by Mr 
Ivan Boesky, did not know 
which shares its Bermuda 
subsidiary was dealing in, a 
director, Mr Edward Davies, 
said yesterday. 

He explained that for tax 
reasons almost all the ar- 
bitrage activities of Cambrian 
were carried out through 
Farnsworth and Hastings, a 
subsidiary incorporated in 
Bermuda. 

“This is a wholly-owned 
subsidiary with a separate 
board. The Cambrian direc- 
tors never demanded to see 
details of its transactions," Mr 
Davies said. “As outside 
directors of Cambrian we were 
never given or. indeed, 
wanted to see the dealing 
sheets for the shares which 
Farnsworth was buying or 
selling." 

The Cambrian directors 
did, however, receive fall 
details of those share trans- 
actions .carried out by Cam- 
brian itself These were 
reviewed at quarterly board 
meetings. 

Among shares shown on the 
Cambrian dealing sheets is a 
large block of Distillers shares. 
“I am aware that we were in 
Etistfllers," Mr Davies said. “I 
can’t say when they were 
bought or sold. But I have 
never seen any Guinness 
shares in Cambrian’s reported 
transactions". 

The Cambrian dealing 
sheets also show that the 
company bought a substantial 
number of shares in Imperial 
Group, which was taken over 
iy Hanson Trust this year 
fter a hotly contested battle 
with United Biscuits. 

“We did buy a lot of 
Imperial shares and accepted 
the Hanson bid We bought 
them quite late in the day”. 


MARKET-SUMMARY 


ST OCK MARKETS 

Dow Jones 1932.09 (+1.83)* 

N°Sdow 18802741-107.96) 

Sydney: AO .. — ~~ 1440-3 {*12.6) 
SSSSank ......... 2063.6<+4.6) 

Sa 

zEkmS 563.80 (same) 

KgK 

dosing prices Page 25 

interest hates 

London: Bank Base: : 11* ' 

U$?p8roe RM ' 7J* b 

CURRENCIES 

London: 4225' 

iss§> m 

£ ^Sex.-i 1 1 .2 

IJS727149 SOR £0.845620 


main price changes 


RISES: 


Samuel Heath 

Tace 

Goring Kerr . — 

Cap Group 

Diploma 


+2T 

„ 193p (+7p> 

. 214p (+13pl 
Associated News 366p j+^j 

Redfeam 325pi+7p) 


Holmes a Court’s 
bid talk lifts BHP 


Just when it seemed that 
peace had broken out at 
Broken Hill Proprietary 
(BHP), Australia’s largest 
company, along comes Mr 
Robert Holmes a Court to stir 
the pot once again. - 

Although the two parties 
ended three years of acrimony 
by signing a well-publicised 
pact in September, the Perth- 
based entrepreneur yesterday 
rekindled rumours that Ire 
might make another takeover 
bid for the ofl, minerals and 
steel giant by entering into an 
agreement to underwrite the 
sale of a 5 per cent BHP stake 
held by Equiticorp Tasman. 

At present, Mr Holmes a 
Court owns 28.5 per cent of 
BHP, built up through a series 
of takeover bids by his Bell 
Resources group. Two months 
ago. in return fora seat on the 
board, he agreed not to in- 
crease his holding; without 
making a takeover bid unless a 


By Richard lender 

third party made an offer or 
acquired a stake in excess of 
20 per cent. Mr John Elliott, 
chairman of Elders-IXL, 
agreed to the same ground 
rules in connection with his 20 
per cent stake. ‘ 

Yesterday’s agreement 
could, of course, increase his 
stake substantially, if the 
Equiticorp placing flopped. 
But BHP is trying to keep cooL 

A board statement yes- 
terday said Mr Holmes a 
Court’s role in the underwrit- 
ing would not contravene the 
rules laid down by Australia’s 
National Companies and 
Securities Commission or the 
letter and spirit of the Septem- 
ber agreement 

Mr Holmes a Court 
keeping the analysts 
about his intentions, anno 
yesterday’s move was enough 
to boost BHP shares by 20 
cents to AusS8.80 in Sydney. 


is 



Clayton Yentter: “Congress is boiling over with frustration" 


US ‘may retaliate’ 
in trade dispute 

By Our Industrial Correspondent 
Mr Clayton Yen tier, the US sorghum and maize to Spain 

and fears that $600 million of 


trade - representative, gave 
warning in London yesterday 
that the US was running out of 
patience in the bitter trade 
disputes with Europe. 

He told the Confederation 
of British Industry in 
London:“President Reagan 
cannot hold back protec- 
tionism if there is a perception 
that other nations are closing 
their markets to US exports. 
And that perception is becom- 
ing so widespread in the US 
that Congress is boiling over 
with frustration. 

“Retaliation is not our 
objective — expanded trade is. 
Retaliation is the step of last 
resort in responding to unfair 
trade practices but it is a step 
we will take if we must.” 

At this week's meeting of 
US and European Economic 
Community ministers in 
Brussels. Mr Yeuttere will say 
that US resentment may be 
uncontainaUe unless rapid 
agreement is reached, particu- 
larly on the issues of Spain's 
and Portugal's accession to the 
EEC and continuing govern- 
ment funding of Airbus. 

The US claims to have lost 
$500 million in exports of 


oilseed sales to Spain and 
Portugal could also be hit. 

Mr Yeutter said: “The EEC 
cannot use its enlargement as 
an opportunity to gain a track 
advantage. "An interim solu- 
tion to the dispute expires in 
three weeks. If a permanent 
solution were not reached, by 
the end of the month, the US 
would have “no alternative 
but to protect its trade rights" 
and had a right under the Gatt 
to be compensated for the 
several hundred million dol- 
lars in trade damage. 

He said protectionist senti- 
ment was strong in the US, 
particularly where job losses 
and bankruptcies were blamed 
on imports, especially subsidi- 
zed or dumped imports. 

The US was very concerned 
about the level of government 
subsidy contemplated for the 
proposed A3 30 and A340 
Airbus and would ask for 
political-level talks in Europe 
in January. 

British Aerospace, the wing 
maker for the Airbus con- 
sortium, is seeking up to £750 
million of state launch aid to 
cover its share of the work. 


SPORT 33 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 37 


Loss-making 
Tricentrol to 
target N Sea 


By Carol Ferguson 

Tricentrol, the debt-laden outflow 
British independent oil com- 
pany. yesterday announced 
losses for the third quarter of 
this year. 

A pretax loss of £5.6 million 
brings the total loss for the 
first nine months to £7.8 
million. 

An extraordinary write-off 
of £58.7 million in respect of 
its reorganized American as- 
sets was taken below the line. 

The majority interest in 
these assets is in the course of 
being sold, leaving Tricentrol 
with a 29 per cent interest 

The sale will raise £60.3 
million to be applied in reduc- 
ing Tricentrol’s debt. On 
completion of the deal, 

Tricentrol will have a net debt 
of £119.7 million, 1.35 times 
its shareholders’ funds of 
£88.2 million. 

Trice ntrofs main producing 
oilfield. Thistle, is in decline 
and output for the nine 
months was 10 per cent lower 
than the same period last year. 

The company’s average sell- 
ing price for its oil per barrel 
was £9.71. less than half last 
year’s selling price of £20.65. 

After tax, exploration and 
the interim dividend pay- 
ment. there was a net cash 


in the first nine 
months of this year of £2.6 
million. 

If there were no further oil 
or gas field developments, 
Tricentrol expects to be cash 
neutral next year. 

However, the start of 
construction at the onshore 
Wyich Farm oilfield in Dor- 
set. which is expected next 
year, will mean that debt 
levels will increase again. 

Consequently, interest pay- 
ments will also increase, rais- 
ing doubts over Tricen trot's 
ability to continue to finance 
its future developments in the 
absence of a rise in the oil 
price. 

The company has other 
possible fields awaiting 
development, including the 
Don oilfield and the Amethyst 
and Raven spurn gas fields. 

Id a statement with the 
results, the company said that 
after the disposal of the major- 
ity of its interests in North 
America, it will be concentrat- 
ing its activities both onshore 
and offshore Britain. 

The board intends to keep 
Tricentrol as a leading British 
independent exploration and 
production company. 


Opec pushing for 
$18 a barrel 

By David Young, Energy Correspondent 


Oil ministers of the 13 Opec 
nations start preliminary dis- 
cussions in Geneva today in 
an effort to find a formula that 
will send the world oQ price 
back up to $18 a band. 

Opec committees on pricing 
and quotas will consider re- 
ports from their export advis- 
ers before moving into a fell 
ministerial session tomorrow. 

There is agreement that the 
meeting must produce a work- 
able formula to convince oil- 
consuming nations that the 
cartel is serious in its aim to 
return to a fixed price system 
from January 1. 

Sheikh Hisham Nazer, the 
new Saudi oil minister, was 
among ministers who arrived 
in Geneva yesterday. He re- 
fused to be drawn on the issue 
of whether Saudi Arabia will 
cut its daily output to bolster 
the price. 

He said: “We shall see very 
soon." 

The members have en- 
dorsed the Saudi call for a 
return to a fixed price system, 
but have yet to agree on how it 
should be implemented. 
There is a realization that 
output will have to be cut by 
up to 1 million barrels a day 
from the present level of 17 
million. But, some countries 


have said they are not in a 
position to make cuts. 

World oil prices are lan- 
guishing below the $15-a- 
barrel level, but a commit- 
ment by Opec to trim 
luction and to return to a 
: price system would have 
an immediate firming effect 
A stronger price would send 
share prices of most British oil 
companies upwards and allow 
them to resurrect marginal 
development projects 
Such a move would be a big 
boost for the Department of 
Energy. It has been attempting 
to persuade many oil com- 
panies to keep together teams 
of engineers and specialists 
Redundancies have been 
made in most companies 
operating in the North Sea and 
some fields, which started 
production recently, are not 
profitable at a price of less 
than $18 a barrel. 


Bid withdrawn 

American Brands withdrew 
its $2.8 billion (£2 billion) 
contested bid for Chese- 
brough-Pond's. the Vaseline 
and Ponds's cold cream group. 
Unilever, the Anglo-Dutch 
conglomerate, made a $3.1 
billion agreed cash offer for 
Pond’s last week. 


Siebe boosts turnover by £100m 


By Alexandra Jackson 

Siebe, the engineering 
group; yesterday reported an 
82 per cent increase in pretax 
profits to £20.1 million for the 
six months to September. 
Turnover rose from £136 
milli on to £236 million and an 
interim dividend of 4.69p was 
declared. 

These figures include profits 
of £8.5 minion from the newly 
acquired businesses, CompAir 
and Deutsche Tecalemit The 
comparable contribution for 


last year was £1 million — 
CompAir was included for 
two months, while Deutsche 
Tecalemit was, at that time, 
not part of the group. 

Siebe’s core businesses grew 
by JS percent in the first half 
Mr Barrie Stephens, group 
managing director, said: “We 
have bad a solid start to the 
year." 

The share price closed at 
803p yesterday, up from 785p, 
reflecting analysts’ satisfaction 
with the results. 


City attention is focusing on 
Siebe's recent acquisition of 
Robertshaw Controls, which 
was bought for $466 million 
(£327 million) in September. 

This was financed partly by 
a five for six rights issue, the 
second in two years. Analysts 
bad been nervous about the 
exit p/e of almost 20, and this 
had helped to push the price 
down from nearly 972p earlier 
this year to 3Q3p. 

However, Mr Stephens is 
excited about the potential. 


Airports set out to woo the institutions 

Cleared for takeoff 


FALLS: 

Granada — 

Prices are as at 4pra 


2B7p(-30p) 


GOLD 


London Fhgngp 


close $386.7! 

272.50 ) 

g^SM7.00-387.5O- 


... .80 
17J2S (£272.00- 


NORTH SEA OIL 


By Edward Townsend, 
Industrial Correspondent 
BAA pic, formerly the Brit- 
ish Airports Authority, em- 
barks on an advertising 

campaign this week in an 
effort to win potential inves- 
tors in tiie m up to privatiza- 
tion next summer. 

The company will not, how- 
ever, be aiming its pnUicity at 
Sid. The new BAA logo to be 
revealed this week and the 
attendant background ma- 
terial are designed to impress 
on financial institutions and 
the Uke its forward looking - 
and its record as the owner of 
seven airports. 

Its chairman. Sir Norman 
Payne, is to announce Im- 
proved half-year profits next 
week. 

BAA is undergoing 
pri va ti zation as part of next 
year's planned sale of the 
nation's air industry assets 
which begins with British 
Airways in January and* b 
followed by Rolls-Royce in 
April 

Despite the possibility of a 
general election next year, Mr 
John Moore, the Secretary of 
State for Transport, confirmed 
in the Commons last wed dot 
the BAA sale would go ahead 
In the summer. 

The privatfaation ofthe big 



three coaid bring In almost 
£3,000 million for the. Trea- 
sury -- £1,000 million each for 
BA and R-R and comfortably 
more than £SO0 imlfion for 
BAA. 

The Government has an- 
nounced already that it will 
retain a golden share in BAA 
and is limiting any single 
shareholding to 15 per cent to 
prevent any airline gaining 
control The company's 7,238 
employees are expected to be 
offered a share deal 

The seven airports — 


. Heathrow, Gatwick, Stansted, 
Glasgow, Prestwick, Edin- 
burgh and Aberdeen — have 
been consistently profitable, 
largely as the result of earn- 
ings from commercial activ- 
ities, including the lucrative 

dutyfree concession. 

The latter accounts for 12 
per cent of BAA's total gross 
income with concession earn- 
ings as a whole — including 
hotels, banks, restanrants, 
shops and car parks - rising 
by 12 per cent last year to 
£133.4 million. 

Some City analysts have 
expressed disquiet at BAA's 
dependence for its profitability 
on its activities outride the 
mainstream, but the company 
will emphasize in the new 
campaign that the enterprise 
must be seen as an integrated 
operation. 

Sir Norman is expected to 
speak next week about the 
impact of the new regulatory 
framework for the seven sepa- 
rate airport companies, an- 
nounced by Mr Moore. 

They will be free from April 
1 to levy charges on airlines 

nsing their airports in fine with 

a strict formula which, said 
Mr Moore, would protect the 
airimes, passengers and other 
air transport esers from abuse 
by BAA of its market power. 


But only INTER CITY offer you 


THE ALTERNATIVE OF YOUR FIRST 


PAYMENT FREE WITH NOTHING TO 
REPAY FOR UP TO 6 MONTHS ON 
OUR PLAN 7 OR A REDUCED INTEREST 
RATE FOR LARGER LOANS. 


• Use for any purpose • Existing loans repaid • No accounts needed for 
Self Employed • MIRAS available on qualifying loans • All loans secured 

• Variable interest rate • No fees • No Employer Enquiries # Free life 

cover • Homeowners and mortgage payers only. 


A deferred repayment plan {our plan 7) is ideal if you have a particular reason to 
delay commencing repayment of your loan (although you obviously pay interest in 
the meantime) but for a larger loan a normal repayment arrangement is usually 
better as the figures below show. Monthly repayment me j BO months 

Deferred repayment Normal repayment 

(An ML* variable] E (APR IsimSSlC 
80.67 72.06 


SAVE £1549*0 
on a loan of £5000 

SAV L £2 «2£S» 129.06 

on a loan of £8000 

SAVE £3101.40 161.33 

on a loan of £10,000 

SAVE £4645.80 2 41 99 

on a loan of £15,000 <*«*■*.»» 


11528 

144.10 

216.18 


*SXF 

8.61 

13.78 

17.23 

25.81 


By multiplying the monthly saving By the number of months ol the loan the total saving over 
the penod can be seen. II the loan ts repaid betoie time, the total cost will be substantially less 
Typical nampteK £3000 x 36 mtta plan 7 = £1 10.70p.m. total cost £3985*0 APR 1&84. 
(drferretf repayment plan). £5000 x 60 mths plan 22 = £120.50pjn, total cost £7230 
APRI&7V 


YOU'LL DO A GOOD DEAL BETTER AT INTER CITY 
REMEMBER! WE HAVE YOUR INTEREST AT HEART. 

No gimmicks - no free offers - no expensive front loading fee plans - just good 
professional service. 


To INTER CITY FINANCE LTD„ 139 Walter Road, Swansea SA 1 5 RQ.I 

Name I 


Address. 


TeiN'...., 

Value of Property £ 

Mge. Outstanding £ ^ 

Monthly Mge.£ 

Amount Required 




INTER CITY FINANCE 

MONEY 

cr tor Homeowne r loans 


LONDON & HOME 
COUNTIES 

01 - 462-6192 

Anytime 
and elsewhere 

( 0792) 464815 


sm#** SPECIALISTS IN 
U|¥ HOME OWNER FINANCE 

» 4 -- m Mrin'jors of tl.r* Conx.-r.it ^ ' 

• • « hi'i.inr. Brokers 

.’-•O tJT.Iri»r' w: Uw.UI VS 

secure-d or\ property 







BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


O0C 


charges 


Watchdogs meet to tighten 
worldwide securities net 


WALL. STREET 


Ow Dec 
8 S 


AMR 56ft 

ASA 36?. 

AWd Signal 
AiiedStrs 
am aims 2* 

Ascca 3- * 

AM* W £■ 

Arr, rfia hs 22,' 

Air. B'zniS * 

Arr Can 


By Colin IN 
Financial Cor 


By Alison Eadie 

The ruling council of 
Lloyd’s insurance market has 
agreed that new members or 
names will be shown how and 
when agents* charges are lev- 
ied and given an indication of 
average charges. 

Failure by many agents to 
disclose charges — and the 
high level of charges — in 
nearly all cases regardless of 
whether the syndicates were 
profitable, have long been a 
cause of discontent among 
names. 

The council has ruled also 
that the regulatory arm of 
Lloyd's will keep a register of 
all members* and managing 
agents* charges available for 


Regulatory officials from 
the world's leading financial 
centres gather at an un- 
disclosed venue near London 
today for a conference that 
Britain expects to lead to a 


gradual tightening of the inter- 
national net for policing 
securities markets rather than 
any monolithic pact against 
malpractice. 

Mr Michael Howard, the 
Minister for Consumer and 
Corporate Affairs, has said 
that the meeting, the first ofits 
kind, would **not change the 
world overnight.” But ■ be 
hopes for “some significant 
progress" towards improved 
information-swapping be- 
tween 

regulators.**Information is 
really the key to effective 
enforcement in this field, " he 
said. 

In a Commons debate last 
week, Mr Howard said insider 
dealing would be high on the 
agenda, but it is understood 
that Whitehall does not want 


public inspection. Agents will 
be' required to provide in- 
formation on charges annual- 

ly- 

UoycTs announced that 
syndicate 540/542 will be 
transferred from WMD 
Underwriting Agencies to 
AUA3, the agency responsible 
for closing down the loss- 
making PCW syndicates. 

Mr AJan Lord, Lloyd’s chief 
executive, said it would be the 
last syndicate to be transferred 
to AUA3. Syndicate 540/542 
cedes business to one of the 
former PCW syndicates and 
must be included, therefore, in 
any eventual settlement of the 
PCW affair. 



Michael Howard: aot oat to change die world overnight 

e conference to focus too the Department of Trade and 
uch on this, however Industry’s financial services 


the conference to focus too 
much on this, however 
topicaL , 

Mr Howard is expected to 
address the meeting, but 
Britain’s delegation will be 
headed by Mr Brian Hilton, of 


division, who played an im- 
portant part in the new legisla- 
tion for the British financial 
services industry. 

The United States will be 


represented by the Securities 
.and Exchange Commission, 
with which the DTI has an 
information-swapping accord. 
Canada, Australia and Hong 
Kong will send officials from 
similar bodies. 

The French delegates will be 
from the CommissioD des 
Operations de Bourse, while 
Japan, West Germany and the 
Netherlands will send finance 
ministry representatives. 

More importantly, Switzer- 
land, often regarded as a 
reluctant participant in moves 
to improve cross-border polic- 
ing due to its penchant for 
bank secrecy, will also be 
present, sending finance and 
foreign ministry officials. 

More bilateral accords, like 
the Anglo-US understanding 
signed this year on the ex- 
change of information, may 
emerge, but Whitehall regards 
building international con- 
fidence between regulators as 
one of the main goals. It also 
wants to ensure that they stay 
abreast of market develop- 
ments in a world of globalised 
trading. 


An BP* 29;. 
A,- E* press SON 
An Hone £ 0 - 
AiT.f JBK!S J 

An Srws g • 

AnTeiasn 27*. 
Amoss . BA . 
AmwcSiee- s* 
ASZTCO 1 

AsMskCOi! 57 ■ 

Aiftows sa> 

AwSlPfPSS »■ 
BkrsTsiNT 
Ban*amer !*■> 
B»o!S«n 

sards'. MV 41% 
BetfiSKel 5 
Sofinq 

BseCascW 63 
BrCen £5% 

Bg Warner 37% 
Bnst MyefS g « 
BP 39 • 

Surinnin d «% 
BurlisnNm oCs 
Bu.TsusJtt n/a 
Cnja&eiiSp 6* - 
Car Pacific 12. » 
CafaraiSer 40 
CeUOMe 242% 
Sv 3SK 
CtUirpOD 32- 
CnaseMan 3£S 
CTmi Bk NY 4S*.i 
Chevrcn 45% 
Cfiryster 39% 
CiSCWD 54* 
Dark Ecpop 20. 
Coca Cola 385. 

§gr e iS 

CimDiaGas 
Cmo m Eng 32M 
CamwWi Ed 33% 
CansErSs 48% 
Cn Nat Gas 33% 
Ccrs Power IS' 1 . 
Cntrt Data 25% 


Ft \ 


w 1 

1 





* M 




Ybu can see why we’re so quick on our feel 


We may do more business than 
any other merchant bank in Britain. 
But in the great wide world, there are 
many financial giants. 

- Long ago, we decided to play ball 
on their home grounds. 

We're in America from sea to 
shining sea: New York, Boston, 
Chicago, Dallas and Los Angeles. 

You'il find us at the sharp end of 
investment banking, requiring the 
highest levels of skill 


Take swaps. Our Los Angeles 
operation (with offshoots in London 
and Tokyo) is a world leader in market 
share and innovation. 

In Chicago, our dealings in 
financial futures combine the most 
sophisticated research with impeccable 
execution. 


Kleinwort Benson 

The bright people in the right places. 


Meanwhile, across the Pacific 

We were the first merchant bank 
to open an office in Tokyo. We have a 
remarkable list of Japanese corporate 
clients and, through our securities 
branch, we transact a large share of the 
huge capital flows to and from Japan. 

In fact, the Kleinwort Benson 
Group is a major player in all the major 
markets: America, the Pacific Basin 
and Europe. 

You have simply to pass us the ball. 



Coming GJ 57 
CPC Inti 77% 


CreaW 34% 

CunssVttT 53% 

Dart X Kraft lUa 
Deere 23 » 

DeftaAir 49% 

□mart Ed 13* 

Dgaa) Eq 108% 

8SSU 

Dresser Ini 20% 
Duke Power rt8% 
DuPont 83% 

Eastern Air n/a 
Esar. Kodak 67% 
Eaton Coro 75% 
Emerson S 90% 
Exxon CcnJ 69 % 
Fee Dor Sts 89% 

»ilU I»WC ct 


• 57% Firestone 28. 

3S% FstCtwago 3*- £*. 
Fst intBnqJ 54. ^ ■ 

67’.; gaP*™** S r, 5£% 
2 "- Ford si,' •to- 

FTWacwa 38- Jjr* 

n GAFCotp f?.. 

25 GTECcrp g 

4 g i, Gen Cc»a 51.. 

57% GenDv^fs *o ; j p 

S3’i GenE'WSn' 5 ft- 

a-, GapmR Jf. !?* 

60--, M#s 42.- rf 

50 GenW^rars ' 

3% GftPSUtfty 38. 

4J Geneseo 3/ 

27 V Georgia Pac • 

65 -. &aete a-f 

$>, Gcodncn -S *;,• 

it': Goodyear «. 

57’, Gould me IS « 13: 

59% Grace 5*.'* S.' 

30 Gt AR& Tac af • 2;.« 

45 ‘. Gr'hnfl 5 :*£ » 

14% GrtimanCor 28 

41 % GiXf S West o 8 . > 

4H. «3 *3. 

4', Hercules 58. -- * 

51 H-len-Pkrti f* ' 

63-, Hooeywetf 6S r 66 • 

SI". I ClnCs 25 -5* 

39% IngersoB 59 . 60 

BOV* W&Kl Steel J# • 

S', IBM 127’* 126. 
S'- INCO J3. 12. 

60% Int Paper ... * • ■ ' 

r./a wiTe*Tel 54.. 5- - 

62% Irving Bark 50 . 50 ; 
12 % jnnsnSJtw 71 69. 

40% Kaaer Ahjm 13% i3_. 

242 Kerr McGee 29 ■ '» 

3S'i KroD’ly Clrk 86 . 87 f 

33 % K Mart *8 • 48.: 

37% Kroger 30. 31 

46 L.T.V. Corp IS »,* 
45 % Urton 80- 

39 % Lockheed 53 / 54% 

54% Lucky Sm 20!. 34- 

20% ManHnver «'% — 

38% Man vi Be Cp 2 
44 Mapco 80 59S 

134 Marine Mid *0": 47 

44 % MrtManena Ai'.i «■ 
32% Masco 27% 27% 

33% tS^utids 63% 63% ' 

47% McOormeB 75% . 6 . 

33% Mead 57% SB v 

16 Merck t14% 114'.-. 
25% MmstaMng 11SS H4% I 
57V McWOi 38. 

77 Monsanto 78/, 79 > 

35% Morgan XP. 66% 86 • 

53% Motorola 38% 38% 


13 12 

77 '. 77', 


54'. 54'.- 


Pfiror 
PtwipsDge 
Plate Mrs 
Pranos Put 
Polaroid 
ppGmd 
PtctrGmBl 
P0 5ESG 
Raytneon 

h vines 

Pocfcwefl int 
ficraiEvtt 

Sa-^eways 

Sara Lee 
;FE 9000C 
Scwowger 
Scott Raner 
Seagram 
Sears Wick 
Snail Trans 

anger 

SmtiiMnSk 

Sony 

smcaiEd 
SWsmBeD 
StdOJ 
SwimgC^g 
Stevens JP 
Sun Comp 
Teiedyne 
Tenneco 
Texaco 
Texas E Cor 
Texas mst 
Texas LMs 
Textron 
Tr 2 vlrs Cor 
TRW Inc 
UAL Inc 
uniiever nv 
U nCarsde 
UnPacCor 
Utd Erands 
USGCcrp 
LKtJ Tedmol 
USX Carp 
Unocal 
jun Water 
WmerUntt 

WeBsFarM 

wstgnsee 

Weyerti'ser 

Whirlpool 

wootwortti 

Xerox Corp 

Zeretfi 


6Zh 627 

21’. 2l‘- 


74% 75% 
lO'i 11 


"1% 71% 


?4% rt\ 

77% 71 


41% 4?:.. 
68% £8% 


40", 41% 

44% 4/J". 


SJ% 9r. 

n/a n a 


69% 6T. 
33 33-. 


aw 33% 

6e% « 


63 v w>, 
43 43S 


54% 54 
3fl% 35% 


*H. 90% 
22% 21 <■ 
35% 35% 

114% 114- 
48 43% 

46'.. 46% 

39 & 

58% 58 
318% 313 
37% 33 

3«% 34 % 

30% 30% 

123% 121% 
33% 33 % 
S5 65% 
44 *i 44*. 
94 931. 

59% 59% 

228% 227% 
23% 23 

65% 66% 

33% 33 
41% 41% 

45*4 44% 
21* 21% 
24% 25% 

48% 48% 

58% 58% 

105’i 105 
50% 60% 

39% 40 
71V. %7l% 
42 42% 

62 61 % 
20 % 20 % 


CANADIAN PRICES 


38% 38% 


n/a NCR Corp 49”, 45% 


2 a v, NL mdsire 5 ”, 5 % 

49% Nat Dears 45'/, 46 

t 8'& Nat Med Ent 24% 2S 
ICS 1 '. NatSmcnat H'« 11% 

44% Norfolk Sin 86% 86% 
61 NWBancrp 39% 39'/. 

19% OcodmPet 27^i 27 'i 


48% Ogden 44V. 45". 

89'A OTnCorD 44% 44% 

n/a Owons-ffl 44% 44% 

68V. PacGasEl 25% 25% 

78% Pan Am 4’>, 5% 

90% Penney J.C. 82% 81% 

69V. Perrnzoil 72% 72% 

90% PepBCO 27% Z7'«. 

/CSftdn&on M**B ci»efl oxe-asue f 


Alai Abort 
AJgomaSB 
Can Pacific 
Commco 
Con Battvst 
Hkr/SidCan 
Hd5nB Ifin 
knasco 
Imperial OH 
In Poe 
RyJ Trustee 
Seagram 
Steel Co 
m-nsnN'A* 
V^cp 

Weston 

iBKmart.it'Su 


XK 26% 
39% 40*; 

nu 11 % 

17% IT 1 : 
13% 13% 
28% 28% 
25% 25V. 
225 23 
33 32% 

47S 47% 
38% 39 
29% 29% 
86*. 87% 
19% 19% 

29% 30 
2.66 2.69 
12 % 12 % 
30% 31 
yUturc: 


Abaco to pay £15m 
for estate agent 


Abaco Investments, the 
fast-moving financial services 
group, is buying the leading 
estate agent Hampton & Sons 
fora maximum £15 million. It 
will finance the deal through 
an £1 8.8 million share issue to 
Standard Chartered Bank. 

Standard will take a 12.7 per 
cent stake and the two other 
big shareholders, British & 
Commonwealth Shipping and 
Canada Life Assurance, will 
reduce their stakes to 23.4 per 
cent and 5.02 per cent respec- 
tively. 

Standard and B&C have 
both said they want Abaco to 
remain independent and 
would not try to obtain con- 
trol for at least three years and 
then not without the prior 
consent of the board. 

B&C and Abaco share close 
links as Abaco's chief exec- 
utive, Mr Peter Goldie, is on 
the B&C board and Mr John 
Gunn, B&C chief executive, is 
on the Abaco board. Mr 
Michael McWilliam, group 
managing director of Stan- 
dard, will also join Abaco’s 
board. 

Hampton, a luxury residen- 
tial and commercial property 
agent, is Abaco's largest ac- 
quisition and Its eighth this 
year. As well as taking the 
number of estate agency out- 
lets to 57, Hampton gives 
Abaco a presence overseas 
through its Hong Kong and 
French offices. 

The full purchase price will 
be paid if Hampton makes 
taxable profits of £1 .325 mil- 
lion in the year to September 
30 next 

The link with Standard 
Chartered should provide 
additional business opportu- 
nities for both parties through 
Hampton selling Standard's 
banking products and Stan- 
dard providing finance for 
commercial property develop- 
ments and for Abaco's further 
expansion. 


six months to November 30 
include an interim dividend of 
5p (4.5p) and a proposed final 
dividend of not less than 10.7p 
l9.7p). With figures in £000. 
franked revenue amounted to 
440(390). unfranked revenue 15 
(35), interest receivable 101 
(64), underwriting commission 
etc 4 (3). administrative ex- 
penses 51 (40). interest charges 6 
(6L revenue before tax 503 (446) 
and tax 150 (139). Earnings per 
share were 7.58p (6.58p) and net 
asset value per ordinary share 
was 49?.4p (3S8.9p). 

• GORING KERR: For the 
year ended September 30, a final 
dividend of 7.7p, making 1 1 .55p 
{ 10.5p), has bern declared. With 
figures in £000. turnover was 
7.610(7.976). cost of sales 3.787 
(3.764), distribution 823 (815). 
administration 901 (745). in- 
terest receivable 31 (59). inxeresi 
payable 26 (29). pretax profit 
2J04 (2.682), lax 897 (1.1 1 3 1 . 
minorities 1 (5k profit 
attributable 1.208 (1.5641. 
extraordinary items nil (81 dhu 
and transfer to reserves 515 
(853). Earnings per share were 
20.J3p(26.07p>. 

• MCLEOD RUSSEL- Results 
for the year to September 30 
include a final dividend of 5p 
(4.5p). making 8.3p (7.5p). With 
figures in £000, turnover was 
27,248 (28.553), pretax profit 
10,489 (14,297), tax 4.741 
(7.591), minority interests debit 


80 (1 13. Earnings per share were 
63.97p (77.4p). The company 
said the results, while below the 
record level of the previous year, 
demonstrated that the group, 
with its wider spread of in- 
terests. could maintain a more 
consistent level of profits in 
periods of poor tea prices. 

• ALFRED PREEDY: Results 
for the six months 10 September 
27 include an interim dividend 
of Ip (same). With figures in 
£000. turnover totalled 38.680 
(55,896). operating profit 235 
(7J), interest payable 339 (424). 
exceptional debits 200 (credit 
30), loss before tax 304 (323 
loss), no lax (nil) and extraor- 
dinary charges 176 (51). The 
second half always contributes 
the biggest share of operating 
profit, with December and Janu- 
ary being particularly im- 
portant 


IN BRIEF 


: nr 
."or 
. \n 


• MOORGATE INVEST- 
MENT TRUST: Results for the 


More compaay news 
is on page 23 


Meyer International 

Interim Statement 1 986 


Summary of Results 

Yeai ended 
3i« March 
1986- 
Emtton 

565.4 Turnover 
32. 1 Profit before tax 
20.4 Attributable profit 


6 myitis EO 

3Uth Sept. 30lh Sept. 

1966 1985 

CmWon Emxiron 

301.9 273.5 

20.2 13.2 

15.5 8.5 


+ 8 %/ • 

+53% ?! . 

+82% : in; - r 


22.57p Earnings per share 
5.75p Dividend per share 


14.35p 

2.1 5p 


8.79p +63% 
1.95p +10% 


■7he /fates tor tie year ended 31st March 7986 are extracted from the 
Groups Accounts at that date which have been delivered to the Registrar of 
companies, the Auditors' Report on those Accounts was unquaBfiep. 


The Chairman 1 , Mr Ronald Groves CBE, comments : 

!n line with expectations, as the year has progressed 
there has been an improvement in the level of activity in 
the construction industry. This, together with firming prices 
for Umber, has made for better trading conditions. 
Accordingly, margins have improved to give a satisfactory 
start to the year. Trading continues well and - subject to 
Unusual qualifications about the Winter — we look to a 
good second half and are on course for a record year. 

T?e acquisition of Brownlee PLC was completed last 
month, from which the Board is confident that a worthwhile 
contnbuUon will arise. 

0 di y id ® nd per share has been increased to 
2.15p ( 1 .95p) and will be paid on 9th February 1987 to 
tnose Members on the Register on 9th January 1 987. 

copies of the Interim Statement are available from 

1 f)6 osersory, 


Meyer International pic 

Vtlliers House 41 / 47 Strand 
London WC2N 5 JG 














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4J-: - 





tJ 9 * J 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


BT7STNESS AND FINANCE 


21 


(STOCK MARKET) 

£6 billion takeover bid for 
Grand Met is on way at last 


-n,. , A Carol Leonard 

“‘ d J> r Grand Metropolitan, 
the drinks. hotels and foods 
empire, could materialize 
'. wl Jfli n 'be next week. 

hiZSfi® 5“ 1x160 consistent 
buying of the stock by in- 
formed sources during the 
past few days. 

One market man said yes- 
terday: "This time it really is 
■coming.” 7 

• Whispers of possible stake- 
building have begun circulat- 
,0 B in some City circles and 
the bid speculation, which has 
•plagued the company for 
many months, is starting to 
rear its head once agaiq 

n Gra ! 1 H. ^efs shares, down 
9p to 447p, have slipped a few 
pence each day since reac hing 
meir peak of 482p on Novem- 
ber 28. The bid premium in 
the price has now evaporated, 
making it an ideal time for a 
predator to pounce. 

And sector-watchers say 
that if there really is a predator 

waiting in the wings, he win 
have to make bis move before 
the company unveils its year- 
end results on Thursday of 
next week. 

Mr Daniel Leaf, leading 
leisure and brewing analyst at 
Wood Mackenzie, the broker, 

'who rates the shares as a 
strong buy regardless of bid 
speculation, said: “Once these 
figures are out of the way, the 
company will have turned the 
comer in terms of Gty percep- 
tion. 


“The presentation of the 
results will give the City a 
chance to meet the new 
rofloagement. They are certain 
to impress and the stock will 
be m for an immediate re- 
lating.” 

He estimates that the break- 
up value of Grand Metropoli- 
tan would be at least £7 a 
share, valuing the entire group 
at £6 billion, and says at its 
present price there is no longer 
any bid premium included. 

At 447p, the company is 
valued at less than £4 billion. 

Because of the enormous 
sums involved in launching a 
bid of this size, the most likely 
suitor is thought to be a 
consortium which would sell 

• Expect details next 
week of Blue Arrow's third 
US acquisition this year. 

The employment agency and 
cleaning services group is 
paying about $15 million (£10 
million) for a franchised 
employment agency in New 
York. This will boost its 
US network to 170 ontlets. Its 
shares eased lp to 3S7p. 



off various parts of the com- 
pany to its members. 

Yesterday's slide in the 
Grand Met price was put 
down to plans by the US 
Government to close the 
Delaware Link, a tax loop hole 
whereby British companies in 
the US can get double tax 
relief. 


Bur anal 
this on 

“negligible”. 

Elsewhere, the stock market 
had another quietly firm ses- 
sion, with leading stocks 
boosted by an opinion poll 
showing the Conservatives 
ahead and British Gas holding 
steady at 62‘Ap, despite notch- 
ing up a volume figure of more 
than 300 million shares. 

The FT-SE 100 index 
gained ground steadily and 
dosed up 12J5 at 1,635.9. The 
FT-30 share index closed up 
S.9at 1,284.4. 

Gilts closed at their highest 
level of the day, aboui £'/« 
better in the shorts and as 
much as £¥* better at the 
longer end, boosted by the 
stronger pound. 

Among blue chips, British 
Telecom was one of the most 
heavily traded, with 14 mil- 
lion shares changing hands 
ahead of its results on 


Thursday. 

The share price, encouraged 
by the political opinion poll, 
finned 4p to 200p. 

Gable &. Wireless gained 5p 

• Britannia Arrow has cat 
its bolding in Cannon Street 
Investments, the USM 
investment group, from 7.7 
per cent to below 5 per 
cent The shares, need at 
about I82p, were bought 
by friendly institntioas. Its 
shares firmed yesterday to 

183p. Analysts forecast prof- 
its of more than £3 million. 

to 324p, I Cl 8p to lll8p, 
Glaxo I9p to 944p, on contin- 
ued support after its annual 
meeting on Mond ay, and BTR 
6p to 274p. THF slipped 5p to 
1 81 p on profit-taking and 
Vickers 3p to 388p. 

Better than expected results 
boosted Goring Kerr 2 Op to 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


■■ ■ „ r 








QnM 


Votene 

1 







Gross 




■ - 

1386 


Price 



Oh 

YU 

fended 

1906 


1 

Mce 



cOv 

YM 



. _ 

Mgh Low Company 

Bd 

Offer Ctfge 

pone* 

% 

P/E >000 

| Mgh Low Coomr 

BM Offer 

Ctfgo 

paaco 

% 

P/E 



363 

283 

AUM-Lyans 

303 

308 

• 

+3 

145 

47 

140 381 

348 

276 

Laid Securities 

344 

347 

• 

+3 

14.5 

42 

23.1 

102 

... 

174 

126 

ASDA-MFI 

148 

152 



45 

33 

184 1,800 

288 

133 

Legal 6 Gen 

243 

248 



123 

53 

313 

781 

. ■ . F 

• 483 

264 

BTR 

273 

278 


+8 

98 

33 

19-2 4.400 

484 

293 

Uoyds 

438 

445 


+13 

25u0 

5.7 

7.1 

1,400 


4S1 

381 

BAT 

464 

469 


+6 

1X4 

33 

122 1.000 

283 

163 

Lonhro 

227 

229 


+1 

17.1 

73 

112 

741 


572 

449 

Barclays 

488 

495 


+15 

28.1 

5.7 

7.1 1300 

231 

163 

Marta 6 Spencer 

183 

186 

• 


5J 

&1 

22.1 

2200 


840 

680 

Bass 

720 

730 


+2 

243 

34 

129 334 

599 

417 

Midland 

580 

567 


+15 

37.1 

63 

209 1700 

•. i 

450 

356 

Bsedwn 

420 

425 

• 

+4 

17.1 

43 

173 1900 

593 

42S 

Nat West 

408 

SIS 


+14 

279 

53 

52 1300 

726 

526 

Blue Circle 

645 

650 



30jO 

43 

92 230 

576 

428 

PA O DM 

500 

505 


-2 

36 A b 

52 

144 

571 


383 

293 

BOC 

350 

353 


+1 

15.4 

44 

13.7 999 

803 

383 

Pearson 

572 

677 


-3 

154 

27 

192 

270 

■ - .. 

289 

170 

Boms 

230 

233 

• 

+3 

106 

46 

15.1 4900 

691 

311 

HMngton Bros 

618 

623 


+3 

193 

3.1 

164 3300 


608 

423 


485 

490 


+2 

234 

43 

103 -1,500 

248 

162 

Ptossey 

178 

182 


+4 

' 72 

43 

133 2.600 


64'i 62 

Br Gas 

Bril 624 


-»4 



1 

942 

718 

Prudential 

825 

832 


+10 

383 

4.7 

54.7 

312 


709 

530 

Br Pmroiaum 

680 

685 



4BJS 

7.1 

73 2200 | 

234 

148 

Racal Beet 

178 

ISO 


+2 

43 

2 A 

183 3300 


280 

177'iBr Telecom 

198 

202 


+4 

107 

54 

11.714000 1 

589 

421 

Rank Org 

523 

530 


+8 

325 

43 

183 

829 


193 

96 

Britoa 

150 

152 



94 

02 

4.1 3300 1 

900 

60S 

Raddt CDhnen 

793 

800 

• 

+3 

239 

33 

172 

372 


' 354 

256 

Burton 

264 

268 



ai 

33 

149 2000 . 

| 584 <2 345 

Reuters 

577 

632 


+2 

5A 

09 

439 

368 

• 

369 

277 

Cable & Wireless 

320 

327 


45 

72 

22 

17.7 2400 

791 







31.4 





196 

158 

Cadbury Sdtwmou 183 

188 


+1 

8.7 

4.7 

21.6 496 

511 

RTZ 

653 

660 

• 

.. 

43 

87 

82 


564 

428 

Coats Viysfla 

452 

456 

• 

48 

17J 

33 

133 767 

532 

365 

Rowntree 

410 

415 

• 

+12 

183 

4.4 

113 

1700 


336 

257 


288 

209 


45 

174 

63 

.. 1.400 

967 

762 

Royfll Ins 

850 

657 

• 

+Z7 

383 

43 

703 

1300 


704 

409 


653 

680 



364) 

53 

183 526 

426 

344 

Sutasbory (J) 

414 

416 

• 

+2 

a+ 

23 

S M2 

51 


330 

252 

Gounaukts 

310 

313 

• 

+1 

102 

33 

103 977 

148* 39 

Sears 

123 

124'z 


S3 

43 

163 4300 


290 

201 

Dee Corp 

206 

213 


+1 

103 

43 

17.1 848 

415 

316 

Sedgwick Gp 

323 

328 


-- 

17.1 

52 

153 

749 


438 

318 


328 

332 


-2 

43 

13 

233 5200 

970 

653 

Shell 

947 

952 


-3 

SIA 

54 

94 

784 

. 

.650 

408 


526 

630 

• 

-2 

a4 

13 

233 515 

132 

93 

Smith & Nephew 

115 

117 


+1 

3-5 

33 

193 

289 


954 

701 


830 

837 


+12 

-343 

41 

213 487 

174 

96 

sre 

166 

170 


. . 

2-1 

13 

.153 

682 


226 

158 


160 

173 


45 

83 

3 J 

10.610.000 

694 

419 

Stun Chart 

790 

797 


+10 - 

46.4 

53 

93 

271 


11 '« 

756<: 


940 

950 


+20 

203 

21 

127 3400 

365 

265 

Storehouse 

282 

237 


-1 

113 

33 

152 

679 


481 

328 

Grand Mel 

445 

460 


-8 

13-5 

33 

153 1.900 

772 

520 

Sun Attsica 

655 

662 

• 

+15 

273 

42 

683 

978 


• 11'i72l 

GUS 'A 

10'tlOU 

• 


30Q 

29 

143 48 

81 '« 75*4 TS8 P/P 

75 

76’* 


.. 

.. 

.. 





954 

720 

GRE 

780 

787 


+10 

42JS 

64 

222 1B4 

420 

265 

Tesco 

398 

403 


-2 

89 

22 

223 

1200 


385 

235 

GKN 

270 

273 

• 

+1 

173 

06 

9-1 696 

529 

374 

Thom EMI 

475 

482 


+2 

S3 

52 

353 

613 


355 

275 


284 

288 


+1 

103 

33 

109 2.600 

349 

iSS’aTrafWBer House 

282 

265 


-1 

183 

72 

8.1 

4400 

- 

215*2 141 


190 

192 


+2 

6-1 

22 

179 4000 

209 

138 

Trusnouse Forte 

179 

182 


-5 

78 

4.4 

173 4300 


623 

403 


440 

448 

• 

+2 

214 

43 

93 45 

22 

13’sUnww 

22 

22 ■* 

• 


60.1 

2J 

202 

110 


11H«734 
583 335 
391 312 

Imp Own Ind 
Jaguar 

Ladbrake 

IVelrii 
525 530 
356 361 


+5 

48.0 

12.7 

163 

43 

24 

47 

123 £1 
109 858- 

17.1 156 

2S9 

231 

925 

216 

174 

430 

Utd Beams 
Welcome 

Woolworth 

234 

214 

645 

237 

217 

655 

• 

• 

+4 

+2 

-5 

133b 

33 

229 

53 

14 

33 

123 2100 
27.7 571 
143 111 


£60m first 
Eurobond 
for Dixons 

By Richard Thomson, 
Banking Correspondent 

Dixons Group, the elec- 
trical goods retailer, an- 
nounced yesterday that it was 
' raising £68 million through a 
convertible Eurobond, the 
first time the company has 
tapped the international cap- 
ital markets. 

The company said that it 
marked the first step towards 
encouraging overseas mves- 
lors to take an interest in it’s 
equity. 

The bonds proved an im- 
mediate success, rising to a 
premium as European inves- 
tors moved in to snap up the 
issue. 

The 15-year notes carry an 
interest rate of _6.75 per cent 
and are being issued in de- 
nominations of £5,000 and 

£5ao°a _ 

The issue will be convert- 
ible into ordinary Dixons 
shares at a premium of 1 1.89 
per cent above the mid- 
markel price of the shares 
yesterday. Dixons closed at 
328p. giving a conversion 
value of J67p. 

“This issue broadens our 
capital base and assists in 
financing the group’s major 

expansion programme, 

will accelerate in 1987/ss 
said Mr Egon von Greyera, the 

vice chairman. 

He added that the Euro- 
convertible issue was the most 
cost effective way 
The issue was lead managed 

national M^cSenove&Co. 


Vaux in ‘hands 
off warning 


Another of the big regional 
brewers, the Sunderland- 
based Vaux group, yesterday 
announced sharply higher 
profits and delivered a "hands 
off” warning to any would-be 
bidders 

Mr Paul Nicholson, the 
chairman, said that the recent 
spate of stock market takeover 
rumours had an unsettling 
affect on employees. 

He assured them, however, 
that the management was 
determined to concentrate on 
the essential object of long- 
term growth rather than short- 
term issues in order to ensure 
a successful future as an 
independent company. 

The Vaux figures revealed 
that profits before tax rose 
from £14,722,000 to 
£17,523,000 for the year to 
September 27. The company 
registered improvements in all 
divisions — brewing, hotels 
and wines and spirits. 

A final dividend of 8.23p is 
to be paid, making the total for 
the year I2.5p compared with 
11 . 06 p last time. 

The figures, however, m- 


clude a below the line 
extroidinary item of £688,000 
relating to the cost of closing 
down a number of its 
breweries. 

In addition to tbe closure of 
Vaux brewery in Sunderiand 
and the Ward Brewery in 
Sheffield, the company 
stopped brewing at its Darieys 
plant in September and plans 
to discontinue brewing in 
Edinburgh next spring. 

Vaux is based in a region 
with big economic problems 
but, Mr Nicholson said: "We 
are one of tbe few successful 
growth companies within that 
region and we firmly believe 
that it is in the interests of all, 
particularly shareholders, that 
we remain independent and 

s^ccessfuL” 

He said also that Vaux is 
emphasizing its determination 
to remain successful and in- 
dependent with investment 
plans of £25 million during 
1987. 

“The current year has 
started well,” Mr Nicholson 
said. 


Compco profits ahead 


Compco Holdings, the pro- 
perty company, has reported 
an interim pretax profit of 
£360,080 to September 25, 
compared with £304,624 for 
the same period the previous 
year. 

The company s net rental 
income rose to £425,766 from 
£354,404 while interest pay- 
able has trebled to £25,933. 
Earnings per share were 1 1.3p 


compared with 8.76p. 

Since announcing the in- 
terim figures, Compco has 
bought two office buildings 
close to the City of London 
with potential for improve- 
ment, which Iras resulted in 
borrowings rising to £2 
million. 

The company says interest 
charges in the second half will 
be significantly higher. 


Devenish 
froths 
to £5.9m 

The west country brewer JA 
Devenish is beginning to see 
the benefits m the agreed 
merger with fast-growing Inn 
Leisure, headed by Mr Mi- 
chael Cannon. In spite of poor 
summer weather, profits, sales 
and earnings per share made 
substantial progress. 

Group profits for the y< 
ended September 30 rose from 
£5.5 million before tax to 
£5.987 million. Basic earnings 
per share have increased from 
8.77p to 12.14p and 
shareholders are promised a 
final dividend of 2.15p per 
share compared with 2.05p 
last time. 

After the Inn Leisure 
acqulsiton, ail the company's 
operations have been through 
a thorough review. Some have 
been closed down while other 
changes have produced 
considerable economies. 
Undo’ the new chief exec- 
utive, Mr Cannon, the group 
has a number of new and 
exciting projects for the future, 
the company statement said. 


Glasgow trust 
agrees to bid 

Glasgow Stockholders, tbe 
investment trust, has finally 
recommended the bid worth 
£54.9 million in cash from 
John Mowlem. The offer was 
made three weeks ago and 
accepted Ini Sun Life Assur- 
ance and Sun life Pensions 
speaking for 26J per cent of 
the trust Liquidation of the 
trust will raise about £55 
million and be nsed for expan- 
sion plans. 


Mobile telephones double in a year 


Cellular telephone users in 
Western Europe number 
about 500.000, or twice 
total of last year, and the 
market could double again 
over the next two yeas* 

This was forecast yesterday 
by Communications and in- 
formation Technology 
search in a new study* of the 
mobile communication mar- 
ket in Western Europe. ™ 

report describes the growth in 

the° sector as “explostve^ 

outpacing P 1 ®**. finecta- 
industry’s optimistic expecta 

tions. 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 

be about 2.1 million. 


The study suggests an av- 
erage growth of 30 per cent a 
year during the rest of tbe 
decade. ‘ 

Within 10 years C3T expects 
3.3 million cellular users, or 
more than five times the 
present lotaL In addition, 
there are more than a million 
users of radio pagers in West- 
ern Europe, and this sector is 
expected to grow by 20 per 
cent a year until the end of the 
decade. At that time the total 
number of users is expected to 


There are 3.1 million pri- 
vate, mobile radios in use. But 
growth in this sector is ex- 
pected to rise by only 5 per 
cent a year. These radios offer 
communication only with a 
base station. 

The total mobile commu- 
ni cations mar ket in Europe is 
growing by more than 40 per 
cent a year, seconding to OT. 
By 1990 the business is ex- 
pected to be worth about $4 
billion (£2.8 billion) a year 


including 
$1.75 billl 


equipment sales of 
on. 


Increases of this order - 
international telephony in 
contrast is growing by only 
about 12 per cent a year — are 
likely, in spite of capacity and 
frequency limitations and, in 
some countries, high prices, 
GIT said. 

* Mobile Communications in 
Western Europe 1987: £3,450 
from CTT Research, 1 Hare- 
wood Place, Hanover Square, 
London W1R 9HA. 


265p, and TACE 20p to 360p, 
while Granada dipped 3p to 
2S7p, despite reporting a 43 
percent increase in profits and 
Whitecroft slipped 12p to 
248p on a 31 per cent rail in 
profitability. 

The banking sector gained 
considerable ground across 
the board, after a number of 
favourable brokers circulars, 
with Barclays putting on I5p 
to 492p, Midland 15p to 564p, 
National Westminster 14p to 
502p and Uoyds I3p to 442p. 
Royal Bank of Scotland 
firmed 6p to 2£2p and Stan- 
dard Chartered went up I Op to 
794p. 

Insurances were also ahead, 
with Royal Insurance jumping 
27p to 854p. tbe Prudential 
lOp to 829p, Guardian Royal 
lOp to 784p and General 
Accident 12p to 834p. Hogs 
Robinson, the insurance bro- 
ker, gained 5p to 343p. 

Stores were mixed where 
changed, with the exception of 
Rainers, tbe fast-growing High 
Street jewellery chain which 
jumped 9p to a new high at 
261p after a lunch hosted by 
James GapeL the broker. 
James Cape! were said to be 
strong buyers of the stock. 
GUS ordinary shares gained 
37p to 1 ,450p and Boots 3p to 
232p, while Woolworth 
slipped back 5p to 650p, 
Harris Qneensway 4p to 2l2p 
and Dixons 2p to 330p. 

Oils were also dull ahead of 
tomorrow's Opec meeting in 
Geneva. Shell eased 3p to 
950p, while BP, which had 
more than 2 million of its 
shares traded in the market, 
was unchanged at 683p. 
<Lflsmo dipped 3p to I46p. I C 
Gas 7p to 543p and TricentroL 
which announced a loss-mak- 
ing set of results, 3p to 58p. 

Smith New Court, the in- 
dependent jobbing firm, hard- 
ened a penny to 157j>, on talk 
that it is in merger discussions 
with Hong Kong and Shang- 
hai Bank, the international 
finance group which owns 
James CapeL, the broker. 

Hong Kong and Shanghai 
does not at present have a 
market making arm in British 
equities. James Capel opted to 
act as an agency broker only 
and already does a consid- 
erable amount of joint busi- 
ness with Smith New Court 
But Mr Peter Quinnen, 
ertswbile senior partner of 
James Capel, said such talk is 
untrue: “We are good friends 
with Smith New Court and we 
do a lot of business with 
them,** he said," but we do not 
have, nor have we ever had, 
any interest whatsoever in 
getting into a formal relation- 
ship with them.” 

Analysts, however, think 
that such a merger would 
make sense. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


The Old Lady gently 
puts her foot down 


T he Big Bang and the wider 
financial revolution has resulted 
in a pounding headache for the 
poor old banking supervisor. In a 
rougher, tougher world the game may be 
played according to the rules, but many 
of the most effective plays are on the 
blind side of the referee. 

Such was the lament from Brian 
Quinn, the Bank of England's head of 
banking supervision, addressing the 
1 2th World Banking Conference yes- 
terday. Gone are tbe days, he feared, 
when banks could be relied on to accept 
the nudges and bints from the Bank of 
England. In its place is a new era where 
they will do their damnedest to get 
around the spirit of the law even if they 
stick by its letter. 

The modern-day banking supervisor, 
Mr Quinn admitted, has to juggle so 
man y haik in the air that it is hardly 
surprising if one or two fell to the 
ground. The Bank was accused of 
having butterfingers in the case of 
Johnson Matthey Bankers and that 
episode will not easily be erased from its 
collective memory. 

Three specific issues are exercising 
the Bank's 150-strong supervision di- 
vision right now. The first is on large 
exposures. The Bank starts to take a 
supervisory interest in any exposure of 
more than 10 per cent of capital, and eff- 
ectively sets a limit on any exposure 
equivalent to more than 25 per cent of 
capitaL 

The problem is that the appropriate 
exposure will differ according to the 
bank and the loan in question, and to 
the number of large exposures held by 
any one hank. The approach requires 
judgement and flexibility and this, it 
appears, is not frilly appreciated by the 
banking community. Push us too for on 


this, MrQuinn seemed to be raying, and 
the result will be a rigidity which 
benefits nobody. 

The second area, the role of the banks 
in the securities markets, is one on 
which things should become a little 
clearer early next year, when the Bank 
publishes new guidelines. The heart of 
the problem is the distinction between 
banking assets and trading assets. 
Developing an appropriate measure of 
capital adequacy to cover a bank 
subsidiaiy with a large and active 
trading book is Car from easy. 

This is only part of the effort to bring 
all the new-fangled hanking instruments 
now being invented under a leakproof 
supervisory umbrella. Not only is it 
requiring a qualitative change in atti- 
tude by the regulators, but it also offers 
an opportunity to harmonize rules being 
formulated in other countries. When the 
results of the Bank's deliberations on 
these matters emerge, they are likely to 
bear a very strong resemblance to rules 
being adopted in the US. 

Finally, to show that the concern of 
the authorities extends from the bank- 
ing parlours to the high street, Mr Quinn 
sounded a warning on personal-sector 
credit. Earlier in the autumn, tbe 
Governor of the Bank expanded on the 
dangers of too fast a pace of mortgage 
lending. Now his head of banking 
supervision rays the banks should be 
asking themselves whether all the credit 
and charge-card lending is not building 
a mountain of unserviceable personal 
sector debt 

Tbe Bank would be the last to admit 
it But things were a lot easier, from both 
a prudential and a monetary control 
point of view, when there were quanti- 
tative controls on bank lending. 


The great British let-down 

A lthough jhe price of British Gas "certain insitutional investors,” ha 


shares has wilted, disappoint- 
ment with the early market 
performance is not nearly so great as 
disappointment among ordinary 
subscribers with the number of shares 
they were allotted. 

This sense of let-down may be laid 
feiriy at the door of N M Rothschild As 
advisers to the Government, and for 
reasons not difficult to understand, 
N M Rothschild were anxious to ensure 
the issue's success, initially measured by 
the number of times an offer is 
oversubscribed 

But success did not come easily. It 
required some strenuous marketing by 
N~M Rothschilds among institutional 
and “corporate” investors in the anx- 
ious days immediately before the clos- 
ing date when it appeared that the public 
was not as wildly excited by British Gas 
as the ad men and public relations 
advisers had claimed 

The institutions, or to be precise 


, had 

been given a preferential allotment, 
which in the event was scaled down to 
969 million shares, at a price of 135p per 
share less their legitimate but still 
healthy commissions for underwriting 
the issue. The impression, wrong as it 
turned out, among institutions was that 
the offer of U65 million shares to "the 
general public ” excluded them. They 
were rapidly disabused of this notion, 
came in for the general public’s shares 
and undoubtedly ensured the over- 
subscription of "the UK Public Offer*’. 

Although a cut-off would have been 
feirer, it was decided to allot shares on 
an open-ended basis. 

The disappointment this has caused 
would diminish if the shares perform 
less well, though that statement has to 
be set aside another; namely the natural 
banier — no allotment letters until next 
week — to ordinary investors selling 
shares this week when the premium was 
tempting. 



NO ONE 
CAN MATCH OUR 
TECHNOLOGY 

The Dunlop Max 200G tennis racket, 
winner of the Queen's Award for Technology, 
is unique. 

Its injection moulded carbon fibre 
construction is unlike that of any other racket 
Its flexibility and strength unsurpassed 

Dunlop. Yet another BTR company 
leading its field 



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THE 1 


urn 


RS WF.DNESPA Vr>FnRMBER 10 1986 



This mnouticemenl appears asa matter of record only. 


British Gas^ 

Offer of 

4,025,500,000 Ordinary Shares 


Kleinwort Benson 

acted as financial advisers to 
BRfTISH GAS pic 



Kleinwort Benson 
International 

810 Kokusai Building, 
1-1, Marunouchi 3-chome, 
Chiyoda - ku, Tokyo 100 

Market Makers in 
Shares of 
British Gas pic 

Contact: Gary Stanton 



Kleinwort Grieveson 
Securities 

20 Fendiurch Street, 
London EC3P 3DB 

Market Makers in 
Shares of 
British Gas pic 

Contact: Charles Hue Williams 
Barrie Bennett 

Members of The Stock Exchange 



Kleinwort Grieveson 
Securities 

(a division of Kleinwort Benson International) 

100 Wall Street, 

New York, NY 10005 

Market Makers in 
ADSsof 
British Gas pic 

Contact: Chung Lew 

Members of The New York Stock Exchange 


Licensed Securities Dealers 




m 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 





BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


23 


Electron buys Bytech 


Contracts have been ex- 
changetj for the acquisition by 
Electron House or the Byiech 

mn°r UP ' r a ^ nch »sed distrib- 
utor of electronic compo- 

^ nts - systems and computer 
Peripherals for £3.3 million 


COMPANY NEWS 


. "^ e shares which are being 
issued to finance the 
Quisition have 


ac- 

uiik been P^ccd 

* ,lh institutional and other 
investors by Chase Manhattan 
Securities at I20p per new 
ordinary share and J06p per 

share convcn ®*k Preference 

. Electron's profitability is 
l V?® as,n S through improved 
cmcien<7. and the acquisition 
of the Bytech Group is ex- 
pected to enhance this trend. 

• OSBORNE & LITTLE: Fie- 
urcs in £000 for the six months 
to September 30. Interim divi- 
den °, L3p (Ip). Turnover 
was 3.805 (2.646). profit before 
exceptional items was 673 ( 404 ) 
pretax profit was 508 (404) and 
earnmgs per share -were 4.62p 
(4.4 ip). The company expects 
sares and profits to be higher in 
the second half than in the first. 
STRONG & FISHER 


deferred until April 1988 and 
dependent upon profits for 
1987. Mr Michael WbittalJ. 
founder and managing director 
of Whinall. will be appointed 
managing director of Turriff 
Construction which will include 
Whitiall with effect from Janu- 
ary 5. 

• BERKELEY GROUP: Re- 
sults for the six months to 
October 31 include an interim 
dividend of 0.85p <0.7p) and. 
with figures in £000, turnover of 


to seek further complementary 
acquisitions. 

• HUMBERSIDE ELEC- 
TRONIC CONTROLS: No 
dividend (O.lp) for the year to 


May 31. With figures in £000. 
turnover was 1,005 


_ . (863), profit 

before exceptional items 29 
(H5). exceptional debits 379 
(nil), loss alter exceptional deb- 
its 350 (profit 145). Loss per 
share was 1.63p (eps 0.84p). The 
exceptional debits arc a loss on a 
big contract due to a commer- 
cial settlement dispute, 32, 
writedown of obsolete part 
stocks. 182, and provisions 


21,051 ( 1 3.237), operating profit against stock machines of 165. 
of 3,008 ( i ,910). profit of related There is 


HOLDINGS/C ARNAR 

• Secretary of 


®°OTH: The Secretary of State 
K>r Trade and Industry has 
received undertakings from 
Strong & Fisher not to acquire 
any pan of the share capital of 
Garnar Booth, or to enter into 
any agreement which would 

result in its having an interest of 
more than 1 7 per cent in any 
class of shares in Garnar during 
the investigation by the Mergers 
and Monopolies Commission. 

