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THE 





No 62.639 



FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 




dean up in 
months 


By Pearce Wright Science Editor 


British Nuclear Fuels has 
been given 1 2 months to make 
changes to its nuclear waste 
reprocessing plant at 
Sellafield. in Cumbria. 

The company was told yes- 
terday by the Health and 
Safety Executive that unless 
the modifications were made 
the siLc would be closed. 

The demands come in the 
wake of the publication of the 
safely audit of Sellafield by the 
Nuclear Installations Inspec- 
torate. which criticized BNFL 
for short-term measures over 
maintenance of older plant 
that gave rise to most leaks 
and exposures radiation. 

Mr John Rimington. direc- 
tor general of the Safely 
Executive, said: “These are 
not recommendations. The 
changes have been imposed, 
i hcv will have to be im- 
plemented. We intend that 
they should be carried out 
without delay.” 

Last night the company 
said the audit was “a helpful 
contribution to the further 
improvement of safety at 
Sellafield." 

The range of improvements 
requested covered manage- 
ment, control and in- 
strumentation, containment, 
ventilation, decontamination, 
transfer of radio active materi- 
als. maintenance and staff 
training. 


The investigation began in 
February after a number of 
"minor" incidents of leaks 
and exposures of radiation. 

Attention centred on five 
which occurred this year. 
They involved: 

• Discharges of uranium to 
the Irish Sea on January 23 
and 24. 

• Release of a radioactive 
aerosol in the B205 building 
on February 5 


Safety audit 
Undue secrecy 



• Fire in a trench at the waste 
disposal site at Drigg. adjacent 
to Sellafield, on February 13 ' 

• Leak of liquid from a 
cracked pipe carrying effluent 
on February 18 

• Contamination with pluto- 
nium dust in equipment 
where operators were making 
plutonium pellets on March 1. 

The report concludes that 
none of the five incidents was 
capable of significantly affect- 
ing the public, though one 
incident could have had seri- 
ous consequences for some 
workers if protective systems 
had not come into play and 
prevented escalation. 

British Nuclear Fuels said 
that high priority had been 
given to the development of 
new plants, including those to 
reduce radioactive discharges 
to the sea, to meet wbat was 
seen as the public's main 



Ud- 


© The £4,000 daily prize 
in the Portfolio Gold 
competition was shared 
by two readers. Details 
pageS. 

6 There Is a further 
£4,000 to be won today. 
Portfolio list page 29; 

hv* -!w iriibiiflaikin 

service, page 22. 


row 


The political row over the 
Government's choice of an 
airborne early warning system 
was intensifying last night, 
with accusations from 
supporters of GECs Nimrod 
chat the RAF has been leaking 
information to undermine the 
British option and conflicting 
Commons motions signed by 

cohorts of Tories. 

Ministers are to decide 
within the next few days 
between the British-made sys- 
tem, which has cost £900 mil- 
lion to develop and Boeing’s 
E3-Awacs. . 

Cedi Parkinson, page 18 


Nato is to hold direct talks for. 
the first time with the Warsaw 
Pact on conventional arms 
control “from the Atlantic to 
the Urals" ? a 6 e 22 


End of 


The cricket career of Geoffrey 
Boycott. iHe world’s leading 
Test run-scorer, seems over 
after his rejection of a contract 
with Derbyshire to allay 
opposition to his standing 
again as a Yorkshire wniimt- 
tee member 


Four-dav cricket matches will 
become ' pari of the county 

championship for the first 
time in I9SS. the Test and 
County Cricket Board decided 
at their winter mating 
Lord’s Psee3S 


White Crusader’s chances in 

the America’s Cup look slnn. 
An international jury have 
rejected the British 
SaUSA for ctaugug her 

forward rudder Page-=> 



Britain calling 

British Telecom intends to 
match the besuetommum- 

cations companies of 
world with an moment o 
£2.1 billion on 
services ^ 


Home News 2-7 

Overseas &-1I 

:Sf £3 

Births, deaths 
marriages ** 
Business zS-W 
Cburch « 

Cwki f ,2S 

CrtWSi«uri5l6.iZ 
Dior} 

is is * 


Law Report 
Leaders 
Letters! 1 !* 
Motoring 
Parliament 
Sale Room 

TV & Radio 
Universities 20 
Weather ** 


concern about reprocessing 
operations at Sellafield. 

It accepted that it was 
timely to deploy more re- 
sources on improving the 
older operating plants on tbe 
site, which were under 
criticism. 

Mr Eddie Ryder, the chief 
nuclear insjrector, said: 
“There is nothing that affects 
the risks and dangers to the 
public. The problems we have 
uncovered largely affect tbe 
doses of radiation to 
workers.” 

Mr Rimington said there 
had been a distinct improve- 
ment in the amount of radio 
active discharge and in the 
incidents involving exposures 
to workers. 

He said the policies of the 
company in improving the 
plant seemed to be the right 
ones. 

But the priorities had been 
applied in a way that reduced 
the attention paid to poten- 
tially hazardous parts of the 
old plant Some of those did 
not yet come up to the 
standard demanded. 

There was criticism over 
delays in tbe preparation of a 
fully developed "safety case” 
for the reprocessing plant. 

There was also criticism 
over a short-term approach to 
maintenance and to renewel 
in important farts of the 
plant, and over inadequacies 
' in instructions and 
procedures. 



Filibuster fails to 
halt schools Bill 

By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 

Labour MPs yesterday 
wiped out the day's business 
in the Commons after a 23- 
hOuf protest filibuster against 
the teachers' pay BilL 

But their action foiled to 
stop the controversial legisla- 
tion completing its re main i n g 
stages. 

After a debate lasting a little 
short of 24 horns and incor- 
porating 16 divisions, the 
legislation empowering an im- 
posed settlement in tbe long- 
running schools dispute was 
given a third reading by 235 
votes to 1 52 - a Government 
majority of 83. 

One casualty of the mara- 
thon silting was the scheduled 
Commons clash between the 
Prime Minister and Mr Neil 
Kinnock, which was widely 
expected to focus on Labour’s 
unilateralist defence policy. 

Tory and Alliance MPs 
were saying that Labour kept 
talking to save Mr Kinnock 
further embarrassment over 
his party's plans to scrap 
nuclear weapons, but this was 
strongly denied by Opposition 
sources. 

They pointed to minutes of 
last week’s shadow cabinet 
meeting at which it was de- 
cided to mount an all-out 
assault on what was regarded 
as a "brutal” measure being 
rushed through the House. 

Labour MPs were told last 
Thursday to expect a sitting 
lasting late into the night m an 
attempt to expose the short- 
comings of the Government s 
approach. 


Earlier yesterday, a weary 
Mr Giles Radke, Labour’s 
frontbench education spokes- 
man, said the 30 backbench 
“ shar pshooters” who had 
fought the Bill through tbe 
night had made their point. 

They had subjected it to full 
democratic scrutiny, exposed 
its contents to a wider public 
and sent a signal to the Lords, 
which debates it on January 
12 . 

Tbe Bill scraps the 
Burnham pay bargainin 
machinery and replaces it wit! 
an interim advisory commit- 
tee to make recommendations 
to Mr Kenneth Baker, the 
Secretary of State for Educa- 
tion and Science. 

But Mr Baker will be the 
final arbiter over any orders 
laid before Parliament. 

Labour’s attack centred on 
tbe accusation that the Sec- 
retary of State was robbing 
teachers of their trade unions 
rights in defiarus of inter- 
national conventions. 

But Mr Baker insisted that 
his proposals would respect 
such rights because the unions 
would nave a part to play in 
the determination of salaries 
and conditions. 

Moving the third reading, 
he said it was a pity the 
Opposition had not had more 
to say about children's rights 
and parents' righis - notably 
the right to an uninterrupted 
high quality education. The 
Bill was designed to help 
restore this right. 

Parliament, page 4 


Economy ‘looks bright’ 

The outlook for the earn- or ought to be, within our 
omv next year is good, says the grasp." 

Bank of England. And manu- It predicts that the economy 
facturing industry plans to will grow by 3 per cent, 
invest more next year than at According to the Depart- 
any time since the late 1970s ment of Trade and Industry’s 
(David Smith writes). Investment Intentions Sur- 

The Bank, in its Quarterly vey, the volume of investment 
Bulletin, says : “The Chan- by industry wiD rise by 6 per 
cellor of the Exchequer has cent next year and by a similar 
painted a picture of non- amount in 1988. 
inflationary growth which is. Bank optimism, page 23 


Royal pair break new ground at Bond film set 


■v? 5 • V . • ‘ !" . 

' ■ 




Tbe Princess of Wales smashing a film stunt synthetic sugar glass bottle over the Prince of Wales’s head yesterday when 
they visited Pinewood studios, Buckinghamshire, to see the making of . Living Daylights , the new Janies Bond film. 


Satellite 
TV licence 
for Virgin 
partners 

By Jonathan Miller 
Media Correspondent 

The Independent Broad- 
casting Authority yesterday 
awarded a 1 5-year franchise to 
operate Britain’s direct 
broadcasting satellite service 
to British Satellite Broadcast- 
ing, a consortium formed by 
Granada-the Pearson group 
(publishers of the Financial 
Times) and Virgin, with 
Amstrad Consumer Electron- 
ics and Anglia Television. 

Tbe consortium, BSB, said 
it planned to start transmit- 
ting three new channels by 


, „ u , and would seek addi- 
tional investors to provide the 
£500-£60ft million finance 

Lord Thomson of Moni- 
fieth, IBA chairman, said the 
iroject was the first privately 
inanced satellite broadcasting 
system in the world. If 
successful, it could create up 
to 25,000 new jobs over five 
years. 

Mr Andrew Quinn, co- 
ordinator of BSB, said that 
four separate programme ser- 
vices will be provided, sharing 
the three channels available. 

One channel devoted en- 
tirety to feature films, will be 
available by subscription for a 
weekly fee ofaboot £2.50, and 
BSB said it plans to participate 
directly in the production of 
12 feature films a year. 

The other two channels, one 
a children’s service, tbe other 
general entertainment, will be 
supported by advertising. 


Opposition mounts to 
S African censorship 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


A storm of protest from 
newspapers and opposition 
parties greeted the imposition 
yesterday by Pretoria of 
sweeping new censorship of 
press, radio and television 
reporting of civil unrest and 
most forms of extra-par- 
liamentary opposition to the 
Government 

Mr Colin Eglin, leader of the 
Progressive Federal Party the 
liberal anti-apartheid official 
opposition in the white House 
of Assembly, said the new 
restrictions, which apply to 


ists, had “in effect, pro- 
nounced the death sentence 
on press freedom in South 
Africa." 

...Johannesburg’s evening 
newspaper,' The Star, in a 
front-page editorial comment 
under the heading “An Iron 
Curiain”, warned its readers.' 
“This is just possibly the last 
issue of any relatively free 
newspaper you will read in 
South Africa." 

In a similar front-page state- 
ment, the Pretoria Newssaid: 
"Well, that’s it. Today South 
Africa joins such sophistic 
autocracies as Zambia, Moz- 
ambique, Tanzania, Paraguay, 
China and its own arch foe, 
Soviet Russia. It now has in 
common with them _ that 
distinctive characteristic of 
dictatorial re gimes ^ political 
control of the press.” ___ 

Tbe paper went on: “Of 
course, this does not disturb 
the SABC (South African 
Broadcasting Corporation) or 


the (Afrikaans) newspapers, 
which, with mild protest, will 
don the muzzle. But it eff- 
ectively means the end of the 
freedom and credibility of ihe 
independent newspapers." 

Mr Hal Miller, executive 
jchairman of the Argus Com- 
pany, one of the two main 
English newspaper groups, 
said: “Tbe regulations are 
even more restrictive than we 
expected, and tbe flickering 
tam p of freedom has dimmed 
alarmin gly. Our newspapers 
will be severely handicapped 
in their primary task of 
providing information to the 
public, and there isa very real 
danger that, in tbe absence of 
independent reporting and 
analysis, the people of South 
Africa will be prey to exag- 
gerated and disruptive ru- 
mour.” 




coi- 00 *' 





For Mr Jaap Marais, of the 
extreme right-wing Herstigte 
Nasionale Party, Pretoria was 
“going too for" in requiring 
official clearance of unrest 
reports. 

A spokesman for the United 
Democratic Front, the broad 
multi-racial alliance of anti- 
apartheid organizations, said 
it intended to challenge the 
validity of the new press curbs 
in the Supreme Court 

The UDF, most of whose 
activities will now be unrep- 
ortable except in a form 
approved by the Government 
said it feared that any possibil- 
ity of a relatively non-violent 
negotiated transition to 
democracy would now dis- 
appear permanently. 

Tbe new regulations require 
sll articles containing prohib- 
ited material to be telexed for 
vetting by an inter-depart- 
mental press liaison centre, set 
up by the Government’s Bu- 
reau for Information. 

Prohibited material covers 
news and comment about all 
forms of unrest, from riots and 
police action _ to protest 
marches, meetings, funerals, 
boycotts and politically-moti- 
vated strikes, as well as report- 
ing of statements encouraging 
people to take part in such 
activity. 

The Foreign Corres- 
pondents* Association said its 
members would continue to 
do their best to inform the 
public of events. 

Blanket of silence, page 8 



By Ian Smith 
Northern Correspondent 

Mr James Anderton. lay 
preacher and Britain's most 
outspoken chief constable, 
vesierday launched a moral 
cr usad e against Aids. He 
decried it as the self-inflicted 
scourge of society. 

The new president oi the 
Association of Chief Poiice 
Officers and recent convert to 
Catholicism said the spread of 
Aids in the so-called civilized 
Western society could be 
blamed on tbe increasingly 
degenerate conduct of the^ 
human race and a cesspool of 
immorality. 

Officers from forces 
throughout the country, who 
were attending a seminar or- 
ganized by Greater Manches- 
ter police to discuss policies 
and safeguards to protect offi- 
cers coming into future con- 
tact with Aids carriers, sat 
stunned as the head of 
Britain's largest provincial 
force delivered his surprise 
sermon. 

Mr Anderton told the 160 
delegates from 43 forces 
ihatbecause of his personal 
lifestyle he felt Aids posed no 
threat to him. 

But as a Christian, police 
officer, husband, father, and 
lover of the human race who 
cared about future generations 
of yet unborn children be 
sought answers to baffling and 
bewildering questions. 

With a preacher's practised 
skill Mr .Anderton led his 
audience gently into the sub- 
ject Besides those suffering 
the self-inflicted scourge were 
many others who were com- 
pletely innocent victims. 

The whole of society, he 
suggested, must be worried 
about the disease for social, 
political, practical and not 
least of all moral reasons. 

Of intense worry were tele- 
vision reports which discussed 
the possibility of whole 
generations being wiped out 
and of entire nations being 
decimated. 

Mr Anderton spoke of Aids 
as a crippling commentary of 
twentieth century iifestyle. 

“If, as we are told. Aids is 
for the most part a sexually 
transmitted disease (hen it 
should be easy to stop. 3ut 
how can it be in the light of 
current attitudes and 
behaviour?" 

Mr Anderton then launched 
into the crux of his theme with 
a zealot's fervour. 

“Why do homosexuals 
freely engaged in sodomy and 
other obnoxious sexual prac- 
tices knowing the dangers 
involved?” he asked. “Why is 
this question not asked of 
these people? 

“Why do prostitutes, in- 
fected or not, ply their trade 
regardless. Why is that ques- 
tion not asked every day on 

television? 

“Why do so called happily 
married men receive the sex- 
ual services of prostitutes or 
Continued on page 22, col 6 


Computer funds sought 
in hunt for child killer 


Tbe Home Office is to be 
asked to provide funds for the 
standardization of police com- 
puter information on three 
child murders. 

A spokesman for six chief 
constables said yesterday they 
were convinced that, tbe mur- 
ders could be solved. But 
important parallels could not 
be followed up because of a 
lack of resources to transfer 
information to a recently- 
acquired Home . Office com- 
puter, called Holmes. 

The chief constables de- 
cided this week to approach 
the Home Office for financial 
backing after three meetings at 
which Urey discussed the 
"considerable financial and 
resource implications" of such 
an operation. 

The police said- yesterday 
that the move indicated the 
importance of a possible link 
between the murders of Caro- 
line Hogg, aged five, who 
disappeared in July 1983. 


Susan Maxwell, aged 1 1. who 
went missing in July 1982, and 
Sarah Harper, aged 10, who 
disappeared last March. 

A spokesman for the Lo- 
thian and Borders police said: 
"Right from the start we 
realized that there could well 
be a link between the Hogg 
and Maxwell murders. It has 
many very distinctive and 
very important parallels. 

“But computerization of all 
three cases would involve the 
tranfer of 70,000 records on 
the Hogg case alone. Convert- 
ing manual indexes to the 
Holmes programme is a mas- 
sive manpower and logistical 
problem," he said. 

Mr Charles Mcl^chlan, 
Nottinghamshire chief con- 
stable, who chaired the meet- 
ings, has said previously that 
the murders could have been 
committed by the same man. 

A Home Office spokesman 
said that computerization was 
the responsibility of individ- 
ual constabularies. 


Fleming 
refuge in 
Peru fails 

By Michael HorsneU 

Peru last night dashed the 
hopes of refuge for Mr John 
Fleming, the Briton wanted by 
Scotland Yard for questioning 
over the £26 million Brinks- 
Mat robbery, by withdrawing 
a visa granted to him earlier 
Under US law Fleming, 
who has been held in Miami 
for almost four months, faces 
deportation to Britain if he is 
unable to find a country 
willing to give him refuge. 

Since August, he has been 
expelled or turned back fron^ 
Spain, Costa Rica, Panama 
and the Dominican Republic, 
and now may be running short 
of possible hosts. 

The Immigration and Natu- 
ralization Service said officials 
at the Peruvian consulate in 
Miami revoked his visa after 
learning that he was being 
sought for questioning by 
Scotland Yard. 


MPs query ban on Chamberlain’s private diary 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 

Historians and MPS are told that they could be re- 
questioning the action of Sir leased next year. 

Robert Armstrong, the Cam- But the university has re- 
net Secretary, in stopping the ceatly been told by Sir Robert 
publication next month of the that the original advice was a 
private diary and papers of mistake and that the papers 
Neville Chamberlain. were subject to the 100-year 


Birmingham University 
which houses the papers 

consisting of * _S? 
several letters from Chamber- 
lain to his sisters, was plan- 
ning to release the papers u 
January- in accordance with 


. 100-year 
secrecy, rule on ministeral 
papers relating to the abdica- 
tion. 

The earlier mistake had 
apparently been made because 
the officials concerned forgot 
that Chamberlain was, as 



inniarv. in accoraanw wm* turn vu®***^* . — , — 

Si it had been led to believe Chancellor of the Exchequer, a 
h? the Cabinet Office was a member of the Baldwin Cabi- 
S-vear ban on the docu- net which had to wrestle with 

mems- lhecrisis ' u . . 

receiving the papers However, historians are 
r Am cKxriain’s famflyin raising doubts over the le^l 
foTb tite university contacted basis for Sur Roberts action in 
Cabinet Offi« and was stoppingthe release of private. 


Neville Chamberlain, pic- 
tured in 1936. 

as opposed to ministerial, 
papers. 

Ministerial papers are the 
property of the Crown and 
therefore subject to tbe terms 
of public records Acts through 
the decades. 


Experts on public records 
believe that the Cabinet Office 
may have discretion to stop 
the publication of private 
papers if their contents are 
thought to contain materia! 
similar to that in ministerial 
papers which are the subject of 
aim 

Mr B S Benedikz, sub- 
librarian of special collections 
at Birmingham, said yes- 
terday: “This is a grey area. It 
raises the question of when the 
responsibility of a Cabinet 
minister ends. Do the private 
recollections of events that 
occurred in Cabinet amount 
to ministerial papers if they 
are written down and commit- 
ted to a diary? " _ . 

He said university authori- 
ties would be discussing how 
to clear up the confusion. 


Mr David Alton, Liberal 
MP for Mossley Hill, is tabling 
questions to the Lord Privy 
Seal Mr John Biffen, asking 
why the papers were being 
withheld. 

He said yesterday: “Tbe 
legality of this action must be 
investigated. The documents 
are not government docu- 
ments and several other pri- 
vate collections of papers of 
politicians relating to the 
abdication have already been 
opened to historical 
inspection. 

“Senior Civil Servants seem 
to have a knee-jerk reaction to 
try to suppress the publication 
of information. Now this 
seems to be extending to 
historical documents that can 
have no bearing on present 
day security affairs.” 



Muscular Dystrophy has caused David 
too much suffering for far too long. 

At four, he began to find it difficult to 
walk. By the age of ten, this relentless, 
muscle-wasting disease had confined him to 
a wheelchair. 

But to end the disease, our scientists 
need to know how it begins. 

The more you help, the sooner they can 
find the causa 

To save other children from suffering like 
David, it can't be a day too soon. 


35 Macaulay Road, London SW4 OOP Reg. Chanty No. 205395. 










HOME NEWS 


NEWS SUMMARY 


Bomb attempt 
by IRA foiled 

The Provisional IRA yesterday sent a parcel bomb to the 
offices of a member of the Northern Ireland police 
authority as part of an fri rittiid atjon ««n»p a« g n against its 
members. 

Terrorists hid the explosive device inside a book before 
sending [the parcel through the mail ata time when postmen 
are coping with the huge Christinas rash. 

A businessman became suspicions when it was delivered 
to his premises in Belfast's city centre and carried the 
package to an RUC station near by where Army bomb dis- 
posal experts defased the device. 

Police to get armour 

Mr Charles Kelly, Chief Constable of Staffordshire, was 
yesterday told he may have five armour-plated vehicles in 
which to transport po lice. 

Mr Kelly had asked his police authority for the vehicles 
to be fitted with the armour, which inrindes plastic lining 
inside, iron-griD windows and anti-riot tyres and petrol 
tanh$ . 

Although it is the first time the force has bad armour- 
plated vehicles, the chief constable dismissed suggestions 
that they represented a new initiative. He said they merely 
replaced existing vehicles. 

Maxwell 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


<■» 


Inquiry 
into firm 

The police commercial 
branch yesterday began an 
investigation into the 
£5 milli on crash of Liver- 
poors festival gardens. 

It was disclosed last 
week that more than 550 
companies were owed a 
total of £5.4 million by 
Transworld Leisure, the 
company which ran the 
former international gar- 
den festival site. Mr John 
Anton, bead of the firm, 
has resigned from the com- 
pany which planned to 
renovate the resort 


damages 

Mr Robert Maxwell, the 
publisher, was yesterday 
awarded £5,000 in the 
High Court against WH 
Smith & Sen, who distrib- 
uted an issue of Private Eye 
that contained a libel 

a gainst him. 

WH Smith apologized. 
The court was told that it 
had continued to distribute 
Private Eye after it stated 
that it would justify the 
allegation, which It tailed 
to do. 

Mr Maxwell was 
awarded £55,000 against 
the magazine last month. 


Adult training boost 

A £3 million scheme to boost adult t raining In industry 
was announced last ni ght by Mr George Walden, Under 
Sectretary of State for education and Science. 

The scheme, called Pickup, will provide courses at 
colleges, polytechnics and universities to help to adults up- 
date their skills. Annual grants of between £25,000 and 
£150.000 win be made avaQahie. 

A report released yesterday said b uilding societies were 
also seeking better management training because of new 
laws which allow them greater competition with banks. 

Union 
ballot 

Voting in the re-run bal- 
lot which win decide 
whether Mr John Mac- 
readie (right), a supporter 
of Militant Tendency, be- 
comes general secretary of 
the Civu and Public Ser- 
vices Association is ex- 
pected to be completed 
today. 

A report showed that 21 
branches of the association 
with a membership of 
2J70, were unable to vote 
in the last ballot which 
gave Mr Macreadie a vic- 
tory by 121 votes. 



I -' 1 ' 
< : '/■•'V ' 


Victory for disabled 

More severely disabled people win qualify for extra 
allowances under new arrangements announced by the 
soda! secarity minister, Mr John Major, yesterday. 

From April 1988, when the social security reforms come 
into effect, severely disabled people living independently in 
the community wfll qualify for an extra premium even if 
they are currently receivingthe lower rate of attendance 
allowance. 

The_ announcement comes after widespread criticism of 
the original proposal that only those receiving attendance 
allowance at the higher rate would be eligible. Mr Major 
said that 7,000 people would qualify ata cost of £8 million. 



With love this Christmas 

Say I Love YouThis Christmas With A Gift From Graff 
From The Most Fabulous Collection Of Jewels InThe World 
55 Brompton Road. Knichtcbridce. London SW 3 
Telephone 0K5&4 8571 


Solicitors vote to lift advertising rules 


By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs 
Correspondent 

A new publidty code giving 
solicitors wide freedom to 
advertise in supermarkets, sta- 
tions and post offices, on tee- 
shirts or as sponsors for 
sporting or other events, was 
endorsed in priodple by the 
Law Society council yes- 
terday. 

But at the end of a long and 
intense debate the 70-member 
council decisively rejected a 


proposal to allow solicitors to 
make arrangements with es- 
tate agents, banks or building 
societies for the introduction 
of clients. 

The proposal was a key part 
of a package for revised prac- 
tice rules which would have 
paved the way for radical 
change. Final council ap- 
proval was deferred for the 
new publicity code, as well as 
the remaining revised practice 
rules, until next month. 

Under the proposed new 


rules, solicitors would be able 
to ret up companies providing 
services, such as company 
secretarial services; trustee or 
executor companies; or prop- 
erty display centres. But a ban 
is proposed on “hiving off" 
part of a solicitor's practice — 
such as conveyancing — to a 
separate business. 

This issue with the question 
of solicitors employed by 
fin ^n^ i institutions, and that 
of mixed partnerships with 
other professionals, are likely 


to be looked at separately next 

SpnDS ' „ j lh _ peter Verdin. who chaired the 

The publicity code and the nier a warning 

revised practice rules wj J"“ B *£Sion would be 
come up for final approval at out 0 f “mainstream 

the Law Society council meet- squeezea 0 ,hev 


ing next month. 

Under the new code there is 
a complete shift in emphasis, 
which allows almost all 
advertising instead of only 
limited advertising as now. 
Advertising on television, by 
direct mail and on “moveable 
objects” is permitted. 


commercial life" unless they 
agreed to the changes. 

But there was wide opposi- 
tion from many members. \ r 
John Franks, called the pro- 
posals a “rogues chartefand 
said the profession should oe 
balloted on the proposed new 
rules. 


Charities 
must change, 
Princess 
Anne says 


By Paul Vallely 

Private charities in Britain “There 
should pioneer new tech- 
niques of caring for the soc- 
ially deprived. Princess Anne 
says. 

They could then be incor- 
porated into the welfare state 
system she adds in a forth- 
coming television programme 
on the work of the Save the 
Children Fund in Great 
Britain. 

But the charities should not 
absolve the state system of its 
responsibilities. 

The innovative role of char- 
ities is already evident in 
certain areas and could well be 
extended, says the Princess, 
who is president of the fund 
which is best known for 
overseas relief work. 

Princess Anne says in the 
hour-long documentary. The 
Princess and the Children , 
which will be shown by TV 
South on New Year's Day, 
that the fund spends a third of 
its income on work in 
Britain's inner-city areas. 

Its projects include a centre 
to care for the children of 
Protestant and Catholic de- 
tainees in Belfast: a playbus 
scheme to minister to the 
needs of gypsy children in the 
Home Counties, a day-care 
and literacy project for Asian 
mothers and their children in 
London; and inner-city 
schemes to give moral and 
legal support to some of the 
parents of the nine million 
children in Britain who live 
below the official poverty line. 

People needed to be edu- 
cated about their rights under 
the welfare state system, the 
princess says. 


is no point in us 
trying to duplicate the thing or 
just pass it by. Besides, it 
makes perfectly good sense to 
inform people of what is 
available for them.*’ 

She says there is now a 
greater awareness in local 
authorities for gram aid to be 
channeled through voluntary 
agencies, which can try out 
new approaches. 

“It is one way of finding out 
whether they work before 
local authorities take them on. 
The voluntary agencies are 
much more flexible and can 
respond much more quickly, 
so they are probably much 
better placed to carry out 
those sort of investigative 
projects.” 

They also have another 
important function. The wel- 
fare state is a safety net bat 
there will always be some 
groups of people who tall 
throu gh. 

The Princess says Save the 
Children's work at home is 
“every bit as important” as its 
work overseas. 

“It has always tended to 
look for areas which are being 
neglected for one reason or 
another — people falling 
through the safety net” 

She said the aim was to find 
some practical way in which 
we can approach the problem 
so that it can be incorporated 
in the welfare state. 

The fond is happy to prime 
such initiates which currently 
cost about £5.6 million a year 
to run. “But we do not want to 
go on running them. They are 
there, if they work, to be taken 
over” 


PC gives 
‘jail attack 9 
statement 

Former police constable 
Tom Clarke, who claimed on 
a television programme that 
the men jailed for the Bir- 
mingham pub bombings bad 
been threatened with guns and 
alsatian dogs, yesterday gave a 
voluntary statement to senior 
police officers. 

In the presence of his solic- 
itor, Mr George Jonas, be gave 
a 1 7-page witness statement to 
Mr Leslie Sharpe, deputy chief 
constable of the West Mid- 
lands police. 

On December i, Mr Clarke 
told a World in Action docu- 
mentary that while on duty at 
Queens Road police station, 
Aston. Birmingham, he saw 
evidence that the men had 
been beaten up try police. 

Mr Clarke left the police 
eight years ago after 23 years 
service when he was convicted 
of stealing £5 from a prisoner. 
He served two months in jail. 


Soldiers in 
new Irish 
crossing 

A third incursion by British 
soldiers into the Irish Repub- 
lic is being investigated by 
authorities on both sides of 
the border. 

Four soldiers were discov- 
ered 75 yards into Co Donegal 
by people living near a border 
customs post at Killea. They 
had crossed into the south 
while eng age d on border duty 
in Co Londonderry but re- 
turned when a joint Gardai 
and Irish army patrol arrived 
on the scene and told them 
they were in the south. 

The incident was the third 
to occur since last Saturday 
leading to protests by Irish 
government ministers, sen- 
sitive in the run-up to a 
general election, to opposition 
efforts to exploit the issue. 

In the most serious incident 
a soldier was held for five 
hours at Dundalk police sta- 
tion in Co Louth. 



Mr John Browne, MP, after his visit to Winchester Prison 
yesterday (Photograph: Peter Trievnor). 

Wintonians wary 
of MP under fire 

Prom Robin Young, Winchester 


One does not need to spend 
long in the busy streets and 
narrow lanes of Winchester to 
realize that the area's local 
Conservative MP is in a 
surprising amount of trouble. 

Mr John Browne, a para- 
chuting former Guards officer, 
succeeded Rear-Admiral Mor- 
gan Giles in the blue drip safe 
Conservative sear in Hamp- 
shire in 1979, but saw his 
majority whittled by the Alli- 
ance challenge at the last 
election. 

Mr Browne is now prin- 
cipally in die news because of 
a bitter divorce settlement 
dispute with his former wife, 
who is threatened with 
imprisonment if she does not 
pay an outstanding £49,000 
from an original £175,000 
settlement agreed in 1984. 

Mr Browne last week an- 
nounced his engagement to a 
New York divorcee and 
promptly had to deny tumours 
that it was his intention to 
drop his parfiamentary career 
and emigrate to the United 
States. 

Simultaneously, criticism 
reared its ugly bead among 
senior former officers of his 
local Conservative association. 

Mr Simon Blunt, the 
constituency chairman, has 
summoned a special meeting 
of the constituency executive 
next Tuesday to consider 
whether Mr Browne should be 
readopted as the 
constituency's candidate. 


Yesterday Mr Browne pre- 
sented a dfligpn t face to his 
constituency/He pot himself 
on display at die animal 
tatstock show, where he was 
greeted as a familiar face by 
several farmers, exhibitors 
and butchers and also went to 
the local prison. 

To his face, Wintonians are 
affable and pleasant, and Mr 
Browne exuded confidence 
among them. But a small, and 
not necessarily representative, 
straw peril among former 
Conservative voters in the 
constituent showed that a 
quarter said they would not 
vote for Mr Browne again. 
Winchester is among the most 
prosperous constituencies in 
the country, yet its citizens 
have plenty of complaints. 
They grumble, for example, 
about the Great Divide which, 
they claim starves local in- 
dustry of skilled labour be- 
cause of high property prices. 


Asbestos peril 
in theatre 

Blue asbestos has been 
found in the 1 30-year-okJ 
Wellington Pier theatre. Great 
Yarmouth, Norfolk, which is 
facing demolition. 

The council, which owns 
the theatre, said yesterday it 
would spend more than 
£ 8,000 on covering the dan- 
gerous asbestos, as part of a 
campaign to save the building. 


Airport warning on gift wrapping 


By Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent 


Gaily' wrapped Christinas 
presents could be tom open by 
security staff at Heathrow 
Airport, passengers were war- 
ned yesterday. 

The British Airports Auth- 
ority advised travellers using 
the airport not to wrap their 
presents. 

Security chiefs fear that 
terrorists or drag smugglers 
may try to use the Christmas 
peak passenger limes to slip 
drugs or weapons into or out 
of the country, and security 
staff have been told not to 
relax the constant search. 

Warning notices about hand 
baggage and wrapped parcels 


are being posted in all pas- 
senger terminals and will be 
backed by public address 
announcements. 

Extra security staff are being 
drafted in to help during the 
Christmas rush, when up to 
100,000 passengers a day are 
expected to pass through the 
airport 

Mr Michael King. Heath- 
row's chairman and managing 
director, said that time spent 
on searches could delay flights 
if warnings were ignored. 

“If our warnings are ignored 
the large numbers of pas- 
sengers coupled with the tight 
security measures required by 


the Governmeut could seri- 
ously affect lime spent on 
searcbes and even delay some 
flights. 

“We want travellers to have 
a happy start to their Christ- 
mas holidays. They can make 
their journeys so much easier 
for themselves.'* 

• Candle-shaped light bulbs 
found on sale in Stoke-on- 
Trent and Lichfield, Stafford- 
shire, could kifl, trading 
standards officers said yes- 
terday. 

The 25-watt bulbs, pack- 
aged in a red and blue box. 
have an inch-long Jive wire 
protruding from the base. 


Powerboat 
death was 
an accident 

A verdict of accidental 
death was recorded yesterday 
on Mr William Taylor, one of 
Europe's leading powerboat 
racers, who died in a 120 mph 
crash last September. 

Mr Taylor, aged 40, of 
Priory Road, Keynsham, Bris- 
tol was thrown from his craft 
during a Formula 2 grand prix 
race at Holme Pierrepont 
national watersports centre 
□ear Nottingham, an inquest 
was told. 

Mr Nigel Reed, of Stock- 
wood, Bristol said that engine 
problems had emerged on a 
practice run. 


Meanest’ 

councils 

attacked 

By Richard Evans 

Political Correspondent 

A propaganda offensive to 
highlight the “meanest" Con- 
servative-controlled councils 

will be launched by the La- 
bour Party today. _ . 

The campaign is ratenaea 
to counter the “loony Left 
attack launched by the Gov- 
ernment against left-wing 
authorities. 

Each month the record ora 
Tory “meany" council will be 
compared with that of a 

similar Labour-controlled 
authority. The first council 
will be Berkshire which. La- 
bour claims: 

• Prevented any children 
under five entering primary 
school; 

• Used secret procedures to 
scrap seven new nursery 
classes due for opening in 
September 1985: 

• Cut staff in higher educa- 
tion, affecting particularly 
dance and drama courses; 

• Cut tack on road mainte- 
nance, leading to the Audit 
Commission to say the coun- 
cil should spend another 
£600,000: 

• Stopped all internal re- 
decoration in schools, youth 
and community centres this 
year. 

Labour will say that in 
Labour-controlled Derby- 
shire, school meals are 3 Op 
cheaper, rubbish Costs half as 
much to collect, more is spent 
on road repairs, over 30 times 
as much is invested in eco- 
nomic development, under- 
fives have nearly four times as 
good a chance of getting a 
school place and there are, 
proportionally, more police. 

Other councils on Labour’s 
“meanest municipalities” list 
include: 

• Bromley, which intends to 
put up council rents by 25 per 
cent and evict 100 people 
from their homes over the 
next two years to make way 
for a shopping development: 

• Buckinghamshire County 
Council which has just cut all 
school meals; 

• Surrey County Council 
where parents have been 
asked to help to buy school 
books and equipment; 

• Wandsworth, which priv- 
atized rubbish collection and 
then won an award for dirty 
streets. 


Collieries’ 
waste still 
polluting 
coastline 

By a Staff Reporter 

Mr Richard Trace)-, the 
junior environment minister 
was vesierday show the full 
extent of the "black waste 
pollution, along the coastline 
of Co Durham, caused by the 
dumping of colliery waste. 

Mr Tracev spent an hour in 
a helicopter being shown the 
area around Seaham Harbour 
to discover the full extent of 
the problem. 

Afterwards he toured five 
beaches with Mr Ken Moses, 
technical director of British 
Coal, and met local coun- 
cillors and environmental 
pressure groups to discuss 
ways of clearing the ugly black 
waste. 

Several schemes are already 
under wav; £740.000 has been 
spent at Blackhall. and 
£240.000 is earmarked for 
land reclamation in the 
Easington area, with 100 per 
cent grant aid. Mr Tracey was 
investigating how the Govern- 
ment could aid future clear-up 
schemes, in co-operation with 
British CoaL 

Afterwards, he said future 
joint land reclamation 
schemes pm forward by Brit- 
ish Coal and local people 
would be given a high priority 
for government assistance. 

Future tipping by British 
Coal could be concentrated on 
one site, to ease environ- 
mental problems He empha- 
sized that the industry should 
meet the costs of achieving the 
environmental standards of 
the day. 

Mr William Waldegrave, 
the environment and country- 
side minister, has been given a 
frosty reception by some water 
authorities after his announce- 
ment that 350 bathing beaches 
around the country have to be 
brought up to EEC standards 
by the end of the 1 990s. 

At present only about half 
Britain's beaches meet the 
Community's requirements. 
Others, including popular re- 
sorts such as Blackpool, would 
fail the tests according to 
initial results from a two-year 
survey of the beaches due to 
be completed next year. 

• Mr Cliff Davies, the South 
Wales area director of British 
Coal, who has presided over 
the closure of half the 
coalfield's pits since the end of 
the miners’ strike, is to retire. 

Since his appointment in 
July last year, Mr Davies has 
closed 13 pits and cut man- 
power in the coalfield from 
21,000 to 11.800. The cuts, 
together with investment 
totalling £100 million in new 
high technology coalfaces, 
brought the area into profit for 
the first time since the Second 
World War. He is to be 
succeeded by the deputy direc- 
tor (mining) Mr Ron Price, 
who will take over on April 1. 

Mr Davies, aged 61. took 
over as area director on July 1 
last year, four months after the 
end of the miners' strike. 


Prosecution of former 
MIS officers unlikely 

By Michael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent 
Sir Michael Haven, Attor- Lord Rothschild's case, after a 


ney General, is still consid- 
ering whether to take action 
against a number of former 
MI 5 and MI 6 officers, includ- 
ing Lord Rothschild, for their 
alleged involvement in books 
on British espionage and 
counter-espionage. 

However it is now felt 
unlikely that any will face 
prosecution. Sir Michael is 
expected to make a statement 
soon in a written answer 

A number of allegations 
have been made about former 
members of MI5 and MI 6 in 
connection with books by 
journalists since the start of 
the government case against 
the former MI5 officer, Mr 
Peter Wright, in Sydney. ' 

Sir Michael is considering 


Print activists demand recall of TUC 


By Tim Jones 

Hardline print union ac- 
tivists are putting increasing 
pressure on Miss Brenda 
Dean, general secretary of 
Sogat '82, to demand a recall 
of the TUC to discuss reopen- 
ing disciplinary action against 
the electricians' union, which 
has members working at the 
News International plant at 
Wapping, east London. 

The activists, and their 
diminishing band of support- 
ers. are being backed by the 
London Communist Cam- 
paign Group. Their strategy 
has been outlined in the 
communist Morning Star 
newspaper, which last week 
dismissed a quarter of its print 


workers with redundancy 
terms far inferior to those 
being offered to the former 
employees of News Inter- 
national, publishers of The 
Times and three other na- 
tional newspapers. 

Prim workers are angry 
over the decision by the TUC 
general council last month not 
to act on the vote taken by the 
TUC congress in Brighton 
which said the Electrical, Elec- 
tronic, Telecommunication 
and Plumbing Union should 
be punished because of its 
association with the company. 

Mr Eric Hammond, general 
secretary of the EETPU, has 
said the reality of the situation 
is that throughout the dispute, 
thousands of members of 


Sogat, the National Graphical 
Association, the National 
Union of Journalists and the 
Transport and General Work- 
ers' Union have worked 10 
produce and distribute all 
News International's publica- 
tions. 

In contrast only a “couple 
of hundred” EETPU members 
worked at the company's high 
technology plant at Wapping. 

The Sogat hardliners claim 
that by its action, the policy- 
making general council has 
snubbed the TIJC congress 
which they say is the uftimate 
“parliament" of the trade 
union movement. Its de- 
cisions should therefore be 
acted upon. 

Miss Dean acknowledges 

t: 


she is in a difficult position as 
only tiie general council can 
order a special recall 

Sogat's national executive 
committee will consider the 
request to press for a recall of 
congress at its next meeting in 
January although some ac- 
tivists are pressing for an 
immediate derision. 

A recent meeting called by 
the London Communist Cam- 
paign Group called fora mass 
turn-out at Wapping tomor- 
row to demonstrate in support 
of the 5, 1 40 former employees 
who went on strike ana were 
dismissed. 

There have been regular 
demonstrations and marches 
and 24-hour picketing since 
the dispute began last January. 


statement by Mr Wright that 
he paid for his flight to Britain 
and arranged for him to meet 
Mr Chapman Pincher with the 
aim of writing a book about 
Soviet penetration of MI5. 

Although Lord Rothschild 
has not explained why he 
brought Mr Wright to meet 
Mr Pincher, Sir Michael is 
likely to decide against legal 
action. 

Other former intelligence 
officers under investigation 
are Sir Arthur Franks, former 
MI 6 director-general Sir Dick 
White, former head of MI5 
and MI 6 , Mr Arthur Martin, a 
former colleague of Mr 
Wright, and Mr George Rus- 
sell Lee, a former MI5 assis- 
tant director. 



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THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Brain defect 
babies ‘could 
be used in 
transplants’ 

By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 

The birth of babies who are the heart, liver and kidneys, 
doomed io die from brain from such cases could be 
defects could be induced and transplanted at least as a 
their vital organs used in temporary life-saving measure 
transplant operations to save pending other treatment or 
other dying children, accord- transplant operations, he sug- 
mg to an American surgeon, gested. 

The controversial prospect. Dr Harrison, of the foetal 
m which expectant mothers treatment programme and the 
would be asked to allow their division of paediatric surgery 
newborn to become immedi- in San Francisco, said: “If 
ate candidates for transplants, foetal organs prove suitable, 
js put forward in tomorrow's transplantation for children 
issue of The Lancet by Dr may be greatly snnptified". 
Michael Harrison, of the The biggest potential 
University of California in advantage was that such or- 
San Francisco. gans were less likely to be 

Most children with fetal rejected, 
diseases die waiting for a M We are identifying foetuses 

transplant because there are so fatally damaged that sur- 
not enough donor organs, he viva! outside the womb is 
said. The present system of impossible. The ability to 
taking organs from brain transplant foetal organs may 
dead accident vjcnms could now give us the chance to 
no i, i y i ^ el **!? demand. recognize the contribution of 

Unless donor material be- this doomed foetus to 
comes simpler and less costly mankind," Dr Harrison said, 
to procure and transplant. The diagnosis of 
these life-saving procedures anencephaly should be con- 
will have to be rationed," Dr firmed by experts independent 


any stage of pregnancy “may mothers, 
be ideal donors", he said Such ‘The diagnosis of foetal 
babies would die naturally anencephaly is always dev- 
during or shortly after birth. asiating. Once the family has 
One baby in every 1,000- worked through their grief and 
2.000 was bom with anen- derided how the pregancy will 
cephaJy, in which the brain is be managed the possibility of 


One baby in every 1,000— 
2,000 was bom with anen- 


missing. The condition is 
easily detectable during preg- 
nancy and screening could 


organ donation may be 
brought lip- 

“In my experience families 


lead to about 2,000 such cases are surprisingly positive about 
being identified in the United donation. They dutch at any 


Slates every year. Dr Harrison 
said 

Immature organs, including 


possibility that something 
good might be salvaged from a 
seemingly wasted pregnancy.” 


Wife had a fatal 
dose of morphine 


A forensic scientist found a 
fetal overdose of morphine in 
the body of a doctor whose 
husband a general prac- 
titioner, is accused of murder- 
ing her, the Central Criminal 
Court was told yesterday. 

Dr John Taylor, had been 
given part of the fiver of Dr 
Ruby Baksh after her body 
was exhumed in Spain. 

He also examined serum 
taken from Dr John Baksh’s 
second wife, Madhu, after he 
had allegedly tried to kill her. 

Dr Taylor said it showed 
morphine was in her body 
“which could have been 
fetal”. 

Dr Baksh, aged 53, of 
Bickley Road, Bromley, 
south-east London, denies 
murdering his first wife in 
1983 and attempting to mur- 
der his second wife in January 
this year. 

Mr Allan Green, for the 
prosecution, has alleged that 
Dr Baksh injected Ruby with a 
fetal dose of morphine while 
on holidav in Spain and got an 
elderly Spanish doctor to cer- 


tify she had died from a heart 
attack. 

Mr Green has told the court 
that Dr Rakrii wanted to be 
free to marry Madhu, but 
later, faced with heavy debts 
be drugged her. slit her throat 
and dumped her in woods in 
Kent Her life was saved when 
a passer-by foutad her. 

Det Chief Supt Norman 
Stockfbrd said Dr Baksh wrote 
to him of “kissing and cud- 
dling sessions” be had with 
Madhu in a hospital ward in 
November 1982. 

Dr Baksh wrote that his first 
wife took an overdose that 
month but recovered. When 
they went to Spain in Decem- 
ber Dr Baksh claimed she 
committed suicide after she 
found out about his affair. 

Dr Baksh told Mr Stockford 
that he found a note beside his 
wife's body which declared: “I 
cannot take it any more. I am 
afraid I have to go. This time I 
am making sure I will not 
wake up.” 

The trial continues next 
week. 


Medieval gold locket 
sold for record £1 ,3m 


liddleham Jewel, a 
el dating from Rich- 
time. was sold at 
's yesterday for 
ion to an undisclosed 
uyer. 

ice was a record for 
[ieval object sold at 
uction, Mr Richard 
senior director of 
s. said. The previous' 
rice was £ 1 .2 million, 
1976 for an enamel 
n. 

treasure hunters 
ie locket in Middle-, 
rth Yorkshire, near a I 
ich belonged to Rich- 
They will share the 
of tbe sale with the 
f Lhe land and its 


jam Wi^ans, agedj 

hose who found the 

a metal detector 
vas at the sale and 
always knew it was 


something special I'm going 
for a holiday now and I could 
think about a new bouse.” 

Sotheby's would not dis- 
close whether the jewel, de- 
scribed as one of the most 
important examples of medi- 
eval goldsmith's work surviv- 
ing, would stay in Britain. 

Tbe fifteenth century jewel, 
just bigger than a matchbox, is 
engraved with a nativity scene 
on one side, and the trinity on 
the other, with a border of 
saints and a ring at the top for 
a chain. 

Members of the Richard HI 
Society, from Wensteydate, 
Yorkshire, which is dedicated 
to the memory of the mon- 
arch. were at the sale with 
more than a dozen Middle- 
bam villagers. 

The society speculates that 
the jewel may have been given 
to Richard's illegitimate son 
Edward as a charm to ward off 
epilepsy. 


How would you 
prefer to meet 
someone special? 

□ In a wine bar 

□ At a party 

□ At a night dub 

□ Through someone who knows 
and cares for both of yon. 

..Co aSdentifii ^Personal 
rt ifi tiate. suceessfol - a sophisticated huBridml 
tnnixl actions - and yon s«ek a rery^spccial 
na relatkwship, you should loan about Hekoa’s 
x "Mrir hnMllrgT ' t - 

S well-educated, successful individuals 
Attractive “Parmer for life". 

. and Helena does not believe that computers or 
rfienis. 


;vgry appucam is accepted py netena. 
: about lhe Helena Service, telephone 

i6 or 01 409 2913 
ON FREE OF CHARGE 

a lOSAL VJLP.CLUB 


Harrison said. of the transplant team, and the 

But foetuses with defects so transplant surgeons should 
hopeless that they meet the not be involved in the care or 
requirements for abortion at counselling of the expectant 


Rape case 
jury’s vital 
questions 

Prosecuting counsel in the 
case of a doctor accused of 
raping a girl aged eight, told 
the jury yesterday that they 
had two vital questions to 
consider. Was rite sexually 
assaulted; and did the doctor 
do it? 

Mr John Mathew, QC for 
the prosecution, was making 
his dosing speech on the 
fourth day of the trial, in a 
private prosecution, brought 
by the gut’s mother, at 
Chelmsford Crown Court. 

The doctor, aged 50, an 
anaesthetist, from Essex, has 
denied raping the girl while 
she was staying with him. He 
has also denied indecent 
assault. 

Mr Mathew told the jury: 
“There are really two ques- 
tions for you to ask yourself 
and then answer them...was 
that young girl sexually as- 
saulted, raped or indecently 
assaulted? Because if the an- 
swer to that is no, or that you 
are not sure, then that is the 
end of this matter and you will 
acquit and you needn't think 
any further about the evid- 
ence.” 

If they were sure, he said, 
they had to consider whether 
the defendant was responsible. 

There were three aspects to 
this, based on the evidence. 
They were: the change in the 
girl's character immediately 
she returned from tbe doctor's 
house; tbe medical evidence; 
and the evidence relating to 
staining of the nightdress she 
said she was wearing on the 
night she alleges she was 
raped. 

Mr Mathew suggested the 
evidence about dramatic 
changes in the girTs behaviour 
was “overwhelming”. He also 
suggested there was “comp- 
elling” medical evidence. 

Mr Anthony Ariidge. QC 
for the defence, said: “All of us 
in this courtroom have an 
abhorrence of sexual interfer- 
ence with young children. If it 
is proved that men or women 
are responsible for such sexual 
interference, then it is right 
that they should be convicted. 

“On the other hand, there is 
perhaps nothing worse than 
the thought of someone being 
wrongly convicted." 

He spoke about the diffi- 
culty of assessing the evidence 
of a young child, and de- 
scribed what had been a 
“traumatic year” for the girl. 

Her parents split up; her 
home burnt down; she moved 
house twice and changed 
schools twice; Iter brother was 
ill; her mother had to stay with 
him in hospital; she had to 
stay away from home, with the 
doctor; and her mother was 
taking a new lover. 

He asked: “Would it be 
truly beyond the realms of 
thought that such a little girl 
would want to draw attention 
to herself? That such a little 
girl would want to hurt herself 
by banging her head, or in 
some other way?" 

The case continues today. 


Dog savages baby 


Coroner absolves family 


A coroner yesterday ab- 
solved a family of all blame 
for tbe attack by their Jack 
Russell terrier which killed 
their daughter, aged five days. 

The dog. Dotty, was put 
down after killing Amy Vic- 
toria Bourne, of Wanlip Road, 
Plaistow, east London, on 
Tuesday. 

At the inquest into the 
child's death. Dr Harold Price, 
the London eastern district 
coroner, described the death 
as “tragic, sudden and un- 
expected”. 

As the child's father, Mr 
Daniel Bourne, a bus driver, 
listened. Dr Price said: “There 
is no way in my view this 
absolutely loving little family 
could have anticipated this 
tragic event”. 

He recorded a verdict of 
accidental death. 

Mr Bourne told the Wal- 
thamstow inquest that his 
daughter was born on Thurs- 
day of last week at Newham 
hospital, east London, weigh- 
ing 61b 6oz. 

He said the Jack Russell had 
been with tbe family for two- 
ahd-a-half years and that his 


Children 
gain from 
rhymes 

Parents who want their 
children to do well at school 
were yesterday urged to switch 
off the television and teach 
them nursery thymes. 

Psychologists from Oxford 
University claim that young- 
sters taught rhymes have a 
bead start over classmates. 

The team started a study in 
the 1970s and recent tests of 
the 400 children, now aged 13, 
showed that those who had 
never learnt nursery rhymes 
were still lagging years behind 
with reading and spelling. 

Dr Lynetle Bradley, of the 
university's experimental 
psychology department, said: 
“The ones who couldn't 
rhyme to start with and who 
weren’t trained were two years 
behind by the time they were 
eight or nine. 

“I have just checked again 
and tbe same big difference is 
still there. They haven't 
caught up at att. 

“We need to turn off the 
television and go back to 
reciting nursery rhymes. Itisa 
pleasant way for children to 
team about sounds.” 


Ice Age find 

The skull of a bison which 
roamed Britain during the Ice 
Age 100,000 years ago has 
been unearthed during 
excavations in a gravel pit at 
Maxey, near Peterborough, 
Cambridgeshire. The bones 
are being coated with a special 
plastic to prevent crumbling 
and go on display in the city 
musuem next year. 


other two daughters, Claire, 
aged 13, and Lyndsey, aged 
10, got on well with it. and 
with their other dog, a cross- 
breed Labrador. 

“They used to dress the Jack 
Russell up and push her 
around in a pram. Tbe dog 
had never done anything to 
anybody.” Mr Bourne said. 

Mr Bourne said he and his 
wife had been trying for a third 
child for several years. 

Chi Tuesday, they had in- 
tended to take Amy out in the 
perambulator. While he fetch- 
ed it the baby was in a carrycot 
on two chairs up against the 
wall in the kitchen. 

Mr Bourne said: “I noticed 
that the tittle dog had gone. I 
saw she was in the carrycot. I 
rushed over there and at first 1 
thought die was just being 
nosy. Then- 1 picked op the 
baby and called out for my 
mother to get an ambulance.” 

Staff at Newham General 
Hospital later certified the 
baby dead. 

Dr Alan Grant, a patholo- 
gist, said death was due to 
cerebral lacerations due to 
skull perforation and fracture. 


He said that part of the 
babv's brain had been de- 
stroyed. There were cuts to the 
head and widespread bruising 
totheskulL 

Some cots were caused by 
the small teeth of the dog. 

PC Colin Manning, a dog 
handler from East Ham police 
station, said the dog, which 
had blood around its muzzle, 
showed aggression towards 
him. 

Later, at the hospital, Mr 
Bourne told him he wanted 
the dog destroyed. This was 
done by a veterinary surgeon- 

PC David T inale, stationed 
at East Ham, said he saw 
blood stains outside the house 
when he went there. 

Dr Price said: “We all of us 
feel lhe greatest sympathy 
towards this young family 
with regard to this tragic, 
sudden and unexpected death 
of a very valuable little girl 
whom the parents have been 
trying to have for 10 years. 

“Perhaps the dog may have 
been jealous, I don't know. 
Perhaps it jumped in response 
to the high frequency noise of 
the baby.” 


Non-white 
population 
shown 
in survey 

By Peter Evans, Home 

Affaire Correspondent 

One fifth of the population 
of inner London is non-white, 
according to a government 
report yesterday. The non- 
whites accounted for 9 per 
cent of the people in metro- 
politan counties and 4.4 per 
cent of the total population of 
Britain. 

The Labour Force Survey 
7985 shows that the propor- 
tion of persons aged under 30 
in the non-white population 
was 62 per cent compared 
with only 42 per cent of 
whites. 

Some 60 per cent of the 
West Indian or Guyanese and 
Indian populations were aged 
under 30 compared with 
around 70 per cent of Paki- 
stanis and Bangladeshis. 

However, the population of 
mixed ethnic origin had the 
youngest age structure of alL 
More than half were aged 
under 16. 

The report, prepared by the 
Office of Population Censuses 
and Surveys, shows how 
Britain turned into a multi- 
racial country. 

Only 10 per cent, most of 
whom were white people born 
in the Mediterranean Com- 
monwealth or India, entered 
the United Kingdom before 
1955. Most of the people bom 
in the Caribbean Common- 
wealth came between the mid 
1950s and the mid 1960s and 
the corresponding peak for 
people bom in India came in 
the late 1960s and early 1970s. 
People bom in Bangladesh 
were more recent arrivals and 
more than one third first 
entered the UK during the 
1980s. 

The total non-white popula- 
tion in 1985 is put at 
2,376,000. The total com- 
prises 547,000 people of West 
In dian or Guyanese ethnic 
origin, 689,000 of Indian, 
406JH0 of Pakistani, 99,000 
of Ban gladeshi, 122,000 of 
Chinese, 102,000 of African, 

61.000 of Arab, 232,000 of 
“mixed” and 1 17,000 “other”. 
“Not staled” were 637,000. 

The survey is of private 
households. The results are 
based on interviews in the 
spring quarter of 1985. The 
total coverage of the survey 
was about 59,000 households 
in Britain, containing about 

160.000 people. The results 
have been uprated from the 
sample to give estimates 
applying to the population of 
Britain as a whole. 



— 

Breakfast 
surprises 
for two 

Yesterday’s winners of the 
Portfolio Gold prize, sharing 
£4,000, have both been taking 
part in the game since it 
started and both discovered 
their good fortune during their 
ratine breakfast-time check 
on the numbers. 

Mrs Jntia Bishop, of Long 
Bennington, Lincolnshire, 
checked with her husband, a 
company director, wud said 
she would probably invest the 
mosey on behalf of their son, 
Andrew, aged three. 

The other winner, Mrs 
Anne Edgexley, aged 75, of 
Keisale, Saxmandham, Suf- 
folk, who is married with a 
famil y and “a lot of grand- 
children"; said: “I have happy 
dreams sk possibly replacing 
my car and other things that 
are fast wearing out, like the 
washing nwrfring. You need a 
car tiring in the country as we 
do.” 

Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: Portfolio Gold, 

The Times* 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 



Mrs Julia Bishop, who plans 
to in vest her win 


Fireproof lab 
gutted in blaze 

A fire at the Monks Wood 
experimental station at Ab- 
bots Ripton, Cambridgeshire, 
caused estimated at 

£256,000 yesterday. 

The fire, hi a laboratory 
described as fireproof, started 
in the early hoars and was 
extinguished by staff The 
station carries out animal and 
mineral research for tbe 
Government. 


Packaging materials — solutions 
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Couple ‘shunned 
after false arrest’ 


A woman who is suing the 
police for false arrest dm-mg a 
murder inquiry wept yes- 
terday as she told tbe High 
Court in London how bo- 
South Wales pit village turned 


Mrs Sarah Holtham, aged 
45, of Upper Frahcis Street, 
Abertridur, Mid Glamorgan, 
and her husband, William, 
aged 49, are claiming damages 
against the Metropolitan Pol- 
ice and Det Chief ln$p Derek 
Croft. 

Their son, Gareth, was a 
suspect in the murder of Mr 
Anthony Bird, a homosexual, 
in London in Jane 1980, and 
they were arrested at their 
home in November 1980. 
They were questioned in 
London for four days, but 
were not charged. 

Police believed the couple 


had knowledgs of stolen stereo 
equipment — a vital clue 
which is still missm&Their 
son has not been charged with 
theaime- 

Mrs Holtham, a factory 
worker, wept as she told Mr 
Justice Pain: “I knew I hadn’t 
done anything wrong. The 
police called me a liar. 

“What we went through in 
Abertridur for a long time 
afterwards was very sad. 

“It was terrible for us as a 
family. We lost quite a lot of 
friends and we were being kept 
awake until four, five or six in 
the morning with terrible 
phone calls.” 

The police claim they had 
reasonable grounds for taking 
the Hofthams into custody 
and acted fewfully. 

The hearing was adjourned 
until today. 


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December 1 1 1 986 


TPFTTM^FMDAYTOC^ffl^J 2 1986 

PARLIAMENT 


Teachers’ pay Bill 
approved after 
all-night debate 


The Teachers* Pay and Con- 
ditions Bill received its third 
reading in die Commons at 
124pm, after 23 hours of debate 

interrupted only by divisions. 
The sitting lasted from 2J0prn 
on Wednesday until 4J8pra 
today and. as a result, today's 
scheduled business was lost 

MPs should have debated a 
Northern Ireland Bill on sec- 
urity in the province, which 
instead will be considered next 
week. 

The teachers' Bill darted on 
Wednesday with a spate of 
points of order from Labour 

MPs complaining about the 

Government's intention to rush 
it through and they followed 
that with lengthy speeches, 
including one of nearly two 
hours. The debate proceeded as 
fellows: 

4.18pm, Wednesday: Commii- 
- tee stage of the Bill began. 

Longest speech on the first 
group of amendments by Dr 
■John Marek (Wrexham. Lab) 
from 7.27pm to 853pm (1 hour 
26 min). 

10pm: Division on first group of 
amendments. 

lOJOpnc Committee stage re- 
sumed after procedural motions 
were dealt with, including a 
division on the 10 o'clock 
business motion allowing the 
House to continue sitting. 

Mr Peter Hardy (Wentworth. 
Lab) asked on a point of order if 
a story that he had seen on the 
news agency tapes, saying that 
consideration of the Bill was 
now going to be suspended, was 
true. Mr Kenneth Baker replied, 

with some relish, that he had no 
intention of suspending consid- 
eration of the BilL “We have 
just started and 1 feel the debate 
is just be ginning . We are just 
warming up.” 

1037pm: Mr Giles Radice, chief 
Opposition spokesman, moved 
the first of the second group of 
amendments saying that the 
Remuneration of Teachers Act 
should be replaced by negotiat- 
ing machinery as set out in the 
Acas document agreed between 
the local authority employers 
and unions representing the 
majority of teachers. 

By lZASam, Thursday, Mr 
Robert Clay (Sunderland North, 
Lab) was accusing the Govern- 
ment of Stalinism and atten- 
dance in the public gallery was 
down to one man. 

Mr Jeremy Corbyn (Islington 
North, Lab) intervened to report 
that he bad Just returned from 
the picket line at Wapping. The 
News International dispute, be 
said, was an example of an 
opp re s sive Government which 
paid thousands of police officers 
to keep 5,000 people out of 
work. 

Because of inadequate indus- 
trial relations legislation, a pri- 
vate employer bad been allowed 
to dismiss people at will and the 
Government supported him. In 
the teachers' dispute, the 
Government was in favour of 
the law of die jungle in the 
public sector, just as it ap- 
plauded the law of the jungle in 
the private sector. 

Replying at IZ5<fam, Mrs 
Angela Rum bold. Minister of 
State for Education and Science; 
pointed out that two of the six 
teachers* unions had not signed 
die Acas deal and two of those 
that had signed had changed 
their minds. The proposals were 
unacceptable. 

Mr Mark Fisher, for the 
Opposition, asked why the Sec- 
retary of State did not hold a 
ballot of aQ teachers to see 
whether they preferred his deal 
or the Acas one. 

Mrs Rum bold said she was 
sure Mr Baker would be willing 
to hold such a ballot if be had 
the power to do so. Mr Tony 
Ranks (Newham North West, 
Lab) suggsted, from a sed- 
entary position, putting an 
advertisement in The Guardian. 

Mr Fisher challenged the 
Government to insert a new 


■ clause in the Bill to give the 
I Sccreiaiy of State the power to 
t ballot teachers. Mm Rum bold 

■ did not respond to the challenge. 

. She said the “wonderland of 
i unrealistic negotiations'* could 
i not go on. The amendment was 
i a recipe for further chaos. 

ZOlane The Prime Minister 
i appeared in the chamber and sat 

■ for a while on the Government 
i front beach. 

2.18am: Mr Clement Freud 
(North East Cambridgeshire. L) 
i unsuccessfully attempted to 
f move a dosure motion. 

Mr Max Madden (Bradford 
West, Lab) complained, on a 
point of older, that Mr Freud's 
! only contributions had been 
attempts to curtail die debate 
i and he was now reading a 
newspaper article about smok- 
ing. The committee chairman. 
Sir Paul Dean, said that unless 
Mr Freud was preparing himself 
-for the debate he should desist 
He did. 

The longest speech in this 
section, and the most entertain- 
ing, was made by Mr Dennis 
Skinner (Bolsover, Lab) who 
spoke from 232am to 4.19am (1 
hour 47 min). 

He devoted the first part of 
his speech to an attack on the 
Alliance and Mr Freud came in 
for particular criticism. Re- 
sponding. Mr Freud said that he 
was waiting for the Alliance 
amendments to be reached. 

Mr Skinner drew the biggest 
laughs of the night. He first 
pointed out that if Mr Freud was 
appearing on Just A Minute be 
would be pulled up for rep- 
etition because he had made 
that point three times. 

He then expounded his theory 
that the reason why an extra 
microphone had been placed on 
the Conservative side, after the 
installa tion of an extra one on 
the Opposition sde for the 
benefit of the Liberals, was in 
readiness for the Leader of the 
SDP (Dr Owen) crossing the 
floor of the chamber. 

Responding to Mr Freud’s 
argument that the committee 
had only reached line five of the 
Bill after more than nine hours 
of debate, Mr Skinner pointed 
out that the only way the 
Opposition could attempt to 
frustrate obnoxious Bills such as 
this was by occupying time. 

At 3.28am Mr Skinner asked 
if it was in order for Mrs 
Rumbold's parliamentary pri- 
vate secretary, Mr Eric Forth 
(Mkt Worcestershire, Q, to be 
fast asleep. The volume of the 
resulting laughter weds Mr 
Forth. 

Mr Mart Fisher, winding up, 
pledged Labour to repeal the 
legislation and replace it with 
properly democratic collective 
bargaining machinery- and Said 
that if the Government would 
dare to ballot the teachers be 
would be surprised if even 
15- per cent supported Mr 
Baker’s plans. 

453am: Division cm second 
group of amendments after 6 
hours 16 min of debate. Amend- 
ment rejected by 131 votes to 31 
— Government majority, 100. 
SJOdaaa: The first of a group of 
amendments dealing with the 
anomalous position of teachers 
in further education, who are 
not affected by the BflL was 
moved by Mr Andrew Bennett, 
for the Opposition. 

530am: In a division, the 
amendment was rejected by 124 
votes to 27 — Government 
majority,^. 

541am: Mr Fisher moved the 
first of the next group of 
amendments, the purpose of 
which was to set up a national 
joint council to negotiate 
teachers’ pay and conditions. He 
said that this proposal was based 
on the Acas agreement readied 
in Nottingham and would en- 
sure that direct collective 
bargaining took place between 
unions ana employers. 

Mr Kenneth Baker said that 
the teaching profession was 

Channel Tunnel Bill 


divided, the teachers’ unions 
were divided from each other 
and within themselves, and the 
employers were divided. 

Something very dose to the 
proposed joint council had al- 
ready been operating for some 
time and a solution to the 
dispute had not been found. 
Therefore be did not think it 
was sensible for the Govern- 
ment to accept the amendment 
because such a council would 
not work at this stage.. 

Mr Martin Flannery (Shef- 
field, Hillsborough, Lab) said 
that the most the advisory 
committee would be able to do 
was to glean ideas from people it 
had talked to among elected 
groupings. They would have 
tittle or no impact on the 
outcome. 

“Most people on the Tory 
side have been to public schools 
and do not understand the state 
system.” 

He combined criticism of the 
minister’s political altitude with 
that of his physical attitude, 
alleging somnolence among the 
few Conservative MPS present 
in the chamber at that moment 
“He lies there with his sleeping 
pack behind him. unconsciously 
saying to us: ‘I am not interested 
in what you are saying*.” 

[Mr Baker, Secretary of State, 
was using his front-bendi privi- 
lege of relaxing with feet up on 
the table, bat his two supporters 
on the back benches were sitting 
with their beads to the mioo- 
phones in the seats behind 
them, eyes dosed in eoncen- 
trationj 

Mr Flannery predicted diffi- 
culties for Mr Baker so great as 
make what had happened to M 
Chirac (the French Prime Min- 
ister) look like a tea party. 

Mr Allen McKay (Barnsley 
West and Penistone, Lab), a 
former National Coal Board 
industrial relations officer, said 
that only three Conservatives 
were left after the long and 
laborious night 

730am: [The public had also 
found it laborious; only one 
person was present in the public 

8B TTre Secretary of State was to 
be judge and jury, paying and 
appointing the members of the 
advisory committee and guiding 
them. 

In his years as an industrial 
relations officer he had found 
that imposition of settlements 
on a body of people did not 
wot The issue very soon raised 
its head again. 

Mr Corbyn said that no one 
would have respect for a body 



Mr Dams Skinner who had a few cheering words far Mr Clement Freed. 


Chirac (the French Prime Min- The committro wouJdcom- 
ister) look like a tea party. prise aspirant Tory MPs or 

Mr Allen McKay (Barnsley former Tory MPs, or people 
West and Penistone, Lab), a from public schools who would 
former National Coal Board worsen conditions in the state 
industrial relations officer, said schools. 
that only three Conservatives “Where are those creeps to 
were left after the long and come from? Are there enough 
laborious night creeps for the minister to fill his 

730am: [The public had also advisory body or will it be the 
found it laborious; only one ultimate trip-up for Mr Baker, 
person was present in the public Will he finally trip over his own 
gallery.! Biylcreem?” . ^ 

The Secretary of State was to The amendment was rejected 
be judge and jury, paying and by 137 votes to 26 — Govra- 
appointing the members of the ment majority. 111. The first 
advisory committee and priding cl aus e of the Bill was earned by 
them. 144 votes to 33 — Government 

In his years as an industrial majority. 111. 
relations officer he had found 7.44am: Mr Derek Fatchett, an 
that imposition of settlements Opposition spokesman on eduo- 
on a body of people did not ahon, then moved the first of a 
work. The issne very soon raised group of amendments to pro- 
its head g g»" vide that appointments by the 

Mr Corbyn said that no one Secretary of State to the ad- 
would have respect for a body visory committee should follow 
appointed by the Secretary of consultation With teachers* un- 


State ions and associations and local 

“We be set back into education authorities and that 
another teachers’ dispute, an- the advisory committee should 
other problem in the schools, be independent, 
because Mr Baker will not free “While we seek to amend and 

up to real reason lor the improve the advisory commit- 
dispute, that teachers have been tee, it would not be the intention 
consistently underpaid and his of a forthcoming Labour 
Government has consistently government to have any truck' 
cut the money for educational with this co mmitt ee. When we 
spending.” come to repeal this legislation. 



Mrs Angela SmnboM: An interest in ballots. Mr Derek 
Fatchett: A promise to repeal. 


the advisory committee will go 
with it." 

Appointments to it would be 
at the dictate of the Secretary of 
Stale who took to himself. also, 
the power to dismiss those who 
were unable or ""fi t, in bis 
opinion, to per f orm their duties. 
Mr Baker would appoint, as this 
Government had always done, 
only those prep are d to go along 
with the Government 

Mr Prank Cook (Stockton 
North. Lab): Noddies. 

Mr Fatchett: That is right- We 
are trying to bring in an dement 
of indirect democracy. We are 
trying to find common ground 
with the Government. 

&22anc Mr Robert Dunn, 
Under-Secretary of State for 
Education and Science, said that 
the difficulty with the amend- 
ments was that they were mis- 
chievous and pervers e in 
seeking to create what the 
Government was trying to dis- 
pose o£ a second round of 
Bu rnham committees. 

The members of the commit- 
tee under Labour proposals 
would have to go baa to their 
masters to decide their policy, so 
the independence of the com- 
mittee would not exist from its 
beginning. 

The committee must be com- 
posed of people who were of 
standing and integrity and in- 
dependence of mind, who could 
exercise independent judge- 
ment, conduct independent 
analysis and arrive at indepen- 
dent conclusions. 

He gave an unqualified assur- 
ance that its reports would be 
made public without undue 
delay. 

9J0uc Mr John Evans (St 
Helens North, Lab) said that the 
Government was removing 
from teachers their union. The 
Bill was aimed at smashing the 
National Union ofTeachers and 
other unions. 

Mr Fatchett said that the Bill 
would bring the teachers’ unions 
much closer to raw politics. 

The amendment was rejected 
by 216 votes to 93 — Govern- 
ment majority, |23. 

937am: Mr Freud moved the 
first of series of amendments to 
give the Secretary ofState power 
only to inform the committee 
about financial constraints. 


Channel Tnnncl Bill Five LabOUT MPS 

‘Coast mud dump planned 9 boycott UDM vote 


By Martin Fiddler, Political Reporter 


The meeting point of (be 
Channel tunnel wiB be seven 
kilometres nearer France than 
England, with two thirds of aB 
the excavated mod being 
dumped in “a huge excres- 
cence” on England's coastline, 
an MPsaid yesterday. 

Mr Nick Raynsford, who 
supported his claim with 
French newspaper cuttings, 
mathematics and rhetoric, ac- 
cused the Government of “sell- 
ing out” Britain's coastline 
and natural heritage in the 
interests of a foreign country 
ami a shaky commercial ven- 
ture which it would do any- 
thing to support. 

Shakespeare Cliff, an En- 
vironmentally Sensitive Area 
which forms part of Dover’s 
white cliffs, was bong “offered 
ap as a sacrificial dumping 
ground in the interests of the 
French and Eurotnnnel”, be 
said. The French were rubbing 
their hands fa glee and think- 


ing how lightly they had 


Mr Raynsford, Lahore MP 
for Fulham, who was speaking 
daring the committee stage of 
the Channel Tunnel BUL 
based Ms assertion on a report 
in a French newspaper. La 
Vmx da Nord, which quotes a 
French Eur otunn el director as 
saying that only three million 
cubic metres of spoil vriD be 
dumped m France compared 
with five million in Britain. 

Anticipating the Govern- 
ment's argument that there 
w3i be nine kilometres of land- 
based tunnel at the English 
end compared with 3.7 ki- 
lometres in France, Mr 
Raynsford said that if the mid- 
channel meeting point was 
really mid-channel, British 
responsibility would be for 
2735 kilometres or 55 per 
cent of the tunnel. 

As it was, the French figures 
indicated a 625 per cent to 
375 per cent dimioa of ex- 


cavated mud in France’s fa- 
vour, and die explanation was | 
that tee meeting point was to 
be seven kilometres nearer ' 
France. | 

Joining the fray, Mr Jona- 
than Aitkea, Tory MP for 
Unset South, accused Mr 
David Mitchell, tee transport 
minister who claimed last 
week that the meeting point 
would be only “slightly 

nearer” France, of “a touch of 
Armstrongitis — being econo- 
mical with the truth”. 

Mr Mitchell intervened to 
insist that the meeting point 
would be a maximum of two 
kilometres nearer France and 
accused Mr Raynsford of 
“bnBdingagreateffificeonthe 

basis of a report h a French 
newspaper”. 

Mr Raynsford had antici- 
pated that accusation too. He 
flourished a document pro- 
duced by Eurotunnel in France 
which cited identical figures 
fur the division of spofl. 


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Five Labour MPs led by Mr 
Stanley Orme, the party’s 
energy spokesman, refused 
yesterday to have anything to 
do with a Commons commit- 
tee vote on whether the break- 
away Union of Democratic 
Mineworicers should be repre- 
sented on coal industry pen- 
sion boards. 

In doing so they provoked a 
tirade of abuse from their 
Conservative and Alliance 
opponents, who accused them 
of “running scared” of Mr 
Arthur ScargilL the NUM 
president, and of betraying 
loyal UDM supporters of 
Labour. 

Labour has been put on the 
spot by a government Coal 
Bill which will give the UDM 
the right to representation era 
coal industry pension boards 
and charitable trusts, thereby 
offering it a new degree .of 
recognition and challenging 
the NUM*s insistence teat it 
should be the industry's only 
recognized union. 

Labour’s dilemna is exacer- 
bated by the- fact that its 
refusal to recognize the UDM 
could seriously affect its for- 
tunes in up to six key seats in 
the Nottinghamshire coal- 
fields. 

The crucial clause came up 
in tee BilTs committee stage 
yesterday and tee five Labour 
members refused to lake any 
part in the debate or to vote, 
despite being challenged to do 
so by teeir opponents. - 

Mr David Hunt, the min- 
ister for coal, claimed that 

i 


“tee shadow of the president 
of the NUM” had thrown a I 
“shroud of silence” over tee i 
five Labour MPS, not one of | 
whom bad made any attempt 
to discuss tee clause. I 

“TTte majority of people in 
this committee will find h 
surprising that some UDM 
members are still loyal to the 
Labour Party. These people 
have been vilified in the most 
disgraceful fashion in this 
House and 1 feel the time has 
now come for a parting of the 
ways.” 

He challenged tee Labour 
MPs to “have tee guts and 
courage to distance yourselves 
from tee stance of tee presi- 
dent of the NUM". 

Mr Ian Wrigglesworth, the 
SDP energy spo k e sma n, spoke 
of tee “evil background” 
which led to the UDMs 
formation. 

“There was a viciousness 
and nastiness and unpleasant- 
ness which stalked this land in 
a way which we have not seen 
in post-war years.” That 
“vendetta” was still going on 
and Labour was “running 
scared”, he said. 

Labour had voted against 
the Bill on its second reading 
in the Commons, but on 
grounds other than tee 
UDIvTs right to representation 
on pension boards. The sole 
dissenter was Mr Don Con- 
cannon, Labour MP for the 
Nottinghamshire coalfield 
constituency of Mansfield, 
who supported it r 


rather than to give it directives. 

He said that it was very good 
to have a morning audience 
which had been significantly 
missing during the night (pro- 
tests and laughter). 

“It would be fair to tell those 
MPs who rise now that they 
have missed some virtuoso 
performances." 

Mis Elaine Kefien-Bowman 
(Lancaster, Q: So did you. 

Mr Freud: I have been here. 
Above all was the virtuoso 
performance by Mr Skinner, a 
graduate of the Quasimodo 
school of deportment, who kept 
the House up for some two 
hours. 

The relationship between the 
Secretary of State and tee 
committee is tike that between 
Idi Amin and bis army. The 
Secretary of State may say what 
he will and the advisory' 
committee will do what it is told 
to do. 

“The Bill allows the Se c r e t ary 
of Slate to give directives to the 
committee. Our amendment 
maintains the link between the 
Secretary of State and the 
committee” 

It seemed to them that the 
Government would have no 
interest, or only a paging 
interest, in what the committee 
might say or do. Tie Conser- 
vatives’ only interest was in the 
imposition of the Bfll on the 
teachers and employers. 
10.14am: Mis Rum bold said 
that the power of the Secretary 
of State to give directions should 
be of great benefit to the 
committee in its interim life. 

It would be stupid for its 
remit not to take account of the 
financial position of local 
authorities. The committee 
would need to operate within a 
realistic framework of what 
local authorities could afford. 

The purpose of the amend- 
ments was to weaken the Sec- 
retary of State's control in 
determining matters on which 
the committee should advise, 
and the terms under which it 
should operate. 

The Government p ro posals 
would give teachers stability 
and certain knowledge that 
there would be an effective 
system for the determination of 
their pay in tire medium term. 

Syringes 
would 
cost £8m 

The annual cost of prescribing 
disposable syringes and needles 
to all diabetic patients would be 
between £8 million and 
£10 million, in addition to the 
£1.2 million the Government 
already spent each year in 
prescribing reusable syringes, 
Lady Trmnpmgtoa. Under-Sec- 
retary of State for Health and 
Social Security, said during 
question lime in the House of 
Lords. 

In reply to the Earl of 
Kinnort! (C), who asked wbat 
progress was befog made to- 
wards allowing doctors to pre- 
scribe disposable plastic sy- 
ringes, particularly to those with 
diabetic conditions, she said the 
Government was keeping the 
position under review. 

Lord Wfostanley (L) asked if she 
would bear in mind the plight of 

S rents with children suffering 
mn diabetes who had enough 
of a burden without having to 
sterilize syringes. If disposable 
syringes could not be prescribed 
for all diabetic patients, could 
not children at least recieve 
them? 

Lady Trtrapiagton said that 
most children with this con- 
dition were under consultants 
who could, if they decided h was 
dintcally desirable, prescribe 
disposable syringes. . 

Lord Ennab (Lab) said he was 
disappointed that the Govern- 
ment response had not been 
more encouraging. It would be a 
worthwhile expense and a 
wonderful Christmas present for 
all diabetic sufferers. 

Lady Trampfogton said that she 
would make sure her ministerial 
colleagues were aware of the 
strength of feeling on the 
subject. 


meui '““rVhe Bill was 

clause of debate ”>... 

sssistj®. m 

ijjSsagas 

majority. 81. a partv is saddled wfte 

2 - 29pm Mr Faichett mo'eda £.; ar policy ii do 

new clause enabling tire an things. It can 

SS'S ESn^SE 

conditions! Tor all those mtt£ed issoes will dominate tbe 
in the snpervision of stftool *j 0lS campaign: or can 1° 

Sojktc Mr ftoebcu «-25 sun lt had 

SffSSSrSSuTdnm setae* A? Mr 

AirnstronE, the deputy chair- concentrating all «•* e *j® 
man. called for order. the unlikely goa. 01 0011 . Jj 

Mr Cecil Franks (Barrow and fhe British people lo me 
Furness, C) said that as todays rfr|1ies of Labours defence 

business had been wiped out 

Prime Minister’s question hme P® - * . tb j^t remarkable 

Mr F rank s commented: There h e seemed deliberate!) to have 
are MPs on all sides who itasve drawing attention to the 

an interest in the Prime no lie v which is his great- 

Minister’s question time and it . i^oral liability, without 

*» 

^"f CO! fo£ M Tn h T,e "SfAh the Mta . 
Chamber]. Wednesday of tee party s new 

Mr Ar m st ro ng said that it was defence statement. Modern 
not for him to give procedural Britain in c Modern World, 
decisions and that the commit- ^ gyonmj has begun to shift, 
tee stage must continue. There is a difference between 

An toenew Clause. nuclear bases from this rotm- 

Those involved in education tty as soon as 
bad heard the Government^ Labour government took of- 
reaction to democratic rights it fice, and promising to do so 
was not interested in these 0D jy after “complex and thor- 
issues. The new clause was discussion” with oar 

important to the children. aKi -_ 

The new clause was rejected 

fav 21 1 votes to 138 — Govern- ■ 

ment majority. 73. PcUTtV S CllSUCCS 

Mr dement Freud, moving r j 

one of a group of amendments. QOt lIDprOVcU 
said amid some laughter. “This 

Tb« chafes .he^v^fcie 
times and it is feir now to expect expectation ol what a Labour 
victory.” government would do. I am net 

Mr Dunn said that the ^ sare , however, that it will 
Opposition had tried to make the party’s chances of 

something of the provision office. 

allowingtheSecreta^orSiateto W, “v£tow%Bbtle (tistinc- 
remove a member from office. " naiever suuue uisum. 

They had claimed there was tions may be drawn between 
something sinister in that But it consultation and negotiation, 
was entirely common form. which Mr Kinnock is evidently 

The Secretary of State would s tfl] not prepared to contem- 
fcave to have evidence on which plate. Labour ministers would 
he could property base his f|nd them^es caught up in 
opinion. If he made an un- . ... ^ nnirefhlr arrimo- 

i4sonablededsion.il could be 

challenged bv way of judicial discussions with their 

review. allies. 

The amendment was rejected Being committed to Nato as 
by 222 votes to 142 — Govern- strongly and wholeheartedly 
ment majority. 80. as this state matt emphasizes, 

3 - 09pm: Mr ^Kenneth Baker, how could they break off these 

conversations to art on their 
that the der at e bad been long, ^ n—, 

thorough and exhaustive but *£"* 

not e xhausting for him, his what chance could there wol 
Minister of Stale or his Par- securing agreement from Other 
liamentary Secretary. They were allied governments ea toe 
ready for many more hours of ejection of American nndear 
de i? Ie - , ... bases from fltis country? 

Hew^dhketotlraiteteem So the prospect would be of 

for all the help they had given „ „j LlL. 

him during the course of the * „ JfUfl 

nigh t gimg teat would create a great 

On some votes only 26 or 27 deal of uncertainty, but would 
Opposition MPs had managed probably not lead ut the end to 
to stay np but the Conservatives the removal of the bases unless 
had overwhelmed Labour by the Americans themselves be- 
five to one. mme fed up with such tire- 

“I would like to thank all my partners, 

friends for sharing my deter- Britain would give up its 

mutation to see this BiH on to n-ripar weanons. hot the 
the statute book.” own unclear weapons, hut me 

Mr Giles Radice. thanlced die prassllre . 8f Sfrt 

staff and officers of tee House ITS 5 

who, despite ibe haste with totekdy that «f W of 
which the BUI had been rail- the money saved would be 
roaded through the Commons, devoted to strengthening the 
had prodded members with the conventional forces, 
usual efficient service. This whole process would be 

The Secretary of State had bad for the alliance, bat not so 
failed to shake Labour’s view disastrous as simply (dlii¥ 
teat tee Bill, n>de roughshod ^ Ujajte | ^ take its 

over International Labour Or- ^ 
ganization conventions as well “SSSf 
as the European social contract DW T 1 f rs *°? °* 

3.24pm: The Bfll was read the 

third dine by 235 voles to 152 - e T“‘r ** 

Government majority, 83. electorate than tee old one. 


' The merit of the change is that 

rn r* it now looks less likely that a 

I Iirann rnr government would 

X uvauu AVAL carry oat the party’s coramit- 
TT A T"? meat on American nndear 

I\Ar 1 If bases in this country. 

t « But that is hardly a reassnr- 

fnp g n f lt TQ ance that can be shouted aloud 

LilU jJjlllig by Labour politicians. “Don’t 
Delivery of tee first Tucano ffOI 5 r : we don't mea n what we 
trainer aircraft from Shorts to . fa not exactly the most 
the RAF will be made next inspiring slogan for an election 
spring, Mr Archibald Hamilton, campaign. 

Under-Secret ary o f State for In any case, there can be no 
Defence Procurement, raid m a certainty that a Labour 
written Commons reply. The 

date represents a few months' won ^_ r , no ? ^ 

slippage in the orginal <fau» poshed by its own left wing to 

be more precipitate than it 

rv_ -i? , would wish. Tire next Par- 

raruameni Bamentaiy Labour Party will 

- contain a higher proportion of 

next week left-wingers than the present 

The main business in tee House „ 

of Commons next week will be: _ **ow hard they pressed a 
Monday: Debate on private labour admin istration on de- 
member’s motion on manage- 

ment and operation of tee T 

security services. Motion for the L«Clt S lCaCuOD 

may be critical 

Tuesday: Northern Ireland (Em- B — 

ergency Provisions) BilL second fence might well depend upon 


UABEKw*' may ** critic 31 


ergency Provisions) BilL second fence might well depend upon 
reading. Motion on supple- how successful it was in other 

fie,ds - Minfatera who seemed 

Chancellor’s autumn statement. rt 

Thursday: Motions on supple- to resist 

mentary and social security in the meantime, the re- 
benefit orders and regulations, action of the Labour left to this 
Friday: Christmas adjournment new twist in party policy may 

de ^ m es ' . . bt critical. Lahore suffered in 

The main business in tee — ■ - 

House of Lords will be: 

Monday: Debate on the Peacock 
report on the financing of tee 
BBC. 

Tuesday: Fire Safety and Safety 


tee 1 983 election not only from 
tee unpopularity of its defence 
commitments, bat also from 
the divisions in the party. 

— -r- - * This time the right wing hac 

mPtees of Sport BiH, second srifered in spptSnflyTUeat 

hopelessness. The teft has 


StesaysK E 

and on the situation in Cyprus. ~nnock has shared its conwc- 
Li censing (Restaurant Meals) terns and semi no need op to 
Bill, second reading, now to temper them. Now that 

Thwsday: Debate on disposing the process of fudging has 
of waste at sea. Local Govern- begun, will the party's uneasy 

BilL second^ £3? defeB “ to “ 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Catalogue of accidents 

Sellafield plant report 
demands safety audit 
on hazards in store 








tm 


Wit 


Help line for child 
abuse victims in 
appeal for funds 


By Angelia Johnson 


British Nuclear Fuels has 
been told to improve the 
management and operation 
procedures of its nuclear fuel 
reprocessing plant at Sel- 
lafield. in Cumbria. 

A report published yes- 
terday called for a safety audit 
by the Nuclear Installations 
Inspectorate. 

It has an analysis of in- 
cidents of leaks and contam- 
ination since 1979. The report 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 




approach in respect to B205 
both for maintenance and 
planned investment, without 
considering the longh term. 

That was said to be most 
apparent in the control room 
which had been successively 
adapted so as not to present a 
dear picture of the state of the 
plant to its operators. 

In other respects the con- 
ditions at the B205 plant were 
said to have been subondi- 


savs more than 00 1,avc aurorai- 

K* w^e nrSf M,ed 10 <** requirements of 

production in an unsatisfec- 


duccd by civil power genera- 
tion over 30 years is on the site 
ai Sellafield, much of it in 
liquid form. 

So long as waste remains in 
liquid form and therefore 
dispensable, it presents a haz- 
ard to those who work there, 
and potentially to the public 
or the environment. 

The report says a significant 
difficulty in the management 
of the site is the lack of 
national agreement on the 
means of the disposal in the 
long term of much of the 
highly active waste. 

Bui the investigation fo- 
cuses on the central reprocess- 
ing plant called B205. It is 
said, for practical purposes, to 
be irreplaceable and must 
continue to operate for some 
years. 

Most of the inddents have 
occurred in B20S and its allied 
buildings. 

The spent fuel from power 
stations which arrives at the 
site for reprocessing is of the 
type used in the 11 Magnox 
power stations of the Central 
Electricity Generating Board 
and the South of Scotland 
Electricity Board. 

The report says even if the 
Magnox nuclear power sta- 
tions were closed tomorrow 
the spent fuel currently held at 
the power stations or in store 
at Sellafield would require 
about ten yearn for its 
reprocessing at the present 
rate. 

But the plant for reprocess- 
ing Magnox fuel is between 20 
and 30 years old. 

The report says the recent 
priorities of the company on 
introducing new plant has 
reduced the attention paid to 
the levels of capital renewal, 
management and skilled la- 
bour in the potentially hazard- 
ous older parts of the plant 

British Nuclear Fuels Is 
criticized for a short-term 


tory manner. 

The consequence of the 
shortcomings was that both 
management and workers had 
difficulty in dealing with an 
accumulation of minor prob- 
lems without the ability to 
deal with longer term ob- 
stacles. 

The report added that with 
one or two exceptions, the 
thoroughgoing and positive 
dedication to every aspect that 
is characteristic of the best 
parts of the chemical industry 
had yet to be achieved. 

While site management was 
conscious of the difficulties 
and the need for care, it did 
not appear to be in complete 
control. 

The effectiveness or safety 
advisory committees on the 
site was also criticized. 

Despite recommendations 
to the company by the Health 
and Safety Executive in 1981, 
the report said, the correct 
balance was yet to be achieved 
between the authoritative ad- 
visory role of the safety 
committees and the essential 
responsibility of line manage- 
ment for the safety of the 
operations under their con- 
trol 

In such circumstances, 
management tended to react 
rather than to lead and to 
shelter behind committee 
opinions and execution of 
paper procedures rather than 
take clear management de- 
cisions on real problems. 

Examination of the working 
of a system called clearance 
certificates for work in the 
plant disclosed an excessive 
use of the system, dogging 
operations. 

There remained a shortage 
of dear and detailed instruc- 
tion how the work itself was to 
be done. 

The site licence required the 
production of safety cases for 


new plant and regularly up- 
date safety assessments for 
existing plants. 

The safety case was de- 
scribed as fundamental to 
proper safety management It 
was the source from which 
plant operating rules, mainte- 
nance schedules and 
emergccay plans should flow. 

The report said many of the 
plants audited at Sellafield 
were newer than B205, and in 
general were in a more 
satisfactory condition, though 
the need for better working 
instructiona held good for 
those as well. 

Deficiencies were detected 1 
that could lead to hazards and, 1 
in some limited circum- 
stances, to the public 

The inspectors were not 
satisfied, for instance, about 
the practice of transfers be- 
tween shifts and between 
departments. 

The report said Sellafield had 
been going through a period of 
huge and beneficial invest- 
ment, much of which was 
complete, and standards were 
improving. 

Safety Audit ofBNFL Sellafield 
1986. volumes 1 and 2 (Health 
and Safely Excctive, Nuclear 
Installations Inspectorate: £7 
and £10). 













Mr John OUett, aged 26, a former pit worker, of Thomiey, Co Durham, restoring banners 
cameo by branches of the National Union of Mineworkers since the nineteenth cent ury and 
traditionally of silk, depicting anything from political leaders to religions scenes. 


Miss Esther Rantzen, the 
television personality, ap- 
pealed yesterday for more 
money to keep Childline, a 
free national telephone service 
for children in danger, open to 
receive up to 500 calls a day. 

The charity has been in- 
undated with telephone calls 
from abused children, aged 
from six, and has estimated 
that it will cost £1.9 million a 
year to run the service. At 
present it has enough money 
to last until February. 

Miss Rantzen, chairman of 
Childline, which was launched 
last October, said in London 
yesterday; “These children 
have never spoken to anyone 
of their agony before. We must 
keep these lines open.” 

She said that the largest 
category of calls tiandkH by 
trained counsellors was from 
children who had been sex- 
ually abused, an estimated 
1,336. A further 637 said they 
had suffered physical vi- 
olence, 21 i complained of 
being bullied and 596 of 
parental problems. 

After three evenings and an 
afternoon spent manning one 
of 10 telephone lines at the 
charity's headquarters in 
Queen Victoria Street, central 
London, Miss Rantzen said: 
“These children let you into 
their hearts. 1 am now walking 
around, as we all are, with the 


harrowing tales they have told 
me in my head.” 

One boy rang from a tele- 
phone in a local shop late at 
night because he was fright- 
ened to go home after being 
threatened with a knife by his 
drunken father. Eventually he 
was persuaded to allow a local 
doctor to become involved. 

A girl telephoned because 
she was worried that the next 
day she was to become forc- 
ibly involved in pornographic 
photography. She talked about 

the abuse she regularly suf- 
fered, but refused to give 
details of herself or her family. 

Miss Rantzen said that 
about 90 per cent of children 
who telephoned did so anony- 
mously. But many telephoned 
several limes before they were 
able to confide in a counsellor. 

London and the Home 
Counties have recorded $88 
cases so far. followed by 
southern England with 372, 
Midlands 377, East Anglia 
124. North 806. west Scotland 
229, Wales 112 and Northern 
Ireland 58. 

Miss Rantzen said it cost 
£65,000 a year to keep one 
telephone line open. Individ- 
ual donations of£! would pay 
for the cost of a 10-minute 
call Companies are also being 
canvassed for support. 

Donations should be sent to 
Childline, Freepost 1111. 
London EC4B 4BB. 


Outdated equipment 
and secrecy blamed 


By Ian Smith 


The report on Sellafield was 
last night welcomed by Mr Bin 
Maxwell secretary of the joint 
shop stewards committee, 
which represents more than 
7,000 workers at the plant 

The report held no sur- 
prises, Mr Maxwell said. It 
merely pinpointed die prob- 
lems which both the workers 
and the management were 
aware of and were dealing 
with. 

Outdated equipment at the 
plant still existed only because 
of unwillingness by successive 
Labour and Conservative gov- 
ernments to pour millions of 
pounds into the provision of 
new equipment 

To update the plant Mr 
Maxwell said, would cost sev- 
eral miHi ons of pounds, but 
that was only peanuts to a 
company which was mak i n g 
high profits. 

Of the five inddents at the 
plant this year the Health and 
Safety Executive said only one 
was potentially serious. 

Mr Maxwell spoke of 
workers' reassnranos that 
warning systems stalled 
some years previously had 
proved capable of meeting the 
emergency. 

•‘Because of undue secrecy 
the public have been bom- 
barded by wild and hysterical 
claims made by opponents trf 
nuclear energy,” Mr Maxwell 

said. .. 

■‘What they must realize is 
that as someone who has 
worked at the plant for 
years and who cans deeply 
about his wife, children and 
grandchildren, there is no way 
ifiat I or fellow workers wortd 
not be shouting from the 
rooftops if something was 
seriously wrong- 


Mr Maxwell said that since 
the mid-1970s onion officials 
had been pressing for a reduc- 
tion in the radioactive expo- 
sure deemed safe be reduced 
from five iems to 0.5 rems as 
advised by the International 
Medical Council 

That safety limit had now 
been readied. Liquid dis- 
charge had also dropped by 
300 per cent since 1975. “We 
are not satisfied yet because 
we realize we have to be whiter 
than white hot that dream is , 
fast becoming realization.” 

Mr BID Minto, chairman of 
the Sellafield Local Liaison 
Committee, an environmental 
watchdog group set up to 
monitor the nuclear plant, said 
a special meeting would be 
called to discuss the Health 
and Safety Executive findings 
in either late Jan nary or early 
February. 

“The report comes as no 
great surprise. Work has al- 
ready started to put right those 
thing s hi ghligh ted in this in- 
vestigation, in particular the 
Magnox plant which they 
widely say is 20 or 30 years out 
of date. 

“The experts have told ns 
that if money is spent now on 
modern equipment then the 
plant have a safe and useful 
life for the next decade.” 

Mr Minto was pleased that 
management had accepted the 
report’s criticisms and taken 
steps to implement its recom- 
mendations. 

He issued a warning, how- 
ever, that his committee would 
be keeping a watch on the 
implementation of the recom- 
mendations that more staff be 
taken on and better training be 
provided. 


70 have harmful 
meningitis strain 



Initial results from a huge 

meningitis SCI ^ n,11 f h “ eJ S^ 
in Gloucestershire show mat 
70 people are carrying the new 
erram of the brain disease 

X-hh 3S killed 

in the area (-Itil Sherman 

writes). 

Last month rese ^! ( l l!f e 

SiSSS 

Sc Sneh n ou£ e s£,ud, 
jEEe the rate of meningitis is 
now 14 times the national 

average. ^ swabbing 

S hli 700 people carried a 
sbow 'ha 70fl PeoP. iis ^ 

S’Sir* w **“ 6,3 

strain 


Dr James Stuart, senior 
registrar in community medi- 
cine for Gloucester Health 
Authority said yesterday that 
the overall number of carri- 
ers — 11 per cent of the 
population — matched 
national figures and were 
quite normal. It did not mean 
ihese people would go on to 
develop the disease. 

“Many people cany the 
disease without contracting it 
or passing it on and they may 
only carry it for a few days, 
weeks or months,” Dr Stuart 
said. 

He could not say whether 
the extent of B15 strain was 
normal as no national studies 
had been done on this strain. 


j.RENAiftjl “This is going to be a difficult 
[ 6uni> '”] choice, the new Renault 9 has 
I ab e t te r ' - 1 a range of six models.” 

“The handling on this new 
Renault must be really good — it has 
independent fr on t and rear suspension. 
Not all the competition can say that.” 

“The Turbo version has 115 bhp 
and does 0—62 mph in 8.5 seconds, 
that'll take some beating” 

“Think of the time and trouble I'll 


save with major servicing needed only 
every 30,000 miles.” 

“Looks like those powerful single 
beam, quartz halogen headlights to me.” 

“At 56 mph they say the new 
Renault 9 GTL does 55.4*mpg.” 

“That's nothing, at that speed 
the diesel version gives you 64J2*mpg” 

“ Adjustable head restraints, 
carpeted boot, sound system, you 
name it, it’s in the new Renault 9.” 


“Talk about trim, in this spanking 
new 1987 model they Ve used new 
materials, new colours and even the 
safety belts match.” 

“I’ve looked inside, I’ve looked 
underneath and I've looked at the 
finish. And I've only got one question 
to ask — where can I test drive one?” 


“The overall styling is f •• ' - . 
incredibly dynamic and these i Renault 
new bumpers with integral i • ~ " 

spoilers just about wrap it up” f~ 


THE NEW RENAULT 9 FROM £5£25 


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ith a patriotic 


Everyone w 

will enjoy this. 

The world’s leading international 

airport group is not on the other side 

of the Atlantic. 

Nor on the other side ot the 
Channel. 

It’s right on your doorstep. 
Namely, BAA pic. Formerly, the 
British Airports Authority. 

Although you may not have heard 
our new name before, you’ll certainly 
have come across our runways. 

We own and operate all seven 

of the airports ■HViffKillH 
shown here. ^SSSSE^S 

Between them, BSSSSj^S 
they account for JSSSSSSSS 
75% of all UK air 
passenger traffic 

and 85% of all air HUMangM 
cargo. 

In the last 12 months, that came 
to 54 million people. 43 million of 
them on international flights. 

Which, as you can see, is more 
than twice as many as number two. 
(Or should wc say numero deux?) 

Naturally, with airports as busy as 
ours, it’s not just planes that come 
flying in. 

Over the past 21 years, our annual 
operating profits have shown a 
healthy rate of climb. With half our 

coming from 
commercial activities such as duty 
free and other trading concessions. 
Which makes a substanHsI 




revenue now 


The worlds ^^ InKnaaonalajrport grou & 


ISSUED BY COUNTY LIMITED ON BEHALF OF HM GOVERNMENT AND J HENRY SCHRQQER "WAGG 8c CO LIMITED ON BEHALF OF BAA P ! c 

! ' ... . -v 








THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


HOME NEWS 


7 


Environment lobby 
accused of halting 
aviation progress 


By Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent 


The Government was yes- 
terday accused of “playing to 
the gallery” by making short- 
term decisions aimed at 
pacifying environmental pres- 
sure groups which could se- 
verely damage the long-term 
future of British aviation and 
the on veiling public. 

Airports capacity in the 
South-east will be filled by the 
end of the century, yet min- 
isters ^ refuse to “grasp the 
nettle” of planning for more 
noways because it is a long- 
term problem which they can 
hand on to future ministers, 
according to the Air Transport 
Users Committee. 

The committee, set up by 
the Civil Aviation Authority 
to represent the views of the 
travelling public, wants a long- 
term air transport policy 
which would extend beyond 
the lifetime of any individual 
government. 

“Civil aviation is not an 
ordinary industry subject to 
the forces of the market 
place ” the committee’s chair- 
man. Mr John Cox, said. 

"Government plays a major 
role. Unfortunately, govern- 
ments of both parties have 
denied that role the im- 
portance it deserves. There 
has been too much playing to 
the gallery for short-term 
political considerations and a 
lack of long-term decision 
making. 


“They take far too much 
notice of the so-called en- 
vironmentalists because they 
make a great deal of noise, arc 
articulate and are very eff- 
ective in lobbying ministers. 
The Government takes notice 
of those who shout loudest” 
He gave several examples of 
short-term decisions which 
caused more problems in the 
longterm: 

• The ending of the Heatb- 
row-Gatwick helicopter link 
which both airlines anrf trav- 
ellers regarded as vital but 
which was scrapped because 
of complaints about its noise. 

• An analysis of competition 
in civil aviation generally 
which was finally dealt with as 
simply a battle between Brit- 
ish Airways and British 
Caledonian. 

• Maintaining Prestwick as a 
Scottish international gateway 
rather than developing an 
international hub airport 
which would have been far 
more effective in keeping 
Scottish air services. 

• Decisions not to build a 
second runway at Gaiwick or 
at Slansted when there is clear 
evidence that such a runway 
will be needed shortly. 

• A delay in the completion 
of Gatwick's second passenger 
terminal which is expected to 
cause huge delays and chaos to 
holidaymakers next summer. 


The committee also at- 
tacked airlines for failing to 
provide information which 
would enable a proper debate 
to be held on European air 
fares. 

“We as consumers must 
have better access to this 
information," Mr Cox said. 
'“This is something govern- 
ment could facilitate. We are 
no longer prepared to tolerate 
the smokescreen put up by 
some airlines in Europe that is 
simply designed to cover up 
their inefficient use of man- 
power and resources for which 
wc travellers pay.” 

The committee is also 
continuing to press for the 
early introduction of smoke 
hoods on all passenger aircraft 
which could be worn in the 
event of a fire and which, it is 
claimed, would have saved 
many lives in the recent 
Manchester airport disaster. 

Fun her research work, 
probably involving members 
of the Armed Forces is now 
planned ac Oxford University 
lo refine the proposals -for 
smoke hoods. A decision is 
expected by the Gvil Aviation 
Authority next year. 

But there is still concern 
among experts that the smoke 
hoods could cause more prob- 
lems as people struggle to put 
them on and impede others 
trying to escape. 


Police told that 
race is a priority 

By Peter Evans, Home Affaire Correspondent 


Police forces should make 
dear to ethnic minorities that 
tackling racial incidents is a 
priority, the Government said 
yesterday. 

In reply to a House of 
Commons report on racially 
motivated violence, the 
Government said it is to carry 
■out a study of the incidence of 
racial violence in 1987 and 
research the response of police 
and other agencies lo it 

The Commons home affaire 
committee’s recommendation 
that police should press 
charges against attackers, 
rather than rely on private 
prosecutions by the victims, is 
being discussed with the 
crown prosecution service and 
the Association of Chief Pol- 
ice Officers. 

An inter-departmental 
working group, reporting to 
the Ministerial Group on 
Crime Prevention, has called 
for more police action to 
tackle racial attacks. 

National statistics showing 
the number of racial attacks 
are not available but the 
Runnymede Trust, a 


campaigning pressure group, 
estimates there are 70,000 
incidents a year. 

The Government welcomed 
the home affaire committee's 
report and said that, in spite of 
initiatives already taken, there 
was “no room for complac- 
ency”. 

The reply said: “Where one 
community lives in fear of 
abuse or attack by members erf 
another, a wedge is driven 
between them. 

“To prevent continuing 
damag e to community rela- 
tions, the Government be- 
lieves it is important that 
visible and vigorous action is 
taken to combat racial attacks 
and harassment 

“It is vital to secure the 
confidence of the ethnic 
minorities in the institutions 
of society and to signal dearly 
to those who would perpetrate 
such behaviour that their ac- 
tions will not be tolerated. 

“The long-term effects on 
our society of an undercurrent 
of racial intolerance and vi- 
olence must not be under- 
estimated,” the government 
reply said. 


Protection for Civil 
Servants criticized 

By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter ’ 


The chairmen of Commons 
select committees are to pro- 
duce a “robust” report 
highlighting their opposition 
to government plans to in- 
struct Civil Servants not to 
answer questions about their 
conduct. 

