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KSmodTurged 

Bobb-. D-. ^hody _ n _ 

Sp to defend hard 

bar.n«J J r .*,. 1,1 *e« 

:iii left, councils 






THURSDAY DECEMBER IS 1986 



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By Richard Evans and Philip Webster 

Mr Neil Kinnock's long- group teade r ami Mr Tonv is 
running tatte with the mili- 5Sod. ™ y re 

taut left flared up asain The hanUefi 


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taut len uarea up again 
yesterday when be launched 
moves to discipline the new 
leader of Liverpool City 
Council. 

The party leader faced the 
wrath of hard-left council 
leaders, who accused him of 
failing to defend them against 
the Tories* “loony left” 
campaign. 

Mr Benue Grant, the hard 
left leader of Haringey coun- 
cil. angrily accused Mr 
Kinnock of “doing a tremen- 
dous disservice to Labour 
councils and the whole party* 1 
by not standing by Labour 
& controlled authorities under 
fire from the Government for 
pursuing conroversial policies 
on racism, and lesbian and gay 
rights. 

In a signed front page article 
in Campaign Group News, 
published by the hard left 
group of Campaign MPs, Mr 
Grant said: “The party leader- 
ship would do themselves and 
die party a lot of good if they 
defended Labour councils 
against Tory attacks.” 

Meanwhile, at the National 
Executive Committee, Mr 
Kinnock initiated moves 
which could lead to the expul- 
sion from the party of Mr 
Tony Byrne, recently installed 
as the new Liverpool Labour 

* Tomorrow 


group leader and Mr Tony 
Hood, the secretary. 

The hard-left Mr Byrne, 
who became leader in a coup 
which deposed the long serv- 
ing Mr John Hamilton, infuri- 
ated Mr Kinnock by 
continuing to recognize the 
expelled Mr Derek Hatton as 
deputy leader. 

Yesterday, against strong 
apposition from the left, he 
moved that the cases of the 
two men be referred to the 


Tales of 
the head 



Mr Khmodki Impassioned SSL^JST 1 
speech to the NEC. 

SJffSlSmS 
ffSSERjS'SS 2%*L*!S* 

the. NEC has shown ft want. Swe^eS* 

filings fectsm reply to the ' 
but has len the committee to ,u A p™, wp\,p 

deddethep^doneot. „NdlKoi^ 

L Ik J r J ^ J “ lodc ’ "*<? was (LabourtlS go 

tracked by 21 votes to six, told sp ok e sman ) and 
the executive in ^ an un- Cunningham 
passioned speech: Let us not environment secrets 
forget what was done to John „„ ^ . . 

Hamilton. That has not been "B>* 3 

forgotten or forgiven in toed ton* them to. 

livemnoL They are doing a tn 

^TSdemoralizing for the 
people of Liverpool to see that and the whole party. 
John Hamilton has been Grsn ^ who 

kicked out just because there Coatinned on page 


is a litie clique who, for one 
reason or another, want to 
keep Derek Hatton in the 
public eye.” 

His action and words de- 
lighted members of the centre 
and right on the executive, 
who believe there is continu- 
ing electoral advantage in Mr 
Kinnock being seen as eager lo 
take on extremist elements in 
the party. 

The onslaught from Mr 
Grant comes only weeks after 
Mr Kinnock publidy de- 
nounced the “zealotry” of 
some left wing council leaders, 
which he said was providing 
ammunition to Labour’s 
opponents. 

The Conservatives have 
successfully mounted a pro- 
longed campaign against the 
activities of certain “loony 
left” councils, which senior 
Labour MPs acknowledge has 
damaged their own electoral 
hopes. 

But in his article, Mr Grant 
insists that councils like 
Haringey, Brent, Lambeth, 
Hackney and Manchester are 
only implementing Labour 
policy. 

“We face hysterical attacks 
because we act on party 
policy. We’ve collected all the 
tacts in reply to the Tories and 
the Press. We’ve given them 
to Neil Kinnock, to Jade Straw 
(Labour’s local government 
spokesman) and to John 
Cunningham (shadow 
environment secretary). 

“But they have simply re- 
fused to use them to defend us. 
They are doing a tremendous 
disservice to Labour councils 
and the whole party.” 

Mr Grant, who has been 

Coatinned oa page 20, col 1 



Mrs Thatcher yesterday led Julie McGurk and Martin Grove, followed by Jennifer Grant, 



This is a marble 
head of Archilles, 
bought by the Getty 
Museum for $2.5 
million. Or is it a 
Roman copy, worth 
$60,000? Or even a 
fake, worth $1,000? 
A look at an art 
controversy. 

On Saturday 

Don’t miss the 
special Christmas 
Jumbo Crossword, 
with five £50 prizes. 


Labour in Cabinet to 
Wapping defuse 
jading row Awacs row 


By Our Political Staff 

Mr Neal Kinnock was under 
attack last night after support- 
ing a move calling for the 


By Pllp Webster 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

Ministers hope to enter the 


release of a print union ac- Christmas recess with the 
tivist imprisoned for assault- controversy over the new 
ing a policeman outside the airborne early warning system 
News International plant at for the RAF largely buried. 


Wapping. 

Michael Hicks, aged 49, an 
executive member of Sogat 82, 
received a 12-month sentence, 


After a Cabinet discussion 
this morning Mr George 
Younger, Secretary afState for 
Defence, is expected to tell the 


with eight months suspended. Commons this afternoon that 
at Southwark Crown Court the Government has plumped 


this month after being 
branded a “disgrace” by the 
judge. 

Labour’s national executive 
passed without a vote yes- 
terday a motion condemning 
the arrest and imprisonment 
of Hicks 

Last night Mr Gerald 
Howarth, Conservative MP 
for Cannock and Burotwood, 


for the Boeing Airborne Warn- 
ing and Control System. 

It is widely expected that the 
Speaker win accede to any 
demand for an immed ia t e 
debate, which would take 
place tonight. The move 
would not be unwelcome to 
the Government which be- 
lieves that it would allow the 
sting to be taken out of the 


was tabling a motion calling, issue. 

on Mr Kinnock to slate his The Cabinet's Overseas and 


- • 

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• There is £8,000 to 
be won today in The 
Times Portfolio Gold 
competition as there 
was no winner 
yesterday. 

• Portfolio list, page 
25; howto play, 
information service, 20 . 


Land deal 

British Land is raising £92 
million to buy Euston Centre 

Investments, part owner of the 

Huston Centre in London, and 
to finance two other 
projects Page 21 

Oil deadlock 

Iran called for Iraq’s suspen- 
sion from the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
tries as talks on curbing 
production remained dead- 
locked over Iraq's output 
quota ^**8* 21 


TIMES SPORT 


position on the role of law. 
“Wapping is one of the stand- 
ing disgraces of modern trade 
unionism, involving as it has 


Defence Policy Committee 
met last night under Mrs 
Margaret Thatcher’s chair- 


msross the road in Hyde Park, 

a painting competition for : 

Shooting 

range 

killings 

By Stewart Tendler 
Crime Reporter 

A police and military in- 
quiry began yesterday into a 
shooting incident on as Army 
range in which a young private 
pumped bullets into a cor- 
poral and then tinned his gun 
on himself 

Private Nicholas Biirnup, 
aged 17, -from Brighton, died 
immediately. Corporal David 
John Bumstead, aged 25, from 
St Ives, Cambridgeshire, was 
wounded by four shots and 
later died at a hospital in 
Ashford, Kent 

A spokesman for Kent pol- 
ice said they were not looking 
for anyone in connection with 
the deaths. An Army spokes- 
man said there was no ques- 
tion of an accidental discharge 
or any doubts about breaches 
of safety rules on the ranges. 

The shooting took place 
yesterday at the high security 
ranges at Hylhe, Kent, as men 
from the 3rd Battalion, 
Queen’s Regiment, were being 
training to use 9mm Browning 
pistols. The ranges are used by 
troops facing possible duties 
in Northern Ireland. 

Corporal Bumstead, a 
member of the Royal Pioneer 
Corps and married for five 
months, worked permanently 
at the range. 

The day’s training for the 
battalion, which arrived last 
Sunday for an eight-day 
course, was underway. Sol- 


randon, to promote road safety. The children were winners in 
uropean Road Safety Year. (Photograph: Bill Warhnrst). 

Miner’s wife gets 
world’s first triple 
transplant surgery 


By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 
Mrs Davina Thompson, a daughter, Stephanie, aged 
Yorkshire miner’s wife, was nine, last month joined the 
recovering in a Cambridge- waiting list at Pap worth for a 
shire hospital yesterday after new heart and lungs. The 


becoming the world's first decision to carry out the 
patient to receive a new heart, combined operations was 


; and liver. 


made after suitable donor 


The unique triple fcrans- organs, all from the- same 
plant whidwnvolved a team unidentified patient, were 


of 15 surgeons, anaesthetists 
and nurses, took seven hours 


made available on Tuesday. 
She was alerted by a radio 


to perform. It required the co- bleeper provided by the hos- 
operation of three hospitals pitaL The donor organs were 
and the collaboration of two flown to Papworth by beli- 
eminent transplant surgeons copter from the John Radcliffe 
in the operating theatre at Infirmary, Oxford. 

Papworth Hospital. _ Mrs Thompson and her 


Mrs Thompson, aged 35, of husband, Steve, were flown 
Rawmarsh, near Rotherham, from Leeds-Bradford airport 


South Yorkshire, had been 
suffering for several years 
from a serious liver com- 
plaint, and bad been assessed 
as a transplant candidate. 

She then developed severe 
pulmonary hypertension, whi- 
ch meant that to perform the 
Over graft first would probably 
have caused her heart to faiL 
Mrs Thompson, who has a 

m: ■ * 


the continuing practice of bids. The paper prepared by 
preventing other trade union- ihe Ministry of Defence 


ists from going to work. 

“If a party which aspires to 
government is not prepared to 
support die rule of law, it is 
surely not fit to govern.” 


s*. 

t be. e> 


manship to consider the two diers were carrying out target 
mnor m*mmi - ku I practice on an elementary 
range. 


recommending Awacs 


The corporal was in his hut 


said by one minister to be when other troops in the area 
“devastatingly convincing” so heard shots. They saw the 
the committee is believed to private emerge from the hot 



recommended 


and shoot himself in the head. 


Mrs Davina Thompson: In a 
satisfactory condition. 


to the United States Air Force 
base at Alconbury, which was 
opened especially for the 
flight. They were then driven 
10 miles to Papworth. 

The surgery began soon 
after midnight It first in- 
volved the exchange of the 
heart and lungs by Mr John 
Wallwork, Papworth’s leading 
transplant specialist The liver 
graft was then performed by 
Professor Sir Roy Caine, of 
Addenbrooke’s Hospital, 
Cambridge, a world expert in 
the field. About 250 such 
grafts have been carried out 
there since 1968. 

Mrs Celia Wright trans- 
plant co-ordinator at Adden- 
brooke’s, said: “For such a 
young woman, the patient did 
not have a very high quality of 
life. Whenever we do trans- 
plants of more than one organ, 
the organs come from the 
same donor. This helps over- 
come the risks of rejection.” 

Coatinned on page 20, col 5 




Reply demand in MI5 case Meningitis 

By Midtael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent blamed as 

The Government is ex- Michael of “the worst form of confirmed that the decision 1 • 

peeled to demand the right of dishonesty” by allowing an- had not been Sir Michael's. llfW fllAC! 
reply m the MI5 court case in other man. Sir Robert, to lie Mr Turnbull said that Sir wlAV-kJ 

Australia after accusations by on his b ehalf and then to do Michael allowed the Cabinet 
the defence counsel that Sir nothing to correct it. Secretary to give evidence in 

Robert Armstrong, the Cabi- He was referring to an court which be knew to be 


The ‘Government is consid- 
ering a new crackdown on 
under age drinking Page 5 


Robert Armstrong, the Cabi- He was referring to an 
net Secretary, and Sir Michael answer given by Sir Robert on 
Havers, the Attorney-General, the second day of the bearing 
had been guilty of lies and in the New South Wales 
dishonesty. Supreme Court when he said 

In his final submission, Mr that it was the Attomey- 
Malcolm T umbull produced a General alone who had de- 
devastating array of allega- cided against stopping the 
lions against the Government publication of the book, Their 
over its handli n g of the case Trade is Treachery, by Mr 
involving the book. Spy- Chapman Pincber in 1981, 
catcher, written by Mr Peter which had been written in 
Wright, the former MI5 collaboration with Mr Wright 


officer. 


week later Sir 


Mr Turnbull accused Sir apologized to the court and 


had not been Sir Michael's. 
Mr Turnbull said that Sir 
Michael allowed the Cabinet 
Secretary to give evidence in 
court which be knew to be 
false. 

The accusations brought no 
public response from Number 
10 or from the Attorney- 
General- However, the Gov- 
ernment's legal advisers were 
planning yesterday to draw up 
a full reply to the allegations. 
As it is a civil case the 
Government counsel has a 
right of reply. 

The court case is expected 
to finish tomorrow or Monday 
Sydney hearing, page 7 


i ; v 1 " ; Race with time Liberals’ end of term report on Tories 




Harold Cudmore, skipper of 
White Crusader, Bntain s 
failed America’s Cup chal- 
lenger, maintains that tune 
was not on the side of his 
campaign Page 3® 

Home News 2-7 Uw Report 31 
Overseas 7-12 Leaders 17 
Appts 18,24 Lefteis J7 
Aits 13 Ofctaary 18 

Births, deads, Parliament 4 
marriages 19 SaleRaum 18 
BoofcT 15 Science g 
Bosmess 21-26 Sport 31-3436 
Coart 18 Tneains, etc 12 

Cnssvnntel43e TV & Radio 35 
Divy Id Universities 19 

Events 20 W«Aer 2» 

Features I4J6 Wdb » 


20 Weather 
J4J6 Wdb 


****** 


By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 
The Liberal Party is to 
launch personal attacks on 
Conservative MPS in 50 key 
seats by ridiculing their voting 

records. , . , __ 

The liberal whip’s office is 
sending its parliamentary can- 
didates in these constituencies 
draft press releases in the form 
of “end-of-term reports” wh- 
ich chart how each Toiy voted 
in 10 important divuaons 
during the year, comments on 
their performance, and a grade 
from A to D for “Dunce . 

The candidates are expected 


to extract as much publicity as 
possible for these assessments. 

Id the case of Mr Derek 
Conway, for example, the 
release shows that the Shrews- 
bury MP voted for the 
Government on all 10 occa- 
sions - Star Wars, rural pol- 
icy, Libya, nuclear energy, 
economic policy, defence, 
water privatization, the in- 
troduction of the poll tax in 
Scotland, no increased finan- 
cial support to pensioners 
during the winter and staying 
out of the European Monetary 
System. 

The release, headlined “Lo- 


cal MP given D for Dunce”, 
advises the liberal candidate 
to select the three or four votes 
‘you consider most impor- 
tant” and provides him with a 
tailor-made comment “Mr 
Conway shows little inclina- 
tion to think for himself. He 
may be loyal to Mrs Thatcher, 
but this is not the best way to 
represent his constituents.” 

Mr Ian Grist, Tory MP for 
Cardiff Central, is another in a 
long list of alleged “dunces”, 
having foiled to vote in five of 
the divisions and having sup- 
ported the Government in the 
rest 


Other MPS known to be 
taigetted include Mr David 
Heathcoat-Amery, Mr Win- 
ston Churchill, Mr Geoffrey 
Dickens, Mr Keith Hampson, 
Mr Charles Irving, Mr Rich- 
ard Needham, Mr Toby JesseL 
Mr Wyn Roberts, Mr Peter 
Morrison, Mr Richard Need- 
ham and Sir John Wells. 

Mr David Alton, the Liberal 
chief whip, said yesterday that 
the voting records showed 
most of the 50 were “first and 
foremost party loyalists who 
Mindly follow instructions ; 
from the Prime Minister’s 
henchmen”. 


By Jill Shaman 

A boy aged seven, from 
Stonehouse, Gloucestershire, 
has died from suspected men- 
ingitis and another child, aged 
two. from the same village, 
also with suspected men- 
ingitis, is now in the intensive 
care unit of the Gloucester- 
shire Royal Hospital in 
Gloucester. 

Wayne Smith was admitted 
to hospital on Monday suffer- 
ing from what his parents 
thought was a strained 
ligamentHis doctor had sent 
sent him for an x-ray, but 
when he arrived at the hos- 
pital he was diagosed as 
having a virus and admitted. 
He died on Tuesday night. 

“We just can't believe it,” 
his father, Mr Terry Smith, 
said. He was such an active 
child. We had taken part in the 
recent tests for meningitis and 
got nothing back, but we will 
now be retested for it” 

Last month a screening 
project started in Stonehouse 
in an attempt to trace how the 
meningoccal meningitis has 
been spreading in the area. 
Interim results identified 70 
carriers of the more serious 
B15 strain and 700 other 
carriers -a result which re- 
flects normal levels through- 
out the country. 


Reagan 28,000 
due for more 


prostate 

surgery 

From Michael Bin yon , 
Washington j 

President Reagan will go 
into hospital next month for a 
minor operation on an en- 
larged prostate gland, the 
White House said yesterday. 
Bui it emphasized that the 
problem was “not urgent”. 

He will enter Bethesda Na- 
val Hospital on January 4 for 
tests to follow up on his 
operation last year for colon 
cancer. 

The next day surgeons will 
perform the prostate opera- 
tion under a local spinal 
anaesthetic. He will be awake 
during the entire 40-minute 
procedure and remain in hos- 
pital for about four days. 

The operation, called a 
trans-urethral resection of the 
prostate, is to alleviate mild 
recurring urinary discomfort 
It is not a full removal of the 
gland, a major operation that 
requires lengthy rest and 
recuperation afterwards. 

Mr Lany Speakes, the 
White House spokesman, said 
the operation was common in 
men over 50. The prostate is a 
small organ about the size of a 
walnut, located next to the 
bladder and surrounding the 
urethra, the urinary canal. An 
enlarged prostate can make 
urination difficult, and the 
operation involves the re- 
moval of small amounts of 
tissue from the urinary tract to 
enlarge iL 

Mr Reagan, at 75 the oldest 
President in US history, 
underwent a similar operation 
and a complete bladder 
examination in 1967. No trace 
of cancer was found then, and 
Mr Speakes said that the 
prostate operation was not 
related to Mr Reagan's cancer 
surgery last year. 

The operation will be per- 
formed by Dr David Utz of 
the renowned Mayo Clinic in 
Rochester, New York, with Dr 
! J. R. Bears, a family friend, 
assisting. 

There are no plans to in- 
voke the constitutional pro- 
vision temporarily handing 
over presidential power to the 
Vice President, Mr George 
Bush, as Mr Reagan will at no 
time be undonscioas. 

Meanwhile, the condition of 
Mr William Casey, the direc- 
tor of the Central Intefligenoe 
Agency who suffered two mi- 
nor seizures on Monday, is 
said to be comfortable and 
stable. He is undergoing tests 
at a hospital in Washington. 


postmen 

wanted 

By Edward Townsend 

Industrial Correspondent 

The Post Office is to employ 
an additional 28,000 postmen 
and womeD in the next five 
years to cope with the increas- 
ing use being made of the 
nation's postal service. 

The new jobs, of which 
about a quarter will be part- 
time. were announced yes- 
terday despite the disclosure 
of a big. but expected, reduc- 
tion in profits to £21 million 
for the six months ending 
October 1. For the year as a 
whole, a profit of more than 
£100 million is expected. 

Mr Bill Cockbura, manag- 
ing director, posts, said that 
the extra staff would be 
needed in delivery and sorting 
operations. 

At the same time he an- 
nounced that the Post Office 
was to extend second deliv- 
eries, currently available only 
in towns and cities, to 400.000 
addresses in the semi-rural 
outskirts of urban areas where 
there had been recent housing 
developments. 

In what was described as 
“the biggest ever campaign 
aimed specifically at delivery 
performance”, about 20,000 
new recruits will be required. 
The additional 8,000 will be 
needed for the Post Office's 
drive to reduce overtime. 

Sir Ronald Dearing, the 
chairman, said that Post Of- 
fice workers last year worked 
55 million man hours of 
overtime, 15 per cent of the 
total world ng time. 

The Post Office is now 
experiencing the biggest 
growth in letter and parcel 
sending in its history. A record 
46 million letters a day were 
handled by the Post Office in 
the six months to October and 
employment grew by 3,000. 

The Post Office now em- 
ploys 183,614 people of which 
120,000 are postmen and 
sorting staff 

This Christmas, which has 
seen the Post Office offer for 
sale 300 million discounted 
stamps, is proving to be the 
most successful for the Royal 
Mail 

In the first 15 days of 
December, 910-million items 
were posted, 115 million on 
December 15 alone. This was 
swollen by the 4.5 million 
share certificates sent out to 
new shareholders in pri- 
vatized British Gas. 

Post Office profits, page 21 


Champion took drugs 


New York (AP) — Tim 
Witherspoon, who lost the 
World Boxing Association 
heavyweight title on a first- 
round knockout to James 
“Bonecrusher” Smith tost Fri- 
day, foiled drug tests both 
before and after the fight, Mr 
Jose Torres, chairman of the 
New York State Athletic 
• Commission, said last night. 


The tests revealed mari- 
juana in Witherspoon’s sys- 
tem and Mr Torres said that 
he would take action against 
the former champion next 
week. After Witherspoon won 
the title last January in At- 
lanta, a post-fight lest revealed 
marijuana in his system and 
the WBA fined him $25,000. 

Details, page 36 


*01 







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of Bibendum Glasses 

Save at least 10% on loose prices of 6 red 
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And don’t forget our1986/7 catalogue 
has a £5 voucher which you can use until 
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ha 


7 





HOME NEWS 


THF TTMPS THtJRSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


Lawson curbs 
tax cut hopes 


Compulsory history lessons sought 


hopes of big tax cuts in the Budget, despite the buoyancy m 
government revenue and lower than ejected borrowing. 

The Chancellor of die Exchequer told the Gonmoes 
during a debate on his antanm statement; “I very much 
doubt whether there will be much scope for reductions in 
taxation”. Mr Lawson said his scepticism stemmed from 
the £4.7 billion increase in public spending in 1987-88 an- 
nounced last month, but public sector borrow^ for this 
year was ou track and more likely to undershoot than over- 


By Mark Dowd 
Education Reporter 

The Government will be 
urged tomorrow to guarantee 
the compulsory study of Brit- 
ish social history by secondary 
school children up till the age 
of 16. 


no child will be exempt from a 
basic modular course which 
its members will present to- 
morrow at a meeting with Mr 
Baker. 


ing rede as a centre 
tourism. 


for Frame are required to e™ 


The president of the associ- £5^“ «5eof France in die One hour a wee* « an 


Its diverse syllabus includes 

traditional subjects such as the 

study of Britain’s economy, 
the role of political parties and 
trade unions as wefl as femi- 


Ontside forecasters using the Treasu ry model and 
economic assumptions have con clw d e d that there is scope 
for a 2 p redaction in the bask rate of income tax. 


Encourndby recrat state- ^ unfofo; as weD as fcmi- 
Sf? te ™* m . the “youth revolution", 

gtovS^Slof Rate for Sling the Beatles, and the 

growth of die leisure industry, 
future legislation on a depart- ^ 

ment-approved national core Pupils would also be re- 
i curriculum, members of the quired to scrutinize the hoti- 
Historical Association are day industry at home and 
seeking an undertaking that abroad and Britain's expand- 


“KJSraS 

University, laments the feet MjJJJf®, would take between 40 and 60 

feat half Sf secondary school ashamed to follow suit. Jours of teaching. 

childr en have abandoned fee _ _ -p • _«. 

study of any history at 14. a Professor Read emphasized 

“The idea behindfeis gg? %Ev]£uEii that the syllabus was not 
course is not just to encourage documem^Snnitied to fee “Jteodedas a 
the stu^rofmstory finite own it reads: GOT 

sake, tat to tram our young ^^^Sarionmudir^ras GCSE 

people for life by making them that at present many children courses m non-contemporary 
more aware of feeir national j^sdlSfacwing nothing. lust ° r v cou £ J® 0 
heritage. yfr^ny nothing about modular 22 ’ 

“After alL students in developments since 1945, plement to their other stu 


Catholic 
job bias 
in Ulster 
denied 


< y 
4 \ - -• 


*1 r : ^ 


r . * 

4, * 


By Richard Ford 
The Fair Employment 


Right to sue upheld 


Former soldier Melvyn Pearce yesterday won the right to 
sue the Government for damages after being exposed to 
radiation during nuclear weapon tests. 

The Ministry of Defence, which churned exemption 
under the 1947 Grown Proceedings Act, plus to cha llen g e 
yesterday's High Gmrt derision in fee House of Lords. 

Mr Peirce, of BackweO, Bristol, who has cancer of fee 
blood, served on Christmas Island darfaq; atomic testing In 
1958. The tests were carried ant by fee UK Atomic Energy 

Authority and because of negligence 6y their employees Mr 
Pearce suffered serious injury, the judge said. 


Pet birds 
killed 


Lloyds’ 
£3m writ 


Prostitutes 
wipe out 
fines with 
stay in court 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


Children were in tears 
yesterday after arriving at 
school and finding their 
pets had been slaughtered. 

Twenty birds kept at 
Worsbrongh Bank Eml 
School, Worsbrongh Dale, 
near Barnsley, Sooth York- 
shire, had teen beheaded, 
including a goose called 
Daphne, which had been a 
school pet for 16 years. 

Their bodies had been 
taken away but the heads 
had been left behind in 
pools of blood in the 
school’s farm park, where 
die children, some as young 
as three years old, used to 
feed the birds every day. 


A writ for more than 
£3 million has beat served 
on Lloyds Bank after its 
handling of fee TJnailn - 

based Lnmiere group of 
companies which took part 
in a malti-miDion pound 
export fraud. 

On Tuesday two former 
directors of the firm woe 
given suspended prison 
sentences after being found 
guilty of false accounting. 

Wheat fee firm collapsed, 
fee Government’s Export 
Credit Guarantee Depart- 
ment, which had nnder- 
writtea fee overdrafts, had 
to pay £3 million to Lloyds 
Bank. 


Prostitutes are being allow- the same time the penalty was 
ed to write off hundreds of cleared from the book 


pounds in fines merely by 
sitting at the back of a 
courtroom fora few hours as a 


But Mr Forster added that 
the traditional way for fee 


wuuiuwui iui a i^iv uuuid as a . n - _ . “ . • M , 

way of tackling the problem of *5“*“! j» 


defaulters. 

One woman wrote off a 
£750 fine after spending only 


day" was in the court cells 
rather than to sit at the back of 
the courtroom, which was far 


JU UUX# OHM JUbUUtUK VUiy t* - ■ f 

45 minutes at fee hack of fme in terms of 

Birmingham magistrates’ P^g^ienL 


IBAjob Increase in 


for Rowe kangeroo cull 

xUl 1/1/ W w Svdnev CAP) - The Austra 


Miss Colette Bowe 
fee Civil Servant' at 
the centre of the Westland 


Sydney (AP) - The Austra- 
lian Government yesterday 
proposed increasing to 130,- 
000 the number of kangaroos 


affair, was named y ester- to be culled next year to 


day as the new controller of prevent formers aryl rancher s 
in formation services at the from killing the a n i m al s . 
Independent Broadcasting The increase would bring to 
Authority 2.8 million the number of 

Miss Bowe will succeed kangaroos to be killed through 
Miss Barbara Hosking, government programme 
who is joining Yorkshire Mr Barry Cohen, Minister 
Television as a political of the Environment, said the 
consultant higher quota was needed be- 

Miss Bowe, aged 40, an cause of an increase In the 
economist, and head of kangaroo population. It is 
information at the Depart- estimated that there are more 
ment of Trade and Industry than 20 million in Australia, 
since 1984, was named in “Without an effective man- 
fee Commons as the of- agement plan there is a danger 
tidal who leaked a letter that formers and graziers mil 
from Sir Patrick Maybew, use much less humane meth- 
Solkitor General, accusing ods of reducing the number of 
Mr Michael Haseltine erf kangaroos when and where 
material maenrrades hi fee they have reached pest 
Westland affair. proportions," he said 


Village built for war 


A village complete wife 32 bouses, a public boose, 
church, and two forms is to be bntit by the Army on a Welsh 
mountain at a cost of £3 million, but no one wffl live there. 

The village at Sennybridge, near Brecon, Powys, which 
is a mock-up of a European one, is to be used to train sol- 
diers in urban warfare. 

The houses will be shells with first floras, but will be aMe 
to withstand attack by light weapons. 

The plans have been attacked by the Plaid Cymru MP 
for Merionnydd, Mr Dafydd EOis Thomas. “Considering 
fee problems that hoe Welsh boosing, the Government 
would be better off spending the money on real homes 
rather than shells that no one can live in." 


court, a rate equivalent to 
nearly £17 a minute. 

The practice by magistrates 
of giving the option of “one 
day" or a fine is becoming 
increasingly common as a way 
to deal with penniless fine 
defaulters or in cases where a 
fine is pointless. 

But it has crane to a head 
over the offence of soliciting 
since imprisonment was abol- 
ished in 1982 and magistrates 
find themselves with only the 
sanction of imposing fine after 
fine, which can encourage 
more soliciting; or imprison- 
ment for non-payment 
Mr David Summers, the 
deputy magistrates’ clerk, 
said: “If a woman has a laige 
number of fines, justices may 
impose a one-day detention 
sentence and remit the rest". 

Magistrates were often fear- 
ful that if they inflicted the 
relevant fine the woman 
would return to prostitution 
to pay the fine, he added. 

The detention was “a mark 
of tire frustration and fee 
difficulties in which mag- 
istrates find themselves" since 
imprisonment was removed. 

At Birmingham mag- 
istrates* court, during two 
days, two out of 13 prostitutes 
appearing before fee justices 
have been allowed to writeoff 
their sentences in this way. 

Yesterday Mr Brian Forster, 
secretary to the Justices’ 
Clerics’ Society, said that the 
iractice was quite common 
or certain kinds of offences 
which do not otherwise cany a 
sentence of imprisonment, 
such as taking a v eh icle and 
driving away; and driving 
wife no licence. 

“If you have a defaulter 
owing fines from way back, 
you don’t want to send him 
down; so you can convert it 
into one day’s imprison- 
ment," he said. 

In that way the court 
marked its disfavour and at 


Not all courts, however, 
have custody rooms which are 
staffed by police officers. 


In giving the option of “one 
day" the court had to be 
satisfied that there had been 
wilful refusal to pay fee fine, 
or culpable neglect, be added. 

Mr Forster said that orig- 
inally the “one day" was ustti 
for drunks, who were “fined 
ten bob or one day". 

“They would do their one 
day in court custody and be let 
out at four o’clock. 

“It was a very sound way of 
dealing wife them; there was 
no hope of collecting any fine 
imposed," he said 

“You might also have a 
youth sentenced for six 
months wife a series of other 
minor offences. 

“It’s pointless to fine him 
£50 for this and another £25 
for that, which will still be 
hanging over him when he 
comes out 

“So the magistrates impose 
’one day* instead." 

The practice has become 
particularly common in 
London, where it is widely 
used by stipendiary mag- 
istrates. 

Yesterday Mr Ian Fowler, 
principal chief derk of Inner 
London magistrates’ courts, 
said that fee “one day” sen- 
tence was chiefly used in two 



Agency 1 in Northern Ireland 
'tcsierdav rejected allegations 
of jobs discrimination in fa- 
vour of Roman Catholics. 

In its annual report, fee 
agenev said there was little 
evidence feat Protestants had 
less opportunity than Catho- 
lics in obtaining work, but feat 

the general economic situa- 
tion in North Ireland made it 
more difficult for everyone to 
find work. 

The agency said feat while 
many members of the Prot- 
estant community believed 
feat the reason they had 
greater difficulty in obtaining 
work was because Catholics 
were getting fee jobs, the 
reality was feat this was 
because of the province’s poor 
economic situation. 

“The higher unemployment 
being experienced in all areas 
has resulted in close scrutiny 
of job opportunities by politi- 
cal representatives of the Prot- 
estant community, but. alth- 
ough an imbalance in the local 


office of an employer may 
occur from time to time, there 
is little evidence that in any 
significant areas Protestants 
have less opportunity than 
Roman Catholics." 


Mr Michael Winner, the film director chairman of the Police Memorial Trust, laying a 

floral tribute yesterday to the Haxrods bomb victims (Photograph: Chris Harris). 


Bomb victims remembered 


Police held a tribute for 
three colleagues yesterday on 
tbe third anniversary of their 
deaths in fee Hanods bomb 
blast 

An emotional one-minute 
silence was held on the spot 
where Inspector Stephen 
Dodd, Sergeant Noel Lane 
and Woman Police Constable 
Jane Arbuthnot were kille d by 
a car bomb planted during the 
IRA’s Christmas 1983 bomb- 
ing campaign. 

The remembrance service 


ways: for someone’s first court at 1.17pm — the exact 

appearance for a minor of- moment when the massive 


fence when the court wants to 
register some kind of pen- 
alty — “A typical example is 
drunk and disorderly. 

“It may not be appropriate 
to have a conditional dis- 
charge; he has no money fora 
fine so you say ‘one day*.” 

He said that it was also used 
where the court was dealing 
with an outstanding fine; ei- 
ther where the person had not 
paid or was not likely to be 
able to pay, after coming out 
of prison. 


explosion ripped into fee 
Hanods building. 

Officers from Chelsea Pol- 
ice Station and Hanods sec- 
urity staff formed a guard of 
honour as tokens of remem- 
brance were laid at the foot of 
a memorial stone in Hans 
Crescent 

Wreaths of flowers were laid 
by police representatives, 
Hanods staff and Mr Michael 
Winner, the film director, 
founder and chairman of the 
Police Memorial Trust 


The service brought bade 
painful memories for Sergeant 
Andy Metoam, who was se- 
verely injured in the blast and 
spent five months off work 
recovering. He still has shrap- 
nel Iod#d in his chest, which 
he says “is an ever present 
reminder". 

He added: “The service was 

very emotional for me. I can 
still remember the bomb Hast 
vividly. I was standing just a 
few feet away from the car and 
was flung through the air by 
tbe force of fee explosion." 

Mr Winner also found fee 
service movingJie has cam- 
paigned on behalf of the Police 
Memorial Trust and received 
backing from film actors such 
as Mr Marion Brando, Mr 
Robert Mitchum and Mr 
Roger Moore, as well as 
Catenet ministers. 

He said afterwards: “I be- 
lieve it is important to remem- 
ber police officers who die 
doing their duty on behalf of 
the public.” 

• A bench was unveiled yes- 
terday in memory erf the two 


schoolgirls who were killed in 
Brighton, East Sussex. 


Karen Hadaway and Nicky 
Fellows, both aged nine, died 
in the town’s Wild Park, near 
feeir homes on fee Motdse- 
coomb Estate. Two sycamore 
trees were planted either tide 
of the bench. 


Darren Hadaway, aged 12, 
and Jonathan Fellows, aged 
15, brothers of the dead girls, 
unveiled fee bench, which 
bears a plaque in memory of 
the playmates. 

Karen’s mother, Michefle, 
who is expecting a baby early 
next year wept constantly as 
she stood by the bench with 
her husband Lee. Next to 
them stood Mr Barrie Fellows, 
father of Nicky, who consoled 
his wife, Susan. 

Father Marcus Ronchetti 
said the memorial was a result 
of fee goodwill that had 
flowed from the tragedy. 

A local man, aged 20, has 
been charged wife the mur- 
ders of the girls. 


The report said that in the 
past there had been little 
Protestant unemployment in 
most parts of fee province, 
and that Protestants had little 
difficulty in obtaining work. 

But as companies look ac- 
tion to ensure equality of 
opportunity, unemployment 
began to chmb and members 
of the Protestant community 
began to believe that fee 
reason they faced problems in 
finding work was because 
Catholics were getting fee 
jobs. 

The re po r t said that it was 
apparent, from tbe anxiety' 
created in certain areas by fee 

employment of Catholics, 
how under-represented they 
had been. 

The agency criticized fee 
attitude of some management 
which, it said, remained some- 
what hostile to what it be- 
lieved was interference from a 
statutory body. But there was 
a growing awareness of fee 
need to put real meaning into 
commitments to promote 
equal job opportunities. 

The agency, which has been 
in existence for 10 years, said 
there was a greater acceptance 
of fee need for a professional 
approach to fee problem of 
equal opportunity. 

Critics who wanted more 
dramatic change would find 
that the long-term results of 
fee agency’s work would be a 
better measure of its effective- 
ness in promoting equal 
opportunity in a deeply di- 
vided country. 


Sogat poll 


is delayed 


Appeal to 
keep MIS 
book ban 


Manpower Services adverts 


Accusation of propaganda 


Hindley asked BR accused of secrecy 


for second day 
on the moors 


in line closure plans 


By Ronald Faux, Employment Affairs Correspondent 


Sir Michael Havers, the 
Attorney General, asked a 
High Court judge yesterday to 
continue fee han on a book by 
former MI5 agent, Joan 
Miller, although he has lost his 
battle to stop its publication in 
the Irish Republic. 

The English distributors of 
One Girl’s War, Turnaround 
Distribution Ltd, want Mr 
Justice Simon Brown to lift 
the injunction granted to the 
Attorney General last month. 

They say that, after the 
decision in the High Court in 
Dublin earlier this month to 
overturn a ban on the book in 
the republic, no further harm 
could be done by publication 
in England. 

But Sir Michael, who is not 
appealing against the Dublin 
order, still wants the ban to 
continue in England “in fee 
interest of national security" 
and is opposing fee company's 
application. 

His counsel Mr John Laws, 
told fee judge that if state 
interests required a leak-proof 
security service, fee republic’s 
refusal to ban leaks over there 
did not make them harmless 
in this country. 

He accepted that some of 
the book's contents were 
“classified" but denied that 
was necessarily the same as 
being damaging. Lifting the 
ban could result in friendly 
countries losing confidence in 
our ability to protect confiden- 
tiality. 

The book’s publishers chall- 
enge the Attorney GeneraTs 
case feat a condition of Miss 
Miller’s employment was not 
to divulge information for life. 
They also say it is unfair that 
the book can be distributed in 
fee Irish Republic but not in 
Britain. 

The judge said he would 
give his decision today. 


Advertisements placed by He said the slogan “Ref- 


fee Manpower Services Com- orming Social Security We’ve 
mission have been reported to got our act together” used in 
fee Advertising Sta ndar ds me advertisement was wholly 


Authority as poorly disguised misleading and omitted “re- 
political propaganda and a forms” feat ended benefit for 


breach of its code. industrial 

Mr Frank Field, chairman 14 percenl 
of the organization. Charter rate unem] 
for Jobs, has asked the Indep- ness bend 


industrial disablement below 
14 percent abolished reduced 
rate unemployment and sick- 
ness benefit and maternity 


cadent Bro adca s t ing Auto- allowance. for new claimants, 
ority to investigate whether and extended toe voluntary 


public money was bang used 
to finance party political adv- 
ertisements, and whether the 
current government adve- 
rtising budget of £8.4 million 
breached the Code of Adv- 
ertising Standards and Prac- 
tice. 

The Government, he said, 
claimed the aim was to inform 
fee unemployed about fee 
Restart scheme, but the real 
aim was to convince the 
85 per cent in work that jobs 
were available if only the 
unemployed would “get off 
their backsides and find 
them” 


tired unemployment disqualifica- 
ady- tion to 13 weeks. 


j”— All these measures had been 
introduced long before the 
date presented m the advert- 
*rac- vsemtmL 

In a letter to Lord Thomson 
said, of Monifcith, chairman of tire 
Form IBA, Mr Field claimed tire 
fee advertisements dearly in- 
real fared that jobs were readily 
the available and claimants who 
jobs presented themselves at Job- 
the centres would find themselves 
off successful 

find The implication was that 


employed through choice or 
some fault of their own. He 
said toe Government had one 
of fee largest advertising ac- 
counts in the country and 
claimed feat fee nature erf 
their advertisements had cha- 
nged significantly during the 
past year. 

The Department of Empl- 
oyment pointed put yesterday 
that the “Restart” advertising 
campaign had already been 
cleared with the Independent 
Television Companies Associ- 
ation which had found It 
entirely acceptable. 

The campaign was not run 
by the Government but by tiie 
Manpower Services Commis- 
sion, an independent organ- 
ization. The .aim was to 
prepare the long-term un- 
employed for their “in depth" 
Restart interview and to 
encourage them to take up the 
individual schemes available 


The implication was that with the scheme, 
the unemployed were un- TV ads d D e mi n a, page 16 


fity Ian Smith 

Northern C or resp on dent 

Myra Hindley twice pleaded 
with a Home Office official to 
be allowed a second day oa the 
Yorkshire moors to help grade 
police to the site irf other 
undiscovered graves, ber solic- 
itor said yesterday. 

rim, Mr Michael Fisher 
said, the Home Office official 
insisted she be returned to 1 
Ceekham Wood Prison, Roch- 
ester, Kent, that evening, as 1 
agreed earlier. 

Mr Fisher walked alongside 
Hindley across Saddfemutfa 
Moor, Greater Manchester, 

during her seven-boar visit 
He sad she thought she had 
been able to help searchers 

Mr Fisher said she believed 
feat given extra time she could 
have provided the police wife 
at least twice as much 
information. 

Det Chief Sapt Peter Top- 
ping, who is leading the hunt, 
said be would like more time 
wife Hindley. 


British Rail responded yes- 
terday to. accusations of se- 
crecy by refusing to publish its 
financial case for closing the 
72-mile Settle to Carlisle line. 

An announcement that the 
BR board had sent a secret 
financial appraisal to Mr John 
Moore, Secretary of State for 
Transport, received immedi- 
ate condemnation at a press 
conference in Settle, North 
Yorkshire, to mark the 
publication of the rail 
watchdogs’ inquiry into toe 
closure plan. 


report has been sent to Mr 
Moore, who is expected to ! 
announce a decision on the 
line's future in toe spring, 
bringing to an end the longest 
running, most hotly contested 
closure procedure. 

Mr Towfer, whose commit- 
tee received nearly 15,000 of 
the 22,000 objections lodged, 
said BR bad shown “lack of 
candour” by denying for two 
years after doubts surfaced in 
1981 that it had any plans to 
close the line. 


By Tim Jones 

Leaders of Sogat ’82, whose 
members are involved in a 
dispute with News Inter- 
national, will not know until 
after Christmas whether their 
205,000 members have voted 
fora 58p weekly levy to save 
their union from bankruptcy. 

Miss Brenda Dean, general 
.secretary, and members of her 
national executive committee, 
deckled to ballot the members 
on the 26-week levy rather 
than exercise their right, out- 
lined in the rule book, to 
impose it. 

The result should have been 
known tomorrow but officials 
at the union's headquarters in 
Benfleet, Essex, say that a 
defay has been caused because 
of the pre-Christmas post and 
the holiday period 

Miss Dean and the rest of 


Y L . 


A 


^ His report ij. ^ critical 

The jomt findings of fee ofBR’s refusal to provide the 
Transport U sere Consultative committees with financial 


her executive are disappointed 
that tire majority of Sogat 


Committees for north-east 
and north-west England were 
announced by Mr James 
Towler, chairman of the 
north-east consultative 
committee. 

He accused BR of befog 
“economical with the truth" 
in its “disgraceful” rundown 
of the line, which is described 
in its own promotional ma- 
terial as “England’s greatest 
historic scenic route". 

A copy of the 450-page 


committees with financial 
data to back its case. 

The consultative com- 
mittees’ report also accuses 
BR of being out of step with 
government policy to promote 
tourism and lets are and ignor- 
ing extra demand for rail 
travel to Scotland expected to 
be generated by the Channel 
tunnel. 


The report details a steady 
nse in traffic on the line 
during the past three years. 


National guidelines promised to curb inquiries 


By John Young 


tryside and Planning, said questions have been raised 


The Government yesterday yc ^ 
undertook to issue national .v 1 
policy guidelines on such is- 
sues as energy, transport and jjy J 
urban development to reduce 


yesterday. 

“The Government agrees 


about tbe relative contribu- 
tions of coal, nuclear power. 


that objectors at public in- 
quiries should receive finan- 


In response to the com- 
mittee’s recommendation that 


with the committee that the alternative technologies and 
development control activ- energy-saving measures. 


dal assistance - from public the Secretary of State for the 


Victory for 
Speelman in 
chess final 


Environment should make the 


ities of local planning authori- In some countries objectors 

tire^ngfo k 5 S C fiM* ttes*ouldtateplace^ainst have resorted to direct action, 

mblicmSteri^ *e background, of dear ex- it points out, adding: “We 

pUDUC inquiries. nf national nnliRV ” — 


The committee suggested final decision only on cases 
that assistance should he given which cause Substantial public 


Committee on toe Environ- Over the past 20 years, local toe normal form of protest 

ment, toe Government ack- residents and pressure groups against a major and contro- 
nowledges the foiling* of tbe have increasingly demanded venial project . 
planning system and the need right to express views on Although it recognizes the 
to restore its credibility. ' the policy assumptions under- need for public debate, the 

“Nobody would disagree large-scale development Government rejects the con- 
that the present procedures plans, it says. cept of a two-stage process. 


the background of dear ex- j t points out, adding: “We 
pressures of national policy,” must do everything possible to 


prevent this from becoming 


planning system and the need . 


to restore its credibility. 

“Nobody would disagree 
that the present procedures 
are a mess and that they need 


Although it recognizes the 


cept of a two-stage process. 


to be more tightly bandied, _ _ 

MrWife'am waldejgrave,Mte- also applied to schemes from 
ister for Environment, Conn- the energy industries, where 


That has been particularly with the first stage devoted to 
true of road propokls but has policy issues and the second to 


policy issues ana tne second to 
specific matters. 

It also rejects suggestions 


to “those who help the 
Government to decide policy 
at major public inquiries". 
But the government statement 
says that most electors 
participate to defend their 
own interests and there is no 
reason why this should be 
financed from public funds. 

The statement says that 
performance in dealing with 
planning appeals is signifi- 
cantly better than a decade 
ago, in spite of an increase in 
toe number of appeals. 


or parliam entary controversy, 
or involves new policy issue, 
toe statement sets out guide- 
lines for those to be consid- 
ered of national importance. . 

They include residential 
developments of 150 or more 
houses, retail development 
over 100,000 sq ft, “sig- 
nificant” developments in the 
Green Belt, largescale min- 
eral developments and pro- 


Bernard Speelman yes- 
terday won the British Chess 
Championship for the second 
year in succession, heating 
Murray Chandler with precise 
endplay in the second of two 
tie-break games. 

The first of toe games in 
which each of the grand- 
masters had 30 minutes to 
play ended in a draw. 


that the majority of Sogat 
members in toe provinces are 
disobeying union instructions 
and distributing The Times 
and other national news- 
papers published by News 
International. 

The levy ballot is being seen 
as a vote of confidence in the 
leadership and its attitude 
to wratis toe dispute. 

Miss Dean and her be- 
leaguered national executive 
are only too. aware of the 
contempt which many Sogat 
members in the provinces 
have for their colleagues in 
London. 

Miss Dean has said that tbe 
union nationally is fre ed with 
a bill of more than fl_s.mil- 
lion due to sequestration' and 
other legal costs and some- 
thing like £1 million in benefit 
paid out during the Wapping 
dispute which began when 
5,100 print workers went on 
strike and were dismissed. ' 

Ifl addition, according to 
Miss Dean, Sogat could face 
damages being claimed 


against it in the courts by 
News International of a mini- 


mum of£U million and pos- 
sibly £2.75 million. 


In the second Speelman 
exerted strong pressure on the 
centre with a bishop on the 
long diagonal and his queen. 


posals against which .another. Exchanges in the centre re- 
government department has suited in Chandler being sad- 


raised important objections. . j died wife an isolated pawn j vug^ 




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Most nurses 
‘unable to 
deal with 
heart arrest’ 


By JD1 Sherman 
Most trained nurses would resourc 
be unable to give basic first aid Any 

to a heart attack victim in the learnt 
vital first Few minutes, accord- evident 
mg to a team of researchers she saic 
from a London hospital. jv » 

They claim that patients' concern 
lives could be unnecessarily at were co 
risk as muses are often the nerfonr 
only staff present when a be to? 
cardiac arrest occurs. trainmp 

Saving the life of someone -». 
who has had a heart attack can f Qu iV* 
tfcpend on simple cesuscita- tecbSm 
non techniques, such as 
mouth to mouth, in the first s-JJULf 
four minutes before the high ITP yesL 
technology “crash” team of £5„i un 
doctors arrive. , n °- - ( 

But a study undertaken at JJJSJjg 
the Royal Free Hospital, P ^1 
Hampstead, north-west Lon- *7*t1 
don, showed that none of the fPP'^P 
nurses performed hasic life 
support adequately, according able to 
to national standards, and p 
more than half were com- ftcfc ersg 
pletely ineffective. lam ad^ 

Details of the study to be Uce ’ sau 
presented today at the British But si 
Psychological Society’s con- tinning 
ferenoe also show that most of J** 1 ™ *t 1 
the nurses overestimated their ail 
skills. “Whe 

The more senior nurses and cardiac j 
those who had dealt with more whether 
arrests were more confident whether 
about their ability but per- brain go 
formed no better than junior is a va 
nurses. and our 

The researchers, clinical sophism 
psychologists Dr Teresa Mar- with it.” 
teau and Dr Marie Johnston, Miss 
have called for obligatory was not i 
regular retraining for all findings, 
nurses once they qualify. vious su 

‘The first four minutes after junior dc 
a cardiac arrest are vital,” Dr these bai 
Marteau said. “I agre 

“If you have an arrest in obligatoi 
hospital a nurse is the first on qualified 
the scene. Unless we have think thi 
effective nurses it puts into all staff 
question the overall use of porters a 


resources of the crash ream,” 

Any skills that nurses fay* 
learnt during training 
evidently since deteriorated, 
she said 

Dr Marteau said she was 
concerned that nurses who 
were confident that they could 
perform resuscitation would 
be the least likely to seek 
training. 

“It is these people who we 
found were least expert at the 
technique," she said. 

. The Royal College of Nurs- 


all nurses were given ei g h t 
hours of basic resusctiation 
training by a cardiologist or 
specialist nurse. 

“Pretty stringent training is 
applied so that ail nurses when 
they finish training should be 



able to resuscitate a car diac 
arrest patient,” Miss Frances 
Pickersgilj, the college’s assis- 
tant adviser in nursing prac- 
tice, said. 

But she admitted that the 
training might not be effective 
when it came to coping with a 
heart attack for the first time. 

“When faced with your first 
cardiac patient you're not sure 
whether they have fainted or 
whether they are dead. The 
brain goes into reverse gear. It 
is a very emotive situation 
and our tr aining may not be 
sophisticated enough to cope 
with it.” 

Miss PickersgOl said she 
was not really surprised by the 
findings, but added that pre- 
vious surveys had shown that 
junior doctors were also bad at 
these basic skills. 

“I agree that there should be 
obligatory training for post- 
qualified nursing staff but I 
think this should also apply to 
all staff including doctors, 
porters and cleaners.” 


Christmas 
‘misery for 
low paid’ 

By Jill Shermao 
Christinas for low mrome 

fimiilix is a wi alih i M W * p affitfr 

than a celebration and results 
in big debts, the Child Poverty 
Action Group says today. 

Traditional turkey and 
Christmas padding are an 
unaffordable Imuwy for many 
families, who sit down to 
sausage and chips instead. 

The average household wffl 
. spend £375 on Christmas this 
year, the group says. This will 
include £100 on presents far 
each child aged between 8-14, 
but low income families win 
have to spend an entire week’s 
social seprity benefit to buy 
oae of this year’s most popular 


Aids research and education 


Women face quiz over sex 

By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 


Girl can 
stay with 
her father 


Kill er gets 
two life 
sentences 


A girl aged 12 yesterday won 
the right to continue living 
with her father. 

In October, a judge ordered because be was afraid he was 
that the giri, whose parents are going to lose his children was 
divorced, should live with her given two life sentences at 


A man who killed the 
woman with whom he was 
living and their social worker 
because be was afraid he was 


mother, although she had 
pleaded to remain with her 
father, whom the judge de- 
scribed as “insensitive” 

But after hearing of thegrrTs 
repeated pleas to remain with 
her father, two judges at the 
Court of Appeal in London 
ruled that she need not go to 
live with her mother after alL 
They imposed a three-month 
ban on the mother seeing her, 
as a “cooling off” period. 

Lord Justice May, sitting 
with Mr Justice Uncoln, said 
the Watford County Court 
judge who ordered that the girl 
should go to live with her 
mother and her aster, aged 10, 
was wrong. 

He said it was obvious from 
the girl's pleas to remain with 
her father that she was “im- 
placably opposed” to the idea. 

Allowing an appeal by the 
girl's father against the ruling, 
and awarding custody, care 
and control of the girl to the 
father, the judge said the 
county court judge had failed 
to rake into account the 
strength of the girfs feelings. 

The judge urged the parents, 
who were in court, to “stop the 
battle” they were engaged in, 
“They must do all they can 
to help the children and to 
work gradually to build up the 
very necessary bridges within 
the family 


Birmingham Crown Court 
yesterday. . 

Brian wfidman, aged 38, of 
Woodgate Valley, Bir- 
mingham, who admitted 
murdering Miss Julie Harri- 
son, with whom he was living, 
and Miss Frances Bettridge, a 
social worker, was told by Mr 
Justice Henry: “You took two 
innocent fives with these ter- 
rible crimes”. 

Wildman had separated 
from Miss Harrison, aged 30, 
earlier this year and under 
care proceedings she was pre- 
vented from staying with him 
with their daughter, aged IX 

But when she spent week- 
ends with Wildman their so- 
cial worker. Miss Bettridge, 
decided to speak to them 
about it 

When Miss Harrison ar- 
rived for the meeting Wfld- 
m? n threw a belt around hex 
neck and tried to strangle her. 
She broke free but was pre- 
vented from escaping by 
Wildman who stabbed her 
and then strangled her before 
he drowned her in the bath. 

When Miss Bettridge, aged 
27, arrived Wildman said his 
wife was not there. He stabbed 
her and strangled her 

His plans to loll himself and 
his family by burning the 
house down railed when he 
heard the screams of his twin 
sons, aged five. 


Coroner throws doubt 
on smear test policy 


. A coroner has criticized ^an 
extraordinary state of affairs 
In which women ander the age 
of 35 are not given cervical 
smear tests because genera! 
practitioners do not receive 
payment 

The National Health Ser- 
vice is reviewing its policy, but 
believes women younger than 
35 are at less risk, of contract- 
ing cervical cancer. 

Dr Paul Knapman, the 
Westminster coroner, said at a 
resumed inquest yesterday 
that he had “grave doubts 
whether that was so. 


He recorded a verdict of 
misadventure on Miss Jane 
McKenna, aged 31, a knitwear 
designer, of Vaobn^b Hill, 
Greenwich, _ south-east 
f iOnrfp«*, who died from kidney 
failure on November 6 after an 

accidental toxic drug overdose 
was given at the Royal 
Marsden Hospital, Chelsea. 

Miss McKenna bad a cer- 
vical smear test at Lewisham 
hospital on October 6, 198 2, 
which was negative. Terminal 
cancer was diagnosed eight 
months after a hysterectomy 
in February 1986. 


or getting further into debt,” 
the report says. 

The charity recommends a 
special Christmas famiw for 
famfliK firing on aortal sec- 
urity and raising the supple- 
mentary benefit scales for 
children and increasnm chOd 
benefit 

Ike grasp also *"«■ that 
television advertising for the 
latest toys in the weeks before 
Christmas puts added pres- 
sure oa parents. It says that 
this type of advertising should 
be i nv e stig ate d and, if nec- 
essary, regulated. 


Alleged petrol 
bomber in 
photographs 

Photographs taken by a 
press photographer during last 
year’s riots in Birmingham led 
to the identification of an 
alleged petrol bomber, a court 
was tokJ yesterday. 

Mr Anthony Barker, QC, 
for the prosecution, said that 
James Hazell, aged 31, had 
also been seen in the riot area 
by police officers who knew 
him shortly before the photo- 
graphs were taken. 

He told Birmingham Grown 
Court that a photograph of a 
man holding a bottle contain- 
ing a liquid, with a fuse 
already lit, appeared on the 
front page of many national 
newspapers the next day. 

Moments later the petrol 
bomb was thrown into a 
building supplies shop, caus- 
ing a serious fire which re- 
sulted in £20,000 in damage. 

Mr Barker said it was the 
crown’s case that Mr Hazell, 
of MerryhiO Drive, Winson 
Green, Birmingham, who has 
denied arson, was the petrol 
bomber in the photograph. 

He said the incident occ- 
urred shortly after a visit to 
the area by Mr Douglas Hurd, 
Home Secretary, after serious 
rioting and looting, in which 
two people were killed. 

The case continues today. 

Higgins case 
adjourned 

A case involving Alex Hig- 
gins, the former world cham- 
pion snooker player, was 
opened and adjourned until 
January 16 at Preston Mag- 
istrates' Court, Lancashire, 
yesterday. 

Mr Higgins, aged 37, of 
Mottram St Andrew, near 
Prestbury, Cheshire, who did 
not appear in court, is charged 
with assaulting Mr rail 
HathereU at Preston on 
November 24, and damaging 
a door. 


The sexual behaviour of 
more than 1,000 young 
women is to be studied to 
provide dues for better public 
education about Aids. 

The Department of Health 
has been asked to fund the 
study and is considering the 
proposals put forward by a 
research team. 

The researchers believe that 
women hold the key to in- 
fluencing men’s attitudes 
about limiting the spread of 
the disease. 

The women involved in the 
planned study would be re- 
cruited in Loudon at family 
planning centres, through gen- 
eral practitioners, and at clin- 
ics for the treatment of 
sexually transmitted diseases. 

They would be asked about 
their sex lives, the number of 


partners they have had, and 
their attitudes towards the use 
of condoms. 

Dr John Green, head of the 
psychology department at St 
Mary's Hospital, Paddington, 
west London, which has the 
largest number of Aids cases 
of any hospital in Britain, will 
lead the study. 

“We know very little about 
heterosexual behaviour in this 
country. We want to learn 
more about sexually active 
women because that informa- 
tion will help ns shape future 
Aids' education projects.” 

Dr Green, who is also 
director of the Aids Counsel- 
ling Training Unit, set up by 
the DHSS, said: “We want to 
discover how much condoms 
are used and to examine the 
ability of women to influence 


men to use this form of 
contraception.” 

Most people who know they 
are carrying the Aids virus, as 
well as those who have devel- 
oped the disease, are giving up 
sexual relations for fear of 
passing it on, according to 
other research published , 
today. 

The findings, by Miss 
Heather George, a senior clini- 
cal psychologist at St Mary’s, 
are being reported to a British 
Psychological Society con- 
ference in London. 

She interviewed 150 people, 
including about 50 homosex- 
ual men who are infected, 50 
who have developed the dis- 
ease and 50 who have not been 
tested for infection but are 
dose to someone with symp- 
toms. 


70 years 
and still 
howling 

By Kenneth Gosling 

The “Grand Howl” goes out 
at fall volume from four Cub 
Scouts from Greenwich as 
they help to celebrate the 
movement’s seventieth anniv- 
ersary at tiie Caxton Hall in 


Children to be warned of dangers 


Schoolchildren are to be 
taught in the classroom about 
the risks of Aids, in a pr oj ect 
baached fa London yesterday. 
Health education workers will 
explain how the disease is 
r*** reamed 

The three-year programme 
is being fimded with a £96,000 
from the North-west Thames 
Regional Health Authority. 

- Dr Tony Pinching, consul- 
tant rUmral itmim milngret at 


St Mary's Hospital, Padding- 
ton, who announced the 
project, said: “It is especially 
important to educate the next 
generation before they estab- 
lish pattens of sexual behav- 
iour or are tempted to 
experiment with drugs. 

“Audiences of children are 
among the most receptive and 
may well be aide to 'help 
educate their parents.” 

Dr Pinching, who already 


speaks to school classes, said 
schools were given the chance 
to Id parents withdraw chil- 
dren from the nib, fan this 
had not happened. 

The project is being led by 
Mr Martin Weaver, who pre- 
viously worked with the Ter- 
rence Higgins Tkust the 
leading Aids charity, and Mrs 
Alison Wren, a microbiologist 
and teacher who has special- 
ized in sex education. 


The four, from the left, are 
Andrew Cook, aged nine, 
Kevin Roberts and Andrew 
Sfackey, both aged 10, and 
Robert Russell, aged nine, 
preseat day successors to the 
Wolf Cubs and their “Dyb 
Dyb Dyb” chant which went 
out years ago. 

Special occasions are prob- 
ably celebrated just as they 
were reported in The Scouter 
of February, 1935, (“a gorge in 
the afternoon”) although 
much else has changed. Now 
Cub Scouts rally behind sack 
causes as bird boxes for old 
people or knitted blankets for 
overseas relief. But the magic 
is still strong. In the last 
census, in 1984, there were 
280,843 Cub Scouts in Britain. 
There would be thousands 
more bat for the lack of adult 
leaders. 

Wolf Cubs became Cub 
Scouts in 1966, the Cubs’ 
golden jubilee year. Scout- 
masters and Cuhmastera are 
now known as Scout Leaders 
and Cub Scoot Leaders. 

(Photograph: Chris Harris) 


Couple in 
US deaths 
hunt jailed 
for fraud 

An American heiress and 
her boy friend, accused of 
murdering her parents in a 
black magic ritual were jailed 
yesterday for 12 months each 
after admitting fraud offences. 

Elizabeth Haysom, aged 23, 
and Jens Soering, aged 20, son 
of a West German diplomat, 
admitted opening bank ac- 
counts in false names to 
obtain illegally more than 
£6.500. 

Scotland Yard extradition 
squad detectives were at 
Kingston Crown Court, Sur- 
rey, with a warrant for the 
couple’s arrest, accusing them 
of the murder of Haysom's 
parents. 

The bodies of Mr Derek 

Haysom, aged 71, a steel 
magnate, and Mrs Nancy 
Haysom, aged 53, were found 
with multiple stab wounds in 
their home in Lynchburg. 
Virginia, in March last year. 

Soering and Haysom, who 
were students at Virginia 
University, have been in- 
dicted by a United States 
grand jury on charges of first 
degree murder. Soering is also 
accused of capital murder, the 
killing of more than one 
person. If found guilty, he 
could face the death penalty. 

The couple were jailed after 
admitting two charges of 
obtaining a pecuniary advan- 
tage by deception between 
January 9 and April 30 this 
year, and one charge of going 
equipped to cheat 

Mr Michael Lawson, for the 
prosecution, said the couple 
had opened bank accounts in 
Bath and Canterbury on their 
arrival in Britain, using forged 
identification cards and pass- 
ports made from false docu- 
ments bought in T hailan d. 

In bed and breakfast accom- 
modation rented by the couple 
in Paddington, west London, 
detectives found 10 sets of 
Canadian identification cards 
and driving licences, rubber 
stamps, wigs and moustaches. 

Mr Nicholas Valios. counsel 
for the defence, said the 
couple came to Britain, where 
hanks are vulnerable to fraud, 
after failing to get work in 
Europe or Thailand. 

Judge Oddie ordered that 
£2,250 in cash found on the 
pair be paid in compensation 
to the Lloyds and Midland 
banks involved, and Marks & 
Spencer. 

Haysom and Soering, who 
have been in custody for seven 
and a half months, will be re- 
arrested on their release to 
face extradition proceedings at 
Bow Street Magistrates' 
Court, London. 



Facing the future with confidence 


Points made by the Chairman, Mr Alan McLintock , CA^ in his address to the 
139th Annual General Meeting held on 16th December 1986. 


Plea to sell Ripper’s house 


A judge at Bradford County 
Court was asked yesterday to 
order the sale of the former 
Bradford home of Peter 
Sutcliffe, known as the York- 
shire Ripper. 

The application on behalf at 
Mr Roy Garth waite. the 
trustee in Sutcliffe’s bank- 
ruptcy, has been made so that 
part of the proceeds can be 
used to pay compensation of 
£25,722 awarded to two 
surviving victims and the 
mother of a gul aged 16 killed 
hy him . 

Mrs Marilyn Moore was 
awarded £10.500 damages, 
Mrs Maureen Long £8,500 


and Mis Irene MacDonald, 
the mother of Jayne Mac- 
Donald, £6,722. So far they 
have received nothing- 

Sutcliffe’s share in the de- 
tached house in Garden Lane, 
Heaton, was transferred to bis 
wife, Sonia, when she was 
legally separated from him. 
She still lives there. . 

But Mr Garth waite said that 
no one representing the cred- 
itors ofSutcliffe was present m 
court when Mia Sutcliffe 
successfully applied in May 
1983 for an order for me 
transfer of her husband's in- 
terest in the property to her. 

The effect of the order was 





to remove the only asset 
available to his creditors. 

Mr Garth waite submitte 
that Sutcliffe was bankrupt 
from February 1983 and that 
the judge who made the aider 
for the transfer did not have 
jurisdiction. 

la an affidavit read to the 
court. Mis Sutcliffe denied 
that she had acted improperly 
in seeking to have her 
husband’s interest in the 
house transferred to her. She 
claimed that she had contrib- 
uted three times as much as 
her husband towards the pur- 
chase of the house. 

The case continues today. 


Results. 1986 was yet another year in which the Society 
broke new ground in terms of the volume of its business. This 
was a considerable achievement in the context of the ever- 
increasing competition in the marketplace.and the additional 
pressures imposed by the need to prepare for new legislation. 

Assets increased during the year by £1,036 million to 
£7,827 million. At the year end the Society had 2.76 million 
investment accounts and 363,000 borrowers. Lending increased 
by 22% helping more than 62,000 families to buy their 
own homes. 

Increase in Reserves. At the end of the year the Society’s 
surplus was £65.5 million, taking the general reserve to 
£319.4 million, equivalent to 4.08% of total assets, the 
highest ratio recorded tty the Woolwich in the last quarter 
century. This is the most reassuring of the figures, not only 
because of our prime objective of enhancing the Society^ 
financial strength and security, but also because of the need 
for a higher capital base on which to build new services for 
the future. 


Building Societies Act 1986. The Chairman welcomed the 
Building Societies Act and the opportunities it affords for 
societies to compete more effectively. He said that the Society 
did not propose to use all the available powers immediately, 
but pointed out that it now had the ability and the flexibility 
to respond to the demands of customers and the marketplace. 
He reassured members that no new powers would change the 
face of the Woolwich irrevocably. The greater part of the 
business would continue to be concentrated in the traditional 
saving and mortgage lending services, that had been 
provided so successfully for so long. 

The Future- The Chairman concluded: "These are, indeed, 
changing and challenging times. However, at the Woolwich 
we look forward to the new era with the greatest confidence 
in the Society’s financial and business strength, and with a 
determination to distinguish the 
Woolwich from other institutions 
by the excellence of the ruTTiru"! 

services we offer". \ u U / 


The Special Resolution proposing the adoption of 
new powers under the BuUding Societies Act 1986 
was carried by an overwhelming majority. 


Copies of the Annual Report and die full text 
of the Chairman & A ddress are available from the 
Secretary, Equitable House. London SEI8 GAB. 


WOOLWICH 

EQUITABLE BUILDING SOCIETY 











4 


December 17 1986 



TT TFJTTMBSTTTtTIRSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 

PARLIAMENT 


Farm ministers 
‘have taken 
an historic step’ 


The agreement reached yes- 
terday in Brussels by the EEC 
Council of Agriculture; min- 
isters of the EEC. after 90 hours 
of negotiations, would result in 
reduction of production of milk 
by 9.5 per cent, Mr John Gam- 
mer, Minister of State, Agri- 
culture, Fisheries and Food, said 
in a statement to the Commons, 

Changes were also to be made 
to prevent excessive recourse to 
intervention, which had been 
noticeable in the Community 
particularly over the past year. 
On beef, the council had agreed 
big reforms in the intervention 
system, designed to reduce both 
the cost and the volume of 
intervention buying. 

The council had agreed to the 
British request to devaluation in 
its green pound of six. points for 
beef and 3.3 points for sbeep. 
Those changes, which would 
take effect on January 5, would 
result in support prices in those 
two sectors being increased by 
about S per cent and I.S per 
cent respectively. 

“This will be worth an addi- 
tional £50 million to farmers in 
a full year. The devaluation will 
also help towards restoring our 
meat traders' position relative 
to Ireland." 

One important aim of the 
arrangements would be to help 
to tackle the surplus problem. 
Member states would be re- 
quired to offer aid for the 
conversion to non-surplus out- 
put and also operate an early 
retirement scheme for farmers 
who wanted to abandon pro- 
duction. 

The changes, particularly in 
the milk sector, would cause 
serious problems of adjustment 
for many individual farmers but 
they would be sizeably com- 
pensated. But the package 
agreed fitted in well with the 
best interests of the UK 
industry. 

“The Agriculture Council has 
taken an historic step forward in 
tackling the problems of sur- 
pluses which will bring substan- 
tial savings to the Community 
budget. 

“Twelve nations have to- 
gether found the way forward in 
agriculture despite differences 
so big that once they could have 
caused wars." 

Mr Brynmor John, Opposition 
spokesman on agriculture, said 
Mr Cummer had announced 
measures which, if they worked, 
would take a sizeable step in 
reducing surpluses in the dairy 
sector. 

It was important not to 
overstate what had been achi- 
eved. Even if it did conquer the 
dairy problem, the most notori- 
ous of a number of surplus 
regimes, there was no mention 
in the agreement of cereals. 

The impetus must not be lost 
and agriculture ministers must 
not let events back them against 
the wall before they acted on the 
common agriculture policy. The 
House should insist that the 
CAP was thoroughly reformed if 
all spheres. 

Mr Gununer said other dairy 
producers in the world should 
reduce their production simi- 
larly. It was not fair to ask 
British and other European 
farmers to reduce their produc- 
tion if other countries did not do 
the same. 

Sir Richard Body (Holland with 
Boston, C) asked how many 
dairy farmers might go out of 
business as a result of the 
agreement. 

Mr Gammer said that was 
difficult to estimate. When quo- 
tas came into operation, it was 
thought that dairy fanners 
would have to go out of busi- 
ness. That turned out not to be 
the case. “1 do not believe that 
these changes will mean dairy 
farmers will have to go out of 
business." 

Those who wished to would 
be given an opportunity to do so 
and those wbo did not wish to 
would be compensated. 

Mr Richard Uvsey (Brecon and 
Radnor, L) asked what affect the 
settlement would have on the 


income of the average size dairy 
farm in the UK. 

Mr Gammer said there was no 
doubt that the compensation for 
the cut in quota was such that it 
ought to replace the profit which 
would otherwise have come 
from producing that milk. 

Dr Roger Thomas (Carmarthen. 
Lab) asked what plans there 



Gunmen Dairy 
“adjustments”. 

were to help former dairy farm- 
ers in the next 40 years. 

Mr Gammer: i do not believe 
there will be all these ex-dairy 
farmers. The arrangements 
mean that those people who 
have to reduce their quotas will 
be very property compensated 
for that reduction. 

Mr John Taylor (Strattgford. 
OUP) said the net result of the 



Mrs Dmmoody: Plea for 
creamery workers. 

minister’s settlement would be 
terrifying for fanners through- 
out the UK. and would result in 
reduction of farming, more 
penalties and more unemploy- 
ment in rural areas. 

Mr Gmzuner said that he had got 
it totally wrong. 

Mrs Gwyneth Dnmroody (Cr- 
ewe and Nanrwich. Lab) asked 



Mr Penitafigon: Cutting 
dairy production. 

how the minister could con- 
vince the creamery workers 
losing their jobs in January that 
this was a good package. 

Mr Gammer said it may be 
neoesssary to reduce the number 
of creameries. There were 
arrangements made for those 
workers which were more gen- 
erous than those provided by 
the national scheme. 


Mr Dafydd WMey (Caernarfon 
PI Q said that Britain imported 
a lot of daijy products and dairy 
fanners in west Wales could not 
und erstand why Mr Gumraer 
had sold them down the river. 
Mr Gammer said Char Britain 
imported Danish and New Zea- 
land butter because British 
housewives wanted to buy iL 
They should have that right. He 
hoped that Mr Wigley was not 
suggesting otherwise and that 
housewives should be forced to 
buy Welsh butter, though it was 
always good. 

Mr James Lomond (Oldham 
Central and Royton, Lab) said 
there bad been little mention oi 
the consumer today. With 
surplus of daily products, could 
consumers look forward to an 
early cut in milk prices instead 
of continual increases? Or had 
the law of supply and demand 
been repealed in favour of the 
fanning industry? 

Mr Gammer said that be wanted 
to make sure farmers got a 
reasonable living, but the 
Government had always fought 
for consumer interests. The beef 
premium helped them, for 
instance. 

Mr David Penhaligon (Truro, L) 
asked whether the minister had 
explained to the Community 
that the height of bis ambition 
was that Britain should cut dairy 
production by the same percent- 
age as those member states in 
phenomenal surplus. 

Mr Gammer replied that Britain 
was taking the same burden as 
other states. Last year Britain 
put into intervention 98.000 
tonnes of butter but imported 
much less than that It was 
impossible to ask the rest of the 
Community to suffer a bigger 
burden when Britain was impos- 
ing the cost of that 98,000 
tonnes on them. 

Mr Nicholas Wmtertoa (Mac- 
clesfield, C) said be bad strongly 
opposed and deplored the way 
this Government had treated 
dairy farmers here when they 
did not contribute year in and 
year out to the surplus in Europe 
in liquid milk, dairy products. 

He challenged the minister's 
estimate of butter imports and 
said that Britain imported 
135,000 tonnes of dairy prod- 
ucts so she was a net importer. 

Mr Gammer said it was not 
the Government which had 
imported these products, but the 
housewife who bad chosen to 
buy them. Every farmer would 
get compensation for the com- 
pulsory cut. more than they 
coukl have expected to get in 
profits. 

Mr Tony Banks (Newham 
North West. Lab) said that as 
vigorous steps were to be taken 
to reduce the intervention store, 
now was the lime, particularly 
with Christmas coming up, for 
the food in the beef and butter 
stores to be given free to 
pensioners. 

Mr Gammer said some of the 
butter had been in intervention 
for a long time and Mr Banks 
would not want dial distributed 
to pensioners. Also, those who 
usually bought butter would not 
buy it if it was given away. So 
that butter itself would then go 
into intervention. 

Mr Nicholas Bndgen (Wolver- 
hampton South West, C) asked 
the minister to be generous with 
the truth in describing a reduc- 
tion in the cost of the CAP. He 
hoped there would be no need 
for any increase in contributions 
from value-added tax or for a 
supplementary budget for the 
EEC. 

Mr Gummer said be bad given 
the exact figures, that the 
changes in dairying would mean 
a reduction in the budget of 
£1,200 million in the next three 
years. In beef the reduction 
would be £120 million. 

“But we have not finished yet. 
The continuing effect of that wifi 
be even greater savings and the 
UK. Government is determined 
now to turn to those other areas 
and reduce the cost of those, 
too.” 





Mr Conaf Gregory, Tory JVTPfor York, recommending shoppers in London vesterd^yto bar safe British toys and to boycott 
po tentially dangerous imported ones (Photograph: Ros Drinkwater). 


British leadership of 
EEC ‘great success’ 


The most effective pattern of 
derision during the British 
presidency of the EEC in the 
second half of 1986 had been the 
record of more derisions taken 
unit adopted on the int e r nal 
market than ever before. Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, Secretary of 
State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, said daring ex- 
changes after a statement about 
the past meeting of the EEC 
Foreign Affairs Council under 
his presidency. 

There had also beet more 
help than ever before for small 
businesses and an action pro- 
gramme on unemployment, be 
sauL There had also been total 
co-operation on illegal immigra- 
tion and crime. 

The derisions on Tuesday on 
agricultural policy had gone 
farther than anyone coaid bare 
imagined, and one of the most 
fundamental reforms ever ob- 
tained bad been obtained under 
the British presidency. 

Sir Russell Johnston (Inverness, 
Nairn and Lochaber, L) asked 
whether the council had consid- 
ered a common electoral system 
for the European Parliament, 
since the political committee of 
the Parliament had reached 
agreement. 

“The existing system is 
dearly unfair to electors. Can we 
be assured that even thoogh we 
did not get a change by 1984 we 
shall get one by 1989?" 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: I am sorry to 
disappoint him, bat no sugges- 
tion was made by any member of 


EEC AFFAIRS 


the council of that matter, so 
dear to his heart, to be 
considered. 

Mr Anthony Lloyd (Str etfor d, 
Lab): He cannot face both ways 
on the issue of trade with the 
United States, chiming great 
success in terms of lemons and 
spaghetti while jpdafa fag in 
sabre-rattling about potential 
US action, gjven that six months 
ago he was very optimistic about 
trade *°nrc and we now face the 
serious possibility of a tr ade 
war. So wfaat went w rong raider 
his presidency? 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: Nothing in 
that respect. We started in the 
summer with three specific anxi- 
eties between the Community 
and tiie US- First, sboeU we get 
the next Gatt round going? The 
answer was yes, we did do so as a 
result of Britain's successful 
leadership of the Community 
delegation. 

Second, should we resolve the 
disputes about pasta, l emons 
and steel? The answer was yes. 
that dispute was resolved 
satisfactorily and jobs in the 
steel industry were safeguarded. 

Think should we be able to 
end the dspsfe fallowing the 
enlargement of the Community 
where the US was rtainnng tire 
right to impose dzscriminatioo 
against os? That dispute has not 
yet been resolved but we d ecide d 
it would be sensible to give it one 


farther month for negotiation. 

It is much better to avoid 
trade war fharT ran into one. bat 
the Community, if necessary, is 
armed to fke firm and robust 
measures against the LS on an 
exactly marching basis. 

Mr Darid Wmnick (Walsall 
North, Lab): Why was the 
question of police-state restric- 
tions in Sooth Africa not placed 
on the agenda? These l a test 
restrictions demonstrate race 
a gain there is no solution zn 
Sooth Africa while the present 
authorities remain in office- It is 
aQ the more unfortunate that he 
s a parry to appeasement over 
what is ' happening in Sooth 
Africa. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: I do not 
accept his view. The matter of 
Sooth Africa was discussed 
yesterday. The 12 are planning 
to make high-level representa- 
tions in Pretoria on human 
rights generally and the UK 
Government has already taken 
action. We have made it plain 
that muzzling the press and 
locking up ones political oppo- 
nents is not the answer 
Mr George Foulkes. fix' the 
Opposites: Is it rat true that the 
six montits of the UK presi- 
dency, which wifl go down as the 
pasta presidency, has been an 
abject failure? 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: Hxs point 
has no foundation whatsoever. 

This was a presidency of 
formidable achievement and 
only Mr Fotikes fails to rec- 
ognize it- 


Million 
tenant 
owners 

In (he financial years 1983-84 to 
1985-86, respectively, 117.000, 
89.000 and 80,000 tenants 
bought their council homes, Mr 
John Patten, Minister for Hous- 
ing, Urban Affairs and Con- 
struction, said in reply to a 
Commons question. 

The figure for the entire 
country since 1979 had passed 
one million and this year rigbt- 
to-buy applications were run- 
ning at the highest rate since 
they reached their peak in 1982- 
83. 

Mr David Knox (Staffordshire, 
Moorlands, Q: What percent- 
age of total council-hoase stock 
was sold to sitting tenants? 

Mr Patten: There are four and a 
half million council tenants still 
living in council flats and 
houses. Of those, we estimate 
that approximately half a mil- 
lion. and perhaps 600.000, still 
have the resources to boy. 


Irish Dail request 
‘is misconceived’ 


SELLAFIELD 


The Dali resolution calling for 
the closure of the Sefiafield 
nuclear reprocessing plant was 
misconceived, Mr Nicholas 
Ridley, Secretary of State for the 
Environment, said during Com- 
mons questions. He said most 
radioactivity in the Irish Sea 
was natural radioactivity. 

Mr Ridley sprite of the 
improvements at the plant since 
1979 and of the mtutf-miQiofi 
pound capital programme by 
British Nuclear Fuels, which 
had already reduced discharges 
to the environment to one sixth 
of the level in 1979. Further 
reductions should be achi- 
eveable in the 1990s. 

Mr Geraint Howells (Cere- 
digion and Pembroke North, L) 
sought the minister's views on 
what he said was the Irish 


Government's call to close 
Seliafiefd because of the threat 
to environment and the life of 
the fishing industry. 

Mr Ridley told him that the call 
fat a come from the Dail and that 
was not the Government in 
Ireland- 

About 99.8 percent of radio- 
activity in the Irish Sea was 
natural. Most of the remaining 
0.2 per cent came from fallout 
from nuclear weapons tests. 
Mr John Taylor (Strangford, 
OUP) asked if the minister 
would approve any further 
nuclear plants discharging nu- 
clear waste into the Irish Sea. 
Mr Ridley said an expert 
committee commissioned by 
the Irish health department 
recently published a report 
which showed that Seafla field 
had had np observable impact 
on the incidence of childhood 
leukaemia along the Irish east 
coast since 1977. 


Agreement 
on tobacco 
imminent 


SPONSORSHIP 


Mr Richard Tracey, Under- 
secretary of Sate for the 
Environment, said during Com- 
mons questions that he was 
□earing the end of detailed 
negotiations with the tobacco 
industry on sport sponsorship 
leading' to a new- voluntary 
agreement. He hoped to mate a 
statement early in the new year. 
Mr John Carlisle (Luton North. 
C) said that sport bad benefited 
enormously from the tobacco 
industry and urged Mr Tracey’ to 
remember in further negotia- 
tions that that money would nor 
be easily replaced. He asked for 
a categoric assurance that the 
Government would not go 
down the road taken by the 
Labour Party whereby they had 
oudawed or would outlaw to- 
bacco sponsorship in sport 
Mr Tracey: I have always 
believed that voluntary agree- 
ment is the right way. 

Mr Clement Freed (North East 
Cambridgeshire. L) said an 
increasing number of young 
children were smoking. It was 
essential to remove the glamour 
element of tobacco sponsorship 
of sport 
Mr Tracey: This is one of the 
points we have considered very 
carefully in our negotiations 
with the tobacco companies. 
Since the voluntary system was 
first adopted in 1972. 36 per 
cent of men and 32 per cent of 
women are smokers compared 
with 52 per cent and 41 percent 
in 1972, and the improvement 
continues. 

Mr Robert Atkins (South 
Ribble. Q said cigarette com- 
panies had done an amazing job 
in supporting the great game of 
cricket 

Mr Tracey: It is quite right that 
tobacco sponsorship has made a 
contribution to cricket, although 
that contribution is now declin- 
ing in the same way as it is 
across other sports. 

Mr Robert Brown (Newcastle 
upon Tyne North, Lab): Wien 
will be face the fact that having 
banned tobacco advertising on 
television, to allow sponsorship 
of major contests like snooker, 
which many young people 
watch, is a direct incentive to 
youngsters to start smoking? 

Mr Tracey: This is one of the 
points we have taken into 
consideration during the nego- 
tiations leading to this vol- 
untary agreement. 

He added later that tobacco 
sponsorship of sport now 
amounted to just short of 
£10 million, whereas the all-in 
sponsorship of sport ran at 
£150 million a year. 


Decision 
on illegal 
rates 
defended 

Mr Rhodes Hinson. Minister for 
Local Government. o!T 

criticism during t- ommons 
questions of the statement made 
vesterdav by Mr Nicholas Rid- 
ley. Secretary of Sure for the 
Environment, whsc.t repealed 
that the rate-support grant sys- 
tem had been operated unlaw- 
fully in recent years. 

Mr Allan Roberts (Bootle. Lib) 
asked for an admission that the 
Secretary of State had actually 
been breaking the law since 
1980 because of political inter- 
ference with the drafting of 
legislation, urged on by Tory 
JocaJ authority associations. 

He said that that had enabled 
Tory authorities to put up rents 
and to make profits on the 
housing revenue account that 
could be deducted from their 
total expenditure in order to get 
them extra grant Thai was a 
scandal. 

Mr Boyson said the simple 
answer was no. The I9S0 Act 
which would be amended 
shortly, was brought in at foe 
request of local authorities. 
Labour as well as Conservative. 
It just showed the danger of 
what happened when a govern- 
ment was over-reasonable in 
dealing with people. 

Mr Simon Hughes (Southwark 
and Bermondsey, L) asked, in 
the light of the farcical state- 
ment on local government fi- 
nance yesterday, how the rate- 
capped authorities were going to 
be dealt with. 

Could there be a guarantee 
that each such authority would 
be looked at scperately and 
given proper attention? 

Mr Boyson said that the state- 
ment would have been farcical 
only if there had been a govern- 
ment which did nothing about 
the information it retrieved. 
The rate-capped authorities 
would know their limit of 
expenditure, it would be in the 
Bill. 

Mr John Taylor (Solihull. C) 
said the rating environment 
would be considerably im- 
proved if the local authorities 
would confine themselves to 
their statutory responsibilities 
and desist from social en- 
gineering. 

Mr John Watts (Slough. O said 
that, as it had proved necessary 
to find legislative time to block a 
few loopholes in the Act. it 
might make sense to make use 
of that lime to scrap the existing 
unsatisfactory and unfair sys- 
tem and introduce a fairer one 
such as that set out in the 
Government’s Green Paper. 

Air Boyson said they would 
have to wail a little longer. Thai 
legislation was promised at the 
latest in the first session of the 
next Parliament. 

Dr John Cunningham, Oppo- 
sition spokesman on the en- 
vironment. said Mr Ridley bad 
been forced to admit that he 
knew of the fiasco in October. 
So why had he gone through the 
charade of issuing two more 
consultative documents on rate- 
support gram without being 
candid with the House and with 
local authorities on the des- 
perate situation he found him- 
seirin? 

Mr Boyson said that Mr Ridley 
had made dear yesterday that at 
the end of October, when he 
received the information, had 
he come to the House and said: 
“We have a problem and do not 
know what to do about it”. 
Labour would have been the 
firai to object. Mr Ridley had to 
take legal advice. He had been 
misled once by taking the addee 
of the local associations. 


Alliance manifesto 


Nuclear defence policy issue settled 


By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 

The Affiance parties yes- 
terday formally completed foe 
agonizing business of borying 
their differences over nuclear 
'weapons by releasing die text 
> of foe statement foal will form 
\ foe core of their defence policy 
at foe next election. 

It says: “In government we 
.. would maintain with whatever 
necessary modernization our 
minimum nuclear deterrent 
' anti! it can be negotiated away, 
as part of foe global arms 
’ negotiation process, in r e t u r n 
for worthwhile concessions by 
.the USSR which would en- 
hance British and European 
. security. This fa in contrast to 
Labour's "give it away' 
strategy. 

“In any such modernization 
we would maintain our capab- 
ility in the sense of freezing 
oar capacity at a level no 
greater than that of foe Polaris 
system. This is in contrast to 
foe Tories' intent greatly to 
increase the nuclear deterrent. 

“We would assign oar mini- 
mum deterrent to Nato and 
seek every opportunity to im- 
prove European co-operation 
on procurement and strategic 
questions.*' 

The Affiance also pledged 
itself to cancel Trident because 
of Hs “excessive number of 
warheads, high cost and 
continued dependence on 
United States technology”. 
Expected savings, contested 



Dr Owen (left) and Mr Steel: No further approval needed. 


by the Government, would be 

transferred to foe conventional 
defence budget 

The statement, which forms 
part of the final version of 
Partnership for Progress, the 
basis of foe Alliance's coming 
manifesto, was agreed by foe 
joint policy committee of die 
two parties on Tuesday nighL 
ft does not specify the succes- 
sor to Polaris. 

It says it would be rash of 
foe two parties in opposition to 
commit themselves to any one 
system, referring to possible 
options including different 
ballistic and non- ballistic air 
and sabmarine-laanched 
systems. 

Past enthusiasm for an An- 
glo-French solution, probably 
involving fitting M4 missiles 
to submarines, is mated, with 
the Affiance saying it would 


explore with the French scope 
for co-operation “over entreat 
nuclear capabilities” to art 
costs and reduce armaments. 

Yesterday foe two leaders, 
Mr David Steel and Dr David 
Owen, defended the decision 
to leave their options open. 

Mr Steel said that they did 
not have access to all the 
necessary information to make 
a choice now and that there 
was also a “timing problem” 
because any conclusions 
readied today could well be 
overtaken by events. 

“We have set out the policy 
avenues that we take with ns 
into government The actual 
weapons system we choose is a 
matt er for when we are in 
government” 

Dr Owen, wbo is known to 
favour sea-launched cruise 
missiles, said there were argu- 


ments for and against ballistic 
missiles. 

“I don't think it's vital to 
make an absolute decision at 
this stage-.I don't think it's 
necessary to express a pref- 
erence. 

“The only fundamental 
question the British people 
want to know is will yon 
modernize your deterrent. 

That’s a decision we have 
made quite dearly.” 

The Affiance split over de- 
fence, which has seriously 
model its standing in the 
polls, opened up after foe 
Liberal Party's conference in 
Eastbourne when delegates 
narrowly voted to take Britain 
down a non-nuclear route in 
future defence policy. 

Mr Steel said yesterday that 
he was convinced that foe new 
policy line, which calls for a 
strengthened European pillar 
to Nato and backs farther 
arms control, would be en- 
dorsed by foe Liberal rank and 
file because it had been agreed 
by all the “key people” in- 
volved In foe Ea st b ourn e 
revolt. 

Bat foe two party leaders 
made dear that they had no 
plans to pat the policy to sttch 
a test. It had been drawn up 
with fnB regard to their sepa- 
rate constitutions and no far- 
ther approval was necessary. 

They said they would be 
writing to all their par- 
liamentary candidates enclos- 
ing a copy of the agreed text 


City tin crisis 


Secrecy ‘put jobs in peril’ 


By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 


Excessive government se- 
crecy over last year’s tin crisis 
had jeopardized “enormous 
investment, foe reputation of 
a major City institution and 
the Bank of England, and the 
jobs of thousands of Cornish 
people”, a Tory-controlled 
select committee said yes- 
terday. 

As predicted in The Times. 
the final report on the crisis by 
the trade and industry com- 
mittee censures both the 
government and the Bank of 
England for their failure to 
warn the London Metal Ex- 
change (LME) or the dealers' 
creditor banks or the tin 
miners of what was hanging 
over them. 

“Vague warnings” were 
given to the dealers by the 
Bank of England, and the 
LME should have taken more 
notice of those, the report 
says. 

But the LME, which had a 
long-standing relationship 
with the Bank, dearly ex- 
pected unambiguous warn- 
ings. The Bank, which was 
acting as confidential adviser 
to the Government, should 
have told the LME that that 
relationship precluded its giv- 
ing such warnings. 

. The Bank is also censured 
for failing to tell the creditor 
banks Of what was likely to 
happen. “This would have 
affected foe lending policies of 



the banks.” They are owed 
£340 million. 

The Government, specifi- 
cally the Department of Trade 
and Industry, is criticized on 
several counts. 

Its suggestion that the LME 
should have known what was 
going on because h had 
“representatives” at the Inter- 
national Tin Council was 
highly misleading because 
those “representatives" were 
in fact advisers wbo were 
bound by foe tin council's 
confidentiality rules. 

Its excuse that it did not 
warn foe Cornish miners be- 
cause there wps nothing they 
could have done is dismissed 
as “factually incorrect". There 
was action the mines could 
have taken. 

It had also been wrong to 
sign an inherently flawed 
Sixth International Tin Agree- 
ment partly to avoid worsen- 
ing relations with tin-pro- 
ducing countries such as 
Malaysia. “It was wrong to 
allow doubtful considerations 
of international relations to 
outweigh common sense when 
the derision was taken to join 
the Sixth ITA.” 

Launching foe report, Mr 
Kenneth Warren, the commit- 
tee chairman, said that he 
believed foe Government had 
been “obsessed by secrecy to 
the detriment of good gov- 
ernment”. 

In a situation such as that. 


both it and foe Bank had a 
duty to act. 

