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Full text of "The Times , 1986, UK, English"

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SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 





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ows joy 
at freedom for 
the Sakharovs 


Ex-champion jockey freed on £1.2m sure^gj 

; : ?v . Lester Piggott 

- accused of false 

5 ilSP tax statement 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 

mn T H h ^ S fe V '!L U |!- ioa ycslerday Bonner, who was sentenced to b 
SmiSm ?-! 8 gesture to five years’ internal exile for s t 
ti> to improve its tarnished anti-state activities in 1984. 


image in the field of human 
rights by announcing an end 
to the internal exile imposed 
nearly seven years ago on Dr 
Andrei Sakharov, the 
country’s best known dis- 
sident. 

The unexpected gesture, 
which had been repeatedly 
demanded by Western lead- 
ers, was announced as the 
dramatic finale to an other- 
wise routine press conference 
called by the Soviet Foreign 
Ministry, ostensibly to discuss 
the future of the moratorium 
on nuclear weapons testing. 

Prompted by a question 
from an .American television 
reporter, Mr Vladimir Pet- 
rovsky. the Soviet Deputy 
Foreign Minister, stunned the 
400 Western and Soviet news- 
men by informing them that 
Dr Sakharov was free to 
return to Moscow from the 
closed city of Gorky and to 
resume his scientific career. 

Mr Petrovsky, who was 
understood to have been act- 


ing on the specific orders of next week. 


The news spread quickly on 
the bush telegraph through 
Moscow's dissident commu- 
nity, where it was greeted with 
astonishment and delight. 
Close friends of Dr Sakharov 
said that the dissident phy- 
sician, aged 65, and his 62- 
year-old wife were not 

The first hint the Sakharovs 
bad that something dramatic 
was about to happen was on 
Monday evening, when a work- 
man called at their pat un- 
announced and installed a 
telephone (Our Foreign Staff 
writes). Next day it rang. The 
caller was Mr Gorbachov, who 
broke the glad news. The 
Sakharovs promptly used 
their new phone to tell their 
danghter in Boston . 

Background, reaction 6 
Peter Red da way 16 
Leading article 17 

expected to return to their 
Moscow flat until some time 


Mr Mikhail Gorbachov, the 
Soviet leader, went on to 
announce that the Praesidium 
of the Supreme Soviet had 
also offered a pardon to Dr 
Sakharov’s wife, Mis Yelena 

Monday 


in store 



The High Street 
spending boom has 
been fuelled by 
ever-easi er credit. 
But how easily do 
iittie store cards 
lead to big financial 
problems? 


£28,000 to 
be won 

• There is £28,000 to 
be won today in The 
Times Portfolio Gold 
competition — £24,000 
in the weekly 
competition as there 
has been no winner 
for the past two weeks, 
plus the daily prize of 
£4,000. 

• The £4,000 prize 
yesterday was won by 
Mrs Christine 
Catchpole, of Forest 
Row, East Sussex. 
Details, page 3. 

• Portfolio fists, 
pages 20 and 25. 


'TIMES BUSINESS 


IMF task 

M Michel Camdessus, the new 
managing director of the 
International Monetary Fund, 
faces a tough task in unifying 
the agency Page 21 


TIMES SPORT 


No standing 

FIFA, the governing body of 
world football, hopes to elimi- 
nate hooliganism from the 
1994 World Cup by allowing 
seated spectators only Page 34 

Sailor lost 

Jacques de Roux, a French- 
man competing in the single- , 
handed round-the-world race ' 
is missing, feared drowned, 
after his yacht was found 
unmanned south of 
Sydney Pag* 34 

Home News 2-4 L»»Kep«t » 
Overseas 5-7 Lwle*® J; 
Appts Letters |7 

Asetofe® 19 Otanmry M 
Arts 8 Parliament 4 

Births, deaths. Retirin' 
marriages 19 Sate JJ 

Bridge It Science J® 
Business 21-25 Senses IV 
Cbe» 11 Sport 29^34 
Cborcto 19 TVatres.dc IS 
Craft 28 « 

Crosswords 12,20 Ufll^ities J* 
Diary 16 Wrath* 20 

Features 9-16 18 


Indicating the suddenness 
> of the Kremlin's decision, the 
| friends also told Western 
1 reporters that Dr Gnri 
■ Marchuk, the new head of the 
1 Soviet Academy of Sciences, 
had travelled to Gorky yes- 
terday and spent two hours 
talking with Dr Sakharov 
about his future. The report 
could not be confirmed from 
official sources. 

It was understood that the 
ending of the banishment of 
Dr Sakharov, who in 1975 
won the Nobel peace prize for 
his human rights campaign- 
ing, was made, on condition 
that he remains in Moscow. 
Mr Gorbachov said eailier 
this year that he would not be 
permitted to travel abroad, 

Iran deal 
prosecutor 
appointed 

From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

A special three-judge court 
yesterday named a 74-year-old 
former judge and diplomat as 
the independent prosecutor to 
conduct a criminal investiga- 
tion of the Iran arms affair. 

Judge Lawrence Walsb, a 
prominent attorney who was 
the deputy US negotiator at 
the Vietnam peace talks in 
Paris, is formally known as an 
independent counsel. 

Like the special Watergate 
prosecutors, Mr Archibald 
Cox and Mr Leon Jaworski, he 
has foil power of prosecution. 
He can make criminal indict- 
ments if he finds any laws 
were broken in the secret sale 
of arms to Iran and the 
diversion of some of the 
profits to the Nicaraguan 
Contras. 

His investigation is likely to 
take up to a year. 

Under strong pressure from 
Congress and public opinion, 
an initially reluctant President 
Reagan announced his request 
to a court to appoint an 

independent counsel early this 
i month- 

“Judge Walsh is one of the 
outstanding lawyers of the 
nation and brings to this very 
broad investigation into 
whether there has been a 
violation of any federal crim- 
inal law by any person in the 
Iran-Contra affair the judge- 
ment and ability acquired 
through years of experience as 
a prosecutor, federal judge, 
government official trial law- 
yer and as a recognized leader 
of the bar of the nation,” the 
court said. 

Meese evidence, page 5 


Greeks and 
Turks in 
border clash 

From Mario Modiano 

Athens ( 

A Greek soldier, aged 19. I 
was reported killed and an- t 


because he was still in pos- 
session of state secrets. 

This referred to Dr 
Sakharov's work as the in- 
ventor of the Soviet hydrogen 
bomb, which was developed 
in 1953. He is widely regarded 
for his scientific brain, but in 
recent years he has become a 
symbol of the fight for intellec- 
tual freedom inside the Soviet 
Union. Recent reports have 
said that his health is not 
good. 

One of the key factors 
behind the Kremlin move, 
which was seen as a further 
demonstration of Mr 
Gorbachov's growing per- 
sonal power, was a private 
letter sent to the Soviet leader 
earlier this year in which the 
dissident physicist offered to 
curtail his public activities in 
exchange for the relaxation of 
official measures against him. 

The first sign of a thaw in 
the Kremlin’s attitude to- 
wards the Sakharovs — who 
have been subjected to gross 
KGB harassment and surveil- 
lance daring their lonely exile 
— came last December, when 
Mrs Bonner was permitted to 
go on a six-month trip to the 
West for medical treatment 

Soviet officials said that the 
timing of yesterday’s 
announcement was also 
linked to the recent offer by 
the Kremlin to host an inter- 
national human rights con- 
ference in Moscow for all 
nations participating in the 
European security and co- 
operation conference in 
Vienna. 

• WASHINGTON: The 
White House yesterday said it 
was pleased to hear of die 
release of Dr Sakharov from 
internal exile but noted that 
the system of abuses ofhuman 
rights in the Soviet Union 
continued (Mohsin Ali 
writes). ' 
















mm 


lias 


By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 

Lester Piggott. the former auihrottiesand it would sccem 
champion jockey, appeared is now to used against me next 
yesterday before Newmarket year.” 
magistrates accused of making Mr Piggott, aged 51. who 

a false tax statement about his became a trainer after retiring 
bank accounts. He was re- as a jockev, was arrested at his 
mmided until March 19. home in’ Hamilton' Road. 

lne magistrates had given Newmarket, yesterday mom- 
one of Britain s legendary fog by Suffolk police, 
figures three hours to raise 

fpS®? ff'SfS ™ «^?1Mte5Sr»£ 

beforedie coun orface prison! gg* £ 

cash but bad nis home and _ IA . 

stables valued at a little short 

of the £1 million needed. The jjf 5*2“*“ 2*5 VISES 

court accepted the deeds plus ■ e * e 

F sioners deliver or caused to be 

j* t™ 1 * 2 ms? -Sote'Sis:; 

&33XS wasmss 

5! iy * JSJf. held at 29 April 1983 were at 

r h * mu Ihe National Westminster , 
Charles SLGeorge, the mil- Newmarket, contrary to i 
ra “ CommoJSr^ ^contrary to 

horse owner. _ , , „ . I 

Mr. Piggott and his wife The Intand Revenue did not 

signed over their home and OPP 0 ® 5 s? ugh L 

stables worth £950,000 to the ^reties of £100,000 each, the 

deposit by Mr Piggott of £2 ; 

It had taken five and a half jSjStjg ^ SurTCnder of 
mm for Mr Piggott . who ISS adjourned for 20 
ent much of the afternoon miautes . when the mag- 
foe Newmarket police cells, islrates retted ^ 
tree himself. man, Mr John Moore smiled 

Even after foe court ac- at Mr Piggott and said: “We 


hours for Mr. Piggott . who 
spent much of foe afternoon 
in foe Newmarket police cells, 
to free himself. 

Even after foe court ac- 


Lester Piggott: Must report weekly to the police. 

Brent ghetto fear 
of Asian governor 

By John Clare, Education Correspondent 


cep led foe stables deeds they are happy to gran! hail” 
still insisted they should be The magistrates set bail 
signed over by Mrs. Piggott as with sureties each of £1 00,000, 


well as her husband. 

After being freed. Mr. 
Piggott said in a written 


The school governor whose 
allegedly racist activities are 


Mr Hasani and his wife, 
who is white, have four chil- 


now to be investigated by dren. Three are at Sudbury 
Brent eoundl is an Asian who Junior School; the fourth is in 
fears flat the council’s policies the infants section. He has 


statement :“I was very dis- set that he must live at his 
appointed to be arrested today Newmarket home and report 
as, since 1 February 1986, my weekly to police, 
advisers and myself had spent Mr Piggott, who spent more 

thousands of hours getting than nine hours in police 
together all foe evidence that custody, was told by mag- 
was sought by Inland Revenue istrates to produce a bankers’ 
and Customs and Excise with draft for £950,000 by 5pm on 
a view to settling my Monday or be taken back into 
affairs. This evidence was police custody, 
made available to the Michael Seely, page 30 


Whitehall 
inquiry to 
end soon 

By Colin Narbrongh 

The investigation into foe 
possible abuse of privileged, 
market-moving information 
by civil servants could be 
completed quickly. The. Gov- 
ernment is believed to have a 
good idea of where foe sources, 
of leaks are to be found. 

The Stock Exchange’s abil- 
ity to monitor electronically 
suspicious share price move- 
ments is understood to have 
played a key part in foe 
decision by Mr Paul Channon, 
foe Trade and Industry Sec- 
re lary, to investigate foe very 
officials responsible for fair 
competition in business. 

His derision to appoint 
outside inspectors to follow up 
allegations by officials at the 
DT7, foe Monopolies and 
Mergers Commission and foe 
Office of Fair Trading, fol- 
lowed foe spate of insider 
dealings on both sides of foe 
Atlantic. 

They are expected to focus 
on foe DTTs divisions dealing 
with competition policy and 
mergers, and on foe OFT 
mergers secretariat 
DTI officials refused to say 
how many civil servants 
would be 

involved.Informaiion was 
available to a broad cross- 
section of the DTTs 13,000 
staff from junior clerical 
workers upwards. 

Spokesmen for the depart- 
ments whose officials are 
under investigation said they 
were unaware of any suspen- 
sions or dismissals linked with 
foe investigation. 

Leading article, page 17 


, are turning ms neigaoournoofl 
L and iiis. childrens’ .school mt ? 

' a “ghetto”."-:- - - - * 

Mr Haleem Hasani says the 
council suspects him of hav- 
ing pul pressure on Miss 
Maureen McGoldrick, the 
headteacher of Sudbury In- 
fonts School, not to employ 
any more black or Asian 
teachers. 

On Thursday night foe 
council derided, on legal ad- 
vice, to drop its proceedings 
against Miss McGoldrick but 
said it would investigate the 
conduct of “certain governors 
and parents”. 

Mr Hasani said yesterday: 
“I understand they mean me. 
But 1 am ready for them- 1 do 
not feel guilty. I spoke foe 
truth and 1 do not repent or 
regret anything that I have 
said." 





Hasani: fears school 
becoming ghetto. 


been a governor pf_one or 
other school —{currently of 
.for eight-years. 

He was first appointed, as 
a“ community" governor, by 
Brent council. Now a parent 
governor, be is also chairman 
of the joint parent-teacher 
association. 

“I spend most of ray spare 
time there. I have done ray 
best for foe school and foe 
children.” 

The “truth" that Mr Hasani 
refers to is his belief — and he 
chooses his words carefully — 
foal children in an English 
school should not be taught 
exclusively by those whose 
mother-tongue is not English. 

“There must be a balance 1 
between English and non- 
English. But in foe infonts 
school my children had non- 
English teachers for three 
consecutive years. It's not- 
right so l challenged it” 

Mr Hasani estimates that 
about half foe teachers at 
Sudbury are black or Asian, as 
are about 85 per cent of foe 
children. “I nave never ob- 
jected to black teachers, what I 
complained about was really a 
managerial issue: there was a 
problem about bow they were 
distributed. 

“But then they gagged me. 
They tried to sweep the issue 
under the carpet. Nobody 
came forward to support me 
because they were afraid... I 

Continued on page 20, col 4 


New year inquiry on 
defence procurement 

By Peter Davenport, Defence Correspondent 
A three-man inquiry team is which serious consideration 


‘£23m loss’ warning 


Washington — Shareholders 
in Guinness stand to lose 
about £23 million, a third oi 
the £70 million foe company 
invested in foe' partnership of 
Mr Ivan Boesky, the disgraced 
arbitrageur, according to Wall 
Street analysts (Bailey Morris 
writes). 

The calculations, a new 
blow to the troubled Guinness 
company and to its chairman, 
Mr Ernest Saunders, came as a 
new storm of controversy 


erupted yesterday over foe 
United States Government’s 
settlement with Mr Boesky. 

Mr Boesky claims that Wall 
Street estimates of potential 
losses are too high. 

US officials confirmed that 
Mr Boesky was allowed to 
remain with his company, 
Ivan F Boesky & Co LP. until 
April !, 1988, a critically 
important date. 

Boesky £70m, page 21 , 


to investigate the future 
management of all large-scale 
defence procurement projects 
in foe wake of foe Nimrod 
debacle, it was announced last 
night. 

It will start wort: in foe new 
year and is expected to pro- 
duce a report for Mr George 
Younger, Secretary of State for 
Defence, and Sir Robin lbbs, 
head of foe Cabinet's Ef- 
ficiency Unit, by foe summer. 

As foe inquiry was an- 
nounced, it was also disclosed 
foal during foe nine-year 
course ofthe Nimrod develop- 
ment, there were five major 
reviews of foe project during 

Boxer in 
dear over 
drug test 

By John Good body 
Tim Witherspoon did not 
fail drug tests for marijuana 
before and after his World 
Boxing Association heavy- 
weight title defeat on Decem- 
ber 12 by James “ Bon ecru sb- 
er" Smith. 

Mr Jose Tones, the chair- 
man of foe New York State 
Athletic Commission, said 
yesterday: “It was a clerical 
error. Somebody made a criti- 
cal error in potting ‘positive’ 
when it should have been 
negative. I called Witherspoon 
at 1.30 am and apologized. He 
said he appreciated me calling 
.him." 

Mr Edward Grayson, au- 
thor of Sport and the Law. said 
Witherspoon would be en- 
titled to “almost record 
damages". 

Clerical error, page 34 


m sitfeiigsj yStalker 

Pifffffttt decides 

of false toquit 

oi raise the force 

rAYYIPTlT By Ian Smith 

JJI lr< Northern Correspondent 

r rime Bonm-tor Mr John Stalker, foe disillu- 

, crane Reporter sj oned Deputy Chief Con- 

mihrotties and it would sceem stable of Greater Manchester, 
is now to used against me next is quitting foe force just three 
yew." months after successfully 

Mr Piggotu aged 51. who clearing his professional and 
>ecame a trainer after retiring personal reputation, 
is a jockey, was arrested at his He has formally applied to 

lomc in’ Hamilton' Road, retire in March, at least eight 
Newmarket, yesterday morn- years earlier than he had 
ng by Suffolk police. planned to leave foe force. He 

According to a spokesman » s aged 47. 
or the Inland Revenue Mr At his brother’s wedding in 
*igeoti is accused that “on or London yesterday, Mr Stalker 
ibout 29 April. 1983. at sai* “f am . n ° l a broken 
Newmarket or elsewhere did man — it’s simply that my 
rifo intent to defiaud and to family don’t want me to be a 
he prejudice of Her Majesty policeman any more, 
he Queen and the Corarais- J “ I could have put my head 
ioners deliver or caused to be Q 0 ™ 11 ant * ignored all the 
lelivered to foe Inland Rev- difficulties at work, still doing 
nue special office a statement foe job as a professional. But it 
igned by him and dated 29 was killing me to come home 
Lpril 1983 which contained a see my wife Stella so 
aise statement, namelv that upscL I have seen my mother 
he only bank accounts he turn from being a spritely lady 
ield at 29 April 1983 were at into 30 old woman.” 
he National Westminster Mr Stalker was removed as 
lank, Newmarket, contrary to head of an inquiry into allega- 
’ommon Law”. lions that the Royal Ulster 

The Inland Revenue did not "P opera J i, S 1 2 

Sfi! ftiSSMufl! SSp&SSMSJg 

is passport He said yesterday:*;! am not 

TTiebencb adjourned for 20 ? om e g wash any dirty hnen 
linutes. When foe mag- “ ““£* »®ebooy 

trates returned the chaff else starts it There is no way I 

.an, Mr John Moore smiled “W out 35 a b,tter ??g ■ 
t Mr Piggott and said: “We .a tarefiffi y 

re happyto gram haiL” considered deasi on involving 

The magiarates set bail aJI my femdy. It is mte to say 
ifo sureties each of £1 00,000, Sf 
reducing the amount depos- for at least anofoer eight y^rs, 
ited by foe ex-jockey to £1 ° n “° sndei ?^ n 1 

million Conditions were also my * , ? atl 5“ 

rl that he must live at his 20(1 decided to go after 30 
ewmarket home and report * m term like most police- 
eeklv to nolice. mea d0 - 

spent more “ is ”*ES5* “J* 

tan nine hours to police Stalker was bitterly upset that 

istody, was told byTnag- ^ was not informed id ad- 
trates to produce tanker? S"*/* P* of M >™ 

raft for £950,000 by 5pm on ? 1 "|} ,ey * relurn T 10 
londay or be taken back into Saddleworth moor on Tues- 
slice custody day. particularly as he was one 

Mkhaei Seety, page 30 pfonly three serving membps 

in foe Manchester force m- 

• volved in the original 

nquiry on It tP believed that his 

' * " j. resignation . was accepted by 

Chief Constable Mr James 
W U1 l Anderton without any attempt 

nice Correspondent made to change his mind. 

Recently foe emotional 
hich serious consideration strain on Mr Stalker became 
as given to scrapping ft. so great that on doctor’s 

The inquiry team will con- orders he took two weeks off 


was given to scrapping rL 


sist of two senior MoD staff 
one a scientist and foe other 
an administrator, and a mem- 
ber of foe Efficiency Unit. 

It was emphasized last night 
that the need for an investiga- 
tion had been taken some 
weeks ago and it would be into 
foe management and monitor- 
ing of the Nimrod programme 
and not into the actual choice 
of aircraft to provide foe UK’s 
next generation of airborne 
early warning radar. 

The team will also be look- 
ing at the handling of several 

Continued on page 20, col 6 


work and told how foe sus- 
tained pressure of foe inquiry 
had taken its toll on his entire 
family, including his wife 
Stella, aged 43, and their two 
daughters. 

- Mrs Stalker said that her 
husband had become a 
changed man who had lost 
weight and confidence to his 
future. 

One of foe most worrying 
burdens he has had to carry is 
foe £21.000 legal fees incurred 
in the long struggle to clear his 
name. 

Continued on Page 20, col 8 




■■ft. 


Chorus of anger at theatre grant cuts 


By Gavin Bell 
Arts Correspondent 

The axe of threatened Arts 
Council cash cuts has fallen 
principally on the national 
theatre and opera companies. 


y»tcrday in a provoking a chon^ofdirmay 
Sing incident between and _ concern about their 
Greek and Turkish Army bor- survival. 

oinno thp R iver Ev- Under the council alloca- 


Greek and Turkish Army bor- 
der patrols along the River Ev- 
ros. which marks foe frontiei 
between foe two countries. 

According to t& e Greek 


tions announced yesterday, 
the National Theatre and the 
Royal Shakespeare Company 


account a patrol spotted five wdl rest™ ” 

Turkish soldiers in Greek their grants next year-eff- 
SriS east of Fermi and ectwely a substantial cut in 

•*dS ^Sta’oJSri «£ re Th‘r^nth Bank Board, 
v ntol. one and miming a which runs foe London con- 
S-SG^kMldiSf cm hail complex, was also 

report "claimed given a “standstill” grant, 
the exchange lEk nlace in while English National Opera 
TurltishiOTnlorvand resulted received an increase well be- 
in foe death of a Turkish towmflauon. 


q ☆ * * * 


lieutenant and a soldier. 


The Royal Opera House 


was granted a slay of execu- 
tion, pending discussions on 
longer-lent! funding, but it is 
unlikely to fere much better 
than the ENO. 

In accordance with the 
council’s regional develop- 
ment policy, arts bodies in 
Scotland, Wales and the Eng- 
lish regions were spared foe 
worst of the cutbacks. 

Mr Luke Rittner, secretary- 
general of foe Arts Council, 
blamed inadequate gov- 
ernment funding, and said 
many organizations would 
have to use all their ingenuity 
and management skills to stay 
in business. 

“Some of our companies 
face foe prospect of alarming 
deficits if, on a diminishing 
income, they are to meet foe 
continuing demand for their 
activities." 

He believed large com- 


panies could cope with finan- 
cial difficulties more easily 
than some of foe smaller ones. 

Mr Rittner said foe council 
had begun discussions with 
Mr Richard Luce, Minister for 
the Arts, on a proposal to 
establish three-year funding 
arrangements to replace foe 
current annual grant system. 

In the meantime, he had 
ordered an immediate review 
of overhead expenditure by 
foe regional arts associations, 
and by foe Arts Council itself 

Mr Rittner welcomed arts 
marketing initiatives by the 
Government, but said: 
“You’ve got to have some- 
thing to market in foe first 
place.” 

He concluded: “Our mess- 
age to the Government is 
clear. It really should not go 
on penalising foe artistic suc- 
cess of this country.” 


Mr Geoffrey Cass, chair- 
man of the Royal Shakespeare 
Company, said foe allocation 
represented a shortfall to foe 
company of £800,000. 

“The RSC is well aware of 
the Arts Council’s funding 
problems and is sympathetic, 
but slow strangulation of 
Britain’s outstanding national 
and international assets is not 
a sensible policy.” 

Mr Peter Jonas, managing 
director of ENO, said its 2.6 
per cent increase, representing 
£172,000, would be swallowed 
up by increased VAT pay- 
ments to foe Government, 
resulting from increased 
attendances. 

“That’s foe very sad thing 
about it, it is only helping to 
pay off tax debts accruing 
from our success." 

Hall attack, page 2 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


* * *** 


Single vote sees 
FitzGerald home 


Beloff takes charge of Tory students 


The Irish Republic's g o v ernm ent last night won by a 
majority of one a crucial vote to adjourn the Dail at the end 
of a debate held in an electioneering atmosphere. 

Two sick deputies brought to the chamber for the crucial 
vote were given an ovation by their parliamentary 
colleagues as they stn^gled through the division lobbies. 
~ Mr Oliver Flanagan, a Fine Gael backbocher, looked 

pale and tired as he entered the Da3 with the aid of a walk- 
ing frame while opposition deputy David Andrews, who is 
recovering from a hade operation, was in a wheelchair for 
the vote. 

But Dr Garret FitzGerald was able to win the debate 
adjourning the DaO until Jan nary 28 when a backbencher 
who quit his party earlier in the month abstained on the 
adjournment motion. Dining the Christmas recess Fine 
Gael-Labour cabinet ministers win attempt to frame a 
budget which the Prime Minister has said will in volve 
austerity measures inrlmtinp Ir£300 million sp ending cuts. 

Hcm^S^Dy depcti^telieTe the Government wffl be 
forced to go to the country before Easter. 


By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 

Lord Beloff, tin political 
historian and founder of 
Britain's only private univer- 
sity, is one of a quartet of 
righ t-wi ng academics ap- 
pointed to form the core of the 
body replacing the recently 
disbanded Federation of 
Conservative Students. 

Lord Beloff, agai 73, who 
holds several senior party 
posts, will be joined by Dr 
John Marks, until recently a 
senior lecturer at the North 
London Polytechnic and one 


of the Black Paper authors; 
Professor John Honey, of 
Leicester University; and 
Professor David Dilks, of 
Leeds University, on the 
Conservative Collegiate 
Forum. 

The forum, to be chaired by 
Mr Peter Morrison, deputy 
chairman of the Conservative 
Party, will also include 12 
students leaders representing 
all parts of the country, and 
Mr John Bereow, the former 
FCS chairman. 

Yesterday, Lord Beloff, 
Professor Emeritus at Oxford 
University and first principal 


Dockers’ 
pay deal 


Appeal is 
dismissed 


More than 1,080 dockers 
in Liverpool voted yes- 
terday at the Philharmonic 
Hall to accept a new two 
year pay deal which pro- 
vides a basic wage increase 
of £8 and £115 bonus paid 
every six months. 

Management have prom- 
ised better working con- 
ditions and working 
practices to turn the loss- 
making cargo-handling 
into profit by attracting 
more work. 

The chairman of the 
shop stewards committee, 
Mr Dennis Kelly, said the 
deal, reached after eight 
months, had saved the port 


Pierre Royan, who was 
sentenced to three months' 
imprisonment for firing 
three shots from a storting 
pistol in protest against a 
Sinn Fein member speak- 
ing at a council meeting, 
hatf bis appeal dismissed 
yesterday at Inner London 
Crown Coart, south 
London. 

Royan, aged 27, of 
Fanshaw Street Hackney, 
east London, was sen- 
tenced by a magistrate at 
Old Street central London, 
on Wednesday after he 
admitted disrupting the 
public meeting last 
October. 


Dons’ threat 
of disruptive 
action over 
pay dispute 


By Mark Dowd, Education Reporter 
Disrupted lectures and the of 25 per cent over two years. 

■ . . , i- _<■ : t r - ? J I .1 


withholding of examination 
marks in Britain's 46 univer- 
sities* could affect students in 


University dons have al- 
ready consented in principle 
to a system of staff appraisal 


higher education after a vote and other reforms demanded 
yesterday by the Association by the Government, and are 


of University Teachers to frustrated with Mr Baker, 
begin a programme of indus- who, they believe, is dragging 


NUJ quits pay role 


trial action in the new year. 

Members of the associa- 
tion's national council de- 
rided on the move at a 


his heels on a pay settlement 
which has been delayed. 

A request for an interim pay 
rise of 6 per cent, pending a 


meeting in Birmingham after final settlement, was rejected 
an inconclusive meeting ear- last week by vice-chancellors. 


The National Union of Journalists has decided to 
withdraw from national pay bargaining with the News- 
paper Society, which represents 261 provincial companies. 

Branches will have to negotiate pay deals after a ballot of 
8,000 members rejected a rise of between £5 and £ 6 a week 
and a “get-out danse**, which said that newspapers in 
financial difficulty would not be bound by the agreement 


lier in the week with Mr The general secretary of the 


Kenneth Baker. Secretary of association, Miss Diana War- 


State for Education. 

Much now depends on 


wick, said after 
meeting: “As Mr 


yesterday's 
Baker has 


further meeting with Mr Baker not responded to our recent 
scheduled for mid-January. If negotiations, members believe 
the association comes away that he will be moved only by 


Bomber 

guilty 




empty-handed its members disruptive industrial action 
will be balloted on strike and that is the path they fed 


A Birmingham Crown 
Court jury decided yes- 
terday that James HazeU 
was the petrol bomber fea- 
tured on the front pages of 
the national newspapers 
during the Handsworth ri- 
ots in September last year. 

Hazel! win be sentenced 
on Monday. He had been 
pictured carrying a petrol 
bomb shortly before throw- 
ing it into a building sup- 
plies shop. 

HazeU, aged 32. of 
Merry hill Drive, Winson 
Green, had denied the ar- 
son charge. He said he was 
not the man in the 
photograph. 



action at the end of the month, they must now follow, 
which, if approved, would # The three academic advis- 
begm to affea campuses m ers to Ruskin College. Oxfoid, 
early February. have presented Mr George 

Yesterday, the second larg- Walden. Under Secretary of 
est teaching union also gave a Stale for ^< 2 ^ with a 


resounding “no” to the rival oa academic freedom 

W ^conditions deals pro- designed to avoid a repetition 


posed by the local education 
authorities and the Govern- 
ment. 

In a low turnout of 41 per 


of the dispute involving the 
former politics lecturer. Mr 
David Selboume. 

Mr Walden said yesterday 


cent, members of the National that he would be studying the 
Union of Schoolmas- document “very closely”, but 


ters/Union of Women Tea- reiterated the point be has 
ctaers rejected by 4 1 ,994 votes made to the college previously 

C 1-70 4 k. 1 ’ 1 . ..... . .. r 


to 5,178 the employers’ pack- that there could be no com- 
age agreed at the conciliation promise on the issue of free- 


service, Acas, and rebuffed Mr dora for academics. 
Baker by rejecting his pro- Students boycotted 


✓ - 


posed settlement by an even Selbourne’s lectures after he 
bigger margin of 44,691 to wrote anarricfe for The Times 


in March. He is suing Ruskin 


The university lecturers are tor constructive dismissal and 
demanding a phased pay deal defamation. 


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m. 


Scotland 
close to 
settlement 


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V . V ^ // 

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Iff 




An end to the two-year 
Scottish teachers’ dispute 
looks likely in the new year. 

The main unions appear 
certain to ballot their mem- 
bers with the recommenda- 
tion that they approve the 
latest deal discussed with local 
authority employers and the 
Government 

Reports drawn up by two 
working parties established 
after an overwhelming rejec- 
tion of the Government’s 
initial package, were yesterday 
approved by the employers’ 
and teachers' sides. 

Last night, the executive of 
the Educational Institute of 
Scotland, the country’s largest 
teaching union, voted 21 to six 
in favour of a recommenda- 
tion that the deal should be 
accepted. 

The settlement proposed by 
yesterday’s meeting of the 
Scottish Joint Negotiating 
Committee is based on the 
original two-stage, 16.4 per 
cent pay offer. 


of Buckingham University, 
who tried to act as a peace- 
maker in the confrontation 
between the FCS radicals and 
party hierarchy, said he saw 
himself as a ‘"grandfather” 
figure building bridges across 
the generation gap. 

The forum's main task, he 
thought, was to recapture the 
academic high ground for 
Conservative ideas, a position 
lost since 1979 under the 
impact of financial stringency, 
retirements and defections to 
the SDP. 

“We need a new network 
among dons, lecturers and so 


forth and to act as souring 
board for party policy. The 
students have remained 
numerically very effective 2 nd 
active, but because the central 
leadership fell into the hands 
of extremists, there was chaos. 

“The thing is to rebuild 
proper lines of communica- 
tion between the partv at Jhe 
centre and local branches. 

After the "outrageous** slur 
a^inst Lord Stockton in an 
FCS magazine, it was 
“inevitable** that the body be 
rtfsfrgnded, be said. 

Mr Bereow said that in 
flyfrtitinn to the academics, the 


forum would include the 
“best” of the former 
branch chairmen 10 “empha- 
size the broad-based character 
of Conservatism''. 

It would concentrate on 
campaigning on the campuses, 
policy formation, especially in 
the areas of further and higher 
education, and extending 
Tory influence within the 
academic circles. 

“We shall not be distracted 
bv personal bickering and the 
pursuit of fetishes", a dear 
reference to the factional 
infighting that dogged me 
FCS. 



Anderton 
censured 
on Aids 
speech 


Sir Peter Hall, artistic director of the National Theatre, call- 
ing for a public outcry against cuts in go v e r nm ent spending 
on the arts yesterday (Photograph: Chris Hams). 


Hall sees political r‘"7HT 

A But after the meeting an 

battle on arts cash 


Sir Peter Hah emerged last 
night as the most outspoken 
Critic of the Government's arts 
funding policy after hearing 
the allocation of cash for next 
year. 

At a briefing in his National 
Theatre office, he said: “I 
don’t think the Government 
would mind if one of the 
national companies closed. 
My view is that they want to 
see the theatres dosed, or 
diminish ed, or privatized. 

“Our only defence is in the 
political arena, to prove to the 
Government that there are 
votes in the arts just as there 
are in education, and if you 
muck up our heritage, ruin our 
traditions, and wreck our. 
tourist industry, people will 
mind.” 


■w “ v '*’**^** | which bad spurred him to 

can t get the money, the, make the speech which has 
Government won’t give the, inflamed public opinion. . 


money, so it's up to the 
audiences to say why are you 
doing this? 

“We spend millions of 


“The speech was not pre- 
prepared but jotted down in 
notes I made while being 
driven to the seminar. I was 


pounds a year in our educa- mni ^ ^ tfGod to 

uon system leaching children say what I did and I will not re- 


how to appreciate Shake- 
speare. and now it’s almost 
impossible for a child to see a 
Shakespeare production in a 
regional theatre because they 
can’t afford to put them on. 
which seems to me rather 
potty." 

For a relatively small sum 
of money, between £20 mil- 
lion and £25 million, the 
Government could transform 
the arts 2 nd thereby support 
one of the biggest success 
stories in Britain since the 
war. which brought the coun- 


He repeated his call for a- try enormous international | 


national 
saying: ' 


>test campaign, 
s Arts Council 


prestige and did not cost it a 
penny. 


tract a single word.” 

Prevented from expanding 
on Ins comments during the 
authority meeting, Mr 
Anderton added later: “They 
stage-managed the situation to 
prevent me speaking and lik- 
ened me to Adolf Hitler with- 
out allowing me to reply. 

“I think they were afraid of 
what I was going to say but 
they are so wrong ~ 

“I have never felt such peace 
of mind in my life before and 
when the time comes for me to 
speak further I will be driven 
by even greater conviction and 
motivation.” 


£27m extra on publicity bill 


By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 

A senior Commons select of the Treasury and Gvil Department of Employment 


committee is to convene a 
special meeting on the first 
working day after the Christ- 
mas break to discover why the 
department that publicizes the 
Government’s work has been 
authorized to spend an extra 
£27 million on top of its £70 
million annual budget. 

The 35 per cent increase to 
the Central Office of 
Information's 1986/87 cash 


The report on conditions of Limit slipped through without 
service suggests that teachers debate when the Commons 




LAST 


toke on an additional 80 hours 
in the school and working year 
to cover curricular develop- 
ment. parent-teacher meetings 
and in-service t raining . 


approved a series of winter 
supplementary estimates last 
Monday. 

Mr Anthony Beanmont- 
. Dark, a Conservative member 


Service Committee, said it 
was “an awful lot of money 
with an awfully little amount 
of explanation”. 

He said: “We don’t yet 
know what it's about but we 
will and we should. What we 
are saying is that you should 
not expect to get through 
£27 million extra ‘on the nod’. 
The Treasury committee is 
there to make sure the House 
doesn't overlook these 
things.” 

Mr Neville Taylor, Direc- 
tor-General of the Central 
Office of Information, will 
appear on January 12 to be 
asked why, for example, the 


is to spend an extra £7.1 mil- 
lion to publicize its activities, 
and why life Manpower Ser- 
vices Commission is to spend 
an extra £9.6 million. 


Other departments with up- 
graded demands include the 
Department of Health and 
Social Security, which will eet 
an extra £4.2 million; Min- 
istry of Defence (£2.4 million) 
and Department of Energy 
(£ 1.8 million). 


TV staff 
vote to 
strike 
over pay 

By Tim Jones 


« •• -r 

t ? J £ 

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Live programmes on BBC 
Vvirion will be senousl} 


By Ian Smith 
Labour-controlled Greater 
Manches ter Police Authority 
hw demanded that its Chief 
Constable, Mr James 
Anderton. retract bis claim 
that Aids is a “holy judgement 
on a hnywan cesspit swirling in 


After a stormy discussion 
members, who each had a full 
text of the speech delivered by 
Mr Anderton to police officers 
at an Aids seminar eight days 
■ go, agreed he had exceeded 
hfe acceptable bounds of 
responsxblity. 

By 21 votes to 20 they 
supported a four-point demand 
made by Manchester City 
Council that Mr Anderton 
retract his speech, that the 
authority be disassociated 
from his“hranophobic’* views, 
that they pursue moves to take 
disciplinary measures against 
Mr Anderton that they re- 
iterate their backing of the 
government campaign to 
counteract the Aids menace. 


Members also decided to 
hold an Aids seminar to 
counteract the damage they 
felt had been inflicted by Mr 
Anderton. 

The chairman of the policy 
committee, Mr ToHy 
McArdeil, spoke of the 
inffaxnatory speech made by 
Mr Anderton winch would do 
nothing bnt harm to 
potitirians* attempts to pre- 
vent tire spread of a killer 
rims. 


television win ac 
disrupted in the new year after 
a ballot decision yesteraay by 
600 electricians to withdraw 
their labour from midnight on 
January 3. 

The electricians, who are 
responsible for lighting, voted 
bv a 3-1 majority lor industrial 
action which they hope 
resolve a pay and differentials 
argument which has been 
simmering for three years. 

At one sugc the men. 
members cf the HectncaL 
Electronic Telecommunica- 
tion and Plumbing Union had 
threatened to begin their 
industrial action before 
Christmas. 

Bui after their shop stew- 
ards had met yesterday they 
derided that such a move 
would lose them public sym- 
pathy. A statement issued by 
the union said: “The EETPU 
have been anxious to avoid 
any action which would affect 
the viewing public during 
Christmas and the new year.” 

The statement recognized 
that television, during the 
holiday period, is especially 
important to elderly and sick 
people. 

The union blamed the 
Corporation for the break- 
down of talks. Mr Harry 
Hughes, a union executive 
member, said: “Our argument 
is with the management and 
not with the general public 
and we are doing our best to 
minimize the effect on the 
viewers.** 

When the same argument 
was raised last year, the union 
voted overwhelmingly to take 
industrial action, but then 
agreed to return 10 the nego- 
tiating table. 

One reason for the dispute 
is that differentials were 
eroded three years ago when 
scene shifters received a 
20 per cent pay rise. 

But the union also claims 
that the basic pay of £5.000 at 
the BBC is much less than for 
electricians in other parts of 
the industry. At ITV. the 
union says, their members 
receive £2 an hour more for 
doing the same job. 

EEPTU members employed 
by lighting contractors have 
said they will refuse to under- 
take any extra work and other 
unions have also said they will 
not undertake any extra 
duties. 

Live shows, sport and new 
programmes will be part- 
icularly affected by the 
dispute. 


pOiiC^ 


Ruling on 
plastic 
bullets 


The Central Office of 
Information said yesterday 
that its job was to provide a 
foil publicity service for gov- 
ernment departments. 


The fall of Nimrod 


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GEC fears damage by 
break-up of its team 


RAF is left with costly 
but useless aircraft 



By Ronald Faux, Employment Affairs Correspondent 
GEC Avionics, the com- tains of money at a problem. 


By Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent 


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pany that lost the £900 million 
airborne radar contract to 
Boeing, now fears a damaging 
loss of its best technicians 
employed on the Nimrod 
project 

The group of 1,500 electron- 
ics specialists which devel- 
oped the Nimrod early 
warning system is one of the 
most advanced technology 
teams in the world. 

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on their skills. They include 
radar technicians, signal 
processing technicians and 
software specialists who were 
able to produce what one GEC 
scientist described as a unique 
blend of expertise. 

“They have that especially 
British approach to solving 
problems, the Barnes Wallis 
back of an envelope solution 
rather than throwing moun- 


These people will be highly 
sought after, not least in our 
own country”, he said. 

Plessey, the electronics 
company which is a partner in 
the successful. Boeing Awacs 
programme, yesterday can- 
celled a “recruiting seminar 
at a hotel near the GEC 
Avionics plant at 
Borehamwood, Hertfordshire. 

Would-be job applicants 
were met by a battery of news 
and television cameramen. 

Plessey said that the semi- 
nar was cancelled at the last 
minute because there was no 
way confidentiality could be 
assured. 

Plessey stands to gain multi- 
millt on pound contracts from 
Boeing under the Awacs pro- 
gramme, 

GEC Avionics made-it clear 
yesterday that the company 
would fight to keep its skilled 
workers. 


The Royal Air Force was pounds In yet more work 
last night trying to decide what 00 ti** aircraft. 


to do with the II odd-shaped 
aircraft with which ft had 
planned to mount a constant 
patrol of British airspace. 

The 11 Nimrod AEW Mark 


The Nimrod, a straight 
derivative of the civilian 
Comet airliner, was first built 
in 1969 as the Mark 1 
maritime patrol craft. When 


3s were converted at a cost of production dosed down in 
more than £200 million by 1976 a total of 49 had been 


British Aerospace at Wood- 
ford near Manchester, ready 
to bouse the radar which, in 
the end, did not work. 

But with their huge bulbous 
noses and rear they are now 


built for the RAF and already 
many of them were hack in the 
Woodford factory being op- 
graded into the more sophis- 
ticated Mark 2 patrol aircraft 
with computers 50 times more 


Northumbria Police 
Authority yesterday foiled in 
its High Court action challeng- 
ing the power of the Home 
Secretary to supply Chief Con- 
stables with plastic bullets and 
CS gas without the prior 
consent of local police 
authorities. 

Two judges ruled in a test 
case that the Mr Douglas 
Hurd, the Home Secretary, 
had a prerogative to supply 
such equipment. 

Mr Justice Mann, sitting 
with Lord Justice Watkins, 
said: “The decision whether or 
not to use the equipment 
supplied by the Secretary of 
State is for the chief constable 
alone to make”. He said the 
court's judgement related to 
supply, not to use, which was 
the responsibility of chief 
constables. 

Northumbria Police 
Authority had sought a 
declaration that the Home 
Secretary had no legal power 
to issue plastic baton rounds 
or CS gas to chief constables 
without the consent of the 
local police authority, “save in 
a situation of grave 
emergency”. 

The authority, backed by 
the Association of Metropoli- 
tan Authorities, launched its 
High Court challenge follow- 
ing the issue of Home Office 
Circular 40 in May this year, 
which proposed setting up a 
central store of plastic bullets, 
CS gas ami other equipment 
from which any police force 
could withdraw items on 
obtaining the approval of HM 
Inspector of Constabulary. 

Mr Justice Mann said the 
availability to a chief con- 
stable of “suitable equipment” 
ought not to depend on ju- 
dicial review, as the authority 
had argued, unless there was a 
compelling reason. 

It had been argued by Mr 
Desmond Keene, QC» for the 
Labour-led authority, that the 
Home Secretary’s prerogative 
had been removal by the 
introduction of the 1964 Pol- 
ice Act. 


completely useless in their - efficient than in the Marie 1 
present shape. The probability version. 


is that they will once agam 
have to go back to Woodford to 
have tiie radomes removed. 


Thai, in 1977 Marconi, as it 
then was, was given die con- 
tract to provide the electronic 


Collection 

Mr Russell Profit! was not 
short-listed for .the vacant post 
of Director of Education of the 
L°°don borough of Brent as 
implied in our report, “Baker 
orders Brent to drop ‘racism’ 
case”, on December 13. 


and be re-converted either into equipment for the Mark 3 
Hying foe! tankers, maritime version — the centre of the 

. _ m s Cl 1 a 


patrol aircraft or replacements controversy. The only 

for the Canberra electronic amraft then capable of carry- 


wariare training aircraft. . mg the electronics was thought 

Whatever is decided, the to be the original Nimrod 
Ministry of Defence will have Mark 1, n service with the 


to spend several hundred m3- RAF. So 11 were taken back 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986* 


HOME NEWS 


Two Sikhs found 
guilty of plotting 
to murder Gandhi 



The Sikh ringleader and an 
accomplice in a plot to assas- 
sinate Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the 
Indian prime minister, during 
his official visit to Britain 15 
months ago, were found guilty 
at Birmingham Crown Court 
yesterday of conspiracy to 
murder. 

Jamail Singh Ranuana, 
aged 46. the former owner of a 
cash and cany store, who led 
the conspiracy, and Sukvinder 
Singh Gill, aged 30, a dyer, 
both of Leicester, will be 
sentenced today. 

They were convicted of 
conspiring to murder Mr Gan- 
dhi and soliciting two under- 
cover policemen to kill the 
Indian prime minister. 
Ranuana was also convicted 
of possessing a .38 Smith and 
Wesson revolver and supply- 
ing heroin. 

The jury deliberated for 18 
hours and spent two nights in 
an hotel before unanimously 


convicting Ranuana after a 
trial lasting nine weeks. 

T wo hours later it convicted 
Gill on a 10 to one majority 


lion, was said by his support- 
ers to be facing a “death 
warrant" if he was returned to 
India because of his 


verdict. One juror was missing campaigning for an indepen- 


because of illness. 

A third Sikh, Parmatma 
Singh Marwaha, aged 44. a 
jeans manufacturer from 
Leicester, and British trea- 
surer of the International Sikh 
Youth Federation, was found 
not guilty of conspiracy and 
soliciting. 


dent Sikh state. 

All three men bad denied 
the charges. Gill told the court 
he spoke no English and had 
no idea what was going on 
when Ranuana attempted to 
hire two “IRA gunmen to kill 1 
Mr Gandhi. 

The “gunmen" were under- j 



t' 

> 



Marwaha sagged as the not cover policemen, who 
guilty verdict was returned thwarted the plot. 


and in the street outride there 
were emotional scenes as he 


The court had been told that 
Ranuana, a father of four, was 


dhi and soliciting two under- turtwnned supporters arrested under the Prevention 

cover policemen to kill the “** said ’ trough his solicitor, of Terrorism Act in October 
Indian prime minister " Iaraso pleased to be freed." 1985 after an underworld 
Ranuana was also convicted Mr Justice McCullough said informer, identified in court 

of possessing a .38 Smith and he wo “ ,d cons ! der the ques- only as John, tipped off police 
Wesson revolver and supply- ? ,0D of deportation when past- about the plot, 
inn heroin ,n & semen** today on Gill, 'As a result, the undercover 

T-, "... . „ who came to Britain in 1978 policemen played the role of 

l he jury deliberated for 18 and is still an Indian national. IRA killers for hire and se- 
hours and spent two nights in Gill, a father of two and a crcily tape-recorded details of i 

an hotel before unanimously member of the youth federa- Ranuana 's conspiracy. 

Police help informer to hide 


K7m 

fl-1 


Search of 
moors is 
abandoned 
for winter 

Bad weather has forced 
police to call off their opera- 
tion on Saddlewonh Moor in 
Greater Manchester, where 
they have been searching for 
the bodies of further victims 
of the moors murderers. Myra 
Hindley and Ian Brady, for the 
past four weeks. 

As blizzards swept the 
search area, yesterday, the 
man leading the hunt for the 
bodies of two missing chil- 
dren, Det Chief Supt Peter 
Topping, said that when they 
returned, in the spring, they 
would sxan digging at places 
pointed out by Myra Hindley 


Solace for 
parking 
ticket 

A teacher of English was the 
sole winner of yesterday's 
Portfolio Gold prize of £4,000. 

Mrs Christine Catch pole, 
aged 41, from Forest Row In 
East Sussex, has played the 
Portfolio Gold game for the 
past 10 months. 

“It Is quite unbelief a We." 
she said. “At first everything 
conspired against me. The 
newsagent did not deliver The 
Times this morning, so I had to 
look for another copy while On 


who had been allowed out of a shopping trip in Eastbourne, 
jail recently to assist the “But before I had time to 


The underworld informer 
* who tipped off detectives 
about a plot by British Sikhs to 
assassinate Mr Rajiv Gandhi, 
the Indian prime minister, has 
gone into hiding, with police 
help. 

Police said that the infor- 
mer's life had been threatened 
after he warned them that 
militant Sikhs planned to 
murder Mr Gandhi during his 
official visit to England in 
October 1985. 

The tip-off led to the arrest 
of several Sikhs in Leicester, 
including the “ringleader”, 
Jamail Singh Ranuana, aged 
46, who was fooled by an 
elaborate police undercover 
operation. 

He was said to have re- 
ceived inside information 
from the Indian High Com- 
mission in London about Mr 
Gandhi's itinerary, including 
meetings with the Prime Min- 
ister and the Prince of Wales. 
But, the two “IRA gunmen" 
Ranuana tried to hire for 
£60,000 to carry out the 
assassination were undercover 
policemen. 

In the trial at Birmingham 
Crown Court, the defence 
accused the policemen of act- 
ing as agent provocateurs to 
encourage a crime thatother- 
wise would not have , been 

Drug may 
fight side 
effects 

By a Staff Reporter 
A drug is being developed 
which coaid transform treat- 
ments for mental disorders 
such as schizophrenia and 
anxiety and prove effective 
against the side effects of 
nausea and vomiting linked 
with cancer treatment. 

First details of the drag, 
developed by Glaxo under the 
code name, GR38032F, were 
reported yesterday at the Brit- 
ish Pharmaceutics! Society 
meeting in London. 

The company emphasizes 
that the compound is at a very 
early stage of development, 
but says it may prove a 
milestone in the treatment of 
diseases of the central nervous 
system. 

Present treatments for anxi- 
ety , including drags such as 
Vaiitun, often have marked 
side-effects including sedation 
and addiction. 

With schizophrenia, drugs 
often provoke a Parkinson's 
reaction, with severe shaki- 
ness and nnco-ordinated 
movements. 

Anti-cancer drags, part- 
icularly cisplatin cause 
distressing nausea and vom- 
iting. 

The new compound , which 
is based on a synthetic com- 
pound of “unique molecular 
str u ctur e" is the result of 10 
years of research. 

Tests on animals started in 
1983 and the company has 
started rfinirat trials on 
humans, but it will take sev- 
eral years before it is known 
whether the achievements in- 
dicated by the animal research 
ran he realized in humans. 

Glaxo researchers claim 
that they have discovered for 
the first time a sub-type of 5- 

bydxoxytryptamine receptors. 

The new compound blocks 
these receptors and one result 
is a fine tuning of other major 

nturo transmitter systems that 
affect physiological functions. 

Animal studies have shown 
that GR38032F can control 
overactivity in the brain sys- 
tem, thought to be responsible 
for symptoms of 
schizophrenia. J 


By Craig Sefon 

committed. Counsel said that 
it was “sel-up" by the 
“unscrupulous" informer, 
who was awaiting trial on 
serious charges and wanted a 
soft sentence in return for 
helping the police. 

Mr Justice McCullough 
ruled that the informer's real 
name and the identities of the 


ammunition. The police have 
never discovered where he got 
iL 

Ranuana boasted that the 
£60,000 fee was “peanuts” 
and bank slips showed the 
money seemed to be available. 
Ranuana, a father of four, was 
a director of a Peterborough I 
cash and cany business, who j 


policemen should remain se- came to England in 1958. * 
cret because of fears for their He lived in Be [grave, the 
safety. The policemen were Sikh area of Leicester where 
referred to as Tom B and Ian S the International Sikh Youth 


and the informer as John. Federation was a hotbed of 
When Tom B met Ranuana militant protest against the 
he pretended to be the IRA Indian government 
killer of Mr Airey Neave, Militant Sikhs swore ven- 
Conservative spokesman on geance on Mr Gandhi for the 
Northern Ireland killed by a storming by Indian troops in 
bomb at the Commons in 1984 of their holy shrine, the 
1979. Golden Temple of Amritsar, 

The police bugged a room at in Punjab and the death of the 
the Post House Hotel, Leices- Sikh spiritual leader, Sam 
ter, where Tom B met Bhindranwale. 


m 


search. 

The decision to call off the 
operation came as the key 
witness in the trial of Hindley 
and Brady, more than 20 years 
ago. was brought back to 
Saddle worth Moor to help 
police in the search. 

Hindley's former brother- 
in-law, Mr David Smith, aged 
38, who called police in after 
I watching Edward Evans, aged 
17. being axed to death by 
Brady, was driven over the 
moor, in an unmarked police 
car, after spending half an 
hour talking to Mr Topping in 
the search incident room. 

Mr Topping said: “His visit 
has been useful. Just exactly 
what he has done 1 am not 
prepared to discuss.” 

Mr Smith, who often 
accompanied the pair on to 
the moor above Oldham as a 
teenager, was driven slowly j 
past Hollin Brown Knoll, near 
where the bodies of Leslie Ann 
Downey, aged 10, and John 
Kilbridge, aged ! 2, were found 
in shallow graves. 

The area is believed to have 
been the second identified by 
Hindley during her visit from 
Cookham Wood Prison on 
Tuesday, when she spent 
seven hours on the moor. 


Ranuana. 

He told Ranuana: “I want 
you to understand you are 
asking me to terminate a head 
of stale. You are not talking 
about some simple crime, but 
the biggest form of criminal 
offence a man can get caught 
up in." 

Police doubts about 
Ranuana's plan disappeared 
when he produced a shortened 


Ranuana was exposed when 
he sought underworld help in 
the planned killing and dis- 
closed his plot to John, the 
informer, in a public house. 
The role of John was a central 
issue in the trial. 

When John was convicted 
of stealing at his own trial and 
sent to prison, senior officers 
expressed their concern for his 
safety. They arranged a new 


Jolly marking 30 years' tea parties yesterday with champagne (Photograph: Chris Harris)! SSfhoureon ^ the moor** 

Sbfy TripJe s wap woman ‘stable 

Yhjtf'4'17' Mrs Davina Thompson, the door of her room in the tant staphylococcus aureus 

tf-l J l j world's first triple transplant intensive care unit" is a wound infection whi 


Jolly, an expert ten-drinker, 
discarded her cup for cham- 
pagne yesterday to celebrate 
30 years of chimpanzee tele- 
vision commercials. 

The one-hundredth tele- 
vision advertisement for 
Brooke Bonde, in what is 


Mrs Davina Thompson, the 
world's first triple transplant 
patient, showed signs of 
regaining consciousness yes- 
terday, two days after the 
operation in which she was 
given a new heart, lungs and 
uver. 

She is said to be in a 
"satisfactory and stable” con- 


.38 Smith and Wesson re- address for him when he was 
volver and 1 7 rounds of released. 

Signs of success 
in war on heroin 

By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 
The United Kingdom is on being won, there was welcome 


thought to be Britain’s long- dition, still, at Papworth Hos- 
est-nmning campaign, is to be Pjtal, Cambridgeshire, where 


shown on Boxing Day. 

The PG Ups chimpanzees 
have been appearing on tele- 
vision since 1956, acting as 
yachtsmen, removal men. 
Toot de France cyclists, and 
even as Janies Bond, the spy 
fiction character, introducing 
himself with the words: “My 
name is Bond - Brooke Bond." 

The chimps' champagne I 


the operation was perform pd- 
“Sbe is not fully conscious 
but she is regaining con- 
sciousness." a spokesman for 
East Anglia Regional Health 
Authority said yesterday. 
“Her husband has been into 
see her again today and her 
mother and father-in-law have 
waved to her through the glass 


By Jill Sherman 

door of her room in the 
intensive care unit.” 

Mrs Thompson's daughter. 
Stephanie, aged nine, who 
arrived at the hospital on 
Thursday, has still not been 
allowed to visit her mother 
because there is a greater risk 
of infection from children. 

It could be a few days 
before Mrs Thompson fully 
regains consciousness, 

• All non-urgent operations 
were cancelled yesterday at 
Addenbrookes Hospital, 
Cambridge, where a dan- 
gerous bacteria, resistant to 
antibiotics, has infected four 
patients in the intensive care 
unit 

The bacteria known as. 
MSRA — or Methic-illin-resis- 


tant staphylococcus aureus - 
is a wound infection which 
affects patients who have 
undergone severe surgical 
procedures. “It could delay 
their recovery and can be 
quite dangerous if it is not 
treated property as the pa- 
tients are very weak,” the 
hospital unit's general man- 
ager, Mr David Astley, said. 
• A man aged 22, and his 
mother, are recovering in 
Cardiff Royal Infirmary after 
he was given one of her 
Iddneys in a three-hour opera- 
tion yesterday. 

Mrs Joyce Riddell said she 
could not stand watching her 
son, Mr Jeff Jones, suffering 
any longer from his kidney 
disease. 


check my numbers, I received 
a £14 traffic ticket. So I still 
can't believe I have won," sbe 
said. 

When asked how she in- 
tended spending the prize 
money, Mrs Catchpole said: 
“Apart from paying the park- 
ing fine. I’ll now be able to buy 
all the Christmas presents I 
had dreamed about.” 

Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BBI 6AJ. 

Jasmine case 
social worker 
wins damages 

The social worker who lost 
her job for “gross misconduct” 
in the Jasmine Beckford case 
was unfairly dismissed by 
Brent council, a High Court 
judge ruled yesterday. 

But Mrs Diane Dietmann 
will not be reinstated by Brent 
Social Services, because she 
did not immediately challenge 
her dismissal. 

Mr Justice Hodgson ruled 
that she had thereby accepted 
iL He awarded her damages 
for wrongful dismissal which 
will amount to 16 weeks* 
wages. 

The judge said that Mrs 
Dietmann, of Tudor W’eli 
Close, Stanmore, north-west 
London, was “deeply 
shocked” when she was dis- 
missed in December last year 
after an inquiry report which 
accused her of gross 
negligence. 

He said that while gross 
negligence may be the same as 
gross misconduct in law, he 
could not say the same for her 
coo track which allowed dis- 
missal only for gross 
misconduct 

Brent council is considering 
an appeal. 


The United Kingdom is on being won, there was welcome .TT'; 

course to turn back the heroin evidence that the growth of 

tide, according to Mr David the problem was slowing Osteal Tele nston st ndms. 
Mrltor. Minister of State at i„ 1983. addict notifications 

the Home Office. increased by 42 per cent and in SSwth fSISr ltohfoBri! i 

Addict notifications have 1984 by 26 per cent In 1985 r££ S 

shown a smaller increase and notifications of new addicts “ Ja - ““ Lass 

customs and excise pro- rose by 20 per cent. M 

visional figures for 1986. to be Mr Mellor, who is chairman gf**? ***» 

released next month, will in- of the Ministerial Group on nriwffrL to wm* with rhn^rc 
dicate heroin seizures have the Misuse of Drags, said: JETSAM rf fifcTE 
been significantly lower than “No one, of course, pretends SSaSer "ffisvofce fe 
in 1985. these notifications, 90 per cent 

The purity of heroin seized of which are for heroin addic- 
when entering the country has lion, represent the total num- a retiredbal maitaeS^ 
fallen, while street prices show her of drug dependants in the whose roire is 

a slight rise. UK. They are only a limited h ^£”£2? Tthe 

“Taken together,' Mr proportion of the true figure. 2 J ert i SCLnL e serred ilw 
MeMor said, “these se^re But they do proride an im- 3mSSS?foJo^Sd srifc 
indicators may well mean portant indicator ” “Sh* raSnte in Ilk# 

some reduction in the avail- Even if the heroin problem cmain,y sceins 10 ““ 

ability of heroin here. At the was moving towards its peak, Mo „_ o-ji,--, jj™,;. 

same time some treatment as was hoped, that was at far 
agencies are beginning to re- too high a leveL The cocaine 
port a levelling off in heron. mua not be undereai- £*"3 

referrals. mated either, and the growth ~ t ^ . 

During the first year of the of amphetamine misuse was a * ” 

Government's anti-heroin ad- serious cause for concern. - 

vert i sing, independent evaiu- The anti-drugs strategy is J 
ation has found that the being further intensified, in- 

proportion of young people eluding the tough confiscation J»S iy »i«» 

who said they would reject an provisions of the Drag Traf- JSLSSLSS 

offer of heroin has risen from ticking Offences Act 1986, 

83 per cent to 94 per cent which will be in force in the ^ 

“None of this means we can M xt few weeks. ltsahm “““P 8112 ** 8 - 

afford to be complacent,” Mr „ . . 

gvafj™ SBBSB Loft cash will 

addicts in the UK. in 1985, Kingi j om / q85\ (Statistical kp rACfnVfpH 
published yesterday. They Department, Home Office. Lu- I CbUIUCU 

meant that while the fight nar House. Croydon. Surrey fL A non/iv 

against heroin was far from CRO 9^T>, £2.50/ IU LIlc Occliy 


.. •*/ 


.'Shi im 


home in Leicestershire, said: 
threat must not be underesti- ^ chimps d 0 adore 
mated either, and the growth bQ( t f feey jJSnk it in 

of amphetamine misuse was a Sk**, notScaps,” 
serious cause for concern. - 

The anti-drags strategy is 
being further intensified, in- 

eluding the lough confiscation rh^t rh^ 

provisions of the Drag Traf-’ 
ticking Offences Act 1986, 


TO LAUNCH YOU ON YOUR FIRST 
OE2 CRUISE. WE’VE PUT 
TOGETHER A VERY SPECIAL PACKAGE. 


which will be in force in the 
next few weeks. 

Home Office Statistical Bulletin. 
Statistics of Drug Addicts Noti- 
fied to the Home Office. United 
Kingdom 1985\ (Statistical 
Department. Home Office, Lu- 
nar House. Croydon. Surrey 
CRO 9^T>, £2.50). 


Police to visit mother 
of girl found strangled 

Murder squad detectives Usher showed the cause of 
investigating the strangulation death, but further tests were 
of a girl aged seven are being carried out to establish if 
expected to interview her she had been sexually as- 
mother at Skegness, Lincoln- saulted. 


shire, today in an attempt to 
find a motive for the killing. 


The girl was left on her own 
asleep shortly before 9pra on 


Nicola Spencer was found Thursday. A friend of the 
dead at a flat in Grosvenor mother returned less than two 
Road. Skegness, by a male hours later to fetch an inhaler 
friend of her mother, Qiris- and found the girt dead 
tine, who was out drinking. Det Supt Tom Coates, head 
a' post mortem examina- of North Lincolnshire CID, 
lion yesterday by Home Office said: “At this stage I can’t say 

n r * 1 --, i .i ..__J vi 

pathologist 


Professor Alan whether a weapon was used 1 


was filmed in Italy using 
Italian chimpanzees. 

Loft cash will 
be restricted 
to the needy 

The Government yesterday 
announced a widespread cut- 
back in its roof insolation 
scheme (Our Property Corres- 
pondent writes). 

Mr John Patten, Honsing 
Minister, said in a written 
Commons reply that legisla- 
tion on insolation grants would 
restrict them to people on 
benefit and end the present 
general 66 per cent grant 
Mr Patten annonneed, how- 
ever, that a further £1.5 mil- 
lion was being made available I 
this financial year for English 
councils which have already 
nsed np their allocations. 

He said that almost 90 per 
cent of the accessible roofs hi 
England were now insnlated, 


Perhaps \tiu\i- drvaml uhuui lakiny 
a cniisr- nn llir QKJ hul llial< .i> f.ir u> il’- 
pone. Jusl b dream. Bt-cairsn liLi- a lul of 
people you probabli though! ii cruise nn 
such a world -fanum- ship was a pleasure 
reserved for the very rieh.T1i.il .is sniiieoni* 
who actually has to work tiir a living. you'd 
be the odd one out. 

Or maybeynu linui“lil dicn-'d be no- 
thing tn do cm I rnard evcptsii in a dii-keh.iir. 
sure at die ocean and count the seagulls. 

WetL if that'- wl ml y un 
thought. a QFL2 Mewi-amer*. 
cruise will maki-yon think Tp 

again. These cruises \ \ 


to Midi excilitu; pl.io-s a- Miniciru anil 
I. Mi. in mid yell'll re.iJi-w (lit- \uliu- is ignite 
fitilslHijdin». 

j>PECIM.K\JO\ME\T 

\i in'll liml the pmlilnn nn hiKini is 
uni inns In while aw ay the 
hours hilt rat) u-r to liml .y, 

ciinii^h hours Ineiijiiv ail m .. . vf 


a® 



Happier ‘holy hour’ for Ireland’s drinkers 

r r . . i . . -ii __ 


By Paul VaUely 
Theologians have long 
taken account of the po®ib“" 
ity that the Irish, for all their 
piety, misunderstood the par- 
able of the repentant pnbhcan. 

The licensees of Dublin, it 
most be admitted, have for the 
past 60 years been religious in 
their observance y 

hour”, the time of rest between 
three and four o’clock m the 
afternoon when they have 
retired behind their giiotters 


and refused to serve alcohol to 
anyone. 

Whether the discrepancy 
between this and the Vatican’s 
somewhat more prayerful no- 
tion of a Holy Horn- has been 
pointed oat to the Irish gov- 
ernment is not dear. At any 
rate it has now decided to 
abandon it. 

Moves to liberalize drinking 
conditions in the Irish Repaid 
lie. in an attempt to make the 


country more attractive to 
tourists, were outlined by Dr 
Garret FitzGerald’s gov- 
ernment in a national plan two 
years ago. 

The new measure will affect 
tire drinkers of Cork as well as 
Dublin. Elsewhere in the 
republic the boor (which natu- 
rally enough lasted for two 


allow public houses and bars 
to stay open until midnight 
during the summer months. 

In a sop to potential pro- 
testers, the government has 
said that it will also be 
tightening regulations against 
under age drinking. The mea- 
sure detailing the reforms, the 
Intoxicating Liquor Bill, Is 


horns on Sunday) is not oh- expected to go through par- 
served. Bat the entire nation liament without serious 
will be affected by plans to opposition- 


have been <kpecialh designed l«ir first time 
QE2 pasnetigers. And whal makes tlu a m 
wen belter news is the (am astir package uf 
extras we've included - just Tor you. 

So a QEJ Newcomers cruise is a 
unique rlumre to discover Jeiu enjoy ahli*. 
I low memorable a cruise aboard one of die 
nkisl luxurious >lii|n in lliew arid can In - . 

A chance to him tital dream into j 
reality. 

'.spgqvL y:\ue 

Su wu tliuughl the \m«.e ur a miiv 
aboard die QE2 would be beyond yuiir 
nwh. right? Wrung. Uur QEJ Newcomers 
cruises start Imtii £+9^ piT person mul that 
includes your ben mi fully appointed cabin, 
■ill ini-fll* and gratuities. 

Compare that tu the cost uf a hnlid.n 
in a five star hotel in jtisl one location and 
die value already lunk« i'utIIhuI. Hul if mu 
add die lari Unit yourCuiiard Hunting Iiuiel 
will cam 1 you in supn-inr five-star ct unfurl 


I lie firM - cIhss 
f' y*‘ s / < "fUF «'iilcnainm*-nl anti 

MHmr fimlihes fnvlv on 
. YmKaKmMF nffcr. Gnu'll find a msinu. 

liTture thentn* oikI be.illii 
yuHr *pa. >wiinniiiig p*««ls. \sbiri 
^ \ pool bnibs and uiglil • (libs. The 
slinws and die entertainment are «if 
ihe standard vnu'd evpert in die V\i->t 
End. with a cast i if stars .md rr-lcbnlii-s front 
"ft and ibe slnae. Anti the ineiii^!' 

Tlw chuiiv is unbelievable. Tlte ser- 
vice in ifierf -able. 

SPECIAL XEWC X'lMEKS PACK.AGE . 

Wl- make sure every passenger nn a 
QEJ cruise feels special. 

Bui for NewraniiTS we really push 
die boat uul Just look at die package we've 
laid on - just Tur yuu: 

□ Free firsl-rliiss rail travel tu and from 
Lunduiv'SuulhiUiiptuii nr free parking at 
Soudiamplon 

□ Your uvvn cuurier 

□ Tipping included 

□ \ Nevutimers’ (vrrty In 

inulie new friends 

□ A free sliureevnir.siun 

□ Spct ral tniiibk-hve cheek-in 

□ Seating with uIIht \i*wn uiiiers in die 
rvstanrdiiLs 

G \ duty live I mil le ul spiril fur each adult 
Wlltil's 1 1 hire. iVirri d'vtiu'VK already 
taken n miiM'nlmurd .limlher ship hi id this 
isyutir first tjKJ cruise v nil srili qnalifr fur 
uiir spei ial \en> timers' package. 


| SKKI :|AJ- \KUO »\IKHS t.Rt ISES j 
With fuuriJKJ New ri imers rnii«a.s to 

I chmise fnim.v nii're spoiled fur choice. 

May 10. Visiting Madeira Jiidlederifc. 
/days Iwni i l't «•». Mai ill. 

Visiting Lisliun mid (.amiiiiiii. 

^ days fmm tVto. 

-V" July JO. \isiimg 

Lisbon. Praia HaHucli.i, 

y - • and (iiibr.tllar. 

__ inluvstn.im J.54II. 
. "' SepleinlH-r Jl \ish- 

^ " inc Maili'ira and Teih-rile. 

/days.lriiniityii. 

SPt-X'IVL FORK BQi IMJ^T - | 

If sailing avvuv inini H all. rehuing ill 
liznin. seeing new lures . ii id e.\citrng places 
all Nimuis great, why uul find nut nmri-'* 
Wew produced I In ■ \i-wi ■nniers Purkel 
Guide tu Cruising lu help ym d\« just dial. 
It's a concise bonkli-l lli.il will answer all 
d rose oilier t|iie>U(iiis ymi b.ivc in mind. 

It's .it ailubte fret- from t .iiimnl (li-lcplione 
1*1-441 1 jOtOI ,uid .it vonr travel agent. Or 
jusl cuniplcle the lunpmi below unrl post it 
In the address diouit. It could (ainu li you 
nu thebnlidav of ii lift -nine. 


n; '.ee -end me a frwriijn ul ltn* 

I Neucuueis I W^el ( ii idle lu ( 'nnsii ig. 


1W in: Canard Bns hiire Si'rares.l^uk Kami 
Rood. FulkiTJiHK-. keni CTI'J jL)Z. 


QE2 


MEWCOMER d 

r«W-C RUISE 










HOME NEWS 


THF TTMRS SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


* * * * * 


Two devised 


blind spot 
for computer 
fraud pack 









iS3 


'i'.v 






graft? a 






By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 
An anonymous tip-off two opened up a new.' area and 


years ago led customs investi- 
gators to two men who yes- 
terday received suspended 
sentences for the first comput- 
erized VAT fraud to be de- 
tected in the EEC. 

But for that information the 
secret ingredient in an other- 
wise innocent stock-taking 
and accounting software sys- 
tem called Movieman might 
have cost the Treasury 

millions. 

Raymond Atkinson, aged 
38. a certified accountant, of 
Deacon's Bank. Wessington. 
Derbyshire, and Geoffrey 

Allsop, aged 36, a systems 

analyst, of Manor View. 
Wessington, both admitted 

conspiracy to incite the 
commission of false 
accounting 

They were each given nine 
months' jail sentences sus- 
pended for two years and each 
fined £ 1 , 000 . 

Judge Davidson told them 
at Derby Crown Court “I am- 
bound to treat fraud of this 
. kind as a very serious matter. 

“It’s very easy to see in this 
age of potential electronic 
fraud that devices could be 
placed into future pro- 
grammes that could result in 
very substantial losses to the 
public purse and enrich those 
involved.*’ 

The two were convicted for 
developing a secret “patch** 
within the system which 
allowed a customer to hide 
part of what he earned each 
day so that VAT inspectors, 
auditors and the Inland Rev- 
enue were given a false im- 
pression of earnings. 

When customs investi- 
gators working on the in- 
vestigation. codenamed 
Operation Patchwork, moved 
in last year, only 12 retailers 
were using the secret system, 
defrauding about £ 100 . 000 . 
but the potential for greater 
damage existed. 

Investigators believe that 
Movieman is an augury of 
future fraud. Mr Michael 
Newsom, a senior customs 
officer, said: “We think this 
case is typical of the type of 
fraud we will be facing in the 
computer age. 

“in the past fraudsters used 
a little black book to record 
their fraudulent dealings. To- 
day the computer can be 
used." 

The case, he said, bad 


“brings us with a jolt into the 
computer fraud age". 

Movieman was bom in the 
offices of a small computer 
firm called Micro-computer 
Services, based at Alfreton, 
Derbyshire. 

Williams, an accountant, 
ran the sales side of the 
business while Allsop was 
involved in computer tech- 
niques. A graduate, he was 
trained in computers by Brit- 
ish Rail at Derby before 
moving into his own work. 

The two men put together a 
software package aimed at 
video recording hire shops. 
The package, priced at about 
£5,000 gave shops a system 
which kepi stock records, 
monitored the hire of films 
and noted accounts. The re- 
tailer could tell which were bis 
most successful films and who 
were his best customers. 

Many of the 120 firms who 
bought the package were not 
told about the extra facility 
that lay within the package. 
The computer firm's salesmen 
- given immunity against 
prosecution by the crown - 
were told to bring the secret 
feature into play if they had 3 
susceptible customer or a sale 
might be lost 

The suppression feature 
came into play when a user 
was consulting the computer 
menu for reporting sales. Us- 
ing one password the user 
would be given a true record 
of the day's sales. A second 
password brought the sup- 
pression factor into play. 









.'qsii 

•.AjVfc." ■* 



Verdict on 
Hell’s 
Angel 
is quashed 








mm?.* 


pin Muidin, a stouecarver from Guildford, Surrey, surrounded by grimacing gargoyles in the Eng l i sh Heritage workshop at Vanxhall, south London, 


where 18 of the medieval carved figures, eadbi with individual features, are being produced by the Property Services Agency for the Edward HI tower at 

Windsor Castle, to replace the badly weathered originals (Photograph: Tim Bishop). 


Two freed 
on drugs 
charges 


Abortion advice 


Court rules against clinics 


Two men accused of being 
drug suppliers walked free 
from court yesterday after 
allegations of corruption were 
made against a senior Scot- 
land Yard detective. 

Michael West and James 
O’Lougblin were arrested 
while allegedly trying to set up 
a cocaine deal to trap a drugs 
pusher. They claimed the 
operation was organized with 
undercover police to trap a 
cocaine dealer called “Diego" 
who was said to have dis- 
appeared after their arrest. 

During the trial at South- 
wark Crown Court it was 
claimed that Mr West and Mr 
O'Loughlin were set up by- 
Scotland Yard’s senior opera- 
tional detective, Det Supt 


Two clinics offering advice 
to women see long abortions in 
Britain are acting illegally, the 
High Court is Dublin ruled 
yesterday. 

The first test case Brought 
since a clause forbidding abor- 
tion was inserted into the 
constitution ended with two 
Dublin clinics being told to 
cease their counselling ser- 
vices from January 12 next 
year. 

The ruling, by Mr Justice 
Hamilton, president of the 
High Court, is to be chal- 
lenged. on appeal, in the 
Supreme Court by the clinics, 
who said that the decision was 


By Richard Ford 

Door Counselling and the 
Well Woman Centre were 
flouting the constitution by 
giving information tb preg- 
nant women about abortion 
clinics operating in Britain, 
and providing travel services. 

“There can be no doubt but 
that abortion is contrary to 
national policy, public moral- 
ity and to the law. The court is 
under a duty 10 act to ensure 
that rights such as the fun- 
damental right to life are 
protected and to regard as 
unlawful any attempt to inter- 
fere with Thai right." 

During a four-day hearing 
two months ago. the society 


they were constitutionally en- 
titled to give a son-directed 
counselling service. 

The case was the first 
thorough testing of the 


Hospital’s 
gain from 
extra fund 


Bt Jill Sherman 


Guy’s Hospital, beset by 
financial difficulties for the 
past two years, is likely to be 


constitutional amendment oneo fthe'fim beneficiaries of 
forbidding abortion, which ^ million fund set up by 
was passed bv a two to one ^ Government to help 
majority in ISa3. 7 nnr i ftR rraians 

Mia Rail Riddick, of Open LoMlon reE ' 05 - 
Line Counselling, said after- Mr Norman Fowler, Sec- 
wards: “1 believe the service retary of State for Social 


we provide for Irish women is Services, announced yes- 
needed. There would not be a ; terday that he had approved a 


demand for it. if it was not £35 million new building 
required. One of the problems development at the south 
about ibis judgement is that it London teaching hospital and 
sweeps a social problem under interim arrangements to pro- 
the carpet-" vide services until it comes 


a “sad day in the history of said the clinics procured and 


Customs investigators were ^ month a 
alerted in November 1984. S upt Lundy was the sul 
So corruption allegations 

dunn 8 a television docu- 

ms^om^mountedon 
retailers using Ihe package and 


Irish women". 

In a 90-minute reserved 
judgement, the judge backed 
the Society for the Protection 


assisted pregnant women 10 
travel abroad for abortions 
and that they advised clients 
to consider a termination as a 


the carpel. vide services until n comes 

Yesterday's judgement 1 into operation in 1994. 
came 24 hours after the Euro- i _ ... 

pean Court of Human Rights . Jae arrangements, which 
said the lack of provision for include a 1 ^-bed observation 
divorce and remarriage in the 111111 aw * surgery 


investigators took, one of the ^ h £ re btionsh,p v^I 

"supergrass” called Roy 


packages for examination by a 
special computer audit uniL 

It took them two weeks to 
break through the code which 
kept fraudulent information 
locked away. 

In February last year 80 
customs officers and com- 
puter expens carried out a 
series of raids on video hire 
shops and the computer firm. 
Nine companies using the 
fraudulent system were dealt 
with by customs commis- 


wtth by customs commis- £SEbt -^ 1 ^’ con- 
sumers without going to court. M r L undvh ad fira 

They were fined a total of 


Garner. 

Yesterday the jury took two 
hours to return unanimous 
not guilty verdicts on Mr West 
and Mr O’Loughlin who each 
denied possessing a total of 2.6 
kilogrammes of cocaine, with 
intent to supply, on Novem- 
ber 27 last year. 

During the trial, defence 
counsel for Mr West, Mr 
Michael West, QC, claimed 
another “supergrass" con- 


Anthonv Lundy. the Society for the Protection to consider a" termination as a divorce and remarriage in the I 111111 ZL ^ 

Less than a month ago Del of Unborn Children who solution to the problem of republic did no! mean it was J expected to cost 0)0.000 
Supt Lundy was the subject of brought the case, arguing that unwanted pregnancy. These in breach ol ihe European 1 be paid for out of the 

corruption allegations made ^ clinics were acting con- actions, they claimed. Convention on Human ] sp<?cial fund and open early 

during a television docu- trary m Irish law which, under amounted to a “conspiracy to Rights. But the republic was next year, 

mentary. He is now being section 40 0 f the written corrupt public morals". found to be in breach of tbe These will provide vital 

investigated by ine Uiiet Lon- constitution, guarantees the The duties, w hich see up to convention because of the transitional services so that 

siabte 01 boulh jr orxsmre right to life of the unborn. 1.000 pregnant women a year, inferior legal status given to the closure of another acute 

about bis retanonship wim a Mr Justice Hamilton said denied counselling them to go the children of unmarried hospital in the district. New 

^supergrass cauea Koy j, e was satisfied that Open abroad for abortions and said parents. Cross, can eo ahead in Mav. 


Convention on Human I special fond and open early 
Rights. But the republic was j nexl >' ear 
found to be in breach of tbe 1 These will provide vital 
convention because of the { t ransi ti onal services so that 
inferior legal status given to j jjje closure of another acute 


the children 
parents. 


unmarried 


Boy killed Ministry wins test 


bully after 
£15 threat 


case on trespass 


hospital in the district. New 
Cross, can go ahead in May. 
Lewisham and North South- 
wark Health Authority has 
planned to concentrate all 
acute beds on Guv's and 
Lewisham, dispensing with 
338 beds at New Cross. 


£34.487. 


Ex-MI5 chief 
wins damages 
for book libel 

Mr Charles Simians, a for- 


Ex-Beatle in 
court victory 
over £260,000 

The former Beatle, Ringo 


mer deputy director general of Starr, won a court battle 
MI5, won libel damages in tbe yesterday which will save him 


High Court yesterday over 
allegations that he leaked se- 
crets to Nigel West, the 
author. 

The allegations were made 
by another author, Phillip 
Knightley. in his book on 
spying. The Second Oldest 
Profession. 

Mr Desmond Browne, for 
Mr Simians, told Mr Justice 
Drake that he was asked after 
he refired to prepare a history 
of security during the last war 
for the Cabinet. Mr Knightley 
suggested that he was bitter 


paying almost £260,000 extra 
maintenance to his former 
wife, Maureen, from whom 
whe was divorced in 15)75. 

Tbe Court of Appeal in 
London overruled a High 
Court order, made in July, 
back-dating an increase in the 
musician's a nmml mainte- 
nance payments to April 1979. 

Lords Justices Purehas, 
NeQI and Balcombe held that 
£70.000 a year — £1346 a 
week — was not an unreason- 
able figure to expect The 
musician had “behaved with 
outstanding generosity and pa- 


introduced the idea of the drug 
deal trap for “Diego". 

Mr West and Mr 
O'Loughlin were to arrange a 
deal with undercover police 
officers posing as buyers, to 
establish their credentials. 

The undercover detectives 
were wired with tape recorders 
and the deal was captured on 
video cameras. 

Mr West’s counsel told the 
jury that the video tapes and 
transcripts had been edited in 
an attempt to convict Mr West 
and Mr O’Loughlin. 

Mr West, QC, told the court 
that his client and Mr 
O'Loughlin. who were both on 
remand in Wormwood Scrubs 
Prison, were visited four times 


Tbe victim ofa school bully 
finally snapped and stabbed to 
death his tormentor, the Cen - 1 
tral Criminal Court was told 
yesterday. 

Simon Lundie. aged 17, was 1 
sentenced to five years’ youth 
custody after admitting the 
manslaughter of Robert Tuck- 
er last July. His plea of not 
guilty to murder was accepted 
after the judge was told that 
Lundie had been provoked. 

Both boys attended King 
Harold School at Waltham 
Abbey, Essex. “Tucker used to 
bully the defendant taking 
money from him," Mr Timo- 
thy Langdale, for the prosecu- 
tion. said. 

At first it was 70p a day 
lunch money but later Tucker 
was demanding up to £ 20 , 
threatening violence. 

• The day before the stabbing 


Magistrates who held that 
Ministry of Defence by-laws 
aimed at preventing trespass 
on the United States Air Force 
bass at Mildenhail, Suffolk, 
had no legal validity were 
overruled by the High Court 

yesterday. 

The test case involved by- 
laws introduced by Mr Mi- 
chael Heselfine, the former 
Secretary of State for Defence, 
to outlaw protests at 
Mildenhail and other military 
bases throughout the country. 

Allowing an appeal by Min- 
istry of Defence police, two 
judges ordered the magistrates 
to convict Mr John Bugg, aged 
49, of entering a protected area 


magistrates derided in July 
thai Mr Bu& a former police- 
man. of St Paul's Road. 


The new £35 million phase 
at Guy’s will indude 275 beds 
and 90 dav places and include 
a range of supporting deparr- 


Walton Highway, near ments, teaching and research 
Wisbech. Cambridgeshire, facilities. 


Blowing conch 
earns jail term 
for Bermudan 


was not guilty of an offence Guy's unit general manager. By Kenneth Gosling 


because the prosecution had Mr Nigel Smith, said yes- 
foiled to prove beyond reason- terday that it would do little to 


able doubt that the by-laws resolve the district's fi nancial 
were valid. difficulties, which were largely 

He said the correct ap- a result of treating more 


proach was for by-laws to be patients with the same num- 
presumed valid until a defen- her of beds. 


dant showed that they were 
not 

The magistrates had, 
wrongly accepted Mr Bus's 


Although allocations to re- 
gional health authorities have 
not been announced. South 
East Thames Regional Health 


^unent that the by-laws Authority is confident that it 
were invalid. will receive the £500,000 rev- 

Mr Bugg, an 


49, of entering a protected area Mr Bugg, an • individual enue needed to fond the 

in April “other than by way of rights campaigner, hari gone interim services at Guy's and 
an authorized entrance", coo- on to the base in a deliberate similar observation and day 
trary to the by-laws. attempt 10 prove that he had surgery units at neighbouring 

Mr Justice Mann said the the right to do so. Lewisham hospital 


trary to the by-laws. 

Mr Justice Mann said the 


Lewisham hospital 


by an informer called Geof- Tucker demoded £15. Lun- 
frey Stack, who worked with Jfv.™ R A t S? )rxl A .^ enue : 


about it not being published 
generally and had got together 

with Mr West and lotted a t " nce towards ^ mfe - 
copy of his manuscript. That . However,^ rated that the 
was untrue, the court was told. “[crease — r 

Mr Simkins had not met Mr ?"»«« ^OWJ 1 ? 

West and had not given him ^ sn ^f 1981 


any first hand knowledge of and *47,000 higher his 
MI5’s activities. Mr Knightley "Tf"" ttainteaaace order of 


and his publishers acknowl- 
edged the allegations were 
mistaken and agreed to apolo- 
gize and pay undisclosed dam- 
ages and legal costs. 


£23,000 - should be back- 
dated only to April this year. 

Tbe decision means that be 
frees a back payment of about 
£19300. 


Mr Lundy and proposed the 
I trap. ^ 

Mr Lundy denied the allega- Tucker tl 
tion. He told the court “I have .birthday, 
never met Stack — and *»H e \ 
wouldn't know him if he Tucker tc 
walked in cow. ” to ^ hil 

Referring to the television forward 
documentary Mr West QC, boy died 
said: “The accusations in that stab worn 
! programme involved your stomach.’ 
handling of informers. You Mr Jus 
have split the Metropolitan sentence. 
Police force straight down the wicked ai 
middle, between those who mg some 
believe in you and those who got over 
believe you are a thoroughly pea of hi 
corrupt officer.” a useful li 


Waltham Abbey, could not 
raise tbe amount He took a 
knife when he went to meet 
Tucker the next day, Lundie’s 


Plea to Rifkind on ski centre jobs 


By Ronald Faux, Employment Affairs Correspondent 


He was very nervous. 
Tucker told him he was going 
to sort him out Lundie lunged 
forward with the knife. The 
boy died in hospital from two 
stab wounds, in the chest and 
stomach.” 

Mr Justice Alliott passing 
sentence, said: “You did a 
wicked and terrible thing kill- 
ing someone who may have 
got over this unattractive as- 
pea of his character and lived 
a useful life.” 


The number of new jobs 
expected to be created by a £6 
million ski development in 
the Highland region of Scot- 
land has been wrongly as- 
sessed by the Government 
according to a survey commis- 
sioned by the Highlands and 
Islands Development Board 
and the Scottish Development 
Agency. 

Mr Malcolm Rifkind. Sec- 
retary of State for Scotland, 
must give his consent for the 
scheme to go ahead and 
qualify for European Commu- 
nity grants, but the Scottish 


Office has put the cost per job 
of the scheme at more than 
£60,000. 


but had to conform to Trea- 
sury rules. 


The new survey, presented 
by a Highland delegation to 
Lord Glenarthur, Minister for 
the Highlands, puts the cost at 
no more than £24.000. It is the 
cost per job which is the 
touchstone for Treasury 
approval 


The latest evidence by in- 
dependent consultants, re- 
quested by Mr . Rifkind, l 
should secure Scottish Office i 
approval 


Mr David Biair, chief exec- 
utive of Lochaber District 
Council said yesterday that 
the Government seemed to 


wish the scheme to go ahead required." 


A statement from Lochaber 
council yesterday said: “Noth- 
ing can stop the ski develop- 
ment and the start of 
commercial activity next win- 
ter except Mr Rifkind, whose 
consent is now urgently 


Thomas Joe Benjamin’s 
habit of blowing mi a conch 
shell to call a meeting of his 
friends in Brixton market 
earned him a seven-day jail 
sentence yesterday. 

Two High Court judges 
upheld the Inner London 
Down Court’s rating that 
Benjamin must go to prison if 
he refused to consent to being 
bound over to die keep the 
peace. 

Benjamin, a Bermudan-born 
community worker, derided 
that he had no intention of 
giving up the practice. For two 
years, np to November 17, 
1984, he had been in the habit 
of going to die market and 
blowing his conch shell. 

Although he was acquitted 
of an alleged assault on tbe 
police, said to have happened 
after his arrest, tbe judge at 
Inner London Crown Court 
jailed him for seven days for 
refusing to be bound over. The 
H igh Court judges offered bin 
48 hours to deckle whether to 
promise to keep the peace, an 
offer he rejected. 

Benjamin, who was in his 
fourth day of custody, was 
freed -yesterday because the 
sentence amounts to five days 
with remission, and because 
the prison has no facilities to 
release prisoners this Sat- 
urday. 


Judge retires 


December 19 1986 PARLIAMENT 


Tough justice with a lenient streak Indian minister’s bribe hint 


By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 


Lord Justice “Fred” Law- 
ton, one of the last of tbe tongb 
“no nonsense” school of 
judges feared by hardened- 
criminals, retired yesterday. 

More than 40 judges and 
barristers crowded his court- 
room to pay tribute to the 
gra m mar school boy who rose 
to become a senior Court of 
Appeal judge after being ap- 
pointed one of tbe youngest 
High Court judges at tbe age 
of 49. 

It was the first time that the 
two divisions, c riminal and 
civil of the Court of Appeal 
had sat together and the 
occasion was marked by the 
presence, among many other 
judges, of the Master of the 
Rolls, the Lord Chief Justice 
and the Attorney General 

But the atmosphere yes- 
terday was far from serious. 
Sir Michael Havers, QC tbe 
Attorney General likened 
Lord Justice Lawton, aged 75, 
to a labrador, to which the 
retiring judge responded that 
labradors with dicey hips were 
usually put down. 

The sou of a prison gov- 
ernor — his father was a 
prison officer and 



Lord Justice Lawton, who 
retired yesterday 


eraor of Wandsworth — he 
has often been labelled a 
“hanging judge”. But his 
toughness against violent 
criminals has always been 
tempered by leniency and 
concern for lesser offenders. 

Sending down Charles 
Richardson for 25 years in 
1967, the then Mr Justice 
Lawron said tbe south London 
gamp leader wasr "virions, 
sadistic and a disgrace to 
society” for 


crossed his path. He added: 
“One is ashamed to live in a 
society that contains men like 
yon." 

He has also been well 
known for robust views on 
sentencing: in 1971 he called 
for a national labour corps in 
which offenders would under- 
take jobs such as clearing 
industrial debris. Again, in 
1978, he recommended “short, 
sharp shocks” for young 
offenders, perhaps in disused 
Army camps, SO they could 
team that “bad behaviour 
results in unpleasant 
consequences". Nor has he 
much time for the theories of 
social workers and penal 
reformers or what he has 
called “cosy chats with proba- 
tion officers”. 


“Clap-trap" was how he 
described a psychiatric report 
on a youth who tried to escape 


from the High Court m 1979. 
The youth had an appalling 



The youth had an appalling 
record and had to be dealt with 
severely, he said. 

But the judge has an un- 
expected reformist streak, and 
has long ago discarded the 
political views that almost led 
him to stood as a Mosleyite 
ate in the thirties. He 
favours non-custodial 


penalties where possible. 

Under his chairmanship, 
the Criminal Law Revision 
Committee called for radical 
reforms, many now in force, to 
the law on sexual offences. 
These included a measure 
agaidst kerb crawling, pro- 
posals to deal with those tiring 
off organized prostitution, to 
extend the law of rape to 
separated husbands and wives 
and to increase penalties for 
attempted rape and indecent 
assault. 

Lord Justice Lawton, a larg- 
ish mao with thickset features 
and a measured style of deliv- 
ery well suited to anecdotes, of 
which he is food, did not tike 
most other judges, go to public 
school He went to Battersea , 
Grammar School before going 
on to Cambridge University^ 
He was called to the Bar in ; 
1935, served in the war with 1 
the London Irish Rifles until 
he was invalided out in 1941, 
resumed his career and took 
silk in 1957. He was promoted 
to the Court of Appeal in 1972. 


Mr Terence Dicks (Hayes ana 
Hariington,.C) said he had been 
asked for a bribe by the Indian 
Home Affairs Minister, Mr Bula 
Singh, when he visited India io 
iry to help a constituent, Mrs 
KLuidip Karra, .who, he said, had 
been imprisoned on trumped- 
up charges. 

He had been made to (eel as if 
he bad asked for an audience 
with the Lord and the Minister’s 
opening words to him were: 


this issue to die quietly for the 
sake of Anglo-Indian relations. 

The behaviour of the corrupt 
government in India had been 
nothing short of appalling. Per- 
haps Britain should stop giving 
aid to India. 


only aggravated the problem. 
These were sensitive matters 


Five projects 
for homeless 


and people should reflect very' 
hard before making any intem- 
perate statements. 

The remarks Mr Dicks bad 
made about aid to India were 
unworthy. The aid programme 
helped thousands of poor and 
needy people. 

Comments that he had made 
previously, and repealed today, 
about Indian ministers had 
caused grave offence. Such com- 
ments would not help the cause 
of his constituent or the thou- 
sands of moderate Sikhs in 
Britain. ' 


Was the Foreign Office going 
> act? Tbe British Government 


“Have you something for me? A 
gift?" He had pretended not to 
know what the minister was 
talking about and the interview 
effectively ended then. The 
Minister had promised to look 
into the case, about which he 
claimed to know nothing, and to 
contact Mr Dicks. He had not 
done so. 

Mrs Kasu’s husband Profes- 
sor Paul Bedl was the first Sikh 
to be elected chairman of the 
Anglo-Asian Conservative Soci- 


ety in Britain [which was dis- 
solved today]. There had been 
anger among those he defeated 
in that election. It had been* 
alleged that the man who had 
manipulated that society for 
many years bad contacts _ in 
India and it was not surprising 
that Mrs Kami was being put 


to an? Tbe British Government 
should intervene at the top 
leveL 

Mrs Lynda Chalker, Minister of 
State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, said she greatly 
regretted some of the language 
Mr Dicks had seen fit to use 
when referring to the Indian 
government and the legal pro- 
cesses in that Commonwealth 
country. 

She firmly rejected bis sugges- 
tion that the British Gov- 
ernment or the Foreign Office 
was unsympathetic to the wel- 
fare of British citizens abroad or 
of the hard-working Sikh 
community in Britain. 


A scheme allowing local au- 
thorities extra resources and 
expertise to bring empty dwel- 
hngs back tnio use for homeless 
ramifies is to take effect outside 
London for the first time. 


The judge is likely to be in 
great demand helping out as 
retired judges do on civil and 
criminal appeals, where he 
will be sitting as Sir Fred 
Lawton. 


Mrs Kami had been charged 
under India’s anti-terrorism 
laws and her case, which had 
. been handled in a manner which 
was fully in accordance with the 
legal procedures in India, must 


Mr Timothy Renton, Minis- 
ter of State for Foreign and 
Commonwealth Affaire, had 
discussed Mrs Kanu's case very 
folly with the High Commission 
and he was satisfied that every- 
thing possible was being done to 
help her. 

His attack on an Indian , 
minister would make the 
authorities dose ranks and 
could delay; rather than expedite 
a decision in this 'case. 


Mr Richard Tracey, Under 
Secretary of State for Environ- 
ment, said, referring to the 
Estates Action Unit: We have 
approved projects for five 
authorities at South Tyneside. 
Y °r t .Woodspring. Rushmore 
and Milton Keynes. 

This involves extra resources 
of £ 1 # million, with 130 dwell- 
ings being brought back into use 
for tbe homeless. 


. under pressure in India just after 
| tbe election of her huroand, in 
order to gel him to resign. 

He believed that tx>th the 
Indian government and the 
British Foreign Office wanted 


be heard by the Indian courts. 
As a U K citizen, she had bee; 


As a U K citizen, she had been 
given the normal consular 
assistance. 

Publicity did not always pay 
in such cases. Often a low-key 
approach had resolved prob- 
lems when public acrimony had 


He had suggested that her 
detention and charge might m 
some way be bound up w>ib the 
affairs of the Anglo-Asian 
Assocation. Mr Dicks should 
make his representations to the 
chairman of the Conservative 
Parry and to the National 
Union,, in' whose area these 
decisions lay. 


Prison officers are 
‘against fresh start’ 

If the Home Office tried to 
impose the conditions On prison 
officers outlined in its policy 
document A Fresh Stan it would 
cause increasing bitterness awi 
mass resignations from the ser- 
Mr Thomas Cox Hooting. 

Pr * so ° officers be- 
lieved it would lead to com- 
pulsory overtime. 

® a 7j d Melier, Minister of 
j?£. me Office, said tbe 
mison Officers’ Association had 
a vested interest in preserving 
cutting working practices but 
5™9 r ?,S 0ven,0r s must have the 
flexibility io make better use of 
resources, both staff and money. 


-JS53®; .> - . 


i 


The High Court yesterday 
quashed a coroner s verdict ot 
unlawful killing on John 
Mikkleson. a Hell s Angel and 
ordered a new inquest 

Lord Justice Catkins, sil- 
ting with Mr Justice Roch ra 
the Queen's Bench D»vi*°jai 
Court, said that he reached his 
derision with “considerable 
reluctance”. 

Mikkleson. aged from 
Windsor, Berkshire, dial in 
police custody after being 
arrested after a fight at 
Bedfont, Middlesex, in July- 

last vear.- w t 3 

He had been hit on the head 
with a police truncheon, put 

unconscious in a police van 
and left on the charge room 
floor at the police station 
before being taken to hospital. 
He died without regaining 
consciousness. 

A jury reached the unlawful 
killing verdict after an inquest 
conducted by Dr John Burton, 
the west London coroner, in 
March this year. 

Eight police officers chal- 
lenged the verdict after a 
number of them were sus- 
pended from duty. They 
claimed that the coroner's 
directions to the jury were 
"wrong in law. inadequate and 
confusing”. 

Lord Justice Watkins 
agreed that the jury were 
“gravely misdirected” and 
could not have been otherwise 
than confused by what they 
were told. But he said be bad 
“much sympathy” with the 
coroner dealing with the case. 

The judge ordered a fresh 
inquest before a different 
coroner and jury. He said: “1 
am in no doubt I would have 
directed the jury that it would 
be unsafe to find that the 
arresting officers mis- 
conducted themselves in a 
difficult situation, in any sense 
whatsoever." 

He said it was unthinkable 
that the jury, who added a 
rider to their verdict that the 
killing was due to man- 
slaughter as a result of the 
degree of care given to the 
man after he was over- 
powered. should find that a 
criminal offence bad been 
committed without being sat- 
isfied beyond reasonable 
doubt. 

He declared that the burden 
of proof necessary to reach 
such a verdict must be beyond 
reasonable doubt. 


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THE TIMES SA TURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 



WORLD SUMMARY 


Karachi rioters 
lynch policeman 

cH? 0f -» s SS5P“ t0ni Karachi early yesterday. 

liC.*SLS C 9 le S ? nmn ? cd ** chicle at about 
1 JO am, dragged the uniformed men out and beat them, 

dancing and clapping while their victims pleaded for mercy! 

Hospital doctors said another body was brought in with 
stab rands, taking the death toll on the sixthdayof ethnic 
"•JJ* “ Palustan’s hugest city to at least 181. 7 
roha reported no untoward incidents in Karachi durinj 
on the Muslim sabbath, as prayers were of 
rered at hundreds of mosques for the riot vi ctim. 

Falkland Consular 
fishing access 


North being deserted ‘by so-called friends’ 

Meese gives more secret evidence 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 

Mr Edwin Meese, the US to know how much money 


The Falkland Islands 
Government Office has 
completed its international 
selection of trawlennen to 
be allowed to fish around 
the islands. Polish and 
Spanish applicants are 
among the successful (An- 
drew McEwen writes). 

The Office began send- 
ing out advice notices yes- 
terday for the fishing 
season beginning in Feb- 
ruary. The licences stem 
from Britain's unilateral 
declaration of an interim 
fishing protection zone. 


Consular 

access 

The Foreign Office an- 
nounced yesterday that its 
consul in t.ns»fc» had been 
granted access to visit a 
Briton detained by Zam- 
bian authorities a week 
ago, allegedly for being a 
South African saboteur. 

A spokesman described 
the Briton as Hit and well” 
and said it was hoped the 
consul would be able to 
visit him again next week. 
The man, whose name has 
not yet been released, was 
arrested with two other 
white men. 


Voyager over Kenya 

Nairobi 
(Reuter) - The 

experimental vT ~^TT^7T: 

aircraft Voy- x A 

ager has passed , 

safely over Ken- ] Friday | -j^SOMALUC 

ya on the sixth T ! ' kb™ 

day of its non- Uganda /v- i JL— ' 

stop ronnd the \(7 J 

world flight; a r | 

pilot who si- 

ghted it said vtctof[3 Nj&O vj^lThuraday Ijj 
yesterday. 12.30pm I 

The pilot, __ \c*. OMT | | 

who asked not soomiies \ 

to be named, 

tracker plum which located the Voyager near Isioto in 
central Kenya and followed it to the Ugandan border. 

The two aircraft made radio contact and all appeared to be 
well on board the Voyager, he said. 

The aircraft had been chartered in Nairobi by officials of 
the company that owns Voyager, Voyager Enterprises Inc_ 
to locate the experi m ental plane and make contact with its 
two-man crew, the pilot said. 

The twin-engined Voyager has already passed the half- 
way point on its 27,000 miles ronnd the worid flight that be- 
gan in California. 


Thursday 

1&30pm 

GMT 



Bonn spy 
scandal 

Bonn — The West Ger- 
man Interior Ministry has 
named three Soviet dip- 
lomats and a member of the 
Czechoslovak Embassy as 
spies and asked the For- 
eign Ministry to declare 
them persona non grata, a 
Bonn paper said yesterday 
(John England writes). 

The report, in Die Welt, 
said they had been engaged 
in spying in political, tech- 
nological and military ar- 
eas. The Interior Ministry 
refused to comment, but a 
source dose to the ministry 
said it was expected to tell 
the three to leave without 
fuss as soon as possible. 


Language 

barrier 

Ottawa — The Quebec 
Government has resumed 
laying charges against 
merchants who display 
signs sot composed exclu- 
sively in French, the 
province’s official language 
(John Best writes). 

Charges have been bud 
against 27 firms for posting 
signs written bilingually in 
both English and French. 
The actions broke a mora- 
torium on prosecutions that 
had lasted nearly a year, 
awaiting a Quebec Court of 
Appeal ruling. 

A company can be fined 
up to SCan 1,000 (over 
£700) on a first conviction. 


Rebels sink Nile boats 

Nairobi — Rebels of the Sudanese People's liberation 
Army daim to have destroyed four river boats on the White 
Nile in two recent attacks on a government convoy returning 
from delivering relief supplies to the Upper Nile regional 
capital of MalafcaJ (A Correspondent writes). 

The attacks were made at the weekend, near Kodok. 


Roses clue 
in kidnap 

mystery 

From Mac Margo lis 
Rio de Janeiro I 

Brazilian police, with few 
leads and scanty evidence, are 


Colombo 
swaps its 
prisoners 

From Vijitha Yapa 
Colombo 

In a big reversal of policy, 
the Sri Lankan Government 


trying to solve a spectacular yesterday swapped two sus- 
case ofkidoapping which has peeled guerrillas for two of its 


already involved the authori- 
ties in Uruguay, Paraguay and 
Argentina. 

Even the FBI was called in 
to help solve the case of the 
vice-president of Brazil's larg- 
est hank , Senhor Antonio 
Beltifoi Martinez, aged 58, 
who was seized early last 
month. 

He reappeared about 20 
miles outside Sao Paulo on 
Wednesday, after his son 
delivered two suitcases packed 
with $4 million. 

His family was told of his 
abduction in a typewritten 
note attached to a bouquet of 
30 white roses. 

Police said a woman wear- 1 
ing a blonde wig and green ; 
contact lenses had ordered the 
roses from a Sao Paulo florist. 

The kidnappers repeatedly 


soldiers. 

The two guerrilla suspects — 
Gamini Anaslhene and Kunju 
Alias Kumar — were flown m 
an Air Force plane to the* 
northern capital of J affn a, a 
stronghold of the Liberation 
Tigers of Tamil Eelam, while 
the two army mm — Lieuten- 
ant Ajit Chandrasiri and gun- 
ner Keen hi Bandara — turned 
up at Colombo domestic air- 
port in civilian clothes. 

Gunner Bandara had a foot 
injury from a bullet wound be 
received on October 13, the 
day of his capture. 

The soldiers were captured i 
by the Tigers at Adampan, 
near the north-western town 
of Mannar, when the Army 
was on a major combing-out 
operation of suspected guer- 
rilla hideouts. 

The Sri Lankan authorities 


telephoned and wrote to the |he releases were acts of 
family, telling them not to co- good will and not a swap. 


operate with the police. 

Senhor Josecyr Cuoco, an 
agent of the Brazilian anti- 
kidnap group. Gas, said he 
feared that this case could now 
spawn “an industry of kidnap- 
pings” in Sao Paulo. 


Negotiations, however, had 
been going on for more than 
two months. 

Meanwhile, at Morawewa 
in Eastern Province six people 
were killed yesterday when 
about 40 guenillas attacked a 


Attorney-General, yesterday 
gave further in camera tes- 
timony to the House intelli- 
gence committee, as senators 
were trying to piece together 
evidence they have beard ra 
Senate intelligence committee 
hearings, which ended on 
Thursday. 

The senators, who heard the 
secret testimony in a protected 
room and have sworn not to 
reveal any details, heard from 
more than 30 witnesses, in- 
cluding senior figures from the 
White House, the National 
Security Council (NSC), the 
Pentagon, State Department 
and the Central Intelligence 
Agency. 

However, frustrated sen- 
ators were unable to get the 
key figures in the arms scandal 
to testily — Vice-Admiral 
John Poindexter and Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Oliver North, 
who were formerly at the 
NSC, and General Richard 
Second, who has retired, all 
invoked the Fifth Amend- 
ment against self-incrimina- 
tion. The committee was 
disappointed that there were 
more questions raised than 
answered. 

The key issue which the 
Senate was unable to deter- 
mine was whether President 
Reagan had authorized the 
first shipment of arms from 
Israel to Iran in August 1985. 

Mr Robert McFarlane, the 
former National Security Ad- 
viser, said the President gave a 
verbal authorization; Mr Don- 
ald Regan, the White House 
Chief of Staff, said Mr Reagan 
was opposed to any sale and 
only condoned it after he dis* 
covereed it had happened. 

The second issue still un- 
resolved is who authorized the 
transfer of the profits from the 
arms sale to the Contras - at a 
lime when it was illegal for the 
US to help them because of a 
congressional ban on military 
aid to the rebels. 

Thirdly, the Senate wanted 


was involved. Mr Meese last 
month said that between SiO 
millionand S30 million was 
diverted to the Contras. But 
some Contra leaders denied 
getting any of that money. 

There have been accusa- 
tions that middlemen took 
most of it. Congressional 
sources are now saying Mr 
Meese overestimated the fig- 
ure, which is really between S4 
million and S10 million. 

Foreign ministers of eight 
Latin American countries have 
said they will send a min- 
isterial delegation to Central 
America to renew efforts to- 
wards peace In the region (AP 
reports from Rio de Janeiro). 

The announcement came at 

the end of two days of talks on 
regional co-operation and 
prospects for peace in Central 
America. The coan tries repre- 
sented were Colombia, Pan- 
ama, Venezuela, Mexico; Bra- 
zil, Argentina, Uruguay and 
Pent - members of the 
Contadora group and its 
supporters. 

Other issues still to be 
clarified are whether Colonel 
North acted on bis own or 
with higher approval. The 
roles of his associates, in and 
out of government, are still 
unclear. 

President Reagan, who has 
asked for a full disclosure of 
the facts from all concerned, 
has now requested the Senate 
committee to make available 
as much of the evidence it 
heard as it can without jeop- 
ardizing US security. He in- 
dicated that he would present 
the facts to the American 
people. 

Colonel North, who until 
now has refused to comment 
on the affair, has complained 
bitterly that he is now being 
abandoned by “so-called 
friends and colleagues'*. 

He told reporters, who have 




















:,W *«. ’■Tv*" ■ 




. ■ 



■ v Vi: 




Family reunion for the American mercenary* Mr E 
left, and Gene on arriving in Green Bay, Wisconsin, s 

besieged his house each day: TT T __ 

“I continue to place my trust I J I I I I 

in tiie Lord, in my family.’’ XJA.J 

He said several people had j m 

suggested he should give up Tl f| 1 1 

his individual rights under the 
Constitution — a reference to n , _ ... 

his invoking the Fifth Amend- 

meat on lawyers* advice -but Lc 

he would not dn vi tary observers watched as 

Ifo didTot teUeve Presi- fousands of Sandinista sol- 
dent Reagan really wanted diers took part in exercises 
him to give up his rights. Ending Niraragua against a 
“People have died fece down altack by US and other 

in the mud all over the worid °lfr” ^ 

defending those individual 5?^?^ 

rights?* said “Total Annihilation of the 

& Enemy Invader, ended late 

on Thursday after three days 
of manoeuvres by 6,500 San- 


*&?•••••• 




:ne Hasenfhs, with his sons Adam, 
r his release from jail in Nicaragua. 


US officers watch 
Sandinista troops 


Regan target of whispering 
campaign in Washington 


sources said it was the first 
time that US military person- 
nel had been permitted to 
watch Sandinista 

manoeuvres. 

The US provides military 
aid to the Contra rebels, who 
attack Nicaragua from bases 
just across the border in 
Honduras. 

General Humberto Ortega, 
the Defence Minister and 
brother of President Daniel 


dinista troops using Soviet- Ortega, said Major Nell was 
made T-55 tanks, Mi-24 particularly interested in see- 


The fall of Donald Regan is 
a classic example of the way 
power politics work in Wash- 
ington. First there are the 
murmurs and whispers — 
press articles quoting 
‘‘officials” or “sources" voic- 
ing dissatisfaction with the 
White House Chief of Staff! 
Then come the more authori- 
tative, but still unnamed, calls 
from “senior Administration 
officials” for him to step 
down. 

Then the leaks begin - 
President Reagan’s California 
circle and, more damagingly, 
Mrs Nancy Reagan are quoted 
advising the President to dis- 
miss his abrasive aide: Then 
senators and senior Repub- 
licans go public, criticizing 
him on television and speak- 
ing ofhim as an obstacle to the 
President’s recovery. 

