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THE 

No 62.648 

Labour attack 

‘distortion’ in 
press reports 



TIMES 


TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


Labour MPs have been 
urged io launch a new year 
offensive against whal party 
strategists believe is a con- 
certed Reel Street campaign 
to torpedo their hopes of an 
election victory. 

They have been advised to 
tackle political journalists 
responsible for reports that 
they believe either distort or 
misrepresent party policy or 
activities. 

At the same time, firont- 
bcnch spokesmen have been 
asked to step up their drive for 
favourable press coverage by 
pumping out plenty of speech- 
es and making themselves 
readily available for comment 
on controversial issues. 

The counter-attack was 
urged by Mr Peter Mandelson, 
director of Labour's campaign 
and communications unit, at a 
private meeting at the Com- 
mons last week with senior 
MPs who make up the 
frombench team. 

Those present said that he 
had told them of an analysis 
he had conducted of news- 
paper coverage of the Labour 
Party over the past few 
months. 

It concluded that press re- 
ports had generally been fair 
and reasonable up to August, 
but since then the party had 
been subjected to an unremit- 

Tomorrow 

[Who he? 1 


Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


ting campaign of vilification 
in all but a couple of news- 
papers. culminating in per- 
sonal attacks on Mr Neil 
Kin nock, the Labour leader, 
over his contacts with the 
defence lawyer in the MI5 
spy book case. 

The MPs were told that the 
wave of assaults on u loony 
left" councils, the tax imptica- 


> 

>■ 




Who is this man and 
what is he doing? If 
you can answer this, 
and similar 
questions about the 
year gone by, you 
may be in line for a 
case of vintage 
Moet and Chandon 
champagne, worth 
£182, in our Prize 
Christmas Quiz. 
There are six cases 
to be won in a 
competition 
guaranteed to keep 
the brain ticking 
over the holiday. 
Plus 

For sports fans, a 
week's holiday for 
two at the La Manga 
Club in Spain’s 
Costa Calida is the 
first prize in 
tomorrow’s special 
Sports Crossword. 

Order your 
copy now 


—^dd— 

• There is £8,000 to 
be won today in The 
Times Portfolio Gold 
competition as there 
was no winner 
yesterday. 

• Portfolio list, page 
21; how to play, 
information service, 16. 


; TIMES BUSINESS 


Oil prices Hp 

Despite a rise in crude oil 
pricesTmotorisis are likely to 
escape having la pay more for 
petrol for some weeks Page 17 


F A TlMES-SPORf 


Title sacrifice 

Lloyd Honeyghan, Britain's 
worid welterweight champion, 
has surrendered one of his 
three worid titles rather than 
meet the challenge of a white 
South African Page 28 


Mr Neil Kinnock: target 
of personal attacks'. 

lions of Labour's spending 
plans and alleged selection of 
far-left candidates for safe 
seats were part of orchestrated 
propaganda campaign involv- 
ing the Downing Street press 
office and Conservative Cen- 
tral Office. 

According to Mr 
Mandelson, the MPs said, 
political reporters and com- 
mentators had uncritically 
latched on to this material to 
smear the party. 

The Liberal split over de- 
fence and the evident unity 
and professionalism of the 
Labour conference had pro- 
vided a brief respite, but since 
the Tory gathering in Bourne- 

Piggott 
pays in 
£ 950,000 

A solicitor acting for Lester 
Piggott, the former champion 
jockey, yesterday delivered 
bail security in the form of a 
banker's draft for £950,000 to 
the justices' clerk for West 
Suffolk. 

Mr Piggott, aged 51, had 
appeared before Newmarket 
magistrates on Friday, ac- 
cused of making a false tax 
statement concerning his bank 
account. He bad raced re- 
arrest if yesterday’s 5pm dead- 
line for the ‘ security was not 
met. 

The sum is is the highest to 
be demanded by magistrates 
and is in addition to two 
sureties of £125,000 each, put 
up by Mr Henry Cecil, the 
trainer, and Mr Charles St 
George, a racehorse owner. 

Mr Piggott, of Hamilton 
Road, Newmarket, who be- 
came a trainer after retiring 
from riding last year, is to 
appear before Newmarket 
magistrates on March 19. 

Under the bail conditions, 
he has surrendered his pass- 
port, he must live at his home 
in Newmarket and report 
weekly to police. 

The inquiry into Mr 
Piggott’s affairs is believed to 
be part of an investigation by 
i Inland Revenue and Customs 
& Excise inspectors, involving 
leading figures in the racing 
world. 

The previous highest bail 
security demanded was 
£325,000, imposed in 1983 on 
two men accused of smuggling 


mouth the party had faced a 
shrill and hysterical onslaught. 

The Labour MPs said that 
Mr Mandelson had singled 
out The Sunday Times as the 
“flagship" of anti-Labour sto- 
ries, and other papers had 
followed its lead. 

They had been given a 
warning to expect more of the 
same in the run-up to the 
election as the Conservative 
Party’s propaganda machine 
moved into top gear. 

The communications direc- 
tor had said that one option 
was to retreat into the bunker 
and concentrate their efforts 
on using television and radio, 
under a statutory and pro- 
fessional obligation to ensure 
balanced political coverage, as 
the means of putting across 
the party's message. 

But, according to the MPs, 
he had counselled against such 
a course. Instead, they were 
urged personally to single out 
offending journalists and, 
with the aid of a quiet word, to 
make their displeasure felt. 

The Conservative Party was 
voicing surprise at the new 
Labour move last night. A 
spokesman said it was “an 
interesting if somewhat des- 
perate new tactic." 

He added: "I do not think 
we would want to become 
enmeshed in this row but it 
does not seem to be the 
response of a particularly self- 
confident party. 

“The Labour Party can 
concentrate on talking to itself 
and the press but we will 
concentrate on talking to the 
electorate about the issues. 
That is our job and we will do 
it up to the election." 

Voyager 
heads 
for home 

From Mohsin AK 
Washington 

The two Voyager pilois, 
suffering from fatigue and 
fering headwinds for the first 
time, early yesterday flew their 
buffeted two-engined aircraft 
across the Caribbean and 
headed home on the last kg of 
their non-stop, round-the- 
world flight without refuelling. 

The pilots, Dick Rutan and 
Jeana Yeager, flew through 
“some clouds and storms" at 
00.80 GMT to cross Panama 
and head up the Pacific along 
the west coast of Mexico on 
the way to a landing back 
alEdwards Air Force Base in 
California this morning — a 
day ahead of schedule. 

As Voyager turns north it 
will, for the first time since the 
trip began on December 14, 
face fuel-eating headwinds. 

The Voyager landing orig- 
inally had been expected thus 
afternoon. Early yesterday it 
had logged about 21700 miles 
and had about another 2,400 
miles to go. 

Aviation heroes, page 7 

DTI inquiry 
nears end 

The investigation into pos- 
sible leaks of market-sensitive 
information by civil servants 
could end by Christmas, but 
the Department of Trade and 
Industry declines to confirm 
or deny reports that a young 
woman is the source Page 17 



Mr Mordechai Vanunu showing the message he wrote on his hand as be was taken to court in Jerusalem: “Vannnu was hi- 
jacked in Rome ITL, 30.9.86 2100. Came to Rome by BA fly 504." 


Vanunu PoUticia 
says hijack 

happened ^ “T®*™ 

in Rome David Pi 

From Ian Murray The Liberal Party was dev- 

Jerosalem asrated yesterday by the death 

Mr Mordechai Vanunu has !!^£SSSSfSS: STf 

again defied attempts to si- 

lence him and told the worid 1 his natlve 

that he was “hijacked in 

Rome" to be taken to Israel to Politicians m all parties 
stand trial for treason and rmSStm 
espionage. The revelation 
leaves the Italian Government 
with the embarrassing task of 

asking Israel if it carried out ^ and the 


Politicians mourn Concern at 

‘irreplaceable’ J? olice bil1 

David Penhaligon By John Good body 

O' Snorts News rhrresnondenf 


an illegal abduction on Italian 
soiL 

The former nuclear tech- 
nician is proving to be the 
man Israel cannot gag. He 


Alliance of an important 
member of their parlia- 
mentary team, a shrewd politi- 
cal strategist and -a highly 
respected constituency MP. 

In a statement issued soon 


broke the Israel Official Se- after news of Mr Penhaligon’s 
crets Act to tell The Sunday death reached Westminster a 
Times in September that his profoundly distressed Mr 
country had stockpiled the David Sted said: “He is 
world’s sixth largest armoury irreplaceable.” 
of nuclear warheads. On Sun- ft was a view to be echoed 


day. he- fl u t sm arted his guards throughout the day m a series 
had found a way to. tell of tributes from Dr David 
journalists how he had been Owen, leader of the SDP, 
brought to Israel other political leaders, and 

Before being taken to court MPs from the West Country, 
for only his second appear- all of whom regarded him as a 
a ace since being secretly 
smuggled back to Israel nearly 
three months ago, be had 
written a secret message on the 
palm of his left hand in 
English. 

As the van bringing him 
from his top security prison 
slowed to go down the lane 
behind the East Jerusalem 
Court where he was to appear, 
he flattened the palm of his 
hand against the window. 

Before his guards could pull 
his hand away, the message 
had been photographed. 

“Vananu was hijacked in 
Rome ITL, 30/9/86, 2100" it 
read. “Came to Rome by BA 
fly 504." 

The hearing lasted three David Penhaligon: Shrewd 
hours and it was agreed that political strategist 

Mr Vanunu would be re- 

manded in custody through- # m 

out the legal proceedings f\/| 
against him. When he was y I rM 1 1 Ill f 1 8 
brought out the border police- o 

men guarding him were care- 4* _ _ J _ V 

fit! to hold his handcuffed ifll* fffllllt 

wrist down so that he could 

not try the trick again. But a _ T11l 

voice from the crowd of uyjiii. 

journalists called in Hebrew: Two young children from 

“Where were you captured?" Northamptonshire have died 
He had time to shout “Rome” simultaneously from a rare 
before the hand of one of his complication of meningitis, 
guards roughly silenced him. Nicola, aged 23 months. 

The military censor did his and James Smith, aged two, 
best to prevent details being were found dead in their beds 
released. The Israeli afternoon by their mother, Mrs Sue 

ConimHd on page Ifi, col 3 oo S^y m 



friend. Mr Neil Kinnock, the 
Labour leader, said that Mr 
Penhaligon was a “decent, 
sweet man with a wonderful 
sense of humour and indepen- 
dence. Everybody, political 
friead or foe, is going to miss 
him." 

Mr Penhaligon. aged 42. 
died in the accident about 6.45 
am yesterday at Truck Fork 
on the A3 90 road in Cornwall. 

He was driving his Rover 
car from Truro towards St 
Austell for bis regular Chrisl- 

Photograph 2 

Obituary 13 

mas visit to the postal sorting 
office when it was struck 
almost head-on by a large van 
travelling in the opposite 
direction- The accident dosed 
the icy road for more than two 
hours. Mr Penhaligon died 
instantly. 

Mr Penhaligon, who was 
married with one son and one 
daughter, was the Liberals' 
Treasury spokesman. Along 
with Mr Alan Beith and Mr 
Paddy Ashdown, he was 
considered to be one the 
leading candidates to take 
over from Mr Steel when the 
Liberal leader eventually de- 
cided to stand down. 

His death means a by- 
election in a seal which Mr 
Penhaligon has built into one 
of the Liberals’ safest. He won 
the constituency from the 
Conservatives by 464 votes in 
October, 1974, and at the 1 983 
election increased his majority 
to 10,480. 

Although much of Mr 
Fenhaligon's vote was a per- 
sonal one, the Liberals will 

Continued on page 2, col 4 


police bill 
for soccer 

By John Good body 
Sports News Correspondent 
The Government is so con- 
cerned at the cost of policing 
football matches in the fight 
against hooliganism that it has 
asked the Metropolitan Police 
to provide a detailed bill. 

It costs £13.88 an hour to 
hire one policeman and the 12 
London League dubs last 
season contributed almost £1 
million between them towards 
the policing at grounds. 

Home Office officials con- 
cede that the actual coat is 
“several limes that amount" 
because of the increasing need 
to have officers deployed away 
from the ground. 

Gubs do not contribute to 
the cost of policemen being on 
duty in the streets and city 
centres, before and after 
matches. 

Supt David McCrone, dep- 
uty. head of the public order 
branch of the Metropolitan 
Police said: “The trouble has 
generally shifted from the 
grounds to the streets partly 
because of our success inside 
the stadium caused by such 
factors as the introduction of 
closed-circuit television and 
the strict segregation of 
supporters." 

Ministers are very con- 
cerned at the cost involved 
and will use the evidence in 
the argument with the Foot- 
ball League that it should 
introduce 100 per cent 
membership schemes with 
identity cards at the 92 League 
clubs. 

Mr Dick Tracey, the Sports 
Minister, and Mr Douglas 
Hogg, Under Secretary of 
State at the Home Office, are 
Continued on page 16, col 8 


rules out 
pardons 
for aides 

From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 

President Reagan yesterday 
ruled out a presidential par- 
don for Lieutenant-Colonel 
Oliver North and .Admiral 
John Poindexter to enable 
them to tell the full story of the 
Iran-Contra scandal. 

Congressional investigators 
are still refusing to accept Mr 
Reagan's call for limited 
immunity for the two former 
National Security Agency of- 
ficials who presumably know 
(he full story of the affair. Both 
have refused to testily under 
their Fifth Amendment rights 
against selt-incrimination. 

But many senior members 
of Congress of both parties are 
becoming increasingly con- 
vinced that the only way to 
uncover the lull story 1 of Lbe 
scandal will eventually be to 
gram limited immunity. 

Mr James Wright, the in- 
coming Democratic Speaker 
of the House of Repre- 
sentatives. called for a 
presidential pardon as “the 
ultimate act of leadership, the 
ultimate immunity". But a 
senior White House official 
rejected the idea 

Many congressmen believe 
a pardon now would imply 
that Admiral Poindexter and 
Colonel North were guilty of a 
crime. There is also a wide- 
spread feeling on Capitol Hill 
that with the inquiry still in its 
early stages it would be wrong 
to interfere with the possibil- 
ity of prosecutions if serious 
crimes were uncovered. 

Mr Larry Speakes. the 
While House spokesman, did 
not totally rule out a future 
presidential pardon. “The 
President is not planning a 
pardon for them, but of course 
as the Chief Executive one 
always retains the right for 
executive clemency," he said. 

Some senior Republicans 
and Democrats criticized Mr 
Wright’s call as premature at 
this stage of the congressional 
investigation. But Senator 
Warren Rudman. the senior 
Republican on the Senate 
select committee investigating 
the scandal said prolonged 
national anguish would not be 
justified by “the possible 
imprisonment for a short 
period of a few people for 
things they thought they were 
doing righl”. 

President Reagan's popular- 
ity is continuing to plummet 
and there are increasingly 
persistent, frank questions 
about his forgetfulness and 
whether he is really up to the 
rigours of the job. An opinion 
poll among residents of Jowa 
showed that one in four 
thought he should resign. 
Nearly one in five wanted him 
impeached. Three-quarters of 
those questioned believed the 
Administration was trying to 
cover up the scandal. 

Mr Reagan appeared tense 
yesterday when he signed a 
National Day of Prayer 
Proclamation. 


Meningitis blamed 
for double death 


Iran claims British ‘spy 9 confessed 


By Nicholas Beeston 
The Iranian envoy to 
London yesterday claimed 
that in's country was holding 
two suspected British spies 
and that one of them had 
made a confession, which was 
filmed and would soon be 
shown on Iranian television. 

At a press conference in the 
Iranian embassy in Kensing- 
ton. Mr Muhammad Mahdi 
Akhoond-Zadeh, the newly 
appointed charge d’affaires, 
accused Mr Roger Cooper, a 


. £■ 


British businessman, of “spy- national has been held at the 
ing activities" and claimed he high-security Evin prison in 


had confessed. 

“Cooper was a British sub- 


Tehran for more than a year. 
The Foreign Office is ex- 


j-ect spying for the interests of ^ ro ^fjfor fteTetetiSl 

who C addS’thS l 1h? e sf l !i!S^ confession before responding 
who added that the 51-year : ^ ^ lr anian Haim.: 

old Bnton was a fluent Farsi 

speaker and had been a . The other Briton accused of 
speech-writer in Iran under spying in Iran is Mr Nicholas 
the late Shah. Nicola, aged 2 1 , from London, 


Mr Cooper, who worked for who was arrested by Iranian 
the Financial Times and also police near the Pakistani tor- 
represented the American oil der after allegedly being 
company McDermott Inter- caught with firearms. 


By Jill Sherman 

Two young children from The 
Northamptonshire have died as Wall 
simultaneously from a rare afthoug 
complication of meningitis. contrib 
Nicola, aged 23 months, mening 
and James Smith, aged two, James 
were found dead in their beds com mu 
by their mother, Mrs Sue masten 
Smith, on Sunday morning, m screen i 
their home in Stoneht 
Wellingborough. “Th< 

At first pathologists di- casued 
agnosed a severe throat infec- which i 
tion which the children had and cai 
not been able to fight But adrenal 
yesterday Kettering’s district and th 
medical officer. Dr John Rog- said Dr 
ers, said that bacteriologists at Dr St 
Kettering General Hospital the dea 
found evidence of menigoccal shire ar 
meningitis. the sam 

“The children died of an Dr Rt 
unusual complication of other o 
meningococcal meningitis, aged 5 
They both had .the same admine 
reaction, a failure of the Ketterir 
adrenal glands which meant Sunday 
that their defence mechanisms discharj 
were shot to pieces." afteraoc 


The complication, known 
as Waterhouse Freiderichson, 
although rare, is often the 
contributory cause of death in 
meningitis cases, said Dr 
James Stuart specialist in 
community medicine, who is 
masterminding the meningitis 
screening programme in 
Stonehouse Gloucesterhisre. 

“The complication is 
casued by blood poisoning 
which overwhelms the body 
and -causes a failure of the 
adrenal glands, ft causes shock 
and the circulation stops," 
said Dr Stuart. 

Dr Stuart said that some of 
the deaths in the Gloucester- 
shire area bad been caused by 
the same syndrome. 

Dr Rogers said that the two 
other older daughters, Jackie 
aged 5 and Toni 4. were 
admitted for observation to 
Kettering General Hospital on 
Sunday but they were both 
discharged early yesterday 
afternoon. 


The Queen to end side-saddle parade 


\ 



By Robin Young 

The Queen is to give up 
riding side-saddle at the 
Trooping of the Colour in 
June. Instead of her annual 
display of dignified equestrian 
expertise, she will drive to and 
from Horse Guards as a 
passenger in a carriage, and 
will inspect her annual birth- 
day parade from the comfort 
of the coach. 

The Queen's decision has, 
according to Buckingham Pal- 
ace, nothing to do with either 
security or the state of the 
monarch's health. It is all 
because of the age of her horse. 


For the past 18 years the 
Queen has ridden her blade 
mare, Burmese, at the Troop- 
ing. The couple have starred 
on more than a million picture 
postcards, and the pose in 
which people most readily 
picture the Queen is as the 
world’s best known prac- 
titioner of a physically fatigu- 
ing and potentially dangerous 
equestrianism that most 
horsewomen no longer even 
attempt 

Burmese, who was pre- 
sented to the Queen by the 
Royal Canadian Mounted 
Police at the age of seven, is 


now 24. The Queen is 61. But 
Miss Sylvia Stanier, the horse- 
woman who acts as royal 
stand-in at trooping of the 
colour rehearsals, estimated 
yesterday that Burmese was by 
human standards the equiva- 
lent of 90 years old. 

"I imagine that the powers 
that be, taking into consid- 
eration that horses do not 
normally live to the age of 24, 
are rather wary of lbe fact that 
they are putting the Queen on 
a horse which is more than an 
old age pensioner", Miss 
Stanier said 

Though the horse is of- 


ficially perfectly fit, tire Queen 
herself thinks it is lime that 
the old black mare should be 
. retired from parades. There is 
no question of her going to the 
knackers* yard. Miss Stanier 
said yesterday; “I shall look 
after Burmese, and I can 
assure you everyone else will 
until the end of her days". 

Miss Stanier said that Bur- 
mese was “a rare animal in 
that she always wants to be out 
in front, which is unusuaL In 
all the years that she has done 
the trooping, she has only 
caused me problems if she is 

Confirmed on page 16, col 3 




2 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


NEWS SUMMARY 


Man accused of 


Salisbury death 


Del ectives investigating the brutal kQIings of tiro women 
in Salisbury charged a mm with the reorder of one of them 
last night 

Mr Alexander Mariuses, a public lavatory cleaner 
employed by Salisbury District Council, was accused of 
murdering Mrs Beryl Deacon, aged 44, from Ringwood, 
Hampshire, whose body was discovered in lavatories in 
Salisbury early on Sunday. 

Mr Madnnes, aged 27, of Westwood Rd, Salisbury* 
appeared before a special sitting of Salisbury magistrates. 
He made no application for bail and was remanded hi cus- 
tody until tomorrow. 

Detectives an still inquiring into the murder of another 
Salisbury woman, Miss Roth Perrett, aged 25, a 
psychiatric patient who was found strangled on Saturday 
two miles from where Mrs Deacon’s body was discovered. 


Maxwell 
TV foray 


Bus row 
settled 


Representatives of Mr 
Robert Maxwell are nego- 
tiating in Paris to take an 
ownership stake in the 
main French television net- 
work, which is to be pri- 
vatized in the new year, ina 
flotation expected to raise 
£400 million. 

Mr Maxwell is seeking 
np to 10 per cent of the 
equity in the channel, TF1. 
He and his representatives 
are said to have had talks 
with several large French 
companies, including 
Havas, the advertising 
agency, in an effort to form 
a consortium . 


All 74 bus drivers of 
Merthyr Tydfil Transport, 
Mid Ghmoigan, who were 
dismissed on Saturday and 
told to pay back three day's 
wages that had already 
been advanced, were yes- 
terday reinstated. 

The men lost their jobs 
after an unofficial strike in 
support of a colleague who 
was dismissed for allegedly 
issuing a wrong ticket. 

After negotiations with 
the drivers and onion 
representatives, the com- 
pany said last night that 
the drivers were back on 
duty. 


Pit overtime threat 


The Yorkshire coalfield could be hit by the biggest 
dispute since the miners’ strike. 

Members of the pit deputies' union Nacods at 
Gohlthorpe colliery, near Doncaster, who are on strike, are 
calling on the 4,000 deputies in Yorkshire to impose an 
overtime ban after management provided safety cover, a job 
which they normally do, last weekend. 

Today delegates will meet in Barnsley at a Nacods area 
council meeting to decide whether to impose the overtime 
ban. Gotdthorpe's 60 deputies have not worked since 
December 14 and 550 members of the National Union of 
Mineworkers were sent home without pay. 

British Coal said at the weekend that 36 NUM men with 
branch agreement carried out essential safety work. 


Prince is 
on move 


The schooldays of Prince 
William (right) start a new 
phase in January when he 
moves to another pre-prep 
school. 

Buckingham Palace is 
not disclosing its name, bat 
an announcement will be 
made shortly before be is 
due to begin - possibly in 
mid-January. 

Ten days ago Prince 
William, aged four, left his 
nursery school at Notting 
HSU - after playing the 
part of an Innkeeper in the 
school's nativity play. 

He spent four terms at 
the school, which is run by 
Mrs Jane Mynors. 



am wm 


Judges meet target 


lord Hailsham of St Maryfebone, the Lord Chancellor, 

W 3 *> ■ ■ f n - n n | f A » ■ ■ ,1 _ 


has met his promised target of a 10 per cent Increase in the 
circuit bench (Our Home Affairs Correspondent writes). 

His department announced yesterday that 50 new circuit 
judges had been appointed in England and Wales in 1986. 
That is more than in any year once 1972, and brings the to- 
tal of circuit judges in post at the end of tire year to 391, the 
highest ever. Three of the judges are women - two 
banisters and one solicitor. 


£10m train 
ferry berth 
for Dover 


By Rodney Cowton 

Transport Correspondent 

Dover Harbour Board is lo 
invest £10 million in a new 
freight-train ferry berth. . 

A ferry now under construc- 
tion will operate from the 
berth and will have four times 
the cargo-carrying capacity of 
existing rail freight ferries. 

The board said yesterday it 
was confident that the ship 
and the berth would be able to 
meet the challenge of the 
Channel tunnel, which is due 
to come into operation in 
1993. The new berth will 
become the only one for cross- 
channel rail freight 

Mr John Potter, deputy 
managing director of the 
board, said that the berth was 
due to be completed in Janu- 
ary 1988. The French nationa- 
lized railways operator, 
SNCF, had signed a 1 0-year 
contract to use the berth, 
which would ensure that a 
very high proportion of the 
project's capita] cost would be 
recovered in that period. 

The new ferry is being built 

in France for SNCF, but 
British Rail will make exten- 
sive use of iL It will carry rail 
wagons on its lower deck and 
trucks on its upper deck. 

Apart from hatring much 
greater cargo-carrying capac- 
ity, the new ship will be fester, 
and its turn-round time at 
Dover is expected to be at 
least one hour quicker than 
existing rail ferries. It is sched- 
uled to make four round trips 
a day between Dover and 
Dunkirk. 

With the closure next 
month of the British Rail 
service from Harwich to 
Zeebrugge in Belgium, it is 
expected that rail freight traf- 
fic through Dover will rise to 
one million tonnes next year, 
using existing facilities. Mr 
Potter said it was quite pos- 
sible that it would double 

Both British Rail and SNCF 
are planning to operate inten- 
sive rail Services through the 
Channel tunnel from 1993. 


Settle line 
‘loses £lm 
each year’ 


British Rail yesterday re- 
leased an outline of its finan- 
cial case for closing the route 
between Carlisle and Settle, 
regarded as possibly the most 
beautiful railway line in 
England. 

British Rail said that be- 
tween £2.7 million and £4.3 
million was needed urgently 
for the Ribblehead viaduct In 
addition there were 20 other 
viaducts, 14 tunnels and 325 
bridges. Total civil engineer- 
ing costs on the line, excluding 
day to day maintenance, 
would average £950.000 a year. 

On-going costs would total 
£1.96 million a year, made up 
of infrastructure, £950,000, 
train operating costs, 
£800,000, and interest and 
depreciation on rolling stock, 
£210,000. Current revenue 
was £1 million a year, leaving 

a loss of nearly £1 million . 

A rail route is proposed 
from Leeds to Carlisle via 
Giggleswick and Camforth, 
and a bus route, sponsored by 
British Rail, between Appleby 
and Penrith. 


Young orders 


after Rhine 


O 


litical Staff 
Lord Young of Grafiham, 
Secretary of State for Employ- 
ment, has ordered a review of 
emergency plans to deal with 
the escape of hazardous waste, 
as a result of the Rhine 
disaster. 

The aim is to see if any 
lessons can be learnt from the 
pollution catastrophe which 
began with the discharge of 
agricultural pesticides into the 
nver in Switzerland and killed 
off aO aquatic life in the Rhine 


through West Germany and 
the Ntd 


fetheriands to the North 
Sea. 

The review will include 
investigating the requirements 
for firms to keep local councils 
up to date on sites which could 
pose a major hazard. 

Environment ministers qui- 
cklydaimed last month that 
tighter safety rules in Britain 
would prevent a disaster simi- 
lar to that at the Sandoz 
warehouse in Basle, Switzer- 
land, where 30 tons of pesti- 
cides and a mercury comp- 


ound were washed into the 
Rhine by firemen fighting a 
blaze. 

Bat there is now consid- 
erable confusion on whether 
such a disaster would be 
caught by the present safety 
measures in Britain. This is 
made worse because respon- 
sibility for dealing with poflu- 
tion is shared between the 
Departments of Environment 
and Employment 

Lord Young, who has 
responsibility for the Health 
and Safety Executive, de- 


fy to 


scribed in a written 
Lord Kenneti the 
Democratic peer, the present 
arrangements for monitoring 


« •„ hw i -sciential, have to notify local 

sized that smce Bnmm h^d ^ lhori!i(?s ofihe chemicals on 
adopted the EBTsl Seveso 



sates with the greatest major 
‘ ' enables 


accident hazard. This . 
councils to draw up off-site 
e m e rgency plans to deal with 
any leakage. 

These arrangements will 

be reviewed in the light of the 

accident at Basle,” be said. 


The Department of Envir- 
onment said it knew nothing 
about the review and empha- 


directive”, strict safety mea- 
sures were already in toree. 

But the Health and Safety 
Executive said it did not yet 
know whether a Basle-type 
incident would be covered by 
the present law. 

Under the Control of Indus- 
trial Major Accident Hazards 

regulations (Cimah) 19S-, 
owners of about 200 plant 5 , 
designated as haying the great- 
est major accident hazard 


sire- 

-We do not know yet if the 

warehouse at . *9^ 

have been clashed in Britain 
as a noiifablc site- . ^ * sre 
waiting for information from 
the firm in Basle about exactly 
what was stored there. 

-We believe about 32 dif- 
ferent chemicals were in- 
volved and some were even 
banned pesticides - stored 

apd awaiting disposal . 


& 


L 4 ? < a> 


II 1 


Rise in bomb 


attacks put 
down to new 
split in IRA 


By Richard Ford 

The recent upsurge in ter- 
rorism in Northern Ireland 
has been blamed on the split 
wi thin the Provisional IRA 
over its policy of not 
participating in the Dail, the 
Dublin parliament 
Senior RUC officers believe 
that defections from the Pro- 
visional movement have forc- 
ed the military men to launch 
bombing onslaught as a 
means of reassuring their 
supporters that the terrorist 
campaign is not being down- 
graded. 

In the wake of carefully 
planned Provisional IRA 
bomb attacks on hotels and 
bars at the weekend, the RUC 
yesterday renewed its warning 
to the province that terrorists 
were intent on continuing 
their campaign over Christ- 
mas and into the new year. 

A statement issued from 
RUC headquarters said: The 
main reason for these attacks 
is the need within the Pro- 
visional IRA leadership to 
counter increasing defections 
to the rival Republican Sinn 
Ran. 

"The public are again urged 
to exercise maximum vigi- 
lance not only in the days 
coming up to Christmas, but 
also in the new year period.'’ 

Security forces in the North 
expected an increase in Pro- 
visional IRA violence after its 
political wing, Provisional 
Sinn Fein, derided at its 
annual conference to abandon 
“abstentionism” and allow 
elected representatives to take 
their seats in the Irish 
Republic's parliament 

The decision led to a walk- 
out by Mr Ruairi O Bradigh, a 


former party president who 
founded Republican Sinn 
Fein, which m recent weeks 
has been setting up its 
organization in the North. 

It was expected that the 
Provisional IRA leaders, who 
publicly backed the decision 
to drop abstentionism, would 
attempt to increase their ter- 
rorist offensive to reassure 
traditionalists and sceptics of 
the new policy that the bomb 
and bullet would remain a 

main part in their campaign 

Meanwhile the RUC and 
the police federation have 
publicly criticized Cardinal 
Tomas O Fiaich’s remark that 
until the allegations that the 
force operated a shoot-to-kill 
policy were cleared up, 
nationalists would be reluc- 
tant to join the force. 

The RUC described the 
cardinal's comments as -hurt- 
ful, unconstructive and un- 
helpful”, particularly as the 
force was offering every en- 
couragement to recruit more 
Roman Catholics so the RUC 
would be more representative. 

The composition of the 
force is approximately 90 per 
cent Protestant and 10 per 
cent Roman Catholic with 
senior officers privately ad- 
mitting that they face diffi- 
culties in recruiting national- 
ists, who in many cases have 
to completely dissociate them- 
selves from their community 
on joining the force. 

But in their statement the 
RUC said that as professional 
police officers they resented 
Cardinal O Hatch's com- 
ments and had no need to 
assert their impartiality as the 
record was there for everyone 
who chose to see it 


MPs grieve for 


Shooting 
blamed 
on feud 


A feud within the outlawed 
Irish National Liberation 
Army is being blamed for the 
killing of a self-employed 
plumber in West Belfast. 

Thomas McCartan, aged 31, 
a father of five, was shot in the 
head by two gunmen who 
ambushed him at the gate of 
his home in Andersonstown at 
midnight on Sunday. 

He was approaching his 
house having driven mends 
home when the gunmen fired 
shots into his head at point- 
blank range before escaping in 
a hijacked van. The vehicle 
was later found abandoned a 
few hundred yards away and 
police do not suspect that the 
killing was sectarian. 

It is the second murder to 
hit the family. Nine years ago, 
Mr Jack McCartan, the dead 
man's father, who was the 
manager of a local social club, 
was shot dead. 

Yesterday the . Provisional 
IRA denied any involvement 
in the killing of Mr McCartan 
and detectives are working on 
the theory that he was shot 
dead because of a row wi thin 
the ranks Of the paramili tary 
organization. 

Dr Joe Hendron, a Social 
Democratic and Labour Party 
councillor, said the shooting 
demonstrated the nature of 

the “paramilitary scourge" 
faced by West Belfast “Dur- 
ing the past week they have 
shot innocent people, blown 
them up by mistake and 
damaged their homes and 
places of work:”. 


Pay bonus 
for stress 
criticized 



The wreckage of David Penhatigon's smashed Rover is taken away from the crash site. 


Continued from page 1 
expect to hold the seat with a 
good majority. 

Last night some Liberals 
were privately hoping that Mr 
John Pandoe, the former MP 
for North Cornwall and still a 
leading figure in the party, 
would be tempted to make a 
comeback to the Commons 
which he left in 1979 . 

Mr Pardoe, who was de- 
feated by Mr Steel in the 
contest for the leadership after 
the resignation of Mr Jeremy 
Thorpe, has already taken on 
the post of chairman of the 
Alliance's general election 


planning group and has pri- 
vate business commitments. 
His return to Westminster 
would be welcomed by his 
Liberal colleagues, not least 
MrSteeL 

Mr Peuhaligon was one of 
Britain’s most widely-liked 
MPs, regularly appearing on 
radio and television. He was 
often on BBC television's 
Question Time programme, 
and was one of three poli- 
ticians who stood in for 
Jimmy Young on his morning 
radio programme when the 
broadcaster went on holiday 
last month. 

His ready wit and familiar 


Cornish accent were obvious 
attractions to producers. Mr 
Penhaligon often joked to his 
colleagues that he was a 
“professional Comishman” 
and that he was regularly 
invited to appear on the media 
not in his role as a Liberal 
spokesman but because he was 
Cornish. 

His loss is a shattering blow 
to the Liberals, and to Mr 
Steel who was always grateful 
for his private advice. 

The Liberal leader was in 
his constituency yesterday 
when Mr David Alton, the 
party 's chief whip, telephoned 
him to tell him of the tragedy. 


Mr Steel immediately rang Mr 
Penhaligon ’s wife Annette to 
express his sympathy. 

The Prime Minister was 
said to be deeply shocked, and 
was writing a letter of sym- 
pathy to Mr Penhaligon’s 
family. 

Dr Owen said: “In the 
political life of the West 
Country David Penhaligon 
will be irreplaceable. He was a 
colourful, charismatic and 
courageous Comishman.” 

West Country Conservative 
MPs were warm in their 
tributes. Mr David Harris (St 
Ives) said he and other Cor- 
nish MPs were shattered 


Gallery appeal launched 


Tate seeks £2.9m Constable 


Bid to let 
TV into 


The BBC in Northern Ire- 
land was criticized by the 
Confederation of British In- 
dustry in the province yes- 
terday for paying a £300 bonus 
to staff because of the stress 
they had endured this year. 

The corporation refused to 
comment on the payment of 
the bonus to each of its 700 
workers, amidst private criti- 
cism from businessmen and 
an^er from Unionist and 
nationalist politicians. 

The CBI criticized the pay- 
ment of such bonuses, saying 
it implied that everyone em- 
ployed by the Corporation was 
operating in what could be 
regarded as a war zone. 

Major companies employ- 
ing people from the province 
and elsewhere denied that 
their staff received additional 
payment for working in the 
north. Spokesmen for Marks 
& Spencer, British Midland 
airline and British Airways 
said that no bonuses or 
“danger” money were paid. 

Civil Servants at the North- 
ern Ireland Office receive no 
extra allowance, though sol- 
diers get a Northern Ireland 
allowance of £2.45 a day to 
compensate for the high cost 
of living, unsocial hours and 
working conditions. 

Some businessmen said that 
the payment of bonuses set a 
damaging precedent and that 
those who had paid them in 
the early years bad found it 
difficult to stop the practice 
once the scale of the troubles 
declined. 


The Tate Gallery is to 
launch an appeal to buy 
Constable's “The Opening of 
Waterloo Bridge” and the 
National Heritage Memorial 
Fund is making a £1 million 
grant towards the purchase. 

The Tate appeal begins on 
January 27 for the balance of 
the £2.9 million needed to 
acquire the painting from its 
owner, Mrs A J. Sheldon, 
daughter of the late Mr Harry 
Ferguson, one of the founders 
of the Massey-Ferguson trac- 
tor empire. 

National Heritage’s grant is 
the largest yet made by the 
fund for a single work of ait 
and reflects the importance 
attached to what is generally 
regarded as one of the 


By John Young 

greatest master- 


painters 
pieces. 

A leading art expert said last 
night that, because of the 
painting’s historic as well as 
artistic significance, it was 
inconceivable that it should be 
allowed to leave the country. 

The gallery's trustees have 
already committed £500,000 
from their annual allocation 
towards its purchase. A fur- 
ther £250,000 has been prom- 
ised by the National Art- 
Collections Fund, its largest 
ever disbursement, and 
£100,000 by the Friends of the 
Tale Gallery. 

The painting, first publicly 
exhibited at the Royal Acad- 
emy in 1832, depicts the 
opening of the bridge by the 
Prince Regent, subsequently 


King George IV, in 1817. It 
measures 86%ins by 53ins and 
is described as one of the three 
great Constables still in pri- 
vate hands. 

A spokesman for the Tate 
said that the trustees regarded 
its acquisition as essential to 
its collection which, although 
rich in Constables, contained 
only one other canvas measur- 
ing more than 6ft across, “The 
Marine Parade and Old C hain 
Pier, Brighton”, which was 
purchased for the nation for 
£15,000 in 1950. Constable 
saw it as one of his most 
important achievements. 

The asking price for ‘The 
Opening of Waterloo Bridge” 
is £4 million, but its (trice will 
be reduced to £2.9 million by 
tax concessions. 




Date of Thatcher visit 
to Moscow is agreed 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


The Prime Minister is to 
visit Moscow shortly before 
Easter, Downing Street con- 
firmed last night 
The trip, which Conser- 
vative strategists are expecting 
to give an important boost to 
Mrs Thatcher in election year, 
will last three days. 

The dates were agreed in 
principle at a Downing Street 
meeting yesterday between 
Mrs Thatcher and Mr Leonid 
Zamyatin, the Soviet am- 
bassador, who took with him a 
message from Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov, the Soviet leader. 

It was the latest in the 
increasing stream of contacts 
between the British and Soviet 
governments. 

Last week the British 
Ambassador in Moscow, Sir 
Bryan Gardedge, had a meet- 
ing with Mr Gorbachov, the 
first formal talks between a 
Kremlin leader and a British 


ambassador for 23 years. 

Given the present diffi- 
culties of the United States' 
presidency. British ministers 
are hoping and expecting that 
Britain's role in East-West 
talks in the wake of the 
Reykjavik summit mil be of 
increasing importance. 

Mrs Thatcher has made 
clear that she intends to raise 
with Mr Gorbachov a 50 per 
cent cut in strategic nuclear 
weapons, by the United States 
and Soviet Union, the elimin- 
ation of longer range inter- 
mediate nuclear weapons in 
Europe and a ban on chemical 
weapons. 


the 


Tory strategists believe that 
e visit will have electoral 


advantages, underlining Mrs 
Thatcher's status as a world 
leader. 

Mr Gorbachov has made 
plain that he regards the tripas 
being of great importance. 


Cattle smugglers defraud EEC subsidy scheme 


By a Staff Reporter 

Cross-border cattle 
gling i$ defrauding the EEC of 
hundreds of thousands of 

pounds and threatening ruin tn 
slaughter houses in Northern 
Ireland. 

The illicit trade in cattle 
along the 300-mile Irish bor- 
der is showing no sign of 
decline in spite of the creation 
of special customs task forces 
to deal with- the scandal. 

The large profits to be made 
by smuggling syndicates and 
the nature of a border cutting 
through farms and even 
through homes is making the 
task of customs officials al- 
most impossible. 

Farming organizations be- 
lieve that only when die 26 per 


cent disparity between the 
green pound of the UK and the 
pant of the Irish Republic is 
closed will the cattle smug- 
gling decline, leaving die field 
dear for more traditional 
items such as liquor. 

The European Community’s 
green currency is the mecha- 
nism used to avoid one nation 
enjoying a trading advantage 
over fellow member states 
because of a fall in the value of 
its currency. 

The disparity between the 
UK and Irish Republic devel- 
oped in the summer when the 
Dublin government devalued 
its currency by 6 per cent 
followed by a similar cut In the 
green punt. 

But there has been no 
similar redaction in the UK’s 


pound and so to ensure 
at Irish farmers receive the 
EEC common price on their 
exports to Britain they HnWn 
an export subsidy of between. 
£120 to £140 per cow or 
carcass sent to the UK. 


In a small number of cases 
cattle are moved into the south 
then legally re-exported back 
across the border a few days 
later with farmers claiming the 
subsidy. 


To prevent farm produce 
being exported from the UK 
into other member slates 
where higher prices operate, 
the EEC imposes a levy per 
head of cattle. It is this 
subsidy system which the 
cattle smugglers in the north 
have been exploiting for three 
months. 


Last month an estimated 
40,000 cattle were iDegally 
taken across the fender with 
smugglers driving them in 
trucks with false number 
plates across unapproved 
roads or dropping them in 
fields at night where they are 
led a few hundred yards into 
the south. 


animals brought illegally from 
the north appear to be legiti- 
mate cattle from the Irish 
Republic. 

Slaughter bouses in North- 
ern Ireland have been affected 
by the smuggling, with plants 
suffering a 20 per cent decline 
in the months until November 
and there is concern that 
things may get worse if the 
smuggling continues at its 
present rate. 


One person involved In the 
meat trade said: “The cattle go 
down on the hoof, are killed in 
the republic and then exported 
to Britain with a subsidy of op 
to £150 per animal.** 


With many forms straddling 
die bonder it is an almost 
impossible task for customs 
officials, whose job has been 
made more difficult by reports 
that fate* Animal ear tags have 
been manufactured so that 


Although extra 
officers have been sent to 
border areas, farming 
organizations fear their impact 
has been minimal 


One man said: “The only 
way we will get a satisfactory 
solution of this problem is to 
have a meaningful devaluation 
of the ereen nound." 


US firm plans 
new HQ on 
Telegraph site 


By Judith Huntley 
Commercial Property 
Correspondent 

Goldman Sachs, the US 
investment house, has bought 
the Fleet Street printing works 
of The Daily Telegraph to 
redevelop the site as its 
London headquarters. 

Goldman Sachs has bought 
Rothesay Developments, a 
small property development 
company which bought the 
freehold site from the news- 
paper in 19S4. Neither side 
will reveal how much has been 
paid but prices are rising 
rapidly in the Fleet Street area 
as the newspaper industry 

moves away. 

Rothesay planned to build a 
tower block on the 1.15 acre 
site with more than 
200,000 sq ft of offices and it 
is believed that Goldman 
Sachs will build at least that 
amount for its own occupa- 
tion. The scheme could cost 
about £100 million. 

The Daily Telegraph has 
built a £75 million printing 
plant in London's Docklands 
and its journalists are due to 
move to a building near by on 
the Isle of Dogs next year. Its 
sale to Rothesay involved a 
complicated agreement over 
initial payments and a share of 
development profits, but the 
exact financial details 
not disclosed. 


were 




C; 


"-r 



Goldman Sachs has been 
searching for a large amount 
of space in the City’s square 
mile for some time but has 
been unable to find new 
offices. The move to Fleet 
Street reflects the dire shortage 
of top quality offices in the 
City, where rents are soaring 
on the back of strong demand 
and scarcity of supply in the 
wake of the Big Bang, the de- 
regulation of the financial 
markets. 


By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 
MPs are to make fresh 
moves to have the proceed- 
ings of Commons select 
committees televised when 
they return from the Christ- 
mas break, and this time they 
believe they stand a good 
chance of success. 

One significant new factor 
which could work in their 
favour has been the positive 
impact on public opinion of 
watching newsclips of Presi- 
dent Reagan's aides being 
grilled on the Iran arms affair 
by the House of Repre- 
sentatives foreign affairs com- 
mittee. 

Mr Austin Mitchell, Labour 
MP for Grimsby, tabled an 
Early Day Motion last June 
which was signed by 162 MPs 
from all parties who were in 
favour of televising select 
committees. 

Mr Mitchell is now plan- 
ning to table another EDM for 
which he believes he can 
secure well over 200 
signatures. 

He also hopes to introduce a 
len-minutc rule bill. If that 
too, is well-supported. Mr 
John Biffen, Leader of the 
House, will be under strong 
pressure to find time for a 
half-day debate at the end of 
which MPs would have a free 
vote. 

The last similiar debate was 
in November 19S5, when MPs 
rejected by just 12 votes a 
move to allow the Commons 
itself to be televised for an 
experimental period. The sur- 
prise defeat was attributed to 
the last minute change of heart 
of Mrs Thatcher, who had 
earlier co me round to the idea. 

To allow cameras into the 
committee rooms, however, 
would be seen as a significant 
step towards allowing them 
into the actual chamber. 

Sir Edward du Cann, former 
chairman of the Conservative 
backbench 1922 committee 
Md a sponsor of the first 
EDM, said last night that there 
was now no doubt that tele- 
vision would be introduced in 
some form in the Commons. 

He believed this firesh at- 
tempt to televise select 
committees could succeed be-, 
cause televising the Lords had 
proved successful; because it 
represented a conciliatory 
compromise following the 
exclusion of cameras from the 
chamber, and because there 
if? increasing realization 
tuat chat shows and television 

ESTEP werc over 
from Pariamem as the politi- 
cal forum of the nation. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


HOME NEWS 


3 


Conman who duped 
secretary with job 
offer sent to prison 


A confidence trickster who 
duped Miss Sarah Lambert, a 
London secretary, into parting 
with more than £1,000. was 
jailed for three years yes- 
terday. 

Joseph Hanson had pleaded 
guilty to “deliberate, cold- 
blooded, carefully planned 
and calculated fraud” Judge 
Norwood, passing sentence, 
said at Isleworth Crown 
Court, west London. 

She ordered that the sen- 
tence run consecutively to one 
that Hanson is presently serv- 
ing. which ends in February 
1988. 

The disappearance of the 
Miss Lambert, aged 26. for 
four days in mid-August 
started a nationwide hunt. 

Hanson, aged 4f. a former 
driving instructor, of Gamut 
Lane, Earlsfield, south 
London, admitted six charges 
of deception, three involving 
Miss Lambert, one each 
involving a car hire company, 
a hotel, and a bed-and- break- 
fa si establishment 

The judge told him: “You 
are preying on the more 
defenceless members of our 
society. You did it at a time 
when you were meant to be 
going back to prison, from 
which you had quite in- 
explicably been released for 
the weekend.” 

The court was told that 
Hanson overstayed his week- 
end leave from prison, posed 
as a prosperous businessman 
and met Miss Lambert 
through an employment 
agency. He offered her a salary 


of £l 2,500. clothing allowance 
and car. 

She paid out various sums, 
believing she would be re- 
imbursed, and her total loss 
was a little more than £1.060. 
Mr Jeremy Carter-Manning, 
for the prosecution, said. 

. Hanson promised her an 
increase in salary to £21,000 
and that she would meet 
famous people. A trip to the 
United States was also 
mentioned. 

Eventually, Hanson aban- 
doned her at Basingstoke rail- 
way station where, after 
several hours waiting for him 
to return, she rang a friend and 
was found by the police. 

Hanson was arrested a day 
later by a private detective, 
who identified him in Read- 
ing, Berkshire, after seeing his 
photograph on television. 

Mr Carter-Manning said 
that there had been a romantic 
side to the relationship. 



Miss Sarah Lambert victim 
of a ‘cokf-Mooded* fraud 


“Clearly these two people got 
on well, were very anracted to 
each other and certainly Han- 
son, in his interview with 
police, indicated that there 
may have been an element of 
that in both directions. 

“Bui what he makes quite 
dear is that the fault for what 
occurred arose entirely from 
his deceptions and his prom- 
ises to her rather than from 
anything else.” 

The court was told that 
Hanson had committed simi- 
lar tricks before. He even had 
a name for them - “meal ticket 
offences”. 

Mr Mark Batchelor, for the 
defence, said that Hanson was 
a conman who used his know- 
ledge of human weakness to 
get meals, comforubfe hotels 
and female company. 

He had once said that if Bo 
Derek came for an interview 
and did not have an Access 
card it would be no good. He 
was a “macho man", Mr 
Batchelor said. 

The judge told Hansom “I 
have no doubt at all that you 
will do this again, you've been 
doing it for years, and you 
always pick up some young 
girl among others you defraud. 
• Miss Lambert's disappear- 
ance between Friday, August 
15, and Monday, August 18, 
was linked at fust with the 
presumed abduction of Miss 
Susannah Lamp] ugh. an estate 
agent who had vanished after 
going to show a man called 
“Mr Kipper” a house in 
Fulham. Police later dis- 
counted any link. 






Irina Ratnshinskaya, the poet, and Igor Gerashchenko, her husband, meeting Mrs Thatcher at Downing Street yesterday. 


Christmas 
jail threat 
for drivers 

By Peter Evans 
Home Affairs 
Correspondent 

Drivers who give a positive 
breath test after being stopped 
by police in Nottinghamshire 
on Christmas Day are likely to 
be locked up until Boxing Day 
if they have been in trouble 
before. 

Acting Chief Superinten- 
dent Roger Storey, head of the 
county’s traffic department, 
said yesterday the drivers will 
be held for the protection of 
the public for the remand 
court on Boxing Day. because 
one does not sit on Christmas 
Day. The qualification is a 

f irevious conviction in the last 
ive years or a similar offence 
pending. 

Nottinghamshire is setting 
the pace in the first crucial 
period in the Department of 
T ransport's £600,000 seasonal 
campaign against drinking 
and driving, which hinges on 
such slogans as: “If you drink 
and drive you’re a menace to 
society." 

In three days since Decem- 
ber 19, the number of breath 
tests requested by the Not- 
tinghamshire force is up by a 
third on the average of925 for 
the previous three years. The 
1,525 requests this year have 
led to 58 drivers being ar- 
rested, or 3.8 per cent The 
previous average for a similar 
period was 3.6 per cent 
Chief Supt Storey denied his 
force engaged in random test- 
ing. saying the powers of the 
police were adequate. 

Gloucestershire police fig- 
ures for positive tests in three 
days have jumped from 17 last 
year to 25 this. But a spokes- 
man could not say how many 
tests there bad been. There 
had been £ national agreement 
not to give the total, only of 
positive results, he said. 

Drivers were warned yes- 
terday not to rely on the use of 
alcohol self-test khs. The 
Automobile Association said: 
“These devices do not nec- 
essarily show when the blood 
alcohol content is at its peak. 
They encourage drivers to 
play Russian roulette with 
lives by drinking up to the 
legal limit 

“Drinking and driving is a 
lethal cocktail. The only safe 
drink is a soft drink.” 

• AA patrols will, as always, 
be operating normally on 
Christinas Day and Boxing 
Day, providing 24 breakdown 
and relay service cover. 


University elects 
first woman head 


By Mark Dowd, Education Reporter 

Bristol is poised to become taking over this 
the first university with 


university with a 
woman at the head of its main 
governing body. 

Mrs Stella Clarke, a former 
governor of the BBC and sister 
of Mr Tom King, Secretary of 
Slate for Northern Ireland, 
has been elected chairman of 
the university council from 
July 1987. 

She will succeed Dr Richard 
HiJU, a local industrialist who 
is to become one of the 
university’s three pro-chancel- 
lors. 

As head of die 64-member 
council which meets six times 
each academic year Mrs 
Clarke will have the ultimate 


over this important 
post at a time which is very 
difficult for universities nat- 
ionally.” 

The new chairman-elect will 
be hoping that her latest role 
in public life will attract less 
danger than her experience as 
a magistrate which she began 
in 1968. 

Two yrars ago she was taken 
hostage in her own court by a 
prisoner who threatened her 
with a broken decanter and 
held her for several minutes 
before police intervened to 
free her. 

Mrs Clarke is married with 
four sons and a daughter. 


university’s finances, employ- 
ing staff and ensuring building 
maintenance. 

Indeed, her appointment is 
in keeping with Bristol’s 
reputation as a trend-setter in 
matters of female equality. In 
1876, as University College, it 
became the first institution of 
higher education to admit 
women on the basis of equal- 
ity with men. 

Mrs Clarke, aged 54, who 
was educated at Cheltenham 
Ladies’ College and Trinity 
College. Dublin, said yes- 
terday. “1 am honoured to be 



Mrs Clarke; “It is a great 

challenge.” 


Aids virus is rampant 
among haemophiliacs 


TWo-thirds of the 90 
haemophiliacs in the Birming- 
ham area are infected with the 
Aids virus, an inquest was told 
yesterday. 

Dr lan Franklin was giving 
evidence on the death of a 
haemophiliac who died from 
Aids after being treated with 
contaminated Factor 8 plasma 
imported from the US. 

Dr Franklin, a consultant 
haematologist at Birming- 
ham’s Queen Elizabeth Hosp- 
ital, said that Peter Eustace, 
aged 30, a haemophiliac since 
birth, had been treated with 
Factor 8 for a number of years. 

The Factor 8 plasma re- 
sponsible for his infection had 
been imported from the Unit- 
ed States but since the dangers 
were recognized all Factor 8 
had been heat treated before 
use. 

He said it was hoped that by 
the end of next year the UK 
would be selfcfufficient in 
Factor 8 but at present only 


between 10 and 25 per cent 
was home produced. 

In the Birmingham area 
between 85 and 90 haemo- 
philiacs were under treatment 
and it had been found that two 
thirds of these were infected 
with the virus. 

The coroner. Dr Richard 
Whittington, recorded a ver- 
dict of “death by mis- 
adventure” on Mr Eustace, a 
graphic artist of Dryden 
Road, Acocks Green, 
Birmingham. 

He said he would write to 
the regional health authority 
suggesting that more resources 
be allocated for the follonnip 
of Aids victims and possible 
contacts. 

After the inquest Dr Frank- 
lin said: “I would like to make 
it clear that only a very few of 
these people actually have 
Aids. The others have anti- 
bodies in their blood but are 
not showing any of the 
effects.” 


Freed poet 
will stay 
in West 

By Mary Dejevsky 

Irina Ramshinskaya, the 
dissident Russian poet, who is 
in London after leaving the 
Soviet Union last week, says 
that she and her husband plan 
to remain in the West, at least 
for the time being. 

Miss Ratnshinskaya, aged 
32, said at a press conference 
yesterday that she had never 
felt so five in her life. She 
thanked all those in Britain 
who had campaig ned on her 
behalf, and also read oat an 
open letter to Mr Gorbachov, 
thanking him for the release of 
Andrei Sakharov. In it she 
expressed the hope that this 
wonld be a first step to the 
release of all political 
prisoners. 

After the conference she 
visited Mrs Thatcher at 
Downing Street 
Miss Ratnshinskaya was 
released from prison camp in 
October after serving four 
years of a seven-year sentence 
for writing poems the authori- 
ties considered anti-Soviet. 

She said she spent about one 
day in every three in either the 
camp prison or a punishment 
cell. T7»e policy seemed to be 
not just to isolate political 
detainees from society, bat to 
make them renounce their 
views, she said. 

She described her worst 
moments as when camp of- 
ficials told her that her hus- 
band, Igor Gerashchenko, 
could be executed for his 
dissident activities. When she 
was arrested, she said, she and 
her husband had both pledged 
not to testify against each 
other. 

David Aster, speaking for 
the Irina Trust, one of the 
organizations which cam- 
paigned in Britain for her 
release, said Miss 
Ratnshinskaya had now had a 
full medical check-op. She 
was very emaciated, but other- 
wise had no outstanding medi- 
cal problems. In prison she 
had suffered from high blood 
pressure, blackouts and kid- 
ney pains. 

Miss Ratnshinskaya said 
that in the four years she spent 
in due camp, physical torture 
was not necessary: “They 
refined it down to extreme 
cold, extreme filth and ex- 
treme hunger. 

“Frequently the measures 
applied to us were senseless 
and could only be described as 
humiliations,” she said. The 
women were forced to wear 
identity tags. 

“We refused, and we were 
punished, not once but a lot.” 

She was once knocked no- 
conscious when she went on 
hanger strike over the treat- 
ment of a sick fellow prisoner. 

She spoke of her struggle 
for human rights. “When I 
was five years old, I told 
grown-ups that when I was 
grown up myself I wonld move 
to Africa to see monkeys and 
crocodiles. 

“They said I wonld not be 
allowed. When I asked: ‘Who 
would not allow me - the 
crocodiles?’ they said: “No, 
onr authority.” 

“From that time, I have 
preferred to deal with 
crocodiles.” 


Children’s charity inquiry 


Suspicion over cash appeal 


An unregistered charity be- 
ing investigated for fraud has 
made a Christmas appeal to 
thousands of hospital staff to 
raise money for holidays for 
deprived children, it was dis- 
closed yesterday . 

The organization Holidep 
(Holidays for Deprived Chil- 
dren) is run by a self-em- 
ployed businessman from a 
dilapidated terraced house 
near Crystal Palace, south 
London. It has asked hospitals 
throughout Britain to send 
donations in “the largest bank 
notes possible.” 

Mr Dennis Peach, Chief 
Charity Commissioner, said 
yesterday that he viewed the 
methods employed by Holi- 
dep with “great suspicion”. 
Hie main charity supposedly 
benefiting from the money 
raised has dissociated itself 
from the appeal. 

Mr Peach said yesterday 
that, because Holidep was not 
registered as a charity, there 
was nothing the Charity 
Commission could do. "How- 
ever, if such organizations 
demand money in bank notes. 


By David Sapsted 

the first thing 1 would recom- 
mend would be to contact the 
police.” 

Scotland Yard confirmed 
yesterday that a man aged 44 
from Holidep had been ar- 
rested lost month after allega- 
tions of fraud, but had been 
released pending further in- 
quiries. Two other people 
whose names appear on the 
Holidep appeal are being 
sought. 

Holidep has asked hospitals 
to charge entrance fees at 
Christinas parties and send 
the money to the group's 
headquarters. 

Dr Bamardo’s, whose chil- 
dren Holidep claimed would 
be among those to benefit has 
foiled to obtain a list of 
hospitals approached by the 
group. Hie children's home 
has now sent a letter to all 
health journals dissociating 
itself from the appeal. 

Dr Bill Beaver, Dr 
Bamardo's publicity director, 
said that the appeal was 
grossly misleading because it 
portrayed Bamardo children 
as sometimes “being incar- 


cerated for years within four 
walls of their institutional 
home”. He said that such 
practices were jeopardizing 
the public's goodwill towards 
charitable giving. 

The problem for both the 
Charity Commission and the 
police is that any charity, 
registered or not, does not 
have to give a set amount to 
the charitable causes it pro- 
fesses to support. 

Mr Ivan James Saxton, the 
Secretary of Holidep, who 
describes himself as a 
businessman, said that he 
hoped to raise hundreds of 
thousands of pounds to estab- 
lish his group's own holiday 
camp. 

Failing that, he said, smaller 
amounts would be given to 
recognized charities to pro- 
vide holidays for children. 

Last Friday, Mr Saxton 
formally applied for charitable 
status, but the case has yet to 
be considered. Holidep re- 
mains under no legal obliga- 
tion to specify how the money 
raised will be spent nor the 
amount to be retained. 


TV programmes for 1987 


BBC spends £75m on 100 new shows 


The BBC yesterday prom- 
bed viewers more than 100 
new programmes in a £75 
million television package for 
the new year. 

The money is being spent 
mainly on “home grown” ma- 
terial which will give viewers 
1.500 horns of BBC-originated 
programmes in tire first three 
months of 1987. 

On the comedy front Jasper 
Carrott returns with a new late 
night Saturday show and 
Young Ones’ stars Rik Mayall 
and Nigel Planer have a new 
comedy series called Filthy 
Rick and Catftat. 

Dawn French and Jennifer 
Saunders have their own vari- 
ety show and comedy crosses 
the bonier in Foreign Bodies* a 
new series sec in Belfast, and 
looks at tire future in 
Dwarf* a space-age series- 


Bob Monkhoose wiB host 
the revival of former ITV 
show. Opportunity Knocks* 
and zany comedian Kenny 
Everett will present a new quiz 
game called Brainstorm. 

Tom O'Connor will have his 
own daytime show and return- 
ing favourites include Bread; 
the Mistress; Tony Brittan and 

Nigel Havers in Don't Wait 
Up; Les Dennis m the Laugh- 
ter Show and Rory Brenner 
with Now Something Else. 

Stars appearing in new 
drama productions include Ian 
Hogg, in a 10-part police 
series, Rockliffe’s Babies, and 
Susan Penhaligon in Fay 
Weldon's first original series 
for TV, Heart of the Country. 

Bob Peck, Miranda Rich- 
ardson ami Joanne Whalley 
star in Screen Two productions 
and Lenny Henry gets his first 


dramatic break in the Screen ■ faces pins the return of many 


Two film. Coast to Coast 

Ian Richardson plays the 
traitor, Anthony Blunt, in 
Slant* and Cheryl Campbell 
stars in A Sort of Innocence - 
a six-part serial set in the 
West Midlands. 

The season w3I also include 
a four-part adaptation of the 
Diary of Amu Frank* Nerys 
Hughes returns as the District 
Nurse. Other popular series 
returning include Miss Mar- 
pie* Bergerac* One-by-OneanA 
Strike It Rich. 

Annoftnring the package 
Mr Michael Grade, BBC TV's 
director of programmes, said: 
“Innovation is onr resolution 
for the new year - in drama, 
entertainment, and factual 
programmes there frill be new 
ideas, new format and new 


familiar favourites. 

Among the main offerings in 
the new year is C/mr, in which 
three leading politicians will 
be confronted with an imagi- 
nary hijack. 

The programme will go out 
over two boors on a Sunday 
night and Soy Jenkins, Fran- 
cis Pym aid Gerald Kagfaipn, 
will have to decide, aided by 
expert legal, military and dip- 
lomatic airisers, how to tackle 
the hijack of a British airliner, 
forced to land in Beirut. 

Series brought in from 
abroad include the return of 
Cagney and Lacey, two new 
comedy shows from America - 
Perfect Strangers* and Head 
of the Class - and from 
Australia a five past mini- 
series, Anzocs* with Raul 
Hogan. 


Boy George drugs dossier 

By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 

The father of Boy George. Over the weekend. Boy the newspapers. When I look 

George, aged 25, was arrested 


the pop singer, yesterday said 
he had received telephone 
threats when it became known 
that he was prepared to give 
information to police on the 
dealers supplying drugs to 
people in the the pop music 
world. 

Mr Gerald O’Dowd, aged 
56. from south London, said 
he had prepared a secret 
dossier which he had lodged 
with a solicitor. Mr O’Dowd 
said he was prepared to name 
dealers not only because of 
what they had done to his son 
but also “for all the young 
children in the playgrounds 
who can get drugs as easily as 
sweets”. 

Scotland Yard said yes- 
terday that police were always 
ready to investigate any 
information passed to them by 
the public. 


and searched for drugs. He 
was released on police bail 
pending the analysis of 
substances. 

Shortly afterwards, Mr 
Mark Golding, aged 20, one of 
the men arrested with the pop 
singer, was taken from a house 
in Netting Hill, west London, 
and taken to hospital in 
Paddington, where be died 
from a suspected overdose of 
methadone, a synthetic nar- 
cotic used in treating heroin 
addicts. 

Scotland Yard said that a 
post mortem examination on 
the dead man had yet to be 
arranged but the inquest will 
be opened on January 31. 

After the death, Mr O’Dowd 
disclosed the existence of his 
dossier. He said: "You have 
seen the pictures of my son in 


and see what drugs have done 
to my son, this is the message I 
want to get across to the young 
people of this country.” 

“I have a son who is 
unfortunately a very famous 
person. I have got to think of 
all the other children and 
young people, and older peo- 
ple. who are on their way to 
their deaths by the abuse of 
drugs.” 

He accused drug dealers of 
manipulating people and be- 
ing ready to tempt children. 
"These scum are outside wait- 
ing to kill them. That's why I 
am doing it It's no good 
anybody threatening me. My 
life is short anyway." 

Mr O’Dowd, who has had a 
number of heart attacks, said 
he and his fondly had been 
forced to watch what drugs 
had done to Boy George. 


Inquest is 
told how 
WPC died 
in chase 

A young police constable 
yesterday described the last 
seconds of a high-speed car 
chase in which WPC Debbie 
Leat was ItiUed. 

PC Richard Cadden, aged 
20, was co-driver of a police 
Ford Escort which chased a 
second Escort through the 
streets of Bristol, Avon, at 
speeds of up to SQmph. 

He told an inquest in Bristol 
yesterday that he had sug- 
gested chasing the car after 
hearing it revving its engine at 
traffic lights while be and 20- 
year-old WPC Leal, known to 
her colleagues as “Action 
Gill” were parked. 

He said: “WPC Leal slowed 
to follow the orange Escort 
through red lights then accel- 
erated up to 80 miles per hour 
when the car in front suddenly 
turned off to the right. 

“I felt we had gone too far to 
the left. We went past the 
junction and all 1 remember 
then is Debbie screaming my 
name, ‘Rich'. I dosed my eyes 
and when 1 opened them again 
I could feel a sharp pain in my 
chest 

“We had collided with 
something. When l looked 
over to Debbie I saw she was 
trapped and feared the worst.” 

PC Cadden said he found 
the car radio did not work and 
he had to kick his way out of 
the wrecked vehicle before 
struggling to a bench where he 
waited until firemen arrived. 

The inquest was told that 
the car had probably been 
flying through the air when it 
hit a tree. 

Sgl Graham Bates, who 
arrived on the scene shortly 
afterwards, said the car had 
probably swerved due to the 
damp road surface which had 
tended to draw the rear of the 
car out and cause it to slide. 

Mr Donald Hawkins, the 
Avon coroner, recorded a 
verdict of accidental death on 
WPC Leat. of Samuel White 
Road. Hanham, BristoL 

Police are still trying to trace 
the driver of the car being 
pursued. 


Jailed head 
freed by 
Appeal Court 

A prep school headmaster, 
jailed for assaulting two of his 
pupils by beating them, has 
been freed by the Court of 
Appeal. 

The court allowed an appeal 
by Derek Slade, aged 37, 
former head of Dalesdown 
prep school at Dial Post, near 
Horsham. West Sussex, 
against the three-month sen- 
tence imposed at Chichester 
Crown Court last month. 

Lord Justice Stephen Br- 
own, sitting with Mr Justice 
Tudor Evans and Mr Justice 
French, set aside the jafl term 
and granted Slade a 12-month 
conditional discharge. 

With remission, he had 
been due for release from 
Lewes Prison in mid-January. 

Slade, who had admitted 
two assaults on pupils, was 
said to have beaten a boy of 
eight for writing a 363-word 
essay instead of 400 words. 

At the time of the crown 
court hearing, Slade, a Church 
of England lay reader, was 
living with a sister in Derby- 
shire. He has sold the school. 


Judge’s 
plea in 
mugging 

By Kenneth Gosling 

A judge at the Central 
Criminal Court who has taken 
a personal interest in the 
welfare of a court usher at- 
tacked by muggers has ap- 
pealed to the public to turn 
detective and track down the 
attackers before Christmas. 

Judge Argyle, QC, said yes- 
terday it would be “a nice 
present" for the victim. Miss 
Rosena Jones, if the culprits 
were arrested soon. 

It was after Miss Jones, aged 
60, was ambushed by two 
young men outside Mile End 
Underground station in Octo- 
ber that Judge Argyle put up a 
personal reward of £100 for 
information leading to the 
arrest of the assailants. 

He also launched a collec- 
tion for Miss Jones, who was 
robbed of her handbag 
containing a cheque book, 
keys, credit cards and £90. 

Although there have so far 
been no arrests, several of the 
cheques have been forged and 
passed, giving rise to hopes 
that the attackers will be 
traced. 

The judge had earlier de- 
scribed the attack as a particu- 
larly revolting one on an 
elderly defenceless woman. 

Miss Jones was able to 
return to work soon after she 
was attacked although she 
received black eyes, a swollen 
nose and throat injuries. She 
fought back and bit one of the 
men. 

After Judge Argyle’s appeal, 
contributions came in from 
other judges and from journal- 
ists. lawyers, prison officers 
and court staff 
In court yesterday, tbejudge 
said, “There is very good 
information as to the identity 
of these criminals and a lot of 
people must know where they 
are.” 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


REPLACING YOUR 
WINDSCREEN NEEDN’T BE 
A COSTLY OPERATION. 


When your face hits the windscreen you'll 
be glad that the windscreen gives way to it. 

But even with a laminated windscreen you 
could still cut your face to ribbons. 

That’s why Pilkington has developed an anti- 
lacerative windscreen that will give way but not 
splinter, making it even safer. 

A thin plastic coating bonded to the glass 
holds it together (what’s more it won’t craze; if the 
windscreen is struck by a stone it merely chips or 
cracks leaving a clear view of the road) . 

Of course, if everyone were to wear their seat 
belts then this sort of accident need rarely, if 
ever, occur. 

Unfortunately these accidents happen every 
day. That’s why we have to continue to make the 
glass safer. 

In the USA where they have the most strin- 
gent safety regulations of any country, Pilkington 
is by far the major supplier of automotive glass. 

Pilkington is responsible for about 17% of the 
world’s output, last year glazing over 7 million cars. 

Just one of the achievements of a company 
that has successfully built itself up to become the 
world’s leading glass company, with a worldwide 
turnover of around £2,000,000,000. 

Pilkington is currently developing an invisible 
windscreen heating element which can defrost 
itself in under two minutes. 

A windscreen containing an almost invisible 
car aerial. 




Plastic surgery si2,ooo. 


* ■ 


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A car window so tough that stolen car stereos 
may soon become as outdated a phenomenon as 
The Bay City Rollers. 

No other glass manufacturer produces as 
large a range of products, from flat glass to glass 
fibre, from ophthalmic lenses to the optics for 
missile guidance systems. 

These are the innovations that give Pilkington 
the edge over the competition: 

Although, in this case thankfully not the 
cutting edge. 



Pilkington 

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THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 




Lord Dpvlin 1 Rinka races round on a spending spree for toys 


opposed to 
ending juror 
challenge 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 
lord Devlin, the fanner law - are certain to fad the mount- 
lord, has come out against the mg debate. 



Government's proposal 10 
abolish the defence right of 
challenge to jurors. 

He said ihat he was against 
any diminution of the right 
of peremptory challenge” un- 
less, at the same rime, action 
was taken to develop the 
procedure of challenge “for 
cause", that is, with reason. 

“Before we interfere . with . 
peremptory challenge we 
should see if there can be a 
proper procedure for chall- 
enge for cause." 

He was also critical of the 
Government's intention to 
end the defence right of chall- 
enge while leaving intact the 
crown's right to ask jurors te 
“stand by". 

“1 have always said there 
must be an equal deal for both. 
If the peremptory challenge is 
removed, the crown must give 
up the right to stand by." 

Instead, he said, there must 
be a proper system of chall- 
enge for cause for both sides. 

The former law lord's com- 
ments come as the Gov- 
ernment is preparing for a 
lough light in Parliament over 
its proposals, contained in the 
Criminal Justice Bill. 

Lord Devlin said that he 
would not favour such an 
expansion of challenge for 
cause that one would “go the 
way of the American system". 

In the United Stales, jurors 
were endlessly challenged over 
a period of days or even weeks 
before a trial, and the whole 
procedure had become a sort 
of “preliminary canter”, he 
said. 

In Britain challenge for 
cause had become discredited 
in the last century and fallen 
into disuse. But it was worth 
considering whether through 
legislation or “by ascertaining 
the attitude of judges" the pro- 
cedure could be reformed. 
Lord Devlin said. 

“But if you merely put 
forward a proposal for ending 
peremptory challenge without 
seeing if anything can be done 
about challenge for cause I do 
not support it." 

The comments by Lord 
Devlin, for long a passionate 
supporter of the jury system* , 




against the ' proposal ^md ^ Mr 

given a warning that ab olition 
enge “may well be contrary to 

ance and the reality 

fiiJ^SbmSon, te^^^oskffl RjD ^ a Mordecai, aged nine, from north Loudon, speeds her shopping trolley round Selfridges yesterday helping to choose £6,000 of toys for Capital 
committee on fraud trials, in Radio's Christinas appeaLThe money came from a conceit by Status Quo and a £1,000 donation from the store (Photograph: Tim Bishop). 


fill submission, to the Roskfll 
committee on fraud trials, in 
favour of keeping juries in 
complex fraud cases, and the 
Government has for the 
present adopted that view. 

Mr David Melior, Minister 
of Slate at the Home Office, 
has rejected the criticisms 
made by the Bar association 
and said that the present 
system of peremptory chaB- 


Six bailed 
after death 
at match 


Mass trespass 

Evictions to be speeded up 


By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


Mr Barry Adamson, chall- 


enge “completely distorts the! man of Scarborough Football 


composition of the jury 


Club, who collapsed after an 


He pointed out that the incident during a matc h at the 
crown use of “stand by" was dub, died of a heart attack, an 


to be confined, by published inquest was told yesterday, 
guidelines, to strictly limited Six football supporters fro: 


categories of cases. 


the Morecambe and Lancaster 


The present system forced areas were remanded on bail 
defence lawyers to manipulate by magistrates at Scarborough 


Lord Hailsham of St 
Maryiebone, the Lord Chan- 
cellor, is proposing to speed 
up procedures for the re- 
possession of open land from 
hippies and other mass 
trespassers. 

He yesterday laid before 
Parliament amendments to 
the Supreme Court Rules, 


a right in a w^r calculated 10 S^of SSTaS which woatd raduc a fan, five 
secure their client's acquittal, out 0 f violence at the match ™Y? two ™® minim u m 
and it was “embarrassing and nn Katimtav period between the service of 


and it was “embarrassing and on Saturday. period between the service ot 

offensive" to jurors, who gave All six, aged between 17 and an application lor re- 
up their time to do jury service 24, were accused of unlawfully POgf®®” 
only to be stood down without fighting and making an affray order. But five days will 
reason. ffttTttnnr and dUrt»i>« remam ite period m the case 


of others at the Athletic 
ground, Scarborough, during 
the FA Trophy match between 
Scarborough and Morecambe. 

Mr Geoff Heseiton, chair- 
man of the magistrates, said 
all would be remanded on bail 


order. But five days win 
remain the period in the case 
of residential premises. 

The Public Order Act 1986 
has already introduced a new 
police power to evict tres- 
passers in certain drcnm- 
stances. Yesterday's 
announcement covered 


comments received on the 
Lord Chancellor's consulta- 
tion ' paper on summary 
proceedings for the possession 
of land. 

There was general agree- 
ment about the reduction 
from five to two days in 
respect of open land but there 
was concern about such a 
change in the case of residen- 
tial premises. It was felt there 
would be difficulty in obtain- 
ing legal advice in such a short 
period. 

Two other changes include 
clarification of provisions for 
serving applications on defen- 
dants on open land. It will be 
possible to save them by 
fixing envelopes containing 
the summons to stakes at 


Two jailed 
in Faslane 
bribe case 


conspicuous points on the Two former oompar 
land And masters and district ^ who bribed officia 
registrars will be ableto hear Faslane submarine 


applications to the High Court Strathclyde, were each jailed 


instead of judges. 


The changes win come into 
force on January 12. S imilar 
changes are to be made in 
proceedings in the county 
courts. 


At the time of the convoy, 
trespass was not a c riminal 
offence. Concerted action to 
identify potential trespassers 
in travelling groups so that 
preventive legal moves can be 
made has also been recom- 
mended in advice to fanners 
and landowners by the Min- 
istry of Agriculture, Fisheries 
and Food. 


Oil WUU1U tA. iWlldlJMW WU LWUI , _ - " J - 

until January 19 on sureties of dungea rn ciya procedure. 


Lord Devlin, who wants a 
wider inquiry into system 


between £250 and £500. 

Mr Michael Oakley, the 
Scarborough coroner, yes- 
terday opened and adjourned 
the inquest on Mr Adamson, 
who was aged 47. 

Evidence was given in a 
written statement by bis wife, 
Elizabeth, who identified the 
body at Scarborough hospital 


Although h is generally 
agreed that the present proce- 
dure works efficiently in cases 
for which it was originally 
intended, those involving 
squatters on residential prop- 
erty, there have been criti- 
cisms that the procedure is too 
slow, complicated and expen- 
sive. And foe so-called “hippie 


‘Frozen’ house prices 
bring hope to buyers 


for a year yesterday and 
ordered to pay £25,000 
compensation to the Secretary 
of State for Defence. 

John Nixon, aged 55, of 
RainhilL Merseyside, and 
John Cackett, aged 44, of 
Scarisbrick, Lancashire, had 
been convicted at an earlier 
court ofbribing Civil Servants 
at the base with £ 22,000 to 
allow the unauthorized re- 
moval of waste oil, and of 
stealing more than one million 
litres of waste off. 

The High Court in Edin- 
burgh was told that they were 
directors of a Bootle oil supply 
company and had acted with 


Every Liberal MP has 
fought his way into the House 
of Commons by his own. 
personal efforts. There is bo 
sneb thing as a safe Liberal 
seat So there is a higher 
proportion of distinctive, even 
quirky, personalities among 
the Liberals Sian in any other 
parliamentary party. 

Nobody represented this 
tendency more strongly than 
David Penhaiigon. He was 

above aU, and m the best sense 
of the word, a character. Hus 
was evident, in the most 
obvious but least important 
sense, the moment he opened 
his month. His strong Cornish 
yffwit marked him as a poli- 
tician with such deep roots In 
his region that be was immune 
to the homogenizing pressures 
of Westminster. 

But there are quite a number 
of essentially, if not quite so 
emphatically, regional poli- 
ticians in the House of Com- 
mons. It was two other 
qualities that made 
i Penfailga® unique. - 

I have knows no other 
parliamentarian am humour 
so regularly effective 

political in st r ument . Some- 
times this became a trap as 
well as a strength. Sometimes 
it obscured the seriousness of 
his purpose. He was fre- 
quently extremely fanny, bat 
be was much more than a 
funny ™»n who had strayed 
into politics. 


Humour that 
became habit 


Because he downed so 
much, and so successfully, he 
could be mistaken for a down. 

But that was a gross mistmder- 


their manager in Scotland, sjamUn® Time and time again 

2 Sf i S 1 ? Cl f 22 heemployed humour aTa 
BeUshill, I^naikdure, who is deliberate weapon to achieve 


. ir.T-, TT deliberate weapon to acmeve 
a mne-raonth sentence ends. It was a rhetori- 


servmga nine-monu 
for bribing officials. 


By Christopher Warman, Property Correspondent 
Home-seekers are being 190 estate agents fa England 


cal device, which worked so 

Extortion case | ^ ^ ‘ “*• ta 


urged to enter the housing 
market now while prices are 
“frozen countrywide”. . 


£lm is left I Bomber in 


Saturday. She said her hus- shortcomings m the law of 


to school 
by old boy 


A public school has received 
a £1 million Christmas wind- 
fall in the will of a former 
popO. 

Mr Norman Sharpe, a 
bache!or,who died fast July, 
aged 79. rarely visited his old 
school Giggles wick, near Set- 
tle, North Yorkshire, where be 
was a day boy between 1921 
and 1925. Bnt he retained a 
deep affection for the school 
which has a royal charter 
dating from the 1500s- 

Mr Sharpe, OBE, and 
holder of the American Legion 
of Honour for wartime ser- 
vices, was the former chair- 
man and managing director of 
a greetings card and fine art 
business in Bradford. West 
Yorkshire. 

The family business, which 
was established by his grand- 
father, was taken over recently 
by Hallmark of the United 
States. 

Mr Peter Hobson, head- 
master of the £5,000-a-year 
school which has about 400 
boys and girls aged eight to 18, 
said yesterday that the be- 
quest was “totally unexpec- 
ted". 

He added: “Everyone here 
is deeply grateful to him for 
this marvellous demonstration 
of faith in his old school and 
his belief in independent 

education.*’ 

He said he thought the 
legacy would be used for 
investment to further guar- 
antee the school's long-term 
security. 

“We shall then consider 
other possible benefits for 
present and future generations 
of boys and girls. 

“Giggleswick can now face 
the future with even greater 
confidence. We are now in an 
even stronger position to make 
a substantial contribution to 
the future prosperity of in- 
dependent education in the 
north of England." 

Mr Sharpe left more than 
£2 million, about half his 
fortune going to the school 
Other beneficiaries will in- 
clude his family, and certain 
former employees of his old 
company. 

He is survived by a brother, 
Donald, who lives in retire- 
ment near Ukley, West York- 
shire, and has no children. 

Mr Edward Green, aged 71, 
a lifelong business friend of 
Mr Sharpe and executor of his 
estate, said: “He was a most 
able businessman and totally 
dedicated to building np his 
business. But he always bad 
the interests of his workers at 
heart 

“Mr Sharpe lived very qui- 
etly as a bachelor. It's typical 
of him to remember his old 

school" , ... . . 

Other w ills, page 14 


photo is 
jailed 


James Hazel], whose photo- 
graph appeared in national 


band- bad been -in good health. 

PC Alan Fern, the coroner's 
officer, said a post-mortem 
examination carried out by Dr 
Michael Green, a Home Of- 
fice pathologist, had given the 
cause of death as a heart 
attack. 

Dr Green had not com- 
pleted his report but the cause 


trespass.- . . 

The Lord Chancellor’s 
Department said: “It was felt 
by many that neither the 
raiminal nor the civil law gave 
adequate assistance to fanners 
and others against mass 
trespass." 

The change comes after 


The suggestion comes in the 
latest: survey, published today, 
of the Royal Institatfan of 
Chartered Surveyors, which 
says that with prices levelling 
ont it is a good time to bay, 
before die expected increases 
next spring. 


The survey for the quarter 
ending on November 30 shows 
that nearly 60 per cent of the 


and Wales taking put re- 
ported that prices had not 
moved during the three-month 
period, and 36 percent saw a 
rise of only 2 pa- cent 
Static prices have also been 
recorded in the: South- wes 4 - 
where a special survey in- 
dicates that there are more 
booses for sale and fern 
buyers than elsewhere in tire, 
country. Country homes, par- 
ticularly cottages and farm 
houses, are, nevertheless, 
popular auction items. 


rnmond . . indulged too much. I think he 

Iv lIl dI J u . .. . appreciated when he became 

An Iraqi student accused of the Liberal economic spokes- 
**“ ' -man that this is not a subject 


tryiny to obtain £500,000 by 
b lackmailing Mr Ali At* 
Fayed,' the co-owner of 
Haorods, was. bailed until 
January'- 12 at HWrseferry 
Road Magistrates’ Court in 
central London yesterday. 


which most British people 
regard as appropriate for 
laughter. It is not known in 
this country as the dismal 
science for nothing. Yet the 
imp of vrit kept on escaping 


Abbas AJ-Bassan, aged- 28, J from his control 


newspapers carrying a petrol of death would not be 
bomb during riots in changed. 


Handsworth, Birmingham, _ The coroner adjourned the 
was yesterday jailed for five inquest to a date to be fixed 


years at the city's crown court, because further inquiries had 
Hazdl later threw the bomb still to be made into the 


Glut of large turkeys 
brings down prices 


into a building supplies shop incident 
on the seond day of riots last yj, 
year, after a visit to the area by .TSUI 
Mr Douglas Hurd, Home « 
Secretary. lOr 3 

Mr Anthony Barker, QC, . , 
for the prosecution, said ."■.IPS 


Fan detained 
for attack 

A football supporter who 


The price of large fresh 
turkeys plummeted at whole- 
sale markets around Britain 
yesterday, with some traders 
offering two birds for the price 
of one to clear stocks. 


Hazell was identified from the 
photograph by police and a 
woman who knew him but he con *°°?S?“ V th 


During early trading the 
price of large fresh birds fell 
from 70p a pound to 40p, but 
many dealers refused to buy 
knowing there was no outlet 

Last year there was a short- 
age of fresh turkeys and prices 
were very high, according to 
Mr Alan Dan, marketing 
director of Dewhurst’s, 
Britain's hugest high street 
butchers chain. 

“This year fanners tried to 
cash in again but there are too 
many big birds on the market 
from 161b to 221 b and over,” 
he said 

A spokesman for the Na- 


went into hiding in London 5SL t 0 ifSE? 

for a few days before giving ^ ^ Bradford 


himself up 

When it came to his trial 
Hazell had changed his 
appearance from when the 
photograph was taken. Instead 
of jeans and a floppy cap be 
wore spectacles, a smart suit 
and a bow tic. 

One jury was unable to 
reach a verdict at a trial in 
September, but a second jury 
found him guilty last Friday 
on the charge of arson. 


magistrates yesterday. 

Michael John Robinson, 
aged 20, of Elford Rise, 
Snemion, Nottingham, admit- 
ted threatening behaviour and 
having an offensive weapon. 
The chairman, Mr Alan 
Kilshaw, told him the sen- 
tence was “for the protection 
of the public". 

Mr Stephen Uttley, for the 
prosecution, said Robinson 
was arrested outside Odsel 
stadium, Bradford, on Nov- 


pouncL Yesterday birds weigh- 
ing between 10 and 161 b were 
fetching between 75p and 90p 
a pound, while heavier birds 
were 40p, when a buyer could 
be found. 

About 11 million birds are 
bought every Christmas, 2.5 
milli on of diem fresh farm 
birds. 

Fanners unable to sell their 
birds are expected to freeze 
them and release them into 
the trade during next year, or 
portion them. 

“Whatever they do, there is 
no way these producers mil 
get their production costs 
back,” Mr Dan said. 

Supplies of frozen birds are 
not affected, although prices, 
at 49p a pound, are below fast 
year’s. 

• The Prime Minister re- 


More seek 
holiday 
sunshine 


of Epping Walk; Holme, Man- 
chester, an electronics student 
at Loughborough College, 
Leicestershire, is dunged with 
making the demand in a letter 
sent to the Egyptian business- 
man in November. 


Arsonists hit 
Welsh cottage 


More people are heading for 
the sun this Christmas than 
ever before, tour operators 
said yesterday. 

Thomson Holidays said this 
Christinas will be its busiest 
with 386 charter and sched- 
uled flights carrying 95,000 
holidaymakers abroad. 

“There must be a greater 
desire than ever before to get 
away from it during the 
hofiday,” the company said. 

Intasim Holidays reported 
sales 50 per cent op including 
winter sun destinations. 

But for most workers and 


A holiday cottage on a 
hillside near Conwy, Gwyn- 
edd, was almost destroyed 
yesterday in a fire.whkh had 
the hallmarks of an attack by 
Welsh extremists. There have 
been nearly 200 similar in- 
cidents since 1979. 

The cottage is owned by Mr 
John Quaffington and his 
wife, Rosaleen, of Hanwood, 
Shrewsbury, Shropshire. They , 
bought it 20 years ago and 
renovated it from a near ruin. 


Double-glazed 

deathtrap 


Home-made double : 


office staff yesterday was a was blamed yesterday for the 
nonhal day. The number of death of a woman aged 21, 


commuters using trains across I poisoned by carbon monoxide 


tional Farmers' Union said ceived her t raditional Christ- 


masrsSdBdS; 


Hazell said his client was 
given the petrol bomb by 
another man and had thrown 
it at the shop rather than at 
police. 


was playing Nottingham 
Forest 

• Extradition proceedings 
against 26 Liverpool football 


that fanners had increased 
production by about 12 per 
cent this year. 

The problem has been 


mas turkey yesterday. The 
321b bird was presented to her 
at Downing Street by Colonel 
Ted Phillips, chairman of Sun 


caused by overproduction and Valley Farms, of Hereford, on 
the mild weather, which behalf of the British Poultry 


Judge Potter told Hazell: supporters facing man- 
“You committed a spectacu- slaughter charges over the 


far act of arson in the front and 
full view of a riotous mob in a 
manner calculated to 


riots at the Heysel stadium, 
Brussels, will be held at 
Highbury Corner magistrates' 


encourage that mob to further] courts, 


lawless violence." 


February. 


London, 


meant the turkeys put on 
weight faster than usual Birds 
weighing between 10 and 141b, 
the most popular size, are still 
available, Mr Dan said. 

Last year, fresh birds were 
selling for £1 and more a 


behalf of the British Poultry 
Federation. 

Mrs Thatcher seemed sur- 
prised at the she of the bird, 
which will take more than 10 
hours to cook. She said that 
she would have to get up very 
early to get it cooked in time. 


the country was only slightly in the bedroom of her home in 
less than uaiaL Crown Terrace, Belper, 

Tubes in London carried Derbyshire, 
about 10 per cent fewer Miss Shelley. Johnson had- 
commaters. But British Rail left a gas fire on and the door 
Southern Region, said rush dosed. Police said polythene 
hour trains were almost as fuO had been tacked across the 
as usual yesterday and the window, preventing 
same story was repeated by ventilation, 
spokesmen for other regions, wji •— 

Shell and ICI said that most f BIT OD0DS I OF 
staff were working until ,i i 
Christmas Eve and the In- tftC lBSt tlitl fe 


This damaged his standing 
in some quarters. He was not 
at his best fa the Commons. 
But his humour often enabled 
him to be a remarkably eff- 
ective debater on other occa- 
sions. . 