• GABORNE: Expenses, in 
addition to start-up costs, have 
been incurred throughout the 
whole period. In the second half 
the company will enjoy a full six 
months trading on a nationwide 
basis. 


companies 120 (nil), interest of 
45 (242). pretax profit of 3,083 
(1.668) and tax of 1,079 (667). 
Earnings per share were 6.3p 
(4.0p). The company says sales 
arc at a record level and the 
directors are confident about the 
future. 

• TACE: A final dividend of 
S.68p has been declared, making 
8.52p (6.65p) for the year to 
September 30. With figures in 
£000, turnover amounted to 
22,048 (20,135), gross profit 
8.766 (7.353). distribution cosis 
1,981 (1,744), administration 
2.936 (2,281), operating, profit 
3,849 (3.328), interest payable 
(net) 347 (212), pretax profit 
3,502 (3,116), tax 819 (1.116), 
outside shareholders* interests 
574 (625) and extraordinary 
debts 496 (credit 1,882). Earn- 
ings per share were 30.07p 
(2 1.4 Ip). The group continues 


no tax charge (nil). The 
management accounts indicate 
a modest profit for the six 
months to the end of Novem- 
ber. The profit Tor the full year 
to May 31, 1987, is entirely 
dependent on an early conver- 
sion of the high positive inquiry 
levels into firm orders, 

• AUDIOTRONIG With fig- 
ures in £000, results for the 16 
months to June 30, 1986 (year to 
March 1, 1985) include turnover 
of 3.272 (10,553), loss on or- 
dinary activities before lax of 


676 (I J53). lax nil (3) and an 
" of< 


extraordinary credit of 465 (430 
dbt). In recent months, the 
management's attention has 
been largely devoted to the 
programme of asset sales and 
other cost-saving measures nec- 
essary to ensure stabilization of 
the company’s financial pos- 
ition. This has now been largely 
accomplished. 


Whitecroft jumps 31% 


• TURRIFF CORPORA- 
TION: The company has en- 
tered into a conditional 
agreement to acquire Whinall 
Holdings, a Birmingham build- 
ing contractor which trades 
under the name of Moffet 
Whinall. The consideration, 
payable in cash on completion,! 
is approximately £450.000 plus' 
a further maximum of £75,000 


Whiiecroft, the textiles, 
lighting and building supplies 
group, yesterday launched a 
net £15.2 million rights issue 
and announced pretax profits 
31 per cent higber at £3.6 
million for the six months to 
September 30. 

The company, which foiled 
last August in its takeover bid 
for Beco Holdings, said it was 


raising new money in readi- 


ness tor future acquisitions. 
Borrowings over the past 18 
months have increased by £1 7 
million. 

Whitecroft has a 12 percent 
stake in Eleco which cost £3 


million. An extraordinary 
debit of £765.000 was due 
largely to bid costs. 

The textiles and lighting 
divisions showed strong 
growth, but the building sup- 
plies registered a 27 per cent 
dip in profits owing to non- 
recurring costs of moving to a 
new site and developing two 
additional manufacturing 
units for PVC windows. 


The interim dividend was 
raised to 3p from 2.5p and the 
company has promised that 
total dividends will be not less 
than lOpa share. 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


FtattMog* 

Ntt»1? 

Dec 7 
Dec 15 


LastDolBBe Lot Daeteratfan For Settlement 

No* 28 Feb 19 M»r2 

Dec 12 Mar 5 Mar 16 

__ - J»2 Marts Mar 30 

Mm *■*“" *4 « 9/1996 IMCM6 cobs. AmsMd. Exoanwt Abaca 
ftxUeyBrewWM. Banprtn Pneet Bowie*. Content. Apricot Systems DaagMra. 
Memcom, JF6. Brash Gas, Hat A Spencer, JT Parrish, Abo-Wost, OsJooty. WsOeoma. 

C onn*. Astra, Ptecom, TS8, Cartier, BC*. Sound Dttusfen, London 

PutBridahGas. 

Pul British Gas. 


, Fwrantl, Morgan Gronfes, SqUty & General, 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Tlvaa Monte Smteig 
Dec 86 2L 

Mai 67 

Jun87 

Seo B7, 


_ SS 


Dec 87 

Mm 88 


Prawous day's total open 
Month EurBdnibtf 


Three 

Dec 86 

Ms 07 


GO 
K.G2 
09.06 
09.(8 
89.03 
- 8845 

merest (6082 


lam One EstVol 

SS.S7 6639 218 

88.67 S&&2 88.86 1309 

69.07 09^6 39.08 9a 

09.19 891S 69.19 20 

0947 82.03 0906 A3 

88.85 88.65 8865 20 


JunB7 

Sep 07 

USTmoawyBoud 

Dec 66 

Mar 87 _ 

Jun 67 


9X90 

94.05 

94.03 

93.08 


stool 


100-14 

89-10 

NT 


__ interest 24020 

93J1 9388 9349 M2 

54.05 94.83 94.04 1850 

94.05 9402 34.02 440 

B3JH 9348 9168 227 

Previous tty's total open tatnrest 3968 
5 10CWS 100-12 361 

99-01 


100-16 

99-19 


99-12 

98-14 


2990 
0 


Short Cat 
Dec 68. 
Mar 87. 


Jun 67 


NT 

NT 


NT 


Previous tty's totarepen merest 146 
~ 95-61 o 


0 


isa? 


Mar 87 __ 


Jun 67 

87. 


SS 


-SE 100 
Dee BB.. 


1094>1 

100-03 

NT 

NT 


Pianous tty's total Open Merest 19865 
1084)8 108-00 1084)9 IS 

109-17 108-00 108-14 17538 

108-17 0 


Mar 87 


16140 

16640 


Previous 
iS4_30 I. 

16185 166.40 


1 64.00 435 

T0&8O 40 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Market alee 
desTennee 
DecendierS 
N York 1^4210-1.4240 
Montreal 19553-13534 
Ams‘daml22S5-1247l 
Brussels 59-31-S9.82 
Cpngon 10.7797-iD.8S4i 
Dutfei 1.0471-1.0560 
Frankfurt 18540-2^750 
Lisbon 2i 1.70213.70 
Madrid 193.03-193^5 
M8an 1977.75-199175 
Oslo 1 00760-1 0.7475 
Pans 93830-0.4280 
St'kMn 9 8605-19115 
Tokyo 230.85-231.67 
Vienna 20X3-2025 
Zurtcn 2J3648-2.4057 


1 ATI 0-1 .4220 

19553-1^581 

3242002484 
59.71-59 SB. 

1 0X342-1 CL8490 
14)532-10342 

£8703-2^745 

211.74-21160 

19368-19395 

198796-1993.82 

10.7316-10.7465 

94108-94274 

96071-96112 

231.30- 231. 67 

20.22-20-25 

24019-2.4057 


0604>67prom 

050-0.41 prsm 

1%-ltCpram 

21-I6pram 

IW-Vpram 

issues 

1%-l%pram 

01-121 dts 

!6-34tfis 


3 months 
162-I.77prem 

l-SMJftnm 

4tt-«prem 
S5-*7pr«n 
3X4»prsR 


pastes 

8tt-9KrtJfe 


Staritog Index 


4%-4%uram 
2l2-333cfe 
21-71 do 
1prem-3cfis 
1«V19%<fc 
3S-2’Apmm 
4%-3%prani 
4-3 i pram 
29U-2S*prefi 
4X-4prem 

197S «■ re> at 893 (day* tenpe 66.1-603). 


ltt-9%dts 

IX-Hprere 

1%-feprom 

1%-1Wprem 

9%-8Xpram 

1%-IUproai 


OTHER STERUNG RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentina austroT 
Australia dottr _ 

Bamei<Sner 

Brazil cruzado* 


1.B8S&-16S54 trtfand 


21798-2.1931 Smgepore . 

06345-O538S Ma£y-5ia _ 

206245-206917 Austraka - 

0.7290-0.7390 Canada _ 


13475-1 3505 


„ 21925-2.1935 
2692026945 


065180.8521 


13763-13708 


7.0030-7.0430 Sudan 64625-6.9675 

Greece draenma 198.82-200.8S Norway 75458-76500 

Hong Korn dOHar 1 1.0713-1 16006 Denmark 7 6220-7.0270 

India rupee 1865-18.75 Wear Germany 26102-20202 

Iraq drier n/a 9 mo*i and 18890-16900 

041856.4265 


Kuwait (knar KD 


Netnerianas. 


MatoysodoSar 368004.7000 France 

Mexico peso 1240-1290 


22820-23830 


66175-66225 


Base Rates % 
Cteanng Banks 11 
Finance House 11% 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


BULLION 


Discount Market Loans % 
STKfUe-O 


7 days 5’ s .*-6% 
Smnth 6M 


Treastay BaBs (Discount %) 

ics 


= _ ion 

3 mirth 3mrth 10"is 

Prene Bank BAs (Discount %) 

1 mnth 10 ij .«-' , ib 2m«h lO^IO^n 
3 tenth IO^b-IO" i»6 mnth 1 054-1 0 u «j 
Trade Bats fDtscoum %) 

1 mnth iPm 2 mnth 11 '>iB 

3 mnth 11 "» 6 mnth 11 Y, 

( n tertank pb) 

Overreght open 1054 dose 12 
1 week 11 - 10 % Bmnth 11 %- 11 % 

1 mnth ll%-ll’,t 9 mnth 11 %- 11 % 

3 mnth 11 %- 11 % 12 mth 11 %-llK 


7 days 5K-5% 
3 mnth 5-4% 


^ ■ r. i 

rfOnCB ri«A 

7 days 
3 mnth 


7 days 1%-1% 
Smith 454-4K 


Yen 

7 ttys 4*4% 

3 mnth 4 *m4 7 w 


cal 614-5% 
1 mnth 6 B <a-6 J ig 
6 mnth 6 , ir6 ,, w 
cafl 5%4% 
1 mntfi 5K-5M 
6 mnth 54% 
cal 7%-6% 
1 mntfi 9 6 w-9% 
Smnth 9*18-9 
cai 2X-114 
1 mnth 4%4% 

6 mntfi 4*ra-4'ia 

cat 414-8% 


GokfcS388.75-387.25 


NewZeetanddottBr 
Saud AretM riyd 


162.65-162.75 

1890.0-13996 

42.014266 


Singapore dollar 3.1 166-3 1203 Hong Kong 7.7805-7.7895 

Samn Africa rand - - 


U AEdkham — 
"Lloyds Bank 


3.17204.1895 Portugal . 


53070-53470 Spam 


14930-14960 

13&20-13830 


Austria — 


14.19-1421 


com, ex vet): 

>-272.75) 


Ratee aoppfied by Bvdays Bank H0FEX aid ExteL 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 





Wto 



Puts 



Sorias 

•tm 


Jun 

jm 

_tSL 

Jun 

MM Lyons 

280 

30 

42 

48 

2% 

7 

12 

(-306* ^ 

300 

is 

Sib 

32 

9 

14 

17 

330 

4 

15 

18 

30 

33 

35 

Bmsh Gas 

50 

13 

15 

17 

Y» 

1% 

2 

(*«} 

60 

5 

7% 

10 

2 

3% 

4% 


70 

1 

2% 

5 

8% 

0% 

10% 

BP 

BOO 

90 

103 


1 

8 



P682) 

650 

42 

60 

77 

5 

25 

35 

700 

13 

30 

45 

25 

50 

60 

Cons GoW 

550 

122 

142 



2 

8 



rss7) 

600 

B0 

105 

115 

8 

20 

77 

650 

42 

68 

04 

20 

37 

44 

Cnxnm 

260 

56 

65 

— 

1% 

1% 

— 

I 1 ** 

280 

36 

47 

55 

2 

4 

8 

300 

19 

31 

43 

4 

8 

14 


330 

5 

16 

27 

22 

24 

31 

Com Union 

260 

17 

24 

32 

6 

11 

15 

(-2701 

200 

8 

1b 

22 

16 

21 

24 

300 


8 

16 

32 

37 

42 

Caoie6WAre 

300 

32 

45 

55 

4 

i3 

16 

(-326) 

325 

14 

26 


14 

20 


35Q 

4 

17 


3? 

38 

— 


375 

1 

— 

— 

52 

— 

— 

GEC 

1B0 

15 

20 

27 

4 

6 

8 

(16$) 

160 

4% 

11 

15 

17 

20 

22 

200 

1 

4% 

8 

35 

38 

40 

Grand tiat 

360 

97 

102 

— 

1 

1* 

— 

fW) 

390 

07 

72 

— 

1 

3 

— 

420 

42 

53 

72 

4 

14 

17 


460 

17 

35 

47 

22 

32 

38 

ta 

1000 

130 

145 

175 

2 

11 

16 

miB) 

1050 

02 

105 

135 

5 

92 

30 

1100 

42 

70 

10H 

15 

40 

50 


1150 

18 

45 

72 

48 


7b 

Land Sac 


“4 F 

59 

64 

1% 

r 

7 

r345) 

330 

21 

35 

40 

4 

10 

13 

380 

5 

14 

21 

19 

23 

26 

Marks &Spen 

180 

11 

~ 20 


• 3 

i 

i 

pas) 

200 

3 

10 

17 

17 

19 

23 

220 

1 

5 

9 

37 

39 

39 

SMI Trans 

900 

65 

Ml 

105 

4 

18 

30 

(-949) 

950 

28 

50 

70 

17 

40 

60 

1000 

9 

30 

42 

S3 

65 

75 

Traftagar House 

280 

12 

21 

28 

9 

Id 

20 

(-264) 

280 

5 

13 

19 

26 

99 

35 

300 

2 

7 

11 

45 

48 

52 

TSB 

70 

8% 

11% 

14% 

1 

2 

3V 

("77) 

80 

?K 

8% 

8 

4% 

6 

8 

90 

1% 

2% 

5 

14 

14% 

15 


Sarim 

Doc 

Ha 

Jim 

Doc 

Mar 

Jua 

Beectram 

360 

85 

78 



1 

8 



r*23j 

390 

35 

53 

BS 

1% 

7 

10 

420 

8 

33 

43 

5 

18 

28 


480 

1 

14 

22 

40 

45 

SS 

Boots 

200 

32 

39 

46 

%• 

3 

4 

C232) 

220 

12 

26 

3? 

K 

8 

19 

240 

1 

13 

21 

10 

13 

23 

am 

260 

18 

30 

36 

1 

7 

10 

f274) 

200 

4 

17 

23 

7 

14 

90 

300 

— 

8 

13 

— 

28 

32 

BlTK 

KD 

00 

» 

105 

2 

6 

1? 

(*728) 

700 

33 

55 

75 

4 

15 

27 

750 

2 

30 

50 

33 

50 

60 

Blua Crete 

800 

48 

77 

93 

1 

10 

17 

rw7) 

650 

8 

45 

65 

15 

30 

42 

700 

1 

— 

_ 

57 

— 

— 

De Bears 

650 

135 

165 



2 

13 

__ 

(*773) 

700 

90 

130 

150 

3 

90 

33 

750 

50 

100 

120 

8 

40 

SS 


mo 

8 

67 

95 

35 

63 

80 

Dixons 

300 

32 

48 

50 

% 

6 

10 

rs3i> 

330 

4 

26 

38 

5 

15 

22 


380 

1 

12 

26 

32 

34 

36 

GKN 

240 

34 

43 

47 

1 

3 

6 

(-273) 

280 

14 

77 

33 

9 

a 

14 

280 

9 

18 

23 

11 

18 

23 


300 

% 

8 


27 

32 


Glaxo 

900 

47 

85 

117 

9 

90 

30 

(-943) 

950 

10 

80 

85 

18 

38 

54 

1000 

2 

35 

60 

62 

68 

80 


1050 

1 

Itt 

— 

110 

113 

— 

Hanson 

160 

32 

34 


% 

1% 


n«> 

180 

12 18% 24% 

1 

S 

8% 


Puts 


Series Pec Mar Jen Pec Mw 


Hanson 

200 

1% 

0 

14% 

9 15% 

18 

(com) 

220 

% 

3 

7 

29 

31 

32% 

Jaguar 

r«i) 

500 

550 

32 

2 

58 

26 

00 

42 

1 

22 

18 

35 

25 

42 

600 

1 

13 

— 

70 

77 



420 

W 

75 

90 

1 

4 

7 

(-477) 

460 

22 

43 

64 

4% 

18 

29 

500 

5 

21 

40 

25 

27 

42 


560 

1 

11 

— 

/5 

60 


TOSCO 

330 

73 





% 





cm 

360 

43 

60 

72 

1 

7 

10 

390 

13 

33 

43 

2 

15 

1R 


420 

2 

17 

25 

22 

25 

27 


Series 

Feb May Aus 

Feb 

May Abb 

B"tA«0 

420 

S3 

92 

— 

4 

8 



cm 

460 

40 

50 

75 

9 

17 

23 

500 

27 

35 

48 

27 

37 

42 

BAT Ires 

390 

88 

95 



2 

3 

_ 

(*467) 

480 

60 

68 

80 

3 

7 

13 

460 

20 

40 

55 

15 

18 

25 


SCO 

10 

20 

3) 

38 

42 

» 

Barclays 

460 

50 

60 

70 

7 

17 

22 

(■487) 

500 

Zi 

35 

40 

22 

30 

37 

550 

5 

12 

— 

Bb 

72 


BntTfliocom 

180 

25 

30 

34 

1% 

5 

9 

(*201) 

200 

10 

17 

21 

10 

13 

16 

220 

3% 

0 

— 

24 

25 

— 

Cacoury Sefcwnps 1 BO 

30 

33 

38 

2 

4 

7 

1-185) 

180 

13 

10 

» 

6 

10 

14 

200 

5 

11 

15 

17 

22 

25 

Guinness 

280 

24 

35 

45 

17 

90 

25 

1289) 

300 

14 

20 

35 

Z7 

30 

35 


330 

5 

13 

20 

50 

50 

55 

Lattttk* 

330 

4? 

59 

80 

3 

8 

19 

C359) 

360 

18 

32 

42 

12 

17 

25 

390 

7 

17 

27 

33 

37 

40 

LASMO 

130 

23 

99 


3% 

6 


Cl 46) 

140 

17 

93 

31 

7 

19 

13 

160 

9 

13 

20 

19 

21 

22 

Midland Bank 

500 

75 

87 

97 

3 

in 

15 

rsaj) 

550 

40 

.SO 

62 

17 

95 

32 

600 

15 

20 

30 

47 

52 

57 

PSO 

460 

57 

6B 

02 

5 

11 

15 

C504) 

500 

98 

40 

55 

20 

30 

3? 

550 

6 

17 

27 

bO 

57 

62 

Racsl 

160 

23 

39 

38 

5 

7 

9 

(*178) 

180 

10 

18 

24 

13 

17 

22 

200 

4 

10 


25 

30 

— 

RTZ 

550 

197 



4 



f*67) 

600 

as 

109 



8 

17 

_ 

BSD 

47 

fi? 

82 

29 

.17 

45 


700 

20 

37 

52 

56 

65 

74 

Vaal Beats 

70 

17 

21 

94 

2% 

5 

6 

(■81) 

80 

0 

14 

17 

7 

9 10% 

90 

3% 

8% 

11 % 

12 

13% 

15 


Sorias 

Mar 

Jun 

Sep 

Mer 

Jim 

Sep 

Lonrho 

200 

35 

49 


2 

7 


(-229) 

220 

21 

97 

33 

8% 

16 

19 

240 

9 

16 

20 

23 

98 

31 


260 

4 

a 

— 

40 

42 



Senas 

Feb May 


Feb May Aim 

Tr 11%% 1991 

100 

2'm 


•sT 


Vie 

1% 

(-£102) 

102 


1'ie 

2 


"v 

2% 

104 

% 

% 

— 

3U 

3« 

— 

Tr 1 1 Vft. 03*07 

104 

3% 

4% 

5 s HI 

1% 

«n 

3K 

mo6) 

106 

THjj 

3' HI 

4' hi 

2% 

3% 


108 

1% 

2% 

3*ie 

3% 

4% 

5'n 


110 

a** 



5% 

fi 



112 

% 

1% 


6% 

7% 



114 

X 

lSi 

— 

Hft 


— 


Dec Jen 

Feb 

Mar 

Dec 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

FT-SE 1550 

95 107 



1 

8 



Index 1575 

70 B5 



— 

2 

10 



0636) 1600 

44 67 

82 

93 

4 

17 

23 

28 

1625 

30 40 

6b 

78 

13 

25 

33 

38 

1650 

16 35 

50 

63 

27 

35 

49 

48 

1675 

B 23 

33 


45 

50 

57 


1700 

1% — 

— 

— 

68 

— 


— 


9, 1986. ToM contracts 75334. Celsfi0852. Puts 24482. 

FT-SC index. CaPe: 801 . PutK 1080 


■Underlying security price. 


$ 38560-38860 (£270.75- 
Sowrwgns tMw. ax retk 
% 91 60526b (E64^5 -Sj 00 
Platinum 

S 475.00 (£334.15 ) 

SOver 

S 53460 (£375.75) 


ECGD 


1 mnth 4 a«r*> 
1414-4% 


Brrrth 


Fixed Rate Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Averaga reference rate tor 
intere st period November 1, 1985 to 
November 28, 1985 tedwive: 11218 per 
cent. 


Local Authority Deposits (%) 

2 days 10% 7 days 10% 

1 mnth 10 % 3 mnth 11 % 

Smnth 11% 12 mttr 11% 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 


Local Authority Banda C%) 
i ninth 11 Vll % 2 mnth 11%-11% 


3 mnth 11V11% 
9 mnth 11%-11% 


6 mnth 11 %- 11 % 
12mth 11 %- 11 % 


SterSng CDs (%) 

1 limit, 1 1 1 ts-1 1 

6 mnth 11V11X 


2 §50p) 
arsea (1 


Smnth 11%-11V 

12mth 11"3r11% 


Dolor CDs (%) 

1 mnth 620-6.15 
6 mnth 565-560 


3 mnth 105-660 
12mth 665-660 


Ashteed (122p) 

Avis Ewope 
Biston&Banarsea (1Q3p) 
Brake Bros H25p) 
British Gas (50p) 

Dental S (130p) 

Fletcher Kino (175p) 
Gaynor (94p) 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN 11.00% 

Adam & Company. 11.00% 

BCCI 11.00% 

Citibank Savingst 12.45% 

Consolidated Crds 11.00% 

Co-operative Bank >.11.00% 

C. Hoare & Co 11.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai! 1.00% 

Lloyds Bank 11.00% 

Nat Westminster 11.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotlandll.00% 

TSB 11.00% 

Citibank NA— 11.00% 

f Mortgage Base Rate. 


Geest (125p) 
e (16p) 


Gtentree 

Gordon 


Guthne Corp 1ST. 


Hals Homes 


Gdns (95p) 
Harmony Lsisua (23p). 
Lloyds Chemst (tOSp) 
Lon& Metropofitan ' 

Mecca Leisure (1* 


145p) 


Miss Sacn 


Northumbrian 


145 
231 +2*2 
141 
149 
62 U - 5 r 
156-2 
180-1 
109 +1 
155 +1 
53+5 
206 
170-1 
105 -1 
27-1 
132 +1 
166-1 
153 'a +'a 
97+2 


Spandex 
Sumrt (I35p) 

TSB Chan tstas (70p) 


TSB Grow (lOOp) 
Virgin (140p) 
Wlmney Madcay { 


paw 


WooUoris Better J104p) 


220-1 

1» 

95 

78*«+'4 

133 

168+2 


ward Group (97p) 


105 +1 


RIGHTS ISSUES 


Cook WM FTP 
GtanfiaU N/P 
Lon Assc Inw F 


Noridk Cap 


180 

26 


Cap Ff 
Patrocan F/P 
RegaBan N/P 
“ Sec Nf 


20 

244 

65+2 


Quarto 


112+1 

126-4 


Wafirar 

(Issue price in brackets). 


190 


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
UNSECURED CREDITORS 

17 SOUTHAMPTON PLACE. LONDON WC1A 2EH 


Would anyone who has supplied goods or services since 4»h March 1986 

to and is I 


i now a creditor o£ 
HOUSE OF HOLLAND 
Localstate lid T/A House iff HoOaod 
Evensare lid T/A House of Helhuid 

Pteose coatoa tktabot Asaodatiam ats 


162 Lnd Street. Soeebport PS9 OQA 

677256 Action G. Fax: 0784 488S0 


Telephone 0764 44484 Tekac 




WHITECROFT 


31% INCREASE IN PROFIT 


INTERIM RESULTS 
TO 30 SEPTEMBER 1986 



1986 

rood 

1985 

€068 


Turnover 

53,942 

48,668 

OP 11% 

Profit Before Tax 

3,591 

2,740 

UP 31% 

Earnings Per Share 

10.0p 

7-1 P 

UP41% 

Dividends Per Share 

3.0p 

2.5p UP 20% 


• LIGHTING PROFITS UP 67% 

• TEXTILE PROFITS 24% HIGHER 

"Trading results for the first two 
months of the second half have been 
encouraging and we continue to view 
the outlook for the current year with 

Confidence!' Tom Weatherby, Chairman 


WHITECROFT pic 

Textiles. Building Supplies, Lighting, Property Development. 


A copy of the Interim Report may be obtained from: The Secretary. 
Whitecroft pic. Water lane, Wilmsiow, Cheshire SKS 5BX. 
Telephone: 0625 524677. 




PUT OUR 

RESULTS UNDER THE 
MICROSCOPE AND THEY 
LOOK EVEN BETTER 


The performance of Nunc, manufacturers 
of culture specimen containers deserves closer 
inspection. 

Especially in the area of diagnostic scanning, 
where their Immuno Reader system leads the field 
in scanning for AIDS anti- bodies.. 

Nunc, like many BTR companies, benefits 
from focused research and development 



BTR PLC. SILVERTOWN HOUSE, VINCENT SQUARE, 
LONDON SW1P 2PL 01-834 3848. 


i 




BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



THF TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


«ee«y 

Bid Offer chug Yld 


Mtgr toe Accuse 250.5 2G6L0# +18 402 

Do hctw 1982 2108* *IA 482 

Q8M MOM 93.1 973 -04 828 

COMM 77 JJ 810 -04 8J29 

HAAnorTHMCWi 1308 1488 -18 002 

Far EaW T*i Aeon 17*0 187.1* .+1.1 ai3 
Euro Tat Mon 175.1 I860 -27 0L81 

Qmem TiM 2313 230 +17 138 

MC— T — M BW ir 

i. Latxene* ftxjcwy n. London EG4R BSA 

01422 4090 . 

US BMr Go's 7as 782 +02 022 

CaU Rad 1139 1212 +08 024 

UKtoceme FM 7817 818 +03 484 

Fir EMBtn Fml 771 823 +1.1 090 

Own Mon 782 81.1# -0.1 135 

Rwl MM 538 57.1 • -0.1 9.00 

MOM Rm Fond «4 516 . . S04 

Eurosaan Income 889 917 -03 270 

rwnrlrh Rad 498 522 +4L1 297 

ratNVEOTMTIMIMOBIS _ 

190. WW Own SL Qtoagow 02 M 
041-332 3132 

Bound ante 444 472 +02 140 

00 Acorn 458 482 -MX2 . . . 

Ineaae Oft Inc *00 <34* +04 580 

Do ton <37 405# +04 . . 

Savin Col Inc 512 S48# -08 180 ' 

Do ton 52-1 SS4W -as .. 

WW — W M O— IUD 
floor WO. Tondrtdg*, 1N8 IDT 
0732 361144 

Amatol 1087 1158* -12 072 

AMT eww MOM 35-7 382 -0L! 42S 

ABM RMCU to It BUI +02 021 

Aossna 332 352 +0.4 127 

European 459 484 +0.1 0.00 

Far Bml M 358 37.9+ -03 4.1D 

CR 8 Read M 287 298 +0.1 987 

QroMh 8 Mcoma . 944 101.0+ -1.7 4.77 

Japan Sped# SO 412 448 -03 .. 

Japan 1*53 1560 -09 .. 

Managed M 1*3J 1533 -1.1 006 

MnlmwEaA 813 87 8+ .. 8.15 

PicUtion* at) 328 35.1 ..888 

Soud! EM Ada 41.7 444 -08 023 

SpacM St» 171.7 1847 +05 085 


Weekly 

Bd Offer chUg Yld 


Weekly 

m Offer ch'ng YU 


'saLoSon l 


Amatol EMM £3693 3748 .. 184 

J*an Exonpt £*5*2 *634 .. 071 

Ara PnwrtyTa SIOOOO J .. 800 

Propviy Trust £20238 .. 880 


3. union vna Bugs, London KM, London 
BC 2 M 5 NQ 
01 -es 5181 

Ama A Gan inn 2830 2884 +11 .. 

Do Aocun 2268 2418 +11 . . 

Aotar Uanand M 2114 2238 +10 121 

DO Acam 2194 2328 +12 121 

end T» too 2032 2188 +72 234 

DoAoam 2478 2828 +23 284 

Conv 5 0* toe 8&0 930e .. 831 

Do Acam 1178 12380 +0.1 581 

Extra toe T« MC is 72 1789 +04 441 

Do Aeon 1814 1914 +08 441 

Mama Trust 1204 1274+ +09 4.11 

Do Accas 128 8 062+ +08 4.11 

M CrOMOi FO toe 1678 178.6 +04 .. 

Do Aoan 1852 1994 +07 . . 

Jam 8 Gao M 958 1018 +08 087 

Do ACCWn 968 1C22 + 1.1 087 

Monday Incoma Fd B4.S S9.4+ +06 433 

Racovwy 1484 1578 +04 14S 

Do ACCUD 1618 1704 +04 14S 

Bxapaan toe 683 72 8 +02 040 

Do Accura 683 728 +02 080 

Rnwtdd Inc 488 512 .. 180 

Oo Accra 482 512 .. 180 


+11 .. 
+11 .. 
+18 121 
+12 121 
+12 234 
+28 234 
.. 581 
+0.1 581 
+04 441 
+08 441 
+09 4.11 
+08 4.11 
+04 .. 
+07 .. 
+02 087 
♦1.1 087 
+06 433 
+04 145 
♦04 145 
+02 020 
+4X2 080 
.. 180 
.. 120 





^SaaSSn 

Era# Bata 
Do Aeon 
maengad Pont*} 
Mtrfato 
Do Acam 


Bd Offer cffflg 


nu i2S9* -as *■« 
1422 1514# -02 
1«9 MS2# -08 . » 
*648 (TAM -05 12| 
917 582 401 IS 

11SL7 *278 +02 2*{ 

T27.6 «8 +«s l* 3 


mwwrjuwBiMoiMruBitr 


153. Hope an. GUgoa G2 30 H 
0*1 W< 9252 


MB *334 -0.4 227 

2729 2913 -02 13 

2212 2854# -Ol 081 


scan Cos 2212 2884# 

IICPML P RO t Rag MrtCTP fr 


ar 


57.1 80.6 
248 2S2o 
3COM 2M8w 
1968 2082 
172 192# 


1432 1SL9# 
478 507# 
fflfi 638 
B>7 668 
tU 154# 

668 893 

404 423 


EMBpifnat 

EMOpt ' 042 88.1 

Onan QnA Rad 
Am* Grand! 1062 1138 

AuB GrowO 789 837 

EMopnai 937 99.4 

Do Accnm 948 997 

Euro CrndMr 174 182 

Far Em 60.1 638 

Hong Kong 332 352 

SaGtotn 393 417W 

tod tocos ry fill Tf«8 

Jam PM* 792 M3 

JMMnCis 102 172 

USSilWB CD 688 73.1 • 




6*1 EE. 
499 159: 
985 Ml 
«?r im 


TyTT 




m 


So. Enough 


Mart* Grew# 
N Aoanen 
mean Fnd 


708 752 
408 422# 
348 361 
<54 488# 
4*3 528 
201 299 
308 327 
32J 34.1# 


PO Bax 902. Edctmgh B416 MO 

031-655 6000 


N tor toe 
UK Goan 
Extra Inc 


M Mad M 
US In e om* 
Do ACQSB 


573 SI O# .. 482 
M2 8*7 ..404 

668 702 - - 48* 


2298 9446 
2888 2852 


+02 3 8 * 

+13 33* 




GJoucsstar GL53 7LQ 

02*2 521311 

UK Itolancad toe 708 748# +03 119 

DO Acorn 718 788# +08 111 

UK Qtdi Aeeum eaa 953 +0.4 115' 

UK Hgh Inc Inc 678 713# +02 486 

N Amman Aeeum 703 7S0 -0-1 071 

Far Emu Aeon 1128 1198 +12 085 

Euepnan Aeeum 923 BB.4 -08 1.17 

UK G*t 0 FI M 435 522# -02 933 

Do torn 522 5S2# -03 678 


ISO, 


tan a rxm m 

OraMi E«M» 


Property Shu 
Sum** Compartt* 
Bsapean Trust 


1108 1148 +08 978 
MBS 2102# +18 107 
2744 2643 +07 280 


1492 1864 
2642 2709 
2778 2932 
2173 2302 


+07 280 
-02 182 
+18 (100 
+13 188 
+02 180 


2788 2043# -14 030 


QUMESSJMHQMlNr TRUST 

MAKAS8R3 

PO Bon 441 32 9t UMon BC3P 


NEL Toots 

MHr Gfc 801 IH9 -.1007 

HLAtMrntUSTMAHAOElSir 

99-1 00. SndHg FB. Uddnm. Kan tfu 1XX 

0622 874751 

MLA Amokn 25J 208 -02 038 

MLA Ganaral 334 353# +08 2.12 

MLA tot a nutod 598 63.4 +03 083 

MU GAUM 212 228# -0111.40 

MLA incoraa <13 44 4# +07 206 

MLAEoopMi 328 342 .. 073 


gG^tay.awvwwgata*. 

Gndi UMs 708 707 ..383 

GAO find W 103.1 1057 .. 779 

Hteh toeema Urta 115.1 1223 .. 429 

t+SvWUGAUM 578 590 .. 087 

taa Grawto urn UE7 1553 .. 035 

NManeaUW 748 705 .. 07S 

Far Em UMS 90.1 1023 .. 006 

ft n — T 708 772 ..282 

RetCAPIMTTRUSr 

Uncortl Hat. 252. Randard Bet E7 

81-234 55*4 

lln# *348 *428# +0.4 4J5 

MERCURY roup MAIIAOatS UP 
33. naMn SL 6C4R 9AS 
01-280 1080 

Am* Grown 902 1043# +11 129 

Do Aeeum 1032 VSJ# +4H 129 

Am bone. su .551. +03 486 

Do Accua w* m* +04 Am 

Batman Orowdi K32 751.B -05 099 

Do Aeeum M88 1572 -05 099 

GaoaoT 2*85 2808 +18 134 

Do Acorn 40*3 4262 +12 13* 

QtJ & Raad 791 714# -08 882 

Do AfiCOn 92.1 025# -04 682 

mean# E&a aos +02 A37 

Do Acoan 967 1(HL3 +03 *& 

2782 2B9.1B +03 182 
DD Ancon 3308 35B5c +03 182 

Japan ia &0 1977 +o.a ooo 

bo Aeeum 1913 202.4 +03 080 

Racovwy 2033 2153# +13 248 

Do Accura 2193 2318# +1.1 248 

P#n#t Pea 23*4 an. 4 .. 2.70 

Exampl Aeon 3649 3743 .. 270 

ton I ton* Rato 825 873c -OJ 3.46 

-0.1 348 


Do Accm Lkats 


SMDWOAFWxJ 868 887 . 080 

US Govt Bond Fd 4518 523 -4.1 . . 

Cnafianger 488 503 -42 230 

WWDSOR TRUST MAMAOBtS LTD 
VUndior Hou*#, 83, K to g to ^f . Unto n MC2B 


01-406 8331 
Cow* EquBy 


468 S13# -02 759 
588 605 +0-7 484 

553 58-6 +41 llh 


The prices in this 
section refer to 
Monday’s trading 


rT*-*r 







VMim 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


■ i. 19 *? r 


Gras TH | 

H|R Lrr* Cmpaqr 

Bd Qfftr 

Cb4geito p % P/E 


IJ'i B'rA S M Gs 
65 « ATA SrtBdon 
136 98 MMftfSS) 

6* 33 Atetdrso SO Use 

143 <5 AcCRSSWRd 

82 34 Mom Cons 
19 a’lAoto Jrwter 
22 14 Mud Learn 
195 90 tom 

276 121 AnjoSccuBm* 
121 SB m 
IE «*>*»**» 

146 140 Aftod 
365 220 AspenCaanB 
169 107 AsjmW 
6ffl 27 Pamj 


n 13 +V 

» 56 #+2 

OO 134 • 

*5 SO 

i i .. 

14 16 

90 95 -2 

zn 274 -3 

10B 112 +2 

MB 153 +1 

3*2 3*5 -1 

300 310 
142 147 


if™ 

70 64 BB6 0*f#i 

CIS. 

IHSB 1 - 

ii^r 


.1 ssss 

lii 


175 130 CW 
210 85 CMnnOI 

» 62 Cjaato 

U4 06 Qmt stu to* 

141 74 Quay Sea 

205 63 CfectooUEuK 

161 125 CMsa Mm 
13 evowa Maanto 
268 ISB Oman W 
2J’x BVCftr 
100 86 own 
*5 25 Otywaoa 
GOO 475 Qtyiem 7% 

115 67 CnaprM 
173 146 Cbdw Ham* 

33 14 aeam GsW 

57 25 S* 04 H to* 

120 87 Qodm Beesedm 

68 53 Q*a EmewM 
1*3 21 Conn 

133 21 Cotoono toe 

ITS 123 Com fim tod 

i so QxnpBen 
3* CBssm 
38 Cons Tan kn 
r*3 am ucnxm 
93 D»dS 
UJ 93 cm 
*30 308 Qanphom 
7S *6 CimiUuiA 
114 95 CrwawA 
113 75 Dm Lodao 
198 153 OrtdCaa in 
62 88 Croat TV Prods 

157 78 CraSS 

73 43 DBE T«B 
140 83 DJ5ee Mam 

65 60 Dwen 
2*6 190 Darts (W) 

84 65 Deal 6 Boms 
27 21 OeM (MM 

188 131 Ddtor 
57 *0 Ddmr 
138 108 Daaewa _ 

115 TO Dnaus Be 
135 6B DaaayWdna 
285 ITS DOeoa 
*78 375 Dart 
21 IB Dow 

68 39 Erte- 
148 104 Eahn Ftoo Oeaes 
37 it Feabne 
325 218 EO> Fin* 

*1 22 Edn Ol A Gn 

«I 322 pwj* Popi -a- 
1*8 108 EfcOM Hoose 
100 72 awwanc Dm P 
46 34 EMW 
i8 6 B M n armM Rad 
216 122 Eon 
115 HQ EwCMHMM 
400 U8 F* 

380 151 HO Go 
1E1 138 F 4 H Gras 
50 51 ROtoKK 
73'i 17 feiywa o * 


300 310 

142 147 
312 317 -1 

US 106 

530 560 +10 

31 33 +1 

IBS 175 

1*5 150 +3 

87 82 

M S 

42’.- 44 -■? 

200 2W +3 

73 78 -1 

108 113 

2S> 24>, # 

*3 48 
18>. 18*. 

61 84 

120 123 

138 M3 

14 16 

27 S -1 

38 39 

NR 112 • . 
1*5 150 

2® 294 +1 

131 134 • 

18 21 

77 82 • +4 
225 230 #+2 
185 195 +5 

M 58 +1 

*5 <7 + 1 

330 350 
1» 190 #+1 
220 230 

!V 3’. 

83’r 88 Hr 
160 170 

33 34 +4 

152 157 • . . 
140 ISO +S 

63 88 

180 183 -1 

128 131 • .. 
145 155 -18 

148 153 • 

9 lOb . .. 
ZS5 280 #-2 
17 IB -'t 

97 102 +2 

41 44 

775 825 +25 

83 88 

1*3 M8 

31 32’.- -«t 

53 56 

lg 117 • 

58 65 

138 143 

22 26 -1 
157 16? ■ . . 

42 47 

MS 152 +2 

38 4a 

1U 163 -2 

97 102 • . 
93 98 

■m 415 #-s 

» 57 +2 

92 97 -1 

WO 105 +7 

M 17D • 

W T2 -1 
U7 140 • -7 

U S +2 

s bo #-a 

1*8 183 -2 

74 77 

81 25 + 1 * 

HB 130 

*7 49 

Vi » 43 

e ro +i 

05 285 

4£6 *80 -5 

22 23 +4 

44 47 

127 130 -I 

19 JO’r 

^ r *? 
425 430 +1 

125 130 #-2 
96 100 +2 

SB 40 -2 

10 12 +2 

in 208 

110 115 -2 

305 405 

240 245 

IX MO 

67 72 # . 
164 t8 +4 


Qj6b AS 
11 19 

3fi 27 
L7e 35 
46 . . .. 

.. .. 17 

.. .. II 

- 7> 13 , 1J 

23 06 337 


*3 ao us 

44 1.4 3ZB 

86 BO 57 
M3 26 156 
76 

11.4 67 73 

70 47 133 

86 96 156 
»* 21 156 

73 35 167 

U 76 86 
M 58 WS 

87 29 312 

. . . . 126 
. ■ . . 264 

.. .. 86 
6JJ 49 1*2 
13 38 17.4 


13 47 96 

64 53 123 

33 23 223 

50 17 226 

Y.1 15 106 
63 75 &S 

54 24 233 

126 U 10 
43 73 104 

1.8 35 .. 

53 15 185 

43 23 216 
1160 12 U 

14 40 123 

26 16 T66 

.. 20.1 


25 45 133 

36 20 270 

11 24 15.7 

... .. 132 

23 15 246 

10 306 .. 
52 23 273 

.. a .. 26 

16 38 152 


18 11 99 

33 23 197 


133 93 
73 51 
B 31 
318 MO 
60 30 

m eo 
240 130 
136 B 
3B ?10 
MO 04 
ISO 78 
*7 35 

07 72 

246 100 
100 11 

90 32 

18E 87 

155 88 
135 95 

si a 

167 155 
175 116 
41 19 

135 814 

190 160 
109 60 
98 58 

29 26 
320 133 
2Efi 196 
*7 26 

482 3834 
*02 2034 
150 1434 
4T5 155 
205 45 

91 71 
424 7 
140 HJ5 
198 105 

15a 1 W 
X 22 
14 B< 
(89 Hi 
2H 175 
230 152 

31 11 
m 44 
M3 BB 
353 190 
210 204 

32 19 

443 233 
190 116 
» 2 
14B MO 
120 73 

73 48 

330 253 
32 57 

330 220 

53 53 
113 50 
113 67 

78 37 

125 70 

614 32 
118 81 
290 74 

123 73 
140 9C 
198 133 
02 17 

113 77 

327 180 
(89 101 
125 « 

130 54 

9b 71 
176 92 

35 9 

116 101 
308 195 
220 14 

SB 75 
S 9 
75 8 

WT 135 
SS4 311 
13B 55 

HE 71 

95 a 

760 360 
220 95 

47 22 

440 231 
t 85 in 
193 199 
220 130 
47 13 

230 98 

iso a? 

150 118 
sr 25 
274 15 
zis a 

182 IS 
387 230 

54 04 

27 14 i 

» 70 
75 68 
21 8 
150 81 
190 «3 
181 79 

46 U 
91 88 I 
75 26 I 


37 18 
310 180 
414 23 
143 85 
255 ISO 
79 46 
251 GB4 
7184 
g iw 

ira £ 

vs s 

ao 728 

3 

I i 

201 1 « 

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40 

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21 

94 


40 

42 

125 

43 

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120 

S3 

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~ 1 

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218 



17 

417 

20 

15 2 

33b 21 

74 2 

1J 

50 

83 

43 

30 

110 

3J 

25 

248 

29 

94 

as 



42 

UJ 

10 

84 

40 

25 

113 

43 

30 

1E8 

fa 

29 

114 

lb 

14 

127 

Lb 

a b 

130 

as 

28 

152 


"* 

70 

46 

85 

173 

M 

U 

199 



4.4 

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73 

86 

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0/ 

874 

28 

97 

147 



17.1 

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2J 

29 

415 

43 

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121 

» 

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25 

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5.7 

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48 

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127 

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fill 

66 

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283 

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07 

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73 

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155 

i.1 

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180 

43b 

2* 

710 

1.7 

40 

129 

43 

28 

85 



56 

70 

25 

200 

37 

93 

110 



28 

40 

43 

141 

47 

fB 

88 

60 

30 

SB 

26b 30 

714 

02 

07 

59 2 






335 

11 



49 

10 

282 

28* 

24 

92 

20 

24 

159 

25 

75 

23 

33 

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48 

15 


21 

13 

K1 

11 

42 

235 

7.1 

53 

146 

36 


204 

18 



41 

83 


47 

32 





62 

35 

187 



234 


127 

MB 

as 

856 

151 

IS 

392 

SIB 

112 

113 

135 

138 

280 

2M 

Mb Ob 

27 

33 

48 7 

472 

nw 

105 

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ao 

233 

146 

149 

152 

156 

388 

370 

332 

205 

563 

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215 

218 

112 

114 

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158 

416 

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105 

72 

74 ' 

125 

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336 

339 

568 

572 

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m 

313 

317 

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147 

137 

140 

735 

740 ■ 

171 

173 

172 

174 

IB 

IB 

149 

152 

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106 

Z2S 

232 

208 

212 

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324 

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ms 

127 

128 1 

155 

158 i 

288 

283 

m 

270 < 


16 

28 

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310 

V 

416 


29 

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89 

23 

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us 

00 

895 

391 

20 

515 

10 

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29 

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207 

aa 

24 

592 

226 

40 

302 

33 

33 

486 

31.4 

39 

347 

05 

82 


120 

80 

17 3 

154 

42 

342 

1.6 

00 


i.4a 

02 


80 

40 

MB 

09 

00 

683 

939 

33 

488 

94 

15 

mi 

55 

33 

484 

70 

19 

DO 

13 

10 

887 

25 

21 

883 

11 

09 

880 

01 

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190 

44 

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82 

14 

894 

74 

37 

381 

12.0 

41 

394 


10 


36 

70 

937 

49 

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55 

32 

444 

30 

75 

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13 

21 


11b 

1.4 

737 

24b 

23 

715 

20 

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29 

14 


I70b 

56 

283 

34 

21 

669 

55 

42 

320 

450 

27 

469 

33 

13 


94 

20 

AM 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


M 20 966 
14 16 00 .. 


38 21 Baototo 25 

'S 


34 TPsDofy MW 

Siga'-’ 

113 86 Frtwtoa 
773 375 Famtogton 
IM 81 Fran 1% 

223 183 ST mSumih 
Pa 75 Goode (D & M] 
M'*490 HnknanMma 
218 153 CH 
448 3X UN 
385 190 M 8 G 

3 ® W 008 

138 86 Padtt to* m 

.2 -PS'taiwra 


SO 83 

a a 

torn 142 M3 ( 

23 24 

a zo4 

ISB 158 l 
177 188 

2B5 257 

I 110 115 < 

I* 760 775 

1W 115 * 
nm 199 200 I 

&j*L 1914 Iff, 

Admn 94 to i 

200 203 i 
433 437 
270 275 
Houcs 3a 332 

TM MB 138 

rt 43 444 


as 12 UR Kna CM 156 158 


»+4 6jD 

.. 700 

+V 700 
I .. 50 

<3 
.. 7.1 

> 33 

.. 123 

i+3 71 

i .. *3 

-1 IS 

> •• 22.1 
i+l 12JB 
-I 25.0 

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-i mo 

+14 M 
i+i mo 


COMMODITIES 







Tena — - ban 

SLVBISMMJ. 

^i__ 374^0-375.00 

UneMoMlK . 384AK385J00 

JW- na 

Ton# -idto 

alummum 

ttal* 796J0-73730 

Three Months . 806^0-807^0 

W ^50 

Tone Steady But Quiet 

MCKB. 

^8h 2534-2540 

TTroe Months 2592-2Ste 

Tone Steady But bidet 


NEAT AND LIVESTOCK 


Apr unq. SGjS0> 

Jun unq. 96.10 

Aug unq. 96.00 

VofcO. 

PioMMtmRO 
LA# Caois Can&act 
p-parkffa 

Month Open' Close 
Pab 96.00 96W 

Apr 100JO 100.50 

Jun 101J50 101ii0- 


MPPERORAOEA 

Cash 93t.00-332.00 

Three Months . WJM5130 

vrf jem 

Term . — • > Catoar 


115.40 11400 



QWi nym oa a n d Co report 
SUGAR (Fnm Cl Csanflnw) 


COFFEE 


•ten 

1900-575 


WtWMOJs Open trrtafc WT2>^ 

sp otma nra tconmian tB ry: . 

wSdoSm 1 J)on W 12 A 6 . 


susmsssisne I s «sss- us 


































-%Jd- 


JB"S» !L portfolio cart check vour 
onfe Add 00 U>is S* 

^sasfK« 

& ^L° uui8ht OT a 5ia « oruS'ioS 

0®>*y prize money sated If vou an> - 

fflk < Y m f* 00 *^ anU 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Shares gain groiini 


AND FINANCE 


i . a- . 


ty I j 



— ^old' 



ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began Monday. Dealings end December 19. §Contango day December 22. Setdement day January 5. 

grorward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 

Where stocks have ooly one price quoted, those am mkfafl* prices taken daiy al 5pm. Yield, change and P/E ratio are caleuletttl on the m/rm* p ^. 


ST«sNpiiM«lidRd 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+50 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


ttsb Ln Con rev 


IE HiES EZuSlM '-1F1 I 



EJ K-Z ZEKl^— rr T" .T.g »l ^ 


JO 2B3 

mtolym 

840 SBO 
Br 41 
222 112 

ox m 

157 77 
182 M4 
786 530 
615 4X 
237 172 
204 MS 

3ZBT 

ao 183 
355 275 
548 405 
91 86 

E3! 

179 M 
288 mi 

IM 77 
4B 217 

as 131 

ZM ID 
540 353 
31s m 

318 218 
251 168 
sa 410 

SA BnwflK 
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330 195 



MS 47 MO 
Z4J 13 T2fl 
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aiOb 13 233 
U U S2 
U 9L1 152 
1M U 2M 
11.4 ZB l&1 
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U 30 tu 
U U HI 
BD U IS7 
31 45 03 

u 4j n 

s a *7 

iaa zb nr 

MU) 45 P7 
IU U 117 
115 «JB 115 
115 45 125 

I1J0 45 205 
mum 
115 35 233 


CAP Gp 








Please take account of any 

minns signs 



SHORTS (Under Five Years) 


100b 

tea 

Wa 

Xb 

XV 

Mb 

Traaa 

emu 

10q-V 1907 
2W 1907 
IDbtb 1987 

■ » J 


PUj 

Eeci 

77*1 

♦-X- 

ICl 

10% 1987 

97b 

104b 

iffc 

T««n 

Tram 

3% 1987 
12% 1987 

99b 

1Mb 

Bb 

»b 

Ihm 

Exctr 

7b% 19854 



Ikau 

cav% ran 
3% raw 

102s 1 

2b 

Tam 

Sb% 1988 

10SS 

TMb 

tllb 

107b 

QVTtea 
a Each 
Mb EtoB 
9b Each 

10b% 1989 

ip* mao 

UFA 1999 
11% 1689 

93b 

103V 

02 

1Mb 1 


9% 19664 
C0b% 1889 
S% 1988 
13% IBM 

66 

108 

113 

69 

• 

b 

Ml 

a 

3 

t_JL 

P 

2V% 1990 
11% I860 
12 b% 1990 
3% 1990 

100b 

106'« 

06V 

96b 


P 

BV% 19674 
10% 1990 
2b% 1990 
C10% 1991 

112b 

94b 


H +21 

1tb% 1991 
6b% WB7-« 

TTvJ 

r£ 


11% 1991 

r-rxi.a.T-i 

3% 1991 


2S T ante B Hi Mb 

ua as CHoutadUM wa- 
rn m onto &p is? 

590 483 Com 484 

MB » QMlffMl 4*7 

2ZB 5L Ctaeh tat) 2M 

8 !S« 3 

103 75 Ml « 

73 54 DoS' 64 

172 51 FMteMH* lit 
50 54 Fin Gp 74 

94 80 StotoT 84 

MS 106 Gfcta & Db*M US 
365 254 Ghats jup 337 
15Z 06 HAT uo 

314 36 tMMBv 481 

258 175 Hnfeaon 175 

79 42 HmtaHStiGn 97 
244 144 MeywMWBBRI 200 
60 428 HWAM 54S 
59 ZB *3 Hoard SM 51 

303 T2B gjsw* JobASM 186 
4S> as iarUt (JJ I son 440 
488 296 LattOtn 377 

464 25S Do 5' 377 

119 76 lamee fMto) 7B 

*S £ aw £ 

ss sag* 850 * s 

135 101 IM* 120 

210 in ItolMto PH0 M2 
151 90 IH B ten IS 
m m Hdtea(NM| 386 
m 22B NcCatty as 249 
257 171 teM m 

42 23 Mil ISMey) 36 

154 in Itat (A) MS 

444 as Morten (Mb) 336 
B2D 790 MBMM 010 

33 M3 Wan>M 290 
254 115 nuw 239 

1» 74 Ptater Timtor 83 


471 332 Rmtonl 
323 m IUbbU 
Si tSS’dRoohr CmM 
M2 87 snpta Hter 
•7 to aaat(j 

481 V3M VT*mK 

M 23BVMn teuton 
209 136 may an 
<36 210 TM S JtaM 
101 75 Th 

207 13B Tmm 
361 UB WXOCfM 
293 246 WM 
103 59 Mn (1) 
SM 172 VMsBUb 
id 3 B7 Nam Eton 


HO 

232 

267 «-1 
75 + 1 
222 44 

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217 .. 

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647 -2 

245 • .. 
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70 -1 

ISO -I 

i r* -*j 

130 +2 

157 

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2M • ♦! 

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no 4-t 
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M3 • 

08 • .. 

120 +2 

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116 SO 215 
164 62 144 

D.to 51 fi3 
7.1 12 165 
HJ 17 IU 
102 23 K1 
M5 74 M2 

04 12 06 

197 U U 

30 14 23J 

44 U IU 

at u iu 
1» « K 
144 U 221 
43 55 14.1 

iu u ^ 

53 16 MB 

45 25 \ 

35 23 224 

250 S3 90 
6L5 75 1Z1 
75 17 154 

B5 74 IU 
Ul U 2U 
50 4j6 70.1 

25 25 157 

25 35 SB 
SB 42 124 

5 4 7.1 222 

65 51 152 

26 15 391 
14 U 17 

54 36 142 

MS* 55 H> 
25 17 115 
ti ss as 

20.1 17 155 

20 38 200 

7.1 p Ml 

M2 32 015 
ioj zn m? 
707 28 107 
57 7 2 64 

55* 175 11 
102 27 132 

7.7 35 31.1 

126 35 MB 

M O 11 
75 4.1 IU 
01 0.7 .. 

mi 47 125 
41 17 U3 
62 20 155 

14 17 .. 

U U 195 

207 sa taj 
157 15 M2 

05 12 215 
95 17 95 
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200 52 no 

205 11 MO 
17.1 O 120 
125 A3 103 
04 54 795 

15 27 195 

65 75 125' 
750 37 710 

127 4.1 07 

84 42 ISfi 

82 27 175 

15 75 67.1 

IM 4B ^MiS 
ISO 46 712 

IM as 162 

14 1.4 IU 
U M W 

15 15 305 

07 05 185 

12 14 775 

U II 177 


2» 257 »+1 
72 75 *1 

134 137 -2 

Ol 134 • 
532 S» 047 
IM 201 *4 

m so • .. 

15V ITV +1' 

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H 327 46 

207 206 *+2 

190 IBS +7 
57 JB ♦'! 
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138 143 
343 3*8 «*1 
a 333 <-1 

218 222 
150 155 -1 

61b 63b Ji 
U8 190 • .. 
43 4B 
37 40 

302 312 +2 

Cl 41 *1 

isfi m .. 

3*3 385 • *4 
m BB +| 
a 57 

307 M +2 
270 275 >2 

M Mb •+!>. 
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49 52 

171 172 46 1 ; 

IX 135 

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62 67 *2 

HO 243 •-! 
240 250 

m ao *a 

mm - z 

SM 212 a-t-l 
m a •„ 
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77 82 +4 

87 97 -3 

382 332 +C 

m ass 

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40 45 

46 a e-i 

270 285 +M 
83b 64b 
U 14 41 

418 422 +2 

KB 1» -1 

23b Mb 4-lb 
96 » *+l 
Mb - 
255 26S 
186 171 43 

178 180 +3 

17b ■ +'■ 

M5 150 • 

66 75 

176 179 42 
107 112 *-1 
XO 335 I .. 

48b 46b -41 
MB 170 4-1 

MB M9 +1 
52 54 -1 

77 

TBS 187 4-1 
60 62 -1 
473 479 

250 300 .. 

328 328 +3 

M3 187 -1 

mm*.. 

143 147 

420 42S -2 

23 235 • 

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66 Ed 

267 277 

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SOU 55 65 

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41 60 207 

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15 Al 17 
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23 53 113 
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14 24 IU 

15 U .. 
40 I? 754 
U0 29 172 
U 25 147 

S M sue 
15 197 
25 U IU 
15 20 213 

U 37 107 

15 At MO - 
17 20 U 

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7.10 65 5U 
75 65 195 
U 07 227 
50 42 09 

ti, a? mi 
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D7t 09 128 

M tO 244 
LI 19 159 

11 02 S3 

13 BU HJ 

u> 12 m* 
Ub 60 mi 

78.1 


45 65 

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15 17 IU 
IS 60 tU 

u r* 

15 I2B 

ZB 717 


KM IU 

BB 


1 2 

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714 


47 


72 

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767 


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43 

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75 

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57 

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6.1 

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170 

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FINANCE AND LAND 


M2 205 JteOMMb 
777 MB Ana Mn 
757 125 It amain 
m H5 Bartky Tocb 

zz is Cn 3 i 

263 219 Cndauar 
43 23 BnUmy 
34 17 SSrVGto 
MS 732 HvSSte 
m ua team 
MB 56 Ra Knoa Loan 
109 76 Do tax 
148 114 Haantol 
W UVPtirtHl (JT) 

223 195 Tama fan 


237 241 41 

IX Ml 
125 OS .. 
Z37 242 • .. 
Mb Mb 4b 

2M Z35 43 

36b 41b 44 

Xb 31b • .. 

155 KSJ • .. 
19Bb 2Kb *41 

m to* m-i 


IU 19 TU 
57 SA 365 

13 42 3L2 
7.1 45 215 
Kl 44 280 

3 % " 


n*TM i>i ini i ff HMPM»M 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 





| V 









d£ 



ipj 


115b 4b 
1Kb 4b 


107*. +b 
113*. *'• 



51b 40 MOD Hfll 0pm 

244 H ASM CM3 
456 365 Ante* 

2*7 tSB Andar CtoWI 
156 132 OTP 

in BibBajer neo 

132 102 Bkgdaa 
MB 135 Bran Dim 
MO B Br Bin 

174 MS Canmap (W] 

MB 248 

ZW t» toffl fifes 
177 125 DO A' 

23 16 cay [text) 

KB 142 CM 
M2 m DOOM 

245 175 Os 6 Earn) 
rn 113 EMM 

BB 208 F o— ma y 
773 113 KAtadpBaaa} 
45S 3X Mten 
101b 72VHeasa DM50 
IBB JB HoS U0|M 
1lb734 MCtoM 
747 333 team 
116 99 

Kb llbHofe Mjte 
177 119 te , 

IM BBbtetmdh HM9I 
l» 129 (tow 
330 36 SSCT 
73 X SoElh&MtaBM 
ho its tehiii a aS m* 
mi 87 MH Gtom 


Xb ■ 4b 
235 236 41 

448 4H • .. 
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149 TH 43 
111 • 4b 

125 128 
148 151 -1 

78 76 -1 

122 16* -1 

57 a • •• 

m sos «+i 
175 777 •-! 
59 Sb .. 
167 K9 41 
1» M2 • .. 
212 214 .. 

124 CM 46 
24B ZC *-2 
155 KB .. 
306 on +1 
1D9'J .. +*a 

94 37 • 
11'a 11b 
« «5 -2 

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m in +1 
mjb m b 411 
IX Ml -1 
233 . -5 

51 SS 46 
235 240 a+S 
166 MB 


400 U .. 
40 17 240 

105 20 214 

6.1 25 M.1 

64 42 112 

SB U ,. 

103 ai mi 

656 A4 775 
15 15 195 

5-1 Al 208 
n.l A3 97 
70 15 127 
70 AO 1« 
m m sj 
19B BO 775 
.. .. MB 

8.4 35 *2 

55 44 102 

ms 54 98 

7.1 45 91 

219 1 55 M2 

62 (i tU 

48.6 43 725 

125 11 Ml 
55 55 09 

03 .. 

28 15 220 

37 M «M 
27 28 170 

!! 645 
115 4B 268 
AS 25 IU 


CINEMAS AND TV 


388 175 Afl£i TV 'A' 
417 386 CaaU W 
5? 27 bngkn 

340 176 KN H/V 

477 74 LWrMMi 
363 IBS Scat TV 
278 1 TVS V/V 

M 31 TON 

341 319 Itosll 

226 137 TVAU 
152 Wt Utoar TV 
191 1 WtotlY 


319 322 -1 185 A3 «7 

aja 4G3 

48 50 • 25 59 7.1 

202 205 41 mi SS U 

re **3 m-i zu> u ai 

343 346 .. 159. 46 114 

2(7 248 4lb 143 U 122 

48 49 29 65 SO 

297 S88 M-2 150 SO .. 

201 MS 64 12 .. 

MB 152 • 99 59 75 

T73 175 -2 .. .. 


Kp l R ff i — V 


SSE5ESS 



B ♦! 

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185 

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480 

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9/k 

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143 45 81 

107 U 193 
99 17 MB 
£7 U 198 
79 55 111 

43 51 19C 

IX 59 .. 

1796 55 IU 
SO 04 .. 

so 12 m 
u u u 
7.7 .. 

57 30 M4 

89 55 135 

157 AD 179 

II 1 &4 *65 
7.1 53 145 
50 U 174 
94 15 215 

U> 13 .. 

U U 79 
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U U 111 
a 13 13 
125 S3 177 


BU OBer CO not Oar p % P/E 


-1 14 35 M7 

29 6 l0 .. 

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-5 219 44 142 


■3 174*115 Id 

•-2 627 382 .. 

35 

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+2 256 46 103 

4b . . . . 229 

1 .. 22S 35 

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• 96 54 HJ 

4b .. .. 20 

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•-1 75 U 45 




em a 


132 137 41-3 MO 74 119 

86 IB «-3 SS 08 

433 <37 -6 298 65 2ZB 

488 «0 •-! 250 U 397 

34 X Ul 49 125 

228 229 41b 17.1 75 113 

« S£i *-2 16 45 135 

205 290 *3 03 32 7.4 

280 205 -2 03 13 73 

ITS 177 41 96 55 11 

56b 57b -lb 

SB 650 *-*2 229 IB 139 

14 151 -S 534 

2*8 2S3 -2 M7 43 IU 


an 4i 

975 

270 48 

3TB 44 
»!.. 
837 *413 
787 «4W 
4n a-i 
343 44 

246 4! 