The mam thrust of the 
report is understood to have 
been agreed unanimously at a 
private meeting of the liaison 
committee of chairmen yes- 
terday, and the final version 
will be published as soon as 
possible. 

The report will reject any 
attempt to curb the powers or 
select committees, and argue 
that the Government’s pro- 
posed instructions would in 
some instances make their 
work impossible. 

The report will concentrate 
on the practical implications 
of the instructions, but it is 
supported by another report 
published by the Treasury and 


Gvil Service Committee ear- 
lier this week which outlined 
the constitutional reasons why 
select committees had the 
power to demand what an- 
swers they wanted. 

The Government tagged its 
proposals on to the end of its 
reply to the defence com- 
mittee’s investigation into the 
Westland affair, during which 
MPs unsuccessfully sought to 
question senior Gvil Servants 
at the heart of the controversy. 

The chairmen believe this 
move was ill-considered and 
motivated more by pique than 
common sense, and that the 
Government will have to back 
down. 

Mr John Biffen, Leader bf 
the House, has promised that 
the instructions will not be 
formally issued until both the 
Liaison and Treasury and 
Civil Service committees have 
been consulted. 






S 



s- 

* Closing down sale 
at Jermyn Streets 
Inlernafionally 
renowned 
jewellers' shop. 
All slock including 
mjny onginal 
designs al 
Halt Price 


L 

E 


GRIMA 

80 IERMYN STREET 
LONDON SW1 

ssESfsasMaBfe 


Doctor 

‘rejected 

patient’ 

A heroin addict was refused 
treatment by a Harley Street 
psychiatrist when she lost her 
job, a disciplinary hearing was 
told yesterday. 

Dr Ann Dally, aged 60, 
stopped helping the woman 
after she ran up a bill for more 
than £200, the General Medi- 
cal Council committee was 
told. 

The former hospital tele- 
phonist, identified only as 
Miss B, said: “1 was not 
formally discharged. She just 
said don’t come unless you 
have the money to pay me.” 

Miss B said Dr Dally 
stopped treating her soon after 
she lost her job in April last 
year. It was only after Miss B 
went to a detoxification unit 
that she beat her addiction, 
the council's professional con- 
duct committee was told. 

Miss B, aged 28. from 
Buckinghamshire, said Dr 
Dally was “renowned” for not 
referring her patients to drying 
out centres. 

The committee was tokl 
Miss B and her boy friend 
visited Dr Dally for two and a 
half years al her surgery in 
Devonshire Place, Maiyle- 
bone, central London. She 
charged the couple £45 per 
consultation. She added: “1 
only ever spent five or 10 
minutes with Dr Dally and I 
was never in london for more 
than half an hour”. 

Dr Dally denies two charges 
of serious professional mis- 
conduct by irresponsibly 
prescribing the heroin sub- 
stitute methadone and not 
properly checking on the back- 
ground of one other patients. 

The hearing continues. 

Call to license 
crossbows to 
stop rustlers 

The Fanners' Union of 
Wales yesterday called for 
crossbows to be licensed in an 
attempt to stop sheep rustlers. 

Mr Brian Edwards, the Fuw 
Gwent branch secretary, said 
crossbows are used because 
they are silent and deadly. He 
said thefts often go undetected 
for long periods as rustlers 
take only a few sheep from 
each farm. 

A private member's Bill was 
unveiled in Parliament this 
week lo control the sale of 
crossbows, but Mr Edwards 
said they should also be 
licensed so owners could be 
traced. 

Hotel is sold 
for £2.6m 

Ladbroke’s have bought the 
54-bedroom Fel bridge Hotel 
at East Grinstead, west Sus- 
sex, for £16 million. 

Proposals for the hotel, 
which began as tearooms in 
1935 and was rebuilt after a 
fire in 1981, include adding 20 
bedrooms and conference and 
training facilities. 

Slim vehicle 

A slimline fire engine cost- 
ing £38,000 has been delivered 
to Gloucestershire Fire Bri- 
gade for use in the county’s 
narrow lanes. 


CHARITY 

COMMISSION 

The JefenRatson Bequest 
m connection with die 
Royal Academy of Music 

The Oram* Cowwawwrs bare 
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Cophs can be obtained from them M 

Sl Altos's Hurt, 57/M 
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(ret 31 M 07 -A 1 -UV 



Dr Fiona Vincent with a lOin refracting telescope built in 1871 (Photograph: Arthur Fc 


Starry show will 
attract the crowds 


By Kenneth Gosling 


A shower of shooting stars 
this weekend is bound to 
attract an interested crowd to 
Britain's only full-time public 
observatory at Dundee. 

It will be nothing new to Dr 
Fiona Vincent, city astrono- 
mer for the past four years, 
who has been gratified to note 
the growing numbers of vis- 
itors to the Mills Observatory 
at Balgay Park, which was 
given to Dundee in 1889 by Mr 
John Mills, an amateur 
astronomer. 

Halley’s Comet had some- 
thing to do with increasing the 
popularity of the subject - in 
spite of poor conditions 800 


visitors managed to see it. But 
Dr Vincent is rather glad 
things are back to normal, as 
the whole show is ran by 
herself and one assistant. She 
admits that Halley's Comet 
put rather a strain on. the 
system. 

A measure of the observ- 
atory’s continuing popularity 
is shown by the fact that only 
five eights are left in March 
for party visits. 

Baring the winter 100 peo- 
ple can be found viewing on a 
dear night through various 
telescopes available to them. 

The astronomy society has 
50 members. 


Dinosaur helps to 
win museum cash 


The dinosaur found itself in 
the middle of a sophisticated 
“hard sell” marketing cam- 
paign at the Natural History 
Museum in London yesterday 
(Kenneth Gosling writes). 

Museum officials called in 
newspapers and advertising 
agencies to launch a “world 
first” in boosting its services 
and trying to dose the finan- 
cial gaps which threaten it 
through to 1991. 

As school parties wound 
their way among the glass 
cases, a plan to issue two 
million passports next year, 
coinciding with the introduc- 
tion of museum charges on 
April I, was unveiled as a new 


initiative to generate more 
fluids. 

Every visitor, whether pay- 
ing or not. will be given a 
passport, each containing spe- 
cial offers, discounts and com- 
petitions; news about current 
and forthcoming events; a 
mini-map; suggestions for 
activities, and. of course, 
advertising. 

From next April admission 
will continue to be free be- 
tween 4.30 and 6pm as well as 
to school parties and educa- 
tional institutions. 

Everyone else will pay £2 a 
head, half price for pensioners 
and “non-party" children. 


Gold rush 
fear after 
court’s 
decision 

Irish archaeologists fear a 
“gold rush” by metal detector 
enthusiasts after a High Court 
“finder’s keepers" ruling 
which could possibly add 
Ir£5.5 million to the bank 
balance of a wealthy farmer. 

Thai is the value the judge 

put on the Derrynaflan hoard, 

unearthed in February 1980 at 
Littleton bog in Tipperary by 
Mr Michael Webb, aged 58, 
and his son Michael, aged 22, 
as they prospected near a fifth 
century Christian ruin with a 
metal detector. 

Mr Webb refused a reward 
of lr£ 10,000 and took legal 
action for repossession of a 
complete ninth century altar 
set, tbe centrepiece of which is 
the jewel-studded gold and 
silver Derrynaflan chalice, re- 
stored for lr£28,000 by the 
British Museum. He won, and 
can keep the treasure or be 
paid the value. 

Although the Irish National 
Museum has lodged an appeal 
to the Supreme Court, its 
director. Dr Brendan O'Rior- 
dan. and other archaeologists 
arc clearly worried at the gold 
rush prospect. 

He has said that he would 
have preferred the hoard to 
have remained underground 
for another 100 years, rather 
than have it found with a 
metal detector. 

He fears there will be a mass 
plundering of monastic sites 
throughout the republic and is 
worried that the High Court 
ruling could lead to hundreds 
of litigation cases for objects 
previously found and handed 
over to the museum. 

After the High Court ruling. 
Dr O'Riordan said he felt 
confident that the Supreme 
Court would lake another 
view. 

He disclosed that the mu- 
seum had originally offered 
lr£200.000 to the Webbs in 
compensation, but this was 
overturned by the govern- 
ment, and reduced to 
Ir£l0,000. 



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8 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY iDECEMBER 12 1986. 


WORLD SUMMARY 


Guerrillas ‘kill 

1,000 tribesmen’ 

Pfcafca — Bangladeshi Gowraneut officials chiwd here 
y^eriay that at least 1,000 people had been kflkd since 
1975 by tribal guerrillas fighting fin- secession In the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts redos (Ahmed Fazl writes). 

A mnesty International had accused the Government of 
having violated human rights in the Hflf* daring its 
campaign to contain the war waged fry the outla we d ShaHti 
Bahhii (peace force) guerrillas. 

The Governmec' said that die victims included 43 
tribesmen shot by goerriDas for haring allegedly collabo- 
rated with the security forces. It also claimed that 500 Ben- 
gali Muslim settlers had been killed in ethnic dashes with 
Buddhist tribesmen between 1975 and 1981. It gave no 
figures for guerrillas or troops killed ia the fighting. 

An estimated 15,000 regular soldiers and paramilitary 
bonier gawds are deployed in the Hills to fight the 
guerrillas, who are demanding the eqnlaon of Bengali 
settlers and a separate homeland for the 500,000 Chakras 
and Manna tribesmen. 

Laureate’s peace call 

Oslo (Reuter) — The winner of the 1986 Nobel peace prize, 
the Romanian-born Jewish anther and human rights 
campaigner Elie Wiesd, yesterday called for bettor relations 
between Israel and its Arab neighbours. 

“I would like to see this people, my people, aUe to estab- 
lish the foundation for a constructive relationship with aD its 
Arab neighbours, as it has done with Egypt We most exert 
pressure on all those In power to come to terms,” he said in a 
Nobel lecture at Oslo University. 

Mr Wiese!, aged 58, a survivor of Hitler’s concentration 
camps, was presented with the Nobel Peace Prize on 
Wednesday. 

Falklands Israeli air 
permits attack 


South African censorship 

Newspapers faced with 
blanket of silence 
under Pretoria’s rules 


French prote 


/TO S3 




new 


Madrid — Spanish fish- 
ing fleets are expected to be 
given 35 licences to operate 
in the fishing conservation 
zone around the Falkland 
Islands for the season 
beginning in February 
(Rfciard Wigg writes). 
Among those applying has 
been the fleet belonging to 
the Anamer Co-operative 
based on Vigo, hi Galicia, 
northwestern Spain: it is 
one of the best equipped for 
c a t chi ng squid. 

The 150-mfle conserva- 
tion zone was announced on 
October 29, and Spain 
sides with Argentina in the 
sovereignty dispute. 


Beirut — Israeli Air 
Force jets yesterday at- 
tacked Palestinian guer- 
rilla bases in Syrian- 
controlled te r ri tory in nor- 
thern Lebanon (Juan Car- 
los Gamnrio writes). Re- 
ports from the port of 
Tripoli said that four peo- 
ple were killed and six 
wounded daring the raid, 
near the Palestinian refu- 
gee camp of Naher al- 
Bared. 

Israeli military anthori- • 
ties in Tel Aviv claimed ■ 
that outposts of the Fatah 
Revolutionary Council of 
the notorious Abu Nidal 
were among the targets hit 


South Africa's harsh 
press controls, announced yes- 
terday in the form of a 
proclamation signed fay Presi- 
dent Botha in the Government 
Gazette ; impose a sweeping 
form of pre-publication cen- 
sorship which has never pre- 
viously been resorted to in this 
country. 

President Botha's procla- 
mation was issued under the 
Public Safety Act of 1953, the 
law which empowers him to 
declare a state of emergency. It 
incorporates and extends, 
greatly the emergency press 
regulations already in force in 
one form or another since 
June 12. 

The new measures, which 
apply to both local and foreign 
journalists based here, list a 
wide range of “subversive 
statements” and anti-govern- 
ment activity which cannot be 
written about unless the re- 
ports have been cleared in 
advance by government off- 
icials. 

Although statements in Par- 
liament will still be privileged, 
the regulations will for the first 
time restrict the reporting of 
public court proceedings in 
which final judgement has not 
yet been given. 

Once judgement has been 
given, h will be possible to 
report such evidence. Any 
other news or comment on the 
arrest and detention of emer- 
gency de taine es will be sub- 
jected to official clearance 
before it can be published. 

The Commissioner of Pol- 
ice and the Minister of Home 
Aflairs are empowered to seize 
publications which cont ai n 
prohibited material, and to 
dose down for three months 
at a time any newspaper or 
periodical which persists in 
publishing material after hav- 
ing been warned. 


from Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 
The Government’s Bureau 
for Information is to set up an 
office, manned 24 horns a day, 
to w hich journalists will be 
expected to submit, by telex, 
articles or parts of articles 
containing matter foiling with- 
in the ambit of the new 
censorship rules. The onus 
will be on the journalist to 
Observe this procedure. 

Newspapers are also prohib- 
ited from leaving blank spaces 
to indicate that textual or 


Among the “subversive 
statements" which it will bean 
offence to publish without 
authorization are those “cal- 
culated to have the effect erf] 
inciting or encouraging mem- 
bers efthe public "to take part 
in: 

• any unlawful 
concourse or procession 
any number of persons”; 

• a physical attack on security 
force members, local autb- 

(for instance, 


The 


on 


blank 


regulation 

spaces in news, _ 
magazines reads in full: “No 
person shall pubKsfa any 
publication ha which any Mask 
space or any obliteration or 
deletion of part of the text of a 
report or of a photograph or 
part OT a photograph appears, 
if that blank space, oblitera- 
tion or deletion, as may appear 


township councillors) 
and their 

• any form of boycott (for 
instance, of white-owned 
shops, particular products, 
schools), civil disobedience 
(fcg v refusing to pay rents), 
stayaways from work or illegal 


sign or symbol in (hat publica- 
tion or from the particular 
context in winch the Wank 
space, obliteration or deletion 
appears, is intended to be 
understood as a reference to 
the effect of a provision of 
these regulations." 


material 1ms had 
to be deleted at the request of 
the censors. It appears, how- 
ever, that they ww be allowed 
to carry statements advising 
readers that copy has been 
censored. 

There is no indication of 
how long it will take for an 
article to be cleared, banned or 
amended. A journalist who 
publishes restricted or deleted 
matter without authority wifi 
be liable to a fine of 20,000 
rand (£6,250) or 10 years in 
prison, or imprisonment with- 
out the option of a fine. 


• the activities of any “alter- 
native structure", a reference 
to the “people’s courts" and 
grass-roots “civic associa- 
tions” which have sprung up 
in black townships across the 
country in opposition to 
government-created bodies 
such as township councils; 

• agitation against compul- 
sory military service. 

All reporting of these activ- 
ities will also be subject to 
official clearance. For exam- 
ple, it will be an offence to 
publish details of the time and 
place of unlawful gatherings or 
to report on the effectiveness 
of boycotts, work stayaways 
and the like. 

Present regulations prohib- 
iting journalists from being 
“on the scene, or at a place 
within sight, of any unrest, 
restricted gathering or security 
force action", iff from report- 
ing security force action, with- 
out official per mission are 
included in the new measures. 



Concession on Sikhs Publish — and be banned 


Delhi — Britain 

agreed dining two days of 
disenssioos wnh tbe Indian 
Government to look at the 
possibility of rhangw^ 

British laws to crack down 
on Sikhs who are encourag* 
ing terrorist activities in 
India (Michael Handyn 
writes). 

A joint statement makes 
dear that the British team 
at the Delhi talks, led by 
Mr Timothy Renton, right. 

Minister of State at the 
Foreign Office, went a 
long way towards meeting 
some of the objections of tbe TnHfanre to what they see as 
“leniepcy" in Britain towards people advocating the 
establishment of Khalistan as a separate Sikh state. But 
such c h a n ges are likely to meet Ejections from a strong 



From Out Own Correspondent 


by the erosion of freedom of speech. 


Junta pair 
called 

Athens - A parliament- 
ary committee has decided 
to summon two jailed 
Greek junta Ieaders,--Cato- 
nel George Fapadoponlos 
and Brigadier Dimitris 
Ioann ides to testify in an 
Investigation into the 1974 
Greek-backed coup on Cy- 
prus (A Correspondent 
writes). 

The 30-member panel 
has interviewed 47 officials 
since it was Conned in 
February. 


Veteran 

deported 

Bangkok —An American 
boo of the Vietnam war, 
forma* Colonel James 
“Bo" Gritz, was deported 
from Thailand for the sec- 
ond time in three weeks 
(Neil KeDy writes). 

Mr Gritz, who is persona 
non grata because of secret 
missions into Laos to look 
for American prisoners, 
was twice caught with a 
false passport. The first 
time be was sent to Singa- 
pore and then Hong Kong. 


South African editors and 
journalists, and foreign corres- 
pondents based here, are stiff 
trying to digest the full im- 
plications of the sweeping new 
press controls imposed yes- 
terday, which are for in excess 
of anything they have pre- 
viously experienced. 

“We will publish as much as 
we can, but with due 
prudence,” Mr Anthony 
Heard, editor of the Cape 
Times, said. 

“We must not take this 
lying down. I think there could 
still be room for challenging 
the regulations in the courts. 
We are still not quite in the 
Cambodia league, though we 
have dearly crossed a water- 
shed." 

Previous regulations, par* 
ticulariy those restricting the 
repenting of “subversive state- 
ments”, were eroded consid- 
erably by Supreme Court 
judgements which found that 
many of the regulations had 
been so vaguely drafted, and 
were so sweeping and ar- 
bitrary in their scope, as to be 
ultra vires. 

At first glance, tbe revised 
and reinforced regulations 
contained in yesterday’s pro- 
clamation appear to be much 
more carefully and precisely 
worried, and defibenuefy de- 
signed to close tbe loopholes 
discovered by the courts. 

It is going to require some 


highly creative advocacy, and 
sympathetic judges, to get 
round the new controls. 

Pretoria's aim, beyond 
much doubt, is to prevent 
anything except government- 
approved news and opinion 
being published about matters 
covered by the omnibus term 
“unrest” — which includes not 
only actual violence and riots, 
but a wide range of extra- 
parliamentary opposition, 
protest and ri vfl disobedience; 

The previous regulations 
were onerous enough- They 
prohibited all journalists from 
being on the scene of unrest, 
or from reporting the actions 
of the security forces without 
official permission, though it 
is fair to acknowledge that 
they were not enforced to the 
letter in the case of foreign 
journalists, and were always 
more stringent on paper than 
in practice. 

Writing journalists, at least, 
could still report at second 
hand, using their own con- 
tacts, on unrest incidents. 

Reporting of boycotts, stri- 
kes and other forms of protest 
covered fay tbe new regula- 
tions were also not sutyxt to 
any form, of pre-publication 
Vetting, as wifi now be the 
case. 

Bending of the roles became 
common even in the reporting 
of police and army action. Tbe 
government is said to have 


been infuriated by the device 
used by Johannesburg's eve- 
mug newspaper. The Star, of 
printing, pm l the official 
version of police action along- 
side the usually radically dif- 
ferent version given - by 
township residents. 

All such reports will now 
have to be sifted through the 
Bureau of Information. 

This will limit severely any 
uncensored reporting not only 
of unrest but also of the 
activities of organizations like 
the United Democratic Front, 
the broad alliance of grass- 
roots anti-apartheid organ- 
izations. 

Papers like the Weekly 
Mail, started by journalists 
who formerly worked on the 
now defunct Rand Daily Mail, 
and New Nation, which is 
funded by the Catholic church 
and olited by a blade political 
activist, Mr Zwelakhe Sisulu, 
will find it particulariy hard to 
operate as they specialize in 
covering black resistance to 
the government. 

Tbe sheer practicability of 
the censorship machinery is 
also in question. There will 
initially be six telex machines 
in the Burean of Information 
to handle copy that may be 
submitted for clearance by 
both domestic newspapers 
and journalists and the more 
than 100 foreign journalists 
here. 


Vote leaves EEC 
without budget 


Strasbourg (Renter) — The 
European Parliament, in a 
more which effectively leaves 
the EEC without a 1987 
budget, yesterday voted to 
increase spending next year by 
more than its legal margin. 

But M Pierre Pflimlin, 
president of the European 
Pa rliament, has said he will 
not sign what would be an 
illegal budget. 

Tbe vote came after senior 
Enro-MPs and budget minist- 
ers foiled after more than 10 
horns of talks to agree on new 
spending priorities for 1987. 

The Strasbourg Assembly 
was keen for more cash for 
social and regional spending, 
and for research and aid 
programmes now threatened 
by nmaway form expenditure. 

The failure to settle a budget 
forces the EEC, already facing 
a budget shortfall next year of 
nearly $4 bfiffon (about £2.7 
bOUonX on to an emergency 
financing system from Jan- 
uary. 

Mr Homing Cfaristopher- 
sen, the EEC Budget Cohiiuxs- 
sioner, told journalists the 
situation faced by the Commu- 
nity was now “very, very 
serious indeed". 

He said both sides had 
fallen out over a microscopic 
amount in relation to die entire 
budget He said there had been 
a regrettable lack of political 
will to reach an accord. 

• Cap defended: As British 
attempts to find a formula to 
curb tbe excesses of the EECs 
Common Agricultural Policy 
(Cap) contained,, the French 
Ambassador to Britain yes- 


terday came to its defence 
(Andrew McEwan writes). 

M Luc de La Barre de 
Narrtetril said that too much 
importance was being attached 
to a policy that cost the 
equivalent of only 0.6 per cent 
of the gross national product 
of the EEC 

Its problems were those of 
success, he told the French 
Chamber of Commerce. While 
a recent series of articles in 
The Times had presented Cap 
as wholly bad, it was not 
without advantages. 

While admitting that Cap 
cost 70 per cent of the EEC 
budget, he pointed out th at 
Britain’s contribution was only 
18 per cent against 21 permit 
for France and more than 25 
pm- cent for West Germany. 

His remarks came between 
two sessions iff the 12 Agri- 
culture Ministers in Brussels 
seeking cuts in dairy and beef 
production. After foiling to 
agree earlier this week the 
ministers have been called to a 
special weekend session to- 
morrow 

• BRUSSELS: Fears that tbe 
Common Market plans to 
propose a new single rate of 
Value Added Tax (VAT) on 
books and learned journals 
prompted die launch yes- 
terday of an anti-VAT cam- 
paign by the European Book 
Publishers 1 Association (Our 
Correspondent writes). 

In Britain, Ireland and Por- 
tugal books are zero rated for 
VAT. But in other countries 
VAT ranges from 2 per cent In 
Italy to 22 per cent in 
Denmark. 


drag feet 
on Scotch 

From Our Correspondent 
Brussels 

When the Japanese Foreign 
Minister, Mr Tadashi Kur- 
anari, meets Sir Geoffrey 
Howe here today he will have 
disappointing news for the 
Scotch whisky industry. 

According to diplomatic 
sources in ihe European 
Community, the Japanese 
delegation came to Brussels 
this week without any con- 
crete proposals for opening up 
the Japanese liquor market to 
imported spirits. 

The Trade and Industry 
Minister, Mr Hadjime Tam- 
ura. is said to have told the 
Europeans that no legislation 
has yet been drawn up to 
change a tax system that 
discriminates against foreign 
products. 

Although the Japanese 
Cabinet recently gave the go- 
ahead for the Finance Min- 
istry to draw up new 
legislation, Mr Tamura spoke 
of “the long procedures" in- 
volved in changing laws that 
would have a harsh effect on 
local distillers. 

The news wifi be particu- 
larly hard because the £140 
million-a-year spirits export 
trade has taken on an im- 
portance beyond its real 
significance' in the overall 
trade between JaDan and 
Europe. 

It has become a test case for 
the EECs ability to force a 
change in Japanese attitudes 
on imports 


Name of 
the game 
in French 

From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

What is the most popular 
name for a child in France 
today? Marcel? Jeanne? Jean- 
Pierre? Odette? No, those are 
all now definitely passe. 

■ Emiiie and Julien top the 
popularity charts, with Anglo- 
Saxon names such as Kevin 
and Marion gaining ground 
A study of Christian names 
just published by two sociolo- 
gists, shows that names have 
cycles of populrity before go- 
ing ont of {fashion. 

Until the beginning of this 
century, a French child was 
given die name of a parent or 
close relatives, of the saint on 
whose day he was bom, or of 
godparents. Over the past 80 
years, however, the choice has 
been much more varied. 

Among girls, Marie was 
most popular in the early 
years of the century. At the 
outbreak of the First World 
War, Jeanne took over. Then 
came Jeannine or Janine 
(1927-35); Monique (1936- 
43); Danielle (1944-7); Eran- 
coise (1948-50); Martine (19- 
51-8); Brigitte (1959); Sylvie 
(1960-4); Nathalie (1965-72); 
Sandrine (1973 X Stephanie 
( 1975-7); Celine . ( 1 978-80); 
Aurtlie (1 98 1-4); and Emiiie 
since 1985. 

Among boys, Jean was su- 
preme for 25 years (1913-37); 
followed by Michel (1938-55): 
Patrick (1956-8; Philippe (19- 
59-63); Thierry (1964-5); Phi- 
lippe (1966); Christoplie (19- 
67-8); Stephane (1970-5); Se- 
bastien (1976-9); Nicolas (19- 
80-2); and Julien since 1 983. 


Astonishment on Capitol Hill as congressmen investigate the Iran arms scandal 


CIA head reveals Canada connection 


From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

Tbe first week of hearings 
on the Iran affair by tbe House 
ofRepresentatives ends today, 
leaving congressmen aston- 
ished at some of the secret 
testimony and provoking fur- 
ther controversy over the role 
of- the Central Intelligence 
Agency and its director, Mr 
W illiam Casey. 

Committee members said 
afterwards they had learnt that 
tbe scandal involved new 
characters, whom they would 
not identify. They said tha t, 
despite Mr Casey's frequent 
assertions during his five-hour 
testimony that he did not 

know many of the answers, he 

had revealed a Canadian 
connection to the Iran arms 
sales and tbe diversion of 
funds to the Nicaraguan 
Contras. 

The Washington Post said 
yesterday that this involved a 
group of Canadians, who bad 
financed the US arms ship- 
ments to Iran but did not 
receive the money they were 
owed and were threatening in 
October to file a lawsuit to 
expose the clandestine 
operation. 

Mr Casey had reportedly 
learnt about this from a 
former New York legal client, 
who had telephoned him on 
October 7 and told him that 
the arms profits were going to 
Centra] America. He told the 
committee members that this 
was his first inkling that funds 
generated by the arms deal 
were perhaps being diverted 
for another purpose. . 

Mr Gerry Studds, a Mass- 
achusetts Democrat on the 
committee, said there was 


“pretty universal aston- 
ishment” at Mr Casey’s tes- 
timony, and “a lot of open 
mouths in the room”. Another 
member said the puzzle was 
“very for from complete". 
And the chairman of the 
House foreign aflairs commit- 
tee, Mr Dante Fascell, said 
that, when “all the dots are 
linked", it would certainly be 
“extra o r d inary". Meanwhile, 
Mr Adnan Khashoggi, a Saudi 
Arabian arms dealer, has 
admitted that he initiated the 
sale of arms to Iran, but said 
he knew nothing of the Iranian 
payments being used to help 
the Contras. 

He said on television that. 


in an effort to bring peace to 
the Middle East, he wrote to 
Mr Robert McFarlane, then 
the National Security Adviser, 
on July 1 last year, offering to 
put him in contact with 
Iranian moderates. He said 
copies of the letter were sent to 
King Fahd of Saudi Arabia, 
President Mubarak of Egypt 
and King Husain of Jordan. 

He said after the letter was 
sent, Mr Manushir 
Ghorbanifer, an I ranian arms 
dealer, and other Iranians met 
Mr David Kimche, then 
Director-General of die Israeli 
Foreign Ministry, and Israeli 
arms dealers in Hamburg. 
After that meeting, Mr 


Kimche met Mr McFarlane 
and got what the Israelis saw 
as a go-ahead for the sales, he 
said. 

Mr Khashoggi said there 
was no mention at the time of 
the American hostages in 
Lebanon. 

He told ABC Television 
that when the Iranians learnt 
they were dealing with the 
Israelis, Ayatollah Khomeini 
declared: “We deal with the 
Devil for our own objectives.” 

He said two more arms 
shipments followed, with 
funds supplied by financiers in 
f-atiflHn and the Cayman Is- 
lands, which were paid into a 
. Swiss bank account. 


The men digging into the mess 


The various co mmi ttees in- 
vestigating the Iran arms deal 
and diversion of funds to the 
Contras in Nicaragua are: 

• Senate select committee on 

Sffitdl^eiCK chair man, Sen- 
afof David Diirenboger (Rep- 
ublican, Minnesota). It has 
competed a week of closed 
bearings and is issuing 
countrywide subpoenas for 
MOMients. It hw expanded 
its witness list and may soon 

cover all senior officials ou the 

National Security Council ex- 
cept President Reagan and 
Vice-President Bush. Zt has 
oversight responsibilities for 
aOgovenuneiitEBtelUgeiKeop- 
erations at home and abroad. 

• House permanent select 
committee an intelligence: 
chairman, Mr Lee H amil ton 
(Democrat, Indiana). Charged 
with oversight responsibilities 


From Mohsxn AH, Washington 

for all go ver nm ent in teffi g en ce 
operatteis at home and 
abroad. Its closed hearings 
began on Tuesday. 

• Select committees: Leaders 
of tbe House and Senate 
agreed last week to form 
separate Watergate-style com- 
mittees. Tbe committees will 
be created by separate resolu- 
tions meadi chamber immedi- 
ately after the new Congress 
convenes on January 6. The 
Senate panel wifi include six 
Democrats, five Repubticans 
and one non-voting ex officio 
member from each party, tbe 
House panel of nine Demo- 
crats ami six Republicans. 

• House of Representatives 

fo r e ign affair e mnmii rtpe 

chairman, Mr Dante Fascell 
(Democrat, Florida). The com- 
mittee heard testimony in open 
session from Mr George 
Shultz, Secretary of State, and 


Mr Robert McFaribme, former 
National Security Adviser, on 
Monday. Vice- Admiral John 
Poindexter and Lieutenant- 
Colonel Oliver North ap- 
peared before it ou Tuesday, 
but took tbe Fifth Amendment 
and refused to answer ques- 
tions. The committee is also 
seeking a wide range of docu- 
ments concerning the case. 

• Justice Department Laun- 
ched a full-scale criminal in- 
vestigation ou November 26. 
Its investigation is expected to 
aid when an indkpeodeitt 
counsel (prosecutor) is app- 
ointed. 

• Independent inquiry: The 
Justice Department lart week 
asked a three-judge court to 
appoint a counsel and .to 
approve a mandate to investi- 
gate illegalities related to the 
arms sales and the diversion of 


h 


UN debate 
fails to 
cool strife 

From Zoriaoa Pysariwsky 
New York 

The war of words between 
Nicarag u a and Honduras has 
escalated in the United Na- 
, dons Security Council, despite 
efforts by the Sandinista 
Government to avoid a 
confrontation on the ground 
by playing down the Hon- 
duran role in the weekend 
strafing of Nicaraguan targets. 

During the debate on 
Wednesday nigbt each side 
Charged the other with aggres- 
sion and responsibility for the 
recent border clashes. 

Sefiora Nora Estoraa, the 
Nicaraguan representative, ac- 
cused the US of state 
terrorism. 

She said that the Reagan 
Ad m i n istration was see king to 
manipulate Honduras and 
other countries in laying the 
groundwork for a war “of 
major proportions" in the 


.of having completely fob- 
rioted charges that 2,500 
Nicaraguan troops were on 
Honduran territory. • 

Seflor Roberto Martinez, 
the Honduran delegate, vow- 
ed that military action gainst 
Sandinista forces would cease 
only when every Nicaraguan 
soldier had born removed 
from Honduran territory. 

General Vernon Waiters, 
the US Ambassador, de- 
scribed Nicaragua's request 
fora Security Council meeting 
as “an act of astonishing 
duplicity and arrogance". 


Kidnap shadow on 
Basque politics 

From Richard Wigg, Madrid 

businessmen in the Basque 
country have been kidnapped. 
Families have often secretly 
paid the ransom because the 
authorities have not been able 
lo ^^ otec ^ them adequately. 

. *“ e Socialists desire haste, 
above all, m getting a coalition 
government, which the elec- 
™ made inevitable, 
h£^f, groun 1 ?* Bul 1,0 party 
5“ ?t 801 beyond pnffi- 
aary gestures. 

Senor Benegas began neeo- 
tiauons yesiendaywiih 1h£ 

V eft « whJch 

ideologically closest to the 

Ssft ** *■ pany hi 
raaw to persuade is the 

Nationalist Party 

week2; J h i c !u decid * at a 
'wekend gathering of local 

££ Whelher tO°S 

into opposition & 

c* _ *■ _ 


Senor Jos6 Benegas, the 
Socialist leader in the Basque 
country, yesterday began ne- 
gotiations to form a new gov- 
ernment after last month’s 
general * election against the 
grim background ofa suspect- 
ed Eia kidnapping. 

Police were searching for 
Senor Jaime Caballero, a pol- 
itically well-connected San 
Sebastian industrialist, who 
they suspect was seized on 
Wednesday fay the armed sep- 
aratist organization while go- 
ing to one of two nearby paper 
factories owned by his family. 

So for Eta has not claimed 
responsibility, but the Madrid 
Government representative in 
tbe autonomous region said 
he believed the kidnapping 
was due to Eta’s need for 
funds as well as the desire to 
“intervene” in *Hp 


uuu» aa weu as me desire to ■■ " u «ner to go 

‘intervene” in theloVeri “*> ?PPOsition B 

ment-forming process. «negas has only nil- 

.SSft.’*! Unitv* 


who needs 
wn other par- 


amenaoi me Basque Nation- KtS • ,gni 3,80 to 

alist Party, which has ruled Proposing with- 

until now, and his fotber fo«« ° f ^ Spanish 

pronuneni local politician and 

J^^nSh5^ tlry Gov - 1(Xk>dd 

eraor of Sun Sebastian and his HS s S vm 6 sentences for 
™ fe “ d J°. n , 1 « October and m maad- 

^9* where MSdriSE Unt l prison outside 
£fn^ U faSi! 0ry “ Sltuaied is rafil d « ave fae ? un what they 

after businessmen have^S h° ur J y 

“revoluUoiS>to® “* aDed ^ de’SSSi^g^r 
^During the pas, 10 years 39 


v i 








?“V> 
i i l 




' . 2 
i - k 



U 








Aberdeen 

Abergavenny 

Alnwick 

Alresford 

Alvechurch 

Ainersham 

Aylesbury 

Babbitry 

Banstead 

Barking 

Barkingside 

Bamet 

Barnsley 

Barnstaple 

Bath 

Beaconsfieia 

Bearsted 

Bedford 

Berkhampsted 

gjdeford 

Birmingham 

Bishops Stortfora 

Blairgowrie 
Bletchley 
Bognor Regis 
Boreham Wood 
Boston 

Bournemouth 

^Br acknell __ 

A fall range 


Bradford on Avon 

BramhaQ 

Bramley 

Brandon 

Bridgwater 

Brighton 

Bristol 

Bromsgrove 

Budleigh Salterton 

Bungay 

Burgess Hill 

Burnham (Bucks) 

Bury St Edmunds 

Buxton 

Camberley 

Cambridge 

Canterbury 

Canvey 

Cardiff 

Chard 

Chesham 

Chester 

Chelmsford 

Cheltenham 

Chislehurst 

Chichester 

Chippenham 

Church Crookham 

Clitheroe 


Colchester 

Congleton 

Corbridge 

Corby 

Crawley 

Cumbernauld 

Dalgety Bay 

Datchet 

Dawlish 

Derby 

Diss 

Doncaster 

Dorchester 

Dorking 

Dundee 

Durham 

Eastbourne 

EastGrinstead 

Edinburgh 

Elgin 

Ely 

Epping 

Evesham 

Falmouth 

Faringdon 

Famcombe 

Famham 

Famham Common 
Folkestone 


n 



□i 


MIN 

ICl 


Frinton ^ 

Galashiels 

Gerrards Cross 

Glasgow 

Gloucester 

Godalmiiig 

Halifax 

Hamilton 

Hanley 

Harrogate 

Hasti ng s 

Hatch End 

Hawick 

Haywards Heath 

Helensburgh 

Heznel Hempstead 

Hereford 

Hertford 

Hexham 



Hinchley Wood 
Horsham 

Hove 

Hull 

Huntingdon 

Hurstpierpoint 

Hytfce 

Ickenham 

Inverness 

Ipswich 

Kendal 

Kenilworth 

Kidderminster 

KuQington 


Kilmarnock 

Kingsbridge 

Kings Lynn 

Kirkcaldy 

Knutsford 

Leeds 

Leicester 

Leigh on Sea 

Leighton Buzzard 

Leominster 

T.in <-p ln 

Littlehampton 


London: 
Blackheath 
Eastcheap 
Edgware Road 
Kings Road 
KnJghtsbridge 
MaidaVale 
Mark Lane 
Marykbone 
Shaftesbury Ave 
Shepherd Market 
St Johns Wood 
Strand 

Victoria Street 


Looe 

Loughborough 

Lowestoft 

Malvern 

Market Drayton 

Market Harborough 

Marlborough 

Melton Mowbray 

Minehead 

Montrose 

Morpeth 

Nantwtch 

Newark 

Newbury 

Newcastle u Lyme 

Newcastle u Tyne 

Newmarket 


Newport. IOW 

Newquay 

Northampton 

North Berwick 

North wich 

Norwich 

Nuneaton 

Oadby 

Ongar 

Oswestry 

Oxford 

Paisley 

Penicuik 

Perth 

Pinner 

Plymouth 

Pontefract 

Pbntdand 

Poole 

Boynton 

Prestbury 

Preston 

Ramsgate 

Reading 

Redcar 

Retford 

Rlpon 

Royston 

Rugby 


Ruislip 

Ruthin 

Saffron Walden 

Salisbury 

Sandbach 

Saxmundham 

Scarborough 

Selby 

Selsdon 

Sevenoaks 

Sheffield 

Shepperton 

Sheringham 

Sidmouth 

Skipton 

Solihull 

Southampton 

Southport 

St AnnesonSea 

St Acmes 

Stamford 

Staplehurst 

Stirling 

Stourbridge 

Stourport 

Stowznarket 

Street 

Sudbury 

Sutton 


Sutton Coldfield 
Tadworth 

Tam worth 

Taunton 

Thame 

Thetford 

Thornbury 

Truro 

Tunbridge Wells 

Twickenham 

Dckfreld 

Uttoxeter 

Uxbridge 

Virginia Water 

Wakefield 

Wallington 

Walton on Thames 

Welwyn Garden City 

West Bridgford 

West Molesey 

Winchester 

Wisbech 

Wokingham 

Wolverhampton 

Worthing 

Wrexham 

Wymondham 

Yeovil 

York 


of these and other whiskies in a variety of sizes is available at Peter Dominic Wine Centres, For your nearest Wine Centre consult your telephone directory or call 0279 411040. 

All items offered subject to stock remaining. By Law. we do not sell alcohol to persons under 18 years of age. 


















I 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Bonn holds civil servant 
for link with ‘spy ’ 
and charges secretary 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 3 986 

I Life-and-death struggle 


S savs 


08 








■r ■' ' . •'ST 

Sife J. 




too quick 


From John England, Bonn 

A higb-nnktog civil servant meeting in Vienna in August 
m the West German Defence with a man calling himself Dr 
Ministry has been arrested on Sternberg, who had visited his 
suspicion of spying for East home in Bonn a few weeks 
Germany, while at the same before, 
time it was revealed yesterday Dr Sternberg, who had in- 
that a former secretary in the traduced himself as a repre- 


time it was revealed yesterday Dr Sternberg, who had in- 
that a former secretary in the traduced himself as a repre* 
Federal President's Office has sentative of a foreign arms 
been charged with spying for ■ firm, had asked Herr West* 
the KGB. phal to work for his company 

A Defence Ministry spokes- “on the side”, he said, 
man said that the civil ser- Dr Rebmann said that so far 

vant, named as Herr Jurgen the questioning of Herr 
Westphal aged 48. bad Westphal suggested that he 
worked in the department of had not earned out any es- 
the armed forces chief-of-stafif pionage work before his arrest 
sines 1980 on planning stud- He added that the case of 
ies. He had been under Frau Margareie Hoke , aged 
surveillance for months and Si. who was a secretary in the 


was arrested on Tuesday. 


A military counter-mtelli- from June 19S9 until her 
gence agent said that he could arrest in August 1985 amid a 
have done serious damage to wave of spy scandals in Bonn, 
Bonn because be bad access to was much more serious, 
military planning and to the. He told a press conference 
armed forces' computer. in Karlsruhe that he had 
Dr Kurt Rebmann, the raised charges against her on' 
Federal Public Prosecutor, November 29 on suspicion of 
said that Hen Westphal was having spied for the KGB 
suspected of having offered to from 1 968 until the time of her 
wore for an "eastern" secret arrest 

service. He had had a two-day Between 1972 and July 


oeeting in Vienna in August 1985, be said, Frau Hoke bad 
rith a man calling himself Dr ft ad access to more than 1,700 
lernbeig. who had visited his documents classified confi- 
ome in Bonn a few weeks dentiai, secret or top secret, 
efore. Most had come from the 

Dr Sternberg, who had in- foreign, interior and defence 
oduced himself as a repre- ministries as well as from the 
rotative of a foreign arms chancellery. They included 
rm, had asked Herr West- reports qn Cabinet meetings 
txal to work for his company and federal intelligence ser- , 
)n die side” he said. vice affairs. 

Dr Rebmann said that so for Dr Rebmann said Frau 
e questioning of Herr Hoke had given her KGB 
r estpbal suggested that he spymaster copies of many of 
id not earned out any es- the documents, inducting 
onage work before his arrest briefings for successive federal 
He added that the case of presidents on foreign and 
■au Margareie Hoke . aged defence questions. She bad 
who was a secretary in the also betrayed secret reports 
Federal President’s Office from Bonn's diplomatic mis- 
>m June 1959 until her sions around the world as well 
rest in August 1985 ami d a as information on civil de- 
lve of spy scandals in Bonn, fence measures in Germany, 
is much more serious. Cabinet decisions on the 

He told a press conference appointments or promotions 
Karlsruhe that he had of senior officials were also 
ised charges a gains t her on passed on to the KGB, be said, 
ovember 29 on suspicion of The charges against her 
iving spied for the KGB have been raised in the 
urn 1 968 until the time of her Dusseklorf High Court, where 
rest she is expected to go on trial 

Between 1972 and July early next year. 










JSS 


MR 


• iv 






- ****+>£ 






* *-■ » . 




K ! ‘. 


arrest 

Between 




Soviet boost to pull-out talks 

By Andrew McEwen, Diplomatic Correspondent 




A Soviet effort to speed 
negotiations on withdrawal of 
its troops from Afghanistan 
appeared to be under way 
yesterday. 

Mr Abdul Sattar, head of 
the Pakistan Foreign Ministry, 
said after discussions in Mos- 
cow with Mr Eduard Shevard- 
nadze. the Soviet Foreign 
Minister, that a timetable for 
withdrawal could be agreed 
soon. 

Dr Muhammad Najib, the 
Afghan Prime Minister, was 
expected to arrive in Moscow 


yesterday. The two visits are 
the latest in a series of 
indications that Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov may be serious 
about wanting a settlement 

Recent signs include his 
statement that Moscow would 
welcome a neutral govern- 
ment in Kabul, and the feet 
that during his visit to India 
Soviet television broadcast a 
press conference which in- 
cluded hostile questions about 
the Soviet military presence in 
Afghanistan. 

Full agreement has been 


reached on United Nations 
monitoring of the withdrawal 
of 1 10,000 Soviet troops and 
on plans to cut the supply lines 
of Afghanistan's Islamic guer- 
rillas. the Mujahidin. 

Senor Diego Cbrdovez. the 
UN Under-Secretary -General, 
was reported yesterday to 
have said that the timetable 
for withdrawal would be the 
only problem remaining when 
proximity talks between Af- 
ghan ana Pakistani officials | 
resume in Geneva in Feb- ; 
ruary. 


From Michael Hsstsaack, Harare 


Paul Bekker, aged 32, a Zimbabwean 
farmer, recovering m a hospital bed in 
Harare from wounds he received after 
stabbing a lioness to the heart in a 10- 
minnte life-and-death struggle. His 16- 
month-old daughter, Cardie, is with 
him. Mr Bekker, of Marondera, was 
one of a 16-member party from the 
Dutch Reformed Church who were 
combining Scripture lessons with na- 
ture study on a canoe safari down the 
Zambezi river. They camped on Tues- 
day at Rnkomeshe Rest Hots, down- 
stream from the Chinmdn border post. 


between Zimbabwe and Zambia, when 
Mr Bekker and two companions, the 
Rev John Oosthsisen and Mr Piet 
Blitz. were woken by the lioness, who 
forced he? way into their hot through 
the door and seised Mr Bekker by the 
leg. 

His companions rushed out of the hat 
and brought Mr Bekker a hunting 
knife, with which he stabbed the lioness 
to the heart. He was given immediate 
first aid by two medical students from 
another canoe party and rushed to 
hospital in Harare. 




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French in 
new atoll 
atom test 

Wellington (Reuter) — The 
French Government yester- 
day exploded its eighth 
nuclear device this year at the 
South Pacific test site on 
Mumroa Atoll, according to 
New Zealand scientists. The 
blast was the 83rd since 1975. 

Cold cash 

Buenos Aires (Reuter) — 
Argentina became the first 
country to open a bank in 
.Antarctica when the state- 
owned Rank of the National 
Territory of Tierra del Fuego, 
Antarctica and South Atlantic 
Islands opened a branch at 
Esperanza military base. 

Weighty move 

Ankara (Reuter) - Turkey 
has granted political asylum to 
the weightlifting champion of 
Bulgaria, Naim Suleymanov, 
an ethnic Turk who dis- 
appeared in Australia this 
week. Foreign Ministry of- 
ficials said. 

Pope’s plea 

Vatican City (Reuter) — The 
Pope, in his 1987 peace mess- 
age, begged terrorists to give 
up violence even if their cause 
was just saying that they 
undermined the very febrile of 
society. 

Cheat’s end 

Peking (Reuter) — Zjang 
Zhiping, a factory employee 
who embezzled 117,000 yuan 
(£21,700) by issuing felse re- 
ceipts and stealing his com- 
pany’s coal, has been exe- 
cuted, China’s official Central 
Television Station said. 

Iraq attack 

Baghdad (Reuter) — Iraq 
said that its military aircraft 
bad attacked a large naval 
target — its usual term for an 
oil tanker or cargo ship — in 
the Gutt according to a 
military spokesman. 


! From lan M array 

£ Jerusalem 

j The United Slates has told 
Israel that it wnsidm an 
[ excessive use made of 

1 euns in dealing with the unrest 

hi the occupied temtones 
over the past week 
The political officer ai me 
, American Embassy in Tel 
f *viv Mr Roger Hamson. 
'passed on this .view to Mr 
Michael Shilo. director of the 
North America division ai the 
Foreign Ministry, during a 
meeting to seek clarification 
about what Jed to four people 
being killed and 21 others 
wounded, some senousiy. bv 
gunfire. Another needed 
treatment for injuries. 

Mr Harrison accepted that 
there had been great provoca- 
tion to the security forces 
trying to control the often 
violent demonstrations, but 
questioned the need for troops 
to fire live ammunition so 
often to break them up. 

The meeting, at a relatively 
low diplomatic level, was 
arranged after the United 
Stales refused to veto a UN 
Security Council resolution 
this week which condemned 
Israel over events in the 
territories. 

Demonstrations and pro- 
tests continued yesterday 
both in the West Bank and in 
the Gaza Strip, although on a 
much-reduced scale. The 
worst reported incident was at 
a UN school in the Gaza Strip, 
which is out of bounds to 
Israeli soldiers.' troops fired 
several gas canisters at girls in 
the playground after stones 
had teen thrown. 

During the week-long dis- 
turbances Israeli security for- 
ces have made 176 arrests, 
largely for stone-throwing. Six 
of those captured, from the 
Tulkarm refugee camp west of 
Nablus, have already been 
sentenced to up to six months 
imprisonment along with 
fines of between £800 and 
£1,200 each. 

On the Israeli side, an 
inquiry is continuing into who 
fired the shot which killed a 
1 2-year-old Palestinian boy at 
Ba lata refugee camp near Nab- 
lus on Monday. The Israeli 
army insists that its patrol 
there fired only after the boy 
was taken dying to hospital. 
Palestinians are adamant that 
nobody in the camp has a gun. 

Investigators are trying to 
trace a car, seen near the camp 
at the time of the shooting, 
which may have been carrying 
militant Israeli settlers. The 
settlements in areas like this, 
deep in the West Bank, are 
usually the homes of militant 
nationalists. They are allowed 
to carry guns for protection, 
and Palestinians claim they 
are only too eager to use them. 

The wave of violent protests 
has roused the anger of the 
settler movement at a time 
when it is growing suspicious 
that the government will go 
back on its undertaking to 
build six more such colonies 
in the occupied territories. 

Leaders of Gush Emunim. 
the militant settler movement, 
are threatening to organize 
strikes and sit-ins where they 
want to settle if the govern- 
ment does not honour its 
commitment quickly. Mr 
Yitzhak Shamir, the Prime 
Minister, has now promised: 

“If the economic situation 
allows it, Likud will act for the 
establishment of additional 
settlements.” 


Copper Belt still tense 
as army takes control 

From Michael Hartnack, Harare 



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The Zambian Army was 
said yesterday to be in control 
of the tense situation on the 
country’s Copper Belt after a 
week of rioting in which eight 
people have died and hun- 
dreds of others were injured. 

Pitched battles have raged 
on a scale unprecedented even 
in the violence before Zambia 
rained independence from 
Britain 22 years ago. Public 

AitOor Airnlftfloil nt n f 1 A m y 


cent increase in the price of 
maize meal, the country's 
staple food. 

Only sporadic incidents of 
stone throwing were reported 
yesterday in the main Copper 
Belt towns of Ndola, Kitwe 
and Muftiltra, where security 
forces maintained thedusk-to- 
dawn curfew imposed by Pres- 
ident Kaunda. 

No unrest was reported in 
the volatile squatter town- 
ships around the Zambian 
capital but some traders in 
Lusaka wore preparing shut- 
ters in case the looting spread. 
Members of Zambia's smaD 
Asian community have been 
the main victims of the attacks 
on shops. 

Mr Kaunda maintained his 
ban on outgoing traffic at 
Zambia’s land borders, str- 
anding dozens of Zimbab- 
wean transport drivers en 
route from Harare to Zaire. 

Hie Government said that 
the border closure was to stop 
loot being smuggled from the 
country. However. Zambia's 
airports were open and flights 
were departing as usual 

The rioting was triggered by 
an increase from about 3.8 
kwacha to 8.2 kwacha (!9p- 
41p) for a kilogram of maize 
meal. The kwacha has lost 90 
per cent of its value over the 


past year and is now worth 
about 5p. 

The subsidy on maize meal 
maintained by the Govern- 
ment — the last vestige of a 
policy of using copper rev- 
enues to buy cheap imported 
food — was slashed in onler to 
secure a loan of $280 million 
(about £187 million) from the 
International Monetary Fund. 

Zambia has now accrued 
about £2.7 billion in foreign 
debt and is faced with a slump 
in revenues from copper, its 
only important export Local 
fanning has been discouraged 
by years of price undercutting 
by unrestricted imports from 
developed countries. 

Observers in Harare are 
dismayed by the outbreak of 
violence, which for 14 years 
withstood a sanctions war 
with Rhodesia, when an eco- 
nomic confrontation with 
South Africa may be imm- 
inent 

At the height of the copper 
belt noting the forces used 
shotguns to blast their way 
through barricades when tear- 
gas and baton charges failed. 

Leading article, pa ge 19 

THE ROYAL MASONIC 
HOSPITAL 
Ravenseonrt Park, 
London, W6 OTN 
Annual 

General Meeting 

jssa&ttasRas: 

Wsn pmiponoi uniil j diie io Ik Surf fit- 

Ute new Board of Manapnou. n« hens 
la«r than ?kii ApnL 1987. ^ 

J nonce convening the Annua] Gmml 
Mentis, B^tng tfeuib oTUme aodvm w. 

M 11 orcuiafcd ,n W unc. 

I. A. Lashfarooke 
Chirf Executive Officer. 
December 1986. 


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From David Watts 
Manila 

The Philippines is strug- 
gling for economic survival, 
and its ministers give it onlv 
two years to uy to avoid a 
catastrophe. 

If democracy is to be made 
secure, international invest- 
ment must come soon to fight 
poverty and unemployment. 

Even if things go well, it will 


Economic crisis in the Philippines 

years of hard slog will 
international support 


Government believes that a 
GNP growth rate of 6 S Der 

-&»l P ' r “toting out the mess left by ^ 

On the credit side, the « ^ arcos ^ ^ken time, next year. Negotiations with 
Government of President But now a programme for the the Paris Qnb, which includes 
Aquino has the prospect of e 2??P m3 L has o^sed Britain, are due to resume 
pohncal stability with the wdl nm to the end of later this month, 

departure from the Govern- Mrs Aquino's tenure m 1992. _ . _ . 

ment of the Defence Minister The Philippines is a classic th I V&S£^«S- CV - ^ m 

Mr Juan Pbn^&Sitea example of bow World Bank the 1960s.the Pfohppmes was 
ceasefire with thTco^muiu^ and IMF development one of Asia staght economic 
insurgents, and the expected schemes and loans can result hope* s f cond ®“Jy . *? Japan, 
overwhelming endoisSSSt in a Third World counnys 
of a new constitution in early boring itself into a seemingly ^ 

February, inflation is virtually bottomless pit of debt bas left it hopefessly adrift 

non-existent and the peso . M*» S 01 * 1 * Monsod, Min- aftCT-Qwasted yeas under 
exchange rate stable. ister of Economic Planning, President Marcos. Sixty per 

A ... . argues that the hiafahraud ccni of the people are on the 


of man-days lost by only 8 per 
cent. 


Talks with the IMF have 
been delayed and are not 


. .!*'■ . V •'* 


political stability with the whic “ win run to the end ol 
departure from the Govern- Mrs Aquino's tenure in 1992. 


" u kU ut IlldUC “*V VVTWU- 

secure, international invest- jjent orthe Defence Minister, 
ment must come soon to fight Mr j ; uaQ . Ponce Emile, a 
poverty and unemployment. ffiasefire with the Communist 
Even ifthingsgowell.it will Jnsur B® nts ' and the expected 
be the 1990s before it can overwhelming endorsement 
recover the standard of living Sr * ncw constitution in early 
of four years ago, so destine- February. Inflation is virtually 
live has been the combination noi i^ x,slent and the peso 
of low worid prices for its exc “ aD S e rate stable, 
primary products, the weight Although new investment 
ol its international debt and in the first 10 months of the 
tne greed and incompetence of year was down on the pra- 
ttle ousted President Marcos vious year, Mr_Jos6 Co nee p- 

nnn hie ivarim- w!_- . • r . 




and bis cronies. 

One leading foreign econo- 
mist is more gloomy about the 
country's prospects even than 
the Philippines Government; 
“There is no light at the end of 
the mnneL” 

There are, however, occa- 
sional glimmers of hope that 
the Government seizes, like 
the 2.5 per cent improvement 
in gross national product in 
the third quarter; the first 
expansion of GNP after 2'A 


cion, Minister of Trade and 
Industry, says that for the first 
time in many years Filipinos 
invested more in their country 
than did foreigners. 

On the debit side, high 
hopes of more Japanese 
investment raised during Mrs 
Aquino's visit to Tokyo have 
been dampened by the kidnap 
of the local manager of the 
Mitsui Trading Company. 

The Japanese, however, are 


■ -- . mm * llv JaiAiucac, uuwever. are 

years of decline, it could mean expected to resume their in- 
an annual GNP growth of terest once the situation is 
between zero and 0.5 per cent. clarified. The number of 
But if social and political strikes is up by 61 per cent 
chaos is to be slaved off. the over last year, but the number 

Opposition stakes 
claim in Trinidad 

From Jeremy Taylor, Port of Spain 


The Philippines is a classic « 1& bard to believe that in 
example of bow Worid Bank the 1960s the Philippines was 
and IMF development one of Asia's bright economic 
schemes and loans can result hopes, second only to Japan, 
in a Third World country's Today the rest of Asia, apart 
boring itself into a seemingly “ om Vietnam and Cambodia, 
bottomless pit of debt. bas left it hopefessly adrift 

Mrs Solita Monsod, Min- wf** years under 

ister of Economic Planning, President Marcos. Sixty per 
argues that the highly-paid of the people are on the 
representatives in Manila of ' P° ven y hoe. In sugar-growing 
international hanks and in- srcas people are starving, 
strtutions, who must have The electronics revolution 
known that Mr Marcos and has come and gone, and the 
his cronies were creaming off Philippines h as picked up 
huge portions of each new little of the sunrise industry 
loan, must now take some of that goes with it. Even in 
the responsibility for the basics as textiles Taiwan and 
present situation. She de- South Korea have advantages 
mauds repudiation, #r at least in almost everything except 
a further moratorium, on labour costs. 

budget win go to finance manufacturing Iwse, having 
payments on the $26,000 mil- jjyed for 7®®” off J® 1 ® of 
lion (£18,000 million) na- fruit, sugar and coconuts, 
tional debt, and unless some Mrs Monsod argues that a 
of that is repudiated, or much manufacturing base must be 
more generous terms permit- built from scratch, and that it 
ted, there will not be the is impossible to do so while so 
money to develop the industry much of the country's money 
needed to get the country back is being eaten up by outsland- 
on its feeL jug debt 





i; 




ly 






I::: H 


>■> ■■-■■jsJ 




Cornmnnist guerrillas in the Philippines joyfully raising their guns in the Bataan town of 
Sawfll, 33 mites west of the capital, to celebrate the 60-day ceasefire agreed with the 
government aimed forces of President Corazon Aquino earlier this week. 


Trinidad and Tobago is 
preparing for general elections 
on Monday which are likely to 
be the closest and most bitterly 
fought in 30 years. The rating 
People's National Movement 
(PNM), which swept to power 
in 1956 under Dr Eric Wil- 
liams and has been there ever 
since, is straggling to beat off a 
challenge from the first unified 
and broadly-based opposition 
party it has ever faced — the 
National Alliance for 
Reconstruction (NAS), led by 
a former lieutenant of Dr 
W illiams, Mr AN. Robinson. 

An opinion poll published 
last weekend gave the NAR a 
lead of 55 per cent to 23 per 
cent m voting intentions; and 
Mr Robinson a lead of 45 per 
cent to 18 over die Prime 
Minister, Mr George Cham- 
bers, in popularity ratings. 

However, the PNM has a 
26-10 majority in Parliament, 
and even the 29 per cent swing 
reported by the poll may not 
erode that lead. The NAS has 
complained forcefully of ir- 
regularities in the voters' list, 
including the addition of 



Mr Chambers: behind in the 
popularity polls. 


92,000 names — more rim* 10 
pa cent of the electorate — to 
the supplemental list 

Mr Chambers, who suc- 
ceeded Dr W illiam* m 1981, is 
presenting the PNM as the 
natural party of eoramneat, 
toe party of stability, co a t iaa - 
ity and good financial man- 
agement 

The PNM manifesto relies 
heavily on its 30-year track 
record. The NAR pictures toe 
rating party as weary ami 
secretive after three decades m 
power — bankrupt of ideas, 
riddled with c or r u pti on , and 
gritty of (fe 

wealtlt of the co untry's 1974- 
83 o3 boom. It promises 
renewed energy and action as 
well as such carrots as fax 
concessions and an amnesty 
for illegal Caribbean hnm- 
igrants. 

The election comes as toe 
oil-based economy sin semes 
decline, doe partly to dedramg 
production and a stagnant 
refining sector, but also to toe; 
fall of w prices, w h ich s las h ed; 
national reveane and wiped 
out the local currency gams of 
devaluation a year ago. 

Unemployment, officially at 
17 per rant, has become toe 
most serious issue as a series 
of busmess closures and lay- 
offs continues. 

Foreign exchange reserves 
have been steadily depleted; 
the trade surplus is dertrmng; 
and the Government has been 
experiencing cash flow prob- 
lems. 

Alternative sources of rev- 
enue, such as tourism, export 
manufacturing and petro- 
chemicals, are still far from 
generating new income at the 
levels required. The annual 
budget, normally presented 
this month, has been post- 
poned. 


Solidarity faces hi-tech 
accusation by police 

From Roger Boyes, Warsaw 


ana parauei y* Tandy computers, said by the 

officials to have been snatched 
during raids on foraer unto- 
r!f as Dart of a ground leaders, such as Mr 

ro show Zbigniew Bujak. Espionage 


and code booxs. as paii u* » 
concerted campaign to show 
that the Solidarity under- 
ground is now little more than 

aS P7 rinE - with a 


ground leaders, suen as mr 
Zbigniew Bujak. Espionage 
equipment included buying 
devices, code books and pho- 
tnmnipt nf a classified book 


The move coincided wun a — 

government apped to all thoffi P ^ ^ show ^ 

still active m unde^round activity and w- 

opposition to give themse^s ^ of same 

up before the end of the year, ^ supposed to 

when the amnesty exp^- ^monstrate that Solidarity 

Colonel Jerzy a f p^bably could not continue if 

lawyer and senior mCTn^r 2 pro^J for Western 

the Polish it 

depanmenu in c^onel Karpacz, echoing 

crct services were involve i aUegatjon5 m the regional 

the financing ofsfopme__ i s ^ sh press, said the mam 
expensive h i gh-toch ^ P- smuffiler, caught on 

ment to the underground. November 29 had aro^ed 

On one side ^JJ^t the suspicion of the Swedish 
sium, where police before leaving on the 

policemen w . oB ^ M!t4 , ns . was ferry to Poland- 
have done their ^ But the customs authontw 

a pUe of contratood conds- ^ checked with higher anth- 
cated from two SwjdM™ orit ies - the implication 's 
trucks which were V ^t it was a wing of the 

tereeptedat .the torder ^ Swedish secret ser^-a^ 
The equipment icau^ ihe lftad had been waved 

JffiSSSPiSuHa ^fpn.blemwrththUldl.d 

ili^o Misb of seS ope«^ t — 

&S&& SJbifiSS 

high-^ade _“T i ‘ 4flr ;,v pro- ih e most part be 

beaming b ■ p 0 |i' s h tele- {*; 0Den jy in Swedish or 

sramir.es o iis;ei! - o^y 

** SSSfcSSSS"* *-* 

q ofSe other ^ l!drc "- 


If* 


I ' 


The giant IQ rampany has recentiy embarked on an imaginative 
cortvasion to coal programme in the UK. When complet^ IQ will bum 
wefl over one million tonnes of steam coal per year; opening up new 
markets for British CoaL 

The bulk chemical plant at Lostock in Cheshire was the first 
plant to go on stream and was closely followed by it's j tf t M I 

sister site at Winnington. These installations have been ■ 

firing at Hidde^eld and the massive 

importance to flep^y in its purchasing 

of fuels; and this investment in coal will wlgm; f 

ensure it can select the lowest cost 


r. — i:«ia «,nrp than devices, cooc dwm <wu hum- lticu. mvcbuncriLa ui iaxu 

1 °™J“ ,,0W tocopies of a classified book represent sound king term pfenning. 

The move coincided with a listing Polish trucks and British Coal is confident that it wfll be 

— i rjfinpnlfn all those planCS. . aViIotnmoatt'Vncrlomanrlat'ftinu 


British Coal is confident that it win be 
able to meet this demand at My 
competitive prices. 

Act now fear real help with conversaon costs 
- A Government Grant Scheme currently supports 
conversion to coal by providing up to 25% erf the eligible 
capital costs. Loans at favourable terms (including 
deferred repayments) are also available man tiie European 
Coal and Sted Community. 


Tasman 
defence 
talks on 
the rocks 

From Richard Long 
Wellington 

Attempts by the New Zea- 
land Government to expand 
defence relationships with 
Australia appeared to be on 
the rocks yesterday after a day 
of discussions between Mr 
David Lange, the Prime Min- 
ister of New Zealand, and Mr 
Bin Hayden, the Australian 

Minister of Foreign Affairs. 

Mr Hayden, who arrived in 
New Zealand saying that the 
defence relationship had gone 
about as far as it could and 
that Australia could not re- 
place the United States' role, 
made dear that there were no 
proposals to expand links. 

He said that newspaper 
reports had led him to expect 
this, and that such an expan- 
sion would imply increased 
defence spending, but there 
had been no concrete proposal 
from New Zealand. 

The comments led to some 
confusion about New Zea- 
land’s defence plans in view of 
earlier comments from Mr 
Lange, Mr Frank O’ Flynn, 
Minuter of Defence, and 
other ministers that a str- 
engthened defence relation- 
ship with Australia was sought 
to replace, in part, the loss of 
the American connection. 

America withdrew its sec- 
urity commitment after the 
Lange Government last year 
banned the entry of nuclear 
warships. 


Industrial requirements can be met from a 


types and ratings, all backed by a British Coal free 

technlcalservice:AtodemcoalplantBfulIyautomatic 

with completely enclosed handling- a concept that meets both the economic 

and aesthetic needs of the UK’s leading industrial companies. 

A final word from Malcolm Edwards, British Coal’s Commercial Director: 

‘No other source of energy can match British Coal's supply andpridng profile 
The Government Grant Scheme; which isn’t due to aid until mia-1987, can 
make converting to coal one of die soundest investments your company has 
evermade. 

The time to talk is now’. 


I H 

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J 


12 


TUP TTMFS FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986. 


THE ARTS 1 



Roundheads roll 



its policy of 

providing a forazn for mar- 
ginal^ if not to say dissident, 
vievrs, Open Space (BBC2) 
played host to a bistory tin- 
dent from Stirling who set oat 
to question oar uncritical 
acceptance of tbe House of 
Windsor. Brave man. 

. A Voyage Round the Mon- 
archy turned out to be a day 
trip to the more salient peaks 
of the anti-loyalist tinge, from 
the glacial Piers Brandon to 
the majestic andvstin poten- 
tially volcanic Willie Hamil- 
ton MP, a man for whom the 
existence of royalty seems a 
personal affront “Reactionary 
and right-wing, brainwashing, 
irrational ..." We had, of 
course, heard it all before. 

On a more perceptive tack, 
Phillip Kmghtley sensibly 
suggested that Fleet Street 
and the Palace seem to observe 
an unwritten code of conduct, 
whereby the formes may print 
as nincb speculative trash as it 
pleases so long as it does not 
question its s object’s raison 
ttttre. An out-and-out repub- 
lican newspaper woold indeed 
be a wonder to behold, as well 
US a co m m e rcial disaster. 

Republicans come in various 
guises, from earnest Christian 
democrats to weekend Round- 
heads. One woold like to have 
asked these last whether they 
realized that life under the 
Protectorate was high-minded, 
paranoid and not orach fun. 
Bat it really is no good saying 
that the monarchy is absurd 
and anachronistic, when that 
Is at (east partly the point of it 


One waited in vain for an 
interviewee to declare what 
seems to be seif-evident: that; 
with the Chordi of Engbund all ' 
but moribund, tbe Royal fam- 
ily have become sot so such a 
living soap opera as a secular 
adl, individnaDy embodying 
tbe virtues and foibles of a 
pagan pantheon and collec- 
tively serving as a focus for 
q nfrs i-religioas sentiment The 
Defender of the Faith is 
symbolically more important 
thgn the faith she defends. 


In this context, levellers’ 
moans about the dass system 
are a red herring. They may 
have had more validity in the 
second 40 Minutes film about 
Whitehall’s recruitment 
procedure, The Final Board 
(also BBC2), which showed a 
Charterhouse girl scraping 
into tbe Diplomatic Service 
and a Comprehensive hay 
scraping out of tbe Home Civil 
Service. 


Both are Oxbridge gradu- 
ates, both rowed fbr their 
colleges. In interview, she was 
charming, personable, well- 
spoken and utterly flummoxed 
by some fairly straightforward 
questions; he was hahtfng , 
demotic, slightly chippy and 
capable of sustaining an 
argument 

The assessors were more 
worried about his espousal ©ff 
the ’issues** picked up in his 
time on the GLC grants 
committee than of bis time 
spent working for tbe London 
Rubber Company. He would 
probably have been well ad- 
vised not to say, on leaving, 
“Cheers". 


Martin Cropper 


Everyman becomes 




David Robinson joins America in 
falling for the charm of an outback 
innocent at large in New York 




CINEMA 


Crocodile Dundee 
(15) 

Leicester Square 
Theatre 


Harem (15) 
Camion Shaftesbury 
Avenue 


Howard ... A 
New Breed of 
Hero(pg) 
Empire Leicester 
Square 


Link (15) 

Cannons, 

Haymarket, Oxford 
Street 


T . 1 

M 

r ( 1 

JoyeHxJ 

IN 

loci! 


Crocodile Dundee opened in 
the United States 10 weeks 
i, took $8 mini on in its first 
tys on release, and then 
climbed to top place in the 
box-office charts, a position it 
has retained for the past 
month. This kind of popular 
success is unprecedented fin* 
an Australian — or, indeed for 
any non-American film — and 
serves to demonstrate how 
enthusiastically tbe public will 
still respond to comedy of die 
most simple, good-natured, 
old-fashioned soft — and to a 
star of human scale. 


The star is Paul Hogan, a 
man with a lean, quizzical, 
beat-up face, who started out 
as a rigger oo the Sydney 
Bridge and went on, barely a 
decade ago, to become 
Australia’s most popular co- 
median. He madp his mark 
with American audiences in 
television commercials for tbe 
.Australian Tourist Commis- 
sion and in this country with 
the Fosters’ lager serie&His 
stock-in-trade is tbe mythical 
Oz character of wily 
resourcefulness, naivety, grit, 
hard-d rinking sociability and 
impatience with pretension. 

For his feature film debut 
(he co-authored the script with 
Ken Sbadie and the producer 
John Cornell) Hogan takes an 
idea which has served 'movie 
comedians since before tbe 
time of Will Rogers, his most 
direct screen antecedent: the 
impact of the untamed back- 
woods (or outback) boy on tbe 
big city. 

Tbe exploits of Crocodile 
Dundee, a buccaneering croc- 
odile poacher, attract a New 
York lady reporter. After an 
eventful excursion into the 
bush together, the tody sweeps 
him off to New York. One 
wilderness is much like an- 
other to Dundee: New York 
on the other hand is shaken up 
by his friendly habit of saying 
“G’dye” to every passer-by, or 
deflating the pomp of grand 
hotels by hang in g out his 
washing and treating waiters 
and doormen as if they were 
people. He copes with pimps, 
prostitutes, muggers,, coke- 
sniffers, the pretentious rich, 
tbe resentful poor and all the 
other perils of New York life. 

Dundee's character does not 



The swagman and the sop histicate : Paul Pngan and t jiwta Kozlowski in Crocodile Dundee 

develop in foe film: Hke the befriend cabbies, drunks and into the night: a moment l ater 

dowagers and his constant 


people around him he is 
essentially a comic type and 
foe joke depends on his re- 
action to tbs situations and 
people be encounters. This is, 
of course, in the manner of 
television series comedy (the 
background of Hogan and his 
director, Peter Faiman)j but it 
also conforms to a classic style 
of film comedy. It is easy to 
imagine, on the analogy of the 
great old-time comics, Croco- 
dile Out West or Crocodile in 
the Navy. 

Crocodile/Hogan’s particu- 
lar appeal is foe determined 
democracy which makes him 


he himmlf represents. He 
watches with bemused interest 
as the New Yorker (spunkily 
played by an attractive new 
actress, Tjnda Koziowski) fol- 
lows bis recommended bush 
diet of vegetation garnished 
with bugs, but then sagely 
opens a can of beans for his 
own tucker. He slyly checks 
with a wrist-watch before 
idling the time from the sun. 
“They think their way”, he 
explains mystically, as a 
young Aboriginal (David 
GoupiH) makes bravely off 


Extra 

performances 
22nd & 24th 
December 
at 2.30 







THE MUSICAL SENSATION 
IN ITS SECOND SELL-OUT YEAR 


I PALACE THEATRE 


BOX OFFICE 01-434 0909 


r flf 240 7200 


crasxreMostRwcc 
noons. T pure 


ROSS DIMSEY wwsemts* TIM BURSTAU- FILM COUN FRIEUSAMO JUDY DAVIS IN KANGAROO 
STMtRiNC JOHN WALTON JUUE NIHILLPETERHEHJR FETCRCUMMINSanDHUGH KEATS-OVRNE Ml KANGAROO 
SCREENPLAY EVAN JONES ADAPTED FROM THE NOVEL BY O H. LAWRENCE PRODUCTION DESIGN TRACY WATT 
COSTUMES TERRY RYAN MUSIC NATH AN WAKS D* RECTW OF PHOTOGRAPHY DAN BURS7AU. 

PnOOUCEn ROSS DIMSEY DIRECTOR Tim BURSTALL. 

FILMED IN PAN AV15I0N H, I H IlPli . 

DtSTDiBimONW^ ENTERPPrse 


□OLAY STEPEO IN SELECTED THEATRES 


NOW BCJUmOM 


HAYMARKET 
Tel: 839 1527 


KENSINGTON 
lei: 602 6644 


there is a crash and fearful 
cursing from the bush. 

There are other resem- 
blances to old-style movie 
comedy. The structure is quite 
shaggy, rambling from in- 
cident to incident and clum- 
sily shifting tack midway with 
the move from Australia to 
New York, but always held 
together by the suspense of 
whether ami when Crocodile 
will get the girt. Tbe film also 
has the rare merit of building 
up its comic-roman tic finale 
with speed, attack and a quick 
exit 

Head-on cultural collision is 
also the theme of Harem, an 
elegant, beguiling but 
■inconsequential feature con- 
jceived and directed by a a 
firet-time French director, Ar- 
thur Jofife- It gets swiftly to 
business as Nastassia Kinski, 
convincing as a restless young 
New York professional 
woman, is drugged and kid- 
napped on her way to a 
wedding. 

She wakes to find she has 
been added to the well-stocked 
desert harem of a suave oil 
sheik (Ben Kingsley). The 
harem turns out to be an 
unwanted and unused legacy 
from his forebears — part of 
the dead-weight of tradition 
th a t ex plains the schizophi©- 
nia of this man torn between 
two worlds. The bored harem 
inmates pass their time be- 
tween watching soft-core vid- 
eos, and licensed nights out 
with the local American oil- 
men. 

The sheik and the New 
Yorker find common ground 
in a more liberated sort of 
affection, after which the film 
has not really anywhere much 
to go* but wanders off vari- 
ously into the fey and melo- 
dramatic. Designed by the 
great Alexander Trauner 
(adapting a weird and wonder- 
fill abandoned Moroccan fort 
for tbe principal set), photo- 


graphed by Pasq^o 
Santis, and wA v L h e 
erotica in foe hare... Vl e . 
lira always prcr-a* 

•£&&£<« 
SBifesS S 

outer space (if ><y 

saves the world o> lOUing 

SSion by a. nj 

lords of lie Universe. Bosec 
on a comic boo’s cteHMT 
(acfciowleed in.-i? engea! 
TJS title Howsrc int Duoo. 
this represents foe lunatic 
extreme of the special effects 

^There are a few passable 
jokes in the first halt where 
Howard - accidentally mis- 
directed from his owt 3 pianet 
which is a duck-scale simu- 
lacrum of Earth - deuvers his 
caustic commentary on nu- 
mau civilization. But Howard 
(evidently a smau 
wearing a plastic heaa ano. 
feathers) is not very appeajng; 
the people around him are 
strictlv two-dimensional; ano 
the duck’s coy sex scenes with 
the leading lady (Lea Thomp- 
son) are very uneasy. 

The producer-diracior-wn- 

ter team of Willard Huyck and 

Gloria Katz previously 
scripted American Graffiti and 
Indiana Jones and ike Temple 
of Doom. There must have 
been a terrible moment, many 
millions of collars into the 
production of Howard, when 
everyone realised it was not 
going to work either as com- 
edy or thriller, as kid's stuff or 
sophisticated fore. 

Perhaps a spate of animal 
science fiction is pending. 
link is a horror story in which 
the threatening peril is a 
homicidal chimpanzee whose 
intelligence has been devel- 
oped by a crazed London 
University anthropologist 
(Terence Stamp) - the first of 
his creature's victims. 

The director Richard 
F rankim (who m 2 de Psycho 
II) is evidently a Hitchcock 
devotee: he sets the action in a 
Psycho-style mansion, and the 
dumps are trained by Ray 
Berwick, who worked on The 
Birds. (The performance of 
r ink himself may however be 
due rather to the “special 
chara cter design consultant” 
Lyle Conway, who was 
responsible fbr the Wonder- 
land creatures in Dreamchild). 

The difference is that Hitch- 
cock always worked with well- 
formed scripts, which Everett 
De Roche’s screenplay for 
Link is not. The establishing 
section is long and tiresome; 
the denouement, with a te- 
diously indestructible mon- 
ster, seems interminable, and 
there is not much, apart from 
the apes’ performances, to 
admire in between. 


150 FRENCH PAINTERS 

A PANORAMA OF 
CONTEMPORARY 
FRENCH ART 

14th - 18th December 
11am -7pm 
NovoieL, 
Hammersmith 
International Centre 
1 Sbonlands. London W6 SDR. 
Telephone 01-741 1555. 


ADMISSION FREE 



CONCERTS 


BAJKHCAN HALL 638 8795/638 

• 8891 T O« l~l 7.15 TH E HORN/ 

FERRY LHHIJTTMAS CON- 


Oreteirtra, Winchester Cam.- 
dral Choir. Martin Neary rood. 


OPERA & BALLET 


COUSEUM S 836 £161 CC 2 JO 
6338 BUM NATIONAL 
" Ton 1 1 7 JO Last Pert 
id Pas. Tomor 7.00 


ROYAL OPERA . HOUSE 240 

1066/1911 sidby Info 836 
■ fr< 0 -V S CC Tickets El - 
£22.50|’£ 13/50 Mats iBaliefi 

£2- £40 1 Opera V 66 am phi Yeats 

s ntll on Dor day. 

Tom 7 OO THE BOY AL OPERA 

Dla ZadailMA Tomor 2 JO & 

1 1 M IRC ROYAL BALLET Tba 

Nrocradtor. Ballet Casting Ufa: 

OI 340 9815. 


iMuars wells sts sons. 

First CaU CC 24hr 7 day 340 
7300. Until 37 Dee. Eve* 7 30. 
■ Mais Today 6 Tomor 2 30 

MENOTTl'S 

’The Bay Wfca Cm* To® Fart 

(BrtUrti Premier®! 6 

‘AMAHL « The Niafct VMtora. 

Ot 378 0856 for Winter Own 


THEATRES 


AOELFM 836 7611 or 240 7913 
/a CC 741 9999/836 7368/379 
6433 Grt» Salto 930 6123 Ftrat 
Call 24hr 7 day CC 240 7200 illfcq 
tee' NOW BOOKING TO MAY 30 
1987 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 

Nlgtill}' at 7.30 Mats Wed al 2/30 
& Sal 4.30 A fl.OO 

Extra Bntof DayPayfi *30 A « 
“THE lurnsr SHOW 

m Towir* s Express 


ALBERT 836 3878 CC 379 6666/ 
579 6433/ 741 9999 Crouo 
. Sales 836 3962. Eves asm 
LIMITED LONDON SEASON 

: DAVE ALLEN LIVE 

-OEVASTATWOLY FUNNY- 


01 -836 6111 R 
836 1171. First Call i24 hrs/7 
daysi 240 7200 <t*s fen. Eve* 
7.3a Wed mar 3. Sal 4 dr 8 

Rajraf * l nM i » » a « CmruRT I 


LES LIAISONS 
DANGERaiSES 

Wlaaar 4 “BEST PLAY” nmR 
U adaay Doaean “BEST 
ACTRESS” OMr Award* '86 

Tickets avail Ore 25 at 3om. 
Dec 26. 27 al 4pm 


APOLLO THEATRE 037 2663 

434 3598 Firsi Call 01-240 7200 
TTcketnuster CC 3TO 6433 
Mon-Frt B. Slat 4.30 A 8 .15 
Thurs Mats 3. Dec 24 mai only. 
No perl Dec 25. Dec 26 Bam mu 
only 

PAUL SCOFIELD 


of tbe Year - Lore— ra OMar 


HOWARD ROLLINS 

“MAGNIFICENT” DMaO 

I'M NOT RAPPAPORT 

-Wondolully funny" D.Ext> 
TONI" AWARD BEST PLAY 
NOW BOOKING 1987 


APOLLO VICTORIA SS 828 8666 
CC 630 6262 Party BUM 828 
6188 First Can ct (24iir) 240 
7200 CC OPEN ALL HOURS 379 
6433 Grp Sales 930 6123. This 
from W VI Sndth Travel Branches. 
EW1746 Mats Toe A Sal 3.0 
“A MUSICAL THAT SURPASSES 
ARYTHHC AROUND IN EVERY 
MHEMMir D EXP 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Matte try 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
Lyrics by RICHARD STHGOE 
Directed by TREVOR NUNN 
APPL Y DAI LY TO BOX OFFICE 
FOR RETURNS Special renew 
sums M £5 an Tues mats far 
OAPTl 

CHARITY u nainli r MAUMEE 
UASm Wad 17 Dae Hoi tm 


NOW BOMUN6 TO SEPT 1987 


01 628 8795/658 
8891 cc CMon-Son 1 Qum Rum) 

TOTAL SHAKESPEARE 
COMPART 

BARBKAH THEATRE Red. 
price serfs Toni 7.30. Ttamor 
2.00 4, 7.30. A IS IS Dec A 


rORO^OR A SOHO by jonn 


ALBERT 240 7999 «: 579 6565/ 
379 6433/ 74 1 9999/ Crps 656 
3962. 1.30 & 4.15 dally F«r 3 
wk& Arm Tup CMiVI WoodY 
THE OLD MAN 
OF LOCHMA B AH 
a Muritai Pfay for chiwren. 
From ine book tar HUH Tne 
Prince ot Wplea. 

ALDWYOt Ol 836 6404/0 641 cr 
. 01 579 6233. Ot 741 9999 

DOROTHY TV11N 
SUSAMEKCEL 
HARRYTOWB 
• STEVEM MACKtRTTHH 


BRIGHTON BEACH 
MEMOIRS 

Direcim by WlftH A B RHWAN 
A Naiional Theatre Production 
•■HumiHir al Its be®, a rlt* and 
loctno production” Dally MW 1 "A 
brauU/uUy . rtHNwd family 
remedy ” Timm “ n wUl run fora 
. Iona nme“ Tbpr Out . 
Eva Mon FH 7-SO MatsWMs 
3.0 &*« S.OO*8. 30 Fiat Call 24 
Kr7 day cc 01 240 7200 (in Mtfl 
Ml TKMiamne at , S79 6M5 on 
Mn fee' Grp Sales 01 930 6123. 


Shaw returns 19 A 20 Dec. 
THE P IT Tout. T omor A Man 
7 30 HERESIES by Deborah 
Levy PMNCtU 

SCflfPTOMAE by Richard Net- 
son return 19 * 20 Dec. 


BLOOMSBURY, Gordon Sl WC1 
387 9629 CC 380 14S3. Frem 
Tue 16 Dec UK ADVENTURES 


OF MR TOAD. Tba SpmMbs 
H ew FnOr HwiFiel 


COMCOY THEATRE 930 2678 
CC 240 7200/579 6453/741 
9999 Grp* 930 6123 

“A aaparti aeH 

TR W 

JOHN ALOCRTOH 


TAYLOR 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

A CmiKdy brftaartHarm 

“A MAMTAL MASTE RPIECE 
„WOHOCTFUU.Y FUNNY* 
N of me V 

—Che Bpptaov* or rapturaus 
rereonitJon 1 ’ O Mall 
■ vory ninny indeed" SEjsk 
M on-Thu 8 FtVSm 5.30*8.50 


COTTESLOC V 928 2282 CC 
fMaPonaf Thertr y a •naM flmli- 
lorluin) ToaX ThuF* 7.30. 
T omor 2 J0 A 7.30 IK 
MOTHER by smut- Man. Tue. 
Wed 7 30 IK MY AT IMS 
and WRECKED EGGS. Toni 
6pm Lactam Tbe Mother. 45 
min Btama^n- pert ad tfcta £2 


UBIIMW S 930 5216 CC 57S 
6666/379 6433/741 9999. On* 
836 3962. Evpi 8LX) Thu mu 
2 SO Sat 830 A 8.30 

“BRITISH FARCE AT ITS BEST" 
D Mao 

TIM Theatre of Comedy Company 


ALFRED MARKS 
AMTA JACK! 

GRAHAM MPER 

SAM COX 

RUN FOR YOUR WIFE) 

written and directed by 
RAY COONEY 




“SHOULD RIM 

Good seals avail Thurs mats. 


DOMHBOM THEATRE 680 8046/ 1 
9562. ALL let CC Dkgs FIRST 
CALL 34!tr 7 day on 8362428 NOi 
BOOKING FEE Grp SBtes 9301 
6123 

DAVE CLAIM** 

TIME 

THE ULTIMATE E 

CUFF RICHARD 

AS 'THE ROCK STAR* 

THE PORTRAYAL OF ‘AKASH* 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

Mon-Frt 7.30 Thu Mai 230 Sal 4 
A 8 16. Al Thors mats only -The 
Rock Star- will be performed by 
John Christie. Reduced nth 
Thurs mats only £7 * no 
How Rartd a B to April T. 
SLATS AVAR. Miff PERF TOJTT 


340 

8230 CC 579 6565/6453 T* IS 
Ian Eve* 8pm. Sal mats Son 


DRURY LAME THEATRE ROYAL 

Box Office i CCOI 8368108.01- 
2409066/7. Fun Gadl 2W 7 day 


cc U« on Ol 240 7200 (no Mog 

^ 64S3 


fee). TlckotmaMer Ol 
(no Hq reel 

DarM Murkk's 

42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL IK FAMILY 

Whtoar of rtf tfea baat 

Martari Award* tor 1984 

voted 

MUSICAL 

S T AN D ARD DRAMA AWARDS 

y«ed 

t ii JawJ musical 

LAURSMCC OUVO AWARD 

voted 

BKT MUSICAL 

FLAYS A PLAYERS 


AWARD 

EV98 9,0 Mats Wed 3.0. Sat fcl.a 4 
8JO Reduced Drtce mat Weds. 
Students and OAP^i standby 
CrOop Sales 930 6123 
BOOK MOW FOR XMAS 
Special manner Occ 26 3pm 


DUCHESS S 836 8343 CC 240 
9640 CC 379 6433 * CC 3 
hr/7 day 840 7200 Ei» 8 Wed 
mat 3 Sat 5 * a 


WCRE BRITISH 


DUKE OP YORKS 836 S122 CC 
836 9837/741 9999/379 6433 
JMtir 240 7300. Eva 8. Thu 5. 
SM 6 * 8.30 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Standard baa Award 1984 

STEPPING OUT 

Hit Comedy by Richard Hants 
D irecte d by Juba mcKWh» 

“ IHR MIF N ON TAT* S» 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


FORTUM* BO/CC 836 2236/9 
f.cmj. 7<Uv 24nr 840 
ma Re) Cm 930 6125. 


AW I 

7200 1 


UK 


StaM mam 
. TWkbwi'* 


Today at 2pm & 730prn. 
Tomor Dn. 6pm * 8pm. 


SOI 3796107. 1st can 

24/hr 7 day 240 720a Grp Soles 
930 61 25. TKkMinaster 379 6433 
Eves 7.30. Sal 5 A 8 Tues mat « 

IUDI TnCHAEL 
DENCH WILLIAMS 

-Cuss of their own- SM 

MR and MRS NOBODY 

by Keith Waterhouse 
Directed oy Ned Shcrrin 
“Tba beat comedy to ranch ■ 
Wert End BUjaci" Tt raa 
“EVERY BO DY MU ST SEE UBS 
N O BO DY" DJrtaU 
No perf ChrtanRto Eva 


GLOBE 01-437 3667 CC 741 9999 
1st Call 240 7200 24 nr 7 day Odw 
fee) Grp Sues 930 6123 

Pram 14 tannery 

OUTSTAHDBK ACWEVUBIHT 
AWARD - Obhr Aanrda *8S 


JACKSON 
la 


PLOHmafT 

-mrtulno” Obs 

•OUSE OF 

with PATWCUt^HAYES 


Sianaard Drama Awards 


GLOBE 437 1692 CC OPEN ALL 
HOURS 379 6433 1st Crtl 24Jw 
240 7200 (no bag Mi 741 9999 
mo bm toe) Grp sales 930 6123. 
Tltts from W H Smith Travel 
Branches Eves e Matt Wed 3 Sol 4 


COMEDY OF THE YEA* 


LEND ME A TENOR 

“H icb Iwrtiter you're after 
then the fun retries nowhe 
thicker and faster” Sid 
A comedy by Ken Ludwig 
Dtrecwd by p nvld O Ptnore 
LAST S WEEKS 


GREENWICH THEATRE 01^859 

7785. First Can cc 24hn 240 

7200 (Dkg reek Evas 7.46. Matt 

Sal 2L30 (Dec 15 at 7.01 Dec 26 

M 4.0 & 7.45 NNJHT MUST 

FALL by Emlyn WUttams. 


HAMPSTEAD 722 9301, Even B. 
Sat Mat 4 JO. IO I .R 6 IRK 
War. A Now Caawdy by 


farce 


peifornunrro from 
and DavM 
TbraHalT Tlreea. -Very 
fuxmy" O.Exp 


HAYMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 

Ba* Office* CCOI 930 9832. 1st 
CaU 24br/7 day CC blNA 240 7200 
TKaceimaster 3 T9 6453 Evee 7 JO 
Wed A SM matt 2-30tm 

DEREK JACOBI In 
“A Truly 

Performance'* S.TTmes 

BREAKING the COD E 

by KUSH WHITUMJHE 
Jaaa David ball i f Daai 

Michael ** — [* 

Dnr bv CLIFFORD WILLIAMS 

TUB HUMAH, HUMANE, 
SERIOUS AND BIUW I'B K. 

PLAY VERY HKHLY 

nXOMMCHM3F’ S-Tbna 
No MO enrfstmas Eve 


HER MAKSTYS HaymartM 639 

2244 CC OPEN ALL HOURS 

379 6131 First Call CC 240 

7200 

ANDREW UjOYD WEBBER'S 
new MHiiraL 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 


LAURENCE OUVWR AWARD 
EVENING STANDARD AWARD 


La a e ia ii i OBvto r Av mrd e INC 

Sanm Sieve 

MWubb Barton 

CUF* moon play* Chflitin* 
at certain paronnuices 
Directed by KAROLD prince 
“ i 7 46 Matt Wed * SM 3 
1 bks* only for Apr to Co 


LONDON PALLADRJM 437 7373J 
741 9999 WO bkfl feel. Find CaM 
24 Hr 7 Day OC 2*0 7200. (HBf 
BKG FEE} Grp Sates 930 6123. 
Ttcketmarter 3796433 


THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 
A DENBQWLLEY 

IA CAGE AUX FOUJffi 


S.TN 

Mon-Frt 7.30. Mali Wad ZOO 
Sat 230 * 8.00 

SUnt concessions avail, al door 

Mmt-Fyi A Sal matt 

SCATS A VALARLE FROM AMO, 
Haw boaHag to AprB 25, UB7 


. 01-741 

231 1 Fraw SM Eves 73a Wed 

Mats 230 (Open* Dec 18 al 

7pm. Dec 24 rt «W» imh(l 


adapted by Mm HWte. wtib 
mu sic b y Cart Pe wto. 

STUDIO Eva 8pm THE RUESS 


LYRIC THEATRE Stonestery 
Ave Wl 01-437 3686/7 01-434 
1OS0. 01-434 1060 01-734 

6166/7 

ewe m BLAKELY 

-a briaisni * layousty 
comic performance- F. Ttmee 
tn 

The NaUonrt Thealrel acctatmed 
production of 

ALAR AYCKBOURN'S 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL _ 

-HearmreaMnpty fuiwy Gdn 
"HHorfous...- S. Tins 
-A rare evatdao ot 
com tc ewdlaraiioo*' Ttmp 
Evw 730. Mate Wed and »**- 
Croup Sales 01-930 6X23. 

Reduced price mate Student * 


mm Ol 240 7200 (ewMMnn too) 

RBnRn^RMMiWnRHMHMB s °“ 


TlclMtdHHtor Ol sn 8432 

ten Ml 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL *87 


LYTTELTON- -S' 928 2252 CC 
CNauanai Tnranys jrascwta™ 
ataaw font 7-46. Toms 215 
gow price mat) *745 its- 
MAGCSTRATE W.l^tW /5; 
views Thur 7.46 * Dec 1 9. 20 
* Jon 2. 3. 5. owm 
jan 7 m 7.00. Then JnJ •» 
t^oomwmtqlandiw 
S tephen WBaMff Um 7 A 8 
SOLD OUT) Tom llprn 
LytOetBO Buf»< Maro S aea; 
Bin<s Law Mom Cabara od 
tktt £4. - 


MAYFAIR Ol 629 3037 
From Dec 16 to Jw 5 
Twice dally 2 D A AO _ 
Weds * SbB IOlSO 40 * 
SOOTY^ XMAS SHOW 


M«n- 

& S.10 


■BM 


WAVrAlff s CC 629 
Thu 8 Frt/SM 6-<- - 

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THE BUSINESS OF 
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“Snajimar “nm ea 

^cnSrmima yea* 


6668 l« C «l 240 73003796433 
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CCns 


lavteti new pro du c t i on 
TORI com in 


AN nAUANSFRAW HAT 

adapted br SMON MOORE 
Fran Labtciw 
wan CLIVE DUNN 
and STRATFORD JOHNS 
Directed by ANTON ROOOEH M 
Preview to Dec 1 a. Open* Dac 19 
. at 8.00 


STRATFORD I 



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Tba Y Ottos Vie prottottoe ol 

GHOSTS 

By Henrik Ibsen 
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Ctty Umltt 


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c 


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acomiH OALUorr 

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at 

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D. 


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*.Mj < m.W |1 >JW?«ll PA tKT- 
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- Frt lo-B. Eats lo-ia.jo 

FSwreFORaSeSriajis~orw 

ng- ttuMeg ed Bkm prints TrSi 
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M SSSSAL Sag SattMure by 

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"“nurr. u ill ' 







ROYAL ACADEMY. Piccadilly 01 
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19Di Century. 1 OU 1 December 
lo 23rd December. Dally ICUm 
Ip 6pm sal IQam iq lpm. 


WILLIAM WALCOT 


Centre Gallery 

-1 — . wga r d al 26 Store 

Street. London wci.Mon ■ Fti- 
10 ■ 5. Sol 10 


CAMDEN PLAZA opp Camden 
Town Tube 486 2443 Men US) 
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Dec LABYRIWTH 1 U 1 


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SHOAM JPC) Pari 1 Tues 6 
Ttenre S4S Sals 11 . 30 am * 
5 45 Pan 2 Mon. weo & Fn 
6.45 Sundays Pan 1 at 
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ly absorbing .see die film" Sla. 
i'CURZON WEST END Snaftesbury 
Aienue Wl 439 4805 MabBto 
SmHh. Denholm Elli oil. Jum 
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www iPOL Film at 130 inm 
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t^EGTStj SQUARE THEATRE 

930 5252 (Ena,/930 7615 124 
hr Access/ visa I AmEx Book- 
I nos ' CROCODILE DUNDEE 1 1 Si 
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1045am Sh0W 6aturd 4y 


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? 1 ^S Ratsbookab,c in advance 
/or 70 a 9.15 




jnmR urn I ITS I M<p 

2 ,S 6 00 8 40. 


flU teaSs *n 

Access and Vea use- 
pfionc boom n^s welcome. 

•*QN LEICESTER SQUARE 

info 930 4230 / 


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cibdTp . WC11 oauy 

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THE ARTS 2 


| THEATRE 

The Hobbit 

The Fort une 

Since this production contains 
the three essentials f or a 
children s show - clear storv 
spectacular scenes and like-* 
able heroes - the short- 
comrags a tetchy old grom>-ap 
notices wttl not do mach to 
dunuush their enjoyment 

First the story. Well, it is 
** Pia»-rfrod 
Hohbit, shamed into mining 
13 dvrarves with jaw-crunch- 
rag names in their fight to 
regain their ancestral terri- 
tory. The journey is part 
treasure-banc, pan dragon- 
qnest, undertaken by a reluc- 
tant Siegfried with hairy feet 
who discovers the thriUinn 
terror of outwitting giant spi- 
ders and crashing the skulk of 
evil goblins. 

He is helped by a benign 
wizard - and the lofty Dudley 
Long in his pointed hat along- 
side four-foot high Dixon 
make a quaintly attractive 
doable act ' 

Tbe children I consulted did 
not mind the boring bits, the 
wordy or incomprehensible 
explanations. They had no 
sense of being cheated after 
the heroes are led away to 
dungeons and nothing follows 
but the narrator’s co mment , 
“don’t worry — they escaped.” 
Tedious scenes and narrative 
cop-outs may even, I suppose, 
function as opportunities for a 
young audience to recover 
from the excitements else- 
where. 

The first of these is a fight 
with luminous goblins, WM 
out like splkey Siamese danc- 
ers, that culminates in the 
flight of a sword across the 
da r kened stage. The decision 
to overlay GoUnm’s voice npon 
itself spoiled that encounter 
but momentum picked up 
again with David Lmnsden’s 
excellent Beont, rough and 
heavily moving like the bear 
he changes into. 

High spot of the evening is 
the dragon Srnang, scaly and 
huge, on its nest of treasure. 
Impressively handled by a 
puppeteer below its neck, ami 
speaking with the sarcastic 
George Sanders politeness ex- 
pected of such beasts, it then 
comes forward (four other 
puppeteers controlling its 
glittering wings) to stretch its 
neck across the orchestra pit 
and screech in rage before 
expiring like a collapsed 
pterodactyl. 

Jeremy Kingston 


Complicating a classic 


DANCE 


The Nutcracker 

Royal, Plymouth 


i The Nutcracker could be one 
of the easiest of the classic 
ballets to produce, but almost 
everyone who tackles it now- 
adays decides to complicate 
matters. Peter Schaufuss, in 
his version, sponsored by 
Digital and premiered by the 
London Festival Ballet is no 
exception. 

He has obviously been read- 
ing Professor Wiley’s writings 
about Tchaikovsky's ballet 
music, so the first change he 
makes is to identify all the 
characters with members of 
Tchaikovsky’s family, the 
composer himself becoming 
Drossdmeyer, the others be- 
ing drawn mainly from his 
sister's household. 

As an exercise in ingenuity, 
requiring pages of explication 
in the cast list and programme 
notes, it is rather impressive. 
In practice, it makes surpris- 
ingly little difference to the 
plot, and there are so many 
minor personages huddled 
around the stage that you 
hardly notice, and certainly do 
not recognize, them. 

The other big change is 
more obtrusive. Schaufuss 
must needs drag in the epi- 
sodes from Hoffmann's story 
which were left out of the 
ballet’s original libretto. So we 
get the barely relevant tale of 
Princess Pirlipat, the mice and 
the hard nut, not once but 
twice; first as a dumb show 
performed by children with 
captions (because otherwise 
we should have no idea what it 
meant), and then in tableaux 
vtvants during an added scene 
showing little Tanya’s deliri- 
ous illness. 

This would not be possible 
without taking considerable 
liberties with the music. An 
extract from the beginning of 
Act II gets tacked on to Act I, 
immediately after the over- 
ture, to introduce Tchaikov- 
sky and his valet, who 
becomes the romantic lead. 

Two piano pieces from the 
Children’s Album are inter- 
polated in the party to show 
Drosselmeyer's sensitive 
relationship with niece Tanya 
(which was never in doubt 
anyway). For the illness, we 
get music from the early opera 
Voynoda, and a funeral march 





English Concert/ 

Pinnock 

Barbican 

This event was, if nothing else, 
a triumph of inverse market- 
ing. Corelli’s Christmas Con- 
certo. Vivaldi’s Gloria, the 
Rflrh efmtntn containing Jesu. 
Joy of Man’s Desiring , all 
performed by some of 
Britain’s most distinguished 
baroque musicians: how did 
they manage to keep the 
audience away? News of the 
concert obviously crept out to 
some punters, though. Was 
there a leak? Was MI5 
involved? 

The fact is that some works 
are so “popular” that the 
discer nin g musical public 
(and one presumes that the 
English Concert aims to at- 
tract the discerning public) 
actually shuns them. Vivaldi's 
Gloria, which must be per- 
formed on average about once 


Prissy, 

precise 

CONCERTS 


every hour in December by 
school and amateur choirs, is 
such a work. 

Moreover, I would rather 
have heard it sung with ama- 
teur gusto and pride than in 
the way it was delivered here 

— precise, prissy and deadpan. 
Trevor Pinnock’s direction 

ensured a neat scheme of 
dynamics was immaculately 
executed. Only the music's 
heart and soul were missing. 

The English Concert and its 
choir seemed considerably 
more roused by Bach — the 
“Visitation” cantata, Herz 

und Murid urtd TatvndLeben 

— and rightly so. 


It contained some of Bach’s 
most felicitous instrumental 
writing, notably for oboes (of 
both the d’amore and da 
caccia ilk), violin, cello and — 
blaring festively over the big- 
ger ensembles - trumpet 

Not all of these solos were as 
faultlessly delivered as the 
players would have wished. 
But at least the general feeling 
was of spirit and boldness. 

There was much pleasant 
solo singing, too. Carolyn 
Watkinson, who had seemed 
to be straying under pilch in 
the Vivaldi, recovered her 
usual poise in the alto aria 
Schdmedick. 

Lorna Anderson shaped the 

phrases of Berate dir. Jesu 
very naturally, though her 
timbre seemed to thin out 
rather obviously at the top. 

Alasdair Elliott and Stephen' 
Varcoe seized their brief 
opportunities with style and 
vigour. 

Richard Morrison 


Another shimmering first 


.V- 

, - v\ • '.7' 

,* *5 :• * • v • \\ 





Youth at the prow; Trinidad SevBbuio and Matz Scoog, the young lovers in The Nutcracker 


from HamleL To this last, 
mice defeated in battle stage a 
procession so like Napoleon’s 
retreat from Moscow that the 
1812 Overture might almost 
be more apt 

All these nhang pg interrupt 
the coherent and universally 
popular score which is the 
ballet’s main attraction: what 
kind of compliment to 
Tchaikovsky is that? 

David Walker's designs for 
the Christmas Party are 
acceptably grand, but the 
transformation to the Land of 
Snow is a sad 1 m down, like a 
rejected, first draft for Les 


Patineurs, and the second act 
presumably takes place in the 
Land of Kitsch. 

Schaufuss, in his first at- 
tempt at original choreog- 
raphy, shows some ability, as 
you would expect, at arranging 
solos for men. His best inven- 
tion is the Russian ' d ance, 
done as a male trio, tremen- 
dously energetic, although thi« 
will be better if he drops the 
childish joke of making them 
pretend to drink from vodka 
bottles while dancing. (Simi- 
larly, 1 hope be has second 
thoughts about showing 
Drossehneyer smoking-all the 





Hme- hardly the ihing for a 
famil y show.) 

Bui the rest of the choreog- 
raphy suggests that Schaufuss 
would do better to stick, in 
future, to the multiple talents 
he already demonstrated, 
inataaH of Hatimii^g One fhfft i 
very apparently, is not iris. 

One of his gifts is dial of 
developing a really strong 
company. At this first perfor- 
mance, even the small parts 
were largely cast from prin- 
cipals and soloists, and there 
were no weak links anywhere. 

Detailed comment on the 
performances, with multiple 
casting , can await foe Festival 
HaQ season, but I must men- 
tion Trinidad Sevillino and 
Matz Skoog, ideal young lov- 
ers, and welcome Christopher 
Bruce’s return to the stage, 
even in so nebulous a role as 
Tchaflcovsky/Drossehneyer. 

John Perdval 


LPO /Downes 
Festival Hall 


The Royal Philharmonic Soci- 
ety, which revels in its reputa- 
tion for world premieres, 
notched up another first on 
Wednesday night. Delius 
wrote his single-movement 
orchestral American Rhap- 
sody while he was in Paris, as 
part of foe gestation process of 
his later Appalachia, with its 
choral apotheosis. 

A lost eight-bars’ worth of 
manuscript made foe earlier 
work unavailable for perfor- 
mance until Philip Jones, of 
York University, did some 
reconstruction work, and pre- 
sented the London Phil- 
harmonic and Edward Do- 
wnes - with foe plearing 
Fran co-Atlantic medley we 
heard. 

Twelve minutes is just 
about long enough for this 
carousel of tunes mom the Big 
Country, exquisitely orche- 


strated, variated, and bound 
together in a river-mist of 
added sixths, shimmering 

rremolandi and melismatic 
wind writing. Berlioz-style 
brass (cornets, trumpets, tenor 
trombones) and Dixieland 
rhythms combine to flex foe 
work’s muscle: Downes drew 
outstanding playing from all 
sections of foe orchestra. 

Talking of jazz, it was Nigel 
Kennedy. I suspect, who, 
through Elgar, provided foe 
audience for Delius and, later, 
Vaughan Williams. 

The award-winning Violin 
Concerto was put on show 
again; the “Cathedral” Stradi- 
vari us glowed its way through 
the work’s emotional mael- 
stroms; and foe impassioned 
sense of -fresh encounter, 
which Kennedy never peases 
to bring to the work, was 
matched by orchestral playing 
which breathed deep from the 

rfinphragni. 

It was Downes and 

Vau ghan W illiams, th o ugh, 


who provided foe evening’s 
substance. It was one of those 
occasion in which eye and ear 
gave foe same message. The 
tension in Downes’s shoul- 
ders, hunched over the min- 
iature score, emblemized foe 
smouldering concentration of 
his reading of the Ninth 
Symphony. 