It also contributed to his 
other great quality, as a link 
between high politics and the 
general paMic. In the age of 
the career politician he 
sounded the quintessential or- 
dinary man. As with anyone 
who manages to convey the 
impression of being outstand- 
ingly ordinary, he was not. 
There was art fa his simplic- 
ity. But it was a considerable 
political attribute. 

It is in this sense that I 
believe he is a loss to British 
politics as weD as to his party. 
Although he was a serious 
politician. I doubt if he was a 
particularly deep one. Al- 
though he was mentioned from 
time to time as a possible 
successor to David Steel if be 
Should give op the Liberal 
leadership after the next elec- 
tion, I question if Penhaiigon 
would have been chosen ami 
even more if he would have 
been comfortable fa the role. 


Anil 
of CO 


nrer 

dence 


Christmas Eve and the In- 

The Christmas fair on the 
bjeonmura mnd lo be 0 ld cattle market in Norwich 

doing likewise. city centre, a tradition going 

back more than 150 years, 
opened yesterday for the fast 
tune. 

__ A £60 million shopping 

-vm Ef4- complex is to be built mere. 

■ I I Bl-P i 1 1 - Work will begin next year after 

* -“O a £500,000 archaeological dig 

number of _ wealthy individ- 


Farming surpluses: 2 


Foresters and bird lovers square up for fight 


The so-called Row Country , , . . , . , 

of Caithness and Sutherland, a In the second of three articles John Young, 

wild and desolate landscape of Agriculture Correspondent, looks at the dispute about 
moor and bog, was until large-scale afforestation. 


recently a remote and mysteri- 
ous place attracting little 
interest. 

But all at once it has become 
a battleground between the 
forest industry and conserva- 
tionists who are determined to 
prevent it from carpeting the 
ground with trees. 

The protagonists are, on the 
one side, the Forestry Com- 
mission and Fountain For- 
estry. Britain's largest wood- 
land management company. 


the most important wildlife Again, they ask, bow can the 


habitats in Europe and home environmentalists in one 
to species found nowhere else, breath claim that afforestation 


The numbers of birds, nota- destroys wildlife and in the 
bly greenshanks, golden plo- next assert that the present 


vers and dunlins, will be inha bitants are under threat 
reduced and further threat- from invading species that 


ened bv predators living choose to make the woods 
among the trees, they say. their home. 


The foresters reply that ’Hie foresters concede that 


between them they manage many of the early post-war 
56,325 hectares out of a total plantations, comprising regi- 


Gooservancy Council and that 
they must be discussed with 
otter conservation bodies, lo- 
cal authorities and the Min- 
istry of Agriculture. 

Such arguments cut little ice 
with the conservationists who 
are convinced that most of 
upland Britain and indeed, if 
farming becomes unecon- 
omic, parts of lowland Britain 
are in danger of being covered 
in huge monotonous blankets 
of evergreens. 

Most of the environmental 


uals, “showbiz stars” among nty s Norman castle- Winning his seal Gnu 

them, have invested in for- IT* L Conaervatires by a mer 

estry as a means of tax Xllgll LiSin votes in October, I 97 < 

avoidance. imlawa iHimMail to* 31 b* majority to 

Under the present rules they JUdgC OlVOrCCU than 10,000 in the last 


High Court 


and on the other a number of cent — and that only 32^330 
environmental bodies led by hectares are already planted or 


of 192,000— about 29 per men ted ranks of a single 
cent — and that only 32^30 species, were environmentally 


groups, including the Council 
for the Protection of Rural 


England and the Ramblers' 
Association, have demanded 


the Nature Conservancy 
Council and the Royal Society 
for the Protection of Birds. 

The environmentalists 
claim that the creeping forest 
is threatening to destroy a 
unique wilderness, intern at- 


scheduled. 

They also claim “there can 
be no doubt” that afforest- 
ation will increase the number 
of birds and that there are. for 
example, many more gotten 
eagles since the plantations 


unattractive. They are now planning controls on forestry, 
attempting to undo some of 1 This is something which 
the damage, by planting dif- successive governments have 


are able to set off net expen- 
diture against income from 
other sources, and are not 
subsequently liable to pay tax 
if and when they sell up. 

Leaders of the forest in- 
dustry see objections to this as 
evidence that the conserva- 
tionist movement has been 
infiltrated by politically moti- 
vated people whose main 
concern is to attack the rich. 

Mr Brian Howefl, of Foun- 
tain Forestry, said: “Their 
attitude is totally irres- 


If there had been an Alliance 
government fa his lifetime, I 
am not sure that he would have 
been a successful senior min- 
ister. Bnt politics needs th«reg 
who are able to make the 
process and the problems 
comprehensible to a .wider 
public. That was Penhaligoa's 
gift. 

He was a man of common 
sense who was able te inspire 
confidence that he was a 
reasonable and well in- 
tentional sort of chap. How 
well he coaW inspire con- 
fidence was evident from his 
success as a constituency MP. 

Winning his seal Grom the 
Conservatives by a mere 464 
votes in October, 1974, he 
built np bis majority to mote 
than 10,000 m the last elec- 


The wife of Mr Justice 
Harman, a London High 
Court judge, was granted a 
divorce yesterday in the court 
room opposite the one where 
he usually sits. 

Sir Jeremiah Harman, aged 
56, did not contest the 
proceedings- 


If 1 L' il < ? \T- r ■ i r,x^ 


Man survives 
train crash 

Russell Jordan, aged 20, 


ferent species in gaps created 
by windblow and felling. 

They also point out that all 
afforestation plans have to be 
approved by the Forestry 
Commission and the Nature 


ionally recognized as one of came to Scotland. 


so far resisted, although they 
are now part of Labour Party 
policy. 

Conservationist objections 
have recently been intensified 
bv the knowledge that a 


ponsibfer A very successful received head and knee inju- 
and important industry is ries when he was hit by a 


being da maged by irres- 
ponsible comments, and we 
resent it very much.” 
Tomorrow: Are more trees the 
answer? 


Derby to Nottingham train 
yesterday while walking home 
to Norman Street, Cotm- 
anhay, Derbyshire, from a 
night dub. 


fa developing the strength of 
the Alliance throughout the 
sooth-west ft fa probably 
there that his party will feel 
his loss most acutely. Bnt be 

was recognized as an attractive 

personality throughout the 
country. 

As the tasks of government 
become more and more 
specialized, so the need be- 
come; all the greater for 
potitioans who can be equally 
at haute fa a ministry, fa 
Parliament or with thegrtfein! 
public. David Peahafigon .was 
an outstanding example of an 
intensely political politician - 
who never lost touch with 

people outside politics. 









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/WM 







THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


^ WORLD SUMMARY 


Briton freed 


Aftermath of mass rallies for democracy in Shanghai streets 













writes). 


“SSs^^wiss: 



s=s&-Jasaassgf=== 

fonr 

Mr Robertson, aged 54. whose wife lives in the Algar ve. 

MaumtaS r ” EEC ”! mim “ WwiRUC^S 
Government when he was captured by the 

d£L?L re nSe followed direct talks between a British 

ffiirtKSRrcifaEL ,h b - 

Libya attack in Chad 

N djamena (AP) — Libyan aircraft, artillery and t*nk s 
yesterday launched a fierce attack, with the use or napalm 
and toxic gas shells, on loyalist positions in the Tibesti 
Mountains of northern Chad. 

Mr Khaims Togoi, chief spokesman for President Habrt 

Cnad, said the Libyan attack concentrated on guerrilla po- 
sitions controlling Bardai, once the “capital" of former 
President Gookouni OneddePs rebel govenuaent, where the 
Libyans suffered a heavy defeat on SaterdayJie said that 
the Chadian defenders held their ground and that Bardai re- 
mains in the hands of Goukomfs forces. 

Mr Goukouni, leader of a Libyan-sponsored rebel 
government in Bardai. was ousted by other rebel leaders in 
October and took most of fats estimated 3,000 mountain 
fighters into a spontaneous alliance wth President Habrt, his 
former enemy, against the Libyans. 

Border 100 die in 
redrawn Iraqi raid 

The Hague (AP) - The Tehran (Renter) - Iran 
World Court yesterday di- said more than 100 people 
Vided Up 1,200 square miles died yesterday in an Iraqi 
of disputed territory ■ air raid on the western town 
claimed by both Burkina of Eslamabad-e G barb, and 
Faso and Mali which drew announced an extension of 
the West African nations its reprisal shelling of mili- 
into a brief border war a tary and economic targets 
year ago. inside Iraq. 

l n its ruling, a fire-man Tehran Radio ■raid that i 
special chamber of the Iraqi jets struck the town 
court divided the disputed for the second fim» in as 
areas, which lie in the many days as relatives 
eastern parts of both na- buried the 103 victims of 

tions, into roughly equal Sunday’s raid on the 

parts. The proposed 124'A- provincial capital of 
mile border tine gives Mali Bakhtaran n»r by. 
a bigger chunk of the Mr Ali Akbar Velayali, 
disputed territory's western the I ranian Foreign M in- 
zone and Burkina Faso a feter, has appealed to the 
larger portion in the east- United Nates for argent 
em zone. action to stop such attacks 

Law report, page 23 the radio said. 




down OB 


People climbing t rees to obtain a better view of the demonstrations calling for democracy and press freedom in Shanghai's People's Square on Sunday. 

Dawia /vaa^- /awnvaw%l/x/l I Distanced from Brezhnev 


Paris transport crippled 
as Metro drivers 
join rail and sea strike 


Paris (AP) — Most Paris 
commuter railway operators 
walked out yesterday, joining 
a strike by rail and maritime 
workers that has crippled 
transport throughout the 
country. 

Drivers on the French 
capital's M£lro and suburban 
commuter trains walked out 
to demand higher pay and 
changes in job classification. 
Only four in 10 trains were 
operating, with several lines 
virtually shut down. 

Negotiations between the 
management of the SNCF, 
France's national railroad sys- 


Nond. where picketers were 
blocking the tracks. The TGV, 
the high-speed train, was 
maintaining its normal sched- 
ule on three of seven lines, but 
only half its service on the 
others. 

At Chambety, in the Alpine 
foothills, striking workers 
were blocking the high-speed 
train line, forcing travellers to 
continue toward the area's 
many ski resorts by bus. 

M Jacques Chirac, the 
French Prime Minister, met 
his ministers responsible for 
public sector affairs yesterday 
to discuss the strikes. His 


lem, and railway workers were office issued a statement say- 
scheduled for last night. The jpg the conservative go- 
SNCF walkout began as a vemment's strategy to cut 
wildcat strike on December inflation and stimulate the 


Bokassa trial dispute 


18, and has since gained the economy meant salaries must 


Bangui (AP) — The judge in the trial of former Emperor 
Bokassa yesterday denied a defence request for a week's re- 
cess, saying that little progress had been made and that the 
court could not afford to waste more time. The defence ar- 
gued that their dient, aged 65, was suffering from high blood 
pressure and needed time to recuperate. . 

Judge Edouard Franck reacted heatedly to defence 
protests over his ruling, shouting: “The court has already 
made its decision-” He said that the court coaid only afford to 
take December 24 and 25 to observe Christmas holidays. 
The French defence lawyer, M Francis Szpiner, responded 
that the process would move more quickly “if we quit calling 
the same witnesses and asking the same questions". 

Bilingual Strikers 
banned too noisy 

Ottawa - The Gov- Johannesburg - The 
eminent of Quebec has management of one of 

resumed laying charges South Africa's biggest 

against merchants who dis- supermarket chains threat- 

play signs not composed ened yesterday to go to 

exclusively in French, the court in a Ml to stop 

province's official lan guag e striking black workers 

(John Best writes). “dapping, singing and 

Charges have been laid dancing” (Ray Kennedy 

against 27 firms for posting writes). Residents of fiats 

signs written bilingnally in near an outlet of OK Ba- 

English and French. The zaars in the centre of 

actions broke a moratorium Johannesburg said that 

on prosecutions that had they had been kept awake 

lasted nearly a year while by the din from the store, 

the Government awaited a Ninety-two of the chain's 
Quebec appeal ruling on 202 stores nationwide have 

(he constitutional validity been hit by the four-day- 

of the French-only old strike over a demand 

requirement for an immediate pay rise. 


backing of several unions. 

The strike, which arose over 
working conditions and a new 
salary scale, continued to dis- 
rupt train services across 
France during the peak of the 
holiday travel season. 

On main lines out of Paris 
traffic ranged from one in two 
trains leaving some stations, 
to none at all at the Gate du 


increase within strict limi ts. 

“France is at 'a decisive 
moment in its policy of eco- 
nomic reform,’' the statement 
said. “If this policy is ques- 
tioned, aD our efforts to 
increase employment will be 
compromised.” 

M Jacques Doufifiagues, the 
Transport Minister, Iras urged 


the raihvaymen to go back to. extra flights. 


work, saying that their com- 
plaints did not justify “hitting 
travellers in the days leading 
up to Christmas”. 

Negotiations between repre- 
sentatives of striking mer- 
chant seamen and dock- 
workers were under way in 
Paris yesterday. 

The maritime strike, which 
began on December S, has 
closed the pons of Marseille, ; 
Nantes. La Rochelle and Le 
Havre to most cargo traffic. 

The merchant seamen and 
dock workers — belonging to 
the Communist-led CGT 
union — went on strike to 
protest against planned 
changes in the merchant ma- 
rine system announced by the 
Government in October. 

The package includes a 
measure that would allow 
certain French ships to em- 
ploy foreign sailors. 

The domestic airline. Air 
Inter, target of a two-day strike 
by flight crews who are op- 
posed to the airline's plans to 
cut their number, resumed 
services on Sunday with 140 


Sakharov freedom 
sets seal on 
Gorbachov reform 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 

When Dr Andrei Sakharov given new freedom, 
ts foot in Moscow this becoming more the ord' 


sets foot in Moscow this 
morning, for the first time 
since his banishment In Jann- 
ary it will be the culmination of 
a dramatic series of recent 
events which have set the 
symbolic seal on the Gor- 
bachov era and distanced it 
formally from the legacy left 
by Leonid Brezhnev. 

In addition to Mr Gor- 
bachov's personal decision to 
free the country's most bril- 
liant dissident, the past week 
has seat the sacking of Mr 
Dimnnkhamed Kunayev, one 
of Brezhnev's last s urvivin g 
cronies, and the subsequent 
unprecedented admission that 
his replacement as Party chief 
had sparked nationalist riot- 
ing on the streets of the 
Kazakhstan capital of Alma- 
Ata. 

In the spirit of glamost 
(openness) aid self-criticism 
being fostered as the central 
plank of Mr Gorbachov's 
reformist policy, the decision 
to publicize the riots was 
accompanied by a hard-hitting 
assessment in Pravda attack- 
ing much of Brezhnev's policy 


given new freedom, it is aI ^ or lraffic centres, af- 
becommg more the order ofthe fecIed production and social 
day. This is more than just a order”, 
cosmetic change.” The radio said that from 

2®*“ .“^mediate re- now on official permission 
suits of the decision to free Dr would have to be obtained for 
Saharov and to pardon his ^ rally or demonstration, 
wife, Mrs Vejena Bonner, has misted a number of banned 
jfi? a 'f® breathe new life into acl ivitics and said that those 
* dbsid “? violating the provisions would 

wtyand to prompt hopes that be “seveifly punished by pub- 
snch an mumstakeabie nptnrn Uc securi* and judicial organs 
in Kremlm policy presages a according to the seriousnesTof 
^ their individual cases and 
ened treatment of dissevers, according to the provisions of 
FormanyJewishreteaibs the criminal law” 
and others who have had to witnesses said that another 
endue official oppr obrium , 2 00 police lined the streets 
harassment and even brutal- oulside ^ dty ^ which 

ity, the central importance is had ^ funded ^ 
se» DM so much m the ending teitiay by tfaousands 0 f Jtu- 

hw £ y exfl€ denis and their supporters, 
but m the fact that such a nyve Movement at city halland in 
was deliberatriy pobUdzsd in People's Square was filmed, 
the official Soviet media. There was no sign of any 
including Pravda and the tele- student groups or gatherings, 
vision news. Security was also tight on 

“This Is a change, a reaL the university campuses, from 
change," explained one Jew- where the students led the 


Shanghai (Reuter) - Chi- 
nese authorities placed a 
clamp on student protests 
yesterday, deploying 200 pol- 
ice around the site of Sunday's 
mass demonstration and 
warning that official per- 
mission would be needed for 
further rallies. 

Thousands of people dem- 
anding more democracy and 
press freedom had gathered in 
Shanghai's People's Square on 
Sunday in the biggest protest 
seen ir. China for years. 

Early vesterdav afternoon 
about 20(5 police arrived at the 
square in vans and dispersed 
any groups of people there. 
They also screened the passes 
of anyone seeking to enter. 

In 'a dearly co-ordinated 
crackdown, the authorities 
also began a propaganda blitz 
against the protest organizers. 

Shanghai Radio broadcast a 
warning from the city police 
calling on citizens to “expose 
trouble-making and disrupt- 
ing activities by a small num- 
ber of people with ulterior 
motives and criminals in or- 
der to maintain public order". 

The city's main newspaper. 
Hen Hu: Bao. said that 
“criminals took the opportu- 
nity to make trouble” during 
the last two days of 
demonstrations, which had 
“caused serious obstructions 
at major traffic centres, af- 
fected production and social 
order”. 

The radio said that from 
now on official permission 
would have to be obtained for 
any rally or demonstration. 

It listed a number of banned 
activities and said that those 
violating the provisionswould 
be “severely punished by pub- 
lic security and judicial oigans 
according to the seriousness of 
their individual cases and 
according to the provisions of 
the criminal law”. 

Witnesses said that another 
200 police lined the streets 
outside the city hall, which 
■ had been surrounded yes- 
terday by thousands of stu- 
dents and their supporters. 
Movement at city hall and in 
People's Square was filmed. 

There was no sign of any 
student groups or gatherings. 

Security was also tight on 


Francis wepmer, responded CWTi^A. 9 _• A/% ^ j _ A g • mg much or Brezhnev's policy 

BSKlBtf! -1 11 rat One gives 12.5m to Australia ss-atma 

Strikers 1 
too noisy 


ish woman whose family has 
been watting with increasing 
pessimism for eight years for 
permission to emigrate. 

Westerners have noted with 
some surprise that the new 


marches. People entering the 
Communications University 
needed to show identity passes 
and the public-address system 
broadcast messages saying 
that students had been muded 


MOO GMT l 

Monday'! 


Voyager pilots join 
heroes of aviation 

From Mohsin Ali, Washington 

As the experimental aircraft side and sleeping space for one 
Voyager circles ihe globe non- on the port side, 
stop without refuelling, Dick Ruton and Yrager have 
Rutan and Jeana Yeager, its been working in shifts of four 
pilots, arc being compared to eight hours. For exercise, 
with aviation heroes such as ' they use an elastic rubber 
Charles Lindbergh and Ame- device For working on every 
lia EarharL joint every day. For hygiene. 

Cooped up in a cabin the they use alcohol-tased skin 
size°ofa telephone kiosk, and hair cleansers that do not 
siic ui a ». H require the use of water. 

r*r 15555s They took only one change 

■■.I Air Force Base / of clothing, but several of 

.^PiMOGNrrapproic \ undergarments. Toilet facil- 

1 ir^ Tgr Vi-t ilies on ■*« Primitive, 

iwu. jyv A main concern has been 

% 1. " drinking enough liquids, and 

' r . Ijwdogmt they have been monitoring 

W1 Mondoy t each other to see that they are 
• : “ doing this. Another big head- 

1300 ache has been the -noise of 
Monday engines and the wind. 

i \ . ;; COSTAR IC A — a — J J La^ Q f sleep and fatigue 

Rutan aged 48, a retired Air have been the big enemies, 
Force lieutenant-colonel, and They were so tired on Sat- 
Yeaeer aged 32, holder of unday morning, while crossing 
nine aviation speed and the Atlantic, that they forgot 
endurance records, have to add oil to the rear engine, 
shown phenomenal courage This caused an abrupt rise in 
during the past nine days in engine temperature and gave 
the unique, hand-built them the biggest scare of their 

aircraft * fll But within 10 minutes they 

Voyager mission control ex- d j SC0V ered that the engine, 

pecis about 75,000 people 10 one of lw0t was nearly two 
welcome the fired and storm- quarts low on oil. They 
tossed pilots when they land at qu j c u y added more, and there 
dawn today at Edwards .Air n0 damage. 

Force Base in the Mojave The pilots have generally 
desert after a world record- kcpl Voyager below 15,000 
breaking epic flight of 27, /uu feeL l0 avo j d developing a 
miles. potentially fatal accumulation 

Vovazer’s cabin gives Rutan of -fluid in tiie lungs after 70 to 
about half the 90 hours of flying. 
3tl< L\£f«,nnM have in a The main trouble areas 
5paC u hSfrhhS car Ten feei have been the central Pacific 
ihfcS and Atlantic, where winds 
long and three . 3 converge, and southern Af- 

?r.?5 k E!l. h ^r!h? Lrboare! rica, where head winds arise. 



From Harry Debelins 
Madrid 


Sefior Antonio Canton, a lottery official, emptying numbered 
balls into a drum in preparation for the world's largest draw. 


“The Fat One" yesterday 
favoured a long-term Spanish 
emigrant to Australia, Seflor 
Jose Nunez Monturfo, to the 
: tune of 47S million pesetas 
(nearly £2.5 million) as 
Spain's annual Christmas lot- 
tery, the biggest in the world. 1 
showered £389 million on i 
lucky winners. 

“The Fat One” is the 
Spaniard's favourite yuletide 
. character. They call him “El 
Gordo”, and he represents the 
number with the biggest pay- 
off in the Christmas lottery. 
This time it was 3772. 

Senor Nunez Monturfo, 
aged 64, a tobacco farmer who 
lives in Myrtleford, Victoria, 
bought his lottery tickets last 
summer during the visit to 
relatives in his home town of 
Archidona, near Malaga. 

Before going back to Austra- 
lia, where according to friends 
be has lived for 20 years, he 
gave a small share of his 
lottery number to four neph- 
ews who own a bar in 
Archidona. The pay-off for 
their share was 25 million 
pesetas (neatly £130,000). The 
many others “touched” by 
“The Fat One” won a total of 
£81.7 million. 

Most of the second prize 
winnings went to employees 
of a refinery in Corunna, who 
shared the number 56,320. 

- They will split between them 
seven billion pesetas (36.3 
million). 


the state had slipped into 
disorder. 

Although the article, to 
mark the 80th annivemy of 
his birth, balanced criticism 
with some praise, it ruthlessly 
dissected the failings of his 
later years with references to 
food shortages, economic de- 
cline, a personality cult, nepo- 
tism and corroption. 

The effect of such criticism 
in a society where sycophancy 
has been a more common 
method of dealing with recent 
Party leaders cannot be over- 
emphasized. “We knew that 
things were going wrong, es- 
pecially the corruption. But we 
just did not dare speak oat 
about them,” one Communist 
Party member said. 


mood of cautions optimism [ .and did not have a clear idea 
about human rights is to be I of what was going on. 


found mainly among dis- 
sidents, refuseniks and others 
who have most reason to be 
cynical about Kremlin prom- 
ises of a wind of change. 

In conversations with 
journalists, leaders of the dis- 
sident community have repeat- 
edly given credit to Mr 
GHorhachov for the changed 
atmosphere, with some argu- 
ing that the time taken to 
release Dr Sakharov was 
indicative of resistance inside 
the party hierarchy. 

Professor Valery Siefer, a 
prominent refusenik who has 
been trying since 1979 to 
secure an exit visa, said: “I 
think that there is a real 


sSilSsbeS^e pace of ** abort demsc^feidw 
change in the dosing stages of 

I986that few ontsklei?even ifoe nj^echelo® fight- 
noticed the article in last “W ^ 

Saturday’s Izmtia stating the to ^uoacy to make nn- 
that the crew of the Adminti po rtam . changes m tins area. 
Nakhimov, which sank on Once the immediate euphoria 


August 31 vith the loss of 


nearly 400 lives, were notori- 
ous drunkards. It said that 
since 1981, 18 captains, 75 
first officers and 141 senior 
mechanics bad been dismissed 
for “disciplinary reasons” 
from the Soviet company 
which owned the finer. 


return to his home has snb- 
sided, pressure is expected to 
mount for his freedom to be 
matched by similar leniency 
towards other dissidents. 

Western sources said yes- 
terday that Mr Yosef Began, 
Ms Ida Nodal and the so- 


Co mmanting on the revela- called “original refusenik”, 
tions, one Western diplomat Mr Vladimir Slepak, one of 
said: “Even in the recent past, the _ first Soviet Jews to or- 
the appearance of such a piece ganize the teaching of Hebrew, 
of reporting in the official were expected to feature prom- 
Goverameut newspaper would inently in the renewed cam- 


have raised eyebrows. But now 
that journalists have been 


paign for further liberalization 
in the Kremlin's policy. 


Classes seemed to be 
continuing as normal. But one 
foreign teacher said that about 
half of her students were 
missing. 

Yesterday's coverage on 
Shanghai radio and television 
was the first direct mention in 
the domestic media of a spate 
of unrest that has swept 
university campuses in the 
last three weeks. 

On Sunday night, the New 
China News Agency accused 
students of having beaten up 
31 police who asked them to 
stop blocking a city street at 
rash hour. It also said hun- 
dreds of demonstrators broke 
into government offices. 

• HONG KONG - Trav- 
ellers arriving yesterday from 
Shanghai said that they had 
seen no significant violence 
and had been impressed by the 
good mood of the dem- 
onstrators and the moderate 
response of the police. Some 
students have accused the 
latter of arresting several of 
their colleagues (David Eon- 
avia writes). 

Experience of political dem- 
onstrations in China over 40- 
odd years is that they are 
rarely spontaneous and are 
manipulated by high-level 
political groups as weapons 
against their antagonists. 

What may be significant is 
that yesterday's ban on further 
marches shows that, however 
it began, the upsurge of politi- 
cal sentiment has gone further 
than was intended. 


Swaziland keeps Botha Karens flee from Burmese repression 

waiting in raid protest From Neil Kelly, Bangkok I 1 I the Burmese Array was 

O * ' I «igiM \ \ i ion mile® 1 enmnlainine lhat it had npL 


• Monday .. 

Rutan, aged 48, a retired Air 

Force lieutenant-colonel, and 
Yeager, aged 32. holder of 
nine aviation speed and 
endurance records, have 
shown phenomenal courage 
during the past nine days in 
the unique, hand-built 
aircraft. 

Voyager mission control ex- 
pects about 75,000 people to 
welcome the fired and stonn- 
tosod pilots when they land at 
dawn today at Edwaids .Air 
Force Base in the Mojave 
desert after a world iworf- 
breaking epic flight of -7,700 
miles. 

Voyager’s cabin gives Rutan 
and Yeager about half.tbc 
space they would have iga 
small hatchback car. Ten teei 
long and three wide, the own 
or cockpit has room for only a 
pilot’s seat on the starboard 


Fran Ray Kennedy, Johannesburg 
Mr R F “PIk” Botha, the protests by both Switzerland 
Sooth African Foreign Min- and Swaziland they were 
ister, was kept waiting in an freed, 
ante-room for 30 minutes yes- It was reported in South 
terday after arriving in Mba- Africa at the weekend that the 
bane, (he Swaziland capital, intelligence services had been 


for talks with Mr Sotja duped into recommending a 
Dlamini, its Prime Minister, raid into Swaziland and that 


Two-and-a-half hours later 
he left the Prime Minister's 
office. “Yon can write what 
yon like,” he told journalists. 
“I have no comment" The 
Prime Minister's office also 
refused to make any state- 
ment 


the Department of Foreign 
Affairs had advance know- 
ledge of it, as did President 


Meanwhile, advertisements 
placed in Sonth African news- 
papers by the Bureau for 
Information purporting to set 


It was dear, though, that the out the “trfce perspective" (A 
time Mr Botha was kept the new slate of emergency 
waiting was meant to convey regulations affecting the me- 
Swazfland's displeasure over dia were yesterday attacked 
the armed raids by units of the strongly by the English-lan- 
South African security force guage dailies. 


earlier this month in which 
two Swiss nationals and two 


The Pretoria Neva said: 
“We admire their cheek . . . 


blacks were abducted and two W'e disagree totally that media 


people killed. 

At die time Mr Botha said 
that the Swiss were being held 
because of their suspected 
links with the African Na- 


tional Congress. But after shoulders.* 


reporting and comment are, as 
they claim, generating much of 
the revolutionary dimate for 
upheaval. The blame for that 
Iks folly on the Government's 


Thousands of Karen people 
in Burma are on the move 
towards the border with Thai- 
land to escape a campaign of 
repression by Burmese Gov- 
ernment forces, according to 
Western relief workers and 
Thai intelligence sources on 
the border. 

More than 26,000 refugees 
from Burma are now in Thai- 
land, 18.000 of them Karens 
and most of the others of the 
Mon grouping. These ethnic 
minorities have been in rebel- 
lion against Rangoon for more 
than 35 years. 

Some refugees say they 
walked for up to three weeks 
from the Shwegyin area. Oth- 
ers from the Papun district, 
closer (o Thailand say that 
5.000 more people there are 
moving towards the border. 

The refugees claim that they 
have been forced lo flee by the 
brutal actions of Burmese 
soldiers who seized rice and 
other possessions, burned 
houses and rounded up people 
into compounds. Those sus- 
pected of helping the Karen 


From Neil Kelly, Bangkok 

Karen people guerrillas are threatened with 
n the move execution, 

er with Thai- Repons similar to these, 

campaign of which have been coming in 
tnnese Gov- with the refugees for two 

according to years, have been confirmed by 
workers and Christian aid workers secretly 
sources on helping the Karens, many of 
whom are themselves Chris- 
000 refugees tian, inside Burma. The Bur- 
tow in Thai- mese Government says little 
hem Karens about its war against the 

aihers of the rebels. 

rhese ethnic Thai military officers on- the 
een in rebel- border say that the Burmese 
ton for more Army has been conducting a 
drive during the past week 
: say they against Mon liberation Army 
three weeks guerrillas near the Three Pa- 
ri area. Oth- godas Pass, a well-known 
tun district. Border landmark, forcing 
id say that 8,000 refugees into Thailand, 
le there are Burmese artillery and in- 
he border. fan try have attacked the big 

im that they market near the pass and 
lo flee by the surrounding villages but Thai 
>f Burmese border police say that the 
ed rice and guerrillas fought them off wiih 
is, burned great determination. The Tha- 
:d up people is say that 1 5 Burmese soldiers 
Those sus- and five guerrillas were killed. 

<, the Karen Bangkok intelligence an- 
alysts say that Burmese sol- 


BURMA •. \ r = 

x 

Shwegyin* Papon 


ANDAMAN 
: SEA 


THAILAND 


’ -v Three 

. Pegodas 
V Pass 




diets are now establishing 
themselves in rebel districts 
tiiey had previously ignored, 
including Tenasserim, in the 
far south, where 100.000 Ka- 
rens fear they will also be 
harassed by the Army. 

Well-informed Govern- 
ment officials and business- 
men from the West say that 
during recent visits to Ran- 
goon they have learned that 


the Burmese Array was 
complaining that it had nei- 
ther the manpower nor weap- 
ons to sustain a campaign 
against the rebels. 

They also found indecision 
and inertia more marked than 
in the past in official circles 
because of the continuing 
uncertainty about Burma's 
political future. This stems 
from the frail health of the 
country's leader. General Ne 
Win. who has tften in power 
for 25 years and is now aged 
75, and the lack of an obvious 
successor. 

According to these reports, 
some younger officials now 
speak more openly about 
Burma’s need for foreign 
investment and expertise 
which has been rejected by 
General Ne Win. Diplomats 
in Rangoon say that is a sign 
of what may come when new 
leaders take over. 

For the time being the 
Japanese, eager both in Gov- 
ernment ana in private in- 
dustry to provide aid and 
investment, are making little 
progress towards overcoming 
Burmese isolationism. 















8 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Karachi waits for the 
spark that will set 
off new ethnic clashes 


From Zaha Hussein, Karachi 


After a week of violence 
which has left some 200 
people dead, Karachi, the 
industrial heartland of Paki- 
stan, now has a semblance of 
normality. 

But the city, which has a 
population of seven million 
and has been a melting pot for 
immigrants from India, Bang- 
ladesh and Afghanistan as well 
as other regions of Pakistan, 
will never be the same again. 

The dire predictions that 
Karachi could become an- 
other Beirut has acquired an 
ominous ring of truth with the 
current wave of violence. 

Beneath the deceptive calm, 
the situation is more exptorive 
than ever. A minor incident 
could spark off yet another 
round of bloody clashes. 

Within a short span of 40 
days Karachi has bled 
twueJMore than SO people 
were killed last month in 
dashes between the two main 
ethnic groups in the city, 
Pathans and Urdu-speaking 
Mohajirs (refugees from Lidia 
who migrated to Pakistan 
after the partition of the 
subcontinent in 1947 and 
from Bangladesh after 1971). 

The first ethnic riots be- 
tween these two groups broke 
out in Karachi in April 1985, 
following a traffic accident in 
which a girl student was killed, 
and soon turned into Patban- 
Mohajir dashes because most 
drivers and users of the long- 
distance heavy lorries are are 
Pathans. 

The ethnic dashes between 
the two communities have 
simply kept on recurring. 
Even a minor traffic accident 
would plunge the city into 
violence. * 

The current wave of vi- 
olence, the worst in the 
country’s history, started after 
an army clean-up operation in 
Sohrab Goth, a predomi- 
nantly Pa than and Afghan 
refugee settlement, on Decem- 
ber Ti 

There has been increasing 
public pressure to free the area 
of drug smugglers and arms 
dealers. Apathy on the part of 
the administration and the 

traflcto bysome influntiii 
persons- in the Government 
has exacerbated the situation. 


managed to remove their 
stocks of narcotics and arms 
to safer places. 

According to the Karachi 
En glish-language daily Dawn, 
about 20 truckloads of weap- 
ons and a huge quantity of 
heroin were removed from 
Sohrab Goth during the night 
of December 11-12 and se- 
cretly taken to various parts of 
the city. 

On the first day of the 
operation, on December 12, 
the law enforcement agencies 
could find only a few men in a 
population of more than 
50,000. 

The plans for the dean-up 
operation had been discussed 
at a secret meeting in which 


while tension had still not 
subsided following last 
month's dashes. 


6 Beneath the 
deceptive calm, the 
situation is more 
explosive than ever. 
A minor incident 
could spark off yet 
another round of 
bloody clashes 9 


The incompetence and in- 
eptitude of the administration 
was evident during the week 
of rioting. There were not 
enough army troops deployed 
to check the riots, and in many 
places people repeatedly de- 
manded police pi 
from gangs of killers, but 
without success. 

Although the rioting, which 
has been taking place in 
Karachi for a year and a half, 
is often characterized as ethnic 
conflicts, an analysis of the 
situation indicates that the 
causes are much deeper. 

There are many socio-eco- 
nomic and political factors 
which have given rise to the 
present tension and ethnic 
division. The hostility be- 
tween the Pathans and the 
Mohajirs is not based 
ethnic factors alone. 


on 


senior political, police and 
military officials participated. 

The administration has no 
explanation as to how the 
secret was leaked to the drug 
traffickers. The mediahas 
made man y alleg ations of 
corruption and protection of 
drugs dealers among top exec- 
utives of the provincial 
administration. 

While the operation was in 
progress, on December 14, 
some 200 Pathans, alleged to 
have the backing of the drag 
dealers, arm6d with 
Kalishinikovs and other 
sophisticated firearms, at- 
tacked Aligarh colony in the 
Orangi Town area, a predomi- 
nantly Urdu-speaking Bihari 
area which was the scene of 
the worst clashes last month. 
Most of the people who took 
part in the killing were said to 
be from the Sohrab Goth area. 

The carnage began at about 
9 am and continued for six 
hours with the adminis tration 
doing nothing to stop it 

According to eyewitnesses, 
people, including women and 
children, were brutally killed 
while a small contingent of 


As the largest industrial and 
financial centre and a port 
city, Karachi has been attract- 
ing people from all over the 
country. Because of this its 
population has risen from 
100,000 in 1947 to seven 
millioa in 1986. 


a small contingent 

The clean-up opera tionwas -♦police watched- Scores of peo- 
finally undertaken with the Pl e wer c burnt to death, 
support of 3,000 army troops.-^ According to a -cautions 
and police. estimatej-raore than 70 people 

Strangely, very few drags S' 
and arms were recovered dur- * had finished.. The 

ing the six-day operation, piling triggered ethnic clashes 
Some of the leaders are re- mother parts of the city. 


ported to have been tipped off 
a day earlier about the opera- 
tion and are said to have 


It is still not dear why the 
Government chose this time 
to start the clean-up operation 


The Urdu-speaking Mob- 
ajirs, who comprise 45 per 
cent of the city's population, 
form the majority. But the 
Pathans fixup the North-West- 
ern Frontier, with a popula- 
tion of more than 1,500,000, 
also form a major ethnic 
group. 

Tire increasing strain on the 
infra structure and on the lim- 
ited jobs market has caused 
tension between the different 
ethnic groups to rise. The 
Mohajirs and the local Sindhis 
particularly fed that outsiders 
are taking the jobs and re- 
sources of the city. 

Since 1979 two significant 
new developments have taken 
place in Karachi 

One is the growth of a 
powerful drugs mafia, which is 
also involved in the transport 
industry. The other is the 
upsurge of spontaneous street 
protests against drugs dealers 
and bus operations in both of 
which Pathans are involved. 
This has caused such protests 
to often take an ethnic colour. 

The recent rise of Mohajir 
nationalism has -further led to 
polarization on the ethnic 

bases. 

•The .1985 general election, 
in which the votes were cast 
on ethnic bases rather on- 
political programmes, has also 
increased this trend. The in- 
flux of arms through Afghan 
refugees has also created a 
volatile situation. 


Junejo names 16 of new Cabinet 


fQ 


From Hasan Akhtar 
Islamabad 

Mr Mohammad Khan J un- 
jo, the Prime Minister of 
ddstan, yesterday took back 
16 of his former ministers and 
ministers of state while 
reconstituting his Cabinet. He 
had asked on Saturday for tire 
resignation of the entire group 
of about 40 members. 

President Zia of Pakistan 

EEl? ministers and four 
ministers of state. More min- 
isters are expected to be 
included within the next week. 

Mr Junqjo had accepted the 
resignation of his entire cabi- 
net in order to drop those 
reportedly either corrupt or 
working secretly to weaken his 
position in the ruling party. 

Mr Junejo comes from 
Sind, while most MPs and the 
ruling Pakistan Muslim Lea- 



Mr Junejo; Aiming for a 
Cabinet free of taint, 
gue Party belong to the 
Punjab. 

Some ministers readmitted 
to the Cabinet have had their 
portfolios changed, while oth- 
ers have returned to their 
previous responsibilities. 

Hie Ministers and Min- 


isters of State a] 
terday are: Foreign 
Sahabzada Yaqub Khan, In- 
terior Mr Aslam Khan KJhat- 
tak. Education Mr Naseem 
Ahmad Aheer, Finance and 
Economic Affairs Mr Yasin 
Khan Wattoo, Industries Mr 
Shujal Husain, Justice Mr 
Wasim Sajjad, Information 
Kazi Abdul Majid Abid, Food 
and Agricritone Mr Moham- 
mad Ibrahim Baluch, Housing 
Haji Hanif Tayyeb, Local 
Government Mr Anwar Aziz 
Chaudhary, States and Fron- 
tier Regions Mr Qasim Shah, 
Without Portfolio Mr Iqbal 
Ahmad Khan. 

The Ministers of State are: 
Foreign Affairs Mr Zain 
Noorani, Health Mr Ghnlam 
Mohammad Mehr, Special 
Education Begum Afsar Kiz- 
ilbash. Railways Mr Nisar 
Mo hamma d Khan. 



Otto Heademaim, aged 74, who was jailed for 
10 years yesterday for killing a fellow prisoner 
in a Nazi concentration camp in 1941, being 
carried on a stretcher into the Moabit 
courtroom in West Berlin yesterday. 

. Hodemann had been entrusted by SS 
guards at tbe Manthausen concentration camp 
with overseeing fellow inmates, (Renta- reports 
from West Berlin). The cam-t found him guilty 
of haring led Mr Jozef Wojdanowsld, aged 49, 
away from a work-party at a quarry belonging 


to the camp in January 1941 and beating and 
kicking him to death behind a pfle of rubble. 
HeHemaim denied the charges. 

The court decided that prisoner-overseers at 
Manthaasen had been tnU by SS gnards to kill 
hnnatpn who could no longer work. Bat 
Heidemann's action in murdering Mr Wojdan- 
owski, one of more than 100 prisoners under 
his control, most be considered a crime even in 

the conditions of the Nazi period, Judge Hans 
Pruder ruled. 


American arrested 
in Tokyo drive on 
fingerprint rebels 


Tokyo police have arrested 
an American activist m a new 
drive against foreigners wno 
refuse to give their finger- 
prints- , , , 

The authorities had been 
watching Mr Robert Ricketts 
for two months and detained 
him as he left a translation 
agency where he works. 

His arrest is an important 
move in the Government s 
campaign to break the back of 
the anti-fingerprint campaign 
because Mr Ricketts has acted 
as a coordinator for the 
disparate groups of Koreans, 
Asian- Am errican s, religious 
and citizens' groups who op- 
pose the system whereby all 
resident foreigners, including 
Koreans who were bora id 
Japan, must be fingerprinted 
when applying for their alien 
registration cards. 

After Mr Ricketts's arrest he 
was forcibly fingerprinted, but 
the authorities were enable to 
get prints of all his fingers. He 
has been refusing to give his 
prints since 1985. along with 
1,375 other foreigners, mostly 
Koreans. 

In a newspaper interview a 


From David Watts, Tokyo 

However, due to a tough 
new stance by the Ministry of 

Justice, police .(SSL 
been putting additional pres- 
sure on local authorities to 
give up the files at 
same time proposing softer 
regulations in responseto 
diplomatic pressure from 
South Korea. 

Under the proposals, wtuch 
have not yet become law, 
foreigners would be finger- 
printed only once, on arrival, 
and the ink used would be 
washable rather than the 
messy, semi-permanent type 
used at present- 
The fingerprint refusers say 
that being fingerprinted is a 
violation of human rights and 
of the constitution because it 
provides for unequal treat- 
ment under the law of Japa- 
nese and Koreans, both of 
whom have been bora in the 
same country. 

Mr Shunji Kobayashi. who 
is in charge of the immigration 
department of the Ministry of 
Justice, says that the system 
was introduced in the late 
1950s to combat the flow of 
ill egal immig rants from Ko~ 


few weeks before bis arrest he - tea. 

accused the authorities of At a recent press briefing he 


treating him as though he were 
a ‘Terrorist’'’ when all of his 
actions were in the open. Mr 
Ricketts feces a fine of np to 
200,000 yen (£837) or a prison 
term. 

The activists have been 
helped by the 700 local 
authorities in Japan who have 
been refusing to co-operate 
with police requests for files 
on fingerprint refusers. A 
three-month grace period is 
allowed for re-registration 
once the card runs out at the 
end of its five-year validity. 


at first denied that such finger- 
prints were ever used in 
criminal cases, but later 
admitted that they might be 
used as a means of identifying 
a foreigner in an incident 
unrelated to a breach of 
immigration law. 

“Legally speaking it's only 
for Koreans," Mr Kobayashi 
said. “It will suffice if we take 
fingerprints only from Kore- 
ans living in tbe country. But I 
don't think it's practicable; I 
don't think it's rational and I 
don’t think it's proper.” 


Rare army 
presence in 
Goa riots 


- The 


Bombay (Reuter) 

Indian Army staged a new 
show of strength in Goa 
yesterday, while police re- 
inforcements poured into the 
territory as the death toll in 
violence sweeping the popular 
seaside resort rose to six. 

Police said that 1,500 
reinforcements were flown in 
fay the .central Government 
and:, neighbouring .Gujarat 
state to help the 2,000-strong 
local police. More were ex- 
pected from die states of 
Karnataka and Maharashtra. 

The Army, alerted after a 
pitched battle between rival 
supporters of the Konkani and 
Marathi languages on Sunday 
night, marched through. 
Madagoa, an important com- 
mercial centre. 

It was the first tune the 
Indian Army had been called 
out in Goa since 1961, when it 
marched in to take over from 
the Portuguese. 

Police in Panjixn, the cap- 
ital, said that thousands of 
foreign tourists who had 
planned to spend Christmas in 
the former Portuguese enclave 
were crowding the airport and 
railway stations to leave. 

There were no immediate 


Fights in House as amnesty 
granted to Uruguay soldiers 


From Eduardo Cue, Bnenos Aires 


In an emotionally 
session, interrupted by 
fights among the legislators, 
the Uruguayan Congress has 
approved a controversial am- 
nesty for military and police 
officers accused of human 
rights violations during the 
former military dictatorship. 

The action by Congress has 
brought a sudden and.. un-_ 
expected end to four months 
of political crisis in Uruguay 
and illustrated the power the 
military continues to wield 
over the 22-momh-old civil- 
ian Government of President 
Julio Maria SanguinettL 

The Chamber of Deputies 
on Sunday gave final approval 
to the Bill, which became law 
imm e diat ely, just two hours 
before an army lieutenant- 
colonel had been scheduled to 
appear before a civ ilian court 
investigating charges of hu- 
man rights violations. 


The military had let it be 
known last week that its 
officers would categorically 
refuse to appear before the 
tribunal, thereby seriously and 
perhaps irrevocably, challeng- 
ing the authority of the 
country's fragile ci vilian in- 
stitutions. 

The amnesty measure was 
introduced by Senior Wilson 
Ferreira Aldunate, tbe leader 
of tire opposition National 
Party, who ted refused to 
support a similar measure 
introduced by President San- 
guinetti last August. Sefior 
Ferreira • changed his mind 
after meeting the Army com- 
mander, General Hugo Me- 
dina. who made dear that the 
military would not back 
down. 

Tbe National Party deputy, 
Sefior Gonzalo Aguirre, in a 
reference to the pressure 
brought to bear fry the mili- 


tary, admitted that the solu- 
tion “was a bad one, but it is 
also the most realistic”. 


As thousands of Uruguay- 
ans took to the streets in 
Montevideo and other cities 
in pot-banging and car-honk- 
ing protests on Sunday, fist 
fights broke out on the flora: of 
the House among some 20 
deputies when a Frente 
Amplio deputy accused the 
National Party of “acting out 
offeai”. Hie Frente Amplio, a 
coalition of left-wing parties 
which together make np the 
country’s third largest politi- 
cal force, has refused to con- 
sider any amnesty for the 
military. 


Public opinion polls have 
consistently shown that about 
70 per cent of Uruguayan 
people believe the military 
should be tried for alleged 
human rights violations. 


reports ofinjuries to any of the 
estimated 70,000 foreign and 
Indian tourists. But many 
visitors were feared stranded 
in towns cut off by barricades 
set up by militant supporters 
of the local Konkani language [ 
who are campaigning for im- j 
mediate statehood for Goa 
with Konkani as its official 

lan g ua ge. 1 

Konkani is spoken mainly 
by native Goa Christians and 
Hindus living along the coast, 
while Marathi is spoken in the 
hinterland and by Hindu 
immigrants. 



Shops hit 
in German 


arson wave 


Bonn — A wave of arson 
attacks on shops in Hamburg 
continued yesterday for the 
second successive day, with 
early-morning fires on two 
floors of a city department 
store (John England writes). 

The store's sprinkler system 
soon extinguished the fires, 
but the water caused severe 
damage to goot&Firemen and 
police helped store owners to 
search a total of 31 premises 
for small incendiary devices 
with acid time-fuses. 

The arson attacks began on 
Sunday, following rioting on 
Saturday night during a dem- 
onstration against the police 
clearance of houses occupied 
by squatters. Nearly 100 po- 
licemen and 31 demonstrators 
were injured. 


One-way Poles 


Munich (Reuter) — Twenty 
Polish tourists foiled to rejoin 
their coach before it left for 
Czechoslovakia on its way 
home. Police say it is not clear 
if the 15 men and five women, 
missing after a weekend in 
Bavaria, were staying to visit 
relatives or would seek asylum 
in Germany. 


Cash take 


(AP) — Three 
armed men robbed a Copen- 
hagen department store dur- 
ing the Christmas shopping 
rash and made off with 5 
million kroner (£470,000) 
cash in a blue pram. 


Suspects free 


Uruguayan riot police dodging atones thrown by demonstrators in Montivideo on Sunday. 


Wildlife laws threaten 
Kenyan tourist boom 


From A Correspondent, Nairobi 


The recent expulsion at 
gunpoint of a party of foreign 
tourists from a Kenyan game 
sanctuaty has exposed a di- 
lemma racing Kenya’s boom- 
ing tourist industry. 

Now that more than 
600,000 tourists are visiting 
the game reserves and marine 
parks each year the Gov- 
ernment has become alarmed 
at the detrimental effect of 
these lame numbers on the 
ecology of some wildlife areas. 

Tbe Ministry of Tourism 
and Wildlife has recently sent 
orders to its game wardens to 
be more rigorous in enforcing 
regulations in parks, especially 
that making it illegal for 
tourist vehicles to be driven 
off designated roads into 
grassland and bush country in 
search of lions, leopards and 
other wild animals. 

It is now also an offence to 
harass any animaL 

According to Mr Brendan 
Burke, a British tourist in the 
group expelled last week from 
Amboseh National Park at tbe 
foot of Mt Kilimanjaro, they 
were travelling in two mini- 
buses driven by Kenyans 
when they were stopped by a 
game warden and ordered out 
of the park without any 
explanation. 

Mr Alfeyo Baraza, the game 
warden, was annoyed, it 
seems, because the tourists 
ted left the road and were 


photographing lions in tbe 
bush against the background 
of Mt Kilimanjaro. This, he 
raid later, was. harassing the 
Hons. 

The Incident is tbe latest in 
a growing number since the 
issue of the “get tough” direc- 
tive, which is causing tension 
between tour operators and 
drivers anxious to please their 
clients and the authorities who 
are under heavy pressure from 
conservationists to limit the 
number of visitors allowed 
into the reserves. 


Mr Baraza said that about 
100 tourist buses enter Am- 
boseli each day, and those 
driving through the bush 
country are damaging rietiratg 
vegetation crucial to the 
animals * survival. 


. As Amboseli is only a few 
hours’ drive from Nairobi it 
has become probably tbe most 
accessible - and least expen- 
sive — anim al sanctuary in- 
Africa in which visitors can 
see the “big five” - lion, 
leopard, rhino, elephant and 
buffalo - in tbe same day. 

In the leisurely old-time 
safaris it could lake a couple of 
weeks. 

A Ministry of Tourism of- 
ficial agreed that the mass 
influx of tourists is threaten- 
ing to turn this world-famous 
game sanctuary into “just 
another zoo”. 


Lebanese learning that it is time to pay the bill 


From Robert Fisk 
Middle East Correspondent 


Ayeste is not a de- 
monstrative wo man. She is 
large and buxom and washes 
the floor of my flat by wrap- 
ping a wet doth round her foot 
and scraping it backwards and 
forwards across the tiles. Most 
days when she comes to dean 
my home, she just sighs when 
I ask about her family. 

But now she arrives in 
consternation and anger, hold- 


ing out her right wrist “I sold 
my last bracelet yesterday,” 
she says. “It was to pay for the 
children’s school.” She holds 
out her left wrist, which is 
equally bare. “This morning, I 
have sold my watch. What can 
1 do? I have nothing more to 
sell” 

Up a side street, Farid 
apologises for the higher price 
he charges for my manouche — 
the soft hot thyme sandwich 
the Lebanese eat for breakfast. 
“How can we go on?” he asks , 
with that special suggestion of 
guilt that is nowadays con- 
veyed to foreigners. “I spent 
all our money on Ngjla’s 
hospital treament” 

Hospital? I had been in 
Cairo for two weeks. Had his 
wife been ill? 

“You didn’t hear about our 
shell," he says possessively, 
and jerks his thumb at the 
broken window near the coun- 
ter, its glass still hanging in 
cruel shards from the frame. 
Outside his shop the fine old 
tree that ted shaded the 


portico ofhis house was gone.. 
A blackened 6ft stump was 
all that remained. 

“Najla was standing here at 
the counter when the shell hit 
the tree and the glass was 
blown into her stomach. She 
was in the hospital for a week 
and I used all my savings on 
her treatment We have noth- 
ing left.” He wrapped the 
manouche in greaseproof pa- 
per and apologised again. 

It is as if the Lebanese have 
just begun to understand then- 
collective sickness, the bill for 
which they must at last pay 
themselves. Muslims and 
Christians blame each other 
for their economic distress, 
but some blame foreigners — 


Centre, watching tbe traffic. 


Just by a fruitstall I noticed a 


# They will kidnap 
any man with bine 
eyes... rash enough 
to cross their path 9 


among them those who see 
foreigners as a quick source of 
income. They will kidnap any 
man with Hue eyes or Western 
appearance rash enough to 
cross their path, in the hope 
that they can sell him back to 
his family or to those darker 
figures who need a hostage to 
kill 

Even Hamra Street, with its 
French fashion shops and 
overpriced book stores, has 
become a tribulation for 
Westerners. 

One morning I was walking 
to my bank in the Piccadilly 


blue Volvo kerb crawling be- 
tide me. It ted no registration 
plates and there were three 
men inside, two in the front 
and one in the rear, all with 
beards. The man in the back 
wore a camouflage jacket and 
I could just make out the tip of 
a rifle. 

Should I ran to the 
fruitstall, where a bald, 
chubby man is serving a drink 
made from carrots beneath a 
sign proclaiming him “The 
King of Juice”? The three men 
are staring. 

“Marhabaf' (Hi there), I 
say. The three bearded feces 
break into smiles. “Ahaian,” 
they chorus back in greeting. 
Were they really being just 
friendly? 

Carrying money around 
Beirut has always been dan- 
gerous, which is why the 
moneychangers have armed 
bodyguards. Today, I find 
they also have two-way radios 
to talk to the local banks 
because the Lebanese pound is 
collapsing so fast that the 
antiquated phone system can- 
not keep pace with the ex- 
change rates. 

In the past 1 carried cur- 
rency in a brown envelope 
inside a newspaper. Now I 
find the customers in my bank 
holding plastic shopping bags, 
scooping the money from the 
cash desk in thousands of blue 
nates. The avalanche tells its 
own story, not least for a 
Christian neighbour of mine 


who, for a special reason, had 
already been to collect her 
savings in notes of 250 Leba- 
nese pounds. 

She came back from holi- 
day, she says, to find gunmen 
in her house. “Squatters, the 
worst kind of people — their 
guns were propped against my 
door when- 1 arrived.” 

Her stoty is truly awful 
because it is typically unjust. 


# Customers in my 
bank. . .scooping 
money in thousands 
of bine notes # 


Anywhere else, you would call 
the police. But this is Beirut 

She sat down with the 
Muslim gunmen and made a 
deal She would pay them to 
leave the house. The figure 
was in tens of thousands of 
Lebanese pounds, but the 
militiamen said there was just 
one small condition - that 
they take the contents of the 
house with them. 

My neighbour ted no op- 
tion but to agree, and there- 
fore watched helplessly as the 
gunmen trooped from her 
home carrying her furniture, 
her television, her cutlery, 
even her daughter's wedding 
presents. She tried to live 
there in an empty house, but 
now she is leaving too, taking 
bags full of worthless notes 
with her. 

Some are less fortunate. At 
home, my phone rings. A 


Lebanese acquaintance of 
mine, a Muslim b usinessman, 
has been unaccountably ab- 
ducted from his house. It is his 
sister phoning from France to 
ask if I can give money to his 
wife. 

I call the woman and she is 
crying. Yes, she would like the 
money. But one minute later, 
she calls back. “Don’t come, 
they are watching me. I am 
followed everywhere. You will 
be kidnapped if you come 
here. They listen to the phoneL 
Don't come — for my sake." 
The receiver is slammed down 

in panic- 

Who are “they”? Why 
should they follow her? I 
never find out. 

A few days later, as I am 
about to leave Beirut, a friend 
calls by my home urging me to 
book my future flights under 
another name. We are sipping 
red wine on my balcony when 
shells start felling on the 
Corniche, the coast road not 
for from the mosque at Ein 
Mreisse. 

“Blank-blank,” they echo, 
as if someone is Sapping 
pieces of timber together in 
tiie darkness. . 

At Beirut airport, a weary 
Middle East Airlines clerk 
advises against false names on 
the passenger manifest with a 
weary sense of fatalism. “Do 
you- want to give them a hard 
time before they kidnap you?" 
he asks. 

Sometimes the Lebanese 
ask questions which you, 
ply cannot answer. 


Paris — Six people arrested 
in connection with the discov- 
ery of an arms cache on the 
outskirts of Paris last Thurs- 
day were released without 
having been chained. 


Sudan aid 


um (AP) — Inter- 
relief agencies are 


Khartoum 
national 

giving Sudan $100 million a 
year m aid and providing jobs 
for more than 6,000 Sudanese, 
Mr Ka m i l Shawki, Sudanese 
commissioner for relief and 
rehabilitation, said. 


Bus tragedy 


Ankara (Reuter) - Seven- 
teen people were killed and 36 
injured when a bus carryin g 
wedding guests crashed into a 
stream near Istanbul the third 
major , bus accident in Turkey 
m eight weeks. 


Buon giorno 


Rome (Reuter) - Breakfest 
television was launched in 
Italy with a 414-hour pro- 
gramme of news, music, fea- 
tures and interviews. 


Sentry hurt 


Ajaccio (Reuter) - A police 

teu^c s,mdily 


Taking off 


D ffi* China 

nmSSSu 8 ."*? , Chlnesc airline 
expected t° help to break the 

22, SS* mo , no P° | y. win 

oegm service on January 1 . 

Vital omission 




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signature of BeteiniSf 




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THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 

THE ARTS 


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:■ :'or the 

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n .« ; tv roies 


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h take 


* Battling 
with the 
cliches 

North and South (Central) is 
produced by the man who 
orchestrated the opening and 
dosing extravaganzas of the 
Los Angeles Olympics. And it 

shows. Last nightwas the final 
episode in this athletic foot- 
note to the American Civil 
War — a drama which pays 
homage to Gone With the 
, Wind in a manner that is as 
y flatulent as it is indigestible. 


I TELEVISION 

Given tile story - a story, 
according to the Press hand- 
out, of “murder, rape, abortion 
and sfeve-abnse” — it is all the 
more extraordinary that one 
should have watched h in 
complete somnolence. Judging 
from the Press hand-oat, the 
stars experienced similar dffli . 
cully in keeping awake. “1 had 
no idea about American his- 
tory when I got here”, parrs 
the luscious Lesley-Anne 
Down from Clapham Com- 
mon, “and I have to say that I 
still haven’t.” She plays what 
she calls “a victim of her time” 
(teatime?) — a wo man who 
stays with her dastardly hus- 
band, even though he treats 
her badly; a woman in pas- 
sionate love with the south- 
erner Orry Main. 

Orry (short for ’orriWe?) 
looks as if he has limped off 
the tennis court He is por- 
trayed by Patrick Swayze, who 
started life as a ballet dancer 
and who had the audacity to 
rewrite the character because 
it was originally too self- 
pitying. “This role is the break 
of a lifetime and, believe me, X 
gave it my alL” Patrick 
Swayze’s all is something I 
suspect many people wfll feel 
they could have dime without 
in the last two weeks. 

Certainly die script he tam- 
? pered with needed an electric 
cattle-prod to make it budge. 
Written for television by no 
fewer than four people, it had 
few fines longer than ten words 
and a devotion to cfichi thn 
can only be described as 
arthritic. “Are yon all right?” 
(after a dnelk “damn the 
Union — and damn your 
muon” (of two people about to 
be married as South Carolina 
secedes); “she can go to a 
hotel, sbe can go to hospital or 
she can go to hell”. One was 
quite thankful to the Civil War 
for potting an end to it afl. 

Three days before Christ- 
mas the BBC served us with 
their worst drama of the year. 
Apart from singling out the 
writer, Barry Davis, it would 
only be invidious to mention 
anyone involved in The Oldest 
Goose in the Business (BBC2). 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 

CONCERTS 

Alfred Shnittke 

Almeida 

Following his huge and rowdy 
First Symphony, smaller 
works by Alfred Shnittke 
trailed into the air at the 
Almeida, making noises hard- 
ly less rude. IBs First Quartet, 
20 years oh 


r,.'Cis free ^ 


rasedv 


■ . .>iorno. 


..,rv hurt. 


: ,1 ifli 1 ' 11 L- 


. "(I 
1 *1 ' 


l -\l: 


20 years old, dates back to a 
time when he was still able to 
exist creatively as a kind of 
fine-nerved, atonal Shostako- 
vich, before the tensions in 
that persona had sprung open. 
Bat the Second, written in 
1980, is very much more self- 
conscious, and works with 
characteristically extreme 
contrasts between fortissimo 
scrubbing in all four in- 
struments and weightless, 
hi g h- reaching polyphonic ada- 
gio. Equally characteristic is 
the virtual omnipresence of 
chant-like melody, more or 
less obscured by die different 
ways the music has of present- 
ing itself. Both these works 
were given their first British 
performances by Chameleon. 

In between came smaller 


Northern 

Saxophone 

Quartet 

Purcell Room 

Hearing an entire concert of 
music for saxophone quartet 
makes one realize just why 
comparatively little decent lit- 
erature for the combination 
exists. Unlike the instruments 
of a string quartet, the individ- 
uals of the family differ only m 
respect of their range of 
pitches. Hence, unless foe 
music is particularly well 
crafted, or the performances 
are especially sparkling, u 
element of doumess is liable 
to creep into proceedings. 

And that, for all the un- 
doubted expertise of me 
composers and the technical 
assurance of the Nortnern 
Saxophone Quartet. «» ^pre- 
cisely the result here. B> tar 
the best of the bunch was 

Claude Pascal’s Qw arte V.J?! 
1961. Introduced by one ol L e 
players as a work owing much 
to Debussy and Ravel. this 
neat and personaole piece had 



Magic out of the photocopier 





Even at Christmas, London galleries 
\ are not exactly rife with good 
wholesome entertainment for all the 
family. However, I have managed to 
unearth a few quite jolly shows, and 
there are more that can, with a will, be 
! bent to the causes of innocent 
merriment. 

The show which seems to satisfy 
these criteria in the most whole- 
hearted fashion is that of Homemade 
Prints by David Hockney, at 
Knoedler until — well, no one seems 
quite sure, but certainly over the 
holiday and into the New Year. There 
is a lot of fire and enlightenment to be 
gained from them, both in themselves 
and in the way they are made. 
Hockney's inexhaustible curiosity 
has led him to the humble Xerox 
machine, of all things. (Also, appar- 
ently, a number of not-so-humble 
developments of it.) Would h be 
possible, he wondered, to use it to 
make original prints which would not 
be merely reproductive, but actually 
use the machine's special qualities in 
some special way? So, he experi- 
mented, and came up with the 
observation that the Xerox’s spe c ial 
qualities were two, or two that 
particularly interested him. First, that 
u isa species of camera in which there 
is no focal length between the object 
and the lens. Second that its ink is 
applied dry, in powder form, and 
bonded to the paper by heat 

This means that you can reproduce 
exactly what you pul on paper, at 
exactly the same size, and that you 
can build up effects of intense colour 
by printing over and over on the same 
piece of paper, each time reproducing 
from a different original of exactly the 
same dimensions. Consequently, 
apart from a very special quality in 
the pigment applied, you end up with 
an original print which is not in itself 
a reproduction of anything else, but 
works by building up its effects rather 
like, but texturally different from, the 
way a lithograph or a screen print 
does. And what does that produce? 
Why, instantly recognizable Hock- 
neys, of course. 

It has long seemed that Hockney’s 
most important attribute was his 
wholly personal way of looking at 
t thing s, and his most rinwiing talent 

i Still instantly recognizable 
. Hockney: Self-Portrait, July 1986; 

\ and (in text) lam A Heinz — the 
l nwfllfw jbH the Harhsfmmi — and 

* Mau Looking for His Glasses 


GALLERIES 

John Russell Taylor 
seeks out some shows 
providing seasonable 
entertainment as well 
as edification 

his ability to make us see things 
exactly as he sees them. Whether it is 
a painting or a drawing or a print ora 
photograph or a collage of many 
photographs, or created in some 
medium, like his poured paper pulp, 
even more esoteric, we first and 
foremost get Hockney's vision. And it 
is the same here. Whether he is 
showing us a vase of flowers or a chan- 
on a terrace, or the Hollywood HSls 
against a street map of Los Angeles, 
or a bright red sneaker juxtaposed 
with a very blade dachshund, we 
know exactly what we are seeing and, 
unmistakably, whose eyes we are 
seeing it through. 

Other, more traditional artists 
sometimes achieve a similar instan t 
recogn usability. Perhaps we should 
not be too sure about Louis Wain 
(Michael Parkin, until January 9), 





sihee not aD jolly anthropomorphic 
cats from the first half of die century 
are actually by him. (Probably all the 
frantic, garishly aureoled cats are, 
since to the best of my knowledge 
Wain was the only artist ofhis kind to 
go mad on paper as well as in life.) 
But he probably did what he did 
better than anyone else, and few cat- 
lovers, however much they may 
rtsent the cute humanizing, seem 
wholly immune to his charm. 

William Waleot is perhaps more 
reliably recognizable: though be was 
certainly not the only skilled architec- 
tural draughtsman of the time, his gift 
for making even the most unlikely 


subjects look romantic and monu- 
mental was quite unmatched. The 
show ofhis watercolours and etchings 
at the Building Centre until January 
17 covers his whole career ana 
virtually his whole range, from 
workaday office blocks somehow 
transfigured by his visionary gleam to 
the amazing capriccii which bring 
him at moments within hailing 
distance of Piranesi Though he is 
avidly collected these days, there still 
seems to he a lot left to discover. 

The Waleot show is presented 
jointly by the Building Centre and the 
Gallery Lingard. The latter also have 
a very pleasing show of their own on 
at tbe moment (SO Pall Mall, until 
January 30). Under the title of Trad, 
Jazz and Mod it evokes powerfully 
the mix-and-match architecture of 
Europe in the Twenties and Thirties, 
mostly through architects’ drawings, 
some quite basic and practical, but 
many gleefully elaborating on what 
one takes to have been the actual 
effect, in order to convince a diem or 
glamorize something already stand- 
ing glumly somewhere on the Great 
West Road. Many of the drawings are 
rather beautiful in themselves, and 
even the least have a certain nostalgic 
pulL. taking one back to the days when 
Trad was somewhere fit for an 
Aldwycfa farce to live in and Mod was 
shiny and streamlined enough to 
stage a dozen Asiaire/Rogers musi- 
cals. 

A more immediate approach to the 
recording of architecture is exem- 
plified by Istanbul: Gateway to 
Splendour, at the Zamana Gallery 
until January 18. Described as “A 
Journey through Turkish Archi- 
tecture”, it shows us many of the 
most gorgeous monuments of Is- 
tanbul through the lens of the Turkish 
photographer Ahmet Ertug. The 
glowing colour photographs are 
supplemented by enough explanatory 
captions and analytical drawings to 
make the show more than a National 
Geographic outing, supposing you 
want any more than that But 
possibly the best way to take it all is to 
look, wonder and get on the next 
plane to Istanbul. Whether your taste 
goes to tbe geometrical glories of the 
Suleymaniye Mosque or the pinch- 
beck glitter of 19th-century attempts 
to keep up with Versailles, neither the 
pictures nor the place are likely to 
disappoint you. 

Istanbul radiates immutability. But 
if you care to meditate on mutability 


you could hardly do so more cheer- 
fully than at Pompeii and Hercula- 
neum (Weinreb Architectural Gal- 
lery, 36 Store Street, until January 
23). The subject is not so much the 
fail of empires as the way later 
generations reacted to what remained 
— especially in the second half of the 
l$ih century, when Pompeii fever 
swept Europe, and endless engravings 
of the buildings and paintings which 
were then being revealed flooded the 
market. At tbe lime, the fender 
editions were likely to be hand- 
coloured, but many sets of not-so- 
fency survived in blade and white. 
Now Weinreb have set their own 
colourists to examine the original 

subjects of these engravings in situ, 
and colour them accordingly, though 
with due regard to the tastes of the 
engravers* time as well as those of the 
Pompeians themselves. The result is 
no doubt historically questionable, 
on several counts, but totally charm- 
ing, and seldom likely to offend our 
guardians of morality more than a 
veTy, very’ little. 

Lots of people have thought they 
invented the strip cartoon — even 
Gerald Brockhurst, it seems - but we 
might equally well find its origins on 
the walls of Pompeii. 1 doubt whether 
Reg Psrlett ever considered that 
when producing, more than 60 years 
ago, his first strips for comics like 
Funny Wonder and Merry and 
Bright. But, after all, many of his 
subjects have been,. if not the gods 
and goddesses of the ancient mural- 
ists, at least our own equivalent, the 
stars of the big screen mid, later, the 
smalL Yellowing pages of Film Fun 
and TV Fun, showing until January 
3 1 at the National Theatre along with 
original drawings, books and personal 
memorabilia, should tug at the heart- 
strings of several generations, as well 
as providing a worthy tribute to the 
doyen of British “comic** artists, still 
going strong in his eighties. 


Mistletoe is being cut once 
more; the moon rises over 
Gaul; Andrei Serban’s Norma 
has arrived in Leeds. Its 
appropriation by Opera North 
means that this powerful 
production will be toured to 
those parts of Britain pot 
reached last year by Welsh 
National, where it opened. 

A lot of the fuss has gone. 
The symbolic shedding of 
masks and layers of clothing is 
much modified; the odd side- 
shows are all but done away 
with. What remains is the 
strong triangle of relation- 
ships: Norma and her novice 
Priestess, Adalgisa, proudly 
embracing each other in sister- 
hood, and bearing down upon 
Poltione, crushing him like a 
shiny black beetle. 

works. Quasi una sonata, 
dating from 1968, was prob- 
ably the best known piece on 
the programme, but die 
performance by Mark Lu- 
botsky and Peter Frankl made 
one know it anew, bringing 
out not only the fury and 
strength of its ironies and 
disconnections but also the 
fastidious cate with which 
they are composed. It is one 
measure ofShnittke’s achieve- 
ment that his music can elicit 
and justify performances of 
this quality. 

Just as outstanding, in its- 
perhaps necessarily more 
studious manner, was Andrew 
Ball's performance of the Im- 
provisation and Fugue for 
piano, which begins with stri- 
dent chords and startling 
reverberations, then bursts 
away in a contrapuntal path 
that turns out to be circular. 
Immediately before this per- 
formance Pierre Audi had 
justly reminded ns that the 
Almeida had taken a lead in 
presenting Shnittke since 
1984: it is good to see their 
jnitiative bearing fruit, and to 
know that there will be more 
Shnittke in Islington next 
summer. 

Paul Griffiths 

more in common with the 
elegance of Poulenc. 

Of the remainder, the 
American saxophonist Phil 
Woods's Three Improvisa- 
tions would surely have been 
more effective if the players 
bad been able to provide the 
spontaneous abandon that the 
language of jazz de m ands, 
though the work said nothing 
very remarkable. Little was to 
be gained other than an ex- 
ercise in patience, either, from 
David Kershaw’s sequence of 
six Bagatelles, composed ear- 
lier this year, the fifth, 
“processional", sounded as if 
- it had been originally in- 
tended, and scored, for the 
Black Dyke Mills Band. 

Meanwhile Paul Reade’s 
Quartet was distinguished 
chiefly by the composer’s 
workmanlike manipulation of 
some eminently slender 
material. 

Oddly, in all of these new 
works there was to be heard 
not a single multiphonic or 
anything else that could be 
construed as a contemporary 
playing technique. Is the me- 
dium really that inflexible? 

Stephen Pettitt 


1 OPERA 

Norma 

Grand, Leeds 


The bad news is that Opera 
North has chosen a Norma 
who simply does not have 
what Bellini lakes. Monica 
Pick-Hieronimi, making her 
company debut, has, I suspect, 
been working too much and 
too heavily at Verdi and 
Puccini to mould her voice to 
Bellini’s bel canto. She cuts a 
formidable figure physically, 
but this marron g!ac£ of a 
voice is too dark in tinta, too 
sluggish in habit, too flat 


indeed too much of the time to 
be able to articulate the puls- 
ing emotion in every second of 
her music. There is much 
good intention there, and 
Pick-Hieronimi can produce a 
high mezzo voce of true lunar 
beauty — but drat is simply not 
enough. 

Not enough, other, that her 
voice should blend passably 
well with the lively Adalgisa of 
Eiddwen Harrhy. For all her 
sharpness of response, the 
musical chemistry is simply 
not equal to their very pal- 
pable physical relationship. 
The Pollione is already famil- 
iar with the production. Fred- 
erick Donaldson sang the part 
in Waks, but it sounds as if he 
needs to run himself in again. 
His tenor as yet stopped short 


of the footlights, at times only 
shadowing foe orchestra. 

Give Timms, conducting, 
must talrp his fair share of 
blame here. He is not foe most . 
sensitive of accompanists, nor 
the most stylish of Bellini 
interpreters: the momentum is 
there, but too little detail to 
fuel Bellini's great cathartic 
crescendi. 

John Tranter, a bullish, 
assertive Oroveso, is always 
equal to what is going on m 
tbe pit; and, where foe or- 
chestra fails to conjure 
Bellini’s shifting lights and 
shadows, David Cunning- 
ham’s lighting, a superb aspect 
of this production, more than 
compensates. 

Hilary Finch 


Still going well 
up to pitch 

Hilary Finch meets the tenor Alfredo 
Kraus (right) who tonight at Covent 
Garden returns to the role of Edgardo 
in Lucia di Lammermoor in which he 
made his Royal Opera debut more 
than a quarter of a century ago 




ffill McCoe as Tevye, fafl-bodied vocally and physically 


The large-scale musical is a 
fairly rare bird in Scotland— a 
situation that Bill McCoe’s 
new Scottish Sogers Com- 
pany (making its d£bat here) 
hopes to remedy. Closely al- 
lied with Scottish Opera, with 
whom McCue has snog for 
many years, the company 
hopes to bring together estab- 
lished singers and players and 
ne wc omer s: this initial pro- 
duction is performed by Scot- 
tish Opera smgers and chorus, 
but when it transfers to Edin- 
burgh in January the chorus 
and orchestra should include 
many more new feces. 

In its present form it is an 
accomplished production har- 
king back to Scottish Opera's 
1979 Fiddler. The atmospheri- 
cally realistic set has been 
revived and McCoe himself 
again plays Tevye, the long- 
snfFering but affable milkmaa 
who acts as spokesman for his 
p»«n»H Jewish village as it is 


As adapted by tbe remarkably 
versatile John Wells, the 
Lyric's musical Alice cleverly 
fuses comedy, brutality, mys- 
tery and innocence without 
ever descending into the senti- 
mental. From the moment tbe 
curtain rises on Anthony 
Ward’s superbly intimated 
Wonderland, a skilled com- 
pany in imaginative costumes 
lead us deeper into the frag- 
mented dream-imagery of the 
little girl beginning to question 
her relationship to a worid 
that does not quite make 
sense. As the Cheshire Cat 
tells her, "We're all mad 
here”. 

Just as unfathomable is foe 
decision to turn Act II into an 
opera. Indeed it is the music 


| THEATRE 

Fiddler on the 
Roof 

Royal, Glasgow 


drawn into a new world that 
brings both pa-ogress and 
persecution. 

McCne makes a personable 
Tevye, full-bodied both vocally 
and physically, holding the 
stage, chastising his maker 
with affection and good- 
humouredly giving way to his 
daughters as they challenge 
foe age-old traditional values 
that are the stronghold of a 
community th re a te ned by ex- 
tonal change and eviction. He 
is assisted by Una McLean, 
whose singing voice is not of 
the best bat whose equally 
sizeable stage personality 


Alice In 
Wonderland 

Lyric, Hammersmith 

which prevents this Alice be- 
ing a triumph. Carl Davis’s 
settings of these Wonderland 
lyrics border on the preten- 
tious. There is an air of 
Victorians about the musical 
concept, but even the Victori- 
ans had hummable tunes. 
Davis's songs stop the action 
dead every ume. 

In such a visually inventive 
production, staged with pre- 
cision by Ian Forrest, particu- 
larly haunting is a pepper- 
dusted kitchen in which the 
pig-baby gets abused by Cook 


makes the comic tension be- 
tween husband and wife both 
sharp and affectionate. 

Peter Ebert’s prodaction 
moves sw if t ly and fluently, 
lending a stirring sense of 
spirit and occasion to foe 
largprocale songs. Where it is 
less saccessfhl is in detailed 
finer shading -Clare Shearer, 
Patricia Hay and Una Bu- 
chanan as >I»T force daughters 
do not develop very far in 
different directions and the 
foreboding undercurrent of the 
double edge to the change they 
partially represent does not 
felly emerge. Jay Jackson 
makes an earnest, bespec- 
tacled radical, however, as 
Perchik foe student and Alan 
Oke a cowed and fotigent 
tailor. The final mood of 
indomitable spirit is carried 
borne, caught np in foe music, 
which is snnpty as irresistible 
as ever. 

Sarah Hemming 


and Duchess (a performance 
of wit by Joan Davis, who 
manages to be simultaneously 
subtle and larger than life) and 
tbe eternal tea-party — the 
table a gigantic grandfather 
clock, a strait-jacketed March 
Hare and monster-tike Mad 
Hatter as beady as the Dor- 
mouse is vague. 

Lesley Manviile’s Alice is 
property demure and ar- 
rogant But it is Harold Inno- 
cent doing double duty as a 
pasha-like Caterpillar and a 
weepy Mock Turtle in a Bath 
chair, who threatens to steal 
the show with the exquisite 
timing of his smallest re- 
actions. 

Beth Porter 


S uch is the crescendo of 
expectation which 
leads to Edgardo's sui- 
cide in Lucia di 
Lammermoor that foe 
work was, until the middle of 
the 19th century, regarded as a 
tenor rather than a soprano 
opera. In feet the very first 
Edgardo, Gilbert Duprez, sug- 
gested breaking up the repeat 
of the cabaletta with tem- 
perature-raising interventions 
from the solo cello. With 
Alfredo Kraus returning to- 
night to foe role of the 
anguished lover, in which he 
mad* his Royal Opera debut 
in 1959, many eyes will be 
turned to that first, hasty 
entry, many ears timed in 
readiness for that last scene. 
Kraus, approa ching his sixti- 
eth year, still pl ans to take it at 
pitch, something which regu- 
larly defeats even his younger 
colleagues. 

“Donizetti knew perfectly 
well foe human voice and how 
to create, through foe colour 
of a particular pitch, just the 
emotional climate he wanted. 
He didn't warn a darker, more 
heroic colour — he needed 
clarity, brilliance: it’s more 
difficult, but I feel better with 
it that way.” The audience 
need fear no histrionics: 
Edgardo is, for Kraus, a self- 
absorbed Werther-like ro- 
mantic — “But this is foe 
classical repertory: you don't 
have to act too much. The 
expression has to be in the 
feeling of tbe voice, not the 
body. There must be a very big 
interiority. Only then can it be 
carried to foe audience.” 

Anyone familiar with 
Kraus's recording of Lucia 
(with Gruberova and Bruson) 
will know just what he means: 
foe way be takes the weight of 

.On grounds of authenticity it 
would probably be hard to 
beat Peter W right’s produc- 
tion of The Nutcracker which 
is currently in repertory at 
Covent Garden. He remains 
close to the original libretto. 
He has retained as much as is 
known of foe original choreog- 
raphy, and Juba Trevelyan 
Oman's designs provide us 
with a positive lexicon of 
bourgeois life in 19th-century 
Nuremberg. However, the re- 
sult is sadly lacking in magic, 
foe essential factor in this 
most fantastic of ballets. The 
design seemed to overwhelm 
the dancers and with a few 
exception the dancing lacked 
style and clarity. 

To be fair to foe dancers, 
Wright’s own choreography is 
not a great deal of help. 
Seemingly packed full of steps, 
it struck me as fidgety and 


Donizetti's placing of each 
word within foe melodic line 
— never a second wasted, not 
one part of the voice left to 
chance. The perfectionism of 
foe composer matches that of 
the performer. The light, 
crystalline lyric tenor which 
has served Kraus so many 
years has been nurtured with 
the help of exemplars tike Tito 
Schipa and Gigli But ul- 
timately Kraus has been his 
own most critical and exacting 
taskmaster, testing his own 
abilities, rigorously setting his 
own limits. 

“We are working with 
something we don’t touch, we 
don’t see, even we don’t hear. 
All I've tried to do is know my 
voice: to use my imagination 
to work with the sensations, 
with foeir immediate lan- 
guage. If you have this quality, 
this other sense, to understand 
what is the voice, that's fine — 
but nobody can give it to 
you.” 

K raus’s words, ting- 
ed with the His- 
panic ofhis child- 
hood in the Canary 
Island* , are deli- 
cately chosen; his gestures, in 
speech as in performance, 
sparingly placed. He refuses a 
small smoked salmon salad in 
order to eat exactly what be 
wants and when — and speaks 
calmly of a lifelong routine of 
exercise, gymnastics, small 
eating, little socializing; a 
timetable in which precisely 
three holidays a year — in the 
family house at Lanzarote - 
are dovetailed with a strictly 
limited schedule. 


He sings only the repertoire 
which he feels lies within the 
limits ofhis voice — some 20 
roles in all, in Italian bel canto 


DANCE 

The Nutcracker 

Co vent Garden 


surprisingly unmusicaL In tbe 
Snowflakes Waltz he was able 
to follow Ivanov's floor pat- 
terns which still exists in 
notation form; but, although 
foe patterns may be ravishing, 
it is impossible to see them 
from foe stalls because of the 
lack of a raked stage, and 
Wright's choreography is best 
described as banaL As a final 
blow, Julia Trevelyan Oman's 
white wigs hardly flatter the 
pretty girls of the corps de 
ballet 

Alexander Grant returned 
to his old company at the 
weekend to play Drossel- 


. and French lyric opera. Next 
year shows a neat chart of 
Lucia's Edgardo, the Canaries, 
Rigoktio's Duca, the Canar- 
ies, Hoffmann, Romeo, 
Weather, Romfco, foe Canar- 
ies. “This is not a bad word, 
'limit'. If you want to have this 
finger bigger, you start to pull, 
you break it . . 

Each, according to Kraus, 
strictly to his own. And that 
should apply to opera conduc- 
tors, too. “They don't study 
any more. After a period of 
years as a symphonic conduc- 
tor, they think they can turn to 
opera — but they don’t have 
foe experience. Fifty years 
ago, they had to be in the 
theatre for years, learning 
about the voice as a repetitenr, 
knowing every word, every 
phrase, every note. Hie mae- 
stro was always called ’Mae- 
stro concertatore e direttore’. 

“We have lost a lot of things 
— good singers, good conduc- 
tors. It is really a tittle sad to 
say. The continuity of opera 
has . been interrupted, the 
chain broken. Part of it is 
because the or c h es tra s are too 
big today. Maybe the most 
responsible for this was Tos- 
canini He, after all, invented 
the big orchestra. The stage, 
which is supposed to cover the 
pit, to come almost to tbe 
middle of foe audience, was 
pulled bade to give space for a 
sound which is now too big to 
accompany. Tenors of foe past 
could sing light and heavy 
opera, because they weren’t 
fighting a war with the or- 
chestra. Now it's impossible to 
go back. The or ch es tra is a 
protagonist and, - in con- 
sequence, every conductor 
would like to be a pro- 
tagonist.” 

meyer. He gives foe character 
such sweetness and affability 
that it seems impqssibfe the 
children should be in the least 
scared of him. Certainly not 
foe bright,- assured Clara of 
Susannah Jones, whose enjoy- 
ment of her adventures was 
positively infectious. Sbe was 
well matched by Jo nathan 
Burrows, as bight and brave a 
Nutcracker as one could pos- 
sibly wish for. 

The orchestra, conducted 
by Gennadi Rozhdestvensky, 
seemed to have recovered 
itseiL and it would be fair to 
describe foe star of the eve- 
ning as Tchaikovsky himself. 

Judith 

Craicks hank 

m— — 

Entertainments 

appear on page 15 



10 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 





SPSS'S™! 

£562,000 




1988 

122,000 


• 1985 
£199^000 


1984 

£189^)00 


THE MINERS’ STRIKE-AND TWO YEARS ON 


SPECTRUM 


Last gasp 
of the big 
spenders 

A year ago King Coal was deposed in many 
parts of the country as the pit closure 
programme got under way. But what was 
happening to the miners? Brian Janies went 
to a town where huge redundancy payments 
have brought bizarre consequences — and a 
bonanza of misery — for the newly-rich 


The coal miners of Garw knew for 
certain that their lives were about 
to be changed on' the day they 
stepped, blinking, from the pitcage 
to be surrounded by men with 
briefcases who pursued them into 
the showers, waving contracts for 
life insurance and unit trusts. 

That was a year ago and almost 
every day since then the Welsh- 
men have had more examples of 
what it means to come into 
money. They stand in the miner *’ 
welfare and talk about managed 
trusts; they go home to be nagged 
by their wives about micro-waves, 
fitted kitchens and double glaring 
The colliery at Garw, perched at 
the head of a picturesque Glamor- 
gan valley one hiU over from the 
Rhondda, last December became 
one of the 16 Welsh pits dosed by 
British Coal since the strike. 
Garw's 600 workforce joined the 
43,000 miners who thus lost their 
jobs, and the village of Blaengarw 
lost its only reason to exist 
But if the thrust was cruel, the 
miners threw themselves on to the 
sword, choosing not to linger on in 
the face of British Coal's long-term 
intentions. By shutting their mine 
last Christmas they qualified for 
enhanced redundancy terms. 

Men up to the age of 49 got 
£1,000 for every year of pit service; 
men aged 50 and over got a lump 
sum and a part pension. The 
Government has spent £1 billion 
on the scheme, and for the 200 
men of the Garw valley villages, 
individual payments of £35,000 
were not unique, and around 
£20,000 could be counted an 
average. So roughly £4 million in 
spendable income suddenly 
flowed into a valley where, during 
the strike a year before, food 
parcels and soup kitchens had 
kept the children fed. 

If the number of D-registered 
cars measures a community’s 
financial health, then Garw pros- 


pers. But like the “healthy” red 
cheeks of a man dying from lung 
disease, such signs mislead. The 
deluge of money into the Garw 
had effects that were banal and 
bizarre; and there are deep and 
corrosive problems not yet even 
faced. 

Keith Hughes, wears several 
hats, running his own estate 
agency, managing a building soci- 
ety, and being secretary of the 
valley chamber of commerce. It 
was he who described the scene at 
the pithead baths; “Like flies 
around a honeypot, insurance 
salesmen, investment advisors, 
just came a-running. Even respect- 


• *r ■ 


‘A few went 
potty, gave their 
daughters 
weddings fit 
for a princess’ 


Mine host Trevor Stoneham (standing, centre) was a miner himself — now he runs the Blaengarw Hotel, meeting place for the community 


KETTH HUGHES 


able banks had cars covered with 
banners parked across the gales. 

“That was the start of iL Blokes 
could see the world was after their 
money. But the soda] p ress ure s 
have been worse. Chaps were 
afraid to go home because of the 
nagging; it was all about keeping 
up with the Joneses . . and the 
Morgans . . . and the Griffiths. A 
lot of money went quickly on 
enjoying themselves. This little 
office alone put out £2,000 in 
travellers’ cheques for trips to 
Spain and Majorca in one week. 
And why not? 

“But a few did go potty. Gave 
their daughters daft weddings, fit 
for a princess. Bought boats, 
caravans, improved their homes 
so much the weight of new 
curtains and carpets nearly pulled 
the roof in. You have to try and 
understand it, blokes who had 
worked all their lives now had 
nothing to do except form them- 
selves into unofficial video dubs, 
luring a film and passing it down 
every house in the street before 
taking it back. And so they went 
shopping. And they spent I think 
it has settled a bit now, they are 
starting to think about tomorrow. 
And what faces them after that” 

Not a day too soon, according to 
Trevor Stoneham, the ex-miner 
who runs the Blaengarw Hotel, 
social centre of this grey huddle of 
houses. “Disillusion has already 
set in. A year ago they were flush 
with money. Men who’d never 
handled more than a £300 Christ- 
mas bonus now had £30,000 to 
play with, so it was doubles 
instead of pints. Bound to be. And 
the buying — some of the talk in 
here would turn you 
grey . . . Taffy has a new car, next 
day Dai gets one better. 

“You can do that for a bit if you 
are going to get another job. 


Practically none of them has. 
There’s about 40 go by bus to 
other pits . . some have to leave at 
4am. Other get the bus at Ham and 
don’t get back until II at night 
That's no life. Of my 150 regulars 
who worked the Garw, I don't 
suppose more than 10 have got 
jobs down in the town, Bridgend. 
“In two or three years, the way 
some of them are going, the 
money will be gone. What then?” 

Another Garw businesmen sees 
the crisis coming within weeks, 
not years. “By February, for most 
of them, the dole money ends. 
Then it is on to supplementary 
benefit They hope! They’ve got 
the idea that so long as they have a 
penny less than the £3,000 upper 
limit they can claim benefit 
That’s why they’ve been spending 
thrir capitaL They would not be 
told that the Inspector can chuck 
'em out of his office when he hears 
how they have spent their 
money new cars and all that 

“And there will be a few in die 
valley who will have no sympathy. 
Money has made many of them 
arrogant and selfish. More capital- 


ist than Maggie. They have forgot- 
ten how other people pitched in 
and helped them in the strike. 
They are so wrapped up in interest 
rates, percentages, finding out 
where they can drive to in their 
cars to boy at a discount, they 
have forgotten the shopkeeepers 
up here who helped feed their kids 
on credit There's money awash 
up tore, but it's not all lovely, 
boyo.” 