Mr Regan digs in his heels, 
asserts his position and sol- 
diers on. But the hammer 
blows are now raining on him 
daily. Vituperative profiles 
appear in the papers, reporters 
stalk him wherever be goes 
with the relentless question: 
“Will you resign V And, of 
course, in the end he wilL 

Power in Washington, as in 
the Kremlin, works through 
symbols. And like the old men 


atop the Lenin Mausoleum, 
the senior players in the 
Administration of Ronald 
Reagan — or indeed any of his 
predecessors — understand the 
unwritten rules. 


Washington View 

By Michael Binyon 


In his heyday, Mr Regan 
was always there, no more 
than a couple of steps from Mr 
Reagan, carrying the im- 
portant papers, jostling a path 
clear for the President, snap- 
ping a comment or quip to the 
throng of reporters. 

But when things began to go 
wrong, he faded from view. 
The “Prime Minister”, as he 
enjoyed hearing himself dubb- 
ed, was no longer prime — 
others, such as Mr George 
Shultz and Vice-President 
George Bush, were there in- 
stead. Mr Regan was no longer 
sought out for his comments, 
no longer the star of the 
television interviews. 

In Washington, influence 
lies only in its perception. For 
unlike governments in Eur- 
ope, no American Cabinet 
member or White House of- 



&&& 

Miss Jin Morrell, the fiancee of John McCarthy, a British 
hostage in Lebanon, looks at photographs of foreign 
hostages during a visit to Damascus. Miss M rrell, aged 29, 
is in the Syrian capital to try to seek the release of her hus- 
band-to-be, who has been held since April 


firial is a politician in his own 
right All serve at the whim of 
the President They have no 
elective base on which to rest 
their authority, no constit- 
uency they can mobilize to 
mount a challenge. 

The only * two . men the 
American people elect to rule 
'them are the President and the 
Vice-President Power, there- 
fore, depends on accomplish- 
ment on being indispensable, 
on effectively carrying out the 
President’s wishes. And since 
it is not always easy to know 
or anticipate these, a canny 
survivor has always to look 
over his shoulder to see who 
has the President’s ear, or who 
has moved his office closer to 
the Oval Office . 

The political stiletto in 
Washington, therefore, con- 
sists of innuendo, of sugges- 
tions that one is “out of the 
loop” and no longer valued as 
an adviser. 

And this is usually a self- 
fulfilling rumour — usually, 
but not always. The Shultz 
example is a clear exception. A 
year or two ago, when conser- 
vatives were riding high in the 
Administration, the enemies 
of the dour pragmatist at the 
State Department put it about 
that Mr Shultz was on the way 
out, that he was so low-profile 
as to be almost invisible. 

It was fervently predicted 
that he was disillusioned with 
his loss ofinfluenoe and would 
resign. He did noL Mr Shultz, 
a consummate team player, 
out-manoeuvred his oppo- 
nents, and, until Reykjavik, 
was riding ever higher. 

Then came Iran. Mr Shultz 
took a risk in distancing 
himself from the White 
House, to the fury of Mr 
Regan. Again, the symbols 
were so arcane as to be 
unintelligible to all but 
Kremlinologists or their 
White House equivalents: he 
did not issue statements of 
support for President Reagan; 
he allowed a tone of doubt and 
hesitation to creep into his 
voice. 

But Mr Shultz now has a 
power base of his own: Europe 
and the world. He know be is 
indispensable in the present 
crisis. The White House, 
whatever its irritation, cannot 
get rid of the last remaining 
figure credible to America's 
allies. The threat of resigna- 
tion was never openly made. 
But it hung in the air, clear to 
all who read the press. And 
when he had won his way, Mr 
Shultz mad? the ritual state- 
ment of support and loyalty. 

And to all the political 
analysts, the symbols and 
rituals have said more than 
any of the statements. Mr 
Reagan may insist he is keep- 
ing his Chief of Staff, but the 
portents tell otherwise. 


helicopter gunships, multiple ing the Soviet-built Mi-24 
rocket launchers, surface-- to- helicopter gunship 
ai r miss iles and anti-aircraft The Iene „ 1 called 

Thursday’s three-hour ex- 
^ „ m T eu '7 ^.. ap Pf' ercises “eilremely 
illy the largest since the 5at i^ aic ,or y .’' He said they 

of “the geneS 


Iran says 
US paid 
hostage 
ransom 

Tehran (Reuter) - A senior 
Iranian official said yesterday 
that Washington paid a ran- 
som to Iran to secure the free- 
dom of US hostages held in 
Lebanon. 

The parliamentary Speaker, 
Mr Ali Akbar Hasemi Rafsan- 
jani. said: “I explicitly declare 
to the .American people and 
the world that the Americans 
paid us ransom in the Leban- 
on affair. We received ransom 
in return for our intercession.” 

Iranian officials and Wash- 
ington have denied that US 
weapons were sent to Iran in a 
direct trade for Americans 
held by pro-Iranian groups in 
Lebanon. 

Three US hostages were 
freed during an 18-month 
period when the White House 
was secretly trying to improve 
relations with Tehran, partly 
by authorizing arms 
shipments. 

Mr Rafsanjani said formal 
relations between the two 
countries, broken by the 
United States during the 1 979- 
81 occupation of the Ameri- 
can Embassy in Tehran, could 
not be restored at present. 

But he said it would be a 
first step if Washington re- 
leased Iranian assets, includ- 
ing weapons and military 
supplies paid for before Iran's 
1979 Islamic Revolution. ■ 

He said the release of the 
assets and Iran's response. in 
“requesting our Shia brothers 
in Lebanon to free US 
hostages” was all that was 
possible between Iran and the 
United States for the time 
being. 

Mr Rafsanjani said many 
US politicians agreed with 
President Reagan that the 
United States should have 
relations with Iran because of 
its strategic importance. 

“How can they be voted 
into office in the While 
House, the Senate, the Con- 
gress, etc, and yet not have the 
guts to implement what is in 
their country’s interest?” 

He urged them to admit 
their mistake in “adopting a 
hostile attitude towards a 
nation which rose up to regain 
its rights and nothing more. 

“You know that you have 
great interests in the Persian 
Gulf and that no one except 


ently the largest since the 
Sandinistas came to power in 


raguan people are carrying out 
north-western Nicaragua f nr /v-infrnntTmy thp emwino 


about three miles from the 
Honduran border. 

Among the foreign observ- 
ers who watched- the war. 
games at Nicaragua’s invita- 
tion were Colonel Edward 
Lorenzen, the Military Atta- 
che in tiie US Embassy in 
Managua, and Major Victor 


for confronting the. growing 
dangers of a US invasion 
against Nicaragua.” 

The Honduran Cov? 
eminent did not accept a 
Nicaraguan invitation to send 
observers, describing the 
manoeuvres as “ill-timed and 
highly provocative given the 


Nell, the embassy’s Air Atta- climate of tension existing 
che. Nicaraguan military along the border." 


Iran can safeguard the Gulfs 
security. Now come out and 
say this explicitly.” he said. • 

Mr - Rafsanjani said Iran 
would never fall into the 
Soviet orbit,' a possibility 
voiced by some American, 
leaders. 

“We will have nothing with 
the Soviet Union except an 
equal relationship” he said- 
“They (Americans) should get ' 
ft out of their heads that wfe ■ 
might become a Soviet sat- 
ellite, but we can be friends 
with the Soviets . . . and that’s 
what we are working for." 


OLD RUEDESHEIM-ON-THE-RHIN E 




The Asbach Story 

It could easily lx* argued that Rucdcsheim is the 
gateway to that most beautiful pan of the River Rhine with 
its vineyards and castles. 

What is beyond dispute is that it is the home of that 
most sought after German Brandy - Asbach Uralt. For it j 
whs here, around the turn i >f the century’ that Hugo m 

Asbach founded his world-fame ills distillery’. 4SL 

It lakes five litres i >f the finest wines to produce ^ * ’ 
one single bottle of Asbach Uralt. What ir also takes is L£^ 3 ' 
the family ski H'in distilling; the maturing in 
Limousin oak barrels: and of course the blending, mSm 

handed dr nv n thn »ugh generatu >ns. t« > create th is M|l| 

soft, mellow, gc jlden brandy. The after din ner i|||i 

brandy that isn’t just ft »r after dinner. j||li 

Disci >vcr it in discerning restaurants and re $| l 

i iff licences, t »r a mie and see as here in Rucdcsheim B3B 
ftt »ni Mi inday to mid-day Friday li >r a lasting. 

Ft >r further informatii in write u »: 

Weinhrennerei. Asbach it G i. <>220 Rucdcsheim am 
Rhein, Pustfach 1 1 3d. West Germany. Sffl 


ndjlilnitt'- - 


Withdrawal of new French 10-franc coins will cost £10m 

^ Paris ‘ identical to a 50 -cenriae piece. franc piece, which is about the size of an English I 

From Dians, Genues, vans AnmymHm the. Gmn*nm*n Awicrijm with. DUW 


^ Paris identical to a 50-centime piece. 

From Dmn! Geodes, Fans Amwandiig the Government’s decision to with- 

Less than two months after its unhappy birth, draw the new coin from January 1, M Edouard 
France's new “baby" 10-franc coin (worth about £l) Ballad ur, the Finance Minister, emphasized that its 
hue hw»u killed off — to ■ unanuiKHis sigh ofreliei, creation was entirely the responsibility of the former 
but atacosf of more than £!0 million to toe french Socialist regime. 


taxpayer. 

thP moment of its branch on October 22 the 
bigger tluo aa oki Ifeglisb 

S ^STwlom^ S sft» 11 Md°tbickness it m> «lm«t 


He had considered withdrawing the 50-centime 
piece, hot that would have cost an estimated £50 
million. 

A million of the new coins have gone into 
circulation alongside the former, large copper 30- 


franc piece, which is about the size of an English top 
piece. 

• Privatization list: Names of the next four compa- 
nies to be privatized after St Gobain, Paris bas, and 
the television c hannel, TF1, have been announced by 
M Ballad or. 

They are Havas, the largest French advertising 
company; Credit Commercial de France, one of the 
10 biggest French banks; and two smaller banks, the 
Basque de Betunent et des Tramux Publics, and the 
Banqae Indastrielle et Mobilise JPrivde. 



M 

Irnlt’ 


The Great Brandy 
from the Romantic Rhine 





6 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


Gorbachov sanctioned release of Nobel prize winn er from exile 

ordeal 


Western concern helped end Sakharovs’ 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


The Kremlin's decision, 
sanctioned personally by Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov, to allow 
Dr Andrei Sakharov and his 
wife, Yelena Bonner, to return 
to Moscow ends a nightmare 
existence for the Nobel prize- 
winner dissident which began 
when he was banished to the 
closed city of Gorky nearly 
seven years ago. 

During that time, be has 
lived under constant surveil- 
lance and more than occas- 
ional harassment by the KGB, 
cut off from the outside world 
and from his profession of 
advanced science within the 
Soviet Union. Most ordinary 
citizens have been convinced 
by an avalanche of official 
propaganda to regard him as a 
traitor. Many articles in the 
party press slyly attributed his 
alleged failings to the fact that 
his second wife, Mrs Bonner, 
is Jewish, 

According to many Western 
experts. Dr Sakharov's exile - 
which began after his arrest on 


a street of Moscow - is illegal 
although Soviet officials re- 
cently used a press conference 
called to mark International 
Human Rights Day to argue 
that it was justified as an 
administrative decision taken 
by the Praesidium of the 
Supreme Soviet 

Over the years, a trickle of 
information has reached the 
West about the desperate con- 
ditions in which Dr Sakharov 
has had to live, surrounded by 
the secret police and deprived 
by a special jamming device of 
bearing any foreign broad- 
casts. He was never formally 
charged or convicted under 
any Soviet law. 

Conditions in Gorky, a 
bleak industrial city on the 
banks of the Volga, some 250 
miles east of Moscow, were 
graphically described in Mis 
Bonner’s recent book with the 
poignant title Alone Together. 
“Wherever you go, you feel 
the KGB watching, sometimes 

making films, sometimes 


harassing,” she wrote: “Some- 
times you find that your house 
has been entered and things 
moved or taken.” 

Probably the most painful 
period of Dr Sakharov's long 
exile came in 1984 - he 
himself noted the aptnes of 
the date — when the inventor 
of the Soviet hydrogen bomb 
and youngest-ever full mem- 
ber of the Soviet Academy of 
Sciences was forcibly fed to 
break a hunger strike mounted 
in an attempt to make the 
authorities let his wife travel 
abroad for urgent medical 
treatment, a move allowed 
more than a year later. 

In response to the protest. 
Dr Sakharov was treated to 
what amounted to torture. 

“f was again pushed down 
onto the bed without a pillow, 
and my hands and feet were 
tied. A tight clamp was placed 
on my nose so that 1 could 
breathe only through my 
mouth. Whenever I opened 
my mouth to take a breath, a 



' . . % - ' - •: 






; V 


Dr Sakharov and his wife, Yelena Bonner: the end comes to 
a nightmare existence in the dosed city of Gorky. 

spoonful of nutriment or 
broth containing strained 
meat would be poured into my 
mouth,” he wrote in a smug- 
gled account published in the 
West earlier this year. 

“Sometimes my jaws were 
pried open by a fever. They 
would hold my mouth shut 
until I swallowed, so that I 
could not spit out the food. 

When I managed to do so, it 
only prolonged the agony ... I 
had to gasp for breath. I could 


feci the veins bulging on my 
forehead.” 

Although Dr Sakharov’s ill- 
treatment and continuing ex- 
ile became one of the bifflest 
threats to Mr Gorbachov's 
efforts to improve the Krem- 
lin's on human rights, 
many Soviet officials seemed 
to regard it as justified, argu- 
ing that be should have been 
sent to a labour camp. 

Those veteran Moscow 
correspondents who met Dr 


Sakharo v before his banish- 
ment remember him as a 
quietly spoken, impeccably 
mannered man who left a nnn 
impression of w hat one hard- 
nosed American reporter de- 
scribed as “saintliness” 

Among qualities cited by 
those who knew him during 
his frequent contacts with the 
Western media winch so 
infuriated the authorities were 
his courage, determination 
ana sheer strength of imeLcct 

in rhe subjects that wore his 
speciality — theoretical phys- 
ics and cosmology. 

For many years he was 
involved in the crash Soviet 
p r o gr a m me to catch up with 
the US in nuclear weapons, a 
period when he was among the 
country's elite and was three 
times awarded the decoration 
Hero of Socialist Labour. 

All this changed in 1968, 
when he published an essay in 
the West called Thoughts on 
Progress. Coexistence and 
Intellectual Freedom. Emerg- 
ing only a few weeks before the 


Soviet-led in*asion o! 
Czechoslovakia, the my. 
and later calls that the West 
should reject detente without 
internal Soviet liberalization, 
angered the Kremlin. 

A vicious press campaign 
was unleashed in which he 
was depicted as a “pro- 
fascisT. His eventual seizure 
by the KGB and exile became 
more intolerable in May, 
19S4. when the lifeline forged 
by his wife's trips to Moscow 
was cut with her, too. being 
exited to Gorky for five years 
for alleged anti-state activities. 

Observers here believe that 
it was the firm support which 
Mr Bonner received during 
her meetings with world lead- 
ers during her recent stay in 
the West, such as Mis Mar-- 
gam Thatcher and President 
Mitterrand, that finally per- 
suaded the Kremlin to re- 
think the most self-defeating 
of its campaigns against non- 
conforming Soviet citizens. 

Peter Reddaway, page 16 
Leading article, page 17 


Turks still 
press to 
join EEC 

By Andrew McEwen 
Diplomatic Correspondent 

Turkey has served notice 
that it does not intend to take 
“No” as an answer from 
Britain in its bid to secure EEC 
membership. 

Mr Ali Bozer, Turkey's 
Minister for EEC Affairs, flew 
home yesterday after reveal- 
ing that he had told Sir 
Geoffrey Howe that a formal 
application was imminent 
This was not what the Foreign 
Secretary wanted to hear. 

Mr Bozer’s stand showed 
that Ankara bad chosen to 
ignore strong hints from Mrs 
Thatcher that the time was not 
ripe for Turkish membership. 

Mr Bozer said he had noted 
discouraging remarks made by 
the Prime Minister at the EEC 
summit in London on Decem- 
ber 6. and that Sir Geoffrey 
bad repeated them during 
their meeting on Thursday. 

Mrs Thatcher made two 
points at the summit: Tur- 
key's association agreement 
with the EEC should be made 
to work before moving on to 
foil membership, and the EEC 
should adjust to the acoession 
of Spain and Portugal before 
accepting a 13th member. 


Soviet rioting ‘over ’ 

Kre mlin confirms 
more open policy 

From Our Own Correspondent, Moscow 


The Soviet Government 
said yesterday that the situa- 
tion in the Kazakhstan capital 
of Alma-Ata, scene of rioting 
against the appointment of a 
new leader of the Central 
Asian republic's Communist 
Party, had “returned to 
normal”. 

The news was given at a 
press conference by Mr Vladi- 
mir Petrovsky, the Deputy 
Foreign Minister, further ref- 
lecting the unprecedented 
fashion the K remlin has cho- 
sen to publicize the serious 
disturbances in the nation's 
second largest republic. 

Mr Petrovsky, deliberately 
drawing attention to the fact 
that the Kremlin had broken 
with the tradition of secrecy 
surrounding reports of in- 
ternal unrest inside the Soviet 
Union, said: “The reports of 
the unrest were immediately 
relayed to the mass media. 
This is in line with the new 
policy of openness which was 
decided upon at the 27th 
congress of the Co mmunis t 
Party in February.” 

Mr Petrovsky did not add 


greatly to the details about the 
disturbances first released on 
Thursday night by Tass. But 
he stressed that the “over- 
whelming and absolute maj- 
ority” of party members in the 
republic had approved the 
decision to replace Mr Din- 
rnukhamed Kunayev, aged 74, 
with Mr Gennady Kolbin, a 
59-year-old Gorbachov loyal- 
ist and Russian national. 

It was noted that the new 
policy did not extend to 
publicizing immediately ex- 
actly what methods had been 
used to put down the unrest, 
which is understood to have 
involved several hundred riot- 
ers and the burning of at feast 
20 cars, but it is assumed in 
Moscow that tough tactics 
were employed 

Although independent con- 
firmation of the security situa- 
tion in Kazakhstan was 
unavailable in Moscow, West- 
ern embassies appeared to 
accept the official assurances 
that the situation had returned 
to normal. 

Leading article, page 17 



Cautious 
welcome 
for Soviet 
decision 

Bv Oar Foreign Staff 

Western officials have 
hailed the Soviet decision to 
free Dr Sakharov from in- 
ternal exile, but said there 
were manv other cases to be 
resolved if Moscow meant to 
turn a new leaf in its treatment 
of dissidents 

The Foreign Secretary, Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, said the de- 
rision would be warmly wel-' 
corned everywhere. 

“At this lime of happiness 
we should not forget ihe many 
others in the Soviet Union 
who are still deprived of those 
human rights for which 
Andrei Sakharov and his wife 
have themselves fought so 
hard." he said. 

In Washington, the pre- 
sidential spokesman. Mr 
Larry Speakes, said: “We wel- 
come this as a personal victory 
of courage for the principles of 
human rights that the two 
have come to exemplify .” 

But he added: “There are 
countless others who remain 
incarcerated for no reason 
other than their desire to 
express their views.” 

The United Stales Ambas- 
sador in Moscow. Mr Arthur 
Hartman, said: “If he is 
allowed to return to Moscow 
to work, this is a wonderful 
development” 

The French Foreign Trade 
Minister. M Michel Noir, 
described the release as a 
gesture after the Soviet dis- 
sident Anatoly Marchenko, 
died in jail earlier this month. 

In The Hague, a Dutch 
government spokesman said: 
“The Netherlands sincerely 
hopes this move wiD open the 
way for an improvement in 
the condition and fates of 
others in the Soviet Union 
such as Sakharov ” 

But a spokesman for the 
Amsterdam-based Bukovsky 
Foundation, which campaigns 
for human rights in the Soviet 
Union, also said the decision 
was an attempt to gloss over 
Marchenko's death. 


Alain Frost, who has won the 
World Formula One motor 
racing championship twice, 
waving to motorists as be 
drives his McLaren racing car 
down the Champs Elysees 
yesterday in a lap of honour 
which is accorded to French- 
men who achieve world status 
in their chosen field. 



China gets 
tough on 
screening 

Peking (AFP) — China's 
Health Ministry, feeing resis- 
tance by foreign students to 
mandatory Aids screening, 
has threatened to bar them 
from classes unless they 
complied. 

The programme is part of 
China's efforts to keep the 
country fine from the deadly 
disease. So far the disease has 
been discovered in only four 
Chinese, all haemophiliacs. 

Maradona in 
paternity suit 

Naples (AP) — Court 
proceedings have begun in a 
paternity case involving the 
Argentine football star Diego 
Maradona, who plays for Na- 
poli in Italy's First Division. 

Signorina Cristina Sinagra, 
a 22-year-old woman mom 
Naples, is claiming Maradona 
is the father of her recently 
born child. 

Mulroney trip 

Harare (AFP) — The Ca- 
nadian Prune Minister, Mr 
Brian Mulroney, is to make a 
three-day official visit to Zim- 
babwe in January. 

Too costly 

Lagos (AFP) — Pan Ameri- 
can World Airlines is ending 
nearly a quarter of a century of 
service to Africa after Ni- 
geria's military Government 
cut the feres airlines can 
charge for flights out of Lagos. 

Death penalty 

Peking (Reuter) — An 
accountant at the Bank of 
China and two accomplices 
from the Portuguese-admin- 
istered territory of Macao 
have been executed inZhuhai 
in the south of China for 
smuggling, fraud and em- 
bezzlement. 

Police hurt 

MebUa (Reuter) — At feast 
seven policemen were injured 
when 300 Muslims stoned a 
police station in protest at the 
arrest of a Muslim leader in 
this Spanish enclave. 

Bewigged bear 

Wellington (Reuter) - Dr 
Gerard Wall the Speaker of 
New Zealand's Parliament/ 
finding a large stuffed brown 
bear dothed m wij> and gown 
occupying his chair when he 
returned from a dinner break, 
gave the bear the customary 
parliamentary bow before an 
attendant removed it from the 
chamber. 


Bokassa trial judges charge 
ex-police chief with perjury 


After many hours of legal 
shadow-bating, the court try- 
ing former Emperor Jean- 
B6dei Bokassa for minder, 
cannibalism, grand larceny 
and sundry' other crimes yes- 
terday arrested his former 
Chief of Police, Mr Corzon 
Kazin, and later charged him 
with perjury. 

Mr Kazin has been tying 
himself in knots during an 
extended and highly un- 
comfortable stint under ques- 
tioning about his role in the 
violent death of one of 
Bokassa's Cabinet ministers. 

He went a bit too far 
yesterday in readjusting his 
previous testimony. Mr Kaz- 
in, a key witness in the 
disappearance and presumed 
death in 1973 of the then 


From Philip Jacobson, Bangui 
Public Works Minister, Luc- 
ien Mpongo, initially denied 
involvement. 

But he contradicted himself 
and admitted he was the one 
who had escorted him to j ail 

Up shot the public pros- 
ecutor with his by now famil- 
iar demands for Mr Kazin — 
who, interestingly, is now a 
highly placed official in the 
present Government — to pav 
the penalty for lying to the 
court. 

To applause from on- 
lookers, the judge and his 
colleagues on the bench 
marched off into recess to 
consider what was to be done 
about him. It goes without 
saying that like everything 
else in the Palais de Justice, 


this turned into another time- 
consuming exercise. 

Sortly after this little 
drama unrolled, there was 
another development: the for- 
mer emperor’s lawyers asked 
for a week-long recess over 
Christmas. 

They argued that Bokassa. 
who is 65. was emotionally- 
drained after five days of 
listening to scores of witnesses 
testifying about friends or 
relatives kidnapped and tor- 
tured to death or summarilv 
shot 

There are those among the 
visiting press corps who sus- 
pect that this is something of a 
put-up job. but the court has 
already decided to suspend the 
hearings from Monday. 


Blacks begin Christmas campaign 

Five die over candle protest 


From Michael Hornsby 
Johannesburg 
The Christmas candle-light- 
ing protest called by the main 
anti-apartheid groups has 
caused a new set of problems 
in South Africa, with at least 
five people killed so far this 
week in violent clashes be- 
tween different black groups 
over its organization. 

The deaths, in fi ghting be- 
tween militant youths and 
gangs of blanket-dad Basuto 
tribesmen, known in township 
parlance as the “Russians” 
were first reported in yester- 
day's issue of the Sowetan, the 
main daily En gfish - fangnapp 
newspaper read by blacks m 
the Johannesburg urea. 

The Soweto police later 
confirmed the deaths, and said 
that three people died in the 
Mapetla district of Soweto, 
two in the Chiawelo district 
and one in the Phiri district, 
apparently as a result of 
knobkenie attacks. 


THE SUNDAY TIMES 

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The trouble began on the 
evening of December 16, the 
start of the 10-day “Christmas 
Against the Emergency” pro- 
test called by the United 
Democratic Front (UDF), an 

The British Ambassador to 
South Africa, Sir Patrick 
Moberiy, yesterday delivered 
a protest Note to the Sooth 
African Government on HpfaqH 
of toe EEC, expressing grave 
concern “at growing evidence 
of serious abases of hanan 
rights in South Africa”. 

alliance of more than 800 anti- 
apartheid organizations. 

As part of the protest, 
residents of Soweto and other 
black townships throughout 
the counfry were asked to 
switch off their electric lights 
between 7 pm and 9 pm and 
light candles instead This 
request was widely obeyed in 
Soweto and many other 
townships. 


In Basuto-occupied areas of 
Soweto, however, there was 
resistance to the young mem- 
bers of UDF street commit- 
tees, known as “comrades”, 
who patrolled the townsbip 
monitoring and enforcing the 
blackout The bouse of one 
unco-operative Basuto was 
reportedly attacked and set 
alight. 

Gangs of “Russians” arm- 
ed with knives and knob- 
kernes, then sought revenge, 
raiding houses and flogging 
and assaulting any youths they 
found In addition to the five 
deaths, scores of other people 
were said to be injured 

The “Russians” have a long 
history in South Africa’s black 
townships. Their name is said 
to derive from their reput- 
ation for violence — an unfair 
slur on the Basuto people as a 
whole and the blankets they 
wear to keep warm in their 
mountainous homeland of 
Lesotho. 


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THE TIMES SATU RDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


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The MI5 case: No judgement until February 


Whitehall compromise hint 
as spy book hearing ends 


The MIS book hearing ended on a note 
of mystery yesterday after 22 days of 
evidence and legal argument estimated to 
jj^ve cost the British Government about 
£1 million and a good deal more in loss of 
dignity, a judgement in the marathon 
battle over Mr Peter Wright’s memoirs is 
noi expected before Febniary. 

The final act in Corn 8D of the New- 
South Wales Supreme Court included an 
angry rebuttal by Whitehall of allegations 
made against Sir Michael Havers, the 
Attorney-General, and Sir Robert Arm- 
strong. the Cabinet Secretary, and a 
suggestion that there could be a last- 
minute compromise. 

It also quashed last-minute speculation 
of a deal on Mr Wright’s book. 
Spy catcher, after a hint of compromise 
briefly entered the co urtro om. 

The mystery concerns precisely what 
the British Government intended by 
asking for “clarification’’ of its position, 
which on Thursday provoked Mr Justice 
Powell to accuse Whitehall of delaying 
tactics, and warn that he could dismiss 
the entire case. 

It appears that the Government was 
asking the judge to be an arbiter of what 
material in the secret Wright manuscript 
is in the public domain — in other words, 
is common knowledge ■— by asking him to 
compare its contents with 26 other books. 

This proposal indicated a new flexibil- 
ity on the important public domain issue. 
The Government has throughout dis- 
missed it as irrelevant, maintaining that 
Mr Wright was disqualified from writing 
about anything learnt during his career 
with M15, whether it was in the public 
domain or not. 

Yesterday morning Mr Malcolm 
Tumbull. counsel for Mr Wright, said his 
understanding was that Whitehall was 
offering the deal of a “blue pencil job” . 
similar to that used on Nigel West's book, ' 
.4 Matter of Trust, which was published ! 
with government approval after being ! 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 

West-style negotiation, as long as it is 
carried out fairly and quickly” Mr 
Turnbull said. 

Mr Theo Simos QC said, however, that 
Mr Tumbull had misunderstood the 
government position. The intention was 
that the judge should explore the prin- 
ciple of public domain. If, for example, a 
subject had been covered in two lines of a 
previous book, was Mr Wright entitled to 
write 20 pages on it? 

If appropriate, Mr Simos said there 
would be discussions with Mr Wright 
about bow the principle would apply to 
the whole manuscript He described this 
process as “negotiation”, but then said 

% The submissions (about 
Sir Robert and Sir Michael) 
were baseless, unjustified 
and should be rejected 
out of hand 9 

Mr Theo Simos, QC 


temporarily restrained. 

“We remain prepared to enter into a 


that was “the wrong word” and rhang r-a it 
to “discussion”. 

Mr Simos then went on the offensive 
for one of the few times in the case in 
denouncing Mr Turnbull's attack on Sir 
Michael Havers and Sir Robert 
Armstrong. 

The language used by Mr Turnbull in 
accusing these men of deceit had been 
“extravagant, melodramatic and outra- 
geously inappropriate,” Mr Simos said. 
“The submissions were ba s el e ss, unjusti- 
fied and should be rejected out of hand. 
They were full of schoolboy debating 
tricks, full of emotive allegations and 
mixed metaphors, which even a third-rate 
journalist should not be proud of” 

The attack on Sir Robert's credibility 
had been based on three matters: the 
letter he wrote to Chapman Fincher’s ' 
publishers asking for a copy of Their 
Trade Is Treachery when the Gov- 


Upsurge in Uganda tribal war 


Support for rebel guerrillas 
in north worries Britain 

By Andrew McEwen, Diplomatic Correspondent 


Disturbing evidence that 
President Yoweri Museveni is 
losing his military grip on 
northern Uganda in the face of 
stiff, iri bally-based resistance 
has reached London. 

Travellers, returning from 
the region paint a grim picture 
of fighting virtually on a daily 
basis between the President’s 
National Resistance Army 
and guerrilla movements. 

The strife has severely ham- 
pered European relief efforts, 
driven many small farmers 
from their land, discouraged 
crop planting, and aroused 
concern among EEC officials 
in Brussels that food supplies 
may dwindle. 

Four independent sources 
contacted by The Times 
agreed that the guerrillas were 
receiving strong popular sup- 
port from local Acholi people. 
While still in control of Gulu, 
the main central northern, 
town, and the road linking it' 
to Kampala, government 
troops risked ambush when- 
ever they moved into the 
bush. 

Even troops in the town 
have been twice attacked. 

The local support will cause 
greater concern in Britain than 
the fighting itself Whitehall 
has invested high hopes in 
President Museveni as the 
man most likely to break the 


mould of Ugandan tribalism. 
Since he came to power in 
January his excellent civil 
rights record has encouraged 
ministers to believe that he 
could attract broad, inter- 
tribal support. 

For several months con- 
tinuing resistance in the north 
stemmed mainly from rem- 
nants of the Uganda National 
Liberation Army (UNLA^ the 
troops of the previous 
government 

The balance of guerrilla 
forces has since changed. Re- 
cent visitors say that UNLA 
units have merged with a 
broader but loose-lmit resis- 
tance which has no dear- 
leader. Roving bandits and 
cattle rustlers have added to 
the confusion. 

One Acholi source said 
there was now hardly a family 

r\ SUDAN / £| 


UGANDA! 


f Kampala U 

EntebbeJy|j| 

$2* JUS 


that did not have a relative 
linked to the guerrillas. Local 
people refer to them simnlv as 
alum or oduL Both words are 
said to mean “the people from 
the bush”. 

The trends have prompted 
mounting pessimism about 
the chances for national 
reconciliation. For 20 years 
the Nflotic tribes of the north 
— the Acholis. Langis and 
West Nile peoples — domi- 
nated the fax more numerous 
southern Bantu through the 
governments of Idi Amin, 
Milton Obote and Tito 
Okeflo. 

While President Museveni’s 
support comes from the 
Bantu, his policy is strongly 
opposed to tribalism. In an 
attempt to attract broad sup- 
port be has imposed stern 
discipline on his own troops. 

An attempt to cast doubt on 
their reputation emerged last 
week. A prominent Acholi 
flew to London to air allega- 
tions of serious civil rights 
abuses by the President's 
forces. He claimed that gov- 
ernment troops hunting 
guerrillas had killed 1 1 civil- 
ian hostages in a single in- 
cident On another oocaaon 
women attempting to flee a 
hut set on fire by troops were 
shot dead as they broke out of 
a mud walL 


Suicides by young Japanese rise 


Tokyo - Suicides by young 
Japanese hare risen dramati- 
cally thk year, with 723 
children and teenagers taking 
their own lives in the 11 
months to December (Darid 
Watts writes). 

The biggest increase in sui- 
cides was among young girls, 
apparently prompted by the 


example of Miss Ynkflco 
Okada, a young pop singer. 

Miss Okada was the in- 
carnation of the dreams of 
thousands of romantic, im- 
mature Japanese girls. After a 
foiled suicide attempt in April, 
she was released from hospital 
only to jump promptly to her 
death from an apartment win- 


dow. The singer was dis- 
tranght over an unhappy affair 
with an older man. 

A rash of “copycat” suicides 
followed and % the end of 
November 220 girls, 77 per 
cent more than last year, had 


increase cmne in May after 
Miss Okada's death. 


Zimbabwe 
crackdown 
on ‘quacks 9 

From A Correspondent 
Harare 

The Zimbabwe Govern- 
ment is planning to damp 
down on bogus “traditional 
healers” by introducing a 
disciplinary code along the 
lines in force for Western- 
trained doctors. 

The traditional healers or 
herbalists have been officially 
recognized since indepen- 
dence in 1980 and their ‘pre- 
vious , description — witch 
doctors — is frowned upon. 

But after six years of talks 
and studies the authorities 
have not come up with a 
definition of a “traditional 
healed* or a set of examina- 
tions which could be imposed 
to check their abilities. 

The last time an African 
government tried to tackle the 
problem was more than 160 
years ago, when King Shaka's 
Zulu empire was faced with an 
epidemic of teenage boys try- 
ing to evade army service by 
enrolling as trainee witch doc- 
tors. They were made to sleep 
unarmed in the hyena-infested 
bush to prove their super- 
natural powers. 

Zimbabwe’s bona fide tra- 
ditional healere, or ngangas, 
as they are known, received 
warm praise from the coun- 
try’s foremost expert on west- 
ern medicine, the late Profes- 
sor Michael Gelfand, who ac- 
knowledged their ability to 
treat psychosomatic illnesses 
bnrond the reach of European 
science. 

The Prime Minister. Mr 
Robert Mugabe, told a group 
of government-trained health 
assistants in Harare on Thurs- 
day that the state-sponsored 
Zimbabwe National Tradi- 
tional Healers' Association 
(Zinatha) was ready to weed 
out quacks who cheated gull- 
ible people in the country’s re- 
mote areas. 



— v. yii.U, 


■X 


eminent already had page prooft; on his 

sworn answers to two interrogatories; and 
on the delay in correcting his mistake that 
Sir Michael had made the decision not to 
try to restrain the Pinchcr book. 

Mr Simos said Sir Robert bad admitted 
that his tetter to the publishers had given 
“a misleading impression”. Bui his 
answers to this question had been that of 
a truthful witness. 

At this point, the judge interrupted to 
say that it could be said of Sir Robert that 
“he would not stoop to a lie when a half 
truth would do” He had admitted, the 
judge added, that though be would not 
wish to lie; there might be circumstances 
in which he had to. 

The judge said: “I have to say to myself, 
’I know that he has dissembled on one 
occasion.’ I must bear that in mind.” 

That was not the issue, Mr Simos 
replied. The issue was whether Sir Robert 
lied in the witness box. 

As to that, the judge said that in the past 
10 years there bid been only four 
witnesses who be bad concluded were 
lying. His main objection to Sir Robert's 
testimony was that he was an official 
when the person who could have offered 
useful, hard evidence would have been a 
technician. 

On the two interrogatories, Mr Simos 
said that, subject to qualifications made 
by Sir Robert on the replies themselves, 
there was no basis for suggesting that he 
had not been truthful in cross-examin- 
ation. 

On the one-week delay before Sir 
Robert told the court that he bad been 
mistaken in testifying that it had been Sir 
Michael who decided not to seek restraint 
of the Pincher book. Mr Simos said: “No 
delay was attributable to Sir Robert”. 

Any delay on Sir Michael’s side had 
been due to “study of the transcript and . 
making inquiries from all appropriate 
persons, and then giving consideration as 
to whether it was appropriate to commu- 
nicate with a witness under cross-exam- 
ination.” 







!# 

... 

5 ■«" i O 
' ‘ *£. 


Jerusalem 
police 
raid bible 
college 

From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

Police with sniffer dogs 
trained in finding explosives 
raided the Shuvu Banim 
yeshiva (bible college) in the 
old city of Jerusalem early 
vesierday morning. 

After a search of the ram- 
bling old building, in the 
Muslim quarter of the city, 
they arrested one student for 
possession of a knife and a 
dagger. 

Another student from the 
college was arrested on 
Wednesday after police sear- 
ched the car he had been 
driving and found rags and 
turpentine inside. The car had 
been abandoned after a chase 
on Tuesday night, when its 
three occupants disappeared 
into the darkness. 

A student from the same 
college was stabbed to death in 
the Old City last month, 
provoking violent anti-Arab 
demonstrations after three 
Palestinians were arrested for 
the murder. 

Yesterday's raid was carried 
out as part of police investiga- 
tions into grenade booby traps 
set outside an Arab home and 
under an Arab-owned car, 
which were discovered on 
Wednesday in east Jerusalem. 

The bombs had been made 
from Israeli Army grenades 
and had been set using similar 
techniques. They were de- 
fused by an Israeli Army 
bomb disposal team. 

Police say they are in- 
vestigating a possibility that 
there has been a rebirth of the 
extremist Jewish “under- 
ground” gang, members of 
which in the past have been 
responsible for bombing the 
cats of West Bank Arab 
mayors and for planning to 
Mow up the Dome of the Rock 
in the Old City. 

The occupied territories 
continue to remain tense, with 
occasional stone-throwing in- 
cidents. 


An Israeli soldier stands guard in Manger Square, Bethlehem, as part of the increased occasional stone-throwing in- 
security measures being taken in preparation for the flood of tourists over Christmas. cidents. 

Labour in revolt at Israel budget cuts 

Jerusalem — Labour man- that it will put the nation at developed by the defence in- (£240 million) in cuts being 
bers of Israel's coalition Gov- risk. dastries. The need to find sought by the Treas ury, 

enunent of National Unity, Mr Yitzhak Rabin, tire De- buyers to keep tire factories in This would lop 180 million 
backed by the party’s political fence Minister, has empha- business was reluctantly judg- shekels off tire defence budget, 
bureau and the Histadrnt sized this in pointing out that ed to be more important than while Mr Rabin has been 


trade muon movement, mean budget ents have already un- 
to block the economic anster- demined the security of the 
ity plan and budget doe to be cmmtry. 
presented to the Cabinet to- Mr Rabin has also told the 


morrow (Ian Murray writes). 
According to the Likud 


Knesset that not only has mili- 
tary training had to be redne- 


Finapce Minister, -Mr Moshe ed, ammunition reserves used 
Nissan, the package is in- np and emergency depots raid- 
tended to herald a new erain ed, but that all of its prodne- 
the economy, bat Labour min- tion secrets have hail to be dis- 


isters, led by Mr Shimon 
Peres, who as Prime Minister 
brought in tire last austerity 
phain July 1985, have damn- 
ed the scheme as hitting the 
poor to help the rich. Even 
more significantly, they claim 


dosed as tire state-run defence 
industries have struggled to 
stay in business. 

The disclosures were made, 
he said, to try to interest for- 
eign buyers in top-secret weap- 
ons systems designed and 


developed by the defence in- 
dustries. The need to find 
buyers to keep the factories in 
business was reluctantly judg- 
ed to be more important than 
keeping their secrets. Even 
though the disclosures had 
now been made, it would be a 
year or more before it was 
known if the sacrifice had paid 
off. 

He also complained that 
weapons research had had to 
be curtailed and that research 
staff would have to be cut by 
700 more before the end of 
March, merely to hold spend- 
ing inside last year’s budget 
This year's draft budget has 
defence contributing savings 

S divalent to 40 per cent of all 
the 486 million shekels 


(£240 million) in cuts being 
sought by the Treasury. 

TTiis would lop 180 million 
shekels off the defence budget, 
while Mr Rabin has been 
pressing for an increase of at 
least that amount just to 
maintain defence levels. 

Health and education are 
the other two areas where the 
Treasury is seeking large cuts. 
Both are ran by Labour min- 
isters, who are threatening to 
join Mr Rabin in Mocking the 
budget. Mr Nissim insists that 
tire plan most be implemented 
if the economy is to continue 
its painful recovery. He has 
told Mr Rabin the security of 
tire country relies at least as 
much on a sound economy as it 
does on the Army. 


Welshman accused of 
Lufthansa kidnapping 


India clears Briton of 
Bhopal spying charges 


From John Engla n d , Bonn 


From Knldip Nayar, Delhi 


A Welshman extradited 
from London to West Ger- 
many last month is to be 
charged with involvement in 
the terrorist kidnapping of a 
Lufthansa airline manager in 
Bolivia in 1983, for whom a 
$1.5 million (about £1 mil- 
lion) ransom was paid. 

Mr Alan Rees, aged 35, of 
the South Wales town of 
Ammanford, has been in jail 
in Frankfurt on remand since 
his extradition on November 
26 after losing a long legal 
battle to stay in Britain. 

Mr Rees, along with four 
members of the Bolivian 
Socialist Falange group, is 
alleged to have kidnapped 
Herr Michael Wurcbe, aged 
41, the Lufthansa regional 
manager, from outside his 
home in La Paz on November 
14 1983. 


Herr Wurcbe told police 
that five masked and armed 
men bundled him in to the 
back seat of his car, gave him 
an injection that made him 
lose consciousness, and drove 
him to a shack on the outskirts 
of La Paz where he was 
chained to a bed. 

The kidnappers* ransom de- 
mand of $1.5 million was met 
with registered notes from the. 
West German Federal Bank, 
and Herr Wurcbe was released 
near La Paz airport 

Mr Rees, who denies all 
charges against him, was ar- 
rested at Gatwick airport ini 
March 1984. 

The spokesman in Wies- 
baden said three of the Boliv- 
ians, who initially accused Mr 
Rees of masterminding the 
kidnapping, had also been de- 
tained. 


The Supreme Court oflndia 
has ordered the Government 
to drop all charges against Mr 
David Bergman, a Briton 
arrested in Bhopal for spying. 

Mr Bergman, a 21-year-old 
law student, approached the 
court on Friday to dear his 
name and alleged that the 
Madhya Pradesh government 
continued to malign him. 

Justice M M Dutta and 
Justice Rangath Misra said in 
their judgement that the 
charge against Mr Bergman 
was not maintainable and that 
the state government and the 
central Government should 
“clearly” state that there was 
no charge of spying against 
him. 

Mr Bergman bicycled from 
Birmingham to Bhopal to 
raise money for the survivors 
of the gas tragedy of December 


1984 in the Union Carbide 
plant at BhopaL 

In Punjab, suspected Sikh 
terrorists killed a student in 
Amritsar yesterday. 

Three days earlier, terrorists 
killed a Sikh family of six, 
including three children, for 
having allegedly given infor- 
mation to police about Mr 
Dhana Singh Sidhu, a “Khal- 
istan” leader who was arrested 
on Sunday right. 

Mr Surjit Singh Barnala, the 
Punjab Chief Minister, has 
defended the police entry iuto 
the Golden Temple in Amrit- 
sar earlier this year. He asked 
the Akali breakaway group in 
the state assembly in Chan- 
digargh what else he could 
have done when the terrorists 
announced the formation of 
“Khali stan” from the ram- 
parts of the temple. 


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8 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


THE ARTS 



OPERA 


La Boheme 

Grand, Leeds 


Xt no longer shocks when 
notoriously shocking directors 
fail to shock, and so David 
Freeman's production of La 
JBohime, where the characters 
actually look, and behave 
credibly like, young Parisians 
of around 1830 can be ac- 
cepted quite cheerfully as an 
essay in naturalism, and a 
successful essay at that 

1 think it is possible to take 
the opera at other than face 
value, but Mr Freeman pro- 
vides good reason for treating 
it naively. First in the physical 
energy he inspires in the cast, 
and second in his device of a 
narrator. 

Between the acts Schaunard 
reappears, 20 years on, to 
reminisce, so that we really are 
shown, as the original novel 
bad it, “scenes from Bohe- 
mian fife”. 

The highly-romanticized 
and compacted nature of the 
scenes is perhaps explained as 
due to the working of mem- 
ory, alternatively we may be 
witnessing an opera composed 
by Schaunard himself! 

More practically, the nar- 
rative covers scene changes 
neatly. 

But, of course, the main 
business is the opera, which, 
curiously, seems shortened by 
the extension, perhaps be- 
cause it is so definitively 
framed into four panels, vivid 
though the acting style is. 

The garret is indeed a tiny 
space, only about 12 feet 
across and this thrusts the 
companions up against each 
other, helping them to gen- 
erate in themselves and in one 
another a self-conscious, exag- 
gerated vitality. That effect is 
also assisted by the feet that 
David Rogers’ designs pro- 
vide grey backgrounds, barely 
in focus, against which the 
costumes parade in vigorous 
colours, especially in the sec- 
ond act With nothing pic- 
turesque in the setting, the 
action is closely centred on the 
six young people. 

The production bears that 
centring because all six are 
young and young-looking, 
spontaneous in their behav- 
iour and fresh of voice. Eirian 
Davies as Mimi is not only a 
triumphof make-up: her dis- 
tant vibrato-less tones are 
plausibly those of a consump- 
tive, and yet she can swing 
from this delicacy to a fullness 
that is still in character. 

William Shim ell is darkly 
suave and sensual as Marcello, 
and Anna Steiger, after a 
shaky start as Musetta, looks 
set to equal him in game- 
playing and vocal cunning. 
Clive Bayley, vocally unfit, 
acted an eager, shaggy Colline 
to John CoimelFs secure 
pronouncements from the pit, 
where Elgar Howanh was in 
charge of a delectably col- 
ourful orchestral perfor- 
mance. 

Paul Griffiths 


Prize turkeys of 1986 


B ritain led the world in 
turkey-fanning this year. 
The prize bud, of course, 
was the disastrous Revolu- 
tion. Apart from being a 
profound setback to the economy and 
morale of British films, Hugh 
Hudson's story of the American 
Revolution raised the profound ques- 
tion of how it was possible for a major 
film organization to invest over $20m 
in a script whose inadequacies must 
have appeared from the first, even to 
the most inexperienced eye. 

The actors (A1 Pacino and die 
ubiquitous Nastassja Kinsky) did not 
have a chance against the absurdities 
and chatter of the screenplay; and the 
visual possibilities were largely sac- 
rificed to a naive quest for newsreel- 
style authenticity (aka wobbly 
cameras). 

Another British extravaganza. Ab- 
solute Beginners turned Colin 
Mctxmes’ mirror of the Fifties into a 
series of superficial, nostalgic, scatter- 
brained pop videos. The novel be- 
came just another period artefact, 
alongside the old TV sets, refrig- 
erators, news headlines and a middle- 
aged Mandy Rice-Da vies. The 
director Juiien Temple offered as his 
surprising excuse: “I simply wanted 
to conjure up the experience I 
remember the first time I took speed 
in the city”. 

Highlander (directed by Russell 
Mulcahy, like Juiien Temple a pop 

Worst 
among 
equals 

In American parlance, a 
“couch potato” is a home- 
grown tuber distinguished by 
deep roots and square eyes. 

Where h umans nave heads 
and hands, couch potatoes 
have programme guides and 
auto-changers. This easy-care 
domestic vegetable requires 
only occasional watering with 
alcoholic beverages. 

As a member of the English 
sub-species “sofa spud”, I 
happily absorb snooker, 
Gainsborough movies, sham- 
poo commericals. Alio, Alio , 
snooker repeats, news for the 
deaf I have been known to sit 
through programmes hosted 
by Dennis Norden; a nicely 
tinted test card gets my vote 
every time. 

But nothing short of death 
threats would induce me ever 
again to watch a single minute 
of First Among Equals (Gra- 
nada). This much-vaunted 
“drama” of political ambition 
and men's tailoring bad all the 
allure of a bus timetable. 

An unreadable novel be- 
came an unwatchable serial 
staffed by decent second-di- 
vision actors who ought to 
have had more sense of 
shame. With its plywood 
characterization and 
fibreboard dialogue, it easily 
beat Life and Loves of a She 
Devil as the year's silliest 
fictional adaptation. 


With five more days to go before the Christmas 
dinner our film and television critics select some 
of the biggest screen flops of the year 


video wizard) saw maximal deploy- 
ment of special effects and high 
technology alongside minimal story 
sense. The comic-strip saga was a 
farrago about a gaggle of immortal 
creatures, representing good and evil 
and battling down the ages for the 
prize of universal intelligence. For 
sure none of them had ever won it. 

Car Trouble win at least be 
remembered for putting on the screen 
a venerable sexual myth about the 
fornicating adulterers who find 
themselve inextricably trapped in the 
act by a muscular spasm. The director 
was David Green. 

The daffiest bird from the British 
hatcheries though must have been 
Biggies, directed by John Hough. It 
was a bizarre decision to resurrect 
Captain W. E. Johns' boys* book 
hero (whose one-time devot ees most 
by now be well past cinema-going 
age); it was a defeatist one to hurl the 
mm into mid-Atlantic, subordinating 
the nominal hero to a modem New 
Yorker who keeps felling through a 
time- warp to get caught up in the 
adventures of Biggies and his pals on 
the Western Front in 1917. 


In Hollywood, Tnrkeycock 
bellicosity is currently potent stuff at 
the box office: Top Gun and Heart- 
break Ridge, which tell young Amer- 
ica what fun the next war will be. 
Sylvester Stallone does his bit for 
int ernational misunderstanding m 
Rocky IV by battling a Soviet Golteth 
twice his rige. Naturally the Commie 
has the advantage of costly tech- 
nological t raining , as well as steroids 
and plain ch eating- Honest American 
guts conquer, just the same. 

A ustralian actor and director 
Bruce Beresford’s King 
David, diligently doing a 
breakneck rundown of die 
Biblical monarch’s dip- 
lomatic career and private life, failed 
to capture the flamboyance of old De 
Mille epics, though it did revive some 
of the absurdities — liked the robed 
stenographer who announces he's 
taking it all down for the Book of 
Sam uel, or the nasty moment when 
Richard Gere girds up his athletic 
loins to dance before the Lord. 

Probably the first film adapted 
from a board game was Clue (in this 
country, where it was invented. 


known as “Guedo”). This predict- 
ably doomed undertaking fell to an 
Englishman. Jonathan Lynn, as his 
first feature assignment. The film has 
its place in history as the only time in 
half a century that anyone thought it 
funny when the French Maid says 
“OuC ouT. f _ 

For Britain they changed the title of 
Howard the Duck to Howard ... A 
New Breed of Hero, evidently hoping 
that audiences would not notice that 
the nasty little thing from outer space 
was a bird. But no one was fooled, 
and the box office has proved the 
Duck a kosher Turkey. 

Everyone his blind spots: in 
Roman Polanski it is apparently an 
inability to direct either action or 
knockabout comedy. Since Pirates 
was intended as knocakbout comedy 
spoof adventure, another 530m (of 
Franco-Tunisian money this time) 
went more or less down the drain. 
The galleon was nice. 

Finally two Turkey Titles that have 
not yet surfeced in this country, but 
deserve recording. Claes of Nuke ’Em 
High promises high jinks and comi- 
cal catas tro phes when an entire 
school is exposed to radiation from a 
n»rU»ar power plant fell-out; and 
given a title like Revenge of the 
Teenage Vixens From Outer Space, 
the movie to go with it is almost 
superfl nous. 


David SobinSOIl Howard the Duck: a bird that did not take off 



The unreadable info the anwafchaMe 


My second hate was The 
Story of English (BBC2), a 
fulsome babble in weekly 
instalments. This sprawling 
historical survey of the 
mother tongue as she is spoke 
was a useful idea torpedoed by 
lack of ideas, and suffering 
from a surfeit of Roberts 
(McGrum and MacNeil), who 
— not knowing how properly 
to enlighten and entertain 
their audience — ended by 
patronizing and boring it 
But the bronze medal in the 
1986 Turkey Olympics went 
ngland 


pantomime in which the even- 
tual World Grp winners tri- 
umphed over the finest perms 
that ever set sail from Albion’s 
shore. 

The original script was 
clumsily rewritten in a 
sweltering dug-out; the De- 
mon King kept his head and 
used his hand; John Barnes 
was given all of ten minutes as 
understudy; Ray Wilkins was 
not sent off It got even hotter. 
John Moison has missed his 
vocation as a potato broker. 


170U 1 UI REV Uiyui|;iu» WCUL if M 

to England v Argentina, a Maitlll UOPPOT 


Self-appointed household gods 


Much as we now look hack at 
mercury cures, tobacco, and 
hallucinogens, so wiQ future 
generations be astonished by 
now we have been fool enough 
to allow violence into our 
homes under the mask of 
pleasure. By then, the correla- 
tion between violence on 
streets and violence on screen 
win be an accepted truism. 

Another cause for wonder- 
ment will be the imrtnoas 
stranglehold t fit Desmond 

WilcOX and F.gtb#r RantZCH 

cu r rently exert on our nation. 
To have these two as house- 
hold gods most be some 
reflection on oar home. 

Esther, self-appointed 
moral guardian (“very, very 
interested in imiraiwm* and 
the Ethiopian fond”) with the 
ex pr essio n of a fap ghwg boa- 
constrictor; and Desmond, 
mercilessly ali ghting on ex- 
posed flesh tike a bluebottle to 
extract that one last tear. The 
most gruesome thing about 



T erry Waite and Esther Rantzen: a taste for the centre stage 


Desmond's case is foe way he 
bisemt-wonns his way into 
people's tires, to become an 
integral, even necessary part 

Of rtwfr wetw w- 
What other fowl could be 
pfocked from our screen with- 
out the shedding of a Wilcox 
tear? Tim Rice, of course, and 
Frank Boagh (a slippered 
refutation, surely, of any left- 


wing bias attack): all those 
respon s ible for *AHo, ' Alb, 
Chdrwyant, and The Jim 
Davidson Show — though not 
Blind Date which along with 
The Singing Detective are the 
plnms on this year's pudding. 
Former newscasters Pamela 
Armstrong and Angela 
Rippon. Alastair Burnet 
straining to be Terry Waite, 


and lastly Terry Wake strain- 
ing to be Alastair Bui net. 

I do not know why the words 
"the Archbishop of 
Canterbury’s special envoy” 
carry the charge they do, bat 
whenever I hear them my 
stomach convulses. Mr Waite 
performs as excellent a job as 
Ms Rantzen. but in making 
centre stage his work behind 
the scenes he does both him- 
self and this work a disservice. 

The single worst series this 
year consisted in foe inter- 
views Terry Waite co nducte d 
with people be much admires. 
Looking tike a great St Bct- 
nard which had lost Its brandy 
bottle, Waite inspected his 
hands, giggled, and talked a 
lot about himself. Invited to 
discuss her wok for Save The 
Children, Princess Anne had 
to listen to Mr Waite’s fanta- 
sies about becoming a 

“ Nicholas 
Shakespeare 


Television c r iti c is m may be rightly 
regarded by many as the test refuge of 
would-be sages and sit-down comedi- 
ans; but, when it comes to ridding a 
world of its iQ we tube-thumpers have 
one advantage over those more authori- 
tative prophets of doom who double-up 
as downs— such as drief constables, old 
Young Tories and the moral re-ar- 
mament school of cricket correspon- 
dents. With TV, the bad can be 
extinguished at a switch of a button. 

It is easy to denounce obvious 
individual horrors of the year, knowing 
that they have already been zapped by a 
touch of pood cm many a remot 
control: Brian Moore's iniquitous kan- 


When to press 
the button 

garoo conn before the World Cup which 
somehow judged Kevin Keegan to be a 
better footballer than George Best, The 
Price is Right [passim ), Steve Davis 
winning a final frame of snooker, 
Russdl Grant (past, present andfaam). 
However, in seasonal sympathy with 
those other moralizes who in vara kick 
against {nicks and try to repel waves, I 
will declare myself against some general 
trends in television. 


. Let there me no more televised award 
ceremonies, all mannered hypocrisy in a 
tuxedo of unction, less they start giving 
televised awards for televised award 
ceremony. Let there be no more Royal 
travalogues lest we subiiminally assume 
that foreign stales only exist when 
blessed by the Windsors. 

And finally, let there be a distinction 
between char shows and arts and book 
programmes — other than that in the 
former the guests promote their own 
works, in the latter that of their friends. 

Andrew Hislop 


Tales of 1001 fantasies 


The WaBet of Kai Lrnig by 
Ernest Bramah (Oxford, £4.95) 

O most esteemed and discern- 
ing reader, leant of these 
gravity-removing and elabo- 
rately devised although not 
absolutely authentically Ori- 
ental tales from the mouth of 
the itinerant story-teller Kai 
Lung. 

: Highly esteemed by such 
not inconsiderable mandarins 
as J.B. Priestley and Hilaire 
Belloc, who is there who 
would stoop so near to the 
dusty ground beneath their 
bound and elegant feet as to 
complain tha t Ernest Bramah, 
the exceedingly industrious 
and versatile author of these 
printed leaves, had never ac- 
tually been many li further 
East than Calais and lrnew not 
the first thing about Ancient 
China? 

' For the Bramah aficionado 
this may seem a poor imita- 
tion of his style, but this is 
bow. it appears to foe 
uninitiated. 

The Wallet of Kai Lung, the 
first in a series of Kai Long 
books that brought Ernest 
Bramah feme and fortune and 
even a fen dub, is written in a 
style which mixes Oriental- 
ized pseudo-archaic circum- 
locutions and bathetic 
modern colloquialisms. 

He creates an absorb world 
of elaborate etiquette and 
ceremony, where true love, 


“The Sparkling New 
Family MnsicaT 





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PAPERBACKS 

heroism and honour struggle 
against greed and cowardice. 
Supernatural events are 
commonplace; but the main 
thing that hampers everyone's 
pursuit of a happy life is an all- 
pervading and senseless 
bureaucracy of present day 
proportions. 

Regardless of his lack of 
knowledge about China, 
Bramah includes all the popu- 
lar conceptions and mis- 
conceptions of Imperial 
Chinese life; essentially a mix- 
ture of puppy-pie, tea drink- 


stories themselves are 
entertaining. Bramah uses the 
plots of familiar folk tales, 
such as the simple lad who 
maktx; good by malring the 
Emperor laugh (in this case, 
by means of a troupe of highly 
trained performing locusts), 
the return of the nobleman’s 
long-lost son who has grown 
up as a goatherd, or a vari- 
ation on the Midas story. 

There are some delightful 
characters, such as the man 
whose job is to catch bril- 
liantly coloured winged in- 
sects, and whose great skill is 
to be able to leap high in the 
air and select from any passing 
band the one he particularly 
desires 

. Although bogus, the Ori- 
ental philosophy that informs 
each tale is often teflingj 
Spurious sayings such as: “It is 


a mark of insincerity of pur- 
pose to spend one's time in 
looking for the sacred Em- 
peror in the low-class tea- 
shops”, are amusing, ironic, 
and true. Some of the sayings, 
however, reveal Bramah’s wit 
at its weakest; “Beware lest 
when being kissed by the all- 
seeing Emperor, you step 
upon the elusive banana- 

peeL" 

In one of his stories, Kai 
Lung describes how he la- 
boured for years to produce 
his masterpiece, to find that 
all his thoughts had all already 
been written centuries before 
by the great Lo Kuan Chang; 

Sample excerpts from the 
work in question will give you 
an idea of what the joke is: “A 
sedan-chair! A sedan-chair! 
This person will unhesitat- 
ingly exchange his entire and 
well-regulated Empire for 
such an article;” and “O nobly 
intentioned but nevertheless 
exceedingly morose Tung- 
shin, the object before you is 
your distinguished and evilly- 
disposed-of father's honour- 
ably-inspired demon.” 

It is very funny if you like 
that sort of thing. I suspect it 
strays into tire category de- 
scribed by Fowler as pedantic 
humour: “(although) the im- 
pulse is healthy for 
children . . .there will always 
be some who fail to realize 
that the clever habit ap- 
plauded at home will make 
them insufferable abroad.” 

Annabel Edwards 


A magic Miller mural 


Donald Cooper 


[ 


THEATRE 


The American 

Clock 

Olivier 


One degree under 


The Adventures of Speedfafl 
by John Fuller (Penguin, £2.95) 


John Fuller is a fellow of 
Magdalen College, Oxford. 
Speed&n, the character be has 
created to be the mainstay of 
these stories, is a philosophy 
don at an Oxford college, and 
immersed in foe intrigues of 
the senior common room. He 
is a silly man, liable to the sort 
of migudgements that lead to 
inconveniences sometimes bi- 
zarre, but more often just 
tedious. All foe academic 
stereotypes are there: some are 
locked in conflict about 


whether to sell off part of the 
college estates, others are wor- 
ried about an election to an 
Honorary Fellowship and who 
is going to get it, or whose bit 
of research discredits someone 
else’s. Do people in Oxford 
colleges really live these thin 
little lives or is it a wholly 
artificial convention? Either 
way, it is hard to see who, 
outside the academic ghetto, 
coukl be entertained by these 
scenes of petty jealousy. Geri- 
atric school strafes are not 
really appealing. 

Anne Barnes 


Arthur Miller's “mural” of the 
American Depression may 
have looked good at . foe 
Cotteskre, but it looks nothing 
short of magnificent in its new 
setting: an epic work which 
has now found an epic stage. 

Surveying the country from 
New York to Lonsianna and 
deploying a company who 
throng tire playing area and 
auditorium as rioting 
farmworkers, relief queues, 
and dance hall customers, it 
expands to charge the building 
with life and re-enact the 
agony ofa nation. It is hard to 
imagine how it was ever 
presented in studio 
conditions. 

Its director, Peter Wood, 
has had a shaky year, bat here 
at least he fully regains his 
ability to moralize all the 
theatrical elements in 
projecting a text with maxi- 
mum force and fluency. 

Upstage, Timothy O’Brien 
presents the mural itseff a 
substratum of industrial scrap 
topped with an expanse of 
virgin land. The company 
assemble before this geologi- 
cal icon, walking and rxrfter- 
skating round a slowly turning 
revolve under two giant street 
lamps. It is a wonderful image 
of the anonymous American 
melting pot before any in- 
dividual feces emerge. 

The weakest passages of the 
play are its pre-crash opening 
scenes which set up no more 
than a generalized sense of 
apprehension. Thereafter ev- 
ery scene tells a private as well 
as a public story. 

This is not simply a ques- 
tion of autiobiography. Much 
of the piece does relate to tire 
Baums of Brooklyn, who are 
dosely related to Miller’s own 
family. But young Lee Baum 
(Neil Daglish) is there more to 
observe the lives of others 
than to tell his own story; and 
the play's most powerful epi- 
sode - a re-enactment of foe 
Iowa farmers' uprising, m 



Facing the Depresahnc David Sch o fi eld md Barrie Ingh am 


which a bankrupt fanner auc- 
tions off his property for $1 — 
takes leave of the Baums 
altogether. 

What we see, through Lee’s 
uncommitted eyes, is a coun- 
try that has abruptly lost its 
one certain belief and is 
splitting up in all directions 
into violence, panic, suicide, 
madness, and political 
fanaticism. 

With that scenario, it is one 
of Milter’s achievements that 
so much of the piece is also 
vary fanny; not only m di- 
rectly comic scenes, such as 
that of a young song-writer 
(Barry James) doggedly turn- 
ing out would-be hits and 
ignoring his mother's exhorta- 
tions to marry the landlord's 
daughter: but also in the 
glancing ironies which 
successive scenes cast on each 
other. 

The production is at its best 
in weaving patterns of that 
kind: part variety show, port 
in the 


f 


pres entatio na l style of the 
1930s, drawing heavily on 
music as mudi fra domestic as 
for crowd scenes. 

Dramatic values Apart, 
Robert Lockhart’s arrange- 
ments harvest a rich crop of 
Thirties jazz, romantic songs, 
barber shop harmonizing, and 
railroad blues. An unaccom- 
panied saxapbone drifts into a 
meianchony Gershwin pre- 
lude, a crowd assembles, and 
with a deafening metallic clat- 
ter one of the group throws 
himself into foe subway. 

Sara Kestelman, as the 
mother gradually driven into 
spite and mistrust, gives the 
tragic performance of the 

night 

Elsewhere, in Michad Bry- 
ant as the bankrupt father and] 
an amazing series of high- 
energy Depression cameos 
from Drad Schofield, it is a 
story of people tanging on and 
sometimes coming through. 

frying Wardle 


yt- 


Our Colourful Past ... 

THE TIMES 

THE WORLD 
AN ILLUSTRATED 
HISTORY 

Hundreds of colour illustrations 
and maps combine with a strong 
lucid narrative to bring vividly to 
life the story of mankind from the 
Ice Age to the Cold War. 

Editor: Professor Geoffrey Parker 
Consultant Professor Norman Stone 

Fantastic value: 480 pages. Hardback, £15 only. 
Available through bookshops now.’ 

TIMES BOOKS 


SHOW THE FAMILY THE WORLD 
THIS CHRISTMAS 


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CONCISE ATLAS 
OF THE WORLD 


Completely revised 
1986 concise edition of the 
world famous Atlas 


Slipcased 

Available now through book shops 












THE 



ty i 




TIMES 


December 20-26 


SATURDAY 


A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 


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The pleasure of their company 


Great party-givers are made, not bom. 
Shona Crawford Poole spoke to three 
^ stylish — and very different — hostesses 
about the elusive art of entertaining 


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In the hHrty-bnriy of (be 
seasonal harfharai there win 
be many to agree with whoever 
wrote “the hell of hostessing is 
that one can know what thing* 
make a good hostess and stai 
he quite unable to achieve 
them.” 

The heyday of the hostess 
as one who entertained sump- 
tuously or modestly in her own 
borne was Edwardian. 
Today's most talked-aboiit 
parties and dinners are given 
by women who entertain with- 
out the armies of servants their 
grandmothers might have 
called on. Here are some 
r ,3 whose styles are individual 
and whose imitations prized. 

1 u her first Smythsoifs 
leatherbound guest and 
menu book Caroline 
Waldegrave recorded: 
“A policy decision has 
been taken by W illiam. We are 
to have a dinner party every 
Thursday.” That was in Janu- 
ary 1 978. An entry six months 
later notes: “Getting very 
tired. This session seems very 
long.” 

If she should be called upon 
to write her memoirs — and, as 
the wife of a younger states- 
man, an impeccably pedigreed 
minister in the Depar t ment of 
the Environment and Conser- 
vative member for Bristol 
West, the possibility is not 
, unthinkable — what fun she 
' will have. For not only does 
she record her menus, guest 
lists and seating plans, but 
what die wore and the prin- 
cipal subjects of the evening's 
conversation: “Politics always 
comes into iL” 

For the evening in May 
1979, when her husband ar- 
rived home in Kensington 
unannounced and accompa- 
nied by five fellow freshman 
MPs, she rustled up a hot 
orange souffle. 

On May 5, 1980, the night 
the Iranian Embassy siege was 
lifted, she gave her guests pain 
de poisson in a lobster mould, 
vinegar chicken and bilberry 
tart. “We watched television 
and were proud of the SAS 
and being British.” 

There have been dis- 
appointments, too. The entry 
of April 5 1982 notes that 
“Frances Pyra was to have 
come to dinner but he was 
made Foreign Secretary 
instead.” 

And, with unflinching can- 
door of the dinner she gave a 
week after their first daughter 
was bora, “The food was very 
nasty. I couldn't concentrate." 

Now there are two daugh- 
ters and a son, ranging in age 
from two to six. Earlier this 
year her first solo cookery 


book was published, and she 
has tittle tone for fuss after a 
full day as managing director 
®td co-principal of Leith's 
School Of Food And Wine;. 
She swears that her husband 
chooses and buys all her 
clothes without her assistance. 

SCENE SETTING 

“I entertain very little in 
Bristol and there it has to be 
very informal. In London, it is 
in the dining room. We have 
eight or 14. For 14 1 bring in 
the kitchen table and Wflham 
and I sit at separate tables.” 


GUESTS 

“Obviously 1 entertain poli- 
ticians, but not an Tories and 
not too many MPs at any one 
time or they take over the 
conversation completely. Also 
they often leave in time to 
vote at 10pm in the House of 
Commons. As a result I tend 
to remember occasions by 
what the vote was. 

“Otherwise our guests are 
usually other cooks like 
Josceline Dimbleby — who is 
an old friend — or journalists 
like her husband, David.” 

DRINK 

“1 am surprised by how much 
MPs drink. We don't chink 
very grand wine. Instead of 
Montrachet we drink 
Muscadet and instead of the 
very grand claret we would 
like, we have Fleurie. The 
pocket dictates.” 


FOOD 

“I play a sort of trick on them 
all and see if 1 can get away 
with health food. And it does 
worfc I have rationalized it to 
the point where it imitates 
ordinary food. 

“We might have a warm 
salad, then poached chicken 
breasts with a red pepper 
sauce, then a pretty arrange- 
ment of fresh fruit or a sorbet 
1 have just started doing 
biscuit cups matte of filo 
pastry filled with fruit and 
people have no idea that they 
are practically fetlessL 

“I used to make French 
dressing with yoghurt and all 
that but 1 have stopped be- 
cause I just don’t think is it as 
niceasoiL” 



rjirolme Waldegrave: “IhaTeihraysreliedonWgiiain to take charge of the co n vers a tion” Nathalie Hamhro: “I don’t have a dfcmer party, as such, vary often; once every 10 days, say” 


FREQUENCY 

“We have people for dinner 
less often now — about every 


GJ7AHAM5 — FOR. 

PANTOMIME O R PARTY f 



three weeks. Of course there 
are three birthday parties, one 
for each of the children. I 
share a birthday with William 
and we used to have a joint 
party for that, a large dinner 
party. I don't like cocktail 
parties and don’t go to them.” 


RULES 

“I like to be well-prepared so 
that I can be relaxed. I think 
we are quite good at making 
busy people relax. 1 am not 
sure T have rules at alL I have 
always relied on William to 
take charge of the conversa- 
tion. I am lost ifhe is not there 
when the everting starts.” 

If food and conversation at 
the Wakfegraves could not be 
more modern, the formalities 
are the traditional ones. “We 
only separate if there are lots 
of MPs or if the point of the 
evening is work, and then not 
necessarily by sex.” 


m & 




GRAHAM’S 

late bottled 

VINTAGE 


. ^ y atholie Hambro 
1 has the elegance of 
I toj an antelope and a 
I rare originality 
v that bypasses cli- 
che. She “wins the prize as the 
author Z would most Hire to 
ask me to duraer”, Paul Levy 
wrote when reviewing her first 
book, Particular Delights, for 
Harpers & Queen. In Vogue, 
Lady Harlech hailed her has a 
“most refreshing new voice in 
the cookery world”. 

Her business is interior 

.Pimlico flat^doubles as the 
study. The walls are broadly 
striped in two shades of 
raspberry, bright and deep. 
Against this gaiety are paint- 
ings and prints in formal black 
and gold frames. Black felt to 
the floor dresses the circular 
table littered with shaded, 
candles m crystal sticks; his in 
this small and fascinating 
room that she e n t e rt a ins her 
friends. 

“They are all very dose 
friends, quite artistic on the 
whole. They have a keen eye 
for the aesthetic. But they can 
be bankers, lawyers, or they 
can do nothing aD day. We 
have an exchange of ideas.” 

One frequent visitor is her 
husband, banker Anthony 
Hambra, from whom she is 
separated, and is “the most 
important person in my life”. 

She describes her entertain- 
ing style as “completely infor- 
mal It is not bohemian. It is 
very cosy." 


SCENE SETTING who comes 


GUESTS 

“I do no business while enter- 
taining. I devote a lot of time 
to my business and I keep a lot 
of time for my friends. But Z 
don’t mix the two.” 


DRINK 

“1 notice that people are 
drinking less. Hardly anyone 
drinks anything except wine 
before dinner. Then they carry 
on with wine, or sometimes 
water, through dinner. 

“I think that people now 
want to be in controL Yon 
don't get away any more with 
a heavy lunch with lots of 
drink and being inefficient in 
your job. And in the morning, 
if you are not on good form 
and up quite early, it does not 


FOOD 

“I give people cold food, 
warm sometimes .but very 
rarely something hot. I find 
people work late. Sometimes 
they have to go and see 
someone fora drink. I like to 
have dime all the work and not 
to be worried about the food. 


So I settle for five or six dishes 
— att at the same time — and 
pudding, cheese and fruiL 

“I rarely offer meat as such 
although it goes into other 
things. I might have a Chinese 
salad with steamed spinach. I 
always have a pasta dish with 
rosemary, basil or thyme. 
Then a vegetable dish, with 
which I will use some nuts. I 
try to maki* all my dishes 
different by experimenting 
with different herbs or nuts or 
oils, but in fact it is quite 
simple. 

“People go into the kitchen 
to get the food, two or three at 
a time. We really are very 
informal." 


FREQUENCY 

“I don’t have a dinner party, 
as such, very often: mice every 
10 days, say, usually for six to 
eight people. I do not have 
larger numbers unless it is on 
the spur of the moment, then, 
if it is 12 I love it. I dislike 
planning more than two or 
three days in advance." 

RULES 

“There are no rates." 


C ressSda Bell's par- 
ties, it has been said, 
cost her guests an 
arm and a leg just to 
get through the front 
door. Typically, an invitation 
will command “dress carnival 
style, bring champagne”. She 
says, with unshakable assur- 
ance, that “people have got 
used to the fact that it will be 
worth their while”. 

The daughter of art his- 
torian Professor Quentin Bell 
and granddaughter of Blooms- 
bury luminaries Clive and 
Vanessa Bell, she designs and 
prints bold textiles in darkest 
Hackney, last pool of afford- 
able studio and . workshop 
space near central London. 

Her parties are as dramatic 
as her work. A black-and- 
white bash — even the food 
was two-tone — for 150 
marked her final year at the 
Royal College of Art. When 
her birthday coincided with a 
royal wedding, there was a 
party for which the guests had 
to dress as kings and queens. 

At the moment lade of 
suitable party space is cramp- 
ing her larger-than-life enter- 
taining style, which ideally 
involves no fewer than a 
hundred guests, a theme, cos- 
tumes, decorations, eating, 
drinking, Ameigg and dawn 
(“One must not foiget to have 
done something for hmch the 
next day”). 

She says: “I suppose I only 
want to give parties where 
everyone who comes to it says 
it is the best party they have 
ever been to. One is dying to 
surpass oneself all the time.” 

SCENE SETTING 

“The visual ride of my parties 
is very i m portant When I 
have a theme and everyone 
has dressed up, the whole 
entrance thing becomes very 
important People who have 
decided to be too clever and 
worn something ally have 
apologized and said they felt 
completely out of place. If you 
are not wearing what I have 



DRINK 

“I still ask my guests to bring it 
because I can't afford iL I 
provide a certain amount” 

FOOD 

“At a sit-down dinner party 
the food is absolutely all- 
important Fora party-party it 
has just got to be nice. I never 
really enjoy eating at parties 
because you can't concentrate 
on the food. 

“If I had loads and loads of 
money I suppose my parties 
would not be nearly so good 
because I would end up doing 


afl the grand and conventional 
things. A' shoestring doesn’t 
bun.” 


FREQUENCY 

“There is a distinct lack of 
parties this Christmas. X 
thought it was just me, but a 
number of people who always 
have a Christmas party are not 
having one this year. I don’t 
.know why not”.” 

RULES 

“Are there any? I suppose the 
only unfoigiveable thing is 
stinginess. And paper plates." 




- ilfiSfF THE BIG 

# JlRgE-CHmSIMAS 




FUR 


q5ST*5!E 







Cressida Belt “I only want to give rariaes where everyone 
who comes says it is the best party they have ever been to” 


o 


graham 5 
‘•flarnw r«n* 
1979 

POUT 




“I love candles, everywhere. I 
like candlelight because it is 
very soft, but yon need a lot of 
candles. If you have only one 
or two camfles you haven very 
hard light 

“Sometimes in winter Uight 
candles for lunch. I pat night- 
lights in little glass cups — 
nothing smart” 


SATURDAY 
Boxing eleven dth* 
Films to watch out 35L, 
for on television £5"“ 
this Christmas gsL*. 
— page 14 


XI Gardenias 
1] OntudA&m 
14 Opera 

12 Had® 

13 Tins Cook 

14 Travel 


asked yon to wear, you arc not 
part of the action. When you 
walk into a room and yon look 
wonderful and everyone else 
looks wonderful that starts 
you off really welL 
“I like foe dressing up. 
Getting the men to dress np is 
very important If yon can get , 
them to do it, you know you < 
are really on to a winner. 1 
“I've seen whole rooms full j 
of people — who have never 
waltzed in their lives - really 
get going, carried along by the 
occasion.” i 

■ , I 

GUESTS 


“A completely mixed bunch 
of painters, designers, tele- 
virion people, lawyers, writers 
- all sorts. I often mix them 
quite radically." 


ana subject to nvnMMHy . 
UEASE | McoMauawNMaw 

wafjWSJgai Eagg ~ 


HUGE DISCOUNTS— EVERYS1NGLE 
GARMENT SLASHED IN PRICE 


B 8 P reduttdtn 

ladies SheepririnSGnfiQnattrtrroin £89.95 
Gents Sheepskins (SnBQquiitj) rmm £159 
Fur Lined Rain Coats from £69.95 

Model Stranded 

Mink Coats £266fr£1595 

Silver fox Jackets ouistiai £105(7 £475 
Mink Coats £L26(r£475 

Blue fox Jackets owen £46 fr £175 
Mink Jackets (Faasui -£090" £395 
Coney Jackets J3&95 £29.95 


Blue fox Jackets omcd £ 45 fr *175 
Mink Jackets susiui -£ 990 " £395 
Coney Jackets J 27&95 £ 29.95 

PhaanaridlopsgdaiiwoiganBeiitaalmib diwaMt prices. 
!MP0RTAIfT:|«EftBBtS0F ITS BRTTISH FUR TRADE ASSOCtAHOII 
Hew by biter City Furs L«.22 GM** Hi London EC4 TM0M36 8454 

LONDON MTOtNAHONAL HOTEL 

MTcCROMWHiRD, LONDON SWSTet(^37D 4200 
( Ntor GI«Ke5ter good nm) Earls Cotrt Uiderpmd ) 



THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


TRAVEL 1 


Preserving the 


\r>cc 


last rays of 


a golden past 


Away from Peru’s well-trodden paths of crumbling history. 


Nicholas Shakespeare discovers a country of dusty beauty 


Admiral Caferatta lay dying in 
a hospital bed when 1 arrived 
in Lima. A former com- 
mander of the naval forces in 
Ayacucho, and now a banker, 
he had been shot - though not 
without resistance — by a 
group of terrorists led by a 
woman dressed as a school- 
girl. This group had since been 


captured. (Children playing in 
the suburb where they fled 


the suburb where they fled 
noticed what seemed to be red 
paint in the sand. Paying them 
for any other drops they 
discovered, the police found 
themselves on a macabre trail 
to the terrorists' door.) 

On television there was 
footage of President Garcia by 
the Admiral's bed, investing 
him with the Order of the Sun. 
For a nation of past masters in 
the art of ritualizing defeat, it 
was another sorry celebration. 

“ Lima the horrible," com- 
plained the surrealist poet 
Osar Mora. And it is. The 
garua, a moist London fog 
which descends for half the 
year, combines with a heavier 
atmosphere of civil war — a 
war waged against those in- 
visible enemies, the 
Sender! stas. The curfew fells 
at one in the morning with an 
effect on social life which can 
only be circumvented by hold- 
ing all-night parties. Recently, 
a new trend has sprung up for 
those wishing to get home 
earlier. It involves the private 
purchase of ambulances. 

But Lima is not Pern, as the 
government stresses in news- 
paper advertisements. While 
this message is part of an 
attempt to stem the migration 
from the mountains to the 
outlying slums (now es- 
timated at 500 a day) it is also, 
thank goodness, the truth. The 
road to Cuzco, Machu Picchu 
and Arequipa may be as 
famous and over-trodden as 
ever. But less well known and 


just as worthwhile for those 
with an appetite for adventure 
rather than tourism is the trail 
north. 

The sand-blown town of 
Pi lira, on the edge of the 
Sechura desert, is the birth- 
place of Peru's most famous 
naval officer, Miguel Grain. 
Admiral Grau died in 1879 on 
board the British-built Huas- 
car after he had rammed a 
sandbank and then, out- 
numbered five to one, at- 
tempted the same on the 
Chilean navy. The only relic 
to be recovered after the 
explosion off Angamos was a 
portion of the great man's leg. 

Inside the courtyard of his 
house, now a museum, a green 
statue shows him with a 
bulbous nose and noble mut- 


ECUADOR 


Piura _ 0 Coel*pe 


/^cSamana 
ScchumX ***£ 

Desert \PERU 

PACIFIC 

/vr « • w » 


100 "miles 


Madia 

““ Picchu \ 
O ^flCozco 
A >^ Ukc / 
Titicaca H 
ArapripaQ y 


ton-chops. On the wall, beside 
his heavy furniture, are photos 
showing the candelabra-ed in- 
terior of el gloriosos monitor 
Huascar and a black and gold 
sword donated, as a testimony 
of their profound admiration, 
by a group of Peruvian ladies 
then living in Europe. 

In common with most Peru- 
vian towns, though abetted by 
recent floods, Piura's colonial 
past has been allowed to 
disintegrate as if the buildings 
in some way represent the 
crime perpetrated on the 
country by the Spanish. Plain 
concrete is preferred to stone- 
carving; metal entrails spike 
towards the rainless sky from 


unfinished roofs. The only 
trace of a more prosperous era 
is the town square where girls 
parade in an exaggerated 
swagger on high heels too big 
for them and, beneath the 
bougainvillaea, a band in 
baseball caps {days endear- 
ingly pompous music. 

The richest man in Piura 
lives behind locked doors on 
the Calle Loreto. He has a thin 
white moustache, neatly 
triangled to his nostrils, an 
embroidered shirt with silver 
ends screwed on to the collar 
and the largest collection of 
Vicu ceramics in the world. It 
is a collection he guards with a 
pistol produced readily and 
with a grandee's flourish from 
his back pocket. This same 
gun he once fired in jest at 
some light bulbs in the Coun- 
try Club, causing its president 
— and his neighbour, a man 
educated at the Priory School, 
Bath, no less — to expel him. 

Apart from ceramics, he 
also fittingly collects crucifixes 
(the Catholic church having 
exerted as much influence as 
the conquistadores). “Six- 
teenth century, at least", he 
says of one which seemes 
more fin de slide. In a room 
opposite a plastic parrot (“it 
makes no mess"}, the cru- 
cifixes are stacked one behind 
the other amnwg miniature 
ceramics from the Chimu 
dynasty. Below an outdated 
calendar showing a bare- 
breasted girl is a safe with box 
after box of small crosses — 
3,000 of them. “A collection 
without parallel,” be boasts. 
And, when his wife is out of 
earshot, “the best in the 
world." 

Chimu, Vicu, Inca: these 
were cultures that flourished 
before Pizarro, the pig-farmer 
from Estremadura, arrived 
with his brothers in the 16th 
century, exchanging gospels 



fridi costs 


c->i- Ltjs 

kirV ferry l:r.k :s offering 


M-tec; nas tor iip ifl 


throuen 


mroug-ioi!. i - 

from £ ! -0 :o £ 1 ' 3 ." and include 
all meals, cverr.isht accom- 
modation and sightsKfjjg 
excursions. The trains, made 
up of air-conditionec sleeping 
cars and refurbished Puhroan- 
sivie dav coaches, wul -cave & 
Pancras on Friday evenings, 
picking up at S: Altana 
Leicester. Derby and S«..- 
field. Bookings can be made 
onlv throuch Pullman Rail 
(0543 254076). 


Weaving magic spells: a native woman (left) a c okw r M shawl; the imp re ss ive, palm-filled Plaza de Armas (top) in 
Arequipa, and (bottom) life carries on as ft has for centuries in an old Peruvian village 


for gold. Occasionally, beside 
the grey coastal road, an adobe 
mound, rubbed into insignifi- 
cance by the desert winds, 
denotes an old settlement. To 
find a more impressive tes- 
timony, one must travel in- 
land and high into the Andes. 

Cuelape lies a day and a 
half's drive from Piura along a 
precipitous dirt track that 
plunges down cactus slopes to 
the Utcubamba. After Machu 
Pi ecu, it is the most spectacu- 
lar ruin in Pern. The setting is 
probably more spectacular, on 
top of a mountain that com- 
mands a view and strains the 
eye in every direction. Yet few 
know of its existence. (Two 
tourists was the previous 
month's tally. One, an Air 
Force officer called Moenko, 
had sprayed his name in 
purple on the yellow walL) 

Three times as many stones 
as the Great Pyramid were 
used to build Cuelape, the 
capital of the warlike 
Chachapoyas who inhabited it 
until the 1560s and wor- 
shipped snakes. Held in fee by 
the Incas, the Chachapoyans 


were much sought-after for the 
whiteness and preniness of 
their women. Judging by iheir 
descendants in the neigh- 
bouring towns, the prettiest 
were taken long ago. 

Today, 417 round houses, 
four metres high and seven 
metres wide, are strangled by 
the roots of trees with 
colourful red parasites. Six of 
the houses have rhomboid 
friezes made out of a stone 
brought from the valley floor 
where leprosy and malaria 


woe once rife Human bones 
He everywhere. little excava- 
tion has been done and the 
locals do not come and dig at 
night far fear of spirits. 

Mysterious, defiant, awe- 
some, Cuelape is a city still 
holding its breath. To take its 
pulse one must make the 
three-hour walk in the morn- 
ing, for in mid-afternoon the 
clear sky goes the colour of 
dried bread and it pouts. 
“Neither in woman's tears nor 
in the skies of the mountain 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Rights: Journey Latin America 
offer the cheapest fares from 
London. The £500 return flight 
on Viasa takes 22 hours to 


Lima (via Caracas. Bogota and 
Madrid). Contact 16 
Devonshire Road, London W4 
(01-747 3108). 

Internal flights: Unpracfictabte. 
though it is essential to confirm 
your tickets at every available 
opportunity. 

Hotels: Lima: Cesar's, 
expensive; Bolivar. Trapo: Opt 
Gar (unlike most hotels outside 
Lima, this has hot water and 


also the best restaurant in 
town). About £10 a night. Piura: 
HotetTunstas in Plaza de 
Armas. Chachapoyas (for 
Cuelape): Thera are four, aO 
much of a muchness. 
Cajamarca: Hold da Turistas, 
Plaza de Armas. 

Readhxp The South American 
Handbook is invaluable, but do 
not be put off by tee warnings, 
on every pace, against thieves 
and pickpockets. 

Travel ti p : Cany documents 
and money in an elastic 
bandage round your leg. 


should you put your trust," 
said the guide, dashing for 
cover as the mist rolled from 
the mountain's back like sweat 
off a hot shirt. 

The road below Cuelape 
leads in a breathtaking day's 
drive to Cajamarca, after Are- ! 
quipa the loveliest ccloniai 
city in Peru. Here Pizarro and 
his 150 men audaciously cap- 
tured the Inca Atahualpa. The 
room in Amalia Puga which 
he filled with gold and silver is 
dosed for works. Wires dangle 
above the door from a tele- 
phone socket 

Next door, his Indian sub- 
jects, with babies on their 
backs and hats on their plaited 
heads, queue at the Atahualpa 
bus station. They wear lilac 
paper flowers on the rim of 
their straw hats, for it is el dla 
de las rmiertas. They have just 
come from the ornate church 
of Sao Francisco, dipping 
fingers in the empty shell- 
shaped bowl of holy water. On 
the pavement newspapers an- 
nounce the death of Admiral 
Caferatta. 


• Travelscenc will be one of 
the few operators offering 
holidays based oc Spain's 
para dors next year. The fly- 
drive tours use p re-booked 
accommodation in Catalonia. 
Cast ilia 2 nd AndaJoria, with 
flights from Heathrow. 
Gatwick and Manchester. 
One-week holidays, including 
car hire, range front £359 to 
£479. Information: 01- 
935 1025. 


Honing up for the snow 


Ski holiday operators ere 
announcing special January 
ofers to comhji slow hooking 
auc to doubts over row con- 
ditions. Leicester-based Idea- 
tions f 0533 539190/ is 
charging a flat-rate £99 for a 
onc-wcck apartment holiday 
with air travel from Gatwick to 
snv of its resorts ir. the French 


Alps. 

Taking the free way 


Free car hire on all stayput 
holidays in Florida next year 
is offered in a new programme 
from Pan American 
Thriftwav. a subsidiary of the 
US airiine. Travellers who do 
not wish to take up the offer 
qualify for a £15-per-week 


reduction in the holiday price, 


Information: 01-629 S262. 

Philip Ray 


HOLIDAYS & VILLAS 


OVERSEAS 

TRAVEL 


ITS ALL AT 

TRAJDLFINDERS 



AUSTRALIA 


SELF-CATERING 

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Long-Haul 01-603 1515 
Europo/USA 01-937 5400 
Ist/Busness 01-838 3444 


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FARO £49 MILAN £79 
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bob (Or over IBs. Pbaoe 0633 
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HEART OF ENGLAND 


LONDON 


Kin R untim e Km nohdap let. 
s/c Oat tn dean, quiet VKxortan 
bouse. 2 bob. lounge. IdL 020 
|W Tot 01-722-7968 
MSTAHT FIAT. Luxury BcrvtcM 
Kenatngm. Chahaa from £326 
RW. mag Town House Apart- 
ments 373 3433 


Gowmmem Decreed /Bonded 
ABTA IATA ATQL/1458 



SELFCATERING 

FRANCE 


nmVENOE- Homo low m Medi- 
eval Village. Sleeps 4/S. From 
eioornv. 0203 329639 


WOULD Wide CHARES W| 

boat any fare to any deatlnanmi 
la Ore world. NEVER know. 
INOLY UNDERSOLD. EALING 
Travel Ol 879 7776. ABTA 


SYD/MEL £636 Rerih £666. AS 
major ca m era to Aus/NZ. Ol- 
684 7371 ABTA. 


CU&rCUriEHS ON nghB/hoU 
lo Europe. USA & most deana*. 
tkms. DiNoraal Travel: 01-730 
2201. ABTA IATA ATOL. 



DARTAR. N York £229. LA/San 
Fran £329. Nairobi £399. 
JoDurg £499. Syd/Mel £669. 
Bangkok £369. All direct dally 
flights 01 839 7144 


CHRISTMAS 

DEADLINES 


Advertisements for the 
following issues: 


Saturday 27th 
December 


Monday 29th 
December 


Tuesday 30th 
.December 


1ST * CLUB CLASS FUOKTS: 
Huac Dtacounb. SunworM 
Travel. (05727) 26097 

/2T1 09/27838. 


o/w £490 nn £786. Auckland 
o/w £464 rtn £776. Jotwrg 
o/w £246 rtn £4BE. Los Ange- 
les o/w £178 rtn £340. London 
FUght Centre 01-370 6332. 

LOW FARES BFOfamnME - 
USA. N/S America. Far CasL 
Africa. Airline Ant'd Agl 
Trayvaie. 48 Margaret Street. 
Wl. 01 G80 2928 (Visa 

Acocptedi 

am CALL fbr same of the best 
dais in nights, apartments, ho* 
Ids and car hire. Td London 01 
636 6000. Manchester 061 B3Z 
2000. Air Travel AdvBory 
Bureau. 

AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
o/w £490 rtn £ 786. Auckland 
o/w £480 rtn £778. JoUurg 
o/w £290 rm £490. Los Am- 
ies o/w £168 rtn £336. London 
mow On fre o:-370 6332. 

LATM JUKKKA. Low COM 
flluhto OB. mo £496. Lima 
£495 rtn. Also Small Gram 
Holiday Joumeys-tea Peru 
Iran £360) JLA 01-747-3109 

HOLT FROM £139. Taormina 
hotels, sidiv a la Cam. CraM 
Tour. night only tram £89 rtn. 
ISLAND SUN 01-222 7462. 
ABTA/ ATOL 1907. 

XMAS 20/27 D*Cl Summer 87. 
DtcTba. canaries. Greece flm a 
hols 6 wk hob 3/1 (r £399. 
Lunarscas*. 01-441 0122 

C24flTtt. 


TUWSIA. For your holiday 
where m am s u n u nsr. Call for 
our brochure no w. T unisian 
Travel Bureau . 0137? 4411. 
ALL UB CtlKL Lowest fares ag 
major scheduled cairfen. Ol- 
684 7371 ABTA 
MONO KONG £489, BANGKOK 
£369. Singapore £457. Other 
FE cues. 01-384 6S14 ABTA. 
LOWEST Air Fares. SetMd mod 
Europe A worldwide, mm Star 
Travel- 91 928 3200 


MABBELLA Luxury vUas avafl. 
able throughout me year. For 
brochure. Teh Howson Homes 
Ol 428 3962. 


WINTER SPORTS 


HOTELS ABROAD 


VENICE 

HOTEL LA FEN ICE 
ET DES ARTISTES 

38124 taka, Sa Mam 1886 
Fhm mndes walk Iran SL Mark's 
Sotara. maty comfort, cosy 


ionosphere at modentt priceL 


val otscul ear u e m g apis 

I ha let Central location. FttBser- 
*«*• Let by the week. TeL Ol- 
i W l- 

WEBBBEB Wore already ski-thfl, 
ttnon-s wren our ctutot next to 
Median U available now unto 
April. Prices Cram £76 nw half 
board. Phone Ktm on 0734 
664930 

VILLARB. Beautmn new 1 bed- 
room aooartmKnL Rorfecl 
skUno. Available now for nn- 
vato Mono. 01-634 4674 
halt mice Pnvnte flat amnni 
gtm> La Plasna. *eow 6. 2 
baths from 200i Dec.. Jan . Pen 
- March. Tel 01-369 6968 
3(0 FLIGHTS. Daily n Geneva. 
ZbHdi. Munich rtc- From «9. 
SM WEST. Tel 01 785 9999. 


CHRISTMAS AT CASTLE KEEP 
HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 
AA'dnAr* RACiHNr 


Kingsgate, Bwadstmrs, Kent CT10 3PQ 
Telephone Thanet (0843) 65222 


SUPERB CLIFF TOP SETTING OVER THE 
ENGLISH CHANNEL 


Special mid-week breaks. 3 


at £70 per person inclusive of VAT, one eve 
meal and mil En glish breakfast. 3 night wee! 


break for the price of 2 with Saturday dinner dance 
£82.50 per person. 

Xderence TTM87/1 


must be placed by 


Tuesday 23rd 
December 6pm 


To place your 

advertisements 


please telephone 
01-481 4000 


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TRAVEL 2 


Miles of smiles 
in sun valley 


Cindy Selby goes 
real cross-country 
skiing on the Swiss 
and French borders 

Someone suggested we visit a 
slate mine. In facL it was M 
Neuvecelle, manager of our 
Hole! Fleur de Neige. who 
came up with this prepos- 
terous scheme just as we were 
clipping into skis for our first 
day at the Pones du Soleil. 
which lead to 12 valleys. 24 
peaks. 200 lifts and 400 miles 
of piste. 

Were these to be sacrificed 
for some gloomy old cave? 
No. We decided the skiing was 
far more important. 

Our chosen resort, Chalet is 
a traditional Savoyarde village 
of wooden chalets. Even when 
it becomes the target of skiers 
from nearby Geneva at the 
weekend, there is no conges- 
tion on the slopes since the 
terrain is vasL 

The Portes du Soleil takes 
its name from the ridge at the 
heart of a dozen resorts scat- 
tered on either side of the 
Fran co- Swiss border between 
Lake Leman and Mont Blanc. 
The resorts have joined up to 
form the largest linked ski 
circuit in the world. A single 
ski -pass gives one access to the 
whole network. 

Skiers can explore a new 
valley every day and you are 
constantly zig-zagging over 
the border between the seven 
French and five Swiss resorts 
which make up the chain. It 
gives a new meaning to the 
term "cross-co untiy skiing”. 
There are miles of prepared 
trails with slopes to suit every 
grade of downhill skier. 

On one of our days we were 
able to ski the broad slopes of 
Chatel and Super-Cbaiel 
(above the tree line) as well as 
a circuit within the circuit, a 
45-mile tour. From Chatel we 
meandered down to MoTgins 
and Champoussin (Swiss), 
then up to the panoramic 
Portes du Soleil ridge. From 
there, an easy piste leads down 
to Les Crosets. Then it was on 
to the Chavanette, better 
known as the Wall, a for- 
midable piste reaching down 
from the highest peak in the 
region. The siding is terrific 
for experts; terrifying for any- 
one else. Intermediates, how- 
ever, can bypass the Wall and 


continue on the inner circuit 
to the modem resort of 
Avoriaz and on to Chatel. 

Skiers cannot rely on ade- 
quate snow in December or 
April; and even in March the 
bottoms of the runs can be 
mushy. At 4,000 to 7,743 feel 
ti is fairly low and the skiing 
season is therefore limited. 

. The major bonus is the 
giant and varied terrain but 
Chatel, in particular, has fur- 
ther attractions. Being French 
it is slightly cheaper than the 
Swiss resorts. Being old it has 
pleasing architecture and the 
ambience of a proper village. 

Accommodation in Chatel 
is in hotels or apartments. The 
resort is ideal for families 
since it has a s Id-kindergarten 





*4 ■ v 


“Slopes to suit every grade 
of downhill skier 

for 3 to 8-year-olds and even a 
nurseiy for babies. 

.Beginners, young and old, 
will find the ski instructors 
competent and caring The 
Chatel ski school assembles on 
the nursery slope right by the 
Hotel Fleur de Neige. One can 
ski back here, too, at the end of 
the day. The hotel has much to 
recommend it: a convenient 
location; old-fashioned charm 
dog fires, wooden shutters); 
and fine cuisine, a sharp but 
welcome contrast to the slinky 
world of salopettes and skis. 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Global organize skiing holidays 
to Chatel, Champoussin and 
Avoriaz. A week, half-board, at 
the Hotel Fleur de Neige costs 
from £244 in January to £342 
in February. Chatel apartments 
cost £137-£214 a week, £167- 
£267 a fortnight Prices include 
flights and transfers. 

Ski Global, 26 Bmffeld Road, 
Bromley, Kent (01 -464 3552). 


CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY OUTINGS 


Fun and games for busy bodies 


Many museums and art galleries ran special events for 
children of all ages throughout the Christmas 
holidays, as do some theatres and civic or community 
centres. Facilities vary from region to region, with 
large cities generally providing a wider variety of 
entertainments. It is always worth checking to see 
what is available in your area with local education 
departments, libraries, press and local radio stations. 

JUDY FROSHAUG gives a guide to what’s on 


ROYAL SCOTTISH MUSEUM: 
Art competition for children 
tinder 16 - paper, pencil and 
rubber provided. Subjects: 
anything the children wish to 
draw In the collections. Also 
film shows including The 
Railway Children and Tales of 
Beatrix Potter. 

Royal Scottish Museum. 
Chamber Street Edinburgh 
(031 2257534). Competition 
Dec 27-30. weekdays 10am- 
5pm, Sunday 2pm-5pm, and at 
the museum in Queen Street at 
the same hours, Dec 27-31. 
Film shows in Chambers 
Street Dec 29, 30, 31 , Jan 5, 6. 
2pm. AU events free. 

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF 
WALES: Children's workshop 
with more than 1 00 different 
exhibitions from the permanent 
collection to "discover", 
including mining tools, stone 
age implements and pottery, 
animals and botanical 
specimens. 

Cathays Park, Cardiff, South 
Glamorgan (0222 397951). 
Today-Jan 5 except Dec 24, 
25.26. Jan I.Tues-Sat 10am- 
5pm, Sim 2.30pm -5 pm. Free. 

MANCHESTER CITY ART 


GALLERIES: Gallery Gallop: A 
Christmas Cavalcade of 
a holiday activity 
he Alfred Munnfngs 
i, for 5-1 5 year olds. 


Horses i6 a holiday 
[inked to the, 
exhibition, 

Younger children make their 
own hobby horses, older 
children may sculpt Golden 
Slippers - Or Cinderella Eat 
Your Heart Out! is linked to the 
current exhibition, Clothing the 
Extremities, with an 
opportunity to look at the 
footwear of four centuries and 
decorate your own pair of 
shoes. 


Princess 
Street (061 236 9422 Ext 220). 
Today 10am-12.3Opm. 2pm- 
4.30pm; Golden Strppers, at 
foe Gallery of English 
Costume, Platt HaU 
(061 236 9283). Dec 22, 23, 
10am-3.30pm. 

WALKER ART GALLERY: 
Children’s quiz with which to 
tour toe gallery entitled The 12 
Days of Christmas. 

William Brawn Street, 
Liverpool (051 227 5234). Dec 
22-Jan 3. Mon-Sat 12.30pm- 
4.30pm. Free. 


LIVERPOOL MUSEUM: AngtO- 
Saxon activities for 8-1 1 year 
olds with dressing-up sessions 
and workshops - beads, 
brooches, warrior helmets - 
and quiz and drawing sheets. 
William Brown Street 
Liverpool (051 207 0001). Dec 
30, Jan 2, 5. 10.30am- 
12.15pm, 1pm-3.45pm. Free. 

BIRMINGHAM MUSEUM AND 
ART GALLERY: Or eg ami 
Christmas tree decoration 
workshops for all the family. 
Dec 22, 23. 10.30am-12.30 and 
2pm-4pm. A quiz Look for 
Faces and Figures throughout 
the holiday. Hand-bell ringers 
today at 1 pm in toe Edwardian 
Tea Room and on Dec 29, 
2.30pm, a Chinese Magic 
Lantern Show In the Council 
Chamber. 

Chamberlain Square, 
Birmingham (021 235 2839). 
Normal museum qpeninq 
times. Mon-Sat 9.30a m~5pm, 
Sun 2pm-5pm. All events free. 

CHRISTMAS CIRCUS: Gerry 
Cottle and Austen Brothers 
combine for a show in toe giant 
12-pole tent, seating more than 
2,000 people, with ring, zoo 
and caravans aU under cover. 
Battersea Park Big Top. 
Hippodrome (01-228 9540). 
Preview Wed, opens Fit 
Matinee and evening. Until Jan 

NATIONAL PORTRAIT 
GALLERY: Quiz sheet - 
Understanding Portraits: The 
Kiingrew Test plus a series of 
drama workshops entitled 
Poser! in which body language 
- how and why people posed 
for their portraits — is explored 
and re-enacted. 

St Martin's Place, Trafalgar 
] Liars, London WC2 (01- 
~ 1552). Free quiz, until Jan 
5. Poser! workshops for 11-16 

S aar olds Dec 21, 22, 23, 2pm- 
30pm. For 16-18year olds, 
Jan 2, 3, 4, 2pm-3.30pm. 

Tickets free but must be pro- 
booked via an s.a.e. with 
name, address, age and 
preferred dates, to toe 
Secretary's Office, National 
Portrait Gallery. 

MUSEUM OF LONDON: 
Programme of children's 
events and family sessions to 
coincide with the current 
exhibition of doBs, Hello Dolly. 



-r-. ■•-*.** • v 

Ice and a slice of down capers: The Snowman (top) at the 
Barbican and circus world entertainment in Battersea park 


This includes story-telling 
sessions, practical workshops 
for dressing peg and paper 
dolls and on Jan 4 ballet 
workshops, learning steps 
from Coppetia with members 
of the Sadler's Wells Ballet 
Company, followed by a 
performance. 

London Wall, London EC2 (01- 
600 3699 ext 200). Jan 3-1 1. 

NATIONAL MARITIME 
MUSEUM: Christmas 
Planetarium shows — The 
Stars at Christmas and 
Exploring toe Planets. Suitable 
all ages. 

Greenwich, London SE10 (01- 
858 4422). Dec 29. 30. 31. Jan 


i entry; adult 
£1.50, chUd 50p. 

HAMPTON COURT PALACE: 
Four workshops — in date 
order: Mask making - learn 
how to sculpt and make latex 
masks; In toe Wardrobe — 
design and make strange 
costumes; Creative Interiors - 
making props, mirrors, 
screens and chandeliers; 
Grand Exteriors — making 


scenery, chimneys columns. 
On Location - culmination of 
week's activities with 
rehearsals and show. 

East Mofesey, Surrey (01- 
977 8441). Dec 29, 30, 31 , Jan 
2, 3. lOam-lpm and 2pm-4pm 
each day. Entrance by normal 
admission. Adult 50p, child 
25p. 

NATIONAL ARMY MUSEUM: 

For children and families, 
gallery trails for the permanent 
exhibitions plus Only a Scrap 
of Paper? - an activity sheet 
showing how to “age a map 
and do old fashioned writing, 
related to a display of historical 
documents; and an action 
sheet related to toe current 
Raiders exhibition plus a 
computer on which to test your 
knowledge or simulate a 
commando raid. 

Royal Hospital Road, London, 
S W3 (01-730 0717). 
Throuahoutholidays Mon-Sat 
10am-3.30pm,'$un 2pm- 
5.30pm. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
STATE APARTMENTS: 
Different events over four days 
include an opportunity to try on 


Victorian Court dress and 
discover its history, play 
traditional party games, animal 
mask and race painting, 
demonstration of 1 7th-century 
harpsichord music, treasure 
hunt, malting board games and 
a Victorian optical toy. 
Kensington Gardens. W8 (01- 
937 9561 ). Dec 29, 30, 31 . Jan 
2. Morning sessions 10am- 
1pm, afternoons 2pm-4pm. 
entrance to the events by 
normal admission: Adult £2.50, 
child £1. 

NATIONAL GALLERY: 
Christmas quiz — Fiery Tales — 
looks at candles, bonfires, 
flaming torches and other fiery 
elements In the gallery's 
paintings. Meet toe artist 
sessions with Paolo Uccello, 
alias artist and art historian 
James Heard, discussing 
Uccello’s "The Battle of San 
Romano" painted in Florence 
in the mid -15th century. 
Suitable for 7-14 year olds. 
Trafalgar Square, London; 
WC2 (01-839 3321). Quiz 
today^Jan 5. Meet toe Artist, 
Dec 29, 30, 31, Jan 2 at 
2.30pm, Dec 3, 11.30am and 
2.30pm. Admission free. 

Tickets available 30 minutes 
before each performance 
outside the Trafalgar Square 
Theatre. 

BETHNAL GREEN MUSEUM 
OF CHILDHOOD: Story-telling 
sessions and workshops 
based on making Christmas 
decorations and sweats. 

Punch and Judy Show on Dec 
27. 2.30pm. 

Cambridge Heath Road, 
London, E2 (01-980 2415). Dec 
22, 23, 29, 30, 31, Jan 3. 
Mornings from 11am. Free. 

THE IVEAGH BEQUEST: 
Christmas entertainment for 
children and families includes a 
Christmas quiz - worksheets 
and puzzles based on the 
paintings and the house and a 
dramatic entertainment — 
Emma: Art and nature's Child 
- centred round the two 
portraits of Lady Hamilton in 
the permanent collection. 
Kenwood, Hampstead Lane, 
London, NW3 (01-348 1286). 
Dec 29, 30, 31, Jan 2,3. 
Programme repeats daily with 
quiz 10.30am-12.30pm, drama 
2pm-3.30pm. Free. 

HORNIMAN MUSEUM: Art and 
craft workshops for children 
aged eight and over, each with 
a different theme. Subjects, in 
date order, are: screen 
printing, Christmas tree 
decorating, Guatemalan 
weaving, Indian embroidery, 
Inuit design, printed calendars, 
day calendars, Indian day 
designs, plus a family 
down/dreus workshop for 
parents and/or children aged 


London Road, Forest Hill. 
London, SE23 (01*699 2339). 
Dec 22, 23. 27. 29, 30, 31. Jan 
3, 11am-12.30pm. Adult £1, 
child 50p. Pre-book. 

TATE GALLERY: Christmas 
Tree Guessing Game with 
raizes. Lecture by Laurence 
Bradbury — Prodigies in Paint 
— explaining how famous 
artists painted when young. 
Suitable for 8-13 year olds. 
Two gallery tours: Fact and 
Fantasy, for 13 year olds and 
under - comparing 
representations and "real life" 
paintings with those of the 
imagination; Seeing the Light — 
for 8-13 year olds — looks at 
different depictions of light. 
Miflbank, London, SW1 (01- 
821 1313). Guessing Game 
today-Jan2. Lecture Dec 29, 

1 1 -30am. Fact and Fantasy — 
Dec 30, Jan 2. 11 .30am- meet 
in the Rotunda. Seeing the 
Light -Dec 31, Jan 5, 7, 

1 1.30am. Ail events free. 
VICTORIA & ALBERT 
MUSEUM: Victorian Christmas 
celebration with ballads, 
carols, brass band, music hall, 
pantomime, games and a visit 
from Santa Claus. 

Cromwell Road. London, SW7 
(01-589 6371). Tomorrow, 

3pm. Adult £2. child free. 

SCIENCE MUSEUM: Wizards 
of Steam — a series of 
demonstrations showing how 
concepts of steam were put 
Into practice with results that 
changed the. world. Suitable for 
children aged eight and over. 
South Kensington, London, 
SW7 (01-589 3456). Dec 29. 

30, 31 , Jan 2, 3, 3pm each day. 
Tickets free but must be 
obtained in advance from the 
Information Office. 

BARBICAN CENTRE: 

Children's Christmas party 
with films and live 
entertainment today. 11am and 
2.30pm — no adults admitted. 
The Snowman and Saint- 
Saens's Carnival of the 
Animals with Howard Blake 
and Bernard Cribbens on Dec 
22, tern, Dec 30, 3pm. Adults 
£5.50, £7.50, under-6s £3.50, 
£4.50. Funtasia 87, a musical 
entertainment with Ann 


Rachlin, Jan 1 , 3pm. Adult 
£5.50, child £3.50. TeddyBear 
concerts, Jan 2-4, 3pm. Tickets 


£5.50, £4.50 
Silk Street London, E2 (01- 
638 8891). 

C OMMO NWEALTH 
INSTITUTE: An ansi and the 
Sky God — Caribbean story- 
telling with music, dance and 
plenty of audience 
participation. 