‘Dedicated to foe Royal 
Philharmonic Society, this last 
symphony was composed just 
three years after 
Shostakovich’s tenth: this 
performance urged us to an 
awareness of the composers’ 
strange and subtle kinship. 

Downes emphasized foe 
austerity of outline in the 
outer movements. He drew 
energy from the striding oo ’ 
taves and augmentations and * 
diminutions of the first, and 
foe tensely lyrical cantilena of. 
foe last, and made of foe 
Andante and Scherzo a march 
and danse macabre of fierce - 
primitivism. 


Hilary Finch 


"The only play in London it has been impossible to see' 

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THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 






SPECTRUM 


Fis]^ tA«m tliiit hnnkpn P> 


The deckhands of 


Peterhead have 


money to spare 


for fast cars and 


foreign holidays. 


Howard Foster 


investigates 


A bleak November 
Sunday afternoon 
in the Scottish fish- 
ing town of 
Peterhead Inside 
die granite fishermen’s houses 
the older people relax after 
lunch. Is a layby on the edge 
of town their sons are prepar- 
ing to take part in a weekly 
ritual that will soon shatter the 
silence of the Sabbath. 

There, obscuring a series of 
No Parking signs are 40 new 
or almost new sports saloons, 
about £500,000 worth of 
young man’s dream with 
expensive stereo systems 
pumping out pop to the 
surrounding countryside. At a 
given signal, the first car pulls 
'out onto the road and the 
others follow nose to tail as the 
Peterhead young bloods begin 
“The Circuit” that takes them 
round the streets of their 
home town and up to the next 
port, Fraserburgh, to while 
away foe Sunday “cruising” in 
-true mid-American fashion. 

These men, in their late 
teens, are a working-class 
.phenomenon. They are 
mainl y deckhands working 
the fishing fleet out of 
Peterhead and they enjoy a 
spending power unrivalled by 
their peers just about any- 
where in Britain. Conser- 
vative estimates put their 
earnings at £500 a week when 
the fishing is poor. Usually 
they pocket more than £1,000 
once the money earned from 
the week’s catch is divided 
between the crew every Friday 
on Peterhead’s fishing quay. 

“In the past three and a half 
weeks I have made £8,000,” 
said one 18-year-old deck- 
hand, his hair still bleached 
from a Mediterranean holiday 
with his friends. He drives a 
new Audi sports car and those 
who know the state of fishing 
in Peterhead do not doubt that 
he is telling the tnith. 


Fastestfishennram tire west SHmranded by spmts cars, ^ young Mooferrf Peterhead parepare for “The C3naHt”rofflid thdr lwrae town and to the next port They have oeen Known m pay «« 


W hile Aberdeen, 
32 miles down 
the exposed and 
windy Eastern 
Scottish coast 
from Peterhead, feds the chill 
of the oil recession, these 
young men are helping to fend 
off the effects of rising un- 
employment for their town. It 1 
is rare for Scotland, where 
link is heard nowadays other 
than tales of new redun- 
dancies and economic decline. 

Alistair Buchan, at 22, is a 
car salesman at the local Ford 
dealer in Peterhead. He went 
to school with a lot of the 
fishermen who are now bis 
customers. “They will come 
in, choose a sports car that 
sells for about £9,000 or 


£10,000 and pay for it in full 
either with cash or a cheque. 
Some take a particular model 
because they like the colour,” 
says Alistair, whose garage, 
although only in business 

three years, is already building 
a new site three times its 
present size dose by. 

“Sometimes they smash 
their new cars up and rather 
than wait for the repair some 
have been known to buy 
another straight away. They 
have tittle else to spend their 
money on and when they are 
away for days on end, and at 
home so little, their cash soon 
mounts up.” 

Not that Peterhead flinches 
when the fleet hits town on 
Friday night Drinking and 
driving is comparatively rare 
and some of the youngsters 
who join “The Circuit” fit it in 
between as many as three 
visits to church on Sunday. 
Half-a-dozen strict religious 
brethren groups still maintain 
a hold on their young. Men 
and women still tend to marry 
young among the fishing, 
community and after playing 
the field the fisherman usu- 
ally finds himself a “quine” — 
fishergiri - and settles down 
to have children. 

Vauxhall and Opds are 
“flavour of the month” with 
the young fishermen. Mantas 
and Astra GTBs constantly 
glide through Peterhead. The 
older fishermen and the 
trawler skippers seem to prefer 
an Audi or a Mercedes. Occa- 
sionally a new Jaguar arrives 
on the streets although one 


skipper is known to keep his 
model almost permanoitly 
cosseted inside his garage. 

Ronnie Gordon, a local 
furniture trader, recounts tales 
of orders for hand-made silk 
sheets from Hatreds, £3,000 
sitting-room suites and costly, 
furnishings replaced annually 
for the sake of it. “Purchases 
are made on the basis of how 
much something costs,” Gor- 
don says. “One woman re- 
jected a £ 1 50 duvet because it 
was not expensive enough.” 


the past 12 months — more 
than rivals Aberdeen and 
Ullapool put together. 

A few weeks ago the long 
queues of boats waiting to 
lmtnad at tiie quayside filled 
more than 6,000 eight-stone 
boxes with fish for the first 
time ever. Confidence in the 
future of fishing is helping to 
ease unemployment in Peter- 
head, currently around 14 per 
cent 


T he prosperity of the 
fishing community 
in Peterhead is based 
on its harbour. Until 
the 1970s, Aberdeen 
was synonymous with North 
Sea fishing. Then, as the 
Granite Gty geared itself up to 
meet the ofl boom and with 
fishermen becoming increas- 
ingly disenchanted with its 
unwieldy and restrictive 
Docks Labour Scheme, the 
move to Peterhead began. 

Peterhead offered a new 
harbour basin, a non-union- 
ized quay where the trawler 
crews could quickly unload 
their catch for safe in the 
market, and proximity to the 
haddock, cod and herring 
fishing grounds. Fish buyers 
began to move to Peterhead to 
take the catches from the 
'boats, and more boats started 
to unload where the buyers 
were. 

It is now the biggest fishing 
port in Europe, and last week 
announced that it had landed 
£63 million-worth of fish in 


Len Stainton, the local fish 
merchant, has never em- 
ployed more workers in his 
fish processing plant He has 
70 on his books, earning 
around £157 for a 40-hour 
week filleting fish. Increas- 
ingly, he says, unemployed 
fish workers from Hull, 
Grimsby and Fleetwood are 
coming to Peterhead. 

“Work is becoming avail- 
able all the time. We now 
supply Spain, France, Ger- 
many and Belgium as well as 
Britain. There is little the 
Japanese could teach us about 
management involvement If 
they need someone to help cut 
fish, I get stuck in. There are 
so unions in the fishing 
trade,” he says. 

Nobody begrudges the high 
wages paid to the fishermen: 
“When yon have waves break- 
ing over the boat, it’s bobbing 
like a cork, it’s cold and you 
have to fish 24 hours at one 
go, you deserve the money 
you earn. It’s a dangerous job 
and these are real men,” says 
Walter Milne, master of the 
Faithful IL 


Next March, workbegins on 
an ambitious £18 million 
harbour expansion pro- 
gramme. Captain Alec Anld, 
the harbourmaster, says that 
there are 18 new beats on 
order for the Peterhead fleet, 
at a cost of about £1 millio n 
eacfa.“We will be looking for 
government and EEC grants 
for our new harbour basm but 
ft has to be said that the banks 
seem keen to lend us money. 
They, and I, feel confident 
about the future,” says Cap- 
lain Auld. 


B ut the danger signs 
are there, say some 
connected with the 
fishing industry. 
Captain John D. 
Buchan, although now 76, still 
retains shares in fishing boats 
and is chairman of Britain’s 
largest ice ' factory at 
Peterhead. 


Envy of the deckhands: at 20, George Forman has already written ofTtwo £22,000 Pbrches 


He, like Stainton and oth- 
ers, is worried about the 
scarcity of fish in the future. 
He blames illegal nets used by 
the Norwegians and the Danes 
for the shortage of haddock 
and cod; “Cod has doubled in 
price in the past year and the 
fishermen are making more 
money off fewer fish,” says 
Captain Buchan. 


i Peterhead is now the only 
place to sell or buy fish’ 


“Unless we have some 
conservation soon, Tin very 
pessi m istic about the future. 
The only good thing is that 
Peterhead wfll be the best 
equipped port in Europe to 
withstand recession. That is 
one thing to be thankful for”. 


Among the young men making 
a large amount of money from 
die fishing boon is George 
Forman. At 20 he already runs 
three separate businesses and 
from 6am he is on the 
fishmarket baying fish for 
firms all over Britain and 
Earope. He combines this with 
a fish transporting business 
and has recently started a 
processing company. He em- 
ploys 16 people and is about to 
take on another three. 


George Forman enjoys a 
car-owning reputation in 
Peterhead that is the envy of 
the young deckhands. He has 
already written 'off two 
£22,080 Porsches and with an 
insurance premium veering 
alarmingly towards £2,000 a 
year be has had to settle for a 
top of the range BMW. This 
Christmas he will be taking a 
three- week break in Hawaii. 

“1 can honestly say that 
nothing wfll spoil the scene 


here,” says Forman. “We have 
the best futilities in Europe 
and we are expanding all the 
time. Peterhead is now the ‘ 
only place to come if yon want 
to buy or sell fish. Fish has 
finally been recognized as a 
health; product and sales are 
improving. 

“We have high prices at the 
m oment but happily there is 
no sign yet that they will reach 
a level where people wfll refuse 
to pay.” 


f TIM ESI 


SATURDAY 


£12,000 to be won 


Merrily on high 


From Ca nterbu ry to York, from Alexandra Palace to 
Trafalgar Square, the sheers wfll dutifully rhyme their 
evetime songs this Christmas. Tomorrow The Times 
gives a gride to the best carol concerts — piss some 
shopping ideas, both for those who favour Christmas 
post and for those who like their presents hi-tech 


Two turtle We will rock 

doves ... k you . . . 
Unusual gifts for Best of the year’s 
the garden jazz and pop 


For the man who lays un- 
disputed claim to the title of 
Britain's champion pub 
crawler, Alisdair Atrd scarcely 
looks the pert In the last six 
years he has supped in more 
than 2,000 hostdries up and 
down the land. Yet his lean, 
athletic frame shows no trace 
of the true enthusiast’s usual 
beer belly. And at each port of 
call he arrives, and leaves, as 
sober as a judge. Scarcely 
surprising, because a judge of 
licensed houses is exactly what 
he is. 

Next Monday, the Con- 
sumers Association’s 1987 
Good Pub Guide (£8.95) will 
go on sale. Its 1,200 main 
entries will have two things in 
common. Each pub will have 
been personally visited by the 
guide’s indefatigable editor. 
And when next visited, each 
landlord will foil to recognize 
the man who, like all true 
undercover investigators, 
wears his anonymity tike a 
chain of office. 

For a quarter of every year 


Alisdair Aird has a 


drink at 2,000 


pubs a year— and 


all in a good cause 


6 1 hate 
pubs 
that are 


just too 
local 9 


Sapping for 

Alisdair And 


He always arrives, 
and leaves, as 
sober as a judge 


Can you always gel your copy of The Times? 

Dear Newsagent, please deliver/save me a copy of The Times 


NAME. 


ADDRESS, 


Aird drives himself the 1< 
and breadth of Britain on 
mission of discovery, and the 
pint pot in front of him when 
we met at The George, a 
historic pub in Southwark, 
south London, was a rare 
indulgence. 

“Usually I go in, order a half 
pint of beer, take the top off ft 
and have a surreptitious look 
around," he says. “When a 
pub is very busy, particularly 
in the summer, it’s easy to 
dispose of the rest of the glass. 
At quiet times, and especially 
in the north, it’s much harder 
and I have a magnificent list of 
excuses.”Describing his tastes 
as “catholic”, Aird likes a 
drop of almost anything 
providing it is well kept. “I am 
particularly fond of malt 
whisky,” he says. 

Aird first had the idea of 
producing a guide to good 
pubs while he was working for 
the Consumer Association’s 


Holiday Which? magazine, 
but only in 1979, when he had 
left to become a freelance 
researcher, (fid he brain to put 
his ambition into effect. 

Touring the country at ran- 
dom, he took three years to 
compile enough material for 
his first guide, published four 
years ago. Even then selection 
was, he admits, sometimes 
rather arbitrary. “If a pub car 
park was crowded I used to 
pop inside, and if it wasn't I 
would drive straight past,” he 
recalls. 


from cooling equipment and 
fens. 

“I don't like pubs where you 
are expected to have some- 
thing to eat and which treat 
you tike second class citizens 
if you don't and, particularly 
for my book, I don't like pubs 
which are really locals to the 
uncomfortable exclusion' of 
strangers — Hertfordshire and 
Bedfordshire tend to be 
particularly hostile in that 
respect” 

And the itinerant British 


Now, however, his judge- 
ment is assisted by a huge 
army of amateur sleuths who 
correspond with him regu- 
larly. “As I can't hope to get 
round to every pub in the 
guide every year, I can be 
fairly certain that one of my 
informants will tip me off if 
ay. there is a change of 
management or a pronounced 
drop in standard.” 


Informants tip 
him off If 
standards drop 


His pet hates? “I don’t like 
fuzzy, intrusive piped music. I 
don’t like lighting designed to 
reach only down to table-top 
level — I see no reason why a 
pub floor should not be at feast 
as clean as the pavement 
outside. I don’t like pubs 
which leave dirty glasses on 
the table and which have 
excessive noise behind the bar 


pub lover's happiest hunting 
'ground? “Definitely 
Yorkshire,” he says, without a 
hint of diplomatic hesitation. 

So will Aird put down his 
critic’s pen one day and 
practise the kind of mine host 
excellence he applauds in 
others? “Certainly not,” he 
declares. “For one thing the 
working hours are ridiculous, 
and for another, there are an 
awful lot of perfectly horrible 
customers whom I couldn’t 
stand for a minute.” 


William Greaves 

© Thnaa Hwmwrt Ud 19* 


A song of squalor 


A gy p sy violinist, as the 
tourist brochures da fan. Is a 
delightful part of dining oat in 
Hungary. But Jew diners, 
hilled by the sound of the 
cymbafaxn, realize that they 
are listening to a repre- 
sentative of Europe's poorest 
ethnic minority. 

The dark-skinned virtuoso 
at die for end of toe Budapest 
restaurant represents only a 
small privileged percentage of 
Hungary’s 400,000 gypsies, 
most of whoa live in appalling 
squalor. 

Ia some narrow side streets 
off Budapest’s Rakocszi 
Square, toe shop windows are 
filled with hand-made string 
instruments. These are the 
tools of existence of the 
wealthier gypsies and on a 
calm Monday evening, almost 
every flat reverberates to toe 
sound of five-year-olds tortn- 
ously practising their scales. 

The mnsfcfauB are tradition- 
ally toe a ris tocrats of toe 
gypsy community. A few 
closely related families pro- 
duce generation after genera- 
tion of cymbaknn players, 
riofimsts and bass players. All 
of the hands who (flay in 
Budapest's luxnry restaurants 
are in the hands of these 
families, who five in tramped 
bowses with gambling facades 
anxmd Rakocszi Square. 

The square is an eccentric 
red light district where dis- 
creet prostitution occurs after 
dark. Propping np the bars are 
dark Romany beauties, seldom 
seen by the businesssmen from 
the West who are encouraged 
to court the seductive Magyar 
girls around the expensive 
hotels along the Danube. 

Although the Rakocszi 
Square dwellings have not 
been restored or modernized 
for decades, they sue consid- 
ered luxurious by the gypsies 
from the country. In the towns 
and villages of eastern Hun- 
gary, gypsy families with five 
children habitually share one 
room. Sanitation is primitive. 


For the poorest 


ethnic minority in 


Europe, music is 


the only escape 


from daily misery 


lacking even the most ele- 
mentary plumbing. 

It is the shocking housing 
conditiqns of toe poor majority 
which most concerns those 
Hungarians who believe that 
the state should treat toe 
gypsies more fairly. Social 
workers estimate that 350,000 
live in these conditions ami 
Magyars have nicknamed the 
eastern region around Debre- 
cen, where most gypsies live, 
“H angary’s Sicily”. 

The Hungarians regard 
gypsies with loathing and 
distrust Although there are 


much' sma ll e r ethnic minor- 
ities in Hungary which have 
official recognition from Buda- 
pest, gypsies enjoy no such i 
status. In schools, gypsy chit- 
drea are often lamped together 
with mentally handicapped 
children. Predictably, few are 
able to better themselves. 

Caught between the indif- 
ference of their better-off 
brothers and the distrust of the 
authorities, they are trapped 
in an existence which caw only 
lead to bitter resentment. 
While so little of the country’s 
wealth is channelled Into 
improving their education and 
tiring conditions, the crime 
rate among gypsies will con- 
tinue to rise and Hungary wfij 
have both the poorest and the 
wealthiest inhabitants in east- 
ern Europe. - ‘ 


Richard Bassett 


© Times Noupapara Lid 1988 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 130 


ACROSS 


I Sleeveless jacket (6) 
4 Parched (6) 

7 Diy< 4 ) 

8 In the open (8) 

9 Anlemf7) 

11 Stray (5) 

12 British banking 
world (7,6) 

15 Cotton thread (5) 

16 Unclear (7) 

20 Courteous (8) 

21 Unoccupied (4) 

22 Convincing (6) 

23 Assuredly (6) 


DOWN 


1 Weepy (7) 

2 Tree heath (5) 

3 Depletion (5) 

4 Petty quarrel (4) 

5 Intern! (7) 

6 Due(S) 


10 &cape( 5 ) IS Reasoning system ( 5 ) 

11 lx>ves excessively (5) 17 Foundation (5) 

13 Wild horse (7) 18 Unwarranted <51 

14 Because of that (7) 19 JosUe(4) 

SOLUTION TO NO 1129 


ACROSS: 1 Rotund 4 Feeble 9 Verruca 10 Balsa II Rhea i 
glJSTSSi ,8SUiPaSS 24 Oversee 


12 De- 


DOWN: 1 Rave 2 Torch 3 Neuralgia 5 Ebb 6 Ballast 7 Enacts 
8 Pandora's Box 11 R» 13 Thankless ]5 Unravel ifi Sin 
17 Asylum 20 Loser 2l Rely 23 Rod. 


* 






THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


FRIDAY PAGE 



17 











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A generation bom to die? 


The heart break of 
Aids is bad enough 
for adults, but a new 


Tom KM 


generation is comin g 
into the world under 
its shadow, say s 
* Thomson Prentice 

T he odds have always been 
slacked against Jamie 
McConville. His entrance 
mto the world last Feb- 
ruaiy was overshadowed 
oy danger to himself, to his mother 
and to the medical staff who 
delivered him. An hour before his 
birth in a Scottish hospital isolation 
room, maternity' wand nurses began 
slipping on protective gloves, ma^ 
and aprons. “They didn’t tell me 
exactly why those precautions were 
necessary", his mother says. “But I 
knew. I was heartbroken few my 
■ baby even before he was bom.” 

Jamie is a child of the Aids 
generation. He was infected in the 
. womb by the human 

immuno- 
deficiency virus (HIV) that his 
mother was carrying, and there is a 
substantial risk that he may soon 
contract the disease. 

Now, at 10 months, he is a 
healthy, happy infant, showing no 
symptoms. But knowledge of Aids 
is, like understanding of the disease, 
also still in its infan cy For the rest 
of his life, Jamie wiO have to be 
regularly monitored by specialists. 

So too will at least 30 other 
British babies and their mothers 
who are similarly infected. Two 
infants have already developed the 
disease. Almost all the cases so far 
have involved mothers who were 
heroin addicts and who, like Jamie's 
mother, hmimt* carriers as a result 
of sharing contaminated needles 
with other drug abusers. Fifteen 
women have contracted Aids in 
« Britain, and seven have died. 

As Aids infection spreads, grow- 
ing numbers of women who do not 
abuse drugs are at risk from sexual 
transmission of HIV. For than as 
much as for the addicts, the risks 
associated with pregnancy and 
motherhood are truly dreadful 
“No mother on earth wants to 
Jose her baby, but losing Jamie to 

W hen they heard that 
their son, Peter, was 
an Aids virus carrier, 
his parents fett an- 
noyed. “We didn't 
think it was oar tram for another 
problem. Bat now we just want to let 
people know the positive things we 
feel about it”, says Norman, his 
father, a 36-year-old computer sys- 
tems manager . 

Eighteen months ago Peter, a 
haemophiliac, developed antibodies 
to the vires after receiving contami- 
nated Mood-dotting agent. He was 
then nine, and it was the first case of 
its kind in Britain. “Bat we are level- 
' beaded, and haemophiliacs and 
their families are used to dealing 
with problems”, says. Norman. 

To the family’s disappointment, 
the local haemophilia centre did not 
know what to do. They didn't seem 
surprised that it had happened, bnt 

said that there was nothing to worry 
about”, says Peter’s mother, Do- 
reen. Aids is not a notifiable disease, 
bnt because of the risks ofblood 
spillage the parents deckled to 
inform Peter’s primary school' “We 



Lorraine McConville and Jamie, happiness under a dond: “I was heartbroken even before he was bom T 


Aids is the worst prospect 
imaginable", Lorraine McConvifie 
says. “Every morning when I wake I 
pick him up in my arms and search 
for any sign that he is unwelL Every 
night f go to sleep praying that he 
will be spared. 

“At the back of my mind there is 
the knowledge that 1 could develop 
Aids myself I'm trying to come to 
terms with that, but my real worry is 
the baby. What would happen to 
him if I should die?” 

The Secretary of State for Social 
Services shares all her anxieties. 
“The birth of babies infected with 
Aids is perhaps the most tragic 
consequence of the spread of this 
disease”, Noonan Fowler says.“It 


shows what we are up against. It 
underlines the need for women, as 
well as men, to lake every 
precaution.” 

Dr JacqueHne Mok, a consultant 
paediatrician in Edinburgh, is 
closely involved in the care of 25 
babies, inducting Jamie, who are 
carriers of the virus. “If we believe 
die evidence from international 
research, the outlook is grim” she 
says. “American researchers cal- 
culate that 50 per cent of g«* 
infants will die within a year of 
birth, and that 80 per cent are dead 
by the age of three.” 

About 300 babies in America 
have so far contracted Aids. Dr Mok 
emphasizes, however, that there are 


too many unknown factors in- 
volved in the development of Aids 
in babies to assess the risks ac- 
curately. “There are many ques- 
tions that need to be answered. We 
are followup up all the children 
because we have no idea what the 
exact rate of transmission of the 
infection is.” 

A scientific study of Aids-infected 
infants in Europe is being planned, 
with Dr Mok a leading participant 
in a group of experts. Britain will co- 
ordinate the study, which wiO 
involve babies from West Ger- 
many, the Netherlands, Italy and 
France. The Flench Society of 
Perinatal Medicine has already 
warned that Aids could be the most 


How one family is coping 


warded them to take precautions in 
case Frier injured himself m the 
playground.” 

The result was that many of tire 
parents, fearful for their ddMica, 
boycotted the school - and a qoarter 
of the pupils were kept away. “I 
thought they were going to come and 
daub our house with a red cross,” 
says Doreen. The coqple were 
particularly worried that the distur- 
bance would escalate and that Pieter 
would be taken away from sdkooL 
“Being haemophiliac, he can’t ever 
do manual labour. He desperately 
needs his education”, Norman 
explains. 

However, after two public meet- 
ings and a talk at the school by an 
Aids expert, the outcry died down. 
Classes were back to normal after 
three weeks. Indeed, Doreen and 
Norman were impressed with the 
support they received. “The only 
tone I got really depressed was when 


our dentist refined to continue 
treating any of ns”, Doreen says. 
“But Peter’s friends went out of 
thefr way to play with him and invite 
him round to tea.” In addition, they 
frit the school eased a lot of the 
pressure daring the trouble, install- 
ing a special assistant to allay 
parents’ fears and keep a watch on 
Peter. 

Norman’s complaint fa that, de- 
spite an impression to the contrary, 
there is no counseffing and back-iqi 
system available to families of 
carriers, “fa just doesn’t exist We 
haven’t been offered anything unless 
we have gone out of oar way to ask 
for it” “In a way, it was fortunate 
that the problem happened to as”, 
Doreen adds. “Peter was young, so it 
was not the emotional shock it worid 
have beat for somebody older. And 
because of his haemophilia, be has 
always had to face up to toe problem 
of being different It could have 


happened to a less confident 
Amity” Both parents have been 
tested for Aids and been hod 
antibody ne ga t iv e . It is reassuring to 
think that yon can five in such dose 
contact wfth someone without being 
contaminated. As far as Peter is 
concerned, he is bored with all the 
fuss.” 

Their son's predicament has had 
little effect oa their day-to-day lives. 
They stifi kiss and coddle him, and 
simply observe normal hygiene 
precautions. “We keep an eye on 
any health problems — but you 
would do that with any child. We are 
raindfnl of Mood spjfbge and take 
extra care when infecting him, to 
avoid jabbing ourselves,” Doreen 
explains. The only time she was 
scared was when Peter developed 
what she thought were the first signs 
of the virus — swollen glands. It 
turned out to be mumps. 

They have yet to face foe greatest 


common infectious disease among 
new-born children next year. 

Like Jamie, the babies may 
appear to be perfectly healthy. 
Clinical illness is, however, usually 
apparent in the first six months. 
Failure to thrive, recurrent fevers, 
respiratory disease and persistent 
infections are foe most ominous 
signs. “Every time he gets a little 
cold I Stan to fear the worst”, Mrs 
McConville says at her home in 
Dunfermline, Fife, where she cares 
for Jamie and his two older, 
unaffected, brothers. 

Tests on Jamie have shown a 
decline in the HIV antibodies foal 
be acquired from his mother. The 
critical question is whether be will 
develop antibodies of his own. If so, 
it win mean he is more at risk 
Monitoring the mothers is equally 
important. For them — and any 
other woman who becomes a carrier 
of the Aids virus — foe usually 
pleasurable prospects of sex. preg- 
nancy and childbirth are Iife-loog 
hazards. Sex is dangerous because of 
foe risk of transmitting the infection 
through vaginal fluids to foe male 

A U infected women are 
warned not to have 
intercouse unless foe man 
uses a condom. Preg- 
nancy is dangerous be- 
cause it lowers the maternal 
immunological system, causing in- 
creased susceptibility to some infec- 
tions, and may trigger the onset of 
an Aids-related condition. 

One of the 25 Edinburgh women 
who gave birth to infected tobies 
did so despite medical advice that 
she should have an abortion. Two 
others subsequently became preg- 
nant again. Both were strongly 
advised to have abortions, and did 
so. Childbirth is dangerous because 
it poses additional risks to mother 
and child of HIV infection, and 
means that maternity staff must 
observe safeguards. 

Lorraine McConville somehow 
keeps the nightmares at toy, busy- 
ing herself with foe daily routine of 
caring for Jamie and her two other 
sons.“I know that I can never have 
another child, even if I wanted to” 
she says. “That's a small price to 
pay for my stupidity in getting 
involved in drugs. 

“What I can never come to terms 
with is the horrible start to life that I 
gave my baby. The guilt never 
leaves me. All I can do is hope 
against the odds that Jamie will stay 
healthy.” 

problems. They are worried, for 
instance, about his next school 
“Parents will be involved who 
haven’t been before. Bat we have 
gone through die battle far his 
education, and Oat has bid (he 
cornerstone far foe next straggle”, 
Norman says. “Then there fa (he 
problem of girls,” Doreen says. “I 
can envisage irate parents taming 
np on my doorstep when Peter gets 
to foe stage of trying to kiss girls. 
And what will happen when he 
wants to marry and have children? 
All we can do is give him foe 
information and support and ensure 
that be is honest.” 

Always in their mhtd sis foe 
possibility (hat Peter might develop 
foe full-blown Abb syndrome. “It 
makes me sick when people bang on 
about divine retribution, homosex- 
uals and pre-faculty”, Doreen says. 
“I think — what about a 10-year-old 
haemophiliac? If he develops the 
syndrome, we’ll cope. Yon can’t fast 
crumble into a heap.” 

Caroline Phillips 

©Timas newspapers Ltd IMS 


MEDICAL BRIEFING 


Whistle 
and puff 

A cardboard whistle being 
evaluated in foe Paediatric 
Department at foe University 
of Sheffield may prove as 
important an advance in medi- 
cine as pieces of hi-tech 

nwphiitf fy CT Sting hnndmfa of 

thousands of times as much. 
One of foe factors which has 
been found responsible for 
death from asthma fa the 
difficulty of measnring the loss 
of long Auction daring an 
attack; experience shows that 
patients and their general 
practitioners find it difficult to 
estimate just how severe the 


Despite foe production of 
portable peak flow meters, a 
simple device for measnring 
long function, a clinical 
assessment is usually the only 
test to which the patient is 
submitted. Delay in seeking 
specialist advice, folio wing 
failure to recognise the 
seriousness of an attack of 
asthma, is a frequent cause of 
catastrophe. 

Parents who have straggled 


trifo a peak flow meter and 
found it difficult to persuade 
their child to Mow into it 
repot that blowing down a 
whistle can be quite fun in- 
stead, and that a patient soon 
learns to master iL 

The particular whistle, 
manufactured by Alternate 
Resources Ltd, is a cylinder 
which has a number of holes 
along it with a month piece at 
one end and a whistle at foe 
other. The amount of puff 
needed to Mow foe whistle is 
proportional to the number of 
holes open; the more holes 

open, the harder the child will 
have to blow to make a noise. 
The device has been graduated 
by comparing its readings with 
those obtained when using a 
Wright peak flow meter. It has 
the additional advantage that 
foe whistle will sound if the 
child sucks rather than Mows. 

A report in foe British 
Medical Journal about the 
work in Sheffield suggests that 
the peak flow whistle is cheap 
and effective and that its low 
cost, less than a seventh of 
that of a conventional peak 
flow meter, should greatly 
extend foe u umber of parents 
who monitor their children's 
asthma attacks. 


Pressure on meat eaters 


m 


Vegetarians have always insisted that if the rest 
of the community would follow their diet they 
would be healthier in general and their blood 
pressure in particular would be reduced. Casual 
observation of the red-faced, jolly butcher 
would seam to confirm their view, but until 
recently there has been no large-scale, carefully 
monitored trial. Now the British Medical Journal reports the 
results of a randomized cross-over trial carried out in Western 
Australia where 58 people between the ages of 30 and 64, 
who were mildly hypertensive, were switched to an eggs and 
vegetarian diet Their systolic Mood pressure fell by an 
average of 5mm. Although this improvement seems very 
marginal, statisticians estimate that such a ten would reduce 
the coronary heart rate by seven per cent 
The general public, however, would be untikefy to feel that 
the loss of meat from their diet made this worthwhile; indeed, 
most of the Australians who gave up their steaks during the 
clinical trial could not wait to return to an omnivorous diet 


Risky vision 



r^=rri Visitors to foe 
annual Hog 
MPttfesJ Air at Bungay 
Filin “ Suflblkfois 
year were able 
to take time off 

I - — * from bowling 

for foe pig to visit the St 
John's Ambulance Brigade 
tent, where arrangements ha# 
been made to test fairgoers far 
diabetes. Of foe 237 people 
who took the opportunity, 10 
were found to need farther 
tests. 

Their afternoon may have 
been spoilt, but the early 
diagnosis which resulted may 
later save their sight Eight 
per cent of diabetics who have 
had the disease for 20 years 
have eye complkations, and 
two out of every 100 diabetics 
go blind. Yet blindness could 
be greatly reduced if patients 
attended ophthalmologists 
(eye specialists) regularly; the 
British Diabetic Association 
estimates that seven oat of ten 
of the diabetics who lose their 
sight could have had it saved if 
treatment had been carried out 
in time. They recommend that 
diabetics’ eyes shoald be 
checked by an ophthahnolo- 
gist annually. 

A recent report in the 

British Journal of Opktbai- Dr Thomas Stnttaford 


otology s upports their view; in 
one survey half foe insnlm - 
depeadent diabetics Investi- 
gated had not regularly visited 
an ophthalmologist; when they 
did, 28 per cent already had 

disease of foe retina of the eye, 
and 20 per cent needed urgent 
treatment 

Bowled out 

Cricket fans 
watching lan 
Botham's 
<a non-bowt“ 
fast week ware 
later relieved 
that he had 
tom his intercostal 
muscles. A pain very similar 
to this is often due to nerve 
root irritation, the result of a 
prolapsed intervertebral disc. 
It is a common injury of 
bowlers and seemed likely 
when Botham told an inter- 
viewer that climbing up and 
down stairs was proving diffi- 
cult, a symptom all too famil- 
iar to those who have 
suffered with their back. 

Even if fiiis had been lan 
Botham's trouble, the 
prognosis would not be very 
different; 80-90 per cent of 
patients with acute backache 
are free of symptoms within 
two weeks. 


Ai a small child in London 
and Bath, Elspeth Howe spent 
her pocket money on Wood- 
worth's “amazingly cheap" 
Mars bars and recalls the nqw- 
legendary store as a s h i nin g 
light in the high street, a kind 
of youngster’s Aladdin's Cave. 

Almost half a century on, 
she still shops at Woolworth; 
only now the o nce-magical 
emporium has entered the 
world of high technology, 
complete with wire baskets, 
central tills and assista n ts who 
are not always entirely aware 
of what they stock or where it 
is — though that final observa- 
tion is not Lady Howe's bur 
my own, following a fruitless 
search around the Wimbledon 
branch for sticky coloured 
marking dots. 

“You know, the kina they 
sell ai Woolworth", was how 
my removal man described 
them. Not any more. S* J* 
they do they were well bidden 

behind the infuriating u-it s- 
nol-on-lbe-shelf-we-toyeo’t- 

cot-it” syndrome that has 
heralded the ^gb slreet 

mass marketing - 

stores that come w tte f onn °} 

■ warehouses rather to shops* 

1 with fairground-type h^^ 
and piped music to lull shop- 

SofftS'ln ira ditio “L do * 

ESSVb!Wj- 

stopping being every 
eV S ,0 p^oftedy n am«=|>™ 

SE “ d 

which turns 0 rt i nve d Lady 
annually, ^ vear non- 

Howe ^ a ^Lriob^eher 

executive forector to f 

“ pan,C n w SvSA aff- 

commumty ana v 

airs" to US boardroom- 
that since 70 


Howe to 
alter an 
image 

Woolworth is going 
back to what it does 
best, aided by a Lady 
with fond memories 
from childhood 



Lady Horn: at borne in Wooties 


50,000 employees are women, 
as well as the vast majority of 
its customers, it could use the 
benefit of her feminine wis- 
dom. “There is a feeling that 
that side of the human race 
should be represented at de- 
cision-making level", rays 
Lady Howe of her appoint- 
ment For Lady Howe herself; 
54-year-old wife of Foreign 
Secretary Sir Geoffrey, it is but 
one more challenge in a 
lifetime of energetic public 
work ranging from the juven- 
ile courts to the council of 
MACRO to setting up the 
Equal Opportunities Commis- 

a She feds qualified for her 
new role — both as committed 


shopper and consumer repre- 
sentative. She has already 
reconnoitred a Comet show- 
room and a B & Q do-it- 
yourself superstore, both now 
owned by Woolworth. She 
was impressed by the way the 
goods were displayed and the 
helpful staff 

“f like the modem methods 
of shopping”, she says. “In the 
past perhaps assistants were a 
bit over-enthusiastic in their 
efforts to persuade yon to buy. 
You can go on living in the 
past if it's profitable but you 
owe it to your employees and 
shareholders to make sure that 
you arc in the business of 

Sq^Even so, Readmits that 
she misses the era of the 
delivery van. 

She has yet to decide which 
areas she win tackle, although 
she expects that she win be 
keeping an eye on “things such 
as the role of women in the 
organization and the rote of 
the company in the 
community.” 

On criticism that sates staff 

do not know what they are 
selling, she says: “That I 
regard as bad m a nagement 
I’ve been pretty impressed by 
the staff training that now goes 
on. Apart from anything else, 
if you don’t fed part of foe 
store, yon’re going to do a 
much less good job.” 

She believes in family shop- 
ping, although she has little 
opportunity to shop with her 
own family. Her daughter, 
Caroline; 31, married with a 
small child, teaches sinking 
and her 27-year-old twins, 
Amanda and Alexander are, 
respectively, a lawyer and 
CND press officer. 

“Shops that tend to cater 
exclusively for men or women 
are missing half the market”, 
rays Lady Howe. “And Fm a 
very keen supporter of Sunday 
opening because I believe that 
increasingly families look on a 
shopping trip as an enjoyable 
occasion as well as something 
they need to do.” 

Sally Brampton 

Q Times NewsfnfMn Ltd 1S96 


TALKBACK 


From Christine Jacot de 
Boinod, 

Albert Bridge Road. 

London SW1I. 

I read Vivien Tomlhtson's 
“All The Fary Of The Fayre” 
(Wednesday Page, November 
26th) with keen interest, bat 
her view of the Christmas 
Fayre is qmte, quite different 
from my own. I work for a 
large company and at foe 
moment we’re trying to raise 
a 


foe Mind. One of tire fund- 

raising events is a hring-and- 
boy sale, and e v eryone who 
has been involved with it has 
been staggered by the re- 
spoese from caotrfoators. 

What is normally just a 
reasonably friendly body of 

people, who can be refied 
upon to contribute to good 
causes, has toned into a 
frenzied army of jam makers, 
dried flower arrangers, bird- 
feeder whittios, tombola 
spinners, record stall runners, 
Christmas card designers, 
baby ctothes manufacturers 
and pickled ooion bottlers. 

Hitherto hidden talents are 
revealing themselves at an 
alar ming rate — foe office 
moose has metamorpbosized 
into a pastry cook of patis- 
serie standards, ‘foe lads’ are 
righfiy prood of then- Christ- 
mas gift tags and the taifttod 
bodges, crafted and donated 
by another member ai foe 
team shoald sell like hot 
cakes — talking ai which, foe 
cake stall will be groaning 
under the shram of pledged 
chocolate chip coolders, al- 
mond batter crn&cfc, Mrs 
Richmond’s apple pies and 
Forest Gate gateaax (sic). 

What is it Hwt nwltw 
people suddenly throw them- 
selves wholeheartedly into 
such events? I think it may be 
a combmatien of things — foe 
•good cause* hseff a return to 
a Bine Petto mentality, Val- 
erie Singleton's washing np 
liquid bottles, a chance to 
show off in areas other than 
career. It’s a feeling of 
spirit.. 


TO TEAR OUT OUR SHOP-FRONT, 
WF.’RF. RF.TN fi FORCED TO TEAR UP 




OUR 


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SO 


r Christmas. 


£79] 




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. A 

■V 







i THE TIMES 
; DIARY 

i After you, 
j Hugh 

; Hugh Montefiore, the fiery Bishop 

• .of Birmingham who retires in 
; March, is tipped to be succeeded 

■ by an equally controversial mem- 
; ber of the doth; inner city lobbyist 

• James Thompson. It seems Some- 
; one Up There has taken pity on 

• Thompson, who as Bishop of 

• Stepney has laboured under the 

■ unsympathetic regime of Graham 
, Leonard, the traditionalist Bishop 

• —of London with whom be has 
l recently disagreed over women 
‘ priests. The Birmingham vacancy 
t committee, when it meets to make 

- recommendations to the Crown 
I Appointments Committee, wfll 

• * doubtless be aware that Thomp- 

son was chaplain of Cuddesdon 
* r Theological College at the time 

• —Robert Runde was principal. 

• Dog-collared cynics observe it 
would not be the first time an okl 
friend of the Archbishop has won 

*- [preferment. Indeed, it is said, the 
• ' new bishops of Oxford, Lichfield 
[ - and Exeter are all members of 
! ' Canterbury’s charmed circle. 

-• Still on the church; yesterday’s 
[.Radio Four Daily Service included 
' * a prayer for “the victims of 
insidious secrecy and for those 
' '“whose trust has been betrayed by 

■ -their partner in trade and their 
i ' partner in work.” Who could they 

• * possibly mean? 

irHoming in 

tl- Lynda Chalker’s recent talks with 
President Museveni in Uganda 
J ..were abruptly interrupted when a 
-/somewhat confused hippopota- 

• —mus attempted to gatecrash. For- 
; '“eign Office officials said yesterday 

- the minister was discussing IMF 
! 'suggestions for the Ugandan econ- 

- “omy when there was a loud crash 
’ and the sound of splintering glass. 

Mrs Chalker was shaken, not least 
-"because in the dark — the incident 
. ’..happened at 10 pm — the possibU- 

• tty of a terrorist attack could not 
; . be ruled out Minutes passed 

- before the intruder was identified. 

[[Late score 

: ’Edward Heath may not be on the 
-- 'podium but nevertheless has a role 
‘In the performance of Sir William 

• ^Walton’s Battle of Britain suite at 
. "Monday's memorial service for 
[ [Richard Dimbleby at Westminster 

• 'Abbey. Lady Walton tells me from 
[ "her home in Italy that Sir W illiam 

- was distraught when he discov- 
. \ered that United Artists had 
< decided to use only a few seconds 
Lofhis score for the 1 960s film, The 
; Battle of Britain. Hearing of 

• .Walton’s concern that UA bad not 
' returned the manuscript. Heath, 
/then prime minister, personally 
[ .intervened to retrieve it It was 

ited to Walton on his 70lh 
ay as a surprise present 

BARRY FANTONI 



[[Distanced 

• The effects of Count Nikolai 
; Tolstoy's book The Minister and 
■the Massacres — in which he 

• accuses Harold Macmillan of 
[ .sending 40,000 Cossacks and 
/White Russians back to Stalin — 
..are still being felt at Winchester 
‘College. Headmaster James 
; Sabben-Oare has just suppressed 

• a review of the book in the school 
magazine by history master Mark 

[ Stephenson. Could the problem 
I have been the unsympathetic light 
[cast on Lord Aldington, then a 

• brigadier, now Warden of Win- 
1 Chester College? Certainly not, 

• Sabbeodare told me yesterday; 
; The Wykehamist was a forum for 
[school matters and for boys to 
I voice their opinions. “What some- 
rone did 40 years ago, entirely 
■ unconnected with the school, is 
; irrelevant” 

: • 1 am toid several Labour MPs 
> are boasting that they hHre bongtrt 

'British Gas shares: all profits to 

• the party, of coarse. 

Take your pick 

.The Solomonic justice of His 
'Honour Judge Peter Greenwood 
•prestding at Chelmsford Crown 
1 court after complaints from the 
■jury, he banned reporters from 
! entering or leaving except between 
[witnesses. Aghast that it would 
prevent them meeting deadlines, 

: they appealed to him to change his 
mind. Judge Greenwood 
’But only on condition that 
"bought books of raffle tickets for 
one of his favourite charities, the 
■Cherry Tree Sports Football Club. 

Taking a stance 

One anti-apartheid sympathizer is 
not boycotting Bijer’s Sunbird at 
the Lyric, Hammersmith (PHS 
yesterday). Sean Taylor shares the 
impeccable liberal credentials of 
his step-brother. Dr Frederick van 
Zyl Slabbert, former leader of 
South Africa’s Progressive Federal 
party. Taylor is not only in the 
play - he’s the lead actor. 

PHS 


Nimrod: best on all counts 

by Cecil Parkinson 


None of ns in Parliament can be 
happy with the long-running saga 
of the choice of Britain’s airborne 
early warning system. Many 
thought tbe matter was settled 
once and for all in 1977 when the 
Ministry of Defence announced 
that it had opted for Nimrod, a 
British Aerospace aircraft eq- 
uipped with GEC technology. 

It is difficult to discover exactly 
what has happened since then, and 
the version one hears depends on 
the person one is talking to. What 
is clear is that tbe system is later 
than it should have been and more 
expensive than the original es- 
timate. These two fids should not 
obscure two even more important 
frets: Nimrod has still been devel- 
oped in five years less than it took 
the Americans to develop Awacs 
and that the Americans have spent 
more than twice as much on 
developing their system as we 
have on ours. Fur from being an 
example of Britain’s inability to 
produce a highly technical product 
within an acceptable tir np and at 
an acceptable price, it is evidence 
that British technologists can, and 
have, outperformed the technolo- 
gists of the United Slates — one of 


the most advanced countries in 
the world. 

Tbe second misapprehension 
about Nimrod is that it does not 
and will sot wort Fortunately 
George Younger, the Defence 
Secretary, has openly acknowl- 
edged that Nimrod doer work. Tbe 
technical problems which remain 
to be solved are relatively minor, 
and the solutions to most of them 
already known. 

Nimrod will be at least as good 
as Awacs and some people believe 
it will be better. Whatever the 
rights and wrongs about the past, 
the RAF now has a choice of two 
systems, both of which work. The 
choice that the Cabinet will have 
to make should therefore be based 
on cost and delivery. Here Nim- 
rod has an indisputable advan- 
tage. Tbe 11 aircraft can be 
delivered to the RAF, meeting the 
RAFs foil specifications, at a cost 
of £300 million more than has 
been spent to date. It is hard to get 
at the exact cost of ihe American 
system but most people regard a 
figure of £1,000 million as being 
the likely price. So Nimrod can 
become available to the RAF for 


of Nimrod 
that, over 
the system. 
This 


£500m less than it would cost to 
switch to Awacs. 

Tbe opponents 
counter this by 
the 20>year life span 
Awacs will be 
assertion is strongly disputed and 
is in feet so theoretical as to be 
improvable. What is beyond dis- 
pute is that Nimrod wfll cost 
several hundred mflhoD pounds 
less initially and will need far 
fewer people to operate it Other 
opponents of Nunrod argue that 
there is no certainty mat the 
aircraft can be delivered within 
the specified time. GEC can point 
to the fret that since it took over 
full responsibility for the contract 
on March 3 this year it has 
consistently beaten the deadlines 
and has produced better perfor- 
mance than promised. It also 
accepts that the contract will have 
to be at a fixed price with 
substantial financial penalties for 
non-performance. It is totally 
confident that it can do the job 
within the fixed price and that it 
wOl not incur penalties. 

Nimrod would have enormous 
export potential for Britain. Six- 
teen countries have already ex- 


r strong interest Both 

Lockheed and Aeritaha have ex- 
pressed their confidence in the 
GEC system and have underfilled 
that confidence by investing 
substantial sums of their own' 
money in furthering co-operative 
ventures. 



The Labour Party’s attempt to 
remodel its defence pohey is a 
hopeless operation. It * ratbCT » 
if Henry Ford had attempted to 
am*®. . rescue the Edsel car by cnaogmg 

Estimated export sates wukj be the design of 

(UGm Thic anil tw lost I arid offering deferred terms, -ne 
same old central defect remains 


worth £25 billion. This will be lost 

unless Nimrod goes ahead. Many 
jobs in Britain depend on the 
Nimrod project but the prime 
consideration must be the defence 
of the country. If the system did 
not work then, regardless of the 
number of jobs involved, defence 
considerations would come first. 
But the system does work. It wifi 
save substantial sums in future 
defence budgets and will show the 
worid that, in a shorter time and at 
less cost than its rivals, Britain can 
produce products which involve 
tire most advanced technology. 

It would be an unnecessary blow 
to the morals, hard work and jobs 
of thousands of people to opt at 
this stage for tbe rival system. For 
defence and economic reasons, the 
choice must be Nimrod. 

The author is Conservative MPfar 
Hertsmere. 


Tbe London borough of Brent 
represents the convergence of 
three of the most potent issues on 
the domestic agenda: education, 
race and local government poli- 
tics. Each on its own would 
guarantee the constant attention 
of MPs and the media: together, 
they ensure an almost fevered 
obsession. 

That may be uncomfortable for 
Brent, but h is also most instruc- 
tive for the nation. For if you want 
to see the future, take a trip along 
the North Circular Road. Known 
locally as the Berlin Wall, it 
divides the largely white and 
middle-dass north of the borough 
from the largely black and work- 
ing-class south. 

It also represents an educational 
divide which exists quite as 
acutely, and shamefully, but much 
less noticeably, everywhere else in 
Britain. The schools in the north 
of the borough obtain 7 5 per cent 
more O-level passes per pupil than 
do those in the south. 

Three years ago, in an attempt 
to explain that discrepancy, the 
council (then, as now, under 
Labour control) set up an indepen- 
dent inquiry under tbe chairman- 
ship of Miss Jocelyn Barrow, who 
is blade and a governor of the 
BBC It eventually produced a 
mammoth report which was al- 
most instantly buried in the kind 
of recrimination that had sur- 
rounded tbe inquiry from the 
start: it was boycotted by teachers, 
banned from schools, and much 
valuable research was mysteri- 
ously destroyed. 

The report’s principal conclu- 
sion was bizarre and went a long 
way towards explaining the 
leaders’ attitude to the inquiry. It 
said that the entire education 
system in Brent was “permeated 
with racism”. And that meant 
everyone: politicians, admin- 
istrators and teachers. All were 
lumped together as “either out- 
right racists, patronising, biased, 
ethnocentric or amply and some- 
what naively ignorant of the racist 
context in which they work”. 

As evidence, the inquiry relied 
largely on the views of black 
parents. Most seemed to think 
that their children were not doing 
well because their teachers were 
deliberately bolding them back. 
One parent was quoted as 
"There was a certain sort 
strategy in what they were 
doing, believe me. I mean, a 
simple little thing like a drawing, 
they’d give him a merit mark for. 
But if be did a piece of com- 
position that was two pages full, 
you bet the next day he'd be in 
detention. He'd be punished for 
trying. He was being kept to a level 
they wanted him to.” 

Thai may be paranoid, but it 
es to the very heart of the issue. 
>r the simple fret is that black 
children in Brent, who comprise 
60 per cent of the total, are doing 
worse in school than white chil- 
dren — and black parents want to 
know why. 

The trouble is that, unlike white 
parents, who have had at least a 
hundred years to get used to the 
idea, black parents are unaccount- 
ably reluctant to accept that their 
children's failure to get on in our 


As the Brent row rambles on, John Clare 
shows that a left-wing anthority need not be 
synonymous with second-rate education 

What black 
parents 
really want 



Jocelyn Barrow: ‘entire system 
permeated with racism’ 

educational system is simply a 
consequence of their class. 

So in a society that many 
believe they have good reason to 
regard as racist, they look for 
another reason. And as they look 
they notice something else that is 
happening to their children in 
school. Not only do they seem to 
be invariably relegated to the CSE 
rather than the O-level stream, but 
once there are offered ersatz 
courses, with titles their parents 
have never previously en- 
countered, which are designed, or 
so the teachers assure them, to 
“equip young people for a life of 
unemployment”. 

In other words, “drawing” in- 
stead of “composition”. Who can 
wonder if some parents come to 
their own (paranoid) conclusions? 

However, that is emphatically 
not the analysis of the Brent 
report. On the contrary, it argues 
that black children do badly in 
school because the traditional 
curriculum, with its emphasis on 
acquiring knowledge and passing 
exams, is “culturally foreign” to 
them — part, indeed, of that 
inchoate and ali-pervasive racism. 

Accordingly, it recommends yet 
more “alternative pathways", the 
very courses that black parents 
reject. The report notes stiffly: 
“Tbe developments in the curricu- 


Mauraen McGoldridc target of 
of a ‘loony left’ campaign 

lum we have advocated have a 
problem in securing public recog- 
nition comparable to that ac- 
corded to external examinations." 

Later on it cautiously changes 
tack: “We are not criticising the 
aims or indeed tbe methods of 
’child-centred education’ but we 
are saying that its outcomes are 
very different from its intentions. 
It has alienated the very social 
groups it was supposedly designed 
to give a voice to. It must be 
fundamentally rethought and re- 
cast in terms that make sense to 
the marginalized child and his/her 
parents and continue rather than 
interrupt their culture.” 

But what are black parents (or 
indeed anyone else) to make of all 
that? Not surprisingly, the only 
impression the report left was to 
confirm a widespread but mind- 
less conviction that racism ex- 
plained everything. 

Unhappily, it is an impression 
the council has done nothing to 
dispeL The result is that the 
“loony left” label sticks because an 
obsession with racism seems to 
loom over everything Brent does. 
The persecution, if that is what it 
is, of Miss Maureen McGoldridc, 
the headteacher of Sudbury In- 
fants School, is a case in point 
Even if, as has been alleged and 
resolutely denied, she did tell a 


Getting at the great sell-off facts 


When should I sdl my Gas shares!? 
Did you get an allocation of TSB? 
Will BA be a good buy? These are 
tbe questions which tend to leap 
into the conversation where one 
or more brand new share-owners 
are gathered together. 

There are much more important 
questions which people should be 
asking about the government’s 
sale of state industries. For in- 
stance, can you get your telephone 
maided more quickly now? Why 
is your father-in-law buying a new 
Jaguar when ten years ago he 
swore he woold never buy an- 
other? 

Considering the central role 
which privatization has assumed 
in the government's economic 
policies It is astonishing that there 
has not been more effort to find 
out whether it really does deliver 
tbe benefits claimed for it A new 
book* published this week at- 
tempts to fill some of the gaps. 

The editors, John Kay, Colin 
Mayer and David Thompson, 
marshal some fairly convincing 
evidence that at least in compet- 
itive markets privately-owned 
companies are more efficient titan 
publidy-ownai Work by Richard 
Pryke of the University of Liver- 
pool shows that at least until 
recently, when it has been, prepar- 
ing for privatization, British Air- 
ways has been less profitable than 
British Caledonian, Sealink (be- 


fore its sale to private owners) was 
less efficient than European Fer- 
ries and the Electricity Boards' 
high street showrooms sold only 
about two thirds as much equip- 
ment per shop as comped tors like 
Currys. 

None of this may strike the 
average consumer as very surpris- 
ing. What we still lack is detailed 
evidence on tbe quality of service 
and value for money provided by 
enterprises before and after 
privatization: in other words the 
direct effect of the government’s 
policies. 

We can learn something from 
profitability. Since its privat- 
ization in 1981 profits earned by 
Cable and Wireless have risen 
from £64.1 million to £295 million 
in 1986. Jaguar’s profits have 
increased from £9.6 million to 
£1213 million since 1982 In the 
same period National Freight's 
earnings have risen from £ 10.1 
million to £28.8 million. All these 
companies were already operating 
in competitive markets and have 
achieved greater success after 
release from tbe constraints on 
management and access to capital- 
of being in the public sector. 

There Is also useful evidence 
from the deregulation of long 
distance coach services. An analy- 
sis by Evan Davis of the Institute 
for Fiscal Studies shows that the 
customer has undoubtedly bene- 
fited from the infusion of private 


competition into the coach market 
through cheaper feres and higher 
quality service, even if National 
Express has been able to consoli- 
date its dominant position. The 
most casual observer could hardly 
foil to notice tbe sudden appear- 
ance of gleaming new continental 
style coaches on the streets in 
contrast to the dowdy okl chara- 
bancs of old. 

But more important for the 


is the performance of the giant 
utilities whose customers indude 
practically ap of us. The national- 
ized industries became a by-word 
for poor service; what better 
demonstration of the benefits iff 
privatization than that they 
should become a by-word for good 
service. 

The editors of die new study are 
not optimistic. Competition, they 
argue, is what counts most, not 
ownership, and the privatization 
of British Telecom and British 
Gas has not been structured to 
increase competition much within 
those industries. 

They may be over-pessimistic 
Competition for business cus- 
tomers in telecoms is now a reality 
as Mercury spreads its wings. At 
Offers insistence, domestic cus- 
tomers can also obtain access to 
Mercury’s low-cost intercity net- 
work via BT fines. In all the frstest 
growing areas of tbe industry 
competition is strong. 


The situation in gas is less 
satisfactory. But if Mercury is 
prepared to compete for domestic 
business through the BT network 
wby should the oil companies not 
sell surplus gas through the British 
Gas network? The 1982 Act 
permits them to do so and 
negotiations have already taken 
place between independent com- 
panies and large business users of 
gas. So for British Gas has always 
lowered its price to compete, but 
that is the way competition often 
works— by forcing the incumbent 
producer to offer a better deaL 
Monopolies, ays the new ortho- 
doxy, may not be against the 
public interest if entry costs for 
competitors are km. 

Further analysis of the effects of 
privatization can only be helpful, 
not least if it also encourages 
competition and privatization 
through contracting out in public 
services such as health andeduca- 


eitber Britain, under a Labour 
government, will continue to fle- 
° — American 

defence (in 

are w ^ 


ESfS Ttoes in some 

true that the strain on 
S defence 

soon cause a real dash of pnor 
fries- it is true that some Nato 
Suilries already refine tojave 
American nuclear 
their soil; it B even mie thatsome 


pend ultimately on Amenran ^ ^ Europeans 

nuclear weapons forits tfe^O* a^ut Nato’s reliana 

on nuclear weapons to jti 
conventional attack and that at 


Americans out even after con- 


sutadons) or it wiU Mt sc dnpcnjj 


council official that her school did 
not want any more black teachers, 
Brent would have been excoriated 
for disciplining her. 

The irony of all this is that 
another authority in London, 
quite as left-wing and responsible 
for educating more black children 
than any other, has not only been 
down this tortured road but come 
back with a convincing answer. 

After years of complaining 
about racism (and sexism), the 
Inner London Education Auth- 
ority finally started listening to 
what black parents were saying. 
They said they were fed up with 
“initiatives” on race and they did 
not want to know about new- 
fangled subjects. They wanted 
their children to pass examina- 
tions in traditional subjects so that 
they would have the qualifications 
they needed to find jobs. 

In short, they demanded the 
three Rs, and they wanted them 
taught properly, just as they are in 
the voluntary Saturday schools to 
which thousands of black parents 
have been sending their children 
for years. 

The ILEA, to its credit, did a U- 
turn. Now the talk is all of quality 
rather than equality: the message 
is that the latter can only grow out 
of the former. Good schools, the 
authority says, are well ordered 
places where the teachers have 
high expectations of their pupils 
and everybody worts hard. 

Funhennore, good schools are 
to be meas u red by their pupils' 
success in public exams, properly 
weighted to take account of the 
nature of their intake. 

So, unlike Brent, the ILEA is not 
in the process of appointing a 
small army of “race relations 
advisers” to seek out evidence of 
racist practices. Instead, it is 
recruiting senior teachers to be 
sent into schools which have been 
identified — on the basis of their 
weighted examination results —as 
not performing as well as they 
should. 

The chief inspector of the ILEA, 
and a powerful inflncence cm its 
thinking, is Dr David Hargreaves, 
a widely respected academic. He 
tells a poignant and illustrative 
story. 

“Recently, and by coincidence,” 
he says, “I had separate conversa- 
tions with a member (of the 
authority), an inspector and an 
ILEA hod on the same theme. All 
four of us had one common 
dement in our histories we were 
working-class and attended gram- 
mar or direct grant schools. Our 
parents had limited formal educa- 
tion and no special ambitions for 
us. Our schools, however, set high 
expectations for us and pressured 
us to work hard, raising our 
aspirations so that we found our 
way to university. Would our 
educational histones have been 
the same, we wondered, had we 
attended an ILEA comprehensive 
school of today?” 

Dr Hargreaves does not say 
what the answers were: it is 
enough that the question was 
asked. 

Is it too late for Brent to learn 
the same painful lesson? 

The author is Education Corres- 
pondent of The Times. 


offering a credible 
defence o f the country). 

There are only two ways to 
escape this dilemma. The first is 
so disreputable that not even Mr 
Kinnock quite dares to spell it out 
explicitly, though the new paper 
comes dose to it from tim e to 
tinw. That is to adopt the “free- 
rider” position: whatever we do, 
the Americans wfll continue to 
defend us, with nuclear weapons 
in the last resort, because it is in 
their own national interest to do 
so. The second escape route is to 
pretend that nuclear weapons are 
no longer relevant at all to the 
defence of Europe; conventional 
weapons will do all that is 
necessary. It is Kirin ock's mis- 
fortune that a wholehearted rash 
to either of these exits is impos- 
sible. 

The free-rider solution foils on 
four counts: (a) it has been made 
painfiilly dear on many occasions, 
the most recent being Kinnock’s 
tour of the US, that we cannot be 
absolutely sure these days that 
emotion will not cause the Ameri- 
cans to act against their best 
interest (and, of course, ours) by 
withdrawing credible protection 
from Europe if they are suf- 
ficiently provoked; (b) tbe British 
public are unlike ly to warm to tbe 
idea of sponging on the Ameri- 
cans; (c) if we wash our hands 
completely of American nuclear 
strategy we obviously lose all 
influence over it; (d) it has the 
tactical drawback, as Kinnock is 
now going to discover, that the 
strong paofist/CND sentiment in 
his party is offended by any 
admission that American nuclear 
missiles have any role whatever in 
keeping the Russians at bay - they 
want what Kinnock offered them 
at this year's party conference, 
namely a completely non-nudear 
Nato, not simply a Nato whose 
non-American members are con- 
sciously sheltering under a single 
American nuclear umbrella. 

This last point accounts for the 
extraordinarily lame phraseology 
of several key passages in the new 
Labour document, notably tbe 
statement near the very end that 
“we accept that both the US and 
the Soviet Union will want" (not 
“need”, you notice) “to maintain 
a minimum second strike capabil- 
ity as long as the other does”. The 
necessity for nuclear deterrents is 
thus grudgingly acknowledged for 
the sake of the commonsenacal 
voter but it is quarantined, as it 
were, from Europe by the implica- 
tion that it is a matter only for the 
silly old superpowers and has 
nothing to do with us. The central 
Nato idea of an American nudear 
“guarantee” cannot be so quietly 
and painlessly glassed over. 

That brings us naturally to die 
second escape: the idea of a 


the European political capital 
invested so heavily m the deploy- 
ment of American cruise and 

Pershing missiles. 

Cynical old Dems Healey 
knows enough to make these 
fragments of intellectual res- 
pectability stretch some way over 
his nakedness, but they ao not 
cover the most sig nific a n t pans. 
The issue still comes down to the 
question of whether the British 
voters wfll really believe that Nato 
can defend itself without nudear 
weapons Europe if the Russia n s 
continue to possess them, or even, 
indeed, if they don't It is one 
Thing to hope for 50 per cent 
negotiated cuts in mtennedime- 
range missiles such as cruise and 
Soviet SS20s but quite another to 
endorse unilateral nudear dis- 
armament or to accept that large 
and expensive increases in con- 
ventional arms are an adequate or 
desirable substitute for the rel- 
atively cheap nuclear deterrents 
now based in Britain and else- 
where on the continent It simply 
doesn’t add up. 

Could any thing make this dog's 
breakfast look more appetising? 
There is not much hut in the 
ketchup bottle. One chance is that 
the West German Social Demo- 
crats, with whom Labour has very 
imprudently worked out a com- 
mon defence position, do well in 
the elections in January, thus 
giving at least a scrap of authentic- 
ity to the Labour claim to be in the 
European mainstream on this 
subject. But Kinnock could end up 
looking even more isolated be- 
cause everything suggests that the 
SPD is hearting for a catastrophe 
on the same scale as Labour's own 
defeat in 1983, and with much the 
same cause: h has been taken over 
by the left. 

Another outside hope fin* La- 
bour is that events at the super- 
power level will let it off the hook, 
either because die Reagan admin- 
istration becomes so discredited 
that irreparable damage is done to 
the whole concept of an American 
guarantee or,, alternatively, be- 
cause Reagan manages to salvage 
his authority by an arms deal so 
radical that it overtakes the British 
controversy. All very improbable, 
at least in 1987. 

That leaves only the real 
possibility that Mrs Thatcher and 
Norman Tebbit overplay their 
band on the defence issue. The 
charge that Kinnock has been 
playing politics with security has 
served the Prime Minister pretty 
well in the last two weeks. A bit 
too much stridency on the nudear 
question - a subject which people 
take very seriously, if events 
oblige them to turn their attention 
to it — could easily cause the 
accusation to rebound on her. 


Paul Pickering 

The fledgeling 
that flipped 


A successful crime writer told me 
the other day that c riminal*; are 
made in the nursery. As I had just 
received the grim details of the 
formative years of Hector, the 
talkative and exceedingly delin- 
quent raven I adopt at London 
Zoo, it was worth putting the 
theory to the test 
Hector was for many years a star 
turn at die Tower of London. 
There be impressed everyone with 
his vocal skills, saying endearing 
things like “Give us it 'ere then,” 
in an Arthur Milliard voice. Then 
one day he turned nasty. 

“It was only mischief to begin 
with,” said Yeoman Raven Mas- 
ter John Wilmington. “He was 
never a bad lad when I was around 
- just high-spirited. Because he 
could fly everywhere he assumed 
everything belonged to him. He 
once tore the windscreen wipers 
off a Bentley and pecked the 
surface off a guardsman's boots.” 

But it was Hector’s intense 
hatred of Americans which led to 
his becoming London Zoo's only 
political prisoner. For some rea- 
son people who say “Have a nice 
day” and wear plaid jackets 
brought out the worst in him. The 
aid tame when he attacked a hho- 
rinsed lady from Little Rock. 

Hector not only zoomed after 
her like a Phantom going flat out, 
knocking off her flowered hat and 
tearing it to pieces with his beak, 
but laughed while he did it As the 
woman had been brought up on 
the Old Testament and the Na- 
tional Enquirer site was convinced 
he was a demon from hefl, and she 
had to be treated for shock. 
Imprisonment at, the zoo has. If 
anything, mack him angrier. 

Tie is the only bud it’s too 


tioiL This government's example „ ^ 

is being followed by many foreign dangerous to go in" with," says his 
oouatnes now pfenning mqjor keeper, Fred. “He nearly had a 
privatisation programmes, but chap's eye out Yon have © get 


even at home there is still much to 
be learnt about *na»imfring the 
benefits of privatization and de- 

regUlati<>n ‘ J T J 

Rodney Lord 

•Privatisation and Regulation, the 
UK Experience (Clarendon Press, 
Oxford, £25 hardback, £9.95 
paperback). 


him to savage a broom and then 
put it into a separate enclosure at 
the back if you want to dean him 
out You would stand much more 
chance with a lag cat” 

So what went wrong in Hector's 
fMgrfng haod that caused him to 
become a dangerous psychopath? 
A man wrote to me recently with a 


dreadful story. The poor bird, it 
seems, was brought up in South 
London. My correspondent, a 
solicitor, explained that a friend 
had found Hector on a trip to 
Wales and brought him back to 
live in a tiny South London flat 
“He was mad on wildlife and 
taught the bird to talk. Hector 
used to ride around on the steering 
wheel of his mini van.” 

But Hector's maniacal 
cnatterings were not popular with 
those living close by, especially 
with one man, on night shift, who 
was kept awake for much of the 
day. Worse, Hector once bur- 
rowed through the thin plaster 
wall with his beak, almost giving 
him a heart attack. Well how 
would you tike it if a raven’s head 
suddenly drilled its way into your 
bedroom and said “Good mom- 
Hector” . He had to go to 
the Tower. 

Hector's former owner is now 
too distraught to talk publicly 
about the matter. But who knows 
what dark influences that small 
uat had on a young raven who 
SSEJ? h *T e beenTflying free in 
Wales and contenting himself with 
Pelting the occasional climber. 

. E '' en , worse, Hector's upbring- 

South London was not the para- 
it is today, with councfl 
workers loitering on every sttc et 
comer and sometimes bursting 
mto homes just to make sure the 
occupants are still alive and not 
vHmms of tbe recession. Lambeth 
“^Parent creches 
in those days. Hector had to suffer 
alone. It does not excuse his 
presort behaviour but perhans he 
attacks Americans because they 
have a material wealth he could 
never remotely imagine. 

1."?* mus “8 on this point 
ratetoonwrthebarsofHeSra’s 

enckjsure when I felt a share 
sowing pain in my arm. Hector 
chuckled and hepped gSSy 

mntai^Pfcrawiafly, I think in the 

SSL^Li* 1 ’ 5 P^ticnlar raven 
u nkindnes - was bom and not 

been bad. 





THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 





1 Pefmm g aa Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 

JUDGING RIGHTS 


The motives of those who wish tha u. , 

to incorporate the Euronean rr j Human Rights and 
Convention on Human Riehte Freedoms Bifl 

into the law in Britain tendto attem P ts «> in- 

fell into two categories. The f rodu _ ce *** concept to British 
fint, with Lord Scarmanat the SEJL®* 1 * “ft ^ 
helm, believe that the United ■£2? am ?5 1 u 
Kingdom should have itsown 5?S d 5! ms ^°l Convention] 
Bill of Rights andTsioe ££ ** fortx . of 

assume the political imwS ^Jhe Convention itself ap- 
sibility of ageing n ia schedule to the BilL 

custom-made Bill, thS? the nS22 aUy H mtr0du ? d *? ^ 
next best option is to adopt the sSSan Low ! s 

Convention to which Britain Scaiman and Broxboume, it 

has adhered since 1952* J® 5 P ?? Sed by lheir Lordships 

j 1S5Z * but subsequently lapsed. Now 

The _ second springs more Sir Edward Gardner nr *ha 


from pique than constitutional 
objective. Why should a 
Commission and a Court, with 
their base in a foreign country 
and made up almost entirely of 
foreign officials and judges, 
continue to have the right to 
meddle in our affairs? Better 
that we should bring the 
Convention home, when at 
least cases alleging its breach 


Sir Edward Gardner, QC, the 
Chairman of the Commons 
Select Committee on Home 
Affairs, is bringing it before the 
Commons. 

No attempt is made to give 
the Bill a special status in law 
by laying down unique and 


stringent pariiamemaiy or iu- WQUU1 * .II 

^ci^prcJSSuwforamend^ Jg, 

mpnt a* ■ expansion m the last few years 


meant, as most countries with 
constitutions provide. At first 


j- - ^ — ' # ^mvTiuv. Ofc ill Jl 

would be heard by our own blush, therefore, the Bill is just 


national judges. 

The ammunition for that 
approach is provided by the 
statistics. Numerically, the 
United Kingdom government, 
whatever its political hue, 
leads the other twenty mem- 
bers of the Council of Europe 
both in the number of com- 
plaints laid against it in Stras- 
bourg and in the number of 
occasions on which the Euro- 
pean Court of Human Rights 
has judged it guilty of a breach 
of the Convention. 

The United Kingdom’s fre- 
quent appearances do not, 
however, denote particular 
disregard of its international 
obligations in the area of 
human rights. The principal 
reason is that in almost every 
other European country the 
Convention, or some constitu- 
tional document ahn to it, is 
part of that national law. 
Aggrieved citizens do not rush 
so quickly to Strasbourg be- 
cause they are able to air their 
complaints before their own 
courts. In Britain, even with 
the welcome increase in the 
citizen’s ability to challenge 
administrative decisions try 
the judicial review procedure, 
Strasbourg is often the only 
rather than the last resort 

Opponents of incorpora- 
tion, too, divide into two 
broad camps. There are those 

— including the Government 

— who have reservations 
about the imprecise nature of 
the convention and claim 
constit-utional obstacles to its 
becoming part of our law; and 
there are the objectors, mainly 
on the political left, who fear 
placing the interpretation of 
the Convention into the 
conservative hands of E n gl ish 
and Scottish judges. 

For the Convention is not 
like legislation passed by West- 
minster. It is in effect a Bill of 
Rights setting out in ringing, 
sweeping and often nebulous 
tones the rights to which the 
citizen is entitled. Therein lies 
its difficulty for British 
consumption. We are not 
accustomed to written constit- 
utions or Bills of Rights. They 
fit uneasily into our system of 


another piece of Westminster 
legislation which, if passed 
into law, would be subject to 
amendment or repeal by or- 
dinary parliamentary proce- 
dure. To that extent 
parliamentary sovereignty is 
not affected. 

Yet the Bill does contain the 
trappings of a constitution. All 
other laws, past and future, 
will have to conform to the Kst 
of rights and freedoms laid 
down in the Convention, or 
run the risk of being strode 
down for being in effect 
(though the term is not used in 
the Bill) imconstitutionaL 

And what of the terms of the 
Convention itself in the Bill’s 
schedule? If Pa rliament be- 
comes free to change them, it 
might lead to the absurd result 
that the Westminster version 
of the Convention would be 
different finom the treaty to 
which Britain adheres. But if 
Par liamen t cannot chang e the 
terms, is this not giving the 
Convention a special, higher 
status than ordinary law? 

The position of Strasbourg’s 
European Court of Human 
Rights raises a further diffi- 
culty. At present, its findings 
are not legally binding, though 
they are followed because of 
our treaty obligations. The 
court does not form part of our 
national legal structure in the 
way that Luxembourg’s Euro- 
pean Community’s court does. 

Incorporating the Conven- 
tion would, however, give 
Strasbourg a more formal sta- 
tus as the court oflast resort, in 
effect a court of appeal front 
the national courts. We would 
have given foreign judges 
more power — though, as a 
result of providing national 
remedies, there would presum- 
ably be many fewer cases going 
to Strasbourg to enable them 
to exercise ft. 

A further constitutional 
question arises over the role of 
judges in Britain. They are 
trained to interpret detailed 
statutes passed by West- 
minster and to make up their 
minds between alternative de- 
tailed arguments put to them 
by barristers. It is an approach 
not necessarily suited to the 
kind of enquiry to which 


of administrative law has 
obliged judges to come to 
terms with making decisions 
which have political policy 
consequences. 

Yet a Bill of Rights would 
greatly expand this. The need 
to interpret tire vague abstract 
rights embodied in it would 
compel judges to venture more 
frequently into politically dan- 
gerous territory without giving 
them the concrete guidance of 
traditional jurisprudence. Al- 
ready, complaints are occa- 
sionally heard from the left 
about the supposed political 
partiality of the judidaxy. 
These can at present be easily 
dismissed. The feet that over 
the last few years the law has 
not suited the trade unions and 
the left has to do with par- 
liament and the electorate, not 
with the judiciary. 

But such complaints would 
have greater apparent 
reasonableness, on both left 
and right, if a Bill of Sights 
were to enable and even 
compel judges to deliver 
judgements which could not 
easily be distinguished from 
legislative or executive de- 
cisions on a wide range of 
matters. The Scottish judge. 
Lord McOuskey, argued in 
this week’s Reith Lecture that 
the pcriftics of the judiciary 
would then become of su- 
preme interest. That is perhaps 
an exaggeration. There is at 
least a risk, however, that 
judges would be selected on 
the basis of their political 
views and judicial decisions 
would increasingly be matters 
of intense controversy. 

The main question, then, is 
simple. Do we need lire Euro- 
pean Convention on Human 
Rights in our law? Will the 
upheaval which incorporating 
it will undoubtedly bring be 
outweighed by the benefit to 
the citizens of having a quasi 
Bill of Rights which may turn 
out to be a constitutional 
nightmare? There is, in feet, no 
evidence of risk to the liberties 
of the subject sufficient to 
justify subordinating the Brit- 
ish system of judicial inter- 
pretation of concrete law to an 
over-riding power of the 
judges to interpret a series of 
ringing abstract declarations at 
their own discretion. 


law and government tana oi enquiry 10 wmen men own mscretH 

TIGHTENING THE COPPER BELT 


which have erupted 
a’s copper belt over 
week are but one 
tion of the economic 
ing southern Africa, 
lediate cause of the 
irest is reported to be 
increase in the price 
neat, the staple food, 
ase — of more than 
?nt — applies only to 
ior type of maize, 
eople with the theo- 
ition of buying low 
ieal to make ends 

est price rises were 
in effect, not by the 
government but by 
•national Monetary 
a condition for 
further loans. For 
despite its years of 
olitical stability, is a 
of Third World m- 
s . jt is a country 
s a net outflow of 
urrency because of 
mistic borrowing 
uture prosperity that 
do long in coming- 

test austerity «ea- 
ipiiated rioting, loot- 
^ceona^lesari 
L ve been seen since 
ecame indepentot 
i 20 years ago. in® 

! have dispatched 

iepleted foreign cur- 

afof anarchy in so 
/Mv vital a region 


highlights the dilemma for 
President Kaunda and for 
Zambia’s friends abroad, 
including Britain. At what 
point do the economic reforms 
and austerity measures re- 
quired by international lend- 
ing organizations so 
destabilize the domestic politi- 
cal situation that their main 
purpose — returning the coun- 
try to solvency — is defeated? 

Where a country has a 
record of political instability, 
or endemic corruption, the 
likelihood is, first, that not so 
much should have been lent in 
the first place and, second, that 
neither the recipient nor the 
lender would have much to 
lose from scaling down, or 
even severing the relationship. 
Zambia, however, does not 
quite fit into this gloomy 
pattern. Its troubles are due 
partly to bad luck. The contin- 
ued fell in copper prices is a 
trend that was not predicted, 
and the agricultural reforms 
away from collectivization 
came too late to remedy 
Zambia’s dependence on im- 
ports. 

There is, however, the 
possibility that the latest 
disturbances are only one 
manifestation of a deeper dis- 
content within the Bemba 
tribe (dominant in the copper 
belt) over President Kaunda’s 
presidency. There have been 
reports for some time of 
concern among the country’s 
intelligence services about 
developing unrest As long as 
the army remains loyal it is 
hard to see how any serious 


threat to Mr Kaunda could 
materialize. But the inter- 
national financial co mmuni ty 
shares the president’s interest 
in maintaining stability in the 
country and must therefore be 
alive to the dangers which 
might lie beneath the surface. 

They also have a common 
interest in persevering with 
their relationship. The IMF 
and others hope to recoup 
some of their investment And 
Zambia needs loans that win 
make a more positive 
contribution to growth than 
past investments have done. 
Violent change in Zambia 
would foster neither aim. 

Some Western govern- 
ments, notably the United 
States, have already begun to 
argue that austerity measures 
alone are incapable of remedy- 
ing Africa’s persistent insol- 
vency. A year ago at the World 
Bank meeting in Seoul they 
put forward a more flexible 
approach to lending which 
concentrated on funding eco- 
nomic growth and broke away 
from the austerity-led recipes 
offered before. 

This may show a way for- 
ward. In view of past experi- 
ence, however, there must be a 
strict quid pro quo for any 
future loans. If it is not to be 
austerity, then it must be 
greater liberalisation of the 
recipient economy and its 
adjustment to market forces. 
For the present, the unrest in 
Zambia this week illustrates 
the risks, to all involved, of 
fejiin g to change 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Labour’s defence policy under fire 


Continental judges are accus- 
tomed namely, the determina- 
tion of whether or not 
particular laws, rules or con- 
duct fell within the very broad 
wording of an article in a Bill 
of Rights or a constitution. It 
may also bring judges dan- 
gerously dose to having to 
make decisions about what are 
essentially policy matters 
more property in the hands of 
the executive. 

It is true, of course, that the 
top echelons of the judiciary 
are not entirely novices at 
making decisions on constitu- 
tional issues. The law lords, 
when they sit on the Privy 
Council in their judicial capac- 
ity, are constantly interpreting 
the constitutions of Common- 
wealth countries with no 


From Sir Patrick Dormer 
Sir, In a television interview Mr 
Neil Kinnock claimed in the 
United Stales feat the Labour 
Party had always been prepare d to 
defend this country. This is a 
falsehood of monumental propor- 
tions. 

From 1929 until the outbreak of 
war the Labour Party, riddled with 
pacifism, systematically opposed 
the National Government’s mea- 
sures to rearm. They denounced as 
warmongers all who, in the loom- 
ing Nazi menace, called far more 
defence. In the very year that 
Hitler invaded Czechoslovakia 
the Labour Party confere n ce voted 
not to reduce but to abolish the 
RAF altogether. 

Only four months before the 
outbreak of war tire Parliamentary 
Labour Party voted against 
conscription. And in September. 
1939, their personal hatred of 
Neville Chamberlain was such 
that they forgot their duty to their 
country and refused to share the 
burden of Government until fee 
spring of 1940. 

When Germany was defeated, 
Winston Churchill appealed in the 
national interest to Attlee to 
remain in fee Coalition at least 
until Japan had been defeated, so 
that a united country could face 
the world’s problems. Attlee re- 
fused. In war fee Labour Party 
arrived late and left early. 

This is Labour’s infamous de- 
fence record, for which, to the best 
of my knowledge, no member of 
fee Labour Party has ever ex- 
pressed a word of contrition or 
regret for fee damage they did. 

And when in 1982 fee Ar- 
gentines committed unprovoked 
aggression and invaded the Falk- 
land Islands, Labour MPx criti- 
cized not them but fee Prime 
Minister who felt compelled to 
observe in the Commons that “she 
wished fee leader [Mr Foot] of fee 
Labour Party was as conceraed for 
our defence as he is to keep Soviet 
superiority”. ' 

Mr Kinnock, whose policy of 
“defenceless defence” has been 
repudiated by the United States 
and every Nato government, is 
now busy putting a gloss on it so as 
to make it appear less dangerous 
and reprehensible than it is. Given 
his inexperience and irresponsibil- 
ity, will anyone believe him? 

Yours etc, 

PATRICK DONNER, 

Hnrstbonroe Park, - 
Whitchurch, 

Ham pshire , 

December 9. 

Front Major-General J. D. hunt 
Sir, Does Mr Kinnock intend to 
increase our land forces contribu- 
tion to Nato by forming more 

Brain stem deaths 

From Dr Andrew Bamji 
Sir, The views of Dr Wainwright 
Evans (report, December 8) on 
brain stem death are not new and 
have been refuted on more than 
one occasion in the medical press 
over fee past four years. They are 
based on a fundamental mis- 
understanding of physiology and a 
failure to c ompre hend fee dif- 
ference between death of fee 
individual “as a whole" and death 
“of fee whole individual”; cessa- 
tion of fee circulation is irrelevant 
to either. 

The code for fee diagnosis of" 
brain stem death requires fee 
essential precondition of in- 
controvertible evidence of ir- 
reversible struc tura l damage. If 
there is any doubt whatever then 
the diagnosis of brain stem death 
may not be made and fee patient 
cannot be certified dead. 

This is why Dr Evans has never 
produced and will never be able to 
produce any case of resurrection 
from a correctly diagnosed stale of 
brain stem death. To frighten 
people wife the notion feat fee 
brain stem dead may yet be 
resurrected is irresponsible. 

May I remind Dr Evans of 
Sydney Smith’s dictum: “death 
must be distinguished from dying; 
wife which it is often confused.” 

It is understandable why fee 
layman may foil to perceive fee 
difference and incumbent on doc- 
tors to ensure that they under- 
stand, so that they can explain. 

Yours faithfully, 

ANDREW BAMJI 
Brook General Hospital, 

Shooters Hill Road, SE18. 
Decembers. 

A case of misconduct 

FromMrF.E. Weale 
Sir, Your third leader (November 
27) is correct in questioning the 
mechanisms with which “disturb- 
ing aspects" of the case in which I 
was found guilty of professional 
misconduct have been brought to 
tight 

I do not believe feat the Royal 
College of Surgeons bears any 
responsibility in this matter, 
though we do have the opinion of 
iu president that “ft was the 
responsibility qf the surgeon who 
admitted a patient to ensure that 
he or she was cared for. either by 
himself or by another surgeon who 
war coming on duty" Substan- 
tially fee same conclusion was 
arrived at by the Tower Hamlets 
advisory panel reporting on fee 
Wendy Savage case (see British 
Medical Journal, October 25, 
1986, page 1092). 

I have twice requested public 
enquiries to be made into the 
conditions of work wife which 1 i 
have been confronted over the 
past few years. To its credit, fee 1 
Royal College of Surgeons re- 
ported in the autumn of 1983 on 
these problems. It is unfortunate 
that fee advice, was unacceptable i 


divisions? If so, fee Soviet Union 
can match us fourfold. 

How does be propose to get fee 
men? By greatly increasing psy? In 
which case, what win fee TUC 
say? And if not, by reintroducing 
National Service that will mean 
trebling the size erf the training 
ma c hin e, fee provision of more 
barracks and training areas Ac, 
&c? It win be difficult to find room 
to house and tram the new 
divisions in G erman y, let alone in 
♦his country. 

Or does he intend to mate our 
increased contribution a maritime 
one? More warships and sub- 
marines (non-nuclear, of co one). 
How is be goring to man fee ship*? 
Except in fee imtnediate after- 
math of the Falkland; war the 
Royal Navy has been struggling 

wife a retention problem for many 

years. 

Perhaps ft is the RAF which is 
to benefit the most from the 
largesse so lavishly promised by 
Mr Kinnock? It probably should 
be, after having been cut to the 
bone by successive governments. 
But this win mean more land for 
airfields, and in view (rfthdr ever- 
increasing cost the addition of 
relatively few planes to the 
frontline strength. Here again, 
there will be a retention problem, 
since skfiled men are oflered many 
advantages in civilian life: 

Not for one moment would I 
wish to disparage the good in- 
tentions and high ideals of those 
who want to take Britain out of the 
“nuclear dub”. But if it should 
ever come to war, which God 
forbid, and should the Russians 
and Americans be locked in a life 
struggle, we shall certainly not 
save ourselves by abandoning 
such influence as we still possess, 
nor by pulling the wool over our 
eyes, as we tried to do in the run- 
up to World War EL We still had to 
fight Hitler in fee end. 

I am. Ac, Ac, 

JAMES LUNT, 

Hilltop House, 

Lfttk Milton, Oxfordshire. 
December 6. 

From Dr Humphrey Smith 
Sir, Your second leader of Decem- 
ber 8 mates fee statement in 
relation to the Labour Party “ . . . 
its non-nuclear defence policy 
carries no credibility at alL” 

Sir, this is rubbish. Jt is quite 
specifically an account of its 
defence policy fern, at the age of 
41, 1 intend to vote for the Labour 
Party at the next general election, 
for fee first time m my life. I do 
not think I am alone. 

Yours faithfully, 

HUMPHREY SMITH, 

1. Graft Road, 

Atherstone, Warwickshire. 
Decembers. 

Country of origin 

From Mr Rupert Blum 
Sir, The letter by Sir Edward du 
Cairn and otters of fee Conser- 
vative Parliamentary Group for 
European Reform seems to con- 
fuse the obligation to show the 
country of origin on consumer 
products wife the right of produc- 
ers to continue doing so. The 
proposed repeal of fee Trade 
Descriptions Act 1972 will in no 
way affect that right. 

My own county of Hereford- 
shire produces some excellent 
products. When firms judge that 
buyers will be attracted by being 
mule aware of its origin, there is 
nothing in the EEC Treaty to 
prevent them marking the product 
Made in Herefordshire, England 
(or Great Britain or UK). 

Yours faithfully, 

RUPERT BLUM, 

Prior House, 

Stoke Prior, 

Leominster, 

Herefordshire. 

Deoember5. 

Sports ground 

Front Mr C. G. Buck 
Sir, Let me add emphasis to John 
Goodbody’s telling articles 
(December 2, 3) about the appall- 
ing rates burdens which amateur 
sports dubs are made to bear. 

The rates bill for Lords cricket 
ground is quoted as £25,700. Ours, 
for a comparable area in the 
southern outskirts of Sheffield, is 
£45,000. 

Yours sincerely, 

G G. BUCK (President, 

Sheffield Amateur Sports Club), 

The Grange, 

Bradway, 

Sheffield, South Yorkshire. 
December 5. 


to my colleagues or the regional 
health authority, thus placing me 
in a serious minority position. 

The Vascular Surgical Society of 
Great Britain is aware of the 
anomalous position of single- 
handed surgeons practising vas- 
cular surgery and discussed it at its 
recent meeting in November. 

I practise sophisticated smggty. 
I have twice been warned fay Royal 
College of Surgeons repre- 
sentatives feat I expose myself to 
undue medico-legal risk for under- 
taking foe kmd of work which X do 
in the South-east (Dartfind and 
Gravesham) without an intensive- 
care trnil 

I have carried a heavy burden 
for 1 7 years and ft is fee care with 
which I have done my work which 
has on the one hand benefited my 
patients, and on the otter has 
excused the health authority from 
providing me with what others 
regard as absolute essentials. It 
was not possible for me to bring 
such matters to the notice of the 
General Medical CoundL 
Yours faithfully, 

F. E WEALE, 

Top Corner 
9 Warren View, 

Shorne, Kent, 

December 4. 



Security service 
over-mighty? 

From Mr Aubrey Jones 
Sir, Professor Hough (December 
6 ) is right: the requirement of 
lifelong confidentiality now 
placed on an official of fee secariiy 
services should be conditional, 
not absolute. Ifi for example, such 
an official were to keep to himself 
information about an act of 
espionage against the government 
or the day, no matter whether that 
act had been undertaken officially 
or unofficially, be would in effect 
be elevating bis service above fee 
government. 

The real issue anting from fee 
Wright case is: which is the 
paramount authority, security ser- 
vices or government? It can now 
be seen, foanks to Mr Wright, that 
fee present system, with its 
emphasis on absolute secrecy on 
fee part of everyone, can conduce 
to the omnipotence of the security 
service. 

Even a prime minister may feel 
the need to appeal against it, as 
did, according to report, Lord 
Wilson. It is difficult, however, to 
see to whom he or she may appeal 
unless it be to a small body of 
privy counsellors drawn from 
more than one political party. 
Yours faithfully, 

AUBREY JONES, 

89 North End House, 

Fitzjames Avenue, W14. 

From Mr K. I. McCollum 
Sir, In the current real life spy 
drama no one seems to have asked 
the obvious question. Why, if so 
many senior British intelligence 
officers were Russian moles, has 
this made so little difference? 
Britain has remained intact, fee 
foundations of Nato are 
uncnunbled, the wheels of inter- 
national diplomacy have contin- 
ued to torn. 

Are the dire consequences of all 
the double-dealing too secret to be 
revealed? Or could ft be that 
Professor J. G Masterman, who 
was in a position to know, got it 
right when he suggested that in 
time of peace the elaborate game 
of espionage and counter-espion- 
age is largely a waste of time? 
Yours sincerely, 

IAIN McCALLUM, 

Combesbury Farm, 

Backland St Mary, 

Chard, Somerset. 

From Mr Chapman Fincher 
Sir, I must protest concerning a 
statement about myself marie by 
my old friend Miles Copeland in 
his article (December 1) about the 
Wright affair. Mr Copeland wrote 
Peter Wright is sure to have enou gh 
of a best-seller to make whatever 
Chapman Pincher paid him look 
like peanuts. 

I have never paid Mr Wright 
anything. Mr Wright received 
royalties on a jointly-authored 
book property paid fay the pub- 
lisher and nothing else. 

Yours sincerely, 

CHAPMAN PINCHER, 

Church House, 

16 Church Street, 

Kinfoury, 

Newbury, Berkshire. 

Towards forgiveness 

From the Reverend Stephen Trott 
Sir, Your correspondent on 
“forgiveness”, Mr Con oily 
(Decanter 8), should beware of 
taking snap definitions from fee 
Shorter Oxford Dictionary and 
elevating them into theological 
principles. 

The dictionary hanfly does 
justice to the word “love” when it 
gives “warm affection” as a defi- 
nition: but a dictionary is not 
intended to explore the depths of 
such words. 

Whether exercised by fee Gen- 
eral Assembly in Scotland, or by 
an individual priest in an epis- 
copal church, the ministry of 
reconciliation and fogiveness is 
very much something involving 
human beings, because to forgive 
is to express the conviction that 
God does forgive sinners who 
repent, and has given power and 
authority to his church to do so. 

We are thus restored to grace 
and fellowship wife our brothers 
and sisters in fee church, Mr 
Conofly’s “third parties**. Were 
forgiveness withheld, then none of 
us could remain members of 
God’s churchj let alone be or- 
dained to minister within ft. 

Yours faithfully, 

STEPHEN TROTT, 

14 Southgate, 

Hestie, Humberside. 

December8. 


From the President of the General 
Medical Council 

Sir, It would not be proper for me 
to comment upon the determina- 
tion of the Professional Conduct 
Committee of this Counci] in the 
case to which you referred in your 
leading article of November 27 - 
save to say that the committee 
readied its decision after full 
consideration of all of fee ev- 
idence heard in the case, and to 
make it clear that the complaint in 
question, which was first received 
in the form required by the rales 
on August 8, 1986, was considered 
by the Preliminary Proceedings 
Committee at its next meeting on 
October 1. It was referred for a 
formal hearing by the Conduct 
Committee on November 19 and 
20 . 

I have noted fee later you 
published (December 5) from the 
President of the Royal College of 
Suigeons of England and can only 
add that the General Medical 
Council will continue to attach 
paramount importance to its pri- 
mary responsibility of protecting 
the public. 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN WALTON, President, 
General Medical Council, 

44 Ha Ham Street, Wl. 
Decembers. 


ON THIS DAY 


DECEMBER 12 1854 

The Storm which preceded the 
terrible first winter in the Crimea 
caused most damage at sea, where, 
at least 30 Allied ships were sunk. 
The most serious loss was the 
Prince, loaded with 40,000 new 
uniforms, underwear, hats, gloves, 
medical supplies and ammunition. 

By comparison it was possible 
almost to make light of the storm 
havoc at Army headquarters, io 
. which The Times correspondent, 
William Howard Russell, was 
attached. The censored 
exclamation was presumably 
“SW/” 


THE BRITISH EXPEDITION. 


(From Our Special Correspondent.) 

Comp Before Sebastopol, Nov. 14 

The camp was visited by b 
humcane today. It commenced 
shortly after 6 o’clock am, and was 
preceded by rain w jiwlh from 
SW and SSW. 

For about an hour I had been in a 
listless state between waking and 
sleeping, listening to the pelting of 
the rain the fla rin g 

canvas of the tent, or dodging the 
streams of water which flowed 
underneath it, saturating our blan- 
kets onH miinrting on the macin- 
tosh sheets in pools. The sound. of 
t.lw» rain, its heavy beating on *ln» 
earth, had become gradually swal- 
lowed up by fee noise of the 
rushing of the wind over the 
common, and by the flapping of the 
tents as they rocked more violently 
beneath its force. Gradually the 
sides of the canvas, which were 
tucked in under big stones to 
sec ure them, began to rise and 
Sutter, permitting the wind to 
enter playfully and drive before it 
sheets of rain right into one’s face; 
the pep began to indicate painful 
indecision *»>ri want of fiwrrmmw of 
purpose... 

At every fresh blast the pole of 
the tent played and bent litre a 
sahnma rod; the canvas togged at 
the ropes to pull them up, and fee 
pegs yielded gentry. A 
crack! I looked at my compamons, 
who seemed determined to shot out 
all sound end sense by piling as 
much clothes as they canid collect 
over their heeds. A roar of wind, 

and Hi- pole raitfl fatal 

“crack” was heard a gain- “Get up, 
doctor! up with you; E — !, the tent 
is coming down!” The Doctor rose 
from beneath his tumulus of 
clothes. Now, if there was anything 
in winch the Doctor put confidence 
more than another, it whs his tent- 
pole. There was a derided bend in 
the nririril» of it, but he used to 
argue, on Bound anatomical, math- 
ematical, and physical principles, 
that the bend was a 
improvement, and he believed that 
no power of Aeohu could ever 
shake it. 

He looked at the pofe bbnd(y; as 
he looks at afl things, put out his 
hand, and shook it. “Why, man”, 
said he rep ro achfully, “rt*a all right 
— that pole would stand for ever,” 
and then he crouched down and 
burrowed under his bedclothes. 

Scarcely had he given the last 
convulsive heave of the blankets 
which indicates perfect comfort 
and satisfaction, when a harsh 
screaming sound, increasing in 
vehemence as it approached, 
struck us with honor. As it passed 
along we beard the snapping of 
tent-poles sod ttn> sharp craelc of 
timber and canvas . . . The pole 
broke off short in the middle, as if 
it were glass, and in an instant we 
were pressed down and half stifled 
by the heavy folds of the wet 
canvas, which beat us about the 
head with the greatest Any. Half 
breathleaB and blind, I struggled for 
the door. Such a sight as met the 
eye! The whole head-quarters’ 
flump was beaten to the earth, and 
the unhappy occup an ts were rush- 
ing through the in all direc- 
tions in dtase of their effects and 
clothes... 

Dr. Haifa tent, close at hand, 
was levelled; and the principal 
medical o ffi c er of the British army 
wight be seen in an nrnmnai state 
of perturbation, seeking for his 
ere be took to Bight .. . 

Thetwode, in drawers and 
shirt, was tearing through the rain 
frnd through tlnf* dirt HIm a mania* 
after a cap which he fancied was 
his own, and which he found, after 
a desperate run, was his sergeant’s. 
The air was filled with blankets, 
hats, great coats, little coats, and 
even tghly a and chairs! 
Macintoshes, quilts, mdia rubber 
tubs, bed-dothes, s hee t s of tent- 
canvas want whirling like leaves in 
the gale towards Sebastopol . . . 

.. . Now and then a cruel gleam 
of sanahme absolutely shot oat of a 
rift in the walls of clouds and 
rendered the misery of the scene 
more striking. Gathered up as we 
were under fee old wall, we could 
not but think with amrious hearts 
of our Beet at sea — of our 
transports off Balaklava and tire 
Katcha — of the men in the 
tranches and on picket. Alas! we 
had too much reason for our 


Nov 15 . . . Hie fall of this tree, 
which had seen many winters, 
coupled with the fact that the 
verandahs and balconies of the 
houses anda tow of very fine acacia 

trees on the beach were blown 
down c or rob ora tes the statement 
so generally mndo by the inhabit- 
ants that they had never seen at 
heard of such a hur r icane in their 
Kfpfcmw*, although there is a tradi- 



Breath of summer , 

From Mr James W.Giflett , 

Sir, On December 3, within 
minutes of seeing fee first snow^ 
drops in bloom, my wife was stung 
by a wasp! 

Yours faithfully, •; 

J. W. GILLETT, 

16 Lea Road, 

Ampthifl, 

Bedford. 

December 6. 



v ; 


THE TIMF-S FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 



Saleroom 


COURT AND SOCIAL 


£423,500 for bust 
of French general 


COURT 
. CIRCULAR 

: BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
December 1 1: The Queen held 
.an investiture at Buckingham 
Palace thi$ morning. 

The Queen this evening at- 
tended a Reception at Guildhall 
to mark the 150ih Anniversary 

■ of The Newspaper Society. 

Her Majesty was received by 
the Right Hon the Lord Mayor 
(Sir David Rowe-Ham) and the 
President of the Society (Mr 
-J.E.G Dicks). 

Lady Susan Hussey, Mr 
Kenneth Scott, Mr Michael 
Shea and Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Timothy Laurence, RN 
were in attendance. 

; The Queen, attended by Lady 
Susan Hussey, Mr Kenneth 
Scott and Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Timothy Laurence. RN, 
left King's Cross Station in the 
Royal Train this evening for 
South Yorkshire. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, 
President of the F6d6d6radon 
-Equestre Internation ale, 
accompanied by The Princess 
Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips, at- 
tended the FEI General Assem- 
bly at the Waldorf Hotel today. 

Mr Brian McGrath was in 
attendance. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, 
accompanied by The Princess 
Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips, this 
evening attended a dinner given 

■ by the FEI at the Waldorf HoteL 
_ Lieutenant-Colonel Sir John 

Miller, Mr Brian McGrath and 
Mrs Timothy Holderness- 
Rod dam were in attendance. 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
-December 11: The Prince of 
Wales, President, The Prince’s 
Trust, accompanied by The 
. Princess of Wales, this after- 
noon visited the production 
*-stage of the film Living Day- 
lights at Pinewood Studios. 

Mrs George West and Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Brian Anderson 
. were in attendance. 
KENSINGTON PALACE 

■ December II: The Princess 
Margaret Countess ofSnowdon 

‘ today visited Crowborough and 
' was received on arrival at Eridge 
.Park by Her Majesty’s Vice- 
- Lord Lieutenant for East Sussex 
' (Major B^LH. Shand). 

Her Royal Highness opened 


Forthcoming 

marriages 

Mr MJL Bhondia 

; and Miss M. Lalji Mamdam 
The engagement is announced 

■ between Mahmood Reza, elder 
son of the late Mr and Mrs 
Sherali Janmoharaed Bhogadia, 
of Leicester, and Mansura, el- 
dest daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Hassanali Lalji Mamdani, of 
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. 

Mr CJ. Brockbank 
and Miss JJfi. Breeze 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, younger 
-sou of Mr and Mrs Roger 
Brockbank. ofStavdey. Kendal 
Cumbria, and Judith, elder 
daughter of Mr and Mis Alan 
Breeze, of Sandiway, 
North wich. Cheshire. 

Mr PJ. Brooksbank 
and Miss JJVL Crunch 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter, son of Mr and 
Mrs Jack Brooksbank, of Nor- 
wich, and Jill daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Harold Crouch, of 
Ashford, Kent 

' Mr N. DiUon-Hatcher 
and Miss LM. Anstruther- 
Norton 

' The engagement is announced 

’ between NiuL eider son of Dr 
'G.W. Hatcher and the late Mis 
M.B. Hatcher, of Hove, Sussex, 
and Imogen, younger daughter 
of Mr ‘and Mis J.H. Anstruther- 
Norton, of Maukten, Bedford- 
shire. 

1 Mr DX. Manley 
and Miss E.M. Madeod 
The engagement is announced 
between David, youngest son of 
the late Mr Ivor Manley and 
-Mrs Ivor Manley, of Bacton, 
Herefordshire, and Erica, only 
daughter of Mr Alastair Mac- 
leod, of Miami Florida, and 
Mrs Lorna Macleod, of 
Weobley, Herefordshire. 
Mr&MX.Raben 
ami Miss SJ.L Stratton 
The engagement is announced 
between Matthew, eldest son of 
Baron and Baroness Michael 
Raben Levetzau, of Rathmirc 
Park, Tullow, Co Carlow, and 
Sarah Jane, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Vernon Stratton, of St 
Helen’s Station, Isle of Wight. 


the new swimming pool at 
Goldsmiths Leisure Centre and, 
in the afternoon. The Princess 
opened the hydrotherapy pool at 
the Horder Centre for Arthntics, 
of which Her Royal Highness is 
President 

The Princess Margaret, 

Go yntess Of SflOWdOU who 

travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
The Hon Mis Wilis. 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
December 11: The Duke of 
Gloucester, President, the In- 
stitute of Advanced Motorists, 
today received Mr FJVL Pick- 
ering, Chairman, and Mis R.B. 
Peters, Chief Executive and 
Secretary. 

The Duchess of Gloucester, this 
afternoon visited The Royal 
Institute of Oil Painters’ Ex- 
hibition at The Mall Galleries, 
SWl. 

Mrs Howard Page was in 

attendance. 

THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 
December II: Princess Alexan- 
dra and the Hon Angus Ogilvy. 
to mark the Centenary of Olym- 
pia, were present this evening at 
the opening of the International 
Show Jumping Championships 
at Olympia. 

The Princess ofWales, Patron of 
Help the Aged, will attend the 
premiere of Short Circuit, in aid 
of the charity, at the Leicester 
Square Theatre on January IS. 

The Duke of Gloucester will 
present the 1986 award to the 
Girl Technician Engineer of the 
Year at the Royal Society of Arts 
on December 15. 

Princess Alexandra will attend 
the opening of the Toshiba 
Gallery of Japanese Art at the 
Victoria and Albert Museum on 
December 17. 

The Queen and the Duke of 
Edinburgh will attend a lun- 
cheon given by the Regimental 
lieutenant Colonels, House- 
hold Division, at the Officers’ 
Mess, Wellington Barracks, on 
December 18. 

The Prince of Wales, Trustee of 
the National Gallery, will attend 
a dinner at the gallery on 
December 18 to mark the 
retirement of the director. Sir 
Michael Levey. 

Princess Anne, President of the 
Save the Children Fund, will 

Mr JJM. Fernie 
and Miss FJS. Swans 
The engagement is announced 
between James, son of Mr and 
Mrs William Fernie, of 
Tellisford, Somerset, and Fiona, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Mi- 
chael Swann, of Pinner, 
Middlesex. 

Mr G. Frett 
and Miss A. Gandy 
The engagement is announced 
between George, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs DJ. Frett, of New 
Malden, Surrey, and Angela, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J. 
Gandy, of Blue Anchor, 
Mine head, Somerset 

Mr D.H. Godfrey 
and Miss GJWL Peefing 
The engagement is announced 
between David, son of Mr and 
Mis D.F. Godfrey, of Newark, 
Nottinghamshire, and Gillian, 
daughter of Mr and Mis W.B. 
Peeling, of Newport, Gwent 
Mr ASJL Jones 
and Miss AJLC. Eley 
The engagement is announced 
between Ross, eldest son of the 
late Mr R.H. Jones and of Mis 
J.D. Nathan, of Paris Walk, 
London, and Annabel, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs Robin Eley, of 
Hackthorn Hall Lincoln. 

MrR.CF.Rea 
and Miss S J. Golding 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, younger son 
of Major and Mrs MF. Rea, of 
The Old Rectory, Cowley, 
Gloucestershire, and Sarah 
Jane, da'i£h tw ‘ of Mr and Mrs 
B.M. Golding, of Wells Farm, 
Oaveidon, Warwickshire. 
MrR.W. Robinson 
and Miss MX Smith 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert William, son of 
Mr and Mrs R-G Robinson, of 
Cotgrave, Nottingham, and Ma- 
rie Bernadette, daughter of Mrs 
M.E Smith and of the late Mr S. 
Smith, of Grassendale, 
Liverpool 
Mr ML!. Sclanders 
and Miss J. Cassie 
‘ The engagement is announced 
between Malcolm, son of Mr 
and Mrs J.S. Sclanders, of 
Hayward's Heath, West Sussex, 
and Jacquelyn, elder daughter of 
Mr and Mrs J.R. Chssie, of 
Bedlington, Northumberland. 


attend Carols for Save the 
Children at the Albert Hall on 
December 18. 

The Prince of Wales, Vice- 
pan-on of the British Conned, 

wflj visit the council office at 10 
Spring Gardens, SWl, on 
December 19. 

Princess Alexandra will attend a 
gala tribute presented by English 
National Opera at the London 
Coliseum on December 21 to , 
mark tire retirement of Lord 
Goodman, CH, as chairman of 
the board. 

The Princess of Wales will visit 
the Tadworth Court Hospital 
for Children in Surrey on Janu- 
ary 20. 

Princess Anne will attend a gala 
performance of The Voyage of 
the Dawn Dreader at Sadler’s 
Wells Theatre on January 2a 
The Princess of Wales, Presi- 
dent of Dr Barnardo’s, will visit 
St John’s Community Day Care 
Centre, 2-4 St John's Crescent, I 
SW9, on January 22. 