You sense a dereliction in 
Garw, squatting there with the 
obsolescent prettiness of an empty 
biscuit-box, not only of shuttered 
buddings that once housed shops, 
but also of the people. There are 
33 unemployed tor every job 
offered in this part of Glamorgan. 
Only three or four men get on the 
morning buses into the Bridgend 
factory estates, and they sit 
hemmed in by the wives and 
daughters of their former primates 
who are, increasingly, the bread- 
winners of Garw. 

Ontside the Welsh ex- 
serviceman's dub a man called 
Gwyn speaks “This used to be a 
man’s village. Now the women 


have bloody taken over. Some of 
us get in here drinking , but we 
don’t have too much. Still a bit of 
pride left It’s having nothing to do 
that’s hard. These hands, see, not 
bloody made for knitting." 

There is even deeper bitterness 
in the home of Berwyn Howell, a 
tough 61-year-old who, as Lodge 
secretary of the NUM, held the 
miners together during the strike 
(Garw is proud of the fact that it 
had only one rebel 2 gainst the 
cause — and he was English). 
“Sure there’s been daft things 
happening in Garw,” he says. 
“Some smar t salesman sold a 
whole lot of brand new Metro cars 
in one street people was running 
around trying to find whose cars 
was which. But you have to expect 
daft things when you do a thing 
like this to a co mmuni ty — 
people's minds are in a turmoil. 

“The men of Garw didn't sell 
their jobs, they were bribed and 
blackmailed into it. The way it 
works, if they had kept their pit on 
after January 1 this year, all the 
months they were on strike would 
have counted in calculating their 


Geoffrey Skns 


One street had 
so many new 
Metros that the 
owners got 
them mixed up 




benefits. But that's the pasiand 
what's eating away at tins village is 
that they don't see a future. 

“What I really worry about is 
the kids. Us old ‘uns can be the 
idle rich, walk the hills we used to 
dig under. But the thing is that 
thev haven’t taken a new Irid on in 
■ our mine since 1981. five years 
without a single job created. We 
have 18 to 22 year-olds never done 
a hitch of work. Our police 
sergeant used to boast he could 
mind this place with one OAP to 
help him. Well, there are still more 
mugs than muggers in the valley, 

but things are turning old 

people down the lane had their 
homes cracked open. 

“I am not against half our 
houses being sold to people in 
Bridgend — even though it make a 
pit village part of the bloody 
commuter belt. Well give people a 
welcome, so long as they don't 
expect us to wait on their tables. 

“Nor am I against progress. 
When I was chairman of the 
council 1 bad an aerial survey of 
the valley, to show where land was 
ready for development. Country 
park, nature trails, holiday flats. 
Yes, OK. But what this place, full 
of conscientious, skilful men, 
needs is a factory. What it needs is 
bloody work." As we spoke there 
came a knock on the door. Berwyn 
returned: “Man selling carpets 
door to door. That’s what is has 
come to for lots of pitmen.” 

Or running fish and chip vans 
around the estates of Glamorgan's 
industrial plain. Or setting up as 
builders. Or taxi drivers. Quite a 
few of Garw’s redundant have 
sunk money into starting their 
own business. Many have failed. 
Among those still fighting to 
succeed is Ray Bennett, who 
opened a tyre workshop in nearby 
Brynmenyn. “Had a few months 
sitting about on £48 a week dole, 
watching ray payment for 17 years 
of my life slipping away. Thought 
the only thing worth investing in 
was myself I am working all 
hours, but with £5,000 in stocks 
and a lot more in tools, if this goes 
I am in trouble: Thank goodness 
my wife backs me— not like some 
who couldn’t see a use for the 
money beyond two more weeks in 
Benidorm and a fresh perm.” 

Next door, three more of Garw 
ex-pitmen have combined to 
launch an auto-electrical business. 
“We had ail had enough,” Tony 
Keyes says. “That strike finished 
us. If it Wasn’t the bosses telling 
you what to do it was the union. 
We are all tradesmen, certain we 
could sell our skills. Hard at first. 
We have sunk a lot into this, and 
there were days when we looked at 
each other and wondered. But it's 
picking up ... it togtnng to work. 
Being your own boss is great” 


* 





Church services and snowflakes evoke Christmas — but how real is the image? 


A mass of detail 


Tonight under the blaze of 49 
lights imported by BBC Tele- 
vision, Clifton Cathedral in 
Bristol wfll ring to many and 
varied sounds — of an organ 
voluntary by Wiene, of carols, 
of readings from Isaiah, Tito 
and Luke, of prayers. AH 
under the eyes of four cam- 
eras, red-eyed and aD-seeing. 
Nearly a year of preparation 
will be reaching a climax. 
And the viewing figures? 
Zero. 

But fear not for a waste of 
the licence money. Tonight is 
merely a rehearsal for what 
will, tomorrow night, attract 
the year's biggest television, 
audience for a religions event 
— between three and four 
million people timed in to 
midnight 

It mil have a special 
significance — or rather a 
small, separate significance — 
for the S( Rev Monsignor 
Crispian Hollis, effectively 
the Bishop of Clifton’s dep- 
uty, for tomo rro w night a 
wheel turns foil circle: be- 
tween 1977 and 1981, Hollis 
was Roman Catholic assis- 
tant to the head of religious 
broadcasting at the BBC and 


Mgr Hollis: a special night 

he produced the radio end of 
the 1981 midnight imw — 
just before he joined Clifton, 
Perhaps the biggest diffi- 
culty in staging tbs k ind of 
event - it alternates between 
the Anglicans and die Catho- 
lics — is die risk that it can 
become a programme rather 
than a service, a religious 
Match of the Day. Hollis gave 
over the front page of his 
Christmas diocesan news- 
letter ^ to the subject, 
stressing that this Is a 
service, not a television show. 

“We do onr own thing”, he 


The midnight mass 
on television will be 
a spectacle planned 
for nearly a year 

says, “and that is how it most 
be. We are not req sired to 
shape the service for tele- 
vision and at Clifton we have 
thegre&t good fortune of size, 
which means there is do 
tjtievisioii-imposed restriction 
os numbers." 

Bat tdevisloa has to be 
accommodated, to the phys- 
ical and other senses. The 
only light shining tomorrow 
night not to have been in- 
stalled by the BBC wiB be 
that over the crib; the front 
row of seats has been moved 
back three feet so that a 
camera can track in to cover 
communion; the number of 
seats has been carefully 
worked out in advance (it is 
1,108k and one aisle is 
blocked off by a camera 

gantry. 

The congregation will have 
to be in situ by 1030pm, an 
hour before die transmission, 

so that the BBC engineers can 

balance the sound from four 
microphones placed overhead 
and to give time for “the warm 
up” • 

Hollis says : “It is no longer 
such a novel thing to be on 
television, bat it’s important 
that the conjpegation has 
time to relax, to treat the 
cameras as If they weren’t 
there — it's terrible if yon get 
people following the cameras 
with their eyes, for example.” 

Not everything will be qaite 
what it seems. Hollis, for 
example, an accomplished 
public speaker, is at this 
moment petting the fin«h« 
touches to that dreaded thing 
— a script 

“I usually just have a few 
notes for the homily” he 
says, “and it’s hard to sit 
down and write for the eye 
what must be beard by the 
ear, but of course the tele- 
vision people have to know 
exactly where we are at a 
given time. As for the content, 

1 don't fed there any con- 
straints. But there to one 
golden rale when yon are 
speaking both to the parish 
and the national audience — 
no to- jokes.” 

Peter Barnard 


Just a snowball’s chance 


White Christmasses are few 
and for between. In the past 50 

years the London area can 
boast of only three occasions 
which can be regarded as 

matching the traditi onal im- 
age. In 1981 the remnants of 
an earlier snowstorm hung on 
until Christmas Day, while in 
1957 a brief cold spell led to 
snow over the holidays. But 
the only time the snow lay 
several days before Christinas 
and lasted right through Box- 
ing Day was in 1938. 

If we relax the require- 
ments, then we find that snow 
on Boxing Day is more com- 
mon, particularly during the 
past 25 years. Even so, this 
rails well short of what we 
have been brought up to 
expect, which raises the ques- 
tion as to whether the whole 
image of a snowy December 
25 is a fabrication. 

But what is a white Christ- 
mas? To Ladbroke’s, fin- 
example, the sole criterion is 
snow falling on the London 
weather centre roof at midday 
On December 25. This is why 
they escaped by the skin of 
their teeth in 1981, when 
much of the country was still 
under a blanket of snow. But 
to most of us the simplest 
measure is snow on Christmas 
morning. 


What are the odds - 


on our having a 
real Dickensian 
Christmas, 1986? 

From available meteo- 
rological records the incidence 
of snow over Christmas in 
London has declined. In the 
late 18th century the propor- 
tion of Snowy Christmasses 
was a respectable two out of 
five. In the first 60 years of this 
century it was well under one 
in 10, but ihe proportion has 
risen a bit since 1980. 

The memory of the coldest 
conditions of the 1 6th to 1 9th 
centuries is encapsulated in 
art and literature. Nowhere is 
this more true than in the 
work, of Charles Dickens, 
which has played such a part 
in establishing the traditional 
view of the festive season. 

In Dickens’s first novel, 
Pickwick Papers, there is “a 
good human Christmas 
chapter”‘at Dingley DelL This 
and the subsequent chapter — 
a tale of the supernatural 
featuring the sexton Gabriel 
Grubb, the forerunner of 
Scrooge - are set against a 
background of snow and ice. 


The feet that the publication 
of these chapters — late in 
December 1836, as pan of a 
serial - coincided with one of 
the greatest snowstorms of the 
19th century probably re- 
inforced the image with both 
the writer and his readership. 
With the publication of A 
Christmas Carol in December 
1 843, the die was cast 

While the memories of the 
Frost Fairs on the Thames and 
the Dutch and Flemish winter 
landscapes have helped to 
reinforce the popular imay it 
was the Dickensian model 
that did most to establish the 
modern view of Chris tmas. 

The more frequent cold 
spells of the last 10 winters 
could be a sign that we will be 
having , more white 
Christmasses. But this is hard 
to reconcile with the growing 
evidence that the global cli- 
mate is warming. So for the 
moment the safest assumption 
is that it is simply a product of 
the natural variability of our 
climate. 

WJ. Burroughs 

© 7ktta Nmnpnpwi Ltd *985 

Weather note: The outlook is for 
milder, cloudy weather, "per- 
haps preceded by sleet or snow. " 

Details, page 16 


The hi-tech brain train 


Getting there is 


irrelevant at one 


Swedish company, 


whose workforce 


thinks en route 


I f a novel idea thought up 
by the Swedes finds an 
echo here, British Rail can 
stop worrying quite so much 
about getting there. The train 
standing so frustratingly 300 
yards short of platform five 
could be full of computing 
commuters too busy with the 
work to worry about the wait. 
For high-speed read hi-tech. 

These days, the minute they 
step aboard in Stockholm, a 
select few Swedish commuters 
— who work for ASEA, the 
nuclear and electrical multi- 
national based at Vasteras, 
1 10 kilometres from the cap- 
ital — start work at plush desks 
m front of computer termi- 
nals. The train, adapted at a 
cost of £400,000, is equipped 
with desks, ergonomically-de- 
signed furniture, computers, 
and dial-anywhere telephones. 

At one desk sits Dnsan 
Babala, a 49-year-old nuclear 
physicist He is working on a 
System that aims to make. 
nuclear reactors “ultimately 
safe”. Sheets of paper dotted 
with complex equations litter 
his desk. 

“I moved to Stockholm 
from vasteras in 1972”, he 
says. “My wife works there. 
Before I travelled sometimes 
by car, sometimes by train. It 
was a total of two hours, 40 
minutes wasted each day. 
Sometimes I would even have 
to stay at V&teras all week." 

H e says the train is 
“perfect for me. I have 
almost everything I 
need here: 1 shouldn't be a bit 
surprised to seethe idea catch 
on m other countries. Why not 
in Britain for example, where 
you have so many commut- 
ers? I'm certainly very; sat- 
isfied with 

It was Ann Larsson, a 34- 
year-old member of ASEA’s 
business development and 
corporate planning section — 
and hersell a Stockholm-Vas- 
leras commuter — who dreamt 
up the mobile office. “It was 
just a joke at first, then we 
thought, ‘Why not?* It seemed 
crazy but it made sense ” she 
says. 


On-line: Dan Tannenberg of ASEA makes his 


given that the company mafcpq 
locomotives and rolling stock, ’ 
it was good PR, apart from the 
practical benefits. 

Birgjtta Benthede, 38, who 
works as a consultant to 
ASEA, finds the train has done 
wonders for her family life. 
She hates commuting so much 
that she previously spent most 
of the week in a company flat 
in Vasteras, leaving her hus- 
band Morgan, 40, to look after 
their two children back home 
in Stockholm. “He’s ex- 
tremely happy about this 
development,” she says. 


"Hie mobile office is run by a 
staff of four girts, working in 
two shifts, operating the 
switchboard, cleaning the 
desks and fitted carpets, brew- 
ing coffee and tea and making 
sure things run smoothly. 

So far around 20 regular 
commuters use the 
office/train, which makes the 
return journey six times a day. 
Tickets cost £20 return, but 
ASEA pays a third and the rest 
is tax deductable. 

Christopher Mosey 

© Thaw H aiw pa p ma Ud 1966 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 138 

ACROSS - — 

1 Cloth texture ( 6 ) 

5 Nevertheless (6) 

8 Athens bird (3) 

9 Deviation (6) 

10 Irish bard hero (6) 

11 Japanese rice drink 

12 Renounce throne (8) 

14 Perinatal brain dam-; 

age effect (8,5) 

17 CIear{8) 

19 Venerated panel (4) 

21 Spiced rice dish (6) 

23 Pass by (6) 

24 Rocky hill (3) 

25 Prime (6) 

26 Most miring (6) 

DOWN 

2 Conflict scene (5) 

3 New Deal president 

4 Rflte(7) «S S <5, 

5 Not silen tly (5) 15 Lai^e building (71 •’"UK desert paich 

6 Affirmative (3J 16 Literary culture (7) 22 Pu, OT ( 3 , 


SOLUTION TO NO 1137 


iJULU I IVi* * v i»v a 

ACROSS: I Speech SCOtt 8 Blade 9 Cuticle n<«*. 
13 Tire 15 Facsimile 58 Earn 19 Phvskwe viv^r”’ 
M Me 25 Yeariv - ^ -2 Vivaldi 


28 Quill 






11 



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* '■■ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


FASHION by Suzy Menkes 


Finding the gilty party 


PEOPLE 


Gold and glitter is 
the combination 
for Christmas 
parties, but be 
subtle and avoid 
the strident 


■ m A *’ • / . 




G old is the colour 
and glitter is the 
message for party 
dressing. Cosmet- 
ics and clothes 
both have a built-in sparkle — 
but one that is subtle rather 
than strident. A hint of gilt on 
a hair bow, a thread of gold 
woven through a sweater or a 
metallic sparkle on a plain 
fabric all make sophisicated 
evening statements. The fav- 
ourite inky velvet bustiers and 
little black dancing dresses 
have taken gold for a partner, 
and the fashion story is this 
mix of dark and li gh t. 

When David and Elizabeth 
Emanuel turned their bou- 
tique opening into a gih-y 
party, they were starting a 
trend that will be seen right 
through Christmas and New 
Year's Eve Matt and shin e is 
spreading from the high fash- 
ion designers to the high 
street, and golden fashion 
accessories make good last 
minute Christinas presents. 
Present ideas with the Midas 
touch from Fenwick of Bond 
Street start with the season's 
bustier in shimmering gold 
(£14.95). 

F or party hair there are 
flat satin clip bows, 
chic in black and gold 
striped satin (£7.50). 
Round the waist of a 
black dress go gilded leather 
gloves (£24.95), a stretchy 
glitter sequinned belt or 
cummerbund (£5.95). Gilded 
leather gloves (£24.95) add a 
finishing touch. For lower-key 
occasions there is a plain Mack 
crew neck sweater with swirls 
of gold sparkle (£18.95). 

Wicked lady outfits start 
with the Emanuels black T- 
shirt with a Ballo in Mascera 
gilded mask (£12.50 from 10 
Beauchamp Place). A 19605- 
style sleeveless roll-neck 
sweater in black threaded with 
gold (£19.99) makes up an 
outfit with a slinky back-slil 
tube skirt (£24.99), from Next •' 
Collection. - • 

A striking animal print in 
lurex on chiffon brings two ■ 
fashion trends together in a 
tunic top (£29.99) from Miss 
Selfridge. This store's glitzy 
party clothes include a black : 
taffeta fishtail dress with gold 
panels niched at the side 
(£69.99), a stretchy htrex tube 
mini dress (£49.99) and a 
black shift swirling with glitter 
and with a plunging V at the 
back (£59.99). 

Esiee Lauder sets the trend 
for sparkling cosmetics with 
her Quicksilver Colours that ' 
include silver eye definers, 
t ransl u seen i face powder and 
a Starlit Silver nail lacquer. 
Mary Quant's liquid eyeliners , 
come m gleaming gjold or • 
silver and her powder is laced * 
with silver dust Rimmel have 
come up with Glitz cosmetics 
— eyeshadow showered with 
golden specks and a tawny 
ginger lipstick lit with pearl. S 
Even sensible Sainsbury are 1 
patting an the glitz for your c 
grocery shopping list — glitter 
dust or gold stars are sus- t 
pended in its jars of Miss J I 
Nightglitz hair gel. 


• y iir-L 
■ -id 
•: t-msi 


F 




- , ■v r 


V.. - V 


Matching 

Zandra 

Holding court at tire Gros- 
venor House Hotel last 
week was Zamira Rhodes, 
her shocking pink hair al- 
most colour matched to the 
lobster soooflel A week of 
fashion shows am) festivites 
peaked on Friday under a 
Christmas tree deaantiy 
decorated with white doves. 

Sculptor Andrew Logan 
added Christmas glitter 
with his mirrored Jewellery 
pinned to Zandra's pmir 
crepe dress. She toasted 
mmniwjnin queen Adele 
Rootstein, in Zandra's 
trompe Foefl Chanet-styte 
chains printed on a stinky 
black dress, and TV pre- 
senter Anne Diamond, who 


is renting about a Rhodes 
wardrobe for her new eve- 
ning chat show. 

Guests at the glamorous 
lunch, at Timer Restaurant 
of tiie Year Ninety Farit 
Lane, applauded the new 
daywear collection, and es- 
pecially the fantastic £500 
denim Jackets customized in 
a patchwork of Zandra’s 
fabrics, and inspired orig- 
inally by tire Blitz ex- 
hibition at tire Victoria and 
Albert Museum. 

Zandra, fresh from a ! 
weekend offashion shows at ; 
Gleneagles in Scotland, 
tells me that fay the mid of 
1987 we wiD be able to bay 
Zamira Rhodes luggage, 
hair bows, more of her 
hoary knits and sweat- 
shirts, and a new lower- 
priced collection to be ma d e , 
in India and launched in 
fashion week next March. 


* •-•I 
• . s ' 

' ..*1 









Under the spreadiag tree: Zandra Rhodes in sharking pink 

Benetton’s Russian drive 

The latest fashion company to embrace the big Bear is 
Benetton, who are hoping to take their colourful knits and 
ever-expanding empire to the Soviet Union early next 
year. Luciano Benetton, who runs the all-Italian family 
business with his brothers Gifberto and Carlo and designer 
sister Giuliana, has already penetrated the Iron and the 
Bamboo curtains. The United Colours of Benetton, 
immortalised in the fashion world by the bold poster 
campaign by Italian photographer Tuscan!, have reached 
Budapest in Hungary, Prague in Czechoslovakia, Belgrade 
’in Yugoslavia and Sofia in Bulgaria. A month ago 
Benetton opened a state-owned store in Beijin g , China. 
The Benetton brothers are now talking confidently about 
•having shops spanning the Soviet Union in five years. 

Model 
editor? 


-Just as fashion doyenne 
Grace Coddington, winner 
of a 1960s Vogue model 
■contest, leaves -tile Bible of 
Style to work for Calvin 
Klein in New York, I hear 
news of a model new recruit. 
Catherine Dyer (right), 
rangy wife of snper-saapper 
David Bailey, is to give tip 
her career in front of tire 
camera to train as a Fashion 
Editor on Vogue. Beanpole 
Catherine, five foot nine and 
glossily elegant as a con- 
ventional cover girl, will 
. take np her appointment in 
the new year, leaving the 
Bailey baby Patoma, 18 
.months, Iw-lf home. 

Catherine, the subject of a 
profile of her life and tunes 
with thrice-married Bailey 
in January’s Vogue, is now 
25 — a ripe old age for a 
model, however dasically 
beautiful. But Catherine 
still reveals a good deal of 
herself in a transparent 



voile Galliano blouse in 
Vogue's Bailey photograph. 

Win Bailey's ex, model 
Marie Helvza, who is antbor 
of a do-it-yourself style 
guide, join Catherine on her 
.glossy new perch? 


Putting on the glitz. Make yourself the Christmas look with 
net brocade and tuSe, modelled on a David Ftelden tutu. Net 
In black, white and 18 vibrant colours, 65p a metre from John 
Lewis, Oxford Street and group stores. Two metres gathered 
on to elastic for each skirt layer. Bustier from a triangular one 
metre length of 140 cm fabric, tied at the back waist Gffltter 
brocades from £12.95 to £45, sequfaed sffle £98 a metre, all at 
Liberty, Regent Street W 1. David Fieiden at 132 Kings Road 
SW3. Bruce Oldfield seamed stockings £2£9, elbow length 


satin gloves by Cornelia James £11.99 both from maior 
department stores. GBtter basket of flowers earrings and 
crystal bracelet from Monty Don 58 Beauchamp Place SW3 

Hair by Debbie H organ for Daniel Galvin's colour Salon, using 
one metre tulle. 

Make-up by BJ. GHan for Faces 
Styled by Pete Hunt 
Photograph by TONY McGEE 





Yule legs wrapped up in holly 


Forget fishnet and 
seams; holiday 
stocking are 
sporting leaves, 
lacy roses and 
gold peacocks 


The holly and the ivy, sequins 
and stars are all playing 
supporting roles in this year’s 
fashion pantomime. Festively 
patterned legs are dressed op 
in tights aid stockings that 
put seams ant * fishnets in the 
shade. A discreet holly leaf 
adonis one leg of Zandra 
Rhodes’ sheer black tights and 

Kunert go for glitz with an 

ornate swirling gold peacock. 

Mary Quant has painted 
snowy white Christmas roses 
in delicate, lacy patterns on to 
thick white tights, and The 
doth sticks to abstract de- 
signs with ha anting black and 
white faces. For sheer festive 
glamour Pierre Montonx ho- 
siery spirts gold fountains, 
silver Inrex rosettes sewn at 
the ankles or sparkling 
diamante studs all the W&y Up. 

Adorning Brace Oldfield’s 
hosiery design for the feSive 
season is a discreet sparkling 
butterfly just above tirengu* 
knee. Tiers, ruffles, puffballs 
and pleats afl appear on 
dresses and skirts that end 
just below or above the knee 
leaving plenty of scope for tire 
subtlest motif at the ankle or 

Christmas trees on kgs. 


ojrmar 

(CA/UAL 5 

SALE 

■& v 


: ' -V j 





Shear black stockings with a rash of odd razed spots and cir- 
cles, £18 by Pierre Monteoux from Browns, 27 South Motor* 
Street, W1. 

Ornate golden peacock woven into sheer black tights, £12.95 
by Kunert from Harvey Nichols, iOiightsbridga, SW1, 

Se (fridges, Oxford Street, W1. 

Delicate black and white floral patterned tights, £4.99 by Mary 
Quant from Selfridges, Oxford Street, W1 and leading stores. 

Left festive socks - red and Mack patterned with Father 
Christmas and reindeer; and Christmas crackers, both £4.99, 
branches of the Sock Shop. 

Illustrations by JOYCE McOONALD 
Photograph by CHRIS DAWES 








rrr 


FT 

1 1 

if. 


THET 


;day de< 


8FR 23 1986_ 



Sighs 


Confused by what size dress to buy 
my loved one for Christmas, I 
received unexpected help from an 
assistant at the Richmond branch 
of Hobbs, die boutique chain. 
Having ascertained that their 
build was about the same, the 
assistant obliged by baring her 
midriff with the cheerful inquiry; 
“You mean this sort of shapef" 
What could I do but gulp “xes” 
and produce my chequebook: 

BARRY FANTONI 
I TOR IF 



1/ 


*Me? I've backed Inland Revenue at 
5-2 on.’ 

Eyelid unbatted 

As Mike Gatting's men do battle 
Down Under, Sierra Leone 
breathlessly awaits the arrival of 
an England XI for a tour which, 
officially, will indude a Test 
match and a series of one-day 
internationals. This is leaving the 
British players somewhat con- 
fused since they are a collection of 
dub cricketers playing under the 
modest title of The Scorpions 
(because of the sting in their tail). 
They may not be top-flight cricket- 
ers, but they can certainly think cm 
their feet On their last visit to 
Sierra Leone they were greeted by 
President Joseph Momoh with the 
question: “Which is Botham and 
which is Gower” — to which a 
Scorpion immediately replied: 
“Business commitments forced 
diem to cancel at the last 
moment” If they field balls as 
sharply as questions, they must be 
in with a chance. 

Fiver fever 

Legal eagle Michael Joseph 
continues his battles with the 
profession. After infuriating fellow 
solicitors with his best-selling The 
Conveyancing Fraud, he now ; 
plans a further ploy: paying his 
£255 Law Society sub in £5 notes 
stamped with the words “Lawyers 
Can Seriously Damage Your 
Health" — the title, incidentally, of 

his latest book. I have warned him 
that the jape would contravene a 
tittle-known Currency Act, which 
carries a maximum fine of £1. “It's 
worth running the risk,” he says. 

Living on 

The right-wing Federation of 
Conservative Students may have 
been disbanded, but the Conser- 
vative Party must live with the 
taint for at least a year. Norman 
Tebbit, the party chairman, acted 
too late to prevent the federation’s 
appearance in the 1987 Conser- 
vative Party Diary under the 
heading National Union Advisory 
Committees. PUS 


The unthinking enemy within 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Scientifically 

speaking 

Margaret Thatcher, not famous 
for her love of dissidents within 
her own party, is eager to further 
her acquaintance with the Soviet 
physicist and human rights cam- 
paigner Yuri Orlov. Insiders at 
Downing Street tell me she was so 
impressed by Oriov when they 
met in November, after he was 
allowed to leave the Soviet Union, 
that she now wants him to brief 
her before her visit to Moscow, 
which is expected to take place 
early next year. I gather that her 
enthusiasm for Orlov’s counsel 
stems from his late arrival on the 
dissident scene, having already 
gained prominence in the Russian 
scientific establishment Mrs T, of 
course, might have occupied a 
similar niche in Britain had she 
not been diverted along the way. 

No bells prize 

The West Germans have intro- 
duced what must be the last word 
in literary anti-awards — the 
£10,000 Karl Kraus Prize for the 
worst user of language. The awpd 
is made on condition the writer 
not only swears never to burst into 
print again but also _ agrees to 
denounce his or her writings. This 
year’s w inn er, the critic Fritz 
Raddatz, has so fer remained 
silent I can only assume that this 
is because he is ai present engaged 
on writing a book. 

Post pique 

Staff on a trade journal were 
flattered to get a Christinas card 
from Greville Janner, MP for 
Leicester West But their joy 
turned to indignation on seeing 
that the envelope, marked London 
SW, was stamped with the words 
“Twenty three pence to pay 5 ]. 
They should not be too censori- 
ous, however, for other prominent 
politicians — David Owen among 
them — have run into similar 
difficulties over posting cards is 
the parliamentary SW area. 

<S Most popular requests on Loui- 
siana State Penitentiary's pris- 
oner-fun radio station — Elvis 
Presley's JaiUmae Sack and Sam 
Cooke's Chain Gang. 


President Reagan has admitted 
that mistakes were made over 
Iran. That isaH the more reason to 
keep those events in perspective. 
Yet, at the very time when 
America needs cool beads and 
calm co-operation to overcome 
the mistakes of the arms sate, 
partisan politics are endangering 
not only the recovery of America’s 
world leadership , but the capacity 
of the presidency to conduct 
American foreign policy de- 
cisively. 

The stakes are great. The world 
in 1986 is very different from the 
world in 198 1 . A steady erosion of 
clarity and confidence in Western 
ideas and values had pushed the 
West into a decade of decline. Too 
many succumbed to the weakness 
of unilateral restraint and ac- 
cepted the inevitability of the 
Brezhnev doctrme.lt was Reagan, 
along with leaders such as Mar- 
garet Thatcher and Helmut Kohl, 
who ended our long retreat and 
sparked the revitalization of the 
west They understood that the 
West must deal with totalitarians 
from a position of strength. 

As a result, in the last six years, 
we have not only prevented any 
nation from falling to communist 
conquest but have overturned the 
Brezhnev doctrine by welcoming 
the first country in post-war 
history, Grenada, back into the 
family of free nations. 

But the foundation of renewed 
security the West has so pains- 
takingly rebuilt is threatened by 
the turmoil over Iran. Those who 
would exploit the situation with 
harsh and partisan attacks on the 
president's policies risk not only 


Jack Kemp spells out the dangers in the 
attempts to undermine Reagan oyer Iran 


paralyzing US foreign policy but 
rendering the entire Western 
world less prosperous, safe and 
free. We can expect great pressure 
from three fronts. - 

First, congressional opponents 
will attempt to use Iran as a means 
to lessen the President’s power to 
conduct foreign policy. Over the 
past decade we have witnessed a 
rash of congressional initiatives to 
limit presidential authority. Two 
of these, the Boland and Clark 
Amendments, which prevented 
aid to freedom fighters in Nica- 
ragua and Angola, were over- 
turned in the last Congress. But 
they will undoubtedly be brought 
in to include other countries in the 
100th Congress. 

Efforts to weaken the National 
Security Council and the US 
intelligence agencies should also 
be expected. While such congres- 
sional supervision might satisfy 
some partisan feelings, it can only 
harm our nation. A future presi- 
dent, Democrat or Republican, 
restricted by Congress, inad- 
equately informed by a 1970s- 
styie intelligence network, will 
have little chance of promoting 
freedom, let alone providing 
strong leadership to the United 
States and our allies. 

Second, there will be a whole- 
sale effort to dismantle the Reagan 
doctrine. No issue inspires more 
irrational opposition than 
Reagan's commitment to help 


people to fight for their self- 
determination. 

Thus the new Democratic 
leadership will try to stop funds 
for foe Contras in Nicaragua. 
Even sow they are trying to 
resurrect a plan that could cut off 
aid to the Contras in return for 
Nicaraguan communists signing a 
“peace treaty” which would nei- 
ther bind them to keep the peace 
nor to honour their still unmet 
pledge to implement democracy. 

The President will also come 
under pressure' to support an 
accord in Af ghanistan that would 
stop US arms shipments to the 
anti-communist guerrillas before 
any Soviet withdrawaL 

Third, liberals in Congress and 
the arms control bureaucracy will 
intensify efforts to lock the Presi- 
dent into arms control policies ' 
that cede unwise and unequal 
advantages to the Soviet Union. 
Such policies, pushed through the 
House in the last minutes of the 
99th Congress, included unilateral 
compliance with Salt n, a one-year 
moratorium on an uncompleted 
US testing programme and drastic 
cuts in SDI when the Russians are 
racing foil speed ahead. 

The President must draw foe 
line, and, if necessary, veto any 
reduction in his authority to 
conduct foreign policy. 

The Reagan doctrine must not 
just be saved; it must spread and 
succeed. The President may have 


to thwart State Department efforts 
for a phony Coutadora peace 
treaty for Nicaragua as he did last 
spring. In Afghanistan, he may 
have to stop the sell out of the 
Mujahedin. There can be no real 
settlement until Soviet forces have 
left Afghanistan to the Afghan 
people. . . . 

On arms control, we need to 
insist on Soviet compliance with 
existing agreements before signing 
new ones, and on strict verifica- 
tion procedures as a sine qua non. 
And while striving for equitable 
reductions in nuclear aims, let us 
remember Mrs Thatcher’s words 
that nuclear weapons in the hands 
of the West have been guarantors 
of freedom and peace. It serves us 
nothing to reduce nuclear weap- 
ons if we make the world safer for 
conventional war. 

Above all, we must build on our 
progress, working with our allies 
for stronger co-operation agains t 
terrorism, continued conventional 
modernization and a dear, work- 
able blueprint to fund and begin 
immediate deployment of SDL 

President Reagan has foe ideas, 
the principles and foe proven 
policies to move America forward. 
But he still needs support from 
Republicans who look to the 
future, from responsible Demo- 
crats who have supported his 
vision, and from our allies who 
look to America for leadership. 


Digby Anderson 

NowTthestiff as 

a board game 


Peter Walker, the Energy Sec- 
retary, pointed out in a recent 
interview that the increase in 
home and share ownership meant 
that the owners’ children would 
receive “a sizeable inher- 
itance... in their middle yeare . 
Hie remarks were about the 


„» in the church’s central, act of 
worship, only for fcctoao! 
fashion to make it redundant 
some five years after and set up an 
uoly wooden table in its stead. 

Many of our towns, especially at 
the seaside, are decorated with 
wooden benches inscribed with 
the names of their donors wio, no 


Hi, remark, vrere atom me donoBwho.no 

economy but they higl^ht the the es^ Jeasan t visions of 

Changing taetammd I « 8 oro^din^pUund resting place for 

more personal matter making gaded with shopping 

Will r . f I WAKUBIMan^ 


The author is Republican con- 
gressman for Buffalo, New York, 
and is seen as a contender for the 
1988 presidential nomination. 
This article is also appearing in the 
New York Times. 


Clifford Longley examines the dilemma confronting the churches after John Biffen’s 
appeal for moral reinforcement for the goyeramenfs health awareness campaign 

Schism over the scourge 


The Christian churches, acting as 
guardians of traditional sexual 
morality, could become the 
government’s most important al- 
lies in its education campaign 
against Aids. But, just as foe 
government think* it should not 
preach morality, so the churches 
are by no means sure they should 
capitalize on a public health crisis. 

Neither church nor government 
has fully appreciated that pre-Aids 
and post- Aids are two entirely 
different worlds, and that the 
earlier balances and compromises 
on sexual morality are not nec- 
essarily workable any more. Yet 
what foe government and most 
people probably still want is 
unattainable: a Permissive Sodety 
without Aids. 

The revolution in attitudes once 
this goal is seen as impossible will 
be enormous, but it is a revolution 
which has hardly started. So while 
churchmen are dusting off their 
old sermons on chastity, they are 
not yet sure whether to recycle 
them. They do not want to offend 
the code of liberal tolerance; nor 
do they want to be accused of 
whipping up Aids hysteria. Aids 
seems to be bringing out un- 
certainties and weaknesses all 
round. 

In foe Church of England, for 
instance, it is drawing attention to 
the profound disagreement 
concerning homosexuality. In evi- 
dence to a House of Commons 
committee on Aids this week. The 
General Synod’s board for social 
responsibility had to admit that 
some hold foe traditional view 
while others “leave the issue to 
private judgment where a stable 
caring relationship exists." In 
short, the Church of England has 
failed to answer the question of 
whether sodomy is sinful. 

Against heterosexual promiscu- 
ity, the board cites a version of the 
so-called natural law argument — 
that human bodies are not de- 
signed for casual sex, and there- 
fore it is bound to lead to trouble. 
But the natural law argument in 
moral theology has generally been 
used in the past to prove the 
immorality of homosexuality, not 
promiscuous heterosexuality, 
where even traditional “natural 
law” theologians regard its rele- 
vance as a little uncertain. 

The traditionalists have spotted 
this already, and attempts are 
likely to be made soon to relaunch 
foe debate on the morality of 
homosexual acts. Pressure is al- 
ready being felt from the grass- 
roots — church members who 



have never really come to terms 
with foe official tolerance of moral 
pluralism — for a firm and ringing 
reaffirmation of the traditional 
ethic. At such levels foe fine 
distinctions theologians like to 
make do not carry much weight; 
foe church is seen simply as 
having lost foe courage of its 
convictions. 

Even finer theological distinc- 
tions are being made in foe 
Roman Catholic Church. It has 
not been easy to describe ac- 
curately its official policy towards 
foe anti-Aids programme. The 
church does not “agree” with it, 
but nor does it “object”. The 
phrase “tacit acceptance" used in 
The Times to sum up the church's 
present broad attitude is proving 
tacitly acceptable, after one at- 
tempt to disown it. 

Some aspects of foe programme 
foe church does reject, such as the 
slogan “Play Safe” on Radio One. 
The Social Services Secretary, 
Normam Fowler, has offered to 
meet church representatives to 
discuss their difficulties, but there 


is no guarantee that he will 
understand them. The Catholic 
bishops have not been quick to 
accept his offer, which suggests 
they are not quite sure what they 
waul to say to him. 

The feet is that foe Catholic 
Church, like foe Church of Eng- 
land, is still feeling its way, not 
quite sure what note to strike. 
While in foe Anglican case the lack 
of an official line on homosexual- 
ity makes foe church's attitude 
seem confused, so in the Catholic 
case the issue is bedevilled by foe 
government’s promotion of con- 
doms as its first line of defence 
against Aids. The feet that a 
condom is a contraceptive device 
causes instinctive Catholic cau- 
tion. Even if most married Catho- 
lics use contraceptives, the 
bishops could never publicly ap- 
prove of their doing so. 

So the Christinas cracker Aids 
condundrum for Catholic church- 
men is this: if it is wrong to use 
condoms, and wrong to be sex- 
ually promiscuous, can it be right 
to urge the sexually promiscuous 


to use condoms? For that is what 
the government is dmng And the 
point is not lost on foe church that 
unless foe promiscuous do indeed 
use condoms, there is every 
likelihood of a serious Aids epi- 
demic “We do not want to be the 
cause of that,” said one Catholic 
source. 

So fer no leader of any of foe 
twain denominations has given 
currency to foe view that Aids is 
divine punishment for immoral- 
ity. But beneath the surface it is 
dear that many of them do in feet 
believe something on those lines. 
The Anglican board’s statement 
this week could be interpreted that 
way. The issue is raised whenever 
churchmen try to say why, exactly, 
promiscuity and homosexuality 
are wrong: is it just because God 
(or the church) disapproves, or is 
it because these activities are 
harmful to foe individuals in- 
volved, being contrary to the way 
h uman sexuality is “naturally” 
designed to work? 

They say it is foe latter; and if 
God disapproves it is because of 
foe harm that follows. But post- 
Aids, the harm is potentially fer 
mare serious. It may not be God 
taking revenge, but it is certainly 
nature taking revenge; and God, 
the churchmen all confess, de- 
signed nature. 

So Aids is a penalty for sinful 
behaviour programmed into na- 
ture by its Designer. Unfortu- 
nately the penalty does not always 
fell only on the sinner. 

There is plenty of substance 
here with which foe churches 
could mount a stung a ssEnh on 
public opinion, quite openly 
admitting that they are ||<nn g the 
Aids threat to promote traditional 
standards of sexual behaviour, 
with an argument like that above 
providing the logical connection. 

At the moment they merely 
seem to want the government to 
do this for them: official Anglican 
and Catholic comments on the 
anti-Aids programme have regret- 
ted that the emphasis is on 
condoms rather than on chastity. 

The issue for churchmen, now, 
is whether they can devise a 
programme of public education 
themselves that would stand a 
reasonable chance of changing 
people’s moral attitudes and 
behaviour in favour of chastity. If 
they could, they might reasonably 
expect the government to help to 
pay for it, in the name of public 
health. 


more personal matter making a 
will. 

Until recently, this presented 
few problems. Many parents had 
comparatively little wealth to 
leave. The choice of beneficiary 
was obvious; each other, then 
their children, and, more often 
Than not, only two of them. 
Furthermore, because life expec- 
tancy was shorter, the benefit to 
those children was also obvious: 
they received a small sum of 
money at a relatively early stage m 
their working life when they 
needed all they could get to raise 
their own families. 

In the majority of harmonious 
famiH es all was straightforward. 
Gone were the dilemmas and 
struggles of foe large 1 9th century 
families with early and un- 
expected deaths, demographics 
which furnished the background 
for the plot of many a Victorian 
novel about wicked guardian un- 
cles trying to defraud consumptive 
wards of their rightful inheritance. 

But now the trends are c h angi n g 
a gain. The amounts left are larger 
as owner-occupation grows and 
the price of properties has risen. 
The privatization of British 
Telecom, Gas and TSB has signifi- 
cantly widened share ownership 
and there is more to come. 

Though higher pensions cannot 
themselves be inherited by chil- 
dren, they may protect other, 
capital assets for transfer. Not all 
these assets are passed on through 
wills: many are transferred before 
death to avoid taxes. But to those 
owning them, they are all sums to 
be passed on and about which 
decisions have to be made. Indeed 
the taxes and possibility of earlier 
transfer add to foe decisions to be 
taken. Poor decisions may burden 
recipients with tax debts malting 
them “beneficiaries” hugely in 
name. 

Those inheriting these rams, foe 
offspring, are no longer, in many 
cases, impoverished young mar- 
rieds, let alone penniless children, 
but married couples with a house 
of their own and at foe peak of 
their own earning power. Nor are 
they necessarily foe only or ob- 
vious choice: The increasing di- 
vorce rate and, even more, foe 
high remarriage rate, are playing 
havoc with the old tidy “family” 
obligations. And childless couples 
have no obvious blood beneficiary 
after each others death. I say 
no thing of lesbian mothers. 

It fa not only family patterns 
which are changing. The institu- 
tions to which many leave money 
are also subject to rapid change: 
Pity those who left hard-earned 
money to enrich a high altar for 


to sit. look at the sea, convene and 
meet friends. Would they have left 
foe money if they could have seen 
foe benches piled high with teen- 


each other and shouting abuse at 
the present generation of pension- 
ers as they wearily passby? 

Is it safe for a capitalist, meat- 
eating cat lover to leave jus estate 
to an organization which looks 
after abandoned doggies and puss- 
ies? Might it not be taken overby 
extremist-activist vegetarians set 
on destroying foe meat and poul- 
try industry? 

Slowly it dawns that not only 
must decisions be made but that 
they axe not congenial. Innocently 
one bad thought foal giving away 
money would be easy and rather 
fun. Worse, it is apparent that the 
decisions might cause harm. 

What will son Richard do if he 
find* himself with £100,000 to 
blow ax the age of 45 just as he and 
Margaret are simultaneously 
enjoying their mid-life crises, see- 
ing their house empty of the 
cementing influence of their now 
adult children and going through 
an acrimonious “bad patch?" Mr 
Walker thinks he will rush out and 
start a business. 

I gather that the determination 
to get round to making 3 will 
features high in the New Year 
resolutions of those of a certain 
age. Perhaps if Christmas gets 
unbearably warm and friendly, 
they might cool things down a bit 
by inviting the family to join in 
and argue about who should 
inherit before they decide on 
January I. 

The argument turns out to be 
just like foe politics of welfare: 
there are advocates of comprehen- 
sive welfare who want everyone to 
receive an equal share; means 
testers who would direct it at those 
with least income; wealth creators 
who would give it to those who 
have made most money and might 
make most of more; fine tuners 
who would try to ng its future 
benefits in detail; and, just like 
politicians, those who would use it 
to satisfy old scores or foment 
envy and unrest A most educa- 
tional Christmas game — let’s call 
it Testaments. 

No, you can't see the right 
answers. I just thought you might 
like a new, genuine and intriguing 
social puzzle to play. Anything to 
distract attention from the one 
“they” have set us for 1987. Can 
you imagine? A whole year of the 
Environment 

The author is director of the Social 
Affairs Unit- 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

I’ve got it, you 
name it 


Today’s message from Bethlehem 


The people in foe camps know 
that Christinas is coining when the 
number of arrests starts to rise. In 
the past week there have been 20, 
slightly more than usual, but that 
was expected in the wake of the 
widespread, often violent, demon- 
strations in the Israeli -occupied 
territories this month. This Christ- 
mas, they seem almost to take 
heart in the arrests for they see 
them as a kind of victory. 

The camp fa Dheisheh, which 
hangs on to foe southern fringe of 
Bethlehem along foe eastern side 
ofthe main road to Hebron. When 
tensions rise, children in the camp 
specialize in throwing stones at foe 
Israeli cars travelling up and down 
foe highway. From an early age, 
they are taught that peace on earth 
means little in foe suburbs of 
Bethlehem. 

Majed Nimer Odefa has been 
arrested seven times in his young 
life and he pulls a wry face when 
he is asked about foe Christmas 
message. “During this period foe 
Israelis try to put away foe more 
nationalist ones. They can nuke 
an arrest and don't need to make a 
charge for 18 days, so just before 
Christmas they round up foe likely 
troublemakers. 

“Sometimes we feel Christinas 
because of foe big numbers of 
soldiers sent in. They put np their 


tents just across the road and 
increase the patrols. Then we 
know it's Omstmas.” 

People in the camp blame foe 
extra dampdown on foe feet that 
over the holiday the eyes and ears 
of the world briefly focus on foe 
not-so-little town of Bethlehem. 
The authorities and, they say, 
most of all Elias Freij, the mayor, 
want to be sure that there is a 
quiet, peaceful Christmas for the 
benefit of foe television cameras 
and foe choirs from all over the 
world in Manger Square by foe 
Church of foe Holy Nativity on 
Christmas Eve. Once foe holiday 
is over and foe media attention is 
somewhere else, foe camp returns 
to normal. 

“Normal” means living under 
permanent scrutiny from an 
observation post among foe boul- 
ders on the rough hillside 
overlooking the camp. From 
there, army patrols are directed by 
radio to any place where some- 
thing suspicious is seen. 

Dheisheh is peopled by sus- 
pects. Walk along its muddy 
roads, where foe open sewers flow 
down foe middle, and seemingly 
everyone you pass has a criminal 

Shtmoa Peres is no longer 1 prime 
minister of Israel, as staled in an 
article on this page on ^nday 


history and is proud of it At the 
infants school the teacher is a 
trained social worker, Najah Ibra- 
him, who remembers how, as a girl 
of six, she was shocked when her 
father was arrested within days of 
Israel occupying foe West Bank in 
1967. Her class ofbright-eyed five- 
year-olds are learning reading and 
writing together with a good deal 
of stories of Islam. 

They know one about a preg- 
nant virgin, who gave birth under 
a palm tree and was then inspired 
to take foe fhih of the tree and eat 
it, she explains. Her children 
identify foe garish tinsel tree in 
Manger Square, where the Christ- 
mas processions start, as foe tree 
of that virgin. But foe Christmas 
message seems lost. Will the five- 
year-olds grow up to throw stones? 
“Why not?”, says the social 
worker whose father went to 
prison. "They are Palestinians." 

Die camp is unmistakably Mus- 
lim. Its one new building is the 
m inaret of the mosque, rising like 
a lighthouse above foe squalor. 
Old men with grizzled beards and 
lorn keffiyah head-scarfs wonder 
at the growing enthusiasm of foe 
young for regular prayer. 

Their other faith is that they win 
return to foe land of their fathers, 
some 39 carefully remembered 
villages on the fertile plains west 


of the Judean Hills. From the age 
of eight, children are taken back to 
the area in the summer to work in 
the fields and orchards, now run 
by Jewish farmers, and to see the 
land from which their famili es fled 
in 1948. Back in the filth of the 
camp, foe resentment festers. 

“They get arrested so often that 
they start not caring,” says Majed 
Odeh. “The young people start 
having no fear. They just don't 
care if they are caught It becomes 
normal being arrested." 


streets of Bethlehem this year, that 
resentful militancy is having its 
effect The tinsel outside foe shops 
tarnishes in foe rain. Salesmen 
from shops selling olive wood and 
mother-of-pearl rush out in near 
desperation to call “please come 
inside and look, only look,” at 
each rare passing 
tourist 

Tales of terrorism and unrest 
spread worldwide have wrecked 
travel to foe holy places this year. 
Hotels have never been so empty. 
There is plenty of room in foe 
inns. There is too much peace and 
quiet, but for the wrong reasons. It 
is born, not of Christmas, but of 
the filth, frustration, and resent- 
ment that produces violence in the 
refugee camps. •_ _ _ 

IanMnrrav 


Here is a little Christmas quiz 
based loosely on foe year’s news, 
which you may care to cut out and 
keep for foe festive period, or even 
cut into individual questions for 
stuffing into crackers. There are 
no prizes for getting the right 
answers save a glow of smugness. 

1. Which was foe event most 
looked forward to during the 
whole of 1986 and which, when it 
came, turned out to be the 
dampest squib? (a) Big Bang; (b) 
Royal Wedding; f) Eddy Shah’s 
Today. 

2. Which of the following is the 
most accurate description of Big 
Bang? (a) It is a method of 
dragging the running of the 
London Stock Exchange from the 
18th century into foe 19th; (b) It 
enables insiders to get news of 
Guinness share price movements 
even earlier than they would 
normally do; (c) It keeps Sid in 
touch. 

3. Which, during 1986, became foe 
longest-running war in 20th-cen- 
tury history? (a) Iran-Iraq War, (b) 
Contest between Karpov and 
Kasparov; (c) The America's Cup 
pre liminar ies. 

4. Courtney Fine is which of the 
following? (a) Jazz musician; (b) 
Most expensive health resort in 
Britain; (c) Small Wiltshire v illage 
where cruise-missile carriers al- 
ways break down. 

5. What has been described as the 
most racially-oriented set-up in 
the world today? (a) South Africa; 

(b) Brent Council 

6. Robert Maxwell was accused by 
Private Eye of having asked 
Labour politicians for a title. This 
charge was thrown out on foe 
grounds that (a) Labour poli- 
ticians would never be in a 
position to grant him a title; (b) 
The title had already been given to 

Bob Gekiof and melted down to 
raise money for Band Aid; (c) If 
foe accusation -was made by 
Private Eye it must be felse. 

7. The British government is 
trying to prevent publication of 
Peter Wright’s book in Australia 
because: {a) The book needs all the 
publicity it can get; (b) The case 
gives a few politicians and civil 
servants foe. chance to fly out to 
Australia to watch a Test match; 

(c) Sir Michael Havers and Su 
Robert Armstrong are both full- 
time Soviet spies? 

8. What is or are Loose Tubes? (a). 
New jazz band; (b) British entrant 
in the America's Cup; (c) Rare 


disease from which Michael 
Heseltine suffers. 

9. Samosa is or was what? (a) A 
Pacific is land on which France 
tests her anti-Greenpeace weap- 
ons;' (b) Absolutely delicious ori- 
ental snack; (c) President of 
Mozambique who very suddenly 
became ex-president while flying 
over South Africa. 

10. The Nimrod early-warning 
system was turned down by foe 
British government in preference 
to the American Awacs system 
because: (a) It was backed by foe 
Ministry of Defence and therefore 
suspect; (b) You could see its 
arguments coming a mile off, (c) 
Anything made by a company 
with James Prior in charge is not 
going to be picked by foe British 

government while Mrs Thatcher fa 

in charge. 

11. Which of the following was 
given away this year by Mrs 
Thatcher because nobody could be 
found who wanted to buy a single 
share in it? (a) Westland Heli- 
copters; (b) Leon Brittan; (c) The 
Commonwealth Games. 

12. What does it mean when an 
American citizen pleads the Fifth 
Amendment? (a) He knows every- 
Jtong; (b) He knows nothing; (c) 
He knows everything but Presi- 
dent Reagan knows nothing. 

13. Ian Botham declared that he 
would rather leave Somerset than 
be parted from Viv Richards and 
Joel Garner. As a result (a) Ail 
three have gone to play for 
dmerent counties; (b) All three 
have gone to play m different 
countnes; (c) Taunton, in despera- 
tion, has decided to leave the 
Commonwealth and main* a uni- 
toteral declaration of indepen- 
dence. 

14. Prime Minister’s Question 
Time is an ancient parliamentary 

which is so called because: 
[a) The prime minister asks all the 
questions; (b) Mr Kinnock asks 
long questions divided into 

twSE® 1 * 1 * parts ^ 311(1 ^ 

ThatehCTi answers none of them; 
Mrs Thatcher reads out bits of 
TS* *5? written statis- 
liS ?!S! 1 the P^ormance of the 
test Labour government which has 

befo^aK *° aDy ques!ion she ‘ a 

“ currently, (a) 
Wrmng a novel based on his li£ 

Christ?!? ^ n ti ng an apologetic 
Christnia5 car’d to Mrs Thatcher. 


M: 


\**i 





: K, ' :r -: 

* 1 ft. . - 

f. 








) t 



THE TTMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


13 


Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


„ . THE SOCIALIST DILEMMA 

Mr Neil Kinnock must hope 
mat the end of 1986 is the 
of his and his party’s 
mrtunes from which both will 
?*over as the general election 


draws near. It would certainly 
be foolish to suppose that 
eithtt Labour or its leader can 
off Despite the 
m Labours public support 
s. as charted by the opinion 
■ ■ Polls, the party still has ira- 
mense reserves of support to 
draw on from people and from 
social classes who take it as 
axiomatic that Labour is the 
natural defender of their in- 
terests and who feel tied to it 
by history. 

This suppprt gives the party 
a solid platform in certain 
areas from which it can rise 
again if the Conservatives are 
damaged either by their own 
errors or by political accidents. 
Labour's massive majorities in 
these places also make it hard 
for the Alliance, with its own 
vote spread more evenly and 
^thinly over the country, to 
* .supplant Labour as the Tories’ 
principal rivaL The important 
qualification to the Tories’ 
recent rise in the opinion polls 
at Labour’s expense is that, 
even in relation to the latest 
Gallup poll (giving the Tories 
an 8.5 per cent lead) Labour 
support is still significantly 
higher than it was in the 1983 
election. 

When all this is said, how- 
ever, the outlook for Labour 
today seems bleak. It is under- 
standable that some of Mr 
Kinnock's colleagues should 

press him to bowdlerise still 
further the parties* commit- 
ment to expel the US nuclear 
bases which, with its anti-Nato 
.! implication, has recently done 
Labour most damage. 


They would also like Labour 
to switch its attack to social 
and economic policies, and 
specifically to die welfare ser- 
vices, education. 


unemployement and indus- 
trial policy. Yet it is by no 
means clear that Labour will 
do bettor on this pitch than it 
has done with defence, unless 
the government inflicts dam- 
age on itself. The economy is 
improving, unemployment is 
falling, and the government is 
spending more on the social 
services. But above ail, the 
public’s rejection of Labour 
lies not in its stars, nor even in 
its leader, but in its own 
present nature. 

Mr Kinnock. it is true, does 
appear increasingly implau- 
sible as a national leader. His 
attempts to explain away pub- 
lic anxieties over Labour's 
defence policy on the grounds 
that it will make Britain 
stronger seem simply ludi- 
crous against Nato condemna- 
tion. But the intellectual 
incoherence which he 
manifests merely reflects the 
intellectual incoherence of a 
Labour Fatty which, faced 
with the electorate's rejection 
of the socialism to which the 
party is hooked, tries to 
camouflage its objectives with 
a smart public image and 
verbal re-packaging. 

In one sense it is a problem 
as old as the attempts of the 
Gaitskellites in the 1950s to 
turn Labour in a new direc- 
tion. It had then become clear 
that the country, though it 
wanted a welfare state, wodd 
tolerate no more socialism. 
Gaitskell and his friends 
fought to reverse their party's 
socialist commitment and 


seemed almost to have suc- 
ceeded The Wilson gov- 
ernment of 1964 was the 
beneficiary of this achieve- 
ment Six years later, however, 
its version of social democracy 
had foundered, largely because 
the unions made it unwork- 
able. Then, in the 1970s, came 
Labour's massive shift to the 
left, the abolition of its de- 
fence against extremist infilt- 
ration, and the dear socialist 
commitment which, under Mr 
Michad Foot’s leadership, was 
rejected by foe nation 

It was as foe candidate of 
this commitment to socialism 


that Mr Kinnock rose to be his 
party’s leader. He is the child 
of socialism and he shares its 
reflex actions, even though he 
now tries to trim foe party’s 
policies to accomodate the feet 
that foe nation dislikes them. 
He encapsulates Labour’s 
problem, but he is not its 
cause. He is not a clear-headed 
politician, and is prone to 
suppose that verbal fluency 
washes away public dis- 
content 

It is probably true that social 
policy offers Labour more 
than defence. Yet if Mr 
Kinnock had avoided going 
into battle for foe defence 
policy to which he and his 
party were committed, he 
would have been smoked out 
and would have had to try to 
explain it sooner or later, with 
precisely foe same effect The 
same is also true of social 
policy. The nation does not 
want socialism, yet socialism 
is what it is being offered. Mr 
Kinnock is not a brilliant 
policitian, but foe most bril- 
liant of politicians cannot sell 
policies the nation dislikes. 


BALANCING THE UN BUDGET 


Annual income twenty 
pounds, annual expenditure 
twenty pounds nought and six, 
result misery — said Mr 
Micawber. He was not, how- 
ever, thinking of the United 
Nations, where the result 
would have been not so much 
misery as a demand for more 
money from Washington. 
That at least has been the 
position until now, and foe 
news that things have changed 
is as welcome over here as it is 
over there. The UN is becom- 
ing cash conscious. 


It would be nice to think 
that the UN’s resolution to put 
its affairs in order was sponta- 
neous. In feet, it was last year’s 
decision by an exasperated 
United States to cut its finan- 
cial contribution in draconian 
fashion which forced foe Gen- 
eral Assembly to act A partial 
reprieve by Congress when 
reviewing foe budget last Octo- 
ber enabled foe Secretary- 
General to struggle through to 
the end of the year. 


majority in foe General 
Assembly to vote the UN 
more funds without too much 
thought about where it should 
come from. Henceforth, all 
extra spending will have to be 
approved by the 21-member 
programme and coordination 
committee, in which foe major 
donors will be able to block 


The 15 per cent cut, which 
has now been agreed in foe 
organization’s 14,000 staff— 
together with economies in 
meetings, travel expenses and 
paperwork — is long overdue. 
Last year, for example, it was 
proposed to hold three special 
meetings on Southern Africa 
away from the organisation's 
New York headquarters, al- 
though the additional (and 
quite unnecessary) cost of 
staging them out of town was 
equivalent to foe total annual 
UN contributions of its 40 
poorest countries. With 70 
nations responsible for less 
than two percent of the annual 
UN budget, the Third World 
has been perfectly happy to see 
overall spending double 
within a decade. 


But with the USA paying 25 
per cent of the UN’s annual 
budget, the organization was 
faced by a choice this year 
between bankruptcy and re- 
form. To the relief not only of 
the United States but also 
Britain which finds less than 
five per cent and foe Soviet 
Union which finds more than 
ten, the organization has reluc- 
tantly chosen the second op- 
tion. 


Meanwhile, developing 
countries have been able to use 
foe General Assembly as a 
forum for their anti-Ameri- 
canism and strident dislike of 
Western capitalist powers — 
who actually did have to meet 
the rising bills. 


The distribution of its finan- 
cial burden among the UN's 
1 59 member countries is un- 
changed. Washington firmly 
rejected a suggestion that the 
USA should start paying less 
in percentage terms — because 
this would have risked a 
reduction in its influence over 
the organization. This in itself 
broadly confirms the view that 
it was not the financial burden 
as much as the UN's anti- 
Western stance which pro- 
voked Congress to act 
The new system for 
sanctioning additional 
expenditue should help to 
correct this. Until now the 
Third World has used its 


any consensus. 

In one sense the American 
backlash has come too late. 
The UN has been growing 
more moderate in foe last year 
or two. There is even a danger 
that an attempt by Wash- 
ington to force even more 
concessions could be counter- 
productive. 

The test of this will come 
next October when foe Senate 
Foreign Relations Commitee 
decides on foe next year’s UN 
contribution. For foe com- 
mittee to tighten the screw 
could have the opposite effect 
— by provoking foe UN’s more 
radical lobby to throw out the 
package of reforms now 
agreed, and a loss of foe 
ground which has been won. 
This seems unlikely, however, 
following foe mid-term elec- 
tions— and the appointment 
as chairman of Senator 
Claiborne Pell, a sympathetic 
Democrat from Rhode Island. 

For General Vernon Wal- 
ters, US ambassador to foe 
UN. to describe the reforms as 
a “great day for mankind” 
might be going a little far. But 
if foe UN can now spend only 
nineteen pounds, nineteen and 
sixpence, it could be the first 
step to an effective world 
organisation. 


THE POOR AT CHRISTMAS 


Poverty, a pinched and mis- 
erable experience at any time, 
is particularly depressing over 
Christmas. The annual orgy of 
getting, spending and advertis- 
ing makes poor families feel 
their everyday deprivations 
with particular sharpness. 

Everyone else is uneasily 
conscious of the paradox that 
the religious season which 
should relieve the poor of their 
burdens has become a grand 
commercial celebration which 
makes those burdens more 
onerous than usual. It is half 
the reason why charities make 
their appeals to the general 
public at this time. 

Hence, perhaps, the appear- 
ance this week of two studies 
of poverty in Britain from the 
Low P^y Unit and the Child 
Poverty Action Group. Both 
argue that poverty has grown 
worse in Britain — over peri- 
ods of 100 and 20 years 
respectively. 

Take, first, the Low Fay 
Unit's report. The Pay Race — 
Winner and Losers. This 
points out that in 1886 the 
bottom fifth of wage-earners 
earned 69 per cent of foe 
average manual wage. Today, 
foe same calculation suggests 
that the bottom fifth earn only 
65 per cent of the average. 
Accordingly, the report con- 


cludes that the “gap” between 
the lowest-paid and the rest of 
society has “widened.” 

However, over the same 
period, the real income of both 
average earners and the low 
paid has risen something like 
fourfold, in comparison with 
this 400 per cent rise in their 
real living standards, the four 
per cent drop in relative 
earnings by foe low paid is a 
statistical blip of so signifi- 
cance. It is a measure not of 
poverty, but of inequality. 

The term invented to make 
such reasoning popular is, of 
course, relative poverty. The 
essentially bogus character of 
this concept can be seen as 
follows, if a slump were to cut 
average earnings" by half but 
below-average earnings by 
only a quarter, the low-paid 
might be starving but they 
would be relatively better-off. 

Similar reasoning flaws the 
CPAG's report on poor chil- 
dren. This argues that not only 
are more children living in 
poverty today. but also that 
such poverty is greater than it 
was 20 years ago. since supple- 
mentary benefits have de- 
clined as 2 percentage of 
average earning from 48 to 39 
per cerL 

In feet, both average earn- 
ings and supplementary bene- 


fits have risen in real teims. As 
another table in the report 
reveals, a family of four living 
on supplementary benefit to- 
day is about 12 percent better- 
off in real terms than in 1966 
since that is foe amount by 
which the increase in benefits 
has outstripped price rises. 

Furthermore, that rise in 
real supplementary benefit 
levels is one reason for the 
increase in foe number of poor 
people. As the level at which 
people become eligible for 
social benefits rises, so more 
people become eligible and 
thus defined as poor. Official 
figures suggest that foe six per 
cent rise by which benefits 
have outstripped prices since 
1979 accounts for foe entire 
increase in foe number of 
people at or below supple- 
mentary benefit levels. 

But relative poverty in 
Britain remains not too far 
from absolute poverty. Those 
on supplementary benefit this 
Christmas will not be starving, 
but they will not be enjoying 
high standards of nutrition or 
good housing conditions. It is 
that which should concern ire, 
not the manipulation of statis- 
tics which tell us more about 
the political convictions of 
their authors than about the 
condition of England. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Soviet view of space-based defence 

Pact’s millions of highly trained, 
heavily armed, whole time 
servicemen by increased “con- 
ventional” defences. 


From Major-General Rair 
Simonyan 
Sir, I would like to express my 
disioreement with the article in 
support of the strategic defence 
initiative by David Hart (Decem- 
ber 2). 

First, the author of foe article 
Haims that SDL, even if it is only 
32 per cent effective in destroying 
enemy targets, will substantially 
enhance deterrence, stabilise foe 
international situation and de- 
prive foe Soviet Union of a first- 
strike capability. 

However, deterrence implies 
that in the event of nuclear attack, 
the victim must have the ability to 
inflict unacceptable retaliatory 
damage on the aggressor. By 
seeking to deprive the Soviet 
Union of this capability, SDI 
actually undermines deterrence. 

Furthermore, even if SDI is 
only partially implemented, the 
risk of nuclear conflict will in- 
crease, because SDI implies the 
development of weapons which 
are both offensive and defensive. 
A space-based missile defence 
system could become a shield 
from behind which the United 
States might try to launch a first 
strike (and surely it is illogical for 
Mr Hart to base his argument on 
tiie premise that the Soviet Union, 
which has a no-first-uae-of- 
sncfear-weapoiis policy, would 
start such a conflict, rather titan 
foe United States, which has never 
ruled out a first strike). 

Second, Mr Hart advances uto- 
pian schemes for a jointly-con- 
trolled Soviet-American missile 
defence system. But even if both 
sides deploy such systems the 
strategic system would remain 
unstable because the system of one 
side would be able to put out of 
commission the system of the 
other. 

Third. Mr Hart argues that since 
any programme to counter land- 
based lasers would be more expen- 
sive than their deployment, these 
lasers could make foe whole 
system effective. Yet here are just 
four of many cheap ways to render 
land-based lasers ineffective: foe 
orbital spraying of fine particles 
creating minor surface defects 
that make lase r focusing impos- 
sible; spraying light-weight materi- 
als near a mirror or laser with a 
high degree of laser radiation 
absorption; protecting missiles 
with beam-reflecting and absorb- 
ing coating Or making missiles 
revolve around their axes to 
prevent laser beam fbcuring; 
shortening the post-boost path of 
ballistic missiles and other mea- 
sures to impede anti-missile 
weapon tainting. 

The flaws in Mr Hart's argu- 
ments underline the point that foe 
only way tp peace and stability lies 
through agreements on cutting 
and eventually eliminating nuc- 
lear weapons here on earth rather 
than through the development of 
space shield-swords. 

Yours sincerely, 

RAIR SIMONYAN, 

Ministry of Defence of the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics, 
Frunzi Street Moscow, USSR. 
December 16. 

From Mr G.MX. Smith 
Sir, Major-General James Lunt 
(December 12) demonstrates the 
futility of Mr Kinnock’s idyllic 
dream of matching the Warsaw 


Home thoughts 
on curriculum 


Mere verbiage 

From the Director of the Royal 
School for the Blind 
Sir, Radio 4 this morning (Decem- 
ber IS) introduced the verb 
“anonymise”. May I therefore 
letterise you that such verbising 
terribilises the English la n g uage 
and should not be radioised by the 
BBC. 

Yours sincerely, 

BERNARD COOTE, Director, 
Royal School for the Blind, 
Highland Road. . 

Leafoerhead, Surrey. 


Pre-trial driving ban 

From Mr Tom B. Harrison 
Sir. Your Legal Affairs Corres- 
pondent reports (December 9) the 
“controversial*' decision of Ox- 
ford magistrates to ban a man 
from driving before his case has 
been heard. It is indeed controver- 
sial, since most people strongly 
oppose the general principle of 
punishing a man before his guilt is 
determined. 

There are some instances, how- 
ever, when the protection of the 
public transcends that principle 
and demands some form of 
restriction upon foe accused’s 
freedom. 

An accused may be remanded m 
custody before trial where an 
exception to foe right to bail, now 
enshrined in the Bail Act 1976, is 
established. By the same token 1 
see no reason why magistrates 
should not, in appropriate circum- 
stances, attach, as a condition to 
granting a person bail, a pro- 
hibition upon driving until his 
case is heard. This should only be 
considered proper in the most 
serious cases and where there is 
good reason to believe foe accused 
would commit a further offence if 
allowed to continue driving. 

In most cases foe evidence 
against the drink/dri ver is 


overwhelming, the plea “guilty” 
and the consequence a driving ban 
of not less than a year. Accord- 
ingly the likelihood of injustice or 
hardship in imposing a pre-trial 
ban is not great. The advantage to 
foe public is that the danger 
presented by the drink/driver is 
immediately removed. ‘ 

There is one anomaly in the 
present law, however. Where a 
man has been remanded in cus- 
tody pending trial and is given a 
custodial sentence foe time spent 
on remand is treated. as having 
been part of foe sentence. If a man 
is banned from driving pre-trial by 
way of a bail condition, this wifi 
not as I understand the law. count 
towards any period of dis- 
qualification subsequently im- 
posed for the offence. This 
unfortunate error should be re- 
moved. 

The drink/driver is usually at 
his worst at tins time of year. I 
hope foe “controversial” justices 
in Oxford are not to be alone in 
doing their bit to keep our roads 
safe. 


Yours faithfully. 

tom Harrison, 

Harrison & Co, Solicitors, 
Swan Lane, 

Haverhill, Suffolk. 
December 1 1. 


Law on bad debts 

From Mr M. A. Sheldon-Alien 
Sir, The letter of Mr Sidney Z. 
Manches (December 11) makes a 
number of valid points. This 
association, during its short life 
thus far of nearly four years, has 
spent most of its energies in trying 
to obtain more equitable treat- 
ment for those made bankrupt, 
whilst still recognising the pos- 
ition of the creditors. 

Under the new Insolvency Act 
no prior court proceedings will be 
needed in many cases, since foe 
act of bankruptcy (now given a 
new name) will be the failure to 
pay within a short period of time 
any moneys due to foe creditor 
after the service of a demand in a 
prescribed form. 

The debtor has foe right, on 
limited grounds, to apply to set 
aside foe demand, but we will 
increasingly see petitions pre- 
sented and bankruptcy orders 
made without foe liability for foe 
debt being properly tested by foe 
courts. 

It cannot be disputed that foe 
old bankruptcy laws were founded 
in the days of Dickens. It is my 
view foai ibe new insolvency laws 
take us back to the attitude of foe 
Middle Ages. 


■ In our humble view, the lot of 
the bankrupt must inevitably get 
far worse before consideration can 
be given to make it better. In foe 
meantime; the disgrace and 
humiliation will increase, as will 
the numbers suffering them be- 
cause of the greater ease in foe 
procedure in malting someone 

bankrupt. 

Yours feithfuDy, 

MICHAEL A SHELDON- 
ALLEN (Hon Legal Secretary, 
Association of Bankrupts), 

32 Finchley Lane, 

Hendon, NW4. 


Badgering badgers 

From Mr Michad Meredith 
Sir, I agree with Mr Martelli 
(December 13} that badgers are a 
most difficult garden pest to 


combat But they are strictly 
small light— 1 1 


nocturnal, so a small light— I use a 
15-watt bulb fixed about two feet 
above ground level - wiU keep 
them out of the flltuninaied area. 
It will even keep them away from 
strawberries, one of foeir favourite 
foods. 

Yours feifofoliy, 

MICHAEL MEREDITH, 

Sandy Lodge. 

Long Lane. Botnenkampton. 
Bridport, Dorset. 




Mr Kinnock's virion of a pre- 
1914 style defence, with volunteer 
servicemen fighting on the Conti- 
nent. with no inconvenience or 
danger to anyone else, las a 
nostalgic appeal to a generation, 
including Dr Humphrey Smith 
(December 12) with no memory of 
Dunkirk or the conventional blitz, . 
and to whom foe certainty of our 
force being swept aside in a matter 
of days is as unthinkable as the 
subsequent invasion and occupa- 
tion. 

It is to Mr Kinnock’s credit that 
he has refrained from the Labour 
Party's fudge in 1939, “collective 
security”. Thai meant alliances 
between two or more disarmed 
nations, each looking to the others 
to do the fighting. Hitler knew that 
0 + 0 + 0 - 0 . 

The issue is, however, largely 
academic, because Mr Kinnock is 
probably the only member of the 
Shadow Cabinet who would con- 
sider . for one moment any 
strengthening of conventional 
forces. The gamble is still “Give 
war a chance. We bet that Britain 
can avoid involvement.” 

Yours faithfully, 

GORDON M. L SMITH, 

44 Devonshire Street, Wl. 
December 15.. 

From Mr Walter Cairns 
Sir. Loath though I am to take 
issue with my mend and former 
mentor. Professor Lasok (Decem- 
ber 16), I fed compelled to 
question his of Lab- 

our’s defence policy in foe light of 
18th-century Poland rather than 
in that of 20th-century Britain. 

The whole thrust of Labour’s 
policy is not to weaken our 
defences, but to strengthen them 
to the point where any con- 
ventional attack fry tire Warsaw 
Pact is impossible. There is no 
need to bade this up by means of 
any nuclear weapons based in this 
country simply because the point 
at which American strategic 
nuclear weapons could wipe out 
every Russian several times over 
was reached 20 years ago. , 

This is not, however, the same 
as “sheltering under America’s 
nuclear umbrella”, but merely 
stating the undeniable feet that 
America will retain its massive 
strategic nuclear capacity regard- 
less of what any British gov- 
ernment does or fails to do. 

Yours sincerely, 

W. CAIRNS, 

University of Dundee, 
Department of Public Law, 
Saymgeour Buflding, 

Park Place, Dundee. 

December 16. 


From Viscountess In 
Sir, As Mr Kenneth Baker makes 
his plans for a national curricu- 
lum, may I make a special plea for 
the importance of the less obvious 
subject of home economics to be 
included (with realistically ade- 
quate time in the timetable) in 
every school, for every young 
person — academic and less so, 
boys as well as girls? 

With so many broken homes 
today in every stratum of society, 
and also many youngsters in 

residential care for much of their 
upbringing, this particular subject 
has an even greater significance 
beyond the classroom. -• 

If well taught, it can grve.added 
confidence and often, instead of a 
sense of inadequacy, of achievable 
possibilities beyond the subject 
matter (i.e., the tools forlbejobof 
household management, bringing 
up a family, good budgeting, 
cooking and health matters etc) to 
build better, more stable homes 
for themselves and their- own 
females — particularly to those 
most in need of it. 

I write from the experience of a 
good many years as governor of a 
comprehensive school (previously 
grammar) in inner London, cou- 
pled with involvement with vol- 
untary ‘ residential work with 


fours faithfully, 

SUSAN INGLEBY, 

Flat 1, 61 Onslow Square. SW7. 


Hope deferred 


From Professor T. C. Barker 
Sir, in June this year foe Eco- 
nomic and Social Research Coun- 
cil announced that it had allocated 
£250,000 to promote research into 
the history of innovation in the 
United Kingdom. I was invited to 
join five other -specialists on a 
smaO sub-comiruttee to make 
recommendations on foe merits of 
foe various applications for this 
money and to monitor the 
progress of res e ar ch. 

Early in August I was informed 
that foe first meeting of the sub- 
committee would be held today 
(December 5). 

Very recently L received a brief 
note from ESRG telling me that, 
although 39 proposals awaited our 
consideration, the meeting had 
been postponed because of 
“budgetary constraints on further 
travel and subsistence expenditure 
in this financial year”. 

None of ns had to be brought 
from outside the United King- 
dom. Three of us, in feet, would 
have to travel no more than about 
50 miles and 1 merely had to cross 
a small' part of London. No. 
indication was given of how far 
into the* future foe meeting would 
have to be postponed 


Presumably th£ allocation of the 


£250,000 will now be deferred 
until new travel expenditure is 
authorised by foe ESRC in the 
next financial year. Meanwhile the 
39 applicants wiU be left wonder- 
ing what is happening. 

That the only Government 
source of funding for the social 
sciences has been brought to such 
a pass is most alarming. 

Yours faithfully, 

T. C. BARKER, 

The London School of Economics 
and Political Science, 

Houghton Street, WC2. 

December 5. 


Patent protection 

From Mr Archy Kirkwood, MP far 
Roxburgh and Berwickshire 
(Liberal) 

Sir, The campaign by foe Associ- 
ation of British Pharmaceutical 
Industry to abolish licences of 
right for pharmaceutical products, 
of which echoes have recently 
appeared in your columns 
(November 26, Ltecember 1), is as 
astonishing as it is audacious. 

The multinational drug com- 
panies are amongst the world’s 
most profitable businesses; earlier 
this year they obtained a £60 
million bonus through the phar- 
maceutical price regulation 
scheme and now they are mount- 
ing a campaign whose effect will 
be to prejudice the continuing 
viability of the independent 
generics industry. 

The claim, that foe licence of 
right provision in the 1 977 Patents 
Act is “unique to the UK” is at 
best a half-truth. The degree of 
protection in Britain is excep- 
tionally great because the product 
itself is protected, rather than 
simply foe process of manufacture 
(as is the case in such countries as 
Denmark, Greece, Spain, Por- 
tugal, Austria, Finland, Norway, 
and Canada). 

And to rite the United States, as ‘ 
Sir John Harvey-Jones does 
(December 1), is extraordinary, as 
there — unlike the UK —substitu- 
tion of generic products for the 
original brand is available at foe 
retail pharmacist level 

What must be remembered is 


that all products patented since 


1978 now enjoy a 20-year patent 
protection — foe argument con- 
cerns solely foe pre-1978 patented 
products. When invented, these 
had onlv a 16-vear patent life; foe 
1977 Patents Act retrospectively 
extended this to 20 - years and 
deliberately balanced this exten- 
sion with a licence of right 
provision available only tor the 
final four years. 

To abolish licences of right now 
would impose an extra £150-200 
million annual burden on foe 
National Health Service’s drugs 
biif by foe early 1990s and kill off 
the competition from foe indepen- . 


dent generic industry, which has 
i this bill < 


helped to keep this bill down. This 
hardly accords with economic 
sense or whb the Government's 
protested belief in free com- 
petition. 

Yours sincerelv, 

ARCHY* KIRKWOOD, 

House of Commons: . 





ON THIS DAY 


DECEMBER 23 1935 


\- eu , Zealand had won die second 
P" 2 C\ encounter between the two 
‘ -ipn in 1924, so that this was 

me -eased the excitement, and 
Bernard Darnm, as ardent a 
partisan for Waif* « 
was for Cambridge in golf , fh 
his hat in the air and was, on ._ 
own admission, lea away almost 
teen 


his 

in 


RUGBY 

FOOTBALL 


A WELSH VICTORY 


ALL BLACKS LOSE 

A GREAT GAME 


From Oar Rugby Football 
Correspondent 

Walsh Rugby football bridged 
the years at Cardiff on Saturday, 
when New Zealand were beaten, byj 
. the odd point in 23 — two goals and 
one try (13 points) to one goal, one 
dropped goal arid one tty (12 
points). 

Tim story of the match unfolded 
itself with all the cruel relish off 
highly-spiced fiction. A ground 
hardened by frost and . a treacher- 
ous smdaro added to the thrills and 

h » miA To the winners, even 
more tium the loseia. it was an 
uphill fight, from foe first kick to 
the last. T.ifrp 1905 in result, it was 
most iiplita It in developments In 
1905, perhaps the greatest of afl 
Wels h aides won a grim strag ’ 
against the original All Blacks, . 
one try to nothing — the famous 
text-book try scored by Teny 
Morgan. In 1935 a new and vastly 
different Wales achieved some- 
thing equally great by differ ent 
mgtfvy i q , methods which were 
more or less enforced on them by 
the coarse of the play and the state 
of the pound. New Zealand, as 
generally expected, got most of the 
ball, yet scored only one try by 
means of passing. Their other nine 
points woe the result of Welsh 
mistakes and the greatness of 
Gilbert as a lock. Gilbert’s dropped 
goal from almost halfway will five 
as long in foe memory, or even 
longer, than Wallace’s winning 
hazard at Swansea 30 years ago. 


WOOLLEB’S STRIDE 


Wales, having escaped actual 
disaster in the first half while their 
forwaids were settling down into a 
pack — the lessons in forward play 
were cheap at three points — 
suddenly sprang to effec ti v e life 
early in foe d half. The 
chances in the open never were <rf| 
the obvious kind, and the dassiea) 
method of approach was next to J 
jTn prmidhlB- Bat, in their use of; 
Wcoher’s stupendous stride —now, 
being. used in midfield; — the 
rieveriy placed punt ahead, and |as$| 
but. not least, foe cjoae s^pport 
offered to the man whohad broken 
away, helped by. the bounce of foe 
ball, foe- Welsh backs 
themselves better opportunists 
even thjin . thgfo - brilliant 
opponents. 

Two tries, each made into a goal, 
turned Wales from a losing side] 
into a winning one in a few 
minutes. Yet the battle was barely 
half lost and won. Crisis mice more 
settled on foe Welsh team, when 
under intense pressure mistakes 
were made, and a wonder fu l 
dropped goal by Gilbert; closely 
followed by » second try by Ball, 
seemed to spell bitter disappoint- 
ment. There was a horrified silence 
when the scare-beard, which had 
to be rectified at the instruction ofl 
the referee, established foe feet 
that Gilbert also had converted 
Ball’s snatch-fry into a goal and 
foe score had changed from 10-3 in 
favour of Wales to 12-10 foe other 
way round. None too much time 
remained, but foe Welsh counter- 
effort, undeterred by the carrying 
away of Tarr, their booker, on a 
stretcher, was to prove invincible, 
and 50,000 imprisoned spirits fair- 
ly broke loose when the winning fry 
was scored; 

Even then the result was not 

folly signed and settled When, 

at last, Idwal Rees, as heroic and 1 
telling a player in his way as 
WooBer was in his, caught foe final 
skier and punted it deliberately 


into touch, a shouting crowd swept] 
over the . field . . . ringing 
“Land of my Fathers”. 


, *» 

;*C 


Helping charities 

From Mr James G. L. Jackson • 

Sir, Miss Edna Smith (December 
17) will be gad .to know that foe H 
introduction of Christmas cards *. 
produced and sold by charities led.*; . 
to the formation of The 1959 ? 
GroUp of Charities by 20 national 
associations concerned with medi- * 
cal research and the welfare of ■■ 
han dicapped persons. 

. Since 1959 the Group :has ■*. 
annually been responsible for the ,.S 
temporary opening of charity 
Christmas card shops around the •- 
country, with the administrative.. ~ 
costs being shared . by the* ' 
participating societies. . 'i 

The limitation, for practical 1 * 
purposes, to medically-oriented ’. T 
chanties led to foe later formation ' 
of other groups mcoiporating -'^ 
many non-medical organisations. 

I am. Sir, youis faithfully. 

JAMES G. L. JACKSONS 
(Founder Chairman, The 1959. 
Group of Charities), ‘ 

As from: Beacons, 

Northbrook Avenue, ’ ’ 

Winchester, Hampshire. ■ ” v * 

From Mrs Pamela Jenkins 

Sir, Many of our local shops which “ 
advertise “pocket money tovs”"~ 
tare chaired their labels (on - 
shelves within the easy reach of- 
children) to “stocklng-fifeis” 

Do the managera of these shops - ■ 

asaunc that only non-readers*" 
befieve in Father Christmas or bs*"- 

my son believes, does Santa now 
shop in foe High Street? • ' • ..**■ 

Yours faithfully, ■- 
PAMELA JENKIN& 

10 Riselaw Crescent, • .O 

Edinburgh. 

December 16. 


f 




■>, i 


14 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986. 


£ ft ft_ 


COURT AND SOCIAL 


Science report 


Hormone’s crucial role 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


SOCIAL 

NEWS 


A service on thanksgiving for 
the life of Mr Alastair Guthrie 
will uhe place at St Mary’s 
Church, Bryanston Square, 
London, Wl, on Thursday, 
January 8, 1987, at 1 1 am. 

A memorial service for Pauline 
Grant will be held today at 
11 am at Brampton Oratory. 


Richard Dimbleby 
Cancer Fund 


The trustees of The Richard 
Dimbleby Cancer Fund thank 
all those who supported 
Celebration of a Broadcaster. 
which appeared on BBC2 on 
Tuesday, December 16. Dona- 
tions and legacies are always 
needed, and should be sent to 
The Richard DimbleWy Cancer 

Fund, 14 King Street, Rich- 
mond, Surrey. 


Birthdays today 


Lord Bancroft, 64; Mrs C. 
BicknelL 67; Mr Archibald 
Black, 79; Lord Blake, 70; Vice- 
Admiral Sir Stephen GarlilL, 84; 
Professor Sir Theodore 
Crawford, 75: Mr Maurice 
Denham, 77; Sir Colin Fielding, 
60; Mr Christopher Lawrence, 
50, Brigadier Sir Geoffrey 
Macnab, 87; Miss J. M. 
Quennell, 63; Herr Helmut 
Schmidt. 68. 


Appointments 

The Ministry of Agriculture, 
Fisheries and Food announce 

the following appointments, eft 
ective from December 24: 

Mr G. Stapleton to be Chief 
Executive of the Intervention 
Board for Agricultural Produce, 
in succession to Mr A.K.H. 
Atkinson. 

Mr J.W. Hepbarn to be Direc- 
tor of Establishments, in succes- 
sion to Mr Stapleton. 

Mr AJL Cnwtehank to be 
promoted to Under Secretary 
(Animal Health), in succession 
to Mr Hepburn. 

Other appointments include: 
Sear Admiral KA. Snow to be 
Receiver General and Chapter 
Qok, Westminster Abbey, 
from March 26, 1987. He suc- 
ceeds Mr W.RJ. Pullen, who is 
retiring. 

Sir John Knox, QC to be 
Deputy Chairman of the Par- 
liamentary Boundary Commis- 
sion for England. He succeeds 
Sir Raymond Walton. 

The Rev Jeremy Martineau to 
be, Chairman of Rural Voice, an 

allianrt* of Organisations 

including the Council for the 
Protection ofRural England and 
the National Federation of 
Women’s Institutes. 

Dr RAJS. Atwood, head of 
history, Repton School, to be 
Headmaster of Box Hill School, 
Dorking, from next September. 
He succeeds Mr Roy 
McComish, who is retiring after 
28 years as founder headmaster. 


The hormone progesterone is described in 
tire latest edition of The New England Journal 
of Medicate as unique in the me it plays in 
reproduction. Its presence is essential lor a 
successful pregnancy, creating the ideal 
paysiotegical conditions for a< fertilised egg to 
become established in the uterus until the 
embryo is able to stimnlate the secretion of this 
vital molecule. 


In addition to fee uterus, fee breast and fee 
brain are other target organs which respond to 
progesterone in the development of pregnancy. 
But understanding of Its actions, and partica- 
larlj its influence on the central nervous 
System, is apparently very sketchy. 

Indeed, the commentary in the medical 
journal suggests that the current level of 
knowledge of the hormone represents the 
minimal understanding of the mechanisms of 
this crucial molecule. 

This view of the importance of progesterone 
is presented by Dr William Crowley, an 
endocrinologist at Massachusetts General 
Hospital, Boston, before his review of a 

c on trov e rsial paper in the same issae of the 
jovnaL It contains results of trials wife a pfU 
for early termination of pregnancy, up to six to 
seven weeks after conception. Termination 
works by Mocking progesterone. 

The trials, involving 100 women, were done 
in France by doctors working with Dr Beatrice 
Conzinet at the Hopital de Bketre, at Bketre, 


in coqpnictioii wife Roussel, fee pharmaceuti- 
cal firm. 

The women were given a drug, a synthetic 
steroid called RU 486, during the first 10 days 
after their missed period. Complete abortions 
occurred in 85 per cent of tire group and each 
case was the subject of dose medical scrutiny 
and follow-up. Dr Crowley says: “The medical 
and social implications of this major advance 
are equally important* 1 . 

He draws attention to fee fact that RU 486, 
or mifepristone, was first used in research to 
find out more about progesterone because it is 
an antagonist to the hormone, or in other 
words, it blocks its action. 

While Dr Crowley believes RU 486 offers 
“important new avenues of research” for 
gniria'M iirerghi into infertility, he is less certain 
abootme use of such compounds for termina- 
tion of pregnancy. He says“It wiQ at once 
provide new options, yet force farther difficult 
chokes on to a society already bitterly divided 
about medical termination of pregnancy”. 

He adds^A grim footnote enrages from the 
report of Dr Couzmet ami pots this agonomg 
social issue in sharper reHef". 

One of the women in fee French trial had an 
abortion, experienced restoration of her nor- 
mal cycle, and returned wife a second 
unwanted pregrancy to participate in the stndy 
a few months later. 


Source: The New England Journal .of 


Medicine, Vtd 315 , p 1565 , 1986. 


University news 


Cambridge 
Election 

Mr Raymond Freeman, AI~ 
drichian praelector in chem- 
istry, Oxford University, to the 
John Humphrey Plummer 
professorship of physics from 
July 1. 1987. 

Dr Wendy Margaret Bennett has 
been appointed a fellow of 
Queens' College from January 1. 
Mr Maurice MeyneU Scan- has 
been appointed a fellow com- 
moner of Queens’ from that 
date. 


University, has been appointed 
to the chair of mathematics at 
the University College of Swan- 
sea from next September. 


Kent 

Dr BJ.T. Morgan, reader m 
statistics, to be professor of 
applied statistics from January 


Wales 

Dr David Emrys Evans, reader 
in mathematics at Warwick 


Liverpool 

Dr Richard Joyner has been 
appointed the first director of 
the Leverbulme Centre for 
Innovative Catalysis and profes- 
sor of chemistry from next 
ApriL Dr Joyner is currently 
research associate and bead of 
the fundamentals of catalysis 
group at the BP Research 
Centre, Sunbury-on-Thames. 


Latest wills 


Mr John Michael Croft, of 
Kentish Town, London, found- 
ing director of the National 
Youth Theatre, left estate val- 
ued at £252.861 net. Among 
other bequests he left his borne 
(less any mortgage) to the 
National Youth Theatre. 

Mr George Richards, of 
Wincanion, Somerset, left 
£204,999 net After bequests 
totalling £53,500 and effects be 
left the residue to the Injured 
Jockeys Fund. 

Dr Louis Minski, of Cheam. 
Surrey, child psychiatrist, left 
£103,673 net 

Lord Braye, 7th Baron, of 
Stanford Hall, Leicestershire, 
deputy lieutenant of the county 
since 1954, left estate valued at 
£1,121.286 net. 