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4S7 -I 

241 

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832 411 

427 

830 *422 

327 .. 

455 e-i 

413 .. 

670 «4M 
924 m-z 
240 

450 -1 


PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERTG 


LEISURE 


M4 96 (tor c vm ■*■ 
220 128 Omsart Hotel 
2?i m HMtetar 
132 4Z Cmto 
225 I Oayxafei 
463 3S Fat Latan 
62b 49 GRA _ 
rn a Haitaga Brook* 

1 51b 93 tefesa Tarn 
131 M to ine 
103 3S JAM* HUH 
2DB 137 te M 

391 14 tern 

«3 326 ftHrUaW 
64 X Way Latent 
228 120 SMI He*** 

360 MS Saswsssm Ss 
172 119 SMay tma 
74 51 TeanteaMn* 
tffi QSbZMea 


IK IM 
Ml 191 41 

203 208 *41 
114b 117b -1 
175 179 
3B3 XS e-2 

Xb a -b 

m 120 46 

M7 149 
114 116 • 

49 52 

TM 152 • 

163 173 •-? 
318 320 -1 

370 375 • -5 
X 37 -b 
1® 164 -2 

183 193 43 

KB 172 .. 

83 65 -1 

182 195 41 


PROPERTY 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


UNDATED 

40b STbCoepU 4% 
42 32b war Ui 3b* 

52b 44b COW 3b% 
34b 20b Tns 3% 
29*. 22bCoiw*2«» 
29b 23b Tims Zb% 


INDEX- LINKED 



30b 4b IOS 

33*. 4b 104 

45b 4b 
2B*a +b 
24 •*} 

SS>t +b 


IDS +* 
116 + 1 * 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


2SS **3 959 35 

£ -I* 1556 5J 


2W v 

too -3 

a 

490 +H 

X #-1 


290 • 


: ;?b 2® ai 

»•* M H 

tf* 1 . E 8 

"5 e-2 g«" “ 

f %1 s s 
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IS ill its w 



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17 

26 

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55 

22 2 


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38 

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13 

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38 

04 

676 


14 

7.1 

507 


T7.1 

21 

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It 

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12 




11 

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27.1 


ULl 

23 

17J 

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I7S 

40 

135 


104 

48 

192 


67 

48 

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IOS 

24 

IU 


U 

15 

173 


43 

13 

214 


68 

15 

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38 

40 

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23 



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19 

172 


63 

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BUSINESSAND FINANCE/LAW 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


New chief 
atIPC 
Magazines 

IPC Magazines: Mr Peter 
Davis becomes chair man, 
succeeding Mr Ron Chfltnn, 
and also becomes chairman of | 
tbe Consumer Publishing 
Group, succeeding Mr D W3- 
kins. Mr John Mellon be- 
comes chief executive from 
January 1. Mr John Matthews 
win become managing direc- 
tor of IPC Sales A Distribu- 
tion and will join the board of 
IPC Magazines from January 
1., Mr Andrew Walker will 
join the board from January I. 

Taylor Woodrow Homes: 
Mr Richard Mooney will be- 
come chair man from January 
1, succeeding Lady Taylor. 

Barclays de Zoete Wedd: 
Mr Peter Holloway is now 
director, UK equity market- 


TEMPUS 


Fatter Granada leopard 
stalks corporate jungle 


rrank Usher Holdings:- Mr 
Ddrek Cruncher and Mr Lea 
Wright have been appointed 
to the board. 



Richard Mooney j 

Burso n-MarsteUer: Mr Mi- 1 
chad Horton has become! 
president and chief executive | 
officer, Europe: Mr Terence, 
Fane-Sanaders will become 1 
chairman and chief executive , 
officer UK from January 1. 

Charles Barker Human Re- 1 
sources: Mr Simon Barrow is : 
to become chief executive ■ 
•early in 1987, succeeding Mr 
Road; Brahhmite. 

Scandinavian Bank Group: 
Mr Andre de Pfyffer is a non- 
executive director. 

Kings College London: Sir 
James Spooner has been ap- 
pointed chairman of the coun- 
cil, succeeding Earl Jeliicoe. 

National Westminster 
B ank: Mr Don Anderson has 
become regional executive 
director, outer London region, 
succeeding Mr Andrew Hirst 

Promaprint Mr Brian Don- 
nelly becomes operations 
director and Mr John 
Easterby director, business 
development 

Investor Relations Society: 
Mr Peter Smith has been 
elected chairman, succeeding 
Mr Eric Silvester. 


It is fortunate that Granada 
is better at running its busi- 
ness than it is at producing 
television advertisements. 
The “leopard which changed 
its spots” campaign, featuring 
its move into TV and video 
retailing from straight rent- 
als, runs “TeO SkT a dose 
second in the nausea-induc- 
ing stakes. 

Nonetheless, the leopard 
image is well suited to a 
company that has been jolted 
from slumber by an un- 
welcome predator in ihe 
shape of Rank and is now 
moving swiftly through the 
corporate jungle with an eye 
out for its own prey. 

The management, having 
enhanced its high street pres- 
ence by paying £30 million in 
October for the Laskys elec- 
trical goods chain, is now 
looking for other purchases, 
large or small, either in 
retailing again, in the leisure 
and consumer group, or the 
small but fast-growing busi- 
ness services division. 

The balance sheet certainly 
presents strong potential — 
gearing was maintained at 
about 26 percent, despite net 
borrowings rising by almost 
50 per cent to £99.1 minion, 
by a £100 million property 
revaluation, and the 
deconsolidation of customer- 
credit operations. 

Prospects are looking solid 
throughout the group, al- 
though nobody is expecting 
the 41 per cent rise in pretax 
profits to be repeated in 1987. 

The leap into retailing 
looks justified fay the contin- 
ued fell in rented sets, while 
television advertising rev- 
enue remains strong, al- 
though last year's 20 per cent 
growth will not be matched. 
Consumer money spinners 
such as bingo and motorway 
services are being backed up 
by imaginative acg ni s ti o ns 
and new projects. 

Pretax estimates for 1987 
are for about £106 million, 
which puts the shares, down 
3p at 287p, on a p/e ratio of 
about 11. A very solid hold 
and a strong buy on any 
weakness. 




PRICE RELATIVE TO 

FfA ALL-SHARE INDEX 


Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jut Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 


on importing- wholesaling 
and ha s diversified intn other 
areas, notably manufacturing 
and builders' mere ban ting. 

Although importing- 
wholesaling still accounts for 
more than 50 per cent of the 
business, it is no longer the 
traditional risk-reward opera- 
tion that it was. With the rest 
of the industry, an improved 
approach to stock manage- 
ment has made stock losses 
and profits less of a feature. 

The JewsoQ' builders* 
merebantmg chain accounts 
for more than a quarter of 
Meyer's business. Newly 
added Brownlee broadens the 
geographical spread and 
brings further rationalization 
opportunities. 

Although three-quarters of 
the way towards a t ar get of 
200 merchanting outlets, 
Meyer is finding it difficult to 
make sizeable acquisitions 
without incurring overlaps. 
Small strategic purchases will 


Meyer Int 


The timber industry has 
changed beyond recognition. 
Gone are the days offeast and 
famine which terrified all but 
the more daring investor. 

Meyer International is a 
microcosm of the industry. It 
has reduced its dependence 


first-half results reflected a 
buoyant trading period for 
the industry and the outlook 
for 1987 is bright. 

The Building Material 
Producers’ panel recently 
forecast a 3J5 per cent in- 
crease in total c onst ruction 
output for 1987. This in- 
cludes a 2 per cent rise in new 
housing and 5 per cent on 
housing repair, maintenance 
and improvement work, botfr 
important areas for Meyer. 

Worries about manage- 
ment sucession have been 
mostly allayed and Magnet 
and Southerns rays that rt is 
not planning to increase its 1 
per cent stake. 

For the current year, Meyer 
should make £40 milhon 
with a further increase of 10 
per cent in 1987-88. The 
shares are selling on a p/e 
ratio of 10.5 times. 


'could you OWN 

the eu&nf s 

. y oU /vfANA0££ 


lK r . 

- fOUCHBl 


Hie management buy-out is now, more than ever, an increasingly popular 
alternative to corporate employment. The advantages, after all, are dear 
enough. To the seller, a convenient, efficient and costretfccfive way of 
shedding an unwanted business. To the buyers, the chance to go it alone with 
every prospect of very real reward. 

There, however, the simplicity ends. And, to potential candidates, a word 
of warning. Expect no favours. 

The present management will be supported by a battery of professional 
advisors, many of whom, quite possibly, you’ve known and wcxked with fix- 
years. If your bid is to be successful, you and your colleagues will need similar 

expertise of the highest calibre to plan, negotiate and implement your buy-out. 

Come to us. We’re one of the world's largest firms of Chartered 
Accountants and Management Consultants, with 23 offices in the UK. Our 
Corporate Finance Group is highly experienced is managetrait buy-outs of 
every size (weVe been successfully involved-in over 70 in the past four years). 

We can help with finance, through our specialists in merchant banking 
and venture capital. We can help with taxation, which can o th erwise 

so easily impose disadvantageous structure. We can help with « 

planning and resources, for the full weight of our <&&- 

worldwide network is readily at hand. •"""a 

And, when the time comes, we can 
help with flotation, be it a full listing 
or the USM. Most important of 
all, our commitment to your new \ V^SS* 50 *** 1 * 

endeavour will be both continuous . 

and sustained \ tW** 6 

As a first step, send for our booklet y -**&* s ' 
cm Management Buy-Outs. It win help » ctf*** 7 , 

to esteblish whether a buy-out might be \ 

feasible, using our questionnaire to help . 

you decide whether you’re a candidate. \ ^ _V% 

For your copy, call either Tony Henan 

or Ian Mdsaac of our Corporate Finance V |V --gs 

Group on 01-353 8011. Or simply complete \ .*«we 

and return the coupon. V ■ 




\ 

\ ^ 






Law Report Decem ber 10 1 986 _ 

Admissibility of photofit pictures 


Norcros 

Norcros’s businesses have 
failed to grow despite a good 
year for the building industry. 
Double glazing is no longer a 
growth market and sate of 
ceramic tiles are suffering 
fix*m damping. 

Consequently, The City was 
unimpressed by Norcxos’s 
interim pretax profit of £20 
million, announced yes- 
terday. An 8.6 per cent in- 
crease is nothing to write 
home about and the shares 
fell 3p to 255p. 

Most disappointing was 
the unchanged profit from 
the building products and 
services division. This ac- 
counts for more than 40 per 
cent of total profits. Seventy 
per cent of Norcros’s profits 
is construction related, if 
international sales and UBM, 
the recently acquired 
builders’ merchants, axe 
included. 

UBM*s profits growth had 
as much to do with the 
distortion in the comparative 
half year — when Norcros had 
owned UBM for only five 
months — and the reduction 
of pilfering in its London 
brandies, as with sustainable 
profits growth. 

Printing and packaging, 
which accounts for 25 per 
cent of pretax profit, is the 
star in Norcros’s firmament. 
Its profits increased 29 per 
cent 

Yet most of the group’s 
huge capital expenditure bud- 
get — more than £20 million 
— wfll be focused on building 
and engineering, refinbishing 
UBM and re-equipping in 
ceramics. 

Disillusioned analysts have 
chopped their earnings fore- 
casts again to just £47 millio n 
for the full year. 


Regina v Code 

Before Lord Justice .Watkins, 
Mr Justice Drake and Mr Jus- 
tice Ogoall 

[Judgment December 9] 

A photofit picture of an 
alleged attacker made by a 
police officer from a description 
by a witness was admissible in 
evidence during examination- 
in-chief offeewttness. 

A sketch similarly made, a 
photograph of a suspect during 
the commission of an offence 
and a photofit were in a class of 
evidence of their own, to which 
neither the rule against hearsay 
nftrthe t Kimiysi pn pf 

an earlier consistent statement 
applied. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
in a reserved judgment dismiss- 
ing an appeal by Christopher 
Cook, aged 20, of Bredon Court, 
Edgware. Middlesex, from 
conviction' at Acton Crown 
Court (Judge Palmer) or robbery 
and indecent assault, for each of 
which he was sentenced to three 
years’ youth .custody concur- 
rent. 

Mr R.D. Roebuck, who did 
not appear below, for the appel- 
lant; Miss Sally O'Neill for the 
Crown. 

LORD JUSTICE WATKINS, 


said that on October 17, 1984 a 
woman was making her way 
home from work at about 6pm 
in Edgware when a man at- 
tacked her, indecently assaulted 
her and took money from her. 

The following day she re- 
ported the maser to the police 
and described her assailant. 
From hear description on Octo- 
ber 19 a photofit picture was. 
pieced together and photo- 
graphed fay a police officer. 

After an unsuccessful attempt 
had been made to bold an 
identification parade, the 
woman was unable to identify 
any of several men bunched 
together when she stood ai the 
top of an escalator at Brent 
Cross shopping centre. .How- 
ever, she identified the appellant 
in the street walking away from 
the shopping centre 

At trial, in the jury's absence, 
counsel for the defence submit- 


ted that the photofit was in- 
admissible in evidence because 
to pul h before the jury would be 
to introduce a previous consis- 
tent statement and, further, a 
basic principle of the hearsay 
rule would be offended against. 

The trial judge ruled against 
the submission. 

Broadly similar submissions 
were made on appeaL 

In R v Smith (Percy) (£1976] 
Crim LR 533) a police officer 
bad made a sketch in ac- 
cordance with a description of 
the defendant provided by a ' 
young pill An appeal against 
conviction was dismissed — as 
appeared from a transcript of 
the judgment — on the ground 
that the sketch was the guTs 
made through the hand of the 
police officer and there was no 
reason for raying that it was not 
admissible in evidence. 

However, in that case no 
submission had been made to 
the effect that the sketch was a 
self-serving previously made 
consistent statement. If such a 
submission had. been made the . 
ruling might have bee n dif- 
ferent. 

The present case was un- 
doubtedly important and the 
issue arising for decision was 
not argued in Smith, which had 
been criticized by some well 
known academics. 

Common sense leant heavily 
in the direction of endorsing the 
opinion expressed in Smith. 
Photofils bad been admitted in 
evidence without objection in a 
number of cases bat that did hot 
mean that they were strictly 
speaking admissible. 

It was beyond dispute that the 
woman when in the witness box 
could have been permitted to 
see the photofit, which she had 
observed being composed, for 
the purpose of refreshing her 
memory. 

Using a photofit for the 
purpose of refreshing memory 
could not of hselfhave the effect 
of rendering the photofit admis- 
sible so as to enable the jury to 
see it. If either the hearsay rule 
or the rale against the admission 
of a previous consistent state- 
ment was applicable to the 
situation — the evidence of 


photofit being, as bad to be 
acknowledged, no exception to 
’ those rules — there would be no 
reason why the submission 
made on the appellant's behalf 
should not succeed. 

Their Lordships questioned 
whether either of those roles 
applied to evidence of a 
phoiofiL 

dearly, what was sard to a 
police officer by a prospective 
witness in the absence of a 
defendant was hearsay and 
could not, therefore, be admis- 
sible in evidence. But admis- 
sibility of a photofit was not 
dependent on .a recital fay a 
witness when giving evidence of 
what that person said to the 
police officer composing !!- So 
that aspect of hearsay aid not 
need further to be considered. 

The rule was said to apply not 
only to assertions made orally 
but to those made in .writing or 
by conduct- Never, so far as 
‘their Lordships knew, had it 
ever been held to apply to this 
comparatively modern form of 
evidence, namely, the sketch 
made by the police officer, to . 
accord with the witness's 
recollection of a suspect's phys- 
ical characteristics and mode of 
dress and the even more mod- 
em photofit compiled from an 
identical source. 

Both were manifestations of 
the seeing eye, translations of 
vision on to paper through the 
mMinni of a police officer's skill 
of drawing or composing which 
a witness did not possess. The 
police officer was merely doing 
what the witness could do u 
possessing -the requisite skill. 

When drawing or composing 
he was akin to a camera without, 
of course, being able to match in 
clarity the photograph of a - 
person or scene which a camera 
automatically produced. 

There was no doubt that a 
photograph taken, for example, 
of a suspect during the commis- 
sion of an offence was admis- 
sible: see R v Toison ((1864) FA 
F 103, 104) ver Mr Justice 
Willis, who said: “The photo- 
graph was admissible because it 
*s only a visible representation 
of the image or impression 
made upon the minds of the 


witnesses by, the sight of the 
person or object it represents; 
and, therefore is, in reality, only 
another speciesof foe evidence 
which persons rive of identity, 
when they speak merely from 
memory.” ... 

That ruling had never jmee 
been doubted and was applied 
with regularity to photographs 
including those taken nowadays 
automatically in banks during a 
robbery. Such photographs were 
invaluable aids to identification 
of criminals. It had never been 
suggested of them that they .were 
-subject u> the rule against 


*1® Lordships regarded the 
production of the sketch or 
photofit by a police officer 

malting a graphic representation 

of a witness’s memory as an- 
other form of the camera at 
work, albeit imperfectly and not 
produced -contemporaneously 

with the material incident but 
soon or fairly soon afterwards. 

As their Lordships perceived 
it, ihe photofit was- not a 
statement in writing made in the 
absence of a defepdantor any- 
thing resembling rt in the sense 
that the very old rule against 
hearsay had ever been expressed 
to embrace. . 

It was sui generis, that is. the 
only one of its kind. It was a 
thing apart, the admissibility to 
evidence of which would not be 
in breach of the hearsay rule. 

Seeing that their Lordships 
did not regard the photofit as a 
statement at all, it could not 
come .within the description of 
an earlier consistent statement 
which, save' in exceptional 
circumstances, could not ever 
be admissible in evidence. 

The true position was that the 
photograph, the sketch- and the 
phoiont were in a class of 
evidence of their own to which 
neither the rule against hearsay 
nor the rale against the ad- 
mission of an earl ier . consistent 
statement applied. 

The trial judge was correct 
and the appeal was dismissed. 
An appeal against sentence was 
aiw dismissed. 

1 Solicitors: S. B. Gilinsky A 
Co, Edgware; Crown- 1 Prosecu- 
tion Service, Acton. 


Creditors’ interest prior to wife’s 


Winkwwth v -Edward Baron 
Development Co Ltd and Oth- 
ers 

Before Lord Keith of Kinlori, 
Lord Templeman, Lord Grif- 
fiths. Lord Mackay of Gashfem 
and Lord Ackner 
[Speeches December 4] 

The payment of money by a 
wife in occupation of the matri- 
monial home to a company 
under the control of herself and 
her former husband which had 
purchased that home did not 
give her an overriding equitable 
interest in it wi thin section 
- 70(1 Xg) of the Land Registra- 
tion Act 1925. 

The House of Lords so held in 
allowing an appeal by the mort- 
gagee, Mr Peter Winkworth, 
from the order of the Court of 
Appeal (Lord Justice Neill and 
Lord Justice Nourse; Lord Jus- 
tice Kerr dissenting) (The Times 
December 23, 1985; (1986) 52 
P A C R 67) allowing an appeal 
by Mrs Joy Wing from the 
judgment of Mr Gerald God- 
frey. QG sitting as a deputy 
High Court judge, who or dered 
that she give up possession. 

Mr Andrew Morritt, QC and 
Mr David Parry for the appel- 
lant; Mr Alan Wan), QC and Mr 
Peter Ralls fertile respondents. 

LORD TEMPLEMAN said 
that the issued share capita] of 
the company consisted of two 
shares. In 1980 £200,000 had 
been paid into the company’s 
bank account as proceeds of 
sale, incurring a potential liabil- 
ity to corporation tax of over 
£ 100 , 000 . 

One of the shares in tire 
company was tranferred to Mr 
Wing, the other to Mis Wing. 
The purchase price of £1 15,000 
was extracted from the 
company’s bank account.-, The 
company then purchased 75 
Hayes Lane, Beckenham, Kent 
for £70,000, lea-ring 'a - bank 


balance of £271. Mr and Mrs 
Wing went into occupation. 

Mrs Wing, the company sec- 
retary, knew nothing about busi- 
ness and left the management of 
the company’s affairs in the 
hands of her husband. 

After taking control of the 
company and paying tire pur- 
chase price for the shares out of 
the company’s hank account, 
Mr Wing drew further cheques 
on the company’s account to 
finance the purchase of a wash- 
ing machine for Hayes Lane, a 
motor car and jewelry for his . 
wife, and other teems of expen- 
diture appropriate -to an 
establishment in Beckenham. 

On selling their former matri- 
monial home, Mrs Wing au- 
thorized the payment -of the 
£8,600 proceeds of sale into the 
company's bank account, thus 
reducing its overdraft to £8.000. 
She did not say in evidence 
whether die knew the account 
was overdrawn. She did not 
know of an undertaking by Mr 
Wing to the batik which secured 
the overdraft on the title deeds 
of Hayes Lane. 

In 1981, Mr Winkworth ad- 
vanced £70,000 to the company. 
The signature of Mis Wing on 
the teal charge and letters 
acknowledging, inter alia, that 
they occupied Hayes Lane as 
bare licensees of the company 
and not by virtue of any tenancy 
or lease, had been forged by Mr 
Wing. 

The company, haring been 
stripped, deciined into insol- 
vency, and went into tiquida- 
tioo. probably belatedly, in 
1983. 

It had been contended on 
behalf of Mis Wing that the 
payment of £8,600 into the 
company's bank account ob- 
tained for her an equitable 
interest in the proportion that 
£8,600 bore to £7B,000, and that 
her equitable interest took prior- 


ity over the claims of the 
company’s . creditors, secured 
and unsecured. 

That bold and astonishing 
proposition would enable her to 
continue inoccupation of Hayes 
Lane, without any contribution 
to itsemenses, until a court, on 
the application of the company 
tinder section 30 of the Law of 
Property Act 1925, thought fit to 
order Hayes Lane to be sold for 
the benefit of the company and 
Mrs Wing as tenants in common 
inequity. 

Mr Wing had not had the 
effrontery to raise on his behalf a 
similar contention. No doubt he 
was pleased to have maintained 
a matrimonial borne for over six 
years without cost to himself 
and at the expense largely of the 
Inland Revenue. 

Responsibility for the last 
three years and for the six-figure 
litigation costs borne by the 
legal aid fund, was dared by the 
decision of tire House of Lords 
in Williams A Glyns Bank Ltd v 
Boland ai9SlC AC 4S7). 

The argument on behalf of 
Mrs Wing exploited the . eq- 
uitable doctrine that a teal 
owner held in trust for the 
persons who had contributed to 
the purchase price of the prop- 
erty or made contributions 
referable to the acquisition of 
the property. 

The sum of £8,600 had re- 
duced the company's overdraft 
which had been secured by the . 
holding of the title deeds to the 
order of the hank. Therefore, it 
was said, fee payment was 
referable to the acquisition of 
Hayes Lane by fee company, 
and equity requited it to bold 
Hayes Lane for itself and Mr 
and Mrs Wing, or one of them. 

The simple answer to that 
tonuous argument was that fee 
payment of £8 ,600 was not 
referable to fee acquisition of 
Hayes Lane which had already 


bent bought and paid for in fiifl. 
There had been no: connection 
between the acquisition of 
Hayes Lane and fee payment of 
£8,600. 

The proper inference to be 
drawn from the admitted facts 
was feat Hayes Lane, acquired 
by fee company, and the sum of 
£8,600 paid into its bank ac- 
count, became assets of the 
company, managed by Mr Wing 
for fee benefit of himself and 
Mrs Wing as sole and equal 
shareholders and not as owners 
of equitable interests. . 

Equity was not a computer. 
Equity operated on conscience 
but was not influenced by 
sentimentality. 

. Thecquscience of acompauy, 
as well as its management, was 
confided to its directors, who 
owed a duty to it and its 
creditors to ensure its affairs 
were property administered and 
that its property was not- dis- 
sipated or exploited for the 
benefit of the directors them- 
selves. 

Mr Wing was responsible for 
the insolvency of fee company. 
Mrs Wing was not aware that, as 
a director, she owed any duty to 
the company or its creditors. 

But in fee ciicmim ances of 
the case and ru view of Mrs 
Wing's failure to discover and 
e.\ercise her powers as a director 
so as to ensure that the affairs of 
fee company were properly 
conducted, equity would not 
compel, or even allow, fee 
company to bold pan of its 
property on trust for Mrs Wing 
to the detriment of creditors and 
in priority to the chums of 
creditors. 

Lord Keith, Lord Griffiths. 
Lord Mackay and Lord Ackner 


European Law Report 


Solicitors: Pariett Kent A Cb; 
Gemence Turner A Henry, . 
Bromley- 


Strasbourg 


Damages for harming defence rights 


Unterpertinger v Austria 
Before G. Wiarda, President 
and Judges W. Ganshof van der 
Meetsch, F. Matscber, B. Walsh, 
Sir Vincent Evans, R- Mac- 
donald and C Russo 
Registrar M.-A. fasten 
(Case No 1/1985/87/134) 
(Judgment November 24] 

When a person’s conviction 
was based principally upon 
testimony tendered in the form 
of statements read out in open 
court (which bad previously 
been made to the police by 
members of his family entitled 
to refuse to give evidence in 
court), such a procedure appre- 
ciably restricted his defence 
rights and was in violation of 
article 6 of the European 
Convention mi Human Rights. 

Article 6 provides: “1 In fee 
determination of any crim- 

inal charg e against him, every- 
one is entitled to a fair and 
public hearing within a reason- 
able time by an independent and 

impartial tribunal established 
by law 

“3 Everyone charged with a 
criminal offence has fee follow- 
ing minimum rights: ... (d) to 
examine or have examined wit- 
nesses against him and to obtain 
fee attendance and examination 
of witnesses on his behalf under 
fee same conditions as wit- 
nesses a gainst him ..." 

On March 10. 1980, fee' 
Innsbruck Regional Court 
found Mr UnterpertmgergnSty 
of having caused actual bodily 
barm to his step-daughter on 
August 14, 1979 and to his wife 
on September 9, 1979. It sen- 
tenced him to six months’ . 
imprisonment. The Innsbruck 
Court of Appeal confirmed fee 
judgment on June 4, 1980- 

Mrs Unterpertingcr and her 
daughter had been heard by fee 
police, the former in respect of 
both incidents, .the latter m - 
respect of the first incident only. 

Ax fee bearing before fee • 
regional court, they both- de- . 


dared feat they did not wish to 
give evidence, and feat pre- 
vented both fee regional court 
and, later, the Court of Appeal 
from questioning them (article 
152 (I) of the Code of Criminal 
Procedure). However, in ac- 
cordance wife Austrian judicial 
practice, their declarations id 
the police were read out ax the 
bearing. 

On appeal, the applicant re- 
quested that additional ev- 
idence should be taken and, in 
particular, several witnesses 
beard. The Court of Appeal 
decided to hear his sister-in-law 
but refused his other requests. 

The regional court and fee 
Court of Appeal based their 
judgments, inter alia, on I the 
declarations made to fee police 
by Mrs Untexpertinger and her 
daughter. 

1 In its report of October II, 
1984, fee Euxopran Commis- 
sion of Human Rights exp r es se d 
the opinion that there had been 
no violation of article 6 r para- 
graph 3(d) (five votes to five, 
with tire casting vou of the 
President) or of article 6. para- 
graph I (five votes to four, wife 
one abstention). 

. In its judgment the European 
Court of Human Rights held: 

1 Articled 

The Court recalled that fee. 
guarantees contained in para- 
graph 3 were specific aspects of 
the general concept ofa fair trial 
set forth in paragraph I. In the 
circumstances of the instant 
case, it considered the 
applicant’s complaints from fee 
angle of paragraph 1 taken 
together wife - fee principles 
inherent in paragraph 3(d).' 

It went on to hold that article 
JS20XD of fee Code of Crim- 
inal Procedure, by virtue of 
which members of the 
applicant's family were entitled 
to refuse to give evidence, was, 
as sudt, manifestly not in- 
compatible wife article 6, para- 
graphs 1 and 3(d). - 

It made allowance for. fee 


special problems that might be 
entailed by a confrontation tg- 
rween someone “charged wife a 
criminal offence” and a witness 
from bis own family and was 
calculated to protect such a 
witness by avoiding bis being 
put in a moral dnemma; further- 
more, there existed comparable 
provisions in fee domestic law 
of several member slates of fee 
Council of Europe. 

In' itself fee reading out of 
statements in that way could not 
be regarded as being inccmsis- - 
tent wife article 6, paragraphs 1 
and 3(d) of fee Convention, but 
the use made of them as 
' evidence had nevertheless . to 
comply with the rights of the 
defence, which it was fee object 
and purpose of article 6 to 
protect. 

. Thai was especially so where 
the person “charged wife a 
criminal offence”, who had fee 
right under article 6, paragraph 
3(d) to “examine or have 
examined'* witnesses a gain** 
him, had not had an opportu- 
nity at any stage in the earlier, 
proceedings to question die' 
persons whose statements were 
read out at the hearing. 

In fee instant case the police 
had taken statements fr o m Mrs 
Umerpertinger as a “suspect” in 
relation to the incident - on 
August 14, 1979 and then as a 
complainant in relation to fee 
incident on September 9, 1979; 
from ; . Miss. Tappeiner (fee 
applicant's - stejHfanghteri.they 
had taken a statement as a 
‘person involved" in cotmeo- ’ 
tion with the first incident. ! 

By refusing to give evidence 
"m court, they .prevented "the 

applicant from examining fegm 

or having them examined on 
their statements. Admittedly, he 
was able to submit his com- 
ments freely during the heanog, 
but the Court of Appeal refused 
to admit the evidence he sought 
to adduce m order to .pm his. 
former wife's arid step- 
daughter’s credibility in doubt' 


It was true that the statements 
made by Mrs Umerpertinger 
and Miss Tappeiner were not 
.fee only evidence before the 
courts. They also had before 
...them, inter alia, the police 
report s , the medical - reports 
appended thereto and the fue on 
fee couple's divorce proceed- 
ings; in addition, fee Court of 
Appeal had heard a sister-in-law 
of Mr Umerpertinger as a 
witness. 

However, -it was dear from 
fee judgment of June 4, 1980 
feat the Court of Appeal based 
the applicant’s- conviction 
mainly on the statements 
by Mrs Umerpertinger and Miss 
Tappeiner to fee police. It did 
not treat those simply as items 
of information but as proof of 
fee truth of the accusations 
made by the women at the time. 

Admittedly, it was for the 

Court of Appeal to assess the 
material before it as well as the 
■relevance of the evidence which 
l fee accused sought to adduce; 
but Mr Umerpertinger was 
"nevertheless convicted on the 
basis of “testimony" in re spec t 
of which his defence rights were 
appreciably restricted. 

That being -so, the applicant 
did not have a fair trial and 
there was a breach of paragraph 

1 of article 6 of the Convention, 
■taken together wife fee prin- 
ciples inherent " in ’paragraph 

3(dV . " 

2 Application of article 50 , 

Th e Court accepted -the 

greater part of the applicant's 
c laim for just ' satisfaction and 
dmded .feat. fee.. respondeat 

***** . must pay fdm 28,000 . 

Austrian sc hilling * m respect of 
loss of earnings, 100.000 Aus- 
trian schillings in respect of non- 
pecuniary . damage and. 
33.578.15 Austrian schillings 
less 5,470,50 French francs by 
way of reimbursement for cons - 
and expenses incurred before 
the Convention bodies and not 
covered by teal aid. 



t 




-- 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 





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NON STATUS MORTGAGES AVAILABLE 

HIRSCH INTERNATIONAL 
(FINANCIAL SERVICES) LTD. 

One cf Europe's Lea/Eng Mortgage Brokers 

15, Berkeley Sum, Laudas W1X 5AE. 

TeL- 01-629 5051/2 TELEX 28374 



waL &j a i d 




TOiii ii iraia 


am 


v > * * jiF ip i ' 


mzm 



Tg 11 * 11 


Beauvoir Place, N1 

retirement housing close to 
ondon, 1 bedroom apartments 
from £26,000 
irt rent part purchase) 

Carole Evans on 01-961 2277 
using As«ocUtron, Bt«* House, 
ark Parade, NW1Q 4HT 


35 S I E ELES RD, N.W.3. 

2pm - 6pm 

Luxury 2 bedroom garden flat, 2 bathrooms, large 
terrace and wealth of features. 125 year lease. 
£165,000. 

ATTACHED FAMILY HOUSE. Magnificent gaferted 
studio reception room. 5 beds, 3 baths, dressing rm.. 
Bbrary. dining mv, kA/bfst rm. 120* watted garden. 
Suit concert parrist, Arttet or Diptormri. 
£650,000 freehold. 

View tocteiy 2 - 6pm or 
telephone 0277 824211 (T) 


BROMPTON PARK SW6 

6. flaw: Cnr hnmediMc acen o uioa oiher bueariotMlv fliHv 

furnished or carpets and curtains only. 

Began! reception room with patio or balcony. fiiHy floed kitchen 
with an appliances, luxury bathroom with bath and shower, 
bedroom with folly fined mirrored wardrobes, video door entry 
system. 

PuBy exclusive dev elo pme n t, 24 hoar security and 

portera g e, private walled gardens, with sports complex mri udi n g 
swimming pooL saunas and gymnasiums, private car parting. 

One of Ibe last opportunities to account a property in oat of 
Central Londons most exchtsive and secure developments. 
Price £10&M» - £116^00 
Mortgages arranged 

Call: BARCOL PROPERTIES 

01-453 0698 


KENSINGTON W.I 4 

21-35 Mommgton Ave 


Last three remaining new lux 1 Bed Flats in small p/b 
block. High specification inc fttd carpets, ktts & 
bathrooms Fully tiled. Secondary Glazing on exposed 
elevations. E/phone. NHBC warranty. Two mins walk 
West Kensington Tribe. 

PRICES FROM £77,900 

Usciitot far quick exettaage. 

AN |(ySHEA| DEVELOPMENT 
01-441 4747 

(&30 - 5L30 Moo - Fri) 



OR LOW START UP TO 30% 
less repayment per month 

it Non status mortgages up to 75% 

★ Any purpose 

.. .* . ★ Up toJMdt joint frioome. 

★ You can stai afford the 
Home of Your Dreams 

Commercial mortgages from 12.75% 

HOME VISIT IF REQUIRED 

RAYMOND BRETT & CO 
Denbigh House 
Denbigh Road 
Milton Keynes MK1 1YP. 

Telephone without obligation 

0908 368071 

70% 

RE-MORTGAGE 

FAST OFFER - NO FUSS 

No Reference made to employer, bank, ! 
accountant or existing lender. 

No reason required for advance 

12% INTEREST RATE 

01-681 6646 or 01-686 5251 
UK MORTGAGE COMPANY LTD, 

Green Dragon House, High St, Croydon 


LUPUS sr SW1 Superb upper, mabonaue. 3 beds, 2 mcapta. 
kitchen, fabulous condtaon, vkteo entry phone. 99 yre £166,000 
FtnUAMES AVE W14 Huge end Immec 4 bade, 2 baths, 2 
recaps eptspadous Htchav video entry phone . panoramic 

views 141 yr» E2DO.OOO 

DONNE PLACE 8W3 Delghtftil 3 bed 2 rscepts, house, bath, sep 
mc, kitchen, rare freehold £279.000 
SOUTH KEN Magnif 1st fi flat needs decor 2 beds, recept big 
kitchen, both, 118 yre, £122£00 

SJIMJI fills ELUS & CO 
i|S J&QO 01 225 0625 
Ql ego 0PBI 7 DAYS A WEB( 


SINTON ANDREWS. 

LUXUMOUSLY REFURBISHED 2STOHEY MAISONKTTE 

wilt ample prime garden. ImcnordaiK»rd io oaoing rtandni* 


As an international 
businessman you will 
appreciate London’s 
investment potential. 




The Businessman’s 
home from home. 


Luxurious Apartments 
for the international businessman 
in this famous London building 

FOR SALE 

FROM £68300 *125 YEAR LEASES 


Sales Office Open Daily: 01-5895100 

MON.— SAX. SUNDAY Telex: 937067 

— 7pjn. Ihun- — 6p jn. Fax: 01-225 Z286 


HaaptOD&Sas Keith Cardaie Groves 
01-4938222 OF58IOI55 


TANONBURYNl 
Ceorpiaii style lownhouse 
is square, i huh, garden, 

m*m* p,,rid,,8 ■ 

BARNSBURY N1 
A superb grd floor I bed 
split maisooetie.- fiilly fined 
kh. tame recep with 
feunres. un bath and WC. 


SL James's Square. SW1 
An ftnmaama ratortriahod 8/ 
9th flow iraBontta. aftcii has 
bam stalMJy decoraiBd to a 
wry r*gh standard, access to 


features, bn bath and WC 
£71,950. 

DE BEAUVOIR 
TOWN N* 

A 1st floor I bed flat spflt 
level kii/b'&st rm, bnfa 
and WC targe ««*P. entry 
phone, epo and cant. 
£59,950. 


pM square gardens. 
EfflALL- DBLE RECEP: I0T/ 
BEST RM: 3 BEDS: 2 BATHS (1 
E/S£ CLKRM: PORTER: LIFT: 
E/PH0S£: COMMUNAL C/H & 



ntifity ihl qroirtfy to h. 9 ^W^C^ 40r pmaic pniBL 

RTVEB iSwSCWW nSl^BORDHL 
m of small Bala rangw bom very trolly uneientabk. out 
i no baihnn and a cocmle with rowf views of (be ThnnaL 
Prices farm £52J»0 l 1M year leans. 


04 222 7020 


AVENUE, BELSJZE PARK 

A magnificent pair of lavishly refurbished 
apartments with superb proportions. Many 
period features, h#i ceilings, top quality 



i AND FLATS THROUGH- 
HE DOCKLANDS AREA 

SffiENTTAL department 
XEL- 01-T9A 9560 


Taylor Dixon Porter 


u fsmWttouse. 2 nrap. 

i ixftteraa beta to an toHflptay swlanJ m h 
Whs kK MSS""®,; L“ 
^iKster to* « PS'S™*”** rm. 


2 and 3 beds on garden and entrance floors. 

Garden Level £225,000 
Entrance Floor £250,000 
125 Year Lease 


A Development Hy 
The Shield Group PIC. 

01-794 8254 




Spectacular penthouse apartment in axeiusbe position, having 
extonsne views along both reaches ol the River Thames and 
ovartooldng the Houses of Parttamen t Over 7,000 sq It Includes 
^ftd(K^volu^fec8pWWf)grcwm.Fwihar52rtrec«p.24ft 
kitchen, master sidle. 4 further bedrooms, study, 3 bathrooms, 
250 ft balcony. Or condtooring. 

Otters Invited In excess or £2400,000 
GODDARD & SMITH 
01-930 7321 


BATTERSEA, NEAR RIVER 

Select development of five town houses end six lists 

currently undo 1 construction by Berkeley Homes 
(London) Ltd. Reservations taken now to beat the 
Spring rush. For brochure and prices contact Sole 

Selling Agents: 

KENWOOD 
223 2252 


tSUNCTOM 

.01-354 0066 

0 lino) A 


CROWN 

COURT 

REGENTS 

PARK, 

NW8 

Supefb.Bpadau3.brMd 
new apartment for sale on 
secure 125 year tone, in 
this spectacular 
devfitopmeni overtaoMng 

Hanover Gam and Regents 

Pwk. M NMmbes. raiding 
24 hour security, comfort 
cooing, underground 
perking and luxurious foyer. 

APPLY: 

fHHJP ANDREWS 
014865991 


IHAJDA VALE W9 


Mayfair W1 

Sopat first door apanm ewt In 
smart block, quel position doss 
fiiaKvenor Snare. 

DBLE ASPECT RECEP: LARGE 
HALL KfT: 2 BfflS: BATH: 
BASEMBIT STOffiROOIft 

CARETAKER: UFT: LOW OUT-. 
■60M6S: 1 

Lauebokf: £l45flB 

KfrigMstuidge 01-730 9291 


£49550 L/H. 
studio room, 
gch, BxcsUem 
Me AfMts. 
JRDHS. Bl- 
fell matnt 2 
Hinge, fitted 
pamal douMe 




1 i. 'ff T „ 


«lth extenshetoof tenues 

ovartoakmg Rtwr Ttoms ad SL Pads.3dUe 
area, Udst/breattiaa mi, u/gniund parting. 

POBOESTBI 7H»«£ 1N2 2 wipwe PtaR3/4 bed vanmmifiEMteiw 
dewtapment ctase Hyde Park. Maptitesat reap areas. U/rpxnd psrttaa 
landscaped annate oartans. Planng eonseid io tan. Oftas In excess d 
CUMLOM Freehold Ifay DMA. 

JMEfflaaiBE sm mmat « anmw m bednxm noor ftt 
wnh odensM wms across Hyde Part. En-sutt iKfflfoom. Stow mum. 
Large V staged reception area. Fully eotupped kttotaen.UuuH2nld £275500 
KMGS REACH SEi Spaoous 2 bed rtvenddeftaioiHitaakau ime Knan& 
Abet beyond. 25' taenge tatdien ftanroom A eftjakroom U/psfcil jnrtito 1 


T-vi. 


01-830 


KENNINGTON 

Absolutely aaperb 4 bed scniKletacha] Georgian hone. Accan 
comprats: 3 reaps. 2 knctwn, 2 tariis, onw Ikxhc. 150 ft garden. 
Garage. Whai a mily magnificem tay. £240.000, For viewing pkase 
calt 

JACKSON PROPERTY SERVICES 

01-928 2496 

9am - 7pm Every Day of the Week 
lndoding Sasdays 




London Regent Properriee Ltd 

01 734 c™ «h 482 1411 

jWDA VALE. Mce a beekt»Bi manenn Menu toqr. m yean, 

£85,000. 

MAimu arm TWesupam tan re w Mta rrota mm oveneoiCng Hide 

Perk Bum 3rd Boor of mten emto itock. S - 12 nwnun to. 

2 bedroom: SCO pw. a DeOro oma E30D p». 


KNIGHTS BRIDGE SW7 superbly 
irinro apart h k * non prestne 
biodi nor Hyde Phk. 27 It rettaL 3 
bertos. 2 innbta bedims Bfl yre 
E249AD 

0EVBCB4BHBH Superb 2nd 
flr 3 bedim aput in m koory 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


&apWC.Rto 


WSHMWY. HI -E59JSO UK 
bnmac tom flat in ljj& Vtatonan 
baa. Own et na ice. iouiqb. btst 
rm/ kttctien wxb lux I/I oto urns, 
lux bathroom, from bedroom, 
gel), communal gardens, d / 
glazed. Sole aganb. 

South bows street, hi 
E120J0Q F/tL D M epanlUl pared 
tsnaced property. Immac coreL 
Private gadens, 2 bedrooms. 2 
reception rooms, f fi nscftsa 2 , 
tacavooms. ubbty room. 

STOKE ffiMNMYM. Exeepdon- 
aliy spacious 1 bad flat hi 
excellent location. 10 mins 
Lnerpooi at Ira bedroom, I8tt 
iOo rifle, fit. kitchen, mod. 
banraom. E49550. Sato agrees 

l 354 5224 J 


SHEPHHUS BUSH VIZ 

Suat 6 bednn Vkmrin sraprety 
modonhed u the Mohesl sand- 
ants. Baps* map. fined to. ibung 
mi 8 uhHy rm, 2 bedms, 3S‘ pdn. 
Earty riewbg tigMy lecammandreL 
E197JOO freehold. 


tartans, «*h marble eriboca, a iwr 
99 yr toee proa on appHetaOB. 


123 year lesfia. 

01 734 MBS ea 373 
iao^pciwertdaje. 


^ UliOI-743 4444f 


MflV , i jSr..l W.2. 

Med- kxsrean. wnh tatuoie wewl 


aw Imbai. V reoensM reout area 
and BBCKfti 4 bedrmamia. nHana 
tor 2 as. 999 yr lease 1450000 
F» *otb wuperte: 


tei 01 602 5554 


SWIM MENCT «r tervteeU and 
““Wvteed. funitowd anarl- 
mmB is toflunp for tocBtKmal 

capacity in London. Offers of 
Hole agents end companies 
Jp**®*#*. Send your documat- 
■mfan wtm axutinoM. prices 
M re: Mrs r paosL cb TreveL 

^tatfacb. CJ-K507S OumUgen. 

Syrtoeiiana. 


. SeMdionol states In 
toOGtent location, ai wWi 
sepnw kWiarej t 
bathrooms. Price* from 
yffi > L pfi fl, og yM*" 


01 221 03301 


SW7 Dnotai Puce. Exemajonai 
Interior deatpned 1/2 bed 1st 
floor balcony ItoL Cat CH. 
auunn ett. Long lease S snare 
M rrcenou. £ia&000. Yet. Ol 
3T3 482S. 

I SWI9 UNMOO 2nd n naL gt per 
wnllal. recew. dbie bed. both. 
UL bale, pan CH. CHW 90 yrs 
C8TJBOD Holmans 01 370 ■ 
£781. I 


ST JOHNS WOOD 

large 3nJ floor flat 3 dofifc „ 

Mjfooms atth fitted wnatoes. Z 


room, tody f 
nmaadatacond 
neUris^fib 


Asfdrei p*c 
apes and 


£360 

CONVEYANCING 

For Sales & Purchases 
for prices up to £80.000 
wedrarge£360+ VAT & 
disbursements. 

Barretts Solicitors 
01-248 0551. 


PHUJUMCH GOH> taWiL Z bed 

3rd floor nai. Comm, rntra. 99 

yrt. Ol 7S7 97ca m Otfffnn gH an next write 

















28 


THF TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


3 


ST. wins* tenant z 

jppa t wft myesshe riews a 

Undon's aoticaT sea. Attract. 

"Wjlw U HWATE SUtttE 

ekmoo 

■H* nax HZ New insnKMn 


|wep Wth Ana trim over ttia Part! 
ttjECti ht E31tUM0 

nmuann so wi. s* n& 

Nat nbucaoD suet 6tti HnvMn 
njM. Mock- 3 wSTl MSB. I shower. 

SKuniftsa; 

BXdttsg Intenor toVgnM nst 

OWoTtorak. ! ft ! Tfc 

gggj aw. ranuiE miuug. 

WfflS fl Bwa y g tec rate 

PWt La pfc’Snas ones mra m 

tog® tb* 

fPfraov^3^i84 


balanced 

awns. 3 beds. 


PERIOD TERRACED 

COTTAGE L 

white nteous ct Ealing Broadway. 
U 4 d tenge mBi mat sates* and 

•smractiw matte firepbcd. modem 

texsoa onto wod-aoed not terrace 

bbwmV djytbpBrt. 

■nibjfflrumwlH D»a WBM 

n3> rate at Mot K base 

■■mo nun p text sprfw wm 

■fes. At re* at ban a mm! area 
sutaUs for bateau and 
IWHt tW. Bogiar atom swwn. 

M g» «M btabog Mb emeiaan 

beser. new roof. double gtetfl at 
tram of da house. 

■Ottaa hi icgka of CtSUfft 

Tat 01 998 0396. 


N1 

Bamsbury. Attractive period 
house in wide, tree-lined 
street, dose transport. In 
immaculate aider, retaining 
features: thro' recep, 3 beds, 
bath, kit, ski. dining rm, cloak 
rm & WCTcH. walied garden. 
£162^00. FH. 

HoDrtack & Co. 226 (TlfflL 


PARSONS GREEN 

okmh, 3 own. z DBtns. 

n«tfy bteL NHBC. aaMJtoQn, 

My flood kfkhen. GCH 
carpets. (Roseate real met) 


TEL TH ON 01-546 7775 

ffl| OB 8^3816843(0). 

mSo?* 


WESTMINSTER 

SW1 

A sopab 4 bedrm fiat in 
pnsupe UodL 3 en soitt 
brohnns. shwr im. Igr dbte 

a nn. dnrirc rm, fitily 
Idt/breaknst rm. Ail 
amenities. tafcct COOd. 
87 yr he. £325.000. 

Tel: 01-221 2221 


HAMMERSMITH 

W6 

Dstonne Street 3 bedroom 

house. Double recaption, 

khchen/dbier. patio garden. 

Modernised and redecorated 


13SjOOO. 

Hooper & Jackson: 
736 1161. 


REGENTS PARK 
& NW1. 

We haw selected properties 
available now. 

1 bed tan E72.000 

Z bed tan £120.000 

3 bed tan £156.000 

For tuther detais ad viewing 
lira 

61 482 4255 (T) 


■AKER ST Un*aod mews Iwsf 
a Die Regents Park and West 
End. 3 beds. bain. «p wc. 
recent Mi. me. i»uo Freehold 
£160.000 EUs A Go Ol 722 
0955. 


FULHAM Modernised house clow 
Id river. 3 beds. 1 wlm shower 
room ensulte. 2 rereps. fitted 
kttchen. conservatory + uuttty 
area wtm WC 650 garden. 
£170.000 01-381 3461. 


IVOR COURT. NW|. Nr Regents 
Ph. DMe bod- Recep. K & B. 
Porter, un. CH. CHW. 137 yr 
lean. £69.000. TH: 01-219 
£021 (dual or IOZ86I 830010 
KtHV 


REsarrs mm nws. unuHiai 

smoko With high oHUng/- 
Oreptace. F/F lux mi and bain. 
Qpp Regent's Parts Ui p/b Mock. 
All new 999 yr lease. £66.000. 
ToTOl 289 6683 


C NWS Superb 
newly refurb flat In p/b Mock. 2 
beds, recep wttn bale over gdn. 
F/F loot Ml A bath. 9Qyr lease. 
£83.000 for outek sale. Tel: Ol 
289 6683 or Ol 794 3104 


CMStMlCH W4 Elegant 3 storey 
town house. West gardens. 
Close 10 shops 6 transport. 
Freehold £168.300. TVser 
Omen wood 6 Co. Ol 994 7022 


j Watenwnt 
Quay. 2 new luxury 3 + 4 bed 
Qeonpan houses. Gas CH. car 
parking. Tel. 267 3658 after 
6-30 pm and weekends 


HARLCT STREET Wt A luxury 
2 bed. Sfli floor Oai. wttti poten- 
Ual. £229.000 Garage neg- 
otiable. Tel Or-936 4191 or Ol 
936 9441. 


OUIRM WALE TaMefuUy decorat- 

ed balcony naL .p/b m an s i on 
Mock. 2/3 bed. fully 
modernised and equ ipped. 
C12O00a 01 286 7779. 


A VALE MagnUtcem tma 
r (tot fRandoWi Avenue*. 1 
bedrm. rec rm. fully flit, 
bauum. Lame 120 m. 
.500. Tel: 01 286 3863 


NR B tcu rra PARK 4 double 
bedrm freehold house. 2 reew. 
with 1 bed self cont ain ed rial. 
Wlttt potential. Cutek sate 
£250.000 W: 01-935-9441 


PULBAll Crouad Or fM. Lounge, 
due bed. fined bath. 20 ft 
IcM/dtnor. Patio. GCH. 96 yr 
lease. £ 61.000 inci carpets. 
Qiack sale. 1WOI 736 1202 . 


WEMBLEY PARK Moal 3 bedrm 
oof tarn tty M on attractive 
Barn HU. dw. gnu. GCH. 
£ 1 16.000 nor mack saw. Tel: 
01 957 0902 i«vu not FHdayl 


B i kwl yii ite ed house. ,3 bed. 2 

n. patio. Warm £106.000 

m £ 10.000 spent. Asking 

9.960. Tel. Ol 692 9185. 


MR B TC P UT S PAMC 4 double 
bedroom freehold house. 2 
reept- with poteuUal. Quick sale 
£240.000 Tel: 01-9369441 


SIN 3 bed AaL Spacious, newty 
decorated. £69.950. No ogtails. 
Tel 01 636 1931. 


I SW6 Must sen 

. Ground floor 

flat wtlh garden In quiet street. 

dose io tube. I beanoem. fuHy 

titled UICMB- lovely reception 

room, unusual study, in excel- 

lent order and derotmed wtm 


style. DejinKHy 
good value. Lease 97 years. 

£73JOO. Farrar Stead « Clyn 

Ol 731 4391 

Wll. Wcftovm Park Bd. 
linraod family f/hld wtin punt 
rim far 4 flaia. £ 195.000 01 
461 4084/ 997 4967. 


IMMACULATE 

KNIGHTSBRIDGE 

FLAT 

2 beds. 2 baths, in 
garden square 
close to Harrods. 

£295,000 
01-581 8936 


HIGHBURY PLACE, NS 

A splendid Qeoraan tract 

house looktog onto the ne- 

Sned open spaces of Wfittjwj 

fields- Ths elegant house 
eonqxtses S floors ol spacious 
MB maHNned accom- 

modation tetanhu many 
ortonol decorative features. 
Including mH kept eest being 
issfledflinbuoi good she. 

£45M0B FREEHOLD 
ntWHE SOMUr 3St 4490 
Waakdsyi 


FARM STREET W1. 

Pntattr the bit new floss ol 
wlsan e e to bs floB is Haytor 
erttring mfley kcwtOds 
a c co nw a ion. TWs m RmM m 
ilfottB 1st (tots toady lung hi ttts 

reacsDOB ra. 2 naps, my. * 
tats. 4 bads, kd/trfast rm. son 
rooBL *me ceilsr. 99 veai lea se. 
£1.000, O S n. 00. ftn e npfcoo and ftfly 

ei 2Z1 S534. 


STJAMES‘S 

SWIe 

OHMmynStmet-BeBUbMped- 
s-tanaeiBtsQMlCasLt 
Coit se neaonAma OeroraadM 

ma Ngnest stwuard BsougnouL 1 

Ooutte badmom. sang room. 

wodBtP ka Lfl oi i . Damtocm Ufc. 

portnoe. 92 yew Masa. 

CliOQOO for quck sale. 

TB.01-eZ2-73S4.sm. 


TUBEU PABIL 

fajrify ruse. End (Brace. Fhn 
beds. Two reaps. Two talhs. 
Separate WC. lie tafehen. UWy 
ril CeBar. GCH. Bool tor. Paw. 
From and back gtfns. Ctnwnienl 
locabon fur afl tasporL sdioois 
sod Paffiamern H& Freehold. 
E155JKM. No agenl 
Tel: 01-607 7273 
(iv/ends, ewes). 


HYDE PARK 

ISO YDS 

W2 Nr Roval Uncasv HonUMge 

3 douMe badroom ground floor 

flat in period conv Mon. 

[viagnlfteem drawing mom 

wttti ornate owing, & working 

flic plare. Very targe filled 

Mldi ep . 2 eti suite b a l luuuum 

+ 1 dk. Long Lease 82 years 

tnuaoitaiMn 

Td 0836 24S7SZ or B1 SS4 41S6 


SHORT 

LEASES 

to the bsart of mdantal 
PnWtca 
Press ranre 
£ 2 aooa- EdO-oco 

WINKWQRTH 

828 1788 


BtVEKSlIlC CHISWICK W4 

STRAND ON THE GREEN- A 
charming 3 bed property deling 
back to the I7U, c. Drawing 
room, dining room, kilchcn. 
breakfast room. 2 bams. 9a 
rage- garden*. Views over Rtvrr 
Thames from must rooms. RN’ 
«t properties m this htatorK 
area rarely became avaiiaabte 
and early Inspection is stromdy 
re commended. FTxttd. offers m 
the region ol £360.000. Tysre 
Greenwood A Co OX 994 7022 


REGENTS PARK. Baker Si. Lux 
ury 4/6 bed apt m sought alter 
block. 6 baths. 2 en sidle, sau- 
na. lacuzzl. marble knehen. 
roof terrace and roof garden. 2 
dbte rerep rooms, cocktail bar. 
Loin tense Has lo be seen. 
Avau irnmeo. Owner going 
abroad. Offers inv lied ov 
£400000 No agents Tel Ascot 
36181 rSunl. 01 289 1446 or 
486 6109 fWeeketayi) 


UNDER CUOMO and only 15 
minutes from West Endr Ma* 
rnfkenl Victorian family house 
close lo Queens Park, an origi- 
nal features- Large reception. 
200 dining/ kH chen. 4 beds. 2 
torn. GCH. 800 garden. oK 
stree t perking. No urne wasters, 
no agents. £169.950 lor gUcfc 
sale. Td. Ol 969 3824. 


PMK CDMervaaon 

area W4. Best road. Preny 6 
bed Norman Shaw detached 
hse. Double recep- large Ml & 
brraUasL 2 baths. 65 It gdn. nr 
tube. Inspecti on essential. Free- 
hold Oilers in the region of 
£325.000 Tyser Greenwood it 
co 01 994 7022 


CHISWICK m me River. An ex- 
ceptional moder nis ed 3 bed 
Edwardian property, tge recep 
room, modem kit & bath. elk. 
CH. 461? west-garden. 
Strand on the Green. Viewing 
strongly recommended. Free- 
hold £119.960 TVser 
Greenwood & Co. 01 994 7022 


LITHE VEMCE. DeUghtfol peri 

od house. Beeuti/uuy renovated 

U the highest standard, retain 

tng original features. 3 
receptions. 3 bedrooms. 2 
baths, sauna, lacuzzl. German 
ktlctien. conservatory, patio 
garden. £299.000 freehold. 
View today. Tel: 01-286 0364. 


NW8 Newly decorated 2 bed 
ground/lower ground maKon- 
etie. unusual potential lor 
masatve appreciation. Prestige, 
block opposite Primrose Hill 
Price reduced for quick sate 
£119.600 5UMCCI lo cun[racl 
Ring Marcy on Ol 986 3711 
Mon to Frl. 


Wll. Victor? - 

an house, access communal 

gardens . 3r d and 4th floor mai- 

sonette. 3 bedrooms, drawing 
room wttn terrace overlooking 

gardens. Dining roam. 
£ 162 . 000 . Leasehold / share! 
Freehold. T«: 01-727 4566 


Ml. ARLINGTON Avenue/ 
Square. Beautifully converted 

1840 terraoed house. 3/4 beds. 

2 baths, double reception open- 

ing on to south facing patio 
gamon. study- quality filled 

kitchen £176.000. Tel: Ol 226 

8596 Home 01-222 9020 Office 


OFF EATON SQUARE. Beautiful 

tv refurbished house In private 

mews. "L" shaped double recep. 

tuning rm. 4 bednus. 5 bauirms 

<2 en suite), guest cloak, new 

fully fitted kitchen. Garage No 

Ageote. EnfrancMsabte L/noM 
£430.000 Tel: 01-937-1193 


..J - Spurn*, gntd 
floor RaL 1 bed Cshower/ wo. 2 
rorap. klt/baoi. pretty gdn. plus 
targe cellar, gas CH. £75.000 
for quick sate. Tel: JFR 01-603 
7930 moBKj or 01-828 6666 
rofltce) 


Charming period 
house. Fully modernised, three 

bedrooms, lined kitchen, dble 

reception room onto lately pa- 

■lo garden. OCH. me carpets & 

curia Ins. Freehold. £102.000. 
Tel: Ol 731 4810. 


I NWS. Magqdn 
flat In sought alter toe. All new. 
Iv refurb mroughoui Spac bed. 
recap. Idt/diner. bath with wg 
too. CCH. Preiw weu race gdn. 
£92.600 for mack sate. Tel. Ol 
289 6683 


W4. CKISWRX Spacious four 
bed roomed house bordering 
Bedford Park, recently rriur 
oisned by ardilteci owner. 
Price: £149,500. Telephone. 
Ol 994 7745 iw/epds. cvesi or 
01-938 2464 i daytime i. 


CHELSEA. SWflO. Supem newly 

modernised t hednn nano flat. 

125 yr tse. £79.950. Angeld 

Stanley 352 0060 or 362 9866. 


CHELSEA & 
KENSINGTON 


] 


D0CKLANPS _1 1 FROM £65,000. 


TARLEY 
&CXX 

BUTE STHEET, SW7 
Amacawkr decomtod and ftrahod 
1 strand Floor ma. W. me. 2 bads, 
tan. daskroori. nracB. atefl 
aimed, long co let. £ SO p*. 
KENWAY ROAD, SW5 
Newt* U n co rmad anraeflw cottage 
ash pado. me. U. 3 beds, bfltoi aval 
imned. tang S> M. E3S0 {W- 

CEDERLANO COWTT. 

OLD BROWTON ROAD, SW7 
BnunM kentor deatend 3rt floor 
W win balcony, rec. bt 2 beds, 2 
barns, avail mad. king co tot. 
£450 pw. 

01-589 1244 


R0U1D 6ARBBIS, 

LONBON SW7. 

Dcefca! sdrehon ol tato. oM 

and tern had tots (many total (Mate 

teaaasf . Sax&gufly amor 
deygnes. tbe fbB may K pwctiased 
rebate of re ne w s. Lena tot 
BaflMfcR fr Rfcafl Wa ffl M 

D/raxp. 2 Dato'ftaB^iJroor 

i» P mim 

^€4 352 37 * 6 , 


NORLAND SQUARE. 
HOLLAND PARK Wll 

An opportunity teacqiRs an 
unmodemsad house m Bis 
Biriusw garten square oj 
Hnpoang bow franttd 
VictDnan re si dences Mt 
areund suoert) squve oanlens 
raw mcorporaang private 
»m courts, tapressn* 33‘ 

reception room. 2/3 further 
reception rooms and 7 -9 
bedrooms Racarngmany 
features a nd ha« ag 
_ uiiHte rev osdsn. 
Freehold £465^100. 

Sole agents 

JOHN WILCOX 4Ca 
ST-8022252 


COLEHERNE 
COURT 

Stttmbq mteriar 
Id door BaL 
Comptetefy refurtu^ed md ready 
to move n id. Vast recepton 
room / JuB. Amp mom, My 
equipped kitchen, master 
bedroom aruMattnom an side. 
2 further bedrooms. 2nd 
bathroom. Access to 2 acre 
gardens. 24 hour porta rage. 
L1&50Q to metude cvpds ail 
cwans. Lease _S2_ 

Tel 01 7367293 or 


Wit 

HOLLAND PARK 

Suxub devefopmenl 

oppoftomty. the arty 
ucnodOTseo Mews house 

left m (he chanmig rotted 

Hews. Ptanraig app&aGon In 


H process for extra hoar la farm 

/ Sbedmom. 


2 bathmam. taps 


jnffiereraoni 

£180X00. For anmedi 

viemna phone 
01-749 7277(afta). 


CHRISTMAS SALE 

Buy a special present this 
Christmas - A 2 battaomed, 
2 reception, kitchen, 
b a throom cottage, with a 
tong lease in Belgravia, 
for £240,000. 

Tefc 01 8Z4 8638 erariogs 
or an 01 734 3834 
daring office hoars. 


PERFECT BUSINNESS 

MAN’S PIED A TERRE 
BEHIND KARROOS 

Meal tar tang OflBMtoM Note 
Ibi ewetty samd n PW Si. 
Moteosai i wnraM » ■ w 

bgcr oaWrd Raw&crt m. hsi 

MM DDFUdcn. I dUa #c*oam. 

L» Htatae Mum. E*y pi LA. 

Carautar. CH S HW. 29 r to*. 

let 01 5W SataD! 603 1812 


CHELSEA SW10. 

£235,000 FreefiaW. 