Kensington High Street 
London, W8 (01-603 4535). 
Dec 29-Jan 4 except Jan 1, 
Mon-Sat 1 1 .30am and 2.30pm, 
Sun 2.30pm and 3.45pm. Free. 


IN THE GARDEN 



Bine spruce: like most Christmas trees it is modi happier outside in its natural habitat 

Top shots for the pot 


>ufd not be so dismal as to 
cize the Great Norwegian 
istmas tree in Trafalgar 
are or those which, over 
last few decades, have 
ime the focus of seasonal 
brations in towns and 
iges all over the country, 
letheless, it seems a shame 
we unwittingly kill h un- 
is of thousands of juvenile 
5 each Christmas. The 
way spruce, which is the 
monest Christmas tree, 
ns to a splendid mature 
hi of 150 foot in its 
iral cold, mountain 


IIUHJ. . 

? needle drop, which is so 

Ling to the houseproud, 
senls a great trauma for a 
tree brought inside to the 
londitions of our living 
s as it tries desperately to 
nt moisture loss. Even n 
have taken all possible 
utions — choosing a tree 
roots, acclimatizing it 
ally to indoor con-- 
is. and keeping it well- 
ed - it will never be 
happy. Sadly, this is also 

jr the other kinds of trees 

? market for Chnstmas - 

as black spruce blue 
?, Nordman fir ana ber- 
pruce. Incidentally, anu- 
ant sprays were found 


Francesca Greenoak 

gives some tips on 

choosing and caring 

for Christmas trees 

not to have any significant 
effect in the initial trials 
carried out by Which? 
magazine. 

One of the best Christmas 

trees I have seen is the Chinese 
weeping cypress, Cupressus 
funebris . , whose juvenile fo- 
liage is a softly delicate blue- 
green. It gained popularity 
with the Victorians as an 
ornamental houseplant at 
about the same time as the 
passion for Christmas trees 
was spreading. Not hardy out 
of doors, it is un bothered by 
root restriction and will grow 
healthily in a pot for years 
with adequate watering and a 
standard liquid feed. AU my 
recent inquiries, hpwever. 
have drawn a blank and I have 
to conclude that it is now no 
longer available in Britain. 

Some nurserymen recom- 
mended instead the Monterey 
cypress, Cupressus 

macrocorpa, which has 
yellowy-green foliage. This 
hardy tree does fairly well if it 



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Mqp, fjartenvts nMerano? book £d (Hams in 
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Tn nts (04731 663757 


can be outdoors for most of 
the year and its pot brought 
inside only for two to three 
weeks. 

A particularly beautiful 
conifer is the Japanese cedar 
Cryptomeria japonica, which 
conies in dwarf varieties like 
Elegans Nana and grow only 
to about three fret ft has the 
most delicate feathery foliage 
which turns red-bronze in 
winter. It is so pretty it hardly 
needs decoration, and lights 
and trinkets should be lined 
off now and again so that the 
foliage can be mist-sprayed 
(especially if it shows signs of 
dryness or shrivelling). Buy 
pot-grown plants about two 
foot high and keep them 
outdoors for most of the year, 
bringing them inside to a 
relatively cool spot. A good 
way to avoid drying-out for 
any of these trees is to place 
the container in a pot of damp 
gravel and water from below. 

If you buy a Christmas 
poinsettia Euphorbia 
pulchcrrima. with its rich red 
flower-like bracts, choose your 
sped men from an indoor 
display and take great care it 
doesn't catch a chill on the 
way home by covering it with 
a plastic bag. Don’t ignore 
your regular indoor 
houseplants. 

For traditionalists, the Kiss- 
ing Bough is an attractive old 
English Christmas decoration. 
This consists of two intersect- 
ing hoops of wood or wire 
which you bind with ever- 
greens such ?s Holly j-.nd i vy, 
and Qclu- u.e. The most im- 
portant feature is a spray of 
mistletoe hung in the centre. 


CHESS 


The correct telephone number 
for Sandvik. mentioned last 
week, is 021 550 4700. 


Fading fortunes of 
a tired champion 


Will Karpov win his Can- 
didates' match with Sokolov 
early in 1987? On paper, the 
former world champion must 
be the clear favourite, but 
after tbe exertions of his 
latest title match, tbe set-back 
at Tilbmg and the Dubai 
Olympiad, Karpov is begin- 
ning to look exhausted. 

A poll of Grandmasters at 
Dubai even revealed a few 
who favoured the chances of 
the relatively inexperienced 
Sokolov. This is the kind of 
game which is currently 
causing headaches for 
Karpov supporters. 

White: Ljubojevic; Black: 
Karpov. 

Ruy Lopez, Yugoslavia v 
USSR, Dubai OV/rr^iaAJg'&b 

3 Bb5 a6 IBM IM 
B M Be7 6 (tel bS 

7 BM dG 8 c 3 04 

0 M 

Hardly ever seen. Normal is 
9 h3 followed by d4. 

8 _ Bg 4 in Ti 3 a*n 

11 o*n nb5 12 Baa ba4 

Black can hardly hope to 
cling to the pawn, but plans 
to free his position while 
White is engaged in restoring 
material equilibrium. An al- 
ternative in this rare line is 

12 ... c5 13 d3 b4 14 cxb4 
cxb4 15 Nd2 Nd7 16 Nb3 
with some edge for White 
based on the activity of his 
King's Bishop (Ljubojevic- 
Portisch, Tilburg 1986). 

13 (Ml <M7 14 03 BM 

15 Nd 2 QbS IB Be« 

Ensures recovery of the pawn. 

16 _ NhM 17 HUM NOT 

18 Ran4 aS IS Sa3 cS 

Black's opening strategy has 
backfired. He is no longer a 
pawn ahead and his own "a" 
pawn is isolated and vuinera- 

ft. dE 21 enB cxd5 

22 ftaB M 


Too ' passive. Black should 
strike out at once with 22 _ 
d4! eg 23 cxd4 Bb4 or 23. 
Bxd4 exd4 24 Rxe7 dxc3 25 
bxc3 Qxd3. This line, sug- 
gested by ex-worid champion, 
Smyslov, would grant Black 
some chances. 

23 83 04 



ABCDEFGH 


If 23. ... Qxd3 24 Rdl Qb5 25 
c4! 

34 Nefl 

This neat riposte annihilates 
Black's counter-attack at a 
stroke. 

24 - Hxa4 25 bn4 003 

26 exd4 Wd4 27 BnM OnO 

28 Nff5 NM5 2# Bw>5 Re* 

3D Q41 Qa6 31 BfaZ hS 

Avoiding immediate loss af- 
ter 31 ... Rc4 32 Re8! Qxa4 

33 Rxf8+ KxfS 34 Qd8+ Qe8 

35 Ba3+. 

32 R*4 OH 33 004 RH 

34 Bc3 Qc7 35 03 RH 

36 RH OcS 37 Bd2 Rh1+ 

38 Hal RH 

Black can recapture the pawn 
after 38 ... Rxel+ 39 Bxel 
Qe6 40 Bd2 Qxh3 but 41 
Qd8 leaves White well on 
top. 

S3 Rel 0(6 40 Oc4 ObE 

41 K02 me 42 006 (MB 

43 Cbtd6 mm 44 Rcflt POiT 

45 Ba3 Rb 2 48 Ho8 BM 

47 14 M DM Be7 

Black resigned 

Raymond Keene 


BRIDGE 


Nearly 40 years ago, Robert 
Darvas wrote a remarkable 
book, a bridge fairv story, 
called Right through ike Pack. 
His fantasy was that a pack of 
cards came to life, and each 
card had a tale to tell in which 
it played a critical role. 

I don't possess Darvas's 
vivid imagination, but the 
other day I did wonder if the 
Queen of clubs deliberately 
set out to taunt me. You shall 
be the judge. 

Teams. Love all. Dealer 
South. 

* 986 
? KJ976 
C- 6 4 
4 AB3 


♦ J102 
S? 52 

£ K 10 8 2 

* K1042 


N 

W E 
S 


4 K 3 

■v* AB 

0 Q J 9 7 5 3 
♦ Q97 


Stranger 

than 

fiction 


my discomfiture by putting 
me on play with the +Q to 
concede a ruff and discard 
and tbe contract 

Teams. Love all. Dealer 
North. 

« J 5 3 
T Q10 9 
v A J 7 
♦ AJ 107 


4 AQ7S4 
C»Q1043 
0 A 
4 J 65 


4 62 
K7 2 

v KQ8653 
443 


N 

W E 
S 


4 0107 
” AJ643 
C- 10 4 
4Q52 


W 


4 A K 9 8 4 
".'B5 
C 92 
• KflS 6 


NO 

3v 

No 


1NT 

4T 


2';- 

No 


14 

?r 

NO 


W 


N 


Opening lead v2 

I was EasL Declarer won 
my 0J with the 0A and 
played a heart to dummy’s 
King and my Ace. Correctly, 
I switched to the +7. Declar- 
er, needing miracles, tried tbe 
4>J and ducked in dummy 
when my partner produced 
the +K. West returned the 
42 and declarer played 
dummy's Ace. 

It was perfectly obvious 
that West must hold the 410. 
so I should rid myself of the 
4Q. But when the trick was 
quitted, I found her still 
leering at me in my hand. 

Declarer ruffed a diamond 
and drew the outstanding 
trump. After successfully fi- 
nessing the 4Q and cashing 
the 4A. declarer completed 


iHT No *rm 
No 2NT(2) No 34 

No 44 No 44 

NO NO No - 


(1) A transfer to spades 

(2) Maximum, with three card spade 
support. 


Once again I was East My 
partner led the OK which 
declarer decided to duck, 
while I contributed the 010. 
Partner found the impeccable 
switch to the ^2. I won the 
second trick with the S7J, 
cashed the ^A and played a 
third round of the suit. 

Declarer ruffed and, excus- 
ably, went into a prolonged 
brown study. His task ap- 
peared impossible. From my 
angle it was easy to see his 
problem. To neutralize my 
holdings in the black suits, he 
required three entries to 
dummy, and be only had 
two. Eventually, declarer 
played a diamond to 
dummy’s 'OJ and called for 
the 4J. Confident of my 
calculations. I covered, or 
thought 1 did. Bui to my 
horror the beastly creature 
was still there. 

Declarer played a spade to 
his nine, and experienced no 
further trouble. All credit to 
declarer, Graham Kirby, who 
played both hands with 
consummate skiiL Korchnoi 
would claim sorcery. Certain- 
ly I could see the Queen of 
dubs on a broomstick. 

Jeremy Flint 


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It’s Better In The Bahamas. 

Close your eyes. Imagine a school of flying 
fish breaking the sparkling blue surface of the 
sea in a silvery shower This is The Bahamas. 
Imagine a land where the pursuit of luxury has 


been elevated to an art form This is The Bahamas 
Imagine a beach of powder salt rose coloured 
sand where the only footsteps you're likely tu see 
are your own. This is The Bahamas 

Imagine an island called Paradise, beautiful 
enough to live up to its name This is The Baha mas 
Imagine seven hundred different reasons for 
visiting a country, every cne a separate island This 
is The Bahamas. 


Now turn that dream into reality Wake up 
to Speedbiid. specialists in long haul holidays for 
over 20 years, where 7 nights in The Bahamas 
can cost you as little as £528 

Speeded: 




1 


LAST-MINUTE iT% SHOPPING 


■ft ft ft * 


Bv Nicole Swengley 



titaraiil 


WuMU tf li iCtMrtwMapia 


ipi 


VV 


For him: colourful silk bow tie, £15, from The 
Design Centre Shop; For her velvet Fergie- 
style hair bow, £7.50, from Liberty. For 
them; screwpuU corkscrew, £8.95 and foil 
cutter, £3.95, The General Trading Company 



Drawings: Michael Davidson 




mm 





?cr 

TFP-xZyv 








v# 

t 


\\\ 


///.. 

S&y/to 


5>-rr-.VV 

‘tJ- «C. 


iffl 

ml 


th 


- L m^ 


ilk 






J*rsr it 


i-i 




Red and silver chocolate dragees, £239, and Christmas tea, 8 
Forts am & Mason quarter-bottle champagne, £3.15, individual 


The Tea House; 
a pudding £UC 


For wise mac sandalwood carved owl, ^85, TheGeneral 
Trading Company. For a little cracker: Onent ExpreM label 
rfffc farfpker s, £15.95, Liberty; Art Deco-style brooches, 
from £15.90, The General Trading Company 


Anthenacm42 SheftonStreet. WC2; The j?)!?* 

laSrSSrt Street? W iTmmI Short East 5-7 Neal Street, 
V^&sXl£WJernwn Street, SW1 and 133 Fulham Road, 
SW3; P^Mnts: 1 29 Stoana Street. SW1; Th# Tea House: ,15a 
Neal Street WC2; The Watch Gallery: 129 Fulham Hoad. SWG 



';.<W 4 
'■: l 

#3 




A 


sop to entertain 

excited children 

while yon snatch g ■ 

an extra hoar’s 

sleep on Christ- R--:.^3j®W 

ine? A tantflKrfng £2-* Sflr&tl 


"jX.< i.- '- v* : . 

~.m 







V- ^ * .y£; 

'>■ -i.'.fC.i. . 







Skywatch, £99, Watch Gallery; VW watch, £10.95, Presents; Hener solar power watch, £2750, Anthentics 


; mas morning? A tanfaKrinfl £;-- 
taste of presents to come? 

1 Whatever you feel about v - 
seasonal stockings, one thing |- m \Zj£j£. 
is for sure; they offer a test of > 
ingenuity when it comes to 
filling them. »>/£&$>>& 

No doubt we all follow our j- 

own time-honoured tra- * - 

dilions in choosing their & 
contents - a tangerine in the %*- 
toe, perhaps, or bap of .aA*. 

golden chocolate coins — *wk . 
and, certainly, sweets, nuts \r 

and fruit are easy to buy at |pE V 
the last minute. §£&??-■ ’ 

But, to track down a gSfcsfi ; 
handful of quirky trifles, in- 
jokes and minor w himsies, t 
it’s a question of sifting ■ v 
through the shops to spot : 
these pleasing treasures fork- • 
ing among the tacky junk 
and vulgar puns which often 
pass for mini-gifts. 

To save time and personal 
energy in the last few shop- * 
ping days before Christmas, - 
we’ve come up with a 
stockingful of bright ideas, 

for adults and children, guar- . 

antecd to elicit a giggle. Jramea 



.rj%r ,.b 

£ feiti 







r £3-e. 




Japanese water flowers, 3t5p; Vamshicg coin trick, £L85; Fortune teffing fish, 2p, all from Neal Street East 


Jumbo Crossword 

Prizes of £50 will be given for the first five correct solutions opened 
on Tuesday January 6, 1987. Entries should be addressed to The 

T - : __ .. T I /”< a /"I iV »T'* « T» • 


Ml 12 I 13 I 14 ! |S f 16 1 17 | !8i 19 I |10 j ftt 1 |12 


I ! 1 


HI In calendars are 
r bang up to date 


Times Jumbo Crossword Competition, The Times, 1 Pennington 
Street London, El 9XN. The winners and solution will be 
announced on Saturday January 10. 


ACROSS 

1 Reason given for the vanishing of the Baker 
(alias “Fritter-my-wig") (3.3,5 6,3,3) 

15 Note terrible curse from which one such saves 
us? (7) 

16 Aristotle so footloose a philosopher (11) 

17 One politician learning to beg (7) 

18 Notes stream meandering nearest to the rising 
sun (1 1) 

19 See about Italian river resort in Switzerland 

0) 

20 Not that these cats show mutual attachment 
(7) 

21 Making four in the test is nugatory (7) 

22 This spoon means the end for Samuel 
Whiskers (3-4) 

23 Father Tor instance chasing trains, missing 
one, it's obvious (II) 

25 Macbeth with a new title apparently? (5) 

26 Start term in revision of the origin of radio 
(11) 

28 A queen's favourite cheese (9) 

30 Once keeping in bed. that’s following instruc- 
tions (9) 

33 “An arm. clothed in white samite, mystic, 
-wonderful" one employed on state occasions 
(5-61 

35 Writer twice interrupted by a song of triumph 
(5) 

36 Member of university of no practical im- 
portance (8) 

39 In Rome 1 say nothing (3) 

40 It's said some lions were so inquisitive (5) 

41 The case is altered for schools (7) 

43 How to start a journey when in progress in 
France (7) 

44 In the body of the church one appears 
ingenuous (5) 

45 Topless style of Horace’s work (3) 

46 Toys carelessly when eating cheese - it’s the 
judge’s condition (8) 

48 A chore, transposing words, to define his 
dance? (5) 

49 The fallacious reasoner bolds nothing for, say, 
Madame Blavatsky (II) 

51 Queues said to be short for these matters for 
debate (9) 

53 Male composer, it’s said, we have to treat 
roughly (9) 

55 Pooh-Bah's added detail was intended so to 
confirm Ko-Ko’s narrative (II) 

58 Winter sportsman’s higb-bal]? (5) 

59 Edible fungus which the banjo-player plucked 

01 ) 

61 “That — was 1 turn’d into a hart" (T Night) 
(7) 

63 Writer of books not like the revised version 
(7) 

64 Roused by the tocsin nearly everyone 
prepared for battle (7) 

66 Leaders of early Christian revival in face of 
condemnation (7) 

67 -Disturbed by rake, strange creeper (of the 
highest order)) (6-5) 

68 My “Ichabod" confession comes to a dead 
end (7) 

69 Musical girl forbidden to see Japanese drama 
(12,7) 


70 Single solid form *e put on a pedestal (7) 

71 Jack Point's part for instance contains a lot of 
good sense (4,1,4,4,16,2,4) 

DOWN 

1 Process of brewing involves fine? No matter 
( 12 ) 

2 Revive organization of cruises with funny old 
Harry (II) 

3 Manager at home with needles and thread (9) 

4 A minor source gives odds on Cuiiy-lock (9) 

5 Sei apart for a purpose that’s suitable (1 1) 

6 Corneal inflammation from a strike perhaps 
outside it (9) 

7 A large number draw on a Roman flask (7) 

8 Pronounced this to be a type of vehicle (1 1) 

9 Stopper used by a surgeon, but awkwardly, the 
speaker holds (9) 

10 House-builder skilled in every department of 
work (4.Z3.6) 

11 One has some difficulty with one's under- 
statement (7) 

12 One from this institution would be safe from 
the Pirates of Penzance (9) 

13 Gem's weight much more than a carat (5) 

14 Simplicity of the reasoning that impressed 
Doyle's doctor (14) 

24 Beg outside church or jump on the stage (9) 

27 This form of element is nothing to a s mall 
shark (7) 

29 Tending to show anger about, tribal develop- 
ment (9) 

31 1 entered, in English and French, natives of 
Asia and America (7) 

32 Remarked about bird put up for the job (9) 

33 Coin, second kind (7) 

34 Distinguished some of them in entertainment 
( 7 ) 

35 Musician from an island in hell (7) 

37 Schizophrenic state of a volunteer force in 
frenzied action (9) 

38 Alexander’s music 5 to dose this social 
function? (10,5) 

40 Condition is for and against one in this way 
(7) 

42 With hammers novices can make a power- 
control contrivance (5-9) 

47 Alienation of unusual characters in a science 
fiction film (12) 

50 Divided into sections to find eligible bachelor 
to dine perhaps ( ! I) 

51 American style suit seen on board ship? (7-4) 

52 Able to produce nothing indigenous round 
the Swiss mountain (11) 

54 Growth of Times misrepresented in song (9) 

55 Far from dim in bars (9) 

56 To this butterfly William’s house appears a 
dump (6-3) 

57 Her auntie embarrassed to be called such a 
mammal? (9) 

58 One that dips into the cellar on board (4-5) 

60 Soldier leads learned cleric always to the 

huntsman's quarry (3,4) 

62 Attendant of Dionysus unless one is mistaken 
(7) 

65 One of those quivering by the Lady of 
Shalott’s river (5) 


i 

■ 

1 

V 

Hjj 


■ 


28 


29 

□ 

rn 


! 



■ 




■ 






35{ | 








■ 


■ 




41 

1 

u 


1 





■ 

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46 

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|6lT 62 


It had to happen. Designer 
calendars have hit the home. 
Once a blueprint for the 
essential nrinftnaKst accessory 
In hi-tech offices, stark Mack 
and white calendars — with 
perhaps the odd splodge of 
designer red — are the prevail- 
ing style when It comes to 
date-checking In the kitchen, 
home office and living room 
these days. 

In fashionable blade and 
red, Oggettfs Vk foot-high 
wall-bang metal model, 
£43.25, looks more like a dock 
t h a n a reminder of die date. 
The red arm twists round In a 
half moon to give the date 
while a magnetic red Mob 
marks die relevant month. 

Another Oggetti ap«Ja, 
£24450, screams out the date 
with numbers sizeable enough 
for the most myopic. A harely- 
readable list In the comer of 


12 345e 



etti’s 2 x h ft high wall-hi 
idiana clock-style metal c 
endar costs £43215 


■ 1 ■■ I . . . . .. I . . n il,, I I ■ ■ ■ ■ I — I.. . .! 

Concise Jumbo Crossword 

There are no prizes for this crossword. The solution will appear on Satnrday December 27 
ACROSS 63 Swagger (7) 24 Ghangw causing (9) 

1 Jane Montgomery ram ptw.ll W Line walls again (7) 27 Compulsion (7) 

formers’ harvest hymn 66 Swarm over (7) 29 Discharge (9) 

(Z6.3.6.3.7) 67 Substantial quantity (5,6) 31 Coin face (7) 

15 Entertainment industry (7) 68 Red, purple, pink hardy 32 Gratilying (9) 

16 Statement clarifier (I!) annual (7) 33 Large tent (7) 

17 Without apparent sex (7) 69 Abrupt utterance (1 1) 34 Ship journey (7) 

18 Top floor (5,6) 70 Fixed habits (3,4) 35 Applicable to group (7) 

19 Render ineffective (7) 71 Violent movement opposed 37 Gravely (9) 

20 Open air cinema (5.2) “ mdependence 38 Impulse (4^3,6) 

21 Grow together (7) 1 40 Loosen (7) 

22 Non -Jewish girls (7) DOWN 42 Joshua’s trumpet target 

23 Happening in spells (II) \ dean dirty dishes (4Z3.3) < WJ 

25 Worthless matter (5) 2 Goldmine seekers (11) 47 Discriminating faculty 

26 Express vocal encourage- 3 At boundaries (2,7) <5,2,5) 

mer.t(5,l,5) 4 piacenames list (9) 50 Not subterranean (5,6) 

28 Consecrates (9) 5 Surface fertilizer (3,8) 51 Not be oneself (4,7) 

30 Giving back (9) 6 Fust beginnings (5,4) 52 Talk together (1 1) 

33 Lans urban complex (II) 7 stimulus (7) 54 Reece (9) 

35 Isracl/Syria Hdghts (5) 8 Scourge of the Swastika au- 55 Utterly reckless type (9) 

36 Cider brandy (8) thor(4,7) 56 “Excellent” (9) 

39 Batsman’s score (3) 9 Stabilizing ligament (9) 57 Dives under water (9) 

40 Setback (5) 10 Third King of Anns (63,6) 58 Advocating practical atti- 

41 Sets fire to (7) 11 Fame (7) tude(9) • 

43 Coming from south (7) 12 Not occurring regularly (9) 60 Be superior (7) 

44 Expensive money lending 13 Temporary ceasefire (5) 62 Windmill rodder sail (7) 

W - 14 Inexorabteness(14) 65 Crash (5) 

4 Confinefli) 1 ° ■ SOLUTION TO NO 1 131 (last Saturday's prize concise) 

48 Feudal lord (5) ACROSS: 1 Sacrum 4 Cravat 7 Fury 8 Creosote .9 Port-Au- 

49 Ineffective (11) Prince 15 Archer 16 Abound 17 Piece of eight 23 Hau$- 

41 CnmnlpTP" riirle (4.51 24 Rile 25 Recess 26 Prayer 

l\ t J DOWN: 1 Sift 2 Cartouche 3 Mecca 4Qeep 5Assai 

53 emission (V) 6 Aztec 10 Theme 11 Rabbi 12 Naughtily 13 Ends 

55 Gate guards (11) 14 Palp 18 Irate 19 Caste 20 Ogres 21 Equip 22 Jeer 

cq nleasure 1 1 H TAe winners of prize concise No 1131 are: Mrs J. Wilson. Underhill 

1 ° Road - CleaddrL Tyne and Wear Peter L. Ogier. Us Habits. St. 
61 Personal belongings (7) Martin. Guernsey. Channel Islands. 


JUDO .. . ■ a, .... ..... 


Address 


V , •**« 




Another Prize Jumbo Crossword will appear on January 1 


SOLUTION TO NO 1 136 (yesterday’s concise crossword) 

ACROSS: 1 Tassel 4 Morbid * 7 Gybe* 8 Submerge 9 Theatre 11 Sites 12 Spitting image 
15 Sheen 16 Crevice 20 Bradshaw 21 Hilt 22 Realty 23 Yonder 
DOWN: 1 Tagetcs 2 Sable 3 Laser 4 Mobs 5 Biretta 6 Dregs 10 Titan 11 Shire 
Ulkebana 14 Elector 15 Sober 17 Rowdy 18 Iliad 19 Ahoy 


Tie calendar/note holder, £3.99 
plus 75p p&p from Save the 

Children (teh 01-703 5400) 

each page - oh, so subtly — 
jogs the memory as to which 
day of the week that particular 
date falls in each month. 

Of course, there’s the mural 
plethora of pictorial calendars 
produced to please dog-lovers, 
cat-lovers, horse fenders and 
weary executives who appre- 
ciate a wry den Baxter joke to 

keep ap their spirits. 

There are calendars for 
Tolkien fens, railway buffs, 
Hollywood film addicts, 
admirers of our Miiwml her- 
itage — both hardware and 
landscape — and anyone who 
prefers their garden indoors 
rather than out. Royal Por- 
traits both ancient and modem 
— with paintings, for example, 
from the National Portrait 
Gallery or those of the Prince 

and Princess of Wales — can 
also be hnog. 

Children and grown-up chil- 
dren are catered for with the 
Pooh calendar, shaped like a 
honey-pot, £350 from Scrib- 
bler; the Teddy Bear calendar, 
£435 from Athena; Adrian 
Mole's calendar-cum-diary, 
£3.50 from W. H. Smith; The 


Dafly Trivia calendar, £239 
from Paperchase, with a 
jamboree bag of monthly “not- 
a-lot-of- people- know- that” 
information and the Trivial 
Ptirsnit calendar, £2.99 from 
W. H. Smith. 

Bat perhaps some of the 
most visually appealing cal- 
endars in the current crop are 
the pictorial ones which seem 
to have more in common with 
glossily illustrated hardback 
books. Partknlariy striking 
are three from Liberty: a 
Guatemala Rainbow Cal- 
endar, £11.95, showing the 
traditional brightly-coloured 
hand woven costumes of Ma- 
yan culture; Bruno Zehader’s 
deKghtfiil photographs from 
toe Antarctic in the Penguins 

?* 95 ' and the Or- 
chid Calendar, £5.95, with its 
spectacular colour photo- 
graphs of exotic Mooms. 



HBH1E! 



Trivial Pursuit calendar. £2.99, 
fijjL a .9W2 question each day, 
from branches o f W. H. Smith 

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DRINK 


j^forc you visit your local wine retailer, Jane MacQuitty offers a guide to reds and whites for Christmas celebrations 


The best of the chain gangs on trial 


<£ 




Christmas comes bnt once a 
year and with It the opportu- 
nity for ns all to forget the 
bank balance and to splash ont 
on a starry bottle or two of the 
finest wines the world 
produces. 

Finding these costly and 
osnaliy classic charmers is 
generally much easier than 
tracking down good wines at 
cheap prices. But this year ! 
wanted to make certain that 
everyone had the opportunity 
to buy The Times' best Christ- 
mas bottles. So I asked the 
largest of wine retailers in the 
country (those with at least 
200 licenced branches or 
more) to pat forward a top 
Christmas white and Christ- 
mas red. 

Each retailer was told that 
the wines had to suit seasonal 
food (but not necessarilv just 
turkey), be priced under £10 a 
bottle and that value for money 
wonld be taken into account. 
In addition 1 stressed that 
whatever wines the retailers 
put forward they would have to 
be widely available; 10 cases of 
Chateau Christmas sold via 
one branch wonld not be a 
suitable contender. 


despite •** strength 
and importance of their festive 
sales few wine buyers 1 spoke 

to rose to meet this Christmas 

challenge. 

Joining me (JMQ) in this 
N«nd Christmas tasting were 
John Higgins (JH) Arts Edi- 
tor of TkeTimes, Robin Young 
HJY) also from The Tima and 
Master of Wine Adam Ban- 
croft (AJEt) from the Burgundy 
specialists Domaine Direct. 

We all found this Christmas 
tasting a disappointment It 
was especially worrying, too, 
to note that few buyers were 
prepared to pot forward wines 
which cost more than £6 a 
bottle and only two went dose 
to the £10 limit 

Yet surely at Christmas 
time we all deserve a treat or 
two? Or is it just that all ri Mwe 
pricey and prestigious wines 
that appear on off-licence 
are only ever available in 
infuriatingly small quantities? 

Never mind, all the wines 
which fall into our “Top of the 
Tree*’ and “Christmas 
Cracker” categories will cer- , 
te mly he lp toensnre that your l 1 


Eric Beaumont 


Christmas celebrations are 
success. 



1981 Torres Gran Coronas, 
Penedes. Threshers £4.89 

This "sunburnt spicy hefty 
peppery red" (JMQ) will be at 
its best only with the chunkiest 
Christmas foods. AB was 
kinder noting this “ripe attrac- 
tive blockbuster will keep the 
cold out". As was RY; "Good 
Christmas supper party red" 
and JH: "Easy drinking”. 


1981 Marquis de Murrieta 
Etiqueta Blanca, Ygay. Rob- 
erts & Cooper £3.99 
Again the warm spicy sun- 
burn plum Jam like nose and 
taste" (JMQ) of this Spanish 
red may nor oe everyone's 
idea of the perfect festive wine 
but AB thought it would be 
"good with game" and JH "ex- 
cellent nose; I'd be happy with 
this". 


BORDERLINE 


WHITE WINES 


TOP OF THE TREE 


1985 Sancerre, Domains des 
Trois Pressoire, Pierre et 
Etienne RttfauHL 
Threshers £5.85 
An ultra-stylish Sancerre that 
won hands down in the whites: 


"Lovely zingy chalky 
se berry-green Sar 


gooseberry-green Sancerre 
class. . . excellent as a 
Christmas aperitif and with the 
first course (JMQ); "Classic 
Sauvignon . . . superb, bags of 
fruit" (AB); "enjoyable aperitif- 
style Sancerre (RY). An 
unexpected Thresher's 
triumph. 


CHRISTMAS 

CRACKERS 


1985 Venegazzu Pinot Griglo, 
Conte Loredan. 

Augustus Barnett £3.49 
Italy’s only offering here makes 
a good inexpensive white 
Christmas all-rounder- JMQ 
enjoyed its "zippy flowery- 
herbaceous smeu and bane 
sugar iike taste". RY sir 
picked up "a boiled sweets 


1985 Montana Chardonnay. 
Oddbins and Goufitfi Bros 
£3.99 

New Zealand's Chardonnays 
have come of age as tMs south 
island white demonstrated: 
"Classy pineapple-tike 
Chardonnay nose plus a fresh 
leafy-apptey New Zealand 
palate ,r (JMQ); "Appealing 
warm toasty flavour" (RY); 
"honeyed nose agreeable with 
the tuncey" (JH); "ripe peachy 
nose, oaky tones . . .a 
Chardonnay treat" (AB). 

1982 Smnsbtiry*s Blanc de 
Blancs Brat Vintage 
Champagne, Unard Gontler. 
Salisbury's £9.95 
Sainsbury's new own-label 
vintage bubbly had an 
“attractive flowery-pi neapptey 
Chardonnay scent but a young 
sharpish taste” (JMQ) and was 
"light and green In flavour” 

(R Y). As AB and JH put tt this 
youthful fizZ would make either 
a good bottle to start 
Christmas Day” or else would 
"work well as a pre-Christmas 
lunch drink". 


Amaud. Peter Dominie E&52 
A useful Christmas runner-up 
blessed with a “fresh .green - 
zesty herbaceous bouquet and 
taste . . . again a lively 
Christmas Day aperitif and first 
course wine" (JMQ). RY 
thought Its "pleasant lemon- 
buttery flavour" would come In 
useful with the Christmas 
buffet as did AB: "Good weight 
for Christmas food”. 


Franzla Cabernet Sauvignoh. 
Victoria Wine £2.99 
A cheap price, but sadly a taste 
to match: "Herbaceous grassy 
nose but a palate that is too 
sweet, jammy and confected 
for Christmas” noted JMQ. No 
one else disagreed: 
"Oversweet, not much 
backbone or tannin” (AB) and 
RY: “Sweetened up too 
much". 


appropriate of white wines. 
However this "palatable 
flowery-appley Muscadet" 
(JMQ) would probably go down 
wefl with a Ashy first course. 

RY found it "a bit aggressive 


for the season of goodwill" 

AB thought it 


and both JH and 
"lacked character". 


1985 White Burgundy 

ntdeProoucteure 


m-de- 


Groupementdel 
de Lugny-St-Gei 
Setose. Maries & 

£4*99 

"A good fruity Christmas 
aperitif but too soft for the 
spidest festive fare?" queried 
JMQ as did RY "could work 
with starter"'; AB similarly 
noted “soft fruit, soft palate". 
AB in all a useful Christmas 
aperitif white wilhout the guts 
or depth to cope either with 
spicy stuffings or meats. 


1985 Sancerre, Vacheron. 
Tesco £5.49 
There was a world of 
difference between this and 
our Top of the Tree Sancerre: 
JMQ noted "green chalky 
Sancerre nose but dull and 
sweet with it"; AB: “Well-made 
but lacks exuberance" RY; 
"Dull, flat neutral” and JH 
"Very light in colour and 
tasted 


to know when and what to 
drink this with". Quite. 

MAcon Blanc Villages. 
Alexandre SHvestre. Presto 
£3.99 

No one wanted to celebrate 
Christmas with this "dull, 
sweaty, earthy Macon taste" 
(JMQ), that was “pretty 
ordinary stuff" for RY, 
“acceptable but short" for JH 
and "prematurely old or past 
its best" for AB. 


light spicy Syrah fruit and the 
backbone to cope with the 
festive fare" would be a 
perfect and popular choice 
with all the family. RY thought 
its "good fruit and rich 
attractive flavour would l. 
with Christmas lunch of eit.. 
duck, goose or turkey”. AB 
enjoyed its “berried nose" and 
“sweet tobacco-like fruit and 
spice”. 


FESTIVE FAILURES 


BORDERLINE 


CHRISTMAS CHEER 


note” finding it "refreshing 


invigorating and flavour 


1985 Domaine deCa h rttone, 
Cti&teauneuf-du-Pape, Louis 


1985ChAteaudela 
CassemicMre, Muscadet de 
Store et Maine, Donation 
Bahuaud. Victoria Wme £3J& 
Given the cold weather at 
Christmas time Muscadet is 
not perhaps, tire most 


1985 Chateau (TAvriM 
Chardonnay, Vm de Pays du 
Maine & Lone. Roberts & 
Cooper £2.89 

“Water-white colour, elegant 
smoky nose but dull dirty 
taste was JMQ's verdict here. 
Everyone else agreed: 
"Unpleasant really drab dry 
wine" (RY); '"Very ordinary 1 ’ 
(AB); JH spotted it as "very 
young Loire" adding "."dffflcult... 


1984 ChabSs Premier Cru 
Vaflkms, A Bichot Unwins 
£9.95 

Chabfis should be truly 
ashamed of itself; everyone 
gave this pricey premier cru 
their lowest mark: JMQ noted 
"Wet straw and wet dog"; RY: 
"Not much pleasure in mis"; 
JH: "Dreadful - wouldn’t have 
it in the house" and AB, who 
detected its Chablis source, 
“Earthy animal -like nose”. 


CHRISTMAS 

CRACKERS 


RED WINES 


TOPOF THE TREE 


1984 Cbateauneuf-du-Pape, 
Les Amevete, J R QuoL 
Tesco £5^9 


This “very classy" red 
‘ rnf with "delkaous 


-CbAteauneufi 


1982 Ortando R F Cabernet 
Sauvignon, G Cramp & Sons. 
Oddbins and Gough Bros 
£3.99 

Everyone at the Christmas 
table wifl enjoy the “sweet 


EATING OUT 


Raw deals and sake 


London's • Japanese res- 
taurants, unlike its French or 
Indian or Italian ones, are, all 
of them, dependent on Japa- 
nese custom. And their hefty 
prices are determined by the 
fact that they are expense 
account perks. 

Squeezed between a sand- 
wich bar and a minicab outfit, 
so implausibly theatrical that 
it might have jumped out of 
Mona Lisa, I found a window 
with a crimson kimono and a 
sign saying Gonbei. 

As in ad these places, you 
glean a piece of scalp disease 
as you enter, through the 
pendent swathes of ritual rag. 
By our table was a Color 
heater with leaflets advertising 
the products of Funisato 
Foods of Camden. Furusatq is 
evidently a useful outfit. With 
its supplies and a modicum of 
nous we can all go Japanese. 

I suppose the provenance or 
the grab doesn't matter as long 
as it's good. Most of Gonbei’ s 
“cooking” is all right, though 
the battered king prawns and 
veg are of chip-shop greasi- 
ness. Sashimi (raw fish) which 
is the glory of the Japanese 


Francis Mostey 



kitchen, although it has more 
to do with filleting and arty 
presentation than with cook- 
ing. here comprises: salmon, 
octopus, turbot, cuttle-fish, 
tuna and a couple of species 
that the bemused waitress 
didn't know the Japanese 
name of, let alone the English. 
The usual green mustard and 
soy dressing was just that — 
the usual, but fine and fiery as 
ever. 

We also ate buckwheat noo- 
dles in a sweetish broth, a 
chicken kebab with a precur- 


sor of HP sauce and, another 
palate-fryer this one, bean 
curd with ginger sauce. A plate 
of thinly sliced raw beef that 
I'd like to have eaten raw was 
shoved mi the table along with 
a piece of equipment from an 
under-the-artihes garage — two 
gas burners connoted to yet 
another Calor cylinder. A grill 
was fitted on the top of the 
burners and we were invited 
to grease this piece of metal 
with a quoit of beef &L 
Restaurants are for eating 
in, kitchens for cooking in. 
The “breaking down of the 
barrier" reduces the former to 
gaming places. The whole 
point is not to participate in 
the creation — we all have 
stoves, we all have the address 
of Funisato Foods. While this 
boy scout primus-stove stuff 
was going on, a stream of men 
had been slipping by. I fol- 
lowed them. Out back, from a 
room past the lavatories, came 
the dry rustle of a knot of 
rattlers. Within, when I 
peeked, was a mahjong rally — 
heads down, Chrvas Regal 
everywhere. £50fbr two. 


THE TIMES COOK 


Ferreira: (n) An ancient tradition 
to celebrate the end of an 

excellent meal 

Ferreira: (n) A term used to 
describe a splendid wine 
cellar. 


Ferreira: THE 

PORT WORLD’S 

best kept secret 





Sole A jams Gnias & *^v.wCoun.CMfcS« L^DoAsrg. W? RH4 IK. 
Pan (/Grants of sLjuncs-* uu- 


Ok Two Three is dearer; 
here we drank only Kirrin 
Beer. The restaurant has dark 
wicker screens between the 
tables, greenery here and there 
and hemispherical lamp- 
shades made from the kind of 
wire that keeps flies from 
larders. Six pieces, each the 
size of a domino, of a raw belly 
of a tuna cost £12; this must be 
some sort of record. A dish 
called “various fish" was com- 
prised of scallops, mackerel 
and spinach perfumed with 
rice vinegar that was adjudged 
to lend n the flavour of old 
towels, but jolly nice old 
towels of course. 

There's an excellent stew of 
noodles, aji no moto (mono- 
sodium glutamate), seaweed 
which must have been fresh 
cut from a groyne that morn- 
ing. chicken gizzard, mush- 
room and fishcake. And die 
(leanisb) belly pork simmered 
in sake is one of the most 
succulent meat dishes imag- 
inable. £70 plus for two - and 
you'll note that the bill has a 
space for you to write your 
nam e and company. If you 
warn to eat tike this you must 
join Sanya 

Jonathan Meades 


Gonbei 151 Kings Cross Road, 
WC1 (01-278 M19), 


19), Mon to Sat 


1(01-27 

8-1 0.30pm. 

One Two Three 27 Davies 
Street Wl (01 -409 0750), Mon 
to Fri 12-2i0pm and 6-30- . 
11.30pm. 





Stuffed with richness 


To stuff or not to stuff? is 
stuffing necessary? Do yon 
tike it? Why bother? Let's 
decide first whether it is to add 
flavour, moisture, bulk, vari- 
ety or all four. 

. Stuffing is hardly ever 
gwTitifll, although it comes in 
handy when a small bird must 
stretch to feed a multitude. In 
the case of turkey, the main 
purpose of stuffing is to add 
flavour and perhaps variety. It 
should not be needed as a 
moisturizer unless the bird is 
horribly overcooked. 

This year’s turkey has a 
richly flavoured stuffing; The 
second recipe, a variation of a 
traditional potato stuffing for 
goose, could not be simpler. It 
also provides one of the 
accompanying vegetables 

which makes one less thing to 
think about on the day. 


Talking turkey with 4 tablespoons olive on 


Shona Crawford Poole 2253(8 ° 2)ir65hbfead< ^ 


Roast goose with potato 
stuffing 

Serves six to eight 


1 goose, about 4.5kg (101b) 


For the stuffing 


1.8kg (41b) potatoes 


6 rashers streaky bacon 


30g(Toz) butter 


3 bunches spring onions, finely 
chopped 


3 sticks celery, finely chopped 


Salt and freshly ground black 
pepper 


Mix the potatoes, bacon, 
spring onions and chopped 
celery with a generous season- 
ing of sail and pepper and use 
this mixture to stuff the goose. 
Truss it with string or skewers 
and prick the skin lightly with 
a fork or skewer on the legs, 
back and lower breast to help 
the fat to run out. Do not 
puncture the skin over the 
main breast area because the 
fat underneath it will be 
needed to baste the meat. 

Set the goose on a rack in a 
roasting tin and roast it in a 
preheated moderately hot 
oven (200°C/400°F, gas mark 
6) for 15 minutes. 

Turn the bird over on to its 
breast, reduce the temperature 
to moderate (180°C/350°F, 
gas mark 4) and roast for 1 Vh 
hours: then turn it on to its 
back again and roast it for 
another 1 % hours — making a 
total of 3K hours' cooking 
time. Pour off the fat in the 
roasting pan two or three 
times. 

The goose is cooked when 
the juices ran pale gold. Test 
with a skewer inserted into the 
leg close to the body. Rest the 
bird for at least 10 minutes 
before carving it. 


55g (2oz) freshly grated 
Parmesan cheese 


5 tablespoons dry sherry 


Yi nutmeg, grated 


Salt and freshly ground black 
pepper 


To baste 


1 1Qg (4oz) blitter, melted 


8 tablespoons dry white wine 
Put the minced pork and veal 
in a large bowL Fry the liver 
for a moment or two in a 
tablespoon of oil — just long 
enough to firm it a little. Chop 
it finely and add it to the bowl 
together with the Parma ham. 
shallots, prunes and apple, all 
finely chopped. Break up the 
chestnuts and add them too, 
then mix all the ingredients 
lightly together. 

Heat the remaining oil and 
fry the stuffing, in two or three 
batches, over a medium beat 
for about 10 minutes. Remove 
it from the heat and stir in the 
breadcrumbs, Parmesan, 
sherry and seasonings. Set 
aside to cool 


Take the giblets from the' 
goose and use them to make 
stock for gravy, reserving the 
liver. (Serve the liver tightly 
sauteed as a warm salad first 
course.) Save any detachable 
lumps of goqse fat to render 
down as dripping and cut oft 
the wing tips for the stockpoL 
Peel, cook and mash the 
potatoes. Grill the bacon until 
it is crisp then cool and 
crumble it Melt the butter, 
add the chopped spring on- 
ions, and cook them on a low 
heat for a minute or two. 


Roast turkey with chestnut 

stuffing 

Serves 12to14 


1 fresh turkey, about 5kg (i 1 lb) 
For the stuffing 


225g (8oz) 
Ineiy minced 


225g (8oz) minced veal 


1 turkey liver 


1l0g(4oz) Parma ham 


H0g(4oz) shallots 


1 lOg (4oz) stoned prunes 
1 medium dessert apple 


450g (1 lb) cooked chestnuts 


Stuff the turkey with this 
mixture. Truss it and remem- 
ber to calculate the cooking 
time on stuffed weight Set the 
turkey on a rack in a shallow 
roasting tin. Soak a double 
thicknos of butter muslin in 
the wine. Wring it out, soak it 
in the melted butter and drape 
it over the breast and thighs of 
the turkey. 

Roast in a preheated mod- 
erate oven (160°C/325°F, gas 
mark 3) for about four hours, 
basting it several times. The 
turkey is cooked when the 
juices run clear. Test with a 
skewer inserted into the 
thickest part of the leg close to 
the body. Remove ana discard 
the cloth and rest the turkey in 
a warm place for at least IS 
minutes before carving it 


seductive cassis fruit and rich 
New World charm" (JMQ) of 
the Australian red. Its ripe 
overt fruit will make a good 
marriage either with turkey or 
other festive fare, 
accompanied by fruit sauces or 
stuffings. 


1981 Chateau de Pez, Saint 
Estephe. Peter Dominic £7 JHL 
A disappointment considering 


the good name of this ch&teau. 
IQ thou 


1974Ch8teauneuf-du Pape, 
Domaine Guy MaureL Unwins 
£8.19 

Another red Ch£teauneuf with 
“delicious ripe spicy-smoky 
cinnamon fruit and backbone, 
oak and depth” (JMQ). RY, like 
AB, enjoyed its ‘ rich gamey 
fruit and oak” but Ifce JH 
thought it "possibly a bit 
austere for some tastes". Its 
distinctive mature style does 
not have the universal appeal 
of Tesco's Ch&teaum 


1981 Chateau Maucaflloux, 
Moults, Dourthe Freres. 
Sainsbury's £6.95. 

JMQ wasn't very keen on this 
one finding its "grassy-fruity 
nose and taste a shade dull 
and neutral". But everyone 
else loved it “Appetising fruity 
claret" noted RY; “Pleasant 
rich blackcurrant and cigar-box 
tones" AB, and JH: “One of 
the best". 


JMQ thought it had a “not 
unpleasant fight truffiy nose 
and taste but was too thin for 
ing" 

Mu 


Christmas drinking"; AB 

lushroomy 


similarly noted 
nose, rather loose knit". JH 
was the harshest critic: 
"Doggy nose 
undistinguished". 


FESTIVE FAILURES 


CHRISTMAS CHEER 


1983 Crozes-Hennftage, Cave 
Cooperative de Vina fins/ 
Marin & Spencer £349 

A worthy alternative wine for 
turkey and all the trimmings 
this “well made soft juicy 
blackberry and blackcurrant 
like wine and finesse and dept 
too" (JMQ). AB was its biggest 
fan: "Classic black pepper 
Syrah nose and Uackcurranty 
fruit”. • 


Beaujolals, Alexandre 
SHvestre. Presto £2i9 
Not a bottle any of us would 
want to face on Christmas Day. 
"Acidic, cooked light 
strawberry/raspberry 
Beaujolais fruit" wrote JMQ; 
"Rather lacking in charm and 
fruit" (AB); “Anaemic, acidic" 
(JH). 


1981 Chflteau I 
era bourgeois. Haul I 
Augustus Barnett ES49 
This "aggressive, rough 
farmyardy stuff' (JMQ) would 
bring little joy at Christmas. RY 

Col* M i 


felt it was wxfistinguishBd 
dydarar andJH 


rather woody 
"musty". 



Display your 

crown jewels 
over dinner. 


Croft Ports. Ap predated 

at the finest dinner parties 

for over three centuries. 



How many Santas 
are euddy-wifters? 


If the national average is anything to go by, 
probably about 10%. 

But research shows that in ancient civilisa- 
tions buck-fisted, south-pawed, in otherwords left- 
handed people, may have had the upper hand. 
j_ Could it, after all, be wrong to be right and 
right to be left? 

Read The Economists 
112 -page Christmas 
double issue. Out now. £2- 


TKeVjS 

Economist 











THF- TTMKS SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


CHRISTMAS TELEVISION AND RADIO 


Bv Peter Waymark 







FILMS ON TV 


TELEVISION 


BLACK HARRY: ShWey MacLaine 
made her first screen appearance in 
The Trouble With Harry in 1 956. 
Relentlessly teased by the director, 
Alfred Hitchcock, who insisted on 


RINKSIDE SEAT: Jayne Torvffl and 
Christopher Dean, the ice dance 


wizards, get their skates on again for 

' fa ~ 


talking to her in Cockney rhyming 
‘ ‘ ' iptsm. The 


slang, she had a torrid baptism, 
film, a joyous black comedy about a 
dead body that stubbornly refuses to 
stay buried, was mysteriously 
withdrawn for many years ana has 
only recently resurfaced. Look out 
for John Forsythe, blue-rinsed hero 
of Dynasty, as an abstract painter. 
ITV, Christmas Eve, 10-1 1.50pm. 


Fire and Tee. It is a fantasy drama 
about a prince and princess from 
opposite worlds who meet and fan in 
love but find that their passion 
threatens to destroy them. With 


choreography by Graeme Murphy, 
“ ‘ ay Dane 


artistic director of the Sydney Dance 
Company, Fire and Ice combines ice 
dance with ballet, boasts more than 
30 spectacular costumes and 
features music by the ubiquitous Carl 
Davis. iTV, Boxing Day, 7.30-8.30pm. 


FILMS ON TV 

ENGLISH LESSON: Jufie Walters 
shot to international stardom as the 
working-class girl who joins the 
Open University in Willy Russeirs 
Educating Rita. Michael Caine is the 
disillusioned English professor who 
becomes her tutor. Released three 
years ago and being shown on 
British television for the first time, the 
film was a huge box-office success 
and a landmark in the career of its 
veteran director, Lewis Gilbert, 
whose credits go back to Reach For 
theSkymthe 1950s. BBC1 , 
Christmas Day, 10.40pn>1 2.30am. 


TELEVISION 




TELEVISION 


GREAT DAME: Peggy Ashcroft may 
be our greatest living actress but she 
has not hitherto been noted for her 
willingness to be interviewed on 
television. Now, in her 80th year, she 
makes amends. In conversation with 
the critic Michael BtHington, she 
reflects on a brilliant career which 
started at Birmingham Rep in 1926. 
She recalls her several Juliets, 
gelling racialist letters while acting 
with Paul Robeson, and, away from 
the stage, playing cricket with Len 
Hutton. Dame Peggy is on Channel 4, 
Christmas Eve, 9-1 0.45pm. 


GOON FOREVER: The Goons ~ 
Spike Milligan, Peter Seilers and 
Harry Secombe - sent a shock wave 
through British comedy in the 1950s 
and the memory of their irreverent, 
anarchic style lingers fondly on. This 
year five editions of The Goon Show 
which were broadcast overseas but 
have never been heard in this 
country were discovered in the BBC 
Archives and are being unwrapped 
for Christmas. Meet Ecdes. 
Blcodnok, Giyptpype-Thynne and 
company on Radio 4. starting on 
Christmas Day, 12-27-1 2.55pm. 


RIGHT WALLY: George Cole as 
Wally, an old man who suffers from 
loss of memory, in Day to 


Remember, a play about a family 
gathering tor Chris 


/hnstmas which 
skilfully walks the tightrope between 
comedy and pathos. Ron Cook plays 
toe son-in-law left to cope with 
Wally's affliction, and Rosemary 
Leach and Barbara Flynn complete a 
strong quartet The script by the 
prolific Jack Rosenthal, shrewdly 


S.- 






catches the interplay of character 
rices of banal speech. 


and the nuances i 
Channel 4, tomorrow, 9.45^1 0.45pm. 


TODAY 


• ••2001: A SPACE 
ODYSSEY (1966): Stanley 
Kubrick's bold and intelligent 
excursion into science fiction, 
with brilQant spatial effects, 
which largely dispenses with 
conventional plotting to 
emphasise the power of 
images and ideas. A rich meal, 
both for the eye and the mind. 
BBC2, 11.50am-2.05pm. 

• •THE BEST YEARS OF 
OUR LIVES (1946): William 
Wyler's powerfully crafted 
drama of American servicemen 
making the painful adjustment 
to civilian life. Six Oscars 
included one for the handless 
veteran, Harold Russefl. 
Channel 4, 2-5. 05pm. 

• •HAROLD LLOYD’S 
WORLD OF COMEDY (1962): 
Uoyd himself made the 
selection of golden moments 
from his silent and early sound 
films. An avalanche of 
brilliantly executed gags from a 
unique comic talent 
BBC2, 2.05-3.40pm. 
PICCADILLY INCIDENT (1946): 
Anna N eagle returns from a 
desert island to find that 
husband Michael Wilding has 
re-married. The first of the 
"London" films, directed by 
real husband Herbert Wilcox. 
Launches a N eagle season. 
BBC2, 3.40-5-20pm. 

• OLIVER! (1968): Handsome 
and lively screen version of 
Lionel Bart's stage musical, 
based on Oliver Twist, with 
fetching performances from 
Ron Moody, Harry Secombe 


and the young Mark Lester. 
eranCardf 


Veteran Caro! Reed directed 
and won himself an Oscar. 
BBC1, 5.55-8.1 5pm. 

• TRADING PLACES (1983): 
Exuberant sharp-edged John 
Landis comedy with poor black 
Eddie Murphy and rich smug 
Dan Acfcroyd swapping roles to 
settle a bet between two old 
stockbrokers (Don Ameche 


and Ralph Bellamy). 

-12.25am. 


ITV. 10.15pm-12. 

British television premiere. 

• • THE WAGES OF FEAR 
(1953): French cinema 
stalwarts Yves Montand and 
Charles Vanei in Henri- 
Georges Ctouzofs classic 
thriller, which wrings every last 
drop of suspense out of a 
hazardous journey through 
Central America with trucks of 


nitroglycerine. 

BBC2, 1 0.45pm-1 -20am. 


TARZAN, THE APE MAN 
(1981): Bo Derek as a scantily 
clad Jane in a good-to-took-at 
but dramatically empty foray 
into the African (actually Sn 
Lankan) jungle, directed by 
husband John. 

BBC1, 11.1 5pm-1. 05am. 


TOMORROW 


• THREE COINS IN A 
FOUNTAIN (1954): Dorothy 
McGuire, Jean Peters and 
Maggie McNamara as three 

i romance 


Maggie McNamara as three 
American girls finding romanc 
in Rome. A slight story, lifted 


by lush photography and Frank 
Sinatra's title song. 

5.55pm. 


Channel 4, 2-3 
ROOSTER COGBURN (1975): 
Leisurely sequel to True Grit 
with John Wayne repeating Ms 
Oscar-winning performance as 
the one-eyed gunman and 
joined by reflow veteran 
Katharine 
BBC1.3-4. 


• • ALL THAT JA2Z (1979£ 


Director/choreographer I 
Fosse baring his life. and soul 
in a downbeat, frenetic and 


I about an artist heading 
for a crack-up. With Roy 
SchekSer as the Fosse 
character and Jessica Lange. 
BBC2, 10. 25 pm- 12.30am. 
British television premiere. 

• • LITTLE CAESAR (1930): 
Early gangster classic, with an 
explosive performance from 
Edward G. Robinson as a 
mobster based on Al Capone. 
Rough at the edges but moves 
with tremendous pace. 

Channel 4, 10.45pm-12.10am, 


MONDAY 


• THEMARKOFZORRO 

(1920): Dated but stiU punchy 
silent swashbuckler about the 
Mexican Robin Hood which set 
Douglas Fairbanks on his way 
to energetic stardom. 

BBC2, noon-1 .25pm. 

THE PINK PANTHER STRIKES 
AGAIN (1976): Variable 
addition to a famous series 
with Peter Sellers as the 


bumbling Inspector Ckxiseau 
Herbert Lorn as the master 


and 

criminal out to destroy him. 
ITV, 1.30-3.25pm. 

• ONE MILLION YEARS BC 
(1966): Hammer Films taking 
time off from horror for 


The great TV picture show 




trip back to the Stone Age in 
Welch 


the company of Raquel 
and splendid 


animated 
monsters designed by special 
effects man Ray Harryhausen . 

BBC1, 2. 05-3. 40pm. 

• THEY FLEW ALONE (1941): 
Anna Neagle and Robert 
Newton as the pioneer aviators 
Amy Johnson and Jim MolIEson 
whose public triumphs were 


undermined by a rocky 

i Sofia, flag-waving 


marriage 
biography. 
BBC2, 3.50-5 


.30pm. 



• STAR SPANGLED 
RHYTHM (1942) is an 
engaging pot-pourri of song, 
dance and comedy as the big 
names on the Paramount pay- 
roll do their party pieces for 
the war effort. Bing Crosby 
(above) croons Old Glory and 
delivers a patriotic oration on 
the deeds of great Presidents; 
and there are contributions 
from Bob Hope, Paulette God- 
dard, Dorothy Lamoor, Alan 
Ladd and Veronica Lake. 
Channel 4, 430-&25pm. 


1941 (1979): Said to be the 
most expensive comedy ever 
made and notable as Steven 
Spielberg's one commercial 
flop. Lots of energy but lithe wit 
in a story of Californians going 
hysterical as the Japanese 
threaten to invade. 

BBC2, 7-9 pm. 

British television premiers. 


TUESDAY 


he 


• • THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA (1925): Terrific 
performance by Lon Chaney 
as the deformed musician 
luring the diva to his lair in the 
Parisian sewers. Stylish and 
atmospheric, and still the best 
film version of Gaston 
Leroux's classic chiller. 

BBC2, 12-50-2.05pm_ 

RAISE THE TTTANTTC (1980): It 
would have been easier to 
have lowered the sea said one 
wag of this fifeless epic which 
effectively static the film career 
of Lord Lew &ada. 

ITV, 130-3.35pm. 

THE JUNGLE BOOK (1942): 
Colourful but dramatically staid 
Korda version of the Kipting 
stories, with Sabu as the boy 
Mowgfi and model animals. 
BBC1.Z05-3.50pm 

• THE GREAT WALTZ (1938): 
Hollywood goes to Old Vienna 
for a plush, sugary musical 
biography of toe waltz kfeg, 
Johann Strauss. Perversely, 
is played by a French actor, 
Fernand Gravet, and another 
Frenchman, Julfen Duvtvier, 
directs. 

Channel 4, Z30-4ZSpm. 
YELLOW CANARY (1943k 
Efficient wartime spy thriller 
with unusual casting for Anna 
Neagle as, perish the thought, 
a woman suspected of being 
sympathetic to the Nazis. 

BBC2, 4-5.35pm. 

• IPSA WONDERFUL 
WORLD (1939): Madcap 
comedy with James Stewart as 
a greenhorn private eye 
aligned to shadow a 
millionaire and faffing in love 
with Claudette Colbert 
Channel 4, 4_25-6pm. 

• THAT TOUCH OF MINK 
(1962): Cary Grant as a suave 
bachelor in amorous pursuit of 
the virginal Doris Day. Formula 
plot but with Grant at his stylish 
best it cannot fail 
BBCZ6Z5-8pm. 

GUYS AND DOLLS (1955): 
Heavy, stutfo-bound version of 
the Damon Runyon musical. 


Dim the house lights, settle m your seats and time in to 
our critical guide to 60 movies playing on television 
during Christmas week. The rati ngs system, which 
should give plenty to axgne about, Is: 

• •• not to be missed • • highly recommended 

th watching 


• THE SEVEN YEAR ITCH 
(1955): E Ely VVCder season 
starts with one of his lesser 
pieces, from a stage hit about 
a married man’s pursuit of the 
ithe 


well worth 


with Marion Brando as an 
unlikely Sky Masterson. The 
dolls, especially Vivian Blame, 
steal the show. 

Channel 4, 830-1 1.1 5pm. 
FIREFQX (1982): Clint 
Eastwood versus the 
Commies. Probably the worst 
Eastwood film ever made and 
since he directed as well as 
starred he has no excuse. 

ITV, 9-10 and 10.15-1 150pm. 



• • • NORTH BY 
NORTHWEST (1959) gave 
Cary Grant one of his happiest 
roles as die cocky advertising 
man mistaken for a spy in 
Alfred Hitchcock’s chase 
thriller. The scene in which 
Grant, alone on empty road, is 
menaced by a crop-duster, has 
rightly passed Into movie leg- 
rad. But there are other 
marveUons set pieces, from the 
murder in the United Nations 
to the climactic shoot-out on 
Mount Rnshmore. Eva Marie 
Saint is the resideiit Hitch- 
cock Monde, concealing pas- 
sion under a cool exterior, and 
Janies Mason makes a suave 
villam- BBC1, lOpm-lZlSam. 


CHRISTMAS EVE 


• CAMMINACAMWNA 

(1983): Ermanno Okra's highly 
personal often i di osyncratic, 
re-woriring of the stay of toe 
Three Wise Mot, vividly shot in 
rural Italy and performed by a 
cast of non-professional 
actors. 

Channel 4, 1 1 am-1 .40pm. 
British television premiere. 

• DR JEKYLL AND MR HYDE 
(1920): John Barrymore in 
flamboyant form as Robert 
Louis Stevenson's split 
personality, managing most of 
his tra ns formations with facial 
contortions rattier than trick 
effects. 

BBC2, 12-50-1 -50pm. 


ROB ROY- THE HIGHLAND 
ROGUE (1953): Richard Todd 
as the Scottish adventurer hi a 
tepid British production from 
the Watt Disney stutio. 

[TV, 1 -30-3pm (Scottish, 
Christmas Day, 1230-2pm). 


• •• THE WIZARD OF OZ 
(1939): Judy Garland and 
chums take to the YsHow Brick 
Road for an enduring piece of 
Hollywood magic with 
marveflous songs and a host of 
delightful characters— the 
Witch (Margaret Hamilton), the 
Scarecrow (Ray Boiger), the 
Cowardy Lion (Bert Lahr) and 
the Tin Man ^ack Haley). 


BBC1, 


05pm. 

• THE STRONG MAN (1 926): 
The baby-faced silent 
comedian Harry Langdon in his 
best screen roe as a First 
World War soldier in pureuit of 
a gW penfriend. Shown in a 
newly restored print, with 
music by Carl Davis. 
4,330-5pm. 


Monroe's skirt biflowing up 
over the subway grating. 
5BC2. 4.45-£.3spni. 

MR MAI (1983): Feeble rote- 
reversal comedy with Ten Garr 
as trie working wife and 
Michael Keaton as tntobie left 
to cope at home. 

BBC1, 6-20-7.5Gpfn. 

British television premiere. 

• HOLIDAY INN (1942): Bing 
Crosby and Fred Astaire in a 
likeable, unassuming Irving 
Berfin musical which 
introduced the song White 
Christmas. 

Channel 4, 7-9pm. 

• ••THE TROUBLE WITH 
HARRY. See top of page. 



• ••MEET ME EV ST 
LOUI S (1944), is a d tanning 
portrait of small-town Amer- 
ica, designed as an affirmation 
of traditional values at a time 
when fondly life was being 
disrupted by tie war. DeEghts 
include the playing ef the 
young Judy Gai -fend and Mar- 
garet O’Brien (above), num- 
bers Eke the Trolley Song and 
sumptuous Technicolor. The 
first in a season of nnntfrak 
d i rect ed by Vincente Minnelli . 
BBC2, 1145pm-135am. 


MAD LOVE (1935): Peter Lorre 
making his Hollywood debut as 
a mad surgeon grafting the 
hands of an executed 
murderer on to an injured 
concert pimtisL Effective 
honor hokum tirectad by 
German emigre Karl Freund. 
Channel 4. l2L45-2am. 


from AiJeen Quinn as tittle 
orphan Annie and Afoert 
Frone/s bald millionaire. 
BBC1, 3.1 0-5.1 5pm. 
British television premiere. 


• THE FORTUNE COOKIE 
(1966): Billy Wilder si typically 
cynical mood with the story of 
a crooked lawyer (splendid. 
Oscar-winning performance 
from Walter Matthau) trying to 
win exorbitant damages. 
BBC2, 5.1 5-7 ,20pm. 


CHRISTMAS DAY 


THE PURE HELL OF ST 
TR IN IAN'S (I960): Third in the 
series about Ronald Saaile's 
awful schod^rte and the joke 
is starting to paH. But there is 
compensation in George 
Ode's Rash Harry, a sphrish 
forerunner of Arthur Daley. 
BBC1, 10-1 1.30am. 


• THE SWISS FAMILY 
ROBINSON (1959): John Mills 
leading Itis shipwrecked family 
to a new life on a tropical 
island. Lively, well-made 
offering from Disney. 

' Jexc 
t1.< 


NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN 
(1983): Sean Connery, 
complete with toupee, returns 
as an ageing but st# styfesh 
James Bond m a loose re- 
make of ThunderbaB. 

ITV, 6.30-9pm. 

British television premiere. 


EDITH AND MARCEL (1983): 
Fanciful, embroidered account 
by director Claude Latouch of 4 
the love affair between Edith 
Piaf and the boxer Marcel 
Cerdan. With Evefyne Bouix as 
Piaf, Marcel Cerdan as his 
father and Charles Aznavour 
as himself. 

BBC2, 8.20-1 0.55pm. 

British television premiere. 




- ' ' ' »T 


• EDUCATING RITA 
See top of page. 


• THE PIRATE (194# Director 
Vincente Mimteffi may have 
created his Caribbean island in 
the studio but with stars Ifte 
Judy Garland and Gene KeHy, 


songs by Cole Porter and lush 

Vine: * “ 


• FEDORA (1978): Wiffiam 
Holden as a Hollywood 
producer trying to persuade an 
old actress out of retirement in 
Bifly Wilder's mellow study of 
image-making, a subject he 


colour, the staginess hardly 
natters. 

BBC2, 1220-2pm. 


previously explored — also with 
Holden —in Sunset l 


1 Boulevard. 

BBC2, 11.10pm-1am. 


• HELLZAPOPPfN’ 

Manic, surreal farce 
vaudevflEans Oie Olsen and 
Chic Johnson in a screen 
version of their famous 
hit A non-stop volley of 
and visual gags bufit around 
the attempts of two bungfing 
comics to put on a show. 
Channel 4, 135-3pm. 


BOXING DAY 


CHrmrCHfITY BANG BANG 
(1968): Dick van Dyke as a 
crazy inventor who gives an 
old racing car magical powers. 
Overlong and sometimes 
uneasy mixture of sentiment 


and farce; but kids lap it up. 

L45pm. 


• • DUMBO (1941): Delightful 
Disney cartoon about the fittie 
circus elephant who uses his 
big ears to fly. 
ITV t 3.10-4.2Dpin. 

British television premiere. 


ANNE (1981): Ponderous 
screen version of the stage 
musical with an unfikely 
director in John Huston. Saved 


Competitive edge and a touch of nostalgia 


TELEVISION 


Christmas tefevisfon, at the end of the day, is 
all about ratings, and ratmgs depend not so 
much on the goods but bow they are 
scheduled. It is no comddeuce that BBC1 has 
EastEnders starting on Christinas Day at 
635pm. As Britain’s most-watched pro- 
gramme it stands an excellent chance of 
sabotaging ITVs Bond film which kicks off 


five minutes earlier, and with another edition 
of EastEnders on the same night (10- 
1030pm), the Beeb should dean up. 

In between the two visits to Albert Square, 
tbe admirable Joan Hickson, who has become 
a television star at 80, is back as Miss Marple 
in Tbe Murder at the Vicarage (830-1 0pm). 
ITV gamely reponds with another Christie, 
Dead Man's Folly (lOJOpm-nridnight) only to 
risk a second battering from EastEnders. 

Competitive scheduling is not confined to- 
the mass audience. BBC2 and Channel 4 both 
have Christmas Day documentaries on mu- 


sicians, both starting at 730pm, Tbe BBC 
offering, Aaron Copland: A Self Portrait, 
marks his 85th birthday, while on 4 there is 
Vladimir Horowitz — The Last Romantic. 
Horowitz is 82. Wendy Hiller is not a bad age, 
either. She plays Lady Bracknell in The 
Importance of Being Earnest (Channel 4, 
Christmas Day, 9-1 1.10pm). 

like Agatha Christie, Alan Ayckbourn has 
become a seasonal fixture. He is represented 
this year by Season’s Greetings (BBC2, Wed, 
9-1 030pm), a ftmny-painfnl view of a family 
Christmas performed with relish by a 
smashing cast that includes Geoffrey Palmer, 
Anna Massey and Peter Vaughan. 

Jeremy Isaacs says that as brag as he is hi 
charge rtf Channel 4 than will always be a 
Christinas showing of The Snowman. Tone in 
to this delicate piece of animation on 
Christmas Day, 530-&29pm. The Box of 
Delights could also become a Christinas 
percnniaL The beautiful adaptation of 
Masefield’s story is back on BBC1, in three 
parts, starting on Monday, 5-tipm. 


RADIO 


Christmas radio is heavily tinged with 
nostalgia. The Goons are bade (see lop of 
page) and so is Paul Temple and there are 
golden moments from The Archers. 

Bat it is not entirely a trip (town memory 
lane. Radio 3 has a new play by Anthony 
Minghdla, a young writer who has blossomed 
in 1 986 with his first West End production. 
Made in Bangkok, and the television drama. 
What If Ids Raining? His radio play. Two 
Planks and a Passion (Toes, 7.30-9.30pm) 
goes bade to the Middle Ages and the city of 
York, which is staging the Mystery Plays. 

Financial stringency threatens the eater- 
prise but with a royal visit in the offing, civic 
pride determines that the money shall be 
found. A cast which any West F.nd manager 
would dream about includes another man of 
1986, David ThreUaH of Paradise Postponed. 

Less demanding fore is offered on Radio 4. 
Peter Saliis plays Agatha Christie's sleuth in 


Hercule Poirot’s Chris tmas (Christmas Eve, 
730-9pm), the first in a series of classic crime 
storie&Uniike these, Francis Dnrbridge's 
Paul Temple was a radio original, whichnever 
translated successfully to other media. 

Paul Temple and the Conrad Case, first 
heard in July 1959, is revived on Christmas 
Day (Radio 4, 6.30-7pm), with Peter finim. 


BBC1,10.30am-12.< 

ESCAPE TO WITCH 
MOUNTAIN (1974): Two 
orphan children with 
supernatural powers come 
under the wing of dastardly 
millionaire Ray Milland. Disney 
sc-fi, ideal for a young 
audience. 

ITV. 10.30anvl2.15pm. 

• THE GUNS OF NAVARONE 
(1961): Gregory Peck and 
David Niven lead Allied 
commandos in a mission to 
destroy huge German guns on 
a Greek island. Effective 
Second World War 
blockbuster, stronger on action 
than talk. 

BBC1, 130-4pm. 

» 20,000 LEAGUES UNDER 


: i-n 


J 

$ 

M 


P” c 


THE SEA (1954): James Mason 
makes a splendid r 


Marjorie Westbury as" Steve and the famous 
clrflnar ” ‘ ‘ " * 


angers. Vintage Antes is also on 


Christmas Day (Radio 4, 8.05-8.5Gam). 
recalling the demise of Grace and other gems 
from the 35-year-old story of country folk. 

. There is a revealing portrait of Hollywood 
in its heyday in Yon Must Remember This 
(Radio 4, Boxing Day, 930-10.1 5pm). Nigel 
Andrews looks at the malrifng of ryrsah/mtfq 
from its origins as an unprodneed play and 
through the Warner Brothers sampga ma- 
chine to silver screen triumph in 1942. Funny 
to think that Ronald Reagan, not Humphrey 
Bogart, could have landed the part of Rick, 
though Casablanca is Spanish for White 
House. 


, — — l Captain 

Nemo in a spirited Disney 
version of the Jules Verne 
adventure about Victorian 
scientists held on a submarine, 
nrv, 2. 10-4. 30pm 

• •THE BAND WAGON 
(1953): Vincente MinneUi’s 
wbrantputting-on-a-show 
musical, joyously performed by 
Fred Astaire, Jack Buchanan 
(his best film part as an 
eccentric Broadway producer) 
and Cyd Charisse. 
BBC2.4~5.50pm. 

THESPY WHO LOVED ME 
(1977): Tired addition to the 
James Bond cycle, with 007 

Dnner Unnn, — - 




: ■ t . 




THE WEEK AHEAD 


CONCERTS 


INTIMATE MESSIAH: The 
choir and orchestra of The 
Sixteen take a small-scale 
view of Handel’s Messiah. 

St John's, Smith Square, 
London SW1 (01-222 1061). 
Today, 7pm. 

NATIONAL CHILDREN: The 
National Children's Orchestra 
plays Panufnlk's Heroic 
Overture, Sarrt-Saens’s Danse 
Macabre, Chabrier’s 
Esparia, Maw’s Summer 
Dances, Rktout's Recorder 
Concerto. 

Queen Elizabeth Han, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
31 91 ). Tomorrow, 7.1 5pm. 


ROCK. 


DR FEELGOOD*. Lee 
Brilleaux has been on the road 
most of theyear with his 
gang of R&B perennials and 
Christmas week is no 


Tomorrow, Cheltenham 
Town Had (0242 521621): Mon, 
Hot Tub Club, Doncaster, 

Com 






• Gary Kemp of Spandau 
Ballet, who have proved a 
remarkably resilient and 
adaptable unit After teuight’s 
show at G-Mex, Manchester 
(063 834 2700), they settle m 
for a residency at Wembley 
Arena (01*9® 1234), from 

Monday Cor fire lights (not 




DANCE 


LONDON FESTIVAL 
BALLET: Peter Schaufoss's 
new production of 77x1 
Nutcracker opens Fri. 
Performances continue 
twice dally unta Jan 3, then 


Ian 17. 

Festival HaH (01-928 3191) 

ROYAL BALLET: Another 
Nutctacker, this one produced 
by Peter Wright Two 
performances today (with 
Maria Abneida and Antony 
Dowson featured this 
afternoon, Cynthia Harve 
and Jay Jolley tontahft further 
performances Dec 27 (phis 
matirtee), 29, 31 and Jan 1,2,3 
(plus metinde), 6, 8 and 9, 
Covent Garden (01-240 
1066) 


NORTHERN BALLET 
THEATRE: A different 
Christmas treat Cind&relta 
fo a Viennese setting with a 
specially written score by 


Johann Strauss. Ti 
Leisure Centre, 
(0625-533789); then Mon & 
Tues evenings, Wed 
matinde, R1 matinde and 
evening, phis further 
performances until Jan 3, at 
the Demgate, Northampton 
(060424811) 


at the 


OPERA 


ROYAL OPERA HOUSE: 

Lucia dlLammannoor is the 

Royal Opera's Christmas 
offering on Tues and Boxing 
Day at730pm. Handel's 


Samscw on Mon at7pm. 
Covent Garden, London, 


WC2 (01-240 1068). 


ENGLISH NATIONAL 

OPERA: Jan&cek’s early, short 
opera, Qsud (Fate), twinned 
most enterpristngjy with a 
staged performance of the 
composer’s haunting Gtoy of 
One who Disappeared on 
Mon at 7.30pm. 

Coliseum, St Martin's Lane, - 
London, WC2 (01-836 3161). 


GALLERIES 


SCOTT1E WILSON: OddbaB, 
"primitive" paintings. 
Hastings Museum and Art 
Gallery, Cambridge Road, 
Hastings (0424- 



• Paul vea Hfndenharg looks 

inappropriately grave as u 
urges the German public to 
subscribe to the 7th War 


Loans scheme in a pester from 
19X7. German posters woe 
made by pioneers of graphic 
design and expression. The 
Poster In Germany 1914-1920, 
is <m show at the Imperial War 
Museum, Lambeth Road, 
London SE1 (01-735 8922). 


/. 5.15-7 

£«££°?* E . L,,CE n’ wot 

0959): Jade Lemmon and 
Tony Curtis as musicians in 
drag on the run from 
Songsters, Marilyn Monroe in 
cute support BiHy wader's 
conw farrago is short on 
JjsrapHne but rich In gags. 
BB C2, lO.QSpnwnfcJrSjJit 


tf 



> THE VERDICT (1982): A 
I end satisfying 


BOOKINGS 


FIRST CHANCE 


GARDEN CONCERTS: Postal 
bookingoperr far first of ! series 
with Royal Opera House 
orchestra under Bernard 
Haitink. Feb 12 and 14. 

Couent Garden, London WC2 
(01-240 1086). 


' solid 

r .ama from director Sidney 
Lumet with strong 
performances frwn Paul 
Newman and James Mason as 

Tlm SEQUEL 
0982): Another frenzied 

the disaster movie, 
“aspace shuttle heads for - 
°fcfivion, but like most movie 

^^hfaifetoSST 

EL 1 K-i? p !P-. 12 ' 5 0atn- 


i i. 


Gmcer&Max 
Harrison? Opera; Hilary 
Finch; Galleries: David 
Lee; Rode David 
Sinclair; Bookings: 
Aime Whitehsase 


around THE 

gjjtenhc comedy from director 
Lutetsch, in ora-war 

*®r*ces Iran James 
(and Margaret Sudavan 




h: 










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BARBICAN HALL 

Barbican Centre. Silk St. EC2Y 80S 
Q.T-638 8891/ 628 8795 
Telephone Bookings: 10am-8pm 7 days a week 

in»Co'p«-<*i-or o? n-oCi, s' Lontiov' 



_ - -p ur er jMj taaiw ul t*m- o) oonvi tauten 

JMay JMKS OALWAVS CMW5TMAS COU.ECDOW. B6C Concert 

MD« Orchestra 6 Sutgm 

JMg™ Wl bcma sum 

a * -Bpwi farmonduvacknud m astute muhLandanAnse. 

If?" HA*«i.«5St*H.CnyrtLwt8qhl^^ 

MOW L9.CH.CCi I’b.M. 

.SpQfaWPrt By Jafin Uana Ctvrrfrucfccn Lhi 

ROVALPHR.H AJHtONU: ORCHESTRA. Anfaur Davison 

Oj**"** UNVM) Johray Mora* |faai) Pioq 

j* *? «' Ofhnbadr J Suwu B; ftnderaon: QMtnMi Rtmaky 
* “*■ Wonrt Cowruwa/Morriv TthfaflcovOcy. 

niCSKlLH Spon-.wvd o» DHL hbrt/nwfc’ Butters 


RAYMOND GUBBAY presents 

at the BARBICAN 


TUESDAY 23 DECEMBER at 3.3B A 7.45 p.m. 

Otfotaib OL. ,(WMHSa TOE TOHMOSUi 


VICTOR HOCHHAUSER 







BOXING DAY 2S DECEMBER at 145 


Li >■ i .j JX \!^i- ! ii MM ; 






WOHTHEBW SaaOWOME OllAflTET 
urwm uww Ludtirt LLritrq. #. *■ to— , I 

iLon»- v, mi p *, A fk^ . pJ 

So.^nr, 


> RM*r CaraaC' M Pruslo 

il Xiriliaa s,, tu>j.rn rv^, 

XBA 3 irnmowunoin for 



^SOUTH BANK CRAFTS 




6 CB *iO rlM Rg 

wn— WfSPCANO DANCE FROM THE BALLET, ^dtofl Wrt» 
Royal BaBM Chch & Punopal Dancers BramweaTi 
3.00pm Plan inn nrcnlin bv ' 
ft74Spm 


S521 Th^Ml 

noomn TOM* a 






xfmm , 




jiagtiiiimii 


Egmont Overture 
Piano Concerto No. 5 (Emperor) 
Symphony No. 5 
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Conductor JAMES JUDD HOWARD SHELLET jiaau 
15.S0, UJ.W.IH, a. 50, i Lu.W. ill SO 


SUNDAY 28 DECEMBER at3 pmx. 

SVSk Both. •BRANDENBURG CONCERTO No. 3 

VVl Mozan EINE KLEZSE NACHTML'SK 

WSf Mozart. VIOLIN CONCERTO No. 4* 

wr VnaW THE FOUR SEASONS 

ENGLISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 

CaodmoT: PHILIP LEDGER JOSE LUIS GARCIA viola 
ALAN BRXND vjoIid (BBC Young MnaJdu of the Year. IMS)* 

[A SO. iS SO. tZ ill. M. SU. /!■! %u 


SUNDAY 28 DECEMBER at Z30 p.m. 

CHRISTMAS LOVE CLASSICS 

— TrAdm** ROMEO Vffl [111ET FL.VTLSY OT. 

lH^BW Hopni CfTESMEZZUFSOM CAV VLLtKLL BL5IK.W 

ftTU Grin mxi arvci Kni tv L mivos 

f. m 8fait~— JlirEFSOVl'CUUlEA' 

j-Sra—H TK BUT D VASE CUJZ 

LONDON CaMiERTOR CHEST RA 
Cnlmlor BARRY VP ORI3SW ORTH STEPHEN HOL'CH ,-iuno 
And a Red Rene for non 1 Lady member of the audience - 

t5 W.ihW.i!Lf*.5u.4W ill, ill. W 


nrxj rrt ;{» y/,i a,) a :Ta r* to ; l 


NEW YEAR 
GALA CONCERTS 


Sunday 38th December at 730 

TCHAIKOVSKY 

PHELHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 
BAND OF THE SCOTS GUARDS 

Introduced & conducted by. ANTONY HOPKINS 
Sokasu ALLAN SCHILLER 

*L»®hc Stave, Suiu “The Swan Lake*. Piano Cmccrto No. L 

Snte The Kiuaadar 1 

OVERTURE ‘1812* WITH CANNON 
AND MORTAR EFFECTS 


mM Thursday 1st January at 730 

mu VIENNESE 
NEW YEAR GALA 

PHILHAKMONIA ORCHESTRA 
EIGHT SOLOISTS FROM 
SADLERS WELLS ROYAL BALLET 

Conductor. ORMSBY WILKINS 
JOHANN STRAUSS: Oe. Dir Fledenans, Cnelun ntlka, Ftaprann 
Ibhk Scene Crsm Gntea Rail, Emperor Waltz, Bata Fen '.••>] fca, 
Khktzki' .March. AnrO Mka. Vara of Spnuc, Tnnch-Tnadi Pbifcj, 
i^ptUD March, tt inr \Xomeo & Sous, Cham paote PoDu, Kjzkzni PoBca. 
Bine Danube Waltz: LEBAJL- GoU A SdwrtXUo: 
WALDTECFEL: Skzten U'jfa.LA]VNHR: Sn Year Galop. 

£J Sa £h, £7 JC. 0-50. £ 10 from RAH SSV 3212 CC SS9 WeS 
TictrtnrwurCCHodme opcndJilvmcSmKi 3 "N 6433 


^ 1 — ! 




i ' . TV 


HIGH SOCIETY 

DUMM tty Richard Eyrv 
Prra Feb 13 tai Nisht Feb 26 
Mtr Fn 7 n& wed Mat S SOI a.as 
a, B.1B. CD SMO 990 6123 




MftSJWSu nl 2ooon.7pm 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HAM 

RAYMOND GUBB AY prueoa u vhe ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

SUNDAY 28 DECEMBER at 3 p-rnTzM o S!* 

JOHANN STRAUSS GALA 

JOHANS STRAINS ORCHESTRA 
Oarocd tram ihr r»hn S’ JOHN BRAOBURF 
n mJjIttA ANN JAMES upm, 

B *4 GERALDINE STEPHENSON dwtra-lia 

J^WSTRUJSSDANCERSnihein.aBorf^pa.ai 

“"teSSSSSJlS 2 isaasiar , 

. AieektitM® Wjhz. Siogeihiu Prjfci. Cadiuch* Galon. 

Laughias Sonp than Dir RcderamiL Qumpagne PoOa. Blue Danube \Taltz. 

Mauace: 0.£*W. i5 ». XL Fa C 50. o.x' 

— t -™i"g IL ti. UkCLLA 31', fl ;;:, » ;f KiM (11-^28 3|Q| CC.BI-iggaBM 

RAYMOND GUBBAY prerenu at the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

SUNDAY 11 JANUARY at 7.30 p.m. 

© Popular Classics 

Reiaiaj — THE BARBER OF SEVILLE OVERTURE 

Haadel....... WATER MUSIC SUITE 

Bachm a n ta ov PIANO CONCERTO No Jt 

g.n«* — PEER GYNT SUITE Ne. 1 

Elgar. POMPAND CIRCUMSTANCE MARCH No. 1 . 
Borodm .~POLO VTSIAN DANCES (PRINCE IGOR) 1 1??!®?' 
LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA I XST® 

Cooduav. BARRY WORDSWORTH ALAN GRAVILL pane 1 

«.(3,LA »./B.£O.W.iJ0. M ,£n iM Hill 01-928 3191 C.C. 01-9288800 ' 



EiLdTi 







j j St John's Smith Square 

~ mfSB 

Wr-W, 





TUESDAY 30 DECEMBER at 7^5 p.m. 

Mradetssofan.-HEBRIDES OVERTURE 

Tchaikovsky VIOLIN CONCERTO 

Dvorak... .SYMPHONY No. 9 

(NEW WORLD) 

PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 

Conduaon SIR YEHUDI MENUHIN 

HU KUN \*iolin 

£5.50. £6.50. L8. i!>. W. £10 50. £11.50 


FRIDAY 2 JANUARY at Z45 p.m. 

VERDI GALA NIGHT 

jflbh La Form Del Dcatlna: Overrule, Pi c Ojee; D Travamre: 

ft ftT^A Anvil Cbarus. Murine. [] Bolen; Nabacco: Ojotib of ibe 
I % Hcbnw Staves; Rlgoleoo: Cain Nome, Quesio O Quclb, 

I a\9|f Quonet, Vengeance Ducii La TraviztatAa HI Prdude. Di 
Piacenza, Don Cartoc Etendihni Duct- Eboli’v Aria) 
Aida: Rjmnu Vindror, Crlorc Aidj, Gnnd .Marcb- 
LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA Condoetix JANE GLOVER 
ELIZABETH VAUGHAN wprauo 
SKRY ELLA MAGNUS mezzu^rnmo 
ALBERTO REMEDIOS I enor NEIL 80 W LETT boril one 
LONDON CHORAL SOCIETY 

FANFARE TBUMPETERS FROM THE BAND OF THE WELSH GUARDS 

£5.50. £6.50, £9.50,00.50. £11.50 


SUNDAY -1 JANUARY at Z30 p.m. 

TCHAIKOVSKY 

ftdtk Steepuu Bcaniy Waltz, Swan Lake Stole; 
JP/flB PaaoCoDcmoNB. IjNstcncker Suite; 







H 


WWIFOELD director. 

30 BecftwwicSeienaqam DOp 25. Puna ft Wmo Qunai in E Hat Op 
□•ember 16 Water (2n0lh Ann | Gong Chnnn Quntel n Eftat Op M. Ride 
33C PJTV T-,e Op Ou. mwatKwi KJ nw Ctoncr Op. 6S. mcrenrand ny Ouanan 
Boo*o. a. L4. a £2 



YEAITS DAY CONCERT. THE KimrSCONSORtr^Ht KBq 
o* cnoic G.RdMt.C. Behmn.A. M ob. C- R od. C-Ste el e m t*h w .P. 
Uoaodwh. R. Goodman loMer J6 Bactu Camara No 61 JB«=£ibm 
G on ,n alien Landon. OmatmM Oralenc IW 6| T ele n— i. TriXW 
flaetc Concwao at A loa ocoedamow Iftt DA EdO, £3 


LONDON SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA Buto2t 


Satnniay 3 3m 7.45 pm 

MURRAY PERAHIA 

BERLIOZ Ovenurc ‘Beatrice and Benedict’ 

SCHUMANN Piano Conamo 

SIBELIUS Symphony No 5 

SIR COLIN DAVIS 

Sponsored 6» Harris sigricn/tmal Group IJmhed 
Seal prices £12.50. £10.50, £8 JO, £6.50. £5. £3.50 
Bos Office Tel 10-8 every day iac Son 01-638 8891/6288795 


Tonight, Tues 7.30 then Dec 29, Jan 3^, and continuing 



w t 


Biz^t 


5tunmng 1950 S CastincSdlyBuraais(CijnTiefi) 

. ■ ti_i| JL John TiWftowiifJonn Harm (Don Josft) 

VtfBSr aide arory -sryio RoKtfnunc | (Mkosla). Dnvid Arnold (EscomSlo) 
production ■ . • ■ a Carman Conductors Mark Ektef/PauJ DonioJ 
you've never seen before” Pro<J,Jco r David l*wmtaay. Dosianw Maria B^rmon 
Daily Mail 

English National Opera, London Coliseum, St Martin's lane, London WC2 

Box Office 01-836 3161 Credit Cards 01-240 5258 

This production has born assisted by a gwiwouj gift from ESSO UK pic WM 


l|\of 1812 Overture 

LeS«r with Canmm ind Mimr Effima 

mr LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 

Conductor FRASER GOULDING WILLIAM STEPHENSON pzmo 
RAND OF THE WELSH GUARDS 
£5.50, £6.50, £8, £9.50. £10.50. £11.50 


SATURDAY 10 JANUARY at S p.m. 

Bade. — -VIOLIN CONCERTO IN A MINOR 

h WagBCT._. — SIEGFRIED IDYLL 

|k Ronhd-.. THE SILKEN LADDER OVERTURE 

» Bacewia. CONCERTO FOR STRING ORCHESTRA 
If Muon SYMPHONY No. 41 (JUPITER) 

* WARSAW SINFONIA 

CoBdudOT/violtn 

SIR YEHUDI MENUHIN 

£B.50,£>.50,f 10.50, £11.50 

widi Aaplo-Svrin Aniata 


_ W EDNESDAY 14 JANUARY at Z45 pan. 

Mozart MARRIAGE OF FIGARO 0V. 

|V. M Beethoven —PIANO CONCERTO No. 5 (EMPEROR) 
||k\Vl Beethoven iimHNiinHiitatN C0RI0LAN OVERTURE 

Moran. SYMPHONY No. 40 

ENGLISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 

Conductor MARTIN ANDRE STEVEN DBGROOTEpnw 
£5.50,£8.M,£8.£9.50, £1030. £11 A0 
Bw Office 01-628 8795 CC 01-638 8891 


MJCWM S 830 8S543 CC aaO 
<•648 CC S79 6«S & CC 24 
hr/7 day 040 7300 Ewga 8 Wad 
mat S Sal 141 
nap ape. fu*g 


B U M OF YORKS 830 5122 CC 
836 9837/701 9799/379 0033 
aatir 240 7200. Evaa 8. THU S. 
Sal 6 ft BOO 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Waailari Drama A— d IMW 

STEPPING OUT 

Ha Conaady ear Rteham Hanta 
DlntM fay Julia KcKoohi 
-nsnm oh taw «a 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


Monday 12th Jazmary at 7.45 

MOZART - BRUCKNER 

PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 
Conduaon FRANCESCO D’AVALOS 
SolotsL FOU TS’ONG 

Ov. Marie Flute MOZART 

Piano Concerto No. 2LX 447 MOZART 

Spaiphany No. 7 BRUCKNER 

AfB.l9-tt.iCI0-30.in.5P 

Friday 23rd January at 7.45 
HANDEL - RACHMANINOV 
ROSSINI - BEETHOVEN 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Cood: ANDRE BERNARD Soloist ANTHONY GOLDSTONE 

Or. Thiering Majpk ROSSINI 

Mdric lor the Royal Fireworks HANDEL 

PumoCancartoND.2 RACHMANINOV 

S ymp hony No. ((FWord) -BEETHOVEN 

r , £7,£8yp»-ML£l0.50,£«.50 
Tkicn from lijeBoz Office, BjortranOinv 6388891 6288795 


m 


LVMC ft U W UlMmi 01-741 
23 1 1 Evaa 7JO iDae 2a at OM. 
™. baa office for details of 
mmu>AUCXM WOMDKBLAM) 
adapted fay Mm Wafts, with 
music by Cart Dovta. Ml 
SPOON ON BUTTON MOON 
rr«L box office for port fames). 
STUMO Eves 8pm THE ftlftnai 



NATIONAL PORTRAIT 
MUMTp » Martin ■» Hsn. 
Londo n WCS L Tel OI-93Q 1662. 
CUZftftCIH ■ : Pomama or fio 
years Adm. £2. Family ticket 
£S. Mon-Fn 10 * Sat IOC. 
Sun 2-6. CkMed 24 - 26 Dec. 
ft I Jan- 


pannm QALumr. u mmnk 

8L BW 1 Ol -236 8144. LOWS 
WAHL 1860-1969. 



HAYMAKKET THEATRE BOYAL 

Bn fdlR ft CC 01-930 9SR. 1st 
car JMftr/7 day CC fakga 240 7200 
Tlckctmaster 379 6433 Eves 730 
Wad ft Sat mate TJOptn 



BREAKING the CODE 

fay MICH H NHEB OM 


nr fay CLIFFORD WILLIAMS 

-nw HUMAN, HUMANE, 
SCRHRI* AW WM FPD f C 
ru^mwrmniLT 

No Poft Cbmtnw Eve 




RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

Written and directed by 
RAY COONEY 

Ow 1.600 8 MM ports 

*WNUHHMBln"S.EX 
Good Mats avail Thura mala. 


BOMB NON THEATRE 680 8846/ 
9662. ALL tef CC Mess rater 
CALL 24M- Tday on 636 2428 HO 
BOOKINO PEE OTP Sales 930 
6123 

■HAVE CLARK’S 

TIME 



FORTUNE BO/CC 836 2238/9 
Aoy F.CALL 7day 2410- 240 
7200 aAj^MOJSKO 6123. 

Rn* UK stews sanlon 


OPERA & BALLET 


COLISEUM S 836 S16» _cc « P 
G2&8 ENSUBH KAT IOWAL 
OPERA Toni 7 00 Carajsn. 
Tamar TOO ROYAL W* 


ROYAL OPERA HOUSE 240 

1066/1911. StdfaY Wo “6 
6903. S oa Ttetate £1- 
£22JMV£1360 Mats (Bantu 
£2^G00 tOnwal. 66 ampfal 9aau 
avail on die day. 

Today 2-50 ft 7 JO THE ROVAL 
■ai I ITTTlia Hsk i r — BaBat 
CMOnglntte Ol 240 9816.Hgg 
7.00 THE ROYAL OPERA 


5ADLEIFS WELLS 278 8916. 
First Can cc 24 far 7 day H*o 
720a Until 27 Dec. Evq 7.3 0. 
Mats; Sate ft Bnxfaw Day 2.30twn 


ALBERT 836 3878 cr 379 6666/ 

574 6433/741 9999/ Gnu 836 

3962. 1.30 * 4.15 dally. For 3 

weeks only. David Wood's 
THE OLD MAM 
OF LOCfMACAR 
a Misdeal Play (or ehiidrm. 
From the book by JJH Jiw 
prince of Wales. Dec 22 ft 23M 
130 ft 6.30. Dee E4 Jl lj« 
only. Dec 26 at 1.30 ft 4.16 


AlDWYCMOl 8366404/0641 ec 
01379 6853. Q» 741 9999 


ALB8SY 836 3878 or 579 6866/ 
379 6433/ 741 9999 Group 
Sales 836 S9COL Eves Bom 
LIMITED LONDON SEASON 

DAVE ALLEN LIVE 

•DfVMTAnKLV FUNNY" 
LHC. Dac 26 ft 27 al asm. No 
Parte tec 22. 23. 24. 26 


COMPANY 

BA RMC AK THEATRE Today 
2X0 ft 7.30 MHMLllftllCE 
Sbaw^ “Mnstemiece. a gkxl- 


STEVEH W MKWTOW I 

ROBERT «LEJa»TElt 


MEN0T7TS 

w Win Cnvr Taa Fa 


(Rrmaft Premure ift,. 

AMANL ft Tfa. 

01-278 0838 for Wtolcr Opera 
info 


BRIGHTON BEACH 
MEMOIRS 

•ys&ss 

hmutlfuUV fflflUly 

SSgss.-AS’ST’" 

M 7 daw cr 01 240 7200 m#N* 
fajtg reel Grp Sales oi 


APOLLO 17KATRE 437 2663 

434 3696 First CUB 01-240 7200 
i M i, cc 379 6433 
MOO-fTI a. sat 430 ft B.IB 
Thors Mate 3. Dse 24 mat only. 
No pert Dec 26. Dec 26 8std perf 
esuy 

PAUL 6COFMLP 
-MASTERLEY" F.Tlmos 
HOWARD ROOMS 
"MAGpnFIGENT“ D.MaB | 

rM NOT RAPPAPORT 

~wonderfolty hm ay" PJ» 

TONY AWARD BEST PLAY 


mn FOR A BOMB tty John 
WhttM nturm team 22 Dee 
1W PIT Today 240 ft 7^0 
nMCMA 6CRI PTO R1 AE by 
Rtcfaam Netaon. BUURl fay 
Deberaft Levy returns from 22 
pec. 

BLOOM5NURT, Oordon ft wci 
387 9629 CC 380 1483. Until 
Jap IOl Eves 7pm. Mate Today. 
Mon. Tues. wed a F« Da ns 
perf Wed Eve ft Dec 23 

rm A@wncnntcs or hr 

TOAD, Tim Tii.ilidsg Mate 


CHIMaU Broml ey 460 6677 
MCH IVHrmHOTON Roy 
Mudd. Royer do Courcay ft 
NeoMo Bear. Bin Ffar tw e e. 
Jimmy Thorupson. Lsm Paul. 

~ LU— ilY THEATRE 950 2678 
CC 240 7200/379 6420/741 
9999 Orw 930 6I2S 


yaBo” 


i yj - ( . _ - . ^ ^ | 

■ h 

f t tj 


| THEATRES | 

1MM 836 7611 ZJp TSlg 
/4 CC 741 9W/8S6 TS5B/379 
643S Ore Sates 9 S 0 FttM 

Can 24hr 7 day CC 240 BOON* 
feN NOW BOOKING TO MAI 30 
1987 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL , , 
ragfaOy M 7 JO Mats Wed el 2-w 
ft Sal 4.30 4 8 ® - _ 

“sspas^^* 

Bt TOW s M»ws 

Ns Ksteha P«4 El * 



amRABSADORS 01-836 6111 w 
836 1171, Firs' C*D 124 W/7 
340 7200 <bk9 *«*• 

7 30- Wrd mal 3, Set 4 Jr ° 

Revs! SWMNF* CfapStejr* 

les liaisons 

DANGER ELISES 

•Bttmar ft -BOTFLAY" 

Oftvter AirartteT** 

Dee S3 3 * 2*±2VSa2' 

ft 26 . Dec 26 4 * 8jwt 

Tjckrtff nvttU Dec 23 at 3pm. 
Sec ». 37 at 8T*™ 


STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Music ny 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
Lyrics fay RICHARD STtLCOE 
Directed by TREVOR NUNN 
APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 
FOR RE TU H N8 Special contra 
Mens ai £6 on Tues mats for 

OAPY 

Spatial amt SHta Dac 39m 
Ka parf 248> he 
HOW NOQMNB TO HPT 1887 


TATUM FENRALMON 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

A Comedy fay li te nant Harris 
“A MAR ITAL M AWW Ct 
— W OH D U FULLT nSSte" 
n of me w 

“The opolaitea of ndniwi 
muiuHtim " D MdU 
“Very tunny mdeetr 3£n 
Mon-Tliu 8 Fri/Sal 6J0 ft 8 JO 

Unuui T9 1 928 22S2 CC 
(NmUanal Theatre's naaQ «udl- 
tonutni Today 2.30 a 7.30 last 
perts THE MOTHER By BreefaL 
Men. TUe. Fn 7 Jo THE BAY 
AT NICE and WRECKED EGC8 
rme Buuang wu be cioMd Dec 
24 ft 25). 


CLIFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAR* , 
THE PORTRAYAL OF -AKASH* 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 1 

Moo-Frt 7 JO Thu MM 2J0 Sal 4 
ft 8.18. At Thura mats only “The 
Reck Star- Mil be p e t fm m a d by 
John Ctertafte BFE Ct AL COWCN8- 
ROH6 afCT an parte except FH ft 
Sat avaa ter OAP-s. UBaofa. mi- 
dents ft under 165 am i hr 
before perf. Reduced prices Thun 
mate mRy cr a CIO 
Near R a d ttte K In AprB *87. 


KM— AN WAREHOUSE 200 

8230 CC 379 6666/6435 TO lO 
Jan Eves 8pm. Sal man Stem 


DRURY LANE THEATRE ROYAL 

BMC Office ft OC 01-836 8108. 01- 
240 9066/7. Firet Can 24tar 7 day 
cc fatal on Ol 240 7200 Inn fata ! 
fee). Tk M BBfar 01 579 6433 
In o Mg fee) < 

D-M Bteti W e 

42ND STREET 

A SH OW FOR ALL T8C FAMH.T 
Mhurdd lb Beet 
Nttekal Award* br IBM 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 


able heroes. imnerteftaMa 
magic" nma* 

Today at tojoam ft 7 SOpm 
Mon-Fti at 2pm ft 7jopm 
Sac 2pm. Stan ft Bpm. 

SAHRKK S 01 379 6107. let can 
24/hr 7 day 240 7200. Cre Sales 
930 61 25. Ttctaamaner 579 6433 
Eve* 730. Sal 16 ft 8 Mal Tuas 

JUDI MICHAEL 

DENCH WILLIAMS 

"CteM of their own" Std 

MR and MSS NOBODY 

ny ICantl WMdfaOUM 
Dmcbd fay Nod Sharrfai . 


mini 1 1 DAdaU 
No pnf ChrMnua Eve 


SLOBA 01-437 3667 CC 741 9999 

1 st CM 240 7200 24 hr 7 day (fata 
feel Cre Sales 930 6123 

Fmm 14 teimaartt 
OUTSTAMDfNC ACHEVEMOIT 
AWARD - OMar Amnh *88 


In Lar ne ** ■■ ihr l Htnu " Ctaa 
TRE HOUSE OF 

with PATRICIA HAYES 
Maria Kmart - Heat —ra ci al 

Standard Drama Awards 


THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

Starring 

— m a n . CRAWFORD 

SARAH STEVE 

BRKSHTMAN BARTON 

CUfre Moara may* OnteOne 
» certain performances 
DB-rrted fay HAROLD PRINCE i 

Eves 7 46 Mats Wed ft 9*1 3 
Postal mas only tor Apr to Oct 

UfBOH PALLADIUM 437 7373. 
741 9999 (no fata W Ftrsl tell 
24 Hr 7 Day OC 240 7200. (HO 
■HA FEE) Cm Sates 930 6123. 
Tlckefmastcr 379 6433 
OVER 250 ROM af 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 
ft DOSS QULLCY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLIES 

•*_A FALUUHUM HOAR OF 
A PPR OVAL** S.TM 
Mon-Fri 7.30. Mate Wed 2-00 
Sal 3JO ft LOO 
add ( Mtett W M avedL at dm- 
MooFrt ft Sat mate 
SCAT* AVAILABLE FROM 030 
Xta Eva 7JL Ha ate* 

Maw tteekln* Is April 25, 1887 


LYRIC THEATRE EnaBetfaury 
Ave WI 01-437 3486/7 01-434 
16SO. 01-434 1060. 01-734 

8166/7 

COLM BLAKELY 
“A briUlaM ft loyeuriy 
comic performance” F. Tunas 
U 

The Natio nal Theatre ** actia trned 
Pi QdllLUtii^ Of 


SOLD OUT, Mon. Tue. Fri 7.48 
TOW OF MMKY. (The build 
toe win be dosed Pec 24 ft 2 a 

MAYFAIR 01 629 3037 
Until Jan 3 
Twice dally 2.0 ft AO 
Weds ft Sate 10.30. 2 J> A a o 

SOOTY’S XMAS SHOW 

MAYFAIR S CC 629 3036. 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 


MERMAID THEATRE Ol 236 
6668 1st Can 240 7200 579 6433 
741 9999 Grp Sates 930 6123 
Kamadi Grahame** wonderful 

THE WIND IN THE 
WILLOWS 

Twice daUy 2 ft 6. 

Dec 24 Ham ft 2pm 

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The taMes wM ba ria a ad 
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16 




How free are the Sakharovs? 


SPORTS 

DIARY 

Frances Edmonds 

in Australia 

Crying 

shame 

Australian cricket c aptains are not 
the only sportsmen liable to break 
down and sob in defeat John 
Kolius, the Robert Redfoid of the 
America’s Cup and skipper of the 
New York Yacht Club’s entry 
America H, was reduced to tears as 
New Zealand's “plastic fantastic” 
KZ7, skippered by 12-metre 
genuis Chris Dickson, eliminated 
the New Yorkers from the race 
after their 24 successful defences 
of the cup in the 132 ye 
preceding Australia ITs 1983 vic- 
tory. it was the sea breeze, the 
celebrated “Fremantle Doctor” 
which delivered the death blow to 
the Americans' $20 million two- 
year fight to regain the cup. “We 
may sue the doctor for 
malpractice,” said the defeated 
syndicate's spokesman wryly. 

• After America D’s thrashing, 
two Sydney expatriates turned up 
at the New York Yacht Club and 
offered a replacement trophy. The 
dob declined their offer — an em- 
pty Foster's beer can with wooden 
spoon and an Australian flag. 

Super grass 

The Adelaide Oval's perfect bat- 
ting pilch is a credit to 
groundsman Les Burden who has 
long criticized batsmen's use of 
rubber-soled shoes and maintains 
that the less popular spikes aerate 
the pitch instead of merely tearing 
off the top grass, and gives the 
spinners some rough to bowl on 
during the fourth and fifth days. 
Burdett is winning his argument. 
Spikes are now mandatory' in- 
Sheffield Shield matches at the 
Oral and he has started preaching 
the message for Test matches too. 

Blinder 

Former Australian skipper Richie 
Benaud has invented an odd way 
to improve the leg-spin of Peter 
Sleep and the off-spin of Greg 
Matthews. In an attempt to give 
the bowlers a mental picture of a 
perfect line and length, Benaud 
took the pair off to the nets in 
Adelaide and obliged them to 
bowl with their eyes dosed. Wags 
in the England team say they 
thought that the Australian open- 
ing attack had already been doing 
just that in Perth. 

Wakey-wakey 

England cricket captain Mike 
Gatting, who overslept and ar- 
rived late at the Melbourne cricket 
ground for the match against 
Victoria, will not be allowed to 
forget his peccadillo. In Adelaide, 
most of the team ignored the 
Hilton hotel's megadecibel fire- 
alarm siren which went off at 
6.30 am assuming it was some 
prankster’s wake-up call for their 
dozy skipper. 

Who’s who? 

After the blood-letting at Somerset 
Cricket Club, the captain's re- 
cently published biography It Sort 
of Clicks: Ian Botham talking to 
Peter Roebuck is destined to- 
become a collector’s item. Roe- 
buck has started another book, to 
be published by William 
Heinemann in the spring. A piece 
from the Australian poet Henry 
Lawson’s anthology, The Land 
Where Sport is Sacred, has in- 
spired the title. Heroes and Clods. 
Roebuck refuses to say who will be 
placed in which category. 


Big talk 


During Mike Gatling’s eariy- 
moming absence from the Mel- 
bourne cricket ground it fell to the 
oldest member of the team, Phil 
Edmonds, to give the pre-match 
pep talk. “Nor interjected some- 
one at one point “That will not 
do . . . That is a three-syllable 
word and Gatt does not know any 
three-syllable words.” “Oh, yes he 
does,” countered Surrey’s wicket- 
keeper Jack Richards, mindful of 
his skipper’s increasingly generous 
girth. “Ham-bur-gerf” 

Board stiff 

After the Adelaide Test PBL 
Marketing, the company that mar- 
kets the game for the Australian 
Cricket Board, may well have to 
rethink some of its advertising 
slogans. Television slots featuring 
a lion and a kangaroo in a 
dramatic “dashes for the Ashes” 
tussle are perhaps excessive in 
their claims for exciting play even 
by the usual PR standards. So 
dreary was the last day’s play that 
one woman spectator even 
brought an iron and ironing board 
to the Oval to press her laundry. 


BARRY FANTONI 



The immine nt return of Andrei 
Sakharov to Moscow from exile in 
Gorky does not come as a surprise 
to close watchers of Soviet affairs. 
On the other hand, what he and 
his wife will wish to do — and be 
allowed to do — after their return 
is very unclear, and will depend on 
many unforeseeable factors. 

What is certain is that the 
Kremlin’s move is not part of any 
discernible general polity of the 
Gorbachov leadership to ease the 
extremely harsh measures which 
have been taken against dissidents 
and would-be emigrants of all 
sorts over the past seven years — 
ever since, in feet, Sakharov was 
exiled for criticizing tire Soviet 
occupation of Afghanistan. 

A growing number of individ- 
uals have, like the Sakharovs, 
benefited from concessions de- 
signed to placate foreign opinion. 
But emigration is still barred to 
most applicants. And despite 
markedly greater openness in the 
media and cultural life, severe 
treatment is still being handed out 
to most dissidents. 

The biggest questions are 
whether the authorities have im- 
osed limits on tire Sakharovs’ 
tture activity in Moscow, and if 
so, whether the strong-willed 
couple intend to observe them. 

When campaigning for his wife 
to be allowed to travel to the 
United States for medical treat- 
ment , which she eventually did 
this year. Dr S akhar ov did, under 
official pressure, give a very 
conditional undertaking to limit 
his public statements. More re- 
cently, however, he issued a 
forthright appeal on behalf of 
political prisoners, much in the 
style of his pre-exile days. 


Peter Reddaway speculates about 
the conditions that the Russian 
leaders may have imposed 


The authorities may have de- 
cided not to impose any con- 
ditions — at least at first — 
calculating that with the dissident 
groups in considerable disarray, 
Sakharov’s return to Moscow will 
not lead to a new surge in their 
activity. If this were to happen, 
however, the authorities may have 
resolved in advance to take what- 
ever steps against Sakharov future 
circumstances will permit. 

Another question-mark hangs 
over whether the Sakharovs may 
soon want to move on from 
Moscow to join their family in 
Massachusetts. Would the Krem- 
lin in that case agree? 

In the past, Sakharov has been 
convinced that the authorities will 
never let him emigrate. He (re- 
lieves they do not want the West 
to know certain Don-technical 
information about the Soviet 
space programme to which he was 
privy prior to his exclusion from it 
in 1968. 

Partly for this reason, perhaps, 
be has never expressed an un- 
equivocal desire to emigrate. He 
regards Russia as his home, and he 
feels a duty to act as a spokesman 
for the persecuted. 

By contrast, the Kremlin has 
sometimes appeared divided on 
whether it might let him go. Two 
years ago official spokesmen said 


he was free to leave, only to be 
contradicted by other spokesmen. 
To date, the Gorbachov regime 
has taken up the negative position. 