Surprisingly, however, foe 
committee concedes the right 
of foe Bank and the Govern- 
ment to withhold from select 
committees papers pawing be- 
tween departments and their 
confidential advisers. Twice 
during its inquiry the commit- 
tee had demanded details of 
documents shown by foe 
Government to the Bank and 
on both occasions, on govern- 
ment instructions, the Rank 
had effectively declined. A 
trial of strength had been 
expected. 

Trade and Industry Committee: 
The Tin Crisis: Supplementary 
Report (Stationery Office: 
£5.50). 

• After seven days of legal 
argument, judgement was re- 
served in foe High Court 
yesterday in foe application by 
foe International Tin Council, 
said by counsel to be “hope- 
lessly insolvent” to strike out 
a petition for its compulsory 
winding-up/ 

Mr Justice Milieu is ex- 
pected to give judgement dur- 
ing foe next term which begins 
on January 12. Amalgamated 
Metal Trading, which has an 
arbitration award in its favour 
for £5.3 million, and the mer- 
chant bankers Kleinwort Ben- 
son, which claims to be a 
creditor for £7 million, are 
opposing the Council's ap- 
plication." 


Graffiti 
bring 
problems 

Sexist and racial criteria are 
being used by some local 
authorities in deciding whether 
to remove graffiti, it was said 
during question time. Mr Chris- 
topher Chope, Under-Secretary 
of State for the Environment, 
said that Camden Council in 
London had refused to remove 
"Kilroy was here", although an 
official had said that “KiJroy 
was queer" would have been 
removed. 

Mr John Heddle (Mid-Stafford- 
shire. C) said that some Labour 
loca l authorities were refusing to 
remove such graffiti unleg it 
was sexist or racist. 

The more people buy flats in 
local authority blocks, the more 
pride they take in their own 
environment and the greater 
respect they will have for the 
common parts of those blocks. 


More marine 
reserves likely 

Five more marine nature re- 
senres are being prepared to 
follow the first which has been 
set up around Lundv Island in 
foe Bristol Channel. Mr WD- 
kra Waldegrave, Under-Scc- 
retary or Slate for the En- 
vironment, said during question 
time. The chairman of the 
Nature Conservancy Council 
had written to him already 
about Skomer, off the Welsh 
COSSL 

The time taken so far in 
negotiations about the reserves 
nad been largely because of the 
need to reassure fishermen, but 
if it was shown that the reserves 
could be established without 
endangenrw foeir livelihood, 
they could be established more 
quickly without arousing sus- 
picion. 

Parliamemt today 

of waste at sea. Local Covero- 

S2.h A c1 (Aniendmment) Bill, 
scrono nsadmg. 





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THE TIMES 


Illegal drinking by 
teenagers may lead 
to new crackdown 



ering a new crackdown against 
under age drinking after a 
nationwide survev disclosed 
yesterday that 40 per cent of 
those aged 16 were drinking 
illegally in public houses.. 

With only one in 10 young- 


Th.r n ^ Richard Evans, Political Correspondent 

SSsks ft 

ider ace ^ PP Mn t of those aged 16. had 

cga0^ publkhSus^^ fi K2S by the Department of portc 

as# pi 1 

young peop^s drinking hab- Jy 

33S A SES52S- *£* 

£,* y ’r non amon | and 1 1 per cent of girls said than 
^i y 17 X rt y °^f sl f r ln aged ^ drank at l 08 * weekly. units 

_ “Weekly drinking rose to 52 eqniv 


previous year. Drunkenness 
had affected more than half 
the older boys. 

A quarter of those involved 
in such heavy drinking re- 
ported having got into argu- 
ments or fights as a result, or 


sters remaining teetotal by the 
age of 1 7, education chiefs are 


age of 1 7, education chiefs are 
also being asked if children 
should be given extra advice 
at school about the dangers of 
drink. 


having upset their parents. 
One in 10 of the be 


The Adolescent Drinking 
Survey, conducted among 
nearly 5,000 youngsters ?grd 
13 to 17, shows that 82 per 




iris in England and Wales 


their first “proper drink” 


cent of the girls among 15- 
year-olds, and to 61 percent of 


^t h nl^fU^ p r dnn r year-olds, and to 61 percent of 
|*3f li. 0 * wh ° toys and 54 per cent of girls 

j q Pf te J of among 1 7-year-olds. Nine per 


boys said they had their first 
alcoholic drink before the age 
of nine. Scottish children start 
later, but catch up by the age 
of 15. 

Most adolescents started 
drinking at home, but a quar- 


cent of boys said they drank 
almost every day,” the report 
says. 

About one third of boys and 
up to a quarter of girls aged 1 3 
said they had been “very 
drunk" at least once in the 


Youngforced into 
part-time labour 


By Jill Sherman 

Teenagers have become the during the same neriod. Bv 

IV lakomnw I m liur - , J 


day labourers and 
workers of the 1980s, the 
youth employment organiza- 
tion, YouthauL, says today. 

A survey published by the 
charity disputes government 
claims that the dramatic rise 
in part-time work is helping 
women who want more flexible 
working hoars. 

“Most of the new part-time 
workers are teenagers unable 
to get fall-time work,** the 
report says. 

The snrvey shows that there 
has been a 250 per cent 
increase since 1979 in the 
number of teenagers in part- 
time work, from 116,000 to 
407,000, compared with a 2 5 
per cent increase in part-time 
adult women workers. 

The number of teenagers in 
full-time work had fallen from 
1.8 million to 12 million 


1985, one in fom teenagers 
could find only a part-time job, 
and six out erf every 10 part- 
time workers was mdw the 
age of 20 . 

Nearly half the iwm g prq fa 
part-time work have jobs that 
are temporary; 

“When politicians talk 
about flexible labour markup 
they are really talking about 
unemployed teenagers having 
to take part-time, short term, 
unprotected work.* Mr Paul 
Lewis, director of Yonthaid, 
said. 

Part-time work had not 
grown significantly tor adult 
women, “bat among teenagers 
it has grown eaormoosly, and 
it is con t ribut in g to the pov- 
erty, homelessness and lack of 
independence that some yomg 
people are now experieacmg,” 
Mr Lewis said. 


One in 10 of the boys 
committed acts of vandalism 
or attracted the attention of 
the police after drinking too 
much. 

Half of the youngest chil- 
dren interviewed drank less 
than four standard alcohol 
units a week, rate unit being 
equivalent to half a pint of 
beer, a glass of wine ora single 
measure of spirits. 

Half of the boys aged 15 
who drank at all consumed 
more than the equivalent of 
five pints of beer a week. One 
in six consumed about two 
pints a day. 

Mrs Edwina Currie. Under 
Secretary of State at the 
Department of Health and 
Social Security, said her col- 
leagues at the Department of 
Education and the Home Of- 
fice would “consider whether 
any action on alcohol educa- 
tion in schools and on enforce- 
ment of the licensing laws is 
necessary in the light of this 
report”. 

She added: “We recognize 
that alcohol used wisely and 
within the law is not harmful 
but there is a need to safeguard 
our young people against the 
dangers of alcohol misuse”. 
Adolescent Drinking (Stationery 
Office; £6.80). 



Huge rise 
in crown 
courts’ 
workload 




Donny, a boar badger, and 
bis rescuer, Mrs Roth Mar- 
ray, who has campaigned for 
better protection for badgers 
for more than 30 years. 

Donny is one of 51 badgers 
at Mrs Murray's sanctuary at 
Laughter Hole Farm, Yel- 
verton, Devon. He was found 
on Dartmoor badly mauled 
and suffering from hypother- 
mia, 

Mrs Murray, aged 61, has 
been celebrating her latest 
campaign victory, a move by 
the Ministry of Agricaltnre to 


have proof before badgers 
suspected of spreading bovine 
tnbercnlosis are gassed. 

According to Mrs Murray, 
badgers are not naturally se- 
cretive, nocturnal animilt. 
“They have been driven under- 
ground by years of persecu- 
tion. My •nimk like nftrtnng 
better than to fie in the son.” 

The animals Mzs Murray 
cares for are always returned 
to the wild if possible. Mean- 
while, they stay at her field 
study centre. 

(Photograph: Nick Rogers) 


By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 

A huge rise in the number of 
cases committed for trial in 
the crown courts of the north- 
ern circuit is shown in figures 
published by the Lord Chan- 
cellor's Department yes- 
terday. 

The total rose from 6,713 m 
1979 to 11,672 in 1985, 
according to Your Court, the 
department's journal. 

In the county courts the 
number of proceedings for*, 
mally started with the lodging 
of a “plaint" rose by almost 
one third from 215,759 to 
309,266 in 1985; and matri- 
monial petitions filed rose 
from 21,739 to 24,893 during 
the same period. 

But the figures also show a 
drop in the average waiting 
times. 

For defendants in custody, 
tbe average waiting time fell 
from 1 1.3 weeks in 1979 to 8.7 
weeks in 1 985; and the waiting 
time for defendants on bail feu 
from 17.5 to 11.4 weeks 
during the same period. 


Wife and rival in funeral dispute 


The two women in the life 
of Charles Arnold, a dustman, 
could not agree about his 
funeral arrangements after be 
died of a heart attack three 
weeks ago. 

Mr Arnold’s widow, Louisa, 
aged 58, wanted a cremation. 


years, who had lived at the 
same flat as Mr Arnold at 
Grampian House, Edmonton 
Green, north London, derided 
on a burial at Edmonton 
cemetery. 

The hospital refused to 
release the body until a ruling 


Arnold, of Rivulet Road, 
Tottenham, should make the 
funeral arrangements. 


followed by the interment of was matte and tbe issue was 


his ashes in north London. 

But Mrs Alice Holtham, 
aged 59, his close friend of two 


settled in the High Court 


After considering the only 
previous reported case of its 
kind, which was heard more a 
century ago, the judge ruled in 
favour of Kirs Arnold and said 
he was aware that any derision 


yesterday when Mr Justice he made was “bound to cause 
Hoffmann decided that Mrs pain to one side or the other”. 


Race rules I Soldier on 


complaint 
is upheld 


death 


A Daily Express report sin- 


charge 


gied out' seven Rastafarians 
from more than 110 people 
arrested at a rock festival as a 
result of a sub-editing mishap, 
but the Press Council says 
today its effect conflicted with 
the council’s guidelines on 
mentioning race. 

Mr R Borzello, ofTslington, 
north London, complained 
that the paper reported that 
seven defendants were Ras- 
tafarians while not giving the 
religion of 103 others arrested 

The newspaper reported 
that police arrested more than 
1 1 0 people on dru§s charges at 
tbe Reading Festival. Seven 
Rastafarians were due to 
appear in court that day. 

Mr Borzello suggested that 
by reporting tbe seven defen- 
dants were Rastafarians, the 
newspaper identified them as 
black. 

The managing editor of the 
paper, MrStruan Coupar, said 
that 1 10 people had been due 
to appear in court, 103 of them 
on charges of possessing drugs 
and the seven Rastafarians on 
charges of supplying them. 


An inquest into the death of 
a soldier, who died after an 
incident with a smoke flare 
during an Army demonstra- 
tion at a fete, was adjourned 
indefinitely by the Bir- 
mingham coroner. Dr Richard 
Whittington, yesterday when 
a serving soldier stationed in 
Lichfield, Staffordshire, was 
charged with his manslaugh- 
ter. 

Martin Weston, aged 23, 
died from a suspected heart 
attack when the bomb ex- 
ploded at the Camp Hill rugby 
club’s fete at their ground in 
Shirley, West Midlands, 

Marie Andrew Wilson, seed 
20, from Lapworth, Warwick- 
shire, a member of the Assault 
Pioneer Troop, appeared be- 
fore Coventry magistrates yes- 
terday dunged with the 
manslaughter of Mr Weston, 
who lived in COfeshifi Heath 
Road, Marston Green, 

He was remanded on bail 


Boxers bound 
over after 


Mr Coupar supplied tbe 
originals of copy from the 
paper's own reporter, and an 
agency, making this clear. He 
explained that when the story 
was sub-edited this distinction 
was omitted. He said police 
believed the seven were part of 
a big drugs ring. 

Tbe Press Council upheld 
tbe complaint and said in its 
adjudication that the Daily 
Express story appeared, by the 
sub-editing mishap, to have 
singled out seven Rastaf- 
arians, identifying their re- 
ligion. and inferentiaUy their 
race, while giving no clue to 
those of the 103 other people 
arrested at the same rock 
festival on, apparently, similar 
drugs charges. 

In fact the charges were not 
similar, and the description of 
the seven as Rastafarians was 
not. therefore, a gratuitous 
singling out of them as the 
error made it appear. 

Its effect, however, was to 
conflict with the Press Coun- 
cil's repeated ruling that 
people's race should not be 
introduced in a prejudicial 
context unless it is relevant 


disturbance 


Two boxers and a boxing 
manager agreed yesterday to 
be bound over to keep the 
peace for two years by New- 
port magistrates after a street 
disturbance. 

They were David Pearce, 
aged 27, the former British 
heavyweight champion, of 
Newport, Gwent; Andrew 
Gerrard, aged 23, the Welsh 
contender, of Risca, near 
Newport; and Billy May, the 
manger, of Newport. 


Shinwell pair 
face charges 


The wife of Lord Shin well’s 
son was accused at Maryle- 
bone Magistrates* Court in 
central London yesterday of 
helping her husband to dis- 
pose of £18,000 he allegedly 
swindled from a prospective 
buyer of his father’s flat 
Mrs Hanoma Shinwell, 
aged 43, of Melrose Avenue, 
Cricklewood, was remanded 
on bail to appear in January 
with her husband, Mr Ernest 
Shinwell, aged 68. 



Students given chance 
to help US politicians 


Thirik df it as an open door. 


The English-Speaking 
Union is offering places for 1 5 
British university students to 
work next summer as assis- 
tants to American congress- 
men and senators in Washing- 
ton DC {Nicholas Beeston 

writes). , . . 

The scheme is being pun- 
ched in co-operation with me 
Catholic University of Amer- 
ica in Washington DC. 

Applicants should be in- 


te rested in politics, economics 
and international affairs, and 
should possess skills in letter 
writing, word processing and 
researching data. 


Application forms can be 
obtained from; Mis Alison 
Wynn. National Youth Offi- 
cer, tbe English-Speaking 
Union, Dartmouth House. 37 
Charles Street, London W1X 
8AB 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


HOME/OVERSEAS NEWS 


The MI5 case: Havers and Armstrong claimed to haye ‘held court in contempt' 

Turnbull questions Downing St integrity 


From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 

Mr Malcolm Turnbull, the 
relentless inqnisitor behind 
Whitehall’s humiliation in the 
MI5 book heating, yesterday 
drew together the threads of 
four weeks of evidence to 
mount a sustained and savage 
assault on the integrity of the 
Thatcher Government 
The main targets at the start 
of his final submissions were 
Sir Michael Havers, the Attor- 
ney-General, and Sir Robert 
Armstrong, the Cabinet Sec- 
retary, both of whom he 
claimed had “held this court 
in contempt". 

j, Sir Robert, he said, was “the 

classical fall guy ... a man. 
sent abroad to lie for his 
country". If be was not, and 
was in fact “an honest and 
careless fool" then Sir Mi- 
chael was guilty of the worst 
form of dishonesty: “He 
allowed another man to He on 
his behalf and did no thin g to 
correct iL" 

In constructing the argu- 
ment by which he came to 
these conclusions, Mr Turn- 
bull referred to recent Com- 
mons debates and said that 
only the pressure put oq the 
Prime Minister by Mr Kin- 
nock had allowed the truth to 
emerge. 

Mr Turnbull said the real 
responsibility for Sir Robert’s 
r conduct lay “with those in 
London who sent him here to 
lie and dissemble to this 
court". 

The harshness of his attack 
brought protests from Mr 
Theo Simos, QC, Whitehall’s 
counsel, and from Mr Justice 
Powell the suggestion that he 
might consider a more mod- 
erate approach. 

The judge said: “It may be 
that in the end I come to 
accept your view as to Sir 
Robert Armstrong. My in- 
clination at the moment is 
against accepting the view that 
Sir Robert’s evidence was 
deliberately and consciously 
misleading. 



Sir Michael Havers 


6 He allowed 
another man to 
lie on his behalf, 
and did nothing to 
correc t it 9 

Mr Malcol m Turnbull 

“It does not follow, how- 
ever, that I may not persist in 
the view that much of his 
evidence was of no use what- 
soever. This is because it did 
not carry the quality, auth- 
ority and detail mat was 
needed in relation to ques- 
tions for which answers were 
needed. 

“I repeat, and you (Mr 
Turnbull) have made the same 
observation, that in the long 
run, the fault may lie not with 
Sir Robert but with those in 
Downing Street." 

Mr Turnbull prefaced his 
remarks by saying that what 
he had to say about Sir Robert 
was very harsh. When he 
started to say that he had 
given “grave consideration" 
to making these allegations, it 
bought an objection from Mr 
Simos. 

“It is gross professional 
misconduct to express per- 
sonal views," he said. “I 
remind him be does not enjoy 
the privilege to niairg defama- 
tory remarks." 


Mr Turnbull replied: "Mr 
Simos has my address for 
service." 

He went back to the evi- 
dence given by Sr Robert on 
the first day ofhis torrid spell 
in the witness box about the 
book by Chapman Pincher, 
Their Trade is Treachery. 

At that time. Sir Robert had 
admitted having represented 
to the publishers thai the 
Government did not have a 
copy of the book, when in feet 
it had obtained one covertly. 
Sir Robert had denied that 
this was a lie, but thought that 
it might be described as being 
“economical with the truth”. 

On the same day. Novem- 
ber IS. Mr Tumbnfi contin- 
ued, Sir Robert had assured 
the court that die decision not 
to try to restrain that book had 
been taken by Sir Michael and 
by no one else — a reply which 
subsequently turned out to be 
false. 

Later Sr Robert had re- 
peated that the decision had 
been an individual one, not of 
the Government collectively. 

These answers bad beat 
reported widely in the British 
press. Mr Turnbull said, and 
over the next three days both 
Mrs Thatcher and Sir Michael 
had been questioned on the 
matter in the Commons. Both 
had replied that it would be 
“inappropriate" to comment 
while the hearing continued. 

“The Attorney (General) 


and the Prime Minister did 
not, however, use these 
opportunities to tell the truth. 
TTtcy did not tell Sir Robert to 
correct his evidence," Mr 
Turnbull said. “The only 
conclusion from these facts is 
that Sir Robert and Sir Mi- 
chael were told to tough it out 
and maintain the deceit" 

Mr Turnbull said that Sir 
Robert had had another 
opportunity to set the record 
straight on November 25, a 
week after his first evidence, 
but did not do so. 

Two days later, he added, 
Mr Kinnock had returned to 
the attack in the Commons, 
and “finally, under pressure, a 
little glint of truth emerged". 

Mr Turnbull read extracts 
from Hansard, in which Mrs 
Thatcher, after refusing for 
security reasons to answer 
questions, conceded that de- 
cisions were taken by the 
Government and not by 
particular ministers. 

The following day, while 
still undergoing cross-exam- 
ination but now in camera. Sir 
Robert admitted having mis- 
led the court and apologized. 
He had been informed, he 
said, that he had been wrong 
in saying that it was Sir 
Michael’s deration not to try 
to stop the book. 

From this, Mr Turnbull 
said, it was apparent that from 
November 20 Sir Michael 
Havers had known tint Sir 



Sir Robert Armstrong 

i la the long ran, the 
fault may lie not with 
Sir Robert, but with 
those in Downing 
Street 9 

Mr Justice Powell 

Robert's evidence was false. 

“Yet it was not for another 
week, after Mrs Thatcher’s 
reluctant answer to Mr 
Kinnock on Thursday, 27 
November, drat Sir Robert 
was told to tell the truth.” 

Mr Turnbull also returned 
to the subject of Interrogatory 
I SO, the sworn answer signed 
by Sir Robert that the Govern- 
ment had decided against 
trying to restrain Their Trade 


Simos explains delay in correction 

From Our Own Correspondent, Sydney 

Mr Tbeo Simos, QC, for Whitehall, in his fi- 
nal submissioBs 00 Tuesday gave this explana- 
tion for the delay in Sr Robert Armstrong’s 
correcting his misleading evidence: 


"So far as concerns the delay between die 
time when Sir Robot gave evidence that the 
Attorney-General had made the decision BOt to 
take action and the time when he received a 
message that the Attorney-General had 
do such decision, that time is consiste nt with 
the study of the foil transcript in London and 


.the necessary inquiries being made particu- 
larly to ascertain whether there was any record 
relating to the matter and consideration being 
given to the question as to whether it was 
appropriate to so inform a witness riming 
cross-examination." 

“In any event. Sir Robert Armstrong has 
stated that he was mistaken originally, and a 
perasal of his evidence shows that he did not 
have personal contact with the Attorney- 
General in relation to any decision not to talce 
action." 


is Treachery because it was 
advised that it had no basis to 
do so. 

Sir Robert had said in his 
evidence that he had discussed 
the Interrogatories with either 
or both Mr John Bailey.- the 
Treasury Solicitor, and his 
deputy, Mr David Hogg, both 
of whom were in court 
throughout his evidence. 

Mr Turnbull said it was 
impossible to believe that 
these answers had not been 
checked whh Sir MichaeL 

It was also inconceivable, 
Mr Turnbull said, that “even 
if Sir Robert had been stating 
his true belief on November 
1 8 (that the decision had been 
Sir Michael's) he or Messrs 
Bailey and Hogg had not bear 
advised by Sir Michael that he 
had not been personally 
involved. 

“The best construction'that 
can be placed on these answers 
— is that Sir Michael Havers • 
allowed Sir Robert Armstrong 
to give evidence in New South 
Wales which Sir Michael knew 
was false. 

“In other words, if Sir 
Robert, Mr Bailey and Mr 
Hogg were honest mid careless 
fools, then Sir Michael Havers 
was guilty of the worst form of 
dishonesty: he allowed an- 
other man to lie on his behalf 
and did nothing to correct iL" 

Mr Turnbull concluded his 
reasoning by seeking to ex- 
plain motive. 

"Why did Sir Robert lie? 
Why did the British Govern- 
ment, its Prime Minister, its 
Attorney-General and its Tre- 
asury Solicitor sit by, allowing 
the lies to be told for so long? 

“The answer lies in the 
special status of the Attorney- 
General. The dignity, im- 
portance and independence of 
that post are too wen known to 
rehearse here. The advice said 
to have been given about 
Their Trade is Treachery was 
most peculiar. It is simply 
nonsense to say that in apply- 
ing for an injunction the 
Attorney-General would have 



Mr Turnbull: Harshness of his attack brought a suggestion 
from Mr Justice Powell of a more moderate approach. 


risked exposing the source 
(who had covertly supplied 
the manuscript to Whitehall). 

“Faced with this problem of 
improbable legal advice, the 
plaintiff cbose to attribute ft to 
the Attomey-GeneraL It was 
just believable that unlikely 
advice of this kind would be 
accepted if it came from the 


first law officer of the Crown 

“There was always a chance 
a court would accept this 
version of events, so long as 
the Attorney-General was pre- 
pared to take the rap Once the 
pressure got too great, the 
truth emerged." 

Mr Turnbull’s submissions 
will continue this mor nin g 


Art grants to help 
better marketing 

By Gavin BeU. Arts Correspondent 


Arts organizations, many of 
which have been complaining 
about lack of public funds, are 
to be offered £250,000 in 
grants to help them to sell 
bright ideas. 

Mr Richard Luce. Minister 
for the Arts, said yesterday the 
experimental scheftte, to be 
launched next year, would be 
part of a broad strategy to 
encourage the arts to become 
more self-sufficient. 

The idea is to stimulate 
organizations receiving cen- 
tral or local government fund- 
ing to increase their audiences 
and financial returns through 
more efficient marketing. 

Grants of between £5,000 
and £10.000, each represent- 
ing half the cost of an unusual 
or original marketing initia- 
tive, will be available to all 
arts bodies, including muse- 
ums and libraries, in England, 
Scotland and Wales. 

Mr Luce estimated that 
between 25 and 50 such 


projects would receive sup- 
port in the next finan cial year. 

“As I travel around arts 
organizations, I often see 

examples of good imaginative 

ideas: I would like to 
encourage others to follow 
suit. I hope my offer to share 
the costs win actively en- 
courage initiative and 
enterprise.” 

Mr Luce cited three recent 
examples of imaginative mar- 
keting — a “Young Scot” card 
issued by the Scottish Arts 
Counci] which offers dis- 
countsat selected events; holi- 
day packages in Yorkshire 
incorporating visits to a dif- 
ferent theatre every evening, 
and the sale of ticlcks at half- 
price to West End theatres in 
London on the day of the 
performance. 

Applications should be 
submitted to a selection panel 
a 1 the Office of Arts and 
Libraries between January 
and April 30. 


Pegging of purchase 
budget is deplored 

By Gavin BeU, Arts Correspondent 


Sir Peter Wakefield, direc- 
tor of the National Art Collec- 
tions Fond, has joined the 
widespread criticism of the 
Government's decision not to 
increase purchase grants for 
museums and galleries next 
year. 

He was delighted tint the 
fond was able to support the 
Tate Gallery’s bid to purchase 
“The Opening of Waterloo 
Bridge", regarded as one of 
Constable's finest paintings, 
in spite of the budget 

announcement last week. 

**I think it is absurd that , in 
the face of art prices going 
throogh the roof, the Govern- 
ment should be pegging 
museums' purchase grants at 
below the levels of 1983.” 

Sir Michael Levey, director 
of the National Gallery, has 
said its porchase grant of 
£2.75 million for next year 
would be sufficient to boy half 
of one good paintin g . 

He is understood to have 
expressed concern privately 
that lack of foods could result 
in important paintings being 
lost to the nation. . 

Mr Richard Luce, Minister 
for foe Arts, annoanced an 
overall increase of _ almost 
£4 m illio n in his provision for 
museums and galleries, to 


cover higher naming costs and 
baDding programmes, bet said 
purchase grants would be 
unchanged from the present 
financial year. 

The fond has promised 
£250,000 towards the pur- 
chase of tire Constable master- 
piece, which is raised at 
£4 million, but which has been 
offered to the Tate by a private 
owner for £2i> mini o n . Th e 
gallery hopes to raise farther 
foods from private soarces 
before handling a public ap- 
peal next month. 



Sir Michael Levey — con- 
cerned at lack of foods 


Student in 
court fight 
seeks aid 

A student who is to make 
history next month by suing a 
Cambridge college to readmit 
him has applied tor legal aid to 
cover his costs, expected to 
amount to several thousands 
of pounds, ft was disclosed 
yesterday. 

Mr Dominic Oakes, aged 
21, of Sherwood, Nottindu 
has demanded that Sid; 
Sussex College reverses the 
decision that resulted in his 
dismissal at the end of his 
second year last June. 

Mr Oakes, who passed his 
first and second year examina- 
tions in mathematics, believes 
he may be the victim of 
discrimmation because of his 
CND activities and his enthu- 
siasm for organizing social 
events at the college. 

The proceedings are ex- 
pected to take place 1 next 
month in the Queens Bench 
Division. Mr Oakes will ask 
the High Court to make an 
order directing the college to 
quash its decision to dismiss 
him. 

He will also seek an order 
requiring the college to re- 
convene the hearing which 
resulted in his dismissal and 
that at the hearing he be 
represented by a solicitor. He 
claims that when he was 
dismissed be was granted only 
a 15-muiote hearing 
The college has refused to 
comment. 

Ban on ducks 
puzzles firm 

A Norfolk poultry firm 
which has just been bought for 
£3 million yesterday began an 
investigation to discover why 
20,000 of its ducks have been 
withdrawn from sale in 
Denmark. 

A Danish official said the 
birds, bred by HC Beales, of 
Attleborough, were not a 
health risk but had a sharp 
rancid taste and were inedible. 

Farley opens 
new plant 

A new £9 million milk- 
drying plant began production 
at the Farley baby milk factory 
in Kendal, Cumbria, yes- 
terday. 

Work on the new plant was 
commissioned before Farley's 
problems a year ago when the 
company’s products were 
linked to 41 cases of salmo- 
nella. Farley has since been 
bought by Boots and produc- 
tion has restarted. 


PC’s ‘turmoil’ at statement 

MfSE szznr. ~ 


, policeman who was afleg" 
y told to write false state- 
nts by bis sergeant was “in 
irmoil” over the incidents, 
ds Crown Court was told 
ierdav. 

C Bernard Caulfield said 
thought the statements 
ting to admissions not 
Je by an arrested man were 
le sort of joke. 

[ couldn’t believe it was 
ig to go to court." he saiti 
Nought it was a joke. But i 
in a turmoil because 1 naa 
me to turn to.” . . 

C Caulfield was owng 
fence at the trial of Ser- 


ai Robert Lawson, aged 34, when he made no such 
. am Horbury, near Wake- admission, 
field West Yorkshire. When PC Caulfield heardof 

He denies four charges of another allegation against Sgt 
with intention to per- Lawson, he approached his 

/■ superintendent 

Mr Stephen Williamson, 
QC, for the defence, alleged 
the constable was not telling 
the truth. “You are looking 
after number one." he said. 

He said PC Caulfield had 
no! been suspended, as Sgt 
Lawson had been, and was 
also given to understand he 
would not be proceeded 


vertthe course of justice. 

On one occasion, in August 
last year, Mr Derrick Scott, 
ayd 23, from Shari ston, near 
Wakefield, was arrested for 
befog drunk and disorderly 
and on suspicion ofbreakmg a 
window at a public house. 

Statements written by PC 
Caulfield, .allegedly acting 
under the instruction or sgt -uum 
Lawson, showed Mr Scott had against, 
admitted breaking the window The trial continues today. 


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THE TTMFSTHTTRSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986. 



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WORLD SUMMARY 


t, nubiciges 

freed at border 

a «ordm R to the tt^RedcS 

banded over to R*d two Maontoans- were 

toemto Bkntyre ^ ta g°- k 

■vac Hiuw^ *u.i A® spokesman said it 


either late yesterdayoTtoday J w * C ’ WOO “ Dere " 

Kwf tTmSL^? ” Ms « fi»<» 

has denied the charges M ™ n Goven,n,ent » however, 

Kurds are Bombing 

released charges 

-5WSS6 Jra&i*-- 

OlOi Palme*. the Swedish (hC'V sre Snntlt ifnnoii 

"*■ ”*■**■• >“ve bee, SLEL XS^iSE 

2*S5^ CorrK P°»«*en* for bombings during hut 

"55* ^sted week's food riots innorth- 

SStartFrfS?' Btwthpo1 ' era , Zurakiu, a police 

ice last rndaj. spokesman said yesterday. 

beeB “They have cmxfessed to 

charged with illegal pos- having been recruited by 

SMswn of a weapon and the South African Govern^ 

attempted numslanghter raent,” he said, announcing 

TJe incident gave the the arrests of (he nnkfent^ 

P°hce the opportunity- to Red Briton, New Zealander 

raid the headquarters of a and Australian. 

Knrdish orpmuarion the Officials at the British 
PJOC. whKh is thought to and Australian high co«n- 

be behind the assassinatjon missions here said they 

of Mr Palme. were investigating tbe case. 

Intransigence charge 

Madrid - A Spanish official who will be in London today 
for discussions on Gibraltar yesterday accused Britain of 
intransigence over the issue (Richard Wigg writes). 

We note a dear intransigence by Britain to negotiating 
with Spain, Seftor Jesus Ezqaerra, director-general of the 
department at (he Foreign Ministry, told the 
official Spanish news agency. His visit is to prepare for talks 
on January 13 between the two countries' foreign ministers 
under the November 1984 Anglo-Spanish agreement 
© GIBRALTAR: Gibraltar’s House of Assembly yesterday 
unanimously passed a motion calling for the colon ’s airport 
to remain exclusively raider the control of British and 
Gibraltarian authorities (Dominique Searle writes). 

Trial set Change 

for Hall of pilots 

Managua (Reuter) - Los Angeles (AP) - 
President Ortega of Nice- Dick Rntan, the exhausted 

ragua has said that Mr pilot of the aircraft Voy- 

Sam Hall, an American, is ager, has handed over con- 

a terrorist and will stand frol to his co-pitot Jeans 

trial before the people’s Yeager, after having guided 

tribunal which last month the aircraft around a ty- 

sentenced a US gun-run- - phoon for 12 hours in their 

cer, Eugene Hasenfns, to bid to dude the world nou- 

30 years' imprisonment stop on raw tank of tod. 

The President said on The experimental craft 
Tuesday that Mr Hall was was over the South China 
not a spy even though he Sea yesterday, heading to* 
was captured outside an an* ward Thailand and Malay- 
base on Friday with maps sia after flying through tie 
of military installations arms of Typliwi Marge 
stuffed into his socks. . around the Philippines. 


THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 

North ‘plotted kidnap of 
Iranians to swap hostages’ 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Stockholm - Four of the 
Kurds held by police in ibe 
murder investigation of Mr 
Olof Palme, the Swedish 
Prime Minister, have been 
released (A Correspondent 
writes). They were arrested 
after a shoot-out with pol- 
ice last Friday. 

A fifth Kurd has been 
charged with illegal pos- 
session of a weapon a n il 
attempted manslaughter. 

The incident gave the 
police the opportunity to 
raid the headquarters of a 
Kurdish organization, the 
PKK, which is thought to 
be behind the assassination 
of Mr Palme. 


Trial set Change 
for Hall of pilots 

Managua (Reuter) - Los Angeles (AP) - 
President Ortega of Nica- Dick Rntan, toe e xhausted 
ragua has said that Mr pilot of toe aircraft Voy- 
Sam Hall, an American, is ager, has handed over con- 
a terrorist and will stand fro! to his co-pOot, Jeans 
trial before toe people’s Yeager, after haring guided 
tribunal which last month the aircraft around a ty- 
sentenced a US gun-run- . phoon for 12 hours in their 
cer, Eugene Hasenfns, to bid to circle the world non- 
30 years' imprisonment stop on one tank of tod. 

The President said on The experimental craft 
Tuesday that Mr Hall was was over toe South China 
not a spy even though he Sea yesterday, heading to* 
was captured outside an ah ward Thailand and Malay- 
base on Friday with maps sia after flying through tk 
of military installations arms of Typhus® Marge 
stuffed into his socks. . around the Philippines. 

Scandal minister free 

Bonn — A former West 
German Cabinet minister 
accused of pocketing mil- 
lions of marks from secret 
government funds for bay- 
ing political prisoners out 
of East German jails was 
acquitted yesterday by the 
Bonn High Court (John 
England writes). 

Herr Egon Franke, right, 
aged 73, a Social Demo- 
crat, was charged with 
having embezzled a total of 
DM6 million (£2.1 mil- 
lion) of public money be- 
tween 1979 and 1982 when 

he was Minister for Inner- HW1 '1M WjRH 
German Affairs. wmm. tbu .• 

His former dose ministry aide, Herr Edgar Hirt,_aged 49, 
was found guilty of embezzlement and destroying files 
relating to the money, and was jailed for 3V4 years. 

Moscow in Man taken 
pledge to in second 
Democrats Swazi raid 


From Michael Binyoa 
Washington 

Lieutenant-Colonel Oliver 
North, the marine at the 
centre of the Iran affair, told a 
National Security Council 
(NSC) colleague that be 
planned to kidnap relatives of 
Iranian officials to swap them 
for Americans held hostage in 
Lebanon, it was reported 
yesterday. 

He outlined his bizarre 
scheme to Mr David Major, 
an incredulous counter-terror- 
ism specialist, on the same day 
last month that a Lebanese 
magazine first published de- 
tails of the secret sale of US 
arms to Iran. 

The Los Angeles Times,. 
quoting sources dose to Colo- 
nel North, said he denounced 
the Beirut report as "dis- 
information”. He claimed the 
real plan to free the hostages 
was not to trade them for arms 
but for relatives of Iranian 
Government officials and be 
had ordered them to be kidr 
napped and held in cages 
throughout Europe. 

Mr Major twice used the 
NSC computer to question 
Colonel North about fus asser- 
tion. Colonel North twice 
| ignored the queries. When 
I asked a third time if he had 
ordered kidnappings, he tap- 
ped out the reply "yes”, the 
Los Angeles Times said. 

An Administration official 
said yesterday that Mr Msjor 
did not believe that Colonel 
North had actually kidnapped 
any Iranians. One source 
called the proposal "vintage 
Ollie” and another said: "He 
would rather tell a good story 
than the truth even if the truth 
serves his purposes better ” 

It is unclear how Colonel 
North intended to carry out 
his plan. One I ranian specifi- 
cally mentioned was the 
nephew of Hashemi Rafsan- 


1 







Lieutenant-Colonel North: still at the centre of controversy. 


jani, the Speaker of the Ira- 
nian Parliament Colonel 
North told Mr Major that the 
kidnapped Iranians would be 
eventually "crazed back” and 
traded for the Americans. 

Mr Caspar Weinberger, the 
US Defence Secretary, yes- 
terday testified before a dosed 
hearing of the Senate Intelli- 
gence Committee as legal 
experts in Congress were 
examining President Reagan's 


call for limited immunity for 
several of the key figures in the 
Iran affair who nave refused to 
answer questions. 

Several voiced scepticism 
over the move, saying it could 
hamper rather than help the 
special prosecutor who will be 
investigating the case. 

Mr Archibald Cox, the first 
Watergate prosecutor, urged 
the committee to reject Mr 
Reagan's request which is an 


evident attempt to get Ad- 
miral John Poindexter and 
Colonel North to testify. 
"Rushing to grant immu- 

S risks unnecessarily ex- 
. ating two of the principal 
actors in what may well be a 
major conspiracy 1 to subvert ! 
the laws at the highest levels of 1 
government." he said. 

Senior lawyers said even the . 
granting of limited immunity , 
would make any subsequent , 
prosecution extremely diffi- 1 
cult. Mr Richard Ben-Veniste, | 
a former Watergate pros- 
ecutor. said Mr Edwin Meese. 
the Attorney-General who I 
recommended the step to 
President Reagan, was acting 
out of political motives, they 
said. 

Following the Senate an- 
nouncement of its special 
investigating committee into 
the (ran affair, the House 
yesterday announced the com- 
position of its 15- man com- 
mittee headed by Mr Lee 
Hamilton, an Indiana Demo- 
crat. Vice-chairman will be Mr 
Dame FasceJL the Democratic 
chairman of the House foreign 
affairs committee. 

The Senate committee will 
be headed by Senator Daniel 
Jnouye of Hawaii, a former 
prosecuting attorney in Hono- 
lulu. The senior Republican 
will be Senator Warren 
R Lid man of New Hampshire, 
a former Attorney-General of 
his state and chairman of the 
Senate committee on ethics. 

Senator Christopher Dodd, 
a Connecticut Democrat re- 
cently returned from a two- 
day visit to Nicaragua, said 
yesterday that there was a 
good chance Mr Eugene 
Hasenfus, the American sen- 
tenced to 30 years imprison- 
ment for running weapons to 
the Contras, would be allowed 
to return to the US within a 
few days. 


Warm welcome for 
EEC ministers 9 
farm breakthrough 

From Richard Owen, Brussels 


Mr Frans Andriessen, the 
< EEC Agriculture Commis- 
! Stoner, yesterday warmly wel- 
comed toe reforms agreed on 
Tuesday by EEC farm min- 
isters at a meeting chaired by 
Mr Michael J opting, toe Min- 
ister of Agriculture, Fisheries 

and Food. 

Mr Andriessen said that toe 
package opened the way for a 
solution to the EEC's appar- 
ently insoluble budget crisis. 
The common agricultural pol- 
icy (CAP) was a post-war 
creation designed to avoid 
shortages in Europe; but until 
now it bad defeated efforts to 
adapt it to circumstances of 
surplus. 

Mr Andriessen. who had 
repeatedly and almost des- 
pairingly urged toe farm min- 
isters to do something to stop 
toe food mountains getting out 
of control, said that the pro- 
cess of reforming toe CAP was 
for from complete. 

The commission would put 
forward proposals for dispos- 
ing of existing stocks as well 
as for curbing future output. 

The form package, agreed 
after lengthy talks, includes a 
cut of nearly 10 per cent in 
milk quotas over two years and 
a 13 per cent reduction in 
guaranteed prices for beef. 

Mr Jopling was widely 
congratulated yesterday by 
EEC officials and Enro-MPs 
on his triumph. 

EEC fisheries ministers 
yesterday opened toe final 
talks of toe British presidency, 
on talks on 1987 fishing 
quotas, including cod and had- 
dock quotas in the North Sen. 

Mr Andriessen echoed Mr 
Jopling’s remark that the form 
package meant that the 
"scandalous” surpluses built 
up over toe past year "will bea 
thing of the past”. 

The compensation arrange- 


ments which made the pack- 
age palatable to formm would 
be paid for partly out of the 
savings made by reduced stor- 
age and price support costs. 
He pnt the saving in the dairy 
sector alone at over £1 biffin. 

Mr Andriessen said that the 
Farm Council had empowered 
the ConunissioD further to 
suspend intervention (guar- 
anteed EEC purchases of sur- 
plus food) if it was used 
excessively. Farm ministers 
are to define "excessively” by 
toe end of February. 

He stressed that toe pur- 
pose was not to pnt pressure mi 
toe market but to restore 
intervention to its original 
purpose as a safety ueL 

He advanced four options on 
disposal of the 1,500,000 
tonne butter mountain: ex- 
ports to "certain destin- 
ations”; use of butter for 
animal feeds; non-food uses; 
and cheap butter for EEC 
consumers. 

The package would stren- 
gthen toe EEC's international 
position and Brussels would be 
asking other negotiating par- 
ties to the General Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade (Gatt) to 
emulate the EEC and reform 
their farm subsidy systems. 

The measures had toe merit 
of acknowledging that south- 
ern EEC states were not resp- 
onsible for most of toe surplus 
output. This would avoid a 
north-south divide ami. pre- 
serve Community cohesion. 

Britain retains its variable 
beef premium as part of the 
package and benefits from a 6 
per cent devaluation of the 
green pound for beef trans- 
actions. Ireland, which ini- 
tially vetoed the beef deal, 
receives a £20 million beef 
premium as toe price of its 
acceptance of the package. 


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J ' From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

Senator Gary Han, favour- 
ite to secure the Democratic 
nomination for the 1988 
American presidential race, 
yesterday said that Mr Gor- 
bachov. the Soviet leader, had 
pledged not to use the 
“Irangate” scandal to stall 
amts negotiations between the 
superpowers. 

The Colorado senator said 
that in a 3 Vi-hour meeting Mr 
Gorbachov had agreed that 
there should be no question of 
waiting for the next US 
administration before making 
r j, efforts to conclude an arms 
agreement 

He quoted Mr Gorbachov 
as saying it was too important 
an issue to wait another 24 
months. 

There had been fears that 
Moscow may have privately 
abandoned hopes of reaching 
an aims agreement with Presi- 
dent Reagan after the failed 
Reykjavik summit and the 
complications of the Iran 
arms scandaL 

At the breakfast-time press 
conference. Senator Hart in- 
dicated that the question of a 
precise definition about what 
research would be jjermitted 
on Star Wars provided the 
best avenue to a possible 
compromise on arms. 

He pinpointed disagree- 
ment over the type of research 
the US could carry out on 
space weapons as 
main reason for the failure or 
the two sides to reach a 
major historic breakthrough 

in Iceland. . , 4 

He suggested that Mr 
Reagan may have thrown 
away such an agreement oy 
insisting on testing SDlom- 
side “the laboratory wnlwg 
finding out precisely wha. the 
Kremlin meant by that term- 


From Michael Hornsby 

Johannesburg 

Swaziland police disclosed 
yesterday that a man was 
abducted in a second raid by 
armed men presumed to have 
come from South Africa on 
Monday night. 

The man has been identifed 
by Swazi sources as Mr Roy 
Zahee, said to be a South 
African Indian and a member 
of the United Democratic 
Front (UDF). the multiracial 
but black-dominated anti-ap- 
artheid resistance movement 

On Friday armed members 
of the South African security 
forces kidnapped two Swiss, 
Mr Daniel Schneider, a 
commercial artist, and his 
Fiancee, Miss Coriuue 
Bischoff, an assistant hotel 
manageress, and Mr Danger 
Nyoni, an assistant restaurant 
manager. 

All three were later released. 
A fourth person, Mrs Grace 
Cele, was also abducted and is 
still missing. 

In addition. The raiders 
killed the 13 -year-old son of 
Mr Nyoni. It is believed that 
they shot and killed Mr Mat- 
thew Maphumulo, a member 
of the outlawed African Na- 
tional Congress. 

• Subversion trial: Nine white 
campaigners against military 
conscription ' appeared in 
court in Cape Town yesterday 
on charges of making subver- 
sive statements’' in one of the 
few prosecutions so far re- 
corded for offences under the 
South African state of 
emergency. 

The three women and sw 
men, all members of the End 
Conscription Campaign 
(ECO, were released on bail of 
rands 150 (£47) each in the 
Cape Town Magistrate s 
Court. The case was ad- 
journed until January 14. 


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_ 10 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


Surinam’s rebel leader 
again outwits Bouterse 
by capturing aircraft 

From Christopher Thomas, Paramaribo 

Sergeant Ronny Brunswijk, being committed against slogan — “Democracy yes, 
me young rebel soldier whose civilians. terrorism no” — is far from 

guerrillas are storming thr- Although Sergeant Bruns- communist 
ough eastern Surinam, has wijfc appears to take excep- With 15 s 
captured two aircraft in an- tional steps to avoid hurting Bouterse to 

other stunning demonstration civilians, there are strong ment build—^ _ 

ofhis ability to outwit govern- suggestions that he, too, may support a pay rise for the 
ment troops. have blood on his hands. At Army. It snowballed and he 

with a touch of audacity the time of the massacre in 
that infuriates the military December 1982 of 15 civic 


dictators, he uses the planes' 
radios to issue a constant 
siring of demands for reforms. 
Sometimes he gives a warning 
that he will strike a military 
target on a given day unless 
his ultimatum is met 

One of the aircraft is a 
civilian 16-seaten the other is 
thought to be a light military 
plane. It is not known where 
they are being kept, but clearly 
Sergeant Brunswijk is in con- 
trol of at least one of the eight 
airstrips to the easL 

The nearest airstrip to his 
stronghold at Stoelman's Is- 
land, on the border with 
French Guiana, is 50 miles to 
the south at Benzdorp- But 
then the planes could also be 
at the border town of .Albina, 
which the Government has 
evacuated and which almost 
certainly is in rebel hands. 

No planes, including mis- 
sionary aircraft, are allowed to 
fly to Die east any more. 

Air transport is the only 
practical means of travel in 
the nine-tenths of Surinam 
covered with dense trackless 
jungle. If Sergeant Brunswijk 
were able to fly and refuel his 
craft he would dramatically 
increase his tactical strengths. 

Bush Negroes — rural blacks 
descended from runaway 
slaves — who have come to 
Paramaribo, say the Govern- 
ment has forced the evacua- 
tion of many entire villages in 
the east and there are strong 
indications that atrocities are 


leaders who had set up an 
opposition group, he was 
bodyguard to Lieutenant- 
Colonel Desi Bouterse, the 
military strongman. 

Some say he was present 
when the men were lined up in 
the centre of Paramaribo and 
shot In any case, he remained 



Sergeant Brunswijk: Hired 
skilled foreign mercenaries 
closely involved with the re- 
gime for well over three years 
after the atrocity before resign- 
ing over a pay dispute and 
beading into the jungle. 

Although there is wide- 
spread international concern 
at what is happening in Suri- 
nam, it is far from clear what 
kind of political ideology 
Colonel Bouterse is trying to 
impose. 

Despite many threats, no 
industries have been national- 
ized. Works by Marx, Cbe 
Guevara and Mao are no- 
where to be found. There are 
no revolutionary posters, and 
indeed, the newest official 


ended up running the country, 
apparently much to his own 
surprise. 

He and his men hung up a 
suggestion box outside the 
army barracks in the early 
days. Soon, a military council 
was formed along with a 
civilian Government headed 
by a President, Dr Chin A Sen, 
who was ousted in January 
1982 and now is in exile in 
The Netherlands. 

Soon after taking power 
Colonel Bouterse became im- 
pressed by the newly formed 
People’s Revolutionary Party, 
beaded by a small group of 
Casrroites. A People's Militia, 
the secret eyes and ears of the 
Government, was formed on 
the Cuban model. 

Having turned away from 
Cuba in a policy shift in 1 983, 
he is now flirting with Libya. 
Nobody knows where that 
might lead. Rather than 
pursuing any clear ideology, 
he seems to be twisting and 
turning simply to retain 
power. 

Sergeant Brunswijk, too, 
was never known as an 
ideologue. 

With the obvious co-opera- 
tion of French Guiana, the 
rebel leader bas talked with 
Dutch journalists in the vagu- 
est of terms about what he 
wants to achieve. 

It appears that, with copious 
funds secured from Suri- 
namese exiles in The Nether- 
lands. he has hifed large 
□umbers of skilled foreign 
mercenaries. 



AFP crisis | Spanish 
deepens as ! pupils echo 

strike is j French 
extended i protests 


Emotional greeting: Mr Yitzhak 
Shamir, the Israeli Prime Minister, 
left, embracing Mr Elxe Weisel, the 
Romanian-born American Jew who won 
the 1986 Nobel peace prize for lit- 
erature for his work arising from his 
own humiliation in concentration 
camps, to luncheon at the Prime 


Minister’s home in Jerusalem yes- 
terday. Mr Shamir told foreign Jewish 
leaders that the predicted sharp decline 
in the world’s Jewish population would 
be as catastrophic as the near-exter- 
mination of European Jewry fay the 
Nazis in the Second World War (Renter 
reports from Jerusalem). 



EXCLUSIVE 




From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

The crisis at Agencc Fran«- 
Presse <AJ=P). the world s tford 
largest news agenev and int 
onlv one based on ihe French 
language, deepened 
as journalists entered the sec- 
ond week of their strike and 
demanded the resignation ol 
M Henri Pigeat, aged 46, iu 
managing director for it- 
years. 

There have already- been 
warnings that the strike cou ld 
sound the death knell for AFP, 
which has been labouring 
under increasing competition 
from the two leading inter- 
national agencies. Associated 
Press and Reuter, and suffer- 
ing huge losses as a result. 

After a deficit last year of 
63.7 million francs (£6.8 mil- 
lion), the agency expects to 
make a further loss of 50 
million francs this year on a 
turnover of 792 million 
francs, despite having shed 
140 of its 2,000 staff in the 
past six months. 

Undera controversial emer- 
gency restructuring plan in- 
troduced by M Pigeat in July. 
300 jobs are due to be shed by 
1989, half of them journalists. 
In addition, AFP’s foreign- 
language services are due to be 
decentralized and stream- 
lined, with the German desk 
moving from Paris to Bonn, 
the l*tin American desk to 
Washington, and the Middle 
East desk to Nicosia. 

The journalists are demand- 
ing the abandonment of most 
of the decentralization pro- 
posals and are refusing to 
accept compulsory redun- 
dancies. They say the plan will 
lead to a poorer quality and 
ultimately unviable service. 

They put the entire blame 
for the crisis on M Pigeat. 
complaining that he has never 
had any direct journalistic 
experience, and accusing him 
of being “cold, arrogant and 
incompetent”. 

Forty heads of editorial 
departments signed a petition 
yesterday demanding his res- 
ignation. Such a move was 
“an indispensable condition 
for the resumption of normal 
working at the agency and for 
the maintenance of its place in 
the world”. 

AFP journalists voted two 
to one on Tuesday evening in 
favour of a further 48-hour 
extension of the strike, after 
the breakdown of the first 
attempt at negotiations be- 
tween the management and 
unions. The talks lasted only 
12 minutes before the journal- 
ists walked out. 

There is now talk of bring- 
ing in a provisional admin - 
istrator or a mediator. 


i From Richard " igg 
Madrid 

Tens of thousands of Span- 
ish secondary schooSehdarea 

Sot to the streets >**«rd*> * 

nrotest against the Socialist 
Go' ernmeat’s policies 00 Dm ’“ 
ersit> education. 

In Madrid, at leas! 50,000 
(he immediate mtbdnraal of 

measures limiting uimcreily 
access . as well as calling for 
more public spending on 
education. 

Teenagers in other cities, 
including Barcelona. Valencia. 
Seville and Granada, also 
responded to a nation wide 

strike call, which left most of 
the state-run secondary sch- 
ools without classes. 

Though the organirere fail- 
ed to bring out a majority of 
the tw o million schoolchildren 
involved, the demonstrations 
were the first challenge by 
young people w Senor Jose 
Mara vail, the Socialist Educa- 
tion Minister. 

The protesters want him to 
cancel the university entrance 
restrictions which he in- 
troduced in May, as well as 
removing the recent increases 
on student university fees. 

Tfae Spanish demonstra- 
tions echo events in France in 
recent weeks, but one of the 
organizers said: "We are not 
copying the French, though 
the two countries’ education 
policies are very much alike.” 

The schoolchildren's fears 
about getting a place iu 
Spain's already badly over- 
crowded universi tie s are long 
standing, but the French 
example has clearly inspired 
Ihe schookbfldrea aswell as 
the Communists and political 
forces to the left of the 
governing Socialists. 

Two rival groups tried to 
lead the protest; a Madrid 
committee based on 60 local 
state-run secondary schools, 
and a Marxist students’ union 
which has suddenly surfaced 
from the provinces. 

At a meeting before yest- 
erday's march a majority re- 
sisted efforts by Madrid 
University students to take 
over the schoolchildren's more 
limited university entrance 
problems. 

The two rival groups 
marched separately yesterday 
and Seflor Marcefino Ca- 
macho, the communist trade 
union leader, switched from 
one group to the other. 

Senior Education Ministry 
officials said that they would 
be wafiag to consider the 
schoolchildren's demands. 


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French look to sale 
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institutions which, it is hoped, 
will form a “dub of friends” 
designed to prevent any even- 
tual foreign takeover. The 
main pubhc floatation is due 
at the end of January or in 
February. 

Shares for St Gobain, the 
glass and building materials 
group, were offered for sale 
three weeks ago at 310 francs 

Initial demand outstripped 
share offers by 14 times. The 
shares were already being 
quoted at 355-360 francs on 
1 the London “grey market" last 
week, and trading on the open 
market is due to start next 
Tuesday. 

. The Government was par- 
ticularly pleased by the large 
number of small shareholders 
who came forward in a coun- 
fry. where there is little tra- 
dition of popular share 
ownership. 

More than a million of the 
1-6 million St Gobain 
shareholders are private in- 
dividuals. and the group now 
has six times more sharehold- 
ers than any other French 
company. 

Ten per cent of the capital 
was offered at preferential 
rates to the company's 150- 
OOOemployees- More than 
60,000 immediately snapped 
up all the available shares. 

l L 8 Per cent of 
ihe 28 mflhon shares reserved 
lor foreign investors were 
bought within 48 hours. 

. ^.Government had orig- 
inally intended to sell 20 
cent of tte capita! on the 

ssBSs&a- 

to help to satisfy 


The Government put for- 
ward its most attractive com- 
pany first Si Gobain, which 
was nationalized in 1982, is 
well known throughout the 
world and made a healthy 753 
million francs profit last year 
on a turnover of 67.8 billion 
francs. 

The outstanding success of 
this first test-case nevertheless 
bodes well for the rest of the 
Government's highly ambit- 
ious privatization programme 



M Ballad ur: St Gobain sale 
exemplary success*, 
w hich involves half of the 
exceptionally large public sec- 
tor m France, with an es- 
timated value of 250-300 
billion francs. 

The Pansbas group with 
profits Iasi year of 2.7 billion 
francs on assets of 551 billion 
francs, is the next due for 
privatization, a television 
“““Pa'S", show- 
ing the elegant interior of the 
group s Paris-based head- 
quarters began last week. 

"2 1 ? . St Gobain, 10 per 
cent of the capital will be 
offered at preferential rates to 
^5. bank s 55,000 employees, 
while a further 20 per cent will 
pc set aside for foreign 
investors. * 

the capital will be offered in 
me lorm oF-privilesed invest- 
ment certificates" which will 
attract a higher dividend but 
carry no voting rights. 

rJSLi ^5 Of Assurances 
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M Edouard BaUadur the 
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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


Three top Co mmunis t 
Party leaders quit 
Vietnamese hierarchy 


In the most profound 
leadership change since the 
death of Ho Cm Minh- the 
three top leaders of the Com- 
munist Party of Vietnam yes- 
terday resigned from the 
Central Committee. 

All three, Mr Truong Chinh, 
the Secretary -General: Mr 
Pham Van Dong, the Prime 
Minister; and Mr Le Due Tho. 
a key member of the Politburo 
and the negotiator of the Paris 
peace accords, worked closely 
with Ho Chi Minh from the 
foundation of the party in 
1930. 

AH have played important 
rales in the country's three 
modem wars, against the 
Japanese, the French and the 
Americans; the same triumvi- 
rate which has led Vietnam 
since the death of Ho Chi 
Minh in 1969. 

AH three men walked to the 
podium in the Ba Dinh HaU ia 
Hanoi to wave and accept the 
applause of communist dele- 
gates from all over the world 


.vj % ^ 

‘ v : 3 


From David Watts, Tokyo 

after their retirement had been 
announced by the Interior 
Minister, Mr Pham Hung. 

Mr Chinh. aged 79, Mr 
Dong, 80, and Mr Tho. 73, 
have played historic roles in 
the country's development 
and are taking some of the 
responsibility for the morass 
in which Vietnam finds itself 
today. 

Mr Chinh. in particular, was 
responsible for rolling back a 
previous attempt at economic 
reform in the mid-1970s and 
their collective decision to 
invade the Chinese-supported 
Cambodia of Pol Pot in 1979 
left Vietnam isolated and 
estranged from two of the 
world's three most powerful 
nations and with its economy 
in serious trouble. 

They will, however, play an 
advisory role to the new, 
reformist leadership which 
will be named today to run the 
country and make a fresh 
attempt to rescue its economy. 

The new leadership will be 


&>■ — 




t - ,■ ifeJa Xffld nme ana is expected to come 

■watedrBS „ iVX-r ; , +* • *8 back in a senior position. Mi 

S V; . >■ ' Vo Van Kjet, chairman of the 

jg - 5 4 i planning commission and an 

sa£aaB-..w:^ important reformer, is also 

The Vietnamese leaders who have resigned: Mr Truong expected to figure in the 
Chinh, left, Mr P ham Van Dong and Mr Le Due Tho. promotions. 

Strikers in Maori minister in 
at Marcos loan link 

City flump From Richard Long, Wellington 


From Mario Modiano 
Athens 

Striking rubbish collectors 
in Athens clashed with riot 
police near the city disposal 
dump yesterday after the 
Greek Government called in 
the Army to dear the dty 
centre of putrefying moun- 
tains of uncollected rubbish. 

Seven strikers were injured 
and 18 arrested in the scuttles 
after pickets lay down in front 
of Army lorries 

The country’s 25,000 gar- 
bage collectors and street- 
sweepers, whose strike for 
higher pay, pension rights and 
job security entered its Nth 
day. are defying an by the 
Government ordering them 
back to work. 

Disobedience is punishable 
by jail as well as confiscation 
of personal property. But the 
rubbish-men's union says that 
the order is an unconsliiu- , 
tional attempt to deprive 
members of the right to strike. 

Soldiers in fatigues drove 
yesterday along the main 
streets to shovel up piles of 
disembowelled rubbish bags 
interfering with the heavy pre- 
Christmas traffic. 


The Labour Government of 
New Zealand was rocked last 
night by an official report 
which showed that its senior 
Maori civil servant had made 
a secret attempt to borrow 
SNZ600 million (£217 million) 
from Hawaiian sources said to 
be linked with die deposed 
President or the Philippines, 
Mr Ferdinand Marcos. 

The report has landed the 
Minister of Maori Affairs, Mr 
Koro Wetere. in deep political 
trouble, as it disclosed be 
knew of his department's 
negotiations to raise the 
money from a Hawaiian loan 
broker, Mr Michael Gisondi, 
but did not tell his Cabinet 
colleagues. 

While there was speculation 
that he might be forced to 
resign, there was no Immediate 
comment from the Prime Min- 
ister, Mr David Lange, except 
for a brief statement saying 
the Cabinet knew nothing of 
the loan discussions. 

The inquiry report, from Dr 
Rod Deane, chairman of the 
State Services Commission, 
followed Opposition allega- 
tions in Parliament on Tues- 
day of a scandal involving 
Government ministers. 


imunist Karachi 

5 quit “y °l 

»rarphv 12bumt 

.rareny todeath 

From A Correspondent 

significant, not merely be- Karachi 

cause of its newness but At least a dozen cnarrea 
because its ideas will m- bodies, all from the one 
evitably emerge from the least family, were recovered from 
' communist part of the country the debris ofa house set alight 
— the south around Ho Chi by a gang of Pashtuns yes- 
Minh City, the former capital terday in Orangi township, in 
Saigon Karachi They included two 

° . . children, two women and 

The switch will effectively eighl mcn ^ boys, 
acknowledge that the ideo- six other bodies, riddled 
logues of the north must with bullets, were brought to 
finally yield to some of the lhe civil hospital from the 
pragmatism shown by the same area, 
south, an indication that it is j n another gruesome mur- 
Hanoi that is being changed der, five headless bodies 
by what was formerly the non- reportedly decapitated by 
communist part of the country roc kei fire, were brought from 
and not vice versa. another part of Orangi town - 1 

A number of predictions ship, scene of the worn yiol- 
have been circulating as to ence. There have been various 
who might be given lhe party's ■ reports of rocket-launchers be- 
most senior posts today but ing used in the area, 
the most widely suggested With 30 more deaths since 
successor to Mr Chinh is Mr Tuesday night, the total nmn- 
Nguyen Van Linh. who is the her of casualties from the four 
deputy secretary of the party days of fighting yesterday 
organization in the south dur- stood at more than 155. 
ing the war and ‘who. for Despite the strict curfew 
reasons unexplained, left or restrictions, there have been 
was removed from the Pol- reports of snipers, riding on 
itbureau at the last party motorbikes and in cars, roam- 
congress in 1982 and was re- ing the city and shooting 
instated in 1 985. indiscriminately at people. 

w ,, . Six people were reported 

Mr Vo Nguyen Giap. lhe s h ol by troops for violat- 
leading strategist of the wars ing ^ curfew, but their 
against the French and the rjpaihc have not deterred otb- 
Amencans, has likewise been ^ shooting, stabbing and 
out of the limelight for some 31 -son continued unabated in 
time and is expected to come various parts of the city 
back in a senior position. Mr yesterday. 

Vo Van Kiel, chainnan of the ’ Tension also mounted yes- 
planning commission ana an terday in Koran gl east of 
important re former, is also Karachi, when those (tilled in 
expected to figure in the clashes in Shah Faisal Colony 
promotions. on Monday were brought 

from hospital for buriaL In 

• • __ view of the tense situation, 

mister m elm ^ p,rad 

• -m At least 450 people have 

l|H |>r been arrested on charges of 
Uilla llliA murder, looting, arson and 

inciting people to riot since 
mg, Wellington the ethnic violence broke out 

The Opposition Maori af- between the Pashtuns, from 
fairs spokesman, Mr Winston Pakistan's North West Fron- 
Peters, produced documents tier Province, and Urdu- 
between the department and speaking Mohajtr refugees. 

Mr Gisondi showing that a Police have also arrested an 
loan procurement fee of alleged notorious drug dealer, 
SNZ21 million was being dis- Mr Daud Pathan. on sus- 


The Opposition Maori af- 
fairs spokesman, Mr Winston 
Peters, produced documents 
between the department and 
Mr Gisondi showing that a 


cussed for raising the loan. 
Such an amount Mr Peters 


picion of being one of those 
responsible for the carnage in 


said, "raised suggestions of Orangi on Sunday. 


kick-backs and backhanders". 
He compared the incident with 


Khemlani 


A group of Pushtuns, alleg- 
edly backed by drug smugglers 


which rocked the Australian 
Labor Government of Mr 
Gough Whitlam in 1974 when 
two Cabinet ministers, Mr Jim , 
Cairns and Mr Rex Connor, 
were involved in nnanthorized , 
loan negotiations with Middle 
East oil interests.. 

But the deputy Prime Min- 
ister, Mr Geoffrey Palmer, 
rejected these claims as “innu- 
endo and sleaze". In a stormy 
debate in Parliament Mr 
Palmer said that the Cabinet 
knew nothing of the incident 
and that Mr Wetere had not 


affair and arms dealers, went on the 


rampage after the Army 
mounted a clean-up operation 
in Sohrab Goth district a 
predominantly Push tun area. 

So for, in the five daysof the 
clean-up, law-enforcement 
agencies have uncovered large 
stores of drugs and arms. 

Afghans living in Sohrab 
Goth are being removed to a 
rufugee camp, and according 
to some reports, have been 
involved in the clashes. 

Meanwhile, demonstrating 
relatives of the victims of the 
riots yesterday forced Presi- 


gjven his consent to the raising dent Zia and his Prime Min- 


of any loan. 

The Finance Under-Sec- 
retary, Mr Trevor de Cleene, 
caused a sensation when he 


ister, Mr Muhammad Khan 
Under-Sec- Junejo, to cancel a visit to a 
de Cleene, local hospital Hundreds of 
n when he angry demonstrators shouted 














mm 




‘a.VJWiSOt 1 








Irina Satnshinskaya, a Soviet poet who 
was released in October from a Kiev 
prison where she had been held for 
"anti-Soviet propaganda", with her 
husband outside the British Embassy in 
Moscow yesterday after applying for a 
visa for travel to Britain. 

A British Embassy spokesman said 
she had completed the visa formalities 
but declined to say when Mrs 




Ratnshinskay a, aged 32, and her 
husband, Mr Igor Gerashchenko, 
planned to leave Moscow. The visas 
were valid for three months, he added. 

Mrs Ratushinskaya, considered by 
Western critics as one of the Soviet 
Union's most talented modern poets, 
was sentenced in April 1983 to seven 
years in a labour camp and five years’ 
internal exile. 


Marriage 
over for 
Maria 
Franco 

yjjjrid - The Roman 
Catholic Church has annulled 
the marriage ci Ocr.cpl 
Franco's granddaughter Se- 
cora Maria de! Carmen Marti- 
nez Bordiu Franco. 10 the 
King's fire 1 cousin. Prince 
Alfonso de Borrwn. i2w_»ers j 
for lhe Prince said yesterday 
(Harry Dcbelius writes?. • 

The Ro:a Tribunal, lhe 
ecclesiastical court, granted 
ihe annulment at lhe pcL’BOfr- 
of Prince Alfonso. 

40 ‘executed’ 

Paris (Reuter) - pic dis- 
sident Iranian People's Mujs- j 
hedin Organization said st tad. 
appealed to the L-nited Na-_ 
lions after reports that 40^ 
detainees on a hunger strike 
were executed in Tehran. 

Sending food 

Rome (Reuter) - The ■> 
United Nations Food and .* 
.Agriculture Organization is to- 
send million worth of emer- 
gency food aid to Afghan and '. 
Ethiopian refugees. 

Eta’s claim 

Madrid — Eta's military:; 
wing, in a phone call to Egin , " 
the Basque left-wing national- 
ist paper, has taken res pons-' - 
ibility for Monday night's 
oorab attacks in Barcelona on ~V 
two French firms. But local 
police believe the tiny Catalan 
independence group Terra 
Uiure may have played a role. 


Trial of ex-Emperor Bokassa 


British victim recalls savage beating 


said he suspected the source of heart-felt threats against the 
funds could be Mr Marcos, country's leaders. 


From Philip Jacobson 
Bangui 

Sitting quietly among the 
foreign journalists here to 
report the trial of Jean-Bedel 
Bokassa is one man with a 
special interest in the case. 

Almost a decade ago. Mr 
Michael Goldsmith, a veteran 
correspondent for lhe Asso- 
ciated Press, was given a 
vicious beating by the former 
Emperor of the Central Af- 
rican Republic To this day, be 
carries on his forehead a scar 
left by a heavy ivory baton. 

When Mr Goldsmith fell 
under the blow Bokassa 
kicked him and urged his 
entourage to join in. The last 
thing the reporter remem- 
bered was seeing an expen- 
sively-shod fool — Bokassa’s, 
as he later discovered — stamp 
on his spectacles. 

He regained consciousness 
in the punishment block of 
Bangui central jail where he 
spent nearly a month. 

Mr Goldsmith, a Briton in 
his mid-60s, has been working 
in black Africa for years. The 
prosecution was eager to have 
him testify but he prefers to 
report the proceedings rather 
than be part of them. 

On Monday before the trial 
began. Colonel Jean-Claude 
Mansion, the French officer in 
charge of security in Bangui, 
whispered to Mr Goldsmith 
that Bokassa sent his regards 
and hoped they might meet 


again in happier cir- 
cumstances. 

.Although Mr Goldsmith is 
redeem about what was 
dearfv a terrifying ordeal — he 
had feared gangrene was set- 
ting m to wounds festering 
beneath the tight handcuffs he 
was forced to wear for six days 
— he believes it helps to 
illuminate aspects of Bok- 
assa’s complex character, es- 


He received a telex message 
containing several garbled 
paragraphs, and was promptly 
arrested on suspicion of spy- 
ing and driven 70 miles to 
Berengo Palace to be interro- 
gated by Bokassa. 

Mr Goldsmith believes that 
Bokassa was already simmer- 
ing with anger about the 
derisive press Coverage his 
coronation plans had at- 


trawedTnotablyin France, his 


iciable swings of mood. 

The trouble for Mr Gold- 
smith began in Bangui in 
August 1977. when he was 
covering preparations for the 
elaborate coronation of Em- 
peror Bokassa 1. 


second home. 

.As he lay in a filthy cell, Mr 
Goldsmith was not aware that 
letters from his wife appealing 
for his release were beginning 
to touch the warm and emo- 


tional side of Bokassa. Com-.' 
bined with the personal.' 
intercession of lhe President 
of Gabon, the letters helped 10 ’ 
secure for Mr Goldsmith 
medical attention and finally:: 
his release. 

Before leaving the country - 
he was summoned to Lhe same. . . 
room in Berengo Palace u fcere_: y 
he had been beaten and was 
greeted warmly by his former . 
assailant, who informed him -• 
that it was the love of his ., 
family that had moved the 
heart of Bokassa. Mr Gold- a. 
smith received three forewell 7. 
kisses on each cheek, and was - 
sent on his way. 


Snail’s pace of missing witnesses 


From Our Own Correspondent, Bangui 


With bearings in the 
Bokassa trial adjourned yes- 
terday while a complex point 
of procedure was befog 
thrashed oat, it is beaming 
apparent that the authorities 
of the Central African Repub- 
lic may have underestimated 
the difficulties in bringing the 
former Emperor to book. 

The suaxTs pace of proceed- 
ings for the first two days 
suggests that dealing with aD 
of the 60 or more witnesses 
scheduled to appear is to be a 
lengthy exercise. Already, sev- 
eral have failed to turn up at 
the Palais de Justice, causing 
a hasty revision of the presid- 


ing judge's intended agenda. 

While it is still too early to 
know how this will affect 
either side's case, there are 
signs that the hasty arrange- 
ment of the country’s biggest 
trial, after Bokassa’s un- 
expected return from exile in 
October, has Anther com- 
plicated matters. 

The two French lawyers 
leading the defence insist, as 
they would, that the written 
statements iff evidence at 
present available to the court 
fofi utterly to establish any 
direct and admissible link 
between the former Emperor 
and the many crimes of which 


he stands accused. The 
prosecution naturally contests 
this, but acknowledges the 
special problems posed by the 
number of key witnesses them- 
selves compromised in one 
way or another by their pre- 
vious service under the 
Bokassa regime. 

Nothing demonstrated this 
more dramatically than the 
prolonged roasting endured by 
Bokassa's former Chief of 
Police on Tuesday. It took the 
combined efforts of judge, 
prosecution and defence sev- 
eral hours to extract anything 
of material value or im- 
portance to the case. 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


CONCERTS 


MRBKJUM HALL 628 8796/638 
8891. Tom A Frl 7.16 TESCO 
FAMILY CHRISTMAS COM. 

C ntHfci aad Chant* Robin 
Stapleton rood. Stuart Burrows 
tin. 

I OPERA & BALLET I 


COL Wei UM S 836 3161 cc SMO 
5268 KMCUSM NATKNUL 
OKRA Ton-1 7.30 Ms 
nadnaa. Toma- 7.30 

. IMT/Ond. 

ROYAL OPERA HOUSE 240 
1066/1911. Sumy Info 836 
6903 S CC. Tl diets El -£22.60 
(Balleti 1M «L lOperaj 68 
amptii seals avail on liir day. 
Toni 7.00 THE ROYAL OPC3A 
Ssma Toma 7.30 THE ROY- 
AL BALLET Tbo Nstersthsr 
BaUrl Casting Info: Ol 240 
9815 

SADLER’S WELLS Z7B 8916. 
Ftr-M Call CC 2atir 7 day 24C 
7300. Until 27 Dec. Eves 7.30 
Mats; Sate A Boxing Day 2.30pnr 

MENOTTTS 

11m Bay Wfca Srm Too Fast 

(Bmlsfi Premiere) & 

AMAH. & lb MsM VWton. 

01-278 0865 la winter Open 
info 


THEATRES 


ADCLMB 836 7611 or 240 7913 
/« CC 741 9999/836 73C8/379 

6433 Cns Sales 930 6123 First 
Call 24hr 7 day CC 240 7200 ibKg 
feel NOW BOOKING TO MAY 30 
1987 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 

Nightly at 7.30 Man wed m 2-30 
A Sal 4.30 & 8.00 

Extra BoxJoc Day Part, *JO a a 
**TH E_ WARM EST SHOW 
M Town*- s Exmsi 
No EvnAag Part toll Eva 

ALBERT 836 3878 cc 379 6365/ 
379 6433/ 741 9999/ Gm 836 
3962 1.30 A 4 IS daily. Fa 3 
weeks only. Davtd Wood's 

THE OLD MAN 

OP I PCHHAIBAIr 

A Musical Play fa children. 
From iik book by HRH The 
Prince af Wales. Dec 22 3 23 at 
1.30 A G JO. Dec 24 M 1.50 
only Dec 26 at 1.30 & 4.16 


ALBERT 836 3878 cc 379 6366/ 
379 6433/ 741 9999 Group 
Sates 836 3962 Eves 8pm 
LIMITED LONDON SEASON 

DAVE ALLEN UVE 

-DEVASTATMCLV FUNNY” 
LBC. Dec 26 A 27 al 89 m. No 
Pelfs Dec 22. 23. 24. 2S 
ALDWYCH 01 836 6404/0641 cc 
Ol 379 6233. Ol 741 9999 
DOROTHY TUT* 

SUSAN EXCEL 
HARRY TOMB 
STEVEN MACKINTOSH 


BRIGHTON BEACH 
MEMOIRS 

Directed by MICHAEL RUBMAN 
A Nabofud Theatre Production , 
"Humour a! Its best, a rich and 
krvlna production- Daily Man "A 
beautifully shaped family 
cotnnly- Times - II wifi run la a 
long time" Time Oul 
Eves Men ■ Frl 7.30 Mate Weds 
3.0 Sate 5.00 & 8 JO First Call 24 
hr 7 day cc 01 240 7200 uio bfeg 
fee] TVketmaster Ol 379 6433 (no 
Hg real Grp Sates 01 930 6123. 


APOLLO THEATRE 437 2663 

434 3S98 First Con 01-240 7200 
Tteketraaster cc 379 6433 
Mon-Fri B. Sal 4.30 & 8.16 
Thura Mats 3 Dec 24 mat only. 
No perl Dec 25. Dec 26 Spin perf 

only 

PAUL SConELD 
NondoatHf C e— d y Pnfoiwf 
af tin Tow - La— net OSvter 
A wards 198S 
HOWARD ROLLINS 
-MAOUncavT" D Man 

TO NOT RAPPAFORT 

"Woodeffuny tunny" D.Exp 
TONY AWARD BEST PLAY 
NOW BOOKING 1907 


CRTTDQOH S 930 3216 CC 379 
6865. 379 6433/741 9999. Gn» 
836 3960. EV9S 8.00 Thu mat 
2.30 Sal 530 A 8.30. Dec 24 at 
8pm- D ec 26 at 230 & 8pm 
“BRITISH FARCE AT ITS BEST" 
D Mail 

The Theatre ol Comedy Company 


SAM COX 

RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

Written and dtrecled by 
RAY COONEY 

Over 1.600 .li l i .p ITtea peris 
“SHOULD BUN MM LIFE" S Ex 
Good mu avail Thun mate. 

POtmaOH THEATRE S8Q 8846/ 
9562. ALL Ml CC b*0S FIRST 
CALL 24hT 7 day on 856 2429 NO 
BOOKMHB FIX Grp Sates 930 
6123 

DAVE CLASH'S 

TIME 

THE ULTIMATE EWEKNCE 

CLIFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAR' 

THE PORTRAYAL OF 'AKASH' 
BY 



BARBICAN 01 628 8798/638 
8891 ce (MoivSun lOanFSmni 

ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 


AMBASSADORS (11-836 6111 cc 
836 1171. Mr* Call <24 hn/T 
day’, 1 240 7200 (bKq feel Etes 
7.30. Wed mat 3. Sal 4 4 8 

Hayal ShM u epaara r» »te u *« 

LES LIAISONS 
DANGEREUSES 

HHaaar 4 “ B EST PLAT- memda 
IMaay Dm "BEST 
ACTRESS” fflMa Award* >86 

ncMli avail Dec 23 al 3pm. 
pec 26. 27 at 4pm 


APOLLO VICTORIA 88 828 8666 
CC 630 6262 Party Blcgs BPS 
6188 Fmt Can cc i24ftr> 240 
7200 CC OPEN ALL HOURS 379 
6433 Op Sales 930 6123 Tkts 
from W H Smiut Travel Brancltn 
Evn 7.46 M4U Tue A Sal 30 
«A MUSICAL THAT SURPASSES 
ANYTMHG AROUND M EVERY 
DflWHttON" D Exp 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Muse by 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
Lyrics by RICHARD STJLGOE 

Directed by TKEVOH NUNN 
UlttY DAILY TO BOX OfflCE 
FOR RETURNS Special ranees 
stems at ES on Turn mats tor 
OAPY 

g p« ri « l mat 26th Dec 3wn 
Ha par* 24th Dec 
NOW BMMUNC TO SOW lM7 


BARBICAN THEATRE Low 

Prire pert* Today 2 00 A 7.30 
A PENNY FOR ASOH6 by John 
Whltlnq HBSAUJAHCE Mr 
Shaw Tomor 7.30. Sal 2J» A 
7 . 3 a 

THE P IT Today 2.00 A 7.30 
HEHESKS by Deborah Levy. 
PCBKCHHA SCRIPT ORIAE by 

Richard Ncfcxxrfnaa 7.30. Sal 
2.00 6 7 30 

BLOOMSBURY. Gordon SL WC1 
387 9629 CC 380 1463. Until 
Jan 10 . Eves 7pm. Mate SaL 
Mon. Tun £ Wed 2am. THE 

ADVENTURES OF MR TOAD. 

Blk T*** 

CHUBCH m. Brom ley 460 6677 
DWK WRT T 7flH. T O R Hoy 
HudtL Roger de Courccy A 
Nrtfcle Bear. BID Pertwee, 
jimmy Thompinn. Lyn patd. ■ 

COMEDY THEATRE 930 2S7B 
CC 240 7200/379 6433/741 
9999 Grpa 930 6123 

“A «pm* edh( potpmUp" 

Tiroes 

JOHN ALDERTON 
OWEN SUSAN 

TAYLOR PCKHALMON 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

A Comedy oy Richard Hants 
"A MARITAL MASTERFtECC 
-WOHOERFUILY FUNNY" 

N of lhe W 

"The applause of rapturous 
ncopiiHaT D Man 
■■Very funny Indeed- s.Exp 
. Mon-Thu B FT1/B41 530 A 8J0 


COTTESLOE *S* 928 2232 CC 
I National Theatre's sman abdf 
Hrmmi Ton'L Ttnrar 7.30. Sat 
£.30 & 7,30 last peris THE 
MOTHER Bv Brrrhl Men. Tue 
7 30 THE BAY AT NKC and 
WRECKED EGGS The Building 
will be dosed Dec 24 tk 26) 


DOHMAR WAREHOUSE 240 

8230 OC 379 656G/6435 Til lO 
Jaa Even Sum. Sat mate Bpm 

PORT PREVDI 

DRURY LAME THEATRE ROYAL 

Box OfUce4.CC d -836 8106. Ol- 
040 9066/7. First Call 24hr 7 day 
cc bka on Ol 240 7200 (no bteg 
feel. IKfcetmaater Ol 379 6433 

wmo nninuri 

42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL THE FAMR.Y 
Wlmw e «i afl tfca tad 
Maateal A warda ft ItM 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

STAMNUID DRAMA AWARDS 

voted 

. .. . BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE OLIVER AWARD 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

__ PLA TS A PLAYERS 
LONDON THEATRE CRITICS 
AWARD 

Evgs 8.0 Mate Wed 3.0, $<d S O A 
8.30 Reduced price mat Weds 
Students and OAF, standby. 
Group Sates 930 6123 
BOOK MOW FDR XMAS 
Special matinee Dec 26 3pm 

DUCHESS S 836 8243 CC 240 
9648 CC 379 6433 A CC 24 
hr/7 day 240 7200 Ew 8 Wed 
mat 3 Sat S tk 8 
N O SEX , PLEASE 
WCTtt BRITISH 

DUKE OF TURKS 836 6122 CC 
836 9837/741 9999/379 6433 
24br 240 7300. Eves 8. Thu X 
Sat S& 8.30 

COMEDY OF'THE YEAR 

auadtd Draw Ap a rt ISM 

STEPPING OUT 

HH Comedy by mount Hams 
Dtrecled by Julia MCKenae 

"TMUMPH ON TAP* 5U 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 

Extra ton mat Dec 23 3-fl Opt 


FORTUNE BO/CC 836 2238/9 
A w F.CALL 7 day Mhr 240 
7200 IMP feel Grm 900 6123. 

DOHT MSS 
Pint UK Mace wri te 
JJRJL ToEuen'a 
THE HOBBIT 

-Snectaeiilar scenes raid uke- 
a Me heroes... impisIthpMe 

mafne" Tutted 

Today al 10.30am A 730am 
Mop-Fri al 2pm A 7 30MH 
Sai 2pm. 6am Mr Sam. 


OARfUCHSDl 3796107. 1M can 
24/hr T day 240 7200 Grp Sates 
9306123 TKketmastec 379 6433 
Eves 7 30. Sari .5 & B Mai Turn , 
3pm 

JUDI MICHAEL 
DENCH WILLIAMS , 

-Oat or BMtr own" SM 

MR and MRS NOBODY i 

by KetUi Waterhouse 
Directed by Ned Sherrln 


teOROtnr» D.Mau 
No perf CnrtMittas Eve 

GLOBE 437 1B92CCOPEN ALL 
HOURS 379 6433 1st Cal 24 hr 
240 7200 Uio Meg feel 741 9999 
(no bfcy tee) Grp Sales 930 6123. 
Tku from w H Srahh Travel 
Branches Eves 8 Mat Wed 3 Sat 4 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 
Latann Olihr Awards 1SGB 

LEND ME A TENOR 

**tr IT's laughter you're after... 
then the fun come, nowhere 
thicker and faster" SM 
A Comedy by Ken Ludwig 
Directed by David dunore 
Na pari X mas E ve 
LAST 4 WEEKS 

GLOBE 01-437 3667 cc 741 9999 
1 « Can 240 7200 24 nr 7 day Ibhg 
fee) Grp Sales 930 61Z3 

Fret 14 Jmm 
OUTSTAMMNC AOHEV P UT 
AWARD - (Miter A»ri> ’•6 


ta Urea's “thrUllng" Obs 

THE HOUSE OF 
BERNARSA ALBA 
wHh PATRICIA HAYES 
tents Eepart - BaM Dtesctm 

Standard Drama Awards 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373, NET 
741 9999 (no bhg fee). First Cafl 405 
24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200. (NO 379 
BMG FEE] Grp Sates 930 6123. Trat 
Tkhetnuslri 379 6433 
OVER 250 PERFB sf THE 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 
& DENES QUILLEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

“_A PALLADIUM ROAR OF 
APPROVAL" G.TH 

Mon-Fri 7-30. Mate Wed 2.00 

Sal 230 A 8.00 OLD VI 

SbhU tent waw B avail. ■ door r-y,, 7, 
Mon-Fri & Sat mate 
SEATS AVAILABLF FROM £2 JO 
K— Esa 7-30. Na mat 
New l ee fclai ta Apt* 23, 1M7 



PRMCE EDWARD Box Office 
73e 8951 First Call 24 Hr 7 Days 
cc BooUng 836 3464 Crp Sates 
930 6123. Mon-Sal 7.30 Mate 
Thun A sat 2-30 

CHESS 

-A GRAND MASTER OF A 
SHOW" Newsweek 

New beekloE (a March 2S, 1957 
MAT SEATS SOMETIMES 
AVAILABLE ON DAY 

Sana aaate avaB 24 Deo 7J30 A 


STRAND B36 2660 CC 836 I WHITEHALL eft TriMpr Sq Ol 1 PARKIN GALLERY. 1 1 Molrcmb 


41 43/51 9a 741 9999. Flmt Cafl 930 7765/ 839 4455 OC Ol 579 
24 Hr 7 Day cc 240 7200 (na bkg 6565/379 6033.741 9999 Grp 
fee) Grp Sales 930 6123 uries 930 61 23/836 3962 

CABARET SIS™ 



LYRIC THEATRE ShafMstMnr 
A vo WI 01-437 3680/7 01-434 
1550. 01-434 1060. 01-734 

6166/7 

COLBt BLAKELY 
-A tamtam A Joyously 
comic perfonsianee- F. Times 



A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

-Heart!) reaJdnpiy funny- Odn 
"HUarloua — , S. Tima* 

-A rare evening of 
comic exhnaratton- Tima 
Evps 7 JO. Mats Wed and Sat 30. 
Group SUM 01-930 6123. 

Reduced price mats Student & 
OAP Stand-by 

Fleet CaB 24hr 7 day cc tedtep 
on 01 240 7200 (mi beefcte c tee) 
m Into leetar 41 JJ* 8433 (w 
ha aMn y tea) ■ 

WINNER OF AIL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL *87 




THE WOMEN 

by Clare Boothe Luce 
“An f ee— I. ritzy — te a— — p pe" 
i ft. •vtuaousLY F O wnr- 
Times. -Witty, wicked women’s 

STUDDEIl PROOUCTfnr* D 

Minor 

LAST 4 WEEKS - MUST END 
IAN LO 

OLD .VIC 928 7616 CC 261 1821 
rreriewi tram 14 lee. Opens 20 
Jan at 7pm 



MA TJREEN UTOAN i* 
WONDERFUL TOWN! 

-It ripples with exotemenr- 
S. Times “Just wonderful '• D-Exp 
M on-Sid 8 Mato Wed 2-30 Sal 8 


ROYAL COURT S CC 730 1745/ 
1857 cc 24hr 7 day 240 7200 
0*8 feel (MB Sari Eves 8pm. 
Sal Mai 4pm jaM Stock 
presents A MOUTHFUL OF 
MUDS by Cseyl OmrchU A D»- 
VM Lan. 

ROYAL COURT UPSTAIRS 7*0 
2SS4 IMA Sat Eves 7M Sot 
Matt 330 BYWTWUTE by Sa- 


Starring 

WAYNE SLEEP 

Directed A Choreographed by 

GBR— Lyaa a 

Mon-Fri 7.46. Mai Wed 300 
Bat 430 Jk 8.16 

OAP REDUCED PRICES BUYS. 
BOOKRK HOW IIP TO APRIL *B7 

Spec pat New Year's EVr 7pm 

THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

The way best of Britain's 
comer talenf" Daily Man . 
Se e separate entries under: 

CRfTERKM THEATRE 


OF COMEDY 


HOLIDAY 

a comedy by PHb Bevy 
Dir by LMDSAY ANDERSON 


mmmm 







Twice dally s a 230 Mr 730 
6 weeks only. Dec 24 11 am 6 
2.30pm. No perf Dec 28 (Dec 19 ; 
7pml 


CC 379 0219. 836 0479. First CaB 
24 hr 7 day too take fee) 2407200. 
Keith Orowse 741 9999 urn trim 
fee) Grp Sales 930 6123- Eves 
Mon-Fri 8pm. Sat 6 A 630. Wed 
Mats 3pm No pertt Dee 24 A 20. 
Extra Mat Turn 23 Dec 3pm 


HER HAJESTYS Haymaricet 839 
2244 CC OPEN ALL HOURS 
379 6131 First Call CC 240 
7200 

ANDREW LLOYD W EB BER’S 
NEW MUSICAL 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

Starring 

■atawn cRAwrcHp 

. SARAH STEVE 

BRKJHTMAN BARTON 

Ctaire Moore pUvs C hrtsane 
af certain performances 
Directed hy HAROLD PRINCE 
Eves 7.45 Mata Wed Mi Sal 3 
Postal bkes only fa Apr to Od 


MAYFAIR Ol 6B9 3087 
UntB Jan 3 
Twice daily 2.0 & d.o 
weds Mi Sate 103 a 2.0 & 4.0 

SOOTY’S XMAS SHOW 


aHERHUUD THEATRE Ol 236 

8868 1st Can 240 7200 379 6433 
741 9999 Grp Sates 930 6123 
Kenneth OrahartM'i wonderful 

THE WIND IN THE 
WILLOWS 

Twice daily 2 A 6. 

Dee 24 Ham A Sam, 


MAYFAIR S CC 629 3036. Mon- 
Thu B Fri/SU 630 A 8.10 

RICHARD TODD m 

"The Bast TkrBhr tar ysanTSM 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

“An u n a b ashed winner" S Epp 
"S anaaouT Tbnes 

ATM TIBULLUS YEAR 
Cast HMUtte this weak 
He IPS— Men 22 Dee 



A Mystery Thriller tar 
an the Fandly 

KILLING JES SICA 

Directed by BRYAN PUKREB 
TTiidilan <A * 5l sMth* tar no- 
priee thj- 1 4 ty " D-MaB - “In the 

Azata Ct ir te Be ItafBer- Std. 
"TWS SHOW IS A SUHMS 
W nUtE H " 1 Listener 


mmt 


CHARLIE GIRL 
ONLY 4 WEEKS LEFT TO 
SEE THIS FABULOUS 
CAST. LAST PERF JAN 10 

PAUL WROUS 
CYD CMARtSaC 




Abo been. TKKMmaaier 379 6«33 
a any W H Gmtlh Travel Branch 1 


VtCTOMA PMJtCE Ol 240 7200 
booking now 24 hr 7 day 


HCCMNLLY 457 4606 CC 379 
6665/ 379 6453/ 240 7200. 

Graw Sales 930 41 23/ 836 3962. 