Immaotee mews house, ameitty 
designed. Exrf deev. Ctoai. 25' 
reap, _to tatehen, 3 beds, mod 
bath. Recommended. 

Jackson Prtp«ri^S«ivfc€s: 
Open 7 days a week 9 - 7pm. 


REbCUFFE SQUARE Stunning 
d M igoT Dnytex j t urtui niL cte- 
gam 1 st floor drawing room 
with balcony overtowdofl 
Square, separate sallotM din- 
tag ro om . 5 bedrms. 2 batbrnre 
targe south lacing roof terrace 
Offers over £300.000 Tel: Ol- 
370-7793 No Agents. 


CHELSEA CLOISTER SW3 1 su- 
perb new 1 bedroomed ftaL 
£127.000 . Abo 1 superb pew 
studio £67.000. Ideal Go M. 
Completion December. Quick 
sale. 01-903 8131. 


ROSARY CARDENS SWT Bright 

and deUghtrul third floor flat In 

occecenl condition. Reception. 

bedroom wim mwd wardrobes. 

fully filed kitchen, bathroom 

and utility room. Low 
outgoings. £86 000 Teh Ol 
328 0299 (after 6pm) 


SW10 

£125.000 Ch ar ming end of ter- 

race 3rd floor flat in wetow 
condition, drawing room, opens 

<mo West racing roof terrace. 3 

beds.kn. both, tad ch. 66 yrs. 

Saving ol 730 0822. 

BttPlY STYLISH 2 bedroomed 
flirt, viewsof Albert Han. totally 
redecorated, new machines. 

new carpels. 22 year lease. 
£1 10.000 Ring Mrs. Anderson 
937 9675. 

BAILS CT SQ 5WS tmmoe prod 
fl ftaL in new corn- hUpi ctU- 
“W- receoL filled ML 2 dMe 
jre e, bath, snowr. tad g ch. 
gg yrr £l 56.000 HOLMANS Ol 
370 6781. 

"«* Ew*Ue« raised 
S°w-fteL Lge Receo. 3 


HAMPSTEAD* 

H1GHGATE 


urt ffcTivendafe 

BELSIZE PARK, N.W J. 

A smerbtf located 3 store? dotUe 
trentefl EftaardW fBsdence. offanti 
snoous & wea prapobonac 
accornmniaflar and fc in fhe 
deroniM ■order nreughoui S«aM 
dose d the bkHIM transport S 
dtappmg fachfles a taeratock Ml 
S Betece Ml 7 beds. 3 bafts. 2 
■eceps. lux ks/trt rm. uR im, gdn. 
COUK. Gas CJL £388500. Freehold. 
Ref 18/36171. 

01-388 9367 


CAfOFKLD SARDEMS, mM6 VIC- 

lonan 4 bedroom. 2 rcccpdon 

family maisonefle. Ideally situ- 

ated for all transport faculties. 
Overlooking 2 acres of private 

RwmunaJ gardens. Extremely 

tow out goings, share of free- 

*wM- Price reduced for auick 

sole, dim Invited around 
£140.000 Tel Ol 624 4231 
weekends & evening. . 


KIANDS 

PROPERTY CENTRE 


ITIIR 


FLATS & HOUSES 

THROUGHOUT THE 
DOCKLANDS 

TEL: 790 9560 


El studio ftai in modem cuy 

block. 6 mins walk Tower of 

London. Filled bcdroom/sitllng 

roam. Fully eaulpped Wth"/ 

Bathroom eic. 122 year lease 

£67.800 For Quick Sale. Phone 

01-4880066 office noun “ 

0892-48201 cves/wkends. 


tKAPFMCL Large benny flat In 

convaned riverside warehouse. 

Extensive views. Don ate bed - 

roon Fined kilchcn. Carpets. 

Por te rage. Priva te stoe. 

£iao.OOa ono. for oak* sale. 
Tel: 01-986 1068 


OOCKUH87S - City - Bow 
Selection of period A New 

Houses A Flats dose City and 

River. £40 - £360-000. Phone 

Mcflowails Residential: 01 790 

9832 or 0860 71 1664. 
DOCKLANDS WAPPM6 Near 
Oty / transport- Modem. 3/4 

bed. house- kjtchen/diner. liv- 

ing room, study, garden. C/H 
etc. £230 pan. Teh Ol 729 
3078. 

CASCADES. Contract for 3rd Or: 

2 bed IUL Vetsr emynxlu — 

required. 446 6766 IT) 


SOUTH OF THE 

THAMES 


ftamoi3 aa)crt)ng » 
amwfsoia. 2 DeUrej^- 8“ 
cb. ua pe is . Wioonai feaiim- 
xphifiRhnw. grtg j(1 
Antad deapned. London id 
oms.iitof.-BH ffcuycrtw 
prapotn WorttMB3«neO 
subpetta sams. Tet 
ANTHONY -SINCLAIR 
016755123 


tdouk bec cbmmoh 

jiaaowteflii'MiwiMi 

ftase aoo an been MV 'Rtonnsed 

au Bncmd anna r eeifto of 
lagmad pare leaam segmle 

fledreoes. 2 eotos rtteewn mans. 

Ur rand warn.- Bretota Wk 

BWr more, arematore »* *■ ta 

"‘'"'tittaww awa.. 
—imniiLwaaa 
01 E73 33SS 


SISTOVA ROAD, 
SHI 2 

Lamer l bar average three 
bedroom ts* Row H*. 
Mot lease. CH. 
E54.950 teasehoftl 
A Brae setoona ol mooerttes 
atwysavmlabte 
mm ESTATES 
81 675 6950 


fesv H 

Chaffered Swam 

f rr a pm an mmimm U* 


TWIXT 

THE COMMONS 

1 bed gat ten U m Cul-de-sac. 
Motorised and beamtul decor, 
frendi nndows oran Wgadens 
SC. 

rram 

FOR QUICK SALE 

B1-833 3171 (Aay) (T| 


cuphan ctnntoN 
WEST SIDE 

Hate’s veurefrenea ip 

If ohgtoaf Cd wrtMr. 

looting Am Conancn. Ever, en^nal 

toaus wei-shafoa about too suo- 

Sidence at mo raw. Ilo wa w r era b 

d taktn top acme* at a pnea of 

E95.ooa As a a beds. 2 recepiton. 

kseneo. Scuflwy besroom, too and 

45li souta faemg raar gaiitan 

GARDEN FIAT 
BETWEEN THE COMMONS 

Nenfy eomarted 2 twfioom fist ndb 

pado and garden In quni road ctosa 

Wandswargi Coonvn and good 

local taopi. Norttieote mditw buses 

and Sim on. Ftad cstwrs. cooker 

and nob nciudM for £87300. 

v 228 7474 , 

140 NORTHCCJTE ROAD SW 1 1 


END OF “THE DRAIN” 

ATTRACTIVE 3-BED 
MAISONETTE 

2 Reopkre and modem Rad 
kficfwi. modem btfi aid 2 wx. 
Btooon nd nro m BoopeD S 
SFI. 3 runs WatertoiL 10 nuts 
Bta. ImmedttB vacant possesses. 
997 


IH: fft B3 3W 

Entoags and w eetads 


WFEB OF TBE WfflT 

Oapham. netrty- converted flat 

wtfa i two dmtite bedrooms, 

kitchen, bath loom. I 


balcony Freehold. 1 minute 

tobe. dose afl a nwPes Bid 

City, an* sale. £59550 ono 

Tet 81-203 7122. 
(ans phone) 


UPPER NORWOOD SE19 
(Cached Victorian house. 
13 toons. 4 kitchens. 3 
baits in t/3rd acre. Large 
heated tiled swwrmn pool, 
sara, 4 garages. Often 
£25DjBOO 

tanetfate possesioa. 
No traders. 

Tet 01 385 5365. 


BATTERSEA 

SW11 

(Lavender Sweden -Supem 1st itaor 

raflonaae «w 2 oue Bearms. 2 
Batnrms. Lge Ltuige. 
MVBraoktat Rm. fifl Gas CK 
fitted Corn, tarty deooratBd 
C7S.OOO. New Myr Isa 
Tel emer 01-087111 
OSes His or W3 72223S. 

m. 


. a moment from the 
Common. Elegaat Victorian 
r ully mod famuy botne. 3 beds. 
Data, sep W.G.. 2 intercommu- 
mraiuis i ro e po. mror 
kll/ breakfast room Gas CJL 
Weal lacing gdn. F/H 
£195 jOOO. Kluan & King: 878 
4942. 


imposing 

futty extended Edwardian cor- 
ner family house. S beds. 2 
baths <1 e/s). 3 reecos. law 
kilrheo/breaWast room. g» 
CH. westerly garden. Garage. 
Freehold £225.000. Kltaon A 
King; 01 878 4942. 


Pretty 3 

flat fronted. Georgian home m 

quel s tre e t 2 rotas, from tube. 

S beds, large kKchen/dlner. at- 

tractive OF wrt-aoefoed 
garden- £160,000. Tel. Ol 682 


CUUPHA0SW4 (mmacuiaie lerr. 
grnd floor ftab recep. klL bed. 
bath, pallo. toe cellar. GCH. ex 
ceUCM transport. Must be sero. 
96 YR Lease. £62.000 IOT quick 
sale. TEL- 627 8063. eves 


EXCEPTIONAL APT In 

Rlvcrmead Court by »e river at 
Fulham wilti r e c e p.. 3 beds. 2 

baths, fcd/ dining rm . £169^00 

Tel 684 2601 Mondays- Fri- 
days 9.30 to SJOpra III 


SOUmnELOS SWIS Lovely 3 

bed Vlct (ere hae retatataa an 

orig feats- 2 rrcas. fitted HI. 

sedoded gone. GCH. dose to 

Mo. £J 33-000 01-670 6667 

eves/wkends. 01-668 0131 day 


FULHAM Ansebn Road 4/5 bed. 

Small south garden. Totally 
unmodembed. £125.000 FH 

for immediate sale. Abbotsbury 

Estates. Ol 381 6677 
MAYFAIR Shepherds Market (Jn- 

mual Freehold 3 bedroomed 

flat with roof terrace and stun- 
ning view*, offers ever 
£2OOD0a TeL-Ol-OOB 0199. 
RHLL HU RVT7. Modern p/b 

spacious a bed ftaL good deco- 

radvc order, pas CM. entry 

phone. IS mine Cuy. £64,000. 

01-906 2582 after 6pm. 
WOCiW FHteHWin HOUSE 

SW6. £156.00a 2 beds. bath. 

19ft rec wtlh doors to w facing 

garden. ML. diner, gas Ch. 731 
4448 IT) 

KMTUUto PLACE wi toff). Stu- 

dio. ex show na(. i defl l Med- a- 
lort and rioganUy rnrmawd. 

40 year Mae. £49.980. Td Ol 

821 9164. 

Cmr ECL Seiecuon of newly 

nnvntcd 1 bed flats £57.000- 

£ 61.000 Leasehold. Terence 
Payne A Assoc 01-278 8008 

EALtodtt W» 2 vuporb town centre 

quality appai tal ents: 1 bed 
E64.CXJO: StUdlO £49.000. Tel 

891 4429/ 367 3613 office CD 

ENORMOUS UMHOD <pnd fir flat 

Cleveland Sg. W2. £130^X10. 

Massive potential 23 bedrm. 

Long Ise. 01-499 0329 iT) 
FULHAM MW. pretty grad fir 

flat. Rcc.dbteDed. private pane. 

oners on £61.000. Long Ise. 

01-361 7633 <T7 
W2 Crd/lsl floor mattonMie. 

own roof terrace, one bedroom. 

Wed rated kitchen. Long lease 

£71.800 Tel: 01-229-1732 • 
WUIIICTOte MBdtS Large 2 

Bed itaL gardens and parking. 

CSS -BOO TelXll 284 4126 

tSL totCTt AI Ml Angel. CW2AOO- 

OwfTMng 1 bed flaL o/ looking 
. ™- Ol 857 59S9 

LEe * Do walking, 
well Una your Meal borne. Pc 
lemon Run, 741 7137 
MARBLE ARCH 2 bm flat in lux- 
ury on Hock, un, poner rv 
114 yrs £142.500. 727 9TO3 

Rfl^ CannoL 2 bds. blh ♦ Shwr 

nn- E/Phone, Lux mi. c.H 
£82^95. 881 3299 IT). 

89 DeUgbUuily convened 2 bad 

garden OaL £69.900. Tel. Ol 

002 7701 or 01 422 2286 . 
W9.3 bed r/h mews house with 
age. Private sale Mo agents. 
JU69.O00. 296 1150. 


MORGANS WALK SWlt. to- 
maculate House In prestige 
riverside dev rioomenc 3/4 bed- 
rawns. ojrden. garage. 
£186.000. Tel: 01 226 2644. 


Double bedroom. 

newty convened 

flat £564)00. TetOl -677-0522 


VAJUXBALL 1 bed flat. GCH. 
large kit / diner, garden. reDar 
£66.600. TH. S82 5631. 


CLAPHAM SOUTH. 2 bed ’Mews 

style* levmhouse. Quiet conve- 

nient locatloi) dose iitoc. Large 
retro. Ill Idi, 30*00110 gdn- Can 

move qutckly £82300. View 

Sun Ol 673 5884 or Douglas A 

Gordon 01 673 0191 
KOamarOM SWB. Last remain- 

ing mews house in superb new 
devetaumenl. 3 beds, fony fu kit 

with Ncf appliances, garage. 

garden. £120.000. TH Show 

House a? M Endow Place 731 

1479 IT) 

BATTERSEA SW8. L'nmOIKni- 
Red period house wuth 
POtosxial lor 4 Beds. 2 Baths. Kit 

A 2 recros Freehold £85.000. 

Offers Invited. £gerions Limit- 

ed. Tel: 01 495 0676. 


PUTNEY Heart! - smart 2 bed 
townftousr Mftw to near Cport 
GCH. GCE- STace garden. 
FTiOM £87.600. Tel: 788 7336 
after 4.50 p ro. 

BARNES COMMON Substantial 4 
bed house. comprising 5 
rmeptf. kiL hata 70 n pdn 
£187^00 Sturgs Ol 748 8483. 

BATTERSEA Superb one bed flat 

wlui balcony overlooking nark. 

Excellent decorative order. 
£78300 Tel day 01 491 2700 

LET OUR LEGS Do the walking. 

went rind your ideal home. Pe- 

terson Rush 741 7127 

QUEERS CLUB GDNS WX4. New 

on mkt tats w ee k . Newty mod. 

1 bed £70000. 2 beds £92^00 

+ £100000. 3 beds * bale 

£132300. AD v gd rm sizes + 

views over comm gdns/lemib 

etv 125 yrs. Stuart Wilson Ol- 

236 0725 Ring today 
EHJMCTOM M7 • Deltgtitful Vic- 

torian house, two double beds, 
two reccps. large b at hroom. Oi- 

led kitchen. splendid 
conservatory. 50 ft garden. 
OCH. £105.000 Tec 01-263 
6067 


Newly redecorated Studio Oat 
0/1 Gardens. Entrance HalL 
Studio Room iS'xia*. Fined 
Kitchen la’xa 1 . Batarooro 
12^4 '4. £66.000. TeL- 01-93 
2340 m 

QUEENS CLUB Gardens W14 
£ 1 40.000. Superbly spadoro 
raised groun d floor mansion 
IUL 3 beds. 2 baths, bright 
recep. esc un. Roll* Royee seed 
garage extra £7.000. 731 4448 
m 

SUTHERLAND AVENUE London 
wg. 1 st floor 2 Bedroom Cal 
wtm balcony, carpets, fuby ra- 
ted Kitchen with appliances. 
Gas ch. Entryphone, ise 126 
yrs. £96000. Tel: 01-286 1616 
1 Office Hours; (Tl 

PETERBOROUGH ESTATE 
£186.000. Luxurious 3 bed. 2 
bath, newly convened 1 st a 
2nd floor matsooette. Smctous 
rec. and excellent woockn 
MKhen. 731 4448 IT) 

SWX Ashley Gardena. Comtaend- 
atde 19 ft spacious mansion flat 
ww, a balcony. 3 beds. 2 urns, 
gd reccpuge ka/dtamg. ter 116 
yrs £179.300 Hunter Estates 
Ol 828 2146. 


DULWICH 


DULWICH SE21 

This b a sty&sh and efeganl fax 
stony Georpsn house dot has 
bean ttaugaftfy modemsed co 
provide a fimrous famV home. 
3 bedrooms (ponntfll cawosoi 
to 5/6 bedrooms), double 
reception, kitchen, breakfast 
main, utftty mom. 190 It rear 
grtten. oH SraeC pariana 
£205.000 FitthokL 

Viedfog knper^ve tirraugh 

Sola Agents 

HARVEY & WHEELER 
01 737 6211 


Can'! nnd anything for me price 

In Dulwich? Try us. £99.950 

for quick sale. Good decorative 

order. 3/4 bedroomed town 

house, open plan lounge/ dining 

/Tolly fitted • kitchen. 2 bath- 
rooms. GCH. plus healed 
swimming pool garage. Tel: 01 
778 6822 eves A w/ends. 


LOVELY Edwardian maison. 5 

beds. 2 recess. Gdn. GCH. Origi 

nal features, oxcj dec order. 6 

mins Dulwfch/Brockwefl Park. 

HV.Dulwicli/Herne HU BR. Of- 

fers over £ 60.000 lac carpets. 
Ta Ol 761 0601 
SQfl DETACHED S bedrooms. 

Hvlng room, dlnino room. GCH. 

garden. £ 129.000. Tei oi 670 
2648 teveslL 


RICHMOND & 
KINGSTON 


LANCASTER PARK 

Substantial 3 snrey Vctesiai 

terrace house in nee d of 

modemsaboa htov ‘mcel 

features. Close Shops. Tram 
and Tubas. Cte dd pro wte 6 
Beds; 2 RnvK BntMRnc 
Kit; Clkrm; Cellar; Gdn. 
Freetedd £225,000. 

DANIEL SMITH 
01 582 5550 


PARKSIDE 

RICHMOND 

Cbvniinqfy converted coach 
house: three snsutae be drooms: 
modem kdchefi downstan 
doAroonc fcsge lounge; 
separte diflng room: endosad 
paths/ c o u rt y ard plus mom than 
adaquEe garOan. 

Otop E30W00 

Tel: 01 940 0325 


M CHM OH O Bridge A xpactous 2 
bed grnd ftr conversion Hal Inti 
orlq. viet feuurcs + gdn. GCH. 
Newly dec Muff be vtewro. 
£78000 01 891 1561 Sunday 
+ alter 7.30 ora w/days. 


7SDOMG70H. Lane VJcf. aefRL 
45ft ptayrm. 160ft south farinp 
gurdn. 4 beds. bata. 2 rteps. 
lilted uichrfi. rtookrooni. GCH. 
£167^00- Tet Ol- 977 Z748. 


KtL ctwtnning 

nvin house. 2 dWe beds, bata- 
mo. living area wim klictwn. 
ttauo. integral g a r a ge, ch. frro 
ttoto £156^00 UIOl 067 6361 
















Blending la: an artist's impression 


ta of the coornani derdopn,™. of ^ i. a histone serth* to Beichworti, 


Tradition wins in the Green Belt 


A small courtyard development by 
Berkeley Homes within the walled 
kitchen garden of the listed Belch worth 
House, near Dorking, Surrey, is interest- 
ing for two particular reasons — for the 
buyers it is attracting, and for the feet 
that it was allowed in the first place. 

The land is in the Green Bell and in an 
area of outstanding natural beauty. And 
in view of the hostility displayed to any 
development od Green Belt land, with 
government assurances that it will not 
sanction any encroachment, it is an 
exceptional development. 

Detailed planning consent was granted 
only after considerable negotiation be- 
tween the vendor’s architects and the 
local authority. As a result, the vendor 
agreed that the proceeds from the sale of 
the land should be put towards the 
refurbishment and restoration of the 
nearby Beicirworth House, which dates 
from the 15th century' and has a 
clockfece dated 1675. 


The attractions of 
life in a village 


Berkeley Homes is now levelling the 
1.5-acre site and renovating the high 
mellowed brick walls. It is to build 14 
village houses round a courtyard, and a 
single detached four-bedroom house: 

The development will have its own 
private road, and the architectural 
concept has been carefully considered to 
■make sure the scheme mends into the 
surrounding Betchworth village. 

The houses will be built in a mixture of 
traditional styles, some tile-bong, and 
using reclaimed bricks, clay tiles and 
cast-iron guttering and pipes. All the 
houses will have two reception rooms; 
some will have two bedrooms, some win 
have three. 

When the local authority gave consent 
the planners saw the proposed develop- 
ment as attracting firk-lime buyers. In 
feet, the houses are being sold o&plan to 
people who are trading down and want to 
enjoy the benefits of village life. Seven 
have already been reserved. Prices range 
from £97,500 to £165,000, beyond the 
reach of most first-time buyers, and the 


By Christopher Wannan 

Property Correspondent 


agents are Newman Davis and Company 
of Guildford. 

For Peter Frauds, managing director 
of Berkeley Homes, the development is a 
vindication of the use of Green Belt land 
in certain circumstances. He supports 
the Green Beit but says villages need 
some form of development to keep them 
alive. He says: “These pieces of Green 
Belt land are choking villages, and it is 
better to develop on them and bring 
people into the villages than to build on a 
field miles away." 

The quick sale of nearly half the 
houses also points to the success of 
Berkeley Homes in its approach to 
housing! The company, based in 
Wey bridge, was formed !0 years ago. It 
has now gone public and has eight 
autonomous regional offices. The group 
built 242 houses last year and specializes 
in single, individually designed houses 
built in traditional styles, or low-volume 
estates generally at the top end of the 
market. 

it prides itself on its 20th-century 
approach, but it emphasizes the tra- 
ditional nature of its designs, and uses 
second-hand bricks and clay roof tiles 
where possible. 

The essence of the company’s philos- 
ophy is its "kerbside appeal". Jim Farrer, 
the group chairman, says: “We believe 
we know what people want and we try 
hard to get it right. If houses look right 
they will attract customers." The group 
claims to be a “true" developer, selling 
early off-plan and making its profit 
margin, not speculating on a higher price 
once the bouse in completed. 

Another of its conspicuous successes 
has been in association with Speyhawk 
and Rosehaugh Partnership to build 
developments at Old Islewortb on the 
Thames west of London as part of a 
whole village scheme for the regenera- 
tion of the Isleworth conservation area. 
A scheme of 2$ town houses and three 
fiats at MUlside Place, costing from 
££0,000 to £1 72,000. has been sold out m 
less than two months. 


This pattern is being repeated at 
Nazareth House, Old Isleworth. where 
4 ! riverside town houses are being duiil 
Before building. 20 of the houses were 
placed on the market on October 24 at 
prices up to £250.000 and so far at least 
19 have been reserved. 

Tonv Pidglev. the managing director, 
comments; “It shows once more the 
in) pcrtar.ce of providing attractively 
desisned character houses, with well 
planned accommodation in a superb 
setting. There is certainly a distinct 
charm about the old village setting 
which, with the added benefit of river 
frontage, is of instant appeal to our 
purchasers." 

The houses, to be built in the Dutch 
gable style, are grouped arounda central 
courtyard on 2.2 acres with 4G0n of nver 
frontage between Richmond and Kew. 
Every bouse will have four oedrooms. 
two or three bathrooms, two reception 


Customers can decide 
for themselves 


rooms, and a garden. The Nazareth 
House project is pan of an overall plan to 
make Old Isleworth a business and 
residential village. When completed, it 
will have 140 homes, a range of leisure 
and business facilities, including a new 
riverside pub and restaurant, 5.000 sq ft 
of craft workshops and a new riverside 
walkway. 

In its 10 years. Berkeley has progressed 
with its in-house design teams through 
many styles, including the ever popular 
Georgian and Tudor. Some of the earlier 
houses had a colonial look, but today's 
most popular styles, according to Mr 
Farrer. are Tudor and traditional 
cottage. 

At the exclusive St Georges Hill estate 
at Weybridge, a large house in Georgian 
srvle is just being completed. It will cost 
around £550,000 and for the price - as 
with its other houses - the group likes to 
allow customers to mould it to their 
desires. Inside design, including some of 
the walls, can be changed to provide 
exactly the accommodation required. 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


On the Instructions of 
Magdalen College, Oxford 

OXFORDSHIRE 

M40 14 miles. Oxford 6 miles. M4 27 miles. 

AN OUTSTANDING 
FORESTRY INVESTMENT 

Excellent Road Frontage. Well Drained 
Soil. All Year Round Access. 

High Proportion of Mature Timber, 
including Quality Oak. 

Abont 354 Acres (143 ha.) 

For Sale by Tender in 6 Lots. 

Sole Agents 


23 Beaumont Street, Oxford 0X1 2NP 
Tel: (0865) 246611 

-127 Mount Street, London WlY 5HA 
Tel: 01-499 4155 


WIMBLEDON 


MNEB PABK ROADl 2 dnfft 

bed purpose bum flaL Garage. 
Near Otetnct Line. £66.960. 
Tel. Ot 789 473S after 5 pm. 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


RENT A HOME 

TEI 0258 72 2966 

RICHMOND 

ft Rat 2 bedrooms, 
bathroom, lounge/diner, 
kitchen. Desirable location 
immediate occupation rent 
£180.00 PWK 

PALACE-COURT W2 

superb 2 bedrooms, 2 
baths, lounge diner, mod 
kitchen, all new appliances, 
furnished hi$t standard 
immed H te occupation rant 
£290.00 PWK. 


HOLLAND par* Carden flaL 1 
M4. 1 r«gpc kRehen and bota- 
rofflTL CH. fully rurnisnea. from 
ifwti Dec. £17S bw Tei: Ol- 




BERKSHIRE 


Hampton & Sons 


NEAR HUNGERFORD, 

BERKSHIRE 

k> a glorious position bounded 
on tfra sides by tha Hwar 
Kertnet a cteBghtM 5 
bedroom mater's house of the 
Georgian period and a 
handsome and substantial 
mu. ideal fa- con v ersio n to 
one or two dwellings. 
Gardens, ml pool and race- 
in afl about IK acres. 

ovatabte from the 
owner's sole agents. 

01-483 8222 

6 Artngton Street 
London SW1 A It® 


nrtHDSOfL cturacier VKwen s 
M lodge jjyrnpaUifflniUy 
modemiMd Gas CH. Dogate 
e sarsac . Garden. £135.900. 
WaST-mame*. 1 0763*62509. 


nClJCHITOL Ctmezy ratraaL 1 

bedroom ftal la oM mm urtta es- 

chantutg rt»«r «5B«t Easy 

BCnss to Loudon - Motorway 
tad rail services. Bca taM M Ul- 
locauoa. £60.000 Tet 
1194. 


EAST CANTON. Large HMftHed 
cottage. River Lamotxim trout 
age Preny viltag c between 
SSrfajry/Lambown- M4 ■•1141 
4 miles, a rec.3 DedfcffOdcns. 
views £ 80 . 000 . Ptweaas 
n«MRv House Denar u new 


LOOKING FOR A PROPERTY IN 
DEVON OR CORNWALL? 

Save time, money and tiring wasted journeys 
by contacting the experts. 

K. L O. ENTERPRISES 
FOUNDRY HOUSE, STOKE CUNSLAND 
CALLINGTON, CORNWALL 
0579 70445 Anytime 


BLUNT HOUSE 
RESIDENTIAL REST HOME 
(formerly Ross Rennie Rest Home) 
Oxted, Surrey 

FOR SALE 

As imposing substantial country house set 
within grounds of 16 acres currently used as a 
rest home with a license for 13 residents and 
offering tremendous scope for further 
expansion including nursing facilities subject 
03 die necessary consents. 

For full details apply co: 

Raer J. Stevenette of Sole Agents 




ITREVOR&SQNS I 


29 THURLOE STREET, LONDON SW7 2LQ. 
TELEPHONE: 01-584 6162 


LEICESTERSHIRE 

qydwwBgtoM6B.M1.)Kn)oterw3ynenKrt Soktw. te)arictoirtnrproti«^, 


Otto. Cette. Fine Oak Starase. Sn Bedrooms. Bathroom and Guests Stwmr/ 
OtBknjom DtegftUii and so&jfed gmuate on thro Imds. Om* grass paddocks. 
Idaa! hung box. 

For further dcafe apply to ne sole agents 

Re nts, Kacfany & Son. 

WB3M Y, 


HEN NEKTON BEECHES 

WMBRMK-m- THAMES. 
2 oafstaxflng new detached 
resafences of grea charm & 
chanenr on large woodsd 


S9QJ0B. 

“asms* 

en 0734 585181. (TV 


MAT HVSHsne. Snarl 
ground floor Itel overlooking 

river. 2 double beds. 2 bains, 
lounge /dining, new rilled ktten- 
en. C/H. snxuo over garage. 
£1 12.600. Trt <06281 33426 


BUCKS 


HOLTON KETNR9 Euston 48 
mint. New detached House. 
Luxury 4 beds (rnaffer Bedroom 
with uMnrr. S baths. 2 rccep- 
ttons. doak rm. dream rtldm. 
ureoktaMSuilllty. entrance to 
Urge offlee/granny annex with 
•mower room, very High energy 
cmcfail. Double garage, ■’i am. 
£166.000. Tel: 0908B6BA17 


Unique 600 jrr OM 

former taddURC stables now 
magntnceni d« rcsWenee. 3 
Recaps. 3 bnb. cauiwd oraw 
rm. bam. ut/b'iaff. sen anon: 
bata. bed. lounge, ku OOL 

iw« fifln f Whrt DnopT 


devon&cornwauJ 


— — .n .mm. Favoured 

village. Modernised 4/5 bed 
bouse. 2 recoK. 2 baths, fitted 
kitchen. CH. walled garden. 
£89.500. Tel: ID747J 2680 


BOCK - Colt house. Three bed- 
rooms. Secluded situation. 
Close to gaff course and beach- 
Si. If 5 - 000 ’ Tel: (09261 
401703. 


TORQUAY. Magnificent and quteti 
positton. studio Flat in select] 
modem block only 5 minutes! 
JTOm the sea and yacht marina 
Using Room ao'xlSV Glorious 
**? views. Beautifully ruled 
kitchen wim freezer, frig and 

Healed Unen cupboard Hall. 

Own cue space C26.EOO. New 

full tumiAhings at valuation U 

required. Sole Agents. 
Ctiambertaliie-BroUii'r* 4 
Mtohetmore. 22 Soulhcrnhay 
Ea»I. Exeter <05921 76018 ^ 


WIVE# Altractn, barhouraide 
ftouse. Three double rooms, do- 
tahttaUy live. £7aooa^iS? 
0736 796689 after 6.30^ 


EAST ANGLIA 


cottac « ustrt 
taMKlHSML CH 3 bed. 
taglcnook. »■ 

tig- O* <Met VUU 90 . rtoae 

• NcwiTidrla'L Bury g> ph, 

munds £ 79.000 oasSaSmV 


I Luxinr tlal I min 
sea. 3 beds, bauirm. superb 
lounge, unii kitchen, consent 
tow. pauo garden. XEO.OOO, 
072885 201 1 


1 8 room residence. Large 

filled Mi/Miast area. Large par- 
Cantto. Oilers oier 
£150.000. Tel: 0223 880566. 


ESSEX 


HOBHCHURCM: charming 3 bed 
del character hse Dble garage 
Gidea Pk Sot 6 mins. £ 1 28.000. 
Tel: <04024) 52S25 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE § 


CHELTENHAM 22 MILES 
& LONDON 2% HOURS. 

TV beautiful S unsDOilM wrest ol 
Oeani MostftggajM scsDdnmt 
a 8 5 OBfwneo homes in a 
Mtiute) & rtaawe HoMv 
Martort ngpdbn) scenerv. 
bxaav ttB) tatnrms. u. 1 rrato. 
*.S batons, uty. any. iCtawr 
atnos-l Dblatmqaimi 

tapflaapu^ Mten mm ntw 
tradraial offtanoi WWba 
OTimnani) v rriocatisq phgna lEM 
M325 1 Dean) lot im tmenye n) 
Wibetafc PntK Iran 500’ 

WESTCRAFT (DEAN) 
BuiW lor Bts iBfare. 
SflbjBCt te ataOsUBy. 


CIREHCESTES 4 MILES 

A striking modem house with 
spacious reception areas. 5 bed- 
rooms. 3 bathrooms, garden, m 
an attractive location on the 
edge of the vtdaoe. Often ui the 
region of £T60iOOD 

John German 
Teh 0672 20691. 


7 miles. Barrw 
eon unity to acquire a penod 
farm house In need of renova- 
tion. together with adiaceW 
stone barn and oul buildings, 
sn in beautiful secluded valley 
with so acres Further land 
available Offers h excess of 
£250.000 Tcl:Flndtay 0286 
69066 


Hants jx>rset, & 

uxw. 


BOTLEY 

5-iMfraamed dot. house dose to 
River HamOle & yachting marina. 
S« n 3 acres wnh stwimeng 
wkH. fishing ten & sable Uotk. 
5 mms. from stn. with connecting 
Tracts lo London. 
£230,800 

Tet (04892) 2594. 

Fortiers umeanbe 
latr thame U if rogd. 


DORSET 
NR BLANDFORD 

3 New bnck and lied houses. 4 
Bedrooms . 2 bathrooms, 3 
Reception. Lowfyvflage 
seanj. ftnm £95000. . 

SENIOR & GODWIN 
(0258)52327 


CoBtinued on Red WS 


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*SV. :- . 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 





29 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/2 


Catherine of Aragon 
slept here . . . 


ing Henry VII was 
9 the final < 


I While Kir 

SBJWhiB the final details of the 

between Prince Arthur 
ana Catherine of Aragon near Portsmouth 

£?_ 0f Knight of the 

^^i&^IBSSSSSSlu, 

miles from Odiham, Known now 
unsurpnsingiy as Catherine of Aragon. 
The Grade II listed house, datinq back 
2,f h ®2® th Cerrtur y> has since Men 
^'^9^ » create a family house, it is 
bwlt of bnck with a timber frame and has 
a fine herringbone brick entrance 

ESE 'l^ s rBC8 P fon rooms, a 
master bedroom suite and four further 
bedrooms, and a ssff-contatned annexe 
with two bedrooms. There is at so a 
gardener’s cottage in the grounds of 
about 2.5 acres adjoining protected 
open farmland. Hampton & Sons* 

Famham office is seeking offers of 
more than £350,000. 



PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


House hunting? 

Let’s talkSwedish. 



IteKfooor in Swensfcabj, tne Swedish village $ ftteiDofough. isan 

e^Jswec^«oprr^tarre8iS«MisnhfiSe& ^ 

They tew weiytfrne the most taMas Saedecouta uam- 

fioept the cow. cola Swedish winters. BaBie bouses nave assn 

toe insulation and tnpie gazing to - ^ 

keen you warm without cri»bng 
heatingbiHs. 


Only 50 minntestyiiaintD 
London. FrwnU3&900 
Call Hunters now 


one 


5'n fatpy l of London’s Docklands 
™«*8ted before the new sure# of 
activity, SaviUs is sefflng a third-fkior 

flatat Mo 1, The Pierhead, Wapptng, t 
of the area's most prestigious 
addresses. The Pierhead! which fofms 
anopetKended square, was bum in 
18H totalise senior employees of the 
Lon^an Dock Company, and the flat 
has fine tows of the river and the City. 
The flat has a double reception room 
and two bedrooms and a large roof 

t^e2&iSo n,s ' ““h® pri " ** 


The prosp^of bviiw m a village with the name of Lytc&rtt Matravers is ratherl 
appealing, thought of toying Lytcbett St Marv&wroeriy the rectory far liel 
vdfagenear Poofa, Dor**, ts almost im-ristilte except for the price of £475, OWL 
Lytchett St Maiy is* fine cotmtry bouse built aronad 1720 mi the edge of the! 

"tod* ® 1831 was gran a grander facade i 

Howell James moved firom London to become rector. The! 
Gr«le II listed ho use h as been meticulously renovated by the present owners 
while retaining rts original features and has three reception rooms, a master b 
roote state and four farther bedrooms. The grounds of three acres "H mie a 
buildings, lawns, paddocks and woodland, snathe agents are Ptadential Proootv 
Services (Pearsons before the take-over) at Riagwood 


The great hall lives on 


The mills boom 


E9 The popularity of mills (featured in 
this column last week) is reinforced with 
news of more mills, both wind and 
water, on the market The Windmill, with 
the Mill House at Bardwell, Bury St 
Edmunds, is thought to be one of only two 
windmills in the country stflf to be 
milling on a daily commercial basis. It was 
built in 1825 in tarred red brick and 
has been restored by the present owner. 
With the house, two reception rooms 
and four bedrooms, and a third of an 
acre, it is for sale at £120,000 through 
Rutters, of Bury St Edmunds. 

The Old Mill, at Co ton, Whitchurch, 
Shropshire, a former windmill with a 
circular hiving room and several 
bedrooms in the mill tower, is for sale at 
£80,000 (Tel: 0948 840426), while 
Terwick Mill, Trotton, near Midhurst, West 
Sussex, is an old watermHi whose 
unconverted part, of timber construction, 
dates back to about 1600. The 
remainder of Terwick MfH, built of stone, 
dates from the 1700s and has a 
reception room, two main bedrooms and 
two further bedrooms, h overlooks the 
millpond and mill stream and stands in 
three-quarters of an acre. It also has 
fishing rights. King & Chasemore's 
Midhurst office is seeking offers 
around £250,000. 


! Windy Brow, on die outskirts of 


Lymtngton, Hampshire, not far from the 
New Forest, 


-oresL is a fine thatched house, 
butt in 1922 and recently extensively 
modernized. It has five bedrooms 
and three reception rooms, with a tends 
court, a heated swimming pool and a 
summer house in the five acres of 


Jackson, of Lymington, is asking for 
offers dose to £3?&000 l 


The sale of two of the finest p roperties in 
Norfolk— a great house and a great estate 
— with news of their new owners gives an 
insight into the way in which these grand 
Places, in danger of hcoouring redund ant, 
can be and are being preserved. 

Melton Constable Hall, described as 
the finest Grade I listed house in England 
not at present occupied, was offered for 
sale by Strutt & Parker in May with an 
asking price of more than £300,000. 

This Charles n house, built between 
1644 and J 670, had been empty for more 
than 20 years before the announcement 
earlier this month that h had been 
bought by a foreign investment company 
for refurbishment and development. No 
price was given. 

The new owners, through Melton 
Development Ltd, are represented by 
Roger Gawn, who, as chairman of 
Norwich Investments and Securities 
Ltd. is involved in a major redevelop- 
ment in Norwich city centre. He will be 
responsible for the Melton Constable 
scheme in design and implementation 
and will ultimately live there in one of 
the principal houses. 

The plan involved placing the main 
building into a trust so that the public 
can have access to it and its gardens. The 
remainder of the property will be 
converted into booses from the group of 
listed buildings, and there will eventually 
be 24 houses, excluding the mam haH 
Only a few will be available fix* sale. 

The Pickenham Hall estate, near 
Swaffham, has the Hall, built this 
century on earlier foundations, as the 
centre of a 3,500-acre estate, with 
grounds reputedly laid out by Humphrey 
Repton. What made it exceptional was 
that the estate included most of the 
nearby village of South Pickenham, and 
Knight Frank & d Rutley valued it at 
between £5 million and £10 million.— an 


imprecise figure reflecting uncertainty 
about how much it might fetch. 

Its new owner is a Bedfordshire man, 
Richard Daniels, who started in business 

whb a C £600 loan from his lathe? Now, 
aged 55. be is the chairman and 
managing director of Richard Daniels 
Homes. He has bought the whole thing, 
including the South Pickenham Estate 
Company, the mansion, the village, three 
farms and two miles of river, and 
although the price has not been disclosed 
it is believed to be around £7 million. 


‘Unique heritage 
of the estate’ 


The forthcoming sale by the Mote ton 
family, who had lived thane since 1925, 
raised fears that it would be broken up 
and redeveloped. Mr Daniels quickly 
made it clear that it would be preserved 
as it is how. 

He said: “Although the purchase has 
been in the name of one of the 
development companies in the group. 
Bonder Developments, there are no 
plans to do any thing other than preserve 


the unique heritage of the Pickenham 
Hall Estate.** 


It was thought that the estate might be 
difficult 4o seQ. Mr Daniels explained 
simply: “Pickenham Estate became 


available. We took a look at it and liked 
it We don't intend to alter anything 
apart from creating slightly more office 
space, if necessary. The present staff will 
retain their jobs because we win use the 
Hall as our headquarters where clients 
and staff can work and relax. ” 

Thus do great estates stay the same, 
and change. • 

cw 


Tel: 0733-45131 ~ 

NewHomesOfficaCongaa ftaertwough. 



HOUSEHUNTERS IN 
CORNWALL 


Home boa bog from mUn ana» n frnsuating and sometimes 
disappointing. From a cotuge to a mansion, or something in 
between. *e assess >our requuemnus. any out toe initial search 
and inspection of properties oo your behalf and save you tunc aod 
money. Contact; HOUSEHUNTERS IN CORNWALL Oak 
Meadows" Penan Downs. GokJsithocy. Penzance TO 9HG. 
Tct 10736} 711331 (day) (0736) 7l0ol9 (noting) 


ARKLEY, HERTS 

New detached chalet bungalow nearing completion 
situated in a prestige Road, offering 4 double 
bedrooms. 3 receptions, kitchen, utility. 3 bathrooms 
(2 en suite) shower room, spacious hallway, gas 
central heating, double gtaizmg throughout. Lap: 
detached double garage, gardens. 

01-888 7066 (7 days) 


NEW FOREST - NEAR THE SOLENT 


A Qua Bwoniil ttustinl country house set fl is own esnofexiy seduMd five 
acre poatfs nJ both imbcaoee canters ant iwctodo. The ptaeny nas dm 
very syngama&eaity motomsea teroughout crer re US two yeas to lam an 
atfsondmg family noma. Hafinay. (trmng room, Craig room, scafy. sun ream, 
pro toKflenrtraWaa mem. iffiry room, five bedr oo ms. bsctiuju iaanxr 
locre. M> ax s. Ml gro-find central Beano. «ensw garaang. ban) tenns 
cun. baud shmimib pool «en ri anono mom. bnCscaeed tame) 
and partner* Price. £385.000 Frwootrt. 

JACKSON & JACKSON 

The House on the (bay. Lynwaren. Hampssm. S041 SAY 
Telephone; {CBMI 7SE5 



CHARITON KINGS, CHELTENHAM 


A truly unique devel op me nt of magnificent architect 
designed 4 and 5 bedroomed detached residences in 
prime position at Chariton Kings on south eastern 
outskirts of Cheltenham. 


An exciting range of 6 house types offering very spacious 
family accommodation and luxuriously equipped 
throughout. All dweIVngs have two full bathrooms. 
GCH, double glazing, recreation room or study and 
large double garage. 

PRICES £140.000 to £157,000. 


Fu^tun^shadsho^homaandS^eaOttiat 
open 7 days a week at Chancel Patk,CttoiMiW6y, 
CkencesterM, Chariton Ktnga. Cheltenham. 

Contact SveDennfngton (02*2) 574296 or 
Ualvem (09849)90901(24 hr ansi 


BEAUTIFUL 18TH CENTURY 
COUNTRY COTTAGE. 


fmtnacubir throughout (Sugumber) Somerset. 4 bedrooms. 2 
bathrooms, rece pt ion room, dining room, lounge, lovely new 
lined kitchen and thatched roof. C 


uthouses. Super ganku. Stream. Views, steamnams phis 15 
acres of kind. £MS.D00r 


I Price to include entire contents. 
Would abo make ideal weekend retreat. 

0959 72060 or 01 855 94S3 


THE PERIOD PROPERTY REGISTER 

The Christmas gift that lasts all year. Hundreds of 
beautiful old and historic homes for sale throughout the 
country month after month in one book. Favour a 
friend with a subscription thk Christmas. 

Telephone our Christmas Gift Line for early despatch. 
The Historic Buildings Co 
P O Box 150, Ctaobham Gl)24 8JD 
09905 7983/6128 


YORKSHIRE 


from 

£2,500 Anyone ftrtercMed tn 
becoming a Joint owner of ttx? 
freehold of a deUghUuuy 
modernised daks cottage In a 
beautiful pusumn rmp CSX 
244106 after 6 pm weekdays. 


Norwood 
House Farm. Kdumarsti mi 2 
mis. London 2 tiro. IS acres 
grass plus 4 beds. 2 baths, a 
recep*. Landscaped garden. 
Loirtv views. Extensive out- 
buDdfiWs Ram payable £000. 
Opposite 7 BO sore country 
park, ideal nones. Endtrenng. 
Hence £ 160.000 tar otnek -sir. 
Ring 0742 486501 NOwl 


PROPERTY WANTED 


properties In Central London re- 
quired for renovation Ol 236 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


MONMOUTHSHIRE 


Supeit) l/f 5 bad 
CaUfbmun styto home, set 

m v, aoe ol twraced gtos 
with siperb views of 


surrounding vaSoys- AvaQ 
1 yr min let 


Jan for 
Paddington i hr 30 mins. 
M4 5 mtns. Usual ref reqd. 

Tet 86333 60349 


SUFFOLK NORFOLK 
BORDER 


SpifncSd ttwcftsd Mage taispwty. 
Good access id matortaMs 3/4 
bemoans. 2 MVmrtK. 3 
recepoona. hay Mted Wrtm. 
rtouato gaiaQe, GCH OardMier. 
Raws nctudad Newly Oecorwed. 
Partner hmtsfled. 
nJBflpn 

Tek 0379-75684 


WHY PAY MIME? BOA. off. Dtv 
creet 1st class Proo. Mgi. 
Dn/ofl shore: IntelL comptcle 
sevtre. 7 days 01-2S&438O. 


OVERSEAS PROPERTIES 


1 


AS FEATURED ON TVl! 


Don't take risks. We an the 


agency oa the Costa Blanca with a first daw 


r eput ation, as featured on TV Bee. Vfllaaand apa rt m e nt * Mmwira, Jwm anH fMpe m 


unspoQt area. 


with emrylata spemrty 


Impectioo ffighis or we meet you at your holiday hoteL 


Brodmm or video from the leaders: 


/ 


. COSTA BLANCA VILLAS 

[Dapf RM) 13-17 Newbury Street 
Wantage Oxon 0X12 8BU 
TeL 02357 65305 {24 hours) 

Telex. 837071 CBVROK G 


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VHS of BETA 

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send £10 deposit 

refundable on return 


SPAIN 


AWWFROM 
OUR HEATHER 

WUR BUSINESS 
A THE j 
PRESSURE 



COSTA DEL SOL SPECIALISTS 


Use our years of experience to guide you. 
Complete choice of villas, town houses, 
apartments. Weekly four-day inspection 
trips £75 per person in January. 


Ref ST 


HANTS. DORSET. 
I.O.W. 


a 


FOR SAIE... 

I For a choice o) (me candy homes 
wan suHrp and paddocks horn 
£120.000. 

TO LET 

[ Gonage with Ian). outhuklBigs and 
suong £3^00 per anun. 

SEAWARDS 

1 64 Othm Bd- SoaBsaa. Kata. 

(0705) 816644 


HEW FOREST - Beaulieu. Coun- 
try conaqe on Do J* L “ r 
surrounded W Ireeo. One min 

ul*-. walk from Beaulieu River 
J bedrnts. dblc garage, private 
veOudcd gdn of '• am 
£.165.000 Tct. 0690 612247 


MR AUtesmm. cnarmlnp lath 
century cuUflPC In WTWU viuw. 
5 Beds. bain. oU CH. parape- 
urirden. access London 

S™£KO. Tel 096273 2106 


CHARMOUTM Dorset. Spadote 
del oansalow. Level walk sea & 
Shoos 2 double ien suliei beds. 
3 rcccas. 2 car oaraor. GM CH 
£99.500. Tel 0097 60244. 


BOUHHEMOUTH Meyrtck Par*. 
Home and tncorne or imposing 
family residence in 1/3 acre 
£160.000 TEL O2O0 29O3M 


mr OF WHEHT Properly Com- 
nleie covera ge contact 
CREASEV & JEFFERY Of N^ w ' 
SrT^rourWt .0983. 625241 


SOUTHAMFTWfc 

del hse. 4 dblc beds. 3 baths. 4 
recs. msKle pool/sauna/oramiy 
c^eaoc^ .0703. 709443 


OM Stone cottage. 2 

beds. Lor gdn Oullrses. Olios 
on £65.000 Repty to BOX B70. 


HEREFOW»ra^. 

WORCS. & SHROP 


loolow 

4 miles. 

A spacious CH. Architect 
designed 4, bed house, 
standinq in lan^ gardens, 
with 2 rec. rooms, shower 
room, bathroom. *®l' 
appoked breaX/tal ubiitn. 
cloakroom & Double prage, 
set m an area of outsferwmg 
beauty. PBIC& £75.000. 

To \Ttesr: 

Agents 0584 5207. 


Sapid Bfareesteislifre 

PewlsewHlMM 2J# 






Contort 

Btgall Castle 4 

K.Sykes (05W) 2W246. 


HEREFORDSHIRE - 


0ccmW9^.f*^J n .V 


aablind wm 

fl35.00C D* 1 ** 5 lom 

STOOKE H:LL 

Et3le Aoerts. 

Heielcrd a nd Blanches - 

0432 - 267511- 


HERTFORDSHDRE 


TUDOR COACHING UM 

Superior spoOous Oku house. 

MartySe. Listed Grade B and 


resorted by Row! Comra tetai on 
WSTOWCflL 


L arge 

17th C. mi reception rooms ■# 
ns and Jacntaan Mfl 


V pwo w— l. i nyiK u g Mini 

vraodbunrs. nrocaa beams. Fou- 


reap, (our good beds. tm> bafts. 

Hmd-crsted mod tatchOL 


aid sbyroom. Fu* 

wagr* 1 double g ram C wstwrt 
and ireau h am garden. Easting 
perrmaon for resouan. Otters on 
Msnnm 

Tet 0582 841212 


ST ALBANS 

2D mtns Cert London, 5 
nuns M25/M1. 17th cant 
nr cott in conservation 
area o'looMng river and 
perk. TWO dtoteoods- Bath. 
FuUy fit Idt/abwr. Beamed 


hving room with open 
fir^iteca. Gdn. F/H. 
85.000. Tet (0727)6314 


£85,000. Tet (0727)63149 

-(w/end.eveL 


KENT 


] 


LUXURY FLATS BY THE SEA 

BHDAPST ABS KEN T 

A fcnavy ihw 1 fhi deaef otwicrtt mb 

2 4 3 betVoomspteagHitopiEo- 
an win large tetcw ws. W t. My 
hoed tatchew »d c a p ^ . gas 
heatng and 

Prom £62*500 
Can <fc27) 770551 berwcn Bi wrt 
5j0 lor a eotourbrochure. and to 
anaws an aptwntment io vae otr 
tivtncncd slew N«L 

rembiE Wartw House 
DtNNfc CaJitsrtury 


LOOSE 

Loose VSley. Supertfy ccriygad 
c.17th Ra^one 
tfth iftameter wtw 
wf»ei. trad pondand^aanT. 

Generous tgruly 

ol 6/7 hedrtns. ifiwa m m o- 

1/2 batftms. 

Oreaidasl room. Gas CH. Doutte 




m 673871 


t u h er dBI New Urge tusunr 

lounge. Mh,» 


fined MUiwn- uulliy store. 
rS^no Tel 0303-6^1 


MIDDLESEX 


EAOTCOTEPARK 

PINNER 

$mal) dwfaOTtenl rf new 

in exetoive cul-de-sac. 4 
Mrooos. 2 balhroomNC^. 
Study. 2 IWSpUMS. fully-fiHrf 
bSten. briefest mm and 

utility. Double wvbb gaia^. 

Only 2 rmalnine- 

e I75,0#0 frecfcwlil 

ShoirihHtae open t° r 
SuTtdaj- ncicmfi. 

Other times fry appointment. 

B^. HALL. 

Ruislip (0895) 674111 



HERTFORDSHIRE 


HirTmfHff uflM,r HAHBOW**- 

“ISilrlwd J ncdrwiWra. 

mrten. 6 mins 

Sjssm w * 

33 after 1C 1 00 am 


ELSTWtH Prom ""jJgfgS 

cmintn- ' ^rr ” acre. 

London, i? "l^^wiiii loft. 

outauUdinvi. rm. 


north west 


—yfi ifStBr itsmmsi. 

IfcHJ TH ** f M] del bouse 


fully '□Sle'fiarape, 


OS3AT50 


in 1 ■ eere -inmlHifv 


NORTHWEST 


ISLE OF MAN 



Sarveyest Exlalei 

6624-23488 


Favoured vfBaoe 


4 mm Chester. 


spadous. sonny 192CTs home. 
Green Belt- Over 1 ar~ 
M fd e n/ orchail. Lai 

Uvtng/dtntap. sfurty/sUtlng. 4 
iw l s^e beds. 2 hamrms. 
m/b m£. c M»- Part dm atognp 
Matas. dM parage- Good 
M way /airport conneetoa 

£10&dOO- TeL 0244 8S1230 


OXFORDSHIRE 


SOOTH OXON - 


Charming detached 
satin quarter acre In 
of beautiful sought alter 
down land village. 3 bed. 
dWng haU, lounge, bathroom 
and wtEhen. M4 10 triies. 
Oxford 14 miles. Didcot 
mainline station 4 miles. 

Offers El 
Tet 0235 


BONUU0 YttiABE OrfwdshtE. A 

orar5«ii penod ftouusa « ftatt rere 

Mth lock shop. 3 taR 

3/4 Bats. Was n reoon E1S.CB0, 
BUCKUWO. 9XF0RDSHUE 
Lranuriy aroototed stoca cottge 
min 3 Beds . 2 Baths, large Gwtao 8 
Qb careai HIB. ones OB £107500. 


BBC KELL & BALLARD, 
WANTAGE 

02357 3611 


rimed Cotsweid 
house, porgrous news, spacious 
acromodabon tnc 5 beds. Vi of 
acre, more land available. 
£127.300. Tel- 0608 41010 


Tworui Oxford- 
shire Cotswohis DeUghUuHs' 
situated stone buflt 4 bedroom. 
3 reception. 2 bath room image 
bungalow In attractive setOng. 
£157.000. Coilicrs. Bmwood A 
BcwlBV 0789 290444 


SCOTLAND 


BANCHORY BEESffiE - 

cottage (and fishrig). Comfortable 
■ell appointed collage. 2 
Bedrooms both en suite 
bathrooms, lounge wth tang 
area and kitchen, cloakroom, 
drying area, tn idylfic I Nation mSi 

bte tide at game feting on both 
banks ol Ihe Hva Feugh. For 
[other partcuras contact; 0224 
882133 - 8J0 an to 5,00 pm 


SCOTLAND 


RBSESS, WYRE 
ORKNEY 


Fuiyjquwed Ohrui pretota 
modernised 


urfi. 60 kjb beef turn, 

3 lad tantOAe (d.g. chi. cottage, 
otttedtfings (te. ,™* Ota on 
gggte aal ataa d. «reh is oal 
sbwcss (seme hnm Btan 
Uanri). 


nM «0Sfi} 3151 


LUXURY 

APABTMEVTS FBH SALE 


Supeiti 2 ana 3 apaRnm 
nomes prortoowig the remain 
Linso Urio QoB Cana. 
Flees start at E34JX9 


Tet K33 320852 
for details. 


TMEMVAirnBEOFTttS 

UNHHJE OPPORTUUTY TO 

Ota ft StaU. PJWT OF 

SCOTUUffl M BEAHIffUL 

BOYM.DBESOE 

Bur )«Biaad row tortus <d tide 
your nmc (fre. tea9 bam OtUXB 
itas»wf«row®,Mi« 
fur yror nrororoa. OtOk tare 
BTO1MRO 

OartroiHouas. Muter. 
Abtnfranabbe AB358F. 

Tdj 033855658 


| SOMERSET & AVON | 



City Of Bath 

M4(J.tS) 9 imes. London 
(Paddington) 1 boro 10 mteutes 

of very bnagjraltve deafen 
Qtact access to Sydney tofiera 
LarE receptkm eras, ttefier, 
gaeried detlioora. further 
bedroom with en sun 
bathroom, show 

Ptr\®B parkiw 
(Bfers for the frrahokl « the 
recan oi £96,000 

Joint Agents: Prftftard ft 
Partners. Bath, leL. (0225) 66225 
Knight Fra* 3 RuUey. 
CaeacestEf, teL (0285) K771 
(CRC/13S6) 


EXCEPTIONAL 

COnAGE 

in conservation vtBage. Meat 
rgHrement. 2 hix doufate bed 
BiiimS pfciyi ooif- 
Oonvenient M5. Bristol 14 
mteB. London 2 hows. 
53500 

TetflCTZ) 875117 

HUTCH. Individual iMatecl 

btawfllmj'. * beds. 

tdtciiRi/breauaa room, 

toungr. dlnlna room, train, ga- 
rage. CH. boauUful garden 
extending <*> acre, targe parking 
area. £86.000 OS72 501409. 

POUMMSFOm, Histone bse. Lae 
lounge, tux ML 4 beds. balh. 
Gge. Orchard. Superb value M 
£16O.O0a I0B25) 42263 

| SUfiflEY | 


rare OPPORTUNITY 

to {unease Ariatoed bte Vksatan 
tmtf house n pqaeobe nsai 

MZ5. ZD ran bating. 4 good 
seed bafraoms, 25 it ksage Mth 

Hik itee asped md shipped pine 
Itaa. dnoig rm, bftasl rm, li/kl 
Wfiroom, More. snri. cedar, Jge 
(BfOBi lam. beauSM bffefr pac. 

DM *ole wtSwa M3O0D0 

Rfeig 6883 MZ798 


SUSSEX 


5COTUND SW Detached ^eriud- 
<4 nouse- 5 jeres. stables, barn, 
riser 3 racep. snidy. 4 bed. CM 
Apa. Freehold. Often in region 
Of £4fijQOO. Tel. OS4S2 334 


CAMKLEY MamUflceni mat- 
sureoib' d ragned Oorsian 
house in St son Parting onto 
- go« course south (sting- 4 bnfe. 
4 recpL gaBaried tamcUng. 
£215.000 Tel: 0276683967 


BUNOALjOW. LOWER Sixibory 
Scmghi «*«■ tocaUon. maiy/ 
in pair annexe, swtmnung pool. 
rtbuPht parage. £200.000 Free- 
hold TM! 0932 229225 


MOTERLEY 6 yr on use. 6 OMS 
»rer 3 bath, ttU.utflna.dWo 
garage rtmH shwr room lam 
PM £178.000. 0276 219*3 


MDDLETON-ON-SEA 

SUPERB MARINE 
RESIDENCE 

■Si A«iJ tonsdOT frortvKQi 
omk mm am. 6 bstt. 3 

Paabrobaia £225000 
fttaro Wr derate. 
Ntofn&Dfamn 
fttailrin. IHriritete ■ weUs 

Tet (024369) 3748. 


18V4 ACRES 

bi staeti n«* pedfloo with 
agrradtiiral piarmnig for 4/5 
bedim f aim house. 

All services insitu ndutfing 
dygestn* tank. 

For father details 
Stapfecross 671 


BISBOPSTORE 

FORCE 

Eaiy t9k C. SBssn coEt gnpoty 
wrarablriy omerfcd hon 2 a*- 
»i aa aoiste rad ribgt 3 

Ws. St S® Bring. ttStfi 
Cqo*c. Steratf ■ pratt mart 
tana to Scsa-Dan khfle 
write rial Or nwa- 

pari lane. 08500 no ottn. 
(0273) 26833. 


VESTCATE OM SEA 

LargB Edwanflan end larreco. 15 
nrins wadi from ana. 5 bedrooms 
(4 double), bathroom, larae 
rotate ame. tarn lounge with 
French windows ft 2 open fires, 
dnteg room, flttad kltdwn. an 
(XR. SO* garden A patio, m 
atm. Soma anginal features. 
haUhrDorer. 

Foss B&B. E49JM0 

684333483 

■teMHTOM Satalean. dm - Use 
o/iookmg park. sea. * be*, 
lounge Anno-. 2 roes. CH. fitted 
Idl. £145^00 F/H. 0273 3BS07 

CENTRAL enSHTON rastiton- 
atrie area. Prosy vtaoctan 
rofiage. CH Two double beds. 

New kuefien. Sun roof Waned 

garden. Price: £64.960. Tot 

NOrthvMOd. MUM* 26966. 

SOUTH West Smw. Four bed 
detached boose, outer dose. 2 
receptions, cavity wall tosuia- 
IIoiil pan douste glased, ctese to 
Three Bridges SUIton. £89.960 
034Z 714949 omcr. 0293 
883072 home. 

BEAUTIFUL sra view and 2 mins 
walk from lews centre. Luxuri- 
ous Jaroe 1 bedroom fbi. 
£56 ^X). Tel. Boroor 862862. 

WALES | 

ABEBFOBTH. DUVID. Terraced 
Stone Hois*. 4 beds. 3 recaps. 
wcSm. treenimiM. garage. 
C38 000. Tet: 0239 81 1146. 

NMrra WALES. Uotnur Ltfeooai 
house, huge toonge. 4 Brooms. 
Oroom. ni Known, study. Lhu. 
Ale garage. 04. Dtte gtazed.' 
Beach frwuape. 2000 sq n over- 
aU. Ottere around £70.000. 
TEL. 0492 617312. 

WILTSHIRE E 

OHiSHTniL Georgian Cottage, 
very peaceful eatttloa in centre 
of Bradford on Avon, tadefully 
renovated. 2 D/brdrootns. Uv- 
mg roam, opqi flrepuce. 
hDdien / ffluiug room, broom + 
wc. PM, wun newer border 
£49300 Ttd 02216 3382/2794 




Bay with toafidencs 
Se8 vritfaout tears 


Overseas Property Bratera 
O.P.B. LtiL 

Could save you £1JX)0's 
when buying or selfing 
Overseas Property. 


0P.B. UL, 


■Pens 

■HF10 8B& 
35452 • Telex 837225. 


MONTMARTRE 
PARIS 18 - RESIDENTIAL 
EXCEPTIONAL 

‘ART DECO’ PRIVATE MANSION 

pbs staptwe's Studio, appnsomatety 500 sq.m. Bring ; 
patio-garden, many terraces. 

HOT OVERIOOKH5 

MADJMMO TeL' 010 33 (1) 42 60 30 39 


COSTA DEL AZAHAR 


(Mr 

ftoa Pcatoi 


kfleadnSn 


flareretw— fci— ywn. 


l past 4 rotor conr car partrog. 


3 dartk Monro «a tad mtaatta. 2 Uv DM S tud baDacorM. lam huge 
nntang twfi. fefly had i tad Mcfcn wtt ea aw ro&y rasn 


ffl fflcro 


aw m warn ■ t wror 

ASETlIRPTOPSrnES 

arrow id Oartay Hone. Sai MpmdLK^taHBro-Tlares. Sroey im SQL 


CANARY ISLANDS 


“1 CAN PERSONALTY 
RECOMMEND EL BOTANCO” 
BECAUSE I HAUE MATE IT 
MY PERMANENT ’HOME 


Ta fey feowatd. Cbaraaa of rte 
{jnpwhidiaHad iteun&ldntanai 
cfapjnoMC to Tfcnenfe." 
ftrafaehcrtare-'MiRJrt.accterai 
051-2369306 

[ ^ pfh p lfl ffcwti F T? fm 

FtcrtdUfiDO £44X00 


M ALMfl fcW rar Town property 
Lar flB3b cd matwnetre. we« fit- 
l«J WWvsi. Am loin^Q, pauo. 
wkroroo. uaieib views. 
£67^00. David Butler Estate 
Agents 06662 4S70 . 


