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Full text of "The Times , 1986, UK, English"

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No 62,650 


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SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


njumocK goes 
on the attack 
over councils 


By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 
Mr Neil Kin nock is to are to iR>ncr nnn «i 


war «eu ivinnocfc is to 
effectively launch Labour’s 
general election campaign in 
February by extolling 
Labour's record in local gov- 
ernment, the one area apart 
from defence the Conser- 
vatives believe they have La- 
bour reeling. 

Conservative MPs inter- 
preted the news as evidence 
that their party’s relentless 
onslaught on Labour's “loony 
left’ councils had hit home, 
and as an attempt by Labour 
to divert the spotlight from 
their unilateralist defence 
policy. 

Whatever the reason. 
Labour's party strategists have 
decided to significantly up- 
grade the party's three-day 
local government conference 
in Leeds from February 6 to 
locus attention on what they 
believe is the excellent record 
of most Labour authorities 
compared to their Tory 
• counterparts. 

Mr Kinnock will deliver the 
keynote speech and be sup- 
ported by Mr Roy Hanersley. 
Labour’s deputy leader. Dr 
John Cunningham, the 
environment spokesman, and 


are to be transformed into 
major set piece occasions 
during what is almost certain 
to be election year. 

Mr Kinnock will attempt to 
steal the Conservatives' thun- 
der by echoing their argument 
that Labour local authorities 
are giving the electorate a 
foretaste of what to expect 
from a Labour government. 

Far from concentrating on 
what Labour mainta ins is a 


OAPC Iraq says 
gUCa Basra 

r»lr offensive 
lUUn defeated 

• TH By Robert Fisk 

a I Middle East Correspondent 

V M ® I I The hijacking and destme- 

B B ■ tion of the Iraqi Airways 

m airliner over Saudi Arabia on 

Thursday and the latest Ira- 
rter nian offensive in the Gulf War 

dis, which fail to provide even a 

basic services such as nursery rtk&V opposition 

schools or school lunches. groups in Tehran aimed at 

Using the record of Labour encouraging Iraqis to over- 
local authorities as a pointer, frow their own President, Mr 

Mr Kintvwlr aril! »a MOdaiD HUSSCUL 





S'l-'.'flJW.-fcfc 


Iceland storms 
claim 15 as 
ships go down 

By Robin Young 

At least 15 seamen died, and on December 20, and was not 




Mr Kinnock will seek to 
present the electorate with as 


Iran has formally denied 


stark a choice as possible P® 1 * “* ** i hi ac,an S m 
between the priorities and Jjjjj passengers were 
values of a .future Labour but the Woody in- 

government and those ofthe odenL together wito Tehran 
Government claims of a successful offen- 




a further six are missing 
believed dead, after a British- 
owned tanker and an Icelandic 
freighter were wrecked in the 
north Atlantic off Iceland over 
Christmas. 

Two more died, and six 
were reported missing, from a 
Cypriot tanker which sank on 
Thursday night in the 
Mediterranean. 

The victims of the Icelandic 


carrying a cargo. She had been 
due to collect a cargo of fish 
liver oil from Iceland on 
Boxing Day. 

A spokesman for the ship's 
managing agents. Mr Gordon 
Haggerstone. said: “As far as 

we know the weather was not 
exceptionally bad. We are all 
very shocked and sick at the 
news”. 

Mr John Taylor, a spokcs- 


TJfwp-S' 



Dr Rhodes Boyson: wel- 
comed Labour’s tfluHrs- 

tiny handful of extreme left- 
wing councils, the Labour 
leader will aigue that despite 
the restraints of central gov- 


GovemmenL d 3 **™ of » successful offen- 

P&rty sources accept that ave around tta a* of Basra, 
the likely Tory reaction wOl be appear statically designed to 
a redoubled attack on the stiffen the teckbone of thcee 
activities of the “loony-left" inad , e Ira ? be abte to 

councils, but they argue that l °pple ft** .“I? wthout 
these attacks bear no relation any om^ help from Iran, 
to most peoples’ experiences Members of the Iraqi opp- 
of Labourauthorities/ “"bop Dawaa Party, which 

They daim the attacks are a fas links with the extreme 
“distortion” and can be shown bIamic Jlhad movement in 

as such bj chronicling the ■ ,l 

achievements of Labour Hijack details 
councils. ■ — ■ 

However, Dr Rhodes Boy- Beirut, as well as organiz 
son, the minister .for local tions like the New Uran 
government,, last night re- Party which has an office : 
jected Labour’s claims that London, met in Tehran c 






> -united :■& 
U^'ttlNODOMj 


•r..; U'y-v , 

v X S 
. -VCC 


r=300 miles 1 


Beirut, as well as organiza- 
tions like the New Drama 
Party which has an office in 
London, met in Tehran on 


V*. 

* • 

* ! la- 


thers were only a handful of I Thursday to friture ( \ 


«:] 


Mr David Blunkett, leader of eramem, most Labour coun- 


extreme left-wing councils. 

“If they think Liverpool, 
Manchester, Bristol, Brent, 
Ealing, Islington and Lambeth 
is only - a small percentage 


tactics. 

At least three anonymous 
telephone callers, saying that 
they represented pro-Iranian 
groups, later claimed nesp- 


Sheffield City CounciL 
Party sources said that this 


oils have done an excellent job 
in maintaining standards in 


there’s something wrong with onsibihty in Lebanon for the 
their maths. One can go on hijacking. One caller said that 


would be the first of a series of services which directly affect 
normally routine events that peoples' lives such as educa- 


and on/ 


he spoke on behalf of Islamic 


He claimed that the hard Jihad, and tokl a Western 
left was increasing in strength, news agency in the 


Monday 


Over the 
limit _ 


tion, and that it would be well 
represented in a .Labour 
government. 

Conservative MPs pos- 
itively welcomed the news 


operation with the Dawaa 
Party.” 

Surviving passengers on the 
Iraqi Airways flight said that 
at least two - possibly four — 



lion, housing, health, employ- taking over more local capital that his organization 
ment and transport. authorities with every elec- staged the hijack “in co- 

He will couple this with a tion, and that it would be well operation with the Dawaa 
savage attack on the represented in a .Labour Party.” 

Conservatives' record on local government Surviving passengers on the 

government, pouting at na- Conservative MPs pos- Iraqi Airways flight said that 
tional level to the increased itjvely welcomed the news at least two - possibly four — 
centralization since 1979 and that Labour was voluntarily gunmen tried to take over the 
to “wrecking policies” on moving local government mi aircraft shortly after take-off. 
education, housing and to centre stage. They claimed The passengers died in an 
transport. that Labour’s s i miliar at- exchange of fire between the 

At local level he wiD_ de- tempts to carry the battle to hijackers and Iraqi security 
nounce Tory authorities the enemy on defence have guards in mid-air and in the 
which he claims have reduced been singularly unsuccessful, subsequent explosion when 
services to a nimimnm. and they interpreted the move the crew ofthe aircraft were 


Deadly pain Ian Botham and Gladstone Small, who took 
five wickets each yesterday. 


Five wicket 
triumph 


disasters include six Britons man for the Gibraltar-based 
who were the officers of the owners of the vessel, said that 

1 ,230-ton tanker Syneta which - . 

ran aground on Slorudur Is- &•' ' •/ iWJMJ T iifli 

land outside the remote port a^PELAWDff £ .L 
of Reydarfiordur on the east £? T/Q. 
coast of Iceland at about 
midnight on Christmas night. 

The crew of the Syneta sent aS® ££ S 

out a Mayday call as their ship rowfft c . 

hit the rocks, but told Icelan- f •£<W P T-v' -^2 
die coastguards that they 'y i; •; r 7 ^ • ; . ■ ; ' 

could not launch their life- ^■>' : -;i(Nrrnj 
boats because of the rocks and ^/kinqoom^ / 30 ° mHes 
heavy surf. 

Captain Hannas Hafstein, ' V a js — fa3 i 
of the Icelandic Ufesaving ^ ^mpany wou]d not 
Association, said that at lam, issuing ai^iofihc crew. 

off ihe west coast of Afiica. 

fesl atthe foot ofSkrudur. The „ Yesterday evening, Mr Wyn 
island is a steep, straight rock £°‘* rts ’ ^ Conservative MP 
161 metres high, marked with Conwy, paid tribute to the 
a lighthouse. captain of the Syneta, Mr 

A parachute rocker was ? chardCape ’ wh ,°, ^ al 
fired to the stranded vessel. . Frynnon, Llandudno 
and 12 trawlers and an Icelan- ■* unc ^ on > and was an active 
die coastguard ship joined in nie ? 1 “ er of Conwy Conser- 
the attempt to rescue sum- ^bve Association, 
vors, hampered bv force five Mr Roberts said, after call- 
winds, heavy surf and snow ing to comfort the captain's 
showers. widow: “He was a fine man 


that Labour was voluntarily gunmen tried to take over the 
moving local government mi aircraft shortly after take-off. 
to centre stage. They claimed The passengers died in an 
that Labour’s s i miliar at- exchange of fire between the 


SA clash 
over death 


for Botham 0 f student 


nounce Tory authorities 
which he daims have reduced 
services to a minimum. 

Labour has begun to issue 
profiles of "mean” Tory coun- 


guards in mid-air and in the 
subsequent explosion, when 
the crew of the aircraft were 


By John Goodhody 
Sports News 
Correspondent 


From Ray Kennedy 
Johannesburg 
A dispute was developing 


as evidence of Labour’s I tryin^to land at an airfield in 


anxiety. 


When alcohol kills 
10 times more 
youngsters than 
heroin, why no 
public campaign to 
curb teenage 
drinking? 

New Year’s 
Day 

The Times will 
publish on New 
Year’s Day, the only 
quality newspaper 
in Britain to do so. 
Don’t miss our full 
coverage of news 
and sport - order 
your copy today. 


MP’s death causes 
critical by-election 

By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 

A critical by-election that is bandwagon and to bury the 
fraught with danger for La- memories of last autumn's 
hour and which could deter- defence debacle, which sent 


mine the date of the general their opinion poll ratings 
election is in prospect, follow- plummeting, 
ing the sudden death on But for Labour, failure to 
Christmas Eve of Mr Guy hold wheat used to be a solid 
Barnett, Labour MP for Labour seat would be a body 
Greenwich. blow to a party which is 

Mr Barnett held the seat seriously aspiring to form the 
with a majority reduced to just next government, despite fall- 
1, 211 in 1983. The Conser- ing ratings, 
vatives came second, with the Though it was played down 
SDP Alliance less than 4,000 by parly sources yesterday, the 
votes behind. Ail three parties immediate danger for Labour 
can therefore realistically bope is that the constituency party 
to win the by-election, which will pick a left-wing candidate, 
will probably be held in late who would be relentlessly 
February or early March. attacked by the opposition 

The result will be a unique # 

pointer to the national mood. There ts a small Militant 

A good Conservative presence withm the local La- 

performance, allied to a ^ b, £ «£!*** 

respectable showing in the whole it was wefl to the left of 
Truro by-election caused by rclatively-moderate Mr 
the death in a read accident of Baroett, with whom it was 
Mr David Penhaligon, would sometmes at odds, 
chnmlv increase the nressure ... Another telling factor _is j 


t* MT l/avio rennaugun, woum 

If/ / -/ sharply increase the pressure 

CrC on *” IS Thatcher to go to the 


• There is £12,000 to 
be won today in The 
Tunes Portfolio Gold 
competition — the 
weekly £8,000 plus 
the daily £4,000. 

• The £4,000 prize 
yesterday was won by 
Mr Ian Han, of 
Famham, Surrey. 
Details, page 3. 

• Portfolio lists, 
pages 24 and 33. 


TIMES SPORT 


United win 

Manchester United beat 
Liverpool 1-0 at Anfield with 
a goal by Whiteside. Arsenal, 
the first division leaders, drew 
1-1 al Leicester Pages 40, 42 


TIMES BUSINESS 


Sterling boost 

Sterling gained 95 points to 
$1.4580 against the dollar and 
2.3 pfennigs to DM2.8700, on 
prospects of an $ 1 8-a -barrel 
oil price Page 25 


Home News 2-5 Feames 11-20 
Overseas 6-10 Law Report » 
Appis 2 6. 22 Leaders 21 

Arts 16 UttCTS 21 

Births, deaths, Obhtary « 
marriages 23 Refijpon 22 
Bridge 17 Services 23 

Business 25-27 Science 23 
Chess 17 Soo« <**?«« 39 

Church 22 Sport 3440.42 
Court 22 Theatres, etc » 

Crosswords 1704 TV & foul* 41 
Diary 20 Weather 24 

Events 24 WiDs 22 


sy a-tf- u- a- * 


on Mra Thatcher to go to the f?™* of ft 

country in May or June, rather Labour-conti^ed Gj^nwich 


than October. 


council, which is left-wing. 


For the Alliance, which is - a ft rate “ 

efifectively being relaunched JJLS *^£ 5 * 

next month, another spectacu- loony-left mould as Harrn- 
lar by-election victory is badly tRf or Brent. Labour increased 
needed to remobilize the Continued on page 24, col 4 


remobilize 


Saudi, Arabia. 

Iran's sudden attack around 
Basra had been expected by 
the Iraqis who have been 
receiving regular satellite 
photographs from the Ameri- 
cans of Iran’s military prep- 
arations on the southern 
sector of the Gulf front. 

As is now their habit, the 
Iranians staged a series of 
limited sorties across the lines 
in the hope that individual 
units might break through and 
could then be supported by 
| reinforcements in a larger- 
scale offensive. In the event, it 
seems that do such victories 
were forthcoming. 

For the second time this 
year, however, the Iranians 
did manage to cross the 
treacherously fast-flowing wa- 
ters of the Shaft al-Arab and 
land on the waterlogged date 
palm plantations of Umm at 
Rasas island, which is held by 
the Iraqis. 

But by yesterday morning, 
Baghdad Radio felt confident 
enough to proclaim an Iraqi 
“final victory” against the 
Iranian attack and to report 
that “our forces are continuing 
to destroy enemy remnants on 
the island of Umm al-Rasas 
— where the enemy gained a 
foothold on December 24.” 