The Princess of Wales, Presi- 
dent of the Royal Academy of 
Music, will attend the Arthur 
Rubinstein Memorial concert in 
aid of the Royal Academy of 
Music Appeal and the Institute 
for Polish-Jewish Studies, Ox- 
ford, at the Festival Hall on 
January 25. 

The Princess of Wales will open 
the new special unit for 
deaf?visually handicapped chil- 
dren at WhitefiekJ School Mac- 
Donald Road, E17, on January 
27. 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Henry Frost will be held 
at All Haliows-by-the Tower at 
1 1.30 today. 

Birthdays today 

Miss Tracy Austin, 26; Mr 1 
Lionel Blair, 55; Major-General 
Sir Rupert Brazmr-Creagh, 77; 
Miss Denise Coffey, 50; Mr 
Kenneth Cranham, 42; the Hon 
Mrs Gwynneth Dun woody, MP, 
56; Mr Emerson Fittipaldi 40; 
Mr Roy Grantham, 60; Air 
Commodore Dame Felicity 
Hill, 71; Mr Philip Ledger, 49; 
Canon Professor EJL MascaU, 
81; Mr John Osborne. 57; Mr 
Frank Sinatra. 71; Lieutenant- 
General Sir William Turner. 79; 
the Right Rev Denis Wakeling, 
68 . 


By Hnoa MaDalieo 


The morning session of a sate 
of medieval add la ter Lsro-- 
pean bronzes, scdlptnres and 
works of art at Sotheby’s 
yesterday aronsed consid- 
erable enthusiasm in widely 
diverse fields and produced a 
total of £1,810^19 with 9 per 

^ fing^jjofpe mar ble half- 
length bust of the ITth-centary 
French general the Dnc de 
Loxembonrg, with a massive 
wig, armour and the Order ®f 
the St Esprit, went to the 
London dealer, Adrian Ward- 
Jackson, at £423,501 (es- 
timate £80,§a0 to £ 120 , 000 ). 

It was attributed to the 
Flemish sculptor, Jan Pieter 
van Banrsbeit the eider, on 


only two signed busts by fa® 
are known. The. sculptor of 
Hi is one was certainly at pains 
to ignore the notably humped 
back of die sitter. 

An early 17th-century 
bronze group of Hercules dub- 
bing a dragon, which was 
attributed to Felice Palma and 
apparently based on a design 
by Gianbotogna, was bought 
by Agnew at £220,000 (es- 
timate £70,000 to £100.500). 

From a much earlier period 
of European civilization, there 
was a carved ivory pyxis, or 
circular box for the reservation 
to 1 the host, which went to 
Edward Win, of New York 

Reception 

Newspaper Society 
The Queen was present at a 
reception held at Guildhall last 
night to mark the 150th anniver- 
sary of the Newspaper Society. 
Mr J.E.G Dicks, president, and 
Mrs Dicks received tire guests 
who also included the Lord 
Mayor and Laxly Mayore ss, 
accompanied by the Sberiffi and 
their ladies, Mr Giles Shaw, 
Minister of State for Trade and 
Industry, and Mr Brian Gould, 
MP. 


for £308,000 (estimate 
£200,000 to £300,000). It 
dated from about AD 50C- 
seems to have originated in 
western Europe and was 
boldly carved with scenes of 
the healing mirades of Christ- 

A fine Limoges dtampleve 
enamel and aasse or refi- 
qeary, dating from about 1190, 
sold for £66,000. 

In a sale of jewels at 
Sotheby’s, a diamond ring 
with a pear-shaped stone 
weighing 9.89 carets made 
£85^00 (estimate £30,000 to 
£40,000). , . 

At Christie’s, a sale of 
English furniture made a total 
of £326,733 with 18 per cast 
failing to find buyers. The 
London dealer, Christopher 
Gibbs, bought the two most 
expensive tots, an earfy Geor- 
gian two-section walnut cam- 
net at £30,800 (estimate 
£7,000 to £10,000) and a small 

n - .1 - Ium wI 


OBITUARY „7ATin?R 

SIR AUGUSTUS WALKER 

Intrepid air commanaer ^ 

» i« i 04 T he was given com- training <- priority 

Air Chief Marshal Sir Ag- ibebombCTSianon at was * & himsei f 

gus£s Walker, OT.CBE, ^‘^Nortngh^shire. rate ^ s!a sm. The 
590, DFC AFC, died on ^ere that he lost jus ^ 0 f^ e world, too. ^ 

rwember 11 at the age « 74. 411011 £1- -veninfi while rest oi ,, ne w della- 
pilot, he had an jn^One ^emng off he curious 

excefleni record onopmuo^ ^ffburning incencfiar.« 'from 617 (ihe 

d ^the^,MdMnto^ feUjSf from the open bo® b ledafo Squadron. to the 


in 1942, Aixerwaroa uia «ht> runway, nc • — - - .qcq There. 

man y important commands, his car and set off Us v egas. *n 'j- ' fiv^g 

z&s&te 

going to a Nat0 post in jgjyjstp,* worn the yon. 

Sasbo u &|2 

sr&’sssw? ssssSKs 

Catharine's College, Cam- approached . . fi-Ifeptwo veara before being 

NaSld- rdeAOC-nvCFiyingT™., 

ences Tripos, and won a rugby aim. Tlis had to.be amputat- ing Command. > 


nniinc. nubiv jp—--- _ 

Second in the Natural Sa- 
ences Tripos, and won a rugby 
Blue, 

He joined the RAF in 1934 
and was posted, two years 

a Art Ait 


arm. ims nau w u*. 
ed, but, thoi«h nghthanded , 
he did not aUow it to intotoj 
him, and was back as station 


and was posted, two yea« imn, ana was 

later, to 99 Squadron, of commander within t o 

Heyford bombers. Between nioirths. 


Mr O.W. Scatt 
and Miss TXL Ban 
The engagement is announced 
between Oliver William, eldest 
son of Mr and Mrs W.T. Scutt, 
of Hungeuon, Leioes i era hir e, 
and Tania Catherine, elder 
daughter of Mr and Mrs JJD. 
Barr, of Cheltenham, 
Mr CD. Skinner 
and Miss &A. Uoyd-WHltaias 
The engagement is announced 
between David, only son of Mr 
and Mrs HJ. Skinner, of 
Chance Fields, Radford Semele, 
Warwickshire, and Suky, youn- 
gest daughter of Mr and Mis 
Donald Boot, of Qakwood 
Farm, Beenham, Berkshire. 

Mr A.G. Singleton 
and Miss JJVL Rated 
The engagement is announced 
between Alastair, only son of 
Major and Mis John Singleton, 
of St Cyrus, Kincardineshire, 
and Jane, only daughter of 
Suigeon Captain and Mis An- 
drew Rintoul of Alverstoke, 
Hampshire. 

Flight Lieutenant D.B. 


and Miss SJ. Cursham 
The engagement is announced 
between David, elder son of Mr 
FLA. Wildridge and the late Mis 
F.L Wildridge, and Juliet, eldest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J.G 
Cuisbam, of East Leake, Lough- 
borough, Leicestershire. 


SSaTJf Marriages 


Lieutenant-Colonel J.B. 
Henderson 

and Miss CE. Horsbrugh- 
Porter 

The marriage took place on 
Saturday, November 29, at St 
Mary’s Church, Salford, Chip- 
ping Norton, between Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel J.B. Henderson and 
Miss C.E Horsbrugb-Porter. 
Mr H. Marshall 
and Miss L. House 
The marriage took place on 
December 6 at St Mary’s 
Church, Preston Candover, be- 
tween Mr Harry Marshall son 
of Mr and Mrs Geoffrey Mar- 
shall and Miss Laura House, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Adrian 
House. The Rev Rycroft Smith 
and the Rev Simon House 
officiated. 

Mr Oliver James was best 
man. 



b«©ltcase at £22,000 (estimate 
£10,000 to £15,000). 

On Wednesday afternoon, 
Christie's held a sale of aa tfc- 
uities which produced 
£300,586 with 18 per cent 
bought in. 

In yesterday's saleroom re- 
port die price of the Dali 
mvtlflfp sold in New York 
should have read $132^000, 
and the sterling total for the 
jewel sale was £2,783,796. 

Dinners 

Fan Makers’ Company 
The Lord Mayor and Lady 
Mayoress, accompanied by the , 
Sheriffs and their ladies, at- 
tended the annual dinner of the 
Fan Makers’ Company held last j 
night at the Mansion House. Mr 
MS. Ross Coffins, Master, 
accompanied by Mrs R. 
McWhirter, presided. The Lewd 
Mayor, Mr P.G. Bird, Foreign 
Warden, and Sir John Page, MP, 
also spoke. Among those 


ncyimu r — _ , 

then and the outbreak of war From 1943 he commanded 
he specialised in. amiamente- ^ a bomber 

He also captained ffie RAF ^^ embrac iu g three airfields, 
rugby team from 1936 to ^ ^ was SASO at 

SeA nd v^ £ sssEssasrsss 

did a flying refresher course. His main contnTxjb^n to 
and lsuer commanded a the RAF in the 1950s was u 1 

squadron of Hampdens. . In Bomber Command, at a cru- 

194! he was appointed station aal period when its hrst jet 
commander at North aircraft were coming into 


L nflenham. 

Walker was not only a 
superb aircraft ca p t ain , but a 
b rilliant leader of formations. 

1. _ tUaM nnC 


service. 

He commanded RAF 
Coningsby from 1951 to 1953 


Luncheons 

Diplomatic an ^ Coumouwaaldi 
Writers’ Assodation of Britain 
Mr Chris Patten, Minister for 
Overseas Development, was the 
guest of honour at a luncheon 
given by the Diplomatic and 
Commonwealth . .Writers* 
Association of Britain at the 
Reform Club yesterday. Mr 
John Osman, president, was in 
the chair. 

British Property Federation 
Mr John Brown, President of 
the British Property Federation, 
was host at a luncheon held at i 9 
Sloane Street, SWl, on Thurs- 
day. December 11, for the Hon 
Nicholas Ridley, Secretary of 
State for the Environment. Mr 
John Delafons. Deputy Sec- 
retary at the Department of the 
Environment, Mr Geoffrey Car- 
ter, vice-president, and other 
members of the federation were 
present. 

International Conned] of Chris- 
tians and Jews 

Sir Sigmund Sternberg, chair- 
man of the executive committee 
of the International Council of 
Christians and Jews, was host at 
a luncheon held yesterday at 
Hilled House, WC1, to maik the 
appointment of the Rev Rich- 
ard Harries, Dean of King’s 
College London and Bishop- 
elect of Oxford, as consultant to 
the Archbishop of Canterbury 
and the Archbishop of York on 
interfaith matters. 

Appointments 

Mr J JV. Robson, Ambassador at 
Bogota, to be Ambassador to 
Norway in succession to Sir 
William Bentley, who is retiring 
from the Diplomatic Service. 
Mrs SJE. Brown to be h ead of 
Companies Division, Depart- 
ment of Trade and Industry in 
succession to Mr AA. Dugiud. 
Sir Hew Fleetwood Hantilton- 
Dulrymple to be Lord lieuten- 
ant for Lothian Region in 
succession 10 the Earl of 
Wemyss and March, who will be 
retiring on January 19. 


Latest wills 

Dr Elwyn Davies, of Aberyst- 
wyth, former president of the 
National Library of Wales, left 
estate valued ai £597.880 net. 
Mr James Ferguson Bomford, of 
Pershore, Worcestershire, left 
£1,704,710 net 


brilliant leader of formations. Washingtons (B- 

widespread scepticism m high final year 

places about Bomber ^f^f^iSeTofemili ize 

B 53 r*»J» 

. . ■ r. ^ T t f\CA La tivtlr rAITIinflnd 



Ead of Lauderdale 
The Earl of Lauderdale was host 
at a dinner at the Houses of 
Parliament last night. The guest 
of honour was Mr Ian L ang, i 
Minister for Industry and 
Education, Scottish Office, oth- 
ers present were: 


UVVll vwi iM i li JI i -- 

reputation for striving relent- 
lessly to make sure that his 
aircraft were getting to their 
targets. No deaih-or-gjory 
daredevil, he nevertheless 
-went to imm ense pains - and 
courted the consequent dan- 
gers - to identify objectives 
before ordering bombs away. 

On one night operation 
when the target, a factory, was 
almost totally obscured, he 
found a gap in the cloud cover, 
and dived through it, intend- 
ing to take a closer look at 
rooftop leveL He found, in- 
stead, that he had flown slap 
into a balloon barrage, but 
managed to extricate h im s e l f 
and deliver his bomb-load 
accurately. This was all done 
in the face of heavy enemy 
flak. 


In 1954 he took command 
of the RAF Flying College at 
Manby, and led its staff and 
students on numerous long- 
range exercises. In July of that 
year he navigated two Has- 
tings aircraft in surveys over 
the North Pole, which paved 
the way for the first flight to 
the Pole by a British jet 
aircraft (the college’s Canberra 
bomber, Aries IV, in October 
1954). These flights yielded 
valuable information on the 
behaviour of gas turbine en- 
gines at extreme temperatures. 
Walker was awarded the AFC 
in 1956. 

In that year, he became 
AOC 1 Group, Bomber Com- 
mand. Its Vulcans were enter- 


His final RAF appointment 
was as Inspector-General 
11964-67). but in the latter year 
he «nl to a Nato.poa sa 

Deputv Cora man aer-in-Chser. 

Allied Forces Central turope- 
from which he retired in 1970L 
In retirement he continued 
active. He was a non-execu- 
tive director of Philips Hec- 
ironics from 1970 to 198— but 
had a host of other interests. 
Though his playing days were 
over, he continued to be 
deeply involved in rugby and 
qualified as a first-class refer- 
ee He was president ot the 
RFU in 1965-66. He also 
played an excellent game of 
golf, left-handed, and had a 
single-figure handicap. 

In his service career, as in 
his life outside. Gus Walker 
was a man who led from the 
from Like many bombing 
men of his generation his was 
the philosophy of going m 
“hard and low". He never 
expected of a subordinate 
anything he would not do 
himself. At Coningsby he once 
stood in for a bomb-aimer 
who had gone sick, unreserv- 
edly putting himself under the 
aircraft's captain, although he 
commanded the entire sta- 
tion. 

A man of his temperament 
was, naturally, no fiiesd of the 
bureaucrat and he could be 
rough with those who sought 
to strew red tape in his path. 
In the mess he was popular, 
though he neither drank nor 
smoked 

He leaves a widow, Brenda, 


to of heavy enemy a son and a daughter! 

MR WALTER STOESSEL DAN DONOVAN 



Glass Sellers' Company 
Hie Glass Sellers* Company 
held a dinner last night ax 
Stationers’ Hall after the in- 
stallation of officers. Mr Philip 
J. Willoughby, Master, was in 
the chair and the other sp eaker s 
were Mr Robert Marshall 
Renter Warden, Mr Patrick 
Roney, Chief Commoner, and 
Mr David Wiffiams-Tbomas. 



University news 

Wales 

The following have been 
awarded readerships at the 
University College of Wales, 
Aberystwyth: Dr Roger Horgan 
(botany and microbiology) and 
Dr Richard Kemp (zoology). 


Moments after Mrs Hope fell 
her Aid-Call was telephoning 
neighbours for help 

- * ^ ^ * v • - * ***•' *; v. - f * * ^ 

' ’- 4 % 


Grants 

Medical Research Council: £10 2 .661 
to Prof ewor J W Almond (micro. 
Mo logy) for Hw. fleneHc araiy»of 
us vacoiKS. 

, Adntfnistra- 

Son: £209.684 ro.Dr P J Gregory to 
study varietal differe nces In ro ot 
systems In relation to (TOP Bnorowe- 

wScwneT ^^^ 'ti n^SnSruS 

Almond tor the wrafrucOon of novel 

sasrBsiss ysy; 
gf^afftgsssasssssfs! 

eouUmwm. 

Lancaster 

Honorary degrees have been 
conferred on the following: 

U_D: Mr J.S.B. Boyce, former CWef 
Education Officer for Lancashire; Mr 
Tom Stephenson, peoneer on access to 
the countryside. 

HA: Mr Arthur Grew. Beadle at the 
university. 1966-79. 

DSe Mr Derek Robert a. FB& Wnt 
deputy managing director Ctecfaiucal) 
at GLC. 

DUte Prol^mr Auat m Wo ohyrtu 
rounding pro f e s sor of M W at the 
uni vastly. 

Grants 

^growth and carbohydrate phytt<£ 

mv of an ovtf-wln — — " 



Mr Walter Stoessel Ameri- 
can diplomat, died on Decem- 
ber 9. He was 66. 

During a career span nin g 

more than four decades he was 
successively United States 
ambassador to Poland, the 
Soviet Union and West Ger- 
many. A fluent Russian speak- 
er hie specialized in Soviet 
affairs. 

Walter John Stoessel was 
boro at Manhattan, Kansas, 
on January 24, 1920, and 
educated at Stanford 
University. 

In 1947 he was posted for 
two years to the US embassy 
in Moscow, returning to spend 
a year at Columbia 
University’s Russian Insti- 
tute, and four years at the 
Stale Department. Later he 
served, briefly, at the White 
House. 

Between 1956 and 1963 he 
was mainly in Paris, bat in the 
latter year he returned as 
deputy chief of mission until 
1965. Three years later, after 
another period in Washing- 
ton, he received his first 
ambassadorial posting - to 
Poland. 

In December 1969 he visit- 
ed the Chinese embassy in 
Warsaw for a meeting with the 
Chinese chargt* d’affaires. Lei 
Yang. It was a. sig nifi cant 
event, soon followed by Presi- 
dent Nixon's announcement 
that the American trade em- 
bargo against Ghina would be 
relaxed. 

Two further meetings took 
place the following month, 
which smoothed the way for 
Kissinger’s secret visit to 
Peking. 

From 1972 to 1974 Stoessel 
was assistant secretary of state 
for European affairs, engaged 
in talks with the Soviets on 
mutual and balanced force 
reductions (MBFR). 

Nixon, doubtless pleased by 
his tactful diplomacy in War- 
saw, sent him in 1974 as 
ambassador to Moscow. 
There he helped negotiate 
agreements on the size of 
nuclear tests and attended 
meetings between Kissinger 
and Brezhnev. 

It wasat this period that the 
Americans had good reason to 
suspect that the Russians were 
beaming high levels of micro- 


wave radiation at their embas- 
sy. In 1975 Stoessel was taken 
ill with nausea and bleeding 
from the eyes, and was found 
to have contracted leukaemia, 
the disease which, in fact, 
eventually killed him. 

The following year Stoessel 
was appointed ambassador to 
West Gmnany. He remained 
until 1981, returning to Wash- 
ington as deputy secretary of 
state under Alexander Haig. 
He stood in for a time in 1982 
between Haig’s resignation 
and the appointment of 
George Schultz. Stoessel him- 
self retired later that year. 

But he was not allowed to 
resl and was later recalled for 
a number of special assign- 
ments: improving relations 
with Hungary, meetings with 
Polish communist leaders, 
and the withdrawal of Israeli 
troops from Sinai. He was 
once ag ain in conversation 
with the Chinese, on the 
subject of peaceful nuclear 
cooperation. 

The silver-haired Stoessel 
was a tough and skilled diplo- 
maL By way of relaxation he 
had a passion for paddle 
tennis (played with a sponge 
ball and paddle-shaped bat, 
with rules similar to ordinary 
tennis). 

He married, in 1946, Mary 
Arm Ferrendou, who survives 
him with their three 
daughters. 

MR JOHN 
BOLTON 

Mr John Bolton, CB, died 
recently at the age of 60. 

Born in Lancashire on De- 
cember 30, 1925, he was 
educated a Blackburn College 
of Technology, and then 
served apprenticeships with 
BAC and Courtaulds. 

In 1954 he entered the 
National Health Service as a 
group engineer, and in 1968 
was appointed chief engineer 
to the DHSS, becoming cbief 
works officer in 1977. 

Last year he became presi- 
dent of the Institute of Hospi- 
tal Engineering. 

He was a good talker and 
genial companion, as well as 
an admirable administrator. 

His wife, Nell, survives 
him, with their three 
daughters. 


Dan Donovan, one of the 
best known British band sing- 
ers in the early days of radio, 
died on December 6. He was 
85. 

He first sang professionally 
at tea dances in Cardiff, where 
he was boro, before going to 
London in the earty 1920s. 

His distinctive light tenor, 
reminiscent of his American 
contemporary Rudy Vallee, 
soon attracted attention and 
he sang with all the popular 
bands of the period. Among 
them were those led by Bert 
Ambrose and Harry Roy; Roy 
Fox and Lew Stone; and Nat 
Gonella and Charlie Kunz. 

He achieved national fame - 
and a claim to being the first 
“pop star” years before the 
term was invented - while 
singing with Henry Hall, 
Britain's premier broadcasting 
orchestra leader. 

Altogether he made some 
8,000 broadcasts, a couple of 
films and innumerable 
records, from “Red Sails in 
the Sunset” to such oddities as 
the “Daughter of Mother 
Machree.” His best known 
song, “When Day is Done," 
became his signature tune 
when he went solo at £300 a 
week in the 1930s. 

After the war he returned to 
Wales and took part in many 
broadcasts before taking over 
a number of public houses. 
His trademark was a rakishly- 
tilted trilby which he wore to 
the end of bis days. 

He is survived by a daugh- 
ter. 

MR H. de C. 
HASTINGS 

Sir Hugh Casson writes: 

So obsessively modest a 
man as Hubert de Cronin 
Hastings would be the last 
person to notice (or even, 
perhaps, to mind that much) 
the absence from his obituary 
(December 6) of the fact that 
in 1971 he was awarded the 
Royal Gold Medal for his 
services to architecture. 

Those of us, however, who 
knew and worked for him do 
mind, for it was a welcome 
recognition of the pioneering 
and influential work of an 
extraordinary but. by his own 
wish, almost unknown man. 


Science report 


North American duck settles down in Britain 


By Gareth How Davies 

The rapid s p read across Britain 
of the Ruddy dock, a ooloarfel 
North American escapee, has 
become one of the must 
coasp tenons ornithological sac- 
cess stories of recent years. 

There are now well scattered 
populations of an estimated 
1300 birds, and the manner in 
which tiie dock has colonized 
vacant habitats so positively 
suggests it has already become 
an established member of 
Britain’s avifauna. 

The British Trnst for 
Ornithology describes the ad- 
vance of die duck, Oxyura 
jamaicensis, as possibly the 

most impressive in any bird 
since the coU&red dove burst 


across Europe from the extreme 
sooth-east in the 1930s to reach 
Britain by the mid-1950s and 
become a common garden H. 

Roddy docks, with their chest- 
not piamage, white cheeks and 
bine Hill, gather in winter m 
conveniently static groups on 
reservoirs and lakes, makin g 
them easy to coant. 

Three pairs were imported m 
1948 from the US to the 
Wildfowl Trust at SKmbrfdge- 

Twenty on pinioned juveniles eir* 
caped in 1S37, followed by about 

70 more ia the six yews *9 to 
1963. Thereafter, the docks 
were regularly recorded on res- 
ervoirs and small reeded meres 
ia Cheshire, Shropshire, 
Staffordshire and the county of 
Avon. 


The trust's newly published 
Adas of Wintering Birds in 
Britain and Ireland records 
Roddy dock in 244 10-kBometre 
squares, whereas its 1976 Adas 
rf Breeding Birds noted the 
docks in only 2ft 10-kilometre 
squares. 

The Roddy dock first bred in 
the wfid ia 1960. Six breeding 
pairs were recorded in 1965. 
There were 25 pairs by 1972. 
The 1975 population, at 300 to 
350, had doubled by 1978, 
reaching 1,800 by 1984 despite 
losses in the great freeze off 
1981-82. 

Recent hard winters appear to 
have promoted its disposal. In 
the severe weather of 1978-79 
the dock deserted Staffordshire 


and moved as far away as 
Ireland, the Sollies, Norfolk 
and Kent. Another dispersal 
from its central England strong- 
hold took place in 1981-81 when 
ft moved down to Cornwall 
Devon and Dorset. It has also 
expanded into Anglesey, the 
East Midlands. Scotlands and 
many southern comities. 

The Roddy dock is aquatic. It 
flies only when it moves from 
one water to another, feeding on 
insect larvae and seeds on the 
yater bed. A remarkable feature 
is the deck's rapid establish- 
ntent of regular migration pat- 
terns within Britain, with large 
numbers returning in winter to 
reservoirs and lakes in Avon and 
Staffordshire from their other 

breeding grounds. 







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BERTHS, MARRIAGES 
DEATHS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


taten lo rat ttM nrttaiw. mu 

'!>** me and MMUid^ta'S 
Ha arrvnjit. -n iro me to be 

Mali 49: 1 

CAMPBOX- On December 9th. u» Su- 
san and Robin, a son Donald blay. 

EVANS - On December in 1986. a Si 
Thomas's Hospital, to Anne m. 
Walsh) and Bill. Fapd Charles Bene- 
dict a brother for Harriet. 

CRAMAM.WATSON . On December 
6th 1986. in London lo Brigitte (ate 
Jeansom and Andrew, a son. Florian 
Nicholas, a brother for Manta. 

wccms - On December 3rd 1986. to 
Susan tote suodoni and tvunm. a 
son wiuiam Ml chart. 

KMC - On December Tin. at Queen 
Charlotte's Hospital, to Jane (nte 
G wynn i and Graham, a son James 
Peter . 

MOTCAN . on Deember 6th. at St. 
Lukes. CuUdford. lo Susan (nee i?n- 
pen and Ml chart, a second son. Guy 
Michael John, 

O* GORMAN - On December 9th 1966. 
ai Mount Alvernla HospitaL 
Guildford, to Frances (nte Thomp- 
son) and Roy. a son. 

RATCUFFE - See Waraham. 

TOBIAS - on December Bth 1986. to 
Jane and Paul, a daughter, phwppb 
M arie , a sister for Johanna Louise. 

WAREMAM - On December 10th 1986. 
ai SI Mary’s Paddington, (a Helen 
(nte Rtfdiffrj and PhUlR. a mb. 
Nicholas Christian. 

WOODHEAD • On December loth, to 
Rose, wife of Nicholas, a son. 

GOLDEN | 

ANNIVERSARIES | 

b *22T :W, 5. t, 2 v ■ 2? Orrmuwr I2to. 
1 936 ji St Paid’s Cathedral. KamMda. 
Goando. Rev. S John Berry lo Doreen R 
v* jnv-y. m woodune Rom. lUcMcy 
Bromley, Kent. 

THORPE : THOKKAT on December 
12lh. 1936 ai Pathhead West 
Church. Kirkcaldy. John tj»me to 
Frances Margaret. 


DEATHS 


ARMSTRONG - On December 10th 
1986. Deborah Pease, aged 76 yean, 
wife or Hilary. Funeral at St 
Laurence's. Ludlow, on December 
17th. 

ASHTON - On December 4th. Alberta 
inteTaiix peacefully in her sleep, be- 
loved wife, mother and 
grandmother. No letters please, fam- 
ily flowt-rs only, donations u wished 
to R-NXJ.. Guernsey, c/o Harbour 
Master's office. SL Peter Port. Fu- 
neral Sendee took place at St 
Martin’s Parish Church Tuesday De- 
cember 9th at 10.30 am. private 
cremation. 

BAYLY - on December 9th. peacefully 
ai The Sue Ryder Home. Susan, sis- 
ter of Jotm and James and the late 
Patricia Hulme and loving and be- 
loved aunt. Service at St Botolph's 
Church. Swyncombe. 12 noon. 
Tuesday December 16 th. followed 
by burial at Christmas Common. Do- 
nations apprec ia ted to Sue Ryder 
Home. NetUebed. Onto. 

BULL - On December 7th 1906. peace- 
fully at Smutlngdrte. PhyOls Maud 
Eleanor, widow of Hitary Carol 
Howard BuO and dear and ksvtns sta- 
ler of Barbara, in her 87lh year. 
Funeral Service wtu take place at 
Easthampstead Park Crematorium. 9 
Mile Ride. Wokingham, on Monday 
IStft December at 1 1.00am. 

CLARKE - On December Bth 1986.. 
peacefully at R.NJL. Haslar. EM 
MolUe. beloved wife of Wallace. FU- , 
rural iO,4Sam. December 16th at SI : 
Mary's Church. Alverstoke. rodowed 
by private commUtaL Fam&y Bowers 
only. Donations If wished to Kina 
George V Fund for Sailors. 

CftOU. - On December 9th. at the Mac- 
mlllan UnlL Derek Le Mesnrtar. aged 
63. Of MUford-an-Sen. very dear hus- 
band of Anne and father or Emma. 
Funeral private. No flowers please. 
But 8 desired. Donations to Macmil- 
lan Cancer Trust. Christchurch 
Hospital. Christchurch. Dorset or 
Mane Curie Memorial .Foundation. 
28 Bdgrave Sg. London. SW1X 
BQG. 

DE V1LLE - On December 9th 1966. 
peacefully x Bury House. Bury. 
West Sussex. Phoebus Elizabeth 
Vlolel formerly of Ptfboroii|*i. West 
Sussex, much lowed by tea- family 
and friends. Funeral Sendee at 
Findon Crematorium. Tuesday De- 
cember I60i at 11 am. Flowers and 
enquiries lo Reynolds Funeral Dtree 
ion. 27-31 High St Bognor Regis. 
West Sussex Tel: 0243 864746. 
FRENCH - On December 10th. peace- 
fully in hospital Edith Ann. tale of 
Kirby-ie-Soken. Essex, aged 75 
years. Much loved sister and sadly 
missed by all her family and friends. 
Funeral service on Tuesday Decent-, 
ber 16Ut at Weriey Crematorium at’ 
2. 45 pm. Flowers may be sent to 
P.G. Oxley Ltd.. 47 HMhStteeL WaL 
t on-on- Naze. Ess e x. 

GABRR. - On December 6th 1986. I* 
Youstf- Cremation to be held at 
Goble rs Oeen Crematorium on Sun- 
day 14th ai nam. No dowers. 
GAUNTLETT - On December 8th. 
peacefully at William Road. 
Lymmgion. John Mildred Deane 
aged 92. rormerty of St Edwards 
School Oxford, cremation Bourne- 
mouth. Thursday December 18th 
twelve noon, enquiries ro Dia mond 
and Son Lyminglon 0S90 72060 de- 
i.iiK of a memorial service will be 
announced taler. Family flowers but 
donations lo Qturrit of England Chil- 
drens Society. 4 HWhfletd Avenue. 
Lyminglon. Hants. 

COKE - On December 10th 1986. 
peacefully at home. James Michael 
husband of Mary Lee and father Of 
Angus. Stewart. Douglas and Don- 
ald. Cremation, family only. 
HESKETH - On December 9th. peace- 
fully at Sutton Veny House Niurtng . 
Home. Frank. CBE. LLJL aged 189- _ 
formerly of Welwyn Garflec i Ctty. 
and Principal AssMant SaUcftor fa 
the Post Omce- Creally loved as hus- 
band of the late May. father of 
Margam. Rulh and PhlMPDa- 
f other and greal orandfainer. 
Funeral Service at Salisbury Crerafr 
lorium on December l«h at 12 
noon. Flowers to F Outto * Son. 11 
poriway. Warminster, wots. 

KNKffT - On DecmteM- 4Uv. S 6 ** 
home in CWsiehureL Dmrtd Ora- 
hame. Owrlshed htamapd OfJmjft 
most beloved daddy of James ana 
Matthew and da^y JOTM** 
brother of Kenneth ami Pelw. Pre- 
cious memories far an hksfrtends- 
Funeral service al EDM) Oreinalori- 

asrwgrstfffrg 

s^ smay B l sr ,w ^s^ : 

Donations, if tmUtred. to UiePar- 
tdnsons Disease Society. 36 
Place London. Wl. All enquiries 
nte»e to Franc* <* a g£ I $& Son8 
of Bromley. Tef OI 460 1720 


Church news 

nsnss^^£^gsss w 

^ ^nlV^Bgogi, g 

»=« 


SteSa-ansaa tbb 

diocese. _ n garraiL Vicar. 

The RevR « mSwd. » «*«• 
Embw y. cruid'i. Farndoo. 

dtocese of 

n R CBPte,. uspo “S 


D China Curalr.gM^ 
Wl °’ 

eninglCT'- same Rector. 

The Rev M indusu-lal Mis- 

SS k ■ S TI5S S S ,0 Se , ^ 

^^°^^ U ‘ nUChn ^ 
.WuSuotTviCM’. SI Jotm 
The Rev M AH»°?^r&ad«rii- 
me "^^.^Vicar. 

» 51 
Chetwyn^dtoCMe « Haraacre w 

fSSfieffi^Ss *gf S25£ « 

iT^lTie Willed beneiie ^ and 
ME? F Jones. CIWPW" «f 


W*9* • On December loth. Hemy 
Murray Owen, dearly loved htaband 
ofJwe. father of Richard and hm. 
Owtaton « Barium. 12.30pm. 
Tuesday December 16th. Family 
Bowers only but feniiw. if 
wished, to the Imperial Cancer Re- 
wareh Carapslvk care of The Brrtt 

rS ™ 1 20 «*» Street . 

Sandwich. Kem 

********* ■ On December nth. 
tafafafuny ai St Luke's Nursing 
Home. Headlngton. Osffocd. Dr 
Arthur Francis Martbtan O RE.. 
L L-P -. aged 86, formerly Vice Qmn- 
«tor of Ranchi Urtvemtty. A 
Service of Thanksgiving wtu be an- 
nounced infer. 

MAY - On December 9th. map Regi- 
nald Aldridge MD. MRCP. FRC 
J^ch. Professor of Psychiatry. 
UCLA, peacefully at horns. teWQ 
CMside Drive. MaiBni. faimmia. 
Son of the late Mr and Mn R H May 
«W0CkenbtnsL beloved husband of 
Doctor Genevieve Stewart May and 
dear brother of Amy Havard Jones. 
MELVN1E • On December 9th. at 
Aldeburgn. otiieuy after a tang iHnem 
borne wtm courage. Sir Euoeoe Mel- 

vUie. KCMC. beloved mahimd of 
EKzabrth. tovtng father of Richard. 
Andrea and Alec, and devoted grand* 
lamer of AUgaiL Caqar. Shan. 
AurtoL Ddiv and Alastair. Service in 
West Chapel. Colder* Oka Crema- 
torium. London, on 18th December 
■M 2 o'clock- Family Bowen only. 
MOMAM - On December 9th. 
suddenley at home. Cwrt Herbert. 
Bhhopstou. Swansea. Tbomaa John. 
Emeritus Professor of Welsh and for- 
mer mdsirar of Uaiverauy of wales, 
aged 79 years. Service a Bethel 
Sketty. Swansea. Monday December 
16Ui at 1.15pm. Enaidres to Wiaiam 
Pressure Ltd. 0792 366513. 
HDSUEY - Os December 8di 1986. 
suddenly at his home, Rogosfleld. 
Langho. fUarkfa ini (f o rmerl y of 
Newchurch tn Rossendale) George 
Bertram (Bert) Pidsley aged 70 
yean, the beloved husband of the 
late Dorothy, very dear father of 
John. Flame. Dun. Tony and All- 
son. tarn a much loved grandfather 
and friend. Funeral takes place Mon- 
day December 16Ui wtih service at 
Newchurch Methodist Chapel af 
1.30pm, followed by cremation at 
Pleastogton. Blackburn at 3.00pm. 
No flowers by request. QonaUono if 
desired may be sent to The Bristlsh 
Heart Foundation c/o of The Find 
Hamer Funeral Service TeU07O6) 
2157 21. 

REED -On December 8th 1986. Henry 
Reed the poet age 72. Funeral ser- 
vice at Golden Green Crematorium 
(West Chapel) on Tuesday 16th De- 
cember at 230m. Flowers may be 
sent to J H Kenyon Limited. S3 
Westbenme Grove. W2. Tel: 01 229 
9861 or donations to The Royal Lit- 
erary Fund. 144 Temple Chambers. 
EC4 

RICHARDSON • On December 8th. in 
bospttaL Ralph Croft, dearly loved 
husband of Mary. Funeral has been 
held. Memorial service to be 
armounced. 

RONSON -On December 10th, sodden- 
ly. George, of 2 Hamtoe Court 
Broom Park. Teddtngtou. aged 77. 
deany loved husband or Dorothy and 
father of David and Tncia and thrtr 
famines. Sendee at Kinpoton Otnu- 
torluro. Bonner H81 Road. Ktogston 
oo Tuesday I6tb December ai 1 1.30 
am. Family flowers only, donations 
loTedtUngton Memorial HospBaL AB 
enquiries to Frederick W Paine. Fu- 
neral Directors. 102. High Street. 
Tmkungfon. Teh 01 977 1027. 

SHUCK - On December 9th. peacefUBy 
in ber sleep. EdUfi Shock, much 
toved sister of George 8tney. of Mel- 
bourne. Australia and mother of 
Jean. David and Bernard. Funeral 
service on TixsiUy ltitti December 
at 2pm at South Essex Ownatorium. 

THOMAS - On Decanter 10th. sud- 
denly at home. D ane rs yde 
KQmaooim. Mary, beloved wifa of 
Str Patrick Thomasi Rcoepdon ofthe 
body and Requiem Euchartrt at SC 
FStans Church. Moss Road. 
KOmacotm. today. Friday, at 7pm. 
Funeral servfce tomorrow. Saturday 
December 13di at lOJQem. Fol- 
lowed by private omatton. family 
Bowers only, dwiati o n s If d e alt ed to 
the Ean Haig Fund Scotland or Er- 
rtdne BospttaL 

VEHH- On December 10th. p wmrfhli y 
at hwne after a long Bhieea Cyril 
Henry Lords- Much loved father of 
Graham. Jflsm. Jidtan. Noel and 
Petar. 

WALKER - On December nth, peace- 
fuily In his sleep. Air Chief Marshal . 
Sir Augustus (Gita) Walker, dearly ! 
beloved husband of Brenda, lovtag 
father of Raymond and Jane, grand- 
father of Jaroe*. John and Simon. 
Funeral private, family flowm only, 
donations if desired to Royal Air I 
Forces Association or Royal Air 
Force Benevolent Fund. Tbanksipv- 
ing service will he aaaotmeed later. 

WEBB - On December 7th. traatrady 
as a result of an xen tnt DavM 
Christopher. Beloved eldest sonofDI 
and WaBy Webb and Ms wifa Gflban 
tote Haarman) of Trtaey. Ltoooto- 
shire. All funeral enquiries lo 
Hambroob and Johns Ftmteta Dbec- 
tors. T«L Fottstone 56167. 

I MEMORIAL SERVICES I 


KALDOR - A Memorial Service win be 
held far Professor Lord Ktador. MA. 
fba. Fellow of Ktoss OoOege and 
Emeritus Professor of Economics in 
the University of Cambridge, at 
2.30pm on Saturday 17th January 
1987. in the chapel of Ktogs CoDese. 
Cambridge. 


ENMEMORIAM-WAR 


42 CDO ML - to gratefal memory of 
those who fen at Unhang cn 121 b 
December 1962 - Ok* and Dorothy 
Morris. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


JONES - In loving remembrance of Da- 
vid Cwyn Jones, died December 12 
1976 . Kay and Stephen. 

STEER - Harold. The centenary of his 
birth. Beloved husband, father, 
grandfather and schoolmaster. Mea 
Gtoria FMes. 

THORN T O N - fader, tn loving memory 
of my dear brother, who passed 
away on December 12th 1983. very 
sadly missed and ren ts nb ered with 
much love always, by Para. Ian. 
Gavtn and Nicola. 

THORNTON - Peter treasured memo- 
ries of our dearly loved eon who 
passed away an December 12th 
1986. In our hearts he will always 
stay. Loved and remembered every- 
day. very sadly mi ssed by Mum and 
Dad. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


TMm OHOanUM pum tufa oor CMir. 
man. Lord TOnypantty. provide mere 


Dean of Central and North HuiL 

““The kw^G SMBer. vic ar, Pfa L 
and Rural Dean of wetsalL diocese of 
uSif 1^ » be abp Preb^auV Of 
Whimiiqwn to uctmeM CtaUiodraL 

“rhc^R H atroent VW ar.CesBe 
Church, and Rural Dran of Stafford. 

of LKhlWd. to be ,ario 
Prebendatyor Oaffrough in LB- 
(letd cathedral- 

King New 

tfag^sn wwtf 

SrtfrtSierhsm Valley, same diocese. 


Stertton* iMocm® o t NorwtcA. io rdEc 

°°C»SnTp I Gardner vtcy . WMey 
wto pytford. djoose af OriUCord. to 

retire on March 4. ___ 

TTie R6V M J M Glover. teMp 

^BR8Sffl»E&6 

^sttp^ifaw mtotsba’ priest at 

N ffiS' L E Z 5a^v S ar. Netogrg, 
With GrawtoLdJpqa* of CariWs. 

"S!."rW a 

Giles. Noredch- dtoreg.o f NorwWt. to 
pesPrSSSffe. vicar . Barto n 

I 

Vfca rSj. Jo hn’s, 
team. Vicar. 

PCT rtto-g ocwo of Carikle. paired on 
^ Vicar. St 


f\v H White. Vicar. St 
M«vs. Harrow-m*-th*4«n. decoe of 
fSflw. » "tire on Jatumry 1 





many lonely om wotse Pnaat k aa 
Hem. id the Netkmal OmuHu n Fond 
(or Ihr Am*. New Broad S * U faL 36 
Km faaad Strert.l moon COM INK. 

PH— wwuhbu wmag ma so 
beer mm Atunon. if you mm written 
a book im dewrvH pumtatioo wise 
to. DM: TM1I/2S THE BOOK CUED 
LTD. SB High Street. Ums Sms 
BN? 9LU. 

MKMOLSON FAMILY WUI JCMDh Bui 
•Meiwrd. PM, Cert cr Suren, or snyem 
knowno tarn WMty er nwr «M» 
reow. w e re, contact C aantau Oi-daa- 
8034 er 0908677785 

OLYMFU NORSK SNOW. O—Mf 

Banana. 200 yards (rota Grand Han. 




01 7*9 7779 I 


TN ADVERTENTLY" Dot r*——— WB3 
tnumab. jock ana thenar are ea the 
ban. Lore The Orta. 

A tWMfnMl Om (rare Paradne. Bn 
ParadiM Garase la Die Meroedaa Sec- 
tton d in. Moaning cehnn. 

SftDSNPSaWSinMdM. tnr» ton- 

S i hen*. Needs ofaoty of Teh 

4M BUS 

THE P O M B S KI PUMD TWO. Private 
rttnu end Xmas dteoer muSc. 01-221 
2488. 

NAPPY S NBI1TM A S BBO WNSO NS to- 

InM Hi (amity In*, write BOX J6S . 
BlB« Thank you Mr re I— » 
month* er my ore. Cano. 


WANTED 


WUMumasauunnRiBga. Peat 
Graduate DWH . Secreferul A 
Eurepfai MiMM. csr. Cei. treks ponoen 
to ore laaonape amis. Futty anblto. 
Prreeni salary XdoOd. Please reply w. 
38 The OM SCHOOL Artery Read. Bow. 
£5 BBZ- 


pAUfliNSS ay Batata Oman/ Dtmiop 
and ownes Sbnuan. Tnroaunortnn. 
CouBb to n Caen. Akemr. 0789 
702*42. 


BOABOBOOM TABLE Mdeual Charity 
require boantnma UbirlOseM 20/ZZ. 
wa purduee. bat wood rreter hire or 
NIL meat write to Die Secretary. 16 
Ogle SuaeL London wi. or tekpbone 
01-dSd 44 « Eta. 226 
WAMTED HCSPOtATSLY 3 ttckets 
Pladdo De tamj a OMUe. Cowed Car. 
dan. any dale, rum 80 year okra 
amMOOMu 02*00 2747 eveereo*. 
tt WANTED Urge Vic ■" W drebee. 
chain. exfeodtoo t a tue *. 
dataLBeolirawa. hurmos * on patoUnok 
etc 01 946 7683 dayJU 7890471 eves 
auMNMC modi end Ml id— art— 
wanted. Ores. AMMdb. 117 KMHSnp- 
ten Church SLW* hs 01 229 9618. 
■ANTED Edwardian. Victorian and NU 
ponied fwntture. Mr Astxon w 947 
0946. 667-669 Gsrntl Uoe. EMttfleld. 
SW17. 


Gale, BayswpKf. W2. Sunday Sn- 
vices at 1 1 .00 am. and 6A5 pm. TN 
01 723 0721. 

WttELER - On September 8th 1986. 
tn Sydney. Australia, wnttam Thom- 
as. Bom 22nd July 1912 In Lambeth. 
England. Sadly mused by his family. 


BIRTHDAYS 


pat onosvmor t *o today. Ham 

Birthday. Love Roydoi & Dana. 


FOR SALE 


YOU'LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RESISTA CARPETS 

iMeerk Idea. 
IMMlnat)- 
■ ye + vsl 
ipm l« plsui 
ay 12 * wide 



SERVICES 


ANCESTRY 

the team with the best 
experie n ce World-wide 

ACHIEVEMENTS 
DEPT T, 
NORTHGATE 
CANTERBURY 
CT1 JBA 
TEL: 0227 462618 
HERALDRY 


home or office. £4.78 per sq yd + vat. 
PUIS DM larpeM srieeden of PiMn car- 
Iking tn London. 

I«8 Wandsworth Bridge Rd 
Psrsons Qraca SW6 

TctO 1-731-3368/9 


CHAPPELL OF BOND ST 

EST. 1811 

PIANOS 

Nsw Piano Showroom now eeea 
Special offers on exadag 


Join ore-6 wool 
Tel ATI History 


mooted by i 
Tel 10634) ; 


rr TMung a tare year"? 
i waiter creme ki ns<y. 
Abroad. Di e« 8164. 


ALpreocnL Learn to 
i b> rum Kom. Ores 
- weekend (wtih occJ 


ban vitae document!. DMailc 01-631 
5588. 

CONVEY AMCNN ay fuQir qartUted Soucl- 
km. £180 + VAT and KubM 

rewrHnreti itv ow 51939 a 

FBMDBMMV. Love or Manteoe. AI aoss. 
areas. Datedno. Dept <0161 23 Aotnodoo 
Rood. London WB. Tel: 01-938 toil. 
LAW coacfaue for accountancy., banking, 
secret., bus ensure AUo A LcveL John 
B ob erw o n 455-0907 (Mm). 
MMiMoriMtanuTiitea-f 2 

DCs. hoW. Weekends fared £96. 

ThosCre Sendees. 01-A39 1439. 
nuk usa. France, bun*. Aistratts + 
any other co w itrae. TRAVCOUR.. 
Tefc 01 225 0966 

arenas. London School af Bridoe and 
Oua. 38 KHes Bond. SW3. 01-689 
7201. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


HARRY SECOMBE SAYS: 

'Whzthavelgpt 
that I can't give?’ 

Diabetes is not infectious but 
it can strike anyone. It is still 
incurable but we can fight 
the damage and suffering ii 
can cause-every year more 
than 1 .500 children develop 
diabetes, the hidden d iseas e. 

Join us in the 

fight. Vftneed (?£*£& 
yoorhelp -Now vST* 

BRITISH 

DIABETIC ASSOCIATION 

10 Queen Anne Street. London 
>WIM OBD. kk. « «*. •r.rei. 


Give Direct 
T o Cancer 
Research 


H With 850 scienrists, 
doctors and 
technicians in our 
own laboratories, over 9>1H» of 
your donation or Ic^icy poes 
directly to research. 

.Send nr RO. Box 123, 

Room TL Lincoln). Inn Fidtis 
London WC2A -WX. 


Thousands 
of people need 
yonr help to 
ease the pain 
of cancer. 

loo on Mp m lo itpiacr few and dr- 
t|Bn <Mih iabn and dipm) for no Oak), 
tn irui-ingafopo-tionUAI or dcHUUoe, 
Plow OrtlM BS tar drtads of |u>nmi 
faflit re-w U’ 

The Naifomi Socirtj for l ower KdirC 
Keum 74\. Aortioi Hmiw. IS-19 Briuen 
Sc. ioktan SWT TTY. 

Idtpteur DfjjW 7KII. 


Low com cradtt term* rwMtabte. 

CHAPPELL OF 
BOND STREET 

00 NEW BOND STREET, LOffflON Wl 

01 491 2777 


THE HOLLY A THE IVORIES 
When they are In your room 
Of all the pianos in the world 
Markson always call the tune 

WE SOX a ALSO HIRE I 
(ftent only £ 16 pm) 

MARKSON PIANOS 

Ataear sl nwi 
01 935 8682 

ArtOkry Place. SEI8 
01 854 4517 


are. race horeeo m rentable 
no Alt Deco and Art 
tecta. Tel: 0923 777 2 03. 


BtaO AM taPBD Orano NoAOmJT. fa n ag o 
ay oveutruko- £1 . 000 .TEL : Waion on 
Thame* (0932) 203396. 


IHJBIU I Boudoir grand piano. 6ft 
etna. Rosewood. bn a iw iOMo . ExraDem 
tatannenL C8JKXL Tta (0837) 840346 


FllXll Ct l GKYBTAL WH(e wtoe (oUte. 
gold trtra (12) ST Louis • ovceBo af 
£1000 0902 896444 


60 years old. Fran £40. Private nfe. 
Trt 01 441 5416. 


1TEMWAY rosewood, a It IO tartmM 
Mam Mr sols. Approx do rare okL 

£4500. Tee Ol- 458 5032 - 


aTBOSPBQODDtotngYbbtewBb 
etahnrett pearl tntay. Ckreter but ex- 
tendtale 10 obloog 10 eeM 8. Sbt chain 
2 1 ei iitai pmi vMue BSjMV) 

win aoorat £5000 000 Tab J. PMBtpge 

OO 01-734-8926 

6PO Red HUPfaaae teotae. canpttaMy re- 
fiPtOhed. denned, repotatad ml 
LMM MOUd MMtate. £610 udi. 
Deavevy extra. OaaCacl M. FUherty. 11. 
Ling Drive. UgUwMer. Srerey. 

TTK TBBKS (1814-1986) Tide Xmre ghra 
so m s nnc an an original tasue dated the 
very date they we™ born. £11.96 (Ptote 
tree worn nrwspsoero Yesterday's 
News. 45 DundcmaM Road. Ootwya 
Bay. Tel. 0492 6311 96/631 803. 

FMEST qon Ht y wool empem. AI trade 
prices and under, atao avsitebie 100^ 


in. EsmoN (Cm sneo oomuu- 
cam - 88. todfa. box omsBunn-OrCv. 
far JObm. El 950 Inc. PAP, teucktey 
■02801 702674. Access. BAtanL Atao 
qvoUy ouWde catering. 

■■KarTB OF HETTLEXCD onrual Winter 
stas of rogues and rrprooucoon fa rat- 
ure onmmrn c M PMdWa r 27lh 

Dece mb er. 

■BK COAT For sole. Stas 12-14. Maau- 
ful condffion. nail collar. fuB sleeves. 
£1.000. KUtpdaiM (006881) 224. 

SEATFMDOtS. Beta Uck eta Mr an sold. 


01-828 1678. 

ItaWIJCtl 8MHTBW WUWI tram only 
£1326 p.p. Xmas d*L gtd Oeenrauj 
Products (T). Easl Hendreri. Oxob 0X12 
BLN (029(9 833798/732/062 anyttow. 
THE TMCS 1 795 18 28. OB tar fates 
avail. Hand b o n ne ready lor prassnbi 
dan - also ■sataws’’. £i2^o. 
Remember When. 01-688 6323. 
HUU T I post ANY EVENT. Phantom. 
Cate. Starlight Exp. Caere. Les MteAn 
theatre and sport*. Tri: 821-6616/828- 
O40&JUCX / Visa / Dtners. 

II W tl B IIAI FUrnHWoB Company offers 

invltaanBl 00k. Okie A roahoosov ftirnl- 
ture lo auft me dtamUMw at 32 
City Road. Owner. TriT 0244-41 81 8. 
BCCHSTCM Grand. 1014. 3 »L DtaM. 
Mustcuute l id t n a uBi L £4200. 01-686 


Lripete 1906. ExceOenl cocvUtton. 
£3.750. TeL £BaOU 0226 833162 
CATS, CHCIL Lei Mta.snd PtranMm. A8 
Iheatre and sport. TM 439 1768. AB ma- 
tor credit rtfs. 

PA Ct M HUW D - atanOMd tanootn powar 
bitch. Mack and tan. for sale. £140. Trt: 
Wirksworth (0629 82) 2021. 

I nBCCS/FflSZDK. CookcxH. clc. Cttt 
yoo buy de te r? B * 8 Lid. 01 229 
1947/8468. 

PrtLL LDtCTte Caoedtan Lynx Coax, taze 
IO. Price £2500 Tel: Ol-fiOl-lSSS or 
01-564-8423 

BRAND PIANO -W«ber ST", mate by 
stenrways of New vbric. Good const- 
He n. £1.950. T«L 0727 57159. 

MAN LA88ALB new wedvs. Ms A Kara. 
go*d * diamond. 2 for pries or l. Ol 997 

0301 

HNMNT me nprigu taaoo- Mahogany. 
New 1981. Mine £1800 one. TsJ 0452 
713000. 


tfienonra. Ol sto 8609/01 836 991ft • 
srn FOX Fur cool BwpteMe tttns Ore 
wfatak 47" long. Tteted tawuktare, 
£900. Tel: 01 930 3720 

THE PIANO BNBNUHOP Free credit over 

1 yoarKrik APR) on the beta setecnan er 
new A rasuned plonesXaw tntereta over 

2 yrs 6 3 m Written guotaHone. Flee 
Queugue. soe Ktsbeais Rd. Nwa. 01. 
267 7671. 


FU1SBABE 


FUUUM RsBTH lady's lane not with 1 
dole and 1 angle mono m let. Eacakcat 
Shved fartHhta Itefta e nc e i otwa. 
New tn lube * bre. From £S6pw tod. 
TM. Ol 736 9006 «vn only- 


2B8WKK l.iiMiirtnin m e n taon Rat AS 
UdJOies. Carage. 10 mma Tube o/R- 
PTOf m/F. N/S. £66 pvr excL Tel: 01 
994 6126 fetss/WOMN. 


rotate TV. W tabes and puees. £40 pw. 
Ol 802 7967 i ncnings 

rAMBEBWkU. Pror tacaaie «o tarere com- 
rortaMsCN Bat Own room . Esayaccns 
to «y and West end. £140 per mouib. 
TM. Ot 593 4459 after 7pm- 
AU3UMDNA PALACX N/S. New conver- 
taon. own rata, share BaL 6 itaSBR. 
£48 pw exri. TMOI 431 0656 w/B88 
1537 h 

CLAPHAM SOUTH Ftauate 20/22 to 
ebon room. Largs BaL AD mod eons. 
New lube. £136 dob mod. AvaflMte 
Jan. Tta: Ol 678 2608 

1 RENTALS \ 

For toe beat rental a rtrrtirm of 

QUALITY 
FIATS & HOUSES 

to priBur London were 

QURAISHI 

CONSTANTINE 

270 Carts Court Road. SW5 

01-244 75S5 

MAIDA VALE W9 
£240 p.w. 

BcnuQM two bedroom flat wfth 
brand new fl kitchen & lovely re- 
cetxton wfib btocony in popular 
mansion UoOl 

T ft t» 6 wns Largest l erimg Agenta 
Little Venice 1 OffierOl-2S6 4632 


PUTNEY can*- Spadous 2 Bedroom naL 
8 teeanta s bret Pnuwy lube. Fiffly horn, 
new carom, boom & ml not ma w n o- 
entrance phone, pvt pertfaie £126 PW. 
Ol 870 2341 


■ M BIITM D 1 em es upesn HoUcay Pais/ 
hses to London avaabtoe now. Bargain 
ericas. Rttace PrapezUes 01-485 8926 


Wata Lendon Areas for wtattng appu- 
cante ui Ol 221 8838. 


P U NT ft MINES Contact oa new on Ol- 
236 8861 «er Ow beta J e hchfm of 
(Urnttawd om and hmaoe lo rant to 


OVERSEAS IRAYEL 


Worldwide tow-cost flights 

The best . and mem prove I 
196-000 dtetes ton 1970 


ATOUBd toe world tram £766 

SYDNEY 

COLOMBO 

PERTH 

MRS 

Aubajua) 

JOTUfC 

BAftSUK 

UNA 

SNSAKKE 

GENEVA 

HONG K3NS 

STANBUL 

BOW.' 

NEW YORK 

BOMBAY 

UJS ANGELES 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

§5K& S8 

CARO £230 AUCKLAND £786 

£2U HONG KONO £6S0 

OQJTOMBAY littO MIAMI £330 

BAkiSSc E3G0 AND MANY MOfie 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 




mQPBJ wot 


TRAILFINDERS 

EtatsCotai Road 
Leaden W8 5EI 
OPEN 9-6 MON-SAT 

Loop^ted 0I-VJ7 9631 
tad 014(0 1515 
Eisope/USA 01-937 5400 
ItfBnocp 01-438 J*« 


Ute 6 Gnp 
AiewBA 


LOWEST FARES 

Parts £69 N YORK 

Frankfort £60 LASSF 

Lbood r-xbri Mtend 

Nairobi £326 SUNOri 

jotAirg £460 Bangkok 

Cairo £206 Ktanandu 

Dd/Brea £336 Rangoon 

Hong knap £510 Catam 

Hoge OBcooms Avaa on 1* * Gab C 

SUN & SAND 

21 Swallow sl London wi 
Ox-459 2X00/457 0537 


AffTA 1ATA ATOL/I45I 



UP UP & AWAY 


Europe. 5 Tba Americas. 


Wl - 2 mine Oxford SL Dritghtful Igs 1 
bed balcony rm oToaklog gurden 
MPSri. OL runy Cura. £160 pw. TcfcOl 
955 3593. 


£200 - £1.000 oer week. Trt: : 
681 6136. 


01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


CANARY ISLANDS. Xmas special bud 
a ceem. Tenerife 19/23/30 DnJ> 
C2T8PP C. Canaria 22 Dec fr C28S10. 
Outer dates/detas on reoueta. Bonanza 
Note IOSCO) 298844. OSL ATOL 231 


tare n any desunauon m Ite world. 
NEVER KNOWINGLY UNDEK90LXX 
EALZNQ Travel Ol 879 7775. 


ABI TI CKE T S SpedMHts N York £229. 
LA/Sao Fran £329 Sydney/Metoonrao 
£769. ABdtnndaay OMbBftaRrtr 190 
Jews StracLOl 859 7144 


WIIUIITlIt ON flighis/bota k> Eu- 
rope. USA A moN d ra t ton o ns . 
DtotaBMI Travel: 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL 


A P1UCA N SEAT 3 P EL I AUIH . World 
Travel Centre. 01 878 8146. ABTA- 
IATA. 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKIBEACH 

VILLAS 

CHtUSTMAS SPCtoALS 

VERBZER £109 
MERIBCL £209 

STAFFED CHALET PRICES FULLY 
INCUJSVE 

Of fagto. eld in s ura nce and deBctena 
food 

NO EXTRAS BUT ALL THE FlULLSt 
UM7TCD OFFERS - BOOK NOW ON 
(0223)311115 

ABTA 141 OX ATOL 38 IB 

Accere/Baretaycard/Amex 


JUST nUMCZ - Super value aetf catering 
tad hobdays to me best French resorts. 
Ring Mr new brochure new. 

Trt 01-789 2592. 

ABTA 59266 AMI 1583. 


SM H UT - NOW Offering xupctb ChrM- 
mas spaelata to France and Swraaiand. 
SAVE up 10 £200 lor dm On 20/27 
Dec. 01 786 9999. 


fEHSIfB Private anartmcnL central by 
Medran. 5 tettate bote, bath/nhowar. 
nt c eB ro i rook, garage. Jan 31 - Feb 14. 
Ring 01 730 6613 Monday - Friday. 


mm m M m 



MAYFANt WL Ure m/c (IM 2 born*, toe 1ST * CLUB CLASS FLIGHTS: HupeDte- 

ruUV iSb^XROO pw Ol 493 ^,^5^38^ ^ "» 


OLD OWOT. Cheyne Odns 8W3. 
channtog 1 bed ftdty fta nhbed DaL 6 
months leL £180 pw. TetOl-351 9639 


BY NABtoBTXAU NEATH: weB funrished 
S/c tneemert QeL 2 roana. b 8r k. Betane 
Ube/lhope. Min 6 mantra. Non tanokara 
only. £100 PW Inc CH. RU« 928 8959 
an 4124 er 794 6678. 

~A— WAN EBCWWK Seeks lax 
Rat/boaM: up to £800pw. Ureal fees 
rag- FhiaipB Kay * UMl Sooih or Dio 
Porte. Chtana odter. 01-352 Bill or 
North or the Park. Regent* Par* once. 
01-6 86 9882. 

ITBW CScane Sq area). Odtatoadtog 
earrice ao o a r tm enL 22 days mm leL 
Sludn £270 pw. One be d room itote 
£400-460 pw. Ten The Apoartnwnte 
01-891 1042. THta 22861" METMAK 
G. 

■B HBATE - Attractive 8/C DOL dbohte 
bedroom, kvtna room. K A B. Of A gar- 
den. Statable couple or Nagto. pereon. 
£90 PW. Trt: Ol 348 2764/01 794 
0739. 

HYDE M WJ. sunny news bee. 3 tod 
bam. 2 bon. maenr on atom + Jmrai. 
Huge rate p l an toe rnsrallo roof termn 
A sep nr. Easy pmkb ig Dual ham. 
£650 pw. Ol 723 4133. 

SW1 very tatat tradtoonoBy fre moutaon 
(tot wKh okyltoe vtewe. dtale reoepL with 
pteno. 2 beds. bam. sbwr. good klL 
£236 pw Cootee 01 828 8261. 

ten Spnctaus petto om rtooe to all aeasd- 
Ues. to dble bed. rampL epcniag onto 
patUx. bat h , ktt/btota. £140 pw Cboles 
01 828 8261. 

CAHW TOWN. 6 mu tvtte. Large 2 
bed DaL Recap, batnrm. wl ad ament- 
das. Ota ch-faritate ent ran ce . £1 50 pw. 
Avail January I yr. Trt Ol 482 1667. 

lAHOL WlM Wo mow need your 
proparttes tor uhriamahe and corpo rate 
appucanri Benham A Reeves 01 938 


8YD/NBX. £636 Penh £666. AO tnaior 
carriers lo Aus/NZ. 01-684 7371 
ABTA. 


CHEAP FUBT 5 Worldwide. Haymarfcta 

01-900 1356. 


B B C— HB A aOBFB Mtt Wbrtd- 
Wtda. Trt U.T.C. (07BS 867036. 


nWOUNT FARES Worldwide 01-434 
0734 Juptier Travel. 


■UBmaOMIERS Dtacomd Fares w« 
wide. Ita/eronomy. 01-387 9100 


nJGNTSOOKERS Dteromd Fares world- 
wide. Ut/cconomy. 01-387 9100 


Ol 441 till. 


734 6307. ABTA/ Alta. 


BP A Hi raro . xmm mo lds ir £109. Bloo m 
Ol 736 B191- Aba 80791/AM 1893. 

TAKE TWK OFF to Paris. AitmerdnT 
Broserts. Bruges. Geneva. Berne. Lau- 
sanne. Zurich. The Hague. Duotin. 
Rouen. Houtngw A Dieppe. Tboe OB. 
2a. Chenor Cloee. Irmtei n. SW1X 78Q. 
01-236 8070. 


London W2. 3 bedroo m tunny BaL 
£600 pw neg 01-769 829ft 01-767 
79 1 1 _ _ 

when eeaktoe beta r e n tal proper ties to 
central and prime London arena 
£10O/£2AO(*w. 

nwifl Attractive flat- 1 targe recep- 
ttan. dtoe betarm. kBchen. brthrm. mho. 
GCK £180 pw tod. 01-361 3670 

COVXNT OMMKMsry 1 bod fur- 
nhhed. CH. avadable now. Cnrowv let 
£180 per wore Tel: 01-524 1872 

DOCKLANDS Plate and houem to M 
Dirourtnut toe P ockten di arm. TetOJ- 
790 9650 

EABLS conrr BUS 3 bodroomlax iul 
£ 560 pw neg 01-769 8290. 01-767 
7911 

BMEOI PARK newly dec rotates or 1 bad 
flats. CH. TV, Lone/ Short lees. From 
£126 p.w. 937 4999 

LUX 3 bed. town house to Kew. Cange, 
odns. ctaer lo tube and Kew odns. Cl 85 
pw. Tel: Ol 878 5796. 

BtAVPABt. Nyde Mr* me rocM mm 
Hng/swl lata 1/6 bate, beta prtcaa 
CBooe Apanmente Ol 938 9512. 

Ml NARteOOS. snuB s/c sendees stodlo 
OSL C-H.C. C/H. retadera heueakaeper. 
£400 pan. TM 01-584 8646 


,kAft£590pcm. 



SK7IMIILD Ttosae Mote faom £99 Andor- 
ra A Ttgnas Brochure Ol 602 4826 
24hr. ABTA. 

SM FUBKTS. Dally n Oeneva. Zurich. 
Munich etc. From £89. SKI WEST. TM 
01 785 9999. 

ONLY UTSpa 20 Dec. Lovely caret-ad 
Chalet Porta du StaetL SM Total. 109387 
231115. 


UJL HOLIDAYS 


XMAS* Scota/Banter- 8/C coawe tor 5. 
£200 pw. wind a t lony maun t m i far 9. 
£326 pw. Both OL UyOlc. 08*064- 
509. 


MSTANIT FLAT. Lureny Serviced Ken- 
ahpm. Cbctaea from £B2s pw. Hag 
Town House Apartments 373 3453 


COMPANY NOTICES 


CANADIAN PACIFIC LIMITED 
At a maeting or the Board of bkrtare held 
today, me Mtotet dhtate nd a were 


A tlnol ouanerly dMdend of twelve cents 
<12 rente) Canadton per share on the oul- 
etandtng onUnoiy ataere* to respect of toe 
year 1985. payable on January 28. 1987. 
10 htaderpta record altha d oer ur bukraa e 
M 12 noon on December as. 1906. 
Preference Shares 

A final arod-anmwl d i vidend af D8 p OXP 
per Canadian Dollar preferenoe share and 
2 /sm nance per taeiun g p re fe rence share 
on Use outa fi dinc preference Norm to 
respect of toe year 1966. pny n bte no 
January 28. 1987. so htadera of record M 
Die rtooe or butaneae al 12 puna on 
Decetnbta 24. 1986. 

_ By Order of the Board 
MONTREAL. DECEMBER ft 1986 
DJ. DEEOAN 
SECRETARY 


PUBLIC NOTICES 








Furmtoted RaL 3 rm 
exri. 01-622 3761. 


CM T.V. 24 hr Sw. Telex. CMUnonam 
Apartments 01-373 6306. 


lU %gZc&s c WBhen la serve in toe 
p^Sfof^V Date- «w«e Derby. 


Macmillan fond 

; IkgstoHlte to Meto Secen to taco RA6 

fcttMo. 2B1D17 


How near ^ 
we are to 
thecure... 

.depends on you, ■ 


43 Great Oramd Straet, 

LendaaWCUISn BMOSOlfll 

lelniiT gnnrtwi TTmit^naf iiiTi's 


FLATSHA1E 


FLATMATES Setecovo Sturiag. Wrtl 
esub mutMuaory savin. Ptoe tel lor 
aooL 01-689 6491. 3i3 Breapfeo 
Road. SW3 

flAMTOfftnCK. BR 4 okra. 3rd penen 
to share superb hotter. £150 pm oca. 
own room. m/r. n/a. Trt: Lucy 01-379 
7672 twW 01-943 3309 toOBM). 

Hf DULWICH Prof rs/f to share la flat, 
dose Sta. v spartom + wefl furnished 
£40 pw excL Tel: (O) 01-761-0900 DO 
01- 671.9 648 after 6 JOpm 

OHSMICH 2nd pereen (pref 20N to snare 
flat nr tube. Own room. £46 pw ate. 
Trt. 01-996 9216 OU. 

KU or DOBA nrer n/4 snare lux om pwp 
room and urn £66 par weak one Tot 
01- GIB 4603 

KEW Prof O/ft Kae + gdn. shared fartk- 
Hes. 7 mine ntae. Car PM- £60 pw. N/S, 
T«L 940 0626 or Jo 493 7848 Ex 13L. 

HI - Idert for dty- O/R. CH. fax mataon- 
one. ah mod rons. £66 pwoo tort. Tek 
Ol 739 1633 after 7 pee. 

KS targe own room superior bk near 
Oval tube. Sun young prnrrgnrmii non 
Hooker. £60 pw tad. Teh 01-701 0741 

SNOKT/LOM term booBerttare with ga^ 
dm. W12. £46 gw exd. new tube. Own 
large room. Tab 0223 B9296&. 

SU RBI T ON M/F. N/ftO/R It! 3 bed bom* 
dose to stouoa £180 pm ad. Tefc 01 
590 SiSS. (After 8pnft 

SWI Room to quiet house far grad/prof. 
CH. gdn. privacy- cycle tiirtcnme. £160 
pan exd. Tel. Ol 671 8241 after 4 pin. 

WII Href 2328. own rom. gas CH, 
snare wun l oilier. £1B0 pan. Trt Qi 
871 3312 Sat tan. 

IMS Largo own room. Stocrior Rsl £56 
pw BBC- From Jan 9 10 APfll 9. T« 731 
1832 on Sunday 14 tevesa. 

WANTED central London. Own room. 
ProfHmtla. fton-smoicer. £250 pcm. Ol 
748 1767. 

WEST PUTNEY Mature groRMtofiai per- 
son to smtt private hou se. Own room. 
£200 peta. Trt. 789 177* afire 650 gen. 


off Sloane Square. Fully serviced A 
equipped. Tefc 01-373 6306 (T). 

ST MNEF1 PLACE H B L uxury 
serviced 2 Bed apartment. Mao JoeP- 
pen next lo Perk. 01-373 6306 (TL 
SWS. Carts court. Spocioup c omforta ble 
. btaamy flat. £sso oroi tort. Please rod 
' Tim Brooke 01 370 3316. 
m 6B Kings Rd. Lovely 1 bad Am fttL 
3rd to- 6 rath min. £126 pw. 362 6496 
A 0866 63147. 

W14 SovenUt Doer pted a wteh reeire 

block. Excellent vtewe. £170 P-w. Ol 
727 7227 (T) 

WAFPW C averiooka Tobacco Dock, new 
iieBtaicr lurntehed 2 bed fIM. oge- Oora 
patty let £130 pw. 78&9D1 1/947 0586 
111 Mil ITIflM Mod hee nr sta. 4 beds. 2 
reams. 2 Dethrms. ope A *M grt. 
£260 pw. WUtams A Son 947 5150. 

DOMESTIC* j 
CATERING SITUATIONS I 


art mm haNNY MKBt 22+. from Janu- 
ary. with rotrart* . 2 cMkbren (3 
years and 6 mootbs) to Ha mptamd 
home. Nursery duties only, tooibir 
ato/T kepL two days a week and one 
wnkaid per month. Flrat da» refer- 
ences essential, Ptoa telephone Ms 
Hayward on: 01-493 9399 (between 9 
Mi end 2 pm weekdays*. 


■XMMENCED COOK for anaa English- 
starred hotel in French Ski Resort. Tel; 
01 731 7989 

HEAD WATTE* required lor Thai naxv- 
rata tn Surrey. Fluent Enodsh emaart. 
excrtletu salary to suitable appHcank oc- 
comniodatloii available If ’ required. 
Reply to BOX C39 . 

| SITUATIONS WANTED | 


0RC4MKD DtoOUUTK BUMtaUK 
PA/Secretaiy seeks Udw ad top port. RO- 
pty to BOX B99 . 


BOMB ABROADT Ateey A Wberire 
sprctallse 10 rea dy-to-wear Ugh t weffllU 

tones. 129 Regent St Lo n d on Wl. 


Trt London Ol 636 600ft M s mh e eter 
061 832 2000. AIT Travel Advisory 
Bureau. 

OCB.Y PROM CUP- Tonrmbw Starts. 
Sicily a la Cane. Grand Tom. niton 
only teem £89 rtn- ISLAND SUN Ol- 
222 7482. A8TA/ATOL 1907. 




AosuMiasu. USA. Africa. Fbr£mL to- 
4a. CtobecreSL 01-757 0659/2 160. 
ABTA 

1'MW nm avaOstoUty- GMwtck/Faro 
18 Doc £146 Mtaaoa 22 DectaNMT. 
£159. Vtaezander. 01 723 6964. Attt 
AMI Accaas/VIsa. 

NAVE YOU COT Your Turkey -87 bro- 
chure yet? Ring Turkish (Might 
HtaUXava now 00 Ol 891 6901. Alta DO 
20*7 


Tenerife. Edmond Travel ATOL 1783. 
01-681 *641. Horsham 68S41 


mmm m 


farm. Dumas Travel. 01-488 9011 
ABTA 

HOLLAND. Daay ftHMs. £38 O/W. £36 
Rtn. Frankfurt nom £59. Mfrarte Jet 
01 379 5322 

LOgfEST Air Fares. Sched u led Surras A 
WoridwtOs . Med Star Travel. Ol 928 
5200 

MOBOCCAN MASKS • Hoddays. flights, 
access, car fare. CaH Senoua HohdJtvs- 
01 629 9712 ABTA ATOL 1178 

TUNISIA. For your holiday where ITS stm 
summer. CaB fUr ore brot her* how. Tu- 
nisian Travel Bureau. 01-575 4411. 

LATM A— CA Low coK toto ds e-p . 
Rio £*«. Lima £496 rtn. Also SneD 
Gms Holiday Jot*neyUe0 Peru from 
£360) JLA 01-747-3108 

LOW FANES TO America.. Amtra ito A 
New Zealand. Tel: 01-9302566. Hrema 
Travel 36 Whitehall. Lo n d o n. SW1. 
ABTA 5485X. 

LOW FARES WORLDWIDC - USA. N/S 
Ainenea. Far Ean. Africa. /UrttaeApFd 
Ato Trtyvale. 48 Morgarrt Street Wl. 
01 580 2928 (Visa Accepted) 

emu YORK. LA. USA. Worldwide 6MB- 
nations. For (be cheapest tores, try m 
lit, RUMMtta iravrt. 1 Ptote Sfrrrt. 
fHC ba eond surrey. ABTA 01-940 *073- 

MPFONABt Seal sate W USArCoribbeem- 
fa East- Australia. C an By 
professionals ABTA IATA cc excentd. 
Tel 01 2S4 6788 

man SUN suartaic oritn n cyprro. ; 
Malta. Morocco. Greece. Malaea.AJfa- 
aaHr. Doc. PM World Hobdays 01 734 
2562 AJUH 1438. 

XMM 20/27 Dec 6 Smaroor 87. Ofsma. 
Canaries. Oreece rite A bees. 6 wfc hots : 
3/1 fr £399. Limanrapa. 01-441 0122 . 
CZ4hrt>. j 

XMAS. Wlmer. S umm er. Algarve. TUer 
(fr. Greece. Ttelw. Start. £gypL Sri , 
Lanka and many more bets/Otoius. 
Ventura: 01 261 8466. ATOL 2034. 



n nn m anrm m i 
CLE RK TO THE GOVENORS 
ST PETERS SCHOOL. YORK 


LEGAL NOTICES 


RAPtANT SttoER OLAZE 
tLAMC ASHmO .UMT TEP 
NOTICE IS HERESY CaVENpraaiawto 

Semen 688 of toe Conmaies Art J986 
that a Moetmgeftoc CJ^nws 
above named (rntupanv wm be hcltf at 
BOwater Hoorn. KuWetariflgfc Urtdon 
8WIX 7NN on Monday Ibe 29m day « 
December 1986 M 11.00 tartorti to me 
I onnem. tor mr purposs of h aving a Mi 

stalcitteMof toepoottonof mooantadVT 

affatoi. together wun a Urt 2* 
creditors of Die Company and me 
eoumued -v of toeir cuunv. bm 
before them, and far no pwtoms 
nrovMted for to secMnm 6 89 and W ft 

Dated 9th Dece mb er 1986 
By enter of tor Bonruta Mrarten 
B-R gwmrid Umtted 

OUSKWARD LIMITED 
NOTICE K HEREBY C3VEN pinupnfH 
Section 688 or tor Copman teo Art IMS 
that a Meeting Of the Credttore of the 
above named Oropaay MU be held at 
Bowater Home. KntehBbri doe. London 
swix 7NN on M o n d a y toe 29m dw of 
member 1986 at 11 jo o'clock m toe 

foreman, nr toe otopose of havbig a fafl 

statement of toe ptatnon ta me Oenpamra 
off bn. together wflh a UN of toe 
creOHnra of toe Cnranaiu' tart toe 
estimated amo u nt of their daunt, laid 
before them, and far toe o u roco ea 
provided far m scooens 589 and 590 

DMed 901 December 1986 

By order of Dw Board of Directors 
B4 Secret aria t UeMted 

IN THE HIGH COWIT OF JUSTICE' 

No. 006S48 er 1986 

OtANCCRY DIVISION 

COMPANIES COURT 
JN THE MATTER OF TIHPPEN UMrTH> 
AND 

M THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1948 
By Order ta the KKt> Court of Justice 
dated the 20Ui day of October 1986 Nfoel 
J Halls, curent Accountant ta DeteWa 
Htaktas A Soto. Lennon Horae. CM Road. 
Ctoueester GLl 1XD has been app o inted 
Liquidator er the ohnvo named Company 
without a C omnd t te e ta taspaeaon. 

Doted 60) December 1986 
NJ. HALLS 

LIQUIDATOR 

KDHAM FRCX3HT SERVICES UMTTED 
NOTICC IS HEREBY GIVEN ponuonl to 
Section 588 ta me Co m pas u o s Act 1986 
tttat a Meettno ta the Creonora ta toe 
above named Company wtu be hem ta 
Bowater House. Ktag h td i ridoe. London 
SWIX 7NN on Monday the 39th day of 
Cwmter 1986 at 1030 o’clock in toe 
forenoon, for Ihr purpose of having a fuB 
suimtsnt ta Uw pastnaa ta toe OompanVs 
attain, looesbcr with a UK ta the 
CredRon ta the Company and the 
erttmatad amount ta thar claims, told 
before tram, and for the p u rpos es 
provided for ta sacoem 689 and 690. 

Dated 9th December 1986 
By order of toe Board of P tr cclon 
M Staeta rtta Umtted 

T J A J COOLING UMTTED 
NOTICE B HEREBY OVEN mat toe 
creditors ta the above-named c omp a n y, 
which is bring wound-up voluntarily, are 
required oo or be f o r e toe 16th day ta 
February 1987. to send then- names, 
addresses and ptaUndara of thrtrctakM la 
the undexrtgacd N J HarnSknvSntlth ta 
Latova. Croostey A OMs. Stanhooo 
House, no Drany Lane. London WC2B 
5ST, ira Uamdator ta to* comp a n y, or bt 
default thereof they win be excluded from 
tor benefit ta any dMrfbuOcn made before 
such debts are proved. 

Dated this 3nl day ta December 1906 

NJ. HAMftTON-GMJTH 
LKXJIPATOR 

COVENT TRADMO LIMITED 
FORMERLY P A P COM MUNICATIONS 
LIMITED 

NOTICE IS HEREBY OWEN pursuant IO 
Secttan 688ta toe Companies Art. 1986 
that a meettno ta toe m dPcn of toe 

above named Company wtu be beM ta the 
Offices ta LEONARD CURTIS A CO- 
Sduated al 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE. 
LONDON W2 6LF an Tuesday toe I6to 
day ta Oecereber 1986 at 1030 o'clock 
forenoon, for tor putpooee provtdad far tax 
Sections 589 and 890. 

Dated ns 3rd day ta D sce M b er 1986 

JOHN B SMITH 
DSRECTOR 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1986 
A ND 

IN THE MATTER OF CASTLE HOUSE 
DtSTRIBUTlON SERVICES LIMITED 
Take notice, that by oruer or toe HM> 
OMR dated me 18 day ta November 
1966. NevfB Fraser Shearman of Latham 
Croata 6 Davis. Stanhope Horae. 110 
Dntiy Lane. London WC2B BBT has been 
a ppotnted Uq u m a to r ta toe above named 
comp any without a Committee ta 

Dated tote 2 day ta Dece mb er 1986 
ILF. SHEARMAN 
LIQUIDATOR 

HAZELMOSS LIMITED 
NOTICE B HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to 
Section 888 ta toe Companies Art. 1986. 
mat a ISETWO ta tot oedltora of the 
above named Company wfn nr held at too 
offlOo ta LEXJNARD CURTS & CO_ 
sttuotld as SO EASTBOURNE TERRACE. 
LONDON W26LF on Friday toe 1901 day 
ta nectwtiN 1966 at 1200 o’clock mkl- 
day. far toe purposes provided Mr lb 
StCOoas 889 and 690. 

Dated Che dtb day ta Decembe r 1986 
ANDREW CLUSTER 
D IRECTOR 

LOCaiSTATE LBHTTEZ} 

notice s hereby given pureuent to 
Section 588 ta the Companies Art. 1986. 
that a meeting of toe creators of toe 
above named Co m pa n y wui be he« at toe 
Offices ta LEONARD CURTS * CO 
SllWted M 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE 
LONDON W2 6LF on Monday toe 16th 
day ta December 1986 at 12.00 o’clock 
midday, far too purposes provided far bt 
Scthotn 689 and 690. 

Dated too 5th nay ta December 1986 
L LUCY 


QUAYLON LIMITED T/A THE 
PLEASUREDROME 
NOTICE B HEREBY GIVEN Dial Die 
creditors ta toe above-named Company, 
which Is bring wound-up votuntarlly. era 
: reontred an or betore to* SOth day ta Jan- 
uary 1987. tseano tostr names, sddrstaes 
and particulare ta Iheir rtalins lo the un- 
der-stoned Alan D. Kofudaobam ta 
Latham. Croasley B Davis. Stanhope 
House. HO Drury Lane. London WC2B 
EST. the Uq uW s te r ta the company, or In 
default thereof they win ba excluded from 
toe benefit ta any dtetribuuon made before 
auen debts ere proved. 

Doted IMS 8tn day ta December 1986 
AJ5. KENMNGHAM 
UQUIDATOB 

RE 8AINTHEATH LIMITED 
BY (RIDER OF THE HK3H COURT 
DATED THE 3 1 ST JULY 1986. NEVILLE 
ECKLHY F^A. OF »2. BRIGHTON 
ROAD. SOUTH CROYDON. HAS BEEN 
APPOINTED LIQUIDATOR OF THE 
ABOVE- NAMED COMPANY WITHOUT 
A COMMITTEE OF INSPECTION. 

DATED 9TH DECEMBER 1986 


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Warsaw | Royal romance jewels for sale 
Pact 

talks 


cTiTiTT 


From Richard Owen and 
Frederick Bonnait, Brussels 

Naio is to hold direct talks 
for the first time with the 
Warsaw Pact on conventional 
arms control “from the At- 
lantic to the Urals'*. 

Preparatory talks are to 
begin in Vienna “as soon as 
possible" to establish where 
the new negotiations will tafa» 
place and on what basis. Mr 
George Shultz, the American 
Secretary of State, yesterda 1 
told Nato Foreign Minister 
that the Western alliance was 
in confident mood and Araeri- 
can foreign policy was “up am 
running" alter recent setbacks. 

Signor Marcello Guidi, the 
Nato Deputy Secretary-Gen- 
eral, said Nato was ready to 
open talks with the Warsaw 
Pact to define a mandate for 
the negotiations. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, stressed the 
urgent need to give the Nato 
task force on conventional 
forces the necessary political 
push to get on with its work. 
He said it was vital to balance 
conventional as well as nuc- 
lear weapons afterthe Iceland 
summit 

The initial Naio-Warsaw 
Pact contacts would not be 
within the framework of the 
Mutual and Balance Force 
Reduction (MBFR) talks or 
the European Security Review 
Conference (CSCE), both of 
which are being held in Vi- 
enna, officials said. It is not 
clear how the new form will 
affect the MBFR talks , which 
arc limited to troop levels in 
central Europe and have been 
in the doldrums for more than 
13 years. 

A significant aspect of 
yesterday's declaration is that 
it was approved by all 16 Nato 
members, including France, 
which does not participate in 
MBFR. France had wanted 
the new talks to be within the 
framework of the Stockholm 
conference on confidence- 
building measures, which in- 
volves 35 nations, rather than 
bloc to bloc talks. Signor 
Guidi insisted that the new 
talks were not bloc to bloc but 
amounted to group negotia- 
tions between “16 and 7” — 
the 16 Nato members and the 
seven from the Warsaw Pact 
The Brussels declaration 
stressed the need for effective 
verification in conventional 
cuts, involving on-site inspec- 
tion and detailed exchanges of 
information — the current 
sucking point at the MBFR 
talks. 



made by Van Cteef and Arpels and the tiger bracelet, right, by Cartier. 


eBery. The tassted cabochon necklace, left, was 
Duchess sold her famous canary diamond rhig. 


Anderton 

crusade 

against 

Aids 

Costumed from page 1 
even those of other men 
despite the rids involved?, 
Why is that Question not 
asked on television every day 
instead of asking people to 
wear condoms? 

“Why do drug pushers and 
deaims create a vehicle for the 
honor of Aids. Why is that 
question not asked on tele- 
vision every couple of hours 
of every day? 

“And why do poraog- 
ranhers spread their filth to 
ado to the boon?” 

Mr Andertn said thoe was a 
moral dilemma that was not 
bring addressed. “What I have 
said and my views — are * 


r I'J (>«: H 74 m:Yi -III VA t -i , -u- H 


You. may d'” 11 ' 85 them as 
wildly inaccurate, un- 
informed, biased or based on 
self-satisfied moral 
indignation.’ 1 

Later the chief constable 
denied be had been advocat- 
ing the introduction of harsh 
new laws against homosexual- 
ity, prostitution and 
pornography. 

Greater Manchester police 
are forerunners oflaw enforce- 
ment moves to improve 
protection for policemen hav- 
ing to with cr iminals 
suspected of bring infected 
with or carrying Aids. 

• A special school for di*- 
turbed children at Newton 
Aycliffe, near Darlington, Co 
Durham, has refused to admit 
a teenager who is carrying the 
Aids virus. Staff are often 
attacked and sometimes bitten 1 


Fr ank Johnson at the Gonumms : 

An object lesson 
in being boring 


The marathon attempt by of bores fielded in the cham- 
tbe - Opposition to be so ber itself, 
boring about education that The rest of tire- party is 
yesterday’s sitting of the slumped around the Palace of 
House could not take place Westminster, snoring eating 


has aided in victory for the successive 
Labour team. voting when summoned to 

Almost 24 hours earlier, do so by the terrible bells 
the House 1 had begun die When play started early on 
committee - stage and third Thursday evening, there was 
reading of the Teachers’ Pay gome doubt whether Labour 
and Conditions Bin, the mea- could keep going for the near- 
sure which enables die Sec- 24 hours required to win. 

1 reiary of State for Education, This was because, as was 
Mr Kenneth Baker; to impose pointed out here yesterday, 
a settlement in the teachers' most of them were teachers. 


breakfasts 


retary of State for Educa t ion, This was because, as was 
Mr Kenneth Baker; to impose pointed out here yesterday, 
a settlement in the teachers' mg^ 0 f them were teachers, 
pay dispute. The Govern- They tend to be boring 
merit wanted to get the bill enough when the/ have the 
through quickly. aid ofabtackboard and chalk. 

. The Opposition had no ^ they are not so hot when 
power to stop t hat . But by their only prop is a Commons 


power to stop tnaL box oy their only pr 
debating it for as long as order paper, 
possible, the Opposition As the nil 
hoped to subject the Govern- left-wingei 


As the night wore on, the 
left-winger Mr Martin 


mem to the inconvenience of Flannery was the only one 
losing a day's business. TTiat among of the teachers who 
meant a connoisseur's night was soporific up to inter- 
of first class boredom played national standards. But, then, 
under Test co nditio ns. - be is a former headmaster 
. Labour managed to bore would have practised 
on until dawn broke over a over many a school speech 
comatose chamber, and went <&y 

on to achieve its oWective of ^ Uibout captain, its 
siffl droning at 2J0 m the education spokesman, Mr 
afternoon. That was the time Giles Radice, came in for a 
at which yesterdays sitting j ot gf advene criticism as to 


The gifts of love that King 
Edward VIH lavished on Wal- 
Gs Simpson win go mder the 

hammer next spring. 

The sale of the Duchess of 
Windsor^ fabulous collection 
of jewels will take place at 
Sotheby's In Genera on April 
2 and 3 and is expected to raise 
over £5 mOtion for the Institnt 
Pastern — the beneficiary of 
the Windsor estate. 

The most emotive pieces 
will be those that chart the 
royal romance hi loving 
inscriptions. The 30 pieces 
dedicated to the woman who 
captured the heart of the King, 
include the ruby necklace 
given to Mrs Simpson on her 
40tfa birthday in 1936, in- 
scribed “My Wallis from her 
David" and die sapphire and 
diamond bracelet from Van 
Oeef and Arpels that foe King 
gave her on their marriage. 

Wallis Simpson's bracelet 
of gold crosses, which scan- 
dalized the world when worn 
with scanty beach dotiws on 
the cruise in the NShtin in the 
summer of 1936, was a tal- 


isman. Each cross is movingly 
inscribed and marks a particu- 
lar event in their lives. 

Although the Royal ro- 
mance provides emotional and 
historical interes t , the Duch- 
ess of Windsor's collection of 
jewellery is supremely im- 
portant from an aesthetic point 
of view. The sale will be, 
according to David Bennett, 
the Director of Jewellery at 
Sotheby's, London, “the sum- 
mit of my career". 

The fantastic menagerie of 
animal designs made for the 
Duchess of Windsor fcy 

By Suzy Menkes 

Jeanne Toussamt of Cartier 
are among 87 si gnifican t 
pieces from the Farm jewel- 
lers. The collection of Cartier 
cats includes an articulated 
diamond tiger bracelet that 
wraps romd the w rists like a 
uHmfflg animal, and two cat 
broodies with priceless gem 
stones; a pave-set diamond 
brooch with a central sapphire 
of 15235 carats, worth £5,000 


when the Duke bought ft from 
Cartier hi 1949, and an equally 
impressive prowling panther 
brooch holding an emerald. 

The 23 pieces by Van Cleef 
and Arpels includes the wed- 
ding bracelets, a tassefted 
cabochon ruby necklace and a 
pair of qttintensseBtiaDy 1940s 
iliawAHit dips containing 
stones of 403 and 52 carats. 

Mr David Bennett, who first 
viewed die collection for 
Sotheby's in a Paris bank 
vault two weeks ago says: “It 
is such an amazing collection 
became it shows great taste, 
not just an agglomeration of 
jewels. It was a very moving 
experience for me. The 
mscriptions give tire feeling of 
this great love affair.** 

Some of the Dncfaess’s 
jewellery was sold privately 
during her twilight years. 
These pieces included her 
enormous canary diamond 
ring. 

The Duchess of Windsor’s 
jewellery will be considered 
the sale of the century by 
jewellery historians 


Foreign Office admits 
envoy at Contra talks 

By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 


was supposed to begin. 

' But, under National Te- 
dium rules, if a sitting is still 
continuing at a time when the 
next sitting is due to begin, 
the latter sitting cannot take 
place. All the business which 
would have been included in 
Hax sitting is deemed to be 
lost 

At 334 pm, the Opposition 
voiced no objection to the 


his tactics.. Know-alls de- 
nounced his team selection. 
He had relied too much on 
middle-class players like him- 
seif, it was suggested. 

So at 232 am he put in a 
miner. 

Mr Dennis Skinner 
(Bolsover) rose and played a 
classic innings of nearly two 
hours. Mucb of it had only a 


voiced no opjemon to me glancing relationship with the 
Bdl recemngits thud reacting fSra* Pay and Con- 
because, by then. Labour had HiHnns Bill. 


The Foreign Office admit- 
ted yesterday that a British 
diplomat attended a meeting 
of Contra leaders in Costa 
Rica last month at which 
American officials allegedly 
discussed the formation of a 
“rebel” government in Nicar- 
agua. 

In the Commons Mr 
George Foulkes, a Labour 
foreign affairs spokesman, de- 
manded a statement from Sir 
Geoffiey Howe, the Foreign 
Secretary, about a move which 
be later likened to sending a 
representative to a meeting of 
the IRA. 

Mr Tim Wflsey, Fust Sec- 
retary in San Jose, attended 
the Fourth Assembly of die 
United Nicaraguan Opposi- 
tion in San Jos6, Costa Rica, 
on November 24 and 25. 


Whitehall sources stressed he 
was present as an observer 
The Foreign Office insisted 
that the meeting had not been 
secret and that the diplomat 
had attended as part of his 
duty to report developments 
Quoting a “very reliable 
source”, Mr Foulkes claimed 
the meeting discussed the 
establishment of a provisional 
“rebel” government in the 
eastern part of Nicaragua 
which the US hoped would be 

free interpretation as naive. 

• MANAGUA: A Nicara- 
guan court yesterday con- 
firmed a 30-year jail sentence 
imposed on Eugene Hasenfus, 
a US citizen, for running guns 
to anti-government rebels 
(Reuter reports). 


succeeded in its mam objec- 
tive of preventing the follow 
on. 

If it really wants to deal 
with any of the business 
which ft would otherwise 


ditions Bill 

Another working-class 
player, Mr Jeremy Corbyn 
(Islington North) found an 
excuse to tell the House, deep 
in -the night, that he had just 


wiiM.il u wuuiu uuiciwiac i,-„„ 

have deah with yesterday, the 

Government will have to find g Wappmg- Ma ps he g oes 


another day for it 
The main debate yesterday 
would have been about 
Northern Ireland. The 
Government does not care 
much about Northern Ire- 
land, and so was not particu- 


that every night, or dreamt it, 
or is a sleepwalker. 

The moment . when 
yesterday's business was lost 
was an emotional one. The 
digital dock reached 2.30pm. 

Various Tories immedi- 
ately complained that die 


jariy pat out by losing the day's Prime Ministerial ques- 
business. That makes fi on time had been lost and 
Labour’s exercise rather ^ House ^uld not enjoy 
pointless. the spectacle of the Prime 

But to put too much Minister bludgeoning Mr 
emphasis on that would be to Kinnock about nuclear weap- 
undermme the foith of scores ons, the Wright trid,- and ms 


of ample Labour members lonely 
who kept being woken all United 
night 'to vote in the endless plainer 
divisions which punctuated The » 
the match. For in alt-night with th 
games of this land the actual night. / 
play is carried fory the handful MPs. 


lonely wanderings in the 
United - States. That ex- 
plained everything. 

The Chamber was strewn 
with the debris of the long 
night. And that was only the 
MPs. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 
The Queen arrives at Don- 
caster Station, 9.45; visits Don- 
caster Leisure Centre. 10.05; 
arrives at the Brampton Centre, 
il; Barnsley Council for Vol- 
untary Services, 11.45; Barnsley 
Town Hidl for lunch, 12.15; 
later visits Sheffield Wednesday 
Football Club. Hillsborough, 
230; Sheffield Assay Offices, 
3.15; Sheffield Town Hall, 3.45, 
leaves from Sheffield Station, 
4.15. 


The Prince ofWaks visits the 
Gloucestershire Assocation for 
the Disabled ax Stuart House, 
Minchinhampton, 230, 

The Duke of Kent, as Chan- 
cellor, presides at the Honorary 
Degree Ceremonies at Surrey 
University, 4.10. 

Princess Alexandra attends a 
gala performance of '‘Cind- 
erella in aid of the Royal Star 
and Garter Home for Disabled 
Sailors, Soldiers and Airmen at 
the Richmond Theatre, Rich- , 
mond, Surrey, 735. 

New exhibitions ! 

Alfred Mannings' paintings; | 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,227 



ACROSS 

1 Teachers' mum is capital 

(5) . ^ . 

4 Row about firm involving 
fraud (9). 

9 Mark, comprising unused 
note or coin (9). 

10 Greek story (5). 

11 Bird with magical powers? 

( 6 ) 

12 The reasons advanced are 
not about to stick (8L 

14 Hairy Hugo can't do with 
dishevelment (5-3-2). 

16 Search for honey (4). 

19 Emotion that enemy dis- 
plays (4). 

20 Those seeded need good 
luck (33*4). 

22 Colour lades. “Hard 
cheese!**, I say (8). 

23 Turned into an insect, 
round river (6). 

26 Jack finishes off water, to 
Jill’s regret (5). 

27 Found out about judge in 
novel (7-2). 

28 Refreshment for cricketers? 
Yes, after the start (9). 

29 Stay sticky (5). 


DOWN 

1 An international strike for 
practice? (43). 

2 French city incomplete? By 
no means! (5). 

3 To be honest, that rig's out 
of order (8). 

Concise Crossword page 16 


4 Piece of film about sauce 
(4). 

5 Assemble and leave without 
great upheaval (10). 

6 A tablet for tooth trouble 
(6k 

7 Stirring love song doesn't 
start, nor does love (23,4). 

8 Boat turning up in the is- 
land out east (5). 

13 Analogous to cra w li n g 
(2.3,5). 

15 Crazy flag here (23,4). 

17 A dilettante as stroke (9). 

ix Welsh engineers first to siq>- 
f?ly maxenal (8). 

21 Figure socially acceptable in 
Washington, for instance 
( 6 ). 

22 He wrote on Friday (5). 

24 Creature seen in summer? 
(5L 

25 Shut ouL like this (4). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,226 


iae-THEES-} 

0 ' H B B n R B R 

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n i u i? ra 0 a 

S&EFJTi anaiSBISKns 
EEC., S E B 

■ asjnGJlBlTCfflSlTSitSSSE 
li 13 B @ E 


Athenaeum Gallery, Princess 
Street, Manchester (ends Jan 
25). 

Last Chance to see 

Modem works bequeathed by 
Molly Freeman; Eldon Gallery, 
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, 
Tue to Sat 10 - 4. Sun 2-4. 

The Forest: Southampton Art 
Gallery, Civic Centre, South- 
ampton. 

Printings by T.P.FIanagan; 
Fermanagh County Museum, 

ErnifckiBen, 10 - i, 2 - 5. 

Quintessence of Landscape 
and Bronze Age Moor by Maria 
Walker Last, and recent draw- 
ings and prints by Bany Her- 
bert, University of Leeds 
gallery, Leeds, 10 - 5. 

Artists in Handsworth; Holy- 
bead Community School, Flor- 
ence Road, Handsworth, Birm- 
ingham, 10 - 9. 

Music 

Mondrian Trio, Kelso High 
School. Kelso. 

Regional Primary/Secondary 
Choir and String Orchestra, Si 
Ronan's Primary School, laaer- 
leitben, 6.30. 

Organ Recital by Peter Good- 
man. Hull City Hall, HnD, 
12.30. 

Chamber Ensemble of the 
Academy of St Martm-in-!he- 
Fidds; West Somerset School, 
Minebead, 8. 

Ch ri st ma s musical entertain- 
ment with Peter Medhurst and 
Jacqueline Edwards; Sal tram' 
House, Plymouth. 7.45. 

Scottish National Orchestra 
conducted by Neeme Jarvi; 
Usher HalL Edinburgh, 730. 

Ladies of the Leicester Phil- 
harmonic Chorus; De Montfbrt 
Hall, Leicester, 730. 

St Edmund's School Carol 
Service; Cathedral Church of 
Christ, C aut e i l wu y, 730. 
General 

Live broadcast of Radio 4*s 
Any Questions, St George's; 
Brandon Hill, Bristol, 730. 


Top Films 


The top box-office films in 
London 
1 H Labyrinth 
2(2) The Mission 
3 (1 I Top Gun 
4(3) Round Midnight 
5( 5) Monaflsa 
6(101 A Room with a View 
7(7) Running Scared 
8(6) Big Trouble hUttto China 
9(4) Ruthless Paople 
10(8) True Stories 
The top flhns In Mm provinces: 

1 Top Gun 

2 Ruthless 

3 Running Scared 

4 Psycho HI 

5 Big Traubla in Ltata China 
SORpad Dr Sow umlaal 


Top video rentals 


1(1) Indtana Jones and the Tem- 
ple of Doom 
2(2 Rtahtffigtt 
3(4 Spfes Lite Us 
4(8 Santa Claus: The Movie 
5(3 Teen Wolf 
6(11 Silver Bidet 
7(5 The Delta Force 
8(7 The HowTmg 2 
9(6 Death Wish 3 
10(16 Demons 


The pound 



Roads 


London and Sout h ou st A2& 
Delays, tana closures and (fi- 
varswns between Perry Street and 
Chistehurat Road. Swap. Atifc 
Resmfecing northbound between 
Hoddesdon and Rush Green inter- 
changes. Aldershot Road race, 
avoid town betw e e n 10 am and 
noon. 

Mdtewhc MS: Major work 


Bypass bufidmg at Bewdley, severe, 
congestion, in: Peak time delays 
between junctions 15 and 16 near 
North am pton. 



lilLy . _ 

& & rn T? ra n & 
amHcsiTraraspt koctidis 
her n ra ra k 
:-iosr3^ uijsnciiasiiKsns 

is e n e s a gs s 
■iCTsmssn iysxsiEsrafsnz! 


Wales end ft* west; 114: 

Co nt r afl ow between Junctions 16 

and 17 (Swindon and Chippenhfim'i). 

Mh Lane closures between iuno- 
flons 27 28 (Thwton/Honitor). 

AS: SMe tee between Gobowen 
and CKSTOwjid. tong delays. 

SooBufc A7& Shgle Dne three 
mfleseastot Gieniuce.rMns. A77t: 
Two sets of roedworics betireen 
GJasgow and Ayr, delays. Al9fc 
Oosed et the east end ot Abelady 
due to gas explosion, 
i nt n rmagon s y p p B eri by AA. 


Rtfas tbr srae dmowMion bank notm 
only m suppM by Bwtiqnt .Bank PIC. 


Im4ob Ilia FT inch* dosad damn OJB at 
UN7, 


Anniversaries 

Births: Gustave Ffatubert, 
Rouen, 1821; Edvard Manch,' 
painter, Loten, Norway, 1863. 

Deaths; Sir Mare twbsrd 
Brand, London, 1849; Hubert 
tewg Venice, 1889; Det«- 
bs Fshtiuks, Santa Monica, 
California, 1939; TaUsdah Bu- 
kbesl, actress, New York, 1968. 


Parliament today 

CwnmiMB (930): Debates on 
private Members’ motio n s on 
defence projects and exports 
and On employment and train- 
ing initiatives. 

Christmas post 

Today is the latest recom- 
mended date for posting air 
mad, Christmas cards, punted 

papers, letters and postcards to 

most European and eastern 
European countries. 


Food prices 


Deciding what meal to have 
for Christmas dinner does 
present a problem. So much 
depends on the size of the party, 
and if it is a big gathering, turkey 
is an economical choice. How- 
ever, beef and goose have an 
even longer tradition. 

The problem with goose is the 
meat to bone ratio. You will 
need at least 1 lb per person. 
Prices vary. A local butcher is 
seOiqg at £1.75 per lb whereas at 
a wen-known large store a 91b 
goose costs just over £26 and a 
121b bird a little over £34. A 
large rib of beefat an average 
price of £1.54 per lb is well 

worth thinking about. 

Home produced Iamb prices 
have soared this week Leg, 
chops and shoulder are up by 
about 6p per Cb. New Zealand 
Iamb leg is also up by 6p per lb 
but the other cuts show just a 
marginal increase. 

Meat and poultry on promo- 
tion in shops and supermarkets 
include: Presto, topside of beef 
£1.88 per lb, boneless shoulder 
of pork £1.99 per lb; Tesco, 
whole shoulder of lamb 69p per 
lb and British Standard Grade A 
'■oven ready frozen turkey 54p 
per lb: Dewl rarsi Dewfrcsfa fresh 
style frozen turkey 89p per lb 
and Large roasting chickens 59p 
per lb; Fine Fare frozen leg of 
pork 99p per lb. Red Delicious 
apples from Canaria 39 to 55p 
per lb are now widely available. 
They are crisp and juicy and 
look wonderfbL Best Coxes 25p 
to 4Sp per lb are also good but 
there are quite a lot of rather 
woolly cheap ones. Grapes are 
pfeotnul and cheap. New is early 
forced rhubarb at 55 to 60p per 
lb and Jamaican Ughe fruit 50p 
to £1.00 each. 

Watercress 25 to 3 Spa bunch. 
Chinese leaves 40 to 55p a bead. 
Royal Beetroot 12 to 20p per tb 
and tomatoes 40 to 70p per lb 
are the best salad boys. 

AH home grown vegetables 
are plentiful and cheap. Brussel 
sprouts 9 to 20p per lb. English 
winter cabbage 15 to 20p per lb, 
carrots 10 tol8p, parsnips 18 to 
3 Op, courgettes 50 to - 90p, 
broccoli SO to 70p po: lb are 
among the ben buys. 


[ WEATHER ) A frontal system wfll affect northern aod wesfcera areas* 

England and Wales wfll have a mostly bright and dry 
morning, with some sunshine. However, some thicker cloud may linger in the ex- 
treme SE. During the afternoon, cloud will thicken over Wales, W and N England, 
bringing some nun. After a bright start, with a few showers in E Scotland, wet and 
very windy weather, already over Northern Ireland at dawn, will spread quickly 
NE to affect all N Brftain. The far NW wifl torn clearer, bHt with showers during 
the evening. Outlook for tomorrow and Sunday: Stowers or longer spells of rain on 
Saturday. Some dry aid bright weather on Sunday, showers in the N. 


HIGH TIDES 



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AND FINANCE 


THE 



| u 9 iX- 

TIMES 


SPORT 33 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 37 


FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 

STOCK MARKET " 

FT 30 Share 
1284.7 (-0.6) 

FT-SE 100 
1634.0 (-0.6) 

Bargains 

31290(31309) 

USM (Datastream) 
129.62 (+1.63) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 
1.4235 (-0.0015) 

W German mark 

2.8698 (+0.0070) 

Trade-weighted 
68.3 (+0.1) 

Offer for 
Bryant 
‘derisory’ 

The £133 million bid from 
English China Clays for Bry- 
an i Holdings is “derisory” and 
ignores the company’s record 
and prospects, Mr Chris Bry- 
ant, chairman of Bryant, said 
in the firm's defence 
document. 