200 yr oU VtUagr cottage im- 
maculate Thrt# b«Jrc<rfna One 


hour from London. &4&500 
i fwfcdayveveL 


Tet. 06662 4609 1 


ItHUBFE SOUTH. The best de- 

velopment on San Mtgnrt calf 
Course overlooldno sea. or su- 

perb prapertlM by Kurt Konrad, 
adjacent to new Marina, nr Lao 

Americas. Tel Gran So) Proper* 

Ueo H37721 23597 (24 tn> 

ABOPA member Free brochure 


Los 


Chmuanos oso San Mlguri potr 
rouno. Apartments a villas. 
New/ resale Inspection nighb. 
0609 616022 .fTI 


BEAUTIFUL ALPS 
- MARITIMES 

Hill top village; Upper 
rasoneSe. 25 


3 beds, lounge. Wahan - dm. 
m. shoner 


bathroom, shoner room en 
suite, balcony, cratm with 
m ag nT rent wens Gorge- Du - 
Loro. Offers ESdOODneg. Tet: 
01 455 5564 evenings. 


WANTED 


Families or persons 
prepared to Invest £3000- 
£6000 to purchase new 
property in country 

coastal area of France 
near Sables de D’Ollonne. 
Joint ownership basis. 

Tel: 05086 4685 


; SOUTH Justllnbbed 2 
bed villa Qutei comer. Quirk 
tale. £26.000 Td. 0268 
761 728. 


Los CrtsUanos. ! bM 

iHrtnml Meal porouon F/F 
Qtdck sate. £32X00. Tel. 0268 
7SI728. 


CYPRUS 


CYFHUS Property- Feri cheated 7 
Contact us now CLP. P. Assoc. 
46 Pnaar House. London W10 
6W> 


FRANCE 


OVERLOOKS 
DOWNHILL COURSE 
VAL D’ISERE 

New Stucho eparengnt 


sleeps * 4 futy fieod. 
'itoiet, Ja 


pvaHabte to let, January & 

February. 

Further detaSs avaiatfle, 

W t o pfiPn o' 

01 499 899» or 01 7M 8528. 


FABM m South or France. Omc 
to Montpetoer 7 acres approx. 
Small no use. trout Ihhlng. wine 
sowing area- FreehcM off era 
0 1.500 Tri: Cwmbran 

106335 1 69989 after 6 pm 


DOtPT rmL ouy Large house, 
hill lop village in Languedoc, 
winter skl-tng 3/4 hr. Med 1 hr. 
£13.000 Tri 0304 614470. 
Details on requesi. 


BUYERS M FftAMCC wide se- 
lection of residences, villas etc. 
Free catalogue «n rewest, ov. 
Marenand do Blem. BP 78. 
33027 Bordeaux Oedeac. Franco 


FRMICC - All regions callages 
chateaux from tiaooo Fi- 
nance available. Brochure. 
VUkHri ltd 01-485 2733. 


GENERAL 


ISLAND 
PROPERTIES 
(Canrias ft Bilewta 


saea wiol tro m Ine proparoe s . 
TBSFBFE ftOfn £l2j00 


KStORa Iron E24.000 
UKABOTE iron £29500 
Froxs Irani (JK or Sparesh Barts 
zi ^gh/y competUHe rates, 
arrange! 


tombsat. 

30-33 SnStSkeet, 

CUcbesfer. 


0243 779730 


OVERSEAS HOUSEHOLD insur- 
ance arranged a) Lloyd's 
Eng** wonted policy nwim 
^ “ a ^3 n 9- Abo Motor !n- 
rewtwed 

wrtth Annual Qraeo 
Card Tel: ioea6» 7Q7B7 


VILLAQUEST 


A large selection of 
vilas and apartments, 
Costa del Sol, 
Majorca, Tenerife. 
New and resales from 
£15,000 bargains to 
super luxury. 
Inspection flights 
arranged. 


-lo V cj r cv- : 

u-iipc-i : t Spanish 
H.cicav.'oy 


win 


on Scams Costa B ; once 


01-842 0063 


ANDORRA 


A complete range of top (tarty 
homes throughout this poprtar 
twQ-seison tax haven. 
Apartments from tlB.IOB. 
Chalets from UB.flBt to 
<?ai. pw 

Winter skteq and sunana sun. 
Ik itwatahlrt 

Contact; Gestandor UK Ud. 25 
Vetera St London SW1 OBJ. 

Bt-222 3183 (24 hts) 
Special wnttf inspectlai risfe 
ataabte raw! (Extra Special. 
Jan. 10th). Sate Agnate l*r 
- ' ‘ (Andorra). 


PROMOVALL S.L. 


ANDORRA & SPAIN 

Buy direct from the 
txJkter/devetapBT 

LUXURY APARTMENTS 
A VILLAS 
FROM£2tMM» 
Moc^jages avaflabte. Also 
management 

Arantiri service. 

For full detate write: 
12a Furze Lane, Parley, 
Surrey CR2 3E& 
or Teb 01-668 8543. 


ITALY 


ITALY 

TUSCANY 

FOR SALE. LOTOly tanhousM. 
offisge houses, bams, many nflh 
and. Hr usb. ncxeno,. an eoam 


tor occupation. 

BAIBBtiW TO 
London RomL OM SratfonL 
Bocks MK19 6AE. 

TeL (0908) 567787 


PORTUGAL 


PORTUGUESE 

FARMHOUSES 

tram £15.000. Brttish archied are) 
builders offer beautiful rural 
propenias Private design 
commission also undertaken in 
Orotta do Larnu and the Portuguese 

aunty ode. Offices B London are) 

Algarve Contact Mr Uidtari 
Brown Tefaptana 01 22] 2885 
(office naas). 


ALGARVE 


Bidding Pktls. near Faro 
tor sale, quality vfltes 
coostnicted, infection 
holidays and finance 
aitmtged. Havifand 
Ovwseas Property Sales. 
01-891 2461 (office nous) 
01-891 6530 (ansafone). 


&qey the barer doate m repemr 
[tovetopnms ol Via and Aparaaoib. 

SrtssnM *( sea and mmnj.or on 
ftheraouman dopes; EacrilMt arronhles, 
friestquta ojhuiwusi and vivkb. 

Sent tor the oburbadm. 

CHS Mu 

■bnMmCgidiHoM 
SroWWd 


— ■ r — VK ib y gam Bara 
aMfcnegMnrawnr 



COSTA DEL SOL 
MUAS 

vffla in 


IndhriduaHy 
Bxdustve 
nestling at the 
Terraces south-facing with 
magnificent news down the 
n ro unl a i n slde to the see- 2 
bedrms, 2 bethrais. etc. 
Surinanng pool, tennis 
courts, and golf couraa 
neartiy- 


Apdroxntatoiy ES2.000- 
nrtiar pare 


panctrtar5: 

031-229 8418 


TORRIEVEJA AREA 


Costa Blanca, Spain. Villas, 
apartments, chalets for sate 
from £10,000 to £60,000. 
We represent orrty buSdeis 
of good repute. 

Free advice. 
Costevtfle Ltd, CoBege 
Farm, PuHosMi, Bedford. 
Tet (0525) 716123. 


EUROPEAN 

PROPERTIES 

Vilas ft a n art m e wa bi Costa Del 
ScL Costa Bianca ft Portugal. 
PRICES FROM E124O0 
TO E20Q400 

Subsidised inspection flights 
and finances arranged. 

TEL tri-604 2178 

526 CNgmB Road, 
Woodford Britan “ 


,/ HARBCLLA Re- 

Bales. e nmMerabte nvlan Sole 

Agmh for luxury villa davelee- 

racM & Spanish male agency. 

Fuenotrota: Co ownershln 

schemes. Tel: 01^46 2481 m 


COM4 del Sol. property buyers. 
Ring 01-930 0901 


- juu north of All- 
cante. fully furnished 2 
bedroomea aparimern over- 
HTOkliro Mcdtlerranean. 

£17.000. Tel: 0732 457236. 


■WWS Beautifully portioned new 
2/3 bed aoL 1V> miles from 
beach. tSmaU seiecl community 
with all faculties. £40^X30 Tct 
0204 696660 lews) 


COSTA BRAVA. Tessa de Mar 
Luaay static homes, (utty lur- 
ntshed. to sleep 4 to 8 persons. 
H/C water. WC. shower, ft 
kit cnen. MagnlOceni sUc. Large 
swimming pool, bar, restauraru 
* strop. Prices from £3,960 
Guaranteed lenurg contract 
upto £ 1.000 per year available. 
Phone for iree cowiar bradiure. 
021366 1333 (24 hrs) 


COETA DEL 30L/LOS 
BOUCMES immaculate - as 
mw opartmnu. tounge/dtning 
room with terrace. 3 bedrooms, 
flued Mlchen. 1 * bathrooms, 
venr close to suUonAhops. 
£52400. Tel. 02656 4516. 


COSTA 

BLANCA 


BENIA, JAVEA, MQRA1RA 
ft OLIVA 

We hare the widest portfota of 
heetnU properties on the Costa 
Blanca, all backed by our No Risk 
Free Legal Protection Schema. Buy 
yutr bmd aid M us dangn and 
tuUd your vtHa. Land twees from 
£4.500. detached vrttas from 
£20,000. It you want a ready butt 
property seta front our portfolio 
at Rncas. Vidas. & Apartments. 
Far delta write or phono: 

SABLQ 

INTBItiATlONAL LTD, 

8 Argyll Mare. 
Srgjf SL 
■fry CV2 4R. 

mm *m 

, Horn Cob (rites 

ttHBS) 52841/62425. 



LA 

MANGA 

CLUB 


Deluxe Apartments and 
Got! Bungalows 
For sale 


£50,000 to 
£105,000 


immediate possession 
For information calt 
Michael Cookson 
at Madrid Tet 2796467 
or write to: 

Apartado 998 - Madrid. 


COSTA BLANCA 


at La Manga & ’ 
(TofrturiBjo) «t rusortebiu 
pnees- 

01-398 5710 
Oam^piq) 



lARRY 

(Piomononel Lid 


COSTA DEL SOL 


Malaga io Estepona. We can 
offer wide rare of new 
properties near beach 
End £23.000 


.... Of in 
£250.000. 
Regular inspection flights. 
Far hadwn tdephur 
■1-551 6825. 

Cast Eqm Ltri. 


Crocwrie H*e, 43a Hfek Sl 
ririe. Uni Ehk. 


BxtWfsirie. I 


SWITZERLAND 



Lake Geneva 
ft Mountain reaorta 

WtMaNrofimenMHira 


hub. us — nan, am 
m mu mto ml w 

anua-ite«toinirtibMro 

RBVACSJL 

— — 

Kuzmea-feBtaa 


HOKiaeux. Luxury apartment 
mrriookUM lake. 13m SFR. 
Osbornes SbUdrora. 93 Par*- 
way. London nwi Tel: 01-485 
8811 


SKI RESORTS. Apartments and 
chalets tn VHIars and Haute 
Nendaz. Osbornes SaUcUorv 93 
Parkway. Luodon NWI T«. 
01-486 8811 


fUMESHAKE OVTRSEAi 


WANT TO SELL 

YOUR TIME SHARE? 
BUT CANT 

The HDjidty Hone Heestosefl 

itifrtasin naeun (MIL MARKET 
roVOUR BEHALF IP compan#E« 

ntflntal dienb. 

Cad MR 7130 mhtkmts 
0M88 W12 office hw« 
H0UOAY HOME AES5TSI 
B7/B8 BOM) ST, LONDON W.L 


TIME SHARE for sole. Crowes. 
Weeks 14 & 16. often Easier 
Oilers own- £4,000 considered. 
Ring Mr Martin 0298 3152 
TENERIFE STB. LUX UWC^nt 
bungalows 2 Wlis fn n Jt - 795 - 
Brochure 021 746 9808- 


TO PLACE YOUR 
PROPERTY ADVERTISEMENT 

THE TIMES 

TEL: 
01-481 


IN 


TRADE 

ADVERTISERS 


1986 


ADVERTISING 
FAX NO. 

TELEX 


01-481 9313 
925088 


PRIVATE 

ADVERTISERS 


TEL- 
01 -481 


4000 


i 


raw*-*- 1 




TfTF TTMRS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


RENTALS 


CHESTERTONS 

^ — PRUDENTIAL ^ 


offering that personal &- -professional service 



Quraishi Constantine 


S8EAT JAMB ST, MCI 
£148 M- 

Immaadatt one Wdreom flat 
ideal tar a professional poison 
requiring a central location. 
Hjtto PM Office: 01-282 S« 


HTZJAMES AVENUE W14 

Rare opportunity to Dw In mts sought 
attar mansion nock. Easy access to 
High St. Kensington and West End. 3 
bedrooms, douoto reception ideal ant- 


CLAREH80N ROAD W11 


CHELSEA CLQI5TBB SW3 


decorated bright ami spacious 
so Hoaand Park tube. 2 be- 


artaMng. dkitng room, spa bathroom, 
shower room, ft knchan. parking, por- 
terage. Long company let 
E275 pw 
PIMLICO SW1 


fiat dose Hoaand Park tube. 2 be- 
drooms. ba t hroom with shower, double 
reception, dating area, ft Mtchen. Com- 
pany lev 

£280 pw 


Businessman's paradise In S. Kensing- 
ton- Bmeptlonal 1 bed apartment In 
this exclusive complex. hmacutetaly 
f ur ni she d, ensulte bath. Mly ap- 


P8O0ABS, E14 
EISA p-w- 

Spacious famrfy house 
lumtehed to the hi^iest 
standard- 3 beds. 2 recaps. 
I garden. 

Pw**-* Office: 01-538 4821 


EATON AYEUE.XV3 
£675 p-H. 

Superb tumstaus ap ar t me n t 
furnished to ttto highast 
specification- < bods, 3 baths, 
reception. 0 kitch en, ige gtto- 
UBto Ucsica Office BT-ZM 4832 


BK80PS HUSKS, 5WS 

£250 (Mi. 

Overlooking bc-ang gm + 
tarns courts o» Bshtsss Rartc. 
5 ones wa» Iron Picney 
Bridge 0*8. 2 case beds, rec, 
toattBd tat bath. 

Mas natr si-731 3111 


HHELBMK vbiabe, 
SSI 9 

£150 p-w. 

Bat in beautiful 
datashed house bnida 
Wistbtadan csnunen. 2 Beds, 2 
recaps, tat. bath, co let. 
W lmM c dn a Office 01-MS 9W 


pOsnced kitchen. 24 hrs p orter age, 
maid service, cable and sat TV. worid- 
vride c o fraim toa t i on. Co let 


Very attractive and specious maiso- 
nette on three floors. weO decorated. 3 
bedrooms. 2 bathrooms (1 ensurta) 
large reception, ff kitchen with ma- 
chines. Long company let. 

£200 pw 


BR0MPT0N PARK SW6 
Rural iranquiBty in Fufliam. Brand new 
fist In this desirable development. 2 be- 
drooms. 2 bathrooms {t ensutof recep- 
tion. ItJy equipped American kitchen, 
landscaped gardens, sauna, swimming 
pool and gym. Long co let 


HANOVER TERRACE NW1 


C8WTE&0 SARD9IS, SW7 
£350 p-W- 

Charming 2 bed flat with 
country style Tut/breaK' room, 
reception o'looking g arden s. 2 
b a ths, communal gdna 8 
private roof terrace. Must be 


GBTOIfE SffiHT, SM3 
£350 p.*. 

Contfortabto family house In 
uniquB comer of old Chaises. 
Double rae, If Wt 4 beds. P 
tale), 2 baths, petto. 

Gftrtwi Office 01-589 5211 


RQUJUD PARK, Mil 
£900 p.w. 

Exceptional perio d house 
refwotsfted to the highest 
s t an dar d. 4 recaps. 6 beds. 3 
baths + shwra. tat paao. 
XsBsg n Office 01-221 3500 


2 bed rriews cottage in the 


jm« Park, surrounded by 
ms. Reception whh on- 
i. ff kitchen, bath, parking, 

£2S0 pw 


Office 01-937 7244 


HESlfORD SHEET, Ml 
£350 p-V. 

Attractive newly hanotied Oat 
In bustling Shepherds Market. 
2 beds. 2 baths, double 
reception. 

Haytofa Office B1-629 4513 


CUYBTOI 5IBST, SW1 
£250 PM. 

Lovely 3 bedroom tr-aSsoneas 
with river views. AS newly 
furnished 8 deccratea. 
Exnatem kdchen. Reascnabta 
rent as ware to let qutttay. 
PtatOCO Office 81434 9SB8 


OPENING 

SOON 

IN 

BATTERSEA 



KING and LOCKWOOD 


Bamefl. Nassau Bead -«cccrt=J =oaoi*i *msix 

“o EOE-.I ui Krtl ci . ! . .. ^ acam 2 i w.j 

'wugc - aec. -v®Jv v L'— J? 

srtiAC. i«n Its ^«.-^Uedi £S5C 21 pAnsai 

=3f«w amtrvr ag.zt-i- K cu» 

1 e= sc*. l*V C«*’ • e "'*^ E4S9B0 

<c . e (rental 

TedcBogtort. ThamesiM U7t a gmamg m ad 

Cn .-w nvr ■* j b*j= *** nrarS»=3* 

\cr? Co L*<‘ CI75.K 

<***«* 

nacre*. aratfatt room. G mW 

*lsng In ... - «vn am 


2 Barnes High Swd.W*l* SW M ** 
01-878 7886 — 


A subs&ary of *uden*sd P r op erty Services isi ' 


WARWICK HOAD SW5 


PLOUGHMAN'S CLOSE NW1 


CATHCAHT ROAD SW10 


‘Jv> 


athini Graham 


Fabulous 1st floor conversion, newly 
decorated and furnished throughout, 
near Earls Court tuba. 2 bedrooms, 
large open plan reception, bath, ff kit- 
chen with machines. Company let. 


□eighth* 2 bed new town house In a 


quot secluded mews overlooking Re- 
gents Canal with easy access to West 
End and Ctty. Large reception, ff kit- 
chen, bat h- wttt i shower, car pan, 
pstio/gdn. Company let. 

£175 


Charming studio, designed and deco- 
rated with mat imagination. The per- 


med with ^aat imagination. The per- 
fect bachelor apartment in qffiet tree- 
fined street, near many good restau- 
rants. 


£175 pw 


270 Earls Court Rd, SW5. 01-244 7353 


AREAS AlSG AVAILABLE 




RESIDENTIAL 


01 631 5313 


MASKELLS 

ESTATE ACtWIS 


Hampton & Sons 


FURNISHED RENTALS 


SLOANE COURT WEST, SW3 

Superb Honor Desgned flats, rrwrutes from 
Skene Square. Accommoearmr- 2 Bedrooms. 2 
Btfti rooms. 2 Reception rooms, use of annual 
gardens. . 

From £600 pw weak 


WETHERBY GARDENS, SW5 

Exceptmnffiy attractive 2 bedroom flats In 
spacious period convetsm Each ru h as acces s 
to communal gardens ad many have terraces. 


Am £300 per week 


St. James’s Office 01-493 8222 London SWIA 1RB 


FARRAR 
ST KAL) 
U>jGlyn 



ST PAULS COURT. W14 
Pretty 1 beikm flat web 
communal gdns. 3 nans tobe. 
£150 aw. me ch. 
COVERT GARDEN. WC2 
Cbarmmp Long Acre flat vflfl 
lots ol ei au aer. 1st fir. 1 
oednn. £180 p.w. 
FOSBURY MEWS. W2 
Spacious 2 bedim House «tb 
Garage n secluded me ws: 2 
batons, iw ba thr ns . £250 
P.w. 


ASSOCIATED WITH 

HtLLKAMUEL 


1NVIWWFM ‘1 IHCl' 

Mortgages, Savings. 
Tax Planning. Pensions, 
Life Assurance and 

Insurance 


UWMa*Mmmaa2ftm Shtir. 
Osaaoem. gfima auq am. U- 



ome 

Dm 

ome 


HBGHTSBRIDfiE. 

Begantly f u rnished 
masonatteL 3 bed. 3 bath 
and huge roofterrece- 
Contpany let only. 1 yBar+. 
£750 pff week. 

01 225 1022 


COURTFIELD GARDENS SW5 

New development decorated to a very high 
standard. Studio flat £200 pw. 2 bedroom flats; 
from £325 pw to £475 pw. 


Property Management Services Ltd 


MONTPELIER MEWS SW7 

Very conveniently situated 2 bed flat with South 
facing terrace. Long/short lets. From £300 pw 
inclusive of some maid service. 


01 584 3285 



01-223 8111 



HOUSES AND FLATS THROUGH- 
OUT THE DOCKLANDS AREA 

RESIDENTIAL LETTINfl DEPARTMENT 
TR: 01-790 9560 


HANOVER TERRACE MEWS, 
N.W.1. Superb wdl deanled 
mms house e qutt md m fhgns 
Rtik but dose to fitter Street Me 
mcep web twrace owffoofceis ode. 
stuCy. rraster txdrm wet ortswe 
sliw rm. 2nd Deftm. batem, Ige 
IUv fta H mOi a# mdms. plai 
£400 aw. 


KUMfE OOfB. «L2. Hetty wrtUrt 
ltd o quel toed WO we ol nnutf 
OttwfidDOOBH lraioaeL«(.M 
mm 3#M1. pug. £VJ5 D*. 
anittatM puec. twx 
new, dec n w sa u an. 
Sion w* from ftonefl Lftta. Dbk 
icaaigi Uylfid lovtfta im. stuey 
wdi Moo* i dtto tods . ! beta (1 en 
seal oong. £350 pw. reg. 


SERVICE FLATS AVAILABLE IN ALL PRICE RANGES. 
MARVEEN SMITH ASSOCIATES 
7Z7 7957 or 937 9801 




j.>j Anscombe 
& Rir>gkmd 


Residential Lettings^ 


VENETIAN-STTLE 

uvmG 

Pha item of Sl Fan Is. 
rawer Bridge and I'kxonaa 


• Plaza Estates 


N0UBK BEKS. SUN 
Noaly docoratcfl and 


tumrinrd family house. 4 
bees. 3 moos. 3 bats. FF 
M. mol terr and ago Aral 
oa» for long Co L« £750.00 


KBrSBIBTON HIGH STREET, 


UNFURNfFURN mansan tta 
■nh superb Mas. Mi and 
portrr. 3 beds. 2 receos. 2 
tarts, m Ff a Aval now 
ta> long Co UL E400/450i» 


MARBLE ARCH W1 

Stunning studio flat in mod 
PB bk. Good kit. beat, roof 
tarr. Long lac £200 pw 

DEVONSHIRE ST. W1* 

Very gracious 1st Ur flat with 
high calUnga. 2 ba ds, b ath, 
recap, krt. Long tot £275 pw. 

01-724 3100 


4LDSOOT STHLEI. SWT 
Bngm m BMui maty 
deanM fut nconvetsnn. 2 
beds. 1 reap l bam and ML- 
Aral now to tang Co LoL 


RER9E HILL Lovely detached 
Edtonton Horae. 4 beds. 2 raps. 
beatM fatchan /bnakfaa room, 
garage SmaN nest garden. Vwy 
dose mam BA stafton. Vana 10 
mns £270 pw. 

HBME ML 3 bods, 2 reeep 
Edwanban base dose BA staboo. 
10 mns WctoH. £150 pw. 

KEYHOLD 

733 4518 (24 bans) 




Horner HOI 


Incorporating Mays Rentals 

TO LET 


UICHA& DAVID & CO 
01 543 

E&EH Uadri toe good res area. 
4 beds. 2 recess. 2 Mb. kacben. 
M gge. Bartens. Kewly dec and 


Ttrounhni Corn stops 
m. £1250 p-Cjn. 


and staboa £1250 pno. 
mmaxM ause 3 no) tee. 

ad dec order. 2 reaps, baft. U. 
gdns. Cto* stn/ube & shops 
So aero. 


KEKSttSTON C08BT. W&. 

MezDy becsi = tss cse 
p adn s nare s SMCfcsK 
riflKsbed fss Css tsosswa. 
tzty raws ; nz. 

p- ’ zm tr d a) E hcl -Fra, bseft. 2 
tats, bafa aju . E23G ea nec 
REfflfTS PARK MW1. 
c bmatuy rtr o mroc 2 sam y 
house set mcsSy s^edmeas 
. • air.wuB tan Sse wit an 


cl fiegens Pans. E tan. 
act l d aeJ. 2 s beds. 1 


recea. cob 1 1 aei. 2 ! 
ba rro o m. 2 s as 
tttccry £350 pm zsj. 


01-629 6604 , 


BRUCE 


S-PAriT/NSR: 


SELECTION OF 2 BEDROOM FLATS 


PEMBR1DGE VILLAS W11 

Very well decorated flat elegant drawing room, small 

Kitchen. 2 b edroom s , bathroom. £250 pw 


REDCUFFE SO SW5 

Newly decorated flat on rased ground floor, large sitting 
room, kitchen with afl machines. 2 doubta be d i uums . 
bathroom. £350 pw 


. 01-629 6604 , 


PALACE GARDENS TERRACE W8 

fmenor designed masonette large reception room, 2 

bedrooms. 2 bathroo m , utility room, fined kitchen. £450 pw 


.ST. JAMES HO’JSS. 13 KENSINGTON SQUARE. 
LONOOU >VS. - 0:-93? So4? 93? 9S54 


EXECUTIVE CREME 


ESHER SURREY 

Fully furnished detached 
isiwy home. 2 Ige recep 
rooms. 3 bedrooms. 1 
bathroom plus one shower. 


£1000 px-m. TeL (0372) 
66614. Telex 8955112. 


WOKING SURREY 

Fully or part furnished 


spacious family home. 4 
receps. 5 bedrooms. 3 
b a throoms secluded gaden 
with s wi mm ing pool £1600 
gem. tet (04862) 73488. 
Talex 8955112 


Offices in Sussex. Surey, 
Berkshire & S.W. London 


THE VERY BEST 


LanOkmls 8 Tenants 
come m us for 
BEL6RAVIA. HAMPSTEAD. 
KENSINGTON, WIMBLEDON 
and am ter areas. 

Phone now. 

BIRCH & CO 
01-734 7432 


OVERSEAS? 

WE HAVE WAITING 
COMPANY TENANTS 
WANTING TO RENT 
YOJR HOME IN 
CBfTRAL/SW LONDON 


Buchanans 

Letins& Hanagenwm 

01-3517367 


HALLETT 

LINES 

&CO 


ROBERT IRVING + BURNS 


Offers bice selection of 
flats A houses in: 
CITY. 

KNIGHTSBKIDGE. 
KENSINGTON, 
WIMBLEDON, 
asd other anas. 


For prompt A efficient 
service Please Call 


01-637 0 8 21 

MARGARET STREET W1 


Specialists in furnished 
accommo datio n 

01 748 3224 


Looking for a career — 
■ not a job! 


Join the exciting world of 

high-tech recruitment 

' £9,000 Basic + Commission 


OLD HAMPSTEAD Dtscemtng 
tenant sought for eteganl pri- 
vate home fttratfm wtno or 
(Ateen Aanr bouse W«fl Ml* 
hack from road beNod targe 

coaummal country ovUan. 
Dbte receottan. uichen with 
wasivr/dnw. 2 Bedrooms, 
bathroom wUh cxeettent show- 
er. lamUy deep freeze. CH Use 
of pnlm. £325 p.w. Dr La 
Rue. Ol 493 2938/2224. 



HLOMVU. Brand new tmraac 
hae In private mews. 5 beds. 2 
bains + cloak, me reeep. r/f kit 
with aU mactn. tasufuUy dec 
and funt throuphout. Loop 
Company let only. S6bO pw. ot 
377 3600 m 



4 bed. 4batfi 
penthouse with roof 
terrace in Pont St 
SW1. 

HOLMANS: 

01 370 6781. 

£1^50 pw. 


L0NG/SH0RT 


fora re to rt o n o« luxury 
propontoa. i-S Bods, From 


£2SCtaw. 

BERKELEY 

ESTATES 

01-935 8959 


A rare opportunity for inteffigent. self mativaced penile, sged 
21 plus. Co join one of the UK’s most successful computer 
recruitment agencies and train to become consultants. 
Based in London, and covering the Home Counties region, 
you will identify and supply dp contract staff to clients, based 
on the requrements generated by our active sales farce. 
This is an unusually challenging po si t ion offering real scope 
for career development, in addition to a staling salary of 
£9,000 we operate a generous com mission scheme, which 
should easily generate an additional £3.000 in the fast year, 
and offer a full range of large company benefits. 

If you would Tike to find out more about these outstanding 
opportijnities please send a detafad ev to 
Ruth Parsons, Manager— London Contracts Dhnsion, 
Knight Prapamming Support United, Royalty Haase, 

72 Dean Street, London W1V 5HB. 


ADVERTISING 

OPPORTUNITY 

£10,000 


We are a large international advertising agency 
in Mayfair looking for an experienced secretary 
to work for one of our Board Directors and his 
team. 

This position would appeal to a wen educated, 
intelligent, flexible secretary with excellent skills 
and some experience at senior level liaising 
confidently with both clients and staff. As well as 
the usual secretarial tasks the job will allow 
ample opportunity to become involved with the 
work of the group. 

tf you have an interest in advertising and are 
looking for a new challenge, enjoying all the 
benefits of being part of a team within a large 
successful agency this could be the opportunity 
you have been waitteg for. 

For more details please telephone Susanna 
Jacobsen on 629 9496. 


ISLE OF DOCS Luxury house. 
Spectacular vtews. newly deco- 
rated. beautifully Uirntshed. 2 
receps. tatchen/dlnlns. games 
roam. G bedrooms. 3 bath- 
rooms. 2 eaidens. easy parking. 
7 nrtm dor. £&ao pw.ono t«h 
OI GI5 9912 Ol 603 7269. 


BED LION SQ *m UNFUR- 
NISHED iul on wi a. or vicl 
mansion toock. 2 beds, recent, 
bath. Mt/bfast rm. New tease 
refill Mil ml. Co tot for l year. 
£176 pw. exd-SavUls Ol 499 
96«4 (ref rgmv 


WEST HA MPSTE AD Huge man- 
sion ttoL 4 bedrooms. 2 
ba thro om s. 2 targe receps. lUUy 
fined kitchen. £350 pw. Co M 
only. 6-12 mouths 01-328 
8853. 


Wl Unique mews Hal. Large 
newly reAstbM panefied 
rooms. Ideal for company teL 
£326 pw TH Ot 935 1068 
(day), ot 3S2 8432 levesl 


LEINSTER GARDENS W2. 

Anracdve Snt boar ta Mtfi ML 


DarotobMraoai.nBept.KSB. 


Ct 40 pw. long co 1st. 

HAMMERSMITH W6. 

Ugln and uraata 4th Boar On In 



01584 6863 


TOP JOBS 

Television £12,000^14,000 

In Frankfurt PA/Researcfa Assis- 
tant, super job - opening of new of- 
fices. 

Munich cXI 7,000 

US. multi. Opening offices in Ger- 
many. PA. role to President 

Capital Markets cJMA^XM 

Soper job in busy London environ- 
ment lots of German, needs English 
and German shorthand. 

REC CONS 


TOP JOBS 
WITH IMPECCABLE 


£10,000 8JLB. 

PA to MD of famous jewellers. 
Eng/Fr 100/60. 25+. Calm personal- 

£12^£14JM0 

Career ntiwfad PA's for two senior 
executives of Anglo French consor- 
tium. 284-. Eng/Fr. 100/60. 

£17,000+ 

PA to oil traders. 25 honrs-a-day for 
career hungry pro. with at least 
120/70 Eni/Fr. 


ROYAL COLLEGE 
OF PHYSICIANS 

has a vacancy for 

A SENIOR ADMINISTRATOR 

to be appointed as 

HEAD OF THE TRAINING OFFICE 
AGED 30+ 

Within Scale £12*94 - £1M85. 



Tta department housas Bie JoM Commute* tor Higher Medaal Tmnmg zro 
Gam Protessws Tranng'iatai b mqnnaata to naxnannQ tfta tojh 
saratoib o» Posgradutta Madime. « oafflcuUr by Usman «1 apperntt rt 
Trams ftjsts m Hospmls nraughou ma UK and bre. 

In undenatang ita mxwt« and daitatonfl tak, tha tuxassto ifipfcam «ll 
be reqxBBtafe to 4 Ml tune stall. 


Ike wwwtaa m » not necessity wsm a utnms badonunl In mpbcal 
*S7wHstraMn row be m a snoanrtsonr post and mu haw tad several 
yens al staff RBnaginim and tnxnenn ol admanstrane icsponstoDus. 



yeas ol stalf RBnaginim and nixneoca ol admanstrane ressonstoHues. 
Keftha mutt exett ralong under pmsswn. be ol cheeritf dsoaakOP. an 
nceSont commuataor and have beat) demonstramy suctzssM r lie 
mbvatan. orqanisaan and cononl ol tows m order U maa aratgem 
oeadtows Aopreoaon ol motton (tfta Betmotofiy mtod be m asset. 


International Secretaries 


Attoctim (tftas ovartanUng toonTa Pari 3 innutH «oA Iran Grttt tafland 
Street rad Regent S Pm umMymmd stanns. 


to annual and cost ol bring reriws) according to age art 
i. on a scale relating n> University Scales. 


HECCKT9 PAW Newty redeco- 
rated nal to very high aamtard 
In luxury modern block with 
porterage, tin. GCH Double 
bedroom. (ounge/dbUnp. kitch- 
en. BaOtroom. haiL (nUcony. 
£166 pw. available Immediate- 
ly. TeCOl 441 8733. 


■CLSBAV1A- Luxury PenUiouse 
Appartmeni. t Bed. Lounoe-KIL 
Bain. Balcony. Fully equipped 
and Furnished ThrougbouL 
Long or Start let. Avauable 
Now. £360 pw. 01 289 7123 


CHELSEA SW3 Good locaaan 
owner, own 2 bed ttat. nan. 
ktl + washer, talh. avati now. 
£170 pw tod. Ot * CHW. F W 
OappOl 221 8838 


Hodday (late/ toes In London 
avauable now. Bargain pricey 
palace Properties 01-486 8926 


r W CAPP OwmaranaS Ser- 
trtcast LM reatdre propentos In 
Central. South and West Lon- 
don Areas for waiting 
applicants tel Ol 221 8838. 


01-491 7100 


01-491 7100 


A p p nctoto na to tta P oisoned Manager, 

RCP, 11 St Andrews Ptaca, London KW1 4LE. 


LAWSON A KEHMAM Dlplonum 
& executives urgently seek 
quality p roperties in an central/ 
West Unman areas. For atten- 
tion please ring 01-938 342S. 


WEST DULWICH immaculate 
M. one bed. 1 rae.lt and b. OT. 
£90 p/w Tel Ol 8700847 Eves. 


AVAILABLE NOW Luxury flats A 
houses £200 • £1 .000 per week. 
Tel: Burgess 581 6136. 



■Wl very fight unfurnished 4th 
floor flat, close to all amenities. 
2 dbte beds, recent, an. bath. 
£176 pwmeCH CHW cootes 
Ol 828 8261. 




MHMNCrOH W8. Unfurnished 
6Ui floor inlerlor designed flat 
u> luxury ponered block. Stun- 
ning view,. Totally refurbished. 
AH new carpets, curtains, ma- 
chines. £476 pw Inc CH W. + 
CH. Buchan anc 361 T7«7. 
HENSMGTDH SW7. Charnung 
mews house 3 beds. 2 boms. 2 
rerep ms. ML cfkrm. ctl Taste 
luUy fm-n & weu dec 
throughout. Available now lor 
long tot. £360 pw. Bernard 
Wats h 730 9148. 

WEST HAMPSTEAD S/C fum 
rial new dec. CH/HW. large llv- 
mg rm. i double bed rm. l 
single bed rm. hit and separate 
bam and wc phone Suit 3 per- 
wa. mating. £120 Pw Tel: Ol 

ALL Vtsmnta lo London, a large 
taeaion of duality furnished 
nats and houses in Central Lon- 
dan. Bdgmia. Kenslnglon. 
- etc. Hunters; 837 

730 0. 

tatdoe near. Luxury 1 
oeoroom fiat. Fully furnished. 
HCW. Ot new kilchOL conve- 
nteni loCrty & Sven End. Sun 2 
prof or young executives tiao 
pw. Tel: Ol 622 2127 days. 
CME&SOM RD. 3 able bed nuison- 
«te and gdn m quiel street. 
C/M. fully fum + machines. 
Newly decorated. Ooie lube 
£22flpw Avail now. Tel: Ol 
385 SOOS or iOB974» 3189 
COBHAM Superb del 4 bed. 2 
bath residence In private rd 
cvertookloe take A woods Easy 
access to American school at 
Cobnam £346 pw. Andrews tel- 
ling Ol 68S Olll 
Hvns nt W2. Sunny mews roe. 
3 dM beds. 2 bibs, master en 
suarc * lanczi. Hugo open-plan 
to? spiral io roof vniCB A HP 
lerr. Easy oarfctnn End turn. 
asoiw Ol 723 4133. 

K EHfi to lCTXtoi A sele ct ion of new- 
ty decorated 2 bed flats looking 
otd onto private courtyard. 24 

pf Long Co Let. 

£390/£37S p.w Goddard & 
Smith Ol 930 7321 . 
rtmeKTVBtiniii ll Nr Karroas. 2 
z talto + lacuzzl. recep 
with ptdtire window onio prl- 
vjue garden Sduaro fiteyei. 
d ml no room, kit • an machines. 

res ponrr Long 
f 46° P w Goddard & 

Smith 01 930 7321 


Wl Modem lux ant. deeps 6. 2 
baths, sauna, unity, patio. 
Ul/dtn. lounge/bar. cable TV. 
cleaner. short/Mug lei £SOO- 
£1000 pw negTalOl 388 1616 
ALLEN BATES A CO have a lane 
selection of flan * houses avail 
for long / strait let tta £160.00 
P.w. oz 499 166S 


prestige blk. 3 ndas Sin. £1 15 
pw. 01-898 3618 after 7pm 


CENTHAL LONDOf* Hobday and 
long stay luxury balcony a part- 
SSSFrom xaaopw. 01-228 
7168 m. 


AMERICAN BANK urgently re- 
oulres luxury ftars/twrae*. 
Chetsca. Kru^iDbrtdge. Belgra- 

vta areas. £200 • £2,000 pw. 
Burgess Estate Agenbi SB 1 6136 


CHELSEA. Attractive flat. 1 large 
reception. dMe bedim, kitchen, 
bathrm. oodo. GCH. £180 pw 
bid. 01-361 3670 
CHELSEA SW10L Super Mews 
me. 2 dble bed. bathrm ensulle. 
■bower, tor fit an/ diner, note. 
GCH. £226 pw. 881 5828 
CLAPHAM NTH 1 min M». 2 
ran. Both tm Sept *87. £46pw 
each. One 5 days per week, 
from Jan. Tel: 733 7368 tevej. 
COULSDON Family Me furnished 
& decorated to Mto> standard. 
IO mins station. £l 18 p.w. An- 
drews Letting Ol 686 Ol 1 1 


iux flat- £SSO pw neg 01-769 
8290. 01-767 791 1 
EC1 2 bed. r/f luxury flat with 
sun terrace, dose to CMy . £136 
pw TPM 446 2026 
CttEEM PARK rerwflr dec studjro 
or 1 bed fits. CH. TV. Lito Wx t- 
lets. Fm £125 p.w. 937 4999 


HAMPSTIAOMM Lux OaL 26 ft 
rec. able bad. CH. TV. toe sm- 
ny bale, w/maeh- Co let pref. 
£125 pw 01-424 4617. 


■UHPSTEAD fum flat 2 beds, 
recep. toil 5.0001. 4 wKs + £250 
p.w. Inc. DUona 482 2277 


HENSMQTON Nfi Rood, bed- 
room. dressing room. K & 8. 
CH. Turbo shower etc. £165 
pw Tel. 01 -3734763/0722- 

72639/01-937 3964 


MALE SECRETARIES 
Saudi Arabia 
£ 10,300 - £ 11,600 
Tax Free + bonus 


General Arabian Metical and Atfed Services United (GAMA), « 
me Hospital Management Company .prowting, c onsulta ncy 
services to the prestipous Riyadh AJ-Wwj Hospital Pmgr®nniB m 
Saudi Arabia. 


We are now seeking Male Secretaries for a number ofpositiore 
based in Riyadh. Candidates must have typir^j speeds of 45 wpm 
and shorthand speeds of 100 wpnL Addrttorafly you shaJd 
possess good o^anisabon/adminStrahve state, the aMny to deal 
wftfi people at all tevets and diplomacy. 


ExctiJent benefits are avafcbte in adtibon to a tax-free stizy 
vrtrcti win be further enhanced by a tonus upon campfetton of the 
2 year contract 


Salaries ae paid in Saidi ffiyals and the sterling satary quoted te 
cafcutated at the exchstge rate of 5J Saudi Riyafs = £1.00 


Please write with a comprehensive Currircubm Vitas or telephone 
for an apptiGatxxi form. 


flidh Davies, Recraftroent Officer, 
GAMA fntemafioaaf Ltd. 

Glea House, Stag Place, 
London SW1E 5AG 


EXECUTIVE 

SECRETARY 


&£13^D0 

Plus besefits 


The Ctdaf Executive of this 
wed established Financial 
Services company requires 
an intis oensabfe 1st dass 
sccrteary. The successful 
^dividual must have gained 
City or Financial experience 
aul wartto use It to expand 
this role to its fuU pttertaf. 
The post requres someone 
with a very sound educa- 


tion, preferably a graduate, 
a strong personalty with 
plenty of initiative and 
- maturity to get totally in- 
volved in this demanding 
and sometimes pressurised 
position. Age 26-35. 
100/60. W.P. experience 
useful 


ADMINISTRATOR 

£10,000 


Very mucti a ope ofTjob. To look afttr successful sraafl 
business came for 25 independent companies (aidthectt. 
graphic designers, film producers, ere). Running die central 
services (with betpl typing, telex, day to day book-keeping, 
general lenan t liaison and most definitely 
CALM in moments of panic. 


Write with CV or riqg, 

Lona Mackinaw, Worlds End Studios, 
134 Lots Kd, London, SW10 ORJ. 

01 351 4333 


CAREER PA 

£10,000 RISING to £14,000+ 


(Rec Cons] 
01-499 009S 


Senior 

Secretaries 


Financial Management Consultant working with 
International Public Company needs PA who is 
seeking a challenging role. Managing a small 
back up team the successful applicant wifi be 


academical^ bright, have an excellent telephone 
manner and be able to work under pressure. 


Interested? 


Tel today or tommorrow on 01 580 4330 


Tetephooe: 01-630 8621 


"OTTtNGWU. SATE: Lux studio 

oiunmenl suit I won or eou- 
Pte. ftdljr fum. CH. separate 
"Hrhon **4 bathroom. £500 
Prep «cj Shoo or urn let Ol- 
9« 3229 after 6.00 pm 


SECRETARY/OFFICE 

MANAGER 


Secretary/Office Administrator for Managing 
Director and Management team of small. 


rapidly expanding manufacturing company in 
Acton. Wide range of duties and 
responsibilities for someone wishing to 
develop to Office Manager with reduced 
secretarial activities. Good command of 


written English essential. Good typing speeds. 
Shorthand and word processor training an 


Shorthand and word processor trammg an 
advantage. Must wish and be able to work as 
part of a team. 40 hour week. Salary £10,000 
negotiable. 

* Apply with CV to: Helen Jorgensen, 
Dfodex Holdings Pftx, Kampson House, 
Camomile Street, Lonodn EC3A 7 AN. 


-With 


LETTINGS 
NEGOTIATOR 
For Bright Fs&am 
Estate Agents. 

» you enjoy nne&ng people and 
pm pf s . can wort unsuper- 
vised and tad, are smart. 
morajHnouvttsd and a .car 


owner, ttat ytn erffl enjoy 
worirao at our Wsndty team. 
Portage to cf14iNX). 



SECRETARY 
FINANCE CO 
£1 ^OWN- 
MORTGAGE 

Preaipous Finance Co. 
itqmn: no tipeiotn] 
secreuiy to wort as pan of 


a lively young team. Are 
24/29. Typing 50 wpm A 
nitty SH 80 & Wang exp. 
A smart appearance, good 
sense ot humour and 

friendly personality arc a 

maa as is a good wort 
record and ihe ability to 
wort regular overtime 
(until 7.30 occasionally). 
Esc benefits include 
interest free STL 
subs mart etc. 

Call Anna on 

606 2291 

CAS 

Personnel ConsBftants 


TEMPTING TIMES 


umaaORAns With secretarial 
shuts tor Immediate Mte i Mt U w 
bookings for Christmas vaca- 
tion. Con lad Kale MumCHOfl 
683 0065 Meredith Seoti 

Recrullmem. 


COURSES 


WOLACT HALL: Home study for 
GCE. Deorees. Professions. Wf 
toreius. Dew AL2. Wotoey H* 
OxJonL 0X2 6PR Tri 0866 
52200 iZa nrsL 


Maths common cnthaHCC 

Intensive Revtstan OWri » 
•nomine or 5 af te rnoon, 16 1» 
19 Occember or 5 la 9 JonuaiT 
£76. TH 589 2527 


Pre 






















































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 



LA CREME DE LA CREME 


We talk and you listen, no. 
\bu talk and we listen, yes. 






AUDIO AND SHORTHAND 
SECRETARIES 

We are looking for audio and shorthand secretaries for 
onr senior manages based in Central London. You need to 
be between 18-58, bare a pleasing pexsonajity and the 
ability to cope with people at all levels. 

The successful applicants must have 40 wpm typing, 
eitberaudio or 100 wpm shor thand, with at least two years 
expe ri en c e. RSA, Pi tman orLCC q paHficat fons 
knowledge of word processing would be desirable 

We are offering a we& paid job with good prospects. The 
starting pay varies between £8250 and £9825, with the 
obvious opportunity for further advancement that can only 
be offered by such a large organis ation 

Applications, by CV, should be sent to the address below, 
or phone 01-608 1148 for further details. 


Repty to: Hugh Seckieman 
British Telecom International 
Boom 400 
Cardinal House 

London ECUS 3ND 


(STD 

BRITISH TELECOM 
INTERNATIONAL 


Numerate Secretary 

...with experience of PC’s 

Victoria c.£9,500 

required by a major UK based international company at its 
Head Office in Victoria 

As a key member of a small team you wifl provide full secretarial 
support to the Financial Communications Manager and have 
the flair to organise high level meetings and functions in waiving 
brokers and the finance! press. 

You will have excellent secretarial skills, experience of or 
demonstrable interest in personal computers, be' good at 
comrmiTKalmg and keen to develop further. 

Please write with full details. These wtfl be forwarded direct to 
our client. List separately any companies to whom you* 
application should not be sent Bryan Oliva’, ref. BCQ/A/7. 

MSL Advertisina. 

52 Grosvenor Gardens, London SW1 W QAW. 

Offices in Europe, the Americas. Austraiasn and Asm Paafic. 


Advertising 




Young at Heart 

£9,500 

Our client, a top- name advertising agency, 
is seeking someone with drive and 
integrity to assist their Senior Financial 
Director Dealing at International level 
with clients and executives, you will enjoy 
total involvement in this central develop- 
ing role. Excellent skills (80/50) and a 
strong, bright personality are essential 
Please telephone 01-493 5787. 


GORDON YATES 


Rcctuanera CoomiImw* 


EXCLUSIVE 
EVENTS ORGANISER 
£12,000 neg. + car 

Have you got the commitment, flair and pro- 
fessionalism to organise events for this highly 
successful and exclusive business entertain- 
ment consultancy? As a vital member of a 
small team you will have sole responsibility for 
every specialist event handled by the company 
down to the finest detail. Social poise, self- 
motivation and boundless energy to work long 
hours and some weekends necessary. Manage- 
ment experience in public relations, hotels or 
banqueting gasantial. Age 28-34. Based in Ful- 
ham. Please call 434 4512. 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


Elegance & Admin 

to £11,000 aae 

This is a unique opportunity to utilise your 
organising flair in an erudite, academic 
environment. As Admin/ RA to Chairman 
of dais prestigious \fest End College you 
will co-ordinate course bookings, 
material^ marketing and dient liaison. 
Excellent presentation and communica- 
tive skills essential Skills 90/50. Please 
telephone 01-493 5787. 


GORDONYATES 


Rccrumneni Consohaim 


City Property 

£11,000 

We are a prestigious and fast moving firm 
of chartered surveyors and we require an 
intelligent and conscientious PA/ 
secretary for the dynamic young 
commercial agency partner (mid 30's) 
and his team, in our rapidly expanding 
City office. 

Excellent organisational skills, first class 
presentation, plus outgoing and enthusi- 
astic personality. Wang experience 
essential plus fast typing/shorthand and 
audio (60/1 00). Age: 24 to 30. 

C.V. in strictest confidence to The Times, 

Box No. COi. 


DIRECTORS' SECRETARIES 


TOP JOBS FOR TOP PEOPLE 

Meet the Professionals’ Professionals 

£ 10,000 - £ 20,000 

To our candidates the decision to change jobs 
i^nShn^rthai. a glance at th>BBed»r 
lumns. An important amamwe 

thought and BtD^ectoiB Secrrtanra t^s^at wo 

have to offer. If you are seriously ambrtncs rod me 
worth more than you are earning, then it wm be 
worip ukmc j To discuss the mo- 



SECRETARIAL RECRUITMENT 
CONSULTANTS 


Surrey/Hampshire 

Border 

PA £11,000 

The Corporate Affairs Department of thus 
major international Group handles ail the 
press and public relations activity for the 
Group's worldwide interests. 

The division's Chief Executive, based at 
Corporate HQ. is seeking a high calibre PA 
who wHI enable him to fulfil his worldwide 
commitments effectively. It requires 
previous senior level experience - i deafly 
in a PR or marketing environment - 
excellent secretarial skills (s/h not 
essential) and previous exposure to word 
processing. In ail respects this is a superb 
opportunity for a seif starter probably 
aged 25-35. Please contact GtlHan 
Etwood. 


01-491 1868 


Admin Flair 

£8,740 

Excellent prospects for a well-presented 
young person to join this dynamic Hi-Tec 
organisation. Working for Group Manager 
in o very busy office, you should be efficient, 
competent and flexible, with excellent ad- 
ministration skills. An involving role requiring 
shorthand and typing (90/60) and some 
work experience. Age 23+ Call now on 
01 - 4934466 . 

MERRYWEATHER ADVERTISING & SELECTION 





WANG SECRETARY 

£10,000 

Becomepart of the team of this professional 
firm of Stockbrokers. The usual secretarial 
duties, plus the preparation of annual 
budgets using Lotus 123 on the Wang PC. 
This is a new position, so setting up of 
systems will also be part of this Interesting 
opportunity. For more details, call us and 
arrange an interview. 

— OFFICE— 

— SYSTEMS — 
RECRUITMENT 
— SERVICES — 


■Karon nuwGL 
no — iniowc o w B 


USSMofeny Arne London WCZHttD 
MqMaeOI-ugaOOl 


I IBBIIil — 

ruun salary, £9.000. 
he.* to M. A. Roberts, 
lames's Street. SWIA 1L 

» f 0 r any information on 

493 4411. 


SENIOR SECRETARY - IBM DlSPiAYYIRlTER 
£11,000 

A challenging and varied position working as right 
hand to a busy, but charming gentleman. Use your 
shorthand, audio and word processing skills for 
secretarial duties and your administration expertise 
for preparing statistics and recording of payments. 

Call us today for a positive career move. 

— OFFICE — 

— SYSTEMS — 
RECRUITMENT 
— SERVICES — 

MCmUK MM L 
(Mmaiw wt Him wnei 

ry Autot LoarfonWOH BAD 


irkpboiM 01 ■ 4jr)4(tfr 



DRAKE 

PERSONNEL “ 

PERSONNEL 
CHALLENGE 
£9,000 

ixng jnlfflnriPUJl company 

^ a hr person to jwi 
iikii “l^SsoS: 

STB- 

-yolvaj hi aim in, organs*!) 
Min the UK and overseas 
A good faWnem owm® 

mam pew* »i U» pho * 1 *- ■« 

5 Vw good wrg M 

jtofiomd mw cal' 
UWisaBialwM 

81-221 M72 


'COLLEGE LEAVER! 

wci Property 

Our client, a fast growing 
and highiy successful com- 
pany ol architectural con- 
sutans/property deve- 
lopers. Is in need of a se- 
cretary with audio and fast 
accurate typing. This is an 
excellent opportunity to im- 
prove your stilts aid grow 
with the company as it con- 
times to expand. Ideally 
you will have some office 
experience together with a 
knowledge of W.P. Age 
18+. Salary c£7,000 (Rec 
Cons). 

01-58$ 4422 

Senior 

Secreraries 




met**** 


wi*w*Anowu.fl 



AUDIO 

SECRETARY 

Required for Director of 

Mayfair Chartered 
Surveyors. Exceflau 
remuneration package. 

Telephone 


HERRING SON & DAW 
817348155 


IIMDRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

FORTNIGHT IN 
TURKEY 
£10,500 

&W tMO weeks n Tarim 
(Mr listen sW( n 
USB «■ QU Dtytwrmct . At 
PA m t super America! MD you 
wU be In tautfM offices 
kuitfcg after Km and dealing 
rthccrfMenttei matters. Ymrt 
need potash and saphsdeagon 1 
as yarn be Ids tram person. 
OroanisB Die and aid 
reautmast of amsreary soft. 

It you enjoy pampering your 
boss and taw good typing mn 
IBM Diaptaywm contact 
Debbie HB on 
81-834 0388 

TMCORAXrwfllRNAnONALCXOUP 


READ’S 
RESTAURANT 

This rapidly expanding 

restaurant needs an 
enthusiastic person with 
knowledge and love of 
food and wine to promote 
and build up our recently 
opened shop next door, 
which sells our own 
products and wine, and 
also to expand and 
develop our outside 
catering business. Salary 
and snare of profits 
negotfable. 

Keith Read, 
Read’s Restaurant 
152 Old Brampton Road, 
London SW5 0B& 
Telephone 01-373 2445 


"RECEPTIONIST* 

8aflvSL30pm OR 
1.30prn-8-00pm 
Property Co, exc£. 

Call coMHaitasr 
SecAgy 
OB 01 488 0087 


TOUR 

COMPANY 

Leading Ski Tour Operator 
requ ires a PA/See tor its 
Product Manager. Fluency 

in French, numeracy, good 
typing and rusty 
shorthand are a must tor 
this position hi a varied 
and busy working 

wwonmem. Knowtodge 
of the Industry an 
advantage. Salary 
according to experience + 
good benefits. 

Phone Dare 

01-291-5595 


TOUR 

COMPANY 

Leading Ski Tour Operator 
requires a PA/Sec for its 
Product Manager. Fluency 
in French, numeracy, goad 
typing and rusty 
shorthand are a must tor 
Ms posiwn m a vened 
and busy working 
environment. Knowledge 
of the inoustry an 
advantage. Salary 
according to experience + 
good benefits. 

. Phone Clare 

01-291-5595 


^jjk SPREAD YOUR WINGS 4|r 


SECRETARY 

£9,000 

You will used to be multi- 
ulcrtud u nark for these 
Directofi’ You <mI! lu'e 
consultant liaison wih 
imcnuiional d soils, and jour 
inner- is varied and ustercsiing. 

taking Tull advantage of vour 
shorthand and jud» sktlk. The 
benefits )ou mil rrreis e include: 
Rthi-iurant jod pension scheme. 
D-ilh hours 4 - S 3(1. 

JUNIOR TYPIST 
£7,000 

Multwunooal household name 
neecs you! Diverse 
jdmininraatm and typing will 
be ■•our rcsponsibiliiv in return. 
STL Soaal CTuband restaurant 
are ai >nur disposal. 
Telephone Loretta Quigley 
an 01-189 8032 at 
1 1 Ludgate Circus. EC4 


PERSONNEL 

SECRETARY 

£9,600 

This is sour golds) opportune} lowtrt 
m ibe idmwra indnsuvi AsauHOai w 
i be hmud Manager von vnll provide 
foH yrrmnaJ support u the 
d qxinm an. cwnmunicaiiiis at all lei eh 
tnhui die cmaparn and the gcnml 
priMic. (oennses ndude. 2$ days hub. 
BUP V Socal Ouh and cescumoL 

RECEPTIONIST/ 
TELEPHONIST 
IMMEDIATE START! 

\ our prp&ssuulisa in ansaenne the 

tefcpnooe. giwing man? sisuoo and 
despatching icteis is required b} a 
presnstocs company There ts ample car 
pariranu 25 days bds. pension 
asd social dub 
Contact Jifke Andrews 
a 01-578 2233 at 
Ambur House. Hifih Street, 
Hounslow (Abore forrys) 


SECRETARY PA. 
£9,500 
You will be responsible to the top 

Legal Advisor in a highly 
rcspccied miematioiul company. 
\ our sbonbaod and wont 
processing experience will be 
utilised when handling 
coTTcqmndcTurc and comma 
negotiations. Your rewards arc 
BUPA. uavd dacouriia. profit 
share and LVs. 

WP OPERATOR 
£9,000 

Your all round office skills will be 
m demand by ihw widely 
respected authority. Working 
uiih an effiaeni leant, your 
flexibiliiv to operate Tela «rill tie 
sowbi. Benefits mdude LVs. 
STL, _ hour breaks, hours 9- 5pm. 
Tetephone Sarah Meakin 
on 01-836 9272 at 
1 Kingsway, London WC2 
(Opposite Bosh House) 


JUNIOR 

SECRETARY 

£7.000 

Benefit mdude- Discouni oo m- 
hnuse pmduns. BLIP A LVs Rns 
Xmas boons. The [eadmg Cosmeiic 
euaipany requires your nuigomg 
personality arid secmaiul sLilk. 
No experience required - also 
excel lent opportunity to train on 
u-oid Processor. 

PERSONAL .ASS1ST.4NT 
PART TIME 

Beoe&n include.- Flexible corbog 
hum nwitu re hhri Y&US 

boous. This opportunity has 
arisen Cwa nature person to wort 
on own mutative directly for 
Managing Director. No shorthand 
or typrae reginred. 

Ring Annie Nicholas or 
Valerie Gtasfoid 
on 01-434 9664/9 at 
14S Oxford Street "1 
(Opposite Snpa Sports) 


KINGSWAY 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


TEMPORARY STAFF 
SPECIALISTS 


$ 


PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT: 

PERSONNEL: 

SW1 


Applications invited for new post as PA to Executive 
Secretary Personnel and Administration. The iob requires 
good inter-personal skills, pleasant tetephone manner, 
organising ability and the utmost discretion. Applicants 
should be trained secretaries- of good education, able to work 
on their own initiative with a minimum of 2 years work 
experience preferably in Personnel. WP experience an 
advantage. Salary around £9,000. 

Details from N.F.W.I., 

39 Eccteston street 

London SW1W 9 NT. 

Tel: 01-730 7212. 

Closiig date 23rd December 1986. 



THIS IS 

THE HARDEST POSITION 
WE’VE EVER HAD TO FILL! 

Due to the continued success of our organisation 
we're looking for Personal Advisors to join our 
Central London operations. 

The people we have in mind will be self-motivated 
with the will to succeed, have good communication 
skills and the necessary sales drive. 

If you think you have all If takes, call in 
or ring Paulette Shaffer to arrange an 
appointment 


BROOK STREET 


PROPERTY PARTNERS PA £10,000 

Top firm of chartered surveyors is lookina for a bright 
confident person who wants to work at senior level and 
have plenty of variety. He is chamttng, a keep-fitaholici a 
very good delegator so the job should be demandinB but 
fun. Skills 100/60. 

MARKETING £11,000 

As PA to the international marketing director of this leadi 
corporation you will Base with VIPs, organise and attei.. 
conterencas/exhibitiDns and hold the tort whan he is 
traveWng abroad. Excellent presentation plus 80/55 skills 
and WP r — 




experience essential. 


pleasettriepbofle: 01-499 8070 
87 New Bond Street London W.1 . 

CAROLINE KMG SECRETARUU.APPOUnnaiTS 


J 


230 High Holborn, WC1V 7DA 
01-242 6991 


M I S O N 


PERSONNEL BANKING 

c£1 0,500 

Two bright, rnteillgefTf young secretaries are sought by the 
Personnel Dept ofWs leading Merchant Bank. Full invotve- 
mant fai a variety of personnel tasks, you will be arranging 
Interviews, liaising with agencies and dealing with a variety 
of internal employee admin. Skills of 80/80 are required. 
Our clients offer a fall range of banking benefits Including 
mortgage subsidy and bonus. 

01-583 5441 

Recruitment Consultants 


DEBORAH IS OUR 
CHAIRMANS 
SECRETARY 

She is leaving him for another division within the 
Company and we are looking Tor her replacement. As 
weU as having excellent shorthand and typing skills, she 
has managed to ease the load of oar very busy Chairman 
by being an extremely competent PA. 

If you would like to work for a wefl established food 
importers/distributors, based a stones throw from East 
Croydon (BR station) and can emulate Deborah’s skills 
plus a world 


plus a working know, 
apply in writing to; 


of French and German, please 


Mrs J. Suter, Financial Director, 
Winterbotfom Darby & Company limited, 
16 Dingwall Road, Croydon, 
Surrey, CR9 2SN. 


COUNTRY LIFE! 

PA /secretary to Managing Director of small 
investment management company, situated in 
Gloucestershire. Intelligent, well-dressed, 
competent, tidy, good with figures. Knowledge 
of computers usdul, must have experience of 
book-keeping. Shorthand essentiaL Age 25-45. 
Salary negotiable to £8,000. Pleasant offices in 
country house. Various recreational facilities 
available including riding, tennis and 

swimming. 

Applications in writing to: 

Alistair Madnnes & Company Ltd, 
Glebe House, Shipton Moyne, 
Tetbury, Glocs, GL8 8PW. 


PERSONALITY PLUS 


Top firm of interior Designers ’ 
flamboyant shorthand sec/PA w 
Chief Executive. Very high admi 


_ W1 require a versatile I 
'A with WP (22 +) for their | 
admin content ana an Meal 
to become part of a thriving company. Salary 


Call Sally Owens 01 23S 8427 
4 Pont Street, London SWlX 9EL 




f NIGHTSBRIDG C 
SECRETARIES L. 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
Office in Brussels 
£14,000 - 16,000 

Nous eogageons Tadjointe au President cTun 
Groupe financier. 

La fonction requiem de I'initiative et la capacite de 
rediger du counter commercial err autonoraie. Une 
bonne inaitrise du francais ecrit et parf^ esi 
necessaire. 

Please write riving fell career to: 

INTERENTERPRISES 
avenue Bois du Dimanche 23 - 
B- 1150 Brussels 


mi 


IDRAKE 

PERSONNEL 


GERMAN PA 

c. £11,000 

plus Mtge. 