The Iranians had earlier 
claimed to have killed 3,000 
Iraqi troops and captured 
another 4,500 in their attack. 
Iraqi television later showed a 
film of piles of Iranian 
corpses. 


Ian Botham, still nursing a last night over the death of a 
nl> muscle injury, returned to 20-year-old-black South Af- 
utentationalaickei yesterday rican student activist, who 
to take fivrfor 41 and three had been detained without 
tiip catches as Australia were trial for six months under 
dismissed for 141 the state of emergency re- 


opening day of the Fourth 
Test at Melbourne. Gladstone 
Small grabbed the other five 
wickets. 

England, one up the series, 
were 95 for one at the dose. 


illations. 

Police^ said that Simon 
Matanzima Mamie died after 
beiag treated for a fit at the 
Boksbuig-Benoni Hospital, 
east of Johannesburg, and that 


. As the Syneta turned over 
and sank leaving only one end 
above water, the crew jumped 
into the icy waters. 

The first body was found at 
2.40 am, drifting in a life 
jacket A few minutes later 
another crew member was 
found still alive and taken 
aboard a fishing vesseL He 
died minutes after being 
rescued. 

At 4 am a helicopter from 
the Icelandic coastguards 
joined the, search and by 5 am 
the searchers had spotted nine 
bodies floating in life jackets. 

Seven were picked up but 
two sank before they could be 
reached. 

The Syneta left Liverpool 


the company would not be 
issuing a list of the crew. 

The six officers were Brit- 
ish, and the six deckhands 
from the Cape Verde Islands 
off the west coast of Africa. 

Yesterday evening, Mr Wyn 
Roberts, the Conservative MP 
for Conwy, paid tribute to the 
captain of the Syneta, Mr 
Richard Cape, who lived at 
Biyn Ffynnou, Llandudno 
Junction, and was an active 
member of Conwy Conser- 
vative Association. 

Mr Roberts said, after call- 
ing to comfort the captain's 
widow: “He was a fine man 
and had many friends in the 
area”. 

The sinking of the Syneta 
was the second accident to 
shipping off Reydarfjordur in 
two days. 

Six crewmen were killed 
and five rescued when the 
Icelandic cargo ship 
Suduriand sank in heavy seas 
on Wednesday about 290 
miles out of the port. 

The 1, 000-ton freighter sank 
just before midnight on 
Christmas Eve after being 
capsized by gale force winds in 
heavy seas almost half-way 
between Iceland and Norway. 

The ship was fully loaded 
with salted herring which it 

Continued on page 2, col 4 


It was the twenty-seventh a post mortem examination 
time that Botham, who was would be held, 
yesterday running in off a He became ill on Monday at 

■ Modderbee prison near Be- 

The England cricket party are noni and was taken to hospital 
to make an official complaint immediately, the spokesman 
to the BBC because they were said. He addedTHis illness 
inconvenienced during a live was initially diagnosed by a 
tele vision lint on the Noel hospital doctor as epilepsy. He 
Edmonds Christmas Show on died the following morning.” 
Christmas Day Page 42 But members of Mr Mar- 


Bokassa’s trial to be 
extended to March 27 


Christmas Day Page 42 But members of Mr Mar- 
— ule’s family claimed yesterday 

dozen paces and bowling at he had no history of epileptic 
about 65 per cent of his attacks or fits. His brother, 
normal pace, has claimed five BethueL said: “I visited him 
wickets in his international about a month ago in prison 
career, eq ualling the record of R&d be looked healthy enough 
Richard Hadlee of New to me. He had never suffered 
Zealand. from fits before.” 

D ~,u a. «T Mr Marule was detained on 


Bangui (Reuter) - The trial 
ofthe former Emperor of the 
Central African Republic Mr 
Jean-Bedel Bokassa, will be 
extended until March 27, the 
court said yesterday. 

A Justice Ministry decree 
on the ninth day of his trial for 
crimes ranging from cannibal- 
ism to fraud, confirmed 
predictions that it would be 
impossible to complete pro- 


ceedings by today’s target 
date. 

Interest in the trial is rapidly 
waning and Mr Bokassa was 
yesterday represented, in a 
virtually empty courtroom. 

His two French lawyers, 
who had asked for a week’s 
adjournment because of the 
65-year-old former dictator's 
poor health, flew home on 
December 23 


Richard Hacfle 
Zealand. 

Botham said 


June 20, eight days after the 


swing the ball about a bit 
more. 

“We bowled very well. 


South African Students, which 
has been banned and of the 


, y JZ- Township Students’ Congress 
made play at evoything aI Kwaihema, near Spring 35 

okf miles east of Johannesburg 

oM cbchf, but catches *tn wberehelivei 


old dichf, but catches Ivin 
matches.” 

Much of the credit for 
Botham's performance must 
go to Laurie Brown, the' 
England physiotherapist, who 
has been treating Botham’s 

Continued on page 24, col 3 


He was one of seven blacks 
whose politically related 


S T deaths were officially con- 

ViviMd Jwf firmed by the South African 

ngbmd pbyaotherapisl, *ho authorhi£5 over chriflmas. 


Powerful Reagan 

new engine 

A named a former US Ambas- 

IOr All HUS ■ sador to Nato, Mr David 

Abshire, as a Cabinet-level 
By Harvey Elliott , special adviser to co-ordinate 
Air Correspondent White House efforts to resolvi 

Airbus Industrie yesterday ft J n 55. a {? ls , 

hit tack strongly in the battle , Mr Abshire wtil head a lean 
2 otaain a big share of the to supennse 1 White Housi 
next generation of the long- artl °ns centre versj 

Sul jetairiine market 

The European consortium, fr®® ^..ft ft® 31 ® 11 ? 
in which BroSb Aerospace to the Contra rebels « 

has a 20 per cent share, Niraragua. 
announced that it had signed a He will co-ordinate White 

deal with International Aero House responses to congres- 
Engines to fit a new, more sional and otiier requests foi 
powerful engine to its pro- information in a timely man- 
nosed A340 aircraft. This will ner, working with senioi 
enable it to at least equal the members of the White House 

performance of the American ■■ 

rival McDonnell Douglas MD XT 1 ! , 

M. which has so far been |i | IrOriir 
winning the battle to provide a M-dM. v M. V. 

challenger to the Boeing 747. _ . 

The agreement with IAE - From Harry Detains 
a consortium of engine . Madrid 

manufacturersconsisting of p or most people it would 
Rolls Royce. Pratt and Whit- have been a dream come true 

ney. Aero but f or a paienria tar man- 

MTL ! of Germany and Fiat Jacinto Sanchez 

Aviazipne of Haiy Zambrano, aged 34, winning 

Lhat Airbus will now be able to 250 million pesetas (nearly 
offer airtines two versions of £ 1 ,300,000) on Spain’s Christ- 

the A340- _ . mas “El Gordo” lottery was a 

\ irons chiefs are having 

alt; »ilh ! 3 airlines and hope ^ Zambrano had sold 

*■» to ticks. U, COS. 

10 Sypoor* dirttbla, page 25 tomns atthe bar ho managed 


Reagan’s crisis team chief 


Washington (Reuter) — staff, assisted by repre- 
President Reagan yesterday sentatives from key V^ite 
named a former US Amtas- House staff offices,” a state- 
sador to Nato, Mr David ment said. 

Abshire, as a Cabinet-level Mr Abshire. a graduate of 
special adviser to co-ordinate the US Military Academy at 
White House efforts to resolve West Point, recently stepped 
the Iran arms scandaL down as America’s Nato 

Mr Abshire will head a team Ambassador, a post he held 


U** ucuu Domains Three of the others were shot 

Controlled on page 24, col 3 in a township clash with police 

near BethaJ in the Eastern 

~1 • 4* ' TransvaaL The Bureau for 

fe Igl f* ij 1 Of Information said a black mob 
will vl stoned a security force vehicle 

- . . ' . - .. and the security forces retaii- 

Cariuca, another former dip- shntwm anri nicinl 


How to get 
into the Harvey 
Nichols Sale 
two days before 
everyone else. 


lomat, took Admiral 
Poindexter’s post 
The Iran-Contra disclosures 
spawned an array of investiga- 


ated with shotgun and pistol 
fire. One security force mem- 
ber was injured. 

On Christmas Day two 
blacks were killed in what was 


- <• « uiuviva ivbit aiuLu hi nnaL niui 

uons. ran^ng from apresiden- described by Bureau as a 


to supenrise White House since 1983. 
actions in the controversy He was listed among pos- 
over the secret sale of sums to sible replacements for Ad- 
Iran and the diversion of miral John Poindexter, who 
profits to the Contra rebels in resigned as National Security 
Nicaragua. Adviser when the diversion to 

“He will co-ordinate White the Contras of proceeds from 
House responses to congres- the aims sales was disclosed. 


sional and other requests for 
information in a timely man- 


working 


Another National Security 
Council official. Lieutenant- 


members of the Whhe House dismissed 


senior Colonel Oliver North, was 


tial . review board's 
examination of the role and 
conduct of the NSC staff to an 
inquiry by a court-appointed 
independent cousel into pos- 
sible criminal wrongdoing. 

In addition. Congress is set 
to resume an investiagtion 
into the affair early next 
month by select House and 
Senate investigative 
committees. 

Mr Abshire will assume bis 
duties on January 5 


— - i injured 

Brunei gift to Contras, page 8 I blacks. 


violent skirmish between rad- 
ical and moderate blacks in 
Sakhile township, near the 
Eastern Transvaal town of 
Standerton, and an unidenti- 
fied man was “necklaced” — 
burned to death with a petrol- 
filled tyre round his neck — in 
Kwazekele township, outside 
Port Elizabeth. 

In other “unrest-related” 
incidents reported by the Bu- 
reau four other people were 
injured at the hands of fellow 


El Gordo 9 s glad tidings bring little joy 


From Harry Detains 
Madrid 

For most people is would 
have been a dream come true 
but for a Palcncia tar man- 


l 250 million pesetas (nearly 
, £ 1 ,300,000) on Spain's Christ- 
I mas “El Gordo” lottery was a 
nightmare. 

Senor Zambrano had sold 
shares of his ticket to cus- 
tomers at the bar he managed 


in a poor neighbourhood of 
the northern city. Each of 
those shares was priced and 
marketed as if it represented 
one fiftieth of his ticket. The 
trouble was that he allegedly 
sold nearly five times as much 
lottery as he actually had. 

Employees of the tank 
where he had deposited his 
lottery ticket quickly discov- 
ered that there were more 
claimants than prize money, 
and they advised police. 

On Christmas Eve. after two 


days of hiding, when there was 
talk in the poor El Cristo 
neighbourhood of Paienria of 
a lynching, Senor Zambrano 
turned himself in to police and 
was held on suspicion of 
fraud. 

If the tar manager had been 
lucky enough not to win, be 
would allegedly have almost 
quintupled his original 25,000 
peseta (£130) investment 

Most of the holders of the 
shares in question met in 
Paienria yesterday with a 


lawyer to decide what legal 
action tiiey might take 

The joy and celebrations of 
last Monday, the day of the 
drawing, turned into not only 
anger and bitterness but, for 
some winners, it turned to 
serious concern. 

Many had gone out im- 
mediately and bought things 
they wanted. Some drove off 
with new cars or signed onlers 
for other costly items which 
now they may not be able to 
pay for. 


The Harvey Nichols Sale Preview days are Mon- 
day and Tuesday, the 29th and 30th of December. 

If you become a Charge Account customer on 
either of the two days, you’ll have the 
opportunity to buy sale merchandise two days 
; before everyone else. 

And what’s more we‘11 give you a further 10% off 
sale prices. 

To open an account, just go to the Customer 
Services department on the 3rd floor. BS I B i 

Harwy Nichols, Knightsbridge, SWlTel. 01-235 500ft iffilfclli 


r 


1 



HOME NEWS 


THE TTMES SATURDAY DECEMBE R 27 1986 " ' ’ 

Pressure on Panloe to stand in Truro by- election 


Divide in cost of 
housing widens 


jl — - 

Alliance disarray over M r Sj 

Br Martin Fletcher are almost certain to be «- problem, towjw, is how to OTls^general election earn- 

VSBmSS eluded from the team. replace Mr Pentehgqa, then Baih. Jhe ^ miim 2nd he would not be 


death 


The North-South divide in property prices widened 
sharply in 1986. according to Britain’s biggest budding 
society. While hoase prices in the north of England 
increased by less than 10 per cent tills year, they rose by 
more than 20 per cent hi Greater London and the Sooth- 
East 

The overall aimual rate of increase across the Umted 
Kingdom ms 13.6 per cent, the Halifax Bolding Society 
says. The society predicts that an increase hi the supply of 
new homes win combine with static mortgage rates to 
reduce house price inflation during 1987. 

It amid fall to 15 per cent in London and the South-East 

and is likely to remain in single figures in less prosperous 
areas, the society says. 


By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 

An Alliance plan to an- 
nounce a team of joint elec- 
tion spokesmen on New 
Year’s Day has been thrown 
into disarray by the death last 
Monday in a road accident of 
Mr David Penhahgon, one of 
the very few top Liberals with 
expertise in economics. 


It also emerged yesterday 


am almost certain to be ex- 
cluded from the team- 

Mr Simon Hughes, his 
party’s environment spokes- 
man, and Mr Archie Kirk- 
wood, the health and social 
services spokesman, could 
both have expected to be 
included, while Mr Michael 
Meadowcroft, the race rela- 
tions spokesman, also had a 
c hore , 

But after the defence de- 


problem, however, is how to 
replace Mr Penhaligoa, their 
economic affairs spokesman, 
who had been pencilled in as 
both employment spokesman 
and the liberal representative 
on the joint economics team 
which will be headed by Mr 
Roy J enkins, a former Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer. 


that the three Liberal MPs bade the party leadership is 
who rebelled against the party unsure how far they can be 


Knife deaths search 


leadership on defence at last trusted. 