Mrs Jean Leslie Foster, of I 
King's Lynn. Norfolk, left estate 
valued at £1.904.828 net She 
left her property to relatives. 
Lillian May Bartlett, of I 
Westbury on Tryro, Bristol, 
Avon, left £381.669 net. After ! 
bequests totalling £9,000 she left 
the residue equally between the 
Sacred Heart Church, 
Westbury, and St Joseph’s 
Home. Cotham. Bristol. 

Other estates include (net, be- 
fore tax paid): 

Chorley, Mrs Elsie Esme, of I 

Femdown. Dorset £354,530 

Edmeades, Major Richard Wil- 
liam, of Meopham, 

Kent £633,625 

GAL Mrs Nellie Marion, of I 


Boston Spa. West 

Yorkshire £483,924 

Stannard, Mrs Doris Cardwell, 
of Cheltenham £343,441 



Forthcoming 

marriages 


Mr TJXN. Argent 
and Miss S J. Seymour 
The engagement is anno unced 
between Nicholas, younger son 
of Mr and Mis TJL Argent, of 
Staplefield, Sussex, and Jane, 
elder daughter of Mr and Mis 
LF. Seymour, of Lidgatc, New- 
market, Suffolk. 


Mr S.T. Ayres 
and Miss S-C. Kemp 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, only son of 
Mr and Mrs John Ayres, of 
Paignton, Devon, and Steph- 
anie, elder daughter of Mr 
Raymond Kemp, of Haslemere, 
Sumy, and Mis Robert Orrin, 
of Famborongh, Hampshire. 


Mr CJL Cbope 
and Miss CM. Hutchinson 
The engagement is announced 


between Christopher, only son 
of His Honour and Mrs Robert 
Cbope. ofCarclew, Truro, Corn- 
wall, and Christine, youngest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Robert 
Hutchinson, of Chipperfield 
Common, Hertfordshire. 


MrTJM. Clayton 
and Miss R. Dantfaorne 
The engagement is announced 
between Timothy Mark, son of 
Mr and Mrs D.M. Clayton, of 
Wimbledon. London, and Re- 
becca, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
R.J. Dunthorne, of Ely, 
Cambridgeshire. 


The Prince of Wales riding with fee Quota Hunt at Hicklmg 
Pastures In Nottinghamshire yesterday. 



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OBITUARY 

MR DAVID PENHALIGON 

Liberal politician of gopd sense, 
charm and promise 

■.■jaSfes 


Mr David Penhaligon, 
Liberal MP for Truro, who 
was killed yesterday m a 
motor accident at the age of 
42, was one of the most 
attractive and promising 
among the younger figures m 
British politics. From a county 
haw to which he remained 
loyal, and which he consoli- 
dated, be grew into a national 
figure with an increasing grasp 
of national problems. 

His style was delightfully 
fresh, humorous and 
un pompous. In Parliament he 
was very wen liked, and was 
gaining stature, but it was 
outride Parliament that be 

was most effective as a spokes- 
man. Above all he excelled on 
radio and television, and his 
cheerfid, sensible, down-to- 
earth comments will be 
missed by millions. 

His death is a cruel loss to 
the Liberal Party and the 
Alliance, whose cause he rep- 
resented as persuasively as 
anyone, and more persuasive- 
ly than most. 

David Charles Penhaligon 
was born on June 6, 1944. D- 
Day, and educated at Truro 
School and Cornwall Techni- 
cal College. 

His famil y background was 
apolitical, but he developed 
radical instincts while quite 
young. This may have been 
something to do with 
what he saw of the socially 
deprived families who formed 
a proportion of the tenants of 
the caravan site his father 
owned on the outskirts of 
Truro. In any event, he was an 
early recruit to the Liberal 
ranks, joining the Young lib- 
erals while still at school. 

There he was not greatly 
noted, except for an affable 
nature. A place whose school- 
boy general elections always 
had the Cornish Nationalist 

fandiriatf* far ahftari of the 

Liberals, for the pickings left 
by the two major parties, 
offered little scope for his 
germinating political talent 

At Cornwall Technical Coll- 
ege he took his diploma in 
engineering, and in 1962 
joined the firm of Holman 
Bros in Camborne. There he 
was head of a research and 
development department 
He and his wife lived above 
the village post office at 
Chaoewater, where she was 
sub-postmistress. He did not 
attempt to become a local 
councillor, but always had his 
eye on Parliament and worked 
hard to build up fee Truro 
constituency party. 

His first attempt was in 
1970 atTotnes, South Devon, 
where he trailed Conservative 
and Labour. Next he contest- 
ed Truro in the first of the 
general elections of 1974, 
when a supposedly safe Con- 
servative eluded his grasp by 
2,561 votes. At the second 



election of that year, in Octo- 
ber, he won it by 464 votes. 

During his first Parliament 
he showed a marked lack of 

enthusiasm for the Lib-Lab 

pact and in 1978 single- 
handedly delayed a bill pro- 
moted by Mr Benn and the 
Energy Department to reorga- 
nize the electricity supply 
svstem. pleading the necessity 
to be absent from the House 
because his daughter was up 

from the country. 

He acted as Liberal Parlia- 
mentary spokesman on em- 
ployment from 1976 to 1981. 
When the Bullock Report on 

industrial democracy was 
published in 1977 he strongly 
opposed the idea that direc- 
tors should be elected by trade 
union members only. 

From the first he gave proof 
of being an excellent constitu- 
ency Member, never missing 
an opportunity to champion 
local interests, in the 1979 
election he was rewarded by 
converting his slender initial 
majority into one of 8,708. 

At the 1980 Liberal Assem- 
bly at Blackpool be spoke 
against a proposal that the 
party should go for a non- 
nuclear defence policy. He 
asked those supporting it if 
they wanted no nuclear capac- 
ity on British soil and when 
they replied “yes" asked them 
toe’fiuther question, did they 
want the United States to have 
□one as well? When they again 
chanted “yes", he commented 
“Then you are advocating 
surrender”. His intervention 
undoubtedly helped to swing 
the vote against the non- 
nuclear proposal. 

The following year, at Llan- 
dudno, he spoke against a 
motion opposing the siting of 
cruise missiles in Britain. 
Professor E P. Thompson 
was, he said, disappointed that 
the Russians had not stopped 
installing SS20s, because , if 
they had, the British and 
American governments could 
have been persuaded not to 
have cruise. “I am sure be is 
right", said Penhaligon, - but 
they haven’t stopped install- 
ing them. Don’t vote for this 
motion until they do”. This 
time his plea was not heeded. 


MR COLIN MACKENZIE 


Dr A.G. Goodman 
and Ms SJVf. Whisker 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, youngest son 
of Mr and Mrs Edward. Good- 
man, of Knowle, West Mid- 
lands, and Sharon, daughter of 
Mr and Mis John Yoxall, of Co 
Antrim. Northern Ireland. 

Mr S.M. Jackson 
and Miss D.S. Jones 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs Michael Jackson, of 
HawkweU, Essex, Diana, daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs Lewis Jones, 
of Sutton Coldfield. 


Mr AJP. McC. Nightingale 
and Miss F.M. McCnOocfi 
The engagement is announced 
between Alexander, younger son 
ofMr and Mrs Michael Nightin- 
gale, of Cromarty, and Fiona, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Ian 
McCulloch, of Inverness. 


Captain RJLP. Prichard 
and Miss CA. Skssor 
The en g ag e m ent is announced 
between Rupert Rowland 
Playfair Prichard, The Para- 
chute Regiment, son of Mr and 
Mrs F.H. Prichard, of Oxford, 
and Catherine Aim, daughter of 


Group Captain and Mrs J-A.G 
i Bulk 


Slessor, of Buricbam, Alton. 


Mr MJ JP. Sanders 
and Mbs V.C Withers 
The engagement is announced 
tween Michael, son of the Rev 
G.L. and Mrs Sanders, of Great 
Waltham, Essex, and Verity, 
eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs 
R-G. Withers, of Kings Norton. 
Birmingham. 


Marriages 

Professor M-DX Chisholm 
and Mrs J-C. Shachletoa 
The marriage took place in 
Cambridge, on Saturday, 
December 13, of Professor Mi- 
chael Chisholm and Mrs Judith 
Shack] eton (nee Murray). 

Mr A. Jardfne 
and Miss SJ.C Crocker 
The marriage took place on 
Thursday, December 1 1, in 
Blackburn, between Mr Alex 
Jardine and Miss Sarah Crocker. 


Mr RA. Knox 

and Mbs AJL Stafford Charles 
The marriage took place on 
December 13, 1986, at Christ 
Church, Chelsea, between Mr 
Robert Knox, The Royal An- 
glian Regiment, only son of Mr 
and Mrs T.CS. Knox, and Miss 
Lucy Stafford Charles, elder 
daughter of Mr and Mis M J. 
Stafford Charles. The Rev Niall 
Weir officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Andrew and Lucy 
Houchin and Miss Finella Staf- 
ford Charles. Mr Steven Langley 
was best man. 

A reception was held at the 
Naval and Military Gub and the 
honeymoon is being spent in 
Kenya. 


Mr Cohn Mackenzie, CMG, 
LLD, scholar, aesthete, soldier 
and industrialist, died on De- 
cember 21. He was 88. 

Colin Hercules Mackenzie 
was bora on October 5, 1898. 
He was educated at Eton and 
King's College, Cambridge, 
where he was senior scholar, 
got a first in Economics, and 
won the Chancellor's Medal 
for English Verse. 

During the First World War 
he served with the Scots 
Guards in France and suffered 
a serious wound, resulting in 
amputation of his left leg from 
the hip. 

His business career was 
with the Glasgow cotton firm 
of J & P Coats, which he 
joined as their first graduate 
trainee. By his early twenties 
he was on the board, where his 
outstanding intelligence made 
him effective in debate, and 
where he also showed a capac- 
ity for taking decisions. 

In his wide travels for the 
company - with which be 
remained, apart from war 


service, until his retirement in 
1958 - he became convinced 
that world markets could not 
be supplied satisfactorily from 
Britain alone. His greatest 
business achievement was to 
bring a sometimes reluctant 
board to share his belief, and 
the Coats mills overseas, par- 
ticularly those in Asia and 
South America, are a lasting 
tribute to his flair. 

His record during the Sec- 
ond World War, though very 
little known, was of 
real importance. When SOE 
decided that a separate opera- 
tional unit should be set up in 
India, the Viceroy, Lord Lin- 
lithgow, who had been a fellow 
director on the Goats board, 
suggested that Mackenzie 
should be given command. 

The new unit, called Force . 
136, developed rapidly as it 
established. political, econom- 
ic and military missions in the . 
five countries of South-East 
Asia Command. 

Its contribution in the Bur- 
ma campaign was, in one 
instance, vital. In fee Sittang 
valley fee lives of about 2,000 
men were saved by the action 
of Force 136 guerrillas in 
preventing the Japanese from 
reaching Toungoo before fee' 
British 14th Army. Mackenzie 
was fee mainspring of feat 
preventive action, for without 
his efforts fee guerrilla force 
would never have existed. 

The Colonial govemmeni- 
iu-exile had managed to per- 
suade General Oliver Leese, 
commander of all land forces 
in SEAC, to ban the issue of 
arms to anyone associated 7 


wife the Burmese nationalist 
movement Mackenzie would 
not accept fee order. The 
unarmed Karens had suffered 
murderous reprisals by fee 
Japanese fee previous year for 
helping Force 136 agents, and 
Mackenzie told Mountbatten, 
fee supreme commander, that 
to deny arras, even for self- 
defence, to fee Burmese parti- 
sans was to condemn them to 
death. 

Mountbatten overruled 
Leese’s order, men and arms 
were dropped, and the ensuing 
operation held fee Japanese 
15th division for ten days 
while British troops captured 
Toongoo for the loss of some 
60 men, though Mountbatten 
had thought fee price of its 
capture might be 3,000 lives. 

After his retirement from 
Coats, Mackenzie was chair- 
man of the Scottish committee 
of the Arts Council from 1962 
to 1970. 

In this post he used his 
business acumen and diplo- 
matic skill to win for Scotland 
a proper share of the national 
allocation of funds for fee arts. 
On his persona] initiative fee 
Western Theatre Ballet was 
brought to Scotland to become 
fee now highly successful 


Scottish Ballet Company. 

During his chairmanship 
the Scottish arts committee 
was reconstituted as the Scot- 
tish Arts Council - further 
evidence of his success in 
raising the profile of fee arts in 
Scotland. In 1970 he was 
awarded an hon LLD by St 
Andrews. 

All his life he was a collec- 
tor, more especially of books 
and pictures. He praised and 
bought works by such artists 
as Duncan Grant and Max 
Ernst before they became 
famous. 

In 1972 he and his wife left 
their house in Edinburgh, 
which had belonged to Robert 
Louis Steveusou, and moved 
to Skye. There, at Kyle House, 
his azaleas and rhododen- 
drons were a great attraction. 
The garden was regularly open 
to the public, and gardening 
enthusiasts flocked to it from 
all over the worid. 

He also continued to enter- 
tain, in his old age, a varied 
host of friends, including art- 
ists and writers of the younger 
generation, who will miss his 
rare blend of intellect, charm 
and integrity. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Clodagh. and their dau gh ter. 


BILL SIMPSON 


Bill Simpson, who played 
Dr Finlay in fee popular 
television series. Dr Finlays 
Casebook, died on December 
21, at the age of 54. 

He was an actor who had 
the fortune to achieve perfect 
casting and national fame in 
one particular role, and fee 
misfortune to be known al- 
most entirely for thaL His 
career before and after Dr 
Finlay was inevitably 
overshadowed. 

Based on fee stories by A. J. 
Cronin, Dr Finlay’s Casebook 
was set in a small Scottish 
town in the 1920s. It drew its 
dramatic resonance from fee 
interplay between Bill 
Simpson’s young, impetuous 
Finlay and his older, worldly- 
wise colleague. Dr Cameron, 
played by Andrew Crnik- 
shank. 


Janet Mullen’s kindly but 
shrewd housekeeper complet- 
ed a strong trio and fee series 
won fee accolade of fee 
“dean-up” campaigner, Mrs 
Mary Wbitehouse, as being a 
fine example of wholesome 
family viewing. 

Simpson played fee part in 
more than 200 episodes 
throughout the nine-year run 
of the series from 1 962, dever- 
ly suggesting the mellowing of 


the character as he became 
older and greyer. He played it 
for several more years when 
Dr Finlay transferred to radio. 

He was born in Du nure, a 
fishtng village in Ayrshire, 
studied drama in Glasgow and 
started his professional career 
with fee Edinburgh Gateway 
Theatre. For two years he was 
an announcer oh Scottish 
Television. 

After Dr Finlay finished* 
bimpson went into a West 
End musical, Romance, but it 
closed after only five days. On 
television he plaved a veteri- 
nary surgeon' in The 
McKinnons and a secret agent 
in the thriller series, Scotch on 
the Rocks, but neither was 
particularly successful. 

On stage he appeared regu- 
“riy m Christmas panto- 
mimes and spent two years 
playing the Open University 
professor in a touring produc- 
hon of Willy Russell's Educat- 
ing Rua, 

In later years Simpson’s 
private life tended to hit the 
Headlines more often than his 
acting. His first marriage, to 
fee actress Mary Miller, was 
married 

anofeer actress. Tracv Reed, 
by whom he had two" daugh- 
ters. This marriage ended in 
divorce in 1980. 


■ \ ■ 


•s' 


but the comment was typical 
of his common sense. 

The SDP was now m being 
and Penhaligon always fa- 
voured the Alliance, while 
insisting that the just interests 
of the Liberal Pany should be 
upheld. -As one of fee 
“firemen’* appointed to han- 
dle fee sensitive issue of seals 
allocation, he showed the right 
combination ot firmness and 
diplomacy- ^ t . 

In fee 1979 Parliament he 
was Liberal spokesman, first 
on energv. later on industry. 
At fee 1983 election he wus 
returned wife 2 five-figure 
majority (10,480). He had, 
apparently, transformed a 
marginal into a safe seat. 

Earlv in the present Parlia- 
ment "he argued that fee 
Alliance parties should merge 
and feat a leader should be 
elected by fee joint member- 
ship. .As employment spokes- 
man again, he opposed the 
Government’s decision to ban 
unions al GCHQ. while warn- 
ing Liberals against opposing 
fee laws on secondary picket- 
ing. on which he thought the 
Government bad been right to 
legislate. 

Appointed the Liberals' 
Parliamentary spokesman on 
Treasury matters in 19S5. be 
had much to learn and charac- 
teristically did not pretend toa 
financial expertise that he did 
not possess. But he was learn- 
ing fast, and showed his sense 
of responsibility in pointing 
out last mouth, wife bis SDP 
opposite number, Mr Ian 
Wrigglesworth. that the 
Alliance's current commit- 
ments were running £5 billion 
ahead of the cash available. 

During the year September 
1 985 - September 1 986 he was 
president of fee Liberal Party, 
and as such presided oyer the 
disastrous Eastbourne Assem- 
bly at which the leadership's 
defence policy, agreed wife the 
SDP, was rejected. He did not 
himself speak in fee defence 
debate, and regretted after- 
wards feat he had uot inter- 
vened. His voice might 
conceivably have turned fee 
scale, as it had done in 1980, 
though not in 1981. 

Penhaligon was brought up 
in fee Church of England, of 
which he remained a faithful, 
though relaxed, member. De- 
spite his conviviality of spirit, 
he was a teetotaller. 

He spoke a little Cornish, 
though no non-British lan- 
guage, and did not travel 
much abroad. His reading was 
largely confined to political 
books and papers. He was an 
avid collector of Whitaker's 
Almanack, of winch he had 50 
or-60 volumes and hoped one 
day to possess the complete 
set 

He married, in 1968, An- 
nette Lidgey. She survives 
him with their son and 
daughter. 


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births, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


,h 4.S 

; ^ 
• . • r H>Ki 


WPW. o my aHMr. lo my tawTuicfu!^ 
your ran lo tha worth of my reouin 
. Wft 7B : | 

* I BIRTHS | 

■EnSTftiSwISiyDwwSwa!! 

198b. The Honourable Mrs Rtehard 
BrUieU. a son. 

BLAKE - On December 20th. in the 
United Arab Emirates, to Jane fn*e 
Nini and lan. a daughter. Rebecca 
Jane. 

BURDEN - On December so. at Dor- 
Chester, lo Jacky (nee RosutdeQ) and 
Richard, a daughter. Elizabeth Rose. 
CABMAN- On September 2nd 1986. at 
Somertelgh Court. Dorchester. Dor- 
set. lo Coraiyn tnee Ware) and John, 
a daughter. Alexandria Coraiyn. 
FRANKE - On December 20th. at 
Queen Charlotte's Maternity Homt- 
u). lo Melanie uiee Ctandagei and 
John, a daughter. Sarah 
FURS DOM - On 1 9th December, to 
Catriona and David, of Fursdon a 
son. Charles McCreath. 

HAYNES — On December 21st to 
Georgina cnee Leej and Nigel, a 
daughter. Laura Alice. 

HOBHOUSE - On December 18th. ai St 
- ■ Thomas', to Juba and Martin, a son. 
Alexander, a brother for Hugh 
JONES - Oo December 15th. at Queen 
Charlotte's Hospital, to Marion (nee 
Sephtoni and David, a son. Charles 
D avid, a brother lor Henry and Katie 
MARTIN - On 20th December, to Linda 
and MOte. a daughter. Joanna 
Crest! na. 

M1LLWARD. On December 18th at 
Princess Margaret. Windsor, to Peter 
and Mandy. a daughter Abby Obvte. 
a sister for Sophie. 

OAKLEY - On Saturday 20th Decem- 
ber at John RaddHTe HkstpttaL 
Oxford, to Sylvia and Martin, a son. 
Edmund Ralph 

PARSONS- SMITH . On December 
2lsL lo Carollne.(ne$ Newman) and 
Nicholas, a son. William Edward. 
SHAW - On December 19th. at Plym- 
outh. to John and Selina, a son. 
James John Longsdon. brother to 
Sopnip. Lucy, and Robert. 
SUTHERLAND -On December 14th. in 
Serta. Brunei, lo George and Jane, a 
son. James George Ogllvie. a brother 
lor Ktrsty and half brother for GaU 
and Shona. 

I RUBY ANNIVERSARIES | 

355(5 eoSSS33roTM23a^f 

c ember 23rd. 1946 at Caxfon HdL 
London. Gabriel David Sacher to 
Jean Jacauetine Goldman. 

GOLDEN I 

ANNIVERSARIES | 

MACAULAY - Mac and Peg. married 
on 23/12/36. Many congratulations 
and our fond love. Pat. Andrew. 
Alasdair. Miranda and Damien. 

BARRETT On December 20th 1986. 
peacefully. Anne Main waring, at 
Clarence Nursing Home. Tunbridge 
Weils. Dearest Ma to Gay and Sandy, 
and Granny lo Piers end Jenny. Fu- 
neral private. Thanksgiving and 
memorial service on Sunday Febru- 
ary 8th at llam. at St Mmys 
Church. TlcehuisL No flowers by re- 
curs!. but donations If desired lo the 
National Trust. 

BECKFORO - On Friday December 
19th 1986. peacefully at The MounL 
Wargrave. Berkshire. Alfred James, 
aged 92 years, (late barbs- of 
Wargrave). Funeral private. Memorl- 
,v al Service at Saint Mary's Church. 

' Wargrave al 3pm Friday 16th Janu- 
ary 1987. No flowers or letters 
please, but donations if desired to 
The Royal British Legion. Wargrave 
Branch. Herons Creek. Station Road, 
wargrave. 

CABLE - On December 21st peaceful- 
ly al her home. Park Bungalow. 
Burleigh. Stroud. Gk». Catherine 
Ethel Mary, aged 88 years. Funeral 
serivee at MlntfUnhamptoa Parish 
Church. Clos. on Wednesday 24th 
December al 12.30 pm followed by 
interment. 

CKAMPNESS - On December 19th. 
Charles Gordon, in tils 84 Ih year, al 
the Eaion Gardens Nursing Home. 
Hove. Much loved by his flarady. 
COBB - On December 19. suddenly al , 
his home at Caclihas. near Lisbon. ' 
John, aged 66. dearly loved by his 
family and friends. The funeral took 
place al St George's. Lisbon, on De- 
cember 21. 1986. 

HARRIS - On December 20th. Maria 
rte. deeply beloved wife of Ronald, 
dearly loved mother of Imogen and 
Richard. Celia and lan. Jocelin and 
Cherry. Olivia, and Edith and Colin, 
and much loved grandmother, sister, 
aunt, and friend. Funeral at SI I 
Mary's Church. Stoke d'Abernon on 
Wednesday December 24th at 2-3C 
pm. No flowers by request 


l ** I - ES - On 20lh December lOflf 
P««futhr. The Reverend c£g 
Lreoerjcii M.C. aged as years, far 

™«y SeworQusiiin to UteAMom 

Forces. Funeral service at Green 
Norton Barteh Church, on Wednes 
£ ay ■... ^a^, Dw *niber at 12,30pm 

, fhswer8 B“te. rtonanons tf de- 
SSL* Crecns Norton 
Airborne Forces Security 
SS 11 * “*""*59 Barracks. Alder 

*? a £ l * «»tortes John 

omwWB. 01 *" 1 ttrecto*. on 

n®*™* 1 ' On December 20 th 1986. 
fSK rtv 1 hu8 *» n <‘ « Joan 

rSSnyS” ^ c ” H ^ r - Cretnabon al 
Ojnfora Crematorium. Bristol al 
am Monday December 29 uv 
Family Downs only, donation* if dr* 

research Fund, c/o Thomas Davis, 
funeral Directors Ltd. 111 

Bse'apS” Ro * L CWUm ‘ 

*^®IUS - On December 20th, at his 
home in Burtord. after tHness most 
courageously home. AfemS 
[Sandy) Reginald, most dearly loved 
I* 1 **"" ^K afy ““***««» tether 
“Jane and Susan. Private funeral at 
won) Crptnafonuni December 24Ui 
at 1-45. Flowers may be sent to E 
Taylor ft Sons. Chapel m Rest. 
Corben Road. Carterton. Own. 
“•“■•G • On December 21 st. Mai- 
Jhw Matu MacKinnon Llnning 
O R-E-. C B£.. 00 Industrial Consul- 
te nt. D early beloved by family and 
n-tend9. Funeral Service on Wednes- 
day 24th December at IO am at the 
west Church. Bumbank Road. Ham- 
Won. Scotland. Funeral thereafter to 
West Cemetery. Wedhafl Road. Ham- 
Won arming approx al 10.30 am. 
LOCWLHthAL - On December 201b. 
Dr Hans LoewenthaL FRC Path., 
peacefully at N. London Nuffletd 
Hospital. Enfield, aged 87 years, be- 
ta ved husband of Use. now of 
Heinrich Stahl House. Bishop's Ave. 
N2. Lovtno father of Susan and Eve- 
lyn. devoted grandfather of Peter. 
Margaret. Catherine and Marilyn, 
great grandfather of DanleL Private 
funeral has been held. 

MACKENZIE • On December 21st. 
peacefully at home in hie 89 Ih year. 
Colin Hercules beloved husband of 
Ctodagh. Cremation private. Memo- 
rial Service to be held in Skye later. 
flnmoLETON • On December 20th. in 
hospital after a long Illness. Susan, 
dear wife of Basil and mother of Phi- 
lippa and Juba, daughter of Reid and 
Betty Sharman. Private funeral 29th 
December. Family flowers only; do- 
nations if desired to King Edward 
VI 1 Hospital. Beaumoru SL Wl. 
MOSS - On December 16th 1986. al 
The Royal Maraden Hospital, Lon- 
don. peacefully after a long and 
brave flout. Patsy, aged 54. the dear- 
ly loved wife of Richard and sadly 
missed by her mother, brothers and 
Mm. Requiem Mam al 81 Joseph’s 
Church. Hjghgale Hill on Monday 
29th December at 12.46 pro. fol- 
lowed by private burtaL 
NKHOfAS - On December 20th. 
peacefully. Dennis of Cotoham, Fu- 
neral service. Monday 29th 
December at Randalls Park Cremato- 
rium. Leather-head at 1 1 -30. Runny 
flowers, or donations If desired to 
charity. 

PtATT- On December 200) 1986. sud- 
denly Sir Harry Ptatt BL. aged 100 
years, beloved father of Honor. Lind- 
sey. Rosemary. Margaret and CMana. 
Service at Prestbury Parish Church 
followed by private in tenant at 
Alderley Edge Cemetery. 

PUGHE - On December 19th. peaceful- 
ly el the age of 106. Miss May E. 
Pughe. sister of the late Revd Joseph 
Evans-Pughe. Fondly remembered 
by her nephews. John and the Revd 
Tom G. Evans-Pughe and their ibra- 
Dtes. Funeral 12 noon Wednesday 
24th December at Holy TMidiy. 
Aberystwyth. 

SMITH - On December 20 1906. os a 
result of a traffic accklenL Nicola 
Sally (NickyL aged 23. the dearly be- 
loved daughter of Pat and Ray Smith 
of Royston. Herts. Sister of Carole 
and beloved gr amla ughter of Baba 
Hawkins of Trtng. An Irreplaceable 
toss. Funeral arrangement later. All 
enquiries please to CecU Newttog. Fu- 
neral Director. Teh Royston 10763) 
43048. 

WHuEHOftN - On December 18th 
1986. peacefully in tospbl after a 
short Illness. Ernest. Colonel- tale 
Royal Engineers, much loved hus- 
band of Dulce (Dollar) and dear 
lather of Jean. Patricia Burgess. An- 
drew and Gillian Cumow. 

I IN MEMORIAM- PRIVATE I 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


MARRM8E SUOMI (HMIMr Jsfmar) 
wish aU dims. nasi, prawn I nad future 
A Happy enristmas and Pmaturrsif 
New Year. 124. Now Bond BL '/l. 01- 
09 9AM. 

NEW YEANS EVE MIA. The Chaster- 
Hsia Hotel. Moytatr. Wa are «Ub taking 
rmnma. Mount ■ dinner and 
dance. £40. Te le ph one 01 491 2022. 
■mos miiirruaarroM - we miss you. 
Late and Ms. Leva sme and aranam.- 
PA Thermals are lovoiy- 


SEKYICES 


SELECT FRMMRS. DnMic Buroduc- 
aara far the unattached. 06 Ma ddo x 
SUM. L ondo n Wl. T du txs t 014U 
9937. 

CH— evs ud uniMMiti cumcu- 
turn vhm doctanante. Detain: 01-631 
3388. 

rammnar UM or Marriage. Ah ages, 
areas. Datetme. Dom 1016) 23 Abteoaon 
Road. London wb. Teh Oi-sss 1011. 


WANTED 


WANTED Edwardian. Vfewnm and aS 
panned Auatfure. Mr Aswan 01 gar 
5946. 667-669 OUIM Lone. EaTMMd. 
SW17. 

<4 WANTED Lane Vie wardrobe*. 

chain. extending mutes 

desto-Boouc— as. oar— aB p ob Ww s 
etc. 01946 7683 daytol W9 0*71 CMS. 


FOB SALE 


Ue setts etc. Nationwide 
deb varies. Tel: (0380) 800039 
(WUteL 



nMBT quality wool carpets. At trade 
prices and under, also ovoitable 100’s 
extra. Large room teze reionanti under 
half normN price. Chancery Carpets 01 
406 0453. 

SEATFMDERS. Best Ucfcete far oa maa- 
out events. Oor cbenls Mute most 
HMOor campaiure. Orada card* accepted. 
01-828 1678. 

THE TBN» 1785-1888. Other Ubes 
avail. Hand bound ready for pre s ent s - 
uon - also "Sundewr*. £12.00. 
Remember When. 01-688 6323 

TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT. Phantom. 
CNs. SUrikdU exp. cures. Ure Mis. AU 
theatre and soarts.Td; 82J-6616/828- 
0498A.EX f Visa / Omars. 

BECNSTEM Grand. 1914. 6 ft. Ehenised. 
Musicians InsmunenL £4.200. 01-586 
4901. T. 

CAYS* CHESS, Les Mteond Phonlom. Ab 
meatre and soon. Tel 439 1763. au ma- 
lar credn era. 

OCMHT 8ASTIAMO mu (2k Block 
hkje /r oeswoo d . exc cona. £800 A £400 
ono. Tel CwnobetL 01 878 3069. 

FRIDGES /FREEZERS. Cookers, etc. Con 
you buy theopor? 8 A 8 Ltd. 01 229 
1947/8456. 

S113NWAY Concret Grand (1961) for Me 
pnvuih. HaU ads ones. Reply to BOX 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Cancer 

To ge ther we cm beat h. 

We fund over one thud of all 
research into the pr e v mi oD and. 
cure of cancer is the UK. 

Hdp us by sending a domdoo 
or make 8 legacy ta 

\0 

C^Vkgn SL| 


FOB SALE 

YOU'LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RESISTA CARPETS 

Wtcondera boauBAd natural cork Uies. 
Cmronaty hard wren no tha best mon- 
ey can buy £8.96 per so yd + vau 
MerafcaMi wrtvei par careei ia ssn 
colours. Bum In underlay 12* wins 
D«iateeefc.Tysar Hnrnasmly 
bams or ernes. £4.78 pot sq yd + VOL 
Pluo die tonal aetaenan a f Main esr- 
netliio In Imdon 

80S FODiam ROM 8W6 

207 1 la act ne k Hto Hampataad NWg 

Tefc01-794-0139 

Free EsUmsie» Expert puano 

WEDDING SUITS 

Dinner Soils 
Cventao Tau Suits 
Surplus to hire 

BARGAINS FROM £30 

LIPMANS HIR£ DEPT 

22 Charing Orem Rd 
London WC2 
Nr LwwteT So atoe 
01-240 2310 


mas sate. New and secondhand. 5 - 30% 
savings, free delivery UK. Cab now. 
Bosendorier London Plano Oatre. 38 


8Uimoi)GStSD WATTS Full size snooker 
table, state bass. oak. steel vacuum 
cwftkms EkcedetU candtoon. View Ips- 
wicn. Td 030 287 253 WvemngO. 


844. temaniiaM cond. low moe a o e . seen 
to be beUevnL must ssu £13800 Onb. 
01 008 4464. 


THE MANO WORKSHOP Free eredli over i 

1 year (0% APR) on me beet eetectiOii of 

now a restored Pianae. Lew Interact over | 

2 yrs A 3 yn. Written quotations. Free 
Calaiogue. 30a Htehoale Rd. NWS. Ol- 
267 7671. 


RENTALS 

Keith 

Cardale 

Groves 

THE INDEPENDENT 
PROFESSIONALS 

Otar readeaiial lettings 
department 

this opportunity of «*hhms *H our 
dicoa A a p pbeaa u toe co m pi nnmu 
of the lemon. 

01-629 6604 

ir you have guatity property to let 
teU us. 

LANDLORDS - OWNERS 

Expert profeaatontf service 

QURAISHI 

CONSTANTINE 

270 Earls Court Road. SWS 

01-244 7353 


KENNY D MIKt Contact us now on 01- 
236 8861 tor toe M sateCUOn of 
rufixsiied nan and homes to rent in 


1 OVERSEAS TRAVEL | 
DISCOUNTED FAR ES 

Return Return 

JO-BUH G/HAR ECU DOUALA £420 
NAIROBI £380 SYDNEY £780 
CASIO £230 AUCKLAND £785 

LAGOS £360 HONG KONG £550 

DEL/BOM8AY £350 kMAMI £330 

BANGKOK £350 AMD MANY MORE 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 


TEL OI-< 
Loss A Group 
AMSyv ISA 


THE STAFF AT 
SKYLORD TRAVEL 

Would ilk* to with our readers* very 
MERRY CHRISTMAS 
* A PROSPEROUS & 
HAPPY NEW YEAR 
SKLYLORD TRAVEL LTD. 

2 nrtuwaw sum. London Wl 

Tel: 01-439 3021/8007 

Aimne Bonded 


UP UP & AWAY 

NamoL JoVuro. Caere. DmaL 
Istanbul. Singapore. XL OHM. 
Bawobion. Hoop Kono. Sydney. 
Mexico. Bogota. Caracas. 
Europe. 6 The Americas. 


AVAILABLE NOW Luxury Oats * I 
£200 - £ 1.000 per week. Tec B 
681 6136 



FLATSHARE 


GYPSY MU. 1 min 8R. Prof person. O/R 
In alee period fl*i_ share l other. OCM. 
£190 pent ex Ol 889 0274. 


RENTALS 


cnriSTA Kniahtebridoe. Beteravla. Pim- 
lico. Westminster. Luxury houses and 
flats available for long or toon lets. 
Ptcme ring for current UsL Cootes. 69 
Buckingham Mace Rd. SW1. 01-528 
8251. 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 

It's all at Tiailfinders 
Worldwide Vow-cost flights 

The beet - and we con prove It 
196000 cbeoa emco 1970 

CURRENT BEST BUYS 

Around toe World from £766 


SYDNEY 

PERTH 

AUCKLAND 

BANGKOK 
SINGAPORE 
HONG KONG 
DELHI/ 
BOMBAY 


NAIROBI 
JO'BURG 
LIMA 
GENEVA 
ISTANBUL 
NEW YORK 
LOS ANGELES 


contained flat In choice part of central 
wmdoor. CH. parking A letepbone. 
Available on A up to 8 months lan*. 
£380 pan. Tet 0753 862388 

AMERICAN BANK urgently requten lux- 
ury Rats/houtt*. Cheisea. Kntghts- 
bridge. Belgravia areas. £200 - £2.000 
pw. Burgees Estate Agents 581 5136 

CITY MEWS: 1 dM bod. eneune bath. WC. 
mower, on / dining. Ipe sunny recap, 
private parte. Co let only. £iso pw. th 
C hris Lawrence 01-48X2488 ext 331. 

HOLIDAY LET. Unique Mews home. 2 
double bate, easy ac cess Chrises. Avafl 
Immed lo end 26m Jan. £280 pw. Tel: 
01-223 5689. 

Wl 2 bed Qal available for short or long- 
term let. luxury, rutty equipped. Sole 
Agents. Earl A Lawrence. Ol *864711. 

DOCXUUBS Flote and houses lo let 
throughout me Docklands area. TefcOl- 
790 9660 

M BI WU RV NB I aona n dale troy abed 
hse nr tube avail new. Co M only- £200 
pw. TU Ol 226 4138. 

KENSINGTON WB - Off Church SL Small 
but charming 2 bed OaL avafl Imraad. 
£220 pw. Tat 01-748 057S. 

MAYFAM , Hyde Pwte me moot luxurious 
lonB/mort lets i/6 beds, ben prices 
Globe Aportmenn Ol 935 9812. 


WASHINGTON BALTIMORE 

TRAILFINDERS 

4340 Earis Chun Road 
London ws 6EJ 

OPEN 9-6 MON-SAT 

Long-Haul 01-937 9631 
and 01603 1516 
Europe/ USA 01 937 5000 
IN/Bmtoess 01-938 3444 


ABTA 1ATA ATOL/1458 

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London W1V 7DC. 

01-4390102/01-439 77S1 
Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


QUEENSGATE, SW7 

- £600 p.w. 

Rare o p pertm tiiy to me a enaci o u e 
flat o/lookmg Hyde Perk. 3 reception 
rooms. 2 beds. 2 baths, tushly 
recommended. 

CHESTERTONS PRUDENTIAL 
KENSINGTON OFFICE: 01-987 7244 

The Largest Letttaa Agent In tendon. 


WORLD WIDE CMZAPflCS We beat any 
fore lo any deatmanon In the world. 
NEVER KNOWINGLY UNDERSOLD. 
EALINO Travel Ol 579 7775. ABTA 


uniuiiiEM cm mgbts/hoia to Eu- 
rope. USA A most d eotHi a n on s . 
automat Travel: 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL. 


MUrrARL N York £229. LA/San Fran 
£329. Nairobi £399. JoHurg £499. 
Syd/Mri £669. Bangkok £369. AM di- 
rect daily thgtits Ol 839 7144 


AFRICAN SEAT SPCCUUJST8. World 
Travel Centre. Ol 078 8146. ABTA. 
IATA. 


MOROCCO BOUND. Regent SL Wl. 01 
734 5307. ABTA/ Alid 847. Telex 
27376. 


SYD/MEL £635 Perth £566. AB mater 
earners to Aw/NZ. 01-584 7571 
ABTA. 


ClKAPnJEHTS World wide. KaytnarVd 
01-930 1366. 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


LOWEST FARES 

Parts £69 N YORK £275 

Frankfurt £60 LA/SF £365 

Lagos £320 Miami £320 

Nairobi £325 Singapore £420 

Jo-bug £460 Bangkok £335 

Cairo £206 Katmandu £440 

Dei/Bem £335 Rangoon £330 

Mono KOOO £510 Calcutta £«2S 

Huge Dtemoms Avan an I U A Club Cteee 

SUN & SAND 

21 Swallow sl London Wl 
01-439 2100/457 0537 

DISCOUNT FLIGHTS 

O/W Rtn 

Sydney £490 £785 

Aedttend £480 £775 

Los AOBdes £168 £336 

Jo1»urg £290 £490 

Bsngkok £320 £360 

Rto £330 £570 

LONDON FLIGHT 
CENTRE 
01-370 6332 

WRfTOt SON pedate prices lo Cyprus. 
Main. Morocco. Gnm. Mama A Te- 
nerife. Deceraaer/Jpnuary. Fan world 
Holiday! Ol 734 2662 AM 1438. 
XMAS/NCW YEAR FUghts A npoh. Mote- 1 
on. TbnanfTe. Faro. Palma, bunaui. 
Cairo A other drstlnaOona. Ventura: Ol : 
2S1 5455. ATOL 2034. 

MALAOA xnus Oigbte 21 Dec 2 weeks. 
£148 01 836 8622. Buckingham 

Travel. 

TUNA. FUr your hobday where irsau . 
summer call for our brochure now. Tu- 
nisian Travel Bureau. 01-373 4411. 
ALL US CrnKS. Lowest fares an mater 
scheduled earners. 01-884 7371 .ABTA* ! 

LATE XMAS & New Yew avafl lo Cartb- 1 
bean & Seychelles with mm Call | 
interune Travel 01-249 8663 ABTA 


WINTER SPORTS 


JUST FRANCE - Super value self catering 
ski holidays In me best French resorts. 
Ring for new brochure now. 

Tri 01-789 2592. 

ABTA 69256 AM 1383. 


SKI WEST - NOW Offering superb ChriU- 
mas specials W France and SwOzertand. 
SAVE UP to £200 lor depo. On 20/27 
Dec. Ol 788 9999. 


SUPERB CHALETS to CouirhevaL Ca- 
tered hols wHh Le Ski at special prices. 
January 3 £169 air. Jan 10 £149 coa- 
ch. More Info A brochure. Call 0454 

SKI SCOTT DUNK. Exclusive chalet holi- 
day!. Cnampery. P ones de Solid. No 
Surcharges. Huge dterouxHa for Janu- 
ary. can now! 0489 877839. 

CHALETS from only £129pp - January 
OepbL Phone John Morgan Ski 101) 499 
191 1 or (0730) 66661 

LA CLUSAZ. FMnch Sid ChateL Resident 
staff. Superb, trad, a ccent, s/cat apu. 
Tel (0242) 603695 Iday)/ 602776 imp) 

SfU FLIQHTR. Dally to Geneva. Zurich. 
Munich etc. From £59. SKI WEST. Tel 
01 785 9999. 

SAIWORLD New Year Tlgnes £99 + oth- 
er too retorts. New snowi coacfi/air. 
Brochure Ol 602 4826 24hr. ABTA. 


1 WINTH I SPORTS | 

TAKE ADVANTAGE or Ui In January, 
vertwr. vinarv. Menbrl. Mrgeve. Ski 
Les Aloes 01 602 9766. 

TO LABS. BeauUfUl new l nedroom 
aparlmenl. Perfect aiding. AvaUbMe 
now for private letOno. 01-834 4874 

1 IUL HOLIDAY | 

R SU8BCX ■ x-tnax/ New Year, delightful 
2 Bed room collage, indoor poaL utuaL 
IO days £360. Tel: 0829 872229. 

DISTANT FLAT. Luxury Serviced Ken- 
sington. cneisrn from £320 pw. Rug 
Town House Apartments 373 3433 

nXHLUMMCA, toe Sussex ludeuway. 
Srafroni note. HaUdaya / brooks. 0424 
213464. 

| PUBLIC NOTICES | 


CHARITY CnOWBON 
Chanty: The wuUttey Tran 
The Charity Comm iteW n cr i propose to 
moke a schema lor this Charily, comes of 
toe draft Scheme may bo obtained from 
them (ref: itj|017-L5) al Sl Alban 1 * 
Home. 57-60 Hay market. London SW1Y 
*OX- OUecttens and suggemom may be 
seal to them wtmin one month from 
today. 

I LEGAL NOTICES I 



A FHJPSOHN 

DtRLCTOR 

MANTLEW4BD LIMITED 

NOTICE IS HEREm- GIVEN pursuant to 
Section 688 of the Companies Act. 1985. 
that a MEETING of UK creditors of the 
above named Company win be held at Uw 
Offices Of LEONARD CURTIS A CO., utu- 
ated Ol 30 EASTBOURNE TBtRACE. 
LONDON W2 6LF on Tuesday toe 23rd 
day of December 1986 at 300 o'clock In 
the afternoon, for toe ptmtascs provided 
for in S ert lonj 589 and 590. 

Dated the 16th day ol December 1986 
A. FUJPSOHN 

DIRECTOR 

R78MAN LIMITED 

NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVEN pursuant lo 
Section 688 of the Companies Art. 1 9BS. 
that a MEETING of toe creditor* at liw 
above named Company will be held al tne 
office! of LEONARD CURTIS A CO.. Me 
a led ai 30 eastoourne terrace. 
LONDON W2 6LF on Tuesday Che 23rd 
day of December 1986 al lOJK o'clock In 
the forenoon, far toe purposes provided 
for in Secoon s 389 and 890. 

Dated the 16th day of December 1986 

A. FIUPSOHN 
DIRECTOR 




A. FUJPSOHN 
DIRECTOR 


2 Ctetpxi Ktxat Terrace. 

TT 2302 London SV1Y SAIL 


Col T.V. 24 hr Sw. Tctax. CoWnghom 
Aparunoalt. 01-373 6306. 

SLOAME APARTMENTS Perfect kxatkxi 
off Soane Square. Fufly serviced A 
equipped. Tet 01-573 6306 CTX 

SHEPKCSDS BUSH 2 bedroom floL £460 
pen. 01-740 6880. 

C IMI S EA Town am. 4 bed*. 2 baths. 2 
recepa. ml. patio. Co teL £300 p.w. tel 
; 381 0828 


* SYDNEY 

* PERTH 

* HOBART 

* JO'BURG 

* AUCKLAND 

* FU 

* BANGKOK 

* SMGAPORE 

* DUBAI 

* MO EAST 

* LUSAKA 

* TORONTO 

* L ANGS-ES 

* CAM8EAN 


* * MELBOURNE* 

* * BRISBANE * 

* * ADELAIDE * 

* * 8 AFMCA * 

* * WELLINGTON * 

* * PT MORESBY * 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity. . 

102 Gloucester Place, l 

London W1H4DH. ft > 


1AYMES - Faith Daphne Amle. 2Sth 
December 19B3. In treasured and 
most lender loving memory. Henry 
and family. 


MQNOK * * TOKYO* 

(GAPORE * * MANILA * 

IBA1 * * BAHRAM* 

D EAST * * NAIROBI * 

SANA * * HARARE * 

ROKTO * * VANCOUVBI * 

ANGELES * * MIAMI * 

JW8EAN * * SFRAMCSCO * 

** SOUTH AMSUGA ** 

* USA * USA * USA *USA * 

SUNWORLD TRAVEL 

(Es’d 1969) 

59 South Sl Epmra . Storey 
(07727) Z753S/25S30/27I09/ 

2531 S/24832/26097 


TRAVEL CENTRE Special <Mnh to USA 
and Canada- Budget lares to Ante 
■ - N_Z_ Sotoh Africa: usa and Portuooi 
wtm aocom. Tel Ol 663 HOI. ABTA 
73196- 

RWA 6 week bate VI tr £399. Sum- 
mer 87 Diertw. Canaries. Greece fils* 
hols. Book now far special offers. 
Lunarackne. 01-441 0122 
LATIN AI M M CA- Low coat IMKili o-g. 
mo £483. Lima £493 rin. AMO Small 
Group Holiday Journeys-ieg fYru from 
£3601 JLA 01-747^108 
SICILY FROM £838. Taormina hriete. 
SKUy a la Carte. Grand Tour. Fhghi 
only from £89 rtn. BLAND SUN Ol- 
222 7452. ABTA/ATOL 1907. 


wiao. Tel U.T.Cl (07331 857006. 


OMCOUHT FARES worktwtde: 01-434 
0734 Jupiter Travel. 


BLADON LINES 

CHRISTMAS & JANUARY BARGAINS 
Chalet Parties 

VERBIER MERISEL SAN VTGIUO 
CRANS MONTANA VAL D’iSERE 

from £149 


SELF CATERING from £99 


wide, l ■/economy- 01-387 9100 


■ALAOA, rAKAWn Ol 441 fill. 
Travetwtoe. Abta. AMI 1783. 


s. AFRICA Finn £466. 01-884 7371 
ABTA. 


TAKE THE OFF lo Parte. Amsterdam. 
Srustete. Bruges. Geneva. Bone. Lou 
aanna: Zurich. The Hague. Dubttn. 
Rotwi. Boulogne A DMppa. Time 017. 
28. Cheser Ctae. London. SW1X 7BQ. 
01-233 8070. 

ONE CALL for some of the beat deals In 
DiBhte. apartments, hotels and car hire. 
Tel London Ol 636 6000. Manchester 
061 8S 2000. Air Travel Advisory 
Bureao. 

■ONB HOME £488. BANOKOK £369. 
Stngmore £437. Other re cities. Ol -684 
6614 ABTA. 

LOWEST Ah’ Fares. Schedided Europe & 
World wide. Mod Star Travel. Ol 926 
3200 


01-785 3131 

Chalet Parties 


Mancfi Deps. 
0422 78121 


01-785 7771 

Self-Catertng St Hotels 


General Enquiries 01-785 2200 


ABTA 16723 
ATOL 1232 


SKI SUPERTRAVEL 

Catered Chalets in the Top Resorts inc. flights 

NEW YEAR AND JANUARY 
OFFERS FROM £189 

Other dates £50 OFF 

01 584 5060 

Ring our NEW SNOWLINE 
on 01 584 0174 


ENTTERTAINMENTS 



CONCERTS 


BARBICAN HALL 628 BT96/638 
8891 . Today 3.30 & 7.46 DHL 
IKTEKNATIOttAL SERES, 
Royal Hai tiai iqo ni r Or rii —t r a, 

Arthur DavtMO cond. Sally 
Ann Bonomte)’ pionn. Johnny 
Moms narraliM-. 


OPERA & BALLET 


COLISEUM S 836 3161 cc 240 
5B58 ENOU5H NATIONAL 
OPeitA Toni 7.00 C teteia. Sal 
7.30 Ola FMarraoua. Box Of 
flee dosed Dec 2* 25 26 

ROYAL OKRA HOUSE 240 

1066/191). Stdhy Inlb 836 
6903. S CC. Tickets fi. r9g. BO 
iBolletl CS-CAO (Opera). 66 
amoni aean avail on toe day. 
Box Office rtosnd Dec HAM 
Ton'L Fri 7.30 IKE ROYAL 
OKRA Larin «fl t a mn a ramr . 

SADLER'S WELLS 278 8916. 
First Cali CC 24 hr 7 day 240 
7200 Until SaL Eves 7 50. Mala: 
Sab A Dee 26^ 2-W^No pert* Dee 

MENOTTTS 

The Bay Who fire* Too Fuel 

iBriUsti Premcrei & 
AMAHL & The Mrhi VMtSri. 

cn-278 0833 for Winier Opera 
Info 


I THEATRES | 

ADELPKI 836 761 1 or 240 7913 
/4 CC 741 9999/836 7358/379 
6433 Grp Sale* 930 6123. Fort 
Call 24hr 7 day CC 240 7200 fbks 
feei NOW BOOKING TO MAY 30 
1987 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 

Nightly al 7 JO Mate Wed al 2.30 
& SM 4 JO A S-OO 

IN TOWN" S Dnreu 

No Emote* Fori Xraao Era 

ALBERT 836 38780:3796666/ 
379 6433/741 9999/ Cm 836 
3962. 1.30 6 4.16 dolly. For 2 
weeks. David Wood's 
THE OLD MAN 
OF LO CHHAO l iff 
A Musical Ploy tor children. 
From toe book by HRH The 
Prince of Wales. Dec 23 M l 30 
& 6 3a Dec 24 at 1.30 only. 
D-C 26 Ol 1JO A 4.15 
ALBERT B36 3878 cr 379 6566/ 
379 6433/ 741 9999 Group 
Sale* 836 3962 Ere* 8Ptn 
LIMITED LONDON SEASON 

DAVE ALLEN LIVE 

-DEVASTATHGLY FUNNY" 
LBC. Dec 26 4 27 al 8pm. No 
Pert* Dec 23. 24, 26 _ 

ALDWYCMOl 836 6404/0641 CC 
Ol 379 6233. Ol 741 9999 
DOROTHY TUT1H 
SUSAN ENGEL 
HARRY TOWS 
STEVEN MACKINTOSH 


BRIGHTON BEACH 

MEMOIRS 

Directed by MfCHAELRUDMAN 

A National Theatre production 
"Humour 41 IIS best- a rlcb and 
knlne production" Dali* 
beauUfuUy snared family 
comedy" Time* ■■ H will run lor a 

long Umr" Time Oui 

Eves Mon ■ Fri 7 30 AlateWeto 
3 O Sats 5.co A 8.30 nr* CaH « 
hr 7 day cc Ol 240 7200 lino ' hfco 
leeiTIclielmasler 01 379M33IW 
bkn feel Grp Sale* 01 930 olZS. 

APOLLO VICTORIA SS 828 8665 
CC 630 6262 Parly Bkgt 828 
6188 First can cr WW »C 

7200 CC OPEN ALL HpURb3« 

6433 Grp Sales 930 612 3 T kte 
from W H Smith Travel Branches. 
EI« 7 4S Mao TUP 6 Sa l fro, 

-A musical DUTMWMgS 
ANYTHMC AROUND Bi EVERY 
ONflEHSIOir- £> EaP 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Music by 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
unra by RICHARD STILCOE 
Dtiwicd by TREVOR NUNN 
APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 
FOR RETURNS Special eanm 
skjiw al £6 on Turt mate lor 
OaPY 

S pec ia l mat 166 0* ®P- 
Ho perl 24th Pec . 

NOW BOOKWC TO SEFT I» 


AMBASSADORS 01-836 6111 CC 
836 1171. First Call C34 tan/7 
day*) 240 7200 (Mtg tee). Evra 
7.30. Wed mat 3. Sol 4 Jr 8 

Regal t hahaopra r o CrapNj'i 

LES LIAISONS 
DANGEREUSES 

Winne r 4 “BEST PLAT” ere* 


Dec 23 3 * 7.30. no ports Dee 24 
* 25. Dec 26 4 Jr 8pm 
Tickets OVMI Dec 23 at 3pm. 
Dec 36. 27 al 4pm 


APOLLO THEATRE 437 2663 

434 3698 Fir* Call 01-240 7200 
Ttcketmarier cc ST9 6433 
Mon-Fri 8. Sot 4 JO * 815 
TTno* Mate 3. Dec 24 mat only. 
No pert Dec 25. Dec 26 Spra peri 
only 

PAUL SCOFIELD 

“MASTERLEY" F-Tlmes 
HOWARD ROLLBtS 

-MAONIFICEhrr" DJ4aH 

FM NOT RAPPAPORT 

■■wonderfullv homy** O-EXP 
TONY AWARD BEST PLAY 


BARBICAN Ol 628 8795/638 
8891 cc (Mon Son lOam-epw) 

ROYAL SHAKESPCANK 

COWAMY 

BARBICAN THEATRE Wrt it 
Fri 7.30. Sot 2-00 6 7 JO A 
PENNY FOR A SONS by John 
Whiting - toe finer lunacies of 
toe Cnglteh at war. SCENES 
FROM A MAW NI AC E by 
Feydeau, tickets available FL 
NAL peRFORMANCCS 31 Dec 

- 5 Jan "Mosnlflcem... raeri 
emoyaWe." D.Tel. 

THE PIT lonT A Fri 7 JO. Sat 
2.00 & 7 JO HERE5KS By Deb- 

orah Levy. TffiE 

MtcmtSHOP'S CHUM bar 
Arthur Milter returns 31 Dec -3 



CHURCHRX Bronrey 460 6677 
DKK WHrmSSGTON Ray 
Hudd. Roger de Coarm A 
Nookle Bear. BUI Pertwee. 
Jimmy Thompson. Lyn PouL 

LUMCDY THEATRE 930 2578 
CC 240 7200/379 6433/741 
9999 Grpo 930 6123 

**A uapeeb aetteg partnarridp" 

Times 

JOHN ALDCRTQM 


TAYLOR POtHALMON 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

A Comedy by Ric hard Harris 
“A MA RITAL MAS! ERPBTOE 
_ WONDERFULLY FUNNY" 

N of tne W 

"The applause of loiXurous 
revogalllon** D Mod 
"Very funny indeed** S Fro 
Mon-Thu 8 Frt/SMSJO* 8.30 

COTTESLOE *S* 928 2202 CC 
( National Theatre's anal audi. 
tortuml Ton’L F H. M wi 7.30. 
Sal 2.30 * 7 3 0 TME B A T AT 
MCE am] WRECKED EBBS tor 
David Hare, rme Building win 
be rioseu Pec 24 A 25k 
C W I I E I IKHi S 930 3 2)6 CC 37? 
6965/379 6C33/7J1 9999. On* 
836 3962. Evas 8.00. Thu mat 
2 30. Sal 5.30 * 8JO De c 24 ol 
8am. Dec 26 al 2-5 0 A awn 
-BRITISH FARCE AT ITS BEST" 
□ Mall 

The Theatre OI Comedy Cmgnj 

DEREK ^JCE 

FOWLPS MILLS 

F ‘ n "Am«D MARKS 
AMTA g*gg 

aPrtHfl— PIPER 

SAM cox 

RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

W linen and directed by 
RAY COQNFV 

Over I 600 ip l H hs paft 
••SHOULD RUN FOR 1ST S. Ex 
p~vi *eate avail Thur* mate. 


MIKE OF YORKS 836 9122 CC 
8309837/741 9999/S79 6433 
24IU- 240 7200. Em 8. Thu 3. 
Sal 9 A a JO 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Hqiiifsnf Drama Award 1964 

STEPPING OUT 

HU cumeoy by Rirtwd HtoTte 

^mrniFti fflS^TAP" std 
THIRD HIURIOUSYEAR 

Extra Xmas raat Boo 23 MOpra 


CLIFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAJT 
THE PORTRAYAL OF ‘AKASW 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

Moo-F« 7 JO Thu Mai 230 Sal 4 
A 8.1& On Fri 26 mal only “The 
Rock Slar” Win be p a fu n ned by 
JOlui OiTUUr SPECIAL CONCES- 
SIONS ai £7 au pert* except Fri A 
Sal eves tor OAP*s. UB40M. stu- 
dente » under I6*s avail 1 hr 
before pert. Reduced prices Frt 26 
mat only £7 A £10 
Now Eeehlag to Apt 77. 
Speetoi lanaik Tnan 23 Jk Fri 
26 Dec 3pm. No pari 24 Doc 
SEATS AViUL FDN POP TOKT 



m m 


42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL THE FAM8.Y 


voted 

BEST MUSICAL _ 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL _ 

LAURENCE OLDflER AWARD 

BEST MUSICAL- 

PLAYS A PLAY ERS 
LONDON THEATRE CRITICS 
AWARD 

Gvgs ao Mate Wed 3.0. Sal SO* 
a. 30 Reduced price mat Weds. 
Siuderts and OAP^ staixtoy. 
Groan Sales 930 6123 
BOOK NOW FDR XMAS 
Special matinee Dec 26 3pm 

DUCHESS S 836 8243 CC 240 
9648 CC 379 6433 A CC 24 
nr/TOBO' 340 7300 Cvpa 8 Wed 
roM 3 Sal S Jr B. Dec 24 at 3pen 
only. Dec 26 d Bpm. No pert 
Dec 26. 

NO SE X. PLEASE 
WE’RE BRITISH 

FORTUNE SO ICC 836 2238/9 
Agy F.CALL 7day 24br a«3 
7200 (WuMOwWO 6123. 

Fhrat UK toRtmtai 
UUL TeHdao’s 
THE HOBBIT 

-SoectacuUr s cenes and Uke- 
abte heroes .. bnoenteiabte 
magtc" TTmea 

Today ai 1030am A 7 JOncu 
MmFrt at 2pm A 7 JOpra 
Sbi 2pm. Spm A Bpm. 

GARRICKS Ol 579 6107. isl can 
24/hr 7 day 240 7200. Grp Sales 
9306123 TlcketraaMer 379 6433 
Eves 7 jo. Sal 6 J> 8 Mal Today 
3pm 

JUDI MICHAEL 
DENCH WILLIAMS 

-Cura of their own” SW 

MR and MRS NOBODY 

by Kettn Waterhouse 
Directed by Ned Sherrin 

"The bate oaraady In ranch tha 
Waat End ibis i*n" Times 


NOBODY" D-Mofl 
No peri Chiteius Eve 


BLOBS 01-437 3667 cr 741 9999 
isl call 240 7200 24 nr 7 day Ojkg 
fee) Grp Sdm 930 6123 

Fran 34 January 
OUTSTANOBW kCWVEMOir 
AWARD - Otortor Aarards T6 
GLENDA JOAN 

JACKSON PLQW2MKT 

in Lana’s -UiriHing" Obi 
THE HOUSE OF 
BERMARM M B A 
win NHKHA HAYES 
Nuria Eiperi - Baal Dtractor 
SandBni Drama Award* 

CLOSE 437 1992 CC OPEN ALL 
HOURS 379 6433 1*1 Call 24 hr 
240 7200 ISO torn IW» 741 9999 
mo bkg leel CTO Sales 930 6123. 
This from w H Smith Travel 
BWKMElFtBMMI W*d35al 4 

COMEDT OF THE TEAR 
Laurence OIMar Asranfa 1SSC 

LEND ME A TENOR 

“II «) UnMff you’re aflar^. 
men toe iun cranes nowhsrv 
miner and faster* Sul 
A Comedy bv Ken Ludwig 
Dtrecled by Dav id CHmore 
No pari Inn Era 
IMT * MOTHS 



MAYFAM Ol 629 3037 
Unto Jan 3 
Twice daily 2-0 * 40 
Weds * Sols 10 JO. 2.0 A 40 

soom XMAS SHOW 

MAYFAM s DC 629 3006. Mon- 
Thu 8 Frt /Sal 6.40 A 8.10 

-The Bast Thrihar tor yiara" 3 M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

“An unabashed wtnMf** S Exp 
“Seroalionai’’ Times 

BTH TKMLLMC YEAR 

MERMAID THEATRE Ol 236 
0368 I MCaB 240 7200 379 6433 
741 9999 Grp Sates 900 6123 
Kenneth GrahameY wonderful 

THE WIND IN THE 
WILLOWS 

Twice daily 2&6 
Dec 24 Horn A 2pm 

WATlONAL^THE^IM^Sto^di 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COM PANY 

See SEPARATE ENTR IES under 
OLIVIER/ LYTTELTON/ 


THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

Searring 

MHlteAFl CRAWFORD 

SARAH STEVE 

BHK3HTMAN BARTON 

Cteere Moore plays dateli n e 
ai certain performances 
Directed tor HAROLD PRINCE 
Eves 7.45 Mats Wad A Sot 3 
PosMbkas only for Apr id Oct 

LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 
741 9999 (no bkg fee). First CaB 
24 Hr 7 Day CC 24 o 7200. two 
UK FEE) Grp Sales 930 6123. 
ncluanwster 379 6 433 
OYER ZSO PERFS of 

THE HIT MUSICAL 

COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 
* DENS OUU-LEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

“_A PALLADIUM ROAR OF 
APP RO VAL" 8. Tel 
Moa-Fri 7.30. 4MB Wed 200 
SU 2JO A BOO 
Stdm concesrioos avafl. at door 
Moo-Frl Jr SM mats 
SEATS AVARJIBLE FROM *7 JO 

Em ML No ml 

Now badkteB la April 25. 1987 


seus days o f peri s all theatres 
from 10 am. RESTAURANT (928 
20351- EAST CAR PARK, Into 
633 088a AM COND 

NEW LONDON Drury Lone WC2 
409 0072 OC OPEN ALL HOURS 
379 6433. Tkto from W H Smith 
Travel Branches. Eves 7.46 Tue A 
Sal 3.00 A 7.45 
THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
/ TA ELIOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OPFICC 
FOR RETURNS Crow Booking* 
Ol 405 1567 or Ol 930 6123. 
HOW BOOKING TO MAY 30 
1987. Extra mot Jan 2 al 3pm. 
Seats available to Jan 

NEW LONDON Drary Lane wcz 
406 0072 CC OKN ALL HOURS 
379 6433.TUS toon w H smith 
Travel Branches. Eves 7.45 Toe* 
Sal 3. 00 A 7.43 
THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBED 
/ TS. ELIOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPL Y DA ILY TO BOX OFF I C E 
FOR RETURNS Grouo Bookings 
406 1667 or 930 6123. WOW 
BDOKMB TO BUY 3B 1*67 
Seals available a Jan 
Extra Mats Dee 22 & Jan 2 at Spm 


PICCADSLLY 437-4006 C C 379 
6566/ 379 6433/ 240 7200. 
Grow sues 930 61 23/836 3862. 

FRANKS HOWERD 

"A Master Clown" Times 


FRED EVANS 
DEREX ROYLE In 
The Famriast Musical 

"Broad force with Stenhen 
Sondheim* songs’’ D.Mail 

A FUNNY THING 
HAPPENED 

ON TNE WAY TO THE FORUM 

Tool 8pm. Tom or 3pm only Dec 
26 8dm- Dec 27 4J0 A 8. IS 


PRMCC EDWARD Box Office 
730 8961 First CaB 24 Hr 7 Days 
cr Booking 836 3464 Grp Sales 
930 6123. Mon-Sat 7JO Mate 
Thur* A 8M2J0 

CHESS 

■A BRAND MASTER OF A 
1ROW" Newsweek 


MAT SEATS SOMETIMES 
AVAILABLE ON DAY 

ana aaato araH 34 Dec 7 JO 


Li iir.y LF T : 


’ALLO’ALLO 

wito the TV SHOW STARS 
-Rfs aO aaoro at the coM at 
le aKfu" o Exp. Eves 8. Frt A Set 
5 JO A OAO EXTRA PERFS 30 & 
SI D«c al 230 

NOW BOOKRt B TO 30 MAY 



"A WONDERFUL STAR" MaB 

MAUREEN UPMAN to 


WONDERFUL TOWN! 

H rlDOtes wUh exritemanl" 
STlmes “Just wonderful" DEyp 
M on-Sat 8 Mots Wed 2-30 Sal 5 




^^3 


LYRK THEATRE ShaDesbory 
Ave Wl 01-437 3686/7 01-434 
1560. 01-434 2050. 01-734 

6166/7 

BU N BLAKELY 

-A brtlhani A jqyou dy 
comic performance" F. Tton 
m 

The Noiienai Theatre's arrtaimed 
eroducuaD of 

ALAN AYCKBOURNS 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

-H eo rtar e al d ngiy funny" can 
"HUoriaus..." S Times 
•'A rare evening of 
comic exraterancfT* Times 
Evgs 7 JO. Mote Wed and Sal 3.0. 
Group Sales 01-930 6123. 

Reduced price mote Student A 
OAP Stand-ny 

rint Caa 2Br 7 day n hllklngi 
on OL 240 7200 (no haak ln g tael 
Tlrkntnaat.r OS 379 6433 (an 

brokin g tan) 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL *87 

LV TILL ION ? 2252 CC 

(Nownal Theatre ■* proscenium 
stage) Toni Fri. Mon 7 as. Sat 
2.15 (law pner mat) A 7.40 
TONS OF M ONET by WUI Ev- 
ens and Vaientlrte. (The 
building wdHbe dosed Dec 24 A 

?«i 


THE WOMEN 

by Cbre Boothe Luce 
“AH fe mal e rOxw extravaganza” 
FT. ”OEL*C*ODSLY FOHHY” 
Time*, "wmy. wicked wxmnl 

world" ECU*. •‘STYLISH, STAK- 
STUDDeB PRODUCTION” D 
Mbror 

No peris Dec 24 & 26 
LAST 3 WEEKS - MUST DID 
JAN LO . 

OLD VIC 928 7616 CC 261 1821 

Prariana from 14 Jam Opens 20 

Jan at 7 pm 


SAVOY THEATRE Ol 836 8888. 
CC 379 6219. 8360479. First Can 
24 hr 7 day uio bkg feel 240 7200. 
Keilh Prowar 741 9999 (no bkg 
feel Grp Sales 930 6123. Eves 
Mon-FD 8pfn. SU 5 A 8 JO. Wed 
Mate 3pm Mb Ptots Dec 24 A 2S. 
Extra Mai Today 3mo 
PATRICK MACNEE 
DAVID JENME 

LANSTCM UNDER 

A UZ RO BE RTSON la 
A Hymn Thriller tor 
ail the Family 

KILLING JES SICA 

Directed by BRYAN FORBES 
“RaakteB wtHi Went* tor san- 
priae A tefomAf” D JMB. "9a (he 


~«S. 


HOLIDAY 

a co m edy by PhMa Bens 
Dir by UNPSAY A NDE R S ON 

OLDffER -S- 928 2252 CC (Na- 
tional Theatre's open Nape) 
Toni. Fri. SaL Men 700 
prompt KING LEAR by Shake- 
soeare. SaL Mon to.so wn A 
2.00 THE FED RKP OTte 
bulldlnp will bretootfl Dec 24 a 

2S> 

PALACE THEATRE 434 0909 CC 
OPEN ALL HOURS 579 6433 
Ftr« Call 2dHr TOay cr 240 7200 
Grp Sales 930 6125. Tkto from 
W H Smith Travel Bi ai Khe* 
THE MUSICAL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLES 

“tf YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET - STEAL ONE T M 
Eves 7.30 Mate Thu & Sat 2.30 
RB Extra Quirting! ■■■1.22 A 24 
Dee at L3S La te comers not ad- 
milled Lima Die Interval 
BEAT T HE TO UTS BY EMQWR- 
NB FOR RETURNS AT TKEBOK 


COMEDY Ol 379 5399 CCOl 379 
6433/ 741 9999- First Can 24 hr 
240 7200 (bkg reeL Op Sales 930 
6123 

Mon- Fri 8. Wed 3. Sal 5.15*830 
THE THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COY 

lavteh^ne w prod uction 

AN ITALIAN STRAW HAT 

by Eugene Labtche 
wtth CLIVE DUNN 
And STRATFORD JOHNS 
Xmas pert*- Dec 23 al SOB *8.00 
No Deris Dec 24 & 23. Dec 26 01 
. 8.00. Dec 27 at 5.15 * 830 

ST MARTIN'S 01-836 1443. SPte 
rial OC No. 379 6433. Evgs 8.0 
Turn 245. SM A Dec 26 a 6 0 
and SO ACATH A LI Mi ll 1 6 a 

THE MOUSETRAP 

STRATFORD UPON AVON 

10789] £95623. ROYAL 

SHAK ESPEARE COSWAMT a 
■RSI*. No Perl Tomor ft Thur. 
Dream TontqhL Fri 7 JO 
Winter's Tale sal IJO.HtahmB 
R SM 7 JO. tme Theatre, 
ll erar Temqht. Fn 7.3o. KhM- 
man Sal 130. Mr MaM Sol 
7 V\ 


STRAND 836 2660 CC 836 
4143/5190. 741 9999. frit CAR 
24 Hr 7 Day n 240 7200 (mH| 
(top Sales 930 6123 

CAB ARET 

“the sh a r p - ri . meet sootAMral 
ed. most i lu i fl rak maslcal n 
ra asli g In tha Was! KMT Bid 

Starring 

WAYNE SLEEP 

Directed ft Choroographed by 

CRBan Lnma 

Mon-Fri 7.45. Mai Wed 3 DO 
Sac a jo ft 8 15 
OAP REDUCED MHCES MATS. 
BOOKMS MOW UP TO APRIL *7 
Spec perl New Years Eve 7pm 

THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

“The very best of Britain's 
comic talent" Dally Man 
See separate entries under: 





ALAN AYCKBOURWS New Ploy 

WOMAN IN MIND 




VICTORIA PALACE 01-834 1317 
Eves 7.30 Mato Wed A Sal 2M 
EXTRA XMAS MATINEES 
December 2629 JO Jan 1 ft 2 
24hr 7 day cc bkg* (no am 
charge) on FIRST CALL 240 7200 
"A NIGHT OF SHEER SONG ft 
DANCE MAGIC" WIQy News 

CHARLIE GIRL 
ONLY 3 WEEKS LEFT TO 
SEE THIS FABULOUS 
CAST. LAST PERF JAN 10 

PAUL NICHOLAS 
CYD CHARTS SC 
DORA BRYAN 
NICHOLAS P ARSO NS 

MARK WVMYER In 

CHARLIE GIRL 


Abo book. Ttekcbnasttr 379 6433 
or any W H Smllft Travel Brandi 

VICTORIA PALACE Book now 
through FImt Cnn exclusively Ol 
240 7200 241V 7 day 


NATASHA RICHARDSON 
ANGELA RICHARDS 

HIGH SOCIETY 

Directed by Rteturd Eyre 
Prevs Feb IS isl MgM Feb 25 
Mon-Fri 7.45 Wed Mat 3 Sal 4 45 
ft 8.15. Go Sales 930 6123 


WCSnmSTER Ol 834 0283/4 
cc 834 0048. cc Ttcketmaster 579 
6433. Mon-Sal 300 ft 6 JO tDec 
24 al 300 only, oo serf* Doc 26) 

3rd Wa*d S i aean 

THE UCHI. THE WITCH A 


WMTEHAU. off Trafalgar Sq Ol 

930 7766/ 839 4455 OC 01 379 
6565/579 6433. 741 9999. Grp 
soles 930 6123/836 3962 


-ONE OF THE FUTMIEST 
PLAYS OF RECENT YEARS" 
Otte 

The Award Winning Comedy 

WHEN I WAS A URL 


TO SHOUT ABOUT" 

□. MoD 

•H REStST HLE COMIC 
WWimfl" Time* 

Eves Mon-Fri 8. SM 8JO * 8 30 
Wed man 3. Dec 26 al £JO ft 

8 JO. No peris Dec 24 ft 25 _ 

WVWHAkP* S 836 302B CC 379 
6563/TKWtniaSler 379 6433/1*1 
Cali 24hr 7 days 240 7200/741 
9999/Grp Sates 930 6123/836 
3962. Eves 7.30. SM mate 3 
For a ttmlled season 
"A performanea ntiiimUriad la 
■■ W—t fti# 1 bidepeiHlenL. 

VANESSA REDGRAVE 

TOM WILKINSON in 

1 W Touag Vic prajntHoB of 

GHOSTS 

By Henru nnea 

DMTT MBS" cay Limits 
NO peris Dec 23. 24 ft 26. Dec 26 

at 7V> 


ART GALLERIES 


ANTHONY eTOFFAY 9 ft 25 

Derma SI. Wl. 499 4100. 
WBXBH P£ K OO W N C . 
BARBICAN ART OALLDIY. Bor- 
Mean Centre. EC2. 01-638 
4141. Unto 4 Jam DavM Rob- 
erto ( 17*6-1954 >: palnniigs of 
Europe ft the Near East PLUS 
Uon Rug* bar nomadic Par* 
I rib e wo men. Turn - Sal io- 
6 45. Sun ft B Hols 12-6,46. 
Closed Monday*. 24 ft 28 Dec. 
■Open 26 Doc A 1 Jan 125,451 
Adim£2 A £1. 

BETHNAL GREEN MUSEUM OF 
CHILDHOOD. Cambridge Heato 
Rd. E-2. SPIRIT OP CHRIST- 
MAS. Wfedys IO - 6. Suns 230 - 
6. Closed Fridays. 24 - 26 Dec. 
ft 1 Jan. 6w- 

HAYWAHD GALLERY, South 
Bank. SE1. ROOM and DOYLE 
FAMILY DdUMUOBS. Closed 
24. 25, 26 Dec. & 1 Jan. Aden. 
CJ.OO/CIJO. Recanted tola : 
01-261 0127. 


Original Prints £20-£500. Until 

24 Dec. 

MUSEUM OF MANKMD, Bur- 
lington Dardens. London Wl. 
HIDDEN PEOPLES OF THE 
AMAZON - Life m ihe Tropical 
Rainforest. Mon-Sal 105. Sun 
2.305. Adm. tree. Caused 24. 

25 Pec, ft i Jan. 

PARKIN GALLERY, n MoMmb 

Si. SW!. 01-235 8144. LOUIS 
WAIN. 1860-1939. 

VICTORIA G ALBERT MUSEUM - 

The Nanonal Museum of An A 
Drawn, s. Kemdngton. NEW 
TOSMBA GALLERYOF JAPA- 
NEBE ART. EYE FOB DBKI- 
STRV: Royal Designers tor 
Industry 1936-1986. Recanted 
Info 01 SBI 4894. Whdys IO ■ 
5.50. Suns 2JO - SJO. Closed 
Fridays *24 - 26 Dee. toe. 
ft 1 Jan. 

ZAMANA GALLERY. 1 CmPnO 
Garaens. SW7. 684 6612. 
ISTANBUL . A PhotomMc 
Journey through Turkish Ar- 
chitecture. Until 18 Jan. Tue- 
Sai 10-530. Sub 12-530 


CINEMAS 



MDIEMA «5 WNWH TS BB mGA 
235 4226 A CHRISTMAS CAR- 
OL «LU Dally unlU28 Dec: 3.0 ft 
5.0. A ROOM WTTH A VBW 
iPGi Daily until ZB Dec 7-0 ft 
*,15 FROM 29 DEO: A ROOM 
WITH A VIEW Dally: 2-50. 
4.46. 7 0. * 9.16 Scute 

bookable In advance for 7.0 A 
9 IS ONLY. A CHRISTMAS 
CAROL at SO A S-0 ONLY aa 
24 DEC. Claras Cl ean*: bac 
2S. 26, 31 ft IAN I 

ODE ON HAVMARKET lft» 
7097, MONA USA flBI Sep 
proas Doily 2 15 6.00 8.40. An 
seals bookable In advance. 
Access and Visa telephone 
bCOklTrtp wefconx- 




n . 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1 ' 


Revitalizing of j Salute marks a fine partners hip’s 
cities Patten’s 


top priority 

By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 



Revitalizing run-down in- 
ner city areas is now the 


erties alongside councils 
where tenants choose not to 


Government’s main environ- exercise their right to buy. 
mental priority, Mr John Pat- “The Government sees this 
ten. Minister for Housing, said as an opportunity to develop 
yesterday as he announced the our policy of diversifying ten- 
sale of the assets of the eight ures in large housing estates 


remaining new towns. 

Ministers hope to raise £2 
billion for the privatization 
programme and eventual tax 
cuts by disposing of the houses 


and giving tenants more 
opportunity of having some 
say in the way their estates are 
run. Many of the 60.000 
rented homes in the new 





■ ^ - 1 
. 


• T •.«,« . 

-P- - 






and commercial properties towns could be involved, 
and sites held by the surviving “We also believe that the 


new town corporations. 


attraction of the substantial 


The first to go will be expertise and financial re- 
Peterborough and by April sources of the private sector 




1992 Milton Keynes, Warring- 
ton, Runcorn, Telford, 
Aycliffe, Peterlee and 
Washington. 

Mr Patten said: “The new 


will do much to sustain the 
quality and diversify the na- 
ture of the rented housing 
stock.” 

Mr Simon Hughes, the 


towns have played an invalu-. Liberal housing spokesman, 
able part m the post-War condemned the plan to chan- 
development of England. But nel the cash raised into tax 
our priorities now must be to cuts, insisting ft should be 
concentrate our attention and switched to housing accounts 
our resources on the older to bolster the renewal and 


urban areas. 

“That is exactly what the 
Secretary of State for the 
Environment, Nicholas Rid- 


renovation of the housing 
stock - now in need of repairs 
costing £20 billion. 

But he was not opposed to 


ley. is doing through the the scheme in principle so 
establishment of the four new long as tenants were fully 
town urban development informed of all the options 
corporations, to join those and allowed to ballot on their 


corporations, to join tnose 
already established at London 
Docklands and Merseyside.” 
As predicted, Mr Patten 


new landlords. 

Local authorities, which 
had planned their policies on 


linked the sales with new the assumption they would 
moves to revive the private become the owners, should 
rented market by stopping the also be given every opportu- 
automatic transfer of about nity to put their case. 

60,000 houses to district coun- Mr John Chrtwright, SDP 

cils when the corporations are housing spokesman, said he 
wound up. had no objection to the move 

Housing associations and provided houses were not 
private sector trusts will be “sold over the heads” of 
invited to bid for the prop- tenants. 

Runcie reservations 
about Aids campaign 



wows** *■ . • 

Sgt Robin Porter and Burmese in festive mood yesterday (Photograph: Peter Trievnor). 


The Archbishop of Canter- 
bury said last night he had 


Dr Runcie spent an hour 
talking to six patients at St 


_ _ Continued from page 1 

Vanunu s u t. ,ta namber one 

ci •• 1 j Miss Stanier said that riding 

flllSSf'K'Pfl Burmese was extremely 

lUjova^U comfortable. “It is like sitting 

9 in an armchair. You do not 

111 1%! 1 IH e~ feel her feet moving. I don’t 

Continued from pace 1 flunk we taew when we took 

her over from the Mounties 
papers yesterday carried the that we bad such a gem”. 

hkhiJit TST The Queen fira rode side- 
hoMmgup his hand, but the 5^^ ^ tta e trooping of the 
words had to be painted out « 


reservations about aspects of Stephens Hospital in Chelsea. 


the Government’s explicit 
advertising campaign against 
Aids. 


Dr Charles Farthing, an 
Aids specialist, said: “For 
some of the patients, it was 


Speaking after visiting term- very emotional. There was 
inallyill patients at an Aids enormous gratitude that som- 
dinic in London, he said the eone as well known as the 
Government had a duty to Archbishop had come to visit 
warn the public but he did not them.” 


give unqualified approval to 
the “Don’t Die of Ignorance, 
Use a Condom” posters. 


Dr Runcie said that the 
Christian response to Aids 
sufferers should not be 


before publication was s 

„ . . ^ in her tabes's birt 

By mid-afternoon, however, rude. In 1951 she 
Israeli radio was reporting that salute for her taker. 
The _ London Standard had then has ridden side 
published the story of what every parade, and 
had happened along with de- year except 1955, 1 
tails of the message on the trooping was cano 
hand. At that point the censor of & mil strike, 
gave up and released the story. ^ ^ 

The brief message still does Queen to undert 
not explain how Mr Vanunu consuming practice 
was persuaded to leave birthday parade, wfc 
Britain, where he would have only occasion when 
been safer from capture by side-saddle and nol 
Israeli agents. It still seems Starting again with a 


colour in 1947, when as 
Princess Elizabeth she joined 
in her tabes's birthday pa- 
rade. In 1951 she took the 
salute for her father, and since 
then has ridden side-saddle at 
every parade, and in every 
year except 1955, when the 
trooping was cancelled be- 


Dr Robert Runcie said: “clouded by fear, self-right- Britain, where he would have 
“I have reservations about eousness or panic”. “In talk- been safer from capture by 
some parts of the Govern- ing about remedies, Christians Israeli agents. It still seems 
ment's campaign but I am not will have to affirm again and likely that he was lured out of 
here to criticize. I believe they again Christian moral stan- ' the country by a Monde girl 
have a duty in making these dards in sexual behaviour” called “Cindy” who be- 
wamings.” Virus rampant, page 3 friended him in London- 


Today’s events 

Last chance to see 
Crafts for Christmas; Coach 
House Craft Gallery, 
Gawthorpe Hall, Paditauu, near 
Burnley; 10 to 5. 

The British School at Athens; 
A Hundred Years of Discovery, 
Lower Corridor, Fitzwilliam 
Museum, Cambridge; 10 to Z 


called “Cindy” who be- 
friended him in London. 


Each year, though, the 
Queen has to undertake time- 
consuming practice for the 
birthday parade, which is the 
only occasion when she rides 
side-saddle and not astride. 
Starting again with a new side- 
saddle horse would be consid- 
erably more demanding, and 
that, the Palace says, has been 
an important factor in the 


Queen’s decision to go by 
carriage in future. 

Miss Stanier said: “The 
Queen immediately had a 
rapport with Burmese and I 
think this is why she is 
hesitant to start out on an- 
other horse. Her Majesty and 
Burmese have been partners 
over the past 18 years and 
have had such a very fine 

partnership the longest 

partnership between horse 
and rider for that sort of 
work”. 

Miss Stanier said that she 
would not like to train a horse 
to succeed Burmese in less 
than four years. 

The change may slightly 
ease the security headache 
which has been a worrying 
feature of the birthday parades 
since 1981, when Marcus 
Saijeant, then aged 17, fired 
six blank shots from a pistol as 
the Queen rode along. 

Burmese, who works with 
the Metropolitan Police bo 
tween state occasions, reacted 
well to the explosions, and the 
Queen kept her precarious 
seat without much apparent 
difficulty. Saijeant was jailed 
for five years. 






1 v. /~f ■ t < x ' * 

mm* 


.-/V:; 


W ; -'v , •• • ■Wk', ; * v. ®!k 

m 

■ - • 

The Queen in uniform and with a moaraiag band for (he 
Duke of Windsor, riding side-saddle on Burmese in 1972. 


Continued from page I 
to meet the League next 
month to discuss its 

proposals. . 

if the Leaeue rails to in- 
troduce 100 percent member- 
ship schemes, then the 
Government is ready 10 in- 
troduce its own legislation in 
this Parliamentary year. The 
League clubs are against com- 
pulsory membership as a con- 
dition for admission to 
grounds because they know 
tois will eliminate the casual 
spectator, so cutting 
attendances. 

According to the latest 
League figures, out of a total of 
541 matches this season there 
have been only 543 arrests 
inside grounds. 

Each week between 600 and 
800 Metropolitan officers are 
on duty every weekend al- 
though the number rose to 950 
on October 11 when there were 
three London derby games. 

Many of the problems are 
caused by the “cross-flow of 
football commuters” in ven- 
ues like Covent Garden and 
the Euston Station complex. 
To cope with such emer- 
gencies. a mobile reserve of 
between 60 and 100 officers 
has been established which 
waits in vans in the vicinity of 
likely trouble spots but can be 
quickly diverted elsewhere. 

The Z000-strong British 4 
Transport Police, who are 
responsible to the Department 
of Transport and not the 
Home Office, have not been 
asked to carry out a similar 
costing survey. But, says Mr 
Ian McGregor, the Assistant 
Chief Constable at Opera- 
tions. “All I can say is that it is 
quite a substantial part of our 
budget” 

On an ordinary Saturday 
the British Transport Police 
allocate 200 officers for duty 
with football fens. Some will 
have to work an 1 8-hour day if 
they have to accompany 
supporters right across the 
country. 

For an England versus Scot- 
land game at Wembley, there 
could be 5 00 on duty, many of 
whom would travel with Scot- 
tish fen* 

On days when football is 
being played, one officer from 
the London Underground and 
one from British Railways 
work at the Operation Centre 
at Scotland Yard. Assistant 
Chief Constable McGregor 
says: “Because of the success 
of liaison and because the 
clubs have been most co- 
operative, the trouble now 
seems to be moving to mini- 
buses and other forms of 
unsupervised transport.” 

Six bailed afro: death, page S 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Five Years with The Face, 
Rauseate Library Gallery, 
Guildford Lawn: 9.30 to 6. 

Christmas Exhibition; The 
Wykeham Galleries. 
Stockbridge; 10 to 5. 

Christmas Exhibition; Dower 
House Gallery, 108 High St, 
Berfchamsted; 10 to 5. 

Christmas Exhibition; Phoe- 
nix Gallery, Lamtham; 10 to I. 

Glasgow Cathedral through 


the Ages; Collins < 
Strathclyde University, 
mood St, Glasgow; 10 to 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,236 



ACROSS 

1 Lose money converting car- 
bolic to this kind of acid (7). 

5 Transport mediation ser- 
vice? Capital! (7). 

9 Workers, never back to the 
fore, who return to haunt os 
(9). 

10 Means of communication 
with a walrus (5). 

IX Australasian in tom declar- 
ing himself a wanderer? (5). 

12 Laced it in differently, tut 
just the same (9). 

14 Perhaps one said as a meta- 
phor (but could just as soon 
be written) (6,2,6). 

17 In TV we bear gentlemen 
taking first class return are 
the brainy ones (14). 

21 Half-moon (9). 

23 Jack the menace becomes 
halfhearted nearer maturity 
(5). 

24 LamWike in appearance, 
Ophelia namely (S). 

25 Residence provided by 
London Stock Exchange? 
(4.5). 

26 Is Africa doubly so just be- 
fore dawn? (7). 

27 Give new form to both 
sides, including oriental 
style (7). 


DOWN 

1 A couple of rows for its oars- 
men (6). 

2 Course for music-maker in 
composition of air (7). 

3 Argument against the 
French one raised — always 
happening (9). 

Concise Crossword page 10 


4 In view of Wagner's work 
being ted by study team 
(i ly. 

5 Trigonometrical ratio of an 
Aegean island (3). 

6 Send the man with the stop- 
watch up (5). 

7 Many an obscure utterance 
in this ancient craft (7). 

8 Furtive sort of bat style (8). 

13 Tour de France (6,5). 

15 One man’s meat is another 
man’s hat-band? (9). 

16 Ground facility to aid flier 
in difficulties (a). 

18 Army man's land register 
(7). 

19 Confiscate Ezra's statement 
of identity ... (7). 

20 . . .or the source of Animal 
Farm, so called (6). 

22 Like dissenters for the 
present occasion (5). 

25 Addition to the family calls 
for a drink (3). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,235 


rasr^jErfd- gi3HLig.ii 
n ra & m Eng 

B -m El E 13 0 0 B 
JijifflnHJEHRSE 
s b is n so . n n 
uanEEfflsBiiIIHfH® 

i=3 isi -E til E nr C? IS 

EE E P E 3 i£i 

m man n o e e 

EaEnUmS. EEEEEIIEIs 
B E S EE m 
-jnyHyn 


mood St, Glasgow; 10 to S. 
Mask 1 

Concert by the Chester Music 
Society Choir and City of Ches- 
ter Brass Band, Chester Cathe- 
dral. 7.3a 

Carol Service, Winchester 
Cathedral, 6.30. 

Turkey preparation 

To avoid food poisoning it is 
necessary to completely thaw 
frozen poultry before cooking. 

The frozen bird should be 
placed in a cool room or fridge 
and covered. A 101b turkey 
needs at least 24 hours to thaw 
at room temperature, and longer 
in a fridge. Remember to re- 
move the giblets. 

Wash your hands thoroughly 
after touching uncooked poultry 
and dispose of the thawed 
liquid, preventing it from 
contaminating other food. 

Postal services 

There will be one letter and 
one parcel delivery tomorrow 
and the last collection of post 
will be around lunchtime. 
Deliveries and collections will 
resume on December 29 but will 
not operate on New Year's Day. 