I Eves Bpm. Wed mate 3. Sate 4.30 
& 8.15 

FRANKS HOWCTP 

“A Master CMwn" Times 
PATRICK CHtOU 


DCJOtK HOYLE tn 
The FmiM Mnstcel 

“Broad fares wittB Stephen 
Sopdnetart somfl" DJttaH 

A FUNNY THING 


ON THE WAV TO THE FORMA 

34 Dec 3pm only. 26 Dec 8pm. Ne 
perf 25 Dec. 

LAST 2 WE13U- EMM 27 DEC 



mm 


MOON iTel. box office tar perf 
iimci). 

mjDPO Cm 8pm THE BUCR6 


NATtOHAL THEATRE SOI Bank 
The htiDdtan w« he riee.d 

NATION^ THEATRE 

COMP ANY 'ATirt’ATT/V 

See SEPARATE ENTRIES under A L L U AL L U 
OUV ICT / LYTT'.VvSri / with me TV SMOWCrAM 

CO T TES LOC. ExeeUant date “PP4 aB same at the uU ef 
scots days o f pgrte all thaonres 1 6 ia* »**P Ecp Dy a» B. j ftf ASat 
rrora 10 am. RESTADRAMT (928 5.30 & 8 40 EXTRA POTTS 30 6 
2053). EASY GAR PARK, Info __ JJIDec al 330 ____ 
633 0880. ADt CONS NOW BOOMMC TO SO MAY 


COMEDY Ol 379 53990C01 379 
6433/ 741 9999w FtrS Ga8 24Br 
240 7200 (Meg tec). On Sates 930 
6123 

Mon-Fri B. Wed 3. Sat 5.16* 8 JO 

PREVEW TOWGMT - OPENS 
TOPA OR AT EDO 

THE THEATRE OF COMEDY 
CO* 

tavteh new ornductloo 
TOH COMTI In 

AN ITALIAN STRAW HAT 

by Eugene LaUche 
with C LIVE DUNN 
and STRATPC**) 30HNS 
Xmas perfb Doc 23 M 3X10 A 8J» 
No perf* Dec 24 & 26. Dec 26 at 
a.oa Dec 27 at s.i& & sjo 


ST HURTRFS 01436 1443. Spe- 
cial OC No. 379 6433. Ev*s &0 
Tuts £46. SM * Dec 26 816 0 
and SjO AGATHA UBUIITl 

THE MOUSETRAP 


HIGH SOCIETY 

Dtrected by mcftardEyrc - 
Prevs Feb 13 1st Ntahl Feb 26 
MenFri 7^8 Wed mm 3 SM 4,46 
. A 8. IS. Op SOet 930 6123 





VANESSA REDGRAVE 

TOM WILKINSON W 

The Tam* We p tadap B ea af 

GHOSTS 

By Henrik Item 

^uMTmwnHA 
DON'T MSS” City UMtt 


930 77*5/ 839 4455 OC Ol 379 6L SW1. 01235 8144. LOIRS 
6565/579 6433. 741 9999 Gtp WAM. 18601939 
j|n 1-e. 930 6123/8* 39^ ROYAL ACADEMY. 

WALTERS TA W ET ™ 9032 Open <UUy 10-6 Inc. 

Trim ft joint iB m riWf Sun< ‘'educed rale Sun tinUI 

nnn StStCUUR 1. 461 N EW ARCMfTECTURE: 

“ONE OF THE FUNNIEST STIRURG,^ 

PLAYS OF RECENT YEARS" _£? SO £17° Coric. ra!^ 

— , . P* . _ „ TAT E GAL LERY. MUIbanh SW1. 

1 SEPVSSZ*** pabotng m Scotland: me 

. mfirS UBSS Golden Ape 1707.1043. UntU 4 

1 J®"- Adm - sa.so. the 

hvSharmanNtacdonMd LIPCWTZ GIFT. unUI lO May. 

m rprivd _hv S Pnon Stgjys Adm (fee. WMh lO - 5.60 

Sura 2 ■ 5.50 CMUd 24. 26. 26 
TO * H S U LJf OWT ^ Dee. and 1 Jan. Recorded Info. 

lpnnmiiTTi conrc oi-oat 712 a. 

HRHINL** Times VKTBRIAA ALBERT MUSEUM - 

Eves Mon-Fri a Gad 530 6 8J» The National Museum of Art A 

Wed main 3. Dec 26 al &30 6 Design. S. Kensington. WW 

B51 No peris Dec 24 M, 35 TOSHIBA GALLERY OF JAPA-. 

WAN ART. fW FOR IMDU- 

^ RuYBl DMgnera fa 

r S5S? l££i« 2 «S 65 *£.2X2 «tw«»*ry 1936-1986 Recorded 

** fATTERSOK 19 Atanurt.', 
Mfliunta Eves epen. a.. Unufoo W1X 3HA. 01-629 

4119. CMBtSTMAS EXHS1- 

I TKHL Pamtmga by HART ’ 
AwnWND and Masters of the 
19th Cenlury lcah December •' 
ta 23rt December. Dally team - » 

to 6pm. Sat-lOam to ipm. 

ANTHONY ■r’wr AY 9 A 93 74W1 eat i nw , Crnn-^; J 


t WRITING" Times 

Eves Mon-Fri & Sat BJO 6 8J» 
Wed mate 3. Dec 26 al 6-30 & 
BJO. No peris Dec 24 6 25 

YOUNG VK 928 6363 CC 379 
6433. CMOS SAT - JULIUS 
CAESAR Eves 7 30. 

Y OUHG V IC STO OfO 938 6363 
KKH CIRCLE TH CO In 
WedefctntTB maaterptece Sprtag 
A mten tea Eves Bum. 


ART G ALLERIES 


Dome t 

wum 


--ft- yi-— *-99 4100. CtofUens. SW7. S®a 6612. 

5 PC KOOMWIG. tSTANBUL - A PholagrapMc M 

IK ART GALLERY. Bar Journey through Turkish At- — 
Centro, Cc? 01-638 chllecture Until 18 Jan. Tun- 
taU4JtetaD^uib£ Sal fO-S 30. Sun 125.30 

79®^B64h Pttntlngs of I"' "" A -- 

A.^1SSn5a r ES 1 cinemas | 

«nen. Tues - Sat io- Wmmmiiinml 

^ CAWEN PLAZA opp Camdro - 

MsrBrsara - 
1Z1- 

y ! » ■■» Itetaa ■ unit ««LSEA CIHEMA kJno» Road ” 

: ipbone fa dettals of BW3 351 3742 rbEM i i8i. Film 
wo ttwnl al a BS 4.30 6. dO B.nf. 

L_g mw muse um of 5to5 mayfam curzon st ' 

>°apimT > aw d rammr h 22ttS 3 TnS aui * e Ls “'* ma ™' !s *" 
■■ IRWI OF CHRIST- SHQAR (PG) Part i Tues 6 

'toys 10-6. Suns 2.30- Thurs 546 Sals ll.jo.un A 1 
? *™a«. 24 - 26 Dec. 546 Part a Mon. wed A Frl 
“* I nr 5.45 Sundays Part I at 

FNJE ART, 30 Una 1 1 JOam Pari 2 at 5 46 Total- — 
». Jaraeato 8W1. BEN ta atearhtno. jiee the fum” Sid- 
M - Steantaetan Spa* Closed Dec 24, 25. 26. Ends 
T O/EACTlS^Stota Van 8 ^ 

l OMZOH WEST END Shaftesbury 

■ . Maggie 

Sminj. Denholm Elliott. JudJ •- 
geod, ta A ROOM WITH A - 
•*W IfGL Film at 1.30 (NOT -i 
StaJjA Dec 26). 346. 6.10 Mr . 

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#■ 



THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


» A peace 
without 
mercy 

In 1986, the lotematnmel 
Year of Peace, $1,000 billion 
was spent on arms and there 
were 15 wars. It was a peace 
which passed the understand- 
ing of most of us. In a report 
made through the eyes of four 
characters, Global Report — 
People for Peace (BBC2) was 
more successful at showing a 
world picture than Thames 1 
recent celebration of uni. 

♦ CEF; It also revealed tele- 
vision’s superiority as a 
medium for conveying the 
many textures of this world. 

Ainsitteily, the programme 
got off to a slow, cumbersome 
start with Alfred Molina’s 
Pitmanesque voiceover and the 
usual eye-drooping footage of 
United Nations troops at work 
in the Lebanon. But, as one 
persevered, this production by 
Peter Firstbrook and Clara 
Paterson took flight. Few 
punches were polled in meting 
out blame. Indeed, a knobbly 
linger was pointed at most of 
the developed countries in the 
UN, unruffled combinations of 
peace- keepers and arms sup- 
pliers. 


TELEVISION 


Two of those selected for 
their story were represen- 
tatives of the “strong army 
means lasting peace” camp, 
and as a result fairly institu- 
tionalized in their responses. 
Haas Vamnaele, a Nato pilot 
in the Belgian Air Force, was 
more or less saying Cheese to 
the idea of peace. His dog- 
fight training in an F-16, 
which rose like an evfl moor- 
hen above the tarmac, was a 
game to laugh at over a beer. 
Infinitely more rewarding was 
to see die Labrador Indiana 
whose peace was violated by 
such low-flying afrcaft “They 
treat ns like the enemy”, 
4 lamented the timid Sylvester 
Andrew, a hunter whose tra- 
ditional way of life is bring 
steam-rollered by the Nato 
airbase. 

Of all those who appeared, 
however, from the President of 
Costa Rfca to Desmond Tutu, 
it was the Kamp u chean grand- 
mother Cheing Yan who left 
the most impact. When her 
son-in-law appeared back at 
the Thai refugee camp, with- 
out legs, she wept from depths 
of both relief and grief. To- 
gether as a family a g ai n , they 
remained a family without a 
future. What a world, one 
thought, watching her daugh- 
ter’s face and the man's empty 
legs. What a horrible, horrible 

woricL Nicholas 
Shakespeare 


The anti-American 
* rock group New 
Model Army have at 
long last broken into 
the United States: 
David Sinclair meets 
them in New York 

Puritan 

problem 

Jason Harris (left), Slade 
the Leveller, Robb Heaton 


Michael 

A 

A group sadly lacking 
the necessary “dis- 
tinguished merit 
and ability” was the 
decision of the Uni- 
ted States immig ration auth- 
orities in turning down New 
Model Army’s petition for an 
HI visa, tne document re- 
quired by alien entertainers 


THE ARTS 




Excellence regarded with mistrust 


“It is time”, said Sir Georg Solti, in 
one of those phrases only he can 
invent, “to grasp the hot iron,” The 
burning object in question is the 
threat to opera standards in 
London. 

Solti had just returned from 
Paris, where a senior French 
government official had been prais- 
ing Covent Garden to him and 
expressing envy at “one of the few 
stable operatic institutions in the 
world”. But what did Solti find 
back in London but newspaper and 
television talk of cut-backs, pos- 
sible dtae-downs and demands for 
greater dependence on private 
funding. Solti, with virtually a 
decade as Music Director ax 
Covent Garden behind him and 
Frankfurt before that, was ve- 
hement, the eyes bunting even 
more brightly than usual: 

“For the first time m xny career I 


The Arts Council is expected to announce the new grants for Covent 
Garden and ENO this weekend. Sir Georg Solti (left), former Music 
Director of the Royal Opera House, speaks out for the first time to 
John Higgins about current public underfunding of opera in Britain 


want to speak out about the need 
for public funding of the arts in 
Britain. We are in danger of 
throwing away everything that has 
been built up over the pest forty 
years. In 1946 there was no opera 
here. Before the war Covent 
Garden seasons were short: you 
could probably hear more opera in 
Catania than in London. But last 
year over a million people heard 
opera in London and other cities in 
Britain. So much for charges of 
elitism! 

“Building up is a slow process; 
puffing down can be achieved all 


too quickly. It is time for us to 
speak up for something that should 

be a source of national pride — and 
I am referring to Covent Garden 
because it is the house in which I 
worked and will continue to work. 
Covent Garden has made boo- 
boos: wc all make boo-boos from 
time to time — Solti matte r boo- 
boos. But it is essential that Britain 
has an international opera house 
and not a half-international house. 
And it should be properly funded. 

“Priestley said that in his report, 
but it was not property acted on. 
Indeed, I felt the anti-opera tide 


growing stronger after that report. 
Things have been going wrong over 
the past three years or so. Greater 
dependence on private funding is 
not the answer. I don’t know an 
opera house in Europe which is 
other than reliant on support from 
local or national goverment Every 
theatre has fixed costs, mostly 
labour, which cannot be altered. It 
is argued that artists’ fees are too 
high, but the money paid to the 
Domingos, Karajans and Soltis is 
but a small fraction of the overall 
budget Qpera is expensive — it 
always has been expensive — and if 


we want it then it must be paid for. 

“Once Britain used to be accused 
ofbeing a nation of Philistines. It is 
not true, although there are cer- 
tainly some phihstines among the 
civil servants. On the contrary, 1 
know no capital in the world with a 
musical audience more appre- 
ciative than the one in I/mdon. But 
what I do note here is a tendency to 
see excellence, and especially pro- 
fessional excellence, as something 
rather suspicious. It is a malaise, it 
is growing and it must be arrested. 

“In Paris Mitterand gives the 
order for the Musfie d’ursay and 
the city has a wonderful new 
building. The Orchestra de Paris, 
now that it has a permanent borne 
in the Salle Pleyel under Bar- 
enboim, is a totally reformed and 
powerful force. In London we must 
not let things slide. It is time to 
speak for a return to excellence.” 


Playing as if they adore it 


directing with an exaggerated 
bow-stroke here, a ddtraising 
of the eyebrows there. More- 


There was nothing out of the f " " — ■■ 

ordinary about this conceit. I fDNT’FRT 
Nothing, that is, except the 1 wlNLClvI 
performers, the Academy of St 

Manm-in-the-Ftelds, whose ASMF /BtOWH 
cornerstone the eariy 18th- / 

century repertoire is. They Festival Hall 

may have disdained the 

authentic cudgels of the pe- directing with an exagg 
nod-style propa g a n dists, but bow-stroke here, a deft: 
tn some respects tire y have of the eyebrows there, 
moved with the times. over, her style of solo j 

Their rhythms are beauti- has none or the disadva 
folly pointed and they always of that of many a 
make the textures clear, even aulhenticist colleague 
if by modem (or rather, Vivaldi's Four Season 
ancient) standards the group is projected an unaim 
largish. And one is more likely forthright tone, swellin 
to encounter patches of stylish tremendously forceful 
ornamentation than used to ness, for example, L 
be the case. But, most im- second movemeni 
portant, they play the music as “Spring”, while, althooj 
though they adore it, and in hardly made the work 
consequence it lives. easy, her technique was i 

For that, much of the credit reliable, 
belongs to the Academy's The light and shade* , 
director and leader, Iona reading was matched i 
Brown, who here showed that choices of tempo, save tl 
she knows just how much— or the hunting finale of 
how little — to dominate, turns”, where Harnonc 


recording, fast, furious and 
paniostneken, just like a real 
chase, has become my per- 
sonal bench-mark. But Brown 
certainly gave its rhythms an 
aggressive accentuation, neg- 
ating brusquely the defiaousTy 
somnolent effect of John 
Constable's harpsichord deco- 
rations in the previous move- 
ment Constable, incidentally, 


over, her style of solo playing provided some improvised 
has none or the disadvantages twiddles that verged deligbt- 
of that of many of her fnlly upon the camp through 
aulhenticist colleagues. In out the work. 
yivddi-. Four Season she Eariier, in Bach's B minor 
pTOKxted an unabashedly orchestra) Suite, the flautist 

sured that he kept the prom- 
ness, for example, in the inence of his role to a level 
second movement of 

^rmE^wha^^Mghshe SSSPfifiSFSJfc 

easy, her technique was utterly mas i cex ^iStely. Butheisan 

tL. is-w* a ^A Academy regular, and so we 

IJe light and shade of her should hkirityemect anything 
reading was matched by apt J J 6 

choices of tempo, save that for 

Stephen Pettitt 



reading was matched by apt 
choices of tempo, save that for 
the hunting finale of “Au- 
tumn”, where Harnoncourt’s 





** ^ ir‘ 


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A group of irresistible talent 


There are debuts and dfibuts; 
London recently had one of 
each. fijpt, the good news. 
The Novsak Trio are already 
well established on the Conti- 
nent.— their leader, Primoz 
Novsak, is Yugoslav, but the 
other two come from Switzer- 
land where the ensemble is 


LONDON 

DEBUTS 


iouu hikic uib aucuiuK is -i ... — ■ . _« „ 

based - and play as though ^ them: their classical rep- 
was represented by 


They showed themselves as romantic Piano Trio by Jo- 
a trio only in two British seph. Haselbacb put the 
premieres of works dedicated Novsak on their mettle, 
to them: their classical rep- The B rahms (G minor. Op 


Kngly intense and intensely 
economic piece, breathing the 
air of Shostakovich’s chamber 
music, but with a spirit and 
voice very much its own. This 
and a more heavily post- 
romantic Piano Trio by Jo- 
seph. Haselbacb put the 


Not the most pig-hke male I 
chauvinist, seeking to poke I TT TF7 
fim at feminist theatre, could p _ ——i 

improve on the opening of 
Deborah Levy’s play, which HereSICS 
shows a dignified lady com- __ _. 
poser striking a few faltering The Fit 

octaves on her upstage grand, 

dosety followed by a cleaner . . 

singing “And the women of 


i? — Susan Tracy with Roger ABam (photograph by Donald Cooper) 

I director’s relationship to the reunions which would do 
material”. She might as well credit to a Drury Lane melo- 


grape-treading 


S?^mbemefrm£rasshe ettaor (as pfeyed to Sisan 
scrubs the stage, while in the £*ES“t 


background a third figure is 
rhythmically tramping grapes 
in a foot-bath. 


they bear a strong resemblance 
to Hinge and Bracket). There 
is Edward “the lonely busi- 
nessman” whose “courtesan” 


they have teen togetberfor Mozart and Brahms Piano 
years. Novsak hi msdf - l eads- Quartets m which they were 


25) and particularly the Mo- 
ozart and Brahms Piano zart (E flat, K493) Quartets 
Liartets m winch they were revealed the fusion of serious- 
ined By Gunter Ludwig, a ness and imaginative stimulus 
anist every bit their equal in which makes the playing of 
usicgl energy. the trio so irresistible. The 

Uros Krek’s 1977 String judgement of tempi and their 
io of three continuous interrelationships was particu- 
ovements — a strongly lariy exciting: they must re- 
ulpted fugue, an interlude turn to London soon, 
id a caprice — was a compel- The 26-year-old Greek gui- 

tarist Dionysius Derm will 

have to wait a little longer. His 
programme of Bach, Villa- 
Lobos and Frank Martin dan- 
onstrated playing which 
would be idiosyncratic (eccen- 
tric even) if the technique 
were at all sound. As it is 
Dervis, whose articulation is 
nimble enough, badly needs 
direction in almost every 
other aspect of his playing. 
Why, for instance, choose the 
violin rather than the lute 
version of the Third Bach 
Partita? Why work laboriously 
through five Villa-Lobos Pre- 
ludes when they are made to 
sound all the same? And why 
end with the composer’s rag- 
ing of Chores when their 
ponderous jollity can only be 
pulled off with the sort offelan 
for which this debutante is 
<mly beginning to seek? 


aii i*> ■ — — ncssuiiui wuuac ujuucmui 

. wife is pursuing an affair with 
piece have names. But they “ 


with purpose and spirit; Mi- joilM!d ^ Gtoter Ludwig, a 
cheJ RoutUy’s viola is on- pianist every bit their equal in 


usually big-voiced; Susanne musical energy. 
Basleris cello of distinctive Uros Krek’s 
character and imaginative Trio of three 
breadth. Together they make movements - 


strongly 


music as if they are absolutely sculpted fugue, an interlude 


thrilled to be doing so. 



and a caprice — was a compel- 




are also Identified as “the 
codrtesan” “the educator", 


an overbearing architect. 
Then there is a submissive 


Wsk tousckeqKr and to 

deKriXTiUM«ttonto RepnMiran aster, pl us, the 

chorus of a hairdresser, a body 
^ conditioner and an African 
fortune-teller who team up 


jnove, is a contradiction in From , note ^ 

tenns ' tiie director, Susan Todd, it 

It consists of several little emerges that Heresies has 
character groups, who seem to been through the workshop 


have been brought quite fortu- treatment whose point “is not 
itously together on the same only to produce a play at the 
acting area. There is Leah, the end but to dynamically alter 
composer, and her companion the actors', writer’s and 


The Kosh’s new programme j _ A x ___ 

comprises two works with I DANCE 

somewhat discrepant fair- » 

poses and methods. I wish that 

some of the directness and The Kosh 

warmth of Sian Williams’s 

long opening solo could have 1 Be rmCC 

got itself into the meandering, 

episodic and contrived main 

piece, and that the solo could ^ kss strenuously pursued 
have received an injection of ^ the skflfoJ fells casually 
more rigorous clarity in ^trodneed in different ways 
rctUjjL for each performer being more 


have put up a placard saying 
“spectators keep out”. Apart 
from the nervous obsession 
with “creativity”, the material 
appears mainly to refer to the 
question of belief Most of the 
characters are looking for a 
belief or losing one. Down- 
stage, evidently to rub this in, 
is an aquarium full of dead 
fish. 

About halfway through the 
evening Miss Levy embarks 
on a plot which involves her 
in trying to pull together a 
group of characters who have 
nothing to do with each other. 
The architect Pimm (Roger 
Aflam) turns out to have been 
Leah's pupil and has a go at a 
Chopin prelude while she 
lectures him on selling out 
The jealous courtesan. May- 
onnaise (sic), egged on fry the 
witches, sets about kidnapping 
Pimm’s daughter with the 
object of shipping the child 
and its cleaner mother back to 
the Danube. The stage be- 
comes engulfed in coin- 
cidences and unlooked-for 


and singing by the performers. 

The sequences showing 
various aspects of sorrow are 


drama. And the evening winds 
up with an attractive in- 
strumental piece by Bona 
Sekacz for which Leah takes 
the credit, standing to one side 
seraphically illuminated. 

The piece is written in 
elevated platitudes, and char- 
acters strike attitudes and 
deliver editorializing rhetoric 
as if it were dialogue. Some 
good performers are involved 
in this sorry mess; and, in the 
case of Miriam Kaiiin as a 
raddled old showbiz mother 
and Ann Mitchell as the 
quietly dignified housekeeper, 
they momentarily bring the 
stage to life. Susan Tracy, 
turning double somersaults in 
increasingly dazzling jump- 
suits, is as eye-catching as a 
golden lizard; though, as my 
woman neighbour remarked, 
“That blonde's sending some- 
thing up - but what?”. If the 
group could not have seen that 
there was no play here: surely 
the RSC management might 
have pointed this out to them. 

Irving Wardle 


transforms the dancer from 
modern casual clothes to a 
quaint, pseudo-flamenco 


carefully worked out for con- dress. Thenceforth it is con- 
trast and effect. But they leave trusts all the way: prayer 
the spectator too conscious of followed by provocative 
the range of study from which flaunting , eni gmatical ly in- 


avowed anti-American gov- 'everybody has to be allowed 
eminent stance ruffled the to do their own trip, man'.” 


Hilary Finch 


Telling Tales is an explora- 
tion of grief and mourning by 
a daughter, a son and his 
girlfriend. The acrobatics 
which were prominent in ear- 
lier productions by this group 


introduced in different ways 
for each performer being more 
effective than the artfully 
insinuated somersaults and 
balances. They are supple- 
mented with simple dance and 
stylized gesture, also a lot of 
deliberately repetitive talking 
(live and recorded), chanting 


they have been developed. 
The outcome of Michael 
Merwitzer’s conscientious di- 
rection is that they seem 
illustrations of textbook situa- 
tions, not a really theatrical 
transformation of the mat- 
erial 

The solo Peasant on the 
Run, on the other band, seems 
all theatrical effect An open- 
ing change of costume (on 
stage but extremely discreet) 


tense gestures set against light 
folksy steps. Probably it 
means more to the performer 
than to her audience. 

Both works are clobbered by 
boring, trite sound scores by 
Howard J. Davidson, but re- 
deemed by the performers: 
Sian Williams in both pieces, 
with Fiona Creese and Rich- 
ard Attlee in Telling Tales. 

John Percival 


authorities' feathers. Slade of- Although 


booking 


fers no explanation of his own, agent reports steady business 
but states that the current visit throughout the tour, at the 


has done nothing to alter his Lone Star NMA played to a 
views on America. “America depressing^ low turn-out, 
is both a young nation, des- with a spirit that must have 
perale to develop a national been hard to summon in the 
identity, and also the most circumstances. Robb Heaton, 


kvJMfU il’^a mm 


ica. Given that the tno 
formed in Bradford in 1982 
had already secured a major 
recording contract with EMI/ 
Capitol, released two albums 
and even appeared on Top of 
the Pops, this seemed a harsh 

inrlnamMl anwnglltf U/bpn 


recent applications by such 
groups as GBH, the Poison 
Girts and Easterhouse have 
been approved without com- 
ment. 

New Model Army’s case has 
become the most notorious of 
its kind. They were turned 
down three times, and re- 
leased a third album before 
the authorities had a change of 
heart enabling the group to 
undertake an 11 -date tour 
which b egan in Boston on 
December 4. , 

When they arrived in New 
York this week the streets 
were teeming with Christmas 
shoppers. As Frank Sinatra 
prepared to open the refur- 
bished Carnegie Hail, an ex- 
hausted, wretched-looking 
Slade the Leveller sat in the 
drab dressing-room of the 
400-ca parity Lone Star Club 
in Greenwich Village. 

Theories as to the reason for 
New Model Army's previous 
inadmissable status r anged 
from the view of the current 
immigration attorney, Rich- 
ard Fraade, that the docu- 
mentation accompanying the 
unsuccessful petitions was in- 
adequate, to the more ro- 
mantic notion that the group s 


no need to grow up." 


thunderous 


He is a strange creature, this imaginative tom-tom patterns 
30 -year-old Slade the Leveller, on “Lovesongs" and “The 
or Justin Sullivan as he was Lights Go Out” while Jason 
christened by his Quaker par- Harris, who at 18 w» too 
ents. By scraping his hair back young to buy a dnnk in the bar 

his hush cheekbones and (the age-hmit m America is 


strong features are renaexcu 

unnecessarily severe and, de- that balanced rhythm and 
snite a friendly disposition, melody wfo particular guile 
prolonged neglect of his skin is “You Are Not Our Heros . 
and teeth has made him look a Slade sang with hoarse pas- 
startlingly unpreposessing sion, occasionally raising ms 
character. The band was re- piercing brown eyes upwards 
a u.vt~., xJjwiat mhpiv 9 oiflnt facsimile of 9 


centlv renamed “New Model to where a giant fecsimile of a 
Uelies” by one music paper, fly with cowboy boots on its 
“We're not very glamorous legs hovered above the stage, a 
people: Tm naturally a rather somewhat incongruous tea- 
scruffy person", he says with a tore of the mock-Texan ter 
SoiSess smile. “I know that dficor. One could not hdp 
Capitol would have loved for wondering if this was quite the 
me 10 put in a false tooth for right setting. 

uiy w ■ j Me,-, Ctata** a vunnmniic 


this tour. They even said so. . *5 1st Slate”, a venomous j 
Americans are obsessed with indictment of the American 
onnd teeth ” presence in Britain, drew a 

good teeth. rousing cheer from a bundle of 

he people by the stage. But, given 

their feelings and the prob- 
lems they have had getting 
reflect^? " here, why are NMA so keen to 
die streak of puritim- ^ America anyway? 

“Tve seen very few American 


A the streak of puritan- 
ism that pervades the per- 


ism umi “rve seen very tew Amencan 

sonahty and music of tne that can offer what we can 

singer. He is a rigonwisiy _ t j ie Americans need ns” is 
honest and open person and is Qnc explanations, 

well known for ms tougn then there’s the matter 
practical opposition to tne ^ aTn y t i on 0 f course. We’d 

abuse of drugs. fie t0 sell millions of 

not to do things ah the time, JXC0Y ^ S> >* * return match is 
and that really shocks people, planned for March. 


and that really shocks people, already planned for March. 

SfffllwSteriSmOTe in • New ModdAnny appear at 
wheifwe’re touring, where the Town and Count* Oub 

conventional wisdom is on Tuesday. 


CHRISTi 


Bizet's 

CARMEN 

Sat & Tue 7.00 then 

Dec 29 Jan 3, 6 and continuing 

"stunning 1950's West Side 
Sfopy-style production" D. Mail 

"vividly sung and acted 
Carmen (Sally Burgess)" 

D. Telegraph 


Strauss's 

DIE 


Janacek double-bill 

OSUD/ The Diary 


FLEDERMAUS (new production) " 

Tonight at 7.30 then Dec 27 , 31 Opens Tomorrow at 7.30 then 

Jan 9, 1 5 and continuing Dec 22, 30 Jan 2, 7, 1 0 only 


Tonight at 7.30 then Dec 27, 31 
Jan 9, 1 5 and continuing 

"visually handsome ... 
stylish and entertaining" 

D. Telegraph 


Osud "an unforgettable 
evening of musk theatre" 

Financial Times 





exist Inc Sally Burgess, John Treleaven/ 
John Horns, Rosamund Ming, David Arnold 
Conductors Mark Elder/Pau! Daniel 
Producer David Pounfney 
Designer Maria Bjdmson 


: ".K' 

- 4 ^V(;u\r N '. 


COSt inc: Valerie Masferson/ Catherine Wilson, 
Abn Opie, Lillian Watson, 

Stuart Kale, Christopher Booth-Jones, 

Rona Kimm, Eric Shilling, Simon Masterton-Smith 
Conductor Herbert Prikopa 
Producer Tom Hawkes 
Designer Tim Gooddiild 


CCUlS inc: Diary Arthur Davies, 

Jean Rigby, Paul Crossley (solo piano) 
Osud Philip Langridge, Eilene Hannon, 
Emile Belcourt, Ludmilla Andrew 
Conductor Mark Elder 
Producer David Pounfney 
Designer Stefa nos Lazoridis 


Sunday December 21 at 7*30 — Royal Gala Tribute Stars of opera, theatre and dance 
honour Lord Goodman Tickets £4.00 - £1 8,50. Some Gala seats at £50.00 & £75.00 ^ 


English National Opera, London Coliseum, St Martin's Lane, London WC2 §Sb| 

Box Office: 01-8363161 Credit Cards 01-240 5258 Seats £4 -£18.50 






u 


THT? tta/tpc TWTTRSnAV DEfEMBER 18 1986 


SPECTRUM 



The phantom of the actor 


GnlaraWbod 


THE TIMES 


V.1 




«i^ 'V 




PROFILE 


MICHAEL CRAWFORD 


T here is a certain kind of 
feme which seems to be 
built on anonymity. Vir- 
tuoso stars of musicals, 
in particular, seem to be 
so aggressively there when on 
stage that they almost vanish 
when off it Nobody, for example, 
ever seems to do a very good job of 
saying precisely what Michael 
Crawford is like. 

On the one hand, of course, he is 
Frank Spencer of Some Mothers 
do 'ave 'em, ' writhing and 
apologising for yet another appall- 
ing domestic blunder. Or he is 
Phineas T. Baroum, or Billy, or 
the Phantom of the Opera. On die 
other band he is a somewhat odd, 
isolated individual, exercising on 
bis rowing machine in his house 
by the river at Wapping and 
commuting daily to Her Majesty’s 
Theatre. 

Even his name has changed, as 
if in response to the uncertainty of 
bis identity. Born Michael 
Dumbell Smith, he became Mi- 
chael Ingram via his step-father 
and finally he legally adopted his 
tfiag jp name of Ciawford — chosen 
from a passing biscuit lorry - in 
1965. 

He was bom m Salisbury m 
1941 His father, a pilot, had been 
lolled in action before his birth 
and he spent his first three years in 
an army camp being brought up by 
his mother. After the war, he 
moved with his mother to Sheer- 
ness in Kent, the home of his 
maternal grandmother who was to 
become the central figure in his 
family life. His mother then 
remarried and they moved to 
Bexleyheath. 

It was a happy childhood which 
only ran into problems at school. 
He went first to a choir school in 
Bexley. His mother had no theatri- 
cal ambitions for him but liked 
hearing him sing. They sub- 
sequently moved to Heme Hill 
and he went to school in Dulwich 
— not to rAe school in Dulwich but 
to one next door called Oakfield. It 
was nevertheless private and a 
considerable burden for his hard- 
up family. . , , 

Academically he survived ade- 
quately in class but proved in- 
capable of passing exams. Escape, 
however, was at hand. Their next 
door neighbour in Heme Hill 
spotted an advertisement, placed 
by the English Opera Company, in 
the Daily Telegraph. They wanted 
boy sopranos for the juvenile leads 
in Benjamin Britten's opera The 


Six months later, he was called 
back. Now they were looking for 
somebody to sing The Little 
Sweep in Britten's Lets Make an 
Opera and the final audition was 
in Britten’s bouse in Regent's 
park. He made it and opened in 


the show at the Royal Court, 
sharing the part with H emmings. 
Soon afterwards, a schoolmaster 
at Oakfield wrote a play for 
schools radio. Crawford sang a 
song, was taken on by an agent 
and, by the time he was 15, he had 
made around 500 radiobroa dc ast s 


as well as being in Britten’s next 
opera, Noyds Fludde. 

He was an energetic, extrovert 
teenager. He was captain and 
goalkeeper of the school football 
team, but he was sent off every 
week for dissent. He embarked on 
imm ense cycle rides — to South- 
end or Brighton m back in a day— 
and later, aged about 19, he 
became an early Mod. 

He left Oakfield at 15 and went 
into rep at Coventry far a year, 
working with Richard Briers, Alan 
Howard and Frank Finlay. 
Returning to London, he kept up 
the radio work and supplemented 
his income by working as a waiter 
in Lyons’ Comer House. 


Turn of the Screw. He went along, 
recited a poem and sang Early One 


Morning. He made it to the last 
five boys out of 800. But at the 
final audition at the Criterion 
Theatre be went to pieces and 
another boy — one David 
Hemmings - got the part. 


H is athletic efficiency 
was such that he 
looked after a whole 
floor, a task that nor- 
mally took four wait- 
ers. He was writing dozens of 
letters to producers. Yet. much as 
he enjoyed show business, he 
nursed an ambition to earn some 
q ualifi cations and become a test 
pilot, a job for which be was 
convinced he was perfectly suited. 

But he was spotted at Lyons by a 
TV producer who gave him a part 
in Emergency Ward 10 consisting 
of one line delivered from a body 
encased from head to foot in 
bandages. He forgot the line — a 
disastrous state of affairs for a five 
show — and had to raise the bed 
sheet to peer downwards at a 
prompt card with the unforget- 
table “Have you seen this. 
Nurse?" written upon it He never 
went back on that medical soap. 

The Sixties embraced Crawford 
as it did many others. A small part 
in a Steve McQueen film — The 
War Laver — led to a big part in 
the 18-month London run of Neil 
Simon's Come Blow Your Horn. It 
was a part that lifted Crawford to a 
higher show business rank and 
identified him as a comic actor. 
But the Zeitgeist really took bold 
with his part in the Richard Lester 
film The Knack and the role of die 
gormless, motorcycling Byron in 
Ned Shenin's Not So Much a 
Programme. More a Way of Life 
In 1965 he married Gabrielle 
Lends, an actress. Soon afterwards 




BIOGRAPHY! 




As seen, frequently, in public life: Frank SpeiK*r (Mt) ^ toved- 
behind to go on stage as BiHy, Baraum and The Phantom 


1942: Bom 


19, Salisbury. 


Dulwich- 

1957: Went into repertory. 

1964: Fikn The Knack. 

1965: Stage appearance in 
Travelling Light and film of A 
Funny Thing Happened on 
the Way to the Forum. 
Mamed Gabrielle Lewis, 
actress. 


1968: Hello, Dotty. 

1970: Hello and Goodbye. 


Stage version of No Sex 
Please, We re British. 

Some Mothers Do ave ’em. 
Musical Bitty. 

Divorce finalised, 
play. Same Time Next Year. 
ITV comedy series Chalk and 
Cheese. 

Flowers for Algernon. 
Bamum five-year run starts. 
Phantom of the Opera. Wins 
second Laurence Olivier 
award for the outstanding 
performance in a musical. 


detected the laughter might be 
about to become a little uneasy. 
He even turned down a $3 million 
offer to take Spencer to America 
“People said 1 was mad. that I 
wouldn't have to worry for the rest 
of my life. But what life? I 
wouldn't have one; after five years 
of that I would never do anything 
else again." 


As seen, occasionally, in real fife: is Michael Crawford more, or less, than the sum of his parts? 


Emma was boro and in 1967 the 
Crawfords went to New Yoik for 
his Broadway run in Peter 
Shaffer’s Block Comedy. Gene 
Kelly spotted him, cast him for the 
third lead in Hello, Dolly and 
suddenl y the Crawfords were fry- 
ing in Be) Air next door to Elvis 
Presley, who put his house on the 
market after a week — possibly, 
muses Crawford, because he re- 
hearsed his songs for the film 
standing on the back garden wafl. 
But those six months cured him of 
any hankering after Hollywood. 

“It wasn't a lifestyle that I could 
be happy with. It wasn’t reaL It 
was like living on Astroturf — you 
try to kid yourself it needs 
watering." 


For Crawford, as for many 
others, the seventies came like a 
long hangover- He walked into 
two disasters: he lost £250,000 in 
an in-judged property investment 
and then his marriage collapsed. 
“I still have a great affection for 
Gabrielle — we get on very welL 
But we married very young and 
grew apart. I don’t suppose it was 
too easy for her to cope with what 
I was doing — work is a big part of 
your life.” 

The break-up began while 
Crawford was making the first 
series of Some Mothers do 'ave'em 
and the divorce was completed 
during the two-year run of the 


Drury La 
nt left hh 


divorce settlement left him more 


or less broke and he found he had 
to start again. He bought a cottage 
in Bedfordshire — the success of 
the TV series meant that in 
London he could cot walk down 
the street without being accosted. 

The 13 episodes of Some Moth- 
ers of 1973 had turned Frank 
Spencer into a figure of popular 
legend as well as one of the easiest 
targets for every impressionist in 
the business. He performed his 
own stunts and established him- 
self as one of the mosi athletic 
stars around. He made seven more 
in the late seventies but refused to 
continue, realising the danger of 
falling off the tightrope between 
being funny and being pitiable. 

By the 20th episode. Crawford 


I n any case, it was still the 
theatre that moved him 
mosL When remembering 
telev isi on or film he is 
pensive, when remembering 
stage shows he leaps to his feet and 
starts rerunning the performance. 
This happens most enthusias- 
tically when he recalls Flowers for 
Algernon. He played a mentally 
retarded man who struck up a 
relationship with a moose — 
among other things this involved 
an elaborate musical number with 
a mouse he had trained himself. 

“Every night this mouse was 
just brilliant, he brought the house 
down. I got the best reviews of my 
life — I know it was die best thing 
I've ever done but the show dosed 
after six weeks. I think the ending 
was just loo sad. People stayed in 
their seats crying. And three weeks 
after the show closed that mouse 
just died . . 

Next came Bamum, a show 
which took Crawford's acrobatic 
abilities to the Emit and accounted 
for five years of his fife — but for 
one year off And it was when the 
dosure of Bamum was announced 
that he was contacted by Andrew 
Lloyd Webber and asked to play 
the Phantom. 


The role is that of die romantic 
lead — gone are the comedy and 
die acrobatics. The effects are, of 
course, expensive and intriguing 
bm the show as a whole is virtually 
unimaginable without Crawford. 
He brings to what would otherwise 
be a rather messy piece of hokum 
that curious intensity, a total 
involvement which critics have 
noticed in everything he does. 


Bryan Appleyard 


0 Tones Newspapers Uri 1988 

Phantom of the Opera is playing 
at Her Majesty's Theatre. . ■ 

A television film o/Bamum will be 
shown on BBC1 on Boxing Dav 
(5.40pm) 


I n Britain's biggest cul- 
tural growth area — muse- 
ums and galleries — the 
need for modern marketing 
techniques was recognised 
long before yesterday's 
announcement of £250,000 of 
Government money to 
encourage market research 
and advanced publicity 
methods. 

Museums and ga ller ie s , 
faced by the realities of a 3 
per cent grant increase this 
year alongside costs rising by 
about 6 per cent, are already 
setting up a series of massive 
marketing and merchandis- 
ing machines to ping the gap. 

NeO Cossobs, for example, 
new directin' of the Science 
Museum, put publicly funded 
museums in turmoil by in- 
trodaring admission charges 
and appointing a marketing 
at the National 
Maritime in 1963. 

He is in the final stages of 
bead-hunting a £30,u00-a- 
year marketing specialist fur 
the Science Museum. “We 
reckon that the institution 
needs that weight of manage- 
ment ability. The object is to 
doable oar gen erated income 
of £1 million over the next 18 
months to two years." 


Hardsell 
in the 

gallery 


month closure by Donald 
Davis of Next 


The idea of putting 
art on the market 
was not, it seems, 
bom yesterday 


Sir Roy Strong of the 
.V & A announced admission 
charges last year as part of a 
marketing strategy of which a 
more important element 
would be V& A Enterprises— 
“we wiD be the Lama Ashley 
of the 1996s," he said. 

V & A Enterprises, set np 
with bank loans and mosey 
from a bequest, has a 
commercial director, Mi- 
chelle Stewart, {nought from 
Debenhams. Her fast task is 
to get the shop working 
properly: it is to be completely 
redesigned during a five- 


Meantime, there are nego- 
tiations with manufacturers 
to torn the V & A’s endless 
stock of design material Into 
products, and to get the 
products retailed country- 
wide. V & A Enterprises is 
expected to stand or fall on its 
own marketing skills. A turn- 
over of 28004)00 expected in 
1987/88 and no profits until 
toe following year. Eventually 
there will be shops in depart- 
ment stores and in about 10 
tourist centres around the 
country. 

The Natural History Mu- 
seum hired Terry Scown- 
Geary from British Telecom 
as their corporate marketing 
consultant in ApriL ' 


Whispering through the ground barrier 


Will the new breed 
of super-quiet 
passenger jets draw 
the teeth of 


... 

^ ; ..o* < « 


immin ent anti- 
noise legislation? 



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Contrary to popular thought infirmity is not an inevitable result of ok! age. 

Indeed, mofical research b today coming to terms with mere and more 
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We've eray hope that one day soon 
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L ast week he launched 
the Passport, an 
information card preu 
to visitors in which advertis- 
ing space is sokL He hopes it 
will make op to £704)90 
towards the museum's pro- 
jected 87/88 shortfall of £13 
mfltioo. “My dream is to 
extend the Passport to in- 
dude mus eums around the 
world: Russia, Moscow, 
France, Australia, America." 

Sue Runyard, who has 
worked fin- both toe V ft A 
and the NHM, is setting np 
the Museum Development 
Unit in partnership with 
Hilary Blame of toe Charities 
Advisory Trust “We wffl be 
ofieriug an initial consultancy 
chat free to any publicly 
funded museum", said 
Runyard, “and we hope that 
fat wffl form the basis hr 
further action by them rather 
than needing further lengthy 
consultancy." 

Caroline Homby-Teck’s 
Museums and Galleries of 
Great Britain has a mail 
order brochure this Chrst- 
mas with a print rua of 504)00 
— selling diaries, scarves, 
jewellery, pri n ts and soon for 
98 museums. This year John 
Beale, creator of the Early 
Teaming Centres, has also 
gone into the field with Past 
Times, a catalogue which 
offers almost anything from a 
paperback Book of Kells to a 
tapestry kit based on a Brit- 
ish Library hanging. 


J^miron- Her Mdesl; 


Simon Tait 


Her rfqfBty&Ken ElUabetti The Queen Mother Registered Charity rta 277468 


Dennis O’Dell, vice-president 
of Pacific Southwest Airline, 
has hardly stopped smiling 
since February 14, 1985. Even 
now the smile turns into a 
huge grin when he remembers 
the telephone call he received 
that day at his office in San 
Diego, California. The caller 
told him fast the British 
Aerospace 146 jet his airline 
had just bought had landed at 
John Wayne, Orange County 
— America’s most noise-con- 
srious airport — at a decibel 
level so low it had fulfilled the 
most stringent noise reduction 
regulations yet devised. 

“We were as surprised as 
anyone”, he said. "But _ we 
proved conclusively that it is 
possible to have jets operating 
into built-up areas. That test 
New the protesters right out of 
the water. The environmental 
groups want to put incredible 
restrictions on aircraft move- 
ments, but when the vast 
majority of people who want 
good air services find they are 
being affected, they will pro- 
test in their turn." 

His view is shared by Brit- 
ish airlines contemplating 
Government action within the 
next few weeks to tighten 
controls on aircraft noise. 
Michael Spicer, the Aviation 
Minister, who will be largely 
responsible for making the 
changes, has already bowed to 
what he sees as vital political 
interests. To avoid aircraft 
from Gatwick flying over 
Gravetye Manor, a 16th cen- 
tury house that is now one of 
the most exclusive hotels in 
West Sussex, Spicer ordered 
all pilots to delay their turn on 
to a southerly heading. 

Die move delighted the 
hotel owner, Peter Herbert; 
but it infuriated residents of 


different proposaL Some pro- 
pose that all airlines be 
banned from buying existing 
“noisy” jets from 1990 and be 
banned from using them after 
1995. Others want to delay a 
total ban until 2012 because of 
the massive costs involved. 

There is now so much 
confusion that the Inter- 
national Civil Aviation 
Organization — the body 
responsible for laying down 
international standards — has 
decided to postpone afl further 
consideration of the noise 
control measures until 1988. 


Not hearing is bettering: the British Aerospace 146 auiraer 


East Grinstead who had to 
suffer the noise instead. 
Through their MP, Tim Ren- 
ton, they bombarded Spicer’s 
department with complaints. 
Now he has promised to force 
the jets into an even tighter 
flight path designed to miss 
both groups of noise pro- 
testers, a promise airlines say 
is nonsense because such pre- 


“We have become very scep- 
tical about the so-called quiet 
aircraft. They are not quiet at 
afl. We know when we are 
disturbed by noise — es- 
pecially at night — and we 
want a total ban on night- 
flying, regardless of the type of 
aircraft used.” 

But the British airlines say 
that if they are to invest huge 
sums of money in new equip- 
ment they must be able to use 
it more effectively — and that 
means extending the boors of 
night-flying. They believe that 
the new aircraft will not 
disturb sleep and want a 
chance to prove it. 

Most people who live near 
airports are vehemently op- 
posed to this suggestion, 
Matthewson says. “It would 
be sick logic to use the 
improvement that has taken 


‘We are very 
sceptical 
about the 
quiet aircraft' 


rise track-keeping is impos- 
sible with existing technology. 

Ironically, the demands for 
greaier control of aircraft 
noise have reached a cre- 
scendo of their own just as 
airlines are embarking on 
massive investment in new 
aircraft which are quieter than 
those now in service. 

But their efforts have had 
little effect on the views of the 
protesters in Britain. Recently 
Neil Matthewson, chairman 
of the Gatwick Area 
Conservation Campaign, said: 


At the beginning of last 
year, however, the authorities 
at John Wayne installed nine 
noise monitoring units and 
displayed them publicly so 
that locals could see what 
noise the aircraft made. Then 
the authorities ruled that no 
aircraft which registered more 
than 86dB could use the 
landing strip without penalty 
or control. They hoped that 
this would “trap” all the 
commercial jets yet allow the 
light aircraft and business jets 
to continue operating. 


It did not work that way, for 
when Dennis O’Dell’s new 
BAe 146 flew in it was well 
below the 86dB limi t. To have 
lowered the cut-off point still 
further would have meant that 
the dozens of private aircraft 
would also have been caught 
So they had no option but to 
allow the 146 to fly in. 

Now it dominates the in- » 
ternal air routes and rival A ‘ 
airlines — such as Air Cal, 
which is based at John Wayne 
— have also bought the 146. 
PSA and Air Cal’s operations 
with the BAe 146 have proved 
so successful that last week US 
Air bought PSA and American 
Airlines took over Air CaL 
promising to keep their opera- 
tions intact 


Michael Spicer has seen for 
himself the benefits of the new 
quiet aircraft. The question 
now is whether he can find a 
way to pacify the protesters by 
appearing to get tough on 
noise and at the same time 
avoid crippling the airlines.' ^ 


Harvey Elliott 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 135 


1 Bewail (6) 

4 Haircutterlfi) 

9 Amusement park (7) 
19 Stimulating effects 
(5) 

11 Volcanic magma (4) 

12 Banner (7) 

14 Raroft^htfll) 

18 Fleet commander (7) 

19 Oxen frame (4) 

22 Shockingly vivid (5) 

24 Spectral (7j 

25 Maiden (6) 

26 Enthusiastic (3.3) 


the number of night flights. If 
life has become slightly better 
that is not a reason for the 
Government to make it 


worse. 

Every country, and often 
every airport within a country, 
has different ways of measur- 
ing and controlling aircraft 
noise. And every international 
forum considering the prob- 
lem has so far come up with a- 


DOWN 

1 Polish (4) 

2 Divine nourishment 
(5) 

3 Fine gypsum (9) 

5 Northern diver (3) 

6 Rod-shaped bacteria 11 Track circuit f 3 ) 

(7J 13 Lazaretto (5.4) 

7 Holiday town (6) . IS Du)] (7) ’ 

8 Island group (ID 16 Beer (3) 




Harold Fielding, the 
impressario responsible for Bar- 
nunt, says that Crawford is the 
roost dedicated performer be ha^: 
ever come acros. He points our’ 
that Crawford {flayed the part of 
Baroum for four years — nobody 
else has lasted more than one year. 
But be also notes a certain shyness 
in the man: “He is not easy to gel 
to know. But, once you do, he 
tends to become a friend for fife 
Even though Bamum has been 
closed for some time the cast still 
get together for reunions — and 
that is thanks to MichaeL” 

.All this is more than mere 
professionalism, it seems to spring 
from an almost naive determ- 
ination to win praise, to be utterly 
and completely engrossed in what- 
ever he is doing. Repeatedly his 
conversation returns to the need 
for people to be encouraged, to be 
led on. He speaks with almost 
childlike pleading and his dressing , 
room at Her Majesty’s is filled <- 
with toy clowns and trinkets in the 
manner of a nursery. 

He treats this room as his home. 
Each night the make-up artist 
spends two and a half hours with 
him, leaving him as The Phantom 
at about six. From then he sucks 
Com plan through a straw — the 
make-up precludes eating — and, 
as the show begins, he sits silently 
on the coffee table waiting for his 
cue. Before he goes on be crosses 
himself 

He laughs nervously as I leave. 
There are still a couple of hours to 
go before he starts being turned 
into the Phantom and looking at 
him it is difficult to imagine who 
he will be for that brief intervaL 


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SOLUTION TO NO 1 134 


17 Narrative song (6) 

20 Sailing vessel IS) 

21 Membranous sac (4) 
P Female deer f 3) 



ACROSS: 1 Duck hawk SSnot Qcu ntM , 

12 Robin 13 Order IS Ustei U Aisha » Upset 
21 Thirsty 23 Rill MRdaSr 0te8ds 18 Ovary 20 Obese 
DOWN: I Duster 2 Coolahah 3 w r „, A 
6 POse 7 Trader 8 Wantonly 0 11 

roar 17 Slayer 19 Peel 22 Ice UDbralten 14 Dialysis 15 Up-. 


tell rT-irr,- ’ r . , ' - 

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to Bill*. 5 




THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


BOOKS 



,4 si Jlftl 


. ‘SllOlKi* 
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*JSS*M 

.:. " ,r:c *t3ap 
• ■'•-jiiL* 



A Niagara of history 
who made it art 

Peter Ackroyd reviews a new edition of the 
last historian who is still read for pleasure 


THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND FROM THE 
ACCESSION OF JAMES U 


i»)nv \*i i V.TiTnJKVj 


Introduction by Peter Rowland 

The Folio Press, £90 








v* v e had thought, Macaulay 
;■ 1—1 wrote, “that the book 

- I I would have a permanent 

-A- place in our literature.” 
-. And so it has proved, even on the 

- most literal test; this History has 
.'never been out of print Bat his 

ambition is not one that most 
•contemporary historians would 
share — few of them seem to know 
1 - enough about “literature” to want 

- to attach themselves to it; but even 
. the more enlightened would prefer 
-to claim some connection with 
1. “knowledge” instead As for the 

idea of “duty” or of “mission”, two 
words which Peter Rowland uses in 
..his excellent introduction to this 
•- new edition, they would be laughed 
right out of court Perhaps that is 
~ why modern history is now gener- 
/ ally read only by other histor ians. 

Macaulay’s audience was rather 
'larger, and when he finished the 

• first two volumes of his work in 
'1848, the street outside his 

• publisher's office was jammed with 
the carriages of booksellers waiting 

• to purchase them. One codfeznpo- 
■ raiy critic said that he and Dickens 




were the two most popular authors 
of the age, and, just to prove that 
literature can also pay, he has been 
described as “the first literary 
millionaire”. That success is die 
more remarkable when you consid- 
er that of all generations, the mid- 
Victorian is the one which could 
most justifiably have dispensed 
with any national past Theirs was 
so prosperous and mighty a civili- 
zation that they could have treated 
the Elizabethans or the Stuarts with 
the same irony drat led Charles 
Dickens to label one of the false 
books in his library The Wisdom of 
Our Ancestors (among the subtitles 
of this compendious volume were 
“Ignorance” and “Superstition”). 
But even if they did not choose to 
applaud their ancestors, they 
wished to understand them, no 
doubt on the unstated prinripje 
that a nation without an historical 
sense is a nation without identity. 
So in our own time historical 
research has become sperigiirM 
only at a great cost: most school- 
children seem to think that any- 
thing before Harold Wilson is lost 




h ft 




ft db 






in the mis ts of time. 

Of course it might be said that 
Macaulay is great precisely because 
be lived before the age of 
“professional” historical research, 
that be was untouched by various 
statistical, textual, or demographic 
enquiries. But this is to the 
point. He knew quite enough about 
statistics in what was, in any ra s^ . a 
great age of Commissions 
Reports — after all, he helped to 
draft legal and educational legisla- 
tion for India. 


B ut he understood that his- 
tory required another kind 
of understanding, 
could be written success- 
fully only on quite different princi- 
ples. He realized that facts alone do 
not persuade, and that evidence by 
itself cann ot enlighten; only good 
prose can achieve both those ends. 
He was not providing some chime- 
ra of “objectivity” or “scientific 
explanation”; be set himself the 
task of interpreting the past in a 
certain definite way, and be did so 
with all the rich and eloquent 


resources of his literary art. 

One of the differences between 
bis age and our own is that tire 
Victorians bad a belief in, and 
appetite for, certain kinds of per- 
manent or inviolable truth. So it is 
that Macaulay constructed a Whig 
interpretation of English history in 
which the steady consolidation of 
parliamentary government is 
seen as a slow progress towards the 
light Bat, more importantly, he 
suggested an organic view of 
history in which past and present 
were part of a general movement 
forward — a movement towards 
power, stability, social harmony, 

apd national hwievnlmm, in which 

fertile soil grew certain “moral 
virtues” that protected the weak, 
and tempered the aggression of the 
strong. This was his vision, and he 
offered it to his contemporaries in a 
language winch, with its rich 
syntactical insistence and its claus- 
al progress, offered a simulacrum 
of the very order he was in die 
process of celebrating. 

This is not to suggest that 
Macaulay was an incompetent 


amateur when it came to the more 
pedestrian aspects of the 
historian’s work. He studied most 
of the available sources. 

A s Thackeray said of him, 
“He reads twenty books 
to write a sentence; he 
travels a hundred miles to 
make a line of description.” But the 
“facts” and the “evidence” became 
part of a larger pattern, and had no 
real meaning outside it Of course 
this is also true of even the most ap- 
parently dispassionate histories; I 
have never read an historical work 
which did not tell me more about 
the historian than about the period 
he purported to describe. 

But the success of Macaulay’s 
History was not established simply 
upon ns ability to confirm certain 
Victorian habits of thought. For in 
another sense be was a great 
innovator, and this principally in 
the realm of the historical imagina- 
tion. He saw the past; and his greai 
gift was to evoke that past so that 
his. readers could see H too. The 
chapter of this work in which he 


’ describes “The State of England in 
1685” is unrivalled as a snctflimvi 
act of imaginative recreation; it is 
written in the same spirit as, but is 
in some ways superior to, the 
historical fictions of Charles Dick- 
ens or Bulwer Lytton. 

The point is that Macaulay 
belongs -in the same company. His 
concern was to give “to truth those 
attractions which have been 
usurped by fiction” and he was 
delighted when his friends re- 
marked that his History was “as 
entertaining as a novel”. The 
modem professional historian 
might not wish to Haim a similar 
success: but so much the worse for 
him. It is only by reanimating the 
past that it can properly be 
understood; and for that reason, if , 
for no other, historical writing at its 
best is a form of literary enquiry. 
Surely every historian wishes to 
carry conviction? Macaulay under- 
stood that simple point, which is 
why his History has survived where 
a thousand superficially more 
“accurate” works have been 
forgotten. 



Tropical 

Law 

Reports 

Basil Boothroyd 

TALES FROM A 
PALM COURT 
By Ronnie Knox Mawer 

Souvenir Press, £9.95 


-Judges, so far as I know, are 
.'"not on oath. 1 hope neverthe- 

- less that Judge Knox Mawer, 
■’ in these 30 or so startling 
"episodes from his judicial 

■ carets’ in far-flung c ranni es of 
the Commonwealth, is telling 

‘nothing tot the truth. Comic 
” writers, even recounting comi- 
cal facts acceptably credible, 
it . can find extra embellishments 
4 \bard to resist We can accept 
that on the Mjcronesian speck 
. of Vomo Island, the author sat 
in judgment in a case of 

• careless driving by ox cart 
, even that the ox was produced 
. in evidence and made menac- 
ingly for the bench. Credulity 
is stretched when His Honour 

- removes his scarlet robe and 
plays the beast matador fash- 
ion, into baffled retreat 

And will he assure me (on 
his honour), that the lady’s 
suspender toft, worn to ensure 
“ the security of unwrinkJed 

- official black stock in gs , gave 
l - way during prayers at the 

Assize Service in Fahiti, so 
» that his stately exit was made 
..with his g*iyktng s down and 
’visibly trailing the belt ? 

If you say so mTud. Certain- 
!y nflud. 

Even allowing off for posst- 
_ ble extravagances, the basic 

■ material is pretty funny, gain- 
' ing handsomely from the run- 
ning contrast between the 
majesty of the law, and its 
administ ration imposed upon 

■ remote cultures, wnere dissat- 
V isfied plain tiffs have to be held 

comiempt for pelting the 
: bench with mangoes. 

£ Among my favourite 

• charge-sheet items are Pos- 
sessing a Coconut for use as an 

Offensive Weapon, and Itie^J 
- Belly Dancing contrary to the 
. Sabbath Day Ordinance. Joy- 

■ Riding on the Post Office 
T bicycle also comes high, part- 


Bacon cuisine 


Few cookery books are as 
important or as fascinating as 
this. Hilary Spmting’s hus- 
band inherited from a great- 
aunt a tong-forgotten “small 
stout handwritten book**, in- 
scribed “Lady ‘ Elinor 
Fetiplace 1604.” Lady 
Fettiplace, one of bis fore- 
bears, had lived at Appleton 
Manor near Oxford; and this 
was her household manual, 
written out in an italic hand 
and “fine, dear, cranky 
Shakespearian English.” The 


Victoria 

Glendinning 

ELINOR 
FETTTPLACE’S 
RECEIPT BOOK 
Elizabethan Country 
House Cooking 
By Hilary Spurting 
• Viking/Salamander, £12.95 

The book is a co ntri bution 


recipes for “Tobacca Wafer” to f °P* todory. Lady F. was 
and “Serop of Tobaccho” were “ cafled 

given her by Sir Walter Ra- 

■rich hhnseff. * hundred years before the 


leigh himself. g* nnnnrea years oeaere roe 

Mrs Spurting has edited & also a contritration to social 
La fo history; she was in charge of 

"“SSf ft* of large hubi- 

a calendar; manyoCtheaimve ^ de pendama, and col- 

S*** 3 ™. Qf yea^ and fte ^ nedfcfaes, some 

ingredients wed by Lady tffl*,,, still usefaLsacb as toe 
Fettiplace would hare been ^edy for nose-bleeds given 
those seasonably available. her by Shakespeare* son-in- 
Her scholarly and practical ig W . Flea-powder, rat poison, 
skilb combined make the book weedkiller, soap, and teeto- 
mnch more than an antiqnari- paste were all made at home, 
an curiosity. It is a cookery She dearly acted as agony 


those seasonably available. 

Her scholarly and practical 

skilb combined make the book 
twwrh more than an antiquari- 
an curiosity. It is a cookery 
book to use. Elinor 


book to nse. Elinor ««mt as wdfc “For tbe Pmshion 
Fettiplace’s co oki ng was an- of the Harte” she sod the 
pie and sophisticated, nearer patient to bed with a posset of 
to today’s tight French caWne Boykd MarigoUes and sngar. 
♦Han to the floury sauces mid Manuals such as this woe 
stews of “traditional” British recopied, added to and passed 
fare. But she is English in her down from old wile to young 
obvious interest in preserves, wife over generations. There is 
jams, fruit cheeses, and Ins- a residual medieval smnpta- 
cuits. If her te nden cy to fin- in the in^n^iw of 

tout everything with rosewater crushed seed pearls ami gold 
seems oatbmdish, her bread- j^f ha a recipe for Spanish 
and-botter p uddin g s are teas- “mannelade”, “optional 
smringly famffiar. The richest extras** even in 1604. As “die 
of these is “The Lord of fates* wife in the chain” Mrs 
Devonshire his Podding’*, fall Spurting has done a marvel- 
of dates, raisins, and cream, fans job. 


The idea that women are mad 
commends itself to many 
men- Ask any barman. It has a 
very respectable litauiy pedi- 
gree too, stretching from 
Greek tragedy through Shake- 
speare to such modern mas- 
ters as the 1986 Booker Prize 1 
j winner. Sadly Amis's male 
characters have become in- 
| creasingiy prone to the feeble 
They Must Be Mad defence. 

This week two comparative 
newcomers push men’s con- 
cern with women’s insanity 
out into deeper waters. The 
protagonist of Jeremy 
Coopers first novel is a young 
woman fi ghting a losing battle 
with psychosis. After a con- 
ventional middle-class child- 
hood, Ruth Harrison suffers a 
complete mental collapse. 
Some say it’s the price she’s 
paying for being an exception- 
al artist. Her doctors incline 
towards a less romantic expla- 
nation, but agree on little else. 
Conflicting advice on treat- 
ment, coupled with the nature 
of her illness, produce for 
Ruth a decade of dizzying 
swings; between stability and 
confusion, brave resistance 
and blind obedience to inner 
voices, optimism and despair. 

Ruth is a very painful book 
to read, not least for its jarring 
contrasts. Ruth’s perception 
ofharself as a mad person who 
has to spend time with other 
mad pmple sits uneasily 


Is she 
glad, 
bad, or 
mad? 


FICTION 


John Nicholson 

RUTH 

By Jeremy Cooper 

Hutchinson. £9.95 

LOVING ROGER 

By Ian Parks 

Hdnemann. £9.95 

TALES OFRAIN 
AND SUNLIGHT 
ByJos&Sarney 

Rax Colling s, £1195 




M 

crime! 


Marcel Berlins 


DEADLY ODDS 
Edited by Richard 
Peyton 

Souvenir Press. £12.95 


Satisfyingly bulky collection 
of crime and mystery short 
stories about horse-racing. A 
well-balanced mix, American 
and F-ngltgK, including the 
obvious (Dick Francis), tire 
surprising (Kipling), and tbe 
obscure. Peyton has unearthed 
some splendid stories by for- 
gotten scribes, and some un- 
usual ones by eminent crime- 
writers not usually known for 
their devotion to the Turf. 

• Moonspender, by Jonathan 
Gash ( Collna, £8.95). Lovejoy 
in his usual exuberant mixture 
of antique fakery, lechery, and 
murder, with an exquisitely 
fanny appearance on TV 
thrown in. A smashing read, 
with one reservation: as narra- 
tive, dialogue, and bits of 
business get sparkler and 
more confident, plots are be- 
coming unnecessarily tangled 
and obscure. 

• Elegy fora Soprano, by Kay 
Nolle Smith (Severn House, 
£835). Cop’s widow discovers 
teal mother to be superstar 
singer. The diva is poisoned, 
all her dose friends confess, 
and foe daughter inquires into 
both the crane and her new- 
found mama’s past A little 
earnest, but a good solution, 
rooted in long-ago secrets. 

• Red Murder, by Marian 
Babson ( Collins , £835). Deli- 
ciously witty tale of two an- 
cient Hollywood stars coping 
with rediscovery and homicide 
on a trip to London. Tart, 
bitchy and amnehtg through- 
out, with the old stagers 
knocking spots off the young 
pretenders. 

• Saratoga Swimmer, By Ste- 
phen Dobyns (Allison A Bus- 
by. £935). The endearing ex- 
cop Charlie Bradshaw, now 
head of a Saratoga racing 
stable's seemity, reluctantly 
investigates his boss’s swim- 
ming-pool shooting. Exciting, 
well-plotted, and the spot-on 
atmosphere of a small racing 
town, its usually down-at-heel 
characters aid its petty 
corruption. 


Changes sex. Anna Eastwood 
is a 20-year-old typist at TT 
Printers, who lives with her 
parents in Ealing. Though not 

O ATTf TTT T\ a with the Clues, and Who 

hml a proper boyfriend. Her S AlU R DAY ***** ««*** Prentice?, all by 
home- hfe is uneventfid., her U AVi^rU Deanis Wheatley (Webb A 

Bower and Michael Joseph, 


t — ■ _ < r. * ~ 


Murder Off Miami, The 
Malinsay Massacre, Here- 
with tbe Clues, and Who 


aspirations at work confined A -fYw%cf 
to subduing office Romeos — VJ UlUol 

discerning 

Anna is a pushover for « 'oqHai* rap /Yin* 
Roger Craikshank from tbe 1 CcUICI j ovv DUX 
moment he confesses that be rm rian 7 Yoi 
bed on the job application ICVIvW U1 IVoI 
form. Roger is a Cambridge T 11Tlrt • 
man, with interesting amm- LUIlg 111 
tions, and a car. Of course 

there’s a downside. He tries to A apcrDaCK 


to read, not least for its jarring What is impressive is not just 
contrast. Ruth’s perception the conviction with which he 
ofhersetfas a mad person who the world as seen by 

has to spend time with other Ruth, but the fact he makes no 
mad .people sits uneasily JSpt to SnipiSTom 
alongside the cosy tolerance of emotions. It is a remarkably 
her friends. Somehow she controlled noveL 


remains lovable even when 
she has become a menace to 
those she loves. 

It appears that “Ruth” is 


Tim Parks is another author 
with striking powers of imagi- 
nation. His first noveL, 
Tongues erf Flame, which won 


based on events in the both the Betty Trask and 
author’s life. I am not sure Somerset Maugham awards, 
why Mr Cooper (or his pub- was narrated by a I5-year-old 
lishers?) have derided to tell boy. For the narrative voice in 
us this, but it in no way Loving Roger, , Mr Parks 
di min i she s his achievement moves up the age range and 


moment he confesses that be 
lied on the job application 
form. Roger is a Cambridge 
man, with interesting am ra- 
tions, and a car. Of course 
there’s a downside. He tries to 
get Anna to read T.S. Eliot 
and JJC Galbraith when she 
would rather be in bed with 
him. Then there’s his reluc- 
tance to let her stay the night 
(is it really the landlady who’s 
against it?) and his flat refusal 
to come and live with her, 
even though she offers to 
support him while he writes 
his plays. 

Roger is actually a bit of a 
pain. 50 years ago he’d have 
become a Russian Spy. Now 
he just reads The Guardian 
and gives Anna a hard time. 
Until, more or less simulta- 
neously, he goes to America 
on business and she discovers 
she is pregnant Then Anna’s 
world starts to unravel and 
Roger ends up dead on her 
new blue nig. Another very 
accomplished performance. 

Tales of Rain and Sunlight 
is unlikely to win Jos 6 Saraey 
any prizes. Being President of 
Brazil must be some consola- 
tion, though, and I imagine he 
will be well satisfied with the 
contribution that this collec- 
tion of bloodthirsty, primitive 
tales will make towards publi- 
cizing the macho, bandit his- 
tory of his native Maranh&o. 


£9.95 each). Enjoyable 1930s- 
style sofre-yoor-ownHOystery 
kits complete with scene-of- 
orime photos, official files, 
scraps of confessions, doe- 
filled correspondence, and, es- 
sentially, sealed solutions. 
Given the contrived exigencies 
of toe format and the overrid- 
ing objective to provide fun, 
the plots aren't half bad either. 


The power and the glory of the Street of Shame 


Louis Heren 

MARKET FOR 
GLORY 

Fleet Street Ownership 
in the 20th Century 
By Simon Jenkins 
Faber. £9.95 

Mr Jenkins, the former editor 
of the Evening Standard, 
claims that the British nation- 



f ^ . 

terJr ■ . 






ly, perhaps, because on that ^ prcss ^ n0 ordinary mdus- 
occasion Judge Knox Mawer For a start, the grotesquely 

was assisted on tbe bench by a labour costs of Flat 

'talking parrot named Henry street would have ruined oth- 
who — should that be gj. jodnstries, but it has sur- 
which? - added his voice to more 0 r less mtact. 

the procedings throughout The credit is awarded to 

Again, I take the authors pjoprieiors who haw been 
unsworn evidence for that happy, indeed eager, to de- 

five non-peamiary returns 

Radng, footittli, y«htjpg 
hooks selected on page 33. lucy 


Glory-hunters of tbe Inky Trade; Roy Thomson, Nortfadiflej Beaverbrook, Mordoch 
millions of pounds for fame, five of tbe harlot throughout n umb er of titles. Three i 


honour, access to power, _ . 

just bring part of the excite- achieve power, and the news- 
ment of newspaper prodno- pepermen who exerted the 


or the ages”. In fact, thev did not 
te- achieve power, and the news- 


don: hence the title of this 
fascinating book. 

Northchffe hungered for aH 
four; and Baldwin condemned 
Rothennere and Beaverbrook 
for aiming at “power without 
responsibility — the preroga- 


most influence were not pro- 
prietors but editors, such as 
Geoffrey Dawson. 

This has not stopped rich 
men from ottering toe market 
for glory; and huge financial 
losses have not reduced the 


number of titles. Three have 
disappeared since 1960, bat 
have been replaced by three 
new ones. In theory the new 
printing technology- should 
make glory-seeking propri- 
etors as well as printers 
redundant 

As Lord Goodman, former 
chairman of The Observer wd 
of the NPA [Newspaper Pub- 


lishers Association), told the 
1977 Royal Commission with 
bis characteristic irony, “some 
of the greatest moral courage 
displayed by newspapers his 
been a readiness to 
capitulate.” Besides, the new 
proprietors of the Express, 
Mirror and Telegraph are 
finding, as so many had 
before, that running newspa- 
pers can be fascinating. 

It seems that such men win 
long be with us; and Mr 
Jenkins rightly concludes that 
they are preferable to public 
subsidy. The obstacles to jour- 
nalists performing their “con- 
stitutional function” - to 
scrutinize, criticize, embar- 
rass, and, in the final analysis, 
even undermine the powers 
that be — are severe enough 
without the added handicap of 
cash limits and Treasury 
monitoring. 


You’ll get caught up 
in Politics on the way 
totheTheatre. 


You’ll also find dozens of other 
categories in the TLS Listings. Itls a 
new, unique, accurate and up-to-date 
weekly listing of new and forth- 
coming books. 

It is organised by subject and genre, 
ranging from Art through to Zoology, 
and will include over 10,000 new titles 
every year 

For all those interested in books it is 
indispensable. 

The benefits of the TLS - the world's 
leading literaiy journal - are obvious. 
With the introduction of the 
invaluable TLS Listings you need to 
be sure of your weekly copy. 


Subject fa 

Classification ™ 

Author ^ 

me 

Publisher ^ 

Pagination 

Hardcover/ 

Paperback 

price 

ISBN (hc&pbj^ 
Publication Date 


‘Theatre and cinema I 

AHm, Martin Particular Friendship* l 

Faber. Ttpp. 13.95, 0 571 is$J7 X. 1^11,86. ' 

-Berfcofr. Sims K vetch and Acapulco 
Faber. 08pp. £3.WCanS9.45. 0 M M5W 1. 17/11/36 
GaBagher, Tag John Ford: The man and his films j 
•Cabfitmta UP. S72pp.. Oha. S3S. 05X050975. ^ ' 

Hare, Davfd The Bay at Nice and Wrecked Eggs 
94pp. £3.95.17.95. 0571 1-0945. 17/11/86. 

Fw*r, Dank The Singing Detective 
Faber. W £9.95 ’hardcover), £4.95/59.95 tpoperbeck). 
0571 1401 7 (he). 0571 14590 6 Ipbt. 17/11/86. 
Sttppard, Tom, adapted from Arthur Sdrafcxier 
Dalliance and Undiscovered Country 
Faber. I47pp £8.95 (hmlmer). £2.95/55 93 (peperbtKh).t 
•0571 147X1 X ihci. 0 571 |4 7J0 9 f pbl . 17)1 1/86. ( 

’ 


TLS Listings 

Place a firm order with your newsagent now! 













. 16 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Biffen’s 


bloomer? 


Disestablished 


Knight line 


Gossip readies me from West- 
minster that Ernest Saunders, the 
chairman of Guinness popularly 
known as “Deadly Ernest” was 
down for a knighthood in the New 
Year's honours list. Tories are 
now wondering whether, in view 
of the investigation into the 
company's takeover practices, the 
unfortunate Saunders will have 
his name scratched out again. 


BARRY FANTONI 




i?cj © G L 


14 


o \ r. *■ 

« «l t'JK-' — 


mm 


1 hear we're advertising for a 
community disorganizer.' 


Living words 


The doctor-poet Dannie Abse was 
delighted to find that copies of his 
new book, Journals from the Ant 
Heap, a selection of personal 
artides^tppeared to have sold out 
at a big London bookshop — until 
on inquiry an assistant pointed 
him to the Natural History stack 
bulging with his oeuvre. 


Unfuzzed 


A little local difficulty at 
Walthamstow police station, in 
north-east London. Constable 
Sukhvinder Paul Singh Chohan 
has abandoned his police issue 
turban for short back and sides 
and regulation helmet. Far from 
rejoicing, his seniors, I under- 
stand, are none too pleased. A 
Sikh who loses his hair loses face 
(so to speak) within his commu- 
nity, and they fear that Chohan's 
decision - taken, he says, “be- 
cause I want to be part of the 
team” - may affect the Mel’s 
attempts to recruit more Sikhs. 


Big game hunt 


Game show graduates are the 
latest phenomenon in the States. 
In Los Angeles, a three-hour 
course has been set up by former 
game show co-ordinator Mark 
Richard, teaching aspirant game- 
sters the art of passing auditions 
for the big money TV quiz shows 
A mere MS primes students on 
how to exchange banalities with 
their future TV inquisitors. I 
reckon some White House staff 
could take remedial lessons. 


Old script 


Let us hope for actor lan FlintofFs 
sake that life does not imitate art. 
Flintoff, who has been selected by 
Labour to fight Devon port against 
David Own, made his last 
appearance on stage in A Pack of 
Lies. 


Home ground 

Newham North East Labour party 
should watch out. For the next 
election, the Tories have just 
picked Peter Davis, head of home 
affairs at Central Office and the 
brains behind the blitz on “looney 
left” councils. One of Davis’s 
main targets? Newham council, 
where Labour bolds every seat. 


THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


IBA’s advertising conundrum 


A very top tongue slipped in a 
Commons commince-room on 
Tuesday night Turning down a 
request by the select committee on 
procedure for a debate on pro- 
posed procedural rhangps, John 
Biffen, the Leader of the House, 
said there was little point in MPs 
considering radical alterations “in 
the last few months of this 
Pa rliam ent"- Not surprisingly, be 
sut up like a clam when excited 
MPs tried to get him to say more. 


Dublin’s Irish Times — no relation 
— has chosen a new editor. Conor 
Brady, a journalist in his forties, 
succeeds the veteran Douglas 
Gagefay. who moved the paper in 
tune with a changing Ireland, from 
its erstwhile role as a bastion of the 
Anglo-Irish establishment to a 
position now more identified with 
the modem values of the republic. 
In recent years the paper has 
developed a reputation for liberal- 
ism and has confronted several 
infernal scandals connected with 
the security forces. Significantly, 
Brady becomes the first Roman 
Catholic to grace the editor’s 
chair. He is the son of a former 
senior police officer. 


Zero interest 


Wildlife artist David Shepherd 
has devised a novel competition: 
be is inviting people to compere 
for the world record (first ever) for 
doing absolutely nothing. He ben 
lieves that few people can remain 
immobile for more than four or 
five minutes, silting on a stool 
before an audience and panel of 
judges. He has a motive, of course: 
to draw attention to the authori- 
ties all over the world who are 
doing nothing to save the rhino 
and other endangered species. 


Yesterday’s request by the Labour 
MP Frank Reid for an investiga- 
tion into government employ- 
ment advertisements on television 
raises a dilemma that has been 
vexing the Independent Broad- 
casting Authority increasingly 
over recent months. 

When is a political ad- 
vertisment not a political 
advertisment? Why does the IBA 
permit British Nuclear Fuels to 
promote, however indirectly, the 
benefits of nuclear energy while 
prohibiting Greenpeace from 
advertising some of the risks? 
Why — perhaps above all — does 
the IBA accept huge privatization 
campaigns when privatization is a 
contentious political issue? 

Political advertising is prohib- 
ited by Clause 9 of the IBA’s code 
of practice, which at first sight 
seems uncompromisingly dear: 
“No advertisement may be in- 
serted by or on behalf of any body, 
the objects whereof are wholly or 
mainly of a political nature, and 
no advertisement may be directed 
towards any political end, and no 
advertisement may have any rela- 
tion to any industrial dispute. No 
advertisement may show partial- 


Winston Fletcher finds that the decisions 
on what is or is not political are puzzling 


ity as respects matters of political 
or industrial controversy or relat- 
ing to current public policy.) 

In the past the IBA has tended 
to apply Clause 9 rigorously, 
perhaps too rigorously. It ooce 
stopped The Spectator from 
advertising on television on the 
ground that it was a political 
publication. But of laze its inter- 
pretation of Clause 9 seems to 
have softened. And in every case, 
doubtless inadvertently, the inter- 
pretations have favoured tire 
government 

For example, it is hard to think 
of an issue more embroiled in 
political controversy than the 
future of nudear energy. The IBA 
claims that British Nuclear Pud’s 
advertising merely promoted the 
company and invited people to 
visit Sellafield, so was non-politi- 
cal. How then can the authority 
reject a Greenpeace advertisement 
that simply pointed out that 

Chernobyl, before the explosion. 


would have looked equally 
innocuous to visitors? 

Or take another example. The 


government has just spent 
£5,000,000 on television promot- 
ing its Action For Jobs campaign. 
The unequivocal message is that 
the government is now actively 
dealing with unemployment — the 
issue that is for and away of 
greatest concern to the electorate: 
The Tories are themselves using 
Action For Jobs in their publicity, 
to show they have not mined a 
blind eye to the unemployed. Yet 
the IBA deems. Action For Jobs 
advertising apolitical. 

The most contentious cam- 
paigns of all, in terms oflong-tenn 
political impact, most be those for 
privatization. British Telecom 
spent £16 minion in 1984 on its 
corporate advertising; British Gas 
in its pre-flotation and flotation 
marketing spent £41 million, of 
which a large proportion went on- 
to television. All the major privat- 
izations have of course been over- 


subscribed. If BT, or the T5B, or 
British Gas bad simply sought a 
straightforward public flotation it 
would have been unnecessary to 
s&k such massive shareholdings; 
grossly wasteful to spend so many 
millions; and unnecessary to use 
television advertising. 

It is not too fanciful to suggest 
that by next spring , when election 
time is nigh, there will be an army 
of some 10,000,000 new share- 
holders, an army that could not 
have been raised without tele- 
vision advertising. 

Nor is it fanciful to surest that 
the votes of this army of novitiate 
share holder will be influenced by 
the fear that Labour might reclaim 
their share certificates. Nor, fi- 
nally, is it fanciful to suggest that 
the government knows all this, 
which is why the corporations 
being pri v a t iz ed spent such vast 
sums on television advertising. 

When is a political advertise- 
ment not a political advertise- 
ment? If influencing voting 
behaviour is not political, what is? 


ion to any industrial dispute. No ““ w “‘ ” to television. Ah the maiorpnvai- advertising agency ueian 

idvcrtisement may show partial- Chernobyl, before the explosion, izaiiom have of course been over- Flacher Delaney. 

Roger Boyes on the weakness underlying the Polish regime’s new line 


Warsaw 

Martial law is to law what martial 
music is to music a distant, 
embarrassing cousin, brassy and 
over-loud, best forgotten. The 
Poles, despite their love of 
anniversaries, are trying not to 
remember that five years ago, on a 
raw December weekend, they were 
occupied by their own army, the 
legal niceties subordinated to the 
needs of a military timetable. 

The images return anyway: the 
frozen military patrols gathered 
around braziers; the curfew that 
abbreviated the days; the mechan- 
ical voice superimposed on tele- 
phone calls, “This conversation is 
being controlled”; the sudden 
disappearance not only of Solid- 
arity's leaders but of those on the 
fringes of the movement; the 
hunger for information in a 
heavily-censored world. 

Things are better now, of 
course; it could hardly be other- 
wise. There have been no Solidar- 
ity prisoners since September; the 
discordant clangour of martial law 
has disappeared; there is washing 
powder in the shops again and, for 
a price, oranges. Visitors to War- 
saw are still a little surprised not to . 
see Soviet tanks in the streets. 

Martial law had two functions: 
to crush Solidarity and any direct 
competition to the communist 
party, and to allow General 
Jaruzelski to outflank the anti- 
reformist old guard in the state 
apparatus. The idea was to regain 
control over the pace of change. 

It became dear to Jaruzelskfs 
civilian advisers that there must 
be a post-Solidarity strategy. The 
legislative underpinning of eco- 
nomic reform — giving factories 
more independence and workers a 
greater say in management, and 
trying to make the economy 
profitable — was put into place. 
Prices, initially under the cover of 
martial law, were repeatedly in- 
creased without the government 
tumbling that was taken as a sign 
of a return to normal. But the 
reform has made no major impact 
on the economy; what improve- 
ments there have been are the 
result more of random factors. 


Jaruzelski’s 
critics get an 
uneasy taste 
of freedom 






The most difficult and pressing 
problem is that of political change. 
As martial law was gradually 
dismantled, political concessions 
were at best timid: the cautious 
possibility, for example, for mul- 
tiple candidates to stand in local 
council elections. Big gestures, 
such as the 1984 amnesty for 
political prisoners, were more a 


result of pressure than gener o si ty 
The amnesty did not seem to fit 


The amnesty did not seem to fit 
into any kind of programme: there 
.were no moves to find new means 
•of expression. 

After suffering for years from 
muddled management, Poland is 
suddenly exposed to foe changes 
now being pushed through in foe 
Soviet Union intended to adapt 
the economy and, to a lesser 
extent, party policy, to' the con- 
ditions of the late 20th century. 

The Soviet Communist Party is 
having to prove itselfby providing 
efficient managers, explaining it- 
self more coherently and opening 
itself to criticism from outside the 
party. In Hungary, which is about 
to embark on a fresh stage in its 
mature and genuine economic 
reform , some thought is being 
given to the relationship between 
economic and political change. 
Poland has. fortuitously, reacted 
foe right position at foe right time: 
it is brimming with ideas that 


would, under different circum- 
stances, be called pluralism. 

Union pluralism — that is, 
letting several unions operate — is 
ruled out because it would give a 
-platform to Solidarity Political 
pluralism — allowing anything 
that might resemble a party — 
would be an unacceptable chall- 
enge to foe communists. But 
within these frontiers there is a 
grey zone which can be exploited. 

The latest development is the 
formation of a social consultative 
council grouping 36 advisers (one 
was a counsel to Lech Walesa, 
others are outspoken champions 
of academic freedom, some are 
economic reformers) who have a 
licence to criticize the Polish 
leadership publicly. 

Early next year, the authorities 
.will establish a civil-rights 
ombudsman to protect citizens 
against bureaucratic abuse. The 
censor, in a recent interview with 
The Times, suggested that the 
boundaries of printed discussion 
would be relaxed. A new maga- 
zine, Res Publico, will try to create 
a forum for writers who would 
otherwise publish underground. 
Alexander Krawczuk, foe new 
Minister for Culture, wants to lure 
Polish artists and writers, cur- 
rently working abroad or for 
underground publications, back 
into the mainstream. A sign of the 
times is that Tadeusz Kon wield, 
foe novelist, is officially publish- 
ing a book for the first time in 
many years. 

Poland is ahead of foe rest of foe 
bloc but all will soon have to 
consider something similar. An 
accommodation has to be readied 
between the* needs of a modern, 
differentiated society and the de- 
mands of a monolithic state. In 
Hungary there is talk of reform 
clubs — discussion centres in 
which malcontents could be 


openly critical. Even in glacial 
Czechoslovakia foe press has been 
allowed to attack inefficient fac- 
tory directors and lazy officials. 

But the imposition of martial 
law has left people suspicious. 
Although Jaruzelski claims to be 
implementing the slogan of 
Hungary’s Kadar, “He who is not 
against ns is with ns”, the parallels 
with Hungaty are slight. After the 
Soviet crushing of the 1936 upris- 
ing, there followed five years of 
repression and then very slow 
liberalization. Under these 
-circumstances it was not difficult 
to secure the compliance of sodepr 
and eventually to strike a bargain 
whereby Hungarians muzzle then- 
political aspirations in return fin- 
economic prosperity (an ex- 
change, it is said, ofbody fin- soul). 

Jaruzelski acted against Solidar- 
ity only after 16 months, during 
which time a generation of Poles 
came to think that socialism amid 
and would be overhauled. Noth- 
ing nowon offer will ever measure 

X o the expectations of those to 
m Solidarity was the ideal. 

Most importantly, the current 
attempts at political diversifica- 
tion are not a logical consequence 
of a successful economic r e f o rm 
but rather a way of letting off 
steam before a fresh round of price 
rises and austerity moves. 

Attempts to pioralize com- 
munism are thus born out of 
weakness rather than strength. 
Jaruzelski needs safety valves 
because he fears that the engine 
might become overheated. The 
social council is a typical con- 
trivance of the post-martial-law 
era, simultaneously clever and 
irrelevant Intellectuals are un- 
happy. so rather than put them in 

& give them access to the party 
sn institutionalized access. 
This fulfils several functions. It 


ensures that the opposition is 
denied their brain power, it keeps 
the communist leadership in- 
formed about social currents, it 
keeps the party on its toes. And if 
all goes well, it spliis the opposi- 
tion into realists — those witting to 
talk to the authorities — and those 
unwitting to compromise. Of 
course, the council will enrich 
public debate, and that is why 
many respectable and respected 
people have joined it, despite 
fierce criticism from Solidarity 
theorists such as Adam Michnik. 


1 But the council is also an 
admission of failure: why is 
parliament not fulfilling the role of 
this council? Or the Patriotic 
Front organization set up specifi- 
cally to promote dialogue between 
communists and non-commun- 
ists? Or the myriad other public 
committees which repent to par- 
liament? fnsffffld of trying to make 
existing institutions more eff- 
ective, Jaruzelski is creating new 
institutions: this too is a hallmark 
of the post-Solidarity period. 


Some prominent dissidents, un- 
concerned whether the new poli- 
cies are foe result of conviction or 
weakness, are ready to exploit the 
cracks now opening up. Oppor- 
tunism, they argue, should not be 
foe monopoly of those in power. 
But the changes can be rolled back 
at any time. If few Poles seem 
interested in foe new ideas, then 
Jaruzelski has carte blanche to 
impose unpopular decisions — a 
wage freeze, say — with foe old 
methods, threatening force rather 
than engaging in elaborate persua- 
sion. Martial law will not be 
imposed a second time but the 
present focus on pluralism in a 
communist state may prove to be 
little more than an interesting but 
shortlived interiade in Poland’s 
jagged crisis-prone history of foe 
past 40 years. 


Ronald Butt 

The pulpit 
the indivic 

If recent p«Btai 


ua 


offer clear and imcwnpromarog 
oiiirieliaes for the bCM'tcar oi 


Alfonsin’s quiet democratic anniversary 


If recent preccwmi ^ guidelines for tr.e w 

go bv, sermons will be preacaea iduaIs in me aggregate 

from i Pupils all determine foe nature of a soaely. 

this Christmas on social b ofteB seems too 

inner cities, tne nuclear bomb and ine ^ ^ 

aid for foe Third V^orld ail neati gJ£s P of praK esi5 ffcaa with 

pinnedtoatextappropn2ie.ofoe 

festival- ine prea^^ ^ ft ^nizes about whether to 

reman* divorced people ill 


wcu-uiLciiut**- * ■ rw-narrv divorcee pcopic ui 

pereecuted, ««connc* Ora- ^ seldom be heart 

tian cause; nobody, could fomk cnmrn ^ of 

whether ludzmg from preac/uu 0 wc - 


° f 1116 ** SSEEd to preserve jt h speaks 
of much of equal opponumuusaod.o^ 


The author is a director of the 
advertising agency Delaney 


Bneaos Aires 

The third anniversary of the 
return to democracy has passed 
almost unnoticed here. In foe 
Plaza de Mayo in the centre of 
Buenos Aires, where Argentines 
traditionally gather in times of 
national euphoria, there were no 
more than the usual number of 
strollers - no ringing speeches, no 
parades, no flagwavmg. ' 

President Raul Alfonsin was not 
even in the country, having cho- 
sen to spend most of the anniver- 
sary week in Brazil. Fora moment 
it appeared as though Argentina 
was just another democracy, 
accustomed to having its presi- 
dent reach foe mid-point of his 
constitutional term. Perhaps that 
was the intent behind foe attitude 
of studied indifference. But Ar- 
gentine democracy is not like any 
other country’s, and it is unlikely 
to be for a long time to come. 

Even so, immense changes have 
taken place since that hoi Decem- 
ber day in 1983 when Alfonsin 
took the oath of office and toasted 
what he called the beginning of 


UK) years of democracy. Inflation 
has been reduced from 30 percent 
a month to about 5 per cent The 
dispute with Chile over three 
islands in foe Beagle Channe l has 

been peacefully settled. Decency 
has been returned to government 
no small matter in Argentina. 

It was not so long ago, after all, 
that security forces were kidnap- 
ping citizens from their homes in 
the middle of the night and taking 
them to clandestine torture cen- 
tres, from which many thousands 
disappeared forever. Today the 
military co mmander s who were 
responsible for that “dirty war” 
are in jail and foe counties 
30 million people are enjoying 
their constitutional liberties. 

The very honor of the recent 
past has helped Alfonsin. To say 
that is not to deny his courage or 
his abilities as a genuine leader. 
Even in a country that suffers 
from boots of collective amnesia, 
the memory of foe last military 
dictatorship and its catastrophes is 
still fresh enough in foe popular 
conscience to insure foal he will be 


able to complete bis six-year 
mandate. The last civilian presi- 
dent who managed to survive 
more than half his six-year 
constitutional term was Arturo 
Frondizi — overthrown by the 
mUharyin 1962. * 

With foe armed forces in dis- 
grace following the dirty war and 
the FaDdands debacle, the govern- 
ment has been spared the threat of 
a military coup that hung over its 
civilian predecessors. But even 
with the troops safely in their 
barracks, Alfonsin’s next three 
years may be even mare difficult 
than the first three. 

He will have to deal with 
Argentina’s $49 billion debt and 
try to attract foreign investment if 
he is to proceed with his ambitious 


integrate the armed services into 
society: a daunting task, as the 
military has been a privileged 
caste for decades. 

This aim of integration was 
without doubt the motive behind 
Aifonsxn’s recent proposal to put 
an end to foe human-rights trials 
of military officers. Alfonsin may 
however have thereby done term 
to his campaign to strengthen 
democracy. While the trials have 
unquestionably contributed to 
continuing tension between civil- 
ian and military authorities, foe 
proposal to end them has tar- 


nished the president s impressive 
nun&n-rights record and raised 
doubts about the independence of 
the Argentine judiciary. Worse, it 
raises suspicions that the armed 
forces are calling the shots behind 
the scenes. 

A bit of celebrating to mark his 
third anniversary might have 
served to remind the men in 
uniform of their role in foe new 
Argentina. 


plans to modernize foe economy. 
He will have to guard against the 
return of hyper-inflation and cope 
with growing discontent among 
the workers over a decline in 
purchasing power. 