TWo young axecubvas 
of a leading US 
Investment Bank are 
looking fora bEngual 
PA to assist them in as 
aspects of their work. 
As one is German and 
tne other Swiss, they 
require someone with 
fluent German and 

German shorthancL 

They wdl rety on you to 
provide fall saenstana! 

support involving 
considerable contact 
with international diems, 
as well as liaison at aU 
levels whhin me bank. 
Excellent organizational 
skins, confidence and 
enthusiasm are reaured 
for this averting position, 
Age 2545 Skills: Kl/BO 

CITY OFFICE 
726 8491 

ASm&uQWgR 


PERSONALITY 

PA 

' £13,000 

Tits c a avert! opporamity lor 
an admni and SH sUletl PA wth 
# vwScrjus aid profassanai 
pratot The edmn coaenl Is 
very high and you wflf be 
ttOKftd to azonmny tour 
bus to UK conferenceE and 
RiMMs, nabraly traneSno In 
stytoff You mi wtheut dndd 
tocomMoBBr mohw as the 
Bp mar’s PA uf ibe UK [Mon 
ot nearly 1 DO 0 salt yw MH be 
the Ogunftaad tor apport sttf. 
Caff qacUy tor a prompt 
interview - 

Marie Tbarcse Q atimaM oa 
81-031 B8K 


iHeDtuuaBfranwrKXWuoioua 


KNIGHTS BRIDGE 
ESTATE AGENCY 

SKretarv/Bawraartsl required 

lor smaH fnendlvotfce Common 
sense, ar mteml in property aid 
pood KtepAOne manner 
HSEffid.Suftintobgertsec 
college kawi. Good salary wtdr 
bonus 
after 5pm 
581 042S 


LUXURY PADS 


An axeditfte property 
management company 
needs a detfleatod to*- 
vtdual to Join their anthu- 
siasftc ana friendly team, 
lira company offers a 
personalised service to 
top mtemational diems 
and you wUI be organising 
and co-onfinatnw ser- 
vices and assisting 
dynamic MO With her 
work. Attention to detail is 
necessary es tWs is an m- 

E5Lffl- , S?AS 


This expanding comparry 

offers .conotoerabieBcope 

to the right person to 
develop their own areas 
ofnsponsWi'ty. fxperi- 
enca m a service or pro- 
Deny rffteted company 

iCouid be usafal Put 001 
SKUIs; 90/80 

WbsS Ead WJice 
01-629 9686 

A NCH^ MORTIMER 


PACESETTER 

£12,000 + Mtg 

As PA to the Head of 
Corporate Finance in tins 
expanding blue clap British 
Merchant Bank you mil be 
expected to help set tire 
pate in this high profile area 

He E an unusually 
personable, go-ahead and 
successful young banter 
who is sufficiently _ well 
organised to involve his PA 
fully in client developments, 
liaison and research. 

I Lass than half of your time 
mil be spent in secretarial 
work, the remainder will be 
working with him thinking 
out and planning the next 
move 

Age 75-35 Skills 100/60 
City Office 
GOO 0286 

ANqo^.^tp.irnjWER 


Continued on next page 










32 


THF TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 


puB 


+ jyJLo: 

ijy + Uranus 


0trtieftamwinbBm3t^ki*sbnentb^ 
tsseek^aaxrnmedPA/Secn^to work for 
a Vkx Resident and his smaB dose-knit trade# 
team. The posmn offers an eia^r^rh^fy 
to work with aack troops at the forefront of 
market-malmBJhe ideal applicant shodd be 
fex&andout&irvwdhaser&afhmourand 
the abiSty to remain cdm to a pressurised 
environment Financia] or banking experience Is 
p referred. wrthaskSrequkemergof9Q/60 + 
WP. Age torScaiar 263(1 Benefeafsomdude 
IfSIL. free hmch free medicai insurance and a 


norHxnb^xjtorypen^ scheme rwkingt} 

total a padBge of £1506000. 

Please telephone 41439 6477 

^5 v : ■ , 

■ _■<*'* 'v 





P. A. TO TEOUTBLE-SHOOTEB. 

This substantial financial services company s 
currently undergong re-organisation and the 
introduction of a marketing function. The MD. is 
responsible for these activities and needs a top-8;ght 
PA to assist him during this exating period of change 
and help him take the company into the 1 990's! 
Organisation skills are very important as are speeds 
of 9CY50 and the ability to liaise at a very high level. 
23-25. £1 0.000+ mortgage. 

^-sr'+’rr y-v * ‘ nrtf‘ f 

... .j, 


high profile 

The Marketing Director of this famouscommunica- 
cons organisation requires a Secretary with loads of 
inifcaove to assist him mthishign-pronle role. 

He is keen to delegate responsibility and will 
expect you to take control of his office. You wm enjoy 

ahigh degreeof involvement- liaising with diems and 

senior staff, organising meetings and 
marketing functions. Skills 8050. "fififcf?? 5 
c£ 1 0.000+ package 20+ . ot-499 3S3i/35 5t 


NABARRO NATHANSON 

PERSONNEL 

ASSISTANT 

Due to expansion, this West End firm of solicitors requires an 
additional assistant in their Personnel Department 
We are looking for someone who: 

□ is in their mid-twenties 
D is educated to A'leveJ standard 

□ has a minimum of 2/3 years' experience in a Personnel Department 
in an administrative capacity (but with the ability to type) 

□ is organised and capable of acting on their own initiative 
□ has the ability to deal with people at all ievds 
□ has a sympathetic and understanding nature. 

The job involves: dealing with all aspects of Personnel including routine 
administration, some recruiting and the undertaking of specific projects. 
The Finn offers: a competitive salary season ticket loan, twice yearly 
salary reviews, four weeks' holiday. 

Please send full c.v. to Miss E Brown. Personnel Administrator. 
Nabarro Nathanson. 76 Jerrrryn Street London SW1Y 6NR. 



SUPERVISOR 

OFFICE SYSTEMS 
FROM £12400 
LONDON 

I9roif>4j 

^RSECUIUTASm# 


Group +, pan of Europe's largest Security 
Organcaaon is looking far an adnwusraoon 
supervisor with experience of word processing 
and a sound background in organisation and 
ad i a t auan on. 

The function of the department, which is based 
at Wiappng is to provide the dental and 
adWWsD ati ve support to ensure mat the 
Company ran continue to provide a good 
service to as Alarms Customers. 

gyou have the required ad r n in en a c i ve and 
supervisory state, please wme with full derails 
Ox- 

RjG. Dewe. RecntHnent Manager, 
GROUP4 TOTAL SECURITY LIMITED, 
Rum a ate Home. Bnadiwy, 

Wares. WR1Z7U. 

traeruiews wfl be heU locaty. 


CREME DE LA CREME 


Public Relations to£l 1,000 

Ifyou are seeking a chaD edging 

role in a creative environment, 
then Join this prestigious PR 
consultancy as PA to a Director. 
You should have a flexible attitude 
and enjoy a varied and pressurised 
day. 60 / 100 skills are required. 

Please call Katrina. 


Advertising £10,000 
Use your excellent secretarial and 
organisational skills to co- 
ordinate top name client 
presentations in this progressive 
advertising company. This 
Director-level position offers 
plenty of responsibility and scope 
For personal development. 60/90 
skills are necessary 


VISION APPOINTMENTS 

CONSULTANTS IN SECRETARIAL SELECTION 

Eastgate House, 16-19 EastcasOa Street, London WIN 7PA ■ Weptione: 01-631 4146 



FAST EXPANDING SPORTS 
MARKETING COMPANY 

Need an Administration Assistant WP and typing skills necessary, shorthand 
preferred. The successful applicant should have an interest in sport be prepared to 
develop oar off a secretarial role hno both providing creative and administrative 
support for the Press Relations Manager and helping admini s te r the companies 
port folio of promotions and sponsorship. Age 21 pins, educated to A levd 
standard. Salary £&Q00 per annum oegaae. 

Applications A C.V. to ; 

MH + P 
Thames House 

18 Park Street London SE1 9EL 


THIRD WORLD INSTITUTE 

(near Euston) 

Reqtfres a Conference Secretary , satary aqufctaent id SSSOO pa. 
4 to S months contract staring altar New Year, Responsfoto tar 
typing, copying and orateOng conference pa per s: 
ccrres o ondanca travel aid acco mm odation a rrangem en ts for 
speakers. Word-processing sMta required. 

Apply wttb C-V.bf 22 Decanlnr to; 
cTWratfrey, UB) 3 EodsUgb Street, WC1H ODD 
Interviews early January. 


* RECEPTIONIST* 

8am-Z30pm OR 
1.30pro-8.00pra 
Property Co. exc£. 

CaU DoMJfartKmr 
Sec Agy 
os 01 488 0007 



SECRETARIAL RECRUITMENT 
CONSULTANTS 


MD'S PA 

West End Marketing 

£10,500 to £12,500 pa 

This is a brand new position for si image- 
conscious person, who enjoys combining a flair 
for PA secretarial work with cflem service. You 
w9 assist the young and successful Managing 
Director whose busy schedule demands 
watertight organisation and an abffity to 'hold 
the forf. French and Spanish would be useful, 
although not essential and you era tikety to be 
aged over 24. Accurate shorthand and an ease 
with new technology are required. 

Please contact Joanna Bafl. 


01-491 1868 


01-5812296 

TM HTQUMIONN. 
SOTfTAflKL 

RECRUITMENT 


(tm) 


01-5848931 

SOWHSCffSCENT 
XMGHT58W0GE 
LONDONS W1 


r OFFICE MANAGER 1 
£19,000 Package 


[ A prestigious American Investment Bank is looking tor a I 
! PA/0ffice Manager to worit in one of ft’s service depat- j 
r rnents. The mat you will be reporting to is dynamic and re- 1 
| sults-orientsted. YotfH be responsible for supplies, equp- , 
j ment and junir support staff as well as organising European I 
j travel schedules arid conferences. For this job you must have J 
| an excel (err secretarial bacfcpound and speeds of 110/60. | 
Age 23-30. 


TEMPORARY SECRETARIES 
c.£14,000 p.a. 

Our cfents, mufti-nationai investnwrt banks. PJl and adver- 


work. 

We tiso have several . 
German and/or French with 
j package. 


A 

ies around £1 


II 

.J 


MP’S SECRETARY 

London Member, Conservative, needs a 
secretary at Westminster from mid January to 
assist with political activities, constil u ea cy 
correspondence and much unusual Individual 
case work. Keen interest in current affairs, 
busmen and human problems very important. 
Flawless typing ana spelling from audio 
ltiai, good SH an advantage. 


Please send brief CV and explain how yoa have 
gained relevant experience to; Advertiser , 32 
Rawlings Street, SW3 2LS. 


LOOKING FOR A CHANGE? 
THEN WE'RE LOOKING FOR 
YOU! 

David and JuHanne run a small sales and 
reservations office in Fifiam, for a large Hotel 
Grot? based in Tokyo and we are looking for 
someone as mad as us to act as a sou, warm, 
efficient Number 3. The vacancy, which win become 
vacant on 5th January, ranges from reservations to 
secretarial work, telephone sales, coffee m " 
etc*, but above afl, being very much part of a 

team - Satar y h range of 

£8,500 and BUPA. 

For further dataSs contact either of us at 

New OtoBl tatenatioOTL faropOTo^Sriee Office, 


Cosmetics 

£11,500 

Nannal confidence and immaculate grooming 
are essential qualities fix' this No 1 PA role in 
a top cosmetics house. Secretarial skills must 
be firs class but the ability to run the MD’s 
office smoothly and co-ordinate ar 
senior level is equally important. 

You should enjoy the social side 
of a PA role looking after 
overseas visitors and 
planning their itineraries as 
well as organising and 
attending presentations 
throughout the UK. 

Age 25-35 Skills 100/60 



Multinational Company situated 
near the Franco-Swiss border 
seeks a bilingual secretary for 
its managinp director and 
personnel director 

English mother tongue, fluent 
frenen (spoken and written), 
shorthand/typing, ability to organise 
and use initiative. 

This position offers a good salary 
and excellent opportunities for the 
successful candidate aged 23 years or 
over and with at least three years’ 
experience. 

Please send full details of 
curriculum vitae to Mr D. Unvois, ITT 
Composants et Instruments, Avenue 
du Marechal de Lattre de Tassigny, 
BP 359, 39105 Dole, France. 


ITT 


Ls 


RECRUITMENT 

r o m p \ N \ 


5 GARRICK STREET 
I COVENT GARDEN 
TEL 01-831 1220 


CENTRE FOR POLICY STUDIES 

Seda i swi m to Director of Studies - responsible for Caisoo 
with p o li ti cia n, Mfl aa ri raiim . u«i<|i"f mi* 

tatwl adnnmnation. Stmemlmlh Mwiiiiii 
Starting salary £10000 pa. 

Please telephone Mis Brooke or Mr Knox on 

01 828 1176 


TOUR 

OPERATOR 

Requires an enthusiastic 
semtai to become part erf he 


In W11. you uolll provide 
secretarial aupoort to the 
Martafiifl Director and other 
fnwnfcgtf the department. 
Skills 50/90 + audio. This 
Wwwtog and vanad poatwn 
dtes a eomiHWw satoy. h»d 

coneasswiis and a profit Inked 
bonus scheme. 


toward C¥ to 

SitkSSSf&L 

totooMVHaitL 


TRADE 
ASSOCIATION 

Requires a secretary 

for toe Director 
General. Good 
shorthand/typing and 
WP experience. 9 
month control due 
to maternity leave. 
Start 5 January. 

£9,000 pa. 

Can 437 0678 
ex 236. 



7 




yMEOAaAOVSntSMG 

PERSONNEL 
to £12^)00 

The c tann « B Parsonnd Dkeetor of an Wa m aflo n J ream} 
' a Pfyftncnnel Asstsant who to an aceUam 

fid i^aghiy with European O f — wr , 

mahtidwn o all parnnnri ncoms 0«wai 


I support for 

stance of psstmei procedures, be 
of 30/60 and most mportanfly . be a 


v ofsu ft leaifonentof sacratanp 

You»^"i^ f 'tD have some 
numerate ®vj haw secretarial a 
se8 starter Age: 25-35 

IBV YEAR BaSUITKM 

B sou are thHang of ebangkig jobs early n the Now Year we would fits to 
at to wo now. We an handing se ve ral wcandes tar secretaries in 
ad vert isi ng and PR hi the salary range ol ES.000 -^12/JOO. 

01-481 3775 

RecnfoBHt CeesaVanls 


The best way to miss 
the big drill 

• Immediate work 

• Competitive rates and a holiday pay 
scheme throughout the winter 

• The pick of me best assignments in 
London 

• Professional and personal service 
Telephone S ally Dowson 
on 01-439 0601. 



PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT 

TO DEPUTY DIRECTOR 

Personal Asistant requried to wok wito toe 
Deputy Director of the BRC as part of the senior 
management team. Hie Deputy Director is 
responsible for puhfic i nforma tion, pofley 
development research and evaluation, fund 
r aisin g and central financial management 

The successfol candidate wffl be numerate, wefl 
organised, experienced in srmSar work, able to 
commuracata well wito coll e a gue s and com ratted 
to toe aims of toe BRC, Good typing and 
secretarial skills essential Word processing an 
advantage but training can be provided. 

Salary: not less that £8706 pa mdutong L ondon 
Weighting (currantfy undo - review). Additional 
points may be awarded for relevant experience 
and/or quafifications. 

t p eah e n : v&ufhan. London SW8. 

For fob description and aroticahon form, write to 
Katherine Stow. BRC. Bondway House. M 
Bondway. London SW8 1SJ. Ctostng data: 23rd 
December 1986. 

The BRC is worktog tow»ds equal opportunities 
in aS aspects of its activities. 

BRITISH REFUGEE COUNCIL 


DA RBEB 

DE S IGN, 

t. I M t T K 1) 

CA NADI AN £11.000 + 

LAWYERS paid overtime 

Yonr i«y»i exper tise is Mwntml wben you assist two 
dynamic la wyos who are invoi ced in the issue of new 
stock and shares. This is a Boot line 

position for a legal secretary who is boring for a more 
stimulating role. Fast WP skills. 

JUNIOR to £9,500 phis 

SECRETARY hanking benefits 

A opportun ity for a poEshed. shorthand 

secretary to A* wfjriwg "-irrld of miMnwrimwl 
hanlring. Based in marharing. yoa wffl ofier hill 
secretarial and «rfn7m sup p mt to a team of four. Age 
21+. 

For farther detaSs contact 
Diane Hiiton or Sarin Psrnsby on 
01-489 0889/01-238 2522. 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 
I GBOVELANO COURT. BOW LANE. LONDON BC4M SEH 
TELEPHONE: 01-480 0889 


PERSONNEL ASSISTANT 

UP TO £10,500 


Recruitment personnel administration and 
a secretarial service to the Personnel 
Manager combine to make this a very 
interesting and demanding job in the Head 
Office of an International Company, near 
Waterloo station. 

You should have previous experience (for 
example as a secretary) in a Personnel 
Department, and we wffl give you some 
training in recruitment Shorthand is not 
essential and we wffl provide Wang Word 
Processing Training. But, most of afl you 
must have the maturity (minimum age 24) 
to get through a heavy workload, often 
using your own initiative, in what can at 
times be a thoroughly hectic environment 

Far an tofomraf dt scassw a stmt &e 

telephone INI Meehan on 01-922 


SECRETARY 
TO MJ). 

WARM 

PERSONALITY 
£12,000 Neg. 
A&hoogb & tot c£ TOKk s 

ynw srfpd firm riw Mamag- 
ing Bimetal's office are of 
An B 8 

zetaiod and ootyHis pexso 



fevefe of 
warmth and i 
wfiit abo _ _ _ 

busy Managin g Dhertcc. 
Same sboEtomd, typing 
aid WP. apaience eas- 
ential Prrfaad aged 27-ffi. 


STRUCTURE 2000 


■DRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

CARffiBEAH 
CONFERENCES 
£8000 

Lbsb wth Hndnl dMs 
km th» fay Amw; 

gsjsa-"aa.“ s 

tmas mte nuUmH cootaans 
™ taaauHs tor tat surer 


rod ctere enounev. Tm an 
the amter am uottm the 
want l tray. Excafera peris 
Muds fret s ttff fBg jj zt aBd 


01-834 


TOPLINE 
RECEPTIONIST 
STOCKBROKING 
£9,500 -£10,000+ 
B0NUS 

A tap City Stock Broken 
requires a wdl groomed 
amcuiaie pbsob used ta 
dealing wnh senior peopfr 
who b capable of nmxkmg 
the mais reception area. 

No typine involved. 

Sal up to £10j000+ 30% 
bonus, free Bupa, 
free Uindi etc. etc. 
For details Tel 
Watsoaoa 
11626 8524 
Monmnest 

Fcr smut d Coasatonts. 


fwjamn 


Onreuri wrwf 4 mm 
nr m 

MnanwaciUiainrvpK- 
Utah! premm 
MftR*7Wf _ . C11JW 

Use Mtrere A JdaqfM aWns »- 
seeoe 


mmbc nan ire • 

mspii 

wama 


CONSERVATIVE 

MR 

Requires full-time 
secretary to work in 
the House of 
Commons. Typing 
and shorthand 
essential. 
Salary £9,000+ 
Reply to BOX J64 


IIMDRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

TRAVELLING 
BILINGUAL 
SECRETARY 
£10,500++ 

Do yon speak Gremz) and taw 
lots re reive aod ndaSw? Ibis 
is an oicrettiita aupvfcnKy to 
v*h an Hdtng rare 
NntKm aiapsN. bma n 
Mreriar There wd be lire 
oooonunfty lor nrendlonal 
nawLadrenee 10 Wa ttsot 
responsWfcy ■*! to itanttw- 
anre yu abflu and 
ton. Use yoor good lyptog retd 
ooH^pgonaay to n-y 

Unto Qfcrey atm no 

n-73< fell. 


TV 

Commercial FBm 
Production Company 
requires Receptionist/ 
Junior A dmin is t rat o r. 

Salary negotiable. 

Telephone Jenny 

on 01 437 9965 


DESPERATE 

£12,000 

Yes. tte ovonvorired, sonalkBss 
twurera utfrt senior gant tam g 
needs a hard wortong P A/- 

be foog. yd op- 
eriemed at sonar lew, hare a 
confident persooaltty and be 

W 9 tree ytwr top skits of 
and not be averse ta 


mnwm u he mm iu o a 
938-1848 Agy. 


•RECEPTIONIST* 

folltuk 

Prestigious 
Waterade Property 
Co: City. Call 

CoklHarbour 
Sec Agy on 

014880007 


IK 


SECRETARY 

Camden Town Interior 
Design Practice need 
realty wed orga nized, self 
motivated office 
secretary. Shorthand not 
necessary. Word 
proce s sing experience an 
advantage. 

Salary negotiable. 

Phone Tara on 
01-482 3080 
fNoAaandes) 


■DRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

EXCELLENT PA 
MUNICH 

DM55JXI0 
(c£20,000) 

Hgb cafora, so&tt M 
raqrered torraprfy Bap andnQ 
munnttanal company to work 
at PtasktartM taw*. Fluency 
n German and Engteti and 
MLaaen t SH n noth 
lan g ua ges re vita). Supreme 
confidence to sot <*> and 
estahSsh rere Drandi Spoken 
Frew* an stivansga. Noo- 
smoter Please Cad 
DAWN TAYLOR ea 
61421 W6. 


§ -&&**&*! 
nW D«N'SrenBMAflOMM.«aUP 




FiN^e 

wBONTremire 


<Q& A, 


SECRETARY - ADMINISTRATOR 

Internationa] Trade Associates in London’s 
W2, close to Paddington, seeks ap experienced 
secretary-administrator to act as one of two 
assistants to the Secretary General and hxs 
Deputy, with specific responsibilities tor org- 
anising meetings, mostly overseas, and for 
pccicttng with the servicing of certain major 
committees. 

The successful candidate should be aged 28-35, 
with English as the mother longue, be fl uent in 
French (other languages desirable), have first 
rate tvping, audio and shorthand skills, wont 
processing experience (WordStar preferably), 
be nummerate, flexible as to hours and over- 
seas travel, drive and be a non-smoker. 

Salary £10.250 - season ticket loan available. 

To apply please send yoor CV together with a 
covering letter to: 

Dr ME. Loveitt, 

6 Bathurst Street, 

Sussex Square, 

Loudon W2 2SD. 

* No agencies. 



Senior PA 

to £12,000 

Our client, a leading European communications 
group, is seeking a mature executive R4 for one 
of their Key Board Directors. An extremely 
involving role, you will deal with senior 
management, organise meetings, diary and 
travel and ensure the smooth running of the 
office. Professional sure-footed and cool under 
pressure, you should also have excellent skills 
(100 60k word processing experience and the 
ability to communicate at all levels. Age 38-50. 
Please telephone 01-409 1232. 


ftonMmenr Consultants 



SECRETARIAL RECRUITMENT 
CONSULTANTS 


DIRECTOR’S PA 

AGE: 21+ £11,000 

Our client, a young and very successful 
publications company, requires a PA for one 
of their dynamic directors. If you are 21-26 
and have toe skills, experience and 
personality to make you worth £11,000 then 

please contact me to find out more about this 

challenging position. Gillian Bwood. 


01-491 1868 


CONFERENCE 
C0KDINAT0R 

WITH TRAVEL 

£ 10,000 

This dream job near 
Green Park involves or- 
ganising and setting up 
co n ferences, receptions 
jctmT yyiiTiufu gt home 

and abroad therefore in- 
cluding some foreign tea- 
veL A small percentage 
of the day requires secre- 
tarial riaHs (90/00) bat 
an excellent organiser 
whoa socially confident 
is <wwitwl- Minimum 
age 25+. 


£8,000++ 

SHORTHAND, AUDIO 
AND WP 
SECRETARIES 

We arc making a register of secretaries who are in the 
market for jobs paying hi excess of £8,000. If you 
would tike your details to be available to 500 ciuenis 
in January, please send your CV to; 

Kathy Reddy, Wardonr Sheet Agency, 
100 Wardonr Street, London, W1 

or ring n t» make a cauvadere appointment on 

7348844. 


RECEPTION ONLY 

c£9£00 

On joking thb wry prestigious int e rnational com pa ny (Charing 
CroKj) you «* be resporifoie tar the smooth running or that 
tiMuWul re caption area, where you wffl be m e eti ng a cron 
sartion ot clients, working closely with one other young 
naptantst ft to essential that you are between 22-28, have 
relevant experience and of course excellent speech and 
presentation. Working condNions are superb and benefits are 
excellent 

Telephone Melanie Laing. 

Ol 631 354?nec-Cofts' 

Price -J<m\esov\ 


HECEnjOMST/TEUPIKHIIST 
FOR ARCHITECTS 
UptO £8,000 

SSsBVSSraa 

_ Carol Crook, 

Rock Townsend,. 

33 Gresse Street, 
London W1P 1PN 

Tel: 01-637 5300 
No Agencies 


KNIGHTS BRIDGE 
ESTATE AGENCY 

Secraln/RficBiAorasi raqurau 
lor smril tnemUy otlice. Common 
9ansB. an nnrest n praotity anti 
good Estep none manner 

essential. Surt rtetooort sec 
coHeueteaw Good satary wnti 
bows. 

Ti 

5810*25 


•RECEPT10W 

FULLTIME 

Prestigious 
Waterside F»rop 
Co. City. Cal 
CofdHarbou 
Sec Agy on 
Ol 488 OOC 














MOTOR racing 

Race is on 
for the 

smoothest 

ride 

By John Blunsden 

* Phrase is likely to be 
added to the vocabulary of 
grand pnx racing next season. It 
is -active suspension", and it 
ryers to a sophisticated system 
of suspension control in which 
messages are sent from each 
comer of the car to a central 
computer processor, which in- 
stantly analyses them and then 
makes the appropriate suspen- 
sion adjustments for optimum 
handling and ride performance. 

•1983. when JPS Team Lotus 
experimented with an “active" 
car in Brazil but the svstem 
clearly needed a lot of develop- 
ment and little has been heard 
about it since. However, the 
Lotus research and develop, 
ment department have been 
continuing their investigations, 
and the system is expected to 
feature on the next Corvette 
sports car 

There are strong rumours that 
the Lot us- Honda formula one 
car. which Gerard Ducarougc is 
designing for 1987. will also be 
actively suspended, but mean- 
while. Williams Grand Prix 
Engineering have announced 
that they, too, have a car 
equipped with computer-con- 
trolled. active-ride suspension 
which began four days of tests at 
Estoril. PortugaL yesterday. 

"We have been developing 
active-ride for several years, 
originally in conjunction with 
Automotive Products of Leam- 
ington" explained the Will- 
iams's design director, Patrick 
Head. “Now we have talten over 
the development from AP. and 
we believe it has far-reaching 
possibilities." 

Williams will run their experi- 
mental car alongside two stan- 
dard specification FWlls in 
Portugal and, if the results from 
the new suspension system are 
sufficiently positive, the team 
will consider racing with what 
they arc already referring to as 
their “glide ride" development 
during the coming season. 

Nigel Mansell is expected to 
return for the tests from Abu 
Dhabi, where he has been on a 
promotion trip for MobiL one of 
his team's sponsors. Last Friday 
evening, Mansell was an- 
nounce! as the recipient of the 
Guild of Motoring Writer’s 
1 986 Driver of the Year award. 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1 986 



SPORT 


33 


Bringing out the best in West 


Unsung Briton Jeremy 
West became the first 
Western canoeist to 
win two titles at the 
world championships 
this year. Chief Sports 
Correspondent David 
Miller met him in 
exile in Basle, 
Switzerland. 

Is it possible for an impecunious 
Briton to penetrate the professional 
arena of a minority sport dominated 
by state-sponsored Eastern Europe- 
ans, would the public know if he did, 
and should they and our Government 
care more than they evidently do? 
The answers are yes, no and maybe. 

The questions are provoked by 
Jeremy West, from- Surrey, a remark- 
able double world champion in 
canoeing, presently living anony- 
mously m Basle, who has a thorax, 
shoulders and biceps to compare with 
Tyson the Terrible, and is an obvious 
candidate for a gold medal at the next 
Olympic Games. 

He excels over the 
prosaic, flat stuff 

Let us consider the last answer first. 
Competitive canoeists in Britain are 
numbered in four figures, rather than 
six or seven, but they are energetic 
enough in their persuasions for 
Princess Anne to have opened, this 
autumn, an artificial white-water 
course at the national water-sports 
centre in Nottingham in the company 
of satisfied officials from the Not- 
tinghamshire and Sports Councils. 

White-water racing is, of course, 
more eccentric than the prosaic flat 
stuff, in which the canoeist must 
generate his own momentum, and at 
which West excels. It is commendable 
that the taxpayer should provide 
community facilities that offer an 
alternative to the son of entertain- 
ment for which too many are at 
present undergoing healthy spells of 
retraining at Her Majesty’s Pleasure. 

Yet is public or private sponsor- 
ship justifiable to help West beat the 
Communists at an activity that as 


• ’ : •" ■ ■*,' ■ 



- V -4 





l 



Worldly goods: Jeremy West and the world championship medals that 
changed his mind about entering the Seoul Olympics 


they perceive it, is an ideology as 
mu<± as a sporting achievement? 

In moderation, I think, public 
support is in the public interestNo 
sociological analyst can tell us pre- 
cisely foe parameters by which we 
estimate our national status, yet sport 
is certainly part of foe equation. A 
world champion canoeist must be 
worth more to our self-esteem than 
any bucolic darts-tosser. 

It is, however, wrong of foe 
publicist for canoedng’s Olympic 
racing squad to claim poverty on 
West's behalt in comparison with, 
say, our leading trade athletes. Ovett, 
Coe, Cram and Black became finan- 
cially prominent only after achieving 
international success. 


The drive of foe international 
sports competitor should always, in 
foe first place, be self-initiated by 
private, not public, will-power. There 
is also foe factor of spectator - and, 
therefore, commercial — interest, 
which is unfortunate for WesL 

Having said that, it is to be hoped 
that he will now be given an dlite 
grant of £5,000 by foe Sports Aid 
Foundation, which hitherto has 
funded him with some £800 per 
annum. Such were the financial 
strains that, until he won foe K1 
(singles) 500 metres and 1 ,000 metres 
in this year’s world championships in 
Montreal he had intended, at 25, to 
retire prematurely. 


Not only was his double gold an 
achievement accomplished only 
twice before — and never by a West- 
ern competitor — but bis time of 
3min 37.60sec was au unofficial 
world record. 

The Olympic champion. Alan 
Thompson’ of New Zealand, re- 
turned bis same Los Angeles time, yet 
was only seventh, and West also 
defeated,' for the first time in three 
meetings this year, the previous 
1.000m world champion, Ferenc 
Csipes, of Hungary. 

“The only way to beat the Eastern 
Europeans.” he says, “is simple - do 
as much work as they do.” 

Jeremy followed in the footsteps of 
Jonathan, eight years his elder 
brother among four. At 13, be joined 
Leander Sea Scouts at Kingston-on- 
Thames and, soon afterwards, he 
crossed foe river to the adjacent 
Royal Canoe Club. 

In 1979, at 18, he won the junior 
world championships silver medal — . 
Britain's first-ever medal — but, im- 
mediately before the Moscow Olym- 
pics, he contracted hepatitis and was 
out of action fora year. 

It took him two or three years to re- 
cover fully, and he meanwhile 
worked at his mathematics degree at 
foe West London Institute. In 1984, 
he took a sabbatical and, in Los 
Angeles, came fifth in the K4 “fours”, 
only half a second behind the bronze 
medallists, and eighth in the K2 
(pairs) with Andrew Sherri ff. 

Medals changed his 
mind about retirement 

Last year, he completed his degree 
and then borrowed £2,000 from his 
father, to attend a winter’s “summer” 
training in New Zealand with Ian 
Ferguson, a former Olympic cham- 
pion. Fteqpison provided new ideas 
and motivation, and Montreal foe 
reward. West changed his mind about 
retiremenL 

What is a British canoeist doing in 
Basle? The answer is that his fiancee, 
whom he is marrying in a fortnight's 
time, is Irene Schaffiier, foe former 
European freestyle ski-jumping 
bronze medallist and now fitness 
coach of foe Swiss canoe team. 

West plans to spend this winter, 
with SAF assistance, strengthening 
his already-formidable physique with 
cross-country skiing and t raining at 
centres in Italy. Spain and PortugaL 

Even if he does not win a gold 
medal in Seoul his offspring must 
surely win a medal at something. 


BOXING 


Lawyers may land 
knockout punch 

From Sriknraar Sm, Boxing Correspondent, New York 


The heavyweight series to 
find an undisputed world cham- 
pion. which Mike Tyson -put on 
its feet so spectacularly by 
stopping Trevor Berbick inside 
two rounds at Las Vegas 1 6 days 

r . is not boxing too clever at 
moment A bit like Danny 
Kave as foe fighting milkman in 
The Kid From Brooklyn, and in 
danger of knocking hiinse If silly. 

Just four days before foe start 
of the sixth bout in the series in 
which Tim Witherspoon meets 
James “Bonecnisher" Smith — 
foe replacement for Tony Tubbs 
— foe Don King organisation, 
who manage both Witherspoon 
and Tubbs besides being co- 
promoters of foe tournament, 
are having to face lawyers 
representing the two boxers 
Tobbs maintains foal he 
should not be taken out of foe 
series and has come here to 
appear before foe New York 
Afoletic Commission’s doctors 
to prove that his injury that 
caused his withdrawal was genu- 
ine. Witherspoon simply wants 
more money. 

Tubbs's attorney. Cary 
MedilJ. said: “We will be bring- 
ing a medical report to bring foe 
medical business all out in foe 
open. We want to prove foe 
sceptics wrong." King was ■*“ 
ported to have said that Tubbs 
was faking injury to get more 
money. Tubbs, who is said to 
. j t r 5/1 iWl i.x clanrl 


aside to let Witherspoon defend 
against Frank Bruno last July, 
has now been paid, another 
$75,000 and been told, “Tubbs 
is history", by King. But MedilJ 
says: “We are going to protea 
our rights to fight for foe title”. 

Witherspoon's lawyer, Den- 
nis Richard from Miami says: 
“Tim has never seen his con- 
tract. We have asked for it but 
they have not shown it They are 
playing hide-and-seek ana I 
have put them on notice in 
writing." 

What has set off this revolt is 
that foe other kid from Brook- 
lyn, Tyson, aged 20, made S1.5 
m from bis oout with Berbick 
and will be clearing $3m in 
March against the winner of 
Friday's bout. 

With Tubbs's withdrawal. 
Witherspoon believes that he 
should automatically go through 
to foe next round to meet 
Tyson. He does not believe be is 
bound by his contract to face a 
substitute. 

Richard is not certain whether 
he can get Witherspoon much 
more for Friday’s defence but, 
should he win, he aims to get 
him more than Sira for his bout 
with Tyson. Witherspoon wants 
$5m but will settle for S 3m — die 
same as Tyson. Richard said 
yesterday: "They should 
remember that there is a human 
being involved who should not 
be taken for granted." 


BASKETBALL 


Anniversary 
ball but 
no sponsors 

The World Invitation Basket- 
ball championship wSl celebrate 
its tenth anniversary without a 
maim' sponsor or television 
coverage at Crystal Palace from 
January 1-4. 

A few familiar faces will also 
be absent, notably Maccabi Tel 
Aviv, foe Israeli champions who 
have woo the men’s senior 
tournament six times, and Red 
Star Belgrade of Yugoslavia. 
Afoletes In Action, foe evangeli- 
cal Christian club from the 
United States, lead the chal- 
lenge from abroad with foe aim 
of repeating their 1981 success. 

Europe is well represented 
with Bayer Leverkusen, of West 
Germany, and Solna, of Sweden, 
making welcome returns while 
Team Badweiser, Cork, will 
carry foe hopes of Ireland. 
Other teams also malting a 
return are Monte Labans Sae 
Panic, of Brazil, and the Austra- 
lian Institute of Sport while 

Wingate College, from foe 
United States, will make their 
first appearance. 

Team JPofycefl Kingston, BCP 
London and Murray Inter- 
national Edinburgh, head foe 
domestic challengers alongside 
foe Prudential Cup finalists, 
Portsm ou th, leaving organisers 
one place to fill in foe men's 
competition. 

. A women's and junior men's 
tournament will take place 
alongside the senior men's, to- 
gether with cadet girls and 
wheelchair championships. 


Lack of platform 

By a Special Correspondent 


While England's leading 
teams contest the Prudential 
Cup final at the Royal Albert 
Hall next Monday' night, a 
British team, arguably better 
than either of them, will lack 
their heels on foe sidelines. 

MIM Livingstone, the Scot- 
tish, champions, have long enter- 
tained big ideas, big ambitions. 
Their owner. David Murray, has 
foe long-term aim of winning 
foe European Cup. 

But limy lack a regular plat- 
form for their talents — they are 
50 lo 100 points baler than any 
of their rivals as this weekend's 
Scottish Cup semi-finals will no 
doubt demonstrate: 


The major snag is that the 
Scottish Association’s annual 
general meeting. >0 September 
took a decision not to allow 
clubs to compete in a com- 
petition controlled by another 
association. It tf that decision 
which MIM want to overturn 
and have obtained the support 
of 11 other dubs in calling an 
extraordinary general meeting 
of the association 

With no prospect of a genuine 
British league emerging in the 
immediate future, David Mur- 
ray is prepared to accept foe 
conditions laid down by foe 
English Association (EBBA) for 
foe new-style league. 


SWIMMING 

Award gives 
Day some 
consolation 

Tony Day. ignored by 
Britain's ■ selectors - for - next 
weekend's European Cup in 
Sweden, has received a financial 
boost. Day, aged 21, who comes 
from Wales but is based in 
Leeds, has been granted a Minet 
award for Olympic excellence, 
and will receive £4,160 towards 
training and travelling expenses 
between now and the 1988 
Olympic Games 

Recently. Day beat Grant 
Robins — selected ahead of him 
for Malmo — in the dub team 
championships and set new 
British records for foe 400 
metres medley and 1,500 metres 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


Seahawks frustrate Raiders’ attack 


The dependable and cau- 
tiously optimistic Curt Warner 
gained i 16 yards and scored two 
touchdowns and Dave Krieg 
passed for 243 yards and two 
touchdowns to lead the Sea- 
hawks to a 37-0 win against the 
Los Angeles Raiders on Monday 
night in Seattle. The flustered 
Raiders had not failed to score 
in a game since 1981. 

“We’re still in the hunt for foe 
play-offs," Warner said. The 
most prolific running back in 
the AFC (1,196 yards) scored on 
runs of five and three yards. 


By Robert Kirley 

“Four weeks ago, I t h in k we 
were the worst team in foe NFL 
and it will be hard to overcome 
lhaL It’s door-die time." 

The result enabled the Denver 
Broncos to win the AFC West ■ 
title and kept alive foe feint 
play-off hopes of Seattle, who 
have won three consecutive 
games. The Seahawks estab- 
lished a team record with 11 
sacks of the Los Angeles 
quarterbacks — Jim Plunkett 
(six), Marc Wilson (four) and 
Rusty Hilger (ooe) - foe most 
ever surrendered by the Raiders. 

“It was a bumbling exp- 


erience," foe Los Angeles coach. 
Tom Flores, said. “We didn't 
play well in all categories.” 
Todd Christensen caught a 20- 
yard toss from Plunkett during 
the Raiders’ fust series to be- 
come foe first player in NFL 
history to catch 80 or more 
passes in each of four seasons. 
Christensen, playing in his 
eighth season, caught 92 passes 
in 1983. 80 in 1984 and 82 last 
season. His three catches, for 50 
yards against the Seahawks 
boosted his reception total to 82. 
the best in foe league, for 1,017 
yards. 


GOLF 


The decline of the 
master and the 
birth of his shrine 


Sports writers of The Times 
present their selection, from the 
sporting books of the year. 
Today: Mitchell Platts on the 
best of the golf books. 

The paradox of Aagasta Na- 
tional Golf Qnb is that the 
moment It began life as a shrine 
to its maker, Bobby Jones, so 
Jones himself acknowledged 
that for him playing the game of 
golf could never be quite foe 
same. Jones, of course, had 
formally announced his retire- 
ment from championship golf m 
1930, after he completed the 
unprecedented “Grand Stem", 
but it was at the inaugural US 
Masters in 1934 on his beloved 
Augusta course that be became 
folly aware that he could no- 
longer perform with sack un- 
paralleled majesty. 

Charles Price, in his excellent 
book, Bobby Jones and The 
Masters (Stanley Panl, £201 
explains the start made by Jones 
in the first round in 1934 and his 
emotions as be played the fifth 
hole; “On the next lee, the whir 
of a movie camera made him 
stop in the middle of his 
backswing. Ordinarily, Jones 
could interrupt his downswing, 
so ranch in control did he keep 
the dubbead. But, for the first 
time in memory, something out- 
side that spotlight be was so 
nsed to had unsettled him. 
(Years ago, when a little girl had 
poked her head through the 
gallery as Jones was almost at 
impact, be had been able to top 
his shot on purpose.) 

“Jones readdressed the bail 
uneasily, and pushed his drive 
into the rough. He knew at that 
instant that something had gone 
ontof his game, forever. Nothing 
so inconsequential had ever 
unnerved him before. 

“It wasn't that Jones had lost 
his nerves. After all be was only 
32. To the contrary, be had 
foand his serves in the pit of bis 
stomach, and with those trem- 
bling hands. Bat something was 

keeping him from "biting his 
nerves work for him inawd of 
against him. In the high-wire act 
Jones was expected to peforra at 
Augusta National something 
improvident had put a net 
underneath him. And that mar- 
gin for error had nullified the 
genins that Jones had for golf. It 
had removed the element of 


danger that he had been able to 
overcome in his inimitable fash- 
ion and that had separated him 
from every other golfer in 
‘f ham phuiships— with foe Grand 
Slam, Bobby Jones had gone 
into golTsTovth dimension. He 
had been to some uncharted 
moon ami back. Now that be was 
earth bound again, he just could 
not perform _JVlen might hit 
longer and straighter shots, sink 
more putts, win more champion- 
ships, even. In short, play better 
golf than Bobby Joses had. But 
nobody would ever play like 
him." 

Price strove not to produce the 
official biography of Jones, foe 

official history of the Augusta 

National Golf Club* or foe 
official chronicle of the Masters 
tournaments. Bat he claims it is 
the authorized version of all 
three. 

It is a story which is as 
entrancing as the Augusta Na- 
tional Golf Coarse itself, and 
one which at foe same time 
examines the extraordinary ca- 
reer of Jones, then of bow be 
came to devise Augusta and then 
the tragic circumstances of his 
later years. 

I enjoyed Arnold Palmer's 
introduction in Arnold Palmer's 
Complete Book of Patting (Stan- 
ley Panl £12.951 composed in 
conjunction with Peter Dobe- 
reiner. “All I ask is that if yon 
come across a passage in the 
following pages that strikes yon 
as utter nonsense, then blame 
Dobereiner. And when yon read 
something that sparkles with the 
authentic gleam of a jewel of 
revelation, then give me the 
credit!" That, of course, we most 
eventually conclude lo be the 
handiwork of Dobereiner. The 
book is a fascinating, and forgiv- 

ably extravagant, insight into 
the game within a game and it is 
woven together by a supreme 
artist of the fairways in 
collaboration with an artist from 
the other side of the ropes. 

Every pictnre tells a thousand 
stories, and in Seve (Partridge 
Press, £1 195), the golf photog- 
rapher PhD Sheldon, assisted 
with text by Dudley Donst, 
captures the first 10 years at the 
phenomenal ' Spaniard's pro- 
fessional career. It is a superb 
portrait which reflects the 
changing moods of Ballesteros 
and emphasizes the skills of the 
award-winning Sheldon. 


Kenya ban Woosnam 
over S Africa links 


The Kenya Golf Union have 
banned Ian Woosnatn, of 
Wales, from defending his Ke- 
nya Open title next year because . 
_he. .played in a tournament in 
South Africa at4he weekend- - 

The Kenyan body's admin- 
istrator, Mike Haroage. told 
reporters that Woosnam would 
not be invited to the com- 
petition. which will be played in 
February. He claimed that 
Woosnam took pan in South 
Africa's Sun City Million Dollar 
championship at foe weekend. 

Harbage added that 
Woosnam was one of the few 
top international golfers who 
had defied political pressure to 
boycott foe South African 
tournament. 

• Four former British Open 
champions, Arnold Palmer. 
Gary Player, Peter Thomson 
and Robeno dc Viccnzo look 
certain to be playing golf again 
in Britain next summer. 

The stars of yester-year are 
lined up to take pan in foe new 
Seniors British Open, which will 
be held at Turn berry on July 23- 
26 — foe week after the Open at 
Muirfield. 

Mark McCormack's Inter- 
national Management Group 
will co- pro mole the new event, 
along with the PGA European 
Tour, who have Britain's PGA 
Seniors champion Neil Coles, 
and the former Ryder Cup 
golfers, Christy O’Connor Se- 
nior. Brian Huggett and Bernard 
Hunt, among their over-50's. 

The Seniors Open will have a 
prize fund of £150,000. The 
organisers have secured a three- ■ 


year contract with Tumbeny. 
using the famous Ailsa course. 

• A final round of 75 earned 
r Steve Jones;' of; the United 

Stales; first place in the 108-hole 
PGA qualifying tournament at 
La Quinta. California, on Mon- 
day. Jones .finished 17 unddr 
par. on 415. 

He had rounds of 67, 65. 69. 
67. 72 and 75, to win by four 
shots over Steve EUdnglon. of 
Australia, who scored an even- 
par 72, to .finish with a six-day 
total of 4 19 — 13 under par. 

The victory was worth 
$15,000 (£10,700) to Jones. 
Elkington collected- $9,000 for 
finishing second. 

A total of S3 players earped 
their playing cards for foe 1987 
PGA Tour by completing foe 
tournament with scores, of 
434 - two over par — or better 

over the six rounds. 

Jones, who led or shared foe 
lead in each of the six rounds, 
finished I36lh on this year's 
PGA Tour official money list 
with $51,473. 

The 53 qualifiers join foe 125 
leading earners from this year to 
form foe 1987 PGA Tour. . 

Final scores; 415; S Jonas; 41K S 
Skinoton: 421: PPartitn, RM«fiat;423:T 
Gamer: 424: W Bimoo. D Johnson: 425c D 
Waldorf. D Shtry Jnr. L Roberts. 

• The Wilson Club Pro- 
fessionals Charapionshij 
have an increased prize' 

£25.000 next season when it is 
played at Sandiway. Cheshire, 
from June 24-27. David Huish 
(North Berwick), nominated as 
the captain of the PGA for 1988. 
is foe defending champion. 


up will 
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TH~F TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


RACING 


Comeragh King the star 
of an impressive team 


Jimmy FitzGerald and his 
stable jockey Mark Dwyer are 


triumphant march at Haydock 
Park this afternoon where 
they will be responsible for 
fancied runners in five of the 
six races. 

My feeling is that they will 
land a double with Comeragh 
King and FonriveTV Forget 


which is the day's most valu- 
able race, is almost a carbon 
copy of the Edward Hanmer 
Memorial Chase run over the 
course and distance three 
weeks ago. On that occasion 
only three runners went to 
post and two of them were 
Forgive'N Forget and 
Cybrandian. the principal 
contenders again now. 

The difference is today’s 
race has conditions attached 
whereas their last race was a 
handicap. 

On that occasion Forgive’N 
Forget gave Cybrandian 16ib 
and a four-length beating so it 
is rather difficult to envisage 
Cybrandian winning today’s 
race at level weights, even ifhe 
was below his best last time as 
reflection suggests. 

In the meantime he has won 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 

> well at Chepstow from Mr 
; Moonraker. who did not let 


um-jiiihiiii 


oh Saturday when he was 
runner-up to Oregon Trail in 
the big race there. Also 
Cybrandian was runner-up to 
Foraive’N Forget at Wetherby 
earlier in the season. 

While be was beaten only 
half a length that day he was 


terms the dice are loaded 
heavily in favour of 
Fitzgerald's horse, who has 
run some of his finest races on 
this Lancashire track. 

Following a promising first 
run over fences at Newbury 
where he was runner-up to 
Playschool Comeragh King is 
napped to win the Ribble 
Novices Chase. 

At Cheltenham on Saturday 
the feeling was that Playschool 
would have won again if only 
he had not hit the third last 
fence so hard and come down. 
So Comeragh King's form 
could easily look so much 
better. Even as it stands it is 
still sufficient for me to name 
him as the day's banker 
without hesitation. 

Later in the afternoon Peter 
Scudamore, the season’s lead- 


ing jockey can counter 
Dwyer's considerable chal- 


c ham pi on ship by also landing 
a double on Admiral's Cap 
and Powys. 

After beating Western Sun- 
set at Devon and Exeter 
Admiral's Cup was then far 
from disgraced at Newbury 
where he was runner-up to 


tance that may have been a 
too far for him. I prefer him 
now to Centre Attraction for 
the Boston Pit Handicap 
Chase. 

Travelling companion 
Powys, trained like Admiral’s 
Cup by Fred Winter, is pre- 
ferred to Avoport and 
Mod tech for the Ashton 
Novices’ Hurdle on the 
strength of promising runs at 
Ascot and Sandown Park this 
season. 

Meanwhile at Huntingdon 
the irrepressible Fitzgerald 
can also win with Sip of 
Orange in the EBF Novices 
Hurdle (qualifier). 

A 20-length winner at New- 
castle ten days ago and by six 
lengths at Wetherby before 
that she should be much too 
good for King Nimrod. 



Forgive’N Forget, the Cheltenham Gold Cup favourite, is selected by Mandarin to repeat last month’s emphatic coarse and 
distan ce win over Cybrandian in the Tommy Whittle Chase at Haydock Park today. 


HAYDOCK PARK 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


£30 WATERLOO HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,951: 2m 4f) (14 runners) 

3 003-004 CHARLOTTES DUNCE fl^Dj (Mrs N Westbrook) M H Easterly 5-11-9, — LWyer 


1.00 Mou-Dafa. 

1.30 COMERAGH KING (nap) 

2.00 Forgive ’N Forget. 


2.30 String Player. 
3.00 Admiral's Cup. 

3.30 Pbwys. 


Michael Seely's selection: 2.30 SOME MACHINE (nap) 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

103 (12) 0-0432 TIMESFDRM (CDJBF){MfS J Rytey) BHaflMM 


B West (4) 


RacecanJ number. Draw in brackets. Six-figure 
form (F-fefl. P-puited up. U-unsaatBd rater. B- 
brought down. S-sfipoed up. R-retused). Horse's 
name (B-tifinhers. V-<nsor. H-hood. E-EyesTuek). O- 
COutsb winner D-distance winner. CD-cntrae 


Going: soft, hurdle course; good to soft, chase course 

1.0 STEWARDS SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE (£1 ,050: 2m) (17 runners) 


6 22-0100 MOU-DAFA <M Pipe) M Pipe 8-114) P Scudamore 80 8-1 

B 10030P FLOW WONDER (D) (Roe RacngJGRos 6-11-6 NON-RUNNER — — 

9 002-000 DANCE OP LIFE (P Hamer) P Hamer 7-11-4 Mr P Hamer 82 12-1 

12 40020-3 SPIGOT SHAFT (B Johnson) OWmtieB-l 1-1 A Carroll 89 7-2 

13 00/0000 SKYBOOT (Mrs B Robinson) E Carter 7-1 1-1 P Rlcfaard* 85 — 

14 BBO-100 HYDE (D) (1 Anderson) I Anderson 9-10-13 AMtnphy(7) 91 8-1 

15 134110 KITTY WREN (DJ3F) (Roe Racing Ltd) G Roe 6-10-12 NON-RUNNER 

17 320/ GOOD FRIENDSHIP (A DonnaBon) Jxnmy Fitzgerald 5-10-11 M Dwyer — 7-2 

18 043000 FROSTY TOUCH fMreE Slack) Mrs E Slack 8-10-10 Was Stock (7) 98 — 

20 01204-4 DESCARTES (BJ))(J McQueen) M Naugtnon 4-10-8 B Storey G99F5-2 

21 uaao/o PETER DRUMMER (RFiyfJOU 6-10-8 C LhmUya (7) 96 — 

23 Q/OP30-P TUDOR SQUIRE (D Tucker] D Tucker 9-10-3 A Octal (7) 92 — 

25 08000P/ LANCE OF ST GEORGE (D) (4 Townson] J Townson 7-10-2 — Sbonoa Jamas (7) — — 

27 BOPOim F/UR CITY (V) (G BeO) F Gfison 9-10-1 LWyer 

28 OOOCO/O RfOGEWAY QlRL(JParfill)JParmt 6-10-1 RPinoy 

30 002004 SMOOTS SON (Mss GRees) Mm GRees 7-1041 — 08 — 

31 0000- HAYMAN (D McCain) D McCain 6-104 KDootan — — 

1985; ORBITAL MANOEUVeRS 4-10-7 T Wall (8-1) B McMahon 22 ran 
CnDM MOU-OAFA won b handicap hurdle in Ireland last July, sinca then has finished (1 0-0) 35SM 6tf) to 
rv/nin Ebgee (1 1 -3) at Kemoion (2m 41, £2879, good, Now 6, 12 ran). DANCE OF LffE, behind twice this 


2) finished about 51 4th to Pofasn * 
DRUMMER (11-1® ran just ow 221 
Selection: FROSTY TOUCH 


Newcastle <2m 120yds, El 940. sort. Jan 11. 18 ran). DESCARTE S (11- 
U (10-11) at Watrurtiy (2m. £1120, goad. Now 25. 15 ran). PETER 
to Rywis Dove at Leicester (2m. £1 159. soft. Nov 28, 17 ran). 


1.30 RIBBLE NOVICE CHASE (£2,337; 2m 4f) (5 runners) 

5 333-112 COMERAGH WNQ(BF) (A FBudga Ltd) JmmyFtegaraW 7-10-12 M Dwyer N894-7F 

6 43F-3F2 NEW SONG (J Sanders) M Ohm 7-10-12 R P un woody 87 7-1 

9 1142F2 TAHQOGAITS BEST (J Emits) H Peacock 6-10-12 P Scudamore 74 8-1 

10 FD4-132 MAGGIE8 GIRL (Mrs M Whiteman) Donys Smilb 7-10-11 C Grant 72 7-1 

11 0-20033 RIGHT CLOUDY (PUJtfc)PUddfl 8-10-7 B Storey 6412-1 

1985: REPWGTON 7-11-6 C HawWns (4-11 taw) N Crump 4 ran 

CHRIUI COMERAGH KING (11-0) shaped Mealy on chasing debut whan 31 2nd to Playschool (11-0) at 
rwnm Newbury (2m 41, £41 42. good to soft. Now 22.10 rani NEW SONG (10-1 2) made a mistake at me 
last when short head 2nd to Turftana (11-4) at WWrarhampton (2m 4f, Om good. Nov 24, 10 ran). 
TAROOGAN'S BEST (11-0) no chance with winner when 51 2nd to Hand Over (11-4) here (2m 41. £2290, good to 
sott. Nov 19. 5 ran). MAGGIES GIRL (10-1) catered tram 2 out when 61 2nd to Centre Attraction (11-11) in 
handicap chase at Ayr (2m 4f, £1931, good to soft. Now 21, 5 ran). RIGHTOUOUOV (11-1)no chance InsWe Oral 
'fi mile when 371 Iasi of 3 finishers to Jomt Sowera^ity (11-10) at Newcastle (2m 41. £7123. good. Now 29, 4 

Selection COMERAGH KING 




mm 




HUNTINGDON 


Selections 


By Mandarin 


12.45 Beau Dire. 

2.15 Oversway. 

1.15 High Renown. 

2.45 Professor Plum. 

i.45 Sip Of Orange. 

3.15 Hasty Gamble. 

By Michael Seely 


1.15 High Renown. 3.15 Catherine Bridge. , 

The Times Private Handicapper’s top rating: 3.15 Prcfalas. 


Going: good to soft 

12.45 MONTAGU SELLING HURDLE (£1 ,363: 2m 100yd) (22 runners) 

1 0004F-3 WARRIOR WCLE (Mrs E Robinson) D Robinson 4-11-10 HBrD Robtaoa 88 — 

2 KHMPP FOUR FOR UNCLE (I CanpbcUQ I Campbel 4-11-5 RCampbett 97 — 

3 00- OKAAOH(S Squires) M Tompkins 4-1 1-5 SSmttti Ecdea — — 

4 PAMELA HEANEY (Mrs a Speyer) H Beasley 4-11-5 RGoktetote 

6 PODARCES (M Farrer) G Harttgan 4-1 1-S J Bartow — — 

9 4208F2 HALLOWED (P Pritchard) P Pritchard 4-114) NFeam(7) #99 B-2 

10 RAMUE (Miss A Sykes] J Bhertngtan 4-114 — — 7-2 

11 002 RELUCTANT GIFT (D Gandofo) D Gmdotto 4-1 1-0 TWooAey (7) 97 5-1 

H Furiong 80 F3-1 

S Sherwood — 8-1 

Date McKeown (7] — — 


12 (HHMR TANA MIST (R Voorspuy) R Voorepuy 4-114 — 


13 0 BEAU DDE (Mss W Redman) J Jenkins 3-1 0-7 S Sherwood 

14 00 BE POSITIVE (A Soence) A Ingham 3-10-7 Date McKeown (7) 

15 CAREER MADNESS (T Ramsden) M Ryan 3-10-7 — 

IB 0 CHEAL (P Fletcher) M Hmcbfiffo 3-10-7 SMcNete 

19 «JSH DILEMMA (T Ramsdan) D Ringer 3-10-7 — D Murphy 

21 0Q344 MPPB1 SMITH (WJ Smith) WJSmdh 3-1 0-7 JJOidnn 

22 P NORHAM CASTLE (R Ledger) R Ledger 3-10-7 MraN Ledger 

23 OOOP RHODE ISLAND RED (J Bruton) A Moore 3-10-7 G Moore 

24 0 RUBUS (D Thom) D Thom 3-10-7 M Brenn a n 

27 0 ANGEL DUST (K Stone) K Stone 3-10-2. A Stringer 

29 JUST THE TICKET (F May) C Booth 3-10-2 D Dutton 

30 0UU MEMMAM STAR (B) (C BraomfiekQ P Hedger 3-10-2 H Richards 

31 00 SUNTAN (M Hatgh) P Falgatt 3-10-2 R Baggon 

1985: KMGHTS HEM 4-11-1 R Chapman (5-4 ftw) F Watwyn 12 ran 

1.15 CROWLAND NOVICE CHASE (£1,612: 2m 5«) (18 runners) 

1 1-33131 BROKEN WMG (B.CO) (Furiong Bros Ltd) N Henderson 8-1 1-6 — S SmKb Ecdes 

2 02-143 UNG(BF) (Mrs PW Hams) PWHams 8-1 1-1 R Strong* 

•5 0400-44 BURNS LAD (BF) IP Wright) N Lee-Judson 5-10-10 8 Mom 

7 0 COMPTON BOY (R Clements) C Holmes 10-10-10 K Barite 

8 F COOLOUGHTER (N Roberts) J Webber 5-10-10 G Mranirti 

9 4300/PD COUNT FHEDBI1CK ( J WtxXgaft S Dow 6-10-10 R Rowe 

10 1IKW1-2 CUMREW (BJBF) (N Harris) N Vigors 5-10-10 C Cox (4) 

11 00/PPFP DIUJMMOKJ STREET (Fran) A Moore 7-10-10. G Moore 

14 22/0000 FADA(B) IB Broad) J Bosley 9-10-10 m Bosley (4) 

18 07111 -MI HIGH RENOWN (Dewfresh Muatvoonw) J Jerkins 6 - 10-10 S Sherwood 

19 000/1*00 ICEN (A Guy) J Parkas B-10-10 J J Quntj 

22 OP L£VULGAN(S Redmond) A Turnel 6*10-10 Brown 

24 4/8P-1I0 HEVEROF (J Mandevutoi G Grecey 6-10-10 j Dnggen 

26 OP30P/P PHINCE FEUX (Mrs L Browring) D Browning 6-10-10 R Rowell 

28 1P0-U40 STICK OF RO CK (E Parker) D Barons B-10-10- PMctaoOi 

30 002/F03- SWBFT RETORT (GBeccla)T Forster 6-10-10 H Davies 

33 0/0P0M OUR GRAC1E (8 Cotoban) T Buigm 7.1 BdaHaan 

34 flfHMZ-0 PAGE OF GOLD f R Brtnfcwortfi] D QandOtfO 6-10-5- MWBtoma 

1965: Dhr b VODKATINI 6*10-10 A Webb (7-4 lav) P Haynss 12 ran 


SSmHb Ecdes *99 5-2 

R Strong* 76 12-1 

S Moore TO — 


Course specialists 


j Edwams 
M Rvan 
P Harris 

J Gifford 
OGandolfo 
J FitzGerald 


TRAINERS 

Winners Runners Percent 
5 23 385 

9 38 23.7 

B 40 20.0 

30 ’S 19b4 

IS 63 7S JD 

5 27 IB.5 


E Murphy 
S Smith Ecdes 
PBartwi 
H Davies 
R Rowe 
Only QuaBflers 


JOCKEYS 

Wnnera 

a 

29 

14 

15 
18 


Rides Percent 


5 0014-00 CROOMNG BERRY (P Green) JJ OHM 7-10-13 

7 40010/ BRICKEY RANGER (D) (TSMter) Mrs 5 OSver 9-10-11 

8 01340/ EMERALD WATSON (N Harrison) F Winter 6-10-10 

9 0000P-Q SOME MACHINE (D) (W O'Gcmtan) Jwnmy FitzgwMd 7-10-1C 

12 4100P-0 OCEANUS (R Mftchel) Denys Smith 5-10-6 

13 200400 FORTY GRAND (N Howtey) P Chariton 5-10-6 

16 03430-4 ROMAN DUSK (D) (E LocUey) J Charlton 6-10-3 

16 F20P-00 SM LUCKY (B)(P Brown) B McMahon 7-104 

19 22-3011 STRfiNG PLAYER (C) (F H Lae) F H Lee 4-10-3 (9ex) 

22 423330 W5L COVERED (D) (G Hamilton) R HoRnshead 5-10-0 

23 12/UP40 SfffNTON WAY (M H«koy) J Jflntow 6-10-0 

26 00-0002 HARLEY [Miss J Eaton) Miss J Eaton 4-1 04 

27 403/P0-2 WMSKY GO GO [F Ham) Mss R Hamar 10-100 


— 84 — 

J Duggan — 10-1 

_ P Scudamore — 12-1 

MDwyr 9012-1 

_ A Soldi (7) 83 — 

K Cottar (7) 86 — 

R Camsha w 91 6-1 

HBreanaa 91 — 

SHotand •99F9-* 

P Dover 90 16-1 

— H Joaktas (7) 84 — 

Count 8314-1 

iMLWdttci (7) 86 6-1 


198& HALF ASLEEP 4-10-T P FarreO (1 1-2) W Bsey 15 ran 


and (Sstance winner. BF-beatan favourite In latest 
race). Owner in brackets. Tratner. Age and 
weight. Rater plus any allowance. The Tines 
Private Handcapper's raffing. Approxi ma te starting 
price. 