Post Offices in England ana 
Wales will dose at 12JO pm 
tomorrow and at 4 pm in 
Scotland, opening again on 
December 29. They win be 
dosed on New Year's Day and 
also on January 2 in Scotland. 

Country walks 

Countryside walkers have the 
choice of more than 120,000 
miles of public paths in Britain 
and trespass can be avoided by 
keeping to the paths, which may 
be marked on Ordnance Survey 
maps. 

Gates and stiles should be 
used wherever possible as dam- 


Books — novels of the year 

Books — fiction 

The Literary Editor’s selection of novels of the yoan 

4" Artitf ot the Roofing World, by Kazuo Isrt^jroJFaber . 53L95) 

j* ppdwrti OaugMer^by Janice BBott (Hoddur & Stoughton, £9.95) 


DrGrabMto Daughter, by Jaruoe Bfiott(Hodder & Stougf 
Gabriel** Lament, by Pate Bailey (Cape, £9.95) 

If Not Now, When?, by Primo Lew (Michael Joseph, £10.95} 
Innocence, by Penelope FftzgeraJd (Cotois, £9.S5) 

Roger's Version, by John' Updike (Andte Deutsch. £9.95) 
Staring at the Sun, by Julian Barnes (Cape. £9-95) 

The OH Devis, by KBigsley Amis (Hutctfnson. £9.95) 

The Real Life of Aletendro Mayta, by Mario Vargas Uos< 
What’s Bred m the Bone, by Robertson Davies (w ing, £ 


Whafs Bred i 


( WEATHER VA.coM northerly airflow will cover the country. SW Eng- 

N — — 'land, Wales, NW England, N Ireland and W Scotland 

wal be dry and fairly sonny although N Ireland and NW Scotland will cloud over 
later with perhaps some rain. London, SE and central southern and the Midlands 
win be mainly dry and bright with some sunshine but still the chance of a few snow 
showers especially in Kent E Anglia, NE England, E Scotland and Orkney and 
Shetland will have a little sunshine at times bnt there will be snow showers as well, 
the s now s ettling particnlariy on hills.lt will be a cold day everywhere. Outlook for 
tomorrow and Thursday: Turning milder and doudy with rain, perhaps preceded 
by sleet or snow. 


HIGH TIDES 


TV top ten 

National top tan Mavtsion programmes bi 
the «wx* ending December 74: 


1 EBst£ndara(Tij 08 /Sui) 22.15m 

2 EastEnders (itium/Sui) 2J.80m 

3 Just Good Friends 15-2Sm 

4 'alto 'a*o 1320m 

5 Threa Up. Two Down 1225m 

6 News and Weather (Sun 21:10) 
11.00m 

7 The Paul Daniels Magic Show 
1095m 

B The Beastmastar 1020m 
9 A Question of Sport (axe. Northern 
Irelandp 0.50m 
10 Hkla-hi 1025m 


create a gap through which 
livestock can escape, and can be 
expensive to repair. 

The pound 


AnttmiaS 
Austria Sett 
BaUnmFr 
Canada! 

Danmark Kr 

HntandMJdt 7, 

Franca Fir a. 

Germany Dm 
Greece Dr 
HongKengS 
Ireland Pt 
Italy Urn 
Japan ran 
Netherlands GU 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
South Africa Rd 
Spain Pts 
Sweden Kr 

wrRnZZflfRDKI rr 

USAS 

VegnMiltar 

Rates for small (Knominatlan bank noma 
onty as supplied by Sardays Bank PLC. 
Different rates apply to travellors’ 
cheques and other lorefgn currency 
business. 

Retail Price Index: 391 J 
London The FT index dosed lb 14.0 at 
1288.1. 



1 Coronation Street (Mon) Granada 
16.05m 

2 Coronation street (Wed] Granada 
15.55m 

3 New Faces of *88 Grand Final 
Central 13.45m 

4 Buteofa (axe. Tynwses) Centrat 
1320m 

5 The A-team mr 1225m 

6 Beadta's About LWT 12.60m 

7 The EquaSzerfTV 1240m 

8 North and South (Sun) FTV 1225m 

9 Play Your CBnfs Right LWT 12.00m 
10 Fresh Reids Themes llUSm 

1 VWoria Wol^^As Seen On TV 
620m 

2 AI Passion Spent 625m 

3 Heart UkeAWheel 525m 

4 Food and Drink 5.10m 

7 Entertainment USA 425m 

8 Richard CtajfdHOun in London 
4.60m 

9 Mouse On the Moon 450m 

10 Star Trek 425m 

Channel 4 

1 Broo ksl de (Tues/Ssl ) 625m 

2 Brootahle (Mon^at) 625m 

3 Jirreny B and Ante 425m 

4 Countdown (TteaS) 3.70m 

5 Who Dares Wins 3-70ro 

6 Golden Girts 3-ASm 

7 Countdown (Ftf) &4Qm 

8 Countdown (Mori) 2J90m 

9 Countdown (Tues) 220m 

10 Countdown (Wed) 22S 

Breeldast te te v is ten: The average 
weeuy figures (or audteces at peak 
times (with figures in pa ren thes i s 
showing the reach - the ranter of people 
w4io viewed for at least three mir, : ? 
BBC1: SrsskteT Taw: Mon U Ffi 
1 . 1 m ( 52 m) 

TV-amr Qood Marmg Britain Man to Frt 
|JnyiOJBni) Sat 22m (7.1m) 

Broadcasters' Autfence Research Board. 


Roads 

London and the South-east; 
A305: Single line traffic from 
Briar Rd to First Gross Rd, 
Twickenham. A407: Single line 
traffic with stop/go boards at 
junction of Wfllesden High Rd 
and Beaconsfidd Rd. A30; De- 
lays between 9.00 am and 4J0 
pm at London Rd and Station 
Rd, Hook. 

The Midlands: MS: North- 
bound entry slip road at junc- 
tion 6 (Warndon), Hereford and 
Worcester, reopened. A456: De- 
lays likely to continue until 
Christmas Eve, at Bewdley by- 
pass. AI: Lane closures W of St 
Neots at Eaton Socon, 


TODAY 

Londen Bridge 

Aberdeen 

Avom uuuai 

BeMsst 

CardW 

Devonpart 

Dwmr 

Fakaoutti 

Gtoagow 

He ra mJ i 

ST- 

Bfraconbe 

Lafth 

Uverpooi 

LowastoR 

Mmgete 

Wtod Ham 

Newquay 

Oban 


The North: Ml: Delays be- 
tween junctions 31 and 33 (A57 
Worksop/A630 Sheffield). M6: 
Contraflow between junctions 
29 and 32 (Prcston/M55). AI: 
Work at Wetherby bypass, W 
Yorkshire. 

Wales and the west A3& 
Delays between Exeter and 
Plymouth due to lane closures 
in both directions at the top of 
Haldon Hill. A38/A358: Work 
on roundabout at junctkiD 25 
(MS) link road, Taunton. A4& 
Inside lane closed E and west- , 
bound on M4 (junction 44) to 
Port Talbot due to roadworks 
from Lon-Las to Eariswood. 

Scotiand: M8: E and west- 
bound lane closures between 
junctions 29 (St James inter- 
change) and junction 26 
(Millington). Glasgow: Inside 
lane closures at Crookston Rd 
and Brockburn Rd, towards 
Paisley Rd W. A198: Tem- 
porary lighisat Meadowh ill near 
TranenL 

Information supplied by AA 


Smteamptan 

Swansea 

Teas 

WHon-oo-Hz* 
Tkte msasured in 









:lBbO 280 an. 





Anniversaries 

Births: Janus Gibbs, archi- 
tect, 1682; Joseph Smit h, 
founder of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-Day Saints 
(Mormons), 1805. 

Deaths: Thomas Robert Mal- 
thas, economist, 1834; Edward 
Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of 
Halifax, statesman, 1959. 

Our address 


Paitta Ba - bow to play 
M^sggaay ««« s«ur telly 

Add Uiess (oneUwr to determine 
your weekly Portfolio 
If jyur total m atches the DubOshed 
wywy dlvmmd figure you have won 

ssi Statfsa: ss^gyss: 

your ortax mmmiort tnaow. 

Netetaw am be amptaif ooMde tmse 

teauSTii. 

You must have your card with you 
when you telephone. 

ir you are unaue to mention* 
someone «t*C «*i claim on your Dehalf 
but they muu have your card am call 
The Times Portfolio dates line 

between the stipulated times. 

, No tesptMSM&te can be aceeotad 
-for failure to contact the claims office 
for any reason within the stated 

above mstructXms are ep- ] 
dauy and w«HJ 


C AROUND BRITAIN ) 

Sun Rain Max 
hre »n C F 

Scwbore -41 s 41 shower 
gridtog ton 12 25 5 41 has 
Cl Oil Ml * 

Lowestoft 


3 37 bright 

4 39 sunny 
4 39 sunny 
4 39 sunny 
4 39 sunny 
3 37 snow 

3 37 bright 

4 39 bright 

3 37 suwy 

4 39 sunny 
4 39 sunny 

3 37 sunny 

4 39 sunny 

5 41 sunny 

4 39 sunny 

6 41 Sunny 
6 43 sunny 
6 43 sunny 

6 43 sunny 
8 46 sunny 

7 45 bright 
6 43 bright 

8 46 sunny 
8 48 sunny 
6 43 sunny 

5 41 surety 
3 37 bright 
5 41 gurtnys 
3 37 sunny 
5 41 sunny 

3 37 sunny 

4 39 stem 

4 39 army 
3 37 snow 

3 37 shower 
8 43 sunny 

5 41 sunny 

6 43 sunny 

3 37 brttfq 

4 35 bright 

2 38 sunny 
4 39 sunny 
4 39 cloudy 

3 37 rata 

4 39 sunny . 

5 41 shower 

6 43 bright 
4 39 doudy 

6 41 sunny 


( LIGHTING-UPTIME 

London 425 pm to 725 am 
Bristol 424 pm to 7X5 am 
afintargh 4.11 pm to B.13 am 

Manchester 422 pm to 7.54 am 
Penance 453 pm to 750 am 

( LONDON 


Yesterday. Tamp: max 6 am to 8 


a Sunrise* Sunsets: 

8-05 am 355pm 

(tomsets Moon rises 
i»qu "*I- 

l YESTERDAY 1 

6 

C F OF 

ETnwrfL* 2 G‘* Bn »oy f 541 

|®s a s=r c a 

SEn* f a?7 ■ 337 


Bar. mean sea test. 6 pm, 1028.0 
mWbars. rising 
1.0lMmBbars^29531a 


NOON TODAY 


EXmeom 72 

TefgnaooBi &8 - 

Torquay 6.8 

FMmohSi * .16 

Pe na nce 72 M 

Sc9yWn 28 M 

Jersey 32 .01 

Oueinsay 42 .01 

Newquay 5.8 -08 


ffcq-n-Tyne 

Nottingham. 



EtSnbngh 

Eshdatemulr 

Glasgow 

KMoss 

Lonrtok 

Prestwick 

Stornoway 

Time 

Wick 


figures rwravalabta 


MDOAY: c, ckud; d, 


C F 

Aiaocto s 10 50 ~ 
Afcrotfri f 18 84 
Alex’dria s 18 68 
Algtare r 10 SO 
Amsfdm an 2 36 
AStens r 13 55 
Bahrein c 18 64 



Bcksade s 0 32 
^Ei sn -3 27 
Bwmocto' c 18 64 
Btarttz t 7 45 
Bonta^t I 6 43 
BoulVie 

. Bntsaato s 1 34 
Bwtapst t 2 36 
I B Aires* C 31 88 
i Cate & 20 68 
Cape Tin s 22 72 
CuteK> - f 16 61 ■ 
CWcaoo* I 3 37 
OrtSSdi c 18 84 


pe CV 

khes 


;i m 


7!--:- - . 


v.; 

•’\C v»i, 


jBibid 


Irro]:.. 


aiks 




el f’ 


J 


17 


w>»r 


Otw ■ 


fv* 


Thf'.'Z 


%^lt 

2JTW> 

—■ -V .< J - •>» 


£ii-*.; 


-.:• l."^j if 

- - ■'• d^ue 

•'.«., ‘‘a 

■ ..’ " "'• 

•• : ;-7-" n ^ 

. • : r .- ‘ - 11 if 
-t..-.;-;?-ib-|A 

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LP * J 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 23 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 27 


TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 

STOCK MARKET 

FT 30 Share 

1286.1 (+14.0) 

FT-SE 100 

1652.2 (+20.0) 
Bargains 
30012(31646) 

USM (Data stream) 
129.43 (+0.55) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 
1.4420 (+0.0125) 

W German marie 
2.8508 (-0.0221) 
Trade-weighted 
68.5 (-0.1) 

Yule Catto 
fleshes out 
£17m bid 

Yule Catto, the industrial 
chemicals, specialist building 
products and plantations busi- 
ness, yesterday published its 
offer document for Barrow 
Hepburn the industrial hold- 
ing company which is chaired 
by Professor Roland Smith. 

Yule Catto announced a 
£17.3 million bid on Decem- 
ber 12 which was rejected by 
the Bairow Hepburn board. It 
is bidding one new convertible 
preference share of lOOp plus 
I08p in cash for every four 
Barrow Hepburn sharps. This 
values the bid at 52p a share. 

Firth fillip 

Interim pretax profits of G 
M Firth (Holdings) in the half 
year to September 30 leapt by 
34 per cent to £1.4 million on 
turnover up 1 9 per cent to £28 
million. The dividend is' 
raised by O.OSp to 0.5p net 

Tempos, page 19 

Profits slump 

Interim pretax profits at 
Dominion International 
slumped 8 per cent to £4.6 
million on turnover up SS per 
cent to £39 million for the six 
months to September 30. The 
net dividend of 2.5p was 
unchanged. 

Tempos, page 19 

£4m buyout 

Guidehouse, the capital 
raising group, has financed a 
£4.1 milli on management 
buy-out of James Crosby, a 
leading housebuilder in the 
North-west Midland Bank is 
providing debt finance of 
about £3.1 million. 

Business chief 

Dr Theophilo de Azeredo 
Santos of Brazil has been 
elected president of the Inter- 
national Chamber of Com- 
merce for next year and J 988. 
Mr Peter Wallenberg of Swe- 
den is vice-president 

Stake sale . 

Cadbury Schweppes Austra- 
lia, is selling its 40 per cent 
shareholding in Oasis In- 
dustries in New Zealand tolD 
' Nathan for NZ$26 million 
(£9.3 million). 

£55m bid 

Panfida Capital, a subsid- 
iary of the Sydney-based 
investment group Panfida 
Ltd, has made a £55 million 
bid for “Investing in Success” 
Equities, the British invest- 
ment trust 

Offer talks 

Standard Securities, the 
property company, is in talks 
which could lead to an expan- 
sion of its capital resources 
and an offer for the company. 


WaO Street 18 Tempos 19 
Co News 18 Comment 19 
Commodities 18 Stock Markrt 19 
Traded Opts 18 UmlTnets 20 
Money Writs 18 USM Prices 28 
Foreign Em* 18 Stare Prices 21 


Brent touches $ 1 8 a barrel 

Crude oil price 
starts to climb 


By David Young, Energy Correspondent 


The world oil price started 

thTSUl f?X b low - panies have been'waiting fbr 

th ^,J va ^ e °f. *k. e In addition most Western an increase in Opec prices to 
T en !* k y Opec to taint governments used the excuse put up prices. But the size of 
^ 3 cheaper crude oil to raise stocks held by the companies 

OUm the excise duty on oil products and by governments means 

reluctant topass ihat ™^ufo£ 

should still benefit from cheap 0 n any pnee rises which could delayed, 
petrol and from cheaper home be seen as inflationary. rw . . _ oct - 

heating oil for some weeks as Price increases at the petrol nJ e Sj 1 5?>£L 0 22JS' 


they built up while prices were all of the leading oil com- 


panies have been waiting for 
an increase in Opec prices to 


healing oil for some weeks as 
oil companies use up stocks 


DATA STREAM 



Starting index 
Loft hand 
scale 


DECEMBER 


I^rice increase alira oetrol P«rol prices, the most vis- 

ible effect of Opec policies, 
pumps are inevitable almost taw ^ ^ 

Britain in the past six months 
ercni iiiMc fzjr 17 -° by intensive forecourt com- 

HOmH stZ I bSS. P^tjon between the oil com-. 

SUPPORT g At present, demand is at its 

§7 "16-5 lowest and the big three in ! 

if Britain — Esso, Shell and BP — 

M;; are reluctant to take the lead in 

M' _ 16 0 raising prices. 

/:■ North Sea Brent crude was 

//# YWa traded yesterday at above $18 

JJ r*' 1w/\i a barrel for the first time in 

f/r Sm- ” -is^ almost a year and some trad- 

/ ere are predicting that the $20 

l barrel is likely in January. 

. The key to firmer prices is 

f | Brant crude I - 15.0 Opec’s ability to maintain its 

a gS Right hand I present fragile unity and keep 

„ .1 output to its newly agreed 

figure of 1 5.8 million barrels a 
-14.5 day. 

An $18 barrel would help 
-r Britain’s oil revenues as well 

- ' as those of poorer countries 



US on course 
for 3% growth, 
says OECD 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

United States growth The report examines the 
should shortly accelerate to impact of the major influences 
about 3 per cent a year and on the US economy both this 
stay at that level for the next year and next. 

18 months, the Organization On the assumption of oil 
for Economic Cooperation prices at $15 a barrel, lower oil 
and Development says in its prices will pro i vide a boost 
annual report on the country's equivalent to 0.4 per cent of 
prospects. gross national product next 

Inflation in the US is not year, after a 0.3 percent boost 
expected to show any signifi- next year, 
cant increase. The forecast is The rise in the stock market, 
for a 3.2 per cent rise in the which has a dded $450 billion 
gross national product de- to net household wealth, is 


flator in the first half of 1988, estimated to provide an even 
over the corresponding period bigger boost — 0.5 per cent 
of next year, little changed next year, after 0.4 per cent 
from the present 3.1 per cent, this. 


rate of increase. 


The effects of the lower 


The report adds: “Contrary dollar are mixed, unproved 
to developments in past cy- trade performance partly off- 
dical upturns, inflation is set by inflationary pressures, 
projected to remain relatively The net effect is a 0.4 percent 
subdued, while capacity con- GNP boost next year, after a 
straints are unlikely to pose a 0.1 per cent contractionary 


threat 


Brant etude 
Right hand 


Opec deal lifts market 




serious threat to the influence this year, 
recovery." Finally, the reduction in the 

But tiie Paris-based indus- budget deficit, assuming im- 
trialized countries’ club, pre- plementation of the Balanced 
diets that the large current Budget Act, is contractionary 
account deficit will persist. bu 0.6 per cent of GNP in next 

It predicts a painfully slow year, 
reduction in the deficit from The deficit has had an 
-$69.25 billion in the second expansionary influence, 
half of this year, to $66.75 equivalent to 0.25 per cent of 
billion in the first half of 1988. GNP, this year. 

Job losses avoided 

The OECD, in an examina- geographical mobility of la- 
tion of the workings of the bour and real wage flexibility. 


The Opec agreement helped 
to produce higher share prices 
and a strong rally in gov- 
ernment bonds. But the 

S ound, surprisingly, showed 
file benefit from the prospect 
of $18 a barrel oil prices. The 
sterling index feU 0.1 to 68.5. 

The weekend deal in Ge- 
neva, Gallup poll results 
showing the Conservatives 8.5 
points ahead of Labour, and 


The gilt-edged market was points to dose at 1,286.1. 
particularly strong, taking the Sterling's rise was, however, 
view that a base-rate increase short-lived. The index, after 
to protect sterling had now rising to 68.9 at 9am, ended at 
passed. Long-dated bonds 68.5, pulled down by sterling’s 
rose by more than a point as fell against the mark, 
money market interest rales 

edged down. The pound rose 93 pomts to 

When sterling rose yes- close at $1.4420 but dropped 
terday morning, some traders by mwe *an two pfenmgs to 


Sir Isaac: at the peak of his power in 1970 

Sir Isaac made life 
president of GUS 


By Teresa Poole 


Wolfson, 


Three divisional managing 


syndicates. 


few months of next year. 


news from the CBI of pay year. This, coupled with the 
settlements at a 10-year low, buoyancy of the gfit-edged 
encouraged the financial mar- market, helped equities. The 
kets yesterday. FT 30-share index rose by 14 0 

Hillsdown 
puts £8m 
into coal 

By Cliff Fettham 
Hillsdown Holdings, the 
acquisitive food and furniture 
group, hopes to strike a rich 
profit seam from its latest 
investment — in a coal mining 
group. 

The company is pumping 
£8.7 million into Anglo 
United Development 
Corporation, the country’s 
biggest independent producer 
ofopen-cast coal in return for 
a 29.9 per cent stake. 

Anglo United shares 
jumped 3p to 30p, compared 
with the 25p being paid by 
Hillsdown for its new shares. 

Mr Harry Solomon, joint 
chairman of Hillsdown, said: 

“This is a one-off deal and it 
is certainly not a include to 
taki ng control. “Nuclear 
power is out of favour, and 
there are all sorts of invest- 
ment problems with oil” 

Hillsdown is a big user of 
energy — its annual bill is £30 
million — and there could be 
scope for buying some coaL 
Anglo is keen to break into 
retailing, and Hillsdown’s 
chain of 200 builders' mer- 
chants could provide outlets 
for the move. 

Anglo United is headed by 
Mr David McEriain, aged 38, 
who said last night: “The tie 
up with Hillsdown gives us the 
financial muscle to move into 
coal trading possibly by or- 
ganic growth or by 
acquisition.” 


were talking of a possible UM2 S533 - 
reduction in base rates next Dealers said markets were 
year. This, coupled with the thin and that the pound’s foil 
buoyancy of the gfit-edged against European currencies 
market, helped equities. The reflected the strength of the 


FT 30-share index rose by 14.0 mark against the dollar. 

PCW delay expected 

Lloyd’s insurance market is Lloyd's and AUA3 had 
unlikely to make an offer to reached agreement on prin- 
settle the PCW ailair before apies on which a settlement 
the end of next month at the could be based, he said, but 
earliest, according to a letter other important matters re- 
yesterday to names on PCW mained to be settled. 


founder of Great Universal directors have also been ap- 
Stores, is to step down as joint pointed from the b oard, 
chairman of the mail order, formaliziiig for tiie first time 
retail and finance group. Aged the divisional structure of the 
89, he is to become honorary company, 
life president. Mr Richard Pugh is to be 

Tiie new chairman will be managing director of a cat- 
Slr Isaac’s son. Lord (Leon- alogne and mail orriexdivisioii; 
aid) Wolfson, aged 59, who is Mr William Header managing 
joint c hairman and managing director of a financial services 
director. The assistant division; Mr Stanley Peacock 
managing directors, Mr Har- managing directin' of the Bur- 
old Bowman and Mr A Trevor berry division; and Mr Eric 
Spittle, will become joint dep- Barnes director of ret a ilin g 


labour market in the United 
States, concludes that flexibil- 
ity has helped to counter the 
potential job losses resulting 
from the current account 
deficit 

It says: “It cannot be con- 
cluded that the current deficit 
has resulted in an excessive 
destruction of jobs.” 

Since 1970, 30 million net 
jobs have been created in the 
United States, with 10 million 
of these in the latest recovery. 
This compares with no net job 
gains in Europe. 

The OECD says that this is 
because the job mar ket in the 
US is the most flexible among 
the industrialized countries. 

This shows up in greater 


In periods of high inflation 
there was less tendency among 
wage bargainers in the US to 
match inflation. 

As a result of these factors, 
with a lower degree of 
unionization, the labour mar- 
ket is for less segmented than 
in Europe. 

It is for easier to move 
between unemployment and 
work than in Europe, where 
the unemployed can quickly 
become “outsiders,” and find 
themselves disadvantaged. 

The OECD challenges the 
popular view that employ- 
ment growth in the United 
States has occurred because 
individuals have been forced 
into low productivity jobs. 


He gave details of the 


Sir Ian Morrow, chairman standstill agreement on 
of AUA3, the agency manag- American litigation secured 
ing the lossmaking syndicates, last week. “We have obtained, 
said the complexity of the with the assistance of the 1985 
issues makes it unlikely that PCW names committee and 
even preli min ary d e t ails of their advisers, a standstill 
such an offer could be ready agreement to prevent claims, 
earlier. which might otherwise be 

He hoped a resolution brought against potential 
would.be achieved m the first defendants in the US, from 


becoming time-barred.’ 


nty chairmen. 

Sir Isaac, who lives in 
Israel has been mweH ami 
has had tittle involvement in 
the running of the company for 
some time. He was sole chair- 
man for 38 years. 

Mr Bowman said: “His new 
appointment is a mark of 
respect for his contribution to 
the company.” 

In 1955 Sr Isaac founded 
the Wolfson Foundation for 
the advancement of health, 
education and yonth activities 


and brciness information ser- 
vices. Mr Robert Barradoagh, 
who is nearly 70, is to retire 
The City was yesterday 
uncertain how to interpret the 
changes at GUS. Mr Dan 
Banting, retail analyst at 
Scrimgeoar Vickers, the bro- 
ker, said: “This is part of a 
long, slow evolution which one 
day may see a transition to a 
less cautions, more outgoing, 
more aggressive management 
style.” 

Comment, page 19 


Loan rates hit index 

The longer leading index for of messages from the cyclical 
the economy fell last month, indicators would point to a 
its fourth successive monthly situation in which the econ- 
dedine. The index, which omy was at present recover- 
forecasts turning points in the ing, giving way to a downturn 
economy a year ahead, was next year. 


pulled down by firmer interest 
rates and lower share prices. 


However, officials said that 
the cyclical indicators rc- 


Last month, the longer lead- mained difficult to interpret 
ing index stood at 100.9 (1980 and did not provide any clear 
= 100), compared with 102^ guide to trends in the econ- 


in October. 

The shorter leading index 
edged up slightly in October 


omy in the coming months. 

Movements in the co- 
incident index do support the 


and the coincident index rose view that there was a pause in 
from 92.1 in September to economic activity for about 12 
92.4 in October. months between the middle of 

Normally, this combination last year and mid-1 986. 


DU to end inquiry this week 


This advertisement is issued in compliance with the requirements 
of die Council of The Stock Exchange. 


By Colin Narbrongh Secretary of State for Trade triggered 
and Industry, announced last action. 
The unprecedented in- Thursday the appointment of The D 
vestigation by outside mspec- two outside inspectors to in- unwilling 
tors into alleged leaks of vestigate allegations that reports th 


Channon’s 


into alleged leaks 


completed by Christmas, 
according to Whitehall 
sources yesterday. 


ten tea in- Thursday the appointment of The DTI was yesterday 
side inspeo- two outside inspectors to in- unwilling to confirm or deny 
1 leaks of vestigate allegations that reports that a young woman 
market-sensitive information privileged information on employed at the DTI had' 
by servants could be merger decisions was being passed privileged information 
Christmas, leaked by officials of the to her brother, a solicitor, who 
Whitehall Department of Trade and used it for share dealings. In 


This would relieve the G ov- ^id Monopolies Commi ssion, 
eminent of the embarrassing or the Office of Fair Trading. 


Department of Trade and used it for share dealings. In 
Industry (DTI), the Mergers line with the official stone- 
and Monopolies Commission, walling since the probe was 


task of having to investigate 


the Office of Fair Trading, announced, the department ! 
Odd movements in toe declined to give any details of I 


tiie officials trusted with keep- prices close to announcements the progress or origins of the 
ing business competition fair. 0 f merger rulings were widely investigations. 

Only weeks after naming attributed to inside informs- From the outset the Gov- 
inspectors to look into pos- ti on being passed on by civil eminent is believed to have 
sible insider dealingin City servants to market operators, had a good idea where to look 
firms. Mr Paul Channon, This was believed to have for leaks. 


This was believed to have for leaks. 


Rent-a-satellite service for UK companies 

Transatlantic round table 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS I MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


Ngw York 

Dow Jones 1919.85 (-9.00)* 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow ..... 18825.40 (-104.63) 

Hang Seng 5 2503T7 (+39;96| 

Amsterdam; Gen 283.4 (+2-w 

Sydney: AO ... — 1460.6 (+3.8) 

Commerzbank 2035.9 (-2.8) 

Brussels: 

General - 4053.66 (+18.64) 

Paris; CAC 

Zurich: SKA Gen 550.90 (+0.90) 

London: FT. A ^ 

FT. Gilts 82.89 (-0.57) 

Closing prices Page 21 


INTEREST RATES 


London: Bank Base: 11% 

3-month Interbank 11 ,, 32-11 3 3J% 
3 -month eligible Mis:1(H 3 a> ,, '«% 
buying rate 
US; Prime Rate 7fc% 

Federal Funds 6 7 ie%* 

3-month Treasury BHiS 5.51-5.50%* 
30-year bonds 101 tt-lQl 9 '*’ 


CURRENCIES 



Godwm warren 
Norbaln Elect . 
Standard Secs. 


Prontaprlnt 

Prices are as at 4pm 


76p(-7p) 


GOLD 


London: 

E: 51.4420 
£: DM2.8508 
£: SwFr2.3908 
£; FFr9.3658 
E Yen 234.4 7 
£: Index: 66.5 


New York: 

$: £1.4420* 

$: DM1 .9785* 
$: SwFrl.6595* 
S: FFr6.4975* 

$: Yen162.7S* 
$: lndex;lQ9.9 


London Fixing: 

273.50) 

New York: 

Comax $392^0-392.70* 


194.15 

00 (£273.00- 


ECU £0.727132 SDR £0.839338 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent (Jan.) pm Si 7.1 Obti I ($16.25) 

* Pamtos W«t pnea 


By Jonathan Miller, Media 
Correspondent 

Mr Bruce Fireman, the 
investment banker, mil next 
month launch a rent-a-sat- 
ellite scheme for British public 
companies to put their case to 
American investment 
analysts. 

For about £39,000 an hour 
Mr Fireman’s European 
Financial Network will link 
British managers with Ameri- 
can institutions, using a two- 
way television Link. 

He said that the price 
compares favourably with 
sending executives to America 
on Concorde flights for days of 1 
traditional road-sbow c 
presentations. 

Mr Fireman has still to sign fnT 
up his first customer, but he is 
sufficiently confident to have 
backed it entirely from his “ 
own funds. He declined to 1 
disclose the size of his 
investmenL Tire 

Mr Fireman described the bon 
plan as akin to an analysts’ lhe,! 
conference held on the day rtulT 
that a company announces its torn 
financial results - with the £50 [ 
audience 3,000 miles away. noli 

He said: “American inves- Tfc 
tors need to be tofd exactly the been 


' • S ■ . r* -.1 

• •; •• ** • “■ y «, v •: 



panies are using satellite links 
to present their case, to the 
institutions. 

According to Mr Fireman, 
150 American companies 
have made use of the system 
including American Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Com- 
pany and Digital Equipment. 

The transmissions from 
Britain will be carried by an 
Inielsal satellite to New York, 
where they will be retransmit- 
ted to an American domestic 
satellite service. Institutional 
Research Network, which has 
60 institutional subscribers, 
manag in g funds with a value 
of more than £1,000 billion. 

Presentations can include 
direct contributions to camera 
from senior management, 
slides, charts, film and 


Presentations 

charge £39,000 an hour contributi 

pean shareholders. Right now, from senioT 
all they’ve got is what’s on the slides, charts, 
screen fijit thing in the videotape, 
morning. For an extra 

“Uring this semce. they 
can be approached directly. 

They can watch the present*- “ ? JJJfj 
tion, pick up a telephone on Jg* 
their desk, call a New York JSaShSu 
number and put their question iTr ^ man 

JShimF? mvestor ’ 11 15 together the fina 
nothing. iJSanonAovtt non 


The concept has already 
en proved in America, 


tors need to be tola exactly me been proved in America, 
same information as Euro* where more than 150 com- 


For an extra fee, Mr Fire- 
man promises to arrange for 
an edited version to be carried 
on the Financial News Net- 
work, a cable television ser- 
vice reaching 10 million 
American homes. 

Mr Fireman — he is the 
investment banker who put 
together the financing for The 
Independent newspaper - said 
that the company, which he 
owns, plans to launch its 
KTVF<? !R January. 


STRATTON INVESTMENT TRUST pic 

(Registered in England no. 2067050) 


Issue of 

12,625,176 Ordinary Shares of 50p each. 

to former Shareholders of Outwich Investment Trust pic 
under the terms of the reconstruction approved by 
Shareholders on 8th December, 1986. 


Application has been made to the Council of The Stock 
Exchange for die above Shares to be admitted to the Official 
List by way of introduction. 

The Listing Particulars relating to the Ordinary Shares 
are available in the Extel Statistical Service and copies may 
be obtained, up to and including 29th December, 1986, from 
the Company Announcements Office, The Stock Exchange, 
London EC2 and, up to and including 6th January, 1987, 
■from: 


Stratton InvestmentTrust pic 
8 Bishopsgate 
London EC2N 4AE 


Cazenove &. Co. 
12 TokenhouseYard 
London EC2R TAN 


23rd December, 1966 


4 







18 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986. 


WALL STREET 


Shares in early retreat 


New York (Renter) — Will 
Street shares retreated 
slightly in early trading yes- 
terday as the market took 
theoportmiity to digest last 
Friday's broad advance 
andrecord volume, 

CHI issues reacted positively 
to news of an Opec agreement 
on production cuts bat the 
agreement fuelled inflation 
worries in the bond market 
The Dow Jones industrial 


average dipped 253 to 
1,92632 at one stage when the 
transport average was down 
557 to 83031 and the ntflities 
indicator down 139 to 21057. 
The 65 stocks average de- 
clined 2.73 to 751.99. 

The broader Standard & 
Poor’s composite index' lost 
130 at 24839 while the New 
York Stock Exchange 
composite index slipped 0.78 
to 14137. 



Dec 

Dec 


Dec 

Dec 


Dec 

Dec 


19 

18 


19 

18 


19 

18 

AMR 

56 

55* 

Rreatone 

28* 

27% 

Pfizer 

61* 

62 

ASA 

36* 

36* 

Fat Chicago 

30* 

31* 

PhetpsDge 

21* 

21* 

Alfied Signal 

AUedStra 

42* 

67* 

42* 

67* 

FstWBngj 

FstPrwiC 

54* 

9 

53* 

8% 

PMp MTS 
PhSfesPat 

73 

11* 

73* 

11* 

AteChfimrs 

2* 

?* 

Ford 

58% 

57* 


88% 

ti/U 

Alcoa 

34 

34 

FTWnchra 

37* 

37% 

PPG bid 

75 

73* 

Amexlnc 

12V- 

12* 

OAF Corp 

39* 

38* 

PlttrGmM 

00* 

79 

Am'rdaHs 

73* 

23* 

GTE Corp 

59* 

58* 

PbSE&G 

41 

41* 

Am Brands 

44* 

44* 

Gen Corp 

74* 

75* 

Raytheon 

68% 

6/H 

Am Can- 

86* 

85* 

GenDy'mcs 

GenSectric 

69* 

69* 

RynMsMet 

42 

40* 

AmCynrn'd 

80% 

80 

88% 

86% 

Rockwell mt 

47* 

48 

78* 

28* 

Ganmst 

18* 

18* 

Royal Dutch 

93% 

92% 

Am Express 

ra% 

59* 

Gen Mite 

44 

43* 

Sara Lae 

69% 

69* 

Am Home 

7fi* 

77* 

Gen Moon 

88* 

66* 

SFESopac 

30* 

30% 

Am Motors 

3 

2% 

GnPbUtny 

23% 

23* 

SchTbereer 

34 

32 

AmSTnrd 

43* 

43 

Genesco 

3* 

3X 

Scott Paper 

63* 

63* 

AmTeteph 

26* 

26* 

Georgia Pac 

38* 

33* 

Seagram 

63* 

62* 

Amoco 

70 

65* 

GSate 

bOX 

bOX 

Seers mx* 

41* 

49* 


5* 

5* 


45 

44* 

ShedTtans 

ffi* 

5SX 

Asarco 
Ashland CH 

14% 

58* 

14* 

68 

Goodyear 

Gouwlnc 

41* 

18 

41% 

18* 

imSSctaBk 

39* 

91% 

39% 

91* 

At Richfield 

60* 

59* 

Gran 

62* 

51% 

Sony 

SthCMEd 

22* 

22 


78* 

28* 

GtAUftTac 

23* 

72* 

35 

34% 

BKrsTstNY 

47* 

47* 

Gr-hnd 

31* 

32% 

SWstnBel 

114* 

113* 

Bankamer 

14* 

15* 

GrumanCor 

28* 

28* 

StdOH 

49% 

48* 

Bk of Baton 

43 

42* 

GuH8 West 

6b% 

65* 

Staring Dra 
Stevens JP 

46* 

46 

Bank of NY 

39* 

39% 

Heinz KJ. 

42 

41 

39* 

39* 

Beth Steel 

6* 

5* 

Hercules 

53% 

54 


59% 

56 

Boeing 

53* 

63 

53 

62* 

Hiett-md 

■ ■ — 

noneywon 

fCbrtfe 

44 

60% 

43% 

61% 

teledyne 

Tenneco 

310* 

38* 

308* 

38* 


48* 

47% 

22* 

23* 

Texaco 

35* 

36% 

Bg Warner 

41% 

41% 

kneraol 
infand Steal 

bf 

57 


28* 

28% 

82* 

81* 

19 

18% 

Texas Inst 

121* 

119% 

BP 

40% 

40% 

IBM 

125* 

126* 

Texas UtRs 

32* 

32* 


43 

42% 

INCO 

12 

11* 

Textron 

66 

65% 

Burf ton Nm 

58 

56% 

Int Paper 
tetTefTei 

74* 

73% 

TravtraCor 

45% 

45* 

Brunswick 

34 

33 

52* 

52% 

TRW Inc 

93 

90* 

CnvtnflSp 

61* 

GO 

Irving Bank 

48* 

46% 

UAL me 

58* 

57* 

CanPadflc 

12* 

12* 


68* 

68* 

Unsever NV 

233 

229* 

CaurpOar 

41% 

242% 

40% 

242 

KeiserAtem 
Kan McGee 

13 

26* 

12* 

28* 

Unimn 

UnCartade 

83* 

22* 

83% 

22* 

Central 8W 

35 

34* 

KmbTyCtrk 

83* 

83* 

UnPacCor 

B4* 

53% 

Champion 

32% 

31% 

K Mart 

47* 

47* 

Utd Brands 

36* 

33* 

Chase Man 

37* 

38* 

Kroger 

L-TV.Corp 

30 

bl* 

USGCorp 


38% 

ChmBkNY 

44% 

44* 

1% 

1* 

UtdTechnol 

47* 

46* 


46 

46* 

Litton 

77 

78* 

USX Corp 

21* 

22* 

Chrysler 

40 

39% 

Lockheed 

50* 

51 

Unocal 

27% 

26% 

Gficorp 

54% 

S3* 

Lucky Sirs 
Manfrnver 

30* 

80% 

Jim Walter 

49% 

48% 

70* 

20* 

48* 

47% 

WmerLmM 

58* 

58* 

Coca Cota 

39% 

38% 

ManvtaeCp 

1* 

1* 

Wefts Fargo 
Wstghsa 0 

104 

105 

CBS 

43* 

47* 

Mapco 

60* 

60% 

60 

59* 

131* 

129* 

Marine Mid 

48 

45* 


39* 

39% 


45% 

45* 

Mn Marietta 

39* 

37* 


69% 

69* 

Cmb'tnEng 

33% 

33 

Masco 

78* 

28% 


40* 

39* 

35 

34% 

McDonalds 

65 

63% 

Xerox Com 

82 

61* 

Cons Etfis 

48* 

48* 

McDormefl 

78* 

76* 

Zenith 

21% 

21* 

Cn Nat Gas 

34* 

33* 

Mead 

57% 

67* 





Cons Power 
Cntrl Data 
Coding Gl 
CPC lnB 
Crane 
Curtiss Wrt 
DataGenL 

Deere 
Delta Air 
Detroit Ed 
Digital Eq 


16* 

26* 

56* 

81* 

34* 

54* 

31* 

25* 

49* 

17* 

106* 


Dteiw 45* 

DowCtaffl 61 
Dresser ind 19* 
Duke Rower 47* 
DuPont 88 
Emm Kodak 68* 
Eaton Core 77* 
Emerson a 87* 
Emery Air 12* 
Exxon Coro 73 
Fed Dpt Sts 89 


16* 

27* 

56* 

81 

34* 

54* 

31* 

23* 

48* 

17* 

106 

45* 

60* 

19* 

47* 

87* 

68* 

74* 

88 * 

12 * 

71* 

87* 


Merck 
MlnstaMng 
Mobil OH 
Monsanto 
Morgan JJ 1 . 
Motorola 
NCR Carp 
NLIndstr? 
NatOfsfts 
NatMedEnt 
NatSmcndt 
Norfofc S0i 

NWBancrp 

OccktatPet 


Ogden 
OSn Core 
Omrota 


PBcQasB 

Pan Am 

Penney J.C. 

Penrtzoi 

Peplsco 


116* 113 
116* 116* 
40* 39/. 
78* 76* 

86* 86* 
37* 37* 
47* 45* 
5* 5* 

46* 46* 
23* 23* 

11 * 11 * 
86* 84* 

38* 38* 
28* 27* 
43* 43* 
41* 41 
51 50* 

25 24% 

4* 4* 

76* 76* 
64* 63* 
27* 26* 


CANADIAN PRICES 


AgncoEag 
AfcnAJum 
AlgomaStf 
Can Pacific 
Continoo 
GonBathrat 
Ho/Sid Can 
HdsnBMn 

Imasco 
artel 01 
taftpe 
Rytfrustco 
Seanam 
Stew Co 
TfcmanN-A 1 

SS? 0 "" 

Weston 


28* 

38* 

11 

17* 

13 

29* 

26* 

23 

32% 

49* 

38* 

30* 

86* 

18% 

30* 

254 

12 * 

35* 


28* 

38* 

10* 

17* 

13* 

29 

26% 

23 

32 

49* 

38* 

30* 

86% 

18* 

30% 

250 

12* 

35* 


Fears of i solation from world economic community I Lucas boosts 


!■ yf 


Make friends with other 


nations. Japanese told 


industry 
in N Ireland 


ullti 

% h‘l i ) 


& 

?. 5* 


From David Watts, Tokyo 

Japan is in danger of isolat- And the question has been 

A ■ re-opened by friction with 

Europe over taxes on wt 


ing itself from the rest of the 
world economic community, 
the Japanese foreign minister, 
Mr Tadashi Kuranari said 
yesterday. 

He added: “We must try to 
survive as a country that is 
indispensable to the rest of the 
world. 

“To that end we must 
continue to be modest, we 
must maintain h umili ty and 
continue to exchange opinions 
with various countries around 
the world, listening to the 


and wines and the _ 
trade problems with the 
United Stales. 

Another factor is Heir 
Helmut Schmidt’s statement 
that Japan did not have dose 
friends on whom it could call 
even in Asia. This desire to 
gain friendships apparently 
will not influence British de- 
mands for removal of 
discriminatory whisky taxes. 

Japan has hinted that it 



opinions of everyone, even if cannot remove grading sys- 


some opinions seem minor to 
us.” 

The question of Japan’s 
isolation is one that constantly 
haunts its leaders — a feeling 
that it is in the world but not 
of it 


terns which discriminate 
against Scotch in one swoop. 

Mr Knranari, speaking to 
the Japan Press Club, con- 
firmed that the best offer, 
when the details are finalized 
this week, will be removal of 


Mr Kuranari:“We most listen 
to other opinions” 
such categorization over a 
period of at least three years. 

Mr Kuranari’s thoughts os 
isolation have been affected 
by the narrow margin by 
which Japan scraped through 
to its membership of the 


United Nations Security 
CounciL 

It is seeking to break out of 
its bierarchial attitude to- 
wards other countries which 
dictate? a policy in which the 
Japanese foreign ministry re- 
sponds on the basis of a 
country’s status. 

Japan needed 103 votes to 
qualify and collected 107. 

Mr Kuianari said: “This is 
something we should reflect 
on. However small a country 
is we must respond to that 
country and try and gain an 
understanding of Japan from 
the smallest of countries to try 
and keep them os onr side, to 
keep them as our friends. 

"How many countries 
around the world support 
Japan? That is a question, so 
we must try harder and 
harder.” 


Fund planned to help Third World 


From Onr Correspondent 
Tokyo 

Japan and the World Bank 
are in talks about setting up a 
special fund to channel some 
of Tokyo’s huge trade sur- 
pluses to Third World 
countries. 


It is hoped that the World 
Bank would draw about S375 
milli on (£265 million) from 
Japanese institutions and 
$375 million from the Japa- 
nese government in the first 
year, beginning next ApriL 
This as the response of Mr 


Yasubiro Nakasone, the 
Prime Minister, to world atti- 
cism of his country’s trade 
surpluses. 

The plan would run for 
three years and be worth a 
total of $2 billion. It would be 
the first time that the Japanese 


government has given money 
directly to the World Bank. 

Japanese institutions pro- 
vide $1.87 billion of World 
Bank funds every year. 

Japan’s world-wide trade 
surplus could reach $80 bil- 
lion this year. 


Marchant to 
buy PR firm 


Holmes & Marchant, the 
sales promotion and graphic 
design company, is /buying 
Biggs C ommunications, 
public relations and advertis- 
ing group, for a maximum £6 

millio n 

In the year to March 31 
Biggs of High Wycombe, 
Buckinghamshire, made pro- 
tax profits of £400,000 on 
turnover of £6.8 million. 

The price, to be paid in 
stages, and in shares win 
depend on profits. It will be 
equivalent to 1 1 times taxed 
earnings for the three years to 
September 30, 1989. 


BET buys film US 
scaffolding company 


By Alison Eadie 
BET, the industrial services ing arrangement as a good deal 


group, yesterday announced 
the $16 


milli on (£11 million) 
acquisition of Werner Enter- 
prises, a private Georgia- 
based scaffolding company. 

The acquisition has been 
financed through a bought 
deal arranged by Goldman 
Sarh^ the US investment 
hank, Gol dman yesterday 
placed 2.6 million new BET 
shares at 432p, against a 
market price about 43 6p. 

Mr Neil Ryder, a BET 
director, described the financ- 


for the company which pro- 
tected the small shareholder. * 

Weiner operates in Georgia, 
Alabama, Florida and Texas. 
In 1985, its pretax profit 
totalled $2 million on <ai*s of 
$23.7 million. BET is keen to 
expand Werner’s business in 
the southern states of the US. 

BET recently took over 
HAT Group, which has paint- 
ing operations in the US. In 
addition, it ha* linm rental 
and publishing businesses in 
America. 


Bowater buys 
Staybrite 


Bowater Industries, the pa- 
per, parkaging and building 
group, is expanding its home 
improvements division with 
the acquisition of Staybrite 
Windows, of Coventry. 

Bowater is paying an InHial 
£3 milli on in shams, and a 
further sum of up to £3.5 
million wifi be payable over 
the next two years, depending 
on results. 

Staybrite made an operating 
profit of just under £1 milli on 
in the past year on turnover of 
£13 million. Bo water’s other 
main home improvement 
company is ADP Insulations, 
acquired in 1985. 


By Robert RodweD 

The manufacturing in- 
dustry in Northern Ireland 
yesterday recieved its second 
boost in eight days from 
British industry. 

Lucas Industries is to spend 
£4 milli on to expand its Lucas 
Stability Electronics factory at 
Antrim. The investment will 
create 200 new jobs and will 
mean a transfer of production 
work from the mainland. Half 
the vacancies will become 
available over the next 12 
months. 

The Antrim plant will make 
a new rang e of silicon chip- 
based components developed 
by the corporate Research and 
Development Centre in Bir- 
mingham. Initially there will 
be small-scale production of 
these components at its ve- 
hicle plant in Bi rmingham. 

The news encourages cau- 
tious confidence that, at long 
last, the much needed u 
for Northern Ireland’s 
manufacturing base 
underway. 

The silicon-chip production 
operation, the first for the 
Province, wifi make chip- 
based surge suppressors which 
protect sensitive electronic 
systems from lightning , nucle- 
ar radiation antistatic electric- 
ity. 

Dr Kevin Hawkins, a Lucas 
Industries’ spokes m a n , said: 
“The suipressors have their 
main applications in the tele- 
communications and avionics 
markets and do not fit natu- 
rally into the vehicle context. 
We decided, therefore, to 
transfer the work from Bir- 





is 


John McAllister in talks 
with other companies 

mingbam to Antrim. It is one 
of our industrial system group 
factories and is more closely 
attuned to the specialist 
market.” 

Mr Andrew Little, director 
and general manager of Stabil- 
ity Electronics, said the US, 
Germany and Italy were 
potential markets. He added 
that world demand was worth 
about £40 million a year. His 
plant would aim to capture 10 
per cent 

Mr John McAllister, chief 
executive of the Northern 
Ireland Industrial Develop- 
ment Board, said the board’s 
“case workload” was at its 
highest level for some years. It 
was negotiating a number of 
projects with other electronics 
manufacturers. Mr Peter Vig- 
gers, junior minister for in- 
dustry at the NID, was 
confident that 1987 would be 
a much brighter year economi- 
cally for Northern Ireland 
than the past several years. 


4J 


1 


..«5 




: -3.S- 

- r* -5* 

. fT* 

-■-i 


APPOINTMENT'S' 


COMPANY NEWS 


• J W SPEAR & SONS: Turn- 
over for the second half of 1986 
failed to reach the level antici- 
pated. For the year it will be 
marginally ahead of 1 985. Since 
product development and 
promotional costs were geared 
to support the assumed higher 
turnover, the pretax profit for 
1986 will be materially lower 
than in 198S. It is intended to 
maintain the dividend for 1986 
at 6p. 

HUMBERSIDE ELEC- 
TRONIC CONTROLS: Oeves 
Investments has bought 2 mil- 
lion shares from Mr P Monaster 
(8.51 percent). 

• WCRS GROUP: The com- 


pany has acquired Alan Pascoe 
s. The fi 


Associates. The first payment 
will be £1 .7 million of which £! 
million will be cash and 
£700,000 will be met by the 
issue of 1 34,610 ordinary snares. 
A debenture will be issued to 
pay the last tranche up to a 
maximum of £5.75 million, 
dep ending on future profits. 
GESTETNER HOLDINGS: 
AFP has subscribed for 10 
million new Gestetner ordinary 
capital shares at !40p a share. 
AFP has also subscribed nil paid 
for £1 15.6 million nominal of 7 
per cent convertible unsecured 
loan stock 2001. 

REA DICUT INTER- 
NATIONAL: Mr Paul 

Channon, The Trade and In- 
dustry Secretary, has decided 
not to refer to the Monopolies 
Commission the proposed ac- 
quisition of F Drake (Fibres). 

• BULMER & LUMB 
(HOLDINGS): The Allied Tex- 
tile agreed offer document in- 
cludes an estimate by the board 
of the consolidated profit on 
ordinary activities before tax of 
the Allied group of £7.5 million 
for the year to September 
30.(£6.4). The offer document 
includes also the terras of an 
agreed offer for the 3,5 per cent 
Bulmer preference shares. 
Holders of these are being 
offered 60p a share, which 
values the preference share cap- 
ital at £60,000. A loan note 
alternative will also be available 
on the basis of 60p in nominal 
value of unsecured unlisted loan 
notes of Allied for each Bulmer 
preference share. 

• CARLTON COMMU- 
NICATIONS: The company is 
acquiring Gordon Enterprises, 
of New York. The first payment 
is $6.2 million (£4.33) cash. An 
additional sum of up to $14.8 
million is payable if specified 
income levels are achieved in 
each of the years to September 
3a 1991. 

• BURNS-ANDERSON: the 
The chairman has written to 
shareholders urging them to 
ignore the offer from Dudley. 

• SHEFFIELD BRICK: The 
listing of the shares, temporarily 
suspended on November 3, has 
been cancelled after 
shareholders’ approval of the re- 
organization proposals. A rule 


520 notice has been issued, 
admitting a new company. Ben- 
son SBG. to the official list. 

• ROTHMANS INTER- 
NATIONAL: Ro thmans and 
Philip Morris say that the 
amalgamation of their 
subsidaries, Rothmans of Pall 
Mall and Benson & Hedges 
(Canada), as Rothmans. Benson 
& Hedges has been completed. 
GABANINTHA GOLD DE- 
POSIT: Southern Ventures said 
that continuing exploration on 
the Gabanintha gold deposit 
near Meekatharra, Western 
Australia, has produced “signifi- 
cant intersections'' on the 
Canterbury prospect. 

• THE BANKERS* INVEST- 
MENT TRUST: Fourth interim 
dividend 1.06p, making Z86p. 
One-for-one capitalization pro- 
posed. Figures in £s for year to 
October 31. Total income 
4,867,648 (4,534,633), deben- 
ture and interest payable 
970,129 (870,330), admin- 
istrative expenses 499,278 
(455.368). tax 1.102.660 

(1.091.220) , revenue after all 
charges and tax 2,295,581 
(2,117,715). earnings per share 
2.90p (2.67). net asset value 
after deducting prior charges at 
par 1 63. 1 p (118.6). The board 
forecasts a minimum increase in 
next year’s dividend of 7 per 
cent. 

• BRAJTH WAITE GROUP: 
No interim dividend. Figures in 
£s for six months to September 
30. Turnover 4,497,007 

(5.402.221) , profit on ordinary 
activities 242.491 (141.046). in- 
terest 136,423 (67.379). loss on 
discounted businesses nil 
(229,182), operating profit 
106.068 (debit 1 55.5 IS), profit 
on ordinary activities 106.068 
(loss 1 5S.S 1 5), extraordinary 

charges nil (800,000), earnings 
per share 3.6p (5.6 p). 

• AUDIO FIDELITY: 
in £s for 14 mths to June . 
rnths to April 30). Turnover 
5,644,526 (4,386^34), pretax 
profit 186,852 (86,444), tax 
adjustment in respect of pre- 
vious years 937 (oil). UK 
corporation tax 52,032 (nil), 
deferred tax 4,264 (3.000), 
extraordinary credit nil 
(73,153), earnings per share 
4.83p (3.07). The board says that 
the outlook for the current year 
is favourable, and that further 
progress on the road to full 
recovery seems assured. 

• READ1CUT INTER- 
NATIONAL: Applications to 
purchase 14,319,171 new or- 


f: Figures 
me 30 <12 


dinary shares have been re- 
ceived -about 68.4 per cent of 
the qualifying shareholders* en- 
titlement. The shares not app- 
lied for will be retained by the 
institutional investors with 
which they were conditionally 
placed, subject to completion of 
the acquisition of Drake, ex- 
pected on December 22. 

• WELLMAN: The directors 
are unable to recommend the 
payment of ordinary or pref- 
erence dividends until reserves 
are rebuilt. Figures for six 
months to September 30. Turn- 
over 18,017 (19,913), pretax 
profit 663 (142), tax credit 11 
(charge 19). extraordinary debit 
32 (370). earnings per share, net 
basis 4.29p (0.77), fully diluted 
2.62p (0.47) 

• SMITHS INDUSTRIES: 
The company has reached agree- 
ment with Crest Nicholson for 
the acquisition by the company 
of Crest's wholly-owned subsid- 
iary. J D Pbtier, and Camper & 
Nicholsons Marine Equipment 
The two companies, with com- 
bined assets of about £1 million, 
will be integrated with the 
Smiths subsidiary, Kelvin 
Hughes. 

• BRASWAY: Interim divi- 
dend 0.5p (same). 

Figures in £s for 26 weeks to 
October 3 1. Turnover 9,467,996 
(12.673,738), pretax profit 
502,696 (604,352), tax 175.944 
(241,740), earnings per share 
1.76p(l-95). The board says that 
sales are expanding and inroads 
are being made to European 
markets. 

• BODYCOTE INTER- 
NATIONAL: Conditional 
agreement has been reached for 
the company to acquire 75 per 
cent of the issued share capital 
of Skdmersdale Packaging. The 
initial consideration will be 
£3.25 million, payable on 
completion, which will be by the 
issue of 870,321 new Bodycote 
ordinary shares and a balance of 
£290,909 in cash. On comple- 
tion Bodycote will be granted 
options to buy the remaining 25 
per cent of Skeimersdale in two 
tranches at a value to be 
determined by profits in the 

three financial years to Decem- 
ber 31, 1988. 

• FISHERMEN’S PETRO- 
LEUM: The company considers 
that some of the Inner Moray 
Firth blocks offered in the tenth 
licensing round are 
“prospective’', and it is negotiat- 
ing to join a consortium op- 
erated by Kerr-Mcgee Oil (UK) 


to apply for a block or blocks. If 
successful and a licence is 
awarded, provision will be made 
to secure appropriate financial 
backing for the company. 

• GLANFIELD LAWRENCE: 
Acceptances have been received 
for 2,479.963 shares (93.7 per 
cent) under the rights issue. 

• OPTOMETRJCS (USA): 
Figures in $000 for six months 
to September 30. Turnover 
1,365 (1.240), pretax profit 37 
(65), tax 9 (21). earnings per 
share 0.28c (0.44). The company 
has received five contracts for 
projects to develop optical sys- 
tems for a variety of 
applications. 

• D ELMAR GROUP: The 
company is to purchase for 
£500,000 Wdrbook Holdings, 
whose principal operating 
subsidiary is Weirbrook, which 

• COMPREHENSIVE 
FINANCIAL SERVICES: The 
company is to acquire a strategic 
stake in Hunziker Associates 
(HASAX the financial services 
group, of Geneva. The agree- 
ment marks the launch of a joint 
venture between HASA and 
CFS overseas subsidiaries. A 23 
per stake is being acquired for 
5Fr7 13,000 (£293,000). HASA 


is acquiring 50 per cent of CFS*s 
Geneva Consult 


ltancy Co, the 
CFS trust company. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


■tafcet rates 
day's range 
December 22 
NYorit 1,4415-1.4460 
Montreal 15885-15884 
Ams-<tam&2232-&2S77 
Brussels 58.40-60.00 


Cptnen 10-8118-109008 
Dubfi IX " 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN 11.00% 

Adam & Company 11.00% 

BCCI -.11.00% 

Citibank Savings! 12.45% 

Consolidated Crds ........11.00% 

Co-operative Bank 1 1.00% 

C. Hoare & Co 11.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 1.00% 

Lloyds Bank 11.00% 

Nat Westminster ...11.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotiandl!00% 

TSB 11.00% 

Citibank NA ....11.00% 

t Mortgage Base Rate. 


.0482-1.0593 
Frankfurt JL851 3-2. 881 5 
Lisbon 213.77-21 5.1 6 
Madrid 1S3.1B-164.72 
Milan 1979. 18-2001 .38 

Oslo 108394-1 0.0970 

Path 9.3582-9.4596 
Srthlm 9.9132-95674 
Tokyo 234.15-23552 
Vienna 2059-2029 
Zurich 23893-24324 


dose 

D fn wnhff ?? 

1.4415-1,4425 

15849-15878 

8583845288 

59/40-5952 

10.8113-108878 

1.0483-15503 

2.8513-23554 

21456-21453 

163.16-19051 

198058-1986.68 

105458-106676 

93582-93782 

95132-95345 

23453-23451 

2059-20.12 

23893-23946 


1 month 

0.49-0-4flpronj 

a48439pram 

1*-I%p««n 

20-14pram 

IK-Ipram 

l7-2edb 

1%-lKpian 

91-I2«dte 

iPSSdte 

par-3cfi8 

3X-4Kdte 

1%-l%prem 

1%-1Kprsm 

1*-1Xpram 

9%-7%prem 

1X-l*pram 


Staffing index compared wttt 1975 \ 


3 months 
1.66-1 .81 pram 
138-1 23pram 
4%-3%prem 
51-43arem 
4X-3*pram 
5240* 
4*-4*prem 
224-33238 
20-780 Is 

1prem-2tf8 
1 1 *-12*ds 
3%-Z*pram 
3%-Sprem 
4-3*prem 
28K-24* pram 
4-3%prem 

down 8(685 (day's ranga 665-685). 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



Argentina austral* 
Australia dolar 


Bahrain dinar 
Brazil cruzado ■ 


215032-21.1833 
■0.731 00.7410 
75100-7.0500 

2Q22JV204J20 


Greece drachma — 

Hong Kong dollar 113460-11.2553 

tnfta rupee 18.75-1855 

Iraq dinar — — — r ^a 


KuwaitdtnarKO 

Malaysia doflar 
Maxim peso 



New Zealand dollar . 

Saudi Arabia rival S 3845-5.4245 

Singapore dollar 3.15535.1998 

South Africa rand 
UAEdrinm __ 

UoydsBanfc 


— 33004-33170 
53340-55240 


• CROWN TELEVISION 
PRODUCTIONS: The com- 
pany has agreed in principle 
with Mr Bernard Falk to buy his 
television and video production 
company, Falkman. The pur- 
chase will indude Falkman’ s 
one-third interest in the 
Maidenhead television com- 
pany, Thames Valley Tele- 
vision, and a 50 per cent interest 
in Five Ltd, a publisher of 
T rainin g manuals, specialized 
magazines and audio anti v isual 
productions. 

• HOME BREWERY CO: The 
offer by Scottish & Newcastle 
Breweries for the issued pref- 
erence share capital will dose on 
January 3, and it will not be 
further extended. 

• OVENSTONE INVEST- 
MENTS : Figures in R000 for 
six months to September 3a 
Turnover 83.505 (86,239). pre- 
tax loss 1,424 (profit 3,424). tax 
465 (248), loss per share 4.7c 
(4.4c earninRsX 

• BRUNNER INVESTMENT 
TRUST: Final dividend l-35p, 
making 2.45p (2L2), payable 
April 1. Figures in £000 for year 
to November 30. pretax pit 
1,214 (97 IX tax 711 (676), 
earnings per share 2.43 d (2J2X 

• DARES ESTATES: The 
company has acquired Hippo- 
drome House, Aldershot, 


Hampshire, from Klein won 
Benson (Trustees) for 
£?.305.00q to be satisfied by 
£1,075,000 cash and the balance 
by the issue of 9,111,111 or- 
dinary shares at 13 ]-2p. 

• NATIONAL HOME 
LOANS CORPORATION: 
The tender panel loan facility, 
arranged by SG Warburg last 
month, is to be increased from 
£200 million to £300 million. 
The company says that the 
increase has been possible be- 
cause the level of participation 
has considerably exceeded orig- 
inal expectations. 

• THE CONTINENTAL & 
INDUSTRIAL TRUST: Trans- 
atlantic Insurance Holdings has 
increased its holding to 
15,078,487 ordinary shares 
(89.01 1 per oent). 

• FLETCHER DENNYS SYS- 
TEMS: Interim dividend lp. 
Figures in £000 for six months 
to September 30. Turnover 41 79 
(2836), pretax loss 159 (161 
loss), no tax (sameX loss per 
share 2.3p (same). 

• THE M AND G EURO- 
PEAN & GENERAL FUND: 
Interim on income units 0.2p 
(03). payable February 13. 

• THE M AND G GENERAL 
TRUST FUND: Final for 1986 
9.562p (8.223), payable March 


British Alcan Al uminium: 
Lord Peyton of Yeovil has 
been elected non-executive 
c hairman, Mr David Morton 
joins the board. 

TSB Scotland: Mr Eric 
Wilson will succeed Mr Ian H 
Macdonald as chief general 
manag er on March 31. Mr 
Wilson will also become a 
director of TSB Group. 

Waterford Glass Group: Mr 
Brian Patterson becomes 
group director of management 
and corporate development 
from April 1. 

Samuel Montagu & Co: Mr 
Richard Gillingham, Mr John 
Neary, Mr Jeremy Prescott, 
Mr Tom Q uinn, Mr John 
Rickards, Mr Mossman 
Rouecbe, Mr Jeffrey Unrin 
and Mr Arthur Wadsworth 
become executive directors. 

Brown Shipley: Mr Robin 
Owens is to jom Medens Trust 
as manag in g director. 

Sale Tilney: Mr J B Bu- 
chanan, Mr J H Cahill and 
Mr R T D Stott have been 
appointed directors. 


Charterhouse: Mr David 
Parish has joined the board as 
director of planning. 

Connells Estate Agents: Mr 
David Wood has become fi- 
nance director. 




Bank of England: Sir Colin 


Ross Corness becomes a direc- 

- . - 

tor for four years on March 1. 

-i.t 

Thorn EMI: Mr Andrew 


Marsh has been made busi- w 

. ’ - •- or 

ness development director at 
Thorn EMI Business 

!■ - A.** 1 

Communications. 


Ocean Transport & Trad- 

■ ■ -TFt 

ing: Mr Nicholas Barber be- 


comes chief executive on 


January 1. Mr Peter Marshall 


becomes non-executive chair- 


man at the annual meeting in 


May. 

’ '5*11 

BSS Group: Mr P Donovan 

. iu’!' 

and Mr A Milne are now 

■ ■ *i 

executive directors. 

1 

Clarke Hooper Mr Peter j 


Nugent is a director from 
January 1. Mr Hans Thykier 
is now a director of the 
Foreign and Colonial Atlantic 
Fund and the Foreign and 
Colonial Oriental Fund. 


'!:* . 

: 

— rfV 

• r* 


RECENT ISSUES 


.;r*r 


EQUITIES 

Ashtead (1 22pl 
British Gas (50p) 

Cap A Regional (85p) 
OankHS^ * 
Fletcher ) 

Gaynor ' 

Geest (1 
Gtentree (1 . , 

Gordon Bussed (190p) 
Guthrie Corp (150p) 



148-2 
63'j +1 


Hate Homes 


Hamwny Leisure (23p) 


(95p) 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


Clearing Banks 11 
Finance House 11* 

Dtaeorart Marital Loans « 
Overnight Wtee 1 0* Low 7 
weekTKiiox 

Treasury BOs (Discount %) 

Buying SsiSng 

2 mntn 2mrrth lO 3 * 

3 nwth 10"M 3imft 10* 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days fi*6* 
3 rnnih 6*-6% 


Ptene Bar* Bate {Dtecou* %) 

0* 2 mnth 10 a 8j-10 D B 


1 mnth 10«i*-1. 

3 tenth 1CP>ai-10 ,, i*6mnth lO-'m-UPra 


Trade BRs (Dtscoura*) 

1 tenth 11»M 2mnth 11 IJ » 

3 mntn 11 , t» 6mnth 11 6 i* 


Interbank (%) 

Orwniglit open 10* dose 5 
1 weeklO'Sa-IPu Gm«h 11*»-ll*n 
Immh 11%-11'ia 9mntfi 11>ie-1i a ra 
3mrth 11"K-11*» 12mth 11'ia-ll’w 


7 days 8-7% 
Smith 5 b w- 5 3 ib 
F ranco Franc 
7 days 8X-8 

3mnm 9-87, 

SwtssPteic 
7 days 1G >4-954 
3mnth 4X-4H 
Van 

7 days 4 a w4 ,, ,a 
3 mnih 4"„4* ia 


can 6X-5X 
1 ninth 8 7 i*-S & m 
6 ninth 6**r6 7 ia 
cal 5X-4K 
1 tenth 6«X 
6 mnth 5'n-4 ,6 i« 
call 8X-7X 
1 tenth 8X-8K 
6 mnth 8%-8% 
cal 1%.% 

1 mnth 6-5% 

6 mnth 4*-4% 
caB 5-4 

1 mirth 

6 mnth 4 *m- 4 ’n 


BULLION 


Local Authority Deposits TO 
2 days 10* 7 Cays io» 

1 mnth 10% - 

6 mnth 11* 


GokfcS39350-39450 

Kmowrand tear coin, ax « 
S»M»39450( 


3mmn 11% 
12mm 11* 


Load Authority B 
1 rimth 11*-11* 
3 mnth 11*-11% 
3 ninth 11%-tiX 


„ <%) 

2 mnth 11%-11* 
6 mmh n*-t1% 
12imh 1154-11 


SI 

Platinum 
$483£5 (£33430) 

S 537-5-39 (£3.72-3.74 ) 


Starting CDs (%) 

‘ 0 »ib 3m«h 11X-11* 


1 mnth 11'.*.U 

6 mnth I1*is-T1'i» 12mth 11%-ri 
Polar CDs (%) 

1 mnth B_KhL 50 3 mnth 6.704.65 
6 mnth &46-6.40 12mrti &35-630 


ECGD 


Scheme IV Ai 
Interest period 


■wage 

d Now 


. IlOOp) 

Hoskyns Op (128p) 
Johnson By. 

Lloyds Chemist f105p) 
Logftek (G5p) 

LonA Metropolitan (145p) 
MIL (144p) 

Maybom (1Q2p) 


155-1 
178 
108-1 
170 
51 +1 
207 
170-1 
105 +1 
27 
101 -4 
147-3 
158-2 
133 +1 
67 

168-1 

145 

108 


Nobo (152p) 

Noth umbrian Rne (60p) 
Plum Hldas (90p) 

Sumrt (135p) 

TSB Cnan isles (70p) 
TSB Group (100p) 
Virgin (140p) 

Ward Group (97p) 
WlkSng Office (I35p) 
RIGHTS ISSUES 


153 

91 

113 

136 

110-1 

73'n** 

133 

102 

143 


H: 


Avon Rubber N/P 
Bkm Mint N/P 
Leisure Inv N/P 


Marimg NJP 


M unton 


Property Tst N/P 
Throg Sec 


26-2 
16 
5': 
11 +1 
6-1 


Walter '(Alfred) N/P 
(Issue price in bracksteX 


74 

203-2 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


^vwnfcer l. IMS 


cent. 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


nratDaaBngs 

Nov 17 
Deci 
Dec 15 

CaB 


.BBA, 


LastDoaOngi 
Nov 28 
Dec 12 
Jan 2 

ware taken out ett 2 
North Kaigurfl Mines, 


Feb 19 
Mar 5 
Marlfl 


ForSatSemeot 
Mar 2 
Maris 
Mar 30 


Dm, 

PUI & Call: North Kaigurfl Mines. Amsirad. 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


‘Rum Meodi Stating 

Mar 87 

Jun87 

Sep 87 

Dec 87 

Ma 


jun88 » 

Prerious da/s lotte opan tnterast 142S1 

Three Month EtredeQar 


Open 

8M0 

88l 

Low 

88J7 

Owe 

8890 

EstVol 

1801 

8927 

8927 

8924 

8924 

145 

8337 

aa.-m 

8937 

8939 

70 

8929 

6929 

8929 

8928 

40 

NT 

— 

— 

8808 

0 


— 68j8T 


Mar 87. 
Jun87 . 
Sap 87. 
Dec 87. 


USiramny Bond 
Jun87 


9352 
93.93 
9355 
93 JGS 



Previous^ tota o^Jntarast 21405 
93J2 9350 9392 1883 

3354 9351 9353 225 

93.85 83.83 6356 188 

8355 9164 93.34 80 

Pravioue dm's total wen Mtareat 3221 
9040 W-17 1112 

98-20 0 


— , 0 


9652 


96-48 

96-62 


Prevtous day's total open intarest 1B264 

JL 111-06 0 

111-12 11026 111-11 * 
111-15 0 

0 

i Interest 3754 
16455 734 

167.30 308 


Previous day’s total 
BJ0 


1B3J 

16650 


- 



Cdb 



POte 


Series 

Jw 

Apr 

Jte 

Jan 

Apr 

JM 

AKed Lyons 

280 

35 

43 

50 

1 

5 

10 

(■31 2) 

300 

17 

30 

3E 

4 

11 

17 


330 

1* 

14 

23 

22 

27 

35 

British Gas 

50 

14 

16 

18 

K 

% 


C64) 

60 

b% 

8* 

11 

1* 

2% 

4 


70 

% 

3% 

5% 

7 

8* 

9* 

BP 

600 

118 

127 



1 

6 


mu 

6S0 

68 

8b 

100 

1* 

17 

23 


700 

23 

42 

60 

10 

35 

43 

Oats Gold 

550 

130 

153 

_ 

2 

6 


t'673) 

600 

62 

112 

1 77 

2 

13 

18 


650 

39* 

82 

92 

15 

2S 

37 

_ CourtsuWs 

260 

66 

64 


1 



C313J 

280 

36 

45 

53 

1* 

3 



300 

16 

28 

39 

5 

7 



330 

3 

13 

22 

19 

22 

25 

- ComUnlon 

260 

12 

19 

28 

A 

12 


r263) 

230 

3 

11 

21 

20 

22 

to 


300 

1 

6 

13 

40 

41 

43 

CehteA Wire 

300 

32 

48 

60 




C328) 

325 

11 

27 


7 

15 



350 

2 

14 

— 

25 

33 



375 

1 

— 

— 

48 




GEC 

160 

17 

?A 

to 

% 

4% 

8 

P78> 

180 

4* 

13 

18 

10 

15 

17 


200 

1 

b 

10 

27 

30 

32 

Grand Met 

380 

96 

103 





T454) 

390 

66 

73 

— 

1 

2 




420 

42 

bO 

67 

3 

9 



460 

13 

32 

48 

19 

30 

35 

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1000 

87 

106 

134 

7 

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1050 

42 

72 

104 

6 

28 

37 


1100 

1150 

1b 

5 

43 

29 

7b 

50 

33 

77 

55 

85 

60 

90 

1 Land Sec 

300 

35 

45 

49 

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330 

10 

26 

34 

4 

9 

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360 

2 

12 

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30 

30 

33 

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180 

4 

14 

19 

7 

10 

14 

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200 

1 

6 

9 

27 

to 

29 

220 

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4 

47 

48 

49 

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900 

93 

105 

170 

? 

14 

22 

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950 

44 

62 

82 

6 

27 

37 

1000 

14 

45 

52 

to 

50 

to 

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280 

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16 

26 

7 

13 

16 

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280 

2 

11 

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24 

27 

31 

300 

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5 

9 

43 

43 

45 

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70 

5 

9 

12 

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80 

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90 

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82 

73 

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420 

38 

50 

60 

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200 

220 

240 

34 

22 

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26 

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32 

22 

2 

7 

22 

4 

12 

to 

17 

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250 

24 

33 

37 

7 

10 

13 

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280 

14 

20 

24 

18 

to 

24 

300 

6* 

11 

— 

33 

37 

— 


300 

a 

40 

46 

9 

14 

20 

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330 

13 

24 

28 

26 

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38 

380 

4 

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54 

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240 

35 

40 

48 

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260 

280 

300 

20 

9 

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27 

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26 

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to 

18 

29 

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900 

175 200 



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10 


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950 

130 160 195 

13 

to 


1000 

95 125 165 

27 

37 

45 


1050 

60 

95 135 

47 

58 

66 

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180 

29 




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550 

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420 

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Feb 

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47 — 



PT-5E lades. QMKU99 , 


Pote 11238. 
Puteflias 


’ Unttort yteS eecurtty price. 







THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


19 


(IN THE MARKET) 


Broker 
who is 
badly 
missed 

The authorities produced 
testing set of money supply 
figures last week. Gilts buck- 
led on news that November 
broad money risen by 
about 1M pm- cent. Bat the 
news from Opec over the 
weekend was good. Oil prices 
look to be heading upwards. 
Gilts rallied strongly as ster- 
ling bounced, leaving the 
authorities, arguably, in 
state of euphoric relief. 

The authorities face large 
problems in re taining some 
level of liable comm nnlcatjon 
with a market whose focus of 
attention varies very sharply. 
In the old market, the dynam- 
ics were practically ceremo- 
nial. The authorities M their 
man on the floor in the shape 
of the Government Broker, the 
conduit between traders and 
the Bank. 

Not only did the Gov- 
ernment Broker help to drive 
prices backwards and for- 
wards by his intervention tac- 
tics. His visible presence on 
the trading floor helped orient 
the market towards the minu- 
tiae of dealing techniques a»*d 
price changes and away from 
concept 

But traditional structure has 
now been swept away. 
Symbolizing this change is the 
loss of market demotic. Deal- 
ing jargon, like “do-do” 
prices has been junked and the 
Government Broker has been 
transmogrified in the shift 
from a floor to a screen 
market The Wedd-Ackroyd 
axis has been replaced by 27 
market makers. 

Hostile 

The authorities look to be 
doubly disadvantaged. Then- 
ready instrument of conunn- 
uication with the market has 
gone. Meanwhile concept has 
shown a capacity to resurface 
in a shape and form which is 
fairly hostile. That is one 
reason why current yields are 
so high. 

November monetary data 
illustrates this point The net 
public sector contribution to 
£M3 was negative by some 
£0.8 billion, an optimal state- 
ment of what the cmrent 
administration has been trying 
to achieve since the end of the 
last decade. But the market 
seized on the huge figure of 
nearly £4 billion for bank 
lending, and prices felt - 
Traders now equate this 
kind of lending figure with 
weakening sterling because off] 
the erosion in recent months of 
Britain's visible trade account 
and because sterling has fallen 
so sharply since midsummer. 

Loss of ready access to the 
collective market unconscious 
may be crucial in the early 
mouths of 1987. The new gilts 
market has become very inter- 
national very quickly and 
there are nnresolved 
contradictions built into the 
composition of current yields. 

On the one hand, German 
rates have risen abruptly in 
the nm-np to Christmas. 
Frankfurt money market rates 
are close to 5 per cent, in 
reaction perhaps to the JO pm- 
cent annualized growth rate in 
German money stock. 

These developments will 
concern the British monetary 
authorities because, no do rally 
at least, sterling and London 
money market rates are priced 
off Frankfurt. 

Uncertain 

Conversely, gilts have tended 
to price off New York, with the 
tiro bond markets running in 
tandem ami separated by tra- 
ditional differentials. Un- 
certain trends in the oil price 
threaten this stable relation- 
ship. A feature of price move- 
ments in both financial centres 
ahead of Christmas has been 
the way they diverged mark- 
edly as rumour followed ru- 
mour of an Opec production 
agreement 

So far this week, London 
has benefited because in the 
short term oil prices may move 
towards $18 a barrel. Bus the 
process could be reversed, if 
traders sense the production 
agreement Is Calling apart. 

In essence, London is pric- 
ing off New York and Frank- 
furt when both financial 
centres are responding to 
domestic monetary policies 
which lack common ground. 

The Bundesbank appar- 
ently wants to put np rates 
while the Fed wants to see 
them lower. Even though it 
ma y all come right on the night 
for London, with oil prices 
continuing to firm, or the 
Germans deferring a mark 
realignment, such dual pricing 
means precarious equilibrium 
in the gilts market 
Yield prospects most re- 
main highly volatile, not least 
because structural changes 
have robbed the authorities ®f 
easy access to a fund of 
goodwill among domestic 
players. 

Christopher Dunn 


C STOCK MARKET) 


Opec decision heralds 
seasonal shares rally 


By Michael Clark 

The traditional pre-Christ- 
mas rally has arrived late in 
the stock market this year so 
investors set about making the 
most of it yesterday dreaming 
of lower interest rates in the 
new year. 

This little bit of extra festive 
cheer followed the decision of 
the ministers of the Organiza- 
tion of Oil Exporting Coun- 
tries to cut output by 7.25 per 
cent to 1 5.8 million barrels a 
day during the first six months 
of 1987. The move immedi- 
ately boosted the price of 
crude oil on world markets 
which at one stage hit $18 a 
barrel. 

It is hoped this will allow 
room for a 1 per cent reduc- 
tion in British interest rales 
and leave scope for the Chan- 
cellor to make his proposed 
tax cuts. 

Investors look their cue 
from oil shares which were 
quick to respond to the news 
with leaders like BP climbing 
17p to 720p, Shell 12p to 
983p, Ultramar 4p to 160p 
and Britoil a similar amount 
at 170p. 

The rest of the equity 
market also enjoyed selective 
support for stores and 
electricals as the new long 
three-week Christmas account 
got under way with sentiment 
boosted by the latest opinion 
poll findings. 

The FT index of top 30 
shares closed at its best levels 
of the day 14.0 up at 1,286.1 
while the broader based FT- 


DATASTTCAM 
r 280 



British 

TELECOAX 


Still a political football? 


Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sap Oct Nov Dec 


SE 100 index finish ed 20.0 up 
at 1.652.2. 

Government securities also 
caught the scent of cheaper 
money with prices at the 
longer end of the market 
enjoying gains of more than 
£1. But the index-linked issues 
had to contend with small 

• STC which has undergone 
something of a re-rating re- 
cently, was a ga in hitting new 
heights yesterday with the 
price recovering from an early 
setback to close 2p higher at 
172p. This was despite a pot 
through of 5 milli on shares at 
168p, bringing the total num- 
ber traded on the day to 68 
million. 

losses in reaction to Friday's 
announcement of an extra 
£600 million of Treasury Z5 
per cent index-linked 2024 
being issued. 

British . Telecom, dubbed 
the “people’s share” when the 


some new heart back into ibe 
shares. 

Those like Kletnwort 
Grieveson claim that BT is a 
“buy" on fundamentals alone 
but warn that the price will 
continue to be influenced by 
political uncertainties. 

Mr Chris Tucker, analyst at 
Grieveson, says: “The share 
price will continue to be 
dictated by the opinion polls 
until the uncertainties about 
the general election ' become 
dearer." 

Last night the shares closed 
3p higher at 209p — their best 
level for some months — 

company came to marta in d^legoiogexJividcnd. 
November 1984, has been. Tfa e big retailers, which 
under a cloud this year after spent^most of tastweek in the 
news of the Labour Party’s 
commitment to re-nationallze 
it at the original flotation price 
of J 30p if returned to power at 
the next election. 

Labour’s decision has eff- 
ectively wiped lOOp from the 
BT share price in recent 
months which, at one stage. 


160 


doldrums, enjoyed a long- 
awaited rally following further 
evidence of another record 
Christmas spending spree in 
the high street. 

Institutional support lifted 


hit a low for the year of 178p 
and left the group's 1,500,000 
shareholders with two stark 
choices. They could either sell 
their shares at a sharp dis- 
count to their true worth, or 
accept the Government’s non- 
voting bonds. This would, 
hopefully, give them a return 
on their investment, but no 
say in how the company was 
run. 

The weekend news that the 
latest opinion polls gave the 
Conservatives an 8 per cent 
lead over Labour has put 


• English China Clays 
stepped up the pressure yes- 
terday in its battle for Bryant 
Holdings, up lp at 155p. ECC 
in its latest offer document 
casts doubt on the Bryant 
forecast ofa 55 par cent pretax 
profits increase and wonders 
why no mention of It was made 
at the rights issue in October, 
when Bryant direct ms surren- 
dered the rights to over I 
million shares at 90p. 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


teOM 


Barton Group 1 lp to 271p and 
Storehouse I4p to 277p after 
both went ex-dividend. There 
was also support for Sears 3p 
to I20p, 


teem 


ISM 

Mgh Low Company 

Price 

Bid Oriar i 

ora* 

dhr 

pane* 

YM 

% 

1 

P/E 

radad 

*000 

1988 

Mgb Lew Company 

Pike 

Bid Offer 

Ctr’ga 

dhr 

pence 

YU 

% 

P/E 

383 

283 

AHtodkLyons 

310 

315 

• 

+5 

145 

43 

143 

4300 

391 

312 

Ladbroke 

370 

375 


43 

16* 

4* 

17* 332 

174 

126 

ASOA-MR 

150 

154 


+5 

45 

S3 

163 2300 

349 

276 

Land Securities 

331 

334 


44 

14* 

4A 

223 938 

455 

375 

BET 

435 

440 


+2 

243 [ 55 

153 

1.900 

288 

133 

Legal & Gen 

245 

250 


44 

123 

5* 

31* 248 

330 

241 

BTR 

26B 

273 


46 

93 

33 

183 

1300 

484 

293 

Lloyds 

433 

440 


42 

25* 

5.7 

7* 1,500 

491 

381 

BAT 

488 

473 


48 

1Bl4 

33 

123 

574 

283 

183 

Lonhra 

234 

238 


42*1 

17.1 

7* 

11*6*00 

572 

449 

Barclays 

503 

510 


48 

28.1 

53 

73 

362 

231 

163 

Marks ft Spencer 

174 

177 

• 

+6 

5* 

3* 

21* 258 

840 

625 

Burnt 

720 

730 

• 

413 

243 

3.4 

123 

996 

599 

417 

Midsnd 

573 

580 


47 

37.1 

8A 

21 A 728 

450 

356 

Beocham 

435 

440 

• 

46 

17.1 

33 

182 

163 

593 

426 

Nat Watt 

523 

530 


47 

27* 

52 

55 194 

726 

526 

Blue cede 

650 

655 


-3 

son 

43 

93 

238 

576 

428 

P ft O DM 

490 

485 


+3 

264b 5A 

14.1 2*00 

383 

293 

BOC 

360 

383 


41 

ISA 

43 

14.1 

3,100 

603 

383 

Pearson 

572 

577 


45 

15A 

2.7 

192 2200 

289 

170 

Boots 

225 

228 

• 

43 

103 

4.7 

143 

789 

662 

315 

PMngton Bras 

647 

862 

• 

4«'7 

21.4 

3* 

17211*00 

808 

423 

Br Aaro9poca 

480 

495 


43 

23A 

4.7 

1QA 93.000 

248 

162 

Ptossey 

183 

187 


410 

7* 

3* 

13.7 450 

65* 

• 81 

Br Gas 

B3*» 65*s 


42 

93 

14A 


5300 

942 

718 

Prudential 

800 

807 


42 

38* 

4* 

53.1 3*00 

720 

530 

Br Petroleum 

717 

722 


417 

4&S 

63 

73 

9300 

234 

148 

Fiscal Beet 

178 

180 


45 

4* 

2A 

18* 46 

280 

177*1 Br Telecom 

206 

212 

• 

+7*J 

113 

53 

12312300 

569 

421 

Rank Ora 

523 

530 


43 

22* 

43 

18.6 85 

193 

98 

Brttofl 

169 

171 


44 

93 

53 

43 

3.600 

900 

605 

Rackftt ft Cotoman 843 

850 

• 

48 

23* 

23 

183 292 

354 

256 

Burton 

268 

272 

• 

4M 

8.1 

33 

153 

2300 

584*2345 

Reuters 

660 

585 


+5'r 

5A 

1* 

42* 1*00 

369 

277 

CaUa & Wireless 

328 

335 


410 

73 

22 

183 

749 

791 

511 

RTZ 

era 

682 

• 

427 

31A 

4* 

9* 442 

196 

158 

Cadbury Schweppes 181 

184 


41 

8.7 

43 

21A 

720 

532 

365 

Rowntree 

397 

402 

• 

47*1 

18* 

4* 

11.1 718 

564 

426 

Corns VtyeHa 

465 

469 

• 

-1 

173 

33 

143 

341 

867 

762 

Royal Ins 

648 

855 

• 

419 

38* 

4* 

69* 334 

336 

257 

Com Union 

262 

2S5 


42 

17A 

ae 


906 

426 

344 

Salisbury (J) 

412 

416 

• 

45 

8A 

2* 

24* 3500 

704 

409 

Cons GokfltaUs 

688 

875 


43 

35.0 

5 2 

192 

1300 

148'i104 

Sears 

119 

120'i 

43*1 

5* 

4*2 

15A 391 

330' 

252 

Courts ufcte 

309 

312 

a 

-1 

103 

33 

103 

2300 

415 

314 

Sedgwick Gp 

313 

318 


42 

17.1 

SA 

1S.1 735 

290 

201 

Das Coro 

199 

204 


-1 

103 

52 

183 

3300 

984 

653 

Stioa 

980 

985 


414 

51A 

5u2 

9.7 798 

438 

21 8 4 Dixons Grp 

307 

311 


+5 

43 

1A 

220 

333 

132 

93 

Smidi ft Nephew 

121 

123 


41*1 

3* 

2* 

20* 6*00 

650 

406 

Rsons 

533 

538 

• 

43 

8A 

13 

233 

152 

174 

96 

STC 

172 

178 


44 

2.1 

12 

182 243 

954 

701 

Gen Accident 

795 

802 

• 

42 

343 

43 

20-1 

8300 

894 

419 

Stan Chert 

783 

790 


42 

46A 

5* 

8.7 3.700 

226 

158 

GEC 

175 

179 


47 

63 

33 

113 

672 

365 

259 

Storahouu 

273 

278 

• 

419*2 

11* 

4.0 

142 448 

11V 

,756*7 Saxo 

10'« 10A. 



20.0 

13 

21.7 

1200 

772 

520 

Sun Affiance 

640 

647 

• 

411 

27* 

4* 

58* — 

481 

328 

Grand Mai 

452 

457 


42 

14.6 

32 

iai 

151 

81U 72*«TS8 P/P 

73 

74 


4». 

8.1 

8* 

288 

11 * 721 

GUS 'A 

IQ’s 1 0'* 


4*1 

30U0 

23 

143 

224 

420 

265 

TOSCO 

383 

385 


+5 

a* 

23 

21* 344 

774 

720 

GHE 

765 

772 

• 

45 

423 

53 

223 

658 

629 

374 

Thom EMI 

466 

469 

• 

47 

25* 

53 

842 4*00 

385 

235 

G[KN 

261 

264 

• 

42 

173 

63 

83 

5200 

349 

209 

Trafalgar House 

257 

260 

• 

45*2 

10* 

73 

9.7 1.400 

355 

274 

Gufemess 

280 

235 

• 

47 

11.6 

4.1 

107 

2,600 

209 

139 

Trusthouse Forte 

168 

169 


43*2 

7* 

4.7 

187 386 

215b 141 

Hanson 

183 

185 

• 

41*2 

8.1 

33 

11 J 

371 

22 

13'< Unitow 

21*«21** 

• 

+*» 

60.1 

2* 

20* 958 

623 

403 

Hawker SUMey 

430 

436 

• 

47 

21A 

43 

93 

.702 

269 

216 

Utt Biscuits 

229 

231 

• 

4T'i 

13-6 b 

5* 

124 1,700 

11 >1734 

Imp Cham md 

KftIO 1 * 


.. 