The Sakharovs may of coarse 
emerge from the ordeal of their 
exile with changed intentions. The 
cumulative effect of their hunger- 
strikes and the barbarity of the 
doctors who assisted the KGB in 
tormenting them have damaged 
their health and aged them. This is 
dear from Mrs Sakharov’s 
harrowing accounts in her recently 
published book about their exile. 
Alone Together. 

In these — in 

their mid-sixties and with their 
famil y in the United States — it 
would not be surprising if any 
thoughts of emigration grew stron- 
ger. 

A technical quasi-Iegal question 
is also of interest While Mrs 
Sakharov has been legally par- 
doned for her alleged “slander of 
the Soviet system” what exactly 
has happened re gardin g her hus- 
band? When he was exiled without 
trial, in violation of the law, 
spokesmen claimed that the basis 
for this was an unpublished decree 
of the Supreme Soviet Has this 
body now issued another secret 
decree? If so, what are its terms? 

The Sakharovs' return to Mos- 
cow fits into a dear pattern of 


diplomatic moves by the 
Gorbachov administration. The 
physicist Yuri Orlov, the ma th- 
ematician Anatoly Shcfaaransky, 
the computer- programmer 
Gtivnina, and now the Kiev poet 
Irina Ratushmskaya have been 
released one by one, and allowed 
to leave the country. In these and 

other cases the main goal has been 

to create a better image abroad. 

At tiie same time, however, an 
Orthodox Christian named Rusak 
has been sentenced to 12 years for 
his writings on foe church, and foe 
psychiatrist Koryagin is still after 
three years of menial and physi cal 
torture, hovering on the verge of 
death in prison. 

Worsi of afi, the worker and 
author Anatolty Marchenko has 
just become the latest in a 
lengthening fine of dissidents to be 
pushed over verge, by brutal 
prison guards and doctors, and 
into his grave. As Yuri Orlov 
surmised yesterday , Marchenko’s 
death may weO account for the 
ri wring of the Sakharovs' rele ase . 

But their release would not have 
been feasible without the continu- 
ous pressure of scienti sts, g o vcm- 
ments and humanitarian or- 
ganizations over seven years. This 
saved the Sakharovs from 
Marchenko's fete, and brought 
them, now, from the horrors of a 
Kafkaesque existence in Gorky to 
a less abnormal but highly un- 
predictable new phase of their 
fives in the Soviet capital 

The author heads the Kennan 
Institute for Advanced Russian 
Studies, pan of the Woodrsrt 
Wilson International Centre for 
Scholars. Washington. 

S’ 


The many-layered illusions of 
our cultural decomposition 


‘I wandered toady as a leader of the 
TUC...' 


C onservatives make a vir- 
tue of frankness about 
our economic condition. 
But there is room for a 
little more honesty 
about the cultural state of the 
nation too. Economic effortless- 
ness has made us poorer than we 
need be; to imagine that we can 
coast into the future on inherited 
cultural superiority would risk 
mixing poverty with pretension. 

The effects of economic decline 
are quickly and keenly felt, and the 
loss can be calculated in raw cash 
and human suffering. Retraining, 
enterprise and investment can 
prepare for a new industrial age. 

Cultural decline is less easy to 
calibrate, or to counteract We can 
measure the losses of a steel mill 
operating under capacity, but not 
of a child’s brain, imagination or 
intelligence. The gap between our 
society's technological and cul- 
tural aspirations is large and 
growing. The reflections of this di- 
vergence are to be seen in a new 
political brulalism, a loss of roots 
and of simple humanity. None of 
this will be self-correctiog, either 
by a return to prosperity, or by 
modem technology alone. 

The Times recently crossed 
swords with the Prince of Wales 
on the venerable theme of the arts 
versus science in education. The 
prince feared technological dom- 
ination; The Times, lack of enter- 
prise. There were few rever- 
berations, perhaps because the 
exchange fitted too easily into the 
established pattern of debate. 

It is a cosy, predictable sort of 
debate, with a consoling, back- 
wards-and-forwards rocking-chair 
movement: on the one hand, the 
need for more science and train- 
ing; on the other, the vocational 
value of the arts. On the one side, 
the technological imperative; on 
the other, the humanizing human- 
ities. On one side, philistine 
materialism; on the other, the 
rounded man. 

T he debate itself is becom- 
ing a convention, the 
answers as predictable as 
the questions. That is 
what happens if you 
leave out the little matter of 
quality. Do we really live in a 
country of cultural excellence, and 
economic mediocrity? As soon as 
the question is posed, the rodring- 
chair motion becomes less even, 
and more agitated. 

“The British education system 
is too academic, and not suf- 
ficiently practical and voca- 
tional” The mind acquiesces 
numbly in a great contemporary 
truism, even though nearly every- 
thing about it is false. The idea 
that we should think less to earn 
more is as unsound as it is 
uninviting. But the premise itself 
— that we are “too academic” - is 
fast forming into a many-layered 
illusion, a national conceit The 
stark truth is that too much of our 
education is not jnst antibusiness; 
it is anti-intellectual as welL Only 
one word comes to oar lips as 
uncertainly as “entrepreneur- 
ship”, and that is the word 
“culture" itself 

Nothing resembles a swelling as 
much as a hollow. Where are the 
fruits ' of this supposed “aca- 
demicism”? In the feet that the 
government has to set up a public 
inquiry to discover whether we 
should be taught the structure of 
our own language? In the feet that 
some universities run remedial 
courses to enable their students to 
express themselves adequately in 
their own tongue, after 13 years 
full-lime education? In the reading 
habits of a country, two-thirds of 
whose families never buy books, 
and where what is read by children 
is pitifully below their potential? 
In popular veneration for our 
Nobel scientists? Or on our tele- 
vision screens, where the average 
child glazes his mind for 23 hours 
a week — excluding videos? 


George Walden challenges the notion that 
the arts and technology are in conflict 



English, has been quietly dis- 
integrating too. Significantly, the 
report appeared in I97S — die 
nadir of Britain's economic for- 
tunes - and it is worth rereading 
today. Its august equivocations 
mirror more accurately than any 
historical survey the passive 
accommodation to decline which 
was the hallmark of the era. Belief 
in literature as a civilizing experi- 
ence for pupils of all abilities is 
described, with deft condescen- 
sion, as a “spirited credo” and 
before long the report itself sub- 
sides into educational coHo- 
quialese: “total teaching 
situations” and the tike. 

i onservatives cherish the 
I past and tradition. Yet 
our modern brand 
so metimes las a tbm, 
metaffic, utilitarian ring, 
dosely associated with economic 
realism and new defence technol- 
ogies — vital bat not sufficient 
pillars of a civilized society. It is 
right to re-read Adam Smith's 
economics; but also Thomas 
Carlyle's denunciations of materi- 
alism and spiritual waste. If 
Conservatives want change within 
continuity, and to enrich the 
present with a knowledge of the 
past, we would do well to 
encourage a little more familiarity 
with ft. A country losing touch 


c 


Over-production of aesthetes 
and high-domed dreamers would 
be an entertaining excess; but alas, 
it is no part of our problem- We 
need more emphasis on intellec- 
tual achievement in rise arts and 
humanities^ not less: both for 
itself and for vocational reasons 
too. Our education is not 
“academic” enough, and it is not 
practical enough either. There is 
no either/or between arts and 
sciences, no conflict between 
thinking and doing, least of all in 
the intellectually demanding new 
technologies. AD too often, “too 
academic" can be a euphemism 
for “too much mental effort”. 

In Britain, any talk of culture 
has to be approached with crab- 
like circumspection, and the word 
itself somehow carries disagree- 
able foreign flavours. Oswald 
Spengier decided that we didn't 
have one at all — only a soulless 
civilization. But whether he or we 
like it or not, we have one all right, 
and a rather distinguished one too. 
It was once defined by T.S. Eliot 
as including everything from 
Derby Day and the Cup Final to 
boiled cabbage cut up into sec- 
tions. He was not being nationalis- 
tic, and still less “prober than 
thou” — hardly his manner. 

But he certainly wasn't saying 
that culture, however broad its 
scope, is exclusive of the fine arts, 
fine literature, a sense of history 
and intellectual excellence. Since 
boiled cabbage and 
though less perhaps 
seem to be flourishing, it seems 
reasonable to concentrate on these 
less material aspects. 

As a country, we are not short of 
pietistic devotion to foe human- 
ities; only of foe thing itself At 
worst, our attitude to the arts 
comes close to HjL Mencken’s 
description of chastity: a reput- 
ation for it is a wonderful thing; 
chastity itself is sometimes useful 
Like the rarer brands of Scotch, 


E; 


’'our culture seems increasingly 
reserved for the export market 

While British children study 
Kes. or are soJemnlytaught to 
memorize foe saccharine banal- 
ities of foe Beatles’ songs, the 
Russians read more of our classics 
than we do, and the Chinese are 
catching up. But if No 10 were to 
follow the example of the Elysee, 
where the socialist president is- 
sued a statement lamenting 
“collective amnesia”, there would 
be more derision than delight, and 
no powers to enforce a more 
demanding curriculum in the 
teaching of history. 

durational attitudes are 
a key measure of foe 
health of a political 
movement Nothing il- 
lustrates better the 
degeneration of the British social- 
ist tradition than the gap between 
foe 19th-century idealists and the 
policies of cultural decomposition 
pursued by many Labour educa- 
tion authorities today. Once the 
aim was upwards and outwards; 
now it is downwards and inwards. 
It is a poignant historical irony 
that while Labour activists are 
encouraging a new form of provin- 
cial inversion — “people’s history 
groups”, “community publish- 
ing”, ethnic and sexual absurdities 
and the rest — communist coun- 
tries are rediscovering their past: 
Confucius in China, Luther in 
East Germany, and a new empha- 
sis on historical writings in Russia. 

Left-wing politicians and in- 
tellectuals, holding easy sway over 
lamentably educated supporters, 
prepare more empty vessels in 
which to poor the soured wine of 
socialism. Grand hopes and gen- 
erous instincts are a thing of the 
past: leftist educational thinking 
today has the same relationship to 
humane literacy as British trade 
unionism to economic sanity. 

The “liberaF tradition, neatly 
distilled in foe Bullock Report on 


6 In Britain, any talk of culture has to be 
approached with crablike circumspection, 
and the word itself somehow carries 
disagreeable foreign flavours 9 



with its own history is like an old 
ma n losing his a distress- 

ing sight, at once vulnerable, 
unsure, and easily disoriented. 

Given foe binary simplicities of 
the times, it is scarcely possible to 
raise such matters without bei 
suspected of Luddism, or 
evading economic necessity. But 
higher cultural aspirations do not 
conflict with prosperity: they 
underpin and transcend iL With- 
out them, foe protection of 
democracy and foe elaboration of 
sane public policy will become 
increasingly difficult, as govern- 
ments themselves lose the histori- 
cal perspective against which 
domestic and international judge- 
ments must be nnaife 

An intellectual culture is not a 
luxury, bux a practical economic 
and political necessity. The Coll- 
£ge de France recently described it 
as “an instrument of free thought, 
which, like the martial arts in 
other fields, can help today’s 
citizen protect himself against 
abuses of power to which he is 
subjected by advertising, propa- 
ganda, and political or religious 
fanaticism". The dull glint of 
fanaticism is there in British 
politics alright. How well are our 
citizens protected? 

The battle raging over the future 
of Britain's education is one of foe 
most hopeful developments in 
this country for many years. There 
is an obscure but growing ground- 
swell of dissatisfaction with things 
as they are: with foe anti-achieve- 
ment ethos, foe institutionalised 
aspirations to foe second rate, the 
inculcation of ordinariness. It is 
not just a matter of inteUectual 
achievement — vital and under- 
estimated as that is — but of a 
healthy reaction a gainst the 
philosophy of low ex p ect a tions, 
whether in football cooking, Eng- 
lish or maths. 

People do not relish foe pros- 
pect of a future in the third league. 
There is a spark of revolt against 
the logic of decline, the beginnings 
of a renewal of the qnrit of 
educational idealism which foe 
Tory Party must capture. A new 
educational culture, based on 
quality and effort, in foe human- 
ities as well as the sciences, is foe 
only secure basis for the fixture of 
our country. If that is not what 
people want, then we must dim 
down our hopes for that fixture. If 
it is, then there is a lot to be done. 

The author is Minister for Higher 
Education . The anide is based on 
a recent speech to the Tory Reform 
Group. 


/ 


Peter Brimelow 


Santa’s zappy 
Christmas 

American Christmas customs, not 
New V ork . , charmsne. Amen- 

A cheery 20 ft-high FafoerChnst- afl seem never to 
mas has suddenly appeared by the cans, Day. They 

side of foe Connecticut road we have heard or oexm* D ^ xmba 

whiz along ev «y Fri day mght on vear with Christmas 

our weekend refruat from iMan- foe New York 


hat tan. My wife drives too fast for 
me to be sure of foe details. 
However, it seems to be an 
inflatable advertisement for a 
newly-opened outdoor Christmas- 
iree emporium. 

To British sensibilities, this may 
sound rather gross. But the fact is 
Thar the .American rural landscape 


Dav on a Thursday me 
Stock Exchange «s determined to 
open foe next day ana disrupt 
Wall Street’s chance of a Jong 
weekend. 

Americans also don't . seemto 
have heard of Twelfth Night- The 
holly wreaths and decorations put 
with such enthusiasm in 


up 

isso much larger and emptier than December are often still mould- 
iftai of Bri tamfeven m a relatively ering sadly m March. On ihcoto 
highly-populated state like Can- ** “ rhnst ~ 

necucuL that it simply swaDows 


such details. In any case, I was 
delighted to see such a stupendous 
Santa. It confirmed my im- 
pression that Christinas has re- 
lumed to America. . . 

There are of course distinct 
national differences in the celebra- 
tion of Christmas- Northern Euro- 
peans here go in for much more 
public display than southern 
Europeans. The Scots, for obscure 
Caledonian reasons, prefer New 
Year — or New Year's, as they say 
here. But when I first came to 
America from England as a stu- 
dent in the early 1970s I found foe 
natives' enthusiasm for the festi- 
val quite astonishing. 

Gnhfce the British, the Ameri- 
cans decorate the outside of their 
houses at Christmas. In those days 
they did ft in a spectacular way. 
Dri ving through working-class ar- 
eas you would see front gardens 
adorned with elaborate tableaux 
such as whole teams of life-size 
plastic reindeers pulling Santas 
and attendant gnomes on sledges, 
all lighting up at night. Full-grown 
trees would be festooned with 
coloured lights. Seasonal greetings 
would flash on and off. It was a 
community celebration, and com- 
petition, in a way that I remem- 
bered in Britain only at the last 
Coronation. 

The energy crisis later cast a 
palL literally, over afl of this. It 
wasfi just foe increased cost of 
power: ene r g y conservation be- 
came almost a moral issue. But 
with the collapse of Opec foe 
coloured bulbs are being lit again 
afl over America. Fashion-con- 
scious yuppies, however, prefer 
white lights and discreet conifer 
wreaths on the door. 

So this evening, as I write these 
tines. I can see through my 
apartment window the Empire 
State Building illuminated in its 
Christmas colours of red and 
green. Right next-door to me, 
similar lighting has enabled the 
public-spirited Metropolitan Life 
Insurance company to transform 
the tapering top of its head- 
quarters tower, a copy of the 
campanile m Venice, into a 
Christmas tree 700 feet above the 
snarling Manhattan traffic. 

There are other subtle dif- 
ferences between British and 


hand, what we think of as Chnst- 
mas-card weather still has much of 
the country in its icy grasp in 
March. American winters are 
serious affairs and the victims 
have difficulty staying in a ro- 
mantic mood.' 

It's always amusing to watch the 
peculiar look that comes over foe 
faces or British visitors when the 
continuous carol-playing that goes 
on here at Christmas seems to be 
interrupted bv a lugubrious ren- 
dition of The Red Flag. The 
American people have not be- 
latedly validated Karl Man's 
prediction and become the van- 
guard of World Revolution: what 
they are singing is the German 
carol O Tannenbaum. the source 
of the melody — sometimes sun® 
in an English translation as Oh 
Christmas Tree. (With different 
lyrics, it's also the state anthem of 
Maryland.) 

A similar anomaly is the grow- 
ing practice of trimming holly 
wreaths with tartan ribbon, de- 
spite foe Scots' previously-noted 
general abstention. Indeed, m 
regions heavily influenced by 
Scottish immigration, such as the 
Washington-area town of Alexan- 
dria or parts of North Carolina. 
Christmas has somehow come to 
be regarded as so typically Scottish 
that bagpipers are frequently on- 
ployed in public places to regale 
foe crowds. Actually, of course, 
the Christmas traditions of both 
America and Britain are mostly of 
German origin — transmitted, 
respectively.lhrough the influence 
of foe Prince Consort and massive 
immigration. Bui this is rarely 
noted. 

A regular feature m America's 
Christmas is the continuous cam- 
paign by liberal groups to elimi- 
nate any religious symbols from 
public buildings. The American 
Constitution prohibits the “est- 
ablishment** of any religion. But 
most Americans don’t know what 
an established church is, and 
zealots have seized the opportu- 
nity to attack even non-den omina- 
tional symbols with relentless 
fervour, magically, Christmas 
trees are not challenged, though 
hardly erected for ecological rea- 
sons. Emotions run high at this 
profoundly emotional season. 

Meny Christmas — or. as they 
say here, “Happy Holiday”. 


Philip Howard 

Wit half as old 
as Time 


Quotation is the sport of the 
sedentary classes. It is too late to 
run a mile in under four minutes, 
though I impressed myself and 
alarmed the conductor, with a 
long sprint off foe crown of the last 
bend to catch a No 27 bus the 
other day. I no longer seriously 
expect a telephone call from 
Australia inviting me to join foe 
England touring party in order to 
add some biff to foe middle-order 
batting, though in my opinion 
they are wet not to think of ft. 

But we can all quote; and we do, 
Oscar, we do. Next to bring witty 
ourselves, foe best thing is to 
quote another’s wit. It is foe 
English vice; an irritating form of 
showing off, and between friends 
and on foe right occasion a way of 
sharing pleasure. Classical quota- 
tion is no longer the parole of 
literary men all over foe world. 
You need to be jolly careful about 
letting a particle of Greek or Latin 
dip out these days, for fear of 
seeming elitist and an intellectual 
snob. 

Richard Porson, the great Cam- 
bridge classical scholar, was as 
famous for his outstanding mem- 
ory as for his prodigious capacity 
for booze. There are stones to 
confirm the observation that Per- 
son would drink ink rather fo% n 
not drink at aH One day he was 
travelling in a stagecoach when an 
Oxford undemaduate let slip a 
quotation in Greek, in order to 
impress the ladies present, and 
said it was from Sophocles. Per- 
son was not impressed. He pulled 
a pocket edition of Sophodes from 
the recesses of his coat, and 
challenged the young man to find 
foe passage. With the presence of 
mind and sang-froid for which 

Oxford is famous, the undergrad- 
uate said that he lad made a 
mistake, and that foe quotation 
was in fact from Euripides. Porson 
immediately produced a text of 
Euripides and repeated the chall- 
enge. In a desperate attempt to 
save face in front of foe giggling 
girls, foe young man declared that 
the quote must have come from 
Aeschylus. When the inevitable 
text of Aeschylus popped out of 
foe folds of Poison’s coat, foe 
demaduate shouted: “Coach- 
man, let me out! There’s a fellow 
here has the whole Bodleian 
Library in his pocket.” The an- 
ecdote illustrates well the different 
qualities of foe two universities: 

pedantry versus style. 

To be occasionally quoted, if 
only on What the Papas Say, is 
foe supreme fame , for scribblers. 


To make it into The Oxford 
Dictionary of Quotations is to 
have a monument that will last 
longer than bronze. I am in- 
terested in the one-quotation mem 
those whose literary memory rests 
on a single quotation. The classic 
example is D ean Buigon, who as 
an undergraduate wrote in his 
entry for the Newdigale Prize: 

Match me such marvel save in 
Eastern clime, 

A rose-red city half as old as 
Time. 

He was actually quoting from 
Samuel Rogers: 

By many a temple half as old 
as Time. 

Ffagfarism apart, his single fine 
has lived, unlike anything else that 
Buigon wrote. He became Dean of 
Chichester; foe rest of his life as a 


Ctata Womtf 



(h 


is fi nis hed at the age of 14. 

Cornell us Whurr wmtp 
amiable couplet: W>te 

S””S iP ,d<i remains of hk 
K® J?, 6 <?rford 

spell him Whim- the. 

sSKSSSS 

apparently nothing rise^S? 

seswiSw® 

v ^Slfy°ucrv, 

You llbe a cliche 
By and by. 


t- 


t'. 






****** 


J *>J>) <J 



THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


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„ «,9 R A CKS !N THE EMPIRE 

SKSUJ^SS 

Se wllS?: «“» brought honour to his in Moscow, and 


cance in the Soviet Union The 
dissident scientist, Andrei 
Sakharov, and his wife have 
been released at last from 
internal exile. The capital of 
the Central .Asian republic of 
Kazakhstan, Alma-Ata, has 
been the scene of nationalist 
■< riots by Kazakh students, 
which have been reported by 
the Soviet media. And the 
official newspaper, Pravda, has 
blamed Leonid Brezhnev by 
name for the maladies afflict- 
ing Soviet society today. 

Together, these develop- 
ments spell change — change 
which is at once hopeful and 
deeply disturbing. They signify 
that the Soviet media are 
■ becoming more open; they 
illustrate some of the domestic 
and international tensions 
besetting the Soviet Union; 
and they confirm that Mr 
Gorbachov is concerned with 
i image and presentation in a 
“ way his predecessors were not. 

Cynics may be tempted to 
see a grand manipulative 
scheme behind the spate of 
reports from Moscow. Might 
the announcement of Dr 
Sakharov’s release not have 
been timed deliberately to 
distract Western attention 
from news of the unrest in 
Kazakhstan? Might the criti- 
cism of Brezhnev have been 
designed to justify the replace- 
ment of Kazakhstan’s 
Brezhnevite leader — the event 
which is believed to have 
sparked off this week’s rioting 
in Alma-Ata? 

Whether or not such 
^ connections exist, this week’s 
? developments call for a re- 
sponse from the West Because 
of their importance, the West 
should look beyond the 
appearance to the substance 
before deriding what that re- 
sponse should be. 

The release of Dr Sakharov 
and his wife, while to be 
welcomed without reserva- 
tion, must be seen as a further 
attempt by the Gorbachov 
leadership to present a more 
civilized face to the West The 


country, was an indictment ol 
the whole Soviet system. The 
illegality of his exile exem- 
plified its arbitrariness: his 
enforced separation from his 
wife its inhumanity. 

The real import of Dr 
Sakharov’s release waits on 
lime. If he is allowed to resume 
his contacts with his former 
colleagues; if he and his wife 
are both, in time, permitted to 
travel abroad together — even, 
if that is their desire, to 
emigrate — then there will 
have been a real change of 
heart in the Kremlin. 

However, if conditions - of 
silence or isolation, perhaps - 
have been placed on iheir 
return to Moscow, their exile 
in Gorky will have been 
replaced with an exile which is 
the more bitter for being more 
public. And if their experience 
is not replicated in the treat- 
ment of other, less prominent 
dissidents, whose release 
would not elicit so favourable 
a response from the West then 
the Kremlin’s change of heart 
will be spurious. 

While the temptation for the 
West will be to respond to the 
release of Dr Sakharov with 
unalloyed rejoicing and talk of 
victory, its immediate re- 
sponse to the unrest in 
Kazakhstan is likely to be 
Schadenfreude. So, it will be 
said, the Soviet system finds 
nationalism just as tricky a 
force to deal with as the West 
So the Russian big-brother has 
not after all been able to 
convince even second and 
third generations of Soviet- 
educated Kazakhs of Russian 
beneficence and Soviet nation- 
hood. 

There is truth in this assess- 
ment, but not all the truth. 
The young Kazakh rioters 
were said to be dissatisfied by 
the replacement of their long- 
serving communist leader, 
Dinmukfaamed Kunayev, by a 
native Russian from outside 
the republic. In their protests, 
they issued an open challenge 


CITY SCANDALS OF 1986 


As soon as one prominent City 
dealer resigned over allega- 
tions of insider trading, it was 
widely realized in the City that 
a locked door had been opened 
and that much dirty linen 
would tumble out The deal 
H between the American Securi- 
ties & Exchange Commission 
and the disgraced New York 
arbitrageur, Mr Ivan Boesky, 
has proved a great catalyst 
And the appointment of 
inspectors by the Department 
of Trade and Industry to 
investigate its own officers is a 
further sign that the Gov- 
ernment is determined to pur- 
sue this process with reformist 
zeal. 

What is now happening is 
not a result of the changes in 
the City, encapsulated in the 
Big Bang. It is part of the 
process of reforming the old 
system which had sunk into 
* more tawdry ways than most 
■ outsiders imagined. 

The Financial Services Act 
was passed to police the finan- 
cial world with a new two-tier 
system of supervised self- 
regulation, scheduled to come 
fully into force next autumn. It 
was in part needed to protect 
the public from abuses of 
relatively new and unregulated 
forms of investment. It was 
also rethought in the light of 
the City revolution in order to 
substitute tough and sys- 
tematic rules to cope with 
conflicts of interest previously 


prevented by restrictive pfac- 
tices or club conventions. 

The City realises the old 
practices would be fetal to its 
competition with other finan- 
cial centres. And The Gov- 
ernment understands that the 
decay permitted to spread 
under the old ways could 
discredit the new era of mass 
individual share ownership. 

The basic trouble has been 
that the old informal dub-like 
system of trust, under the aegis 
of the Stock Exchange and the 
Bank of England, has broken 
down under the same pres- 
sures as morality in everyday 
life. In particular, merchant 
hanks and stockbrokers have 
sailed closer and closer to the 
wind in the interests of their 
clients in takeover bids. 

The psychological Achilles 
heel of the new systemis that it 
is called self-regulation. In 
practice, however, the new 
regulatory system is close to 
the statutory American sys- 
tem. The Securities & Ex- 
change Commission, under 
the weight of its own bureau- 
cracy, was long ago obliged to 
operate principally through 
self-regulating organizations 
such as the various stock 
exchanges. In Britain, the 
Securities & Investments 
Board, whose members are 
approved bv the Department 
of Trade &’ Industry and the 
Bank of England, plays a 
similar role to the SEC though 
it is a private organization 


with authority devolved to it 
by the DTL It is illegal to do 
investment business without a 
licence which the SIB may take 
away. 

The supervisors monitor the 
various self-regulating 
organizations and stipulate 
much of their ratebooks. 
Moreover, as recent events 
have shown, there is now a 
much stronger purely statutory 
element operated by the DTL 
Only in isolated areas, most 
notably the City Takeover 
Panel, does regulation now 
look weak. 

What does need to be looked 
at again is the source of the 
corruption that is now emerg- 
ing. The principal , agent, on 
both sides of the Atlantic, has 
been the transformation of the 
individual takeover bid into a 
large-scale takeover industry, 
fuelled as much by the opera- ; 
tionsofthelikesofMrBoesky | 
and the desire of merchant 
banks and securities houses to 
drum up business, as by the 
traditional ambitions of finan- 
ciers and managers. 

To cleanse the finan cial 
world, it may be necessary to ' 
change the framework of take- 
over rules and the relations 
between companies and their 
shareholders in which this, 
industry flourishes. That — , 
rather than the improved regu- 
latory system that is now 
exposing some of its excesses 
— should be the target of 
financial reformers. 


Scrooge lives, and we even 
know his address: Heathrow 
Airport The man in charge 
has decreed that passengers, 
throughout the holiday period, 
should not linger over their 
embraces with the loved ones 
they are leaving behind- And 
what reason does he £* v ®J or 
this puritanical ukase? That 
prolonged kissing can lead to 
one party catching a cold, °r 
even flu, from the other? Tnm 
such behaviour sets a ted 
example to the young? That 
lovers oblivious to the world 
in each other’s arms are the 
natural prey of pickpockets. 

No; he is a much colder &h 
than that. A peck on the cheek 

is the recommended limit .it 

seems, in order to ensuT *“J v 
the check-in queues keep mov- 
ing briskly. 

Picture scene. “Now, 

come along, Mrs da Rj®. * 
the Ravenna flight « ctosm& 
and there are 

behind you”. Or, “Look Jiere, 
Mr Ulysses, anybody woui 


fourth leader 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Reagan and the Republican cause Unfair to British 


to the decision of the Soviet 
Communist Party leadership 
in Moscow, and so to the 
policies of Mr Gorbachov. 

Nationalistic challenges 
have been staged before in the 
Soviet Union — in the Baltic 
slates and in the Caucasus — 
' but these had nothing of the 
menace of disturbances in 
Central Asia. Here, the 
combination of a rapidly 
increasing population, na- 
tional sentiment and the emo- 
tional appeal of Islam which 
binds its adherents to Mecca 
rather than to Moscow, is 
potentially more explosive 
than any other source of 
tension in the Soviet Union. 

Already, Slavs have lost 
their overall majority in the 
Soviet population. Yet the 
people of Central Asia see the 
power in their republics pass- 
ing to Russians even more 
widely than before - partly as 
a result of Mr Gorbachov’s 
determination to combat 
corruption. They see their 
influence at the centre of 
power in Moscow similarly 
diminished. Earlier this year a 
project to divert north-flowing 
Siberian rivers southward to 
irrigate Central Asia was 
shelved. With the removal of 
Mr Kunayev, their sole repre- 
sentative on the central Polit- 
buro, they have lost their voice 
at the centre of power. 

This first intimation of sen- 
ous discontent in Central Asia 
presents Mr Gorbachov with a 
problem which equals the 
stagnating economy in its 
seriousness. It is a problem 
that cannot be solved by 
exhortation or by personnel 
changes. It demands the sort of 
radical change in attitude that 
may be foreshadowed in the 
retease of Dr Sakharov. 

Whether such change is 
incipient or not, however. 
Schadenfreude is an inappro- 
priate response from the West 
Friends and foes of the Soviet 
Union alike have now to ask 
themselves whether they can 
contemplate civil unrest in the 
Soviet Union with equanim- 
ity. And If they cannot, what 
their response should be. 


think you were going to Asia 
Minor for ten years’*. Or, 
“With humble duty. Sire, Miss 
Boleyn wouldn’t want to be a 
i No show’, would she?” (Or 
even, “Oh, do cut it short, M. 
Abelard, please") And what 
about FIfikins and Popsy Bear 
and all the other inhabitants of 
our St Valentine’s Day small- 
ads: can you see them being 
content with a wave and a 
smile? 

Now we know why Leander 
swam. And anyway, there is a 
fallacy at the heart of this 
heartless Savonarola. “Say 
your goodbyes”, he says, “at 
the entrance to the terminal” 
And what would that achieve, 
apart from ensuring that there 
would be nobody, at the check- 
in until the last minute, when 
the entire passenger-list would 
arrive simultaneously? And 
ihat is to say nothing of the 
traffic-jams outside the termi- 
nal buildings, where the 
clampers would be doing a 
roaring trade; who ever heard 


of a romantic packing-warden? 

No doubt we shall soon 
begin to see notices at 
Heathrow displaying the time 
permitted for an embrace, and 
the officials with stop-watches 
and menacing expressions 
lurking at the counter; we are 
not sure that we wouldn’t 
prefer the Thought Police to 
the Kiss Police. Besides, to 
make the thing feir, those 
going on short flights should 
have a briefer embrace-time 
than those going far, has that 
been taken into account? 
There should be an extra 
allowance, loo, for newly- 
weds, and a rigidly-enforced 
ten seconds maximum for 
gentlemen seeing off ahem — 
other gentlemen’s wives. 

“Touch her soft mouth, and 
march", says Pistol, setting out 
for Agincourt. “I cannot loss”, 
says Nym, “that is the humour 
of it”. We wondered what 
became of Nym, and now we 
know, he got a job at 
Heathrow, and worked his way 
up. 


From Dr Bruce Collins 
Sir, Mr Patrick J. Buchanan, 
L White House director of comma- 
\ nications (feature, December 10). 
makes out a wholly erroneous case 
against die disloyal Republican 
party establishment , 

| He tells us that President 
Reagan “has done more for the 
Republican Party than any Ameri- 
can since Theodore Roosevelt”; 
T.R., of course, ruined his party’s 
chance of keeping the presidency 
in 1912 when he challenged the 
incumbent William H. Tan, first 
for the party’s nomination and 
then for the presidency, thus 
letting the Democrats in. 

Second, Buchanan asserts that 
Reagan brought the Republicans 
“back from Watergate to become 
the party of vision and opp- 
• onunity” when it seemed to be 
written off In feet, shrewd com- 
mentators in the mid-1970s pre- 
dicted a major realignment, with 
gains for a pragmatic, yuppy (if 
you like) Republicanism following 
the passing or aging of the New 
Deal generation, its ethnic ties and 
its economic preoccupations. The 
“Watergate” mid-term election of 
1974 merely postponed that pro- 
cess. 

Gerald Ford won 48 per cent of 
the popular vote in 1976, not 
much dwarfed by Reagan’s SI per 
cent four years later. More general 
Republican success in 1980 re- 
sulted very little from a “coat- 
tails" effect, but rather from long- 
term planning, good finances, 
opportune promises, a degree of 
unity, and the Democrats’ dis- 
array. 

Third, Buchanan deplores the 
Republican establishment's lack 

South African arrest 

From Mr David Astor 
Sir, Amidst all the gloom in South 
Africa, “the quality of the 
country’s Black leaders shines 
through: their idealism, their 
genuine sense of non-racialism, 
and their readiness not only to 
forget but to fbigive, compel 
admiration. These are precious 
assets. . 

This quotation, from the 
Commonwealth Eminent Persons’ 
report, applies to Mr Zwelakhe 
Sisulu, arrested last week in 
Johannesburg for no given reason. 

I had visited him recently at his 
paper, New Nation, which he 
edited with the financial backing 
of the Catholic Church. He struck 
me as one of the finest young men 
I have met in any country. His 
views were level-headed, indepen- 
dent, generous-minded and nota- 
bly modest for the already famous 
son of two politically- distin- 
guished parents. 

Such a well-balanced man is 
rare in any society. In South Afica 
he is Indeed a precious asset, 
someone .who could help to build 
one community out of fee arti- 
ficially segregated divisions of the 
republic of today. 

Yours etc, 

DAVID ASTOR, 

9 Cavendish Avenue, NW8. 
December 15. 

Payment of VAT 

From Ms Karen Warwick 
Sir, I recently had to find nearly 
£12,000 to pay fee barristers who 
had advised my solicitor over my 
petition to fee European Human 
Rights Commission against fee 
British Government and who had 
represented me at an oral hearing 
in Strasbourg. Of this, over £1,500 
went straight to HM Customs and 
Excise in VAT. 

When fee rights guaranteed by 
fee European Convention cannot 
be litigated against fee United 
Kingdom authorities in fee UK 
itsel£ is it not scandalous that an 
individual should be heavily taxed 
by those same authorities — 
perhaps to the. point of bank- 
ruptcy, as Mr Manches points out 
(December 11) — for going right 
outside the UK to argue feat they, 
the authorities, have violated 
- basic human rights? 

Yours faithfully, 

KAREN WARWICK, 

109 Balls Pond Road, Nl. 
December 11. 

Aids as moral issue 

From Mr R. T. Oerton 
Sir, People are, of course, fully 
entitled to believe feat an a priori 
principle feat sexual conduct 
should be confined to hetero- 
sexual conduct within marriage 
may be derived from scriptural or 
other sources. But it is as dis- 
honest to claim feat Aids validates 
feat principle as it would have 
been to claim feat fee invention of 
the contraceptive pill invalidated 
it. Absolute moral principles, by 
definition, do not stand or fell 
according to fee practical con- 
sequences of their breach. 

The idea that Aids should be 
fought by preaching a moral 
principle of this kind is equally 
untenable: people would not be at 
risk at all unless they bad already 
rejected it 

My own view, for what it is 
worth, is that there is a link 

Measures of evil 

From Mr f. M. W. Butler 
Sir, Rabbi Julia Neuberger 
(December 3) voices a tradition 
and faith according to which fee 
inclination of human beings to- 
wards “good” on the one hand and 
“evil” on fee other is dependent 
on moral teaching or on various 
contrary factors, as fee case may 
be. 

Do we have to be told what is 
good and 'wbat is evil? To say so 
denies “fee moral law” within him 
that filled Immanuel Kant’s mind 
“with wonder and awe". 

Of course he was a greatfeinkcr, 
not one of the herd but spraking 
for himself Nevertheless, might it 
not be true feat such a man, and 


of “family loyalty" to their leader. 
Yet ten years ago one of the most 
damaging blows strode agafi^ the 
incumbent President Ford came 
from Reagan’s quest for fee 
nomination, which was carried 

almost to fee convention floor. 
Presumably this is not something 
lost on fee Republicans' Senate 
leader, Robert Dole, who went 
down to defeat as Ford’s vice- 
presidential running male. 

Nor does Buchanan’s assertion 
that Reagan campaigned hard for 
fee re-election in 1986 of Repub- 
lican senators now ungrateful to 
him cut much ice. The President's 
campaign intervention was one of 
fee election's most curious epi- 
sodes, since it was clear in 
September and October that the 
Administration's policies were not 
made more decto rally palatable 
by Reagan's personal popularity. 
Republicans did best in guber- 
natorial contests, where they 
emphasized state issues, not 
Washington's priorities. 

Finally, to claim that Colonel 
North is an idealist unfairly 
disparaged by Congress and Press 
seems whimsical. Both seem, gen- 
erally, to have accorded him 
reasonable respect; neither re- 
moved this diligent medium-level 
functionary from his post and 
then announced he was a national 
hero. 

Is it to be wondered that a White 
House staff so blatant in its 
display of ignorance should now 
occasion despair among thinking 
Republicans? 

Yours sincerely, 

BRUCE COLLINS, 

Department of Modem History, 
The University, Glasgow. 

Keeping treasures 

From Mr Lawrence Keen 
Sir, Dr John Wood and Miss Clare 
Conybeare (December 6) quite 
rightly drew attention to the 
urgent need for revising fee law of 
treasure trove. One may take some 
measure of consolation in fee feet 
that the owner of fee Middieham 
jewel (your report, December 12) 
may share in the proceeds of its 
sale, unlik e many metal-detector 
discoveries when no agreements 
have been made between treasure- 
hunters and owners. 

Buz this exceptional find high- 
lights again the necessity of a 
complete review of the legislation 
concerning all portable antiq- 
uities. It is quite wrong that fee 
fete of the Middlebam jewel, 
undoubtedly of national im- 
portance, should now be det- 
ermined by the good will of the 
private buyer, or/if it is likely to go 
. abroad, by fee capacity of one of 
fee national museums to raise a 
very substantial sum. 

Yours faithfully, 

LAURENCE KEEN (Chairman, 
Dorset Local History Group), 

7 Church Street, 

Dorchester, Dorset. 

December 12. 

Past laughter 

From Rabbi Jonathan Romain 
Sir, “I cannot believe in a God 
who does not laugh”, declared 
Philip Howard (December 10) and 
claims feat the Bible lacks wiu 
Yet Sarah blames her giggles on 
God (Genesis, xxi, 6), while the 
Israelites credit their laughter to 
him too (Psalms , cxxvi, 2). 

Clearly God does have a sense 
of humour — if for no other reason 
than he so often sets up man, 
catches him on the hop and 
deflates his pretensions - undoing 
Eve wife nothing more exciting 
than an apple, letting Samuel rush 
ahead in his name and choose fee 
wrong man to succeed Saul, and 
fooling Elijah through wind, earth- 
quake and fire while hiding all. 
along in fee still small voice. 

As for today. I am sure God still 
has occasion to laugh, smiling 
especially at fee many claims to be 
the one and only way of worship- 
ping him. 

Yours faithfully, 

JONATHAN ROMAIN, 
Maidenhead Synagogue, 

9 Boyn Hill Avenue, 

Maidenhead, Berkshire. 

December 11. 

between Aids and immorality, but 
of a much simpler land. There is 
only one absolute moral principle: 
that which forbids fee doing of 
harm to others. On this view 
sexual behaviour is immoral only 
to fee extent that it causes harm, 
and this must depend on many 
variable foctors. Aids is .now one 
such factor, and its existence may 
render certain sexual behaviour 
immoral which otherwise would 
not be so. 

Yours feilhflilly, 

R. T. OERTON, 

84 Burgh] ey Road, NW5. 

From Mrs P. E. Mitchell 
Sir, I read your wise words wife 
interest today (December 16) in 
your leader, “Aids and morals". 

Where, oh where, is the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury? * 

Yours faithfully, 

PAMELA MITCHELL, 

46 Eaton Terrace, SW1. 

others like him, have helped to' 
create the tradition of which 
Rabbi Neuberger speaks, because 
and by means of an innate power 
that need not be explained in - 
terms of any religion or culture? 

In using this word “power” I am 
thinking of what Juliette Huxley, 
in her autobiography, Leaves of 
the Tulip Tree , calls “the power of 
life”, universal as it is. 

Our capacity for evil, begotten 
of our consciousness, works 
against this: it might almost be 
called “anti-life". But fee life 
principle has ceased to apply to 
the human race by meanc of 
natural selection (working, as 
Darwin wrote at the end of The 
Origin of Species, “solely by and 
for fee good of each bang”), so 


sportswomen? 

From Mrs Sylvia Disley 
Sir, In his aitide on the decline of 
Oxbridge sporting excellence 
David Miller (Spectrum, Decem- 
ber 9) gives as one of the reasons 
fee proportional rise in women 
students which, he says, “cut fee 
available pool of sportsmen”, thus 
assuming that sportswomen do 
not count. 

Maybe in these establishments 
they do not, but they should be 
mindful of the feet that since fee 
war British women have taken 
their share of Olympic medals, 
world records and so on in such 
sports as track and field athletics, 
swimming and cycling, while in 
tennis British women have 
reached the final of fee singles 
tournament at Wimbledon on six 
occasions and three have won it, 
during which time not one British 
man has succeeded in even reach- 
ing the final. 

Last year fee Cambridge 
women’s ski team beat its Oxford 
counterparts at Val d’Isere, while 
fee Cambridge men lost to Ox- 
ford. Consequently the defeated 
Cambridge men were allowed to 
join the prestigious Hawks Club, 
membership of which is not 
known to be disadvantageous to 
gaining employment in later life, 
while the victorious women skiers 
were not. This is because the 
Hawks Club is for men only. 

Perhaps when Oxbridge can 
offer the same advantages to their 
sportswomen as to their sports- 
men they may enjoy a renaissance 
of their former sporting glories. 
Yours faithfully, 

SYLVIA DISLEY, 

Hampton House, 

Upper Sunbury Road, 

Hampton, Middlesex. 

December 13. 

Student cricket 

From the President of the British 
Polytechnics Sports Association 
Sir, I read wife interest the article 
in The Times today (December 
12) re fee Benson and Hedges 
Oxbridge team. It seems a pity 
that the universities’ sporting 
organisations and fee Test and 
County Cricket Board have 
missed this opportunity of select- 
ing from all students of fee 
required standard. 

Over 160,000 students in poly- 
technics ami 30,000 in colleges 
have been denied the “privilege” 
of playing in fee competition for 
no better reason than that they* 
opted for higher education in the 
other sectors. 

The universities, by virtue of 
tradition, have a voice on fee 
national governing bodies, which 
they have unfortunately declined 
to raise in support of their 
colleagues in this case. Maybe we 
will have to wait until the Com- 
bined Universities team is again at 
such a low ebb before the opportu- 
nity to participate arises again. 
Yours faithfully, 

JOHN GREEN, President, 

British Polytechnics Sports 
Association, 

Birmingham Polytechnic, 

Perry Barr, Birmingham. 

December 12 

Home and dry 

From Mr P. B. Wood 
Sir, Now that we have a new 
President of the RXBA,-may we ask 
him to remind all architects that it 
rains occasionally in this country? 

To be able to get from one’s car 
into one’s house in the dry is 
almost as rare as fee fabulous roc’s 
egg. And where one can, it is 
usually the result of alterations 
effected by fee owner. 

Yours sincerely, 

P. R WOOD, 

Almond Cottage, 7 Over Lane, 

Almondsbury, 

Bristol, Avon. 

December 9. 

A prince’s role 

From Mr Royce Ryton 

Sir. I read with great interest John 

Grigg’s article (December 1 1) on 

the Duke of Windsor and the 

Abdication. 

I agree wife him; it was not a 
constitutional crisis, since 
throughout fee Duke, as King, 
acted in accordance wife fee 
Government's wishes and refused 
to fight them. 

But I believe Mr Grigg to be 
quite wrong on one point. There is 
nothing in law to stop Prince 
Edward, Princess Anne, Princess 
Margaret, Princess Michael or any 
other royal highness who is not a 
peer from standing for. Parliament 
and being elected. 

What prevented the Duke of 
Windsor from standing for Par- 
liament was not that he was royal 
but the feet that he was a duke. 
The King made him a duke to 
prevent political activity and said 
so. 

Yours sincerely, 

ROYCE RYTON, 

64 Kingfisher Drive, 

Ham, 

Richmond, Surrey. 

December 12 

that we have it in varying degrees, * 
depending on inheritance as much 
as, if not more than, what we are 
taught or the society is which we 
live, powerful as teaching and 
environment have always been, 
for good or ill 

Looked at this way, fee capacity 
for evil is no real mystery, but 
instincts still remaining with us 
(feat is, what we have naturally if 
man-made distortions can be dis- 
counted) tend to work for mutual 
good. So it is Kant’s moral law 
feat is valid, not Rabbi Neu- 
beiger’s even balance. 

Yours faithfully, 

P. M. W. BUTLER, 

Cherry Tree Cottage, 

Chase Road, Upper Colwali, 
Malvern, Worcestershire. 


ON THIS DAY 


DECEMBER 201955 

Most of the the essays which 
graced the Court Page in the 
1950s and 1960s were Vie work of 
amateur writers. In content and 
style they often at least equalled 
that of professionals. 


BANKING IN ARCADY 

From a Correspondent 
I never feel so much a stranger as 
I do in the Essex town where I was 
boro and which was my home for 
needy 20 years. Though the tie is 
still strong, revisited it seems no 
longer the place to which I belong. 
Not that it looks much different 
from bow it looked when 1 was a 
boy there 60 years ago. There is the 
same wide High Street with the 
market railing s in the and I 

know exactly where the lanes and 
alleys turn out of it. Even some of 
the Tirnnes over the shops are the 
same. I have an intense feeling of 
recognition, but the Epping with 
which I was once so familiar does 
not recognize me. 

Because, of course, it is not 
there. It lies buried under the 
layers of the years. What I recog- 
nize is only the ghost town, the 
Epping which, in those late- 
Victorian times, was like a village 
in Arcady, isolated in a green ring 
of forest and farmlands, motor-cars 
unknown, bicycles at the penny- 
farthing Biagg. aeroplanes and 
radio undreamt of. That is the 
Epping to which I belong, more 
real to me than the busy modern 
town that has replaced it. 

And most vividly real at that 
corner of the High Street where the 
bank used to be. For it wsb there 
that, by the lucky chance of being 
sent fresh from school to be junior 
clerk. I gained my experience of 
banking in Arcady. 

It was before the time of the 
great ewinlgHnutti nnn Most of the 
country banks were still run by 
private companies. Ours was the 
Chelmsford bank of Sparrow 
Tufiaell and Co., and being merely 
an “Agency”, not yet promoted to 
“Branch" status, there were only 
the three of us — manager, chief 
clerk, and me — to cope with the 
business. We kept idyllic hours, 
opening at 10 and closing at 3 
except on market day (Friday) 
when we went on till &. For most erf 
the week a dreamy peace reigned in 
the town. In summer, the office 
was filled wife fee perfume of 
sweet briar from the hedge that 
grew below the window. Rooks 
made drowsy music from the tall 
trees across fee green. 

As a mere Agency, all we had to 
do was to receive the credits and 
cash the cheques of fee customers, 
enter the details in a Day Book (my 
job), and post a statement of the 
day’s business, together wife the 
cheques handled to fee Chelmsford 
head office where the customers’ 
accounts were kept and their pass- 
books made up. When our stocks of 
gold and silver needed replenishing 
fee manager donned hia tall hat 
and frock coat, took a large, heavily 
secured black bag, and went to 
London to bring back more from 
our agents. He would have been an 
easy prey to robbers on the way 
home, but nobody every molested 
him. . . 

BROAD BROGUES 
The office resounded wife the 
broad brogue of rural Essex, min- 
gled wife many Scottish accents, 
for the Eases soil is much like that 
of the lowlands and attracts the 
Scottish farmers. 

It made Saturday a busy morn- 
ing with us when fee results of this 
weekly boom in trade flowed into 
our credit accounts. 

Then I would handle fee cheques 
of so many different colours and 
designs feat fee banks of those 
days printed, a source of never- 
ending delight to me. They were 
banks whose titles have long been 
forgotten, titles often romantic 
because of the rhythmic string of 
names, all printed in beautiful 
penmanship style wife decorative 
loops and flourishes — Prescott 
Dimsdale Cave Tugwell and Co^ 
Herriea Farquhar Chapman and 
Co^ Sir John Wm. Lubbock, Bart 
Forster and Co^ Barclay Bevan 
Tritton Ransom Bouverie and Co^ 
— they read like lines from some 
mysterious poetry. The most elab- 
orate was “Cocks Biddulph Cocks 
Biddulph and Cocks.” It might 
have come out of Dickens. . . 

Lick and promise 

From Sir Francis A very Jones 
Sir, Animals lick their wounds and 
they heal remarkably quickly, they 
sometimes do the same for a 
fellow animal. Kind Primrose, fee 
cow, dearly thought her owner’s 
balding pate needed a helping Uck 
and her wish was fulfilled with his 
hair growing again (report, 
December IS). 

Medical scientists have recently 
discovered that saliva contains a 
powerful skin healing chemical 
which is known as urogas- 
. cron e/epidermal healing factor 
(URO/EHF). It has been chemi- 
cally identified and synthesized, 
but its full medical capabilities 
have yet to be discovered. 

Primrose may have provided 
doctors wife an invaluable due. It 
is a most interesting substance; its 
presence was suspected over 50 
years ago when a possible cure for 
duodenal ulcer was being investi- 
gated. It now seems- feat this 
indeed may be another use for it 
It almost certainly explains how 
quickly dental wounds heal a foci 
much appreciated by dentists and 
their patients. 

Primrose has had her just 
reward, saved from fee foie other 
follow Jerseys (not Friesians, 
surely?). living on at fee form as a 
family pet doubtlessly she will 
achieve a place in the Guinness 
Book of Records as fee cow who 
licked her way to fame! 

Yours faithfully, 

F. AVERY JONES, 

Mill House, Nulboume, 
PulborOugh. West Sussex. 
December 16. 




.18 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1186 


* ☆ ☆ £ 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
December 19; The Prince Ed- 
ward, Chairman ofThe Duke of 
Edinburgh's Award 30th 
Anniversary Tribute, visited 
Northern Ireland today. 

His Royal Highness, attended 
by Wing Commander A dam 
Wise, travelled in an aircraft of 
The Queen's Flight 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
December 19: The Prince of 
Wales, Vice-Patron, The British 
Council, this morning visited 
the Council Offices at 10, Spring 
Gardens, SWI and 1 1, Portland 
Place, Wl. 

Sir John Riddefl, Bt was in 
attendance. 

His Royal Highness. Chan- 
cellor, the University of Wales, 
gave a luncheon at Kensington 
Palace for representatives from 
the University and from 
Industry. 

December 19: The Duke of 
Gloucester. President East 
Midlands Tourist Board, today 


received Mr John Dfllon-Guy, 
Director, and Mr Rodney Cal- 
low. General Services Manager. 


Birthdays 


TODAY; Miss Jenny Agntter, 
34; Mr J. M. Beaumont, 59; Mr 
Paul Brickhfll, 70; Sir George 
Coldstream, QC, 79; Mr Charles 
Denton, 49; Sir Geoffrey Howe, 
QC, MP, 60; Viscount Sandon, 
64; Miss Rachel Trickett, 63; Sir 
Dick White, 80; Mr John Whit- 
ney, 56. 

TOMORROW: Sir Robert 
Armitage, 80; Sir Arthur Ben- 
son, 79; Air Commandant 
Dame Jean Bromel, 74; Lord 
Caccia. 81; Mrs Chris Evert- 
Lloyd, 32; Vice-Admiral Sir 
Raymond Hawkins, 77; Lord 
Justice Lawton, 75; Mr David 
McFall. 67; Mr W.M.M. 
Milligan, 79; the Most Rev John 
A- Murphy, 81; Sir John 
Nabarro, 71; Mr Anthony Pow- 
ell, 81; Flight Lieutenant W. 
Reid, VC, 65; Mr Walter 
Spangfaero, 43; Mr Grcvide 
Starkey. 47; Mr Peter 
Tinniswood, 50; Mr James Tye, 
65; Dr Kurt Waldheim, 68. 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include 
Miss DJV1. Otter, Headmistress 
of the Royal Naval School, 
Haslemere. to be Headmistress 
of Bedford High School, in 
succession to Mrs M.ELA. Kaye. 
The following to be lay mem- 
bers of the Investigation 
Committee of the Solicitors’ 
Complaints Bureau: Ms Jean 
Horsham (chairman], Mr Mi- 
chael Baines, Sir Kenneth 
Sharp, Mr Paul Okojie, Mr 
John Metiers, Mr Anthony 
Heywrood, and Mr R. William 
Jones. 


Royal visit 
to Portugal 

The Prince and Princess of 
Wales will visit Portugal from 
Wednesday, February II, to 
Saturday. February 14, at the 
invitation of the President of 
Portugal- They will be visiting 
Lisbon and Oporto- 


Judge retires 

Judge Fo rrester-Paton, QC, re- 
tired yesterday at the age of 65 
after presiding over the North- 
ern Circuit for 23 years. 


Saleroom 

Rennaissance fake 
fetches £32,200 

By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 


A magnificent Renaissance 
fake was sold by Christie's on 
Thursday afternoon for 
£35.200 (estimate £30,000 to 
£40,000) to Armitage, the 
London dealer. It is an enamel 
and rock-crystal centrepiece 
mounted in gold and silver- 
gilt, emulating the great Man- 
nerist creations of the 
sixteenth centuiy. 

It was exhibited at the 
Victoria and Albert Museum 
in 1962 as a genuine Renais- 
sance masterpiece but since 
then it has been unveiled as 
one of the creations of 
Reinhold Vasters, a 19th- 
century German goldsmith of 
genius who supplied late 19th- 
century millionaires with 
richly ornamental historical 
fakes. 

Vasters was unmasked in 
1979 when Charles Truman, 
working through the design 
drawings in the Victoria and 
Albert Museum, came upon 
nearly one thousand of his 
designs for goldsmith’s work. 
There were drawings for 
pieces long considered genu- 
ine. notably in the Victoria 
and Albert and the Metropoli- 
tan Museum , New York. 

The centrepiece is the third 
major item by Vasters to come 
on the market since 1979. 
There is an ink and body- 
colour drawing for it in the 
Victoria and Albert archive. 

This proved to be the star 
lot of an English collection of 
objects of vertu formed in the 


early decades of the centuiy . 
The collection brought 
£223.670 with nine per cent 
left unsold. 

In New York on Thursday a 
group of rare Hebrew manu- 
scripts disappointed the 
auctioneers' expectations. A 
very rare, line and complete 
Medieval Mochzor. or cycle of 
the liturgy, dating from the 
early 14th-century sold for 
S467.500 (unpublished es- 
timate $600,000 to $800,000), 
or £322,413, to an American 
collector. A 15th-century illu- 
minated Haggadoh from 
northern Italy was left unsold 
at $185,000 (estimate 
5250,000 to 5350,000). The 
sale of Judaica made a total of 
£912,620 with 37 per cent left 
unsold. 

The morning sale of applied 
arts from 1880 to the present 
day at Sotheby’s in London 
yesterday totalled £374,302 
with 4 per cent left unsold. 
The lop price was £29,700 
(estimate £3,000 to £5,000) for 
a Lalique glass table of the 
1930s. It has a circular top 
with eight glass panels 
moulded with putti and gar- 
lands, a cylindrical column 
support and flared base , both 
with panels of frosted glass. 

•The autumn turnover of 
Christie's totalled £208 million, 
or roughly two-thirds that of 
Sotheby's, and not £158 mil- 
lion. or roughly half as reported 
yesterday. 


True faith of the Virgin Birth 


What does the Church of 
England believe about the 
Virgin Birth of JesuS? At the 
last General Synod, the 
"consensus fidelium” was 
established through two im- 
portant votes in the House of 
Clergy and the House of Laity. 

After recent episcopal 
doubts and denials, die dergy 
and die laity resolved that 
belief in die virginal concep- 
tion of Jesus is the faith of the 
Church of England. These 
were not reports bat “votes”; 
and as such were quite unique. 
Here, at last, was the specific 
response to a series of reports 
and debates, whose history 
has spanned 60 years. 

Although a number of 
clergy would rather not have 
reached any conclusion, the 
result was definite; the Church 
of England is committed to 
belief m the virginal concep- 
tion of Jesus. The resolution 
was passed by a large majority 
in the House of Clergy and an 
overwhelming majority in the 
House of Laity. 

But how can thoughtful 
people affirm such a belief? 
Here are six considerations. 

Fust, the starting point is 
the Gospel narratives them- 
selves. Matthew and Luke 
both have the same central 
core — namely that Mary 
remained bodily a Virgin in 
the conception of Jesus and 
did not have intercourse with 
Joseph. Yet both evangelists 
clearly were drawing on very 
different sources for their 
information. Few; therefore. 


would deny the following: 
“That a virginal conception 
through the power of the Holy 
Spirit is one of the few points 
on which they agree that this 
tradition antedated both 
accounts" (Raymond E. 
Brown). 

The story of the Virgin Birth 
goes right back to the earliest 
period. Indeed, the infancy 
narratives ale dearly of 
Palestinian origin. They re- 
flect Jewish fears of Herod the 
Great and Jewish piety 
centred on temple worahip in 
Jerusalem. The traditional 
view is that the ultimate 
source of tire narratives is the 
holy family - Joseph for 
Matthew and Mary for Luke. 
We must also remember that 
James, Jesus's brother, be- 
came head of the church at 
Jerusalem. He was, therefore, 
in a position to correct any 
Palestinian traditions where 
they were obviously untrue. 

Second, the claim that “vir- 
gin births" are common in 
other religious literature has to 
be challenged. For religious 
literature mostly has accounts 
of “holy marriage”. Here a 
“god" in human or super- 
human form sexually impreg- 
nates a woman. But that is 
quite unlike the accounts of 
the virginal conception in the 
Gospels. 

Third, the story of the 
Virgin Birth cannot amply be 
dismissed as a midrash — and 
for this reason. In Judaism a 
midrash was essentially a 
commentary on a passage of 


of which you have two 
informed” (Luke 1:3-41 Even 
if conterapormy Jews had a 
more cavalier approach to 
history writing, there is every 
reason for thinking that the 
eariv Christians had a very 
different attitude to history 
That was because other 
Jews located the saving events 
of God in the distant past: or. 
if they were of an 2 pocsl>puc 
turn of mind, in the future; but 
the early Christians said they 
were located in the recent past- 
Heucc we must presuppose 
they had an interest in what 
actuall v happened. 

Fifth, the Old Testament 
said the Messiah would be 
born of David's line. The New 
Testament makes it dear that 
Jesus was believed to be the 
Messiah. Why then invent an 
untrue story that separates 
Joseph (of David’s line) from 
the process of conception? 

ginh, if Mary had not been 
a virgin, no one would have 

created a myth to suggest she 

were never concocted out of was a great example of obedi- 
texts. The Dead Sea Scrolls ence. The stria moral climate 

of the dsv would have classed 
her fornication as highly 
disobedient. 

It is for reasons such as 
those that the consensus m the 
Church of England says that 
there is historical sosbtance in 
the Gospel infancy narratives. 
Mary, once again, is being 
honoured as the virgin Mary. 

David Holloway 

Vicar of Jesmond 
Newcastle upon Tyne 


Old Testament scripture, 
which then “took off". The 
midrashist had a text in front 
of him winch he elaborated 
often in a most fanciful way. 
But the text was the starting 
point 

However, Matthew clearly 
isn't starting with a text He 
has a series of traditions about 
the birth and childhood of 
Jesus, into these be weaves 
scriptural references. He is not 
adapting the narratives to fit 
scripture. If anything he is 
adapting scripture to fit the 
narratives. The quotation in 
Matthew 223 (“he shall be 
called a Nazarene”) is a very 
drastic adaptation — it has no 
known reference! Matthew is 
not taking Old Testament 
texts and then writing myths 
to fit 

If he were doing that he 
-would have chosen more 
evocative sections of the Old 
Testament. And, from 
contemporary Jewish practice, 
we know that base events 


OBITUARY 

PROFESSOR J. M. DODD 

World leader in his branch 
of research 


from Qumtan show how texts 
are made to fit contempo rar y 
events and not vice-versa. 
There always was a sub- 
stratum of fact. Even the critic 
must admit that Matthew 
started with the bask: outline 
of the infancy narrative. 

Fourth, Luke himself tells 
us that he was interested is 
“the truth” — “it seemed i 
to me ... to write an 
account « that you may know 
the truth concerningthe things 


Forthcoming 

marriages 

Mr DJ. Austin 
aid Miss AJUL, Henry 
The engagement is announced 
between Desmond, son of the 
late Mr B.P. Austin and of Mrs 
B. Austin, of Swansea, Glamor- 
gan, and Anne, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs J.R- Henry, of 
Bucklebury. Berkshire. 

Captain T.S. Barnard 
and Miss LA. Gbtzer 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen Barnard, the 
Royal Artillery, son of Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel and Mrs T.A. Bar- 
nard. of Guildford, Surrey, and 
Elizabeth, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Ralph Glazer. of Laleham- 
on-Thames, Middlesex. 

Mr B.D. Clarke 
and Miss AJ>. Turner 
The engagement is announced 
between Bruce, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs A.G. Clarke, of Mel- 
bourne. Victoria, and Adrienne, 


Mr O.GS. Contish 
and Miss E-L Spink 
The engagement is announced 
between Oliver, youngest son of 
the late WA Cornish and Mrs 
CM. Dawson, of Horseheath 
Park, near C amb ridge, and 
Emma, youngest daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Leslie Spink, of 
Cambridge. 

Mr G.Q. Launder 
and Miss AJVLC. Barker 
The engagement is announced 
between Gavin Quayle. eider 
son of Mr and Mrs EQ. 
Launder, of 18 Brampton 
Square, SW3, and Alexandra 
Mary Cynthia, younger daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs K.W. Barker, 
of 99 Cadogan Gardens, SW3. 
Mr D. Mansfield 
and Dr S. SuUrran 
The engagement is announced 
between Dean, elder son of Mr 
P.E Mansfield, of Woobnm 
Green. Buckinghamshire, and 
Mrs J. Vyver. of Staverron. 
Devon, and Sanchia, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs M.C. 


^oun^da^terofMrandNtrs Sullivan, of Locksbottom. Kent. 


Tasmania. 

Mr C Lee 
and Miss G. Hill 
The engagement is announced 
between Christian, second son 
of Mr and Mis PX. Lee, of 
Wirrai, Cheshire, and Gillian, 
third daughter of Mr and Mrs 
HAW. Hill, of Eridge. East 
Sussex. 

Mr LD. Mason 
and Miss S J. Wickham 
The engagement is announced 
between Ian. son of Mr and Mrs 
Kenneth Mason, of Hannans 
Cross, Dorset, and Susan, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs John 
Wickham, of Westcott, Srarey. 
Mr C Mendetoritz 
and Miss LA- Zunz 
The engagement is announced 
between Colin, son of Dr and 
Mrs Arnold Mendelovhz, of 
Johannesburg, and Laura, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Jack 
Zunz. of Wimbledon. 

Mr D J. Rhodes 
and Miss AJ3. Ratcliff 
The engagement is announced 
between David, eldest son of Mr 
A. Rhodes and Mrs A A. 
Rhodes, of Gibbet Hill, Cov- 
entry, and Alison, only daughter 
of Mr and Mrs J. Ratcliff, of 
Tuffley, Gloucester. 


Mr JJH. Richards 
and Miss J.M. Prosser 
The engagement is announced 
between James, younger son of 
Dr D.G.B. and Dr M.E Rich- 
ards. of Sutton Coldfield, West 
Midlands, and Joanne Mary, 
daughter of the late Mr NJE.C. 
Prosser and Mrs O.N. Prosser, 
of Old Harlow, Essex. 

Mr M JR. Runner 
and Miss HJL Daniels 
The engagement is announced 
between Martin, only son of Mr 
and Mrs A Rimmer, of Newton, 
Stockton-on-Tees, and Helen, 
younger daughter of Mr and Mis 
C. Daniels, of Tfaelwall, 
Warrington. 

Mr M-W. Smith 
and Miss GC. Craig 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael only son of 
Mr and Mrs W.N. Smith, of 
Chelmsford, Essex, and Con- 
stance, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Dennis Craig, ofRome. 

Mr N.A. Whittaker 
and Miss SJE. Stone 
The engagement is announced 
between Nigel son of Mr and 
Mrs GA Whittaker, of Enfiekl, 
Middlesex, and Susan, elder 
daughter of Mr and Mrs M.G. 
Stone, of Langton, Kent. 


The Present with a Future* 

Move into party power k 
.Vico If i Shulmun toasts the hosts 

Eat out and he in ★ 

Meredith E the rington-S with says where 

Be merry mem - well-dressed in ★ 
all-over Christmas country-house clothes 

Earn £1 million a year at .35 k 
Nicholas Coleridge tots it up 

Find filth amusing ★ 

Alexandra .\rtley meets the grandest fluff 
Look and feel divine ★ 






Tl.i- I l:n -r is. -• .1 , :lii i.ngi. -;c\t 

- S i ' M . I . ■ I ' N ^ I • > : I 

" I 'tw* vi x^-ni i . l‘,r 


Gift subscription £21.60 


block capitals please 


Please scud one year's subscription to: 

addrcNS postcode 

my details are: name 

plane tick if gift card required Q 

1 enclose eheque/p-o. payable to HARPERS & QUEEN for S2l.ft0{ 1 

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RHS medals 

The council of the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society has awarded the 
Victoria medal of honour in 
horticulture to: 

Mr C Ralph GouM. at Makton. Essex, 
former flower breeder with Hurst 
Seeds: Mr R A E Jertert. of 

Abergavenny. Gwent, president of the 

RHS: Lady Palmer, of Tonmgton. 
North Devon: Mr John B. Simmons. 
Curator of Uw Royal Botanic Gardens. 
Kew. 


Christening 

The infant son of Mr and Mrs 
David ProfUmo was christened 
Thomas David by the Rev 
Christopher Hamel-Cook and 
the Rev Peter Watkins at St 
Marylebone Parish Church, on 
Friday, December 19. The god- 
parents are Mr Simon Booker, 
Mr Angns Graham-Cam pbell, 
Mr Graham Swift, the Hon Mrs 
Amschel Rothschild, and Mrs 
James Sassoon. 


Dinner 


Stationery Office 
The Hon Peter Brooke, Minister 
of State for the Treasury, gave a 
private dinner last night at 
Brooks’ to mark the retirement 
of Mr William Sharp. Controller 
and Chief Executive of Her 
Majesty’s Stationery Office, at 
the end of hs bicentenary year. 
Others present were: 

Mrs Sharp. Sir WDHam HasdUne. Sir 

Robert Armstrong. Sr Peter MUdte- 

Um. sir Gordon Downey. Sir Kenneth 
Bradshaw. Professor BA Thrush. Mr 
Kennwti Allen. Mr John Batter. Mr 
Jafm Dole. MT Keith CtsnL Mr Murcfo 

MacLeqn Mid Mr Michael Norgrove. 


Service dinner 

The ReyaJ Regiment of FosRiers 
Officers of C (G 
Company of the 


Officers of C (City of London) 
he 5th (V) Battal- 


ion, The Royal Regiment of 
Fusiliers, held a dinner at HM 
Towtf of London last night. 
Major H. Railton welcomed the 
guests who included the Master 
and the Clerk of the 
Cord warners’ Company, Colo- 
nel MJ. Dudding, Lieutenant- 
Colonel W.G. Pettifar and 
Lieutenant-Colonel AJ.M. 
Rice. 


Latest wills 

Mr Alec Hobson, of Aylsham, 
Norfolk, secretary of the Royal 
Agricultural Society of England 
and Wales, 1946-61, left estate 
valued at £278,650 neL 
Mr Harry Maeteod Brashes, of 
Kington Langley, Wiltshire, sur- 
veyor, left £3,642,41 9 net. 



Processor J. M. Dodd. FR5. 
Professor of Zoology at the 
University College of North 
Wales from 1968 to 1931. died 
on December 1 5. at the age 71 . 

Dodd was the prototype of a 
whole generation of compara- 
tive endocrinologists, who 
gave the subject stature. 

James Macro Dodd was 
boiTi on May 26. 1915, and 
educated at the White House 
School Brampton. Camber- 
land. and Liverpool Universi- 
ty. where he graduated with 
nrst class honours in zoology 
in 195". 

From an eariv stage, his 
interest was marine biology, 
but finding no posts available 
he became a teacher at Cardi- 
gan Grammar School in 193S. 

I A rcserach post in marine 
biology was offered to him as 
soon as be took the job. but he 
felt honour-bound to refuse it. 

By this time war was loom- 
ing.* and he joined the RAF. 
first as an aircraftsman. But 
on the death of his mother he 
felt free to become flying crew. 
He was rejected as a pilot 
because of a slight defect of 
vision. This did not deter him 
and be became a navigator. 

Drafted to Transport Com- 
mand he flew- to many ports of 
tire world from Greenland to 
Australia, ferrying freight and 
passengers, often on secret and 
important missions. 

On return to civilian life in 
1946 he was appointed assis- 
tant in zoology* at Aberdeen 
University, and in the follow- 
ing year he was appointed 
lecturer and later reader in 
zoology ax St Andrews, where 
he was director of the Gatty 
Marine Laboratory, a post 
much to his liking, where be 
developed his knowledge and 
skill in marine biology. 

He slaved there until 1960 
when, with some reluctance to 


PROFESSOR GLYN DANIEL 

Colin Renfrew 


The Prince of Wales getting s taste of pop music yesterday* 
when he visited a British Cbtmcfl exhibition, “Pop! British 
Music in the Eighties", which mU soon be nuking an 
overseas tour. 


University news 

Oxford 

Professor ZanvO A. Cohn, 
professor and senior physician. 
Laboratory of Cellular Physiol- 
ogy and Immunology, 
Rocfcerfeller University, New 
York, has been elected to the 
Newton-Abrabam visiting 
professorship in medical, bio- 
logical and chemical sciences for 
the year 1987-88. 

Queen’s, Belfast 
Appointments 

Professors emeriti: Mr W Kirk 
(geography). Dr C Ehrlich 
(economics and social history) 
and Dr J C Murdoch (crop and 
animal production). 

Professorial fellow; Dr F Brown, 
head of virology at Wellcome 

Biotechnology. 

Grants 

Sdnnoe and EMnwInr Research 
OmmrH: £161.17910 Dr J McCartney 
and Dr B K Hinds io research 
computer aided design and pattern 
generation for Die garment Industry: 
£113.600 <wtoi Leeds University) fo 


Dr J B Goai t ura for reseaiUi an a 
small gas engae driven modulating 
neat pump. 

Durham 

Appointments as professors 
Professor David McNamara, 
primary education, from Janu- 
ary 1, 1987. 

Dr William Feast, chemistry, 
from September 1, 1986. 

Dr Robert Thompson, geology’, 
from April I, 1987. 

Anthony John Fletcher, modem 
history, from April 1, 1987. 
David Edward Cooper, philos- 
ophy, from November I, 2986. 
Other appointments 

CtHtnnan of the board of studies In 
DhUtMoptod Professor D.E. Cot 
Noventoer 1 to September 30. 1 
Honorary viauroj professor in 
physics and electronics: Dr . 
Lmley Kirtay. from October 19. 1986. 

Visaing profess**" In zoology: Profes- 

sor Kenneth David McFadden. Brow 

January hi AprH.1987. 

visiting professor In Oriental studies: 

Professor Aidro Maoumaio. 

April 1. 1987. 

Spicer and Pester ReadecsMp b» 
Accounting: Dr Raymond Keighley 
Ashton, from April 1. 1987. 

Reader In physics: Dr Brian KetOi 
Tanner, from August 1. 1986. 
Reader in psychology: Dr John 
Malcolm Findlay, from July 1. 1986. 


Science report 

Breathlessness helped 
by acupuncture use 

By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 


The use of traditional Chinese 
acupuncture in a British hos- 
pital has produced “encourag- 
ing and significant 
improvements” in relieving 
breathlessness suffered by a 
group of patients with severe 
long conditions. 

The successful results of a 
pilot stndy into the treatment 
are “clinically and socially 
important”, according to re- 
port in The Lancet today. 

The patients who received 
acupuncture had chronic 
obstructive pulmonary dis- 
ease, for which there is no 
satisfactory drug treatment. 
Patients can experience (□tol- 
erable breathlessness. 

Twenty-six; outpatients at 
the Osier chest unit of the 
Churchill Hospital, Oxford, 
took part in the study. Thor 
condition Bunted their ex- 
ercise tolerance to walking 
between 20 and 360 metres. 

The patients were divided 
into two groups. Genuine acu- 
pcnctere was given to the first 
on 13 occasions over 
weeks. Stainless steel 
needles were inserted along 
the m iddle of the knees. 

Neither electrical nor laser 
stimulation of the needles was 
used. The placebo patients 
were given the same number of 
“treatments” ova the same 
period. However, their needles 
were inserted into “non- 
acupuncture” or “dead” 
points. 

Acupuncture has been re- 
ported to be of therapeutic 


benefit in the control of back 

pain and migrant*, ami may 
work thrangl the mechanism 
of endorphin release. 

The Oxford researchers de- 
rided to test the hypothesis 
that the treatment might be 
able to alter the perception of 
breathlessness and sensations 
of distress in patients with 
chronic obstructive pulmonary 
disease. 

The two groups were tested 
for exercise tolerance in a 
series of walks during and 
following the experiment. The 
absolute improvements in dis- 
tance walked in tire treated 
group ranged from 27 to 181 
metra, with a mean increase 
of 77 metres. When individnal 
improveme n ts were assessed 
they averaged 44 per cent on 
the last three walks, and 66 
per cent on the last walk. 

Dr Kim Johst, who or- 
ganized the study, said some 
attempt would be made to 
assess (Juration of effect Fur- 
ther detailed studies and a 
more prolonged course of 
treatment were also necessary* 
he said. 

“Whether improvement is 
achieved because the aext* 
puncture mediates tike release 
of endogenous opiates, as is 
thought to occur when it is 
used for pain relief, is purely 
speculative", he said. 

“It is possible that ether 
peptides are implicated or 
even that some totally dif- 
ferent mechanism is 
responsible." 


Professor 
writes: 

Your obimary ofGlyn Dan- 
iel (December 15), while pav- 
ing tribute to his work as a 
popularizer of archaeology, 
foiled to give an adequate 
account of his scholarly con- 
tributions to the subject, and 
appeared also to belittle the 
originality of his archaeologi- 
cal research. 

Glyn Daniel was an innova- 
tor in at least two ways. He 
was the first systematic histo- 
rian of archaeology, at any rate 
in the English language. His 
pioneering The Three Ages 
laid the foundations for the 
first coherent account of the 
history of the subject. A 
Hundred Years of Archaeology 
(1950). Supported by the doc- 
umentary evidence set out in 
The Origins and Growth of 
Archaeology (1967) and given 
r lurid expression in 
brm in The Idea of 
Prehistory ( 1 962), this body of 
work gave several generations 
of students and scholars their 
first appreciation that archae- 
ology and prehistory are about 
ideas, not simply about things, 
and that ideas are produced by 
people who are themselves the 
products of their time. 

His work in this direction 
has, moreover, gained a new 
lease of life with the applica- 


tion of Critical Theory to 
archaeology in recent years, 
where the historical context of 
the research under scrutiny is 
seen as particularly relevant. 

Glyn Daniel was a man 
brimming over with interests 
and obsm-vations and ideas. 
His Antiquity editorials alone 
offered more stimulus than 
the total work of many schol- 
ars. Yet in saying this I have 
not yet touched on his own 
great and enduring interest, 
summarized in The Megalith 
Builders of Western Europe 
(1958). many of whose ideas 
were already introduced in his 
seminal article “The Dual 
Nature of the Megalithie Colo- 
nization of Prehistoric 
Europe”, published in 1941. 
He felt the mystery of these 
great monuments already on 
his first visit to Brittany In 
1934, and it continued to 
“exercise an irresistible 
fascination” upon him, and 
through him upon generations 
of younger archaeologists, for 
the res; of his life. 

As his pupil, and as his 
successor in the Disney Chair 
of Archaeology. I know that I 
speak for several generations 
of students in recalling the 
boundless intellectual stimu- 
lus, humour and sheer good 
fun of a supervision or even 
an encounter with Glvn. 


MR TOM SCOTT 


Tom Scott, who died on 
December 17, aged 80, was a 
familiar figure in post-war golf 
as editor of the weekly maga- 
zine Golf Illustrated for 31 
years. 

When he handed over the 
editorship in 1977 he contin- 
ued to write an occasional 
column, and within a few days 
of his death had completed a 
feature for the magazine on 
the history of the game. 

Thomas Ure Paterson Scott 
was bom a Filer. His early 
training was with D. C. 
Thomson’s in Dundee, and 
after the war, which he ended 
as a squadron leader, he began 


his editorship of Golf Illustrat- 
ed. 

Never slow to engage in an 
argument, he was nevertheless 
an easy companion and, with 
a rich Scottish accent and a 
presence to match, he shone in 
the field of public relations. 

He was president of the 
Association of Golf Writers 
from 1981 to 1984, and collab- 
orated with Geoffrey Cousins 
in a number of books, includ- 
ing A Centenary of Opens and 
Golf for the Not So Young. 

He moved in retirement to 
Carnoustie, where he is sur- 
wved by his second wife, Ella 
(Bunny). 


SIR RICHARD CAVE 


Mr Peter Bowring, chairman 
of the Aldeburgh Foundation, 
writes : 

Many of Sir Richard Cave’s 
friends, while appreciating the 
thoroughness with which his 
outstanding business career 
was covered (December 6), 
will be sorry that no mention 
was made of his enthusiastic 
support for the arts in general 
and, in particular, for the 
Aldeburgh Foundation. 

There is no doubt that Dick 
Cave’s joining the council of 
flie foundation, at a time when 
its fortunes were at a low ebb. 
proved to be a blessing. 

By his encouragement and 
by direct help in applying 


sound business principles, the 
foundation was quickly set on 
its feet again. 

But it was not only in his 
capacity as a businessman of 
exceptional qualities that he 
helped. As chairman of the 
Aldeburgh appeal, his eneigy 
and gentle, but very positive, 
powers of persuasion have 
ensured that its target is now 
in sight. 

As a generous and regular 
supporter of the Aldeburgh 
Festival and other events at 
snape Mailings he will be 
sadly missed. 

Estival time it seemed 
that his house was 
bursting with guests. 




Jeaic a happ> situation, he 
moved to Leeds as Professor 
cf Zoology. There he set up 
and directed the Robin 
Hood’s Bay laboratory, near 
Whitby, a’ centre lor the 
investigation of the ecology of 
rocky shores. 

In I%S he moved to the 
Lloyd Roberts chair of Zoolo- 
ev at Bangor. 

"'Dodd made outstanding 
contributions to comparative 
endocrinology and was one of 
an elite group which, in the 
1950s. established it as a 
recognized discipline within 
zoology, making the United 
Kingdom the leading country 
for research in the subject. His 
work concentrated on carti- 
laginous fishes, sharks, skates, 
ra* s and dogfishes. 

Whilst sharks have gained 
recent notoriety in other direc- 
tions. they are not suitable for 
laboratory work. It was 
Dodd's contribution to find 
methods of keeping smaller 
dogfishes in the laboratory for 
considerable periods, and his 
work is confined to one spe- 
cies (Scv/iorhinus caniculai 

Friendship with Dodds was 
a great privilege. His wisdom 
and humour made his compa- 
ny always a delight- He had a 
great love of nature and the 
arts, in particular music. 

It was not easy to penetrate 
his reserve. His strength of 
character carried him through 
early difficulties, such as cur- 
ing by his own efforts a very 
baa. stammer. 

He combined knowledge 
with manual dexterity. His 
kindly understanding, togeth- 
er with an ability to explain 
complex matters simply, 
made him a good teacher. 

Dodd's main collaborator 
was his wife. Dr Margaret 
Dodd, herself a distinguished 
zoologist- He is survived by 
her and their three sons. 


always 


MISS ELLA 
BAKER 


SIR ROGER 
JACKLING 

K. A. &M. writes: Hla Baker, who died m New 

Many of us fortunate York on December n n n W 
enough to have known Roger 83rd birthday olaved a nmS 

J«a.j8(obHi ^y Nov embCT ble role in tht qS 

25) after his retirement from Rights movement 

the Diplomatic Service will In the 1950s eh? 

remember especially his work tam behind 

as a panel chairman for the field organiser for thT 

CM I W »■ Boanl, al 

which led to his doing similar vancement of Cotmir^ 

work for the police. People. Coloured 

In these new tasks he in- In 1 957 she was asked r*. 
spired the same trust respect Martin LutherKinTtaw? ** 
and deep affection that had the national office 
helped to make him so sue- Southern Leadershin r ftn £- 
cessfitim diplomacy. ence. p Lonf er- 

To allow himself to under- Later, she oreaniMrf 
take them he declined offers of conference that fhf 

employment in industry and *»— • . crealed the 

finance. 




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THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 



births, marriages, deaths 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


UK unto im, L« UWnr wart thwi 
WM fla kero m» tomnundmcnis. ana 

^unnn . 4 


births 


■ Ob December 17m 
“J** Rural Giwm Hospttal. s**,. 
BOrtto Jaw Utee AntMl intlani 
daughter. Caroline Elistelh. 

' 9? D*wnb«r 1 Bin. at me m> 
L ^^f ovlJ “Wrist Hmptui. 
to Jtota and 1 David Be Ur, « dauoturr 
Atacandra Mary. “wwt. 

;,° n Dw * ml >«‘ iwt. at Royal 
Bam United, to Ctutstloe and tuck, a 
aon. Rouen William. 

WWWW *« Packwood. 

- On November 2SnS. to 
MOttecn and Martin, a dauotuer 
Mary Ll-ahan. a shier 

WOOOTT - On Thursday December 
I 8 U 1 1986. to AUsonlSd HtaySSSi 
£,*» Leo Rupert, a brother for 

9LOMAN- Chi December lith 1966 at 
Lwwtcr. to Susan (nee Ontai and 
iWrtwrd. a gUI of a son. Peter Jack. 

- On December 17th 19&A 

* CuckHrtd Hospital, to Mary inro 

a daughter Fran- 
cesca Alice, a shier for Jenny 

* eryan. 


' On December 17th. pesce- 

CrahJ!£?*.£f ,CP ' wMsw °* Herbert 
to««i u> her children. 
BrUdAUdnm and treat grandchfl 
w ™ toved her dearty •with 

, —ftoS'fwh December Spin, at , 
-Junction Road. 
55?®i f F "2» "w* 1 ? «m»y- Dona- 
r22.j , «- a !? ,r * d to Aocfl PUgrbm* 

SS’JES'' ,k t °”* “™w 

■^.■jasEsrpjsrjR 

75“* Harm. widow of Walter 

Joh ns., reame r of Stephen. eUbumUi 

7“J 6 tovtag mutmotber 

ff* g** twrandmooier. Crenaaon 

S££5' IS"?** taU Oo"^ u 

dewed to Uw Save the Children 
Fond. 


TOMIJRS - On Thursday December 
18UI. oneenufy. Dam Jerome of 
worth Abbey. Regutom Tuesday De- 
cember 23ra at ipm. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SERVICES 


WANTED 


FOR SALE 


LEGAL NOTICES 


TOFLAS - On December 1501. at Cath- 
bridgr. GMwge, suddenly after a tons 
atom- Private family funeral. 


Tonja « HMROMti ate. «r. im «adM 
Chroma* cm ws year DU. mstaM. 
nave opoMorad a Guide Dog for dm 
BU nfl T«Wtiv- and through hun am 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


BAfHMN Yvonne, roetltueo 
humanUas ant in nwtnacla eemper. 


H *** C1 *T “ On December 16m. peaeo- 

Herbert. Crataatlcn «l Tunbridge 
tawnaianum on Monday De- 
cember 2901, « 12 noon. 


•TOWS ■ Sir John Berry . Jock Hobbs. 
Barn I6.12.IB82 - Died 21. 12.1963. 
The Greatest - The Perfect Batman - 
The Master. 


DEATHS 


■ On December ITih 
1986. victor AOen. dearly toved 
husband of MUdred, mte of The wri- 
to'taon Club. Funeral service at 
Putnoy vale Crematorium on Tues- 
day December 2ird at 1pm. Cut 
ftowen only to Harrods Funeral Ser- 
vice. 49 Marioes Road. London wa. 
01-937 0572 by Ham. 


BIRTHDAYS 


imara - m on 2la CongnmOM 
■oa every heieim — 10 you Iran wvr 
Mad Ml mane MMh and tram 
Alfred. 



ANCESTRY 

Contact 

ttw team with the best 

npertmor World wide 


ACHIEVEMENTS 
DEPT T, 
NORTHGATE 
CANTERBURY 
CTJ 1BA 
TEU- 0227 46261 S 

HERALDRY 


DISAPOINTED 
B.ALLET FAN 

Desperaieiy seeks OcfceHs) for 
Friends of Covent Garden Gala on 
Sunday December 21*. 

Phone 01 822 9555 
10.00 io 6.00pm 


TR* najeo WORKSHOP Free creon aver 
i vw to* appi an tm- best srlecnon of 
neu 6 restored DUnnlaw interest 
oier 2 yr» A 3 m. Wmtni ouMadons. 

K r Si?^ 0SU * 30B *"*0^ Bn. NWS. 
7 q7I. 


PBtOJJ CALENDAR 1N7 MUM Mndl- 
Hon. board. Oflm. Lymlngun I0090i 
79384. 


PB»AJ I calendar TasWul Cofleaon 
19S7 CdlnMartn Chrfemus DresenTV? 
OUtirm Tat 0046 414779. 


E AR LY n a med PoiMa nq to menage car- 
■vans nr Venice Summer 87. Good 
MAUh, caravan experience essential. 
Photo A luE daubs Reply to BOX F67 


RENTALS 


1 


SHARECARE 

PROFESSIONAL 

SERVICES 


Ed wardia n. Vmonan and ui 

S S^ iSSS 1 ?' W A**OM 03 «47 

“W WOWfima Lane. Eanuieid. 


: of etrthdeya. C. 


Tofedwr we 


beat a. 


DORWARD - on December 18th 1986. 
Peacefully Reverend John Cochrane 
aoed 99. formerly of Mukden. Man- 
chu na and Mennuilr. Angus. 
Beloved father, grandfather and 
weal grandfather. Funeral service ar 
St Boswells church on Monday oo~i ' 
December at Ham. Family flown* 
only. 

CAYNOR-OD December 16th 1986. in 
her 840t year, ai her residence to 
Sutton. Dublin. Jo. formerly of 
Roxboro Baity, may she rest in 
peace. 


MMKSSKfUC - On Decembtr 9th 
1986. Wiaum Markhsm (BUI). <tar- 
hn« husband of Anne, dear father of 
Veronica and Feticuy and loved 
Grandpa of Joe and KaUe. 


TO troy J. a wtm mU our lav* (real R. J. 
E. C. and B an your eta MTOiday. I 


THOMPSON - On Decembe r 19th. at 
hoaae. jack dearest tiusoaod of Betty, 
dearly loved father of Jeremy and 
Lucy and grandfather of Martin. 
Emma. Ttouny and John. Cremation 
at New Southgate aatnatortum. 
Brunswick Park Road. London. Nl l. 
On Tuesday 23rd December at 
ll.OOxm. Family (towers only. But 
Donations U destred to Cancer 
research. 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


WEBB - victor (Chief UtUe Saar) and 
Anita. 170 High Street London 
NWio. CengntulaUoaa on fifty gold- 
en years from your sen Joabear. 
Sherry and Jane, and grandchildren 
Rnraima and Regan. 


We find over one third of all 
resear ch into tbe pr e v enti o u and 
cure of cancer in the UK. 

Hdp ua by sending a dotmioa 
or make a legacy to: 

Cancer 
Research 
Campaign 


2 Cohen Hauer Terrace, 

TT 20/12 Laddaa SW1Y SAIL 


Offer cefiuwmionair un der sta nding 
and wsdanrr io MO you cap* ana 
mrrrome noouofM and pnrtulogl' 
m mtrtaa. No Bunar mr naiure or 
ratant of year aitrmau. our 


t£. WANTED Largr Vie wanirobn, 
rtiaus. ramdmg lakln. 

dnK.ooo* cases, burraus 4 ell sambnos 
•tc Ol 9447084 AawAl 1SIM71 nn. 


CNELSCA MAISOHETTE ideally londed 
tor KiugnBWMgr and Soutn Km 2 dM 
Mdroom. sitting room, a and b. Colour 
TV. Full CH. Cmw and rleclnc. Holiday 
or Co let. 3 monBt* n». £450 pw. Tel 
SSt 2949. 


IN THE MATTER OF 
A W. LANCASTER LIMITED 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NOTICE IS KERESV OtVEN mat Btr 
ctmuoiv of me iuimurm Company, 
which h bring %eiuntanly wound up. arc 
rvqu ired. on of before me 15th day of 
January. 1987. to send In their run 
Ctuis tin and urnanm. thrtr addresses 
ana desenpUem. fun pMWuttn of their 
drMs or Claims, and the names and 
add raises of Iheir Sobatora Uf any L to me 
undersigned D J. Buckler. FCA of Arthur 
Andersen * Co.. PO Box SB. 1 Surrey 
Siren. London WC2R SNT me I igntpaWr 

of mo said Componi'. and. H so rnnared 
by notice to wrung from (he said lambda 
tor. are. personalty or by m«r Soucttoev 
to come (n and urine mar debts or etann* 
ai suen umr ana place as stud! be aproned 
In suen notice, or ui default thereof they 
wtu be excluded trora me bencfii of any 
mstmumoo made before such debts an 
prated. 

DATED (Ms tout day of December 1986 
DJ. BUCKLER 
LIQUIDATOR 


C8TA8USHCB W RI TE R needs gmet 
room in central London daytime only. 

Tel 01 243 0827 


H E AR ASCOT COUnar. furrmhed on coun- 
try estate. 2 bedroom*. 2 rrerpoon 
room* sitcnen. bathroom, gas CH. Pret- 
ty garden, garage No pen EA2S pan. 
Phone 0344 882782 or 886301. 


our# an dtgnn (h*^i cMalidrallalkty. 
Pi L*» a >ia n*i psychotherapy aHo asad- 
aBM where aocxwiate. Phone 01 -48c 
4320 or wrnr 11 Avenue Court, rarm 
Aw*. NW2 2PT iPoatai oolyi Info and 


JlWtUDtr. com. saver, o u nonds ur- 
gently wonted Top prices, winama. 43 
Lambs Conduu St WC1. Ol 406 esse 


FOR SALE 


Wanted snort M flat, t/2 Mdsww 

Cram London. February |« to April 
1 im 1906. P r o fnuo i R. K. Winkeimann 
St Johns HosolUL Lbte St. London 
WC2H TU 





yotru. BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RESISTA CARPETS 

WManders broutlful natural cortt dies. 
Ejurvmely bard wearing the best mwv 
n can buy £8 95 per sg yd ♦ vat. 
MHUuim valve* We rarms so Nan 
colours Bum in undsrtap IF wr 


HEMfnr 4 JLItfl Contact us now on 01- 
245 8861 lor me pest Sel ection of 
funumd flats and hour* 10 real m 
KiugMsbfWgr. Oiefsea and KcnUngtoa. 


Archaeology 

Mint link to Black Death 


Excavations on the site of the 
former Royal Mint have 
shown that before the area was 
used for coining money it had 
been an abbey, a plague 
cemetery and a navy depOL 


By Norman Hammond, Archaeology Correspondent 


More than six centuries of 
London's history are being 
exposed in a dig which will last 
until early 1988, and which 
will eventually incorporate re- 
mains of the medieval mon- 
astery into tbe new buildings 
on the site. 


^ard III in 1350, and flour- 
ished mightily until its 
dissolution by Henry VIII 
Walls and floors from the 
southern pan of the abbey 
buildings have been found, 
including the south ride of the 
cloister walk, the refectory 
with its decorated tile floor, 
the wanning house and the 
large and complex sewer sys- 
tem that served the monastic 
latrines. 


came full, the monastic burial 
ground was used. 

“We don’t think the devel- 
opers want the new building to 
be known as Black Death 
House”, one of the archaeolo- 
gists said. 

In feet. City Merchant 
Developers and Postel, to- 


gether with tbe Crown Estate 
Commissioners who own the 


The Royal Mint was housed 
just north of the Tower of 
London until a few years ago, 
when coining was moved to 
Llanwrst in South Wales, a 
location known to employees 
at the time as “the hole with 
the Mint”; now the former 
Mint itself has a large hole, in 
which the foundations of 
England's third richest Cister- 
cian Abbey have been 
revealed 


Further investigation of the 
abbey will uncover the monks’ 
and lay patrons' cemeteries, 
and the northern and eastern 
portions of the great abbey 
church, together with the evi- 
dence for later uses of the site. 


One period of use about 
which the archaeologists from 
the Museum of London are 
being temporarily reticent is 
tbe Black Death cemetery 
used to bury the dead from 
that great plague of 1349: the 


The Abbey of St Mary 
Graces was founded by Ed- 


abbey lay just outside the 
walls of the City: as the 


walls of the City; as the 
intramural churchyards be- 


Commissioners who own the 
site, have provided the fund- 
ing for the work, and have also 
agreed to include surviving 
pans of the abbey into the new 
structure. 

The Crown became in- 
volved with the rite in Tudor 
times, when the dissolved 
monastery was used as a 
victualling yard for Elizabeth 
I’s navy. Salt pork, bee£ bread 
and biscuits were shipped out 
to keep England's hearts of 
oak stout against the Armada. 

A number of brick floors of 
this period have been found, 
and the next year’s excava- 
tions are expected to reveal 
more details of the Tudor 
naval base. 


Hooligan or Stereotype? 


I*n*8 attic* £* 76 per sg yd *■ vM. 
PI ut the largest srtrcuoa at puan car 
peong to l onnnn. 


t«8 Wanasweroi snag* no 

Parsons dm swa 


Football violence, old ladies being mugged, cars 
written off, homes ransacked - is this your view 
of crimes committed by teenagers today? 

But most crime is more mundane: around 90% 
of teenage crime is non-violent and 50% is 
petty theft. 

For most young 'criminals* committal to courts 
and prison is no answer. Up to 85% re-offend: 
they become trapped in a criminal career. 


Tet01-73 1-336S/9 

Fra* EsumotevEspcft fitting 



Since 1976 Rainer has pioneered vital 'last 
chance' alternatives to Care and prison for 
nearly Yz million teenagers. Rainers’ small-scale 
community-based projects focus on specific 
individual needs helping to build seif-esteem 
and responsibility. They successfully divert 
young people from crane. 

But we need your committed support Please 
send your donation, or for more information to 
Chris Naylor, RAINER FOUNDATION. 232 
Tooley Street London SE1 2JX (01-403 
4434). And help the teenager behind the 
stereotype. 


■URROtieiB a WATTS Fun stzt mook*r 
uMr. stair Ms*, oak. UrH vacuum 
CuMUom. ExcrUrnl randmon Vlrw b«- 

MCft. Tat. OS6 287 244 imsuigu. 


KMCHT KIO LDH9M Piano. Mahogany. 
rrgutaBy lunnL As nrw. £1.000 tor 
oulrk sal*. TO (0734) 445192 anyumr 


W o ne w . upright Canadian piano, in 
good condioon. £895. to. Crayford 
10322)624041. 




1 1 - 1 -H 1 1 1 ^ .* ^ j ; » ; i 1 . 



in 




mM 


Ig&i 




Will 

P ippi 

mm 


WARNER COSMETICS UK LIMITED 

In pursuance o< Utr piwtsians o< SrcDan 

SS8 of mr coowmo Act 1980. Nonet » 
narrhy gn m Dial a Meeting ct Ovdltan of 
mr roocr uamro company will br nrw at 
Thr DM Rectory. uit*e Cadndtn- 
BrrfchomslM. HM IPA on 27tb Dec cm 
farr 1986 al 11.00 a m 

Dialed 18m Drcrmerr 1986 
BY ORDER OF THE BOARD 
GW. GODAK 

BPramp 


COMPANY NOTICES 


KENNEDY TRAVEL (YORKSHIRE) 
LIMITED 

TO WHOM rr MAY CONCERN 
Hotter Is hfffby glvra tnat - 
t At an Extraordinary General Meeting 
ol thr above named Company duly con- 
vened and nrld ai 7 a James* Row 
snrlnrMBI I XA on 1 70i Drrrmber 1 986 
a Special Revolution was ptoerd mat the 
paymnu of One hundred and thirty five 
thousand pounds out of DM- Company’s 
capital as defined in Seaton I7!i I) of tor 
Companies Act 1986 in respect of the pur- 
chase by thr company tram Paul Kavazy 
and Margaret Vivienne Kavazy of me 
Company's 9376 Ordinary Sham of LI 
such under section 162 of the said Act be 
authorised 

2 The Statutory Declaration or Dm Di- 
rectors and Auditors Report required tty 
Section 173 of the Companies Art 1985 
are available for Inspection at the 
Company V Registered Office at 50 Market 
Street Barnsley South Yorfesmre. 

3 Any creditor of me Company may ai 
any Him wtudn five weeks Imraedlaiety 
following 1701 December (986 apply to 
■he High Couri or Justice for an order pro- 
hibiting ihe payment 

Doled 17th December 1986 


The RAF 
Benevolent Fund 
repays the debt 
we owe 



WMSTOMCIaj*C)tBA*S Speeches- Book- 
er prizewinner Kingsley Amis. The 
Crime Stories of Rex SUmL Chriuoptier 
Isherwood. mad rttilng books. Hie mu* . 
Iravd books of Ronald Searlr and 
thousands of books for sale am wanted, 
are all In Die January law of Book and 
Magazine Collector, pries £1.40. on sale 
In your local mwja s eni on Friday. 19(h 
December. V you are mate to obtain a 
copy Irani your newsagent, then write 
to Book and Magazine collector. 43-46. 
8L Mary's Road. Eating. London W6 
SRO- 



BBWIira or NETTLBKD Annual winter 
sal* of repaca and reproduction rural. 
tore commences Saturday. 27Ui 
Dcenubar. NetUebed. nmr Henley on 
Thame* (0491) 6411XS. Bournemouth 
(0202) 293580. Berkeley. Nr Bristol 
(0454) B109S2. Topcham. Nr Qatar 
(039287) 7443: Reading (0734) 

691731. MANY ITEMS IN OUR READ- 
ING SHOWROOMS <fi PMCE OR LESS 


LEGAL NOTICES 


Church news 


Vicar. St Luke. OrrcU. same diocese. 


Appointments 

The Rev J T Archer, non-stipendiary 
minister, diocese of Derby, to be 
Vicar. St John. Edlington. Doncaster, 
diocese of Sheffield. 

Canon S M Bannister, honorary 
canon of Manchester, and Vicar. 
Oldham, diocese of Manchester, to be 
vicar. Hatfield Hyde, dtocne or St 
Albans. 

The Rev T Byron. priesf-Irwharoe. 
St Philip- Leicester, diocese of Leices- 
ler. Io be also Rural Dean or 
Christianity North Deanery. 

The Rev J C Clarke. Rector. St 
Bartholomew. Barrow, diocese of 
Chester, to be Vicar. All Saints. 
Thornton Hough, same diocese. 

The Rev J R Carr. Rector. Wldford. 


The Rev J L Sharpe. Chaplain, 
Knowie Hospital. Faretinm. diocese of 


Portsmouth, to be also an honorary 
canon of Portsmouth Gatnadral. 

The Rev C Strong, curate. Dalton to 
Furness, diocese of Carltue. to be 
Vicar. Wootton. diocese of St Albans. 

The Rev C D Taylor. Vicar. Mill on. 
diocese of Bam and WcUa. to be iso 
Rural Dean of Locking. 

The Rev P J Taylor. Rector. Nacum 
wilb Holme Hale, diocese M Norwich, 
to be also Rural Dean of Bracfcland. 
same diocese. 

The Rev J W Valentine, team vicar 


PauL diocese of Exeter, retired on 
October 31. 

The Rev JFC Talbot. Rector. West 
Fbiton. diocese of UcbOeid. to retire tn 
januaiV T98T. ". . . 7 - • *- 

_ Tty Rev P Crawford. Rector. East 
wivhHL diocese of St Edmundsbury 
and Ipswich, to retire on February 14. 


THE TONES f 1814-1986) This Xmas give 
someone an ao ortRnal issue dated the 
very dwe they were bora. £11.96 (pan 
hee 1870* newspaper!) Yesterdays 
New*. 93 Dtaaksnakl Road. COlwyn 
Bay. TO. 0*92 531 195/54 1 304. 


The Royal Air Force reached a peak strength of 
L 7 2O0,frOO in 1944-and-iBore than 1% million men 
and women served during the war years. 



NOTICE Is hereby given pursuant to *27 
of ihe TRUSTEE Art. 1926 Dot any per- 
son Having a Claim against or an 
INTEREST In Use ESTATE Of any of OM 
deceased person's wheer name*, address- 
es and descriptions are se< mil below b 
hereby reguirM to send particulars in 
willing of hi* clatm or Interest to me per- 
son or penons mmUoned in raiaiion to the 
deceased person con rented before the date 
specified: after »*hich dale the estate at (he 
deceased wUl be dMrtbulid by me person- 
al representatives among the penons 
entitled thereto having reinrd only to the 
claims and Interests of which they have 
had notice. 


LAMBERT. laoM Mary or 34 Wellington 
Park- Canon. Bristol BS8 2UW died on 1 
November 1986. ParUrulars to DsnMS- 
Lambert. Executor. Hobbits Cohagg-Prea- 
prci Place. Ashton. HeMon. Cornwall 
THIS 9SH before 28 Febnatry 1987. 


COURSES 


Other appointment 

Captain R Wheatley. CA. Bcenae d 
lay worker. Holy TrmJtv Shared 
Church I ecumenical project). South 


In ihe Huntingdon tram ministry, and 
diocesan leaflet editor, diocese of 
York, to be Vicar. Sand Hutton (Gate 
Hetmatey. Upper Hehnslar. BoaaalL 
BuUercrambe. Howiiumj, same di- 
ocese. He continues as dio ce san leaflet 
editor. 

The Rev A J Wetob. priesi vn -charge. 
Cosatogton and Woo laving! on. diocese 
of Bath and Weds, to be also priest Jn- 
charge. Bawdrtp. 


Woodham Ferrers, diocese of of 
Chelmsford, to be licensed lay worker. 
St Co Jumbal. Scarborough, diocese of 
York. 


Thousands did not come back. Many lie in the 
forgotten comers of earth and sea. Many thousands 
more were left disabled - mentally and physically. 


™*5T quality wool carpets, ai trade 
prtcM and under. al*o available IOCTi 
enra. Lame mom rise msaau under 
half normal price. Chancery Carpels 01 
406 0453. 


St Mary, diocese of Chelmsford, to be 
team Vicar. St Thomas's, id the 
Beacon tree West team ministry. satn» 
diocese. 

The Rev T Emmett. Vicar. Christ 
Church with SI .Ann. Newcastle, 
diocese of Newcastle, to be Vicar, si 
Peter. Byweu. same diocese. 

The Rev J R HerVtois. vicar. An 
Sauus*. Den mead, and Rural Dean of 
HavanL diocese of Portsmouth, to be 
otto an honorary canon of Ports- 
mouth Cathedral. 

The .Rev M Graham. Vicar. St 


The Rev F E WHJoughhy. curate. 
Tonbridge perish church, toocese Of 
Rochester, to be vicar. Sutton-at- 
Hone. same diocese. 

The Rev F winderbank. Church of 
England Children's Society organiser. 
London boroughs. Io he Vicar. St 
Stephen. Newton. Flowery Field, 
diocese of Chester. 


Flowery Field. 


Chore* of Scotland 
Inductions 

The Rev G S Oowie to Birnle with 
piuscarden. 

The Rev EUzabeUi M Henderson to 
Edinburgh. Granion. 

The Rev A M weOa to Associate at. 
cumbemoud. St Mungo's. 

Translations 

The Rev G w Foster from 
Invergorden to Dundee. 9MMt. 

The Rev w C Robb from KUbeny 
with Tarbert to Canine with Som. 
The Rev D K Speed from Siantpcrland 
to Abcrfayle with Port or Mentetth. 


Last year ihe RAF Benevolent Fund made grants in 
excess of £7,000,000, widows, dependants and the 
disabled rcci eying the major share. And this cost 
continues io rise as age and infirmity overtake the 
survivors. Inflation too imposes an ever increasing 
burden. 


FREE CVT Wtui every flora or TV 
^bW oc rated before Xm«* from 
Tops. 91 Lower Sloau Si. SW1. 730 
0933 


XATTONDGR8. Bert tickets tor an aold- 
out events. Our clients include mow 
rad bar mnusnln Oredrt cards oujfPWd. 
01-828 1678. 


6 1 UNMAY Rosewood Boudoir Grand 
1912. Outrtandbig condition. Full re- 
port by nano Advisory service 
available. £4.250. TeL 01-937 2402. 


Michael, and All Angela. Lawton 
Moor, diocese of Manchester, io be 
Recior. St Wilfrid. Mobbertey. diocese 
of Chester. 

The Rev T J Higgins. Vicar. St 
Augustine's. Whllton. diocese of 
London, to be also Area Dean of 
Hampton. 


The Rev H RottiweU. per m i s sion «o 
officiate, diocese of Lincoln- to be 
Assistant curate. Boston. St Bototpn. 
same diocese. 

The Rev J B Saunders. Assistant 
Curate. St Breofce and Egioshayle. 
diocese of Truro, to bo Vicar. 
TTeverbyn. same diocese. 

The Rev J r Smith. Curate. St 


North Leith, to Ayr. St Andrews. 
The Rev A G Graham from Redgorton 
with Stanley to Arbroaih. St 
MargareTs- 


Wc need your help. Every donation we receive 
means we have more to give. Please remember the 
Fund in your Will; advice on legacies, bequests and 
convenants is gladly given. If you know of anyone 
who might qualify for help from the Fund please 
let us know. 


two* EVEXINS PRESSES, br Spa- 
mu- As new. -Otnrtmassv. seta 12. 
£600 ra. 01 994 1 179/ 577 1 too 


M THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 
No. 006543 of 1986 
CHANCERY DIVIS ION 
__IN THE MATTER OF 
SCANDINAVIAN RANK CROUP PLC 
AND 

IN TOT MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NO ITCE B HEREBY CTVEN dirt IM Or- 
der of the High CMBi of JinUca (Chanoety 
Dh-tston) dated the 15th day of December 
1986 com Inning the reduction of capital 
of the above-named Company Iron 
£76.000.000 to £10694.570 and the 
Mingle approved by ihe Chun showing 
wim raspect io th* camai of the Company 
as altered tbe several particulars remaned 
by ihe above- me n tione d Act were regsa- 
tered by the Rt u b b ' ar of Co m pa nies on the 

17th December 1986. 

DATED this 20th day of Dacenucr 1986 
FteshfleidB of anadan Ho m e 
28 Newgate Street. London EC1A 7LH 
Softeners tor me above-paroed Company 


WXSTf M81 l.i Hama stody for nrr 
Degram (Loudon BA. BSc. LLB. Wtf- 
522 FWmslon*. Proapectus: 

Dew. AL6. Woisay HalL Oxford 0X2 
6PR. TO: 0866 60200 (24 Mil 

A f mt - eouwEb n«ch m 

Francs. Art History In Florence, tnfor- 
mauan from John Hall. 36 Moos m 
L ondon SW3 4NB Tel. 684 7336. 


vKMttPMMiwvnamr summer 

OOLTOE. Information from John Han. 

36 King» Rd.. London SW3 4NB. TO 


DOMESTIC 4 
CATERING SITUATIONS 


T1K I — I 17K-IIM. Other titles 
swan. Hand bound ready liar preaenla- 
Uon - also “Sundays". £12.60. 
Remember When. 01-688 6323. 


TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT. Phantom. 
Cats, airughi Fm Ch e ss . Les MW- AU 
theatre and sporM-Tei: 821-6616/828- 
0496JLEx / VRa / Diners. 


Dunoon. EdgetUU. diocese of Uver- 
pool, io be priest -in-charge. Christ 
Church. Waterloo, and priest-to- 
charge. St Mary. Waiertoo. «m» 
diocese. 

The Rev C Irvins, curate. Holy 
Cross. Newcastle, diocese of New- 
castle. to be team Vicar. St Paul 
within the WUUngion team, same 
diocese. 

The Rev A S Hopes. Vfcar. St Paul. 
Tottenham, diocese of London, to the 
Prebendai Stall of Sweating in St 
Paul's Cathedral, same diocese. 

The Pei G W Lawson, priest -In- 
charoe. Somerby. diocese of Letoesten 
io be also an honorary carton ot St 
Mark's Cathedral. Sait Lake City. 
Utah. USA. 

The Rev G S Mowai, retired, with 
permission to Officiate, diocese of Bath 
and Welts, to be minister to charge, 
the Chapel of St Mary Magdalen. 
Holloway. Bath, same diocese. 

The Pev A E D Murdoch, vicar. 
Shoeburvness. diocese of Cnelntsford- 
lo be Vicar, united parish of W&t 
Poldens (Chilton Pokien. Edinglon and 
Caicott). diocese of Bath and wells. 

The Rev C Pope. Vicar. St PhUto. 
Westbrook, diocese of Liverpool, to be 


Mary. Bermondsey, diocese of South- 
wark. to be Parish Priest. St Luke. 


wnytelrafe. same diocese. 

The Rev a D Stan. Vicar. Woburn, 
diocese of Oxford, to be Vicar, wing, 
same diocese. 


Resignations and retirements 
The Rev OH Brahhaw. Roctor. The 
Stolons with Tydd. diocese of Lincoln, 
to retire on January 31. 1987. 

The Rev RF Grist. Prlest-bvchanie. 
Chef i ion Bishop, diocese ofExeicr. to 
retire on January ol. 1987. . 