September’s party assembly The liberals’ most pressing 


Not to be represented on the 
economics team would be 
nnthmlcaMe, but the only 
other Liberal MPS with eco- 
nomic experience are Mr 
Richard Wamwright, wlm will 
not be standing at the next 


has been pencilled in as the 
Alliance foreign affairs 
spokesman. 

There was speculation last 
n igh ? that this blatant gap in 
the Alliance line-up could put 
further pressure on Mr John 
Pardoe, a Liberal economic 
affair s spokesman before he 
lost his seat in 1979, to stand 
in the Truro by-election: 

Mr Paidoe, who runs a 
London-based new technol- 
ogy training agency, has dis- 
counted such a move. He is 


paign ana ne wouw 

able to do both jobs. 


Partv sources confirmed 
vesterday that should Mr 
Fenhaligon’s widow, Annette, 
deride to fight her husband s 
seat, the nomination would be 
hers for the asking. 


It is also likely to include a 
Liberal and an SDP peer. 

Mr Ian Wrigglesworth 
would be the SDP repre- 
sentative beneath Mr Jenin ns 
on the economics team, as 
well as trade and industry 


spokesman. 

Mr Paddy Ashdown, Lib- 
eral trade and industry 


qeouc . an rt industry 

2KS" spokesman, would be in lie 

has for me asking. team, but in another capacity. 

The putative team of AIK- Originally the Uhoafc»we 

SSba-w 


Detectives were yesterday bunting for a man after his 
wife and her mother were found stabbed to death at their 
home. There were two drihbes in the house. 

Police fbuxl the body ofMrs Joan Ord, aged 39, and her 

mother, Mrs Dorothy Abnett, aged 72, who was seriously 
injured, at Rope Walk, Sandhurst, Kent, on Christmas 
Eve. Mis Abnett was taken to the Kent and Sussex 
Hospital, Tunbridge Wells, where she died. 

Police want Co interview Mr Derek Ord, aged 38, who 
has lived in Ashford, Surrey, since separating from his 
wife. He is 5ft 8in, has brown hair and was last seen wear- 
ing leather troosers and a leather jacket. 

He is believed to be driving a red Ford pickup truck. 


Scientists 

discover 

missing 

planet 


Hunt for 
lost girl 


A teenage girl missing 
since early on Christmas 
Day may have been ab- 
ducted. Samantha Eter- 
idge, aged 17, was last seen 
hi a taxi at a quarto* past 
midnig ht when three ntis- 
nfes away from her home in 
Chur digate Road, Ches- 
tnut, Hertfordshire. 

Samantha had been out 
with friends. She later met 
two girt friends and another 
male friend at the Pfongh 
public bouse. The four set 
off borne, with the last in 
the gronp leaving her in the 
taxi. Det Insp William 
Pritchard, of Enfield CID, 
said the taxi had not been 
traced. 


Homeless 
sent away 


More homeless young 
people soaght charity 
accommodation in North- 
ern Ireland this Christmas. 


Eight young people were 
turned away from the the 
Simon Community's youth 
hostel in North Belfast on 
Christmas Eve after all 21 
beds had been cfamted. 

“Last Christmas we had 
only four or five yotmg 
people in the old hostel 
which had 16 beds. This 
Christinas we had 12 
youngsters among the 21 
we were able to accept," the 

director, Mr Jim Doran, 
said. 

Shelter campaign, page S 


Sid sends 


a surprise 

A Gloucestershire boy 
aged 13 received an no- 
expected Christmas 
present from British Gas: a 
£600 cheque and 800 
shares for which he had not 
applied. 

Mr and Mrs Michael 
Young, of Sooth Coney, 
near Cirencester, wrote for 
a prospectus for their son 
Martin (right), but derided 
not to boy any shares. 

When the British Gas 
envelope arrived they 
thought a relative had sent 
him a surprise before 
realizing it ms a mistake. 

British Gas said that a 
computer M bungled. 



Miners’ damages 


The Union of Democratic Mineworkers has negotiated 
£3.2 million damages for Its members dming the year. 
Individual awards range from £50 to £86,000 for serious 
disablement One member, Mr John Beet, aged 30, of 
Cotgrave Colliery, Nottingham, was prepared to accept 
£2325 for back injuries sustained underground but At 

muon’s tawyere finally negotiated a £40,000 settlement - 


Science Editor 

Astronomers have found a 
planet that was declared lost 
SO yean ago. 

The object, named Mally, 
orbits the Sun once every 4 
years and 84 days in a path 
between Mars and Jupiter, 
and was rediscovered by 
detective weak and the use of 
computers. 

Dr Richard West of the 
European Southern Obser- 
vatory, and Dr Lutz 
Schraadel, of the 
Astronomisches 
Rechemnstitut, in West Ger- 
many, used the latest methods 
to search original photographs 
of the object, which was first 
recorded by Karl Reinmuto, a 
young astronomer in Heidel- 
berg, in 1931. 

One hundred pictures of the 
planet have been recovered 
using one of the modern 
telescopes at the southern 
obervatory on La Silla, a 
2,400tnetre-high mountain in 
Chile. 

The planet's image first 
appeared faintly on a photo- 
graphic plate of a camera 
attached to 72cm (28in) tele- 
scope, during observations of 
the constellation Virgo. 

Reinmuth's measurement 
of its position was accepted 
and listed in the catalogue of 
the International Astronomi- 
cal Union. It was described as 
minor planet and given the 
number 1179 and a name 
proposed by the astronomer. 
It is not known why he chose 
to call it Mally. 

No other reports were made 
for five years after the first 
si g h ting , so an attempt was 
mounted to locate the body. 

It was unsuccessful, and in 
an exceptional measure the 
International Astronomical 
Union declared officially that 
planet Mally’ was lost 

The computer analyses pro- 
duced a more accurate 
measurement of the planet's 
orbit, and hence gave astrono- 
mers a better idea of the part 
of the sky in which to focus the 
telescopes. 

The latest information 
shows that Mally is seven 
kilometres in diameter. 


SKXX MUST HE UQUIKTED • All STOCK MUST BE UQUBMTCD • ALL STOCK MUST BE UQUaMEn -ALL STOCK MUST BE UQUDKTED 





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Saboteurs 
‘disrupt 
100 hunt 
meets’ 


A huntsman and excited hounds of the New Forest Hunt gathering before heading into the woods for a Boxing Day hunt 

(Photograph: Stuart Nicol). 


Switch to low-tar grades 


Steady decline in smoking 


By Kenneth Gosling 


Search for 
killer 
of teacher 


The rate of cigarette smok- In 1982, for the first time, the index showed a slight 
ing has declined steadily dor- smokos were a minority in increase in drinking between 
ing the period covered by the every social group and this 1 978 and 1984. In 1978, 39 per 


ing the period covered by the every social group and this 1978and 1984. In 1978,39per hunting the killer ofa father of 
General Household Survey was again the case two years cent were classified as “fre- two whose body was found on 


Police at Bradford, west 
Yorkshire, were yesterday 
hunting the killer of a father of 


(1972-1984), and the. propor- 
tion of people aged 16 and 
over who smoke cigarettes 
continues to falL 
In 1972 , 52 per ceig of men 
and 41 per cent* of women 
were cigarette smokers but by 
1984 these proportions were 
down to 36 per cent of men 
and 32 percent of women - a 
more rapid decline for men 
than for women. 


later. 

Prevalence 


among 


men and women continued to drinkers. 


quent light drinkers*’ and 25 
per cent as” “occasional" 


be much higher in manual By 1984, 42 per cent of 


than non-manual groups, and women were “frequent light’* 
in 1984 there appeared the and 20 per cent “occasional”. 


first' decline among women in However, a recent survey in 


the unskilled manual group Scotland found that between 
since the survey began. 1976 and 1984 alcohol 


TThe average weekly con- 

sumption by smokers began to 06111 bctwccn 1 982 311(1 


decline in the mid-70s. 
Between 1976 and 1984 the 


nee the survey began. 1976 and 1984 alcohol 

Among professional women SSSSESS-rfL, — S"* 
ere was a reduction in 

evalence from 21 per cent to £? l 5h?lSfS? , 5 

jpcc cent between 1982 and 

a reduction in the proportion 
Unlike male smokers, fe- of heavier drinkers — down 


Between 1976 and 1984 the Unlike male smokers, fe- of heavier drinkers — down 
number for adult males fell males in every sodo-eco- fiom 25 per cent in that year to 
from 129 a week to 115. For nomic group smoked more 21 per cent in 1982 and 20 per 
adult females the figures cigarettes a week in 1984 than cent in 1984. 
dropped from 101 to 96. they did in 1972. The Scottish figures showed 


adult females the figures 
dropped from 101 to 96. 

In 1984, for the first time, 
smokers were asked about the 
brands they smoked so that tar 
levels could be identified. 


Obtaining information 
about the population's drink- 
ing is “notoriously difficult", 
the survey says. 


Over three fifths of adult 
smokers used brands classi- 
fied as in the low or low to 
middle tar category. 


There is no way, for exam- 
ple, using the quantity-fre- 
quency (QF) index adopted in 
1978 of telling whether some- 


Tbe Scottish figures showed 
virtually no change in men’s 
drinking habits. 

Drinking habits vary with 
marital status, the survey says. 
In all except the youngest age 
group, n on-married men were 
more likely than married to be 
moderate or heavy drinkers. 

Married women in the 45- 


Christmas Day. 

Mr Donald Swaine, aged 48, 
a teacher, of Hazelhurst Road, 
Bradford, had spent Christ- 
mas Eve celebrating with fel- 
low committee members of 
the (oral branch of the Youth 
Hostel-Association. 

As be walked home alone 
between midnight and 2am he 
was dubbed to death and his 
body was hidden under a 
discarded mattress in a yard in 
Highfidd Place, Manning- 
ham, Bradford. 

Yesterday, detectives were 
making house-to-house in- 
quiries along the two-mile 
route from the Five Lane Ends 
district to where the body was 
found. 

Det Supt Kenneth Baines, 
who is leading the hunt, said: 
“It was a brutal attack and his 
injuries are the worst 1 have 


By a Staff Reporter 

Hunt saboteurs claimed to 
have disrupted 100 Boxing 
Day meets across the country 
yesterday in their most wide- 
spread campaign to dare. 

Bat there were no reports of 
violent or angry clashes., and 
the saboteurs were said to 
have had little impact on the 
193 hunts riding to fox- 
hounds. 

The principal target was a 
meeting of the Surrey Union 
Foxhounds in Guildford, 
where between 70 a nd 1 00 
banner-waving demonstrators 
led a noisy protest. 

Members of the Hunt Sabo- 
teurs Association claimed 
they also cleared neighbouring 
woodland by Mowing horns 
and whistles, and set false 
trails for the hounds. 

A spokesman for the sabo- 
teurs said the protest passed 
off peacefully ami was largely 
good-humoured. 

At Grantham, members of 
the Bealvoir Hunt were met by 
the town's mayor. Mr Paul 
Johnson, wielding a placard 
instead of the traditional stir- 
rup cup. It read: “Killing is not 
a pretty sight". 

Mr Johnson said be was 
against blood sports and 
foxhunting appalled him. 

Protesters claimed they also 
disrupted hunts in Sussex. 
Hampshire, the West Country 
and the Midlands. The Quom 
Hunt at Loughborough. Leic- 
estershire, faced a noisy but 
peaceful demonstration. 

A spokesman for the Hunt 
Saboteur Association said 
last night: “There were more 
hunts sabotaged than ever 
before". 

But he said he had received 
no reports of angry clashes 
between saboteurs and hunts- 
men. 

There were 193 hunts with 
about 19.000 people riding tc 
foxhounds yesterday, accord- 
ing to a spokesman for the 
Masters of Foxhounds Assoc- 
iation. 

He said another one million 
people attended meets as spec- 
tators or followers, and that 
the saboteurs’ actions bad 
little impact 

In Northern Ireland about 
60 anti-field sport campaign- 


er seen in my 28 years of era beat drums, blew whistles. 


Fewer thao half of one per «- 2“ SiMESaS SBfeS 


police service. 

“Anyone who has seen a 
relative come home with 


sounded car horns and played 
music loudly over a public 
address system to distract 


cent smoked brands in the 
middle to high group. 

Women were more than 
twice as likely as men to 
smoke low tar brands. 


three pints of beer three times 
a week and four whiskies three 


than non-mamed to fall into 
the three heaviest drinking 


bloodstained clothing needs to greyhounds at the annual 
know how brutal this attack Boxing Day live hare coursing 


times a week is drinking three categories. 

times a week, six times a week And being married had little 


or some frequency in between. 
However, among women 


effect on men ctasssified as 
moderate or heavy drinkers. 


Iceland storms claim 15 


has been." 

Det Supt Baines said Mr 
Swaine. who was a teacher at 
the Drummond Language 
Centre, in Bradford, had spent 
the evening at the Lane Ends 
and Idlers public houses. 


meeting at CrebiUy, Co An- 
trim, yesterday. 

The anti-coursing protests 
have become a ritual over 
recent years at the two-day 
meeting, beginning on Boxing . 
Day, which is the high spot of 


Continued from page 1 
was carrying from 
Reydarfjoidur to Murmansk. 

The cargo was part of a 
consignment of salted herring 
which the Soviet Union 
agreed to purchase from Ice- 
land last month, averting a 
dispute which had threatened 
trade relations between the 
two countries. 

Eight of the 1 1-man Icelan- 
dic crew managed to scramble 
on to a hferaft, but only five 
were still alive when they were 
rescued by a Lynx helicopter 
from the Danish coastguard 
frigate, Vaedderen, after hav- 
ing been located by an RAF 
Nimrod reconnaisance air- 
craft flying from Lossiemouth. 

The Nimrod had dropped 
survival equipment and kept 
the liferaft under observation 
until the frigate and helicopter 
arrived from the Faroe Is- 
lands, 300 miles to toe south. 

The three crew members 
who did not reach the life raft 


He was last seen shortly toe coursing calendar in the 
after midnight walking from P rov mce. 




Five Lane Ei 
House Road. 


along Swain 



Det Supt Baines said rob- 
bery was a possible motive. 