Most importantly, be must 
strengthen the country^ still un- 
certain nnlrtkal institutions and 


ditfon of foe church. 

But between foe lines of muen 
of foe preaching there will be a ret 
of assumptions resting on the 
proposition that what should con- 
cern us most is the moral guilt o> a 
society so obsessed with maten- 
alfam that it .is foiling to ia * e 
collective social action. Congrega- 
tions are less likely to receive a 
message illuminating foe res- 
ponabilitv of foe individual. 

To findthis a great foiling is not 
to say that morality can only be 
individual. The extreme individ- 
ualists who enjoy asserting that 
there is no such thing as collective 
morality and that morality is by 
its nature individual, undermine 
their own cause. Their dogmatism 
is an understandable reaction 
against foe opposite and prevail- 
ing dogmatism which works on 
foe assumption rha* the only real 
morality is collective, and that the 
state, or foe community is its 

But the counter-heresy of foe 
individual as the exclusive source 
of moral responsibility and of foe 
state as property responsible for 
no more than defence, law and 
order and help for those at the 
bottom of foe pile, is equally 
fallacious. Since foe beginning of 
our civilization, communities 
have tried through their govern- 
ments to provide remedies for 
social needs and grievances. 
Humanity has a shared if limited 
conscience, as well as foe con- 
sciences of individuals, and it 
rightly leads to collective action to 
help foe poor and protect the 
vulnerable. 

Yet the duties of the community 
are commonly preached with 
much more extended implications 
than thk. ft will be assumed that 
foe state should spend on good 
causes but nothing will be said 
about bow foe money forspending 
is to be made. 

The materialism of a consumer 
society will be denounced but not 
defined. Yet some of the excesses 
of silly materialism arise precisely 
because the state leaves foe in- 
dividual no scope for providing 
for the serious things that matter 
io every family, and materialism 
has also improved the lot of 
everyone, including foe poor. 

• Above all, the failure of the 
church is to be so preoccupied 
with foe conscience of society as to 
seem to forget that foe conscience 
of the individual, which may have 
to be invoked against society, is 
the ultimate arbiter of human 
behaviour. There is a failure to 


about woman priests. But would fr 
dare to assert that mothers have 
no higher responsibility than to 
rive their own time, if they 
possibly can, to lock after their 
own children is their homes? (To 
the angry feminists’ protest. Why 
not the father? my reply ty AH 
right, but he usually isn’t so good 
atiL) , . 

Similar questions nave lam at 
the heart of our difficulties wifo 
industrial relations. The trade 
unionist’s undeniable right to 
withhold his labour as a safeguard 
against exploitation has been per- 
verted into a claim to do work 
uneconomical^ - , even to be paid 
fordoing non-jobs which is a fraud 
against society as a whole and the 
poor, just as much as “insider” 
trading cheats shareholders. 

Some of these economic truths 
have been learned in recent years, 
yet it does not seem that it has 
Infused the clergy with a revived 
interest in preaching foe res- 
ponsibility of foe individual. Now, 
however, foe threat of .Aids offers 
them a new reminder that their 
business is with individual con- 
duct, and with trying to move 
individuals' hearts and minds. 

There is an argument that foe 
communication of this disease is 
principally to do with promiscuity 
as such, heterosexual as well as 
homosexual, rather than being 
especially, though not exclusively, 
passed by practices which are 
more usually homosexual. The 
evidence does not seem entirely 
dear. But what is not in doubt is 
that it has initially been conveyed 
to foe West principally by prac- 
tices which until now have been 
regarded as morally wrong ten 
which, in our prevailing climate of 
relativism, even foe churches have 
feared to censure; and that it 
spreads by promiscuity of all sorts. 

Yet what h uman society has 
ever lived without its rules and 
taboos — usually based on some 
perfectly rational distiction be- 
tween the dean and foe unclean — 
and without some absolutes? Our 
society has asserted that there are 
no taboos and no absolutes but 
only human convenience, and the 
churches have tried to live with 
foe damage as best they can. 

If they really wish to be heart 
attentively they will have to speak 
again to the individual with 
whom, as foe facts of life are 
increasingly teaching us in many 
more matters than Aids, ultimate 
responsibility really lies. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Sinless songs of 
Patpong Road 


“We may be a lot poorer than 
Thailand,” a Burmese tdd me, 
“but at feast we’re not foe harem 
of the East” 

Yes, Thailand has certainly 
gained the reputation of being a 
place where every sexual whim 
can be gratified in almost any 
currency along the wicked Pat- 
pong Road in old Bangkok. I Had 
never been to Bangkok before. 1 
might never go there again. So it 
seemed pretty important to me 
that in my one night there 1 should 
do something exciting which had 
nothing remotely to do with sex. 
And in the Thai Airlines in-flight 
magazine Sawasdee — which I 
have to say is the only airline 
magazine I have found worth 
taking from the plane — I camg 
across a piece on jazz in Bangkok 
which seemed to offer a solution. 

“Where can I find Bobby’s 
Anns?” I asked the hotel clerk, 
showing him the article. He 
looked up the address. 

“It is at the First Floor, The Car 
Park, Patpong Road," he said. 

An unlikely address for a jazz 
pub, halfway up a car park in the 
vice street of Bangkok, and indeed 
none of the people who stopped to 

help us in Patpong Road knew 
about foe car park. None of them 
cared about it, either. They were 
for more interested in getting us 
mto chibs where we could see girts 
do most a mazin g things with their 
anatomy, and occasionally, as we 
walked down the road, doors 
would swing open to reveal girts 
on stage doing aitiawng things 
while simultaneously achieving a 
look of boredom. 

“Sir, sir, come inside and see a 
woman with a fish," implored one 
impresario. 

“Sorry, it’s too degrading." said 
my colleague. 

«*Plained to the 
puzzled Thai. “Can you imagine 

what rts like for a fish to go home 


wood, beery smells and home- 
brewed jazz. Glasses of ale ap- 
peared at - the ends of our hands 
and we sat down in front of the 
grand piano, which was a good 
place to sit because the piano had 
a foot-wide shelf built into it ail 
round on which foe customers 
could plonk their wallop, or 
wallop their {Monk. 

Almost everyone in the band 
was of a different nationality. 
There was an American guitarist, 
nearly inaudible, and a German 
banjoist, mercifully totally in- 
audible. The tenor saxophonist 
had a wrinkled Oriental smile and 
played nicely, foe trumpeter was 
small and dark and reached for 
exciting high notes which he often 
hit, and sometimes thrillingly 
missed, and the clarinettist was 
foe Australian defence attache, by 
the name of Lac hie Thomson. The 
leader was a very good trombon- 
ist, called Vic Luna, who sang lii»» 
a Far Eastern Nat Gonella, and the 
whole effect was as if one HnH 
come across a bunch of Glenn 
Miller’s boys having a night off! 

% They played tunes like In The 
Mood, Tm Confessing, Sheik of 
Ajaby and Chattanooga Choo 
Choo, and several middle-aged 

nhitp nuinlaw i :■ j “ 


the war would never end, and 
everyone clapped and cheered 
when Bobby, foe owner, got up 
uid rang Won't You Come Home, 
BiU Bailey? — winch, having no 
tune or words in partic ular , is 
always a good song for an owner to 
ring. In London it would have 
been just a pub night, but there in 
Patpong Road I think it was the 
most innocent oasis in a wicked 
world that, I have ever come 
across. 

In an odd sort of way, it was al so 
very daring. In a street where 


sex is the norm, tapping 
your feet to foe Australian defence 
«*acfte weaving his skilful way 
trough Christopher Columbus 
mujst rank very nearly as kinky, or 
attest highly unconventional, 
see Grown Men On Stage! Watch 


at foe weekend and tell his famil y 
he’s in a double act with 

a woman? 

That s ■ disgusting; they’d say 
‘Well, the money’s good,’ foe fish 
would mumble, ‘and I hope to go 
solo soon; I’ve got this Utile 
backing band I'm rehearsing 
with...”* ^ 

The Thai obviously saw what 
we were getting at because he 
relented and showed us foe way to 

foe multi-storey car park and there 

on the fiiri floor we pushed open a 
door marked Bobby’s Pub and 


r 


t P ar *ugly Blow Through 

JhSfViSSi “ Tbe y GmpT&T 

Forbidden High a and 
r 3 asTfrcy Parade 

Round foe Club, Fully-Dressed, 
Playing The SaintSl lJICSxa '. 

• we and then we 
came out into the cold reality of 

P”* ^d the pub 


y’ : 


j&r 

•J-aLr ' • . 


-- U -j 


ooor marxea Dooojrs run and had vmisheri i.? 

found ourselves, as magically as if those mwS J M st .*■ do m 

in an oM-&shioned mystery story, 




Eduardo Cue I in a“London pub foil of polished hasn’tqSte feded. 6 ®^ 4 11 ^ 


^ri r; 


■ 







* 



THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


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1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 

SACRED NO LONGER 


This week’s agreement fay the 
EEC farm ministers has been 
widely welcomed. For the 
British Government it is an 
undoubted political coup. For 
those who share the view — 
vividly revealed in The Times 

in recent weeks - that the CAP 

has become a profligate affront 
to the European ideal, it offers 
grounds for praise as well as 
hope. 

^ Several notes of caution are, 
however, in order before the 
agreement can truly be termed 
the first step on the road to 
reform. First, will the states- 
men of Brussels be able to 
stand the heat of the hustings 
back home? It is not only the 
two million cows whose death 
warrants were signed in Brus- 
sels this week who will have 
cause to regret the agreement 
on dairy and beef policies. 

The formers will be more 
vocal than the cattle, opposi- 
tion politicians perhaps more 
vocal than the formers. The 
Irish government, in particu- 
lar, risks- paying a heavy 

^penalty in next spring’s elec- 
tions for its responsible stance 
in Brussels. 

Many EEC formers who 
invested in cattle in the period 
— not long past — when they 
were being encouraged to do so 
will have real cause now to fed 
hard done by. When a policy is 
allowed to run out of hand 
because no-one has the cour- 
age to control it, putting 
matters right is going to hurt. 

Secondly, if the Brussels 
agreement is to herald a genu- 
ine return to a sane Commit 
nity policy on agriculture, it 


has to be realised that there is 
more pain unavoidably in 
store. If the two million cows 
are not to die in vain, the 
pressure has to be kept up. 

The strategic decisions now 
taken should ensure that the 
stocks of butter and milk- 
powder stop growing, and 
prevent still larger mountains 
of beef carcases. But that is not 
a certainty. The fertility of 
nature and the ingenuity of 
man are only too apt to 
burgeon in unforeseen ways, 
however carefuly they seem to 
be pruned bade. 

Considerable celebrations 
were mounted in 1983, when 
public opinion was (like today) 
calling for progress on the 
CAP. A formula was reached 
which was proclaimed to solve 
the problem. It did not do so, 
and the joint curb now im- 
posed on milk and beef will 
have to be closely monitored 
to see that it does not channel 
producers into building up 
other kinds of surplus. Sheep- 
farmers in Wales are already 
worried that cattle-formers in 
milder climates may now turn 
to sheep-forming and undercut 
them. 

The form ministers do, npp i» 
the less, deserve some 
congratulation. So do the gov- 
ernments that instructed them 
— particularly those, like the 
Irish and Germans, whose 
nerve might well have been 
sapped by the proximity of 
elections. And the British 
Government too deserves its 
full share of the credit For 
Britain chaired the session, 
and without Mr Michael 


Jopling’s persistence in hang- 
ing on for a solution, the 
opportunity would almost cer- 
tainly have slipped away, 

Mrs Thatcher may have 
ruffled some feathers recently 
by her forthrightness, but the 
Community’s leaders know 
that it was in a good cause. 
Unless the EEC can bring its 
agricultural subsidies under 
control, the Community will 
simply cease to be viablk 

The Brussels negotiators 
still have to get down to 
working out what the decisions 
wiQ mean to individual form- 
ers. The compensations 
inducements are said to be 
generous, but much will de- 
pend on bow they are distrib- 
uted. Quotas tend to be a 
clumsy instrument, but they 
seem to be the best available in 
the present crisis. It is not 
enough simply to crush the 
small producer and clear the 
field for the agricultural 
production-line. In principle, 
assistance to the weaker op- 
erators should be channelled 
through the regional and social 
funds, rather than the basic 
subsidy system. 

The largest of the 
Community’s food mountains 
by for is made of grain, not 
beef or butter. Finding a 
formula to control that must 
be a task for the Co mmunit y 
under Belgian leadership, in 
the new year. 

Whatever its limitations, the 
agreement reached this week 
shows that there is, after all, 
the goodwill in Europe to bring 
agricultural problems under 
control. 



17 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Rights and wrongs on human lights 

From Lord Scarman and others 30 years it has recovered, due in 


VIETNAM’S TIME OF TROUBLES 


. The honourable retirement of 
' three gentlemen well past their 
seventieth birthdays would 
raise few eyebrows in most 
countries of die world. But 
when the country is Vietnam — 
a land where longevity in high 
office has become the norm — 
and when the new pensioners 
are that country’s three most 
senior political leaders, 
superannuation takes on a 
different complexion. 

The relegation to “advisory 
roles” of Communist Party 
General Secretary and head of 
state, Truong Chinh; of the 
Prime Minister, Pham Van 
Dong; and of a senior member 
of the Politburo, Le Due Tho, 
removes from policy-making 
the closest surviving associates 
of Vietnam’s legendary leader. 
Ho Chi Minb. It also ends a 
decade in which a unified 
Vietnam at peace with itself (if 
not with its neighbours) has 
been run by men more accus- 
tomed to running a war. 

The passing of this triumvi- 
rate at Vietnam's delayed 
Communist Party Congress 
this week is a rare example of 
the congress — an institution 
common to the communist 
world as a whole — being used, 
to renew the country’s senior 
leadership without disgrace. 
Co mmunis t regimes, however, 
are not known for their dis- 
position to sudden or thorough 
change of this kind, and it is a 
measure of the unhappy state 
of Vietnam 1 1 years after the 
communist victory that such 
radical measures were deemed 


to be necessary. Certainly, 
there are few glimmers of hope 
in any area of Vietnamese life. 

Agriculture is devastated; a 
sharp rise in the birth rate 
means there are more mouths 
to feed and food is short 
Corruption and speculation 
surpass the levels reached in 
US-occupied Saigon. Viet- 
nam’s currency, devalued sev- 
eral times over, is almost 
worthless on the international 
market Economic changes 
and counterchanges have con- 
fused the outlines of the 
permissible, as well as betray- 
ing conflicts within the leader- 
ship. Nor is outside aid 
forthcoming. Erstwhile friends 
- notably the Chinese and the 
United Nations — deserted 
when their beneficiary in- 
vaded neighbouring Cam- 
bodia. 

Only the Soviet Union has 
stood by Vietnam for what 
were sound strategic reasons. 
But all the signs are that the 
Gorbachov leadership is at 
least as interested in the 
rational use of resources by its 
allies as it is in their revolu- 
tionary zeal and ideological 
purity. Moscow seems reluc- 
tant to underwrite Vietnamese 
mismanagement indefinitely, 
and Vietnamese leaders — to 
judge by their abject self- 
criticism and fulsome tributes 
to Soviet help in recent 
months — have been made 
well aware of this. 

Changes in the thrust of 
Soviet foreign policy since Mr 
Gorbachov took office also 


mate Vietnam less of an asset 
than it was 10 years ago. Then, 
at loggerheads with China, 
Moscow needed its friendship 
with Vietnam. Now, with an 
improvement in relations with 
China in the forefront of Mr 
Gorbachov’s foreign policy, 
the alliance with Vietnam is a 
liability. Only if Vietnam can. 
be persuaded to withdraw 
from Cambodia — Peking’s 
chief condition for improved 
relations with Moscow — 
could that liability be turned to 
advantage. 

In recent months, as its 
economic and political situa- 
tion has deteriorated, Vietnam 
has intimated a desire to end 
its international isolation. Its 
leaders, however, steeped in 
the legacy of Ho Chi Minh and 
in their years of combat 
against the French, the Ameri- 
cans and the Chinese, showed 
little appreciation of the link 
between their country’s isola- 
tion and the presence of 
Vietnamese troops in Cam- 
bodia. 

The hope must be that the 
change of leadership an- 
nounced yesterday will foster 
the flexibility in Hanoi that 
has been lacking since the 
occupation of Cambodia 
nearly eight years ago. The 
Cambodia conundrum 
been a focus of local and 
superpower tension in the Far 
East for too long, and the long- 
suffering people of Cambodia, 
and of Vietnam, could stand to 
benefit most of all 


A GRASS-ROOTS REBELLION 


When people of influence foil 
to stand against malignant 
causes, ordinary men and 
women will found their own 
resistance movement. That is 
what is now happening in the 
London borough of Haringey. 

A group of parents there is 
fi ghting against the extremists 
in charge of the local council 
who have been promoting 
'‘positive images” of homosex- 
^ uals in schools. The campaign 
against which the Haringey 
parents are making their stand 
is not covert The borough has 
funded a “lesbian and gay 
unit” to manage it This unit 
employs what are called out- 
reach workers whose function 
is to go into schools to identify 
and even encourage children 
whom they diagnose as homo- 
sexual It wishes to put instruc- 
tion about homsexual 
practices into sex education 
and offers in-service training 
to teachers. 

A letter from the Lesbian 
and Gay Unit, on official 
Borough Council paper, was 
sent to all schools last June 
stating that “new council pol- 
icy wi thin die education ser- 
vice is that lesbian and gay 
issues be addressed with the 
same vigour and clarity as 
other areas of oppresaon. 
Stating that the council has 
established a fund for 
“curriculum projects’* t0 „ pr0 J. 
mote “positive images , oi 
homosexuals from nursery 
schools upwards, the letter 


V 


stated that members of the 
unit “are wanting to meet 
heads of educational 
establishments..^ talk with 
them about their current prac- 
tices with regard to lesbians 
and gays-” „ „ 

How many heads felt free to 
throw this into the waste-paper 
basket it is impossible to say. 
Perhaps quite a few. But they 
are also under pressure from 
outside the schools — and 
sometimes from within them! 
— to advance the same cause. 
Some“gay” teachers, indeed, 
have angrily abused and pick- 
eted the parents who were 
protesting. 

The parents allege that they 
have been subject to abuse, to 
vandalism in their homes, to 
death threats and to such 
unpleasant experiences as be- 
ing spat and urinated on. Most 
of the parents are from work- 
ing class backgrounds. Many 
are from the Asian or West 
Indian or Irish Roman Catho- 
lic Communities whose re- 
ligious principles are deeply 
affronted by what is happen- 
ing, a Muslim mother states 
that she has been told by a 
Labour Haringey councfflor 
that the Koran and the Bible 
need up-dating - which is 
hardly the business of the 
Haringey Labour Party. 

But how legitimate is the 
Barents’ concern about the 
character of the ‘‘positive 

images” campaign? Acartoon 

”Us£book” caDed “The Play 


Book for Kids about Sex’ 
available from toe unit, in- 
cludes an introduction of 
small children to homosexual 
relationships and could even 
be construed as conditioning 
children for sexual abuse. 
From the childrens* shelves of 
a public library, a IS year old 
school girl obtained a a book 
which is simply homosexual 
pornography. And the cam- 
paign, as described by its own 
advocates, is designed to sub- 
ject the school curriculum to 
homosexual proselytising. 

As it happens, most of the 
protesting parents are Labour 
voters. But they have come to 
believe that their own party 
has become a cover for the 
ami-democratic left which 
abuses the education of their 
children to undermine the 
fam ily and democracy. 

None of this, of course, 
could happen but for political 
funding by local authorities. 
The Haringey mothers wrote 
to Mr Neil Kinnock but got a 
five-line letter from his office 
saying he could not intervene. 
They have taken the point 
Today the House of Lords is 
debating a private member’s 
bill introduced by Lord 
Haisbury. which would seek to 
forbid local authorities for 
giving financial aid for the 
promotion of homosexuality. 
It is of riveting interest to the 
mothers of Haringey. 


Sir, In your leading arude beaded 
“Judging rights" (December 12) 
you express opposition to the 
Human Rights and Fundamental 
Freedoms Bill which would enact 
as pan of our law those provisions 
of the European Convention 
which set out the rights and 
freedoms protected by the 
Convention. You conclude that 
under existing law there is no 
evidence of risk to our liberties 
sufficient to justify subordinating 
our law to an overriding power of 
the judges to interpret the ringing 
abstract declarations of the 
Convention “at their own 
discretion.” 

Your conclusion, with respect, 
is unsound. It is eloquently 
worded but grievously flawed. 

First, there is plenty of evidence 
that ousting British law is an 
insufficient protection of the lib- 
erties which by ratifying the 
Convention we have obliged our- 
selves in international law to 
protect. Your article admits as 
much in hs third and fourth 
paragraphs. 

Second, the Human Rights Bill, 
if enacted, would not subject us to 
a power of judges to interpret its 
provisions “at their own 
discretion”. Faced with the stat- 
ute, our judges would have to 
interpret it — exactly as they have 
to interpret other statutes. Statu- 
tory interpretation is a recognised 
judicial process, nor an exercise of 
arbitrary judicial power. 

Third, the European Conven- 
tion is not a series of “ringing 
abstract declarations” It was 
largely drafted by two English 
lawyers, one of whom was a skilled 
draftsman and the other later 
became a Lord Chancellor. 
Admittedly it is couched in the 
language of principle. But so are 
many important British statutes 
(do you recollect our own enacted 
Bill of Rights?) 

Judges by their training in the 
common law are experienced in 
the development of principle. And 
they have no difficulty in 
distinguishing principle which is 
justiciable from policy which is 
not do you recollect the approach 
of our judges (gently criticised in 
your columns, following the de- 
cision of the House of Lords in the 
GCHQ case) to the problem of 
national security? 

May we ask you. Sir, to give the 
Human Rights Bill a fair wind as it 
seeks a passage through the un- 
certain waters of parliamentary 
scrutiny? 

Yours sincerely, 

SCARMAN, 

BROXBOURNE, 

EDWARD GARDNER, 

Rights Campaign, 

60 Chandos Place, WC2. 


From Professor Garth Nettheim . 
Sir, Your leading article, “J udging 
rights” (December 12), indicates 
that the spirit of A V. Dicey is still 
alive in the land. His writings late 
last century and early this century 
influenced generations of lawyers 
in the UK and elsewhere to the 
complacent believe that both 
“falls of rights” and “admin- 
istrative law” were foreign aberra- 
tions, alien and unnecessary in 
lands Messed by the genius of the 
common law. 

In regard to administrative law, 
one expert in relatively recent 
times was moved to write that 
“English administrative law has 
still not recovered from Dicey’s 
denial of its existence". In the past 


large part to the far-sighted efforts 
of some notable British judges, 
such that you are able to speak of 
“the welcome increase in the 
citizen’s ability to chatl^ ny 
administrative decisions by the 
judicial review procedure”. But 
the Dicey legacy still seems to 
prevail in any discussion of pro- 
posals for enhanced protection of 
human rights. 

Yon also note that the UK 
“leads the other 20 members of 
the Council of Europe both in the 
number of complaints laid against 
it in Strasbourg and in the number 
of occasions on which the Euro- 
pean Court of Human Rights has 
judged it guilty of a breach of the 
Convention” You explain this 
record by noting that the UK lacks 
a national forum in which issues 
of violation of the Convention can 
be aired. 

With respect, surely what is 
significant is the fact of such 
violations. Even if Parliament and 
the executive are as high-minded 
and as rigbts-minded as we would 
like to believe, it sometimes needs 
the judiciary, deciding a particular 
case, to achieve the degree of fine- 
tuning that is required to achieve a 
proper balance between conflict- 
ing interests. 

At present, such balancing lias 
been almost entirely left to 
commissioners and judges in 
Strasbourg. It is hard to believe 
that the task might not be equally 
well done — and more appro- 
priately done — by judges in the 
UK itseff 
Yours sincerely, 

GARTH NETTHEIM, 

1 12 1-anghatn Road, N1S. 

Child abuse cases 

From Ms J. Temkin and Professor 
G.J.ZeUick 

Sir, Your leader of December 2 
comes down too emphatically and 
prematurely against Professor 
GlanviUe Williams's suggestion 
(feature. November 25) that child 
victims of sex offences should be 
interviewed by an independent 
professional before the trial and 
the interview pre-recorded and 
then shown to the jury. 

You are dismissing the idea now 
as summarily and superficially as 
did Professor Wflfiams’s col- 
leagues on tile C riminal Law 
Revision Committee some 20 
years ago. 

Of course there are major issues 
involved, but the trauma for child 
witnesses, even under the pro- 
posals in the Criminal Justice Bin, 
should not be underestimated. It 
would not be possible for such a 
change to be introduced without 
the fullest debate and consid- 
eration, but the children who fall 
victim to such crimes deserve at 
least that 

There is now a good deal of 
experience of such arrangements 
in other jurisdictions, notably in 
the United States, where there is at 
least as much sensitivity to the 
rights of defendants as here. The 
Government should certainly 
initiate a searching study of these 
procedures without delay. Our 
present criminal procedure is not 
so perfect that radical changes are 
unthinkable. 

Your s fiath fully, 

JENNIFER TEMKIN, 

(London School of Economics), 
GRAHAM ZELL1CK, 

Faculty of laws. 

Queen Mary College, 

Mile End Road, El. 


Fatnre of shipping 

From Captain W. M. Doughs 
( Merchant Navy) 

Sir, As the British Merchant Navy 
moves into terminal decline it is 
reported in The Times today (late 
editions, December 1 1) that Mr J. 
Moore, Secretary of State for 
Transport, cannot offer incentives 
to maintain a viable fleet 
In view of the Government’s 
lack of a shipping policy, many 
British seafarers do have sym- 
pathy for British shipowners 
operating under flags of conve- 
nience. However, at times of 
hostility such ships cannot be 
requisitioned by the British 
Government What financial in- 
centives will then have to be made 
to the owners to place these ships 
under British Government con- 
trol? 

I and many of my British 
colleagues finding employment 
uniter foreign flags would like to 
ask where we stand. In times of - 
hostilities and an expanded mer- 
chant fleet, will our employment 
be based upon “market forces” or 
conscription? 

Yours faithfully, 

W. M. DOUGLAS, 

Crofts de, 

Bc c chcn Cliff Road, 

Bath, Avon. 

December 11. 


Scale offish sales 

From Mr John Green 
Sir, Incomes of between £500 and 
£1,000 a weds (Spectrum, Decem- 
ber 1 2) are by no means unusual in 
the fishing industry. Most crews 
are employed on a share basis and 
their income is based on this 
principle. 

Of more concern to the public 
should be the way public money is 
invested in the catching side of the 
fish industry. This would be 
acceptable if the end result were to 
be more fish for the British 
consumer. 

In feet more and more British- 
caught fish finds its way on to 
continental tables. This applies 
not only to Peterhead but to most 
of the ports in Great Britain. 
Bayers from France, Germany 
and Spain are offering juices at 
first-hand sales which far exceed 
those the home market will stand. 

Recently published statistics in- 
dicate an increased percentage of 
disposable income being spent by 
continentals on food. Sadly the 
reverse applies to the UK. 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN GREEN, 

Managing Director, 

J. B. Green (Crouch End) Limited, 
Fish, poultry and game dealers, 

65 Wood Vale, 

MusweU Hill NI0. 


Fears unallayed 
for mentally ill 

From Mr John Lane 
Sir, For some time, St Mungo and 
other agencies concerned with 
alleviating homelessness have 
tried to call attention to the issues 
raised by Dr Weller (November 
22) and Mr Jacobs (November 
27). We fear a crisis of appalling 
magnitude will soon be looming in 
our Jaxge cities. 

A high percentage of the res- 
idents in our main hostel come in 
from tbe streets with chronic 
psychiatric problems for which 
they receive no treatment. 
Whether on tbe streets or in 
hostels, they are unable to register 
with GPs — the principal route to 
tbe NHS range of treatments — 
because their homelessness ap- 
pears to be equated with an array 
of anti-soda! habits. People who 
are ill are thus condemned to 
deteriorate completely before 
there is any hope of intervention. 

A man we recently admitted 
came to us from a green-belt 
psychiatric hospital via a bed-and 
breakfast hotel. The delays in 
processing his DHSS claim left 
him unable to pay his rent. He 
spent several nights sleeping 
rough, with neither money nor 
food, before a passer-by referred 
him to us. 

We took him to a walk-in 
medical centre whose staff con- 
tacted the hospital for details of 
his diagnosis: on grounds of 
confidentiality, it refused to di- 
vulge them. Tbe man had a 
complete breakdown, and is now 
hospitalised. 

Two of our staff have just 
returned from New York, which 
has afforded them a glimpse of tbe 
future. The scale of homelessness 
amongst memally-ill dischargees 
is acute and appalling: it is 
estimated they number 30,000. A 
quarter of the patients discharged 
went to “unknown destinations” 
Our fears are heightened rather 
than allayed by Baroness 
Trumpington’s contribution 
(December 9). A “range of 
provision'’ for in-patients is nec- 
essary, but who will provide the 
variety of services offered by the 
best hospitals when they dose? 
The main providers all construe 
their priorities and responsibilities 
differently. 

In America, ex-patients find tbe 
services in the community to be 
fragmented, uncoordinated and 
inaccessible doe to departmental 
bickering over responsibilities. All 
tbe evidence suggests that having 
carefully watched the US experi- 
ence, we in Britian are studiously 
duplicating every callous error. 

With 1987 designated the Inter- 
national Year of Shelter for the 
Homeless, dare we hope for more 
action than just another 
commemorative postage stamp? 
Yours 

JOHN LANE, Director, 

St Mungo Community Housing 
Associalon Ltd, 

217-221 Harrow Road, 

Paddington, W2. 

December 10. 

Keeping treasures 

From Sir Arthur Drew 
Sir, We have become used to great 
paintings fetching between £5mil- 
lion arid £10million in tbe sale- 
room. But yesterday the 
Middle ham pendant fetched 
£1.3mil!ion (report, December 
12). At that price is is unlikely that 
the present system can stop the 
export of this English medieval 
masterpiece. 

Is it not time the system was 
changed or at least buffed up with 
additional money in the National 
Heritage Memorial Fund? An 
object like this should rest in a 
museum in England, where it can 
be enjoyed by the public. 

Yours faithfully, 

ARTHUR DREW, 

Reform Chib, 

Pali Mafl, SW1. 

December 12. 


ON THIS DAY 


DECEMBER 18 1840 

Napoleon’s coffin was brought in 
the French warship , La Belle- 
Poule, to Cherbourg from St 
Helena, where he had died on 
May 5, 1821. There it was 
I transhipped, and in its passage up 
the Seme to Paris was saluted at 
every stage by crowds. 

Our Correspondent at the 
Inoalxdes did justice to the 
impressioe ceremony in the 
chapel but took a more critical 
view of the scenes outside 


FUNE RAL OF NAPO LEON 

(From a Correspondent.) 

PARIS, Dec 15. 

. . . Tbe cold was indeed bitter 
for those to whom tickets had been 
allotted for the tribunes that 
occupied each side of the avenue 
leading up the esplanade of the 
Invalides from the quay to the 
great gate; but the crowd bore the 
biting frost with patience, for it 
was decidedly one of the very best 
positions for seeing tbe funeral 
procession pass. The stands were 
already filled by 11 o’clock, and it 
was not until 2 o’clock that the 
procession reached the quay. Never 
was sight during this interval of 
three mortal hours less appropriate 
to the occasion than the spectacle 
we had before us. The intense cold 
rendered movement necessary for 
fear of being frozen to the spot, and 
to keep themselves warm the 
spectators in the stand began to 
dance. The mania gained the crowd 
below, and for a long time the 
troops of the line and the National 
Guards were joining in one general 
contredance, or an enormous 
ronde a la main. This preliminary 
orgie, while waiting for the body of 
the great hero of their nation, and 
in tiie face of the long line of 
statues of their greatest. warriors, 
struck us as peculiarly French — 
perhaps we mean inconsistent A 
propos of the long line of warrior 
statues that lined the avenue; the 
I struck us as good. These 
heroes seemed placed there to 
receive the last, and perhaps 
greatest, warrior of the nation, as 
he was restored in death to bis 
country. They may have been 
coarsely executed for the greater 
part, but this succession of war- 
riors, from C harlemagn e and Clo- 
vis down to the last Generals of the 
Empire, placed upon the passage of 
the Emperor to salute him as he 
passed to his last home, was well 
conceived. 

But why jdace Napoleon in his 
Imperial robes, at the end, to greet 
himself? . . . ’nil the procession 
really reached this spot the hours 
of impatient waiting were long; the 
dancing, however, which we have 
already described, whited away the 
time of some, and the f*nnnn fined 
from the first court of the Invalides 
every quarter of an hour seemed to 
warm the hearts, if not the limbs, 
of others. For our parts, the cannon 
had one great advantage: the rich 
clouds of rolling smoke that they 
sent forth hid from our eyes for a 
time the bare poles and skeleton 
scaffolding of the half-draped spars 
that were announced in the pro- 
gramme as a triumphal funeral 
entrance to the Invalides. Nothing 
could be more paltry, more ugly, 
more disgraceful than this ragged- 
looking curtain to the great drama 
that was to be acted . . . The very 
fire-pots that occupied the tripods 
at the top of the two entrance 
gateposts of painted half-gilt wood 
seemed as if they, too, had received 
orders not to burn, and only to 
smoke. The same ordre dujour was 
zealously observed by the other 
candelabra that alternated with the 


statues along tbe avenue leading to 
the Invalides, and they dimmed 


instead of blazing, and went out 
before the funeral procession ar- 
rived. The day before tbe proces- 
sion reached us. cleared up 
beautifully. A small quantity of 
snow had fallen, but ibe heavens 
did more for tbe solemnity of the 
ceremony than man had done. The 
day, as far as the season of the year 
would admit of, was a day such as 
proverbially graced Napoleon’s 
fetes in his imperial splendour and 
now greeted him again as he 
received his last honours. We heard 
it called a Napoleonic day . . . 


Terrorist murder 

From Mr Ralph Hoarau 
Sir, I refer to your article, “Murder 
in terrorist backlash” (November 
26), concerning tbe coroner’s re- 
port on the assassination of the- 
exiled Seychellois leader, Mr Ge- 
rard Hoarau. Summing up his 
report, the coroner. Dr David 
Paul, said: 

This was tbe evil beddash of 
terrorist activity which involved 
people living in this country but was 
not the concern of citizens of this 
country. 

My brother, now revered as a 
national hero by the Seychellois 
people, was an advocate of peace 
who was campaigning vigorously, 
with tbe support of the majority of 
the Seychellois, for the return of 
peace, democracy and justice is 
Seychelles. 

All along, in spite of being 
imprisoned and forced into exile 
by Marxist dictator Albert Ren£, 
my brother bad always opposed 


any violent solution to tbe Sey- 
chelles rfifcmnia. His challenges to 
Ren 6, who assumed power in a 
bloody coup d’etat,, to bold free 
and fair elections were always 
rejected. That challenge still 
stands. 

Your article points out that 
Scotland Yard’s anti-terrorist 
branch had not been aware of any 
threats against my brother’s life. 
In September, 1985, my brother 
had informed a certain Inspector 
Haslett, of Scotland Yard, that the 
French police had uncovered a 
plot to assassinate him in Fiance 
and flat he feared for his life. 
Arrests were also made by the 
French. 

This was dismissed by Scotland 
Yard as “a wild story”. Two 
months later that wild story 
turned into grim reality. 

Yours fafthfiilly, 

R. HOARAU, 

8 Dorset Waye, 

Heston, Middlesex. 


Country of origin 

From Mr A. A. Painter 
Sir, The Conservative Par- 
liamentary Group for European 
Reform express popular concern 
(letter, Dramber 5) that the 
repeal of the Trade Descriptions 
Act 1972 will be detrimental to 
consumers in that it wifi no longer 
be necessary for imported goods to 
bear an indication of the country 
of origin. However, they mis- 
understand the requirements of 
that act and the likely effect of its 
repeal. 

The Act requires that imported 
goods bearing a UK name or 
mark, or anything which may be 
taken as such, shall bear an 
indication of the country of origin. 
It has been generally ineffective 
because foreign goods not bearing 
a UK name etc are exempted and, 
by virtue of the international 
production of consumer goods, it 
is often impossible to decide in 
which country a product is in fact 
made. 

It is common for goods assem- 
bled in one country to be made 
entirely or partly from compo- 
nents made in one or more other 
countries. Any indication of die 
country of origin is likely, in those 

circ ums tances, to he midparting 

There is evidence to suggest that 
compulsory origin marking may 
actually work against the interests 
of British manufacturers in prod- 
uct categories where consumers 
believe the foreign product to be 
superior. But whether that is so or 
not, it will remain open to British 
manufacturers to voluntarily 
mark their goods with a statement 
of origin. The consumer may then 
reasonably assume that goods not 
so marked are imported. 

It should be borne in mind that 
a false indication of origin is an 
offence against the Trade Descrip- 
tions Act 1968 which will be 


unaffected by the Consumer 
Protection Bill 

Origin marking is no longer a 
credible measure of consumer 
protection, nor is it a good 
example of the erosion of UK 
sovereignty. 

Yours fait hfully, 

A. A. PAINTER, 

Lawmark, 

Sussex Suite, 

City Gates, 

2-4 Southgate, 

Chichester, Sussex. 

December 5. 

Music on trains 

From Miss Carol Illingworth 
Sir, Henry Stanhope's support of 
buskers (feature, December 5) is 
most welcome. Britain, however, 
does not have a monopoly. 

Some three years ago I travelled 
by train from Orange, New South 
Wales, to Sydney and on this 
journey through the spectacular 
Blue Mountain range the pas- 
sengers were entertained by a 
group of young musicians 
performing Australian folk songs 
and bush ballads. It is, perhaps, no 
coincidence that A. B. Paterson 
(Banjo Paterson, of “Waltzing 
Matilda" fame) was bom within a 
stone's throw of Orange. I was 
unable to discover whether this 
was an isolated occurrence. 

Would it not be delightful if BR 
were to take a leaf out of the 
Australians’ book, and lay on 
“performing” trains for visitors to 
Britain? Shakespeare’s songs on 
the Stratford train, sea shanties to 
coastal destinations. Elgar on the 
way to the Malvems, Scottish 
ballads and, of course, calypsos 
when the West Indian cricket 
team are visiting us. for example. 
Yours etc, 

CAROL ILLINGWORTH, 

2F Randolph Crescent, W9. 
December 5. 


IS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 



COURT AND SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
December 17: His Excellency 
Mr Ali Arshad and Mrs Arshad 
were received in farewell audi- 
ence by The Queen and took 
leave upon His Excellency 
retinquishrag his appointment 
as Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary from Paki- 
stan to the Court oFS t James’s. 

His Excellency Jonkheer 
J.UFL Huydecoper and Ma- 
dame Huydecoper were re- 
ceived in farewell audience by 
The Queen and took leave upon 
His Excellency relinquishing his 
appointment as Ambassador 
Extraordinary and 

Plenipotentiary from the King- 
dom of the Netherlands to the 
Court of St James’s. 

His Excellency Mr Callisto 
Metekenya Mkona and Mrs 
Mkona were received in farewell 
audience by The Queen and 
took leave upon His Excellency 
relinquishing his appointment 
as High Commissioner for the 
Republic of Malawi in London. 

The Duchess of York this 
evening attended Christmas 
Carols with the Stars at the 
Royal Albert HaO in aid of 
Leukaemia Research Fund. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the President of the 
Royal Albert Hall (Sir Kirby 
Laing), the Founder-Director of 
the Fund (Mr Gordon Pilfer) 
and the President, Leukaemia 
League of 365 (Lady Rose 
Nfevtll). 


Mrs John Floyd and Wing 
Commander Adam Wise were 
in attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
December 17: The Princess 
Margaret. Countess of Snow-' 
'(ton, as Grand President of the 
St John Ambulance Association 
and Brigade, this evening at- 
tended a Carol Service held at St 
George’s Church, Hanover 
Square, in aid of the West- 
minster Christmas AppeaL 

The Hon Mrs Witts was in 
attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES’S PALACE 
December 17: Tbe Duke of 
Kent, as President of the Royal 
National Lifeboat Institution, 
today attended a hmch given by 
the Variety Club of Great 
Britain in aid of the RNLL 

Captain Michael Campbell- 
Lamerton was in attendance. 

THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 
December 17: Princess Alexan- 
dra, Patron, this afternoon vis- 
ited St Christopher’s Hospice, 
Sydenham, London SE26. 

In the evening. Her Royal 
Highness and tbe Hon Angus 
Ogjlvy were present at the 
opening of the Toshiba Gallery 
of Japanese Art and Design at 
the Victoria and Albert 
Museum. 

Mrs Peter Afia was in 
attendance. 


A service of thanksgiving for tbe 
life of Sir Geoffrey Agnew will 
be held at St James’s. Piccadilly, 
at noon today. 


Reception 

Sothehy^ 

Princess Margaret was present 
at a reception held in Sotheby’s 
Bond Street Gallery yesterday 
after the presentation of “The 
Story of Christmas” organized 
by the Propis Partnership, in aid 
of the St John Ambulance 
Centenary Appeal and the 
Chevne Centre for Spastic Chil- 
dren. The Chairman of 
Sotheby's and Mis Thompson 
and the Chairman of the Estates 
Gazette and Mis Wilson re- 
ceived the guests. 

Dinners 

Rcryal Society of St George 
The Lord Mayor and Lady 
Mayoress, accompanied by the 
Sheriffs and their ladies, at- 
tended tbe Christmas dinner of 
the City of London branch of 
the Royal Society of St George 
held last night at the Mansion 
House. Mr William B. Fraser, 
chairman, accompanied by Mis 
Fraser, presided and the other 
speakers were the Lord Mayor. 
Sir Walter Bodmer, Director of 
Research of the Imperial Cancer 
Research Fund, Mr Alderman 
L. John Chalstrey, Mr William 
Shand and the Rev Basil Wat- 
son. Others present included: 

Mator-General Sir Dlgby and Lady 
Raeburn. Lady Bodmer. Prtac* and 
Princess Carol of Romania. Ute 
Resident Governor of HM Tower of 
London and Mrs MacLetlan Uw 
Master of tbe Guild of Freemen of me 
City of London and Mrs HododL the 
President of the United Wards* Club of 
the City of London and Mrs Nortball- 
Laurle. tbe Chairman of tbe Manorial 
Society of Great Britain and officers of 
the society and their ladies. 


National Committee for the 
900th Anniversary of Domesday 
Book, 1086-1986 

Mr Robert Smith, Chairman of 
the National Committee for the 
900th Anniversary of Domes- 
day Book, 1 086- 1 986, welcomed 
members of the national 
committee and members of tbe 
Manorial Society of Great 
Britain at dinner at the East 
India Club, London, on Tues- 
day night. The Speaker, Mr 
Bernard Weatherill. MP, 
accompanied by Mrs 
Weatherill, was tbe guest of 
honour. Among those present 
were: 

The Earl and Countess of Onslow. 
Viscouni and Viscountess Masereene 
and Ferrard. Lord Sudeley. Sir Colin 
OMe (Garter Principal K^of. Aim), 


S*r John Blqu-Davtson. 
Katarina of Yiw 


_ . Princess 

ugosLrvia. Mr K Best. 

MP. MrDdf SUva. QC. Mr N J Deva. 
Mr N J Fisher (.West Midlands 
chairman) and Mrs Fisher. Mr J 
Hayes. MP. Mr and Mrs J M M HuUts. 
Prafenor and Mrs H R Loyn. Mr and 
Mrs I McCorquodale. Mr A Mac- 
Millan. Dr P Moore. Mr J E PowriL 
MP. and Mrs Powell. Mr G F Rand 
(East Anglia chairman) and Mrs Rand. 
Mr N Thome. MP. and Mr and Mrs P 
WorsUwmr. 

Service 

dinner 

Berkhamsted School CCF 

Lieutenant-Colonel W.E. 
Glover presided at the annual 
dinner of Berkhamsted School 
Combined Cadet Force held last 
night at Troopers, Aldbory. The 
principal guest s were Brigadier 
and Mrs R-S. Higson, Major and 
Mis E-F.R. Scroggie, Dr and 
Mrs C.L. Tutty and the head- 
master and Mrs CJ. Driver. 


Birthdays today 

Sir Brian Batsfoid, 76; Field 
Marshal Sir Edwin Bramah. 63; 
Herr Willy Brandt, 73; Sir Hugh 
Fraser. 50; Lieutenant-Com- 
mander I. E. Fraser, VC. 66; Mr 
Christopher Fry, 79; Miss Rose- 
mary Leach, 51; Miss Annette 
Page, 54; Mr Meriyn Rees, MP, 
66: Mr Keith Richard, 43; Lord 

Robens of Woktingbam, 76: 
Major-General Sir Reginald 
Scoones, 86; Mr Joe Wade, 67; 
the Right Rev R. K. William- 
son, 54. 


Luncheon 

Variety Qub of Great Britain 
Tbe Duke of Kent was the guest 
of honour at the Variety Club of 
Great Britain’s Christmas lun- 
cheon held at the Hilton hotel 
yesterday and, as President of 
die Royal National Lifeboat 
Institution, accepted a cheque 
from the dub. Sir Kenneth 
Newman, Commissioner of the 
Metropolitan Police, accepted a 
cheque for the Police 
Dependants' Trust 
Board of Deputies Of British 
Jews 

Mr Kenneth Baker, Secretary of 
State for Education and Science, 
was the guest of honour at a 
luncheon held yesterday at Wo- 
burn House, Tavistock Square. 
Dr Lionel Kopelowitz, Presi- 
dent of the Board of Deputies of 
British Jews, the honorary offi- 
cers and the secretary general 
were tbe hosts. Among those 
present were: 

Tbe Ambassador of Israel. the Ambas- 
sador of Turkey. Marouess of Read- 
Chief Rabbi. Rabbi, Dr A Levy. 
Mr Edmund de Rothschild. Mr and 
Mrs Philip McKeamey. Dr R M W 
Rlckptl (Chairman. Committee of 
Directors of Polytechnics), and bead 
teachers and uu »e m on» of Jewish 
schools. 


Appointments 

Lon}*Justtee Woolf to be Chair- 
man of the Advisory Committee 
on Legal Education, in succes- 
sion to Lord Justice Lawton. 
Mr Giles Charles Fielding 
Forrester and Mr David Chris- 
tian Pitmen to be circuit judges 
on the South Eastern Circuit. 
Judge Medd. QG and Mr 
Charles Potter. QC. to be part- 
time Special Commissioners of 
Income Tax. 

Mr Gareth Williams, QC to be 
Leader of the Wales and Chester 
Circuit from January I. 

Other appointments include: 
Viscount Boyd of Merton to be 
Chairman of the Save the 
Children Fund. 

Mr John Parry to be National 
Governor for Wales of the BBC. 


Micklefield School 

Mr Eric Reynolds has been 
appointed Headmaster of 
Micklefield School, Seaford, in 
succession to Mrs Margaret 
Payton, who retires in the 
summer of 1987. 


Rendcomb College 

Mr John Tolputt has been 
appointed Headmaster of 
Rendcomb College, Cirencester 
from September 1987. He suc- 
ceeds Mr Roger Med ill. who is 
retiring after 16 years as 
headmaster. 


Jim in a double fix 



Tete a tete: Jimmy Savfie, the television personality, in gold lame tracksuit and naming 
shoes, met his likeness at Madame Tussaud’s in London yesterday. The new waxwork was 
sculpted by Steve Swales. (Photograph: John Manning). 


Sale room 


Record for silver ornament 


By Geraldine Norman 
Sale Room Correspondent 

A magnificent silver epergne 
made by Paul de Lamerie in 
the 1730s became the most 
expensive single item of Eng- 
lish silver ever sold at auction 
when it reached £770.000 
(unpublished estimate 
£500,000-£750,000) at 
Christie’s yesterday. 

Lamerie, the Hugnenot 
silversmith, is looked upon as 
the greatest British master of 
the art and tbe epergne, with 
its dishes and candelabra 
arms, gives foil reign to his 
rococo genres. 

He mad** very few of them. 
This one was designed for the 
Ear! of Mountrath, one of bis 
best dints, and had passed to 
the Port arii ngton &mBy by 
marriage; it was sent for sale 
yesterday the rite Earl of 
Portariington and his brother , 
the Hon John Dawsoo- 
Damer. It was bought by 
Jacques Koopman. 

Only three other Lamerie 
epergnes have been seen at 
auction this century. Tbe last 
cost £850 at Christie’s in 1947 
and was bought by an Indian 
prince to give to the Queen, 
then Princess Elizabeth, as a 
wedding presenL The highest 
previous price was £1,800 in 
1919. 

Christie’s silver sale proved 
highly successful, with a total 
of £1,174£33 and seven per 
cent unsold. A German red 
glass pilgrim bottle mounted 
in silver-gilt in Augsburg 
around 1690 secured £25300 



... . -.»i> •• • •_ 


The lavish epergne. which sold for a record £770,000 at 
Christie's Yesterday. 


(estimate £5,000-£8,000) 
while a plain Lamerie ink- 
stand of 1730 m»rfp £ 36,500 
(estimate £6,000-£8,000). 

Christie's sale of decorative 
arts from 1880 to the present 
day, in contrast, proved un- 
usually atsnccessfiiL There 
was a total of £134,404 but 54 
per cent was left unsold and 
this figure represented a large 
number of lots, rather than one 
or two expensive items. 

At Phillips, teddy bears 
were the big attraction of the 
day. Mr G-LiStann, a collec- 
tor and dealer from Cincxnnxti, 
Ohio, spent £3J)80 (estimate 
£L500-£2,000) for a Steiff 
blonde plush teddy in good 
condition, though his growler 


is reported “inoperative’’, 
worn Steiff plash teddy that 
had only bees expected to 
make £700-£900 also sold to 
Mr Storm at £2^00. 

A Norfolk dealer, Mr Roger 
Bradbury, had come to the sale 
with his son, aged six, who is a 
teddy fanatic. They bought 41 
bears at a total cost of £528. 
The sale made £58£57 with 
three pa - cent left unsold. 

Sotheby’s sale of Victorian 
paintings made £727,870 with 
125 per cent left tmsokL 
Landscap es were dnhig better 
than usual with & W illiam 
Sbayer harvesting scene en- 
titled “The Gossips” making 
£24,750 (estimate £10,006- 
£15,000). 



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Forthcoming 

marriages 


Mr MJELC. FitzRoy 
and Miss GA- Garnet! 

The engagement is announced 
between Mi ch ael, only son of 
Lord and Lady Edward FitzRoy, 
of Norton House, Norwich, 
Norfolk, and Cornelia, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Peter 
Garnett, of Quakers' Orchard, 
P&aslake, Surrey. 

Captain P. Adams 
and Miss D. Danjefl 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter Adams, of The 
Parachute Regiment, youngest 
son of Mrs June Adams, of The 
Glebe, Uffington, Oxfordshire, 
and Deborah, youngest daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs Richard 
DanieU, of Nairobi, Kenya. 


MrRJX Fearn 
and Miss JJL Johnson 
The forthcoming marriage is 
announced between Richard, 
elder son of Mr and Mrs G.N. 
Fearn, of Chalfont St Peter, 
Buckinghamshire, and Judy, 


younger daughter of Dr and Mrs 
E Johnson, of Wlrxflesham, 
Surrey. 

Mr JJVLC Griffiths 
and Miss J5. Edgecombe 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Jeremy, son of Mr and 
Mrs Michael Griffiths, of 
Yarnton, Oxfordshire, and 
Jenny, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Tony Edgecombe. ofDorcbester 
on Thames, Oxfordshire. 

Mr JLJ-A- Long 
and Miss &£. Wills 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard John Alban, 
younger son of the late Mr T.A. 
Long and Mrs EM. Long, of 
Westhaven, Angus, and Heather 
Elizabeth, younger daughter of 
tbe late Mr A.EJ. Wills and Mrs 
H.G. Wills, of Falmouth, 
Cornwall. 

Mr AS. Maday 
and Miss FJL Neal 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, eider son of 
Dr and Mrs Strang Maclay, of 
Hambtedon. Surrey, and Felic- 
ity, younger daughter of Mr and 
Mrs John Neal, of Mill Hill, 
London. 

Mr CP. Mead 
and Miss GAL Davenport 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, eldest son 
of Brigadier and Mrs P.W. 
Mead, of Blackheath, London, 
and Gwyneth, youngest daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mis W.CA. 
Davenport, of Norwich, 
Norfolk 

Mr AJB- Moore 
and Miss L-S. Churcfcley 
The engagement is announced 
between Antony, son of the late 
Mr H. Moore and Mis J. Jago, of 
Ashford, Kent,' and Lynn, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs AJL 
Churchley, of Hythe, Kent. 

Mr P-S. Phillips 
and Miss QJLC.Uoyd-Jacob 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter, only son of Mrs 


Patricia Witchell, of FetetsfiekL 
Hampshire, and Mr Nigel Phil- 
lips, of Deal. Kent, and Cho, 
younger daughter of Mis Clare 
Lloyd-Jacob, of London, and 
Mr David Lloyd-Jacob, of New 
York. 

Mr EW. Tail 
and Miss J.A. S trad e r s 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon, son of Mr and 
Mrs Thomas Tail, of Rich- 
mond, Surrey, and Jessica, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Vernon 
Saunders, ofWey bridge, Surrey. 

Mr G. Thompson 
and Miss MLJ. Maneaster 
The engagement is announced, 
between Gareth, son of Mr and 
Mrs Peter Thompson, of 
Bumiston. North Yorkshire, 
and Miranda, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Martin Muncaster, of 
Clouds Hill, Lynchmere, 
Haslemere, Surrey. 

Mr R. Underwood 
and Miss W. Bbnshaid 
The engagement is announced 
between Rory, eldest son of Mis 
Anne Underwood and the late 
Mr J.A. Underwood, of Barnard 
Castle, Co Durham, and 
Wendy, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Laurence S. Blanshard, 
of East HaJton, Grimbsy, South 
Humberside. 

Mr A~OJVL Wadsworth 
and Miss SJ. Leslie 
Tbe e ng a g e m ent is announced 
between Andrew, son of Dr and 
Mrs V.M_ Wadswort h , and So- 
phia, daughter of Mr M. Leslie, 
ofWesterham, Kent, and Mrs G 
Leslie, of Cowden, Kent. 

Mr W. Walpole 
and Mrs fJR-J. Watts 
The engagement is announced 
between Bill Walpole, husband 
of the late Phflys Walpole, 
Hamels Park, BuntingfonL and 
Lavender Watts, widow of Ma- 
jor A-G. Wans, The Dorset 
Regiment, The Bara Cottage, 
Little Hormead, Hertfordshire. 

Marriage 

Mr M.W. Fane 

and MssEAtBonnor-MiHrice 
The marriage took place on 
November 1, 1986,atStTysilio 
and St Mary, Meifod. Mont- 
gomeryshire, of Mr Mark wil- 
liam Fane, son of the late Mr 
Michael Fane and of Mrs Fane, 
of Bladcdown House, Hamp- 
shire, and Miss Enina Mary 
Bonnor-Maurice, daughter of 
Major and Mrs Edward Bonnor- 
Maurice. of Bodynfoel, 
Lianfechain. The Rev Kenneth 

Habershon officiated. 

The bride, who given in 
mar riage by her father, was 
attended by Phoebe Crawshaw, 
Leonie de Baer, Geraldine 
Loriraer, Timothy Edwards, 
Ben Francis and Xan Vannuza. 
Mr Nicholas Fane was best man. 

the honeymoon is being 
spent in Sri Lanka. 


OBITUARY 
PROFESSOR HARR* 
JONES 

Important theoretical 
physicist 


Professor Hany Jones, 
FRS, who died suddenly on 
December 15 St the age of SI, 
was one of the world s leading 
solid-state physicists. 

Bora on April 12, 1905, at 
Pudsev. Yorkshire, he studied 
phvstcs at Leeds University 
Jnd later did Meta** 
Trinitv College, Cambridge, 
under Professor R. H. Fowler. 
In 1930 he became a research 
assistant in the physics depart- 
ment at BristoL 
fn I93S he went ro Imperial 
College. London, as R eaderm 
Mathematics and from 1946 
to 1972 was Professor there 
(h ead nf department 1955-70). 
From 1970 to 1972 he was 
pro-Rector. 

On retirement he continued 
working, as senior research 
fellow, until 1981. He was 
elected FRS in 1952. 

Jones’s most influential 
contributions to theoretical 
physics concerned the inter- 
pretation of the electronic 
properties of solids- This work 
had its origins in his studies at 
Bristol in the 1930s and 
involved co-operation with 
Nevill Mott (now Sir NeviU, 
Nobel Laureate in Physics). 

His most original work 
concerned the influence of the 
Fermi surface (the region in 
momentum space enclosing 
quantum states occupied by 


electrons) an alloy structures 

(Hume-Rcihery ralesL da- 
magnetic susceptibility 
calvanomagnctisra « ad 50:1 
X-rav emission spectra- 

As a result he published in 
1936. with Mott The Tr.eon 
of ike Properties oj SfetoisorJ 
Alloys, whkh has remained a 

classic . . 

During the post-war period 
he founded, in the raalhentat- 
ics department oi Imperial 
College, a school of solid-slate 
theory that flourishes to this 

day. . . 

After his retirement he 
turned attention to gas 
dvnamics, a subject on which 
he had first collaborated with 
Sir Geoffrey Taylor, FRS. 
during the war. He wrote a 
number of original papers on 
the dynamics of spinning det- 
onation waves, on the mecha- 
nism of vibrating flames, and 
on the generation of sound by 
flames. 

Jones was modest and kind- 
ly. A true Yorkshireman, and 
more especially a true Pudsev 
man. he had a life-long love of 
cricket, especially when his 
team won. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Molly, and by their son and 
two daughters — the elder of 
whom. Mrs Angela Rumbold, 
is MP for Mitcham and Minis- 
ter of State in the Department 
of Education and Science. 


MR GORDON RAY 


Mr Gordon N. Ray. the 
American literary scholar 
who. from 1963^ to 1985, 
presided over the John Simon 
Guggenheim Memorial Foun- 
dation. directing its fellowship 
programme for science and 
the arts, died on December 15, 
at the age of 72. 

Gordon Norton Ray was 
born in New York on Septem- 
ber 8, 1915, and educated at 
the University of Indiana and 
at Harvard. His early career 
on the faculty there was 
interrupted by the war, for 
which be enisled as an ap- 
prentice seaman in the US 
Navy. He was later commis- 
sioned and saw a good deal of 
active service, mainly in air- 
craft carriers in the Pacific 
where he had seven battle 
stars to his credit 

On demobilization he re- 
turned to scholarly work with 
great energy and determ- 
ination. publishing his four- 
volume edition ofThackeray’s 
letters and papers in 1 945-6, to 
be followed by the two vol- 
umes of his biography of 
Thackeray, The Vses of Adver- 
sity (1955) and The Age of 
Wisdom (1958). 

His interest in H. G. Wells 
led to the publication (with 
Leon Edel) of Henry James 
and H. G. Wells (1958) and, 
later, H. G. Wells and Rebecca 
West (1974X Both drew on the 
collections of the University 
of Illinois, where Ray was 
Professor of English from 
1946 to 1960, latterly serving 
also as Vice-President of the 
University; and where, under 
his aegis, the university library 
was greatly expanded, becom- 
ing one of the most important 
in the country. 

He moved from Illinois to 
New York in 1960, to join the 
Guggenheim Foundation, 
where he took over as Presi- 
dent in 1963. The manage- 
ment of one of the most 
prestigious of American 
learned foundations is a very 


demanding post, but Ray 
found time to keep up many of 
his scholarly interests, to be 
attached to the graduate 
school of New York Universi- 
ty as a professor, and to be 
heavily involved in the direc- 
tion of several other learned 
institutions. 

Among these was the 
PieTpont Morgan Library, 
which staged two exhibitions 
from his personal collection, 
on which were based the 
lavish catalogue-monographs 
The Illustrator and the Book in 
England 1790-1814 (1976) 
and The Art of the French 
Illustrated Book ( 1 982). 

Ray bails up an outstanding 
private library in his fine 
apartment overlooking the 
East River. The collection was 
exceptionally strong in many 
areas of 19th-century English 
literature. In later years his 
interests turned more to illus- 
trated books, and he bought 
widely and presrientiy in an 
originally underestimated 
field. 

He was generous in allowing 
access to his collections to 
scholars who had won his 
approval, and he gave a 
number of major lectures 
which emphasized to univer- 
sity libraries in the United 
States the importance of 
building up and maintaining 
their rare book collections. 
Recently he bad given many 
of his own books to the 
Pierpont Morgan Library. 

Ray was a man of solid and 
authoritative presence, and of 
considered and consequential 
speech, who managed by strict 
routines of domestic life, ad- 
ministrative work and foreign 
travel to keep up his reading in 
his chosen areas of study with 
remarkable thoroughness. 

He was well known in 
Britain both to fellow scholars 
and to the book trade, and was 
elected Lyell Reader in Bibli- 
ography at Oxford for the year 
1984-5. 

He was unmarried. 


MR MAURICE HANDFORD 


Maurice James Handfbrd, a 
conductor who was particular- 
ly well-known in the north of 
England, died on December 
16, aged 58. He was a sound 
interpreter of 20th century 
music and particularly effect- 
ive in choral and other laige- 
scalc works. 

He was bora on April 29, 
1928, at Salisbury, and studied 
at the Royal Academy of 
Music, with the bora as his 
main subject. From 1949 to 
1961 be played that instru- 
ment in Sir John Barbirolli's 

Halle Orchestra. 

Barbirolli encouraged him 
to take up conducting and in 
September 1961 he became 
conductor of the Royal 
Academy’s First Orchestra 
initially as Barbirolli’s asso- 
ciate. He began with some of 
the orchestra's industrial 
concerts. 

In 1962 be was given charge 
of the first Halle performance 
of Comma Bunina, in which 
he was able to demonstrate his 
special ability in choral works. 
Tbe following year he was 
made the orchestra’s associate 
conductor, and was assign^ 
by Barbirolli much of the 
modern and difficult reper- 


tory. Thus he became indis- 
pensable in directing such 
complex works as Messaien’s 
Turangalila symphony and 
the music of Lutoslawski and 
Penderecki. 

In 1970, on the death of 
Barbirolli, he conducted The 
Dream of Gerontius in his 
mentor's memory. Although 
he did not succeed Sir John as 
conductor of the Hall6 he 
continued to conduct the or- 
chestra in works requiring his 
particular talent, such as 
Delius’s Mass of Life. From 
1970 to 1974 he was staff 
conductor with die City of 
Birmingham Orchestra and 
from 1971 to 1975, conductor 
of the Calgary Philhar monic 
in Canada. 

He was an excellent orches- 
tral trainer, and was connect- 
ed with both the Royal 
Northern School of Music in 
Manchester and the RAM in 
London. His last appearance 
was with the Academy orches- 
tra two weeks aeo, in a concert 
which included the Vaughan 
Williams “London” Sympho 

ny. 

His two marriages ended in 
divorce. There is one son from 
the second. 


SIR RICHARD DENBY 


Sir Richard Denby, who 
died on December 1 6, aged 71, 
was president of the Law 
Society in 1977-78 and a 
member of the Cr imina l Inju- 
lies Compensation Board. 

Richard Kenneth Denby 
was born on March 20, 1915 
and educated at Ackworth 
School and Leeds University 
where he took a first in Law! 
He was admitted solicitor in 
1937, taking first class hon- 
ours and the Clifford Inn Prize 
in the Law Society finals. 

He joined die Bradford firm 
of A. V. Hammond and Co 
where he was to spend most of 
fais working life. He retired 
recently as senior partner. 

When war came he was 


.1 


commissioned in the Green 
Howards and served at Allied 
Forces Headquarters in North 
Africa, at the War Office and 
as assistant military secretary 
at Northern Co mmand He 
was mentioned in despatches 
£ad attained the rank of 

ueuteuant-coloneL 
Denby was an ebullient, 
outgoing character, well- 
versed in public relations, and 
gear's presidency brought * 
the affairs of the Law Society 
into the public eye to a far 
greater extent than they had 
been before. 

m Elecn - whom he 

Mined m 1 939, died in 1974, 
ano ne is survived by a sbn 
and two daughters. 

it. 




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THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 




19 


BIRTHS, MAKHUGES, DEATHS PERSONAL COLUMNS 


** m* imoram « out o» 

ttunij. tiut on* day u, »nf, ^ im . a _ 

r°sr yrarv jm 1 

s PHi-T a , B 


ADOSON ■ On Tueulay I6ih ctoeetn- 
bcr at Nw Cross WotvertuinDtan. to 
Ljti and K'en. a daughter Roftanaoh 
Katharine, dear slyer (or Charter. 
PrneJopr. Martin and Douglas. 


PtWV - On Dece m ber idoi. suddenly 

“OpramgUV.athhiHate.^S? 

XL** ^ aJodwood. Didev. 

J2T? , 72 - Oeaily loved 
{^md oroie late Eileen, rather of 
IWy. Frances ana Michael am 
Rl ^ h * w - *W»n. 
K«ind. Cnun» and Charles. 
2*, 1 ’?' funeral. Memorial 
5«wicelo De arranged No Itowm. 

loS,JonnA ®- 


MMIM - On December isui 1986, 
PtxeiuDy at Tmolecomw. in us 
“Bln year. Rohm wuiiam late of . 
Cappers. Datum. WbikMgh. North 
Devon. Gone to tda Moved Lai*. 
Much loved rattier or David and 
Ram. Funeral imkt 12 JOM 1 Mon- 
day December 22nd at Yeovil 
crematorium. Enquires to Eraa« Fu- 
neral Servient. Newell, Sherborne 
Tel: 0935 81347*^ ^ncnwrac. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


GARY AND MARY 
DAVEY 


orouaty announc* Che arrival of j non. 


... 


BARIkum - On December tom. to ■ On December tab «»*q 

“4 Hugo, a 5^ h0nw -O«natW0iecfc).hI^mfl 


«lauqhi pr. Eri ca loufce Kate. 
^^AWSCTTE • On December i lih. at 

Queen Charlotte's Hospital. to Hilary 
owe Newest and Peter, a daughter 

Emily Rose. ^ 


COMBE - On December I7ih to Ub by 
inee Taylor) and MichacL » 
daughter 


of u>n»M C ? f18 (W o«ck). hushamt 
« Margaret. Funeral on Friday Dr> 

SSSSiS at , 2pm - M BaiSSuParlc 

S*f l «^DonatlwB If desired to 
ywu for Stem. Judd street. London 


■JffiEWM ' On December 14th 
1906. In hospital m Henleyon- 
Thames, alter a short Hinas. Charles 
Tyson aged 61. husband of the late 
J*iKo and brother of Tom. the late 
Herbert and Esther. Formerly with 
the Brush Council. Private fiw.ni 
service, no (lowers. 


Jwwi Lewis Dav Of 


« 17.00 on Monday December iSKb. 


at St Georges HbspObL SW17. 


0A . v f Y ' ° n Wowsav December 15th. 
al St. Ceoroes Hospital. SV.17. to 
Mary and Gary, a son. James Lewis. 
FRATTA • On December 16 th 1986. in 
USA, to Faral) (nee Bacquer) 
and Rcben. a son Bradley Robert. 
™w®M« - On December 10th. at 

VvaUard General HospuaL lo Janet 

•nee Drapeaui and Paul, a dausblcr 
Ceordna Eliza b eth, a skier (or 
J*UThO$ 

NOTT - On December 12th 1986. to 
Wendy uwe ManingeU) and Colin a 
boy. Ch ristopher James. 

POUTER ■ On December i5(h, to Anna 
inee Noble) and John, a son. Georat 
Edward. 

SOBKflM - On October 30th 1986. lo 
Philip and Barbara, a daughter 
Chry ytal Angela, a ssier for Tracy. 
STEWART - On December 15th. to 
Anne utee Sandenuuu and Lachlan a 
son. (Lachlan Robert) al Imemess. 
WARDLE - On December 9th 1986 at 
Princess Margaret Hospital, Swin- 
don. to Jennifer inee Vernon) and 
John, a son Andrew Gray, a brother 
f or Ja mes. 

WHITEHEAD - on December 16th. at 
Wordsiey HusdU.i 1 Stourbridge, to 
Julie mce Cartwright) and Peter, 
son. Alexander Lees Whitehead. 


F1 ®*5 rHOU8 ** ■ 0,1 December )6th 
1986. peacefully al home. Ftorence 
Aubrey ana dear mother of 
„ mured and Derek. AH enouinea to 
Baum* Funeral Service, tetepnone 
061 7731071. 


6W fW UHTH . on Monday Decem- 
ber 25tn. peacefully at Hunthay. 
Axminsior Dr David Moteswonn 
ORE much loved husband of Rose, 
maty, lather and grandfather. 
Family flowers only please or dona- 
Uons to LEPRA. 


r w» i iCTS Ln»Bi M«iMia ortna tegsnwr 
Scientific. Uuunra. Humamaflan 
LoaaM to mao the RwwrecDon of Hu- 
tnanity. Rrpty to SOX F71 TW 01 388 
8903 


KAmiERMC KKM you bol MSm tor . 
wvous Oiiwnw ana ui mttn oi Mr Uw 
New Vean 


FOLLOWS - Lady CUn ciawinw an 
Deieniber 15th 1986. peacefully in 
her 91 si year after a shun fflona. 
widow oi the lair Sir CeoHrey Fol- 
lows CM C. formerly of the Colonial 
Adnunsmnve Sendee, aunt of He- 
lene Dawson of Sevenoaks Kent and 
tf Guy Dexoud of Mate. Seychelles. 
Reoteem Mass al St- Thomas of Can 
tertuay Church. Sevenoaks at 9.15 
am on Tuesday 23rd December, fol- 
lowed by private cremation. 


- On December 17th. 
peacefully ji home In Malta. Arthur 
Stuart MBE. agrd 79. laving husband 
or Ibe late Marie Louise, dearest ta- 
mer of CecUy (Sue). FeUcliy. Lizzie 
and Andrew. 


MR HJ. JOCL wtshesoU his friends a Mar- 
ry Cnnsuns and a Happy New Year 


BIRTHDAYS 


“•TrA** - On December Ifitb 1986. 
tolhteen F.E. Grattan MBE. widow 
“ Oft P- Cratian RMU, mother 
or Patrick Grattan and Elizabeth 
Dawson. Fuaeral service at 
^Kthamnstead Pam Qeroatortum. 
hlonday December 22nd 
12.30pm. Manorial service al 
Plympton to be ananoed laser. Faro 
ihr Oowers only please. E nquW tn u 
Das-ld Greedy. Tel 0544 773741. 


NEWMAN • On December I6th 1986. 
Andrew Newman. Beloved husband 
of SheOagh. broOKT of Lenny, father 
of jane and grandfather of wmtam. 
Peacefully after a long and bravely 
borne Hines*. Private funeral. No 
flowers but donations to Cancer Re- 
search, u wished. 


ALAN WATSON UVBMSVT 
40 lodsy. happy Mrmaay oeacafoo Po- 
lar Bearn 

ALASTAM WILLIAM SMtTN la one to- 
day. Happy batMay darBng. Lots of 
lov« (rom Saran and Roy. 

(M i LO - A very Hapov Btnnday - lam 
yai C. 

■SCMARB c. DAWKS la 91 today. Cm- 
sranaaaoM ana lave. The (amity. 


WNJNO - On December 15th 1986. 
peacefully to Haywards Heath Hoa- 
mlai. Colonel Cedric Jameson OdUng 
T.D.. aged 91 years. Memorial ser- 
vice ai CucMMd Parish Church on 
Monday 22nd December at 
II -30am. No dowers by regucsL 


SERVICES 


DEATHS 




EARROW - On December 14th, sud- 
denly at home. Enc Norman, dearest 
husband of Elizabeth- adored father 
of Jill and Tim and much loved 
Grandfather (Poppa) of Mark. Sally 
and Kate. Funeral service at Holy 
Cross Church, Btoslead. Isle or Wight 
on Friday December 19th at 2.45pm. 
Followed by private cremation. 
Flowers and all enquires to H V Tay- 
lor and Son Ltd. 45 Green St. Ryde. 
Kte Of Wight. Tel: 0983 62082. Me- 
m onal s ervice at Prestbury Later. 
BEMSTED - On December 16th 1986. 
peacefully at home. John Austen in 
tus 90th year, dearly loved husband 
of Flora, loving father of Susan and 
David and their families. Thanksgiv- 
ing Service al SbeldwkS] Parish 
Church, on Friday December 19th at 
3.30 mh. Family flowers only, but do- 
nations if desired to SheMwtch. 
Leaveland and Badlesmere 
Churches. No letters but enquiries lo 
R High and Sods Ltd. 1 Bayford 
Road. Situngbounw. Kent. Tel-. 
(0 795) 7295 8. 

COLCHESTER - On December 16th. 
Reverend John Charles Markham. 
Vicar of St Anne's and All Sainte 
Church. South Lambeth. SWB. Fu- 
neral service at The South London 
Crematorium, SW16 on Tuesday 
23rd December 1.45pm. Family 
flowers tun donations may be sent lo 
St Thomas' scanner Appeal, c/o X 
Ray Department St Thomas* Hospi- 
tal. SEl. A special Thanksgiving 
service win be held on Saturday 31st 
January 1987 at 6-OOpra In the 
above church. 

COLVILLE - on Tuesday December 
16th 1986. at home, islabank. 
Coupar Angus. Perthshire, after a 
short illness, borne with dignity and 
good humour. Wynn Robot, loving 
husband of Delrdre. Cremation pri- 
vate. Donations If desired to Cancer 
Research. A Thanksgiving Service 
Will be held al St John's Episcopal 
Church. Perth on Wednesday 7th 
January 1987 at 2pm. 
CROSTHWAITE - On December 14th. 
al Melville House Nursing Home. 
Edgbasian. Btrmtnghatn. after a long 
illness borne with dignity and good 
humour. Joseph Laurence, aged 80 
years. A greatly loved brother, unde 
and friend. Funeral service 12 noon 
on Monday December 21st at the 
Parish Church of St Mary. 
Handswonh. No flowers but tf de- 
sired donations for St Mary's may be 
sent to W H Scott and Son. Funeral 
Directors. 426 RoOon Pork Road. 
Eagbaslon. Birmingham. 

EPEATH - On December 16th. peace- 
fully In her sleep al home. Dorothy 
May aged 90 years, beloved wife of 
the late David Cert) and dearly loved 
mouier of Vanda. Audrey. David. 
John. Mary and Anne, abo a much 
loved grandmother and veal grand- 
mother. Funeral sendee at 5pm at 
Poole Crematorium. Poole. Dorset, 
on Monday 22nd December. Flowers 
or donations if desired to The Royal 
Commonwealth Society for The 
Blind, c/o Tapper Funeral Services. 
52 Parks! one RtL Poole. Dorset 


HALL • On December i2ih. Alan, 
senior lecturer to classics, al Keete 
University. Husband of Jill and 
fainer ot Alexander am |»m. No 
Mowers Donators to British institute 
of Archaeology at Ankara. 69 
Arlington Road. London. NWi 7ES. 
to memoriura Keete University 
Chapel 2.00pm 20th December. 


**N*WND - On December 4th. peace- 
fully at Wilten Hospice. MU ton 
Keynes. Thomas G.D.F/LL RJLF. 
fRld.j. aged 75 years. At Ms request - 
•I wtsh to express my apprecfaumi to 
all ray friends, neighbour* and 
aquamtances throughout the British 
Wes who have shown me such kind- 
bass and tolerance ova- the years 
and with particular reference lo 
those stffl resident In Leamington 
Spa. 


SMART - On December 14m 1986. at 
Harpenden. David Mod Smart, dear- 
ly knied husband of Tricte and father 
of George. Andrew and PhOippa and 
very dear son of Doreen and Bryan- 
Funeral al Harpenden Methodist 
Church. High Sired, Harpenden. ai 
1 45pm on Friday December 19th 
and private burnt al Westfield Road 
Cemetery. Famtty flowers only 
mease, but donations if desired to 
The British Heart Foundation. 


Mrir MM OR MR one tor CMUimi • A 
'"Hint mars* ra ate i an p m mu te and 
fMcnwm« gw. wrne for ute ms - 
write with tuam. Free brochure oa 
our WMTior courso: London School oi 
JourndUan Ref r. f g H e rtf or d SrreeL 
P wfc lo op. London wi. OI *90 8SMO 
reft CVS Ud gndwonil rnmeu- 


Him vtuw doeuRMncs. Dtouc 01031 
3388 . 

nUNDtlv, Love or Mtmaar. ad eon. 
area*. Datebnr. Dept tOio) 23 AtUBucton 
Rood. London W8. To!. 01-938 ion. 


deb and 
1 18-40 aoe rtoupi TM: 01-373 


TAYLOR - On December 1 6th 1986. 
peacefully in Taunton. Dr. Sheila 
Mary utee Gough) ARRC. MB. CUB. 
DCH. DRCOG. adored wife tn the 
late Brigadier Donald Verner Taylor. 
CBE. FDF. HDD. Bamaer al Law. 
Funeral an 22nd December 1986 al 
Stoke St. Gregory Pariah Church. 
Donations lo Association for interna- 
tional Cancer Research. 


school 
1606. 

A-LXVTL Cum eounni French tn 
r ranee. Art Hmory tn Ftonmce. Inter- 
mnuon from John Mall. JO Kings n«_ 
London SW3 4N8 TeL S8d 7338. 


FOB SALE 


]|[ 


RENTALS 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


YOITLL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 

resista carpets 


Wicanoere Maud namral csrh tiki. 
CxtrMiMy loro wraran me tx*i mon- 
ey can buy £8.96 aer ag yd ♦ <-*d. 
Merakaun velvet ptte carort 14 pteui 
ntan Bum to u n der t a y 12 " mdr 
from Hock. 7 rear wear guarantee for 
homearoaire £4 7E per m w + vaL 
Pi in me larpor fetec no n of ptem car- 
penng u> London. 

255 New unp Road 
Paniw Green SW6 


For the befj rentaa ■ ele c ti on of 

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FLITS & HOUSES 

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OURAISHI 
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WANTED 


DISAPOINTHD 
BALLET FAN 


CHKUXA. Lux. */ t eunny flvaio ton tn 
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42-48 EARLS COURT ROAD 
LONDON W8 6EJ 


Desperately seeks Ocfcetcs) for 
Friends of Govent Garden 
Gala on Sunday 
December 21sL 


F W CARP I ManaBemeni Scnical LM re- 
quire pnxwnice m Crnoral. Sam and 
wrw London Area* lor wasting upon 
cant* tel Oi 221 8938- 


Cinnpc/USA FHoMS 01-957 5400 
low Haul FbWB 01-603 ISIS 
IN/Buaateas Cues 01-958 3444 
Government Lieented/Bondea 
ABTA IATA ATOL 1458 


Phone 01 822 9555 

10.00 lo 6.00pm 


■ban * man conuci u> now on or- 
236 8861 (or me M tdrrlion Of 
rural vital nab ana bouse* to rent tn 
KiMSfibbridpe. Cntera and Kneupsn 


AUSTRALIAN Alt Waned By private 
buyer. U Butman by leading Australian 
artists, ea (tecs. WMMo. WlUums. 
Herman me. Tot 073081 6237. 


VUHTD EdwaTOtan. VKUnan and 

nmud furniture- Mr ASilon 01 947 

5946. 667668 Gama Lane. Eorbfh-M. 

SWI7 

C WANTED Larpe Vic wardrobes, 
chans. extaMHiw Ubtes. 

Mutedkam. bureaus 6 on suminei 

eft OI 946 7683 das OI 7890471 evn 


*WS. Owe io me Cromwell Hosnttsj. Lux 

woo nai iu£v mo. ca. ore', on prone, 
porterage £:20 pw Co bobaay teL 
Saganne Pram Lu eC9 9653. 


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★ ★HUGE DISCOUNTS** 

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M2 - Siioem one ante era flat m pdn sq 
Avail on loro or snort m L0e reerp & 
lulls in sit/o last m. Eutnnti. co teL 
£130 taw Tet*0T22j 27144 


room in renoW uwoon otiiimr ana 
TM. OI 243 0827 
jnVELUERT. Gold. Shir. Dtroaro* ur 
gratis wanted Too once*, williams 43 
Lambs ConduM Si WCI Ot 403 3338- 
MM COAT wanted stranded, very dark 
female Mira. luH terrain size 14/16 
Tel. (0775) 28498. 


AVAILABLE NOW Luxiirv flats 4 houses 
£200 £ I OOO per week TM Buramv 

081 5136 


* SYWEV 

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ft LUSAKA 

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ft ft 5 FRANCISCO ft 


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ft* SOUTH AMERICA ftft 
ft USA ft USA ft USA ftUSA ft 


SUMMER 

COURSE, totoiraiuon from John Hau. 
36 Kings Rd.. London 8W5 4NB. TM 


FOB SALE 


HART - On December 16th 1986. 
Peacefully after a long Bbwsa. 
Esmond AJLI.CS and M.B.E. for- 
merly of West Brook. Upber 
Oddlngton. Moreton In Marsh. 
Gloucestershire- Dearly loved hus- 
band of ftivnor and father of Ingrid 
and Jerald 


■ - On December I5th 2986. 
peacefully at home to Kiraington. 
near Oxford. Francis. Widower of 
Muriel and Hearty loved father of tan 
and grandfather of Ben aid Mat- 
thew. Funeral sendee at Kinilngiou 
Parish Church on Friday i9Ui De- 
cember ai i|.i5am. 


A CASED 9M of M cm V 
tery by Jacgn-. 70 MM. £880. Tab 
Botton 10204) 388078 


MGLESON • On December 9th. at 
Cane HOI HutolnL Ooulsdon. Sur- 
rey. Jack, aged 78. Funeral on 
Friday 19th December at 12 noon at 
Beckenham Crematorium. 


KEEN - On December 150i 1986. sud- 
denly after a short Illness. Elizabeth 
Mary. Honorary Secretary of the 
O-VJ I.A.. of 89 TMrtmere Gardens. 
South Kenton, only aaitg hitT of the 
late Albert and Mary Keen. Funeral 
service on Monday 22nd December 
1030am at SL George's. Hanover 
Square, wi followed by cremation 
at Gowers Green Crematorium. 
Flowers to G. Savtue and San Lid. 
569 High Road. Wonhlcy. Middx or 
donations IT desired to The Queen 
Victoria's Rifles Association. 66 Da- 
vies Street London. W 1 Y 2HR. 


WARE - On December 15th 1986. 
peacefully in hondUL Elizabeth 
Corbett ware, age 86. of 
Sdrpenbeck. York, eider daughter of 
the late William Ware of Caernhltiy. 
Funeral al 11. 00am on Monday 
22nd December ai SI Mary's Church. 
SMrpenbeck. 


i Annual wtoter 

sale o I iwnNcft and raproducOm furni- 

ture cammencto Saniroay. 27th 
DMteraber. NetUcbM. roar Hnuay on 

Humes 104911 641110. Bounumaatn 

(0202) 295080. BorfteKy. Mr BrlaM 

(04 63) 8 10962. ToMhum. Nr CaMor 

(039087) 744& Reading (0734) 

B91731. MANY ITEMS IN OUR READ- 

ING SHOWROOMS ft PRICE OR LESS. 


W1ULJMMB • On December 16th. 
peacefully in west Suffolk hospitaL 
Vera. In her 84Ui year, sadly missed 
by her son Derek, her staters, famtty 
and friends. Private service ai Chi- 
chester Crematorium on Tuesday 
December 23rd at 230m. Flowers 
to Colchester Crematorium. 


VALAIS 

loro. Thyon lea Coil ora st-Luc Val 

d*Annivteiw Fin end dum 08 to 180 

nP. 1 lo 5 mama, cradtt 60% buereat 

rate 6 78%. Duration IS rears. Owners 

Bunders. Dtrccl Bate Val p iuuwuuii 

•SA.. 10 av. Hu MUL CH-19G0 Skto. 
Tet OlO 41 07/33 34 96. 


THE HAMO WO RK SHO P Frae cradn over 

1 rear (0% APR) on Uw beat aCteCDnn of 

row a, restored ManoaJjw toro aa r over 

2 yra A 3 im. wnttan oumiMra Free 

Catalogue. 30a Hlghgate Rd. NWS. Dl- 

36T 7671. 


IN MEMOftlAM - PRIVATE 


rw rams aaio-toao tws Xmas give 

aorneone an an original Issue dated the 

very daw they ware born. £11.96 (Mas 

(Tee 1870% newsnaperi) Yesterday’* 

New*. 43 OundonaM Road. Cobaya 

flay. TeL 0492 631 195/631303. 


LOWE - On December 15th 1986. In 
hospitaL Prescott WUtoughDy Seals 
Lowe, aged 88 years of Aynsome 
House. CartmeL Grange-over-Ssnds. 
Service al Boarbank Hall. 
ADlthwaUe on Friday December 
19th at 10am. 


COOPER Dame Gladys In Joyous mem- 
ory on her birthday. 


out YORK nJWTOHES. cobble eana 

etc. Nationwide dettvariee. T«L- <0380) 

830039 (Wilts). 


LUCE - On December 14th 1986. In 
hosnttiti after a short umcds. Marga- 
ret (Maggfe). sadly missed by all who 
knew her. Funeral Sendee at St 
John's Church. Whitchurch on Fri- 
day December I9ih at 1.16pm. 


HERVEV ■ In memory of Henry Augus- 
tus. son of George. Prince of wales 
and Marla (FUzherbertl. Bom 18th 
December 1786. Dr W F Wheeler 
great great grandson. 

MAWUMC. F.TJL 18/1/1940 - 
18/12/1 98S. The titular heto of the 
Manning family'. 

POOLET -Dr Joan Margaret dedicat- 
ed Physician, devoted mother and 
darting wife. In constant loving mem- 
ory of dear Jo. December 18th 1983. 


MAC 


- On December 14(h. 


peace! any at Raigroore HospitaL In- 
verness, Lenora Margaret Matheaon 
of 23 High Street Cromarty. Wife of 
the late Charles Ronald (sometime of 
me University of Cambridge) and 
mother of Aldan and Hugh, interred 
in Cromarty Churchyard. 


FUNERAL 

ARRANGEMENTS 


RbcGEOUGH BOND . On December 
lStb 1986. peacefully after a short 
Hlnesa. Waller Albeit Neville (Tom- 
my) of The Argory. Dungannon. 
Northern Ireland. Service al The 
Arsonr. 2-OOpcn Friday December 
1 9th. Fhmlly flowers only. Dona- 
tions. In Dcu. may be sent to Dr. 
Barnardo's Appeals Office. 414 An- 
trim Road. Belfast 15. 


RYDE - The fimwal arrangements for 
the late Professor John Kenneth 
Hyde, of Brabyms Lodge are w fol- 
lows. Service In the University 
Chaplaincy of Sato: Petera. Oxford 
Road. Manchester at 1 lara on Satur- 
day the 20th of December roltowed 
by private Interment Fhmfly Dowers 
only please but if desired donations 
In tieu to the Marfan Association. De- 
partment or hmo Pathology. Saint 
Georges HospitaL Blackshaw Road. 
London SW17 OQT. Enquires to 
Browns Funeral Dtredws. Made. 
061-427 2290 or 061- 436 6207. 


IRfEST aoautr wool carpels. At trade 

prices and under, atoo awatiabte tocra 

aura. Large room star remnants Me 

pair nonual once. Chanmy Carpets ot 

406 0063. 

FREE CUT with every video or TV 

MOW or ranted before xva from 

Tooc. 91 Lower Sloans sl swi. 730 

0933. 

sava Btograptoy (Zaun dy Monk TeoOL 

Maouacnpt from iBtti century about 

Jesus's UfS to India. TeL OI 373 4093 

CEAITWESS. Beat Ucfcen (or on «dd- 

oot everts. Our clients Include mod 

iMIte'Companla*. credit canls accepted. 

01-828 1678. 

SifOKED SCOTTISH SALMON mwn only 

£IM5 D4>. xnas dM. gto. aearwater 

Products m. Eaal Henared. OnonOX12 

8LN (0238) 833798/732/082 aaytime. 

17*3- 1986. Other (toes 

a\-afl. Hand bound ready for presenta- 

tion - also “Sundays". £12.60. 
W toi iI m When. 01-688 6323. 
TICKETS FOR ANT EVENT, Phantom. 

Cats. SurUora Dm. Cara Las MR. An 

toeapft and sparts.T»: 821-66)6/820- 

049SJLEX / visa / Diners. 

KUUIIM Orand. 1914. 6 (t- Cbanwa. 

Musicians l ustriat iew- £4joa 01-686 

4981. T. 

TICKETS FOR AMY EVENT, POaniem. 
CMs. Startitod E«». CTOaa. Le* MR-AH 
uwauft and womTtl: 821-6616/828- 
049 &AXX / visa / Dtoers. 

CATS, cun, Us Mtoand Phantom. A3 

tnetora and mon. Tel 439 1763. AH um- 

lor credit cds- 


FLATSHARE 


W14. Handy 10 Kenunsun High SI. 4 
tedroomv 2 rw, K 3 B. baicony 
Company in £400 pw 857 7365 m. 


SUNWORLD TRAVEL 

lEsi'd 1%4) 

14 Sralh Sl. Etnom . Sane)- 

(037271 J753S/J3SW/27I04/ 

25JIS/24S12/M047 


E2 - Professional maie/frmate ron-imok- 

m. share ure stiiMr Victorian nope. 
I smote room EAOnw: I douMr £56 pw 
or corote £40 pw caai me. Gas CH. TV, 
washing machine, orar Central Line. 
Tel 0372 37701 1 es 223 (day) A 01-980 
984j (after 7 30 pna 


SIM 2 rooms tn Jux flat On Northern line 
lube. F/M py/6 £60 pw rid. TrilOl 
767 6612 (OI G62 6161 iH aTUr 6 oral 


FLATMATES Selective Snaring Well 
esob muoauriory tertice. Ptse'M tor 
appe 01-689 6491. 313 BromMOn 
Road. SWS 
HAMPSTEAD Graduate nan Htsoher ter 
dnpf room m nun IM near IN ui w u se 
HU. £ao pw excl. Tidiness esse 
TeL 01-686-4304 


SWS Interior designed s/t nuasonene. 
Sun young rotwte Dmog. rrceoron 
and audio roam F/F aid pine kitchen. 
Reel lo include araner. colour TV. ste- 
reo. washer drier etc £146 ow Hdv 
required Tel: Mr Steghens 01-736 
8307 

MAMDSWOffTM COMMON West side. 
Luznrv (urmsned rouse diervnklna 
common. Large bvtng room, 
kucpen/dlner 4 MO. 9 oaUta. commu- 
nal garden with lenrus court £220 pw 
Available now J manma ML 01-535 
0130 1 day ■ 01 870 2611 icvesi 

ALL VISITORS 10 London, a large selec- 
tion ot miabiy furnished (lass and 
houses m CeruriM London. Belgravia. 
Kenmnnm. HolLuid Park etc- Human: 
837 7365 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

Remrn Return 

JO-BURG/HAH £«65 DOUALA U20 

NAIROBI C380 SYDNEY £760 

CAIRO £230 AUCKLAND £785 

LAGOS £360 HONG KONG ES50 

□EL/BOMBAY E350 MIAMI £330 

BANGKOK £350 AND MANY MORE 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 

162(168 Regent St WI 
TEL* 01437 C55/6/7/0 
tme & Group 
AMEX/VISA 


'B25SfEP7B 
wungs Hucaiw 


ML Ctrl, own room in luxury flaL TV. 
central Motaifl. video, prone commu- 
nal gardens. £46 pw mriratve 
Oecbidly. extra. TeL- 01-481 6841. 

WANTED SWI. SWS. SWIO. Own nun 
by nice proleMinnN female. 76 Needed 
Imraednoety- Voting flatmate preferrra. 
TeL OI 748 1767. 