He claimed that the docu- 
ment demolished ECC’s 
claims to be a more efficient 
housebuilder than Bryant, h 
pointed to Bryant's quality 
and strength, saying tha t 
ECCs approach was “incoher- 
ent and confusing." 

But Mr Bob Carlton Porter, 
ECCs finance director, said 
that he did not believe that 
Bryant had addressed the 
principal points raised by 

DTI inquiry 

The Department of Trade 
and Industry has named two 
inspectors to investigate the 
shareholder membership of 
Consolidated Gold Fields. 
They; are Mr George Warren, a 
solicitor, and Mr David An- 
ton, a chartered accountant, 
both of Deloitte Haskins & 
Sells. 

GUS growth 

Great Universal Stores, the 
mail order, retail and financ e 
group, continued its 36-year 
record of unbroken profits 
advance by making £134.4 
million pretax in the six 
months to the end of 
September. 

P&O in talks 

P&O is in talks with British 
Land, the property company, 
to sell its half share in Elision 
Centre Properties. British 
Land owns the other half. 

Thorn launch 

Thorn EMI, the electricals 
group, launched a £60 million 
Eurobond. The five-year 
bonds, !5 per cent of which 
went to Swiss investors, rose 
rapidly to a premium. 


Air America, the two-year- 
old US airline which is a 
quarter owned by its staff, is 
launching on Monday a twice- 
weekly transatlantic service 
from Gatwick to Baltimore- 
Washington and Los Angeles. 
Introductory single fares of 
£ 1 39 to Washington and £1 99 
to Los Angeles will be offerd. 

Dee advance 

Dee Corporation, the super- 
market group, announced a 30 
per cent jump in its interim 
profits to £78-2 million for the 
23 weeks to November 8. 
Turnover was up by 21 per 
cent to £2.5 billion. The 
dividend is increased by 7 per 
cent to 3p net. 

Tempos, page 30 


Tempos 22 
Wall Street 23 
Co News 22 
Comment 23 
Stock Market 23 
Money Mrkts 23 


ForetRB Excb 23 
Traded Opts 23 
Unit Treats 24 
Canmoditfes 24 
USM Prices 24 
•Share Prices 25 


Accord with Treasury on growth 

Bank boosts 
optimism 


Wall Street 
‘enraged’ at 
hi-tech abuses 

From BaUey Morris, Washington 

Mr John Phelan, chairman lion about takeovers is dis- 
of the New York Stock Ex- dosed be shortened and 
change, yesterday called for communicated better to the 


By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

The Bank of England is these two fronts, the balance sumcsa rise in the oil price to 
optimistic about the prospects of payments deficit could be $20 a barrel by early 1988, 
for the economy next year, larger and longer-lasting than which could push sterling 
Growth is re-emerging in all is comfortable. siginificantly higher, 

the major economies and “The extent and duration of The Bank is concerned also 
shoutd continue, it says in its the deficit depends on about wages growth and the 
\a\esx Quarterly Bulletin. industry’s response to iis fact that earnings in the public 

The Bank is in accord with present trading oppon- sector appear to be accderat- 


the Treasury — gross domestic ■ unities,” the Bulletin says. “It 


. product to expand by 3 per 
I cent, inflation contained at 
close to 4 per cent and a 
current account deficit of be- 
1 tween £1 billion and £2 
billion. 

Output growth has resumed 
in the major economies after a 
lull earlier this year, with the 
main impetus coming from 
stronger consumer spending. 

“The resumption of steady 
economic growth abroad, and 
a more competitive exchange 
rate, present great opportu- 
. nities to make progress in 
| overcoming some long-stand- 
ing problems in unemploy- 
ment and a declining non-oil 
industrial base,” the Bank 
says. 

Non-inflationary growth is 
within Britain’s grasp, accord- 
ing to the Bank’s economists. 

The main uncertainties are 
the supply response of in- 


520 a barrel by early 1988, 
which could push sterling 
siginificantly higher. 

The Bank is concerned also 
about wages growth and the 
fact that earnings in the public 
sector appear to be accelerat- 
ing in order to catch up with 


F ’W' - ' *; V'v 


sweeping reforms of securities market and to government 
markets to “slam the window” He urged regulators to slew 

on insider trading down the process in which 

Mr Phelan offered a blue- takeovers are executed. This 
int for action in his fijsi should be complimented by a 


dustry to the lower exchange since the late 1970s. 
rate and its ability to contain The survey suggests a 
costs. The implication is that substantial strengthening of 
if the performance is poor on investment prospects. 


would be most regrettable if private sector increases, 
uncertainties about sterling “Any convergence should 
slowed industry’s supply be towards a lower rate of 
response." earnings growth," the Bank 

The Bank of England, like says, “so the greatest need is 
the Chancellor, favours stabd- for pay moderation in 
ity for sterling industry.” 

However, its forecast for The Bank also favours in- 
world economic prospects as- creased flexibility of regional 
— — and occupational pay 

Investment to di “ tave 
rise sharply 

Investment by British in- slower growth in equity and 
dustry is to rise sharply, house prices and the high level 
according to the Department of real after-tax interest rates, 
of Trade and Industry’s latest the Bank says. 

While satisfied with the 

tnTSrfaild level for sterling, the 

nse by 6 per cent m 1987 ami economists at the Bank do not 

believe that the dollar has 
felknfer enough lo contci the 
is forecast to ra by 2 per cent h Americancurrent ac- 
ne* ye*r to £6.95 billion m aX. deficit I 

1980 prices — its highest level _. 1IC 

- - — The US current account is 

forecast to stabilize at $125 
billion (about £88 billion) 

Comment, page 25 i 



Messel identifies 
LCP share buyer 



[Hint for action in his tnsi 
Congress appearance since the 
insider trading cases against 
Mr Ivan Boesky and Mr 
Dennis Levine were revealed. 

He said that he and his 
institution were “enraged”, 
and said that technological 


ruling requiring corporations 
in takeovers to answer yes or 
no when queried by the SEC. 

“The acceptance over the 
past several years by the SEC 
of a ’no comment’ response 
was appropriate for that time 


advances had created some of but now it may need to be 
the conditions for abuses changed,” he said. 


which had existed daring the 
1920s. 

Specifically, he referred to 
the practices of “risk arbitra- 


Mr Phelan called for a full- 
scale review of the activities 
and obligations of arbitrageurs 
in the market place. With 


geurs", which he described as “junk bonds”, he said the 
a form of speculative trading danger which existed was a 


that “certainly raises the spec- 
tre of pool operations”. 


“concentration of assets" es- 
pecially with regard to finan- 


Eartier. in opening the first dal institutions. 

’ a series of Congressional He said time did not permit 


Ob the prod action line; 
turn rotmd in fortunes 

Westland 

flies 

into profit 

Westland, the rescued heli- 
copter group, yesterday re- 
ported a turnround in profits 
of more than £120 million in 
the year to the end of Septem- 
ber. 

Pretax profits of £26.4 mil- 
lion were announced com- 
pared with a loss of £953 
million in 1984-85. However, 
gross profits fall slightly from 
£463 million to £45.1 million 
on turnover 12 per cent higher 
at £344.4 million. 

A proposed financial 
reconstuction supported by 
the Westland board involving 
Sikorskv. part of the US 


The Stock Exchange has the 
name of the purchaser who 
bought 25,000 slimes in LCP 
on the eve of Ward White’s 
bid for the company. 

Reports of the purchase 
have led to an Exchange 
investigation to determine 
whether there are grounds for 
suspecting insider dealing. 

A spokesman for L Messei 
& Co, the stockbroker, said 
yesterday the purchase had 
been made through Messel for 
one of its institutional clients. 

“The block trade was done 
for an institutional client, and 
we have reported this fact to 
the Stock Exchange,” he said. 

The spokesman refused to 
identify the client, but said 
Messel had given the Ex- 
change the names of the 
institution and the buyer. 

Asked whether the buyer 
had been dealing on bis own 


By Lawrence Lever 

£ has the behalf the spokesan said: 
iser who “The purchase was made for, 
s in LCP and on behalf of, the instim- 
[ White’s tional client.” 

The Stock Exchange inquiry 
purchase was requested by Ward White 
Exchange last week after reports in the 
ft te rming Wall Street Journal. 
mnds for It is understood that the 
ding . trade was made at 5.35pm on 
- Messel October 21 through Messel, 
ter, said acting as an agency broker, 
ase had and that it was executed via 
[essel for Barclays de Zoete Wedd, act- 
1 clients, mg as market-maker, 
ras done An Exchange spokesman 
ient, and would say only that the 
s fact to Exchange’s inquiry was 
he end, proceeding 
fused to The hostile bid for LCP by 
but said Ward White has intensified, 
the Ex- Ward White has raised its 
of the offer from about £150 million 
yer. to £174 million, and taken its 
e buyer stake in LCP from 8 per cent 
his own to 29 per cent. 


Sir George Jefferson: emphasis on improved service 


BT rings in with 
£lbn at half-time 

By John BeO, City Editor 

Brffisb Telecom is investing More than £100 nriDioa i 


Sikorskv part of the US f ™ ™ »«l 

company SSted Techno!- 

OfflesTand the Italian group of the present 8pm. It said the 
Rat^during its last financial ex ja two hours in the evening 
year, wascontested. to 

The alternative was a Euro- 
pean consortium. The ensuing 
forore led to the resignations 
of Mr Michael Hesemne and 
Mr Leon Britten. 

Sir John Cuckney, the chair- 
man of Westland, said of the 
results: “We have had an 
encouraging start at rehabili- 
tating Westland and are work- 
ing closely and effectively with 
Sikorsky and Fiat" 

Tempos, page 30 


Seaq trading to shut 
down two hours early 

By Richard Lander 

Amid all the talk of a global test the way they use Seaq and 
village and round-the-clock to train operators to use the 
trading in international seenri- exchange's own “level three” 
ties, the Slock Exchange's personal computer work sta- 
Seaq screen share-quotation lions, 
system is cutting two hours An exchange spokesman 
from its operating times from said the system was little used 
today. after 6pm. He explained: 

The exchange said that until “When we set up at Big Bang, 
the end of January, Seaq will 8pm seemed like a good time. 

Now, everyone seems to want 
to go home at 6pm, unless 
they want to train staff or test 
the system. 


a record £2.1 bOlioa on sys- 
tems and services, with the 
aim of matching the best 
telecommnnicatieDS com- 
panies anmd the world. 

“We setter from an anti- 
quated telephone network and 
antiquated ex cha n ge! and 
they have to be replaced,” Mr 
Graeme Odger, the deputy 
chairman, said yesterday 
when presenting £1.006 billion 
half-time profits. 

British Telecom, whose 
chairman is Sir George Jeffer- 
son, has announced its spend- 
log programme this year wiD 
be 35 per cent higher than it 
was in 1984, the year the 
company was privatized. 

BTs continuing strength 
made it possible to invest more 
than ever before in improving 
Its service to cu s tomer s and 
ensuring the More prosperity 
of the company for sharehold- 
ers and staff alike, Mr Odger 

More than £450 mOtiou has 
been earmarked for modem 
digital wrimniys, which are 
being installed at die rate of 
one every working day. 

The conmanv has already 
laid more than 100,000 miles 
of optical fibre, proportionally 
more than any other country, 
enabling faster and dearer 
calls. 

“Our service is already 
noticeably better than it was in 
that respect,” said Mr Odger. 


being spent on computerizing 
the directory inquiry and cus- 
tomer service systems as part 
of a £700 nnlli og computeriza- 
tion programme. 

Abort £160 million has been 
allocated to modernizing the 
public pay-phone service. 
There are now more boxes 
than there wee two years ago; 
more than half have modern 
equipment and many accept 
pbonecaids, BT said. 

Many of die technical 
improvements being in- 
troduced have been developed 
in the company’s own research 
laboratories, which spend 
£180 minion a year on re- 
search and development 

BTs half-year figures were 
1L5 per cent higher than in 
the previous year. 

Sales increased 14 per cent 
to £4.614 motion. 

Shareholders are to receive 
an interim dividend of 335p 
per share, almost 12 per cert 
np on 1985. 


of a series of Congressional 
investigations into & insider 
trading case, Mr John Dingell, 
chairman of the House over- 
sight sub-committee, said the 
questions raised this week 
were similar to those asked 50 
years ago. 

“At that time, the public 
was shocked by the revela- 
tions of stocks manipulations, 
pools, insider trading and a 
host of other abuses. We are 
facing now what appears to be 
the biggest series of market 
abuses since the 1929 crash,” 
Mr Dingell said. 

He promised to seek legisla- 
tion correcting the abuses and 
to provide new resources and 
authority for the US Securities 
and Exchange Commission 
(SEC) in the new 100 Con- 
gress, which takes office on 
January 6. 

Mr Phelan said the sophis- 
ticated electronic systems 
which now control markets 
had created “a relatively new 
phenonemon” 

He called for a re-examina- 
tion by regulatory authorities 
of the definition of insider 
trading to dose what he called 
a “structural problem in our 
system.” 

He asked that the timespan 
in which important informa- 


a foil discussion of the risks 
posed by the international- 
ization of financial markets. 
But added that it was an area 
which governments and finan- 
cial officials should examine 
closely. 

Also appearing before the 
committee was Mr John Shad, 
chairman of the SEC. He said 
the case against Mr Boesky 
should be regarded positively 
rather than negatively by 
Congressional officials deter- 
mined to enact new reforms. 

“In 1981, well-known 
publications were reporting 
that insider trading was so 
pervasive nothing could be 
done,” he said. However, the 
fact that the largest insider 
trading case in SEC history 
was brought against Mr 
Boesky is proof that the 
system is working. 

Nonetheless, Mr Shad said 
last week that he would seek a 
record increase in the agency’s 
enforcement budget to do a 
better job in patrolling 
markets. 

Mr Dingell said the public’s 
confidence had been severely 
shaken and must be restored 
in the new Congress for the 
market place to perform 
effectively. 


Saudis hold Opec key 
to higher oil price 

By David Young, Energy Correspondent 

The off ministers of the 13 oil minister, has yet to reveal 
Opec nations yesterday in his country's position. 

Geneva started their attempt As the largest oil producers 
to send world oD price back m the organization Saudi will 
upwards with Saudi Arabia’s have to cut its output if Opec 
new oil minister apparently is to reduce its overran 
holding the key to a solution, production from its present 17 
r~ r- million barrels a day to nearer 

16 million which the oil 

countries have accepted that says jj necessary 

ontpm ^ have to be gJS jfier nrfusedto be 


The majority of member 
countries have accepted that 
output cuts wll have to be 
made if Opec is to achieve its 
goal of scalding prices up to 
$18 by January 1. 

However. Sheikh Hisham 
Nazer, who replaced Sheikh 
Ahmed Zaki Yamani as Saudi 


industry says is necessary 
Sheikh Nazer refused to be 
drawn into a public debate on 
the issue. He hoped that Opec 
would be in a position to 
achieve an $18 barrel price 
“very soon.” 

Scraping the barrel, page 25 


Cash card machines top Ombudsman list 


The banking bandits 


Who picks up the bill 
for your Telex line 
when you buy a 
3M Whisper Telex? 




KsSMSJmarket summary 


STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


1919.85 (-13.08)* 
18731.25 (-44.93) 
2467.13 (+24.54) 

286.0 (+1.5) 

...... 1437.4 (+6.6) 

20623 (+1^) 

«!S8H!S 

"... 563.60 (same) 

n/a 

“-1 81 .60 (-0.04) 


New Vo* 

Dow Jones — ■ 

Tokyo 

NfoK® Dow 

Hongkong: 

Hang Seng -m-- 

AmstentamiGen 

Sydney: AO . — 
FranMore 
Commerzbank 
Brussels: 

General 

Paris: CAC — 
Zurich: SKA Gen 
London: FT. A .... 
FT. Gilts 

Closing prices 


INTERE ST RATES 

London: Bank Base: 1 11% 

2-month interbank f f 
S-month eligible MkHH*-''** 
buving rate 
US: Prime Rate 7'A% 

Federal Funds 5 ,3 >s% , 

CURRENCIES 


London: 

£• SI .4235 
£ CM2.8668 
£: $wFr2.4CE9 
L FFr9.4022 
E: Yen£21.53 
£: indes:6e ; 2 
ECU £0.725094 


New York: 

S; £1.4235* 

S: DM2.0135' 

SrSv.-Fr1.b870- 


£: index:11 
SDR £0.841836 


RISES: ^ _ 

Grand Met 

Guinness 

Begaeridge Brick — 

Nottingham Bnek 

Molins — 

Bodycote — — 

TunstaD Telecom — 

Appteyard 

Bass - 

BPCC 

LCP Holdings 

Dawson Int 

1C Gas 

Blue Arrow 

BP...- 

FALLS: 

PiMnglonBros - g7p -12p 

Wagon Ind. 254P 

FlexefloC&W — 

Avon Rubber ....... 372p -14p) 

Prices are as at 4pm 


GOLD 

London Fixing: 

StS&SSm 

273.00) 

cZlx%e.iM83.xr 


north sea oil 


By Richard Thomson j V3> *• s % . ^ ft-J Z 

Banking Correspondent j*- | > / 

Cash card machines are b-* ; ; V”' 

causing the public more f ' J. j! 

aggravation than any other ^ 
banking service, according to L y 
the Banking Ombudsman’s 
first annual report. .7*. 

The Ombudsman, Mr Ian 
Edwards-Jones QC, said that, 
of a total of 782 complaints to 
the new body, 85 concerned fegHfikiS- ^ 
disputed withdrawals from A pi a 

cash machines. Customers ' EMM 

usually complained that the BBBBb ■fci&Sh raPil 
machine had given less cash Ml ¥ SIB 

than they had sought Ian Edwan^Jooes; FSse 

But Mr Edwards-Jones ia complaints lady 
pointed out that, with more . 

than 350 million cash ma- settled in favour of the cus- 
chine transactions annually, it tomer, although the banks had 
was no surp rise that there oot admitted to beipg in the 


ear 


Ian Edward-Jones: Rise 
in complaints Likely 


were “occasional hiccups.” wrong. A total of 63 com- 

plaints have been settled or 

The u .^ xt Sere under consideration. 

complaint - there were 58 m u_~T 

the categ o ry — was about The Ombudsman was set 
arities in the conduct of up by the hanks at the 
accounts. This twwmt beginning of this year to act as 
an ire had either done nn independent arbitrator in 
liing they should not disputes between tanks and 
lone, or tad omitted 10 public in cases the tanks’ 
meriting for which a own disputes proceedings had 
ter had asked. foiled to solve. The 19 bank 

k charges came a dose mpnljers of the scheme have 
ariSsfmmrtfainis. 53 rndfom customers - 99 per 


that tanks had either done 
something they should not 
have done, or tad omitted 10 
do something for which a 
customer bad asked. 

tank charges came a dose 
third, with 54 complaints. 


either ineligible or were with- BI ™ n ' 
drawn, while only 26 had so The cost of the Ombuds- 
far reached an arbitrated man — paid by the tanks — 
settlement was £230,000 during the year, 

Mr Edwards-Jones said that and it will rise to £336,000 
all but three of these had been next year- 


Although be tins powers 
only as an arbitrator, the 
Ombudsman made sugges- 
tions in his report of ways in 
which banks could improve 
their services. Complaints had 
revealed considerable annoy- 
ance among customers that 
children over I f were fre- 
quently given cash cards with- 
out their parents’ consent 

The Ombudsman recom- 
mended that tanks should not 
send out personal identifica- 
tion numbers 10 use with 
credit cards in machines 
without first asking customers 
if they wanted a number. 
Banks should also give fuller 
information about the costs of 
borrowing. 

The complaints ranged over 
130 subjects. Mr Edwards- 
Jones said that ft was likely 
that the number of complaints 
would rise next year as the 
public became more aware of 
the Ombudsman through 
advertising at bank branches. 

He added that the scheme 
had produced benefits apart 
from settling individual 
disputes. 

The Ombudsman had been 
able to correct customer-bank 
misunderstandings at an early 
stage, it could persuade tanks 
to reconsider complaints with- 
out having to resort to a 
formal ruling under the 
scheme and it had helped to 
sharpen the tanks’s own com- 
plaints proceedurcs. 








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24 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


r 


THF TTMFS FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


WALL STREET 


Blue chips stronger 
on buyout offer 


New York (Renter) — Wall 
Street shares were mivpd fa 
mode rate tradi ng as bfae drips 
drew strength from Owens. 


sent stock that rase sharply 
after news that it had received 
a beyoat offer. 

Hie braader market was 
lower after being hart by some 
early futures-related sell 


Dow Jones industrial 
rose eight points to 
ted advances 7 


to 4 oa a vdhnne of 22 million 
shares. 

IBM, another Dow stock, 
gained l*/* to 129 1 /*. Ameri- 
can Express fell Y« to 5 9 s f 9 

The transport index was 
down 040 to 844.71. Hie 
atilittes index was down also, 
by 029 to 211.94 

The New York Stock Ex- 
change composite Index was 
14&0&, down 038 while the 
Standard and Poor's 100 index 
was down 042 to 238-16. 


Dm Dbc| 
10 


AMR 
ASA 

aim; 

Afiedt . 
AKaCMmrs 
Alcoa 
Amaxlnc 
AmrdaHs 


S6X 55* 
38% 38 

43 42X 

87% 67% 
2 % 2 % 
34% 34% 
12 % 12 % 
22% 2Z% 


Am Brands 44% 44% 
Am Can 87% 86% 

AmCynm'd 82 82% 

Am BPwr 29% 23% 

Am Express 00 60 

Am Homo 80% 80 


Am Motors 
AmSt'nrd 
AmTetoph 
Amoco 
Armco Steel 
Asorco 


3% 3% 

43% 43% 

27% 27% 
64% 83% 
5% 5% 

U% 14% 


AattandOB 57% 57% 

At Rich-Safes 69 57% 

Avon Prods 31 30 

BkrsTstNY 46% 45% 

Bantaaner 15% 15 

Bk of Baton 42% 41% 
Bank of NY 40% 41% 

Both Stasl 5 4% 

Booing 52% 51% 

BseCasoda 62% 61% 
Brdon 49% 50% 

Bg Warner 38% 37% 
Brist Myers 82 81X 

BP 39% 39 X 

BurT ton bid 41% 41% 

BurftnnNtn 59 58% 

Brunswick 34% 33% 

Cmpbefl Sp 60% 61% 
Can Pacific 12% 12% 
CaMpO* 38% 39% 
Caianese 242 241% 

Central SW 35% 35% 

Champion 32 31% 

Chase Man 37% 36% 
ChmSkNY 45% 45% 
Chevron 46% 45% 

Chester 39 38% 

Cftfcoro 53% 53 

Ctorii Equip 20% 20% 

Coca Cola 39 36% 

Colgate 42% %41% 
CBS 134% 133% 
ClmfaiaOBS 44% 44% 
CmblnEng 32% 32K 
GomwHflEd 33% 33% 
ConsEcfie 48% 47% 
Cn Nat Gas 34% 34% 

Cora Power 18% 15% 

CntriData 26% 25% 
Coming Gl 55% 55% 
CPChS 78 77% 

Crane 34% 34% 
CwdssVWt 54% 53% 

DataGenL 33 33% 

Deere 23% 23% 

OeBaAir 49% 49% 
DaroitEd 17% 18% 

Digital Eq 108% 107 
Disney 45% 44% 

Dow Cham 60% 60% 

Dresser Ind 19% 19% 

Duke Power 48% 48% 
DuPont 88% 69% 
Estm Kodak 69% 87% 
Eaton Cora 76% 75 

Emerson B 88% 88% 

Emery Air 12% 12% 
Exxon Corp 70% 69% 

Fa dOptSte 86% 88% 


Dee Dae 
10 S 


firestone 28% 27% 

Fat Chicago 32% 32% 


FttMBncp 54% 54% 
mC 9 


9 


FstPenn _ 

Ford 57% 57% 

FTWachw 38% 38% 
OAF Corp 40% 40 

GTE Cup 59% 59% 
Gar Corp 81 81 

Gen Dy rocs 73% 73% 

Gun Electric 86% 86% 
Gen Inst 18% 18% 
Gen MBS 42% 41% 
Gen Motors 71 70% 

GnPbUtny 23% 23% 
Genasco 3% 3% 

Georgia Pac 39% 38% 

&ms 50 49% 

Goodrich 44% 44% 

Goodyear 43 42% 

GouUlnc 18% 19 

Grace 53% 52 
GtAttATac 24% 24% 
QThnd 33% 32% 

GmmanCor 27% 27% 
GUI « West 68% 68 

HstezHJ. 43 42% 

■ ■ — — — - « t!M< r her 

miCUwa 901% 30n 

HVtt-Pkrd 43% 43% 

68% 65% 

25 26% 

tegereqfl 57 58 

hand Steal 18% 18% 
IBM 128% 127 

INCO 12% 11% 

IntPapor 76% 76% 
tntTeiTel 54% 68% 

hiring Bank 50% 50% 

JhnsnSJn 71% 70% 
Kaiser Alum 13% 13% 
Karr McGee 29% 29% 
KmtfjjCtrk 85% S5% 

Kroger 
LTVC 


LT.V.Corp 

Litton 

Lockheed 


47% 47% 
30% 30% 

1 % 1 % 
78% 79 
50% 51% 


Lucky Sirs 31 31 

Manfrnver 48% 48 


• ExUf.aMHLcEaMrMm 


MarwBeCp 2% 2% 

Mapoo 61% 81% 
Marine MU 46% 46% 
Mrt Marietta 40% 40% 
M8SCO 28% 28% 
McDonalds 83% 62% 
McOomwl 75 75% 

Mead 57% 57% 
Merck 115% 114 
MnstaMng 116 115% 

MotelOa 39% 38% 
Monsanto 78% 78% 
Morgan JP. 87% 88% 
Motorola 38 37% 

NCR Cup 49% 49 

NLIndstrs 5% 5% 

Nat Dlstks 46% 46% 
Nat Med Erri 24% 24% 

NatSmcndt 11% 11% 
Norfolk Sth 85% 85% 
NWaanerp 39 38% 

OccUmPM 27% 27% 
44 44% 

44% 44% 
44% 44 

PacOasB 24% 24% 
Pan Am 5 5 

Penney JG. 77% 80% 

Pamzod 73% 72% 

Paptsco 27% Z7% 

fuFEE ' ’ 


Dec 

10 


Dec 

9 


Pfizer 62% 
Pimps Oge 22% 
PhjtoMre 75% 
PWpePet 10% 
PotaroU 70% 
PPG bid 74% 
PldrGmCI 78% 
ROSEA G 41% 
Raytheon a 
RyrtdsMet 40% 
Rochwefllnt 45 
Boyaf Dutch 92% 
Sara Lee 70 
SFESopac 32% 
Schrtwger 34% 
Scott Paper 63% 
Seagram 82% 
Sears RJxk 42% 
Shefl Trans 54% 
Singer 40 
SmSunHc 90% 
Sony 22 

SdiCalEd 35% 
STMstnBefl 114% 
StdOB 49% 


62% 

21 % 

74% 

10 % 

70% 

73% 

77% 

41% 

66 

39% 

44% 

91% 

69% 

32% 

33% 

64% 

63% 

42% 

54% 


Sterfingpra 47% 
Stevens Jp 


38% 

Sin Comp 57% 

Teledyne 313% 

Terraco 37% 

Texaco 34% 

Texas ECu 29% 
Texas test 129% 

Texas IMs 33% 

Textron 65% 

TravksCu 44% 

TRW tnc 93% 

UAL Inc 69% 

UnReverNV 229% 


Unisys 82% 
Un Carbide 22% 


Un PscCor 63% 
Utd Brands 33% 
USGCorp 41 
UUTechnol 47% 
USX Corp 21% 
Unocal 25% 
Jm Walter 49% 
WmwLiittt 58% 


Weis Fargo 104% 
Usee 60% 


wstghsel 
Weyerhser 39% 
Wtwlpoal 70% 

WOOhrortfi 42 
Xerox Corp 61% 
Zentti 20% 


89% 

21 % 

35% 

114% 

47% 

46% 

38% 

57% 

314% 

37% 

34 

29% 

124% 

33% 

65% 

44% 

83% 

56% 

227% 

82% 

22 % 

64% 

33% 

41% 

45% 

21% 

24% 

49% 

57% 

104K 

59% 

39% 

69% 

42% 

61% 

20 % 


US retail 
sales gain 
0.5% to 
$1223bn 


CANADIAN PRICES 


Ogden 

OwCorp 

Owens-H 


tes? 

Moons Stl 

CanPadflc 

Cominco 

ConBathrst 

Hkr/SMCan 

HdsnBIAn 


Imperial Oil 
InProe 
Ryl Trustee 
Sea 


Seagram 

SteelGo 

ThmsnN'A’ 

vgjydon. 


■ Net SSTp iSS tfU. I TraST 


26% 26% 
12 % 12 % 
11 % 11 % 
17% 17 

13% 13% 
28% 28% 
26 26% 
22 % 22 % 
32% 32% 

47% 47% 
38% 38% 
30% 29% 
86% 87% 
19% 18% 
30% 30% 
260 259 
12 % 12 % 
31 


Washington (Reuter) - Re- 
tail sales id the US rase by 
$634 milli on (£452 milKon), 
or 0.5 per cent, in November 
to a seasonally adjusted figi 
of $122.3 billion, the Co 
merce Depart m ent said yes- 
terday. 

The moderate increase 
came after a revised drop of 
$6,7 billion, or 5.2 per cent, in 
October. Previously, the 
department said sales in Octo- 
ber had fallen 5 percent. 

Without car sates, which fell 
$189 milli on in November, 
sales for the month were up 
$823 million, or 0.9 per cent, 
to $94.2 billion, the depart- 
ment said. 

The November fell in car 
sates came after a decline in 
October sales of $7 billion, or 
19.9 per cent. 

The department said the 0.9 
per cent nse in sales, excluding 
cars, for November was the 
highest since July 1985 when 
sales were up 1 percent 
Retail sales, which had risen 
for six consecutive months 
before the October drop, have 
resumed an upward trend. 

Sales of durable goods rose 
by $137 million, or 0.3 per 
cent to $47.7 billion after a 
fell of $7 billion, or 12.9 per 
cent in October. 

Sales of non-durable goods 
rose by $497 million, or 0.7 
percent to $74.53 billion after 
a rise of $319 million in 
October. 

Gains in non-durable sales 
included an increase in sales 
of $304 million to $23.76 
billion for grocery stores, as 
well as a $39 million gain, up 
to $6.9 billion, in sales for 
petrol stations. 

Washington (AP-Dow 
Jones) — initial claims for 
state unemployment insur- 
ance fell 14,000 to 350,000 in 
the week to November 29, the 
Labour Department said yes- 
terday. The figure stood at 
364,000 a week earlier. 

Id the week to November 
22, 2,417,000 were receiving 
state unemployment benefits, 
down 206,000 from the pre- 
vious week's unrevised 
2,623,000. The number 
receiving unemployment 
benefits as a percentage of 
those covered by unemploy- 
ment insurance fell to 26 per 
cent in the same week. 


Polly Peck to buy Russell 
Hobbs in £12m TI deal 


By Alison Eadie 
Polly Peck International, 
the fruit packaging, electron- 


ics, textiles, and mineral bot- 
tling group run by Mr Asil 
Nadir, is buying Russell 
Hobbs and Tower House- 
wares from TI Group for £12 
million cash. 

Mr Nadir said the ac- 
quisitions would be a further 
step in the company’s strategy 

^RussefiHobbs is brown ?or 
its aiifnnmiic electric kettles, 
toasters, fryers, irons and coP 
fee makers. Tower is best 
known for. domestic pots and 
pans, pressure cookers, slow 
cookers, fryers, kettles and 

sandwich toaster*. 

Polly Peck has been keen for 
some time to diversify geo- 
graphically away from its 
strong dependence on Turkey 



Asfl Nadir ‘acquisitions part of an international strategy' 
The acq uisitions will pro- natural extension of the 


and Northern Cyprus. 


vide a strong manufacturing 
base in Britain from which to 
market the two famous band 
names internationally, the 
company said. 

Mr Mark Ellis, joint manag- 
ing director of Polly Peck, said 
the businesses would be a 


company's consumer elect- 
ronics business in Turkey, 
assembling televisions and 

video-recorders. 

Polly Peck is particularly 
keen to expand exports of 
Russell Hobbs and Tower 
products. At present they ac- 


count for only 15 per cent 
sales. 

The company wants 
build more of a presence in 
Britain. It has some textile 
manufacturing in the Britain 
through Wearwell, which has 
diminished and is no longer 
large enough to mop up the 
company's unrelieved Ad- 
vanced Corporation Tax. 

TI said Russell Hobbs and 
Tower were only small apph- 
jinne businesses and did not fit 
with the company’s bf c “* 
strategic direction. 

TI is restructuring the com- 
pany to concentrate on the 
core areas of specialized steel 
tubes, specialized engineering, 
automative and cycles. 

Il is keeping iis cooking and 
V^ in g domestic appliances 
businesses, whose bat known 
twines include Creda, New 
World and Glow-worm. 


Industrial co-ops 
want more cash 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 
A plea for more cash has bers of co-operatives has eased 


to the Government from 
Development 
Agency, which receives aid of 
£200,000 a year to boost the 
g rowt h at industrial and 
commercial co-operatives. 

The number of co-operatives 
has risen in the past two yean 
from 900 to about M00. 

However, Mr Ralph Woolf, 
the CDA chairman, gives a 
warning in the agency's annual 
report of “opportunities 
missed and hopes under-ful- 
filled because of the lack of 
central finance.” 

The value in real terms of 
aid has fallen by two thirds 
since 1983, be says. 

“Problems will not be solved 
by throwimg money at them. 
But there is a line between - 
profligacy and parsimony 
which we are ready to bead," 
be adds. 

The CDA deserves “rad- 
ically Improved binding," he 
says. The plea is also aimed at 
the private sector which has 
supported the CDA. 

Mr Woolf ays; “Alter the 
scale of oar resources and we 
have the plans and the people 
to respond." 

Hie rate of growth in nnm- 


this year. 

However the number of 
inquiries to the CDA about co- 
operatives rose by a tenth in 
the past year to 2£1Q, a 
quarter of than from 
interested in start-ftps 

The CDA is continuing to 
open the way for two 



lands of co-operative. Hie 
first the marketing co-op- 
erative, is to help snail busi- 
nesses to market themselves 
more effectively by belonging 
to n stronger grouping. , 

The other is the equity co- 
operative providing a struc tur e 
for obtaining risk capital more 
readily. Four co-operatives are 
using this str u c tu r e . 

There are now 16 co-op- 
erative support organizations 


which give local help to co- 
operatives. 


BSC buys Dutch 
steel stockholder 


By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


The British Steel Corpora- 
tion, which is top of the list for 
privatization if the Conser- 
vatives win the next election, 
yesterday continued its drive 
to become a more inter- 
national company with the 
takeover of a long-established 
Dutch steel stockholder. 

The acquisition of Feyen 
Stalservice, of Maastricht, 
will give BSC an outlet in 
Europe on top of its one 
German and three French 
ones. 

A BSC spokesman said that 
the deal — the price was not 
disclosed — highlighted the 
corporation's commitment to 
provide European customers- 
with a fully competitive ser- 
vice: BSC already opeated a 
major distribution network in 
Britain, and the Dutch ac- 
quisition was a logical exten- 
sion of marketing policies. 

Feyan has the ability to 
handl e carbon and stainless 
steels and aluminium. 

Latest production figures 
for BSC and the privately- 
owned steel sector, published 
today, show that production 
in the first 1 1 months of the 
year averaged 283,000 tonnes 
a week, a fell of 7.4 per cent on 


in the 


the 305,000 tonnes 
correspinding period. 

However, steel output in 
November alone was 331,600 
tonnes a week, 6 per cent 
higher than fa November 
1985. 

BSC and the British In- 
dependent Steel Producers' 
Association said that, while 
production was well main- 
tained in the major 
steelmaking centres, output 
for some oil-related products 
such as seamless tubes and 
pipes — on which much of the 
Scottish steel industry de- 
pends — remained low. 

Meanwhile, the British 
Scrap Federation reported a 
marked decline in exports of 
ferrous scrap. 

The federation said that 
exports this year were unlikely 
to exceed 3.9 million tonnes 
compared with 4.5 milli on 
tonnes in 1985. 

• Mr Robert Scholey, chair- 
man of BSC, has been made a 
honorary doctor of engineer- 
ing by Sheffield University to 
honour his "immense 
contribution” to the British 
steel industry. 


Challenge 
over life 
assurance 
earnings 


- } 
* ‘ 


By Lawrence Lever 
The banks and building 
societies are facing a. legal 
challenge to their practice of 
not disclosing the amount of 
commission they earn on sales 
of life assurance products. 

It could, if successful, lead 
to thousands of investors 
claiming back commission 
which they have paid to the 
banks and societies on sales of 
life assurance-related products 
And it could also force the 
Securities and Investments 
Board, the City watchdog, to 
revise its controversial pro- 
posed rules on disclosure of 
commission. 

The challenge comes from 
Mr Clive Wolman. a journal- 
ist on the Financial Times, 
who is suing National West- 
minster Bank for the return of 
commission that it earned for 
arranging an endowment 
mortgage on his behalf with 
the Norwich Union. 

Mr Wolman is claiming that 
the bank was acting as his 
agent in arranging the endow- 
ment mortgage and was there- 
fore legally obliged to disclose 
to him both the feet and the 
amount of commission it was 
earning. 

Mr Wolman's solicitors last 
week served a High Court writ 
on the bank claiming return of 
the commission — estimated 
to be about £500 — plus 
interest, damages and costs. 

The legal position of an 
agent earning life assurance 
commission has not jne- 
viously been formally tested 
in the law courts. 

The case poses a threat to 
the £250 million-plus 
commissions earned by the 
banks and the building soci- 
eties from endowment 
policies. 

At the moment, solicitors 
and accountants are obliged 
by their professional codes to 
disclose the amount of 
commission they earn. 

The SIB — which lays down 1 
the benchmark for investor 
protection — has decreed that 
intermediaries selling life 
assurance do not need to 
disclose the amount of 
commission they earn, pro- 
vided that they sell products 
of life companies party to a 
voluntary commissions 
agreement. 



;nx 




HALF YEAR 
RESULTS 
ON TARGET 


-RENTAL & RE TAIL 


Strong progress in UK and internationally 


T E C H N O L 0; G Y • 


Good performance by electronics, fire & security 
and software services 



M U SIC- 


Significant improvement in U.S. market share 


CONSUMER & CO M M ERC1AL 


Commercial products, cookers and Kenwood profits 
on schedule 


I RESULTS FOR SIX f-. 

MONTHS ENDED' 

3 G -S E F T 0 


1986 

1985 

Turnover 

£1 ,487.8m 

£1 ,533.6m 

Operating profit 

£55.5m 

£38.4m 

Pre-tax profit 

£41 .5m 

£11. 4m 

Earnings per share 

9.7p 

1.4p 

Dividend 

. £1 0.9m 

£10.7m 


For further details please contact 

Corporate Communications Department. THORN EMI pic, THORN EMI House, 
Upper Saint Martins Lane, London, WC2H 9 ED 


i 

I 

I 



THORN EMI 


FROM THE HIGH STREET TO HIGH TECHNOLOGY 


* 



RHP profits leap 60% 


Pretax profits at RHP, the 
mechanical and electrical en- 
gineering group; rose neatly 60 
percent from £11.1 million to 
£17.7 million in the year to 
October 3, on turnover up 28 
per cent to £164.1 million. 

British activities improved, 
but overseas subsidiaries de- 
clined. 

Muirhead, acquired in Jane 


1985, and Graviner, bought 
this year, boosted the elec- 
trical division's operating 
profits from £3.5 million to 
£8.5 million. The bearings 
division made operating prof- 
its of £10.5 million, and the 
fasteners division was up 15 
per cent to £596,000 prom. 

The total dividend was 
raised to 5p from 4.25p. 


J. JB. T 




THE GAS LINES 


Phone for latest prices or ask for our British 
Gas “How to Deal” information sheet 
Open for dealing seven days this week. 
ALL DEALINGS COMMISSION FREE. 


.DIAL 100 FREEPHONE FINMAN L d v 
01-925 0006 or Nottingham (0602)476136' 




FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES LTD, 

MEMBER OF FBI BRA. 

3 SI JAMES'S SQUARE, LONDON SWL 



Good news for retailers 

The TFS system for refunding VAT to overseas visitors 
has now been operating nationwide for several months, 
and has been fully proven by hundreds of small retailers 
as well as major groups such as Jaeger, Country Casuals 
and Dunn & Co. Further recognition of TFS as the 
market leader in this field is provided by Chester 
Marketing Bureau and Colchester Chamber of Trade, 
who have recently adopted the TFS scheme. 

■ At no cost to the retailer, TFS relieves him of the 
entire administrative burden, simplifies the 
transaction at point of sale, and encourages 
spending by overseas visitors. 

■ The shopper also benefits, since he receives his 
refund within just a few days, in the form of a single 
cheque in the currency of his choice. 

For further information, just send us your 
business card or coll us on 

(01)-8394556. 

70URI5TTAX FREE SHOPPING LIMITED 
Norway House, 21-24 Codcspur Street, London SW1Y5BN 
{i/a LONDONTAX FREE SHOPPING, 

CHESTS TAX SHOPPING . 
and COLCHESTER TAX FREE SHOPPING) 


to raise 
£10.8m 

By Richard Lander 

Avon Rubber, the t> 
inflatable craft and indusl 
polymers group, is makir 
one-for-four rights call to n 
£10.8 million. 

The money will be use< 
refinance three recent 
quisitions and provide tu 
for new growth opportunit 

The rights issue was 
nounced along with the 
nual figures which shoi 
pretax profits rising from £ 
million to £6.09 million 
turnover of £296.1 million 

Mr Tony Mitchard, 
chief executive, described 
margins as very unsatisafet 
and said the company wo 
continue its restructuring p 
gramme which will invo 
750 redundancies. 

The main thrust of Avc 
growth has come from 
industrial polymer divs; 
whose products include i 
pirators for military person 
and hovercraft skirt system 

The tyre market, wh 
plunged the group into loss 
the early 1980s, re main s w 
tough, while the inflatab 
division has suffered front 
lack of military orders. 

Avon shares fell 1 7p to 36 
while the new rights papa 
being offered at 335p. 


BRITISH GAS 
BUY OR SELL 

NO COMMISSION 


CALL FOR 

COMPETITIVE PRICE 
UWWR: 

01493 5022 
MANCHESTER: 
061-236 1330 

mil BURGH: 

031-226 5445 

SUN 9am- 9pm. 


WALTERS. JACOB 
,&COMPAl\JY Ltd' 

SPECIALISING IN V/C'v'JlS 
SMALL- ACCOUNTS L 

CG ADMINISTRATION fee 


BASE 

lending 


ABN.. 

Mg’ & Comjiaiy ,:; 

Citibank Saingsf III 

ated Crds^ 

Co-operative Bank „ 

C. Hoare & Co_„ 

^“5 ^ & Stangfe 

Uoyds Bank _Z 

flat Westminster 

5*al Bank of Scodani 

f SB. 


Cittank NA .!" “ “J ill 
Mortgage Base Rate. 








> 


‘v 





* 


L 

r 

r. 

T 

? V 

l 


9- 

i 

>■ 










THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


JNESS AND FINANCE 


25 


(STOCK MARKET) 

Barclay brothers may sell 
their 10% stake in IC Gas 


By Carol Leonard 


And the prospect of a com- 



The referral of the £730 
million bid from Gulf Re- 
sources for Imperial Conti- 
nental Gas to the Monopolies 
Commission could put an enfl 
to the bid once and for all. 

Talk in the market that the 
Barclay brothers, who control 
Gulf had already sold iheir 
10.6 percent stake in ICGasis 
not true, but such a sale may 
not be far away. 

Mr David Bardav said yes- 
terday: “We still have our 
stake, but we are reviewing the 
situation at this very 
moment." 

He aid that they have “at 
least a week** to decide 
whether to stay with their bid 


• The recovery of a 
number of diamonds from the 
Argyte Mine in Australia 
is cansing analysts to look 
favourably on Ashton 
Mining, which has a 38 per 
cent stake in the project. 
Eldred Hal ton of Grieveson 
Grant is one of those 
backing Ashton. Its shares 
closed at 115p yesterday. 

throughout a lengthy 
Monoplies Commission ref- 
erence, or walk away. 

The demerger plans pro- 
posed by the IC Gas board on 
Wednesday are broadly the 
same as the plans being pro- 
posed by the Barclay brothers. 


pany split creating two 
seperale publicly quoted units, 
one containing its Belgian 
investments and the other 
comprising Calor Gas and its 
oil exploration interests, yes- 
terday boosted the IC Gas 
share price by 24p to 552p. 

Market men believe that 
such a split would cause the 
company's share price to more 

accurately reflect its asset 
value and it is this belief that 
caused yesterday's rise. 

If the !C Gas directors go 
ahead with these proposals, 
they would virtually destroy 
the argument being put for- 
ward by the Barclays- 

Mr Brian Wflmot. the fi- 
nance director at IC Gas, said 

yesterday that the company 
had every intention of going 
ahead with the proposals, 
subject to tax clearance. 

He explained: “We applied 
to the Inland Revenue for 
clearance about three weeks 
ago and we hope to hear 
before Christmas." 

Some brokers still believe, 
however, that if the Barclays 
sell their stake, it may be 
picked up by yet another 
predator. They say that if 
another bid is launched, it will 
have to bean agreed deal. The 
company most frequently 
mentioned as a possible 
friendly bidder is Petrofina, 
the Belgian 03 exploration 


company in which I C Gas has 
a 7 per cent stake. Petrofina 
has better asset backing than 
Gulf and has only minor 
interests in Britain and so 
would be more likely to escape 
a reference to the Monopolies 
Commission. 

Elsewhere, the stock market 
was quietly firm, although it 
dosed off its best level of the 
day. The FT-SE 100 index had 
gamed 6.4 points by 10 am but 
closed 0.6 of a point lower at 
1,634.0. The FT 30 share 
index, up 7 points by 10 am, 
dosed just 0.8 lower at 
U84.7. 

The gilt-edged market saw a 
burst of trading after lunch 
following the suggestion, in 
the Bank of England's Quar- 
terly Bulletin, that o3 will 
reach $20 a barrel by 1988. 


Stocks moved ahead by as 
much as £1 'A at the longer end 
and by £46 in the shorts. Some 
traders complained that a 
number of firms were trading 
in gilts ahead of the official 
5.30pm bulletin embargo. 

Among blue-chip equities. 
Grand Metropolitan, the ho- 
tels and brewing group, gained 
a further I4p to 472p, making 
a two-day rise of 25 p, follow- 
ing the article in this column, 
predicting a consortium bid 
for the group. More than 8 
million shares changed hands 
in the stock market yesterday. 
Buyers are being lined up for 
parts of the business and the 
bid could materialize anytime 
between now and the end of 
January. 

Analysts say any predator 
would be well advised to strike 




ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


1988 

Wcti Low Company 

phot 

BU Offer 

»fle 

Ov 

panes 

YM 

% 

1 

P/C 

HM 

TOO 

11 

06 

i Low 

, L||| - ) 

Mee 

BM Offer Ctfga 

dfar 

VU 

% 


363 

283 

Afltod-Lyoas 

303 

308 

• 

-2 

145 

47 

140 

1.900 

349 

275 

Land Seeurittoe 

340 

343 

• 

-a 

M5 

42 

229 277 

174 

126 

ASOA-MH 

146 

ISO 


-2 

45 

00 

162 

85t 

288 

133 

Legal & Gan 

247 

252 


+4 

1Z3 

49 

319 3900 

330 

241 

BTR 

275 

280 


+9 

as 

35 

19/4 

2400 

484 

293 

Lloyds 

443 

450 



254) 

59 

72 804 

491 

381 

BAT 

457 

462 


-6 

184 

40 

120 

2700 

283 

183 

Lontvo 

227 

229 



17.1 

79 

112 UI 

572 

449 

Barclays 

483 

490 


-5 

23.1 

08 

75 

2600 

231 

163 

Marta & Spencer 

180 

183 

• 

-1 

5/8 

39 

21 J 3900 

840 

825 

Bass 

725 

735 


+7 

243 

3-3 

135 

73 

599 

417 

Mttand 

558 

565 



37.1 

69 

209 1200 

450 

359 

Beecham 

417 

422 

• 

+2 

17.1 

41 

174 

1.100 

593 

426 

Nat West 

508 

515 


+6 

27.6 

54 

59 828 

72S 

526 

BkJfl Orcta 

646 

651 


+S 

30.0 

48 

92 

382 

576 

428 

P & O Dfrd 

505 

510 


-2 

2&4P 

52 

149 446 

383 

293 

BOC 

3S0 

3S3 


+9 

15/4 

44 

132 

441 

603 

383 

Pearson 

567 

572 


+4 

15.4 

2-7 

189 815 

289 

170 

Boots 

229 

232 

• 

-1 

106 

45 

15.1 

1500 

629 

315 

Pfldngton Brae 

620 

62S 


-6 

214 

&4 

169 3900 

60S 

423 

Br Aerospace 

485 

490 



23.4 

48 

103 

756 

243 

162 

Ptassay 

172 

176 


-3 

72 

4.1 

129 4900 

64’j 81 

Br Gas 

82 

64 


+2 




— 1 

942 

718 

Prudential 

B25 

832 



389 

47 

547 121 

709 

530 

Br Petrotoun 

678 

683 


+8 

489 

7.1 

7 A 

3500 

234 

146 

Racal Bad 

176 

160 


-2 

49 

24 

189 1900 

280 

177'aBr Telecom 

195 

199- 


-4 

107 

54 

115 14000 

589 

421 

Rank Org 

524 

531 


+4 

22.5 

49 

189 952 

193 

98 

Brttofl 

155 

157 


+7 

93 

65 

42 

7500 

900 

605 

Racket & Coenwi 

806 

813 

• 

+6 

233 

39 

179 212 

354 

256 

Staton 

as 

262 


-2 

8.1 

3.1 

145- 

483 

584 <3 345 

Reuters 

575 

580 



5 A 

09 

439 821 

3S9 

277 

Cable & wireless 

313 

320 


-6 

7 2 

25 

175 

1500 

791 

511 

RTZ 

660 

667 

w 


31/4 

4.7 

69 346 

196 

158 

Cadbury Schweppes 181 

184 


-1 

BJ 

48 

21 4 

3500 

532 

365 

Rowntree 

398 

403 

• 

-9 

1&0 

49 

11.1 1400 

564 

426 

Coats Vlyele 

464 

468 

• 

+2 

17.9 

35 

135 

233 

967 

782 

Royal toe 

648 

856 

• 

-10 

:»« 

49 

899 1900 

338 

257 

Com Union 

271 

274 


+1 

17/4 

04 


2500 

428 

344 

Setoabcoy (J) 

412 

415 

• 


84 

29 

249 210 

704 

409 

Cons Gottflefcfc 

657 

664 


-8 

359 

03 

185 

427 

USH1Q4 

Sears 

121 '» 123 


-1 

5.0 

4.1 

159 340 

330 

252 

Courtaukts 

309 

312 

• 

-1 

102 

35 

105 

1200 

415 

316 

Sedgwick Gp 

320 

325 



17.1 

59 

154 1400 

290 

201 

Dee Corp 

199 

204 


-6 

10l3 

8.1 

165 

5500 

970 

653 

Stafl 

945 

950 


+3 

514 

54 

99 3900 

438 

218': 

r Dixons &p 

318 

322 


-4 

43 

15 

225 

1500 

132 

93 

Smith & Nephew 

115 

117 


♦1 

39 

39 

1991400 

650 

408 

Fisons 

513 

518 

• 

-2 

04 

15 

235 

1500 

174 

96 

STC 

168 

170 


-2 

2.1 

19 

159 631 

954 

701 

Gen Accident 

815 

822 

• 

-10 

343 

42 

205 

811 

894 

419 

Sian Chart 

806 

815 


+« 

484 

5.7 

109 1400 

226 

158 

QFT. 

188 

173 


-1 

03 

07 

105 4200 

335 

265 

Storehouse 

Z73 

Z78 


-4 

11.0 

49 

142 1.700 

11V 

756': 

r Glaxo 

982 

872 


+22 

20J) 

2.1 

202 3500 

772 

520 

Sun Affiance 

650 

557 

w 

-8 

27.5 

49 

539 672 

481 

328 

Grand Met 

469 

474 


+14 

105 

25 

155 8500 

61 '4 75*4 TBS PIP 

75'* 76 


-4 

. . 

... 

■ • 

11 ’j 721 

BUS ’A 

10 

10'» 

• 


300 

35 

141 

432 













GRE 

775 

782 


-5 

425 

55 

225 

108 

420 

265 

Teaco 

395 

398 


-8 

89 

29 

227 115 


235 

GKN 

272 

275 


+2 

175 

65 

92 

1,500 

529 

374 

Thom B 41 

482 

488 


+2 

259 

52 

354 1900 

355 



2 95 

300 


+8 

115 

35 

115 6.000 t 

349 

209 

Traiaigar House 

261 

262 


+14 

189 

72 

89 2900 


r141 


187 

iee 



6.1 

02 

125 7500 

209 

139 

Tnjethousa Forts 

177 

178 


-44 

79 

49 

179 3400 

623 

403 

Hawker Siddeiey 

438 

442 

• 

-2 

21/4 

49 

07 

221 

22 

13* Unlever 

22 

224 

• 

+4 

80.1 

2.7 

202 321 



11 

11 '■ 


+■'. 

408 

44 

124 

1.700 

268 

216 

Ira Books 

237 

238 

• 

+14 

139b 

57 

129 2900 




524 

529 


-1 

. 12.7 

24 

109 

802 

231 

174 

Wellcome 

214 

216 

m 

-1 

39 

14 

279 1,700 

391 

312 

Ladbroka 

357 

362 


+4 

165 

<7 

172 

323 

i os 

430 

Wtootwonh 

650 

655 


+3 

229 

39 

149 122 


before the company unveils its 
results next Thursday. 

Glaxo advanced 15p to 
960p — on American buying — 
BTR 7p to 276p, ICI 20p to 
l.!07p, while TrastHonse 
Forte slipped 5p to 177p os 
talk that it is about to buy a 15 
per cent stake in Kentucky 
Fried Chicken. 

Among newcomers. Wild- 
ing Office Equipment, the 
office equipment retailer, 
opened at a 13p premium on 
its I3Sp placing price, before 
settling bade at 146p. 

British Gas finned i.5p to 
62.5p with 161 million shares 
traded in the stock market, but 
City analysts say they are 
Ukdy to ease a couple of pence 
by next Tuesday, the day 


• Shares in Brierley 
Investments, the master 
company of Mr Ron 
Brierley, the New Zealand 
e nt repreneur, made their 
debut on the London stock 
market yesterday and 
made a !0p prembnn on Aar 
215p placing price. Chase 
Manhat^ a Swunttei fa 
market-maker far Brierley. 


when most small shareholders 
wiH receive their allotment 
letters and mil thus, for the 
first time, be in a position to 
selL 

The allotment letters, telling 
investors bow many shares 
they have been allocated, are 
being posted on Monday. 

Mr Simon EUiston, an en- 
ergy analyst at Savory Mflln, 
the broker, says: “The shares 
have been firm in line with the 
rest of the oil sector, but come 
next Tuesday I think we’ll see 
a couple of pence off the price. 
The 20 percent argument, that 
a lot of small shareholders will 
hold on to their shares because 
of die 20 per cent yield they’ll 
get from dividends and 
vouchers doesn’t really hold 
water. Even if the price drops 
to 60p, that still works out at a 
20 per cent profit and they can 
get it instantly just by selling 
their shares — without having 
to wait all year.” 

The rest of tbe ofl sector was 
in an optimistic mood as the 
Opec meeting got underway in 
Geneva. BP gained 6p to 
68lp, Shell 3p to 948p, Enter- 
prise S.5p to 151.5p. 

Market sentiment towards 
the members of tbe con- 
sortium which was awarded 
the franchise for Direct 
Broadcasting by Satellite was 
initially favourable, although 
analysts stressed it was diffi- 
cult to immediately gauge the 
full implications of such a 
costly and technically com- 
plex project. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Bank of England sings 
the Treasury’s tune 


T he Bank of England has always 
resisted the popular notion that it 
is the Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer’s poodle. But the assessment 
contained m its latest Quarterly Bul- 
letin is either a remarkable example of 
powerful minds in harmony or tbe 
result of the Bank's Over-indulging in 
Bonio biscuits. 

Tbe Bank thinks that the Treasury’s 
inflation projections are quite reason- 
able; that British exporters will be 
sufficiently spurred by the devalued 
pound to bring the current account 
back to surplus; and that monetary 
conditions — since the raising of bank 
base rates in October — are broadly 
satisfactory. The Bank finds no argu- 
ment with the Treasury’s forecast of a 
£l-£2 billion current account deficit 
next year, or of inflation rising to 4per 
cent but not more. 

All this is based on a Treasury 
assumption that the oil price will 
remain at $15 a barret Later in the 
Bulletin, when the Bank comes on to 
world economic prospects, we find 
that tbe in-house view is that oil prices 
will rise from the present $15 a barrel 
to $20 a barrel by early 1988, with 
consequences for inflation, the bal- 
ance of payments and the exchange 
rate about which the Bank declines to 
speculate. 

A similar inconsistency comes with 
the expectation that Britain’s trade 
will respond to the sharp sterling foil 
that has occurred, but that other 


countries' balance of payments are 
relatively immune. Whereas the 16 
per cent foil in the value of sterling 
should be enough to bring our current 
account round, the US current deficit 
remains stuck at $125 billion (£87 
billion) next year, in spite of a 30 per 
cent foil in the dollar. And Japan’s 
current account surplus is forecast to 
widen to $100 billion next year. 

There is a definite feeling of deja vu 
about the Bank's assessment of mone- 
tary conditions. Basically, the statis- 
tics are rather foggy, partly because of 
the British Gas privatization, partly 
because of the switch to calendar 
month money numbers. Two years 
ago, when British Telecom came to 
the market, the money figures were 
also rendered unreliable. Then as 
now, the Bank's verdict was that 
monetary conditions were tight 
enough. The January 1985 sterling 
crisis and a 47j point interest rate hike 
duly followed. 

There is no overwhelming reason 
why history should repeat itself but 
the Bank's grounds for thinking that it 
will not look somewhat thin. They are 
that the exchange rate has stabilized, 
albeit just above its all-time low; that 
house and equity prices are rising less 
quickly, which could mean that excess 
money is going into goods rather than 
assets; and that narrow money, M0, 
remains within target range. Lf the 
markets scent blood, they may need a 
little more than this to keep the 
hounds at bay. 


Muddying the waters 


P aul Channon, the Secretary of 
State for Trade and Industry, has 
muddied the swirling waters of 
competition policy with his decision to 
refer to the Monopolies and Mergers 
Commision the £750 million takeover 
offer for IC Gas, the group widely 
known for Calor Gas. It is difficult to 
reconcile this move with recent referrals 
which have been appraised almost 
solely on the grounds of competition 
rather than the wider issues permitted 
by the Fair Trading legislation. 

For practitioners in the City and 
companies seeking to grow by ac- 
quisition, Norman Tebbit's decision to 
give preference to competition aspects 
of a proposed merger were a welcome 
amplification of a policy which had 
become confused and confusing. The 
process had become too much like a 
lottery and the scope for subjective 
assessments by panel members, too 
great. 

The IC Gas reference is a retrograde 
step. It is based not on questions of 
competition but on tenuous surmise 
about what might happen should tbe 
bidder prove to have over-extended 
itself in a highly leveraged offer. 

Yet, the gearing issue was aired 


thoroughly in the commission's recent 
investigation into the bid for Allied- 
Lyons by the Australian, Elders DCL_ 

The bidder. Gulf Resources, showed 
the Office of Fair Trading forecasts 
which indicated that cash-flow cover for 
debt service was comfortable following 
the disposal of IC Gas's Belgian 
interests. 

The Government has given in to a 
sustained campaign by its own back- 
benchers. This is not the way to 
administer competition policy. 

Sir Gordon Borne, the Director- 
General of Fair Trading, would no 
doubt agree, or would he? 

He recently told an audience in 
Scotland “I do not question that it is 
right that the primary emphasis in any 
mergers policy should be on the 
promotion or, more aptly, the protec- 
tion of competition. For the most pari, 
competition is the best way of ensuring 
that markets work efficiently, that firms 
produce the sort of goods and services 
that consumers want at as low a cost as 
possible, and that our industries are 
competitive from an international 
standpoint*' 

Why he decided in favour of referring 
IC Gas is mildly mystifying. 


Opec scrapes the bottom 
of the $15 oil barrel 


How the future of 
exploration and 
employment in 
the North Sea oil 
industry may 
depend on 
members of the 
producers' cartel 
reaching a 
workable deal to 


) prices to 


a barrel 


i an 

to send 
ces higher, 

ire prepar- 
>f unprece- 

i . »_ir 


jmpanies 

involved 

oduction 




ueral 

stem. 

Iritoil 


;dun- 

lafier 

jecto 



Sheikh Hisham Nazen holds the key to a price rise 


a pany has 
rs, drillers 
ir special 
r needed, 
jarrel, the 
iorking on 


partners 
ger corn- 
el's sal- 
ortioned 
ime he 
t 

for in- 
sane in a 
r cent of 
ui has to 
le costs. 

discov- 

ntoftfie 


up 


prices would mean some 
projects could be revived and 
staff kept on. 

Mr Aiick Buchanan-Smith, 
the Energy Minister,’ has told 
the industry be hopes they win 
“hang on in there" and retain 
tbe skills and manpower nec- 
essary if Britain is to find new 
and cheaper ways of transport- 
ing oil from the North Sea and 
from beneath the woodlands 
of Surrey. Sussex and Dorset 

His efforts to persuade oil 
companies to keep going are 
partly due to the need to 
maintain oil revenues and 
keep people employed in areas 
where the unemployment rate 
is already higher than the 
national average, and so com- 
panies will be able to take part 
in the bidding for tbe new 
round of licences he will put 
on offer early next year. 

He has backed his pleas 
with action by winning the 
early repayment of advance 
petroleum revenue tax from 
the Treasury. 

This will benefit companies 
such as Britoil and Sovereign, 
which have large semi- 
submersible drilling rigs ca- 
pable of exploring the deeper 
and more hostile waters to the 
North and West of the 
Shetland^. 

He has also made con- 
cessions in the type of equip- 
ment which can be used, while 
.still masting on as high a level 


as possible of British content 
This has meant that subsea 
systems, rather than expen- 
sive fixed platforms, can be 
used. And he has streamlined 
the planning system for on- 
shore development within the 
parameters of environmental 
requirements. 

In addition, he has an- 
nounced that seven onshore 
exploration licences pre- 
viously issued under the old 
ad hoc arrangements have 
been converted into the new, 
more tightly-controlled ex- 
ploration licences. 

This means that tbe search 
for oil will now take place in 
Fife, North and South York- 
shire, Derbyshire, Stafford- 
shire and on the Berkshire- 
Oxfordshire border. 

M r Buchanan-Smith 
said: “Operations 
will only be allowed 
under these new licences as 
long as I am satisfied that 
companies have given due 
regard to all the planning and 
environmental issues in the 
area." 

However, the pace of 
exploration both offshore and 
onshore will depend on the o3 
price and (hat will be deter- 
mined at tbe Opec meeting 
now in session in Geneva. 

Iran has called for a cut in 
production, which would send 
prices upwards and allow 


Opec to move back towards a 
contract pricing system that 
would partly help it to achieve 
its aim of an $18 price from 
January 1 and possibly a $24 
price by June. 

It has the backing of six of 
the 13 Opec nations, but tire 
key will be Saudi Arabia's 
stand. Should Sheikh Hisham 
Nazer, the Saudi oil minister, 
agree to a cut in Saudi Arabia's 
output, the price would rise. 

Mr Rilwani Lukman, the 
Nigerian ofl minister and 
Opec s president, made clear 
that Opec is all too aware of 
the cost to date of its policy of 
defending market share by 
allowing prices to tumble. 

H e said that what had 
happened had been a 
“very traumatic ex- 
perience for both producing 
and consuming countries” 
and bad cost tbe Opec nations 
$50 billion (£35 billion) in lost 
oil revenues. 

However, once again the 
Opec president attacked Bri- 
tain for its decision not to trim 
North Sea output to help Opec 
restore the present supply- 
demand imbalance. 

“Unfortunately some pro- 
ducers outside Opec nave 
remained hostile to our initia- 
tive for a dialogue, even while 
appreciating tbit without such 
a development, which would 
lead to co-operation in the 
form of production cuts, mar- 
ket stability will remain 
illusory," he said. 

“Any meaningful dialogue 
can only take place with an 
undemanding that all produc- 
ers, inside as well as outside 
Opec, share the burden of 
defending a higher price. “ 

James Capel, the stock- 
broker says: “We still believe 
it is important not to become 
too involved in Opec politics 
and ignore tbe real world. 
Even given co-operation all 
round, we do not believe it is 
possible for Opec to maintain 
a stable $18 oil price. 

“If Opec is making a good 
attempt at SIS, prices might 
average $16 in 1987. If not, 
$ 14 or so looks more likely.” 

David Young 

Energy Correspondent 


RHP Group pic 


1986 Results 

^ Profits up 60% * EPS up 14% 

^Dividend up 18% 



1986 

£000 

(unaudited) 

1985 

£000 

Sales 

164,115 

128,292 

Profit before interest 

19,602 

12,602 

Interest 

(1,929) 

(1,530) 

Profit before tax 

17,673 

11,072 


RHP is a British group of companies manufacturing precision elec- 
trical and mechanical engineering products for a wide range of 
industries, including aerospace, automotive, 
communications, construction, defence, elec- 
tronics, engineering, energy, process control and 
telecommunications. 

RHP operates in the UK through subsidiaries and 
divisions, with subsidiaries in Australia, Canada, 

France, Germany, New Zealand, South Africa 
and the USA and agents elsewhere in the world. 

Copies of the Report and Accounts may be obtained from 

RHP Group pic, PO Box 20, Pilgrim House, High Street, BiUericay, Essex CM12 9XY 










These latest figures represent the fifth year 
of solid growth in our businesses and include 
the first contribution from Distillers. 

The pre-tax profit figure is up 180% and is 
almost six times the one reported in 1981. 

On the home market, draught Guinness 
continued its recovery with a sales volume 
increase of 14% over 1985’s very healthy figures. 

The repackaging and successful relaunch of 
Guinness Extra will have a further favourable 
impact on sales in the coming months. 

Kalibei; our recently developed alcohol- 
free lager, can also be relied on for future sales 
growth. It is now selling nationally in Great 
Britain as well as in the lucrative USA market. 

In fact overall, in our key target develop- 
ment markets the USA and Western Europe 
sales have advanced strongly showing volume 
growth 30% above the previous year. 

With Bells, we have virtually halted the 
five year decline in the United Kingdom market 
share. 

Distillers has also been the scene of positive 
management action and strong financial control, 
resulting in a profit contribution of £134m. 

Management of our worldwide spirit 
sales and marketing operation has been stream- 
lined and will be relocated, outside Central 
London, in early 1987. 

The UK spirits division is to be merged 
with Bells and will be headquartered in 
Perth, Scotland, from July 1987. 

Improved efficiency has increased trading 
profit margins to 5% in our retail businesses 

npTjr-p rjTpiT TDTh C ahead °f P lan - 

-A. jL JLJL/ JL lVJvJ JLVL/O^ The disposal of non-strategic businesses 

and assets has already raised nearly £200m in 
cash 


THE FACTS 
BEHIND 






iHi 

$ 

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fid 

9 

5 

6 


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i 

:.it6 

$ 

8 


GUINNESS PLC 
1986 RESULTS 

Second interim statement for year to 30 September 1986 

□ Turnover up 96% to £2, 325m. 

□ Profit before tax and earnings per stock unit 
up for the fifth successive year. 

□ Profit before tax up 180% to £241m. 

□ Earnings per stock unit up 13% to 28.5p. 

□ Dividend up 13%. 

“The excellent results we have reported today 
flow directly from the commitment and dibit 
of all the management, staff and employees 
throughout the Guinness Group. 

Ernest W Saunders 
Chairman. December lOrh 1986 

id 

GUINNESS PLC 



Our achievements in 1986 provide a plat- 
form from which we can realise the enormous 
potential of our unrivalled portfolio of world 
brands. 



BtMMW TO xn MCqum 

0MKGllMBS4C.lrtai 

GUINNESS PLC 







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• VVHESSOE: Year to Srpt 27. 
Total payment maintained at 
■«r un »®y« r ffl«l million 
$?8?® Pretax profii 

£4.74 million (£5.02 million), 
Earamgs per share !6.3p 
{ 1 4_7p). The order intake for the 
year was £1 1 7 million and, with 
completions of £98 million, the 
gross order book value at Sept, 
was £330 million. The outlook 
for 1986-7 in some of the 
group's main markets — es- 
pecially for power-station build- 
ing in Britain and Australia — is 
uncertain, the board reports. 
However, recent developments 
in other areas encourage the 
nope that prospects may im- 


COMPANY NEWS 


• YELLO WHAMMER: Half- 
yw to Sept 3a Turnover 
£19.39 million (£12.46 million). 
Pretax profit £713,000 
(£620,000). Earnings per share 
4-3p <3-3p). Interim dividend 
unchanged at 0.6p. The group 
has performed a»ftg( (yn*ly and 
the board is confident that it will 
continue to operate at record 
levels for the remainder of the 
year. The subsidiaries formed 
earlier this year in public rela- 
tions and typesetting moved 
quickly into profit and are 
growing above expectations. 

• PEJUCOM: Total dividend 


2Jp (I3p) for the year to Sept 
3a Turnover £16.64 million 


More company news 
on page 30 



Prove m i9g7 and beyond, 
though the work shortage is 
likely to persist in certain sec- 
tors. 

• WAGON INDUSTRIAL 
HOLDINGS: Half-year fo Sept 
30. Interim dividend raised to 
4p (3Jp). Turnover £43.13 mil- 
lion (£39.35 million). Pretax 
profit £3.1 million (£2.35 mil- 
lion). Earnings per share 10.18p 
(7.04p). The board reports that 
the office equipment division 
'achieved the largest compar- 
ative increase, mainly because 
of the considerable improve- 
ment in the results of Vinco, the 
French subsidiary. Group pre- 
tax profits for the second half 
are expected to show an increase 
on 1985-86. 


directors report that the latest 
results fully justify the 
reorganization. Geographical 
diversifications and the 
development of new mai - tHf ; 
will continue to be the comer-. 


stone of policy in the current 

wth inve 


year, with investment for the 
fiiUii 


lure taking priority over the 
. The current year has 


short-term, 
started satisfactorily, with the 

results of Boffin and Pro vector 

being particularly encouraging. 
• SYLTONE: Half-year to 
Sept. 30. Interim payment un- 
changed at 3.6p. Turnover 


£10.71 million ^£la2 million), 


Pretax profit £421,000 
(£635,000). Earnings per share 
7.16p (13. 14pX The forward 


order load is being maintained 
iiness oevelo 


and new business developments 
are showing satisfactory 
progress. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 


Ashtsad (122p) 
Bttsftm&SBttersoa (103p) 


Brake Bros (125p)' 


Britisn Gas <50p| 
Daniel S (130p) 


FteWiar^Kmj'('t75p) 


Gaynor 


Geest (12Sg^ 


Giantree 


Gordon Russel (I90p) 
Gutftrie Corn (150p) 
Hals Homes A Gdrts 


Harmony Leisure 
Lloyds Chemist ft 
Logitek (65p) 


145+7 
141 
148-1 
63+2 
156 
1B1 
109 
183 +4 
55+2 
206 
170 
105-1 
28 +1 
132+1 


Spendex 


Sumit (135p) 

tan Isles (70p) 


T58 CS tan 
TSB Group flOQp) 
Virgin (14£b) 

Woottons Better (I04p) 
Ward G " 

Wddmg 


228+6 

139 

97+1 

75*i 

132*2 +<2 
82-1 
103-1 
146 


Lon& Metropolitan (T4Sp) 
‘ (105p) 


Miss Sam HMgs 
Hobo (152p) 
Nothumbrian One (fiOp) 

Plum Hid 

Quarto (1 


166 
98+1 
156 
92 +3 
110-1 
128 


RIGHTS ISSUES 
Cook WM p/I 
Gtanflefd 
Lon Assc 
Norfolk Cap H 
Petrocen FTP 
Regaflan N/P 


U F IP 
N/P 

B Inv F/l 


Trabg Sec F/P 
Wadmngton F/P 


196+15 
26 
20 
24*2 
65 +2 
1-1 


WOBcar 
(issue price in brackets). 


190 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


day's range 
December 11 
N Yort 1.4230-1.4270 
Montreal 18637-15685 
Amsdan>a2350-&2490 
Brussels 50 .52-59.83 
Cphgan 10.B1 20-108594 
Dub* 1.0505-1.0589 
Frankfurt 2.B81 6-24755 
Lisbon 21188-213.18 
19337-19394 
1981 .48-1995.42 
10,7678-10.8229 
93832-94312 
96946-9S250 
23131-232.14 
20.12-2021 
24332-24006 


Madrid 

Milan 

Oslo 

Pans 

SlKhlm 

Tokyo 

Vienna 

Zurich 


Haricot i 
dose 

December 11 

1/4230-1.4240 

1.9637-1.9665 

32437-32481 

5927-59.78 

1 02447-1 02594 

1.0532-1.0542 

22666-22706 

21128-212.75 

193.60-193.88 

198723-1993.60 

102041-102188 

9.397544141 

920980.9239 

23121-231.68 

20.18-2021 

22992-24030 


1 month 


IK-IKprem 
22-l7prem 
Ift-ftpram 
1824dis 
ift-lftpram 
8S-122dte 
15-30dB 
1 prom- 2 c*s 
6ft-8Kcfe 
Ift-li 


3monflis 

122-1.77prem 

120-125prem 

4ft-4ftfX*m 

6081 c 


51 

4VM%pram 
21042703 
27-30cfls 
38rem-d8 
16ft-17dte 
4K-3Xpram 
4-3Kprem 
4-3 X prism 
29-25\pram 
4X-4pram 


-ipram 
IK-Kpram 


Kpram 
1%-1Kpram 
9ft-flprern 
ift-lftpram 


Staffing index compared MAh 197S was up at 882 (day's range M2-M2). 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argwitfeia austral* 
Australia dollar , 


. 1.7053-1.7123 
. 2.1828-2.1881 


Bahrain dinar 02355-02395 

Brazicmzado* 0 4018 02171 

Cyprus pound 0.7300-0.7400 

ft&nd marka 7.0100-72500 


AustraBa . 
Canada. 


. 12535-12565 
. 2.1915-2.1928 
. 22910229301 


0287006583 


Sweden 


Greece dracfvna 199.60-201 .60 

Hang Kong doaar 112885-112878 

India rupee 1825-1075 

baq dmor — n/* 

Kuwait dkiarKD 0417004210 


1 12800-128051 
82625-62675 


Danmark. 


rKD 
Malaysia doflar 
Mexico peso. 


West Germany 
Switzerland — 

UnlliBriitTlrio 
KODTOfianoa , 


72900-72950 

72178-72225 

22167-22177 


32890-3-6946 Franca 


I 12875-12885 
2-2795-72805 
i 62100-62150 


1245-1295 


New Zealand doUai 220^-22214 

Saudi Arabia nyal .. 52300-53700 

Singapore dollar 3.12053.1244 

SouttiAfnca rand 3.1781-3. 1947 

UAEcMiam 52180-52580 

■Lloyds Bank 


Japan 

Say. 

Bek/unfComm) 


Hong Kong , 
Pormgal. 


182.70-16220 

13962-13992 

412041.95 


Spain 


Austria 


7.7880-7.7890 
149.10-14940 
13520-13820 
_ 14.18-1420 


RHea nVpBad by Baretaya Bank HOFEX and BiteL 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Open 

8829 


Three Month Staring 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 W29 

JunB7 — — BB-1D 

Sep 87 B9.19 

D«c 87 8824 

Mar 88 8825 


Previous day's total open interest 161 79 


Three Month EmtoHar 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 9423 

Jun87 94.ro 

Sep 87 9329 


USTtaeatay Bond 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun87 


100-14 

9945 

NT— 


Previous dart total open tateraM 24857 

3328 MSS 9326 970 

3425 . 9421 34.02 1663 

9424 9420 9420 480 

8320 9326 9327 201 

Prevtoui day's low open Wares* 3875 
100-14 100-M 100-11 45 

9925 99-08 99-10 2967 

— 98-12 0 


Short Gtt 
Dec 88 — . 
Mar 87 «... 
Jiai87 — 


96-00 

96-00 

NT_. 


Prevtoue da/e total open Harast 188 
96-00 96-00 96-18 38 

96-12 96-00 96-18 SB 


LongGHt 
Dec 86 


Dec 
Mar 87 
Jun87 
Sep 87 


10806 

108-15 

NT 

NT 


Preiious day's total open interest 21 097 
109-02 108-05 10806 150 

109-16 106-16 109-12 16525 

109-15 0 


FT-SE100 
Dec 96 — 
Mar 87 


16425 

16625 




16420 

16725 186.70 16720 179 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


FM Dealings 
NOV 17 
Decl 
Dec 15 


LastDaamgs 
Nov 28 
Dec 12 
Jan 2 


Feb 19 
Mar 5 
Mar 19 


FarSafttMMflt 

Mar 2 


Mar 16 
Mar 30 


CSreen R«s«M]c». AgojW^, 


The 


_ r. Bewick Hopper, WoW, 

■ Veneer, Johnson Fhih Brown, Win. Boulton. 




Resources. 


Invitation to 
Tender 


BRIGHTON BOROUGH COUNCIL 

&^. in S ft Td. c SS^^ 

SBS and^SS&ing compnlcr 
rv!mna; ies abk to meet the. above 

m the lender list should apply to. 

^rector of Cw»P»fWB 

gjrg-s. Town Hall, Brighton, East 

SSS/BNl 1JA. 

pfecse: Brighion (0273)29801 «L 464 (MR 
ES55 i«l 666 (Mr Towner). _ 


CM' for tenders is Jaraar, 
2 nd 1987 , (12 Noon). 


• PHOENIX TIMBER: No in- 
terim dividend (same) for the 
six months to Sept. 30, bui the 
board expects to recommend a 
final (nil hut time). Turnover 


£17.82 million j£2a'l 1 million), 


Pretax profit £132,000 
(£35,000). Earnings per. share 
4.3p (Up). The new shares 
issued in Oct. will substantially 
cut interest charges in the 
second half Conditions gen- 
erally remained difficult 
throughout the first half 

• PLtXELLO castors a 


‘WHEELS: Total payment 4.1p 
(3.Sp) for the year to ScpL 30.. 
Turnover £ 1 2.93 million 
(£12.57 million). Pretax profit 
£579.278 (£785.493). Given- 
reasonable stability of the ex- 
change rate of the Australian- 
dollar, the board considers that 
the Australian offshoot win 
return to profitability and that 
group results for the full year 
will show an improvement. The 
current year has started well 
with an excellent intake of 
orders during Oct. and Nov. 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 




ri-tyj?:- *.-■ £1-4 


Oeama Banks 11 
Ftoanca House lift 
tXacaoet Martlet Loans % 
Ownwota Hnh; 10ft Low8 
WeekSactWi 
Treasury Btea (Dncdud%) 

2mnS 10°» 2«^ 10" » 

3mnth 10 ”= Sfliren iO»m 


) S* Bmnth Ilft-IIS 

HMIi" Bouteitlft-llft 
3 meh 11 s^i IK 12mth llft-llft 

Leal Arthority Deposit* f*l 
Seays 10-4 7 days IDS 

1 mmfi tf 3mnth 11 4 ib 

Bran ll’m Urns, w» 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


BULLION 


Imreti 11’tf 

3mna ii"* 


■ (CUscoum%) 
2mmh it «« 


Loot Aodwdty Bonds FH 
1 own m«- 1 iu 2mnth ilft-IIS 
3ram lift-lift Gram tlft-llft 
9 rath lift-lift 12 raft llft-llft 


Srmn ii»» 


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Imran il'w 2nnti 11°>> 

3nmft IT's emnft 11 n u 


Starting CDs 

Iran ii vil 3 moth llVlift 
Sown iiViift I2msn llft-llft 


UMtanfcCM 
OverragneopM 11 cteteG 


Denar CD* (ft) 

62&620 3 raft 610-6-05 


6na 6.00-595 12mft 625-6.00 


Polly 

7 days S*i»-6» 
3mran 
De u ts ch BMik 
7 Wy3 5' *- 41*16 
3 moth 5'*-4 :f «i 

Frencn Franc 

7 days 9-8ft 
3mnft9ft-yi» 
Swiss Praise 
7 days Ift-lft 
3mnth 4ft-4ft 
You 

7 days 4K-4I. 


cal 6'-'-5ft 
Imnth $ft-6ft 
6mnffl 6'M-5'*rt 


can 5iv-4 v, 

1 iranh S^io-S^w 

6mft 4»«/Hij 

can 7%-6ft 

1 ram Sft-9ft 
firrinm 

630 Ift-ft 

1 mnft 4 M iB-4 a i# 
Smfflb 4 ] w4'ia 
can 5-4 

1 reran 4"i»-4«* 
6rranri 4’*-4 *m 


GtftrS38& 0038640 
KmgBrrandtpwcom.eAv aO; 
t (S271 2&&2.7S) 

Sovwfcfttejnew. « 

S 91.78^2.75(04586525) 
Plasoum 

S 481.00 (£337.651 
Sdver 

$ 5.35^37 (OT83.7B) 


ECGD 


Rued Rate Storting Export Finance 
Senerae IV Average reterenea rata for 
iraerasr parsed Norambor 1. 1986 10 
N evambar 28. 1988 mcktslw. 11248 per 
cant 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 








tea* 



Put* 



S«l** 

ten 

it 

4 m 

Jan 

_*2L 

ten 


200 

33 

43 

so 

2 

7 

is 

C306) 

300 

17 

27 

35 

8 

13 

16 

330 

4 

18 

18 

28 

30 

33 

Britan Bm 

50 

13ft 

16 

18 

ft 

1 

1ft 

(■83) 

80 

5 

8 

10ft 

1ft 

3 

4 

70 

1 

3ft 

4ft 

7ft 

8ft 

9ft 

BP 

600 

92 

107 



1 

9 



rm 

650 

45 

65 

80 

3 

22 

33 

700 

13 

33 

50 

21 

48 

58 

OqmGoH 

550 

171) 

140 


2 

8 


(*869) 

600 

77 

102 

117 

6 

20 

25 

650 

40 

68 

85 

20 

37 

44 


260 

56 

65 



1 

1ft 



r3«) 

280 

36 

47 

55 

IK 

4 

8 

300 

19 

32 

40 

4 

7 

l? 


330 

4 

15 

2/ 

19 

25 

31 


280 

70 

29 

34 

3 

8 

13 

nZ75) 

280 

8 

19 

24 

12 

16 

22 

300 

2 

9 

16 

27 

31 

35 

Cabta&Wre 

300 

30 

45 

55 

4 

13 

18 

C321) 

325 

13 

27 

— 

13 

20 

— 

350 

4 

16 


33 

40 

— 


875 

1 

— 

— 

54 

— 

— 


Pate 


Soria* Doc Mar Jon Doc Uw Jtaa 


CM* 


COB* 


Pure 


GEC 

(*173) 


160 18 24 30 

180 Sft 14 20 

200 1 5M 9 


3 5 8 

13 17 IB 

28 30 34 


Grand Met 

360 

120 

125 



1 

1 

_ 

r<74) 

390 

SO 

95 


1 

2 

— 

420 

ff» 

73 

90 

1» 

9 

13 


460 

30 

46 

63 

13 

21 

28 

ia 

1000 

127 

141 

170 

? 

10 

16 

P1W) 

1050 

78 

100 

130 

S 

22 

30 

1100 

37 

67 

98 

15 

40 

50 


1150 

17 

43 

68 

48 

65 

75 

Land Sac 

300 

45 

56 

61 

1ft 

3 

7 

(■342) 

330 

19 

33 

38 

4 

10 

14 

360 

3 

13 

20 

22 

24 

28 

Mart* & Span 

180 

8 

18 

23 

4 

7 

9 

tun) 

200 

2 

9 

16 

20 

22 

24 

220 

1 

3 

6 

40 

42 

43 


Stse* Tr*ns 
ftetj 


900 68 88 107 3 17 32 

950 30 52 73 15 42 52 

1000 9 27 50 52 87 68 


Trafalgar House 

rite) 

260 

280 

8 

4 

19 

11 

24 

16 

11 

28 

16 

31 

19 

34 

300 

IK 

5 

9 

47 

50 

52 

TSB 


B 

11 

UK 

1 

2 

3ft 

(*76) 

80 

1ft 

5ft 

8 

5 

6ft 

8ft 

90 

ft 

2ft 

4 

14ft 

15 

15ft 


KH 

m 

H 

m 

m 

m 

H 

Poafliam 

360 

63 

75 



i 

2 

— 

r«n 

390 

33 

52 

63 

i 

t 

12 

420 

5 

n 

40 

4 

19 

28 


460 

1 

10 ft 

21 

42 

45 

48 

Boots 

200 

32 

39 

45 

X 

3 

4 

(•231) 

’ * ■ 

12 

25 

32 

ft 

7 

10 

240 

1 

12 

21 

10 

14 

22 

BTR 

260 

18 

30 

36 

1 

7 

10 

CWfi) 

280 

4 

1/ 

24 

9 

15 


300 

— 

a 

15 

— 

33 

3b 


6S0 

88 

95 

105 

2 

6 

12 

(*733) 

700 

38 

55 

75 

4 

15 

27 

750 

2 

32 

50 

30 

50 

50 


600 

50 

78 

92 

1 

10 

17 

C648) 

650 

8 

45 

83 

10 

27 

40 

700 

1 

— 

— 

55 

— 

— 


650 

125 

IS 



1 

13 

— 

(*769) 

TOO 

75 

115 

140 

2 

20 

33 

750 

30 

8/ 

110 

6 

45 

55 


800 

7 

60 

8S 

35 

70 

80 


300 

22 

38 

52 

ft 

6 

12 

(*321) 

330 

1 

22 

34 

10 

20 

22 

360 

ft 

9 

20 

40 

42 

44 

GKN 

240 

36 

45 

50 

1 

3 

8 

(*274) 

260 

18 

29 

35 

1 

9 

12 

260 

? 

17 

23 

7 

16 

23 


300 

ft 

9 

— 

25 

29 

— 


900 

77 

105 

IS 

2 

13 

20 

(*971) 

950 

?7 

72 

102 

7 

28 

42 

1000 

5 

47 

70 

35 

55 

bb 


1050 

1 

27 

— 

80 

90 

— 


Hansen 

160 

31 

34 

— 

V, 

1ft 

~ 

(-19D 

180 

lift 18ft 

25 

1 

5ft 

8 

Hanson 

200 

1 

8 14ft 

10 

15 

17ft 

(can) 

m 

ft 

3 

7 

30 32ft 32ft 

jasuar 

■ (W 

500 

wn 

57 

75 

1 

18 

22 

550 

i 

24 

38 

22 

35 

42 


600 

i 

12 

— 

70 

72 

— 

Thorn Efca 

420 

K7 

77 

RR 

1 

3 

5 

r«sj 

460 

27 

43 

60 

2 

15 

20 


500 

2ft 

22 

37 

18 

32 

37 


550 

1 

9 

— 

ty 

74 

— 

Teste 

330 

70 


_ 

ft 





(*338) 

360 

40 

58 

65 

i 

7 

10 

El 


El 

EM 

i 

15 

18 


420 

ft 

15 

22 

23 

27 

30 


States 

FM> 

■toy tel 

Fob May Aim 

Em Aero 

420 

» 

90 



4 

8 


r*®> 

460 

47 

55 

73 

« 

17 

23 

500 

25 

33 

47 

27 

38 

43 

BATImts 

390 

m 

90 



2 

3 


C«S2) 

420 

S3 

57 

78 

3 

7 

13 

460 

77 

37 

63 

20 

PS 

30 


500 

9 

19 

35 

42 

45 

S3 

Barclays 

460 

50 

60 

70 

6 

15 

20 

1*453) 

500 


35 

42 

20 

30 

37 

559 

5 

13 

— 

62 

70 

— 

8nt Teiscam 

ISO 

2? 

F7 

33 

1ft 

4ft 

9 

(*201) 

200 

9ft 

16 

16 

10 

12 

16 

220 

3 

a 

— 

25 

26 

— 


160 

30 

32 

33 

1ft 

3 

7 

(184) 

180 

1? 

19 

24 

7 

11 

14 

200 

4ft 

10 

15 

IB 

22 

25 

Guinness 

2B0 

75 

37 

45 

10 

15 

18 

(293) 

300 

14 

28 

35 

21ft 

28 

33 


333 

5 

14 

23 

45 

50 

50 

LatOrota 

330 

40 

50 

58 

3 

A 

1? 

(*359) 

360 

17 

28 

40 

13 

18 

22 

390 

7 

1/ 

27 

35 

37 

42 




Serin 

Dec 

Mar 

ten 

Dec 

Mar 

ten 

LASMO 


130 

26 

31 


3ft 

6 

_ 

1*151) 


140 

20 

25 

32 

S 

10 

12 


160 

9 

14 

21 

16 

18 

20 

Midonaeank 

500 

77 

87 

97 

3 

10 

15 

(*563) 


550 

40 

so 

82 

17 

20 

30 


600 

15 

20 

32 

45 

52 

57 

PBO 


460 

GO 

70 

AS 

4 

10 

13 

rsos) 


500 

32 

4 2 

57 

16 

28 

30 


550 

6 

18 

28 

45 

50 

55 

Ratal 


ISO 

?S 

33 

42 

3 

6 

9 

(*161) 


180 

11 

21 

27 

10 

15 

20 


200 

4 

12 

— 

20 

28 

— 

RTZ 


550 

130 

_ 

__ 

4 

_ 



rm 


600 

87 

107 

_ 

8 

17 

MB 


660 

50 

63 

85 

22 

37 

45 



700 

22 

40 

52 

53 

85 

72 



Series 

M«r 

Jun 

Sep 

Mar 

ten Sep 



200 

35 

42 

__ 

2 

7 

— 




19 

27 

33 

8ft 

16 

19 


240 

8ft 

IKK 

20 

23 

28 

31 



260 

3 

a 


40 

42 




Series 

E3 

ca 

CT 

Feb May 

E-l 

STITTTTrm 

100 

2 


ES 

“IB 

Via 

IK 

(-£102) 


102 

1 


2 

1ft 

2ft 

2ft 


104 


=%J 

— 

3 

»„ 

— 


104 

3ft 

4ft 

5ft 

1»1B 


3'm 

(*£107) 


106 

■‘w 

3H 

4ft 

2ft 

,T5? 

4 


108 

1% 


8*» 

:tft 

4ft 

S'jj 



110 

»<K 



'»ib 

5ft 

— 



112 



_ 

Aft 

7'ib 

— 



114 

*u 

1ft 

— 

8 

Aft 




Dec Jan 

Feb 

Mat 

Dec 

tea 

Feb 

Mar 

FT-SE 

1550 

97 110 





1 

5 






1575 

72 85 

— 

— 

l 

8 

— . 

_ 

(•1641) 

1600 

47 67 

AS 

95 

2 

15 

20 

25 

162S 

27 52 

67 

80 

A 

22 

30 

35 


1650 

13 37 

50 

82 

20 

33 

40 

43 


1875 

6 24ft 

35 

— - 

38 

47 

53 

— - 


1700 

1ft — 

— 

— 

83 

— 

— 

— * 


DasaoUMr 11, 1986. Total contracts 42187 . 0*0*30003. Put* 12184. 

FT-SEIndoz. Cate 690. Puts: 837 


"Undertying security price. 


SR 

Law 

CtaM 

EMVtf 

8856 

8846 

83 

88.71 

8847 

88.70 

496 

09.10 

8948 

884B 

102 

8930 

89.16 

89.18 

37 

09-04 

B9C3 

8844 

6 

8845 

B8.77 

8880 

10 


British Te 



Investing 



ever be 



" N - 


i4 * 
■« ^ 


“The current financial year has started well with total 
turnover for the first six months up 14.0% compared with 
the same period last year at £4,614 million. Excluding 
sales by companies acquired since the first half of 
last year, turnover grew by 10.7%. 

Turnover from telephone calls grew by 9.4% to 
£2,423 million. Our inland telephone call volumes increas- 
ed by 7% and international call volumes were up by 11%. 

We earned £1,006 million before tax which represents an 11.5% increase 
compared with last year. Operating costs, excluding those of new acquisitions, 
increased by 10.4%. 

Earnings per share in the first six months were 20.0% higher at 10.2p and 
we have declared an interim dividend of 3.35 pence (net) per share which will 
be paid to investors on February 23, 1987 

Your Board has confidence that satisfactory progress will be maintained 
through the rest of the year. 

Our continuing strength makes it possible for us to invest more than ever 
before, to improve the service we give our customers and to secure the future 
prosperity of our company for shareholders and staff alike. 

Our total investment in fixed assets for the year is planned to be over 
£2,1 00 million - up more than 35% on 1984, the year in 
which the company was privatised” 

Sir George Jefferson, Chairman 


SECOND -QUARTER 
FOR • 6 - MONTHS 


AND -HALF -YEAR -RESULTS 
TO -30 -SEPTEMBER -1986 



Second quarter 

3 months ended 30 Sept 
(unaudited) 

1986 1985 

Em On 

Cumulative 

6 months ended 30 Sept 
(unaudited) 

1986 1985 

Em Em 

Turnover 

2,362 

2,044 

4,614 

4,049 

Operating profit 

569 

518 

1,142 

1,037 

Profit before taxation 

504 

452 

1,006 

902 

Taxation 

183 

181 

366 

363 

Minority interests 

(D 

— 

(2) 

— 

Preference dividend 

16 

15 

32 

31 

Profit attributable to 
ordinary shareholders 

306 

256 

610 

508 

Interim dividend 



201 

180 

Earnings per ordinary share 

5.1p 

4.3p 

10.2p 

8.5p 

Interim dividend per 
ordinary share (net) 



3.35p 

3.0p 


INVESTING - FOR- A 
MORE -MODERN - NETWORK 



HALF • YEAR - FINANCIAL ■ HIGHLIGHTS 


i Turnover up 14.0% to £4,614m. o Profit before taxation up 11.5% to £1 ,006m. 
• Capital expenditure of £987m wholly funded from within the business. 

© Over 90% of capital purchases from UK suppliers. 


Over £450 million of investment is planned 
this year on modern digital exchanges which are now being installed at the rate 
of one every working day We have already laid over 100,000 miles of optical fibre 
- proportionately more than any other country All this will improve the capacity 
and quality of the network and result in faster, clearer calls across the country 


INVESTING - IN - RESEARCH 


INVESTING • IN • NEW • SYSTEMS • AND - SERVICES 


Many technical improvements now being in- 
troduced have been developed in our own research 
laboratories, the work there being part of our £180 
million annual research and development programme. 


V\fe are spending over £100 million this year to develop our directory 
enquiry and customer service systems. This is part of a continuing £700 million 
computerisation programme. 



INVESTING • FOR - THE • COMMUNITY 


Overall a record investment by British Telecom this year. 

A massive ongoing programme to transform our systems 
and services and to achieve our objective of matching the best 
telecommunications company anywhere in the world. 



£160 million is being invested in a programme for 
modernising the public payphone service. There are 
now more boxes than two years ago -over half have 
modern equipment and many of them take phonecards. 
Every public payphone is now fitted with a device to help 
people with hearing aids and the new phone booths are 
easier to use for people in wheel chairs. 




if ynwidd like I copy of be interim mails leaflet ar it yao bate raj queries as a master, please call us m flits LMUoe muabec vhich enables yon to telephtme frois ao^whepe in the US for fie price it a local call: UnkLine 0345 OlMi 

British lefecommunicatrons pic, 81 Negate Street, London EC1A 7AJ. Telephone 01-356 5000. For daily information on the British Telecom share price, dial Shareline on; 

LonfM 01-246 8022 Mughai 021-246 8056 E£riar§h 031-447 0333'Basgo* 041-248 44.00 Ljieipofll 051-488 0797 tUuster 061-246 8050 Better (0232) 8030 Bristol (0272) 215444 Carfflf (0222) 8037 Leeds (0532) 8038 


A 


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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


jTTg t tmps FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT iRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


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^b 2 «i )£z *;? - 

N Amer 127 6 J& - 5 J 

VANGUARD TRUST 

SrStfSo^OI^S ^ D«^! W C1 ‘ 

Z38 2466 , _ 

Gro«9i IM 1»3 

Do Arorn 279.1 296-3 tm_6 

s?* sh :i £g 
*Sf3 +c5 d& 

■r££* m 1333 14MC iSb sS 

Oo Accum J Hi -<JS J2 

Maser fWtoflO K.ea -006 ^ 

Do ACCuni 5Q330 £5.44 -O-Dfl 2JB 

Abtofl Rofn Arts (51 IM S 1C3 . . 126 

Do Accm 1M5 1337 . 236 

FmEorta Gen h* 563 62.0 +13 5.00 

Do town 583 02.3 +13 C.00 

Em Fund ttc M-i »J -03 0.73 

Do fee 50-1 633 -63 —73 

KANDLEY UW7 TRUST MAfMCKRS 
wamey House. 7. DevcnsMie So. London EC2 
01-929 1533 

America n Trust 674 72-1 -05 170 

Far Eart 6 Gan iZCfl 1275 +0.7 050 

Ml Groudh 7M 839 +08 353 

Income 7rus1 85 1 91.1 . 5J» 

japan Growci 137.5 14..1 +14 0 ;C 

Smut Oiinjjiiues HID 1<9.S +0: 2JC 

Teenncfogj 33J *150 O.iP 

Austria 495 513 -03 1 60 

UK Trust 157 .0 145.0a +C3 1*0 

European Growth 6’ 3 04.6 -G2 530 

Hots Kcng 30.9 32.7 . 1 EC 

WAVBUT ASSET MANAGEMOff 
13. enema Sq.. EanCurgh 
031-225 1551 

Aisnaitan Gold 282 30.0 -0.1 C.15 

PeotcBesto 213 2174 -31 120 

Canadian Bid Gdi 530 61.7 -05 OW 

Gama Mae Fnd C103 4 107.74 +81 £80 
WWrmtODALE UNIT TRUST MANAOERS 
2 Hcnm La EC2 flBT 
01-600 9085/6 

SKDUGtt Fund C87 69.8 +0 ' 020 

US Gene Sand M <519 521 ... 

CnsBengw 49.5 499 -at US 

RB4P50H TRUST MANAGERS LT P _ 

wnndsor House. SI lOngswBV. Union LVD2B 


-Of 5=3 
+C-? 1 7F 
♦1C 1.87 


scottch umr trust 

29. Cherts*) Sq. Gttnu&i 
031-226 4372 


WtM Growth 
N Amer ican 

Income Fund 
European 
N Amer Inc 
UK Growth 
Extra Inc 


71.7 712 

40.1 428C 
316 35.7 

45.7 485a 
46.4 51.4 

28.1 293 
31.0 339 
314 34.4# 


+06 a 00 

+0.1 0 74 
-02 000 
.. 491 
-03 077 
.. 178 
-Ol 255 
.. 5.71 


Hdbcm EtHy 403.1 4205 -04 309 

Eurapeen 110.7 117.1# -04 062 

Hatoom Conns 52.7 565 -02 057 

WMnMrtkc 64.4 68.1# .. 851 

Hotxxn t5r 106.1 1128 -02 076 

Jepenese 108.1 1102 -02 095 

N Amartcxn 77.1 518# -04 080 

Homan Spec Ste 64.1 679# -03 196 
Hoeom UK Growm BIJ 360 . . 102 

Hoenm oet Trust 1798 VS! 1 +07 151 

Hatoom Saar Cos tas 527 . . 218 


scamsH widows 

PO Bm 901 EdhOursh EH 1 6 S6U 

031 -aS 6000 

Pag Eq Inc 2316 2405 

Do Accun 270 S 2830 


Growth IK 
Da Axuffl 


ifch VWd 
Do Acaxn 
Speed Sto 
Do tecum 
Trustee 
Do tecum 
Amu 5 Gen 
Do tecum 
Kssur WtaW 
Do tecum 


+02 250 
+03 250 


30 Ory RO. London EC1Y 2AY 
01-638 EDIT 


Amer Tech & Gen 1039 1108 


-1.4 054 

P6OS0 ~ 2134 2272 +02 0.00 

Sac income Fnd 1707 1515 -1.1 484 

Special Stumor# 2S21 2355# +3.4 1.49 

mu Grow* <36 4G4 -018 

American Majors 703 7780 -09 12S 

SnaS CPC <21 449 +02 (87 

Japan Tech 5 Gen 1101 119 4 -02 am 

interna fltmaf Income 579 817# . . 583 

Exempt 5623 6098 -02 225 

UK General 3*-6 308# .. 383 

Euro Grown 423 4E9 +02 032 


+25 229 
+12 £02 
-li £E2 
+C2 287 
+02 287 


Exempt 
UK General 


Euro Grown 
Euro Income 

STANDARD LIFE 


-02 D OD 
.. 583 
-02 225 
.. 383 
+02 032 


455 51.6# +OI 490 


3 Georoa St. Edhttaoh Bd 2X2 
C31 22SZ552 

uccmo Unas 248 26.4 

DC Aeon Units 278 296 

STEW ART. W ORY UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

<£. cnancoe Sq. ErtnCuren 
C31-Z28 3271 


NC tocoma 883 939# +0.4 490 

NC Japai U£8 2 ma +09 D ot 

NC MMOT IX Co 514 94.5# -0 1 130 

NC Smtotar Aee 602 704 +04 133 

NC American kic 28S.1 3032 -13 1.15 

Do Aeon 3112 331.0 -18 1.15 

NC SmaSer Coe 143.0 152.1 . . 153 

NCSnerBxopCO'a 1375 2105# -02 033 
NC Exempt Gtt C1«0 1218# .. 944 


+OI 162 
+OI 282 


American Fund 2268 2413# -1.1 180 

Do tecum 256.1 272.7# -13 180 

Do WUMnnnl 1557 1658# -05 180 

Austrian Field 187.1 1460 -09 085 

DoACStan 1394 1488 

Bnttrt) Rxid 539 * 627.7 

Do tecum EffiB.i BUOi 

Bxopeen Raid 335.0 cmj 

DO Accum 3313 3743 

Japan Fund 65.S 701 

Do Aacum 653 705 

Seats PPP 178.6 1859 

SUN ALLIANCE 

Sun Mance Hse. Horsham. Sussex 
C+03 56293 

&t»ty Trust Acc 350.7 4134 

N Am Trust Acc 625 GOB 

Far EM Trust Acc 039 909 

mykhrato Bond 52.1 554 

Eraupean SSJ 592 

Etj*y Inc Tet 499 520 


-03 1 66 
-09 185 
-006 129 
-098 IK 
. . 136 
. 236 
+33 5.00 
♦03 C.OO 
-S3 0.73 
-03 5.73 


574 72.1 -03 170 

IZCfl 1279 +0.7 050 

793 539 +08 =83 

65 I 91.1 . 580 

1 J7.5 147.1 +14 0 :C 

1110 1 >9.5 +0? UC 

333 *380 0.9 

499 £23 -02 1 60 

157.0 145.0# +02 3.*o 
612 64.6 -02 030 

309 32.7 . ISC 


Rjxty Trust Acc 360.7 4134 +25 173 

N Am Trust ACC 625 GOB -08 145 

Far EM Trust Acc 839 989 -03 024 

Wbrtdwde Bond 511 554 -02 683 

Eraupean SSJ 592 -07 192 

EquCy Me Tet 499 520 +19 683 

SUN LIRE GF CANADA 
1X4. COctapw SbuM. Lcmlon SWIY SBH 
Dstotog rxriH-830 2G08 

UK Income 25.1 20.7 .. 486 

Do GTOwVl 24.1 258 +0.1 286 

75B UNIT TRUSTS LTD 
Keens Haose. AndoMr. Hants. SRiO IPG 
0264 56789 UeWtogx: 0254 68432/3/4 
Amedcai toe 119.1 1285 -05 180 

OO MCrOn 1292 1332 -08 180 

Extra Incam Inc 1170 1252 +08 531 

DO AcOHI 1418 150.1 +07 £31 

General Unil toe isao 1699 +05 291 

DO Accuni 2B18 278 2 412 291 

G* 6 Ftald me 458 472 +08 948 

Do Accuni 619 638 +05 343 


65D 

. 01-405 8331 
Con* A Earty 
tocoma 
Grown 


49.1 523 • +13 782 

57.0 63.7 +C2 4 S3 

55.1 £87 +01 211 


The prices in this 
section refer to 
Wednesday's trading 


Do Amu 
General itod toe 
□□ ACCIflB 
G* & Fhad toe 
Do Accuni 


+07 581 
+05 291 
+12 291 
+08 948 
+08 948 


Man 
Podflc tac 
Co Accoa 
tod tac 
Do Accsm 
Selected Opps toe 
Oo Accmn 
Nauai Re* 

Do Acorn 


2175 231.4# +07 457 
5449 3879# +12 457 
1870 1999 +01 851 


193-1 2055 
3445 3884 
42B5 4555 
B&2 705 
732 779 
559 855# 
57.1 805 


+0.1 851 
+0.1 081 
-2.1 196 
-29 195 
+08 154 
+08 194 
.. 182 
+0.1 192 


• Ex dMdend. c Cun dividend, k Caro 
stock sptL ■ Ex stock spirt, in Cuni all 
(any two or more ol afiovp). a Ex an (any 
two or mom ol aboeel. Dealins or 
valuation days; (1) Monday. (2) Tuesday. 
(3) Watfeiesday. i«) Thursday. (5} Fr«3y. 
(20) 26th of mown. (21; 2nd Thursday cl 
month. (22) 1st and 3rd Wednesday oi 
month. (23) 20th of month. (24'. 3rd 
Tuesday of month. (25) 1st and 3rd 
Thursday ol month. (26) 4th Tuesday of 
month. (27) 1M Wednesdayof rnonsh. (2Bl 
LastThuredayof monih. ;2S) 3rd working 
day of month. (SO) 16* of month. (3D 1st 
working day ol month. (32) 20tfi of month. 
133) 1st day of February. Mey. August, 


TARGET TRUST MANAGBM 

Mg GaMnne TO ^leitowy Bocia 

Amer Eapta 716 792# -05 099 

AMraean 228 235 -02 0.1® 

OoneaWy BU 904 -08 190 

Energy 239 319 .. 191 

Eqwjy 1275 1357c -22 392 

Eunpeen Spec SB 119.1 1264 -04 094 


a Last woridna dsy of 
of month. (36) 14Si of 
month. (37) Zlst ol month. i3S) 3rd 
Wednesday of month. (3d) 2nd 
Wednesday of month. (40) Vaiusd 
monthly. (41) Last Thursday ol Slock 
Exchange account (42) Last ay ol 
mo nth. (43) 2nd and 4th Wednesday of 
month. (44) Quarterly. (45) 6th of month. 
(46) 2nd Tuesday of month. 


month. (44) Quarierty. (45) I 
(46) 2nd Tuesday at mentf 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


Gross W 

Qrnga *» p % Pff 


GS 46 

ATA SefcOM 

136 68 

64 33 
143 45 

SOS 34 
IS 8 

AMnoifl 
Nmfam Stk H 
Hass Sum 
team Conn 
lAtss JtoHr 

22 14 
127 90 

278 T21 
121 58 
IB 132 

Aam Lean 

H 

11 


11 

11 
44'r 43 


II 

BFP 

BTSSm 

Boarafl Start 

Sv* 


ia iz 


ii 

£L 

II 


li 

MB 115 
345 1® 
3*1 : 

mj 73 

EL 

roi rewiwfl 

CCA GjOefles 

180 130 
42 25 
175 130 
210 65 

CULUcn 

CPU camp 

era 

CMato On 



185 08 
141 74 

20S 03 


161 125 



268 I SB 
21 ■« 8 K 

CKSHt « 

Otor 

45 Zb 

SOD <575 
115 87 
173 148 
33 M 

Ccwtaon 7% 
Dam 

Bate Heap# 
Dapd Grid 




133 93 FWftflta) 

73 51 FUcta OHWJ-1 
K 31 Ftatoch 
358 HO Rugs 
68 30 Roid 01 

a 80 FM«Htetoi 
240 DO Radi Cm 
138 85 Fiaktote 


115 118 -1 

5Z 57 -1 

44 0 +1 

3B8 304 -4 

0 0 

18 81 -2 

170 iea a-3 

IBS 111 +2 


m. 210 Fi*h SnB -A' 345 355 


iso m GMxa 

159 7S Swffitt® 

47 35 OteJftam 

97 72 GUn Lwws 

m !B0 Gate Mm 

no II e#«t Horae 


32 Octal Go 

W 67 Goto iSirau 65 « -I 

155 88 GoadwW PM ISO 155 +2 

135 95 6a*J (LtoWOO) 130 MO 

91 58 Gan« Sutea 65 mm.. 