The police want to trace 
anyone who saw Mr Swaine 
walking alone or accompanied 
between Five Lane Ends and 
Highfield Place. 


Tire British-owned Synetn which ran agrawl off the east 
coast of Iceland at auduight oa Christmas Day 


Mr Swaine and his wife, 
Brenda, aged 51, have two 
children, Martin, aged IS, and 
Helen aged 13. 


Police were on hand to keep 
the protesters and the coursing 
enthusiasts apart. 

In one of its few displays of 
unanimity the recently abol- 
ished Northern Ireland 
Assembly twice voted for the 
abolition of hare coursing but 
the Northern Ireland Office 
minister responsible for the 
environment ignored the vote 




for shock and exhaustion 
aboard the frigate. 

In toe third Christmas sea 
disaster, a Cypriot tanker, the' 
1,600-ton Stainless Trader, 
foundered in heavy seas 20 
mi I p< south of Sardinia. 

The bodies of two of the 18 
crew members — 16 South 
Koreans and two Greeks — 


5 ht on Christmas Day j Mrs Swaine had taken her 

husband in the family car to 
hours after starting their jour- meet his friends and had 


umaa] 92.76: Canartm ni sn¥ 
Dfcr *<*8* 

i rmianq Mkk 9.00; France F 8.00: W 

Hepubac 000:1 


ney from Le Havre. offered to collect him, but he 

The ferry had to be towed had chosen to walk home, 
into Plymouth after fire broke t ■■ ■ 


Vusostavta Din 70a 


were recovered by a ferry boat 
which was one of several ships 


were feared dead, although' braving the storm to searching 
vessels and aircraft from the rough seas for survivors. 


Britain, Denmark, and the 
United States Navy base at 
Keffavik in Iceland continued 
to patrol the area. 

The survivors were treated 


The 280 passengers and die 
crew of the fire-damaged car 
ferry St Killian II reached 
Ireland just after lunchtime on 
Christinas Day, almost 36 


out m its engine room, and 
from there those aboard were 
taken in a fleet of coaches to 
Heathrow where a charter Aer 
Lingus jumbo was waiting to 
fly than home. 

Dublin airport was specially 
opened, for toe first time on a 
Christmas Day, to receive 
toem. 

The passengers' cars were 
being transported from Plym- 
outh aboard another vessel 
and were available for collec- 
tion at Rosslare yesterday. 


WITH WINGS A PACKAGE 
TO INDIA COULD COST AS LITTLE 
AS £658i 


Union fond for Third World 


Britain's second biggest 
union is to take advantage of 
recent government measures 
to raise funds for Third Work! 
development 

The General Municipal 
Boilermakers and Allied Tra- 
des Union is to urge members 
to have charitable donations 
deducted from their pay to 
into a special fund. 

Under measures announced 
just before Christmas, such 


donations win get tax relief vices - as well as direct fem- 
from April so that every £100 ine reliet 
donated will be wdrib an extra “After the success of Band 

£30 to charity. - Aid in providing funds and 

Mr John Edmonds, the raising public awareness of toe 


Oxxoe frum our exciting range of escorted 
tours and experience the rich heritage ofRujustlua^ 
the breathtaking scenery of Kashmir and 
Kathmandu, or the tropical trsnefmUu\’ of Southern 
India. As an alternatkewhy not view the glory of 
Rajasthan by train onboard tlx enchanting PuLce 
on Wheels. , Xy 

A variety qf optional exten- 
dons can reveal the beach tnuz- J y 
sures of Goa, or even the ^ 
mysteries of Bangkok. 

f» farther rnfamutton *baut the U/np 

IW6I87 fiogumn'HvynirhcilAffLl Travel jF 

AtP*aruUQ992 87666. ^ 

r MinctMionri nui*. i'Jkii*. 


union’s general secretary, said 
yesterday: “We will be looking 
at fending development pro- 
jects which relate to the in- 
terests of our own members 
— such as. irrigation and 
power projects, and the 
development of health ser- 


raisrng public awareness of to e 
Third World, our own 'Union 
Aid* should help with long- 
term development 
“But the success of our 
scheme will depend on the co- 
operation of employers in 
providing check-off facilities 
for the staff” 



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"'HH.S2bo. 

-\f :i3!!T-aj 

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: C-'^ j «■ £ ■' 

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‘Safety hazard’ caused 
by tons of duty-free 
goods loaded on planes 




By Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent 

°f duty-free goods could provide secure areas on be 
earned by passeraers or stored board aircraft for storage of nu 
JU S? £ r “J e “T duty-free. This would reduce tal 
llignt are a safety h a za rd and the fire hazard and avoid the « , 
help increase the cost of risk of flying bottles in the * 
airline tickets, says the leading event of turbulence." 


being made to standardize the 
number of bags which can be 
taken on board. 


help increase the cost of 
airline tickets, says the leading 
airline consumer group. 

. The International Federa- 
tion of Airline Passengers' 
Associations (IFAPA) wants 
duty-free goods to be picked 
up on landing rather thaw 
carried backwards and for- 
wards between countries. 

It is pressing for a change in 
regulations to make it possible 
for air passengers to pick up 
their duty free goods after they 
have left their aircraft — per- 
haps ha ving already ordered 
and paid for the goods on 
board. 

But it admits that the idea 
will meet resistance from both 
airlines and airports, which 
rely heavily on duty free sales 
to boost profits. 

IFAPA claims that on the 
North Adamic routes alone. 
72,000 tons of alcohol are 
flown backwards and forwards 
each year, representing a fuel 
wastage of 6.S million gallons, 
which has to be passed on to 
the passengers. 

Bags containing duty-free 
can also block the aisles and 
cause an additional fire 
hazar d 

Pilots, consumer organiza- 
tions and Customs are in 
favour of “point of entry" 
duty-free sales. Bat the air- 
lines and the airports strongly 
oppose the suggestion. 

They argue that not only do 
they make vital extra cash 
from duty-free sales, but there 
would have to be a complete 
change in airport lay-outs to 
accommodate duty-free pur- 
chase on arrival with the 
inevitable delay this would 
bring to passengers. 

Mr Geoffrey Lipman, 
IFAPA’s executive director, 
said: “These are under- 
standable points of view per- 
haps. But IFAPA maintains 
that from a passenger safety 
point of view the arguments 
still far outweigh commercial 
considerations. 


Some of die survivors of the 
Manchester air crash last 
September claimed that their 
exit was blocked by hag s of 
duty-free goods in the aisles 

Air Canada to 
launch cheap 
charter deals 

Air fana«fa js to m»tri» s 
serious attempt to grab a 
bigger share of the booming 
holiday traffic between Britain 
and Toronto, by lamehing its 
own charter flights from 
Gatwick and Prestwick at 
prices well below those now 
offered by British Airways. 

Highly restrictive agree- 
ments between Britain and 
Canada over the price of 
tickets have meant that Air 


• Passenger confidence in air 
travel is beginning to return 
after a year marred by foiling 
oil prices and fears of terror- 
ism, according to British 
Caledonian. 

The airline, faced with the 
prospect of declaring a loss for 
1986, says that 1987 already 
promises to be a money- 
spinner, with more people 
booking seats in advance than 
ever before. 

‘‘There is dear evidence 
that, for BCal at least, the tide 
of trading performance is 
beginning to turn," Mr David 
Colunan, its managing direc- 
tor, said yesterday. 

“It is a little early to be 
conclusive but the signs so for 
this financial year have been 

good. 

“For the first time our 
forward bookings, at well over 
200,000, are greater than the 
number of passengers we ex- 







the market fall to around 20 
per cent during the summer — 
peak tune for families visiting 
friends and relations. 


month. We are confident tha t 
1987 will herald a new era of 
business prosperity." 

The upturn could not have 


The bulk of die passengers c ?™ e at . better hme for the 
now fly with a huge number of “ r,, “ e r route network is 
charter airlines, who operate loc fc«* ra !° serving the 

only in the summer and offer od capuds and has 

flights at well below the sobered more than most from 
no rmal gfogdale pri ce IfveL tbe economic decline of 1 986. 

Air raitaiia has decided to Although the group as a 
hit fan* bv «*TKn- charter' whole is likely to break even, 
fligh t* through travel com- the airline win almost cer- 
panies such as Jetsave. tainly declare a trading loss. 

Charters are completely free ^ ne the main reasons 
of restrictions on price and the the reduction in pas- 

move is bomid to trigger senger-load factor - the num- 
retaliatory moves both by her of people , carried on racb 
British Airways and other of its scheduled flights. That 
airlines which By to Toronto, declined during the year from 
Tbe charters will ran be- an average of 621 per cent in 
tween April 30 and October 24 *?- 59.6 pCT cent in 

and will be at least 15 per cent 1986, resulting in a sharp drop 
down on scheduled fares. An “ 3WH per flight, 
off-peak round trip fare wilfbe Nevertheless, the airline 
£266, rising to a summer peak earned a total of 2371,745 
of £388. passengers on all its routes 

during the year, an increase of 


Susan Lacey and Bombay, the Royal Bengal tiger she trains (Photograph: Ros Drinkwater). 


and under seats. But this was 

not_ pinpointed as a problem deem? to rtrfuce the 


“Duty-free purchase on ar- 
rival is the only sensible long 
term solution. Until such time 
as this system can be in- 
troduced worldwide, airlines 

Top award 
for City 
restaurant 

By Robin Young 

The Times Restaurant of 
the Year is Le Poulbot, the 
Roux brothers' dining room 
for directors and business 
executives in the City of 
London. 

Announcing tbe awards. 
The Times restaurant critic, 
Jonathan Meades, said that in 
the past couple of years the 
English chef Mr Rowley 
Leigh, had transformed a 
competent restaurant into an 
exciting one. 

Mr Leigh worked first at Le 
Gavroche in Mayfeirand then 
buying meal and vegetables 
for the Roux restaurants be- 
fore graduating to a kitchen of 
his own. 

Differing from The Good 
Good Guide, which describes 
Mr Leigh as a faithful disciple 
of the Roux brothers’ style, Mr 
Meades says that his cooking 
is “not recognizably of the 
Roux schooL His style is 
un fussy, direct, muscular". 

An award as Newcomer of 
the Year goes to Mr Nicolas 
BlackJock, of La Bastide in 
Soho, an English chef who 
specializes in French provin- 
cial dishes. 

If Mr Leigh, a Cambridge 
graduate, came to cooking 
comparatively late, starting 
with the Roux brothers when 
he was aged 28, Mr BlackJock, 
an Oxford man, was even 
later. Until a few years ago, 
when be turned 40, be was a 
computer company executive. 

Awards, page 15 


during the inquest 
However, safety authorities 


The only woman tiger 
trainer in Europe is one of the 
stars of a Christmas circus 
which opened yesterday at toe 
Battersea. Park. Big Top 
Hippodrome in south Loudon. 

Mrs Susan Lacey’s co-star 
is Bombay, aged 13 months, a 
Royal Bengal tiger which eats 
10 sheep heads, equivalent to 
15 pounds of meat, each day. 

Six police 
injured 
in clashes 


number of staff on the payroll Police blamed “mindless 

led to a 12 percent increase in yobs" yesterday for violent 
productivity during the year, incidents in the Thames Val- 
giving tbe BCal the highest jgy area over Christmas. Five 
productivitiy level among all policemen were iqjured. 
European scheduled airlines. “j t seems people can’t enjoy 
— ———————— Christmas wjjhout . ruining 

I _L__A P. „ other people’s festivities," a 
PiIIIh Till police spokesman said. 

^ U -M. vrl. The most serious incident 
1 ^ a • began when fighting broke out 

4 T| rr Afi 71 /| between two women drinking 
UtovU J - "* in the Bull and Crown public 
” house at Aylesbury, Bucking- 

hamshire, on Christmas Eve. 
When the landlord intervened 
a brawl developed. 

Twenty-five police officers 
were called to the scene and 
one of them. Detective Con- 
stable John Robinson, aged 
46, was taken to Stoke Mande- 
ville Hospital with two broken 
ribs, a cracked vertebrae and 
bruising to his windpipe. He 
was detained for treatment but 
allowed home yesterday on 
sick leave. 

Tbe fighting spilled into 
Aylesbury town centre and 10 
people were arrested before 
calm was restored. 

More than 30 people were 
involved in a street fight in the 
centre of Slough in tbe early 
horns of Christinas Day. 

Police Constable Mark 
King, aged 24, was taken to 
hospitaT with arm and head 
injuries after trying to break 
up the brawL Mr Graham 
Hanson, a special constable, 
.. ... ... .... - was bitten on his arm and 

lumseif to rehd. At fee age of another officer was bead- 


are increasingly concerned at productivity during the year, 
the amount of hand baggage, giving tbe BCal the highest 
including duty-frees, which is productivitiy level among all 
taken on board. Efforts are European scheduled airlines. 


British debut for 
virtuoso aged 14 


By Gavin BeB 
Arts Correspondent 

A Canadian muskstu aged 
14, who has been deserfoed as 
the greatest young violinist 
since Mikhail Goldstein, fa to 
make his European concert 
debut In Bristol. 

Corey Cerovsek (right), who 
also displays a precocious 
talent for mathematics and 
languages, win perform as 
soloist in Mozart’s A major 
Concerto at fee Colston Hall 
on January 22 before appear- 
ing at the Festival Hall in 
London the next evening. 

Rudolf Barshai, who will 
conduct the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra for both 
concerts, is one of Cerovsek’s 
greatest admirers. 

“His imagjnutiun is Wke an 
adult’s, his style is that of an 
experienced artfat I remember 
hearing Goldstein inRnssia m 
the 1930s play tbe Mea- 
I defasohn Concerto at fee age 
of 12. 1 bare not heard anyone 
like him, until now." 

Goldstein, who played a 
public concert in Odessa when 
be was wed fire, left the 
Soviet Union in 1964, and 
settled in Hamburg. 

Cerovsek, who is of Aus- 
trian parentage, has per- 
formed wife more than a dozen 
orchestras in Canada and the 
United States, and played far 
the Queen during her Ca- 
nadian tour in 1984. 