483 

43 

123 

292 

231 

174 

Woflcomo 

222 

224 

• 

47*1 

3* 

1* 

27A 1200 

583 

335 

Jaguar 

513 

518 


41 

12.7 

23 

107 

268. 

925 

430 

Wbotwonh 

682 

687 


422 

22* 

3* 

15.7 . . 


( GILT-EDGED ) 

Yesterday’s Gilt-Edged col- 
umn “Balance of Payments 
will temper rally" was wrongly 
attributed. The author was 
Robert Thomas, of Green well 
Montagu, to whom we 
apologise. 


( tempus ) 


Dominion troubled 
by its disposals 


Life at Dominion Inter- 
national Group is not partic- 
ularly easy at the moment It 
is not impossible, just diffi- 
cult. to realize a £25 million 
property portfolio and mini- 
mize exposure to energy at , 
the bottom of the cycle while 
trying to expand financial 
services at the lop. 

On the property side, the 
group plans to release more 
than £25 million through 
disposals over a period of two 
years. It has sold, or has 
contracts to sell, a good 
proportion of its commercial 
portfolio and is withdrawing 
from the housing market 

The profit-over-book value 
of these disposals is unlikely 
to be more than £2 million 
but it will free cash for 
expansion elsewhere. 

In natural resources, the 
core business of its 59 per 
cent interest in South West 
Resources appears to be bold- 
ing up well in adverse mar- 
kets but the problems at 
William Hunt have yet to be 
solved. 

Dominion invested £9.9 
million in 26 per cent of 
William Hunt, a Hong Kong 
commodity trading and oil 
services company now in 
financial difficulties. A recap- 
italization at Hunt may go 
ahead, but Dominion will not 
contribute any further cap- 
itaL Instead, it will opt to see 
its stake reduced to just 5 per 
cent. 

This will involve a write- 
off amounting to £5 or £6 
million — the exact amount 
cannot be quantified yet. 

Also to be written off this 
year is the first of three equal 
tranches of $6 million (£4 
milli on) in connection with 
the acquisition of Trans- 
national. the US leasing 
company. 

After all write-offs, the 
roup's debt at the end of this 
nancial year — March 1987 
- is likely to be equal to 100 
per cent of its equity. Even 
with this comparatively high 
level of gearing, the group has 
significant unused borrowing 
facilities and will be looking 


DOMINION INTERNATIONAL 



90 


Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 


to buy financial services com- 
panies in Britain for up to £10 
million. 

Michael Simmonds, of 
Credit Suisse Buckmastet & 
Moore, is forecasting a pretax 
profit for the year to March 
1987 of £1 1.5 million, giving 
a p/e of 5.6. There is little 
downside risk but the market 
will want to be reassured of 
the extent of the strain on the 
balance sheet before commit- 
ting itself to a higher rating. 

GM Firth 


(Holdings) 


At the interim stage. GM 
Firth (Holdings) shows every 
sign of heading for another 
record year for profits, de- 
spite a slight dip in steel 
stockholding which still ac- 
counts for about a third of the 
group’s business. 

The year started well for 
the steel stockholders, but a 
general setback in engineer- 
ing affected them all ad- 
versely, although Firth 
seemed to suffer less than the 
average. 

Elsewhere, the business ap- 
pears to be doing welL Fur- 
niture and floorings had a 
particularly good first half 
and transport also did welL 

As a result, group trading 
profit before tax leaped 34 per 
cent to £1.4 million on turn- 


over up 19 per cent to £28 
million in the six months to 
September 30. Some 
£290,000, approximately 20 
per cent of the pretax total, 
came from the independently 
quoted brewery fittings 
manufacturer. Porter 
Chadburn. This compared 
with a profit of £85,000 in the 
comparable six months. 

Firth raised its stake in 
Porter Chadburn to 65 per 
cent in April 1985. In the 
ensuing year to March 1986, 
annual losses of £63,000 were 
transformed into profits of 
over £500.000, mainly due to 
the closure of its Bolton 
factory. The prospects for this 
business have improved 
considerably. 

Charles Wade Steel, tbe 
recently acquired Midlands 
steel stockholder, made a 
small contribution to interim 
profits. This acquisition gives 
Firth a base from which to 
expand in the West Midlands 
and takes its stockholding 
turnover up to around £15 
million annually. 

It certainly looks like mak- 
ing plenty of money this year. 
Trading profit before tax 
could reach £3.2 million, 
putting the shares on a 
prospective multiple of 
around 10.6. The shares have 
underperformed the market 
for tbe last year and the rating 
looks undemanding. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


A low-key revolution 
among the Wolfsons 
G 


rent Universal Stores is not the 
roost communicative 

company, though it remains one 
of the most consistently profitable and a 
favourite among investors with long 
memories. It has also entered a phase of 
change at the top — always a fascinating 
procedure in a major, family-controlled 
company which is being managed 
quietly, save for the noisy speculation 
that Sir Philip Harris is the adopted 
crown prince, and at a stately pace. 
Characteristically, a statement yes- 
terday of a comprehensive restructuring 
of the board occupied a mere three and a 
half lines on the Stock Exchange Topic 
screen. 

The full text revealed the formalizing 
for the first time of the GUS divisional 
structure and the appointment of three 
divisional managing directors. Sir I sa ac 
Wolfson's son. Lord (Leonard) 
Wolfson, who at the moment is joint 
chairman (with his founding father) and 
managing director, will become sole 
chairman and bis father, now living in 
Israel, becomes honorary life president 

What this means for the company was 
not immediately clear to the analysts 
but in the market where it is thought 
that one day GUS will embrace democ- 
racy, the A shares gained 12p to 1022p. 
The company considers that it is no 
longer appropriate for the chairman and 


managing director to be the same 
person: in future. Lord Wolfson, to- 
gether with two deputy chairmen, 
Harold Bowman and Trevor Spittle, 
will oversee financial and divisional 
results. Lord Wolfson is a fascinated 
and dedicated member of the House of 
Lords, which as lime goes by will surely 
take up more of his time and interest 
Who would then succeed him as 
managing director of the group is the 
tantalising question. 

The latest changes, confirming as they 
do the existing responsibilities of the 
present members of the board, will not 
by themselves change the conservative 
and low-key GUS management style. 
They do, however, suggest that the 
family is aware of the company’s 
perceived problems. 

For shareholders, in the meantime, it 
is more pertinent to look at the recent 
interim results which showed a near 17 
per cent improvement in profits to 
£1 34.4 million in the six months to the 
end of September. For the frill year, 
more than £330 milli on is in sight, 
helped by the stake in Harris 
Queensway. 

The husbandry is of a high order but 
not even GUS, the great pacesetter in 
retailing when young Isaac built his 
dynamic estate, can remain for ever set 
in its ways. 


Ritblat’s Euston express 

T 


he ever youthful John Ritblat, 
chairman of British Land, sur- 
vived the falling masonry in the 
collapsed property boom of the early 
1 970s, since when his astute dealing and 
trading have created a multi-faceted 
group. The British Land of the 1980s isa 
large property investor and developer 
with industrial holdings, an interest in 
films (notably The Mission) and 
' investment in hotels with the 
Ladbroke Group. It is a mixture, not 
surprisingly, the stock market finds 
hard to value. 

Mr Ritblat’s latest, £65 million deal, 
with the Pe ninsular and Oriental 
Steam Navigation Company, which 
also understands property, involves 
British Land’s buying the other half of 
the 1 million sq ft Euston Centre in 
London to give it sole control of the 
asset The company’s £92 million 
fund-raising exercise to pay for the 
Euston Centre and other properties in 
Euston Centre Investments, and to 
meet outstanding payments on other 
portfolio purchases, increased share 
capital by 45 per cent and diluted the 
net asset value by about 25p.a share. 
The shares may continue to suffer for 
the same reason. 

However, the Monopolies and 
Meigers Comission gave its blessing 
to the deal yesterday. The way is now 
clear for British Land to assess the ECI 
portfolio, which was bought at a 13.6 
per cent discount — considerably less 
than the discount at which British 
Land itself trades. 

The Euston Centre is an ageing 


building which can hardly be de- 
scribed as a prime investment despite 
being frilly let It is in an area that so 
far has failed to attract financial 
conglomerates from the Square Mile 
which are taking space in once 
unthought of places — south of the 
Thames, for example. If British Land 
is to unlock any potential within the 
Euston Centre and offset dilution, it 
will have to refurbish the develop- 
ment and alter the lease structure to 
raise rental value. 

This takes time. A sale to one of the 
new breed of so-called merchant 
developers, or to an owner-occupier, 
would convince the market that 
British Land could swiftly combat the 
dilution, leaving it with the real plums 
in the ECI portfolio. 

Vogue House in Hanover Square 
and other P&O properties in Wigmore 
Street and Dover Street came as part 
of the deal. They offer tremendous 
scope to catch a share of the booming 
West End office market which is 
seeing rental growth almost on a par 
with the City as shortage of space 
drives banking operations further 
afield. 

The acquisitive Mr Ritblat has left 
the way clear for further purchases but 
whether these will be property, port- 
folios or corporate deals has yet to be 
revealed. The market has linked 
British Land, as a prospective bidder, 
with Great Portland Estates, a rumour 
he strenuously denies. In any event, 
any increase in share capital would 
hardly be welcomed by the market 


C 


FUTURES AND OPTIONS 


3 


World still seeks an answer to 
the feast-and-famine problem 

T 


here may be celebra- 
tions in Brussels now 
that the European Eco- 
nomic Community (EEC) has 
found a way to trim the beef 
and butter mountains but 
there is little joy among the 
world's grain producers. 

Far from becoming empty, 
the grain silos of Europe, 
North America, Australia and 
Argentina will probably bulge 
as never before next year. 
According to the International 
Wheat Council's latest report, 
stocks of wheat and coarse 
grains are likely to rise to 377 
million tonnes , almost 50 per 
cent above the level of two 
years ago. 

This has resulted largely 
from another bumper year for 
food output in the developed 
world. Global production next 
year is estimated at a record 
1.36 billion tonnes, with 
stronger strains and more 
productive fertilizers boosting 
yields and negating any efforts 
to effect acreage reductions. 

Although consumption of 
grains is likely to be at a 
record, more of it will be met 
from within the country of 
production. World trade is 
forecast to sink to 169 million 
tonnes next year, down 
sharply from tbe record 208 
million just two seasons ago. 

The big villains of tbe peace, 
as far as the producers are 
concerned, are the Russians. 
Over the years. Soviet crop 
estimates have been swal- 
lowed by the West with large 
grains of salt as efforts to 
expand production to more 
marginal land were dogged by 
inefficiencies and bad 
weather. 

Now, in the Gorbachov era, 
efficiency and accountability 
are the watchwords from the 
Baltic porn to the oilfields of 
Siberia. Coincidence or not, 
Moscow last month an- 
nounced it would be reaping a 
grain harvest of 210 million 
tonnes — almost 10 per cent 
up on last year. This is likely 
to result in a fail in imports of 
almost half to 20 million 
tonnes. 

Furthermore, Soviet of- 
ficials are trying to emphasize 



Piling np; Grain mountains are growing as never before 


that this is no one-hit wonder 
but an indication of the im- 
proved methods being used in 
Soviet agriculture. 

Improvements to 

productivity will concentrate 
on land that is naturally fertile 
and has decent water supplies. 
No longer win wheat sprout in 
the field, be harvested at the 
wrong time, rot in storage or 
end up at the wrong place. 

Tbe wheat producers have 
not quite thrown away the salt 
cellars but, with prices ever 
falling, they are bound to take 
tbe matter seriously. The big 
five producers are to meet in 
San Diego in February to 
discuss the problem. The dis- 
cussions should, as diplomats 
say, be "full and frank". 

In particular, delegates from 
Argentina, Canada and 
Australia will forcibly tell the 
EEC and US representatives 
that their export and produc- 
tion subsidies — part ofa long- 
running trade war between 
Washington and Brussels — 
are responsible for driving 
down the prices of some of 
their most vital exports. 

Whether the five groups will 
have the will to do anything 
about the problem is question- 
able. It has taken years for the 


members of Opec to face up to 
the crisis of over-production 
in spite of much greater 
incentives to make common 
cause. Even now there are 
doubts over whether they 
have succeeded. 

Furthermore, food on a 
global scale is a politically 
explosive subject The idea of 
a production-sharing agree- 
ment or a “Wheatpec” cartel 
to reduce production until 
prices rise would be unaccept- 
able while horrifying pictures 
of Third World hunger can be 
brought into the homes of the 
developed world. 

A s if to underline the 
crisis of riches facing 
the producers, forecasts 
of the longer-term food out- 
look in the Third World point 
to an unequal race between 
population growth and food 
availability. A more vexing 
problem is resources distribu- 
tion, particularly outside 
those areas where the "green 
revolution" never took bold. 

One report earlier this year 
by the International Food 
Policy Research Institute in 
Washington forecast a net 
food deficit of 1 10 million 
tonnes in the Middle East, and 


north and sub-Saharan Africa 
by the year 2000. 

Results of a study by the 
UN’s Food and Agricultural 
Organization (FAO) on Af- 
rica's agricultural food pros- 
pects for the next 25 years 
were, if anything, gloomier. 
Mr Edouard Saouma, the 
FAO’s director-general, spoke 
of tbe possibility of “repeated 
and massive famines and food 
imports which could bankrupt 
even prosperous African 
countries." 

Ironically, there are several 
African countries that have 
contributed to the production 
boom this year. According to 
FAO, nine Sahelian countries 
will have record harvests for 
the second year in succession 
and foe scourge of the locusts 
and grasshoppers has been 
beaten for the time being. But 
a long-term solution to the 
literal co-existence of feast and 
famine seems as far away as 
ever. 

Richard Lander 

Bonn hint 
of interest 
rates fall 

Bonn (Reuter) — West Ger- 
man interest rates may fall 
next year if the strong growth 
in central bank money supply 
can be slowed, Heir Gerhard 
Stoltenberg, the finance min- 
ister, said. 

Herr Stoltenberg said a cut 
In rates could not be ruled out 
in 1987 because real interest 
rates in West Germany and in 
some other countries were 
very high. 

But he said German rates 
could not be cut at present 
because the Bundesbank was 
understandably worried about 
money supply expansion. 

“If the money supply 
development can be slowed in 
1987, there may still be room 
(for cuts)," be said in an 
interview with Well am 
Sonntag. 






BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


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2057 2102# 

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65 Hohom Vhdua EC1A 2EU 
Ganeral Enqms 01536 3953 Dm&V Um 0V 
238 2MB 

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DO Accum 594 832 ..OOO 

Bn Fund he 404 S29 . . 0.72 

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WARDLEYUOT TRUST MANAGERS 
Wardtoy House. 7. Dawndara Sq. London EC2 
01-929 1S32 

American Trun 685 715 .. 1.70 

Far East A Gan 1229 1300 -0.1 On 

me Growth 784 83.0 ..080 

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income Trust 
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Hong Kang 


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515 551 +09 180 

1372 145,2# +07 290 

015 65.1 +04 070 

320 335 +03 1.60 


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13 Ctumuta Sq, EdHturgn 
031-2& 1551 

Austrian OoH 319 329 +01 015 

PacOc Scan 287 262# +03 1.70 

Canadian Bel GUT S65 503 -05 000 

Ghnw Mm Aid *10X6 1075# . . 650 

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-wondeor Housa. EL Khgney. London WC2B 
6SD 

01-405 8331 

Com 6 Equity 489 522# . . 762 

income 584 801 +02 497 

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Energy futures markets have reacted m a dearly bullish 
manner to test weekend’s Opec agreement Forecasts are 
that there wffl be a draw down in crude ofl stocks of about 
two mfllion barrets per day to the first quarter of 
1987-CommerrtbyQNir 


78 

v a« 

KB 

SB 

MB 

485 

118 

as 

iS 

* 

W7 

183 

fl’l 

I Magi lEi 

330 


DNTEHNATTONAL 
PETROLEUM EXCHANGE 

‘ S ®SSnSwlS V 

HEAVY FUS.OL 

Jorr uML‘88.0 

Fab unq.-88/O 

Mo 1 


142JWEJ0 
14325-43 .00 
14119-4050 

isg.omM 

143.00-38^0 


LONDON COMMOOmr 
EXCHANGE 

GWjQynfon and Comport 

SUGAR (From a Czzanttaw) 
FOB 

Mar 1 37/4-37 J 

May 141 .6*41 .4 

Aug M5.845.6 

Oct 149.849.8 

Dm 154.0-5/LQ 

163:0-66.0 


Tone — idle 

S&.VER59HAU. 

372.00-373JOO 
Th|W Months . 382LKM83.00 

Vd Ns 

Tone _ Idle 

ALUMINIUM 

825.YE3T- 7 ®3-OO-784.00 
TJvee Months . 799.00-799^0 

Va 2550 

Tone., Steady But Quiet 

NICKEL 

Cash 2452-24S5 

TJroe Months — 2510-2515 

vol 84 

Tone Steady 

MEATAFffl UVESTOCK 
COMMISSION 
Average Water* prices* 
representative markets on 
December 23 

Gato9e.94a5pperkghy 


,90.00pperkg tw 


nw. down 41 j ■». aug. 


LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 

£ par bonne 


Wheat Barley 
Month dose Cfoee 

Jan I09ffi 110.45 

Mar H2£5 11320 

May 115.10 11455 

Jul 11755 unq. 

Sep 101.15 100.20 

NOv 103.10 103.00 

Vofc Wheat-™. 1187 

Bariey- 414 


11255 11320 

115.10 11455 

11755 unq. 
101.15 10020 

103.10 103.00 



Tfi 






LONDON POTATO FUTURES 
C per tonne 

Month Open Close 
Fab 108.00 10750 

Af* 15250 151.70 

May 171.50 170^1 

Nov 8650 86-00 

votaee 

&N.L FrateM Futures Ltd Oiy 

CatRO Report (910 per pohtj 

raSteUo 9gb 

Apr S raM»-71 9A 719.0 

Jul 87 6195 

Oct 87 7255-7255 7225 

£***■*? OpenbitstlBK 

opot maritetcommentaty: 

^yorgoindejt- 

®M5 down 15on 1S/t2/88 








































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THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



-fjcld- 



daily dividend, figure, if ,, mfgSs? * 
have won outright or a share ofthe loud 
daily prize money Mated. If you are a 
wnjner follow the claim procedure ooihe 
back of your Card You must always have 
you r card available when claiming. 


Wb. Cwim) 
ASDA-MF1 


Craaa 


Carte «r 


1 Foods 


Marta * Spencer 1 DianervA^T 


E5SE1 


Bunounh 


Hanson 


Racal Elect 



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Radiant Metal 


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Barker (Charles) 



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Please lake account of any 
minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please main- « sole of your daily toiais 
for lbe weekly dividend of £8]DOO in 
Saturday's newspaper. 


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BRITISH FUNDS 


IMS 

Mgn Low Stack 


tot. Gross 

Price Pi-pa ytc% ykf*. 


Years) 
ioo%e . . 

89% .. 
Wa .. 

an .. 




SHORTS (Under Five 

103 93*i Exeti 13' A 19B7 

100’* 93% Truss 10q% 1987 
99% B2'« Em* 2%% 1907 
982% 96% Exert WV» 1967 
SP. KPiFuxl 6V* 1 
tm*. 96% Trass 10% 1 
97'. W, Trass 3% 1887 
M'-Dm 12% 1887 
98% S2>. Tram 7%% 1B6S48 
104% 93% am iQYfc 1888 

102% U’mitaH cavs ton 
94% aOSTrsns 3% 1978-88 
107% 92% Traes 8%% ib 6B 
107% 83% Trass 11%% 1989 
109S 93% Trass 10 %% 1989 
104% 93 Each 10% 1889 
ill's 94's Exert 10%% 1! 

107'j 69% Exert 11% I! 

93% 84% Tram 9% 1 

103% 82i. Trass C9%% 1999 
92 82% Trass 3% 1989 

114% 97% T)WS 13% 1990 
88% 76% Exert I'A 1990 ■ 
108% 94% Exert 11% 1990 
113% 1D0 Earn 12%% 1890 
89% 79% Trass 3% 1990 
100% 88% Traos S'.% 1967-BO 
100% 92% Tram 10% I960 
88% 78% Exert 2'j% 1990 
SB 96% Tram C10% 1991 
112'. 85% Tram 11%% 1991 
94% 84% Fond S%* 1887-01 
110% 97% Exert 11% 1991 
88% 78% TJSS8 3% 1991 


FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 

118% M'1 Trass 12%% 1992 107 •+% 

107% 91 '.Tram 10% 1982 OS's +'» 
109% 92% Trass Cl O' 3% 1992 98% +% 
117% 100% Exert 12%% 1992 105% 

123% 102% B*rt 13' A 19® 110% +% 

109 92% Tram 10% IKS 98 % +% 

121% 88% Tram 12 'A 1993 106 % e+% 

91% 78%ftM 9% 1993 82% *% 

128 105% Tram 13%% W3 nr. +*. 

133. 1 Of % Trass 14%% 1984 117% +H 

122% BTVEa* 12V% 1994 107 +% 

127% 106% Exert 13'r% 1994 111% +'. 

103% 6S% Trass 9% 199* 80% +% 

120 98 Tress 12% 1995 104’.O+% 

78% 71% Gas 3% 1890-95 74% +% 

110% 90%Exai ID'A 19» 96%e+% 

126 102 '.Tram 12%% 198S 109% +% 

1331. ice Tram 14% 1996 118 % a+% 

103% 88% Tram 9% 1932-36 B0% +■% 
142% 114 Trass 15%% 1998 123% +% 

130'.- 104% Exert IS'A 1998 113% *% 

84% 74% Rdmpt 3% 1996 80 +% 

10F. 88% Cm 10% 1996 94% +% 

131 105% Ttom 13%% 1997 11S%*+% 

112% 93 Exert 105% 1997 97% ■*% 

101% 79% Tram 8%% 1987 87% +% 

142% 118% Exert 19% 1997 1235 +% 

885 71 Troon fl%% 193638 7B% +% 

107% 875 Exert CPA 1999 B3%e+% 

148% 122% Tram 155% 1988 1i»% +■% 

124% 101% Exert 12% 1998 HIT’S ♦% 

107% 85% Tram 9'!% 1899 92%at% 

1265 103% Exert 12' A 1998 108% +% 

114 93% Tram HP J% 1999 99% +% 

112% 91 Com 10%% 1999 96% ♦% 

1335 105% Tram 19% 2000 1M%M 

98 B4%Cenv 9% 2000 88% +% 

111% 90% Tram 10% 2001 95% +1% 

109% 89 COrt* B%% 2001 94% +1 % 

1375 110% Tram 14% 1986-01 119% +1% 

OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

111% 90% Com 10% 2002 96 *% 

12«% 89% Excn 12% 199902 107%rt+lH 
109% 89% Trass 9>.%2002 94% +1% 

1125 91% Tram 10% saa *'•+'■ 
139%T10%Trew 1S%% 200CHD Wi9*U 
1235 100% Trass 115 % 2001-04 105% +% 
112% 91 '.Tram 10% 2004 98 ■*% 

805 47% Fund 35% 1999-04 ®%ert 
108% 875 Con* 9'j% 2004 *?•« +% 

108% BIHCcn* 95% ZXg +% 

117% 94% Excn 105% a05 1005 ♦% 

134% 108'. Tram 125% 2JKH» *] 

95% 76% Tram 8% 2W2-06 815 +% 
1075 88% Com 9%% 2006 9J% +J» 

i27%ioi5Traas 11%% mo&Qf ig% ft! 
94% 795 Trass 85% 2007 «>••+’■ 

143's 1 13% Ti«m 135% 2004-00 iw% +1 
955 76 Tram 9%2CO0 » • ♦% 

725 KWram S' A 2009-12 60% +% 
93% 74 '.trass 7%% 2013-15 7|5e+4% 

136 109% Exert 12% 2013-17 1155 +% 


iaa iij-_ 
rna 10938 

2.5 1985 

10L5 ID. 963 

66 9670 

TOO 10978 

3.1 1510 

119 11029 
30 10680 

106 11045 

OH 11079 
12. 0233 
BO 11.105 
11.4 11.112 

106 11040 
103 11.110 

10.1 10.107 

110 11093 
50 9.490 

90 11061 

34 

124 10563 

3.1 8.156 

11 0 10067 

120 10096 

U 8.42S 

80 10710 
103 11036 

3-t 11036 

102 9539 

11-5 10578 

90 11911 

11-0 6002 


110 10936 

104 10335 
107 10920 

117 21-222 

123 11027 

104 10046 

11.7 10077 

70 9014 

«L2 11017 

124 10871 

117 11.094 
121 11.080 
90 10-790 
11.4 11.010 
40 7.088 

IOlB 10012 

no 10058 

120 11094 
100 10664 

1ZJ 11.108 
117 10035 

3.7 — 
100 10078 

11.7 11006 
103 10695 
109 10.708 
12.1 11.171 
66 10266 

105 106W 

12.1 11089 

112 10082 

103 10040 
112 10694 

10.7 10215 
109 10737 
116 10678 

.. 10027 

104 10584 
104 10587 

111 11062 


104 10525 
112 10602 

103 1OS02 

104 10472 

113 10930 
106 10578 

104 10456 

86 9218 

103 10411 
103 10396 

105 10408 

106 10571 
36 10206 

103 10384 
105 105*7 
109 10.197 
119 10501 
BO 10.126 
B3 9868 
96 10012 

104 10260 


UNDATED 

*6% 37% Cornels 4% 
42 32% War Ln 3':% 

52% 44% Com 3' A 
34% 28%7tam 3% 

29% 22% Consols 2' A 
29% 23%Tram 2'A 

INDEX-UNKED 
725% 103% Trass U. 2% 
109% 98% Tram K. 2% 
iz 109% Tram % 2% 
107% 95% TVsU 02 A 
107% 93’rTrms IL2V* 
110V 96% Tram IL 2% 
106V 92% Tram H2'A 

TilV 87 TremU'A 
94% 79% Tims IL2'A 
102% 87% Tram 02 A 
99% 90%Tramft3A 
104 SBViram K2'A 


39% *H 100 

34% *% 1QO 

46% +% 75 

29% +% lOl 

24%#.. 102 

24% +% W2 


1988 
1990 
1906 
2001 
2003 
2006 
2009 
2011 
2013 
2016 
2016 A 

XCT 


12S 

108%l 

117% 

101 % 

98% 

1Q2VI 

99% 

103% 
96% 
94% I 
94% 1 


2.1 1.78* 

it 2570 
24 3626 

3.1 3691 

32 3549 

27 17*9 

31 3.689 

32 f feift 

32 3581 

32 3526 

2.7 3476 

32 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Confident start to account 

ACCOUNT DAYS; Dealings began yesterday. Dealings end January 9. §Contango day January 12. Settlement day January 19. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 

where stocks have only one price quoted, these are middle prices taken dally at 5pm. Yield, change Bid P/E ratio an catenated on the mkfcSe price 


1*9* la* Ca naan 


Puts vu 

Bid Otar a%Q*4»p * P/t 


1986 

Hfln Lour Camponr 


Pirn 6raS Tld 

Bd Orta Crtfegs dn p % P/I 


*2 «n n 4a Hi 
533 429 IW is 
128 BO 

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m 260 +2 ... 

M3 VO *3 »8 33 U 

1» ■ 600 44 U 

2* aa ... 115k U 99 


« a Ffei Bras BD 77 SB ♦! 

IX nd RaOntrtuejJ) Ml 12S4 129 -2% 75 SB 134 

S? S W a mdrsMi go » m** iu u u 

£5 581 sunsm too ns in 22 13 a 

BM 419 SM CM TBS 7V . . 484 59 37 


BIB 613 Voaa 

7B% •S'-IMs fW9> 


6ffl «70 
72 - 

308 310 


525 85 870 
» is HLO 


BREWERIES 


to ohb a%Bte*B * p/e 


22 % 6 % 

220 in Ms SBC 

147 I SKi 
ICO 03 Btfknd 
as 37S esutop* 


17% 18 -% 

197 200 •*! 2J 12 136 

255 257 •-*! 167 31 145 

n II 25 31 55 

131 134 -1 

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♦a hls u nr 


143'iicu umtssn T33 us 2i 16 jir 

2JS 1774E7 rmraTy 2B8 W e-ta iTz 54 ?Z2 

® rtmlMM 9S 98 • .. Ub U 92 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


»» 190 Mod M 

as 70 tamtm Ofcow 

2M 105 Ml NM Z 
11% 7%Bamnras2 
280 171 BrtBrtM . 
ii% 6 BM lam tod 
250 230 BM taxi* IK 
» 377 MaW 
00 81 BM a Mm 

57? 448 breiars 
40 X B iulI« i i«> 

700 410 

422 268 Cnr Mao 
5SV 46%r - 

3?V M - 

43% 33%C*OXP 
116 »%D*n»u_— 
303V2l5'>ndBtm BM 
34 17 Equny t Gto 

n? 148 hra tel Hows 
3Kb 290 CemnlW 
ID? 66 RHcaltoi 

315 162 HJFfixra 
430 325 HH Ssul 
81V 56 Hrt Stomal 
520 31s josem itrapeU) 
IS IS'ilOng 4 hw 
570 377 Ntowm Brasan 
481 283 U«* 

82 SS Lon Sod 

3 S Wr 


+% 

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•+10 

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245 SO 
63 84 

288 272 

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MO' 2GD 

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VS SB 
#4 47 

365 800 
29S 385 
50% 51V 

$ : -Jt 

107 

128% - 
29 30 e+i 
197 199 
287 292 ... 

M'j B6 tl 
228 9X #+2 

377 » e-a 
80% 82 +1 
470 485 e-5 

13* ias 

505 510 
433 4? 

350 360 +2 

1,? 'J5 

571 577 45 

333 *11 


BOB 38 

ISO 6 SB 

.. t .. 

175 85 

.. I .. 

1.7 07 

207 52 

ail 55 
23 SO 
139 23 

299 95 
29 57 

139 S3 
206 54 

BJ5 (LI 
2001 42 
13 *4 

as 33 
221 73 

H *9 
Win 46 
19.1 50 

33 40 

183 36 

I2S 9» 
ISO 37 
250 57 

27 31 
96 » 

86 21 
371 95 

ill 31 


71 

413 


279 

129 

142 

93 

64 

231 

115 

111 

70 

139 


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0*9 145 48 

•*« 243 34 

• +3 12 M 

4J 37 
•-3 2606 30 

■*6 42 27 

•-1'a 7.7 54 

•-1 154 22 

.. 114 29 

• -I 39 21 

• .. 79 42 

• +1 84 33 

•-* 119 51 

.. 267 42 

• 31 45 

• .. 88 49 

• -3% 50 23 

33 39 

• -4 HLO 23 

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•+1% 183 53 
•+17% 170 17 

• 42 115 45 

• .. 115 42 

• +2 IIO 4.7 

•-% 138 25 

-I 114 49 


142 

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359 

£ 

55 

224 

151 

169 

84 

147 

189 

14.1 

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159 

W5 

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184 

119 

£§ 

155 


tOf 62 _ _ 

£8 277 QMtBMUi 
Jtt 1B3 nirtito Bk 
2*3 1 UP Bp 

57% 43 Otortda 
SB 113 Oe 7%* CPf 
15B 111 Ooimtol 
353 203 


16% 17 ais 09 205 

S3 07 +t .. .. 79 

SB 332 *■ 72 22 189 

213 21S **6 109 SA C 


348 KB Cor 

2S6 S4 Qm 


5* 59 *% 

2a 231 •*3 

is we +3 

SO 38 

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;= 7TI 220 •*! 

IBS 128 DOT Sum 148 153 -2 

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207 mb man iso ias . . 

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£2 

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39 25 172 

J < OJ 179 
( L7 255 
73 32 104 

1.7 11 U1 

40 72 mi 
19 05 

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29 09 212 


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+% 22 51 11. 

44 27 105 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


396 124 MBS* 

2GB 191 u3mn CM 
297 2*8 ftNC 
» 52 MOM 
223 144 ttnwxxte 
SO 326 BPBtotaffe 

485 284 IhBWrtM to 
ffiS 126 Sn« Mi 
40 21 BXfcy 9mJ ( 
182 MB Mmv 

242 134 BtnshrQi 
75 82 Stow 

1D'«875 BkxHep 
726 525 55i3e!« 
275 2D tof*«ux- 
108 G9 a 
27 1B%8 
BD 37 

is. as torn* 

25 7 BM8B&I 

MS 85 : 

is 70 Cendn top 
590 4£3 ceawn 

486 286 
225 174 
C4 M 

137 72 _ 

11? 78 GO 
103 75 Fak 
73 54 Du K 

172 Si Fumed Hag 
86 54 FWuto) 

94 80 


no 

235 

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213 

216 

•+% 7.1 

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525 

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27 

480 

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• +t 120 

20 

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162 

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211 

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60 

840 

970 

+B 346 

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4.4 

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V 

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155 

53k 

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12% 13 
138 141 
150 IS 
486 486 
463 487 
71 D 215 
113 118 
12B 132 
WB 112 
98 183 
6i a 
116 120 


+1 


87 e+7 


ms iw Mxa a am* m us its 


385 254 

T52 88 HAT 

sm a me 

256 174 imtuins 
78 42 HesdBvSkai .. . 

244 194 Hqmsd TTMpil ?13 213 

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283 T2S fcnccn JMin 186 IB8 


336 30 t-2 
130 170 .. 

447% 452% -« 

172 175 
70 71 +2 

217 45 

548 -1 

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283 T2G meek Jeismn 166 IBS 
470 2ffi M (4 6 Sam 460 4B 
4tt 288 mag , 

404 253 Oo 'A' 

119 “ 


100 57 119 

25 35 124 
mi * j n.5 
261 17 Ml 

20 4JJ 200 
7.1 33 140 

740 30 97.1 


119 7V UmncsMta) 

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376 377 • .. HL7 29 166 
37B 377 • .. 107 28 6)9 


297 

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471 332 IkM 
323 IBB feOBtoi 
W1 USVAcOyCMM 
177 161 tonuMto 
142 87 sm ps&Hnr 

3*8 ZJ6%TM»r 

216 ni Tmay I 

«8 210 Tom A Amck] 
101 75 Tm 


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135 

237 248 (fad 

131 67 (Mm BBS 

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CtSMICALS, PLASTICS 


51% • NOD B/V 
242 MO MH Ceaeldl 
4B ' 

247 199 
ISO 131 HIP 
113 81%0m DU5D 
133 102 Biapta 
154 1DB MOD 
100 84 to Basal 
188 83 ba*g (W) 

306 248 53F 
215 135 Cams torn 

179 125 DBA- 
23 18 toy 

182 142 CRMS 
160 119 Oa DU 
m 155 Os * 

133 113 Ewm 
298 206 T MBUrkm 

173 11s toemacem 

453 330 H4*sen 
101% 72>.He*dW DM50 
106 at Kart Usid 
11% 734 topCtora M 
415 333 LgSS 
118 09 Laigk 
15% li'.kank mas 

180 119 Prtm 

110 fiSVREdxnft HUBS 
176 129 Raaatx 
330 218 SM* BPO 
H 36 
' 178 
170 67 Vatoon Ckam 


4-% 

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• +2 
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233 ZJS 
448 «2 
2* 245 
M8 IS • .. 
Ill .. -% 

130 133 4-1 

M8 150 -1 

7D 73 

135 137 . *3 
271 273 0*2 
208 212 • -3 

175 177 e-1 

19 .. 

170 179 ♦% 

IS 159 • .. 
220 222 .. 
123 125 .. 

238 24Q «-1 
155 lS0 *2 
408 41? *3 

93% - 
IDO «Q 
18% 10% 

407 410 
105 107 
101% .. 

176 1» 

87 WO 

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*+1 


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61 
17 240 

u a* 

IS 1413 

£ 142 

79 WJ 

49 17J 

L9 mo 

39 229 
4.1 102 
39 112 
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50 tJ 

59 115 
.. 104 

39 163 

4.4 102 

5.4 gj 

49 61 

59 109 


02 &f H7 
416 45 120 
129 11 170 

05 52 155 
031 .. .. 

27 10 227 

37 37 114 
37 29 175 

!! 603 
114 49 28.1 
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4801 

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165 

61 

7.1 

7001 

103 

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1.4 

51 

11.1 

70 

70 

10 

160 


53 

120 

7.1 

219 


CINEMAS AND TV 


175 hqto TV*' 
416V2T2 CosH IV 
52 27 Braram 

340 176 KTVtyV 

477 2B3 LWT Http 
383 in Sot TV 
278 1 TVS K/V 

50 31 J3» 

341 219 nmiv 

23 137 TV-AM 
152 74 UbrnTV 
191 1 Ytxtotoi TV 


320 323 4-1 US 49 169 

39a 403 

« « • .. 29 60 70 

199 202 +1 12.1 60 67 

437 440 • .. 259 53 119 

342 3*4 .. «J «B 113 

247 2*0 .. 149 53 122 

47 47% -% 20 61 94 

291 294 #+1 150 51 

200 203 40 64 32 

73 15 e-a 

182 1*3 +2% 09 40 TU 


DRAPER Y AND STORES 


208 123 

18 2Vtma job 

785 390 Body 9 bb 
72 « ft ra ra 

640 405 toms (M) 
Si 36 Barer 
173 83 CmUB'A- 
15 37 CsU|S) 

435 305 DM 
» 428 omim 
7S5 MS “ 


226 90 MM 207 210 •+* 57 

21% 14 MOW 0* 15 15% .. .. 

93 61 Igontt A’ 64 S£ m*2 39 

240 165 nosey (Uni Iffi U6 • . . 29 

a as BMM (mss) 'A* a 52 ..39 

142 145 #+1 33 

5% 0% -% 

780 770 +» 30 

68 70^ -2 14 

402 412 • -403 17.1 
270 272 e+15 11 

161 164 .. 39 

78 79 +1 31 

05 435 .. ttl 

487 4BB •-% 179 

207 210 +3 

138 1« 

400 430 • .. 

II S3 +1 

308 311 *6 

5*5 548 e-1 

B 90 -% 

560 8W -5 

177 180 «+4 

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148 118 Cara ffasl 4' 
425 ?10 OAKS &TOSM 'A' 
IIS 74 Dmtos(U) 

438 218%tam too 
588 345 Otota 
101 IS 9s A 
715 565 PjG (VBMWaiJ 
256 136 Bnprt Ssxra 
274 IBB &m 
135 X Em.. 

1H7 105 Fim M Dbv 
03% 51 Fad (UsUQ 
207 1*3 FnMtski 
JiO Fi mirax 
84 SO GHSR 
153 V ‘ 
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1EV830 008 
II %7Z1 Do 'A' 

307 190 toms . 

« 23 We* a 
45 S Kotos 
172 102 HOMS 01 lam 
90 74 Jam (tossn) 

355V 2« IxdM rads 
200 1HJVLCP 
310 135 Las Com 
830 846 UCaq 
2E5 185 Lnoort 

231 163 8M & ( 

350 283 Mss (JotoJ 
635 488 ItoSS Bras 
207 IBS Nexl 
353 305 0toa(6? 

S7% 3 Pasas 
IS 10D PiBedy l 
264 105 RKtoSL 
335 220 Reed (tam) 

7 95 135 08 A* 

56 31 S 6 U Stoss 
148V1W Seas 
384 234 SraAJMQ-A’ 

72 47 DO -B- 


110 IB 
134 180 #+1 
61 63 


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10% wv +% 300 

20? 334 *+2 7b 
32 33 #+1 

40 43 +1 

170 173 *1 

82 86 +2 

45% 48% -1% 

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307 312 +3 

6*5 575 -5 

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174 176 *+5 
310 312 #-1 
580 si) +a 

221 23 •+« 

315 355 ■ ... 

B* 85% +% 

13* 130 •+] 

257 29 +8 

350 350 

133 ISi +% 

48 SO .... 

119% 120 43% 50 

274 230 +4 U 

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KB 74 SadaSopmH' 34 56 -2 51 

385 258 SUHfceoss 275 278 e«a%110 


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185 S3 WfpM 
107 65 Mtotosm 
9S 430 UtartHBto 


11% n 

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451 455 
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173 in 
280 282 
172 177 
70 74 
802 07 


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V 139 

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59 222 

19 25 B 
42 127 

23 297 

04 750 

21 507 

49 14.1 
30 152 

20 149 
40 270 

26 179 

18 M0 

50 140 
40 104 

24 119 

19 173 
14 220 
19 184 

40 11.1 

23 226 
36 170 
12 140 
29 43 

39 219 

49 80 

28 189 
23 351 

41 140 
44 SI2 

22 201 

29 Ml 

27 162 

7.1 fflj 

79 126 
70 129 

50 115 
23 352 
47 103 
10 139 
U 223 

4.1 1U 
33 209 
10 149 
14 279 

12 a* 

17 203 

13 221 

4.1 944 
17 333 
2 2 310 
47 180 
.. 322 
<2 154 

3.1 163 

10 170 
50 MO 
53 101 
<0 147 
.. 167 


+22 2288 13 157 


ELECTRICALS 


S3 185 AS Elea 
240 133 Atfradc 
150 36VAIBM 

too <3 Apim CmyiseB 

110 63 Alton 
300 225 Albn&c Gone 
79 SO MoRttMy 


328 333 

205 210 -Z 

121 123 +« 

87 50 +1 

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280 297 -I 

70 73 +2 


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88 * Bto iB~ "S M 5 •”. 1 . ?0 “ 143 

SCO 3t0 -l' &8k 29 n? 

20 B e rn as m +3 u u . .. 

90 91 • .. U LI IU 

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» 2* f em l T44k S 53 +2 10 19 229 

1M |EC 174 in +8 53 36 109 

IbO JO Brocmr 125 I3Q 

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g’ls? 50 - ss 

323 220 Lie 


124 Lena 

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+3 210 5.1 01 

+8 65 19 125 

79 17 156 
89 74 153 

328 24 263 
50 45 204 

25 25 117 
29 39 00 
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59 79 136 
29 19 308 

64 25 03 

54 39 142 


<23 270 

222 1 UX70 4 

433 115 tome 

65 52%UooBS IS 90 

ZM *> h em 80 90 +2 

420 305 Meson 405 «5 +8 

183 125 khenrasom 182 187 

HO 134 HUeHs 215 225 .. 

*S7 283 to* 3 3%+% 

SB 33 toxma Eke 48 53 +5 

S5 X torai am *7 50 +1 

313 238 X mun (LnXj) 280 295 -4 

WBV 74 NS 83% 64 •-% 

« 9 Oexotta 12 14 +1 

580 3n Odea manmm 402 405 

in 150 P-L Manrtttrt 160 163 .. 

32 IQ FBKtra a 23 

lW'.9AFMnfnSWI 95 86 • .. 

17% n PRtoK Mm m/v 13% - • .. 
a» 100 WOB 255 2*3 -1 

1* 170 Do ‘A* Ud Vtoni 1*7 175 -1 

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18 IS 122 

17 27 *3 
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281 273 .. 179 89 KL5 

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373 *77 159 42 HI 

212 215 • .. M 07 *1 


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333 223 Sertto (Ofl 

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215 98 SUIM 

5?9 374 TtenEto 

360 225 Tisttad 
350 2DB UE1 
273 1EB UrtnJi 
28S 126 U0 ism 
190 in m Some 
515 320 SB 


41 10 100 

<L7S QJ 119 

21 l> 259 
21 1.1 233 

21 T9 159 

ni 02 as 

03 00 71LB 

200 89 NL8 

79b 90 120 
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40 29 .. 

07 b 31 1l.| 
575 60 

12 22 113 

22 49 89 
72 39 115 


17% - +% 

158 M3 +3 

75 65 

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330 33J s .. 

52'. 54 +3 

171 176 +2 

HE W5 .. 

no 61 

17% - -% 

«5 187 +2 HU 59 149 

S 59 29 44 32 

481 488 «+7 BO 53 342 

300 3U •+!% 39 1.1 117 

330 334 .. 80 2.4 229 

187 180 +1 93 49 M0 

170 182 . 67 22 60 


16 22 148 
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43 24 ao 
29 23 18J 
164 49 113 

07 13 114 

21 1 2 M0 

69 80 124 
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416 410 -I 
227 23? • 


190 50 Men Samos 
103 75 Mtosnaa SO 9* 
230 Hkofcstt* Rafcg 28S 295 

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■9 59 -. 

43 10 as 
IU 59 70 


74 n •+% 43k 57 05 

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172 177 -1 


120 41 09 

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FINANCE AND LAND 


?77 126 ACton tons 
170% 80 AiSSItonB 
240 163 Battty Tett 
22 a Cams 
26 J M Cwtore 
43 23 Camasy 
34 17 Emy&Cra 
132 ray 8 Ss* 

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IP 342 
287 212 


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FOODS 


174 IX ASDA-UR 
37 IS 'Afers DM 
381 29 Arert 
230 AfiFoao 


+2 


1« 150 
25 27 
3» 313 •+* 
310 314 
110-112 


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IS 81 - 

360 2a am mb 
213 170 BtoXCHnk 

108 73 Baays 

IB 145 OejJti 

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SO 

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281 

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75 38 Borttrtdc 71 

WB raa Mm-Ecames 182 

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290 ISO CSkrts Danes 235 

745 Ml Dg -A’ 213 

230 ns Cteom m 

256 20t Dm an 

Wo (irA T7? 

316 238 flriUrt 2» 

167 1D3 Bekrtrts Mfl 

263 108 am Gtoer 240 
(61 126 Hdrtood Foods 150 
250 159 Ito8 182 

2c%u5%nfadm Was 223 
1C 75 trtra Fsrm 107 

is in ran* sm* no 
298 247 total Franc 2S5 
292 270 Baton 244 

M3 » IASI &J0B 4) U2 
TOO 50 Uwtl (6F) 95 

620 505 Ida Aft) 575 

300 122 M ttttem (Banrtg 273 
170 93 Man To* Sw 150 
236 ISO MoraantW) TOO 

257 205 Nfctrti 1*1 (Vtato) 21 D 

02% 51%Mxrnm BV 

360 243 Wa Had* 245 
ISO 152 tafc S Fkocxk 186 
IBB 127 Part Foods 167 

2S2 157 Ml BO 

532 365 flDCBkss Mb 387 
<28 34* smoayjj) <m 
183 1 22 Sdisaa(&Bto) 136 
248 154 Snoam 215 

Bi 50? TMe A Life 560 
to *0 Tara* fitosga a 
420 TROT 363 

325 216 Ungm 312 

269 2ifl Utd Seam 229 

HO 134 mom& Me 15B 


158 +1 

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342 e+2 

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295 .. 

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150 .. 

245 

153 e+T 

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173 • .. 
270 +1 

248 8+2 

137 .. 
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170 • .. 
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248 +2 

190 • .. 
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400 •+«% 
418 •■*9 

138 # +2% 
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315 #+5 
231 e+1% 
101 


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179- 39 
104 44 

131 41 

100 53 

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7 A 65 
179 S3 
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110 39 
119 5i1 


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203 

160 

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22-4 
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90 
151 
250 
320 
207 
M2 
210 
123 
154 
M7 
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175 

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219 

150 

129 

100 


19 IJ 
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47 20 

4.7 21 

46 42 
19 23 

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80 15 
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79 49 
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EJ 34 
60 16 
9,4 34 

150 45 

54 20 

49 35 


09 23 
154 49 
T3S 50 
67b 61 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


156 >1 fttotar Herts 138 140 • 

461 328 Grand MB 453 455 . 

305 201 Kendy Btoctoi 2£ 25B e+7 

391 312 LartHCa 373 375 

565 *47 im to# ratals «i 4sn 

100 7G%1#rtC Orausa 94 95 

115 67 tec* raw ram no iu 

88% Moa «% 67% 

405 348 Sswy Heart A‘ 373 377 

si 58 a 71 

209 UB 1MB0DBS Fane MB 188 


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mem 

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258 206 Adert 
3*1 207 Attxrtta 
255 144 Msbk 
315 1*5 AraotrM 
„ 150 Atotodcra 
n 35 Anracn 
37% 23 tow 
440 373 AS1 0 uesy 
91 30 Atom . 

530 1*3 AKSrEnoBa 
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80 40 Ml llert 
289 U7 rat 
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85 82 BET2C 

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330 241 SIR 
218 153 ' 

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237 133 Be n stod ffAW) 
148 90 " — —— 

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378 248 Btocm 

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181 iiKr 6p 

240 IBB Qlbb.l1 l%ll| 
220 t24'i*toga £«g A| 

288 138 Sr9n*“ 

423 296 Mas Hi 
145 9 BrtrtOTSW MS 
34 17 MmaiB 
48 31 tact I Tod 

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112 58 EeKJukae 
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30 124 
33 79 

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29 179 
58 159 
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3.6 189 
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55 59 
400 450 
31 33 


16 63 US 

3141 74 50 

Ub 50 .. 
10.7 55 1X2 
30 55 87 

67 14 11 7 

17.1 39 IU 

10 18 362 




360 370 • .. 
226 22* e+3 
17% T8'* +1% 

338 340 +4 

21 21 % 

154 158 
270 m +2 
52 54 -1 

211 214 • .. 
32 36 k-1 

137 UB +2 
317 212 e-1 
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139 40 208 


179 60 120 
10 10 112 
79 37 185 
05 10 223 

7.1 61 U 

39 42 IU 

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59 144 
4.9 122 

19 Ml 

20 1&1 
2.7 157 

59 345 
39 125 

60 105 



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60 STO C Tttram g 
356 246 tetolM 
68 30 Onto Mxt 

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224 188 Cm tern 
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319 706 DPCT 

385 208 . 

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283 1*3 

182 S2 Dim 
3S0 233 Oe Lj Aa 
258 153 DCb _ 

2*3 WO DatadStovn 

315 157 

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110 79 

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315 318 
31 34 

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8.1 173 
79 n.i 
19 789 
79 150 


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320 24* EraanfM 

221 151 Eton 
285 20S BS 
43% 34%Etoel 
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3*% 24%BecnkB (CQ T 
104 61 EkoB fB} 

2». 21%£rtart 
381 295 EaemCtoaOm 

1C 112 r, Do« F W l “ 
342 1*7 hnd 
215'. 122 Emm 
438 312 tm 
55 22 Fttceo 

42 26 Feedex Ajrtc tad 
214 m Fan# 

75 48 Wei 
650 408 torn 
BO 35 
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158 81 FegaQr 
41V 27'ifofc Stop N/V 
2*8 157 Fean** Atomy 
87 46 FranOi (ThemraJ 
131 M E8M 
385 235 GW 
310 2S0 OR 
118 60 One top 

200 fie Demur 
153 111 Gmt* 
11%756VGton 

344 184 9rmi 
505 240 Drag Ker 
1*2 W7 GmpmMdpi 
312 206 Sraradi 

180 153 Sjkle 

to s*%Haa toscean 

252 134 to* Em 

222 120 ractf 

205 175 ram 
290 235 total 
57% 23%toneam W 
61 20 Krkaai 
2T5V141 Hxodb 
714 145 do 8% Cm 
688% 98 DC P.% PI 
134%115% DO 10% 

280 US Irtmms 
275 1» StofteW 
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150 90 Kattw 

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3« t« topfemes 
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346 234 HMrtgAme 
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181 118 m 
315 165 

295 240 

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615 473 
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118% 22% 

345 235 _ 

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325 188 Krtay rtd ’ 
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298 230 Max. (4) 

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311 St? +% 
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119% 120% e .. 
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425 430 a +25 
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305 315 

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Z32 238 
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200 295 +S 
252 257 • .. 
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270 272 
245 255 •+% 
430 434 *-* 
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IB 170 • .. 
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195 205 .. 

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340 347 
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305 315 +50 

122 127 +2 

252 ZE2 .. 

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323 198 5d 
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145 85 Do OK 
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487 306 HL torts 
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312 185 
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MS 106 bftytam 

207 95 Ueggrt 

194 KB Saw Bax 
194 128 Matt d asurst 

78% 45 WkWCto 
(37 68 MICM1 Seems 
210 1*3 woas 

325 712 Mra» 

208 2B%toCir* 

42 a%Mm<M 

216 135 Adtaf U» ' 

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206 50 lk+SHK Into 
258 171 Oita Baa tort 
448 247 tote Korn A - 
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574 332 tete-Kararay 
520 MO totksdhc 
14 775 pnavto 
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388 215 
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184 S? 

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158 123 

589 421 WON 
228 115 Rtteraerara 
US 90 ftflrtrti IB Badge 
900 605 Berae & Colrraa 
333 iw nratm M* 

341 2S8 toad EzSOM 
309 16?%fi*ta H 
188 134 Wjon 
364 258 Rtasdrt 
91 40 Rartd 

138 to warn 
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80 a Ware 0«J 
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152 B3 HetaTO toe 
356 149 RsbOBCC (TbBmQ 

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162 116 Rrtrt 
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105 110 .. 

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232 e+1 
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347 352 .. 

135 140 .. 

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232 234 #+2 
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80 82 e+1 
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175 171 e+2 
105 167 e-3 
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129 131 e+3 
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300 305 e+2 
172 177 #-I 
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290 300 
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208 213 
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335 340 e+2 

302 305 a +2 

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60 29 289 
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29 *4 62 

10b 42 139 
139 19 170 
17 27 IU 

27 47 Bi 

MJ 61 IU 
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66 19 223 
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129 42 180 
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185 120 Sad tone* 

170 84 saw A toeatoon 

164 1ZZ SaOlB 
158 106 OB 'A'. 

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153 90 ■/ 

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257 260 e+8% MS 73 87 

2KI 215 -2 90 45 102 

188 SB -1 U 47 171 



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c Ttaea Naiiyuw ItoW - - 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£ 8,000 

Claims required for 

+34 points 

Claimants shoald rinR 02S+S3272 


ter ton YU 

Btt 06a Oinrtto P * Pit 


19*6 

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317 320 
390 400 
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533 637 

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266 13* AE 
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170 172 e+1 
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224 Bi TOer Ktefcy 
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30 130 
S40 
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PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERTS 


26 201 AbboaUato 
153 KM Adam Cara 
57 45 

270 225 
158 90 

198 U5 
3B 242 

310 230 BPCC 
18* 16 Raeartg 

237 V 156 V HrXSd" 

16% 720 cmn fim 


375 IBB ogaa 
314 254 DKT 
178 IX BMtfm PMNi 

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4B5 285 RlrtDttrti 
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233 17B Bold I 

ix m Komqm - 

133 no Loan 
485 in Lrta HS A 6 
316 mo HcCaonMa 
151 S3 16m DM 
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150 96 OB CBW 

351 171 


205 210 
111 114 
47% 48% 

267 272 

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273 2*0 
247 252 

203 20B 

10 k r. 

220 225 
320 330 
294 296 
133 UB 
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268 ZTO 


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220 200 ihrti t£anr 
215 IS Vttn Poflen 
78 40 Wtt 

225 113 Wadanaon rrt 
303 230 Mnp 
SB 320 WRS^ 


81 81 

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137 142 
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mm 

348 353 
275 262 

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S3 SS -1 
825 835 # +5 
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111% 1(2% 

328 333 -A 
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157 167 .. 

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302 246 1 

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%147 01 Lrtd 
178 1« Rnaan 

£ SS5 W “" 

263 223 Cep A fnitabii 
3X 230 CrtNI Prop 
186 Mi Crtatnaad 
4B5 335 nxnertrtd 

171 131 

290 221 aelam 
295 196 Qbattrt 
22 M cmonl Sea 
140 in caxay A Nm 
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260 175 CnsibB 

755 470 Dtam 
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IX 71 EtjMO 
120 105 Esaw 

184 150 ErtasRaa 
118 to Brut 01 Uta 
70 X FM tea 

223 170 Fregam 

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274 202 aaym 
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400 204 Maaba Brtirt 
495 410 Maantnm 
485 360 Dn A' 

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320 Iffl Jamyo 
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305 216 l»Ahw6*i 
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123 KXVMrtty ma 
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235 IS Irrttae Une 
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11%5» HoraUto 
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108 S *MUdw<WJ) 

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13% Bvtadrt 
368 160 Rnafert 
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287 215 M?faa«te 
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196 145 SMN 
183 M2 
4*5 280 
200 144 
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866 675 Rura 
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370 3*0 


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120 123 
500 595 
235 240 
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SHIPPING 


NEWSPAPERS AND 

PUBLISHERS 


172 M5 Mato 
260 IS Atm Bart 
426 218%Asec IrtrtB 
3X 2BB%BbCfc{AAQ 
752 J® taw 

206 115 

376 295 mum n*a 
253 84 Horn Ctaak 
3« IQ tadamema 
704 40* bx mama 


w- 


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KB 167 
235 240 
422 425 
320 3X 
740 750 
465 475 
3» 335 
06 Ml 
309 315 
M) 250 



+2 40 

62 

♦24% aa 
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a+6 414 

.. 114 

. . 114 

• +i X* 

• .. 666 
-6 120 
+0 120 

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+15 .. 
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• -1 KL4 

-1 60 
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27 201 
30 15.1 
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40 170 
30 206 
24 212 
X4 150 
24 250 
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01 150 
30 .. 

20 1X4 

bi :: 


IS 


40 1X4 

aa mb 


OIL 


127 tt Anpai 
31 R dm Bi 
27 ID 
IB S 
21% 5 
425 333 
720 530 
IS 91 
to 16 
419 334 
75% 42 
150 m 
XV W 
S X 
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S 23 

a 4 
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S 26 


As 08 A 
BOH 
9 Boros 
Br IMiKrtld 
BrM 
hym 

Gate Cecil 

£3* 

%re 

fintbod 
Gern Bkw 
Otto u Rbj 
flottra 


122 MB 
X 27 
S 27 
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+2 

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420 425 +3 

390 

7.1 

150 

717 722 +17 

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66 

79 

169 171 +4 

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46 

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87 

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43 45 +2% 

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12 

180 


317 187 Artie rttas 
386 213 frCWlMCMWi 
356 U8 CMM 
9* 51 FWb(JmmKI 

8C3 480 Grata 
76 MVJKrtaUQ 
12% 4%brt 
41 28 BmyOecrt 
•55 100 OcsrtTrm* 

STB 428 P 6 0 Did 


ao • .. 


Mb 20 MJ 

116 20 202 

7A S3 470 

. . « XT W7 

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1. k 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


iui' 

’i :*» ■ 


h;iP c 


. ' 1 I * " i 


Industrial Relations Services 

Labour Law Researcher 


ARTICLED CLERKS 

YOUNG SOLICITORS 


Industrial Relations Services are looking for a 
research officer for their twice-monthly journal, 
Industrial Relations Legal Information Bulletin. 
The successful candidate will have an interest 
in labour legislation end case law, an ability to 
write clearly and accurately foT publication and, 
ideally, some form of legal training (degree 
and/or professional qualification}. 

The job will- involve writing and research; writing 
to tight deadlines within a small professional 
team; and contributing ideas and skills to 
developing new products. 

Salary will be either £13,878 or £15,420 p.a. 
(subject to review from 1 January 1987] 
depending on experience. There is also an 
attractive range of fringe benefits and holiday 
entitlement. 

Applications, setting out full details of your 
career to date and showing how you match our 
requirements, should reach us by Friday, 2 
January and be addressed to: 

Edward Benson, 

Industrial Relations Services. 

67 Maygrove Road, r-x — \ / — )_ 

London NW6 2EJ. » X 


Button - bright articled clerks and 
young solicitors are demanded by our 
latest Practice development plans. 
Our commercial list includes 
household names, established 
European and American clients and 
clients in tomorrow's businesses —like 
waste management, undersea 
research and computer applications 
- as well as commercial 
main-stream business. 

You can develop your skills and 
versatility in handling a varied case 
load In your chosen field - at 
the sharp end. 

Specific opportunities are available 
now in Intellectual Property, Media 
and Commercial work. 

If you would like to know more, why 
not come to see us in Colchester on 
29th or 30th December? 

Call Trevor Dodwefi (0206 - 441 77) 

. or David Church (01 0-322-230-6294) 


SOLICITORS 

COLCHESTER HARWICH BRUSSELS 


PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 


Borough of Havant 

Administrative and Legal Department 


SENIOR 

SOLICITOR 



THE ROYAL 
INSTITUTION OF 
CHARTERED 
SURVEYORS 


requires an 


Salary op to £15,243 
Havant is on the South Coast. 


ADMINISTRATIVE 

SECRETARY 


We need someone good to deal primarily with 
civil litigation and housing work (including 
Committee). Applicants (not necessarily from 
local government) must be strong in at least one 
of those two fields. Applications from barristers 
will be considered. 


Removals, housing support/mortgage subsidy 
scheme and other benefits. 


Flexitime. 


Application form and farther particulars from 
the Borough Secretary and Solicitor, Civic 
Offices, Civic Centre Road, HavanL (TeL 
Havant (0705) 474174 Exf. 187 or 193). 


Disabled persons may apply as appropriate. 
Closing dale: 5th January 1987. 


for the Professional Practice Department 
Duties to investigate complaints against 
RICS Members and advise on practice 
matters. Age 25-45. 

A degree or professional qualification, 
preferably in Law, and excellent 
communication skills are required. 
Commencing salary within a range 
£9,650-£Il,000 pa aae. 

Closing date for applications: Friday 9th 
January 1987 

Application with CV and daytime 
telephone number to the Personnel 
Officer, The RICS, 12 Great George 
Street, Parliament Sqnare, London 
SW1P 3 AD. 


SCOTTISH LEGAL AID BOARD 


CHIEF EXECUTIVE 


The Scottish Legal Aid Board has been appointed by j 
the Secretary of State for Sootland under the terms of I 


the Secretary of State for Sootland under the terms of 
the Legal Aid (Scotland) Act 1986, to assume 
responsibilities early in 1987 for the administration of 


responsibilities eariy in 1987 for the administration of ; 
Legal Aid in Scotland. 

The Board invites Hppications for the post of Chief 
Executive. 

The Chief Executive wiB have overall responsibility 
under the direction of the Board lor the dtecharge of its 
business. The Board will have a staff of approximately 
30Q. and wtl be responsible (dr over ESOm of 
expenditure on the provision of Legal Aid and its 
administration. 


LANDSCAPE 

ARCHITECT 


Requires 

Experienced 

Architect 


Candidates should have a proven record of success, 
ideally encompassing a period of major change, in a 
general management senior financial, professional or 
administrative role within a large and complex 
organisation. 

The salary will be in the range of £28^00 to £32,000 and 
the appointment wifi be for an initial period of 3 years, 
subject to negotiation. 

A job specification and further detaas are available 
from: Mr Donald B. Grant TD, CA, Chairman, The 
Scottish Legal Aid Board, 5 Melville Street, Edinburgh 
EH3 7PE. Tel: 031-226 4061, to whom applications 
marked ‘Private aid Confidential’ should be submitted 
not later than 12th January, 1987. 


with contract experience 
required from Jan 87 to 
assist our Projects 
co-ordinator. An 
opportunity to work with 
a pioneering and 
innovative 
Environmental Arts 
practice working on- 
inner city projects. 


to run the project Must 
have desist, technical 
and contract expertise. 
Able to supervise others 

and work on the 
taasfoifity. design and 
supervision of 
innovative community 
schemes. 


Salary: £10,500. 


Salary up to P03 
(£15,000). 


Write with fall details of 
experience + CV to 


Free Form Arts 
Trust Ltd 
*38 DaJstoa Lana, 
London E8 3AZ. 


Write with C.V. to Free 
Form, 38 Datston Lane, 
London E8 3AZ. 
Tel: 01-248 3394 


An equal opportunities 
Employer. 


COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 


Training and 
Documentation 


At IA we specialise in the fields of training and documentation. Our client 
list boasts the household names in the computer and electronic industries. 


Our clients are at the forefront of technology and are among the world-leaders 
in their fields. 


To satisfy their requirements we are now seeking Draining and Documentation 
Professionals with skills in the following areas 


□ Office Automation Systems □ Networks □ Unix □ Simulation 

□ Train and Trainer' Courses □ Graphics □ CAD/CAM Systems 

□ Microcomputers □ On-line Documentation □ User Documentation 

□ Electronics □ Aerospace □ Communications Q Software Documentation 

If you are considering a positive career move, either In the UK or Overseas; 
then call one of our consultants for a confidential discussion. 


A* 


Telephone: 0462 57141 

Or write to us at Freepost Hitchin Herts SG5 1YL 


A division ol Industrial Artists Limited and member of fhes 
A n Employment Agency and Employment Business QqE Licence No. SUflQBS* 




CORPORATE LAW 


Bird Sanpte & Glasgow and Fyfe 

Ireland & Co., WS, Edinburgh, will amalgamate m 1st May 198“ In 
anticipation of this and because of an increasing workload the two firms 
are now recruiting additional siaikr and junior assistants to jean their 

corpor a te depa rt men to, 

Yfedeal with Stock Exchange, trust, banking and investment 
transactions fig quoted companies as wafl as anotbernoc-prop aty 
aspects of dxonxrcial practice, such aa purchase, saie^ reorganisation 


contracts, intellectual property, recemrship and liquidation. 

Tl» successful applictm ts fir the senior positions will be capable of 
handling a demanding but stimulating work bad. They will already hare 
retevantexperienoe and will be capable of assuming responsibility. 

The other positions would suit more recently qualified etdiators with 
or withoto, relevant experience but with enthusiasm and the a bility to 
learn quickly Rill training will be green- 


dynamic area of practice. Assistants will have full back-up services 
available to them, along with the benefit of excellent conditions. 
IntervffiwswiDbecxaKits^edmEdmbEirgb.GIa^DwaJidLon(ioa. 
Applicants, who may be soliatas, advocates or barristers, should 
apply with fall career and qualificataw details to either of the following:- 


FYFE IRELAND & CO. 
W.S. 


Malcobn Gillies, 

Bird Semple & 
Crawford Horan, 
Solicitors, 

248 West George Street, 
GLASGOW G24RB 


u Craw1 

Herron 


. Andrew Cubie, 
s Fyfe Ireland 
J- &Cou, W-S^ 


27 Melville Street, 


Crawford gr® 


CROYDON 

MAGISTRATES’ COURT 

Court Clerk 


OUR THANKS 
GO TO 

JOHN BETJEMAN 


We have a vacancy for a Court Clerk who 
must be qualified as a Court Clerk and 
ideally have five years experience. 
Applicants must be able to take courts of 
all types. The person appointed will join a 
team of hard working clerks dealing with 
the widest range of cases. 

Salary up to £13,530. 

There is a good -scheme of removal 
allowance. 

Application forms can be obtained from 
my office (686-8680 ext. 206) and must be 
returned by 7.1.87. 


Unto, untrue, a town with a tat I 
to offer sxt so fawns. Wears 
a newly tamed two partner 
nraaice pstenTriftPri 

efientete and more work than 
ween cope wilfi wffimit the 
as ais ta nca of an eroded dark, 
preferably with £ feast live 
toads of Finals passed Ws 
offer you good experience in 
ciwj - and p inea l litigation, 
nfatranoniai, conveyancing aid 
ad areas of genera practice. 
The vacancy arises in January 
1987. 


Why not confect us, ritar 
Jolfe ffenfe or John Robbs. 
*753 206 6. 


J.D. BERRYMAN 
Clerk to Justices 


Croydon Magistrates’ Courts 
Barclay Road 
Croydon CR9 3NG 


CUNNINGHAM, 
JOHN & CO 


Fenwick Elliott 


Construction Law and 
Commercial Litigation 


Brilliant, hard-working, amusing Solicitor needed. 
Crime and see us if you are used to winning cases 
and enjoy working m a hi-tech environment. 
Many of our clients are Architects, Contractors, 
Developers and others associated with 
Construction and Property. The work is hugely but 
not exclusively litigious. 

Newly qualified to 3 year admitted preferred. 


Norfoft/Snffoa sofiatora with 
seven offices toted by fax. need 
young sofictor at Thetfud bead 
office to deal with wofe variety 
of criminal wok (not afi tegd 
aid); per sonal injury and com- 
mercial litigation and matri- 
monial work We are looking for 
ability, energy and a sense of 
humour. Please telephone 
Sfnan. John or WHBzm Jackson 
□oThetfonl (0842)2409 (in and 
out of bows) or just telephone 
ow receptionist Jayne and ask 
for a copy of our brochure. 


DORSET 


Apply to Dean James, Fenwick Elliott, 353 Strand, 
London WC2R OHS. Tei 01-379 6700. 


EAST SUSSEX 


SOUTH DEVON 


CUSHMANS, an expanding 
firm with offices in Brighton 
end How, now requires two 
assistant Soidtore. Each 
must have u sound Marking 
experience and a lively end 


experience and a lively and 
outgoing ap proach- One wti 
be required for al types of 
Litigation with On opportunity 
of so me advocac y an d the 
other for irnHSomndour 
work in nr axpanrfing 
Conveyancing Department. 


p r acti ce l ias kumwfate 
vacancy for newly quefified 
solicitor or person awaiting 
admt sM onhttsTetaimoutfi 
office. Person wishtag to 
transfer articles also 
considered. Must be prepared 
to deal wife probate tuners 
but a wflngness to take on 


Friendly and busy general prac- 
tice has two immediate vacan- 
cies as a resdt of expankm: 
one In ffgation aid the other « 
the nosveantentjous department 
in both tfrare Is scope for some 
speoabsatioa We seek young 
Sototnre or Legal Executives 
who expect competence and 
hard work to be well remded. 
Apply with Ml CV to: 


Creech & Co 
.(Ref: PB), 


Dorchester, 
Dorset DTI 1HF. 


anything a distinct advantage. 
Good salary and definite 


partnership prospects 1 
right applicant. 


Applications wilfi CV tec 


Staton Howe 

Cushmans, 88 Strip Street, 
Brighton BN1 1AY. 


CVto: JDCoutcoo, 
Scott, Retards 8 C* 
23 Queen Street, Dawfisht 
Demi, EX7 AHA. 
Telephone (0626} 863456. 


SUPER 

SECRETARIES 


SCOUT ARIES rat Architects Be 
Deaton*™. Permanent & tamno- 
rary MMMaa. amsa Sposaust 
RecruUmatt CBneuKaiUi. Or 
734 OS3S 


IS THERE LAW 
OUTSIDE LONDON? 


BOREN AM WOOD 


Yes! Sound training with wide 
range of experience offered 
by old established and busy 
medium- sized practice in 
pleasant cathedral city. Rural 
and cultural pursuits on hand. 
Immediate vacancy for 
articled cleric aid possible 
further vacancy in autumn 
1987. 



CH RISTM AS 

GREETINGS 


HWVT CMIKTMM HaSMer 
fjtov Year . Hanples wtien we 
naan m«-L Ken Tvfmwl 


Tel: 01-953 4241-3. 
Ref: JH. 


COURSES 


Write with CV to 
Lemon. Fetton & Co, 
(Ref FDH), 

86 Crane Street 
Salisbury, Wiltshire. SP12QE. 


JUWretUBOtCB . expert 
t remitrM for A weeks pan una 
work on meat*. EucOoil remu- 
neration. Send CV m Mtos 
Bates, ai Portland (toad. 
London Wit OLJ 


French In France. Art History 
in Florence. Information Awn 
Jdhn Hau. sa kuw ro.. Lon- 
don SW3 4MB TeL S84 7335. 


F1UX Lis! of country vacancies at 
salaries from £7,000 to 
£23000. Cnamban Bi B ai t M B* 
01-506 9371. 


mincK vwtaavEftsmr sum. 

MER COURSE. tafQmrntion 


from John HaU. 36 Kings Rd.. 
Wl SWS 4NB. Tet 084 


CHRISTMAS 

DEADLINES 


All advertisements for the issue of 
28th December must be placed by 


Tuesday 23rd December 6pm 


to place your advertisements please 
telephone 


Wk uu.opuuiw 

^ 01-481 4000 ^ 



MKY 

OF 


THE 4g®iS< TIMES 

CLASSIFIED 


The Haws Classified 
columns are read by 1 J 
million of the most affluent 
people in the country. The 
following categories 
appear regularly each 
week and are generally 
accompanied ly relevant 
editorial articles. Use the 
coupon (right), and find 
out how easy, fast and 
economical it is to 
advertise in The Times 
Classified. 


MONDAY 

Education: University 
Appointments. Prep A Public 
School Appointments, 
Educational Courses. 
Scholarships and Fellowships. 

La Crone de hi Crime and Other 
secretarial appointments. 


TUESDAY 

Coaqwler Horizons; Computer 
Appointments with editorial. 
Legal Appointments: Solicitors, 
Commercial Lawyers. Legal 
Officers. Private A Public 
Practice. 

Legal La Crane for top legal 
secretaries. 

Public Sector Appointments. 


WEDNESDAY 

La Crime de fa Crime and other 
secretarial appointments. 
P rop erty: Residential. Town A 
Country. Overseas, Rentals, with 
editorial 

Antiques and CaUedaMes. 

THURSDAY 

Genera] Appointments: 
Management and Executive 
appointments with editorial. 

U Crane de b Creme and other 
secretarial appointments. 


FRIDAY 

Motors: A complete car buyer’s 
guide with editorial 
Business to Bilinear Business 
opportunities, franchises etc. 
with editorial 

Restaurant (Guide. (Monthly) 


SATURDAY 


Overseas and UK Holidays: 
Viiias/Cotiagcs. Hotels, Flights 
etc. 


THE WORLD FAMOUS PERSONAL COLUMN, INCLUDING 
RENTALS. .APPEARS EVERY DAY. 


v-.-- 


L-l, . 




p & I CLUB 

International 

Lawyer 


‘ . - r* .• 1 

i ill 4 


An able and energetic young lawyer preferably 
with some experience at the Bar or as a 
solicitor is required to handle the claims 
involving our shipowner members. 
Knowledge of charter party disputes would be 
a distinct advantage and languages useful. 


Please appiy by handwritten letter with CV 
to> 


K.A.C. Patteson 
Tindall Riley & Co., 
Southwark Towers, 

32 London Bridge Street, 
London, SE1 9RR 


DAS LEGAL EXPENSES INSURANCE 
COMPANY LIMITED 


LEGAL ADVISERS 


Following the planned expansion of the Company we wish to recruit a 
Solicitor to manag e our in-house Telephone Advisory Service m Head 
Office, Bristol 


Ideally the post will suit a solicitor of several years quali fi ca t ion 
although we would consider appointing a recently qualified solicitor 
with the right background. He or she will be expected to a ye advice on a 
wide variety of legal matters affecting the individual. This is a newly 
created post and the ability to organise and communicate well is 
essential. 


We also wish to recruit in a supporting role and Adviser who should be 
either a solicitor or legal executive with relevant experience. 


An attractive salary, non-contributory pension scheme, m 
sidv in due course, luncheon vouchers and other staff 


sidy in due course, luncheon 
offered. 


Applicants should apply in writing with CV. ro> 


C Brewer 

Manager, Claims Department 

DAS Legal Expenses Insurance Company Limited 

Brigstowe 

5 Welsh Back 

Bristol 

BS1 4SE 


A 




CIRENCESTER 


reib Dnnf (non ntato >> 
noMtzd wariatafe refiaun 


il m refer pa w. P a t -fey 
^ a| * 11 

suuH be pnjnfBl to do xuk 
jfenacy. London onlrltr by ton 
Iran MX&y Swindon. 

S ata y ifei nti dfe. 

Pietrne write to 
John Kawu & Co.. 

Havas Houm, 

.6/8 Dyer Streat 
Ctoocwta. GJst- 6L72PF. 


NORTH 

CORNWALL 

Solicitor urgently required 
for ganaraJ practice with 
good salary and 
Partnership prospects. 
Write with CV to: 


NORTH SHROPSHIRE 


John Whiting A Co. 
National Westnferetef Bank 
Ch amb er s 
24 Marketplace 
C a meWoid 
Cornwall 


Small but expanding 
country practice requires 
solicitor for general work, 
opportunity lor advocacy, 
preferably two to three 
years' experience but 
enthusiasm ati important 
Excellent salary for right 
person. 

Apply; MBton Francis, 
32-36 Willow Street, 
Oswestry. 

Tet 0691 654662. 


! eco lor 


-.***<S4 


To Place Your 
Classified 
Advertisement 


Please telephone the appropriate number listed 
below between 9am and 6pm. Monday to 
Friday, or between 9.30am and 1.00pm on 
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Birth, Marriage and Death NoticesO 1-481 4000 

Birth and Death notices may be accepted over 
the telephone. For publication the following day 
please telephone by 1.30pm. Marriage notices 
not appearing on the Court & Social page may 
also be accepted by telephone. 


Trade Advertisers; 


Appointments 
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London El 9DD 


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be inade alter 10.30am on 01-822 9953 ^ 


You may use your Access, Amex, Diners 
or Visa card. 


Fin in tec coupon and attach i? to your advertisement „„ 

piece of paper, al towing 28 tellers and spaces per "L ^ 3 Xf3arilc 

Rates are; Linage £400 per line <min. 3 lines): Boxed CKsnfev rn 

v3£ 


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Name — — 


Address. 


Telephone; (Daytime) Dale of insertion 

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*1 r. %•/ 

•; v^- i • 





VOLLEYBALL 

Scots have 

chance 
to shape 
future 

By a Correspondent 

MIM Livingston win have the 
opportunity to take a hand in 
the future shaping of volley ba ll 
when they travel to the Vara 
invitation tournament in Swe- 
den early next month. 

The 1985 Scottish champions 
are the only British side compet- 
ing in the event, which runs 
from January 3 to 4, and which 
has been designated as an 
official trial tournament by the 
Federation of Internationa] 
Volleyball. 

It is the twentieth year of the 
Vara tournament with teams 
entered from Norway, Denmark 
and Finland as well as the host 
country and FI VB observers 
will watch proceedings whh 
interest 

In an attempt to mak e the 
game more explosive with a 
view to attracting wider tele- 
vision coverage, teams will be 
able to win points while receiv- 
mg service for the first time. As 
a result, the first team to win 30 
points, instead of the normal 15, 
will win the respective set. 

If the new format proves 
successful, then the FTVB win 
look closely at the possibility of 
petending it to more established 
international events. 

Speedwell Rucanor, the men’s 
first division leaders in the 
Royal Bank English League, are 
one of the clubs who employ the 
new scoring system in training 
sessions. 

Steve Nuth, coach to the 
Bath-based side, said “It puts a 
completely different complex- 
ion on the game as every 
mistake can result in a point” 

Speedwell took the most 
significant step to the league title 
so far when they defeated cham- 
pions Polonia on Sunday 15-6, 
15-7. 14-16, 15-7. “We over- 
powered them at the net” Nuth 
said.“In feet I was a little 
surprised at bow easily we beat 
them." 

Speedwell also reached the 
semi-finals of the Knock-Out 
Cup by beating OBC Poole 3-0 
at the weekend and meet Mal- 
ory, conquerors of Polonia, for a 
place in the final next month. 

In the women’s cup quarter 
finals, there were no surprises 
with Sale and Ashcombe both 
reaching the last four 
comfortably. 

Both teams are undefeated in 
the women’s first division and 
look set to meet each other in 
the final of the other major 
domestic competition. Sale 
dropped a set — a rare occur- 
rence this season — in their 3-1 
cup quarter-final win over 
Dragon ara Leeds while 
Ashcombe dismissed Bradford 
Mylhbreakers 3-0. 

KNOCK-OUT CUPdamMM draw: Kmc 
Redwood Lodge v Capital City. Malory v 
Speedwel. Woman: Safe vSpwc, Arsenal 
v Ashcombe. Has to be played on Januay 
17 and 18. 


YACHTING: SAI UNG'S WATERGATE ENDS WITH ALL CLEAR FOR NEW ZEALAND BOAT 

‘Plastic fantastic 9 cleared by tests 


From Keith Wheatley 
Fremantle 


> 


A 


IS 


Glasseate, 
yachting’s 
Watergate, 
over. The con- 
troversy con- 
cerning wheth- 
er or not the New Zealand 
fibreglass ] 2-metre is legal has 
been settled in favour of the 
New Zealanders. Independent 
surveyors from Lloyds pa^wl 
all four semi- finalists as eli- 
gible to .compete in the 
America’s Cup: 

Holes were drilled in the 
New Zealand yacht. But this 
was at the specific request of 
Michael Fay, the syndicate 
chairman. KZ7 had already 
passed her construction re- 
quirements on the basis of 
extensive electronic and 
gamma-ray testing. “It was my 
request to Lloyds,” Fay said 

“Some of the comments 
made about our boat have 
been lunatic, and some of the 
actions irresponsible. Our 
position was >b»s has gone on 
long enoughs and that our 
position of tolerance has 
ended. 

“I've seen transcripts of a 
conversation which, wearing 
my lawyer’s hat, look dose to 
defamation. That has got to 
stop now. Anyone who wants 
to raise the issue again had 
better make a formal protest 
and tread carefully.” 

The prime mover in the 
whispering campaig n a gainst 
the “plastic fantastic” has 
been Dennis Conner and the 
Stars and Stripes syndicate. 
The syndicate, who had their 
boat. Stars and Stripes ’87, 
tested by the measurer say 
they are now content with the 
legality of the New Zealand 
12-metre. “We’re 100 percent 
happy with what we’ve seen,” 
Robot Hopkins, techni cal 
chief of the Stars and Stripes, 
said. “It looked like a very 
thorough test.” 


v. 










SMI 



Drastic: New Zealand’s KZ7 underwent electronic and gamma-ray testing before being declared eligible as a challenger 


Eacfa syndicate was entitled 
to place an observer at the re- 
measuring. “As a result of the 
tests, we feel that no 
aluminium boat or fibreglass 
boat of those four (semi- 
finalists) was in any way 
cheating, and certainly we 
never intended to say any- 
thing like that,” Hopkins said. 

However, Conner, the Stars 
and Stripes skipper, had raised 
anger in the New Zealand 
camp when he suggested re- 


cently that the only reason 
anyone would want to build 
out of fibreglass would be to 
cbeaL 

He said that after Coura- 
geous was built in 1973, 78 out 
81 12-metres had been made 
out of al uminium New Zea- 
land constructed the world's 
first three fibreglass boats. 


KZ3, KZ5 and KZ7, its 
America’s Cup entry. 

Hopkins retorted that as for 
as the Stars and Stripes syn- 
dicate was concerned. Glass- 
gate was over. He said that if 
New Zealand went on to 
become the challenger , it 
would be safe from any 
Australian protest in the final. 
"If that boat wins the chal- 
lenger trial, they will be pretty 
bullet-proof from any criti- 
cism or protest by an Austra- 
lian boat, which is. I'm sine, 
what Commandant Alberini 
was seeking to do.” 

For Michael Fay, the issue 
involved a personal climb- 
down, which he jokingly 
acknowledged. Last Septem- 
ber he said that holes would be 
drilled in the New Zealand 
boat over his dead body. “I 


felt a gesture was called for, so 
I lay down on the dock before 
the measurer got busy with the 
drill and be stepped over me 
to get to the boat,” Bay said. 
“It was somewhat against my 
personal instincts, call it a 
gesture on behalf of the New 


ISyndicai 
What Robert Rymil, prin- 
cipal surveyor with Lloyd’s 
Register of Yachts and Small 
Craft did not do was core-test 
the New Zealand boat This 
m ean* drilling large-diameter 
holes to test lor composition. 
Instead, small holes were 
drilled, and tiny instruments 
poked through to measure hull 
thickness. The operation was 
performed on Sunday and 
KZ7 was well enough to go 
sailing yesterday. 

It was the first time in 


America's Cup history that 
boats progressing from the 
early stages to the semi-finals 
had been subjected to a com- 
plete remeascrement, and 
never before has there been so 
much at stake. 

COmmandante Alberini, of 
the Challenger of Recoid 
Yacht Club, Costa Smeralda, 
and head of the challenge 
organizing authority, made 
the announcement of legality 
with some formality. 

“The necessary physical 
and electronic testing to as- 
certain that the weight, and 
weight distribution, required 
by foe Society (Lloyds), has 
been complied with,” Alberini 
said. Less for mally he added ' 
“I am very happy that the 
gossip and rumours we have 
had will now go away.” 


Kialoa Ill’s record under attack SA sailors in ban row 


Six of the world's top marie, 
including Bob Bed’s 80-foot 
Coudor of Ber muda, fine up 
inside Sydney Heads for the 
nnnnal Sydney-to-Hohart clas- 
sic on Boxing Day with one aim 
in common — to break the 11- 
year-old record for this 650-mile 
passage race held by the ven- 
erable American maxi JUafoa 

m. 

The 70-foot ketch, which is 
owned by Jim KDioy, is one of 
only two yachts to have breached 
the three-day barrier in foe 41- 
year history of foe event —the 
other was Peter Blake’s 1981-82 
Whitbread round-the-world 
racer lion New Zealand, which 


From Barry PfckthaD, Sydney 
won both line' and fc*w*»rwp 
honours in 1980. 

However, with foe American 
yacht Nirvana dipping 14 boors 
off Condor’s former Fastest race 
record last year, it mast only be a 
question of time before the latest 
breed of maxis, now m casmiag 
np to 83 feet long, break through 
the dnsree two-and-a-fealf day 
barrier on this sail across the 
notorious Bass Strait to foe 
Tasmanian capital. 

Lined op against Condor, 
whose crew have bees working 
rotmd the dock to fit a new bnlb 
keel and mast in fone for the 
event, is Sovereign, an 83-foot 


Patrick design developed from 
the fines of Nirvana. It was 
launched last month for Bernard 
Lewis, the Australian real-estate 


itKnnrm, and won its first 
ice -a 180 


mOer — in record 
time last week. 

Two otter pro mising front* 
rmueis expected to head the 
128-strong fleet are the two 
Farr-designed Whitbread en- 
trants, Atlantic Privateer, owned 
by the Sooth African, Padda 
Knttri, and her great rival. 
Enterprise New Zealand, skip- 
pered by Digby Taylor. The pair 
completed the Cape Town- 
AncUaod leg of that race within 
nine miaotes of each other. 


John Martin and Beruie 
Reed, foe South African solo 
round-the-world race sailors 
who are competing in the BOC 
Challenge, have found them- 
selves caught up in foe political 
controversy surrounding foe 
Australian Government’s recent 
ruling to refuse visas to South 
African visitors (Barry Pic Jcihall 
writes). 

While both saDora received a 
warm welcome on arrival in 
Australia, their support crews, 
including Martin's wife, have 
received an official cold shoul- 
der — even though Mrs Martin 
holds a British passport. 

“They’ve stamped on the 
wrong lady’s tail if they think 


they can stop me. I'm from 
Yorkshire and we fight”, Lynn 
Martin told The Australian 
yesterday. 

Mrs Martin has now sent her 
passport to the Australian Em- 
bassy in London where she 
hopes to get a more favourable 
answer today. The effective ban 
on the two South African sup- 
port crews now places a heavy 
wo rk schedule on the two 
sailors, whose boats have both 
suffered extensive damage. 

LATEST FUBSHERS: 2nd due 2. Bet- 


mom Fatond (Harry Hartbmo, Rr)36days 


9hr SSinin. 3rd due 2. Lets 

Luka von den Heads. Fr) 36 days 17hr 
43mta. Omni: (altar 2 bn): 9, Let's Go. 
88 days 5tic 10, Belmont Finland. 
21hrf0min. 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 

Spluttering Jets 
have slim hopes 
for the play-offs 


By Robert KIrley 


In tbe middle of November 
the New York Jets were the 
hottest dub in tbe National 
Football League but that was 
before foe pilot light — and foe 
mayday — went out. New York, 
beaten S2-21 by foe Cincinnati 
Bengab on Sunday, trill splutter 
into foe play-ora after losing 
five consecutive games. 

The Jets could still win the 
AFC East division tide and gain 
a bye in foe first round of foe 
play-ofis if foe Miami Dolphins 
beat the New England Patriots 
in the final game of foe regular 
season. If New England beat 
Miami, the Jets would host 
Kansas City in the conference 
wild-card game next Sunday. 

“It’s embarrassing to be a 
player on this team." foe Jets’ 
defensive end. Barry Bennett, 
said. “Our coaches nave eot to 
be pulling their hair out trying to 
find what will work.” 

Tbe Bengals’ quarterback. 
Boomer Esiason, did work on 
Sunday, passing for 425 yards 
and five touchdowns against the 
Jets, who have yielded 1SI 


Jets are the first team to end tbe 
Tegular season with five defeats 
and still make foe play-offs. It 
would be prodent not to invest 
in Jets T-shirts and pennants for 
your Soper Bowl party. 

The Kansas City Chiefs 
earned a play-off berth with a 
24-19 away win against the 
Ptttsburgh Steelers- Kansas 
City, whose special team* ac- 
counted for three touchdowns, 
secured the victory with an 
interception by Albert Lewis 


two minutes and 22 seconds 
from time to lake their first 
play-off berth since 1971. 

The NFC play-offs were 
established before the games on 
Sunday; the Washington Red- 
skins win host the Los Angeles 
Rams next Sunday in the wild- 
card game. Tbe New York 
Giants and the Chicago Bears 
will host games in foe next 
round, which will include the 
San Francisco 49ers. 

The Bears beat foe Dallas 
Cowboys 24-10 as Walter 
Payton equalled an NFL career 
record with his 106th rushing 
touchdown. Doug Rude threw 
two scoring passes in his first 
start for foe Bears and foe 
Cowboys recorded more defeats 
than wins for the first time since 
1964. 

Tbe Indianapolis Colts, who 
lost their first 13 games, ended 
foe season with their third 
successive win. Thus, the 
Tampa Bay Buccaneers, who 
finished with the poorest record, 
are entitled to foe first choice in 
foe draft of college players. Last 
spring the Buccaneers made the 
first choioe and selected the 
1985 winner of the Heasman 
trophy. Bo Jackson, of Auburn 
University. Jackson became a 
baseball player for foe Kansas 
City Royals. 