The Rev RWJ Hayoer. VtCrt. 
Countess Wear, diocese of Keeler, to 
ref ired an January IO. 1987. 

Canon G Neville. Director of Educw 
non and canon of Lincoln, diocese of 
Lincoln. Io retire as Director of 
Education on June 30. 1987. _ 

Preb DR MUler. Vicar. Wedmore 
with The ale and Blackford, and Rural 
Dean of Azbrtdge. diocese of Bath and 
Wells, and warden ol Readers, same 
diocese, to resign as Rural Doan of 


Retirements 

The Rev K S P Robtnaon from 
Edinburgh. North Merchlson. 

The Rev r N C Murray Iroro 
Pardovau and Ktogscavll wllh 
Winch burgh. 

The Rev A M Rennie from Kincardine 
craiefc and Eddenon. 

The Rev l J M Reid from Kilwinning. 
ADtoey. 

me Pev C irvtzig from Brydaktrk 

wttti HodtiaRL 

The Rev ] S C Knox from Dumfries. St 

Marys. 

The Rev R S Whkeford from 
Shaptnsay. 


Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund 

67 Portland Place, London WIN 4AR TeL 01-580 8343 


IKtaillll Grand. 1914. 6 ft Ebontsed. 
Musicians toatnnnenL CAZto. 01-886 
4981. T. 


Kcgtaercd under die War C h raities Aa 1940 and tbe Charttla Act I960 
tUsnoaoco No. 207377 


OUB YORK MVDM STONE RMngibr 
2“ nuxunura at an umra mbMf price 
Trirabone : 0625633721. 


NATHAN CRAIG LIMITED 
„ T/A CRUMPET 

* NOTICE 8 HEREBY OVEN pursuant IB 
Section 688 or the CWnpantos Art. 1986. 
ttud a MEETING or the creditors or uie 
aoove named Company win be hrid al toe 
Offices ol LEONARD CURTIS & CO . altu- 
aud U 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE. 
LONDON W2 6LF on Monday to* 22bd 
day of December 1966 ai 12.00 o'clock 
midday, far the purposes provided tor id 
S ections 689 and 690. 

Dated to* Btb day of Docember 1986 
NAT HAN CRAIG 
UtHEClOR 


EXraiKMCCB COOK for small Cntfish- 
Naffed hoiel in French Ski Resort. Tel: 
Ol 731 7989 


MA MKli a La A lrai a i w. Super tnxuri- 
ous 3 bedroom apartmePL every 
omcrtvoMe rscUny In complex. Prtvoie 
sale with urge mring. Fbred price 
£130.000. Phone eve and w/e 041 639 
4453. day 041 SSI 1666 


Cburcfi In Wales 


Axbrtdge on January 31. 19B7. 

The Res' EG Rautson. vicar. 
Dunsford wftn Doddlscombaietoh. di- 
ocese of Exeter, to retire on March 31. 
198T. 

The Rev LPN Stokes- Reijw^ 
Wol boro ugh with St Leonards and St 


The Rev J Knowles. Vicar of 
Tredunnoc and UantrtSsent and 
Lkuihennoc. to be vicar of. Dan- 
uowefl. now grouped with Tredunnoc 
and LlantriMenl and Uanhennoc. 
The Rev £ c price. Vicar of Buckley 
to be Rural Dean of Mold, diocese of 
Si Asaph. . 


‘Lusty, though wo are loathsome to love. 

Keen sighted, though we hate to look upon ourselves. 
The name of the disease, spiritually speaking. Is Humiliation. 
- John Updike 

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The Rev P H Vanili. Assistant Curale 
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Responses iBynH. O, re* oenBurn. 
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20 


***** 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


Freed hostages 
snatched back 
from Malawi 


By Nicholas Beeston 

Mozambique yesterday 
seized 57 foreign hostages, 
recently released by the 
country's National Resistance 
Movement, and flew them 
against their will from Malawi 
to Maputo in a daring opera- 
tion overseen by Mr Alberto 
Chipande, the Mozambican 
Defence Minister. 

In an unprecedented move 
that has infuriated the Inter- 
national Committee of the 
Red Cross (ICRQ and the 
Portuguese Government, the 
former captives, who were 
released by the South African- 
backed MNR (Renarao) guer- 


rilla group on Wednesday as a 
gesture of goodwill for Christ- 
mas, were forced by Malawi 
police to fllanryre airport. 

The 43 Portuguese, 10 Paki- 
stanis, two Cape Verdeans and 
two Mauritians were denied 
access to their consuls and 
forced to board a Mozambi- 
can military aicraft, which 
then flew to Maputo. 

Some of the captives had 
spent 16 months as prisoners 
in the Mozambican bush, and 
bad earlier declared they did 
not wish to go to Maputo. 

Well-informed sources told 
The Times that Mr Chipande 
was on board the Soviet-made 
jet and oversaw the entire 
operation. 

The action has jeopardized 
a forth er release by the MNR 
of eight Westerners — includ- 
ing Mr lan Robertson, a 
British engineer, a German 
family of three, three Portu- 
guese Jesuit priests and one 
other Portuguese national. 

“The mood of our people 
inside Mozambique is very 
bad indeed.” said a Renamo 
spokesman in Lisbon, who 
claimed the former hostages 
had been seized by Mozam- 
bique so that the Army could 
question them on the where- 
abouts of MNR military 
positions. 

He believed an imminent 
release of the Western hos- 
tages was “out of the question 
under the circumstances”. 

One explanation for the 
Malawi police action was that 
it coincided with the signing of 
a joint security agreement 
between Malawi and Mozam- 
bique to help end rebel activ- 


ity along their common 
border. 

Renamo with South African 
backing has waged an increas- 
ingly successful campaign 
against the Marxist Govern- 
ment in Maputo by destroying 
vital communication links 
and controlling large parts of 
the countryside. 

Yesterday's bold operation 
by Mozambique follows pres- 
sure by black-ruled front-line 
states against Malawi's Presi- 
dent, Dr Hastings Banda, the 
only leader in the region to 
maintain diplomatic relations 
with Preioria. 

Malawi's complicity in the 
operation suggests that the 
land-locked country's leader- 
ship is straining under pres- 
sure from other black states 
and falling in line with anti- 
South African policy. 

Following the death of 
Mozambican President Mach- 
el in an air crash in October, 
Pretoria claimed that it had 
uncovered a secret plot by the 
late President and Zimbab- 
wean Prime Minister, Mr 
Robert Mugabe, to overthrow 
Dr Banda and replace him 
with a leader more sympa- 
thetic to the front-line cause. 

Although Harare and Ma- 
puto denied the accusation. 
Western diplomatic sources in 
Malawi said the Government 
was “deeply concerned” 

• LISBON: Portugal's For- 
eign Ministry- has presented an 
energetic protest to the Ma- 
lawi Government for snatch- 
ing back the 43 Portuguese 
hostages (Martha de !a Cal 
writes). 

The protest was made at the 
highest level 7 through the 
Portuguese diplomat who. 
along with the ICRC. was in 
Malawi to carry out the 
repatriation of the hostages. 

ST < 

, MALAWI } 
OBtantyni / 

tS , 2 CO mlfiS 

s — 

<£/ Indian Ocean. 

jy v. 

Maputo 

f 

SWAZILAND 




The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,234 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,228 Solution to Puzzle No 17,233 


m e 


c e r ra m a 


rp'A c - e: si 



reiE.Si l ID'U'E. 


A prize o/The Times Concise Atlas of the World will be given 
for the first five correct solutions opened next Wednesday. 
Entries should be addressed to: The Times. Saturday Crossword 
Competition. PO Box 486, Virginia Street. London El 9DD. 
The winners and solution will be published next Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturday’s competition are: R Cathey, 
Bradley Lane. Eccleston, Chorley, Lancs; H Grenville. Forest 
Drive West. London Ell ; Mrs M F HorwilL Chillem Rd. 
Hitchin. Herts; R Lyle, Glynderi, Sennybridge, Brecon, Powvs; 
A Reed, co. Mayfair Hotel, Esplanade. Scarborough, N Yorks. 

Address 



ACROSS 

1 Equal financial reward when 
novice enters golf com- 
petition (5,4). 

$ Girl on the piano - capital 
in Mediterranean island (5). 

9 Most kindred are in the 
home (7). 

10 Number I and several more 
find offensive (7). 

11 Appropriate ceremonial 
form in speech (5). 

12 Italian wine - not an un- 
usual surprise (3,2,4). 

13 Fat and wet (8). 

15 Sounds so disgusted (4). 

19 One still is first to make a 
snow man (4). 

20 17th century girl straddles a 
horse (8). 

23 Horror of man beset by 
weird spectre (3,6). 

24 Fish - one caught inside 
grounds (5). 

26 “In general” (T quote) “That 
divides exactly” (7). 

27 Palm-oil left out of bilberry 
pie (7). 

28 Twisted, without head or 
arms (5). 

29 Never mourn aboui one 
gone but not forgotten (9). 


DOWN 

1 Dogsbody may find a new 
position about 1 1 (3,6). 

2 In a nasal tone they an- 
nounce “A meal — eat up" 
(5). 

3 They don’t get drunk, al- 
though let loose among 
plenty (8). 

4 In general, cards are much 
less (3.5). 

5 One who is drawn from 
New England? (6). 

6 In a factory one is easily 
modified (6). 

7 Hurry up and give ring to 
destructive female in love 
(4,5). 

S A small section, but pro- 
ficient (S). 

14 Huntsmen ore very fit 
(2,3,4). 

16 Place card has Christopher 
and two more names (5,4). 

17 Dad's skin is fairly good (8). 

18 Doing repairs — it's work at 

last (8). 

21 A cycle is available (6). 

22 Kind of maggot (6). 

23 Mark two (5). 


25 Kid influenced by speech 
(5). 

Jumbo Crossword page 12 


£1 5m of Sterling bound for America 


' i - V- - V 'iu,;. ■ 





Austin Rover yesterday 
began shipping the first 
batch of 900 executive 
Rover 800 cars to the 
United States where they 
will be known as the 
Sterling and where deal- 
ers have promised to sell a 
minimum of 28,000 mod- 
els during 1987. 

They were due to leave 
Southampton last night 
on the car carrier Don 
.1 linn . 

This first delivery is 
worth £15m and 150 US 
dealers appointed from 
1,200 applicants wOl sell 
throughout the country. 

The Sterling is being 
produced at the 
company's Cowley plant 
at Oxford. Over 2,000 
cars will have left Britain 
for the USA by the end of 
this year. 

(Photograph: Harry 
Kerr). 


Asian school governor 
fears Brent ghetto 


Inquiry in new year 
on defence buying 


Continued from page 1 
think it’s the people who try to 
suppress these things who are 
the guilty ones." 

Mr Hasani disclosed that 
four white children had been 
withdrawn from Sudbury 
school in the past three days 
and at least two more would 
be leaving in January. “It's 
tragic and it's all because of 
the council's policies that this 
area is becoming a ghetto. 
White people feel under pres- 
sure so there is a rush to leave. 
It is not healthy.” 

Turning to his wife for 
reassurance. Mr Hasani 
added: “I have been here for 
23 years. I love this country. 
There is such a mix of races 
and cultures in such a small 
confined island. It is a blessing 
and a virtue. ” 


Mr Hasani. who is 56. is an 
architect and planner. - *! be- 
long to no party; I speak tny 
mind and 1 am not afraid.” 
But yesterday he was wonder- 
ing "how long a “free mar.” 
could survive in Brent's politi- 
cal climate. 

“1 have just been to the 
school to congratulate Miss 
McGoldrick on her release 
from the turbulent situation 
that has surrounded her. But 
now 1 think that turbulence is 
about to be transferred to 
me_" 

An official of Brent council 
said that he did not know how. 
when or by whom the in- 
vestigation into Mr Hasani 
would be conducted. How- 
ever. Mrs Helene Powell the 
Conservative spokesman on 
education, said: “They should 
let the matter rest 


i Continued from page I 
I other large scale procurement 
i cocirar.5 within the Ministry 
: of Defence :o see what lessons 
1 can be learned far the future. 

■ During tire nine year 
j development of tire Nimrod, a 
' decision to cancel and save 
! millions of pounds, could 
1 have been made during any of 
• tire five reviews, which were 
carried cur. Despite the 
doubts, senior officials of the 
Ministry of (Defence and GEC 
jointly voted to cany on. 

Sources within Whitehall 
said yesterday that at each of 
the reviews the GEC and 
Ministry officials bad given 
“strong consideration about 
whether to continue” bar each 
time the p r ogramme was 
allowed to say alive. 

Ministry of Defence of- 
i Sriais were persuaded 10 keep 


faith with Nimrod largely 
because of the company's 
conviction that it could be 
made to work. But with 
hindsight, said one Whitehall 
source yesterday, the 
Government's technical ex- 
perts should have “pulled the 
plug”. 

It was conceded yesterday 
that there were too many 
people wanting the system to 
work and a more criticial 
monitoring procedure could 
have ensured an earlier 
cancellation. 

The MoD believe that the 
programme was handled cor- 
rectly this year and although 
officials had felt for the last 12 
months that it was not going 
to succeed, GEC had to be 
given a fair chance to prove it 
could. 

The fall of Nimrod, page 2 


Stalker is 
to retire 
early from 
the force 

Continued from page I 
Firs! the police aoihoriiv 
«fnsed 10 bear financial 
burden and then the Associ- 
ation of Chief Police Ofliccrs 
expressed their unwillingness 
io make any contribution. 

h was only after Mr Stalker 

faced the alternative of selling 
his Cheshire home that his 
solicitor. Mr Rodger Pennont 
waived the excess owed in 
leeal fees after supporters 
raised about £4.000. 

Mr Stalker's resignation was 
greeted with dismay by Mr 
Tonv McCardell, chairman of 
the Greater Manchester Police 
Authority policy committee. 

Mr Steve Murphy, ponce 
authority chairman, said 
“I’m very 1 sad to learn of his 
plans to retire because after 
living under a black cloud of 
suspicion for some months he 
was able to dear bis name and 
I have looked forward to a 
long and mutually respectful 
relationship with someone I 
consider a fine policeman." 

News of Mr Stalker's de- 
cision was broken to Detective 
Chief Supt Peter Topping, the 
man leading the Yorkshire 
Moors murder search at a 
lunchtime press conference. 
He said: “I am sad to hear iL It 
is sad to lose a valued 
colleague." 

Greater Manchester Police 
Authority late yesterday ac- 
cepted Mr Stalkers request 10 
resign without discussion. 
They agreed he wouid be 
allowed to leave in March next 
year from his £33.000 a year 
post on foil retirement pen- 
sion. 

Mr Ken Strath, a left-wing 
member of the authority, said 
that Mr Stalker had been 
driven from office and that a 
“oust Stalker campaign” bad 
been mounted by disaffected 
members of Greater Manches- 
ter Police. 

As he left the police 
authority meeting. Mr 
Anderton denied that any rift 
existed between him and his 
deputy and said that he was 
saddened by Mr Stalker’s 
decision to resign. 

“However there are many 
fine officers always available 
to fill our jobs and I am sure 
we will find a suitable 
replacement.” he said. 

Anderton battle, page 2 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 


New exhibitions 

York Art Society Annual 
Exhibition; York City Art Gal- 
lery, Mon to Sat 10 to 5, Sun 
2.30 to 5 (ends Jan 11). 

Music 

Bampion Singers Christmas 
Concert; St Mary's Church. 
Bampton, 7.30. 

Vivaldi: Four Seasons: 
Shcldonian Theatre. Oxford. S. 

Festival Service of Nine Les- 
sons and Carols in cande light; 
Church of St James the Greater, 
Leicester, 6.30. 

Family Concert of Carols and 
Christmas Music. Cambridge 
Philharmonic Society: The Corn 
Exchange, Wheeler St, Cam- 
bridge, 7.30 

Bolton Choral Union's Fam- 
ily Carol Concerts; Victoria 
Hall. Bolton, 7.30. 

The Chelmsford Singers, 
Christmas Oratorio; Chelms- 
ford Cathedral 7.30. 

English String Orchestra, 
Worcester Cathedral Choir; 
Malvern Priory, Worcester, 
7.30. 

Carol Concert; Wells Cathe- 
dral Oratorio Society, Wells, 
7.00. 

Bristol Choral Society; 
Colston Hall. Bristol 7.30. 

Bristol Bach Choir, St 
George's. Brandon Hill Bristol 
7.30. 

Christmas Concert by the 
Abbey Choir and Gabrieli Brass 
Ensemble; Bath Abbey, Bath, 
7.30. 

Christmas Concert: The 
Snowman: The Sands Centre. 
Carlisle, 7.30. 

Carols for Christmas. North- 
ampton Bach Choir, St 
Matthew's Church, Northamp- 
ton, 7.30. 

Carols by CandelighU The 
Briggait, 72 Clyde St Glasgow, 
S. 

On Christmas Night by Nigel 
Forde. St John’s College Chapel 
York. 3 and 7. 

General 

Santa Steam Specials, Bo'ness 
and Kinneil Railway. Union 
Street Bo’ness, West Lothian, 
11 to 4. 


Tomorrow’s events 


Royal engagement 

Princess Alexandra attends a 
gala tribute presented by the 
English National Opera to mark 
the retirement of Lord Good- 
man. CH, as Chairman of the 
Board at the London Coliseum, 
7.15. 

Music 

Family Carols Concert: 
Bournemouth Sinfometla and 
Symphony Chorus; Wessex 
Hall, Arts Centre, Poole, Dorset, 
7.45 

Christmas Concert The East- 
bourne Sinfonia; Floral Hall, 
Winter Garden. Eastbourne. 
Sussex, 3. 

Christmas Concert Tiverton 
Amateur Operatic Society; 
Knighishayes Court. Tiverton, 
Devon. 7.30. 

Master Concerts Series: 
London Brass. Music from 
Renaissance Italy; Wilde The- 
atre, South Hill Park Arts 
Centre, Bracknell Berks. 7.30. 

Carols and Poetry for the 
Nativity; St Mary’s Cathedral. 
Palmerston PI Edinburgh, 6.30. 

Carols for All: City of Bir- 
mingham Choir, Heart of Eng- 
land Brass Ensemble. Kingsbury 
Handbell Ringers; Town Hall 
Birmingham, 2.30. 


Roads 


London and South-east: 
A40(M): Diversions at 
Westway. Paddington, with 
westbound closed ro traffic to- 
day and tomorrow. West End: 
Congestion caused by Christ- 
mas shopping. M20 Kent: 
Contraflow between junctions 7 
and 8 near Maidstone. 

Wales and the west M5i Lane 
closures between junctions 28 
and 30 (Cullorapton/Exeter). 
A38: Delays and lane closures ai 
the top of Haldon HOI between 
Exeter and Plymouth. A48: 
Delays, lane restrictions and 
contraflow between Llandaff 
and Gabalfa. 

The Midlands: M5: One lane 
open northbound between junc- 
tions 6 and 5 (Worcester 
N/Droitwicb). The M5 will be 
closed between junctions 5 and 
7 (Droitwich/Worcester S) from 
9 pm tomorrow to 6 am 
Monday. A!: Contraflows N of 
Newark at Cromwell and 
Carlton-on-TrenL A5: Tem- 
porary lights E of Telford at 
Weston under Lizard. 

The North: MI: Repair work 
between junctions 31 and 33 
(Worksop/Rotherham). A6: Di- 
versions at junction of Chorley 
Rd and Moorside Rd, Swinton. 
A19: Single line traffic at Bari by 
and Riocal bypass, N Yorkshire. 

Scotland: M8 Glasgow: East- 
bound lane closed between junc- 
tions 17 and 15 
(Kelvin side/Town head). A82: 
Delays and lane restrictions S of 
Drumnadrochit. Inverness- 
shire. A94 Angus: Bypass 
construction N of Forfar. 

Information supplied by AA 


The pound 


AostnlbiS 
Austria Sch 
Belgium Ff 
Canada S 
Denmark Kr 
Finland Mkk 
France ft 
G an nat ty Ora 
Greece Dr 
Hona KoogS 
IretandPt 
Italy tin 
•topoaYea 
NetfmtandsGId 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Eac 
Sooth Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
SwodonKr 
Switzerland Fr 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Dor 


Bank 


21.10 

63.10 

2 jM 

1153 

7.48 

9.78 

300 

236 

11.44 

1.102 

2080 

245 

358 

11-30 

221 

445 

200 

1032 

052 

1.495 

820 


Sank 

SeSs 

2.11 

1940 

5930 

1-95 

10.73 

656 

028 

233 

216 

1044 

1442 

1960 

231 

330 

1070 

209 

3.65 

190 

9.77 

238 

1.425 

720 


Rates tor small denomi na tion bank notes 
only as suppked by Baudays Bank PLC. 
Different rates apply to travellers' 
cheques and other forergn currency 
business. 

Ratafl Price Index: 391.7 

London: The FT index closed up 15 at 
1272.1. 


C 


WEATHER )Coid, showery NW flow across Britain. A strong, colt 
" 1 / NW wind wfl! bring showers to many parts of the conn 

m. • • • . . . _ ■ m.r a Mr ...... 


iin wma will ornig soowers to many |nn> ui uic wum 

try. The most frequent and heaviest showers are likely to be in N and W areas o 
Scotland, parts of N Ireland, N and W coastal areas of England and Wales- Othei 
areas will see showers interspersed with good sunny periods. The showers will Cal 
as snow over all high ground, with drifting in the strong wind. Away from the coast 
showers of sleet and snow are possible. During the evening, showers will contintu 
near exposed coasts, but inland, as long dear periods develop, a widespread fros 
will occur. Outlook for tomorrow and Monday: Remaining cold and showery, will 
a risk of longer spells of snow in N and some E areas. Widespread night frosts. 

TODAY Son rioac Sun sets: ( AM J 

□ 

Last quarter December 24 


Son rises: 
BUS i-n 

Moan sets: 
11.11 an 


Sunsets: 

£53 pm 

Moon rises: 
7.46 pm 


TOMORROW Sunrises 
3.04 am 


Cl 


Sun sots: 
153 pm 


Moon sets: Moonrises: 
11.27 am 9.01pn 


Last quarter December 24 


Anniversaries 


TODAY 

Births: John Wflson Croker, 
politician and writer, Galway, 
1805. 

Deaths: John Steinbeck, New 
York, 1968. 

TOMORROW 

Births: Jean Racine, drama- 
tist, La Ferte — MiJon, France, 
1639; Sir Joseph Whitworth, Bt, 
mechanical engineer, Stockport, 
1803; Benjamin Disraeli, 1st 
Earl of Beaconsfield, Prime 
Minister 1868, 1874-80, 
London. 1804. 

Deaths: Giovanni Boccaccio, 
Certaldo, 1375; James Parkin- 
son, physician, London, 1924; 
F. Scott Fitzgerald, novelist and 
short story writer, Hollywood, 
1940; George Patton, American 
general, Heidelberg, 1945; 
Gladys Ripley, contralto, Chich- 
ester, 1955. 


Airport delays 


Air travellers can help reduce 
queues and delays at airports 
during the holiday period by 
carrying only one item of band 


twand bound passengers 
are also advised not to wrap 
Christmas presents before flying 
as the wrappings may be re- 
moved during security checks. 


Our address 


Information far inclusion fa The 
Times Utfprmaiton aeryte e _aftquW M 
wnl to: The Editor. TTJ5. TTw Times. 
RO Box 7. i Virginia arret Wfldw. 
El 9XN. 


t^mMES NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 


Printed by London Post t Print 

crsl Limited of 1 Virginia am 
London El WXN and tty News 
Scotland Ltd.. 124 Portmwi SOtml 
K uuimo Park. Glasgow 041 1EJ. 
Saturday. December 80. .. 
neaatered as a newspaper at the Rost 
Office. 





For readers who may have 
missed a copy of The Times this 
week, we repeat below the 
week's Portfolio price changes 
(today’s are on page 25). 

U M To H to M Sri ’KST 

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btfOUl, 


C UGHT1NG-UP TIME ) 

TODAY 

London 423 pm to 7-34 am 
Bristol 4.33 pm to 7.43 am 
Ec fi nlaaBtiA.09ptntoB.12am 
Manchester 4-21 pm to 7.53 am 
Rename® 4^7 pm to 7.49 am 

TOMORROW 

London 423 pm to 734 am 
Bristol 433 pm to 7.44 am 
Etfinbutgb4.10pm to 8-1 3 am 
Manchester 431 pm to 7.53 am 
- 4.52 pm to 749 am 





(. HIGH TIDES 

) 


C YESTERDAY ) 

Temperatures at midday yesterday; c, 
cloud; r. fain r. rain; a. sun. 

C F C F 

Belfast . c 236 Guernsey r 745 

s 541 Inverness s 236 

I 643 Jenay c 745 

s 745 London s 745 

Confiff s 643 michstar s 541 

Edinburgh r 236 Newcastle e 439 

Gfasgow si 337 Rfakfenmy s 541 

( LONDON ) 


Ye ste r da y: Temp: max 6 am to 6 pm. 8C Portland 
IMF) ; mbl 6 _pm to 6 ara^C (39F) 

Hixiifty: 6 pm. 75 per cent. Rato: 24hr to 
6 pm. Q.QZns Sim: 24 hr to 6 pm. 55 hrs 
Bar. mean sea level, 8 pm. 1009.1 
mi Khars, rising 
1 ,000 mfflbars— 2S53in. 

C AROUND BRITAIN ^ 


TODAY 

London Bridge 

Aberdeen 

Avonmouth 

Belfast 

Cardiff 

Devonport 

Dover 

Falmouth 

Glasgow 

Harwich 

isr-' 

Ilfrac om be 

Larth 

Liverpool 

Low estoft 
Margate 
Milford Haven 
Newquay 
Oban 


Shoraham 
Southampton 
Swansea 
Tees 

IIQlnn nn ll.a 
mr uuiivi tun 


ZJS0 

338 

9.14 

1.09 
653 
7.48 
1 00 
7.16 
354 
1.40 

12.19 

852 

750 

4.47 

1.10 
1154 

155 

asa 

7.14 
7 37 
648 
644 
153 
1.08 

1256 

626 

556 

135 


HT 

6.6 

35 

11.7 

3.0 
105 

5 2 
65 

5.0 
45 
3.7 


PM 

450 

358 

358 

158 

953 

6.06 

1.06 

758 

246 

208 


45 1251 
65 652 

63 853 
55 552 

64 153 
21 11.42 
45 252 
6L3 644 
6A 7.36 
&7 8.14 
55 7.09 
15 950 
45 155 
5.7 1.14 
45 1258 
85 847 
45 600 
35 204 


KT 

6.6 

4.0 
115 

3A 

105 

45 

6.0 
45 
45 
27 
55 

65 
7.9 
54 
8.B 
2 A 

4.4 
64 
61 

3.4 
4.B 
1.7 
4.1 

66 

4.1 
85 

5.1 
35 


TOMORROW 

London Bridge 

Aberdeen 

Avonmouth 

Belfast 

Confiff 

Dewagwri 

Dover 

FOtmooffi 

Glasgow 

Harwich 

llnhihnart 

ncfwneaa 

Mnoantoe 

LeAh 

Liverpool 

Lowestoft 

Margate 

M8fmd Haven 


Oban 


Portsmouth 

Sboretaem 

r ia w t hn yifOfl 


Te_ 

WntMt-en-Hee 


Tide me e mir ed In metres: 1n=35606fL 


AM 

456 

4.19 

9.46 
1 <8 
951 

8.13 

154 
7.43 
357 
215 

1259 

9.10 

856 

556 

1.47 

229 

940 

753 

8.12 

7.17 

9.13 
210 
1.41 

155 
9.01 
656 
208 


HT PM I 
65 457 6 

3.7 4.06 3 

115 10.10 11 
3.0 206 3 

9.55 10 
633 i 
1.41 S 
6.03 4 

352 4 

246 3 

1.10 S 
9.08 G 
9.00 7 

5j43 4 

1.59 a 


10.6 

5.1 
. 65 

45 

4.1 
35 
45 
64 

8.1 
45 
85 


- 1256 
45 258 
65 952 
62 615 
35 851 
55 758 
14 953 
4.1 212 

5.6 153 
4.1 157 
85 952 
45 858 
3.8 240 


S cai faoro 

Bridbtgton 

Cramer 

Lowestoft 

Clacton 

Margate 

Folkestone 

Hastings 

E asili o u me 

Brighton 

Worthing 


SouDaoa 

ShanMn 

Boumeath 

Poole 

Swatioge 

Weymouth 

Exmouth 

Torquay 

FWmouSi 
Scaly Mas 
Guernsey 
N e wquay 
l Uffl cambe 


Doughs 
BIwnAapt 

Bristol (CM) 

CvtWe 

London 

M an ctw s far 

iretLn-Tyae 

rtOtongnsni 


ConSfll 
Eskdafemuir 


Prestwick 
Ore a 
Wick 


Sun Rain 

Max 

hrs 

in 

C 

F 

- 

54 

5 

41 

3.1 

.06 

6 

43 

34 

.18 

5 

41 

6.1 

.02 

7 

4S 



6 

43 

7.0 

54 

7 

45 

7.1 

.01 

7 

45 

64 

.02 

11 

52 

65 

.02 

6 

43 

85 

.01 

7 

45 

75 

.01 

7 

45 

65 

- 

7 

45 

&9 

. 

7 

45 

65 

54 

7 

45 

45 

53 

7 

46 

5-4 

59 

7 

45 

55 

.11 

7 

45 

3.3 

51 

10 

50 

Z9 

.14 

7 

45 

2 JS 

.07 

8 

46 

* 

.16 

8 

46 

15 

58 

9 

46 

4.1 

50 

9 

46 

K£J 

.09 

8 

46 


.13 

9 

4$ 

15 

51 

7 

45 

- 

57 

6 

43 

as 

.42 

5 

41 

5.6 

.16 

6 

43 

6.1 

_ 

8 

46 

0.1 

.09 

5 

41 

55 

-OS 

9 

46 

17 

59 

6 

43 

ZS 


5 

41 

4.6 

.10 

5 

41 

25 

51 

7 

45 

4.1 

.11 

8 

43 

25 

54 

7 

45 

0.4 

.45 

2 

36 

0.7 

50 

3 

37 

25 

.13 

5 

41 

■3J 

56 

6 

43 

15 

5E 

6 

43 

- 

53 

2 

36 

03 

.13 

4 

39 

MObk 





c 


NOON TODAY 


shower 



WfflAY: c. «. f. tain * tag: 4 «« „ ^ L 


show 


show 


Atafdrfa 
Algiers 
Acnsfdm 
Athens 
Bahrain ‘ 
Barbadc* 
Baraka 
Beirut 


iJ6Wui7 



Bermuda’ 

Biarritz 
Borax 
BouTne 
Brunets 
Budapst 
B Aires* 

Cairo 
' Capa Tin 
-CUtanca 
Chicago* . . - 
Ch'chureh f 26 


C 
c 16 
c 13 
c 13 
6 21 
r 5 
s 12 
s 20 
f 28 
f 14 

r 7 
SI 2 
f 20 
f 11 
t 11 

r 3 
r 4 
c 24 
c 16 
s 28 
f 17 
e 0 


F 

61 Cologne 
55 Cpmgn* 
55 Corfu 
70 DubSn ' 
41 Dubrvn** 
54 Fere . 

68 Fkmnee 
82 Frankfurt 
57 Fnochaf 
Geneva 
45 Gibraltar 

36 Katankr 
68 Hong K 
52 Innstt t ek 
52 Istanbul 

37 JoTnog* 
39 Karachi 
75 L Patau 
61 Uafaan 
82 Locarno 
63 L Angels* 
32 inmmbg 
79 Madrid 


On 12 
s 16 

fin i 
I 8 
c 

c 20 

s 21 
C 14 
c io 
s 16 
C 2 
fg 2 


ss fijr 

so Matta 
39 Mefc-me 
48Mttfe0C 
w 
55 
41 

86 

41 Munich 
61 Nairobi 
10 Naples 
61 NtaU 
34 N York* 
46 Nice 
°* to ‘ 

85 Parts 

2 Ptsrlh 
57 Prague 

SSS&f 

36 fflodej 
Riyadh 


• derwu Thonraay-s ^ 


C F 

s 19 66 Rome 
s 16 64 Satzbuig c 3 ! 
S 17 S 3 S Frisco* d 12 i 
i 23 73 Santiago* s 27 i 
_ _ SPaido* r 21 
s 27 61 Seoul 
f 9 48 Slng'por 
» o 32 sndwtai- 
8,1 -1 30 StrasbYg 
so 1 34 Sydney 
>' Tangier 
e 16 61 Telaviv 
■ 61 Tenerife 

r V 45 Tokyo 

* 18 81 Toronto* 
r 1 34 Tufas 
a 6 43 Vatonda 
a 0 32 VimeW 
S 32 90 Venice 
f 3 37 Vienna 
s -1 30 Warsaw 
5 12 54 Washlon 1 , 

* 7S WeTmon f 
3 26 77 Zurich c 


C 

f 17 fl 


c 2 3 

f 30 a 

sn -3 2 
c 5 4 
s 24 7 

C 18 6 
I 12 5 
9 22 7 
S 17 6 
r 2 9 
f 15 5 
f 16. S 
t 
S 
f 
I 


0 3 

6 4 
S 4 
4 3 

7 4 
19 8 
3 S 




■L. 








BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 29 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 33 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 

1272.1 (+1.5) 

FT-SE 100 

1632.2 (+1.6) 

Bargains 

31646 (30087) 

USM (Datastream) 

128.86 (-0.42) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 
1.4325 (+0.0030) 

W German mark 
2.8729 (+0.0025) 

Trade-weighted 

68.6 (+ 0 . 1 ) 


Japanese 
licences 
for firms 

Three British companies, 
Morgan Grenfell Midland 
Bank and James Capel, have 
been awarded branch licences 
to operate as securities busi- 
nesses in Japan. 

Morgan Grenfell said tha t 
its branch should open in 
April. Midland Bank's licence 
has been awarded to its Sam- 
uel Montagu Securities off- 
shoot. James Capel has 
representative status in Ja pan 
The new licence will enable it 
to upgrade its operations to 
branch status. 

Siebe agrees 
Ranco deal 

Siebe has agreed to acquire 
Ranco for $40 (£27.97) per 
share in cash, v aluing Ranco 
at about $150 million. The 
acquisition will be effected 
through a merger of IR Ac- 
quisition Corp, a US subsid- 
iary of Siebe, with Ranco. 

Below target 

A £3.55 million provision 
against property develop- 
ments in Britain and the US 
depressed pretax profits from 
Guinness Peat, the financial 
services group, for the year to 
end-September. They were at 
a iower-than-expected £13 
million, compared with £17.6 
million in 1984-85. 

Heath acts 

C E Heath, the insurance 
broking group hit by top 
management resignations, 
moved to restore confidence 
yesterday by announcing five 
new main-board directors, 
four from Fielding Insurance, 
the fellow Lloyd's broker 
whose merger with C E Heath 
was followed by the defection 
of 28 senior staff 


No referrals 

British 
Shipping' 
lions of 5 


British & Commonwealth 
j's proposed acquisi- 
tions of Steel Brothers Hold- 
ings and of Exco International 
are not being referred to the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission. 

Profit rises 

Stainless Metalcraft, the 
fabricator of stainless 
aluminium and exotic metals 
in the medical nuclear and 
aerospace industries, in- 
creased pretax profits for the 
year to end-August from £0.6 
million to just overfl million. 
A final dividend of 2.5p 
makes a total of 4.5p for the 
year. Tempos; page 23 


No sale 


Associated British Ports will 
not buy Sealink’s ports at 
Heysham, Newhaven and 
Paikeston Quay, Harwich, af- 
ter pre liminar y talks failed to 
produce an agreement on 
financial terms. 


Traded Opts 22 
Money Mrfets 22 
Foreign Each 22 
Wall Street 22 
Co News 22 

Comment 23 


Stock Market 23 

Ksr™*, 3 

Commodities 24 
USM Prices 24 
Share Prices 25 


Guinness’s ‘gesture of confidence’ 


Boesky f 70m 
not short term 


By Richard Lander 

The investment in the 
Boesky partnership had the 
full backing of the Guinness 
board. The four independent 
non-executive directors who 
subsequently joined the board 
in August were not available 
for comment last night. 

However sources at other 
companies that made much 
smaller investments said they 
understood the partnership, 
which specialized in corporate 
arbitrage speculation, was in- 
tended to have a five-year life. 

As the largest limited part- 
ner with more than 10 per cent 
of the $900 million (£629.4 
million) partnership, 
Guinness could not be ex- 
pected to have a right to 
withdraw its funds at short 
notice. 

“I don’t think that as a 

the funds and was a gesture of . limited partner one had any 
confidence in Mr Boesky who right to withdraw funds. I 
was seen to be important in don't believe a fund of that 
our plans in the United nature could be organized on 
States". any other basis," said a senior 


Mr Ivan Boesky’s arbitrage 
partnership in which the 
Guinness group held a major 
stake was not a vehicle suit- 
able for the short-term placing 
of funds, according to other 
participants in the fund. 

On Thursday, a Guinness 
spokesman likened the £69,8 
million investment in the 
fund last May to “putting 
money in the bank". 

He said the funds were 
placed there because of doubts 
about sterling and in anticipa- 
tion of a commercial ac- 
quisition in the United States 
within a six to 18-month 
period. 

However last night he said; 
“It was not intended to create 
the impression that those 
funds would be available for 
an acquisition in short period 
of time. It was seen as being a 
safe and profitable haven for 


executive at another company 
which invested in the Boesky 
partnership. 

Among those that took 
small stakes in the Boesky 
vehicle were Mr Gerald 
Ron son’s Heron group, the 
Water Authorities Super- 
annuation Fund, Comm ercial 
Union and J Henry Schroder 
Wagg, the merchant bank. 

Guinness said it did not 
publicly disclose the invest- 
ment in May because it did 
not regard the move as an 
acquisition. 

Guinness shares, which 
slumped 19p to 280p on 
Thursday, slipped to 277p in 
early trading yesterday but 
recovered to dose 4p higher 
on balance. Business was ac- 
tive again with 6.7 million 
shares changing hands . 

• Guinness announced yes- 
terday that it bad agreed to sell 
the former headquarters of 
Distillers for £30.4 million 
cash to the London & Metro- 
politan property group. 



£50m Big Bang 
boost for BZW 


Malcolm RifknuL • 
“Opportunities” 

Britoil’s 
£35m HQ 
opened 

Britoil's £35 million head- 
quarters in Glasgow was 
opened yesterday by Mr Mal- 
colm Rifkind, the Secretary of 
State for Scotland. 

It brings Britoil’s 800 staff 
under one roof Previously, 
the staff was located in 11 
buildings in the dty. 

Sir Philip Shelbourne, the 
chairman of BritoiL referred 
to “trying circumstances in 
the oil industry over the past 
12 months," mul said it was 
important to have the the staff 
in one bulding. 

Construction of the BritoA 
complex began in 1983, and 
Sir Philip paid tribute to its 
completion on time and to 
budget 

Mr Rifkind referred also to 
the foil in oil prices, but said it 
was important to remember 
how beneficial North Sea oil 
was to Britain, to Glasgow and 
the rest of Scotland. 

The Department of Energy 
had recently authorized 12 
new developments — “all 
providing opportunities for 
Scotland and Britain’s econ- 
omy for many years to come," 
Mr Rifkind added. 

He said it was good to see a 
British company satisfied with 
its location in Scotland. It was 
highly desirable that other 
companies should emulate 
this in the months and years to 
come.” 

Mr Rifkind saw a working 
model of the oil rig placed on 
the Clyde field, based 180 
miles south-east of Aberdeen. 
He was told that 83 per cent of 
the rig was of British content 
B.iioil is working on five 
new developments. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 

New York .... 

Dow Jones 1918.45 (+5.63) 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow 18330.03 (+206.31) 

Amsterdam: Gen 280-8 (+?■ 

Syd ne y A O 1456.8 ( 

cSUSSmnk 20387 (+86) 

General* _ 

Parts: CAC - 410.9 (+05) 

Zurich: SKA Gen .. — 550.0 [-0.7) 
London: FT. A srsTSi til 

Closing prices PO0e25 

INTEREST RATES 

London: Baric Base: 1 1% 

3-month interbank 1 H+11 
3-month eligible WilsriO^M- 1 
buying rale 
US; Prims Rate 
Federal Funds 6 s ro%’ 

3-month Treasury Bills 5-53-5-57% 
30-year bonds I0iv*-I0l s i6 


CURRENCIES 


London: 
£.51.4325 
£ DM2.8729 
£ SwFr2.409S 
£ FFr9.4137 
£ Ysn23864 

£ lndex:68.6 

ECU £0.724223 


New York: 

& £1.4327* 

5: DM2.0060* 
1- SwFrl.6845- 
S: FFr6.6765’ 

S: Yenl 63.17* 

$: Index: 1 1 0-8 

SDR E0.840721 


main price changes 


RISES: 

Wm Cook — 
Bumdene Irw. 
First Leisure . 
TlpTop 

Dawson lot - 
MacCarthys- 
Pearson 


2!9^(+10 p 


,«06p(+11p 


:SSr« 


(Ifi 

p(+8p] 

General Accident 794p (+10p| 

Westtem Bros 126p(+6p) 

TSI 67p (+5p) 


FALLS: 

Grand Met 

THF .... 


448p -7p) 

165p -5p) 


McCarthy 6 Stone — 292p 

§31 

Hi? 

rXj Tompklm 236p(-15p) 
prices are as at 4prt 


GOLD 


so 


London Fixing: 
am $394.1 5_ 
close $393.7 
274.75) 

££&»« ■ 


.75 (£274.25- 


northseaoil 


Brent (Jan.) 

• Denotes f 


By Alexandra Jackson 

Barclays de Zoete Wedd, 
the securities arm of Barclays 
Bank, is to receive a capital 
injection of £50 million to 
fund international expansion 
and to respond to the substan- 
tial increase in business since 
Big Bang in October. 

In line with a statement 
made earlier in the year. 


Pans of Barclays de Zoete 
Wedd have been behind the 
competition in setting up op- 
erations in overseas markets, 
so now BZW has to do some 
catching up. 

Commenting on the capital 
requirements of the securities 
operation. Lord Caxnoys said: 
“We are paying $17 million 


maoe earner in me year, we are paying ai / milli on 
Barclays Bank is to draw down for Wall Street Gearing, a US 
£50 million for use in its’ discount broker, which will 


use in 

securities business. 

This is the last tranche of a 
total current capital commit- 
ment made by the clearing 
bank of £250 million. 

Lord Camoys, chief exec- 
utive of Barclays de Zoete 
Wedd Holdings, said: “The 
increase in our capital base 
reflects Barclays’ confidence 
in BZW." 

The money would be used 
to increase the group's inter- 
national presence, especially 
in New York and Tokyo. 


operate independently of our 
existing securities operation in 
New York. 

“In addition, we expect to 
get a licence in Tokyo in the 
second quarter of next year. 
This will require us to have a 
capital base of about £10 
million.” 

He added: “It is probable 
that £50 milljon could be 
needed to expand the business 
next year. Further capital 
injections will be made as 
necessary to meet future 
growth." 


£600m foreigners’ tap 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


The Bank of England an- 
nounced yesterday that it is 
issuing £600 million of Vh per 
cent index-linked stock, with a 
maturity date of 2024. The 
stock will be free of tax to 
foreigners, the first time this 
has applied to an index-linked 
stock. 

The funding announcement 
was notable in several re- 
spects. The new stock will 
have the longest maturity of 
any British government stock. 

It comes when there are 
worries about an increasein 
inflation in Britain, where 
foreign interest in the gilt 
market, in particular, has been 
muted, with investors con- 
cerned about the con- 
sequences for inflation if the 
Conservatives lose the 
election. 


In addition, the funding 
comes when analysts have 
been revising down their es- 
timates of funding for the 
remainder of the financial 
year, in line with the Iower- 
than-expected public sector 
borrowing requirement 

The PSBR of £5.7 billion for 
the first eight months of the 
year was overfunded by £0.1 
billion. The new stock is 
payable £30 at tender, on 
December 30, and the remain- 
der on February JO; where it 
will help to cover redemptions 
of existing stock. 

The announcement of fund- 
ing in the index-linked sector 
helped the conventional mar- 
ket yesterday. Prices recov- 
ered by around half a point. 



Opec may leave 

Iraq out of 
oil agreement 

By Teresa Poole 

Oil prices finned yesterday Brent for delivery in February 

traded ai $16.90 


Dr Otaiba of the UAE arriving for the filial talks 


as Opec ministers, meeting in 
Geneva, appeared to be near 
agreement on production cut- 
backs which would reduce 
output by 7.25 percent to 15.8 
million barrels a day. 

Mr Rilwanu Lukman of 
Nigeria and Opec president, 
spent the ninth day of the 
conference seeking approval 
from other oil ministers on the 
text of a final communique 
which would be presented to a 
full conference. 

It appeared that the produc- 
tion curbs had been accepted 
by all members except Iraq 
but that a formula had to be 
reached about that country's 
refusal to accept its quota. 

However, delegates said 
problems over fixing differen- 
tials for Opec crudes were 
holding up a full ministerial 
session planned for last night 

Progress has been stalled all 
week because of Iraq’s refusal 
to accept a quota of 1.466 
million barrels per day when 
its Gulf war adversary, Iran, 
has been given 2.255 million 
barrels per day. However, it 
appeared last night as though 
the accord would be finalized 
without Iraq's support 

Gholamreza Aqazadeh, the 
Iranian oil minister, yesterday 
said publicly for the first time 
that Opec should consider 
suspending Iran if it foiled to 
abide by the group's decision 
and there were reports that 
Iraq might be given a month 
to reconsider. 

As oil markets anticipated 
an agreement one cargo of 


was traded at Slb.w com- 
pared with the previous 
night's New York close of 
$16.20. 

Prices eased slightly later in 
the day with February Brent 
up about 40 cents at $ 1 6.60. In 
New York, West Texas Inter- 
mediate for March delivery at 
one pointed breached $17 a 
barrel but then fell back. 

Traders were hopeful that 
an Opec accord would support 
the present oil price level, 
aided by confirmation from 
Mexico and Norway that both 
countries would reduce crude 
output in line with any Opec 
agreement. 

Mr Arne Oeien, the Norwe- 
gian oil minister, said his 
country’ was prepared to cut its 
oil output by eight to nine per 
cent from January, to achieve 
a 10 per cent reduction in oil 
exports. 

A spokesman for the 
Department of Energy in 
London said: “The British 
Government's policy regard- 
ing production cuts is well 
known. We do not intend to 
change our policy which is to 
leave the level of production 
to ihe judjment of the oil 
companies operating in the 
British sector of the North 
Sea." Comment, page 23 


American buy 

Scottish Heritable Trust is 
buying Haven Homes, a pri- 
vate American company, for 
$6 million (£4.2 million). 


Fimbra 

suspends 

dealer 

By Cliff Fettham 

Fimbra, the watchdog body 
for licensed share dealers, has 
suspended the second mem- 
ber company within the last 
week after complaints over its 
share dealing activities. 

The latest company hit by 
the crackdown is Financial 
Management Services which 
has offices in London and 
Nottingham. 

Fimbra, the self-regulating 
organization with 1,300 mem- 
bers, said last night “We are 
not happy with the way the 
company is being run and 
would like to know exactly’ 
who its owners are. We need 
to know whether they are fit 
and proper persons." 

Besides the suspension, 
Fimbra has imposed tough 
restrictions on the financial 
activities of the company. It 
has ordered it not to solicit 
business with the public un- 
less the employee is a member 
of Fimbra, ordered it to lodge 
all clients' money in a separate 
bank account, and has given it 
five working days to prove 
that its liquidity margins com- 
ply with Fimbra rules. 

Financial Management Ser- 
vices has seven days in which 
to ask for the affair to be 
considered by the ruling coun- 
cil of Fimbra. 

Last week, another com- 
pany, Michelin & Co (UK), 
was suspended. It is under- 
stood that investors who 
bought shares through the 
company later found it diffi- 
cuIt resell them. 


New chief for the IMF 


Leading a struggle for unity 


From Bafley Morris 
Washington 

M Michel Camdessus, the 
new managing director of the 
International Monetary Fund, 
faces a formidable task in 
unifying the powerful agency 
after the bitter battle in the 
run-up to his election. 

Officials in Washington 
said yesterday there was 
resentment among some 
supporters of the Dutch fi- 
nance minister, Mr Onno 
Ruding, who was narrowly 
defeated. 

Third World countries re- 
gard M Camdessus as more 
sympathetic to their plight 
than Mr Ruding. They are 
expecting a more lenient, cre- 
ative approach to the high 
interest costs and lack of 
growth which plague their 
countries. 

Mr Ruding's supporters in- 
clude a group of middle level 
executives at the IMF. 

They base their views on the 



M Camdessus: Creative 
approach expected 
results of a straw poll taken 
among European ministers 
who foiled to agree on a 
candidate. 

The ministers gave Mr 
Ruding a majority of their 
votes even though they were 
unable to reach consensus 
The final vote by the IMF’s 
executive board was regarded 
as a victory for Third World 
countries and a defeat for 
European ministers who were 
unable to agree for the first 


time since the institution was 
founded. 

The deadlock among Euro- 
peans, who have traditionally 
appointed one of their own to 
the top IMF position, means 
that other nations, notably 
Japan, have a good chance at 
breaking the fink when M 
Camdessus’ term expires in 
five years lime. 

Meanwhile, Mr Ruding, 
who withdrew his candidacy 
after the straw vote was taken 
in Washington, remains chair- 
man of the IMFs powerful 
interim committee 

Both men, regarded as 
highly qualified international 
civil servants, have pledged to 
work together in moving the 
IMF into a more active role in 
resolving the long-simmering 
debt crisis. 

M Camdessus, who is asso- 
ciated closely with French 
socialists, brings extensive 
knowledge of the debt crisis to 
his new job. 


EEC takes Japanese tax issue to Gatt 

No end to whisky war 


By Derek Harris 
Industrial Editor 

EEC negotiators yesterday 
rejected as inadequate Japa- 
nese offers to curb taxation on 
imported wines and spirits, 
among which Scotch whisky 
has been the mam victim. It Is 
now to take the dispute to the 
General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade (Gatt), the world 
trade body. 

A growing row between the 
EEC and Japan has pivoted on 
whisky. The EEC warned 
Japan to end afl discrimina- 
tion against it and apply the 
same treatment to other liquor 
imports. 

Scotch has assumed a sym- 
bolic significance in the 
drawn-out talks because if the 
Japanese gave way on the 
issue ft coaid improve the 
chances of opening np the 
Japanese market to other 
imports. 

The EEC is expected to 
press Gatt strongly on foe 
issue because foe European 
liquor producers' case has 
looked foe easiest to argue 
since foe discrimination was 
so flagrant 

Japan is foe third biggest 
overseas market for Scotch. 
Bat since 1979 Scotch sales to 
japan have shrank by more 
than a thud and Its share of 



Kop Watanabe: no specific 
offer on liquor tariffs 
foe Japanese market has gone 
dowa from 10 per cent to 6 per 
emit 

last year, Scotch exports, 
indnding those of bulk malt 
which Japanese prodneets use 
in blends, were down 29 per 
cent in volume, la the first nine 
months of this year, there has 
been only a partial recovery 
with shipments op 18 per cent 
compared with the same pe- 
riod last year. 

The EEC executive commis- 
sion said when the talks broke 
np that it wanted Gatt to argue 
for fairer tax laws in Japan, 
especially fo^ whisky. 

The statement came after a 
meeting between Mr Willy de 


Clercq, the EEC external rela- 
tion commissioner, and Mr 
Koji Watanabe, director of the 
Japanese Foreign Ministry’s 
economic affairs bareae. 

The Japanese had Offered to 
cut tariffs on imported liquor 
next April but not by any 
specific anHwmt — which it 
wanted to establish later, 
according to reports in 
Brussels. 

There is speculation that the 
Japanese ministry wanted to 
make a SO par cent across-the- 
board redaction although bit- 
ter opposition from Japanese 
drinks prodneers was thought 
likely to whittle this down to a 
30 per cent cut 

There were suggestions also 
that the Japanese might be 


their present classification 
liquor into three grades. Ibis 
has been the target of most 
criticism from bodies like the 
Scotch Whisky Association, 
because it means the Japanese 
excise tax on Scotch is twice as 
high as that on first-grade 
whisky produced locally and 
seven times more than that on 
Japanese second-grade spirit. 

There are reports that be- 
cause of foe discriminatory tax 
system, Scotch whisky bottled 
in Britain can cost up to £60 a 
bottle in Japan. 


From next year 

it isn't just your clients to 

whom you'll have to prove your 
financial professionalism 



The Financial Sennas Act will open 
up tremendous opportunities to 
firms providing advice on financial 
planning. 

But seizing those opportunities 
will depend in the first 
place on a successful 
application to the SIB 
or an SR0 for auth- 
orisation to conduct 
business. 

Which is why 
The College of 
Financial Planning - established to provide 
independent information, professional tuition 
and advice Id individuals and firms transacting 
personal investment business- is running a 
series of seminors on the subject of authorisation 
this spring. 

Each seminar lasts half a day and will be ted by 
Keith Blundell, a former member of the Marketing 
of Investments Board Organising Committee, 
together with a Council member or senior 
executive of FIMBRA and other eminent speakers 
with relevant practical expertise. Eoch will 
cover: the requirements for authorisation; 
detailed examination of the rules governing the 


conduct of business; practical guid- 
ance on applying for authorisation; the 
construction of business plans and the 
necessary supporting information; and 
new marketing and sales opportunities. 
Attendance at one of these - 
seminars should be firmly 
in the diaries of 
principals, key sales 
staff and adminis- 
trators. To reserve 
your delegates’ 
places, simply 
send the completed coupon. It should prove to 
be one of the best investment decisions youll 
make this yean 

The Seminar fee, inclusive of refreshments and 
VAT, is £45 payable in advance. Ail attending 
delegates will receive a comprehensive guide to 
authorisation. Tickets purchased more than 
21 days prior to the appropriate Seminar date 
will benefit from a discount of £5 per ticket. 

The College will be offering a series of residential 
and study courses leading to diplomas in all 
aspects of Financial Planning Services from 
January 1987. 



EUMU 

To. The Coflege of finorod Pfon t u n g 

FREEPOST. Memoiari House 1 Sf Kainrine's Wiy tondon £ 1 

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January 38 
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February 18 


The College al Fmonoal Rorvmgl 


7 









22 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


TTTF TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


WALL STREET 


‘Triple witching hour’ 
dampens early trading 


New York (Renter) — 
Shares were snfadoed as inves- 
tors awaited the triple witch- 
ing hour — die quarterly 
simultaneous expiry of Is- 
tares, options and stock index 
options. 

Traders said the market was 
likely to be nneventfhl until 
the last hour when investors’ 
moves would be dear. 

The Dow Jones industrial 


average was down 0.14 points 
at 1,912.96. 


Declining issues ted shares 
by a threeTo-lwo margin on a 
volume of Id million shares. 
Chrysler ted (he active shares, 
down Va to 38%* 


The transportation avenge 
was down 0.97 points at 
824.37 and utilities bad shed 
0.58 points to 210*44. 


Dec 

18 


Doc; 

17 


AMR 
ASA 
ASedS 
ASad! 
AUsCWhw 
Alcoa 
Amax Inc 
Am'rdaHs 
Am Brands 
Am Can 
AmCvnm'd 
AmElPwr 
Am Express 
Am Home 
Am Motors 
Am Sired 
AmTsieph 
Amoco 
Anmco Steel 
Asarco 
Ashland 04 
At Richfield 
Aran Prods 
BkrsTstNY 
BanKamer 
Bk of Baton 
Bank of NT 
Betti Steel 


Dec 

18 


Dec 

17 


Bsel 
Brden 
Bg Warner 
Brist Myers 
BP 

Bumocilnd 
Burr ton Ntn 
Brunswick 
CmpOeflSp 
Con Pacific 
CgterpUtor 


Control SW 
Champion 
Chase Man 
ChmBkNY 
Chevron 
Chrystef 
Cjfrmfn 
dark Equip 
Coca Cola 

CTmtka Gas 
CmbtnEng 
Comwtth &J 
Cons Edis 
Cn Nat Gas 
Cons Power 
CntrlData 
Coming Gl 

cpc mii 

Crane 

cumsgwrt 

Data Gent. 

Deere 
Delta Air 
Detroit Ed 
Digital Eg 
Disney 
DowChem 
Dresser Ind 
Duke Power 
DuPont 
Estm Kodak 
Eaton Carp 
Emerson El 
Emery Air 
Exxon Carp 
Fed Dpt Sts 


55% 

55% 


27% 

27% 

36% 

36% 

Fst Chicago 

31% 

31% 

42% 

42% 

FstlntBricp 
Fst Perm C 

53* 

54 

67% 

87% 

8% 

9 

2% 

2% 


57% 

57% 

34 

33% 

FTWachva 

37* 

38% 

12% 

12% 

GAP Com 

38% 

39* 

23% 

22% 

GTE Corp 

58% 

58* 

44% 

45 

Gen Carp 
GenDy'mcs 
Gen Electric 

7HV, 

76* 

85% 

80 

86% 

79% 

59% 

66% 

69* 

88% 

28% 

28% 

Gen Inst 

18% 

18% 

59% 

59 

Gen MOs 

43% 

43% 

77% 

77% 

Gen Motors 

66% 

68 

7% 

3 

GnPbUtny 

23% 

23* 

43 

43% 

Genesco 

3% 

3* 

26% 

27% 

Georgia Pac 

38% 

38% 

65% 

66% 

GB©® 

b0% 

51% 

5% 

5 

Goodrich 

44% 

45% 

14% 

58 

14 

58 

Goodyear 

Gounlnc 

41% 

18% 

42 

IB 

69% 

59 

Grace 

51% 

52 

28% 

29 

GIAtt&TfcC 

22% 

23 

47% 

48 

Gf'hnd 

32% 

32% 

15% 

15% 

Granted Cor 

26% 

26% 

42% 

42% 

GuK&Wmt 

65% 

64% 

39% 

39% 

Hertz HJ. 

41 

41% 

5% 

4% 


54 

54% 

53 

51% 

mert-Pknl 

43% 

43% 

62% 

47% 

62% 

47% 

Honeywefl 

1C litas 

61% 

23% 

63% 

23% 

41% 

81% 

41% 

60% 

IngorsoO 
tn&nd Steel 

57 

18% 

57* 

18* 

40% 

40% 

ISM 

125% 

126* 

42% 

40% 

INCO 

11% 

11* 

56% 

57% 

im Paper 

73% 

74% 

33 

33% 

IntTelTel 

52% 

53% 

60 

GO 

Irving Bank 

46% 

48 

12% 

12% 

JhnsnX Jhn 

6H% 

69* 

40% 

39% 

Kaiser Alum 

12% 

12% 

242 

241 

Kerr McGee 

28% 

28* 

34% 

34% 

KmoTy Ok 

83% 

83% 

31% 

31% 

K Mart 

47% 

47% 

38% 

44% 

38% 

44% 

Kroger 

LT.v. Carp 

51% 

1% 

kl 

46% 

46% 

Litton 

76% 

78% 

39% 

39% 

Lockheed 

51 

52 

53% 

54% 

Lucky Sirs 

30* 

30% 

20% 

20% 

Man Hnver 

47% 

47V. 

38% 

38% 

MarmMCp 

1% 

1* 

42% 

43% 

MSPCO 

60% 

60% 

129% 

129% 

Marine Mid 

45% 

46% 

45% 

45% 

Mrt Marietta 

37% 

30% 

33 

32% 

Masco 

28% 

27% 

34% 

33% 

McDonalds 


62% 

48% 

48% 

McDonnell 

76% 

76% 

33% 

33% 

Mead 

57% 

577. 

16% 

16% 

Merck 

113 

113% 

27% 

27 

MmstaMng 

116% 

115* 

56% 

56 

Mobil OJ 

39% 

39% 

81 

80% 

Monsanto 

76% 

76* 

34% 

34 

Morgan JP. 

867. 

87* 

54% 

54% 

Motorola 

37% 

37* 

31% 

31% 

NCR Corp 

457. 

46% 

23% 

23% 

NLlndstrs 

5% 

5% 

48% 

49% 

NatDisttrs 

48% 

46 

17% 

17% 

NatMedEnt 

23% 

23 

105 

106% 

NatSmcndt 

It* 

11X 

45% 

45% 

Norfolk Sth 

84% 

B5% 

60% 

60% 

NWBanctp 

38% 

38% 

19% 

19% 

Ocodrs Pet 

27% 

27* 

47% 

48 

Ogdon 

43% 

43% 

87% 

68% 

87% 

69% 

OwiCorp 

Owens+a 

41 

50* 

42 

51 

74% 

74% 

Pac Gas B 

24% 

24% 

88% 

88% 

Pan Am 

4% 

4% 

12% 

12% 

Penney J.C. 

76% 

75 

71% 

71% 

Pennzoa 

63% 

63* 

87% 

89% 

Pepraco 

26% 

26% 


Dec 

18 


Dec 

17 


Pfizer 62 

Phelps Dge 21* 
Philip Mrs 73% 
PtiSpsPBt lift 
Polaroid 67% 
PPG >«d 7354 

PrctrGmW 79 

PP S E & G 41% 
Raytheon 67% 
R voids Met 40% 
RockweflW 46 
Royal Dutch 92% 
Sara Lee BS% 
SFESopac 30% 
SchTberper 32 
ScottPaper 63* 
Seagram 62% 
Sears Rbcfc 40% 
Shed Trans 5554 
Singer 39% 
SmthWn Bk 91% 
Sony 22 

SthCalEd 34% 
S-WstnBflO 113 % 
StdOB 48% 
SterfingDra 46 
Stevens JP 38% 
Sun Comp 56 
Teledyne 308% 
Tenneco 38% 
Texaco 35% 
Texas ECor 28% 
Texas Inst 119% 
Texas Utils 32% 
Textron 6554 
Treves Car 45% 
TRW Inc 90% 
UALInc 57% 
UnfleverNV 229% 


Unisys 83% 
UnCarbk* 22K 


Uni 

Un PacCor 63% 
UW Brands 33% 
USGCarp 38% 
UtdTechnol 46% 
USX Carp 22% 
Unocal 26% 
Jim Waiter 48% 
WmarLmbt 58% 


Fargo IDS 
hseQ 59% 


Wstghsel 
Weyarh'ser 39% 
Whirlpool 69% 

Wooiworth 39% 
Xerox Corp 61% 
Zenith 21% 


61 

21 % 

73% 

10 % 

68 % 

74% 

7B* 

41% 

67% 

39% 

46% 

92 

70% 

30% 

32% 

63% 

82% 

41% 

55* 

40% 

91% 

22 % 

35 

11354 

48% 

46% 

38% 

57 

307% 

38% 

35 

29 

120 % 

32% 

65% 

45% 

9154 

57 

227% 

82% 

22% 

64 

32% 

36% 

48% 

2254 

26 

48% 

58% 

105% 

60 

39 

69% 

39% 

60% 

21 % 


CANADIAN PRICES 


AgncoEeg 
A&i Alum 


AlgomaSti 

Can Pacific 

Gomlnco 

ConBathrst 

HkrfSidCan 

HdsnBMin 

ttnasco 

OB 
m 

n* 


Co 

■nimsnN'A’ 


a' 0 ’"’ 


265V 2654 

38% 38% 
10 % 11 
17% 1754 

1354 135V 
29 28% 

2S5V 26 
23 22% 

32 32 

49% 48% 

38% 38% 

30% 30% 
88% 85% 
1854 16 

30% 31% 
2L50 265 

12 % 12 % 
35% 32% 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


RrstDeaEngs 

Nov 17 
Dec 1 
Dec IS 
Can 


LastDeefinga 

Nov 28 
Dec 12 
Jan 2 

taken out ore 19, 


Last Dedsnsttm FdrSetttammit 
Feb 19 Mar 2 

Mar 5 Mar 16 

Mar19 Mar 30 

i Gian. Lawrence. Amstrad, Benkw. THF, 

... , Guinness. London & Prow.. North Kate. 

Metal CkK-, Western Motors. Marks 6 Spencer, Next. Pent ia nd. Mitchell 
Colts. BCA. Combined Technologies. Rockware. Greenwich Rev, Victoria Carpets. 
Suntoqti, Rowntrae, Argyle Trust Grand Met, Ford M. Kan Brookes, Martrheam. 
LBey. W Dawes. BBA, ParkfiekL Camtord, Retold. TricentroL Compart 
Puts Hughes Foods, Dura MB. (rmec. 

Puts A Calls; Gtimesa. AudJotrortc. Amstrad. Gracrwidi Res. 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Month Staffing 

Mar 87 _L 

JunB7 

Sep 87 

Dec 87 

Mar 88 

Jim 88 — _ 

Previous day's total open Interest 141 IS 
Three Month Euradolar 


Open 

68.76 

Mg 

88.80 

Low 

88.76 

Close 

88-79 

EstVoi 

594 

89.18 

89.19 

89.17 

89-17 

81 

88 JO 

89.30 

69-27 

89 20 

82 

NT 



PM MS 

89.15 

0 

NT 




8840 

0 

NT 



88.65 

0 


Mar 87 . 

June/ 

Sep 87 

Dec 87 

USTreesury Bond 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 


93.94 

9398 

93.88 

93.88 


Previous day's total open irterest 21 143 
35 9353 93JM 1251 


93 SS 

9398 93.94 33.97 452 

S3J9 93J5 93.68 111 

93£8 93.65 93J56 21 


100-13 

99-88 

NT 


Previous day's total open Interest 4254 
101-02 100-09 100-12 187 

99-13 


98-31 99-13 968 

— 98-18 O 


Short GM 
Dec 86 — 
Mar 87 — 
Jun 87 — 


NT 

96-24 

NT 


Previous day's total open Interest 213 
96-22 0 

96-24 96-24 96-25 30 

0 


LongGBt 
Dec86 — 


oecl 
Mar 87. 
JunB7 — 
Sep 87 — 
FT-SE100 
Dec 86 — 
Mar 87. — 


109-14 

109-24 

NT 

NT 



163.00 

165.85 


i interest 19278 
109-31 112 

11605 9093 

11609 0 

— 0 
Previous day's total open interest 3707 
16330 162.80 1B2O0 237 

166.15 16530 16530 177 


Refunding 

scheme 


proposed 
by SIB 


Investors who lose money 
when the investment com- 
pany into which they put their 
money collapses, could re- 
ceive up to £48,000 in 
compensation from the the 
Securities and Investments 
Board, under proposals pub- 
lished yesterday. 

The compensation scheme, 
which it is hoped will be in 
place by the end of next year, 
win also offer a pay-out if the 
firm flees the country with the 
money — but only if it is 
registered with the Board. 

The scheme will pay the 
first £30,000 of a successful 
claim in full, as well as 90 per 
cent of the next £20,000 of the 
claim. 

About £100 million win be 
made available to meet any 
claims in the first year of 
operation. It will be raised 
from the investment industry 
at large. 

A publicity campaign is 
planned to steer the public 
towards registered firms. 

There will also be a new 
financial services ombudsman 
to look into investors' com- 
plaints if they feel they have 
not had sufficient redress from 
the SIB. He will be restricted 
to claims of up to £100,000 

The SIB expects its start-up 
expenses to be about £6.5 

aloan from the^ Bank of 
England, repayable over five 
years. 

First year running costs are 
estimated at £7.5 million. 

Sir Kenneth BerrilL chair- 
man of the SIB said the new 
arrangements for policing the 
City could not be expected to 
eliminate investment mal- 
practice entirely. 


Widening trade deficit 


down 


By David Smith 
Economics Correspondent 
Britain’s widening balance 
of payments deficit pulled 
down growth in the third 
quarter, official figures show. 
The average measure of gross 


GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT 


1989 


domestic product rose by 0.3 
1 abo 


ive 


per cent, to 2 per cent 
its level a year earlier. 

The figures underline the 
dangers for the economy if too 
large a proportion of demand 
is met by imports. 

In the third quarter, con- 
sumer spending was strong, 
rising by 1.6 per cent com- 
pared with the second quarter, 
to 4.9 per cent up on its level 
in the third quarter of last 
year. 

But despite this sharp rise, 
and smaller increases in 
investment and government 
spending, the expenditure 
measure of GDP fed by 0.1 per 
cent in the third quarter. 

This was because imports 
rose at a far stronger rate than 
exports. In the third quarter. 


1986 


Q1 

02 

03 

04 
01 
02 
03 


(19B0 prices. 1980 
Output income 

Measure Measure 

109.6 109.3 

1107 111-8 

110.7 111.3 

111.fi 1107 

1122 112-3 

113.1 112.6 

1143 112-4 


= 100 ) 
ExperxStere 
Measure 

109.4 

109.7 
1092 

109.5 

111.7 
1112 
1115 


Average 

Estimate 

109.4 

110.7 

1102 

1102 

112.1 

112J5 

1122 


Source: Central StatBOfeaf Office 


imports increased by 5.7 per 
while 


cent in volume terms, 

export volume was up by only 
12 percent. 

The growth rates over 12 


months were 9.2 per cent for 
imports and 4.8 per cent for 
exports. Imports are deducted 

from expenditure to cal c ulate 
gross domestic product, while 
exports are added. 

The foil in the expenditure 
measure of GDP is disturbing 
when set against the strength 
of consumer spending in the 
economy. 

Third-quarter spending on 
durable goods showed a vol- 
ume increase of 11 per cent 
compared with a year earlier. 

Thissplir between 8 percent 
growth m spending on cars, 3 
per cent on furniture and floor 
coverings and a 19 per cent 
increase in the volume of 


spending on other durable 
goods, including electrical 
products. 

There are, however, ten- 
tative signs that industry is 
responding to strength of de- 
mand in the economy. 

In the third quarter, while 
two of the three measures of 
GDP {expenditure and in- 
come) fell, the output measure 
rose strongly. 

It increased by 1.2 per cent 
lo stand 3.4 per cent up on the 
same period of last year. 

Manufacturing output rose 
by I per cent in the third 
quarter, oil and gas extraction 
was up by 6 per cent. 
Construction output rose by 3 
percent. 


In contrast the income 
measure of GDP was weak, 
because of depressed North 
Sea profits. 

Company profits as a whole 
in the third quarter were 16 
per cent down on a year 
earlier. 

As a result, despite strong 
growth in personal incomes, 
the income measure of GDP 
fell by (U per cent in the third 
quarter and was 1 per cent up 
on a year earlier. 

Officials said that the av- 
erage estimate of GDP, up by 
0.3 per cent in the third 
quarter and 2 per cent higher 
than a year earlier, is at 
present the best guide to 
growth in the economy. 

Another disturbing feature 
of the figures came with the 
calculation for the GDP de* 
fetor — the best guide to 
overall inflati on in the 
economy. 

The GDP deflator at factor 
cost rose by 1.5 per cent in the 
third quarter. If this rate of 
increase was maintained it 
would imply an underlying 
inflation rate of more than 6 
percent. 


German economy ‘needs more tax cuts’ 


Munich (Reuter) — Herr Earl 
Heinrich Oppenlaender, 
director of the ffo economic 
research institute, said the 
current West Gorman eco- 
nomic upswing was not self- 
sustaining. Early tax cuts w ere 
needed to give it further 
support, he added. 

Herr Oppenbender said 
that growth was now being 


supported largely by special 
effects, such as tax reductions 
pot Into operation this year 
and the sharp fall is the price 
of ofl. 

A second series of tax cuts 
scheduled for 1988 should he 
brought forward, lfo expected 
growth of 2J5 per cent this year 
and between 2 and 23 per cart 
next year. 


The lfo forecast is mare 
pessimistic than a prediction 
published two months ago by 
the fire leading institutes 
which saw 3 per cenf expansion 
both this year and next 
Joint predictions from the 
insti t utes , which include lfo, 
grre the average of the fore- 
casts from the tndnrMnwl re- 
search organizations. 


Hezr Oppenlaepder said 

increasing tensions within 

the European Monetary Sys- 
tem (E>fS) meant a revalua- 
tion of the mark and a 
devaluation of the French 
franc were probable. 


A farther rise in the mark 
wobW depress export chances 
further, he added 


Slump in 
energy 
hits BHP 


By Richard Lander 

Broken Hill Propriety 
(BHP). the Australian indus- 
trial, energy and minerals 
erouo, continued to Bee 
prices and difficult market 
conditions for many of its 
products in the six months to 
November 30 when net profits 
fell bv 30 per cent to AusSj9, 
million (£IS3.4 million) from 
AusSS74.4 million. 

BHP’s oil and gas interests 
were particularly badly hit 
Enerev earnings slumped lo 
Aus§S6. 1 million from 
AusS 331S million, with the 
Utah International division in 
the United Slates recording a 
loss of A usS42.1 million. Steel 
profits were also lower. 


The com pan v expects im- 
— Tond 


proved results in ihe sccor_ 
half, but said it would be 
difficult to match the record 
AS9SS.2 million profits re- 
corded last year. An un- 
changed interim dividend of 
17.5 Australian cents has al- 
ready been declared. 


US standstill 


agreement 

Lloyd's names on PCW 
syndicates have secured a 
standstill agreement on Amer- 
ican litigation. The 20 defen- 
dants to a potential action, 
including Lloyd's, agreed not 
to invoice the statute of limita- 
tions on any future lawsuit. 

The agreement made be- 
fore the deadline on Wednes- 
day. has averted temporarily 
the prospect of a multi-million 
dollar lawsuit over ihe PCW 
names’ losses. 

The names are now covered 
by standstill agreements in 
Britain and America. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 
Ashtead (1 
British Gu 
Cap & 
Daniel S 
Fletcher 
Gaynor 
Geest ( 



(65p) 


75p) 


Gientree (I Bp) 
Gordon Russell 


Guthrie Corp (I^Qp) 
Halls Homes & ~ 


90p) 


Grins (95p) 
Harmony Leisure (23p) 
Hornby (tOOpl 
HosKyns Gp (128p) 
Johnson Fry 
(Joyds Chemist (I05p) 
LogiteK (65p) 

Lon& Metropolitan (145p) 
MO. (1440) 

Mss Sam HkJgs (I05p) 


148-2 
62-4 
66 
155-3 
178 
109. 
169-1 
50-1 
207 
171 +2 

104- 1 
27-1 

105- 3 
150 

160-3 
132 
67 
169 +1 
145-1 
97 


Nobo ( 152 p) 
Nothumbrian Fine (BOp) 
Plum Hlrigs (SQp) 


Sum* (135p) 
TSB Chan bias 


(TOP) 
TSB Grata (100p) 
Virgih (T40p) 

Ward Group (97p) 
g Office (13Sp) 


Waiting 

RIGHTS ISSUES 
Avon Rubber N/P 
Gtanfiekf F/P 
Leisure Inv N/P 
Matting N/P 
Munton N/P 
Regalien F/P 
Sac Fi 


153 
91 -2 
113 
138 
111 +1 
7Z 3 * 

133 

102 

143 


30-3 


Wafter (Alfred) N/P 
(Issue price In brackets). 


5 1 r -4 
10 
7 + T » 
325 
74+2 
205+15 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Maiket fetes 
day's range 
December 19 

N York 1.4320-14335 
Montreal 1.9733-1 5768 
Ams’dam3.241532519 
Brussels 59-69-59.89 
Cphgen 108418-103750 
1.0554-1.0582 
Franktu12.8682-2.877D 
Lisbon 213.72-214.74 
Marine 19175-194.47 
199048-199846 
108246-108674 
9.4055-9.4339 
StTdiJm 9.9191-9.9514 
Tokyo 23124-234.02 
Vienna 20.192024 
Zuricn 2.4090-24162 


Mian 

Oslo 

Parts 


r19 
14305-14335 
1.9733-13766 
1246332519 
59.76-58-69 
108560-108745 
1.0565-18575 

2871928770 

21180-214.74 

19175-194.10 

1991.20-199788 

108489108674 

9414084339 

0933882514 

233-56-23422 

2021-2024 

24115-24162 


049-048pram 

046O29piwa 

1 %- 1 %pram 

2914 pram 

IK-Iprem 

2927<fls 

l%-1%pram 

91-124<fis 

1935cfls 


3K-4KOS 

1%-lXprem 

1 %- 1 %prem 

1%-IXprera 

9*-7%prem 

IX-IKpram 


3mantt» 

1.69121pram 

129l23prem 

4%-3%prun 

51-43pram 

4U8Wpren) 

5687do 

4%-4%prem 

22+332dte 

20-76dB 

1pram-2dis 

11 %- 12 %ifis 

3%-2%pram 

3%-3pram 

4-3% prem 

28 %- 2 <%preai 

4-3% pram 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentina austral* 
Austma dollar — 

Bahrain dinar 

Brazil cruzado *_ 
Crams pound. 
FHnnd marks . 


1.73191.7389 Ireland 
21365-21403 


05375-05415 
208740-209940 Australia 
__ 073000.7400 Canada 


Greece dre dsna . 


Hong Kong dollar . 

India rupee 

Iraq dinar . 


7.04197.0510 Sweden 
201.4920340 Norway . 


1 1855918560 
21905-21915 
2600928020 
0.67090.6707 
1 18784-1878 9 
B835968400 


11.168911.1780 Denmark. 


Kuwait dnarKD 
Malaysia doiar . 
Mexico peso 


12691265 West Germany 

n/a Switzerland — 

04195-04235 Netherlands 


New Zealand dollar 
Saudi Arabia riyal - 
Singapore dollar — 
South Africa rand _ 

UAEdrtwm 

Uoyds Bank 


172593.7313 Franco 
1Z791320 


. 7877978825 
. 7885978900 
2005528065 
1882918830 
28675-226851 


25775-88875 


2739927524 


5852958415 
1138911427 Hong Kong 


16109163.15 
13918-13928 
. 41.7941.78 


1191938081 Portugal . 


58365-589765 Spain 


Austria . 


RaAea auppBed by eanttaya Bank HOFEX and EsM. 


7.79497.7960 
1498914980 
13589135.40 
_ 14.1914.12 


COMPANY NEWS 


• RUSH £ TOMPKINS 
GROUP: Interim dividend 
Z75p (2.2). Figures in £000 for 
six month* to September 30 (six 
months to June 30). Turnover 
73,965 (57.097). pretax profit 
I.4S6 (1.234). after tax profit 
1,266(1.144). earnings per share 
9.9p (9.7). The company has 
exchanged a conditional con- 
tract with Priest Marians for the 
sale of the greater part of Rush 
and Tomkins* investment prop- 
erties portfolio for £32.05 mil- 
lion. In addition, the companv 


• ELECTRIC & GENERAL 
INVESTMENT COMPANY: 
Interim dividend 2tp (I.S5). 
Figures in £s for six months to 
November 30. Net assets per 
share taking prior charges at par 
533.7p (3716.1, earnings per 
ordinary share 4.l5p (3.51). 
eantipgs before tax 1.082.733 
(950.224). tax 331.25S 
(315.828). earnings attributable 
75 1 .475 (6343961. The directors 
expect that the final dividend 
will be at least maintained 


has agreed in principle to the 
sale of its of 


office development in 
AldCTSgate Street, London, to a 
leading insurance company for 
£12.4 million cash. 


• METALRAX CROLT: The 
company is to purchase Plastic 
Moulders (Yorkshire) and T 


Morfey & Co, subject to comple- 
te of cor, 


• BALDWIN: No dividend. 
Figures in £s for six months to 
October 31. Turnover 1.540.784 
(1.431.824). pretax profit 69.814 
(55.130), rax 20.246 (16,539), 
earnings per share I.17p (0.96). 


lion and listing of consideration 
shares. The consideration for 
Plastic Moulders is £400.000 
and for Morley £500,000. 

• MACARTHYS 
PHARMACEUTICALS: Final 


• BARROW HEPBURN 
GROUP: The company is add- 
ing to its growing interest in 
chemicals by the acquisition of 
the Chemicals Trading Co from 
Joseph Nadin Contracting. The 
initial consideration was 
£1,050,000 cash. Deferred 
consideration of £50,000 in cash 
will become payable in April. 
1987 if the profits before tax for 
1986 reach £265.000. 


September 30 (year to April 30). 
Pretax profit 6,057 (4,059), tax 
2327 (1.892). profit after tax 
3.730 (2,167), extraordinary 
debit net of tax 6.289 (1.21 1). 
earnings per share pre-extraor- 
dinary hem 27.9p (16.2). 


0 BROWN & TAW SE: Interim 
dividend 22p (same), figures in 
£000 for six months to Septem- 
ber 30. Turnover 51,737 
(51,431), pretax profit 2,012 
(2,910), lax 707 (1.164). earn- 
ings per share 6p (822). The 
chairman says that, while there 
are lew signs of any significant 
overall improvement in de- 
mand. the company is confident 
that - with the expected benefits 
from acquisitions — the group’s 
prospects are favourable. 


0LWT (HOLDINGS): The 
chairman, Mr Christopher 
Bland, toki the annual meeting 
that, during the 12 months to 
October 31, the company was 
the third bi&est independent 
television company in advertis- 
ing revenue terms. 


0 BULMER & LUMB HOLD- 
INGS: Sanderson Murray &. 
Elder Holdings and a subsidiary 
are the reg is tered holders of 
825,991 ordinary shares of the 
company. The boards of Allied 
Textile Co and Bulmer had 
announced the terms of a 
recommended offer Under 
which Allied would acquire 
Bulmer. The after values 
Bulmer at about £1 1.6 million. 
The board of Sanderson Muzray 
say that Sanderson Murray in- 
tends to accept the offer in 
respect of its 9.62 per cent 
holding. 

# IRISH ROPES: final divi- 
dend l.ISp. making 4.S6p (2.1). 
figures m £000 for year to 
September 3a Sales 27.097 
(27.184). pretax profit 654 (347), 
tax 36 (6), extraordinary debit 
181 (nil), earnings per share 
1 6Jp <8. 1). The board says that 
the recent injection of capital, 
(he elimination of the unprofit- 
able parts of the business, allied 
to the product development 
programme, enables the com- 
pany to face the future with 
confidence. 

0 LONDON MERCHANT 
SECURITIES: Interim divi- 
dend 0.8p (0.75). figures in 
£000 for six months to Septem- 
ber 30. Pretax profit 4,119 
(8,320). tax 1,526 (3.763), after 
tax profit 2393 (4,557), extraor- 
dinary loss 511 (nil), earnings 
per snare 0.98p (237). 

0 CLUFF OIL HOLDINGS: 
The company has entered into a 


50/50 joint venture agreement 
with Promotora Recursos 
Naiurales SA for the exploration 
and exploitation of gold depos- 
its in Spain. PRN is a subsidiary 
of Banco de Bilbao. 0 ANGLO 
NORDIC HOLDINGS: In re- 
sponse to an approach by FL 
Smidth & Co. the major share- 
holder in ANH, talks are taking 
place with FLS which may result 
in FLS making an offer to 
acquire further shares in .ANH 
to increase the size of its holding 
in ANH from 46.2 per cent to 
more than SO per cent. FLS has 
said that it would not expect to 
offer more than a modest pre- 
mium over the market price of 
24p per share. 


0 WINDSOR SECURITIES 
(HOLDINGS): final dividend 
of O.Sp, making 0.7p 10.65), 
figures for year to September 
30. Turnover £1.855.100 


(£196,389). pretax profit 
£161,834 (£47,670). tax £58.004 


(£47.265). earnings per share 
I.lOSp (O.OOSp). 

0 ROCKWARE GROUP: Pil- 
kington has sold its 18 per cent 
stake in Rockware. Sir Peter 
Ftirker, chairman of Rockware, 
said his company welcomed the 
move by Pilkipgion to place its 
shareholding on the market. 

0 REG ALLAN PROPERTIES: 
Of the 1 1,238,095 new ordinary 
shares provisionally allotted, 
6.771.351, about 60.25 percent, 
were taken up. The balance has 
been subscribed for at 325p by 
the sub-underwriters. 


EASIER 


TO EARN 


OUR HIGHER 


Wk guarantee the higher rate on 
our Ordinary Account wll stay 
at 6% pA for the whole yeaj? and 
you’ll find it easier to earn. 


HOW IT WORKS 


Keep your account open for the 
whole of 1987, and for each complete 
calendar month when the balance 
is £500 or more, youTl get our higher 
rate of 6% pj. 

On other balances, and on 
accounts opened and closed in 1987, 
you’ll still get 3% for each calendar 
month. 



completely 

Husbands and wives are each 
entitled to this tax-free £70 (£140 in 
total if it's a joint account). 

You’ll find our Ordinary 
Account at any of 20,000 post 
offices - they're open all week and 
on Saturday mornings. 


TAX-FREE INTEREST 


The fust £70 of interest on 
our Ordinary Account each year is 


NATIONAL 

SAVINGS 






MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


BmRUnSi 
Clewing Banks 11 
Finance House 11% 


Discount Market Loans % 
Overnight High: 12 Low 10 

WeekftecfcTlW 


. j{Dfscount%) 
Buying SeHng 

2mm TCP*n Zmntn 10”n 

3mntti 10 u w 3mnth 10% 


Prime Bank HI* (Discount %) 
1 mAh 10 u M-1(K l c2innth 


3 mirth 10 a 3T-10”ie6 mnth 10%-10% 
Trade BSa (Discount %) 

1 mnth IV* 2mnfli 11% 

3 mnth 11 "a 6 mnth 11% 


Interbank (%J 

Omnight open 11 dose 11 
1 weak 11 - 10 % 6 mnth 11 %-IIK 

1 mnth H'w-il'u 9 mnth 1 i%- 11 % 

3m nth wt-trx 12 im iin-iix 


Local Authority Depositor*.) 

2 days 10% 7 days 10% 

1 mnth 11 3 mnth 11% 

G mnth 11 % I 2 mth 11 »,« 


Local Aotbortty Bands (%) 

1 mnth 11 %- 11 % 2 mirth 11%- 11 % 
3 mnth 11%-11% 6 mnth 11%-11% 

9 mnth 11%-11% I2mth 11X-11 


Storing CDs (%) 

i-11 3 mnth 11*n-11* M 


1 mnth 11% 

6 mnth 11 »,*. 1 is„ 12 mtti IIK- 11 % 
DolarCOsfKI 

1nmth7j0d£% 3nvrth G4S&40 
6 mnth 685^80 12 rath G8D4.15 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 6%-6* 
Smith 6*irB 7 ie 


7 days 5%-5% 
3 mnth 6%-5 
Ranch Franc 


7 days 8K-8 
3 mnth 


9%-8% 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 1%-1 
3 mnth 4%-4% 
Ven 

7 days 4%-4% 
3 mnth 4%-4% 


can 6%-6% 
1 mnth 7%-7 
Btrurth tPwIPifl 
cal 554-4% 
1 mnth 5%-6K 
G ninth 4 IB w- ia w 
can 8%-7% 
1 mirth 9-8% 

6 mnth 9-8% 

cafl l*-% 

1 mirth 5%-5% 

6 mnth 4K-4% 
cafl 5-4 

1 mnth 4%-4% 

6 mirth 


BULLION 


G0btSaa3.7S3BS.7S 
Knmorrend (par edn. ex »*«> 

S »U»mOO (£27250-775.00) 

Smerekmsjnew.exvM 

S9Z5ft^5002S4^K85) 

Pfatkun 

S 484^0(2338.10) 

Shrer 

S 58700^58900 (E3.747M.7G0S) 


TREASURY SILLS 


£30Bm OotaAEitnoi 

£9784% received. 85^> 

Last week: £97.34% received: £28% 
Avge rate: £108646% last wk £10.6591% 
Next week: ElOOm replace IM 00m 


ECG0 


Fixed Rate Starting Export Finance 
Scheme tv Average reference rata for 
interest period November 1, 1988 to 
November 28, 1S8S Musive: 11848 par. 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 



Series 


Cells 

Ml 

Jen 

Pate 

Apr 

M 



Series 

Mar 

Cafta 

Jon 

Sop 

Mar 

Puts 

Jun 

Sep 

Afied Lyons 
(•309) 

280 

300 

330 

35 

17 

1% 

43 

30 

15 

50 

38 

23 

1 

5 

25 

5 

12 

27 

10 

17 

35 

Hanson 

(cant) 


200 

220 

5 

2% 

10% 

5 

15% 

17 

37 

20 

37 

2211 

British Gas 
{•62) 

50 

60 

70 

13* 

4* 

* 

15% 

7% 

3 

17% 

10% 

5 

% 

1% 

8 

* 

3 

9 

1 

4 

10 

Jaguar 

rs>5) 


500 

550 

600 

38 

12 

6 

5b 

30 

72 

47 

20 

42 

88 

25 

50 

30 

55 

BP 

(TBS) 

600 

650 

700 

108 

58 

20 

115 

75 

35 

90 

55 

1 

2 

14 

7 

20 

37 

25 

48 

Thom EMI 
0486) 


420 

460 

500 

550 

82 

33 

14 

6 

72 

47 

27 

60 

37 

3 

16 

43 

90 

7 

22 

48 

30 

54 

Cons Gold 
(*669) 

550 

600 

650 

122 

75 

35 

145 

105 

72 

120 

87 

2 

3 

17 

7 

15 

30 

20 

40 

Tesco 

(*379) 


360 

390 

420 

43 

22 

9 

55 

32 

18 

63 

43 

27 

8 

11 

15 

CoretaUds 

0311) 

260 

280 

300 

330 

53 

63 

43 

27 

12 

51 

37 

21 

1 

1% 

e 

22 

1% 

*6 

13 

26 



43 

47 

50 

15 

2% 

B 

24 



Scries 

Feb 

May Aug Feb 

May Aug 

Cora Union 

C 2G2) 

260 

280 

300 

12 

3 

1 

19 

11 

6 

28 

21 

13 

6 

20 

40 

12 

23 

41 

16 

26 

43 

Brit Aero 
(*489) 


420 

460 

GOO 

80 

43 

18 

88 

52 

30 

68 

42 

3 

8 

25 

5 

15 

33 

20 

40 

Cable & Wire 
1*321) 

300 

325 

350 

375 

27 

9 

2 

1 

42 

25 

13 

52 

2 

10 

30 

55 

10 

13 

35 

15 

BAThds 

(■464) 


390 

420 

460 

500 

85 

58 

30 

10 

95 

65 

40 

22 

78 

57 

35 

2 

2 

18 

40 

3 

6 

23 

47 

12 

28 

50 

GEC 

noo) 

160 

180 

200 

12 

3 

1 

19 

11 

4 

24 

16 

8 

2 

16 

35 

6 

17 

38 

9 

20 

40 

Barclays 

1*495) 


460 

500 

550 

47 

18 

5 

55 

30 

10 

70 

43 

5 

20 

60 

15 

32 

70 

22 

40 

Grand Met 

1*451) 

360 

390 

420 

95 

65 

40 

100 

70 

48 

68 

1 

1 

3 

1 

2 

10 

15 

Brit Telecom 
(*205) 


160 

200 

220 

26 

9% 

3 

31 

IB 

8 

37 

22 

1 

7 

22 

3% 

9 

23 

7 

13 

ICI 

now? 

1000 

?050 

82 

45 

110 

77 

137 

107 

2 

6 

15 

28 

18 

35 

ujanuryocnwpps 

(*1B2) 

ISO 

180 

200 

29 

12 

5 

32 

18 

9 

40 

25 

15 

X 

5 

18 

2X 

10 

20 

5 

13 

22 


1150 

7 

32 

50 

77 

85 

90 

Guinness 

(284) 


280 

20 

32 

38 

28 

18 

16 

32% 

58 

20 

28 

Lend See 

300 

34 

45 

49 

1% 

3 

6 


330 

3% 

10 

60 

62 


380 

2 

12 

10 

82 

32 

34 

Ledbroto 

(*370) 


330 

50 

58 

68 

45 

33 

1% 

6 

9 

Marks & Span 

160 

3 

ii 

17 

10 

14 

17 


390 

9 

23 

25 

15 

30 

33 


220 

% 

2 

4 

51 

52 

52 

LASMO 

(158) 


130 

32 

36 

34 

23 

3 

5 


Shell Trans 
r970) 

900 

950 

1000 

80 

35 

10 

95 

53 

30 

115 

73 

47 

2 

10 

38 

IB 

27 

43 

67 


160 

13 

18 

11 

8 

14 

19 

58 

Mktand Bank 


500 

85 

95 

105 

65 

34 

3 

8 

15 

IWWgar House 

280 

3 

10 

22 

12 

16 

19 



600 

15 

22 

11 

37 

18 

42 

27 

50 


300 

% 

4 

8 

51 

51 

53 

pa o 

C492) 


460 

47 

57 

70 

4 

10 

15 

TSB 

r73> 

70 

80 

90 

5 

1 

% 

9 

4% 

2 

12% 

6 

3 

1% 

8 

17% 

3 

8% 

4 

9% 


550 

5 

15 

25 

17 

60 

30 

63 

32 

65 


Series 

Mar 

Jen 

Sep 

Mar 

Jun 

Sep 

(*174) 


160 

180 

200 

21 

9 

3 

28 

18 

9 

38 

24 

4 

13 

28 

6 

16 

10 

20 

Daochan 

T432) 

380 

390 

420 

460 

85 

57 

35 

13 

65 

47 

25 

75 

57 

38 

2 

6 

13 

37 

9 

22 

45 

12 

27 

50 

RTZ 

(*652) 


550 

600 

650 

700 

IS) 

77 

40 

18 

100 

57 

33 

77 

45 

3 

9 

27 

62 

18 

42 

52 

Boots 

(*222) 

200 

220 

240 

30 

IB 

8 

37 

25 

16 

'31 

22 

2 

8 

22 

5 

13 

27 

18 

30 

vaal Reals 
(*83) 


70 

80 

90 

16 21% 23% 

9 14% 16* 
3* B ii 

2* 

6 

4% 

8% 

5 

9% 

BTO 

r284) 

260 

280 

300 

20 

12 

5% 

29 

17 

10 

34 

23 

8 

21 

37 

13 

22 

40 

16 

28 










BOSS 

r®) 

650 

700 

750 

95 

55 

Z7 

105 

70 

45 

90 

65 

8 

12 

40 

12 

23 

55 

30 

60 


Series 

Mar 

Jim Sea 

Mar 


Run 

oLonrho 

(*233) 


200 

as" 

.22 

9 

3% 

44 

29 

16 

8 

_ 

2 

5% 


Blue Orris 
("864) 

800 

650 

700 

82 

45 

17 

K 

62 

32 

110 

75 

43 

0 

18 

50 

13 

30 

57 

20 

38 

60 


240 

260 

34 

20 

8 

18 

36 

13 16% 

25 29 

40 — 

Da Basis 
(*765) 

650 

150 

— 

— 

10 


— 


Series 

Feb 






700 

750 

800 

110 

77 

43 

135 

105 

60 

125 

100 

45 

70 

33- 

55 

80 

65 

90 

7711*% iggi 
(*2101) 


100 

102 

104 

^ a I’a 

!% »« 2% 2’w 2"* 

Dixons 
f305 ) 

300 

330 

360 

24 

12 

4 

.38 

22 

12 

44 

30 

12 

32 

58 

10 

34 

62 

22 

38 

TV 14*% 03/07 
(*£108) 


104 

106 

4* 

3*n 

2*32 

,3 .« 

% 

5* 

4> it 

Pia 

5*b 

»*! 

2fH» 
«« 3*32 

GKN 

f26»? 

240 

280 

280 

34 

19 

10 

39 

25- 

17 

47 

34 

26 

4 

13 

24 

7 ' 
16 
27 

9 

18 

29 



110 

172 

114 

3% 

2% — 
»1A _ 

U — 

3% 

S 

6% 

3% 

4% 

5* 

7* 

4 ‘ 


300 

4 

“ 


42 

"" 

“ 


Dee 

Jen 

Frt™ 

Mar 

Dec 



Mar 

Glaxo 

(*1036) 

900 

950 

1000 

1050 

170 

125 

9Q 

57 

195 

155 

125 

95 

190 

180 

130 

7- 

14 

30 

49 

10 

20 

40 

60 

30 

48 

68 

FT-SC 1550 
Index 1575 
(1628) 1500 
1625 
1650 
1675 
1700 

85 

60 

35 

13 

93 

72 

55 

40 

68 

53 

63 

65 

% 

1 

1 

8 

4 

7 

15 

2S 

20 

32 

a 

35 

Hanson 

nasi 

160 

160 

29 

14 

ZO 26% 

2 

6 

8% 

11 

1 

% 

17 

40 

28 

53 

25 

SO 

37 

54 

43 

59 

50 


in«. 


n * xte, Vngsetti^p rfc- . 


• ■ • 


• - f . r 










u> O 


illtS 


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H.M ^ 


* Ti.r'.'r dn <l Hi. 

: fv-.' £r d";^^Sl n H 

: ^cuh^-C 

• c /■'■*-■■• n ■ _ Rian, 


■J7 • A •*. . iflA_ *>v 

• h : . •;, 

£V>''nS|S 

: 

■ r • 

' ' £•■>*& 
i • -. •■ 1,f Jn (v ^ 

:■■■■ ■ : 

" : ■ ■ «■'■"- re.- rir J ./ Jr, io 

■"*— 1 rjiji* "^ngs 
- *•■ .i l!l|| on t, 5 ' 

' -’•■irei aa * a ^ 




■ - ";:; s r on k%- 

'•••'-• ■ ^urtd , 

:■ 

. • - ■ ; c ‘ a nion. 

- r,! mna. 

. rosdf 

; ,: ' r ' ^'edni 

• . - • '-.•'-Vr’Porarik 

.- . - 1 - ■i-ir.iHicn 

• - • ■■ ftepcw 

'• ’ ’ cov «tit 


• v-'-iasen 

r •i'jflO; 

• - 2:y* 

- '-■»•. 

, a ■'“jLO 

' ( J\ I?, n.. 

■•• ;■ a 

■ -.are- 

* 

- Via 




[MES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


ND FINANCE 


(STOCK MARKI 


Fresh selling in stores sector 
points to a bleak New Year 


By Michael Clark 


I here was precious little 
festive spirit in the stores 
sector yesterday to cheer 
investors with many brokers 
now warning their clients that 
the prospects for a prosperous 
New Year in the high street 
are growing slimmer each day. 

Many of the best known 
names among the retailers 
came under renewed selling 
pressure with only the appear- 
ance of a few baigain hunters 
enabling prices to dose above 
their worst levels of the day. 

Analysis are continuing to 
take an increasingly pessimis- 
tic view of things despite 
reports of bumper Christmas 
sales. Most of them have 
already discounted the better- 
than-expected November re- 
tail sales announced on Mon- 
day showing a 2.4 per cent 
rise. 

They claim the economic 
outlook remains bearish for 
stores. Most economists are 
already predicting a rise in 
inflation and this combined 
with fears of higher interest 
rates after Christmas and less 
scope for cuts in income tax in 
the Budget could lead to a 
sharp reduction in spending in 
the shops. 

The problems facing the 
retailers were no doubt dis- 
cussed in foil at a seasonal 
consumer party thrown by 
Scrimgeour Vickers, the bro- 
ker. and attended by repre- 
sentatives of the leading store 
groups, food retailers and 
various major fund managers. 


Market-makers have re- 
ported widespread and persis- 
tent selling of the store shares 
over the past few days. 

Among the casualties was 
Marks and Spencer, often 
referred to as the jewel in the 
high street crown, which, at 
one stage, was trading just 
1 .5p above its 167p low for the 
year as one big seller unloaded 
5.3 million shares at 167p. 

A number of leading bro- 
kers have been downgrading 
their profit forecasts for the 
present year to March 31. Last 
week James Capet the broker, 
trimmed its estimate by £5 
million to £410 million. 

There were also rumours 
circulating in the market last 
night that one broker is claim- 

• There was revived bid 
speculation in Pearson Group 
yesterday with one over- 
seas buyer trying to bid 575p 
for 6 million shares outside 
the market. He appears to 
haie been sent empty 
away. The price, which 
jumped 7p to 570p at first, 
closed only 3p up at 566p. 
Turnover was restricted to 
2 million shares. 

ing the group will be lucky to 
make £400 million compared 
with £355.8 million last time. 

No one was prepared to 
own up to it. but dealers said it 
was enough to upset an al- 
ready dull market. Back in 
June, when the Marks and 
Spencer share price was trad- 


FTA ALL SHARE 
INDEX 



■ Hl90 


little Christmas cheer 


| Jan Fgto Mar Apr May Jun JU Aug Sep Oct Nov Doc 

ing around 2Q2p, analysts had lower at 1 1 7p with 5.5 million 
been pinning their hopes on a shares changing hands. 

mininn^Th. Dixons remained a dull 

lower at market losing a further 2p to 

ihSnJiid! 306p, after 300p, for a loss on 


Meanwhile, 


Harris 


Queensway, the carpets and 
furnishings group, lost an 
early lead to close Ip cheaper 
at 203p, after 205p. James 
Capel has downgraded its 
forecast for the present year by 
£3 million to £46 million as a 
result of the dull conditions. 
That compares with the £36.8 
million Queensway earned 
last year. 

On Thursday, James Cape! 
reduced its estimate for Sears, 
the William Hill betting shops 
to Selfridges and Saxone 
stores group, from £200 mil- 
lion to £193.5 million. 

Last year Sears made profits 
of £185 million. Other 
downgradings are expected to 
follow. Sears finished 1.5p 


• Grand Metropolitan, the 
drinks, hotel and leisure 
group, enjoyed some heavy 
turnover yesterday with 13 
million shares changing 
hands. There has been talk 
about a mystery buyer 
building op a near 5 per cent 
stake and one broker 
matched np a seller of 5 mil- 
lion shares at 452p. 

the week 14p. Some dealers 
are fearful that Dixons may be 
dragged into the recent Wool- 
worth telephone tapping af- 
fair. The case came to light last 
month after police discovered 
that the home telephone of 
one of Woohvorth's exec- 
utives was being illegally 
tapped. 


tarn 

Wgh Low Company 

383 283 MBad-Lyons 
174 126 ASDA-MFI 
330 241 BTR 
491 381 BAT 
572 449 Barclays 
840 825 Bass 
450 356 Beeeiwn 
726 528 Blua Circle 
383 293 BOC 
289 170 Boots 


Plfas 

Bid OH* Ofa* 

SOS 310 • +2 

145 149 +1 

262 257 

460 465 -5 

495 502 +7 

720 730 -2 

430 435 • +2 

853 658 
3SB 362 

222 225 ■ +1 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 

Oron van 

dte YkJ traded 1986 
pence % P/E *000 Ugh Low Company 


4.7 14.1 2,100 
8.1 18.1 2J00 

37 185 2.400 
4 JO 12.1 607 

5JS 7.2 1300 
3A 128 332 

an 184 2,700 
46 M 359 
4 3 14.1 516 

4.7 14j6 2300 


I1'i734 Imp Cham Ind 
583 335 Jaguar 
391 312 Ladbroka 
349 276 Land Securities 
268 133 Legal & Gan 
484 293 Lloyds 
283 183 Lonhro 
231 163 Maria & Spencer 
599 417 Midtand 
5S3 426 Nat West 


BM Offer Cft*fle 

nmiov 

513 516 -I 

388 371 14 

327 330 

243 246 -1 

433 437 -12 

232 233 +1^ 

189 171 • -4 

588 572 +1 

516 522 +1 


dhr TO 

p— cp % ME 


608 

423 

Br Aerospace 

487 

492 


42 

234 

45 

103 

910 

576 

428 

P A OOfrd 

488 

492 



65^ 61 

Br Gas 

ei'aBS’j 



9-3 

143 

, , 

78500 

603 

383 

Pearson 

568 

572 


+7 

710 

530 

Br Petroleum 

700 

705 


+5 

484 

83 

7.7 

3500 

682 

315 

HHngun Bros 

648 

652 


-5 

280 

177'jBr TOHICOm 

204 

208 


43 

115 

54 

125 

7300 

246 

152 

Ptosaay 

174 

178 


-1 

193 

98 

BntOD 

165 

167 


42 

93 

65 

45 

4,100 

942 

718 

Prudential 

796 

805 


-2 

354 

256 

Burton 

258 

262 


42 

8.1 

ai 

145 

1400 

234 

146 

Racal Beet 

172 

174 


-1 

3SS 

277 

Cable & Wireless 

318 

325 



1Z 

22 

175 

1500 

589 

421 

Rank Om 

523 

525 


-2 

196 

158 

Cadbury Schweppes 180 

188 


-1 

R7 

43 

213 

2500 

BOO 

605 

RacMtt A Cofanmn 

838 

840 

• 

-5 

564 

426 

Coats Vtyols 

468 

470 

• 

42 

174 

95 

145 

644 

5844346 

Routers 

5S7 

568 


-7*» 

336 

257 

Com Union 

280 

283 


. _ 

174 

65 

a m 

940 

7B1 

511 

R7Z 

850 

654 

• 


704 

409 

Cons GokflMfc 

665 

572 


45 

35d0 

5-2 

19.1 

912 

532 

365 

Rountree 

392 

393 

• 

->* 

330 

252 

CowlsuidB 

310 

313 

• 

, . 

102 

33 

105 

435 

967 

782 

Royal Ins 

630 

835 

• 

-1 

290 

201 

Dee Cap 

200 

205 


41 

106 

5-2 

1&4 

1<400 

426 

344 

Saksbury (J) 

408 

410 

• 

-3 

438 

218'aDbnxu Grp 

302 

306 


-A 

43 

iA 

215 

4,100 

1484104 

Sears 

116 

117 


-2 

650 

408 

Fteons * 

530 

535 

* 

-6 

04 

15 

207 

1300 

415 

314 SedOHrick Gp 

312 

315 


-2 

954 

701 

Gen Accident 

■793 

800 

• 

413 

343 

43 

205 

1500 

977 

653 

She! 

968 

970 


+3 

226 

158 

GEC 

168 

172 


44 

63 

3.7 

105 

3.100 

132 

93 

SnuA A Nephew 

120 

121 


+’* 

t1’«758’: 

i Glaxo 

1D*» 10’* 


. . 

20.0 

1.9 

215 

2,700 

174 

96 

STC 

168 

171 


-2 

481 

328 

Grand Met 

450 

455 


-3 

14.6 

S3 

13.1 13500 

894 

419 

Stan Chan 

783 

787 


-2 

11*i 721 

GUS -a 

10 

10 

• 


300 

35 

145 

816 

385 

259 

Stontaoee 

258 

260 


-6 

774 

72Q 

GRE 

760 

767 

• 

+2 

425 

55 

22.1 

2fiB 

1 772 

520 

Sun Attorn* 

630 

635 

• 

+4 

385 

235 

GKN 

259 

262 

• 

_ . 

173 

63 

08 

479 

81'. 72*. TSB P/P 

72'»73 



355 

274 

Gutoness 

281 

283 


+2 

115 

4.1 

10.7 

6700 

420 

265 

Tesco 

378 

380 


-4 

21 5': 141 

Hanson 

1B5 

186 



6.1 

33 

11.8 18500. 

529 

374 

‘Thorn EMI 

464 

467 


-1 

623 

403 

Hawker Siddatay 

424 

427 

• 

43 

215 

55 

9.4 

540 | 

346 

209 

Trafalgar House 

259 

260 




484 44 

12.7 24 

164 44 
144 44 
124 54 

254 5.7 

17.1 7 A 

54 84 

37.1 64 

27.6 54 

284b 54 
154 2.7 

214 34 

. 74 4.1 

384 44 

44 24 

224 44 

234 24 

54 14 

31.4 44 
180 44 
384 44 
84 21 
54 44 

17.1 5-4 
514 54 

34 24 
2.1 12 
484 54 

114 42 
274 *3 

31 34 

39 24 

254 5-4 

139 74 


120 1.400 
104 90 

174 558 

224 1,400 

31.1 787 
74 1-600 

114 593 

20411400 

21.1 284 

54 396 

144 638 

184 2400 
172 8500 
124 5.600 
524 205 

184 1,700 
135 482 

131 218 

422 1,100 
84 229 

104 1,600 
684 800 

234 523 

154 3500 
154 343 

84 998 

204 5,800 
154 1,700 
92 143 

134 2400 
574 1400 

214 754 

84.1 874 
9.7 1400 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


The Bank holds out a 
£600 million carrot 


Bui there were a couple of 
bright spots. Bunns rose 3p to 
26!p, while Storehouse halved 
an earlier fall to finish 3p 
easier at 262p. Both stocks go 
ex-dividend on Monday and 
met renewed institutional 
support. 

The rest of the equity spent 
another lacklustre session and 
ended the account on a quiet 
note. The FT-30 share index 
recovered an early S.6 fall to 
close 1.5 up at 1,2711 with the 
help of new time support for 
the next account starting on 
Monday. 

The wider FT-SE 100 share 
index also rallied towards the 
close ending 1-6 up at (.632.2 
having been 3.S lower earlier 
in die session. 

Turnover in British Gas 
dipped below the levels of the 
previous few days with a total 
of 78 million shares traded. 
The partly-paid shares firmed 
0.5 to 63p. 

But dealers were still 
complaining about the lack of 
turnover generally and have 
clearly missed the traditional 
pre-Christmas rally. 

Government securities ap- 
peared in a more confident 
vein scoring gains of up to Vh 
at the longer end of the 
market 

The Bank of England de- 
cided to issue an by way of 
tender an extra £600 million 
of Treasury index-linked 15 
per cent 2024. Investors will 
have to pay £30 down with the 
balance due on February 10. 

Oil shares were still looking 
vainly for a positive outcome 
to the latest Opec oil talks in 
Geneva. But with no sign of 
agreement prices were left to 
their own devices with prices 
drifting lower in early trade. 

There was some recovery 
toward the close helped by 
selective support Shell firmed 
5p to 97 lp, BP 5p to 703p, 
Enterprise 03 lp to 178pand 
Ultramar a similar amount at 
156p. 

The merchant banks contin- 
ued to eqjoy something of a 
modest re-rating following 
their recent dismal perfor- 
mance. But the broking arm of 
Morgan Grenfell still main- 
tains that much of the selling 
has been overdone and that 
fear that many of the sector 
leaders are undercapitalized is 
ill-founded. 

Hill Samuel hardened 2p to 
3S3p, Mercury International 
the same amount at 358p, but 
Morgan Grenfell lost an early 
lead to close all-square at 
38 lp- Barclays de Zoete 
Wedd, the broker, and rival 
Laing & Croickshank are both 
said to have been big buyers of 
the shares recently. 


T he sobering funding operation, 
expected on December 24, came 
yesterday afternoon. The Bank of 
England launched £600 million of a new 
index-linked stock with a maturity date 
of 2024, which not only exceeds the 
longest dated existing stock by four 
years, but stretches to a time when even 
the Young Turks in the City will be 
drawing their pensions. 

It has a 2Vh per cent coupon, and most 
significantly it is a Fotra (free of tax to 
residents abroad) stock, the first index- 
linked stock to be so defined. 