He was given a miniature 
violin on his fifth birthday, 
shortly after be had taught 


s' . 


nine, he successfully chat- ^ fletL 


people 


tenged 3#» youngsters to wfa 

his cotmtry’s overall National p^ng spilled on to the 


Marie Co m p et it i on hi violin, 
piano and ensemble. He fa 


street outside Selfridge’s in 
Oxford on Christmas Eve. 


studying at fee Indiana School Two policemen on plain 
pfoys * “To" clothes duty were attacked 


eighths-rize Storioni violin, 
dated 1789. 


| when they arrested a man 
suspected of shoplifting. 

PC Nicholas Hackett, aged 


Cerovsek, who speaks Itaf- PC Nicholas Hackett, aged 
ian and German, and is learn- 27, was taken to hospital with 
ing Russian, says he dislikes a broken bone near his right 


being regarded as a gemas or a 
prodigy; “They make me 
sound like a different species. 
I play the violin becaose I love 
it" 


eye and Det Constable Robert 
Krykant, aged 28. needed 
hospital, treatment for head 
injuries. Three men were 
arrested. 


Queen’s Christmas broadcast 


Royal delight at new-look message 


By Jonathan Miller 
Media Correspondent 

The Queen was yesterday 
said to be delighted with the 
new look given to her annual 
Christmas message by a team 
of BBC film makers led by Sir 
David Attenborough. 

The message, transmitted 
around the world by satellite, 
was a break from the normally 
formal Queen’s broadcast 
delivered from her desk at 
Buckingham Plalace. 

The Queen emphasized tra- 
ditional Christian values, and 
recalled the meaning of the 
Christmas story. 

But the presentation was 
thoroughly contemporary, 
with the Queen, in tweed coat 
and relaxed mood, seen 
attending the annual Christ- 
mas party for the children of 
Palace employees as Father 
Christmas arrived, escorted 
by pipers, in a horse-drawn 
sleigh. 

The Queen was shown tak- 
ing the children on a tour of 


Christmas changes peo- 
ple — if only for a few days — 
and is a God-given sign of the 
possibility of peace on earth 
and goodwill among on, the 
Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr 
Robert Rmcie, said in his 
Christmas sermon at Canter- 
bury Cathedral. 

He said; “For most of the 
year we are struck by the 
seeming impossibility of peace 

the Royal Mews. She also 
showed them the horses that 
had pulled the carriages at last 
summer’s Royal Wedding. As 
a choir sang “Away m a 
Manger " The Queen turned 
to the camera to deliver the 
formal part of her message. 

She said: “For the children, 
the party and the meeting with 
Father Christmas, are perhaps 
the most exciting part of the 
evening. But l hope that a 
walk through the stables also 
helps to bring the traditional 
Christmas story alive for 

• hi'ff 


and fee intractability of the 
huge problems and evils which 
beset fee human family. 

But Christmas stirred into 
life. “Loving kindness fa 
contagious: it breeds fa society 
no less than alienation or 
crime or disease. Normal 
strains and tensions are by- 
passed at Christmas by mu- 
tual tolerance, and so their 
effects &3 to appear.” 

“I hope ft also helps them to 
realize now fortunate they are 
to have comfortable homes 


others as you would like them 
to treat you.” 

The lO-minuie film was the 
first to be produced by Sir 
David Attenborough, the 
naturalist and broadcaster. Sir 
David was selected by tbe 
Queen for tbe assignment in 
September, after the death tbis 
year of Mr Richard Cawston. 
who made the film The Royai 
Family in 1969 and had 
produced 15 annual Christ- 
mas messages. 

Broadcasters said yesterday 
that Sir David's production 
was the first to make fiill use of 


mid warm beds to go to, unlike contemporary television tech- 
tfae Holy family, who bad to niques. 


share with the anim ak he- . . . . 

inn.” the decision to make the film 

virtually at the last minute, to 
It was no easy task to bring produce a seasonal flavour, 
up children, “whether you are Filming was on December 1 8. 
famous or quite unknown," In the past,- the film was 
she said. “But we could all made in early December, to 
help by letting the spirit of allow time for film to be 
Christmas fin our homes with shipped by air to the scores of 


love and care and by heeding 
our lord’s iniunctinn to fte3t 


countries where tbe Queen’s 
message is televised. 


Bengal entrancer 


The Gerry Cottle and Brian 
Austin combined Christmas 
dress fa being staged fa a 12- 
pole tent which has previously 
boused the Bolsboi Ballet. It 
seats 2,000 people around the 
central ring, and also allows 
the ekens to have its zoo and 


all its caravans under cover. 

The show includes a herd of 
elephants from fee Austin 
Circus and Lacey's lions, fee 
three largest performing lions 
in Europe. Tbe latter act 
featmes Mrs Lacey’s bus- 
band, Martin, who, in time- 




— — 

£4,000 win 
will pay 
school fees 

A trade association sec- 
retary fa fee sole winner of 
Wednesday’s Portfolio Gold 
prize of £4,000. 

Mr Ian Hall, aged 57, of 
Farnham, Surrey, has played 
the game “non-stop” since it 
started In The Times. 

Mr Hall, secretary of the 
Chamber of Coal Traders’ 
Association, said: “Winning 
Portfolio Gold was an 
astoafahhte thing to have hap- 
pened on Christmas Eve. I am 
quite thrilled.” 

When asked how he in- 
tended spending the prize 
mosey, die father of four said: 
“On a good holiday and school 
fees. The winnings will cer- 
tainly the financial bar- 
den a bit." 

Readers wbo wish to play 
fee game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
toe 

Portfolio Gold, 

Tbe Times, 

. PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 


Youths sought 
in hunt for 
girl’s killer 

rw - n i rMt . Police hunting the killer of 

Dnnk water). Nicola Spencer, aged seven, 

honoured tradition, puts his yesterday trying to trace 
bead inside a lion’s month. 11,0 y«»fes who were seen 

dose to her borne. 

David Jfonyof’s musical They were semi bet Thors- - 
down troupe, tbe Flying day njght at 10.10- just 30 t 
Cherokees, and a team of minutes before her body was 1 
footballing dogs are also fa- fonnd at her bedsit home fa . 
daded fa fee show, which will Grove Rood, Skegness, Lin- - 
continue until January 10. coins hire. 


The Christmas circus will 
end with a wild west finale. 


Success in drink-drive fight 


Police officers in Not- 
tinghamshire, where Britain’s 
most stringent think-drive 
campaig n is being mounted, 
yesterday claimed to be win- 
ning the battle to .persuade 
motorists to stay sober. 

After a week of the force's 
Christmas campaign, 3,337 
drivers have been stopped and 
tested, but only 93, or 2.8 per 
cent were found to be over tbe 
legal limit. 

“The ' public seem to be 
getting the message," a police 
spokesman said yesterday. 
“The number of accidents is 
down and the number of 
positive tests also down. We 
are very pleased with the way 
it is going." 

Derbyshire Police have 


breath-tested 409 motorists 
over the last week and 35 
drivers were found to be over 
the limit. 

“The figures are certainly 
no worse than last year, when 
over the same period we tested 
325 drivers, with 31 positive,” 
a police spokesman stud 
yesterday. 

In Cumbria, 30 driven were 
found to be over the limit in 
drink-drive tests carried out 
during the five days up to 
Christmas Eve. That is an 
increase of three over the 
same period last year. ■ 

• Mr Mike Ross, aged 39, a 
former disc jockey, will spend 
New Year’s Day in Norwich 
jail having been arrested 
twice in four days for alleged 


drink-driving offences. 
Appearing under his real 


Both are described as aged 
about 18 and 5ft 7ins talL One 
was wearing a leather jacket 
and jeans and both were 
walking along the road to- 
wards a Chinese restaurant 
Det Sopt Tom Coates, who 
is leading fee inquiry, said his 


name of Colin NoviUe, the appeal for the yotrths to come 
former presenter with Radio toward was as a result of new 
North Sea International, a ™o™aoon. 

“pirate" station, was re- 
manded in custody until Janu- 
ary 2 by magistrates at Great 
Yarmouth, Norfolk. 

MrNovillc, of Nelson Road 
South, Great Yarmouth, was 
arrested 50 minutes into 
Christmas Day when his car 
mounted a pavement in the 
town centre. 

The court was told that he 
was already on bail from the 
same court in connection with 
an alleged offence on Decem- 
ber 21 and from a court in 
Lowestoft on a similar charge 
dating from December 3. 


Shelters role 
for city caves 

Prehistoric caves fa Not- 
tingham may be equipped with 
water, geueratote and food so 
thatjbey can b£ used as fall- 
out shelters fa fee event of a 
unclear war. 

The proposal for the caves, 
some of which are now being 
brought into ose as tourist 
attractions, fa being consid- * 
ered by the county’s emer- 
gency planners. 








CHARLES LINDBERGH CROSSES THE ATLANTIC, 1927. 



VOYAGER FLIES AROUND THE WORLD NON-STOR 1986. 






• ••■• i* 

:u 

- :•> rg 

- 

•» ?.-•** 
•W# 


Since 1903, we have managed to turn many flights 
of fancy into reality. 

For Voyager, we developed a unique synthetic oil. 
It is stable across a broader temperature range and 
for longer periods than any similar lubricant. 


But we aren’t just concerned with aerial one-offs. 
At present, one third of all the world’s commercial 
aircraft rely on Mobil lubricants. 

An equally impressive record, 
we’re sure you’ll agree. I wf'U'Bp|| 


r 




A -3. . /• - ■ 













THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Housing in Britain 


Campaign to 
help the 
100,000 who 
are homeless 

By Christopher VVarman, Property Correspond en t 


One hundred thousand 
families will this year be 
recorded as homeless by local 
authorities, compared' with 
53,000 in 1978 and 93.000 in 
1985. 

At least 160,000 people will 
be living in board and lodging 
accommodation, 4 million 
homes are substandard and at 
the present slum clearance 
rate a house built today will 
have to last for 1,000 years. 

These are some 'of the 
statistics produced by the 
International Year of Shelter 
for the Homeless, which is to 
be launched on January 5 by 
Lord Seaman, president of 
the United Kingdom Council 
for the International Year. 

The initiative coincides 
with the tenth anniversary of 
the Homeless Persons Act 
1977. which layed down res- 
ponsibilities for local auth- 
orities in housing homeless 
families. 

The council is supported in 
Britain by all the main 
organizations involved in 
housing, as well as leading 
international aid charities. 

The international picture is 
much worse. It is estimated 
that 100 million people have 
no shelter whatsoever, living 
in doorways, on pavements, 
and on rubbish lips. 

An estimated 30 million 
children live on the streets of 
Third World dues, while 
50.000 people a day die from 


pie effects of bad housing, 
inadequate sanitation and 
poor water supply. 

More than 100 countries 
will be working to improve the 
living conditions of homeless 
and poorly housed people. 
The two main aims of the 
campaign are to generate pub- 
lic concern about home- 
lessness and poor housing, 
and to generate funds for 
demonstration projects in the 
United Kingdom and abroad. 

Lord Scarman, who carried 
out a report into the Brixton 
rioting ffve years ago, says that 
in his report he urged the case 
for local people to have more 
of a role in urban regenera- 
tion, and that be had recently 
seen ways in which it was 
heppening, in particular 
through housing association 
developments. 

He said: “Partnership be- 
tween housing associations, 
the private sector and the 
public sector, working with 
professionals sympathetic to 
the aims of their public, will be 
a model for developments in 
the future. 

“A key task for all of us in 
the International Year is to 
consider bow we can ensure 
consumer choice is a reality 
not only for those who can 
afford to buy their homes, but 
for the 30 per cent plus who 
will never be able to afford to 
buy.” 


Rapid increase in 
two-car families 


By David Sapsted 

There is an unprecedented now ha 
boom in two-car families in almost * 
Britain, according to the latest ore — w] 
Government figures, with the eo recor 
wife's “runabout” on the verge of taiBn 
of becoming the norm rather quarter 
than the exception in middie- one in : 
class homes. 18 per o 

Between 1979 and 84, two- . House 
car ownership in households professk 
headed by a professional rose ooes 
from 34 pm- cent to 46 per “"W ® 
cent, reflecting the rapid in- less heel 
crease nationwide in the pur- families 
chase of a second vehicle. 

According to the Gov- 
enunent’s General Household 
Survey 1984 , there was a rise JJJ L y 
in two-car families from 9 per °T < r s . w _ 
cent in 1972 to 17 per cent in 
1984 the 

* chasers 

While the top end of the “Jjg; 

socio-economic group led the 
way, evetf the proportion of 
households whose head was AJfSioi 
described as “economically j MMneg _ 
inactive” increased from 2 to 
4 cent sharply; 

Almost two-thirds of house- increase 
holds had the nse of at least since tin 
one car in 1984, a 4 per cent tekphom 
increase over the previous ^ 
year. shown a 

The figures in the survey, the eighl 
produced by the Office of cent in 1 
Population Censuses and Ssr- 1984. 
veys, showed no slowdown in The ! 
the drive towards the owner- while o 
ship of consumer durables in were less 
general: 83 per cent of all Mesthan 
households had a colour cent out 
tele vis ionby 1984, compared telephone 
with 49 per emit eight years a refrige 
earlier. moniy oi 

Even among economically surveyed, 
inactive heads of household, homes on 
76 per cent of homes had col- Deep 
our sets, the proportion rising continue 
to 94 per cent among prof- popularit 
essionals. Since t 

The number of families with list of si 
only a black-and-white set fell ownershi 
to just 14 per cent per cent 

Two-thirds of households per cent. 


now have central heating — 
almost double the 1972 fig- 
ure — while ownership of vid- 
eo recorders shows little sign 
of tailing off, with almost a 
quarter of all homes having 
one in 1984, compared with 
18 per cent a year earlier. 

Households beaded by a 
professional, normally the 
ones most likely to own con- 
sinner durables, proved to be 
less likely to have a video than 
families of skilled manu al 
workers. 

The survey indnded home 
computers for the first time, 
and 9 per cent of all house- 
holds were found to have one, 
with large families proving to 
be the most frequent pur- 
chasers. 

At the other end of the scale, 
no single people aged over 60 
owned one. 