CODM CHARLOTTE’S DUNCE (11-11) tried to make all and kept on once headed when 7SU 4th to 
•unra Record Harvest (18-13) here at Haydock (2m. £2114 L good to soft. Nov 19. 8 ran) wtth SOME 
MACHINE (10-12) 2KI further back in 5th. BRiCKLEY RANGER (12-^was quite ■ decant performer in Ireland 
in 1983/84, be a t in g IQkemi (10-8) XI at Tralee (2m 41. £1035. yiekfing. Apr 16. 17 ran) in a handicap hunfle. 
EMERALD WATSON(11-0) is another vrith wmning form a wMobadc. b ea t in g Deep hnpresson (iw) ItSlai 
Che8enham(an.£1528.«m.Janl 1985, 10 ran). SIR LUCKY (10-0) has bean a Mtta tSsappomtmg ease a 15U 
2nd to HMf Aaeep (10-l)in this race lastyear (2m 41. £1 94& snL Dec 1 1. 15 ran). STRIW PLAYBt (70-7) is in 
ona 71 win tram BUaar (10-2) at Newcasttelasa time (2m 120yds. £1864. good. Now 29, 

stwt whan SKI 3rd to Prying 

^ 0 ran Ms best race of the 
Dec 1. 7 ran) with ROMAN 


3.0 BOSTON PIT HANDICAP CHASE (£2,713: 2m) (3 runners) 

3 04-0412 ADMIRAL'S CUP (D) (R E A Bolt Ltd) F WlntBr 8-11-7 i 

6 11104/2- BLACKPEET (D) (J MatMutm) J 8 VHsoa 7-10-13 

7 IP-0121 CENTRE ATTRACTION (D) (Mrs V Mason) G RiChardB 7-10-7 (4ex). 

1985: GERBEK 9-1 1-7 G Bradley 3-1 J Old 3 ran 


o d niui w 98 3-1 
COant — 6-1 
PTtick M99F4-6 


FORMS? 

It, PSPMt son. Now 


mraprflnmS^fri^mxktaed mten»into 

L ko* 11, 4 ran). BLAOBFEET (l l-lO^nota Mn out stace Br ush ing a (fistant 2nd to Smarted (10- 


0) at KelsoBm, £1209. good. Nov DS, 3 ran). CEmRE ATTRA 
Girl (10-1) Oar Ayr (2m If, £1931. good to soft. Nov 21. 5 ran). 
Selection: CENTRE ATTRACTION 


3.30 ASHTON NOVICE HURDLE (£1^52: 2m 4f) (16 runners) 

2 020-11 MOOTECH (D) (J Martin Engineers) J S WBson 5-11-5 

8 43-1 «LDFLYHt(aTtop)R Lee 5-10-13 

9 1F43 MARCELLMA (Ms A Hodgkinsoii) E Alston 4-10-8 

10 2 AVOPORT (W (TGomJan) Jimmy Ftogarald 6-10-7 

11 BRICK LAWN (Lord Shrmrtuy) J titackio 5-10-7. 

12 04 CLEVER FOLY(N Mason) GRktfreds 6-10-7 

14 04 DASHALONG (Mre C Black) M OSver 4-10-7 

20 0 FRENCH HABITAT (N Warwick) PDava 4-10-7 

26 MR FAGM (B Tbmlfly) M 06ver 5-10-7 

29 PHaHA7®(T WAY (A Green) Miss M Be9 4-107 

30 3-42 POWYS (RE A Boil Ltd) F WIBntar 6-10-7 

34 00-20 ROYAL SANTA (Miss LWaBaceiR Morris 5-10-7 

35 RYMER KMQ (Q Hutsby) J Chugg 4-10-7 

37 300-4 Tie LODGE PRMCE (OuaRak Hotels Ltd) K Stone 4-10-7 

39 2320-32 VITAL BOY p Russa) R Holder 5*10-7 

40 OUf WURUSH(J Mason) GOUroyd 7-10-7 


ATTRACTION (1 1-1 If not extended to beet Magees 


198& VINO FESTA 6-11-6 Dai WOams (&-1) R PMfdni 14 ran 


T G Dm 90 4-1 

_BDawfing(7) 84 8-1 

— M Alston (7) 82 12-1 

M Dwyer 85 6-1 

PWeraar 

PTacfc — 10-t 

— RDnwoody — — 

G Bradley 

..RCMt 

CGrant • — — 

~P Scudamore 6 99 F5-2 

KDooten 77 — 

AShtape 

LWyer 79 — 

— NGokmao 97 7-2 

GW Gray 


CODM MODTBCH (1 1-2) tended the oddsby 151 tram Beaker no-HQ at A 
rv/mn toaoft.Atov21, 16ran»i«wCt£VERR3U.r(TO-imi2»(Jftirtoar 
5) was always up with the pace beabng Harley Street Men (10-1 2)9 at Ludtow 
ran). MAKELUNA (9-ia is raw paew and could not quickan with 
13) at CMtericM3ra II 80yds. £2549jjqqd to soft, Dec 9. 1 1 ran). A' 
excellent tarn, 7) 2nd to Yesterday's Pfampton whiner Keynes (10-ir 
ran) on seasonal debut POWYSlfi-O) bantered 2 out but stifl ran a 
at Sandown (2m 51 75yds. E48S2, good to soft, Nov i 


Selection: POWYS 



Sfeii 


Course specialists 


JOCKEYS 



Winners 

Runners 

Percent 


Winners 

Rides 

Percent 

M Pipe 

7 

24 

292 

M Dwyer 

15 

52 

2&8 

J FitzGerald 

17 

59 

28.8 

R Eamshaw 

11 

47 

23-4 

MHEasterby 

15 

68 

21.7 

G Bradley 

9 

44 

205 

GRichards 

Only QuaKffere 

5 

70 

7.1 

P Scudamore 

Only Qualifiers 

9 

45 

20.0 


1.45 EBF NOVICE HURDLE QUALIFIER (El. 829: 2m 100yd) (22 runners) 

1 11 SIP OF ORANGE (Mre R Haggle) JVnmy FkzgereW 4-1 1-5 J JQc 

3 O BBXAStS(PWste^R Gow 6-11-0 CBn 

4 BROXTED SPAR (TWardlB) Mrs JPttmm 5-1 W) NRb 

5 BYWAYS BOY (W Hackett) W Kackott 6-11-0 — HBert 

8 0 DORAYTHYM (Mre O McFartantfl Rex Carter 4-11-0 S Wood* 

10 FLEUVE DE SOLBL (Omar Assi) G Ktedorsi^r 4-11-0 =000* 

13 IHCKLETON BOY (R Schaioy) R Senoiey 4-11-0 PDanati 

14 44 KING NBfflOO (0 GrahenQ N GassleQ 4-11-0 MrPMecEwwn 

15 KING SEAR (Mrs Y Aleopp) R DkMn 4-1 1-0 C Ja 


JJ Oaten • 98F4-5 
. C Brown 82 — - 
MRinan ' 


S Woods (7) 

; COn (4) 

P Dennis (4) 

Mr P MacEwan (7) 86 8-1 

C Jon** — — 


4 MAJOR MATCH (Countess ol EgBnton 6 Ylfinton) T Foreter 4-1 1-0 , 


19 00 MBaBERS* HEVHtGE (E Young) D fBchoteon 5-11-0 — 

20 0300P-3 MISlERa«faST1AH(B)(D Wrigrri) P Haynes 5-1 1-0 

21 00 HR KIRBY (Mrs BCuriey)B Curley 4-11-0 

22 0 OH SO STANLEY [Mrs S Lae) GF Lee 5-1 1-0 

23 1L0403 OLD FORD TAVERN (BF) (O Doreuily) J Jenkins 5-11-0- 

24 0 RAM30M TRAVELLER (A Phelps) Mra J Pitmen 5-11-0— 

28 OtMUP WHOTVER [P Wffiams) D Barons 4-1 1-0 

27 WISE WARRIOR (PH Betts LKQJGWord 5-11-0 

29 P-PFOO BIRD ASH (P Poston) P Poston 4-10-9 

31 F FREE CREDIT (7 Brown/ T Brown 5-10-9 


WlhMvteeys(7) 

A Webb 80 14-1 

DHfaphy 

DSfcyme(7) 

S Sherwood 63 10-1 

BdeHean 

P NteboBs 80 — 

R Row* — 5-1 

— Mr T Moore (7) 

_ R Chapman (4) — — 


33 000- HGHTOWN FMTANA (Kighttwii Fnce & Bloodstock) R Hodges 5-106 B Powefl 

34 P/OUH) KAYE-WOOD (Mre M Mvston) Mis M Thomas 6-109 RBeggan 

1985: CELTIC FLAME 4-11-0 R Strange (14-1) P Harris 22 ran 


2.15 HARTFORD HANDICAP CHASE (£2.068: 3m) (8 runners) 

1 00040P- CARVED OPAL (C) (Mrs G Abecassis) F Winter 8-1 2-2 BdeHaan 93 6-1 

4 2B40-FT CERMUUI (D) (M Shone) J Edwards 8-10-12 (4ex) □ Browne 97 4-1 

5 P033-11 CARE (CD) (S Sansbtvy) T FOreter 10-10-9 (4n) HDMu SB F3-1 

6 221/1- RIGHT CMS (D) (T Ctytto) P Bafey 8-108 SMoretored 88 7-1 

7 2240-F2 OVERSWAY (C) (Mrs S Jones) Mrs O Heine 9-102 SSmffli Ecdes *9910-1 

9 2/P041P- SFRMGWOOD (A OWtay) G Hwtigan 9-10-0 SMcNdB 8814-1 

10 2214/F3 IB» AIG) DOWN (Mre GMaxweQJGttlord 11-104) RRowc 79 7-2 

11 OOOF-P POLAR EXPRESS (CQ) (W King) W King 11 -104) B Powefl 7218-1 

1985: MACOUVER 7-11-8 Bde Haan (15-2) Mrs J Pitman lOren 

2j 45 LONG SUTTON CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS HANDICAP CHASE (£1,646: 2m 200yd) 
(5 runners) 

? 0P-IZ3F PROFESSOR PLUM (Mrs C MatNS90h) T Forster 13-104 WNwuphreys •B9F5-4 

4 020214 MANSTON MARAUDER (M SnWi) P Hodgar 10-10-11 (4ex)_ Pennf PtttcthfteyM 10 52 

8 020/041- MOOD MUSIC (S Richards) R Hodges 14-10-5 Whvtoe 90 5-1 

10 0-44P2 PALATMATE (G Hertigwi) G Hartgsn 8-10-4 EBocktey 98 0-1 

13 43MMH SMILING CAVAUB1 (A Madwar) A Medwar 10-104) G Landau 94 7-1 

1985 LANDMG BOARD 7-11-6 C COX (2HS lav) P Hants 5 ran 

3.15 BISHOPS STORTFORD HANDICAP HURDLE (£2,136: 3m If) (25 runners) 

1 U0/WH4) DONEGAL PfUNCE (J McGonagle) P Keflawrsy 10-12-7 Mr A KeBwary (7) 80 — 

3 0124)02 HASTY GAMBLE (BF) [L Corel**) F Winter 6-1 1-5: BdaHnan 86F4-1 

4 PF4104) Sfl) OF ERA (Mrs P Haris) A Moore B-11-5 Candy Moore (4) 84 — 

9 13/F4P-0 CATHERINE BRIDGE (Sh K But!) T Forster 6-10-11 H Davies 82 0-1 

10 203-110 CR»P(J Levy) C Read 5-10-11 MPerreO 85 6-1 

11 32F-091 WHITE THE MU9C (V) (J David Attefl) P FNgete 5-10-11 (4ex) S Jo fu p n 91 B-1 

12 00302/0 CUT *N DRY (Orthopaedic Seddng) P Bowden B-10-10 R Donnie 

13 32F340 BALLYWEST (P Axon) R Hodges 8-10*10 BPawnfl 87 — 

14 3P0003- ORCHH) BAY (B)(RSm*) Mrs J Wmm 9-10-10 C Mam 8810-1 

16 213GFV- AIRBORIE DEAL (K tflgson) A Moore 7-10-8 GMoore 82 — 

18 3041423 toNGTOR (BF) (Southern fleeing Ltd) D Batons 5-10-5 PMctiefls 84 6-1 

») 021000- PHEF4LAS (P Con rtoOy) K Ivory 6-10-3 MRIehante *99 — 

22 10/0000- HEALTH N HAPPWESS (Mre B Curtsy) B Curley 7-1042 Dlfcnpdy — — 

23 0314-04 MEW FARMER (D) (J Priea) J Price 4-10-1 R Row* 91 7-1 

28 3/000403 23PAMB(D)(PWr>^ri)NLee-Judson 8-104) — 8010-1 

29 1304)22 SHAGAYLE (Ms J Peedi) CJ 8884-104) RBeggan 84 7-1 

32 044FP-P PREACHER'S GEM (Q Btoxham) K BaBey 7-104) — A Jones 82 — 

33 14Q04M CAP (YAZURE p Cteiwbek) I Campbell) 6-104J RCwnpbefl 74-— 

34 P-P0030 SmUNDY(M Groorrtendge) R Curto 5-104) R GokteMn 77 

35 3301 PRINCE OF KASHMIR (Sir GSnmtonjJ Severs 7-1041. — - C Brown — — 

38 100400 SHUTTLECOCK STAR (A CatofiJJ Brtflger 4-104).— MWnene 80 — 

37 03810-P BIT OF A DAM)Y(C)(VI/ Gale) J Gifford 6-1 04) Elfeaphy 80 — 

38 0P43P1 / LAWRENCE-LEE (R Btackman) GGracay 9-104) P Oracey (7) 

39 30P/342 MISCHEVOUS JACK (B Byford} B Byford 5-104) Mss G Aririytage (4) 78 — 

40 OOOP- 33 DEVIL'S GOLD (M Smalman) R Shepherd 6-104) MreCSatatenen 7* — 

1985: MOUNT BOUIS 5-11-7 H Dawree (4-1 it-fey) D Oughton 16 ran 


BPowefl 87 — 

C Mann 88 10-1 

GMoore 82 — 

P Mcbefla 84 5-1 

N Richard* *99 — 

D Morphy 

H Rowe »1 7-1 

— 80 10-1 

R Beggan 84 7-1 


Sangster advocates 
a European 
Breeders’ Cup day 


By Michael Seely 


Robert Sangster Iasi night 
called for Europe to attempt to 
stage its own multi-million dol- 
lar Breeders’ Cop Day early in 
September. 

Speaking as the owner of 
Wiganthorpe. the winner of the 
19S6 Gimcrack Slakes, at the 
Girn crack Dinner in York. 
Sangster suggested bolding the 
big day in early September to 
avoid dashing with the Prix de 
TArc de Triomphe. the Cham- 
pion Stakes and the important 
races for two-year-olds in Octo- 
ber. He sai± “The St Leger 
would not be affected as one 
mile six furiong horses are 
specialists in that department-” 

Sangster is clearly blessed 
with a lively imagination and 
the sport needs men with such 
energy and drive: Buz the draw- 
backs to his scheme are two- 
fold. In the first place, in any- 
one season, there are only a few 
horses with true group one 
status and any attempt to divert 
them would obviously be harm- 
ful to the classics and other 
group one races. It might disturb 
the balance of the season. 

The other difficulty lies in the 
funding of a European Breeders' 
Cop Day. It takes all the 
enormous resources of the 
United States to stage their own 
Breeders’ Cup Day and h might 
well prove beyond the capabili- 
ties of Britain, Ireland and 
F ra nce. 

Sangner, who recently bit the 
headlines with his sacking of 
Michael Dickioson, also 
claimed that the present system 
of returning starting prices was 
antiquated and that die feeding 
of information into a giant 
control computer would give a 
truer picture of the situation. 

He said: “At present the SP is 
a force. A few hundred racegoers 
are governing the price for ten 
thousand betting shops up and 


rowing 

New blood 
favoured 
in ARA’s 
scheme 

By Jim Rnilton 

The cliche "come in number 
ciehu your lime is up" could 
become a reality by October 
next wear when the Amateur 
Rowing Association <ARA) 
membership scheme is in- 
troduced. The ARA council 
vcsicrday decided on how the 
registration scheme will affect 
individuals and how income 
might be generated. 

The ARA sensibly decided by 
a majority vote on a scheme that 
will help newcomers to the sport 
and juniors. But to achieve this, 
club and regatta affiliation fees 
must be retained, although the 
regatta levy ceases with the 
introduction of registration. The 
annual registration fees for row- 
ers and scullers will be: seniors 
£14.30: juniors £8.00: beginners 
with no status in their first year 
£5.00 while occasional rowers 
can buv a dav ticket for £3. VAT 
must be added to all these fees. 

The new svstem will enable 
the ARA to liave more control 
of their spon (everyone will 
have a number) and at last 
provide accountable figures of 
numbers of participants to the 
Sports Council and hopefully 
interested sponsors. The scheme 
will also demonstrate to the 
Sports Council that the ARA are 
pursuing ways of raising money 
from within the sport before 
looking for handouts. It is the 
only way forward. ‘ 

B 0 BSLE 1 GHING~ 

Jury pass 
the buck 
on sledges 

From Chris Moore 
Winterberg 

The question of whether the 
East Germans will be allowed to 
use their controversial two-man 
j sledges in next month’s World 
would then have the option off championships will be decided 
sendingback the money into the | ^ the ' pntesidium of the Federa- 


down the country. I'm all for the 
shops remaining in private 
ownership but they could ad 
have terminals linked to a 
centralized computer, like they 
have on racecourses all over the 
world. Punters could still take 
those prices and the proprietor 


system. 

Al though some of Songster’s 
ideas may seem sweeping they 
must be viewed in the climate of 
dramatic change in the industry 
in 1936. New opportunities are 
waiting to be grasped. 

Lord Fairhaven. the Senior 
Steward of the Jockey Club, 
making his traditional speech, 
commented: “Nothing is more 
important to the racing public 
than good racing, and that 
means top horses running in top 
races, notably such as Dancing 
Brave." 

However, he sounded a 
cautionary note on top British 
horses contesting big foreign 
prizes, saying: “There are signs 
that our own autumn pro- 
gramme is losing quality as a 
result. The danger is that more 
and more horses will be aimed 
at a lucrative American cam- 
paign. or the Japan Cup. at the 
expense of our own big races. 
The number of horses involved 
in trans-Atlantic travel is still 
small, but they are among our 
champions." 

He also warned against pos- 
sible rowdyism. He said: “It is 
deeply (disturbing to me to 
witness or to read about 
drunken behaviour on our race- 
courses. We have also had 
streakers and delicacy prevents 
me from describing the act 
perpetrated at Cartmei by a 
young lady during the summer. 
Suffice it to say that Phil Tuck 
found it difficult to sit down for 
a few days." 


Floyd heads Ladbroke weights 

Floyd, the empha tic winner of English-trained horses occupy 
tire Bala Hurdle at Chel te nham six of the top seven places in the 
on Saturday, has been allotted handicap with Floyd followed by 
top weight of 12 stone in tire Corporal Clinger (11-12), River 
IR£50,00G Ladbroke, Europe’s Ctejriog (11-12), Humberside 
richest handicap bardie, at Lady (11-7), Ton Sharp (11-6) 
Leopardstown on Janaary 10. and 1 Bin Zaidoon (11-5). 


iiCDnllViirii 




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lion of Internationa] Bobslei- 
ghing and Tobogganing in 
Vienna this weekend. 

The World Cup jury in 
Winterberg opted for the only 
way out oflhe wrangle yesterday 
by passing the buck following 
the eight-nation protest here last 
weekend. But it promises to 
provide the sport's governing 
body with one of their most 
difficult problems. 

Gion Caviezd. the Swiss coa- 
ch of the British team and one of 
the technical advisers for the 
FIBT. summed it up when he 
said: “I am just glad that, on this 
occasion. 1 will not be involved 
in making the final derision. If 
vou go by the written rules, the 
sled looks legal But according to 
the technical drawings, it is not 
So I do not know how the 
pntesidium are going to reach a 
verdict” 

Some of the heat was taken 
out of the situation yesterday 
when the East Germans un- 
veiled their new four-man 
sledge. Unlike the smaller ver- 
sion, it has a conventional rear 
axle and there are no complaints 
about it being used today at the 
Veltins Cup. 

POWERBOATING 

World Series 
Formula I 
is cancelled 

By a Correspondent 

The International Formula I 
organization announced yes- 
terday the cancellation of the 
1987 Formula I Powerboat 
World Series. This was not 
entirely unexpected as the series 
had already been reduced from 
12 worldwide events in 1985 to 
seven, all held in the United 
States, this year. 

The manufacturers of the 
outboards used in the class, 
Johnson and Evinrude V8 3.6 
litre motors, have supported 

Formula I ever si nee 1981. They 
hoped to attract other com- 
panies as sponsors for the 
televised series next year. With 
link interest shown, they chose 
not to continue their own 
support for the races. 

The next class in the world 
governing body classifications. 
Formula Grand Prix,. hope to 
adopt the Formula I title. They 
have a 13 event series planned 
for 1987 throughout Europe, the 
United States and Asia. Current 
Formula I drivers are likely to 
move into this category of 
racing, powered by Mercury 2 
litre outboards, producing an 
average field of more than 25 
c ompetitors for each event. 

FOR THE RECORD 

BASKETBALL 

EUROPEAN CUP WINNERS' CUP: Man’s 
qaanarttaal mop: tewetote MantaX (TUrig 
** Stayoiro Pwiaro jln 97-84. Mokok 
CSKA^Moecow (USSR) fit VMMXtame (Fft. 

ETON FIVES 

NAT WEST COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP: Sec- 
ond minA Deroyshtre 0. Hertfordshire 3t 
Kora 2. Suffolk 1: uucestersfare 0. Berkshire 
3; Middtesex 3. WOrcestersm 0: OxtoMarwe 
0. Warencxs h PB 3: Shrapsfaro 1. Essex 2 : 
Staffnosiws 3 Buctang haittliX n 
Blkre 0. Hampshire 3. 

FOOTBALL ~ 

FOOTBALL COMBMATKHt Utett 2. OPR 
LFuteem i. Reading 3. 

SOU11ERH LEAGUE BN De9o*f Cucc First 
Postponed: Tronmtae v Foote. 
Monday's nteresuto 

freight ROVER TROPHY: PuBmimy 
round: Stoctaan a Carlisle 1. 

KNIGHT FLOODLIT COMPETITION: 
Stevenage Bareugn 1. Harlow 3 
STAFFORDSHIRE SBtiOR CUP: NarttMKh 
VKtana 3. Stoke 1. 

GMAC CUP: Rrai romf roptw: Bagnor 5. 
Famboraugh 2- Second nS Stafford 2, 
Mo»acamt>e2. 

VAUXHALL-OFCL LEAGUE: PiMter **- 
** IXXwicn 0, Carsnaaon 1. Piaapotwxt 
WaBh a maow » Bromley. 

PA youth CUP: Second ro un d: Croydon 

MtoSuEroSEMOft CUP; Fta! round re* 
pter VVeeldstane 4. Hamsun 2. 


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YACHTING 


Crusader’s challenge 
_ fades as Cudmore 
is pushed to the limit 



JAr.JP# ■■ 




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White Cru- 
sader has only 

> a a remote 

1^ -:. Chance of 

P a; qualifying for 

r the America’s 

Cup semi- 
. finals after be- 

,n 8 defeated by America II in 
winds of more than 30 knots. 
But the British indicate have 
no intention of going down 
without a fight. 

“It means a difficult run of 
vi clones in the last four days,” 
Hzny Cudmore, the Crusader 
skipper, conceded after the 
race against America II. “But 
mathematically it’s feasible so 
we shall not give up until it's 
impossible." Crusader’s crew 
were depressed at the way 
things had gone but not 
despondent. “We've got a 
strong-minded group of 
people," Cudmore said. “The 
reaction was to get back to 
business tomorrow (today is a 
lay-day for challengers). 
That’s their strength." 

The race went America ITs 
way from the start. White 
Crusader had trouble hoisting 
her heavy-weather genoa in 
the period after the 10-minute 
gun and John Kolius, America 
ITs skipper, was able to cross 
the line 12 seconds ahead anrf 
choose his own position. At 
this point it was Wowing a 
steady 28 knots from SSW. 
The seas, wind-driven chop 
on top of an overnight swell, 
were reaching 7ft It was at the 
margins of safety for racing 
12-metres. 

“Today’s conditions were at 
the limit and were okay,” 
Cudmore said. “But anything 
more than that would not be 
sensible: You risk injury or 
losing someone." But what it 
did create was a situation 
where something was going to 
break for someone and — true 
to past ill-fortune — it was 
White Crusader that suffered a 
gear failure to put her out of 
the race. This time it was a clip 
holding the spinnaker to the 
halyard. 

America n stayed about 
half-a-minute ahead on the 
first five tegs, with Kolius 
being content to cover rather 
than struggle to increase his 
lead. “We jumped Harry on 
the start line and then covered 
like crazy," said Kolius later. 
“We’re in a position where we 
couldn't make too many 
errors." 

Untfl this race America n 
were uncertain of a place in 


From Keith Wheatley, Fremantle 


the semi-finals and the race 
meant as much to them as it 
did to the British. The first 
beat saw a tight tacking duel 
with more than 30 tacks on the 
three-mile work. Kolius is, 
however, nothing if not a 
helmsman who covers. At the 
top mark he was 31 seconds in 
front and that margin did not 
change by more than six 
seconds for the next four Iks. 

Up the third beat the British 
boat, fighting to stay in the 
competition, tried every sail- 
ing combination .known to 
Cudmore’s brain. It worked. 


Rivals hold 
all the aces 


White Crusader has four 
races remaining (Keith 
Wheatley writes). One is a bye 
(Challenge France haring 
pulled out) and the remainder 
against New Zealand, Stars 
and Stripes and Heart of 
America. 

Form renders it unlikely bat 
not impossible that Britain 
beats Conner and the Kiwis. 
However, for that to get White 
Crusader into the final four, 
America II would have to lose 
two of her final races — one of 
them against USA. 

That victory by the fifth 
boat, USA, in turn makes it 
easier for them to take the 
fourth place. In short, two 
boats that have been Bailing 
well — America II and USA — 
would need to have an un- 
precedented ran of defeats for 
White Crusader to squeeze 
past them. 


cal. “Clips which work 
perfectly at Newport year after 
year start parting in 32 knots,” 
be said. “We’ve calculated the 
loads but you have 10 safl day 
after day down here to know 
the stress factors and when to 
replace things. 

1 The people at the top of the 
points table have, without 
exception, sailed longer down 
here or elsewhere together. We 

thought we'd worked things 
out but in a 12-metre cam- 
paign they have a habit of 
catching up with you. Out of 
the hundreds of items on a 
boat there will be one or two 
that catch up with you at 
crucial times. It's probably 
been due to lack of time and 
experience sailing down here." 

At the penultimate mark 
America n was SS seconds in 
front and at the finish it was a 
victory to the New York 
Yacht Gub by one minute and 
47 seconds. Since the British 
and the NYYC kept the 
America's Cup to themselves 
for so many years since the 
first race between them in 
[8S1, it was, perhaps, fitting 
that White Crusader’s coup de 
grace should come from the 
old enemy. 

By winning her four remain- 
ing races and the top oppo- 
nents losing all of tbeirs, 
White Crusader might scrape 
into the final four but as 
Cudmore said yesterday 
morning: “If we don’t win this 
one we might as well go 
home.” And they didn’t. 

DEFENDER SERIES RESULTS: 1M 
round: Smooth day (oAjact to protest}: 
Kookaburra HI M AustraHa IV. reared: 
Saak V Kidney bt Kookaburra a, 2mtn 



s-v- ■/ v" ■■■ ■ ■ 






r • 


i 

u 




P*" * 

7 a/3 









mt 




: . . ..Vv; fc;,. 

■ui; 

r.Va 

;y..: /■»... : i 

V- 


but not enough. At the top 
mark the margin was down to 
13 seconds and as they 
rounded it the British 
afterguard made a gybe set, 
daring in the 32-knot breeze, 
and set off down the left ride 
of the course. Kolius was off to 
starboard and was right 

It was during a gybe down 
this r un that toe sp innak er on 
White Crusader parted com- 
pany with the halyard. The 
flailing kite wrapped itself 
tightly around foe forestay 
and had to be cat away with a 
knife. “By foe time we had a 
genoa out and hoisted, Kolius 
was away and gone/' 
Cudmore said. 

Asked whether the incident 
was .typical of the breakages 
and mishaps that seemed to 
have dogged the British cam- 
paign, Cudmore was equivo- 


DEFENDER STANDINGS 
W L 

Kookaburra DJ 24 3 

Australia IV 20 7 

Kookaburra II 16 11 

Start V Kidney 3 24 


Pts 

47 

38 

28 

8 


CHALLENGER SERES RESULTS: Trtd 
round: Safe day: Heart of America bt 
Eagle. 3min 57sec; New Zeeland bt Italia. 
3:30; White Crusader bt Canada II. 35S; 
French Kiss M Chatengn Franco, retired; 
America 8 bt Aa urra. rjft : USA bt Stare 

Zealand tt Azzurra, £0$ Stars and 
Stripes bt Eagle, Hhll; America II bt 

White Crusader, 1:47; Ranch Kiss bt 
Heart of America. 10:10; Rata bt Chai- 
tange Ranee, withdrawn. 

CHALLENGEH STANDINGS 



W 

L 

Pts 

N&w Zealand 

29 

1 

ISO 

French Kbs 

19 

11 

117 

Stars and Stripes 

23 

7 

106 

American 

24 

e 

104 

USA 

20 

10 

103 

White Crusader 

19 

11 

91 

Canada II 

14 

16 

67 

Harm 

14 

16 

63 

Heart of America 

9 

21 

61 

EaQte 

. 9 

21 

38. 

Asuna 

3 

27 

11 


VWthdravmrChalangB France. 

TODAY’S RACES: AustraBa IV v Kooka- 
bura U: Kookaburra H v Start 'o' Kidney. 


A yawning gap on television 


By Barry PkkthaJl 


Billion Dollar Challenge, the 
second of three documentaries 
covering the America's Cap, 
shown on . BBC1 last sslgta, 
highlighted a major problem 
faced by many television com- 
panies attempting to cover this 
tinge sailing jamboree — a des- 
perate lack of action-packed 
footage. 

Thirty-knot winds, hnge 
breaking swells and boats that 
ore continually breaking gear, 
losing crewmen overboard and 
colliding with each other should 
make good television. And, 
Down Under, it does, with mass- 
media coverage of the races 
mirroring the TV revolstion 
Kerry Packer’s World Series 
served up for cricket buffs 

Here, ha Britain, coverage of 
this five-month-long series has 
produced, to date, little more 
t han a yawn — even from salt- 
crusted sailors — though last 
week’s titanic battle between the 
all-conquering New Zealanders 


and Dennis Conner's Stan and 
Stripes injected some promise 
into Channel 4’s weekly pro- 
gramme, The Gnat Australian 
Boat Race, on Satarday. 

The problem is not so modi 
footage, bat the rights to the 
Australian fom, which are trader 
the control of Mark 
McCormack’s International 
Management Group. 

This high-powered sports 
management company, which 
moved in quickly to secure the 
advertising, merchandising and 
TV rights almost i mmed ia t ely 
after Alan Bond bad seized the 
Cop from the New York Yacht 
Club, has worked to restrict 
coverage of the event only to 


action against any 
ponies who wish to produce their 
own footage. 

ITV bosses bit foe bullet — 
even though IMG's legal claim 
to rights on all that happens on 
the waters off Fremantle re- 


mains open to question. The 
BBC resisted and, as a result, 
they are frozen out from receiv- 
ing the best film coverage for 
both news and features. 

“By rights, this AnstnUan 
coverage should be available 
everywhere in the world, but, in 
reality, the footage is being semi 
by no more than a few million 
oatside Australia.” one tele- 
vision spokesman said yes- 
today. “As a result, Perth is 
losing modi of its publicity 
vatoe, and the major sponsors 

are getting disgruntled.” 

Lastnighl’s World Aboat Us 
film was buoyed np by Ian 

Wooldridge’s excellent com- 
mentary, but those who switched 
on to watch Che sailing will 
doubtless have been dis- 
appointed by the feeble 
•glimpses, which took up little 
more than 10 minutes of the 50- 
minste programme - none of it 
a patch on the Australian 
product. 


Right spice for Steak V Kidney 


No one could be more embar- 
rassed than its designer, Peter 
Cole, by the sudden change of 
fortunes of his 12-metre Steak 
•o’ Kidney, the much-maligned 
Australian defence challenger 
representing the Eastern States 
which won its third race yes- 
terday, this time against Kooka- 
burra n (Barry PickthaU writes). 

Having foiled 10 take the 
winning gun in 20 races, every- 
one expected this boat to retire 
quietly from the senes at the end 
of this current round-robin 

trials- . 

Instead, it came out and 
thrashed South Ausiralia by a 
five-minute margin in its nrst 
match, before givmg /dan 
Bond’s crew on Australia IV a 
major fright last week and 
capturing Kookaburra ITs scalp 

^This 3 dramatic turn-around 
has resulted, not from dre chain- 

SOTU?a?i58S 


effort to win a vital place in the 
semi-finals, but from a simple 
change of keel 

Before the swap, Syd Fischer, 
the syndicate head, who has 
bank -rolled this defence chal- 
lenge personally to the time of 
about £33 million was less than 
happy with his purchase. 

"You promised me a fast 
boat,” the disgruntled hotel 
chain owner thundered down 
the phone at Dr Peter Van 
Oossanen, head of research at 
the ship model basin where Bern 
Lexcen's Cup winner Australia 
11 was groomed. “What’s gone 
wrong.” he questioned. 

The Dutch scientist was just 
as perplexed. The Cole design 
had been tank tested with two 
different keels and proved to be 
significantly ^ faster than 
Australia’s earlier winner. 

The answer came at foe end of 
October when Dr van Oossanen 
took a dose look at foe boat in 
Premantle. “But that’s the slow 


keel we tested, not ibe fast one,” 
the scientist exclaimed, leaving 
Cole to explain how be could 
have got the two designs mud- 
dled up. 

“Syd just hit the roof” a dose 
aid recalls. “If Cole had any 
money, he would have sued him 
for every cent.” 

With time fost running out 
before the start of the second 
series of trials, Dr van Oossanan 
and Cole could only work on a 
stop-gap replacement, re-model- 
ling the existing ked into a more 
efficient shape before working 
on the new foil that has trans- 
formed Steak ‘n’ Kidney's 
performance in this final round 
before the semi-final cut. 

“Improvements in ked design 
have made up 70 per cent of the 
advancements in this Cup 
series," Dr Van Oossanen raid 
yesterday while working on new 
fred s for both Australia IV and 
Kookaburra HI at his test tank 
facilities in The Netherlands. 


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RUGBY UNION 


London’s club 
plans begin 
to take shape 


London, foe last of England’s 
four divisions to deride upon 
their structure for next season's 
club championship, announced 
yesterday the shape, if not foe 
content, of their contribution to 
foe new competition 

Metropolitan Police and 
Maidstone, belying their junior 
status, have beat nominated to 
National League Three, while 
Askeans, Havant, Sidcup, 
Southend, Strealham /Croydon 
and Sudbury are nominated to 
foe South Area League. 

Below that level, London 
League One will be supported by 
London Two North and South. 
Thereafter, London League 
Three draw on teams in four 
area leagues: Surrey/Hamp- 
shire, Kent/Sussex, Eastern 
Counties and Middlesex/Hens 


Troubled waters: White Crusader (left) batiks in vain to catch America II in their crucial America's Cop race yesterday 


TENNIS: BECKER ROCKED BACK ON HIS HEELS BY POWERFUL GROUND STROKES 


No doubt about Lendl’s abilities 


From Richard Evans, New York 


On a night Boris Becker will 
want to forget. Ivan Lendl 
stamped his stem personality all 
over the Nabisco Masters with a 
near-flawless exhibition of 
power serving to win the title for 
the fourth time, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. 

Becker, distraught throughout 
much of the match but calm and 
cool-headed afterwards, said: “1 
wanted to win too much.” 

Lendl, of course, wanted to 
win just as badly but at 26 he 
was competing in his seventh 
Madison Square Garden final 
and, emotionally as well as 
physically, be is an athlete in his 
prime. 

Becker, a fabulous shot maker 
who may ultimately become the 
better player, is still teaming 
how beta to utilize his talent on 
those occasions when the body 
does not receive the brain’s 
messages fast enough. 

Mobility has always been his 
nest problem which is why 
manager. Ion Tiriac, has him 
running up and down moun- 


tains during training weeks. A 
little tired, perhaps, after an 
exhausting autumn programme, 
Becker found bad habits return- 
ing as Lendl's powerful ground 
strokes rocked him back on his 
beds and the West German, 
aged 19, could never discover 
foe forward momentum re- 
quired to dominate an opponent 
of this class. 

Fighting his way out of five 
break points in the third game of 
the match. Becker was some- 
what fortunate to be leading 4-3 
on serve but two double faults in 
the ninth game proved fatal 
Having secured the initial 
breakthrough, Lendl simply got 
better and better. 

In foe end the Czechoslovak 
relinquished only 12 points on 
his serve in the entire match. 
Only once did Becker manage to 
get as for as deuce on his 
opponent’s serve. 

Unable to attack the net 
against a player who was serving 
at 110 mph and hitting deep 


with sweeL smooth precision 
whenever back court rallies 
developed, Becker found him- 
self having to dig out a series of 
low bouncing, sliced backhands 
on a slow Supreme court and 
frequently erred. 

Crying out in anguish and 
tearing his hair in frustration, 
Becker received a warning for 
infringing foe no-coaching rule 
the first time he so much as 
glanced ai Tiriac and his coach, 
Gunther Bosch. Bui foe warning 
was unnecessary. He was be- 
yond help. So although Becker 
finishes foe year with a 3-2 
winning record over Lendl, the 
question of who is the number 
one player in the world is not in 
dispute. 

Becker graciously admitted 
that himself for Lendl has the 
French and US Open titles and 
the Masters to stack up against 
his rival's Wimbledon crown. A 
year in which he suffered both 
illness and injury still proved to 
be enormously rewarding for 
this worthy champion. 


In addition to the $2 10.000 he 
won for his efforts here at the 
Garden. Lendl also received a 
cheque for $800,000 for finish- 
ing lop of the Nabisco bonus 
pool. In one night he became a 
millionaire all over again. 

“it feels great to be healthy 
again." said Lend I. who may 
actually have bene filled from 
time off because of a hip 
problem. “I don't think this was 
my best match but 1 competed 
better. And all those people who 
were suggesting Becker should 
be number one will have to wail 
a while now.” 

Butin three weeks’ time a new 
year dawns and the Australian 
Open is already occupying 
Lendl's thoughts. He is taking 
his Australian coach. Tony 
Roche, to Florida far two weeks' 
practise on grass courts before 
Chris Unas. Lendl sees the 
Australian title as a vital part of 
his preparation for gaining the 
confidence he needs to attain his 
primary goal — Wimbledon. 



Becker in 
line for 
third title 


Agony: Becker losing the Masters final but be could recoup his loss in the Young Masters 


From a Correspondent 
Stuttgart 

Boris Becker, the two-time 
Wimbledon champion bat 
beaten finallist in this week’s 
New York Masters, will be 
competing here this week for bis 
third consecutive victory >t the 
Yopg Masters tournament, 
which commences today. 

Becker, aged 19 and ranked 
number two ia foe world, is dear 
favourite in the field of 16 
players aged 21 and under. It 
was this event foal catapulted 
ham to prominence in its inauga- 
ral year, in January, 1985, at 
Birmingham. 

Becker, then 17, beat 
Sweden's Stefan Ed berg in a 
five-set final. He won Wimble- 
don six months later. 

In West Berlin Inst January, 
Becker defeated another Swede, 
Mats Wilander, in the fina l. 
W Sander fa now 22, and no 
longer eligible. 

Ed berg, who fa 20. has chosen 
not to return this year, as he and 
bis partner, Andos Jarryd, are 
the defending champions in this 
week's Masters donbles 
championship in London. 

Becker’s strongest challenge 
still looks likely to come from 
Sweden, of whom there are five 
fa the tournament, i ncl ud in g 
Kent Cartsson, the second seed, 
who is ranked 14 fa the world. 

Hie 16 competitors are di- 
vided into four groups under a 
round robin format. The winner 
of each group goes through to 
the straight euminatioa semi- 
finals. 

The winner will take 
US$30,000 (£21,000) from foe 
prize pool of $150,000. 


Fag-end festival comes to Albert Hall 


By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


The Wimbledon champions, 
Joachim Nystrom and Mats 
Wilander, and foe champions of 
France, John Fitzgerald and 
Tomas Smid, are among foe 
eight teams who will compete in 
foe Nabisco Masters Doubles at 
the Albert Hall from this morn- 
ing until Sunday afternoon. The 
event will be played in two 
groups of four on an all-play-a]l 
basis until Saturday's semi- 
finals. 

For the first time this popular 
doubles-only festival - inaugu-- 
rated by the Texas-based World 
Championship Tennis 

Organization at Montreal in 
1973 — has been merged with 
foe less successful doubles event 
foai was tacked onto foe grand 
prix Masters tournament in 
1975 and swiftly became little 
more than a sideshow. ' 

As a consequence of foe 
merger, the Albert Hall event 
has become foe official doubles 


climax of foe year-long grand 
prix circuit and has been 
shunted into December, foe 
logical month for iL The first six 
wCT doubles tournaments 
were played in North America 
in May and the nod eight in 
Britain fa January. 

Teams qualify for the Albert 
Hal! on the basis of forir records 
in foe year's grand prix tour- 
naments. Two partnerships 
qualified but will not compete. 
They were Peter Fleming and 
John McEnroe (the latieris 
suspension coincides with his 
desire for a break from com- 
petition) and Ken Flach and 
Robert Seguso, who has a bad 
knee. , 

The next team in line, Boris 
Becker and Slobodan 
ZiVojinovic. are not available 
because Becker is playing in foe 
concurrent Waterford Crystal 
“Young Masters” tournament 
in Stunsm. Such clashes dem- 


onstrate the need for a neutral, 
independent fixture-making 
body: bul do not much matter at 
this time of year because there 
are more than enough good 
players to “staff" December’s 
small entry events. 


One group at the Albert Halt, 
in the order of their grand prix 
points standings, consists 
olNystrom and Wilander, Guy 
Forget and Yannick Noah, 
Sergio Casa! and Emilio San- 
chez, and Gary Donnelly and 
Mike De Palmer. The other con- 
sists of Hans Gildenneister and 
Andres Gomez. Siefan Edberg 
and Anders Jarryd. Fitzgerald 
and Smid. and Christo Steyn 
and Dannie Visser. 


The teams plugging gaps in 
the draw include Fitzgerald and 
Smid, who have won two grand 
slam titles: those of the United 
States in 1984 and France this 
year. 


Today's programme, begin- 
ning at 1 1 o'clock, will be 
Fitzgerald and Smid v Steyn and 
Visser, Casal and Sanchez v 
Donnelly and DePalmer and. 
(from 6 o'clock onwards) 
Nystrom and Wilander v Forget 
and Noah and Gildermeisier 
and Gomez v Edberg and 
JaiTyd. 

One can never be sure how fit 
and eager players will be for 
these driest play-off exhibitions 
at the fag-end of the year. But 
doubles tend to be more fan 
than singles for players and 
spectators alike: and doubles is 
the game most people play at 
club lev?]. The other day a 
neighbour said it was outra- 
geous that, by comparison with 
singles, doubles was so badly 
treated in terms of scheduling 
prominence, publicity, and 
prize money. He was looking for 
an argument but did not get one 
— because he was right. 


SPEEDWAY 


Crisis at Wimbledon 


Wimbledon, one of the most 
famous names in British speed- 
way, will fold early In foe new 
year unless they can find a 
sponsor prepared to plough at 
least £25,000 into the dub. 

The London dub's death 
knell rang yesterday in a state- 
ment issued by GRA Group, 
who own Wimbledon Grey- 
hound Stadium - the club's 
home track. 


The statement sai± “GRA 
Group regrets to announce that 
speedway racing will not be 
staged at Wimbledon Stadium 
in 1987 unless an assurance of 
substantial sponsorship has 


been received by January 8 at 
foeJatesL" 

Founded in 1928, 
Wimbledon's heyday came in 
the 1 950’s when they dominated 
British speedway. But their for- 
tunes have been on foe wane in 
recent years and two years ago 
they dropped down to the 
National League. 

Their decline has been 
matched by a fall in attendances. 
The team manager, Cyril 
MaidmenL was pessimistic 
about the chances of a sponsor 
coming forward in time. “They 
must be very slim. We are 
talking about £25,000 for a 
season," he said. 


SKIING 


Back on a crash course 


Val D’Is&re (Reuter) — 
Women racers yesterday re- 
turned here to foe World Cup 
downhill track on which the 
Austrian teenager. Christine 
Putz, was nearly killed last year. 

putz returned to skiing, de- 
spite spending 1 9 days in a coma 
after crashing at 60mph, but she 
will miss the two downhills, 
scheduled for Friday and Sat- 
urday, with tom knee ligaments, 
sustained in pre-season training. 

Pam Ann Fletcher, of foe 
United Stales, who came to grief 
at almost the same spot as Putz 
1 2 months ago, returned in style 
by clocking the fifth fastest time 
of the opening practice. 


“Oh, my goodness, that was 
wild. 1 ’’ Fletcher exclaimed, after 


completing foe course, on which 
site skidded and somersaulted 
over a safety barrier last year. “I 
was a little wide today, where I 
turned that remarkable somer- 
sault. bul it felt fine." 


Heidi Zurbriggen. foe Swiss 
whose brother, Pirmin. won the 
men's downhill here last Friday, 
returned the fastest time from a 
start number of 40 out of 53. 
though the Canadian team coa- 
ch. Currie Chapman, race ref- 
eree for the second year, said 
some racers appeared haunted 
by the memory of Putz's crash. 


SQUASH RACKETS 


Relentless 
Jahangir 
overhauls 
Kenyon 


Karachi (Reuter) — Jahangir 
Khan, of Pakistan, overcame a 
determined early challenge by 
Phil Kenyon to win foe Pakistan 
Masters tournament yesterday. 

Jahangir, beaten just once 
since April 1981. looked slightly 
vulnerable at one game all and 
2-1 down in the third. Bul his 
unflagging brilliance proved loo 
much for his rival, who was 
unable to win another point. 

The former world champion 
finished foe match a 9-2. 5-9, 9- 
2, 9-0 victor to claim his fifth 
successive crown. 

Kenyon was swept away in 
the opening game but found his 
best form at 3-0 down in foe 
second. Varying the pace clev- 
erly and constantly, he forced 
errors from the title bolder. 

Kenyon took an early lead in 
foe third but could not press 
home his advantage from 2-1. 
Upset by the referee’s decision 
to call a let, rather than award- 
ing him a point he lost bis 
concentration and Jahangir took 
command. 

Jahangir, who lost his world 
title to Ross Norman, of New 
Zealand, last month, took foe 
third game with six points in a 
row and swiftly wrapped up foe 
fourth. 

Yesterday's meeting was the 
fa lest in a seven-year pursuit of 
foe world No I by Kenyon, aged 
30. from Buckinghamshire. 
They first mei in foe 1 979 world 
amateur final in Australia. In 
the 1983 world championship in 
New Zealand. Kenyon was cred- 
ited with the distinction of being 
the only player to amass more 
than eight points against the 
young master. 


Show of 
temper 
is costly 


By Colin McQuillan 


Ahmed Tahir, an 1 8-year-old 
from Cairo, is plainly another in 
the long line of elegant Egyptian 
strakeplayers to have enriched 
squash for half a century. These 
days Tahir, the junior and 
senior champion of his country, 
lives in Manchester, playing 
fourth string for Arrow Village 
in foe American Express Pre- 
mier League. 

He has power, speed, extraor- 
dinary deftness of touch at the 
front wall — and complete lack 
of understanding about the idio- 
syncratic control of English 
referees. 

That last characteristic, com- 
bined with yesterday’s fiery 
show of temper, cost the Egyp- 
tian a possible victory over 
Robert Graham. England’s ju- 
nior captain, and presented 
Cannons, 4-1 winners, with a 
vital point in the race for the 
leadership of the national 
league. 

At one game all and 3-3 in foe 
third, Tahir amreared to have 
every chance or taking another 
point from foe London side. He 
was gradually gaining foe ascen- 
dency when three “no-let” calls 
from foe referee, Gordon Ross, 
and an over-eager, double 
bounce, call from the marker, 
Ted Crispin, destroyed his 
concentration. 

The calls were typical of Ross, 
who demands that players make 
every effort to reach foe ball, but 
they undoubtedly broke the 
rhythm of a crucial game. 

RESULTS: mtnrCity Cannons 4, Anew 


vmaoe 1 : R Norman bt U Haial, M, 9-2, 9- 
6; J Hick ox lost to J La Uevra. 9-8, 7-9, 9- 


7. 8- 10. 8-10; D Lee M P Wickenctan. 9-8, 
9-1. 9-2; R Graham bt A Tar*. 9-3, 5-9. 9- 

7. 9- 0; I R Munson bt J dark, 9-7, 9-4. 9-4. 


TODAY'S FIXTURES 


730 unless stated 

FOOTBALL 

FA CUP 

Second round replay 

Northampton v Southend — 

Fourth division 


Wrexham v Cambridge 


UEFA Cup 

Thud round, second leg 
(First leg scores in brackets) 
Barcelona (2) v Bayer Uerdmgan (0) 

Be varan m v Torino (2) 

Borussia Monchengladbach (1) v 

Rangers M) (6.30) 

Gotebora m v Ghent (0) — .... 

Hajduk Split (0) v Dundee United (2) 
pr- 


inter Milan (1£ v DukJa Prague (0).... 


Swarovski Tyrol (0) v Spartak 
Moscow (1). 


Vitoria Gwmaraes (0) v Groningen 


Freidit Rover Trophy 
PreimUnary round 


Hereford v Newport .... ..... 

St Quintln University match 
Oxford v Camdndge (at Wembley 

Stadium, 2.15) 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Chariton v 
Norwich (Bromley FC. 3D): Ipwcn v 
Swindon (2.01: Oxford United v 
Tottenham. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE {7.0k HfSt dMatore 
Nonmgnam Forest v Manchester City. 
Second division; DaiKngton v Nuts 
County (7.30), Doncasmr v Gnmaby (WOK 
Hundersfietd v Barnsley (730): Scurv 
ihorpe » Romerham. Stoke v Blackpool: 
York V Bradford (7.30). 

GM Acceptance Cup: Second round: 

South Liverpool v Runcorn. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: BiH Deflow Cun: 
First round. Coventry Sporting v Mile Oak; 
Dunstame v CHeVnstorCL Midland cfl- 
nsion Leicester United v Buckingham. 
VAUXHALL-OPEL LEAGUE: Second di- 
vision south: RihgIid Manor v Metropoli- 
tan Ponce. 

GREAT MILLS WESTERN LEAGUE 
fflasTondury v Wrobome. 

BUILDING SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Stowmarhei v Solvam Town Rangers. 
League Cup: Third round: Buy Town » 
Great Yarmouth. 

FA YOUTH CUP: Second round: 
Hednastord v Binningham Cny: Orient v 
Exeter Cnv; Port Vale v Mansfield (7.0). 
SOUTHERN JUNIOR FLOODLIT CUP: 
Third round: Tottenham v Queen's Par* 
Rangers (7.01 


RUGBY UNION 

REPRESENTATIVE MATCHES: Bedford Iv 
= f 7.15): Manpaiwa v Royal Navy (at 
ismoirth RFC. 2-30). 

CLUB BATCHES (7.0k GrtMTOarr 
Wanderers v Maestag f7.i 51: NewOndgo * 
AoeniBery: Pontypool v Law*; Swansea 
Cardiff. 


OTHER SPORT 
BASKETBALL (8.0k Men's first dMsIon: 
BCP London v LfittasWiatCrYOa. 1 P®®* 
NSC): Bntisn Masters: Regional round: 
Lamtoth v Hemei and Watford, ©rtwon v 
Plymouth. 

BOXING: Greenwich Borough HaB. Wool- 
wicn (8 Ok Stoke Euro-Spwtmg CM> (at 
King's HaH, SioAe). 

LAWN TENNIS: Nabisco Masters doubles 
chamoiortsnip (at Royal Albert 
London) 

SNOOKER: HofTOmaW world d oubles 
tournament, final stages (at Derogate 
Centre. Northampton). 





16 


SPORT 


THF TfMFS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


CRICKET: CHANCES RECEDE OF BOTHAM PLAYING IN THIRD TEST 


England show a purpose that 
augurs well for task ahead 


England beat Victoria here 
yesterday, for the first time 
since 1 962-63, by five wickets. 
It was a match they had been 
near to winning last Saturday 
evening, yet did so in the end 
with only 17 balls to spare. 
They left afterwards for Ad- 
elaide, where the third Test 
match starts on Friday. 

Needing 184 in a shade 
under three hours, England 
were usefully served by Slack, 
Whitaker, Lamb and Gower, 
who all pooled their weight 
and played attractive strokes. 
There was a purpose about 
England's batting yesterday 
which augurs well for the day 
after tomorrow. 

On a pitch that had become 
slower and easier the drier It 
got, England bad done well in 
the morning to pick up 
Victoria's last four wickets for 
49 runs. It was good to see 
Foster getting three of them. 
Although his control was way- 
ward, he had had no luck on 
Monday, and even with 
Botham unable to bowl he 
must be disappointed not to 
be next in line to join the Test 
attack. 

Having baited and battled 
away for nearly six hours to 
reach his hundred, Hibbert 
dipped Edmouds to mid-on 
when nine short of iL By then 
Lamb had taken a lovely low 
catch at third slip, which got 
rid of Domaitina, a distinctly 
promising batsman-wicket- 
keeper. England were batting 
by 12 o’clock - the last hour 
began at 2.40. to allow the 
party to catch the flight to 
Adelaide - and by lunch 
Alhey, as he tends to do. had 
followed a good first innings 
with a low score in the second, 
caught at the wicket aiming an 
offside force. 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Melbourne 


Whitaker proceeded then to 
show with what splendidly 
little fuss he scores his runs, 
playing each ball on its merits 
as he sees them. He is a hard 
straight hitter between mid-off 
and mid-on, the bat going 
through the line of the ball, 
and can punch it off the back 
foot as well. His booking was 
untidy, though when he 
middled one it went a long 


VICTORIA: First tarings 101 (M W Gatnng 
4 for 31). 

Second Innings 

D F Wtiatmom c zrx) t> Small 43 

A I C Dodemalde Kr» D Smafl . 24 

0 M Jones c Richards b Small 29 

P A Hibbert c Gower b Edmonds 91 

JDSKMonscsubbSmaB 3 


S POTJonns* Si detente b Edmonds 77 

i D Frazer c Ric har ds b SmaS 10 

tM G D Danatxra c Lamb b Foster _ 20 

M G Hughes b Foster 20 

-R j Bngm tow b Foster 1 

S P Davis not out ... 0 


Bright had a rough time of it. 
Known for his economical 
bowling (2.3 runs per over in 
Test cricket) more than for his 
wicket-taking (33 wickets in 
25 Tests), he was now treated 
with disdain by Lamb. 

Bright will probably be play- 
ing against England on Friday 

— unless the Australian selec- 
tors who were present yes- 
terday disliked what they saw 

— and it was as though 
England had decided on a 
calculated attempt to rattle 
him. Several times Lamb 
made room to hit him over 
long-off or extra cover. 

It was a game Victoria were 
noticeably keen to win. But 


Slack joined in the baiting of 
to fine 


Extras (b 9. lb & nb 10) . 

Total 


_ 27 
.345 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-60. 2-106. 3-107, 4- 
f 12. 5-239. 6-263. 7-308. 3-342. 9-344, ip. 
345. 

BOWLING: Sired! 40-9-81-5: Foster 42.1- 
EdmomJs 25- 


9-115-3; Gaffing 34-6-57-0; | 
5-50-2: Alhey 4-0-25-0. 


ENGLAND XL Rret Innings 263 (C W J 
i SB, B N French 58: A I C Dadamade 


4 tor 


Second Innings 
WN Slack c Dvnattina bOu 


TJoniwB _. 35 

CWJAltieycDimatttnabDodeRaide 10 

J J Whttakar c Whatmore b Bright — 48 

A J Lamb c Jones b Bright 36 

DIGnvfflWt 25 


"MW (Sailing b Dooemawe . 
tCJ Richards not out . 


Extras (K> 1. w 8. nb 1) 
T0tal(5 wtts] 


17 
- 0 
10 


184 


B N French. P H Edmonds. N A Foster and 
GC Small cBd not bat 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-14. 248, 3-1 12 4- 
140. 5-180. 


BOWUNG: Hughes 8-0344: Ooctemakto 
12-3-46-2 O' Donnel 


_ _ irtes 121-3-36-1; Bright 

10-1-54-2 Jones 3-0-23-0. 

Umpires: R C BaMtecte and D w Holt 


way. almost far enough to 
reach the most distant of the 
Melbourne boundaries, a good 
100 yards away without any 
run on the ball. 

Whitaker was caught at slip 
off the front edge, trying to 
turn to leg a ball from Bright 
that turned. Apart from this. 


Bright with one or two 
straight hits, and when Lamb 
went to a full toss, which he hit 
to mid-on, Gower finished off 
the job for England, assisted 
by Gatting until, with only 
four runs needed, he was 
bowled by a ball that scarcely 
left the ground. 

It was England's third 
proper victory of the tour, the 
others being against South 
Australia and in the first Test 
match. There is no great merit 
in beating a country XI, as 
England have, in a limited- 
overs match, unless they are 
property bowled out. 

Botham gives himself very 
little chance of playing in 
Friday’s Test match, even as a 
batsman only. He saw a 
specialist again yesterday and 
nothing will be decided before 
tomorrow. Should Botham be 
ruled out. Slack or Whitaker 
may expect to replace him. 
and as they both played 
yesterday neither of them 
would let the side down. 
Purely on the form of the tour, 
Whitaker would be unlucky 


not to be the first pick of the 
two; but Slack could bat at 
No. 3, should England lose an 
early wicket, and he is much 
the more experienced of the 

two. 

The alternative is to play an 
extra bowler in Botham s 
stead, which would mean 
having Richards at No. 6. In 
ail the circumstances a four- 
man attack, with Gatting as 
the fifth bowler, would seem 
preferable to a long tail, 
certainly an attack that had 
two spinners rather than one. 
England, after all- are one np 
in the series. 

The Australians, I'm sure, 
would be delighted if the 

Edmonds- Embuney partner- 
ship were to be broken up, 
especially at Adelaide where, 
in the absence of high-class 
fast bowling, good spin 
almost always what a captain 
most values. A more practical 
option than dropping- Ed- 
monds might be to replace 
DeFrehas with Small on the 
grounds that Small is the more 
accurate and, having played 
for South Australia last sea- 
son, knows the ground well. I 
would be inclined to do this, 
while regretting the temporary 
loss of DeFreitas’s batting and 
fielding. 

Any idea of bringing Pringle 
over from Sydney (where he 
has been doing quite well in 
grade cricket), or sending to 
Tasmania for Ellison was 
discussed only in passing. The 
only justification for this 
would be if Botham were to be 
told that be must do nothing 
for several weeks, which 
would leave England with 
DeFreitas as their only afl- 
rounder. Failing that there is 
an obligation to the present 
party to leave the job to them. 


Indian batting practice Counties on head hunt 


Gwalior (Reuter) — Sri tanka 
opened their tour of India with a 
draw against the Indian Cricket 
Board President’s XL a game 
enlivened on the last day by 
some fine stroke play from the 
Indian batsmen. 

The President's XL resuming 
at 80 for one. indulged in some 
attractive batting practice on a 
dead pitch at the Roop Singh 
stadium as they amassed 355 for 
four In reply to Sri Lanka's 
massive first innings total of 504 
for four declared. 

Raman Lamba hit a sparkling 
113, including two sixes and 1 1 
fours, driving powerfully thr- 
ough the off side before being 
caught ofTGurusinghe. Lamba’s 
overnight partner, Lalchand 
Rajput, was 18 short of his 
century when he was bowled by 
the left arm spinner, Anurasni, 
both batsmen staking claims for 
a place in India’s Test match 
side with their second-wicket 
stand of 145. 

Both Mohammad Azhar- 


nddin, who hit 52 not out. and 
Raman, unbeaten on 39, kept up 
the attack against the Sri Lankan 
bowlers, delighting the large 
crowd with some fluent strokes. 

The Sri Lankans, whose mo- 
rale-boosting total revolved 
around a magnificient unbeaten 
227 by tbeir opener. Sidaih 
Wettirnuny, now play the In- 
dian Under-25 team in a three- 
day match, starting on Friday. 

SRI LANKANS: First Innings 504 far lour 
doc IS Wetimum 2Z7 notout R LDias 81 , 
L R D Mends 65. A P Gurustogha 59; S 
Gudge 4 tor 171) 

BOARD PRESIDENTS XL First Innings 

*K Srikkanth c Dias b Ratnayaha 31 

LSRaputbAmraskl 82 


RLonibacJuranpathy bGurasmghe 113 

Aran Laf b Juranpaffiy 34 

M Azharuddin not out 52 

WV Raman not out — _ 39 

Extras(b1.l)2nb1) 4 


Total (4 write) . 


3S5 


KM Azad. tK S More. S Gudge, R P Singh 

and R SGhffi ffid notbaL 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-39,2-184,3-249.4- 

279. 

BOWLING: Ratneyeke 15-5-47-1; 
Ratnayaka 17-&44-0; da S8va 154-57-0; 
Anurasiri 233-78-1: Juranpatfty 164-65- 
1; GurustnghB 9-2-30-1; Dtas 5-031-0. 


First-class counties are on a 
major shopping spree — with 
Graham Difley, Kent's England 
paceman, and Geoff Boycott, 
former England and Yorkshire 
opener, topping their lists. 

Boycott, is now virtually cer- 
tain to sign a contract to join 
Derbyshire next month. At ihe> 
club's annual meeting on Mon- 
day night, the Derbyshire cap- 
lain, Kim Barnett, said: “We 
need bis runs. Geoff is a very 
professional man and 1 can see 
no problems. We need an extra 
2,000 runs from somewhere 
next season, and I believe Geoff 
is the man for the job." 

Bui counties queuing to cap- 
ture DtUey were warned yes- 
terday about illegal approaches. 

The Kent secretary, David 
Dal by, spelt out the message: 
“Dill try is under contract to us 
until January 1 and no attempt 
should be made to talk to him 
about his future before then.” 

What concerned Kent was a 
suggestion that Hampshire, who 
have said they will be interested 


in Dilley when his contract 
expires have skipper. Mark 
Nicholas, in Australia and avail- 
able to talk to Dilley in Mel- 
bourne this week. 

Kent already have their cap- 
tain, Chris Cowdrey, in Austra- 
lia with a new two-year contract 
for Dilley. 

Dal by said: “I can't believe 
any county would have asked 
their captain to make an ap- 
proach to Dilley at this stage. It 
would be quite contrary to 
TCCB regulations.” 