W KENSOICTON. Yotmg (route. Own 
mom. Newly converted RaL 3 mins 
lube. £46 p.w. exclusive. TeL OI 621 
OOl 1 Ext 2892 Qterie*. 

■LACKNEATH - Prof grad F. N/S. O/R. 
shared mats. £17B nan tod. 01 - 868 - 
6202 eves. 

FULHAM ROAD SWA. Pret F to mare 
niceflaL exceoenl location, own room. 
£88 pw exit. Tel 01 731 2461 (Eves). 

HEMSWOTOM Prof F. N/S. Lux (teL Own 
room. Central heating. £60 pw tort. 
0836-202362. 

OLYMPIA 2 sunny. Quiet rooms in mak- 
sonrttB. £38 * £56 pw axcL Td. Jutte 
Ot 603 4dl8 1 4-8 pm) 

W. KE»MIWgT OH . dace Piccadilly tube, 
ebon teL attractive smaa studio nn. own 
phone. C/H. £49 pw ms. 01-685 5138 

QUEENS CLUB BUNS Prof m/f. dMe 
bed to tux 3 bed mansion flaL £55 
pw atL TeL 0963-33469 


FT aCORCEa DRIVE SWI Cl -ns p.w Al) 
new lurnisninta very pretty second 
door one aedrorirn nal with easy access 
to Oty and west Ena/Stoane Sa. Avail 
(or long lei 6 monito ♦. Pimlico Office; 
01-83* 9998/ 


RSTAHT FLAT. Luaurv Serviced Ken- 
sutglun. Cnrtsea tram £625 pw Ring 
Town House Apartments 373 6433 


LOWEST FARES 

Paris £09 N YORK 

Frankfurt OeO LA/5F 

Lagos £620 Miami 

Nairobi £625 Suwtgere 

Jo-burg £460 Bangkok 

Cairo £205 Katmandu 

Dei/Bom £535 Rangoon 

Horn Kona £610 Cterura 

Hugr Dncoant* Avan on in a Qub 1 

sun & sand 

21 swallow to. London WI 
01-439 2100/437 0557 


£275 

£365 

£620 

£420 

£565 

£440 

£660 

C426 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


TRAVEL WORLD WIDE 

Sound advice and giddaner on re- 
duced tong haul nwlcnti. 
EXTRA SPECIAL 1ST A CLUB TO 
THE USA 
(03777)45509 

SPECIAL 1ST 6 CLUB WORLDWIDE 
IOST27J 43650 

LOW COST ECONOMY WORLDWIDE 

105777142739 

Member al me institute of Travel A 

Tourism 

Available for consultation 
Travel insurance SpeculisL 


MALAGA 

XMAS 


£69 


21st A 23H DEC 


7 Night* 


Subha id a/m atol iBi3 


TANNTOURS 
01 580 2623 


RENTALS 


Wtw 

Qaf/houae: w 'n Esoopw. Usual fees 
req. Ptotopa Kay A Lewis. Soudt of the 
Park. Cheiaea otBco. 01-362 Bill or 
North of the Park- Regent's Parle office. 
01-586 9882. 

OfFOVni TUBE. SWa to private Regen- 
cy crescent. Luxurious. newly 
a ppointed maisonette. 2 dM bedrooms, 
reception, dinlno room. KM. GCH. pa- 
tio. Free panting. £186 pw. Reb. do. laL 
TeL 723-8081. 


CANKiry M AHBL Xmas special tort 
Ktotn. Tenertfe 19/23/30 Dec* 
£278 dp. G. Canaria 22 Dec fr £288 ppl 
O utei dales - desti on nonM. Bonanra 
Ho(S (02021 298844 OSL ATOL 231. 


C00TCUITOB ON ombB/hals (O Eu- 
rope. USA & most destinations. 
DtotamM Travel: 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL. 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. jo'Burg. Cairo. Quml 
bunbul. Singapore. KJL Delhi. 
Bangftnk. Hong Kong Sydney. 
Mexico. Bogota. Caracas. 
Europe. A The Americas. 


Flamingo Travel, 

76 Shaftesbury Avenue 


London Wiv 700. 


BAYSWATEB, superb Duplex apartment. 
2/5 beds. 1/2 IftW. new oecor/furn. 
24 hr security to lux block. Avail now. 
Soon/ lone leL From £276 pw. Tel OI 
486 4266. 

ST JOHNS WOOD studio ^ 

Man ettttoB . 

am/bedroom. Patio, fully furnished. 

central heating. £111 pa- week TeL OI 

624 4022 


WORLD MK OKAMES We Bol any 

I are lo any destination in the world. 
NEVER KNOWINGLY UNDERSOLD. 
EAUNG Travel OI 679 7776- ABTA 


01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


SVD/I 


£636 Perth £666. All malar 

10 Aua/NZ- 01-584 7371 


OS Specialists N York £229. LA/San 
Fran £329. Sydney /Melbourne £769. 
Ah direct daisy Ibgiits Dortnlr 130 
Jamyn SOwLOl 839 7144 


SWI EweOeut 2 BM dal to new luxury 

development. Excetienl sec A Comm 

Odns. 2 note Beds. Rm. KU. Bam. 

4C276pw ncg. Orates 828 8261. 


VENICE For New Year - £70 fllghl only 
(nun Galwiea 29 Dec. refurntov 3 Janu- 
ary. fteii hum ot 686 5533. 


AFRICAN SEAT SPECIALISTS, World 
Travel Outre. OI 878 8146. ABTA. 
IATA. 


DMCOURT FARO WortdwtdlB 01-434 
0734 Jupuer Travel. 


Science report 


insured value - £1620. THU OI 891 

3701. 


Cancer clue in fatty molecules 


Hon. new unwrapped art £700. TeL- 01 

584 6387 

PHANTOM OF ISC OPERA. ArMa. Eric 

Cttrton. Tickets avan. Rugby. Wimble- 

don. Short ■ 01 3408609/01 836 9910. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


An advance in the search fora 
sensitive and specific Wood 
test giving an early indication 
of ibe formation of cancer 
cells has come from looking at 
the so-called “water sup- 
pressed" proton content of 
serum taken from patients 
with and without tumours. 

The new test uses a version 
of nuclear magnetic res- 
onance, NMR, measurements 
that were originally perfected 
for analysing small sample of 
chemical compounds in the 
laboratory. The NMR process 
is perhaps better known by its 
recent adaption in far more 
complicated and expensive 
machines, which surround the 
whole body to obtain detailed 
pictures of the body which X- 
rays can not achieve. 

Images of organs of the 
body are produced by detect- 
ing tiny magnetic signals com- 
ing from protons in the water 
molecules of the tissue being 
examined. 

The new test, devised by a 
team working with Dr Enc 
Fossel, at the Beth Israel 
Hospital and Harvard Medi- 
cal School in Boston, draws on 
the experience of imaging. But 
the doctors have gone back to 
the laboratory size machine. 


Instead of looking at the 
whole body, they tried to 
detect differences in the mag- 
netic properties of the protons 
of some of the fatty molecules 
in blood plasma, which are 
present in everyone. 

Comparisons were made 


between normal controls, pa- 
roalig- 


tients with benign and 
nant tumours, and pregnant 


even a tumour just a third of | 
an inch across contained 
about 1 billion cancer cells, 
and there was a high chance 
that such a cancer has already 
spread. 

Dr Fossel and colleagues 
tried it on 331 people, includ- 
ing healthy people, people 
with benign tumours and pa- 
tients with cancers of the 


CAT LOVERS! 


In ttw ntt year tta CATS PROTECTION 
LEAGUEtiB bated Maly 7DD00 era 

am kdtens, often maims a 

MStoi 


League. BriaHf 

crif* waftsra of 


145 6tnws and Branches 

Uw Otali Jsto& ft depends 

puttie swoon to carry an its 

cats to (terras. 



patients. The results showed breast, lung, ovary, blood, 
differences in the magnetic colon and other organs. In 
resonance of the lipid, or felly, nearly every case, it accurately 
portion of the blood between distinguished people with 
patients with tumours and known cancer from those 
normal individuals . thought to be free of the 

But the paper which de- d i sea s e, 
scribed the new test, published There were two apparent 
in the New England Journal erf exceptions. Perhaps because 
Medicine ; emphasised that of their fest-growxng fetuses, it 


PLEASE send a duration Id bsfp to feed 

era mfltag adaption tt 0UI Rescue 

Cams - or ton (he Leuua. new 

memtwB welcome (Annual Sub CS) 


THE CATS P HO TE C T lO li LEAGUE 

Dopt T, 17 Ktops Hood, 

- ha, W. Sam. RH13 5PP. 
(Rea No. 203644) 


V. THE MIND 

CAN take only 

SO MUCH 


there was no clear explanation 
for the different effect between 
people. 

The researchers speculate 


women 


confused pregnant 
with cancer victims. 

It also suggested that some 
men who had undergone sur- 


that tte change in the ferty fiery for enlarged prostates had 

ssssz 


But there is no indication 
from this first research al what 
stage of tumour development 
this alteration happens . 

In a note of caution on the 
research, published in the Source: 


speculated that these men may 
actually have had slow-grow- 
ing cancer that was left 
behind. 

The New Er, 


Mapr C. after jttttS in Bomb 
now sees an exptosiDn In wary 
dock. All Servicemen nsfc mental 
bre a kdown in peace or war riftc. Wa 
devote ourselves to the welfare of 
mesa men and women. We must po on 
helping them. We must haw finis. 
Please send us a Donation, a Covenant 
or remember us witti a Legacy. 

EX-SERVICES MENTAL 
WELFARE SOCIETY 


flgteMy Hn» tee AmOmi 
WM tadon SW19 r “ ‘ 


IHL Td 01443 6333 


WSI SoiMi random 2 tied flat with bat- 
cony. BEtikMU located nr oontrol line. 

£250 p-w. Amoonibo A Rtnoiaitd 727 

7227 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Wnrtdwftte- Hiyiturbd 
01-930 1366. 


FUCHTBOOBIlIt Otsoouni Faraviaria- 

wkj* in/ccoBomy- 01-387 9100 


DtHUMJIflED A GROUP FAKES wartd- 
wne. Td LI T C. (07531 857035. 


. Nrarty rdlM. 

2nd floor flat nr. tube DOM DM. recep. 

Mw ktBb. A vaU now. £360 pw .PRIORY 


CITY HEWS: I dM bed. omdte bath. WC. 

mower. UI / dining, ige sonny retro. 

Private park. Co im o»U» £ 1 60 pw. Td 

Chre Uwmn Ot-488-2488 u 351. 

KntSBICmM * Surrounding An 

Flats 6 Houses axaUatilr 6 wanted Grom 

Ct60£l jOOOpw. Bentuun A Reeves 938 

3S22. 

NWS Luxury a Mdroonwd Vc garden 
nu. 100 yds Hampstead Heath, CH. 68 


Travetwise. ADU. AML 


01 441 1111 . 


VAL BTSEME New. Arty fitted modern 
apartment. Steens 4 . Owrrtoabs down 
Mil. Available jan/Feh. Contact OI 736 
8628 (HI or OI 499 8994 (WI. 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKJBE-VCH 

VILLAS 

CHRISTMAS SPECIALS 
VERBIDS Cl 69 
MERISEL £209 

STAFFED CHALET PRICES FULLY 
INCLUSIVE 

OI fttghL su UBurancft and OeBoous 
food 

NO EXTRAS BUT ALL THE FlOLLSl 
LIMITED OFFERS -BOOK NOW ON 
(0223) 311113 

AETA I415X ATOL 30 IB 

Amss/Bardaycanl/Aotex 


XMAS & SKI 

Italy - Dowmnis 

Dec 20-27 
Dec 27-3/1 
Beautiful linage. Snow GUaraiUN. 
Prices include goon hotel, ft board, 
no. insurance «c 
SU packs only £66. iSW equip, 
lessons. Lift passes) 

Pan Pacmc Travol:- 
16a Soho Sq . London wi 
TeL 01-734 3094 
ATOL 2108 


SKI SUPERTRA VEL 
SPECIAL XMAS OFFER 

20 DEC FROM £149! 


Catered chalets in ibe lop resorts 
other dales £30 ofT 
UI SSI SOdO 


Plume our NEW SNOWLINE on 
UI i*4 ill 74 toi the Lues sno» reports 


DUE TO CANCELLATION. Staffed cnalrt 
jvdiMM. to Sr>itzerufia for Jinion al 
£144 irttinir M fhglM iHHAnwl 
Han-Bourd Mein. Guides First come 
rvra served TeL Oi 223 oooi 


JUST FRANCE - Super itlw wtf catering 
ski noiKuyv in die bra Frrncti monk 
Ring tor new broaiure now. 

Trt Ol 789 2592. 

ABTA 69266 Alai 1385 


VAL DtSERE OnM for 10 2!st-28th 
February. Bed snow, prime week - but 
we ran ft w WHl someone take it otrr? 
Superb baroatn. Tel Ol 627 1004 home 
or Ol 255 6681 work. 


MU WEST ■ NOW Offering superb QirW- 
ma: vpeoab (o France and flwtaenaad. 
SAVE up to £200 lor deas- On 20/27 
Dec. 01 786 9999 


VHXARS. Beautiful new 1 bedroom 
aopanmeni Perfect skiing Ai-aUaUc 
now tor pnvaie lertlng. 01-834 4874 


TAKE ADVANTAGE ol us in January. 
V renter, viuars. Mcrtbei. Megese Ski 
Lea Alpes Ol 602 9^66 


CHRBTWA5 IN THE CHOW Chalet oar- 
ties I rom £144 Prone Jono Morgan 
Trasrl on 01 499 1911 


UJC. HOUDAYS 


OHHSTMAS.'NEW YEAH, CofewOM 
none cottage sleeps a. warm and peace- 
ful. TEL 0666 62476 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


DIOCESE OF CANTERBURY 
EYTHORNE BENEFICE 
PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
WHEREAS toe Church Conutumcnera 
for Emdund being drarouS for toe 
purposes of toe Pastoral Measure 1983 of 
ascertaining toe whereabouts of (he 
Pa Iron of toe Benefice ot Eymorne in toe 
Diocese of Canterbury hereby request 
NICHOLAS PATOLLON formerly of Lon- 
don or any perron having Knowledge of 
Ills wnereaboute lo communicate with uie 
undmqneo no< urn man toe 51st day of 
December. 1986. 

D-R PhflUpe 
Dtorrsan House 
Lady Wootion'i Green 
Canterbury. Kent 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE MATTER OF 
HARRIS (ANTIQUES) LIMITED 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1485 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Uw 
creation af toe amve-rumed Company, 
sriucti e being voluntarily wound up. are 
ream red. an or before toe 16 U 1 day of 
January 1487. to send in their full 
Christian and surnames, tiuar addresses 
and aeMyipaara. full particulars or Uwti 
debts or claims, and tor names and 
addrrws M uieir Sotirttors iu any), to toe 
undersigned Donald George Driver of 
17/18 Bond GlreeL London W1X 3D A. 
tne Liqindaior of toe said Company, and. 
If so required by nonce in wt-tUug (rom Uie 
said Liquidator, are. personally or by (Mir 
SoHritors. to come to and prove Hseti- debts 
or ciaum at such lime and place as shaD be 
Specified ui such notice, or til default 
(hereof they wHI be excluded from me 
benefit of any dWrt b uMon mode before 
suen debis are proved. 

DATED Uds 12th day of December 1986 
D.G- DRIVER 
LIQUIDATOR 
iNSl This notice to purely forraaL All 
known creators nave been, or wta be. 
paid In full. 


mmte CO BOUND. Regeu SL wi. 01 
734 6507 ABTA/ AUK. 


8. AFRICA From £465. 01604 7371 
ABTA. 


SPACIOUS HAMPSTEAD flat. 2 beds. 2 

mews, study, wree Wtchen. all ma- 

chines. Sunny balcony. 4in floor No 
lift. £180 pw. Phone Ol 586 7694. 
SWI Lovely A ertremdey tight 2nd floor 

dal wan 3 Dtite Beds. 2 Excl Recep. nv 

suae Bato/Stewr. 2nd Bam. Kn/Break. 

£390pw. Cootes 828 8251. 

907 MM The iwunexT to remember 

when seeking best rental praestlu tn 

central and prime London 

£)K>/£2.(X»uw. 

W2 Flats to let. Bnort/lorw slay. S/e with 
Lv. Phone CH. SuW 1 bed/ 2 bed 

flats From £125 P.w. contact Gay on 

Ol 221 7627 
ran g* Attractive flaL 1 large recto- 

lion. dbte bedrm. K it chen - baUirm. mUo. 

GCH. £180 pw bid. 01-351 3670 
CMMHCK Modern studio (ltd £300pcm. 

Trt. 01-6003636 EM 265 (days) 01 -994 

8285 toomei. 

DOCKLANDS Flaw and houses lo tef 

(hrougnatd Ibe Portlands area. TeL-Ol- 

790 9660 


OOfFT BOOK a Ud holiday until you've 
read ora informative brochitie. been 
overwhelmed by toe value A stunned by 
UM Special oilers & FREE Child places 
teier on Xmas £ uv.i su Freedom Ol- 
Jff ^6/4471 (24hraj & Manchester 
061-236 0019 lAfoi 432). 


TAKE TIME OFF to Pam. Amsterdam. 
Bnnwrts. Bruges. Geneva. Berne. Lou- 
ie. Zonm. Tne Hague. Dutton. 
Rouen. Boulogne 6 Dieppe. Time Off. 
Sa Chester Close. London. SW1X 7BQ. 
Oi -235 8070. 

J® SPECIALISTS Sydney o/w 
£490 tin £785. 4ucUando/w£464rm 
£T75. Joftnirg o/w £206 rm £485. Los 
Angeles o/w £178 rm £340. London 
IW« entire 01-370 6332. 

GREAT MAN going Sunwards? Greater 
London Ughtwrighls stock naady-K>- 
wear suils A leisurewear up lo size 52". 
sAim up lo 18".-. noaery etc. 8 SacJcvoie 
SI. London VI l 


VAL OtSESE. Tlgnes & Lea Arcs. Xmas 
availatilltty esiered rtub/cbrteL Hob- 
days by rerurn air. only OtiSpp. 
Untiled avallabtUty New Veer. Sd VaL 
01400 6080.12 Afire) 01-903 4444. 

BEC Mm s WEEK- to January. Lrorn 
lo ski for ONLY £199 per person torts 
lumen, mne John Morgan Travel on 
01 499 1911 

CMAMJTteY. Fortes du SodeL 2 apt* 
avail. SUb a ladormaue holidays. Dtv 
counts up to 309> tor Dec A Jan. Ol 736 
5611. 

SKI SCOTT DUNN. Exclusive ctudri nod- 
days. Champers'. Pones de Soilel. No 
Surcharges. Discounts now for Xmas 

_ tore' January. Can now! 0489 877839. 

UUNTORLD XnutfN. Year Hols from 
£99 Andorra. AuKrta * Ttoneo. Bro- 
chure Ol 602 4826 24 hr- ABTA. 

LAST into ute agnt bargains mean £49. 
valnumder 01-402 4262. ABTA 

AcoeM/vtM. 


WINTER SPORTS 


HALF PfaEK Private flat amrem prate La 
Plagne. sleeps 6. 2 balds from 20Ui Dee.. 
Jan - Feb - March. Tel 01-889 6968 


BW IH IU executive rasldmoe. 25 mins 

city. Purity. Ate naUBrtgMow 

(ranL Long/ahen let. Tel: 0273 72 


i Fra and 

Club Class travel wonwide Budget 
Fares Aunte. N2. S Africa. USA and 
Portugal wun accom. Tel Ol 665 HOI 
ABTA 73196. 


HALF PRICE Holidays - Xmas. Partes du 
Sotril A Aide DTiuez snow ratoel Also 3. 
10 Jan offers. SU Total i0952j23iii3. 
SKI FLIGHTS. Dally lo Geneva. Zurich. 
Munim etc. From £59. SU WEST. Trt 
01 786 9999. 


NETWORK RECORDS LIMITED 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to 

Section 58 8 of tor Companies ACL 1966. 

iti.ii a MEETING of toe creditors of Uw 

above named Company will be MM ai Um 

offices Of LEONARD CURTIS i CO , situ- 

ated al 30 Eastbourne Terrace. London 
WZ 6LF on Monday toe 22nd day of 

December I486 al 10.30 o'clock In toe 

forenoon, for toe purposes provided for Ln 

Sections 589 and 590. 

Dated ttw Wi day of Dece mb er 1986 
G.G. MtCUT CHBO N 

DIRECTOR 


DOMESTIC A 
CATERING SITUATIONS 


in French ski resort unm and April 

1987. No lunettes cooked, so plenty Ol 

time to aid. £iao pw ♦ board and 

accom. (M Mm and lift pat 

Snowtime 01 836 3237 


CXJPCnracCB C OOK for small CngUtet- 
ffMray French su Resort. Tat 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


LAVVYBB 30 yearn aU witti seven years 
dty experience to smppimj, oO. Insur- 
ance BUlnguaL travelled. MfMy 
nrwatuante. Seeks new CMBsnga. Rcoly 
in BOX FBO . 


72S349 

Lrtymer Court rulty 

mod - 2 DM act. £160 pw toe. Co Irt- OI 

67B 1896 ID 


AUCANTE. Malaga. Faro. Palma. Tuner- 
He Dtmond Travel ATOL 17B5. 0263 
6(4434. 01-581 4641. 


IM STROUD GREEN - two double bed Ral 

wan baibream. lounge and patio. £120 

pw. TM; Ol- 272 8361. 


PUTMEY Lovely flat suitable 2/3 pronto 

£120 pw excl. Gas CH. Co irt essential 

Tel: Oi 874 oTss pm only. 


SERVICED APARTMENTS in Kensington. 

Col T.V. 24 nr Sw. Tries. Cotilngrura 

Apartments. 01-373 6306. 


1LOAME JMIIMWn Perfect location 

off gtoane Square. Fully serviced A 

rautooed. Tel: 01-373 6306 (Tl. 

ILS. COMPANY Series torn properties m 

Cemnl London, cabbon A Gasetee 589 

5481. 

mraLEDON AREA. Good refection 

Kousm/RalL No fee to tenants. Tele- 

phone Williams A Son Ol 947 3130. 


same issue of the journal. Dr Journal of Medicine, Vol 315, 
Philip Sebein observed that P 1369-76, 1986. 


University news 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity. 


London 

University College fellowships 

The college is to confer the Ode 
of fdlow on the following: 

Professor G V P Chamberlain- weft*- 
bor and chairman. Obgyi w a™ 
Ctt wcoiony ai St Geovgc S Hospital 
Medical School: Mr f H Cokhl 
manaqlnq director of MuMa tt 
1979: Dr Enrkmrta. FiOTkfort inee 
Hams). Curator of.tlteP*»Wg2 | JWs 
Collection of the n ^ 

(rom 1949-1970: Professor JL_w 

Cuuien*. FBS. iRTifeasoL, ol 


Manchester 

Cosias Xydeas. 


MSc, 


PhD 


102 Gloucester Place. 

London W1H ODH. 


Steward, MEL ChB <Msng!i)^mi^i^. I 


SSSf- 


liwola. associate djrtcWRw'wjsjg 
ehermstri 1 . National Reswrch Ombwu 

faculty of Can leal KtencWjSchooi or 
MedJane slnoe 

Woilf. Founder and EH rector of Brunei 
institute lor Bio-Ensinerniw. 


in ”, i - 

eineenng, Loughborough um- 

tofe^irv to be professor ot Barbara' A Parfm. MCommH 
electricil engineering from April 
eection of deans . 

Dr P.C Stubbs, economic and Granls 

social Studies, from SeptemDer cjhpj,. Research Campaign: 

I. I9S6; KoferaJ-A- *2gg- SiSRA BSSSSKt £S£ 

economic and social studies. 



The title of honorary fellow of 
the college is to be conferred on 
Professor H.LA. Hart, Pnnajxd 
of Brasenose CoIjgBft f CWord 
1973-78, and Mr W.YV. Slack, 
Dean. Middlesex Hospital 
Medical SchooL 


from September 1, 1987; Profes- 
sor 0-C. Wood, technology, 
from September 1, l987,Profes~ 
sor J.R. Hinnells. thoolOgy, 
from January i. 1987. 


mS 5«3 V Research Council: £118.608 ] 
to Dr C 1 Sandie (or rewarth into 
mechonio of cotonlf etectreayw toans- 
pori In health and disewe. , 

Salford HeaNh Aulhorlly: £155.200 
to Professor J G RatcUft* for research | 
into monocianai anttbooien £i iaJS17 , 
lo or w R Robertson for research into 

Council- £782.170 lo Professor P G 
Munmv for research into etemenlary 
physiMT£Sw.746 to Profes- 
Sr Sir Francis Graham atuih to 
study galactic and eidraeatetir radio 
erusaon: £1 15.952 lo fraesor HE 
Hall and Dr J R Hook to study 
SSStriTtod helium 3: £96-218 WMrJ 


BLADON LINES 


^ r rsh5^L , Bribss? imSSsk 

arrtiU^tuffju.^ ft cfutfcheT as«Nr I'S resewii 

OJtrechtL A F ®S2! , Kc k ^Sz^h wrtlromc Trust: £91.7*0 (0 Profe w t y 
iManch). M AStJhiJ- SKe L a Tumhem for a senio r rerey th 

kTSSSSSS biomedical adeno. 


CHRISTMAS & JANUARY BARGAINS 
Chalet Parties 

VERBER MERISEL SAN VTGtUO 
GRANS MONTANA VAL D'tSERE 
from 
£149 

SELF CATERING from £99 
01*786 3131 01-786 7771 

Chalet Parties Setf-Caterbig St Hotels 

General Enquiries 01-786 2200 

Manch Dens. ABTA 16723 

0422 78121 ATOL 1232 


CHRISTMAS m unarm. 4wtcs for UM 
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20 



THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


Journalists reject 
Telegraph offer 


By Tim Jones 


Journalists on The Daily 
Telegraph last night unani- 
mously rejected the 
company’s terms for moving 
out of their distinctive art 
deco listed building in Fleet 
Street to a new high-technol- 
ogy future in a development 
on the Isle of Dogs, east 
London. 

In a stormy meeting, the 
200 journalists decided not to 
co-operate with the company 
over the operation of new 
technology regarded as essen- 
tia] to the survival of the 
newspaper, which lost £2 mil- 
lion in the six month period 
that ended on September 30. 

Feelings were running so 
high that a motion from the 
floor, expressed in far stronger 
lan gu a ge than that proposed 
by chapel (union branch) of- 
ficials of the National Union 
of Journalists was also earned 
by a large majority. 

Journalists felt the terms, 
which offer them a 5 per cent 
pay rise plus £1,250 a year for 
reporters and £2^50 for sub 
editors, with an additional 4 
per cent increase when the 
company has completed its 
restructuring programme was 
"totally insufficient”. 

Some speakers at the closed 


meeting considered that the 
company was trying to change 
their traditional work prac- 
tices and introduce them to 
direct computer inputting "on 
the cheap". 

Others were intent on 
"teaching the company a 
lesson” because they believe 
management had reneged on a 
promise to give them a 5 per 
cent pay rise last February. 

The meeting took place 
against the background of a 
company announcement that 
it was seeking hundreds of 
additional redundancies when 
it moves its editorial and 
business operations to the Isle 
of Dogs next year. 

Senior management has 


said redundancy terms, equal 
seks of pay for every 


to four weeks __ - 

year of service, would be 
withdrawn unless the com- 
pany received full co-opera- 
tion and continuity of 
production. 

The move of printing opera- 
tions to another site on the Isle 
of Dogs has resulted in 970 
redundancies out of a London 
printing workforce of 1,630. 

Under the new proposals, 
few of The Daily Telegraph's 
300 NGA compositors are 
expected to be retained. 


Kinnock urged to 
back hard left 


Continued from page 1 


selected to fight a safe Labour 
seat at the next general elec- 
tion, added: "The party 
should reply with the truth. 
They should tell people about 
the good things we are doing.” 


He continued: “The party 
leadership would do them- 
selves and the party a lot of 
good if they defended Labour 
councils against Tory 
attacks.” 


His bitter criticism of Mr 
Kinnock follows a meeting in 
the Commons earlier this 
week where leaders of Labour 
councils in London, including 
Mr Grant, told party MFs they 
would not water down their 
policies. 

Senior Labour MPs openly 
admit the harm done to the 
party's electoral hopes by 
activities of some left wing run 
authorities, and it was hoped 
the "loony left” bogey would 
be buried when Mr Kinnock 
urged councillors last month 
to avoid acts or statements 
which could be used against 
the party. 


But the public statements of 
Mr Grant and his militant 


town hall colleagues are set to 
dash such hopes. 

In his article, Mr Grant says 
Government ministers have 
singled out Haringey, Brent, 
Lambeth, Hackney and Man- 
chester for special attention 
because they have been at the 
forefront of fighting cuts in 
services and jobs. The Tories 
also had an "overtly racist” 
strategy of trying to isolate 
black Labour council leaders. 

"These councils are singled 
out for attack because their 
policies of fighting low pay, 
defending jobs and services, 
and tackling areas of grave 
disadvantage like pensioners, 
black and minority ethnic 
groups, women, and lesbians 
and gays are genuinely popu- 
lar and build up support for 
Labour. 

"We explained all this to 
John Cunningham...We told 
him the Tory attack was racist 

"But Cu nning ham got Up in 
the House of Commons and 
talked about ‘only 0.1 percent' 
of Labour councillors being in 
the mould Tory ministers had 
described. If you work that out 
it means there are nine Labour 
councillors like that — no 
doubt I am one of them!” 


Whoopers’ contented winter 



Letter from Gabon 


Yellow dinosaur 
beats the jungle 


forward 


Libreville (AFP, Reuter) Sjf^iJJienSndatc by seven 
SP? 1 *. "S? " to months to 





The Wbooper swans at the 'Wildfowl Trust at 
Caerlaverock, near Dumfries, have proved to beso 
contented that even after the trust staff trap and ring 
them, they go back voluntarily into captivity via a spe- 
cial swan pipe. 

Mr Jeff Black, a research officer, says ringing the 
Whoopers is part of a long-term population study to 
check on individual swans’ progress and to re port on 
their breeding success. The swans have been returning 
from Iceland to Caerlaverock for eight years and they 
stay until March. 

This year, a record 144 birds arrived. “More than 
half the ones we recorded this year were sew birds", 
Mr Black said yesterday. “They were probably last 
year’s babies coming back". 


Miner’s wife in world’s 
first triple transplant 


Continued from page 1 

Mrs Thompson was breath- 
ing wiib the aid of a ventilator 
and was said to be in a satis- 
factory condition. Her prog- 
ress will be carefiliiy moni- 
tored for any signs of re- 
jection. and h will be some 
weeks before she wiD be able 
to leave hospital. 

Mr Peter Campion, a 
spokesman for the East An- 
glian Regional Health Autho- 
rity, said: “We have one of 
only a handful of centres 
worldwide that is capable of 
performing a combined opera- 

tinn tVic Invid aC 


tion of this kind, because of 
the expertize in heart-lung 
surgery at Pap worth and the 


pioneering work of Professor 
Ca>e at Addenbrooke's.” 

He said that such an opera- 
tion was unlikely to be re- 
peated for several years 
because of the rare combina- 
tion of the woman's medical 
problems. 

Mrs Jean Thompson, the 
patient's mother-in-law. said:: 
“Dsvinz is a very brave and 
determined woman and we 
are aii very proud of her. She 
had asked’ to have a triple 
transplant even though she 
was well aware of the risks 

involved. 

“She has been in and out of 
hospital for the last two-and-a- 
haif years, but h 2 s been deter- 
mined not to lei it affect her 


rail in a £2 billion line 
crossing the rain forest of 
Gabon. 

The Trans-Gabon railway, 
which has been laid across 
403 miles of some of the most 
difficult terrain on Earth, was 
started in 1974. It will be 
officially inaugurated on 
December 30 but is not 
expected to become opera- 
tional until the middle of next 
year. 

The consortium CCI Euro- 
uag was formed specially for 
the job by 19 firms from six 
countries*— Belgium, Britain, 
Fiance. West Germany, Italy 
and The Netherlands. 

For the past two years a 
huge yellow machine, called 
the “dinosaur” because of its 
size and ungainly appear- 
ance, has been beating a path 
at the rate of eight miles a 
month through the dense 
tropical rain forest laying 
155-vard sections of raiL 

The Italian-designed rail- 
way track-laying machine last 
month completed the second 
stage of the 400- mile railway, 
seven and a half months 
ahead of schedule. 

President Omar Bongo is 
due to open the railway on 
December 30 - the thirteenth 
anniversary of the day he 
Turned the* first sod on the 
project. 

The railway, one of the 
world’s as well as black 
Africa’s most ambitious civil 
engineering projects, links the 
isolated, mineral and timber- 
rich interior with the coast. It 
is one of the few railways to 
be built in recent years when 
many industrialized coun- 
tries have been closing lines. 

The Eurotrag group assem- 
bled a huge earth-moving 
fleet including 150 bull- 
dozers and 460 tracks, to 
batter a way through the 
forest and shift an estimated 
160 million cubic yards of 
earth to cm a track through 
the ragged terrain. 

The railway was built de- 
spite opposition from the 
World Bank, which consid- 
ered the scheme economi- 
cally unsound. Mr Bongo, 
who heads one of Africa’s 
smallest but wealthiest na- 
tions. however, aigued that it 
was the "spine” of the econ- 
omy and a symbol of national 
unity and other aid donors, 
led by France and the Euro- 
pean Community, stepped 
into the breach. 

Work on the 190-mile sec- 
ond stage from Booue to Mr 
Bongo's hometown of 
FranceviUe started in early 
1983. and in June 1984 the 


Euronag ----- 
bringing in extra wooers and 
machinery and working an 
effective 10 -hour ca>. More 
than 4.000 men from aooiri 
20 countries worked on the 
project. 

The second stage passes 
through largely uninhabited 
territory, with few roads and 
onlv three access points to the 
railway, making logistics one 
of the main problems, 
according to M Jacques 
Cosani, the Euros rag worts 
director. 

“Practically everything had 
to be imported and brought 
hundreds of kilometres up to 
the railhead.” he said. 

Nearly half the 500 expatri- 
ates involved in building the 
railway worked in transport, 
maintenance, repair and 
other support services. 

Gabon's tropical climate, 
with rainfall averaging mat 
than lOOin a year, was an- 
other problem. Eurotrag. 
however, managed to work 
through the rains by postpon- 
ing the more delicate 
embankment and other 
earthworks for the dry- 
season. 

Landslides caused by the 
poor quality, rain-soaked day 
soil caused problems at sev. 
era! cuttings, according to Mr 
Robert Clark, the consulting 
engineer. “Good drainage 
was vital, otherwise the rail- 
way would soon be washed 
away”. 

In contrast to the first 
stage, only one major swamp 
had to be crossed, but 10 
bridges had to be built over 
the River Ogooue and its 
tributaries. 

Clearing the forest was not 
too difficult, as most of the 
trees had shallow roots and 
could be bulldozed. 

Now that the railway is 
almost complete, economists 
are asking whether it will ever 
make a profit, especially as no 
decision has yet been made to 
build a terminal at Owe ado 
port to handle manganese 
exports. Without it. however, 
the Trans-Gabon railway- wffl 
find it difficult to cover even 
operating costs, analysts say. 

Manganese will continue to 
be exported along a 47-mile 
cableway across the border 
into the Congo and then by 
railway to the port of Pointe 
Noire. 

Mr Bongo still plans to 
build a third stage from 
Booue to Belisga in the 
north, in order to exploit that 
region's ‘ huge iron ore 
deposits. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 

The Queen and the Duke of 
Edinburgh attend a luncheon 
given by the Regimental 
Lieutenant Colonels, House- 
hold Division, at the Officers' 
Mess, Wellington Barracks, 


Wellington 

12.45; later the Queen opens the 


renovated Headquarters of the 
United Kingdom Centra] Coun- 


cil for Nursing, Midwifery and 
Health Visiting at 23 Portland 
Place, 3.30. 

The Prince of Wales, Trustee 
of the National Gallery, attends 
a dinner to mark the retirement 
of the director. Sir Michael 
Levey, at the National Gallery, 
8.25. 

Princess Anne. Presdent of 
the Save the Children Fund, 
attends Carols for Save the 
Children at the Royal Albert 
Hall, 6.50. 


The Duchess of Kent presents 
the "Children of Courage” 
Awards in Westminster Abbey, 
10.55. 

Princess Michael of Kent, 
Honorary Freeman of the 
Weavers' Company, attends a 
Christinas party for the res- 
idents of Weavers' House, Ell, 


The Times Crossword Pnzzle No 17,232 



ACROSS 

I Stake for Pennsylvania girl 
of French extraction (8). 

5 Back up new thrust in India 

( 6 ). 

10 Whether drunk or not, he's 
a top-liner (9-6). 

11 A number of workers are in 
occupation (7). 

12 County court has medical 
graduate confined (7). 

13 Crazy act of mutt, endlessly 
being the dog's-body (8). 

15 Deceived theologian about 
university exercises (5). 

18 He is said to have a luxuri- 
ous-life. — ironically (5). 

20 Touch down by target — the 
Eiffel Tower, possibly (8). 

23 Obstruction beside the isth- 
mus? At least it’s orna- 
mental (7). 

25 Problem created by woman 
rejecting hat at the outset 

26 Man possibly surrounded 
by protracted noise in the 
Atlantic (4,6,5). 

27 Note evidence and quit (6). 

28 Damaged a hip? Lois are 
mended nere(8). 


trayed as scum (5). 

6 Peacekeepers dream anew of 
such a state (7). 

7 Never in a suit, this com- 
mon fellow! (5). 

8 Yeast helps to provide their 
livelihood (3). 

9 Old squire outside northern 
church is a virile type (8). 

14 Archer may be late — he's 
such a gossip! (4-4). 

16 The average quantity is 
most important (9). 

17 Wren did badly, becoming a 
rook (8). 

19 Lifted up grassland plant, 
uttering loud-cries (7V 

21 Extracts money from Cen- 
tral European weakling (7). 

22 Liberal support for museum 
he wrecked (6). 

24 Figures a rivfl servant re- 
vealed (5). 

25 This dog takes some board- 
ing out! (5). 


Solution to Puzzle No 17,231 




DOWN 

1 A man without sex appeal, 
small and delicate (6). 

2 Illustrious as Chaucer's 
good women and Scott’s 
Montrose (9). 

3 Posed during a film, clothed 
in this material? (7). 

4 A number Lawrence Dor- 




TV 



Concise 


Music 

Christmas Concert; Christ 
Church Cathedral, Oxford, 8. 

Chorister School Carol Ser- 
vice; Durham Cathedral. 2. 

Christmas Music by West 
Riding Singers; Holy Trinity 
Church. Cookridge, 7.45. 

Southampton Choral 
Society’s production of 
Handel’s Messiah, Guildhall. 
Southampton, 7.30. 

Tiverton Amateur Operatic 
Society's Christmas Concert; 
Knighishaycs Ct, Thorton, 7.30. 

Concert by Halte Orchestra; 
Free Trade HaU, Manchester, 
7.30. 

Christmas Concert; Solikall 
library Theatre, Homer Rd, 1. 

Ron Goodwin’s Christmas 
Show; Win ter Gardens, Bourne- 
mouth. 7.30. 

Quintus; Dickens at Christ- 
mas time in words and music; St 
Mary’s Church, Taunton, 1. 

General 

Waterslide opening by 
Sharron Davies; Easttwnrae 
Leisure Pool, 7. 

Alien Punks v Santa; Third 
Eye Centre, 350 Sauchiehah St, 
Glasgow, 730. 


Christmas tree lights 


People are often injured by 
careless handling of Christmas 
tree lights. Before using an old 
set. make sure that the correct 3 
amp or 5 amp fuse is fitted. 
Check for cracked lampholders 
or damaged insulation on the 
wires. Where wires need to be 
joined, make sure connectors 
are used, not insulation tape. 

Do not touch the lights or try 
to replace a bulb until you 
switch off and pull out the plug. 
Never use a normal bulb m 
place of a failed fuse bulb which 
is marked in white. 


The pound 


Bonk 


Bat* 

Buys 

AustraftaS 223 2.11 

Atatna Sch 2120 2000 

Belgium ft 53-10 5&50 

Canada $ W 195 

Demerit Kr 1137 1077 

FMsnriMft 7 A9 628 

Franca Fr 080 820 

Germany Dm 101 224 

Greece Or 236 216 

Hong Kong $ 11.46 1026 

Inland Pt 1.106 1045 

Rely lira 2090 1970 

Japan Y«n 248 232 

NeftwMsGM 329 321 

Norway Kr 1123 10.73 

Portugal Esc 225 210 

Sw* Africa Rd 420 320 

Spain Pta 20025 19025 

Sweden Kr 1025 920 

SwttnriaadR 2535 22% 

USAS 1495 1426 

Yugoslavia Dm 840 740 

Rates tor small d e nom i nation bank notes 
only as sttopM by Barclays Sank PIC. 
Different rates apply to travellers' 
cheques and other foreign curency 

Retail Price Indue 391.7 


London: Tbs FTtaductoasd down 33 at 


Books — paperback 


The Literary Editor's selection of interesting books pubSshed this week: 
FICTION 

Fal Rom Grace, by Larry Coffins (Grafton. £235) 

Natives of ray Person, by George Lamming (ASlson & Busby. £4.95) 

The Chronfctea of Marin Manyshaped, by Sheri S. Tapper (Coegr, £435) 
The Makar of Heavenly Trousers, by Daniefe Vara (Black Swan, £335) 
The Warners, by Juio Gorttzar (ASson & Bushy, £4£5) 

NONFICTION 

A Matte- of PrtacMe. by Ronald Dworfdn (Oxford. £835) 

Convention. A Phsosopnical Study, by David Lnwts (Bteckwefl. £&95) 
Kokoschka in Ns Tbne, by EH. C»orn£>ricti (Tate Gallery, EL95) 

Labour aid the Left In the 1930s, by Ben Plmlott (Alan & Unwin, £8i 
With the Enqmaa Dowager of China, by Katharine A Cart (KPI, E7. 


Roads 


London and South-east: 
A30& No entry from Roe- 
hamptoa La into Clarence i«, 
with delays on Roehampton La 
and Rocks La. A13: Lane 
closures ud delays between 
Masefield Gdns and Jenkins La. 
M10 Hertfordshire: South- 
bound closed between 9.30 am 
and 430 pm. 

Wales and the west: M5: 
Middle and outside fames dosed 
at junction 14 (Thornbury), 
with northbound entry slip road 
dosed. A30: Temporary lights 
NE of Honiton. resurfacing at 
Monkton. A5: Single line tr affi c 
between Gobowen and Chirk, 
Clwyd, N of Os w estry. 

The Midlands: MS: Lane 
dosures b e tween junctions 4 
and 8 (Bromsgrove/MSO), one 
lane only northbound between 
junctions 6 and 5 (Worcester 
N/Droftwicb). A456: Conges- 
tion in morning and evening 
peak periods due to bypass 
construction at Bewdley. AS: 
Temporary lights and delays- 
due to roundabout construction 
near Nuneaton. 

The North: Ml: Repair work 
between junctions 31 and 33 
(Worksop/Rotherham). M6: 
Contraflow and delays between 

junctions 29 and 32 
(Preston/M55). A19: Land 
restrictions and delays on the 
Sunderland bypass. 

Scotland; Mg Glasgow; Out- 
side lane dosed eastbound be- 
tween junctio n s 17 and 15 
~ A82: 

lane traffic S of 
Inver-gany. A97: Single line 
traffic with temporary lights on 
S side of Banff 

Information supplied by AA 


Parliament today 


Commons (2.30 y. Supple- 
mentary and social security 
benefit orders and regulations. 

Lords (II): Debate on dis- 
posal of waste at sea. Local 
Government Act 

(Ameadmment) Bill, second 
reading. 


Our address 


I nf o r m a t i on for jKhuion to The 
Tunes tn/ornuOoa service shouM be 
sent to: The EdUoi-.-TTtS. The Times. 
PO Bov 7. i Virginia Street. London. 
El 9XN. 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge wifi be ra i se d 
today at 2,40 pm. 


Anniversaries 


Births: Carl Maria von We- 
ber, composer, Eutin, Germany, 
1786; Sir Joseph John Thom- 
son, physicist, Manchester, 
1856; Francis Thompson, poet, 
Preston, 1859; Paul Klee, 
painter, Muncbenbuch, Switzer- 
land. 1879. 

Deaths; Antonio Stradivari, 
Cremona, Italy, 1737; Sir John 
Alcock, aviator killed when his 
aircraft crashed near Rouen, 
1919; Bobby (R.T.) Jones, 
champion golfer. Atlanta, Geor- 
gia, 1971. 


Chris tmas calls 


Cheap-rate local, national and 
most international calls will be 
available in England, Wales and 
Northern Ireland from 6 pm on 
Wednesday. December 24 to 8 
am on December 29 and from 6 
pm on December 31 to- 8 am 
January 2. 

In Scotland the reductions 
will run from 6 pm Tuesday, 
December 23 to 8 am Monday, 
January 5. 

A three minute call from 
Britain to Australia will cost 
£2.11 instead of the normal 
£2.64 and a call from London to 


Edinburgh will cost 13p for 


three minutes instead of 26p 
(excluding VAT). 


Christmas post 


Tomorrow is the latest recom- 
mended date for posting first- 
class letters and cards in tune for 
Christmas. 


c 


WEATHER 


")A showery westerly airflow will cover the conn try, with 
— * troughs bringing some longer spells of 


mmor troughs Dnngmg some longer spells 01 nun. 
Eastern Scotland and NE England win have sunny spells and a few showers. Over 
western Scotland, N Ireland and NW England showers are likely to be frequent 
with hail and snow at times. Southern Britain will have a spell of wet weather 
during the morning: most places wfll become brighter by afternoon, though still 
with showers, especially in die W. Temperatures mil be near the seasonal normal, 
but it wfll be windy in the N and W. Outlook for tomorrow and Saturday: mostly 
rather cold and showery. 


c 


HIGH TIDES 


TODAY - AM 

Loota Bridge 2.44 
Aberdeen Z.19 

Avoranootb 8.13 



HT M NT 
aa am &7 

32 223 4.1 

123 836 113 

- 12.12 34 

114 821 11.1 

53 7.05 
&4 1207 

21 635 
43 1A0 

33 131 

52 11.43 
63 7 27 
83 7.14 
5.1 331 

- 1214 

22 1033 
43 1.12 
63 727 
a5 627 

32 735 
5.4 634 

23 a 15 
43 1228 

53 1206 
43 

8.9 7.42 
ao 449 

33 1236 



1m«32n8IL 


C LIGHTING-UPTIME } 


( AROUND BRITAIN ) 


London 422 pm to 723 am 
Bristol 422 pm to 742 am 


8.02 am 332pm 


BrtdRngton 


Sun Rain Max 

hrs to C F 

- .08 7 45 Cloudy 

0.1 36 8 48 shower 


zpm 

EdHmgb 429jom to 211 am 


pm to 732 am 
451 pm to 7.47 am 


n draisato Moon rises 

10.19 am 521 pm 

Last Quarter December 24 


C YESTERDAY ) 


03 - 

03 - 

- .01 


Eastbourne 

Brighton 

Worifrtog 


02 31 
- .12 

- .03 

- .06 

- 35 

- ,14 


Boonenrih 


Sw a n s ea 

Weymouth 

Exmouth 

Te^ranouBi 

Torquay 

Falmouth 


0.1 


0.1 





PuitfuSu - haw to play 


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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


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TIMES 


SPORT 31 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 35 


THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


FT 30 Share 
1276.1 (-3.5) 

FT-SE 100 
1636.3 (-1.6) 

Bargains 
34415 (38336) 

USM (Data stream) 
129.27 (-0.54) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 
1.4300 (-0.0015) 

W German mark 
2.8815 (-0.0101) 

Trade-weighted 

68.6 (-02) 

Beazer in 
agreed bid 
for Franki 

C H Beazer, the house- 
building and contracting 
4 ) group, has made an agreed 


Share sale pays for Euston Centre 

British Land 

in £ 92 m deal 


British Land is rai din g £92 


By Alexandra Jackson 
An independent assessment 


mUlion to finance .thTpur- of 

«ase of properties, including values it at £863 million or 
me remaining interest in the £75.7 milKoa net of dd>t The 
fcuston Centre, a 12-acre office net rental income before debt 
complex in London s Euston changes is about f 6 ? milli on 
Road built during the prop- After the deal, British 
ttty boom in the late 1960s. will own 13 million so ft — 
British Land is paying £65.4 expected to generate net rental 
muiion to Peninsular and income of£l I million a year— 


Oriental Steam 
Company for Ei 


income oftl I milbona year— 
comprising the Euston Centre 
property and offices in 


cash offer worth HKS108 
million (£9.7 million) for 
Franki Investments, a civil 
engineer quoted on the Hong 
Kong stock market 

Beazer, which intends to 
retain Franki’s quote, has 
contracting operations in 
Hong Kong and the Pacific' 
Basin through French Kier. 
The combination of the two 
should provide a substantial 
platform for growth, Beazer 
said. 

Franki's business wifi be 
continued as an independent 
entity. It made pretax profits 
'in the six months to the end of I 
June of HKS 6.8 million. 

Newman buy 

f Newman Tonks Group, the 
Midlands engineering com- 
pany, is paying $ 1 0 million (£7 
million) in shares for Quality, 
an American manufacturer of 
hardware products for archi- 
tects and builders' supply 
merchants. Quality made pre- 
tax profits of $1.27 million in 
the nine months to the end of 
October on sales of $6.4 
million. 

£2m buyout 

The plant hire business of 
the USM-quoted building 
company Consolidated Tern 
is being bought by the 
management in a £2 million 
deaL The new company will 
be called Crestacre Holdings. 

Hogg ahead 

Hogg Robinson, the Lloyd’s 
broking and travel agency 
business, made pretax profits 
in the six months to the end of 
September of £7.9 million, a 
rise of 36 per cent The interim 
dividend was raised 14.4 per 
cent to 5p net 

Tempos, page 24 

SEC inquiry 

Texas Commerce Banc- 
shares Inc, which is to be 
bought by Chemical New 
York Corp (CHL) in a deal 
announced on Monday, said it 
has been contacted by the 
Securities and Exchange 
Commission in relation to an 
inquiry into trading activity in 
rts common stock last Friday. < 
No SEC comment was 
available. 

Bid cleared 

The Trade' Secretary, Mr 
Paul Channon, has decided 
not to refer the proposed 
acquisition of Glasgow Stock- 
holders Trust by John 
Mowlem and Co to the 
Monopolies Commission. 


Y - * ptvpvi LY 0|iU • V t ‘WiT ill 

divestments. To pay for this Wigmore and Dover streets, 
and to finance two other The market had suspected a 

projects, 5G Warburg, the <>«! of nature and Brit i s h 
mCTd*ant banker, is raising Land shares, pushed np by hid 
. mi ILon net through a speculation a few weeks ago to 
pacing of 6Z9 million new nearly 2Q0p, dropped back to 
British Land shares, increas- 
ing British Land's share cap- 
ital by 45 per cent. 

The other projects being 
financed by the placing are 
Lowndes Lambert House in 
Eastcheap, London, EC3, ac- 
quired for £17 million in 
October 1986, and the third 
tranche of £31 million of the 
Legal & General property 
portfolio bought in Jane 1986. 

Euston Centre Investments 
owns, among other things. 50 
per cent of Euston Centre, an 
office complex on the Euston 
Road — once London's tallest 
office block. British Land 
bought the balance of Euston 
Centre from Geoige Wimpey 
in 1984. 

In addition, ECI owns free- 
hold office properties in Do- 
ver Street and Wigmore Euston Centre: built during 
Street, London WI. the property boom 



178p before the announce- 
ment The market’s dis- 
satisfaction with the deal, 
owing to the expected dilution 
in British Land's 1987-88 
earning s per share asset 
value, was shown by a further 
fin in the share price to 175p. 

The ECI purchase is being 
financed in part by the issue or 
6.75 million British r mid 
shares direct to P&O, through 
the placing of 27.98 million 
shares ana by a £6.4 million 
cash payment. British Land 
shareholders are being invited 
to apply for 2 placing shares 
for every 5 British Land shares 
held for I70p. 

Yesterday's announcement 
contained a revaluation of the 
British Land portfolio. The 
directors, supported by the 
opinion of independent asses- 
sors, believe the net tangible 
assets of the group to be £365 
million or 260p a share. 

British Land's i n t erim re- i 
suits for the six months to the j 
end of September showed 
pretax profits up 44 per cent 
from £8.1 milli on to £11.7 
million. Gross world rents, of 
which 85 per cent is collected 
in Britain, was £53 million. 

Mr John Ritbiat, chairman 
of British Land, said the group 
was “well placed to pursue 
further major acquisitions.” 
The interim dividend was 
increased by 25 per cent to 
l-25p. 

Tempos, page 24 



Opec deadlock 
over Gulf War 
adversaries 

By Teresa Poole, Business Correspond eat 
Iran yesterday called for the are minimal — there will be 


suspension of Iraq, its Gulf 
war adversary, from the 
Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries as talks 
on cuts in oil production 
remained deadlocked over the 
question of a quota for Iraq. 

The demand came as inten- 
sive behind-the-scenes nego- 
tiations appeared to yield little 
success in finding a com- 
promise solution to the im- 
passe, and as the planned 
plenary ministerial session 
foiled to lake place: 

Some delegates began to 


one. 

Early in the day the Iranian 
news agency, Inra, quoted a 
hi g h- ranking Iranian official 
as saying that Iran had called 
for Baghdad's suspension be- 
cause of Iraq's refusal to 
accept Opec decisions." 

Delegates saw the call as an 
expression of frustration by 
Iran. After four days of private 
talks Iraq is still refusing to 
accept any oil output quota 
lower than that allocated to 
Iran — 2.3 million barrels a 


Cambrian’s! Clyde pays £6.9m 


successor 

toBoesky 

New York (Reuter) — Mr 
David Hobson, a former se- 
nior partner at Coopers & 
Lybrand. the chartered acc- 
ountant, is taking over as 
ri i frirrogn of Cambrian & 
General Securities, the British 
investment trust formerly 
chaired and managed by Mr 
Ivan Boesky, the disgraced 
American arbitrageur. 

Mr Hobson said yesterday 
that he had been requested to 
take over by the company’s 
merchant bankers, SG War- 
burg, after Mr Boesky’s re- 
signed over disclosure of his 
involvement in the Wall 
Street insider trading scandaL I 
“It’s left a bit of a gap,** he I 
commented. 

Both the bank and certain 
shareholders felt it would be 
best to have an independent 
chairman to sort out the 
company's affairs. 

“The main objective is to 
try to dear up the situation 
and issue the accounts, and 
see where we go from there," 
Mr Hobson said. 

Shareholders have been 
promised a further statement 
before the general meeting is 
held on December 30. This 
will be issued within the next 
week or so. 

anas 


for N Sea stake 


By Carol Ferguson 

Clyde Petroleum, the Brit- 
ish independent oil company, 
is to buy a 9.2 per cent interest 
in the Buchan oilfield in the 
Central North Sea from 
Texaco, the American oil 
group, for $10 million (£6.9 
million). 

Clyde is to pay from its own 
resources, which were boosted 
by £3.6 million of cash on the 
sale of its 25 per cent holding 
in Berkeley Exploration to 



Confident Sir Ren; no collapse 

Stamp rebate hits 
Post Office profits 

By Edward Townsend, Imfratrial Correspondent 
Hie Pbst Office, including return £125 million in 1986- 


output is boosted tenfold in 
the second half of 1989. 

Mr Malcolm Gourlay, 
Clyde’s chief executive, said 
that the deal was a play on the 


Ranger Oil at the time of oil price and on the Buchan 
Ranger’s bid for Berkeley. reserves. “The Buchan res- 

The acquisition will raise va Y complex, and 

Clyde’s interest in Buchan to ultimate recoveiy could be 
21.95 per cent, adding three much ***** ton official 
million barrels of proven of 75 mlIll0n 


developed reserves and 2,500 

bands a day of production. . “J « * ® uchan 

. interest was earlier this year 

On completion Clyde will whe n BP, the Buchan *op- 
have 31 million barrels of oator, paid £17 million for 
provCT British oil reserves, Sulpetro, which owned a 12.71 
mdudmg its share of to per cent interest in Buchan 
Wytca rarm neiu- L/orset, and and onshore acreage including 
another seven million in the ^ interest in Humbly GroveT 


“ I US and Ecuador. 


rds a day, a rate which can be shore acreage. 


A direct comparison is 
Its annual oil production in impossible because of the 
>87 wiQ average 12-500 bar- difficulty of valuing the on- 


maintained until Wytch Farm 


Tempos, page 24 


Wall Street 22 
Recent Issues 22 
Co News 22 

Caunaeat 23 

Stock Mrkts 23 
Ecan View 23 


Tempos 24 
Amatatmems 24 
Traded Opts 24 
Money Mrfcts 24 



Beecham out of drinks 

Beecham, the pharmaceun- set up last year with Remy 
cals group, has pulled out of Martin and Campari to mar- 
the British wines and spirits ket wines and spirits. Remy 
business which it entered 19 Martin is to buyer, 
years ago. Since setting up the opera- 

The group is raising £8 tion Beecham has taken a 
million for its 98 per cent decision to concentrate on its 
stake in Eurobrands, which it core businesses. 


. The Post Office, including 
Girobank, yesterday reported 
first half pretax profits id £21 
milli on ogaimrt £67 millio n a 
year earlier. But h said that it 
was confident of again achiev- 
ing an annual profit of well 
over £100 million. 

Sir Bm Dearing, the chair- 
man, emphasized that the Post 
Office had expected to dip in 
profits and had budgeted for 
them after the long period of 
price restraint including the Ip 
rebate on basic second-class 
letters which cost the Post 
Office £25 million. 

Postal charges rose in Octo- 
ber when the price of the first- 
class stamp was i n crease d by 
Ip to J 8 p and second-class 
stamps, previously cut by lp, 
returned to 13p each. 

Sir Sen strongly denied that 
profits had collapsed. The 
derision to hold and rebate 
prices was "an incentive to. 
help our custome rs and to 
encourage growth at the ex- 
pense of short-term profitabil- 
ity and we are well satisfied 
with the record growth it 
produced. 

“Holding and reducing our 
prices for such a long time was 
a very commercial approach, 
and we held the price discount 
far more than twice as long as 
originally planned and 
announced." 

In the year to March 31 the 
Post Office recorded a profit, 
before tax and interest pay- 
able, of £167 milfion, and oa 
current performance should 


porary curbs on output which 
expire at to end of this 
month, and of reconvening 
the meeting next month. 

But Senor Javier Espinose 
Teran, Ecuador’s oil minister, 
said last night tot ministers 
would probably meet today. 
He added: "The chances of 
breaking up without an accord 


Murdoch 
controls 
HK daily 

Mr Rupert Murdoch's 
Australian publishing com- 
pany, News Corporation, now 
has a controlling interest in 
Hong Kong's main English- 
language daily newspaper, the 
• s v South China Morning Post. 

The move completes a pro- 
cess begun on November 7 
when the company bought a 
mc no collapse 34.9 per cent stake in the 

# paper from the Hong Kong 

U n 4-/% and Shanghai bank and 

D3TG lllTS Hutchison Whampoa. An 
UWl,V AAA SCMP spokesman said yes- 

C* a terday that Dow Jones was 
1^t*A f T t Q selling its 1 8.9 percent interest 
<J V/ L/l v/11 Lij in the South China Morning 
. Post group to News Corpora- 

dustrtal Correspondent non tor USS57 million (£40 

retnra £125 million in 1986- 

g 7 News Corporation said its 

Sir Ron disclosed that in ^hoHy-owned subsidiary, 
October the mafi made a profit j *™ 5 P»toshera, would ex- 

of £32 miffiofi, andhe said tot I?”. 5 * reJSL’EP? 1 ' 

he ms confident that it would «y shareho ders of SCMP at a 


talk of the possibility of aa ^ m 

having to extend the tem- This compares with Iraq’s 


meet the Government-imposed 
target to this year of achiev- 
ing a 3.25 per cent return on 
turnover before net interest 
and tax. 

Last year the Post Office 
was forced — under the system 
of negative external finance 
Emits - to pay £99 million to 
the Treasury of which £6 
million came from Girobank. , 
This year Sir Rim has won a 
reduction to £60 mSEon. 

National Girobank, which 
publishes hs result as a pre- 
tax, historical cost operating 
profit, made £12 raiQion to 
to half year. 

The Post Office said that 
more titan KXMHX) personal 
acconuts were opened, and at 
to end of the six months to 
bank introduced its new mort- 
gage service, earmarking £100 
million for lending to 
bonsehuyers. 

Sir Ron repeated the Post 
Office’s long-term strategy of 
keeping portal prices below 
the rate of infiatioa to to 
next five years. “We wflt be 
ploughing back our profits into 
continuing to keep prices 
down," he said. 

Sir Ron re-iterated the Post 
Office board's opposition to 
any fotnre break-up of the 
corporation 


price of not less than HK$73 
(£6.44) a share, in accordance 
with the Hong Kong code on 
takeovers and mergers. 

News Corporation now 
holds 53.8 per cent of SCMP. 

According to the agreement, 
Dow Jones is required to buy 
SCMPs 51 per cent interest in 
the Far Eastern Economic 
Review. SCMP will also seU its 
12.7 per cent interest in Dow 
Jones Publishing (Asia), pub- 
lisher of the Asian Wall Street 
Journal, to Dow Jones. The 
two companies will become 
wholly-owned subsidiaries of I 
Dow Jones. | 

News Corporation has an i 
option, which expires tomor- 
row, to acquire an additional 
15.1 per cent stake in SCMP 
from Hongkong Bank. 


output of about 1.7 million 
barrels a day. Iraq is exempted 
from the temporary produc- 
tion curb agreement 
The possibility that agree- 
ment on quotas may be post- 
poned weakened oil prices, 
and Brent for delivery in 
February slipped about 20 
cents to $15.90. 


W German 
rates cut 
unlikely 

By David Smith 

Economics Correspondent 

The West German Bundes- 
bank, or central bank, will 
bold its key council meeting 
today, when monetary taigets 
will be set for next year. Herr 
Karl Otto Pohl, the 
Bundesbank president, is ex- 
pected to indicate that there is 
no scope in the short-term for 
a reduction in interest rates in 
West Germany. 

Herr Pohl, who will be 
giving a press conference after 
the council meeting with Hen- 
Martin Bangemann, the 
Economics Minister, will re- 
state the Bundesbank’s 
commitment to monetary tar- 
gets after this year’s overshoot 
— the first since 1978. 

The central bank money 
stock — the target measure — 
has been growing at almost 8 
per cent compared with the 
3.5 to 5.5 per cent target- 
range. The Bundesbank is 
expected to persist with the 3.5 
to 5.5 per cent target for next 
year, but not attempt to daw 
back this year's excess growth. 

Following the annuli meet- 
ing of the International Mone- 
tary Fund in Washington at 
the end of September, when 
the Bandesbank successfully 
resisted international pressure 
to ease interest rates, money 
market rales in Germany have 

been edging upwards. 

The main casualty of this 
gentle firming has been 
France, which has been forced 
to raise interest rates to pro- 
tect the franc's parity in the 
European Monetary System. 


EMAP bid referred 


The agreed bid by the fast- 
growing EMAP group for its 
fellow newspaper publisher 
Courier Press (Holdings) has 
been referred to the Monopo- 
lies and Mergers Commission. 

Yesterday’s announcement 
by Mr Paul Channon, the 
Trade Secretary, came a day 
after EMAP revealed its £22 
milfion offer and said that "it 
had not been discouraged” by 


preliminary discussions with 
Trade Department o fficials on 
the possible results of an 
inquiry. 

The offer will remain open 
until Mr Channon gives his 
final decision, which EMAP 
expects by the end of April 

EMAP is offering CPH 
shareholders a 1 7-for-two 
share swap or £10.80 per CPH 
share in cash or loan notes. 


I van Boesky: resignation 
left *a bit of a gap' 



Equipment makers find small is beautiful 

A sporting chance 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 

More i Han half the popula- key companies like Dunlop’s eg 
lion takes part in some sport- Slazenger, Wilson, with its US is 
ing activity and, although the parentage, and France's Sato- cj 
growth rate is running at 2 per mon — are British companies si 
cent a year, there could be such as Scotland’s Ben Sayers D 
“massive” increases in the and Yorkshire’s Bronty. in 


The Fleming Japanese 
Investment Trust pic 

The company’s policy is to specialise in investment in Japan with the 
emphasis on capital appreciation. 


sales of clothing and equip- 


ment, according to a survey* sports are swimming 


big-spending 


out yesterday. 


million a year), tennis (£58 


In annual turnover the in- million), walking and ram- 
dustry is worth £580 million bling (£47 million), football 
in equipment clothing and (£40 million), athletics and 


London: 

£$T,4300 

■Si DM2.8815 

£SwFA4303 

£ FFr9.4309 

£Yen233.73 

£:lndex.-68.6 


New York? 

& £1.4302* 

DM20160* 

S-SwFn.7010' 

$. FFr6.6005* 
S: Yen 163.52* 


London Fixing: 

274.25) 

.60-392-10* 


8»SL7&4G6 SDR £0.835849 



Surveys of Britain's sports- 
goods industry. 

There are fewer than a 
dozen manufacturing suppli- 
ers to this industry. The 
average company has fewer 
than 25 staff; a sales turnover 
of less than £2 million and a 
profit in only one year in 
three, says tbt survey. 

Golf is the biggest money 
spinner. It makes £96 million 
in sales each year, £80 million 
of which is sales of golfing 
equipmenL Half of this is sold 
to clubs. There are 2J million 
participants — 2.2 million 
men, playing on 2,000 
courses. 


footwear sales. keep fit (£37 million), skiing 

The upgrading of equip- 
meat is one growth influence 
and fashion is another as more 
women begin io take part, says 
the study by Jordan’s Business f 

Surveys of Britain's sports- f 

goods industry. 

There are fewer than a 
dozen manufacturing suppli- 
era to this industry. The 
average company has fewer ^ 
than 25 staff; a sales turnover Dunlop: key sporting firm, bnt 
of less than £2 million and a most are smaller 

profit in only one year m (£3fi (£32 

three, says tbt survey. million) and squash (£30 

Golf is the biggest money million), 
spinner. It makes £96 million Top of the league are the 
in sales each year, £80 million 10.5 million who either walk, 
of which is sales of golfing ramble or clim b mountains 
equipmenL Half of this is sold from a sales viewpoint, 

10 clubs. There are 2-5 million their needs, mainl y in clothing 
participants 2.2 mtihon footwear, are compar- 
men, playing on 2,000 gtively modest 
courses. Increases are forecast for 

Among suppliers for golfing athletics and keep fit; bowls, 
equipment — which include which has benefited from 


hooliganism, and fishing. 

Darts, fueled by television 
exposure, has probably 
peaked and will remain a 
static sport, as have bad- 
minton, snooker, squash, 
swimming and walking, the 
survey suggests. 

One of the biggest areas of 
growth will be the upgrading 
of equipment, the survey says. 

An example is the racket 
industry, which supplies ten- 
nis, squash and badminton 
rackets. Wooden rackets 
which were selling at np to £40 
are being replaced with new 
materials such as carbon fibre, 
graphite, kevlar and boron. 

The starting {vice for these 


Highlights of the period to 

30th September 

1986 

1985 % change 

Total assets 

£162.1m 

£71 .4m 

+127.1 

Net asset value per 
ordinary share 

1006p 

459p 

+119.0 

Ordinary share price 

7% 

406p 

+74.9 


‘The success of our Japanese specialisation has 

been very marked and still appears to be soundly based. 

We propose a capitalisation issue of four shares for each 

share held.” „ „ ^ ^ TTWVT>TV 

RA.K GIFFORD 

graptute. iceviar and boron. rhnirmjjn 

The starting price for these onamnan 

rackets, offering more power M . , " ,"T ^T1 

with lighter weight, is put at 1 li you would like a copy or the Fleming Japanese Annual Report U 1 

I and/or a copy of the Dividend Reinvestment and Savings Scheme | 
j broc h * re Q please t iek a f xL 1. 1 un ihs coupon to : Robert Fleming 1 
Services Limited, 25 Copt:*.*’! s-^viue. London EC2R 7DR. . 


common price. Some sell for 
£500. 

The biggest chain of almost 
100 specialist, sportogoods 
outlets is Olympus, part of 
Sears Holding. 


* Britain's Sports Goals In- Ij 1 
dustry. £125 from Jordan's, | 
Jordan House, 47 Brunswick |[ - 
Place, London N1 6 EE 1 


Name 

Address. 


.FLEMINGS 









BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


l£fl|JLiUC&t 


AY DECEMBER 18 1986 


PCW legal deadline 
will expire today 


By Alison Eadie 


The deadlin e for potential 
defendants to agree to * 
standstill on American litiga- 
tion in the long-running PCW 
affeirat Lloyd’s expires at 1pm 
today. 

If the 20 main defendants 
do not agree to a standstill, 
lawyers acting for about 400 of 
the hardest hit PCW names 
expect to initiate litigation in 
the' US under the Racketeer 
Influenced and Corrupt 
Organisations Act before the 
end of the year. 

The defendants include the 
Lloyds’s brokers, Minet Hold- 
ings, Sedgwick and Alexander 
Howdert, and the accountant, 
Arthur Young, The Corpora- 
tion of Lloyd’s is also a 
defendant ampins* potential 
litigation by PCW names, but 
it may be left out of the 
American action initially. 
Lawyers wish to reserve their 




Peter Mflter. hopes for 

a settlement 


right to join Lloyd’s at a later 
date. 

The defendants have all 
been party to a standstill 
against legal action in Britain 
for the past year. The expecta- 
tion, therefore, is that a stand- 
still on American fitiganao 
■wiQ be agreed, averting the 
prospect of a multi-mdhon 
dollar lawsuit. 

The standstill prevents 


defendants from pleading the 
statute of limitations, or its 
American equivalent. 

Litigation in America is 
potentially fer more harmful 
to the defendants than British 
litigation because the rem- 
edies available to names 
nsder American law are more 
draconian. Under the Rico 
Act triple damages are 
awarded. 

There is also the possibility 
that a lawsuit could question 
the validity of policies written 
in America by the big Lloyd's 
brokers. ... 

Assuming that litigation is 
averted. Uo vtfs chairman, Mr ! 
peter Miller. stiD hopes to 
achieve a settlement of the 
PCW affair. Names are facing 
estimated gross losses of £380 
million, which net down to 
£235 imUkm- Lloyd’s is trying 
to build a settlement on the 
discounted figure of losses of 
£135 million. 


plans fuel merger 



Leisure 

e 

forecast 


Bv John Bell 


for the managem e n t of the 
group. 

Mr Robert Napier, financial 
director of Redland, said yes* 
today: “The new group will 
enjoy a broader geographical 
spread and bexto product 
mix. There will be synergy and 
savings and it will benefit 
foam being a larger force in the 
marker.” 


Mecca Leisure, the bingo 
and holidays group which 
west public in October, 
comfortably topped its 
prospectus profit forecast 
yesterday. 

Pretax profits for the year to 
September 30 readied £734 
mSBon compared with the 
£73 million expected at the 
time of the flotation and £5.76 
millio n for the previous year. 

Mr Michael Guthrie, the 
chairman, reported that the 
year has started well 
and that Mecca was in a 
position to develop its bps* 
nesses and to expand into 
related areas. Capital spend- 
ing was £8 million last year 
and the group expects to span! 
£20 million in the current 12 
months. 

A year ago, Mr Guthrie and 
his management team bought 

die company from Grand 
Metropolitan for 29$ mfllioa. 
At the timg of the flotation the 
backers of the buy-out made a 
return of more than 50 per cent 
on their holdings. 

Most of the group per- 
formed well last year. 
Entertainment and catering 
profits rose from £2J2 million 
to £4.1 million, while Imago 
made £7.1 million, against 
£53 million. The holiday 
cont ribu t io n topped £2.1 mil- 
lion - 


A false market was created 
in Brvan: Holding's shares for 
almost an hour yesterday after 
Brvant made a profit forecast 
of £21 million and rejected an 
increased offer from English 

China Clays. r _. 

However. English Uuna 
CJavs (ECO bad not increased 
its '£132 million otter for 
Bryant, made las! month. Its 
offer is worth 13!.?P a share 
with a cash alternative of 


J30p. . 

Bryant’s shares opened the 
day at !54p and rose to !57p 
in the belief that ECC bad 
increased its offer. Later. Bry- 
ant published a correction to 
the original announcement 
and the price drifted back to 
155p. 

It is thought that the confu- 
sion began with an announce- 
ment. earlier in the day. on the 
Slock Exchange's news service 
which said the bid by EEC 
would not be referred to the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission. It is possible 
that when the nraitel beard of 
the announcement it assumed 
ft to be an increased bid for 
Bryant by EEC. 

TheBryant’s profit forecast 
of at least £21 million pretax 
for the 1 2 months to the end of 
May 1987 is based ou five * 
months of management ac- 'r 
counts and an estimate for the 
remainder of the year. 

Bryant made £133 million 
in its last financial year to the 
end of May 1986. 


: '■ • *• ■ < 


foraacond iladno room 






"We have been supplied with .... 
- ; computers by ICL since 1968. 
-;Tbese can now .process more , . 

.v.' - . F' J-V • ./-V>N /“V LL. ^ 4*. 4 nvtn 


MAJOR US BANK 


^in a day- without problems . •: 
■ the en&oftthe decade 


v itois f igore is likely to have ■ jp 






AH our 




' -jkv> 

. -fj 


BACS Limited 




MAJOR UK INVESTMENT BANK 


As you can see, some computer 
systems have withstood the pressures 
of this year better than others. 

for instance, all gift transfers - 
passed smoothly through ICL systems 
— as they have for the past 20 years. 

Our ongoing record at BACS (the 
largest Automated Clearing House in 
the world) really speaks for Itself. 

And now; in the wake of Big Bang, 
over 60% of all equity transactions 
are settled through ICL systems. 


To achieve all this, we have not only 
helped many of the newly formed 
financial groups make sense of their 
different types of systems, but also 
supplied many new arrivals with our 
products and services. 

Furthermore, we are currently 
bringing to the market special com- 
pliance systems designed to provide 
the internal safeguards required in 
the new trading environment 
In short, not only do we have a 


team of experts with a rather special 
understanding of the City’s needs, but 
computer systems that have success- 
fully l ived up to the business challenges 
of our many clients in the City. Both 
before and after Big Bang. 

And, putting our innate modesty to 
one side, we hope that’s something you 
won’t mind us 
banging on 
about 


We should be talking to each other 



FORMOflE CQKKT BffOPOWT ON FHffiPOI*SX KX «S A kOIBER OF THE 6IC RC GROUP 





COMPANY NEWS 


• BLXLOUGH: Total divi- 
dend HX6p (Z2p) for the year to 
Oct. 31. Turnover £120.19 mD- 
fion (£10537 million). Pretax 
profit £15.93 million (£12.36 
million). Earnings per share 
27.85p (2!.08p). The company 
has agr ee d to acquire the Hub- 
bard- Reader Group for £9 mil- 
lion in rash and 1.8 TniHinn 
ordinary shares. 

• BROOKMOUNT: Interim 
dividend 1.3p (nil) for the six 
months to Sept. 30. Turnover 
£1.57 million (£1.88 million). 
Pretax profit £508.000 
(£260.000). Earnings per share 
(weighted average) 6.9p (5.8p). 

• CAMPBELL AND ARM- 
STRONG: Six months to Sept 
28. Interim 1.3p, as forecast, 
payable on Jan. 30. Turnover 
£4.15 million (£2.83 million). 
Pretax profit £605,000 
(£273.000). Earnings per share 
(weighted average) 6.5p (3. IpV 
The order load looks good for 
the early months of 1987 and 
trading results so for in the 


financial af&ire, both at the 
interim and foil-year stages of 
the current year. The year has 
started well, with trading ahead 
of the comparable period for last 
year. 

• STORMGARD: Concord 
Fastener Industries, a subsid- 
iary. has bought Scan Belts for 
£640.000 in cash. Scan win be 
combined with Concord to give 
the group a stronger position in 
the leather accessories maricei. 

In the 13 months to Feb 28, 
Scan achieved pretax profits of , 
£54,950 on sales of £3.6 million. V : 

• PARKER-KNOLL: The j 

company has conditionally 1 

agreed to acquire Semple, a 
distributor and designer of 
furnishing fabrics, for £7.37 
million in cash and shares. 

• CARDIFF PROPERTY: To- 
tal payment raised to 935 per 
cent (9 per cent) for the year to 
Sep*- 30. Turnover £186.460 
(£224.892). Pretax profit 
£35.328 (£! 7.822X 

• ARCHIMEDES INVEST- 




satisfactory level, the board 
reports. 

• SOUNDTRACS: Dividend 
of Up for the year to Nov 7. 
Turnover £2.62 million (£1.8 
million). Pretax profit £532,648 
(£328.848). Earnings per share 
3.64p (228p). The board reports 
that the company has exceeded 
the profits forecast made at the 
time of the introduction to the 
USM and the current year has 
begun welL 

• JURYS HOTEL GROUP: 
Half-year to Oct 31. Interim 
dividend, I.5p, payable on Jan 
23 (against a single dividend of 
3.5p last time). Pretax profit 
Ir£l-21 million (about £1.13 
minion), against IrE1.62 million 
last time. Turnover Ir£&24 
million (IPE8.76 million). Earn- 
ings per share 5.0p (9-2p). In 
spite of the severe setback in 
trading during the summer 
months, the group is confident 
that prospe cts re main bright. 

• GIBBS MEW: Six months to 
Sept 30. Interim dividend l.Sp 
— a 36.4 per cent increase. Sales: 
brewery, £5.86 million (£4.64 
million), managed houses, 
£541,900 (£390,300) and Wil- 
liam Seymour, £1.77 million 
(£1.83 million). Pretax profit 
£563,000 (£459.900). Earnings 
per share 6.62p (5pX 

• ARENSON GROUP: Mr A 
Arenson, the chairman, told the 
annual meeting that be looked 
forward to reporting a general 
improvement m the company's 


Total dividend I0.9p (I0.15p). 
Pretax revenue £228.756 
(£2 1 0,890). Earnings per income 
share I0.90p(!0.25p). 

• STERLING PUBLISHING: 
Six months to Sept 30. No 
interim dividend (same), bat the 
final will be at least at last year’s 
level (2p). Turnover £1.89 mil- 
lion (£994.000). Pretax loss 
£218.000 (£236,000). Loss per 
share (weighted average) I .Op 
(l.2p). 


• CHEMRING GROUP: Total 
dividend 16.5p (13.5p) for the 
year to Sept 30. Sales £18.99 
million (£8.28 million). Pretax 
profit £3.05 million (£1.63 mil- 
lion). Earnings per share S4p 
(46.8p) and fully diluted 51. Ip. 


• B EEC HAM: The group is to 
give notice to stockholders of 
the early redemption of the 
£2.31 million, 8.5 per cent 
unsecured loan stock, 1984/94, 
on March 31 next 

• NATIONAL AUSTRALIA 

BANK: The bank has agreed to 
acquire a 74 per cent interest in 
Broadbank Corporation, a New 
Z ea la nd finance bouse, from 
Government Life Insurance of j 
New Zealand, which will hold 
the remainder. NAB win issue i 
5.2 million of its ordinary stock ! 
units for the interest. I 

• JACQMAR: Six months to I 

Sept 30, 1986, compared with 
the eight months to Sept. 30, 
1985. Pretax loss £91,000 
(£330,000).. f \ 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AHD FORWARD RATES 




mm 


SESEjlgEESE 




ji A b j g 




¥3S 


RECENT ISSUES 


Brake Bros 
Bflttft Gas 


Daniel S ( 




148-3 

141 

J57 

a'j-i 

68+2 

156 

178-2 

110-1 

169-1 

56 

307 

168-2 

I® 

28+1 

165 

132 

67+2 

168+3 

65-4 

65+2 

94-1 


HETAJL 



























k 


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: •■-'■■ -^.'nane,^ 


*L5i»g Ii i ; if j »/.%« »j =re 3^ « :) q im ftgtTOl 


ECONOMIC VIEW 


Real Incomes growth tells the 
Chancellor’s rags-to-riches tale 

T o non-economists it is tranche of British Airways) 
an rather puzzling. could reduce the PSBR for 
But to economists it is 1986-87 to £3 billion. 

VMV mnfiuimt !• !_ .1 ». . . 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


[COMMENT Kenneth Fleet'l 


Pilkington ahead on 
points in first round 


T o non-economists it is 
all rather puzzling. 
Bui to economists itis 
. . *«y confusing in- 

deed. The Chancellor, faced a 
few months ago with post-oil 
penury, suddenly encounters 
an embarrassment of riches. 

The Treasury, never very 
successful at bitting its 
borrowing targets, looks set 
for another substantial mi«c 
this year. But, as in 1985-86, 
the error will come in the form 
of a sizeable undershoot. 

Two financial years can 
never be directly compared. 
Changes in the pattern and 
size of tax payments and the 
adjustment to a lower oil price 
mean that comparisons be- 
tween the present financial 
year and the last one are 
problematical. 

The fact remains, however, 
that the public sector borrow- 
ing requirement for die first 
eight months of the year was 
only £5.7 billion, compared 
with £6 billion in the corres- 
ponding period of 1 985-86. 

And this year, unlike last, 
most of the privatization pro- 
ceeds have still to come. In 
1985-86, with only a small 
amount of privatization in the 
final four months of the 
financial year, the PSBR out- 
turn was £5.8 billion. 

A similar performance in 
the final four months of thi* 
financial year, coupled with 
the £3.4 billion of privatiza- 
tion proceeds (British Gas, 
shares and loans, and the first 


tranche of British Airways) 
could reduce the PSBR for 
1986-87 to £3 billion. 

No one in the City has yet 
come down to this level, 
although Klein wort Grie- 
veson is talking of £4 billion- 
£5 billion, and £5 billion is 
appearing to be a consensus 
view. The target, remember, is 
H billion. 

How has this happened? 
The most obvious source is 
the co nsnme r spending boom. 
As the table shows, white retail 
sales have gathered strength 
(and they grew stronger last 
month although the detailed 
breakdown is not yet avail- 
able), a greater concentration 
of this spending went into 
clothing and footwear for 
adults, consumer durables, 
and other products on which 
VAT is payable. 

This is all perfectly logical. 
There is a limit to which 
people, even when they are as 
flush with cash as now, can 
increase spending on food, the 
main area of spending which 
is zero-rated. 

Thus, the boom for retailers 
also means a boom in Ex- 
chequer revenues. Customs 
and Excise receipts reached 
£4.4 billion last month, £800 
million up on October. Al- 
though they may have edged 
back this month, similar to 
last year, the underlying trend 
is very strong indeed. 

Consumer spending is not 
the only beneficiary of the 
strong growth in real terms 



Lord Young; “generalized edwrtsttion does not work** 
that has been the central Lord Young's view is that 


feature of the economy this 
year. Income tax receipts are 
strong, as is the Exchequer 
income from corporation tax. 

Such are the Exchequer 
benefits from strong growth in 
real incomes that government 
ministers appear to have given 
up exhorting workers to settle 


the British economy still des- 
perately needs lower wage 
increases. This view appears 
to be challenged by the 
Treasury's experience over the 
past year. Apart from the 
buoyancy of tax revenues, real 
income growth has been the 
source of the recovery in the 
economy from its lull earlier 


RETAIL SALES BY SECTOR 


(Percentage growth rates, volume) 


economy from its mu earner 

State fin" Employment, admit- 


JanOct 

1986 


All retailers 
Food retailers 
Mixed retailers 
Clothing and footwear 
Household goods 


Source : Department of Trade & Industry 


State fin* Employment, admit- 
ted this week that “generalized 
exhortation does not work." 

In a speech to the Institute 
of Directors, Lord Young 
accepted that unions could not 
be held to respond to such 
advice from the Government 
because wage Haims were a 
test of their virility. And 
management is under pressure 
to pay the going rate for 
workers, even if that rate is 
rising. 


unemployment picture. And 
this recovery has also boosted 
productivity, which has im- 
proved Britain's unit wage 
cost position relative to 
competitors. 

And not only is real wage 
growth having dear beneficial 
effects. Public spending is now 
back in favour and, with real 
increases of more than 2 per 
cent both this year and next, is 
making a solid contribution to 
overall economic growth. 


STOCK MARKET 


Drugs sector sparkles but 
volumes slacken elsewhere 


By Carol Leonard 

Christmas festivities were 
wdl to the fore in the City 
yesterday as market men 
made meny in the “watering 
holes” within the Square Mile 
and left the stock market to its 
own devices. 

One stockbroker quipped: 
“Our settlement offices are all 
overloaded with British Gas 
and, until they've sorted 
through the backlog, we might 
as well go out and enjoy 
ourselves.” 

Volumes were extremely 
thin and the FT-SE 100 Share 
index responded to the lack of 
interest by drifting gradually 
lower, to dose down 1.6 at 
1,6363. The FT 30 Share 
index followed a similar pat- 
tern and dosed 3.5 lower at 
1,276.1. 

Gilts opened easier on the 
back of sterling’s weakness, 
but then recovered to end the 
day about one-sixteenth better 
in the longs and unchanged in 

• Watch Smith Newcoort, 
die market-maker. Market ■ 


TIME TO BUY 


FTA ALL SHARE 
PRICE 


Jan Fab Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sap Oct Nov Dec 


460p on further profit-taking Oils drifted downwards, 
and GEC 2p to 164p. disappointed by the absence of 

The pharmaceutical sector any agreement from Opec, but 


movS^eadTy 1 
20p to l,528p, Britannic iS 


new machin es is exceeding 
even die most bullish expecta- 
tions and that production is 
now up to the targeted 70,000 
units a month. 

They forecast that profits 
will almost double, rising 
from £75.3 million to £150 
million, in 1987 and say this 
technical correction repre- 
sents “an excellent buying 
opportunity.” 

Industrial . life insurance 
companies moved sharply 
highe r on vague talk that the 
TSB may be looking for an 
acquisition. Analysts were 
sceptical of the story, although 
there were reports of a heavy 
buyer in the sector. Pearl 


was a rare hub of activity with 
sizeable volumes notched up 
and most shares making use- 
fid gains. Beecham, amid a 
volume of 4.4 million shares. 


managed to dose a few pen- 
nies wove their lowest levels 
of the day. 

SMI gave up 6p to 969p, 
BP a penny to 704p, IC Gas 


budding a stake. They thnik 
Mr Said Steinberg, the 

American corporate raider, 
coold be behind the bay- 
ing. He has just sold his Mer- 
cury International bolding, 
and Smith Newcourt might 
suit hhn better. Smith 
shares eased Ip to 154p. 

the shorts. Helped by Tues- 
day’s PSBR figures, gilts fu- 
tures were just a couple of 
pence below their “high” for 
the year. 

Among blue-chip equities 
rCI firmed 2p to I083p» 
AlEe d-Lyon s a penny to 309p, 

white THF slipped 4p to 172p, 

Grand Metropolitan 3p to 


improved 4p to 430p, after 2p to 57 lp and British Gas 
announcing die sale of its partly-paid half a penny to 63p 
interest in Eurobrands, a with 201 million snares chang- 
mar keting company for wines mg hands, 
and spirits, to Rexny Martin Amstrad, the fest-growing 
for £8 milli on. consumer electronics group, 

Glaxo gained another 13p to could be set to see its shares 
l,023p — ap 1 " 1 on hemes of a move on to higher ground 
new drug, even though it may following an extremely bullish 
still be several years away “buy” circular from Chase 
from the market -- and Fisous Manhattan Securities. Its 
jumped 17p to 538p after a shares, down a penny to 11 lp 
presentation yesterday to the yesterday, have slipped by 
medical press of its new anti- more than 20 per cent since 
asthma drug, Tilade, due to be the September launch of the 
launched in Britain in company’s range of IBM 
January. compatible computers and in 

London International spite of the publication of 
Group- the Durex-to-Royal better-than-expected 1985-6 
Worcester combine, eased a profits and a bullish annual 
half-penny to 24S-5p after report 
Soros, the American fund- In their seven-page review 
management group, an- 'of the company, two analysts, 
nounced it had further cut its Mr Mike Whitaker and Mr 
holding in the company to 4.7 Keith Woolcock, say they 
percent believe that demand for the 


to 887p and Refuge 8p to 
447p. 

Hogg Robinson, the insur- 
ance broker which unveiled 
halftime figures and the ac- 
quisition of Airtours, a chain 
of 21 travel agents, jumped 
13pto360p. 


• Speculators hoping Oat 
Combined English Stores may 
torn into a white knig ht and 
resene Goldsmiths from 
Griflame wffl he disappointed. 
Mr David R o xb u r g h , manag- 
ing director of CES, says here 
“definitely not interested” h 
making a hid. Goldsmith 
shares fi nned 2p to 264p. 


Marks and Speacsr 
3p to 176p with 83 


spite of the publication of sbar F s . traded trough the 


better-than-expected 1985-6 
profits and a bullish annual 
report 


market as some investors 
lightened their load. James 
Capel, the broker, has down- 


In their seven-page review H 051 fore* 25 ! by 

roup, an- ’of the company, two analysts, about £5 milhon. 

Either cut its Mr Mike Whitaker and Mr LCP slipped lp to 196p as 


Keith Woolcock, say they Ward White declared that it 
believe that demand for the now has 4Z8 per cent 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at &45pm 


taw 

Hfrto Ltm Company 

383 283 AUed-Lyow 
174 12fi ASDA-MH 
330 241 BTR 
491 381 BAT 
572 449 Barclays 
*40 625 Baas 
450 355 Beecham 
726 528 Bub Circle 
383 293 BOC 
283 170 Boots 
60S 423 BrAffospan 
65* SI BrGss 
710 530 Br pjftoisum 
280 177*1 Br Telecom 
133 38 Brito! 

354 250 BSW 

369 277 Cat* 4 WWass 
IBS 158 Caawy BdwwppW 
564 426 Corns Wyefci 
336 257 Com Union 
704 409 Cores GoMfiekto 
330 252 CeuiaukiB 
290 201 DeoCOfp 
438 218*3 Dbmrw Grp 
830 408 Psorw 
364 701 Gen Acad** 

228 158 GEC 
II 1 * 756*1 Gtora 
4*1 328 Grand Met 
11*1721 GUS ’A 

385 235 GKN 

355 275 GuinflBW 
2l5*i 141 Hanson 

623 403 HawW SwdBiay 
11*« 734 bnpCIwni hd 
583 335 Jaau» 

381 312 LaritxtJke 


BM OUT Cfa*B* 

307 312 • +2 

144 148 -3 

268 273 

468 473 +3 

483 480 +2 

727 787 *4 

427 432 • +1* 

850 655 

357 380 +? 

222 225 • _1 

490 4» +2 

62 S3 -1 

700 706 -2 

198 202 -1 

163 185 -1 

258 282 +2 

317 324 .. 

182 1© -1 

485 488 • 

285 288 -2 

883 670 +3 

307 310 • +2 

203 208 ■■ 

314 318 

536 538 • +18 

805 807 • +2 

163 1 a -a 

10*#1O*s -- 

455 462 -2 

10*4 10»* • ■■ 

259 261 • -8 

286 299 +? 