167 155 Gnat SoeCwo 1M Ifil .. 

175 116 Seen EtoCH) 170 IfS -2 

41 »fl Gnwm&Uil 36 39 +1 

135 51 ■iGiusranot Sq 12S 1® +3 

190 100 flunur Abate tS5 195 


135 HO .. 

78 03 

44 *7 

93 96 #+l 

213 223 .. 

ra B3 

« « 

05 88 -I 

ISO 1S5 +4 


38 85 128 

256 815 V 

48 M M 
78 48 11.4 

U U 114 
59 1.7 182 
48 11 182 
87 49 .. 
24 52 139 
52 5.4 165 

51 28 2SA 


» Ml 

no us -2 

38 39 +1 

125 140 +3 

165 195 .. 


39 01 T9 
3.1 39 124 
48 25 17.1 

S3 as W3 
35 14 119 

74 48 107 

45 28 189 


109 SB HMsHteH&GtaS 103 m -1 


96 98 Hwffdm Horacwe 78 83 


29 26 Harworv Uwxo 27 29 +1 

329 133 Hawy £ Tamo 305 315 -5 

260 190 III mart Bn# 250 202 -1 

*1 35 Had# Cm 48 a 

482 383'iHeMM 457 467 .. 

410 293'i Bs ‘K UI 405 415 +8 

HO WiHwtesK Rtae 140 150 .. 

415 155 Hlgl+PaU 155 165 +3 

2D5 45 Mobbed PWt 00 63 

91 71 Ahram m 75 • 

42'. 7 Hotaca *0 4tH • .. 

MO IBS HOtem 137 HD 

196 105 Hdifia Hwfewnn 160 190 #-3 

156 110 Hotam naHkn 115 118 #+4 

35 22 Itodn Fnd 33'x 34>i +2 

14 6>.MrtmjBK 7 8b +b 

181 115 Hosier Sari* m 170 #+l 

255 175 HuntoTecll 175 1» #+3 

239 152 MSTBfl 155 165 -5 

31 11 lenc M 17 

115 44 ka San Enow H5 ® +3 

103 68 Unfed 75 BO +8 

353 IV Mto WH Ted! zra 275 • . . 

rn Mi UartteUBes WS, W +2 

32 19<.aoal (to L) H 20 

465 233 JS PWaftw 450 «0 #-8'. 
190 IK JmestaT 173 178 +10 

26 2 jam 6 8 

148 103 Jabawe 8 Joq 115 120 • .. 

120 73 Jobratons Mr# 103 W .. 

73 46 JM Rotaer 68 71 #-2 

330 253 HP 255 2S3 +1 

ffl ® W..W TB k #+1 

330 220 Ktnram S*a 31S 325 

03 S3 ItoWIMww 58 63 

ia so Kto-Tefiai 57 go #-i 

m a L W tod 90 95 +5 

on 37 ixtoi 77 0Z « 

125 70 UribwUmKoi HU ice • .. 

614 32 LBsure toe 57 584 #+4 

123 91 lawn# IfS 118 • .. 

250 J'.lto Lon Gp 28S 295 +5 

la 73 Lorn CM 120 129 .. 

MO 95 Lon A Oydsabto 112 117 

I?0 133 Uxto Etod IB IB • . . 


45 47 
457 467 
405 415 +8 


8j6 65 MLB 

U 18 559 

49 3.0 119 

Zl 28 130 

0.1 0.4 228 

80 28 204 

87 28 248 

1.1 £4 183 

S5>3 27 181 

123 10 16.1 


25 18 198 

£0 2> 1» 


38 22 232 

48 28 217 


31 U tone 

115 ^ IM^Sro l Enaat 


07 21 245 
M M Jfl 
35 28 220 

21 18 217 


18 23 117 

ii nu 


076 38 16.1 
40 09 417 
78 48 155 


U 71 U 

■ • 07 

18 18 300 
7.1 e 178 HA 
38 2.1 102 

37 37 139 

28 28 M2 

08 22 1U 

07b 1J M8 
04 07 68 

ZB 28 228 

U 83 201 


S 17 Lyander PH 37 40 

113 77 (McaiBCmy MJ7 112 
S ISO WIDeop 305 315 

HO im nLauamSHa 115 125 

1 l B & 

I S Opm 3 & 
J 4 *SS“«f iS in 


14 K 

.« sfessa" 

311 MrnitoiwU 


68 72 -2 

m rn #-2 
m as .. 
w me.. 

M 17 
112 1T7 

mm .. 

tfflT»1124# .. 
75 78 #-1 
30 22 +1 

17 22 

MB 172 -8 

396 407 #+8 
116 Itt 

» a 

ffi ?g #*6 
Sffi SB #-5 
1ST W -1 
» 30 -4 

844 454 +4 

K3 187 +2 

157 182 #-1 
177 187 -1 


5.1 48 .. 

7.1 28 108 

too 03 09 

27 38 18 

14 18 354 


iW ® 1 If": 
HHT" 

^ i 2^ « -i 

450 21 ■OdMIMrbni 444 454 +4 

<« S fgNf S—H W 163 187 +« 

™ iS 12 w #-i 

28 130 He HUM m <xr 

47 13 Item . . . 

157 98 Mongto gP X WO 

3 S SSSr 3 3 -V 
LI MW 1 V 

116 02 nsMtoOHeO *97+2 
IK T2S Mcto te « lie.. 

367 230 MM Owe 239 2S to +2 

n sneduna tn h +1 

5>i Oh Do Wads - 

27 14 few &gad Paps 20 g -1 

go n t»m_ n « 

73 68 itomelkm W 72 

21 a SSto s w -1 

150 91 Herat* ra .. 

190 43 Haro*. « 5, -1 

hi T3 Metso* xam i« « 

46 14 Ht 5a B Gbi 21 84 
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75 a ohm tnoee a ffl 


43 37 344 

54 18 208 

4j0 33 04 

44 07 101 

232 .. 35 

SO SO U 
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78 i9 its 
U U 81 
3.7 48 117 

19 28 105 

« 07 397 
57 01 119 
14 07 189 
5J 19 174 
$8 19 308 


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29 20 18.1 
39 12 159 

83 48 

25 08 ISO 

.. .. 08 

35 IT 115 
03 29 162 
8* 37 12,7 
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43 34 Kj 
19 12 49 

39 29 195 

■ . . . 45 

Z4 29 ZU 

29e 64 49 


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310 

188 

4H» 23 

M3 

65 

255 

100 

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126 

222 

83 

62 

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160 

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43 

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200 

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32 

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34 

25'i 

118 

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76 

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201 

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112 

88 

245 

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75 

143 

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128 

120 

208 

158 

103 

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108 

88 

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70 

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63 

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93 

118 

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151 

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83 

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135 

104 

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95 

195 

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135 

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50 

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112 

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155 

179 

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113 

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711 

48 

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70 

101 

83 

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55 

220 

95 

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71 

an i7 <3 

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125 

100 

208 

175 

290 

ISO 

20Q 

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134 

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90 

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120 

TO 

24S 

B? 

148 

75 

366 

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205 

1H 

188 

B4 

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272*1 IB 

Ztt 

83 

SB 

42 

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113 

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199 

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500 

270 

173 

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280 

140 

12J 

43 

560 

420 

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S3 

538 

330 

98 

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188 

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274 104 

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145 

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16 

28 

230 

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27 

411 

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4.4 

29 

423 

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09 

08 

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391 

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502 

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48 

304 


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314 

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204 

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52 

42 

328 

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12 

407 

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453 

244 

325 

215 

215 

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540 

284 

744 

185 

132 

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91 

168 

119 

207 

237 

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72 

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161 

167 

138 

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215 

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271 

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368 #+3 
230 ■ +3 
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243 
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282 
366 
26 
416 



47 SP.AcMnea Ex crass 
66 6 Annto 
30 21 iratod 

154 120 Otm Arrow 
24 IFeDWyMM 
h s do -A 1 

156 ‘ 1 137 Bectra 

179 « EmTiust 
278 187 Em 
113 66 EntorMon 
773 375 RamfcKjtoa 
IK 81 RMBp 

S re SeSW^ 


80S 190 M & G 

«■ ® SSS’SS?" 
JSiS ^Krt 


+1 Id 
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+'i 700 

♦A* 700 
>« .. 59 

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9 .. 43 

H* 2 i? 

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08 

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9-2 109 



COMMODITIES 

an 


1 :.' :-:rry>; «*«+«> _ 

• ‘ V,- .: V ; ■ y ^ ^ V.' 


SK.VER SHALL 

OWt_ 37S50-37E50 

Three Months . 38a0M87J)0 

vei no 

Ton* Ida 


ALUMMUM 

Cmh — . 805^040690 

Three MonttB . 61550-816J0 

£L~~ -1725 

•one — — Firmer 


£ S B 3 - 

«« unq. 55.C0' 

« 8 He-« fc 5 VOta0 : 
* LkmCBtfeCoatacJ 

p. par Mo 

Oaan ctase 

5* fe-M 95.50 

^ 10090 100^0 

■h* 9390 1CC.00 


Cash 

Three Months . 

Vdt 

Tana 


2492-2500 
2550-2555 
-.300 


Copper (s deriving support from a strike at Norands’s 
Home smelter in Quebec. Hie smelter is running at only 
bout 200.000 tonnes. Tne strike 


10 % of annual caiacity of about 200 . 000 tonnes, tiib strike 
has been in effect shea 5th November and should it 
continue tor much longer than forte majeure wB have to be 
declared. Comment by ONI. 

HriERHAIIOIML 



LONDON ORAM FUTURES 
Epar te m u 




Month 

ian 

Her 

May 

M 

Sep 

NOv 

Ucfc Wheat. 
Bortoy 


Whsot Bartoy 
Ctosa Ocse 


10995 111.45 

11390 114.10 


11595 114.&5 

117.2Q una. 


irr jffl una. 
10145 100.7$ 

10355 1CS£6 


SuppCod vie Oommodty 
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Jan 79. MOD 

foh una- 81 . 0 

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Apr unq.-73J) 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


* f! H 


'■ ,; : 1 s 
V 1 ' 

U:.’ ‘1 i 


-gold- 


From >nur portfolio card check your 
flE 1 "nwmeais. on tfcii page 

■ *uu Them up in qvc you vniiT 

lo l? 1 c " cr ^ mis raainsi^tbe 

D unn' d ^ f L RUTC - ,f 11 "S, VOU 

JJ3*e won ouinghi or a share of the total 
Jjj[> mo " c y If you area 

»inniT lullow the darni procedure on the 
’£>‘? ur Wfd-.You must always have 
>our card available when claiming. 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Shares remain steady 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began Monday. Dealings end December 1 9. §Contango day December 22- Settlement day January 5. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 

Wham stocks have only one price quoted, ttwtt are mfddto priew taken dafiy a! 5pm. YMd, change and P/E ratio am calculated on the middle price 


-'gold- 

© Tares N ii w iFo p fW Li nnnrf 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+36 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


HNo. Pw nwn, Cteea h 

J, Ratio m Metal I ladBMTBh L-K i ' 

- Johnston I r.*. |~ 

— vv( -'R- < > | Papcr.lTinu Vdv 1 

_2 Red land { BmidinK.Rf*m 1 1 

— _^ aux Breugnc “ 

_Il -HaUih- Induunak E-k — 

_I Jjcviuiier Indus nah A-D ” 

_2 _Hummg vw "induilnjh E-k' ” 

_1 Cicnml Mmur MwoiyAuwa ti 

l n g^E nuwm 

Ji -^^nd Oj an KantuDaroutu — 

Jf EH OU “ 

t~nnny toll Ncwpapcre 

14 MHthdl Vomers Taduwiab T5T 

_I5 InAfCTdon Tfe^papcn “ 

i2 - SKto Shoo, Leather “ 

I • Hr Romeo Oil ~ 

15 L'liianur Oil — " 

_|^ Eyeflun Trot Property “ 

2n Tomlinsons T>inu« “~ 

NanOril PcrVms BmMiigJttoS" 

— litduanah L-R — 

2i Ind iKtnnU E-R ' ~~ 

. Induaoab E-T~ ~" 

-5 Hmnt- Farm Foods 

^ BtadJ.KU Property 

Dt<<:; PjpcrPnPUAd\ 

Alexandra Wwar Industrials A-D 

- q Heed Eteruute Indus! ruh. L-R "" 

Jil Rubenron Res industrials lHT 

21 ***** Paper Paper.Pnm.Ads 

Matthews (Bernard) Foods 

.'■* Sank? leuunr Leisure 

Japiat Motors, Aircraft* 

•®? Jardinc Math Indusirols ’&K* 

M> Zellers i -k iw- ' 

2j_ I'ape Ind Industrials A-D 

S» Rurycss [ Industrials A-D | 

22 ifrhhw Elect ncab j 

22 Recthatn Industrials A-D j 

21 Heknc uf London Prapers.Stores { 

2£ C.iccTs Gross | ftiper.Prtni^ dv |~~ 

21 Ladies Pndc Draper>-^iotoi | 

ill Pmatd Shoes Xealher J 

v Tunes Nerwpapcrs Ltd. iWy~Tauil 

Please lake account of any 
minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 


Saturday's newspaper 


m 

Hu* 1 om*i 

vT T9l Re Ian Bk 

^ *E feTfat 

t» ii6 Mnauj nh 

gasya*- 

B94 419 sire ere 
HIS fiU ItaOB 
TV* ti-.wre Fra 

so m hi res 


Gib* VH 

OmpiOi B % fit 
+11 

«1 27S 94 U 

a ii u 

•I IUt (4 »02 

■#'i 71 M I3L7 
*+3 194 94 15 

+3 194 12 IU 

+5 <84 97 WO 

•I SI u u 

** 7.7* 2i 15fl 


BREWERIES 


HtadLyre 

fltts 

RAMfl 


CBS (MaiM) 
Owuna U «) 

Gam vwre* 

SB/fl" 


tree Mw 
vre 


ms 

+M 243 
+3'l 17 

«• 

-I »0H 

I 43 


too 49 as 
ire 3/ *4 
I1J 49 lift 
IU 42 OJ 
110 4t 297 
139 U 197 
II 4 19 203 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 



+3 

116 SH »3 

• 164 U 144 

-2 a if ai 189 

-7 11 U Mi 

•+11 143 27 197 

+39 F02 2.1 172 

•I It6 7.6 ISO 
*+1 04 12 06 

•-1 10 7 63 83 

92 24 297 

U U IU 
-W 386 40 134 

+1>i 300 45 12 

• M6 63 22-1 

• +1 43 S3 143 

16 14 *3 

-■> U U Mi 
-■1 1 1 
40 29 

-3 36 24 221 

+1 250 92 90 

43 U U III 

• 73 17 155 

16 7.4 163 

-1 12b 25 299 

so 41 Si 

• 26 25 117 

• 25 36 80 

+2 90 42 124 

• 14 7 1 222 

♦4 83 61 133 

26 13 363 

• 64 26 9 7 

^ 94 16 M2 

• «J»* 97 117 

• 26 17 UJ 

+1 tt.1 10 136 
-1 an 37 150 

20 -13 2Q4 
+1 71 16 140 

+15 143. 30 971 
•-2 107 28 t06 

• 107 20 106 

■ +44 57 66 66 

+2>i 564 166- 46 
-t 10-2 27 137 

-2 77 30 305 

125 39 ISO 

+4 14 46 223 

73 4.1 161 

at or 

-I ' 161 47 124 

-5 46 16 an 

>2 65 30 151 

1.4 37 

-1 93 14 196 

MBSS 

+M S3 30 Z26 
-1 90 67 83 


■ n 

(S'. 164. 

IBB S3 «+8 
256 251 •+! 
83 85 +1 

136 139 +| 
m US • 
so »■ 

MS 199 -4 

69 91 »+1 
16 17 .4 

56 92 42 

313 J20 *5 

2C3 m • 

186 183 
S4 54 
232 23S *-4 

ua ia 

341 Ht m 

327 31? 

ns s * 

bl'i D’j -4 
190 IS 
43 48 

37 40 

382 11? +! 

42 <14 
MCI 164 +4 
3S3 388 • 

82 67 -1 

S3 66 -2 

307 314 

355 379 +2 

91 SB • 

aa 208 +• 

>7 m •«* 
49 52 
MB 173 -I 
130 135 
79 S • 

CO 85 
?40 245 • 

240 an 
755 765 
770 275 
207 2» •+! 
375 378 •+! 
ItO 215 • 

215 240 +3 

BS 90 iO 

83 S3 -4 

385 395 +3 

215 225 

34 34 
40 *5 

47 50 •-! 

25 JM 
9*4 Si'i m 
13 15 +l 

397 400 +1 

168 158 >1 

234 244 
95 96 • 

I0JS 


23 It 137 
117 LI 146 
IS 30 U 


81 li HI 
to? 94 113 
6.0b 15 66 
011 06 295 

73 23 173 
MB II U4 
21 II 342 
114 

19 26 194 

Z4 07 172 
51 17 216 

76b 13 164 
17 1.1 H3 

O 69 207 
10 05 

16 38 101 

16 41 67 

26 09 297 

23 53 112 
41 26 119 

94 24 167 

10 12 
46 64 152 
63b 29 173 
•6 29 146 

H i 4 as 
17 703 
25 26 165 

10 20 213 

63 17 106 


m 

up Ian CBmore 
120 62 new 

JB JO SSa 
84 PiCWIbW 
324 M CbU|H 
H 66 a m 
9i'i 82 Pawn Mi 
115 56 QaoreutM 
309 231 Cre*CM» 

640 610 O — B 
356 y Bow* hi 
88 30 Cre^Afl 
250 ISO CM rClen«) 
148 S6 OnnSs 
605 3S0 Caste {W 
211 US CotoR4 Go 
144 a Coren te t*ca 
m e Qoteee 
9« a Com Saaotart 
235 50 GOdi (MM) 

570 se contan 
us 50 Canos (F) 
m a CMte 
«5 18? CaWnFm 
77 56 Core Db toss 

IM T20 Cam taMsu 
224 168 CMte HOteb 
3U4i:?4Cunaas 3Vn 
SI 33 DSC 

3W 505 CPtt 

80 45 BHSlIh A 
283 IS Dm & Mnca 
162 S2 Daw 
sao ru OeLlft* 

Si IU DM 
an iso Dsmsre 
315 157 Dearer 
27 15 treated 

as 158 Oowaj 
TQ24 S£ DecsnPM 

110 79 Dob 

123 94 DDOMOM 

154 74 Dan 

97 78 Oftot URJ) 

85 95 On A 


_ 6an VB 

OiageC* P *- ? t 

• +1 46 4fi 95 

-I 14 44 |*7 

+1 4 150 


65 

I • 107 

ISO 

• 76 

+*i 03 

•+2 64 

-t 14 
I BrS 71 
-4 116 

*1 26 

• 10 

36 

66 

• 113 

•-74 J75 

•-I 14 

•3 26 

•+t 06 

• 

22 

• 142 

+1 69 

• -2 07 

-1 96 

-I US 

+3 104 

• 06 

• +6 75 

74 


01 02 313 

03 QE 786 
200 66 IU 
75b 66 122 

29 07 ill 
40 25 

07b 29 IIS 
575 60 


FINANCE AND LAND 


242 205 Mtegren 
177 126 are Hrec 
1784 66 iiwmn 
240 165 Batty Tub ' 

22 u acre* 

263 BIS cremer 
43. 23 crew V 
34 (7 EqySj 6 Gen 
165 13? )Niy & 5ta* 
207 153 nre* 


238 240 16 06 

139 M2 4 59 

127 137 -1 68 52 

237 242 • 

14U 184 186 tO 752 

230 Z35 57 24 966 

37 40 

30'i 3t'i • 13 <2 292 

157 HZ • 7 1 46 219 

201 204 «+3 69 44 289 

103 «6 •+! £6 26 303 


106 58 la ten Ires in «8 so 

MB 76 D* 44% U7 T09 825 

MB 114 HbbH ia T25 

10 OrdttrWi gT] 318 328 

223 195 Tamtton Gbrtl 207 212 


223 185 TwvMai Gbrtl 207 212 

FhnacW TiuatB apprer on Pago 28 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 






-r-a 





S1'< « AGO HIV Bn 
242 ISO AMU Cadre • 
451 290 n 
347 ISA taia m 
158 132 BTP 
113 ’n^lrer QW50 

132 HE B ire 

154 IBB BkK Otni 
1® 86 0r B man 

SoSaa?* 

?i3 ras cm b« 

1» 125 ATM 
a W Criy (Hare) 
1734142 COM 
149 110 Da 0M 
M SI Bit Evened 

133 113 End* 

296 20a FCMCO- Meaap 
173 n3 tend Cheat 
453 330 

1014. 72VHMfl£B DM50 
106 68 mtet 
11 ‘.734 teOuiH 
415 333 Lma 
118 SB U« __ 

1SK» ll'.tersk Mg 
170 119 PI|W 
m ss^hnma nop 

178 120 Rmntt 
330 21B SW BPD 
73 SB SteMsStren 
255 178 HDbMMte ft* 
170 67 man Ore 


II 1 . 756*1 
34* 194 
505 240 
182 M7 
3T7 206 
160 153 
BB 59-r 
258 134 
162 120 
2® 175 
290 235 
57-i 20*4 
59 20 
2I5*> 

214 
HB*» 
134-jIIS*. 
280 133 
275 175 M 
623 403 
150 90 
2D5 81 

221 140 
sn 5B 

222 65 
220 122 

92 17 

336 146 
120 78 

327 234 
128 88 
401 207 -i 
in na 
315 IK 


320 • 

157 16? 

268 273 •+! 
41 42 

IS MO «+3 
ITS 

73 73 • 

21 '• n+s 
3?0 322 -I 
22S 

IS IS 8-1 
122 123 »+'i 
137 MZ 
190 192 -I 
160 164 
S3 337 • 

34-i 38 
S 34 • 

132 135 • 

SB 63 

518 520 «+1 

74 77 *-3 

95 1® -7 

61 fit 1 ! +1*1 
98 101 m-3 

£ £• 

55 GO 

BS 87 »+S 
273 275 *+2 
295 305 • 

HQ 1» 

175 177 
143 148 • 

971 975 +28 

3® 310 • -1 
260 30 

137 142 

266 290 +2 

igb in 
86 81 
235 239 

138 14D • 

190 187 

H 5 

ISO 191 
187 189 

S if: 


62 66 127 
466 46 124 

128 3.0 172 
55 5l0 156 
03 

26 16 226 
17 36 116 
27 26 176 

616 

11.4 46 2BJ 
43 26 15.1 


CINEMAS AND TV 


326 ITS Aotea IV A 

41 e - j 272 cm nr 

£ 178 Snvfff 

477 263 LWTlbiji 

3E3 i» scoi nr 

276 1 TVS W 

a 31 TSW 
3*1 719 Tterrt *7V 
228 137 TV- AM 
us IM uinar TV 
191 1 Yaw** TV 


318 322 
398 403 
48 50 • 

203 207 
446 440 «+1 
30 348 
29) 253 +1 

46 48S 
295 299 #-1 
201 203 +1 

148 151 »-1 

172 175 +1 


III U IU 

26 56 71 
121 56 49 
256 58 111 

159 48 11.4 

143 57 124 

26 60 96 

110 41 

64 22 

U U 70 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


UNDATED 

J6S 371.0onstes *S 
n 32'-HVar 3-J 
5?’* 44'; Cor* a** 

34-. 2g'iTra« » 

29** 22* Cereott 2S% 

2ey, 23S Trsas 2'A 

INDEX-LINKED 

* B SS£B 

’sis wwtf-'jjjjj 

,ib ’‘ taTssw-sSI* 

S>T^SiiSvs2oa) 


38S +'* 
33'. +s 
45S 

28'v +'i 

Z4-.4M-1S 
23’. +S 


12<S +^i 
106 ♦'* 
116 -S 

100 +s* 

99 +S 
101 ®. +> 
97-j 

mss 

66-- +S 

as 1 * +s 

S3S +*• 

91 '• *'* 


2.1 1.7S7 

2.1 2687 

26 4856 

3.1 3630 

12 1671 

26 3.7W 

12 1881 
12 1603 
12 1554 
12 3.4* 

2.7 1497 
12 1449 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


2 B 6 as • 

15*. IS*. 

m a « 

178 IN *-2 

. ■> 69 

143 147 »-1 
8S 7 -S 

£85 GS5 +4 
SB 70 

805 615 «+5 
259 2ffl -2S 
»4 1B7 -6 

30 S3 +2 
425 435 
484 488 tt+2 

208 71? 

144 146 -2 

50 <20 • 

51 63 

320 322 —3 

547 550 «+1 
80 91 *+S 

570 HO 4-5 
170 174 • 

2M m+i 
07 102 

1 H 1 * • 

60 62 -1 
an 206 ,+i 

316 336 -1 

sb a +i 
147 MB -2 
242 246 • 

M 14*i •+•* 
6*4 HI '• 

as 212 • 

29*1 3Cj »+1 
38 4B 
183 171 +1 

84 38 -2 

a -v 51 +2 

I 196 *+16 
as no 
650 BSD -10 
240 250 -5 

M U2 «-Z 
317 331 »-Z 
5U GOO +7 

p.sr 

fis 3ES -'l 

i S 31 

SQ 375 -2 


s a 3 

184 188 -l 

S 57 

122 hi T23 -A. 

2» 282 J 

G8 Sfl -4 

O 86 +1 

B 191 +1 

274 ?75 -5S 

«• 11 

as « 

m m +a 


»* -i 

288 290 n-S 

170 173 +3 

70 74 

690 69 +3 


57 27 06 
176 

30 56 222 
25 14 216 

36 46 03 
13 23 286 

10 0.4 676 

1.4 21 3U7 

171 2i aii 

&t 21 MJ 
12 16 149 

11 36 284 

121 26 176 

176 36 IU 

M.4 5J) 186 

67 46 HIS 

101) 26 110 

16 16 170 

43 U 226 
U U IU 
18 <0 112 
at u as 

B 40 IBS 
U M2 
26 26 73 

&1 U IU 

83 46 16 

106 17 146 

14 23 367 

56 40 1&4 
114 47 513 

300 41 196 

3D0 30 J40 

7,5 38 147 
21 77 U 

11 76 120 
120 71 124 

50 56 IU 
VI « 37.4 
Ub 47 Ml 
U 20 124 

11.1 1.7 220 

IU u u 
50 12 TLB 
60 10 152 
M 1.4 279 
7.1 12 196 

13.1 37 MJ 

1.1 10 22.4 

S 3 SI 

76 21 35-1 
30 40 18.1 
360 

■50 LI 150 

86 II IBS 
17 29 170 
o 5i m 
5.1 52 186 

t19 40 140 
157 


■ 12 30 150 

- 211 
43 25 332 

107 57 150 
308 2.1 . 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


231 234 +1 

18B 175 

126 129 
585 590 
N 81 +1 

zg ZJ8 -2 

S3 385 +5 

1® 201 -1 

290 SB • 

*» -7 
« S I 

30-J 32 • 

^ *8 

3(3 338 -20 

m si 

Ttt 123 -a 

431 <36 +1 

£ & -S 
w ™ ? 

20 -j 21 

375 3* 

232 235 • 

152 158 
150 153 

790 300 • 

41 <3 

SO STD • 

33 35 *L 
185 190 -S 
70 75 

W 202 6+2 

<T7 *a #+z 
J6 38 -2 

34 287 
110 115 +2 

in iu +2 
<co no -n 
150 IN -3 
255 IS • 

IM 131 

133 138 •-« 
138 T40 

HO 105 n+z 
H IBS-2 
m us 
40 1 ! 42 • 

<02 <06 +12 
390 400 a +23 
ZZS 232 #-1 
IS W. +1*. 
330 335 
tl »*» 

W IS -1 

773 278 

Si** a +i 
203 208 a-1 

a a a 

W 148 

» 2£ a 
™ g +» 
a % 

282 +2 
•* « 
B 28 

a js -*i 
a a -i 

’a w +• 

2§ 297 -a 
226 2S +2 
in na +i 
a 94 

a a*t 


110 

36 

L5 

52 

50 

52 


U 

10 

51 

11.4 

44 

Mb 

44 

21.4 

66b 

04 

30 



00 

16 

110 

36 

31 

250 

80 

40 

90 

23 

44 

97 

30 

50 

93 

32 

20 

300 

30 

47 

60 

54 

60 

70 

L6 

70 

90 

M2 

77 

103 

74 

9.1 

14.1 

96 


210 

7.5b 

J? 

iso 

1I.4D 


179 

26 

14 

30 

L6b 

43 

115 

37 

27 

m3 

27 

50 

SLO 

M3 

62 

114 

£* 


A 

40 

50 

92 

30b 

36 

93 

17 

53 

63 

70 

19 


00 

53 

299 

30 

40 

111 

LI 

06 

213 

L5 

41 

IU 

ru 

55 

18L7 

120 

41 

172 

14 

OB 


Dl 

00 

1L4 

100 

66 

5.4 

M 

30 

S3 

ML3 

55 

1X3 

10 

12 

271 

IJ 

35 

238 

130 

53 

110 

67 

25 

280 

121 

56 

12 

171 

4.1 

106 

154 

27 

190 



061 

£ 

3 

224 

130 

20 

D< 

279 

U 

OB 

250 

214 

35 

184 

4.1 

52 

110 

10B 

42 

no 

20 

10 

370 

221 

73 

2L2 

12 

1.1 

161 

64 

18 

126 

30 

25 

226 

225 

40 

Ufi 

74 

40 

146 

L7 

10 

X4 

230 

30 

17.4 

86 

27 

95 

69 

29 

160 

69 

30 

150 

31 

as 

190 

• 


80 

66 

50 

147 

5.4 

D9 

<30 

L5 

40 

0.1 

40 

34 

W0 

50 

67 

33 

■ 


230 

3J 

40 

m 

30b 

13 

390 

_ ■ 


107 

63 

04 

70 

S3 

60 

73 



1.1 

at 

60 

102 

24 

U 

273 


U 90 H0 
31.41 11 40 
16 b 56 
1Q7 57 OS 
as S3 66 
87 14 m 
171 4.1 17.4 

10 41 310 

Ub 52 02 

6.1 13 80 
U 10 120 
20 16 
110 40 126 
14 10 350 

53 U 150 
6.1 44 136 

906 56 90 

75 30 126 
21 1.1 107 

14 34 66 
£9 07 220 
86 24 156 
106 40 181 

116 4.1 202 


170 85 02 
10 30 11.1 
79 86 150 
88 14 247 

7.1 <6 66 

66 12 110 
14 U 
11.1 47 102 

57b 7.1 p 

79 20 188 


ft7i -|4 302 
20 57 7! 

iu u u 

43 [ U 14,4 
04 49 UB 

36 16 155 

U It H4 
258 27 ISJ 
24 62 322 
26* 30 128 
220 56 JO 


a a a 

274 l® SdaUBty 
• 104 &5 SvtfKizst 

48 a'rSntecBtMMM 
280 ia*>£098 
IS 103 Sac ta a rhm 
165 120 SniHreire 
170 9< SoB (Roberta# 
164 122 Ssam 
1* 108 00 'A' 

H4 a aw* s*. 

53 b 25 5*00 506 
226 75 Stem 

iS3 a s are 

972 £96 SUM 

3*1 ISO HȤC 
148 BSbSuHnM 
SOD 388 EMBMey 
37 2P*9lF-r 
IS S3 are 
n 30 Sire — reBi 
328 229 Sntes tad 
2S5 IS StreUR) 

194 BS SoraSw 
257 HO SOWMBi 
m 80 Sag fared* 

in e a* cm* 

OH MT 5 Mm 
SO 354 atsWy 
(BO 90 SM«H 
2U 170 BattSa 
86 88 Santel 

2» a SBHtel&IV 

2M 183 SMWiSm 
2*8 tSO 5re 
173 90 ^ 

a 22 Sfmc 

KT HO 
587 319 if 

as, its nr 

24? 7B TS-Ihrefel 
53S 310 ]8C» 
ion 33 itwa Ore 
. p, 5 Ttfea 
95 £4 7 tees 
in 111 let lb*p 
133 91 TDM Mb . 
an SB TtareT-UM 
3a 2ID Tsratt* ffH) 

349 209 ToMIvWm 
20 2D0 TiteiB— ng 
296 IM Tenant Dev 


25 26-r 
193 198 +3 

rai hm +i 
<7 49 a 
W 237 a +2 
15? 160 -1 
MS MB. +1 
145 150 
152 157 +2 

144 146 -1 

141 H -1 
48'* « 

ISO 265 a 
93 96 *3 

807 BIO -1 
58 a a-1 
315 318 a-1 
113 iu a+'i 
4*0 4*< a-2 


8 'M 

10 30 166 
50 16 110 
50 11 156 
40 3.1 IU 
<0 22 146 

1.4 OB <05 

14 10 M4 

20 LB 29.1 

25 53 M3 

40 20 100 

06 12* 50 

201 25 14.4 

26 49 

114 30 109 
80 70 134 

27 ID LI 171 

30 20 IM 
04 1J 230 
70 20 17.7 
U 45 147 
70 40 110 
- 10 00 276 
79 7.7 HL1 
14 13 08 

257 40 IU 
HU 43 07 
33 24 390 
17.1 09 5.1 

60 IU 70 

8.1 

143 60 OD 

66 26 810 

153 * 73 ** 

2M 43 154 

43 55 46 

02 80 110 

90 

44 56 05 

M 54 F04 

3L4 £5 140 

52 2D 215 
IU 72 00 
137 82 105 

00 45 177 


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PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERTG 


biwatnoHt Trusts i 


r on Page 28 


LEISURE 


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30 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE/T.AW 


THF TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


( TEMPUS ) 

Worst could be over 
for Dee share price 


Dee Corporation's share 
price is in a sorry state. 
Market indigestion after the 
issue of more than 400 mil- 
lion stores for acquisitions 
this year is only part of the 
explanation. 

Analysts have been 
scrutinizing Dee's accounting 
policies - and finding them 
wanting. They are concerned 
that Dee’s reputation for 
demonstrable organic growth 
is tarnished, and that earn- 
ings growth is now dependent 
on taking the benefits of 
acquisitions above the line, 
while charging the costs be- 
low the line. 

Meanwhile, yesterday's in- 
terim results confirmed 
analysts' suspicions that the 
benefits of buying Fine Fare 
will take longer then expected 
to come through, and the 
shares fell another 4p to 2Q2p. 

This decline has probably 
gone far enough. With Fine 
Fare. Dee has 1 1 per cent of 
the food retailing market, 
putting it a dose third behind 
SainsbuTy and Tesco. 

Margins have improved 
from 3.2 to 4 per cent despite 
the diluting effect of Fine 
Fare. Gearing is less than 20 
percent. 

While the impact of the 
Fine Fare integration win not 
appear until 1987-88, there is 
no doubt that the economies 
of scale will be substantial. 
Several stores will be sold 
(the profits will be offset 
against the extraordinary 
costs of integration), the Fine 
Fare name will disappear and 
Gateway will be promoted as 
a national food chain. 

Dee should make nearly 
£200 million pretax this year, 
implying a prospective mul- 
tiple of 11. The shares are 
likely to languish until City 
confidence is restored. 

Westland 


Kdatastheam 



mm 


DEE CORPORATION 

—1—1 — I — I — I — 1— 


1320 


-1 280 


-1 240 


->200 


DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 


Hying helicopters is a risky 
business, but so is making 
them. Admittedly, the turn- 
round achieved at Westland 
is impressive, but the return 
being earned on the core 
helicopter business is still a 
third of what is should be. 

Although Westland is ada- 
mant that it will not take on 
unprofitable work, the mar- 
ket remains competitive. A 
£10.1 million write-back 
from India was eradicated by 
a further provision on a 
mystery, £250 million heli- 
copter export contract. 


against which £20 million 
was written-off in 1984-85. 
The possibility of further 
provisions should not be 
ruled out 

The order book is ade- 
quately filled for the next two 
years, but there is a nasty gap 
to be filled before the EH 101 
helicopter goes into full 
production. Efforts are being 
made to win additional Min- 
istry Of Defence and export 
orders. 

However, unless a reason- 
able amount of work is 
picked up, further streamlin- 
ing of the helicopter opera- 
tion may prove necessary. In 
the meantime, efforts are 
being concentrated on 
improving the commercial 
approach as well as 
productivity and efficiencies. 

Ideally, helicopters should 
not account for more than a 
third of group turnover. 
There are no plans to reduce 
exposure to this market, but 
the aerospace and technology 
divisions are expected to 
grow much faster. 

Orders in these businesses 
are more widely spread by 
customer-type and are of 
relatively small value. Delays 
and cancellations have, there- 
fore, a less damaging effect 

Yesterday's results show a 
convalescing Westland. 
There is still some way to go 
before it makes a decent 
return on assets. Indeed, 
gross margins last year 
slipped from IS to 13 per 
cent. 

Firing on all cylinders, 
Westland has the potential to 
double last year's profits. 
Existing shareholders might 
as well stick around as there 
is a dividend on the horizon, 
but there is no rush for 
potential shareholders to buy. 

British Telecom 

British Gas shareholders 
waiting for allotment letters 


with bated breath should take 
a look at British Tele- 
communications before de- 
ciding whether to cash in or 
hold for the long term. 

On the basis of yesterday’s 
half-time profits, Telecom 
shares are distinctly cheap 
and the company is perform- 
ing as well as anyone has the 
right to expect Yet the shares 
languish on a niggardly rat- 
ing. The problem has nothing 
to do with finance, and 
everything to do with poli- 
tics. Telecom shares have 
slipped from a peak of 278p 
earlier this year to just over 
200p, owing to fears over the 
punitive plans for “social 
ownership" — Labour Party 
code for re-nationalization. 

But for that threat, they 
would be much higher on the 
basis of yesterday's results. 

Turnover outstripped infla- 
tion comfortably at £4.6 bil- 
lion, or 10.7 per cent higher, 
excluding acquisitions and 14 
percent up in absolute terras. 

Telephone-calf turnover 
grew by 9.4 per cent with 
international volume provid- 
ing most of the growth. Total 
operating costs remained 
under control rising 10.4 per 
cent in line with income: 

At the pretax level profits 
of £1,006 million were 1 1.5 
percent ahead and, thanks to 
a lower tax charge, earnings 
per share gained 20 per cent 
to 10.2p. 

Dividend is 3.35p, some 12 
per cent higher at the interim 
stage. Full-year earnings of 
21p are likely, which means 
the shares sell on a p/e' 
multiple of less than lOlimes. 

At this level the shares are 
cheap but they are unlikely to 
break out of a narrow trading 
range until the political 
clouds disappear. 


APPOINTMENTS 


law »«<nrt Pecemberj 2 


1986 


Top-level changes 
at NatWest 


National Westminster 
Bank: Mr Terry Great is 
made a deputy group chief 
executive from next July. He 
and Mr John Phstow have 
joined the board. Mr John 
Metboarn becomes general 
manager, international bank- 
ing, from June 1. 

Bensons Crisps: Mr An- 
thony FHdian becomes group 
financial director. 

PA Design: Mrs Dorothy 
Mackenzie and Dr Bob 
Whelan join the board. Mr 
Laurence Gunzi becomes 
managing director, Mr Roy 
Gray and Mr Michael Peters 
joint chairmen, Mr Graham 
Clancy sales director and Mr 
Phjl Seeney technical director. 

London European: Mr 
Donal McSallran becomes 

manag in g director. 

John lamg Construction: 
Mr Brian Hambidge is ma d e 
director, planning and re- 
sourcing, and Mr Gordon Hill 
director, industrial relations. 

Rockware Portland: , Mr 
Brian Webb becomes manag- 
ing director. 

Vallances: Mr Paul Guy is 
appointed chief executive, 
retailing. 

The Design Council: Mr 
Hugh Lang has been made 
deputy chairman. 

Allegheny International: 
Mr Thomas Albani joins the 
board as chief operating 
officer. 

Microgen: Mr Ian Martin 
has been appointed to the 
board as director, UK op- 
erations. 


Mr Tony Hart and Mir Tcjen ; 
M^jumdar become directors. 

1 Beffiaven Brewery Group: 
Mr Henry King has been 
made a non-executive di- 
rector. 

KAE Group: Mrs Gun da 
Lapslti joins the board. 

600 Services: Mr Ian Stan- 
ford has been made managing 
director. 

Aquascutum: Mr Smart 
Hollander becomes group 


Performer’s private 

survive his de 






V 



Donal McSnllfvan 
Trident Trust: Major-Gen- 
eral Sir John Nelson becomes 
president succeeding Bishop 
Launceloi Fleming. 

Confederation Life Insur- 
ance Company: Mr George 
WQlman becomes . vice-presi- 
dent. individual insurance. 

Standard Chartered Mer- 
chant Bank Asia: Mr Jona- 
than Pearson has been made 
managing director. 

Lombard Tricity Finance: 


M&G OFFERS 


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" I UAYTIMETEL.no. I 1 [ ■ 

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Mr/MrvMIss INITIALS 

SURNAME 



ADDRESS 



T J . 1 

POSTCODE 





Memberof (he Unit This! Association 

This offer is notaraikbh to residents of the RepMcoffrdand. 


THE M&G GROUP 


I 

I 

I 


• J WILLIAMS, CARDIFF:’, 
No dividend for year to Seplera- 
her 30. Net turnover 
£11.413.978 (£12,016.5!. 
Profit before i ax £280.021 
(£25.071). lax credit £29 (nil), 
minority interest £35,998 
(£2.411). extraordinary' items 
debt £58,511 (credt £26,923), 
earnings per share 3.52p 
(0.33p).In the course of 
Wyndham's unsuccessful bid, 
the directors informed 
shareholders that they would be 
considering a scheme of 
reconstruction with a view to 
enabling dividend payments to 
be resumed as quickly 
possible. 

• CARR'S MILLING IN- 
DUSTRIES: Final 4.75p mak- 
ing 6 Jp (6p). Sales to external 
customers for the year to August 
30. in £000. 65,799 (57,217). 
Pretax profit 1,482 (1,281), tax 
332 (224), extraordinary debt 
194 '(nil). Minority interest debt 
384 (431), earnings per share, 
weighted average, 18.4p(18.3p). 

• RADIO CLYDE: Final 2.25p 
(2p) making 3.5p (335p). Turn- 
over year to September 30, in 
£000, 4.457 (4.087). Pretax 
profit 532 (336) after deducting' 
liability to IBA secondary rental 
126 (nil) and exchequer levy 32 
(nil). Tax 204 (139), extraor- 
dinary credit (less tax) nil (3). 
Earnings per share, pro-extraor- 
dinary item 5.7p (3.4p)Xocal 
radio increased both audiences 
and advertising revenue during 
the year. The company’s local 
advertising revenue rose 8% 1 
while national advertising rev- 
enue grew by 3%. ■ 

• SIDLAW GROUP: Final 
2.75p making 5.5p (9p). Turn- 
over for year to October 3 in 
£000. 60,618 (58,350). Profit 
before tax 3374 (6359), tax 
1.305 (2,958). Extraordinary 
debts 4,213 (639). Earnings per 
share 9.93p (15.84p). Profit 
before tax breakdown: oil ser- 
vices 3,089 (5303), textiles 
1378 (1 ,466), microsystems loss 
387 (loss 31), assoc co nil (loss 
41 5). interest 606 (credit 36). 

• CITY SITE ESTATES: Final 
0.49p m kg 0.96 p (0.82p) for year 
to September 30. Figs in £000, 
rental income 960 (456), profit 
before tax 339 (554), tax 115 
(241). Realized gain on invest- 
ments 116 (nil). Gross surplus 
for the year 455 (554). profit 
attributable 340 (313). Earnings 
per share basic 237p (7.2 lp), 
Silly diluted 2.05p (3.70p). Net 
assets per share, basic 1.27p 
(95p) and fully diluted 1.04p 
(72p). 

• BOOTH INDUSTRIES: Fig- 
ures in £000 for the six months 
to September 30. Turnover was 
6.037374 (6,502,659). pretax 
profit was 7 1 .60S (loss 373.840), 
tax was 22,198 (nit) and earn- 
ings per share were 5.80 (a loss 
per share of 43.14p). 

. M&G DUAL TRUST: Divi- 
dend was 7.1 p (5.8p) for the six 
months to November 30. Tax 
was 290.575 (254.083), revenue 
after tax was 711335 (592,766), 
and earnings _per share were 
7. 1 J p (S.93p). Dividend payable 
January 23. 

HARVARD SECURITIES 
GROUP: Dividend doubled tb 
lp for the year to Sept 30. 
payable on Feb. 20. Turnover 
£81.18 million (£59.42 million), 
pretax profit £1-9 million (£1.54 
million). Faming? per share 
S.73p(4.93p). i, 


George Wilhnan 

managing director from 
March 1 and Mr Michael 
Walter deputy managing di- 
rector, sales and marketing. 

Smurfit UK Print & 
Packaging Division: Mr Ron 
Watson is made chief exe- 
cutive. 

Forth Ports Authority: Mr 
Peter Gtetterbock becomes 
director, engineering and Mr 
Wilson Murray director, fi- 
nance. 

Taywood Engineering: Mr 
Geoff Topping is made chair- 
man and manag in g director, 
Mr Gordon Knight and Mr 
Michael Prokopion directors. 

Datapoinl (UK): Mr Brian 
Gifford has been made re- 
gional vice president 

Target Group: Mr Robin 
London becomes group fi- 
nance director. 

Structural Dynamics Re- 
search Corporation: Mr Rob- 
ert Henderson. Mr Ted 
McConrtney and Mr Donald 
Young are appointed non- 
executive directors. 

Rauma-Repola Oy. Mr 
Pekka Laxell joins the exec- 
utive committee and is made 
director, shipbuilding and off- 
shore division. Mr Martti 
Union joins the executive 
committee and becomes di- 
rector, engineering division. 

Microgen Holdings: Mr 
Philip- Tattersall is made 
group administration and ac- 
counts director. 

TSB Commercial Holdings: 
Mr John Mxcpherson, Mr 
Laurence Evans and Mr 
Kenneth Cox have been made 
non-executive directors. 


COMPANY NEWS 


Riddess and Others v United 
Artists Corporation and Oth- 
ers 

Before Sir Nicolas Browne- 
Wilkinson, Vice-Chancellor. 
Lord Justice Stephen Brown and 
Lord Justice Bingham 
[Judgment December 10] 

The Dramatic and Musical 
Performers’ Protection Act 1958 
conferred on a performer pri- 
vate rights of action enforceable 
in the civil courts and those 
rights vested in and were 
enforceable by the performer’s 
representatives after 

The Court of Appeal so held 
dismissing an appeal by the 
defendants. United Artists 
Corporation, Mr Blake Edwards 
and Lake line Productions Ltd 
from a judgment of Mr Justice 
Hobbouse on June 10. 1985 in 
favour of the plaintiffs. Elwood 
Abraham RickJess and Michael 

Barry Wolf, suing as executors 
ofPeter Sellers, Satchinanda Ltd 
and Motion Picture Factoring 
SA. 

Mr Andrew Bateson. QC, Mr 
Michael Tugendhat, QC and Mr 
David Parsons for the defen- 
dants; Mr Colin Ross-Mimro. 
QC Mr Robert Englehait. QC 
and Mr Anthony Peto for the 
plain lifts. 

THE VICE-CHANCELLOR 
said that during his lifetime. 
Peter Sellers made a series of 
five films known as the Pink 
Panther films in which he 
played the main character. 
Inspector Qonseau. an eccentric 
and accident-prone French 
detective. 

The character was based on 
an idea of the second defendant, 
Blake Edwards and the fust film 
in the series was made in 1962. 

When a film was made, far 
more film was shot than was 
eventually incorporated in the 
final film released for ex- 
hibition. 

Fbotages not incorporated in 
the final version were called 
“out-takes” which comprised 
not only the film which at the 
time of shooting was found 
unsatisfactory, but also se- 
quences which, tho ug h in them- 
selves satisfactory, were 
discarded in the process of 
editing. 

“Clips”, on the other hand, 
were excerpts from the final film 
as exhibited to the public. 
During Peter Sellers’ lifetime. 
Blake Edwards had the idea of 
making a Pink Panther film 
using out-takes from the earlier 
films together with new addi- 
tional materiaL 
Peter Sellers refused to agree. 
He died in 1980. 

The films had been very 
successful and profitable, in 
1981 the United Artists 
Corporation and Blake Edwards 
decided to make Trail of the 


*£&&&*** 


S'be' a feature film sutmus — utar j*, 

fc w sag 

fS^MlS^omMces in 

^The^defei'dams trie<? “J Iit [^”ofbo!h she l°- ? 396 

the agreement of the plainufeas hal , hev re pa«eu . l 

tour of « «« 
make "“L-fe bv LaJceline exarpnon., of lfcc 


the Ad 
private rights tvilhin tin 


firs; 



their Lordships and 
his Lordship was free to gt"- 
effect to his own views so 
performers were concerned. 

The defends ms former ^on- 
tended that tile making or #«■■> 
after Peter Sellers death tn 


Artists Corporation. The delen 

d ams had paid nothing for the 
use of the material containing 
Peter Sellers' performances 

The defendants said that the> 
were entitled to make use o! the 

dips and out-takes as the owner- 
ship of both the physical, cel! \u~ fos consent uoeid not 

lo id and the copyright in rhe : of lhtr |0>S 

out-takes and clips 'ested in 1 therefore could not gne 

them or their associates - w 

The plaintiffs contended- in- 
ter alia. that the making of 7i rail 
constituted a breach Oi section *- 
■Of the 1958 Act. which made it 
an offence knowingly to make a 
film directly or indirectly from 
or by means of the performance 
of a dramatic or musical work 
without the consent in writing oi 
the performer. 

Their case was that the 195S 
Act conferred on a performer 
private rights of action enforce- 
able in the civil courts and that 
those rights had been infringed 
in that the use of the clips and 
out-takes involved the indirect 
use of Peter Sellers’ perfor- 
mances. 

The defendants contended 
that the 1958 Art gave perform- 
ers no civil remedy; that the 
contracts for the provision of 
Peter Sellers* services in each of 
the earlier films contained his 
consent to the use of clips and 
out-takes in Trail: that they had 
sot “knowingly” made Trail 
without the necessary consents; 
and finall y that the Act did not 
apply to a film made after the 
performer's death. 

The Dramatic and Musical 
Performers* Protection Art 1 925 
made it a criminal offence to 
make a gramophone record 
without the performer’s con- 
sent The Copyright Act 1956 
amended that Act by introduc- 
ing for the first time the pro- 
visions for the protection of film 
actors now to be found in 
section 2 of the 1958 Act. 

The general rule was that 
where an Art created an obliga- 
tion and enforced the perfor- 
mance in a specified manner, 
that performance could not be 
enforced in any other manner 
but there were two classes of 
exceptions to that rule. 

The first was where it was 
apparent that the obligation or 


rise 10 an:, civil und ' ?r 

th Thc> 3 su bm Hied that uniess so 
limited the 1*?$ A ct " ou ' d 
impose an indefinite ban on the 
reproduction of a performance, 
that personal representatives of 
a deceased performer could not 
give the necessary consent to 
any reproduction 3nd that even 
if they could- the power :ndcn- 
nitclv to veto any surti 
reproduction was inconsistent 
with the intention ot Par- 
liament. , . , 

That argument could not be 
upheld. The right to gi^c or 
withhold consent was the same 
as anv other right. A right which 
was 'not personal vested in 
personal representatives and 
prima facie a right conferred by 
statute survived death unless 
there were clear words to the 
contrary. . 

The right to give or withhold 
consent survived the death of 
the performer and vested in the 
personal representatives. The 
1958 Act was passed to protect 
the performer generally and was 
not just to protect his interests 
by prohibiting the reproduction 
of a performance which might 
damage his chances of getting 
further employment. 

Therefore the 1 Q 53 Act did 
confer a civil right of action on 
the plaintiffs and the making of 
Trait constituted a breach of 
that right. Save in relation to the 
use of clips from two of the films 
Peter Sellers did not consent to 
the reproduction of his perfor- 
mance in Trail for the purposes 
of the 1 95S Act 

Lord Justice Bingham and 
Lord Justice Stephen Brown 
delivered concurring judg- 
ments. 

Solicitors: Wright Webb 
Syren; Herbert Oppenheimer 
Nathan & Vandyk. 


Barrister’s part-time income is 
assessable under Schedule E 


Side; v Phillips (Inspector of 
Taxes) 

Before Mr Justice Knox 
[Judgment December 5] 

The income of a banister 
derived from part-time lecturing 
was assessable to income tax 
under Schedule E and not under 
Schedule D. That income con- 
stituted emoluments from an 
“office of employment” within 
the meaning of section 181 of 
the Income and Corporation 
Taxes Art 1970. 

Mr Justice Knox so held in 
the Chancery Division in 
dismissing an appeal by Mr 
Hugh Sidey from a determina- 
tion of the special commis- 
sioners in relation to Schedule E 
assessments made on him for 
the years L976-77 to 1981-82 
inclusive. 


person; 

Crown. 


Moses for the 


MR JUSTICE KNOX said 
that Mr Sidey was called to the 
Bar in 1951 and had a seat in 
chambers in Lincoln's Inn. He 
had not been in general practice 
since about 1960. He derived 
part of his income from part- 
time lecturing on legal subjects 
for the Thames Polytechnic and 
ILEA. 

In 1976 his tax inspector 
concluded that that part of his 


income was to be assessed under 
Schedule E and no longer under 
Schedule D. Thereafter Mr 
Sidey was assessed accordingly. 

The Crown contended, and 
Mr Sidey accepted, that 
“emptoyraenf* was cotermi-' 
nous with Sc he d u le E liability. 
Thus the question was whether 
Mr Sidey had at the 'material 
times a contract of service with 
those for whom he lectured and 
not a contract for services. 

The commissioners who 
beard Mr Sidey’s appeal against 
the assessments had heard ev-. 
idence and seen the documents 
that contained the standard 
terras, conditions and 
responsibilities of part-time lec- 
turers were set out. 

Whether or not those con- 
tracts constituted contracts of 
service was a question of law. 
However the evaluation of the 
various elements was a matter 
of fact. 

The commissioners had the 
function of assessing the various 
factors in the case and the High 
Court bearing an appeal could 
only interfere if the commis- 
sioners had misdirected them- 
selves as to the law or had 
reached a conclusion that was 
contrary to the only true and 
reasonable conclusion that 
could be reached on the -facts. 

Mr Sidey's argument that it 


was open to the appellate court 
to consider the facts as found 
and to make up its own mind on 
the issue was unacceptable. That 
. that was not the court's function 
was dear from the decision of 
the Court of Appeal in ff Kelly v 
Trust House Forte Lid {[ 1 9S4] 1 
QB 90). 

Mr Sidey had gone on to draw 
. attention to features of his work 
that he said supported his 
argument that no contract of 
service existed. He pointed to 
the facts that he was paid on an 
hourly basis, that there was a 
minimum of control over his 
lecturing activities, that there 
was a distinct lack of adherence 
to the terms of his contracts and 
lastly to the discontinuous na- 
ture of his working 
arrangements. 

Notwithstanding those mat- 
ters it was dear that the 
commissioners* decision that 
Mr Sidey’s contracts with those 
for whom he taught constituted 
contracts of service was a 
determination that they were 
well entitled to reach. It fol- 
lowed that the assessments in 
respect of income derived from 
that work was properly assess- 
able under Schedule E. The 
appeal was accordingly- 
dismissed. 

Solicitors; Solicitor of Inland 
Revenue. 


Job fairness not apt in selection 


Labour Party v Oakley 
Before Sir Ralph Kilner-Brown 
and MrT. H. Jenkins and Mr K. 
M. Young 

(Judgment November 27] 

A sales and marketing officer 
whose fixed-term contract was 
not renewed following a 
restructuring of the department 
and who was not given fair 
consideration for a new job 
created as a result of the 
reorganization had' not been 
unfairly dismissed since the 
fairness provisions in section 
57(3> of the Emptoyment 
Protection (Consolidation) Act 
1978 did not apply to selection 
for the new job which occurred 
after the act of dismissal. 

The Emptoyment Appeal Tri- 
bunal so held when considering 
an appeal by the Labour Party 
from a decision of a London 
industrial tribunal last August 
that the employee. Miss N. 
Oakley, had been unfairly dis- 
missed. 

Mr Ivor .Walker, solicitor, for 
the Labour Party; Mr David 
Ellis for the employee. 

SIR • RALPH KILNER ■ 
BROWN said that the employee 
was engaged on a year’s contract 
with the proviso that the post 
would be made permanent if the 
unit proved successful. The 
employers had established that a 
reorganization of the depart- 
ment was necessary. 

The employee’s job dis- 
appeared and a new job was 
created in its place. The em- 
ployee applied for the post but 
was unsuccessful and the ev- 
idence before the industrial 
tribunal indicated that she had 
never been fairly considered and 
that her application was pre- 
judged and doomed to failure. 

The industrial tribunal said 
that an employee whose job was 
disappearing had a right to be 
considered on equal terms for 


the new post and a failure to 
consider her on equal terms 
made the dismissal unfair. 

The employers submitted that 
the unfairness in the selection 
process for the new job was 
irrelevant to the dismissal from 
the old job. The employee 
argued that the fixed-term con- 
tract envisaged the possibility of 
renewal, therefore it was appro- 
priate to consider all the circum- 
stances which concerned her 
possible re-engagement as well 
as those which concerned the 
need for reorganization. 

They said it was wrong under 
section 57(3) of the Act to stop 
the analysis at the point of non- 
renewal; that an assessment of 
all the circumstances and 
substantia] merits of the case 
was required and that the tri- 


bunal bad not misdirected 
themselves in law. 

.The appeal tribunal accepted 
the Labour Party’s argument 
that the provisions of section 
57(3) related to the act of 
dismissal only. The reason for 
the dismissal was the 
reorganization which was found 
to be fair. 

„75 e J -i ,rovisions ° r section 
57(3) did not apply to the wav i n 
which the employers had 
considered her application for 
the new job which was some- 
thing which occurred after the 
act of dismissal. 

The appeal would be allowed 
and leave to appeal granted. 

. Pritchard 
Englefield & Tobin; Matthew 
Arnold & Baldwin. Watford. 


Consolidating claims 


Diefraan v Kent London Bor- 
ough Council 
Wahlstroa v Same 

The Employment Appeal Tri- 
bunal (Mr Justice Popplewdl, 
Miss C. Holroyd and Mr G. H. 
Wright) on Doxmber 8 upheld 
an order by an industrial tri-. 
burial chairman to consolidate 
unfair dismissal claims against 
Brent London Borough Council 
by two social workers who had 
been dismissed following the 
•publication of the report of the 
public inquiry into the death of 
Jasmine Beckfond. 

MR JUSTICE POPPLE- 
WELL said that the chairman 
had excrosed his powers under 
rule 15 of Schedule 1 to the 
Industrial Tribunals (Rules of 
Procedure) Regulations (SI 1935 
No 16). 

The applicants were challeng- 
ing has decision on the ground. 
inter alia, that each would be 
prejudiced by the presence of 
tboother oaitv in that there was 


a conflict as to resp 
between them. 

The majority of tf 
tribunal considered 
chairman had exert 
discretion properly. 

It had been argued 

matter of law ihe twe 
lions in conflict coul 
consolidated. But it 
ponant to look at the u 
rule 15. 

Although it was 
"consolidation of pro* 
the only order a tribui 
make was to hear the 
uons together, unlike 
Court which had the 
consolidate or to ordw 
cases should be hear, 
same time. The i 
tribunal's power unde: 
W3S not consolidatior 
the heading 

The decision in Lem 
Telegraph Ltd (No 2) I 
QB 601) applied 
consolidation and was 
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THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 



31 




YOUR OWN BUSINESS 



Royal backing for first-timers 

he Prince of Wales is l»rfcin*.o C «s^ . . 


BUSINESS TO BUSINESS 


Tbe Prince of Wales is backing a series 
of uutetnw m London, tbe w£? 
MriJaads and (he North East to. help 
small businesses and budding en- 
trepreneurs. The drive is being mounted 
by Business in the Community (BICi the 
umbrella body for local enterprise 
agencies. p 

The initiatives mark the launch 
BIC s second five-year 


as an enterprise agency and the setting 
up of a business sod innovation centre. 

BIC is also involved in drawing op a 
fnrtber action plan, bolstered hy a Civic 
Trust survey, which points to consid- 
erable cultural, recreational and tourism 
potential in the Halifax area. It Is 


of 


" ! e 5 onfl nve-year strategy for 
pooling industrial, commercial and local 
efforts to develop economic growth, 
particularly m disadvantaged areas. 

V™ 6 "ho is proving a keen 

president of BIC is supporting the new 
dnve and this week showed special 
interest in two partnership ventures 
announced at BICs annual meeting in 
Newcastle upon Tyne. 

One is for a partnership, involving the 
local authority and business community, 
ambitiously aimed at improving the 
entire economic base of Halifax in west 
Yorkshire. Plans already afoot iiviH f 
tiie development of Dean Chtogb Indus- 
trial Estate in a former carpet n»»n near 
the town centre, the hunch of the 
Calderdale small business advice service 


By Derek Harris 

Industrial Editor 


small geographical areas of inner cities 
with action concentrating on job creation, 
training and building refurbishment. A 
key aim is to create more w wB 
businesses ami expand existing ones. 

Occidental, the oil company, has pat 
op £80,000 to help start ihe first schemes 
but more aid, including management 
time, is needed. 


regarded as a pilot experiment which if 
successful could be extended to other 
towns. BIC has already looked at 
possibilities at Middlesbrough which has 
a high unemployment rate. 

Among the other initiatives is support 
for a Cleveland Business Centre in the 
centre of Middlesbrough. The aim is to 
raise £600,000 in cash or in WhA to 
provide more workspace and business 
development services. 

Up to eight neighbourhood economic 
development partnerships are also being 
developed, half of them in parts of 
umdon, including the East End. with 
others in the West Midlands and no 
Teesside. The target is comparatively 


Sir Ralph Hal pern, chairman of the 
Barton retailing group and a prominent 
supporter of BIC, also announced a mid- 
1987 opening for the £2 A million desig n 
workshop project planned at Felling, 
Gateshead, for small companies in 
design and marketing. It is anticipated 
that the project wOl create at least 50 new 
businesses employing a minimum of 300 
people. Successful farms wOl later move 
on to make space for more start-ops. 


Applicants wfl] be assessed on the 
potential of their businesses and be given 
Practical help in starting np, said Project 
North Enterprise, the local enterprise 
agency associated with BIC in the 
project. 


Throwing clay brings husband 
and wife team pots of money 


By Mandy Gee-Smyth 
Within eight years John and Sheila 
Francis have turned a garden-shed 
pottery business into an internationally, 
known company with an estimated 
turnover for this year of £200,000. 

Exports, mainly to EEC countries and 
the United States, account for 1 5 per cent 
of the business. 

Graduates of the Royal College of Art, 
they went to Uganda in 1963 to develop 
studies in pottery and ceramics at 
Makerere University and later moved to 
Ghana, where Mr Francis was head of 
tbe industrial design department at 
Kumasi University. 

After 14 years in Africa they returned 
home and invested their savings in an 
old farmhouse with outbuildings at 
Chessell, Isle of Wight and with a £1 ,500 
grant from the Council for Small 
Industries in Rural Areas (COSIRA) 
bought a kiln and went to work. 


MR FRIDAY 



XanPync. 


Their target was the gift-orientated 
decorative pottery market They started 
in stoneware but changed to procelain 
after two years. Now they employ 10 full- 
time workers, mostly school-leavers with 
an artistic bent and six part-time 
workers for packaging and invoicing. 
Output averages 1.000 pieces a week, 
worth about £5,000. Their main costs are 
wages and transport 

Chessell porcelain is not cheap. Its 
original “water gardens”, inspired by the 
coral reefs off the African coast are bowl 
extravaganzas costing around £58. But 
decorative vases, mirrors and lamps sell 
from £14 to £43 with statuettes at £6.33. 

Mr and Mrs Francis aim to keep a 
steady flow through the kilns but have 
two peak periods, the summer tourist 
season and Christmas. An average 
summer order from a gift shop is around 
£1.000. Department stores spend about 
£6.000, possibly twice a year. About 60 
per cent of orders follow their displays at 
gift trade fairs, two in Frankfurt and four 
in Britain. They do not advertise but 
publish comprehensive booklets and run 
a small mail order business. 

Last year, Mrs. Francis spent a month 
demonstrating techniques at Busch Gar- 
dens, a huge arts and crafts centre at 
Williamsburgh, Virginia She recalls: 
“Though the Americans were fascinated 
and we did pretty well out of it, they are 
collection buyers, preferring to invest in 
names like Spode or Wedgwood.” 

In summer, Chessell is packed with 
tourists who pay 15p to watch the potters 
in action. There is a shop which sells 
mostly seconds at reasonable prices. But 
Mrs Francis says: “We don’t wish to 
expand further. We put our success down 
to tight stock control, a close watch on 
how designs sell and order throughput. 



Sheila Francis at her wheel of fortune 


BRIEFING 


■ More women are starting to help 
other women set up in business. Six are 
now directors of local enterprise 


agencies and despite recruitment 
difficulties there are tti 


three women 
counsellors with the snail firms service at 
the Department of Trade and Industry. 
David Trippier, the minister for small 
businesses, said this week he was 
determined to increase the numbers in a 
drive to help women entrepreneurs. 


Around 700,000 women already 

IrftakVs 


account for about a quarter of B 
self-employed and a third of these 
have generated jobs for other peopte. 
Between 1981 and 1964 there was a 
42 per cent increase in the number of 
women setting up businesses. 


FERGUSON & PARTNERS LTD 


Someone you can talk to in the City 


Ferguson & Partners are able to offer a confidential and 
personal service in the area of acquisitions and mergers. 
We can also assist with clients* equity or commercial 
funding requirements. 


Cali Robert Graham, Managing Director. 


FERGUSON & PARTNERS LTD. 


Warnford Court, Throgmorton Street, London EC2N 2AT. 
Tel: 01-588 1187. Fax: 01-628 4189 


Ferguson & Partners Lid is a subsidiary of James Ferguson Holdings pic. 




W 


Property 

Development 

Company 


A client company has retained us to assist 
in the purchase of a property development 
company with a successful record in the 
development of residential, commercial or 
industrial projects. The company is likely to 
have pre-tax profits in the range of £1 million 
to £2.5 million per annum and although the 
emphasis should be on development, a 
company with some property investment 
activity will be considered. 

Experienced management must remain 
with the company. A management buy-out 
might be supported. 

Principals are invited to write to 
Mr D F Hoblyn at the address below. All 
replies will be treated in the strictest 
confidence. 


SHIRE TRUST 


Sb ire Trust Limited ■ 24 Austin Friars ■ London ecsn sen 
Telephone m-26687ii ■ Telex 934751 shirs g- Fax 01-256 9913 

Licensed Dealer Id Securities Licensed Deposit Tkker 


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ESTATES 


fmm 


£960 


interested? 


For • SUPERIOR DEAL 
ccnaajAM&tamddMBfc 
rad wir price (JuSdo on 

02257*4316 


Grafts • fMJIUUMKSU 
aowagft'WNTWs . 

titan —imttT«T4l 


Sales and valuation 
SOUTH DEVON 
PLYMOUTH AREA 
Wen Situated Hofetoy Carawn 
and Lease part on me South 
Devon coast. Comprising 
approomeify 15 aou at land 
with hcence for 300 notafay 
caravans. 45 ten pldies ami a 
well ai wn id i n i cfcifa and office 
complex. Supermarket and 
takeaway, indoor amusements, 
deluded twntptaw, outtaiMflQs 
& stores phis ■ small modem 
hee Hen md. Offers a access of 
El Ifitton 

IK High Street Lewis. 

Sussex 

0273 478424 


BUSINESSES W 


anted| 


MANUFACTURING 

ENGINEERING 

COMPANY 


Midlands based seeking 
acquisitions of 
manufacturers in Ugh! 
engineering. Capita] 
readily available. 
Reply to BOX C37. 


BUSIN ESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Direct from U.S company, 
quakiy shrimp and seafood 

hx world wide market^ 

Regular dethrones, Of U.S. 
standard from Mexica n 
government control 
department 

(McKay and Soffivan) 
Mexico Sft- U-K- 
tek 0923 777203. 
U.SJh teteje- 
Holstead-Scotl 668404 


IHCREASE SALES! 

Good sales reps ate me 
fed sales raps abound 
We will tran yout sates lean 10 
be sh'lled sates protCTorete. 
Vow sales and prdns s* 01 
Conrad «s nw 
WWW erase 
Sales Consuttmo 
14 Woodtands Terrace 
Glasgow G3 OOF 


bmbted 

BAK88RTH1G 

SUITE 


RETIREMENT 

SALE 


Controlling interest in fast 
expanding West Yorkshire 
tounst attraction wdft 
manufacturing. aMesaEng. 

retailing amt restaurant 
I aa litres. T/o £300 .000 pa 
40 years' audited accounts. 
This business is unique m 
the UK and a monopoly 
positron in its wholesaling 
side. Price £200,000. 
Freehold land and buiktoigs. 

Reply to BOX C66. 


19 YEAR OLD 
U.K COMPARY 


key Indemnity Servicw ltd’ toe 
1967 


fr dSnSa 5. y« Cto upto 


Are A/Cs. no.taMjbes. 
ewer £2. 


__10d0. (Also fully traSp 
Co.tor sate) 


061 477 6755 
wfc days 
061 428 0139 

wkend & eves 




Sunday use. for 
and Simula 

S amffK-es. PmfwWy 

WN0 ^D?tf3 9M0 

(office Hours) 


wilt pay (niroduCliora- 

w,,tdinc „ t £S^t.S»<^ d Tri 

Joint w«J" 


gull-cd Telethon* 1 

mini awl J®52. fSdJb, 746170- 
Mr Bale. Barf> 't"*" 



SUWrr 

rtlOhlBhOd raJf u JJJ rnM i9 S4& 
IOC..OOW 1:. P MJY]in’ l ' rn ?' 

k °® VSSS&ao* 0 na 2£‘ 

i«rroenl , Hjrruie. co> 
ol'rra 

oonur oro** ,, i-2' lpr cf- 

l a> tfVSfJSme laroUy 

a*. sn&Z* .MS 


American Con* 1 " 

son 


i PLYMOUTH LICEBSEB 

i restaurant complex 

Pwnc pp^jpn. groundnoor 
restaurant 80 CWBS. tw and 
Grand pane- 1st tl oor W ctw er 

Itaian resfauwd 3 baton ta. 
f/H E350fl00 ; 

Unque apponunty. 

Bartofl Bttskiess Groep. 

0752 674247 


retail 
business 

I Growing profflaWe ratal tartf I 

I orrt^itSJtWDtsiressfar | 

SSff 

Reply to BOX EBB 


WtU. eSTAEUSBED donoi ni™! 

company seeks 

'SSSTnSrtasr ta 

crwlneertoo »•*« »’ "»n»- 
, bXo»n icpiy m 


gg-^ftJfTioxjee. 


CTOCW. 

hcp'j 

WWJS* canir'junt ninda- 

mtaiirJ' utIIv.t oruub 

sa>.Uto"» vc3B '. 


OWE * Bt r^J l ^S7 , on^ uiesSSi 

^'WHOXto, 


REGIONAL 

DISTRIBUTORS 

REQUIRED 

0RGEMTLY 


ELECTBA 

FAME 


Ws are ftie solo dtetrtoutore 

far M IMnd KJngckxn for 

mis rev ckjtton ary naw 

product «MchamvBrtB 
state gtarad windows into 
doubta pared wmdows tv 
utanoatactncUy. Inossconco 

b produces double ai 

tess man tall tfio prire ot 

conventional systems end 

yedds more dun hrice the 

pratt. For hither 


Tet 0628 72396 


EXPORT M 1987. 


We win gw you a Market ftopon 
(or yav product in the UAL and 
Oman, riel hand check on 
compeWan, prices and rtsdifty 
plus recommendations (01 
Agents. Briefing prior n TBh 
December ensures detail report 
by oud January. We have 11 

e verting emerfeace in 
martais. 

Speak tx& 

CAris GRbenan, 
GuU Trade Ltd, 
OIC0959 64758 


NEW 

PRODUCTS 

Designer of metal 
products requires 
fabrication company 

to manufacture for 
worldwide market 
Must be product 
orientated. No time 
wasters please. 
Tat (8926) 55828. 


ORIGINAL 
RUSSIAN VODKA 


Sin 


. re) 

MMdittl __ 

20 a stared to bandtd 

VON Ewopaan pons for 
Stae par corunar la. 
ytwHdtt 


«o 


CMflre Ma 1Z218, 
PA fare 5, 

A-U37Vtaooa (Austria). 


OmmST AD: ami reUw In Uw 
wnatww wtth > cash now M- 
vm •nduray biMnew in 
TnwrH«1 Ovrr 100% mnnal »*- 
iuri on im-esnnmls protanita 
on riDorwCiom from under 
£25.000., with Irrms and n 
rluntK ronMdiwnJ 508 

EumQEXts. Lib diraiunaa. Te- 
nmlr. Td 79 21 36 


WOBHMC partner muired for 
*maflPlaniHlreBi«n«s«»l>- 
bsn« z wore. fSflOO worUng 
canted nquM to buy Inin 
ran party Td- 01646 iobi. 
The womSov Croup RpT. Mn. 
Cndg. 


0PPO8TWBTYTD 
UnrESTHKW 
MT8MMU JACOK 
mVERTUN 

Verdure capiW raquaed lor 
‘do wnMna' p roduction of new 
ataranotata (acteng system. 

Company already capkaficad lor 
producfmn of commercal jack. 
mnan an cin n inUSAwFefa. Soma 
stock has becore avarttde to 


ccrapteo consumer 


preductawMir in 198 7. mare are 
21 prawn consumer reiBUte 
ptrtfase this new tEdmotapy 
restating In ttas invention hank) 
t£t rapidity ffi penetrate entae 
annual 74 mfton worldwide 
riAnD m»faBL Iflnaiwn unit 
inwsonenl S25JOO. 
la dapta a remtaiH aa 
UtorteadJT T7ftt la toy 

PfeMC 01-GB2 1153 
8(0727 38329 


| franchises 1 IwFnnnrra 


Britain's 


most 


- i; attractive 


franchise. 


£95,000 

wifl buy small aircraft 
company with 
developed and CAA 
approved design 
ready for production. 
All figs, moulds and 
drawings available. 
.Developers lack 
production facilities. 
Reply to BOX C42. 


RUN YOUR OWN 
SHOW 


Have you the oonfidenoe 
to rim your own sales 
team and control some 
mobile units? National 
company needs 
someone in your area 
now. 


Tafcttr Lacy 0Z72 292579 


START A BUSINESS 

from Dana prorticing superb 
Boh) and afi cota m Uerass 
cards, Mshutis, Bean 9mtat 
bbb dp machine. Reafstkaiiy 
earn £2-400 per seek even in 
spare tana. Coropieta 
crofciscnaf package £1,150. 
Free details send sas Steen 


Pm. 3 Bsmrad, Bois, 


Essex. CM16< 


DISTRIBUTING 

COMPANY 


required througout UK with 
strong sales fbree in 
marketing pertuiK and 
ndstrtas wfth our ttal back 19 
and support In advertising on 
a natural scale. Haply in 
confidence with conpany 
profile to BOX C20. 


CUEMUET cmuiuuy wttn mnb 
wanMusr apftdla wnM to 
mwmtad re neartnq dram my 
nmpanies aUv 10 utuise> sane, 
active parttetoatton pcmasfo Re. 
tay le BOX D01 . 


SUPfiJtSataaun wlili own odto 
wc/vm/faj/ear/fsoii™ 
taotanu for someming now? 
Protawc mwIl u K y. Hart uos 
and rescues a pw ata tty. Give 
me a can on 01 587 ides- 


WFU at foil started b) a 
honw book artHao b uiiucu ttiw 
can't ran. For (ull redUno de- 
tails stM SAC re OMMke 
PuuvsMnu. (am sn. po bm 
II. Leumluster HR6 9YN. 


■WUIMEItT. manatomna and 
nurtotim wrmr souttil for 
new Im1» (of wdam 

Huge urOaueed palenlial. ReHv 
lo BOX J62. 


PARTNER REQWKD lor eetUna 
up wnuilum. Full fuefc up 
■callable mom manubaurcr 
Td. 01-378 OSfifl. 


S.G.O.. a revolutionary 
new system that creates 
a superb stained glass 
effect offers exciting 
prospects in franchising. 

□ Product unique 
In U.K. 

OOulstancflng market 
potential In private 
homes, industry and 
commerce. 

QhiKduable back-upas 
part of Europe's largest 
home Improvement 
company B.C.T. and 
Anglian Windows. 

Brl Iain's leading window 
manufacturer. 

□ One of most attractive 
franchising 

opportunities in Britain. 
O Requires an invest - 
menl of £35-40,000. 


Contact us for further 
information toddy. Dp D 
Stained Class Overlay 
UK Limited. 

23 Hurricane itay. 
Norwich nR66£J. 

Tel (0603) 485454. 



Stained Glass Quiim 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


SURVEILLANCE 

MONITORING 

ad crater sunstann eeupment 
tar Mil the am*» & 
professional. 

Any or ante Air pna let 
RUBY ELECTRONICS LTD 
. 716, Lea Bridge Rd 
London Eta SAW 
01-5! 


PALL MALL 

+ W2 


Low premium 24hr 
access + parking. Fum 
carpeted offices ind 

phone/tdex/fex. Fr 
£75pw. 


01-839 4808 


Ifyoa 

voAWvnnsR 

-WfaUCBSHOS 

fiElAMewfan 

ywwoot? 

we will! 

BuStoesa Communication 

Centres' LMted 

SUNG 01-938 2233 


ELECTROMK Products for busi- 
ness arte ronsumrr markets, 
•rttadte *°ur soecWcatlon. 
Call Mlrhata GUI research and 
desewproeru. Tct0990 432S9 


A W PfiKC Ictmc service A no 
Mtriisa fee. SSo oer rain UK. 
SOp Europe. £1.60 USA L'K“S 
CMapou. 01-837 0232. 


1 an ter with Rons- 

Payee available for work. 
Aiming considered. 0491 
38MC 124 hr answer servlet) 



NDC\ 

0734*792320 


OFFSHORE 

COMPANIES 


W0RU1WIDE 

^CORPORATIONS 


MatfaV-retaptac-Teta. 

' Fill secrKanai services, 
tele at Man, Channel Islands, 
Gdxattar. Panama. Lftena. 

LuaiUMRita. Antales, UX 

Ready made or special 
Free expfcraiay booklet. 


ASTON COMPANY 
FORMATION LTD 


Dept Tl. 19 Peel Rd, 
Douotes. We oi tei 
TaTmce) 2^1 

Tdrr «7ttl SPiVfc G 


ME SOLVE Corporal# prooieros, 
rMrantaUn. rundno. ertats 
manaoemenu aocuHtdons. and 
dnoub. Td'0642 217BIO 


large cottneases. 01-229 0852 
or 0605 64899. 


IKSnSE MAYFAae AOMtESS 

BurUngton obooe. telex and for 
MHBtllJlO services. Ot 454 2S60 


COMPILERS & 
COMPUTING 
SERVICES 


] 


W. ATX S12K. 20rab ham disk, 
boxed K new. Private rate 
13.100 rad £3-800. Tel: 0922 
69896 evenings. 


contracts cram quality, price 
and delivery. For details 0296 
81866. 


COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 


ALFIE’S 


ANTIQUE 

MARKET 


STALLS FROM 

£15 PW 

723 6066 


MAYFAIR 

W1 


one of tne dost freeholds 
flvafebWwtthextaisvB 
offices/Bats. 
S7im®oa VP. 
Ptate B 1 638 8851 


OFFICE 

AND 

STODIO SPACE 


NW1 

AVAILABLE IMMHHATELY 


Firty serviced 
Osq ft - 


lOOsq ft - 4000sq ft 
From £40 per week 
01 388 9747 
OR 

01 387 2941 


CHISWICK, 

W4 


Largs det house on approc 54 
acre. Prestige location. 
Devotopmem potential, 
sitajea to obtaining 
consents. Guide prira 
EBOOflOO. 

John Spencer 
01-9958904 


HIGHGATE 

VILLAGE 


tasowe Oaraaa ksuy offices 
lo tec wefl posreomd m the 
centre ol Vllage. Approx 400 sq ft 
S4JKJ0 pa tees water A general 
£380 pa 

Tel: 01 341 0281 or 
348 3747 


H0BERM OFFICE 
SUITES 

1888 sq ft sjnrarts 

0o verge of nnrttarete 


7258 sq 
FuSy carpeted, prong 
E&50 psf inclusive of tales 

692 6107 : 828 1551 


DISTRIBUTORS 
& AGENTS 


Seek exclusive 
distributor for mail 
order sale of new 
underground pipe and 
cable detectors; very 
low price and of great 
interest 10 builders and 
administrations. Start 
organised by us. High 
return. Neccessaiy 
stock: 0130. Write tor 


DIPLOMAT 


BJ». 13, 55140 
Vnconkms. France 


TELEX 
FOR ONLY 
£495 


Which mebdes lataphone, 
ttae* toyboard and printer. 
8l included In one smaB neat 
machine which ready does 
sell tor £495 oomptate. I 
dasperitely need nMOuate 
or companies who can bank 
op **» claim of eating 
themselvea satasmon. 

Telephone: 
Monday to Fridtqr 
9 to 5^0. 
TelU628 723S6 


AGRESSIVE 

SALES 

AGENTS 


■ Should dtal Mr Norman on 


0628 73722 right i 

r In new tech 


Marke t leade r 
bus. comm, field otters 
BOlBtWT. +fUfl 


I support 

pack acte to to ose joining 


exp ansion 
programme. 

Dost delay! 


FLABULESS 

PROFIT 


Super slimmer rebound 
exercise product should 


Increase your income by 


at least £100 pw esp ft you 
are settno diets. 
TonatonMKZS 74611 
(Office hours). 


IMPOBT/EXPORTS | 


US SALES, 


ttES/MARXETH 

EXECUTIVE 


NB 


Ex Bm raw refaBntag to Btran. 
seeks conukancy praiacts for 
1967 and oowanis. 19 years 
US/Japanese/UK reariaro 
B yenmce. Tef- 08045 4471 or 
517IB or wile to Atm Aider. 392 
Crsekwood Drive. Lacaster, 
Texas 75146 USA. 

Tet 214 227 3546 


■fremsTED numa cxum 

of exporting Brttaln'B leading 
brand nnnim. e e con di A 
oimnakH in ladles, childrens 
& moBtunr. Please phone for 
further deism 051 480 4700. 


COMMERCIAL 

PRINTERS 


COLOUR 

PRINTING 


SENSATIONAL PRICES 

•LEAFLETS* MAILERS 
• POSTCARDS ^ 

99 




PHONE FOR BROCHURE: 

Lofcoft 01 2051821 

RBTOFUlt 

0A23889944j 

O R WRITE: 
FREEPOST 

HARROGATE HG29BR 



OFFICE 


EQUIPMENT I 
RMSHERS [I 


FAX UPDATE 

Portable fax inachmes. 
Cheapest prices in 
Europe. Limited 
quantities available 
now. Please phone 
Fax International. 

Tel: (0243) 860662 


ALDGATE 


900 yards from City 


Large or Small Offices 


Whether you require 1 room with superb 
views, use of reception, boardroom and all 
secretarial and other facilities, or a large 
unfurnished suite with big dealing roomj, 
etc. 


Long or Short Term 


No formalities, covered car park 

available. 


Tel:01-377 5500 



fCE 

BEFORE 

CHRISTMAS 


WANG Equipment at Half Price k-\ 


IBM, Olivetti at cost 


Call the professionals today 

01-408 1518 



A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 


We pioneer researched solutions lo the ever growing problem 
of h>*k-nc and pest control in the food and dnnk industrur*. 

We non wish lo appoint sales memated persons js 
agenivdistnbuiois id ilnioed areas, lo launch a new range of 
electronic products lo the catering, retail and manufacturing 
sectors. This is a ground floor npponunin in a multi-million ||j 


pound industry, where oar unique product range, nurkciing 
aod field support will ensure success for ibe riant p 


. _ . ipersoo. We 

itspect first year eaminfs to exceed £40.000. You will need 
£2300 Tor initial stock but fad oTfirancc will not be a bar to 
the right apphcanL 
PWase write vriih brief C.V. to 
Mr. MJ. Donovan. Chire Trpco. O & C4 Coedeac Laoc 
Industrial ^ UanlrisuL, Mid Ghawpn CF7 9HG- 



BE VOUR OWN BOSS 

An oeowTEWy m nnsi m a PactiWe Gbmg 
Btaawk mi ak Fvx a Pan-lune - 

6LAZM3 PHOTOGRAPHS CM TO 
PLATES 

Iteti puSa roegne. Foclesi pamsl 

Cic -jnu: nxt- fp, lurrfw aitefc TeT VS! 

3ECISBM6. MB-Tja.niHioiarassjie.il) 

POTTBIY PORTRAITS UBUiSD. 
Brya Hetdofi. The Khnsitato, Hotyfeuad. 
Anglesey 


FOR SALE 


I^Glasoow dub/djscotheque : 24 year lease 


Successful! 

still available : 250 capacity: in excellent decorative 
order : 7 day late licence : » mile from City centre on 
main arterial road. 


Interested parties write in first instance to: Dept RS, 
Peter Menztos Advertising. 

2 Newton Race, Glasgow G3 7PT. 


OFFICE EQUIPMENT 
&FUSNK! 


SHERS 


^ sfBe 4h, 



Period and Reproduction Desks, 
REng Cabinets. Writing and 
room Tables, Desk Chans. 


Write for details: 

Jurt Desks. Dept 12/12/86 
Showrooms:- 20 Church Sheet 

London NWB SEP. Tel No: 01- 
723-7376 
6 Effikte Road. London NW3 
Tel No: 01-722-4902 


INDUSTRIAL 
SERVICES 
& SUPPLIES 


■require Quouuons for hortrem- 
tai borer complete webtfoo unll 
lor rracknt rasiloos cyUndcr 
hMdsetc Tool nee for machine 

5*100 use tents- la BOX AB3 . 


PROMOTION, 
PUBLICm' & 
MARKETING 


AGENTS 

REQUIRED 


Neckwear manuf ac t urin g 
company require a 
number ol agents to 
market ctob and company 
ties. 

Representatives need to 
be mature and self- 
motivated and have 
experience tn this field. 

Canted Les Coffins 
Screes Ad on 
8582 684208 (alter 6pm) 
94 Kadriao Arenas 

DantaUfi, Bad tou Mtire 


HEW FOREST 
TEA RO0NS 


One ot the best In this 
superb catering area The 
property has unique 
advantages of location and 
is extremely wed equipped. 
Having operated over many 
years its reputation is 
unsurpassed. Beautiful 
grounds and generous 
puDhc rooms with very 
private 3 bedroom owners 
accommodation. 


PRICE £250,000 


JOHN LEWIS 
ASSOCIATES 


Phone SOUTHAMPTON fa 
10709) 334828/9 9 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


HUNCOIFOIID, 

New i double bedroom cot Vatr. 
fully liimbtod. fitted urnci. 
I 1 .- miles hi union la M4 Com- 
muter ore* lor West London. 
RracUnq. No children or Dels. 
Amtlabte l-l -97 £330 non. 
Trt 1OW81 83936 


SWITZERLAND 


WHOLESALERS 


CANCELLED order. A SUPFTD 
stock of handknined pullovers 
and cardigans ui loo^e mire 
wool also acrytlc/woota and 
con ora European made, whole- 
sale only. Tel: 01-969 361 1 e* 
313 01-906 4190 9am to 6pm. 

100 BEAUTIFUL. Anllue out 
framed oM “Masters” rroro- 
d unions of Rerabranot. Renoir. 
Ruben, and Goya. £1.500 the 
lot Tc«J753 21778 

CUUrr SClIEEN TV! and video 
protectors An leading manes. 
021 3542393 t24hr»i. 
8WBJHC bath robes 2000 
pieces premier Quality TUrUsh. 
any Quantity. 01 947 7735 


HOTELS & LICENSED 
PREMISES 


WHITBY 

NORTH 

YORKSHIRE 


hvitaton to ptmtesa holiday 
complex of eight and halt 
acres with planning peimtsatin 
(or 85 twWBJay cartages wth 
riverside fronoge am] 
moonngs and direct access to 

the Poll ot WMby. Services 
■Walled and permission 
giarted (nr development to 
commenence nunediaefv. 
Mars in tfia regxm £450.000 
For larflier nformatiiM 
Tel: 0287 23851 



SUPER SECRETARIES \ 


SECRETARIES For Architects <*. 
W'lBhers. Permanenl 3 (rmpo- 
run POM1KU11 AM5A ^peculisl 
Br-crulUTXMir Oonsulunis Ol 

7« ossa 


TO PUCE YOUR 
TRAVEL 
ADVERTISEMENT 
IN 


THE 

TIMES 


TRADE 

ADVERTISERS 
7EL01-481 1SSS 


ADVERTISING 
FAX NO. 
01-431 5313 
TELEX 
925088 
PRIVATE 
ADVERTISERS 
TEL 01-431 4333 


USE YOUR 
AfCESS 
OR 

BARCLAYCARD 



H 






fyTT?mTf!£i3:)i»7A-a»a*g£n 


CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 


inec cm 

™s SaKwi. Basra anna) 2,000 mtes 

S7JK& 

1988 C CX2B 

RE Saloon. 3 .000 rates. 

SKU& 

! wee® 

GT| Turtxu BKtrtc swiflMf. 13.000 rates. 

CBiflSS 

19K C C3Q0 

Safari Esm I5j000 mfles. 

£5^50 

1988 C BX19 

SO Auto Saloon. PAS. BjOOO mflas. 

££.795 

1983 A BX16 

RS Saloon. Afloys. Tried glass. 31000 mflas. 

P9«K 

Special deals oa an eew cnrflea models In 
January 1987 

Contact as now for details at 

LONDON’S PHHMffl DEALER 



UPCHURCH GARAGE UMFTHJ 
EGL 1945 

FOR EVBIYTHING SUBARU 
IN KENT 

2 Horsham Lane, Upchurch 
Sitdnghoume, Kent -j 
TEL: MEDWAY (B534) 31684 4® 

or 372928 QS M 




i. 

58-285 Gohfbawfc Road. Londtu W12 

01-749 6091 

i 

A; 

i i 

A; 


Mitsul)i>fti in Surrey , 


MITSUBISHI 

Court & Smith Ltd 

Fh-hof Hoo;c. Porirreoitfh iload. Uiplev. f .saiJiifr*— rj 

Tel: tOtS!}) 222 IS J ‘ 


GROUP RANGE 
WESTERN LTO 


AUTHORISED a 
MITSUBISHI ^ 

dealer w 


754 Gr?r r r 0 K D; fSO AP. '• 

. GHcEN'rOijC fiOUNDABS.Uf 

' ' r gkeemfqrg* ;•* 

- - i.'JODX, • • 

'• -- fe:: oi-575-7C«a " 



SUBURU 


2 & 4 wheel drive saloons, 
estates & pick-ups available, also 
large range of used Subarus in 
stock. 


WOOTTON MOTOR CENTRE 

rantimnwr street WoottofKlnaffl^Edge. GtoucasteraHra 

Tel: (0453) 842340 


NEW FIAT 


JV\ '7_A 


Delivery mileage only. 
From £3,295. FIAT 
UNOS. Delivery mileage 
including three year 
warranty. From £3.899. 
Limited number only. 

BARCLAY OF 



FAIRWAY 
MOTORS 
BURNLEY LANCS 


LANCER 

ESTATES 

FROM 

STOCK 


Psdttam Rd 

Berate* 

Tel: IB282) 24361 


IMMEDIATE DELIVERY AT 

CONTINENTAL CAR CENTRE 

CHURCH ROAD. STANMORE 

Tel: 01-954 0077 


THE SUBARU SPECIALISTS 




3 Door & 5 Door Justys tor 
ImmsfcBa Defnery 
Also m Stock, a range ol Estate 
Cara and Ugftt Comma oa t 
Vendfis 

Safes. Semx & Fferts 
tannce Recammauted 
Acadent Reefer Shop 
Sates Ceriact - An Archer 



ST BENEDICT’S 
GARAGE LTD 

Norwich. 

Tel: (0603} 620545. 
Most models in stock. 
Used Shoguns our 
speciality. 
Prices from 
£8,500- £12^00. 


7TTTTT 


GARAGE LTD 


; ! I ■ H a . 1 1 : 



BEST BUYS 

Aay Car/Vm sapptied 


ilild JiLTl i 


(subject to status) 

SVB LONHM LIB. 
01 950 0052 


CROSS ROAD 


Chariton, 

Nr Winchester, Hants. 

Tel: (096 279) 767 

4.W.D Specialist Centre. 


E? JETER 
A.»OTORS 


A 

WSU8S6 


MITSUBISHI 

FOR 

DEVON 


rr«; Vr-B'fivi u 


46 P nhl oe Rd, 
Exeter, Devon. 


w HEELERS 


Offer for 

bmnadtata deByery 


um Shi«a 25 dfesal hfto in 
blue. Sam high root. 

SWB Stage Z5 (fiesel ttrto hi 

green 

Banbury 
(0295) 710325 



S & S SEBVKES 

We are pie man Ayrshire 
dealers and win be only too 
pleased to deal with your 
requests. 

3 Aobaak Road, 
Mossfctam, By Ayr 

Tefc0292 521125/ 





MOTORS 




ts 861 432 4799 


I :!:f.| : ■ !!]?:! M ;l 

BHGTTnu?KNBm 


Main Stree t, Butwel, 
Nottingham. 

T U (0602) 272226 



irr-rrm 


1964 A Reg. 5 Speed Hard top. 
StrUoo Hue, Crash ban, spot 
terns. Dog guards/Gm rack. 
Tow pack, lor mileage. 
£5,495 + VAT. 


I ■ '''111', sir ‘I'.lii 


THJT7B3 843207 


ROVER 8251 Auto 

1966 D neg. Lynx Bronze Mtti 
Mi* interior. Alloy vteds. 
sumxd Low nsteage. Ex-flora. 
Largo s wig^w new. 

D1BDEN PURLIEU 
MOTORS GROUP 
Tel: 0703 843207 
Office hours 


GIBSON BROTHERS 



TEL: (09952) 4222 


Green Lae, Gantong, 

Nr. fte n wi, Lancashire. 




I 


760 GLE TURBO 
AUTOMATIC VOLVO 


9,000 rmfes. FSH. 1965. ASS. 
PAS. Sun root. Alloy wheels. 
WMe/bbck leather inferior. 
Bectra widows. Centra l odung . 
MagnflcenL Extended warranty. 
(12.495 


Telephone John L Can 

81-646 4575 


ROVER 825i 

AUTO 


Metallic Gold, fantastic 
sped 6,000 mfles. Huge 
saving an new price with 
lull guarantee. 


■ . £14,750 

0895 53681. T 


POLARIS 


FOR YOUR SUBARU 
full SAiB/sanncE/nuns 

POLARIS OF PETWORTH 


THE SQUARE, 
PETWORTH 


TEL (9798) 43298 


AX DAVIS & CO 

Comsgsby Street 

nwerora 

DIAL DAVIS HA TIE WOflUK 


TEL: (0432) 53471 


MOTORS LTD 
FOR YOUR 
MITSUBISHI NEEDS 

TEL: (0303) 75114 

1-3 Part M 




CUBBIN & NORTH 
UUet Rd, 
Liverpool. ' 
Tet 051 727 1414 

FOX THE FOXTUNATI FEW. 


; DISCOUNTS- ‘J(n ''APCR. 1 S 
f.W IUELE 

TT 


UHEIBCAM motor honw. 28 ft 
Mklai an GJM.C. Clou . 
I&OOO mis. every conceivable 
extra, ewm owner Satan 
Arabian Prince, retactanl me. 
£10.900. Tel: ftttyi 021 471 
8278 or (eves) 021 44? 1390 


v . f.’iG i OfvVATlON, . - 
f0430) 66233 -'4 Lines 


VOLVO. 240 Q£ Estate. Stiver 
IMUOiC. B rep. Genuine 20.000 
miles. Excellent condition. New 
Volvo forces sale. C&800. Tet 
day: 01-871 0104. 


£17.960. Tet 0626 827906. 


M CWT 16001 GsbrioteL. 1986. 
White, low mileage. Immacu- 
late. taxed. £6450. 0765 
60206 w/ends eves. 0223 
870249 day 



RDMULT ONUI 2000 TBE. 
Absohoriy every conceivable 
extra. Rtglsund Augual 1986. 
2.000 mfles only. Metallic red. 
Showroom c ond ition. £15.760. 
Private sale. Te l ephone 0626 
878504 anytime 


BMW AUTHORISED DEALERS 



ROVE* 3500 VOP Automatic. Y 
rep. specimen example, only 

18.000 mUes. guaranteed, 

unique and gonnne oppomml 
ty. £5.476. 0934 838762 

Anytime T. 

VOLVO 240 CLT Estate. B Reg 
Auto. As New. Only 2SOOO 
mfles. Metallic Blue. 
Sunroof/WUM ADay wheels. 
Only £8.600 on o. Tel: 01 649 
5163 eves. 

OPEL Ascona (VauxhaU cavalier 
SWI 3 door, res Sepl 86. 230 
mis onl y, t otally as new. 
£ 7.995. 0773 832572/ 3/4. (T) 
FVUfiSOT 206 CTT. May 80. 

28.000 mUes ExceOem condi- 
tion. £5.100. Eventara/day 
0273 832336/609060. 


XR3I zendar May 66. 6.000 
mfles. White Etectricroar. Elec- 
trie aerial. 2 year extra cover. 
Burglar alarm. Special low pro- 
file lyres. Spedai coattogt an 
bodywork interior. £7.780. 
Tel .0626 60741. 

CmtOCM CTI • Turbo CX 2600. 
1986. Colour coded. 3«.ooo 
mites. Electric roof. Radkxas- 
*ette_ etc. Unmarked. Taxed. 
£6.160. Tel: Wan on 231466 or 
Weybridge 46376 <T) 

R. ROVES. Vogue. Auto 84 mod. 
Derwent blue Full spec. W 6 
Ucfccn extras Only £11 Ada 
TS: Marlow ■ 06284) 2763. «T). 
RANGE HOVER vogue. 1986. 
auto, air ctnumtoning. stiver, 
immaculate. £14.660 ono. TeL 
0268 730102 


■OVER 3600 V P. b rcg. tarmac 
condition- £6280 ONO. Eve- 
ning: 01 891 2692. - 


UUD ROVES SWB. N rcg. dark 
grn. new brake system. £500 
,men( In las 2 rams su per b 
cond. Fun tax/MOT. £2X00 
ono TeL Goes Ol 264 5789 
eves or 01 734 1600 day. 



581 IF ME M. Red. Wire wbeets 
ST Overdrive. 1 owner. 32K. 
£1.400. (0904) 791734. 
TOYOTA -New* Supra . 3,« Man- 
ual. only 3.000 miles 86 C. 
Woking 04862 64641. T 


MOTORS WANTED 


XR2. XR3. XR4. VW GTL 206 
GIL Astra GTE. BMW 3 series 
etc. Any m i leage. Sun way Mo- 
tor Co Ltd. 0653 393320. 


COLVER & HENCHER 

© 

(AYLESBURY) LTD. 

Buckinghamshire’s new BMW dealer. 

Tel: (0296) 436262. 


1986. Zimober red. 
Electric sunroof . Cruise 
control. Rear head rests. 
Radio stereo. 13,000 
mUes. £18,250. FuB 
dealer faculties. 

Tel: 0246 590627 (T) 


BMW. WANTED 



3 HBE1 wanted, numnl/anto. 
any yMr/coM. dbdance no ob- 
lecL irarnedUM naymeni. Oi- 
639 2500.T 

BamPM Instant valuations Na- 
tionwide call John Davies 
DOW. on «OSS2) 23466 


MR 3201 New shape. B speed 
man. 1983 iVI. Metallic blue. 
Fun lux. PAfi. Allays. New ex- 
haust. Panasonic radio cassette 
Elec aerial Taxed test 6 
mourns FSH. KJ.700 All dec. 
Tel: 0924 261419 


3231 May 79. wMW. 60.000 
miles. ster?o. sunroof, tong ox 
& MOT. recently resprayed, 
needs work on engine but fabu- 
lous car hence mice £1.725. 
Tel 09328 60175 Xtayj. 0932 
44648 (evening,) 


944 84. sable, dearie sunroof. 
POM. Panasonic stereo. FSH. 
Superb mroughou! t>ui dignay 
high ndteage hence £10.995 no 
Offers. Tel: 0993-860617 


944 LUX 

1384. B rag. guards red. eiectnc 
suntnf. suie dots and rear 
rafenca. Wack doth Porsche 
spoils seats, long edetided 
guarantee, up rated stereo 
system. FSH. new tyres. 1 
owner member of I.A.M. 
£16.000. Tel: 0268 692291 
anytime, ask foi Graham. 


944 TURBO 

August 86.' Alptee vrhte. 


Bteck leeamr/dotn sport 
seats. ADoy wtraete. Sonic 


seats. Alloy wheels, 
alarm. 

2,600 mites. 

S235BB. 


Tefc07D5 584365 (HWM) 
0785 529415 (BdSOSSS). 


m sc coorc “80 rvo. syooo 
miles, only 2 owners. . FSH. 
Guards red -rtih btack/wMle 
check. Iracnacutale coaouten. 
£11,650. Te l ep ho ne Office 01 
628 961 1/7318 (KGOl or home 
Ol 226 9422 


I28S Porche 1983. Only 8^00 
miles, aulo. white with while 
teaUier. electric sunroof. 
Btoushmid. virtually as new 
£29.600 Tel 06285 29655 (toy 
or 0628 35100 ovemne 


523 5 Series 2 auto. 1984 A rcg. 
run leather, wn pack, dec wata 
& sunroof, an- cno. ABS. 
33.000 mUes blue met., tmmac. 
common. £26.960 wcures. 
Td:0304 363909 eve ft Wends 


Sll TURBO 1982. 99.000 miles. 
Grand Prtx wtme. (flack leallier 
Interior. FSH. alarm. taunaciF 
Late CODdfllOa £21,000. Td Ol 
657 0322 Ofnce or 0371 

820392 home. 


BMW 3251 1966. red. 2 door, 
manual - 6 awed. 4.700 miles, 
computer, sunroof ■ wtmows - 
mirrors- aerial - all electric, ste- 
reo. alloys, n a wer assisted 
steering. As new. £13000 am. 
Td. 0992 711324 anytime. 


3131 1984 A rcg 2 door automat- 
ic SaphUe Blue, sun roof I 
owner 390 00 mfles excellent 
condition, new tyres. Full set 

24232 6600 ™ ; 10990 1 


1988 9285 Manual. WMte with 
brown half ItalhW interior. Air 
Cond. stereo. 4&ooo miles. Im- 
maculate condition £17.000. 
John Wood 0784 266163. 