The Buccaneers should have 
better luck with Vinny Testa- 
verde, the University of Miami 
quarterback and this year’s 
Heisman Trophy winner, who 
has evinced no aspirations to hit 
home runs. 

• Results and tables, page 26 


ICE HOCKEY 


Murrayfield stay on top 


By Norman de Mesquite 


Tony Hand decided not to 
stay in Canada as it was thought 
his return would give Murray- 
field Racers an excellent chance 
to retain their Heineken 
Championship. Weekend wins 
over Durham (at home) and 
Dundee (away) maintained 
their unbeaten record and 
strengthened their hold on first 
place in foe premier division. 

Dundee Rockets, although 
never ahead, maime d to share 
16 goals at Nottin gham on 
Saturday to become the first 
team to take a point from the 
Midlands, but they were no 
match for tbe Raceison Sunday. 

The Panthers found Whitley 
Warriors in surprisingly eff- 
ective form on Sunday and 
although 6-3 ahead at the end of 
foe second period, they con- 
ceded seven goals in the third. 
This was a penalty-filled contest 
which saw 11 players ejected 


four minutes from the end. 

Streatham Redskins, who had 
a win at last after six defeats, and 
Solihull Barons also kept the 
referee busy but foe indivi dual 
performances of Craig 
Melancon and Gary Brine over- 
shadowed anything else. Melan- 
con scored five times — twice 
within a minute when his imib 
was short-handed — and Brine 
made several spectacular saves, 
including a penalty shot early in 
the second period. 

Peterborough Pirates reg- 
istered two more doubfofigure 
wins — their tenth and eleventh 
in as many games — and took 
over the lead in the first 
division. Their imports contrib- 
uted 43 points in the two 
weekend matches and Garry 
Unger and Todd Bidner took 
over foe top two places in foe 
individual scoring race. 

Results, page 26 


International Law Report The Hague 


Decolonization boundaries to apply 


Frontier dispute (Burkina 
Faso/Mali) 

Before Judge Mohammed 
Bedjaoui, President of Cham- 
ber, Judge Manfred Lachs, 
Judge Jos6 Maria Ruda, Judge 
ad hoc Francois Lncfaaire ami 
Judge ad hoc Georges Abi-Saab 
Registrar Torres Bernardez 
[Judgment December 22] 

The appropriate law to apply 
in settling a frontier dispute 
between two former French 
colonies in West Africa was 
considered by tbe International 
Court of Justice at The Hague in 
defining a disputed length of the 
boundary between Burkina Faso 
and Mali. 

The Coart unanimously 
agreed upon foe frontier line, 
but Judges ad hoc Luchaire and 
Abi-Saab dissociated them- 
selves from some of the reason- 
ing and conclusions. 

By a special agreement dated 
September 16, 1983, the Repub- 
lic of Upper Volta (known as 
Burkina Faso since August 4, 

1 984) and foe Republic of Mali 
agreed to submit to a chamber of 
foe Court a dispute relating to 
the delimitation of port of their 
common fomtier. 

The chamber, whose judg- 
ment has the effect of that of the 
foil Court and which was ac- 


Wtaen those boundaries were 
delimitations between different 
administrative divisions or 
colonies subject to the same 
sovereign foe application of the 
principle resulted in their being 
transformed into international 
boundaries, as in the instant 


The principle appeared to 
conflict with tbe right of peoples 
to setf-detennination; however, 
foe maintenance of territorial 
status quo in Africa was often 
seen as foe wisest course. The 
essential requirement of stabil- 
ity in order to survive and 
develop had induced African 
states to consent to tbe mainte- 
nance of colonial frontiers. 

Equity 

The chamber could not de- 
cide ex aequo et bono since the 
parties had not asked it to do so; 
but it would have regard to 
equity infra legem, that form of 
equity which constituted a 
method of interpretation of the 
law in force and which was 
based on law. 

French colonial law 

The parties agreed that the 
delimitation of the frontier had 
to be appraised in the light of the 



arties, 

ate three experts to assist in the ' 

emanation. 

In its judgment the inter- 
ational Court held: 

Both states derived their exis- 
•nce from the process of de- 
ionization which had been 
□folding in Africa during foe 
151 30 years. Their territories 
nd that of Niger were formerty 
art of French West Africa. 
Burkina Faso corresponded to 
le colony of Upper Volta and 
fall to Sudan (formerly French 
udanX Both parties stated foe 
■rtiemeni should be based on 
sped for the principle of the 
itangibility of frontiers inher- 
ed from colonization. 

The Principle 

In those circumstances, the 
ourt could not disregard the 
incipie of uti possidetis juris. 
emphasized the general scope 
r the principle in matters or 
colonization and its ex cep- 
>nal importance for the Ar- 
ran continent. Although 
voked for foe first time in 
tanish America, the principle 
is not a rule pertaining solely 
one specific system of mter- 
txional law. - ' - , 

It was a general principle 
p rally connected with the 
lenomenon of the obtaining of 
dependence and its obvious 
rpose was to prerent the 
dependence and stability of 
w states being endangered by 
itriddal snuggles provoked by 
• challenging of frontiers 
lowing the withdrawal of the 
ministering power, 
nie principle accorded pne- 

linence to legal otie 9 ve C 
cctive possession as a basis oi 
vereignty. Its primary arm 
s to secure respect for the 
ritoria! boundaries which ex- 
when independence was 



French colonial law. Tbe line to 
be determined as that which 
existed in 1959-60 was orig- 
inally no more than an admin- 
istrative boundary dividing two 
former French overseas terri- 
tories and as such was defined at 
that time not according to 
international law but according 

to the relevant French 

^ntOTutiona! law, and there- 
fore the principle of uti 
possidetis , applied as from the 
accession of independence but 
had no retroactive effect. The 
principle froze the territorial 
title; it stopped the clock but it 
did not put back foe hands. 

International law did not 
effect any return to the law of 
the colonizing state, which was 
but one factual element among 
others, evidence indicative of 
the colonial heritage at the 
critical date. 

Administrative heritage 

French West Africa was 
beaded by a governor-general 
and divided into colonies, 
headed by a lieutenant-gov- 
ernor. Colonies were subdivided 
into cervles beaded by a 
comiuandarL , 

Mali gained its independence 
in 1 9nll sucreedmg the Sudanese 
Repubuc which had emerged 
from the French Sudan. 

Upper Volta came into being 
in 1919. was abolished in 1932 
and reconstituted in 1947. with 
the 1 boundaries, and gained 
independence in 1960. 


The problem for the Court 
was to ascertain what in the 
disputed area was the frontier 
which existed in 1959-60 be- 
tween Sudan and Upper Volta. 

Both parties agreed that when 
they became independent there 
was a definite fbrntier and both 
accepted that no modification 
had taken place since. 

Tripoint problem 

The easternmost point of the 
disputed frontier, tbe tripoint 
Niger-Mali-Burkina Faso, gave 
rise to conflict between tbe 
parties. Mali claimed that it 
could not be determined with- 
out Niger’s agreement, and 
Burkina Faso considered that 
the Court had to reach a 
decision. 

The Court held that its juris- 
diction was not restricted 
merely because foe end-point of 
the disputed fro n t i er lay on the 
frontier of a third slate not a 
party to the proceedings. 

The rights of Niger were in 
any event safeguarded by article 
59 of the Statute of the Court 
which provided that the de- 
cision of foe Court had no 
binding force except between 
the parties and in respect of that 
particular case. 

In any event, the Court was 
not required to fix a tripoint, 
which would require the consent 
of an three states, but to 
ascertain in the light of the 
evidence which foe parties had 
made available how for the 
frontier they had inherited from 
the colonial power extended. 

Such a finding implied that 
tbe territory of a third state lay 
beyond the end-point and that 
the parties had exclusive sov- 
ereign rights up to that point. 
However, since the parties had 
contended that they possessed a 
common frontier with the other 
as for as a specific point, neither 
could change-its position to rely 
on sovereignty of a third state. 

Hie Court would merely de- 
fine the end-point where tbe 
frontier ceased to divide the 
territories of Burkina Faso and 
Mali but that would not amount 
to a decision that that was a 
tripoint which affected Niger. 
Evidence 

The parties relied on different 
types of evidence 

1 They referred to legislative 
and regulative texts or admin- 
istrative documents. However, 
as those contained no complete 
description of foe disputed area 
they were limned in scope and 
the correct interpretation of 
them was a matter of dispute 
between the parties. 

2 Maps 

Both produced an abundant 
collection of cartographic 
materials. But the Court noted 
that in frontier delimitations 
maps uerely consitiuied 
information and never con- 
stituted territorial titles in them- 
selves. They were merely 

extrinsic evidence which might 
be used along with other evi- 
dence to establish the real frets. 
Their value depended on their 
technical reliability snd their 
neutrality to the parties in the 
dispute. 

None of the maps available 
could provide an official 


illustration of any of the texts 
produced although it was dear 
from their wording that two of 
tbe texts were intended to be 
accompanied by maps. 

Farther, do indisputable 
boundary line could be dis- 
cerned from the documents. 

One map. issued between 
1958 and 1960 by foe French 
Jnstilut geogmphique national 
was drawn up by a body neutral 
towards the parties. Although it 
did not possess the status of a 
legal title it was a visual por- 
trayal both of the available texts 
and of information available on 
the ground. 

Where other evidence was 
lacking or not sufficient to show 
an exact line, the probative force 
of the IGN map had to be 
viewed as compelling, 

3 The parties also invoked the 
conduct of the administrative 
authorities as proof of tbe 
effective exercise of territorial 
jurisdiction in the regjOD during 
the colonial period. The role 
played by such conduct was 
complex and the Court had to 
make a careful evaluation of 
their legal force in each particu- 
lar instance. 

The Court emphasized that 
the present case was decidedly 
unusual as c o nc e rned the frets 
to be proved or foe evidence to 
be produced. 

Although foe parties had pro- . 
duced as complete a case file as 
possible the Court could not be 
certain of deciding the case cat a 
basis of fixll knowledge of frets. 
The case file showed inconsis- 
tencies and shortcomings. 

Tbe court considered what 
relationship could be estab- 
lished among foe pieces of 
information provided by the 
various texts of which it had to 
make use and reached a number 
of conclusions. 

In certain points the sources 
agreed and bore one another 
out, but in some respects, in 
view of the shortcomings of 
some of the older maps, they 
tended to conflict. 

The western end-point was 
already agreed between foe par- 
ties and the court drew in a 
series of straight lines between 
co-ordinates foe boundary from 
there to the frontier of Niger. 

At one place, the pool of In 
Abao. the co-ordinates were not 
specified but left to foe three 
experts who are to be appointed 
to be drawn. 

The Court considered it in- 
appropriate to appoint those 
experts in the judgment, but 
said they would be appointed 
later by an order of foe Court. 

The ' Court noted with 
satisfaction tbe agreement in 
January 1986 of foe Heads of 
Stale of Burkina Faso and Mali 
to withdraw ail their armed 
farces from either side of the 
disputed area and to effect their 
return to their respective 
territories. 

The Court finally noted that 
the parties had declared they 
would accept foe judgment as 
binding upon them and was 
happy to record the attachment 
of both parties to the inter- 
national judicial process arid to 
foe peaceful settlement -of 
disputes. 


Law Report December 23 1986 


GCHQ payment is taxable 


Hamblett v Godfrey (Inspec- 
tor of Taxes) 

Before Lord Justice Purchas. 
Lord Justice Neill and Lord 
Justice Balcombe 

[Judgment December 17] 

The special, ex gratia, payment 
made to civil service employees 
at GCHQ, Cheltenham, by the 
Government in return for foe 
surrender of certain rights under 
the employment protection leg- 
islation was property to be 
described as an emolument of 
their employment and assess- 
able to income tax under Sched- 
ule E. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
in dismissing an appeal by Miss 
June Hamblen, one of the 
employees, from a decision of 
Mr Justice Knox ( The Times 
March 12. 1986; [1986] 1 WLR 
839) upholding the Crown’s 
appeal from a determination of 
special commissioners in favour 
of Miss Hamblett. The Court 
refused Miss Hamblett leave to 
appeal to the House of Lords. 

Id December 1983 tbe Prime 
Minister gave a direction that 
conditions of service at GCHQ 
should in certain respects be 
restricted and for foe future 
should exclude membership of a 
union other than an approved 
depan mental staff association. 
Employees were off e red a choice 
of accepting tbe withdrawal of 
their rights or of being trans- 
ferred to other civil service 
employment elsewhere. 

Those deciding to continue 
working at GCHQ were paid 
£1,000 by the Government as 
recognition of the loss of foe 
rights that they had previously 


enjoyed. Miss Hamblett was one 
employee who elected to con- 
tinue her employment and she 
was paid the £1,000. 

She appealed against tbe 
assessment to Schedule E in- 
come tax made on her for 1983- 
84 on the basis that the £1,000 
was a taxable emolument of her 
employment. 

The special commissioners 
upheld her case that the pay- 
ment was not an emolument for 
the purposes of section 181 and 
183(1) of the Income and 
Corporation Taxes Act 1970 but 
they dismissed her appeal on the 
ground that it was chargeable 
under section 61 of the Finance 
Act 1976 (benefits received by 
higher paid employees). 

Mr Justice Knox, held that 
the commissioners had erred in 
law and that the payment fell 
within Schedule E by virtue of 
section 181 of the Act He did 
not consider the Crown’s alter- 
native claim under section 61 of 
foe 1976 Act 

Mr R. K. Mathew for Miss 
Hamblett; Mr Alan Moses for 
foe Crown. 

LORD JUSTICE PURCHAS 
said that there were two limbs to 
tbe appeal that arising under 
section 181 and that under 
section 61 of foe Finance Act 
1976. They could be dealt with 
separately. 

Mr Mathew attacked the 
judge’s decision on tbe ground 
that he had disturbed the find- 
ing of feet reached by the 
commissioners that the £1,000 
was not paid to Miss Hamblett 
in return for her services as an 
employee. 


Thus, he said, the decision 
that the payment constituted an 
emolument arising from her 
employment within the charge 
to Schedule E by virtue of 
section 181 of foe 1970 Act 
could not stand. 

Tbe commissioners’ conclu- 
sion, he said, that the payment 
was not an “emolument” for 
section 181 purposes had been 
reached after they had correctly 
applied the law to the frets 
found and after they had cor- 
rectly applied their views of the 
relevant authorities. 

The issue on foe first limb 
could be refined to a narrow 
point of construction — one that 
had often been before the courts 
for consideration — namely the 
significance of the words in 
section 181 “emoluments 
therefrom”. 

The starting point was the 
decision of the House of Lords 
in Hochstrasser v Mayes ([I960] 
AC 376)— a case rebed on by Mr 
Mathew for foe proposition that 
a payment by an employer to an 
employee was not within section 
181 unless it was related to foe 
performance of the service or 
services rendered by the 
employee. 

That case was followed by the 
decisions of foe House of Lords 
in Laidler v Petty ([19661 AC 
16), Brumby v Milner ([1976] I 
WLR 1096) and Tyro- v Smart 
([1979] I WLR 113). 

Those cases established that 
such a payment was a Schedule 
E emolument if it was paid to an 
employee by an employer in 
return for acting as, or being, an 
employee and for no other 
reason. 


The approach that the court 
should take — and which Mr 
Justice Knox did take — was to 
consider the slams of the pay- 
ment in foe context in which it 
was made. 

The £1,000 was made to 
compensate Miss Hamblen for 
the loss of her certain statutory 
protection and also for tbe loss 
of her right to belong to, or join, 
a trade union. 

Those were both rights con- 
nected whh her employment 
and without her employment 
she would not have had any 
need of such rights. 

Had her employer objected to 
some social activity that she 
pursued that was not connected 
with her employment, for exam- 
ple her membership of a particu- 
lar golf club, and had then made 
her payment to refrain from 
carrying on such activity that 
might well be a payment that 
would not satisfy section 181 
and would not be chargeable to 
income tax. 

However, on foe instant frets 
the judge was correct in holding 
that foe commissioners had 
erred in law and was right to 
intervene and to hold that the 
it came within the 
ule E charge. 

In the circumstances it was 
unnecessary to go on to consider 
foe more complicated issues 
arising under section 61 of the 
Finance Act 1976. The appeal 
should be dismissed. 

Lord Justice Neill and Lord 
Justice Balcombe delivered 
concurring judgments. 

Solicitors: Lane & Co, 
Cheltenham; Solicitor of Inland 
Revenue. 


Improbable defence must go for trial 


RafMarn Bank V Ago m 
Universal Sugar Trading Co 
Ltd and Another 

Before Lord Justice Lawton and 
Lord Justice Nourse 
[Judgment December 18] 

Where the defence to an 
action related to events occur- 
ring in a civil war in another 
country with totally different 
mores and laws, and had a 
fictional or storybook quality, 
that did not mean that it could 
not support a defence. If it could 
be described as more than 
shadowy frit less than probable, 
h was a case which should go to 
trial. 

The Court of Appeal dis- 
missed an appeal by foe plain-' 
tiffs, Rafidatn Bank from a 
decision of Mr Justice Skinner 
who on February 14, 1986 gave 
the first defendants, Agom 
Universal Sugar Trading Co Ltd 
conditional leave to defend the 
plaintiffs’ action for the repay- 
ment of money said to be paid 
under a mistake: 

Mr Jules Sber, QC and Mr 
Stephen Nathan for the plain- 
tiffs; Mr Gavin Ughtman, QC 
and Mr Patrick Talbot for foe 
defendants. 


LORD JUSTICE LAWTON 
said that 16 years ago the old 
kingdom of Iraq was over- 
thrown and the Kurds did not 
like their new rulers. From 1970 
to 1983 the Kurds were in a state 
of rebellion. 

At tbe beginning of this 
decade the Kurdish rebellion 
was inconvenient to the Iraqi 
government because of its war 
with Iran. The defendants said 
that consequently there were 
negotiations between tbe Iraqi 
government and tbe Patriotic 
Union of Kurdistan (PUK) fora 
ceasefire and that it was a term 
of foe agreement that the Kurds 
should be paid a substantial sum 
by way of compensation. 

It was said that the stun of 
approximately USSl2m which 
was in dispute represented 
compensation from the Iraqis to 
foe PUK_ The ceasefire lasted 
from 1983 to January 17, 1985 

and when it ended it was said 
that the Iraqi government 
warned their money back and 
used an illegal means of getting 
it. 

The plaintiff said that the 
defence was a pack of lies and 
that the Kurds had swindled 
them out of tbe money. On 


January 8, 1985 someone 

handed into the cable directory 
of the plaintiff bank the 
authorization for the money to 
be paid to a named beneficiary. 
The plaintiffs case was that that 
authorization was forged. 

One of foe plaintiffs’ middle 
rank employees of Kurdish 
origin, who was one of the 
signatories to tbe authorization 
had now taken to the hills. 
However, he had managed to get 
to Teheran where he swore an 
affidavit in which be said that he 
was sent for by tbe Iraqi 
Minister of Finance and told 
that he bad been nominated by 
the PUK as their trustee for the 
moneys to be paid and that he 
was to keep that information to 
himself 

That was denied by the 
plaintiffs. Iraq was a totalitarian 
slate and banks, including the 
plaintiff were owned by the 
government. The plaintiffs pro- 
duced evidence from an aca- 
demic lawyer that under Iraqi 
law the plaintiff was a corpora- 
tion and subject to regulations 
which did not authorize gov- 
ernment ministers to interfere 
with foe day-to-day working of 
the plaintiffs. 


The defendants put in two 
affidavits of Mr Edward Morti- 
mer, formerly The Times Mid- 
dle East correspondent, who. 
relying on his experience as a 
journalist, said that whatever 
the constitution might say on 
paper, Iraq was a single party 
dictatorship in which the will 
and authority of the president 
had the force of law. 

The defendants* submission 
was that the payment was 
compensation which was very 
much a political act which the 
Iraqi government did not want 
publicised and did in a secret 
and unusual way. 

They might have considerable 
difficulty in showing a judge 
that their story was true. But it 
was not a case in which Order 14 
of foe Rules of the Supreme 
Court should apply. 

However improbable a story 
was. unless it was so improbable 
that it was beyond belief, it must 
be tried. 

Lord Justice Nourse delivered 
a concurring judgment 

Solicitors; Landau & Scan lan; 
Boodle Hatfield 







/. 


J 


24 


SPORT 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


' -i it? 




RACING 


Combs Ditch hoping to 
make it third-time 
lucky in King George 


David Eiswortfa is hoping it 
will be third-time lucky when 
his crack chaser Combs Ditch 
attempts to win the King 
George VI Rank Chase at 
Kempton Park on Boxing 
Day. 

The ten-year-okl came sec- 
ond in the 1984 event and was 
beaten only a neck by the 
Dickinson-trained star Way- 
ward Lad last year. 

Combs Ditch goes for the 
Kempton spectacular, tra- 
ditionally the hi g hli g ht of the 
Boxing Day programme, with- 
out the benefit of a prepara- 
tory race. But missing his 
usual run at Cheltenham's 
December meeting will not 
have lessened his chances for 
Friday - the last two seasons 
he has won there first time 
out. 


and we get soil ground and a 
good gallop, he's in with a 
sporting chance," Elsworth 
said 


Fresentins 
a full 


service 


Racing resumes on Boxing 
Day with eight meetings, 
featuring the king George VI 
Chase at Kempton Park. 

The Times will provide a 
comprehensive service for all 
eight programmes in our 
Christmas Eve issue, which 
also features a preview of the 
big races, both here and in 
Ireland, and The Times Private 
Handi capper's exclusive rat- 
ings for Kempton Park and 

Wetherby. 

Saturday's editions wQl 
carry a report by Michael 
Seely with all the up-to-date 
news from Kempton, a live 
report from Ireland's top 
meeting at Leopardstown, all 
the Boxing Day results, pins 
foil details for the four meet- 
ings at Kempton Park, Weth- 
erby, Warwick and Wolver- 
hampton. 

The Times will also be 
publishing on New Year’s Day 
when there win be a full 
service for the six scheduled 
meetings, in chiding rating s for 

Chel tenham and Catterick 

Bridge. 

To take fell advantage of 
our special holiday editions, 
place a regular order for The 
Times with your newsagent 


Sponsors 

increase 

support 


Sponsorship money has 
soared from SAAm to £53m - an 
increase of 20 per cent - in a year 
when inflation has stayed at 
around 5 per cent and television 
coverage has continued to be art. 

While some long-term spon- 
sors, like Benson & Hedges, 
have disappeared from the 
scene, there seems to be no 
shortage of new ones ready to 
take their places. 

“I think it probably reflects 
the great improvement in the 
economic situation,” said Rich- 
ard Dickson, spokesman for De 
Beers, whose hacking of Ascot's 
King George VI and Queen 
Elizabeth Diamond Stakes rose 
by over 22 per cent this year. 
“Companies in general have got 
more money to pet into such 
things as sports sponsorship.” 

With less television outlets 
available, those that remain 
have become even more 
valuable. 

Malcolm Palmer, marketing 
manager for Coral Racing, who 
increased their sponsorship by 
21 per cent in 19S6, said: 
“Cutbacks in television coverage 
have led to people paying more 
money into the races that are 
televised. Sponsors don't want to 
lose the spot they have.” 

Racecourses also deserve 
credit for con tuning to improve 
facilities for company sponsors 
and making the racecourse one 
of the best places to entertain 

clients. 

Richard Power, of Trasthonse 
Forte - spasjJswsMp increase of 
over SO per cent daring 1986 - 
said. “Racecourses are getting 
'much better at packaging the 
whole day for companies. In the 
past, there might be three 
different sponsors on a televised 
day's racing. Now, with tele- 
vision playing less of a role in 
the thinking of many companies, 

raceco u rses can pot the day 

entirely under one company 
banner." 

Whatever the reasons for the 
boom - and it is probably a 
mixture of the three mentioned - 
it ends the racing year on an 
optimistic note. 

However, John Hughes, the 
experienced clerk of the course 
at Aintree and Chepstow and 
one of racing's most en- 
trepreneurial administrators, 
sounds one cantionary note. 

"It is obviously pleasing that 
that graph of sponsorship 
continues to move upwards, and 
ranch credit goes to the smaller 
courses and sponsors,” be said. 
“But we mast not be complacent 
Sponsorship is an extremely 
competitive field, and it i$ 
noticeable, for example, that the 
arts are beginning to attract 
sponsorship.” 


Kempton's sharp three-mile 
track ideally suits bis old 
favourite ‘Cbmber’ who has 
needed a puff on an oxygen 
cylinder to revive him after 
past attempts at Cheltenham's 
Gold Cup in March when 
conditions, if not distance, 
have found him out. 


“If it's fast ground. I’ll be 
surprised if anything can catch 
Dessy.” 

Colin Brown, regular jockey 
on both horses, has a hard, but 
not unenviable choice of big- 
race rides. “I won't be malting 
up my mind until I've walked 
the course on the morning of 
the race,” he said, mindful 
that Combs Ditch doesn’t act 
on the bard and is never an 
easy ride. 


Combs Ditch badly cut his 
off-fore foot at grass in the 
summer and took longer this 
Autumn to come to his peak 
However, he is now fit, fresh 
and pulling hard on the 
gallops near Fordingbridge. 

"If he's as good as he was 


Though his record su] 
he does not hold his form 
long, preferring early or mid- 
season racing to late, in the 

Peter Marsh Chase over three 
miles at Haydock Park last 
January he received 21b from 
Forgive'N Forget and beat 
him lVz lengths. 

By also r unning his popular 
second-season chaser Desert 
Orchid, the Whiisbuiy stable 
should ensure a strong gallop 
in the King George. 


The fast, front-running grey 
jumps superbly, and while 
some doubt his ability to win 
at three miles, Elsworth said: 


Simon Sherwood is booked 
to ride which ever Brown 
rejects. Elsworth and his team 
fear noone, but have great 

respect for Wayward Lad, 
attempting to win a record' 
fourth King George, and the 
ante-post favourite, Forgive'N 
Forget, who won the 1985 
Cheltenham Gold Cup for 
Malton trainer Jimmy 
Fitzgerald. 

• Latest betting on the big 
race: 2 Forgive’N Forget, 9-2 
Wayward Lad, 11-2 Bolands 
Cross, 8 Half Free, Combs 
Ditch, 1 2 Desert Orchid, Door 
Latch, 16 Cybrandian, 20 and 
upwards others. 



basketball 


Portsmouth’s loss 
brings Brazilian 
blend to Last’s cup 


Two South Coast first di- 
vision clubs are bringing joy and 
despair to David Last, the 
tournament director of tne 
World Invitation Club cham- 
pionships (WICB), which go 
ahead for the tenth year 
Janu 


at 
an nary 


Crystal Palace between 
1 and 4. ...... 

Last’s event, which is handi- 
capped this year by having 
neither a major sponsor nor 
television coverage, was already 
suffering from the late with- 
drawal of the Prudential Na- 
tional Cup winners. Poly ecu 
Kingston. Yet, no sooner had 
Draper’s Tools Solent Stars 

confirmed that they would risk a 
fine from the English Basket 
Ball Association by ta king 
Kingston’s place, than HFS 
Portsmouth pulled out to leave 
Tact once again in the lurch. 

He immediately filled the gap, 
however, by inviting a second 
Brazilian club, Continental of 
Sio Paulo, who will be in 
England in any case, as they are 


Combs Ditch, who he a d s for Kempton without the benefit of an outing this season 

Fine omen 


Diligent Dwyer leaves little to 
chance with Forgive’N Forget 


Mark Dwyer will not be 
lingering too long over the 
Christmas Day festivities — he 
has a more pressing matter on 
his mind. 

After lunch with his girl- 
friend and his parents near his 
home in Malton, North York- 
shire, Dwyer will drive 

straight to London. Early on 
Friday morning, he will be 

found walkicg the chase 

course at Kempton Park, stop- 
ping to inspect every fence. 

Amazingly, the man who 
will partner the favourite 
Forgive'N Forget in the King 
George VI Chase on Boxing 
Day has never before ridden 
round Kempton. 

Dwyer, still only 23 years 
old, already has a Cheltenham 
Gold Cup, a Hennessy Gold 
Cup, and two Scottish Na- 
tionals to his credit He is also 
the man who. this season, has 
been consistently pressing 
champion jockey Peter 
Scudamore for the title. 


Jimmy Fitzgerald's owners 
asked him u he would be 
interested in moving there, he 
accepted immediately. 

He arrived at Malton in 
October 1982, at the same 
time as his great friend Ronnie 
O'Leary, the idea being that 
O'Leary would ride the chas- 
ers and Dwyer the hurdlers. 
However, thanks to a few 
good breaks and the ability to 
do 10 stone, he was soon 
installed as Fitzgerald's No 1 
jockey. 

Surely, though, his natural 
ability in the saddle had 
something to do with that 
derision? Dwyer is modest "I 
believe that 90 per cent of 
winners are good horses, and 
also, if you're having the lock, 
people want you to ride for 
them.” 

Needless to say, his services 


are in great demand whenever 
his commitments to Fitz- 
gerald allow. When possible, 
he will ride for Tony Charlton 
and also, when the stable 
starts firing, for Jonjo O'NeilL 
Jonjo has always rated 
Dwyer very highly. "He is a 
great man to settle a horse,” 
says the former champion. 
"He gives them patient rides, 
never gets them unbalanced, 
never panics. And he is a 
superb finisher ” 

Certainly, Peter Scudamore 
is under no illusions about the 
quality of his closest rivaL 
"Mark is a very, very good 
jockey ” be says. "He always 
rides a good race, and horses 
seem to run for him.” 

This season has been 
Dwyer’s busiest ever, partly 
due to appointing an agent to 
get him the type of rides he 


Dissatisfied with 
Nottingham effort 


Last Saturday at Notting- 
ham, he rode his 53rd winner, 
but typiraMy he was not 
satisfied. "I should have made 
it 54, but I rode a bad race in 
the novice chase. I should 
have put Mick's Star into the 
race a bit sooner.” Dwyer is 
not a man to apportion blame 
without justification. 

He was bom in Co Meath 
into a non-racing family, and 
his interest in foe sport was 
kindled by pony racing. At the 
age of 15, he went to The 
Curragh to serve his 
apprenticeship. A year later be 
had ridden his first winner on 
foe Flat, and in 1981 was 
champion apprentice on the- 
Flat in Ireland. But his height, 
5ft lOin, and increasing weight 
forced him to turn to jumping. 

Although be has never mod- 
elled his riding style on any 
particular jockey, in those 
early days he was a great 
admirer of Tommy Carmody. 

He had always fended rid- 
ing in England, so when one of 



wants, and partly due to the 
increasing quality of the Fitz- 
gerald stables. 

"Mr Fitzgerald has grad- 
ually built up a siring of very 
good horses,” Dwyer says. 
"Apart from Forgive'N For- 
get, we have Androma back in 
tr aining for the Scottish Na- 
tional again, and some very 
good prospects, notable Rising 
Forest. 

"I'm a bit worried that 
Forgive'N Forget has run so 
well so early in the season, but 
if all goes well at Kempton 
he’U probably have a run in 
Ireland in February before 
being aimed at Chel tenham 
again. I reckon foe others will 
be more afraid of us than we 
are of thenv” Dwyer said. 

He has a good working 
relationship with Fitzgerald, 
and is happy to adapt his 
riding style to his boss's 
requirements. “The guv’nor 
believes that foe race is won 
between the second last and 
foe last, so that’s foe way Fm 
riding now for him- It doesn't 
always work, mind. Some-, 
times you get there a bit too 
early, sometimes you never 
get there at alL” . 


from 

The Jolly 
Beggar 


Refusing rides 
on bad horses 


Dwyer, who is pressing Scudamore hard for the jockeys' title 


Although in an enviably 
strong position, he is trying 
not to think about the jockeys' 
championship. “You must 
have your priorities right and 
ride on a day-to-day basis. 
Anything can happen between 
now and May, and at the 
moment I don’t feel any 
.pressure on me. 

"Of course, I'll be looking 
for spare rides if I'm still going 
well in a few months' time. I'll 
ride any good jumper, even if 
it's known to make foe odd 
mistake, and HI try to get the 
best out of it But I won't ride 
a bad horse. I can't see foe 
point in that” 

Jimmy Fitzgerald is be- 
lieved to have backed Dwyer 
at 100- 1 for foe champion- 
ship. At this stage of foe 
proceedings, that looks like a 
pretty good bet 

John Dorman 


Leading championship 
contenders Peter Scudamore 
and Mark Dwyer fought out a 
tremendous finish in the last 
race before Christmas at 

Towoester yesterday, victory go- 
ing to Dwyer on The Jolly 
Beggar, his only mount of foe 
day. 

Jimmy FitzGerald’s charge 
and Harry's Bar came right 
away from their rivals over foe 
last two flights, with The JoQy 
Beggar getting foe better of foe 
6-4favourite at foe lost to score 
by one and a half lengths. The 
pair were chased home by First 
Romance, making a promising 
debut for the Queen Mother. 

The Jolly Beggar, whose only 
other racecourse appearance 
was when he finished fourth in 
National Hunt Flax race, be- 
longs to Tim Kiiroe, whose 
yellow and orange colours 
Dwyer win sport on Boxing Day 
when he partners foe 1985 Gold 
Cup winner Forgive’N Forget in 
the King George VI Chase. 

Jimmy Fitzgerald, who now 
needs only one more winner for 
his half-century this season, 
said: Forgive'N Forget is in 
great form. I think be will take a 
lot of beating in the big 
Kempton Chase.” 

Scudamore strD leads Dwyer 
by four (58-54) as he had 
virtual all-the-way victory on 
Ivor Anthony for Flat race 
trainer lan Balding in in the first 
division of foe Mistletoe 
Novices' Chase. 

The American-bred chestnut 
looked like being swallowed up 
by his rivals when he made an 
atrocious mistake three fences 
from home. 

Scudamore did really well to 
retain his seal and Ivor Anthony 
picked himself up and began to 
draw away ax foe next fence to 
come home by five lengths from 
Rambling Song, whose amateur 
rider John Wrathall was later 
fined £75 by foe stewards^ who 

did not accept his explanation as 
to why he weighed m 31b more 
than he weighed out. 


playing in foe Portsmouth tour- 
nament on December 29 and 30. 
The top seeds, Momdibano, 
also ofSao Paulo, are foe other 
Brazilians in foe event 

Solent who meet Sotna of 
Sweden in their first round tie, 
will be in an invidious position 
with foe EBBA should they win 
that and their second-round tie 
with the Greeks from Aris 
Salonika. 

They would then be commit- 
ted to playing their semi-final on 
foe Saturday night at precisely 
the same time as they are 
scheduled to be playing a 
Carlsberg National League game 
at HomeSpare Bolton, who have 
refused to re-arrange the fixture. 
"Let’s just say we'll worry about 
that problem when it comes.” 
said Roger Nash, foe Solent 

rhaimian- 

"There is no profit going into 


Stimpson replaces 
captain Tatham 


Advanced going 


The advanced going for Boxing Day's 
eight meetings are SodgoAoid. good to 
soft; Huntingdon, Hudtas - soft, 
good to soft; Wobertampton, 
Wetherby, soft; VWncant on . soft; 

Rasen, salt Kempton, good to soft; 
Newton AbboL heavy. 


King’s College Boy passes with honours 


King’s College Boy proved his 
class when soaring to a six- 
length victory from Polar No- 
mad in foe Glen tress Novices' 
Chase at Kelso yesterday. His 
jockey. Graham Bradley, re- 
ported: "The winner had two 
stone up his sleeve.” 

The winning trainer, Monica 
Dickinson, said: "King’s College 
Boy came to us from Nick 
Vigprs’s yard. He said the 
gelding would never win a chase 
but he has been given our 
treatment, and could make a 
Cheltenham horse over fences. 
He has won over hurdles there, 
and also won at Ascot." 

The Divider, a winner over 
hurdles and fences at this 
course, battled home to a three 
lengths victory from Preben Fur 
in foe Keilder Handicap Chase 


and delighted his one horse 
perm if- holder, Tricia Calder. 

Geordie Dun, who partnered 
foe winner, said: "1 rode in foe 
colours of Arthur Stephenson, 
because I left Mrs Calder’s 
colours behind at home.” 

The winner was always going 
nicely, pulled alongside Preben 
Fur at foe last. 

Mrs Calder, who was full of 
praise for Stephenson for lend- 
ing her foe colours, said: "The 
Divider now goes in a two and a 
half mile chase at Cheltenham 
on New Year’s Day." 

March Fly, who has had a leg 
infection and has been looked 
after by trainer Alan 
Mactaggart, a steward at both 
Kelso and Newcastle, returned 
to form in the Sislerpath 
Novices* Hurdle. 


The mare, ridden by David 
Mactaggart. who celebrates his 
20th birthday on Christinas 
Day, pushed his father's horse 
home to lead on the run-in. 
Answer Back broke a leg after 
the third hurdle and had to be 
put down. 

Alan Mactaggart, who bred 
the winner, said: “Now March 
Fiy will have another hurdle 
race before switching to chases. 
This is Lhe sire Sousa's first 
winner. David has spent a while 
with both Gordon Richards and 
Jimmy FitzGerald, and has had 

a few rides for Ayr trainer John 
Wilson." 


Michael Hammond is keep- 
ing up his pace Of a winner a 
day. He landed his sixth victory 
in as many racing days when 


Dunloring, a 7-2 chance, lifted 
the Charter hall Juvenile 
Novices’ Hurdle. 

The winner is a syndicate 
horse owned by estate agent 
John Tennant from 
Middleham, and three col- 
leagues, Jim Wardle, Ronald 
Johnson and John Day, who is 
stud manager for Lord 
Leveriiulme at Thirsk. 

Jonathan Davies rode exactly 
to orders when getting 
Priceoflove home to score by 
two lengths in foe Cardrona 
Handicap Hurdle. 

Dudley Moffett, formerly 
assistant to Roger Fisher, was 
saddling his fourth winner of foe 
season, and said: “Priceoflove is 
a horse who needs time between 
his races. He is a good little 
horse and two miles is his trip." 


Results from yesterday’s two meetings 


Towcester 


ftoystoa Tate: 25.50; £230. Cl .20. 22.10. 
OF: E4IL2Q. CSF: £127.51 Whiner SOW to 


: Soft 


maf(an htfe): I, COLONIAL charm s 
S herwood 20-1); 2. Broakmowt (R Rowe 
5-1); 3, None Too O ear (A Charlton 2-t 
Fav). Also ran: 4 Vital Boy (5th). 8 
CondicotB Boy (4th), 12 Thom Prate. 16 
Crimson Bold (pu). King's Advocate fifth), 
20 Tour de Force, 25 Duofflng, 33 Beet 
SpeaaL Haflo Matey, Hasty Over, Mexi- 
can Ml (pit), Paiageno (ref). Safer* 
Reward. EEzabettim. 17 ran. ri, *1, 121. 
1 Ml. hd O Sherwood at Upper Lamboum. 
Tote £76.00; E11-30. fiLOft £1.40. DF 
£220 (winner or second with any other 
horse). CSF; £1 12.02. 

After a stewards' inquiry result stood. 

14) (2m 51 110yds): 1, IVOR ANTHONY (P 
Scudamore, 4-1); 2. Rambling Song (Mr J 
Wrath** 10-1): 3. Atari (R Strange. 33-1). 
Also ran: 6-4 fev Corbitt Goins (lift 100-30 
Steal Yeoman (5th), 12 Erica Superba 
(4th), 33 General Sandy. Hodgson Moor 
(pu). Impound (puL Jubilee Lights jSM. 
Premon's Last 0, Toucor (pu). Sr 
I. 41. lit. 2£ 


M Chapman. 2£00gns. 

2J> (3m 190yds): 1, FELL CLOD I 
Morahead, 6-1 ); Z Cerinmi (D Browne, 1 
A tevfc 3, Kioto (T Jarvis, 10-1). Abo ram 
7-2 Qaata An Uisce (4th). 10 Up And Down 


Ottey, 20 Karakte Reference (6th), See 
You There _ ~ 


. . here (4thL TonoSvw. 25 Lordy Boy. 
Sweet Storm, 33 Banian. Cheventm (pu). 
Just Aquitted, Townsmfe, Vatent n 


BJ Moon (Sthl. Deep Sent (pu}.Greeriham 
ft. 18 ran. 1%L ft, 7L 1L 31. J 


Hrwtou). 

iPflgrlm. 

reentrant 


fij.11Swift Messenger. M Grade Andrea. 


Jacket (ur). 13 ran. SL a 41. iS. 25L 
Batdmg at Ksmsdare. Tote: £340: places 
£ 1 29£2- 1 0. i7l0 OF' £2680. CSF- 
£36.05. 


Remington (8tfft 33 Sprlngwood, 
ty Vim*M (Sth), Seven Acres (pu). 11 
ran. NR: BaBy-Go. 41. 71. 41. 1KI. lOL P 
Bariev at Salabunr Toib: 26.7ft places 
2180. 21.40, £250. DF- £920. C^SP 
£15.28. Tricast £Bl 78 

11-2): 3. Midmght Song (1 Harvey. 7-2). 
Also raft; 6 Braven. 13-Z Turkana (4th), 8 
ToirdeaBriach (5th), Essex ram. 7 ran. 
2*1. ia 51. 9. 15L S Christen at 
Lamboum. Tote £330: places £210. 
E&50. OF- 214.40. CSF £17 At 
M On 5(1 10yds): 1 CHARLIE’S COT- 
TAGE (S Sherwood. 21-20 lav); 2. La 
Votom (S McNefl. 9-2); 3. Reddown (Mr 
M Amiytape. 12-lj. Also ram S-2 Gregora 
Pride (5lh), 6 Salehurst (!}. 33 


Lady (pu). . . 

FftawraM at Malton. Tote £3.60: places 
£220. £1 1ft £4.50. DF- £2.70. CSF- 
£8.73. 

PtaeepoC £139.80. 


fav). Also ran: 7-2 Bounty’s Clown, 7 
Worthy Kfright 11 Rmrcdafe. 12 Ftavigo, 
20 Snow Babu. 33 Queens Pattern (6th). 
so Bafmbicelio (4th), 68 Bslingiance, 
Answer Back (pu). Lighter Shade (pu), 
PowaH Prospect Siberian Moon. 15 ran. 
1KI. 2'AL 5L hd. a Mr A Maaaqoart at 


Jedburgh. Tote: £13-70; _ 

£330, 2i m OF- Winner or second with 


£3 J0, 

any other horse £1 40. CSF- £7186. 


Kelso 


1.45<2m6Q;1.7KEDIVDt£R(TQDun,5- 

_ — - 1,-fy 3_ A sur* 


: Goodie Sort 


12.15 (2m eh): 1, DUNLORMG (M Ham- 
mond, 7-2); 2, r - - - - - 


Seayouaround (6th). 50 Coyer (4thL Jury 
"old. Robert K 


1.30 |2m);1, SAUCY SPRITE (H Davies, fi- 


ll; 2. Brokers Choice (L Harvei^25*1); 3. 


Boulevard Roy (P kiurphy, 5-1). Also ran; 
" Tft.13^1 


1 1-8 lav RamlNe (4th). 13-2 Ur McGflf 
(Sth). 10 Track Marshal 14 Boswoth Bay. 
25 Donna's Boy. Mr Panache (pu). 
Podacres, Chaise Longue. Ravensoatg 
ffirt 12 ran 11 71 hd 3.11 A P Jarvis at 


Action (pu). Paupers Gold. Robert Henry 
(pu). Star Formula (pu). The Bonderizar 
fur). Gterftane Ladv fl). 13 ran. 151, 31, Rl, 
11. 15). N Henderson at Lamboum. Tote- 
£1.80; places £150. £1 10. 2150 DF 
£fi.70.CSp£B,22 


340 (2m): 1. THE JOLLY BEGGAR (M 
Dwyer. S4); 2. Merry's Bar (P Scudamore. 
6-4 fav); 3, Rret flomunagi (R Chapman. 
12 l) Also ran 4-1 Thais For Sura 14 


, Pafs Jester (R Lamb, 11-10 
fev); 3. Segmt Goeto (C Grant 9-2h Also 
ran: 14 Come Pow The Wine (Sth). Pearl 
Fisher. 16 Brannton Lyn (4th), Virajefldra 
(reft 20 BriTS Daughter (fith). 50 Bom 
Nut. Donitik (put 10 tan. ViF. 5L 2)41. 2QL 
31. Q Moore * PMOebM. Tote £2-90. 
places £1.00; £1.00. £220 DF £420 
CSF U 71 

After a stewards inquiry the result stood. 

12.45 Ernfc 1. BEATS SONG (C Grant (9- 
21: 2. M u ui jU htW H (P Niven. 5-1): 3. Dr 
GtoBodne (K Wnana. 7-1 Also ran. 3 lav 
Corker (urL S Super Solo ptM, Steve 
Bracken, a Rortan-Paui tfftm. 25 Barton 
Cross (pu). 8 ran. 2)41, 15l. 10. 2QL M 
NaughtOn at Richmond Tote 2142ft 
£3.90, £120. 2120 DF £8.40 
£25.03. No bid. 


2): 2, Preben For (P Tuck, 3-1 
Row (G Bradley. 10-11 favft. Also ram 14-1 
vaneratown Wtnt 4 ran. NR: Bally-Go. 3, 
12L30L MrsTCalder at Duns. Tote £420 
OF- £420. CSF- £827 


2.15 (3m): 1, KING’S COLLEGE BOY 1 
Bradey. B-4 tavh 2. Polar Nomad 
Lamft, 7-a 3, Dan rfOr (Mr T I 
Abo ran: 7 Katie Mac (ft 14 KL. 

16 Fine Steel furl Game Wood 1 
Echo Beach (5th). 50 f 
Rebrana (pu). 10 ran. 0, 10L 81. 301. Mre I 
Dickinson at Harewood. Tote: £220: 
.... £120. 2140, 2120. DF £4.60 
3F 2707 


1.15 I2mj: 1. MARCH FLY (Mr D 
Mactagmri.14-1);ftla to l «B (PNtven.5- 
1L 3 Haeai a n Dancer (G Thomson. 3-1 


245 GSrrt;. 1. PRICEOFLOVE (J 0 Davies. 
5-1): 2. Smart tn Block (P Tuck. 6-1): 3. 
Carat Stek (Mr j Walton,5-i).Aisoraa , »- 
2 lev Absonant (4th), 6 Bwimr HHI Lad. 9 
Yellow Bear (fith). lO Pofah KrigW (pu), 12 
RapW Beat. Adare, 33 Mate** (5th), 
Shumard. The Fixer, Utto Temped 13 
a. II. SKI. 3L3LD Moffett atCartmel 


Tote SS.60: places £220, 2120. 2T90 
CSF £3525 Tricast £145 78 


DF £1020 

Ptecepot £49 90 


Colonial Charm initialed a 
42-1 double for Simon Sher- 
wood when she made a remaric- 
abte comeback, winning the first- 
division of the Christmas Pud- 
ding Novices' Hurdle. 

It was Colonial Charm's first 
appearance for nearly 22 
months and the six- year-old 
mare came with a fine late run to 
get up to beat Brookmoum for 
her first win, appropriately on 
the birthday of John Sbey who 
shares her with another London 
owner Tony Clohessy. 

Brookmount jumped to the 
front three flights from home, 
but Colonial Charm, a 20-1 
chance, came with a strong 
challenge at the last, together 
wifo foe favourite. None Too 
Dear. Colonial Charm beat 
Brookmoum a neck, with None 
Too Dear tbreequaners of a 
length away third. 

Colonial Charm's owners 
originally had foe mare - their 
first-ever winner - with Chuck 
Spares but transfered her to 
Oliver Sherwood at Lamboorn 
when Spares moved north from 
Newmarket Colonial Charm 
went wrong after arriving at 
Lam bo urn and Sherwood had 
her pin-fired. 

Simon Sherwood also won on 
hot favourite Charlies Cottage, 
on whom he led all foe way to 
win the second division of the 
Mistletoe Novices’ Chase for 
Nick Henderson. 

The champion trainer re- 
ported that stable jockey, Steve 
S mith Ecctes was hoping to 
return to tbe saddle on Boxing 
Day. He has been out of action 
since being kicked in tbe stom- 
ach when Indamelody fell at 
Leicester a week ago. 

Fell Climb, winning for tbe 
second tune from six outings 
this season, showed that stam- 
ina 15 his strong suit when Sam 
Morshead partnered him to a 
four-length victory from foe 
favourite Cenmau m foe Port 
and Brandy Handicap Chase. 

Finnesko again showed bis 
liking for the course with an all- 
the-way success under Michael 
Bowlby in jhc Holly and the Ivy 
Conditional Jockeys' ‘ Chase 
Four of his five wins have been 
on the track 


Paul Stimpson. foe holder of a 
record 83 England caps, has 
been reinstated as captain of foe 
national team following foe 
withdrawal of four Portsmouth 
players, including Kail Tatham, 


but extended his commisera- 
tions to foe new England coach 
by adding: "I think Dave is now 
starting to find out how politics 
will affect his team selections." 

Five players, yet to be capped 


who had been previously named by England, are in the squad of 
as captain for foe Pohfajo 12 


tournament in Finland from 
December 28-31 {Nicholas 
Hading writes). 

The Portsmouth quartet have 
been pulled out because their 


club want all their best players 
1 four- 


available for their own 
team tournament on December 
29 and 30. Besides Tatham, the 
other players affected will be 
Colin Irish. Mike Spaid and Joel 
Moore. 

It was because of foe risk of 
injury, that Portsmouth refused 
permissi on fm- those players to 
play in Sunday night's 
commemorative match for foe 
late Larry Dassie at tbe SobeU 
Centre in Islington. Moore, who 
nevertheless went ahead and 


played, faces disciplinary action 
from tin 


the club: 

Stimpson, who was in charge 
of foe England squad that 
flopped in the Eurtroean 
championships qualifying 
round in Denmark last spring, 
was delighted to be back as 
captain under David Titmass 


that meets Turkey, Finland 
and West Germany in foe 
tournament. They are Peter 
Scantlebury {Happy Eater 
Bracknell Pirates), Russell Tay- 
lor (Reg Varney, Sunderland), 
Jason Fogarty (Sharp Manches- 
ter United), Roy Jordan 
(HomeSpare Bolton and Bury) 
and Kenny Soon (Polycell 
Kingston). 

The most surprising omis- 
sions are Sam Stiller of 
Bracknell and Robby Peers of 
Manchester United. Colin 
McNish, a revelation this season 
at Kingston, had already been 
left out after failing to attend 
two training sessions but he did 
his chances of future selection 
no good by also missing 
Sunday’s get-together, to which 
be had been specially invited, at 
Leicester. 

ENGLAND SQUAD: P Stenson (BCP 
London. Captain). II Bat! (BCP London), P 
(both Leicester), p 



Jordan (BoflonV 


GOLF 


Behan’s new world as 
wide as the prairies 


By Patricia Davies 


IJlIian Behan, one of the 
heroines of the Curtis Cup 
victory is Kansas last August, is 
the first member of the team to 
turn professional. ' < 

Amounring her dedston in 
Dublin yesterdayJVliss Behan, 
aged 21, said; “I hare done aO 
there is to do as an amateur and 
I am very excited at the thought 
of this big new challenge.” 

Bearing in mind that she was 
unknown outside Ireland a year 
and a half a&x, her success is 
nothing short of 
phenoinianLSlK first astounded 
the golfing world - and, she 
admits, herself — when she won 
the British match-play 
championship at Ganton at her 
first attempt m June 1985. "My 
sole aim was to qualify for the 
match-play stages,” she recalls, 
"and I was as surprised as 
anyone when I won the title.” 

That win transformed the life 
of this shy, gauche stud groom 
from the Curragh, one of 16 
children of an Irish Army 
sergeant. She found herself trav- 
elling to Australia to play in the 
Australian Open, she played In 
the Vagfiano Trophy for Great 
Britain and Ireland in Europe, 
wi nn i ng her two foursomes in 
partnership with the experi- 


enced Rnglanil hit— naft—l .till 
Thornhill, and 


thro came the 
highlight - the Cutis Cap 
rictory at Prairie Dimes im 

K ansas- 

The _ Thornhill-Behan 
partnership proved an inspira- 
tion as they routed their oppo- 
nents with a combination of 
Tborohiirs potting and Behan's 
power. Her work with horses 
has given her particularly strong 

hands and forearms aid she hits 

the ball a long way despite an 
unorthodox, upright stance and 
a short backswing. 

She should not be overawed 
when matched against the 
mighty Laura Davies, Europe's 
leading woman professional, and 
M rs Thornhill has no doubts 
about her partner’s ability, say- 
mg simply: “She is a magic 
player.” 

Let us hope the magic survives 
the g rind of being a professional, 
with all the travelling 
drudgery that that involves. 
FortHuately, Miss Behan is 
much more worldly-wise these 
days and is in good hands, befog 

m a na g ed by Roddy Carr, son of 
himself a former pro- 
fessional as well as a member of 
the victorious Walker Con team 
of 1971. 


TO PLACE YOUR 

MOTORS 

ADVERTISEMENT 

IN 

THE 


TIMES 


TRADE ADVERTISERS 

TEL: 01-481 4422 



4 * e j 

A./ 




V 


$ 


By Nicholas Hurling 

this competition. Wc J™ 1 ™' 
to play m foe WICB for a 
number of reasons. We are 
Irving out difiCTcnl things- new 
moves and we want to pu l them 
into practice at foe highest 
level” 

The view was a very dinerent 
one just along foe M27 _at 
Portsmouth, whose coach, Dan 
Lloyd, revealed: "In our best 
interests we have had to pull 
out The tournament is a good 
one but it's just not worth 
risking what can be achieved for 
the rest of foe year. We’ve got a 
hectic schedule and we earn 
afford to risked! foe players 

getting injured.” 

Lloyd was referring to Colin 
Irish, who after missing last 
week’s cup final defeat by 
Kingston, returned to sink 21 
points in Saturday’s 97-S9 first 
division win at Reg Varney 
Sunderland. Solent were also 
victorious, but they were II 
points down io a fluctuating 
match against Calder dale Exp- 
lorers, before succeeding 92-87. 

The last few refereeing de- 
cisions upset Dave Smith, 
Calderdale's assistant coach, 
who after receiving a technical 
offence for kicking a chair in 
protest, stomped off to take no 
farther part. He was in good — 
or bad — company, since An- 
thony Madd, another 
Caiderdale assistant coach, was 
also a technical offender during 
last week's game at Bolton. 

Last, meanwhile, wearing his 
other hat, as coach to BCP 
London, was presented with 
more anxiety by, his dub on 
Saturday. Visiting BPCC Rams 
Derby, London seemed to be 
beading to an easy win over a 
club (hey had already defeated 
in cup and league, when their 
22-point lead was whittled down 
to 83-76 by the finish. 


HH 




^4 


4-5 


Bowl 



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J'-.:; 


■t * 


if'"- . 1 


Is..'. 


'«\i 


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V'W 


rv 




Jo h n Wo odc ock, Cricket Corre s pondent, assesses England’s players and officials in his half-term report 

Broad takes opportunity with both hand; 

England’s tour of Australia fc „ , . . - 


SPORT 


25 


England’s tour of Australia is 
past the turn. Eleven weeks have 
gone and there are eight to come. 
Nets tomorrow mid another Test 
match starting on Boxing Dav 
preclude a Christmas break, but 
not a half-term report. 

_An early setback against 
Queensland, a poor showing 
against Western Australia and 
defeat by New South Wales have 
been offset by victory in the first 
Test match. 

Charges of an over-cautious 
approach since then, though not 


unfounded, have taken insufficient 
account of the legacy of uneasi- 
ness left by 11 successive Test 
matches in West Indies and 
England which contained not a 
single victory and consisted 
mostly of defeat. Suggestions tb»* 
the Ashes should be scrapped are 
no more than a biennial chestnut 
It is like saying that the averages 
should be. 

The overall impression is of a 
well-knit side. I should like to see 
them travelling in ties rather than 
white boiler suits, and there is no 


danger of -anyone being scorched 
by the missionary zeal of the 
players. They realise now, I 
imagine, that they should not have 
contrived to get out of playing a 
limited-overs match after losing 
early to New South Wales in 
Newcastle, and there has been 
some filibustering in the field; but 
three wins in the six state matches 
are par for the course, and more 
thought has gone into making the 
best use of the resources available 
th a n was the case in West Indies 
last winter term. 


Mike Gatting 
It was a pity about the 
“oversleeping” at Melbourne, 
an indication that he still has 
much to learn about the 
responsibilities inherent in the 
England captain's job. On the 
other hand, taking on the No.S 
position in the Test side was 
an act of genuine leadership, 
and the calculated way in 
which he laid about Greg 
Matthews during his 100 in 
the third Test was just what we 
looking for. 

John Emburey 

His bowling m the Test 
victory in Brisbane was one of 
the highlights of the tour so 
far. And now that Australia's 
batsmen are becoming more 
familiar whh his methods, 
, without growing contemp- 
tuous of them, he would, 1 
think, benefit from a more 
varied use of the bowling 
crease. He is a usefully quiet 
foil as Gatting’ s vice-captain. 
Bill Athey 

After first innings scores in 
the first three Tests of 76, 96 
and 55, and opening partner- 
ships in the first and third of 
223 and 112 with Broad, he 
need no longer look back on 
his England career as one of 
almost unrelieved failure. 
Apart from a weakish area 
when brought forward outside 
the off stump, his batting 
technique has much to recom- 
mend it, and he has a 
Yorkshireman’s proper dis- 
taste for getting out. 

Ian Bo tham 

Encouraged, and allowed by 
the press, to keep a lower 
profile than in West Indies, he 
is having a correspondingly 
happier tour, though i^ as he 
promises, he is to end his 
louring days on a high note, 
his inter-costal injury will 
need to make a remarkable 
recovery. His century in Bris- 
bane was an expression of his 
determination to do well. 
Tasmania's wild trout also 
found a fisherman woitby of 
their mettle last Saturday., 
Chris Broad 
He has taken with both 
hands the opportunity the 
tour gave him. Successive 
hundreds against Australia 
give him a proud place on the 


honours board, and he has 
worked bard and very well for 
it His on-side play is as sound 
as his temperament and he is 
always well turned out We 
await with interest to see how 
he copes with the West Indian 
fast bowlers in. Perth at the end 
of next week. 

Phillip DeFreitas 
It is a little eariy yet to 
predict just where his consid- 
erable natural talent will lead 
him. He can be lively with the 
ball, has a fine arm in the field 
and showed, while making 40 
in the first Test match, that be 
has quite a West Indian flair 
with the bat. Then, at Ad- 
elaide, he discovered the part 
nerves play in Test cricket It 
is good to see the pleasure he 
gets out of playing other games 
such as tennis and golf. 
Graham Dilley: Five wickets 
in Australia's first innings of 
the first Test match estab- 
lished him as first pick among 
the fast bowlers. This was a 
splendid effort after the recent 
disruptions to his career. But 
he still tends to bowl as though 
keeping something in reserve, 
such as a yard or more of pace. 
His boots need cleaning very 
badly. 

Phil Edmonds 

An occasionally supercil- 
ious air disguises a caring 
individual. His bowling has 
proved reliable (which could 
not always be said of it), if a 
little unimaginative. In 163 
overs in the Test matches, he 
has taken seven wickets; but 
that is not an uncommonly 
slow rate for spin bowlers in 
Aust ralia, and his role has had 
at times to be attritionaL 
Titmus. for example, took a 
Test wicket every 21 overs on 
his last two Australian tours. 

Ne3 Foster 
He has had to battle against 
the feeling that he is a super- 
numerary, and after talcing 
106 wickets in England last 
season he was relegated too 
soon to the “groundstaff” 
category. He has a point, too. 
To have judged him, even 
provisionally, on his eariy 
form in the nets was to forget 
Madras 1984-85 (11 for 163), 
which showed what there is to 
be tapped. 


Brace French 

Should he feel that we fail to 
reward merit, it would hardly 
be surprising. As the better of 
the two wicketkeepers, be has 
had to cany the drinks simply 
because of Richards's stronger 
batting Reconciling himself 
to this, for the common good, 
is as hard as the hardest leg- 
side stumping and be is 
finding it so. To add to the 
irony, he himself has been 
scoring runs. 

David Gower 

More often than not, he 
seems only to be going 
through the motions. Yet in 
the second Test, at Penh, it 
was dear as soon as he came in 
that something within him 
had stirred. He played there an 
innings of full maturity. And 
for all his apparent indif- 
ference, no one from any 
country has scored more Test 
runs in 1986. “Put that in your 
pipe and smoke it,” he could 
say — though he wouldn’t. 

Allan Lamb 

He must be getting worried 
that he has played 44 innings 
for England since last reaching 
three figures. Being the enthu- 
siast he is, and the only 
cricketer ever to have made 
three hundreds against a four- 
pronged West Indian fast 
attack, there is a natural 
reluctance to lose him; but be 
is in increasing need of some 
Test runs, notwithstanding all 
those he saves with his tireless 
fielding. 

Jack Richards 

Just as French’s tour has 
been a great disappontment to 
him, so must Richards's have 
left him in seventh, heaven. 
His 133 at Perth contained 
many fine and robust strokes. 
Whether he can hold on to his 
place without improving his 
wicketkeeping remains to be 
seen. The one-day stuff, which 
starts soon, will suit him. He is 
excellently keen. 

W3f Slack 

A strong candidate for the 
Barrington Memorial Prize for 
good solid worth. Should he 
be chosen at any time to play 
in a Test match, be will let no 
one down, and should he 
make a hundred, none would 
be more loudly and joyfully 


cheered. He has been in better 
form than his figures (184 runs 
from nine first- class innings) 
suggest; but Athey, once cho- 
sen, has done nothing to be 
dropped. 

Gladstone Small 

Another with engagingly 
few airs and a simple desire to 
give of his best He was 
unlucky that the masters-in- 
charae did not choose him to 
play in the third Test match at, 
Adelaide, but so fearful are 
England of falling short of 
tuns that, to guard against 
doing so, they prefer to pick 
bowlers who can bat a bit 

James Whitaker 

There is a candour to his 
batting, based on orthodox 
lines, that will serve him well: 
indeed, it soon did when he 
made 108 in his first first-class 
innings of the tour. That be 
failed to take bis Test chance, 
when Botham's injury pro- 
vided him with it, was dis- 
appointing; but there will in 
time be others. On this occa- 
sion. he picked the wrong hall 
to hit, something which the 
young Dexter might have 
done. 

Peter Lush 

A new member of the 
touring staff he has shown 
himself, as the senior man - 
ager, to be better able than 
many to find the players’ 
wave-length, while not 
becoming one of them. The 
clearer definition of roles that 
was long overdue and pre- 
ceded the tour has helped him, 
and he knows his own mind! 
The handling of the Gatting 
somnambulism left something 
to be desired, but that can be 
put to salutary effect 
Mickey Stewart 

England's track-suited, 
gum-chewing coacb-cum- 
cricket manager never spares 
himself While he gets on with 
the cricket, Peter Lush sees to 
the administration. Stewart 
has established himself well 
enough now to use his in- 
fluence to stop the working-to- 
rtile that goes on as a result of 
the absurd agreement of only 
90 overs in a Test day. It was 
partly because it was known 
that be would deplore such 
things that he was chosen. 



Festive; Bob Hawke, Prime Minister of Australia, ami Botham (Photo: Graham Morris) 


Sri Lanka despair as India 
make highest ever Test score 


ENGLAND TOUR AVERAGES 


Batting and fielding 



M 

1 

N/O 

R 

NS 

Avg. 

100 

50 

Ct 

St 

1 T Botham 

6 

11 

2 

436 

138 

48.44 

1 

2 

5 



N A Foster 

4 

6 

2 

172 

*74 

43.00 

— 

1 

4 

— 

BC Broad 

8 

15 

2 

544 

162 

41.84 

2 

1 

7 

— 

B N French 

3 

5 

2 

113 

58 

37.66 

— 

1 

9 

1 

D 1 Gower 

7 

13 

2 

392 

136 

35.60 

1 

1 

3 

— 

A J Lamb 

8 

15 

1 

454 

105 

33-14 

1 

3 

8 


J J Whitaker 

5 

7 

0 

214 

108 

30-57 

1 

— 

2 

— 

CWJAtey 

7 

13 

1 

365 

36 

30.41 

— 

4 

5 

— 

MW Gatting 

C J Richards 

8 

15 

0 

384 

100 

25.60 

1 

2 

7 

— 

7 

11 

1 

248 

133 

24.80 

1 

— 

17 

3 

J E Emburey 

7 

11 

3 

166 

49 

20.75 

— 

— 

3 

— 

W N Slack 

5 

9 

0 

184 

89 

20.44 

— 

1 

S 

— 

P A J DeFreitas 

6 

9 

2 

123 

40 

1757 

— 

— 

1 

— 

P H Edmonds 

7 

7 

2 

73 

27 

14.60 

— 

— 

7 

— 

GRDiHey 

GC Small 

5 

6 

4 

8 

1 

2 

33 

65 

32 

26 

11.00 

10.83 

- 

- 

1 

3 



Canberra offers testing 
time for Botham 


Bowling 



O 

M 

R 

W 

Avge 

BB 

St 

10 

M W Gatting 

88 

25 

189 

9 

21 JM 

4-31 

— 

— 

G C Small “ 

180 

49 

446 

21 

21.23 

5-81 

1 

— 

N A Foster 

149 

40 

352 

16 

22.00 

4-20 

— 

— 


133.1 

27 

377 

13 

29.00 

3-42 

— 

— 

G R Dflley 

192-2 

216 

35 

41 

570 

680 

18 

21 

31.86 

32L38 

5-68 

4-44 

1 

_ 

J E Emburey 

P H Edmonds 

363.5 

332 

107 

96 

824 

726 

22 

17 

37.45 

42.70 

6-102 

337 

2 

— 

CWJAthey 

4 

0 

25 

0 


— 

— 

— 

A J Lamb 

1 

1 

0 

0 

— 





England take on the Prime 
Minister’s XI in Canberra today 
in a one-day game which has 
suddenly assumed great im- 
portance. Ian Botham, out of 
action since tearing a rib muscle 
during the drawn second Test at 
Perth, makes his comeback, and 
will be the main focus of 
attention. 

The 3 1 -year-old all-rounder 
had little trouble batting in the 
nets at Hobart but never bowled 
at above gentle medium-pace. 
Today should determine his 
prospects for the Melbourne 
TesL 

Neil Foster could stake a 


claim for his first cap of the 
series, but his fellow pace 
bowler, Phillip DeFreitas, will 
need to recapture some of the 
form be showed earlier in the 
tour if be is to impress. 

The Prime Minister’s side is 
led by Allan Border, Australia's 
captain, and the only one of 
their Test players in the team, 
though several promising 
youngsters, plus a number of 
cringe Test players are included. 

PnME MWtSTEFTSXfc A Bontar (capl). a 
Bebop, R Brown, M Dtmattlna, B 
Henscfw* T Moody. S OttoonsB. J 
SUdcre. D Tazatear, M Vefatta, M 
Whitney. 12m man: M Christa- 


Van Zyl out of ‘Test’ series 

Johannesburg fReuter) - iajuiy ^ expected to sideline 
Come van Zyl, South Afiicas van Zyl, aged 25, for about rix 


fast bowler, has with- 
drawn from the first unofficial 
“Test" against the rebel Austra- 
lian cricketers starting here to- 
morrow because of a stress 
fracture in his left foot. The 


weeks, 

TEAM: S J Coc*. B J VWrtfiald, P N 
Kksten. R G PoSock. C E B Rice (captain), 
K A McKenna, D J Richardson. A J 
Kourle. G S Lb Roux. S T Jefferies. H A 
Page. 


Kanpur (AFP) — Mohammad 
Azharuddin missed what would 
have been a first Test double 
century by one run as India 
made their highest total of 676 
for seven, but the opening 
match in the series against Sri 
Lanka predictably finished in a 
draw here on Monday. 

The 23 year-old Azharuddin 
was out for 199 when be fell leg- 
before to become Ravi 
Ratnayake's third Ibw victim of 
the day off the delivery which 
brought the first Test to a dose, 
the second day of the match 
having been lost to rain. 

Yet it was veteran Sunil 
Gavaskar who took the man of 
the match award with an un- 
blemished innings of 176, and in 
this he stretched his world 
record of Test centuries to 34. 

The Indian captain, Kapil 
Dev, made 163 in adding to 
India's highest-ever score, and 
helped reduce the tourists’ 
bowlers to despair on a Green 
Park pitch at Kanpur which had 
offered them no help. 

India’s previous highest Test 
innings was 644 for seven 
declared against the West In- 
dies. also ai Kanpur, in 1978-79. 

Kapil took 165 balls to reach 
his 163 in 240 minutes, in 
which he bit 19 fount and a six, 
before falling to Ratnayake. He 
and Azharuddin were involved 
in a magnificent 272-run 
partnership off only 49.3 overs, 
which was an Indian best perfor- 
mance for the sixth wicket in all 
Test matches and a record for 
any wicket against Sri Lanka. 

But all the delightful shots 
proved to be worth nothing 
more than practice runs for the 
batsmen, and new figures for the 
statisticians. Neither side had 
the chance of achieving a result 
once rain had begun to fall on 
the second day. Sri" Lanka took- 


Scoreboard 

SRI LANKA: Fbst Innings 420 (R J 
Ratnajrafce 93. S Wetfimuny 79, B Ann 3 

INDIA: Rret tarings 

S Gavaskar c WettVnwiy b Lnbrooy 176 

K Srikkanth c Ahtfs b Ratnayake 18 

r M Lamba run out - — — 24 

D Vangsariar c Guaeingha b De Mai 57 

U AzharoOdm few b Ratnayake 199 

R J Shastri Bn* b Ratnayake .. 6 

‘Kapil Dev few b Rdfitayake 163 

BArunnotout — _ — 2 

Extras (b 1, lb 11, nbIS. wl) . — _3i 

Total (7 wtts) 676 

tK S More. C Sharma. B Aren, and 
Manindar Singh did not bat 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-50. 2-100. 3-21 7. 4- 
380. 5-369. &671. 7-676. 

BOWLING: De Mel. 31-4-119-1; Labrooy. 
35-4-164-1; Ratnayake. 37.1-2-132-4: do 
15-4-58-0: 
.20-16- 


Sitwa. 40-7-133-0: 
Guruslnghe. 7-1-42-0; 
0. 


most of the third day to reach 
420. 

India, resuming at their over- 
night score of 321 for three, lost 


Gavaskar when he was caught 
by Sidaih Wenimuny off the 
seam bowler Graeme Labrooy 
having added 28 runs to his 
score. 

Gavaskar had. helped put on 
163 for the fourth wicket with 
Azharuddin, who had lost an- 
other partner before lunch when 
Ravi Shastri fell leg-before by 
Ratnayake for six, and then 
India were 399 for five 

Azharuddin completed his 
fourth Test hundred by lunch 
and he and Kapil stepped up 
their punishment of the bowlers 
as the day continued. Ratnayake 
alone among bowlers reaped 
some reward for his efforts by 
taking four wickets for 1 32 off 
37.1 overs. 

"Hie first one-day inter- 
national will be played here on 
Wednesday and the second Test 
starts in Nagpur on Saturday. 


Kent’s concession to Dilley 


Kent will leave no turf un- 
turned in their attempt to hold 
on to their England fast bowler. 
Graham Dilley. aged 27; whose 
contract expires at the end of the 
year. 

The club’s chairman. Major 
Martin Ffrench Blake, ex- 
plained yesterday: “It’s prin- 
cipally with Dilley in mind that 
we have dug up and relaid part 
of the square at Canterbury in a 
bid to get a fester and bounder 
wicket." 

He added: “Of course, we 
desperately want him to slay 
and would be very sorry indeed 
if he left. But if he's determined 
to go elsewhere, there’s nothing 
we can do about it because he’s a 
free agent on January I. 

“However, whatever players 
may dedde about their futures 


they still have to get a move 
confirmed by the registration 
committee of the TCCB. 

Speculation is mounting that 
Oillcy may move, although he 
has said be will make no 
decision until he has met his 
county captain. Chris Cowdrey, 
in Sydney eariy in the New 
Year. 

Hampshire’s loss 

Hampshire CCC lost £5.739 
last season. They blame poor 
weather last summer and the 
need to improve fire precau- 
tions at their Southampton 
headquarters as the main rea- 
sons for the losses. The club's 
sponsors, TNT Tristar Parcels 
Express, have signed a new 
agreement, worth about £10,000 
to Hampshire. 


CHRISTMAS BOOKS FOR THE HOCKEY AND RUGBY LEAGUE CONNOISSEUR 


The game that is no 
longer a tangled web 


More to Wigan than the pier 


By Sydney Frisian 


rtien Bemie Cotton, a for- 
■ England and Great Britain 
key player, was asked bow it 
to be overtaken during an 
y morning hill ran by James 
hie. whom Cottoo had 
ht at school. Cotton’s an- 
r was: “Very proud of him”, 
s simple anecdote which 
lis on the concept of per- 
il pride, concludes the book 
ching Hockey by David 
taker who, as England s 
:h. now joins forces with 
ion. the new England 
lager. , . 

gold medal for England in 
1986 World Cup Finals in 
don would have been a 
lg reward for Whittaker, 
has poured imo his book 
-ichness of his experience as 
international player, as 
and's coach since 1 980 and 
I real Britain coach from 
1, having played a big part in 
ironze medal success at die 

I Olympic Games. 

re World Cup portrayed 
:ey as a game combining 
mcism. tactics and skilL It 
xl the imagination or 
olbovs who, in spite of 
and’s 2-1 defeat by Austra- 
i the final, temporarily put 
nd them Ihe impact of 
rail, preferring to be an Ian 
or rather than a Peter 
on and a Sean Kelly rather 
a Gary Lineker, 
ch interest should be kept 
by Whitaker’s book la- 
id for players and coaches 
. which by and large, serves 

II the reader that hockey is 
mger a tangled web woven 


by those who practice to de- 
ceive. As the technical gap 
between teams is dosing, those 
with stronger bodies are coming 
out on top. 

Chris Moore re-lives the 
excitement of the Worid Cup in 
his book Autumn Gobi. This is 
his second work on hockey, 
which follows Duet in the Sun in 
which he dealt with the 1984 
Olympic Games. 

In his usual racy style, he 
recaptures the day to day thrills 
of ihe Worid Cup. leading up to 
the tremulous climax and also 
deals with ihe decline of ihe 
game in the Asian sub-conti- 
nenL His chapter on John 
Crasto. (be Tunes of India 
correspondent, searching for the 
epithets to describe India s 
disasters, is especially amusing. 

in more serious vein. Nevill 
Miroy, a former honorary 
match secretary of the Hockey 
Association, rewrites the His- 
tory of Hockey. It presents the 
game from its earliest days. 
Wgelher with details of ail 

important tournaments such as 
the Olympic Games, the World 
Cup. the European Cup and 
other tournaments. It is a must 
for any sporting bookshelf. 

• Coaching Hockey by David 
Whittaker. The Crowood Press: 

• Autumn Gold, ihe Puma book 
of (he 1986 World Cup hockey, 
bv Chris Moore with photo- 
graphs by Morely Peck«-. The 
Harrow Press: £6. jO + 65pp. 

• The History of Hockey ^ 
Nevill Miroy- Lifeline Lid, 

£9:95. 


Although there are claimants 
and pretenders to the throne in 
places like St Helens, Leeds and 
Hull, there has never been any 
real doubt that the colliery town 
of Wigan is the heartland of 
rugby league. Indeed Wlganers 
complain that they are only 
remembered or recognized fee 
having two things in the town, a 
small and largely disused lock 
known as Wigan Pier and a 
rugby league team. 

George Orwell immortalized 
Wigan Pier in die famous 
political work when be ased fee 
name in the title, “The Road to 
Wigan Pier.” Wigan Rugby 
League dub followers believe, 
however, that the real immortals 
are the legendary full bade and 
goal- kicker Jim Sullivan, the 
try-scoring Brown Bomber, Billy 
Boston, the silken smooth centre 
three-quarter Eric Ashton, fee 
elusive runner of bygone days, 
Johnny Ring and that mighty 
forward, Brian McTigue. 

These great names, and many 
others, are featured in a magnifi- 
cently researched labour of love 
•'Wigan RLFC, 1895- J 986" by 
Ian Morrison. It tells the tale hi 
mmol e detail of bow Wigan 
Wasps, the well-respected 
northern Rugby Union dub, 
joined the great Northern Union 
breakaway in 1895. mice played 
a season at the football ground, 
Springfield Park, now the home 
of Wigan Athletic, end soon 
established themselves as one of 
fee most powerful teams in the 
game. 

There is a fascinating section 
devoted to contemporary reports 


By Keith Macklin 

on exciting games in the dub’s 
history. The first game at Cen- 
tral Park was in 1902 when 
10,000 turned up to see Wigan 
beat the famous Gallant Youths 
of Batiey 14-8. Then there was 
fee match against New Zealand 
in 1907, when 25,000 packed 
Centra! Park, and Wigan beat 
the pioneer touring team from 
down under 12-8. 

Among the many matches 
recalled in this section is a 
particularly gripping piece about 
the amazing game in February 
1925 when Wigan slaughtered 
fee Cambrian amateurs Flimby 
and FothergUl 116-0 in the first 
round of the Challenge Cup. 

The proud lads from Cumber- 
land bad arrived at Central Park 
wife an unbeaten record, and 
whh the boast that their line had 
only been crossed once for a try 
during that season. Wigan mul- 
tiplied this by 24, Johnny Ring 
getting seven tries and the South 
African, Van Heerden four, with 
Jim Sullivan landing 22 goals. 

The demoralised and dejected 
Cumbrian amateurs went home 
with just one consolation, a 
share of a gate of £520, a 
considerable sum 50 years ago. 

The book is superiily doc- 
umented throughout, with all the 

scores and scorers in every 
match since 1895-96, splendid 
action photographs, some vin- 
tage ones from the distant past 
and word portraits in alphabeti- 
cal order of feegreat names that 
have bestrode Central Park. 

Another remarkable piece of 
dedicated research is the 


Rothmans Rugby League Year- 
book 1986-07, which has again 
been edited down to fee minutest 
detail by Raymond Fletcher and 
David Howes and is published 
by Queen Anne Press at £9-95- 

In addition to the exhaustive 
research and delineation of Brit- 
ish rugby league statistics, de- 
tails of international 
tournaments down the years, a 
comprehensive review of last 
season, special articles and in- 
numerable photographs, there is 
a new restore this year which 
gives details of every Australian 
tour. After the recent visit of the 
Kangaroos this is a timely 
insertion, since there is vast 
interest in fee Australians as the 
current worid champions. 

It seems remarkable, given' 
these facts, to realize that there 
was a tune when Great Britain 
ruled fee roost; and. when an 
Australian touring party could 
come to Britain, as in 1937 and 
194R and lose nearly half feeir 
matches, including several de- 
feats by chib sides. Perhaps fee 
wheel will eventually turn full 
circle after alL 

The first historic section ofj 
the book reminds of some of the 
outstanding happenings in the 
game last season, wife fee 
signings of T** 1 ? Holmes and 
Ellery Hanley, the formation of 
the National Amateur T-gagnf 
and the end of fee road for 
Sonthend Idvicte and Bridgend 

experiments. 

• Wigan RLFC 1895-1986 by 
Ian Morrison, Breedon Books: 

£13.95 


NORDIC SKIING 


Excitement mounts as 
obvious winners fail 


By Michael Coleman 


Nothing deadens a sport more 
than an obvious result, all the 
time. To the relief of the cross- 
country skiing worid. fee 
weekend's Worid Cup races at 
Davos showed that nothing is 
certain any longer. 

First, Gunde Svan, of Swe- 
den, the world and Olympic 
champion who was beginning to 
acquire a reputation of being 
unbeatable, came fourth in the 
di a go n a l -style 30 kilometres on 
Saturday. Second. Switzerland 
edged out fee Norwegians in fee 
battle for third place iu the 
skating-style 40km relay on 
Sunday. 

Svan. winner of five World 
Cup races last season from 
1 5km to 50km, had mastered 
the two styles in which Nordic 
skiing is now being raced that a 
season-long series of pro- 
cessions seemed in store this 
winter. He won the first two 
contests at Ramsau, Austria, 
and Cogne. Italy, but his Water- 
loo came in fee falling snow at 
Davos. 

Thomas Ericsson kept the 
Swedish morale up by snatching 
a one second victory over 
Vladimir Smirnov, of the Soviet 
Union, and the next day the 
Swedes, anchored by Svan. held 
off the Finns in the relay. 

Bm only 100 metres behind 
the Finns came the Swiss, Andy 
Griinenfelder robbing the Nor- 
wegians of third place by only 
half a second. The gradual 
preference being shown by Swiss 

youngsters to cross-country. 


partly a protest against fee over- 
commercialization of fee Alpine 
disciplines, is itself a phenom- 
enon of fee sport. 

Svan's World Cup record 
since fee beginning of last 
season, is: 

1, Labrador City (15 km classical 
diagonal). 

1. Btwatxk (30 km skating}. 

1. La Bresse (30km classical). 

2, Bohinj (15 km skating) 

1. Oberstdorf (50 km skating). 


2, Leningrad (15 km skating). 

2. Lahti (15 km skating). 

At Falun. Svan was disqualified 
for too many skating steps in 
classical style race. 

1. Oslo (50km classical). 

1986-7 season: 

1, Ramsau (15 km skating). 

1 . Cogne (15 km classical). 


Komora quits 

Budapest (Reuter) — Imre 
Komora has resigned after 
only five months as manager 
of the Hungarian 
footballteam. He has been 
replaced by Jozsef Verebes, 
fee manager of the successful 
Budapest MTK-VM club. 


New manager 

Mansfield Maftsman Rugby 
League Club have appointed 
Jim C'rellin. the former coach at 
Blackpool Borough. Halifax and 
Swinton to replace Steve 
Dennison, who was dismissed 
last week. 


A match 
batsmen 
couldn’t 
fail in 

By Michael Stevenson 

Recent events in Australia 
have confirmed fee old crick- 
eting adage that the pitch can be 
more important than the play- 
ers. There have been few better 
examples of this truth than fee 
match between Cambridge Uni- 
versity and the powerful West 
Indians in 1950. 

The game was historic, not 
only for its total aimlessness and 
frustration, as seven wickets fell 
in the three uninterrupted days, 
while 1.324 runs were scored: 
but informed rumour had it feat 
this contest was the final straw 
which led to instructions being 
issued to groundsmen feat wick- 
ets must be prepared to give 
more help to the bowlers. 

Such a policy, of coarse, is a 
slippery slope ami fee emer- 
gence of countless “little” seam- 
ens putting the ball fractionally 
short of a length and letting fee 
pitch do the rest, predictably 
coincided with the increasing 
decadence of spin bowling in 
general, and wrist-spin ia 
particular. 

Cambridge that year were a 
Eure batting side, one of fee best 
perhaps in fee history of univer- 
sity cricket, and it did not come 
as a total surprise when John 
Dewes and David Sheppard, the 
latter showing all the stern 
resolve that has brought swift 
advancement in the church, 
contributed 343 for the first 
wicket, amazingly in only fonr 
hours and 40 minutes; -this was 
fee highest opening stand for 

Cambridge, and the highest fees 
For any side against fee West 
Indians. 

The next two batsmen, Hubert 
Doggart and Peter May, were 
also fu t u re internationals and 
fee rest of os ordinary mortals 
chipped in wife sufficient sap- 
port to allow declaration at 
Inch on fee second day at 594 
for four. Ramad bin's and 
Valentine's bowling figures read 
respectively noaght for 86 off 20 
overs and nought for 97 off 32 
overs, though they were soon to 
be destroying fee England 
batting. 

Christiani and Stotlmeyer 
opened fee to mists' innings and 
added 178 before Christiani 
departed, though both batsmen 
were missed, as Wisden records, 

early in their innings." 
There was little evidence at this 
juncture of the mayhem to come 
and the “good book" failed to 
mention that we dropped the 
great Evertoo Weekes on 120 
early in bis innings. He got 304! 

After the dismissal of Stoll- 
meyer, there followed what 
Wisden described as **— an 
entertaining stand" of 350 in 
three hours * B| l 45 minutes 
between Weekes and Frank 
Worrell. One most add that its 
entertainment value decreased if 
mu happened to be a member of 
the fielding side. 



Weekes: primitive ferocity 

One of tire most remarkable 
things about their blistering 
scoring rate was that after a time 
both Weekes and Worrell stead- 
fastly refused to run between 
wickets. 

The ball would be blasted to 
all points wife primitive ferocity 
in Weekes's case and an apolo- 
getic elegance in Worrell's that 
threatened life and limb. The 
non-striker would marram 1 “Big 
shot, Frankie" or “Big shot, 
Evenon." If fee ball reached the 
boundary, SO be iL If not, an 

occasional strolled single was 
the eery most that was 
contemplated. 

After a time, the hnnonr of 
fee situation became paramount 
and we arranged that, as each 
bowler’s figures passed the 
dreaded century, the scorer 
would wave his red handkerchief 
and the sacrificial lamb in 
question would be warmly ap- 
plauded by his colleagues. This 
caused some consternation 
among tire gentlemen of tire 
press, who searched diligently in 
order to discover what new 
record had been broken! 

Then there was the choc-ice 
man. He would move briskly 
roond fee ground. plying his 
trade wife avuncular benevo- 
lence and, on normal days, 
occasionally retrieving tire ball 
when it came his way. May 19, 
1950. was not a normal day. 
After several near misses had 
been registered on the choc-ice 
man by Frankie and Evertoo, be 
became extremely vigilant. 

His neck strap would be 
slipped, his tray dumped un- 
ceremoniously and he would 
swoop on the ball with fee 
dexterity of a young Clive Lloyd 
to buzz it in to tire keeper, while 
we poor fielders, searching for 
any distraction, applauded Mm 
to fee echo. 1 often wonder what 
became of the choc-ice man. 
Energy and dedication of this 
order deserved advancement! 

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY: First tattoos 
J Q Dewes e Wtofcas b Goddard _ IU 
D S Stwppard c TrastraB b WBaan 227 

QHQ Doggart c end b WURams 71 

PBH May not out 44 

A G J Urnnel e CbrisBtoi fa Goddard 10 
MH Stevenson not out — S3 

Extras (fa 3,H>3) S 

Total (4 tons dec) 594 

T U Wens, J J Warr, O J Walt, P A Kaland 
and H W Denman <fld not bat 
BOWLING: Johnson 15-1-55-<k Jones 17- 
4-77-0: Valenikw 32-3-974* RamacHn 
20-2-8S-0: wmarns 12-0 -e±-a worm 
12-0-45-0: Goddard 32-2-128-2; 
StoBmeyer 5-1-38-0. 

WEST MOE& First Iratogs 

R J Ctvi stlanl few b Warr 111 

JBStolbneyorc Doggart bKeOrnd- 83 

F M Worrefl b Wait 160 

ED Weekes not out 304 

K B TresraB not out 56 

Extras (b 3. Hi 8, w 2, (Hi 3) 16 

Total (3 isfcte) , 730 

J D Goddard. C B WMams, P E Jones, K 
N Johnson, K T Ramadan, and A L 
Valentine «fld not bet 
BOWLING: Wsrr 35-3-121-1; Wait 26-3- 
128 - 1 ; KeBand 30-0-105-1; DowHft254- 
123-0: RkianeO 38-1-128-0; Sawenson 
12-0-69-0: W«ls 3-0-28-0; May 2-0-13-0. 

umpires F S Leo amt K IfcCanis 



26 


SPORT 


THE TTMKS TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


RUGBY UNION: SELECTORS BLEND TOGETHER THE FINEST FROM THE DIVISIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP TO PROVIDE FINAL TRIAL 


FOOTBALL 


England’s probables to 
play for their places 
against best of the rest 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


England’s selectors have eff- indeed he may require 
ectivdy asked those players further operation, 
who have been the core of 
their eariy-season training 
squad to play for their {daces 
in the trial at Twickenham on 
January 3. Against the side 
which, with one exception. 


Dooley, the other Fylde 
lock, is being given the chance 
to rehabilitate himself at dub 
level before being tested once 
more at international level, 
his knee ligament injury hav- 


played against Japan two iog perhaps taken more out of 
months ago, they have placed him than he first realized, 
the best XV produced by the Ideally the selectors were 
divisional championship looking at Redman as their 
which ended on Saturday. front jumper, but now he will 
That gives Mike Harrison occupy the place in which he 
the chance to add to his laurels jumps for dub and division, 
as captain of an unbeaten Morrison’s challenge will 


come from Pinnegar who, 
with Rose, his Wasps col- 
league, played consistently 
well throughout the divisional 
championship in a London 
side which ended in bottom 
place. 

Macfarlane, the Fylde 
No. 8, has edged out Egerton 


Yorkshire and the North, 
leading the Rest - whi 
includes six of his colleagues 
from the side that won the 
Thom EMI divisional cham- 
pionship. 

The selectors have tried to 
keep together the northern 
backs who played so well 
against London on Saturday, from the Resi'XV which is 

blending with them the exdt- 

ing talents of Webb and Oti, Trial foamc 
and giving them an old head at ArKU 
the helm in Harding. 

That is a fair decision. The 
England XV played well in the 
final half-hour against Japan 
but very few of them have 
staked an undeniable claim to 
a place in the Five Nations 
championship. Now is their 
chance to demonstrate the 
individual and collective skills 
which the North have promul- 
gated so freely over the last 
three weeks. 

The selectors’ hand has 
been forced at lock forward, 
where there have been so 
many injuries. In their choice 
for the trial their fingers will 
remain crossed that Colclough 
will have recovered fitness 



Morrises (Bath). N 
Rees (Nottingham), 

(Leicester). 

THE REST: J Wabb 
(Wakefield, c apt), k 
C artes (Durham University). C i . 