186 187 +h 

430 434 • -3 

10** 10** 

515 318 -S 

386 369 


«r W 
nee % 


<7 14.1 952 

3.1 1K0 1*00 
as 189 535 

3JB 123 2,100 
SB 74 « 

33 UQ 759 
43 173 8*00 
43 93 832 

43 143 967 


3<9 278 Land SecwWes 
288 183 Legal & Gan 
484 293 Uoyds 
283 183 UnfifO 
231 163 Maria & Spencer 
5» 417 MUbnd 
503 428 Nat West 
578 423 PtODM 


43 143 967 603 383 Pearson 

47 146 4,700 643 315 PWngton Bros ■ 

47 1(M 1300 246 162 Ptooay 

.. 204M 942 718 RuWntlal 

6* 77 4,100 234 146 Racal Bad 

53 117 8.700 589 421 Rank Oig 
57 4 A 1200 800 805 RecWtt & Coiunui 
3.1 US 1^400 584*2345 Reuters 

22 173 1,700 7M S11 H7Z 

47 213 4,700 532 365 RomAm 

33 143 677 887 782 Royal fen 

63 .. 1300 428 344 Satabuy (J) 

62 19.1 318 1484104 Sears 

33 KM 1300 415 315 Sedgwick Op 
5-1 16,7 422 OT 6S& 5M 

1 A 225 1,700 132 93 Smtti & Ngptew 

13 233 4300 174 96 STC 

43 203 630 894 419 Stan Ctat 

33 102 2700 365 286 S«Wiwn 

20 213 3*00 772 620 Sun ABanca 

23 IBS 1300 fit 1 * 73S*T58 P/P 

29 143- 1 » 420 265 Tea* 

63 8,7 1300 529 374 Thom EMI 

39 113 2700 349 209 Trafalgar House 
33 113 3A0O 209 139 Tnstfnusa Fona 
53 . 93 175 22 13'iURflnw 

43 121 960 269 216 UW Biscuits 

23 107 1300 23 1 174 Waflcoma 

43 173 630 925 430 Wootoftfl 


330 332 
2*5 247 
4SO 453 

232 233 
175 177 
555 570 
515 520 
485 498 
560 665 
633 637 
172 174 
805 807 
172 174 
527 530 

632 834 
570 573 
854 660 
390 393 
835 837 
411 414 
121 122 
320 322 
968 970 
119 120 
167 166 
795 800 
265 270 

633 637 
73'i 74 

383 387 
470 474 
259 261 
172 179 

21*8 21*i 

233 234 
214 216 
673 800 


149 4 A 22.1 1,200 
123 69 313 362 


259 53 73 1300 

17.1 7A IIS 464 
53 33 219 8300 

37.1 63 21.1 1300 

273 S3 SJ4 1900 
2Mb 53 143 489 

153 Z7 183 237 
213 3j4 183 1,100 

73 42 123 1900 
383 43 532 962 
43 23 183 1,100 
223 43 18J 448 
219 29 tU 277 
&4 03 483 402 
313 43 BJ 174 
119 49 109 2H 
883 43 883 281 
&4 29 249 100 

89 4.1 153 2J00 

17.1 53 163 1,400 
51A S3 9S 806 

33 23 204 4300 

2.1 13 153 1300 

464 53 63 384 

119 4.1 142 1900 


43 137 

29 tan 


43 Kt* 
43 683 


43 572 


89 23 220 1900 
S3 53 343 297 

189 73 97 1.700 

79 49 17.1 4*00 
60.1 29 19.7 141 

133b S3 129 1300 
S3 14 264 716 

229 34 153 477 


Which brings os back to the 
Government's finances. It is 
possible to argue that this 
year’s PSBR undershoot, tike 
the summer fell in inflation to 
less than 2L5 pa cent, is largely 
a one-off effect. It was lower 

inflafinn rather than an 

acceleration in earnings, that 
produced the strong growth in 
real incomes and all its effects 
outlined above; 

Next year, inflation win be 
higher and real income growth 
consequently lower. It would 
be unwise to expect this year’s 
buoyancy for non-oil revenues 
to persist next year (although 
there could be a boost to oil 
revenues if Opec agrees to $18 
a barrel production). 

Why should a PSBR under- 
shoot this year have any 
consequences for the Gov- 
ernment's plans for 1987, and 
whether or not 2p or 3p is cut 
from the baric rate of income 
tax? City economists are al- 
ready calling into question the 
public spending totals for next 
year, although the planning 
total was raised by £4.7 billion 
to £148.6 billion. 

There is one direct reason 
why an undershoot this year 
has implications for next year. 
The £750 million in British 
Gas loans due for repayment 
at the end of the financial year 
can betaken in either 1986-87 
or 1987-88. 

I f the PSBR is heading for 
an undershoot, it would 
make sense for the Chan- 
cellor to take this £750 
million next year. 

The other reason is that a 
PSBR undershoot this year 
will challeng e the ra wtihilily of 
those in the City who forecast 
overshoots. Just as the Trea- 
sury has bludgeoned the out- 
side world into acceptance of 
its economic forecasts, so the 

fTmnerflrtr is altom p lipg the 

same thing with his commit- 
ment to not allowing borrow- 
ing to rise above £7 billion 
next year. 

So frafl looks to be working 
out rather nicely. Extra public 
spending and tax cuts can be 
magically accommodated in a 
reasonably robust projection 
for public borrow in g. And for 
this, credit must be given to 
the workers and management 
who refused to listen to min- 
isterial exhortation on lower 
pay rises; to the banks and 
other providers of credit fin- 
fuelling an already roaring 
consumer boom; and to the 
spending departments which 
successfully challenged the 
Treasury’s public spending 
totals. 

David Smith 

Economics Correspondent 


A mong today's master bidders and 
their advisers, the technique in 
contested takeovers is to put out 
a deliberately low initial offer. That is 
intended to smoke out the other side’s 
ammunition and, most crucially, to 
depress expectations of the final or real 
offer. Even so, the first bid usually has 
enough credibility to attract a few 
gullible souls who do not watch the 
market too carefully. 

Judged by that test, BTR’s £1.1 billion 
offer for PQkxngton must rate an all-time 
low for credibility having attracted 
acceptances from only 100,000 shares 
with a value of just £644,000 at its first 
closing date on Tuesday. 

Yesterday, the offer was, as expected, 
extended until Christmas eve. This 
tactic too is by now wellwom. Its 
message is that the bidder considers his 
first oner pretty serious and will only be 
dragged with the utmost reluctance into 
increasing it by not very much. The idea 
is that the final offer then comes as a 
pleasant surprise to the bored 
shareholders of the target company, 
who are left to muse that their shares 
would not stand so high if the bid foiled. 
It is also intended to fill in a dull period 
in the bid timetable before the victim 
company is obliged to release all its 
forecasts — in this case January 3. If the 
original foiled bid were not extended, 
the bidder might have to make a 
succession of higher offers, which tend 
to raise market expectations. 

This could be particularly embarrass- 
ing for Sir Owen Green and BTR. 
Pilkmgton’s share price is continuing to 
rise, putting on 3p yesterday on the low 


level of acceptances. At 641p, it stands 
2Sp above its dose on November 20, the 
day the bid was announced. Meanwhile, 
Bill’s share price has been sagging. 
After bolding up well at 291p on the firat 
day, it has dropped to 269p, off a further 
2p yesterday. 

This has cut the value of the bid, 
originally put at around S4Sp, probably 
to less than 530p. If Sir Owen had to 
raise his bid now, he could hardly offer 
less than 650p a share, which would still 
probably not survive PiJDdngton's profit 
forecast and other final salvos. 

The interim profits were bettor than 
expected, causing market forecasts for 
the year to March to be raised from an 
original £175 million or so to £190-200 
million. And since this will indude less 
than five months of the latest and 
biggest 10 per cent rise in British glass 
prices, it is already dear that Pilkington 
can do considerably better than this 
in 1987-88. 

The BTR share price, although it wifi 
have more friends in the New Year, is 
unlikely to be able to sustain a knockout 
bid for the fest-improving glassmaker. 
Pilkington’s own credibility has been 
boosted by the privatization launch of 
its great Continental rival St Gobain, 
which shows a similar, if more modest, 
pattern of retrenchment and recovery. 

The relationship between the City 
and industry will certainly feature 
prominently in discussion of the bid 
right up to its Intended final close on 
January 24. It will probably not decide 
the issue. But it will stiffen institutional 
shareholders to resist any but a knock- 
out bid from BTR. 


Zero could mean plenty 


T he authorities have not been 
afraid to innovate in their choice 
of funding instruments. But we 
have yet to see a zero-ooupon, gilt-edged 
stock emerging from behind the Bank of 
England's solid walls. And this, accord- 
ing to Alexanders Laing & Gruickshank, 
is just what the market needs. 

Zero-coupon bonds, where all the 
return comes in the form of capital 
repayment, have proved highly popular. 
In the United Slates, pension funds and 
insurance companies have latched on to 
zero-coupon bonds for portfolio-match- 
ing purposes. 

A similar de mand, laigely nn fftisfied, 
almost certainly exists in Britain. Be- 
cause of this, Alexanders argues, zeros 
could be priced higher than con- 
ventional stocks, cutting., the cost of 
funding. 

There is another potential saving for 
the Government if zero-coupon gilts 
attracted bigfaer-rate taxpayers currently 
investing in tax shelters. Zeros would 
have lower yields, producing a net 
saving to the authorities. This net saving 


would only be lost if all the switching 
into zero-coupons was from other gilts. 

Reducing the cost of funding is always 
an attractive carrot for the authorities. 
And, if nothing else, a funding innova- 
tion by the authorities might liven up a 
duD-as-dilch water gilt-edged market 

Yesterday, the market managed to 
struggle to gains of a quarter of a point. 
But, the bond market gurus at Salomon 
Brothers, in their Prospects for Finan- 
cial Markets in 1987, suggest that the 
present lethargy will not last 

Citing the gilts market as easily the 
most attractive, in yield terms, of the 
important bond markets, Salomon 
Brothers suggests that judicious 
switching between Deutschmark 
bonds and gilts is the best strategy for 
1987. 

Further dollar weakness is ex- 
pected, helping the pound to recover 
to 51. SO, although Salomons Brothers 
is a keen mark fan at the moment, 
expecting the dollar to fid! to DM 1.75 
and sterling to DM 2.60. 


ORefiance 

India’s largest* company 
is also one of the fastest growing 


Since Reliance went public m 1977, fts sates have 
incroasedd times, assets 42 times and profits 231imes. 

From a medium-sized textile manufacturer with 
sates of Rs. 690 million in 1 977, Reliance has become 
a leading integrated manufacturer of synthetic textiles 
and fibres with sates of over Rs. 7,000 million in 1985. 

Today Reliance is the largest manufacturer of 
polyester yams and fibres in India. 

As a part of its vertical integration programme. 
Reliance is in the process of expanefing its 


| RUPEES IN MLLIONS 

{ sales 

■ NET PROFIT 
| TOTAL ASSETS 
g NETVtfOFfTH 

■ TOTAL DIVIDENDS 

L— ... 


T 

%age 1 

growth over I 
1977 ■ 

QQOW. H 


689.80 7,162.89 938% 

29.30 713.37 2334% 

169.99 7,356.86 4227% 


95.41 3.111.17 
8.93 257.52 


3161% 

2783% 


manufacturing activities in petrochemicals - PTA and 
MEG, the essentia! raw materials for the manufacture 
of polyester. 

Reliance is diversifying into the manufacture of 
other new products - LAB (a detergent intermediate), 
PVC and HDPE (high grade plastics). 

Reliance also has plans to diversify into electronics. 

With the support of more investors than any other 
company in India, over 1.8 million today, ReSance has 
plans for the future. 


Issue of 13.5'/* Secured Fully Convertible.. 
Debentures of 145 Indian Rupees each.. Each 
. compulsorily converted into two Penance shares at 
the end of 12 months a: a conversion price of 
Ps. 72.50 per snare The average price of the 
snares dunno tne week of 3 th November was 
arouse Rs. 220 pc'- sna-e. 

This advertisement l3 not an invitation to 

subscribe ter the Debentures. Fui; details of the 
Oder are contained in an Oftebng Circular dated 
1st December 1936 on the terns or which a!one 
investment in the Decentc-es may be made For a 
copy of the Offering Circula' arid application forms 


Grtndteyi Bank pJx. 

13. SL James Square, 
LONDON swi 
Banfcof Bsoda 
31/32 King Street, 

LONDON EC2 

Hobeck House. 

63/65 Moseley St, 
MANCHESTER M2 3LP. 

175, Soho Road, Handsworth. 
BIRMINGHAM B21-95U. 


32. EaSng Road, 

WEMBLEY BREWT, 
MIDDLESEX HAO 4TL 
State Bank of India 
State Bank House. 

I.MBk Street. LONDON 6C2 

6.X FtnchJey Hoad, 
LONDON NW 11 

Clarendon House 
10/12. OiffonJ Street, 
LONDON NW1 


Kings House, The Green, 
SOUTHALL, MIDDLESEX 
30. Clare Street, BRISTOL 
American Express Bank Lid. 
Winchester House, 

77. London Wail. 

LONDON EC2- 

Canara Baric 
P.O. Box No. 1743, 

14, Moor Lane. 

LONDON EC2 


• in terms of maricet capitalization 


r issue ^ 

OPENING DATE:' 
22 - 12-86 
CLOSING DATE:; 
% 24-12-86 t 


ReSance 

is strategic growth 


Reliance 

Industries Limited 

Rego Oflcfl: M«kw Ctamtera IV. 

222, Nanmfin Port. Bombay 4000?1.hxfeL 
TO 243340 Tetex Oil -6542 VMALtfi 011 -2950 VMALM 







BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


TEMPUS 


British Land could be 
dull in short term 


John Riiblai has been on a 
shopping spree — spending 
£200 million since the end of 
March, Yesterday, with a 
placing and offer to existing 
shareholders, he settled the 
bill for more than half his 
purchases. Although appar- 
ently happy to live with high 
gearing, there are limits be- 
yond which even he is un- 
prepared to venture: 

The British Land asset 
value is a moving target In 
last year’s accounts it came 
out at about 225p but 
yesterday's announcement 
contained a revaluation, tak- 
ing it to 260p. By increasing 
the share capital by 45 per 
cent, however, the newly 
calculated NTAV falls by 
more than 10 per cent to 
232p. The gearing of the 
enlarged group stands at 
about 83 per cent. 

The commercial logic of 
rounding out the Euslon 
Centre interests, of adding to 
the Plantation House scheme 
and to the Legal and General 
portfolio are self-evident. 
However, it may lake the 
market time to digest the 
shares and appreciate the full 
potential of the properties 
involved. 

Proposals have been 
submitted for the redevelop- 
ment of Plantation House 


renegotiating rents at Euston 
Centre is considerable. 

Yesterday's interims 
showed the rest of the busi- 
ness performing satisfac- 
torily. The mam features 
were the inmpressive rise in 
gross rents, the profitable 
disposal of a miscellany of 
industrial interests and the 
merging of the group's prop- 
erty, 90 Broad Street, New 
York with the 85.7 per cent- 
. owned subsidiary, British 
Land Inc, which now has a 
New York Stock Exdchange 
quotation. 

The impact of the new 
acquisitions for the rest of 
this year is insignificant Brit- . 
ish Land should make £27.5 , 
million (eps 13.5p). But next 1 
year the new properties ; 
should make their presence 
felt and push profits to £38 , 
million. Earnings, however, ! 
will be diluted by about 9 per | 
cent to 14. Ip. 

The shares are usually a , 
favourite for traders, but it 
looks as if they could be dull . 
in the short term. 

Clyde Petrolenm 

Ever since the first discov- 
ery well was drilled at the 
Buchan oil field more than 1 0 
years ago, the complex geol- 
ogy has ensured controversy i 
over how big it would ] 
become. : 

There is a widespread be- j 


THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


SE opens doors 
for locals in 
options trading 


PTA ALL SHARE 
INDEX 


PETROLEUM 


By Richard Lander 


DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SS»OCT NOV DEC 


fief that the official, recover- 
able reserves estimate of 75 
million barrels could be too 
low — by as much as 10 
million barrels — even though 
the field has produced 52 
million barrels so far. 

Only time will telL But for 
Clyde Petroleum, which takes 
an optimistic view of the 
field's potential, buying an- 
other slice of Buchan is the 
realization of a long-cher- 
ished dream. 

It was merely a question of 
finding a way to pay for it. Its 
foiled bid for Berkeley 
Exploration and Production 
provided the key. Gyde, the 
underbidder, bad the conso- 
lation prize of £3.6 million 


Berkeley shares to the 
successful bidder. Ranger Oil 

As a result, Gyde’s net debt 
will be about £4 million at the 
December year-end, rising to 
a little more than £10 million 
on completion of this deal. 

Clyde may have to take a 
£25 million asset write-down 
this year owing to lower oil 
prices. But the company does 
not expect debt to rise above 
one-third of shareholders’ 
funds. 

Gyde looks certain to 
make a loss this year before 
asset write-downs. 

However, Gyde should 
make a small profit in 1987, 
assuming the oil price can 
stay at $15 a band If it rises 
above $15, so much the 
better. 

Gyde now has the financial 
strength to do more than just 
survive until Wytch Farm 
comes in with the real jam in 
1989. It will have a sufficient 
cash flow in 1987 to spare $ 10 
million for exploration. This 
will alow it to take part in up 
to 10 offshore and onshore 
wells. 

It will take a much higher 
oil price to bring the indepen- 
dent oil sector back into 
favour but, when it happens, 
Gyde has a good chance of 
being around to enjoy the 
party. Unless, of course, it is 
snapped up by a greedy 
predator. 


Hogg Robinson 

Hogg Robinson's interim 
pretax profits at £7.9 million 
were above best expectations 
and sent the share price 
racing lOp higher to 3S7p. 

The mix of profits caused 
some surprise with travel, 
transport and financial ser- 
vices registering an impres- 
sive operating profits 
increase of 42 per cent, but 
insurance broking showing 
only 4 per cent growth. 

Adverse exchange rates, 
mainly a 15 per cent foil in 
the dollar, and a rise in 
Hogg's own errors and omis- 
sions cover of £700,000 


The fost-growing Stock Ex- 
change traded options market 
is taking an important step to 
boost volume by opening its 
doors to individuals who will 
be admitted as brokets or 
market-makers. 

Sole traders, or locals as 
they are known in the futures 
and options markets, have 
long been an established fea- 
ture of the hectic trading pits 
in the United States. 

The concept has been ex- 
ported to Australia and 
Br itain , where some 60 locals 
do business on the London 
International Financial Fu- 
tures Exchange. The Loudon 
Commodity Exchange is also 
likely to admit locals next 
year. 

Mr Bernard Reed, options 
manager, said the Exchange is 
already open for applications 
from potential locals. Apart 


from having to pass an op- 
tions examination, they will 
have io pay a £10,000 
membership fee and have at 
least £10,000 in liquid capital 

Locals, who can trade 
personally or with limited 
liability, will have to choose 
between acting as brokers or 
market-makers; the Stock Ex- 
change is keen to avoid any 
conflict of interest Locals will 
be barred from dealing with 
the public and will be re- 
stricted to trading with or for 
member firms. 

The Stock Exchange has 
traded options in 42 equities, 
two currencies, two gilts and 
the FT-SE 100 share index. 
Volume averages about 
43,500 contracts a day — more 
than three times the level of a 
year ago —and reached a peak 
of 81,733 last week when 
British Gas was launched. 


APPOINTMENTS 


Ladbroke names 
finance director 


17.11 1 i ■ 


broking profits: 

As the bulk of American 
broking profits foil in the first 
half and British broking prof- 
its in the second half, the 
exchange rate effect should be 
less pronounced in the sec- 
ond half. 

Credit and political insur- 
ance suffered a first half 
downturn due to a lack of 
capital projects in the 
developing world. 

The recent management 
buyouts of the Lloyd’s under- 
writing agency businesses will 
not affect Hogg’s profits for at 
least the next three years, 
because of the profit- sharing 
method used in the sale 
mechanism. 

The growing travel and 
new estate agency business 
should easily fill the gap left 
when underwriting profits 
start to run down. Hogg 
accompanied its interim 
statement with the news that 
it is buying 2 1 travel branches 
from Airtours bringing its 
high street outlets up to 210. 

Full year profits of £21.5 
million are in sight giving a 
prospective p/e ratio of just 
over 12, assuming tax of 33 
percent The rating is modest 
by the standards of other 
Lloyd's brokers. Despite 
outperforming the brokers’ 
index over the past few 
months, Hogg shares should 
go higher in the long term. 


Ladbroke Group: Mr Jerry 
OTVlahony is to be finance 
director. 

Record Merchandisers: Mr 
Malcolm Parkinson has be- 
come chairman and Mr Derek 
Pretty and Mr David Defy 
non-executive directors. Mr 
Hasan Akhtar has become 
chief executive. 

Metalrax Group: Mr Har- 
old John Mnsgrove has joined 
the board as a nonexecutive 
director. 

Shepherd Budding Group: 
Mr Colin Shepherd has be- 
come group chairman and 
managing director, succeeding 
Sir Peter Shepherd. 

Hepworth Plastics: Mr JD 
Carter is to be managing 
director. 

Hercules Incorporated- Mr 
David Hollingsworth is to be 
chairman and chief executive. 
Mr Fred Buckner is to be 
president and Mr Arden 
Engebretsen vice-chairman. 

BCT (UK): Mr Donald 
Wright becomes deputy chair- 
man and managing director. 

National Carriers Contract 
Services: Mr David Bock has 
been named as managing 
director. 

Berkeley Exploration & 
Production: Mr AA Wilson 
has become financial director. 
Ranger Oil (UK). Mr GH 
Bowman, Mr AJ Dingfey and 
Mr AW Hart have become 
directors of Berkeley 
Exploration. 

Salomon Brothers: Mr 
Nicholas Bedford, Mr Ste- 


xryrrrx 






Colin Shepherd 

phen Brisby, Mr F Wood 
Fisher, Mr Gary Goodenongh, 
Mr Jean Graft, Mr David 
Jarvis, Mr Christopher 
Mitchenson, Mr Gordon Tay- 
lor and Miss Valerie Thomp- 
son are to be directors. 

Connells Estate Agents Mr 
David Wood has been named 
as finance director. 

Royle Communications: 
Miss Anne Bartolo has be- 
come account director. 

Steelcase Sirafon Mr 
Charles Fosnett has become 
UK sales and market director. 

John Laing Construction: 
Mr John Arnritt and Mr 
Michael TredweH are to be 
joint managing directors, UK 
Gvil Engineering. 

Persimmon: Mr David Bry- 
ant fo to be managing director 
Persimmon Homes (Anglia). 
Mr Steven Feneley has be- 
come land director Persim- 
mon Homes (Midlands). 



• Beer progress satisfactory. 

• Hotel results hit by US tourism. 

Home Brewery promises exciting future. 


Unaucfited 
half year 
26.10.86 
£m 


Unaudited 
half year 
27.10.85 
£m 


Turnover 

393.8 

393.3 

Operating profit 

. 50.1 

49.5 

Pre-tax profit 

44.8 

43.1 

Earnings per share 

■m 

lO.Op 

Dividend per share 

2.41 p 

2.1 9p 


INlBtM DMDEND 

UPK>% 


For a copy of the full Interim Report please write to The Company Secretary, 
Scottish & Newcastle Breweries pic, ill Holyrood Road, Edinburgh EH8 8YS. 
Existing shareholders will receive a copy shortly. 


A special 
deal on 
an Olivetti 
personal 
computer 

(It must be Christmas.) 


Christmas is a time for 
giving, so giving we are. 

We're offering a com- 
plete Olivetti computer 
solution (Ml 9 PC, letter 
quality printer and word 
processing software) at 
exceptionally reduced 
prices. 

It’s a tempting package 
for any business, 
large or small; 
not just because 
of the price, but 
because it can change and develop as your 
business does. 

When you find you need more than a word 
processor our fully compatible PC can use the 
widest range of PC software available. 

Therefe just one catch; stocks are limited, 
so don’t dawdle. 

We want you to have a happy Christmas, 
not a disappointing 
New Year. 




, f£z 




Please contact Carol White at British Olivetti on 
01-785 6666. British Olivetti Ltd, 

86-88 Upper Richmond Rd, London SW1 5 2UR. 


Tim* Moan Starting 

DbcBS — — 

Mar 87 

Jin 07 

Sap 07 

Dec 07 

Mar 88 

Previous day's total op 
Three Moon Eoradou 

Mar 87 

Jon 87 

Sop 87 

Dec 87 

US Treasury Bond 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jun87 


UxwGU 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sot 87 — 
FT-SE 100 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 


Open High Lea Chew EstVol 

- TO 8864 88.63 88£3 169 

- 88JH 88 l 83 8878 8878 2519 

_ 83.14 89.19 89.14 89.17 110 

- 8976 89 JO 89-25 89.29 m 

- 88.09 89.11 68.09 89.13 83 

o 

- *192 9195 9592 9391 474 

= H 80 ■■ Bt R* 

- 10M4 lOCH^O^'r^^ 38 ’ 7 

: "SJ ^ SS 

Previous day’s total open interest 218 

- — — 96-16 o 

- WT — — 96-19 0 

HT Q 

__ Previous day’s tota/open ^nte/Bsl i9917 
” J2&I iw-ia b 

” 109-20 108-30 109-18 12742 

K — — 109*22 0 

-wr — — a 

- 16390 ,6435^763^' 3533 

- 168.60 167 JO 168.40 166.45 337 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 






[gg 







BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

1 !oo% 

BCCI 11.00% 

embank Savingst 12.45% 

Consolidaled Crds 11 . 00 % 

Co-operative Bank 11.00% 

C. Hoare & Co 11.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 1.00% 

Uoyds Bank 11.00% 

Nat Westminster 11.00% 

Royal Sank of Scotlandll.00% 
TSB ...11.00% 

Citibank NA 11.00% 

t Mortgage Base Rate. 



BRITISH GAS 
BUY OR SELL 

NOCOMMISSION 


CALL FOR 

COMPETITIVE PRICE 


01-493 5022 
01-404 4411 

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J^l i 



THE -TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



-% dd - 

From your portfolio card /’ hrc fc vour 
movnnais, ratos ££ 
Ofily. Add them up to Abe yoa Sir 

an? c&cktelr£t ite 

doily dividend figure. If m maifJiw you 
have won ownghi or a share of ihe tolaJ 
mt »ey stated. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
hack ot your card. You must always lave 
your cord available when claiming. 


Shares ease in quiet trading 

ACCOUNT DAYS; Dealings began December 8 . Dealings end Friday. §Contango day new Monday. Senlement day Jamiray 5 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 

WlMtre stocks hav« only one price quoted, these sra mftidla prices taken da8y at 5pm. Yield, change and P/E ratio are catadated on the middto price 


E EsaEggsi 1 ^"^ — uwm 

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147 1 Bkk 

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166 126 
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580 40 C*W# 


• » 

; - 

Please take account of any 

TT 

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minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily lotah 
for the weekly dividend of £24,000 in 
Saturday’s newspaper. 


BRITISH FUNDS 



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29 

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904 799 Bnaanc 
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288 IS LsoM L Gd 
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527 772 tel LA 
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PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERTG 


(nveatment Tula appear on Poge 26 


2*2 205 ttUMfli 
177 12B Mini Hunt 
1764 68 MoteMi 


2*0 IS Barth* Tab , . .. .. 

22 W Chdhi 19 X A 116 U IU 

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223 195 lanohom QMi 


223 195 Tinphaa BBS 2B7 2t2 .... 

Hnaodal Tmcta appaar on Page 28 


FOODS 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 




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19 




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100 66 ft Banml 

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520 525 *-2 


PROPERTY 



HOTELS AND CATERERS 


32B 175 A «lk IV W 
416'= 212 Cara* TO 
52 27 Grata 
2®fl ITS SffSf fiffif 
477 283 LWTrtigi 
3S3 ID Soot TV 
276 * JWItfV 

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323 326 .. Off 43 174 

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445 447 a -2 25 9 U ILI 

344 348 -2 159 4.8 11.4 

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2D 297 a-3 15D 5.1 

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MB 1S1 a-1 89 89 70 

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DRAPERY AND STORES 


13 

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115 

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NEWSPAPERS AND 


172 145 StceH 

f ife Assoc Soot 
JWbApne Honpapa 

Si £ w* 

205 115 EHW-A- 

ttb UMMaCw 
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127 82 Aapsl 
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TOBACCOS 


481 

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136 

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180 

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ELECTRICALS 



























































































BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986. 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


Offer cfa'ng Ylri 

WOT TRUST H*NAO£>tS 


WaeWy 

BW Offer ch'nfl YW 


BU Offer ch’ng YW 


M 7 . Panymom Rd. HmMI Hewi 
0444 456141 
financial 1306 139.1 -03 395 

Snaky Co^ to 2355 2515 -02 .. 

Do (neons 1504 1608 -0.1 068 

Hgnbxme 874 72.1 -0.1 5 SB 

nxwaa 708 625 -01 438 

Man PVtfSte MC 600 67.1 -02 289 

DO to 1064 1112 -03 .. 

655 507# 402 148 
665 925 402 023 


CM MOM* 1285 137.1 
HJfflir Me Aeeum 2535 3801 
Do toeonw 1895 2121 

GaaiMAeem s*fi ns 

DoMcora 702 ma 

Nth Amor Tat Mom 1365 W35 
MMIU Aaei* 1702 1374 
EroTsttom 1723 1832 
Oral Tnat 2383 2615 


-0.1 333 
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401 013 
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405 059 
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BUOQ6ASTER MAMAOEMOI T m 
Tha Stock Enhrnga London BC8P 2H 
01-588 2668 


Feaemhp be 
GnaticfQ 
Do toon £ 4 ) 

Income ftnd P 
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w.m-B . 

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CSHOaHAHACBa _ 

138. HWi HOBORL LBCOon WC1V 8PY 
01*242 1148 
CSJwM 


515 551 
2211 233.7# 
368.4 3784 
1035 1084 
185.1 1895 
1335 1395 
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FaCUKTIUNAflBEMT 

1. UmnGa PouMoj HO Undai EC4R QUA 

01-623 4660 

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CUM find 1125 1185 401 02* 

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round Has Rnd 48.1 521 40.1 325 

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&KS to ww ’■» 

NORWWUTKWfag?-- 
FO Box A Noma NR1 28*5 
0603 622200 

E227 1251 +C£1 S* 

S^Swt 1«5 T419 -ft* 221 

owwg^yEgJBBBS 

m cacaon Sn^Lonwo we 
Ilgqtni 01-£36 

tm«IQWi 1«5 134 -OICK 

grss.“” ffi s. s;s 


flZI 681 

m .1 12 X 4 


* 0.1 129 
-CJ 159 


-1*U 


89*100 Sanflog Hfl. MaMakns. KM MEW HOC 


MLA Amerfcm 
mla Canal 
MLA bw mia qni 
UA GS Unt 
MLA Means 
MLA EOopasn 


313 255 
334 384# 
695 515 
215 Z32# 
425 453# 
32.1 345 


- 0.1 096 
.. 211 
401 054 
.. 1120 
.. 458 
401 073 


Do Aeeam n*.i *■“ 

gSLM gi H oPom. WC 1 V 7 B 

Grow* Fend M M £6 -Ol gg 

Do lean 1363 1*55 -J 2 

uuTZnTTmr 1213 1315 -Ol 352 

1*87 -03 129 

TSST isL -55 52 

IM uSlM 1S5 ^9# -02 I* 

Dq 235S 2^3# 'W 

PEMP 5 TUA 1 -UMTTTOST 

*»■ me sw r. mrfcr 1 iw 

0481 576868 

H (teM 3 > ZTfi .7 2375 -09 C 7 S 

ISIS £*-' fS 

1‘iiiJrt Re 1533 1637 -CJ 138 

JE? 3 ££* jt-b sgg 

mu nppij Co's SOS 853 -03 036 

K&SlfcS? 843 Ka -JIM 

Snpsm C*n SI- 6 Ut -H 2 129 

PHQUnCDWmuSTMAHAaBtSLTD 

222. a w B gn iadBiSa 

01 - 2*7 T 5 * 4 j 7 

1947 132.7 .. US 


tST 








MANOLOE KAHAOEMEUr 




37.0 392 
785 847 


0*38 356101 

Oram im 701 805 
set A Find m 1319 i« 
hoi Mean urta no* 1217 
MS YMd « Ur* S74 584 
MGIWOI UMK U45 1530 
N Anancsn IW 7 U 785 
Far Em Una 1005 1065 


14*5 1535 
7U 785 
1005 1065 
715 783 


UENCAP WOT TRUST 

Unant Hss. 25Z, Bomfcrd RdL E7 

DW 31 551 * 


HBICUHVW 1 MimoeiSUP 
S 3 . HnaWOMR St ECM US 
01-280 BMO 


882 817# 
855 635 
725 775 
J4C4 2SS.7 
475 51.1 
1875 1885 


1115 118.7 
1885 2105# 
275.7 2985 
1485 154.1 
2645 2797 
2785 2845 
2195 2324 
2754 2815# 


-02 1.15 
-05 058 
.. 448 
-1.7 043 
+117 057 
-05 .. 


402 871 
-05 256 
-03 259 
405 156 
407 059 
-05 156 
-0.1 157 
-15 057 


01-280 2090 
Anar Growth 
Do Axum 
Anar Incoma 
Da Aeon 
Cu ropaan Growth 
Da Acam 
GOMM 
Do Acam 
Gtt A Find 
Do Acam 


955 1015 
1004 1082 
•o n 5S3 
565 585 
i4i 9 mi 
1485 1584 
2187 2815 
4055 4285 


-05 1.18 
-05 1.18 
*0.1 181 
+0.1 35T 
-08 150 
-08 150 
-05 156 
-08 156 


Da Acam 

'^BoAccsn 1887 1895 -02 050 

Raceway 2065 2174 -01 £18 

Do Acam 2217 2345 -0.1 118 

En ow DM 2*52 251.4 *17 279 

Banal Acam 3802 3885 *25 278 

Eao Me Fond Me 815 882# ftl 348 
Do Mean 835 888# -0.1 348 

WDLJH^OROOPOMTTR Off 

»gM™g^»MSL»MW.8M«aldS1»B 


802 808# -02 788 
916 9*5# -02 758 
855 905 -OJ6 458 
804 1025 -06 459 

2681 2887# -05 151 
3339 3SS3# -05 151 
164.4 195.1 -Ol 050 


BamtH Acam 
EtsoMcHnlMc 
Do Acam 


-Ol 050 
-02 am 
- 0.1 2.18 
-0.1 118 
*17 279 
*25 £79 


M7. B3*P *ou 

01-280 6198 

NC Marne «5 9*2# -04 «3C 

MSJmr< -»9 s 73 .. cm 

NCMrvMCO S' 2 544# .. 221 

SC 8aMr Am ST* 722 *04 130 

KAWVR 2811 2995 +C2 I.1A 

Do Ma«e XT* 3S£B *C3 1.18 

KOMkrC# 1*42 ISM .. 151 
KSBMEurxDei 1915 20U# -15 C23 
NCEmoRGc pita aia# .. an 
rowan iMimsr 

33 Kno vn« Sant Laste BSA a*S 


The prices in this 
section refer to 
Toesday’s trading 


Cmns Mceca 787 825 

Do Acam 1885 112-7 

OomnoMy A Qod 1291 1375 

Da Acam 1S38 1950 


TT*frrr 


Bdri Hgh tnc 
Do Acam 
GR A Rnd toe 
DoAaan 
HUi vwd 
Da Acam 
biame 
Da Acam 


581 626 
695 74.1 
187 515 # 
841 875 # 
1874 1875 
2715 2905 
17*5 186.1 
2695 3066 
3015 3195 
3168 3365 


-02 233 
-03 £33 
-04 Z7B 
-05 278 
+ft> 855 
*02 855 
.. 977 
.. 277 
*03 571 
*06 671 
-ar 182 
-0.1 182 
-15 021 
-15 021 




WJ 


* 0.1 tea 

♦312 152 
+02 152 




UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


15 

81 

85 

48 

138 

98 

H 

a 

143 

45 

106 

3 * 

19 

8*1 

22 

M 

127 

a 

m 

121 

121 

58 

Hfi 

132 

3 B 8 

2*0 

320 

IBS 

153 

138 

355 

1 G 2 

in 

HE 

ESS 

*40 

4 B 

27 

zn 

155 

181 

122 

95 

61 

70 

Gl 

44 '» 43 

228 

185 

85 

70 

120 

DM 

a 

tja. 

8 

■tr 1 

37 

17 V 9 

3 

28 

122 

M 3 

141 

a* 

10 

s 

18 

44 

XV 

133 

98 

IS 

138 

295 

IS 

in 

133 

27 

U 

IB 

263 

iS 

m 

m 

9 

48 

® 

42 

358 

UO 

UB 

119 

345 

185 

3 V 2 

im 

73 

180 

130 

42 

25 

175 

130 

2 M 

85 * 

89 

62 

UB 

88 

71 

a 

141 

74 

205 

SS 

181 

125 

13 

BV 

288 

158 

X 

> 8 V 

88 

45 

25 

800 

475 

118 

87 

173 

1 C 

33 

M 

57 

a 

12 U 

87 

98 

a 

151 

111 

131 

21 ■ 

175 

123 ' 

a 

X 1 

1 ® 

M 

a 

38 1 

iTSvKB 1 

115 

99 

ra 

a 

430 


75 

48 

114 

a 

113 

75 

198 

163 

82 

88 

157 

78 

73 

a 

140 

a 

a 

88 

216 

T 9 Q 

M 

a 

' 27 

21 

174 

131 

57 

40 

■* 3 S 

IK 1 

115 

70 f 

IS 

88 1 

-as 

128 1 

483 945 1 

94 

w 1 

9 

39 1 

148 

m l 

•37 

If £ 

SS : 

238 E 


The* 

M OKr 

13 V MV 

on> 

Bom 

B»«B 

Oil 

1 wo 
* 

1 43 

w 

200 

52 

56 

•-a 

£1 

19 

M 3 

133 

I 3 B • .. 

36 

£7 

192 

C 

a 


Ut £5 

134 


- 


45 




«0 

-1 



27 

■ J 

111 

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96 

Hj 

16 



83 

11 

95 

WO 

-3 

8.1 

ni 

288 

271 

+! 

2 3 

(U 

110 

114 

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w 

IK 


29 

11 

144 

Xt 

308 

+i 




305 

315 



£9 


1*5 

150 

-3 

43 

161 

313 

318 

-2 

4*4 

14 

379 

KM 

101 

-2 

88 

82 

58 

MU 

580 

-20 

143 

£8 

159 

X 

32 


114 

67 

77 

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ITS 


71 

w 

IK 

-1 

71 

47 

136 

m 

a 

+1 

86 

99 

tan 

a 

08 


14 

£1 

161 

43 

44 V 

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205 

ifld 

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7.1 

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1/1 

n 

78 

+2 

57 

71 

68 

1 DB 

113 

+1 

84 

58 

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8 *V 25 V • .. 

07 

26 

219 

48 

50 

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135 

W 

18 V 

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784 

81 

64 


80 

49 

68 

120 

123 


M 2 

138 

143 

+1 




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34 

ft 


11 



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47 

96 

108 

110 #+2 

64 

59 

117 

1 b 2 

1 E 7 

+2 

38 



290 

2 » 


50 

17 

277 

131 

134 to .. 




18 

20 

-1 

11 

56 

101 

m 

a 

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60 

81 

IA 

258 

283 


54 

£1 

284 

175 

IBS 

*2 

171 

70 

U 

53 

a 


46 

74 

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M 

48 

-1 

11 

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330 

MS 


58 

19 

184 

in 

m 

• +2 

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28 

718 

220 

230 


111 b 

52 

86 

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34 

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187 


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184 

31 

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a 

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271 

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168 

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in 

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MS 

ISO 


21 

11 

341 



38 

311 


m 

an 

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28 

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24 

100 

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31 

19 

187 

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-- 

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87 

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16 

103 

MS 

MS 


33 

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112 

117 • .. 

56 

49 

134 

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1 % 


38 

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158 

1 % 

+1 

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£0 

296 

37 

42 



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67 

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1.1 

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38 

42 


7 . 1 « 171 

386 

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102 

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26 

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101 

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B 8 

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102 

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142 

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172 #+2 

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204 

88 

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104 

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80 

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£1 

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1 <L 7 a 157 

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278 

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43 

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478 

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123 

178 


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211 

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148 

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208 

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£* 

410 

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to +2 

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370 

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738 

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137 

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87 126 

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42 115 
28 163 
15 08 

12 165 
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65 184 
24 211 


62 Jfl 

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43 23 
113 101 

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118 M 
78 81 
72 25 

201 115 



35 2.1 7X7 

48 24 218 


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■ .. £1 

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295 308 
39 b 49 4 

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$53 MB 
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31 33 

27 S 3 
72 78 
89 72 
180 MS 


98 103 
88 41 
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103 108 .. 

16 « 

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123 128 

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490 410 • .. 
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43 37 HA 

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17 46 117 
U 27 176 
43 97 m7 
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M 15 300 
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181 136 -1 

223 m #5 
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485 SOS • -5 
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BO 270 *42 
1*2 147 
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25 15 167 

82 80 240 
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67 67 82 

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15 26 SS 

64 Ya 2i!t 
66 75 95 
45 15 361 
25 18 275 

HE 1A ZH .4 
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17 40 128 

43 U 160 
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£8 25 WE 

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60 11 260 
85 b 11 205 
02 08 518 

48 75 182 

11 L2 Sf 

45 15 262 

258 26 11 
29 £5 165 


25 £4 156 
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35 U 204 
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£ a w 

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67 50 UD 
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30 U 225 
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13 68 153 
£7 05 Si 
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£3 L7 8U 
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W B 80 


31 

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£2 

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£8 

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226 

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314 

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148 

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179 b 

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46 b 

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40 2*4 GnoMar 
as TO Gnmn Mma 
TO IS IbUiJlM 
IDS 104 bdiRnt 
MO 540 torn* It SKcm 
261 2*4 tor Op 
185 132 ItwyiShM 
B 8 V *5 Jw> Asms 
!» 91 H i Qatar 
MO 119 nmnORa 
3M 237 JOmaat SsOtor 
252 IBB Im Mw*m 
22 a Loa MdH Sw 
71 53 Lon Teat 

tn M2 UKtan 
30Y HHHnfl Ljacb 
2*3 m Ita** 

1 S 7 128 tomy Moam 
M 2 137 StanvM 
388 215 Wav 9 ml 
435 ISO ttawvnn 
402 4M floCM 

87 40 HftMia 

2 i^ja™M =83 

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SI So! 

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105 110 .. 

ass ass +n 

WO 283 a-i 
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305 315 
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380 « 8 .. 
226 229 l+l 
in 484 #+E 
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237 M 2 .. 
82 V 83 V #-V 
284 298 
378 374 #+4 


62 15 

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SJD 3S 
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189 139 ' 
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119 80 'll 


26 

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349 

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209 

29b 

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485 

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300 

29b 

25 

533 

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411 

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18 

377 

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27 

489 

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35 

401 

IM : 

301 

77 

83 

29 

653 

11b 

45 

£9 

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209 

23 

37 

305 

26b 

£3 

853 


FINANCIAL. TRUSTS 



» 27 7J 

423 428 #+3 77 15 .. 

18 IM -b U U .. 

8 51 

41 .. 05 15 .. 

443 448 .. 17.1 18 452 

55 MB .. J5b *4 355 

W HU — 124 43 335 


mm *2 Ya u 

157 MQ :: 45h 25 

<13 417 -1 94 £3 

85 86 #+V 26b 30 

12B 130 +1 29 22 

M 07 

SO 585 +3 «6 22 

W m #-1 76 73 


:: ^bSi 


COMMODITIES 



I’ - * — ** ' l . ' . l . | l l . 1 1 * •' 



Tam Quint 

SfLVBI SHALL- 

Cosh 373JJM74.00 

Three Months . 38&«W84.Q0 

Val NR 

Tam Ida 


12BJW7.1 

mJMTJO 
123.0*82*8 
1220-21 .8 
124.0-23.1 
12BUV2S0 


41 H - +S 
90 83 +1 

mb vS • 

25 26 +1 

21 22 +«, 
157 199 • 

S S2 :: 

110 115 • .. 
780 773 
113 111 #+1 
W 202 #-( 

S £S. + ‘ 

i S«2J 

s i zi 5 

48 47 V -V 
IK ISS 


Apr 95*00 95.00 

Jun 9530 9630 

- .. VofcO. 

PtSMutvafcO 
Uw Canto Correct 
p.perk8a 

Hofeh Open Close 

Apr lOiS 


Coffee remains on tt» defenstra wtti London prices at the 
lowest level for four months. Last night, Colombia opened 
Januray export regi strati o n s at lower prices but the main 
focus is 00 an announcement, due shortly, on the Brazaan 
1987 contract terms. Comment by GNL 

MTBMATKMAL ' I LONDON COMUOWIY 


EXCHANGE 

Q WJoyRaon and Co report 
SUGARS C. Conduit) 
FOB 

Mar 137JU370 

May 141*41 j 

Aug 148*045*0 

Ota 1504*500 

Dec 1570-52*0 

Mar .,1. 166083*0 

Vdt 2829 




unq. unq. 


LONDON GRAM FUTU1ES 
Epertaim 

.. Whaat Barley 

Worth cm*# Oom 

110.10 111.15 
Jgr 11205 1130 Q 

toy 11535 11430 

Jj 1 , 11735 unq. 

Sap 10130 100.75 

Nov 10335 103.45 

VotWhoat 

U3WMN POTATO Bmtp 
, _ £ per loam 

KT - * 1 Op«i Oom 

2 ? W-SO 10800 

’4000 16030 
W 10*00 168.70 

8630 8700 

Vat 525 

nm m 

^ffWitfataatUBPii 


•f v 


is 

L~- r \ T — . 

*■ i \ V 

j - ; ?or 


zrsi& t? 












































27 





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Sis 


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; -: : - r >*:• -02 ft 1 


L * -«,3J 

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THE 



TIMES 


JhpJ^I tJ 9 < 



GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


B unng the past six years 
UK companies ach- 
ieved major productiv- 
ity improvements and 
became much more 
cosi-competitive and profitable. 
The major penalty was the heavy 
loss of jobs, particularly in manu- 
facturing industries such as ship- 
building, engineering and coal 
mining. 

British industry appeared to 
have survived the recession, and 
emerged from it as a much more 
healthy and cost-effective inter- 
national competitor. 

Unfortunately, the success story 
was short-lived. Sales have not 
increased. Profitability has started 
to decline, and strong new 
competitors have moved into 
traditional British markets. It 
would appear that industry may 
be more cosi-competitive, but in 
many cases with obsolescent prod- 
ucts in markets which have 
changed quite dramatically. 

The reason for this short-lived 
success story is the weak market- 
ing performance of many British 
companies, and the root cause of 
this can be found in the two-thirds 
syndrome: 

Two-thirds of British com- 
panies admit they are not good at 
marketing. 

Two-thirds of British com- 
panies do not use market research, 
do not carry out planned Hr yign 
and development of new products, 
and do not train their sales forces. 

Two-thirds of British managing 
directors have no major market- 
ing or sales experience. 


The result of these short- 
comings is seen by the UK's 16th 
place ranking in the international 
marketing league, and its 13 per 
cent unemployment level com- 
pared with the less than 5 per cent 
for the leading six countries in the 
league which include Japan, the 
United States, Sweden and West 
Germany. 

Not surprisingly, a country’s 
marketing dynamism appears to 
have a close correlation with its 
economic prosperity and un- 
employment leveL 

There is no longer any doubt 
that marketing performance is the 
Achilles heel of many UK com- 
panies. The lessons from success- 
fill international competitors have 
not been learned and firms are still 
talking of manufacturing costs and 
prices as the only critical in- 
fluences in world markets. They 
a re not and never were, except in 
the commodity business, and even 
there effective companies have 
learned to emphasize other 
factors. 

After six years of productivity 
and manufacturing efficiency 
gains, many UK companies im- 
proved their cost-competitiveness 
quite dramatically. But this did 
not produce the expected im- 
provement in sales volume and 
market share, and with increasing 
costs, particularly on labour, hard- 
earned competitiveness is now 
being dissipated and profits are 
felling, pfant closures, labour 
shedding, product range reduo- 



The competitive and 
successful society 
must also be a caring 
society if it is to win 
the greatest rewards, 
says Tony McBurnie 


lions and all the other rationaliza- 
tion moves are back again on 
many board agendas, as they 
move into another downward 
spiral of the vicious circle. 

The reason in many cases is a 
lack of awareness of how the 
market environment has changed, 
with new, higher value-added 
products, aggressive competitors, 
and enhanced customer expecta- 
tions. Tired, obsolescent products 
and inadequately trained and 
motivated sales forces do not 
satisfy such expectations. 

There is some awakening to the 
reality of this situation, as the 
response to Institute of Marketing 
initiatives with chief executives, 
government support for market- 
ing, the schools marketing certifi- 
cate and the television marketing 
series, demonstrate very clearly. 

However, old attitudes die hard 
and the debates at the TUC, the 


CBI and party political con- 
ferences place far too much 
emphasis on inward-looking 
considerations of m inim um wage 
levels, infrastructure investment, 
tax rates and the rest, important as 
they are. 

Far too little attention is given 
to the reasons why international 
competitors are decimating Brit- 
ish industries, how they are 
developing new products and 
services to meet the needs of 
markets and customers which they 
have researched and analysed in 
detail, and how they prepare 
aggressive marketing strategies to 
enter and dominate new and 
established markets, which were 
once British. 

Despite its history, or perhaps 
because of it, Britain does not 
have the competitive culture 
which Japan, the United States 
and West Germany have. 


Perhaps our lead in the Indus- 
trial Revolution meant little real 
competition and our captive em- 
pire market blunted our marketing 
prowess. Also, our education and 
social culture directed us towards 
the professions rather than in- 
dustry. Towards playing rather 
than winning? Whatever the rea- 
son, for our lack of international 
marketing success, it is clear that a 
culture change is essential. This 
change is taking place but it has to 
happen more quickly. 

More chief executives need to 
change their own and their 
company's thinking towards the 
market-place, and to the prepara- 
tion of aggressive, carefully 
thought through marketing 
strategies. 

■ More government investment in 
marketing support is needed to 
strengthen medium-sized and 
small companies, with the in- 
evitable payback in jobs from the 
increased manufacturing output 
needed to meet increased sales 
volume. 

More executives need to be 
trained in the fundamentals of 
marketing and how to improve 
their performance in the market- 
place. 

More emphasis is needed on 
developing the marketing strat- 
egies and effective organizations 
to match the needs of a fast- 
changing market environment, 
and less on ad hoc use of 


marketing tools, tactics and 
jargon. 

More effort is needed to 
communicate the critical Impact 
of marketing performance on 
‘economic prosperin’, employment 
'and company profitability, to 
Parliament, business, the City, 
academia, the media and the 
public at large. 

More thought needs to be given 
to attracting bright young people 
into the excitement and satisfac- 
tion of a career in marketing. 

British companies now realize 
that growth and profit will not 
automatically result from manu- 
facturing efficiency and cost-cut- 
ting. Much greater attention must 
be gives to marketing strategy, 
defining markets, carrying out 
research, designing and develop- 
ing the right products, the ones 
customers want, and selling them 
aggressively. 


U nless emphasis is 
placed on much more 
effective marketing, 
the very high cost in 
social, economic and 
human terms, of achieving and 
improving manufacturing perfor- 
mance will have been futile and a 
scandalous waste of talent 

How would the mantle of a 
highly competitive culture sit on 
Brnish heads? Is economic and 
corporate prosperity worth the 
risk to our caring British way of 
life? Would a resurgence of inter- 
national marketing competitive- 
ness mean a swing to an even 


December 18, 1986 


more materialistic culture in this 
country? Was the junior school • 
teacher right when she said 
competitive games should be - 
stopped because they were too 
stressful for the children? 

Without a much more compet- 
itive approach in international 
markets our share of worid trade, ' 
which has fallen by more than half' 
in the past 30 years, will tumble ' 
even further. The difficulties we 
are already experiencing in trying 
to fund the British way of life, will 
become so great that more and 
more cuts in community and 
personal services will be 
necessary. 

We do not have a choice. We 
simply have to ensure that a 
competitive, successful society 
does not become an uncaring 
society. The rewards which flow 
from marketing dynamism, as we 
have seen, are low unemployment, - 
low inflation and a prosperous 
nation — without many of the 
social problems associated with 
lack of business and economic 
success. 

The challenge is a fundamental . 
one, but it will not go away. The 
Institute of Marketing, as the 
national marketing body, has to be 
the catalyst in bringing these goals 
to a successful conclusion. It will 
not be easy, but it has to be 
achieved. The economic prosper- 
ity and the social well-being of the 
country depend on it 



» nave uu ufdjur marxei- tailing, plant closures, labour However, old attitudes die hard which Japan, the United States changing market environment, national marketing competitive- Tonv McBurnie is director general ■ 

aies experience. shedding, product range reduo- and the debates at the TUC, the and West Germany have. and less on ad hoc use of ness mean a swing to an even of the Institute of Marketing 


APPOINTMENTS PHONE: 01-481 4481 - APPOINTMENTS PHONE: 01-481 4481 


The Hong Kong Academy 

for Performing Arts 


Director 


The Academy is a Government-supported multi-disciplinary, bi-cultural 
educational institution in Hong Kong training students at tertiary level in the 
field of dance, music and technical aits. A vacancy will occur for the post of 
Director in August 1987. 

The Director is responsible to the Council of the Academy for its 
academic policy and management, in particular; for the development of 
the Academy as an educational force in the performing arts, and for its 
relationship with other institutions and authorities in Hong Kong and 
internationally. The Director may also be involved in some teaching. 

Candidates for this position wiH have a good background in the 
performing arts; leadership quaftties.and' proven organisational flair; good 
communication skills and an understanding of the academic environment 
A high standard of English and knowledge of Hong Kong and/or Asia will be 
important assets. 

The appointment will initially be on a 3-year contract basis. Remun- 
eration will be attractive, in accordance with the responsibilities of the 
position and the calibre of the appointee and includes subsidised accom- 
modation and usual leave provisions, medical benefits and children’s 
education allowances. 

Further information will be provided on request to: The Chairman of 
Council, The Hong Kong Academy for Per forming Arts, GPO Box 12288, 
Hong Kong (Reference: Director) or 'phone Mrs Katherine Yau, Assistant 
Directoi; on (Hong Kong) 5-8231597. 

Applications should include lull curriculum vitae, three passport sized 
photos and at least three references and should be addressed to the 
Chairman of Council at the above address, to be received not later than 
5 January 1987 Late applications may be considered at the Chairman's 
discretion. 



CJA 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 

35 'Mew Broad Street, London EC2IV1 1 NH 
Tel: 01-588 35S8.orOT58B.3576 
Telex Mo. 8S7374 Fax No. 01-256 8501 


AoantolnaaMoJn^pr'txlurtdBvul uvJti Mtf M i ll pwgtoratgp«fa»M»lnm expanding feassOT 

ACTUARIAL EXECUTIVES - 

& LIFE PRODUCTS 


aTlJi flad: 3 


SURREY £16,000-^000 + MORTGAGE SUBSIDY 

LOM&ESTABLiSHB) U.K. SUBSBMARY OF ONE OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST RNAMOAL SBtiflCES ORGANISATIONS 

On baftatf oJ our clients, wa invte appfcations from Senior Actuarial Stodents/Rnafists with & feast 4 years' roqjerience in a Lie Assirance company or 
Consultancy. 2 of which should haws been in penstonsfempioyee benefits. The successful candidates, likely to be aged 25-32. wffl lead the nuts 
rasponsto te tor ffisk Benefits and Individual Pensions within the Employee Benefits Division or New Product Development wifrin the Actuatal 
Department These ate senior appottmente v«Wch wffl appeal to Actuarial students near to completing professional examinations, who are now keen to 
mow to an ot g arisa to which encourages a creative, positive and matk e ling-OfienlalE d approach to new product development, faison wWicfentB and 
team motivation, tribal salary negotiable £16j000-£25,000 + mortg a ge subsidy. cortrijutory pension scheme, free Be assurance, free metical 
insurance, free kaiches. study leave and assistance wih reloc a tion expenses. Reference AE 4455nT. Asa resist of continued expansion, there are also 
vacandBBfor ACTUARIAL ASSISTANTS, with attest 3 parts of Part A exam in ations completed- Initial Salary nego&abte Cl 2£00-£1 6,000 + package. 
Refe re nce AA 4456/TT. A p p fc atio ns , in strict c onfi de n ce, either by telephone on 01-588 3114, or in writing, quoting reference above, to the 
Managing Director. 


MMPBHUBHBIM KSKMIB {MMUBOT REtUBlTltatT CUHUMnS) IMIHI, 35 « UNO SVRBT, LMO08 EC2U 1IH. 
IBEPHOK: 01-588 3588 BB 8X-5883576. TQBfc 887374. IWC 81458850! 


JAN 5/12? 

Speak well and 
need £400+ pw? If 
so telephone me 
today if you can 
start in early 
January, are aged 
23/50, reasonably 





CALDWELL 


■jl or m "f — "v s The Division engages In research and development 

i\ /I cs n a erm a I )i rprtrvr ss s 

IV ldl lagll lg cv UJl nvr 

^ ilamtfnHtira Tha to If or rwv rnm iinrlartakao 


Greater Manchester Economic 
Development Corporation 

Wc have Keen retained as advisers to the Board of the Corporation in the search for 
a successor to Mr. I A*slie Boardman who retires this year. 

The Corporation was established as a limited company to provide a bridge between 
the public and private sectors, its Managing Director has a unique opportunity to 
manage development banking. Jand/property development and marketing 
resource-. a> an integrated and dynamic stimulus for economic growth in die 
communities of the Greater Manchester Ana. 

The ideal candidate for this position will: 

• have all round general management experience; 

. have a strong marketing background; 

. lx; able to work effectively in public and private sectors. 

Above all the position calls for an individual with real leadership qualities and a 
‘ 1 strung sense of personal commitment. 

■V Martin" salary of up hr £35.000 plus an attractive benefits package is available. 

I’iJjse send details of experience, quoting Ref 61 1 7. in confidence, to: 

the search partners 

international 

Recruitment Consultants 
Buckingham Gate, London SW 1. Tel: 01 -834 7966. 

Calgary Dusseldurf Ixmdon Montreal Ottawa Toronto Vancouver Zurich 


SALES AGENT TRAINEES 

Tf» Cfty Bustoass Machines Qroup are saektog ag g r a ssfo B. 
careewnlndBd psopto to art Office Equipment FUmtiure and 
Stationery. , 

Applicants should be aged 21^20 yura and based In Greater 
London. i 

Experience to Soto a not essential as X A 



AUSTRALIA 

CSiRO 

RESEARCH SCIENTIST/ 
SENIOR RESEARCH SCIENTIST 

A$28,107 - A$41,339 

DIVISION Of MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY 
PRESTON WC 

HELD: Robotics awl maefthw tool control. 

The Division engages In research and development 
work to support Australian Industry. Laboratories are 
located in Mefcoume, Adelaide ami Sydney. Its 
activities are organised Wo three main programs: Arc 
Technics, Materials Engineering and IhtargratBd 
Manufacture. The tetter program undertakes 
research in the areas of computer-aided design and 
manufacture, including robotics, machine tool control, 
machine vfston, microelectronics, and manufacturing 
inform at i on technology. 

An engineer Is sought to conduct research into the 
dynamics and sensor-based control of robots and 
machine tods. The appointee will play a significant 
role in identifying new areas of research. Present 
work in this area Included force /torque c ontro l of 
robotic debarring . Mgh-bandwfdth machining, 
dynamic modelling and simulation of machines, and 
development of an advanced robot controller. 
Significant opportudttes exist for further collaborative 
research with equipment manufacturers, and the 
appointee win be expected to bring high-level skBs In 
machine dynamics and system dynamics and control 
to such developmetns- 

Appbcants should have a PhD degree or equivalent 
quafificattons with substantial experience In the areas 
described, and demonstrated ability in research. 
Experience In production industry is highly desirable. 

This position Is tor appointment on an Indefinite basis 
with Australian Government superannuation benefits. 

APPLICATIONS: Statinng relevant personal 

particuairs. inducting details of quaBfications and 
experience, the names of at least t wo p rofessional 
referees and quoting refe renc e No A3677, should be 
directed to: 

The Chief 

CSIRO Division of Manufacturing Te chnology 

Locked Bag No 9 

Preseton VR5 3072 AUSTRALIA 

by 16 January, 1987. 

CSiRO IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 


IJl SUK KS 

FOODS 



Beswicks Foods are a leading supplier of own label sauces and salad dressings to national and 
International retail and catering outlets. 

We are continuously expanding and developing and have two vacancies for dynamic Managers 
who are capable of working in a fast moving and changing environment 


We are continuously expanding and developing and have two vacancies for dynamic Managers 
who are capable of working in a fast moving and changing environment 

PRODUCTION MANAGER 
£15,000 + BENEFITS 

The Production Manager we seek most be capable of embracing total responsibility for the 
production process and production planning. Reporting directly to the Factory Manager. 
Applicants should be educated at least to degree level in food technology or a related discipline 
with probably five years industrial experience. Whilst the immediate challenge will be succeeding 
in this job, applicants must have the determination and capacity to progress to a more demanding 
senior role within the organisation. 

TECHNICAL MANAGER 
£17,000 + BENEFITS 

The Technical Manager we seek must be capable of embracing total responsibility for product 
development, customer liaison, taste panel and all management functions within the Quality 
Control Department 

Applicants should be educated to degree level in food technology or a related discipline with 
mdepth experience in industrial ma na ge m ent. 

Written applications (maleffemaie) with full c.v. to: 

Lynn Beswick, Personnel Director, 

Beswick Foods LtcL, New Mill Street, 
UTTLEBOROUGH, Lanc&, OL15 8YL. 


Bowood 

ADMINISTRATOR 

Owing to the forthcoming retirement 
of our present Administrator, a 
successor is required for BOWOOD 
HOUSE, one of England's most 
successful Stately Homes open to the 
public. 

Administrative, financial and 
marketing experience essential 

Please apply in writing with foil 
Curriculum Vitae to:- 

The Administrator, 

The Estate Office, 
Bowood, 

Caine, 

Wiltshire, 

SN11 OLZ 


TATE & LYLE TECHNICAL SERVICES 

Following successful implementation of several 















CALIBRE ora Ud proftj utona l 
curriculum vtlaa documents- 
p— 01-631 3388. 






^rTTTTTvTTT 


PART TIME 


MO 


required up to Trial Balance, Budgeting, 
Long Range Forecast, Stock Control 
Paye, etc. Must have experience in the 
Retail Fashion Trade. Hours and salary 
by arrangement 

Please call 01 629 4005. 


in providing technical assistance to a number of 
tea and coffee projects in Southern and Eastern 
Africa. 

There are specific vacancies for> 

Estate Managers 
Agncoltiiral Managers 
Factory Managers 

to work with other groups on new projects in 
these regions which will contribute to the expert 
earnings ca p a bi lities of the countries concerned. 

Tate & Lyle Technical Services has been 
involved in this region in the investment, 
management and servicing of sugar projects for 
at least 35 years and expects to offer sound 
career prospects to staff- 

Applicams should write w.- 

The Operations Manager 
Tate & Lyle Technical Services, 
Enterprise House, 

45 Homesdale So ad, 
Bromley, Kent BS2 9TE. 

Please indude a curriculum vitae with letter of 
application. 



INFORMATION & COMMUNICATION 

SYSTEMS CONSULTANTS 

FORM YOUR OWN CONSULTANCY WITH US 
H yn are amtti n ttn i n fa t mdtai S camsnricater 

















28 


THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


GENERAL APPOINTMENT 


Phillips & Drew Corporate Finance 

Company Liaison & 
Market Information 
Executive 

Phillips & Drew is now wholly-owned by die Union Bank of 
Switzerland, one of the largest banks in the world, and is seeking 
an ambitious executive to join the Corporate Finance Depar- 
tment as a member of the Company Liaison & Market 
information ream which provides a continuous service to the 
Department's client companies. 

As the successful applicant your responsibilities will be to 
cover the key areas of investor relations, market information and 


company announcements, to include specifically: monitoring the 
of the company and its competitors, 
advising client companies on profit statements and dividend 


share price movements 


policy, releasing figures to The Stock Exchange and hosting 

managerne at/in vest or presentations and meetings. 

If you are aged 25-30, with a good standard of education and 
can communicate effectively with top management, this could be 
the opportunity for you. An understanding of how the Gty 
works and a knowledge of Stock Exchange activities is ess e ntial. 

We will reward you with an excellent compensation 
to include a bonus, mortgage subsidy, pension scheme, 
assurance and free BUPA. 

Please apply in confidence to: 

Sally Wafetey. RccruItf rant Officer, 

! & Drew, 



Business-to-business 
direct marketing professionals 

Mailplan Internationa! Limited, the market leaders in busnss-to-business 
direct marketing, seek applications from ambitious, capable and experienced 
individuals. 

The people we need must demonstrate the ability to produce results in this 
demanding and growing marketplace We attach considerable importance to 
the qualities of creative thinking, self-reliance. interpersonal skills, a strong 
desire to make things happen and, above all, the determination to achieve 
results for our clients. 

There are outstanding senior career opportunities. As you would expect 
rewards will be realistically pitched fortne right people 

Write to Murray \Afatson, Marketing Director, 
and teH him why you are the right person 
for tire job. 

Mailplan International Limited 

45*47 Monument Hill Weybridge Surrey KH3 8SF Telephone (0932) 59700. 



trans port 

MANA 


Grade POD £13,041 pa. - 
£20,625 p.a. inclusive 

The Ceuj^ wjj 1 «f a :h0 S Ss^eer^g 

Works Services D ' v, -' ( r, ,L P deration find 
Department to control - h ,® <%, cver 300 

maintenance of a m.xeC 0 f 

ISSSSnJv^lOOO items of Pisnt. 



Fringe benefits. Flexitime is worked. 

from the Personnel "gCjnij 

date: 2nd January, 
19S7. 

Applications from 
disabled persons 
witt be welcomed. 


Lcodoo Borough c< 


Hillingdon 


Department of 

Engineering 


CONSULTANT 

Engineering 


Management 


Systems 


RTZ Computer Services, part of the international mining and mineral 
processing RTZ Group, advises clients upon the use of computer systems. One 
area in which there is proven potential for development of our services is that 
of systems for project, maintenance and materials management. 

We are looking for a qualified engineer with a good degree and al least five 
vears of first hand experience in the application of computer systems in 
engineering management, based upon direct line responsibility. 

" Repo rtmg to the Consultancy Director, he or she will handle a wide range 
of assignments both in the UK arid abroad. The development of this area of 
competence will mean operating autonomously at times, although fully 
supported bv our offices m London and Bristol. 

The ability to establish close working relationships with clients, whilst 
maintaining objectivity, is essential. The appointed consultant must be as 
equally at home presenting proposals to a board of directors as training 
engineering tradesmen in the use of a computer system. 

The remuneration package is substantial, including the benefits of the 
RTZ Group emplovee schemes, and a car will be provided. 

Applications in writing should be sent to 
n I the Personnel Officer, RTC Computer Services 

h|/ limited at our Bristol address, enclosing full 

details of experience and qualifications. 

RTZ Computer Services Limited. 

I Redchffe Street, Bristol BS99 TJS 
Telephone: Bristol f 0272 ) 24181 
Telex: 449657 RTZCS 



TRAINING STANDARDS TO 
MATCH OUR SERVICES 

ASSISTANT 
TRAINING OFFICER 

Frizzell are a leading financial services group with a 
reputation for providing an excellent service to our efients. 

We currently need a highly motivated young person to 
assist our Group Training Officer with the development of 
new training courses and the re-evaluation of existing 
programmes. Occasionally, you wffl also be designing non- 
course based material. In addition to analysing performance 
reviews and preparing statistical information, you will also 
provide strong administrative support within the department 
on a day to day basis. 

Aged around 22-24, educated to 'A' level standard 
and preferably with Instructional experience, the ideal 
candidate will already have administrative experience gained 
in a training or personnel department and will be required to 
have a strong belief in training plus an ability to adapt quickly 
to new situations. 

Based in our head office, dose to Liverpool Street 
Station, we can offer a competitive salary, plus an attractive 
range of benefits which include profit-sharing. 

FRIZZELL 


up 

JET 


Please write with a foil C.V. and stating salary 
expectations to Mrs. S. McGeachle, Group Personnel 
Manager, The FrizzeH Group Limited, 14/22 Bder Street, 
London, El 6DF. 


YOUR DEGREE COULD BE WORTH 
£18000 BEFORE YOU GET IT. 



If you’re intending to takas a degree course at 
a university or polytechnic, you could be worth a 
lot to us, nov^ as a future RAF Officer 

Whether on the ground or in the ah; you 
would work with some of the most exciting 
technology in the world. 

Right now we are particularly interested in 
future Pilots, Navigators, Fighter Controllers, 
Air Traffic Controllers and both men and 
women Engineers and Education Officers. 

SPONSORSHIPS. 

Our three-year University Sponsorship is 
worth £lft03a* (If you are already at university 
or polytechnic, shorter Sponsorships are avail- 
able.) The Sponsorship prepares you for your 
future role as an RAF Officer Although you will 
live exactly as any other undergraduate, you win 
also be a member of the Air Squadron affili- 
ated to your university or polytechnic Depend- 
ing on the branch of the RAF you may become 
qualified for; you can also gain flying experience 
while still an undergraduate 

You would also have short periods of RAF 
training during term time, and gain practical 
experience in your chosen branch at RAF 
Stations in the UK or even overseas, during 
some of your vacations. 

The same Sponsorships are available for 
courses leading to a REng. degree in Mech- 


anical Electronic, Software or Information 
Systems Engineering Such courses (accredited 
by the Engineering Council) are now available 
at the Royal Military College of Science at 
Shrivenham. 

The RAF also offers full Sponsorship of 
sandwich courses in Air Transport Engineer- 
ing at the City University. London, and in Elec- 
tronic and Electrical Engineering at Salford 
University 

All the RAF asks of you in return for Sponsor- 
ship is at least five years' productive service 

For more information, please write to Group 
Captain Paul Items tt; QBE, at (PH) Officer 
Careers, (08/15/12), Stanmore HA7 4PZ, or talk to 
your Careers Officer: 

If you are applyingin writing, please include 
your date of birth and your present and/or in- 
tended qualifications. 

1986^87 (or miles 





RAFemm 

UNIVERSITY SPONSORSHIP 


COMPUTER SALES 


(i) 


W 


(31 


(«) 


PC SALES EXECUTIVES. Aggressive 21-35 year otis 
with good track records required. Leasing top end 
range PC Systems to Major Accounts and Corporate 
Market 18-20K Basic GTE 40K+ BMW & good 
Company benefits. IMMEDIATE START (London & 
South East) 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT MANAGERS. Up to 20K 
Basic + BMW + excellent Company beneffb (London 
A South East} 

GOOD UNDUXENX SYSTEMS SALES EXPERIBICE. 
MAJOR MANUFACTURBi i mm e dia te po siti ons 
avalabte South East & London. IMMEDIATE START. 
15-20K Baste + 30-45 OTE + car &.sxc8*ent benefits. 
COMPUTER PERIPHERALS/OFFICE AUTOMATION. 
Sales Executives with good track records always 
reqirired, looking for a change at Company, or to 
break into Computer Sates, excellent packages 
avalabto. tinmad to ta sort 
For these end many other positions within the 
Computing Industry contact 

MARTIN MELLISH 

THE ACTIVE GROUP 

01*388 3111 

LONDONS LEADING COMPUTING 
SALES CONSULTANCY 
or send CV^s to: 

THE ACTIVE GROUP (UK LTD), Euston 
House, 81-103 Euston Street London NW1 



UNITED ENGINEERING STEELS LTD. 

MANAGER - TRAINING 
DEVELOPMENT 

BROOKFIELD MANOR MANAGEMENT TRAINING & CONFERENCE CENTRE, 
HATHERSAGE, SHEFFIELD. 


an established and successful team 
Centre located in the Peak District National 


There ia an i 

at Brookfield Manor Management Training and ' 

Park near Hathereage. 

In scfdfflbn to providing Management, Supervisory, Teamwork Development and specialist training to the 
Divisions of United Engineering Steels Ltd., the Centra also provides a similar range of training and facilities 
to Industry in general and to the steel industry in particular. 

We are seeking to strengthen the team by appointing a Manager - Training Development, responsible to the 
Centre Manager, whose major responsibifitres wfH be mark e ting, development and management of Team 
TraWng and other Organisational Developmem acttvttes. The forther developfnent erf management and 
specialist training courses and methods. 

The successful applicant wIR be qualified to degree or equivalent level, wfll have worked in manufacturing 
industry and have experience in the development and presentation of Management/Supervisory Training 
and Organisation Development Programmes. 

Reflecting the Importance of this appointment a salary wtthin the range of £16,000-£18,000 p.a. is 
envisaged but could be negotiable for the right candidate. 

Applications should be sent to> 

Manager, Brookfield Manor Management Training & Conference Centre, Hathereage, 
Sheffield. S30 1BR. 


ENGLISH SPEAKING 
PUBLICATION IN 
SPAIN 

is looking for a commercial 
minded Spanish National with 
a proven track record for the 
position of Office Manager. 
The succesful candidate will 
speak fluent Spanish and Eng- 
lish, be numerate and have an 
actual interest in the affairs 
and events of the Costa Del 
SoL Terms will be negotiated 
accoi 
his 

ability. 

Please write with full cv to: 


tegotii 

>rding to the individual and 
or her experience and 


kJR/I, 

13/15 Davies Street 
London Wl. 


MANAGER 

required 


WeareIooldngfbrsomeoiKwiftra*iaice,aml4k^ 




1 ; 



Apply with full details: 

TheLbsnChest 

81/83 High Street 
Ruislip 

Middlesex HA4&JB 
Tel: Ruislip 0895 630828 


ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITIES 


H 


ere a Peugeot Tribal UK we are going from 

trf^rtgrh to ftjih ni»r Co^flT^y i mjh 

309 receiving wide acclaim, and another new 
to be launched in 1988. 

We are now seeking ex p er ie nced Fn giruwe to nuke 
an effective contribution to our continued success. You 
will be wotting ia 2 highly modernised environment 

Well ZO p rn Artr* hrfi it t jnalhyf imwin w I 

Gin it — — Mric 

Semen: Process Engineers 
Yon wffl brad a team of process engineers responsible 
fer ibe process of tooling assignments involving design, 
, rnaag&cnae and gyont of tools requ ir ed 


We are qualified senior «-*f»*«*‘r * with a 

mmiimim cf IS J Kirf process planning -f[— m— nf— in 
bo dy asse mbly cp cgrioia and with proven experience 
of mmrnlHng and cprisng work of other engineers. 

PJL.C. C ompu t er Systems Engineer 
You'll specialise in system design, specification, 
e va l uati on and pnt ggna ticg cf ind ustria l P_L.C.’s 

lifiWr! in nriSUS r n « w p rai»»« whirti 1 1 ^ 1 j t- 

ronnft c mriBg plant, eid via p e riph e r al products 
produce fault diagnostic and management information. 


You'll be required to analyse the sequential contra! 
of electrical and mechanical functions cn current ana 
proposed process equipment operated by P -L- C./ 
Computer base. A key function will be to 
resoftware/ressuezure systems in ladder diagrams an- 
Pascal language formats to cater ter future racdcis ana 
improved productivity and reliability. 

Ideally of graduate engineer status with several 
years’ pr o tect experience preferably within the motor 
industry. 

\ST C offer competitive salaries enhanced by valuable 
incentive and superannuation sche m es and generous 
car purchase discounts. Relocation assistance will be 
provided where appropriate. 

Please apply toN .C. Ro bins on, 

Personnel A rfirniwa trati an /Tr aining Manager, 

Peugeot Ttflrel Motor Corapny Limited, P.o. Box 45. 
London Road. Ryion on Dansmcre, Coventry CY8 3DZ. 
Telephone: (0203) 303030. 

PEUGEOT 
TALBOT 



THE LION GOES FROM STRENGTH TO STRENGTH. 



O WB APPOINTMENTS 


REPORTER 

Television 

So u t ha mpton 


One of our best known reporters, Debbie Thrower, is 
now working with BBC Television News in London. 
We need to replace her with someone who is keen to 
develop a career as a tele vision reporter. You will 
contribute to our regional programmes and network 
news and have the chance to present our highly- 
rated nightly news magazine South Today. 

You’ll need to beajoumafist with radio or 
television experience, andacurrent driving ficence is 
essential. 

One year contract £15,525 —£21,045**. 

(Ref.1398/T) 


PRESENTATION 

ANNOUNCER 

Television 

Norwich 


BBC South & East requires a television presentation 
announcer, based Norwich. Your duties, which are 
on a shift tasis, will include reading news bulletins in 
a self-operated presentation studio during the day 
and fo the context of the nightly magazine 
programme Look East, plus the bulletin following the 
Nine O’clock News. You will also prepare and 
present continuity material and put out pre-recorded 
programmes from the self-operated studio. 

Television experience essential. 

This post is offered as a 12 month contract— 
starting salary (including allowances) will be in the 
range of £12,571 —£13,654. (Ref. 1418/T) 


We are an equal 
opportmities employer 


**Plu8 an aflowancff of £1,Q20pjL 
Contact us immediately farappficationform (quote 



OPPORTUNITIES IN 
TRAINING 

CITY SALARY PACKAGE 

c. £12K 

The vacancies exist within our Training 
Division for Pxofessioonl people aged 25-35 
years. A _ bright personality, good 

nnTTiTTii rr riwifcinn slmki awi imflappahln nature 
are nece ssary attributes for these challenging 
but rewarding pos i tions. 

MICRO COMPUTER TRAINER 

Experience necessary with DOS operating 
system software packages. Additional training 
given if reqirired. 

WORD PROCESSOR TRAINER 

Experience reqirired with dedicated Word 
Processing such a Phillips and or Wang from 
Basic through to Advanced. 



Delta 

Dimensions 


36/37 FURNTVAL ST, LONDON EC4A UQ 
TELEPHONE 01-831 0994 


MARKETING EXECUTIVE 

NEWSLETTERS 

Financial Times Business informati on is looktag far an 
enthusiastic person to Mn s marketing team pmmntfrin a nwy 
of nnatattar Was. You wfil t» rasponribto far developing 
drcubilon through area mar keting campaigns and outer 
promotional moans. The abfltyto communicate was Is vftat 

WeaSjr you should hare at least one years experience In 
marketing with tome knowledge of tSroct mafl techniques. 
Experience in a putifehfag environment would be useful but is 
not essential. 

A good educational background Is required 
creative approach and a methodical analytics! 


A competitive 
together wtthS 


w* be offered 
hoflday a year put 

Please send fu> c.v to; 



J i // 


Steve Bevan 
Personnel Officer 
FTBI 

Greyetoka Place 
Fetter Lane, 
London EC4A iHD 


AUSTRALIA 

CSIRO 

ENfilNEER/SCIENTIST 

A$28,107 - A$41,339 

DIVISION OF MANUFACTURING 
TECHNOLOGY 

WOODV1LLE SA 

■n* D«iskw»«yg^o*fri r^oarch and development work to 

^ located in 

suroe, A delaid a and Sy dney. Rs activities are organised 
three man programs: Are Technics, Materials 
land Integrated Manufactme-^SteterlSg^ 
— research In the areas of computer-aided desmn 

^nwiufa^ire. todutfr^ robotics . maeSne tool «rK 

" ™»*«unng 

n«w% a section of the integrated Manufacture program 
has been set up in the Adetafae Laboratory. An entraeror 
setentist Is required to conduct researc^'m thea^te’of 


into 




lent 


Appfeants should have a PhD v* 
quMfications, with a sound theoretic al 

TCNURE IndefinitB with Australian 
superannuation benefits available 


Government 


of TW^og, 

WOOOVHJLE SA 5011 AUSTRALIA 
By January is, 1987 

CSmO tS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 


LUXURY LETS LONDON LTD 

Esffissaa^^ 

Tel for appointroent 01-328 9343 



IT 


ti. 

t 


jf,», ■ 

CV4 . ' 


f£‘. 


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'w 2 




'M 


■■7$ ■' 

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- 


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■■■ V*> 

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THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 



}S (24 l-.OLiP 3r 
C-.3 


nnc • 


• • t • 

u * * 


■'“‘‘Ollfc 

i.£bi;i' a ir^ce 

=• i-v | ‘Osiita 

r. jEn ua* 


fro* 

^T^./jfsoos 




1— = 3T3| 


«*£ t *'. 

•S- ’l f 


•Ff £ T2' 

1 ^ 


■’■ " “R:5i. 

. ■ ’-V 


•.> ! 


^ ;. , 

£• i 


... :•. •■*■» ' jC-L? -.V ; v ; > 

’- (■■• --• ~ ' ■ -*i * V 1 • -"» • - •• 



Name 


Address 


National Itjf 

T>ate o f Birth 

Achievements 


October 


1983: 


December 


1983: 


January 1984: 

April 1984: 
August 1984: 
l December 1984 r 
jaribary 198^: 


^vrePXjgM VlgAE 

COMPAQ OOKPUTPR M*™>> r d , 

unuse Paradise Road, 

Surrey « .**? 

Brltl.n. of OS descent- 

, 4 - 1982. UK: April inu, 

OS: February 1st, 1982- 


mouter (COMPAQ PLUS) with 

STirs^e — oT IBM PC. 

Went public in USA. year sales 

Turnover ^!J1, jjS* business. 

in history^ 1 

^ 8 e t“u*. S 7 - A- 

COHPM POBtAPU! outso ■ ^ the „rl 4 . 

COMPAQ POBTABU P- ^ ^ - growW 

: :-^ssr ^pssSS'r^. “ ; 


tfARKETiNG OPERATIONS' 
EXECUTIVE 


LOCATION blest London. 

ACE. 25+ Graduate with a minimum 3 years 
experience of working with Computer Dealers/ 
Resellers in a sales-onented role. 


JOB DESCRIPTION. Reporting to U.K. 
i Marketing Manager. Responsible for the 
: overall support and development of the 
> COMPAQ Authorised Dealer Network in fully 
utilising COMRAO's extensive marketing 
j support programmes, and equipping dealers 
i with the necessary skills and materials in 
I order to fully promote COMPAQ'S total 
. product range. In addition, the investigation 
■ of new potential channels of distribution 
for COMFtoQ products will be part of this 
function. 


Worldwide ’company 


than any 


REMUNERATION. Competitive salary, com* 
'> pany car. usual fringe benefits. 


MAJOR ACCOUNTS PRE-SALES 
SUPPORT MANAGER 


* LOCATION. West London. 

- ? ACE. 25+ Graduate with minimum of 2 years 
j experience in a Technical Sales Support role 
: •’* with particular emphasis on the use of 
L : microcomputers within large organisations. 

JOB DESCRIPTION, Reporting to Technical 
:) Director. Responsible for pre-sales technical 
•t support as part of COMPAQ'S Major Accounts 
programme. Will be required to liaise fully with 
COMPAQ'S Authorised Dealer Network as well as 
advising the DP/MIS and Microcomputer Support 
Managers of Major Accounts in areas of 
connectivity, compatibility and other areas 
relating to the installation of C0MR4Q products. 

REMUNERATION. Salary + benefits + car 
commensurate with age and experience. 


COMMUNICATIONS /NETWORK 
SPECIALIST 


LOCATION. West London. 

AGE. 25+ with a minimum of 3 years 
experience with a computer manufacturer or 
large DP Department 

JOB DESCRIPTION. Reporting to Technical 
. Director. Responsible -for the support of COMPAQ 
i Authorised Dealers In the areas of mainframe 


. . = ■ ■ •• ■< ^’•ar •*!**& 






HERE'S 
OUR C.U. 


: . . • » ic' : ; ,V"' V 'V1- V T ■ • : • - v *' / <r- . J. ■ :;.'i 

Si / v j V,.v,‘ ■ Vu.Y- ;^v/- 

*•: wp ""' "' ‘" r •,?*:? ' '■* .*1 

r.% \-.V. ’• .*r\ 



got a bad CM for a four-year-old? 
(Compared to us. Mozart was a 
late-developer. He didn't perform his 
first recital till he was six.) 

Like many CMs we've read, it seems 
almost too good to be true. But unlike 
many we've read, it has no fanciful 
claims or unexplained gaps. Honest. 

As for references, ue wouldn't know 
where to start. Ue've been called 'the 
most successful computer company in 
history*. Ask’ any computer expert Read 
the computer press. 

Then, assuming you think ue’ve the 
right qualifications Cand frankly, if we 
haven't, we don’t know who has.J send 
us your C.V. Put it in an envelope 
marked with the job you're applying for. 
and send it to our Personnel Manager 
at the address above. 

tour application for any of the jobs 
advertised on this page today will be 
treated in the Strictest confidence. 
We ll be rather more discreet with your 


UHERE'S 

YOURS? 


C.U than we’ve been with our own. 

Finally, a word of warning. Our 
standards are high. Ue expect your C.U 
to be even more impressive than ours. 

After all, you've been around longer 
than we have. 


MAJOR ACCOUNTS MANAGER 


LOCATION London. 

ACE AND QUALIFICATIONS. 28-33 Degree or 
similar qualification with at least 5 years 
proven computer sales experience with a major 
computer manufacturer selling Into the corporate 
market place. 

JOB DESCRIPTION. The successful candidate 
will be responsible in conjunction with COMfoQ's 
Authorised Dealers for increasing sales volumes 


of COMFAO products into specific Times 
1000-type organisations. 

The Major Account Manager will identify 
opportunities for C0MA4Q dealers within those 
U.K. organisations who are planning to make a 
major investment in the areas of distributed 
processing using personal computers. 

Obviously an ability to communicate both at 
board level as well as with M.LS. Managers Is an 
essential prerequisite. 

REMUNERATION. High basic salary & 
commission, company car and usual company 
benefits. 


BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT 
EXECUTIVE; 


LOCATION. Uest London. 

ACE. 21+ Graduate with minimum 3 years 
varied experience embracing RC. Application 
Software knowledge as well as some sales, 
marketing and/or support experience. 

JOB DESCRIPTION Reporting to U.K. Marketing 
Manager. Responsible for the co-ordination of 
COMPAQ'S marketing plans in conjunction with 
those of major third party hardware and software 
companies. The successful candidate will also 
be required to identify and evaluate new 
business opportunities for COM FAQ within a 
number of pre-defined application areas. 

REMUNERATION. Competitive salary 

commensurate with position and experience. 
Company car. usual company benefits. 


essential. 

REMUNERATION. Salary + benefits + car 
commensurate with age and experience. 


DEALER SALES MANAGERS 


J v V 1 LOCATION. London and South. Midlands. 

'« U. i : .! North Uest, North East. 

•.* . 

'4 >£>'■' PI AGE/OUAUFICATIDNS. 25-35. Possess a 

. A.'l degree or similar qualification and have a 

.? .Ti . proven track record in the microcomputer 

sales environment, with either manufacturer. 
^aa*'**^ dealer or software house. 

JOB DESCRIPTION. The successful candidate 
will be working closely with both dealer 
principals and dealer sales personnel in order 
to facilitate the required sales volumes of 
CONRAO products through the COMFttO Authorised 
Dealer channel and on to end-users. 

It is envisaged that only those candidates 
who can successfully demonstrate a high level 
of Account Management capability will meet the 
required standards of this role, as COMPAQ'S 
ongoing business relationship with its dealer 
base Is key to its long term success. 

REMUNERATION. Ulll be based upon age and 
experience but will consist of a high basic 
salary and Incentive bonus, company car and 
other fringe benefits. 


'ELEPHGNE SALES 


LOCATION. Richmond Surrey. 

AGE/QUAUFICATIONS. 25+. Telephone articulate, 
some experience with the personal computer 
Industry desirable and educated to University 
standard. 

The successful candidate is expected within 
12-18 months to transfer to a field sales role. 

JOB DESCRIPTION, fou ulll be a member of a 
key sales team which is the focal point 
regarding COMftoQ's day to day liaison with its 
U.K. Authorised Dealer Network. 

Duties will include, receipt of orders, 
shipment queries, advising dealers on stock 
availability. and product specifications, 
ensuring all communications receive prompt and 
effficient attention. 

REMUNERATION. Competitive salary + benefits. 


comPAa 


WE'LL NEVER CEASE TO AMAZE YOU. 


COMPAQ" IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF COMPAQ COMPUTER LIMITED. IBM- IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES. 


r 












p I' .f 

I i 


THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


LA CREME DE I A CREME 





m 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


Salesmen/ Market Makers 


A successful independent firm of 
stockbrokers is seeking to increase its level 
of activity in both Uk and overseas markets 
by recruiting ad d itio n al staff. Skilled, 
highly motivated, committed men or 
women, specialising in institutional sales or 
market making, who may be finding life in 
the post Big-Bang era less than fulfilling, 
and who would prefer to operate in a more 


traditional but nevertheless exci ting and 
forward looking environment, are invited to 
write, in confidence to: 


E ST V Troubridge. 

Kynaston International. 

Edmaw House, 17/19 Maddox Street, 
London WlR OEY. 


KYNASTON 

INTERNATIONAL 




\RKS 


WEST LAMBETH HEALTH AUTHORITY 
ST. THOMAS’ HOSPITAL, London SE1 

RESEARCH SECRETARY - 
CARDIAC DEPARTMENT 

To work in this busy deportment as P er son a l 
Assstant/Seaetazy to the Consultant Cn M a gs t 

T ^ »g ^ a fRallunpiiy and varied job invoking COOtSCt 
with pr iva te patients and srinwristativc duties. 

Salary subject to negotiation, op to £9,000. 

For application form contact the Personnel , 
Department on (01) 261 1185 (24 boms) quoting job , 
reference R/10. 

ryity date: 8th January 1987. 

An Equal Opportunities Employer. 


P.A/Accounts 

Controller 

(Experienced) 

For snail publishing zcv- 
pany io tentfis 
bi and out, help run busy 
office, and prcvtfe seme 
secretarial assistET-cs for 
managing dirtier. Saar/ 
by agreement 

Apply to: 

Colin Leicester, 
Jo&j Caiman & Kiroj Ltd, 
71 SL Russell St 
London WC1B 3BN 

Tel 01-831 6351 



PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT 

Fequrec fcr specisus: 
Department in Central 
URdcn Estate 
Agency. Must ts 
competent 
inSstwe. gs=d J 
secrets rial sfci-s and 
an ebnrty to 
administer. Age 20-35- 
drivine licence. 
Salary £10,000 pa. 


Tel 221 3534 

ref JMH 


RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANT 

Our s&losophY =ut 

success ts determined by 

rfce quality ol 0 “. r 

Co^suhams h3s resulwd it 
our browordous success 
over Uw last ten years 
ir you have had a ye ar c! 
jj-rrcvcmsn: in pcrrjncnt 
or temporary Secretarial 
RecnrrTTTcm. a«d would i*e 
io work with a fast 
Bioandng and happy wa m - 

where you can arrange vour 
financial package to Sint 
your awn abtfaty. then phone 
m Confidence 

ANNE QUINN on 
01-439 9241 

or after 8pm on 

0572 3921. 


BANKING & ACCOUNTANCY 


health club 

Requires outward gSdtgr 
itiendfy reception ster» 
ler e*c , t ,n 9 r,ew ^ 
Noft.'g “ rui Sa». 
LcrCCn. £■ -30° 

bor.us. _ . . — 

Cell Huoh Barton 
01 995 4500 


SECRETARY/ 

BOOK-KEEPER 

Required for smafl 
S Wl interior Dea^i 
Cm party. 
Saicn rregctiaGla 
TeJspfcam 
01 222 0756 


IMPERIAL CANCER 
RESEARCH FUND 

Deputy Trust Officer 

ICRF is Europe's largest independently financed cancer 
research institute, it is a registered charity and relies 
completely on public support in its continuing fight against 
cancer. 

The Deputy Trust Officer will participate in the day to day 
management of our Legacy Department and be involved in 
the planning and introduction or a new computer data base. 

Age 35+. Office management experience, possibly in a legal 
environment, essential. Knowledge of probate work and 
some computer experience an advantage. 

Salary range £12,000 to £14,000 with scope for further 
progression. 

For further information and application form write to 
Ms S M Hurley, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, Lincoln's Inn 
Fields, London, WC2A 3PX quoting ref: 31/87. 