M4 M May “85. red. ESR. 
216/16. PDM. fogs. CCH. 
14.000 mis. FSH. warranty. 
3rd car. AA reports available. 
£16.760 ono. TeL Ol 977 6666 


911 TURBO 1986 Rcd/BOCS 
leatt>er. snorts seals. ESR. LSD. 
Air con etc. unused £44.500 
Tel: 0388 68203 


3231 1986 'B' Reg. Black with 
Mack Interior, sunroof. aDoyt- 
biauptmkl Stereo. 32,000 miiei. 
muvltont condman. £9250 Td 
Michael Stroud- 0792 462253 
I world or 0633 65798 iHontel. 


9X1 1983 Snort cabriolet, white. 
Stack leather Interior. 60.000 
miles. £3.000 lug soon L 
£18.996000. Tel: Ol 263 4545. 
work. 


PORSCHE 944 LUX A Reg 1984 
21000 miles. Guards Red. elec- 
tric sunroof, large tyres. PDM 
ana rear skirl. All usual 
Porsche extras 12XX»mfle ser- 
vice fust completed by A.F.N. 
Lovely condition. £14.860. TeL 
Aldershot I0252J-8S09S1 


rUHBO SSL 1980. LKD 

AnUiracfle/Hack leaUter. AB 

extras immaculate. £17.780. 
Tet 01 286 2322. 



3231 B re* FSH. above av- 
erage miles bid very nice. IS 
monilw warranty. PX or a dis- 
count. £7.496. Ring QMtefiml 
0977 650277. T 


911 SPORTS COUPE 1980 W 
rcg. nwunc Hgm blue, m 
roof, new PTs. 49.000 miles. 
FSH. good coodnun. £13260 
01 -Kl 7076. 


911 SC Taiga. 1979. while. FSH. 
personalised Plato. 2 previous 
owner?, genuine 66600 miles. 
£11.650 TeL 0869 248484. 


944 WMte. 1986 C Reg. s/roof, 
rear Hdrts. rem. com alarm. 
PDM. fags. 215/60. £16.950. 
Tel ,tO? 32 1783808. 

13 TURBO. 78. Priv No. FSH. 
Excellent £14.996. Tel: 01-446 
0681 or 01-906 2976- 


M S3S w reg. Tax and MOT. 
WMte. BMW side stripes Air 
Con. 7V: J wheels. 205 tynre. 
FSH Stunning car. £4.850 qr 
near otter. Tet 0784 66190. 


mMcn setters with buyers To 
sen or buy. Tel 01-356 0886. 


SOB S manual. September 81. 
tow mileage. LHD. superb con- 
dition. taxed and MOT 
£11.950 TEL: Ol 833 0118. 


5281 BE 1984 modal. 4 g> auto. 
Cashmere, fun SE spec. I own- 
er. FSH. 68.000 miles, superb. 
£7.600. 061 663 6477 . eve- 
nings/ W ends. 061 342 8166 
bus hows. T 

BMW 320* 4 dr. black. 1986. 
11.000 mis. s/P. stereo + a 
spun, befgc Idl inmuc. £9 500 
•toOTH. 0896 (Denham) 
832009 anytime. 

85 B 3281 « dr. red. l«ino mb. 
S/R. C/L. ! owner, as new. 
£8^96. Phoenix 026 1264676 


924 July 86. Sapphire 16.600 
mk Many extras £11.496. 
10909) 720492 / 473032. 


924 S i2.fi entonei. May 1986. 
Only 4.900 miles. Black w»> 
grey flannel mrerior. Electric 
sunroof. Alloys. Cassette coin 
holder and gre e n -top tinted 
screen Mint condition Priceon 
aupflcaUon. Tel. 0382 7T2S6 T 
1986 944 puxrds red. electric 
sun roof and window*. 5 weed, 
absolutely Immaculate. 32.000 
mfles. FSH. £14373 ono v 
pari exchange. Tel: 0332 
BS0656 


524 LUX A reg (19831 pUlUium: 
5* 000 muea. Pioneer Stereo. 
P **N alloy wheels, superb 
condition only £8.960. Win 
deraoiwirate in Greater London 
JJkLTS: Ol 504 3869. 
PORSCBE W Lux. 84. blade. 
33-000 Rib. new lyres, lust 
serv iced. ESR. EW. e/door mir- 
rors. rasa holder. FSH. Porsche 
denier wrrty. must he aoxl. Hr* 
nearest £13^90. (06447) 329. 
HI SC Oairao 83. Gourds red. 
394)00 miles Two owners. 


928. Auto. 82 X. Chiffon wrote 
bnmacutotc. Brown teal her 
ESR. PDM. tt. FS SM. PS). 
Stereo. C14.4SO. Tal 0787 
227770 Or 227866. 

•B 924 AUTD Cbeice Of two. 1/r. 
r/MsL manufacturers warras- 
ty. absolute oasgatn. One 
examples- £9 JBO PX. 09328 
6L2S8/OS36 207395 T. 

944 LUX 1984 (AIl ZermAC sfl 
vcr. low m fc we . *PWt» *ais 
sunroof. Porsche serviced fnm 
new £14^00 ono. TO: 01-686 
6117 


394)00 grm« Two owners. 
FSH. CCnhvL Sun roof. Ste- 


reo Superb. £16.780. 
Brabnan of Kensington 01-689 
SZS9. w fe (0544) 885855. 


911 SC Spon, 1983. btoci/biara 
pasha im. 29^00 mla. FSH. 
PDM. stereo « »ki* onnucu- 
Bie.ClUSO. Tel: 3738089 m 
0836 600022 anytsae 
PQB1C1R 911 1974 white. 27 
Hire g. cond. UrouteHXiL 
£2x000. 0264 6 2121 C8L268- 
gr 0460 77072 ( h ome ) 


jiUliTiJ 


Battle hots up ior qiucx 


Ford’s decision to reduce the -pg 
price of many of its diesel cars iigF 
by an average of £650 bringing 
them into line with their 
petrol equivalents is making ^ 
life hard for its competitors 
and the Japanese in particular. 

Their profits were .already 
being squeezed by the sharp 
fall in the value of Staling 
against the Yen — nearly 39 
pa- cent in a year. The pundits 
suggest the present currency 
situation will continue long 
term. On the other hand 
Ford’s £556 to £759 diesel 
“bonus” is due to end on 
Monday. 

It was introduced on Octo- 








VitaJ statistics 

Model' Mitshubshi Lancer 1800 
GL diesel estate . 

Price: £7,789 plus £310 option 
pack 

Engine: 1796cc diesel 
Performance: 0-60mph 14.2 
seconds, maximum speed 
90mph 

Official consumption: Urban 



39.8m pq, 56mph 60.1 mpg and 
75mph 41.5mpg 
Length: 13.7ft 


ber 1 to boost dieseTs sales 
which had fallen off in re- 
sponse to cheaper petroL Die- 
sel had become just as 
expensive as petroL That is no 
longer the position. Diesel is 
now up to 18p a gallon 
cheaper. 

However, the trade is con- 
vinced that Ford's -ploy has 
been so successful that it will 
be replaced by another diesel 
incentive campaign almost 
immediately. Ford has a great 
deal at stake. Dagenham is 
geared up to produce 200,000 
of the new 1.6 diesel engines 


Mitsubishi 
annually. It is the only source 
for all the American group’s 
European car plants. . 

On a straight forward pur- 
chase price basis therefore. 
Ford diesel cars are hard to 
beat. But when all the other 
factors which influence buyers 
are taken into account, there 
are some outstanding rivals. 
One of these is the new 1987 
Mitsubishi Lancer estate with 
a revised version of that 
company’s already much re- 
spected 1.8 diesel engine. 

The rapid development of 
the glow plug has revolu- 
tionized the start and warm- 
up period for diesels. Most of 
today’s offerings take a few.' 
seconds to rrach “‘start-up 
readiness” usually indicated 


Lancer Estate: Something special in diesels, 
no warming P^nod befo^ u coujd 1 ^nrec osc^ 


UU riOJiuuib “r r . 

the engine reaches its operat- 
ing temperature. The super- 
quick glow plugs have an alter 


by- a dashboard warning light. 
The Mitsubishi has gone a 
day further. It will start as 
quickly as you can insert the 
key and rotate iu And there is 


quick glow plugs have an alter 
glow feature which continues 
until the coolant temperature 
reached 55 degrees centigrade. 

Underway it is immediately 
apparent that this is some- 
thing special in diesel cars. 
True it is excessively noisy 
outside the car even for a 
diesel but viewed from the 
driving seat is bound to win a 
lot of converts from petrol, it 
is- remarkablv smooth >or a 
diesel and has so much torque 
in the most frequently used 
lower to middle rev band that 
it gives nothing to the average 
petrol-powered equivalent in 
the cut and thrust of city 
traffic and will cruise happily 
at SOmph with power in 
reserve. 

My Lancer averaged over 
35mpg. With more careful use 


it couia L-uiut ~ 

Ii also makes good use ot .ts 
compact 1 3- 4 ft length. The flat 
load bed. wide opening tan- 

gate, with a cutaway-section ot 
the rear sill only — in trom 
ground level, offers easy load- 
ing. The cargo area can be 
fun her extended by folding 
down the rear seals whicn are 
asy metrically split to permit 
one or two rear passengers in 
addition to the extra baggage 
space. 

The test model had the so- 
called Diamond Option which 
for an extra £310 includes 
power steering and eiectnc 
windows. I regard power steer- 
ing as a must for diesel cars 
which have to double as the 
family shopping transport. 
The extra engine weight above 
the front wheels makes them 
very tiring to maneouvre in 
confined multistorey 
carparks. 


Justy arrives 
for winter 






With the onset of winter 
snow, commuters Dying in 
isolated country districts are 
once again dreading the daily 
journey to the office or fac- 
tory. Thoughts wifi inevitably 
turn to the advantages of four- 
wheel (hive. 

With excellent timing 
International, Motors, the 
importers of Sahara's well- 
known raage of 4 x 4 cars is 
delivering a new economy 
version to its dealers. The 
Sahara Justy in three and 
fonr door hatch-bach form is 
one of the few snp er mini s 
available with four-wheel 
drive. The GL five-doer costs 
a very reasonable £6,148 ami 
the SL three-door £5,998. 

Both are powered by a new 


WM 



Wheel change 
emergency fit 


I have just added a useful 
new tool to the emergency kit I 
cany in my care. It follows a 
hernia-inducing session wres- 
tling with stubbem wheel 
nuts. 


7-i.<35yS 

jC: 


Subaru Josty: Economy four-wheel drive. 


lightweight three cylinder 1.2 
litre engine and feature the 
“on demand” four-wheel 
drive system which Subaru 
pioneered in Britain. This 
East revving little engine is in 
sharp contrast to the 
company's long-running Bat 
four mil- With three valves a 
cylinder, a single belt drives 


camshaft and “dean burn” 
cylinder head, it delivers 
67bhp at 5,600 rpm. More 
importantly the torque curve 
peaks at a very useable 
3,600rpin. 

I plan to road test this 
Fiesta-sized newcomer in the 
near future and frill return to 
it in more detail. 


The Adapta Tommy Lever 
manufactured by A & D Tube 
Manipulations of Heath Mill 
Lane. Deritend, Birmingham, 
is reaching the market in time 
for Christmas, ll sells for 
around £6.70 and is worth 
every penny. 

The patented Adapta con- 
sists of a main tube which slips 
over the end of the spanner 
and a shorter pivoted cross 
piece enabling you to use both 
hands to increase the leverage 
and keep it in position. 



911 SC Spirt 
1982. 


3S400 mies. FSH 
Lancaster. MbWIc aiver. 
Storea Electric sunroof. 
Alarm. Garaged day and 
ratfit Immaculan. 
£17.500 

ia:01 451 6397. 


Y.W. AND AUDI 



of Sfoane Square 


>44 mno. whfi*. rns mi 
tenter Interior. .Bay wtecto. 
alar m, oiter ext ras. £26.760 
Tel: 0833 60623 anytime. 



1986 D MK OtHTTRO TURBO Peal wtata. SH»t> stereo. 

teaite. son root. 3.000 nxtes — <2(256. 

19BS D HUH QOLTTHO TUBS Feisted n ttenato red. testa. 

sin rod. ddMry Rriuge Orff WSOL 

1918 OAHU 90 OMTTBO Fasted 1 ) stone gn» Emcped** 
aasnge engn. 170 W «nl mooted susprosoi 5J30Q 

rates WJ5U 

1986 D JETT* GT Akira wtate. Med gtass. anW tadiino. sun 


mot. Z300 rates. OJ508 ONLY. 

i9M • ear on cowbitble Po«r m imbbc. tea 

ntetas. 31.000 rales BJ95. 


214 PAVILION ROAD. L0ND0N; t SW1. Tel: 01-730 2131 


M. THOMAS 
(GONTMEirTALS) 


288 SE T9B3 / A reg. CianHMtre 
rath beige doth. ESR CC Radn 
cass a tt. 1 owner. Futl sawce 
festory. 8J00 mfles 

only. £17450 

268 E 1986 / C reg. White with 
btae doth. ESR. BN. Radio 
cassette, i owner. Fiflt sendee 
history. 10.000 mites 
only. £18£50 

Tel; 0752 785611 
or 0752 872315 (Smtay) 



230 TE Feb 84 Astral Silver. 
BLue trim. Auto S/R, etor win- 
dows. ABS. Rad/Caas. 1 owner. 
Supplied by us. 21DOO mb. 
£11.760. Tet HoweUs ot 
Worretoer 0905 67219. Sun 
0905 369197 

3U0IC 1983 Blue metallic, sun- 
roof. alloy wheels. ABS. 
r/cassen*. e/wUxtows. £9.850. 
Clover Leaf Can Tet 0264 
61166 or 55278 



280 SL 




OOSL August 1986. Delivery 
mileage- Red/cream Interior. 
Many extras Blaupunkt vlerco. 
Olflse control. Kard/sofl up. 
Genuine. sale. £27.500. TekOl 
268 0366 or 723 0307 (Sun). 


Signal red. 1981. Mint 
condition. FSH. Low 
mileage. 

Price £14,750 
Tel 01 504 8151 


MBBLEB SOVEREMM: 1969. 
59.000 ms only. 6 raonUts tax. 
12 raonlte .MOT. leather uphoi 
story- automatic. PAS. Good 

condition. Onorx Tet,0EO9j 
602361 Mtoyuroe) (0609) 
503337 (eves / w/enfls) 


ICS ROADSTER Vi rev. 1 own- 
er. 19.000 mum only, extra's 
include works hard tog. afl Ton- 
neaus. OD Hereo c»/ra(L 

luggage grto. s/s ran. s poi l er. 
£4.960 06286 22296 private. 


GOLF GTL 


tr R cg. Mars Rad. 
imnncuhae condhkin. 
aUoys wtm new P8, nntad 
windows, sun root. Solar 
Alarm, front tog lamps. 1 
owner, 22,000 miles. 

£6.500 

Tel 01 879 3627. 


XS67 SUNBEAM TWER MARK 2 
RMit hand drive. A.7 tare Fend 
( -rKXr>o. one owner. 77^66 
mors, hard loo. ooti Mo. one or 
only 6 HIM In right hand - drive. 
Offer*. 0224 86I1BB. 


HltPl O 230 SL Sports. Hard 
and sofl up. Aulo and power. 
Red wttn beige Motor. Cocv- 
enn winner. Third Will 
taunacutaie eeodtuon ta roogte - 
ottf. £8.960. Tet 107361 
222207 CO 


AUDI QUATTRO 
TURBO 

'A' ran. Rad. Stereo. 24.000 ndtes. 
£14300 just spent on senes. A 
stunning car in excellent 
common. 

£1095 0 

Part exchange possible 
Tfll : 0227 472095 
0227 65819 (After hons) 


List price. Most models 
waUaote. UK supplied, not 
imp ort 

Executive Motors 
(Car Brokers). 

01 570 5651. 


88RC B D E S 2SOSE A regWtra- 
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owner. 22.000 miles, private 
sale £12.960 Day Ol 804 1494 
eves 0992 719322 


NCR CLUES £50 Si.. 1980. 
whlle/Mue mterlor. lull tender 
body styling ku and tally colour 
coded, hard/soft logs, eh-cmc 
windows. radio casoenc. 
45.000 genuine miles. FSH. 
drives hke new and looks stan 
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RUNUES 30BSC October 
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WVEXDCN B Reg. Unmarked 
example of tuts presugttras vehi- 
cle. Full body styling by T.W.R. 
TMs spfendU gleaming while 
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blue w1Ui | matching interior, l 
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3000 Automatic. 1986.. 19.000 
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6000 miles mb Usability 
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firsts al Sflvefxtooe I960**. 
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JENSON HTBCffim MK3 
1972 White. Good condlHon. 
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Audi qtiAmro coups fa 
1986 - MOtfld coal over £16.000 
new ■ ftawhed in Tornado red 
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very near offer. Tel: (06021 
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XJ4 4.2 Auto. 1983 A rcg. One 
owner 29.000 miles Air con. 
Pto m er radio cassette. 4 new 


85ft SL 84. A/C. Aulo. Cruise. 
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4.000 rails. £21.000. Tel 

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*5 500 E Saloon, tai ailaUe tar 
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with dectnc sun 
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tyres* Leather trim. Se r vice Ms- 
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GOLF OteaeL 2 avalUMr both 


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iftgUAW. E Type. 2 + 2. V12. 
1972. Oten. Professtonauy i» 
stared to ortgtnal condition. 
Offers invited around £9.000. 
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NEW XKL6 auto, aheen. oust 
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AUDI 100 CD A rani "8a. Dark 
metallic Mite. SOJXJO mites. 
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er Hou or extras. £9.000 Tel: 
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NEW MOUAR avaflacte now or 
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COLE CD - 1985. 'B‘ rcg. Stack, 
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V.W. AND AUDI 


AUDI qUATTRO Coupe Tornado 
red. treser wheeta. Itfll and cam- 
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CAMPAKN CABRIOLET U 

white, private vw dale, fun 
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CO/ OOLF GOLF. Over 100 
new cam available from stock. 
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SOLE Ml CBovenMe. wiriw. No- 
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V.W. SOLE Convert Me • 1963- 

*V teg. Maroon. Immaculate 
condition. 14.000 m. 1 owner. 
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JAGUAR 4^> 1983 1 owner, 
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pens, outstanding oemMton, 
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Manor XHKY Reg. sage me- 
tallic. hoe been shell changed 
and return to Jaguar speoflta- 
uon. Absolute barga in . £9,460. 
12 months warranty- Seay 
Park Garage Ltd 021 471 4899. 
1983 (A) Daimler Sovereign 4 2 
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control, alloy whede. 3MCO 
mites, sen-ire ntsury. £9.9aa 
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JAGUAR/MHSLEII 1983/86 
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£6.9W£lflOOO. ca. 19yema. 
PX..TW 01-664 9Q33 Bewm 
8S. 4ft SOVEROCN. One own. 
35.000 me Under warranty. 
COBmV. £12.996. Tel: 10625) 
51075- 

XJ40 36 SWB fljfl g oM- htaf*. 
tnwnor. 2000 lifts. Diw» 

brand new, effirw over c ^ ooo 

comMerafl. T«* 0DB5 S0834 


Blue Btaric C Reg. 1986. Ail 
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cSEseUe 11.800 miles. 
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41 68 ft 85 B Natmc/groy Auto, 
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tras. i onr. Fsh. Si.ooo m. « 

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Z80&L -Conv. H/T -V reg. lev 
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500 SC Company 
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Serviced. Metallic Hue. velour 
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dearie windows. ABS. aflaya. 
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Office 01-406 0481. Wsefeem 
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a *®®- 7 ® s rc»-i«l/hlack Inter)- 
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THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1 986 



SPORT 


33 


^jHL^j cQuiUan reviews the topsy-turvy life of the talented Lisa Opie 

From spoiled brat to darling girl 

Today marks the 


looay mans the beaming 
ofa small celebration for Usa 
Opie. a prodigiously talented 
young professional who has 
played a complete range of 
characters in British squash 
over the past half dozen years, 
from darling girl to spoiled 
brat and back again, with three 
national titles earned alone 
the way. 

Miss Opie is entered, with 
Fiona Geaves, for the London 
Evening Standard British 
Doubles championships 
wmch begin at Cannons Club 
in London this evening. In- 
deed, with the hospitalization 


another cold shoulder for a 
lonely girl whose all-too-pub- 
hc adolescence was littered 
with broken relationships 
both personal and 
professional. 

Since 


. leaving convent 
school m Guernsey at the age 
. | ®. a preparation she shared 
y^th her great rival. Marline 
te Moignan, the squash road 
for Usa Opie has offered a 
great deal of travel but not 
reany arrivals of note. On the 
individual level there has 
always been a problem player 
— Le Moignan and more 


‘Too soon," she says now of 
such mu versa) damnation. “I 
am 23 not 43. I have been 
training with weights this year 
and 1 am stronger, tighter and 
quicker than 1 have ever bocn. 

if things in the women's 
game more generally were as 
positive as Miss Opie now 
appears to be, it would all be a 
(foal more wonderfiiL One of 
the attractions of the London 
Standard British Doubles, be- 
sides the celebration, is un- 
doubtedly the £350 prize 
money. 


oflriplc doubte ChaSn" cn S 


week, the Opie-Geaves 
combination must be fa- 
voured to win Monday's final 
They were losing finalists to 
Cumings and Barbara Diggens 
Iasi year. 


Attracted by the 
sociable weekend 


Lisa Opie finds doubles 
rather hard to take seriously, 
however. “Fiona is actually a 
good doubles player, tactically 
and stroke wise, bui ] have 
only played for light relief 
other than in last year’s British 
championship. This year 1 am 
attracted by the prospect of a 
sociable squash weekend 
where I can celebrate winning 
back the national singles tide a 
fortnight ago.'* 

There are those who would 
suggest Miss Opie, now aged 
23. and living independently 
in her own house in Notting- 
ham, is rather overdue a 
celebration. There have been 
other high points, of coarse, 
national victories in 1981 and 
1 983, and an impressive 
collection of major tour- 
nament wins around the 
world. But the low points have 
seemed rather more indelible. 

Perhaps the lowesi point of 
all was an infamous racket 
chucking incident at Wembley 
when she lost the 1984 British 
Open final to Susan Devoy, of 
New Zealand — a moment of 
fury aimed largely at herself 
but interpreted as aggression 
towards referee. Bob Johnson, 
and incurring dire penalties. 
The worst pan for Lisa Opie 
was probably the withdrawal 
such an act produced in Jonah 
Barrington, the former world 
champion, with whom she 
was training at the time. 

The Wembley outburst was 
merely the most public in a 
series of similar tantrums 
down- the years. Barrington’s 
outraged reaction was just 


from overseas. She has prol> 
ably played more major finals 
than any female player s ince 
the unmatchable Heather 
Mackay. But in the big two, 
the , British Open and the 

world Championship, she has 

been ever the bridesmaid. 

She was one of the fended 
English team which finished 
second to the Australians 
amid bitter recriminations in 
the 1983 World Champion- 
ships, and she was virtually 
excluded, by a combination of 
her own actions and shrewd 
enemy manipulations, from 
the team that beat Devoy’s 
New Zealanders in the J985 
world finals. 


We seem to have 

gone backwards 


‘I work it out 
for myself now’ 


“Now I have learned to be 
alone,” she says. “Other peo- 
ple create the pressures in my 
life. Sometimes I went on 
court with so much advice 
from so many people I did not 
know where to start. I was just 
confused. 

“1 work it out for myself 
now. Sometimes I get it 
wrong. But at least I am 
travelling in one direction at a 
time and can see the wrong 
turnings although sometimes 
only after I’ve taken them." 

She was triumphant after 
winning back the national title 
at Bristol, beating both Soutter 
and Le Moignan in a superb 
and sustained display of 
racket skill and athleticism. 
“You had all written me off” 
she crowed at squash journal- 
ists during the champions' 
press conference. 

ft was a fair accusation. 
Temperament, a long battle 
with a mystery virus and 
repealed failure at last hurdles 
combined to suggest Miss 
Opie was a brilliant promise 
never to be fulfilled in world 
terms. 


Little enough by modern 
sporting Stamfords. Even the 
men’s top prize of £450 is 
small beer compared to the 
US $1 million prize fund of 
their new world grand prix 
structure. But significant to a 
women's nati onal champion 
who has been without even a 
racket contract for a year and 
is having trouble organizing a 
continuous competitive track 
to next April’s British Open 
and the World Championship 
in New Zealand next August 

“The men have really got 
themselves organ bred with 
their national league and 
international grand prix cir- 
cuit Wc seem to have pone 
backwards by comparison. 
There is less competition for 
women than for a long time 
past” 

She has taken to entering 
men's tournaments for match 
practise. Just last week she 
won two and lost two in a 
Northern round-robin event 
finally won by Bryan Beeson, 
the surprise winner of the 
men's national title in Bristol 

“1 have always played 
friendlies with the guys at 
Nottingham, but it is different 
to meet them on a genuine 
competitive basis,” says Miss 
Opie. “Much more fun.” 

It was not much fun for the 
women who met her, fresh 
from such preparations, on 
the Australasian circuit this 
year, when she won almost 
everything except, predict- 
ably. the New Zealand Open 
final against Susan Devoy. 

“I think 1 found myself at 
last in Australia and New 
Zealand,” she says. T went on 
my own just to get the games. 
There was a point when I 
nearly cracked up, but I forced 
myself to work it out and keep 
playing. 

“I haven't looked back 
since. Perhaps 1 have finally 
grown up.” 



Making the jump 
from a novice to 
a world champion 


Lisa Opie: the now grown-up tingles champion who hopes 
for a doubles success as well (Photograph: Stephen line) 


Sports writers of Hie Times 
present their selection from the 
sporting books of the you-. 
Today: Jenny MacArthnr on 
the best from the world of 
equestrianism. 

When Lnrlmfa Green, the 
former world and European 
three-day event champion, had 
her first lesson tram the Olyra- 
pic show jumping gold medallist, 
Hans W inkler, in 1974. he 
watched her for a while and then 
ashed: “Whu sort of a hone is 
this Be Fair then — zf he can win 
Badminton in spite of yon?" 

ft is typical of Mrs Green's 
self-deprecating that 

she should include this anecdote 
in her latest book Crva-Cdam- 
try Riding. Whatever short- 
comings she may have had then 
in Winkler's eyes, she is now 

probably better-qualified than 
anyone in the world to write it. In 
addition to being European 
champion twice and world cham- 
pion once she has the formidable 
record of having woe Badminton 
six times on six different horses. 

Her object to this book, which 
is aimed at all riders, whether 
they are competing in a small 
hunter trial or a major three-day 
event, is to show the correct way 
to jnmp every type of cross- 
country fence, from sxmken road 
to Irish bank, and from open 
ditch to ski-jnmp. She does this 
with the aid of Kit Houghton's 
superb photographs. Riders are 
p i ctur ed jumping fences in vari- 
ous positions and Mrs Green 
makes her comments alongside. 

Her writing, just like her 
riding, is fluent and instinctive. 
This b her fourth book, and she 
pats her message across with 
ease and in the simplest tains. 
When describing the 
“wonderfnT feeling of achieving 
independence of seat from 
hnrfc — fsodamentals to cross- 
country riding — she likens it to 
the moment when, as a child, her 
bicycle first stayed in a straight 
tine and did not “tur n into a 
frenzied snake,” when she let go 
of the handlebars. 

Mrs Virginia Leng, who suc- 
ceeded Mrs Green as World 
Champion this year, readily 
admits the debt she owes Mrs 
Green. In her antobiography,! 
Ginny, written under her maiden 
name of Holgate with Genevieve 
Morphy, she tells of the hones 
spent watching Mrs Green on 
video trying to pinpoint why she 
was so brifinmt at cross-country. 
She would play ha from take-off 
to landing in slow motion watch- 
ing her position at every mo- 
ment. She noticed that as Mis 
Green was never is front of the 
horse's movement coining into a 
fence she was never in a position 
to lose her balance as it was 
trying to get oat af trouble. 

Smfp winning the individual 
bronze medal at the Los Ang el es 
Olympics. Mrs Leng has been 
unable to pot a foot wrong. She 
won the individual and team 
gold medal in the 1985 Euro- 


pean Championships and the 
same again at this year's World 
ChampHSBhqis. Bin hers has 
been a long, hard struggle so the 
top. In spite of (his, as one might 
expect from the fan*loring Mrs 
fjwg fV her tale with 
spirit — there are plenty of high 
jinks and practical Jokes 
punctuating the serious and 
dedicated business of eventing. 

The banting field is the 
nursery ground of many of 
Britain's top riders — Mrs 
Green, Captain Mark Phillips, 
David Broome and Harvey 
Smith to name but a few. They 
aB acknowledge the debt they 
owe to fronting where, apart 
from learning to stay on through 
thick and thin, they first experi- 
enced the excitement of jumping 
fences at speed. 

John Watson, who has banted 
with over 200 packs of hounds in 
Britain — d abroad atoco becom- 


ing banting correspon dent to 

Country Life in 1969. captures 


the thrill an< t comradeship of 

hunting in his fattest book British 
and /ito Hunts and Hu nt smen, 
Volume III, which he describes 
modestly la the introduction as 
“a collection of a further 64 pen- 
portraits of fox, stag and hare 
hunts.” 


It is mach more than that. By 
tracing the histories of each hunt 
(accompanied with n tmer oas 
and (Men spectacular photo- 
graphs) and establishing the 
Integral part they play In the 
countryside. Major Watson has 
made a contribution to social 
history as weD as sporting 
literature. Hunting, as he points 
out, is much more a devotion, a 
way of life, than a sport. 

u the introduction be lists (fie 
numerous changes that have 
occurred in the countryside to 
the detriment of b anting. The 
anti-factors are a minor annoy- 
ance in comparison with the 
whu sprawl which has reduced 
the amount of turntable 
Tbere are also problems of 
trapping — especially in Ire- 
land, and the use of modem tom 
machinery and methods, which 
have drastically reduced the 
hare population, and the prob- 
lem of keeping fanners happy 
with the ever-inaeasiiig num- 
bers who follow hounds. 

Bat what astonishes Major 
Watson is the ability of the 
various knots to cope with these 
problems and, in most cases, 
raar frm r to prodnee tremendous 
sport The modern faxhoand has 
long impressed with its ability to 
adapt to modern conditions. The 
modern foxhunting it ap- 
pears, is bo less adaptable. 

• Cross-Country Riding by Lu- 
cinda Green (with photographs 
by Kit Houghton), Pelham 
Books; £1495. 

• Ginny An Autobiography by 
Virginia Holgate with Genevieve 

Murphy, Stanley Paul; £9.95. 

• British and Irish Hants and 
Huntsmen, Volume HI fry JNP 
Watson, Baisford; £35. 


Bigger role 
demanded 


by Africa 


Algiers (AFP) - African 
sports leaders are demanding a 
bigger role for the continent in 
world sport. The Supreme 
Council for Sport in Africa 


(SCSA) will examine a mani- 
festo callins 


calling for a new sporting 
onder when their general assem- 
bly convenes here this weekend. 


“Africa, which has 45 na- 
tional Olympic committees, is 
under-represented in fee sport's 
governing bodies,” Lamioe Ba. 
fee SCSA seemaxy, said. 

“Africa has made a real 
breakthrough in international 
football since 1982 and has 
shown it can be competitive in 
many athletics events. So we see 
no reason why we should tol- 
erate any longer (he feet we have 
just two qualifiers for the World 
Cup finals,” he said. 

“It’s important feat Africa 
and Asia, which re p re se nt 80 
natioaal Olympic committees 

between them, reinforce existing 
ties,” he a tided . 

He said fee boycott of this 
year’s Commonwealth Games 
in Edinburgh, because of fee 
British government's failure to 
enforce trade sanctions against 
South Africa, bad demonstrated 
fee solidarity of African and 
Asian countries. 


BASKETBALL 


BCP recover to 
beat Leicester 


BCP London picked them- 
selves up from last Sunday's 
defeat at Kingston to record a 
dose-fought 1 1 1-1 OS victory 
over Leicester on Wednesday 
night. 

Leading 57-54 at half-time, 
BCP let their 10-point lead slip 
to two points midway through 
the second half after an explo- 
sive scoring run by Leicester's 
Clyde Vaughan, who finished 
wife 29 points, and Barry Young 
with 36 points. 

Inspirational play by fee Eng- 
land international, Paul 
Stimpsoo. and Brian KeHybrew, 
BCP's player-coach, stemmed 
the tide, the pair coDecring24 
and 23 points respectively. The 
London dub now have won 
nine of feier ten games. 


TODAY'S FIXTURES 


7.30 miras stated 

FOOTBALL 
Second division 

Bradford v West Bromwich 


NORTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE CUP: 

score ft 


HwtiwA — co n d I n. (First loot 
brackets) Rhyl (2) v O m i n try gj. 

OTHER SPORT 


BADMMTDtt StaftortfsNra ctampion- 
steps (at Chestyn Hay SC, Cannock] 
BOKWG: London West Hotel, SW 
EQUESTRJANISSt Otympta Horae ! 

taOfyrnpia). 

TENNIS: Nabisco Master Doubles 
the RovaJ AJbort HaflL 


Tournament final stages (at Demgete 
Centre, Northampton). 


CARBUYE 



GUIDE 


MERCEDES 


MERCEDES WANTED 


MERCEDES 
380 SLC 


Amewnauc. IVtl. X irg. 
Mcullic pnro* bloc. Alloys. 
BUupu.iLi Toronto radio 
cam-ile- -CJOll miles. FSH. 
l.lnmarlcd i aside and ovL 
XI7.7S0OCIO. 

Tel 01 589 2514. 


PARADISE 

GARAGE 

offers: 

380 SL 
1983 A reg. S<pna» red. Tan 


| kaSer FSit One oww.^A/C. 


ABE Bate aaeo 25.000 
£21.500 
I Tel 01-720 0054 weekdays. 
01-876 6435 Sowiays. 


60S LW3 


Maonrfteeni 1970 6fc~. 

k ■ ■ ■diharf rnrtlffli ll 




j QMU1W.. I’ — — 

ol ecu Anympe o only 
1 yi. wisune eewSbon. wsntaons 
mar sitats. a» can d- 
ceexttbi tsM* prenw-ggy 




Tet 01 674 7989 anytime. 


soo D iwiae; i ■ i«6. eooo 


nnm. i»vi r r 

e/w. £l«cT50. 

MERCEDES BENS *20 SE D M9. 

TTTT. ..wi miles, nut 


ilia in. Wot', woornl to . nuI IJ?r' 


Ol*. efiras. p-'SLS’lS.'.o 
Ot -631 6526 or cr73*-«IStO. 

2 SO se 1983 LHD “I th 

A as. B«*cr **f“XV5,“wiu 
royn. «« £9.750 Will 

trait i 02i SOS loos- _ 

yffl ££ 19B4. OX 


pen SE im ex n«i. ^—7 

nuiii. aiiov iKKgS' 

wue will. 


Trif Ot*- 474 6577 C' en,n9> 

3*0 “• 




cona. tym 

Ttf. OCI 363 2M2 Eve*. 

330 TE AUlo v Rcst 




Imnw Conn i I 

230 TE EsMir. 1981.. 7S - aoa 




KWiSE’ioooh *»•» 

S9C SlT red/OL** Me. 
8 * * J .rfl hana drive. 


■S&SsSrsw-" 


roe owi ' 

NTW Vfi/564 SEL P* 10 n »? Sl 

Z St^d No •*""*« OCn - 


ssssr»-fc.s 


LONDON ROAD 
GARAGE 
(ROMFORD) LTD 

Mercedes Benz mart) 
dealers. 

Underwriters for tats and 
tow mBeage Mercedes. 
CONTACT 
MIKE DUNFORD 
ON 0708 23511 
AFTER 7PM 
0245 442172 


WANVEO. SLC. 79/80. *60/460 
. 5.0/600 Any colour ob»w 
White. Advise m it caae. Servm 
history Sums. Tet (0473) 
4&16T7 ntaytrmel or (0*7367) 
277 leves/weekenM. CA 
price CBnunwMW vrtth 
Quaiuy. 


omtly. Best Buyers Mole valley 
Molor Grow Td. 01 394 1114. 


REGISTRATION 

NUMBERS 


320 BOB nScnoo 


Tail MSI 


7BRO. ^ Mort ^~ 


, „.. v . automatic- 1980 
n* >. MelaDic Mue. senoo raltea. 

Gum conKHon- C2.SOO. 
fife 01-3*8 «759 MaytMe) or 
Ol-*" *"* * — — * 


100 GTB °" I9T ^ ^ 


iu £2.600 ono. 
TMCOS3&) 


Marra Mori- 


I avoDbok for 
. transfer- <M«» 


LTD - 

o round £ 1 0 . 000 ■ -«aa-» 

pt»e*e ertw torm TOUfc 


4 .mT For waiweaate 

3 MDT Tnurfrv. £2*60 


Tet; »Wt NOT 


MF&aTS 


9999 

oaod April 1985. £4.000 me mv 
maculate ear wwcmw 


1977 Leyton* 


RN 5858 OuMHBI EV 


uuc. mot May 
condition tXAhn 

Tet: 


87. Qood 


(0734) 343720 


too 


Crryce r Often over 

STU ia-seo. 


Tel MWMS55 


Tel CcW 


2 On Ro**r I lA 


1VCA 2 saTsob” 0«IO. 

i* nJ W4V2) 


. %rA (YA YA) prtrete 
YAY4 mimner tMctnJW- 
[uarXJS 1970. L 4-6 Q0. 


nlBHiSlMg 



ROLLS-ROYCE & BENTLEY 




i k Mortand green ouer Pmiv immoSa Mb 
'L 49J00 rates. 


trmi KM sovkb tetory. Pteac Sties. An axcsfcnt eampb. <9, 

zmsso. 

19*1 W HaM SBver SgH. In great atfii tram wfcurtrfcn. On* owner 
with luff sendee Mstny. 29.000 m*s orty. 179958. 

1981 (X) Star MriL MaaOc ocbb fabe wlti nognoBa Me art utn. A 


s^>one otm or Wtt M satia history, hewng covered only 48JDD 


wo era 

BROWNS GARAGE LTD. 
Phone: (04946) 78478 or 
lys (04946) 2696 


Sundays 


HOWELLS MOTORS , 


JMITED 


«M ewen Hm lube Ml SHwr. wfa ra * rogmapai 
utMrteiy.SroiGiwrorel.MrtnaiilnBrreB&paaiMLStjnom^ 
FSH - i — - ***■ 


I tSS4 Heft Rejw Sfeer Sfflrtl WBoa 6cte owr.ftanw.Jjy 
Ann Ud8 up ids. BMOttoraMBMta 


> tower raff, 3000 raffn, FSH. 


WARRANTED 


mi 


Tel Office 0222 592313 Sandsy 0222 7B5T51 


ROLLS ROYCE 
CORN1CHE 
SALOON 

Gold 
mites. 

Regular service 
avSbic. and MOT 
Rftcuny 87. 

ramM 

Td 0323 91921. 
(fwSJO*. 


aaOie. Appro* 38.000 
Eudlnt anufiiioa. 


mxil 


1980 SHADOW H 


Caribbean Sub. Retfty 

wceBerrt condtion. F5M. 
39,000 miles. Second 
owner. Private sMe. 

El MOO 


•ar 


(tojrtm-CT 

(eves) 01-455 264Z. 


tnunanuaic. flm r e t niw red on 
I60t DecBuner 1963 (A rrax 
Rod* Revce extended warranty 


UK neat two yean. Price 
£35.996 TMnutone OKI -430 
3933 durtug Bimneai bsm. 


- 79 on. 36.71X3 
rnttes. FUfl RJI. hvkc bMory 

r l previous owner. Burgundy 
black cvnfiex. hnmmtrteie. 
£l8.96a Teuwle 
Leeae. Tet 0902 6ui» 


BENTLEY TURBO 
MULSANNE 
BLACK 


Jrnvy 1885, u d 
j Us4 tognaffa 
21,000 rates, t3ortfer 
nd Raffs raattiined. E4S550. 
Ttt Uss Mass - 
01 960 2121 Office Hours. 


M M H T OUrneny 


Oroen wtm rare number plate. 
Cl 1 ^ 00 . TWXT 732 049006 ' 
840111 . 


■aLVEX SHADOW 2 Wr^. 1960. 


Piped Id 

JwadreeL earn owner vriit] FSH. 
.63X300 Rifles. Mmctflaie coo- 

atuoa. no.net. ret 0372 

377243. 


: 600 LWB 8 


Lroni 


WHIT - 1972- Long wM 
beee saloon wflti tflvMpo. Clar- 
et whu ivory Interior. Beaunfu] 
epadman throaoruoat. £8.750. 
Tet (0739 200207 tT9 
want SaADOW 1974, nared 
Areh Wtm cveroes roof. Crum 
new Avon ivnnrrnni Person. 
ai Plate. Superb. £9.960 PX 
Pota. « 467 9000 Ammme. T 


I 1980 SHADOW (I 

1 Caribbean Blue. Really 

excellent condition. 

FSH. 39,000 mffes. 1 
Second owner. 

Private sale. 

ciBjioa. 

Pteasa sail Mr Strata 
day) ff1-J77 1915 
(area) 81-455 2842. - | 


j | SAAB | 


SAAB 900 GLS 

1984 Auto, A reg. stiver. 
aPoy wheels, suiroof, 
spoler, cruise control, 
niari stereo. Safe 
warranty & fully reg untS 

Aug. Vay good condition. 

01-994 5842 

908 TURBO: 82 lYl aulo. Cold. 
v«tour Bin. extras: son roof, 
esretric widOows nt FSK 
£3.950 ono. TH: <0872; 
881012 tuHrowr area) 

9001 88. B reg. 3 door. Platinum 
blue. Sun roof. PhUUps stereo. 
£6^00. Tbk osee 646121 

SAM TURBO 82. V re*. 4 door 
aoui. 66.000 Rtues. Brown ma. 
FSH. MD-J car EjcreBenJ crexM- 
Uoo. £3.480. Tel: 01-937 4584 
otnee 

900 TURBO SE 1983. 29000 
od>. leaner. ZietxuT. every ex- 
tra. 1 cartfuJ Managing 
Director driver. £3.960 0892 
824428 OT Ol 734 1640. 

1 MOTORS leasing 1 


NEW VOLVO 
ESTATES 

For Jam Plan £9,300, for 
special leasing 

anangemeres. please phone 
01-643 3232 

(AN ALIEN MOTORS 

OF WBBLEOON 


| PERFORMANCE CARS | 

SHURA XR4J ■ 1903 (A). Ka- 
nond wMb. 2 mtvaw owner*. 
Service Usury. Under 28.000 
rerarded mites. Security 
raarfeed. Sraerbiy eared for. 

CELP98. Ten 04862 61444 

rwnhsm Ecrtneeri 


PERFORMANCE 

CARS 


JACK HOSE UMfTH) 




FBUUTO 4QB1. 1982. 22JU0 

mb. 1 ounei E25JKHL 

MSBMT1 MBMK 85. 83 

(A). 4.000 mis. CM £00 

M8EMTTI BrtUWO US. 
MffiUhffll mb. 1 imier 

PORSCHE 928 S. 1983 10JJOO 
mb. E 21 .BSL 


SHADOW fl. I960 (W) 55D00 

mis. C19J50. 

CUROBi Faraw fa »o». 


1968 C. 9.000 U. tfiJSL 

01 647 4473 


COLT smew - 19B6. O re* 
2000 iratet. only. SWB. petrol, 
wtute. sunroof. duU-turs. Brin 
SUtfdS. ude rails. £600 stereo, 
snudne mum for sale. 
£10.996 ovno. Tet Ol 639 
2666 m w ends/ Ol 228 
0333 office. 


L070S DCCCL C reg tr onmacu- 
1 nr coKUmci. FSH, 9.000 
mBes. Lott of extra's. New ex- 
cess of £ 18 . 000 . 9WUI »e 
oareau K13.996. Gan be 
slewed Sui London. 0424 
446629 office noun. 


rnnmn sob otb ov i9sa. 
wtilte wltti red lode. fH + RH 
spoilers, i 1 ?**. air cond. Ki n. B 
alarm. 29300 miles. FSH. 
lu2S/>0a PrtvBie sale. Ptione 
0923 756900 weekends or eves 


PAimtCB KALLIST A 1 . 6 UIR* 
1984 . wood veneer (Msa and 

doer cawnws. 2.900 genuine 
miles an clock Suttetti rondl- 
uon. £8^000 ono TeLOl 878 
8S63 wtncl 


7V» TA94BII 2 81 6 weed, con- 
HrifMr. red. October I9B3, A 
repsnum. 18.000 miles. UB- 
trafutate coiuuiiob. used 
summers only £9.000 Tei 0440 
86504 


nnu sob errs, nurcti as. 
Red wiui Mevratu nide wnn 
Red Dunne, air cond. 7.000 
miles. SM^OO. Private sale. 
Tel 0578 72004 home. 01-539 
3661 


■OVER 3900 vines*. Manual, 
snverieri. I9B6. Sendee histo- 
ry Under warranty until April 
1987. Security marked. Beauti- 
fully presented ai an ma*w 
£11.995. Tel: 0486? 61444 
madlum Stringer} 


BS TURBO 
NEW SHAPE 


D registered, k200 mffes, 
rosso red. recaro seats, 
rapid de-ice front screen, 
electric mirrors and 
windows, fuel computer, 
sun roof, antdock brakes. 


August 87. 2 years extra 
corer warranty. £500 


Accept PJfffi 

Tel SSI 6267027 


JOHN HOSMERl 
MOTORS LTD 

OfffEB THE HKlDWnB | 
EX DEMOBSTMIOItS 
RW SALE 


1985 T TieiA IX TURBO 
19B6 'O' PHSUA LX IE 

1986 D' Y10 fW 


f«a nvstein 

0442 833311 


to ZX Targa Aixo. 
iw. red. One owner. Mint. 
£9.280 Tel: 09274 20076. 
Btt £6.950. See Sunday nmn. 


COLT STAtoON TUtoO A res. 
dictde windows. PAS. sun- 
roof. aoedsl alloys. FSH. 


£6600. Tet (02 S &I 28876. 


rmmi roe cm x m tot 

81 . red/mngpolis. a/c. d/a. 
FSH. 40.000 mb. £21X300. Ol 
251 1200 Wh 660 I9BA C/WE. 


RKW 248 am ( 74 ). ROSSO. 
31.000 mm. FuB leather. Gen- 
uine concoura Solder. £29.996. 
TM: (0629) 732239b CD. 


NEW CUAIUUM Scorpio 4n4. On 
tne Rena am- only ci6Aoa 

Save £3^36. TeL Dew of Croy- 
don Ol 686 8888 - 


1WS D Sierra Caaworih. Sad 
sale. 4000 mom. white. btBOO- 
ful. with Porsche performance. 
£14.960. (HI 0734 760322. (W 
0734 413454 (BoM. 


TOYOTA SUPRA 2.a June 84. 
manual. 36.000 miles. 2 lone 
mHamr bine. a/C. immacBiatt. 

FSH. £7-200 mi 0277 810944 


ions CAM. For me best na- 
Uanwtde cash buyers. Phone 
Ulus Norfolk 0603 407766. 


riMMUm + 8 HHSon. Alloy *■ 

leather, ah extras. £> 4 ^oa 
0428 62836 (Sumy). 


MANAGING 

DIRECTOR 



Voice and Data Gwununkations 
for the financial Community 
Orat55/WOpA,l 


From an MX). 


MGBGT Black. 8900 miles first 
registered 1980. One owner 
from new. Excellent condition. 
Offers over £6,500 Tel: 01-124 
1603. 


MGB 1966 Red, totally restored 
to immaculate condition, wires. 


to an M.G.B 


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34 


SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


RACING 


Music Be Magic can 
strike winning note 
over untried distance 




;<A 


'.s. ■ 7 " ^ '."1 


W ■» ■■ : - »,• xror-:-*. r. •: • - ■ 



By Mandarin (Michael PfailBps) 


Music Be Magic is napped 
to win the Red Alligator 
Handicap Chase at Doncaster 
today, even though the dis- 
tance of 2 Vi mites is new in 
him whereas Voice Of 
Progress, Amber Rambler and 
Repmgioa, his principal ri- 
vals, are all proven over this 
trip. 

Having watched Music Be 
Magic finish strongly up 
San down’s redoubtable hill, 
where he made Berlin fight to 


the last gasp, it is my conien- 
iat Gordon Richards 1 


tion that 
seven-year-old will now relish 
further than two miles. 

Richards clearly thinks so, 
too. otherwise he would have 
waited Tor his only other 
alternative engagements in the 
near future which are both 
over two miles at Ayr next 
week. 

So if we assume that Music 
Be Magic can produce his best 
over this new distance, and he 
is certainly bred to do so, the 
question then to be answered 
is whether he will be good 
enough to master todays ri- 
vals. I believe he wifi. 

The handicapper should 


certainly have got the measure 
of the top weight. Voice Of 
Progress, by now and it is 
significant that the stable 
jockey Richard Dunwoody is 
on duty at Warwick. 

Amber Rambler, on the 
other hand, will be a thorn in 
any side. Yet there are form 
lines which suggest that Music 
Be Magic can cope with him 
on these terms. The first is 
that my nap beat him by five 
lengths when they met at level 
weights, albeit over two miles, 
at Wetherby first time out last 
season. 

Second there is a line 
through Berlin which su gg ests 
that Music Be Magic does 
have 61b in hand now. At 
Sandown be was giving Berlin 
51b when beaten a head by 
him. Yet only a fortnight 
earlier, at Ascot, Amber Ram- 
bler had finished four lengths 
behind Berlin when attempt- 
ing to give exactly the same 
amount of weight away. 

So with Repingtoo penal- 
ized 41b for winning at 
Wetherby last Saturday, I 
believe the stage is set for 
Music Be Magic to regain the 


winning frail having finished 
second In his last two races. 


Playschool (1.45) and Back 
Up (2.15) are others who now 
look poised to pick op the 
winning thread again after 
experiencing misfortune last 
time. 

Playschool, my selection for 
the Merryman n Novices 1 
Chase, looked like winning at 
Cheltenham last Saturday 
when he came down three 
fences from home. 

Before that, he had beaten 
Comeragh King, who in turn 
looked like winning at 
Haydock on Wednesday until 
he feO at the penultimate 
fence. 

As for Buck Up, my selec- 
tion for the EBF Sea Pigeon 
Handicap Hurdle, she was 
poised to ran away with her 
second race of the season until 
she was uprooted by the 
second-last hurdle. 


At Warwick, I give Cottage 
Rna a good chance of winning 
the Budbrooke Novices' 
Chase following that good 
performance recently over the 
same course and distance. 


The Neville Cramp-trained Repiagfn, who won in 
the Red Aifigate Handicap 


DONCASTER 


Guide to our in -line racecard 


103 (12) 04432 TMESTORM (CDJ3F) {Mrs J Rytay) B HM 9-10-0 . 


w 


7-2 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.45 Shannie. 

1.15 Carousel Rocket. 
1.45 Playschool. 


2.15 Buck Ua 

2.45 MUSIC BE MAGIC (nap). 


3.15 Kgsun. 


Michael Seely's selection: 2.15 BUCK UP (nap). 

The Times Private Handicapper’ s top rating: 1.45 PLAYSCHOOL. 


Going: good 

12.45 LOTTERY CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS HANDICAP CHASE (£1.194: 2m 150yd) (6 
runners) 

RGanfty(5) 90 FZ-1 

— — IB-1 

A J Orion (5) • 9B 0-1 

N Faria 89 10-1 

w narima w as 7-a 

P30-P02 SHAMUE (O CNeriJ 0 0‘NsO 7-10-0 PGrasafclifS) SB »4 

18B&: PRESS OAKS 10-11-8 M Bowfey (Evans lav) J S Man 3 ran 


0412113 JUST AUCX (5 CMOS) M H Euttftty 7-19-10. 
O-POOFO AOAHE (D Hodgson) D Hodgson 7-11-8. 


34P-301 ABERSMG (P Todd) □ Todd 11-11-4 (6m).. 


P021UO CHESTNUT PRMCE (D) (1 Buraton) P Prttcharf 11-10-10. 
OPOIF-O FIFTH COUJUN (M vWasntfi) M WSasraMh 8-10-0 



good to firm, Oct 


Cattart* last time {2m. t14&l.goo<l to Arm. Dac 8.9 ran). CHESTNUT PRMCE has® 
ly. best affon (his Eflaaon (TOjQ baring Tha waidar (11-7) a rack at Worcostar {2m, 
iD.7nin).RFTHCOUlMNraadedtaceonia«w>a ri « n ca.aMinlo!i«iladwPdapelari aea ao n wtien^104)a 
(ram SHANNE (105) at WSnrtckpfln, £1024, soft, Apr 1R 13 ranfLast dme out SHANME (9-6) 
r-rtoden when 81 2nd to Akho (124) « Unoueter (an. £1821, sod. Dac4. B ran). 


’ran). 

1 KI 

was. darner-ridden 


1.15 SAUCY KIT NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £2,712: 2m 4f) (11 runners) 


1 

2 
3 

5 

6 
7 

11 

12 

15 

18 

19 


21 CAFFUSQ (J Upson] T Casey 10-12. 


21 CABOUSEL ROCKET (A Saccomando) R Whitaker 1512. 
31 RAGLES ROGUE (0) (D RadmOe) M CSmacho 10-12 


ALARM CALL (Mrs A Budge) Jtawiy RtzgaraM 10-7- 

82 DRY Om (L Naylor) M cnnpmon 107 — . — 

2 FORT UNO (G Lams) C Hoboes 10-7 . 


043420 KLOSTERBRAU (Mrs P Joynes) J Spearing 10-7. 
MASNOON (A WWonsaii) Oanys SmUh 10-7. 


00 NAYSHAN (Mss A HawfcBS) E Wheeler 10-7 _ 
TO KNOCKALENA (W Easom) H Renting 10-2. 


. R Buckley (4) OS 8-1 

_ MBmaene 96F52 

PTbCfc 91 6-1 

M Dwyer — 5-1 

SMtetrifl(l) 79 3-1 


CCux(4) *9910-1 
.P Warner 8312-1 
_ C Grant — 14-1 


04 UARMA PLATA (D Chapman] D Chapman 10-2.. 


lPepper 

PNhaa » — 


1985: 1BNMAJED 1512 JMcLaugran(1 0530) C Spares 18 ran 


CODM CAFFHWi (10-10) beat OM Oubln (10-10) a length in a Makta 
run I VI heavy. A«2B. 19 ran) CAROUSB. ROCKET showed maranal 
" i(10-7)l Viltoa WBdwrtjyjurenUa event writ MARMAPLA 


ing Nos Na Gaodfie (10-7 


In a Maktetf Hurtfle at Tralee (2m. £1037, 
ifrO-3 


when (157) twat- 

MwwtiarPr tuiranflaavem with IWRRIA PLATA (1(Tg) 101 htohar away 

, £685, good. Doc 6, 18 ran). RAFFL ESROCRJE bad dearly barafitteO from an lntoelt*ang(l5lO)M 

■■ikastayertDbaaiDunsianMmmririririririHHHHMMnHM 


jon 

away in 6th and 

absolutely no chance with run 
or that fan, £714, soft Nov 28, 
10) at Worcester, that was no 
Selection: FORT UNO 


, Wttal outing (15 . 

(10-10) Kl at Unoxatar. wltti KLOSTEMMAU (10-10) below form 2BL 
(1 OS) a poor 70i (2m 4t. £865. wft. Dec 4. 18 tan). ORT OM (10-10) had 


1.45 MERRYMAN II NOVICE CHASE (£1,555: 3m 122yd) (B runners) 


0000-1F PLAYSCHOOL (ROriOalDBarara 8-11-1. 


OWM CAIKOC (W A Steplmaon) W A Stephenson 6-10-10 

434220 JAPUHQ (J Thomas) J D Thoms B-10-10 

421-F1F JENNE PAT (BF) (J Thompson Frims Ltd) Q Rkhsds 6-10-10 
00-1200 NO-U-TURN (S Tindafi) S MbSot 8-10-10. 


44443-0 VOYANT{TWragg)DLW»riro 7-10-10. 


_. PMoUt «9iP04 

K Jones 8416-1 

_ D Tam (7) 68 10-1 

PTBCk 03 4-1 

QUadra (4) 60 6-1 

— 3-1 


1985: SOPHISTICATED 7-0-12 Mbs A Beaumont (12-1) Mrs A TomUnaon 6 ran 


FORM PLAYSCHOOL going yjgwhan b a ng 3 out Iasi dme. previously (11 
Sparian Orta* (11-3)1 

@904, so(L Dac 4, 14 


i-1) seared an knpresstee 91 


to soft. Nov 22. 4.. ^ _ 

IT CT1-D to 2nd whan fefing at Iha 
. J1-7) finished 21 2nd to Mr Chris 

. .. -apodjStov 28. io ran). JEWEMTon penribmata start (TT 

l 1 1 <ai1 *1810. good to soft, Nov 21. 11 ran). MHJ-.w. 

ousN(l1-a<ttoppointralavoiJrtiB on chasing dofaut when around 29 Stfi «o 
(Sn 40yds. £176 9, good. Nov & 16 rap). 


1 41, E4143, good to soft, 
1 2nd to Tartan 


Iflntehad »!■■■ 
10-12) was a dbtait 6di to 
(i test at utiaxeter pm a. 
l-TlriSedgefieldama 



Racecard number. Draw Id brackets. Sb-flgora 

- - - .. ... g_ 


and dtetanoa wfnrar. UT bearin tovrarite h team 
raoaj. Owner in brackets. TVatoer. Age and 

_ . . wetfn. Rider plus any alolmnca. The Timas 

name (B4rinkare. V-vbor. l+nood. E-EyearanW. C- Pffratt Handicappar's rating. Acprradmria starttog 
course winner. Ddtetance winner. CD^xurse price. 


form (F-ML P-pritad up. Ihm 
brought down, shipped in. R-rahnefh. Horse's 
namelB-bNnkars. V-irfeor. H-hootl. 


Z15 EBF SEA nGEON HANDICAP HURDLE (£2^65: 2h) 150yd) (6 runnere) 


1 1QOOF4- FLAREY SARK (8 Marsh) R Fisher 9-11-11 _____ 
3 122-31F SEAGRAM (BF) (Mariaest Ltd) D Barm 6-167 ___ 
5 1fF-0n OLD MCK(J Hanson) J Hanson 5-10-1 

7 4114-2F BUCK UP (BF) (l>Ooi R Warded M H Easrirby 4-1CM) . 

8 244360 SEA PBMAirr OR Jonari I R Jones 10-104) 

10 GrutVOO PAVOUR-BY-FORIUNE (J Ottera) Mra S Austin 4-10-0. 


- PMriMNB • M 2-1 

m. ■ Dwyer « 4-1 

LW|W 98 F5-4 

CEraaan B 8-1 

DWflaaua 72 6-1 


1086c WWTER REASURE 5-11-7 M Pitman (158 lav) Mra J Pfbnan 8 ran 

FORM 8 “ 


SEAGRAM, who Iwa been novtosl 

from dtegraced whan 71 2nd to Lanr 

let when hoteflno every chance tear 

^■MBrwSqCbTi4.n3i&H 


9) 4KI 3rd to Stars And StripealKFQ at Newton Abbot (2m, £2382. soft. Mw20, 11 ranl'pAVOUft-aY-FOR- 

u)NE(10-7)a one raced 7£i0th to Brihnny (11-0) at Nawcastie with OLD NKK (11-1Q Mow form unplaced 

lha money 0n if, £1340. good, Nov IsTis ran). Satoctioa: SEAGRAM 


2AS RED AliJGATOR HANDICAP CHASE (£3^47: 2m 41) (6 runners) 

1 14F-133 VOICE OF PROOREBS RR (M Mritey) D Mchoison 8-11-10 RBaggaa 06 4-1 

3 1111-13 AMBER RAMBLER (CHDSRvenoriH Wharton 7-10-13 R Rowe 00 3-1 

4 FP-U422 MUSIC BE MAGIC (NMBSOr^GRiChritU 7-10-12 PTtacfc R99F54 


5 11/11-PP KYOTO (D) (B MonMnuse) J JanMna 3-10-10- 
8 1 F 1 1-01 RBRNGTON D (J GBiiril) N Gnaap 0-10-3 (4ax)_ 


12 FP2PM KUDOS (J W BtendaQ J W Bkmdol 11-1041- 


- M Dwyer 

CHriridaa 06 4-1 

— 9010-1 


190& BHM3HT OASSIS 9-102 S Sherwood (B- 1 ) K Balay 0 rat 


FORM VOICE OF PROGRESS (1M1). to best when tieah. an eaw 121 win from WSteTTmaa (10-7) al 
runm N o wtx g y on raappaaranoe an 4(. £5990. good. Oct 2A/f ran), twice. betow that town sobsa- 
quantiv. AMBER RAMBLER nTSlwaa far Son (fisgracedwMn SKI 3rd to Church Warden (10-7) at Aacot (2m 
M.E1K84, good, Nov I5.6 ran). MUSIC BE MACC(11-7)ca i ia n Wit Bach tohtebeatonlvteaiotiyahaadto 

NawtonMH 


11-2) at Sandown (£m 18yds. £71 19. 
Das saaaoa Bast eftort testtarm (12-7) an 


MUSK BE MAGIC 


(11-7) came ricM tack u Na 
to soft Nov 29. 7 ran) KYOTO has 
61 wkmar from Leodaraance (1 f-1) riNawsori Abbot 
shandy whan a 41 vrinmr tram Socks 
* 7 ran) KUDOS ( 10 - 1 ) looked one 
good. Dec 6,5 ran) 


3.15 DOORNOCKER NOVICE HURDLE (£856: 3m 122yd) (19 rumars) 

1 P022P/1 ALWBtS BOY (Mrs S Marks) J King 7-11-2 SI 

B OOOP-44 DKlSUN(BF)fJ Hard) D NMnteon 5-10-10 RBeggaa 

0 02234)2 BWTOGGOMJ Hanson) J Hanson 6-10-10 ■ Dwyer 

11 OF BRUHTNER (D HorsweS) K BaSey 5-10-10 — — 


12 P2iy3-20 DYLAITS PRIDE (CLriNtolD Barons 7-10-10. 


14 423JD-O0 GALLANT NATIVE (Mrs A Sooton) M CasM 6-10-10 , 

15 IPyPP-PQ HAPPY (BIO (B) (C F Lea) C F Lee 8-10-10 . 


PNMmBb 


16 

19 

20 
22 

23 

24 
26 

27 

28 
29 

33 

34 


P OATLAMTO1 (S PtCkritO Mtee G PlCksid 10-10-10. 


JDDoylaH) 
DShaw 


8413-1 
18 7-1 

n 3-1 

— 15-1 

90 52 
71 — 


000 QUEBS PATTBW (Mrs M Dawson) P Beaumont 51510 
04050 MVPfHOTH D PARK (TranSpfriB Lap C HoSwas 51510 
UFPQO SEALED OFFER (Mss J Hey) P Beaumom 51510, 


400 oaaiT MANUAL (Mrs C Bnri ora i O r u c a ) M H Easarby 51510 
TOO OFTEN (B SoBs) K Bridgwater 7-1510. 



2 CHARTS! HARDWARE (Charter Racing Ltd) Mrs jnwan 5157 
004500 CHART FWDei(BiateaB 1 Gk) A Snrih 5157 
DON RUN (A WMnsoro Deny# Smith 51 


050 OUR DUDLEY (Mrs RBamri) Mrs RBarroft 5157- 
400-402 KERSraiA (Lord Cadogan) N Crucop 5155 


OOO-OPO SAVOLEYRES (Dr L Parry) OL nary 8155. 


1985: POWBIFUL PADDY 5-1510 M Dwyer (6-4 lav) Jimmy Fitzgerald 22 ran 


CADM ALWOtSBOY 

rUQfilniflludMl 


111 


Bah 

ISO (15Q both ori ol contention at ■ 

(157) Improved on past efforts erih a 51 2nd B OW 


afipmto^hwnterp1-Qa.witiiOUEB4SPATT ffiN j11-^a vaBbaMen 



4tfitoAnah- 
| and HAPPY 


teds.E761jlkm.Oa24. 15 rani Btt8UN(15T0)fintshadd4|H 

F t'O-*) e Saftwr 101 back hi wh end SAVOLEYRES (104H arte 
|M«kat Bman put £1386. good W e oft. Nov 22. IS nwAWGl 

■TOy. a race in which CHART ■ 

| weak ened up flw runto teat time. 
■D333. good to soft, Nov 27. 21 ran) 

Hlvm&KLD PAI «(11-0 ) has yeuoreproduca an lHHaoitoDaer Crest (11-0) aiSandown (2m. E1772, soft 

Jan 31, 19 ran) CHACTERHAROW ARE (ll-QIHstiad 2) 3rd (promoted to ZncntD Button Yota Up (fl-O!) on Ms 

hurdPng debut at Woroeriar (an 41. E1014, soft. Nov 19. 24 ran) W ac tiri kBIO TOOOH1 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 


JOCKEYS 

■ Winners ■ 


Hides Percent 


H Wharton 

G 

13 

38£ 


7 47 

1 SD 

G Richards 

6 

28 

21 A 

Pthcii 

6 44 

135 

JmmyRzgsraW 

W A Stephenson 

5 

5 

34 

43 

UJ 

11 D 


Only Quakers 



WARWICK 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


1.00 Ricmar. 

1. 30 Aunt Etty. 

2.00 RoysrripL 


Run. 


2.30' 

3.00 King Retail 
3 JO PenDyne’s Pride. 


By Michael Seely 
2.00 Rogairia 2J0 Stir About 


Going: good to soft 

ua HAMPTON NOVICE HURDLE (Dhr 1: 3-Y-O: £685: 2m) (20 rumors) 


1 

3 

1 CELTIC CHEF (Mrs L SewsQ Mra M RlmaB 11-3 

30212 HICaiAR (B) (M - W Haw; ’ ) J JenkbTS 1 1 -3 

SMamhaed 

97 F6-4 

32 

4 

011113 SPLENDB MAQNOUA 0 (M Pipe) li Plpo 11-3 .... 


93 4-1 


7 

PO CHERRY LUSTRE (C Rivers) B StBwrm« 1510 



9 

11 

12 

DAWN PRINCE (Unity Farm HoBdayS) P Hobbs 1510 

Peter Hobbs 

— 151 

& 0 t 

0 FMBE5T (B) (R AsMonO Mas A King lO-tn 

A Webb 

00 — 

i 

13 

14 

222P03 HOME OR AWAY (R Bsey) J Baker 1510 

ITTMAAD (M Flnrl) R Akflhimr 1 H.IQ __ 

- ■ C Brown 

■ 012-1 

3 

6 

16 

OUT YOMiai (W vngtttran) W W^itmai 1510 


* — 51 

17 

POLEcnopr (h cm y) w pm. in-m . 


8 

10 

13 

15 

20 




21 




24 




25 




27 

0PM aaiBrSPFT(JC.An)WUmri R -l(U; 



T 8 

28 





29 

00 KASU (S Tahsmer) J Hams 156»,— ■ 




30 

30 KBJ-VAIM (R KfWy) W Mo lOA ... 




32 

0 HISS ARON (1 DfUmfl) H WTutinn lOJi 





1985: BOB AMD PETER 1510 J Loner ( 20 - 1 ) M Pipe 26 ran 


1^0 YOUNGSTERS CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS NOVICE SELLING HURDLE (£548: 2m) 

(13 runners) 


00004*0 CHAISE LONGUE (C WKghQ H 0*Nefl 51512. 


GREYHRMRS QUEEN (fttiB D ABlOn) R Cwtta 51512. 


0048 CHORISTERS DREAM (B) (Mrs A Lodge) J Perratt 5155. 
00 RUPERT BROOKE (H Man) I Cok 5155. 


MHoad 


B B o win g 74 51 


03 TBBI GATE (R HoCInsheed) R HaBnshaad 5105. 
0101 AUNT ETTY (CD) (MSwHQM Pipe 5104. 


D BAYVEW GAL (R Juckes) R Juckas 5155- 


BU-T PETAL (M Pdaiton) 0 BurdheA 510-0 . 


PO DEBORAH COT (Mrs S Greathead) T &eath 8 ad 5150. 
P LA KU£ OF SANTO IB Write) 8 Write 5150 


DJ 


82 51 
_ J Lower B99P54 
TPMWd — 51 


D Morris 


LA GRANDE OAME (T Gowf) R SimpSOfl 51041- 


00 L'ETOU DU PALAIS (B BlumM) B Stevens 5150. 
00 SOLENT FLYER (N Pay) B Stevens 5104) 


Jwstca Cbaries Jones 
DGHaflhar 

CWi 


— 52 


Penny Ffitcfe-Heyaa — 15t 


19B& POOELLA 5150 G Landau Averts tav) S MaBor 9 ran 

2 JO STONELEKaH HANDICAP CHASE (£1,741: 3m) (13 runners) 

2 01F211/ ITSOMLYA JOKE C (Mre M Fry) T Forster 51 15 Mr M Arantags (71 

* 411M4 POLAR SUNSET RLBF) (C MacSwitey) T FfrSter 51 1-B___™^_ H Davies 


4 2/11225 KACOUVER (BJJ) (A J Bingtey Ltd) Mrs J Pitman 5n-7_ 

5 2222-00 GAINSAY (B) [E Brown) Mr* J FUman 7-1 1-5 

8 2P0-440 GALESBURG (B) (R Jenks) N GasakH 7-1 1-5 


8 P 0 B 1 / 44 I HY-KO (C,0) (Mis MBrubri(«r)DGarriOll 0 151511. 

9 331352 R0Y8CRFT (D) (Q Hutsby) J Chugg 51510.. 


P Scudamore 
D Browne 


96 4-1 
90 — 
94 51 
81 51 


10 3U/121-0 DARGAI (Maj J Urqriwri) R Armytaga 15157 

11 0P0511 ROGAIUO (CJD) (M Popham) P Baiay 15155 

12 1/M MISTER SKIP (V KBCSliny) J Webber 7-152 

13 21-1210 RIVER WARRIOR (C) (4 Bredtey) J Bradtoy 5152 


P Dover 93 9-2 

— B Pawtf • 99 151 
S Morahaad 94F7-2 


16 P0035U N0R7H LANE (G C Bb^me Lid) M Pipe 5150. 
16 OP/135 BARNABY SAM (J Hobson) RHotenshaad 7-150. 


GMamagh — 151 
_ G Davtaa 92 151 


J Lower (4) 83 — 


198& ROADSTER 512-2 A Webber ( 4-1 Jt-fav} C Nash 9 ran 


D Canary (7) 7S — 


2L30 BUDBROOKE NOVICE CHASE (£1,880: 2m) (19 runners) 

1 20P5F1 COTTAGE RUN C-D (Mrs M Rogers) D Mchobon 511-11 

2 Q 0 P/ AZ1ANO (H Mould) 0 Mctnlsan 5114. 


R Dunwoody •» 52 


5 231104 DANCER M PAMS (K PHteU) J Casgrava 5114 

10 005000 FLVMG TBBBRFOOT (EO (Mrs J Harvey) P Britey 5114 

11 23P24RF GALA'S IMAGE (Shattdi Al Abu Khamsin) Mrs M RknaB 5114 

13 PU 0 F -00 GOLDBI DESTWY (M Hobnas) K Morgan 7-1 14 

15 01U34M JOHN FEATHER (H) (A PhHps) □ Burohel 7-1 

16 3052FF KrmNGBMH Joel) A Turostl 51 14 

17 O0P4-OO MAGWA(GLugg)T Forster 5114 

18 

22 


(7) 


, 3 Morahaad — F51 

— - K Ryan (7) 

.W Kirns (4) — 151 

i Knight 9T151 


OPOP/4 MASTER BRABWGER (J Tucfcar) A Barrow 7-114 
RAM 8 LMQ SONG (C Saunders) C Sounders 81 
23 2/D1253 RHOECUS (M Murray) Mrs M Dlckiraon 7-114 
34 3 / ROMAN SON (Ma) D Crapped) N OBSotoe 5-1 1-4 

25 P0530 ROVING GLBI (Mrs L Drosher) R Armytaga 5114 


27 000/411- ST AM3REW? BAY (Mra DPlfed)T Raster 5114 

28 2022-01 STRABOUT (Mrs K Anderson) N Henderson 7-114 

29 00/050 SUPEmME (Mra G Godfrey) P W Harris 7-114 


034)0 MESQUITE (G Lwgg) S Mrikar 4-157. 



1985c DEB* REPRESSION 511-11 P Scudamore (I5lf (av) N Gasatae 18 ran 


Oil SOLENT LAD fp)(£ Htem) B Stevens 11 -3. 
BUT LADY CRUSTY (M Aoh) R Holder 1512- 


AAH JM BOY (G Curzon) R Akshurst 1510. 
0 ELFAST(jwsbbar)J Webber 1510. 


ae 51 

— 151 


0 FOUL SKJT (Mrs J Franco) W Musaon 1510 . 
GREY SALUTE (T Hayward) J Jemans 1510. 


CSMA 84 — 


leJEfTS PLEASURE 0fts H MatftiewO I Matthews 1510- 
4 WHO RETAIN 5 Thw n i tea ) F WMwyn 1510 


. K Brake 


F PETE MARa(BWadriJL Harris 1510. 
3P ABIGAIL'S GEM (P Gray) R CriOS 155. 


Kl 

JAHairia 


KfH 
— 51 


CHABENKA (Mrs M JarvM) A Jwvto 155. 


FO KNIGHTLY OU(R Carrington) K Bridgewater 155. 
NiTtoA (M Pipe) M Pipe 156. 


— 12-1 

• Si — 

— 51 


1985: MY DOMMON 1510 J Lower (51) M Pipe 25 ran 

340 UPTON HANDICAP HURDLE (£1^471: 2m) (20 runners) 


T 2123041 KARL RUN (CO) (RSflukeriG PHce 511-10. 


51 


2 100/005 DOWN FLIGHT (CJlWCakteagjTCaMwaO 511-9- 

4 041500 TACHADOR (D) (P AwaO R Hodges 511-8 

0 123-000 AMAL LEES HOPE fPH (C Lunsden) G Am 511-7- 

8 44801-0 FIKGO BOY(D)(A DerlnghanJA J Wison5114 _ 

9 043400 AVEBURY (G Roberts) F Jordan 4-11-3 

10 00400-0 CONS PAL (B)(FFaulteMi}UWInlo 511-3 


11 4/D45PF CELTIC HOMEY (D) (Mrs JGoBnsJG IQnderslay 51 1-0 _ 
14 oon-ooo WB.TSMRE YEOMAN (CD) (J Sawyer) P Hayward 51511 . 
P252F0 UMHOC(RCo«ns)W Morris 7-1511. 


0001- CLERMONT LANE (D) (D CowrjJI] M TflW 51511. 
023212 PENLL YNFS PfifflE (B Benton) R Juckes 5158- 


— K Ryan (7) — — 

BPawrii 00 51 

teCUriMriaa 91151 
. R Dunwoody 92 51 

CSriHh 94 — 

A Carrol IS — 

CBraas 91 51 

ZTw Monte 91 — 
_ M Bastard 9014-1 


oootmm Derararr KmafD)(RCroiq Mrs jcrut 5157 . 

40044/0 OUTLAW m(H White) J Edwards 7-104 m 


00015 LORD MURPHY (B Devtes)R Hridar 4-150. 


4 Hurst (7) 

W Haraphraya ro “ i “ 


311P33/ HSTY FANTAN (D Brain) F Hates 15150. 


PMapby 16151 


0051 COLONS. POPSQ (D) (C Kircnn) J Macke 0-150 . 


24 1/00040 BARRHU LAD P^JR Townsend) R Townsend 5150 

25 P/PtWM) BROOKS LAW (CD) (D BtoomfisM) 0 Bkxxnfiefcl 11-150 
86 B0MP5- J8H BROWN (Mra E Haynes) H Haynes 5150 



1151 


90 — - 


198& PEARL RUN 51511 P Warner (13-2) Q Price 26 ran 


Course specialists 


N Henderson 
FI 

Mrs Ji 
H I 
JI 
Ni 


TRAINERS 

Winners a 
13 
18 
8 
S 
12 
S 


l 



Par Cent 


JOCKEYS 

Winmra 

Rides 

Percent 

56 

235 

sshenmod 

6 

18 

sas 

m 

23J5 


15 

82 

1 BJ 

45 

17D 

K Mooney 

11 

62 

17J 

32 

15.6 

RCrar* 

6 

41 

148. 

SI 

132 

H Davies 

11 

88 

11.1 

41 

122 

R Dunwoody 

7 

84 

. 10S 








m:fT: 








#&■ 


Corbiere receives 
accolade after 
thrilling display 


Champion jockey Peter 
Scudamore and the 1983 Grand 
National winner, Corbiere, were 
applauded aO the way into the 
winner’s enclosure by Haydock. 
Park’s sporting crowd after a 
superb victory in the Ronnie 
Johnston Memorial Chase 
yesterday. 

Corbiere turned in such a 
thrilling performance - rrmiring 
aD and jumping like a stag to 
beat Haray Lad by eight lengths 
- that Scudamore told his de- 
lighted trainer, Jenny Pitman: 
“Any jockey who takes the 
riding fee for Corbiere is taking 
money under false pretences. 
His owner, Brian Burrough, 
ought to chargeflOO for the nde 
on the old horse 11 . 

Scudamore came in for the 
ride because Corixere's regular 
partner, Ben de Haan , was 
injured at Huntingdon on 
Wednesday. 

Gaining two lengths at every 
fence, he bad seen the 2-1 
favourite, Kumbi, offbefore the 
home straight and went five 
lengths dear at the second-last, 
coming home unchallenged 
from Hardy Lad, the winner of 
this event last year. 

Mrs Pitman said: “I love the 
old horse and its lovely to see 
the people appreci a ting a cfaamr 
jrion. He went to Oxford dogs 
fora charily appearance in aid 
of cancer research last week and 
'he loves doing things iflcg that - 
he appreciated a chan ge in 
scenery. 

him 

enjoying 


lie rain overnight helped 
today and if he is still 

hmwlf | 


he’H have 


other go at the Grand National. 

Hills have cut his Ain tree odds 
from 33-1 to 25-1. 

Mrs Pitman added: “His next 
race could be the Coral Welsh 
National or a four-miter at 
Cheltenham New Year’s 
meeting". 

Mrs Pitman have good news 
ofher other star chaser, the 1984 
Gold Cup winner. Burrough 
Hill Lad. “He did a good bit of 
work on Wednesday. His legs 
felt good afterwards but we've 
sot a fair way to go yet with 
him, 1 ' she said. 

The jockey in form at 
Haydock was Graham Bradley 
who completed a 21‘A-l double 
on Mister Point and Yahoo. 
With the rain having softened 
the trade, it was a day for 
mudlarks and five times Flat 
winner Mister Point came in 15 
lengths dear for his hurdles 
debut in the Hindley Green 
Novices* Hurdle while Yahoo 
beat the favourite Dutch Lord 
by five lengths in die Birkdale 
Novices' Chase. 

Kescast kept up the tremen- 
dous form of Martin Pipe's 
stable in the Beeches Farm 
Conditional Handicap Hurdle 
when, running for the first time 
since knocking a leg in the 1985 
County Hurdle, he made an 
excellent comeback to win by 20 
lengths. 

Pipe went mi to complete a 
double and gain his 35th success 
of the season with the former 
Bany Hills-trained Flat winner 
High KnowL who won by 30 
lengths first time out over 
hurdles at Leicester. 


Jockey Gub investigate 
complaint by Curley 


The Jockey Onb are b- 
vestiggtiiig a co mpla i nt over the 
raming of novice Mkr Robin 
GoedEwow at Ascot last BHudli. 
The camphiri has bear aade by 
the Newmarket trainer and weU- 
known gambler Barney Ouiey. 

Ouiey has no connection with 
the Toby Balding trained five- 
year-old, hot wrote to the Jockey 
Onb cangriamteg abotet his 

running f@ the K ama t ig^im 

Novices’ Hurdle at Ascot oh 
November 15 when Robot 
Goodfeflow was the hetrfly 
hack ed 13-8 ia ro pil e hat fin- 
ished eight lengths behind 
Tdetrader. 

A fortnight latex, io the 


Smdey Beads Novice Hurdle at 
Sandown Park, Robin 
GoodfHfam prodneed a big Cnra- 
arownd, beating the odds 
Tdetrader by ume lengths. 

Robin GoedfeHow was ridden 
in both races by Graham Brad- 
ley, stylish first jockey to the 
powerffil Monica Dickingoa 
stable. 

Yestetday,MoidaiDixnB, the 
Jockey Club press officer, con- 
finned that the security depart- 
ment were investigating the 
complaint and would submit 
their report fa dne oonrse. Bat 
she stressed that such written 
complaints were not that 
unnsvaL 


Haydock Park Southwell lost 
results 


Racing at Southwell yesterday 
was cancelled an hour before the 

Going: aoft start following several hours of 

1 A dm note) i. MISTER PONT (G torreotial rain. After an inspeo- 
Bradtey. 51k 2. supraMt Ctirnar (C bon, the stewards announced 

that Ae ground y several of the 


Regal Steel, 10 artthys Cfiofca. 11, 
" J " 12 New Gold 

20 Meki 
25 

(put, Victor 
Don't Be 


, onuYijr 


14 


Cool Recaption, 33 ^ridtbc 


to be 


■iVwia ■■■■■■■ 

HMutatejupl, Pssssoge To Reedom (pu), 

StArta Mran. 15i,7f3L 4L 23W. C Ttnkter 

A Mritoa Tote E&SO: E2AO2LS0. 

£235 DF: E3ZJB0. CSPi E29D3. 


fences was waterlogged. 

It is the second meetii 

lost this jumping season 
ing Hexham's abandonment 
earlier this .month because of 
high winds. 


GOLF 


Clouds lift 

on place 
in sun for 
Jacklin 


By John Hennessy 

Tonv Jacklin's taune ■ 

■Ssar-ssas 

erande dub came to « “J* 1 * 


hTSs spent IS Mihra 
months "sitting Wlth 


: bow things «K 8°?®' wSsm 

•^sraars-S- « 
ainisaffln 

wasn't going to happen . lTin i at* 

the sort Of MB to ^ 

associated with faiWJ; 

Bearing in mind his *p*doi 
da^wten he beW 
Open and American Openfor a 
fcJr remarkable 
1969/70, one can under- 
stand the sentimen t 

The clouds lifted three weeks 
aao when lnmagotf, * snbsidiary 
oS \ European Ferries, took ov er 

the responsibility of deduping 

the resort, on tend formerly 
owned by the DoiMcq sherry 
famil y. The cost wdl be about 
£90 imTiinft. with the Don*cq 

hwbw m incorporated in a 

luxurious dob boose- 

The same company own tire 
La Manga Chib, 200 mfles north 

along the Mediterranean coast- 

line, and the new resort, so far 
aanamed, will he developed 
along the same lines, with the 
golf coarse and property owner- 
ship going hand in h a nd . 

The area, 15 minutes from 
Gibraltar airport, covers 340 
acres and David Thomas, who 

has been engaged ns architect, is 

planning a lay-Oat fa Steit 80- 

comera, varying from 7,000 
yards for championships to 
5,750 yards from the ladies 1 tees. 

The sic is a mite from the 
MedMeranean, adjacent to So- 
fogrande, and is being land- 

scaped frith spectators fa mind, 
since the various “hotel waits, " 
in bungalows or villa form, will 
tend fa overtook the course. 
They will seO within n price 
range from £I25.OOO-£25O,®®0. 

The complex, like La M* «a, 
vrill be designed with the family 

in mind, those who resist die 

fclanJidm i—N nflfUin OO the 

coarse, turn their 

attentions to tennis, riding, and 
of coarse s w immi ng. 

Thomas hopes to break 
ground fa Janaary and complete 
the coarse fa antmnn 1988 for an 

official opening the following 

spring. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Kangaroos 

odds-on 

favourites 


By Keith Macklin 


L30(3mcti) 1. YA*WO(G Bradtoy. 7-! 


2. DuKb Lonl (C Grant, 7-4 tort t 
Rom (R Dwmoodr- 3-T 
ALSO RAN: 5 Another Dragon 


Royal Reply (pu), 25 Gamewood 
• Auburn. 7 ra 


rm.SL8Ll»LJ Hanson 

ToCK E320: £1-40, £1.70. 
^£9J5 


2JD Om Mto 1. KESCAST U Liwer. 5 
); 2. Xorncm (K Conor. 7-1^3. CM Hto 


•The Tote's £2 minimum stake 
is to be introduced to Scottish 

courses and extended to all 

enclosures at other courses start- 

ing on Boxing Day, although £1 
each-way bets and £1 dual 
forecast permutations will con- 
tinue to be accepted. 


The junior Kangaroos, the 
Joeys, or simply the Australian 
High School team, are regarded 
as odds-on favourites to win the 
first international match against 
Great Britain at Wigan’s Central 
Park tonight, in a match which 
is getting sponsorship support 
from Wigan Metropolitan Bor- 
ough Council and Greater Man- 
chester Council. 

The Australian schoolboys 
squad were founded in 1972. 
and since then they have lost 
only one game, a provincial 
match against Auckland in 
1982. In international matches 
they are unbeaten. 

The current junior Kangaroos 
are considered in Australia to be 
the strongest young squad ever 
produced and in their short tour 
so fa r they have equalled the 
performances of their seniors, 
the 1986 tourists, by winning 
every match by large margins. 

The Great Britain squad has 
been coached by the Rugby 

r i's director of coaching. 
Larder, and the team 
m a nag er is Jackie Reid, who 
was manager of the 1 983 tour of 
the Young Lions to New 
Zealand. 

• The schoolboy curtain-raiser 
to the Challenge Cup final at 
Wembley in May will be be- 
tween the under-! Js of Leeds 
and Warrington. 

• The two New Zealand inter- 
nationals, Kevin Tamati and 
Graeme West, failed in their 
attempts to play fa this 
weekend's John Player Special 
Trophy matches. They made 
persona! appearances before the 
disciplinary committee in T 
but both were suspended for two 
matches each. 

Tamati will miss the top 
match of the quarter-finals in 
™kich his dub, Warrington, 
trayd for a derby game with St 
Helens tomorrow, and West, the 
Wigan dripper, will miss 
Sunday’s home tie with Leigh. 


«■ 


_ _ „ >11 a£s 5 RAN: 7-4 fev Black 

Rhw (505 9 Tfahonra. 14 awly Lagacy. 

18 Traffltmi «. 20 gga MJtoifc L ondM 
Lsadsr. Mantot VtoSno FUmSngo, 26 

Mute Label. 33Ttocknun, TowravBa. 

16 ran. NR: PricMflove. 

Fieri Wonder. 20. 4UUM, 12LM PjMM 
WBMng m n. Tote: SM& £200. £170, 
MOO. £1-46. OR £6820. CSR £4098. 
Triewt £23907. 

030 (3n 4f ch) 1, CORBIERE 
Scudamore, 52k 2. IMy Lad 
‘^TSWurFtoaMPJ 
2 fav Kurfai (5 
, 18 Royal Jet (Mi). 6 
ran. 8L 11, 20. 12. IS. Mra J iPteran jp 
Upper Lamboum. Toot E4J0c B&30, 
Fn DP. E45D. CSP C13JH- 


• Peter Easterby has booked 
champion jockey Peter 
Scudamore to partner 
Nohalmdun fa the HSS Hire 
Shops Hurdle at Ascot 
tomorrow. 


HOCKEY 


Lincoln entries 

Liman «S| 


Tulse Hill may 
miss Glasgow 

Tulse Hin, who are among the 


NBee arra. AJ Basftaama 3. MO 

Al Fair & Arctic Kan 3. August 5, 

2ero X Beta Sea Hover 3. Bronze opal 3, 

Bundanurg 8, Cantoean Sound 3. Come 


32 surviving teams for the Royal 
dub 


! 7. Conmayjo 5, Oates Srattti 


3D (2m 6T Me) 1, ASncor (A CamD. 

■ ' AlWaflc (S Ketltewan. 4- 


Rtgueur 4. Duff : 

Eagle 5. Fhmcombe 


Htotl Pfc«Y Attoet 


ii-aT*ck MarauNm.7itsA 
Laugh (put 8 Tlpo Stylo (5tW. id Nabaeti 
(4tf^Nashood(pu). 15 EarmWcrtatou).9 
ran NR: Scoft Head. 1ZL lOt, 19. «. D 

ai Westtwry-on-Sewem. ToK 

£240: £140. £130. ELM. OR £570. 
CSF: £8.00. Bought In 2^00gna. 

230 jam Me) 1. HON KNOWL (J 
2-7 fev): & llatetoU (K Doofal. S5 


lOnThe^H _ 

fafaMM De 

rPvk 3. Emerald 

la Fbr caBo a I 

■ Pout 3, 

Fhndngun Court a Fringe 01 Heaven ^ 
FusBar4.GoBararaa5.6oto Prospect 4, 

Grundy Lane < Gurteen Boy 4. Heavy 

Brigade a Mton Bniwn 6, Honest Toa 3. 
Rdiyara Jaatu a Jofi Wtafi 5, Jousmg 
Bm a KSAHlow 4. Kararaw a K-Bosgty 
(LKhg Ofaead 7, Lance a Luckan 4, 
ManchnteraSnnain 7, Meny Measure 4, 
Moores Mb^I 6,T4ount Tumtaoomm 5. 


Lower. 2-7 fevfc 2. HoftMa (K Doofai, 55 
1k a Queen Ot Swonla (P Davec, 14-1 j. 
ALSO RAN: 10 CWual PON (9M, 12 

_ 'GMA 

KLttiBn. 8 J.ia, 

41, 3.2L M P»»at WaBjngton.To» £UtO; 

El . 10 , £ 505 ! £ 1:51 DF: E 31 J 65 CSF: 
E32.KL 


Mr Kewmft3, MythkaJ Man 3, Ntaonoge *. 

No CncMh 4. Ora To Meric a Pafifea 

a Pone# Marandi a Promised tm a 


a Prince MararaK a Promised t$ie S, 
QiaMa*M84. Qm*WrFlyer4, Quiet Riot 
4, Reaay Honest 6, Ssfcer a Safloom 4, 
sWlwtt»r3.StoioMOdaiie 4, Smttng 




A_ Gamer $, 


Twangs % TWonnade Boy a Tnac Or 

TraataT T'y Hbrnt 3, 


Ifenk national indoor 
^ampioii^ip, will probably 
withdraw from the Glenfiddich 
uwtoor tournament fa Glasgow 
on January 10 and I| (Sydney 
™un writes). Their place 
could be laken by Canada. 
tJ&J 2 ? lubs f or the Royal 

ssssssaasss 

1 1 , with the winner of 
^pooiqiteli^ring for the final 

S^n 01811 Patace ™ 
55uthaatB - aSTcoSSnE 


■A 


Ptocepot:£22J20. 


3. Vj?piQShOt3. WoS 
Medfiy 4. Xhaf 4. 
to be announced January ta To 
ran at Doncaster. March 20. 



5. WMsh 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 



SPORT 


35 


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The Lawn Tennis Association's financial performance under scrutiny 


Wimbledon surplus controls 
the year’s spending power 


■hk C La * n , Teni, i& Association 
will have 2s glossy pages of repons 
and accounts to discuss at its annual 
meeting, to be held at Queen’s Club 
West Kensington, this after- 
noon. Ten of those pages are taken 
up by a mass of baffling figures and 
relevant notes concerning the 
money that pours into the LTA and 
what is done with it - baffling, 
anyway, to most of us. 

With the help of the honorary 
treasurer. Dennis Carmichael, a 
patient Scot to whom the money 
maze is as straight-forward as a 
motorway. I have tried to grasp a 
few basic facts about income and 
expenditure. One salient item is that 
Wimbledon's surplus of £6,200.848. 
almost 9 1 per cent of the revenue; is 
subject to tax. LTA expenditure 
reduces the total income of 
£6.834.263 to a surplus of 
£3,129,SI4 which is further re- 
duced, lo £1,460.168. by a tax bill of 
£1,669.646. 

If still on the scent, you may 
reasonably ask how the LTA spends 
£3.704,449. The untidy sum of 
£751,447 is mysteriously listed 
under “administration and general” 
but turns out to be nothing more 
exciting than the cost of running the 
LTA headquarters — staff salaries, 
furniture, rates, electricity, and all 
that stuff. 

The £757.139 allocated to “na- 
tional development, coaching and 
schools" refers to the cost of 
regional training (including 
coaches' salaries), inter-regional 
competitions, schools, “grass roots 
activities”, and the childrens’ game 
known as short tennis. If this 
expenditure produces another 
Roger Taylor, a one-time Sheffield 


By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correpondent 

Paries player, the money may be of rainy days during Wimbledon, 

well spent. “ 


A farther £707,072 is devoted to 
fhe players who look like making it. 
These costs include staffing and 
running the Bisham Abbey national 
training centre, home international 
matches, tours and so-on. A closely- 
relaied item of £669,944 concerns 
tournament costs, inter-county 
competitions, and the network of 
“ratings” events. 

The allocation to county and club 
loan funds, plus administrative 
Brants, comes to £467,307. The next 
big sum is the £269,384 (salaries 
included) devoted to promotion, 
marketing, and the sponsorship of 
pre>Wimbledon tournaments on 
grass. I forgot to check what 
happened to the £82,156 listed 
under “technical and research” but, 
compared with the other sums 
tossed about, it is chicken-fecd 
anyway. 

The total LTA wage bill, in- 
cidentally, is £953,626, a sum which 
includes social security and other 
pension costs. The average weekly 
number of employees is 87. Many of 
these are lo be found tucked away in 
various corners of the new LTA 
office block, which has increased 
“tangible assets” by £696,000. 

If all that is not reasonably dear 
and accurate, the fault is mine 
rather than the admirable 
Carmichael’s. He considers, by the 
way, that although there may be res- 
ervations about the “tennis” year, 
the LTA has had a good year 
financially. The Scot in him came 
through loud and clear when he 
stressed the need for the LTA to 
prepare for a rainy day — by which 
he meant, one assumes, a succession 


“One of the major weaknesses”. 
Carmichael said, “is the lack of 
reserves. If sail tied up. We have no 
money to spare for that rainy day. 
The target of the management 
committee is to get the invested 
reserves up to the amount received 
from Wimbledon. We have made 
great progress towards that.” This 
referred to the feet that the market 
value of invested reserves rose from 
£762,290 to £1,241,079 during the 
past financial year. Carmichael 
hopes the figure will be over £2 
million a year hence. 

Carmichael is an Edinburgh man 
and it would be interesting to know 
his private thoughts about a pro- 
posal that his home city should have 
an independently-promoted pre- 
Wimbledon tournament featuring a 
few celebrities from the men's 
circuit. The LTA are cross about 
that, because of the implied chal- 
lenge to then- own events at Queen’s 
Gub. London, and Bristol. 

Back in 1967 the LTA defied the 
I l f by insisting on open com- 
petition — discarding distinctions 
between am ateur s and pro- 
fessionals. The ITF eventually fell 
into line. But there has since been 
evidence that the ITF, the LTA, and 
almost any other governing body 
you care to name consider that the 
principal of open competition 
should be restricted to the players. 

The idea of open competition 
between promoters is evidently too 
horrifying to contemplate. Quasi- 
monopolies, by contrast, are 
comforting — rather like weapons 
in that they are offensive only if you 
happen to be standing at the wrong 
end. 



Phrk success: Roger Taylor was discovered at grassroots level 


SWIMMING 


Leicester Council 
will sponsor first 
trust fund event 


By Roy Moor 


Swimming’s recent decision 
io allow competitors to have 
trust fends, similar to those now 
operating in track and field 
athletics, has prompted a swift 
response from the Leicester City 
Council. 

With the new ruling coming 
into effect from January 1 the 
Council haveannounced that 
they are making cash rewards 
available to all who compete in 
their open short course meeting 
at the St Margaret's Bath from 
January 23 to 25. . 

Invitations have gone om to a 
number of international cham- 
pions. both at home and abroad, 
and one of the first to accept is 
die Leeds' breaststroke record- 
breaker Adrian Moorhouse, 
who admits to being thrilled by 
Leicester's initiative in setting 
the ball rolling. 

“It is what our sport has 
needed for a long time," 
Moorhouse said. “I don't think 
the opportunity to win money in 
this way will upset the spirit 
within our spoil. Competitors 
won't be racing just Tor the 
money, they like competition 
too much; the chance to build a 
trust fund will just become an 
added incentive and that must 
be good for the future of British 
swimming at international 
leveL” 

Whereas the Leicester City 
Council will be underwriting the 
cost of the meeting they wul be 
supported by a number of local 
companies, who will make 
money available for the cash 
awards by sponsoring individ- 
ual events, taking programme 
space, placing banners around 
the pool and making donations. 

Ail entrants who reached this 


year's finals at the Common- 
wealth Games and European 
junior championships will be 
given expenses and bonuses to 
bo won include: 

•£500 for setting a world record 
•£250 for a European or 
Commonwealth record 
•£100 fora British senior record 
•£40 for a British junior record 

•£30 for an English. Scottish or 
Welsh senior record 
•£1 5 for an English, Scottish or 
Welsh junior record 

A record for the pool or the 
meeting will earn a swimmer £5. 

The organizers are well aware 
that at the last top dass meeting 
at this pool 29 national records 
were broken. 

All monies won will be paid to 
the governing body supervising 
the swimmer's trust hind. 

When Derek Stubbs, the 
ASA's director of swimming 
heard of the Leicester develop- 
ment yesterday, he said: “Speak- 
ing personally at this stage. 1 
welcome the news. These trust 
funds can not only help to keep 
swimmers in this country in- 
stead of going to American 
colleges, but also encourage 
them to stay in the sport longer 
and reach their full potential. 
Too many good youngsters give 
up too soon for want of on 
incentive of this son.” 

Moorhousc's arch-rival, the 
Olympic and world champion, 
Victor Davis of Canada, has 
been invited to compete bui 
after the hammering he took 
from Moorhouse in Toronto 
recently it seems unlikely that 
be will accept. 


RUGBY UNION: WELSH PROSPECTS ARE FINE IF RIGHT DECISIONS ARE TAKEN 

Tidying up Selectors will have Argentina 

come in 
from cold 


on gomg 
4 to ground 

By David Hands 
Rugby Correspondent 

A bugbear of the English dub 
game is the slow heel from the 
sel scrum; this may be develop- 
ing an equivalent in the loose 
scrum if the evidence of last 
Saturday's divisional atatch at 
Sudbury is fo be believed. 

That game, so much of which 
ended in a heap on the gronnd, 
was played shortly , after the, 
following lines were published in 
the London Whistler, the news- 
letter of the London -Sodety of, 
Referees. 

“Staying on the feet by those, 
arriving at the tackle scare 
appears to be ca t ching on with 
the players fairly readily, as> 
long as that is what the referee 1 
insists on from the start of the 
match. If the referee does not 
insist on this and allows a side to 
go to ground without penalty, the 
opposition mil have no alter- 
native bat to do the same and the 
v return of the pfie-sp will ensoe. 

\ “Away from the tackle ... if 
the player falls on a ball in open 
play then it is strictly illegal for 
another player to fall on top of 
him. Conversely, the player who 
goes to gronnd must immedi- 
ately play the ball, release it or 
get np . . . The freedom for the 
player on the ground seems 
unnatural to players but it is 
essentially to protect him from 
possible injury wbcn he is so 

vulnerable.'’ 

That was written after a 
couple of months of good 
weather and hard grounds. Now 
we are back to muddy, wet 
grounds when it is easier to lull 
the bail and work off a set piece. 
than to create play with swift 
loose possession. In those 
circumstances the kind of game 
played two seasons ago is 
returning and may be a_ con- 
sequence of the relaxed inter- 
r* arelation of Law IS, the tackle 
Ian, which was introduced this 

season. . , 

There is concern that players 
are being given licence to go to 
ground in a maul. This could be 
a recipe for pile-nps- Last year 
there were more games with 
players consciously staying on 
their feet because English ref- 
erees interpreted me law 

■“K/ committee of the 
Nations met at the weekendand 
was asked what wonM happau rf 
a player - usually the scrum 
half - chose not to ptej * ““ 
made immediately awufebte al la 
m auL The answer wastimt pig 
should contmoe. 
suggestion that we bare * 

. ^fheel from a protracted maul 

ss well as the set sen*®; . 

Quick possession is what 
hacks - and therefore three- 

SliiSSKt5s 

English * 

Players revert “ 

being more acCTSte™ w 

xs* “ * Mied 

np, and quickly* 


their work cut out 


By Gerald Davies 


It is much easier to be critical 
than to be correct, as a some- 
time novelist and full-time 
prime minister once said. It 
could just as easily have been a 
rejoinder from any one of the 
Welsh selectors after the Welsh 
trial last week, knowing that 
from the squad that will be 
announced this evening they 
have their work cut out to select 
the team for the first inter- 
national against Ireland on 
January 17, 

What is almost certain is that, 
even at this distancej-the' defi- 
nition as to what is correct will 
be interpreted differently out- 
side the caucus of the so-called 
big five selectors. It was ever 
thus. I suppose, but, unlike 
more recent years, there does 
seem to be a wide choice of 
players from which to choose. 

The standard of rugby al club 
level may be inconsistent, but 
there are quite a number of 
young players around who have 
impressed, have reputations to 
make and ambitions to fulfil. It 
is the luxury of a wide pool from 
which to draw. 

By Welsh standards there is 
an abundance of choice at lock; 
there is a range of prop forwards 
and any number, of hookers. 
Once John Devereux and 
Bleddyn Bowen are beck there is 
an embarrassment of riches at 
centre; the wings, too, seem weD 
covered. There is however, a 
short supply at full bad; and 
with Jones and Davies prom- 
inent al half beck there is just 
about adequate cover for them. 
As with the back row, so it will 
be for the whole team: the right 
combination is ess en tial. 

It was Ray Graveil; the for- 
mer Welsh centre, who said, 
after seeing the trial, that be 
would love now to be a selector. 
This turned on its head the 
common response lo a trial 
match in which those thought to 
be the favourites were beaten. 

Those people, while quite 
happy to turn such an exercise 
into a parlour game, which no 
doubt they will over Christmas, 
would shy away from the actual 
task. They would much prefer to 
remain critical from an arm- 
chair's comfortable distance 
away. However, to pick a team 
in Gravell'5 singular fashion has 
an instant appeal, more so than 
having, like the more democrat- 
ically minded Welsh selector, lo 
persuade another four people to 
bis way of thinking. 


But in two, and possibly Three 
respects, the selectors may have 
made things more than nec- 
essarily difficult for themselves. 
The derision not to swap and 
change during the game, and to 
stick throughout to their orig- 
inal team selections, has nar- 
rowed their chance to be correct. 
Steve SuBob, who has re- 
emerged in the last couple of 
seasons with the South Wales 
Police, and during the trial, is 
now a better contender for a 
Welsh ream place than when he 
was first capped four years ago. 

The opportunity should have 
been taken to pair him alongside 
Bob Norster. Admittedly, both 
are middle of the line jumpers 
but with so much movement up 
and down the lineout this might 
not matter much. Norster could 
start at the front where his 
squarer bulk could withstand 
better the congestion. If such a 
selection were to be made, an 
dement of chance remains be- 
cause it is unlikely to be 
resolved satisfactorily in the 
more artificially controlled 
Squad t raining . 

The other area was the back 
row in which different permuta- 
tions should have been tried. 
There is something appealing 
about a trio made up or the two 
Jones boys of Neath — Lyn and 
Mark — and Paul Moriarty on 
the other flank. If such a back 
five should be contemplated 
and with Evans and Buchanan 
at prop, it is an inexperienced 
pack which would need an 
injection of mature guidance, in 
which case the selectors could 
do not better than to bring back 
Alan Phillips, the Cardiff 
hooker. 

There was a puzzle, too, at 
centre threoquarter. It was inju- 
ries that forced changes here. 
But it did not reflect well on the 
selectors way of thinking — four 
of whom are forwards — that 
they should have paired Roger 
Bidgood and Allan Donovan in 
the Probables team. They are 
both similar and neither is 
blessed with the intuitive spark 
of leuan Evans or Mark Ring. 

On Wednesday night, Evans 
once more demonstrated his 
immense gifts in scoring a try of 
shining brilliance against Ponty- 
pool in the centre. If this were 
considered then room could be 
found for Webbe on the wing. 
The prospects are fine, then, 
provided the correct decisions 
are made. 


Nottingham hold a 
remarkable record 

Schools rugby by Michael Stevenson 



UVV* 1 „ 

There are only wo 

from last xxson i Fnjnce a , 
schools ronjlG; ^. r Tim 
Poitiers on pSJ^Vho will 

* McCra'h , n lhc 

^ cap ta in the leant* P • ^ { 1 0 n 

(Merehislon^Caslle School) is al 

CRH Newton r mcGam* 

k Bmwa (EBiteKW *1?*-, W CuRiettton 


Nottingham High School's 
{5-9 defeat of Stamford at the 
weekend left them with the 
remarkable record of IS wins 
from as many matches, the first 
time the school has achieved 
this distinction. Since October 
1981 they have lost only two 
home matches. , . 

Hie school has nine in the 
Nottinghamshire 18 Group. 
Several are extremely tired, 
having played four ganws in 
eight days. Nottingham HS has 
strength in aU departments but 
Philip Milton, the stand-off and 
captain, has played splendidly. 
as well as the two wings, Robert 
Bricricy and Miles Astbury- 
Criroes, who surely would have 
aroused more than passing in- 
terest from Sherlock Holmes. 

Si Bees have still only lost to 
Sedtogh- which is a remarkable 
record when one recalls the 
mass exodus that occurred, 
following Iasi year’s triumphs. 
Their most recent victories have 
been against Barnard Castle (19- 
01 RGS Lancaster 113-6) and 
RGS Newcastle (40-8). In this 
match their full back,. Howard 
Graham, scored four tries which 
brought his season’s total to 100 

^Christ** College. Brecon, 
have enjoyed a very successful 
season, winning 1 1 . drawing one 
and losing one fmm the 13 
matches played and strength in 


depth is dearly reflected by the 
feci that the second XV lost only 
to Millftdd and the third, fourth 
and imder-15 sides were all 
unbeaten. Christ’s last two vic- 
tories were against Gowenon 
(22-3) and WycUffe (32-0). 