Put all this together, and it looks a 
logical way for the Chancellor to begin a 
campaign to attract capital to this 
country. The foreigner has been scared 
away from the gilts market by fears that 
the general election will do terrible 
things to British inflation — either 
because the Conservatives reflate too 
much ahead of it, or Labour reflates 
even more after it. 

The run of trade deficits in prospect 
over the next few months means that 
prophecies of a sterling crisis could 
easily become self-fulfilling. Some long- 
term inflows into the gilts market from 
abroad would clearly help offset current 
account outflows. 

And so. as well as offering a hedge of 
nearly 40 years against whatever the 
politicians might do to inflation in 
Britain, the new stock offers the 
foreigner the carrot of a tax-free real 
return of more than 3'A per cent 
It also keeps the funding momentum 


going, with £30 for each £100 of stock 
payable on tender on December 30, and 
the remainder in February. But will this 
particular turkey fly? 

The agreement that Opec has been 
struggling to put together in Geneva 
could do a lot for perceptions, particu- 
larly from abroad, about the gilts 
market It could lav the ghost of a 
January sterling crisis once and for all, 
although with each day that Opec has 
struggled on, its deliberations have lost 
a little bit more market credibility. 

Even so. as John Shepperd of 
Warburg Securities, say’s, the clear 
foreign bias in this piece of funding 
could make it a reasonably successful 
“Opec Settlement” stock. On the other 
hand, it could also be the Opec flop 
stock. 

Looking further out, it is doubtful if 
foreign interest in the gilts market can 
be sustained merely by offering hedges 
against British inflation. The con- 
ventional market is already offering a 
substantial inflation hedge, but foreign 
buyers have been notable for their 
absence in recent weeks. 

Stephen Lewis, at Phillips & Drew, 
takes the view that when inflation in 
Britain rises, sterling will fall, and the 
index-linked sector, tax free or other- 
wise, will have little to commend it to 
overseas institutions. 

But perhaps the time has come to 
begin taking a gamble on the idea that 
most of sterling's fall is behind us. 


Opec’s real task lies ahead 


W hile Opec ministers wrangle 
over the practicalities and the 
politics of cutting production 
by 7.25 per cent to 15.8 million barrels a 
day, analysts in London were not 
convinced that, even if it sticks, such a 
deal would make a substantial impact 
on the price of crude. 

Over the summer months of 1986, 
before the voluntary production ceiling 
of 17 million barrels a day was agreed, 
Opec had turned on the taps and was 
producing more than 21 million barrels 
a day. This allowed oil companies to 
build up a high level of stocks at 
attractively low prices. 

Estimates of the present level of 
excess stocks, which will have to be 
mopped up over the next few months, 
vary between 200 million and 300 
million barrels of oiL Some estimates go 
as high as 500 million barrels. 

Will the cutbacks be sufficient to 
force prices towards the target level of 
$18 a barrel? 

The breakdown of quotas circulating 
among Opec delegates yesterday sug- 
gested that the 15.8 million banel-a-day 
total may exclude the 300.000 barrel-a- 
day production from the neutral zone 
between Saudi Arabia and Kuwait The 


zone provides the revenue for the “war 
relief' given to Iraq. 

The proposals appeared to assign a 
quota to Iraq of 1.466 million barrels a 
day, compared with present output of 
1.7 million and potential output by the 
end of 1 987 of a further 1 million barrels 
a day. Production for 1987 will be 
boosted as capacity is increased on the 
Petroline pipeline to the Red Sea and oil 
begins to.flow down the new pipeline 
through Turkey to the Mediterranean. 

James Capel, the stockbroker, es- 
timates that world demand for Opec 
crude in the first quarter of 1987 will be 
about 19 million barrels a day. This 
would mean a draw-down of stocks of 
up to 3 million barrels a day. But the 
second quarter demand is likely to see a 
seasonal downturn to less than 17 
million bands a day. 

Nevertheless, assuming Opec mem- 
bers stick to their quotas, much of the 
excess oil could be used up over the next 
six months. This would, at the very 
least, give support for the present price 

But Opec has six months of hard work 
ahead of it to convice the oil market that 
it intends to stick to the agreement. If 
prices do continue to firm the tempta- 
tion to cheat will return. 




TEMPUS 








Return of the Saatchi poise 


Fund managers who sold 
Saaichi & Saatchi shares at 
570p in September must be 
kicking themselves now. 
With the benefit of that most 
priceless of gills, 20/20 hind- 
sight, they were nothing less 
than a steal when they hit that 
low point after a spell in free 
falL 

They crashed from a high 
point of 930p before the 
rights issue and the purchase 
of the Ted Bates agency in the 
US, a deal which made 
Saaichi the biggest advertis- 
ing group in the world. 

The damage was done by 
two factors. First the size of 
the rights issue, £406 million, 
was big enough to make even 
the staunchest fans pause for 
thought Then came the in- 
evitable shakeout of clients 
who found that there were 
conflicts and overlaps when 
the two companies were 
merged. 

Billings worth hundreds of 
millions went through the 
door in search of other agen- 
cies. The defectors were 
hugely publicized because the 
advertising world makes its 
living by poaching business 
and responds almost hysteri- 
cally to routine movements 
of major clients. 

Few noticed that all the 
while,the group was winning 
new business, too. 

Since the announcement of 
the 1985-6 preliminary fig- 


FTA ALL SHARE L 
INDEX (Rebased)& : 


^SAATCHi^S^raHl! 


Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sap Oct Nov Dec 


ures. Saatchi shares have 
recovered their poise splen- 
didly and -are now comfort- 
ably above the 700p level 
where they still look to have 
plenty of steam left. 

This year looks set for 
further strong profits growth 
of around 60 per cent to 
perhaps £115 million. Earn- 
ings growth will be more 
modest due to the increase in 
capital this year. But with 
close on 60p of earnings 
expected by most analysts, 
the shares are selling on a 
market average price earn- 
ings ratio. 

This looks too mean for a 
company with Saatchi’s resil- 
ience and growth potential, 
especially in the field of 
consultancy. 


Stainless 

Metalcraft 

Increasing profits by 77 per 
cent is an impressive achieve- 
ment except when it repre- 
sents a recovery to the levels 
of four years ago. In its short 
life as a public company, 
Stainless Metalcraft has 
experienced a wide range of 
problems although most of 
them are now history. 

The market has only re- 
cently begun to regain con- 
fidence in this precision 
instrument and component 
manufacturer. The shares are 
now over the 200p mark, 
having been as low as 55p last 
year and having come to the 
market in 1983 at 120p. 

Management problems are 


also behind the group, al- 
though Stainless Metalcraft 
has the unenviable reput- 
ation of having had three 
.chairmen in as many years. 

Life is now looking 
brighter. The order book 
contains firm work to the end 
of the current year worth £8 
million compared with £4.5 
million this lime last year. 
This includes a contract from 
British Nuclear Fuels worth 
£3 million before the cost of 
materials. Although the order 
book is boosted by com- 
panies bought during the 
year, the underlying busi- 
nesses is also growing. 

In 1985-86, medical work 
accounted for 70 per cent of 
turnover. However, Stainless 
Metalcraft is keen to reduce 
the contribution from the 
medical division as a propor- 
tion of the whole while not 
reducing its absolute 
contribution. 

Roger Hardman of the 
stockbroker James Capel, be- 
lieves that Stainless 
Metalcraft will make at least 
£1 .7 million this year rising to 
£2.1 million in 1987-88. 

The shares are currently 
selling on under II times 
earnings - a modest rating 
given the unique nature of 
the business and the im- 
proved outlook. However, 
the dividend payment was a 
little miserly considering the 
loyalty afforded to the shares 


APPOINTMENTS 


Managing director for BAe division 

, . m. nu«_» Ronlr- Mr : ‘.vSTf if. . r.&Z.Z&fiW ? -§!*y' M anagement: Mr Mar 


British Aerospace: Mr Peter 
Brighton is to be managing 
director of a new naval and 
electronics system division to 
be formed on January I. Mr A 
O H Gale is to be deputy 
managing director and 
projects director. 

Storm gard: Mr George H 
Moore has been appointed 
group financial director. 

Hill Samuel: Mr Michael 
Mander has been appointed to 
the board. 

Chemical Bank: The com- 
pany has restructured its 
mortgage group and set up a 
wholly owned subsidiary com- 
pany. Chemical Bank Home 
Loans. The Chairman is 
MrJames M Frost, and the 
Managing Director is Mr 
Darid Cameroo-Moore. 


Midland Bank: Mr Stewart 
Gager has been appointed ! 
group risk management 

Cemeni-Roadstone Hold- „ 

ings: Mr Tony Barry is ap- ■' V-3M 

pointed deputy chief 
executive of the group. 

Apricot Computers: Mr Pe- 
ter Horne and Mr Mike Winn 
are joining the board. 

Nicholson, Graham & 

Jones: Mr John Elgar and Mr 
David Race join the partner- 
ship on January 1- 

BASF: Dr Metm»r Wener, RjgUn,, 

head of the fibres division, 

joins the main board. John Mowiem :Mr Geoffrey 

Investors in Industry Bayles joins the board. 

Group: Mr Ralph Nicholas Nationwide Building Sod- 
Qaartano will join the board cty: Mr Christopher Weston 
as a non-executive director on becomes a director. 

January 1. Save & Prosper Investment 


Management: Mr Martin 
Lister is to become a director. 

Ben tails: Mr Andrew Noble 
joins the board as a non- 
executive director in 

February. 

Ocean Transport & Trad- 
ing: Mr Nicholas Barber will 
become chief executive on , 
January i. Mr Pieter Marshall 
will become non-executive 
chairman at the AGM in May. 

Lazard Brothers : Mr Doug- 
las Bushed Mr Gerald Craig- 
McFeely, Mr Christopher 
Fisher, Mrs Frances Heaton, 
Mr Gordon Johns and Mr 
Charles Packshaw will be 
appointed executive directors 
on Januaiy l r Mr Andrew 
Sbrager will be appointed as 
assistant director on January 
5. 


J. Rothschild Holdings pic 


10 YEARS OF CONSISTENT GROWTH 


31 March 

1976 

1977 

1978 

1979 

1980 

1981 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 


1986 


Net assets 
per share 
pence 


28.2 


34.8 


Dividends 
per share 
pence 


0.79 


0.88 


1.45 


1.89 


76.7 


79.3 


110.1 


115.5 


125.2 


1633 


2.47 


4.56 


5.00 


Net assets 
£ million 


32.6 


39.9 


80.2 


99.4 


122.3 


126.3 


232.4 


439.1 


543.6 


6033 


30 September1986 


Halfyear 1713 


230 


6153 


Copies of the Interim Report may be obtained from the 
Company Secretary, J. Rothschild Holdings pic, 15 St James's 
Place, London SW1A 1NW. 


7 


( 







BUSINESS AND FJNAN 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


a ft ft su 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


BM oner Ctl'ng YW 


Weekly 

BU Otter di ng Yld 


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BM Offer chng YW 


9-1/. Perrpnoum Ftt. it a ywan to HMh 
DM4 458144 


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High Income 

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227.0 352.1 +01 

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1070 1M2 


+0.1 4.71 
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5&.B 5970 -14 147 

ar.i sai -a* 029 


BUOCMASTEfl MANAGEMENT 

The Stock Exchange London EC2P 2 n 
01-588 068 


Mkwsootac 
Oenerd Inc (4) 
Do Aceum (4] 
Income FinJ 0) 
Do Aeon (3) 
M hie R] 

Do Accum (2) 
SnoMr loc W 
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SU 601 +06 300 

281.7 2322# -U 250 
357.0 3735 -05 250 

1034 100.1 -03 SUB 

1843 1931 -04 5JH 

1335 1395 -5* 0 49 

1775 1865 -07 089 

£13.41 13.110 +003 £05 
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Do Accent <51 0321 1196 +iMB 2» 

CSfWPMAMACEB S 
125. Kta MoBom. lonoon WClV Vf 
01-3421148 

CS Jjpw Fund 852 907# -12 Q5S 

CANNON FUND MANAGERS 
1. ONmpc W»y. WeroWay. HA9 OhB 


390 2 3071 
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2 . Fere Stress. London EC2T 5A0 
01-588 1815 

brunt 4H55 4J2 

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Dtooa 1005 1060 

CHASE MANHATTAN FUND MANAGERS 
72173 Basmjha* Straat London EC2V SOP 
01-608 6622 

S S C Spnoat Sits 515 585 -07 055 

CHARITIES OFFICIAL. IMVES1M84T FUND 

2 Fern Strom. London EC2Y SAO 
01-588 1815 

buoma 38488 49* 

AatM CIS IS7 

Daposa 1000 10.76 ; 

CLERICAL NEURAL UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Narro w Pan . Bristol BS2 OJH 
0800 373393 

Amar Growth 2+8 363 -05 190 

Ernst? Hign Income <35 462* ■ ■ 450 

European Grow* 3l 6 335 -02 200 

GmwM Kutv 38* *07 -04 2E0 

gSTf-ImW G* 278 211 +0*350 

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MatSwatHt 84.7 2S1 •• 290 

KcW 252 26.7 +05 500 

Japan Grow* 350 37.1 -0.1 090 

f*C* grwGffr 2*0 25* -or 250 

COUNTY (IT MANAGERS LTD 
161. CMatmdo. London BC2V 6EU 
01-726 1W9 

EIMIW Trust 4S1 513 +02 40* 

Erpj leaxne 1894 1793 -0.4 521 

Fmtncal 1722 1823 -08 227 

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CROWN UNIT TRUST SERVICES 
crown noose. VKftng GU2T 1XW 
04889 5033 

HMt Income Trust 2509 2669 -27 480 

Grow* Truss 223 3 2375 -25 103 

Amman Trsnt 1275 1300 -68 0.74 

CRUSADER UNIT TRUST MANAGERS LTD 
FWrcasa. Sonny RH2 88L 

nSSmia* 

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UK Grow* Accum 49* S28 . . 2*1 

DO Dm 494 52-8 . 2.41 

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Paata Grow* 567 606 +02 051 


EFMUMT TRUST MANAGERS 
4. MetnSa descant. Edmtwran 
KI-ZpS 3*92 

Arasncan Fund 725 785 
Cepe* Fund 101 3 1075 
Grow* 6 Inc Fund 1312 1317 
High Dot Fund 1115 1117 
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MLA UNIT TRUST MANAGEMENT _ „ 
99-1 QC- Sarafljg RS. Mxssia*. Karo ME:* »a 
0822 674751 

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SaSS« 313 EJ» -02 ja 

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NLA Inarm 423 *5 *• +C£ 435 

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£ St Ma>v Aaa. London EC3A asp 

01-6Z3 1212 DaaSng 01-623 5766 Daaing 01-623 


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Tokyo nind 1685 1792 


-12 130 
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(Fa) PaciSc (*| 3295 3385 

(Ex) SmOrn Jap (*) 2015 2070 

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T465 1503 
111.7 114.78 
3295 3385 


American Truss 855 905 -1.1 055 

Austrian Trust 272 38.8 +15 d m 

BntBh Tst Accum 620 B6.7 -0.1 1.79 

□a Dot 54.4 S79 -0.1 129 

CotmnodKy Stare 73.7 7038 +03 1.77 

European Truss 575 607 -05 060 

Extra Income Trim 50.1 535 . . 503 

For Eastern Thai 1509 1600 -04 00C 

Fore merest Fund 35.6 372 +021052 

ins torn tot Tst 345 259# -0510*6 
Gtabri Fund Acam 1872 1886 -45 050 

Do Drtt 177.7 1889 -03 DJQ 

G(M stare Trust 16fl l&oa +05 152 

HndDM Amehcan 3T2 331* -07 050 

Hxpi mcoroa That 1*69 1569 +05 55+ 

Haw Kaig Trim 380 404 +05 120 

Income Fund 795 845 -04 303 

Insurance Agendas E49.79 61.71 -0.19 201 

Japan Trust 138-7 1472 -0.7 0.00 

Managed Exempt 3589 269.7 -15 £22 

04 A &0RH Tnist 37.1 394 +05 290 

Soactal Sa Trim 99.1 1062 -02 091 

UXSmfrCSHacTSI 76* H0.6 +02 073 

OOVCTT<JCIWq UNIT MANAGEMENT 
w up iasbr Hae. 77. London Wssumdon EC2N 
IDA 

01-508 5620 

M Growth 87.1 939* +0.7 1.14 

Amman Grown 082 70 i "SS 

Ame r ican Inc 729 772 -09 4« 

European Growth 2«Z 2 2576 -05 DO 

GoU 6 Minerals 475 508 +03 098 

Japan Growth 1585 1603 -1.6 . . 




EAGLE STAR UNTT 1RU6T MARAOn* 

Bsm Road. DNnanham. tBcucanar OL53 7UQ 
02*2 521311 

UK Bamnoad me 701 7*Am -02 3.18 

DO Accum 71* 785* -02 £10 

UK Growth Accum B95 95.0 -08 2.16 

UK Hign Inc Inc 68.1 725* . . 493 

N American Accum 689 734 -09 023 

F«r Eastern Accum 1124 119* +04 095 

Etrann Accum 907 98.7 -14 1.18 

UK at A Ft me 503 53.40 +02 018 

Do Accum 535 66*0 +02 893 


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729 772 
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01-623 9333 


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22S 229 s .. 
480 485 
B5 87 

237 242 .. 

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253 205 
388 372 # .. 
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48 51 
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288 291 


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228 ISTftTnB Ocacto 
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330 217 USOtata 

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Tih mm 70 

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uesday of month. 


Eras Nn 
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2* £3 586 
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► ■ - 23 3* 29.1 

-A 26b £3 649 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


85 1* 

17.1 39 45.1 
669 44 357 
124 4* 335 


378 383 -2 7.1 1* 

15ft - 


158 158 46b 26 

4« 42 -6 84 2* 

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128 128 -2 Z* U 

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448 320 MAI 
305 3M M 6 B 
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COMMODITIES 


25 

2 * 

156 

76 

34 

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77 

04 

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40 

14 

1 X 1 

£1 

12 

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11 

45 

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mm 

mm 


§.-lv b\ 

m— — 


QEESSXtaSl 


Coca has enjoyed a modest tectirecaJ rafly recsntfy but the 
ttveat of renewed producer sefling fes overhead and 
confrontation of the 1986/87 Ivory Coast crop at 
500/520,000 tonnes (the t" ird highest on record) tea been 
bearish!* received. Comment by GNI. 




beanshly received. C 

INTERNATIONAL 







G W Joynaon and Co report 

SUOAJR (Run C. Camkoro) 

FOB 


Mar 

May.. 

1354KS.fi 

1402-3X8 

£9 

Oct 

IW 

Mar 

T44fi-442 

149X8* 

154fi-52fi 

184*«1JJ 

vofc 

COCOA 

Dec - 

2951 

Mer- 


May 

- 14W-6B 

Sep- 

1487-65 

1507-86 

Dec - 

1535-34 

vot 

1089 


Cash 35aotwau» 

Three Months. 33fiK)-332J0 


c muTO icw 
Atmge Mdock pricn 9( 
rapreadiiam markets aa 
DBconberta 

OjtflB. 91 -*«P per kg to 

22«.17pperkg* 

80^8(1 per kg hw 




Wdenpa. dmm3i« %, 


StUVERLAHOE 

Cash „ 374*fr37BOT 

Three Momhs . m0M86J0 


VOWOM MEAT FUTURES 

IMe Pig CtntoM p. pat Ido 


35.00 9SJW * 

96.00 96H0 


Pig Meet trees 
Uv# Cattle Coobact 
p. per kilo 

Open Close 

J® ,96.00 97 DO 

101 -50 10O5C 

unq. 99^0 


UMK3N ORAM FUTURES 
£ per tonne 

Wheal Barley 
Mtwh Ctosa Oose 

Jan 110.15 11075 

Mar 112*5 11355 

May 115.40 114.75 

Jui 117.65 uw. 

sep loi.io iooa 

f*ov 103J55 103-05 

Barley 139 

LONOCN POTATO FUTURES 
Eper tonne 

Month Open Cte*. 

Feb 10EL80 106.30 

fpr 15200 16190 

May 171,00 171-SO 

Nm H750 B650 

VOt 796 


Report |S10 per 


Ap rB7 71SJt-710j0 7tW 


VQliaaiote Open hMst: 1900 

BpoiiTiarlmtoonim HHU ty: - 


Gown 3J) on 18/12/» 



































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wiarta^nisa 


- ( 3c/d~ 

. f™™ > our . pon folio card check your 
wehi shair pnee movements, on this page 
2 n, -'n A ? J * ,^ wn l U P ll > give you your 
ovemn ipiaJ and check this against the 
daily dividend figure. If it matches, you 
have won outright or a share of the total 
daily pnze money staled. If you are a 
wirnicr .follow the claim procedure on the 
hack of your and. You must always have 
your card available when chiming 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Quiet end to account 




— ( Qcld — 


(Current market price multiplied by the number of shares in issue for the stock quoted) 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings bean December 8. Dealings ended yesterday. ^Contango day Monday. Settlement day Januray 5. 

^Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


DAJLY 

DIVIDEND 

£4,000 


WEEKLY 

DIVIDEND 

£24,000 


Claims required I Claims required 


Whore stocks have ontjr ww pries quoted, these are mMflo prices tsken daily at 5pm. Yhrid. change and p/e ratio we calculated on me middle piloa 



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Miaogcn 


TNT 


Sun Alliance 


Dowty 


K»ik Saie 


Hay iNucman) 


Jardiae Mo lb 


Wildalli 


Coals Viyefla 


Perry Gp 


loduunafc S-Z 


Leisure 


Indusu-uh Er-K. 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 



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Industnob S-Z 


Insurance 


MoUMVAirciah 


Foods 


Industrials E-K 


Industrials E-K 


Drapery Clones 


Drapery .Stores 


MotorsAircrafi 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £24,000 in 
today's newspaper. 



BRITISH FUNDS 


**. Ohm 
oft Root 

lock Pnoa Ch’gn yVrt. ykl% 



ti* 

55 

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62 

144 

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33 

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144 

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375 

17 

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175 

12 

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182 

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61 

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CHEMICALS, PLASTICS - 




















235 23B -1 

447 450 m+1 

237 242 -1 

IS! 155 +1 

111 - 

129 132 -1 

i© «o -i 

E 65 

131 134 +2 

2*7 270 • 

20B 2T2 a-3 
175 177 i-Z 
m sf. -i 

177 178 -1“i 

157 158 *_*, 
220 222 +3 

O* 125 

238 241 0-2 
153 156 

40S «8 +1 

*P* - 
99 702 0-1 
HJS IIP. 

407 410 -1 

m tor • .. 

wb .. -*» 

ITS 178 
71 100 -I 
157 M0 
73T - 

53 55 -1 

250 255 te-2 
W IB 4 


CINEMAS AND TV 


as its m an tv w 

41Bb712 grtnJTV . 

» ire 

477 2B3 LWT MB* 

asa res scat tv 
275 1 TVS H/V 

50 31 TSW _ 

3*1 219 1MW TV 
228 137 TV-4M 
152 104 UHmTV 
1S1 1 Vortstfea TV 


38) ^ -1 13* 43 158 

« 49 2* B* rh 

■m 202 -3 12.1 11 67 

437 440 •-! 25* 5* 11* 

342 3*4 .. 15* 4* 1IJ 

217 249 4-2 143 5J IU 

<7 41 -i, U 11 II 

290 283 • -I tt* 51 

196 MB -3 14 32 .. 

MB 150 M-2 19 60 19 

178 182 8* 4* 112 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


UNDATED 

3T. ConsoU 4% 

4E 32-« War Ln 3^ 

52U 44 hi Con* 3'rtfc 
34'l 29'. TI8M 3% 

£3>. 22%Con*Oki 2'rt 

29°« 2S>«t™b» 2'!^ 

INDEX-LINKED 
125 i03'*TrM4 B. 2W 7 96 8 
100’. 98'.T«M 4- » 

122 TOP- Jrw K. 2% I9®5 
1D7N 95’. Traal 12£> *“! 
107'. m'jTrBW 
HO'.- *6'. Tn*s H. 2% M* 

111': 97 Treas 
44 <. TV. TVm tb PLZ'i^ »13 

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12 *’« .. 
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101 '» +•• 
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10.1 

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2-1 1.683 

2-1 1593 

2.4 3*20 

If 3*86 
3.1 3*39 

27 1737 

12 1054 

3.1 15B 
H 2538 
22 3*76 

H 1478 

22 3x25 



% 1 
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459 377 

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48 3? 

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422 261 


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153 106 


£99 417 
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350 283 U4SMIJ 
635 488 Mon Bn* 
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Claimants shonlt 


1955 

rtgn to» CamgiBf 

13) a a weatai Ret 
11b6tt HMBsn 
153 88 ihamg 

591 271 ICGm 
54 22 MO 
38 4bJBUon 
29 9 CCA Mug 

743 65 LASM0 

au S9b Dd Dm 

21 8 n*Coai 

« 15 Mm Lonaoo Qd 
7 SbCOMn 
tib llbU 5evdi 

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113 44 , .Pmxgn 
41 21 ft— i 
»'•« tamttaa 
977 653 sues 
185 IS SUM 
B 18 Samga 
23b 11 TA Emh» 

22 EbTjvs 
153 41 TncamH 
ZBO 80 Tuna Bean 
218 99 UUloar 


for 

+204 points 

ic 0254-53272 


Qua YM 

Oraaiwp b P/E 


J IU II u 
+5 21S 4* 114 


.. .. ■ . 34 

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OVERSEAS TRADERS 


107 75 F*.Uy (Amts) 

481 325 Hansn Cnjitau 
505 303 M B W 
37 2Bb«H |W«4 
au 783 lam 
87 34 QaanMtan 

S6 ttio PunsaTM 

283 na Da A 
213 126 PHByftnt 
61 30 SmDaor 

645 545 Su Bros 
224 El Total JUBUn 
Z71 151 t«n Casa 


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4-1 25* 

170 

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S3 
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PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERTS 


FINANCE AND LAND 


20-205 Wngmnh £ 

177 13 Man Hm T. 

178b BE MHoeQ i; 

2(0 US BwWW Tam Z 

22 18 CwMBi 

283 219 CMdMT ZJ 

U 23 Dam— 

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115 732 hoy 6 SMc 1! 

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105 58 MHhIm II 

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MB 114 Wa—MI 11 

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28 24 30* 
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10* 53 164 

33 13 702 
t&5 17 111 
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58 24 185 

27 1* 213 

47 2* 143 

47 11 M5 
45 45 65 
3* 23 224 

4* 18 233 

8* 15 13* 
38 27 185 

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44 15 249 

7* 48 328 

20 1* 20* 
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Hi® 4* IBl® 
14 21 338 

4* 15 173 

32* 57 117 

.. .. 18 
8* 28 218 
V54 5* Ml 

13* A* 124 
975 II ZOO 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


IS 81 FlMbM 

4Bi sa fiaviM 


1ST Ml *-1 1* 07 87* 
458 455 -5 148 12 U I 


305 208 KcMft BnokK 248 232 • -3 M II 91 

391 312 LadtaM 368 371 44 M* 45 175 

565 447 LaBMUnb 455 480 +3 148 11 119 

100 TBbMMDwWo 98 95 21 22 158 

115 67 Mm Of «f Hnk 110 113 -3 21 l* 312 

M-, MOM 88 87 -1 23 15 175 

405 348 G—itata-A' 373 377 -1 58 1* MB 

11 51 8— 74 78 -b 2* 27 tt.1 

209 139 THtt— to* UM 160 -5 75 4* 114 


ELECTRICALS 


XO 

73B 

Ul 

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110 

179 

M4 

S6 

318 

75b 

29 

tea 

3» 

207 

255 

M4 

315 

1« 

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34 

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373 

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183 

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28$ 

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289 117 

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315 

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383 

293 

330 

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215 

153 

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2X 

310 

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210 

100 

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179 

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358 

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103 

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248 SI +7 
155 182 -6 

127 130 
578 513 -0 

90 92 -1 

222 228 -7 

375 385 +2 

194 187 
HO *5 8-6 
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45 48 M-2 
32b 34 M+2 
380 390 -8 

39 41 -1 

230 245 .. 

TT TB'J -1 
385 379 -2 

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433 438 -1 

77 80 M-1 

358 382 

282 267 .. 

182 US -1 
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383 388 M-2 
229 232 • 

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285 295 • .. 
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480 450 • .. 

32 34 
MO 195 

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192 196 
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245 »5 M-5 
188 191 
VS IS 
137 IX 
163 161 • . . 
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100 IBS .. 
41 42b • .. 

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30 JJD M-3 
222 229 M+1 
IS tSb 
222 237 -I 
71 2lb .. 
IS 158 -1 

S B :J 

211 2M *+S 

33 38 •-! 
134 137 

no 213 • .. 

I 215 22S 
248 253 +5 

02 BE +2 

283 288 +3 

400 <M 

68 72 
28 30 
32 3* *1 

IS Ml -S 

70 n 

330 340 +U 

200 m .. 

109 111 -1 

30 92 *1 

40b 42 
U 68.. 
433 440 .. 


S3 ss m 

3141 1A S* 
1*8 S* . . 
WJ 55 102 

3* 15 17 

67 39 1L6 

17.1 3* 11* 

1* 4* 34* 

a*b a* to 
11 S3 201 
U 1* 126 
2 * 2 * .. 
11* 4J 71* 
34 LB 358 

S3 4J> 192 
61 44 132 

989 58 98 

7.5 4* 125 

21 1.1 U* 
14 S3 17 
2* 67 220 
U U IU 
nu 47 146 

IU 41 2L3 


179 69 12* 
1* 3* 114 
73 37 WS 
09 14 XU 
7.1 92 14 

63 42 115 

23 03 

IU 47 W9 
.57b U U 

n 29 iu 

'« 27 iu 
07* 24 307 
a 51 67 
163 74 65 
44 U 144 
Cl 49 129 
56 19 M.1 
29 29 ill 

25* 27 155 

24 59 343 

298 39 IU 
229 5* m 


SB 24 M* 
.. .. 383 

O 25 183 
U U 193 
IU U IU 
67 14 127 
21 12 759 
6* 68 194 

07 U M3 

«4 57 U5 

25 44 37 

25* 54 341 

15 U 197 

m 24 220 
U 41 IU 
57 37 60 

16 5* 

45 1* 

133 5* 

43b 57 


42 a MbMCM 3D X M-1 

2M H8 Now pR] US 127 M-1 

7S 49 mum 58 63 

m m Fto» S28 532 M-1 

©3 35 ftnmm 72 75 • .. 

m M ftoaao CSW 92 97 

69 20 Fata 55 57 -lb 

151 81 FopO) 151 154 M-1 

41 b 27braMi Gmo N/V 31 32 »+b 

245 157 Fen— 1 HWM* 235 » *2 

87 <8 Pissra passes} S3 58 


238 -1 19 69 .. 

JS8 -4 ..*.. 59 

M7 66 43 .. 

242 • 

20 .. W* 19 7U 

236 -1 57 24 37* 

m -i 

* *-t U 4* 289 

m • .. 7.1 49 214 

395 • .. 83 43 2*2 


131 84 CBM 94 95 •-‘r 

3K 235 QH 29 261 M-1 

310 *0 O) 305 315 

IIS ® &BKM Em 10B KB -1 

200 R GH—r 180 183 +3 

m 111 (M 142 M7 M-1 

HbTSEbStam TO'. 1S% -b 

344 194 SS-twfffl 302 m -S 

505 248 flatnaKar 290 310 +10 

(82 707 Gmnpm Mfti 138 M2 

312 206 Grama 288 28B -1 

m m Gam in itz +2 

85 SbHM PriCdai 95b 97 -b 

252 134 ma Era 232 236 

m 170 H* M 138 T40 M-1 

285 175 KriBt 191 2Cffl .. 

29D 235 Mm 253 258 

STj ZUbHam— M Hb SOb 

56 SQ ’ inm S3 • 

2l5bT41 Haaai 185 186 -b 

214 MS Da OK Cm 182 154 

6894 96 Da5b«n 110b 112 -b 

I34bissb DaHK 121b 12H. -b 

280 133 II — a w 276 2» +1 

275 175 H*n» (PMn) MS 258 

823 403 Mr — «* ©7 •+> 

J58 SO I'iEsav TO5 106 M+tb 

W 81 MM 155 IB5 


M4 

00 

Bar am 

IX 

140 


HU> 

7A 

MS 

220 

IX 


; 185 

195 

ri 



784 

220 

m 

Dwllta 

707 

Till 


79 

31 

167 

132 

42 

Cngoi 

114 

117 

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1.4 

17 

31* 

225 

1 

Ovyitts 

177 

ire 

•+1 

80 

4* 

144 

410 

32S 


404 

407 


93 

23 

709 

85b 49 

GRA 

G4 

&*'. 

+b 



549 

Itt 

■to 

Haubteflte tata 

105 

m 




M2 

151’. 

i 93 

Hum Imd 




83 

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69 

131 

m 

m L asm 

IX 

172 

a -1 

74 

6.1 

112 

101 

32 

Marts Mdgs 

46 

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SB 

199 

19? 

07 

La U 

148 

IX 

a-i 

3.9 

76 

141 

160 

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Keen tas«B 

llfl 

175 


ion 

63 

mi 

1TO 

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1K3 

173 


u 

53 

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291 

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3IS 

3M 

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35 

Ul 

mn 

326 

Reaftr UteU 

360 

90S 

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tt.1 

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64 

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ss 

nr 

177 

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m 

191 

74 

119 

31 

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181 

83 

65 

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4* 

2* 

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1S8 

IXbZeus 

194 

107 

+i 

7.1 

28 

115 


245 201 MHO — 

153 108 Asxaor Can 
57 45 Meant fat 

K1 225 Asac 
153 *0 tetarlttiifcfl 
196 US Banac 
389 2*2 Bum Mean. 
310 230 BPCC 
188 H Dmiung 
277*, 158 1 Bind 
i0b 720 CarttMOoan 
228 197 Chnaai 

ssar 1 ^ 

ITS 130 D—mlbm 
913 390 Eu—DS Pan 
280 170 Fontana M 
4G5 293 FmEDam< 

97 54 Gaax Grass 

233 178 GOd OnMtn 
277 i tod Returns 
333 185 HoWnrW 
133 HO t— 

495 173 Loan H5 8 B 
3IB i« IU— 
151 93 Warn trtoras 
155 118 Hgnai om 
28 \T'Mn S mater 
■as 28 tktti Pam 
885 513 Stas Ga 
085 570 Saadi 10* 

150 S3 DaOnw 
3SS 171 S— 

326 124 SDwiM (Jen 

29 200 lldw Vmi 
215 125 van Mm 
re © wax 
225 113 HMBKflW (J) 
302 230 WaraMH 
SG5 320 NOS 


79 02 

177 182 
U7 142 
320 S3 
123 128 
348 353 
275 293 
128 133 i 
115 120 i 
3Jb - 
54 SB 
820 830 I 
714 738 
lllb 112b 
333 333 
310 315 i 
208 213 

157 1G7 

B 71 
200 2» I 
298 303 
S15 520 l 


. . • . . 51* 

I2S 1* 118 

211 12 U.1 

9* BJ9 .. 
SB 1* 176 
*7 14 . 

HI 5.1 9* 

1.7 I* 312 
.. .. 114 

79 19 1*5 

V U HI 
66 1J 


PROPERTY 


ii fsr&— 

221 MO H— wfltC— k 


MB 190 -3 

165 170 «-2 
197 m -3 
195 2® 

77 79 
333 338 
84 85 +b 
338 345 -4 

109 110 +1 

386b 391 b +15 

108 ire 

ISO 170 -6 

;s; 270 +5 

M3*, 195b +3 

©5 <BS 
285 il .a *-3 
31b 32b -b 
332 342 .. 


«isr- *s s 

3*6 234 Ikntaataoe 338 345 
128 IS Motels Group 107 110 
401 OTbHUtal Wtanpoi 306b HI 
191 119 66 158 ire 

315 165 —a 100 1711 

295 SO JaMonBa— 260 270 

S I KbJatta MKh 193b 1955 
5 473 JokMOn Oaw» 485 495 
295 133 Jd—1 IHBteF 295 TIQ 
1Mb EtbJgtam 6 16 31b 32b 

MS 235 J— OB 332 342 

Kfi 66 J— 4 Stand 103 'ffl? 
132 67 Jo— ifltaam) 113 118 
29 21 K— S 25b 

38 25 UM 29 39b 

KS 1*8 HnyM 256 m 

130 105 ttraadrSmb 120 t» 


BT» MbA— 

M tt AM tan 
93 70 Ado 
211 155 AriogMi Sea 
370 275 ASM 
146 92 I— n 
302 246 H&m (PI 
« SSBbBndkM 
197bM7 Br Lad 
m M9 Brian 
57 40 (tad (A) Uons 
IBS 78 GALA 
293 223 00 8 COMB 
330 ZD CnWf ftap 
198 MB Carniwtatei 

290 221 CtolHona 
295 IS Comb 
22 14 CMwHSee 

I is B r “" 


03* 04 5B4 
24 32 154 
2* 34 164 
24 14 .. 
43 12 43* 

64 52 13.1 

174 63 M3 

144 11 Y82 

4* 27 144 

45 50 

04 69 254 


298 230 ta»W 
zre 123 Bo rn E Z b 


25 25b -b 
29 39b -b 
256 MS 
120 tTS 
25Z 282 -1 

260 275 




1* 

11* 

3* 

31 

74* 

93 

40 

9L6 

29 


07 

S3 

$8 

7.4 

12 

55,1 

293 

16 


73 

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if 

73 

1* 

f^Q 

IU 

M2 

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103 

TA 

04 

1U 

119 

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XI 

758 


149 

li*b 

25 

169 

2* 


U 

l*b 

43 

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17 

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W3 , 

27 

49 

102 

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62 

11* 1 

65 

61 

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68 

13 

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4* 

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aiib 

41 

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53 

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61 

66 

67 

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33 

43 

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61 

09 

212 ! 

55 

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146 

113 

69 

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1* 



61 

l|j 

161 

160 

5l5 

65 

1* 

!}? 

S3* 

HU 

HJi 

U2 

1* 

« 

27.1 

L7 

13* 

H 

288 

67 

12.1 

n 

273 

17.1 

41 

IU 


175 125 EstnsfiAs— 
K0 71 E— 1 Tim 
120 MB Earns Gen 
1M 150 Essraa Prt» 

118 93 Evan Of L— 
a x mow 

227 m Froflrmrc 
56 35 BttkiM 
210 M6 Gr Mam 
374 202 Gmcaw 
»b 11 l—BBd Go 
400 204 tatao Coat—d 
495 410 —m 

MS 300 Do 'A' 

54b J4bH*n*ttn Ttf 
25S W0 Hamm Dan 


76 46bHang Hop Lad 
425 270 Inoy 
320 155 Je— 

328 ?S4bUoa ftae 
849 276 LnSwau 
fflib356 Loa 5 Edki TM 
2E6 147 Ob Eb% 

305 2M Lon 8 ftn» am 
188 151 lan Soap ftap 

211 SD lUnam 
121 KDbUt**Sa« 

06 44 Mttnm 

235 125 ttawato Meoni 
640 167 Mteto Ea 
11V510 Ho— 

780 364 I— 

IS B2 HtadWMlAU) 
23 15bltaM»l 
130 73 He« MMab 
93 43 PataHB 

2985255 PMctew 
2B5 72':Pfi51fcn«| 
203 176 Wop 6 Raw 
180 107 Prop nap 
138 IS Png Sraiji 
13b 8M— i 
360 HO A— i 
100 70 twin 


297 In man 8 impWa 
tin re ScrnUet 

198 1*5 SteOI Gp 
IBS 142 Staton 6— 
445 2BD 

173 144 send SK8 
Si 66 SKAta 
290 » Eeunend Sa— 
59 4 3 Tcmi Cote, 

275 198 T rafted PM 

255 BS UK Late 

as us taw 

EC 475 Wendort 
156 725 warns 
94 White* (JtB) 

176 142 Me* BCauagy 


4* 3.1 564 
03 06 .. 

31 S2 23* 
121 7S 125 
5* S* 13.1 
.. .. 6 * 
IB* AO 10.0 
0* 18 427 

10.16 4* 257. 

35 14 4U 

65 21 ns 

13* 29 28* 

118 31 302 
1* 2* .. 
5.T 23 212 

HI ti 91 

61 21 G2S 
23 1* .. 

107 3* 152 

145 44 22* 

9* TJ 264 
BJ 4* .. 

IL7 24 764 
73 44 363 

108 2* 27* 
HA 49 267 

7.1 85 

52 44 172 
tl U HI 
43 t* 17.7 

57 10 S?3 

M 17 HI 
7.1 09 II* 

7.7 75 15.1 

173 68 451 

1.7 1J SfB 

23b as 141 
123 45 153 

73b 8* M4 
42 23 352 

36 25 255 

61 1.1 413 

528 U 269 
ai ai 

1.4 62 552 

02 5.1 12* 

51 7.1 158 

2* 12 253 

53 4* 152 

13* 39 18* 

U U VI 

68 63 822 

1* 23 as* 
17.1 66 153 

57 23 135 

273 32 369 
25JD 32 27.7 
13 25 359 

67 23 5M 

121 72 9* 


SHIPPING 


37 46 VI* 
3*8 1J 37* 


274 too sneTfcay 

164 55 s—mT 


f'lg^ 

IWp 

IU BO Snpranhn 


110 113 • .. 
108 KS •+! 


25b .. 

UB -2 
104 

44 I-S 
235 »-5 

154 -3 

147 -1 

151 +1 

155 .. 
1 « -2 
143 

47 -1 

719 

95 

740 -55 

65 • .. 
237 te-3 
164 • .. 

425 •-* 

-H 

121 +'a 

36 

266 te-1 
IBS -2 
182 +1 


335 78 AC 
-288 138 AE 
lie ii'rtta aarian 
Hi 75 Aa— d 
Ml W4 A—naQ 
a 34bBS6 _ 

314 M0 OmbSI (CD) 
SB 423 Br Aanspxa 
rre 118 Br Cv Mom 
zre rre c— i 

fJ ssrSU, 

241 177 Qowy 

115 41 FHF 

357 253 FHGroie 
213 125 Font Motor 
131 65 Cans IMG 
295 211 GobbI Mate 
167 51 talULten 
1M EE W— I 
612 373 Htmbuau 

113 44 IWrffl 
KB 269 la 
216 90 l oaten: 

653 437 Iras 

% ’a EKo : n 

* » e M 

91 43 Sun 

116 55 WtM 

103 3? MuntaUn 


.. 1676 

*b 

+2 Ul 
-1 39 

b-b 12 
•1 5* 

.. 214 

+4 54 

63 

-2 52 

1-1 U 
+1 79 

-7 ..a 

-2 49 

-1 7* 

43 

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-1 . . a 

l+l 83 
3* 

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» .. BA 
+1b 22 
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78 

1-1 18* 

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64 

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♦1 

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4.1 123 
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61 7* 

11 122 

14 162 

4* tt* 
48 *33 
33 IS 1 
3* .. 

2-7 99 

47 123 
17 KS 

17 

15 209 

15 .. 

35 M9 
to* .. 


317 187 Awae Br Pent 
385 213 BrCaui— 
35B 198 Celedma 
94 51 fitter (Jeans) 
603 480 Grata 
If. HbJacoBX (8) 

12b ibLite 
41 a tatuyDodS 
255 1® teas TisisboG. 
578 42B P 8 0 DW 
173 BE town* mwi 
3E0 127 TctaeA 
390 360 Toflttdl Seen 


303 367 -3 66b 25 189 

285 ZS8 a-1 61b 23 202 

265 26S M-1 7.4 25 4S8 

56 HI -5 « U 105 

497 507 +2 21.4 43 412 

88 86 Sib 75 61.1 

Bb 7b .. .. a .. 0* 

30 32 +1b .. .. S3 

231 232 +b 129 SB 185 

488 492 .. 264 b 54 M* 

160 IK • . . 7.1 44 252 

306 310 -2 5* 19 262 

370 380 .. 12* 34 525 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


370 290 H 343 353 • -2 9* IS 161 

206 145 fimv Beta 170 174 .. MS 63 107 

46 X Hum Gate 44 © 01* 1* 

218 IBS Unawl Hm ttrt » W7 262 ri 89 45 1Q7 

02 Hbtaraold 8 Btettt BE 70 44 65 265 

174 12 Patted 100 172 a-4 55 52 117 

157 IU Stag 1 fitter 132 135 +2 129 05 52 

273 158 Styte 220 225 .. 64 29 275 


TEXTILES 


1 


NEWSPAPERS Alffl 
PUBLISHERS 


S8 68 SBMM 
2H 43 SUMtn 
2» U3 Sntaht Sam 
246 150 Star 

172 so smtaetav 

43 22 Sfisan 
221 ISO Stan 
507 34 n 
195 US TUT 
2*8 76 TSLTtaoal 
535 310 Tat 
\0U% 33 T—a Cbm 
8b 5 Ttan 
95 54 TAB 
170 in Ta> Hags 
133 91 Tod (w 
390 00 DwkhTJM 
sa 263 TcnwaCfiq 
340 209 TnUgte Hama 
M3 an Tiamaa—d 
207*3124 TaasmtOn 


m -i 

263 nib 


15 29 260 

64 1* 210 
79 35 175 

85 45 147 

75 47 120 

13 05 Z7J 
73 75 U 
1.4 13 125 
S7 45 05 
193 42 125 
19 24 395 
171 7* SO 

85 115 85 
.. .. 25 

U3 85 135 
15 23 214 

MS* V> IU 
2LD 4j 157 

43 55 49 

122 12 125 

! ! ! ; 93 

44 55 14 
|4 53 IU 
H 24 145 

52* 25 713 
1M 73 97 

98 45 ma 
93 47 172 


396 21B'<A6M HWitaM 

ssrar 

s s vr* 

m iis aw a- 
378 295 feme Potato 
253 94 Ham Caatus 
340 183 ktaORHM 
W 404 lot T— 
We tSbtkta Coni 
21*020 tan Hannon 
680 445 OdBW 
168 112 Per tuteteUi Sara 


152 167 -1 44 

233 230 -2 82 

382 397 +10 S3 


332 337 -1 114 

138 141 «+! 14 

305 315 • .. 305 
24S 255 +2 125 

330 340 .. 125 

693 TOO -5 143 

710 790 +5 

20b Jl»« -b 129 
510 5U «-1 104 

158 183 +1 59 

485 470 • .. 225 
362 365 •+! 229 



355 205 AM Tad 
300 153 A— Bras 
192 125 Beta (Jota 
115 88 BemnaMAj 

36 is Bam 

m ire bar Mama 
IX 77 Bubnv & Lute) 
76b BI'Htatt 

330 ZS GfMtadS 

IB 74 CnadMi (J) 

276 211 Daasoa 

HEfaar 

137 ST nagmdi 
210 90 tagna IHMQ 
T2S 47 JMfli fSj 
206 132 1—4 
208 IX lent: 
m 2 64 Um 
118 7? Lyles (SI 

115 ti ifata um 
29b W Mbrten 
IU 04 Ratted 'A 
49b X Mew 
155 109 SET 
136 72bS4tt! 

182 133 Skdai 
K 48 Sntasttt (h 

Ob 11 SBddta ‘A* 

1H X Twind Jermr 
230 H Toadtaam 
WSh 75hTooa 

xo 235 mum 


30 300 -5 

255 260 • ri 
1® 193 ri 
toi mm., 
a si *r 

is in a+t 
131 IX • .. 
Kb 63b +te 
308 310 M-3 

151 153 -2 
252 254 w+15 
49 51 

MO 1«2 a-1 
70-75 
ES *-2 
108 113 .. 

X 41 -1 

112 1M •-> 
120 IX 


TOBACCOS 


491 381 OAT 
ISO 108 Cema 

176 127 Mmm 3' 


HL7 a* 203 
167 41 1S9 

19 35 75 
82 85 125 
.. .. 268 
66a 81 85 

7.1 12 311 

87 9* 

162 3.3 m3 

48 35 1£J 

61 3* 138 

67 1.4 364 

4* 13 .. 

29 4 * 68 

5* 75 58 

75 7.1 8.1 

S* A 4 163 
43 14 217 

55 45 HIS 
U U 132 
81 45 102 
14 15 12.1 

62 85 114 

67 66 M* 

.. .. 167 

65 55 153 

25 5.7 162 
75 55 75 
IB 21 84 
74 55 19 

19 U 69 

66 64 >> 

57 25 109 

SB 57 WJ 
105 28 61 


482 464 >5 184 45 121 

136 143 

174 175 +b 160 57 62 


• Ex dfoidond a Ex aa b Forecast dividend a Interim 
payment passed f P«ca at susperaon g DMdend and 
jdewexeftjdea speoaJpaMnentlrPre-mergta^ffesn 

Forecast earnings o Ex other r Ex ncrins a Ex scrip or 
share spot t Tax-tree . . No sgrnfcant data. 



















































































THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


* * ☆ ☆ * s» 


Edited by Peter Gartland' 


FAMILY MONEY/1 


Keep investments that keep you 


If yon have been 
building up a nest-egg for 
retirement or have 
received a legacy that yon 
wish to tom into 
steady spending power, 
the options on offer are 
almost limitless. 

I.IZWALHNCTON 
shows yon the way 
through the maze 


fdJUMF SP* 


'^i&A 


'ft#* 3 ' 


WwjSt? 




“Have capital, need income" 
is not an uncommon situa- 
tion. The classic way of 
converting a lump sum into a 
flow of income is through an 
annuity. This provides an 
income for life in exchange for 
a single payment. 

However, this is also the 
most drastic as the capital is 
given up forever. Other 
investments will provide an 
income while still leaving your 
cash untouched, for future use 
or posterity. 

When you make a choice, 
there are several questions to 
be considered. Do you want a 
fixed income, or are you 
prepared for it to fluctuate as 
interest rates change? How 
frequently do you need pay- 
ments? Do you want ready 
access to your capital, and 
should it be secure, or will you 
risk some loss in exchange for 
growth potential? Finally, 
what is your tax position? 

Suppose, to start with, you 
want your money to be secure 
in value and fairly easily 
accessible. An obvious poss- 
ibility is a building society 
account. Although these may 
be popularly associated with 
accumulating savings, several 
societies now offer accounts 
with a monthly income 
facility. 

If you want immediate ac- 
cess to your money as well, the 


choice is somewhat limited. 
Among the larger societies, the 
Alliance & Leicester, Chelten- 
ham & Gloucester and 
Nationwide offer monthly 
payments on their instant 
access accounts, though the 
minimum investment is 
higher than usual. 

The facility is more com- 
monly available on notice 
accounts. These are also more 
rewarding, in terms of the 
interest offered, particularly 
for larger deposits. As you 
cannot withdrew your money 


Interest that can be 
transferred regularly 


at once without penalty, it is 
worth shopping around at the 
outset Smaller societies often 
have the best offers. 

A bank account is another 
possibility, although most of 
those paying higher rates of 
interest are primarily designed 
for accumulation. Either the 
interest is added infrequently, 
or withdrawals are restricted. 
However, there are some, such 
as Aitken Hume's Monthly 
Income account which give 
the option of having the 
interest regularly transferred 
to an ordinary bank account. 


Both banks and building 
societies must pay interest net 
of composite rate tax, which 
cannot be reclaimed. If you 
are liable to tax. National 
Savings products are same of 
the lew .remaining invest- 
ments which offer gross 
payments. 

Monthly income first be- 
came available in 1982, with 
the introduction of the Na- 
tional Savings Income Bond. 
This now has a mi nimum of 
£2,000. with an upper limit of 
£20,000. The interest rate is 
variable, but six seeks* notice 
is given of any change. 

An alternative, recently in- 
troduced, is the Indexed 
Bond, which also gives 
monthly returns. In this case, 
the interest rate is fixed year 
by year and is guaranteed to 
nse in line with the retail price 
index for 10 years. However, it 
currently oners less than the 
standard Income Bond, and 
with inflation at a low level, 
indexation is not a big attrac- 
tion. The minimum invest- 
ment is also higher, at £5,000. 

If it is a fixed income you 
are after, for budgeting conve- 
nience, two other options are 


panies. and local authority 
bonds. Both are available for 
periods of one to 10 years, 
with the level of interest fixed 


throughout In each case, it is 
usually paid net of basic rate 


usually paid net of basic rate 
lax, but this can be reclaimed 
on local authority bonds and 
on some types of guaranteed 
bond. 

One drawback to these 
investments is that interest is 
paid infrequently - every six 
months for the local authority 
bonds, and often only an- 
nually on guaranteed bonds. 


Answer could be an 
Income nnit trust 


guaranteed income bonds, of- 
lered by life assurance co fo- 


al though a few do offer 
monthly payments. Addition- 
ally, once you have bought 
either type of bond, you are 
effectively locked in for the 
full term, so it is as well io 
check out the various offers 
available before making a 
choice. 

A feature of all the invest- 
ments mentioned so far is that 
the capital value remains 
static. This means that where 
the interest rate is fixed, your 
income will also be the same 
year to year, and likely to be 
worth less, in real terms, as 


[ time goes by. To keep pace 
with inflation, the interest rate 
I would have to be rising 
steadily, which only the In- 
dexed Bond will guarantee. 

If yon are looking for some 
growth potential, in both cap- 
ital and income, the answer 
could be an income anil trust. 
Although the rate of return 
may look low when compared 
with other investments, 
growth in the capital value will 
lead to a rise in the amount 
you actually receive. 

Distributions on anil trusts 
axe usually made half-yearly, 
but three companies — 
Framhngton. Schroder and 
Touche Remnant - have 
funds which pay a monthly 
dividend There are also sev- 
eral that offer monthly income 
portfolios. The basic version 
is a “package" of trusts which 
pay dividends in different 
months, but this has the 
drawback that both the date 
and the size of the distribution 
can vary month to month, 
depending on which fund is 
paying oul 

A more sophisticated 
arrangement combines the 
unit trust portfolio with a 
bank or building society ac- 
count. This collects the dis- 
tributions from the trusts, and 
a set amount is transferred to 
your own bank account on the 
same day every month. 

There is a slight dis- 
advantage to non-taxpayers, 
in that the interest on the bank 
or building society account is 
paid for net of tax. In addition, 
this portion of your invest- 
ment will have no growth 
potential. On the other hand, 
it does offer an element of 
capital security, while the 
value of unit trusts can go 
down as well as up. 





^ -Nr * . •' 

~ jg V.- ,? • . t* ; 

¥‘r\ ^ X '' '■& 


Ftm and good food worth more than its weight in gold; festive times at the SaiO> in 1 


Gourmet 


Luxury service at one of 
the world’s most famous 
hotels — the Savoy In the 
heart of London — is at 
best a once-in-a-Iifetime 
treat for most of ns. 

It is such a golden 
experience that It makes a 
lot of sense to compare 
the price of a traditional 
Christmas meal at the 
Savoy with the precious 
metal Itself to see just trow 
the price of the Savoy’s 
luxury service has 
changed in recent years. 

The price of gold per 
ounce on December 17. 
1980, was S5S0. By- 
December 17. 1986. the 
price had gone right down 
toS392. 

However, by converting 
doUar-based gold prices 
into sterling and taking 
into account the much 
strengthened US dollar 
during *har six-year pe- 
riod, you get a greatly 
changed picture. 


On this basis the ster- 
ling price of an ounce of 
gold on December 17, 
1980, was £250. Six years 
on von get a sterling price 
of £274. 


Now for the Christmas 
meal prices. In 1980 a 
four-course Dejeuner de 
Noel in the Savoy Grill 
was priced at £18.50. A 
five-course Diner de Noel* 
also in the Grill, would 
have set you back £21. 


This year’s Christmas 
Day luncheon in the Grill 
will cost £60 including 
service and VAT. For the 
same price you can have 
your Christmas Day lun- 
cheon, including a Savoy 
Christmas Cocktail, in 
the Savoy’s River Room 
and listen to Ricky 
Valente at the piano. 

So what is the real 
comparison for similar 
menus? In 1980 a dozen 
people could have enjoyed 


Christinas lunch in the 
Grill at £21 a head. This 
year von would need to 
add a fistful of £1 coins to 
the current market value 
of an ounce of gold so that 
five people could have 
Christinas lunch in the 
Grill or the River Room. 

Now, how about char 
most British of all institu- 
tions — the Savoy After- 
noon Tea? In 1980, at 
£2.75 a head the value of 
one ounce of gold would 
have bought afternoon tea 
for almost 100 people. 
This Christmas at £150 a 
head, afternoon tea for 
only 36 would be possible 
with the valne of an ounce 
of gold. 

The price of luxury- 
sen ice is clearly on the 
increase. But then there 
are times when the price 
is less important than the 
experience. 


Arda Lacey 


There’s still a passion for platinum T hanks for the £20, Mr Lawson 


It has been all fan and games 
in the platinum world this 
year. The shiny white metal 
has outpaced gold for most of 
die time, rating op from $340 
an ounce to $670 in Septem- 
ber, then dropping bade to 
around $485 at present 


The reason for plat- 
hram’s supercharged rise was 
a fear that Sooth Africa, which 
totally dominates production 
in the Western world, might 
cut off supplies In retaliation 
against sanctions imposed by 
its customers. 


The logic behind this argu- 
ment was that platinum has 
many more industrial uses 
than gold. It is used in the 
electronics and chemicals 
trades, and most importantly 
in car exhaust pollution con- 
trol devices. At the same tmw, 
it is a moch less important 
source of revenne than gold for 
the Sooth African government. 

In die end, supplies stayed 
intact and prices retreated, but 
that has done little to quell 
enthusiasm among its follow- 
ers. In a report out this week. 


Shearson Lehman Brothers 
are predicting ao average price 
of $550 in 1987 compared with 
S465 this year. There is likely 
to be a s orpins of supply over 
demand next year, hot Shear- 
son's analysts say It will be 
small enough to be absorbed 
easily by investors’ demand. 

The best place to go if yon 
want to take a bet on platinum 
— and Shearson warns prices 
could remain volatile — is the 
Noble coin made by Ayrton 
Metals, which qualifies as 
legal tender In the Isle of Man. 


Ayrton sells the loz coin at 
6 per cent above the cu r re n t 
offer price for platinum metal 
and guarantees to repurchase 
it at a 3 per cent premium to 
the bid price. Bullion dealers 
were quoting platinum yes- 
terday at S484-S486, which 
means yon could buy a Noble 
for £384.25 and sell it for 
£355.25. Ayrton offer dis- 
counts for larger orders and 
also has a O.loz coin for more 
cautions investors. 


Richard Lander 


The Charities Aid Foundation has given 
a warm welcome to the relaxation 
announced this week by Nigel Lawson 
on the maximum amount that can be 
donated to charity under the payroll 
giving scheme. 

The Chancellor has raised the limit on 
donations qualifying for tax relief from 
£100 a year to £120, principally because 
of the practical difficulty of dividing 
£100 into 12 monthly instalments. 

The new limit means that from April 
6, when the scheme conies into effect, 
anyone m a payroll giving scheme can 
give up to £10 a month to charity and get 
tax relief on the full donation at the ton 


rate of tax paid. So. For example, the 
actual cost of as annual donation off 1 20 
for a 50 per cent taxpayer would be £60. 
Mr Lawson also said the Government 
would itself participate as an employer, 
meaning the scheme wiD be open to 
members of the armed forces and aD 
600,000 civil servants. 

The scheme will work in this way. 
Where an employer is prep ar ed to set up 
a scheme, employees will be able to 
donate a fixed amount every week or 
mOGth to their chosen charity or 
charities. This amount will be deducted 
from pay at source and tax relief given 
automatically through the pay packet. 


Employers will pass the donations to 
clearing houses to distribute the money 
to the chosen charities — these could be. 
for example, in the fields of famine relief 
the arts or medical research. 

The scheme will be entirely voluntary. 
No employer will be obliged to operate a 
scheme and no employee will be obliged 
to join. 

It will not affect charitable donations 
made through a deed of covenant. The 
two systems will operate quite separately 
and individuals will be able to make gifts 
and get tax relief under each system. 

Peter Gartland 




Weekly 

Btf Offer tfi’rn YU 


WeeMy 

Bid Offer cfl'ng Yld 


Weekly 

Bid Offer cti'ng YU 


AETNA UFE MSURANCS 

401. St John S Wot London ECTV 4QE 

<n-e37 ecu 


P Bar 51122 
Equfey QTOwBl 


CRUSADER KHJMNCE 


Weekly 

BM Offer cti'ftg VB 


WeeWy 

Bd Offer ding YB 


Weekly 

Bd Offer ding YB 


1039 1147 .. .. 

1BH 1115 -0.8! .. 

11.47 12XB -0.07 .. 
13.16 1398 -001 .. 


Gtt > R*M W 


1293 1362 -060 .. 


♦005 .. 

♦am .. 


Equty 

Cash 

UdMAUT 
MdNnO Btc M 


1454 

1738 1529 

127.7 1343 
1296 1367 
1117 117.6 

166.7 1587 
1362 1455 
1676 1B7.4 
2239 2357 


Ragan Sonny RH2 881. 
0737243424 


Performunoe Pin 


985 1044 
004 1052 


bSmBCL 

tang uppodnf 
North Amor Ojjp 


11.79 1242 
1126 12.19 
1243 1329 
1467 1566 
1457 1546 
1063 
10.17 

1323 1367 


CMMON ASSURANCE 

MJJgrapjc^Mty. Want) 

Equity links 

iSr 


Far Era (to 
on Prop Sms i 
Oh Prop Sams 2 
Fnuid H 
Cash 

Managed Rene 


Mate HAS QNB 


Prop Bond/Exac 
BH Bd Enc IM 
2nd BMW Aeon 
2nd Hjpi Th^adq 


ao H otaew ei Rd. i 
0202 282373 


Property Fund fee 
Do Accktt 


Equity fund Inoama 
Do Accun 


Monoy Fund 

Prop Fd Ser 4 


2019 2126 
2016 2807 
1039 1065 
1129 1176 
238.7 2516 
221.6 2339 


Mai sv 4 
Con* Ser 4 
Moray Ser 4 
Fixed im Fd Sor 4 
Anericen Ser 4 
HghtacSer* 
blamed few Ser 4 
Jepen Ser 4 


199 0 2065 
1966 2096 
1746 1859 
256.1 2696 
2BB6 305.1 
1106 1166 
2416 2541 


2nd MO ttnwy AO 
2nd Index Amen 
M Far Emi Accun 
2nd GUM A ram 
2nd Em Accun 
2nd Japan Accun 
MOWUPm Ac 
2nd Em Pans Ac 


2nd Japan Are Ac 
LftE^w 



1004 1059 
968 1024 
902 101.7 
1098 115.7 
950 1015 
1012 1057 
1359 1500 

955 101.0 
875 979 

956 102.1 
2099 2874 


Nutt America Fund 2323 2452 

Far Enel Fund 3EU 3866 

Ungd Fund 3017 318.1 

Deport Fund 1428 1497 

Prana RaUdanOU 178.1 1676 

property Fund 1525 1006 


Weekly 

Bid Offer cti'ng YM 


weekly 

Bid Offr cw'ng via 


Umtqed Currency 1106 1166 
GiaM Heart Cam 12BJ 1366 


Do Accun 
Qd Deport Op 
Do Accum 
FfetxUe Cap 
Do Acorn 
Mweymewr Am 
Capital Grown Fond 


MLL SAMUEL UFE 
NLA Tower. AcUtsa 
01-806 4355 
Srart* Find 
BrttatiFund 
tdamettonei Furl 


i Rood. Croydon 


Tower KB San 6BQ 


Property Acase 
Moray Aram 
Spccte UR AC3XE 
.Coen Grown to: 
K Anar tey, 
PfeeSc Acsxr 
Tmfcncbar Ac ssa 
KaszaJffes to=jrc 
J«pn Gnu-i ac^=i 
E* i mum Acorn 


WZS 1716 
9C7 S57 
ri5 1196 
114.1 Q£4 
TOCS TC55 
au 64£ 
TCT7 1ST6 
E5.T 524 
1659 1SS8 
656 9C3 


scorrwAMuu 

150 Si Vkioam SL Gtaagow 
0*1-2(6 2323 


3069 3222 
7769 1674 
2386 2516 
01.7 1367 
1352 1456 
2374 2*96 


EAGLE STAR INSURANCE 

Bwi Road. ChoBenhan. Gfegomster BL53 7LQ 

02*2 521311 

Seem Find 1036 109.1 *02 . . 

Blue Chp Fund 122.1 12B6 -0.1 . . 

Adwimraus Find 1456 isa.6 -as . . 

Pfertonn e nco Fund 1496 1574 -49 .. 


Deter Fund 
Capital Fund 
femme Find 


Property IMta 
Financial Fund 


EAGLE ST AR/MOLAfO 
l Throaenaede SL London BC2 
01-666 1212 

Eape/Mkaand (Mb 1576 1636 


EQUITY 8 LAW 

ArttretamJ Read. Htfi Wycombe 
0494 33377 


ALBANY LK 
a. Pa rtial Lm P u teae I 
0707 42311 


CUV OF WESTMNSira ASSURANCE 
Senay Home. 500. Ambury BNd. 

OMMBon Keynes MQ 2LA 
0906606101 

Property Fund 1149 1258 

Money Find 2279 2389 i 

Mngad Feat 4157 4356 h 



4266 4506 
4116 43X5 
2M3 2788 
2266 2384 
1036 1092 
1776 1666 
2366 2496 

297.1 3127 

235.1 2474 
2900 3D52 
3439 3014 




4.1 .. 
-17 .. 
-16 .. 
.. 

41 .. 
+C9 .. 
-51 .. 
•JJJ .. 
-07 .. 
+16 .. 
♦36 .. 
♦13 .. 
-16 622 
♦07 .. 
♦ 1.1 .. 
-06 .. 
-16 .. 


nnonoBfribmiAL 

SOI. Hgra o Lcodaa EC2R 68* 

C1-52B 323 

Managed C« 2206 Z322 
Mragtd caa :K3 224 
Ewroa 2912 305 6 

£go*y trx 25*2 2674 

■nouHjAd Gte cm i »08 Tile 

Mdea LmfeAdGeue 1006 iC68 
OswcE cjSyM 2616 2754 
Onax Easy irsat 228 1 2*3.1 


sccrnmeoauABLE 

28 S) Andrew So. Edfettwgn BO • 

031 566 9101 


Fixed invest 

KM 

UK Earty . 


PnpVTf fcS 175 B 1364 

Property total 1136 1186 

Faad m Oro 1379 1445 

Rxad ob total 1197 iai fl 

Deport O-S 1813 1896 

Depose feaal 1076 1132 

momcuLLn 
acoroa, KanddL Cundria 
0S30 23J15 


103.4 1066 
855 :aa£ 
M8.9 1075 
1353 1436 
lias 1256 
1589 1056 
1247 131.1 
10*6 1337 
1674 1783 
1697 1787 
1337 1409 
134.9 147.7 


Prop fimd Aram 
Fixed tat Fd Ac: 
M Fund Aram 
Mpnay Fund Aram 
)w£»-u*d su Acs 
P ers ftais Ascoor* 
Pens Mnqd aoccus 
Pens Guarantee 
Pm* guy 

Pms Property 
tea Fixed eit 
Pans kW 
Pew Money 
Raw bidx-LrM 


1502 1582 
«32 1613 
295 6 3112 

131.0 1376 
1122 1181 

6013 

37X0 392.7 
1134 11SJ 

139.1 1454 

me ii7 r 

1176 1236 
1380 1431 
1146 1210 
99.7 105 0 


SUN LIFE UNIT 

SI James Banon. Broad BS99 7SL 
0271 *2011 


Managed Aram 4326 USB 

Proporty Aram 2166 CCS 1 

Equity Aram 501.0 6126 

Fined in Aram 19? 9 2011 

Maa-Ladeed Aram H2.0 1176 
Cbsh Aram 1832 1929 


SCOTTISH UFE PIVESTIBBirS 
19 Sc An d r ews Sa Et&rouiBli EH2 
031-225 2211 


Amm EquCy Aram 1850 2053 
US Bonds Aram 13B8 i*&2 
Japan Aram 232.7 0 

Paosc Aram ua.i 1559 
Far Eastaro Aram 4329 455.1 
memahonal Aram 3S6J 3772 
! US Dakar Aram 981 1044 
1 'Van Acorn 1279 13*0 

Ei*o Cur Aram 1176 1246 
DWrfcutitin Fund 173.0 1022 

European na* iikJ 


«gmhi« Hem Rd. ' 
0908 sown 


MPERML UFE OF CANADA 

lirpartal Lila House. London Road. Grtdtord 

0*83 6712S5 


Growth Fund (4) 258.1 2816 
umr Lateed Mon 2452 2581 
Unit u**d Fixed m 2070 717.9 
Ikm LfeBed Sac Cap 1695 1784 
UM Lfedrod Eq Fd 551.6 58ae 
IM LWsBCl Prop Fd 1784 1676 


EmBy MAcc 
European Fd Aram 
Raad fed Acc 


Got Mow Fd Ace 
kid Men W Acc 
HFMMMMC 


Joan Find 
mi American Fd Ace 
Prop Fd Acc 
MrtPB UN Acc 


7185 78*2 
2146 2280 
2981 3085 
2036 2146 
3406 3581 
1856 1S54 
26* 7 2788 

1642 1726 

2082 219.1 

5244 5516 


Eq TOW Ft« 2626 2767 

Fixed Mamet Raid i4io 1*94 
Far Bsst Fwd 2230 2316 
Nth Amar Red 1662 177.1 
Net Retraces Fund 1516 1596 
am Ffew Fund 1276 1340 
pen Find 1260 1654 


FWian End. Ooridng 1 
0306 805056 


•war 

Spooal Ske Find 
Do Accun 
North American Fd 
Do Accun 
Pacmc Baabi Fund 
Do Mean 
Read Menm Art 
Do Accun 
Property Ftmd 
Do Aram 




Property 
UK Equity 


Ftmd i n terest 
index Lotted 

S£3d 


1176 1235 
170.1 T79J2 
1456 1586 
1900 2016 
2403 2531 
1772 1866 

1116 1176 
1056 111.1 

1117 1196 
1546 1681 


127 J 13*0 
1176 1246 
1780 1822 
1KL4 1183 


-C6 .. 
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♦16 .. 
-04 .. 
■*02 .. 

402 
-30 .. 
♦06 .. 

403 .. 

♦03 . 

-29 . 
-62 .. 
-06 .. 
-10 .. 
*06 .. 
424 849 
♦20 .. 


TS8UFELTD 

Keern House. Andover. Hants. SP10 1PQ 
0254 56799 


HUB DUNBAR ASSURANCE 
ABed natter Assurance Srtndon ! 
B7B3-2K2B1 


OBBCAL MEDICAL/FBEIITV 
KTeWATioMM. 

Kanm PSUn, BOSKS BS2 OJH 
0272 290560 
Aeeunmce Fundi 


UhcCesh Aram 
UK Eq Aram 
SumnfaHfi Accun 
LUemad im Aram 
utehd*-u*d Acc 
UtoMtaed Aram 


UtoO'iieaa Eq Acc 
LHttnapeny Accun 


1196 1256 
175.4 1047 
1g4 1720 
1216 127.7 
100.1 106.4 
1536 151.7 
16S6 1786 
1386 1453 


rtlSH UFE ASSURANCE 
Lonpoow House. 20. CMswrt 


SL London EC1 


Deposit Fond 
Da Accun 


Do Accun 
MmodHmd 
Do Accun 


Pf&xxmu. 

Hottom Bn. EC1N 2NH 
01-405 9222 

Hem p en 1014 1996 *05 .. 


SCOTTISH MUTUAL ASSURANCE 
109 St VMM SL Glasgow G2 SHN 
D*1-2*8 6321 

Flea Fund (35} 9286 8644 4-183 


Managed Find 1*89 1587 

Piopmty Fund 1187 126.1 

Ftaad feUBTOSt Find 1216 1284 

Money Find 1186 1246 

Equrty Find 1916 201.1 


SCOTTBK HUTUAL PMUESTBBIT8 
109, a Wncert SL Gbagow 
041-248 6321 


Ftead kit Dep Aram S2S6 2389 
Eqrty Aram B55.7 6306 

properly Aram 91B.1 aasn 
Fer East Aram 


Managed CqttB 
Do Accum 


3181 3356 
1572 1781 
3181 3326 
5146 5412 
4166 4404 
Accun 2586 2716 

— y Aram 378* 3382 

Aneer Mm Aram 1787 1882 
Amar Prop Accum 130.1 1376 


GMEFtrtdM 
tadewd Secs 
Cash 


im femme 
Eirapaan 


1381 i486 
151.1 198.1 
1114 1174 
1096 1144 
992 1046 
K&ffi 1144 
1129 1186 
1342 1414 
1303 137-2 
1482 1566 
1446 1624 
1553 1646 


1 5 FW taj^ Cfecta. Union EC2M 70J 


QT Pten Bond Rnd 1674 1989 
GT Plm Hitft Yield 1BOJ7 2006 
QT nm Fer Em 213 * 22* 7 
GT Ptan Norib Amar 1356 1489 
GT Plan UX I GE 251.7 2096 
GT Plea Woridrtda 2926 3081 



ROYAL H9VTAQE UFE ABB) 
20, CJBInns Street Loraloo ! 
01-920 0202 0733 2S853* 


Srtety Fund 
Gro*®T Find 


Managed Find 
Properw Fund 


9614 3B06 
2818 278* 
3856 4086 
329.1 34514 
1980 2082 
1846 1722 


memtekanal Final 3080 4106 


MUM Grown MS) 
Mrtl Growth 'A 1 (4^ 
Qg 0 Prep 

^I^VleU 

Co B Managed 
Od a Empavt 

Op > USDoBir 


Etaopem'Rind 
GBH 9 Fad tat Find 


20|O* Addtac 
01-686 0411 


1 Reed. Croydon CR9 5BS 


FtecWo Redramam Flaw Funds 


' Seraai, Uwtoa YT1X 4AD 


2588 2874 -160 

117.4 123.0 -043 

2087 2146 -0-7* 

1581 1685 -107 

2085 2176 -0.50 

1054 1116 -0.77 

1914 2014 -042 

3087 3881 -165 

1887 1786 -165 


gRRmtad Rd. UtadOrt E7 8JB 


EtoHpAcam 4385 4556 
boHM 3804 4004 

OB Ednd Aram 197.7 2082 
Do AH 1746 1034 

fcaynmo nd Accun 2746 am 8 




jndaa-Lfettsd 
CJwJt Deport 

E2KU. 


Jepen Sort- Ctfa 
Tiaopeen 


1136 1196 
1387 140.7 
1084 114.1 
97.0 102.1 
10B4 1124 
1074 1186 
107.4 1181 
9*6 986 
1284 1387 
1236 1306 
114.7 120.7 


LAS GROUP 
m Georga 1 
031-225 B49 


Edtabwgti EH2 2YH 


Managed Fuad 
UK Eqrty 

SSSTW 

Fixed Harast 


Leon Hduml 233 Hg& StQoydan 
01-680 9T71 

SS^cttd SI 

Monq' MariM Bond OT6 
Onnrt Find 

Mmagad FUal ZSSM 

1*3*7 |«6 

me Mmoed 

North American 1216 

Far Beat 2046 

fete Currency 1882 


CUrarno®/ 
Extra few 
nr East 
FtaSMt 


Naum Rea Fnd 


NATIONAL PROVXBfr 
48. Gnwadxacli SL BC3P 3HH 
01-623 4200 


iH? 


oaeuL pmdnuo ure 

gWtertj SL Onetaatt Harts 

Pwttoao Fd Ace 4116 

OoM 2986 


rtflh Technology 


OoMttl 
Money Accu 
Dd Xxdai 


2*06 2536 
3014 3176 
264.1 2781 
1787 1981 
1502 1582 
2076 2186 


COLONIAL MUTUAL 

lflOd0n eeiP 480 


fta few a 

Ctana Ew% 
tatee Caa 


-J"* 1 

Fteed tat Dap 


OoaeBel 
Auente Acorn 
Do Inteal 
Financial Actant 
Do note 
500 Aram 
Oo feted 


179.7 1882 
1596 1584 

187.7 1786 
1499 1576 
2036 2144 
1616 191.1 
2287 ms* 
1986 20(6 


Ape" Ace 8 3234 3*16 


bnana Aram 2*0.0 2515 
Do MW 2184 2287 

Leisure Aram I486 1582 
Spaete SB Aram 1714 mi 
U* Tfedi Aram 1083 1181 
Do felted SU 1082 



4114 4336 
2042 2156 
W7.1 1546 
1166 121.7 
1116 1176 
1136 1196 
1136 1180 


LEOALAOBCRALURn 
7, Mort d to r e Hd. How. 
Bra 724688 
BMg See LrtaJ hit 


Do Aram 

"TaSs; 


Zj. Prtaca g » Wteea Road. BoumeraotA 
0202 792122 

Utengad Baal 4286 4488 -14 

Money Fund 1586 1986 +03 

&M1V Find 3496 8881 -03 

Jrod imanM Fond 143J 150 1 +4.1 

Property Find 2187 2316 


Do Accum 

Managed tatei 

Do Aram 



tadned EBt 
DepoeO 


2989 3147 
2814 2958 
231.7 2434 
2982 3154 
1286 135.1 
1846 194.1 
1116 117.1 
1296 1364 


*S l Gm IIB 

Grown 


♦1.0 
-09 .. 
+061167 
-06 960 
-26 .. 
+1.7 .. 
-0.1 .. 
-16 .. 
+06 .. 
♦1J .. 
- 1.1 . . 
-1.0 .. 
-02 .. 
-85 .. 
-ID .. 
+86 .. 
-00 .. 
*0.1 .. 
♦16 .. 
-14 .. 
-06 .. 
-87 .. 
-20 .. 
+11 .. 


tadwHJrtud Fund 
Memawnel ftnd 
North American Fd 
Pudflc Find 
Propony Fund 

ffifsa r 



TARGET L9=E 

TarBM House. GaWiane Road. Aytestwry Bucks 
Aytostawy {0296] 39*000 
American Eagle 1119 1176 -14 .. 

Auatraton B0.7 S34 +36 .. 

CtxnmocBy 1037 UH2 -05 .. 

Deport 1572 1655 +02 .. 

Energy KL3 55.1 .. .. 

Financial 5909 201.0 -1.1 .. 

Fteed fe a em a i i onal 15*9 1B3.1 -0.7 . . 

GcM 1274 1346 +80 .. 

income ' 2246 2387 +1.1 .. 


Ftad ta wn w i i oral 

Gcrt 

femme 


beemasand Equity 330.8 3*88 


SCOTTISH PROVIDENT 
5 St Andrew* Bq, Ednbugn EH2 ZYA 
031-556 9181 

Mona 1526 1587 -1 

Eqrty 1644 1782 -1 

ESi ta donal 1B39 1937 -2 

Propwly 1136 1194 

Fond tatarast 1114 117.8 +0 

tadex Letted 101.6 W.o *o 

Cash 1146 121.1 +0 


Japan 

Matey 4 Smgapora 
Mar egnd 

Managed Currency 

UwngedProg 

Papnc 

Preferenoe 

popeny 

Spectari Sihmuns 


Technology 
UK Equity 
US Spacal Bond 
Euro Sfeuehons 


£864 300.7 

946 995 
393.9 414J 
94.6 996 

142.0 1(96 
1766 1859 
*334 IteLT 
2606 2746 
197.4 2076 

7.4 

894 9*7 

457.1 4fli9 
1752 1846 

192.1 2003 


PO Box 902. EOnbugh EH18 5BU 


NQRW1CN UNKM 

PO Box 4. Notrtdl NR1 3NG 


Cooonodty 
Extra kic 
ftr Eastern 

Gte 

mm (983*) 
GOHShera 



Equdy Rnd 

Effi&Sft 


4746 

437.7 4609 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


27 


FAMILY MONEY/2 


Champagne Christmas quiz 


I. Consumer protection is 
currently a major talking point 
m the financial services in- 
dustry. Who is the chairman 
of the Securities and Invest- 
ments Board? 

(a) Sir Kenneth Benin 

(b) Michael Howard 

(c) Sir Nicholas Goodison 

(d) Mark Weinberg 


This week you have your second and 


final chance to take part in the Family 
CHRISTMAS 


2. Registered plan managers 
will be free to offer Personal 
Equity Plans (PEPs) from 
January 1. What is the maxi- 
mum annual amount that an 
individual can invest in a 
PEP? 

(a) £2,400 

(b) £4,800 

(c) £6,300 

<d) No limit 


Money CHAMPAGNE 

qniz, an opportunity to discover how 
much yon really know about unit trusts, 
insurance, pensions, braiding societies 
and other subjects that generally come 
under the heading of personal finance 
such as the Business Expansion 
Scheme, tax and National Savings. And 
how quick are you to spot the names of 
key personalities in the personal fi- 
nance world? 


The next five all-correct entries will 
each win a bottle of Krug Grande Cnv£e 
champagne, and the next 10 all-correct 
entries will each receive a- £15 book 
token. 


The CHAMPAGNE CHRISTMAS 
quiz consisting of 20 questions is 
designed to test your knowledge in a 
serious manner — though not too 
serious, of course. 


HOW TO ENTER: 

Against each of the 20 questions shown 
below we have provided four possible 
answers — a, b, c or d. Only one of the 
answers is correct. All you have to do is 
select the correct answer and write a, b, 
c or d in the boxes numbered 1 to 20 at 
the bottom of the entry form. 


3. The forerunner of the 
Business Expansion Scheme 
was known by a different 
name. What was it? 

(a) Investment Income 
Surcharge 

(b) Business Slart-up 
Scheme 

(c) Industrial Building 
Allowance 

(d) Life Assurance Premium 
Relief 


The first all-correct entry form drawn 
from a hat will win a magnum of 
magnificent Krug Grande Cuvfee 
champagne. 


Then send your completed entry to 
The Editor, Family Money, The Times, 
1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN, 
to arrive at this address not later than 
Wednesday, December 31, 1986. 


The names of the quiz winners wiB be 
published in Family Money on Sat- 
urday, January 10, 1987. 


4. British Gas shares were 
initially offered to the public 
at a price of 135p, partly paid. 
But when the Pathfinder 
Prospectus was published a 
maximum price had been 
quoted. What was it? 

(a) 50p 
<b) 125p 

(c) I30p 

(d) I50p 


8. Unit trust funds under 
management have increased 
substantially in recent years. 
At the end of October what 
did the funds under manage- 
ment amount to? 

(a) £29.9 million 

(b) £90.3 million 
<c) £8.7 billion 
fd) £29.9 billion 


15. In which year did gold hit 
its peak price in US dollar 
terms? 

(a) 1986 

(b) 1974 

(c) 1980 

(d) 1981 


9. In June 1985 the Gov- 
ernment announced it was 


phasing out a central pan of 
It sub- 


5. In 1986 the Department for 
National Savings celebrated a 
milestone in its history. In 
which year was National Sav- 
ings founded? 

(a) 1861 

(b) 1886 

(c) 1914 

(d) 1969 


the pensions structure, 
sequently agreed to keep it in a 
modified form. Which of the 
following was going to be 
phased out? 

(a) The State Earnings-Re- 
lated Pension Scheme 

(b) Additional Voluntary 
Contributions 

(c) The Occupational Pen- 
sions Board 

(d) Buy-out bonds 


16. 1986 was the year of Big 
Ban;*, but Big Bang had its 
origins in a pact between the 
chairman of the Stock Ex- 
change and a government 
minister back in 1983. Who 
was the government ministei? 

(a) Sir Geoffrey Howe 

(b) Cecil Parkinson 
(cj Leon Brittan 
(d) Sir Keith Joseph 


6. Who is the chairman of the 
world-famous insurance mar- 
ket. Lloyd's of London? 

(a) Sir Jeremy Morse 

(b) Peter Cameron-Webb 

(c) Peter Miller 

(d) Sir Peter Green 


10. Which of the clearing 
banks has launched a touch- 
screen, instant dealing service 
for British Gas shares? 

(a) Barclays 

(b) Lloyds 

(c) Midland 

(d) National Westmimster 


17. The maximum mortgage 
loan on which tax relief could 
be claimed on the interest 
element was raised to £30,000. 
In which year did this become 
effective? 

(a) 1968 

(b) 1974 

(c) 1983 

(d) 1985 




RULES 


1. Employees of The Times, News International. London 
Post (Printers) Ltd and their families are not eligible to 
enter. 


2- Entries will be limited to one per person and must be 
made on an official entry form. Photocopies are not 
acceptable. 


3. Entries must be received at the office of The Times by 
Wednesday, December 31. 1986. 


4. Proof of posting wffi not be accepted as evidence of 
receipt 


5. The Editor's decision in all matters is final and no corres- 
pondence will be entered into. 


ENTRY FORM 




| My choices are: 

! *□ sn eg 7 □ 

8 □ 9 QlG Oil Q 14 □ 

15Q 16.Q 17[].1Bn 19 □ 20 □ 


Send your completed entry form to: The Editor, Family 
Money, The Times, 1 Pennington Street, London El 
9XN, to arrive not later than Wednesday, December 
31, 1986 


Please mark your envelope CHRISTMAS QUIZ 


7. At 29 percent, the standard 
rate of income tax is now 
below the 30 per cent rate of 
capital gains for the first time. 
But when was capital gains tax 
introduced? 

(a) 1939 

(b) 1965 

(c) 1974 

(d) 1982 


11. 1986 has been the year of 
the acronym. One of the 
following is not a proposed 
self-regulatory organization. 
Which is it? 

LAUTRO 
BDBA 


(d)AFBD 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABN 11.00% 

Adam & Company 11.00% 

BCCI 1100% 

Citibank Savingst 12.45% 

Consolidated Crds— 11.00% 

Co-operative Bank.- 11.00% 

C. Hoare & Co 11.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 1.00% 

Lloyds Bank 11.00% 

Nat Westminster 11.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotlandll.00% 

TSB 11.00% 

Citibank NA 11.00% 

t Mortgage Base Rate. 


12. Of which UK investment 
trust was thedisgraced Ameri- 
can arbitrageur Ivan Boesky 
until recently chairman? 

(a) GT Japan 

(b) Cambrian & General 

(c) Yeoman 

fd) Ailsa 


18. The self-employed and 
others in non-pensionable 
employment who were born in 
1934 and after can pay up to a 
certain percentage of their 

e arning s into a retirement 
annuity contract. What is this 
percentage? 

(a) 10.45 percent 

(b) 17.5 percent 

(c) 25.6 per cent 

(d) 30 per cent . 


13b Which pop star recently 
became chairman of a finan- 
cial advice company? 

(a) Oiff Richard 
fb) Gary Glitter 

(c) Adam Faith 

(d) Helen Shapiro 


19. Which continental Euro- 
pean market recorded the 
biggest percentage stock mar- 
ket index rise in the first 11 
months of 1986 to the end oi 
November? 

(a) Spain 

(b) Italy 

(c) France 

(d) Germany 


14. The Insurance Ombuds- 
man Bureau has had only one 
ombudsman since its forma- 
tion in 1981. Who is be? 

(a) James HaswelJ 

(b) Ernest Saunders 

(c) Sir Kenneth Newman 

(d) Ian Edwards-Jones 


20. On which date did the 
Dow Jones Industrial Average 
touch its low point for 1986 in 
the period January 1 to 
November 30? 

(a) January 22 

(b) April 9 

(c) September 18 

(d) October 27 



When interest rates fall, there will be significant profits to be made. 
For example, a 2% drop in interest rates could mean an 18% rise in 
capital value, on long-dated gilts. 

Gats still offer a return of over 11 % ayear-over 7*A% 
high er than the current inflation rate. It’s time to buy- 
tile clever investor is already beginning to do so. 


/Etna’s Gilt-Edged Bond is an actively managed fund which offers one of 
the most cost effective ways to invest in Gilts. 


* No Front End Load-initial 5% saving over most gilt funds. 


^ Up to 90% cost savings * No Capital Gains Tax *UptolO%ayear 
over direct investment withdrawal facility 



* Voted Financial Product of the Year 1986 
by the Financial Weekly/ Martin Paterson 
award panel - including first for value for 
money and investment performance 


ACT NOW- while gUts are stfll cheap 


/jTtaAKiht LKarmoIihewortcris pubfidy quoted insurance groupwlth assets equivalent toS38Wirion. 


Centre fcopen&mtoSpmeach weekday 

Please send me my FREE Guide to GIH9 and details of Hk.€Iim GILT-EDGED BOND to: 


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-Date of Birth. 


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PS. II you am* sell-employ ed or have no 
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wc can also send you detailsoi /Etna’s 
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Our plans aiebuik around you 






i 


28 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


1. 


FAMILY MONEY /3 



Could Santa be a Soviet subversive? 


Britain's toy companies are 
demanding drastic govern- 
ment action to end toy dump- 
ing in Britain — which is going 
to be a bigger problem this 
winter than ever before. 

“Santa Claus, whoever he 
is, puts hundreds of people on 
the dole queue year after 
year,** said a spokesman bit- 
terly this week. 

“Yet we all condition our 
children to welcome him. We 
live in a mad, mad world. 

“The competition is gro- 
tesquely unfair. There are no 
records of tax or VAT pay- 
ments. though what Santa Inc 


Charming, until yon 
think about it 


owes would pay for seven new 
major hospitals every year. 
And you’re telling me that he 
has gnomes working happily 
for him round the clock for 
nothing but their own accom- 
modation? You must be 
joking.” 


That whirlwind tour round 
Britain in a sleigh drawn by 
four reindeer, dropping pres- 
ents down every chimney, 
sounds very charming — unul 
you think about iL 


Eight months after the 
Chernobyl disaster the beasts 
are still very suspect A posse 
of radioactive reindeer pollut- 
ing every corner of Britain's 
airspace is hardly the Christ- 


mas offering that any environ- 
mentalist would want. 

Reindeer — like the Devil — 
are cloven-hoofed and per- 
fectly capable of carrying foot- 
and-mouth spores. The last 
big outbreak of the disease in 
Britain was in the 1 960s, 
though there have been a few 
cases in the South since then. 

But whenever it breaks out 
the consequences are terrify- 
ing If one cow gets the 
disease, every other animal in 
the herd is slaughtered too. 
The crucial issue after every 
^outbreak is to pinpoint the 
source of the disease, hardly 
possible when four potentially 
infected animals are criss- 
crossing the whole of Britain 
in the course of an evening 

The sleigh itself is almost as 
dangerous. Sleighs do not 
formally come into the Civil 
Aviation Authority’s class- 
ifications, though they count, 
almost certainly, as light air- 
craft. Small aircraft with solo 
pilots are legally obliged to file 
flight plans, if they are to fly 
over densely populated urban 
areas, and pilots themselves 
need a licence. 

A series of disasters has 
resulted from private joyrid- 
ing this year. The loss of two 
big jets and most of the 
passengers aboard resulted 
from crashes with small pri- 
vate aircraft that had not 
bothered to register their 
plans. 

The aviation authorities are 


not the only people concerned. 
The police are worried, too. 

“We spend thousands of 
man hours trying to get 
through the message that chip 
dren should never take sweets 
from a stranger," complains 
one weary chief inspector, 
“but every year parents still 
send their kids off to take 
presents from a man they've 
never met" 

Children may send thou- 
sands of beggmg letters to 
Lapland every year — just 
addressed to Father Christ- 
mas. If he lived there, he 
would be the only person in 


Trail ends near 
the Soviet border 


history to run a billion-dollar 
business from no fixed abode. 

Couriers, clearly, pick up 
the post though Finnish pol- 
ice have never found them. 
Two years ago they decided to 
build a psychological picture 
of the man behind the whole 
operation, bringing in a team 
of psychiatrists to help them. 

They decided that dropping 
toys ail over the world, wear- 
ing an anachronistic disguise, 
was probably an act of pen- 
ance, reflecting someone’s de- 
sire to be a child again. This 
was probably done out of a 
sense of guilt about the way 
that they had built up their 
fortune. 

The theory is still popular. 


The snag is that the local 
police have been through the 
records of every isolated prop- 
erty in Lapland, and there is 
not a single owner who fits the 
picture. 

The trail for Santa Claus 
always seems to end dose to 
the Soviet border, but until 
very recently no one made the 
connection. Now, however, it 
looks as though that piece of 
geography is the key. Pris- 
oners held in the Arctic camps 
of Russia make a mass of soft 
toys, just as prisoners do in 
British jails. 

But why should the Soviet 
authorities distribute free 
toys? Well, toys produced by 
prisoners cost nothing, and 
the delivery system that no 
one can explain provides 
Soviet intelligence with a pic- 
ture of every Western city, 
house by house. 

What is more, as compet- 
itive pressures force some 
Western toy companies to the 
wail, the industry opens up for 
“legitimate" Soviet toy ex- 
ports, which provide a valu- 
able source of badly needed 
foreign exchange. 

No one really knows what is 
concealed behind all that talk 
of sleighs, reindeer and 
presents down the chimney. 
But red-coated men with snow 
on their boots can easily have 
big teeth behind their beaming 
smiles. 


M Yovsm Wbour 

mmihj'Tmaismi 


T x TFP fi:t r aTES ROL'NP-l-P 


Tom TickeU 



An Equitable 
New Year 


■ With the introduction of 
Nigel Lawson's brainchild - 
the personal equity plan - 
now just days away, more 
plans are coming on stream 
in time for the January 1 start 
date. One that aims to 
establish itself as a market 
leader is officially 
announced today. It comas in 
three versions from the 
Prudential, and the Pro's Derek 
Austen says he is looking 
for 10 per cent of the first-year 
estimated PEP market size 
of 500,000 investors. 


Two of the options are 
based on direct investment in 
company shares. Equiplan 
offers a single, lump sum 



equity plans in time tor the 
January 1 start date. 


on the last Saturday before 
Christmas but if you are 
planning to buy that long- 


The credit traps 


awaited luxury today, at least 
ou get full 


■ A last-minute warning to 
Christmas shoppers comes 
from Warwickshire's county 
standards officer Noel Hunter, 
who says that choosing the 
wrong credit deal can add 
hundreds of pounds to the 
total cost of a purchase. 


make sure you get 1 
details of the crecfit terms 
being offered and 
understand how much you are 
going to pay and ovar what 
period. 


Down to business 


A survey carried out by Mr 
Hunter's department show9d 
that a credit deal could add 
from nothing up to £200 to the 
purchase price of a £240 
microwave oven. 


Derek Aostex 10% hope 


investment by way of 
I £300, i 


period. The third option. 


payments of £300, £1,200. 

£1 ,800 or £2,400. Multiplan, 
which is available onhr until the 
end of March, offers a 
regular payment option 
ranging from £75 to £300 a 
month over an eight-month 


Uniplan, allows for a single 
1420 


lump sum payment of £4L . 
to be invested directly in a 
Prudential unit IrusL 
Next Saturday's Family 
Money will feature an up-to- 
aats analysis of personal 


Mr Hunter says he is 
concerned about the 
inadequacy of present laws 
that make it unnecessary in 
many cases to specify the 
total amount payable or the 
duration of the agreement 
He intends to press the 
Government for 
improvements. 


It is hardly practicable to 
shop around for the best deal 


■ Running your own 
business is an appealing 
prospect But if you are 
tempted to allow woolly ideas 
such as freedom and 
romance to cloud your 
judgment then you would 
be well advised to get hold of a 
copy of a newly published 
business start-up checklist 
You will then be forced to 
confront yourself with such 
basic points as how you are 
going to drive the business 
forward, get vital sales at 
the right margins, meet 
production schedules and 
administer the business 
properly. 


You will also have to ask 


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WE’RE BACKING BRITAIN. 


Britain’s economy is shaping up well 
for investors. 

High levels of growth and low in- 
flation have already pushed up company profits. 

(The FT Actuaries All Share Index rose 23.9% over the 
last year to 31.10.86 with net income reinvested.) 

More stable energy costs and increasing world trade are 
making investment here an even better prospect for the future. 

Now, through our Major UK Companies Fund, we give 
you the very best of British. Investment in blue chip British 
companies valued at £100 million or more. In names like Id, 
Hanson Trust, Sains bury T s and P&O. 

And as well as being in good companies, your money 
will be in good hands. The same Rothschild expertise that 


ARE YOU? 


invests millions for governments and 
multinational companies will be searching 
out shares with above average growth and 
dividend prospects for you. 


In companies that are undervalued for example. Or where 

candidate; or where 


a company is considered to be a takeover 
bright new management is about to push up profits. 

We’D be watching, waiting- and acting. 

Invest today from £500 by simply completing the coupon. 
It s time to be back in Britain. 


NM ROTHSCHILD 

ASSET MANAGEMENT 


A SPECIAL DISCOUNT OF 1% WILL BE AVAILABLE TO ALL INVESTORS UP TO I6th JANUARY 1987. 


GENERAL INFORMATION: The manager bN M RohsduU Asms Manage, 
men Loaned New Court. Sc. SuritHns Lane. London EGf P 4DU. Regisrcmf in 
London No- 327982. The trustee b Nabonal Wfarminsnrr Bank PLC 41 Lnthbmy. 
Londoti EC2P2BR"T1]c Fund is authorised bv die Department oTIradcani Industry 
and qualifies as a "wider range" mw esanen n The Trust Deed permits investment m 
traded options within the guidelines laid down by die Department of Hade and 
Industry. An minal charge of 5% a taiuded in tbe offer pnee together wirh an adjust - 
mem of up to 1% or lZ5p per link. wbkherer b die less. An annual charge ofl% of 
the value of dx Fund plus VAT is levied u defray management otpenas at present 
Thera b however a facility to increase dm to a manmum of 14% plus VAT, sibjen to 
three months’ nonce to unkhalden. The etmared grass yield » the offer price on 
4eh December 1986 of 54.2pXD was 2-3296 per annum. Only Incone Units wiB he 
issued. Net income will be datnhuod to unkboidm half ^sariv oa 31s January m3 
51 b July in each year and tmnholdere wiS nrrivr a tax mrifiarr with each such 
dErributwn. AffdiCMttW w® be acknowledged by contract note and umr certificates 
wS be posted jppmrinuidv 6 weeks Ian 

Units Buy be *afd buck at a 1 1 me hv telephoning rhe manager or by rcrummg tour 
renounced certificate. A cheque for the proceeds based on die bed price ruling u the 
mne irwrudjons are received vriB nonnafly be tent »i(hm 10 days of receipt of the 
renounced certificate. The paces of units and yield ate quoted in the narimuj press- 
CoavnenanB paid to tveognked agents. Thu should mi mnber that the price of mats as 
mdl as the income can gp down as wll as up and that mat mists should he regarded as a 
long term investment- This offer & not available to rcsadencs of the Republic of [roland 
nor to persons under the age of 18. 


New Court Major 
UK Companies Fund 


lb N M Rothschild Asset Management Limited. 

FREEPOST, London EC4ES 4RD. ( NO STAMP REQU1RED.1 
I -TOr hereby apply mimmet f - I minimum .£50(1 1 in 



Income Units dF New Gun Major UK Companies Fund (subject to die Hems of the 
That Deed constituting the Fund) at die afler price tiding on receipt of this appBcanoa 
I Wc enclose a cheque payable to N M Rothschild Asset Management UmhecL 
The offer bnotasadabkwresidenBofihe Rcpubfreoflrelawf twr to petsom under dwagt of 18. 


SIGNATURE 


tin the case of joint appheanam. aB nufet sign and prondc runes are! addresses on a separate ihcct.l 

SURNAME ■* TITLE 


FULL FORENAMES 



yourself difficult questions 
about the product or 
service you are planning to sen 
and its potential in toe 
market-place . 

The Business Start-Up 
Checklist aims to guide you 
through all this, ft will not 
guarantee that you wifi make 
the right decision but rt 
could stop you fooling yourself 
into thinking that you nave a 
world-beater of a product on 
your hands. It is available 
from toe Institute of Chartered 
Accountants. Publications 
Despatch, 399 Sifoury 
Boulevard. Central M.iton 
Keynes MK9 2Hl_ The price is 
£6.50. 


Kong lock very promising 
and aim to take advantage by 
seeking out capital growth 
to rough investment both in toe 
large established 
commercial, property and 
utility groups as weli as 
through smaller developing 
e nt r epr eneur companies. 


Cebcsc zzcc^nts - 

wts ter 

pp. c srjy®2 i L55S rtio 

per cent. 

£ frjor.ins 

*625 c/r '^“rfecna 1 westrn-n- 
LI7. ^ ni— tn 7.19 os' cant. 3 
7 33 per cam. 6 months 7 36 
ULESSS®. Cthsr banks may 

di^er 



N a „„ a , ^ , n ?; > T«rt, i Pten ^ 

TVT .r.p J *cs,r-vC3r fifcnnqs 

“!-*» -a'/i “'M-rijm £21? 3 "icnsh. 

'~2X Rc-tum over 

'years 5 8^=er cert, tax-fee 


MONEY FUNDS , _ 

TO c*aF Tmff-ra 



-41 

ir‘ &~rjrs „ ’ K T « 

r-^^'cais ' _ ” 

C r*' var. sz. ■ « • 

3 ‘ 3C ri- 

WTrjK-to- fSSH 
Hzretntt Mr*Bh 
Varies 

lSGi u .c- Pen ■ » 3 tv 
“‘CA 770 ?93 

vasHtCA 7js r.sa 

Ksuaxe h!Ca 

;-f5 756 

£15 M3 ard oer 7.75 

KSt«tesr»r 

\rrSzez Rese^’e 
aac.i3.559 - s :a§ 

£Tr.CM4 3»« •••a . 

Cjjer.ie!-*' Vcrtir 
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-t£.'’£"0.7X ■ 5S . .6 

SrPSJSS 7 £5 350 

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a: a>. Sscajtren: at vine rwiw, 

rciice Had P* 1 ® w 

ton-js recd’S djnns ;,r35 vca- 1 

Local Authority Yeartmg Swids 

-2 T.on'riS ra‘? r.ves.metts 
i i .per :err pes : rate tax 
cec-J^d y.saL-ce .o’ =e re- 
da^acbv icn-taioavsr: 


C-635 5“=7 
C13M32- 
•jiSS iscc 

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C7J2 20S93 
07«2 50«9 


Qi 726 1030 
O' 73S1G8? 


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01 So 9353 


C31 £570201 
CTMsese 



729 =34 


7.t^£' T- iay 
LPT Tg y ^ 


9 0S 321 
7 55 a.15 
5 3S £ 31 
7 S3 an 
7 94 6 57 


0705 327733 
C"0r 327732 
Cl 25-5 0555 
Qt 23o 09=2 
CE72 . *£*'• 
Cm? 752241 
31626 4661 


■S3 318 £752251765 
set 4-^us 1 fw 
sre .*« rss: ai re snw d 


nessarsh: Dasoran Bern 



rrs RKtrr 
Cl'£R .1 
H07H£KCM£f\ 


Cheaper Britain 


£30 bn milestone 


■ The value of unit trust 
funds under management at 
the end of November wen: 
throuah the £30 bilitar. barrier 
for toe first time, according 
tc this week's figures from the 
Unit Trust Association. 

The actual figure of £31.2 
billion ts based on 958 
authorized unit trusts, and 
before the year is out there will 
be atieast one more step 
along the increasingly 
confusing road to 1 ,000 unit 
trust choices when Providence 
Capitol launches a Hong 
Kong fund on December 27. 
The managers beKeve the 
long-term prospects for Hong 


_! Between 1950 and 1956 
the cost of buymg a shopping 
basket of essentia! items 

has Jtc rg a s eri 5y 42 jer cent in 
toe UK ccmpared vrito 73 
per cer.t for W estem Europe 
as a w he* and wen ever 
1 .000 per cent in several other 
sct m to B s. 

So sevs Emc-'cyment 
CcncStors Abroad Ltd, a 
company tost has just 


toe UK ccst cf toe shcocing 
basket today ranks only 
6Cto m croer c- macnitude in a 
!eagusrabieof70 
countries. This c on t rasts with a 
ccrres pending ranking of 
47to ir. 1980. 


National Savings Bank 

C-'C rary Acccrjrrs - if a minimum 
ba-anca ct El CO maintained for 
*ncle of 7985. 6 per cent interest 
pa.izr eacn ccmsletemoninv.-riere 
aaiance ‘s over £500. cmerwise 3 
pr ceto. investment Accounts - 
.75 oer cent interest paid without 
ieiutoar. of tax. one .month s 
rz-ze Of withdrawal, maximum 
r vestment E1C0.0CC 
National Savings Income Bond 
Mr-mum T.vescsenf £2.CJ£J. rw- 
-r.jrr £7C-C C'P0. interest 12-25 per 
sen; varabe at sm weeks' rotiM 
zs d Td-to y wtocut decticreri el 
ax F.ed 3 >m-enj a'. 3. months notice. 
Fa'-a^es -n f.m: yea' 

National Savings Indexed Income 
Bond 

Stort rote i-tcmfiiv mcome for first 
■••ear. £ per sent . increased af end cf 
estr. year tc maten increase m 
pr.oes 2S measured by Refa.! Pnces 
meex. Cash value remains toe 
sane, income taxable, paid gross 
7-ree mo nt h s' notice of witridrawal. 
Vtpmum mvestner; of ES.0P0 m 
niiScas cf £7.000. Maximum 
£-C3.C0G. 




Nigeria is 150 per cent 
mors expensive than toe UK 
but Japan has moved to the 
top of the league, largely 
because oftoe strength of 
toe yen. in 1980 Zaire was toe 
most expensive country tut 
has now dropped to eighth 
place. 


National Savings 4th Index-Linked 
Certificate* 

Wax mum investment - £5.000 
axeudme he- dings at other issues. 
Return ta*-*ree and linked to 
changes ir. toe Retail Prices Index, 
oupo'emem of 3.00 per cent m the 
fu-st year. 3.25 per cert m the 
second, 3,50 per cent in toe third, 
-a.50 per cent in toe fourth and 6.00 
per cent in toe fifth. Value of 
Retirement Issue Certificates pur- 
chased in December 1 981 , £145.61 , 
mcJucSnq bonus and supplement 
Ncwemtier HP! 391.7 . (The new RP1 
figure s no; announced until the 
thirc week of toe fofiowing month). 

National Savings Certificate 
32nd issue. Return totally free of 
income and capital gains tax. equhr- 


investmeht £*.000.' purchased 
to. rough siockbroker cr bank. 

Guaranteed Income Bond* 

Return oaiC net of base rata tax; 
higher r3fe taxpayers may have a 
further liability on mafunty. \2 & 
3yrs General Portfolio 9.1 per cent 
avts General Portfol*;Preniiuni Life 
9.1 per cent 5yr$ New Direction 
Fina’ce .'Credit & Comrnerce 930 
percent 

Local authority town haO bonds 
FxeC term, fixed rale investments, 
meres: quoted net I basic rate tax 
cefiuctBd at source norK-edarr^- 
aciel lyr Leicester 7 57 per cent 2- 
4yrs Kirtciees S.3E per cert. 5-7irg 
Nctortgham 8.2 per cent 8 >ts Vale 
of Glamorqan E.13pe* cent, min my 
£500: 9Sf0vrs Taft By 62* per 
cent, mn inv £1 .000 
Further details available from Char- 
rered Institute of Puttie Finance & 
Accountancy. Leans Bureau 1533 
6361 between 10am and 2.30pm) 
sue also Prestei no 24S08. 

Buikfing Societies 
Ordinary share accounts - 6.00 cer 
ce.it Extra interest accounts usual- 
ly pay 1-2 per cent over ordinary 
share rata Rates quoted above ate 
those mosi commonly offeree. Indi- 
vidual building societies may quote 
different rates, interest on all ac- 
counts paid net of basic rate tax. 
Not redaimacie by non-taxpayers. 

Foreign currency deposes 
Rates quoted by Rothschild's Old 
Court International Reserves £K8l 
26741. Seven days' notice is re- 
quired for withdrawal and no charge 
is made for switching currencies. 
Sterling 70.03 per cent 

US dollar 5.24 per cent 

Yen 2M per cent 

D Mark 3.88 oer cent 

French Franc 5 B9 per cent 

Swiss Franc 2.7B per cent 




MONTHLY INCOME 


ay4awrtL 


9.27% 


CAR + 


8 . 90 * 


NET 


ON £10,000 OR MORE 


Cheltenham 
Gold Account 


(Si 


NONOTICE.NO PENALTIES: 


Ml 



O/ ON 
/ £10,000 
-O OR 

net- MORE 



0/ ON 

/ £5,000 - 
O OR 
fc- MORE 





ON 
£500 

O OR 

NET’ MORE 


CHELTENHAM PREMIER MONTHLY 

INCOME ACCOUNT 

Invest 510,000 or more in a Cheltenham 
Premier Monthly Income Account and we 
pay an impressive 8.90% net. Interest is paid 
on the first of each month and automatical iv 
- added to your account to earn the top rate of 
9.27% CAR; gross equivalent 13.06%? 

Ifyou prefer we can payyour interest directly 
to another C&G account, your bank or vour 
home. You can also add to your investment at 
any time with sums of & 1 : 000 or more. No 
withdrawals can be made during the first six- 
months, but thereafter you can make with- 
drawals of &1 ,000 or more without notice or 
penalty. You must maintain a balance of at least 
£10,000 for the account to remain open. 

CHELTENHAM GOLD 

Alternatively choose Cheltenham Gold for 
its leading combination of high interest and 
instep’ no penalty access. You can earn up to 
8.80% net with no strings whatsoever 

Ifyou wish you can have your interest paid 
monthly. In a Cheltenham Gold Monthlv Interest 
ar ? oun ^ s °f£!0,000 or more earn 
8.46% net, 8 80% Compounded Annual Rate 
and on &5,000 or more 8.23% net, 8.55% CAR' 
still with no strings. ' 




124. 


■ i iMJ-rwji,^ueuennam.ijiosGL53 1BR I 

| Please send me foil details about C&G investment services. 

| Full Name(s) Mr/Mrs/Miss 1 


■mm i 




Cheftenham&Gloucester 

BidldirgSociety 


CHIEF OFFICE: CHELTENHAM HOUSE, CLARENCE STREET, CHELTENHAM, GLOUCESTERSHIRE, GL50 3JR.TFI . n^o 

Member of the Building Societies Association. Assets exceed S3 ■30Q'mi llion. ' 36*61. 

Branches throughout the UK. See Yellow Pages. 

Current rales, which mayvar> - . 'Interest paid annually. ^Compounded Annual Rate. J Gross Equivalent for basic rate tax pavers 


4 L 


Stiff 


\ 


A 

} 1 ! ts- 

V A 


... 

-Jill 


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5«l 



THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


SPORT/LAW 


29 


g|iGBY UNION: CHAM P IONSHIP CAN BE DECIDED UNDER THE LEADERSH IP OF A REMARKABLE CAPTAIN AT SUDBURY 

North fly high on wings 
of adventure through 
Harrison’s inspiration 


Th« • By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 

u Sett' eK 3E " a b 4 0f 

ional championship outright been concerned Si we 
today as the only unbeaten haven’t been winning enough 

ball. After ali, these matches 
are basically trials for the 
England team and I want to 
give our backs every chance to 
show how good they arc.” 