Although the number of 
homes with refrigerators and 
washing machines has risen 
sharply since 1972, the rate of 
Increase has slowed down 
since the seventies, and only 
telephone ownership among 
the “oW-wave” durables has 
shown a significant change in 
the eighties — up from 75 per 
cent in 1981 to 78 pa- cent in 
1984. 

The survey shows that, 
while unemployed workers 
were less likely to own dura- 
bles than those in work, 48 per 
cent out of a job had a 
telephone and 93 per cent had 
a refrigerator, the most com- 
monly owned of all the items 
surveyed, with 94 per cent of 
homes owning one. 

Deep freezes, meanwhile, 
continue to enjoy increasing 
popularity. 

Since they were added to the 
list of survey items in 1978, 
ownership has grown from 32 
per cent of households to 61 
per cent. 


Coastal 
trekker 

property t> e g,ms 
owners final leg 

Nearly one third of homes A woman set off today on 
in Britain which are owned tte last leg of her 5,000-uiile 
outright are owned by wotoen, walk round Britain's coastline, 
according to the General Miss Helen Krasner, aged 
Household Survey 1984 (Our 38, covered miles ianng 
Property Correspondent the past 10 months, but put 
writes). her feet up over Christmas. 

Of the total of 32 per cent. The secretary from Croy- 
most are widows (23 per- don, south London, now 
cent), with 6 per cent single 500 miles to go before die 
women and 3 per cent di- reaches Brighton Pier and 
voiced or separated. ends an adventure that began 

Of homes being bought with at the same spot on Marchl 
a mortgage, the vast majority with a send-off from the town 
(92 per cent) have a man as mayor, 
the head of the household. Although a committed Bod- 
with only 8 per cent women, dhist, the fust thing Miss 
The total is made up of icnt^nw wanted to get straight 

3 per cent single women, whea jfe runes caught up 

4 per cent divorced or sepa- with her at the Bfaxhail Youth 
rated and I per con widows. Hostel, near WoOdbridge, Suf- 

Owner occupation is high- folk, was that she did not set 
est in southern England, with off in search of Zen. 

67 per cent in the South-east *«peonle are alwavs trvineto 
(bu. o nly 5l .iy.o-. !■ 

Greater London). 66 po- cent ^ ifs break a 

3Ild per record « find the meaning of 
cent in East Anglia- |f s ^ that at alL I just 

The proportion m Wales is it was a nice thing to 

60 per cent and in Scotland, ITV?* s 

where renting is much more M _ 

common, 37 per cent. . Smce she wan cfuld grow- 

The survey discloses that 

about 20 per cent of local ““LSEJS 

authority tenants considered a ft er working as a temporary 

buying their home io 1984, 

and 8 per cent took active J**fL pre “ 

steps towaitish. seated Itoelf. 

Thai showed a decline from Miss Krasner is passionate 
10 per cent in 1981 and 1982 ab0Ht the sea, and doubted the 
and 9 per cent in 1 983. purpose of the adventure only 

However, the report says when the coastal path took her 
that with around 600,000 sales 

of council houses to sitting ^ifooly tone thatl feb fed 

tenants in 1981 to 1984, a «P and started wondering what 
reduction in the proportion of 1 was_ do g, was when I 
remaining tenants expressing COBWn 1 see the sea. Being on 
an interest in buying might ™y own was very rarely a Miss Helen Krasner strides oi 

have been expected. fSSJ^S SHfl 7 asn ' t - «.ir ™ 

Govemment figures show tlmt difficult- ^tiflhad mg© 1 ”, 
that about one million tenants mfand to avmd an estuary I ^ 

have now bought their homes «■**»*«»■» 1 wohW some ' i h 
under the rght-lofruy leg- ■““J" 1 ’ deserted road, 

islation I love the sea - it s a very In the latter instance Miss 

Tenants who were not British thi^." Kramer was about to dive into 

considering buying gave as the In spite of the misgivings of the bushes fearing an attacker 
main reason finance (39 per fronds who worried about her with evfl intentions, but it 
cent! while 25 ner cent cave walking alone. Miss Krasner turned out to be a woman who 
She combined famrsof^old sta' *ly defended the natives had recognized ter from Skye 
age and finance ° r island she has almost two months previously. 

A total of 9 percent said circumnavigated. “I think I remember the 

that they were no longer twke she fed people most - they were real- 

considering buying because endangered - on a wild stre- ly nice, friendly and hos- 
tile accommodation was in *** rf Lincolnshire when she pita Me. It's a heck of a lot 
poor repair or lacked am- startled a mother seal snekfing safer for a woman walking 
emties. 

A rare moth Funds flow 

dKhiot like the people in the holds Up B , 

£7m bypass ^ sTUfSSS^' 

decade ago. The total is now A rare moth the size of a > 

19 per cent, compared with thumbnail, Ckoristoneura SSSvsurvStbeSofition 
1 5 per cent in 1 975. lafauryana, is holding up the ? £5Ef££? 

As a result fewer are living start of work on the £7 million H1 ^ 5 If* SjJL. 

in semi-detached houses (30 three-mile Dersuigham-Snett- 

per cent compared with 34 per isham bypass in WSrtNorfblk. f&S ** 

cent), while the number in The Nature Conservancy Grater London Arts, 
terrace houses has increased Council has objected at the Tne ■.association, which is 
from 28 per cent to 30 per eleventh hour to the route of funded mainly by the Arts 
cent. the bypass because it will go . 15 distributing 

Purpose-built flats or mai- over Dersingham Bog, the £1-0,000 m accordance win 
sonettes account for 15 per only known breeding site in rumionty of supporting Afro- 
cent compared with 1 4 per Britain of the moth. Caribbean, Asian and other 

cent in 1975, while 5 per cent . Mr Henry Bellin gham, Con- communities which it regards 
live in convened flats or servative MP for Norfolk 
maisonettes (8 per cent in North-West, said yesterday 





Miss Helen Krasner strides out to complete her marathon walk (Photograph: Chris Harris) 


a calf, and in BerwJck-on- 
Tweed when a car screeched to 
a halt just behind her on a 
deserted road. 

In the latter jmstanee Miss 
Krasner was about to dive into 


turned out to be a woman who 
had recognized ter from Skye 
two months previously. 

“I think I remember the 
people most - they were real- 
ly nice, friendly and hos- 
pitable. It's a heck of a lot 
safer for a woman walking 


around on her own that it 
might otherwise seem from the 
stories one hears In the 
newspapers. 

“People, especially women 
ask me if it's dangerous. I say 
yes, it was pretty dang ero us — 
I was nearly gored by a bull 
and I walked on a crumbling 
path over a cliff, bat that's net 
what they mean.” 

The main dangers have been 
trying to avoid being ran over 
by cars when walking along 
narrow roads at night, and 
negotiating the natural haz- 


Funds flow to minority arts groups 

By Gavin Bell, Arts Correspondent 


1975) and the remaining 1 per 
cent live in accommodation 
including business premises. 
General Household Survey 1984 
(Stationery Office; £1 1.70). 


that be would urge Mr Nicho- 
las Ridley, Secretary of State 
for the Environment, not to 
allow the tiny insect to delay 
work on the bypass. 


The artistic activities of 
ethnic; and social minority 
groups in -London have ev- 
idently survived the abolition 
of the Greater London Coun- 
cil, judging by the latest 
package of grants approved by 
Greater London Arts. 

The association, which is 
funded mainly by the Arts 
Council, is distributing 
£126,000 in accordance with 
its priority of supporting Airo- 
Caribbean, Asian and other 
communities which it regards 
as being under-funded. 

Hence, the biggest alloca- 
tion of £12,000 goes to the 
London College of Printing 
for a film production course 
for women, specifically black 
women. 


About £2,000 has been 
granted towards translating 
the text of a photographic 
exhibition about Asian 
women in Britain, and £300 
for a similar project about 
pensioners from the Carib- 
bean, Africa and Asia. 

A photographer in Ealing, 
west London, receives £400 to 
depict a more sombre sub- 
ject — undertakers and 
funerals. 

The London Forum of 
Black Arts Officers is being 
riven £2,100, apparently to 
find out how to acquire more 
public funds. 

The project is officially 
described as “research into 
funding policies, and patterns 
of funding, of London bor- 


Church campaign aims to strengthen marriage 


By Our Religious Affairs 
Correspondent 

The Roman Catholic 
Church tomorrow launches a 


experience marriage break- 
down, admitting that this is a 
growing problem in the Ro- 
man Catholic community, 
while calling for positive steps 


three-year campaign to strep- within the Church to counter 
gthen family life against the breakdown and divorce. 


threats presented by the mod- 
ern world and the erosion of 
Christian moral values. 


A long synopsis of the 
pastoral letters, issued by the 


In a co-ordinated move Church in advance, states that 
each bishop in England and ^ey are.«£ drawing attention 


Wales has written a pastoral 
letter to be read in all parish 
churches in his diocese at 
Mass tomorrow, focusing on 
certain common themes. 

They emphasize the pres- 
sures on marriage and the 
sympathy due to those who 


to the rising divorce rate in 
England and Wales, up by 11 
per cent last year, and the fact 
that one in three marriages 
now ends this way. 

Unhappiness at work, un- 
employment, poverty and bad 
housing are among the 


commonest causes of strain 
within marriage^ while a 
breakdown in moral standards 
has undermined the ideal of 
lifelong commitment, they 
say. Some blame television. 

Cardinal Hume of West- 
minster, in his letter, says: “I 
would hope that in these years 
of crisis for family life we will 
be able as a church to do much 
more, especially to offer sup- 
port to couples in the early 
years of their marriage''. 

Everyone in the parish 
community has a part to play 
in promoting happy mar- 
riages, be adds. 

The general tone of the 


letters is supportive rather 
than condemnatory, and more 
than one of them has kind 
words to say to those who are 
suffering or have suffered 
marriage breakdown. 

The Most Rev Derek 
Woriock, Archbishop of Liv- 
erpool, states: “The failure of 
marriage is a traumatic experi- 
ence from which people re- 
cover only slowly. At such 
times neighbours, friends and 
the parish community need to 
offer love and support to those 
experiencing difficulties." 

The Right Rev Hugh Lind- 
say, Bishop of Newcastle, 
slates in his letter that God “is 


very dose to the broken 
hearted” 

They propose to strengthen 
the efforts of church agencies 
dealing with marriage prob- 
lems, but they all regard the 
key contribution as coming 
from those whose marriages 
have been successful. 

While Cardinal Hume 
emphasizes that preparation 
for marriage begins in child- 
hood, the Right Rev Augus- 
tine Harris, Bishop of Midd- 
lesbrough, attacks television 
for the way it portrays family 
breakdown as a subject of 
comedy while trivializing 
marriage. 


arris provided by a wfld and 
compelling coast, with rocks 
and diffs to dhnh, rivers and 
estuaries to cross, and the 
vagaries of weather and tides 
to be constantly watched. 

intimately, die impression 
of a benign and cheerful 
people will tmger in her mem- 
ory. 

“The sea and the teantifiil 
scenery wOl always be there, 
faHt it's the people that have 
made this trip spedaL They 
are the things that vary, that 
have provided the warmth.” 


oughs relating to black arts”. 

A similar amount will help 
finance an introductory arts 
course for young black un- 
employed, with special pro- 
vision for disabled and single 
parents. 

Social minorities are sup- 
ported with £2,000 towards 
the publishing costs of a gay 
and lesbian magazine in 
Islington, north London, and 
£1,000 for a series of events, 
readings and workshops by a 
group in Camden, north 
London, called Lesbian 
Speakeasy. 

The most intriguing project, 
which attracted a grant of 
£1,750, is a 40-minute film by 
Zooid Pictures in Islington. 

It is called Dead Pigeons. 


Inquiry 
into power 
station 
explosion 

A panel of inquiry has been 
set up to investigate a power 
station explosion which caus- 
ed a leakage of 8,000 gallons of 
oiL 

Officials from the Central 
Electricity Generating Board 
(CEGB) were yesterday assess- 
ing what damage had been 
caused by the leakage into the 
Bristol Channel. 

The CEGB said yesterday 
that the transformer which 
blew at the Aberthaw power 
station, near Barry, South 
Wales, on Christmas Day had 
contained about 15,000 gal- 
lons of light ofl. 

The leak was caused by the 
explosion of the transformer, 
which channelled electricity 
created at the coal-fired sta- 
tion to the national grid. The 
teak has now been stopped. 

Mr Mike Green, of the 
CEGB, said: “We do not know 
the reason for the fire. A panel 
of inquiry has been set up to 
investigate." 

The explosion had badly 
damaged the concrete build- 
ing in which it had occurred, 
he said. No one was in the 
transformer building and no 
injuries were reported. 

Mr Green said that officials 
had also been checking for 
sigps of the discharge on 
beaches, but so far no oil was 
visible. 

One of the three generators 
at the 1,500 megawatt station 
was not operable yesterday as 
a result of damage caused by 
the explosion. 

Mr Green said a replace- 
ment transformer would be 
brought into operation early 
next year. 

Elephant Lola 
scatters 
hotel guests 

An elephant gave Father 
Christmas and hotel guests a 
fright when a holiday 
spectacular went wrong; 

The five-year-old elephant, 
called Lola, panicked as she 
delivered Christmas Day 
presents to children at the 
Cavendish hotel at East- 
bourne, East Sussex. 

She snapped her reins, 
dumped Mr Bruce Kirtley, 
aged 53, ho* rider, dented two 
parked cars and charged to- 
wards the glass entrance doors 
of another hold. 

Guests there scattered, but 
the elephant’s handler stopped 
her on the hotel steps. 

No one was hurt, and the 
elephant went on to hefo Mr 
Kirtley, a local newsagent 
dressed as Father Christmas, 
to deliver the presents. 

Mr Philip Dodd, the hotel 
manager who hired the ele- 
phant, said- “A wheel of the 
sleigh got caught ou the kerb 
of a flower bed as it came 
round the corner and the noise 
spooked Lola. The sleigh 
broke into bits in the road and 
Santa feU off!” 