He added: “We hope the 
situation will be resolved by the 
end of the year with Dilley 
agreeing to a new contract so 
ruling out any approaches by 
other counties.” 

Meanwhile. Derbyshire are 
also keen to sign lan Botham, 
but a member of their commit- 
tee, the former Test selector, 
Charlie EUiotL returned fiom 
Australia last weekend without 
any firm indications from the 
alt-rounder about his plans. 


\ 



Oat in the cold: Graham Gooch and Ms wife, Brenda, brave the wet weather fora night on the town in London's West End 


Gooch puts Brentwood before Bondi 


To Graham Gooch, ensconced 
for the winter fa fas Brentwood 
borne, the news from Australia is 
un expected- No, be is not sur- 
prised that England are winning. 
What astounds him is the 
continued absence of any off- 
tbe-fieW stories emanating from 
Down Under. 

In the West Indies last winter, 
be knew little else. The political 
balloons went np, Gooch’s 
shoulders drooped, ami his 
wabrash-lihe countenance grew 
ever sadder. 

Brentwood is not everybody's 
idea of Elysinin — not, at least, 
after being In foe Caribbean. 
Gooch, though, was glad to be 
bone with his wife, Brenda, 
after all foe fans over his South 
African connections, ft is no 
surprise to learn now that be is 
not missing touring Australia. 

He is not idling the winter 
away — though he could afford 
to do so, what with his earnings 
from South Africa, a lucrative 
benefit. Tests and tonrs. 
endorsements and books. 

Out Of The Wilderness, his 
account of the 1982 Sooth 
African Breweries 4 tonr, and his 
subsequent ban from inter- 


national cricket, sold nearly 
10,000 hardback copies. Yet 
Gooch is looking to his future — 
as sportsmen are wont to say. 

Now 33, be begins a new job fa 
January, which may mean he 
will not to nr again. He wzD be 
working fa public relations and 
promoting cricket equipment 
and clothing for Stnart Samdge. 

It wiU involve setting tip 
exhibitions, some of which wiD 
carry oa in the summer, when, 
rest assured, he w ffl be back 
phpmi; for Essex and, prcsma 
ably, for En glan d . Some years 
ago. he trained to be a tool- 
maker, bat that qualification fa 
now as good as useless with the 
advent of computerised machin- 
ery and metrication. 

Otherwise, he fa beeping fit, 
training three days a week with 
West Ham, shovelling topsoil fa 
his garden, losing weight 
through running and sometimes 
going to bed at nine o'clock If the 
nanny is away and it is his ttm 
to feed the twins in the small 
hours. 


“Our three children put me 
under pressure,” he says. “I 
have become conditioned Co 


losing sleep and not bring able to 
read the papers dur in g tike day. 
It is a palaver loading foe 
chfldrea into the car and, if we 
had not had twins, I might have 
gone to Australia- Yet I am 
enjoying being a lather. 

“When one has done fire or 
six tours, it depends on individ- 
ual circumstances whether one 
wants to go again. John 
Emburey (Gooch's best 
cricketing friend) telephoned me 
from Australia and said the 
number of flights England were 
havin&to undertake was horren- 
dous, there was no fone off.” 

Gooch's decision to put his 
family before his career, and the 
unlikelihood of Ian Botham's 

(oaring again, may well have 
started a trend that other estab- 
lished Test cricketers will fol- 
low. Here was bound to be a 
reaction sooner or later to 
incessant cricket and travelling. 
Gone are the years when Eng- 
land had no winter tonr. 

Gooch's decision not to tour 
has brought him varied criti- 
cism- A sensitive and wary man, 
more upset than most by adverse 
comment, he did not think much 


of one c or r e spondent's incredu- 
lity that be could prefer a winter 
in Brentwood to sitting on a 
beach fa Sydney drinking 
Foster’s. Gooch has, in fact, said 
he would be available for the 
one-day matches after Christ- 
mas in the event of injury. 

What Gooch would like to do 
this winter is to go back to Sooth 
Africa — not to play, hot to visit 
Ken McEwan, Us dose friend, 
who retired from Essex last 
year. If hr did, he knows be 
would “get it in the neck**, as bn 
puts it. However, he was 
sounded oat as to whether be 
wanted to play fa South Africa 
this winter and has not rated oat 
playing there in the future. 

Gooch wiU leave his lair just 
once this winter. Before Christ- 
mas, he w31 spend four days in 
Hoag Kong, contesting another 
of those aUHroondar challenges, 
in winch Imran Khan. Kapil 
Dev, Richard Hadlee and Clive 
Rice are also competing. 

Twins or no twins. Good ml! 
be catching up on his sleep over 
the next week. 


Ivo Tennant,9p6 


FOOTBALL 



Oxford’s 
recent form 
suggests 
an upset 


By Marcos Williams 


Bailey (left) and Wi gg ins waiting in the wings for recall by Ferguson 

Forest buy Bailey makes early 
£90,000 return f or reserves 


Norwegian 


By Clive White 


By Dennis Shaw 


Nottingham Forest have 
signed Kgetil OsvaldL the 25- 
y ear-old Norwegian inter- 
national midfield player, for 
£90,000. although it might be six 
weeks before he becomes eli- 
gible to play for the champion- 


ship-chasing squad. 
Fan 


crest fear that obtaining his 
work permit could take that 
long. Their manager. Brian 
Cough, flew to Osvald’s dub. 
Lillestroem. to complete the 
deal after the player impressed 
him during a trial period at City 
Ground. 

Osvald. a talented ball-player 
with 14 caps, scored Norway's 
goal against Argentina in a 
friendly international m Oslo 
before the World Cup finals. 

Having seen him in practice 
matches and two testimonials. 
Clough sees the Norwegian as 
having similar potential to 
Foresrs Dutchman, Johnny 
Met god, who has become one of 
the most respected players in 
division one. 


• Alan McDonald pledged his 
future to QPR today, signing an 
improved ihree-and-a-half- year 
contract which will keep him at 
Loftus Road until 1990. 

The manager, Jim Smith, was 
anxious to secure the highly- 
rated 23-year-old Northern Ire- 
land international ce ntr e half. 

“The negotiations dragged on 
a bit, but I am happy at QPR 
and wanted to stay," said Mc- 
Donald, who still had 18 
months of his old contract to 
run. 

I Mich D'Avray, the transfer- 
listed Ipswich Town striker, has 
been prevented from holding 
talks ra Holland later this week 
because he might be needed for 
Saturday's match at Reading. 

D'Avray. aged 24, was due to 
travel to Roda. the Dutch first 
division dub, who watched him 
in last Saturday's 2-2 draw with 
Sheffield United at Penman 
Road. 


Gary Bailey. England's in- 
capacitated reserve goalkeeper 
in Mexico, makes a timely 
return to action on Friday fa his 
first game since February. 

His recovery from a worrying 
knee injury is a month ahead of 
schedule and comes in the same 
week that Chris Turner, his 
deputy at Manchester United, 
burned himself for foe loss of a 
two-goal lead against Totten- 
ham Hotspur fa last Sunday's 
television spectacular at Old 
Trafiord. 

Bailey wifi play for the re- 
serves against litem Town fa a 
friendly to mark the opening of 
the North West Comity League 
dob's floodlights. Alex Fer- 
guson, the United manager, 
said: “It win be an ideal "»«<* 
for Gary to come bock in. He 

wnw through a fun t raining 

session on Monday and provided 
there is no reaction he will 
definitely play.** 

Bailey, who has had two 
operations since he damaged the 
knee a gainst West Ham United 
fa a league game, said: “I'm 
delighted. I've had no problems 
with the knee." 

In May, Bobby Robson, the 
Fnginnd manager, decided to 
take him to Mexico even though 
be was nor folly fit. but he broke 
down fa training. 

Since the iqjtny last February 
Tamo-, signed from Sander land 
before the dart of last season. 


had an uninterrupted run m 
the side. And though many 
people preferred him to Bailey 
be was not without his own 
critics. 

Comparatively small for a top 
class goalkeeper — 5ft 10fa — he 
does not dominate his area as 
boldly as some would like. He 
accepted foe blame for two of 
Tottenham's goals on Sunday. 
the first following a chip by 
Hoddte. foe second a high cross 
by Waddle. On the eve of 
Sunday's game he commented: 
“Every game yon play for 

United, yon are under pressure.” 

One United player who came 
back from a considerably worse 
injury than Bailey was Mark 
Hi ggins, the former Evert on and 
England nnder-23 centra] de- 
fender. 

He retired from the game with 
a pefric injury fa 1984 on 
medical advice only to have his 
career resurrected by Ron 
Atkinson, foe former United 
manager who was dismissed by 
the dub on November 6. 18 
months later. 

Yesterday Higgins, for whom 
United repaid £60,000 fa insur- 
ance compensation, tamed down 
a loan more to Bury. Higgins, 
who appeared fa two FA Cup 
ties last season, last appeared 
for the first team against Shef- 
field Wednesday fa April at foe 
end of a ran of six games, hot foe 
dob would now be willing to part 
with him. 


Oxford, victors in the Univcr- 
siiv rugby match ai Twick- 
enham vesicrday. will today at 
Wembley seek their first 
footballing win over Cambridge 
for four years in the 103rd 
meeting between the clubs since 
the senes began in 1874. 

Cambridge, who won 2-0 last 
\rar. lead In 43 victories to 37. 
but this term's form suggests 
Oxford will hare the edge 

Figures indicate there is lililc 
between the respective records 
f Oxford: played 15. won 5. 
drawn 3. lost 7: Cambridge: 1 !. 
3. 3. 5). but in meetings with the 
same opponents the dark blues 
have a decided edge. Oxford 
drew 2-2 with a Tottenham 
Hotspur XI and 0-0 with an 
Arsenal XI. while Tottenham 
trounced Cambridge S-0 and 
Arsenal defeated them 2-0, Ox- 
ford also had wins over the 
RAF. Navy and Army, but 
Cambridge lost to the Navy and 
shared the points with the RAF. 

David Hunter, the Oxford 
captain and wing player, one of 
four old blues in the squad, has 
been declared fit after recover- 
ing from an ankle injury, as has 
Robert Mather, the Cambridge 
forward. one of four Hampton 
School representatives in the 
match. The others fonn a 
distinguished trio: Link is the 
Oxford secretary. and 
Girdlcsione and Sismey are the 
Cambridge captain and 
secretary. 

Hunter was the only member 
of today's side to have missed 
the game last week in which 
Oxford lost by a single goal to a 
strong Oxford United XI. Cam- 
bridge. too. who field five blues, 
performed encouragingly in 
their final outing, a draw with 
Cambridge United, in which 
Bail, the light blues' goalkeeper 
and a Somerset cricketer, main- 
tained a clean sheet. 

This is the second year the 
fixture has been sponsored by Si 
Quintin. the London chartered 
surveyors, who arc also support- 
ing the final stages of the English 
Schools FA under- 13 six-a-side 
competition, which will be 
staged before the kick-off todav. 
OXFORD: TPNKpa (QEGS Blackburn ana 
Magdalen); K I n gram (St Cyras. Penarth 
anoUnreersityK D Pimfatatt (Ramtord HS 
and Onefl, 'G Link (Hampton and Pem- 
broke). 18 Create* [Manchester GS and 
Qnef). M Daly (NorthoR hs ski Pern- 
broke), A Jones (Latyrmr Upper and St 
Edmund Haig, O Rudkin (St Edward's and 
Pembroke). T Bums (Bradbury and Pem- 
broke). ’G Harper (Abingdon and St 
Edmund Han). "D Hunter (QEGS Black- 
burn and Oriel, capt). Subs ft 
SdetmUam (Lytham St Annas HS and 
Pembro k e). ST Wooftone (Bradfeid. 
Sheffield and KeUe). 

CAMBRIDGE: P BaH fMBHiekl and 
Downing); 'A Spurting {Tonbndge and 


cuu 

Tnray Hal). N Jenkins (Wooten Upper 
and Robinson). *R Sismey (Hampton and 
" none (Ha 


Tnntyt. ft GMtamom (Hampton and St 
John s, capo. S Palmer (Vamdean Coll- 
ege and Christ's). S Bradley (Nelson and 
Cotoe College and St John’s). I McKinnon 
[BenfieM and Girion) *C ENno (Forest and 


Gvton). R Mather (Hampton and Tnrutjf 


HaS). T Werner (International Scnoc 
Geneva and ChurcMfl). Subs: J Hinton 
(Beacon and Doumng). N Craggs 
(Longeron and Sefwyn). 

Referee: M J Benttnan (Huntingdonshire). 
■A blue 


Family areas scheme hits snags 


A revolutionary plan by 
Derby County to bring down foe 
barriers at the Baseball Ground 
and introduce a unique 
membership key scheme for 
fans has run into opposition 
from the police. 

The dub wants to mien up a 
new family enclosure with 

computerized membership 
keys, and the managing director. 
Smart Webb, believes that tak- 
ing away foe high-security fenc- 
ing at that end of the ground is 


vita! to the creation of a “happy 
family atmosphere”. 

Derbyshire police have 
voiced their fears about foe 
removal of the barriers, and 
senior officers are expected to 
renew their opposition when 
they meet representatives of foe 
County Council’s public protec- 
tion committee at foe ground on 
Friday. 

Mr Webb said yesterday : 
“We have hit snags, but we hope 
they can be overcome. Orig- 


inally we supported a total ban 
on visiting fens, as ai Luton, but 
we now believe the creation of 
special family areas is a better 
scheme. 

Tm sure what we are plan- 
ning, with admission by special 
key, is better than the 
Government's idea of a com- 
pulsory membership card. Any 
troublemaker could be banned 
by removing his code from the 
computer and making his key 
useless.- 


ATHLETICS 


Thompson 
in mixed 


pairs test 


Paris (AFP) — Daley Thomp- 
son. Britain's Olympic, world, 
European and Commonwealth 
champion, will compete against 
his great West German decath- 
lon rival. Jurgen Hingsen. in a 
mixed pairs pentathlon here on 
January 18, a French athletics 
coach, Michel Lerouge. said 
yesterday. 

Lerouge said Thompson 
would team up with Judy Simp- 
son who woo the Common- 
wealth heptathlon title and was 
the bronze medal winner in the 
European Championships fa 
Stuttgart. 

Hingsen will be partnered by 
his compatriot. Birgit DresseL 
fourth in Stuttgart, in a com- 
petition comprising 60m hur- 
dles, long jump, shot put high 
jump and 600m for both men 
and women. The men's and 
women's races will be run 
separately but the field events 
will be held simultaneously. 

The organizers, the National 
Sports Institute, are hoping to 
entice the East Germans, 
Torsten Voss, fourth fa the 
Stuttgart decathlon, and Anke 
Behmcr, the European 
heptathlon champion, to this 
hybrid competition. 


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BARCLAYCARD 


Jenny MacArthur assesses the man in the driving seat 


Princess Anne takes over 
FEI reins from her father 


The Duke of Edinburgh re- 
tires after 22 years as president 
of foe Federation Equestre 
Internationale at today’s FEI 
general assembly at foe Waldorf 
Hotel, London. 

He is succeeded by Princess 
Anne, who, like her father, 
brings to the role foe experience 
of being a competitor. She was 
European three-day ‘event 
champion in 1971 and com- 
peted in foe 1976 Olympic 
Games in Montreal. 

The princess is the sole can- 
didate for the office of president, 
the only other names pro- 
posed — Christian Le Grez, for- 
mer president of the French 
federation, and Count von 
Landsbeig, head of foe West 
German federation — having 
felled to meet with foe unquali- 
fied approval of the FEI bureau. 

The organisation Princess 
Anne is taking over — based at 
its Swiss headquarters fa Bern — 
is much more complex than the 
one Prince Philip inherited from 
his predecessor. Prince Bern- 
hard, of The Netherlands, in 
1964. There are now 85 mem- 
ber-countries compared with 52 
then. 



best riders in the Olympics. 

It is ironic that, in the year of 
Prince Philip's retirement, foe 
issue has now finally been 
resolved with the new IOC 


regulations - brought about 
: eflfo 


The Duke: 22 years in saddle 


tion of veterinary regulations in 
1 966. Well aware of the harm fill 
effect on the sport of dis- 
tressed — or obviously tired — 
-horses, foe Duke made the 
establishing of such veterinary 


requirements a pnonty. 

if horses' 


Shamateurism 

campaign 


It governs twice as many 
sports — endurance riding, car- 
riage driving (started by Prince 
Philip in 1970) and foe some- 
what spurious tent-pegging and 
vaulting having been added to 
the more traditional disciplines 
of dressage, three-day eventing 
and show-jumping. 

Above all. foe last 20 years 
have seen an enormous growth 
in the professionalism and 
commercialisation of equestrian 
sports, which puts a premium 
on strong FEI leadership. 

With foe exception of the 
unsuccessful attempt, fa the 
early . 1970s, to clear up 
“shamateurism'*, the FBI under 
the Duke has rarely failed to 
show foal authority. Himself a 
natural leader, Prince Philip has 
shown from foe start his ability 
to weigh up a new idea quickly 
and to assess its implications for 
the sport. 

One of foe earliest and most 
important innovations under 
his presidency was the in trod UC- 


The subject of horses' welfare 
returned in the late 1970s when 
he had to deal with foe 
controversial subject of the 
painkiller phenylbutazone, 
known as “Bute", after the 
general assembly had got fa a 
muddle over the issue. 

In 1976, they proposed that 
horses having Bute should be 
described as such in foe pro- 
gramme of an event It was also 
proposed to forbid its use for 
dressage horses. Hie following 
year the assembly banned it 
altogether after a ‘snap’ vote. 

Prince Philip; an advocate of 
Bute to a permitted level over- 
ruled the vote (it had not been 
on foe agenda) and reopened the 
discussions. In 1980. it was 
agreed that Bute, up to a certain 
leveL should be allowed. 

But foe most contentious 
issue during the Duke’s tong 
term of office -sand one for 


largely through the efforts of the 
British Equestrian Federation — 
which enable a professional to 
renounce his status if he wishes 
to compete in the Olympics. 

The occasional sting, how- 
ever, has not stopped foe Duke 
from grasping the nettle. When 
the idea of foe FEI Volvo World 
Cup for showjumping was first 
discussed fa 1977. some mem- 
bers of foe bureau were against 
foe idea of the FEFs being 
linked with a commercial name. 

Prince Philip, who believed 
that it was possible for a 
commercial sponsor to put a 
vast amount of money into foe 
sport - "in this case. £1 
million" - and still be con- 
trolled, gave the go-ahead- The 
competition i$ now in its ninth 
year and has proved a firm 
success with foe riders, while 
remaining under FEI control 


A natural style 
of leadership 


which many of Britain's show 
jumpers still f 


bear resentment — 
was foe FEI's 1 973 decision, ied 
by Prince Philip, to put an end 
to "shamateurism". 

Following foe conditions laid 
down by the International 
Olympic Committee, 20 of 
Britain's top riders, including 
David Broome. Harvey Smith. 
Malcolm Pyrah and the late 
Caroline Bradley were forced to 

turn professional 
The other countries — nota- 
bly France and West Ger- 
many — failed to follow suit, 
and were not made to do so by 
the FEI. Britain were left 
stranded, unable to field their 


Other- additions to the inter- 
national calendar during the last 
20 years have included the 
President’s Cup — now called 
foe Prince Philip Trophy — for 
the most successful Nations Cup 
Team of the Year, the Tarmac 
showjumping competition and 
Haig dressage — for countries 
who, for reasons of distance or 
resources, are not able to com- 
pete at foe regular FE (-organ ised 
European and world champion- 
fh'ps acd. in 1985, foe Nasua 
World Cup for dressage. 

if the federation which 
Prince Philip hands over to his 
daughter today is twice as big as 
foe one he inherited, its stature 
has grown accordingly. The 
Duke's firm and natural style of 
leadership — much homework 
and meticulous planning has 
gone into his astute handling of 
It? assembly — has 

helped to ensure this. 

While, in other sports — nota- 
bly tennis — the players seem to 
pll the tune. Prince Philip’s 
legacy is a federation that re- 
mains firmly fa control of the 
sport. 


rate 




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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 198i 


37 


McOdJ's Low Letters 
(BBC 2 . 9.35pm) carries any mess- 
age at — and I am not talking 
aboiit the messages that pass to 
mid &o between the two central 
characters and give the film hs 
raison d’etre - it must suidy be 
that you had better be careful what 
you do with thostf old love letters 
you ought have stuffed into the 
back of a drawer, tied up in 
nbbon. Fortunately for Betty 
(Lancashire lass) and Chuck 
(American lad), their corres- 
pondence fell into the caring 
hands of Desfeioud Wilcox and hS 
team who make the current series 
of The Visa. One shudders to 
think what might have been 
of them had they ended up in less 
semauve hands. Even so, I was a 
tnfle uncomfortable watching 
tonjght’s film, feeling as if I was 
reading someone else's private 
letters — which, of course I was. It 


6.00 CeefaxAM. 

6-30 News headlines toHowed by 

The Ffintt tonem. (r) 6-55 ^ 

w earner. 

730 Breakfast Tima with Frank 

Bough, Safly Magnus son and 
Jeremy Paxman. National and 
international news at 7.00, 

7-30, 8.00 and 830; regional 
news and travel at 7.1 5, 745 
anda.1& weather at 7.25, 735 
and 225. 

8-40 Watchdog presented by John 
Stapleton. Viewers have the 
opportunity to question Mike 
Bett of British Telecom about 
the nation's telephone service 
835 Regional news and 
weather 94)0 News. 

9.05 Oay to Day. Robert Kflroy-Sflk 
chairs a studio discussion on a 
topical subject 9.45 Advice 
Shop. Margo MacDonald with 
supplementary benefit 
information 10.00 News and 
weather 10.05 Neirtboura. fri 

1035 PhiBipScholiaidwith^'* 
children's programme news, 
and birthday greetings 10l3O 
nay School 1050 Pinny's 
House. 

1035 Five to Eleven. Diana Qufck 
with a thought for the day 

11.00 News and weather 11.05 
Day Out with Angela Rippon in 
the Vale of Taunton Deane, (r) 

11.35 Open Air. Viewers voice 
their thoughts on television 
programmes (including news 

andweather at 12.00) 

12L25 Domesday Detectives. Team 
quiz competition on the subject 
of Britain 1235 Regional news 
and weather. 

1.00 One Odocfc News with 
Martyn Lewis. Weather 125 
Neighbours. Shane has bad 
news 1 30 Little Misses. 

2.00 FUm: Lady With a Badge 
(1381) starring Seen Brennan 
and PemeU Roberts. A married 
couple move to a small 
Wyoming town where the wife 
is shocked by the corruption 
that is rife among the town's 
law entorcars^Sne decides to 
run for sheriff. Directed by Jud 
Taylor. 335 Save a Life. Dr 
Alan Maryon Taylors 


TELEVISION AND RADIO 
The love that came with the post 

in. t v 

C CHOICE ) 


is no use pretending that Betty's 
letters to Chuck and his to her are 
either literary or romantic master- 
P »I eces ' 1 su ® esl we should regard 
them as the only bridge across 
Much an eventually hopeless love 
affair could cross during the 
Second World War. Betty and 
Chuck met only once - and then 
only briefly - at a Grs dance. 
They corresponded for years. He 
believed she was true only to him. 
She knew she had not been, but 
did not tell him. Eventually, both 
of them now much (rider and 
much wiser and much married, 
they are to meet again. Viewers’ 
reactions to the reunion will, I 
suspect, be mixed Either there will 

not be a dry eye in the house, or 
you will fed apprehensive about 


first aid series, (t) 



3*50 Pinny's House 430 Animal 
Fair 44)5 The Adventures of 
Bufiwinlcle and Rocky. Part 
five (r) 4.10 Hsothcfiff and Co. 
Cartoon adventures of an : 
cat. 4.35 Hartbeat Tony I 
gukte to the art of making 
pictures. 

5*00 N owaround wftfi Roger Finn 
54)5 The CNkfiren of Green 
Known. Episode three of the 
four-part drama based on the 

book by Lucy M Boston. 

5-35 Ma st erte am presented by 
Angela Rippon. 

64)0 News with Nicholas IWtcheU 
and Philip Hayton. Weather. 

6.35 LondonPlus. 

7410 Wogan. TWs evening's guests 
are Jonathan and David 
Dknbteby, Patrick MataMde, 
and the star of the Royal 
Variety Show. Victor Borne. 

7.35 The Clothes Show. Selina 
Scott goes shopping for a 
party dress; Jeff Banks selects 
last minute gifts; and Jane 
Lomas investig a t e s the cut- 
throat business of fashion 
design, (r) 

84)0 Dafias. News of Jenna’s 
condition shakes both Pam 


and Bobby ^Ceefax) 
ntsof View. With 
Took. 


830 Points of * 


Bany 


94)0 A Party Political Broadcast on 
behalf of the Conservative 
Party. 

94)5 News with Julia SomervBe and 
John Humphry*. Regional 
news and weather. 

935 The VtsiL Betty Allen visits 
New Mexico to see the man 
she first met at a Gl dance 40 


1025 


t introduced by 
Steve Rider. Coverage of the 
the Gumness Soccer Six 
indoor football tournament 
from Manchester; highlights 
from the match played in Dubai 
between Celtic ana Liverpool 
and the final of-the Masters 
• international Tennis 
Tournament to New York. 

12.10 Weather. 



Chuck and Betty: tbe for story is told in Love Letters, tins week’s 
edition of The Visit (BBC1, 935pm) 


what might come flying out when 
this particular Pandora's Box is 
opened in the presence of a not 
disinterested third party. 

Up ( j* BC2 ' 9.25pm), 
Nigel Wuliams four-pan drama 
serial about a family that is doing 
precisely that, ends tonight If you 
are expecting a happy ending, with 
all grey clouds dispersed, then you 
will not have been listening intelli- 
gently to what Williams has been 
trying to tdl you for the past four 
weeks. Pain and anger and confu- 
sion have been the staples in 
Breaking Up, and the kind of 
cement that is going to be 
to put this smashed family back 
together again is not the sort that 
comes out of the Good Fairy’s 
locker, even if — as happens 
somewhat conventionally tonight 
— the adhesive is applied 
the background of a scbooTs 
Christinas show with archangel in 


BBC 2 


94)0 Ceefn. 

1230 Design and Innovation. An 
Open University production 
examining developments in 
train travel 1235 Cee fax. 

24)0 News end weather. 

2.02 Sports Afternoon, 
of the final of toe 
Masters Tennis Tournament in 
New York; end the Guinness 
Soccer Six Indoor football 
tournament from Manchester. 
Onckiding news and weather at 

350 National and regional news, 
and weather. 

44K) Pamela Armstrong. This 
afternoon’s guests are John 
Timpson. John Humphrys, J9y 
Cooper and Jane Lapotam 

4J30 Global Report The Kende 
Solution. Peter Adamson 
meets young mothers from a 
vfllage in the populous Indian 
state of Kerala and discovers 
why they decided to be 
sterilized, (ri 

54)0 Domesday Detectives. A 


attendance and plentiful supplies 
of seasonable good wflL 
• Radio choice: Tonight briifes 
the last of Lord Mcdttskey’s 1985 
Keith Lectares on the theme of 
law, justice, and democracy (Ra- 
dio 4, 7.45pm). They have set so 
many fascinating hares running 
that ( am glad to have the 
opportunity to study their courses 
in detail in The Listener every 
week ....Kaleidoscope Extra (Ra- 
dio 4, 4.45pm) is devoted to actors 
turned directors and, predictably 
enough, Simon Callow and Sheila 
Hancock oblige with their 
thoughts on the matter. JMusicai 
hig hli g h t the aU-Henze concert, 
recorded in Cologne in 
September, with the BBC Phil- 
harmonic, BBC Singers and some 
fine soloists ( on Radio 3, 
7.30pm). 



Peter Davalle The Holi-based band. The Honsemartins star in a Hold Tight Special (ITV; 4.45) 


shown at 1235 oh BBC 1. 

5.30 Cover to Cover presented by 
Cofin MacCabe. Two 
bto^aphes of Frank Sinatra - 
Sinatra - My Father, by Nancy 
Sinatra, which was published 
with trie blessing of Ote Blue 
land His Way, by Kitty 
lley, which he tried to 
suppress, are dbcuseed; 

Spike fi^fgan talcs about his 
Goodbye sakfier; and John 
Ranelagh s book on the CIA, 
The Agency, is reviewed. 

6M Fitoe Genmimo (1962) starring 
Chuck Connors. The remaining 
band of Apache warriors 
surrender to the United States 
Cavalry when promised land 
and food, but an unscrupulous 
government agent cheats them 
of their rights. Geronjmo then 
decides to fight the might of 
the US Cavalry with his 50 
men. Directed by Amo Id 
Laven. 

7.40 The Pasadena Roof Orchestra 
day music tram ttie dance 
band days, (r) 

830 Out at Court includes the case 
of ex-policemen John Bugg 
who Is chattenging the by-laws 
on trespass and me use of 
- land around military, espectafly 
United States, bases in Britain 
to show the itegafty of their 
application. 

94)0 K*A*S*H. Hawkeye’s and 
Trapper's altruistic gestu re of 

rf^sotSer^ttBateJvrth 
suspicion by Hotfips and 
Frank, (r) 

9425 Breaking Up. The final episode 
of the drama serial about the 
effect the acrimonious divorce 
of his parents has on their soa 


ITV/LONDON 


6.15 TV-mb Good Morning Britain 

presented by Anne Diamond 
and Richard Keys. News with 
Gordon Honeycombs at &&L 

7.00, 7.30, 840, 8^0 and 94)0; 
financial news at 635; sport at 
640 and 740; cartoon at 7.25; 

pop music at 735? and video 
review at 835. After Nfae 
includes guest Tony Adams; a 
discussion on incontinence; 
and. at 9.17, exercises. 

9J25 Thames news headlines 
fofiowed by Beyond 2000. The 
latest technology 
developments mat win see us 
to trie 21 st century 10.15 wad 
WBd World of Anfanata. 
Bobcats. 1040 Qangwfrefacs. 
The world of the stunt artists 

11.35 Fabulous FUrmies. 

124)0 The Giddy Gme Show, (r) 
12.10 Our Backyard 123b 
Spin Offa. Tim Brooke-Taylor 
conMnuas his exploration of 
interesting places made more 
accessible By the M2S orbital 
motorway. 

14N) News at One with Leonard 
Paridn 1.20 Themes news. 

1-30 A Couitry Practice. Medical 
drama serial set in a remote 
outback town in Australia. 
Today, Simon is wonted about 
the responsUfities of 
fatherhood. 230 Farmhouse 
Kitchen. Grace Mufflgan and 
her guest Joscefine DimblBby, 


iudng roast goose, spiced 
with cinnamon and packed 
with nuts and fnA 
34» Take the MghRomL Someone 
plucks up courage to have a go 
at Davie Sneddon 3^5 
Thames news hearffines 330 
Sons and Daughters. 

44)0 Thomas ths Tank I 
Friends, narrated by I 
Starr. 4.10 The Tetobugs 430 
S.WJUJLO.W. David 
Bellamy's nature series. Today 
he is wrth chfidren from 
Cassop Junior School to 
' ' County Durham and offers' 
himself as a meal for a leech; 
meets a tour-fagged miner; and 
is doused in an ismsual bath. 


4^5 Hold Tight SpecteL The 
Housemartins in concert 

5.15 Blockbusters. General 
knowledge quiz game for 
teenagers, presented by Bob 
Hotness. 

545 News with Alastair Stewart 
64)0 Thames news. 

525 HelpIVfim advice on studying 
on the dole. 

635 Crossroads. The Bellevue 
inmates are staggered. 

74)0 TWs Is Your Life. Eamonn 
Andrews with surprises for 
another unsuspecting worthy. 

7.30 Co rona tion Street. Bet has 
mixed feelings about Alec 

Gitroy. (Oracle) 

8420 Strike ft Lucky. Michael 
Barrymore Resents another 
round of the quiz game that 
uses the most ip3o-date 
technology. 

830 The Benny Hffl Show. 

Highfights from the cometian’s 
»’ With Henry 
», Bob Todd, Jack 
Wright, and Geraldine. 

94)0 The EquaMzer. Robert McCall 
fa asked to help a Russian 
defector when his cover is 
blown by a visiting KGB 
operative. He also comes to 
the aid of a young man who to 
pother 

: in the 

I to which he 
has recently moved. 

Edward Woodward. Last in 
series. (Oracle) 

104)0 A Party PokScal Broadcast on 
behalf of the Conservative 
Party. 

104)5 News with Alastair Burnet and 
Sandy Gafi. Weather fOBowsd 
by Thames news heaefiines 

1(L35 Snooker. The last quarterfinal 
of the Hofmeister World 
DotiXes Championship, 
introduced by Dickie Davies 
from the Demgata Theatre, 
Northampton. The 
commentators are John 
Putman, Dennis Taylor, Rex 
Williams, Ray Ecfrnondsand 
MarkWBdman 

12.15 That’s Hollywood. Bizarre 
dnematic encounters. 

12^0 Night Thoughts. ' 


10.15 Dfvfng Caves of Marble. The 
story of the 1 982 Anglo- 
• Norwegian axpeefition to 
Norway’s Lake Gtomdal fed 
by a glacial river but with no 
known outlet 
1045 A Party Pofiticaf Broadcast on 
behalf of the Conservative 
Party. 

1050 Newsnight 11.35 Weather. 



Per and Barbel Oscarsson at odds with society in Steflan 
Olsson’s film Close to the Wind (Channel 4, 104)0pm) 


CHANNEL 4 


1>J5 Their Lordahto* 1 House, (r) 

2.00 Snooker. Quarterfinal action in 
the Hofmeister World Doubles. 
44)0 Mavis on 4. In this week's 
Predicaments programme 
Mavis Nicholson examines the 
problem of coping with a senile 
relation who has become 
unrecognizable from the 
person once loved, and talks to 
people who are having to come 
to terms with the situation. 

430 Countdown. Yesterday’s 
winner challenged by Paul 
Vates, a drama student 
54K) Slants Please" A condensed 
version of Lilac Time in which 


i girt. He is 
shot down and the girt, 
believing him kitted, resigns 
herself to a lifetime of 
loneliness. 

530 Hogan’s Heroes. Vintage 
American comedy series about 
a group of resourceful Allied 
pnsoners-of-war. 

6.00 The Abbott and CosteBo 
Show" Bud and Lou are forced 
to paper one of their landlord's 
apartments when they faO 
behind wife toe rent 

630 in Time of War 1939-1945; The 
New World Order. Murray 
Sayle presents excerpts from a 
Hm about the future of British 
Imperialism; and a debate on 
What to do with Germany? 
(Qrflcto) " 

7410 Channel 4 News with Pater 
Sissons and Beatrice Hollyar 
indudes a report on the 
Nuclear Inspectorate's 
investigations into safety at the 
SeBafiekJ plant, due to be 
published tomorrow. 

750 Comment This week's political 
slot fa filed by Stephen Ross, 
the Liberal MP for the fate of 
Wight Weather. 

8.00 Looking Into I 
I dis cusse s I 
i to portraiture, (r) 



UO The New EnfightemnenL In 
this penultimate programme of 
his series Professor Kenneth 
Minogue warns of 


94)0 Down the Line. This month’s 
edition of toe magazine 
programme from Scotland 
includes an investigation into 
ths hazards of dismantling 
nudear power stations; a 
preview of the ratBS reform bifl; 
and why remote communities 
in Scotland have better 
travelling theatre faeffittes than • 
their English counterparts. 
104)0 FUm: Close to the Wfad (1969) 
starring Per Oscarsson and 
Barbel Oscarsson. A drama 
about a non-conformist artist, 
at odds with society, who wins 

a competition to design and 
paint a mural for a local 
company. His initial elation 
gives way to frustration when 
toe board of directors bauDt at 
the pornographic aspects of 
the painting and demand 
modifications. Directed by 
SteUan Otsson. 

124)5 Their Lordships’ House. Bids 
at 1220. 


VARIATIONS 


RRC1 wales saapnujao wan»» to- 

day tSSTbf Ms 12.10m-1Z.15 
News and wMtfw SCOTLANO IILSOwp- 
114)0 Docoman 6J5fxn-74)0 Repcnlng Scot- 
land 1025-12.1Dam SportsoMW 12.11L 
T2.1S Waattwr NORTHERH IRELAND 5JSp»- 
S40 Today's Sport &404JX) Inskla Ulster 
BJ5-7-00 Masffinaam 12.Um-12.15 Nows 
and MUHher ENGLAND SJ5pm-74» Re- 
gional news magazines. 

ANGLIA *6 London axcept 225am 
*>"S?H** sesame Street 10J0 Cartoon 
loss Shon SHxy 11J» Sea in Thrir Kood 
11 JO-12420 Max Jaffa 12.30pro-l.00 Gsnfsns 
tor Ml 120-1 SO News 6J» About Angle 
1215am Joym my SouL Cfosedowa . 
BORDER As London except: Stans 
gy i ? ucri SL30am Cartoon 235 Sesame 
Street 10J5 WJd Hentag* 114» Famaadc 
Four 1 12S Cartoon 1140-1200 Perepeettw 
IZaOpot-l J» Gardonng Time L20--L30 
News 1 JO Country Practice 200- 2 30 Lord 
Sneltxirne at Home &00-S35 Lookaniund 
1215am Closedown. 

CENTRAL 

speare Tnlogy IOlOO Adventurer 1(L25 El 
Pueblo 1030-124)0 Maureen MoQoeem 
1230pro-14)0 Somaming to Treasure 1 JO 
News 130-230 HoM Ufa Crossroads 225- 
74)0 News 1215am New Avengers 1.15 
Comedy TongM14K)Jot]flnder 240 Close 


CHANNEL 


Openers 8 l 28 Cartoon MB Sesame SVeet 
1&30 Poseidon Hies 11.20 Aubrey 11 J0-1200 


14)0 The Stilivans 1J0 Short Story 
Theatre 200-230 Prabtam Page &3IMLOO 
The Young Doctors 04)-ft35 Qnratel Report 

930 Sesame Street 1040 BtruwleBd- 
neeth The Sea 1055 Aubrey IDmlncrodMe 
Detectives 1135-1200 Comedians 
I230pn-14)0 PTOizewtonera 130 Granada Re- 
ports 130-230 Randan and HopWrit (De- 
~ 33D-4.00 You na Doctors I 


Is Yow Right 

830-74)0 Croesroads 1215am Ckneoown. 

1035 Bayond 2000 11.10-124)0 Fax 8uy 
1230pm-1J)0 Gardening TVno 130NBWS130- 
230 Randal &HapUrk(beceaMd) 64)0- 
635 News 1215am Closedown. 

HTVWALfSX^ 1 ^^ 

TQtaf Aa London except 935am News 
-L55X 930 World of Stories 830 Carted 
Camera 104)0 Mr Ts.Chrl a tni as Dream 
1055 New Avengers 1130-1200 Cartoon 
1230pm-14)0 Gardens for AN 130-130 
Nam 5.15 Gus HoneyPun 530«45 Croaa- 
roads 54X) Today South Wea 030-74)0 
E nsu a m elB Farm 1037 WmTs World 11J0S 
Snooker 1215aro PoMacrlpt. Ctoeadown- 
Tvc As London except 93SamCar- 
1 toon 935 Sesame Street 1030 Poeei- 


don Hee 1136 Aubrey 1130-1200 
Captafei Scariet 1230paKf4)0 SJBvane 130 
News 130 Short Story 24)0430 Problem 


1215am Company, Closedown. 

TYNE TFFS As London except 
i me lc S g 935i NewsuioSasa- 
ms Street 1030 Indian Legends 114)0 Car- 
toon 1146-124)0 CMkfran Galore* 1230pm- 
1.00 ORriuns Of the WH 130-130 News 
eJXF&te Northern He 1215am Certwty of 
Knowing, Ciosedowa 


Poseidon 

Flee 11.15-1200 blend Wildlife 1230pm- 
14W Something to Treasure 130-l3euawh- 
tkna 230-4JM Wlkt World or Anknals 200- 
535 Good Evening Ulster 1210am BOea m 
Conran 1235 News, Closedown. 

YOR 




Stories 

930 Otherworid 1035 Sono lor Ireland 
1130-1200 Care Beers 123aprB-14» Lunch- 
tune Uve 13D-Z30 Falcon Crest 530-635 
Calendar 1215am Moviemakers 1245-64)0 
Musk Box. 

CAP Starts 1215pm HhtrAun Safly* 
s 5 * 1-45 Their Lordships- House 200 


Countdown 230 Snooker 44)5 Ftah tate n 
430 Guto Goch A Mehvon 435 Smyrffe 530 
BvVJowcorSJaFtveWomonPnoiogra- 

phersBJOBroaksKfe 630 Mavis on 4730 
NewydBkxiSeMi 730 Bias arFyw 830 
Rrc TOTa 835 Hri snow 220 Rtaic Jimmy 
Band Andre 11.10 New Efagmenmart 
1130 A People s war 1240am Ctaeedoam. 



The very soul of fiance 
in the very heart of London. 

THE OAK ROOM 
LE MERIDIEN PICCADEIY 

The perfect setting for a memorable festive feast 
created by our own 3 star executive chef, Michel Lorain 
and David Chambers, Meridien’s head chef. Together 
they present exciting and highly C/ % 

inventive dishes to satisfy the . 

most fastidious gounnel. /VI tKl Ul LlN 

Please call 734 8000 
to make your resen ation. 

TTrCVkft- R— ■-] W,V0BH - 


MF (medium wave). Stereo on 
VHF (see below) 

s on trie half-hour from 


then at 104)0 


Newsonl 
S30arnun»J 
and 124)0 midr 

530am Adrian John 7410 Mike 
Smith's Breakfast Show 930 
Simon Bates 1230pm 
Newsbeet (Rank Partridoe) 1235 
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38 


WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10 1986 


Hint of three-year 
ban on English 
return to Europe 


There was good news and 
bad news here yesterday at the 
headquarters .of FIFA. Joao 
Havelange. the president, said 
there was no possibility of 
Britain losing the separate 
identities of their tour associ- 
ations. But Jacques Georges, 
president of UEFA, said he 
thought it was unlikely there 
could be a return to European 
competition of English clubs 
within two years, never mind 
next season. 

The two leaders of football 
were attending, with many 
other international figures, the 
premiere of Hero, the official 
film of the World Cup in 
Mexico last summer, by 
Woridmark. who produced 
C'Ole in 1982 in Spain. 
Havelange was responding to 
the controversial allegation 
made recently by Hairy 
Cavan, of Northe rn I reland, 
vice-president of FIFA, that 
the home associations were 
likely to be forced to 
amalgamate. 

“Apart from football 
considerations, 1 am a lawyer, 
and the British associations 
have a legal right to retain 
their separate membership." 
Havelange said. “Their 
membership goes back 80 
years, they were themselves 
founded before FIFA, and we 
have no intention of taking 
away what was given to them 
as a right as individual 
associations." 


From David Miller, Zorich 

This is encouraging. Ted 
Crocker and Ernest Walker, 
the respective secretaries of 
the English and Scottish FAs. 
were quick to denounce 
Cavan's remarks at the time, 
as were the Irish FA. 

Havelange yesterday went 
further in his support, saying 
it bad been supposed when he 
became president that he 
would disband the inter- 
national board. This governs 
the laws and Britain shares 
equal power in decision-mak- 
ing with FIFA. Yet Havelange 
said he recognized Britain's 
contribution and the inter- 
national board bad become 
stronger, not weaker. 

The commission which is to 
review and revise FIFA stat- 
utes recently began its work. It 
will look at the position of the 
British, following the proposal 
made at the congress in Mex- 
ico last summer, by Guinea 
and others, that Britain should 
be reduced to a single vote. 
This proposal was withdrawn. 

All the continental confed- 
erations and member associ- 
ations will be asked to give 
their opinion on Britain's 
individual memberships. Un- 
doubtedly the Third World, 
and the Eastern Europeans, 
will be antagonistic. But when 
I asked Havelange whether it 
was possible that Britain 
would be made to field a single 
team in World Cup com- 


Cooper the key to 
Rangers’ survival 


By Hugh Taylor 


Rangers will embark to- 
night on their most demand- 
ing engagement since the 
arrival of Graeme Souness 
brought visions of a return to 
the old glory days at Ibrox. 

Having arrived in West 
Germany clutching at the 
slimmest of lifelines to sur- 
vival in the UEFA Cup, a 1-1 
draw at home, they (ace 
Borussia Monchengladbach 
who have an outstanding 
European record at the 
Bokelberg stadium. 

Knowing that a 0-0 draw 
would see them into the 
quarter-finals, the Germans 
can dictate how this match is 
to be played. While their 
coach, Jupp Heynckes. smiles 
and says that his team will 
concentrate on attack because 
he feels his supporters expect 
more than a lacklustre draw, 
the proficient Borussia. as 
Rangers know, have few 
superiors in the art of varying 
styles of play. Indeed, they 
beat Real Madrid 5-1 last 
season. 

But style is also much on the 
mind of Rangers. Their ele- 
gant, leisurely approach had 
been thought to be ideal for 
European competition but re- 


cently the rhythm has van- 
ished and Rangers have lost 
the harmony which brings 
consistency. 

As there is a belief at Ibrox 
that Borussia. especially with 
Drehsen suspended, may be 
suspect in the air. there is 
likely to be a more vigorous 
approach tonight in the hope 
that the powerful West, aided 
by the equally robust Butcher, 
will lake advantage of the high 
crosses which must be fa- 
voured by Cooper, the 
outstanding winger in Europe, 
if Rangers are to score the vital 
goal. 

However, even if Souness 
declares himself fit to play - 
and the player-manager will 
not decide until nearer the 
kick-off — and Ferguson 
passes a late fitness test, the 
odds are ' stacked against 
Rangers. 

Although Borussia's pride 
was hurt when a run of 14 
unbeaten games ended with a 
2-0 defeat at Nuremberg at the 
weekend. Rangers have been 
told by their manager that 
their opponents will be all the 
more eager to win and go 
forward in Europe. 




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petition, he replied that he 
thought it unlikely. Ft must be 
hoped his expectation is 
soundly based. 

Georges said, sympathetic 
though he was to the English 
situation, that it was his 
opinion and also that of the 
committee of UEFA, that the 
1987-88 season would be too 
soon to re-admit clubs from 
the Football League. He 
thought it might be two or 
three years. 

“What is necessary, above 
all. is for the British Govern- 
ment to introduce legislation 
that prevents your violent 
spectators from travelling to 
the Continent" he said. This, 
of course, is the conundrum of 
the controversy over 
England's exclusion, because 
Mrs Thatcher repeatedly says 
there is no constitutional 
power to institute such 
prohibitions. 

It was agreed by both 
Georges and Hans Bangerter, 
the secretary of UEFA, that 
the English case would 
strengthen if there was seen to 
be stability at English 
matches. “But what is 
stability?" Bangerter asked. 
UEFA concedes there is vi- 
olence elsewhere in Europe at 
football matches, but it is not 
violence with a licence and 
inclination to travel. 

• A review of Hero will be 
appearing shortly. 

Injuries to 
key men 
threaten 
United 

From Stuart Jones 

Football Correspondent 
Split 

The key to Dundee United's 
progress in the UEFA Cup lies 
in the hands of their own 
physiotherapist. If Jim 
McLean was able to select his 
strongest side against Hajduk 
Split here tonight they would 
protect their 2-0 lead and 
reach the last eight. 

But the lone certainty about 
the second leg is that United 
will be depleted, and perhaps 
severely. Worse still the band 
of possible absentees happens 
to include almost all of their 
experienced representatives. 
Hegarty, who missed the first 
game at Tannadice Park a 
fortnight ago, has already been 
ruled oul 

Sturrock, who created both 
of United's goals in spite of a 
damaged toe, has strained a 
tendon. Mai pas has injured a 
hamstring, Bannon was un- 
available for the last two 
games and Clark, Hegarty’s 
understudy who scored the 
potentially decisive second 
goal limped off on Saturday 
with ankle trouble. 

. McLean is left with only 
two players who are both nt 
and accustomed to perform- 
ing in Europe. Yet Narey has 
himself recently returned 
from injury and Milne is, 
according to his manager, “in 
a rut having been at the club 
for nine years, and is out of 
form.” 

Apart from all that. United 
have another reason for fear- 
ing their eventual fete in the 
arena that sits on the shores of 
the Adriatic. la the 21 UEFA 
Cup-ties that have been staged 
there, Hajduk have never 
failed to win. On all but six 
occasions, they have tri- 
umphed by at least two goals. 

United do not need to equal 
the feats of Tottenham 
Hotspur, in 1967, Atletico 
Madrid, in 1976, Veijle, 1979, 
or Dynamo Moscow, 1984. 
who are the only foreign clubs 
to have beaten Hajduk at 
home. But McLean, in admit- 
ting that "we have to score” 
recognizes that his defence is 
unlikely to remain unbroken. 

In Deveric and Bursae, the 
Yugoslavs are armed with two 
predators notable for their 
speed. At Tannadice, after an 
uninspired opening hour, the 
pair suggested that they could 
yet penetrate the hopes of 
United, the club that is carry- 
ing Britain's most realistic 
chances of competing in 
Europe next year. 

Hajduk. inhibited and cau- 
tious. were disappointing two 
weeks ago. “But I don’t mind 
playing against disappointing 
teams. McLean said. 

In their own home, which 
accommodates 55,000 people, 
the Yugoslavs are sure to be 
more convincing, even though 
their .domestic League pos- 
ition confirms that they, like 
United, are not touching the 
heights. 

Their stadium is shaped like 
a huge clam buL rather than 
resembling a protected crusta- 
cean. the Yugoslavs will re- 
main true to their name. 
Hajduk means a bandit who 
strikes rapidly. In doing so, 
they could expose themselves 
dangerously to United’s own 
counter-attacks. 



“toil — b gj I, \w * m ii m . r rsr > 

Streaking away; Oxford scrum half Roberts emerges from a s cru m minus 3 shirt: from the resultant penalty, Oxford took the lead. (Photo: Kan Stewart) 

Johnson kicks Oxford to victory 


Oxford University 15 

Cambridge University . 10 


Ashley Johnson coolly 
dropped his second goal of the 
match two minutes from time 
to complete Oxford's second 
successive victory in the 
University match at Twick- 
enham yesterday. 

The crucial score by the 
Dark Blues stand-off doubled 
in one match his previous 
scoring efforts for the side this 
season. 

His other success was an- 
other dropped goal in 
Oxford's only previous vic- 
tory this season by 18-12 
against Northampton — his 
home town dub for whom his 


father Andy used to play at 
hooker. 

Johnson, who played for 
England Students against Ja- 
pan earlier this season. landed 
his first spot kick in the 19th 
minute to open the scoring for 
Oxford after the unfavoured 
Cambridge side had gone 
ahead with a splendid try by 
Chris Oii 10 minutes earlier. 

Johnson's vital kick came 
after Cambridge, with some 
spirited late running, had 
pulled back to 22-10 as Mark 
Thoma kicked a penalty from 
in front of the posts with five 
minutes left. 

Oxford counter-attacked 
energetically, won a ruck in- 
side the 22 and Johnson. 


collecting a pass from his 
scrum half Simon Roberts, 
did the rest. 

Ox fo r d , who had had pre- 
match coaching from tire 
Au stralian maste r Alan Jones, 
were given a real fight by the 
committed Cambridge pack 
and had to compete for every 
bit of useful possession. 

The fuH back John Risman. 
son of the celebrated England 
international Bev, proved a 
key figure, kicking three pen- 
alties out of four — two in a 
vital second-half spell — and 
making a crashing tackle on 
OtL who was scenting a 
second try from a ran in the 
65ih minute. 

His opposite number 
Thomas, also the son of a 


famous father -the Welsh 
international Clem Thomas — 
had a rather more unsettling 
time and missed three kicks 
before his straightforward 
penalty* near the end. 

The Cambridge try was a 
classy affair, set up by 
thescrum half Andy Cushing 
wiih a kick ahead! From a 
ruck Cushing sent the ball out 
to Tim Lord, who passed to 
Kelvin Wyles, and Thomas 
came into the line to send Oti 
streaking through. 

Cambridge's other score 
came when Wyles scraped 
over a low* dropped goal to put 
his fide 7-6 ahead, a lead they 
enjoyed until Risman kicked 


his second penalty soon after 
half time. 

Johnson said afterwards: “I 
knew with the second chance 
that there were men outside 
me, but I reckoned a certain 
three points was better than 
risking the chance of running 
the ball against a defence who 
had tackled well all 
afternoon.” 

The Cambridge captain. 
Fran Clough, said: “We 
missed a couple of crucial 
penalties, but 1 must say 
Oxford did not have much 10 
offer in terms of attacking 
rugby.” 

OXFORD: Penalties: RfemanpL Drop 
a oris: Johnson (2). CAMBRIDGE: Try: Ob. 
Penally : Thomas. Drop goat wyles. 


FOOTBALL 


Valley Parade set 
for a full house 


The reopening of Bradford 
City's Valley Parade ground 
on Sunday looks sure to be a 
sell-out. Already 12,000 tick- 
ets have been sold and club 
officials are confident of a 
capacity crowd of 15.500 for 
the official opening and the 
Bradford versus England 
showpiece match. 

Bradford have spent £2.6 
milllion rebuilding after the 
blaze which claimed 55 lives 
18 months ago. A purpose- 
built 5,000 seater stand has 
gone up on the site of the old 
stand but bradford have also 
added a new 7.000 capacity 
Kop. 

The England XJ will be 
managed by Bobby Robson 
and the Bradford manager. 
Trevor Cherey, has two of 
City’s best known 
fonnerplayers back to boost 
his side. They are the club's 
all-time top scorer, Bobby 
Campbell who is now at 
Wigan Athletic, and Peter 
Jackson, now at Newcastle 
United. 

The Portsmouth forward. 
Nicky Morgan, has agreed to 
join the second division club. 
Stoke City, in a £40.000 deal. 
Morgan has been on loan at 
Stoke and decided to move 
north after terms between the 
dub had been fixed. 

The former West Ham 
United forward was 
Portsmouth’s leading scorer 
with 15 goalslast season but 
has played in only four 
matches this season. 

The Leicester City director. 


CRICKET 

Richards may 
sign for 
league club 

Vivian Richards, the 
world's greatest batsman and 
captain of the West Indies, 
may be playing Lancashire 
League cricket next season. 

Risbton’s chairman. Wilf 
Woodhouse. who was respon- 
sible for gelling Michael Hold- 
ing. the West Indies Test 
bowler, to spend one season 
with Rishton four years ago, 
said: “There's a good chance 
Richards will be playing for 
us. We have actually agreed 
terms with him and if he 
doesn't play county cricket 
which he wauls to do. there's 
every chance he will come to 
Rishton. 

“We have met his agent and 
he is highly delighted with our 
set up. We expect a decision 
before Christmas." 

Richards leaves for Austra- 
lia on Boxing Day and it is 
understood he wants his fu- 
ture finalized out by then. 


Tom Bloor. has resigned after 
12 years on the board. 

• Crystal Palace, who have 
been forced to switch their FA 
Cup third round home tie with 
Nottingham Forest to Sunday 
January ! I because the dub 
with whom they share then- 
ground. Chariton Athletic, are 
at home in the Cup the 
previous day, have fixed the 
kick-off for 3.0. The decision 
means the game will dash 
with the televised game be- 
tween Luton Town and 
LiverpooL 

• Lloyd McGrath. Coventry 
City's England under 21 mirt- 
fidd player, is to see a 
specialist about the knee in- 
jury which caused him to limp 
out of last Saturday’s match 
against Leicester City. The 
elub’sebief coach, John SiUeti 
said: “He has taken a few 
knocks on it this season and 
the latest one has aggravated 
the injury.” 

• The Celtic midfield player, 
Ronnie Coyle, joined 
Middlesbrough on a mouth's 
loan yesterday with a view to a 
permanent transfer.The 
Middlesbrough manager. 
Bruce Rioch, said a decision 
would be made on the future 
of Coyle, aged 21, after a 
month's loan. 

• Gates in the GM Vauxhall 
Conference have soared this 
season, boosted by the pros- 
pect of the top dub gaining 
admittance to the Football 
League. Overall attendances 
are up by I5per cent 


Parker’s 

benefit 

Sussex County Cricket 
Club's longest-serving player, 
Paul Parker, has been awarded 
a benefit in 1988. Parker, aged 
29. made his debut in 1976 
and received his county cap 
three years later. He appeared 
in one Test match for Eng- 
land, against Australia at the 
Oval in 1981. He has reached 
1.000 runs in a season on 
seven occasions and, last sum- 
mer. was the county's top 
scorer with 1459 champion- 
ship runs at an average of 
41.68. 


Under orders 

Roland Lee has withdrawn 
from Britain’s swimming 
team for this weekend's Euro- 
pean Cup in Maimo. Sweden. 
The City of Cardiff freestyler, 
one of five from whom the 4 x 
100 metres relay team was to 
be chosen, is attending a 
course at Sandhurst as he 
hopes to join the Army, 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Wigan ‘dazed’ by 
crowd cut order 


By Keith Macklin 


Wigan, the biggest crowd- 
pullers in the game, have been 
staggered by an order from the 
local conntil to cot their 
ground capacity from 30,000 
to 124100 under the Safety at 
Sports Grounds Act. 

The Wigan secretary, Mary 
Charnock, said dub directors 
were “shocked and depressed” 
when they were tokl yesterday 
of the decision made by the 
connriTs public protection 
committee. The cause is a 
number of allegedly defective 
crush barriers at the Central 
Park ground. 

The dub at least had a 
measure of consolation when 
yesterday, Ellery Hanley, the 
highest-priced and best-paid 
British player in the game, met 
rhairmsn Jack HStW for 
talks and agreed to withdraw 
his transfer request Hanley, 
who was priced at £150,000 
when he moved to Wigan from 
Bradford Northern two years 
ago, wtH be available for the 
John Player Special Trophy 
quarter-final game against 
Leigh next Sunday. 

But the decision to reduce 
capacity, which takes immedi- 
ate effect, brines confusion to a 
match at which 15,000 are 
expected. “We don’t know yet 
whether to make the match 
all-ticket,” said the Wigan 
secretary. “WearesfiH in a bit 
of a daze.” Sbe added 
contractors' estimates of the 
cost of replacing the defective 


barriers could be as higfa as a 
quarter of a million pounds, 
with £150,000 the minimum 
outlay. 

Wigan’s success over the 
past seasons has been based 
largely ontbeir big crowds, 
which allow them to pay for 
stars like the Australian cap- 
tain, Wally Lewis, Hanley, 
and several Springbok inter- 
nationals. They have used the 
money for g round develop- 
ments, including a new grand- 
stand, floodlights and 
electronic scoreboard. 

The dub are in a Catch-22 
position: they need money to 
renovate the crush-barriers, 
and are unable to draw die 
crowd to gain this-Cotting off 
of major sources of income at 
the gates will prove a stum- 
bling Mock to further develop- 
ment 

Already this season Wigan 
have drawn 30,000 for die dub 
game against the Australians, 

26.000 for the Lancashire Cop 
game with St Helens and 

21.000 for the Great Britain- 
Austrafia international match. 

They were unlucky In that 
die local council have sprung 
this shock in mid-season. 
Other dabs were warned be- 
fore the start of die season that 
improvements were necessary. 

The chairman of the public 
protetfkm committee, Ron 
Capstick, said the decision 
had been taken “in the safety 
interest of supporters”. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 



Parker Long serving 


Laing’s 

chance 


Tony Laing, the British 
light-welterweight champion, 
wll meet West Germany's 
Tony Habermayer for the 
vacant European title in 
London on January 21. If 
Laing. from Nottingham. . is 
successful, his first defence 
will be against Terry Marsh, of 
Basildon, the former 
champion. 


Vintage event 

The French Open Real Ten- 
nis Championships begin to- 
day in Bordeaux where the 
event has. for the first time, 
attracted a sponsor — Chateau 
Cos d'Estourqel vineyards. 
Wayne Davies, an Australian 
professional with the New 
York Racguet & Tennis Club, 
defends his title against Chris 
Ronaldson. the world cham- 
pion. Lachlan Deuchar. the 
British and Australian Open 
champion. 

Coming West 

Oskana Omelyanchik. of 
the Soviet Union, who won 
the overall gold medal at the 
1985 World gymnastics 
championships in Montreal, 
makes her first appearance in 
the West since then at the 
Kraft International at Wem- 
bley Arena 

Quick win 

The World Boxing Associ- 
ation cruise rweiatai champion, 
Evander Holyfiefd of the 
United States, beat his fellow 
American. Mike Brothers, in 
Paris in the third-round. 


SNOOKER 

Last year’s 
finalists 
lose shine 

By Sydney Friskin 

Ray Reardon and Tony 
Jones, last year's runners-up. 
were beaten 5-2 by Kirk 
Stevens and John Virgo, who j 
put themselves in the final of 
the Hofineister world doubles 
championship at Northamp- 
ton yesterday. 

Reardon, wearing an eye- 
shade as a protection from the 
lighting which hinders his 
vision, slightly out-shone his 
partner who did not have one 
of his best days. 

Stevens and Virgo, though 
not being particularly bril- 
liant. set out diligently on a 
task of consolidation and 
thoroughly deserved their vic- 
tory'- Virgo, who has not won a 
title for seven years, gave his 
partner ample support. 

After Stevens and Virgo had 
won the first frame, Reardon 
made a great effort to save the 
second, taking the last red and t 
clearing the colours up to the 1 
pink. He played a safety shot 
on the black which was even- 
tually left by Jones for Stevens 
who look it and put his side 
two frames up. 

Reardon restored the match 
to an even keel with another 
splendid effort on the last 
three colours after Stevens had 
failed to come out of a 
snooker. Reardon fired home 
a long blue and took pink and 
black to level at 2-2. 

Stronger cumulative powers 
enabled Stevens and Virgo to 
go 4-2 ahead, Stevens doing 
more of the scoring, particu- 
larly in the sixth frame which 
he started with a break of 34. / 

Reardon had a good chance in 
the fifth frame but after taking 
the green, brown and blue, 
stumbled over the pink and 
Virgo cashed in. 

Jones, sensing trouble, 
started the seventh frame in 
high gear but the advantage be 
seized was almost cancelled 
out by Stevens who ended a 
break of 34 with an unfortu- 
nately in-off after potting the 
green. 

Reardon was unable to 
capitalize and Virgo had his 
chance of finishing the match 
only to fail with an easy blue 
and let in Jones who in turn 
missed the shot on the pink 
which Stevens potted to save 
the match. y 

• Stevens, who has never won 
a major title said: “It's helped 
Playing doubles, because I 
have not won many games 
this season. I would love to 
win here because this is still a 
world title.” 

RESULTS: Quarter-finals: K StB*«S 
(Can) and J Virgo (Eng) bt R Reardon (Wal) 
and T Jones (fcngl 5-2. Frame scae? 

(Stevens and Virgo Aral: 66-1 1 . 69-68. 13- 
74. 39-50, 70-56. 61-8. 60-52 
Monday's fourft round: J Wme (Ena) and 
A Higgins (Ni) w H (MRtsns (Big) and S 
Miles (Engj 5-2. Frame scorns (mite a™ 

Higgins tiratt 91-23. 70-72. 87-35. ®-1. 

K«S. 790. 73-51