SALES EXECUTIVES 

THE COMPANY Beacon Publications PLC publish international business 
journals and directories in Europe, the Middle East and Far East and are 
winners of the Queen's Award for Export in 1985 and 1986. 

THE PERSON must be a self starter, ambitious, with a strong selling 
background. Previous experience in directory advertising would be an 
advantage. 

THE BENEFITS Beacon Publications PLC are a last moving company 
that are looking for the best. Therefore a good basic salary + commission will 
be offered to the right candidates and the package will be circa £16,000. 

Telephone TREVOR ROBERTO 
Assistant Group Advertisement Manager 


Beacon publications plc # <&> 

WwCtow rat*rj»m anh itf in iif l i iW faniilwW WUK -ESC"- 

wc*cw»>ii,jnr iriniujirworuc r«o»iiwnei — 5T~ — S— 


SENIOR ADMINISTRATOR 

c. £50,000 (nett) 

Brussels based international organisation seeks a senior 
executive for a fixed 2/3 year contract to coordinate EEC affairs. 

Proven administrative ability and experience in dealing with 
Governments and fluent French are essential. Other community 
languages would be an advantage. 

Please write with full C. V. to: 

Ian Macpherson, Shipley Blackburn and Company, 

14-15 Regent Street, LONDON SWlY 4PS. 



Shipley Blackburn 


axmavd Accountants 


RESEARCH/ 

SALES 


Stock Exchange Member firm requires individual with 
6/7 years' experience in computer-driven, quantitive 
analysis research/sales. Applicants should have 
knowledge of multi-tasking distributed inventory 
- management systems; recursive/heuristic A.L 
techniques. Responsibilities will include design and 
management of computer software programmes as they 
relate to U.S. and U.K. equities traded options and 
futures in specific area of risk management, the 
marketing of results to institutional client base in 
U.K. /Europe, U.S.A. Candidates ideally will have 
experience in field of software design in U.S. as well as 
internationally. 

Salary circa £27,500. 

Applicants educated to BA standard, and aged 25-30, 
should write enclosing full career details to 

Box F86 


TOP CALIBRE RESIDENTIAL 
NEGOTIATORS REQUIRED 

By leading firm of West London Agents 
due to 3rd office opening in new year. 
Excellent income potential and pros- 
pects for early advancements. 

Please apply to: 

Paul or Simon Franldin 
on 01-579 6901/6862. 

ACRE ESTATES 


1987 -YOUR 
CRUCIAL YEAR? 

Changing your career’ , 
Finding employment? 
Taking vital exams’ 

NOW IS THE TIME IB epnartt 
h 1st 4*p*f1 bsskimbI and 
gmleiiH Fhb Medme 

0 M A CAREER ANALYSTS 
_ T 90 Gloucester Place Wl 
• • • 01 935 5452(24 hrs) 


BERMUDA - 
TAX FREE INCOME 


CHIEF FINANCIAL 
OFFICER/CONTROLLER 

SALARY C$55,000 

Bermuda Business Machines Ltd. is one of the Island's leading suppliers of 
computer systems and software, point-of-sale systems, office equipment and 
supplies, with a staff of approximately 65 people. Our continued development 
provides a significant career and personal opportunity for a really motivated 
professional. 

The successful candidate win be a qualified Accountant with a minimum of 5-7+ 
years experience as a financial manager or controller in industry, preferably in a 
client-orientated environment Relevant experience will include internal 
accounting and operations control, financial and business management reporting, 
inventory control, project management, and financial and cash management in a 
; strong DP system-based environment 

I The CFO/Controller reports to the Chief Executive and plays an active role in 
I senior management meetings and issues. Primary responsibilities include 
maintaining and improving monthly financial reporting. Internal controls, and 
systems procedures by utilizing advanced computer hardware and software 
technology, managing major company assets, increasing operating efficiencies by 
coordinating interdivisional infonnation flow, improving company and 
interdivisiona! management information reporting, coordinating new and current 
business analysis, planning and budgeting, and providing financial and accounting 
services for related companies. 

This position represents a significant career opportunity to grow with an 
aggressive Bermuda firm and be part of the executive 
management team. The remuneration package is 
attractive and includes comprehensive benefits. 



Replies with resumes should be in writing to: 

The President, 

Bermuda Business Machines Ltd. 

P.O. Box HM 459, 

Hamilton HM BX 

All replies will be held In the strictest confidence. D5HHloiaM Hamara - Te 


Bermuda 


Business 

Machines 


JOB 

HUNTING? 


If you are reassessing: your 
career or seeking your first 
position as an accountant then 
read on. 

The Oyez Accountants 
Appointment Register presents your 
c.v. each month to a wide number of 
potential new employers quickly, 
simply and absolutely free! 

All you have to do is just complete 
one specially designed application 
form, which marshals all the 
relevant infonnation about your 
professional and personal qualities. 
This is then included in the 
Accounts Register for a period 
specified by you. (Naturally, your 


I Mould like to register as a canaxiate, j | 
piea*e send ms (£> information pack | J 


Tbe Sainton' Ltar S&MMfy Snotty ph 
Oyez Sendees Ltd- 

24 Grey’s Inn Road, London WClX 8HR. 
Telephone; 01-831 2285 


identity is withheld until interested 
firms request an interview. You are 
also able to exclude specific firms or 
locations). 

The Oyez Accountants 
Appointment Register is, quite 
simply, the fastest and most precise 
way to announce your availability, 
in complete confidence, to the 
widest number of potential 
employers. 

To find out more send today, 
without obligation, for a free 
Candidate Pack. 


Accountants 

Appointment 

Register 


Address- 







ADVENT 


APPLICATIONS ARE INVITED FOR 
POSITIONS IN THIS LEADING VENTURE 
CAPITAL COMPANY 

Successful candidates will be under 30, hold a degree together with 
accountancy, legal or business qualifications, or be able to demonstrate 
proven experience in a Merchant 8ank or Venture Capitol operation. 
A keen interest m entrepreneurial businesses is essential. 

Salary negotiable. 

AS applications in writing to: 

Director of Personnel, 

ADVENT LTD, 

25 Buckingham Gate, London, SW IE 6LD- 


Actuarial 

Student 

Fenchurch i> a major Lloyds Broker with a highly 
successful Pensions consultancy practice. 

We have an opportunity tor a Student Actuary :•** 
provide the complete range of actuarial services for our 
corporate clients. 

The position offers an unusually rare opportunity for 
working on your own initiative with a minimum of 
direct supervision. 

You should have at least one or mo passes in Part A of 
the actuarial exams and be looking to continue your 
studies. 

In addition to a highly competitive salary Fenchurch 
offers a full range of staff benefits consistent with a large 
Broker. 

To arrange an early interview please telephone our Chief 
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_ Fenchurch 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 198< 


u 9 



fTiriac smiles at last as Becker 



David Miller, Chief Snnrfc 
Correspondent, meets the man brtiM 
the meteoric rise to stardom of the boy 
; . who launched a nation into a brave 


S bowing strength of 
character when twice 
winning Wimbledon 
as a teenager is one 
thing. When Boris 
Becker was losing the Masters 
final in straight sets to Ivan 
Lendl last week, his menial 
hinges were rattling. 

Three days later, beaten in 
front of his own crowd in a 
relatively minor tournament 
at Stuttgart by a compar- 
atively little-known opponent, 
he might have done a 
McEnroe and flipped. He 
didn’t 

■ Are the pressures, the 
responsibilities, crowding in 
on you, he was asked after 
losing to Andrei Chesnokov in 
3 ?he under-21 championship? 
•''‘There is nothing worth 
.‘doing,” Becker said calmly, 
•‘‘that does not involve 
^pressures.” For a young man 
-aged 19, he had the repose ofa 
‘veteran campaigner like 
’Gullickson. In its way, the 
‘moment was as impressive as 
a Wimbledon post-match 
’conference. 

- For an the boom in West 
German tennis, with 200,000 
youngsters taking up the game 
:m the past 18 months, it 
-should be remembered that 
‘Becker did not, like Hoad or 
McEnroe, have the natural 
! touch of genius. His feet were 
.wrong, his positioning 
-questionable, his temper er- 
ratic. What be did have, when 
, vIon Tiriac, the Ro manian 
y coach and manager, took 
charge of him four years ago, 
was an exceptional will to 
succeed. 

“I am not modest. Without 
me, Boris would never have 
done what he has,” Tiriac 
says. Tiriac. whose appear- 


new world of tennis 


ance suggests he was designed 
by Ian Fleming as an ad- 
versary for Bond and could 
not help but seem sinister 
even if he went around ln«ing 
babies, believes that the mak- 
ing of a player is as much in 
the mind as in the racket 
Tiriac is a stickler for 
organization; improbably, for 
someone once involved with 
Nastase, for image. Becker 
reflects this. 

“Boris is a polemic,” Tiriac 
says. “He was tike an Italian , a 
Romanian, another crazy 
Latin. From the first day he 
was difficult Now he has 
matured a lot but from time to 
time it still comes out Against 
Lendl he was an eager 1 9-year- 
old. He wanted something too 
much. Sometimes the self- 
demand for perfection, like we 
have seen with McEnroe, can 
become negative. This is the 
end of the season and all Boris 
can see in front of him is a 
green space with white lines 
and yellow balls. He cannot 
visualize a day off. His re- 
action in New York was 
logical for his age.” 



^ SPORT/LAW 31 

SPORT AND THE LAW 

CCPR claims law 
gives clubs rights 
for total rate relief 

By John Good body. Sports News Correspondent 


A Papal b l ess in g for Becker who, with his girl friend, Benedicte Courtis (left), had an audience at the Vatican yesterday 


W hat Tiriac saw 
four years ago 
was not so 
much a tennis 
player as an athlete, a 1 5-year- 
old who was diving about the 
court and gritting nis teeth for 
every point, a boy who wanted 
success for more than the rest 
did. Tiriac saw a spirit which 
could not be broken. This, he 
believes, is the key to produc- 
ing players: is why, partially, 
the British are failing. The 
coaches are not hard enough 
on the youngsters physically, 
in discipline, while they are 
growing up. 

SQUASH RACKETS 


I am tired and empty and I 
can’t concentrate,” Becker 
said last week, but there was 
still an assurance in his man- 
ner. Yet only two years ago, 
Gunther Bosch, his 
coach, says he was as erratic as 
this every match. The rapidity 
with which Becker has ma- 
tured is exceptional It was 
after the under-21 champion- 

A mixed double 

Baden-Baden (Reuter) — 
Boris Becker and Steffi Graf 
were yesterday voted West 
Germany's sportsman and 
sportswoman of the year in a 
poll by the country’s sports 
journalists. 

ships two years ago that 
people said he might one day 
do welL Within six months he 
won Wimbledon. 

“It's not so much that 1 
have an influence on him,” 
Tiriac says. U I have a co- 
operation. 1 don’t teach him 
when to say be is empty. 
That's instinct. What we are 
now trying to do is adapt his 
game. Up to now. Bom has 
Gved on power but he knows 
there’s more to it than that, 
that he has to manipulate the 
ball and become interested in 
strategy.” 


Tiriac, whose credibility as 
coach is well documented with 
such players as Leconte, Vilas, 
Panatia and Nastase, believes 
that the game is going to 
change radically in the next 10 
years; that the percentage play 
of the Seventies has gone; that 
rallies will become shorter and 
played in less space; that the 
players, utilizing new materi- 
als in rackets and balls, will hit 
even harder and take more 
risks. The game will develop, 
he thinks, the way table tennis 
did 20 years ago. 

Tiriac is in favour of the 
controversial “Super 600” 
concept, which is threatening 
to precipitate legal argument 
between the Men’s Inter- 
national Professional Tennis 
Council and two of the top 
three managem ent groups, 
ProServ and McCormack’s 
International Management 
Group. The concept is that the 
world’s top 10 players would 
be offered huge bonuses to 
commit themselves to some 
IS tournaments offering a 
minimum $603,000 (about 
£420,000) prize-money. Tour- 
naments paying less would get 
only two or three of the top 10 
players. The accusation by 
MIPTC is that ProServ/IMG 
encourage their players to slap 

ATHLETICS 


some tournaments for the 
sake of exhibition matHiaa 
“Boris doesn't like 
exhibitions,” Tiriac says. “Td 
be even more severe (than 
MIPTC) and leave two 
months of the year free, so as 
to avoid what's happened to 
some top players, crumbling 
under the strain. It’s time 
people realized that while 
sport may be business, busi- 
ness does not itself create 
sport I'm no Coubertain but 
we most not kill sport” 

The British have not even a 
game for the moment that 
they can kill Tennis is half 
dead and actually declining in 
the numbers of those taking it 
up. 

“The system and the coach- 
ing in Britain are wrong,” 
Tiriac says. “Coaching is a 
thankless task with tour- 
nament players, 24 hours a 
day, having to know how the 
player will react or think 
tomorrow. The player himself 
doesn’t know. And the coach 
is poorly paid for knowing 
himself” 

T he best systems, he 
thinks, are the 
Czechoslovak and 
the Swedish. The 
former is based on 
Communist-style mathemat- 


ical principles: sending 200 
players to local dubs, keeping 
the best 100 after a period of 
months, then the best 50, 
narrowing the field, discarding 
the failures, then starting 
again with a new younger 
batch the following year. 

The Swedish style — the 
gypsy system, he calls it — is to 
pack the bags of half a dozen 
kids, send them around the 
world with a manager and see 
who survives the stresses, 
mental and physicaL 

The British, be rays, do not 
test character until itistoolaie 
and the players have become 
falsely established in senior 
play. The American system, 
once successfully based on 
student development in the 
colleges, is now operating too 
late with players of 19 or 20. 

Establishing Becker has 
been worth Tiriac’s while. He 
takes a 25 per cent cut from 
Becker’s commercial ranting* 
other than prize-m oney, 
which are about to indude $4 
million a year for six years 
from Puma for all his dothes 
and equipment “I hope to do 
well with Boris,” Tiriac says 
with a half-smile, looking 
more like Oddjob every 
moment 


Sports dubs could win 100 
per cent rate relief if they 
establish educational links and 
then fight the town halls and 
central government with oust- 
ing legislation, says Edward 

Grayson, author of Sport and 

the Law. 

Mr Grayson, a banister, 
points to the 1967 General Rate 
Act to secure 50 per cent of the 
mandatory rate relief and the 
remaining half from a 1981 
House of Lords judgment which 
established charitable status for 
educational sporting trusts. 

The information wig prove of 
immense benefit to all sports 
dubs, who are struggling to 
survive because of the acme 
increase in rate demands. This 
particularly true of Scotland 
where rates are much higher 
than in the rest of Britain. 

The Government is planning 
to harmonize rates in 1990 and 
there are widespread fears that 
this will be a levelling-up rather 
titan a levelling-down. 

Peter Lawson, the secretary of 
the Central Council of Physical 
Recreation (CCPR), said yes- 
terday^ We will draw the 
attention of all Britain’s sports 
bodies to these legal details and 
explain what it means in 
layman's terms.” 

In his recommendation, Mr 
Grayson, a legal adviser to the 
CCPR, quotes Section 53 of the 
1 944 Education Act which states 
that it is a “duty of every local 
education authority to secure 
facilities for recreation and so- 
cial and physical training." The 
Act re mains in force. 

He further says that a 50 per 
cent mandatory rate relief does 


exist for any dub which has 
taken advantage of the House of 
Lords judgments in the FA 
Youth Trust Deed decision of 
Inland Revenue Commissioners 
versus McMullen (1981). This 
established charitable status for 
educational sporting mists. 

Clubs may qualify for manda- 
tory relief of 50 per cent under 
section 40 (!) of the Act, 1967. 

That section operates where 
club premises can be hived offin 
part to be occupied “wholly or 
mainly" for charitable purposes. 
This exists for clubs who struc- 
ture their affairs and premises to 
provide the crucial coaching, 
leaching and training facilities 
to replace or supplement those 
for schools who cannot or will 
not make provision. Any sports 
dub that does this can justifi- 
ably argue that the House of 
Lords charitable education rul- 
ing operates in their favour. 

“The problem is," says Mr 
Grayson, “that hardly any clubs 
realize this. They could be 
saving themselves a lot of 
money each year.” 

In addition, this 50 per cent 
mandatory entitlement on edu- 
cational charitable grounds 
would be a springboard for an 
additional 50 per cent dis- 
cretionary claim under section 
40 (5) (b). This specifies 
"education” in addition to 
identifying the charitable status 
and thereby permits 100 per 
cent relief 

“What we need now are a few 
clubs to take action, thereby 
encouraging others that not only 
are they entitled to rate relief, 
but that they can win it,” Mr 
Grayson says. 


BOXING 


Stiff warning to Boyde 


The on-off comeback fight of 
David Pearce, the former Brit- 
ish heavyweight champion, 
looked off again after warning* 
from John Morris, secretary of 


his father and trainer, claims he 
has already sold 200 tickets for 
the fight and that he expects 
Boyde to arrive as arranged. 

Bui Morris said: “Boyde 


the British Boxing Board of won’t be allowed to box under 


Control, to Lorenzo Boyde, his 
American opponent, that be 
risked his career if the fight goes 

afwd. 

Yesterday Boyde cancelled 
his flight from Chicago to Wales 
for tomorrow’s bout at the Pan: 
Club in Tredegar. Pearce is 
barred from the ring by Board 
after a brain scan revealed a 
congenita] abnormality. Walter, 


Williams’s win sees Manchester Cram wins 

Northern back in contention AAA’s 

Byc.H»McQrittm prize a gain 

Skni i>irKi*r <hvirM tiirir 1985. the first year of the Trevor W il ki nson , the leading mt O 


Skol Leicester stretched theft- 
lead to seven points with a 4-1 
win over Ardteigb Hall in the 
last American Express Premier 
League fixture of 1986, but the 
performance of the night was 
Geoff Williams's defeat of Ross 
Norman, die new world chain-' 
’’ij pion, to bring Manchester 
Northern back into the bant for 
the second half of the season. 

Williams trained himeelf al- 
most to a standstill searchatg for 
a spectacular comeback from 
knee injuries, only to fid mis- 
erably both in the World Open 
and in the more recent National 
Championships. In his deter- 
mination to achieve greater 
strength and power, the tall left- 
handed former cham- 

pion appeared unconsciously to 
sacrifice his natural fast and 
shot-filled game. 

_ Manchester North- 

ern to 4-1 victory over Intercity 
Cannon, Williams rediscovered 
the value of boasting from deep 
and cutting short. He met Nor- 
man In an amsulh lethargic 
mood and beat him 10-9, 1-9, ib- 
9, 9-1. Having contested the first 
>?/two games tooth and nail, Wil- 
liams unveiled in the fourth 
virtually every shot in his exten- 
sive repertoire, and hit target 
-every time. 

; There is some resentment In 
the close-knit Manchester 
Northern camp that InferGty 
Cannons, with a highly paid 
mercenary squad, last year 
" usurped the League Champion- 
ship tfiflf went to Manchester in. 


By CoUb McQnfllan 

1985, the first year of the 
National League. The Manches- 
ter players are always on the 
mettle against the wealthy 
London team and this time only 
Neil Harvey could resist the 
deluge, beating Ashley Naylor' 
over four games. 


Results 

American Express P rae to r Laajpw: Skol 
Lscesisr aTArdMgh Hal! 1; Manchester 
Northern 4. InteiC* Cannon 1; Gdtorade 
Chapel AHertoo 3. Vaao Monroe 25 Home 
Alee Nonnoh a m 2, PounOwretter 
Dunnings Mfl 3; Hate West Country 5. 
Arrow VOsger 






NORDIC SKIING 


Landlord pulls carpet 
from under British 


By Michael Coleman 


Table 


P W L Pis 
Central-Sfcol Oacby 9 8 1 51 

DunrangsM* 9 7 2 4* 

Inter Cny Cannons 9 7 2 43 

Manchester Nrthn 9 6 3 40 

Chapel AJtonon 9 6 3 39 

HaKs West Ccwitry 9 4 5 30 

AnSoghHaB 9 3 6 23 

HAAtoftngham 9 2 7 20 


Visco 
Arrow vwage 


9 2 7 20 
9 0 9 S 


The Poundstretcber squad 
front Dnnniags Mill exploited 
the embarrassment of InterCfty 
Cannon, ovcstranfng Notting- 
ham 3-2 on their own courts and 
ratring over second place in the 
League from the Londoners. 
Philip Kenyon, who lost his 
British title to Bryan Beeson last 
month, squeezed a 4-9, 9-4. 3-9, 
H 9-4 victory over Gawain 
Briars. 

Beeson himself was beaten by 


Trevor Wilkinson, the leading 
Soath African, after hofdrag 8-5 
and three match points in the 
fourth game at second string for 
Chapel Alkvton twhut Visco 
Monroe. Stuart Hailstone, 
Chapel’s own Sooth African, 
lost to Mark Maclean in yet 
another of the long five set 
matches for w hi c h ffc* increas- 
ingly *yg l» Scotsman Is becom- 
ing renowned. But the Leeds 
dnb celebrated a new five figure 
sponsorship deal with an Ameri- 
can health drink company by 
winning the match in the lower 
order. Henceforth they hope to 
be known as Gaterade Chapel 
ABertoo whenever space can be 
fond for such a tide. 

Skol Leicester, who axe of- 
ficially listed as Skol Central 
Qadby, Leicester, feaimed the 
new B riti s h doubles champi on s 
as the c ent rep iece of their 
valuable win over the young 
Essex side from Ardleigh HalL 

Martin Bodhncade and Paal 
Carter took nearly three boms to 

win their first national title last 
weekend. Respectively losing to 
Del Harris and beating Lake 
GoJbJc al second aad third 
strings on Tuesday, they collec- 
tively consumed four more boos 
of court time. 

In Weston-super-Mare, the 
Halts West Country squid man- 
aged theft second successive 5-0 
victory over heleagnered Arrow 
Village, to haal themselves 
seven potato dear of the relega- 
tion battle that once seemed 
certain to engulf them. 


Steve Cram was named the 
outstanding athlete of the year 
by the Amateur Athletics Assoc- 
iaton (AAA) — for the second 
year tunning yesterday — after 
his 800 and 1,500 metres double 
triumph at the Commonwealth 
Games, plus his 1,500 metres 
win at the European cham- 
pionships. 

Cram, from Janow and 
Hebburn Athletic Gub, won the 
C N. Jackson Memorial Cup 
and Colin Jackson, of Cardiff 
was named the AAA's jonior 
athlete of 1986 for his winning 
performance in Athens of 
13.44sec in the 110 metres 
bundles at the world junior 
championship. 

Jon Softy won two awards for 
his 10,000 metres winning run 
1 at the Kodak AAA champion- 
ship at Crystal Palace. The 
Bmgley Harriers is deemed the 
‘best champion of the year,' and 
his performance was considered 
the best on the track. 

Linford Christie, the sprinter, 
from Thames Valley Hamers, 
and the high jumper, Geoff 
Parsons, of London Athletic 
Club, shared the prizes indoors. 
Parsons’s Philips Trophy fol- 
lows his national record of 2J30 
metres at (he Pearl Assurance 
indoor championship. Christie 
won the award for the best 
overall athlete indoors, for win- 
ning the 200 metres European 
championship in Madrid. 

OTHBt AWARDS: M Sham (Thurrock, 
shot putt, best British youth atttete). M 
R o b wBon (Haringey, javefln, best Junior 



Crane three titles 

champion 0 Dairy Crest timor chttfnpkxv 
sNp). J Ragbi (Belgrave Hamers, 200m, 
Raps' Cola best p erferm anm at Kodak 
chesnpraraWp by UK aStiete under 21V B 
Cole (Thurrock, Shot, beet fold perfor- 
mance). Q Foster [US. 110 m hurdtes, 
best tagh hurdtes performance in UK). 

• Said Aouita, the Moroccan, 
and Heike Drechsler were 
named 'Athletes of the year 1 by 
Ail e tica Leggem , the Italian 
track and field magazine. 

Aouita, the men’s middle l 
distance runner, topped (be list . 
with 118 points, ahead of Ben 
Johnson, the Canadian sprinter 
(84). and Sergei Bubka, the 
Soviet pole vaulter (61). The 
women were headed by the East 
Goman long jumper with 161 
points, ahead of Ingrid Kris- 
tiansen, the Norwegian distance 
runner (57). Fatima Whitbread, 
the British javelin thrower, had 
nine points. 


The six-man team that hoists 
Britain's Dag in cross-country 
(Nordic) skiing mil part com- 
pany over Christmas, not for 
reasons of seasonal goodwill, but 
because their Austrian landlord 
needs his fiats back. 

Three win return to Britain 
and the others proceed at then- 
own expense to Pootresma, in 
the Swiss Engadfne, hoping die 
snow has improved. 

“The owner wants ns out for 
two weeks over the holiday so 
we’re splitting op,” Patrick 
Winterton, Hip ipm» captain, 
said from Srhladniag. “We 
expect to move back on Janizary 
7. At the moment we are trying 
to find somebody with an empty 
garage to take all our stuff.” 

Becanse of lack of cash, the 
national squad tMm year has 
been cat hack to five after what 
Winterton described as a 
“graesome” selection process in 
Sweden Is late November these 
are Winterton, Mark Watkins, 
Karl Smith, Ewan McKenzie 
and Andy Wylie. 

Since arriving in Anstria, the 
squad has Increased to six with 
the arrival of setf-ffwnrfd Jona- 
thao Lineen, who has Bved and 
raced modi of his fife arotmd 
Vancouver, hot has a British 
passport. His form so for seems 
to justify his self-selection. 

Two absentees from last 
year's team are Mike Dixon, 
who has transferred to the 
biathlon team which has Its first 
outing at Hochfilaen in Austria 
on Saturday, and John 
Spots wood, a victim of the 
weeding out process. He has 
moved to Switzerland to train 


with Albiu Battesta, the team's 
trainer last year. 

Wintertou and company have 
a new trainer this season, 
Christa Ericsson, from Sweden, 
and are being managed by Hugo 
Allen. Snow scarcity in Austria 
has retarded prepa r ati o n, die 
speed framing only now being 
undertaken, hot form so for is 

AWi-n wm grwg . 

Wmtertna said: “In the first 
World Cop 15-kflometre at 
Ramsan. McKenzie, Wyfie and 
myself were only seven minutes 
(or 15 per cent} behind Gmtde 
Svan. the winner. Last year the , 
gap was 10 minutes. Svan, , 
Sweden's wonder man, won 
again at Cogne, Italy, last 
Sunday and seems again unbeat- 
able whether the style be diag- 
onal or freestyle. 

Bat with limited resources it is 
unlikel y that the British team 
will follow the World Cup 
circuit, concentrating their ef- 
forts instead on three events in 
West Germany. 

BRritSH PflOGnSMMg- Ntoaad cfaa- 
pnsttte (B*d Zwi rad. Jammy 24-Fdh- 

February 11-27); Lowlands ctaaptnaip 
(luz. Bavaria, cot? Mud) 

• East Berlin (Renter) — East 
Germany have condemned 
bobsleigh’s governing body, the 
FZBT, for banning friar modi- 
fied bobsleigh, r bi m ing the 
decision was aimed at disrupting 
their preparations for the 1988 
Olympic Games. 

East Germany's teams drew 
international protests when they 
Introduced a boh, enclosing a 
modified axle in the bodywork, 
at Winterberg, West Germany 
10 days ago. 


our rules and we would inform 
all commissions that he has 
taken part in unlicensed boxing 
with a man who does not meet 
the Board's medical standards.” 
• Yesterday Pearce, Billy May, 
his manager, nod Andrew 
Genard, another heavyweight, 
were bound over by magistrates 
for £1 .000 each to keep the peace 
for two years after an incident in 
Newport in September. 

FISHING 

Decline is in 
size not 
in numbers 

By Conrad Voss Bark 

For some 10 years or more 
fishermen on the Hampshire 
Avon and the Dorset Frome 
have complained that the num- 
ber of salmon in these rivers has 
been declining. For the past 
three years Wessex Water sci- 
entists, beaded by Dr Wil- 
kinson, divisional fishery officer 
at Poole, have been carrying out 
a survey to see if the complaints 
are true. 

They have found that it is not 
a decline but a cyclical fluctua- 
tion. Catches did decline in the 
1970s, says the report, and this 
was a widespread change com- 
mon to all North Atlantic home 
waters, but this occurred after 
the high peak runs of the 1960s. 
The decline was, in feet, a return 
to pre-peak levels. 

Dr Wilkinson says: “Over a 
hundred-year period catches on 
the Hampshire Avon appear to 
show a definite cycle; high peaks 
in the 1880s to 1890s again in 
1915 and 1935 and troughs in 
between. In the last year or so 
catches were relatively good 
This year 1 believe they are very 
good." 

There is, however, a decline in 
the size of salmon. The reason 
for this is not known. 

The Wessex survey was car- 
ried out on four rivers, the 
Piddle and Frome that flow into 
Poole Harbour and (he Stour 
and Avon that reach the sea at 
Christchurch. Copies of the 
report on migratory salmon. 
Price £3, can be obtained from 
the Fishery Department. Wes- 
sex Water, Passage Street, 
Bristol 


Queen’s Bench Division 


Law Report December 18 1986 


Withdrawing grant without giving reasons 


Queen’s Bench Divisional Court 

Quashing a committal 


^ Regjna v Secretary of State Jor 
Transport, Ex parte Sherriff* 
Sons Ltd 

Before Mr Justice Taylor 
[lodgment December 15] 

. Before deriding lo withdraw 

the provision afjnil frrigh* 
facilities under section 8 of the 
Railways Act 1974 (as amended 
by section 16 of the Transport 
An 1978), the Secretary of State 
for Transport should have in- 
formed the applicant for ^rantot 
his reasons for withdrawing tne 
.undertaking and giving the ap- 
plicant an opportunity of mak- 
ing representations. . . 

.■ Furthermore, the decision 
■ was unlawful in that _ it *3* 
based on a rule contained in 
paragraph 2.6 of the Depart- 

- mem ofTransport’s “Memoran- 
' dum of Explanation” which 

^ - fettered the secretary of state s 
discretion to make grants under 
!> section 8 and was therefore ultra 
r vires. . 

Mr Justice Taylor so hdd in 
7 the Queen's Bench Division. 
Z granting an application by Sher- 
iff & Sons Ltd for judicial 
7‘ review inter alia to quash a 

- decision of the secretary of state 

• on November 28. 1984, to 
“ withdraw bis undertaking datca 
«r November I, 1983 to pay the 
I applicants £250,000 grant under 
section 8. 

Section 8 provides: UJ 

Where it aonears to the secretary 


of state that it would be in the 
interests of any locality ... for 
facilities to be provided ... tor 
or in connection with the car- 
riage of freight by rail or loacbng 
or unloading offreight earned or 
intended to be carried by rail, he 
may . . . make grams subject to 
and in accordance with this 


At a meeting on the she 
between the applicants and a 
Department of Transport of- 
ficial, the official said that it 
looked as if be would be 
recommending a grant and that 
no recommendation of bis bad 
ever been turned down. 

That led the applicants to take 


in m ^S^hTorovSoDrf a more cavalier attitude to the 
secuon towards the provision oi ^ ^ ^ mho*** 

cprtion would have done. 


such facilities. 

“(2) Grants trader ffiis section ^ Ucaills submitted a 

shall be xxxade grant application form which 

dm ... °fa capnaJ nature f ndud J^ cerlificaie(a)thfltthc 

whichhas - heM or fedlities would not be provided 

incurred m providing such &cn- ^ ^ z|iat no 

ities - - - o^jon contracts ted been entered into 

and (c) that the project was not 

shall be made in^traa^e already in progress. In fact (b) 

application S and (c) varied from the fens. 

retaryofstate^tbepereonwho ^ November ]( J 933 the 

, s in the : course ^J^te^lte department indicated that a 


j nes ( ^ 

“(3) Grants under this section 
shall be made in pursuance of an 


snail already m progress. 1 

application made to tne sro- varied from th 

retary of stately tbepereon who q* N 0vem ter 1. 


least in part, on paragraph 2.6 of 
a handbook entitled 
“Memorandum of 

Explanation" issued by the 
Department of Transport which 
provided that as grants were an 
incentive to provide facilities, 
any commitment to a project for 
the provision of rail freight 
facilities in advance of a de- 
rision to make a grant would 
render the project ineligible for 
grant 

It was submitted for the 
applicants that the paragraph 
was couched in the terms of a 
rule rather than a policy and as 
such constituted an unlawful 
fetter on the secretary of state's 
discretion to make grants under 
section 8. 


intend, to provide the 

facilities .... 

Mr David Grace, QC mid Mr 
Frederick Phil port for the ap- 
SSMrRScrHendersc^ 
QCand Mr Robert Jay for the 

secretary of siatc. 

MR JUSTICE TAYLOR said 
that the applicant > w SSJ!Sr 
Sants, sought new P«m«s fef 

ih«r exoanding business and 

to chMgefi"-" 
road to rail freight transport. 

They found a site and _m- 
* juried to finance the project 
fi^thc sale of their existing 
premises, a tank loan and a 

great under section a. 


n November 1, 1983 the Although the first page of the 
irtment indicated that a booklet was beaded “Memoran- 
t would be paid subject to dura of Explanation and Notes 


grant would oe pam sucyeci to aura 01 txpiananon ana Notes 
the condition that the applicants for Guidance" the following 
should submit audited claims page referred to the guidance as 
for payment and should notify ‘‘Rules, conditions and 


the department of alterations in 
the facts. 

When the applicants sub- 
sequently applied for payment, 
the deportment asked to see the 
documents relating to the letting 
of contracts. The applicants sent 
a quotation for conversion 
works dated March 1983 and 
their acceptance. 

The applicants received no 
further communication from 
the department until the de- 
cision to withdraw the grant 

That decision was based, at 


page referred to the guidance as 
‘‘Rules, conditions and 
procedures”. 

The vital words in para graph 
2.6 were: “will render a project 
ineligible for grant . . Those 
words admitted of no exception 
and gave no suggestion of any 
discretionary waiver. 

Paragraph 2.6 constituted a 
rule and not a flexible policy and 
was a fetter on discretion. 

It was conceded on behalf of 
the secretary of state that if the 
paragraph constituted a rule, 
then it was ultra vires and 

unlawful. 


Paragraph 2.6 affected the 
derision to withdraw grant The 
department's practical approach 
was that if works bad begun, it 
could not he satisfied that a 
grant was needed. 

The unlawful fetter tainted 
the decision and on that ground 
alone the applicants were en- 
titled to relirt. 

The applicants also submitted 
that the allure of the secretory 
of state to consult the applicants 
before making his decision was 
a breach of natural justice. 

The present case was one in 
which the department should 
have {nit its case to the ap- 
plicants and asked them if they 
had an answer to it before 
deciding whether the grant 
should be withdrawn. 

If the applicants had been told 
that from the documents and 
events the dep ar t m e n t was 
considering a conclusion that no 
grant was needed, the applicants 
would have been able to put 
information forward which 
would have corrected that mis- 
conception. 

Apart from the need to con- 
sult as a matter of natural 
justice, the department needed 
more information 10 enable it to 
reach an informed derision. 

That ground of relief was also 
made out 

Solicitors: Ross Williams 
Wakefield & Co; Treasury Solic- 
itor. 


Regina r Oxford Oty Jnstkes, 
Ex parte Beny 

Before Lord Justice May and Mr 
Justice Russell 
[Judgment December 5] 

Judicial review would lie lo 
quash committal proceedings 
where justices had refused to 
entertain an inquiry under sec- 
tion 76(2) of the Police and 
Criminal Evidence Act 1984 
into the circumstances of the 
obtaining of a confession from 
the defendant although it would 
be rare that the court would 
quash on that ground alone. 

The Queen’s Bench Di- 
visional Court $0 held in 


certiorari to quash his commit- 
tal for trial by the Oxford City 
Justices on February 11, 1986 
on five charges of burglary. 

Mr James Gibbons for the 
applicant; Mr Richard Jenkins 
for the prosecutor. 

LORD JUSTICE MAY said 
that it was accepted on behalf of 
the applicant that prior to thr 
coming into force of the 1984 
Act if examining justices fol- 
lowed the procedure for 
committal proceedings pre- 
scribed by the Magistrates* 
Courts Act I9S0 and the 
Magistrates' Courts Rules (SI 
1981 No 552). the Divisional 
Court would not interfere with a 


committal for trial on the. 
ground that during the commit- 
tal proceedings inadmissible 
evidence had been received. 

It was contended, however, 
that since the passing of the 
1984 Act, the situation was 
different where, as here, the 
justices bad not merely received 
inadmissible evidence, but had 
refused to enter upon the in- 
quiry prescribed by section 
76(2) of the 1984 Act. before 
receiving evidence of a confes- 
sion when it bad been repre- 
sented that it was not or might 
not have been voluntary. 

By so refusing, h was submit- 
ted, the justices thereby declined 
to enter upon an inquiry on 
which they were bound to enter; 
they did not merely receive 
inadmissible evidence, but they 
declined jurisdiction and thus 
the resulting committal could be 
challenged by judicial review. 

Counsel for the prosecutor 
contended that the failure of the 
justices to consider whether the 
alleged confessions by the ap- 
plicant had or had not been 
improperly obtained did not 
affect their jurisdiction to decide 
whether a prima facie case bad 
been made out against him and 
-thus whether he should be 
committed for trial, even having 
regard to the provisions of 
section 76(2) of the 1984 Acl 

All that the justices might 
have done was to admit evi- 


dence which might prove to be 
inadmissible and there was am- 
ple authority, it was accepted, 
that the Divisional Court would 
not interfere with a committal 
by justices on that ground alone. 

Nevertheless, on the authori- 
ties of R V Carden ((1879) 5 

a BDl),RvA/®xfewi([1892J 1 
B 371), and remembering 
Lord Reid’s clastic dictum on 
the meaning of “jurisdiction” in 
Anisminic Ltd v Foreign 
Compensation Commission 
fl 1969] 2 AC 147, 171), as a 
matter of law judicial review 
could go to quash a committal 
in circumstances such as in the 
instant case, where the justices 
had refused to undertake the 
inquiry contemplated by section 
76(2) of the 1984 Art. 

Save in the exceptional case 
the Divisional Court should not 
quash any committal on that 
ground alone. 

Judicial review was a dis- 
cretionary remedy and if it were 
allowed to go in the instant case 
bis Lordship would “tremble to 
think what would be the result 
to the criminal practice of this 
country". 

There was in any event suf- 
ficient evidence for the justices 
to commit the defendant on the 
fifth burglary charge. 

Mr Justice Russell agreed. 

Solicitors: Darby & Son, Ox- 
ford; Crown Prosecution Ser- 
vice, Abingdon. 



3 


li 


SPORT 


THF TTMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


RACING 


Randolph Place to take 
first step on road to top 


Time alone will tell whether 
the first division of the 
Cakibeck Novices' Hurdle at 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 

When the field finally 
emerged from the gloom, he 
was already holding a clear 


ivuvjvca uuiuic dl woa oiiwau; 

Carlisle today sees the birth of lead and passed the post 12 
a future jumping star. For, lengths ahead of his nearest 


with the stresses and strains of 
training and racing jumpers, 
so much can go wrong. 

What is undeniable, how- 
ever, is that the presence of 
Randolph Place (nap) in the 
17-strong field will inject real 
interest into the proceedings 
on the Cumbrian track this 
afternoon. 

For this is the horse that 
Gordon Richards believes 
could be a Cheltenham Gold 
Cup horse one day. And. 
coming from the same female 
family as the mighty Arkle, 
Randolph Place already has a 
lot going for him on paper. 

As far as ability is con- 
cerned, knowledge of his 
prowess on the gallops near 
Penrith accompanied him to 
Newbury in November when 
he was the medium of a 
successful gamble from 4-1 to 
7-4 to win his First educational 
bumper. 

Less can be told about 
Randolph Place's only sub- 
sequent bumper at Chepistow 
simply because most of the 
course was shrouded in thick 
fog. What is known is that 
Randolph Place was again the 


rivaL Thus he became his 
trainer’s elusive first winner 
on the track after a galling wait 

of 23 years. v , 

So. harness that undoubted 
ability to a reported relish for 
jumping, and Randolph Place 
looks the day's banker, albeit 
at short odds again. 

His stable companions. 
Border Rambler (2.15) and 
Tartan Torchlight (2.45), can 
make this a good day for the 
Greystoke trainer and his 
jockey. Phil Tuck, by also 
winning. 

Border Rambler, my selec- 
tion for the Heads Nook 


Before running well in the 
race won by Midnight Count 
at Sandown. Tom Caxton had 
beaten Proud Pilgrim by a 
length at Windsor. And that 
form has worked out well with 
Proud Pilgrim finishing third 
in good company at Newbury 
before winning at Leicester on 
Monday. 

Nicky Henderson gives 
Classified the chance to regain 
his confidence in the Cloves 
Chase after that unhappy 
experience at Ascot last Sat- 
urday when he and Steve 
Smith Eccles parted company 
in the SGB Chase. Classified 
slipped badly on landing and 
then got bumped at a crucial 
stage of his recovery. 

Already a winner over 
today's course and distance. 



Balding confident 

Lucky Vane can 
land Welsh prize 

. .j „, wrhriamas. This was a nice 


uon 1UJ LUC J- - 7 ... . 

Novices' Chase, shaped with a Classified is probably at has 
lot of promise in his most best when he is racing over 2% 


IUL Ui UlUIUUb IU MW “ - , 

recent race over hurdles at miles even though he has 
Haydock when he finished twice run well in the Grand 


third to City Entertainer and 
Tonights The Night. In make 


National. 

Carr Wood can pay High 


luniKUu iuc niKiiu „ : , - w . 

and shape. Border Rambler Know! another compliment 


looks the type to do even 
better over fences and this is 
an ideal opportunity to prove 
that point. 


to do even 


by winning the Coltsfoot 
Novices’ Hurdle for Peter 
Walwyn and Dermot Browne. 
High Know] beat him 


With Jeff King’s horses in convincingly at Leicester but 
such excellent form, I fancy that . was nevertheles a 


mil MWUSIIl mill., *■ . . . « ... , 

Tom Caxton’s chance of win- promising run by Carr wood 
ning the Carawat Novices* on his jumping debut. He 


KIIIIX UJv € ^ - 

Chase at Hereford, even should now prove capable of 


Kanaoipn riace was again me L.aase *u ncicwiu, 

subject of a substantial gamble though Martin Pipe has copingwith Capulei, who alro 
from 2-1 to 6-5 on to win one mapped out the race for that Jewell m his first race over 

smart hurdler of two seasons hurdles when runner-up to 


of the best races of its type 
ever staged in England. 





back. Irish Lord. 


Astral at Kempton. 


Bantnnpota- (left), seen hereon his way to victory over Deep Impression at Che lte nham in 
January, has his first ran for Toby Balding in the Cloves Chase at Hereford today (2 JO) 


Luckv Vane, twice placed in 
die Welsh Grand National. *dj 
attempt to improve on ^at 
excellent record Coral 

sponsored eveni at Chepstow on 

confirmed the 
, i .-ear-old as a definite runner 
after saddling Wording to ^c- 
torv at Worcester y«»rda>- 
-The horse is very well, has a 
winning chance, ^d hasgotm 
go.” the in-form Fvfidd trainer 

^Luckv Vane finished third to 
Burro ugh Hill Lad and Royal 
judEement in the 19S3 running 
iw divided the Harew;ood pair, 
Rigbihand Man and Planctman 

course for the whole of 
last season. Lucky v ane has 
been "slowlv brought back to his 
best bv Balding and gained his 
first victory for almost two years 
at Sandown Park Iasi month. 

FJonfing’s 12-1 naorv m the 
Holly and Ivy Condiuonal 
JocLevs' Handicap Chase was a 
second winner from two ndes 
for the stable for Mark Hoad, 
Successful on Prince Moon at 
Folkestone on Tuesday, Hoad 
brought Fjording home with six 
lengths to spam from the tavour- 

* ^ Mark ' ih e r Richard rode 
for me years ago. and Mark had 
caught ’rny eye from time to 
time. I turned to him because 
Tony Chariton is out of action at 
the moment. Wixh this record I 
chaii have io keep Mark on ice 
for special occasions.*" 

Fjordiag. running for Balding 
for only the second lime, 
jumped soundly all the way, 
mastered the favourite with two 
tojumpaod won convincingly. 
“Fjording is multiply-engaged 


HEREFORD 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.30 Carr Wood. 

1.00 To-Pallikari-Mou. 
1.30 Tom Caxton. 


2.00 Play The Knave. 
2.30 Classified. 

3.00 Super Express. 


By Micbael Seely 

12.30 Carl Wood. 1.30 Irish Lord. 230 CLASSIFIED (nap). 


Going: heavy (last fence omitted) 

1230 COLTSFOOT NOVICE HURDLE(3-Y-0: £958: 2m) {17 runners) 


30120 TINSEL ROSE (0) (Major R Thurman) D Tucker 11-2 PHoB«y(7) 

0 ARABIAN BLUES (W BraOay) B Stevens 11-0 R Strong* 


7 

a 

ii 

2 CAPULET [1 Fry) C Jamas 1 1-0 

3 CARR WOOO (Mrs RHanttre)P Walwyn 114 

OLEAOHIU. PARK (T Hammings) S Motor 114 

D Brawna 

... GCtartM Joust 

78 4-1 
— 10-1 
— 12-1 







.A Pries (7) 

88 — - 

22 

23 

24 

0 RIVER GAMBLER (J RolU) PCundol 114 

0 SAHRAAN (Mre K DovonfxxftF Jordan 114 

SIMPLE EMIEAVOUR (Mrs C Martas) M G WBBams 114 

M Pwratt 
C&bU> 
— C Ltewsflyn (7) 

— 8-1 

— 10-1 



RJBaggm 





. 

38 

P ROMAN PEARL (T Jannsj wGTumar 1M 

-AStanw 

.... . MrLLsy (7) 

— — 

41 

SUNLIT (B Ltewsflyn) B Uewrfyn 184- — 

R Pussy 

— 


PHDIUI TWSEL ROSE, a consistent selling hurdler ran anottwr good race to ba 00-7) 41 2nd to easy 
rvnm Winner B o i n l on o (11-2) at Uidtowlzm. £846. good. Nov 2 6. IB ran). ARABIAN BLUES (10-10) 
was beaten 381 Oy the useful Maroth Une (10-10) ai Worcester (2m. £721, good id soft Dec 3, 20 ran). CAPD- 
LET. showed easMy the best tonnol any of these, when (10-10) a creditable 71 2nd to Astral (ll-l)iaKenipcon 
on be but pm . £l 825. good to soft Nov 20, 1 B ran). CARR WOOD also trad a aerate yet premising introduction 
M0-10). not being hard pressed to finish 31 v,\ 3rd to the wefl-reganted High Knowt (1Q-1U). Le ic e ste r (2m. 
£714. soft, Nov 28, 20 ran), rectory BOY (10-10). win improve on a 141 Bm to Forceto (10-101 at Worcestar 
(2m. E760 L good to soft. Dec 3. 20 cm). GOLDS! AZEUA (10-2) has plenty to find on a 30*1 5th to Olympic 
Eagle (1 0-7) at Taunton (2m If. £575. good to soft. Dec 4, 12 ran). 


1985: WANTAGE 11-0 H Davies (11-10 fav)T Forster 17 ran 

TINSEL BOSE, a consistent seBng hurdler ran another good race to be (10-7) 41 2nd to easy | 
winner BeMono (f 1-2) at Uidtow (2m. £846, good. Nov 26. 18 ran). ARABIAN BUIES (10-10) ; 
n bv the useful MarathLBietl 0-101 at Worcester (2m. £721, qood to soft Dec 3. 20 rank CARI- 


i to Olympic 


1.0 COWSLIP CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE (£535: 2m) (11 
runners) 

1 300480/ BOLD TERRAZZO (S O'Shea) R Morris 5-11-10 KBugeu 

3 20/00-00 CRtHSON SOL (P Kelly) GThomer 5-10-13 NFnm 93 5-2 

4 F-OOOOO SHARED EXPSUENCE (R Dowsett) R Hortop 5-10-12 I Howe! 91 94 

6 000F0- ROODV D*DR (K Dancer) M Castes 5-10-6 Sbnran Jmww — 12-1 

9 001004- TO-PALUKARJ-MOU (M Pipe) M Pipe 6-10-2 J Lower 9 99F2-1 

10 4024/U0 I APPEAL (RDogdaie)D Tucker 5-10-2 R Sparks — 8-1 

11 P000QO- CONOfTS ROCK (Mrs M Sark) Mrs M SUrtc 6-10-2 CEvana 98 — 

12 0-PP PONTON'S PROTEIN (Mrs S Pokiton) D Burchefl 5-10-1 D J Burchefl 

13 00O- BtCORNE (Mrs G Turtey) D WinOe 5-10-0 „ P IMe — — 

14 P/P-0P4O LUCY KING (R Cratt) Ms J Croft 5-10-0 W Humphrey! 8810-1 

15 4UURQP REHAMDER GIRL (D)(R Jucfces)R Judies 5-10-0 TPfnfleW 

1985: (Not condttonal jockeys) COMRA 6-10-5 A Canon (5-1 £-fav) □ Wintle 15 ran 


■ late around to finish just under 1 

£685. good to SOfLNOv 17. 12 rant. SHARED E 
fas shown BtUe kKm since a (1 1-8) 16KI 6th K 

13i ~ 

1*1 
£11 
4th 


bad eartyenor, made 
at Windsor (2m 30yds. 
headed last time and 

£814. firm. Ann 9. 



130 CARAWAY NOVICE CHASE (5-Y-O: El ,677: 2m) (12 runners) 

2 233P-1D TDM CAXTON (M O'Connor) J King 11-5 

3 00 AVON VALE (P Locke) p CundeB 11-0 

4 0- BBS FOLLY (P Rodford) P RodfonJ 11-0 

7 000-DP CITY SUCKER (PWlnkworth)S Meter 11-0 GC 

8 00 GREY GENERAL (J Scobie) M Olver 11-0 

10 00-2020 DIVISIBLE RWG (Mrs D Derang) fl Holder 11-0 

11 1101/ H1SH LORD(W GretSey) M Pipe 114) — — I 

13 P PAUPERS GOLD (Mrs p Starkey) J Webber 11-0 

14 0404P4 PROVERITY (Mrs P Shaw) J Edwards 11-0 

15 0OW1- RAGENS BOY (D Edwards) OOTMI1 11-0 

18 1422/04 TOOUVERE (R Thom#) D Burchefl 11-0 

19 2903-00 UNBEATABLE TIPP-EX (TtooeK Ltd) D Gandotto 11-0 


SHcfM #99 F9-4 

A Genean — — 

C Gray 

G Chariea Janes — 10-1 

— — 12-1 


DIVISIBLE RWG (Mrs D Denmg) fl Holder 11-0 PRkhnM 87 9-2 

■OSH LORD (W GretSey) m Ppo 1 14) PScudmem — 11 -a 

PAUPERS GOLD (Mrs p Sortoy) JWeMjerU-0 GfltanMflh 

KIOVERITY (Mrs P Shaw) J Edwards 11-0 P Barton — — 

RAGENS BOY (D Edwards) OONeifl 11-0 J&Mhem — 6-1 

TROUVEHE (H Thom#) D Burchefl 11-0 W Knox (4) 97 8-1 

UNBEATABLE TIPP-EX (Dppex Ltd) D Gandotto 11-0 RDonwaodjr 

1905: RAGGED ROBIN 11-0 H Davies (5-6 fav) T Forster 11 ran 




Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.45 RANDOLPH PLACE (nap). 
1.1S Class Hopper. 

1.45 MrSpoL 


2.15 Border Rambler. 
2.45 Tartan Torchlight. 

3.15 Tophams Taverns. 


The Times Private Handicapper’s top rating; 2.45 TARTAN TORCHLIGHT. 


Going: soft 

1Z45 CALDBECK NOVICE HURDLE (Dfv 1; £1 ,000: 2m 330yd) (17 runers) 

1 OR) BAffTEL BUCCANEER (B Brandon) RBssM Bed 4-tt-fl B Storey 

2 00-2000 CAPBtSON (R Hornsby) J H Johnson 6*I1<0 — 

3 0 CROFTON PARK (Mrs E Dixon) JDbuxi 5-11-0 K Doctor 

4 2-42 FBtVBtT HOPE (DLuntJD McCain 4-11-0 — 

6 304300 GOLDEN BAVARD (Mrs N Ashall) T CaldweB 5-1 1-0 — 

7 GOLD® POUiW(W A Stephenson)* A Stephenson 4-11-0 HLsah 

8 3 WOOJETTO BOY (ft Sdwley)R8chotey 4-11-0 PD«Xh*(4) 

9 0400 KELLY'S INN (T QendxvWig] DMoNaU 6-1 1-0 — KTeetan 

11 0P0 LOCjnTPOP (Mrs J Johrsor^ J Gouktng B-11-0 JGoukflng 

12 043040 MAJOR ROUGE (JHetdmafi)J Charlton 4-11-0 — 

13 003202 RRLESlAN DANCER (lDe)gleish)W Fairgheve 6-1 1-0 G Thomson (7) 

16 00 OAKGROVE (Lt-Col W Morttath) P Mortailh 4-1 1-C DNotan 


RUnb 

PDemt(t(4) 
— KTeehxi 
. JGoukflng 


• 99 12-1 
79 — 


18 021110- RAM TW THOR (Mrs F Wtriton) F WaAon 11-11-0 — 


G Thomson (7) 

DNotan 

Mr JWahon 


19 11 RAHX5LPH PLACE (Edinburgh Wooflai MUI Lid) G RichanSa 5-11-0 PTuc* 

20 0/00004) SARPAL(CAnTOtrong)V Thompson 5-11-0 l*r M Tbompeon (4) 

28 0 FALCON CRAG (D Macdonald) D MacDonald 5-10-9 J Hansen 

29 O-JPOO PHtSIAH PRINCESS (Mis J Darnel) Mre A How#! 9-1 W MWtetams 

MBS RINUS 4-1 1-0 G Bradley (2*1 fair) D McGaln 1 1 ran 


1.15 ASPATRIA SELLING HURDLE (£517: 2m 330yd) (5 runners) 

1 o STEVEJAN (B Morgan) B Morgan 4-11-7^— ______ MDwysr 

2 4P0 ALLISTER0RAtl8HELD(K Johnson) G Moore 3-10-7 M Hammond 

3 0 CLASS HOPPBl(F Tail) WElsey 3-10-7 MPappar 

4 0040 DOE-TEE (C Parker) C Parker 3-10-7 — 

5 FP TARA DANCG? (V) (D Saley) C Tinkler 3-10-7 — LWyer 

1985: MATELOT 3-10-12 C Grant (11-2) M Naughton 10 rsi 

1.45 RACING POST HANDICAP CHASE (£1,980: 3m) (8 runners) 

1 041431- SUCCEEDS (D) (J Wilson Water) W A Stephenson 9-11-12— bh P Johnson (7) 

3 1121-43 IR SWT (CD) (fl ShtaWR SNotaS-ll-S MrR8htals(7) 

4 212221- HJLLAMARUE (C) (W Stmnsarv-Tayto) G Richards 9-11-2 — PTuc* 

5 01RHJ2 LA BOEUF (D) (Mrs U Lamb) D Lamb 10-11-1 Rlamb 

6 FHH=3F BEAU NTDOUE Robson) E Robson 7-10-S — 

8 BE0200 PURPLE BEAM (TBsittft9}T Barnes 7-ftHL — JKIQsana 

9 031F/FP DAY OF WISHES D (W A Stephenson) W A Stephenson 10-1 0-0,. K Jones 

10 023Q/P0 ANSURO (Miss R SchcMy) R Scholey 9-10-0 — P Demta (4) 

198& SOURES 5-10-12 P Tuck (9-4 fav) J Berry 9 ran 


— 8-1 
• 99F7-4 

— 7-2 
88 82 

— 11-2 


96 3-1 
94 5-1 
90F7-4 
93 7-1 
98 9-1 
• 99 14-1 
— 18-1 
~ 25-1 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

103(12) 80432 TIMESFORMfCOfF) (MreJRyteyJB Hafl 9-KWI 


_ BHM(4) 


Racecard number. Draw m brackets. Sta-figure and distance winnar. BF-beaam favounte m latest 
form (F-fefl. P-pu«ed up. U-unseated nder. 8- race). Owner n brackets. Trainer. Age aad 
brought down. S-siipped up. R-rafused). Horse's wesght. Rider plus any aO u w an ce. The Tomes 
name (B4tMu#rs. v-vtsor. H-hood. E^cyeshtekL C- Private KamScapper's matg. A pp r outia tn aiaitts; 
course wmner. D-distance wmner. CIXourse pnen. 


Results from two meetings Tucker trek 

Worcester novc nff 

Gong: heavy G.-ny Card rU Pecser. 14-1) ALSO RAN: IIJIVJj 1111 


2.0 MIDLAND AREA RACECOURSE STAFFS ASSOCIATION HANDICAP CHASE 
(£2£69: 3m If) (11 runners) 

1 B123-Q2 PLAY THE KNAVE (CQ) (C da P Berry) P Bailey 9-11-10 SMcnbmd n FS-2 

3 dPP-204 SOWTULLA SOY(THototXOOk«J T HouOxookB Tf-TI-5 KrTHtUbniato V KM 

4 4/013-40 LEDBURY LAD (M Wtesmfih) M wassmsh 8-11-1 J Bryan 95 8-1 

5 144-232 RIG STEEL (t^BF) (R RobtanS) P CrmdeO 6-18-10 A Gorman *99 7-2 

6 420-PQ2 NOTRE CHEVAL (C) (Mrs M Moms) J HoneybaS 7-108 PUsrHohta 94 9-2 

7 P/Q-P40 SECRETARY GSIEHAL (M Fatten) R Hodgn 11-10-6 BPew«l 92 — 

8 D-0PF33 MEM8RDGE (PDufbsee) P Dutosee 11-185 RDmmody 90 12-1 

9 03010-2 UPHAM KELLY (R Brtnkworth) D Gandotto 7-10-5 P Barton VT 6-1 

10 304300- KASH&L (Mrs B Taylor) S Meflor 8-10G G Charles Jon— 97 — 

12 U32023 PRINCELY CALL (B£Q) (Mrs G Jonas) Mrs G Jones 12-10-0 J Sutharn 95 — 

14 3/PP0-3P TR1KTY CATCHER (M TatB) M Tate 8-10-0 HhM 

1985: CONEY GLEN 9-10-1 A Webber (33-1) V Bishop 10 ran 


RAN &4I ter Kerar-srs Set !=-T.t 9 
Be aep e; ipuL Le Carets f«r'. t3 
Drryw >*ai. 12 NaCie Szyrr. ig Pam 
US. 23 tens cas. fwasrar, 25 Crarce 
Parrw. 33 Laae a->0 Bsyai. Parker 
Ja s fcsar. 5C Joe Jafte. Ma?c r A-r> cry 
!Pl-\ itarar Sesrei (pu). V.esfer-i 


f tpB* itaxar. Secret (pu>. Wesfem 
j <ftzrrcr. aaaOas. Pxfx Part £C ran. 


NR: Trfor Jussce. Vata nn&. i.!. Z. 2'tL 
a:v, IS. K Esttey ai heref sr3- 

shre. Tele £8*3: £1.60 £2.13. £5.50. CF; 
£11 So. CSr:£*ti4. 


1.15 On me) 1- IGLLAftY BAY (N 
Trite'. 1 2. Sir Jest i K Jones. 8-1L 3. 
a-ey Card iM Peraer. 14-1) ALSO RAN: 
7-a i*t AiC-rsL 5-2 Joseph s CoaL 15-2 
HrrtCev Lane iSffl. 10 Grange Ha Got 
rerr). ii SP-cSy Busmess |4mL 16 Mr 
Ga’dmer. Tartar Trademark. 20 
Gteceny. S3 Just Coins. Country 
fijwrjto 13 rar. 4L 25. 4L 21. 2'4l N Tinktaf 
at 'Ma^.1 Tcte. ESJXJ: £2.30. £1.70. 
E3.EC Dr: £1310. CSF: £2956- 
IM rZn 300yd eh) 1. MBJStEK (M 
Hx - J fT e r a. 7-2): 2. Stog^onfl Sam (C 
Gram. 9-1 u 3. Sopmslicated (R 
Eamshaw. 16-1). ALSO RAN: 9-4 fav 


pays off 
handsomely 


PORM PLAY THE KNAVE rD-91 could not quicken Cram last when 5f 2nd to Knock HS (11-7L wsh 
r wruw SOMTULLA BOY (10-4) 91 back in 4th a! Worcester (3m St. £3038. good id soft. Dec 3. E ran). 


RIG STEEL (10-10) one-paced from 2 out wfien 51 2nd to Certnau (1 1-12) at Leicester (3m. £1786. mod. Nov 
28. 7 ran). NOTRE CHEVAL (10-7) put up best eftort sf season on latest start when 41 2nd to Tudor Road (10- 


■L0 f2n zS) 1. FJOROtNG IV Haad. 12- 
i li 2. Ammg (B Doirtrg. n*4 tavj: 3, 
Chw rt.ja Pnnce :Z Aztikl 2&-1> ALSO 
RAN: 7-2 Seen Mugged ;4r*. 5 Chetesa 
lisad ,6*;. 6 Taranee ■?. 7 Wa»ut 
Warder 'ur-. U Essex K T.\ 33 B ee ch 
Cacse 3 rar S. r*. 5, 2L G 

Ea>±rc a: Wnd Tc*: ET1.4C 1 . £330. 
£20).%7C. DR. 25C.4C. CSF: £41 JB. 


12) at Taunton (3m If. £2290, good. Dec4. G ran). MEMBRIDGE has yet to rwapiure best Bis season, on nwst 
recent arena fj 1 -8) Gnishingra 3n> to Legal Sugar (1 02) at Worcester (2m 4f. £T33a good to soft Dec a 6 
ran). UPHAM GAMBLE (10£) caught dose heme v4vn V»| 2nd to Clonrache Stream no-l2L wsn LEDBURY 


ran). UPHAM GAMBLE (10« caught dose heme when >*l 2nd to Oonroche Strean (10-12X wsn LEDBURY 
LAD (11-5) 361 bach in Stfiar Bancor (3m. £1784. soft DecB. 9 ran). Previously LEDBURY LAD(lO-13)G4di» 
Bundle Boy (11-11). with SOWTULLA BOY (11-8)29 away 5th and SEOtETARY GENERAL (10-13) anedter 
1 Kl back m 6th. Luefiow (3m. £1487. good. N ov 28. 10 ran) On penultimate outmgPRINCa.Y CALL (100) 101 


2nd to Queensway Bov at UthMeter (3m 2f. £2272. good to soft. Ncv 13. 5 ranL best effort. 
Selection: NOTRE CHEVAL 


SetacSon: NQTHE CHEVAL 

240 CLOVES CHASE (£1,654: 2m 41) (7 runners) 

3 FI 2000- BURANNPOUR (Mrs EWetasnin)GBakftig 6-11-5 

5 0003-3U CLASSIFIED (D) (Chavetoy Park Sted) N Henderson 10-11-5 

7 24/2013- GRMOO (D) (R Brown) J HonaybaB 7-11-5 

9 F3-U132 HALYA HAL (D) (Sheikh Afi Abu Khams*8 F Wflnter 7-11-S_ 
11 FF/0010- RORQUAL {D)(WWfwbreadl Mrs MRknefl 11-114 

13 2-02234 ST ALEZAN(D) (Lord Coventry) M Tale 9-1 1-0 

14 0/PUP -OP MTTOE HOUSE (Mrs A Pr*»> Mrs A Pnoe B-10-7„ 


— GBradhqr 9010-1 
MBawfty(«) 98 7-4 
. Peter Hobbe 75 10-1 
.PScodamon •99FS-4 

J Bryan 95 10-1 

H Deviee 7012-1 

C Price — 33-1 


1.30 (2m 2f We, 1. KUWAIT LEEL (C 
9-E7 Z Goideo Jme fN Cotaman. 
25-i;:3.PBet*DayiJSug5ah.6-l). ALSO 
RAN: &-« lav Goc s Hroe (41b), 3 Mtkray 
Ba* fadrL u Fogare Pmcess. 30 
Wizn^-. 25 S£B Bouqubl 33 Jacques 
Sc4t js .1 *c*rsS^te?;.50Utr«sUd 
(pu;. W*»r^ew=sdtSsws*a:u IS ran. r>L 
1C. C 7rL 22. r Jsrt2= at LccrusW. 
Ttrer £4 SC; £1.40. £233. £220. DR: 
£46.70 CSF: £3755. NdCstt 
zo (an eft' i. nraoBBuuE (P 
Scodamcre. 7-4 favt 2. tUsjm (W Knox. 


M’-frtnh air. Tele: £3.60. £1 .70, El 30- OF: 
re sc CSF: £2629. 

2.15 fi&3Ch';1. READY TOKEN (C Grant. 
3-1 ^ 2 Price of Peace (Mr J Osbourne. 5- 
11; 3 Kerai (Mr S Swiers, 33-1). ALSO 
RAN: 51-4 Fav SofcSqr (Sth). 7 Ida's OeSght 
lu). 8 wean Sport, 9 Bdurstafta. 10 
Htffe Bain (£2W. 14 Feed Astaire. Wise 
Cracker (40). 20 Bnght Imp (pu). 25 
Btvdeau Rctme (ouL 33 Auckland Ex- 


Bonteaipi Rouge (puL 33 Auckland Ex- 
press (puL Masw Viigan m. 1 4 ran. 2L 5L 
21. 1’4L 2%L A Sntfb at Berertay. Tow 
£340: £130. £220. £320. DR: £11.40. 
CSF: £2357. 

24S|3m 300yd hdtatl. SURPASS (Miss 

Tate. 9- 2t 2. Pb* Prince (Mr P Johnson, 
8-1t 3. TrfUcata Star (Mrs H Noonan. 68- 
1L ALSO RAN: 10030 lav Bossacanr Boy 
(tehL 4 Treasure Hunter. 11-2 Sana's 
unage (4thL 1 0 Cadeby (6th). Oder Spy (ft. 
Cottage Leas. Tower HopjL 20 Vmff 


\ 3-11: 3 Keky'x Bad (G Menagh. 20-1). 

I ALSO RAN: 5 Ancrea Dawn (f), 10 
Gfflogite Laujt. ft Cfibc Burn (pu). 16 
Pefltan: Lme /53t). 2S Mrs Rotay. Our 


Note. 25 Scale ModaL 33 Oereamw. 
Ch ipnastc , One Track Mind. 50 Bright 
Enough. Long Wait (pu), Murphys Dream 


Grade tpu;. A'Mrush Song LQe (5OT. 
SO Mter csv Bese (4ai). Fa* Wen pu). 


(ct4 66 Ctamina. Ponderontt (pu). Sealed 
Offer (pu). Answer Back (pu). 22 ran. NR: 


198S: FIFTY DOLLARS BORE 10-11-5 B De Haan (2-9 fav) F Winter 3 ran 

CADM Onfinal outing last season BURANWOUR (10-10) waD beaten 8th lo Repingtc 
rvnm (2m <u. good). Last suc cessh i (11-3) when be atin g Deep i mpressi on (11-3) i 
(an, £3922. soft, Jan L8 ran)- CLASSIFIED 1104) a^peti and unsealed rider after 3rd bora 


uting last season BURANWOUR (10-10) weQ beaten 8th to Rapington (10-3) at Ascot 
sod). Last successful (11-3) when be atin g Deep I m p ressi on (11-3) 51 at Chefeonham 
8 ran)- CLASSIFIED (104) sipped and uroasted rider after 3rri berwxJ Door Ufth at 
t start Previously (11-8). needirra run, rust over 51 3rd to Castle Warden (li-TD) at 
xxl to soft, Nov 20 , 4 ran). GRINGO ( 1 1-1 0) ended last term wkh a 231 3rd to high class 
t Kempton (2m 4f.£2411. good. Jan 17, 10ran).MALYAMAL(1M2)baiow form wtwn 


SO fcfter£se Base (40!). Pair Wen (puL 
Ka^xe fiL Mas Pa*eh. Mas Prague (ur). 
Royal Tycoca (ft. 17 ran. NR: Tacova. 12L 
l)il IS, S, lot. M Pipe at Weangton. 
Tote: £3tXL £2.00. £1.30. FS .S 0 . OF: 
£4.40 CSF; £7 Jl. 


S overete nStecs-g, KL4L3.S. R Tate at 
Tfxrsk. foter&TO; £250, £440. £3250. 
DF; £26.30. CSF: £4535. 


3.15(2m lxfle)1. SPECIAL VINTAGE (M 


Dwyer. 4-6 tsvk 2. Royal Cncfcar 
Crank. 10030): 3. Nautical Joke (Mr P 
Johnson. 33-1/. ALSO RAN: 7 TockttUt 
Mb). 25 Dark CymHft Saver Cannon. 33 
Reg o ran o n (pu). TravaBo (euk 50 Hows 
Tony, Top Olhe Cream. Tyne And Wear. 
Unscrupdous Gera (6th), Video Boom 
(5th). Penny Faas. 14 ran. KX, S 12L S a 
Jimmy Rtroeraid at Matter. Tots; £1-60; 
£1J0. «35. £5 J00. OF*- £3JXL C^- 
£339. 

PtacepobESSJO 


! 230(3mshl1. TUDOR ROAD (BPowofl. 
3-lh 2. No Pardon (Parer ttotbs, 6-4 fav]; 
3. Triska (W» K Raes. 14-1). ALSO RAN: 
5 Le Gran Bran (li 9 9wrt Rate (ft. 14 
Gate Pmce (43d. 3b Woodbnd Ganeramr 


B 2nd to Bishops Yam (11-4)at Lraieid (2m 41. smft) last time. Previbusta right up to best when (10-11) 21 3 rJ 
to Von Trappe(1 1-7) at Wlnciinton (2m 5f. £4278, good to soft, Nov 13. 6 ran). RORQUAL (10-2) successful last 
season whan beatmg Freight Fonmrdar (10-1 ) 7f at Cheitanham (2m. £4464, heavy. Jan 2. 6 ran). ST ALEZAN 


season whan beatmg Freight Forwardar (10-1 ) 7f at Chettanham (2m. £4464, heavy. Jan z. 6 ran). ST ALEZAN 
(1 0-1(ft not at best when 271 4th to Indameiody (1 1-1 1) at Wtewtck (3m. good to soft). Bast effort Otis season 
Mi-5) 31 2nd to BckJetgh Bridge (11-10) a! Worcester (3m. £2351. good to firm. Oct 11, 5 ran). 

W RORQUAL 


Jpu). 7 ran. NTt Garrte. 3L 20L 4L L 
Kennard at Taunton. TctK £320; £1.70, 
£120. DF: £210. CSF. £731. 

33 (an IXCe) 1. CSUSAraJTS STAR (S 
Morehead. 33-1): 2. Tudor TuSp (M 


34) CORIANDER HANDICAP HURDLE (£1^24: 3m 11) (17 runners) 


a 1Q/D04-0 RIGHT REGENT (S HaKfle) R Frost 8-11-10 

3 0002-Qp SOLD OAK (Grenvlte Rtchards) Grenvtfla Richards 8-11-7 

4 0/13PO-O SUPB1 EXPRESS p Wffiams) D WintJe 5-1 1-3 


_ JRoat 
BPowal 
A Caron 


5 2100» APRIL GEM (CO) (Mrs M Bridgwater) K Bridgwater 8-11-0 ' 

6 0PP-000 HOLD THE HEAD (B)(S Coppar) GNndenlay 6-11-0 

7 4-41440 DEW (D) (Kestrel Casas Ltd) R Holder 5-10-12 

9 2F-001P WRTTE THE MUSramUOavMAtwqPFNgate 5-10-10 

12 44000-0 LE 8ARTHOIS (B) (B Lay) B Lay 9-108 

13 1X1/904- WORK MATE (G Pika) G Pfca 7-10-8 Jod 

14 F323-Q0 Lffl (B Ycun# B Yotoig 9-10-7 

15 14/P444 ASA SPADES (Vfl(E Parker) D Barons 8-10-7 

16 343040 BOLT HOLE (W HwittorvASan) G DokJge 7-106 

17 043000 SUNSWNE GAL (T Paridns) P Bowden 8-1 0-4 

18 0000-20 EAMQNS OWBt (Mre A TlrowtXidgB) Mrs S Ober 9-102 

20 4/F0040 SILENCE PLEASE (Mrs A Booton) M Castefl 7-10-0 

24 2B04BP POKE'S CASTLE (K W Dunn) K W Item 8-104 

25 CF-P310 BARDSEY (B.CO) (Rytand VehkJe Group Ltd) R Hoffinshead 6-100 

1985c MTHRAS 7-11-4 P hHtar (14-1) B Proace 17 ran 


Uf Ilf, v I II i Um 

- W Wui unuyuM 

C Brawn 

A Dicks (7) 

SJofanon 

Mr L Lay (7) 

Jody BWceeay (7) 

G Moore 

PMehate 

C Mam 

R Dennis 

J Duggan 

JDDoyta(4) 

R Suuuga 

100 PDever 


— 8-1 
M — 
S3 12-1 

93 8-1 
86 — 
88 9-2 

94 6-1 
97 — 

• 8910-1 


Harrington. 6-1t 3. Tim Spartan (4-1 jt- 
favL «3o RAJ* 4 ijJav Safcomba. 11-2 


fav). ALSO RAN: 4 jjJav SaScomba. 11-2 
Hirfi Trust 7 Visual Identity. 8 Kings Folly . 
(xml. 14 Ctewatra BflBa. Narcissus (58i). 
IB Man GhI. 20 Popahmira Lass, 33 
Cash Reduced (6th), Chasstay Boy. Dusty 
Patrol. Highway Express. fndaJatian. La 

CheasHRaa Legal A*L UtdeAtaaeaa 
Sentac. 22 ran. HI, U. 10L S. 23U Mrs W D 
Sykes at Btetexs Casde. Tata.- £5830: 
Ciaoa £150, £1.10. OF: £10920. CSF: 
£218.60 

wacep ohgw.7 0. 


ran Lass, 33 
ley Boy, Dusty 
ftaMation. La 
(pul The 


John Cherry 
put down 


Catterick Bridge 

Going: gocxl 



John Gierry, one of the most 
successful and popular stayers 
of the seventies, has been put 
down at the age of IS. 

In 1976, when teamed by 
Jeremy Tree, he won the Chester 
Cup and Cesarewitch, carryinga 
big weight on each occasion. 

His Cesarewitcb triumph 
made Jock Whitney only the 
second owner ever to win both 
legs of the autumn double in the 
same year. He bad already won 
the Cambridgeshire with 
Intermission. 

John Cherry subsequently 
demonstrated Ins versatility as a 
talented long-distance hurdler 
when trained at Newmarket by 
Tom Jones. 






over Christmas. This «3* a race 
performance for a hovki . JR* 
he’ll gel further. Balding fc»0- 

A her 38 winners 
Martin Pipe enjojrcd h:s 
chasing success ot the «ason 
when Ribobelle made a.1 
running in the Tatiersalls Marcs 
Only Novices' Chase Qaahwn 

A* couple of years 3go. Pipe 
went right through the campaign 
without a single chase m his 
total of 51 successes but cia.ms 
that it is only because he has 
never had many steeplechasers. 
He points to Silver Ace s seven 
successes over fences last season 
io prove that he can do tt with 
the righi material. 

RibobcHc was appeanng tor 
the first time this season and 

jumping fences in public .or tnc 
first time but she was con- 
fidently backed from 5-- to -4 
to beat 16 rivals ana did it ine 
bard wav - from ihe front. 

“Ribo’beHe has schooled well 
at home and she jumped »rU 
today."* Pipe said. *Tm de- 
lighted and she’ll go for ihcfinaJ 
at LiverpooL” The Somerset 
trainer runs another nice young 
horse. Irish Lord, in a novice 
chase at Hereford today . 

• Corbie re and Knock Hill have 
been backed down to 7-1 from 
8-1 with William Hill for 
Saturday’s Coral Welsh Na- 
tional. I Haven talighl is still 
iavourile at 6-1 . 


L 


l i 


Bangor inspection 

There will be an inspection at 
9.0am today to determine f 
whether racing can take place at 
Bangor tomorrow. Bob Davies, 
the clerk of the course, reports 
that pan of the track is 
waterlogged. 


Donald Tucker made the 600- 
mile round trip from Frame. 
Somerset, to Catterick Bridge 
pay off yesterday when Tudor 
Squire gave him his first course 
win in the Kiplin Conditional 
Jockeys Selling Hurdle. It was 
only Tucker's second runner at 
Catterick. 

Tudor Squire, always jump- 
ing boldly, came through to lead 
at the second Iasi flight and beat 
Baval by three lengths. 

Andy Dicks, the winning 
rider, was winning his second 
race over hurdles, having also 
partnered four Flat winners. 

Sharron James was concussed* 
in a fall from Lance of Si George 
and taken to Catterick Military 
Hospital for x-ra>$. 

Killary Bay. who finished 
tenth in the Cambridgeshire 
Handicap at Newmarket, gained 
his first National Hum success 
in the Stieezlam Novices' 
Hurdle. 

The winner, trained and rid- 
den by Nigel Tinkler, was 
always prominent and, having 
established a commanding lead 
by the last hurdle, beat Sir Jest 
by four lengths. 

August, the 7-4 Eavourile. 
finished a disappionting 1 1th of 
the 13 runners. 

Mick Hammond, who is rid- 
ing at the peak of his form, 
brought his score to 12 winners 
this season when Melerek won 
the Charles Vickery Memorial 
Clip Handicap Chase 

The winning trainer. George 
Moore, said: “Melerek seems to 
like this course and will be back 
here for the New Year meeting" _ 

• Nine horses were withdrawn 
at the first forfeit stage for 
Europe's richest handicap bur- . 
die. The Ladbroke, to be run at 
Leopardstown on January 10. 
The absentees are Floyd, Flying 
Trove, Another Shot, Going 
Great, Hypnosis, Oryx Minor, 
Sterne, Freemason and Have A • 
Nice Time. 

• The stewards of the Jockey 
Club have dismissed a com- 
plaint by the trainer, Barney, 
Curley, about the riding . of - 
Robin Goodfellow by Graham 
Bradley in the Kennels Gate ' 
Novices’ Hurdle at Ascot on- 
November 15. They were sat- 
isfied that there was no evidence I 
to support any further inquiry. 


\‘ •l'" ■+ T 

F I i 1 1 w ■* f - r . 


il-C cox 

rr Mi, 

V- * Li 1.1 


Course specialists 


F Winter 
M Pipe 
J Edwards 
F Jordan 
N Handaraon 
Mrs M Rimed 


TRAINERS 

Wtaners Rumars Par Cent 

11 43 253 S Sherwood 

14 56 2SJ) S Morshead 

12 SO 24 JO P Scudamore 

5 22 22.7 R Dunwoody 

8 45 173 P Barton 

15 88 173 C Brown 


JOCKEYS 

Winners redes Percent 
5 21 23.8 

21 107 19.6 

20 104 T&2 

11 63 173 

8 43 T6l3 

5 31 16.1 


Casey’s move to En g land 
reaps immediate rewards 


By Christopher Gould ing 


2.15 HEADS NOOK NOVICE CHASE (£1,021: 2m 4f) (10 runners) 

2 WPPFP ANOTHER GEAR (W A Stephenson) W A Stephenson 6-11-8 R Urate 

3 03043 BORDER RAflBLER(R tyv} G Rkteards S-1 1-3 PToek 

4 02-3003 BOREHAM DOWN JMTS M Ashton) N Byctolt 7-1 1-3 CGtt 

5 OOF-FOP CHORAL SURPRISE (M Thompson) V Thompson 8-11-3 — Mr M Thompson (4) 

6 3001/04 CLANNAD (J Anderaon) R Fisher 7-11-3 ; MMen^nr 

9 2940M R.YMG SQUAD (Mrs J Goodtoaow] Mrs J Goodfaflow 8-11-3 BStoray 

10 FD4 FOREST GOLD (M Mackenzie) N Cramp 5-114 c hmUm 

13 3/FUP-F4 KEEP D RC AM WIO (Mrs L Armstrong) M Redden 6-11-3 AManfgan 

IB 2300F0- TEMAJOJO (A McOusItojr) J J O'Nefl 7-11-3 M Dwysr 

20 08- CtARBAW (Mrs H FtaseftJ Haldane 7-10-12 REamataw 

1988: LADY LAWYER 7-1 1-fi T G Dun (92) J Bnxkbanfc 11 ran 
2.45 CALDBECK NOVICE HURDLE (Div II: £685: 2m 330yd) (13 runners) 

1 0/00421 BAYTOWN COKE (B Morgan) 6 Morgan 6-114 C Prince (7) 

2 00 BOSCHBUML (A Betty) A Betey 4-114 — ■ 

3 DP040 BRABIICR BOY rLaxtorftTLaxton 5-114 — 

4 0CF44 LORD SUN (J Tharp) D Moffatt 4-114 ; KTeatan 

5 000044 MASTER ATTORNEY (Saw Sheet Matt Ud)D McCain 4-114 — 

6 OOP4 PANAVKTA (W A Stephenson) W A Scaphenson 6-114 .... H Laate 

7 F3F-000 PRINCE SOL (VThoneaon)V Thompson 7-114 Mr M Thompson (4) 

9 00-2224 TARTAN TORCMJGHT (EdHxsgh WocBan Mi Ltd) G Rkhanta 8-114- PTtek 

13 00204 WORTHY KNIGHT (I Mamie) B McLean 5-11-0 R E ams h a w 

14 0300P/ CORALS SECRET (Mbs JCaro^ Miss C Caree 6-104 R Crank 

15 0 MAGIC ECHO (J Goking) S Peyne 4-104 B Storey 

16 04 BHSSLAI^AND(D MacDonald) DMacOto^id 5-1 04 — JHauan 

18 STOLEN GOLD (J Baxter) S Laadbetter 6-10-9 — 

, 1985; NUUCK 7-11-0 M Bames (14-1) C Parker 12 ran 

3.15 LADBROKE HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,396: 2m 4f) (18 runners) 

1 U0-4030 TOPHAMS TAVERNS (BAD) (R TophamJ G Mocre 5-12-7 MKmauond 

2 0313P-P POONA EXPRESS (W Sflltes) J Pertoe 5-12-0 — 

5 220-213 OfflUSTMAS HOLLY (R Wood) AAsG Rwatey 5-11-2 _ PWwra 

6 Q/22222- KAHE MAC (D) (S Hicherda) G Rtaharda 8-11-2 PTuck 

8 24/03PP- IBXBfT RULE (D)(D Goose) CJ Bed 6-11-1 . — 

9 3/10432- MAGWOOO(R*S EBortowielftC Parker 8-114 0 Storey 

tO 343040 ROMAN £XSN(D)(WLocfc8y)JChartKin $-10-53 PDennto(4) 

12 110044 CARAT STICK (MreFWitorOFVYrfton 6-10-11 Mr J Watton 

14 OOBH3- SMART JACK |D) (Me EFteherJRRshar 5-104 M M aa gh a r 

15 003214 SYRBR(D)(F Bartow) MNsughton 4-104 R Storage 

18 043430 JAY HXi! THAW (D)(JL Thaw) DMoflatl 8-1 0-8 KTaetan 

17 000-140 PEACE THB*S(B^I)(J &mte) G RJcharde 4-104 NrPDojta(7) 

19 200400 CHBK^iASE (A Taylor) B WHktoson 6-104 GHarkar 

20 4042ff SECRET LAKE W 9 PBtewnJJCtWlton 7-104 CDeMta(7) 

21 000430 raiCEft(D)(R Adamson) V Thompson 8-10-0 . Mr M Thompson (4) 

23 03FU04 NOT EASY (D) (Mrs A Page) W Page 8-104 — , J O’Ounaan (7) 

24 441-003 VICTORY MORN (Mre E Duaxi) J Damn 10-10-0 KDootan 

25 4WP-F0 FBIE Sim |B)F Breams) BMeLean 8-104 REanadm 


R Storage 

KTHtan 

HrPDdyta(7) 

G Horker 

— C Damn (7) 

Mr M Thompson (4) 

- - --- J 0*Gonuafi (7) 

KDootan 

R Earnsbaw 


91 8-1 
75 — 
88F4-1 

92 6-1 
94 — 

91 7-1 

as — 

92 8-1 
9210-1 
97 5-1 
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• 99 — - 
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1985: FLYING OATS 5-104 Mr K Anderaon (13-2) W McCM 13 ran 


Course specialists 





Par Cent 

25.0 

16.7 

15J 


Few National Hunt traraera 
hare made a greater impact this 
season than Terry Casey, who 
took oat a licence to train in few 
country less than a year ago and 
has already saddled 17 winners. 

Casey, who haOs fine Don- 
egal bat now trains at Adstone in 
Northamptonshire, is no 
stranger to the rolling shires of 
England, having spent fire years 
with Frank Gilman when the 
Leicestershire permit trainer 
was nnr t nrin g a p oten tial star in 
Grittar. 

Now 41, Casey twice rode the 
1982 Grand National winner to 
victory over hardies before be 
embarked upon his illastrioas 
career orer fences. Casey ended 
his riding caree - with 46 
winners. 

From a fomfry with no connec- 
tions in racing — his parents ran 
a hotel - Casey made np his 
mini at an eariy age that he 
would try to make a career in the 
sport On leaving school, he 
iflhwJ Aubrey Brabaam, the 
Cnrragh trainer, as an appren- 
tice jockey. He had a few rides 

befmeti7U®histadtmE^faad 

wfthGflmaH. 

He later retBrned to Ireland to 
work for Archie Watson said 
Paddy MnIBns as head man. “I 
learned a lot front Paddy,” 
Casey said. “He has a great feel 
for his horses and does not miss 
an opportunity to make snre that 
all is well with them.” 

After playing an tmp on a n t 
role behind the semes, he 
became a trainer three years ago. 
in Ireland. “I ratted a yard from 
Aubrey Brabazoa at the Cnr- 
ragh where- I trained for J£ 
months and sent rat 25 winners. 


owners were often not paying 
their hills on time. 

“When I was made the offer to 
tram for John Upson a year ago, 
I couldn't refuse. As well as 


' training 14 for Mr Upson, I have 
another 15 horses." 


The facilities at Adstone are 
on a par with the very best. Set 
in 55 picturesque acres, there is 
an all-weather gallop, grass 
gallop and excellent schooling 
gnrands. 

Casey is a great believer hi 
keeping bis horses happy and 
relaxed. He places a lot of 
significance in the fact that be 
can tarn his horses oof In a 
paddock after they have been 
exercised. 

His attention to his hones' 
welfare is always a top priority. 
He feeds his string himself foor 
times a day and is constantly in 
and ont of their boxes; faoimg 


' •- : 
* * * 4 * <0 ■’.WOjZ 


^ *•: - • : 
'■■rmr ■ | 



Terry Casey: mafotaxmng 
the Irish connectioa 


fog, and malting sate they have 
sufficient rugs on against the., 
biting winter winds. 

Casey has a loyal hard-, 
working team assisting him with - 
most of the lads from Ireland. 
Ned Buckley, the stable's 
highly-regarded claiming rider,' 
also hails from the Emerald Isle. *. 
And the Irish connection ex- a 
tends to Casey's choice of senior’' 
Jockeys: Richard Dun woody,.' 
Brendan Powell and Stan Moore 
are all of Irish descent. 

The first requirement of 
successful training is having die * 
right material under yonr care', 
and, as Casey understandably ■ 
has a deep attachment for Irish- * 
feed horses, it is not surprising .. 

that they dominate the yard. Bar < 
yon have to be a good judge to 
pick the right ones. Glenrae, the 
stable star, has always looked a 
racehorse in Casey's eyes. 

Casey explained: “I am very 
friendly with Michael Hickey, 
who is a stud owner and a very.* 
■Bccesfol man with show horses. 

He had Glennie as an even ter." 
°"f * 3 1 asked them: ‘Does he 
gkH.r Th.j, ^ 

S* I bionght along »_ 
bnrdkr thnt lad wo. fire racey 

da^-sred the hurdler so-K 
w^gW him there and then.’' 

Earfier this year, Glenrne 
gave the quiet Irishman Us 

5B2L!PSff *•«* *«» v* . 

ropha m Trophy, run over a rt 
qrCBl t the Grand National 
^surprisingly, in view- 
p» Gtemoes proYen abBity 
gV dm formidabhrSre.; 
t»Ces, Casey is now training tiie 

Grand National very mart. £»< 


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RUGBY LEAR! if 


THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 



SPORT 


33 


Bamford quits 
as Britain’s 
coach owing to 
wife’s illness 

By Keith Maddin 

Rteedaa GnubjSora? SSf appointed 10 

ch. His wife, Rita, suffers from iUf 81 Bnt2jn W®* 1*0 years 
multiple sclerosis and he 


wants to spend more time at 
home with her. 

In his letter of resignation, 
a BaiD ford said he would stay in 
* the post until after the two 
international matches against 
France on January 24 and 
February 8. 

Bamford organized and 
conducted the training ses- 
sions leading up to the recent 
series against Australia under 
the burden offcnowing that his 
wife’s condition was 
deteriorating. 

If he remained in charge of 
Great Britain, he would have 
to take the touring party to 
Australia in 1 988, and he feels 
that, by then, his wife's con- 
dition will be so critical that he 
could not possibly leave her 
for the duration of the three- 
month tour. 

Bamford said yesterday, in 
% a poignant message to Rugby 
League officials and Great 
Britain players: “It has been 
my lifelong ambition to be- 
come a British Lion and take a 
touring party to Australia, but 
there comes a time when 
family duties and responsibil- 
ities— and common human- 
ity — must lake precedence.” 

Bamford coached Dews- 
bury, Halifax, Huddersfield, 
Brantley, Wigan and Leeds 


ago. 

Though Bamford intends to 
quit international coa ching, 
he says he would like to 
continue as a club coach - 

P^erably in his native 

Yorkshire. 

Choosinga successor wfll be 
a difficulnob for the Rugby 
League. "There are obvious 
candidates in Alex Murphy, 
eoach Q f St Helens, the un- 
defeated championship lead- 
ers, Peter Fox, the Leed s 
coach, and Malcolm Reilly, 
who coaches Castleforf. 

Fox was in charge of Great 
when they lost the 
•978 senes against Australia 
2-1, and he has the distinction 
of having coached the last 
Great Britain team to beat the 
Kangaroos. But, so far, his 
Leeds side have had a poor 
season in the championship. 

Murphy’s controversial 
style does not endear him to 
everybody, and he bas not 
been a serious contender for 
the international coaching 
post for some years, while 
Reilly, a long-term servant of 
Castleford, is untried at inter- 
national level 

Outsiders could be John 
Sheridan, who has master- 
minded Doncaster’s revival, 
and Roger Mil! ward, of Hull 
Kingston Rovers 


HORSE TRIALS 


Windsor’s new sponsor 


By Jenny MacArthnr 

Beefeater Steakhouses are the 
new sponsors of the Windsor 
three-day event, which takes 
place from May 22 to 24 under 
Princess Anne's presidency. 

Beefeater previously spon- 
sored Robert Lemieux, the 
international three-day event 
rider, who received £30,000 last 
year. But Lemiuex has six 
advanced horses, beaded by The 
Gamesmaster, and two novices 
in his yard for next year, and 
had asked for substantially more 
money in 1987. Beefeater then 
decided to end their two-year 
contract. 

Bob Dixon, the operations 
development manager for Beef- 
eater, said: “Robert has am- 
bitions which we felt we 
couldn't do justice- So it was 
derided, amicably, to pan. It’s 


coincidence that the end with 
Robert coincides with the start 
in sponsorship with Windsor. 
We hope to continue to support 
Robert in some way.” 

A happier surprise greeted 
Sarah KeUard, the event rider 
from South Yorkshire, yes- 
terday when she woo the 1987 
Range Rover training award for 
a young rider. 

Miss KeUard. aged 20, moves 
to Gaxcombe Park in February 
to spend the competitive season 
training with Captain Mark 
Philli ps and the Range Rover 
team. She win take two horses 
with her Osfaerfon Holly (eighth 
at tire European young ndeis 
championship) and Hello Henry 
(winner of the senior individual 
Pony Club championship). 