Mr Kirtley, who sustained 
bruises, said: “It certainly 
livened things up a bit.” 

Protection for 
social workers 

Social workers in Derby- 
shire are to work in pairs and 
be issued with personal attack 
alarms costing up to £1,500 
each, because of the number of 
attacks on social services staff. 

The precautions were ag- 
reed by the county's social 
services committee, which 
was told that three social 
workers had been kilted in 
Britain in the past 1 8 months. 

Horse spends 
day in ditch 

Firemen battled for five 
hours early yesterday to save a 
horse stuck in a muddy ditch. 

An hydraulic platform was 
used to rescue the four-year- 
old Welsh cob stallion at 
Howbury Farm, in Erilh, 
Kent. 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


WORLD SUMMARY 


Eta bomb hits 
French hotel 

Madrid — Authorities here yesterday waned Frencb- 
Owned companies to take special anti-terrorism precautions. 


after bombs killed a policeman and injured two other people 
in a supermarket in tbe Basque country on Christmas Eve 
and damaged a Madrid hotel on Christmas Night (Harry 
Debefins writes). 

Police were working on the as sump ti o n Hwt the latest at- 
tacks are part of a campaign a gainst French htiw^n in 
Spain by the outlawed terrorist organization, Eta, in protest 


French extraditions and deportations of Eta 

activists. 

Notwithstanding a gaping hole in the hade wall, the 
Novotel Hotel, part of a French hostelry chain, was open for 
business here again yesterday. 




m coma 

Washington — Mr Wfl- 

tfae recovered 

all normal brain functions 
after surgery for removal of 
a tumour last week, accord- 
ing to accounts published 
here (Christopher Thomas 
writes). 

Mr Casey, aged 73, suf- 
fered two seizures on 
December 17, a day before 
he was due to testify in tbe 
Senate on secret arms sates 
to Iran. According to one 
report, Mr Casey remains 
in a partial coma. 

Ministry fire mystery 

Manila (Renter, AP)— The Philippines Foreign Minster, 
Mr Salvador Laurel, said yesterday that a fire which gutted 
three Boots of his Fozeipi Ministry may have been 
accidental bat coaid also have been set by terrorists. 

Mr Laurel said the fire “could have been due to faulty wir- 
nog bat we are not rating oat the possibility of sabotage or 
arson'’. It was followed willun as hoar by anotha- blaze 
which damaged the Ministry of Public Works and 
Highways. 

Meanwhile, in Tawnimanga City, more than 600 families 
fled to emergency shelters after tribesmen raided the 
provincial capital m retaliation for tee killing of one of their 
leaders, a Red Cross official said yesterday. 

Assiut Rhine 

clashes spill 


Asshit (Renter) — Police 
arrested 111 people yes- 
terday during street da- 
shes with Mislim militants 
demanding the im- 
plementation of Islamic 
laws in Egypt, security 
officials said. 

Police fired tear gas and 
made baton charges to 
disperse the demonst ra t or s 
who shouted anti-Gov- 
ernraent slogans. At least 
six policemen and six dem- 
onstrators were slightly in- 
jured, officiate said. 


Zurich (Reuter) — An 
accident at a Swiss chemi- 
cal plant on the upper 
Rhine has erased pollution 
of the river, police said. 

The incident occurred 
early on Christinas Eve 
whoi between 400 aid 500 
litres of o3 escaped into the 
cooling system of the plant, 
about 50 miles south of 
Lake Constance, and then 
into the river. The com- 
pany's fire brigade tried to 
contain the slick in a waste 
water reservoir. 


French 

railmen 

losing 

ground 

From Susan MacDonald 

Paris 

As the week-old train strike 
continued throughout France, 
the director-general of the 
state-owned railways, M Jean 
Dupuy, stated yesterday that 
new negotiations could oi 
begin if the strikers went ba 
to work. 

Talks, originally set for next 
month, took place on Monday 
in view of the strike, but broke 
down after the railways 
managment refused to 


higher than a 3 per cent wage 
increase for 1987 and pat off 
until early next year dis- 
cussions on working con- 
ditions and wage structures. 

The new negotiations would 
be wider-based, he said. 

The strike, which coincided 
with the end of the school 
term, has created great diffi- 
culties for thousands of 
Christmas and New Year 
holidaymakers, and ski resorts 
have been particularly badly 
affected. 

However, as the strike has 
continued so alternative 
forms of long-distance trans- 
port have sprung up: 

The gap between manage- 
ment and strikers appears as 
wide as ever, but the contin- 
ued firm standby the railways 
means that the employers 
hope that the unpopularity of 
the strike over the Christmas 
holiday period and the alter- 
native forms of transport will 
play a part in making strikers 
get back to work. 

Some strikers have set up 
their own grass-roots commit- 
tees because they are afraid 
that tbe unions involved will 
not interpret their feelings 
correctly. 

The railways management 

yesterday refused to meet the 
representatives of the 
committees 




A white property owner in Natal, South Africa, worried by the movement of .Asians and 

blades into an all-white area, going on armed patrol to ensure none cross his fences. 

Freed dissident may need pacemaker 

Sakharov praises reforms 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


After lying deserted for 
nearly two years, the small, 
seventh-storey fiat at 48b 
Chkalov Street has resumed 
its pivotal place in Moscow’s 
intellectual society as Dr 
Andrei Sakharov has used his 
new-foand freedom to give 
interviews on aa extraordinary 
range of controversial issues. 

nokmg relaxed despite 
heart problems, whkh his wife 
believes may necessitate the 
nse of a heart pacemaker, the 
Nobel Peace Prize winner has 
lent his support to many of the 
reforms in Soviet life which 
Mr Gorbachov is trying to 
implement in tbe face of toagh 
conservative opposition. 

"The sort of articles that are 
now appearing read like some 
of die declarations from dis- 
sidents that were issued in the 
1970s and for which many of 
my friends were jaDed,” tire 
65-year-old physicist said. 
“The big change is the appear- 


ance of gfosnotf (openness) in 
orar everyday life. 

“There was practically no 
glaxnost before, and this 
change is a very important 
move forward which promises 
a great deaL It is necessary for 
any healthy society, and it is 
an essential condition for other 
changes. 1 welcome ft with all 
my heart. 

“It is to the meat personal 
credit of Mflchau Sergeyevich 
(Gorbachov) that we have it 
now, even though it was in fact 
a historic necessity far our 
country,’’ Dr Sakharov said. 
Speaking in the kitchen of the 
flat, Dr Sakharov gave the 
first detailed account of the 
historic phone call he received 
from Mr Gorbachov on 
December 16 in Gorky. 

“For seven years there we 
had no phone. Yon can imag- 
ine how surprised we were on 
the Monday evenmg when 
some men came to install one, 
without explanation. On Tnes- 


day afternoon, at 3pm, it rang 
and the switchboard girl said: 
“Mikhail Sergeyevich wiH 
speak to you." 

“I was, of course, taken 
aback. Then he came on the 
fine and said: Tins is 
Gorbachov’ ‘Yes?’ I said. 
■Good day.’ He thm told me 
there had beat a derision by 
the Praeshfimn of the Su- 
preme Soviet that I could 
return to Moscow.” 

• Activist freed: A member of j 
an unofficial Soviet group 
which has campaigned for 
better superp o wer relations 
has been amnestied from a 
two-year term in a labour 
camp, one of ho 1 
said (Reuter reports 
Moscow). 

Mr Alexander Rubchenko 
said Larisa Chukaeva, who 
joined the “Group to Establish 
Trust Between the USA and 
die USSR” last year, «»mi» to 
Moscow on Thursday. 


The Iraqi Airways hijack 

Iran denies role in 
Boeing gun battle 

By Robert Fisk, Middle East Correspondent 

Iraq yesterday angrily ac- their grasp and cradled tot° 
cosed Iran of responsibility for the cockpit. Mr Aarar said, 
the hijacking of the Iraqi “The door was slammed 


sengffls 

tbe plane crashed into the 
desert near a Saudi Arabian 
airfield on Thursday. 

The Foreign Ministiy in 
Tehran indignantly denied 
any involvement, saying that 
Iran had always condemned 
“inhuman acts which may . . . 
threaten the lives" of innocent 
passengers. 

To the surprise of neither 
party, the Saudis — who 
immediately began rescue op- 
erations amid the wreckage of 
the Boeing 737, but who are 
desperate to avoid any 
involvement in the Gulf War 
— reported the “crash lan- 
ding” of the Iraqi airliner but 
made no reference to the feet 
that it had been hijacked. 

A statement issued in Ri- 
yadh yesterday said that, of 
tbe 107 passengers and crew 
on board the plane, 62 had 
been killed and 44 survived, 
with one man unaccounted 
for. 

The most coherent account 
of the drama, which began 
shortly after the aircraft took 
off from Baghdad, came from 
Mr Suleiman .Aarar, a former 
Jordanian Interior Minister 
who was on the flight. 

The plane had entered 
Saudi airspace, he said, when 
a man stood up in the aisle 
holding a hand grenade. 
“Three (Iraqi) security men 
' up and tried to stop 


noises anu : 

cockpit and from behind (me) 
in the economy section. 

“A few moments later, there 
was an explosion inside the 

cockpit. „ , . 

“Then right after that, there 
was another explosion in the 
economy class compartment 
and pistol shots in the 
cockpit" 

Several passengers were kill- 
ed in the brief gun battle 
between the security guards 
and the gunmen, and the rest 
died when — as the crew 
desperately tried to land at the 
remote Arar airbase in Saudi 
Arabia — the plane suffered a 
further explosion and broke in 
half several yards above the 
desert floor. 

It must have been a major 
task to avoid the heavy sec- 
urity precautions of the Iraqi 
police at Baghdad airport and 
to have smuggled weapons 
onto the Boeing, which sug- 
gests that the gunmen had 
accomplices among the auth- 
orities there. 


and wrestled him to the 

floor, but he slipped out of 



Paris will expel Arabs 
after arms cache find 


Paris (Renter) — France will 
expel five of six people of 
Middle East origin arrested 
last week after a forge cache of 
arms and explosives was 
found in a Paris suburb, an 
Interior Ministiy spokesman 
said on Thursday. 

He said expulsion orders 
signed by tbe Interior Min- 
ister, M Charles Pasqua, had 
been issued to two Syrians and 
three Jordanians who con- 
stituted a “menace to public 
order". 

Hie cache, in Aulnay-sous- 
Bois, north-east of Paris, in- 
cluded 66 lb of explosives, 51 
detonators, five sub-machine- 


guns and two pistols. 

The group was released on 
Monday when police could 
not find any direct link be- 
tween them and the stock of 
arms. The sixth person is a 
naturalized French citizen and 
does not face expulsion. 

The spokesman said the five 
would be expelled “as quickly 
as possible", but no date had 
been set 

Police sources said the six 
were suspected of belonging to 
the Islamic fundamentalist 
Muslim Brotherhood, which 
is a dedicated opponent of the 
Syrian and Egyptian govern- 
ments. 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 



Lebanon crisis: Chirac gratitude • Envoy shot • Missing men • Wife rebuffed 


France thanks 
Palestinians 

for helping in 
hostage release 

From Susan MacDonald, Paris 


“1 think I'm dreaming. I 
know I'm in Paris bin I can’t 
believe it yet." 

The just-released French 
hostage, M Aurei Cornea, 
muttered this phrase several 
times as he stood, bewildered 
and hesitant, before a battery 
of microphones in the VIP 
lounge at Orly Airport on 
Christmas Day. 

He had been released in 
Beirut on Christmas Eve and 
bad spent the night at the 
French embassy there before 
being flown by helicopter to 
Lamaca in Cyprus, where a 
French Air Force plane waited 
to take him to Paris. 

He explained that be had 
not been expecting to be 
released and that he had really 
believed it only when be 
arrived at the embassy and 
had first been greeted by a 
young gendarme who bad 
helped him to shave off his 
beard. 

To greet him as he landed in 
Paris on Christmas Day after- 
noon was the Prime Minister, 
M Jacques Chirac, the Min- 
ister of Culture, M Francois 
Leotard, and the Minister for 
Security, M Robert Pandraud. 

Looking frail and haggard, 
55-year-old M Cornea first 
greeted his wife, Aurora, and 
then - in a moment of high 
emotion — he embraced two of 
his television crew colleagues 
who had been kidnapped with 
him in March and released 
last June. 

With tears streaming down 
their faces, their first thoughts 
were for the fourth colleague 
who remains a prisoner. 

At the airport, M Chirac 
publicly thanked Algeria and 
"certain Palestinian leaders" 
who had helped to bring about 
his release. 

He also thanked Syria and 
the Lebanese authorities for 
the role they had played. 

This is the first time that the 
Government has publicly in- 
cluded the Pales tinians in the 
list of people thanked. 

When asked which Palestin- 
ians, M Chirac refused to 
comment saying only that 
press stories that tho-French 



Government bad paid a ran- 
som for the release of the 
hostages had ruined the 
chances of the fourth tde- 
visioD crew member being 
released and nearly stopped 
the release of M Cont£a. 

Five French hostages have 
now been released since the 
Government came to power 
last March. At least four still 
remain m the hands of their 
kidnappers. 

All those released had been 
seized by the Organization for 
Revolutionary Justice. 

Paris had obviously hoped 
that tortuous negotiations car- 
ried out with several coun- 
tries, including Iran and Syria, 
would lead to the release of all 
the French hostages- 

However, the kidnappers 
prefer to release them slowly, 
each time putting Ranee 
through the emotion of seeing 
haggard men come home with 
a joy tempered by the know- 
ledge of what it must be like 
for those still being held. 

Then each time there is the 
public inquest about what the 
Government really agreed to 
in order to obtain their release. 

M Corona said that he had 
seen his colleague, M Jean 
Louis Normandin, just before 
he had been released. “He is in 
good spirits," be said, adding 
that both of them had been 
well treated. 

It was obvious from his 
guarded remarks that he 
would not reveal details of his 
imprisonment for fear of en- 
dangering those left behind. 