R Andrew (Wasps), R Harding 
_ P Randsfl (Wasps). 0 Pm 
R Lae (Bath), P Simpson (Catti). C 





(OnaB), J Goodwin 
SSmlfli (Richmond). DHotoas 
M WHcombe (Bedford). 8 


hard on the Bath man- he had 
two good divisional games,, 
after a glandular ailment, and but a less effective match 
that the Bath pair of Redman against Richards when the 
and Morrison, have recovered south west played the Mid- 
from knocks sustained playing lands at Forester last week- 
for the South-West against the end. Macfarlane is promoted 
Midlands on Saturday. on the ba s i s of one good game, 

Redman ended that game and good report s from Cum — 
with a damaged shin, but still bria and Fylde. Hereceives a 
hopes to play for the Barbar- “minl-triaF’ this Saturday, 
ians against Leicester on since the Barbarians have 
Saturday. asked him to replace the 

Morrison, aged 23, the for- injured Gibson (London Irish) 
mer Loughborough Uuiver- a gainst Leicester, where be 
silv lock who has appeared at will play opposite Richards, 
under- 19, Student, under-23 RendaU, the Wasps loose- 
and B level for England, is the head prop, has alsn withdrawn 
only change in the England from the Bar barians team 
side for the triaL The second- because of a hams tring injury 
row pairing against Japan was and it will be a race against 
Redman and Bainbridge, but time to ensure his fitness for 
the latter has a hamstring the trial. He is due to prop 
injury, and is unlikely to play Dawe in the Rest XV, who is 
again until the New Yean somewhat, fortunate to be 

Romania’s 
hard men 
reach final 

By Chris Than 

There are two schools of 
thought in French rugby. The 
supporters of the French na- 
tional coach, Jacques Fouroux, 
advocate the development of a 
giant “bone crusher’’ on the 
lines of the 1977 Grand Slam 
pack, an option amply illus- 
trated by the display of forward 
power in the second Test against 
the Ail Blacks in Nantes. 

The exponent of the other 
school of thought, Toulouse 
RFC, are ready and willing to 
challenge the view of the 
establishment with their excit- 
ing brand of running rugby in 
the final of the France Clubs 
tournament against the Roma- 
nians from Constanta in Tou- 
louse tonight. 

Toulouse play the French 
version of total rugby as 
preached by Pierre Villepreux, 
the former international full- 
back. It is a game based on the 
polished skills of their players, 
and speed pf action and fool, but 
mainly on an unusually high 
degree of tactical awareness of 
each individual player in the 
Toulouse set up. 

It is a game of total freedom 
and creativity 

TOULOUSE: J Dupu* A Borewvat 0 
Codomwu, D Charvst, H Leconte. P 
Rouge-Thomas, M Lopez, S Lbstb. P 
SouS. T Portotai. T Masai, J-M Glraud, B 
Cousnes. K Jauft (capt). A Ctaana. 

CONSTANTA: G flora* BfToader. A 
Lunoa.G Varga. NUnu.RBewsou.v tan. 

F Opris, E Grkjore, D Prisecaru, E Necuta, 

S Constantin. S Galan. V Gruglea. G 

Duntitnt (capt). 


there ahead of Fen wide (Dur- 
ham City) and Brain, Eng- 
land’s first-choice hooker in 
their last II games. 

Neither Harding nor Oti 
appeared in die divisional 

championship, Harding be- 
cause he is in direct conflict 
with Hill, England’s captain. 
He woo three caps last year 
and his consistency remains 
one of Bristol’s outstanding 
virtues. Oti was preparing 
with Cambridge University 
for the annual encounter with 
Oxford on the first weekend of 
the champi onship, and the 
Midlands, for whom he is 
qualified, preferred their Eng- 
land squad wings, Evans and 
Goodwin. 

However, his speed and 
strength have won him many 
friends, both at Durham and 
Nottin gham where he now 
plays his club rugby. Indeed 
Carting, who has won his way 
to this level without playing 
any senior club rugby at all, 
was placed at full bade in his 
first year at Durham because 
he was the only one last 
enough to support Oti 
properly. 

The understanding they 
contrived then may serve 
them stand them in good stead 
now, as well as the link 
between Simms and Carting 
which was first established in 
the England Schools side of 
1 983. The following year Car- 
ling succeeded Simms as 
schools captain. 

The trial will form part of a 
squad weekend, the players 
plus a dozen replacements 
meeting on January and 
completing the weekend on 
January 4. Martin Green, the 
England coach, will prepare 
the senior side, and Des 
Seabrook. his fellow selector, 
will do the sane for the Rest. 

It remains to be seen 
whether the 1 1 Bath players 
required will turn out for their 
club against Cardiff — or the 
seven Wasps against Rosslyn 
Park — on New Year's Day, 
two days before the trial, but 
there has to come a time when 
the considerations of the na- 
tional side become para- 
mount, and a fortnight before 
the first international of the 
searon is none too soon. 



Webb: Selectors hope his talent* win blood with those of Oti and the northern backs 

Webb’s trial signals change 


The selection of Jon Webb, 
BristoTs fnD back, for the 
England trial, may mark an end 
to the experiment of playing 
converted stand-off halves in 
that position- Footballers Hnw 
Davies and Peter Wfifiams may 
be, bet their positioning and 
defensive qualities most match 
their vision for die a ttacking 
game. 

Webb, aged 23, has shown 
this season that be possesses 

both. He had his advocates m 
the sooth-west last season hot hi 
the new yew his game decl in ed 
slightly. His authoritative play 
this season brought him to the 
replacements’ bench in the di- 
ttAmmI championship and, after 

moling on in the game 

the North, be has seized las 

chance with alacrity. 

“My biggest sarprise is that 
be didn't get in the side straight 
away,” Mike Rafter, die Bristol 
coach, said. “He worked 
p a r ti cu larly hard, pre-s o asou, on 
his F* 1 *” pace and it’s all 
come good for him.” 

Webb himself is also prepared 
to give credit to Ralph Xaihlw, 
his dnb ce nt r e , who retained 
from England’s squad training 


By David Hands 

gap. Those values were seen to 
great advantage playing for the 
in Portugal two months ago with 
variations in t raining which he 

has passed on to the eh* backs. 

Webb is a fifth-year medical 
stndent at Bristol University mid 
hopes to find a position in the 
same area at the end of this 
academic year. Bora in London 
he comes from a medical fiunDy 
and spent the first 10 years of 
his He in T before the 
family retained home and he 
went to the Royal Grammar 
School in Newcastle, where he 
came nnder the guidance of John 
Elders, the former rngiwiii 
coach. 

At 6ft 2in be looks a lanky 
character but that spare frame is 
deceptive; he carries some I3st 
a rocmd when it comes to tack- 
ling. There was nothing missing 
in the divisional game at Bath 
when London created aH sorts of 
pressure positions fa the second 
q Barter bat their attacks foun- 
dered epos Webb’s positioning 
for all their kicks. 

His o utstanding strength, 
however, and the one be admits 
‘to enjoying most, is his speed 
info the line and abiEtv to find a 


Doyle preaching the simple method 


Mick Dqyle, the Irish coach, 

combines an infections optimism 
with a realism that belies the 
brash nature of his personality. 
Coaching manuals are not part 
of his library. Doyle is his own 
man and while be will readily 
admit tint everything he does is 
not necessarily right, be would 
take a lot of convincing that ft 
was not right for the cause of 
Irish nigby- 

A ft er C» e years as a successful 
coach to Leinster, Doyle took 
over as national coach in a doad 
of controversy following foe 
sacking of Willie John 
McBride, a greatly loved and 
much respected fignre, after only 
one season in charge. Bnt the 
flamboyant Doyle proceeded to 
win foe Triple Crown and 
championship, dropping only 
one point to France, in his first 
season at the helm only to prove 
he was not In league with foe 
godjs by losing all four inter- 
nationals last season.* 

Doyle however is very 
optimistic that Ireland will 
bounce back this season and in 
Dublin at the weekend be had 
this to say^Tite Romanian 
match provided an indication of 
what we have been trying to do; 
it was the first time I have seen 
total synchrony between for- 
wards and backs. The pack 
worked their gats out, laid foe 
ball back properly and didn’t 
mess about The backs got aB 
the baD they wanted and 
Crossan scored the tries. 

“It was simple football, what 
we have been training for this 
past two and a half years. 
Alright foe opposition dis- 


By George Ace 

appeared halfway through foe forward play isn’t worth kmm- 


second half bet any opposition 
would have lost heart in similar 


“I reckon we woold have 
beaten most sides on the day and 
it would have taken a ray very 
good ride to have lived with ns. 
There was a lot of things in that 
match that gave me a lot of 
satisfaction and I was really 
proud that that team produced 
that Sco re and that th en- disri- 
piine and nnum i lii i fjil was such 


mg. And what is more I have 
known him for a long time and 
have faith absolute in him. 

‘‘He is probably the only gay I 
could work with and have a 
really har m onious relationship. 
1 am a bit of an individual and I 
tend to do thiugs the way I feel I 
should rather than from any laid 
down reaching methods. He 
mderstands that and accepts 
ft.” 


Doyle scotched widespread 
that they did not concede a point, rumours that he will carry on for 
Oltie Campbell, I thought, another year as coach. “I am 
sammed it Bp well when he said going to pot everything I have 
‘most tea m s hit a purple p at ch got into this team next year and 
for a sped during a match but a little more. Then I am going to 
that te am h it a purple patch take a break and settle down. I 
irate.’ _ _ have been actively involved in 

e have a sqnad training rugby virtually all of my life and 
the weekend of 1 mink three years as iwt " > —i 
January 3 and 4 when I will have coach is enongh. 


Syd MIDar working again with 
me. Syd, as yon know, w2B be foe 
team manager at the World Cep 
and he Is a man I have the 
greatest respect for. What he 
doesn't know about tactics and 


“It is a demanding job and 
while I have enjoyed every 
minute of ft I intend to call it a 
day after the World Cop. I want 
to win everything this season 
and so do the boys. I reckon that 


Irish select Morrow 


The Irish selectors have taken 
the unprecedented step of 
requesting an additional seven 
players to attend foe training 
sessions next month in prepara- 
tion for foe opening inter- 
national against Wales in 
Cardiff on January 17 (George 
Ace writes). 

Called up for the weekend 
stint on January 3 and 4. and on 
Sunday January 1 1 are: P Hay- 
cock (Terenure), D Irwin 
(Instonians). J Langbroek 


(Blackrock), J Holland (Cork 
Con). N Francis (Blackrock), W 
R Duncan (Malone), D Morrow 
(Bangor). 

The most significant name 
here is that of David Morrow. 
The Bangor No 8 was a replace- 
ment for last Saturday's trial 
after Michael Gibson had pulled 
out with a hand injury. 

Morrow won three caps last 
season and Was voted Ulster 
player of foe year but, after an 
outstanding game for Ulster 
against Monster he was dropped. 


by the Sunday evening at foe 
completion of oar tzainmg ses- 
sion next month we win have got 
everything into perspective. I 
think that win over Romania has 
brought it home to the lads that 
15-man rugby is their game and 
it has proved to them that they 
can play it 

“I am very optimistic about 
onr chances and though we lost 
all our matches last season I 
thought we played onr best 
rugby since I took over as coach 
two years age against Scotland 
last March. That was a match 
we certainly didn’t deserve to 
lose and I also thought we woe 
unlucky to lose against Wales. 
In fact, I reckon we were as 
tmlncfcy last season when we 
were whitewashed as we were 
tacky foe previous season when 
we won the Triple Crown and 
championship. 

“Wales will provide a tough 
opening hurdle bnt I think we 
will do wefl. I know, Millar 
knows, and the players know we 
can play a brand of rugby that 
wiD win matches. If Romania did 
nothing else it boosted foe 
confidence of the players. I met 
Bill Beaumont recently at a 
rugby seminar and he said ‘that 
was a super result yon got 
against Romania. I don’t care 
what the o pp os it ion was like, it 
takes a very good team to ran out 
that member of points.” 

On the World Cap, Doyle was 
brief and to the poinfc“See me 
after the last match in the Five 
Nations championship. That is 
my main conoern right row. If 
Ireland realise the high topes of 
Doyle it may be prudent not to 
look him ap for a week or so 


SQUASH RACKETS 


Beeson to lead England 


Bryan Beeson, who captured 
foe Intercity national title last 
month, will spearhead an Eng- 
land team who are favourites to 
retain the home international 
title io Cardiff in mid-January. 

Beeson, from Northumber- 
land. will be joined by Martin 
Bodimeade, the EnglandNo. 3. 
who plays for Berkshire, Jamie 
Hickox of Surrey, Neil Harvey 
of Essex. David Pearson of 
Lancashire, and Paul Carter of 
Hertfordshire. 

Chrter, aged 23, from Potters 
Bar, who with Bodimeade won 
foe British doubles title last 
week, will make his inter- 
national debut. 


• Ross Norman, the New Zea- 
lander who ended the five-year 
unbeaten run of Pakistan’s 
Jahangir Khan to become world 
champion in Toulouse last 
month, has bad a remarkable 
year crowned by finishing top of 
the World Grand Prix rankings. 
But be won by only 300 points, 
with seven wins from 13 tour- 
naments. J ahang ir had foe same 
number of wins from nine. 

WORLD GRAND PRJX STANDINGS: 1, R 
Nonna^gC) 6337pts; 2, Jahangir Khan 

4, R Thoma 
(Erg)2^»6;c 
7. Tristan Noncarrow (Aus) 2,1422: 8, 
Oamar Zaman (p*) 24783: 9, G Briars 
~ \\m; 10, mm Jahan (Eng) 


SNOW REPORTS 


ITALY 
Depth (cm) 

Mn lb 

15 30 La Thu* 10 40 

Andato 10 35 Uvtono 10 30 

Apnea 5 so MawStmO 10 25 

Ar abba 20 30 M di Camp 20 35 

Bonn to 30 40 Ortfael 15 20 

Canazai 25 60 Planeavalo 20 80 

Gaspoggio 0 20 R'detto 15 50 

Cervinia 10 50 S Gafina V 30 45 

CVaima 5 30 SM'toodlC 15 30 

Cortma 15 35 Sappoda 35 70 

Carrara 15 40 Seta efi Val 15 30 

C'mayeur 10 40 Sestriwe 20 30 

Faicade 25 35 Tonate 10 20 

• (Information from the Italian Tourist 
Office). 

SCOTLAND: Cfamgonn: upper runs, tuns 
complete, new snow on a firm base; 
middle runs, runs complete but narrow, 
new snow an a firm base: lower slopes, 
tuns comptata but narrow new snow an a 
firm bum: vwtiral nm 111011 M- Ml 


rods, sight snow; main roaOs, dear; 
stow levd, 2000 feet Gfenatea upper 
runs, some rum complete, new snow 
drifting (« (he ftne); metis runs, soma 
runs complete, new snow drifting (at the 
time}; lower slopes, some nee complete, 
new snow drifting (at the time): vert i c a l 
runs, 800 feet hi roads, right snow: main 
roads, sight snow; snow at an levels. 
Glencoe (weekends onfy): upper runs, 
runs complete, wtedcrast with Icy 
patches: tower slopes, runs con^rtOB but 
narrow irindcrust with Icy patches: vert- 
ed runs. 1400 feet; hi roods, dean main 
roads, dean snow feral. 1000 feet Lecht 
upper runs, some ruts cantiete. new 
snow cm a firm bese: mfcUe runs, runs 
complete, wide snow cover, new snow an 
8 Ann base: tower slopes, ample nursery 
anas, new snow on a Am base: vertical 
runs. 700 feet Wl roads, dean man 
roads, dear snow level. 2000 feet 
• (htfat mal ta n from the Scottish Meteo- 
I Office). 


FOR THE RECORD 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


ICE HOCKEY 


BASKETBALL 


SUING 


R 


UNITED STATES: National League 

Mam 20. OaMt S: GNcago 24. ~ 

Cmcainai 52. Nan York dee 21: 

47. San Dfago 17; Houston 16. Buffalo 7: 

ManapofisSa. Los Angeles Raiders 24; 
Kansas Cay 24. Pittsburgh 19: MmesotaSa, 
New Orleans 17; SI Lous 21. Tampa Bay 17; 
WuhkigtonZI. PMarMpMa T«- 


2?£ 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 


Eastern dviston 
New England Pats 

mr York J 


t(New 
Miami 1 


Jets 

ilns 


Indfana poll s Colts 
Central cBvtston 
tCtovatand Browns 
Cincinnati E 
Pittsburgh 
Houston Otters 
western Anion 
Broncos 
c Chiefs 
Seaftawfcs 
LA Raders 
San Diego Chargen 


W L 
10 5 
io e 

8 7 

4 12 

3 13 
W L 
12 4 
10 6 

6 10 

5 11 
W L 


4 12 


F A 
378 280 
364 388 

403 an 

287 348 
229 400 
F A 
301 310 
409 394 
307 338 
274 329 
F A 
378 327 
3SB326 
386 293 
323 348 
335 396 


NORTH AMERICA: Nation 

at Unite Buss s. ra — teto W Ftews * 
CHoqa Btacfchawte 7. DwokRad Wfrws 4; 
Harttad Wtefats 4, New Yort Rangers 3(01); 
Quebec Nonaques 4. WMpeg Jets 4. 

Wafes Conference 

Patrick DM** 

W L TPts F A 
PMadeipttiaR 25 7 2 52154 50 
New York fa 18 13 2 38129 116 
New Jersey Devi 16 15 2 34127145 
Pittsburgh Pen 1513 4 34121 112 
NewYoKRan 11 16 8 28128 138 
Washington Cap 11 17 6 28104 133 


W L TPts F A 
Hartford Whetera 17 S 5 39108 99 

Boston Bruns 1513 4 38117 107 

Montreal Can 1714 4 38122111 

OuebecNmd 1516 5 35126113 

Buffalo Sabres 722 4 18104 133 

CampbeB Conference 

MMfaOMaiBa 


NATIONAL CONFERB4CE 


fcjMwu avwon 
Yor* Grants 
Redskins 


St Louis Cmtinab 
Central efivotoo 
ICticago Bears 
MmesotaVkngs 
Detroit Lions 
Green Bay Packers 
Tampa Bay Bugs 

Ilf ula— 

wamvn anaoa 

tSan Fran 48ers 
TtlARams 
Atlanta Falcone 
New Orleans Saints 


W 
14 
12 4 
7 9 
5 10 

4 11 
W 
14 

9 7 

5 11 
4 12 
2 14 
W 
10 
10 

7 
7 


L D 
2 0 
0 
0 
1 
1 
L D 
2 0 
0 
0 
0 
0 
L 0 

5 1 

6 0 
8 1 
9 0 


F A 
371 236 
368 296 
346 337 
258 312 
218 351 
F A 
352 187 
388 Z73 
277 328 
254 418 
238 473 
F A 
374 347 
309 267 
280 280 
288 287 


* r- -- — >- 

Mffl)6dOta win 

StLousBbee 
Toronto Made 
Detroit RedWSngt 
Chicago Hawks 
SmfOteDMMioo 


W L TPts F A 
1415 3 31130128 
1215 6 30110125 
1315 4 30110116 
11 14 6 28 98 114 
1017 6 28120143 


E*non»nOters 
Calgary flames 
Mats 


• Dees not I ncl u d e taat faghrs gaom 

Wary New sramd . 

f Have won dMsSon chaapnsaWp. 
ft Haw non a ptay-off berth. 



W L TPts F A 
2211 2 46161 12S 
2013 1 41134124 
_ _ 1514 4 34113116 

Los Angeles Kings 14 17 3 31 144 148 
Vancouver Can 922 3 21 111 136 

HEWEN LEAGUE: Prwnlii itrivlntr 
Cleveland Bombers 5, Whttley warriors 
1 1; Fite flyers 8, Ayr Bruins 0; Murayteld 
Recere7, Durham Warns 6; Ngningftem 
Panthers a, Dundee Rockets 8; Ayr Kidns 
11. Cleveland Bombers 7; Dundee 
Rockets 4, Murayftoid Racers 10; 
Durham Wasps 7. FUe Flyers 8; Struatham 
Redskins 8. SotiU Barons S; Whitley 
WantaslQ, Nottingham Panthers 8. net 
(fvtskxr Blackpool SeaguBs 8, 
Southampton Vidros 15; inrtne Wings 4, 
Oxford C»y Stars 7?Sunderiand Chiefe 6, 
Peterborough Pirates 15: Boumemouh 
Stags & Blackpool Seaouas 8c Glasgow 
Eapes 12. Oxford Clysters 4: KhKcaldy 
Kestrels 6, P e ter boro u gh Pirates IS; 


194: Portland TraRttezem 128, Wash- 
ington BtAeti 101: Lee Angetes Lakan 103, 
HpuSpn Rockets 96; Gokfan Sens Warriors 
121, Seattle Supasonics 112. 


EASTER# CONFBBtCE 
ABaaBeDMskm I V L Pet OB 

Boston Celtics 16 9 .640 - 

Phuadetphia 76ers 14 11 .560 2% 

Washington Buflas 12 13 .480 4 

New Jersey Nets 5 19 208 10% 

New York fataks 5 21 .192 11K 

Central Dh&OB W L Pet G6 

Atlanta Hewks 19 6 760 - 

MftwiAee Becks 18 8 £92 1* 

Detroit Pistons 14 8 £38 3)4 

Chicago Butts 12 12 .500 6K 

Indiana Pacers 12 14 482 7K 

Cleveland Cavatters 11 13 A5a 7% 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Udamt UMae W L Pet G8 

Daflas Mavericks 17 8 .880 - 

Utah Jazz 16 8 £67 1 

Denver Nuggets 12 14 .482 SH 

Houston Rockets 9 15 375 7% 

Sacramento Kings 8 17 320 9 

San Antonio Spun 7 18 .280 10 

Pa&cDMskm W L Pet G8 

Lee Angetes Ukere 19 6 .760 - 

Portend Trafl Actors 17 11 .607 3K 

Golden State Warriors 16 11 sn 4K 

Seattle Supersedes 13 12 .520 s 

Phoenix Suns 12 14 AS2 7VS 

Los Angetes Clppers 4 20 .167 14% 


DAVOS : WORLD CUP CROSS-COUNTRY: 

bteStifa 1. Swadan. 1 hrGB n*ts S*jS aeca<E 

OeeSun d 8tk4&A mtns. T ErSceson 3tfc0tL5. T 
■^■t292&9.G9rarh2&38A2.mand 1 


Year of Maradona 

ends only for 
another to begin 

World football by Simon (/Hagan 


fmn h tiuwt Fn gfaiwt Students 
a pi iKt Japan at Oxford In 
October and Chris Oti, who 
scored four tries that day, was 
ffn> itiw rr hwtpftrary. Oti will be 
playing with Mm again in foe 
triaL 

He is also a goal-lacker, 
mn n wtrt He has (roly I 

recently become BristoTs lacker, 1 
those duties haringrested early | 
in foe season with Sanaa B 
but when Hog£fc Meting 
«im» erratic, three other players 
were ashed to practise, Webb 
among than, and be proved foe 
best of the bunch. 

That may be the result of 
Webb's involvement with A 
group at Brist ol University | 
which holds regular seminars on 
the psychology of sport. There is 
no doubting the p o si t i ve think- 
ing behind bis approach to foe 
game and no doubting his enjoy- 
ment of his current rise in foe 
rankings. 

He is also sufficiently mature 
to know how best to take 
advantage of ft — maybe that, 
derives from an involvement 
with medicine which tends to 
give a valuable perspective on 
life. 

Wood to 
coach 
students 

Ted Wood, whose same has 
been so long associated with 
rugby excellence at Durham 
University, is to coach foe 
Combined England Students 
side (David Hands writes). 

Wood, the domestic bursar at 
the College of St Hild and St 
Bede, has watched a variety of I 
his students — among them Pe- 
ter Warfield, Marcus Rose, 
Mark Bailey and Francis 
Oougfa — go on to play inter- 
national rugby. 

Wood handed over responsib- 
ility for Durham University to 
Peter Dixon this season, and 
now coaches Durham City. He 
succeeds John Robins, the for- 
mer British Lions coach, who 
prepared foe combined sde last 
season, the first in which a fiilly- 
representative student side took 
the field. 

Robins remains foe 
of selectors, having looked after 
the side which played foe Japa- 
nese in October. 

Carling ruled out 

London Welsh are resigned to 
the feet that Will Carling, the 
Durham University centre, can- 
not play for them during their 
de m a n di n g holiday sequence of I 
four matches in little over a 
week. Carling, whose fether 
played at prop for Cardiff was 
keen to make his London Welsh 
debut but is unavailable for the 
Boxing Day match at liangiH 
and the game at Swansea the 
following day. 


If 1986 was foe year Diego 
Maradona finally fulfilled all 
fris dazzling potential oa tw 
international scene, 1987 conM 
mark his greatest triumph at 

dnbleveL 

Maradona and Napoli wiD go 
into foe New Year two points 
dear at the lop of the Italian 
championship after their 2-1 wm 
over Como on Sunday, a result 
which extended foe dob’s un- 
beaten ran this season to 13 
paatehwi and again showed that 
they have foe ability to win their 
first Italian title. 

There is no doubt that the 
impetus Maradona deri ved fro m 
trading Argentina to victory in 
foe World Cop has played a 
huge part in Napoli’s success 
this season. Maradona himself 
most be con scio us of the feet 
that bib contract with Napoli 
runs only until June 1988 — the 
jockeying for his services from 
that fat* has already begun — 
and that they could well repre- 
sent his best chance of winning 
one of foe European dnb com- 
petitions next season. 

Como have been one of Italian 
football's unexpected success 
stories fhfc season but they were 
quite nrai h ie to contain a ram- 
pant Napofi In foe first half of 
their match in which two goals 
from Caffiurelli all but settled the 
outcome. Como pulled a goal 
jwplr six minpi^g from foe end. 

There were 21 goals scored in 
foe Italian league — an ava- 
lanche by normal standards. 
The day's top scorers were 
Sampdoria, whose 4-1 win over 
Javentns underlined the 
champions* erratic form. 


According «o Itaio ABodi, 
Napoli's general manager, tins 
was“tbe most beaatiftti match of 
foe championship”, highlighted 
by superb performances from 
Sampdoria's young forwards, 
Mancmi and ViaDi. There were 
two goals for Vfatili, Jar 
Mandni and another for 
Briegel, foe West German 
international. 

Jnweutus’s recent decline - 

they have slipped to fourth m foe 
table — has coincided with foe 
ri$e of Inter Milan, who stay . 
second after a comfortable 3-0 
win at home to AscolL Two 
points behind them are their . 
neighbours. AC Milan, who won 
2-1 at Roma, both goals coming 
from Virdis. This match was . 
something of a tactical show- 
down between two generations of 
Swedes — Nils Liedbolm. the ' 
64-yeaivold manager of Milan, 
and bis opposite number at ■ 
Roma, Sven Eriksson, aged 38. 

In Spain Barcelona remain a - 
point dear of Real Madrid after 
a 3-1 win over Real Mallorca 
■which included a typically 
opportunist goal from Gary 
Lineker. Real Madrid had the 
pleasure of a trip to foe Canar y 
Islands, where an own go al by 
Rodriquez gave them victory 
over Las Palmas. 

The French season started its 
two-month mid-season break 
with Olympiqne Marseilles and 
Bordeaux still the teams to m 
fwrrh- In matches that smacked v< 
of storing np for winter both 
drew O-O, at Laval and Toulon 
respectively. Marseilles lead 
Bordeaux on goal difference bnt 
there is a gap of four points to 
the third ctabw Monaco. 


OVERSEAS RESULTS 


ARGSITffE: Ferro Carr# Oeste 3, Boca 
Juniors 0: Velez SarstieU 2. Deporfvo 
itafianoO: Platnrae 1 . Radro (CortoDa) 1; 
E studiame s date Plata 3. fating Ctubfl; 
NeweTs Ota Boys 1 .' Tetares (Cordoba) 0; 
Rosario Central 2, Institute (Cortot*) 2: 
Independents 1, Gfmnasia Esgrma La 
Rata 0; River Plata 2, Argentines Junkxs 
1; Unton a Dqiortivo Espanoi 0; San 
Lorenzo do Abnagro 1. Twnpertey a 
Leading positions: 1. Newel's Old Eta 
played 24. 31 poWy.2.lndepe nd fanie.t- 
30; 3. San Lorenzo da Abnagro, 24. 28. 

BELGIAN: Ghent 0, AndertecM 3; 
Bercftem 1. Cercte Bruges 1; Serang 0. 
FC D6ge 1; KortnjX 0. Antwerp 3; 
Motenftee* 1. Waragam 1; CtmtaTOl a 
Mechelen 2; C)ub Bruges 2, Ratting Jet 2: 
BeerschotO. LokBronSTstandard Olga 1. 
Bevaren 2. Leading positions: 1. Ander- 
lecht, played 16. 27 points; 2, Ckib 
Bruges. IB. 24;3, FC MaSnes. 16, 24. 

FRENCH: Nantes 3, Rennes 1; Laval a 
MarsaBeO; AuxeneZTqtAouse IjBrest 

a Paris SaM-Garmato 0; RC Paris 1, 
ray ft Lite 3. La Havre 2: Inadhgi 
.Jobn: 1. Marseflle. played 23. 32 
points; 2. Bordeaux. 22. 57 3. Monaco, 
22.28. 

GREEK: Panatttin a fao s 1. ABC Athens 1; 
Verna 3. Larissa Of Apoflon 0. taanntna 2; 
Arts Salonika 0, Pareontos 0: EthnBcos 1. 
Daxs Drams 4; Otympte to s 4. Dtegoras tk 
on crate 3. Katamarfa 0; traktis T. PACK 


15. 


LEAGUE OP IRELAND! Atftione Town 1. 
Limerick City 2; Bray Wanderers 1. 
Bohemians 3: Cork Oty 1. Waterford 
United 2: Galway United 1. Dundalk 2: St 
Patricks Athletic 1. SSgo Rovers a 
ITALIAN: Atatanta 1 . Avelltoo 1 ; Brescia 1 . 
Verona 1; Empofi 0, Ucfinese 0; brier Maan 
3. Ascofl 0; Napofi 2. Como 1 ; Roma 1 . AC 
Mttan 2: Sampdoria 4, Juventus 1; Torino 
2. Ftarentna 1. 1 — wwHiBtw ■ 
Napoli, pfayad 13, 20potats: 2JnterMden. 
13. 18; STAC Mtei. 13. 18. 
PORTUGUESE ffMrt round curt 
Chaves 4. O elenen ses 2: Estarreja 1. FC 
Porto 4: Ottraira Barro 0. Bros 1: Bera 
Mar 0. Sporting Lisbon 1 (eat): Montljo a 
Partmonerae 1; Ursense 0. Faranse 0 
(aetL Benfica 4. Uniao Santarem <h 
Giimaraes 2. Joane 1; Morerrerae 0. 
Boavista 1; Cartaxo 2. Bnga 1: ftoAve 3, 
Caktas 1; Martttrao 0, Torratta 1. 
SPANISH: Attettoo Madrid 0, Santander i; 
Da roelo na 3. Matorca 1; Osasuna Pam- 
plona 3. Cadiz ft Real Soctadad 4, 
labadel 1: Beta SevBte ft Sevise ft 
Zaragoza 0. AtMattc Bflbao ft Las Pafcnss 

0. Rea) Madrid 1. Leading positions: 1. 
Barcelona, played 18, 27 points 2. Real 
Madrid. 1ft 25.-3, AtWatic Bilbao. 17. 22. 
TURKISH: Gafatasaray 4, Antalyaspor ft 
Dentzfispor 0. Besflctas % Samsunspor 0. 
Sariyer 1; PB n ertMh c e B. Rlzespor ft 
Genclerblrllgi 2. Kocaelispor 1 ; 
Diyarbakfrspor 0. Eskisehirspor 2: 
Bureaspor 2. Ankaregucu 2; Malnyaspor 

1. Allay ft Bokispor 7. Zonguldakspor 1. 
Leading positions: 1, Ga*3tas 
17. 26 points; 2. Besirtas. 

Samsunspor, 17, 24. 


Oiigwell’s chance 
to extend sequence 


Aktenham 

Afleyns 

Ardmgly 

Bolton 

BradHaU 

Brentwood 

Buy 

Charterhouse 

Chtgwoll 

Eton 

Forest 


By George Chesterttra 
The end of the autumn term 
brings the close of the football 
season for those schools which 
turn to other sports, Repton to 
hockey, Shrewsbury to rugby, 
and Eton and Winchester to 
their own individual brands of 
football. A few, like Chigwell 
and Westminster, stay mainly 
with football, and are joined by 
a group of Lent term football 
schools. Harrow, Haileybury, 
and Rugby are among these. 

Chigwell were the only team 
to retain an unbeaten record in 
schools matches, a record which 
now goes back three-and-a-half aSwnds 
years. Htghgate. with nine 
successive wins in the first half 
of term, were not quite able to 
match this, particularly after an 


J Lyon 
Kimboiun 
KE, Wrtley 
Lancing 
Malvern 


Stirawstuy 
QE. Guernsey 
QEGS, B’txjm 


Mocren2 
lS.02.0 (A 
3ftcm tfWrvesnteml 
28*54); 3. Swtaertata 159.1 &5 U Wm t 
3ft59. 7, J ArntneN 3057.*, G GuSSn 


injury to Ziad Nashnush. 

BradfieU did rather better 
than they had feared with a 
young side, eight of whom 
should return next year. 
Ardmgly only lost one match in 
the second half of term, the 
highlight of the season being 
their 2-0 victory over Lancing. 
Gcorgio Fagarazzi had 14 goals 
to his credit 

John Lyon School lost their 
way somewhat in mid-term but 
thanks to a solid defence have 
only lost four of their 19 
matches. Khnboltira had a some- 
what disappointing term and 
but for Simon Browne in goal 
they might well have fared 
worse. Charterhouse won half 
theft matches which with C D 
Jenkins theft only colour return- 
ing, was rather better than 
expected. MtUfield have not 
enjoyed as good a season as 
usual, but the success of tbcir 
under-I6 XI bodes well 
The following table gives an 
autumn term record of inter- 
school matches played by in- 
dependent schools: 


p 

W 

L 

D 

F 

A 

12 

5 

4 

3 

23 

17 

14 

12 

2 

0 

47 

15 

IB 

8 

6 

2 

34 

23 

16 

9 

1 

6 

43 

18, 

13 

5 

7 

1 

22 

31 

12 

3 

7 

2 

16 

19 

13 

5 

4 

4 

25 

22 

14 

7 

4 

3 

25 

20 

8 

5 

0 

3 

24 

7 

15 

TO 

1 

4 

39 

IS 

17 

5 

9 

3 

21 

30 

16 

6 

5 

5 

35 

30 

15 

9 

3 

3 

33 

21 

12 

6 

4 

2 

22 

21 

19 

14 

4 

1 

54 

20 

15 

3 

6 

2 

10 

24 

15 

11 

2 

2 

57 

14. 

15 

8 

4 

3 

37 

26 

13 

7 

5 

1 

39 

24 

17 

9 

5 

3 

35 

20 

17 

3 

13 

1 

20 

62 

14 

6 

4 

4 

38 

20 

7 

6 

1 

0 

34 

0 

14 

e 

3 

4 

49 

25 

11 

4 

2 

5 

19 

17 

15 

2 

8 

5 

21 

28 

11 

1 

8 

2 

12 

35 

22 

16 

3 

3 

76 

32 


Winchester 

WhamptonGS 


FA Trophy draw 

Altrincham, holders of foe FA 
Trophy, could face an awkward 
tie after the second-round draw 
ailoted them a trip to the 
winners of the Maidstone versus 
Weaklstone replay, which takes 
place on Sunday. Runcorn, last 
season's runners-up, also have a 
difficult assignment at Yeovil, 
while Scarborough, the GM 
Vauxhall conference leaders are 
at home to Sutton. All matches 
are to b e played on January 24. 

SECOND ROUND DRAW: Brotnsgrove 
Rovers v Ffireham Town; I 


Bath Crty; Banw v Hrtcrim Town or 

Boreham wood; Nuneaton Boro v Gates* 

heath Ktodsnrenster Harriers or Mosstoy 
v Worthing: Wycombe Wanderers or 
Lrathertiead v Aylesbury Utft Barrow or 
yywtfa* Bay v Gatasbcrough Trinity or 
Soutnbank: Dagenham v Marine; 
W e eta at one or Maidstone utd r Ah 
tnneham: Scarbo rough v Sutton Utd; 
Corby Town or Ashford Town v Wi ~ 
Utd; Newcastle Blue Star v Merthyr 1 
or Dortford; Yaovfl V Runcorn; Camh 
City v Boston UW: Bishops Storttord v 1 
Chetanham Town; Bwten Albion v Bark- 
ing or Weymouth 


2932.7. A GroeoenfeJcter Z75S.7): 4, Norway 
1^8.187 (A Monsan 3047.7. T4f Hone i 
3M&5.V l&ang 819.1. M Hole 29*8.4); 5. 
West Gvmany, 2MS1ZZ ft Stmtot Union, 
2C0JBA 7. East Garnany, 2«.19.0; ft ttoh. 
201.184; 9. Czadtai toakia. aiB.18 A 10, 1 
Yugoshnte. a0«»A 


POOLS FORECAST by Paul Newman 


Setunfay December 27 


ut Germany, 

2ft 7. (Ota West Germany and Italy, 18; 9, 
CzactiOMMfcb. 15: 1ft Canada. 11 


SQUASH RACKETS 


NEWCASTLE UPON TYN& 
arogttGMrt^gro sewrat bt 


HANDBALL 


BWT1SH LEAGUE: t dewater 78 19. Greet | 
Dane 21. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 

7^0 urtttt stated 

. FOOTBALL 

FOOTBALL COtBINATlOie Crystal Pal* 
Than fat Tooting and Mitt 


FIRST DIVISION 

1 Arsenal vSoton 
X Chelsea v Aston VBa 
X Coventry v Tottenham 
1 Man U v Norwich 
1 Oxford vQPR 
X Shaft Wv Liverpool 
x Wattort v Newcastle 
1 West Ham v WHr*tedofi 
Net on coopent: Chariton 
Manchester City (Sun- 
day); Everton v Leicester 
(Sunday Nottingham For- 
est vliiton (Sunday) 


SECOND DfVISfON 


v Reacting 

v Barnsley 
“" J v Bradford 


FOOTBALL 


oca v Tottenham (at 
' ‘ v Arsenal 

; Lofts Road, 


FB BCHT RDVp t 7BOPHT: Ftachdafa » Yortt 
CHy postponed. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE Hrst tevtafari: Post- 
poned: MxfdBGbrou^i v Coventry. Saeood 
dhtatar Wigan v Preston. 

FA TROPHY: ftn round replay: Postponed: 
MahfatonevWatidatonB. 

YOUTH CUP: Sacaed reond netey: 
Chalsaa 6. CBfdff 0. 

FOOTBALL CQMBMATlOte SMndon v QPR 
postpone d. 


MBchem 
Swindon v 


CUft M nnd reptoy: Chelten- 
ham v Slough: Second ronct Buxton v 
Northwlch. 

SOUTH5UI LEAGUE: Mtttand dMatoic 
Leamington v Banbury. 

FA TROPHY: FM round: Hfeffin v 
Boreham Wood; flrat round mpfayc 
Ashford v Corby. Danfort v Merthyr; 
Leatherhead v Wycombe: Southbarrit .v 
Gattabowj M h: wntfey Bay v B»row. 
BHWS AND BUCKS SENfen CUft Ural 
rand: Windsor and Bon v Wantage 


II 

11. 

X H U— ■ H.B 
IWRv Blackburn 
Ijpswidi vCPateoe 
1 0Wwni v Leeds 
IStrtsv Sheffield U 
X Surdariand v Grimsby 
1 WBA v Plymouth 
■ ’ - Bir- 


TMRDDtVISKM 

1 Boumerwh v Fidham 
X BrtstoJ C v WatsaS 

2 Buy v ftotfs Co 
ICartlstev Rotherham 

X Darlmgton v ChestertW 
1 Doncaster v Bolton 
1 GfillnghteTi v Swindon 

1 Newport v Port Vale 

2 Yort v Wigan 

Not on coupons: Brerrt- 
fprtv Bristol R overs |Suo- 
(toy); Chester v Blackpool; 
Mansfield v Middies* 
brauEpt 


fourth division 

X Aidefshot v Coictnster 
1 Butnfay v Crewe 
IHtftavflochdSte 
1 Preston v Hartlepool 

1 Scunthorpe v Lrttoin 

2 SM«nrt v Peterboro 
iSwenaeav Hereford 

1 Torquay vQrtant 
XWohs$vBiater 

Nat an 
bridge 


mouth v Shrewsbury 
(Monday December 29) 


— — Cam- 
v Southend 


gu^Nortampfon v 


CM- 


TRraJE CHANCE (home < 
sea. Coventry, Sheffield neonesriay 
Waford, Sunderland. Bristol City. Dartini 

toft Wolves, Rangers, Airdrie, Clyde, Aw: 

BEST DRAWS Coventry, Smtertana. 
□arflngni. Waives, Rangers. 

A WAts Notts County. Wigan, Celtic. 
QunfeoTHine, Ados. 


MULTIPART LEAGUE 

1 MaccfosSeld v Flhyt 
1 JtatsfcwvGNrsboro 
20swesfryvClKBtey 
XS Liverpool v Mattock 
2W o r Wng toiivHyde 
1 Worksop v Wilton 

SCOTTISH PRaiBt 

1 Aberdeen v HamOton 

2 Clydebank v Cattle 
1 Dundee vHtoeman 
1 Hearn v Fafloric 

1 Mottwwell v St Mirren 
X Rangers v Dundee U 

SCOmSH-BRST 

X Airdrie v Dumbarton 
X Cfytfe v East Fife 
1 Fonarv KKmamocfc 

1 Montrose v Partck 

2 Morton v Ounformfate 

IQ of Sthv Brechin 

SCOTTISH SECOND 

X AyrvStJottestone 
IBttwickv Queen's Pk 
2 § String v Alloa 

1 RarthvAtoton 

2 Stenhsmr v CowdtoWh 
wri on coupons: Sorting v 
M«towbanls; Stranraer v 
Arbroath 


"OME& Araenal. west Ham. Da 
^ Hssrts.Ques 

Homes: Areenal. Newf 
Atarteen. Am 
r^J^JOjtejBrmline. Draws: C 

amry. SaMBrtand. DaSgton. 


0 






THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


27 


TELEVISION AND RADIO 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


Salvo of Christmas rockets from Santa Alf 


Z '5**^ 


’ 4'!!2t Hh?Jl 

S £ *3?$ 

h*fe 

r .“ ? ‘" ,0 * 
:;.; a , r-sSt 

;.v 

"» "V^rE! 

“r.- 1 and 


• Alf Garnett Ians get an un- 
expected bonus tonight in the 
shape of a special Christmas 
edition of In Sickness «»»H in 
Health (BBCl, 9.30pm). I should 
warn you that it is so characteris- 
tically pro-Garnett that it cannot 
avoid being anti-Christmas. It is 
not recommended, therefore, to 
any viewer who cannot admit the 
possibility that, at a time of the 
year when shop tills ring more 
clamorously than church bells, the 
patron saint of the season of good 
is St Michael and not St Nicholas. 
It was a stroke of genius on the 
part of Alf Garnett's creator, 
Johnny Speight, to chose a Santa 
Claus grotto in a department store 
as the launching pad from which 
his anguished creation can launch 
his missiles at a mad, mad, world 
of gift grabbers. Never before, 
surely, can that familiar red robe, 
and those benign, white whiskers 


have concealed such a concentra- 
tion of malevolence. 

• If the sourness of In Sickness 
and in Health is not the flavour 
you prefer in Christmas week, let 
me remind you of some of the 
more palatable dishes on offer 
today. There is the repeated 
second instalment of John 
Masefield's The Box of De tights 
(BBCl , 5.00pm), superbly adapted 
for television, and marred only by 
some inelegant animated se- 
quences. There is Korda's version 
of The Jungle Book (BBCl, 
2.05pm)Jnfinitely better than 
Disney's, and much more respect- 
ful of Kipling. And, from much 
further back in the movie past, 
there is the grandfather of all 
phantom thrillers, the Lon Chaney 
version of The Phantom of the 
Opera (BBC2, lZ50pm). As for 
Duvivier's The Great Waltz 


BBCl 


-r , ■ C; r ^b* 




==«W| 


- ‘ :i-] 






*• O 


6.00 Ceefax AM. 

6.30 News headlines followed by 
The FHntstones. Cartoon 
series, (r) 635 Weather. 

730 Breakfast Time with Frank 
Bough and Jeremy Paxman. 
National and international 
news at 7.00, 730, 8.00 and 
8 JO; regional news and travel 
at 7.15, 7.45 and 8.15; weather 
at 735, 735 and B35. 

8.40 Watchdog. Lynn Faulds Wood 
and John Stapleton investigate 
consumer complaints 835 
Regional news and weather. 

9.00 News and weather 935 
Paddington, (r) 9.10 Play 
Chess. Improve your game, 
with BiH Hartston SL20 A 
Charlie Brown Christinas, (r) 
9.45 London Snow. Part one of 
the Paul Theroux story, read 

S t Elizabeth Spriggs. 

ews and weather 1035 
Neighbours, (r) 1035 
Children’s BBC. Paul Schofield 
with children's programmes 
details, and birthday areetir 
1030 Play School- if 
the Wisp, (r) 

1035 Five to Eleven. Joanna Lumley 
with a thought for the day 
1130 News and weather 1135 
The Dukes of Hazzard. Bo and 
Duke come to aid of Boss 
Hogg who is threatened by the 
machinations of his 
treacherous nephew. 

1135 Junior Kick Start The second 
heat of the motorcycle trials 
competition for the young. 
1230 A Song tor Christmas. 
The semifinal of the 1 986 
Christmas Carol 
competition.1235 Regional 
news and weather. 

130 One O'clock News with 
Martyn Lewis. Weather 1-25 
Neighbours. Paul longs for a 
life of adventure 130 Pigeon 
Street (r) 

235 FHm: The Jungle Book (1942) 
starring Sahu and Joseph 
Calleia. Zoitan Korda's version 
ofthe.Kipitag story about the 
Indian boy reared by wolves. 
330 Jimbo and the Jet Set 4.00 
Panto-timel Aladdin, written 
by and starring Brian Cant 4.10 


Yogi Bear's AO-Star Comedy 
Christmas Caper 435 Orange 
HH.(r) (Ceefax) 

530 The Box at DoBghts. Part two 

of the three-episode 
dramatization of John 
Masefield's story, (r) (Ceefax) 
630 Six O'clock News with 

Nicholas WitcheU and Andrew 
Harvey. Weather. 

6.35 London Plus. 

7.00 Teify Addicts. This year's 
champions, the Reynish family 
from Swansea, tackle a team 


of professfonafs comprising 
Myskow. Barry Took, 
Gra 


kow. Barry T< 
iyson, ana Michael 


NiriaM 
Larry G 
Grade. 

730 EastEndere. Charlie Cotton 
tries to off-load Den's dodgy 
watches in the market. 


8.00 A Question of Spot presented 

S t David Coleman. Emfyn 
ughes and BW Beaumont are 
Joined by Las Dawson, Leo 
Saver, Leslie Grantham, and 
Su Pollard. (Ceefax) 

8.30 Kenny’s Christmas Cracker. 
Zany sketches from Kenny 
Everett and music from 
Spandau Ballet 

930 Nine COocfc News with Jufia 
Somervffle and Andrew 
Harvey. Regional news and 
weather. 

9-30 In Sickness and kiHoaHh. AH, 
after shattering a taw 
youngsters fusions while 
standing in as Father 
Christmas at a local store, 
insults Ns neighbour and Ms 
daughter, (see Choice) 

1030 FHm: North by Northwest 

(1959) starring Cary Grant, Eve 
Marie Saint, and James 
Mason. A thriller in which 
Grant plays Thornhill, an 
advertising executive who is 
mistakenly kidnapped by a 
mysterious espionage 
organisation. Failing to 
oonvince the men or Na 
identity Thornhill narrowly 
escapes death before setting 
off to find the one man who 
can prove his story. Directed 
by Alfred Hitchcock. 

-12.15 weather.. 


(Channel 4, 230pm), I still find it 
irresistibly charming, although it 
takes unpardonable liberties with 
the lift of Johann Strauss. 
Hitchcock's North by Northwest 
(BBCl, 10,00pm) has two of the 
best set pieces he ever filmed — the 
ordeal by crop sprayer, and the 
cliff-hanging tussle on Mount 
Rushmore. Joseph L 
Mankiewicz’s Guys and Dolls 
(Channel 4, 8.30pm) has some 
great songs, but it lacked the sure 
touch of a Minnelli and is not, 
therefore, a memorable Holly- 
wood musical. 

• Other television highlights to- 
night: the final instalment of All 
Passion Spent (BBC2, 9.40pm) 
which I believe is unfolding too 
sedately for some people's taste, 
but pleases me immensely; and 
the final of The Krypton Factor 
(ITV, 7.00pm), a knock-out com- 


BBC 2 


930 Caefox. 

12.25 Gharbar. 

1230 FBnc The Phantom of the 
Opera* (1925) starring Lon 
Chaney as the mad, disfigured 
musician wtio lures a beautiful 
young singer to Ms 
subterranean lair. Directed by 
Rupert Julian. 

235 The Adventures of AfantL The 
comic story of the Chinese fofc 
hero, Atanti, set in the western 


petition which, as I have said 
before, has me on the ropes as 
much as the competitors. 

• Music highlights on radio: Ju- 
lian Sudden's comparison of 
many singers' performances of 
Verdi’s Otello in Interpretations 
on Record (Radio 3, 5.00pm), and 
the BBC Scottish SO playing 
Stravinsky’s The Firebird (Radio 
3, 1.20pm). Without any question, 
the day's spoken word highlight is 
Anthony Minghella's Two Planks 
and a Passion (Radio 3, 730pm) 
which is a spectacular account of 
bootlicking in a I4th century York 
in the grip of Corpus Christi 
pageant fever. Its language swings 
giddily between the outrageously 
vulgar and the quari-Shakespear- 
ean historical. Its cast is a 
director’s dream. 

Peter Davalle 



Krypton Factor finalists: Kenneth Tait, John Miers, David Kemp, Peter Gardiner. In cefltre: Virginia 
Leog, 1985 celebrity special winner (ITv, 7.00pm) 


ITV/LONDON 


330 Twist the Cat’s Whisker. Tom 
O'Connor celebrates 64 BBC 
years in the company of, 
amongst others, Alan 
Freeman, Stuart Hall, Harry 
Worth, and Godfrey TalboL 
(first shown on BBC North 
West) 

330 News, regional news and 
weather. 

430 FHm: VeOow Canary* (1943) 
starring Anna Neagle, Richard 
Greene, and Margaret 
Rutherford. Second World War 
spy thrfller abort Sally 
Maitland, sent to Canada 
because of her Nazi 
sympathies, who, on the boat 
over, 


Erwfishmanandal 
refugee.! 


fugee. Directed by Herbert 
Wilcox 

5-35 Greg Norman’s Golfing Year. 
Peter AiSss recaffs the 
Australian's year - a great 
success despite losing three of 
the four major titles when 
having held the lead in each of 
them. 

635 Fite That Touch of Mink 





Marion Brando, Jean Simmons, Frank Sinatra, Vivian Blaine: 
Guys and Dolls (Channel 4, 830pm) 


young thing 
falls for a millionaire after his 
chauffeur-driven limousine 
sprays her with mud. Directed 
by Delbert Mann. 

830 Henag-TheHenfngGuti. 

The story of the first five 
years of a herring gull, bom on 
the island of Steep Holm in the 
Bristol Channel. 

9.00 Moonfighting.Maddi8and 
David are on a case invloving a 
- Mary, a~ Joseph, and three men 
named King when the 
receptionist, Ms Dispesto, 
arrives holding a babe In her 
amts. 

9.40 AH Passion Spent The third 
and final part of the 
dramatization of Vita Sackvffle- 
Wasfs story, and Lady Slane 
is enjoying herself with her 
new-found friends after years 
of dutiful obedience to her late 
statesman husband. But 
Fitzgeorge, the mflUonaire art 
collector, has a problem for her 
that only she can solve. 
(Ceefax) 

1035 Pavarotti’s Jubilee. Highlights 
of a concert recorded at 
Madison Square Garden, New 
York, celebrating Luciano 
Pavarotti's 25 years as a 
professional singer. With 
Madetyn Reynee (soprano) 
and the American Symphony 
Orchestra conducted by 
Emerson Buddey. 

1230 Weather. 


6.15 TV-am: Good Morning Britain 
presented by Anne Diamond 
and Mike Morris. News with 
Gordon Honeycombs at 730, 

730, 8.00, 830 and 930; 
financial news at 835; sport at 
640 and 743; exercises at 
635; cartoon at 735; pop 
music at 735; and Jeni 
Barnett's postbag at 835. At 
930 Timmy Mallet Introduces 
Wacaday. 

935 Thames news headlines 

followed by FBnc The Magic of 
Dr Snuggles (1 984) An 
animated film about a kindly 
old inventor who lives with a 
badger, a mouse and a bird. 
10.40 The Electric 
Grandmother. Tom, Timothy 
and Agatha are depressed 
after the death of their mother. 
Their tatiiar tries his best to - 
make them happy but it is not 
unfit they find an advert 
offering a 30-day trial of an 
'electric grandmother' that they 
begin to perk up. 

iMoi 


1135 Return of the Monster Trucks. 
A car-crusMrw.i dreg rating 

pectacuiar. 1230 Nymphs and 
Shepherds. The 19/5 reunion 
of the Manchester 
schoolchildren's choir that 
recorded the classic version of 
Purcell's Nymphs and 
Shepherds in 1929. (r) 1230 
The SuBvans. Drama serial 
about an Australian family 
during the Forties. 

130 News at One 130 Thames 
news. 

130 FHm: Raisa the TKaitie (1980) 
starring Jason Robards, 
Richard Jordan, and Alec 
Guinness. Adventure yam 
about the race between 
various super powers to locate 
the wrack of the Titanic in 
order to salvage a supposed 
cargo of byzanium. the vital 
ingredient for the ultimte 
nuclear deterrent Directed by 
Jerry Jameson. (Oracle) 335 
Bugs Bunny 340 Thames 
news heaeffines 345 The • 
Young Doctors. Medical drama 
serial set ki a large Australian 
city hospital 


ting. 

Christmas Gala from 
Richmond Ice Rink, introduced 
by Nick Owen, with 
commentary by Simon Reed. 

5.15 Blockbusters. Genera! 
knowledge quiz game for 
teenagers, presented by Bob 
Holness. 

5.45 News 630 Thames news. 

635 Cros sr oads. 

7.00 The Krypton Factor. The final 
of the tenth competition. 
Kenneth Tait from Aberdeen, 
John Miers from Culross. 

David Kemp from Whitstable, 
and Peter Gardner from 
B lax ham, compete in tests of 
mental agility, observation, 
intelligence, general 
knowledge, physical ability, 
and response. Presented by 
Gordon Bum. (Oracle) 

730 Christmas with George and 
Mildred. Mildred lands the part 
of an Ugly Sister in the 
Hampton Wick Players' version 
of Cinderella, a role desorbed 
by George as typecasting. 
Starring Yootha Joyce and 
Brian Murphy. ( ' 


830 Des O'Connor Tonight Among 
the guests are Tom Jones, 
Shirley Bassey, and Freddie 
Starr. 

930 FHm: Firefox (1982) starring 
Ctirrt Eastwood. ThrMer about 
an ex- Vietnam War air ace who 
is brought out of retirement in 
order to steal a super-plane 
developed by the Russians. It 
is capable of flying at six times 
the speed of sound, is 
undetectable by radar, and 
capable of canyfngnuctear 
arms. Directed by Cfmt 
Eastwood, (continues after the 
news) 

1030 News followed byb Thames 
news headlines. 

10.15 F3m: Firefox continued. 

1130 Joy to the World. A celebration 
of Christmas music with young 
chorister David Pickering. 

With, amongst others students 
. oi the Royal Northern Cofiege 
of Music, (i ' 

1240 Christmas 



Des O’Connor, Shir 
Christmas edition of 


'•v-\ dpi* 






-c mI 



ton * Snn. Ltd, makre of HijManJ CwmTfaJ-rt 60 and oftcr th. Scold. Wtakto 


F (merflum wave). Stereo on 
IF (see below) 

tin haft-hot 
rrtil 830pm 
(midnight. 
drianJohn 


f-hourfrom 

then at 1030 


( Radiol 

MF( 

VHF (see below) 

News on the haft- 
630am unfill 
and 1230 m* 

530am Adrian John 730 MOke 
Smith's Breakfast Show, (search 
for Santa in Lapland) 930 
Simon Bates 1230 Newsbeat (Ian 
Parkinson) 12.45 Gory Davies 
(Top 40 tingles) 330 Dave Lm 
T ravis 530Newsbeat (Ian 
Paridnson) 535 Bruno Brookes 

(kid Top 40 singles) 730 Janice 
Long 1030-1230 John PeefFetive 
50 WF Stereo Redos 1 &Sh- 
430am As Radio 2 1030pm As 
Radio 1 1230-430am As Rado 
2 . 


Tones in a special 
i O’Connor Tonight (ITV, 8.00pm) 

Radio 3 


CHANNEL 4 


230 Film: Hie Great Waltz* (1838) 
starring Fernand GreveL A 
romanuzed biography of Johan 
Strauss, set in the ballrooms 
and beer gardens of Vienna. 
With Luise Rainer as Ms 
neglected wife and Mffiza 
Korjus as the bewitching 
soprano, Carla Donner, with 
whom ha fails in love. Directed 
by Julian Duvivier. 

435 Funs It's a Wonderful World* 
(1939) starring James Stewart 
and Claudette Colbert A 
comedy thriller about Guy 
Johnson, a young private 
detective hired to look after a 
playboy maBonaire. After 
Johnson finds his charge 
standing over a dead woman 
with a smoking gun in his hand 
Johnson is framed for the 
murder, but with the heJp of 
Edwina Corday he goes in 
search of the real kffler. 
Directed by W.S.Van Dyke II. 

630 Cathedral Praise from 

Gloucester CathedraL A multi- 
cultural mixture of traditional 
and Afro-Caribbean music, 
reflecting the community of 
Gloucester. With the choirs of 
the Gospel Churches of 
Gloucester, the London All- 
Stars Steel Band, and Ashanti 
drummers. 

630 Journey into HMmry. Made in 
1 952, this travels back in 
time to the 

GainsboroughT Robert 
and Captain Cook, showing 
outstandng examples of their 
work from Syon House to 
Greenwich. 

7.00 Channel 4 News with Peter 
Sissons and Christabel King 
indudes a profile of Benizir 
Bhutto - is she still a pofitical 
force in Pakistan? Weather. 

830 BrooksUe. Damon tries to 
dissuade Gail from gong to the 
Grants party by tatting her it is 
toroid fogey f amity only, but 
she turns up, uninvited, til the 
same. Meanwhile, Rod 
becomes something of a focal 
hero when he captures a 
teenage burglar 

830 ram: Guys and Dolls (1955) 
starring Marlon Brando, Jean 
Simmons, Frank Sinatra, and 
Vivian Blaine. Lively musical, 
based on the Damon Runyon 
stories, about a flash New 
York gambler who, looking for 
cash to finance new 
headquarters for his 
celebrated dice game, bets 
that he can persuade a lady 
Salvation Army sergeant to 
holiday with him in Havana. 
Directed by JosephL 
Mankiewicz. 

11.15 Comedians Do ItOn Stage. 
Highlights from an evening of 
laughter and music ki aid of Dr 
Rob Buckman's Oncology 


saunders, Neil times, Michael 
Palki, Victoria Wood, Smith 
and Jones, Richard f 
Rory McGrath, and the 1 
Cottage Swing Band. 


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Chori8tsra/TrottBr,org8n/and 
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In B minor Barthold Ktijken, 
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Ph Hha nnonla Orches t ra. 930 
Nows 

935 This Week's Composer: 

CPE Bach. Harpsichord 
Concerto In D,Wq 43 No 2 
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minor, Wq 57 No 6 (SgrizzL 
foriepiano), Duo In E 
minor. Wq 140 (Martin-Unde, 
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183 No 2 (ECO) 


oon a rococo theme), 
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2.15 Gidtar encores: David 
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and Morel 

245 Strings Past and Future: 
Young violinists at the 
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cdBo bv Cassado. and 
BBC SO wtth Yfrah Naaman 

play Roberto Gerhard's 
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630 Mozart Hagen Strtag 
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630 The Royal Recorder 

insort Cafliope under 


r dances and 
from the 


1O00 


and the New York PO 
under Bernstein perform the 
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hrtstmas Muskx S 


1040 Christmas Music: 
Singers and 


k^vee 


BC 

Includes 

works byl 
carols, induding ' 
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1130 Romantic Clarinet Muskx 
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and piano) pertorm 
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12.15 ConcertBBC Scottish 
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Mussorgsky (Night on the 
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Concerto). 130 News 
136 Musical TimBS Past Fritz 

Sptagl on late Victorian 
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1 JO Concert fcoottasd). 
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Cor 

Pickett play) 
fantasias fro 
' English Court, from Henry 
Vito James t 

730 Rodents BBC WBIsh SO 
(under Louis Fremaux) 
play the Sinfontatta 
730 Two Planks and a 

Passion: play by Anthony 
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background of the l 392 
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930 John Stanley: Concerto 
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S BSton. organ), and 
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10 No4 (London Baroque, 
with - John ToS, 
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10-00 Currents from a Northern 
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Steen Pade (Quartet No 1), 
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10.50 Other People's Lives: 
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Op 53 

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1046 Wives of me Great 
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Anthony ~ 
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u. 1 


\ ; : 


, -4, 


TUESDAY DECEMBER 23 1986 


THE 


TIMES 


SPORT 



Honeyghan 

sacrifices 


his crown for 


apartheid 


Lloyd Honeyghan yesterday 
sacrificed a third of his un- 
disputed world welterweight 
title to the light against apart- 
heid. The 26-year-old Jamai- 
can-born Londoner handed in 
the WBA crown rather than 
obey an instruction to meet 
their No. 1 contender, the 
white South African, Harold 
Volbrecht. 

Honeyghan will now con- 
centrate on the WBC and IBF 
titles which he defends against 
the American, Johnny 
Bumpbus, at Wembley Grand 
Hall on Sunday, February 
22.He declared :“I would not 
fight Volbrecht for a million 
pounds — either here or in 
South Africa. How could I 
look myself in the mirror each 
morning or face my own 
people on the streets if I 
agreed? 

“They would think I wasn't 
concerned med with what was 
going on in South Africa-even 
if he denounced apartheid I 
don’t think I could box him. I 
feel so strongly about it.” 

Honehghan's manager, 
Mickey Duff, argued un- 
successfully with the WBA, 
claiming they did not have a 
No 1 contender because 
Volbrecht was meeting Ameri- 
can Mark Breland in a final 
efiminator.Duff said 
very regrettable, but I believe 
most people will still regard 
Lloyd as the undisputed 
champion. He proved that by 
beating Don Curry." 


Honeyghan, who stopped 
Curry in Atlantic City three 
months ago, will earn 
£140,000 for fighting 
Bumphus, who has won 29 or 
his 30 contests.The fight is 
being staged at Wembley's 
3,000 sealer Grand Hall — 
formerly the Conference 
Centre — because the nearby 
arena is unavailable. 


Honeyghan has run into the 
complications which invari- 
ably face the man who holds 
all three titles. The WBC, who 
are firmly anti-apartheid, 
have already stated that if any 
of their champions defends 
against a South African, or the i 
winner of an eliminator : 
involving a South African, ] 
they will consider taking away 

his title. 

They also have a policy of 
banning for life any of their 
champions who work in South 
Africa. But Honeyghan has 
made up his own mind for his 
own reasons. “To me it would 
be like supporting the things 
that have happened out 
there”, he said. 

As well as the WBA title, he 
has also given up Christmas. 
He leaves for America today 
to train in -Palm Springs until 
12 days before the fight, at a 
cost of about £25,000 out of 
his £180,000 purse for the 
Wembley contest The fight is 
over 15 rounds because it 
comes under the jurisdiction 
of the IBF. 

“I have asked my manager 
to get me away as quickly as 
possible, so I'm off 
tomorrow." he said 
yesterday. “I’ve seen all my 
kids and given them their 
Christmas presents”, he said. 
One of Honeyghan's claims to 
feme is that he has four 
children from three mothers. 

His decision to give up the 
WBA crown was applauded by 
the London-based, anti-apart- 
heid group SANROG Exec- 
utive chairman Sam 
Ramsamy said: “It is a 
tremendous sacrifice he is 
making — but one which win 
pay diviends. 

“We shall apply pressure 
within boxing to try to ensure 
that he is eventually restored 
to his rightful place as WBA 
champion” 



Spectre of Botham 
haunts the ghost 

of Christmas books 


At Sixes and Severn 

The autobiography of Pete 

Swarbrick , cricketer 
(Brilliant title. Ed.) 

Acknowledgements: My 
mum, an influential school- 
teacher, the dub coach, the 
woman who makes the lunch 


at Loamsbire County Cricket 
rinh Also to Fred Smith, an 


That's my boy: Dadd Pleat, Tottenham's manager, eyes his new signing, Steve Hodge, with a satisfied smile “chapter 

Foley faces vill a intend keeping a tight 3® 


Gob. Also to Fred Smith, an 

obscure journalist. He actually 

wrote this book, as a matter of 

fa d 

Chapter One: Great 
Days 

I buckled my pads on 
securely. “Good luck, mate, 
said “Both” - good old Ian 
Botham, that is. “England is 
waiting for you to do you r 
bit,” he quipped. At that great 
moment I could not help 
looking bade zo the days when 
I was a snotty little scbooUtid. 
Who would have thought that 
a very ordinary boy from 
Streatham, turning up for 
cricket practice in his dead 
dad's old jockstrap and 
patched flannels would one 
day play for his country? 

(Any more about Botham? 
Ed.) 

Chapter Two: In The 


Chapter Eight: Now 
What? 

(How do we fill up the rest 
of the book? FS) (Ask him 
what he thinks of famous 
cricketers. Like Botham. Ed.) 

David Gower Good player 
but a bit laid back. 

Mike Gatting: Good player 
but a bit fat. Took him a long 
time to establish himself, 
didn't it? 

Bob Willis: Tall man. Talks 
slowly. 

Malcolm Marshall: There is 
not an ounce of malice in the 
man. A delightful person, a 
genius, a charmer, a gentle- 
man. No one in cricket has a 
bad word for him. He is one of 
the old school. An absolute 
sweetie-pie. 

Geoff Boycott: A perfec- 
tionist. Comes from York- 
shire. 

Ian Botham: The game 
needs characters like “Both”. 1 
don't begrudge him a penny of 
his vast fortune. Bastard. 

(Brilliant, illuminating 
chapter. Ed). 


charge of 
disrepute 


hold on purse strings 


Theo Foley, the assistant 
manager of Arsenal, has been 
charged by the Football 
Association of bringing the 
game into disrepute. The 
accusation follows an incident 
during Arsenal's 1-1 draw at 
Norwich on December 13 


Aston Villa will not be 
embarking on a Christmas 
spending spree following the 
£650,000 cash injection re- 
ceived from the sale of Steve 
Hodge to Tottenham Hotspur. 

Although still anchored in 


By Chris Moore 

said. “I did make one inquiry 
last weekend when I knew the 
Hodge deal was on the cards. 
But nothing materialized.” 

A forward with a proven 
goal-scoring record is top of 
his wanted list although he 


when Foley is afleged to have division, Doug Ellis, Aston 
made remarks to a l inesman . Villa’s chairman, made it clear 
The irishman, who was 


the bottom three of the first conceded: “They don't come 
division, Doug Ellis, Aston cheaply and it may even mean 
Villa's chairman, made it clear I will have to sell again first.” 


last night he still intends 


rS n 27 1y ™ an ?S er ?f retaining a tight bold on the 
Charlton and Mill wall could purse strings. 

face a_Iaige fine if found guilty -in the last 15 months we 


of a breach of the FA rules 
covering disrepute and insult- 
ing or improper behaviour. 

Foley now has 14 days to 
inform the FA whether he 
wants a personal - hearing. 
Punishment for the charges 
are unlimited. 


purse strings. 

“In the Last 15 months we 
have laid out £2.6 million on 
new players and have re- 
couped only £1-4 million. 
That has to be taken into 
consideration.” Ellis said. 

“The manager has known 
since he came here that he 
needed to redress the balance 


McNeill is looking to Villa's 
£350,000 summer signing 
Neale Cooper, who has yet to 
kick a ball in the first team, to 
eventually tafcf? over as 
Hodge's replacement in 
midfield. 

After suffering a succession 
of injury setbacks. Cooper has 
emerged unscathed after three 
games and is near to making a 
belated League debut Even 


CRICKET 


Australia torn to 
McDermott again 


Aberdeen deny 
interest in 
Nicholas move 


because, frankly, we still have * so, McNeill is still erring on 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent Melbourne 
in an effort to sharpen their McDermott's nine wickets 


m an enort to snarpen tneir Mcuermotts nine wickets 
attack, Australia have brought have cost him 75 apiece and 
Craig McDermott into their come at a rate ofone every 25 


12 for the fourth Test match 
starting here on Boxing Day. 
Bright is out of it and Zoehrer 
will be back behind his stumps 
in (dace of Dyer so long as he 
passes a fitness test today. 

If England settled for the 
defensive option in Adelaide, 
by weakening their bowling to 
strengthen the batting, so. less 
justifiably, did Australia, who 
were, and still are, behind in 
the series. Realizing now that 
that was a mistake, they win 
almost certainly leave out a 
batsman this time, and it will 
not be easy for them to decide 
which one. 

The chances are it will be 


overs. He never had much 
natural rhythm, relying on 
vigour and brute force. But on 
his day he was decidedly fast. 
This season he has sacrificed 
pace for accuracy, and his 27 
wickets have gat him bade his 
Test place. 

He look six for 125 in 
Queensland's defeat of 
Gatting’s side at the start of 
the present tour, and he will 
have encouraging memories < 
of cricket on the Melbourne 
Cricket Ground where, in his 
first Test match, against West 
Indies two years ago, he took 
six wickets, including Vivian 
Richards’s for nought. From 


By Hugh Taylor 
The directors of at least one 
English dub can breath a sigh 
of relief today in the know- 
ledge that their leading player 
is safe from the hands of the 
marauding Scots. 

The reports that Aberdeen 
wanted to transfer Luton 
Town’s Welsh international, 
Peter Nicholas, to Pittodrie 
has been denied by Ian 
Porterfield, the manager there. 

“All this talk of Scottish 
dubs luring top English play- 


too many players on our 
books." 

But McNeill will be given 
part of the Hodge transfer fee 
to spend, although it is un- 
likely to be much more than 
£300,000. “Whatever happens 
I won't be rushing into any- 
thing before Christmas,” he 


the side of caution a little 
longer. “I cannot emphasize 
the value of caution at this 
stage,” he said. “I will not play 
him until he is absolutely right 
and that is not likely to be 
until after Christmas.” 

Meanwhile. Birmingham 
City’s chairman Km Wheidon 


insisted last night that the 
club's 17-goal top scorer, 
Wayne Clarke, is not for sale. 
Everton's manager Howard 
Kendall has watched Clarke 
twice recently and is under- 
stood to be preparing a 
£400,000 bid for the 25 year 
old forward, who joined the 
Birmingham for £80,000 three 
years ago from Wolver- : 
hampton wanderers. 

Kendall has Clarke ear- 
marked as a posable replace- 
ment for the unsettled Paul 
Wilkinson. 

But, even though while 
Bir mingham are still deep in 
debt and struggling to meet 
their weekly wage bill on 
average gates of around 8,000, 
Wheidon was adamant last 
night that the dub’s prize asset 
was not for sale. “I want to 
make that absolutely dear, no 
matter how tempting an offer 
Eveiton may come up with.” 

Due to an agreement they 
struck with Wolves when they 
signed Clarke, Birmingahm 
would only receive half of any 
profit 


we had it hard as kids. Most 
of the kids in our suburb only 
had one car! Kids today don't 
know how lucky they are. But 
me, I didn't have a care in the 
world in those days. All I 
wanted was a bat in my hand 
and I was happy as a sandboy. 
My mother was a wonderful 
support to me. So was my 
dead dad, come to think of it 

Chapter Three: Early 
Days 

“Make no mistake,” my 
schoolteacher said. “One day 
this lad will play for England.” 
But he was wrong. Poxy old 
Jenkins was turned down by a 
minor county and it was me. 


Jenkins was turned down by a Chapter Nine: Com- 

minor county and it was me, piefeiy Stock 

not him, that joined foe big * WeI £ xhtf s about all I can 


time and got picked for tMnk 0 £ (a^ him for 


Loamsbire Colts. some humorous stories about 

Chapter Four: Leant- Botham. Ed.) (He’s never met 
mg The Trade Botham. I mule up the bit in 

I shall never forget the day I the first chapter. FS) (Well 
first walked out on to foe ask Him his views on 
sacred turf of Lo am s hi re controversial issues, like 
cricket ground I was com- Botham. Ed), 
pletdy overawed but some- £r, no one likes short 


Wednesday hungry for title 


By Martin Searby 

With foe Football League' virtues of honesty and 


entering its most gruelling 
phase in which most clubs face 
four games in an eight-day 
period over the holiday, any 
side who can stand foe pace 


responsibility; it is the height 
of folly to suggest to him that 
more cynical attitudes should 
prevail 

Any Wednesday player who 


and so for we have achieved 
them at this stage,” said 
Wilkinson after the 2-0 vic- 
tory over Newcastle ended the 
Tynesiders’ run of seven 
matches without defeat We 


CIUDS luring lop tmglisn Play- * ,IVIV ***** aumu UIV, uuvmulj WUU “***“"W VTAUIVUL wn 

era north is becoming a bit of a will emerge with a first-dass should over-indulge during know what lies ahead' 


joke,” said Porterfield “I have of honours. 


no intention of signing any 
new players at the moment 
When I arrived here from 


While most critics favour 
foe perennial challenge of 
Liverpool, the re-emergence 


England I promised I would J ^ rse 9^’ precocious 
give all the players a feir crack talents of Nottingham Forest 

T— ■_ i-i nr fn^ ftivnmnlrehfvl Piwnrtrui 


the festive season may not 
remain one far into the New 
Year. “Given the importance 
of this span of games, it would 


His side has already over- 
come the illness of Marwood, 
a fleet winger whose crosses on 


in ZC foe run have opened foe way 

in my view be a cnmmal act if ' 


of the whip. It is true that like or the accomplished Everton 
all clubs, we are looking at *eam, few have given serious 


players for you have always to ffngfteratiqn to the claims of 
look at foe future. But we are Sheffield Wednesday who 


Matthews or Ritchie, both of Reid, Hughes and 
whom would be unlucky, McDermott, England's bals- 


not moving for Nicholas or ^? ve . n °w eli^bed to fifth 


any player failed to live up to 
his responsibilities despite aQ 
the distractions. The period 
will show up unocpected re- 
sults as fatigue, injury, illness, 


for the tall and elegant Chap- 
man to score 13 times already. 
Bradshaw, foe 1 8-year-okl 
who scored his first home goal 
in that win, now has a back 


how I knew I was going to 
make it But I was a bit of a 
harum-scarum in those days. 
Many a time I got drunk and 
threw up behind the 
sightscreen. 

(Did he do this with 
Botham? Ed.) (No. FS) 

Chapter Five: I Make 
It 

I was lucky enough to score 
several centuries in my first 
season with Loamshire: Soon 
people were saying: 
“Swarbrick for England.” For 
a young lad of 2D, foe sky was 
the limit. ( v well put, this. 
Ed.) 

Chapter See England! 

1 got picked for England. It 
was a great honour. It was the 
greatest moment of my life. 
We won the match, too. Good 
old “Both” took 10 wickets, 
sewed 150 runs and took five 
catches. It was a marvellous 
team effort and we all did our 
bit 


Er, no one likes short pitch 
twine but it's part of foe 


bowling but it's part of the 
game. The one-day game has 
improved the fielding beyond 
all recognition. Is that all 
right? 


Chapter Ten: The Sum- 
ming Up 

It's a great game. People 
who write off Pete Swarbrick 
are making a big mistake. 
Where would the game be 
without great characters like, 
well me? Can I have foe 
second half of my advance 
now, please? 

(Well done, marvellous 
stuff. Ed.) (Are you really 
going to charge £9.95 for this? 
FS) (Course! People wifi buy 
anything if if s about cricket. 
By the way. I've got a new idea 
for the title. How about: At 
Sixes and Sevens: Cricket, 
Botham and Me : by Pete 
Swarbrick? Ed). (Ace. FS). 


Simon Barnes 


Matthews after making 73 not 
out at Adelaide, and Ritchie 
because his scores in the series 
have been 41. 45, 33, 24 not 
out, 36 and 40 not out. 

In the eight Test matches be 
has played since taking 30 
wickets at 30.03 against Eng- 
land in England in 1985, 


men will expect to have more 
to contend with than in the 
earlier Tests, if it is a typical 
Melbourne pilch. 


anyone else at foe moment.” 
Meanwhile, Celtic support- 


place in the first division. 

Yet Howard Wilkinson's 


ers are growing adamant that [teve only been beaten 
it is time the league leaders, * our *pd only Arsenal 


strain and the leading forward 

SLttasrsr ffi 

normal- ^ m reserve are two talented 


who displayed defensive anxi- a ^9 improve on that, 
ety 3pm on Saturday when *”Ore importantly, Wednes- 


SCHJAD: G R Man*. 0 C Boon. □ M 
Jonas, A R Border (captain), Q m Ritchie. 
SR Waugh. GRJ Matthews, PR Stem, T 
J Zoehrer. C J McDetmott B A Retd. M G 
Hughes. 

Tour assessment, page 25 


they dropped a point to Aber- 5^7 have built up a squad that 
deen, did something to bolster foe meaning of hard 


their rearguard. work 211(1 mastery of the 

..... , simple things in football two 

sound more cred- characteristics that have been 
fo? backbone of every winning 


GOLF 


be made for the Chelsea centre ^de 

Joe McLaughlin, or, for Wflldnson, a drily humor- 


Charles builds fortune 
and a home from home 


~ Vf f 1 ■ " MMIWVU- « U1UJ UIMUVI- 

that matter, even Nicholas, ous man, has also constructed 
be J ° f a club that is not ashamed to 


immense value at Parkhead. 


embrace 


old-fashioned 


“However, there can be no 
complaints about the arduous 
programme, because, within 
foe game, we all know that for 
big prizes you have to pay big 
prices.” 

Manchester City at Maine 
Road is followed by Liverpool 
at home on Saturday, a visit 
from Norwich City on New 
Year’s Day, and a trip to 
Leicester, the most important 
of these clearly the match with 
foe champions. 

We set ourselves targets. 


in reserve are two talented 
teenagers in Shutt and Hirst, 
since Wednesday have stron- 
ger foundations than last year 
when they ended fifth. 


Eastwood puts his 
guard up again 


I find the speed, commit- 
ment, and drive of Sterland 
and Shelton two compelling 
reasons why Wilkinson's 
dream can come true, while i 
the rest of the team has a 
cohesion and pace that can, at 
times, be breathtaking While 
Owls may be renowned for 
sagacity, it is well to remem- 
ber they are carnivores. 


By George Ace 

One has to admire B J He knows better than anyone 
Eastwood s tenacity. Iheman that there is not an Irish boxer 
who steoed Barry McGmgan capable of filling either of the 
to the WBA version of the two venues like McGuisan 
featherweight championship did, even on the wav utr Hu*h 


featherweight championship did, even on the way up. Hugh 
of the world is contemplating Russell outright winner ofa 


a January boxing promotion 
in Belfast at either the King’s 
Hall or the Ulster HalL 


Neither venture would be a 
viable proposition without 


Lonsdale Bell and by far a 
more popular fighter than any 
of foe current crop of young 
hopefuls, could not do it even 
when he was champion. And 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


From John Baliantme, Montego Bay 

Bob Charles, the New Zea- Alcott who. after the five other 
land left-hander who won foe players in foe three-team play- 
Open Championship at Royal off had failed with birdie putts 


Pressure 
to join 


Lylham in 1963, is building at the first extra hole, the 15th, 
and furnishing a home on who firmly holed a 12-footer. 


ana ninusning a home on 
Professional Golfers’ Associ- 
ation property in West Palm 
Beach, Florida. So his victory 
with Amy Alcott aged 30, in 
the Mazda championship here 
in Jamaica, and their winning 
of the richest first prize in 
world golf ($500,000. about 


"Yippee!” she screamed, 
achieving the additional and 
not inconsiderable feat of 
causing a smile to cross 
Charles’s usually poker face. 
Tony Jackiin once spent the 
better pan ofa round trying to 
coax a grin from that woeful 


l), was especially wel- countenance but to no avail 


come to the elegant pro- 
fessional 

Not that Charles is leaving 
his beloved Christchurch, 
where he has a farm. But it is 
more comfortable for a fellow 
who has now won $51 1,160 in 
a career in United States 
senior golf that began only in 
March, when he turned 50, to 
have a place be can call home 
over here, not far from Jack 
Nicklaus nor, for that matter, 
Bernhard and Viklti Langer. 

“J owe it all to Amy,” 
Charles said graciously after- 
wards and, indeed, it was 


The losing pairs in the play- 
off were Billy Casper, aged 55, 
and Australia's Jan Stephen- 
son, who turned 35 yesterday. 
They fought their way back 
into a tie, after "blowing" a 
two-stroke lead at the turn, 
with the lesser-known Jim 
Ferree and Ayako Okamoto, 
aged 35, of Japan. 


The four governing bodies 
of athletics in Scotland are 
coming under increasing pres- 
sure from the Scottish Sports 
Council to amalgamate. Fi- 
nance is a major reason for the 
Council's interest as it cur- 
rently grant-aids all four and a 
single body would be much 
more efficient 
The Council has written to 
each of them, foe Scottish 
AAA and Scottish Women’s 
AAA. Scottish Cross Country 
Union and Scottish Women's 
Cross Country Union, 
suggesting a meeting and 
offering to appoint a neutral 
chairman. 



Missing Case 


Jimmy Case, the Southamp- 
ton captain, win miss the FA 
Cup third round tie against 
Eveiton at Goodison Park on 
January 10, due to his two 
match suspension. Case, the 
former Liverpool and Brigh- 
ton player, who has reached 2 1 
disciplinary points, will also 
miss the first division game 
against Manchester United a 
week earlier. 


Carr is told 
to make 
a decision 


very substantial sponsorship ^Tfham’s lack-luster Belfast 
and television coverage and some 12 months ago 


the reason is simple: without a 8 aiI ^ t a nondescript Ameri- 
foe _ McGoigan magic pro- 0211 225 . 001 been foigotten, 


fessional boxing in Belfast or 
in Ireland, for that matter, is 
flat beer. 


Fast moves 


Brian Gough, the Nottingham 
Forest manager, who is al- 
ready planning for next sea- 
son, has told Franz Carr, his 
England under-21 winger, that 
he must know shortly wfakher 
he intends to sign a new 
contract Carr, aged 20, whose 
presentcontract ends in June, 
has been watched by several 
top elute recently. 


Eastwood has foe British 
flyweight champion, Dave 
McAuley, under his wing and 
he also controls to a large 
extent foe European middle- 
weight champion. Hero! Gra- 


ham. Individually or together 
the pair would not come 
anywhere near to filling the 
King’s Hall and the expense 
involved in putting a double 
top featuring the two cham- 
pions at the 1,500 capacity 
Ulster Hall almost ce rtainl y 
makes it a non-starter. 


i- 7 - - r-"0 




Douglas: record hopes 


VUiUllllCUl. X f * V • 1 

Hicks’s new inh Do "tf* s 8 bld 

a Hen JUU Desmond Douglas, the Eng- 


LEADING SCORES: 193: B diaries (NZ) 
and A Alcott 64, 85. 64 (won ptay-aff and 


$500,000); B Casper and J ___ 

(Aus). 65, 62, 66: J Fenee and A okamoto 
(Japan). 65, 63. 6S (S29.000 each). 194; A 
Ranter and C Johnson, 65, 64. 65: G 
Litter and 6 Pearson. 64. 64. 66 ($25,000 
each). 1S& B Crampton (Aus) and P 
Bradtey, 63. 65,S7(S2Z000). 


iyiva * 3 » UI,TT Desmond Douglas, the Eng- 

Jane Dicks, a former North- lish and Commonwealth table 
amptonshire county cham- tennis champion, will bid fora 


Southampton have moved 
fast to find a temporary 
replacement for foe England 
goalkeeper, Peter Shilton, who 
broke his nose in a League 
match against Nottingham 
Forest, on Saturday. They 
have signed Manchester City 
second team goalkeeper, Eric 
Nixon, on a month's loan 


Since his move to Forest 
two and a half years ago, be 
has been one oftheir outstand- 
ing players. Under the transfer 
agreement with Blackburn 
Rovers, the fee is being paid in 
sta g es, based on Carr’s num- 
ber of appearances in the first 
team. 


nor will it for a long time. 

Unfortunaety the Monag- 
hans. Gflroys, Caldwells, and 
McGuigans are exceptions 
rather than the rule and there 
is no doubt that McGuigan 
has son of soured those who 
could be classified as fringe 
boxing supporters, who feel 
they have been let down. The 
fanatics will still attend ir- 
respective of the bill but they 
do not appear to be as thick on 
foe ground these days and that 
is why one cannot be optimis- 
tic about foe future. 


pion, takes over as secretary of record lOfo men's singles title 
foe English Ladies Golf in foe Triumph Adler English 
Association on January 12. National Championships at 


Paying up 


Fraser’s tennis optimism 


Melbourne (AP) - Sweden 
may be better on paper, but 
Neale Fraser, Australia’s Davis 
Cup captain, said his country 
should be favoured when the 
two countries meet in the final 
of the tournament, which begin 
on Boxing Day. Fraser also 
daims that his top player. Pat 
Cash, is a better grass court 


player than Sweden's Stefen 
Ed berg, the reigning Australian 
Open champion. 

“I see us as the favourites.” 
Fraser said, “Wc’ye got the best 
grass court player in the world at 
the moment, we’re playing on a 
surface the guys love to day on. 
and we're in from of a home 


Miss Dicks, aged 38. will Crawley on January 23-24. 
spend foe first three months T • ^ 

working in tandem with foe iTIJiiry tUJJg 

°h 1S. "■ ^ D» ova. 


Tour manager 


Les Bettinson, the 51-year- 
old Salford director, has been 


Richard Donovan, the 
South Wales Police and Welsh 
international centre who was 
injured in Saturday's 
Schweppes Cup match against 
Pencoed, is likely to be out for 


Tokyo (AFP) — A Japanese 
magazine publisher was yes- 
terday ordered by a district 
court here to pay 1.8 million 
yen (£7,923) damages to box- 
ing judges Stanley Christdolu. 


Blackburn have already re* 
ceived £100,000 and if Can- 
plays for England’s senior 
team Forest have to pay them 
another £100,000. Clough 
said: “I want the player to 
make up his mind and he has 
to do it very shortly.” 


Ulster Hall shows that did 
not feature McGuigan always 
finished in the red and in most 
cases foe loss incurred was in 
and around the £10,000 mark. 
But those losses could be 
offset against a McGuigan 
show in foe King’s Hall or in 
Dublin and everyone was 
happy. 


named manager for foe Great foe rest of the season. Dono- 
Brilain Rugby League tour to van, aged 23, isstill in hospital 


Australia and New Zealand in with a suspected depressed 
imp . rfn- , cheek fracture. • 


Shain, of the United States, for 
an article accusing them of 
taking bribes in connection 
with the 1 982 WBA world title 
fight between then junior fly- 
weight champion, Katsuo 
Tokashilri. of Japan, and Lnpe 
Madera, of Mexico. 


• Liverpool expect to have 
their Danish international, 
Jan Molby, back for the 
Boxing Day match with Man- 
chester United at Anfidd 
which looks like being a sell 
out Molby has returned to frill 
training after a three-game 
absence with a .hamstring 1 
strain. 


Last month's Ulster Hall 
promotion with foe British 
middleweight title bout top- 
ping foe bill was foe first in foe 
city for several months and a 
first since foe Eastwood- 
McGuigan split turned from 
rumour to feet. It was not, and 
was never expected to be, a 
financial success. Eastwood 
has sever been afraid to 
gamble on his judgement and 
has rarely been proved wrong, 
but no one should ever mis- 
take Mm for a philanthropist. 


Eastwood will argue his 
corner vehemently mid will 
always be prepared to put his 
money where his month is but 
it may be a long. long time 
before the rafters of the King’s 
Hall reverberate to foe roars 
that marked foe entrance of 
the Gones Cyclone and 
accompanied his every move 
while foe action lasted. 
McGuigan was overloaded 
with instant appeal he was an 
electrifying fighter. More is 
foe pity he did not stick to 
wnat he did best and more is 
foe pity that those who have 
had his ear over foe last two 
years or so could not see the 
road they were travelling on 
was fraught wiffi danger. 


V! I"' 


a. 

Ur 


Chapter Seven: 
Afterwards 

I never played for England 
again after making a pair in 
my first Test. But Tm not 
bitter. I love the life of a 
county cricketer. I mean, if 
foev want to pick a load of 
half-wits who can’t tell a half- 
volley from a half-nelson (bril- 
liant phrase. Ed.) (Thank you. 
FS) then that's their business, 
isn’t it? It's a grand life as a 
county pro and if I hang on for 
another 15 years I’ll make a 
killing with my benefit. Mean- 
while. I can always make a 
quick quid as a celebrated 
author. 


I f v 

it-** " r 


Whatever foe future may 
bold for McGuigan it wifi 

never be what it could have 
been. And whatever the future 
nokis for boxing in Belfest it 
will never be foe same as it 
was. 


i; 





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