GYMNASTICS 



Elfin: Oksana Omelya nrhi k, the co-world champion, who appears at Wembley on Saturday 

A star rises from the East 


The Kraft International at 
Wembley this Saturday has 
gained a major attraction for the 
women's competition. She is the 
diminutive Oksana Omeljaa- 
chik, the joint world champion 
from the Soviet Union, who 
combines technical expertise 
with a sristOlating ability to 
play to the audience. 

An elfin 7in tall, she bas an 

impish grin «iwnfMt*.i by a 

wide month. Her prowess is 
demonstrated best by her floor 
exercise, in which she Mends 
spectacular tambUng skflls with 
well-executed dance moves. 

For example, her winning 
routine at the Montreal world 
championships last year in- 
cluded a amqne tumbling pass of 
back flips, somersaults and 
twists across the mat, which 
continued back immediately 
along the same diagonal. 

However, as might be ex- 
pected, Miss OtneJyaachik is a 
talented all-rounder too-Her co- 
world champioa is her compa- 
triot, Yelena Shoshanova, who 
will not be competing at Wem- 
bley. The girls won their joint 
title in November 1985 at Mon- 
treal -the first time snch a tie 
has occurred — after a controver- 


By Peter Aykroyd 

sial decision by Andrei 
Rodyenko, the tatitnrn Soviet 
coach. 

Id the world championships, 
only three competitors from 
each country are allowed among 
the 36 women who qualify for 
the fiwate- 

The Soviet qualifiers then 
were Natalya Yurchenko, the 
wip ing world champion, Olga 
Mostepaoova and Irina Barak- 
sanova. Rodyenko replaced the 
latter pair , on the gro u nds of 
injury, with Shashmwva and 
Omlyanchik, who then shared 
the gold. 

The move was justified only 
because on results, the winners 
were the best gymnast s in the 
USSR team, even though 
OudyaBctuk was the youngest 
member. That summer, she had 
defeated Shusbnnova, the Euro- 
pean champion, for the Soviet 
Union's tide by a wide margin — 
77 AS points to 76-55. 

Oksana began her career as a 
skater in her borne city of Kiev, 
bat at the age of seven was 
spotted as haring the physical 
and mental abilities demanded 
of a prosnismg gymnast. Before 
long, she was a pupil at the 
Spartak special school for sport, 
typical of its kind in the USSR 


where promising yonng sports- 
people receive training. She is 
now based at tbe renowned 
Dynamo Club in Kiev with tbe 
same coach she has had from the 
start — Tatyana Perskaya. 

She trams four boors a day oo 
average; three boms are spent 
mi her work-out. and another 
one hour oo the dance and 
choreography so vital to top 
Soviet gymnasts. Next autumn 
sbe will go to the Institute of 
Eduction in Kiev where she wfll 
embark on a four-year coarse in 
gymnastics marhing. At school 
sbe is artistically inriMwi ««wt 
enjoys drawing and w riting. 

She wfll defend her joint world 
tide in Rotterdam in the antama 
of 1987 too, with the aim of 
winning the tide outright. What 
is certain is that her charisma 
wfll charm world-wide audiences 
just as much as her skills will 
impress them. AD being well, 
she coaid be a leading light of 
the 1988 Seoul Olympics. 

Perhaps the ultimate accolade 
for Oksana Omeiyancfuk has 
been expressed recently by 
Andrei Rodyenko: “Sbe un real 
talent. Let ns remember Olga 
Korbut who won tbe whole world 
with the same e xpressiv eness. 


The double-dealing history 
of the America’s Cup 


Robson’s view of 
England in Mexico 


V* The razzmatazz, media hype, 
and secrecy surrounding the 
A merica's Cup has encouraged a 
plethora of books to coincide 
with the first Australian defence. 

The one I found most enjoy- 
able however. Doug Riggs' Keel- 
hauled — Unsportsmanlike 
Conduct and the America 's Cup 
(Stanford Maritime, £12.95) 
does not cover the current antics 
in Fremantle at alL Instead it 
recalls all the shenanigans and 
double dealings that have gone 
on throughout the 132-year 
history of the Cup. 

The original syndicate mem- 
bers who commissioned the 
schooner America that came to 
Cowes and won tbe original Cup 
were not above a little double 
dealing themselves. 

The famous yacht was built at 
a cost of S3Q.000 with the 
proviso she would be 
^ completed by April 1. 1851 and 
^ prove faster than any vessel of 
her tonnage. If she foiled Op 
either count, the syndicate’s 
penalty clause allowed them to 
refuse her and owe nothing. 

In foci, she was launched a 
month late and lost her first race 
on the smooth waters of the 
Hudson estuary against Maria, a 
sloop owned by one of the 
syndicate members. Mana was 
no match for America in open 
water and the schooner was 
never beaten again but this did 
not stop tbe owners from screw- 
ing her builder to a S 10.000 loss 
on the price, then selling her for 
a $5,000 profit immediately 
after winning the Cup. 

I found it impossible to put 
, Seamanship, by Robin Knox- 
41 Johnston (Hodder & Stoughton, 
£12.95) down, it being the best 
nautical read of the year. Robin 
Knox-Johnston is of the old 
school. A master mariner, who 
learned the ropes the hard 
way — as a lad in the Merchant 
Navy. He was taught to do 
things by the book or face the 
consequences, and it has stood 
him in good stead ever since 
helping this intrepid yachtsman 
to become the first to circum- 


navigate the world alone non- 
stop and conquer many other 
Everests. *Tve not lost a boat in 
more than 500,000 miles of 
sailing,” is an oft quoted 
achievement Knox-Johnston is 
rightly proud of. He's a cautious 
sailor, who thinks every move 
ahead, never pushing boat or 
equipment to the limit — even 
when racing. 

I learned that after joining 
him aboard his catamaran, Brit- 
ish Airways, for a multihull 
grand prix off Martinique last 
year. The French boats had all 
streaked ahead, their weather 
hulls flying into distant clouds 
of spray while ours remained 
stoically level. 

“Could rite cany more sail?" I 
remarked rashly. "Perhaps she 
could, but it's not seamanlike to 
sail that close to the edge,” came 
the withering reply. 

Knox-Johnston's latest book 
mirror’s this approach. It's a 
comprehensive textbook all 
aspiring sailors should read. 
One item I was surprised to miss 
however, was any mention of 
the portable sacrificial kick- 
board I know Knox Johnston 
always takes aboard to direct his 
anger against on the odd occa- 
sion when things go awry. 
Perhaps he broke it 

The safety and ability of so- 
called offshore yachts to survive 
heavy weather was questioned 
in 1979 when the Fastnet race 
turned into tragedy. Six years 
later, a large percentage of the 
entries in both the Fastnet and 
Sydney-Hobart classics were 
again crippled in conditions that 
were by no means exceptional. 

Clearly, lessons had not been 
learned. The evidence pointed 
to boats being WO lightly con- 
structed and to designs that 
became increasingly difficult to 
handle once the winds begin to 
howl. Tony Marchaj, an in- 
dependent scientist specialising 
in aerodynamics and former 
Fellow at Southampton Univer- 
sity, has spent two years study- 
ing the effects strong winds and 
high seas have on yachts. Sea- 


Sports writers of The 
Times continue their 
selection from the sport- 
ing books of the year. 
Today Barry Pickthall, 
Stuart Jones and Michael 
Seely make their choices 
from the worlds of yacht- 
ing, football ana racing 
respectively. 

worthiness — the Forgotten Fac- 
tor (Adlard Coles, £14.95) is a 
compilation of bis findings, 
written in the hope of influenc- 
ing the International Offshore 
Rule, the principle rating for- 
mulae encouraging current de- 
sign failings. This is a weighty 
tonre in every respect, filled with 
formulae, graphs, reports and 
test results, that raises as many 
questions as it answers. 

The first dues towards 
establishing what has made New 
Zealand’s 'Plastic-Fantastic' the 
yacht to beat in the current 
America's Cup challenge trials 
have been revealed by Chris 
Freer in his book The Twelve- 
Metre Yacht — Its Evolution and 
Design 1906-1987 (Nautical 
Books. £15.00). Freer, assisted' 
by Peter Bateman who acted as 
project manager during the em- 
bryonic stages of the New 
Zealand challenge, suggest their 
12-metres, the first to be 
moulded in glass-reinforced 
plastic (GRP), could be as much 
as 30 per cent stiffer than the 
alloy boats built by the com- 
petition. Lloyds Register of 
Shipping, who administer the 
scantling rules of this class and 
had a surveyor on hand 
throughout the construction of 
the three New Zealand 12- 
metres, have said the benefit is 
nearer 20 per cent, but this still 
represents a significant advan- 
tage in controlling the rig. 

Looking for a stocking finer? 
The quiz book Top Marks by 
Bill Beavis (Nautical Books. 
£3.95) will test even the best 
sailing brains. 


There has. as usual, been no 
shortage of football reference 
and quiz books, lightweight 
annuals and autobiographies on 
offer this year. Equally, there 
has, as usual, been a lack of 
publications of a weightier na- 
ture. even though the summer 
was illuminated by the finals of 
the World Cup in Mexico. 

England's hi»«m»w offers an 
insight into a challenge which 
ended at tbe hands (or, more 
specifically, the left fist iff 
Maradona) of the eventual win- 
ners, Argentina, in the quarter- 
finals. Bobby Robson's World 
Cup Diary (Willow Books. Col- 
lins, £9.95) carries the sub-title 
“so near and yet so for." 

Perhaps, but the phrase is also 
relevant to his own proximity to 
tbe truth as he himself admits. 
He reveals, for instance, that he 
was consistently misleading 
about the injuries that troubled 
Bryan Robson during the build- 
up to the tournament and which 
effectively limited his contribu- 
tion to little more than two 
hours. 

“I have never felt happy 
about telling white lies," he 
writes. Yet, in the tunnel of tbe 
Los Angeles Coliseum minutes 
after the end of England's 
victory over Mexico, be "put on 
a brave face to the media” and 
stated that Bryan Robson had 
not dislocated his shoulder. He 
had. 

Later, after England’s captain ' 
had damaged hi* hamstri ng in 
training, “we lied to the watch- 
ing press and said that be had 
tireaked an Achilles tendon." 
Bryan Robson's leg was not the 
only one to be pulled but for the 
sake of tactics rather than for 
more sinister reasons. 

The book, which covers the 
four years of Robson's national 
managerial career, is otherwise 
disappointingly straightforward. 

Humour, sadly overlooked in 
the game overall, appears only 
briefly. When asked what might 


be wrath buying in Tbfisi, Don 
Howe, England’s amicable coa- 
ch who is always armed with a 
joke, suggests “airline tickets.” 

Wilkins, an equally affable 
member of tbe England squad, 
responded to a half-time 
instruction to “get bold of the 
No 8” in the Soviet Union ride 
by saying that: “The only way 
111 do that is if you give me a 
motorbike.” Tbe road to Mex- 
ico was not always full of 

laughter. 

Robson describes the days 
when Vernon Edwards, tbe 
team doctor, suffered a massive 
heart attack and Lineker a 
suspected broken wrist Hap- 
pily, both recovered. He men- 
tions “the three envelopes” left 
for him by his predecessor, Ron 
Greenwood, which were to be 
opened in times of trouble. 

The first mad after the defeat 
by Denmark at Wembley, ad- 
vised him to “blame me" The 
second, after the loss against 
Wales at Wrexham, advised him 
to “blame the Football League.” 
Tbe third, after successive de- 
feats by Scotland, Italy and 
Mexico in 1985. advised him to 
“write three envelopes.” 

The Rothmans Year Book 
(Queen Anne Press, £9.95). now 
in rts seventeenth y ear, offers a 
comprehensive record. Among 
the 960 pages are details of tbe 
past, such as the line-ups of the 
four home countries since 1872, 
to the present, such as the weight 
of each professional attached to 
the English and Scottish League 
dubs. 

The strongest recommenda- 
tion is reserved for Pardon Me 
For Living (Georee Allen and 
Unwin, £9.95), which was first 
published in 1985. The auto- 
biography of Geoffrey Green, a 
former football correspondent 
of The Times who once told the 
Queen that he wanted the FA 
Cup final to be contested “be- 
tween fun and laughter," is a 
delight. 


RUGBY UNION 


Francis unravels the secret world of Piggott 


Lester, The Official Biography 
by Dick Francis (Mfcbael Jo- 
seph, £12.95) towers head and 
shoulders above all other books 
about racing this year. 

Fred Archer, Sir Gordon 

Richards and P6gR0« *** 
t acknowledged as foe three 


Raring has been a dos*- 
mouthed profession for over TOO 
years. And Piggottfearoed his 
lesson early- When he won his 
firet race on The Chase at 
l^tSWkinlWtheboy. 
aged 12. knew that the second 
torse had not been nnaung on 
its 


with the lines of experience. I 
particularly liked the ending. 
Piggott, asked how long he 
would continued riding if it had 
been possible to stop the dock of 
time, answered i m med i a t ely! “A 
thousand years." 

Frost the same author comes 
Bolt, (Joseph, £9.95). Once 


■n^Himniw 1 1 vs - — - ns merits, \ears later he — . - - , 

greatest jockeys to have graced i^ogtod, bat as he rode into the again the breakneck pace and 
the British turf. Frauds, mSd&enctosiireihefoi^ tUc fi^htMting ri^xes are 

through conversations taped Mtorface was at evidence. He compelling as Kit Field mg^the 
ever 12 years has succeeded in stood 4ft din in bis roang boots ebampmn steeplechase 


a comprehensive guide to British 
racecourses, the sur rounding 
countryside and recommended 
hotels, pubs and restaurants. 

Jauntily compiled it describes 
Royal Ascot as "511000 people 
in search of Terry Wogan.” 
Beautifully Oinstrated paintings 
by modern artists such as Neil' 
Cawthorneand Jacquie Jones as 
well as established masters like 
Mannings, ft even offers a guide 
to punting and picking winners. 
An entertaining guide to the 


»ier ii jeais u*s srouu I.-Wdiutt j LmU wrii« nitli rauwuunuig gmae ro me .iccoam. lJ*si 

■ntraveUing the secrete of the ^ weighed less thaufonrst primrose path of what tbe turf Anne Press. 

domi- ^ already knew what not to ^ intelligent and ensp com- Affarc Hr aJflwifc g— ajk-ftml */■ m 


who domi- 
nated racing for over 25 vears. 

In reality there were no se- 
crets; Piggott was a journeyman 

and craftsman, pure and simple, 
who fry dedication, application 
and sheer physical courage 
hried his art to a record woe 
Derby® and be champion jockey 
on 1] occasions 


say in public, 
adults never leant- 


a lesson some passion and Bott is one of tbe 
tost of his offers. 


a very 


piggott is above all 
human man with * ctose-Jtoj 
and devoted fe*njb-H“^ 
has long been a byword ead the 
»ver reflects 

calmness and hninour, etched 


On an entirely different note 
is Travelling the Turf 1987, 
(Kensin gton West prod action, 
£1250 in paperback, £15 hard- 
back). An immense improve- 
ment oo its predecessor, it offers 


offers Its addicts. 

Changing mood again is: low 
Lift , (Duckworth, £9.95) by 
Jeffrey Bernard. Boswell would 
have been proud of this writer as 
he threads his unsteady way 
through the betting shops, pubs, 
dubs, boring and snooker haDs 
of the London he loves and 


bates, "What does yonr daddy 
do?"* child is asked, “he goes to 
London every day, goes Into 
pubs, cashes cbeqees and gives 
the change to mummy.” A 
winning account of a loser's life. 

Briefly, these are also recom- 
mended: Men and Hones I Have 
Known, (reprinted by Alien, 
£L50). Tbe Hod George Lamb- 
ton’s first edition fra 23 years of 
fashion, racing and training at 
tbe turn of the century. Turf 

Account. (Macdonald Queen 
Anne Press. £9.95), Steve 
Smith- Ecdes and Alan Lee. An 
account of a year of a irrepress- 
ible character and bora jump 
jockey survivor. The Encyclo- 
paedia of Flat Racing, (Robert 
Hale, £14.95), updated and en- 
larged by Howard Wright, is a 
comprehensive A to Z. and a 
must for serious students. 


Take the 
pressures 
off World 
Cup men 

Britain's leading rugby play- 
ers should be ordered to take a 
complete break from compet- 
itive rugby the minute the Five 
Nations championship pro- 
gramme is completed. 

That is the view of the Cardiff 
ca pa tain. Alan Phillips, winner 
of 15 Welsh caps, whose club 
would, ironically, be among 
those hardest hit by such a 
move. 

“The World Cup has to take 
preference over everything this 
season, and if it was left to roe 
no one involved in that com- 
petition would play once the 
Five Nations matches arc over.” 
be said. 

“Clubs wouldn't like it be- 
cause the Cup semis and finals 
in England and Wales won't 
have been played by then. But 
the demands on the top players 
are going to be so great this 
season, that you have to take the 
pressure off them. 

“Leaving it to the players 
themselves won’t — that’s been 
shown by the way everyone's 
ignored the requests to restrict 
the number of matches they play 
in. But if the home unions take 
it out of their hands, no one can 
argue, and the players won’t feet 
duty-bound to carry on playing 
for their clubs.” 

Phillips pointed out that his 
own club have plenty to Jose — 
they could end up supplying as 
many as seven players to the 
Welsh World Cup squad. For a 
dub accustomed to Cup suc- 
cess — Cardiff have readied five 
of the Iasi six Schweppes Welsh 
Cup finals, winning four of 
them — losing so many key 
players would be a serious blow. 

“On past form you’d have to 
fancy us to be in the semis again 
this season, but I’d be willing to 
see us take our chances rather 
than insist on our internationals 
playing.”. Phillips added. 

“But you’ve got to get ft from 
tbe rop, you can't blame dubs 
warning to use their best players 
if there’s no directive on this.” 

Phillips won the last of his 
Welsh caps 15 years ago but has 
not given up all hope of an 
international recall, especially as 
the Wales trial was such an 
inconclusive affair. If he does 
make it beck to the international 
arena, he would clearly appre- 
ciate baring a tough club-or- 
country dilemma strived for 
him. 

Merit change 
suits Bath 

Two of Saturday's scheduled 
John Smith’s Merit Table A 
matches have had their mem 
«aatng removed, and will be 
played as dub fixtures. 

Bath, who meet Harlequins at 
The Stoop, and Leicester, who 
face Bristol, made succesful 
appeals to the English merit 
retries organising committee af- 
ter losing several first -choice 
players to Thoro-EMl Di- 
visional Championship 
matches. 

In Bath's case. John Palmer, 
the former England centre, is tbe 
only first-team regular free of 
such commitments. But Harle- 
quins, who themselves have five 
players on call with the London 
squad, and another six injured, 
were unhappy with the change. 

A dub spokesman claimed 
that ‘de-meriting’ was under- 
mining the competition. The 
match at least gives Harlequins, 
who are top of the Merit Table 
A. a chance to play their All 
Black scrum half, David 
Loveridge. 


Trying to create 
a better game 
through discussion 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 

When the Five Nations' 
committee met in Loudon this 
month to discuss the forthcom- 
ing championship, referees and 
coaches from tbe four home 
countries and France were able, 
for the first time, to discuss 

mutual problems. 

Hitherto, coaches had not 
been invited to this animal 
meeting, but Martin Green 


"We may go about it in 
different ways, but, basically, we 
are looking for more continuity, 
to make the game more enjoy- 
able fra players and spectators,** 

Grant said. “We are trying to get 
away from stereotyped, set-piece 
rogby. 

“When coaching came in, 
certain teams specialised in 
certain areas, but everyone 


(Engla n d), Derrick Grant (Scot- ‘ agreed that the set-piece was 


bod), Michael Doyle (Ireland) 
and Tony Gray (Wales) found it 
a valuable experience. 

It is a natural extension to the 
annual coaching conferences 
that Wales, Ireland and Scot- 
land bold each dose season, 
when tbe opportunity is usually 
created for coaches and refe re es 
to discuss mutual problems. In 
Ireland, for Instance, the top 30 
referees bold a parallel con- 
ference every second year. 

England have no such formal 
gathering. The leading referees, 
secretaries and assessors bold a 
sequence of meetings and, at 
Twickenham in August, there 
was a referees' conference that 
was attended by leading players 
and technical administrators. 

Another such conference is 
planned fra next August, but 
there is a feeling in England that 
the other home countries have 
made a greater advance in this 


At this mouth's meeting, ref- 
erees and coaches discussed law 
interpretation, and the Five 
Nations’ committee gave their 
judgements when differences of 
opinion arose. 

Jean-Pferre R oaten repre- 
sented the French msrhlwg 
paneL but New Zealand, whose 
Keith Lawrence will handle the 
games between France and Scot- 
land and Scotland and Wales, 
did not accept an invitation to. 
attend. 

Between them. Green, Grant, 
Gray and Doyle discovered 
considerable common ground, 
which, broadly speaking, may be 
summarised cinder four counts — 
tune and preparation available 
uow that the international sea- 
son has virtually become a year- 
long affair rather than three 
moo tits; consistency of referee- 
ing interpretation; the desire to 
ensrae that the game is played 
by people on their feeC ami 
continuity of play, which is 
obviously linked to the previous 

point. 

Running off 
the ball 

All four welcomed the 
opportunity to sit down together 
and discuss common problems, 
which seldom occur on inter- 
national-match occasions, when 
each individual is tightly boraid 
op with the success - or lack of 
it — of his particular team. Nor, 
on those occasions, do referees 
and coaches always get the 
chance to discuss calmly prob- 
lems that have arisen on the 
pitch. 

“One of the problems is the 
seq uenc e and legality of events 
at the breakdown — what can or 
cannot be done,” Green said. 
“One of the main difficulties 1 
had last season was knowing for 
certain how the sequence of 
events would be i nterpreted 
when players were going to 


“We also talked for a long 
time about tunning off the ball 
and obstruction, which is becom- 
ing increasingly apparent in 
international rugby" 


Universities’ call-up 
for Bradford player 


By David Hands 

Bradford University, surprise opponents, tbe University of 

Wales College of Medicine, have 
reached that for before. 


quarter-finalists in this season's 
Universities Athletic Union 
(UAU) competition, will have a 
representative in the English 
Universities team to play Irish 
Universities at Cotit on January 
8. David Kennefl, their wing 
threequarler, has been chosen in 
tbe team, details of which will be 
confirmed later this week. 

The UAU held trials at Rich- 
mond on Tuesday before selec- 
tors from their four regions sat 
down to decide the team to visit 
Ireland. It will be the first of 
three internationals fra tbe Eng- 
lish Universities, the others 
coming against Scottish Univer- 
sities, at Richmond on January 
16, the eve of the Calcutta Cup 
match, and Welsh Universities 
on March 6. at a Welsh venue. 

The English team in Cork is 
also likely to include Will 
Carling, tbe Durham University 
centre who has made such an 
impression this season in the 
North’s divisional side. 

Durham, as well as Bradford, 
are through to tbe UAU knock- 
out stages, which will be played 
on January 28. Indeed, the semi- 
finals. on February II. are 
bound to include a new name, 
since neither Bradford nor their 


OUAHTER-RHM. DRAW: Durtram V 
Swansea; University of WBtes Cottage at 
Mottcvte v Bradford; Bristol v Noteng- 
ham; Loughborough v Rearing. 

• lan McKie, the Sale forward. 
comes into the Anglo-Scots XV 
for their third match in the 
McEwan’s inter-district champ- 
ionship on Saturday, when they 
play Edinburgh at Myreside. He 
replaces Chris Gray, the Not- 
tingham lock, who strained a 
shoulder against the South of 
Scotland last weekend and will 
be out fra six weeks. 
ANGLO-SCOTS; (v Edinburgh): S Mine 
(London Scotti s h); J Baazley (London 
Scottisn), D OaMelGostartti). R McLean 

(Gtoucestw), T Paraaon-flrowo (London 

Scottish): T Exeter (Moseley). A Ousting 

(CambnSgB IMivereM): D Soto (Baft), 1 
Mfc (London Scottisn), J Reid (London 

Scottish), I Montma (London Scottisn). J 

CarapbaD-Lmerton (London Scottisn). I 

Mena (Sale). C MacDonald (Oxford 

Urwetsny), J Ma cfc fcn (London Scottish). 

• David Morrow and Terry 
McMaster celebrated their call- 
up earlier this week to 
Saturday's Irish trial at Lans- 
downe Road by scoring 
Bangor's two tries in their 1 1-6 
win over Ballymena in the final 
of the Bass Boston Cup (Geotge 
Ace writes). It was Bangor's 
seventh win in the competition. 


where to concentrate, to drill the 
forwards and make them more 
effective. 

“Possibly, because of the 
success that that created, people 
tended to stick to it- Bat. maybe, 
we haven't developed tbe game 
enough fat respect of broken-play 
situations, keeping the ball 
alive. 

“We have to look deeper into 
individual play. Whereas, in the 
past, the great individual players 
did things naturally, we have to 
give players (he knowledge and 
ability, through training prac- 
tices, on how to beat mat, stay 
on their feet and present ball out 
of the tackle. 

Sympathy from 
the referees 

“When J first started to play, 
the job was to avoid a player, to 
beat a man and to stay on your 
feet. The tendency now has been 
to bring in this physical aspect 
of the game that we can’t get 
away from. A balance of both 
would be ideaL 

"We spoke about the rnanl 
coming to ground when the ball 
is not visible, but b still coming 
ba ck , which is sometimes a 
matter of bad techitiqne by the 
ball-carrier as anything else. 

“We are looking for quick bail 
from broken play, and the 
referees were sympathetic. They 
would like to allow the game to 
go on a bit longer at that area, 
but only if the ball is visible." 

Both Wales and Scotland will 
have to come to terms with 
so at hern- hemisphere inter- 
pretations d arin g the champion- 
ship 

"Consistency of interpretation 
from game to game, and during 
iodmdnal games, is important," 
Gray said. "If an area of the 
game is to be worked on for the 
improvement of tbe game, it has 
to be refereed consistently 
throngboat the game." 

Eotn Doyle (Ireland) will 
handle the Calcutta Cup match 
at Twickenham on January 17, 
while Wales v Ireland on the 
same day win be a French 
appointment. 

A French referee wfll also 
take the Ireland- England game 
on February 7, while Colin 
High, the newcomer to 
England's international panel, is 
given die France-Wales game in 
Paris. 

Jim Fleming (Scotland) takes 
tite Eagland-France game on 
February 21 and Roger 
Qufttenton, England’s most 
experienced referee, the Scof- 
faud-Irriand game on the same 
day, which means that Fred 
Howard, the third member of 
England's panel, will be without 
an international this 
championship. 

On March 7, Ray Meesou 

(Scotland) will handle Wales v 
England, while France v Scot- 
land and, on March 21, Scotland 
v Wales go to Keith Lawrence. 

The final game, Ireland v 
France, is a Webb appointment, 
but their panel will not be chosen 
until next month. 

Masters blow 
too much 
for Haden 

Andy Haden has returned to 
New Zealand prematurely after 
his side, Ponsonby, were 
surprisingly beaten on the open- 
ing day of tbe Masters dub 
tournament in Toulouse, Brive, 
Agen and Bayonne (Chris Thau 
writes). 

Haden, who captained his 
club on the day, was so dis- 
appointed with their perfor- 
mance in tbe 21-15 defeat 
against Constanta, of Romania, 
that be left immediately for an 
early flight home. The All Black 

has even threatened to quit 

playing altogether, an entirely 

possible outcome according to 
his fellow New Zealander, Mark 
Brookc-Cowden. 

Haden's arch-rival, the 
Romanian veteran George 
Dumitru, aged 35. won a 
substantial share of the ball in 
the lineoul and led his men to a 
well-deserved victory. 

In another first round match, 
Toulouse beat the Argentine 
champions. Banco Nation, 32- 
22 after a spectacular 
encounter. The Masters tour- 
nament has a rejuvenating effect 
on some of tbe older players, as 

proved by tbe evergreen captain 

of Pumas, Hugo Porta, who 
scored 16 points in the Franco- 
Argentine thriller. 



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34 


SPORT 


THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 


Te 


CRICKET 


acious Border has 
his sights set on 
that winning century 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Hobart, Tasmania 

If England's present sched- leader of the field, with 9,572 
ule is oppressive, it is scarcely inns at an average of 50.64. 


“The forecast for Hobart is 
for rain, strong south-wester- 
lies, low cloud, poor visibility 
and a maximum temperature 
of 62 degrees," said die cap- 
tain of the flight from Mel- 
bourne, and that is much as it 
was when the England cricket- 
ers arrived here yesterday for 
their four-day match against 
Tasmania, due to start today. 
There was no play, because of 
the weather, in the corres- 
ponding match against the 
Indians a year ago, and not 
since [970-71 have England 
played in Hobart without the 
cricket being rain -affected. 

Tasmania's overseas player 
this time is Richard Ellison, 
who has been bowling well for 
them. In 1982-83, when Eng- 
land were here last, Tasmania 
had Michael Holding, of West 
Indies and Derbyshire, and 
Roland Butcher, of Middlesex 
and Barbados. They had Brian 
Davison before that preceded 
by John Hampshire and Jack 
Simmons. If we get a start 
today the rivalry between 
Small Foster and Ellison win 
be as keen as it is friendly. 

There is disappointing news 
of Bruce French, who has 
pains in bis chest and went 
straight to bed on Teaching 
Hobart. The reserve 
wicketkeeper’s job. especially 
when you are the better of the 
two wicketkeepers, is thank- 
less enough without having to 
miss a rare chance of a game. 
Should an emergency arise, 
Alec Stewart of Surrey, and 
Graeme Fowler, of Lan- 
cashire, both of whom can 
*keep a bit are in Australia. 


more so than what most of the 
Australians who took part in 
the last Test match have to 
cope with. England play here 
bom today until Sunday eve- 
ning, on Monday morning 
they fly to Canberra for a one- 
day game against the Prime 
Minister's XI on Tuesday. On 
Tuesday evening they fly from 
Canberra back to Melbourne, 
reaching their hotel not long 
before midnight Criss-cross- 
ing the continent yesterday 
were the Victorians, on their 
way to play Western Australia 
in Perth today, and the South 
Australians, who were bound 
for Sydney for a match with 
New South Wales. 

As Queensland are without 
a game. Border had a rare 
chance of flying back to 
Brisbane for a glimpse of his 
family. Since the first Test 
match, when his head was 
being widely called for, be has 
not only consolidated his pos- 
ition as captain but also made 
further progress through the 
ranks of Australia's leading 
run-scorers. 

His Test record compares 
now with all but Bradman's. 
In 87 Test matches Greg 
Chappell scored 7,1 10 runs at 
an average of 53.86. Border, 
who played his 87tb Test 
match in Adelaide, has scored 
6,785 runs and has an average 
of 53.43. No one has scored 
more runs for Australia than 
Chappell but Border soon will 
have. Aged 31, Bonier is still 
young and fit enough to 
overtake even Gavaskar, the 


Record opening stand 


Kanpur — Ratnayeke and 
Weuimuny shared a record- 
breaking first wicket stand of 
159 as Sri Lanka made an 
imposing start to the first Test 
match against India yesterday. 
Ratnayeke hit a Test highest of 
93 not out and Weuimuny 
scored 79 to spur Sri Lanka to 
217 for two before bad light 
ended play six minutes early on 
the first day. 

India’s attack toiled 


Weuimuny leg before, ending 
an innings containing 13 fours. 

Ratnayeke struck 14 fours 
and produced some elegant 
cover drives. India's other suc- 
cess was achieved by the all- 
rounder, Arun. who captured 
his first Test wicket when he 
bowled Aravin da de Silva. 


SRI LANKA first Jnrnngs 

S Wettonuny ttw b Sftamta 

R J Batnayeto not out 

P A da Silva b Arui 


grassy pitch as Ratnayeke and 
Wettimuny overtook Sri 
Lanka's previous best opening 
stand in Test matches — 77 
against Pakistan at Faisalabad 
in the 1981-82 series. 

The openers launched the 
innings steadily after Sri Lanka 
had won the toss, but gathered 
momentum in the second ses- 
sion until Sharma had 


OU 3 A Gunomgha not out 


Extras \b 1. to 4. nb 12. w 2) . 
Total ft wkts) 


79 

93 

26 

0 


19 

217 


*L R 0 Mentfs. R L Dos. tG de Ahns. A 
Ranatunoa. E A R da Silva. G Labrooy and 
A L F do Mel to bat. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-159, 2-217. 
BOWLING: Kapa 14-7-17-0. Aran 17-4-42- 
1 . Shatma 1 6458-1 . ManMer 1 9-5-594J. 
Sbastri 11-4-32-0. SriOrantb 1-0-44). 
MDtA: K Snkfcanth. S M Gavaskar. R M 
Lamba. D B Venosaikar. M Aztaruddki. 
*Kapa Day. R J Shastrt, fK S Mora. C 
Stiaima, B Arun. Manndar Singh. 


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MjtaOwtca Attends to nhs of Vip. 


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10 HOMES £11-20 

4AWAYS £1350-55 

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Expenses and Commission 
29th November1986— 29-OK 


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Now 37, Gavaskar’s days are 
numbered. 

So how good is Border, not 
simply as an acc umulat or of 
runs but as an all-round 
batsman. He has to rate very 
high indeed. Since being sad- 
dled with the captaincy two 
years ago, something he was 
none too keen to have, he has 
gone in more often than not 
with his side in trouble. They 
have been preoccupied as a 
rule, either with saving the 
follow-on or avoiding an in- 
nings defeat. No Test captain 
has ever had to try to save so 
many desperate causes. Only 
someone with resilience, im- 
mense determination and 
great skill could have made 
the runs, under constant 
stress, that Border has. 

If be snapped after England 


had won the first Test match 
at Brisbane last month, that 
was not because he is a bad 
loser but as a reaction to the 
intemperate criticism of his 
own performance. It is per- 
fectly true that he is not the 
greatest of communicators on 
the field. When his side take a 
wicket he is usually the last to 
join the mob of players to be 
seen carrying on with their 
immodest enthusiasm. He 
lacks the charisma of Richie 
Benaud or the sorcery of Ian 
Chappell: he is not a bom 
tactician or an inspiring lead- 
en but as a batsman he 
commands the highest respect 
and by his tenacity his players 
judge him. 

Border set a new trend 
among Australians when, 
dozen or so years ago, 
became a full-time pro- 
fessional cricketer. To make it 
worth bis while he knew that 
what he needed then was a 
method that worked, whether 
or not it was aesthetically 
pleasing. He had the good 
fortune, or good sense, not to 
join World Series cricket He 
was much better off as a 
young man, playing for 
Australia against England in 
the Test matches of 1978-79 
than he would have been 
having his block knocked off 
up in the country for Mr 
Packer. 

Although both are ou the 
small side, comparisons be- 
tween Border and Neil Harvey 
seem wide of the mark. Har- 
vey was a genius and Border is 
not; just as Compton was and 
Gattmg is not Border is 
pragmatic and courageous. 
Should anyone doubt his 
courage, take a look at his 
record against the full might of 
the West Indian fast bowlers 
in West Indies in 1983-84. It 
was splendid. He has more in 
common with Arthur Morris 
than Harvey, having had to 
work at it as Morris did and 
not, like Harvey, done it all by 
instinct 

On Tuesday evening in 
Adelaide, Border reckoned 
that apart from having pro- 
vided him with a fair degree of 
personal satisfaction, the cen- 
tury he had scored in 
Australia's second innings 
“meant nothing." What he 
said he is waiting and hoping 
most fervently for is the day 
when the century he has just 
scored has paved the way for 
an Australian victory. It will 
come, for sure, and when it 
does it will be well deserved. 


MOTOR RALLYING 


A solution to 
San Remo 
moves closer 

Paris (Reuter) — The Federa- 
tion Internationale do Sport 
Automobile (FISA) yesterday 

began a two-day executive 
committee meeting to settle an 
argument over the San Remo 
Rally which will deride this 
season's world champion. 

The committee is considering 
whether to change the results of 
October’s San Remo event 
following last month’s derision 
tv the Federation Internationale 
d'AutomobUe (FLA) appeal 
court which cleared the disquali- 
fied French team Peugeot of 
infringing race rules. 

If the result is changed, 
Peugeot's Finnish driver, Juha 
Kankkunen, will be champion. 
If not, the title goes to his 
compatriot Markku Alen, of die 
Italian Lancia team; who won 

this month's Olympus Rally in 

the United States to lead the 

championship 1 12-1 10. 

Kankkunen was second be- 
hind the Lancia of Italian, 
Massimo Biasion, after the third 

B ie of the San Remo race 
ore Peugeot were disquali- 
fied, and would win the world 
title if the result were annulled 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


FOOTBALL 
CBTIRAL LEAGUE: FM HMstai (7JQ: 
Blackburn v Everton. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Bfl Mow Cap: 

Hrat rornd (USk Banbuyy Worcester. 

SOUTH-EAST COUNTIES LEAGUE: 


CMsm (7.0); Fulham v Queen's Park 
Rangers (7.30}; Shrewsbury v Leicester 
(7 mttyar. MBwafl v Oxford (7.0). 

RUGBY UNION 
COLOURS HATCH: Queen's Unwerahy v 
Unhteraty CutogB. Cork (at BoKast. 23)}. 

OTHER SPORT 
BADMWTOK Mdfmax C ham pion sh ips 
[at Stamford Hi). 

BASKETBALL: Carfaherg National 

League: First division: Bfrmlnghharn Bil- 

lets v Sharp Manchester United (00- 
RACKETS: Ptorfe schools championships 

(at Queen’s Club. West Kensington). 
TENNIS: Royte Bart Junto Winter ndoor 
Series for toys §pham Abbey}. 



yachting 


British pursuit of 
America’s Cup 
gets more support 

From Keith Wheatley. Fremantle 

said walker. “However. 


White Horse Whisky have 
decided to continue their sup- 
port of the British America's 
Cup team. The early elimina- 
tion of White Crusader has not 
deterred the challenge's biggest 
sponsor from further 
uivolvemcnL 

“White Crusader performed 

well among the toughest com- 
petition ever and we ted that the 
end result did not reflect her true 
potential." the White Horse 
marketing director. Paul 
Actrobus said “Backing the 
challenge in such an exciting 
event as the America's Cap has 
hr* a valuable investment for 
White Horse — no matter what 
the result.** 

The exact level of suppon 
from White Horse remains un- 
certain until the New Year but 
just the knowledge that a big 
sponsor is at the party has given 
the British syndicate confidence 
to make a form commitment to 
an entry in next summer's world 
12-metre championship at 
Porto Cervo. Sardinia. 

The syndicate chairman. Gra- 
ham Walker sees it as vital that 
what has been learned in this 
campaign is brought forward 
and developed in racing from 
now on. “The 1986 challenge 
should have started the day after 
the last race in Newport in 


19SV*— . 
accepting that « sUf y* ^ 
wc committed ourseJyes to 
outline every enort into 3 
credible challenge. What we 
must do now is collate and 
analvsc our experience to gw 
continuity and stability to future 

challenges." _ . . ._ 

Focu ssin g on the rad Inal 14- 
metre racing, as far as Bn tarn is 
concerned is now in the tohw 
a long-term company. BACQ 

Walker added: "The future of 
the sport is in the hands of 
organisations like oundvet. 
who must attract w orld-wide 
media interest and the sponsor- 
ship necessary 10 meet the 
spiralling costs of competing. 

“Commonsense has prevailed 
and the restrictive Rule 26 win 
no longer apply 10 racing 12- 
metres. This opens enormous 
opport unites for the develop- 
ment of a truly grand pox 
vaduing circuit, which should 
attract substantial resources. 

“To some extent our com- 
pany was ahead of its time in 
recognising the commercial 
potential in yacht racing. Our 
major sponsor. White Horae 
whisky, is to be applauded for its 
bold move at a time when the 
advertising restrictions were still 
in force and severely limited a 
return on investment-" 


Semi-finalists Steak‘n’Kidney 
to be checked may withdraw 


A complete re-survey and re- 
measurement of all the boats 
which qualified for the send- 
finals of tire America’s Cnp was 
■imnwimf yesterday by the 
Yacht dab Costa Snwralda, 
winch organised the challenger 
efiminalfen races. 

The more sbodd satisfy crit- 
ics of the tMiUgg challenger in 

the preli mina r ie s. New Zealand, 

whose weight-distribution lias 
been a source of contro versy . 
Some syndicates believe tied the 
boat is fighter at both ends, and 
so. unfairly foster. 

The teste are likely to involve 
the nse of nitra-sound. which is 
ssedto measure the thickness of 
fibreglass in boat hulls. The 
New Zealand syndi c a te have so 
for agreed to any tests that the 
authorities though were 


On your bike: Bill Johnson, the 1984 Olympic downhill skiing champion, pauses daring a j 
workont He has an operation on a torn cartilage and wiH miss the rest of the season 


The Sydney-based yacht 
Sieak’n'Kidney is threatening to 
withdraw from the America's 
Cup defender trials because of a 
dispute over the formal of the 
semi-final rounds. 

Sieak’n'Kidney's syndicate 
tried to change the semi-finals 
from a points-scoring contest to 
one in which the competitors 
stan from scratch, and score in 
the same way as the challenger 
series. But the Royal Perth 
Yacht Dub's America’s Cup 
committee decided to retain the 
original formal for the trials. 

The Sydney boat, which is 
bottom of the standings, has 
won three races out of 30. and 
under tire rules of the com- 
petition. could be eliminated in 
the first or second semi-final 
round if it has insufficient 
points to become a finalist. 


SWIMMING 


Schneider’s victory 
keeps Swiss rolling 


Courmayeur. Italy (Reuter) — 
Vreni Schneider, of Switzer- 
land, won her first World Cup 
slalom race here yesterday to 
take the lead in the overall 
standings for the event. 

Her victory, in a total time of 
Imin 24.06sec, means that the 
Swissieam have now won six of 
the eight cnp events so far this 
season. 

It also allowed Schneider, a 
giant slalom specialist, to over- 
take her team colleague. Maria 
Walliser, a downhill expert who 
did not race today, by one point 
in the overall table. 

Schneider proved the most 
consistent of the racers. She 
clocked the second-fastest time 
in the first run — only 0.04 see 
behind her compatriot, Brigitte 
Ortli — and the fifth best m the 
second leg. 

The victory was her second of 
the season. She won a giant 
slalom race in Waierville Val- 
ley, in the United States. 1 1 days 
earlier — a good start to her 
defence of the giant slalom title. 

Tamara McKinney, the 1984 
slalom cup-winner, who often 
disappointed last year, proved 
again that she is back on farm 
with second place here — only 
0.05sec behind Schneider. 

McKinney, an American who 
is in her ninth year on the World 
Cup circuit, also took second 
place in the opening slalom race 
of the season — in the United 
Stales last month. 


Bell sharpens up 

Martin Bell regained some of 
the sharpness be lost last week- 
end b y ta king third place in the 
first FIS downhill race of the 
season at Val Gardena, Italy, 
yesterday. From a field of 102 
starters. Bell, back on Mack- 
waxed skis, dork ed 1 min 
57.28 sec for tire course, which 
was only bettered by two Ital- 
ians, Igor GgoDa (1:56.49) and 
Alberto Gbieoni (L561S8). Gra- 
ham Beft, Martin's brother, oat 
injured for a long time, came 
back m 1:59.57 for 30th pos- 
ition. 


SLALOM: 1. V Schneider (Suite) Iran 

24.06S6C (41 05/4001 fc Z T McXmy 

1:201 (41 .74M2371; 3. B Orw 

) 1 £4.15 (41 -01 /43-14$;4. 8 GatSant 
124.33; ; 5. R SHaner (Austria) 
124.73: 6, C Sc hn ii ct iau ser (Swrtzj 
124.78: 7. A Wactrtur (Austria) 1:25.04; 8, 
M Maerhofer (Austria) 1:25X6; 9. E Hess 
(Swrtrl 1^5.16; 10. P Msgom Staza (« 
1:25.17: 11.CNBssonfS»re)1:25£8; 12. K 
Buder (Austria) 1:2532; 13. H LazakrWGt) 
125.49; 14. M Mogore Ttafta 0) 1:25.49; 
15. E Twerdrtens (US) 12U0. 

OVERALL WORLD CUP STANDWGSc 1. 

Schneider 86 (XK 2. M WeOew(Sw«tz) 85; 

3, Hess 58; 4. Mckfcmay 56; 5, C Quftst 
(W 51; 6. MRaW (Swirl 48; 7. M Gera 
(WGJ47: 8. OrtT 44; 9. StoxiiShauser 4$ 
10. M Swt (Yuao) 36; 11 , L Graham (Can) 
36: 12. Buderfl; 13, Wartter 3ft -H 8 
Fernandez Ochoa (Sp) 26 and R Steiner 
(Austria) 26. 

SLALOM STANDINGS (after three rreas): 
1. McKfrwey 40 pts; Z Hese 36; -3. 
Schredhauser and ortt 35; = 5. 
Scimetder and Buder 81: 7. Steiner 2ft 8. 
Wach te r 21; «8, NOssan and Maiefholer 
19: 11. Svet 18. 


BOBSLEIGHING 


Phipps at the double 

Stan Tout, the Army driver, and 
his brake-man, Dave Arm- 


Nick Phipps completed the 
domestic double for the second 
time in three years yesterday by 
winning the British two-man 
championship at Konigssee, 
West Germany (Chris Moore 
writes). 


Last month, the 34-year-oki 
Londoner drove his Alfred Steel 
crew to victory in the British 
four-man event at Igls. Austria. 

Phipps and his brake-man. 
Alan Cearns, will now compete 
in the No. 1 British bob in next 
month's world championships 
in St Moritz. 

Making up the team wlU be 


strong, who were runners-up in 
yesterday’s three lauf race. 

Phipps led by 0.40sec after 
winning the opening run in 
52.68sec. Tout closed the gap to 
0.15sec with the fastest tune of 
52.76 on the second lau£ 

But Cearns pushed a champ- 
ionship best start-time of 
5J23sec on the final run, to 
enable the defending champions 
to finish 0.35sec in front. 
RESULT9: 1, N Phipps and A Cearns, 
2min 38.42sec {52£8/5Z91 , KL83); 2, § 
Tout and □ Armstrong, 238.77 (53.38, 
52.76. 5233£S.PBn«jnani and R 
£40.42 (53.45. 5346. 


GOLF 

The many 
sides to 
Crampton 

From John Balia mine 
Montego Bay, Jamaica 

BQ TDden always said that a 
competitor had jest so much 
energy and effort to give to a 
careen one bright, meteoric 
burst like, say. Lew Hoad or 
Bobby Janes or talent and 
stre n g t h eked out for nearly 
ftferime Eke Ken RosewaD or 
Sam Snead. 

Brace Crampton, who is the 
favourite hoe in the Mazda 
Cha mpions tournament, 
firms the second category In his 
playing and personality. A win- 
ner in the fifties and sixties, the 
Australian was worn out by 
nerves and other problems and 
retired prematurely. Fur several 
years he sat, a stone-faced 
monofith In a peaceful dub job 
in Dallas. 

The Trew’ senior PGA tour for 
the over-fifties, whose success 
has astonished even its 
founders, enabled Qram pten to 
be reborn as a lag money winner 
and here be is the andoobted 
king of the middle-aged dremt.' 

The 5730,000 (about £510.- 
000) event which starts today 
and carries $560,000 for the 
winners brings together tire 12 
tap seniors mdodmg Palmer, 
Casper and Iittler and the 
equally suc cessfu l members of 
the LPGA tour like Bradley, 
King and Inkster, 

Crampton won the Crosby at 
Pebble Beach in the mid-sixties. 
In play, this son of a policeman 
was an iron mam in his off 
co ar se demeanour be had an air 
of implacable mellowness, 
awful kind of forced calm. 
Veritably; beseemed a Franken- 
stein before the bobs shook 
loose as they often did. 

At San Diego once, be hit an 
awkward 60-yard pitch 12 feet | 
passed the flag. As he fiong the 
galley rope aside to regain the 
foirway, a spectator yelled: 
“Great shot, Brncey.** Crampton 
wheeled on the fan snapping: “‘A 
rotten shot” The spectator slid 
off mattering: *T paid my money 
and I can say ifs a good shot if I 
want to.” 


Brew may switch 
to the triathlon 


British international swim- 
ming is in danger of losii$ 
Robin Brew, the Royal Air 
Force physical training instruc- 
tor who was such an inspiring 
captain of the Olympic Games 
team in Los Angeles two years 
ago- 

He is becoming increasingly 
captivated by the triathlon — a 
combination of long-distance 
running, cycling and swimming. 

“I enjoy training.” Brew says 
“but, when you analyze the end- 
product of racing in the pool, 
you compete only a matter of a 
minute or two at a time after all 
the hours of daily fitness 


is a hunger within me 
to get more satisfaction from all 
my t raining , and I am findin g 
that satisfaction in triathlon 
events.” 

Since missing a bronze medal 
in the 200 metres individual 
medley final at the Los Angeles 
Olympics by a touch. Brew, aged 
24, has become the World 


By Roy Moor 

Superstars champion as well as 
the United Kingdom’s. 

His naming routine at the 
moment comprises cycling 150 
miles a week — this will be 
increased to 300 IQ the New 
Year — running 60 miles and 
swimming 20,000 metres. 

Does his new sports interest 
mean be will not be challenging 
for a place in the 1988 Olympic 
team for Seoul? “I am lying low 
about this at the moment.” he 
answers. “The way things are 
going, there could be a triathlon 
included in the 1992 Olympic 
Games in Barcelona and that 
would be something I would not 
wish to miss. 

“I love a challenge in which 
physical endurance is con- 
cerned. The tougher triatfalons 
can take up to six hours to 
complete. There is a great 
feeling of satisfaction at the end 
of a stint like this, with no sitting 
around waiting between heats 
and final. It’s action all the way, 
and 1 prefer it that way." 


SCHOOLS FOOTBALL 

Schools team Late rally gives 
relies on Blackburn 
Lancastrians the sixes cup 



ATHLETICS 

RACKETS 

SQUASH RACKETS 







Los 


Main Lrten 121, 
116; Boson 1 


OmlBflO 

jCsWcs 107, New York 

KnfcksflG: U«h Jaa 108, WtashMion Bton 

106; Daw Haw n s ill. Atlanta Forts UK; 

MftrartM Bucks 103. PrtsMpNa 7B«» 91; 

Dates Mawrfcta 101. Sen AntonoSpWf to; 

Chcago Bute 99, Houston Rockets 104; 

GoWw Stete wartore 1W. LtoAngajw 

cappers 117; Portland Trafl Bazars 128. 

Seattta Supereoncs lift Oannr Nuggets 

120, Sacramento Kings 118. 


FOOTBALL 

SOUTHERN LEAGU& Pi— lar dktetoir Peit 

□Oort GamOndge City* Rater. 
rooraiAU COlSmAm Britton 3. Wal- 
tofdl. 

CBfTRAL LEAGUE; Second dWrtnir Pate- 
ponad: Soten » Stoka. 



ICE HOCKEY. 


MOSCOW: tzv 


USSR S, C anada 1: Canada B.Swrtei4_ . 
NORTH AMBOCA: Naltond League (Hft* 

Montreal Canadtens 4,-SI Lous BkteS& Nay 

York Wanda* 4. MfemnOB Norte Sera 2; 

CWgary Flaws 8. De»4 Rad Whga 3. f 

l 


(UjtarnL 8-1 5. 1S6. 1 5-12. 

raonefc n D I ftrWhBngteni (Eton) 
Bridgeman (Harm). 15-11, 15-12: J 1 
uw&tmK**sm w t h wan pad 

17. 15* E G S Nort IBn| M C E 

(Rattort. 15-11. 15* JGKWrtawmueMta 

T Bonner (CharteteouseL 153. 15-*; P J 
G°nteiWi^cr|^J (MrtCteat*). 

(Harrow) MSSToMBnaCTi 
11-15. PH URtfow 

Taylor (Crmortmnn. 7-15. 1: 

Brown (Ru^qr] btw J Bees 
&GWHnrtarCMon)btE 

154. 15- 4: DM A Bavan {k _ 

Hal (Mneteaw), 15-O. 15-2: J O Cataw 

(TonWdgB)bl A JMHamSon (Harrow). 1M. 

15-13: Btir»IHateybur«KlL J SSteHWd 

Cw'fcayiwte (Mafcram), SSwftRW M 
Cook (Tonbridge) btFJ L Smith (MMm). 17- 

18. 15- 12. 152c E Sfcison pianotaUM) tit 
S G Hanray (Hakan), isa. 155. 


RUGBY UNION 

SCHOOLS MATCHES: AHot Bayne 12. Oto 

Boys 8. KCS Wimbledon 20, Wrefii 4; Pbtbb 
35. Hite Road] 5-Tonr: Harrow 3,Gfnn» ROM 
(BucherasS 35. 



Amongst the Northern 
schools, QEGS Blackburn and 
Bolton have each won nine 
school matches (George 
Chesterton writes). Between 
them, these two Lancashire 
schools contribute five of the 
lyers in the Independent 
11 to play Hertfordshire 
on the Bank of England ground 
Roehampton today. 

Bolton's only defeat was in 
the quarter-finals of the Greater 
Manchester Schools Under-19 
Trophy. Nigel McNamara of 
QEGS has been outstanding, 
scoring 15 goals. Bury recovered 
from a poor start to the season, 
having lost only one match since 
half-term- Holme GS on iJbe 
other hand have done less well 
recently, in spite of good wins 
against QEGS and Manchester. 

Wolverhampton GS have 
done well in a full programme 
and still have a chance in four 
cup competitions. 

Alleyns have won 12 of their 
14 matches. Their successes 
include a semi-final place in the 
Palmer Cup. Dominic Fas and 
Nick Humber have both played 
for London schools. Eton have 

another season without 

osing at home. A strong mid- 
field, in which Andrew Lunt anri 
Michael Struts were do minan t, 
brought 12 goals for Jason 
Keaue, 10 for Elliot and iq 
wins. 


Keith Burkinshaw, the former 
manager of Tottenham 
Hotspur, presented the Coriu- 
thian-Casuals Cup to QEGS 
Blackburn who defeated Bolton 
3-2 in yesterday's exciting final 

of the six-a-skie competition at 
Forest School (George Chester- 
ton writes). 

Chigwell, the only southern 
school in the semi-finals, went 
down 4-1 to Bolton. QEGS beat 
Wolverhampton GS in the other 
semi-final, McNamara, the 
outstanding player in the com- 
petition, showing his pace and 
skill by scoring three of their 
goals, making his tally for the 
competition 1 1. His last goal in 
this match came from a sharp 
run down the left and a wither- 
ing left-foot drive. In the final, 
Bolton went ahead when 
Willetts scored from a free kick. 

T F mp eriey ot 

UtG5 turned neatly 10 put the 
ball past Monaghan for the 
equalizer. Bolton went ahead 
again from a somewhat 
fomutuous goal when Barton 
was unsighted butQEGS came 
back immediately, Temperley 
equalizing by pushing the bau 
wide of Monaghan into the 
corner. A minute later be scored 
the winner with a similar shot 
in s id e the other post. 

PLATE: finat Hampton 3, M&feti 0. 


4J. 


¥a 


[RaenoocD IX N Fotodi (Parnate). _ _ 

Johnson (Bractord) to 6 Mies [B tf rrin ^ia ni). 

w. 

TENNIS 


HOCKEY 


OUEEirS CLUB: BWTA 

matt Second rouxt S Sitevan (Etswd to A 

Ftortngflaics) M. ,4*1 W. tartar flnateT 

CaSn(Cartte)MJ Salmon (Sussex^ 7-6.20 
rtr* L Goud (Boas) w/o JTaconl 
•or; S TtomsEss^) U S Srtran ( 

1, 52: A OulWaancs) to J Lnte54.M6- 
4. S wy Hla tee Catte w GaukL 7-ft 6-i 
Tfenmto GnoML 6-2. 7-5. 

POMPANO BEACH F tomtei 

CTO 


Reward for Bolland 


1: AigBMu 3. awdm ft Cnctotebra- 
kte 3. CUbft Spate 


2. Soviet Union 1; West 
-a 1 ; Franca 3.Cnste ft 
1: Tte Mswtands 3. 


■W 

Austria Ml 

Denmark (>.■ 

PUUTTATION, RHiriK SnU Cap tented 

townsmwt West Germany a Gnat Briaki 0:1 

ttey S. B SeWador ft UraM State* 3.1 

Z^rtwe ft BnnJTft ausm 1: Br^na 2. 

Cm Bee 1: Yngostevte3, BotateftCanaoa 
8. Ba tons ft SWaartand Z. Tte Nether- 1 
tends 1.H 


Paul BoDand, a member of 
England's World Cup squad, 
has been appointed captain of 
the Great Britain juniors for the 
Los Reyes tournament in Barce- 
lona from January 4 to 6 
(Sydney Ftiskin writes). 

. Ofthe nine England players in 
the squad. Fens was capped 
twice for Britain and Swayne 
once, during -.the tour of the 
Middle East early this year. 
Each- has won three caps for 
L so has Camilleri. 

1 was also on- the Middle 

East lour, but did not play. He 


was capped once for England 
eariy.ihis year but ^sed 

oSS? ,n tfae Wo ^ d ^ “ 

Ma S F ariane and Cox 
Soattish internationals, 

10juiicd goalkeeper. 

^a^artane (Scot) p 
IJJonpson. a Fenra. 


r 













af 


“IO i 

a: u - 
c arid 
0 

future 

’■at 12 . 
’•am is 

a*cf 
4 ACC. 
“'C or 
sds %r 


ley * 

iw 


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. viU.PTn. 


>TxL4U» 


sgi 





THE TIMES THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 HL— * 

TELEVISION AND RADIO 





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<"■. r'L'ir^t 


• Although it is a photograph of 
that singing trio The Beverley 
Sisterc that adonis this 
today, their contribution to this 
week’s 40 Minutes fflik Dear 
Sister (BBC2, 9.30pm) is nctoaOy 
the least interesting of the four 
stories because, bong rooted in 
professional q. 

odes the intention to put on a 
show. Almost as lightweight, bot 
more revealing abont the invisible 

link between sisters, is the inter- 
view with Tracy and Kerry, two 
aspiring East End songbirds who 
talk about the mutual truthfulness 
that gives point to the line in one 

of their lyrics that says “We go 

together hke Lanrd and Hardy, or 
peaches and cream. The two 
best s isterly stories tonight are 
about Jenny who has come off 
second best to Lis all her lift and 
about Betty who has been Minrf 


6- 00 Ceefax AM. 

630 New* headlines followed by 
The rSntatones. Cartoon 

„ _ series, (r) 635 Weather. 

7- 00 Breakfast Tone with Frank 

Bough, Sally Magnusson. and 
Jeremy Paxrnan. National and 
international news at 7.00, 
7.30, 850 and 830; regional 
news and travel reports at 
7.15, 7.45 and 8.15; weather 
detefls at755, T^S and 8J2S. 

830 Watchdog. Lynn FauMs Wood 
and John Stapleton investigate 
consumer comptonts 835 
Regional news and weather. 

9J0 News and weather 9.05 Day to 
Day, Robert KHroy-SDfc chare a 
.studio discussion on a topical 
subject- 9.45 Advice Shop with 
Margo MacDonald 10.00 News 
and weather 1055 Neighbours 


quartet of sisterly 

raph of j ~ 

C CHOICE ) the immkri 


Mary’s eyes for mm then 50 
years. Jenny’s case illustrates the 
nadity of fete. Not only was diem 
Lj ys s hadow during school days 

(SnerbOOnie for T ig gr amm ar 
for Jenny), but after her 

tailed marriage, Jenny now lives 
m a council house white lis 
c ontin ues to eqjoy a blissfully 
happy manied life in a town 
bouse. Even from the little I have 
told you about sighted Betty and 
bund Mary, you win have gath- 
ered that theirs is a moving story, 
the poignancy of which ternniM 
me long after foe dosing credits 
had rofled off the screen. 

• The Mexican Tapes (B8C2, 
7,30pm) is a low-key celebration 
of nourishing illegality, combined 
with a commentary on a cat-and- 


mouse game. It tells how, flouting 
the immigration laws, Mexicans 
cross over into neighbouring 
California in search of any menial 
job they can lay their hands on. 
Occasionally, immigration service 
officers pounce, and back acres 
the border the Mexicans go. Both 
the US tax man and the Mexicans* 
children indulge in make-believe. 
The tax man does not officially 
acknowledge foe existence of the 
illegal entrants, yet he is happy to 
slice off much of their earnings. 
The children’s street games m- 
vdve foe search flu, and theft o£ 
imaginary work permits. This 
moderately interesting docu- 
mentary was filmed by an amateur 
video-maker, Louis Hock, who 
took maximum advantage of the 
feet that these Mexicans living 
outside foe law were doing so a& 
around him. Originally, this Open - 


Space special cmaisied of four 
one-hour films which were 
screened on American television. 
Edited down to SO minutes by the 
BBC tfwy give a somewhat ragged 
impression of a sodotogicaf prob- 
lem which, you may recall, was 
vividly fictionalized in a film 
transmitted by niatmH 4 fa ct 
year. 

• Best of the rest cm TV tonight: 
On Golden Pond (TTV, 730pm) 
which is both a good, old-fash- 
ioned fern-handkerchief weepfe 
and an intelligent study of 
doughty old age; and Wf * 1 
Breakthrough (Channel 4, 
830pm), a documentary account 
of an amoaft-and-kayak ex- 
pedition that was so foolhardily 
dangerous that I am astonished 
anyone ret ai ned alive. 

Peter Davalle. 





Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


VARIATIO NS 



*\‘V' 





dfifrT**. 



m 




The Beverley Sisters: in this week’s 40 Minates (B^T?30pm) 



[TV/LONDON 


1055 PhflOp Schofield vvith 
chBdren's television 
programme news, and 


OreateatHwoof ThMiAIL 

Tony Robinson with another 

tata^ from Greek mythology 
450 OaBoping Qalagdteu 7 

4- 55 Nawwound 555 Bluu Putar. 

How to organise your own 
brmg and buy sale to help save 
foe sight of babies, children 
and aduHs In Malawi. (Ceefax) 

5- 35 Masterteera. 

550 Six O'clock News with Sue 
Lawfey and Nicholas Wttchek 
Weather. 

635 London Plus. 

750 Tgpurf tha pops introduced by 

730 Eas t Ender a. Dot deflated 
that her husband has returned, 
splashes out on some 
expensive presents for hkn. 

850 i^rowrow'a Wfatfd Ct Hiatreaa 
Quiz with Jwfth Ham, Peter 
Macam, Maggie Phlbin, and 


1035 i=Le to Eleven. 


the Wisp. 


1035 Hwe to Eleven. Geoffrey 

Wheeler with a thought for the 
day 1150 News ana weather 
1 155 Food and Drink Special 
1135 Open Air. Television 
programme makers meet their 
critics, (including news and 
weather at 1250) 

1235 Dome sda y Detectives. The 
second semifinal of the team 
quiz game on Britain and the 
British. 1235 Regional news 
and weather. 

150 One O’clock News with 
Martyn Lewis. Weather 135 
Neighbours. Max tangles with 
the police 130 Animal Fak 
with Don Spencer, (r) 

250 Hbn: Conspiracy of Hearts* 

(1 B60) starring UH Palmer, 
Sylvia Sims, and Yvonne 
Mitchefi. Second World War 
drama set in Northern Italy, 
about nuns from a convent 
helping to smuggle orphaned 
children to safety despite the 
brutal attentions of the Nazis. 
Directed by Ralph Thomas. 
330 Scragtag&od tvs Tea-time 
TeBy455iUINewPopeye 


830 A Question of S 
Hughes and BHI 


Black, Sean Kerty, and Coon 
Deans. The questlonmaster is 
David Coteman. (Ceefax) 

950 Nine O'clock News vtfh 
Nicholas WHchefl and Andrew 
Harvey. Regional news and 
weather. 

930 Crime watU i UK. presented by 
Nick Ross and Sue Cook, 
indudes news of a heartless 
pair of women who are thought 
to have swindted more than 
120 elderly women out of their 
pension books; and a reminder 
of maior cases that have stSI to 
be saved. 

10.10 Just Good Friends. Norman 
escapes from the dole queue 
by acce pt i ng a tab at Vince’s 
new wine bar. (Ceefax) 

10l 40 Matt Houston. CJ. suffers 
amnesia and lands up in the 
local women’s prison which is 
being used as a front for a 
Ngh-dass brotheJ. 

1130 Cdmewstcb Update. 

11-40 Rhoda. Domestic comedy 
series art to New York, (n - 
1255 Weather. 


950 Ceefax. 

250 New* and weather. 

252 Harold Uoyd*. Excerpts from 
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230 MoOvee. Or Anthony Clare in 
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StDnrtrouse.fr) 

350 News and weather. 

353 CrtonrtCutoeper's Hying 
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430 Look Stranger. A profile of 
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fanatic, (r) 

550 PcmeeHey Detective a. pr) 

530 F9bi86l([) 

650 Star Trek. Cretaki Kirk’s body 
has been exchanged for that of 
a beautiful woman, and Is 


6.15 TV-am: Good Morning Britain 
preserted by Anne Diamond 
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Gordon Honsycombe at fl3ft 
750, 730, 850, 830 and 950; 
financial news at 635; sport at 
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pop music at 73% and Jera 
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After Nine section tnctudes the 
winning poems from the family 
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Claire Raynor answering 


dty youngsters on a camping 
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Dangermouseu Animated 
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635 HrtplVhr Taylor Gee. on behalf 
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7.10 100 Greet Sporting Moment*. 
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730 The Mexican Tapes. An Open 


Ives of Kegel Mexican 
immknnts living in the United 
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— anamateur video-maker who 









m. 


■ ' ' < :■ ;• j ^ «.V •/ /•?■ • •. , 

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A scene from Iceland Breakthrough, about the 12-man expedition 
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■■ring a San Diego apartmert 
Mock with Mexican ’Bagels' 

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950 Entertainment USA. Jonathan 
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10.15 PhiSaveis*Mkoisfna 

diemma wtnn he Is asked to 
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1135 Weather. 


Dean Martia Comedy western 
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150 News at Om with Leonard 
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Home Cookery Ciub. Spicy 
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350 Tha Coning Masrtah. A 
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450 The RaggyDds 4.10 The 
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a holiday in Europe, leaving the 


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230 Rfan: My Footteh Heart* (1949) 
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430 Andy Pandy. Cartoon. 

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550 FBm: Three Came Home* 
(1950) starring Claudette 
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930 TMs Week. Part two of Who 
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1030 Jrtte and Company- A music 
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George Hearn, MUcent Martin 
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1130 Quincy. Qincy and Sam, 
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seeking revenge on someone 
who tried to poison him. (r) 
1230 Lifestyles oflheftlcli and 
' Famous. Joan CoHns. 

1235 Mg ht Thoughts. 


>*** m 



Second World War. They are 
taken to separate prison 
camps and given no news of 
each other. WHh Florence 
Desmond. Directed by Jean 
Negulesco. 

7.00 Charnel 4 News with Peter 
Sissons and Christabel King. 

730 Cornraem. With his views on a 
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traveler. Weather. 

850 Iceland Breakthrough. The 
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uncharted Iceland river - the 
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new exploration technique 
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leader, Paul Vander Moten, 
who was awarded the Royal 
Geogaphical Society's 
prestigious Ness Award, 
stxvived al the hazards only to 
succumb to leukaemia in May 
last year, (r) 

950 EIvteHisfSSpetiaLAn 
ecSted version of EMs 
Prertey’s concert of December 
1968 when he performed on 
television for the test time in 











iSTSS j 









1 u T AV/;ii^ia^ ^a^ 

■CT ] ■ l. ' X LI v Vi r \ r.l I 1 , 1 - 






930 Mood Red Rosea. The third 
and final part of the biography 
of Bessie McGuigan, a 
resolute Scotswoman, who 


for her felow workers, but as 
the Eighties arrive, she starts 
to Jose some, including her 
husband. Starring Bteabeth 
MacLannan. (Oracle) 

1030 Court Report -Australia. A 
dramatization of the highSghts 
of the trial in the Sydrwy 
Supreme Court In wtticn the 
British Go v ernment sought to 
ban a book written by a fanner 
MJ5 operative, Peter Wright 
12.15 Rejoice. AmoMAiKteDerine’s 




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Holly 


Garth Hewitt, and M^or 
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535 Shtofng. 650 News Briefln 

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635 Prayer tor the Day (a). 
530 Today, ind 530,730, 

830 News Summary. 

655 Business news. 635, 
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955 A Danish CMdhood: 
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930 The Natural History 
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1050 News; Mecfidne Now 
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1Q30 Mamina Qtanr. Night 


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A String Quartet 
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1030 Six Continents: foreign 

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monitored by the BB& With 
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11.10 On an Overgrown Path: 
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1250 B8C Scottish SO Vi 

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1.00 News 

155 Concert toat two) 

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250 Carl Marfa von 

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THURSDAY DECEMBER 18 1986 




TIMES 


mm 

SPORT 


Firet published ic 1785 




Time and not tide beat the Briti 



HAROLD CUD MO RE (left), skipper of the 
White Crusader, explains why the British 
yacht’s challenge in the America’s Cup 
failed 

Britain's White Crusader can be counted 
in the first division of world-class 12-metre 
yachts in spite of foiling to qualify for the 
semi-finals of the America's Cup challenger 
series. 

Our performance should be seen in the 
context of at best the great races against 
USA and New Zealand. Someone had to 
lose and in both these cases it was us - to 
USA bv three seconds after three and a half 
hours and to New Zealand by six seconds. 

Why? And why didn’t we get through to 
the America’s Cup itself and bring the 
trophy back to Britain? 

We had a good yacht, good rig and sails, a 
good shore maintenance team and a good 
crew. 1 can vouch for all of these. Towards 
the end of the competition we were 
building up a unique sense of teamwork 
involving both the boat and the people 
handling her. 


Given a little longer, we could have been 
in real contention at the end. Which is 
another way of saying that we started out 
our campaign a little on the late side. The 
reason for that was. quite simply, funding. 
Although £5 million sounds a huge 
investment, and is, it is less than the funds 
available to most of the other syndicates 
and was late in materializing. 

Without the backing of Graham Walker 
we would never have put together a 
campaign at all and without the further 
support of our sponsors. White Horse, we 
could not have continued. 

In the time scale allowed us two separate 
designs for our yachts was a bit 
adventurous and a longer time would also 
have benefited the crew by way of more and 
better experience to develop techniques. 

As I said after losing to New Zealand in 
the last 100 metres, all we needed was a 
more refined programme. Whatever else, 
we must not lose sight of what we achieved 
— because it is a major achievement — and 
be determined that our development will 
continue. 


If we maintain continuity we will be 
strongly in contention at the next 
America's Cup in 1990 as well asall the ma- 
jor competitions along the way, including 
the 12-metre world championships taking 
place off Sardinia in June, 193?. 

With one of the fastest^grerwing sports 
audiences world-wide, there is an active 
movement towards the establishment of a 
12-metre grand prix circuit — similar to 
motor racing 

Of the four semi-finalists, I believe that 
New Zealand should beat French Kiss 
without enormous problems except, per- 
haps. in heavier weather when French Kiss 
is at her best. In the other match between 
the two very different American boa ts ana 
skippers, Tom BfackaBer — extrovenea 
and mercurial — racing his extraordinary 
12-metre USA with its bulb hung on a very 
small plate and two full-depth rudders 
a gpinct the introverted Dennis Conner with 
his more conservative boat and tong, 
tough, hard campaign, the result win be 
difficult to predict but I believe that 
Conner will probably dominate unless 


Bl2Ckflller can consistently grao the speed 
that is available in his boat. 

The final of the challenger series between 
the clear winner to date. New Zealand, anc 
the winner of the two Americans. wiJl be 
much cicser than perhaps results have 
indicated. The margins between New 
Zealand and the other challengers were 
reduced to almost nothing towards the end 
of the third round robin. 

Whatever the result ofihe finals, I would , 
still reckon that the challenger will be , 
favourite to take the cup from Australia. 
The formidable campaigns mounted by the 
Australians will produce well-honed boats 
bu: whether their design has been suf- 
ficieniiv adventurous is open to question. 

For the future. Britain must tiot be afraid 
to "back its sailers, who are world class, and 
its designers, who have always had the 
ability and the technical innovation to give 
us winning boats. This group are worth 
backi ng and the commercial concerns tha? 
backers wjH see will be excited by the 
repayment in this fast-developing new 
“okT sport. 


Witherspoon’s career in 
doubt after drug trace 


World boxing was yesterday 
rocked by revelations in New 
York that former champion. 
Tim Witherspoon, had failed 
drug tests before and after his 
sensational first-round defeat 
by James “Bonecrusher" 
Smith in the World Boxing 
Association heavyweight title 
fight Iasi Friday. The disclo- 
sure could end Witherspoon's 
career. 

Jose i orres. chairman of a 
New York Stale Athletic 
Commission, said yesterday 
that pre- and post-fight tests 
on Witherspoon confirmed 
traces of marijuana in the ex- 
champion's system. 

“This is a terrible blow for 
boxing, and very embarrass- 
ing for us." admitted Torres, a 
former fight-heavy weight 
champion. “It could set things 
back ten years. We don't need 


From Ivor Davis, Los Angeles 
this kind of drug scandal in unbeaten Mike Tyson next 


boxing." 

Torres, who was at the 
ringside at Madison Square 
Garden when 31 -year-old 
Smith, who stepped in at a 
week’s notice after Wither- 
spoon's original opponent, 
Tony Tubbs, had withdrawn 
with a shoulder injury, said 
yesterday: “When I saw 
Witherspoon at the weigh-in, I 
was stunned. He didn’t appear 
to be in the best condition. He 
had breasts like a woman 
hanging down over his belly. 
He looked like a young fat 
boy. in no condition to fight." 

Smith knocked the champ- 
ion down three times in the 
first round to win the surpris- 
ing victory. Witherspoon 
came into the ring a flabby 
233*.yb. Smith's victory en- 
abled him to go on to meet the 


March for the unified heavy- 
weight title. 

This is not the first time 
Witherspoon has run into 
trouble with drugs. In Atlanta 
last January, when be out- 
pointed Tubbs to win the 
World Boxing .Association ti- 
tle, drug tests also revealed 
marijuana in his system. At 
that time, the WBA fined him 
US$25,000 (£17,500). 

Torres noted: “The first 
time this happens, a fighter 
gets a warning and a fine. But 
now. the second time, well, 
this is a grave matter. 

“Mr Witherspoon has been 
asked in a letter today to 
attend a commission hearing 
on December 29 when he will 
decide what steps to take. He 


FOOTBALL 


Mangers chief denies being 
Anglo-Scottish promoter 


By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 


David Holmes, the chair- 
man of Rangers, yesterday 
denied that he was the force 
behind a proposal to stage a 
tournament featuring the 
strongest clubs in England and 
Scotland. He also refuted a 
suggestion that he would be 
discussing '.he idea today with 
Martin Edwards, the "chief 
executive of Manchester 
United. 

it is believed that the Anglo- 
Scottish event, an alternative 
to the British Cup. would 
begin in March and fill the 
dales in midweek that are 
usually reserved for European 
lies. Everton. Liverpool. Man- 
chester United and West Ham 
Uniied would represent Eng- 
land; Aberdeen. Celtic. Rang- 
ers and Heart of Midlothian 
would cany- the Scottish flag. 


“I think it is a good idea but 
I must stress that I have not 
been promoting the plan,” 
Holmes said. “But I would be 
willing to listen to an ap- 
proach about the tournament 
as 1 believe the fans would (ike 
s competition like this.” 

Recent reports that UEFA 
are unlikely within the next 
couple of years to lift the 
European ban they imposed 
on English clubs last summer 


the Middle East Liverpool 
and Celtic, for instance, flew 
to Dubai last week to compete 
for the unofficial British title. 

But the success of any plan 
to hold a money-spuming 
tournament within these 
shores would be heavily 
dependent on the weather, 
particularly now that the Scot- 
tish premier division is 
packed with 44 matches. Al- 
though postponements have 


have concerned officials of so for been rare, the worst of 
lead ing English clubs. The cost the winter is to come. 


of being kept out of the rich 
playing fields of the Continent 
is potentially substantial. 

To offset the loss, the bigger 
clubs have accepted invita- 
tions to travel abroad, when- 
ever there is a gap in their 
schedule, to play in lucrative 
“fri end !v“ fixtures, often in 






auai 


Homes 

;bout 


,in so many ways. 



Founder. Grow Caplaln 
Leo ear JCber ture. VC.OM, DSQ. DFC 

The residents in Leonard Cheshire Homes are very severely 
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We also reach out to elderly and disabled people living in their 
own tomes, and to families with a handicapped member who may 
be struggling alone in isolation and despair 19Fam ily Support Services 
in England provide vital part-time help at crucial limes of the day- 
a lifeline indeed. But many, many more services are needed to plug 
the yawninggaps in state provision. Only 2 J7% ofourincome is spent 
on administering this large chanty. 

This means that almost til the money we receive goes in 
DIRECT help to those in need. 

PLEASE HELP US TO GO QN CARING AND EXPANDING 

To: Hon. Treasurer, Room B, The Leonard Cheshire Foundation, 
26-29 Maunsei Street, London SW1P 2QN. 

□ I enclose a donation. 

□ Please send me some information on covenants/legacies* 

□ Please send me more information. *(ptease delete) 



• Alex Smith, who has 
managed Stirling Albion for a 
decade, is the new manager of 
St Mirren and Jimmy Bone, a 
former St Mirren player, who 
managed Arbroath, is his No. 
2. They replace Alex Miller, 
who recently left to join 
Hibernian. 

Club seek 
to amend 
Cup rules 

West Bromwich Albion are , 
to propose a change in the 
rules of the FA Cup to avoid 
other clubs in the future being 
forced to stage unwanted ties. , 

Having been ordered to 
host the Telford United v i 
Leeds United third round 
match on Sunday, January 1 1, 
they are proposing that when a 
dub feel unable to cope, the 
opposition should automati- 
cally bave the right to stage the 
tie. 

“Non-League clubs like 
Telford can have difficulty 
staging ties against any major 
League club,'* Syd Lucas, the 
West Bromwich chairman, 
said. “The rule ought to be 
uniform to deal with the 
situation. As it is we have been 
landed with a match we don't 
want because another dub 
cannot ensure safe crowd 
controL” 

9 The Football Family Face, a 
working party formed to clean 
up football's image, is to 
compile a report on how to 
combat hooliganism for the 
Sports Minister Dick Tracey, 
and they intend to urge the 
Government not to im- 
plement an identity card sys- 
tem at every Football League 
ground. 

• The following Sunday 
matches will be televised live 
by ITV: January 18, Arsenal v 
Coventry (2.35); January 25, 
Nottingham Forest v Everton 
(135). 

• Mick Jones, the Halifax 
Town manager, will tell Peter- 
borough United today 
whether or not he is joining 
them as team manager. 

• The Manchester United 
goalkeeper Gary Bailey has 
passed a crucial comeback test 
in his first competitive game 
for 10 months. Bailey showed 
no ill-effects from a knee 
injury in a 2-0 Central League 
win at Middlesbrough on 
Tuesday night 


could have his boxing licence 
revoked.” 

Torres said the commis- 
sion's own drug tests were 
confirmed by a second series 
of tests done by the New York 
Police Department 

Torres took the opportunity 
to say he was upset at the stale 
of many of today's leading 
heavyweights who climb into 
the ring looking unfit and 
overweight 

“The heavyweight ranks are 
in a mess. I see too many 
boxers who don't take things 
seriously. Mike Tyson (the' 
unbeaten heavyweight cham- 
pion) seems lo be the only 
boxer who trains for a fight 
these days. It is most . 
embarrassing and gives box- 
ing the kind of black eye tlmz 
we don’t need.” 


No rise in 
misconduct 
says FA ; 

The Football Association 
denied yesterday that miscon- 
duct had risen this season, 
although they conceded it had 
escalated in the last fortnight 
when 20 jplavers were sent off 

Eric Dinnie, the head of the 
FA’s disciplinary department, 
said: “The disciplinary record 
this season is running neck 
and neck with last season, 
which, it is true, wasn’t a good 
one for behaviour. But I 
would be surprised if any 
records are broken. Sendings- 
off were well down before lit 
Saturday and cautions are 
running at about the same 
number as last season.” 

The disciplinary committee 
met yesterday to discuss the 
cases of Denzus, of Southamp- 
ton. and Rougvie, of Chelsea, 
but will not be announcing 
their decisions until today. 
Dennis is charged with bring- 
ing the game into disrepute for 
a newspaper article in which 
he recounted a fracas involv- 
ing himself and Peter Shilton. 
Rougvie was sent off on 
December 6 at Stamford 
Bridge for butting John 
Fas ban u, of Wimbledon. 





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There were to gift-wrapped presents for 
Emily Bond (above) on the way to the 
British Women's Tennis Association's 
Christmas under-14 tournament final at 
Queen's dob yesterday. The Gloucester- 
shire g£ri beat Caroline Herbert, of Hert- 
fordshire, 6-4, 5-7, 7-5, but the third seed 
had to come from 2-5 down in the third set of 
her semi-final and hit her way out of trouble 
against another of Britain's promising 


Without a sponsor this year, the Lawn 
Tennis Association stepped in with financial 


support for die popular women's to orna- 
ment, where SaBy Timms, of Essex, the 
British hard-court junior champion, seeded 
No. 7, reached file final with a convincing 
victory over Amanda Gnmfeid, of Lanca- 
shire, 6-2, 7-5. Miss Timms will meet 
Teresa Gatlin, aged 17. The Cambridge girl 
eliminated Julie Salmon, the favourite from 
Sussex, the victim of influenza, who retired 
when trailing 6-7, 0-2. Miss Gatlin, the 
eighth seed, outplayed Lisa GouhL of Essex, 
6-1, 6-3. 

(Photograph: Ian Stewart). 


town centre before the 
Middlesbrough match when 
more than 100 people were 
arrested. Darlington will now 
play York on Sunday, January 
II. 

Canoeist dies 

Paul McConky, a member 
of Britain's gold medal win- 
ning team in the world canoe 
championships three years 
ago, has died in a car accident. 


Foulds is Match switch 

_ Darlington Football Cub, 

npo TA«l still reeling from trouble 

Uwtllvll caused by rival supporters at 
Neal Foulds, the No. 6 seed, ^eir game against Middles- 
was eliminated from the Tolly brough tn November, have 
Ales English Championship in switched their second home 
Bristol yesterday, beaten 6-3 derby of the season to a 
by Ken Owere. Tony Knowles, Sunday. The third division 
seeded third, was beaten 6-2 club have bowed to pressure 
by Les Dodd. from local businesses aftei 

— - , hooligans caused chaos lo the 

jsotnam cnase iown cemre bcf ° L re 

^ . . • _ _ . , Middlesbrough match when 

Derbyshire yesterday of- more ^ i00 people were 
GciaUyjoined the chase to sign arrested. Darlington will now 
Ian Botham. The club s chief play York on Sunday, January 
executive, Roger Fearman. n 
confirmed a letter giving 14 ' . 

days notice of approach to the OlllOeiSt UlCS 

S layer had been sent to *** 

oraerseL Paul McConky, a membej 

l p* j of Britain’s gold medal win- 
Hilaries lined ning team in the world canoe 

W-O-ta. member of 
the winning British Nations 

Cup team at Lidges in Belgium Dncnrvn niif 
last August, has been fined avCSCI vul 

£300 and disqualified from all Stockholm (AP) — Swedish 
events at that show following tennis player, Kent Carisson, 
the positive drugs test made refused to travel with the 
on ms horse April Sun. Swedish team as a reserve, to 
!>„_• _ ___ the Davis Cup final in Austra- 

AJialll SCau lia after a financial dispute 

John Westgarth, the New- ^ Swedish Tennis 

cas tie-based heavyweight, has Federation, newspapers said 
been ordered by the British yesterday. 

Boxing Board of Control to fiJlhrtdv hnilt 
have a brain scan, before he is 'JllWUUj UUUl 
allowed to fight again. Ray Gilbody, of Warring- 

Y ,, - _ ton, the British bantamweight 

in the breach Champion, returns to the ring 

o . « . . . . on February 19 in a title 

Solent Stars wish to fill the defence against Billy Hardy 
pp left by Polycell Kingston’s (Sunderiand) at Sutton Sports 
late withdrawal from the Centre. St Helens, 
world invitation dub basket- _ _ - 

ball tournament at Crystal Pvfltt the D£St 
Palace on January 1 to 4 - if . TT , 
they can rearrange a national . ^ ms Pyatt,tne European 
league fixture against Bolton Iighi welterweight, champion 
on January 3- Sdem would gom Leicester, has bon voted 
then meet Solna, from Swe- 

den, in the first round- fry die Boxing Writers Club- 


Match switch Record in sight 

Darlington ^ofoaU Club Commonwealth table 

still reeling from trouble . - rhamnion. Desmond 


The Commonwealth table 
tennis champion, Desmond 
Douglas, is one match from a 
career milestone. Victory over 
the former European cham- 
pion, John Hilton, in the 
SchiJdkrot British League on 
Sunday would mean the for- 
mer Birmingham bus driver, 


from local hnon ite aged 31, is unbeaten in the 
hooligans caused chaos in the ^ one and a half 


Reserve out 


Stockholm (AP) — Swedish 
tennis player, Kent Carisson. 
refused to travel with the 
Swedish team as a reserve, to 
the Davis Cup final in Austra- 
lia after a financial dispute 
with the Swedish Tennis 
Federation, newspapers said 
here yesterday. 

Gilbody bout 

Ray Gilbody, of Warring- 
ton, the British bantamweight 
champion, returns to the ring 
on February 19 in a title 
defence against Billy Hardy 
(Sunderiand) at Sutton Sports 
Centre, St Helens. 


season, an individual record. 

Title defence 

Andrzej Grubba, of Poland, 
holder of the Welsh Open 
men’s singles title, will be 
defending his crown when the 
1987 event is played at the 
National Sports Centre in 
Cardiff from April 1 to 4. 

Flu threatens 

Hull City's home league 
game against Mill wall on Sun- 
day, is threatened by an 
outbreak of influenza at 
Boothferry Park. So far five 
players and assistant manager, 
Dennis Booth, have been sent 
home, suffering from a virus. 

Games cut 

Seattle (AP) - The size of 
the 1990 Goodwill Games 
have been cut in half to make 
them different from the Olym- 
pic Games and to cut financial 
risks. A sponsor spokesman 
says the Soviets are happy ; 
with the change. 


BADMINTON 

England 

suffer 

whitewash 


England suffered a disas- 
trous day in the Marlboro 
World. Grand Prix finals in 
Kuala Lumpur yesterday, 
with seven defeats out of 
seven (Richard Eaton writes). 

The biggest disappointment 
was the setback of the England 
No. 1 and Commonwealth 
champion, Steve Baddeley, 
who had harboured hopes of 
making the last four. He went 
down 18-13, 17-15 to Alan 
Bodi Kusuma, of Indonesia. 

BaddeJey's rival, Darren 
Hall, the English national 
champion, was also beaten. 
But that was less surprising 
because he feced Morten 
Frost, the London-based alj- 
England champion, from 
Denmark, who is trying to 
regain the title he won two 
years ago in the same Negara 
Stadium. Hall went down 15 - 
5, 15-12. 

There was another English 
singles defeat when Fiona 
Elliott, the former national 
champion, lost 11-1 ^ to Li 
Lingwei, the title-holder from 
China. 

ENGUSH RESULTS: Men's sbigtM: Alan 

Bu<S Xanana flndonea) boat stave 
IB.ia j7.1S : 'Morten Ffotf 
beat Darren Hafl 15-5, 15- 


Ford transfer 

chad Ford, has asked for. a 


transfer. Ford, who was regu- 
lar scram half two seasons ago 
recently .lost his place to 
Shaun Edwards on the return 
to stand-off half of Ellery 
Hanley. 



*•*■** * * 


A divine 
< right 
! to keep 
; winning 

' By Stuart Jones 
j Luton' Town hare perhaps 
» found an answer to the ir 
pravere. They have acquired a 
; new t«>ani member who did not 
s cost them anything, is P»d 

1 anything and does not havens 
specific role to plaj but, m 
I whose presence so Far this 
] season, the side has yet to lose. 

> As a secret weapon, no one 
could be more unlikely than 
[ Reverend Mervyn Terrell. He 
; first stood on the terraces of 
; Kenilworth Road at the age of 
t eight and has been going back 
for “30 odd yeara." Now he 
frag joined Luton in an official 
capacity. He has been ap- 
pointed dub chaplain. 

He describes himself as 
worker priest. I still have 
Sunday duties but my fall-time 
job is secretary of the 
Hertfordshire Society far the 
Blind. I’ve been to two-thirds 
of Luton’s home games and 
they've not been beaten. Hav- 
ing me there is, Z suppose, Eke 
seeing a nun on a plane." 

His position at Luton has no 
dear definition. A dab 
spokes man su ggested that he 
could, among other tasks, 
carry oat weddiag ceremonies. 
Reverend Terrett himself does 
not imagine that be win be 
preaching sermons, conduct- 
ing services cm the a rtificial 
surface or, indeed, praying for 
the grass to grow. 

Always ready 
to lend an ear 

“I want to act as a friend," 
he says, “somebody to talk to, 
whether it be a player, a 
member of the ground-staff or 
whoever. I won't be pushing 
my Christian beliefs on any- 
body but I plan just to be there 
to lead an ear should it be 
needed." 

He wifl continue to act as “a 
match-day host”, which led to 
his appointment. A couple of 
months ago the guest be was to 
entmtun was Reverend Brian 
Rice, the only fhB-time chap- 
lain to local government in the 
country. He also happens to be 
HnrtiepooTs chaplain. 

Aware that visiting support- 
ers are banned from Kenil- 
worth Road, he wrote asking if 
he could go with his son to a 
game while be was on a course 
in the area. He also requested 
to be seated next (o the club’s 
religious representative. There 
was none. So Luton turned to 
Reverend Terrett 
“I had done one or two 
things for the dub over the 
years," he explained. “I wfll be 
taking other guests there in 
the future. I'm going to tevite 
my local bishop, from St 
Albans, to the West Ham 
game, for instance, because 
he's a fan of the Hammers. 

Commentaries 
for the blind 

“Four parties of blind peo- 
ple wfll be going to games in 
the new year. I’ve done a 
regular spot on local radio for 
a while so I will be able to do a 
commentary for them. Identi- 
fying Luton's players presents 
no problem bid I may straggle 
with the opposition." 

He mentioned that “less 
popular sides like Wimbledon 
and Coventry . might be 
particularly difficult but you 
better not quote me on that" < 
On a more serious note, he ' 
pointed out that only through 
Luton's membership scheme 
is be in turn able to carry eot 
his own potentially awkward 
scheme. 

“Escorting fora* loads of 
blind people won't be easy bat 
I know there wfll be no bother. 

A year ago I would have been 
more than apprehensive bat it 
is a different world there now. 

I see very young children 
taken there quite happily, 
there are no policemen and 
even the language has 
improved. 

“It has been revolutionized, i] 
It is a shame that there are no 
away supporters but isn’t it 
better to be able to go to a 
game and enjoy it? The at- 
mosphere may be a bit quite at 
Kenilworth Road hot at [east it 
*® civilized.” As a vicar's tea 
party? 

Hollins thanks 

supporters 


Chelsea’s frustrated 
supporters were given a vote of 
thanks from the club’s trou- 
bled manager John HoUms 
yesterday. Hollins, who has 
been the subject of angry 
demonstrations after recent 
home games, has praised his 
team s supporters. 

“T&sy have been excellent 

Parteolariy on Sunday at 
abIseM where they certainly 


% £ 

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i frf* if 


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are the tree supporters who 
continued to cheer and 
the side even 
were net going 
That makes a bigdd- 

52"? t0 * 3W ®»d the players 
f£d hopefolly we wfll soon 
them mth the smt 
that they are looking 


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