Success is no stranger to 
King’s, Taunton, and they com- 
pleted the season with 10 wins 
and two losses, scoring 285 to 97 
points conceded; in addition 
they lost only one match in the 
two previous seasons (v Mon- 
mouth) and enjoyed an un- 
beaten tour of Canada before the 
current season. 

Their two defeats were by 
Blacknock College (4-29) and 
Christ’s. Brecon (14-17) on a 
day when their goal kicker, 
Simon Painter, missed five pen- 
alties. In the last two seasons he 
has amassed 223 points 

RGS High Wycombe have 
had a wonderful run since half- 
term. They have beaten Richard 
Hale School (32-3). Windsor 
Boys (29-9), Watford OS (21- 
10), Desborough, Maidenhead 
(42-9), Aylesbujy GS ( 1 7-3} and 
St Edmund’s, Ware (28-4). They 
have scored 169 points and 
conceded 38. 

Wellington College have also 
enjoyed their share of success. 
They have won eight from the 
1 1 matches played. W J Parks 
and W R D Waghora in the 
centre have been outstanding. 


By Chris Than 

A bold aad imaginative 
French project any well resalt (a 
foe emergence of a second Five 
Nations* championship, with 
France, Romania, Italy, the 
Soviet Union and Argentina as 
participants. 

Negotiations between the Ar- 
gentine Rugby Union and die 
French Federation are expected 
to be concluded this weekend 
when Argentina become the 
39thr members of the Paris- 
based Federation Internationale 
de Rugby Amateur. It is not yet 
dear ff Argentina wil) accept foil 
membership or whether the 
FIRA executive com mi ttee wiB 
offer Buenos Aires associate 
membership on a trial basis. 

After the Falklands war, 
Argentina's ever-increasing con- 
tacts with the Home Unions 
came to an abrupt end. Wales 
and Ireland cancelled their 
planned tours, while England 
and Scotland deferred any de- 
cision on contacts with Argen- 
tina until full diplomatic 
rela ti ons had been restored. 

Following the conflict in the 
South Atlantic, Argentina, one 
of rugby onion’s eme rgi ng pow- 
ers, therefore found themselves 
fa a sort of sports wilderness as 
far as the Home Unions were 
concerned. 

However, France have con- 
centrated on developing their 
ties with southern-hemisphere 
countries and Argentina's 
French coanection has been 
particnlarty fretful, with France 
twice tearing Arge n ti n a in two 
years. 

The Argentinians, though, felt 
the need to expand their contacts 
and the FIRA championship — 
planned to be played on a home- 
and-away basis over a two-year 
period — should provide them 
with that much-needed compet- 
itive framework. 

It is said that all FIRA 
coon tries involved — with the 
possible exception of the Soviet 
Union — have agreed to the new 
project However, with the Rus- 
sians desperately keen to ex- 
pand their own contacts, they 
are also likely to agree with the 
new format. The only remaining 
question would then be finance. 

Both the Soviet and Roma- 
nian onions struggle economi- 
cally, and it is donbtfal whether 
they could afford to travel to and 
from Argentina. 

Yet the Argentinians are gen- 
erous hosts and they might pay 
the travel expenses of their 
Eastern European guests — as 
they did in 1973 when they 
played hosts to Romania. It is 
understood that, if either Roma- 
nia or the Soviet Union drop out, 
Spain would be standing by to 
take their place. 

FIRA are slowly becoming a 
force to be reckoned with in 
rogby and their membership has 

increased substantially during 
the past year. They now have 38 
members, compared with only 
26 early last year, their latest 
recruits bring Barbados, Taj- 
wan, Hong Kong, Paraguay, the 
Solomon Islands and Western 
Samoa. 

According to their vice-presi- 
dent, Jean-Claode Bonner, 
FIRA are trying to help the 
game to develop worldwide. The 
International Board, be said, 
had concentrated on the laws of 
the game but would have nothing 
to do with the competitive side of 
it 

“So FTRA’s operations are 
complementary to those of the 
board," Monsienr Boarier 
added. “We want to regionalize 
oar competitions. We are trying 
to lanBch an American version d 
the FIRA championship ~ lo- 
calized first in Sooth America — 
and are hoping that the United 
States and Canada will finally 
join in. 

**We are also trying to set np 
an African championship and 
another one in the Pacific area. 
At the same, tune, we envisage a 
European championship, to be 
osed as a qualifier for the Work! 
Cop.” 


YACHTING 


Jury reject British protest 


> 


From Keith Wheatley Fremantle 


White Cru- 

/ _ sader’s chances of 
W reaching the semi- 
a finals of the Qhal- 
longer series of the 
* m America’s Cup 
look slimmer than ever. After 1 1 
hours of deliberation the inter- 
national jury rejected the British 
protest against Tom Blackaller 
for changing the forward rudder 
in mid-series. 

Philip TolhursL a lawyer and 
director of the White Horse 
C halleng e, flew from Loudon to 
conduct the protest. “There Is 
no direct appeal against the jury 
decision.” Tolhurst said. “All 
we do is consider whether 
there are reasons for asking for 
the case to be re-opened.” 

A jubilant Blackaller, who con- 
ducted his own defence, criti- 
cized the way the America's Cup 
is coming to be dominated by 
rules experts. “We don't have 
legal help but we have a boat 
that has the potential to win the 
Cup." be said. “The lawyers are 
going to crawl onto us like flies 
— like the British did." 

When USA damaged her un- 
conventional forward rudder 
last weekend die syndicate 
sought the approval of the chief 
measurer, Ken McAlpine, to 
trying to throw out a fast boat on 
a technicality. It bas not helped 


the image when it became 
apparent that Dennis Conner 
and Stars and Stripes helped 
White Crusader gather their 
evidence. John Marshall, design 
chief with Stars and Stripes, was 
a witness for the British. 
“Conner turned cm me like a 
dog." Blakhaller said when 
mfci his opinion of this inter- 
America disloyalty. 

Blackalhar’s rhetorical allegation 
that the British had half-a-dozen 
lawyers was widely reported 
although, in fact, ToDrarst was 
the only lawyer present at the 
hearing. 

change the fin. He gave it The 


jury found this was a technical 
breach of Rule 27.2 but dis- 
missed the protest. 

“Tom might describe it as nit- 
picking but this is a technologi- 
cal regatta as well as a sailing 
race," said Phil Crebbin, the 
White Crusader technical direc- 
tor, who helped present the case. 
“Evenfoody in yachting knows 
that if you have a port and 
starboard incident you are 
under Rule 36. The technical 
rules are almost bigger in im- 
portance, in my view." 

The Australian press have, per- 
haps predictably, taken the view 
that the British are bad losers. 


Challengers forced into 24-hour wait 


Fremantle (Renter) — 

Yesterday's America's Cop 
challenger rlimmatfan races 
were postponed because annsaal 
winds prevented enough covses 
being laid. A 19-knot easterly 
offshore wind replaced the regu- 
lar Fremantle breeze, leading 
insufficient room to lay out 
enough co urse s to allow the 15- 
fsrM challenger and defender 
fleet to race. 

The postponement of the chal- 
lenger races delays the agony for 
at least four yachts with a 
chance of entering the chal- 


lenger we mi-finals with New 
Zealand, which has an unassail- 
able lead- French Kiss, in second 
place, followed by Stan and 
Stripes, America II and USA, 
all have a dunce to fill the three 
remaining semi- final berths, 
with White Crusader’s chances 
having been reduced almost to 
zero with the rejection of her 
crew's protest against USA 
yesterday. 

Races postponed until today 
include Stars and Stripes 
against French Kiss and New 
Zealand against White 
Crusader. 


BADMINTON 


Management group tightens grip 


Walker International, which 
has a virtual managerial monop- 
oly of Britain's leading bad- 
minton players, announced 
yesterday that Gill Clark, the 
European doubles champion, 
has signed for tbem. 

Tbe Sussex-based company, 
which also looks after the affairs 
of lan Botham and several 
England Test cricketers, now 
has more than 20 badminton 
players on the books, a tes- 
timony to its continued belief 
that, despite problems, the sport 
is still heading into an era of 
trigger sponsorship and more 
television. The company bas all 
the leading British men and now 


By Richard Eaton 

all but two of the leading 
women. 

Miss Clark's inclusion in that 
number will, however, be a 
surprise fo those who know that 
her relations with the former 
England manager, Ciro Ciniglio, 
now Walker International’s bad- 
minton director, have not al- 
ways been harmonious. “We 
didn't see eye to eye most of the 
time but he has a lot of respect 
for what I have achieved on the 
court and 1 know he is very good 
at his job in promoting 
badminton,” Miss Clark said. 

The 25-year-old Kent player’s 
achievements, which include 
winning the European doubles 


title with three different part- 
ners, are remarkable because 
they have come after she had 
been told that a knee injury 
might prevent her playing again. 
But her ebullient personality 
and attacking style just could 
not be kept down. 

That Miss Clark feels these 
qualities could do with better 
promotion may wrongly be seen 
as an implicit criticism of the 
Badminton Association of Eng- 
land. “1 hope it won’t be the BA 
of E versus Walker," Miss Clark 
said. “I have not joined a rival 
group. Walker Internationa] are 
keen to work with the BA of E 
We all need each other. 


HOCKEY 


Experience favours Lancashire 

By Joyce Whitehead 


The nineteenth women's Na- 
tional County Championship 
will be decided this weekend 
after the finals are completed at 
Pickens Lock Centre, in north 
London. The first pool matches 
stan tomorrow morning, wife 
the finalists completing the pro- 
gramme on Sunday afternoon. 

The teams which have quali- 
fied are the five Territorial 
County Champions, who join 
last season's winners, Middle- 
sex, to make the numbers even. 
The six are divided into two 
pools, with each playing twice 
on Saturday. Sunday is reserved 
for crossover matches to deter- 
mine the final pladngs- 

Apart from Middlesex, Avon 
(West area champions) are the 
only county which played in the 
finals last year, although 
Staffordshire (Midlands), Lan- 


cashire (North), and Suffolk 
(East) have all held top place in 
previous years, with Lancashire 
holding the outstanding record. 

They shared the title in 1969 
and 1971 and went on to win it 
outright seven times, ihdr last 
being in Ipswich in 1985. So, 
unless the standard of hockey in 
the territories varies consid- 
erably, Lancashire, with their 
phenomenal victory in the 
North Championship — nine 
wins in nine matches, scoring 39 
goals - must be the favourites. 

Berkshire are the new South 
champions, and are seeking 
their first title. Their first match 
could be crucial. They play 
Middlesex, the ooiy team to beat 
them in the South. 

Avon had a stiff match with 
Wiltshire to win in the West 
tournament. Neither county bad 


lost a match, and only a score 
draw by Wiltshire earlier in the 
tournament separated them. 

Staffordshire, known for their 
sound teamwork, are reliable in 
defence and — if Jane Swin- 
nerton (Sutton) remains in 
form — they could disturb the 
tranquility of their pool with 
Middlesex and Avon. 

Suffolk, who field all but two 

players from Ipswich, the club 
which won their way to, the last 
European Clubs Championship, 
play against Berkshire and Lan- 
cashire and in the end it is 
anyone's guess who will reach 
the final on Sunday afternoon. 

PROGRAMME: Saturday December 13: 
9<30ant MJUOX V Statfs iipm Suffolk v 
Berks; 1 pm Awn « Middx: 230pm Barks 
v Lancs; 4pm: Staffs v Avon; 5-30prrt 
Lancs v Suffolk. Sunday December 14: 
9.30am. Fifth and sixttt piece ptoy-off; 
11 am: TWrd and fourth place play-off; 
Ipm Pinal: 2.30pm: Presentation. 


BOWLS 

Kent have 
the edge 
on Surrey 

By Gordon Allan 

Kent, the defending county 
indoor champions, and Surrey, 
who won the title in 1 978, have 
made small adjustments to the 
teams for their second round 
match in the Prudential Liberty 
Trophy tomorrow. 

. David Crocker, who played at 
home in Kent's first-round win 
over Hertfordshire, will skip one 
of ihe three away rinks at 
Croydon. For Surrey Ted Bar- 
ton will skip Alan Windsor’s 
rink at Cyphers, Beckenham, 
because Windsor is touring 
Australia and New Zealand with 
an English Bowling Association 
party. 

Surrey, with a much-changed 
side, had to go to extra ends to 
beat Sussex by seven shots in the 
first round. They will do well to 
have as tight a match against 
Kent's array of talent. 

Kent won the title last winter 
using a squad of 28 and they are 
choosing largely from the same 
players again. The winners will 
face either Hampshire or 
Middlesex in the quarter-finals 
on January 10, when neutral 
greens come into operation. 

Norfolk, Iasi Season's beaten 
finalists, will play Warwickshire 
tomorrow and Somerset, who 
beat Worcestershire by 76 shots 
in the first round, play Oxford- 
shire. The final is at Hartlepool 
on April 12. 

‘TV format’ for 
the world 
indoor singles 

From a Correspondent 

The World Indoor Bowls 
Council announced a significant 
departure from tradition when 
the tournament director, David 
Harrison, released the 32-player 
draw for February’s Embassy 
world indoor singles event at 
Coatbridge — the seven-up 
“sets" format, recently popu- 
larized by television, is pre- 
ferred to the traditional 21-up 
arrangement. 

In the opening game of the 
championship, the holder. 
Cotswold's Tony Allcock, is 
challenged by Sam Wylie, of 
Ireland, while last season's run- 
ner-up, Phil Skoglund. of New 
Zealand, faces lan Bruce, of 
Aberdeen. 

The CIS United Kingdom 
singles champion, Steve Rees, 
from Swansea, will be tested by 
a young uncapped Englishman, 
Danny Dennison, a cake sales- 
man from Newton Abbot. An- 
other eventful game is in 
prospect when the extrovert 
Italian. Rob Parrella. represent- 
ing Australia, takes on the 
nonchalant young Irishman. 
Michael Dunlop. 

The strong top half of the 

draw also includes Belfast’s 
Superbowl winner, David 
Cortdll. Edinburgh's Willie 
Wood and Tel Aviv’s Cecil 
Brans ky. The bottom half looks, 
if anything, even stronger. 

Four former world cham- 
pions are clustered together, 
with David Bryant (England), 
Jim Baker (Ireland). John Wat- 
son (Scotlandl and Terry Sulli- 
van (Wales) fighting it out for 
one semi-final place. 


Huge rise in salmon farming has mixed benefit 



By Conrad Voss Bark 

A forecast by John MacKay, 
the Scottish Fisheries Minister, 
of an enormous Increase in the 
artificial prod action of salmon 
from Scottish fish forms is likely 
to bring great indirect benefits to 
sport fishermen. Mr MacKay, 


speaking at the opening of BP 
natritioo's new farm food factory 
at Invergonfon, said that by 
1990, production of Scottish 
form salmon might reach 
250,000 tonnes a year. 

In numbers, that would mean 
Scotland producing something 
of the order of 10 to 13 nuUioa 
fo™ salmon, in addition to 
supplies coming from Norway. 
Salmon would Own become a 
familiar food. 

Commercial netsmen will suf- 
fer. Admiral John Mackenzie, 
the director of The Atlantic 


Salmon Trust, a research 
organization, says: “The present 
production of Scottish form 
salmon (about 10.000 tonnes a 
year) has already depressed the 
price of wild salmon taken by the 
nets and any increase would be 
likely to force some of them oof 

of business." 

Rod -an d-line fishermen have 
been jealous of the netmeu for 
years, especially daring low 
water conditions. The a, the 
salmon bunch in the estuaries, 
the nets make a killing, and few 
fish ascend the rivers. Tie 


Scottish nets take between 250 
to 300,000 salmon a year, com- 
pared to 60 to 70.000 by rod- 
and-line fishermen. If nets do go 

out of business and there are 
more fish in the rivers, rod-and- 
line catches and rents will both 
rise. 

Scientists are apprehensive 
about an increase in for™ 
salmon. During gales and high 
many escape from their sea 

cages aad if they go to breed in 
•rivers, no one can know what the 
genetic effects might be on the 
wild stock. 


36 


SPORT 


FOOTBALL 


Rangers must learn 
discipline to add to 
their tactical skills 

By David Miller, Chief Sports Correspondent 


Graeme Souness knows 
enough about football to ex- 
tract the truth from a night of 
emotional and all too pbysic&l 
elimination from the UEFA 
Cup by Borussia 
Monchengtadbach. The truth 
is that his team have to find a 
temperamental discipline to 
go with the tactical discipline 
they had shown they pos- 
sessed in a goalless, bitter 
second leg. 

It needed a brutal encounter 
with Racing of Buenos Aries 
Aires in 1967 for Jock Stein 
and Celtic to learn the lesson, 
and there were moments on 
Wednesday night when we 
were reminded of that shame- 
ful World Club final, as Rang- 
ers had Munro and Cooper, 
their left back and left winger, 
sent off in tbe last quarter of 
an hour. It makes one shudder 
to think what Graham Rob- 
erts might have contributed to 
the evening's action. 

An alarming aspect of the 
performance is that Souness 
was himself several times 
warned for the offence for 
which Cooper was dismissed 
in the last few minutes: dis- 
sent. Souness repeatedly dis- 
puted decisions, and he will 
realise, if he is wise, that his 
example could be taking 
Rangers down the wrong road. 

Butcher, a man of renowned 
emotion in the dressing room, 
was weeping as he left the 


field. Was it in frustration or 
shame? 

How often over the 30 years 
of European competition we 
have heard the song before. A 
British team plays away from 
home, gets involved in a 
kicking match, loses on both 
counts, and returns home 
wailing “we wuz robbed* 1 . 
Rangers were, not without 
some cause, critical of the 
referee, though they were far 
from guiltless. You have to 
learn to live with referees, and 
the comments of Walter 
Smith, the assistant manager, 
show be has not 

Cooper, who had already 
been booked for retaliation 
against a foul by Rahn in the 
first half, was sent off in tbe 
last few minutes, according to 
Alex Ponnet of Belgium, the 
referee, for calling him a 
“dirty German”. It was dou- 
bly naive of Cooper to sup- 
pose that an experienced 
World Cup referee would not 
understand what he was say- 
ing. McMinn also provoc- 
atively questioned almost 
every- decision that went 
against him. 

Ponnet may have made 
mistakes — Butcher was bla- 
tantly pushed off the ball in 
the penalty area going for a 
header near the end - but it 
should be remembered that 
Ponnet booked three Ger- 
mans, Rahn, Thiele and Jung 


out of the six whose names he 
took. Rangers should recall 
that the first grotesque foul, 
was by Dawson, their right! 
bade, in the seventh minute, 1 
for which he could well have 
been sent off. 

The mature teams __ 
Europe - and for that matter 
in the World Cup - recognize 
that there is nothing to be 
adueved by any action, least 
of all petulance, over tbe 
quality of the referees, and 
that ill-controlled tempera- 
ment usually magnifies the 
disadvantage. If Souness can-* 
not, with all his experience 
with Liverpool, Sampdoria 
and Scotland, tell his players, 
then Willie Waddell and tbe 
other Ibrax directors should. 

It is most of all disappoint- 
ing that Rangers should have 
gone out in disarray consid- 
ering they had, especially in 
the first haK played some 
coherent controlled football; 
had reduced Borussia's firmed 
attack to a wimper, and had 
themselves created enough 
half chances, as at Ibrox, to 
have settled tbe match. 
McCoisi hit the bar after only 
eight minutes and Borussia 
often looked a ragged lot 


Rangers plan protest 


Rangers are planning to pro- 
test to UEFA about the han- 
dling, by the Belgian referee 
Alexis Ponnet, of the second leg 
of their cap tie with Borussia 
MOochengladhacii (Hugh Tay- 
lor writes). 

The Glasgow dob are upset 
about the treatment meted oat to 
David Cooper, their inter- 
national winger, in the first half 
of tbe game, in which he was 
ordered off for retaliation near 
the end. 

Yesterday Cooper and Stuart 
Munro. also seat off for retali- 
ation, were excused by Rangers* 
player-manager Graeme 
Souness who said: “As far as I 
am concerned we will not he 
disciplining the players. I was 

Mexico’s 
big share 
of spoils 

Zurich (AP) — The Inter- 
national Football Federation. 
(FIFA), has approved the final 
account of the 1986 World Cup 
tournament showing profits 
totalling 71 million Swiss francs 
(£30,281.690) of which the 
Mexican organizers are to re- 
ceive 30 per cenL 

The remaining 70 per cent 
will be divided among the 24 
national associations that com- 
peted in Mexico. 

• The Football Trust yesterday 
joined the debate on how to 
tackle football hooliganism by 
giving the thumbs down to 
moves to ban away supporters 
and members-only schemes. 

The Trust have monitored a 
project at Leicester City’s Fil- 
bert Street ground for the past 
two years. The Midlands club 
have a membership scheme 
operating in half of the ground, 
but allow visiting supporters in 
the other. 

• The Everton goalkeeper. 
Bobby Minims, has joined 
Sunderland on a month's loan 
and will make his debut against 
Barnsley, tomorrow.Mimms is- 
the fifth goalkeeper to be signed 
on loan by the manager. Lawrie 
McMenemy, in his 18 months at 
the club. 

• Luton Town's directors are 
Jryi qg to persuade the chairman, 
David Evans, to change his 
mind about resigning from the 
post at the end of the 
season “We hope to persuade 
him to stay on as chairman for 
another year,” the director and 
chier executive, John Smith, 
said. 

• Madrid (Reuter) - Diego 
Maradona, who led Argentina to 
Uieir World Cup triumph in 
June, was quoted yesterday as 
saymg he had discussed si gnin g 
for Real Madrid in talks with the 
Spanish league champions. 

Meanwhile in Naples, a Na- 
po|« spokesman said: “It is to- 
tally false, impossible.” 


dose enough to see exactly what 
went on and it is not oar players 
I blame.” 

While Souness refused to 
criticize a match official, there is 
little doubt among some Ran- 
gers' officials that Poanet pun- 
ished the Scots while several 
West Germans, they felt, es- 
caped a series of illegal tackles 
on Cooper and McMinn. 

Neither will Rangers censure 
then- captain, Terry Butcher, the 
England international, who was 
involved in remarkable scenes at 
the end of the game when be had 
to be restrained from dashing 
with Borussia players and the 
referee. 

“Nothing came of this and we 
all understand bow our ca ptain 
felt,” Souness said. 


Souness had brought, ironi- 
cally, a calmness to Rangers' 
approach, so that with Bell. 
Fetgpson and Cooper they 
had controlled the midfield. 
Cooper’s dribbling was often a 
delight, causing German spec- 
tators to applaud. 

What Souness needs is not 
more muscle, in the shape of 
Roberts, but a central striker 
with more sharpness than 
those he already has. Rangers 
have the potential to be an 
important club again, but not 
in the mood they exhibited 


this week, nor 
their chances. 


they miss 


Souness has always been 
one of the hardest men in 
international football occa- 
sionally ruthless, and this 
streak in his character will 
make it particularly difficult 
for him as player-manager to 
limit, rather than encourage 
similar characteristics in oth- 
ers which we saw in Monchen 
Gladbach. 


Inadequacy pays 
off for United 

By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 


It is a sobering thought that 
Dundee United should be left 
alone to carry the British flag in 
Europe. Even Jim McLean, 
their manager, recognizes that 
his side is inadequate. Although 
he is naturally overloaded with 
pessimism he would stand ac- 
cused of being outrageously 
unreal istic if he offered a higher 
opinion. 

United, who seem destined to 
reach the quarter-finals of every 
Continental competition they 
enter, were no more than or- 
dinary in reaching the last eight 
of the UEFA Cup on Wednes- 
day night. 

That is all they needed to be to 
hold on for a goalless draw and 
go through 2-0 on aggregate 
against a Hajduk Split side who, 
though unmistakably more tal- 
ented. were appallingly prof- 
ligate, scorning eight obvious 
goal-scoring chances. 

McLean, (breed because of 
injury to include a worrying 
amount of novices, said be was 
proud of the overall response 
from his side, but conceded later 
that i( had been “just a good, 
workmanlike performance.” 

In spite of their exclusive 
position in Britain during tbe 
second half of the season, they 
are incapable of raising them- 
selves significantly higher. “We 
need more class players”, 
McLean confesses, and he plans 
to buy one or two with the 
money gained from the transfer 
of Gough and Dodds in (he late 
summer. 

But lime has already almost 
run ouL The deadline for any 
new acquisition to be permitted 
to play in the quarter-final ties 
passes on Monday. “Ill be out 
hunting over the next few days, 
but the trouble is that up here we 
are overshadowed by the big 
two, Celtic and Rangers, 
McLean said. 


United's hopes of progressing 
any further in the UEFA Cup 
depend more realistically on the 
return of all of their experienced 
representatives as well as on a 
favourable draw. “We have had 
the luck so far to meet sides like 
us,” McLean admits. "Full of 
industry, rather than full of 
class." 

Anxious to avoid another 
“long haul” (their journeys have 
been to France, Romania, and 
Yugoslavia), he was pleasantly 
surprised to discover that Dy- 
namo Moscow had been re- 
moved from the list of potential 
opponents. There is not much to 
choose geographically between 
the remaining possibilities. AU 
are comfortably within range. 

United's success has cost 
them some £20,000 but McLean 
has his eyes on a place in tbe 
semi-final, “where anything can 
happen,” rather than on a 
lucrative series of matches in 
March. He would rather be 
paired with Guimaraes. for- 
instance, than with Barcelona. 
At the moment anyway. 

“The hope is to make money, 
obviously, but that is not always 
the case in Europe, as we have 
found to our cost” he said. “But 
if we make it to the last four, we 
would be confident of making a 
profit." At least he can now 
select Ferguson, his signing 
from Rangers, who was pre- 
viously ineligible. 

For McLean to realize his 
ambition, Mai pas and Srurrock, 
both of whom were unavailable 
on Wednesday, must be fit as 
well. Yet when the draw is 
made on January 24 (to coincide 
with the presentation of the 
1988 European championships 
in Cologne), the likelihood is 
that United wifi no longer be 
joined by partners who are 
merely workmen. 



WnBano Boone (left), tbe bolder, end bis challenger John Prem, whose struggle for the world rackets title will hare a TV aodtence at Qtreen s Club 


EQUESTRIANISM 


A Princess 
succeeds 
The Duke 

By Jenny MacArtimr 

The Duke of Edinburgh, who 
yesterday completed 22 years as 
president of the Federation 
Equestre Internationale, told a 
press conference at tbe dose of 
the General Assembly, that he 
would be spari ng in fa is ad vice to 
his snocessor. Princess Anne. “I 1 
discovered a long time ago that 
it was no use telling her what to, 
do,” he said. 

Asked if there was anything! 
major he felt he bad not 
accomplished during his term of 
office. Prince Philip said no but 
then later mentioned that he 
would like to see the introduc- 
tion of independent medication 
control at international shows, 
so that drug-tests could be 
performed. 

A new independent syst 
would take the strain off the 
FEL who are solely responsible 
at present. Another problem 
which needed tackling, he 
added, was that of fining in so 
many championships each year 
now that the body embraces 
seven disd^ines. 

When Princess Anne, one of 
the busiest members of the 
Royal Family, was asked how 
she would fit in her new job she 
said she would have to wait and 
see, but added she would make a 
point of being at the FEI 
headquarters in Berne for all the 
Bureau meetings, and would 
take on as many of the repre- 
sentative jobs as possible. 

Earlier, at the last session of 
the General Assembly, there was 
dissention over the new FEI 
ruling on amateurs and pro- 
fessionals. The ruling, in ac- 
cordance with the new IOC 
eligibility regulations, allows 
professional nders to renounce 
their status and become ama- 
teurs again if they want to 
compete at the Olympic Games. 

The East German delegation, 
backed by the Russians, ob- 
jected to the new regulations, 
saying they wanted to keep the 
professionals out, at least for the 
next Olympic Games. 

Prince Philip, in reply, said 
that in the 22 years that he had 
been president there had never 
been a universally accepted 
definition on the distinction 
between professionals and ama- 
teurs. All the FEI could do, he 
said, was interpret the wishes of 
the IOC as closely as possible. 
He thought it was only fair that 
those riders who had become 
professionals under tbe old 
regulations should have the 
chance now ofbeing reclassified. 

Other Olympic matters dis- 
cussed included the changes in 
the rules for tbe individual 
showjumping final and the age 
of horses competing. The orig- 
inal proposal that they should be 
a minimum of six years old with 
the exception of three-day event 
horses, who should be seven, 
was challenged by the French 
Federation, who thought that 
six was too young. 

Prince Philip quickly arrived 
at a compromise — to which 
the majority agreed — whereby 
all horses competing at the, 
Olympics must be a minimum 
of seven years old. 

After a showing of the film by 
the Korean delegates on the 
preparations for the next Olym- 
pics, entitled We Are Ready . 
Prince Philip dosed the meet- 
ing — allowing tbe Russian dele- 
gates to read oat a message 
about equestrianism and 
peace — by handing over to 
Princess Anne the pin which he 
received from a member of the 
Irish Federation when he first 
became president. 


TENNIS 


French double-act find their 
opponents tres difficile 


A steward checking passes ai 
Loyal Albert 


London's Royal Albert Hall 
yesterday had a lot of time on 
his hands and sperm much of it 
reading a booklet, French With 
Ease. As a guide to what was 
happening on court, the title was 
only half-right 

Guy Forget and Yannick 
Noah took three hours and 43 
minutes to beat Mike DePalmer 
and Gary Donnelly 6-7, 6-4, 3-6, 
7-6, 7-S in the Nabisco Masters 
Doubles. 

The French are a Civilized lot 
and it follows that m general, 
they are not at their best before 
lunch — which was when the 
match began. But at one o'clock 
or thereabouts. Forget and 
Noah — untile** Cinderella at 
midnight - went to the ball. 

True, they envied the periph- 
eral diners, and one sometimes 
suspected that Gallic dialogues 
between points had as much to 
do with food as tennis. “Usu- 
ally, 1 joke a lot” Noah said 
later, “and Guy doesn't like 
thaL” 

DePalmer and Donnelly were 
so earnestly and relentlessly 
conversational that the tennis 
often seemed to be an irritating 
interruption. They are a remark- 
ably good team, adding up to 
slijjhtly more than the sum of 
their parts. 

DePalmer, one of those 
confusing Americans with two 
capital letters in his name, is 
squarely built and holds bis 
shoulders so far back that they 
are almost behind him. Don- 
nelly is tall and fair, and reached 
the Wimbledon final with Peter 
Fleming, who used to do that 
sort of thing with John 
McEnroe. 

Forget is a lean, whippy, 
rather grave left-hander. Noah is 
none of that. He has an impish 
sense of fun, lots of rippling- 
muscles and (when nothing is 1 
happening) quivers with ill- 
suppressed energy. To some 
extent, he is reminiscent of Roy 
Emerson. One can imagine the 
beasts of the jungle keeping wefi 
dear of men like thaL 

DePalmer and Donnelly often 
use the tandem formation, with 
the server’s partner standing on 
the same side of the court to 
inhibit cross-court returns. Yes- 
terday, that may have been 


By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 

somewhat counter-productive like Henri Leconte on rah. 
because, as Noah pointed out France have an enviable vaneiy 
later, repeated changes of forma- of doubles teams — all of them 


lion on the other side of the net 
do not permit the receiving pair 
to relax the intensity of their 
concentration. 

The break that mattered — at 
a time when our friendly 
neighbourhood steward was 
deeply into French With Ease — 
came when Donnelly was serv- 
ing at five-all in the fifth seL 
Forget then produced four first 
services, which is a wise thing to 
do when serving for a match. 

“At the end. Guy played 
great”, Noah generously ob- 
served. Oddly, these two have 
yet to play doubles for France in 
a Davis Cup-tie. With a player 


good. , . , 

If you are interested in dou- 
bles strategy, note that, of the 
three left-handers in action yes- 
terdav afternoon. two 
(DePalmer and Andres Gomez) 
played in the deuce court, which 
is "unconventional. This is n 
good debating poinL Just son u 
out amoug vourseives. 

RESULTS: Step Group: Y Noah and 6 
Forget (Fr) M M W [tender and J Nwtrom 
(Swl 2-e. 7-5. 6-2. 7-5: Fbrgat and Npaft 

W G DotmeBy and M DePalmer 1US1 6-7. 6- 

4. 7-fi. 7-5. Red Group: H 

Gflflemetster (CWe) and A Gomez (Ec 
uador) bt S Edoerg and A Janyd (Swel 7- 
6. 6-3. 3-6, 7-5; C Steyn and D Vfeiser (SA) 
bt H GMeiTOster (Cfrte) and A Gomez 
(Ec) 6-3. 6-4. 6-3. 


Cool Carlsson strides 
towards semi-finals 

From a Correspondent, Stuttgart 


Kent Carlsson, of Sweden, 
needs only to win one set today 
in the Young Masters tour- 
nament to advance to the semi- 
finals. 

Carlsson. the No 2 seed in this 
16-man tournament for players 
aged 21 and under, put himself 
in a commanding position yes- 
terdav by beating Paolo Cane, of 
Italy.'6-3, 6-4. Carlsson has not 
lost a set and can afford to drop 
one today in his final round 
robin match, against Michael 
Westpbal. of West Germany. 

The Swede, aged 18. is already 
ranked 14 in the world, but still 
has some way to go before 
joining the elite group of Swedes 
who include Mats Wflander, 
(ranked three). Stefan Edbeig, 
(four) and Joakim Nystrom, 
(seven), but has surpassed An- 
ders Janyd, a former member of 
the group. Jarryd. a Wimbledon 
semi-finalist, has twice under- 
gone knee surgery this year. 

Carlsson has four compatriots 
here, all of whom will soon be 
vying to reach the top 10. “I 
think it’s very difficult to reach 
the top 10.” said Carlsson, who 
won two Grand Prix titles this 
year and reached four finals.“If 
we make it,” Carlsson added, "I 
think the others will still be 


there, forming an even bigger 
group of Swedes. ’ ' 

Carisson’s opponent yes- 
terday was the histrionic Italian 
Cane, who allowed a 4-1 lead in 
the second set to slip away amid 
dramatic outbursts and much 
hurling of rackets around the 
court. He was warned once by 
George Grime, the British um- 
pire. for unsporting conduct 
Carlsson. follows the tradition 
set by Borg and possesses an ice- 
cool temperament and total 
concentration. He simply 
wailed for the storm to subside, 
winning the match as Carte 
pounded a forehand long. 

The young Swede is consid- 
ered one of the few players likely 
to challenge Boris Becker, al- 
though be cannot meet the West 
German before the final. He bas 
a 2-1 head to bead record over 
Becker, although all three 
matches were played on slow 
day, the Swales’s preferred 
surface. 

RESULTSe Gold gn»|RK Caisson (Swe) 
M C Pfstoiasi (It), 6-1. 6-1. Pfetrtesi bt M 
6-3, 6-3; Carisson bt P 
I. Red group: B Backer 
(USSU 6-3, 6-2; A 
WVywnd.6-7.6-3.B- 
Carfsson (Swe) bt K 
Novacsk (Cz), 6-2, 6-1 Blue grow: P 
Lundgren (Swo) bt U Stenhmd (Sure), 6-7, 
&a. ^6; StBflkmd bt T Muster (Austne). 7- 
6JW. 


Westpbal 
Cano (IQ. 

E" A 


SKIING 


Bell keeps Muller 
and Swiss in sight 


Val 

Swiss 


Gardena (Reuter) — 
skiers dominated yes- 
terday's training for the World 
Cup downhill race tomorrow 
with Peter Muller leading a 1 
Swiss sweep of the top four 
places, although there was also 
optimism in the British camp as 
Martin Bell finished sixth. 

Muller, winner of the opening 
downhill in Las Lenas, Argen- 
tina, in August was tbe only one 
of the 82 finishers to dip under 
2min 03sec on the icy Saslong 
course. Conradin Cathomen, a 
late starter, came in second, 
0.38sec behind Muller's time of 
2:02,95. under a sunny sky. - 

Firm in Zurbriggen, the over- 
all leader and one of the 
favourites for the race, and 
Daniel Mahrer completed the 
Swiss dominance with Leonard 
Stock, the Austrian former 
Olympic champion, and Bell 
dose on their heels. 

Muller, narrowly beaten for 
the downhill title by Peter 


Wimsberger, of Austria, last 
year, said he fell comfortable on 
the course, which drops 839 
meters. “It is a perfect downhill, 
a great course, although it is 
bumpy at the start and very icy 
at the top,” he said. “The last 
two jumps, dose to tbe finish, 
are difficult as you are already 
thinking about braking.” 

The course also seemed to suit 
Bell, who set tbe sixth fastest 
time of2.-04.03. Bell placed 10th 
in a downhill here last year at 
the start of a good run of results 
which saw him gain three other 
top 10 places. 

L£ADMG PRACTICE TIMES: 1. P Miner 
2mm Q2JJ5sec 2, C Cathomen 
£03-33: 3. P Zurbrigmn (Swttz). 

: 4. □ Mahrer (Switz), £oi&7; SX 
StOCkf Austria). 203.B8; 6. M Bell (G8X 
204.03; 7. S Ntederaeer (Austefe), &HC23; 
8, P Wmstreraar (Austria). 2&Sj3 2; 9, F 
Heinz® laiSzT 2:0433; 10. F Steczyk 
(Can). 2*4.42. 

• REVISED MEN’S DATES: Dee 13: 
DownhflL vat Gardena. Dec 14: Oant 
staJcxn. La Via — AHa Badta. Doe 15c 
Giant fitafom, La VEa. Dec 16: Spatial 
slalom. Madonna d CampJgUo. 


Figini is in 
fine form 
for downhill 

Val D'lsgrc (Agencies) — The 
world and Olympic champion, 
Michda Figini of Switzerland, 
who did not win a race last 
season, was fastest in practice 
for the second successive day in 
preparation for today’s World 
Cup downhill. 

She was the only woman to 
get under lmin 27sec yesterday 
and appeared to have a lot left in 
reserve, getting up out of her 
racing crouch well before tbe 
finish. Her compatriot, Heidi 
Zurbriggen, improved from 
sixth to second 
Miss Zurbriggen is hoping to 
emulate her brother Pirmin who 
won the men's downhill here 
last week. The women's course 
has been modified from last year 
wben Christine Putz, of 
Austria, had a narrow escape 
from death in a high speed crash 

(US) 1:27.48; 5. MWaftar(SwH_, 

6. K Gutenshon (Austria) 1:27.65. 


ready 
to regain 
title 

By William Stephens 

John Prcnn. the former cham- 
pion. will resume his challenge 
to William Boone, the holder, 
for the world title at Queen's 
Club tomorrow leading by four 
games to three. Prenn has 
gained this marginal superiority 
through uhvsica! fitness, which 
paid dividends during the first 
leg in New York on Saturday. 

A rigorous seven months 
training pro gram me enabled 
him to outlast Boone, whose 
exhaustion was evident in the 
last two games. 

The contrast between the 
contenders is marked. Boone, 
on old Etonian, is a sales 
manager fora rackets company 
A left-hander, he has played 
tennis for Cambridgeshire and 
squash rackets for Norfolk. In 
rackets singles at Eton he was in 
the shadow of Mark Faber and 
never won the public schools 
singles championship. He is an 
exuberant character who ran get 
carried away under pressure. 

Prenn is an old Harrovian 
who is chairman of a clothing 
company. A right-hander, he 
plays tennis for Middlesex, cap- 
tained England in a senior 
international against Wales, and 
at the age of 18 played doubles 
with Pancho Gonzalez in the 
London grass courts champion- 
ships before joining the inter- 
national circuit. 

In rackets at Harrow he was 
outplayed by Mark Thatcher, 
who became public schools 
singles champion. Prenn is of a 
quiet, self-contained nature. 

The world championship first 
leg was a scrappy affair with 
neither player at his best. In the 
first game. Prenn took a 6-1 lead 
before Boone found his rhythm 
and won 15-7. The second was 
level at 8-8 and 12-12 with 
Boone appearing to fade as 
Prenn took the game 15-12. 
Prenn led 8-6 in the third but 
Boone recovered to win !5-8. 

The crucial game was the 
fourth. Prenn trailed 0-6. 1-7, 
and 5-9. at which point Boone 
hit the ball into the back of his 
opponent's head. Play was 
halted while Prenn absorbed the 
pain. From SI 2 down, Prenn 
caught up to 13-13. drawing 
level through executing a soft 
drop shot — one of three he was 
to use to tire his opponent in the 
closing stages of that game. 

After the exertions required to 
win that fourth game 18-17. 
Prenn subsided in the fifth to 
trail 0-8, but Boone made 
unforced errors to allow Prenn 
to catch up to 8-8 and to lead 1 2- 
8. From there, Boone levelled at 
12-12 and 13-13 before 
maintaining dominance to win 
the game 18-15. 

Tlie sixth game showed 
Boone beginning to tire. He led 
3-0, 4-2, and 9-5 but Prenn ’s 
drop shots had. an attriticnaJ 
effect as Boone's competitive- 
ness began to expire and Prenn 
levelled at 9-9. Prenn secured 
the game 15-9 and allowed 
himself an enormous smile as he 
realized the implications. With 
renewed confidence he took an 
rariy lead in the final game of3- 
U. Bui Boone caught up to 4-4 
and 5-5 before he committed 
more unforced errors and Prenn 
maintained pressure to extin- 
guish Boone's fire by winning 

1 J”D. 

Although tomorrow’s match 
is a sell-out. Queen's Club will 
televise it by closed circuit and 
all are welcome. 


f' 


NON-LEAGUE FOOTBALL 


Cheltenham happy with Cup defeat 


John Murphy, the manager of 
Cheltenham Town, does not 
hide the fact that he envies 
Telford United and Maidstone 
United for their continuin g 
involvement in the FA Cup. He 
admits, however, that his team 
have drawn only benefits from 
their unexpected 4-3 defeat 
three months ago at home to 
Bideford in the first qualifying 
round. 

While all the pre-season 
favourites for the GM Vauxhall 
Conference championship — 
Telford, Maidstone, Altrincham 
and Enfield — have had their 
attention diverted by the Cup in 
recent weeks, Cheltenham have 
embarked on a run which has 
put them in serious contention 
for the title. 

Since the defeat against 
Bideford, which was their sec- 
ond successive exit from the 
Cup at the hands of Great Mills 
League opposition. Cheltenham 
have lost only two out of 16 
Conference matches and 
climbed from twelfth to third in 
the table. 

“We learned more from the 
Bide fond game than from any 


By Paul Newman 


other in my three yearn as 
manager here,” Murphy said. 
"We were 3-1 up after 60 
minutes but then became com- 
placent and lei our discipline go. 
We’ve since worked very hard 
to be more consistent and it has 
paid off Wben the Telfords and 
En fields play their games in 
hand they nail probably move 
above us but we are genuinely 
worth a place in the top half 
dozen." 

Cheltenham's new-found con- 
sistency can be explained in part 
by the estab lishm ent of an 

enlarged and settled squad of 
players. Some are on five-year 
contracts and most have been at 
Whaddon Road for ai least two 
seasons. 

“We have tinned down offers 
from professional dubs for two 
players and we are determined 
to keep everybody here,” Mur- 
phy said. “The oldest player in 
tbe team is 27 and they're all 
veiy ambitious to play at a 
higher level — with Cheltenham 
Town.” 

Several dobs are showing an 
interest in Chris Townsend, 
aged 19, the leading scorer with 


17 goals. Formerly on South- 
ampton's books, be joined 
Cheltenham on a free transfer 
from Forest Green Rovers at the 
end of last season. 

Attendances at Whaddon 
Road are averaging nearly 1,100 
and a crowd of more than 1,600 
saw them beat Enfield recently. 
Murphy is particularly looking 
forward to the Boxing Day 
fixture at home to Kidder- 
minster Hamers, for which he 

expects a gate of around 3,000. 

Cheltenham spent £20,000 on 
improving their floodlights last 
year and the local council, who 
own the ground, have just given 
approval to plans to extend its 
use. Work will start soon on a 
gymnasium, two outdoor train- 
ing areas and a r unning track. 
There are also plans to cover tbe 
One remaining open side of the 
ground. 

Murphy does not believe, 
however, that Cheltenham 
would be ready for League 
football if the possibility of 
promotion to the fourth di- 
vision arose at tbe end of the 
season. 

“We want to do tilings slowly 


but surely and to move on when 
we are ready,” he said. “I 
couldn’t see us progressing for a 
couple of years yet. though we 
are adjusting our horizons every 
season.” 

• Fisher Athletic, of the South- 
ern League, yesterday signed a 


with a focal firm. Universal 
Computers. 

CONFERENCE TABLE 
(Including Thurxty December 11) 


Barnet 

Scarborough 

Cheltenham 

ABrincham 

TflBOrt 

Enfield 

Makfstom 

Runcorn 

Boston 


P W 

22 13 

23 12 

24 11 
22 11 
20 11 
21 12 
21 11 
22 11 
23 10 
22 9 


UM 

Stafford 


Nuneaton 

Norttwricft 

RteWey 

MaaJdstone 

Gateshead 

WeUngUtt 


23 
20 
22 
21 

24 
21 
23 
23 

25 
23 
21 
20 


2 11 

4 13 

5 ID 
8 10 

10 9 
7 13 

6 12 
T 11 
5 13 


F APIS 
54 26 45 
30 21 43 
38 25 40 
36 26 40 
42 27 39 
38 25 39 
38 25 37 
40 35 36 

42 41 34 
33 36 33 
47 33 31 
35 26 31 
33 37 29 
38 45 23 

30 42 25 

29 37 23 
27 42 23 

31 37 22 

27 44 22 

30 37 21 
23 49 16 

28 50 .11 


WEDNESDAY’S 

RESULTS 

FA CUR: Second round r a p tew North- 

ampton Town 3, Southend (infeed 


(win ners away » Ne wcastle United 

fourth 

irnripe United 1-| 


Wrexham 2, 




CUP: TtiH round, s econd tog: 

Baveren 0. Torino 1 (Torino win 3-1 on 

aggk HafdiJc Spft 0, Dundee I ' 

(Anted win 2-0); Vitoria Quaman 
3. PC Grorimen (Nett) 0 
Guimaraes win £l); Gdteborg 4. Ghent 0 
(Goteborg wfn -5-0): Borussia 
Maenchanghdbacb 0, Rangers 0 (aog 
score 1-1, Borussia win on away gods 
rijlek SwarOwski Tyrol (Austria) 2, Spartak 
Moscow 0 (Swarostd Tyrol win 3-lJTinter 
Man 1. Dim PiBOueOtabareioned after 
77 minutes through tog. Inter lead 1*0 on 
9tan&2. Bnyw UartBngan 0 
vdn4-0onaggl 
ROVER TROPHY: Prafiakary 
round Hereford 4, Newport 0. 

ST CURTIN UMVERStTY HATCH: Ox- 
ford 3, Cambridge 4, 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: 

Swindon (k Charfton 3, Norwich 1; 

United 2, Tottenham 2. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: FM dhfeiOiE Not- 

tingham Forest 0, Manchester City 1. 
Second dMafcm Doncaster 1. GrfcnsbyO; 

York 0, Bradford C5ty 6; Stoke 1. 

Blackpool 0; Scunthorpe 2, Rotherham 0; 

Huddersfield 3, Barnsley 3; Darlington 4. 

Notts County 3. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE; BO DeBow Cap; 

FM round: Coventry Sporting 4, Mle Oak 

2; Dunste&le 0, CtWnwtorf 0. Mkflnd 

orieton: Buckkitfiaro 1, Leicester (Jtd 4. 

GM ACCEPTANCE CUP; Second round: 
South Liverpool 0, Runcorn 1. 

FA rotmf CUR Second round: 
H ed n esha d 1. Bkrntnghsm 1; Orient 1, 
Exeter 1. 

VAUXHALL-OPEL LEAGUE: Second <2- 

riak na oufec fttasip Manor 0. MetropoK- 
tanFMceO. - 


FOR THE RECORD 


BASKETBALL 


FOOTBALL 



-rcjjfr) bt Eatudamos Madrid 

02; Arexone Cantu ft) bt Spwtak L... 
(USSR) 79-77; onrese JM M Oiym 
Aruibos (Fit 96-78: Cat £nwa IS 
CncSM Barton IWn ft) as-8ft&aMa 
BuduCnOM Ttoarad (TOO) 89-87 JEUXX 
CUP: WMwRSeeond fife Group & LmH 
Sgwtak [BoO ts SWdo FranoUs VarsnBos (Fr), 

RONCHErtl CU P: Wb bwu:. O u c iwJ teg: 

Ancona ft) 89-79: rcnM** Mean ft) M 

Wnaur fW* (But) 91-BB. 

WOMEN'S CHAMPION CLUB'S dP: Agot 
DuasseMori (WG) bt Sparta Prague (Cz)70- 


GARLSBERGNATIOlULLEAGU&RiatlM- 
MokBCP London 111 Simpson 24. MOferew 
■ UTOttWr flrtarelKlYbung 38, VTOgtan 



STATBSc 

_____ jtetfaraPwram 

112: Detroff ptatons 106, Sacramento nn 
101; Boston Cases 108. New Josey Nets SS 
Weahngwn BuMs 108. New York Knkta 
105; Anna Hewka 123. mono Busa 95: 
Data Mavericks 130. Panted TraSsfeasra 
129: Mtweidtte Bucks 116, Las Angetos 
Ldwra S3; Houston Rackets 117, Rwarlx 
Suns 109: Utan Jazz 112. Denver Nuggets 
110; Los Angeles Cappers in, *■ 
SupemnicaSi. 


SNOOKER 


NORTHAMPTON: Hotaetam world i 

OttMerfaub: D T&yterpM) MM TlH 
gjHroi n J WNte (Big) and A Hggftf(M)£) 


2. Tottenham 1. Arsenal 
Wednesday 2. Group D: Oxford Utfl 
2. Manchester |*1; Qwfeaa 1. Oxfexri 1; 
Manchester Utd 5, Chelsea 0. Rnat Odotd 2, 


RUGBY UNION 

REPRESBITATIVE MATCHES: Sedtord 15. 
RAFK HarnMni 13, RoyM Nevy 24. 

CUB MATCHES: Exanr 7. CnMfcWMtorl 9; 
Gtamenan Wandenrs 8, Mwstag IS; 


■CE HOCKEY 

nkrtpog Juts 4. 


RUGBY FIVES 

CHELTENHAM: Ote BfemtBHms W CMtSn- 
hamSate ct IV 11 M9: J MeLacMan jdus C 

Sff?U arid S^UwsontMTCrti 

Wonnngten 16-14; S Norm and F Akenrun 
heat LLavaon and HWBnanai o ii 15-10, 16-5 
and beat T Speer and 3 Wsakstugen in, 
154. 


. RUGBY LEAGUE 

V8X£NBUVE-SW-tm < , France: Tour Bwhdc 
^MMtee£etaAAusuHA50. 

4- 


GOLF 

jSSse^: 


Kfn*£K Cmil£~irAtSi/Y 

SWING 

Frmv^Women^ w ^ 

Ba. 3 HkfiBSA« 3 ? 






"kandbalT 

ST" 

TENNIS 

BSeL635£ ‘ffSKSliSSS 1 “ u Stamun 
H ©wrt bt T ifcsa 
o^=C PraWe® a 







JSfes.’is 


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19 -VftM* 

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- •.•’I’vlii 


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J«P^| tj* 13 



THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 


TELEVISION AND RADIO 


The Scarfe’ s-eye-view of Gerald Scarfe 


' --:-r / V*' 
■ ';.:■<&> 

■ -*£15; 

. . • -V; 

■- ■ 

■ v^Joia {ft 

•:• /i, 

'• -VvStt 

■ -^rs,*^ 

. ' • •¥>****■ 
...- 

'■ U: <»H 

_ - . '.can*. 

.• . «'■ 

• *** 
. ■ “ -'V. |> 

•• ' — .11 . h 
_ •— ■; fc 


• A* Ihe famed caricaturist does 
not opt, verbally, to represent 
himself as a Jekyil and Hyde in his 
self-profile Scarf* on Scarfe 
(BBC2, 9.30pm). I feel free to do 
so. The snag is that although 
Scarfe does make an attempt to 
distinguish between his twin 
personalities by dressing the nice 
one m a dinner jacket and 
giving him a shave and putting his 
unshaven alter-ego into paint- 
splashed jeans, we are finally left 
wondering which of them would 
rise to his feet if told: Will the real 
Gerald Scarfe please stand up. 
And when, in the Elm’s closing 
moments, we see Scarfe frenziedfy 
destroying the vast and violent 
autobiographical mural on which 
he has been working throughout, 
there is considerable ambiquity as 
to which of the two Scarfes he has 
found guilty at the end of a brief 

trial in which he is both judge and 


I CmtexAM. 

I News headQnss followed by 

The FOntstones. (r) 635 
Weather. 

I Breakfast Time with Frank 
Bough, Sally Magnusson. and 
Jeremy Paxman. National and 
international news at 7.00, 

7.30. 8.00 and 8.30; reoionaf 
news and travel at 7.15, 7.45 
aid 8-15; and weather at 7.25. 
7.55 and 835- 

Watchdog. Lynn Faufds Wood 
and John Stapleton investigate 
consumer complaints 8.55 
Regional news and weather 

9.00 News and weather 

Day to Day. A topical subject is 
discussed by Robert Kfiroy- 
Siflt, a studio audience, guests, 
and ‘phone-in viewers 935 
Advice Lme presented by Paul 
Clark and Eileen Evason. 

News and weather 1005 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


VARIATIONS 


( CHOICE ) 

jury. What is more, it is unclear 
what the offence was. Neverthe- 
less, although the exact destina- 
tion in Scarfe’s voyage of self- 
exploration is never reached and 
we do not team the true nature of 
the savage fuel that powers the 
engines, the journey itself is full of 
eyeball-scorching interest En 
route, he seeks directions from 
past and present editors for whom 
be has worked, and from maga- 
zine and film colleagues with 
whom he has collaborated. 1 don’t 
know whether a psychiatrist could 
have uncovered anything of in- 
terest about this complex man (or 
men), but it might have bom 
rewarding to find oul 

• I should also like to know what 
the average psychiatrist, who de- 
pends on the one-to-one consul ta- 


a ppoin tmen t with A 

Box Clever. FamBy 


130 SSssxsarStssm 

PWtomena, wtth Johnny 
4.10 SuperTad. (rt 4.15 


OOmua tha Greatest Hero 
of Them AM. Tony Robinson 
with another tale from Greek 
legend 430 A Day in the 
Life—The Toad's Tate, with the 
voces of Wtntam Rusftton and 
Hugh Uoyd. 

4.55 Newsround with Roger Finn 
535 Granoe HBL En«nrta Pfl 


5 Plump Schofield with 
children's television 
programme news, and 
birthday greetings 10 JO Play 
School (r) 1030 Pinny’s 
House. 

5 Five to Eleven. Diana Guide 
with a thought for the day 
11.00 News and weather 11.05 
Public SchooL The seventh of 
ten programmes about fife at 
Radley College, (r) 11 35 Open 
At. Viewers' chance to 
comment on television 
programmes fmcluctes news 
and weather at 12.00) 

3 Domesday Detectives. Paul 
Cote presents the second day 
of the quarterfinals in the team 
quiz competition with 

g uestions on Britain and the 
rifish 1235 Regional news 
and weather. 

I One O’clock News with 
Martyn Lewis. Weather 135 
Neighbours. Denny is offered 
promotion if he moves to 
Canberra 1.50 King RoBo. (r) 
135 Gran, ft 
The Liver Beds. Comedy 
series starring Nerys Hughes, 
ft 230 Knots Laming. Gary 
breaks his dinner date with his 
wife for a business 


5.35 Mastarteam. 

6-00 News with Sue Lawtey and 
Nicholas Witched Weather. 
035 London Plus. 

tedute'AcSPSmoncSonand, 

from Rio de Janeiro, Parker. 
Thunderbirds' Lady 
Penelope's chauffeur. Plus 
music from Eurythmics. 

735 ’Alo'AHo! Rene is ordered by 
the French resistance to stead 
a vintage plane tor the British 
airmen to make thee 


tion for a living, thinks about A 
Change of Mmd (Channel 4, 
1 0.30pm) because this docu- 
mentary series is about communal 
psychotherapy. Helpers, and those 
needing help, sit is a circle. The 
hetp-needers unburden them- 
selves of their problems; the hdp* 
givers cautiously encourage them 
to open more doors and let in the 
fresh air; the fellow help-needers, 
who know only too well the 
difference that a touch of the hand 
can make, are there to provide a 
measure of comfbn when the tears 
begin to fell, as they inevitably da 
The series has now been running 
for five weeks, and 1 don’t believe 
that, during the whole of that time, 
it has once claimed that its case 
histories ended in a miraculous 
cure. But, as a layman, it strikes 
me that there have been unmistak- 
able signs of hope and, in any case, 
it has been a fascinating experi- 


9 JO Caafax. 

1230 Design and I nn ovatio n . An 
Open University production 
Inv es ti ga ting how Images or 
new technology are created. 

1235 Caafax. 

2.00 News and weather. 

2.02 MMTMffonafSfcow Jumping 
from the Grand HaR. Olympia. 
Introduced by David Vine, 
(includes news and weather at 
3.00) 

330 News and regional news and 
weather. 

44)0 Pamela Armstrong. Among the 
guests Is Keith Floyd. 

435 BRzzarcrs Wonderful Wooden 
Toys. In this last programme of 
his series Richard Bfazard 
demonstrates hte sMfls In 
making models, ft 

54X1 Domesday Detecti ves . A 
repeat of me programme 
shown on BBC 1 at 1235. 

535 Gotta Dance, Gotta Sing. A 


encc to watch the drains begin to 
drop off these deeply troubled 
captives and to recognize that 
some of their traumatic experi- 
ences (tonight’s involve a mother, 
a son and a daughter) are, with 
variations, reflected in our own 
lives. 

• Radio choice: Jenny Ward's 
feature Dr Crippen’s Trial (Radio 
4, 1 1 .00am) tries something new — 
and impressively brings it off. At 
each stage in the reconstructed 
Old Bailey proceedings, a legal or 
forensic expert steps up to the 
microphone and obliges with 
some essential piece of analysis. 
What we lose in continuity, we 
gain in authority — 1 also recom- 
mend David Rudkin's vigorous 
version of Euripides's EGppolytas 
(Radio 3, 9.10pm). It deserves its 
repeat. 



mmi 



* ’ - - 


■ 

mm. 


11111 










Peter Davglle Mrs ThatchCT,according to Gerald Scarfe: Arena, BBC2, 930pm 


ITV /LONDON 


compilation of the 
numbers featured 


8.10 Dynasty. Blake Is under attack 
from all sides after the fire at 
La Mirage not least from the 
scheming Alexis who fees 
wicked allegations to the 


8l00 News with John Humphrys and 
Andrew Harvey. Regional 
news and weather. 

930 Fftn: From Hel to Victory 
(1 979) stantog George 
Peppard, George Hamilton, 
and Capudne. Second Worid 
War adventure that begins in 
1 939 in Paris where six friends 
meet for the last time before 
they find they wH be on 
opposing side® In the contact 
Directeoby Hank MBestone. 

11.10 International Sbow Jirapfog 
from the Grand HaH, Olympta. 
The Cognac Courvoteter 
Napoleon Stakes. 

1230 Rhocfa. Rhoda is too proud to 
ask for help when her business 
hits a cash-flow problem, (r) 

12.45 Weather. 


numbers featured to Hollywood 
musicals. Among those 
appearing are AlJoteon, Fred 
Astaire and Ginger Rogers, 
Carmen Miranda. Frank 
Sinatra, EMs Presley and 
Marflyn Monroe, ft 

635 Cricket Third Test Rfcfte 
Benaud introduces highlights 
of the first day's ptey in the 
match at Adnide between 
Australia and England. 

630 Choir of the Year 1985. In St 
David's HaM, Cardiff, choirs 
from Wales, Exeter, and Bristol 
compete for the three 


6.15 TV-enc Good Morning Brttal 
presented by Anne Diamond 


presented by Anne Diamond 
and Richanf Keys. News with 
Gordon Honeyrambe at 63a 
7M, 73a 009, 538 and &00; 

t sport at 6A0 and 7 JUk cartoon 

at 735; pop music at 735; and 
Jimmy Greaves's letevfcsion 
higWlghts at 835. The After 
Nina guests Include Russeti 
Grant with horoscopes and the 
winner of the best fish and chip 
shop competition and, at 9.17, 
Uzae Webb with exercises. 

935 Thames news heaefiines 

followed by Christmas Vi Bags. 

Part one of a new cartoon 
serial set in tha magical vOage 
where Father Christmas fives 
935 Roger Ramjet 9.45 
Struggle Beneath the Sea. 
How marine animals procreate. 

laos Land of the Ph ara ohs 

(1 955) starring Jack Hawkins 
and Joan CrAns. Ancient 
Egyptian intrigue with the 
Pnaraoh trying to buftd a thief- 
proof tomb and his wife trying 
to put him there. Directed by 
Howard Hawks. 

124X) The Raggy Dofls. (r) 12.10 
RabtoowTOressing 14) as 
nursery rhyme characters. 

1230 New Way of Living. Kate Lyon, 
a lecturer in sooai work, wrth 


This week’s contestants are 
Russeii Hickman and Alefcs 
Mitov. (Oracle) 

5.15 Bloc M » »t ar e . General 
knowledge quiz game for 
teenagers, presented by Bob 
Hotoess. 

5j 45 Nows with Alastafr Stewart 

530 Tta 6 O’clock Show with 
Michael Aspel. 

730 Bruce Forsyth's Play Your 
Cards Right Game show. 

730 Survival Special: Daphne 
Sheidriek and the Orphans of 
TsavaThe story of a 
remarkable widow who tends 
inured animate rescued by her 
late game warden husband 
from poachers in Tsavo 
National Park in Kenya. 

(Oracle) 

830 Tim Two of Us. Last in the 
present series of the sK-com 
starring Nicholas Lyndhurst 
and Janet Dfriey. (wade) 

930 The Professionals: Foxhole on 
the Roof. CI5 agents. Botfia 
and Doyle, battle against 
entrenched and dangerous 
criiranals armed with weapons 

and explosives, (r) 
moo News at Ten wfth Sandy Gad 
and Carol Barnes. 

1030 The London Prog ra mme 


ew Way of Living. Kate Lyon. investigates (he problems of 

torturer in social vrork, wth the capital's congested road: 


advice on 
paidandi 


n opening: 
voluntary 


s for both 
1 work in the 



The adjudicators are Andrew 
Greenwood. Bddwen Harrhy, 
and Owain Arwel Hughes. 

730 Mcro Live examines me 
phenomenon of electronic ma8, 
the fastest-growing use of the 
personal computer. Electronic 
mal systems offer the chance 
for people to send written 
documents immediately to titek 
offices via the telep h o n e from 
anywhere In the world. 

830 Theiwea. Bob Wettings meets 
the celebrated cartoonist who 
has been humourously 
depicting reoatottrant ponies 
for ihe past three decades, at 
his home on the banks of the 
River Test in Hampshire, (r) 

830 Going to Pot. A guide to indoor 
gardening. With Susan 

Hampshire and Geoff 
Hamilton. (Ceefax) 

■ 930 Just Another Day. John 

Pitman meets the punters and 
the runners at Walthamstow 
Dog Track. 

930 Arana: Scarfe on Scarfe. A 
seH-porlrait of Gerald Scarfe, 
with contributions from 
Richard Ingrams, Peter Cook, 
Harold Evans, and Roger 
Waters, (see Choice) 

1030 NenmitighL The latest national 
and international news 


community. 

130 News at Ctoe with Leonard 
Parkin 130 Thames news. 

130 Fim: The Tag Blond Man With 
the One Black Shoe (1972) 
starring Pierre Richard. A 


. spy story about a 
secret sennes chief and his 
efforts to rid himself of fib 
ambitious assistant Directed 


by Yves Robert 
830 Taka the High Road. Fiona 
leaves the big house 335 
Thames news heads nes 330 
Sons and DaegMers. 

430 Rainbow. A repeat of the 
programme shown at 1Z10 
4.15 The Telebugs 435 
Inspector Gadget 430 
Woridwise. Geography quiz 
Dresented bv David Jensen. 


the capital's congested roads, 
and Includes an interview with 
the Transport Minister. Peter 
Bottomiey. Followed by LWT 
News head&nes. 

1130 Snooker. The second semifinal 
of the Hofmeister Worid 
Doubles introduced by Dickie 
Davies from ihe derogate 
Theatre, Northam p to n . 

12.15 MgM Heat A wedding 
reception photographer 
accidentally films a dockside 
murder. Gtambone tries to 
convince her to come forward 
as a witness. 

1.10 Him: Jaguar Lives (1979) 
starring Joe Lewis. Martial arts 
adventure about an agent 

brought out of retfrement to - 

tackle a drugs gang. Directed 
by Ernest Ptotoff. 

235 rogh! Thoughts. 


Dogs being 
Wslth; 


rs big races at 
930pm) 


of one 01 the mate stories of 
the day. 

11.15 Weather. 

1130 The Rockford Fflea. A ease of 
mistaken identity leads to 3m 
befog kidnapped instead of a 
federal wem. Starring Jamas 
Gamer, (r) Ends at 12.15. 



CHANNEL 4 


1j 45 Their LoRfintps' House. A 
repeat of last rilghfs highlights 
of the day's proceedings in tha 
House of Loras. Presented by 
Jackie Ashley. 

230 Snooker. The opening session 
of the seoond semifinal of the 
Hofmeister WOrid Doubles. 

The commentators at the 
Derogate Theatre, 
Northampton, are John 
Puhnan, Dennis Taylor, Rex 
Williams, Ray Edmonds, and 
Mark Wildman. 

430 Countdown. This second 
quarterfinal pits the number 
two seed, Michael 
Stephenson, against Maggie 
Banter, seeded seventh. 
Richard Whitetey is the 
questionmaster, assisted by 
Bid Tidy as the adjudicator. 

530 Car 54, Where Are You?- 
Toody and MuJdoon grapple 
with a gang of geriatnc bank 
robbers. Sterling Joe E Ross 
and Fred Gwynne. 

530 The Tube presented by Joois 
Hod and and Paula Yates. 
Among those appearing on this 
week's show are Paul 
McCartney, Pet Shop Boys. 
Courtney Pine. Tina Turner, 
end Adam Faith. 

730 Channel 4 News with Peter 
Sissons and Beatrice Hollyer 
Includes a report on Cunard's 
attempt to cut labour costs on 
Its flagship, QE2. Weather. 

730 Book Choice. Poet and critic 
Alan Jenkins reviews Life is 
Elsewhere, an early novel of 
Czech writer Milan Kundera, 
but recently published in this 
country for tha first time. 

830 What the Papers Say with 
Julia Langdon of the Daily 
Mirror. 

8.15 A Week In PaWcs presented 
by Nick Ross. An interview 
with Neil Kkmock; and the 
results of a Week In Potitics 
poll on which party viewers 
trust to make the right 
decisions oil- unemployment, 
education, inflation, health 
matters, and housing. 

930 NewtiarL Domestic comedy 
series from the United States 
starring Bob NewtiarL 

930 The Great PtantCoBecttona. 
Roy Lancaster visits the Savlt 
and Valley Gardens In Windsor 
Great Park, (ri (Oracle) 

1030 The Golden Girts. Award- 
winning comedy series about 
four middle-aged women 
sharing a house on the Florida 
coast Starring Bea Arthur, 
BettyWhitB, fiua McCtanahan, 
and Estele Getty 
1030 A Change of Mind: Mother, 
Daughter Mother, Son, 
Programme five of the six-part 
series on psychotherapy, (see 


1 UA 1 mi As LtfvfOA exceet ustm 

ANGLIA sasampSawnW^BMon 
Flos 1lJO-t2.cs Rood Dreams 1.20pm 
Nows 1.3Q-U0 Hire Angel who Pawned Hor 
Harp- SJO-rao About AngBalOJO 
Snootar 12.15 m) Fhc Trapped 1AB Late 
Mgnt final. Close. 

RnonFR As London except: &33*n 
5088™ areet 10^0 Proao- 
tore 11 JS Fenaslie Four 1L35-12JM 
Gram Gnou&es 120pm Nwt 140 Short 
Story 200 FBm: TOta My LMe* aJO-UO 
Young Doctors SJJ0 tookatouid 6JO-7 
Take me High Road 1030 Snooker 
12 . 1 tan Oosa. 

CENTRAL 

My Brother Jonaman* 130 News L30 The 
Captain's Table- 640-7.00 Maws KL30 Snook- 
er i£15am Legends o(T7» west C00- 
LS5 Jobfinder, 

channel 

1QSO-12JOO island of Adventure l^Opm 
News UO Sorrafl and Son 2J0-3JKJ Three Lit- 
tle Words 3JO-4JW Country GP 64» 

Cnannet Report B3S Jane s Diary U0-7.00 
Country Ways 10JO-11JJ0 In Camera 
12.18am Kfljek I.ISCtosa. 

Grampian aaasm. 

1000 Return oi me Jedi lOio-iLOOOW 
Curiosity Shop 1.20pm News 1 J&-0.00 Fhc 
Information Recanted* &00-7.00 North To- 
nqta 10J0-11X0 Crosslire 12.15am News. 


Mike 11.00 Runaway Isand 11J5-12JW 
C o nnections 120pm Grenada Repons 1 JO 
The Week m View 2J10-X00HoM3J0- 
4X0 Young Doctors 600 Granada Reports 
8J0-7JJ0 Please Ski 1030 Snooker 
12.15am FBnc Cruse into Tenor (Ray MHand) 
1^0 Close. 

1030 Beyond 2000 11.15 FdUx the Cat 
1130-1230 Ctuisimas Story 130pm News 
130-330 Rkre Mtfton Pound Note* OOO- 
730 News 1030 Your Say 103SScam ‘88 
11.15 Snooker 12.1 San Close. 

HTV WAI FC AsHTVWestex- 
niv WHI.CJ capt: 530-4J0 Sons and 
Daughters 830-730 Wefcs m Sbc 1030 
Story and the Song 1130-12.15am Snooker. 

stanisHaagag^. 

1035 World of Magic 11 38 Eveiyaay Chi- 
na 1130-1230 Courtly Calendar I30pnr 
News 130 Live at One-Thlny 230330 
Fikn: isn't Life Wortoerfuf? 530 Scotland Today 
630-730 Diffrem Strokes 1030 Scottish 
Questions 11.16 Snooker I2.15aa Late Call. 
Ctosa. 

TSW As London except 93SamSasa- 
— me Street 1030-1230 Flktr Ghoet 
Train* l^lpm News 130330 F&rrc Ban- 
dta of the Rw Grande 338-430 Young Doc- 
tors 600-7.00 Friday Show 1032 Snooker 
12. 15am Postscript 1230 Jack the Ripper 1.1 6 
Ctosa. 

TVC As London except OlSem Seaa- 
-LiSmeSfreet 1030-1230 F8m: Island of 
Advemre 130am News 130 Sorrafl and 
Son 230-330 Three Little Words 330-430 
Coimtry GP 830 Coast to Coast 630-730 
Cotmtry ways 1030 Facing South 1130 
Snooker 12.15am Ko|8k 1.15 Company, 

Ctosa. 

TywETEEsaaass^ 

ttons 10145 Seoanw Shuar 11 j45-i£ 00 
Larry the Lamp 130pm Naws 130330 Film 
Gtos at Sea 600 Northern Life 630-730 
Sporting Chance 1032 Extra Tma 1130 
Snooker IZISam Countryside Christian, 

Close. 


Choice) (Orade) 

F3ttu L* Amour Vioto (1 977) 
starring NathaBe Nefl. The 


mmm. 


YORKSHIRE ftjgBggft 



study of the affect of a brutal 
rape by four young men on a 
nuraa, and of her 
determination to find those 

responsible in order to 
understand the deeper 


Sped B>y 1130-1230 Care Bears 130pm 

News 1.25 Help YomaH 130 FBnt Pedlar 
230-330 Mary 630-730 Calendar 1030 
Snooker 12.15am Late Night Drama 1246630 
Music Box. 




Daphne Sheidriek photographed with her late husband David in 
Kenya’s Tsavo National Park (ITV, 730pm) 




MF (medium wave). Stereo on 
VHF (see below) 




ore 




VHF (see below) 

S30am ACkfan John 730 Mace 
Smith's Breakfast Show 630 
Simon Bates 1230pm 
Newsbeat (Frank Partridge) 12*45 
Gary Davies 330 Steve Wngtrt 
530 Newsbeat (Frank Partridge) 
535 The Best and Worst of 
Singled Out 730 Andy Peebles 
1030-1230 The Friday Rock 
Show. VHF Stereo Rartios 1 & £ — 
430am As Radio 2. 1030pm 
As Radiol. 


:< T J ' 






MF (medium wave). Stereo 
VHF (see Ratio 1) 

News on the hour (except 
83pm). Cricket Third Test 
Australia v England. Reports at 
4.02am, 532, 532, 737,007, and 
132am, 232, 332. 

4.00am Colin Berry 530 Ray 
Moore 7J3II Derek Jameson 930 
Ken Bruce 1 1 .00 Jfenrny Young 
135pm David Jacobs ZOO Gloria 

Hunniford 330 David Hamtiton 
5.05 John Duwi 730 Hubert Gregg 
730 Friday Night Is Music Night 
835 Richard Markham and David 
Nettie at the piano 930 The 
Organist entertains (Nigel Ogden) 
1030 Jack Rothstein wlh Ms 
violin and Langham Orchestra 
1030 The Oumbieweeds 1130 

Peter Dickson's Nightcap 130am 
Bill Rennetis 330-AOO A Little 

Night Musk: 

WORLD SERVICE 




J r 


THF.SUNDAy TIMES 

THE^feHMES 




535 amTest Mafoh: ^strata v 
England. Until 735am 
635 Weather. 730 News 
735 Concert Vanhai 

(Symphony i F: llmea 
Smtoruetta), MHockar (Was 
Ich Im Leben beglnne. 

Die Dubarry: Schwarzkopf , 
soprano and the 
PhBharmonla), Grieg 
(Cowfceeper’s Turre and 
Country Dance. Norwegian 
Melody No 2: National 
PO). Honegger (Symphortc 
poem: Pastorale d'dtfc 
Bavarian RSO), Scarlatti 
(Sonata In G.KX477: 
Dreyfus, harpsichord), 
Janacek (Cunning Little 
Vixen suits: Czech PO). 830 
News 

6.05 Concert (contd):JC 

Bach (Quintet in D, Op 22 
No 1 for fkrte,oboe,vtoSn, 
bassoon, harpsichord: 

Paris Baroque Ensemble}, 
Scott (Lotus Land: Danse 
negro: Ogdon, piano), 
Handel (Concerto 

Grosso m A minor. Op 8 No 
4: Engfch Concert), 

Loews (Harakf: Moll, bass, 
and Garben, piano), 

Johann Strauss (Ritter 
Pasman Pallet music: 

National PO). 930 News 
935 This Week's Composer 
Rossini (in Paris). 

Prelude inoffensif: CtccoKni, 
piano). La regata 
veneziana (Anne-Marie 
Rodde, soprano and 
Noel Lee, piano), Fantasy 
(Bradbury, ctarinet and 
Oliver Dairies, piano). Line 
caresseamafemme 
(Cfccoini, piteto),, 

1030 LancAam Chamber 






Nicholas Kraemer). Boyce 
(Overture to the New 

foXRV&&Wra£ anC8rtD 
vtowvand Healey, cello), 
Handel (Concerto 
Grosso m B fist. Op 3 No 2) 
1035 Duets for aoprano, 
tenon Wendy Eathome 
with Michael Goldtnorpe 
(tenor), and Geoffrey 
Pratiey (piano)- Kodaly’8 
Eight Bttie duets, and 
Dwwak’s Four Moravian 
Durts.Op20.Also 
Faurta Piisqu'lci has; 
Pleursd'onCantique 
11.10 Paganini and Schubert 

Gmord (guiar), ktessfter 
(flute), Oune (viola), De 


(Trio No 5 m . . 

Schubert fQuartet in G 
major, DOS) 

FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:10531 
92.5; Radio 4: 20QkHz/1500m; 
1458kHz/206m: VHF 94.9; Wor 


* fi) p!;i t *c your jihwtiscmcnt telephone 01-181 -iOOO. 


mm 


1Z10 Con cert BBC 

PhBharmonic (under 
Tumovsky). wth Martin 
Roscoe (piano). Part 
one. Schumann (Julius 
Caesaroverture). 

Beethoven (Piano Concerto 
No 5). 130 News 

.135 Concert Suk (A laky tale 
suite} 

135 Scanatti Sonatas: 
Christopher Kite 
(harpsichord). Inductee the G 
minor. Kk 4. and the C 
minor, Kk 22. 

235 Elgar: LPO play the Symphony 
No 1 

330 Currents from a Northern 
Land: Danish music. 

Ruders (String Quartet No 3, 
Motet), Bojsgaard (The 
sunflower). Bans 
Abrahamsen (String 
Quartet No 1). Played by 
Kontra Quartet 

X45 Ladles Lost and Found: 
Martin Jarvis as Chaucer 
to Terence Titer's version of 
Chaucer's Book of the 
Duchess and The House of 
Fame 

430 Choral Vespers: from 
We stmins t e r CathedraL 
435 News 

630 Mainly ter Pleasure: with 
Rodney Slatford 

630 Northern Smfona (under 
Meredith Davies). Gratry 
(Zamira at Azor state). 
Roussel (Petite Suite), 
Honaaaer (Symphony No 4) 

730 Beetiteven and' 
gywtatovich: 

(piano). Part one. Beethoven 
(Quartet in F minor, Op 
95), Shostakovich (Quartet 
No 8) 

8.15 An End to Nostalgia: The 
Anglo-American 
relationship. Talk by Edmund 
Irons, Reader In Pdfities, 

York University 
835 Recital (continued): 
Shostakovich (Piano 
Quintet In G mmor. Op 57) 

9-10 Htppdytus: David 
Rudkin's version of the 
drama by Euripides. With 
Sian PfilBps, Anton 
Lesser, Norman Rodway, 
Constance Chapman 
11.10 Carl Marta von Weber 
Martin Roscoe (piano) 
plays Sonata No 3 In D 
minor, Op 49. Also 
Mendelssohn’s Fantasy in F 
sharp mmor, Op 2u; and 
Schumann's Arabeske 
1137 News. 1230 Mus«c 
1235 Test Match: Third Test 
Second day. Ends 235. 



On long wave, (s) Stereo on VHF. 
535 Shipping 630 News Briefing; 
Weather 6.1 0 Farming 


630 Today, tort 630, 73a 
B30 News Summary 
635 Business News 635, 
735 Weather 73. 83 
News 735, 835 Sport 735 
Thought for the Day 835 
Yest er day In Partement 830 
Your Letters 837 
Weather Travel 

930 News 

935 Desert Island Discs: 

Jackie Coffins, writer of 
6picy and popular romantic 
novels, and sister of 
Joan Cofllns, Is the castaway 
on Michael Parkinson's 
Island. (ri(s) 

9.45 Feedback: Comments, 
complaints and queries 
about the BBC. 

1030 News; International 
Assignment BSC 


1030 Morning Story: A Raw 
Deal, by Jill Norris- The 
reader is Shirley Dixon 

10.45 Daily Service (m 

1130 News; Travel: Dr 
Crippen's Trial: Dr 
Hawley Crip pen was hanged 
ter murder to 1910. 

Jenny Ward, criminologist 
looks at the case, 
assisted by eminent crime 
historians and forensic 
experts. With Bob Sherman 
as Crtppen, Fraser Kerr 
as Richard Muir KC. and 
John Church as 
Inspector Dew. 

1138 The Enchanted Canopy; 
Andrew Mitchell explores 
the rainforest canopy. 

1230 News; The Food 

Programme, with Derek 
Cooper. 

1237 Dehre Special: A Rocket 
tor Defence. The 
taxpayers' contribution to 
new nuclear weapons. 

With David Lander.1235 
Weather 

130 Tha World At One. News 
1.40 The Archers 135 


2.00 News; Woman's Hour 
from Manchester, wfth 
Helen Boadsn. Includes 
Hems on the most 
haunted house in England, 
and the human face of 
destitution in the North West 
Also die final episode of 
Circles in a Forest 

3.00 News; Pendermks by 
William Makepeace 
Thackeray (s). Pen ultimate 
episode. With Hugh 
Dickson and Dominic Guard.. 


4.00 News 

4.05 The News Huddtinea: 

Roy Hudd laughs at the 
news with June Whitfield, 
Chris Emmett and the 
Hudtfliners (s) 

430 Kaleidoscope. Last 
night's edition, repeated, 
includes items on volume 
two of Cahiers du 
Cinema, Pauline Kart's 
Taking it all In, aid the 
American composer Vligfi 
Thompson (i) 

530 PM, News magazine 530 
Shipping 535 Weather 

630 News. Financial Report 
630 Going Places: Clive 
Jacobs on travel and 
transport 

730 News 735 The Archers 

730 Pick of the Week: 

Highlights of the past 
week's BBC programmes, 
presented by Margaret 
Howard. (8) 

B30 Stop Press: Geoffrey 
Goodman on the week's 
newspapers. 

8.45 Any Questions? Esther 
Rantzen, Cedi Parkinson 
MP, Ken Livingstone and Dr 
James McFartane from 
Bristol. With John Tbnpson 
to the chair. 

930 Latter from America, by 
Alistair Cooke. 

9.45 Kaleidoscope. Includes 
King Lear at the National 
Theatre. Monotti opera at 
Sadler's Wrtis. and the 
Nutcracker, danced in 
Plymouth by the London 
Festival Bauet. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime; The 
Fall of Kelvin Walker, by 
Alasdair Gray .The reader Is 
BID Patterson. 

1039 Weather 

1030 The World Tonight 

11.00 Today in Parliament 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1130 Week Ending. Satirical 
review of the week’s 
news. Cast consists of tries 
the regulars - Bill Wallis. 
DevidTeta, Jon Glover and 
Salty Grace (s) 

1230 News; Weather 1233 
Shipping 

VHF (available in England and 
S Wales onM as above 
except 535330am 
Weather; Travel 1130- 
1230 Fbr Schools 1130 
Teaching today ;11.40 
Encore une Etape 135- 
3.00pm For Schools: 
Listening comer (s) 230 
Education now 230 
Books, Plays, Poems 530- 
535 PM (continued) 





38 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 12 1986 




Fast published in 1785 


SPORT 


Yorkshire smear 
campaign ends 
career for Boycott 



Geoff Boycott, sacked by 
Yorkshire last September, has 
turned down the offer of a 
two-year contract with Derby- 
shire, a decision which virtu- 
ally ensures his 25-year first 
class career is over. 

The opening batsman, aged 
46, refused to sign after an 
undignified attempt to start a 
whispering campaign against 
his continued membership of 
the Yorkshire committee, 
upon which he represents the 
Wakefield constituency. 

Not happy with dismissing 
their most productive bats- 
man. successful captain since 
1969 and controversial cha- 
racter, some members of the 
committee, among them the 
Viscount Mountgarret, the 
president, expressed the view 
that if Boycott continued to 
play first class cricket he 
should be disbarred from 
standing for election. There 
were even moves afoot to 
change the rules, drawn up less 
than a year ago, to effect his 
removal 

Boycott, who is a firm 
supporter of the new £425,000 
indoor cricket school of eight 
nets which will be opened next 


By Martin Searby 

door to Headingley next 
month under Doug Padgett, 

the county coach, was under- 
standably annoyed at the 
club's attitude and said yes- 
terday: “The committee are 
obsessed with Geoff Boycott 
and seem totally preoccupied 
with getting me ont of the 
club. They would be better 
occupied putting their en- 
ergies into other things, hav- 
ing lost a major sponsor and 
£20,000 and feeing a £40,000 
deficit on the current account. 

“There is no doubt that 
some members tried to stir up 
potential opposition to me if I 
played for another county and 
I have told Derbyshire that, 
although I am very grateful for 
their offer, 1 am unable to 
accept it.” 

The former England bats- 
man and still the leading Test 
run scorer is not likely to join 
any other county and added: 
“I have no other plans at the 
moment 

While he is in Australia for 
the Ashes series, the election 
will be held for bis Wakefield 
seat where he is opposed by Dr 
John Turner, a heart surgeon, 
whom Boycott beat 203-147 


three years ago. “My first love 
has always been Yorkshire 
cricket and, as any 
Yorkshireman will under- 
stand, it is an emotional thing. 
I want to be involved with the 
cricket school and basically 
carry on serving fire club." 

Half the costs for country’s 


s been pro> 

Sports Council, Leeds City 
Council and the former West 
Yorkshire Metropolitan 
authority. But while firms are 
asked to sponsor each net at 
£12,500 for five years and 
Yorkshire's 11,000 members 
will be asked to buy a brick at 
£ 1 0 each to ensure the school’s 
future, the future of one of 
their favourite sons is less 
sure. 

Only one thing seems cer- • 
tain: the Yorkshire public will ‘ 
certainly take a dim view of 
the latest attempt- to expel , 

Boycott who undoubtedly has 
a great deal still to offer the 
first class game. It seems 
churlish to sack a man and * > ’• 
then prevent him from play- 
ing elsewhere on penalty of ** - 
being thrown out of a club he - 
served for a quarter of a 
century. 



L 




Handing over the reign: lan Botham (right) with some advice for James Whitaker 


Strain finally tells on Botham 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Adelaide 


One ball, thrown at him 
under-arm from no more than 
a few yards at the Adelaide 
Oval yesterday morning, was 
enough to decide Botham that 
the strained muscle in his rib 
cage would prevent him from 
taking any part in the third 
Test match against Australia 
starting here this morning. His 
place at No 6 in the order was 
given to James Whitaker, this 
being the only change from the 
side who won in Brisbane and 
drew in Perth. 

England seem to have de- 
cided some days ago that in 
the event of Botham being 
unable to play they would 
rather weaken the bowling 
than the batting when replac- 
ing him. Gatting is therefore 


left with a four-man attack, 
augmented by his own occa- 
sional medium-pace. It is not 
the first time England have 
gone into an Adelaide Test 
match with only four regular 
bowlers. They did it in 1946 
when Bedser, Edrich, Wright 
and Yardley had only Dun in 
support. 

The temperature then sel- 
dom dropped below the cen- 
tury; but Bedser bowled 
Bradman for nought, Yardley 
bowled 31 economical eight- 
ball overs in Australia's first 
innings and England drew the 
match. 

The lime had come on this 
present tour when Whitaker, 
through no fault of his own, 
was relying on one of the other 


Whitaker undaunted 


The responsibility of replac- 
ing lan Botham is a dauntin g 
task for James Whitaker, bat 
the Yorkshireman will per- 
haps recall how his typically 
audadons maiden century in 
May 1984 was made after be 
had denied Botham a hat- 
trick. 

Like Botham, Whitaker’s 
expansive style can often be 
unorthodox, and in common 
with his Leicestershire men- 
tor, Brian Davison, be firmly 
believes the hall is there to be 
hit hard. 

Whitaker’s exceptionally 
good eye produced much 
memorable dean hitting last 
summer, when he recorded 
1,526 runs at an average of 
66.34, despite a miserable 
mid-season setback when 


Malcolm Marshall broke 
bones in both his hands. 

Yet snefa self-confidence has 
a solid grounding, provided 
daring his Uppingham 
schooldays by careful coach- 
ing from former Leicestershire 
batting loyalists Les Berry and 
Maurice Hallam. It was there, 
too, that a hard streak of 
determination was instilled in 

him 

Simply being chosen for the 
Australian tour was an enor- 
mous thrill, but with the 
unexpected bonus of a Test 
opportunity Whitaker wOl be 
able to display his voracious 
appetite for runs and justify 
the credentials which earned 
him his place in the party 
ahead of several other youth- 
ful and talented competitors. 


batsmen being injured if he 
was to get a Test match. When 
Botham broke down in Perth 
Whitaker's form, and Slack's, 
became instantly more 
relevant 

Basing his views of the way 
Whitaker has made his runs 
against Somerset Peter Roe- 
buck already rates him as the 
best batsman in the England 
party. That is some reference. 
He could be a lot less fortu- 
nate, too, in the time and place 
at which he finds himself 

England team 

B C Broad, C W J Atbey, 
*M W Gatting, A J Lamb, D I 
Gower, J J Whitaker, fC J 
Richards, P A J DeFreitas, J 
E Emburey, P H Edmonds and 
GRDilley. 

playing bis first Test match. 
He has already made a hun- 
dred on the ground, against 
South Australia last month 
(this influenced his selection 
ahead of Slack): it looks a very 
good pitch, and it is not as 
though he will be greeted by 
Thomson at one end and 
Lillee at the other. 

Even so, it is quite a 
situation fora young man, the 
bairn of the party, to find 
himself m. “One thing for 
sure, the bloke taking 
Botham’s place has mighty big 
shoes to fill ” Border said. 
Whitaker sees himself not as 
Botham's substitute, but there 
to do his best by his own 
Lights. He is ambitious, con- 
fident and, in the best sense, 
calculating. And should he do 
well it will be an incentive to 


the senior players, particularly 
Lamb, whose average in 23 
overseas Test matches is only 
21 . 

Whitaker is 24. He went to 
school at Uppingham and 
before that at Malsis in York- 
shire. The last Uppinghamian 
to play for England was Ag- 
new, and before that A P F 
Chapman. There were others 
long ago: Gregor MacGregor, 
who played in the Adelaide 
Test match of 1892; S S 
Schultz, a fast round-arm 
bowler, who played at Mel- 
bourne in 1879; and Oem 
Wilson, brother of Rockley (of 
Winchester College fame and 
himself a Test cricketer) won a 
couple of caps in Sooth Africa 
in 1899. 

It was said that Gem Wil- 
son owed a lot. while at 
Uppingham, to the brilliant 
coaching of H H Stephenson, 
who had played for All- 
England before England 
played. Whitaker came under 
the supervision of Maurice 
Hallam when he was at 
Uppingham. 

1 mention that Whitaker’s 
parents are in Adelaide, be- 
cause of the experience of Bob 
Barber’s father, who, having 
landed in Australia in the 
early morning of January 7, 
1966, went straight to the Hill 
at Sydney, queued to get in 
and watched .his unknowing 
son make 185. With Gower 
and DeFreitas, as well as 
Whitaker, playing today, 
Leicestershire have three 
representatives in the same 
England Test side for the first 
time. 


Four-day matches 
voted in by board 


By Ivo Tennant 


Four-day county champion- 
ship matches will be played 
for the first time in England in 
1988, the Test and County 
Cricket Board decided at their 
winter meeting at Lord’s yes- 
terday. Each county will play 
six four-day matches, in addi- 
tion to 16 over three days. 
This format will be kept for at 
least three years. 

The change, described as 
“ radical” by Alan Smith, chief 
executive-designate of the 
TCCB, was overwhelmingly 
backed by the first class 
counties, who voted 1 5-2 in 
favour. The Nat West Trophy 
and the Refuge Assurance 
League win remain unchanged 
but in 1988 the Benson and 
Hedges Cup (should they still 
be the sponsors) will have no 
quarter-finals. Only the win- 
ners of each zonal group will 
go forward. 

Smith, who said there was 
no reason to suppose Benson 
and Hedges would withdraw 
over this curtailment of then- 
competition. said he expected 
the four-day matches would 
be played at the beginning and 
end of the season, mostly on 
weekdays. Each county will 
play three matches on its 
home grounds and three away. 

The changes are seen as a 
compromise over the Palmer 
Report, which advocated eight 
four-day matches and fewer 
one-day matches. “We would 
hope techniques and abilities 
would improve through four- 
day cricket and that there will 


be a greater premium on 
bowling rides out.” Smith 
said. No derision has been 
reached over possible changes 
in the bonus-points system or 
the covering of pitches. 

Next season, the Combined 
Universities ride that will 
contest the Benson and 
Hedges Cup wiQ encompass 
players from all British 
universities, although Oxford 
and Cambridge will continue 
to provide the venues. 

The TCCB are to make two. 
proposals to the International 
Cricket Conference for consid- 
eration at their meeting next 
summer. They suggest that for 
Tests, bouncers will be limited 
to one an over, with only one 
warning given. Support for 
that is expected from Austra- 
lia. Hie other proposal is that 
bowlers' run-ups be limited to 
30 yards. 

Recommendations to phase 
out the ruling which permits 
counties to play two overseas 
players if they were registered 
before November 28, 1978 
will be discussed further next 
year. 

In 1988, England will play 
five Test maimes and three 
one-day internationals against 
the West Indies and one Test 
match against Sri Lanka. 

Brian Shaw, general man- 
ager of Britannic Assurance, 
sponsors of the County 
Championship, said: “We 
welcome the experiment of 
four-day cricket as a very 
positive development .” 


Four years old. 
Seriously underweight 
for her age. 
Scavenging for food 
where she can find it. 
nd she’s English. 



With parents who re- 
fused to acknowledge that 
she even existed this child 
was being slowly and deli- 
berately starved. Here in 
England. 

Fortunately we found 
■p her in time. Yet without your 
u donations we’d have been 
\ powerless to help. 

'j £15.48 can protect a 
child for two weeks. And 
thatk the sum we're asking 
for now. 

If you can’t afford quite 
that much, all donations are 
gratefully received. 

to hdp protect a child and j 
; my cheque Or postal order ^ 

£15-48 □ £30.90 □ £92.88 □ I 

Accm and Visa card hokieit may 
debit their accounts. Na 


BLOCK CAPITALS PLEASE 


Postcode. 

PJcbc laid jnur dnatm it. 

Dr. A. GBmmc. Rrf-71 J7Q r 

. NSPCC. FREEPOST. RlUllHE 

| London ECIB 1QQ. LiXLlnllS j 

Hi pan dieMfi alnnv the ha ha tun 


SNOOKER 


Hallett and Hendry break new ground 


By Sydney Frisian 

Mike Hallett and Stephen 
Hendry, the crowd's new 
favourites, became the latest 
aspirants for the £4,000 higb- 
est-combined-break prize in 
the Hofmeister world doubles 
championship at Northamp- 
ton yesterday. 

in their 17-frame semi-final 
against John Virgo and Kirk 
Stevens, Hallett made a 106 
clearance in the fourth frame 
and Hendry 48 in the sixth for 
a total of 154. which beat the 
1 52 by Steve Davis and Tony 
Meo. At the interval yes- 


ATHLETICS 

Athletes want 
life bans for 
drug abuse 

tansanse (Renter) — The 
Olympic Athletes’ Commis- 
sion yesterday urged the Inter- 
national Olympic Committee 
to ban for life athletes caught 
using illegal drugs. 

After a 90-minute meeting, 
Britain’s Olympic 1,500 me- 
tres champion, Sebastian Coe, 
said that the 13-member 
Commission felt strongly that 
any athlete found using illegal 
drugs should be banned from 
international sport for life. 

Ken Read, the Canadian 
downhill skier, who was also a 
member of the Commission, 
which was set up in 1981 to 
represent athletes’ views in 
Olympic deliberations, told 
reporters that the IOC had 
been asked to introduce ran- 
dom drags tests. 

“Some athletes have ex- 
pressed concern that this 
would be an intrusion on 
indrvidBal rights and privacy,” 
Read said. “But we say 
participation in the Olympics 
is a privilege, not a right” 


terday, Hallettand Hendry led 
5-2 

Hallett’s 106 enabled him to 
square the match at 2-2 and 
pull back the advantage Virgo 
had established with breaks of 
54 and 30 for a 2rl lead. 

Hendry and Hallett had 
some of their best moments in 
the fifth frame, in which 
breaks of 35 by Hendry and 34 
by Hallett shot them into a 3-2 
lead, which they soon ex- 
tended to 5-2 

In the process, there was 
that crucial 48 break by 
Hendrv and a 71 bv Hallett, 


Berlin posh 

The West German women’s 
open tennis tournament in 
West Berlin plans to become 
the third most important 
European competition after 
Wimbledon and the French 
Open. West Berlin have app- 
lied to the Women’s Inter- 
national P rofess ional Tennis 
Council (WIPTQ to double 
prize money to $300,000 
(about £211,270) from 1988, 
but face strong competition 
from a new $200,000 tour- 
nament being launched in 
Hamburg. 

Fog rules 

Internazionale Milan’s- 
thud round second leg Euro- 
pean Football Union (UEFA) 
Cup match with Dukla 
Prague, abandoned because of 
baa visibility on Wednesday 
night, was again yesterday due 
to more fog. Club o fficials 
were meeting UEFA repre- 
sentatives to arrange a new 
date for the fixture. 
Internazionale won the first 
leg 1-0 in Prague two weeks 
ago and were leading 1-0 with 
a goal from Kari-Hemz 
Rummenigge when thick fog 
reduced visibility 


whose fluency throughout the 
afternoon captivated the 
audience. 

Davis and Meo, the holders 
and winners on three previous 
occasions, must prepare for a 
game of patience when they 
meet Dennis Taylor and Terry 
Griffiths in the second semi- 
final today. 

Jimmy White and Alex 
Higgins had put their own 
cards on the table all too late 
on Wednesday night and were 
beaten 5-4 in foe quarter- 
finals after they had come 
back from 1-4 to 4-4. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 



Hare’s dash 


Dusty Hare, who arrives 
bade from Saudi Arabia at 
8am tomorrow, dashes 
straight from Gatwick Airport 
to captain Leicester against 
Blackheath in the absence of 
Les Cusworth who is 
representing the Midlands in 
the divisional championship. 

Tour increase 

Next year’s Tour of Spain 
cyde race will be increased by 
250 kilometres to 3,900 km 
with entries up from 170 to 
200. The 23-stage event starts 
in Benidorm on April 23, 
finishing in Madrid on May 

15. 


Taylor and Griffiths, who 
had built a big advantage in 
foe with frame, saw their 
prosperity slip away as White 
and then Higgins issued chal- 
lenges. But Higgins and 
White, conceding 21 penalty 
points in the deciding frame, 
fell into numerous traps, pa- 
tience not being either player’s 
virtue. 

RESULTS: CteMMknt: DTaytortNQand 

T Griffiths (Writs) btJ Whte and A 

' Frame scores (Taylor and 
69-35, 31-713, 78-28, 

. . 7-82, 62-20. Sen- 

fin* u Haomt (Eng? andS 

lead J V»go (Enj 

2. Frame scores 
14-88. 76-47. 

71-12. 


New chairman 

Jonathan Crisp, the mil- 
lionaire, is the new chairman 
of Colchester United. Crisp, 
son of a former South African 
Test cricketer, joined the 
board two ye&s ago and is the 
principal shareholder. He suc- 
ceeds Maurice Cadman, chair- 
man for the past five years, 
who will be the dob’s first ever 
life president 

Marathon cash 

More titan £500,000 will be 
invested in next year’s Mars 
London marathon by Tandem 
Computers. The company 
were named yesterday as of- 
ficial computer sponsor for 
the race for the second time. 
Tandem Computers Inc, the 
American parent company, 
are to sponsor the Los Angeles 
marathon for the first time in 
1987. 

Good Gollogly 

Anne Gollogly, the former 
England basketball captain, 
now a Redcar schoolteacher, 
has been appointed assistant 
coach of England's women 
team. 


Witherspoon 
spars with all 
the King’s men 

SrtESeSftBSa 

World .Boxing Assoaatro? "dit includes the party 
heavyweight champion, took nut as ^row after the 
such an ear-bashing from Don Tm gomg^ fighL You 
King, the promoter, for fight. ^ qqq WO rth of 
questioning the deal. Kings f^lS^Sinthe box office - 
son Carl secured for him from w y0U how popular 
King senior, tiiathiswra^ boxers are. Unless this 

continue to be assailed by the the ooxci s 

stridently accusing words long 




after r- "fists of James 
Bonecrusher Smith have fin- 
ished their pounding at Madi- 
son Square Garden tonight - 
that is if Witherspoon s title 
defence is not knocked out by 
legal wrangles that have been 
going on for the last two days. 

The bout was still in doubt 
late last evening because of a 
row over contracts between 
Witherspoon and Don King, 
his manager and the 
promoter. 

After two days of negotia- 
tions the two parties were as 
far apart as before and 
Witherspoon's lawyer, Dennis 
Richard, said: “There is no 
fight unless the promoter 
makes a new contract King 
maintained that the contract 
was valid in the slate of New 
York and that he had no 
intention of releasing 
Witherspoon from it 

For almost two hours on 
Wednesday morning, when he 
sh ould have been preparing 
himself mentally for his title 
defence, Witherspoon had to 
listen to the outpourings of the 
most powerful man in boxing 
from the sidelines of a Press 
conference. The champion 
then had to attend negotia- 
tions between his lawyer, Den- 
nis Richard, and King's men 
that lasted well into foe 
evening 


Talking to an 
empty chair 


inp are. Unless' this 

S^nference sells tickets, 
not the fighU you are gojngto 
have nobody «n the Garden 
but you and me... No more 
lovey dovey anus around foe 
shoulders." 

It was just the stuff for foe 
troops but hardly for fighters. 
King dug deep into > Amman 
constitution, the Bible and 
Shakespeare, so much so that 
when Witherspoon s attorney 
rose to speak he opened 
with the quote from foe 

heavyweight from Stratford- 
on-Avon: "The tody doth 
protest too much, he said. 

While the Shenanigans of 
this week had left 
Witherspoon mentally 
drained, by foe end of r 
Wednesday evening he had 
gathered himself. His close 
friend and head trainer, aim 
Robinson, said: “If foe. nght 
apes on. no way can Timmy 
lose to Bonecrusher because 
Timmy is not fighting 
Bonecrusher now. he is bant- 
ing Don King I know n has 
been a strain for him but he s 
in good shape and will beat 
Bonecrusher again.” 

The last time Witherspoon 
had a row with King was three 
years ago. Witherspoon said: 

“I am so mad I did not train at 
all. To hell with them. Either I 
will knock him out or I'm in 
trouble.” Witherspoon 
knocked out Tillis in one 
round 

But his second trainer. Whit 
Lowery was sceptical about ' 
foe outcome of foe fight He 
believed that because 
Witherspoon’s original oppo- 
nent Tony Tubbs could not 
fight because of a shoulder 
injury Witherspoon should 
have gone through to beat 
Mike Tyson in foe heavy- 
weight series. “Why should 
Timmy fight Bonecrusher 
again?” he said “He has 
already beaten him. A fighter 
has got to have something to 
shoot for. Bonecrusher is 
nothing to shoot for. It could 
be a bad fight for Timmy on 
Friday” 


opposition 


The last time the 
champion's chair was empty 
at a King Press conference was 
last April when Holmes re- 
fused to attend King, with his 
usual flair, kept talking to foe 
empty chair. “All right, 
champ? You hear that, 
champ?” 

This time, with his £1 ’h 
million show on Friday night 
and his multi-million dollar 
world heavyweight title uni- 
fication senes in danger, he 
unburdened himself Looking 
distinctly pale because of a 

violently rude interruption by n 

Mitch Green, a fighter, who Best ClSSS 
chased King out of the * * * 

Garden’s Hall of Fame into 
the kitchen screaming “Fm 
going to break your neck”, he 
castigated his champion, the 
Press, and those who tried to 
stop the rise and rise of Don 
King “from sub-zero.” He 
even raised Witherspoon’s fee 
from $250,000 to $300,000 to 
make the differential between 
the fighters a little more 
respectable. Bonecrusher is 
receiving $230,000. 

King is an accomplished 
speaker. What be says does 
not always make sense but you 
know what he means. “There 
are piranahs who circle a fight 
camp_ Witherspoon has so 
many friends telling him what 
to do, Einstein would have to 
battle them off with a Freud- 
ian concept- You think a 
lawyer is a big bad guy whose 
going to pounce upon me and 


Witherspoon, who's 
thought to be the only person 
who can give Tyson a fight 
even beat him, should prove 
too experienced for Smith. 
Witherspoon has met better 
class opposition. He beat Greg 
Page to win the WBC title, lost 
it to Pinkkm Thomas, and 
won the WBA title from 
Tubbs. 

Smith is a realist He re- 
alizes he has much to learn but 
has developed a confidence in 
himself after three straight 
wins against Mike Weaver, 
Jesse Ferguson and David 
Bey. Under foe direction of 
foe former world middle- 
weight champion, Emile Grif- 
fith, he hopes that he can 
cause yet another upset in this 
year of upsets. 





Witherspoon 


Wegfet: Z33 Vilbs 
Reads 77In 
Chest (normal): 431b 
Chest (expanded): 45in 
Biceps: 17m 
Fore arm: 1-fin 
WmsfcMin 
Tbigfa: 25Vta 
c3Tl6*Hn 

Neck: JTViin 

Wrist: 9m 

Fist 12in 
Ankle 9fci 

Record: 27 bants, 25 
knodumte), 2 lost. 


Smith 


Age3L 
Height: 6ft 4in. 

Wdghfc 228VUbs 

Gfast (normal): 42fefa 
Cbest (expanded): 44in 
Biceps: 18m 
Forearm: Min 
Waist 28m 
Thigh: 29m 
Cateldn 
NedcISn 
Wrist 9in 
Fist 13%lu 
Ankle 9io 

07 Record: 23 boots, 18 
knockouts), 5 lost. 


Ijlv, 




03 


Graham is next 


By George Ace 


Hero! Graham, foe Euro- 
pean middleweight champion 
from Sheffield and leading 
contender for Marvin Haglei’s 
world title will head foe bill at 
the King’s Hall, Belfast, on 
Saturday, January 17 against 
Charlie Boston, from New 
Jersey, who recently stopped 
Errol Christie in eight rounds 
in London. 

Boston has only lost three 
fights out of 15 and is rated in 
the top five by both the WBA 
and foe WBC. The bout will 
be over ten rounds. 

Graham, who boasts an 
unbeaten professional record 
of 37 wins, 20 of them inside 
the distance, has a point to 
prove to Belfast boxing 


followers. On his only pre- 
vious appearance in the city 
he outpointed a nondescript 
American 12 months ago and 
was most unimpressive. 

On that occasion Graham’s 
opponent was a trainee chef, 
San deline Williams who, wife 
sporadic bursts of aggression 
that were never enough to 

S the fight, proved a 
lesome opponent 
It will be the first King’s 
Hall promotion by fee 
Eastwood organisation for 15 
months and is a measure of 
the determination to keep 
boxing alive in fee city even 
without former world feather- 
weight champion Barry 
McGuigan. 





-T: /Tf ..-!--:: •: 



r--=i&