4*4 






^ 5 ! 


f. 


3 ter* 

r*> 


side in the competition. To 
ensure the trophy, thev must 
defeat London at the Wasps 
ground (having played their 
two previous games on home 
territory): a London side 
which, despite the loss of Paul 
Rendall, contains more ability 
than was shown in beating the 
Midlands before being bogged 
down against the South-West. 

If the North do win it will be 
a remarkable achievement for 
Mike Harrison, their captain 
and right wing: Harrison, aged 
30, had no experience of 
captaincy to speak of before 
this season, nor is the wing a 
good position from which to 
lead a side: yet he has led 
Yorkshire to five victories out 
of five in the county champ- 
ionship and now the North in 
two divisional outings. 

He has appeared in five 
games for England 'which 
makes him Wakefield’s most 
capped player. Wakefield, not 
surprisingly, think highly of 
him and Robin Foster, the 
club chairman, describes Har- 
rison: “A superb Barbarian; he 
wants to play rugby, he wants 
the whole XV to play rugby.” 

Harrison, whose intercep- 
tions on England's behalf in 
New Zealand last year became 
the stuff of legend, believes 
that the North and London 
“have the backs to lift the 
quality of the championship.” 
His aspirations coincide with 
those of David Robinson, the 
North's coach, whose team 
shows five changes from that 
which won against the Mid- 
lands last weekend 

“I know people say you 
shouldn't tamper with a win- 
ning team, but I'm not just 
interested in winning - 1 also 


The teams 

At Sudbury 

LONDON (Wasps unless stated) N 
T Smith, R Loxowskl, J 
awwiiHarlBqumsj. M BaBay; s M Smith 

S B ates; P Easanhigh 
(aacKhem 1 ). a Shtunocn, j Protom « 
Jtew. C Pinmoar (captami, m I 

NORTHS Langford prrrvij; M 
(WafcefiBW.capHail, K Simms (Wasps), w 
Canute (Durham University]. R Uodor- 
yfgg? »L°*!»2en: " Andrew (Wasps]. D 
Hobm iShetfofaj; M wtbscombe (Bad- 
tordl M Fonwick (Durrani Crty). S Paters 
(Waiorioo). P SOnptOfl (Battil. J Syddall 
(Waiertoo), D Cusarri (Onefl). P Wln- 
“tj^teni iHoacfingtevj. A Mactartona 

(rVOBJ. 

Referee: i BuSerweO (East MtfarateV 

At Leicester 

MIDLANDS: S Hodgfclnaon (Noarahamj; 

ILmmMi). O Hatday (Notww- 
ftamj. M NorUiarti (RtatnnghamJ. J oooS- 
«» (Moseley), J. Cwmorfc fLtecestar). R 
Moon (Nortogham): L Johnson (Cov- 
«Sfc ® (Nottingham). 0 Pearce 
(Northampton), J Wefb (Leicester) N 

X25* captain). J Oman 

(Bodtoro). G Rom (Notunghaml. D Rich- 
ards (Leicester). 

SOUTH-WEST (Bath untosc stated): J 
Webb (BretooTA SwSTs iS R 
Kmbbs (Bnaol). C Martin; S Bamm, ft HU 
(captan); G Chflcott, G Dawn, R Lee. J 
(Otoucuster). j Morrison, N 
Redman. A Robinson. D Egorton. 
Referee: C High (Lancashire). 

For players to perform to 
their potential, whichever di- 
vision they come from, they 
need good conditions; last 
week neither Bath nor 
Gosforth offered much scope 
for back play, but Wasps and 
Leicester, where the Mid- 
lands, last season's cham- 
pionship winners, hope to 
avoid a whitewash against the 
South-West should be a great 
improvement 
The North have added to 
the capacity of their forwards 
by moving Simpson to the 


blind side, and imrodud 
Marfarlanc, who is 6ft 4in an 
1651, at No. 8. Syddall and 
Cusani in the second row give 
them solidity and height in the 
engine-room and at least the 
front row will not have to deal 
with the entire Wasps from 
row, since Rendall has a 
hamstring strain. 

His place goes to Essenhigh 
of Blackheath, who played 
well for London in the annual 
game against Paris last season. 
Rose will need greater support 
at the lineout so that the 
London backs can show their 
paces, notably in midfield 
where Smith and Salmon wiH 
wish to confound the schemes 
of two Wasps returning home, 
Andrew and Simms. 

Bailey and Simon Smith, 
the London wings, have re- 
verted to their club positions 
after two divisional games on 
‘opposite’ sides, England hav- 
ing picked Bailey on the right 
against Japan in October. 

Should the North lose today 
and the South-West win at 
Leicester, then a three- way tie 
for the title will be derided on 
a points differential. The 
South-West's prospects are 
substantially improved with 
the return of Barnes at stand- 
off after a hip injury and the 
confidence gained last week- 
end against London. 

It will do no harm for Webb 
to repeat that display. The 
Bristol full back confirmed an 
ability which may carry him 
into the national squad which 
will be selected this weekend 
and should be announced on 
Monday. Even with Johnson 
reluming to the Midlands 
front row, it is hard to see the 
home forwards mastering the 
Bath pack and last year’s 
trophy winners may weU end 
this season with nothing. 





Syddall: helping to form a solid second row for the North 

Nervous twitches 
for the likely lads 


One Milne out, another in 


Edinburgh have two enforced 
changes in their team to play the 
Anglo Scots today at Myreside 
in the latest round of the 
McEwans inter-district cham- 
pionship. lain Milne, the tight- 
head prop, has a shoulder injury 
and is replaced by David Milne, 
his brother, while Rafferty is out 
with knee trouble which allows 
Millar in on the flank. 

The Anglos, who have 


By Ian McLauchlan 

brought McKie (Sale) into lock 
for the injured Gray, took a 
fearful beating from the South 
last Saturday and will be looking 
to make amends today. To do so 
their pack will have to increase 
the supply of ball and tidy pos- 
session from all phases of play 
while their backs, who last week 
lacked direction, must help their 
forwards in the early stages by 
putting the ball in front oithem. 


By Gerald Davies 

In Cwmtilleiy, Gwent, there 
is “a tremendous enthusiasm in 
the village**. In Tonda, Glamor- 
gan, they may not be food of 
predictions but they can promise 
an occasion to remember. Extra 
stands are being erected at some 
clnbs. coaches are being hired by 
the dozen in others. 

There will be royal-Kke 
welcomes, the red carpets treat- 
ment will be out for the day, and 


TODAY'S TEAM NEWS 


London Irish v 
London Welsh 

Tom Hennessy captains the 
Irish, who have lost O’Donnell 
through business commitments 
and Gibson with injury. Taylor, 
formerly of Esher, props In this 
John Smith’s merit table B game 
against the Welsh, who bring m 
Ford at lock. 

Richmond v Blackheath 

Martin Drane is Richmond's 
stand-off half for the day's second 
merit table B game, Holman 
playing centra and Thom returning 
at prop. Hureey is returns to 
lead Blackheath who have 
Purchase. Bond and Slater 
available in their backs. 

Rosslyn Park v 
Liverpool/St Helens 

Another table B game and only 
the second between the dubs; Park 
move Plummer to the wing end 
bring Agar. Ripley is at NoB 
against Liverpool who lost 
Jeffrey, their stand-off, to rugby 
league last week and play 
VVBuams instead. 

Bristol v Leicester 
After the de-rrmrrttfng row of 
midweek Bristol wiU want a win 
though Thomas has withdrawn 
and Watson and WHHams day 
centre with Whitehead at full 
back. The experienced French 
plays loose-head for Leicester. 


Northampton v Wasps 

David Pegter has recovered 
from illness to lead Wasps with a 
side Including two of last year's 
England Schools team, Pilgrim at 
fuHoack and Young at centre. 
Russell returns from Amto-Scotti 
duty at stand-off and Cubitt 
replaces the injured Greenhalgh in 
Northampton's centre. 


sh 


Gloucester v Coventry 

Malcolm Preedy, the 
Gloucester captain, has damaged 
knee ligaments but Jones and 
Dunn return to their front row 
against Coventry, who give 
Savage (ex-Nuneaton) his debut at 
scrum half and restore Wynter 
to the wing. 

Orrell v Wakefield 

Francis Ck 
Cam! 
with! 

Orrell. who have the nomadic Glynn 
back at stand-off. Townand 
leads Wakefield and Bowers holds 
his place on the wing Instead of 
Harrison. 

Sale v Headingley 

Mark Reid, home from 
Loughborough University, adds 
weight to the Headingley 
second row and Eagle plays his 
second game of the season on 
the wing. Tipping and Hamilton 
return to Sale's Back row. 

Jen ion and Thomas to the backs. 

Bedford v Moseley 
David Wood deputises at scrum 
half for the injured Peck and 
Canranq at full back for the 
absent Bedford captain, Key. 

Eales, of Nottingham 
University, is at centre for Moseley 
who have Desborough and 
Obogu on the injured list 

Harlequins v Bath 

John Palmer is the only regular 
first-teamer in Bath's depleted 
ranks but the de-merttHno of 
this game allows Loveridge to 
continue at scrum half for 
Harlequins. 

Saracens v Rugby 
Alex Keay. the Saracens 
captain and flanker, misses his first 
game of the season and 
Adamson replaces him in both 
respects. King replaces 
Buckton at centre against revived 
Rugby. 


Edinburgh never found a 
rhythm against the North and 
Midlands, but won and they too 
will be looking for a confidence 
boost before meeting the South 
in the championship decider. 
There is interest in the perfor- 
■ mance of Wyllie and Scot Has- 
tings. both of whom have 
recently returned from injury. 

In the other district game 
Glasgow are at home to the 
North and Midlands for the" 
doubtful honour of holding the 
wooden spoon. Neither side has 
yet won a game this season. The 
visitors showed rare fighting 
qualities against Edinburgh and 
are confident of a win. 

Glasgow have three inter- 
nationals on show, McGuinness 
and Beattie in their pack, plus 
Duncan, the wing. Their exper- 
ience combined with home 
advantage should see the Glas- 
gow side through. A late change 
in the home side sees the 
introduction of Robertson, of 
West of Scotland, at centre, 
while Munro. is replaced on the 
wing by Manning, his Ayr 
colleague. 


Mayors wifi torn out heavy with 
grid chains. Bat, before kick-off 
at least, the smilo; from the 
small dobs for the posh ones 
will be razor sharp as the 
Schweppes Welsh Cap reaches 
the secaod round. 

The small dabs just aright be 
able to sniff some success in the 
air. And some of them have 
every right of h^fh expectations. 
Eight of the major cfnbs have 
been drawn to play uncomfort- 
ably away to the smaller dobs. 
Armed with map and compass 
they must wander away from 
their beaten track and who 
knows what results lie at the end 
of the trail? These are games to 
give nervous twitches to the 
likely lads. 

Aberavon, who have only won 
twice away from home this 
season, travel to Cwmtillety. In 
a m o ng st the Gwent dob's pack 
there are players who have had 
experience of the first class 
game. Mike Cairns, their 
hooker, and Brandon Cripps, 
the prop, have played for 
Abertfllery. The latter, mare 
formidably, for Pontypori, too. 
Their team are having a good 
season having won 18 matches 


and lost one. Their opponents 
must envy such a record. 

only defeat was 
Pill Harriers iff Newport 
who are at home to Bridgend. 

Pontypridd, who have been 
scampered by a minor dob on 
each of the last two seasons, 
must travel with not a little 
trepidation to Whifiand, the 
Pembrokeshire league cham- 
pions. Although they are in 
second position in that league, 
they are unbeaten at home for 
the last two seasons. 

Fear for Pontypridd will stem 
from other factors. They will 
remember the last time they 
played Whitbud in the enp 
competition in 1972 when they 
drew 7-all and went through to 
the next round by winning on the 
toss of a coin. Last year 
went out of the enp by losing < 
to Douvant, near Swansea, who 
play at home m Maesteg. Two 
years ago Pontypridd tost by the 
more substantial margin of 21-6 
to Llandovery who might this 
year give a similar surprise to 
Glamorgan Wanderers. 

Llanelli, who have won the 
competition five times in all, 
have never, as might be ex- 
pected, lost to one of the smaller 
dobs. Tomorrow they travel cast 
to Tonda who are defending a 
fonr-year-oM unbeaten home 
record and are their district 
league champions. Pontypori, 
on the other hand, move West- 
wards to Briton Ferry, hoping 
that they will travel homewards 
more comfortably than when 
they set out on then task in the 
morning. 


RUGBY FIXTURES FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW 


RUGBY UNION 

Final Irish Trial 

Probables v Possibles (Lansdowne Rond, 

2-30)- 

Tftorn EMI Divisional 

SSSSEt. (at Wasps, Ha^xansw Bath ftiSmbp Mam Qioun d, 


Club matches 

Bedford v Moseley 

Birkenhead Park v London Scotttstu 

Brmtngham v Stroud (230) 

Bristol v Leicester- 


Cheltenham v NoQIngtv 
Gloucester v Covatiy. 
Gosforih v Durham (2.15). 


Midlands 

(2.15).... 


v South West (at UMcasnr. 


John Smith's Merit Table B 

London Irish v London Welsh (230) 

Richmond v Bteckheath (2-30) 

Roeslyn Pork v Liverpool St Helens (230) 

pes Welsh Cup 
round 

Briton Ferry v Pontypooi (230) 

Cross Kays v CaratTZ 

Cwmtiliery v Aberavon (230) 

Dunvsnt v Maosteg (£30) 

EbbwVatevBeddau 


MetPofcevExetergAS). 


ItVSteai 

Mortey v Plymouth ( 

Northamtpon v Wasps. 

Northern v Mabuse (230) . 
Nuneaton v New ' 
Orrell v Wakefield 
RourvSiay v 
Sale v Headbigtey 
Saracens v Rugby [2-15 



Llandovery v Glamorgan Wndrs (230) — 
Neath v Haverfordwest 


vGowenon.. 
v Blame. 


Askaans v 
Pialey; Secavfcms v Bishop's Stanford: 
Bedford Athletic v Long Budkfay: Bury St 
Ecfcmmds v Colchester: Cambestey * 
Eastleigh: CM Service v Hendon; 
Dertfordans v Sevenoeks; Ealng v Rus- 


Neytand v Uanharan (230) 
Peneoed v South Wales Pc 


Police (230) 

(230] HarrowV A; 


PHI Harriers v 

Swansea v Pi 

Swansea Unlv v Namyffyflon (2-30) 

Tondu v Llanelli (230] 

WhUand v Po nt ypridd (230) - 



Havant v Gosport 
. .™vtford v Southend: 
4 Windsor: Hltchin v 
Ipswich v Norwich; Maidsn- 
Maidstone v Thurrock; 


Met Police II XV v Tahard; I 
Emanuel; OH Gaytontans v 
OMT v Upper Clapfon: OU PauBnea v KCS 
00; Rearing vGrddford & Godskning; 
Rochford v Ipswich YMCA: Safisbury v 
Portsmouth: Staines v Twickenham; 
Stodcwood Park v Letchworth; 
StreathenVCroydan v SktcifiX Uxtxidge v 
Slough; MtoR Norfolk v Chmgibrd; 
westcombe Paric v Sutton & Epsom; 
Woodford v Sudbury. 

Scottish McE wan’s Mor-Oistrtet 
Championship 

Eoinburgh v Ancfo-Scots (230) 

Glasgow v North and Wcfiands (230). — 
County Colts Rnal 
Eastern Counties v Wanmcfcsnire (TMcfc- 
rnhmi.lq. 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
JOfM PLAYER SPECIAL TROPHY: Saari- 
flaefc Wigan v HuD (at Headfogley. 2.15). 

TOMORROW 
RUGBY LEAGUE 
STONES BH TE H CHAMPIONSHIP: Bar- 
row v Leeds (230): Bradford v Warrington 
(330); Halifax v Salford; Hi* Kkmston 
Rovers v Wktaas: St Helens v Okawn; 
Wakefield v Castfetofo (330). Second 
rfivl ata r u Fulham v York (2.15); Hunslet v 

Huddersfield (330t Keighley v Runcorn 

(3.15); Rochdale v Mansflett Workington 
v Sheffield (230). 


Wakefield 
example 
should be 
followed 

By David Hands 

The debate this week over the 
merits of “demeriring" matches 
- today's John Smith’s Merit 

Table A games, Harlequins 
Bath and Bristol v Leicester, 
have been reduced in status — 
have brought wry grins to some 
northern feces where dubs have 
grown accustomed to playing 
merit table games without lead- 
ing players. 

The county championship is 
still regarded in the north with 
affection but. coupled with the 
divisional championship, it has 
deprived dubs of players for 
Northern Merit Table games 
and. more importantly in view 
of next season's English club 
championship, National Merit 
Table C games. 

Let os take Wakefield, who 
visit Orrell today, as an exam- 
ple. They stand sixth in Merit 
Table C which, next season, will 
be National League Three; natu- 
rally they wish to maintain their 
place in that table so that they 
can try for promotion among 
the country's 24 leading dubs 
but they are doing so without 
the services of half their first- 
choice players, several of whom 
have been injured playing other 
than for the club. 

Mike Harrison, their wing, 
has made only four appearances 
for Wakefield this season be- 
cause of representative calls; 
David Heron, their captain and 
prop, has a damaged bade 
Graham Marshall, in whom the 
Anglo-Scois are interested, was 
injured in training for Yorkshire 
and John Rawnsley, the back- 
row man, has a cauliflower ear. 

Add to that the prolonged 
absence of Bryan Barley, the 
former England centre, and 
sundry other problems in the 
second row and there is a case 
for Wakefield asking regularly 
for merit table games to be 
called off 
They are not, but what they 
are doing, like other sensible 
dubs, is adjusting their fixture 
list so that likely merit table 
games do not coincide with 
divisional dates or. indeed, 
county championship dates. 

There is better news of Barley 
who, laid up with a cracked 
collarbone and broken finger 
early in the season, took the 
chance to have a knee operation 
to remove some bone from a 
cartilage. He is in light training 
and has set himself the playing 
target of Wakefield’s John 
Player Special Cup third round 
tie with Harlequins on January 
24. 

As an example of a side 
whohave successfully organized 
iheirfixtines dining the di- 
visional championship, Not- 
tingham would be bard to beat. 
They supply eight players to the 
Midlands squad today and are 
without the inured lock, Chris 
Gray, but their opposition over 
the divisional weekends has 
been Birkenhead Park, Lough- 
borough Students and Chelten- 
ham who, with the greatest 
respect, do not constitute the 
most testing opposition. 

Challenge 
to French 

From Chris Than 
Toulouse 

A French final in the Masters 
dub tournament here, a rep- 
etition of last year's French 
championship final between 
Toulouse and Agen, is still a 
distinct possibility. 

Agen were lucky to have 
survived against the more 
purposeful and constructive Fiji 
Barbarians, including, Harvey, 
the AD Black, through poor 
kicking from the FijiansAgen 
seem short of ideas without 
Sella (injured hip) and Berbizier 
(concussion), while Berot, may 
have damaged his chances of 
selection for France after an 
inept game. Constanta, the 
Romanians, upset Ponsonby, 
including Hadcn, the All Black 
lock, and their giant pack may 
inflict similiftr on 

Dubroca’s men in the one semi- 
final today. 

In the other semi-final. Tou- 
louse, the hot favourites, meet 
Wests of Brisbane, the French 
running football proving too 
much for Banco Nation, led by 
Hugo Porta, the Argentinian 
captain, winning a thriller, 32- 
22. But the Australians also 
impressed, especially Evans, 
Lane and Smith, when beating 
L’Aquila, of Italy. 


MOTOR RACING 


Filling Balestre’s 
shoes is no job for 
a back-seat driver 


By John Blnnsden 


Notwithstanding Jean-Marie 
Balestre’s resignation from the 
presidency of the Federation 
Internarionale du Sport 
AutombiletFISA) after an eight- 
year stint as the sport's 
supremo, it is inconceivable that 
the influence of this pugnacious 
politician and master tactician 
will not be felt throughout the 
race tracks and rally routes of 
the world in the years ahead 

ll was in keeping with his 
reputation for unpredictability 
and sense of occasion that he left 
his hospital bed, where he had 
been recovering from heart sur- 
gery performed as recently as 
December. 5, to announce 
personally his decision in Paris 
on Thursday, and then to add 
that he had taken it not for 
medical reasons but because he 
was tired of being the victim of 
"lying and defamatory 
campaigns”. That he should 
depart like a tiger rather than as 
a kitten was totally in character. 

But departure is, perhaps, not 
an entirely appropriate word 
because in retaining his presi- 
dency of the Federation 
Internationale d'Autombile 
(FI At, to wbich FISA is affili- 
ated and by which the move- 
ment of just about everything 
which travels on four wheels is 
ultimately influenced, his often 
strident voice will almost cer- 
tainty still be heard echoing 
through the corridors of power 
in the Place de la Concorde 
where the destiny of the sport 
has been decided for so many 
years. 

There was a lime, during the 
1970s, when the sport lacked 
effective government, and at 
grand pnx level the FlA's 
sporting wing, then known as 
the Commission Sportive 
Internationale (CS1), was so 
much putty in the hands of the 
Formula One Constructors' 
Association (FOCA), which 
under the thrusting leadership 
of the Brabham team owner. 
Bemie Ecclestone, was calling 
most of the shots. 

Then, in 1978, Balestre came 
on the scene as the CSI's newly 
elected president after a political 
campaign during which he had 
pledged to restore control of the 
sport to the official governing 
body. Wi thin a year, CSI have 
become FISA, as if to emphasize 
the change of climate, and soon 
FISA and FOCA were locked in 
bitter conflict. 

FISA’s decision to bon sliding 
skirts from cars without the 
customary two-year advance 
notice provided the excuse for 
the fight, but the real reason was 


the conflict over technical and 
financial control of the sport. 
Grand prix racing came dose to 
the brink in I9S0, but the 
outcome was a peace of sorts 
early in 1981 built around the 
Concorde Agreement, through 
which FISA's right as rule- 
makers was confirmed while 
FOCA's financial muscle was 
accepted. 

Balestre and Ecclestone have 
always been worthy adversaries, 
but there has been a deep-rooted 
mutual respect behind their 
periodic outbursts against each 
other. Certainly, through them, 
the sport is more firmly con- 
trolled than ever before, but 
whether Balestre’s toughness 
has always been matched by a 
similar level of wisdom is 
another matter. 

Some of his rule changing has 
bordered on the bizarre, yet his 
motivation (usually to improve 
safety standards) has rarely been 
questionable. His weakness has 
been an inability to see the full 
implications and the longer 
term consequences of his de- 
cision making. This must be a 
first priority' for his successor, if 
only to prevent the U-turns 
which have characterised so 
many of the rule changes in 
recent years. That apart, 
Bale&tre’s will be a difficult act 
lo follow. 





Balestre: win still be beard 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Fortune favours 
revitalized Hull 


By Keith 
The tide of form and fortune 
has turned dramatically for Hull 
in recent weeks. While tbeir 
neighbours from across the 
river. Hull Kingston Rovers, 
wallow in a loss of impetus and 
a severe financial crisis, Hull 
have put together a winning 
streak and today they play the 
holders Wigan in the first semi- 
final of the John Player Special 
Trophy at Headingley. 

Early in the season Hull went 
to Wigan for a league game and 
were duly thrashed inter their 
coach Len Casey had unwisely 
said that Wigan were “an over- 
rated team”. Hull will not be 
underestimating Wigan today, 
but last week’s victory at Brad- 
ford, following a series of im- 
proved performances, has given 
the Humbersiders renewed 
spirit. 

Lee Crooks, the captain, says: 
‘Our recent run has given us our 
confidence back, and we will 
give Wigan a much harder fight 
than in the league game. We 
may even surprise them and 
beat them, especially if we can 
get our defensive game as tight 
as we did at Bradford.” 

One of the successes in the 
recent run has been the high- 
priced Welsh import Gary 
Pearce, who has struck up a fine 
understanding in the centre with 
the fine-scoring Garry Schofield. 

Wigan, win be without their 
captain, Graeme West, who is 
still suspended, and will retain 
the Australian, Ian Roberts, up 
from. They were almost held by 
spirited performances from 


Mackiin 

S win ion and Leigh in their 
previous John Player games, 
and have not shown the high- 
scoring form of early season. 
However, they are still the form 
team, and should go through to 
another final, but Hull's re- 
newed fire could produce the 
surprise Crooks has predicted- 

The winners will meet either 
Warrington or Widoes. who 
play next Saturday at Central 
Park, in the final next month. If 
Wigan win today, the final will 
be ai Bumden Park, home of 
Bolton Wanderers, but if Hull 
win, Headingley or £1 land Road 
will be the venue. 

While Hull and Wigan fight 
out the Trophy semi-final. St 
Helens lick their wounds after 
being knocked out by Warring- 
ton and resume championship 
warfare against Oldham at 
Knowsley Road. St Helens are 
undefeated in the league this 
season, and victory tomorrow 
should restore the confidence of 
both the team and the 
supporters. 

Warrington themselves have 
a tough fixture at Bradford, but 
are playing splendidly at the 
moment and should win, while 
Widnes are the latest side to try 
to take advantage of the remark- 
able vulnerablity of Hall Kings- 
ton Rovers at Craven Park. In 
the second division Fulham's 
improvement will be tested at 
Chiswick with the visit of York, 
and Hunslet, the leaders, should 
bounce back against Hudders- 
field after Iasi week's shock of 
losing their undefeated record at 
Carlisle. 


Court of Appeal 


Law Report December 20 1986 


Court of Appeal 


When a bailed person 
fails to appear 


Practice Direction (Bail: Fafl- 
nre to Surrender to Custody) 
Guidelines on procedure to be 
adopted where a person bailed 
by magistrates' courts and pol- 
ice officers respectively failed to 
surrender to custody were Sy? 1 ' 
by Lord Lane, Lord Chief 
Justice, sitting in the Queen s 
Bench Divisional Court 
Lord Justice Watkins and Mr 
Justice Simon Brown on 
December 19. 

The LORD CHIEF JUSTICE 
said that the practice direction 
was issued with a view to 
clarifying any misunderstana- 
ings as to the effect of the 
decision in Schiavo 
( The Times February 20: 1 1 986 J 
3 WLR 1 77) in which, inter alia. 
the Divisional Court provided 
guidance on the procedure w « 

adopted in magistrates cou 
when dealing with allegations of 
failure to surrender to cusW- 
conlrary to section b ot uic can 
Act 1976. 

His Lordship stated that 
where a person had beenpanj™ 
bail by a court and subsequently 
failed to surrender to custody as 
contemplated by section b( |)o 
6(2) of the 1976 Act. on arres 
that person should be brougJ 
before the court at wh L c “J:L 
proceedings in respect of which 


bail was granted were to be 
heard. 

It was neither necessary nor 
desirable to lay an information 
in order to commence proceed- 
ings for the tailure to surrender. 

Having regard to the nature of 
the offence, which was tanta- 
mount to the defiance of a court 
order, it was more appropriate 
thai the court itself should 
initiate the proceedings by its 
own motion, following an ex- 
press invitation by the pros- 
ecutor. The court would only be 
invited to move if. having 
considered all the circum- 
stances. the prosecutor consid- 
ered proceedings were 
appropriate. 

Where a court complied with 
such an invitation, the pros- 
ecutor would naturally conduct 
the proceedings and, where the 
matter was contested, call the 
evidence. 

Any trial should normally 
take place immediately follow- 
ing the disposal of the proceed- 
ings in respect ot'which bail was 

granted- . . 

Where a person had been 
bailed from a police station 
subject io a duly to appear 
before a magistrates court or to 
attend a police station on a 
appointed date and time, a 
failure so *o appear or attend 


could not be said to be tanta- 
mount to the defiance of a court 
order. There did not exist the 
same compelling justification 
for the court to act by its own 
motion. 

Where bail had been granted 
by a police officer, any proceed- 
ings for a failure to surrender to 
custody, whether at a court or a 
police station, should accord- 
ingly be initiated by charging the 
accused or by the laying of an 
information. 

Medical reports 

While our report of Graham v 
Wan Smyrk and Another ( The 
Times November 26) was an 
accurate summary o f the powers 
of the court under Order 38 of 
the Rules of the Supreme Court 
concerning personal injuries ac- 
tions involving allegations of 
medical negligence, in the event, 
Mr Justice Tudor Evans held 
that although a judge had a 
discretion to order the exchange 
of expert evidence, his exercise 
of that discretion was governed 
by the Court of Appeal decision 
in Rahman v Kirklees Area 
Health Authority ([1980} I WLR 
1244) which obliged his Lord- 
ship in the circumstances to 
exercise his discretion against so 
ordering. 


Move to 
clear 
appeals 
backlog 

Order 14 appeals 

Instructions relating to Order 
14 appeals were given by Lord 
Justice Parker in the Court of 
Appeal on December 19. 

LORD JUSTICE PARKER 
said that a determined effort was 
being made to dear the backlog 
of Older 14 appeals with the 
objective that such appeals 
should be heard within two 
months of the judge's decision. 

It was of paramount im- 
portance that a note of the 
judge’s judgment should be 
agreed between counsel and 
submitted for the judge's ap- 
proval within a very short time 
of bis decision. 

It should be widely known 
that if that did not occur appeals 
were liable to be struck out for 
failure to lodge the necessary 
documents. 

There was no reason why an 
approved note should not be 
available within the time allow- 
ed provided counsel submitted a 
note, or notes where there was 
no agreement, either before or 
immediately after service of the 
notice ofappeaL 


Meaning of ‘acceptance’ for theft 


Regina v Nanayakkara 
Regjna v Khar 
Regina v Tan 

Before Lord Lane, Lord Chief 
Justice, Mr Justice McCowan 
and Mr Justice Simon Brown 
[Judgment December 16] 

“Acceptance” in section 20(2) 
of the Theft Act 1968 had its 
ordinary proper commercial 
meaning, the Court of Appeal 
held in a reserved judgment 
allowing three appeals against 
convictions for conspiracy to 
procure the execution by accep- 
tance of United States Treasury 
social security cheques by 
deception. 

The appellants Nanayakkara 
and Tan were convicted by a 
majority « Southwark Crown 
Court (Judge Lowe and a jury) 
on November 1, 1985 of 
conspiracy to procure the execu- 
tion of valuable securities by 
deception. 

The securities were stolen US 
Treasury social security orders 
(described as “cheques" in the 
indictment) for payment of 
money drawn on the US Trea- 
sury payable in America. 

Khor pleaded guilty to the 
same offence. 

Nanayakkara had been sen- 
tenced to four years’ imprison- 
ment Tan to four and a half 
years and recommended for 
deportation, and Khor to three 


years and recommended for 
deportation. 

Mr Desmond de Silva. QC 
and Miss Kim Salariya for 
Nanayakkara, Mr Maurice As- 
ton for Khor and Mr Chris- 
topher Sallon for Tan. all 
assigned by the Registrar for 
Criminal Appeals; Mr Victor 
Temple and Mr P. James 
Richardson for the Crown. 

The LORD CHIEF JUS- 
TICE, giving the judgment of 
the court, said that in December 
1984 some 4.000 United States 
social security orders worth 
about US$5 million were stolen 
in the USA. By January 14, 1985 
some 317 (worth USS250.000) 
were in London. They had been 
endorsed by two men for the 
payment of money drawn on the 
US Treasury payable in Amer- 
ica. 

The appellant Nanayakkara 
and one Strassborg handed or- 
ders in to Strassbore's bank, the 
lndo-Suez Bank in Berkeley 
Square, which were passed to 
head office and the police were 
informed. No money was 
sought directly from the bank; 
Strassborg expected his account 
to be credited only after clear- 
ance in the United States. 

Section 20(2) of the Theft Act 
defined the substantive offence 
of procuring the execution of a 
valuable security by deception 
to “apply in relation to the 


making, acceptance, endorse- 
ment, alteration, cancellation or 

destruction of a valuable 

security". 

The prosecution bad relied on 
“acceptance". It had been open 
to them to rely on any of the 
others. Their contention was 
that “acceptance" had its or- 
dinary colloquial meaning when 
documents were received by the 
Indo-Suez Bank. 

Mr de Silva bad submitted 
that that interpretation was 
wrong and that "acceptance” 
had a technical meaning derived 
from the Bills of Exchange Act 
1882 and enacted in a series of 
criminal statutes. He had con- 
tended that that was the sense in 
which it was intended that the 
term should be used in the Theft 
Act 1968. 

In so for as their Lordships 
were entitled to look at the 
Criminal Law Revision Com- 
mittee. Eighth Report. Theft ond 
Related Offences HMSO, Cmnd 
2977, paragraph 7, it seemed 
there was no inteation to apply a 
technical term of art meaning to 
the word. 

It followed in their Lordships' 
view that there was no real basis 
for saying that “acceptance** 
had, relating lo valuable securi- 
ties. any meaning other than its 
proper commercial meaning. 

His Lordship referred to J? v 
Beck ([1985] 1 WLR 22) in 


which stolen travellers' cheques 
had been presented to Barclays 
Bank International through nor- 
mal banking channels in France 
and England. 

They had been stolen and 
encashed in the South of France. 
French traders had also been 
reimbursed for goods obtained 
with a stolen Diner's Club card 
by Barclays Bank. 

The Court of Appeal had held 
that when a travellers' cheque or 
Diner’s Club card was accepted 
as genuine by a payer in France 
that was an execution by accep- 
tance and that there migh t be a 
whole series of acceptances. If 
the last of them took place 
within . the jurisdiction the 
crown court had jurisdiction. 

That case could be distin- 
guished on its facts as all that 
had happened in the UK in the 
instant case was that the orders 
were handed to the bank. In 
Beck there was clearly an execu- 
tion within the jurisdiction. 

The mere handing over of the 
valuable securities to the Indo- 
Suez Bank could not possibly 
have amounted to an 
“acceptance” and however 
"acceptance" was to be inter- 
preted it was not an execution 
by any stretch of the imagina- 
tion when the orders were 
handed over to the bank. 

Solicitors: Crown Prosecution - 
Service Headquarters, -S 




30 


SPORT 


* & * * 



i i 


t :■ 


RACING 


Dare Hansel poised to 
play leading role in 
Chepstow stamina test 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


Following that encouraging 
nm at Cheltenham IS days 
ago when he finished a close 
fourth in the race won by I 
Havenlalight, having not run 
for 20 months. Dare Hansel is 
taken to win the Coral Welsh 
National at Chepstow today. 

Discussing his horse's 
chances yesterday, Nick 
Gaselee, his Upper Lamboum 
trainer, said that Dare Hansel 
had worked really well at 
Lamboum on Wednesday. 

“In an ideal world, I would 
have liked one more week 
with him or one more race 
before a test of this nature, but 
he certainly has earned the 
right to run and he’s very well 
indeed,” Gaselee said. 

Two seasons ago, Dan; 
Hansel finished second to the 
smart Antarctic Bay in the Sun 
Alliance Chase during the 
National Hunt Festival at 
Cheltenham where Catch 
Phrase, who is one ofhis rivals 
again now. was among those 
further behind 

After missing the whole of 
last season. Dare Hansel made 
an eye-catching comeback at 
Cheltenham where he finished 
less than five lengths behind 
the race-fit I Havenlalight 
whom he will be meeting on 
61bs better terms this 
afternoon. 

Although totally untried 
over today's extreme distance. 
Dare Hansel has a stayer's 


pedigree and he races like one. 
He should give us a good run. 

Jenny Pitman will be three- 
handed in an attempt to win 
the prize a third time. 

Corbiere, who won this 
event for her in 1982, is in the 
line-up again, along with 
Stearsby and Macoliver. 

Of the three, I prefer 
Corbiere who is clearly in 
sparkling fettle following that 
recent success at Haydock 
Park nine days ago. 

His jumping still has so 
much to commend it whereas 
Lucky Vane and Knock Hill 
two of the serious contenders 
this afternoon, are always 
prone to making the odd 
mistake. 

No matter how he gets on in 
the feature race with Stearsby, 
his flamboyant owner, Terry 
Ramsden, will still have 
plenty to smile about if 
Dunston manages to win the 
Finale Junior Hurdle, as well 
he may. 

“You can go nap on him. 
He's a better horse than Wing 
And A Prayer was at the same 
stage of his career.” was 
trainer Alan Bailey's infec- 
tious summary yesterday. 

Bailey suggested that with 
the likely hot favourite High 
Know! adopting his cus- 
tomary front-running role and 
taking them along at a search- 
ing gallop in the soft ground 
the race will be run to suit 


Dunston for whom Mr 
Ramsden paid 36,000 guineas 
at Newmarket this autumn. 

Dunston's first run over 
hurdles at Uttoxeter certainly 
augured well With that en- 
couragement from his shrewd 
trainer, 1 make him a sporting 
nap to bring High KnowTs 
unbeaten run to an end. 

My other principal fancy at 
Chepstow is Powerless to win 
the Philip Comes Novices 
Hurdle (qualifier). Fined Win- 
ter, his trainer, is of the 
opinion that Powerless will be 
in his element racing over 216 
miles for the first time today 
even though he has done 
pretty well to win twice over 
two miles already. 

While champion jockey Pe- 
ter Scudamore is busy on 
Powerless and others at 
Chepstow, his current chal- 
lenger Mark Dwyer can keep 
up the pressure by landing a 
double at Nottingham on 
Rapier Threat ( 1 .30) and 
Mick’s Star (100). 

At Lingfield Park,it will be 
surprising if the EBF Novices 
Hurdle (qualifier) is not won 
by Sir's At The Gin who ran 
Moiojec to a short head on his 
seasonal debut at Newbury. 

Over the border, at Ayr, I 
like the look of local trainer 
John Wilson’s front running 
seven-year-old Blackfeet in 
the Tairlaw Handicap Chase. 



Classic successes 
laid foundation 
for Piggott fortune 


Lester PisgOtt's arrest yes- 
J£?*r a%?cd tax evasion 

must' have ccmc as . a , rn ^ 
shock to his Scoons of admirers 
for in an probability. P|ggo-i 

must be the h:ghcst-pa ,d sports 
man in British history- 

Dunng a career as a jockey 
which covered 38 years he rtxk 
*3 English classic winners 
Including nine in the Epsom 
SSSv He was also champion 
■ockev on 11 occasions betore 
his retirement from the saddle ai 
the cad of the season. 

Pigeon's alleged rhnfuness 
with money has always berm a 
b-.word. although he »s 3iW 


Bv Michael Seely 

hate always played for she 

highest states. 

The* were the pioneers of the 
business of stallion promotion 
which consisted of skimming off 
•he cream of the North Ameri- 
can yearling market and exploit- 
ing their purchases on European 
tracks. 

Piggott shared in their suc- 
cess. not only from his normal 
riding fees and percentages, but 
also" by negotiating extra 
percentages in prize money and 
shares in stallions. 

By the end of the jockey's 
tiding career the inflationary 
spiral had reached its peak and 
suthons such as Shareef Dancer 


thought to have been a shrewd 
and successful investor on the and H Gran Sctot were being 
Stock Exchance- His close friend syndicated for S40m. A share ts 
and alN Charles St George, has normally one 40th of the 
always denied any knowledge of stallion's value so it is easy u> 
>ho inrkev's activities in this estimate the amouni of money 
’ involved. This ts in addition to 

U. rode his first Dcrbv win- the hundreds of thousands of 
Never Say Die in 1954. pounds earned by such horses in j 
T>e following vear. he was their big-race vjciones. 


CHEPSTOW 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


1.00 Powerless. 

I. JO DUNSTON (nap). 
2.05 Dare Hansel. 


2.40 Broad Beam. 
3.10 Lover Cover. 

3.40 Battle King. 


Michael Seely's selection: 2.05 Corbiere. 

The Times Private Handicapper's top rating; 1.30 HIGH KNOWL. 


Guide to our in-line racecard 


103 (12) 0-0432 TWESFORM (COBF) (Mrs D Robinson] B HaD 9-180 - 


BWnl(4) 88 7-2 


Racaeard number. Draw In brackets S« -figure and distance winner. BF-beeten favourite in latest 
term (F-fefl. P-pulled up. IMmseated noer. B- race). Owner in brackets. Trainer. Age and 
brought down. S-sfcpped up. R-relused). Hose s vwh^u. Rider plus any allowance. The Times 
nsme(B-bta*ers V-vrsor. H-hoad. E-Eyeshreld. C- Private Handcapper's rating. Approximate starting 
course winner. (HSstonce winner. CD-course price. 


Going: soft 

1 J) PHILIP CORNES NOVICE HURDLE QUALIFIER (£3,700; 2m 4f) (20 
runners) 


101 

102 

104 

IQS 

108 

109 

no 

in 

112 

115 

118 

120 


021 BUTTON TOUR UP (0| (A AnnitageJD Nicholson 4-1 1-8- 

400-021 COMPTON PARK (O) (Lord VesteylJKmg 5-1 1-8 

0-401 K) MAD ABOUT YA[P Byrne) LKenrard 811-8. 


11 POWBU£SS(CKr Waterman) F waiter 5-1 1-8 

1 DOYLES EXPRESS (J Doyle Engineering Ud) M Pipe 4-TM„ 


041 LOCKNER LAD (D Heath) R Parker 6-1 1-4 

21101 CINDE GIRL (Mrs B Taylor) S MeSor 4-11-3 

0000/11 PERFECT DOUBLE p ABen) D Bswortti 5-1 1-3 

FF-000 AB8EYBRANET (Mrs E Efts) P CundsB 7-1HJ — 

440-000 BROAD WOOD (P Axon) R Hodges 4-11-0. 


R Beggan 

S McNeill 

B Powell 

. P Scudamore 

P Leach 

™_ H Davies. 


03 8-1 

87 10-1 
90 10-1 
93F4-1 

88 5-1 


000- CONE ALONE (G Pftffips) A J Wfcon 5-11-0 .... 


OP-PO FLYING REPORT (kftsSOanond)JOtd 6-1 1-0.. 

121 F/340-00 FRAUD SQUAD (RWilkams)R Hodges 7-1 1-0.. 

122 30000-0 GREY TORNADO P Short) TKeenor 5-11-0. 


129 0/00000 PROVERBIAL SESSION (B) (W McKenzie-Cofes) W M-Cok» 5-11*0. 


03 

.. M Harrington *89 

P Holley (7) 92 

. NON-RUNNER — 
— W Irvine (7) 

A Webb 

C Llewellyn (7) 

P Richards 

. CGmy 


8-1 

6-1 

6-1 


TS 


132 

133 

141 

151 

152 


00041 ROYAL DUCHY (C Roach) C Roach 4-11-0- 


3-2 ROYAL GURKHA (Miss D Eden) R Frost 6-11-0 . 


~ P Dover 
RMOman 

— J Frost 


4003-21 MISTY SUNSET (D) (R Murray) Mrs M Rimfli 6-10-13 JBiyen 

O/OP-OO ROMFUL AIR (C Mridiel) C Mdchell 6-10-9 Mr T Mitchell (7) 

4FO-000 SUNWOOD(M Pipe) M Pipe 4-10-9 N Dawe 


01 — 
87 — 

75 — 
63 14-1 
93 10-1 

7« — 


1385: PIKES PEAK 4-11-0 S Smith Ecdas (5-1) N Henderson 20 ran 


FORM BUTTON YOUR UP fll-0) landed the odds by a length from Charter Hanwane ( 11 - 0 ) at Worcas- 
1 T„„‘: »r last time (2m 4t.E1014. soft. Nov 19. 24 ran)wrttTFLYKG REPORT I1 1-0) behind when puled 

up. COMP ~ — " " — - -- 

ran) with S 

Toy. gooo 
£1440.00) 


Dec 5, 17 
ABOUT YA 

tune (2m 51 


not appear 

. i to son) and is better judged (1 1-5) on a 71 win over Random Charge (IT 

£1440. good to soft Nov 12, 15 ran). POWERLESS (11-2) bids for a treble after a 4 , 

£849. good. Nov 17. 22 ran)over Golden Fox (10-10) wim C1NOJE GIRL (11-3) 91 back in 5th. 

GIRL 01-10) put up a much better performance last tnna at Hereford (2m. £685. good to soft. Dec 2, 16 ran) 
when a 201 winner from Model Lady (11-0) after being left dear at die last PERFECT DOUBLE was a 33-1 
’ winner on debuL but proved that was no fluke when (10-1 Q) bought with a law run to beat Canuck 


Newbury 
Clown ill 


0) at Bang or test t ime (2m 4f. £749. good to firm. Oct 18 . 12 ran). 
Betecfioic PERFECT DOUBLE 


East Park ft* 


1-30 FINALE JUNIOR 

runners) 


HURDLE (Grade II: 3-Y-O: £5.747: 2m) (9 


202 

203 

204 

205 

206 
207 


422 BLASKET RUN (BF) (H YaJesI C Jackson 11-0 - 

21 DOMARC (J Price) J Price 11-0 

2 DUNSTON (BF) (T Ramsden) A BaHey 1-1-0 


012 FORCEUQ (D) (British Thorot^tbred Pic) G BaMng 11-0. 


3 GUESSING (Racegoers Club Owners Group) P Mtchell 11-0 . 
11 HIGH HNOWL(D) (Anchorage Marina LSI) M Pipe 11-0 

209 302123 RICMAR (B) (Miss W Howard) J Jenkins 11-0 

210 ROIFUL PRINCE (€ MitcheD) C Mttchefl 11-0 

211 SAMANPOUR (Mrs K Rotwils) P Haynes 11-0 


R Beggan 70 20-1 

R Raw* 90 14-1 

A Carrol 89 6-1 

Q Bradley 65 ID-1 

H Davies 85 6-1 

. P Scudamore B99F4-5 
_S Sherwood 90 5-1 
-33-1 
— 16-1 


1985: THE FOOTMAN 11 0 G Bradey (11-1) D Elsworth 12 ran 
FORM DOMARC unfed promise of first effort when 111 - 0 ) beating Framflngton Court (11-0) and 
rwrllTI Ghofar (11-7), both subsequent winners. 2541 and 31 at Newbury (2m. £1783. soft. Nov 21. 13 
ran). DUNSTON wtB improve on his hurdshg debut wtwn (10-10) HI 2nd to Ramies Rogue (10-10) at Uttoxetsr 

e m4f.£S85. soft Dec 4. 15 ran). FORCELLO (11 -d) could not match Framfington Court's (10-12) pace at Lud- 
w earner trim week and was beaten 31 into 2nd pm, £654. soft. Dee 16. 17 ran). GUESSING (ll-O) was far 
from disgraced in simitar company to this first time out when 7X1 3rd to Mareth Line (11-0) at UngfiaW (2m. 

£6427. soft Dec fi, 16 ran). HIGH KNOWL is hig 

easily by 81 from Hotplate (10-7) at Haydodu 
consistent sort and the most experienced of these. 

Sandown (2m. £6068. good to soft, Nov 29. 8 ran). 

HUH KNOWL 


ran). Gut 
athLkrat 

regarded and despite hurtSng rather sketchily scored ( 11 - 0 ) 
: time (2m, £1076, soft, Dec 11. 15 ran). RfCMAR (11-3). a 
te. finished a creditable IQ 2nd to Sprowston Boy (11-4) at 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 


JOCKEYS 


'F Winter 

Winners 

18 

Runners 

72 

Percent 

25.0 

P Scudamore 

Winners 

32 

Rides 

123 

Percent 

264 

T Forster 

14 

60 

23.3 

G Bradley 

5 

20 

25-0 

MrsM Rimel 

15 

66 

22.7 

R Rows 

12 

60 

20.0 


7 

31 

22.6 

A Wet* 

5 

27 

184 

S Meta 

7 

39 

17.9 

H Davies 

16 

89 

18.0 

L Kennard 

15 

92 

163 

PBarton 

8 

54 

144 


2L5 CORAL WELSH NATIONAL HANDICAP CHASE (£21.136: 3m 61} 
(17 runners) 


301 

302 

303 

304 

305 

306 


314-121 I HA VENT ALIGHT (B) (Tonffiax Ud) F Winter 7-11-11 (4ex)._ 

1311-20 STEARSBY (T Ramsden) Mrs J Pitman 7-11-5 

130P-20 KUMBf (BF) (D Lunt) D McCam 11-10-13., 


1313/41 JJMBROOK (B) (Mrs M NeweB) M H Easterby 9-10-12 

12222/4 DAHC HANSEL (Mr*; G Morro-Adams) N Gaselee S-10-12 . 
3P/3401 LUCKY VANE (Miss BSwtra)G Balding 11-10-11 

307 P01U-P0 BALLYMLAN (F Snendan) F Snendan 9-iO-S 

308 124U-2F CATCH PHRASE (K C*t) J GdfQrd 8187. 

309 
3t0 

311 

312 

313 

314 


P! 

G Bradey 

S Nonhead 

LWyer 


. J Frost 
PI 


01-3403 WHY FORGET (PPdfeOW A Stephenson 10-10-2 

iip- 041 KNOCK HILL |P Thompson) J Webber 18182. 


2F2-001 CORBIERE (CD) (B Burrough) Mrs J Pitman 11-10-2 
0-13103 fTTZHERBEHT (C) (A Ford) L Kermard 8-10-1- 


- R Rowe 

R Beggan 

G Itenepi 

B deltean «99 


88 7-1 
84 8-1 

as T 2 -i 

94 ID-1 

90 7-1 
9BF6-1 
92 33-1 

91 81 
90 16-1 i 
S3 6-1 \ 

1 


Knock HiU, whose American owner Peter Thompson has made a flying visit from the United 
States to watch the 30-year-old compete is today’s Welsh National at Chepstow 

Sherwood 
booked 

Simon Sherwood has brer, 
booked by David Els^onh to 
ride either Combs Diich or 
Desert Orchid is the King 
Georgs VI Rack Chase. Cohn 
Btowr. Elsworth** stable jocks*. 
wiD make a hue choice beiaren 
the pair and Sherwood will 
partner ihe oier. 

Simon Christian has left Ore- 
gon Trail among ±e 1 3 four-day 
dec lar ations for Kempton's 
Boxing Day showpiece but the 
impressive Gles International 
Gold Cup winner is mace likely 
to run in The Black and While 
Whiskey Chase az Leopards- 
;own on December 29. 

FOUR-DAY DECLARATIONS: Beau 

Ps-tjer. Ssta-xts Cross. Csr-Jrs Dttfi. 
CjtvanSzn. Deserr Orsa;. Doer Lxsh. 
rCfsW'N Forge. Ore^ir TizL 

EaarSSy. Van Traspe. Wayward Las. 
WesaroStsstt. 


apprinied as firsi jockey to Sir 
Noel Moriess ai W arren Place. 
Ncv-tnarket in succession to Sir 
Gordon Richards, Drafith*? 
time he won two further Derby s 
on Crepcllo and Si Paddy and 
■jkas also associated with such 
ou islanding fillies as Pe'Jie 
Etoile. Caroeza and Aunt Edith. 

Bv now *-hc jockey's services 
were in overwhelming demand 
and in 1966 came the celebrated 
split with Muriess over whom 
was to ride Varinta in the Oiks. 
Ia ihe event Piggoti won the 
rare on Vanma for Vincent 
O'Bnen. 

The partnership wuh O'Brien, 
ihe master trainer from 
Bailydoyle in Tipperary, was 
ore of the most successful that 
modern racing has seen. These 
were ike years of such cham- 
pions as Sir Ivor, .Nijinsky, 
Roberto. The Minstrel and 
Alleged. 

It was during this period that 
Piggon must have laid the 
foundations of his conadetrable 
fortune. O'Brien, Robert 
Sangster. the millionaire race- 
horse owner, and John Magnier. 
head of the Coobnorc Stud. 


Piggott's contract with 
O'Bnen was terminated in 1983, 
whic Pat Eddery was engaged in 
his place. 

The jockey then joined forces 
with Henry Gecil for three 
seasons. During this period he 
won further classics on Fairy 
Footsteps and Teenoso. And in 
19S4, the season of the break in 
his partnership with Cecil over 
the refusal of Daniel 
Wildcnstein to allow Piggott to 
ndc any of his horses, he won 
the Oaks on Circus Plume for 
John Dunlop and the St Leger 
on Commanche Run 

It was during the period of bis 
association with Cecil that> 
disclosures were first made 
about the extra payment nego- 
tiated by Piggon in the shape of 
extra percentages in prize 
money and shares in successful 
racehorses. 

Piggon is married to tbe 
former Susan Armstrong, a 
noted judge of bones and 
successful bloodstock agent. He 
bought Eve Lodge stables in 
Newmarket some years ago and 
has just completed his first 
season as a trainer with 33 
winners. 


11220-2 MACOUVER(B)(A J Bmgtey ltd) Mra ,1 Penan 8-10-0 . 
010-031 COVENT GARDEN (B) (R Parton)W Ctey 8-10-0 

315 PPUPP-0 TACROY (A Duffiekf) G Cahwl 12-10-0 

316 20/F4P-3 TRtSKA(B) (A Hunt) LKannard 10-100. 


317 3/PO-OPO RALLY TASK (B LiowoDyn) B UmveByn 10-100- 


- B1 

HPerraU 
SJOIM 
„ NtfeM 
. StecHlB 

- R I 


87 20-1 
S21A-1 

88 12-1 

— 5C-1 

— 55-1 

— 66-1 


1985: RUN AND SOP 7-10-8 P SctxJamora (13-1) J Spwmg 18 ran 


FORM 

wtwn 151 6tfi to BroBdtMiath (10-5) at Newbury (3m2t. good to sotfl. E 
wtwn (12-0) beating Royal GaraM (100) an oasv 61 at Stafford 1 3m 21. £4550. aaoc to sen. A pr 19. 6 rart. 
JMBROOKn t-7) came from a long way back to beat Vateso (10-5) by a length at Wefterby (3n. £3707. gooft 
Dec 6. 5 ran). He s best In bMwrs.CATCH PHRASE. 13th tencefzBBrai LmgriaM (art)on testes; stan. was net 
disgraced on reappearance wtwn (10-7) lfcl 2nd to Von Trappe (11-7) at Wincanton (2m Sf. £4278. 
soft. Nov 13. 6 ran). COREHERE (10-10) was not extended to beat Hardy Lad (11-6) by B. with WHY I 
(10-10) a length away 3rd end KUMBI (1 1-7) another 32i bade m a (Ssaapcowng 5th at Haydock (3m 4t. £2S£5 
~ ' KUMBI (11-Q had shown batter term wtwn alenj^b 2nd to BiatfihawliSiar jio- 


lb soft. 


Mamberson (10-12) 31 wdti BALL 1 
28, 8 ran). KNOCK MIL (1 1 >7) was also Men to 


OL with COVENT GARDEN (1 0-1 ) a langih back m »d. KNOCK HOI. (10-9) another 2 lil 4». LUCKY VANE (11 
7) 3 fantwr away 8th and CORBIERE (10-12)1 SI back last of 7, also at Haydock 14m. £3675. good ts soft, Ncv 
20). LUCKY VANE (1 1-9) returned to Ms test wtwn beatnig Mamberson (10-12) 31 wdh BAU.YWLAN (1 1 -7) a 
well-beaten 6th at Sandown (3m 5f, £3284, mod 
best advantage last tkne wtwn beating Play The K 
hi 3rd a*^ Worcester (3m 5f, £3038. good to soft. Di 
Rogamo (10-S) a Warwick (3m. £1741, good to 
wmnar fdm Royscriot (1 1-5) at Souttmed(3ni 21, 

Selection: CORBIERE 


£1584. heavy. Nov 24, 5 ran). 


2.40 NEWSBOY HANDICAP CHASE (£2£64: 2m 4f) (16 runners) 


401 10042-4 RRE DRILL (P Norman) K Bishop 11-12-5 

402 31/3020- BIT OF TIC ACTION (J McManus) Mrs M Rimefl 9-12-1. 

403 040-F41 FEARLESS IMP (J Troman) R Shepherd 11-11-11 (5e*)- 


PRkdwids 
_ A Sharpe 
. RShngi 


406 

0424-3F BROAD BEAM (j Jennings) MrsM RaneO 811-9 


407 

DRJ2P-0 DINGBAT (CD1 (T Raoaattl Mrs S Oavemnct 181 1-4 


409 320104-3 CLAUDE MONET IDI/f WNdM D Gandbtfo 811-1 _ 


410 

411 

220821 FRENCH CAPTAM(iq(Duclie»ol Norfolk) Lady Harries 181813 (Sex) MIQnarei 
4UP-2UP DUDE UHalewoodlD McCain 81811 A Mnmhv m 

412 



413 

101-03P SLEALONG (D.BF) (J Reacft P J Jones 810-8 

C Mam 

414 

415 

F3014-4 ROMMARDY J Chadwick) Mrs J Chadwick 7-10-8 

— J*— 

416 





418 

03P004 FLAMING TIDE (J Poynttn) P O'Connor 810-0 



92 8-1 

87 8-1 
9712-1 

90 12-1 
82 10-1 

91 — 
96F5-1 
98 11-2 
86 — 

88 — 
90 — 
9314-1 

96 10-1 
• 99 12-1 

80 — 


1985: JOHNS PRESENT 7-10-13 P Richards (11-2) R Holder 17 ran 


3.10 SCOUT NOVICE CHASE (4-Y-O: £1 ,345: 2m) (7 runners) 


501 

502 

503 

504 

506 
508 

507 


P-00000 CHARLESTON GEORGE (O Stokes) R Shephard 10-12 . 

OPfHMQ LOVER COVER (Mrs A GanetOJ King 10-12 

03-000 ME80UITE (G Lugg) S Medor 10-12 . 


P80 STOCKBROKER (R FrosQ R Frost 10-12. 


0000-00 WHi/S WARRIOR (W Catstray) G Ham 10-12. 


O4O-0F4 DORWOOO LADY (H Harpur-Crem) P OTJonnor 10-7- 
FP-P ROVING SEAL (D BeS) CPoptWRi 10-7. 


Mrs C SmaBman 

SMcNeS 

M Harrington 

J Frost 

B Powell 

H Dairies 

Peter Hobbs 


— 6-1 
— *-1 

— 7-2 

— 8-1 
— 10-1 

— RS-2 

— 20-1 


1985: PUKKA MAJOR 10 12 S Sherwood (13-8 fav) O Sherwood 13 ran 


3.40 K1NGSBRIDGE HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,315: 2m 41) (22 runners) 


602 212U-00 BATTLE KING (CD) (Mrs D Beddngton) F Whiter 5-11-9 

603 340221- PRINCE-8 DRWE (D) (B Mwmtng) B Pafflng 8-11-6 

606 1290-00 PEAHL RUN (R Squires) G Price 5-1 1-3 

609 

610 
811 
612 
613 
815 
616 
618 
621 


001000 ONE FOR MAMMY <C Roach) C Roach 5-11-2 

002000 JADE AND DIAMOND (R Lavefle) G Balding 0-11-2- 
01/ RANCHER (O) (A Hil) L Kermard 5-10-12 . 


00F1- SHEER STEEL (Steel Plate 8 Sections Ltd) P Cundsl 6-1010. 

001 (MW MISS NERO (D) (R Yates) C Jackson 5-10-10 

00Q2/F3 SAUSAGE (BfiOJ (E Swaflleld) R Hodges 8-109 

01-0000 MORNMG LINE (T Pumefl) L Komard 8-109 

0311PJQ MAUJENDOR (CO) (TSiviterJM Tate 6-10-7 

F200/20 SUEZ (BF) (Lord CheJssal T Forster 7-10-5. 


. P Scudamore 
~ C Evans (4) 
- S Morataed 

H Mbnan 

G Bradley 

BPeweS 

A Gorman 

, BDowdng(7) 


622 41300/P- CR UMP E T CATCHER (P Rtctwrda) O Ritfwrds 1010-5 

623 1100/PF LIGHT TRAVELLB1 (Mies E Ctetia) G Cahran 8-10-4 — 

624 032-OOF CELTIC SAGA (D) (Mrs A Hunt) L Kermard 6-10-4 

626 F3F1/PO MASTER CONE (M Reid) K White 9-104.. 


R Beggan 

H Davies 

Mr M Rkrimd* (7) 

SSbenvood 

SMcNeM 

P Dover 


96FB-1 
9812-1 
9710-1 
8714-1 
9712-1 
— 10-1 
9714-1 

97 — 
82 — 

• 9910-1 
— 8-1 

98 7-1 


94 — 


BZ7 04P/DPO- RUEFUL LADY (D) (Mrs D Onions) Mrs D Ortons 7-103. 
031 00/P WALLY WOMBAT CD) (EPrafl)M Scudamore 8-102. 


629 1/DOOf-O WINSOR BOND (Steel Pbte & Sections Lid) P Cundafl 0180- 

630 0330/0-0 SEVBFS SPECS (D) (P Locks) P Cundefl 6-10-0- 


MreSCowt^cn 97 12-1 


632 0/401 OP- CERVANTE SOVEREIGN (Mrs F Hunt) J Roberta 7-10-0. 
634 FF4KIQ AB8EYBRANEY (Mrs £ HSs) P CundoS 7-10-0 


W Knox 


78 — 
90 — 


1985c KMVEST FORTUNE 5-10-2 B Powafl f10-1) L Kennard 20 ran 


■k 2.15 SAfTOYFOra) HANDICAP HURDLE (£1.749: 2m 4f) (7 runners) 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.45 Casual Pass. 
1.15 Blackfeet 
1.45 Hardy Lad. 


2.15 Topleigh. 
2.45 Taelos. 

3.15 Sam fen. 


Michael Seely's selection: 2.15 TOPLEIGH (nap). 


Going: soft (chase course); heavy (hurdles) 

12.45 CAPfltNGTON NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £885: 3m) (13 runners) 


i 

3 

5 

7 

8 

9 

11 

12 

14 

is 

18 

17 

18 


213 BALNERMO (D,BF) (D Mmmo) Denys Smith 11-4„ 
0 SANTEL BOWLER (D Hodgson) D Hodgson 10-12. 
040 CASUAL PASS (J Morrison) G Richards 10-12. 


C Grant »99 F7-4 


EASTERN OASIS (J Andrews) J Andrews 10-12. 


CASENHBIS BOY W O'Connor) P MonteHh 10-12 . 

P GUNNER MAC (F McHaJe) N Bycroft 10-12 

00 MERCIA SOLD (W Walls) WWMs 10-12. 


_ J Ph#fea(7) 

J Hanaen 

MnSBradbume 

D Nolan 

TO Dan 


PBO NEXT DANCE (Mrs E HwMtson) M Naughton 10-1 2_ 
POO VAN DER PUP (EQ (J Latte) Miss Z Green 10-12-™.- 
004 ANGEL DUST(K Stone) K Slone 10-7. 


444004 KAMPHALL(G Oram) Miss Z Green 10-7,__^™™.. 
0 THE rtNK SISTERS ^Petterson)TCunrringham 10-7. 


OOP 1KATRE (Mrs F Sfeterson) G Moore 10*7.. 


. MrM WabtifT) 

PTuek 

KDOdten 

AStriager 

M Meagher 

GHarfcar 

PNhran 


— 20-1 
97 3-1 
-33-1 
— 16-1 
-16-1 
— 25-1 
S3 7-2 
-25-1 

91 8-1 

92 14-1 
— 14-1 
- 20-1 


198S No correspomsng meeting 

1.15 TAIRLAW HANDICAP CHASE (£1^31: 2m) (6 runners) 

1 OWKH DARK IVY (0,BF) (Mrs S Catfwwuod) G Richards 10-11-10 
~ 222-12F NORTON CROSS (D) (Ma) J Uniey)M HBmarby 8-11-7 


3 1104/2-1 BLACKFEET (CD) (J MattWson) j S Wlson 7-1 1-6 (6ax) . 

5 3P/F414- CAHERTY (C^J) (J Gledson) J Gfedson 13-T0-0-. 

6 3202-34 TRODJ9IA (D) (B Farrel) R Fisher 18180 

8 0DF013 AOARE (0 Hodgson) □ Hodgson 7-10-0 


P Tuck 

D Dutton 

C Grant 

HrPCraggs 
.. M Meagher 
. J Phelan (7) 


9411-4 
• 99 F9-4 

97 11-4 

98 16-1 
98 9-2 
9614-1 


1.45 MELLERAVS BELLE CHALLENGE CUP HANDICAP CHASE (£2,903; 3m 3f 40yd) 
(3 runners) 

1 014110- PEATY SANDY (C) (Mss H Hemflton) Mss H HamVnn 12-11-10— Mr A Dudgeon «39 54 

4 431-322 HARDY LAO (Q (Mrs J Mfflgai) 8 WBareon 9-1 1-2 MKmnond 95F4-5 

9 2/PP4-O0 avantie (Taggart & Wlson Ltd] JS WXaon iq-io-o c Grant 71 14-1 


3 41020/1 TOPLEK3H gg (Mrs M Montoith) P Montsfth 8-11-7 

5 1110P3- HAT>eMY NAP (CO) (Mrs B Ramsden) KS«W 8-11-6. 
8 021-130 IMPBKIMOSnY(C)(DLand3)JSWaaan4-11-a 


12 3/10432- MAGWOOD(C)(MraEBor«iwick)C Parker 6-10-13.. 
14 00321-0 SYRMX(CQ)(F Barlow) M Naughten 4-10-7 

16 000-140 PEACE TERMS (B) (J Ennis) G RlChaiM 4*105 

17 02/0042 BURGUNDY (CO) (C Atexanda) C Alexander 7-100 _ 


D Nolan 

.JDDe«les(7) 

TG Dan 

KDoataa 

C Grant 

P Tuck 

- . D hiiWmi 


92 7-2 

• 99 F5-2 

93 6-1 
89 8-1 
96 9-2 
MB 10-1 
96 12-1 


2.45 BENNAN NOVICE CHASE (£1,589: 2m 41) (9 runners) 


044-31 F MR CHRIS (CDL 44 Foods Ltd) M Naugritoa 7-11-4 

urn BUSIED SPRMG (Waking Eng Ltd) JSWUsen 5-10-12. 
Q8U-0U JAY DOUBUE YOU (J MatNesan) J S Wflaon 5-10-12 — 
0BP320 IMLSmEAK (Mrs D CUhant) Mrs D CUhan 6-18-12 — 

32/PF32 PERUABOS (B) (M Walter) K Stone 7-10-12 

004112- TAELOS (D Hob] G Richards 5-10-12- 


2200FD- TEMAJOJO (A McCtUSkay) J J OTfetti 7-10-12- 


040V WHESPEHJNG KMQfT (J Mttcfwl) R Goftfle B-10-12™ 
1/P- FRAGHANT FRIDAY (T CufiUMrt) T Cuthbart 10-18-7 . 


C Grant 98 4-1 

TG Dm — 18-1 

— D Dutton — 20-1 

, R Esmabwr 85 14-1 

— A Stringer • 99 7-2 

P Trick — F2-1 

R Lamb 

PMveo 


J Hansen 


— 8-1 
— 33-1 
-16-1 


3.15 LAURIE5TON NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE (£1^05: 2m) (11 runners) 


8012F0 MOONOAWN (D) (Mrs B Ramsden) K Stone 5-11-10. 

0442-41 SAMFEN (F BMerd) M H Easterby 4-11-5 (7ex) 

OIIOPO A7KMSONS (Mrs T Metcalfe) G Rkdvnls 5-11-4 

P0/QO4-0 KS4G HARRY (R Anderson) RGokfie 5-1 1-2. 


(XS0U3 PENDLEY GOLD (Mrs H GraansWaldB) M Naughten 5-10-ia. 
B00D-40 PROUD CON (H Proud) JCharflon 7-10-11- 


238093 contact kelto (Mrs M Ashton) N Bycroft 4-189. 

0/M- THE PAPPARA29 (Mm S OTtel) <1 J O'NaB 810-5 
04F-04 LORD SUN (J Thorp) D Moflatt 4-180- 


00800 ELrHAR-LE-HAR(R Edetaon)T Ctewin^ian 4-10-0. 


03000-0 LITTLE NEWINGTON m (Capes ManStf Ltd) NByCTOft 5-104. 


A Stringer 0612-1 
_ D Dutton GB9F84 
_ P Tbcfc 90 81 

89 16-1 
9312-1 

90 81 
92 81 
— 281 

K Teeter 88 81 
— 181 
— 14-1 


P Niven 

.JD Davies (7) 
— REamabaw 

C Grant 

RLanb 


C Dennis (7) 

™ 4 


Course specialists 


M H Easterby 

GFMwdg 

Daws Smite 

HFShar 

JSWBoan 

MNaugbton 


TRAINERS 

Winners Runners 
22 as 

47 285 

JS 103 


JOCKEYS 

Winners • 
5 



13 

138 

25 

119 

152 


Par Cent 

38.5 
. 205 

23.0 

17.6 

15.1 

14.7 


C ■ 


Presenting a full service 
on New Year’s Day 

There are six race meetings on New Year's Day, mid Tbe 
Times vnU be publishing on that day, providing a fall service for 
Cheftenham, Catterkk Bridge, Windsor, Leicester, Carlisle and 
Devon & Exeter. Tbe Times Private Handicapper's ratings will 
be available for Cheltenham and CAfterick. 

Thee win also be comprehensive coverage of the Christmas 
holiday racing with the eight Boxing Day programmes, phis a 
preview of frie big Irish meeting at Leopardstowa, in oar 
Christmas Eve issue. To take foil advantage of our special holi- 
day editions, {dace a regular order for The Times with your 
newsagent. 


LINGFIELD PARK 


Selections 

Bj Mandarin 

12.45 The Hadenderos. 1.15 Sir's At The Gin. 

1.45 Akram. 2.15 Mister Christian. 2L45 Vdeso. 
3.15 Merman 

Michael Sedy’s selection: 2.15 Mister Christian. 
Going: soft 

12.45 CFfltfSTMAS CRACKER NOVICE CHASE 
(£1,435: 2m 41) (8 runners) 


00/ WaGMAJBfcaHi 

P QUARTS! TOWN [B) P BuSer 6-1 1-2 RGdUateta 


MnCBtett 


15 PWP S« HHnoH s Motor 7-11^ KrTMtetaim 

17 ^16 THJJNHAIfflM HmrfiJfB 6-11-2 Ifisa S Lawrewa (7) 
19 040 SVDRDQ. Wrs R MunJcKX 81 1- ? G Moaii 

22 430F 8A5SANOCODOugm3a811-OL_ EMmpby 

2-1 Qmirew. £M Tim Haoenderos, 4-1 Ten In Hand. 81 
Sasseroco. 12-1 Sir Hector. 181 Wordel. 25-1 oteere. 


1.15 EBF NOVICE HURDLE (£1,569: 2m) (12) 

3 CURRAKEEN BOY RGow 4-11-0 — 

6 FORT AGUADA N Vigors 4-11-0 CCttrfO 

GAY GUNNER G Grace* 811-0 PDaobte 

QflLUE HOLS N GeSBtafl 4-11-0 D Browne 

4 JB HSTBR C N ash 4-11-0 — 

0 tE MODES TY A Moore 4-11-8 CBodyMooreM 

42- MACROQM S MaSor 4-11-0 G Laodw (4) 

0 MR KA35 A Moon 811-0 G Moore 

F SCYLLA’S CHB* N Wheeler 4-11-0 MrNWbeete 


2.15 GOODWILL NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE 
(£685: 2m) (15 runners) 

. 2 004- STTAR R Ajffiboret 4-11-8_ Data McKoown (7) 

10 ®M) COWAL SHORE Slftflor 811-3 QlMdte 

11 408 FORMtoABLE LADY WWghtmwi 4-11-2 CCox(4) 

14 DO/4 BANDALENT D GandoBo 811-1 MWBtams 

15 P-32 


. _ MISTBtCHRISrnAN<B)P Haynes 811-0 AWSbb 

16 080 PROFIT WARRANT PstMWwfl 7-1813 RGoldsteta 

170802 m AVENGER OR GHnderster 81813 CBrmr 

r BUSINESS W Musson 81813- 


16 /003 ANY I 


B Wright 


19 008 STREET LEVS, HOTWl 810-10 RCboptn— W 

20 0F8 OEEKAYS G Bfem 4-1810 JMdjntftfn 

22 P SWEET ANDY GGnasy 7-1810 PGncay(7) 

23 0300 FORGIVING 8 Stews 4-189 — — 

2400-00 PAT ON THE BACK GBten 8189- 
28 OOP UTTL£DICXENSEBeew 4-104. 


J Barton 


27 F/PO SHARED JOKE 00 M Bofion 8104 

Penny FStcthHayaa (7) 
3-1 Mater Christen, 81 Mr Avenger, 81 Any Business. 8 
1 P3t On The Back. Star Theme, 12-fBandateffl. Forgiving. 

2-45 MAC VUM HANDICAP CHASE (£2,477: 3m) (6) 

2 813 FUDGE DEUGHTflLBF] 0 Sherwood 7-11-7. C On ( 


5 0342 VELESO . 
fl 02-1 F DEWBIS 


.811-1. 

11 - 1 . 


. GLntaHl 


7 MOP ROUND TIE TWST (m D Oughttn 18184-. P Doable 

8 F1P- CHOICE OF CRITICS RAkehini 18182 — 


11 OPP MERCY LASS M Baton 7-180- 


C Brown 
RGoMeta 


7 

S 

9 

10 

11 

12 

16 


18 008 9WTWtXX)RAkalHSt811-0 — Date McKean (7) 

19 2 SSrSATTMEGOfJGffted 811-0 Eflfarafw 

23 0 VITAL EXPORT DEtawnth 4-114 C Brown 

, 11-8 Sfs At (be Gin, 81 Mecrootn. 81 Jfrnstor. 181 La 

Modesty. 181 Vital Export. 14-1 Sffnywood. 

1.45 XIDEX HANDICAP CHASE (£1335: 2m) (5) 

R Hodges 812-0 (7ex] C Brown 


2 M3 AKRAM (Q)R Hodges 8124) ( 
4 -104 BRIGHT KK»MGDGrissel l 
5121-0 VODKATUBP Haynes 7-100.. 


8 0F4O 


- 11 - 2 - 


»Z(BF) I Dudgeon 8106. 
STRAIGHT U® (D) N Wht 


AWabb 


Wheetor 18100. Mr N 


1811 Akram. 81 Hiz. 11-2 BrtoM Morning, 81 VtxftaUni. 
181 Straight Line. 


6-4 Fudge DeUgM. 82 Deviner. 81 VMeeo, 13-2 Chokn Of 
Critica, IMHound The Twist 281 Mercy Lass. 

3.15 BRANDY BUTTER HANDICAP HURDLE 
(£1,094: 2m) (10) 


221/ GREAT LIGHT 
1-PO OWEN'S 


WHTjCOl 
PRDE (D) 


3 1/80 MUSIC WONDER 

4 6-04 OPENMG BARS 

8 -POP HALL'S PRINCE 

9 -344 GOODMAN 
10 801 IBETUAN (0) Mrs 
12 000 WINDBREAKS! “ 
15 OM) WAR AMD 
1712P-8 SNOWBALL JM 



J Jenkins 811-10 — 

R AkBhurst 4-11-9 

DafeMdKeewn(7) 
R Hodges 811-9.. 


ID0ugmm811-9 P Double 

1 Grissdl 811-2 R GoMstam 

jJGBtod 4-11-2 EMupfay 

[ Pitean 81812 Max) C Brown 

(A Moore 8100 Q Moore 

ID MBS 7-180 R RewnH 

i Moore 8180. Candy Moore (<Q 
11-8 Opening Bars. 2-1 Metman, 11-2 Goodman Point, 18 
1 Music Wonder, 14-1 Windbreaker. 281 oteere. 


IKBtfCDt A 
PEAfXflS) [ 

LJM(D)AI 
0.2-1 Metn 
I Windbreak 

Course specialists 


g3w°rth. j 8 from_38. _22 J Jerkins. 9 Irom 52, 17.3%; j 
15.0%;S Meflor. 5 from 44. 11. 4%; A Mwre 

8wwteerejran53 rides, 15.4%; C Brown. 6 
I2a%: G Moore. 8 from 112, 7.1% (only threw 


■NOTTINGHAM' 


Selections 

By Mandarin 
12.30 Positive. 1.00 Destiny Bay. 1.30 Rapier 
Thrust. 2.00 Mick's Star. 2.30 Rouspeter. 3.00 
Sporting Mariner. 


(chase course); good to soft 


1JL30 TOLLERTON NOVICE HURDLE (Drv I: £965: 
2m) (20 runners) 

5 mi Bssyumss^'issies 

7 BIG WHITE CMEF P Blockley 81810 NFtem(7) 

8 2032 COLOHELOAMESMreS Okver 4-1810 JacguiCWm 

18 0 KING SEAR RDKkin 4-1810 C Joom 

19 000 MEMBERS’ REVENGE 0 NiCfiOlsan 81810 — 

20 P MUHAJJALB Stevens 81040 S Moore 

22 PLAY ON CTVietfine 81810 JSothm 

25 RICO RANGE JHwril 4-1810 JAHrerit 

26 P RYVERKBIGJChiag 4-1810 MBowfeyM) 

28 OF SALMON RUN D Mcmison 81810 — 

30 00 SHAflPALONG Mre T Cuthbert 4-1810 

31 -P03 StBBMAN DANCBt P Ftegate 81810 S 


32 2000 SWTHY BEAR R Otakfn 4-1810 W Humphreys (7) 

35 00 V1CKSTOWN (V) B Mororei 4-1810 . C PrtJca (7) 

37 0 XHAU Francome 4-1810 M Oarer 


38 004 CELTIC MART J 
40 DANCHG CLARA 


8185- 


I A Smith 4-1 85. 

41 PUP HEROIC SONG A Rstter 4-185- 


M Dwyer 
P Warner 
MrMWMfings 
D fisher 


42 040 KATE-WOOD B** M Thomas 8185 

5-2 Sand Castle, 81 PosWve, 81 Colonel Jamas, 81 Steal, 
181 Siberian Dancer, 12-1 Smrihy Bear, 281 others 

1.0 COLW1CK HANDICAP CHASE (£1,665: 2m) (6) 

1 P-20 KEVW8F0RTJDSF) Army FfeGaraW 8-12-3 H Dwyer 

2 440 B«mQ«aS(D)KB5fey 1811-13 

Mr T TbOBMtw Jones 

3 -133 rTSGOTTABEALflKWT (D) Mrs W Sykes 811-13 

4 044 DESTWT BAY (D) N Hendarjon 811-11 - mSmBh! 

6 1134 JWTAUCKIBABF)UHEastefby 7-114 — 

9 20P- ROSTRA (D) R Annytego 7-1812— Mr H Amqrtege (7) 

7-4 DeMiny Bw 54 Itegottabeadright 4-1 Just Aft*. 81 
KevfeeteL 81 enghtoassta. 12-1 RoeSa 


iJSO TOLLERTON NOVICE HURDLE (DtV II: £944: 
2m) (18) 


1 *110 BERMSHLADY 

2 -1PP HASDUNdQF 

3 111 RAteBR 

4 ORJ- AFRICAN HAGtC 


J A Harts 
CSmtti 

(D) Jtnmw RtiGwWd 4-11-3 M Dwyer 

J Hans 81810 Lom - 


io 4m Cockalorum (CD) k Morgan 4-i8io 

15 JON CHAMPERS Mre M Tlmnas 81810 

16 8 LAKE VALENTINA M W Easterby 81 810 - 


IB POOP LUCKSH G Games 4-1810 
18 

24 

28 . 

27 SPARK OF PEACE P Btaddey 4-1810 

28 m STAMTAS M EfieJdnson 81810 

33 4230 WALMBt SAWS WPrieca 81810. 


Mr TTbonuow •teies 
JSmbam 


P. WLTMG POT Mrs S Oftw 7-1810- Jncqd OSrar (T) 
00 PRINCE GEORGETOWN RHartop 4-1810 — NCnmk 
ROYAL REEF J Spearing 4-1810 -PWanrer 


,NFteni(7) 


35 004 ANITA’S APPLE P Fetaata 4-185. 

36 0 CAOOHHE D NteHoteoriTl85- 
39 OOF- ROSE CONE Mrs P Sly 4-185- 


_ SJohRsan 

RDwwoody 

M Bastard 


40 004 SHANHA GROVE J Spearing 8185 MBowRiy ( 4 ) 

2.0 MANSFIELD NOVICE CHASE (£2^21: 3m) (11) 

3 812 AGA94ST1HEGRMN(BF)D Mchotaan811-4 

4 832 C ATHTS P AL J Ch uM 6-11-1 

5 221 - CHEE kt RUPERT PLW tems 811-1 . 

ro St FteGeraid 7-11-1 . 

10 F43- LAKfcrmJ J Btemrete 7.11-1 

11 184 MffilPS STAR MW Easterby 8liTZl^nreii 

12 -340 OWEN DUFF R Tate T?M*r jEfi gggg 

M flTTHWOTON D Fearman 7-1 1-1 

g OOF NEON A Hambty 8114) ? 

23 244* PROVIDE (B^S Meter 81 14_ MrTfteS^SS 
- 8 4AgatretTha Grain. 11-4 Mick’s Star. 81 Provide 81 
Cathy s PaL 12-1 Deep South, 14-1 Cheeky Rupert. 281 others 

250 BINGHAM HANDICAP CHASE (£1 ,704: 2m 6f) 



K MIL 9-1 '4- 

i ssaa^¥tasKjit: 

If £3 Ijtfsgzwzxa!*™- 


RDanwnody 

— M Dwyer 


R Crank 

■IJQgln(7) 


M Bremen 
KrAHemtXy 

81 Sr 
1 others 


J2 gOOOT11A ^(P)H Harper 11-182 
Barter 

han«- 

U Hotel 


« »8 




STtanar 


CWteran 
J Breton 


is a 

KHI. "■* 

Course specialists 

J Jsnkms. 6 wfamo» trn ■ , « 

Hmderaon, 10 irom 45 , sISSmk flmnere. 26.1% : n 

nsajss- sip "SatVKijSM 


4 











ses 

m 

ine 


sr\ , 

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■ k 

Vf* r-J- 

• - ^;r . 

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Ha ss 

*" c' "&S 

.;>! -ij-S 

*1 w! "!S 
M!:SS "*! 

i? $ US 

|i ii $1 

Sl'gs tij) 

■‘•i 'Ss ^ 

^u, - | :si 


Wl -n 

u-. 

‘5* S* !ttt 

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“«** * 
• : ' teai , 


pa . 

*S $g 

Hi! *1 !! 


1 

^nl 


: •!!! aft* ‘JJ* 

TPS*S| 

si ‘Ml 
: :|8 
■>: SI -JS 

31 


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‘• : 21 Sjj 

>:a?ss 

Hi £5 ^Jj 

-. M'g* 3? 
".- b '!•& 
•t 4 ;m iS 
• : * «< -Ct; 

’•/Bnaas 
■“ •"-■■'X LaYttj 


34 . ,» . •> 

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*?)•: 




- • r-*- -w<j 


3a f*--‘r. w r^tj^a asa 




*.£ .t 7;. . '\ Xl 


u 9 U 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 


CRICKET 


Mt W el ling ton recalls 
W oolley ’s 305 not out 
as Tasmania fall for 77 





..yf® 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Hobart 

same her/ - ^tfor windy **P™** 1 . a ***9 Kim Hughe 

both. Yesterday it *J? tcrn atipnal against West In- was also leg 


both. Yesterday it was very 
wmdy and occasionally weL 

“Like playing on a cliff too." 


dieson Fcbraury 3. 

“Like playing on a cU# ion" ground, with 

one of the plavers said. In 50 1 hihSSJ ■! VcU, W°, n w 8 ” 8 HP 

overs Tasmania, who h a d h 2“45 ^ J able Moumain 

been put in were bowled m2 does .behind Newlands, has a 
ST 77 to ^hlch SSiiS “ na,n 0, d- w orld charm, look- 
replied with 73 for w" s ve ^ much & it must haw 

.b&fe EiFrF^ 

was making 305 not oulin a S, mH. y r Slbly for “ <«>ur. 

»V^3 ss,,a V s! 

"c“iir5s£ ^-ss&ssss "- 

ra “ d over Ite outfield and thi h H£‘,i. a l ** “ELSHf 

gas ** most ° f u,e ■"wSTtaj* just* 

Now, Small bowled the first Z 
13 overs up wind, conceding SrftrP'hfl!! rH 
only five runs while he was cw ''<W u 

about iL With the wind be- EJHa 
hind them. De Freitas and p D bo*** a** ” DeFrn*as 

^ in. DeFrcius ggS£?S:!ffiS, r#> ^_- 

bowling decidedly last at *° c B oon c BroadbFoster 

times but Foster being the ? E J ^2S3t'i,'^ te b ft 
more accurate. Poor old Small R m Eason cwiaSso oeFrea 
never got a look in at the easier r j l c 

end; but he is much loo good a 
tourist to complain about that. E*vas(i»i.»i.irtft 

Whether what each of them fallotwick^^ f-3£’2-25" 
did has any bearing on the m. s-as. ms. 7-3G. bo. 9-7S. i 
T est team for Melbourne next KS rS 5W»M£ 
week will depend to some ^-aGatung 3-2-145 

extent on Botham's fitness. ENQ LAwixtRraiinmnt 

Yesterday, be had his first 

serious work-out for three JJwwakw notow 

weeks and it went enconrag- ^ ^l 71 

ingly welL He hopes to bowl c w j Ath«y, - m wg^TaTl^ 
an over or two against the RKiuRfs.PAJDeFrwtas.jEEoi 
Prima Miaisicr-s XJ in Can- MKaSgR-.- » 
berra on Tuesday. bowung: cootoy b-o- 33 -i: b s 

French is nut nf hrwnitnl l7 -* Brown 3-1-12^ MHosz 3-1 
rrenen IS out OI Hospital, Umpire* SG Randan andDGrw 

nothing worse than a chest 

infecuon having been di- problems. At just this lii 
agnosed, and he, loo. could be England’s last lour of A 
in the side for Tuesday. A Ua, Pringle was having 
g^me is what he needs, before Since then, Pringle has 
the feeling overpowers him himself in hand, but i 
that be might as well be at some time before he d 
ho D ie ; , , DeFreitas needs to do il 

By lunch yesterday, much of But he look the first 1 
the time lost when no play was yesterday, as well as th 
possible on Thursday had three, 
been made up. Tasmania were Bowler, who was 1% 1 
then 40 forseven after 29 in the ninth over, mr 
overs. The pitch was grassy remembered for havings 
and awkward; the outfield, 100 not out in his first 
which would have yielded a class match, for Leiceste 
fine crop of hay, brought all against Hampshire last 
but the best hits or fastest mer. He is one of three 1 


c ... TASMANIA; FfrrtHwfclgi 

EJHamsc AttwybStntd 14 

P D Bowtar tow b DeFrnnas 7 

K Bfaashaw C Lamb t> Foster ,™-7 

G Hughes aw UFcstar 0 

*pc Boone Broad b Foster 2 

D J euckneham e Richards b FoiW 0 

tE Soule csack O Small 1 

R M Eason c Richards b DeFreitas __ 13 

TJ Cootoy cAmaybDeRoitas IB 

R L Brown c Rchards b DeFreitas 9 

S Mdosi not out 0 

Extras (bl. lb 1.n-t>8} 10 

Total (503 overs) 79 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-2S. 2-25. 3-27. 4- 
33. 5-35, 6-36, 7-36. 8-63. 9-75. 10-7U 
BOWLING: DeFreitas 14.2-4-44-4; Smafi 
l^S^-2: Foster 16-5-204; Emburoy3-2- 
4-0; Gating 3-2-1 -0. 

ENGLAJWJ XL Rnrt bnlnQa 

BC Broad cMlknzb Cooley 15 

WN Stek not out 37 

JJ Whitaker notow 14 

Extras (tvb 7) 7 

Total (1 wM) 73 

C WJ Athey, *M W Gatling, A J Lamb. 1C J 
Richards, PA J DeFreitas, J E Emburay. N 
A Foster and G C SmaA to BflL 
FALL OF WICKET: 1-41. 

BOWUNG: Cooley BO-33-1: Bison 8-1- 
17-0; Brawn 3-1-12-0; MHoaz 3-1-11-0. 
Umpireft: S G Randefl and D Gregg. 

problems. At just this time on 
England’s last tour of Austra- 
lia, Pringle was having them. 
Since then, Pringle has taken 
himself in hand, but it was 
some time before be did so. 
DeFreitas needs to do it now. 
But he took the first wicket 
yesterday, as well as the last 
three. 

Bowler, who was leg before 
in the ninth over, may be 
remembered for having scored 
100 not out in his first first- 
class match, for Leicestershire 
against Hampshire last sum- 
mer. He is one of three of the 


snicks to a rapid halt The best Tas manian side to have come 
ground in Tasmania at the over from the mainland, look- 
moment is reckoned to be ing for cricketing feme and 
Devenport, where England fortune. One of the others, 

SKIING 


Kim Hughes's brother, Glenn, 
was also leg before yesterday, 
trying to book before he bad 
his eye in. The third, Milosz 

(pronounced MylossX bowled 
leg breaks late in the day. 
Hughes and Milosz are both 
from Perth, Bowler from 
Canberra. 

The ball moved about i 
enough off the pitch for Rich- 
ards to take three catches ax 
the wicket, Athey two ax third 
slip, and Broad and Lamb one 
each in the gully. Slack, too, 
took a good one at short teg. If 
Botham plays at Melbourne 
only as a batsman, Foster and 
Small could both now be 
nearer to playing there than 
DeFreitas, on grounds of 
reliability. 

The other recognized Eng- 
lish new hall bowler on view, 
Ellison, did his most effective 
work with the bat. Coming in 
just before lunch he was last 
out, 20 minutes after tea. 
Having obstructed for 25 
overs between various short 
stoppages for min. 

Tasmania were to have had 
DeFreitas playing for them 
this winter, until he withdrew 
when chosen for the England 
tour. Greg Thomas was then a 
candidate, but the job went 
finally to Ellison, who has 
managed to get back some of 
the confidence he lost in 
England last season. 

But fay the time Ellison 
bowled yesterday the pitch 
had eased and he found Slack 
in his best form, timing the 
ball better than anyone aU day. 
After Broad had clipped Coo- 
ley off his toes to square leg, 
Whitaker came in and saw out 
the last few overs with Slack. 
Not often these days do 
England have things quite so 
much their own way. 

Draw likely 

Kanpur, (Reuter) — Rain and 
the strength of the two sides* 
batting line-ups make a draw 
seem the most likely result in 
the first Test match between 
India and Sri t-anira, which 
resumes today after yesterday's 
rest day. Ram and bad light 
prevented a baO being bowled 
on the second day on Thursday. 
Sri Lanka 217 for 2 (R RatnayaM 83): v 
kmSa. 



The way to stardom: Don WDson coaches a young batsman, Gerard Wilson. 
(Photograph: Hugh Routledge). 

The game on a crescendo 


MCCs Christmas coaching 
courses have never been more 
popular than they are now. 
During these school holidays 
more than 300 youths and boys 
are being tutored, disciplined 
and above all, invigorated, in the 
arts of cricket at Lord's indoor 
•chooL They needed to book two 
or three months ago to secure 
(heir places- 

"Cricket is on a crescendo,” 
Don Wilson. MCCs head coa- 
ch, said. “An enormous number 
ef people are inquiring about our 
courses. Boys are coming from 
Aberdeen, Ireland, Hong Kong. 
The joy is that many are 
returning for subsequent Christ- 
mas courses-” 

Even more of a joy for Wilson 
and his fellow coaches (this 
Christmas they include former 
cricketers such as Barry 
Dnddkston, John Hampshire 
and Hxll»» Moseley) is that in 
nine years the indoor school has 


njury may keep 
Girardelli out 


Kranjska Gora (Reuter)— “I'm suffering a lot and 
Marc Girardelli, the World Cup don’t know what will happei 
overall champion, dislocated his now.” he said. “But it looks as i 
shoulder for the second time this season is over for me.” 
this season in the men’s grant A Ioca] doctor ^ ^ 

£m y ^Sr r qSnerimil^ and dcr 011 ^ Spot **** GirardeB 
nut was able to walk back to hi 

oray be out for the rest of the holeL -| can . t Uft my ^ Quldei 

se ¥ on ‘ , ___ properly and I must have it seei 

Gaspoz s ^ory was his i sec- t0 property because in thi 
ond success of the week and hw condition I just can't sld the wai 
third in a row on the tough i should," he said. 

Kranjska Gora course. He came 

down the 52-gate course with a He has had a slow start thu 
height difference of 307 metres year, managing only a thirt 
in a combined time of 2m in place in the super-giant slalom 
37.12sec, six hundredths of a in Val cTIsere, France. 

^ Robei1 The overall World Cup win- 
Rich- ner for two consecutive seasons 
Girardelli has bad problem 
art ftamonon, finished third m ^ hc fina ^ 

i37 58 to maintain his overaH shoulder in 1 983. 

World Cup giant slalom lead. 

Promotion has 85 points to official jiesm-TSe i, j Gamez 
Gaspoz’s 62. 2 mms 37.12 secs : |1:1S.S7fl£l .1 

Pramonon’s third place also pSSMIwMrSn 
consolidated bis second spot in h Mayer (Austria) ' 2:38.15 
the overall standings on 108 ft:i<L55/i:2l.69); 5. M Wasmetar (WG) 
noinue four behind PirOlin *3023 JMimA&IJM 


RACKETS 

Malvern 

show 
the way 

By WOlum Stephens 


By I vo Tennant 

unearthed 35 first class cricket- 
ers. Phillip DeFreitas, now on 
his first Epfllamt tour, was 
spotted by Wilson hi the indoor 
school and given a place on 
MCC*S gronnd staff. 

The Christmas courses are 
not expensive — £42 far two loll 
days — and hence attract a wide 
range of boys, aged between 
seven and 18, of varying ability. 
There are seven coaches to seven 
nets. Proper cricket clothes mnst 

be worn ahhowgfi white shorts 
are acceptable — just. 

“Our aim is to give the boys 
opportunities they may not have 
at school,” Wilson said. “Many 
of them are a bit scared at 
en uring to Lord’s so we try ««l 
allay their nerves and name 
them after Test cricketers. Yes, 
if there is a yonng tearaway we 

f«U him Ian Bo tham . 

“Then once we have sorted 
them out according inability we 
try and teach them the basics. 

GOLF 


The key is that we make it 
interesting and fim for them. Yet 
we also try and teach them to 
behave properly. Behaviour has 
become lax in all walks of life, 
including die cricket fields. If I 
can instill pride in these boys 1 
will have done my job." 

At the end of every course 
each boy's parents (girls are ; 
welcome but there is none on this 
course) will be given a written 
report, respleadant with di- 
agrams. The pick of the boys 
frill be invited to attend a school 
of merit, held every Saturday 
meaning throughout the winter. 

So, has Wilson foimd a poten- 
tial first-class cricketer thfat 
Christmas? He thinks he has. 
Philip Weston Is 13, the son of 
Mike Weston, chairman of 
Englan d 's ru gby selectors, and, 
said Wibon, is a fine cricketer in 
the making. The next generation 
is on its way. 


A tropical Palmer creaks 


From John Kalian tine, Montego Bay 


“I'm suffering a lot and I me wav 

don’t know what will happen w 

now.” he said. “Bui it looks as if By W illiam Stephens 

this season is over for me.” • _ . . 

. . . . _ • . , Marlborough have two semi- 

A local donor reset the shou£ finals in the H K Foster Cup 
der on the spot and GnaideBi Bt Queen's Club today. Guy 
was aWe » nk back to his Barker plays Jonathan Longley 
hold. 1 can i lift my shoulder D f Tonbridge, who is the bolder, 
properly and I must have it seen whjj c Alister Robinson meets 
to properly because in this Jeremy Meyer, of Radley. / 
oondnion I just can t sb the way Malvern is another school to 

I should, he said. have done well in the public 

He has had a slow start this schools singles championship, 
year, managing only a third Two of their players, Michael 
place in the super-giant slalom Henman and lan Timberlake, 
in Val cTIsere, France. eliminated seeds 

The overall World Cup win- CUfton plays 


ner for two consecutive seasons. 1X1 

Girardelli has had problems £5*?* s final ofthelncl^on- 
sinoe he first dislocated his Webber Cup for the umter-l 6s. 


20.73); 4, 
2:38.15 


The Renny Cup semi-finalists 
are Richard Smith Bingham, of 
Eton, against Jonathan Wright, 
of Rugby, and David Bevan, of 
Marlborough, versus Robert 
Cook, of Tonbridge. 


points, jusi four behind Pirmin 
Zurbirggen of Switzerland, who 
finished ninth in 2:38.95. 




I (1:1031/1:21 
23&S2 (1:15.67] 
1238.93 (1:16l6i1 


Finished ninth in 2:38.95. & M Edar 

“1 really wanted my third win % f P^zuran 
in a row here today." Gaspoz - 

said after the race. “The con- 
ditions were very lough and I (Swra) 
was so tired towards the end I 
almost missed a gate at the h Pteren lavmzj cwjuii 
bottom of the course in the 
second rm Zirtnggan JSwteJ.tl? 



RESULTS: QuaM* CMS H K FtetarCqp. 
flr» round: M Hannan (MaAwn) M D 
WMa(Gttoo) 15-10, 17-14, 9-15. 1S-13: l 
TimbarlaJw (Mahwrd M H Swmgtem^st 
(Eton) 16 -13.4:1 5. 1^S .1B-18._1& r 13 ;JW 


Mayer (Radley) htJS 
7, (M. 15-5; G lewta 


STANDWGSil.P 




“I was really lucky to beat ip4: < ._3 (Syia) 8& 5. i aanr^v 
Erlacher. but I'm on a winning hsmS 

streak and in times like this Mustna) 48; 10. LSt^l^Jstria) 43:11,0 
evervthina usually Roes well.” Totseft WWislh 


,i5-a 

. . . . i w a 

Lunl (Malvenij 15-4. i4-17. 18-f4, 15-7. 
OuwleM ln alB J I Longley (Tonbridge) M 
S Ross (Harrow) 15-7, 1M, 17-14; G W 
Barker (Madboroogh) bl Timberiake 15-S, 
15-3. 15-3: fcteyar bt Hannon 18-14, 154. 
15-12; Robinson M Lewie 15-10, 15-11. : 
154. 

nonon-nODn 


LALOM WORLD CUP 


everything usually goes well,” Yotsch 
he said. ^rfwe)33. 

The Austria n-bom Girardelli. giant Slalom world ct 
who races for Luxembourg, left stanimw^ Ji" 1 TaSSfez: 
soon after the race for St Gallen, % 

Switzerland, where he will have zubriggen 34; 6. o To 
an operation on his left shoulder 
today. 





YESTERPArS RACING RESULTS 
Fakenham ^eUSifflSil 

I rtM. JAIMTER (K Townend, 5- 


As Billy Casper stepped on to 
the first tee in the $730,000 
(about £510,000) Mazda tour- 
nament here in Jamaica yes- 
terday the starter droned out his 
list of accomplishments for the 
benefit of the 20 spectators 
braving the 80-degree sub-tropi- 
cal heat: “$2’A million prize- 
money. 51 regular tour 
victories, inducting the 1 959 US 
Open at Winged Foot and the 
1966 US Open at the Olympic 
Club, San Francisco..." 

At the mention of the latter, 
Casper's playing opponent. Ar- 
nold Atimer, lifted his eyes 
skywards. Few watchers knew 
why but the gesture spoke 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

Hard job for 
Irvine on 
youth debut 

Great Britain have made four 
changes for the second and final 
youth international against the 
Australians at EUand Road, 
Leeds, tomorrow in an effort to 
square the series after losing the 
first match 34-2. 

Richard Irvine, of Hudders- 
field, gains his first cap on the 
wing and has the formidable 
task of marking the Australians' 
leading scorer, Darryl Harrison, 
who his taken his try tally to 10 
for the tour. 

Gary Phillips, of Dewsbury, 
comes in as prop forward, Chns 
Connelly, of Warrington, is at 
full back and Andy Raw, of 
Leeds, switches wings. 

GREAT BRITAIN YOimi TEAit 
C Comely (Warrington). R mrfne 
(Huddarsftakl). N Show (Borrow). C 

BrooaM(U6d&ARaw( 


volumes. For in the latter stages 
of that particular Open Casper 
defeated Palmer in one of the 
most astonishing reversals seen 

In the last round Casper was 
seven strokes behind Palmer 
with nine holes to play. But by 
dint of scoring three under par 
on the dosing stretch, and 
helped by some weak shots by 
the great man that looked 
perilously like “choking", the 
big Mormon caught the Penn- 
sylvanian blacksmith and then 
hammered him to defeat in the 
playoff 

Here they were “head to 
head” again, 21 years later. 

In this end-of-season event 


which pairs the top 12 seniors 
with the leading dozen women 
pros for a first prize of $500,000, 
Casper’s partner. Jan Stephen- 
son, of Australia, one of 14 
millionairesses in golfi holed an 
eight-footer for a birdie two at 
tiie 1 38-yard first to put her side 
one under in their belter-ball 
score. 

Palmer rapped a 30-footer 
three feet past and after bis 
partner, Chris Johnson, had 
duly got her three be missed. On 
the next green Palmer, after 
another miss, creaked as he bent 
to pick up his balL “Gee. man, 
you hardly made it down to that 
one,” Casper said, smiling. 


TENNIS 


Olsson predicts a 
third successive win 


Going: good to soft 
IX (2m ch) 1. JAIMTER (K Townend, 5- 
Ifc 2, SniBng Cavafior (G Landau. 9-4); 3. 
Ground Master (N Feam, 10-1)1 ALSO 
RAN: 2 lav Stubbs Daughter (4th). 15^ 
Just Martin (5thl 9 HardbrWge luri 20 
Stretch Out {1)7 ran. Kk /lOpSI, 3UL W 
Holden at Newmarket TOTEwnn ES.D0: 
®4ft Cl .30. OR es.60. CSF: E16£4- 
Alter stewards' Inquire, result stood. 
Winner sold to Rex Carter ter 1.700 
guineas. 

1.30 (2m 80yd tide) 1. WHAT A POPS 
(W Worthngton, 20-1 h 2. Four For Undte 
(R CampWTll-2); 3. Patralan (C Srratft 
S-J lav) ALSO RAN: 7-2 Gale Boy. 5 One 
Of The Lads, 11-2 Trojan God. 6 Pronuem 

Bnde (4th). M Cap D'Azure jaw. 
Lamboum Boy. Porto Irene (Mi). ® S*[J| 
Shadow (pu). 11 ran. 41, 121. sh hd. 4LSh 
hd. Mas G Rees at Scunthorpe- Toff: 
£31 20; CLOO, £2.80. 21.50. Of : £1034»- 
CSF: 2136.79. Trteast £330.76. 

tit) 1, SAM DAW** jPjMWi 




Hubbard at - ---- 
£3.10. 21.30, £3.10. 
£7454. 


n 

TOW 21520; 
£4850. CSF: 


.MASTStVmCE 


12 G Moore at MidtSaftam. Tote: £1.50; 
25 £1.10. £2^0. OF: £340. CSF: £353. 

2.15 (ten ch) 1, RULE OF TH> SEA (P 
7'“' Tuck. 7-4 taw): 2. Oonorol C hon do i (Mr J 


Tick. 7-4 tanh 2. Oonorol Ction dn i (Mr J 
Bradtaime, 5-1); 3. Ftern Sark (M 
Moeghei; 7-2). ALSO RAM 5 ADten 
Glazed (Wi), 8 Valentinos Joy (pu). 25 Hy 
Tab (4th). 33 Penw's DreamJ5lhL Victory 
Boy (puC 8 ran. NR: Hazel Bar*. 12L O. 
12l.8U2f.GRIchaixt8atGrayst0ln.Tota: . 
£3.20; EZS ft ClttL £1.10. OP. £5.7a 
CSF: £10.15 



MelboanM (AP) — Sweden's 
coach, Hans CMsson predicts a 
win for Sweden for the third 
successive year in their Davis 
Cup match against Australia 
which begins here on December 
26, despite the absence of Mats 
Wilander. 

Olsson, who arrived in Mel- 
bourne with his team on Thurs- 
day, admitted Wilander would 
be much missed. 

WDander, who is rated third 
in the world, withdrew because 
of his impending marriage say- 
ing be would not be sufficiently 
prepared. 

Despite W3ander*s absence, 
Olsson said his team was better 
and more experienced than that 
which had lost to Australia in 
the 1983 final. Stefan Ed berg, 
Anders Jarryd, Joakim 
Nystroa and Mikael Perafors 
were better used to grass courts 
than in 1983. 

Olsson said also that Ed berg 
and Jarryd. winners of the 
recent world doubles tide in 


London, would play in the 1 
doubles now that Jarryd was , 
now fully recovered from his 
knee injury. 

Peter McNamara issued a 
rebuke to his critics today who i 
regard his selection in the 
Australian team as being send- | 
mental McNamara, 31, pro- 
duced scintillating form u a 
practice session in which Neale 
Fraser, the captain, bad pot him 
np against Wally Masnr, the 
mnn be replaced in the team. 


SPORT 


CROSS-COUNTRY 


Volatile Mamede 
and Hutchings 
clash in Cardiff 

By Pat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent 


It is probably too much to 
hope that Tim Hutchings and 
Fernando Mamede will repro- 
duce the same exciting finish m 
tomorrow's international Ath- 
letes' Club race in Cardiff as at 
Alexandra Palace last year when 
Alberto Cova and Dave Lewis, 
dead-heated. 

That occasion was slightly 
tarnished when British officials 
fell unable to separate the two 
runners, although the Italian 
had evidently, if marginally, 
won. 

Hutchings is the Briton in 
form this year, and Mamede has 
the same son of success rate as 
Cova when the Portuguese is 
not running in major champion- 
ship races, when he invariably 
foils for reasons which he and a 
succession of analysts have yet 
to fothom. 

The best example is when 
Mamede set the world 
10.000 metres record of 27min 
13.8S sec in Stockholm in 1984. 
a few weeks before running off 
the track without looking un- 
duly strained in the Olympic 
race at the same distance in Los 
Angeles. 

But his most two recent visits 
to Britain have shown how well 
he can perform without cham- 
pionship pressure — hc has won 
the IAC road races in West- 
minster and York in the last two 
years. And in cross-country, he 


and Hutchings have a similar 
record. They are both reigning 
national champions and have 
also finished third in the world 
championships, Mamede in 
Madrid in 1981 and Hutchings 
in New Jersey io 1984. 

Bui Hutchings probably has 
the edge on form at tomorrow's 
distance of eight kilometres at 
the moment. The Englishman 
won the first big domestic race 
over 6.9 km at Gateshead three 
weeks ago, while Mamede was 
finishing fourth in Barcelona to 
Cad Thackerv and Steve Harris. 

Thackery ls running for the 
North of England in this race, 
sponsored by HFC Trust which 
also incorporates the English 
inter-area match and a home 
nations fixture. The other likely 
prominent runners on the I km 
lap around the grounds of 
Cardiff castle are Lewis. Sieve 
Binn& Dave Clarke. David Tay- 
lor, a former race winner, Rich- 
ard O'Flynn, of Ireland and Ed 
EyestoiHL the American, who 
finished third last year, teams up 
with Ed Cummings. 

Liz Lynch, the runaway win- 
ner at Gateshead, is resting from 
the women’s race, but Wendy 
Sly is making her comeback 
after her operation in the sum- 
mer and will meet Kirety Wade, 
of Wales, (third three weeks ago) 
and Yvonne Murray, of Scot- 
land, (fifth). 


ATHLETICS 


Long’s giant strides 


Dave Long, an office worker 
who took up running only three 
years ago, will lead Britain’s 
challenge in the World Mara- 
thon Cup in Seoul next year. 

A 26 year-old from Coventry, 
Long took more than three 
hours to run his first marathon 
in 1983. He has since made such 
giant strides that he has been 
named today as one of the four- 
strong team to tackle the quality 
international field on April 12. 

Long, who hopes to improve 
on bis personal best of two 
hours 14 minutes will be backed 


a day earlier will be Sarah 
Rowell (Dartford), Sandra 
Branney (Victoria Park), Sally 
Ellis (Worcester) and Maureen 
Hurst (Clayton-le-Moor). 


Hereford backed 

The boot will be on the other 
foot leg at Hereford on January 
3, when television will be seek- 
ing publicity from football A 
BBC TV programme — A Sort of 
Innocence - is to sponsor the 
dub's fourth division home 


raqjerienced trio of game against Torquay. Keith 
Welshman, luean Ellis (New- Butler. Herefort's commercial 
pon), and the Scots Lindsay manager said: “The writer Atick 
Robemon (Edinburgh) and Fra- Rowe fives in Hereford and he 
ser Clyne (Aberdeen). hag sponsored the game in the 

Britain's quartet in the programme which starts a six- 
equivalent marathon for women week run in January.” 

BADMINTON 


HOCKEY 


Firebrands Showdown 


withstand 

laterally 

By Sydney Frisian 

England's juniors, playing as 
the Shadows, did well to restrict 
the experienced Firebrands to a 
7-4 win in group A of the Roses 
indoor tournament at Bristol 
yesterday. It was only in the last 
seconds that Purchase scored 
the seventh goal for Firebrands, 
who had conceded three goals 
during a spirited counter-thrust 
by the Shadows. 

The inexperience of the Shad- 


looming 
for Frost 

Morten Frost, the All- Eng- 
land and European Champion, 
yesterday kept on course for a 
showdown with Yang Yang, the 
Chinese No I, in tomorrow’s 
championship deader in the 
Marlboro World Grand Prix 
finals in Kuala Lumpur. 

Frost, aged 28, from Copen- 
hagen, completed his third 
straight games victory, this time 
over Eddie Kumiawan. the 
Indonesian Thomas Cup player. 


ows was. evident in the fim half That ensures Frost finished top 
in which Firebrands, with strong of his group and qualified for the 


midfield play, ran up a >1 lead. 
But Shadows, profiling by the 
instructions from their coach, 
Neil Mallett, during the inter- 


val, came into the second half I only 


last four. He now meets the 
surprise qualifier, little-known 
Indonesian AJan Budi Kusuma. 
Kusuma qualified by beating 


England’s 


more strongly. l om monw 

An early goal by Purchase, Steve Bade 
from a corner, ana three by nesian was 
Parker, the second from a we ”11“, 
follow-up at a comer, gave European si 
Firebrands a 4-0 lead after Frcdnksen \ 
which Shadows, who were a playing fi 
little slack with their drill, successive di 
squandered three comers. Bates Kusuma ana 
increased the lead to 5-0 before w, “- . B 5“ dl 


Commonwealth champion 
Steve Baddeiey. The Indo- 
nesian was further assisted by 
the toe injury that caused the 


-me toe injury that caused the 
European silver medallist lb 
Fredriksen to concede without 
playing for the second 
successive day, officially giving 
Kusuma another straight games 
win. Baddeiey. meanwhile. 


Nail obtained the first goal for I pulled off an outsta n d in g 1 l-IS v 


Shadows. 

In the second half McGuire 
(iwo) and Takher, from a pen- 
alty stroke, scored for Shadows 
with Parker and Purchase reply- 
ing for Firebrands. 

Roses, the England senior 
team, beat Teddington 4-2 in 
group B. 

• Outdoor competition has 
been, suspended this weekend 
except in the Pizza Express 
London League. Blackheath at 
the bottom of the table are at 
home to Richmond in the only 
premier division match today. 
Blackheath have never been 


The pair played only one set «!“.* same since they lost 


but McNamara took 25 minutes 
only to demolish bis younger 
opponent 6-1. Yet, McNamara 
remains aware that he will be 
hard pressed to force himself 
into contention for a place in the 


BOXING 


own. 

. 25 mnalNuL 3 3 B arrera *2 
l Tknsan. 41. 51 (®iw»Bd 2T2?! 


2 ft-fav Prince Carlton (4th). 1» HB » 
Stone (urt. 8 Southern Prinqa (fte). 

Orchid (ft 25 Basil’s Choice Ok HoBow 




lho. 12 nn. — 

distances not ava8antedueK> 
fefer a). M Tompkins arttaymojftet 
g«00; £1-90. S5o. £2.00. Of: £49.10. 
CSF: £51.07. Tricast £105.44. 

. Ptoeepofc 

Ayr 

Gong homes, heavy; chase, soft 

« B ftLi«sris , aa 


2.45 (2m 41 CM 1, SKOOLER PRINCE (C 
Grant, iMfcZ.Cenfce Attraction (P Tuck, 
4-9 fe>* 3. Wardsotf (J Hansen. 8-1). 3 
ran. 9, tfsLF Watson nSsOoefleULTotB: 1 
£3.60. OF: £1£0. CSF: £417. 


Roman to stay busy 


3.15 (2m hdJa) 1, MBS TER POINT (G 
Bradley. 1-4 taw 2. Treyemon (D Notan. 
12-1); 3. FenchuKh Colony (M Entis, 14- 
U ALSO RAN: 02 Heny Measure ‘ 

12 Crash Market m. 33 Tofy's Tonic 
68 Mwcuriua (Still, TkttJysyetya m vu 1 
rt Suggestion (4thL 0 ran. iffl. 15LO. | 
12). C rnWer at i&tton. Tote: £1.40; , 
£1.00. £3.10. £450. DR &20. CSR 
£6.05. 

Ptacepot £888.28. 

• Bangor abandoned — course 
waterlogged. 


HQSSMMm Injured again 

a6aDF?£26-60. CSF: £42£3. Mark Pitman, who only re- 


wet*. 4-ft ALSO RAN: 6 5eaniyroy. 
Highland TWa (4th), 1< Sandron (Sthj. W 
Mewwcm, 20 CarewMatemsjfl^ 
Footed (6th), Helen's Pteasura. Nomam 
Caste. Frits Close 
Hrisanon. Lady Brthop (puL 
13. 51 IL N Categhan ri 

Tgto- £3.80 CMC; £1-10. 

£3.00. CSR £11.08. . 


£3,6oTdF: E2&60. CSF: 242J3. 

1.15 (3m llOwfeh) 1, flSFBE6(Mt|» A 
Beaumont. 33-1L 2, Ctawoche Swat (R 
S^2)T3. Bu^rfltth Boy (C Gram, 
n-e farl ALSO RAN: 5 ESSterBro (ur). 
u Corker (4t#i). 7 Tlw BuMer ij- 1 raa 
NR: Beau N’/doL 11. 41, MreG Barite 
at Tadcastsr. Tote: £15.50: £11iM.j1«50. 
DF: £2.40 (wiraw or second “Wi any 

oltwr horse). CSP. £188.75. _ 

1 as (2m hdte) 1. COOL of HIKE ft* 
Hemm«!d-44tei^2.aMiimg0riteyP 


waro. 14-1). also RAM: iMfcw&eninfl 


turned from injury last week, is 
back in the wars again, after 
breaking his collar bone while 
schooling at his mother’s 
Lamboum yard. “He was 
partnering a novice when he was 
tipped up al a ditch. He’s got to 
see a specialist before we will 
know bow bad the injury is, but 
be is going to be out for a good 
two weeks”, said Jenny Pitman’. 


Bangkok (Reuter) — Gilberto 
Roman, of Mexico, retained his 
World Boxing Council super- 
flyweight title yesterday when he 
outpointed Kongtoranee Paya- 
kariin, of Thailand: He still 
plans no rest despite making 
four successful defences since 
winning the title from Hire 
Watanabe, of Japan, on March 
30. 

Rafael Mendoza, the pro- 
moter, said Roman, one of the 
world's busiest champions, 
would now begin training on 
January 2 to lake on Antoine 
Montero in France, although the 
Mexican had to battle for sur- 
vival in the fifth round against 
the Thai challenger before his 
superior footwork and ringcraft 
strategy paid dividends. 

Roman, aged 23, bad pre- 
dicted a knockout, but found 
himself evenly matched in a 
defensive battle in the early 
rounds and on the ropes in the 
fifth when be had to dig deep 
into his resources to turn the 


contest his way. Throughout the 
last four rounds of the 12-round 
fight be was firmly in control 
through probing left jabs. 

The far more experienced 
Mexican, who entered the ring , 
at the age ofl 1, then unleashed ! 
a finely paced campaign that left | 
the Thai exhausted, bleeding 
from the nose, while his eyes 
were neatly, dosed when the 
bout ended, but for once ihe 
Mexican failed to fUlfil his 
reputation as a knockout 
specialist. 

The three judges scored the 
match 114-113, 115-113 and 
il 6-1 1 4, all for the champion, to 
give Roman his 39th victory in 
43 outings. It was Kongtoranee’s 
first defeat in 10 outings. 

“Roman is a wry good 
champion.” Mendoza said. “He 
is ready to defend anywhere. He 
went to Argentina to fight 
Santos Laciar, 10 Venezuela to 
meet Edgar Monserrat and came 
here to fight Kongtoranee.” 


The Swedish team practised 
alongside the Australians bat 
did not attempt any head-to- 
head matches, concentrating in- 
stead on adjusting to the grass 
courts. 


BASKETBALL 

UWTED STATES; Nauooai Ana Bate i 
(NBA): Mftwftw Bucks 104. Altana Hawks 
95: LOS An ge l as Laftns 131. Poitmd Trafl 
“ — - 115: CNeageBuBs 97. ttk&ana Pacers 
NenS4.MewVaritKncii&83; 

OS 117. Los Annan* Cflmnre 

113: wasimnon eutais 128. 

Warriors 11&. Seattle SupersorMcs 114. 
Houston Rochets 100. Utah jbq 107. 0»tit 
Potore 122; Phoenix Suns 81, 5ai Among 
Sours 34: Indiana Pacers 101 .Boston Celtics 
113. Omriand Cwraten 110. Ph&adatfita 
76ars*07. 


their international centre-half. 
Daved. who moved on to Indian 
Gymkhana. 

Richmond, fifth in the table, 
seem to have stronger resources 
with Westcott in the forward 
line, Newton in midfield and 
Daubeney in defence to guide 


15-11, 18-16 win 
Helen Troke, the England No 
I. saw her chances ended with- 
out quibble, 1 1-3, 1 1-1 by 
China's Zheng YulL Two 
British hopes in the mixed 
doubles survived, however, to 
meet Swedish combinations in 
the last four. The Anglo-Scottish 
pairing of Nora Perry and Billy 
Gilliland play Thomas 
Kihlstrom and Christine 
Magnusson, while Nigel Tier 
and Gillian Gowers meet world 
silver medallists Stefan 
Karlsson and Maria Bengtsson. 
RESULTS: (round robin): Man's (Max 
T Carl sen (Den) M N Yates (GBI 15-8T15- 
8: Y Yang (China) bt R Smek (Mai) 15-10, 
15-7: S Baddeiey (G&) bt M Sxfefc (Mai) 8- 
15. 15-10. 18-lS: A Bud) Kaauma ffindo) bt 
I Fredartksden (DenL scratched; M Frost 
(Den) bt E Kumawen (Indo) 15-8, 15-11; D 
HaU (GB) &i J-P NtartioH (Dsn) 6-15, 15-3. 
15-11. Women’s gkigtes: L UngwraJ 
(China) bt C Magnusson (Sm) 4-11, fi-i, 
1 1-4; S Kttada (Jap) bt J Phoon (Maf) 12-9. 
11-1. Z Yuli icrmai M M Troke (GB) 11-3, 
li-i.Men'e doubles: RStoekanoJStdek 


their fortunes. Guildford, at the (fftf 

top of ihe percentage teague, stiD mSw S 

unbeaten, are unaffected by (Swa) 17-18. is-4, is-5: Women’s don- 
indoor commitments for their an i l J^ a 

home match against Beck- dSiL^BML^NP^GBjSA 
enham. Goode and F Btoi (G8) 15-2, 15-2. 


FOR THE RECORD 




ICE HOCKEY 

MOSCOW: IzwteiB StMiaboM HwMneHb 
mind robin): Finland 5, CsechostorakB 5; 
Hand 3. USSR Z 
NORTH AMEIOCfc 
Hsrtlord WTialofs b, Boston Biurs'S; Ptiaoet- 
“ ” i 8. New York Menders 4: 

North Sore S, Toronto Mapte 

Leals 5; Si Lnte Bhm 3, WlnnqMg Job 3; 
Wgwy Ftarw 6. Quebec Noroquoa Z 


BILLIARDS 

BRISTOL; Monarfka world pratesahwal 
d wp ro nri ap: Find round: G Thompson 
(Eng) ot J fi&maurice (Eng), JM); C Evertai 
Jv5a)DiH&iw*(w«.a-i. 

BOXING 


ihip: G Roman (Mex) ts K Payakarun ffto). 
pts- 

CRICKET 

SYOfteY: ShertMd SMatt Second aavr 
Sokan AisrtrUa <93 (A Wlfltoh 131 . G B»iop 
135. D O'Connor 120; WMns* 5471 v New 
South Wales. 6* for 0 

PEHTH Sheffield Stem Second dar Vto- 
Bna 293 * Wtetem Australia 275 far 7 ok. (W 
Aittowa 89. V Uafks EG; u Hughe* 4-58). 

FOOTBALL 

SOUTH EAST COUNTIES LEAGUE: League 
Cup quartarjtaafc Waat Ham 2, Arsenal I 


NORDIC SKIING 

0BBTTAUSM, Anatria: Mente World Cop 
bMMon (20 k» awuhcsantrvfc 1. W 
MMweaaw (USSR) inr lOmm 4teec 2. F 
OUedeK (dij 1:13,105; 3. A Pppow (USER 
1:13 .19 BraMiposHoraE41,PL«R.iS932 
(3mm panaltyt 45. M Dixon. 12ft52 i0mn 
oonaityt 52. T Hu 1-2226 (8mm pen diyk 
54, C tones, 12241 (4nn penalty), 67, T 
Bomoerg. 12S37 (7mm panatiy); 78, M 
Langm, 12037 (7mm penalty) 

Womnte Eurapean Cap HaMoo tlDkm 
cTow-countryt 1. E Korpela (SweL 45mm 
17 6sec 2. SrO Lunde [ttort. 47:i4.£ 3. A-E 
BrtfcDWi (Nor), 4*238. 


RUGBY UNION 


SCHOOLS UAT€K3fc Mempehxe 6. Rosatyn 
Parte 11 

WlUAM YOUNGER FLOOOUT CUP: HnM. 
“-'-“ULUomheterB. 

C0UNIY CHAWfOM- 
SWP:Kant26,Suafi«<6. 

CLUB HATCH: Martng 4, QU 9oys2a 


TENNIS 

POMPANO BEACH, Fkxida: CMteenU 
nawa Cup Junior tounamcnC Singles 
quarter m ala . Spam 3. France 0. PcpW ea: 
Spam M France, datautt; CzechostovaMa 2. 
West Germany 1. 

oueors club: bwta cm«mb *xm- 
menb Wom en % e e ig tea r — **• S Timms M T 
Cam. 4^. 7-8. 83. 14 and iBtder gUV final; 

A Sorknot E Bond M,W. Seeood rouxt S 
Suttvan bt A Remteg 5-3, 4-6, 


Twins banned 

Warsaw (Reuter) - Polish 
identical twin wrestlers have 
been suspended from com- 
petition for two years for chang- 
ing places in a league 
championship bouL the official 
PAP news agency reported. 


Top of the class 

Danny Sapsford (Surrey) and 
Sue McCarthy (Avon) will take 
a break from their A-Jevel 
studies to defend their Pruden- 
tial British junior indoor titles — 
they are the under-18 * top 
seeds - at Queen's Club, start- 
ing on December 29. 


I 


***** SL 


SPORT/BROADCASTING THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 — ’ 

FOOTBALL; THE RED-HAIRED LANCASHIRE TERRIER CANNOT WAIT TO DIVE STRAIGHT BACK IMTf> THE P0G FIGHT . 

From part-time to 


Portsmouth told to go 
out and battle for the 
right to play the game 


Alan Ball remains un- 
repentant One week after the 
proud name of Portsmouth 
was sullied by iis deep im- 
plication in the most notori- 
ous football match played in 
England for 31 years. Ball 
declared yesterday that he 
would instruct his players to 
do exactly the same against 
Barnsley at Fratton Park 
today. ' 

Bait who watched in dis- 
belief at B ram all Lane last 
Saturday as three of his play- 
ers and one from Sheffield 
United were sent off before 
half-time, said: “I shall tell 
them the same as I did last 
week, to go out and fight for 
the right to play their 
football." 

When Ball was appointed 
manager three seasons ago he 
called Portsmouth a “street 
fighting" city, an unfortunate 
choice of words given last 
week's events. But he ex- 
plained: “People have fought 
for the right to live here; they 
have a right to expect their 
team to do the same." 

The 41 -year-old red-haired 
Lancashire terrier cannot wait 
to dive straight back into the 
dog fight at the top of the 
second division after what he 
described as “the longest week 
of my life". He said: “It got 
out of hand last Saturday. I 
mean, you have crazy days in 
your life. Now the players 
have got to restore the pride of 
the club and their own. But 
you never know, it could have 
a lasting effect upon them. 
They’ve been noticably less 
chirpy in training this week." 

After two consecutive sea- 
sons of heartbreak which have 
seen Portsmouth slip out of 
the frame in the promotion 
race just a few yards from the 
post. Ball and his players are 
determined to avoid this 
particular treble. The reason 
for their failure. Ball believes, 
is because they did not do 
what they set out to do last 
week — match the northerners 
for muscle and desire. 

As one himself Ball is only 
too aware of how northerners 


By Clive White 

can “lake the milk out of your 
teeth”. He said; “It's not the 
team you play against it’s the 
places you have to go to. 
When we leave the lovely 
south coast we’ve got to go to 
Huddersfield. Bradford, 
Leeds. Blackburn. Hull, 
Grimsby, Shrewsbury. Old- 
ham. We've got about 12 of 
them in the cold of winter. It 
ain't 'alf hard for a team who 
piav good footbalL 
“You’ve got to fight for the 
right to match them for effort 




'ym& 


lyraai^ 


JSk 

Ball: unrepentant 

before your ability can come 
out. It's the same in boxing, 
cricket or any other sport. If 
there's one thing a first di- 
vision club dread in the Cup, 
it's to hear their name follow- 
ing on from 'Huddersfield will 
play . . Nobody wants to go 
to these places but we have to 
— and it's not just a one off." 

Ball bemoaned the inconsis- 
tencies in refereeing. “I 
watched a game 24 hours after 
our one in which five players 
would have been sent off had 


vinced that a no-appeal sys- 
tem for sendings off was die 
best. “I am thinking more and 
more there should be room for 
appeal within the 14 days 
before suspensions take effect 
other than for just mistaken 
identity." As for cautions and 
suspensions for dissent, which 
figured prominently in the 
Sheffield game, he was less 
sympathetic. “No one is going 
to change a' referee’s mind 
about a decision." 

Portsmouth say they have 
not decided yet whether to 
discipline the three players 
concerned, Dillon, Gilbert 
and Tait, but Taylor sai± 
“The best influence on disci- 
pline has to come from the 
club. We don’t want players 
playing with handbags over 
their arms but there’s a matter 
of being hard and fair. The 
biggest influence on a player is 
the manager — I know from 
when I was playing — for good 
or bad." 

Ball insists that no manager 
ever told him to go out and 
hurt people or do something 
that would get him sent off 
He maintains that he treats his 
players the way he would like 
to be treated as a player. 
“Because I was a bit naughty 
when I was younger, people 
think this is how I am now." 

But Ball confesses that his 
ambitions have not changed. 
“As a kid I wanted to be the 
best player in England. Now I 
want to be the best manager." 
It was coincidental that the 
Sheffield shame for Bail fol- 
lows an article by a player with 
whom he played at Blackpool 



By David Powell 

no room for .hr b«.« .be> .hoosh. i. -« * 


There is no room m 

manager's office in the football ' ^ys be is fornwaro to 
gnnnzd at Northampton. And. tf a tf hard-working 

not for the fact thatcnckd lisa tf nhom g in 

semmer Sr or four days a week to the 


n>«m for the footballers either, 
AX the end of each season, the 


Ground, home of 

e nmawav leaders of the amptons ^ 


the runaway leaders « 

fourth division, looks as though 
It has been bmh for a temporary 



places the emphasis an ftoesn 

training- At Weymonlb he ha* 
his players fanning across 


fitaset. TV stand which ran the his JZ?” 

rf « side dnring the beadles. M 

S3 m flit- mid- assault course ana now msg 


first dtaswn days In the mid- assault coot 
1960s has been knocked down to cnres-couBtrj 
comply with safety regulations, relay seswo 

sZ- _ ■-* - -- mus tome ill fhe I 


cross-country rnns and track 
relay sessions are weekly fea- 


cannuT WIUI IEB hhuw« -- — J . . f Vnerirttaw. 

In its place is a miniatu re one, tores in the lives of ojorreu^h 
which provides the only seats in ion players. I c _ 7*** 


which provides the only seats m ion players. l <■ act* act 

the boose, aS 430 of them, two months and ha*e never don 
“With the scoots we’re getting so much running m au my We, 


tfck season, there arc none left Irving Gernon. an expe rience d 
far anyone efee,” says a smiling defender on Joan from Ipswich 


Graham Carr, the manager who Town. says. 


is dearly enjoying his dob’s 

new-found attention. 


The transformation 
is due to two men 


Big day ahead: Liam O’Brien yesterday at Old Tntffoni, where he wffl make his debut for 
Manchester United against Leicester City today 


Chelsea far from a lost cause 
Pleat warns Tottenham 


they been playing in front of suggesting that Ball would 
our referee. They've got it so have been the ideal choice for 


water-tight There's no right of the managership of Manches- 
appeaL the referee is always ier United. “Tm not searching 
right If anyone mentions for accolades because I had 


anything about them they're 
bringing the game into 
disrepute and fined up to 
£300. You have to take h on 
the chin. There's nothing else 
you can do.” 

Gordon Taylor, the sec- 
retary of the Professional 
Footballers' Association, 
admitted he was not con- 


them as a player. Those 
managers who look for ac- 
colades were never great 
players." 

with the disappointment of 
his ill-fated return to Black- 
pool as a player-manager well 
behind him. Ball is bent on 
succeeding this time with 
Portsmouth - 


TODAY’S TEAM NEWS 


Arsenal v Luton 
HBfl is set to return for Luton 
after five weeks 1 absence. North is 
also added to last week’s 
squad. Nicholas returns as 
substitute for Arsenal. 


Chelsea v Spurs 
Allen has shrugged off a 
midweek injury but Close is 


included as wefl in a squad of 
1 3 which includes Andes. Claes on 
plays for the reserves. 

Chelsea's injury Bst has shortened 
to Hazard. Murphy, McAUster 
and Dune. Wicks is overlooked. 


Charlton ▼ Liverpool 


Liverpool, already without 
Motoy and Johnston, have tost 
Venison with a back injury. 

Wark, Abiett and Watson are 
included in a squad of 1 4. 

Johns, unavailable because of 
suspension, may now be 
unavailable because of injury - to 
his shoulder. Bolder, who spent 
two years at Anfieid without playing 
a first-team game, stands by. 


Nottm F v Southampton 

Forest drop Bcwyer, the 
captain, and bring back MiBs 


Oxford v A Villa 

Just as Villa welcome back 
Williams. Bfiott and Keown from 
suspension and Birch from 
injury so they lose Hodge with a 
virus. Oxford wffl probably be 
unchanged though Briggs wifi need 
a test on his ankle. Phullps, 
returning from suspension, is the 
likely substitute. 


against a Southampton side 
wno have conceded 25 goals in 
nine away games. Birtles 
returns in place of Starbuck. Dennis 
is straggling to overcome 
tonsfltitis for Southampton. 


Everton v 
Wimbledon 
Reid is back as the Everton 
substitute. He has not played since 
June. Wimbledon add Gage and 
Morris to last week's 1 2. 


West Ham v QPR 

Stewart has failed to recover 
from a hamstring strain. Potts wfll 
probably continue to deputize 
though Watford has been added to 
the squad. Dawes ends a ran of 
187 consecutive league 
appearances because of a 
sprained ankle. FDIery. who has not 
played since March because of 
bade trouble, returns to the squad. 


Man Utd v Leicester 
Ramsay is included in a 
Leicester squad that is without 
Walsh because of injury and 
Venus who is suspended. O'Brien, 
United's recent signing, makes 
his debut in place of the injured 
Moses and Colin Gibson plays 
his first league game since August 
because onnjury to Duxbury. 
Stapleton stands by for Davenport, 
who has a rib injury. 


Tomorrow 


Coventry v Man City 
Pickering, who was poised to 
miss last week's game (eventually 
postponed! because of a 
stomach bug, maintains his ever- 
present record for Coventry. 
Adams deputizes for McGrath. 
Manchester Qty w9 be without 
Greafish (hamstring) and possftjty 
Gfdman (thtgh). Baker plays 
with Raw and May on stand by. 


David Pleat, the Tottenham 
Hotspur manager, expects to 
face the severest test today from 
the worst side in the first 
division. The Chelsea players, 
whose fortunes last week sunk 
as low as they could go. to the 
bottom of the first division 
table, will be playing for their 
own futures as well as tfaai of the 
club. Pleat said. 

“ft is a difficult game at this 
stage of the season for whoever 
is playing them because they 
have lost their last two games. 
Sooner or later they are going to 
get a good result. There’s a great 
incentive for any Chelsea player 
right now because as soon as 
they win a game, John Hollins is 
likely to stick with that team." 
Pleat said. 

For the first time in months 
Hollins was able to announce 
his team the day before a game, 
ironically at the end of a week 
when his casualty list stretched 
into double figures. Dixon and 
Nevin have been declared fit 
and the injured absentee list has 
shrunk to Hazard - formerly of 
Tottenham - Murphy. 
McAllister and Dune. Wicks, 
who submitted a written trans- 
fer request this week, has again 
been overlooked. 

The biggest obstacle for the 
Chelsea players remains Stam- 
ford Bridge and their own 
supporters, though Hollins 
acknowledged that they were a 
great source of encouragement 
last week at Anfieid in the 
televized game which dem- 
onstrated only too vividly the 


By CEve While 
in some trouble at the time and 
they came and got a result. 

“I think Hollins has coped 
very welL He’s remained very- 
calm through it afl. It's never 
easy for a manager when things 
are not going well but someone 
has lo be rock bottom.'" 

One side who seem to be 
turning the comer are Manches- 
ter United, who have also been 
troubled this week by injuries 
and are forced to field Liam 
O'Brien, recently signed from 
Shamrock Rovers, in midfield 


surrendered two-goal leads in 
the las: week, keep Sutii in 
Walsh, las: week's !S-y ear-old 


At their present rate North- 
ampton wiQ reach 116 points, 
which would comfortably out- 
strip the League record of 102 
held by Swindon Town. 

In Richard HiH they have (he 
League's leading scorer on 20 
goals and it is his e x traordinary 
strike me for a midfield player 
which no doubt attracted Ron 
leafs, the Liverpool chief scoot, 
to test week's FA Cop tie against 
| Southen d Un it ed. B ut Carr as- 
[ suits Northampton supporters.* 
{ **Wc want to get out of the fonith 


debutant in goaL Their main f s****®- 


division and we won't be selling cessor, Tony Barton, has been 


c o ncern seems to be Davenport, 
their outstanding player East 
week when he scored twice 
ggaimt Aston Villa. He has no: 


Less than two years ago 
Venhamptoe were bottom of the 
Leagoe and had just played to 


impressed by the new inc umb e nt 
of the post. “He has broug ht 
good players in from nan- 
Leagw and allows them to 


trained all wesk because ofa rib I SJ42. The transformation and 


their lowest ever attendance of express themselves,** nmjjiim 


injury received m that game and 
wiii be required to pass a fitness 
;aa- Stapleton is in reserve. One 
player who does appear to have 
mended is Cofin Gibson, out 
since tbs second match of the 


their now sound firanwiai struc- 
ture can be traced to two men. 
But here Is one in the face for the 
traditional cornerstones of 
experience nod continuity. 
When the pair came together in 


Manager Carr has 
‘street credibility’ 


in place of the injured Moses 
against Leicester City. The ob- 


against Leicester City. The ob- 
vious replacement. Blackmore, 
is unfit, but .Alex Ferguson, the 
manager, said of 0"Brien: “He 
is not yet the finished article 
because be has only been train- 
ing with us for two months but 
he has lots of ability and a good 
temperament. He is also capable 
of scoring outside the box." 

United, who have twice 


season with a harassing injury. I April last year neither had 
He replaces Duxbury. who has’a! ** they were 


knee injury. 

At Upton Park a run of 
appearances. IS? of them, come 
to an end for Dawes, the 
Queen's Park Rangers full back, 
who turned an ankle in training. 
Rangera can iD afford ;o lose 
him for the derby against West 
Ham United after their recent 
bad run 


Reading rubbish Albion 

By Chris Moore kick, allowing Bremner to sei 


West Bromwich Albion . 1 
Reading — - 2 


West Bromwich Albion were 
subjected to chains of “what a 
load of rubbish’’ from their 
supporters as their promotion 
hopes took an unexpected 
knock at the Hawthornes last 
night as Reading easily recorded 
their first win in five games. 

The Albion defence was 


gulf between top and bottom, caught cold from the outset 
Meat believes V 131 . ^ an 8 conceding two goals in the 


neat _ Deneves mar racing conceding two goals in the 
Tottenham will^ give them a opening 14 minutes. 


great incentive. “Everyone likes 
to beat Spurs. When Chelsea 


Ironically, ft was former West 

Brora goalkeeper, Barron, who 


came to White Hart Lane earlier was instrumental in setting up 
in the season they played as Reading’s opener. 


though they were fighting for 
their lives even then. They were 


Cowdrifl made a hash of 
trying to clear Barron's long goal 


kick, allowing Bremner to set 
Williams away on the right. His 
cr o ss was measured to perfec- 
tion for Brenner to plant a 
header ora of Naylor’s reach. 

The comedy of errors contin- 
ued with Whitehead mis-kick- 
ing another intended clearance 
to lei in Senior to coolly convert 
his 14th goal of the season. 

Albion's problems continued 
when they were reduced lo 10 
men after Dyson had limped off 

Crooks finally soared an 
opportunist consolation goal 

WEST BROMWICH ALBION: S Naylor C 
WMtebeed. 8 Cowfefi. C Palmer. P 
Dyson, M Singleton. R Hopkins. C 
Anderson. S Mackenzie, B W tejuBon . G 
Crooks. 

READING: P Bonn: C Baffie. S Richard- 
son. S Bevcn, R Han* S Wood. G 
\mams.LTsitar.CSanior.K&Bimwr.N 
Sndtto. D Horrix. 

(tateraerRGfcOfcnL 


| entering. 

Carr had never managed a 
League dub and the rirerwaan, 
Derek Banks, was nothing more 
to the game than an occasional 
supporter of Watford. “When l 
came I didn't know anything 
about footbalL” Banks con- 
fesses. But his tobacco company 
now has a 78 per cent 
shareholding and there is no 
question of the dub folding as 
there was two years ago. 

The people tf Northampton, 
where football talk is in vogue 
again, might shudder to learn 
that when first ap- 

proached the dub he was not 
taken seriously. He recalls: *T 
had been standing on the ter- 
races at Watford with Mick 
Conroy, who is now a director 
and fives in Northampton. We 
had Jnst watched them lose a 
Milk Cop quarter-final against 
Sunderland and as we left the 
ground Mick asked me ft I 
fancied baying a football dob. I 
sent my accountant up to North- 
ampton but nobody met him 


Northampton's success in the 
counter-attack — “we get the 
ball forward early," says Mot- 
ley, the skipper — has helped 
them become by for and away 
the League's most prolific scor- 
ers. Their S3 goals (Nottingham 
Forest are next os 4 21 hare been 
shared by every outfield player. 

Carr's telephone is forever 
ringing at his office in the 
Cobblers' shop opposite Che 
ground. Ha Cakes every calk 
from managers and supporters 
alike. “He's got street 
aedibflfty," says Alas Taft, a 
former Northerns cricketer now 
helping to administer the foot- 
ball dob lottery and referring lo 
Carr’s mUSagness to mix with 
all the game's social classes. 

Bat if there is one thing likely 
to please Carr more than 
credibility in Northampton it 
awaits ban in Newcastle on 
January 10. That is the day be 
takes his team to the Land of first 
divisioa giants in the FA Cup 
third round. And where better to 
have his finest footballing hour 
than in the town where he was 
barn? 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


SATURDAY ^sua 


"Tv-.IWf 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL AND OTHER FIXTURES 


Kick-off 3.0 unless stated * 

First division 

Arsenal v Luton 

Chartton v Liverpool 

Chelsea v Tottenham 

Everton v Wimbledon 

Manchester Utd v Leicester 

Nottingham F v Southampton 

Oxford v A VHfa 

West Ham v QPR ' 


Second division Third division 

Huddersfield vC Palace Bournemouth v Blackpool 

Portsmouth v Barnsley Bristol C v Bolton 

fisuithom I Mniw Bury v Walsall -™ 


FA TROPHY: Rrat round: Altrincham * 
Crook: Barking v Weymouth; Barnet v 
Woking; Barrow v Whfttey Bay; Bishop 


Portsmouth v Barnsley 

Southern League 

Premier division 

Basingstoke v Gosport 

Fisher v Atvechurch 

Kings Lynn v WiDenhaB 

Redd itch v Folkestone 

Salisbury v Bedworth 

Witney v Shepshed 


Newport v Rothwtram 
York v Fulham 


Auckland v Runcorn |3.la 
FricMey, Bromsgrove v Rhyl; Cambridge 
Oty v Tooting and Mitcham; Cheknatorav 
Sutton Utd; Cheltenham v Dulwich Ham- 
let: Corby v Ashford: Crawley v Bath: 
Dagenham v Harrow: Enfield v Aylesbury: 
Gatnsbanxjgh Trinity v South Bank 
Grantham v Btyth Spartans; Httchln v 


Grantham v Btyth Spartans; Httchln v 
Bonham Wood: Kettering v Yeorifc 
KtddBT mt natar v Mosstey; Marine v Leak; 
Merthyr v Dartftmfc Newcastle Btoe Star v 
Stafford: Northwich v Burton; Saltesh v 
Fareham; Scarborough v Morecambe; 
Southport V Gateshead; Tottord v Nunea- 
ton; Trowbridge v Bishop's Stanford; 
weaistone * Makfctone; Waning v St 
Atoans; Weston-super-Mare v Worthing; 


Midland division 

Bridgnorth v Covtry S 

Gloucester v VS Rugby 

Leic'str U v Leam’gtn 

Mite Oak v Banbury 

Moor Gn v WSMngbro ... 

Rushden v Hedn’sfrd 

Sutton C v Forest Gn 


VauxhaN-Opel League 

Premier dfvisJon 

Bog nor v Kingstonlan 

Hayes v Hendon 

Slough v Carshalton 

First division 

Billericay v Leyton W . 

Grays A v Kingsbury 

Lewes v Rnchley 

Leytonstone v Hampton 

Staines vSouthwick — 

Uxbridge v Tibury — 

HALLS BREWERY HELLEMC LEAGUE 


Fourth division 

Aldershot v Crewe 

Cambridge v Rochdale 

Preston v Orient — 

Swansea v Colchester 

Torquay v Peterborough — 
Wolverhampton v Southend .. 


Multipart League 

Caernarfon v WbrWngton 

Chorieyv Oswestry 

Wrtionv Bangor 


BASKETBALL 


Scottish premier division 

Cefttov Aberdeen 

Dundee Utd v Hearts 

FaOdrk v Dundee 

Hamilton v Rangers 

Hibernian v Motherwell 

St Mirren v Clydebank 

Scottish first efivisiofi 

Brechin v Morton 

Dumbarton v Forfar (2IJ) . — 

Dun f e rml i ne v Clyde 

E Fife v Airdrie 

Ktim a mock v Montrose 

Psrtk* v Queen of Sift 



BPRDEB &asas^^ 


ry l-OOpm-l-SO Farming Outlook an FaO 
(WaSoBUtemo 4JW-SJM Ratum o( the 


CEN T ML ^a S>| 

l-OOpm-l -30 drew 230 Hart ro Hart 330 




ANGLIA 

Sounds LBnCMttnn, dose. 


division (8JQ: Mapper Eater BrackneS 
Prates v HomeSpa re Bo Uon and Bury; 
BPCC Rams Derby v BCP London: Team 


PofyeeB Kingston v Bfmringham Bidets 
i&Jaq); _ Sharp. Manchester United y 


Scottish second division 

Albion v Stirling 

AHoa v Stranraer 

Arbroath v Raith 


SSBBSSiSSaZffia 

channel aeasiaa. 


GRAMPi 



122Gam The Who Fiwl Concert 130 
Closedown: 




Southern division 

Burnham v Andover ... 


(2.15): Premier dMmm: Hounslow v 
Moreton (3.0); PenftN • Bicester; Pegaeua 


Moreton (3.0); PenhM * 
Juniors v Siftermarinc 

Thame; Shortened v 




Cowdenbeath v Berwick 

^fSrtsniniSi w Awr 


Canterbury v Chatham Sgrpness: Abingdon Untied v Morris 

CortrittUan v Woodford 


Port v Plymouth Raiders; Tower Hamlets v 
OUtaam Celtics (&0): Team WaisaO v T F 
Group Cleveland. 


Meadowbank v Ayr : — — 

Queen's Park v E Stilting 

St Johnstone vStenhsmufr 


GRAMPMW ^gg 

num 1J20 Reflections, Ctosedown. 


GRANADA&gSjgg 

Wonder MS Closedown. 


Wycombe v Lsaifcarhead. 

FA VASE: Tbhd round: Havent v Doridng; 
Rossendate v Draytsden (1.45); Bucking- 
ham v westflekfe Throe Bridges v 
Yeadlno; Horsham v Hertford; 
Mangcttsfiflld v Newport IOW. Third round 
replays: Emtey v Seaton Detavat Wisbech 
v Pagent; Halesowen v Walton: Barton 
Rovers v VauxhaU Mob’s; Torrington v 
Abingdon Town II -45) 
vau Shall -Opel league Second 
<8vWon north: Wrranho'; v Haringey; 
Wblverton v Hamel Hempstead. Second 
dviafon south: Banstead v Hsrofiatd: 
Eastbourne United v Woking; Marlow v 
Pstorstieid. 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Bristol 
Rovers v Watford; Luton v West Ham 
(2.0): Reacting v Ipswich (2.0); Souttm^ 
ion v Chelsea (2.0): Tottenham v MhvaV 

SM^NOFF BUSH LEAGUE <2.15 unless 
Stated): Aids V Cotartene; Ballymena v 


Dorchester v Hastings U 

Dover vErith 

Gravesend v Sheppey U 

Thanet Uv RuisHp 

Tonbridge v Poole 


BASS NORTH WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Fint dhriatoc Accrington Stan- 
ley v Congietom Curzon Asmon v Fleet- 
wood: Eastwood Hanley v Biracougir. 

id Motors: (Mam v 
Kirikby * RadcSKe: 
v Bootle; Penrith v SI Helens. 


replay: Easington Sports v Charibury 

AND BUCKS SENIOR CUP: Hrat 
round: FtacfcweB Heath v 

Hazels (Ayicebrey) v Makte 

Mflton Iteynes Borough vNew BradwaB St 
Peter; Tnatcham v Newport Pagnefc 
Windsor end Eton v Wantage; We&igford 

v Winslow . 

WSSEX LEAGUE; Portals v Eastleigh; 
Portsmouth v Homdean: Road Sea v 


HANDBALL 

BRITISH LEAGUE: Leicester 73 V Great 
Dane (1.30) 


Htwanc Steynteqw Sholng Sports. 
SUSSEX COUNTY LEAGUE j2.Si: Cop; 
First round: Newhaven v Eastbourne 
Town; Storrington v Lradna First <S- 
rtston: Arundef v STtoreham; Burgess tD 
v Horsham YMCA (3-0); Hailsham v 
Haywards Heath; U Hte hampton w Chlch- 
ester. Pesoehavan and Telscombe v wide 

PgftflaW V WWtahBwK- 
ESSEX seeon TROPHY: TbW round: 
Harwich and Parteston v Saffron Walden; 
Haytxtdgo Swifts v Harlow; Tlptrea v 
Homchureh; Halstead v Braintree. 

ESSEX LEAGUE: Senior Section: 
Bruhriinmaa v Burnham; Convey Island v 
Wtthant; East Thurrock v East Hem; Eton 
Manor v Savftndg e worth ; Purflest v 
Chaimsfortf: Stansted v Ford; Wocxlford v 
Brentwood. 


NORTHERN COUNTIES EAST LEAGUE: 
Premier dMsfcm AHreton v Bentley vw: 
Boston v Armthops Weifora; Deroby v 
Betoar; Eastwood v Thacktey; Long Eaton 
vParstey CeMc; Pontefract CoNeries v 

Brigs- 


Bangor Carrk* v Unftaid; Crusaders v 
Porta down; Cfenavon v Orstiliery; 
Glentcran v CBttonvfle (3 Xtf. Newry v 
Lame. 

SOUTH EAST COUNTIES LEAGUE: Cup: 


SNOOKER 


Hendry put on 
the invite list 


Third round: Chefcea V Luton; Ipswich v 
Crystal Paface; Southampton v Brigmon. 
First ttivitiaK Orient v Cambridge; 
MiDwal v Gfingham: Tottenham v 


CtESHRE COIMTY SENIOR CW: Sec- 
ond round: Barton v Wtosford; Btesmera 
Pert v General Chemicals: Vauxhal v 
W a rrington. 

DURHAM CUP: RM round rephqp: Bran- 
don v Whlckhem. 

NORTH RIDING SENIOR CUP: Second 
miafifytog round raptor Guobonxjgh v 


ICE HOCKEY 

HEMEXEN LEAGUE: Promter dMsiOR: 
CiweJard Bombers v WhWey Warriors 
(BJtft Fife Flyers V Ayr Bruins (7.15); 
Munayfleld Racers i Durham Wasps 
(&30); NoUngham Parthore v Dundee 
Rockets (SU®. Rret dhit te oie Blackpool 
Seaguts v Southampton vadngs uXfc 
dmriste Wings v Oxford City San (5.0)] 
Sunderiand Chiefs v Petmborough Pi- 
rates (EBO). 


HOCKEY 

PIZZA EXPRESS LONDON LEAGUE 
(2-15): Premier cBvision: BJackht'Ktfi v 

^L?^ *^^L Kampstead: Soutfl Q8te V 
w OjunagB nawkS- 




HTTV WALES 

lOJgpm Oqp Rugby lin^t.tOera Fftn: 
Tradtog Ptecaa. 

SCOTTISH 

down. 


sedonn. 

GRANADA *L^!% «e«pt 
Mouse inapnHlJBUiBtta^aD^wa 

HTV WALES As HTV Watt 


LACROSSE 

BRVE NORTHERN LEAGUE: First (S- 
•toiOK Ashton v Oieadle: Heaton Mersey 
v Urmston: Meaor v s^e: Ofd Hulmetans v 
Boardman a EBctaa; OkJ Vfecorttans v OM 


sxxt G.10 Btocfcbustara 

Teem tZSSm Postacrir 


*Guy5JJ! 

S^HUO 


&0SN8WL 


SOUTHBW LEAGUE: Fkst eff- 
Kenton v Purtey. 


Team 122Sam Postscript Closedown. 
TVS As London exc^jfc 
J Ja t aLasem -nglMK). Rnai Concert 
1 J S e ro Company. Ctoeedoww. 


zS&Zm *£2%. stsys «■ Down 

Wales on Sunday I2^0sm Cto- 

SCOT 


the big tune 

with Northampton 


three or »onr a**’ * 

dub. Arrf thevp« JlW 

in mo. One. Dick L ndenraot 


CC O ft h til ing asabsora^ ^ ptwewm 

dw prospect tf Northampton ets . T short f he bartrr- 

Town PCs hoteh-poten of play- Vakr ^ 


™,„fflboungtoseta waga ^ hi « pri.a» acnwrei. 


Becoming ncuiager « » 

League dub, even if it was the 
bottom one. had been Care’s 
dream doting eight years at 
Weymouth, Dartford and N» 
eaton. 

His first more was to tifpi Hffl 
and Trevor Moriey from Nunea- 
ton along with Graham Seed 
from Friddey Athletic. Since 
then he has added KusseS 
Wilcox (FricLIey), Eddie 
McGoMtick (Nsmsud) and 
David Gilbert (Boston United). 
Ail are how playing in the first 
team. “I rafted good young 
players rather than the riff-raff 
from the free transfer lists who 
wan red signing-on fees," Can 
says, 

Ian Benjamin, one tf only 
three players to have survived 
Carr's clear-oat from the squad 
assembled under his prede- 


TOMORROW 


33K3P8t«e»SC 

ton In Concert 1250 tatty a# ■» FUo- 

pta, CtoMdowR. 


First division 

Coventry v Manchester C ( 1 TJ 0 ) 

Sheffield Wed v Newcastle 


Queen's Part RanoWS; Chartton v South- 
end; Fulham v Vfettort: Portemoutti v 
Norwich. Second dhriston Bristol Rovers 
v Wimbledon; Southend v Tottenham; 
Oxford v Cotohflstsn BwnWort v awr- 
dorc Reading v Bournemouth. 

GREAT MILLS LEAGUE: Pnmtor *■ 
vision: Barnstaple v Mlnehead pUBOf. 
Ctevedon v Bidetord: Oandown v 
RadsUCtt; DawllSh v Bristol CWy reserves 

a : Exmouth v Plymouth reserves: 
onvFrome. 


Stephen Hendry, the young 
Scot, has been given a wild card 
entry into next March’s Belgian 
Classic which has been deri- . 
mated by the withdrawal of 
seven worid ranked players (a 


r al Correspondent writes), 
entire Matchroom squad 


The entire Matchroom squad 
has been pulled out by their 
manager. Barry Hearn, after a 
row over dates. But the Belgian 
promoter, Dany Kalier, is 
determined that the tournament 
will go on. He said: “We will 
invite Hendry and probably 
Malta's Tony Drago. We need 
players who will excite the 
crowds." 


BUILDING SCENE EASTOM LEAGUE 
Branmam v Lowestoft Clacton v 
Gorteston; Colchester reserves v 
Felixstowe; % v Sudbury; Great Yar- 
mouth v Histon; HaverhV v Newmarket; 
Srtiam v Watton; Stowmarket v Chatteris; 
Thattod v March: Wtsboch v Burv Town. 


ARTHUR DUNN CUP, FWromd, 

Old Chotowto»tt v Lteidng OB D 


Taunton v Frome. 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: Frontie r 
division p. Ot Barkmgteele v Southgate; 
Beacons nekt v Edgware; Brimsdown v 
watmam Abbey; Own and Manor v 
Danson: Hartwell v Amerstiam: 
Northwood v 

netftdi v Pennant iSLQK Utyssee v 


COMBINED COUNTIES LEAGUE; Coo- 
ccurs Trophy: Second round: BAs 
(Weybridgej v ChlpstMd (2-0). Prontor 
itivtaioR 51m; Ash vChobhanc Gottorn v 
Maiden Vfta; Famham v Westfield; 
Godalrmru v Cove; Hartlw Wintnoy v 
FrmMy Gn»n; Horiey v Fartelgh (3.0); 
Malden v Virgma water: Meratiram v 
CranWgh. 


ARTHURIAN LEAGUE (2J9: PnBtotof (fi- 
vtokMcGd CtethutiafB vOd Brantwoods; 
Od CMgwefians v (Hd Etonians; OU 
Mahetraans v OU R e ptontan s . FM 
revision: Old Foresters v Old Bradflaldtans: 
Old Salopians v Od Harrovians; OU 
vOld W estmtnstets. 


Second division 

Brighton v Shrewsbury 

Derby v Grimsby (11J3CQ — 

Hull v MfflwaD J P 

Okfosmv Bradford 

Stoke v Leeds 

Sunderland v Bteckbum 


0THS1 SPORT 

GYMNASTOS Kraft International (at 


TTiird division 

Brentford v Middlesbrough (11.30) 

Catiisto v Notts Co — — — 

Doncaster v Swindon — 

Mansfield v Wigan — 


ICE HOCKEY 

HEMGEKEN LEAGUE: Praotor dvitiDR 
Ayr Bruins v Cleveland Bombers (7.0k 
Dundee Rodents v MurrayMd Racere 
(7.0): Durtwm Wasps v FMs Ryers (6 JO): 

Stresham Redskins v Sottwa Barons 
g.ia WWtiev Wamors v Nottingham f 54C 
Parrthera (WOk Rrat dMstaK Bourne- 1 

aoucrampron viKmgs (bju}. 

OTHER SPORT 
GYWHSnCS: Kraft Inter nationa l (at 
Wambtay Arena. 2.0. 

HANMALLs Btitiatt LaaguK SaJford v 

wakeddd (2JQ. 

MOTOR RACING: StM OKs TVS British 
open championship (at Brands Hatch. 

10-ia 

RACKETS: Public schools charnDtonshtos 


ULSTER ftjrw*" yyept 

^5s:^Sss^ ,SportIR ► 


Yorkshire aaaae 

a r’a Wtt ch raaean Mtracta&ia'^: 


12asam Late CaB, Ctora- 
[W AS 3J0 &«- 

a«siaaiss^ssL. 







ULSTER ^ridg npxcaa; 






“tsisrJIS 3 

Cbnrtnn. toon 1 Cttf- 


lw *te, Oora 


: Pubdc schools chanvionsMps 


SUNDAY 


champon$hipe 


DRYBROUGHS NORTHERN LEAGUE: 
FfrstiiMstofi: BedSnaton v Canseft ^.ta 
Chester le Street v Gretna: Easington v 
Wiifby (2-ta Harflepool v Tow Law, 
North Shields v Pmarfes; Ryhope CA v 
Sporatymoor. — 


NENE GROUP UNTIED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Ptoaier (SrisioR Arieray v 
HoB»ach; Bablock v Spaldng: Bourne v 
a Neots: Kennston v Braodey; Long 
Buckby v Stamford; Potton v 
SrifAwborougtK Raunda v DesborougtK 
Rothirefl v Ampthfl; S and L Cwby v 
Northampton.- gpflincer; Wootton v 


Middlesex ChunplonsMps (at Stsmtont 
HO) 

GYMNASTICS: Kraft In tBroaUonaJ (at 


Fourflt division 

Northampton v Lincoln 


BASKETBALL 

CARL8BERG NATIONAL LEAGUE: First 


SNOOKER; 

Ch a m p i WM hit 


-tofmeister Amateur 
Finals (at Breaks SC, 




RACKETS: Wanbtedon Junior 


Bffldmtf Pirates (4.0). Second driftara 
Lambeth Topcats v Oktiiam Celtics (4.^ 

WOMEN'S NATIONAL CUPS SttHtott 
BCP London v Stockport LouvoHre Ufo 
London YMCA </ Avon Northampton^ 


Christmas Amateur 

fat Century S.CX. Newron Abbott 
SQUASH RACKETS: Wimbledon Junior 

Open Boys A Girls Ut a/ 12 Tovnament (at 
Wjfflbtodon Stadun Squash dub). 
TABLE TOMS: Sch&ftrdt British 
trier dhtstofl: Grove v Butter- 

UBS St Neats v Omega 

Seating; Onnestgr v Steaifflocfc Wotvar* 


BDril WALES. SJ 
SS±1 tI.15-11A5 

Tates. 11AS-i2.1Sn w 

Booze. 1&1MUSI News at Wtees 
.. rias and Weather; Ctosa. SCOT- 




toon IMihkjd WhfSt'lZte® 

S4C Startc 


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i. t -J 'S .... __ • 


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tZ-lOera Scottish ffeevo and Weather; 
Ctose. NORTTSJN RELAKL 12JS- 
i2J0«n Northern tretond Nmm Head- 
Bnes and Weather: Ctose. 


h am pton; Rotherham v P an ora m ic Bate. 
VnUniALL: Rofaf Bank of Scotland 
National league: Mfee'a first dw i atoi K 
Speedwefl Ruavwv Pctcnia (3JJ). 




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SATURDAY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 20 1986 

TELEVISION AND RADIO 

Edited by Peter Dear and Peter Davaile 


SUNDAY 


• An embarrassment of riches 
for nJm fans today, what with 

* Clouzot's blood-freezing The 
W*ges of Fear (BBC2, 10.45), 
Kubrick s mind-bending 2001 
- A Space Odyssey (BBC2, 
f 1.50am), Reed’s Other! with 
its Dickensian gusto and 
dutch of fine songs (BBCi 
5.55pm), Wyler’s The Best 

Yeats of our Lives (Channel 4 
2.00pm) with the Hollywood 
star system and screen writing 
at their best, and , much lower 
down the scale but still a lot of 
<un, John Landis’s comedy 
Trading Places (1TV, 
10.15pm). 

• For Redbrick (C4, 8.30pm), 
which resolutely refused to fit 
into the soap-opera category 


C CHOICE ) 

duu some people tried to force 
it into, h is end of academic 
year at Newcastle University 
and end of series. Not all the 
loose ends are tied up. but at 
least some of the undergrad- 
uates and lectures rad up 
lucky. 

• Also recommended: The 
Archbishop of Canterbury's 
pleasingly varied prose and 
verse selection in With Great 
Pleasure (Radio 4,4.00pm). 
Judi Dench is under-em- 
ployed, and Michael Hordern 
is in his element. 



► ^HbUlGUL 

a. r* „ Julia Deakin, Alan Howard and Dorothy 
reter Davaile Balnbriilge’s play Evensong (on ITV, 


Turin In Beryl 
, 9.15pm) 


semary LeachJRon Cook, and Barbara 
to Remember (Channel 4, 9.45pm) 


( CHOICE ) 

• You almost begin to believe 
in Santa Claus when you get 
two new Jack Rosenthal works 
in as many weeks. After 
London’s B urni ng from LWT 
a fortnight ago comes Day to 
Remember from TVS, (Chan- 
nel 4, 9.45pm). Comedy 1 You 
could say that. And you would 
be right. But you don't know 
your Rosenthal if you think 
that this tale of a man who has 
lost his immediate memory is 
aimed less at the heart than at 
the funny bone. 

• Over on ITV at 10.05pm, 
there are Anna Massey and 


8 JO The Famfiy-Ness. (rt 935 
The Muppot Babtea. 

9.00 Saturday Superstore. 
Among the guests are 
Aied Jones and the 
London Community 
Gospel Choir. 

12.15 Grandstand introduced by 
Desmond Lynam. The 
line-up is: (subject to 
alteration) 1220 Football 
Focus with Sob Wilson; 
12450 News and weather; 
12-55, 1.25 and 2430 
Racing from Chepstow: 
1.10 and 1 >10 Sports 
Review; 2.1 5 and 3.05 
Rugby League: the first 
John Player Special 
trophy semifinal: 2S5 and 
3J*5 Ice Hockay: 
Nottingham Panthers v 
Dundee Rockets; 320 Half 
times; 4.35 Final score. 

5.05 News with Jan Learning. 
Weather 5.1 5 
Sporty regional news. 

5-20 Bob's Fun House. 
Television bingo quiz 
game presented by Bob 
Monkhouse. (Ceefax) 

5.55 FBmOBver! (19661 
starring Ron Moody, 

Oliver Reed, and Mark 
Lester. An award winning 
musical based on Charles 
Dickens's Oliver 
Twist Directed by Carol 
Reed. (Ceefax} 

8.15 The Paul Daniels Magic 
Show. The guests are Bob 
Hartman, a puppeteer 
from the United States; the 
world champion 
horseshoe pitchers, 

Danny and Sue 
Kuchcinski; and the 
acrobatic Acro-Mechanico 
group from the 
Philippines. The special 
guest is Percy Edwards- 

fceefax) 

9.00 Casualty. An elderly man 
with a heart condition s 


SLQ0 Ceefax. 

11-00 Carols for Christmas from 
St David's Hafl, Cardiff, 
with the BBC Welsh 
Chorus and the 
Trumpeters of the Welsh 
Guards. 

11.50 FRik 2001: A Space 
Odyssey (1968) starring 
Keir Dutea andGary 
Lockwood. Science Action 
adventure in which man 
fights machinery during a 


Directed by Stanley 
Kubrick. 

24)5 FUm: Harold Lloyd’s 

World of Comedy- (1 962) 
A compilation of cflps from 
the silent fRma of the 
celebrated comedy actor. 


ward; and seems 
determined to die, refusing 
all medication. (Ceefax) 

950 News and sport With Jan 
Learning. Weather. 

1905 Sir Harry - A Celebration- 
High lights from the 
celebration dinner given 
by the Variety Club of 
Great Britain in honour of 
Sir Harry Secomba 
Among the guests are 
Michael Benttne, Sir , 

Geraint Evans, Lulu, and : 

the Treorchy Male Voice 1 
Choir. 

11.15 F8tre Tarzan, the Ape 
Man (1881) starring Bo 
Derek. Richard Harris and, 
as Tarzan, Mfles O’Keeffe. 
Edgar Rice Burroughs's 
hero comes to grips with 
the beautiful daughter of 
Jim Parker who is looking 1 
for the fabled graveyard of 
the elephants but tostead ; 
discovers an inland sea i 
and Tarzan. Directed by 
John Derek. 

1.05 Weather. 


3.40 FBire Piccadilly inckfent* 
(1946) starring Anna 
NeagtoandMcheel 
Wilding. After spending 
three years stranded on a 
desert Island. Diana 
Fraser returns to London 
and her husband who, 
alas, thinking her dead, 
has remarried. Directed by 
Herbert Wilcox. 

5l 20 Sounds of Christmas 
introduced by Brian KayJV 
concert from the 
Chichester Festival 
Theatre featuring the Band 
of HM Royal Marinas, 
CamabHe, Chichester 
Cathedral Choir, snd the 
Fairer Sax. 

910 Intern ati onal Bridge Chrix 
With Arturo Franco (Italy), 
Zla Mahmood (Pakistan). 
Christian Mari (France), and 
Robert Sheehan (England). 

940 Cameo. The wilcfilfe of the 
highways. 

650 NewaVfew with Jan 

Learning and Moira Stuart 
Weather. 

750 Oberoa A new production 
of Carl Marla von Weber's 
opera, recorded at the Alte 
Oper in Frankfurt, with 
Elizabeth Connell, Phfflp 
Lang ridge, Benjamin 
Luxon, La Veme WBBarns. 
and the Edinburgh Festival 
Chores. The Junge 
Deutsche Phflharrnonle Is 
conducted by Seiji Ozawa. 

950 AB Passion Spent 
Episode two of Vita 

! Sack vfflo- West' s novel and 

LadySlane, having 
escaped the dutches of ■ 
her predatory famSy. is 
safely ensconced in 
Hampstead, (r) (Ceefax) 

1945 Flee The Wages of Fear” 
(1953) stanringYves 
Montand and Charles 
Vanel. with briefly. In her 
first screen role, Bridget 
Bardot Thrilling, palm- 
sweating adventure about 
the drivers taking two 
truck-loads of 
nitroglycerine over a 
bumpy, 300 mile tourney. 
Directed by Henn- 
Georges Ctouzot (English 
subtitles). Ends at 1-20. 


ITV/LONDON 


655 TV-am Introduced by 
Richard Keys. Weather at 
658; nd news at 750. 

750 TheWde Awake Ctdb. 

925 No 73. Rjn endgames far 
the young. 1150 The 
Making of Santa Cfeue - 
Th«Movte.AbQNnd-the- 
sesnes look at the making 

of the muW-mfflon pound 

Him starring Dudley 
Moore. 

1250 News with Anne 
Latrchars. 

1255 Saint and Gheavste. Ian 
and Jimmy review the 
week's toottMN news. 
1250 Wrestling from the 
Royal Han, Harrogate. 

150 Hart to Hart Jonathan and 
Jennifer Infiltrate a 
Jinglegram company that is 
the cover for a series of 
Christmas burglaries, (r) 
2.15 Please wrL John 
Aiderton stars In tWs 
comedy series about a 
harassed school master, (r) 

2.45 Gymnaadcs. The Kraft 
International from 
Wembley Arena, 
Introduced by Nbk Owen. 

4.45 Results Service. 

550 News. 

5.05 BkickbtartefS. General 
knowledge quiz game for 


Bob Hotness. 

555 TheA-Team. The irregular 
quartetjoin an American 
footbel team touring East 
Germany in order to 
faeffltate a detecting 
scientist's flight ot me 
West 

650 Beaded About Jeremy 
Beadle plays practical 
Jokes on more 
unsuspecting members of 
the pubic. 

7.00 The Price is Right Game 
show presented by Lesfle 
Crowther. 

900 Laughs from Her 

Majesty’s. Jimmy Tarbuck 
introduces highlights from 
Ms three series' of Live 
From Her Majesty's. 

900 News and sport 

915 Unnatural Causes: 
Evensong, by Beryl 
Bain bridge. Dorothy Tuttn 
and Alan Howard pmy an 
inner-dty vicar and iss 
wife who had hoped for 
better things but are now 
plagued with society's 
outcasts. (Oracle) 

IMS FBM: Ttaftig Places " 

« starring Dan 
/dandEdde 
Murphy. Comedy about a 
bet between two elderly 
brothe r s that they can pick 


925 A Question of Economies. 
Part tea (r) 950 4 What 
It’s Worth, (rt 1020 The 
Hurt of the Dragon. Part 
ten - the sciences of China 
- ancient and modem, (r) 
11.15 Treasure Hunt in the 
Liverpool Docks (rt 1920 
Isaura the Save GW (r) 

1.00 South Seas Voyage. 
Krov and Am Menunln 
visit the island oJTflsopia. M 

250 The Beat Yeara of Our 
Lives* (1 946) starring 
Fredric March. Dana 
Andrews and Harold 
RusseJL A seven Oscars- 
wtrming drama about three 
Second World War 
veterans comfogto terms 
with civilian life .Directed 
by William Wyler. 

550 BnxAslde. (Oracle) (r) 

6.00 Right to Reply. 

Liverpudlian women taka 
issue with three of the 
Brookslde writers who, 
they claim, depict 
unemployment In 
Liveipool as a rnaJe-onfy 
problem. ; 

930 The Great AutraSan Boat 
Race. Highlights of the 
elimination races for the 
America's Cup. 

750 News summary and 
weather followed by 7 
Days. A Christmas 
message from the 
Archbishop of York; and 
Claire Rayner talking 
about young peopto who 
leave home and me 
reasons why. 

750 Mud and Guts. The story 
of the Musselburgh 
Magnums, a British 
American Football team, 
who tested their limited 
akffls against the US 
Hunley wolverines, a 
naval team comprising 
men who have playedthe 
game since senooL 

930 Recbrick. The final 

programme In the series ‘ 
on a year in the We of 
Newcastle University. 


900 Hale arid Pace Christines 
Extravaganza. The 
comedians' guests include 
Courtney Pme and Status 
Qua 

1900 HH Street Bfuea Beflcer 
and others begin 
surveWance of a m^or 

drug4etf ngoutiet . 

(Oracle) 

11.00 Who dares Wins. The final 


man off the street andthat 
he will be able to ran their 
company. Directed by 
John Landis. (Oracle) 
1255 When the Music's Over. 
The popular entertainers 
who have formed their 
fans from the Fifties to the 


150 reght Thoughts. 


series of the offbeat 
comedy show. 

112^45 Six of Hearts. The sixth 
and last programme in 
the series reflecting the 
diversity of gay life. 

1245 The T> - t Zone: Stfll 
VaOey*. Confederate 
soldier prefer to face 
- defeat man makes pact 
with the devil Followed by 
Steel* Two robots prepare 
to meet In a boxing match. 
Ends at 1 -4a 


855 Play School. 9.1 5 Morning 
Worship. The last of four 
masses from Blackfriara, 
Oxford. 

1050 Asian Magazine. A 
musical celebration of 
Christmas 1050 Ideas 
Unlimited, (r) 11.05 
Buongtomo Itatial Lesson 
ten. (r) ” 

1150 Parent Programme. 

Fitness for the under- 
fives, (r) 1145 See Heari 
Christinas SpedaL 

1255 Farming. Details of the 
knpbcaoons of the Farm 
Ministers' agreement in 
Brussels on milk and beef 
1258 Weather. 

1.00 News headlines 1.05 The 
Duke* of Hazzard. Bo and 
Duke rescue a small alien 
creature from the 
avaricious grasp of Boss 
Hogg. 150 Cartoon 240 
EasSndera. (Ceefax) (r) 

350 F8nc Rooster CogbuRi 
(1975) starring John 
Wayne and Katharine 
Hepburn. Deputy Marshal 
Rooster Cogburn is joined 
by a preacher woman 
when he goes in pursuit of 
outlaws who have hijacked 
a wagon of arms ana 
nitroglycerine. Directed by 
Stiiart Millar. 

445 Do mes d a y. The fifth and 
final programme of 
Michael wood's series 
exploring the Itistory of 
England and the English. 

555 David CopperflefcL After 
Dora's death and some 
unMfopy adventures David 
returns home to start fife 
anew. (Ceefax) 

555 Lifafine. Qifi Micrialmora 
and Maggie PhBbtn with 
the latest charity news; 
and Roy Castle appeals on 
behalf of the Sodetyof St 
Dfsmis In Southampton. 

905 News with Jan Learning. 
Weather. 

&15 Songs of Praise. Carols 
byGandMkgit fr w n Rlpon 

7.15 AD Creatures Great and 
SmaB. A repeat of the 
feature-length episode 
shown last Christinas Day, 
sat hi the years 
Immediately alter foe 
Second World War. (Ceefax) 

850 News with Jan Learning. 
Weather. 

90S .The Singing Defective. 

, The sixth and final pert of 
Dennis Potter’s film with 
music. (Ceefex) 

1025 Shout! A programme of 
popular C hr istmas music 


900 Ceefax. 

1050 Dastonfly end Mutttay. (r) 
IMOTheCfwriie Brown 
and Snoopy Show. 

1030 Blue Peter, (r) 1150 The 
Chfldran of Green Knows. 
Final episode, (rt 

1150 Windmffl. Chris Serie with 
a collection of cfes from 
popular Christinas shows 
of the past (r) 1250 No 
Limits, (rt 

1.40 Rugby SpedeLHighfights 
of the final matches in the 
Thoro-EMI DhrtsjonaJ 
Championship. 

250 The Week In the Lords. 

3J30 Boop-Oop-a-Doop. A 
documematy tracing the 
rise to stardom of the 
cartoon character, Betty 
Boop, created in 1930 by 
the New York animators. 
Max and Dave Fleischer. 

4.10 BBC Design Awards. A 
competition for the best of 
British designs in 
products, graphics and the 
environment, (r) 

910 Music te Camera. Bach's 
The Gokfoerg Variations 
played on the harpsichord 
by Stanislav Hefler. 

555 Thinking Aloud. Is Our 
Past Our Future? 
discussed by David 
Canrtadina, Jean La 
Fontaine, Enoch Powell, 
and Patrick Wright 
Presented by Metael 
fanatieff. 

935 SkJ Sunday. The Men’s 
Slalom from Hints rstoder; 
and the Ladies' Slalom 
from Valzoklana. 

7.15 The Natural WOrid: A 
Cactus Cafled Sageuro. 
The famous ten-foot tail 
cactus of the Sonora 
desert made famous by 
countless western films. 

755 Andre Previn and Gene 
Kelly remkilsca about the 
golden days of Hollywood 
musicals. 

935 The Mkmefll MuskaL A 
preview of BBC 2's 
Vincente Minnelli season. 

950 James Galway's 
Christmas CaroL 
Traifitional music for 
Christmas from foe 
Cathedral and Abbey 
Church of St Alban. With 
the Royal Philharmonic 
Orchefra, the Ambrosian 


tradtibhal to black gospel. 

11.15 ODorme* 

Imrsel laa l e e Boors The 
secona and final part of Dr 
Michael O'DonneH's 
inquiry kite alcohol Etouse. 

11.45 %e Sky at MgM. Patrick 
Moore talks about the 
Gafllean Moons. 

1255 Weather. 


toeuttiedraLChoir. . 

945 Did You Sea.? 

EastEnders, AH Passion 
Spent and Apartheid, are 
discussed by Janet Street- 
Porter, Stephen By, and 
Sonny RamphaJ. 

1925 FOmzAfl That Jazz (1979) 
starring RoyScheiderand 
Jessica Larig. Bob 
Fosse's serm- 
autobfegrapMoalmuaioal 
aboutaauccesaftti 
Broadway choreographer 
whose 'burning the candle 
at both ends' fife-style 
leads to heart troune. 

Ends at 1259 


ITV/LONDON 


655 TV-em begins with 

’Sunday Comment' 750 
Are You Awake Yet? 7J25 
Wac Extra 

930 David Frost on Sunday. 
The guests indude 
Malcolm Muggeridge and 
Tim Rice. 

925 Wake Up London. The 
Vicious Boys' Christmas 
Party. 930 Ffenrie Rock 
with Fulton MacKey, (r) 

1900 Krazy Kitchen. 

1920 Against the Odda How 
Beethoven overcame 
hisdeafness. 1930 The 
Adventures of Black 
Beauty, (r) 

1150 Momtog Worship from St 
Martin's, Exiting, 
Newmarket 

1240 Weekend World. Are 
politicians ready to do 
what is needed to avert a 
deadly Aids epidemic? 
Matthew Pams talks to 
Tony Newton, Frank 
Dotson, and Archie 
Kirkwood. 150 Police 
Hve with Shaw Taylor. 

150 Inter na tio nal Athletics. 
The HFC International 
Cross Country through the 
grounds of Cardiff Castie- 

200 The Hunan Factor. What 
has happened to the 
traditional British Sunday? 

230 LWT News headlines 
foflowed by Butiseye 
introduced by Jim Bowen. 

100 The Return of the 
Antelope. Adventures of 
three LiHiputians in 
Victorian England. 

450 Sunday Sunday. Qoria 
Hunniford'sgueste are 
Jayne Torvffland 
Christopher Dean, 
Engelbert Humpenfink, Su 
Poflard, and Freddie Starr. 

550 52-1. Game show 

E tied by Ted Rogers. 

with Anne Leuchars. 
910 Mghway Christmas 
SpacEaL Sir Hairy 
introduces a pro gr a mm e 
of words and music for 
Christmas. 

7.15 Obid Date. A breezy look 
at what can happen on a 
bfinddate. 

900 North and South. The 
peraiitiniate eplsorte and 
Madame Conti lets sip a 
secret about MedoBno 
Fabra/s past (Oracle) 

9 B) Neva . _ _ 

10.05 Hie Christinas Tree- 
Constance, with not long 
to five, has returned to 
Dublin to piece together 
the memories of her past 
and to await a reply from 
tier lover to whom she 
wrote, talHng him about 

their child. Starring Anna 
Massey and Simon 
Callow. 

1140 LWT News head! nes 

foflowed by Parry Como's 
Christmas fat London. 

With Arm-Market and The 
Cambridge Buskers. 

1235 Night Thoughts. 


Simon Callow heading a 
strong cast in Jennifer 
Johnson's seasonable story 
The Christmas Dree, and the 
other recommendabfe TV 
offerings today indude the 
historic pairing of John 
Wayne and Katharine Hep- 
burn in that idiosyncfararic 
western Rooster Codram 
(BBCl, 3.00pm), and the final 
instalment of Dennis Potter’s 
The Singing Detective (BBCl, 
9.05pm). I cannot forgive it 
for some of its excesses, but it 
has taken me by the scruff of 
the neck and made me watch 
it. And bow often can yon say 
that about TV these days~? 

Peter Davaile 


CHANNEL 4 


925 Sunday East Magazine 
programme for Asian 
viewers, coming this 
morning from the 
Hammersmith Palais, the 
venue for a Bhangra 

Disco. Fbtowed by 

Deewanrin. Drama serial 
set hi a Pakistan village. 

1900 The World This Week. 
Current affairs. 

1150 Worzel Gummidge. 

Adventures of an almost 
human scarecrow, (r) 
1150 The Waltons 12-30 
The Tube fr) 

200 FBm: Three Coin* in the 
Fountain (1954) starring 
Clifton Webb and Dorothy 
McGuire. Romantic 
comedy about three 
American secretaries In 
Roma who each throw a 
coin into tin Fountain of 

Trevi to test the legend 
that to do so they win fail ki 
love. Directed by Jean 
Negulesoo. 

3.55 Century on the Crags. 

Alan Hankinson tens he 
story of the sport of rock 
efimoing and joins 
climbers on the old etassfe 
routes on Great Gable and 
Scafefl. 

4.55 News summary followed 
to World Afive: Spain. 

This eefition of the series 
on Spain's wfldfife focuses 
on Me on the rhrerbanks. 

930 Athletics. The women's 
event of the HSC 
International Cross 
Country. 

640 American FootfoaB. San 
Francisco 49ers at the 
New England Patriots. 

7.15 The World at War. This 
fourth programme covers 
the period when Britain 
was beleaguered, awaiting 
the invasion of the 
German traces, (rt (Oracle) 

6.15 The Disputation. A 
recreation of a disputation 
in 13th century Spain 
when King James of 
Aragon is urged to tackle 
the Jewish problem' head 
on. With Christopher Lae. 
Bob Peck, and Alan Dobie. 

925 Ito Comment An 
impressionistic flm 
without dialogue about the 
paradox of freedom. 

945 Day to Remem b er, by 
Jade RosanthaL George - - 
Cole and Rosemary Leach 
star to this comedy &xxit a 
man who cannot 
remember even five 
minutes ago. (Oracle) 

1945 Fine Utae Caesar* (1930) 
starring Edward G 
Robinson. The story of the 
rise and fall of a Roaring 
Twenties gangster. 
Directed by Mervyn Leroy. 

1210 Towers oTBabeL A couple 
in a high-rise flat become 
concerned when they do 
not hear their normally 




MF Jmedluin wave). Stereo < 
VHP (see below). 

News on the haif-hoir urrtB 


7 30°E3o, 1200 midnighL 
6.00am Mark Page 840 Peter 
Powell 1900 Dave Lee Travis 140 
Adrian Juke 240 YauH Never 

oe 16 Again (history of the British 

teenager) 3JM The American 
Chart Show with Gary Byrd 5JW 


Saturday Live (Andy Peebles) 

640 In Concert GUI Scott Heron 
and Robert Cray Band recorded 

at Glastonbury Festival 7 JO Simon 
Mayo 930-1200 The Midnight 
Runners Show (Dixie Peach) VHF 
Stereo Radios 1 & 2 440am As 
Radio 2 1.00pm As Radio 1 740- 
400am As Radio 2 


I i ff # 


MF (i. radium wave). Stereo on 
VHF (see Radiol) 

News on the how untfl 1.00pm. 
then 3.00. 649. 740 and hourly 
from 1040. Sports Desks 
1142am. 1042pm 


4.00am David Bussey 640 
Steve Truetove 90S David Jacobs 
10.00 Sounds of the 60s 11 JM 
John Dunn 140pm Racfio Active 
1 JO Sport on 2 FootbalL 
Rugby Union (London v North. 
Mimamfe v South and South 
West). Racing from Chepstow 
(Coral Welsh National Handicap 


Fundatkm 740 Beat the Record 
740 James Galway's _ 
Christmas Collection. 820-940* 
Interval. (Parade of pipers) 930 


645 Weather. 740 News 
745 Aubadec DefcB (Sleigh 
Ride: Northern Sinfonia), 
Vaughan WiSams (English 
Fcrik Song suite: London 
Wind Orchestra), Marta 
(Wyt Czech PO). Bizet 
(Jeux d* entants: LSO), Bach 
(Jesu, Joy of man’s 
desiring: Ogdon, piano), 
Vhraldi (Winter: Four 
SeoBons: Israel PO), HowbBs 
(R hapsodic CWntet 
Klng^dartnet/R lc h ar ds 
Ensemble), Byrd (Luflaby: 
Consort of MusidcB), Ibert 
(Lfitie white donkey: 

Ogdon, piano), Ravel 
(Mother Goose balteC 
Montreal SO). 900 News 
905 Record Reviewwrith Paul 
Vaughan. Indudes 
. Stephen Dodgson's gride to 
recordings ofBach’s 
Christmas Oratorio 
1915 Stereo Release: Mozart 
(Symphony No 31: 

Orche s tra of the 18th 
Century). Also Mozart’s 
Symphony In A minor, 
Odense (I MusicO, and 
Nottumt. K 346 and K 549 
(Frazes, soprano, 

Karnes- Ferrin, mezzo, 
Wayiand Rogers, bass, 
ana Chicago Symphony 
Winds) 

1055 Faurfc Steven tsserfis 
(cello), Pascal Davoyon 
(piano). Romance; Oegle; 
Sonata te G minor. Op 
117; Berceuse; Acres un 
rove; SicStanne; PapWon 
1955 Robert Mayer Concert 


London PMBiarmonic 
(under Seaman). Brahms 
(Academic Festival 

Overture), Hhdemift (test 
movement Syr phony: 
Mathis der Major) Beethoven 
(movwnents 2 and 3 of 
»rmpho(iy No 7). Strauss 
(raEuiefrepiegel). 1 JW 

IjOS A Czech Christmas: 
works by, inter eBa, 

Janecek (The Holy Virgin of 
FrydeteKvapfl, piano). 


Frydsk: Kvapt. plar 
RybaJKyrte, Czech 
Christinas Mass), Masek 


Ashes, an Radio 4; and 
King Lear at the NatiomL In 
the chain John Wgglns. 

The panel: Paul BaSey, A S 
Byatt, and Bryan 
Robertson. 

935 Liszt BBC SJngere. 

Salve Regina, 1885; 
Saptemsacramenta, 1878; 
Qui seminant in tacrimis, 
1884, etc 

7JS0 Short Story: Benjamin 
Whitrow reads Denton 
Welch's A Morning with the 
Versatile Peer, Lord 
Bems, in the Ancient Seat of 


MF (medum wave). Stereo on 
VHF (see below) 

News on the half-hour urtifl 
HJOafli, then at 230pn, 3J0, 
439 7J0,930 and 1200 

■■filiili Jil 

mKHignL 

6J)Oam Mark Page 6.00 Peter 
Powsil 1900 MBce Read 12»pm 
JimmySavtte's 'Old Record* 

Oub (records from 1980, 74 and 
*GB) 230 Simon Mayo's 
Pilgrimage to the Holy Land 4JOO 


&55 Weather. 7J00 News 
7.05 Tudor Church Music: 
Robert White (Regina 


and Cemohorsfcy (Fugue in A 
minor: Rainberger, 

S^Sert Plano Sonatas: 
Martino Tirtmo plays the 
D major, D 850 
Langnam Chamber 
Orchestra (under 

HandfordLwfihLesle 
Pearson (ptem>l. 

Respighi (Anctent Airs and 
Dances, suite No 3). 

Bloch (Concerto grosso for 
string orc h e stra , with 


7.30 OberonTWeber*B three- 
act opera, sung in 
EngHsfi. Also on BBC2 Cast 
modes Btzabeth 
Connell, Phfflp Langridga 
and Benfernan Luxon. 

Ozawa conducts the 
Edinburgh Festival 
Chorus and Junge Deutsche 
Phfharmonre 
950 Zoo Station: Aidan 


Higgins's Baffin story. 
Wftfi the sounds of the i 
itself and a cast that 


345 Dietrich Ftechsr-Oleekau 
at Salzburg: with Gerald 
Moore (piano). Includes 
Beethoven's An dte feme 
Gefiebte, and in questa 
lombaoacura 

540 Jazz Record Requests: 

with Petiw Clayton 
545 Critics' Fbrum: incftJdes 
comment on the Wm 
Kangaroo; Searching the 


includes Jane Wenham, 
Peter Acre, Helena 
Brack, WHfiam Hope and 
Coin Starkey 

1035 Mozart Hagan String 
Quartet play the Strir^ 
Ouanat in B flat major, K 589 

1140 Beethoven Piano 

Sonatas: John LB plays 
the No 7 inD, Op 10 No 3; 

No 23 in F minor. Op 57 


Ordwstrm 1905 Martin Kelner 
l2-05em Denise Black and the Kray 
Sisters 140 BUI Rennefls and 
jean Chains 3JXHL00 Mstropoie 
Orchestra. 


WORLD SERVICE 




On Long wave (s) Stereo on 
955 Shipping 900 News Briefing; 
Weather 910 Prelude 
music (s) 930 Farming 


ano Nawsdesk (until 6J017JD News 749 
Twanty^xr Hours 7 JO From the Week- 
lies 7.45 Network UK Site News 9® 
Reflations 915 A JoW Good Stow M0 
News 849 Review of fertoh PW«a «.« 
World Today &» RnancWJtows 
Look Ahead BAS About, .Wfen 1069 
News IOlOI Hem s HumpM 1015 MLener 
from America 1M0 People . and P pfe» 
1150 News 1148 Ne*« About Brtete 

11.15 Great Organists Play Bach («« 
11.30) 1250 Sdto Nawwrel IJ-g 

ss™«ss«3 

snsv&mgss 

Rfffio Newsreel 115 Satuntey Soecfe 


Twa^nie Hours atifl Jazz for the 

aSo iSSVm a F fertfpr Bg 
Past \is Sounds of the gfe»J 
Peopta and Pofltics IMOJteW 1M» 
From Our Own ConsepowtentlM g No* 
ideas 1040 Refections, IMS Spore 
Roundup n.00 News 11 J# tomner«y 

11.15 rtoure NorBt^JIJOAnyti^g 
Goes 12X0 News 12-fe N®” 

Britain 12.15 NewnWI ' flf® FfOJ 

me ffrorre '8S 1-00 ^ i£^ * ^ 
Weak 2J» News 2J» Review orme 
Britsh Press 21S iVtoyaafe 
Cook 2J30 ABum Tkne *05 Nfljw **» 
News Ahout BttfenllS ftomOy Ogg 

645 Later from America. AB tkne* v 
GMT. 


Regional TV: on facing vase 


^ivel 

740 News 7.10 Today's 
papers 7.15 On Your 
Farm. Zoonosoiogy 

7.45 In Perspective. Religious 
affairs with Rosemary 
Harthifl 

7^0 Down to Earth. Mike 
Gilliam talks to Alan 
Titchmarah 7.55 Weather; 
Travel 

200 News 210 Today's 
papers 215 Sport on 4. 
News ol En^ah cricketsre In 
Tasmania. 

248 Yesterday in Parliament 
257 WBather, Travel 

200 News 905 Breakaway. 

Radio 4’s travel and 
leisure programme. 

250 Newstand.Areviewcrf 
theweekfies, 

10415 The Week in 
Westminster. 

Presenter's choice of 
memorable moments in 
the Parfaraantary year, for a 
Christmas special. 

1930 Loose Ends, with Ned 
Sherrinandstixflo 


1200 News: Money Box. The 
financial tjTObtems of 

1227 Quote- Unquote. The 
quotations game with a 
celebrity panel (s) 

1255 Weather 1. DO News 
1.10 Arty Questions? Malcohi 

RtfMnd MP, Denis Healey 
MP, SWriey WflBams and 
General Eva Burrows of 
the Salvation Army (rt 1-55 
Slrippk^. 

200 The Afternoon Play. 


11.30 From Our Own 

Correspondoit Ufa and 

politics abroad reported by 
BBC foreign 
corresoonoants. 


David Caute(s) 

3J0 News: Travel; 
international 
Assignment BBC 
corTaspondents report 
form around the world. 

4jQ0 With Great Pleasure. Dm 
Archbishop of 

Canterbury, Dr Robet 

Runcie, presents a 
saiection of Ns favourite 
prose and portry(s) 

445 Feedback. Christopher 
DunWey with complaints, 
comments and queries about 
(ho BBC. 

5JD0 Girts and Boys Come Out 
to Pfay. A pirate of toe 
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Orchestra (s). 

525 Week Endfog. More 
satirical sketches rathe 
week's news (s)&50 
Shipping 5J5 Weather; 
Travel 


640 News; Sports round-up- 
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Robert Robinson (a) 

7.00 Saturday Theatre. 

The Latm Lover, by 
Christopher Denys (s) 

8.30 Baker's Dozen. Richard 

Baker wtth Ms selection 
of records (a) 

930 Those Angel Faces 
Smite. The story of 
Catherine Tat and her 
husband Archibald, Dean 
of Caifi&Je, who toet five 
children within six weeks 
in 1856 958 Weather 

1900 News 1915 Evening 
Service (s) 

1230 Soundings. Spectafist 
reporters discuss the 
religious and moral 
implications of major 
current issues. 

1140 News Quiz of the Year. 

First of two programme s 
in which Richard Ingrams 

and David Taylor are 
joined by guests to mud over 
the pastl 2 months. 

11 JO Merry Chrtetmas Mrs 
SaxfrCoburg. Victoria 
and Albert are all set for 
another Happy 
Christmas at Balmoral, 
until ... (s) 

1200 Nmivs; Weather 1233 

VHF (avaSabie Kn England and 
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Anne Nighmgaie Request 
Show 9.00 Robbie Ymcant 11 4XF 
1200 The Ranking Mss P (with 
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1 & 2. 44Xtera As Radio 2. 


MF (medium wave). Stereo on 
VHF (see Ratflo 1) 

News on the hour (except 
200pm). HeadDrws 7 Mool Sports 
Desks 1202pm. 6.02, 104)2 
44IOaai David Bussey 200 
Steve Trueiowe 7 JO Roger Royte 
205 Melodies for You (SBC 
Concert Orchestra) 11 JM Teddy 
Johnson 200pm Benny Green 
200 Alan Defl 44)0 Jack Rothsteki 
with hksvtofln and Langham 
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Charlie Chester 7 JM Living with 

Betty (Barbara Windsor) 720 
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rtoriosa . Cterices of 
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of Jeremiah, Parti: 

Deter Consort), Tye (My 
trust, O Lord, in toeee 
grounded: Choir of New 
College, Oxfbrd), Byrd 
(TribuIatione& dvttatum: 
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200 Viema Octet Mozarfs 
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News 

94)5 


m z'rfcm n 






naBdta del Redentore. Part 
one. Ragtan Baroque 
Players (under Nidwtes 
KniemerLRagtan 
Baroque Singsrs, and 
stegers Gillian Fisher. 
Patrtzla Kwefla, Paul EWot 
Stephen Varcoe, 

Elsabeth Priday and MIchaal 
Chance, (nterval readbig 
at 125. Part two at 24» 

240 Gordon Jacob: Sarah 
Francis (oboe), Anthony 
Goktstone (piano), 

Cummings String Trio. 
Quartet for oboe and strings, 
1938; Six Shakespearian 
Sketches, 1846; and Quartet 
for piano and strings. 


(r) Ends at 1 


520 New Premises: Nigel 
Andrews presents toe 
arts magazine 
215 Uszt and the Pfana 
HamJsh MUne plays the 
Polonaise No i ki C minor; 
Valsa impromptu; Vatee 
melancoflque; Soirees de 
Vienne No 3; Polonaise 
No 2 In E major 
74)5 Escape from the Harem: 
Jean-Francofc Regnartfs 
true tale of a 17th centaxy 
hijacking. With David 
Rmtoui and Lindsay Dunan. 
Music by Canmra, 
Montecuir ana others. 

6-05 Chopfii and Tchalkovskv: 


consort). Haydn 
nphony Nobs; 


1020 Music Weekly: with 

Michael Oliver. Includes 
a conversation with Gian 
Carlo Menotti, and John 
LSI on per fo rming the 
Beethoven (tiano 
sonatas 

11.15 Merfiri Quartet Haydn's 
Ctoartet in G minor, Op 
774 No 3; and Faure's 
Quartet In E minor, Op 
121 


340 Carl Maris von Weber: 

Age of Enlightenment 
(under Elizabeth WaMsch), 
wtth Elizabeth Connefl 
(soprano), Melvyn Tan 
(fortspiano), Araony Pay 
(darinet). Syrrohony No 2 
Konzertstucfc n F minor. 

Op 79, overture Oberon, and 
Ocean, thou mighty 
monster Ktoeron). Also 
Clarinet Concarto Wo 1. 
the overture to Der 
Frelschutz, and Letee, 

Leise (same opera) 


Berlin Ptwharmonic (under 
Mehta). Chopin's Plano 
Concerto No 1, and 
Tchaikovsky's 
Symphony No 4. Interval 
read ingert 845 

236 HofneTPauine Letts 
reads the story by Eva 
Tucker 

9-55 Currents from a Northern 
Land: Danish music. 
Borup-Jorgensen's Winter 
Music, Par Nornaanfs 
Wie sin Kind, lb Nofhofcn's 
Americana, and Kart 
Aage Rasmussen's Four, 
Fhre. 

114)5 Doo thov on Piano 

Sonatas: John L&oteys 
theNo3inC,Op21N03; 
and the No 14 'm C sharp 
minor, Op 27 No 2 


Closedo w n 





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720 A Word in Edgeways. 
Canon John Bowker, 
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SPORT 


watfo" 1 FIFA want seats 

runout , „ 

of early only ruling lor 


power 


By Give White 


Watford 

Norwich City. 


1994 World Cup 


By John Goodbodv 


After an electrifying start by 
Watford with a goal in 90 
seconds the force drained from 
their initially powerful perfor- 
mance last night, as if in 

sympathy with the power failure 
that delayed the start of this 
rearranged fixture 

Two unsatisfactory first-half 
gpals left the match nicely 
•balanced at half-time, if even 
only in the score. Barnes, at his 
most outrageous best, was 
deserving of a far better goal 
than the one which gave Wat- 
ford the lead after just 90 
seconds. 

As well as inflicting most of 
the serious blows upon a be- 
leaguered Norwich defence he 
also created some of the most 


In a drastic move to elimi- 
nate hooliganism, FIFA, the 
governing body of world foot- 
ball, are proposing to have 
only sealed spectators watch- 
ing all qualifying games and 
final stage matches in the 1 994 
World Cup. 

Sepp Blatter. FIFA’s general 
secretary, said yesterday that 
the intention is to bring the 
rule into force for the 1994 
tournament but the plan is to 
recommend the same regula- 
tions for aU qualifying games 
for the 1 990 tournament when 
the finals will be held in Italy. 

England's chances of staging 
future World Cups could be 
drastically affected because 


"Sjwjgl ?£££ only Coventry City, of the 92 

over some excellent crosses , * j..k. «« .u. 


from often ^ ^ are abletosjat 

What with Callaghan, also a more than 50 per cent ot me 
master of the art. doing much capacity. Attendances for 
the same from the other wing, it preliminary games could be 
wasa wonder Norwich were still sharply affected because 
in die hunt by half-time. Wembley has onlv 45.000 

Gunn, the Norwich goal- 

: keeper, bad bis aerial work cut Explaining the proposal. Mr 
out, though it was lower down J! wfilllv 

that he was found wanung when BIaIter said, we are luify 


Watford seized their early iniua- convinced that aggressive 
live. Fako nudged on a clear- behaviour and the resulting 


ance by Coton, the Watford disturbances are rarely en- 
goalkeeper, and when countered in the seating sec- 


ulverhouse's haif-b eaned tors. It is clear that there is 


tackle left the way dear for ^ potential for violence 


25 , ft fifME £2*35: 


power which Gunn got a hand 


to, but he could still not prevent 
it trickling over the line. 


The problem of football- 
related violence has already 


Falco. who had injured his been discussed by FIFA's 
shoulder and side in a hefty committee for securitv and the 


collision with Bruce, put Barnes pig,, w jjj now „ 0 10 jrjF.Vs 25- 
th rough again six minutes later 


man organizing committee for 
the 1994 World Gip. 

Guido Tognoni, a FIFA 
press spokesman, said there 
was no question of England 
being forced to play their 
qualifying games for the 1990 
competition, scheduled to be- 
gin in the 1988-89 season, in 
stadia where all spectators are 
seated. 

“It will only be a recom- 
mendation and will not be 
compulsory. It will also not be 
compulsory for the 1 990 finals 
in Italy because it was not in 
the terms of reference decided 
for tile country willing to host 
the 1990 finals. But we will be 
selecting the stadia for 1990 
shortly and this recommenda- 
tion could affect which ones 
we select there," he said. 

Chantal Jouidan. a member 
of Italy's World Cup organiz- 
ing committee, said of FIFA's 
plan: “We all want to avoid 
violence and this is one 
method of achieving it. 

“We want to change the 
mentality of people who go to 
football matches, to stop the 
idea that going to a match is a 
question of violence. If people 
are sitting they are calmer and 
less tense physically." Most of 
Italy's 12 proposed stadia for 
1990 have 75 per cent seating 
capacity. 

Mr Tognoni said that Mr 
Blatter's statement would also 
certainly be shared by Joao 
Havelange, the president of 


with a delightful touch, but this 
time Gunn blocked the way. 

However, in a rare expedition 
into Watford territory in ihc 
23rd minute Norwich pulled 
level in even more fonuhuous 
circumstances. Phelan, put into 
space by the neat and nimble 
Gordon, crossed the ball into 
the penalty area with minimum 
danger only for the situation 
suddenly to produce dire 
consequences for Watford when 
Terry deflected it past his goal- 
keeper and Bardsley could only 
help it across the line. 

The Bames-Gunn duel 
continued into the second half 
when a booled clearance from 
the back again released the alert 
Watford player. Gunn again 
raced from his goal to meet the 
advance head-on. but the ball 
broke kindly for Barnes and 
when he aimed his shot 
goafwards Butterworth stepped 
in to dear comfortably. 

Watford pushed their comer 
tally to 17 with still half an hour 
remaining and Barnes again 
came dose with a flashing 
header to a cross by Callaghan 
but the ball flew marginally 
wide. 

WATFORD: A Coton; D Bardsley. W 
ftanron. K Richardson. S Terry. J 
McCMand. N Callaghan. J Barnes. M 
Fafco tsub: LSinnottJ. K Jaetett 6 Porter. 
NORWICH CITY: B Gunn; I Cutverhousa. 
A Spearing. S Bruce. M Phelan. » 
Butterworth. I Crook. K DrinkeB. W 
Biggins. R Rosario. D Gordon. 

Referee: J UQyd (Wrexham). 


Ipswich’s goals 
in sweet revenge 


By A Correspondent 


Ipswich 3 

Plymouth Argyfe 0 


Last night’s results 


FBIST DIVISION: Wattord 1. Norwich 1. 
SECOND DIVISION: farniingtam City 2 . 
Sheffield .Unhad_ 1 1 : ip gwch To wn 3. 

Bromwich Albion 


E iTn J* i 


iniHu uivkxuk: Chester 1 , Chesterfield 
1: Dwfngton 3, Port Vale 2. 
POURTnDIViaON: Bum ley 1. Cardiff Cny 
3; Hafifax 2, Hereford t: Scunthorpe 3. 
Exeter 1; Stockport County 2, Wrexham 1; 
Tranmara Rovers 0. Hartlepool ({.(aban- 
doned after 27 minutes, flood l ights 
failure). 


Ipswich, in fifth place, 
needed just 10 minutes to take 
the lead against the side that 
began the game two places 
above them in the league. 

Seeking quick revenge for a 
comprehensive defeat at the 
hands of their visitors, in 
October. Ipswich began with a 
flurry of frantic attacks which 
had the unnerved Plymouth 
defenders hacking desperate 
clearances into all corners of 
the ground. 

In only the first minute the 
Plymouth full back Nisbet was 
woefully short with a headed 
back pass to his goalkeeper. 
Cherry, and two minutes later, 
the elegant Zondervan sent 
Wilson racing clear with a 
beautiful through ball only to 
see his shot deflected by 
Cherry. 

But the goal which sepa- 
rated the sides at half-time was 
a proper reward for Ipswich's 
spirited and determined play. 

Wilson, inevitably, was the 
scorer. He had begun the game 
in joint first place with Quinn 
of Portsmouth, as the second 
division’s leading scorer with 
16 goals. 


Wilson’s goal owed much to 
the adventurous play of 
Stockwell whose cross into the 
Plymouth penalty area was 
headed on by Dozzeli and into 
the path of Wilson who con- 
trolled the ball perfectly with 
his chest, before holding off a 
lunging defender and shoot- 
ing powerfully past Cherry. 

It was goal to gladden the 
heart of Billy Bingham, North- 
ern Ireland’s manager, who 
has recently been casting in- 
terested glances in Wilson’s 
direction. 

Plymouth, the second di- 
vision surprise packet so far 
this season, were generally 
second best in most depart- 
ments. but still had their 
moments in attack. 

In the 27th minute. Ipswich 
goalkeeper Cooper saved 
bravely at the feet of Tynan 
after a defensive mix-up. and 
shortly before half-time, the 
Ipswich goalkeeper dived full 
length to tip away a full- 
blooded drive from Coughlin, 
Plymouth’s attacking midfield 
player. 


Clarke lifts 
City with 
early goals 


By Dennis Shaw 


Birmingham City 

Sheffield United 


Sheffield United fought 
back nobly at Si Andrews last 
night after two goals from 
Wayne Clarke had set Bir- 
mingham up for a joyful start 
to their festive programme. 
One second half goal by Steve 
Foley for Sheffield United was 
a disappointingly sparse re- 
turn for their commendable 
attempt to exploit 
Bir mingham 's weaknesses. 

A 19th minute handling 
offence by Dempsey to keep 
out Wbition's header from a 
Lynex comer gave Clarke the 
welcome chance for his 16th 
goal of the season 

Birmingham were quickly 
on the rampage a gain This 
time Rees headed Mortimer’s 
centre back across goal and 
Clarke was waiting to nod it 
over the line. 

United’s recent burst of 
respectable form was brought 
to a firm foil stop. Wigley, on 


A beautifully worked goal the right wing, was the man 


heralded 


most likely to make a break 


second half when Deefaan and f or them, though he had little 
Brennan exchanged passes on scope. Although they had 


the edge of the penalty area withe back after his nose 
with Brennan sprinting into injury. United’s chances were 


ARE YOU 

Self-employed 

and feel you can’t 
afford to be ill? 


the box to shoot past Cbarry. strictly limited 

IV T -I Yet Birmingham’s seem- 
illCIIOIi ingfy secure lead suddenly 

^ looked shaky, on the resump- 

t-pllp lion. Foley had the chance to 

IV-Ukl VIA beat Hansbury but shot wide. 

, A A Then Mortimer block tack- 

V ATI Cl All Q led Morris without playing the- 

" V'AlVAV' AA** ball for an obvious penalty, 
Chris Nicholl, the South- but Hansbury brilliantly saved 
npton manag er, claimed M.onis’s shot 
sterday that a mystery per- United’s breakthrough 


amptoo manager, claimed 
yesterday that a mystery per- 


son with a vendetta is trying to cime after 67 minutes with a 


ruin the dub. “I am not going little help from Hansbury. 
to nam e anyone — but it's Foley’s 20-yarder was straight 
very obvious that someone him but the goalkeeper 


The problem with being self-employed is finding the time 
to take time o£ So when illness forces an unplanned rest 
on you, the financial consequences can be quite 
devastating. 

That’s wfay private insurance with BCWA makes5ense. For 
over 50 yearsBCWA has consisrcntfy undermined the 
theory that private medical insurance isa rich man’s dub. 
Du ring that time we have acquired a national reputation 


with knowledge of the dub stopped it then allowed the 
that goes back at least three ball to pass under his body. 


years is out to get us down," 
Nicholl said. 

His outburst was triggered 


CHRMNGHAM CITY: R Hansbury. B 
Rattens. J Dicks. T WBfiams. V Oversea D 
Mordnrar. D Bromner, W Ctaria. S 
W Wtftm,T ftee s.S L ynex, 

SHHPRHJ) UNITED: J Baridna; A Bams- 


by the news that Mark Wright, My. u pb «. m Dempsey, ps&nciffe, j 

the England centre half wants Morris, S Ungtoy. p Withe, s 


the England centre half wants : 

to leave because of “internal hSwjliM 



FIFA and, for the 1 994 World 
Cup. the world governing 
body could insist on no stand- 
ing spectators for matches. 

Brazil, the favourites, Mo- 
rocco and the United Stales 
have all expressed an interest 
in staging the tournament. 

One of the reasons England 
failed to get the 1990 World 
Cup was because there is only i 
one stadium in England ca- 
pable of holding 50.000 fans 
where the sealing capacity is 
more than 50 per cent. The 
exception is Twickenham, the 
home of Rugby Union. 

Mr Tognoni said: “We want 
to force the clubs, particularly 
in Europe, to have better 
stadia. It is very old-fashioned 
to stand for 90 minutes in 
pouring rain to watch sport 
The Americans cannot believe 
it.” 

Glen Kirton. a spokesman 
for the Football Association, 
said: “This is an interesting 
idea. But we are sure FIFA 
realize that there are immense 
complications with what they 
are putting forward. There are 
commercial problems to start 
with and we do not necessarily 
think that making people sit 
down makes people behave 
better." 

Mr Kirton pointed out that 
despite the reputation of Eng- 
land fans there had never been 
a major crowd incident at 
Wemblev for an international. 


for being Txst buy’ 


in the market 

) Our schemes in dude excellent 
cover for private hospital 
charges, specialist fees, 
y out-patient treatment and an 

K Additional Cadi Payment 

option. 8CWA ensures 
[ that when you are iQ, 
you can afford iL 


c 


A 


Bristol House. 

Victoria St. 
Bristol BSl 6AB 


Tel: (0272)2937-12 


BNilalOflnbMDiyWWImAssodrito 

PRIVATE MEDICAL INSURANCE 


{ Bristol Contributory Welfare Association 
• Bristol House, 40*56 Victoria Street Bristol BS 1 6 AB 

I Please send me details of the Prime ft items Scheme 

I I am aged under 65 m for individuals fH 

J For members of Professkmal/Trade Associations j^jj 

I ?b,ne — _ j 

l Address jSfv.L 


TT 20/12 




trouble". 

Wright’s demand was re- 
jected first by Nicholl and 
then by the Southampton 
board, fait he is expected to 
play at Nottingham today 
despite his desire to move. 

“It all started when we had 
four wins in succession last 
month. Things were going 
really well. Obviously, some- 
one did not like us winning 
games and started stirring 
things up,” said NicholL 
! • Doug Rougvie. the Chelsea 
I defender, has been charged 
with bringing the game into 
disrepute following his send- 
ing off in the 44) home defeat 
by Wimbledon a fortnight ago. 
Rougvie starts a two-match 
ban today, missing the 
London derby with Totten- 
ham Hotspur at Stamford 
Bridge. But the extra charge 
has Been brought because he 
was reported by referee, How- 
ard King, for railing to leave 
the field after his dismissal. 

• West Ham United will 
move a motion to halt the 
spread of artificial turf pitches 
for three years at a summit 
meeting of football clubs at 
Villa Park next month. 

• Halifax Town’s coach, Billy 
Ayre, was yesterday appointed 
the dub’s 21st post war man- 
ager. He takes over from Mick 
Jones who left this week to 
become assistant manager at 
Peterborough. 


Jones on 
defensive 


Adrian Jones, the Sussex 
fast bowler who is regarded as 
one of England’s brightest 
prospects, yesterday defended 
his right to seek a move. 
Jones, aged 25, has been 
offered a new three-year con- 
tract by Sussex. 

“All I have done is to say I 
would like to see if I can gel a 
better deal and, if I can, I have 
to look ai it seriously. 1 have 
never made any secret that I 
have been a little unhappy and 
I am only being fair with the 
dub by telling them of my 
feelings," he said. 


Cleaning up 

Taken to the cleaners wfll 
have a new meaning for 
amateur golfers with a new 
tournament next year, the 
Sketchiey championship- This 
is a new stableford event open 
to teams of three players from 
any company registered in 
England. Scotland and Wales. 
All entries must have bona 
fide dub handicaps with a 
maximum limit of 1 8 for men 
and 27 for women. 



error 




Wembley wisp: Martina Ve&kovx. of Czechoslovakia, os bars. (Photograph: Ian Stewart). 


A touch of 
class for 


ATHLETICS 


Wembley 


By Peter Aykroyd 


New plans to ban 
South Africans 


The Kraft International at 
Wembley this weekend has 
taken a huge move up in status 
with the presence of Oksana 
Omefianchik. the Soviet joint 
world champion, in the 10- 
nation tpnraament. 

Her entry is also a signifi- 
cant measure of foe inter- 
i national prestige now enjoyed 
i by Britain by virtue of high 
j gy mn a s tic standards and re- 
1 nowned abilfty for competition 
organization. 

However, Miss Omelian- 
duk will not find the com- 
petition a walkover by any 
means. Three of her opponents 
are m the world’s 20 top 
gymnasts and will test her to 
her limits. Two of them. 
Banana Stoyanova. of Bul- 
garia, and Iveta Polokova, of 
Czechoslovakia, finished sixth 
aad eighth in the recent World I 
Cop, white Diana Dadeva, cf 
Bulgaria, took the bronze 
medal in foeChampions-Al] at 
Wembley last spring. 

Also competing is Lisa El- 
liott, In her first major inter- 
national since winning the 
British national title m Octo- 
ber. 

Among the men, MHsnald 
Watanabem, of Japan, is rated 
thirteenth in foe world, but 
faces foe experience of Alexei 
Hkhonikh, of the Soviet 
Union, and foe youth, of Zhou 
Jing, the Chinese with 
outstanding ability, a mixture 
that promises a fierce battle 
for medals. Britain's fast- 
improving men, while not 
likely to overshadow these 
three far foe overall title, may 
cause a few s ur prise s in some 
of the individual routines. 


Bv Paul Martin 


African sport 2 nd political 
leaders cave drawn up cam- 
paign plans against “allies of 
2 pahhe:d who sneak South 
Africans into international 
competitions by using pass- 
ports of convenience". 

Next year, their fust target 
is to ban athletes from running 
for Britain, or any other 
country, within two years of 
arrival from South Africa 
even if they were bora in 
Britain or hold British 

passports. 

Hie idea was received with 
some hostility by John Holt, 
the London-based Inter- 
national Amateur Athletic 
Federation secretary. “It 
would be impossible admin- 
istratively: all we can check 
are athletes’ passports, not 
their previous residences. We 
are here to help legitimate 
athletes, not block them. In 
any case, you can argue that 
they’re not using passports for 
convenience: they are turning 
their back on South Africa. It 
is a one-way door: they can 


never return there to 
compete." 


The Supreme Council for 
Sport in Africa, which con- 
cluded its annua! meeting m 
Algiers this week, also threat- 
ened that African nations 
would systematically vote 
against candidates for top 
posts in international sports 
bodies whose countries 
“refuse to cease sports ex- 
changes with South Africa” 
The Council's resolution also 
“warns countries which pro- 
vide sanctuary for South Af- 
rican sport and which 
condone their sportsmen and | 
sportswomen competing in j 
South Africa, that they them- j 
selves could face isolation". 


The move for a two-year 
ban on South African-con- 
nected athletes is to be made 
at the IAAF meeting in Rome 
next August, according to Sam 
Rarosamy, the International 
Committee Against Apartheid 
Sport’s London-based 
organizer. 


Gold for Pascoe again 


Dreams of winning gold leading advertising agency, in 
medals are as infrequently a share exchange which will 
realized as plans by students open international markets 
on bow to make their first for the marketing of athletics. 
milli on (Pat Butcher writes). When he retired after 

winning the 400 metres hur- 
Alazi Pascoe has combined dies in the 1974 European and 


both in the space of a dozen 
years, with the announcement 
yesterday that his company, 
APA Ltd, which has the 
contract to market British 
athletics, has linked with the 
American WCRS group, a 


Commonwealth champion- 
ships, Pascoe bought into 
marketing, which he com- 
bined with being an ITV 
commentator before getting 
the contract to market British 
athletics 18 months ago. 


From Ivor Davis 
Los Angeles 

The future o f, Tira 

Witherspoon, foe deposed 

World Boxing Associate* 

heavyweight cfcampwv 

dramatic turn for foe bette r 
yesterday when Jose Toms, 
chairman of the New^ ton: 
Stale Athletic ConnnrsSMO, 
announced foal a terrible mis- 
take tod been made ana 
Witherspoon did not tare 
traces of marijuana m his 
system as had been reported 
earlier this week. 

“it was aU a clerical error, 
Torres said yesterday. "A staff 
person had misread foe coding 
on Witherspoon's urine sam- 
ples. They really showed there 
were no drugs in hi s sys tem. 
As soon as i realized foe 
certainty of foe mistake it took 
me six hours to track down 
Tim in Philadelphia. I r eached 
him at 130 this morning so 
that he wonld be the first to 
bear of foe mistake. He said 
he was very appreciative of the 
call and flunked me for being 
a fine sportsman and a geode* 
man kt having sought has 
oat." 

As a result of foe ww 
findings, Torres said there will 
be no hearing before foe 
commission later this month 
and (here fc no longer any risk 
of Witherspoon losing his 
Ike nee. 

In one of the biggest upsets 
of foe year, Witherspoon was 
stopped in one round by 
substitute James 

“Bonecrusher" Smith at 
Madison Square Garden on 
Friday night. Earlier this 
week. Tones said his office 
had found marijuana in pre- 
and post-fight tests and that 
the findings were confirmed by 
tests done by the New York 
Police Department But yes- 
terday he said foe original 
1 error was merely compounded 
by a member of Ms staff. 

Torres said: “We found foe 
mistake when somebody 
called to ask what was the 
quantity of drugs found in 
Witherspoon's sample. We 
looked into it and realized that 
a staff member bad misread 
the coding report on 
Witherspoon's urine. The 
calibration of the machine on 
foe lab report was improperly 
recorded." he said. 

Torres and Marvin Cohn, 
the deputy New York Sttfe 
Athletic commissioner, said: 
“The whole mistake was com- 
pounded. It’s Hke you push foe 
wrong button on a c omputer 
and the whole mistake mul- 
tiplies. We've made a mistake 
and now we're apologizing 
publicly for iL" 

Cohn added: “I’m not going 
to pinpoint any employee. 
Anyone can make an error. 
We can assure you that we are 
tightening procedures by 
which testing for drugs is 
reported to the commission." 

There was speculation in 
New York that Witherspoon 
may have grounds for legal 
action against the co mmission . 

In Philadelphia, 

Witherspoon told the New 
York Post "When I heard it 
was on the news I didn’t even 
get exdted. I knew this was 
going to happen, Don King 
[the fight promoter] is trying to 
blackball me.” Witherspoon 
claimed be had not smoked 
marijuana in “over a year." 

“After what I went through 
in Atlanta [he was fused 
$25,000 when traces of man - 
Juana were found in his system 
after a boat against Tony 
Tubbs] I would have to be foie 
stupidest human being in foe 
world to smoke a gain, es- 
pecially a week before foe 
fighL All year I've been pass- 
ing tests. And now that I don’t 
want to be with Don King 1 
suddenly flunked two on the 
day of the fight 
“Don King knows I don’t 
want to associate with him. 
He’s going to try every avenue 
to discredit me." he said. 


* i 




SPORT IN BRIEF 




Solent snag 


YACHTING 



Solent Stars' hopes of 
competing in the world invita- 
tion club basketball 
championships at Crystal Pal- 
ace on January 1-4 have hit a 
snag. Solent stepped in as a 
substitute team following the 
withdrawal of Polycefl Kings- 
ton this week but have a 
Carisbeig division one fixture 
at Bolton on January 3. 


Skipper who cheated 
death is feared lost 


From Barry Pickthall, Sydney 

AustraHaD «« semces 


lone sailor and a former 
French submarine com- 


were alerted and the BOC race 
organizers sent up a plane to 


.r^sa-e? 

singlehanded RmmH *i,«. , , shortly after 


For charity 


McDonnell: Italian visit 


Title bout 


Jim McDonnell’s defence of 
his European featherweight 
tide against the Italian, 
Valerio Nati, is likely to take 
place in Italy. 


Fulham Rugby league club, 
so hard up recently that they 
were on foe verge of extinc- 
tion, are dedicating Sunday as 
a fund-raising day for foe 
Royal Ma&lea Cancer Hos- 
pital. Fulham play York in a 
divirion two match at Chis- 
wick Polytechnic Stadium. 


manned 250 miles south of d ^ ofIlfe 0Q board. 


here yesterday. 

The skipper, who cheated 


The patrol boat HMAS 
Fremantle was diverted to 


•taffiTJHriWSS yachted £ 

ago after his yacht capsized t T om , a passing bulk 


ago after his yacht capsized _, a . P 35 ^ 

midway between New Zea- ca ^ ler boarded her at 6.0pm 


Victoria win 


Right formula 


Sydney (Reuter) - Western 
Australia lost foetr final two 
wickets in a drama-packed 
five minutes late in the day to 
give Victoria the first innings 
points in tbeir top-of-the- table 
Sheffield Shield match in 
Perth yesterday. The two 
points gave the visitors a clear 
lead in foe table. • 


Nigel Mansell, of Britain, 
narrowly beaten to foe For- 
mula One title this year, 
admitted yesterday that he 
signed a two-year contract last 
July to drive for Ferrari in the 
world championship. He later 
decided to stay with the 
Williams team for another 
two years and said “the matter 
has been settled amicably” 
with Ferrari. 


land and Cape Horn, last wpfirmed that de Roux 

reported his position to race I”* J uss,n f- An air and sea 

headquarters here at 5.20pm cS rc “ J 00 . , ?, t " ,ued 

(local time) on Thursday ** resumed atfirst 

when five miles off Green hehtloda y- 

Cape, north of Bass StraiL Guy Bemaidin, a fellow 

. : Officials first became con- 

ceraed at 3.0am yesterday place !? taiK .^ fth 

when foe Argos satellite sys- arrival t tontSo tUB u !!2?-2 
tern, tracking the fleet, in- “«“■ ha ? ^ 

dicated that de Roux’s yacht on Th u rsda^, 
had inexplicably turned south 

away from foe finish of this his head ton 8 l * laX ■ hJl 
second wage" of the race 5S2E« tespg*- ■ 


: Officials first became con- 
cerned at 3.0am yesterday 
when the Argos satellite sys- 
tem, tracking foe fleet, in- 


i --■-MOIUU A 1 H 1 I— - 

overboard, Beraardin said. 


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