To coincide with M 
Cornea’s release, which his 
kidappers said was a gesture of 
goodwill at Christmas, the 
Islamic Jihad released Christ- 
mas letters from three hos- 
tages they are holding. The 
letters, addressed to their 
wives, were personal and con- 
tained no political demands. 

The three men, M Marcel 
Carton, M Marcel Fontaine 
and M Jean-Pa ul Kauffinan, 
spent their second Christmas 
in the hands of their kidnap- 
pers. They were kidnapped in 
spring 1985 in Beirut 



>. v. Pr.* ‘ 




Worried wife is told to 
seek solution in Paris 






Two faces of a hostage: 
in the top picture M 
Anrel Corrida, of the 
French television station 
Antenne-2, as he 
looked when he walked 
ipto the Bean Sivsge 
Hotel in west Beirut, 
minutes after being re- 
leased from 290 days of 
captivity. Above, M 
Cornea on Christmas 
Day after his arrival in 
the Cypriot town of 


Paris (Reuter) — Mme 
Joelte Kauffmann, the wife of 
a French hostage held in 
Lebanon, flew back to Paris 
from Beirut yesterday and 
said her visit had done noth- 
ing to alleviate concern over 
his fate. 

“I am returning from Beirut 
very worried," she said. Her 
journalist husband, Jean- Paul, 
was kidnapped in May, 1985. 

She received a letter from 
her husband on Thursday 
night and said yesterday: "I 
gather from my husband’s 
tetter that he is living in total 
isolation." 

Mme Kauffinann had a 20- 
minute meeting in Beirut 
yesterday morning with a Shia 
Muslim religious leader to ask 
for his help in securing the 
release of foreign captives. But 
the mullah, Muhammad Hus- 
sein Fadlallah, the spiritual 
leader of the . pro-Iranian 
Hezbollah (Party of God), told 


her it was up to the French 
Government to act 
“If you want to help the 
hostages, you have to talk to 
the French Government The 
solution is there and not in 
Lebanon," die m ullah told her 
in the presence of reporters. 

Mme Kauffinann said at 
Orly airport that she went to 
Beirut “so that Jean-Paul 
should know 1 was dose to 
him", but she had also met 
Lebanon's Prime Minister, Mr 
Rashid Karami, and the Al- 
gerian Ambassador in Beirut 
She said die was concerned 
to team that 2,000 people were 
being held hostage in Lebanon 
as a result of the dvil war. 

• BEIRUT: Islamic Jihad, 
the kidnappers of three 
Frenchmen and two Ameri- 
cans in Lebanon, yesterday 
renewed demands for an end 
to French aid to Iraq and the 
release of prisoners in Kuwait, 
saying its patience was Tun- 
ning out (Reuter reports). 


Libyan diplomat 
is assassinated 
in Bekaa ambush 

From Juan Carlos Gomntio. Beirut 


Unidentified gunmen am- 
bushed and shot dead a Lib- 
yan diplomat Mr Musbah 
Gharibeh, as be drove through 
the Syrian-controlled Bekaa 
Valley on Thursday. No group 
has claimed responsibility for 
the attack a nd the assassina- 
tion is bound to enter 
Lebanon's voluminous ar- 
chives of inscrutable cases. 

Mr Gharibeh, the financial 

attache of the Libyan Embassy 

in Damascus, reportedly died 
instantly when the gunmen 
sprayed the embassy vehicle 
with automatic gunfire. 

Mr Mohammed Abu Bakr 
Dahmani, a Libyan travelling 
with Mr Gharibeh, was 
wounded in the ambush, 
which was carried out near the 
village of TaanayeL about 25 
miles east of Beirut 

Two days after the attack 
there was no evidence to 


support speculation that the 
ambush could be part of the 
anti-Libyan campaign that fol- 
lowed the mysterious dis- 
appearance of the Imam 
Mousa Sadr, the charismatic 
spiritual leader of Lebanon’s 
Shia Muslims, while on an 
official visit to Libya in 
September, 1978. 

The ambush came as Major i 
Abdel Salam Jalloud, Libya’s 
second-in-command, was 
holding talks with Syrian, 
Iranian, and Pal- ! 

esti man representatives on 
ways to end the war between 
Lebanon's Shia Muslim Amal 
militia and Palestinian guerr- 
illas in southern Lebanon and 
in two refugee camps in 
Beirut. 

Fighting went on unabated 
yesterday after overnight artil- 
lery and rocket battles killed at 
least two people and wounded 
eight around the camps. 


18 foreigners still 
held in Lebanon 


Beirut (Reuter) — Eighteen 
foreigners are still missing, 
believed kidnapped, in Leba- 
non following the release on 
Wednesday of M Cornea. 

The list is made up of seven 
Americans, six French na- 
tionals, two Britons, one Irish- 
man, one Italian and one 
South Korean. 

The missing Americans are: 

Terry Anderson, 39, of Lo- 
rain, Ohio, chief Middle East 
correspondent of Associated 
Press; Thomas Sutherland, 54, 
(Scottish-born) of Fort Colins, 
Colorado, Dean of Agriculture 
at American University of 
Beirut (AUB); William Bock- 
ley, 57, political officer at the 
US Embassy, Falk Wareh, 62, 
businessman of Syrian origin; 
Frank Reed, 54, director ofthe 
Lebanese International 
School; Joseph Citippio, 56, 
chief accountant and deputy 
comptroller aL the American 
University Hospital and Ed- 
ward Tracy, 56, a book 
salesman. 

The missing French na- 
tionals are: Marcel Fontaine, 
43, French Embassy vice- 
consukMaroel Carton, 62, 
French Embassy attach^; 
Jean-Pul Kanffinann, 43, 


journalist for the weekly 
I'Eveunment du Jeudi maga- 
zine; Michel Soerat, 38, Arab 
researcher at the French 
Centre for Studies and Re- 
search of the Contemporary 
Middle East; Jean-Loo is 
Normandin, 34, soundman 
with the French Antenne-2 
television network; Florence 
Raad, 30, Franco-Lebanese 
journalist, missing since May, 
1985. 

The missing Britons are:- 
Alec Collet, 64, journalist on 
assignment for the UN Relief 
and Works Agency for 
Palestinian refugees and John 
McCarthy, 30, Worldwide 
Television News journalist. 

The missing Irishman is 
Brian Keenan, 35, teacher at 
the American University of 
Beirut (AUB). 

The missing South Korean 
is: Chae Do-sung, 43, embassy 
official 

The missing Italian is: 
Alberto Molinari, 67, busi- 
nessman. 

Altogether 65 foreigners 
have been kidnapped in Leba- 
non since January, 1984; 36 
have been freed, four escaped, 
one was rescued and six were 
killed. 


Christmas 
blaze 
destroys 
saint’s relic 

Nice (AP) — A Christmas 
Night fire in a Roman Catho- 
lic cathedral destroyed the 
relic of a saint and three I7th 
century paintings, all classi- 
fied as historic objects, parish 
officials said yesterday. 

The fire started in a Christ- 
mas creche set up in a chapel 
of Sainte Reparte Cathedral, 
according to the rectory. It 
said the blaze was probably 
sparked by a candle or elec- 
trical short-circuit. 

A precious wooden reli- 
quary containing the skeleton 
of Saint Alexander and a 
painting by Jean-Baptiste Van 
Loo showing the martyrdom 
of Saint Bartholomew were 
destroyed. 

Toll rises 

Delhi (Reuter) — Ten peo- 
ple died when their bouses 
collapsed after a heavy snow- 
fall and three died of exposure 
in the Kashmir Valley near 
Pakistan, bringing the death 
tofl in the cold snap to 101. 

Party time 

Ankara (Reuter) — The 
People's Party, the 23rd party 
to be created since the 1980 
military coup, was launched 
in Turkey by a group of 
parliamentary defectors from 
the main opposition Social 
Democratic People's Party. 

Gas blast 

Frankfurt (Reuter) — Two 
people were killed and five 
injured when a gas explosion 
destroyed the top two floors of 
a four-storey house in Frank- . 
furt, firemen said. 

Goa riot 

Delhi (Reuter) — Police 
fired in the air to break up 
hundreds of stone-throwing 
demonstrators in a new up- 
surge of language violence in 
the seaside resort of Goa. 

Two killed 

Tenerife (Reuter) — A Ger- 
man tourist and a Spanish 
resident of Britain were killed 
when an explosion ripped 
through a block of holiday 
flats in the island of Tenerife. 

Runway skid 

Ankara (Reuter) — A Lib- 
yan Boeing 727 skidded off the 
runway after landing at Is- 
tanbul and tipped on to its 
right wing, officials said. None 
of the 111 passengers and 11 
crew was hurt^ 


















ISSUED BY HILL SAMUEL & CO. LIMITED 
ON BEHALF OF H.M. GOVERNMENT 


Form together with details of the offer, ring 01-200 1000 day or night. ^Or send offthe coupon. 

Th ' cou n should only be completed by residents ofthe UK and information wifi only be sene to addresses in the UK. This advertisement is being published in the UK only. It does not constitute or form part of any offer to sell or solicitation of any offer to buy any securities. 




8 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TTMRS SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


West now less gloomy over Afghanistan 


By Andrew McEwen 
Diplomatic Correspondent 

The eighth year of Soviet occupation of 
Afghanistan began yesterday with the West in, 
a less pessimistic mood. Strong statements of 
condemnation were balanced by more riqn a 
glimmer of hope. 

Most diplomats believe that the Kremlin 
reached a psychological turning point daring 
1986. Conciliatory hints from Mr Gorbachov, 
the Soviet leader, are increasingly being 
interpreted as a new Soviet policy in the 
making rather than as public relations 
window-d ressing. 

The Whitehall assessment is that Mr 
Goritacbor weighs the political cost more 
heavily than his predecessors, realizing 
the West views Soviet occupation as a major 
barrier to arras-control treaties. Secondly, the 
growing cost of fighting guerrillas armed with 


highly effective anti-aircraft missiles has ero-, 
ded Moscow's commitment to the Kabo! Gov- 
ernment 

“Afghanistan is a test of Soviet intentions,” 
Sir Geoffrey Howe, the Foreign Secretary, 
said yesterday in a sharply-worded anniver- 
sary statement 

The same point was made before Christmas 
by the Prime Minister hi a message to Mr 
Gorbachov. She Is expected to repeat it when 
she visits Moscow at the aid of March. 

The encouraging signs noted by the West in 
1986 were Moscow’s attempt to improve 
relations with Pakistan; progress in UN- 
sponsored shuttle diplomacy between Islam-, 
abad and Kabai; statements by Mr Gorbachov 
hinting that a settlement might be near; and 
the withdrawal ofa token 8,000 Soviet troops. 

A farther straw in the wind was a visit to 
Moscow by Afghanistan’s new President, Dr 


Najih, and his security chiefs earlier this 
month. British diplomats believe the Afghans 
were urged to take far greater respmsikeM&f 
for their own defence, allowing Moscow to 
appear rbore flexible at the next round of UN- 
sponsored talks in Geneva, which begins on 
February XL 

Mr Abdul Sattar, Pakistan's chief Foreign 
Ministry civil servant, predicted in London 
recently that the talks would produce an 
agreed timetab le for Soviet withdrawal. 

Whi tehall ’s strategy is to keep up the 
pressure until a far more definite policy 
change emerges. Sir Geoffrey's statement 
minced no warns in daiming that Moscow was 
trying to keep the realities of Afghanistan a 
secret While talking of withdrawal they had- 
intensified tim war. 

“The United Nations special rapporteur 
has estimated that 49,000 civQiaiis were killed 


in 

human rights continue to cause massive 
suffering,' he said. 

While the immediate aim is to allow the 
Soviet Union to extricate itself, the post- 
Soviet future is already a focus of concern. 

The Mujahidin (Islamic Holy Warriors) 
will not easily be persuaded to step fig hting , 
even if the weapons supply route through 
Pakistan is severed. The seven main resis- 
tance movements have no political structure 
and only limited common amis. 

The possibility of a civil war producing an 
extreme T sfrmin government would concern 
Whit eha l l and Washington almost as ranch as 
Moscow. The West has always assumed that 
one of President Brezhnev's original motives 
far the invasion was fa damp down Isl am ic 
fimda m en talfs m, within, as much as beyond 
Soviet borders. 


Report exposes 
serious errors 
in Soviet courts 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


One of the most swingeing 
indictments yet published 
here about the ramshackle 
Soviet legal system is con- 
tained in an official report 
recently delivered to a four- 
day plenum of the Supreme 
Court and summarized by the 
literary weekly, Lileraiurnaya 
Gazeia. 

According to the report, 
drawn up by the court's 
deputy chairman, Mr Yev- 
geny Smolenisev. miscarr- 
iages of justice have been 
widespread throughout the 
Soviet Union. Some of the 
most serious examples quoted 
involved innocent people be- 
ing sentenced to death by, 
firing squad. 

One of the worst cases 
outlined in the report in- 
volved 14 people from the 
Byelorussian town of Vitebsk, 
who were sentenced to what 
were described only as “ex- 
tremely grave punishments” 
for crimes which they had not 
committed. The term is nor- 
mally used in Soviet legal 
parlance when describing the 
death sentence. 

The paper's reporter, Mr 
Arkady Vasbeig, said that the 
investigators responsible for 
this miscarriage of justice had 
now been themselves sen- 
tenced. but none of the judges, 
who issued the initial false 
verdict or failed to overturn it 


on appeal bad been punished. 

Among other serious mis- 
carriages of justice mentioned 
in the damning report was the 
case of an innocent man 
sentenced to death in the 
Baltic Soviet republic of Lat- 
via, but h was not made clear 
whether the execution had 
taken place. 

Lileraiurnaya Gazeta went 
on to cite the case of a boy in 
the Crimea who was tried for 
the murder of his father. His 
mother, despairing of getting 
justice from the court, con- 
ducted her own investigation 
and caught the real killers. 

Soviet judges were known 
to have come under pressure 
from the political authorities 
and, in some cases, were 
known to have telephoned 
regional party officials to seek 
advice before giving verdicts. 

The judicial report dis- 
closed that while the number 
of jailings in the Soviet Union 
was decreasing, excessive 
punishments were often 
handed out by the courts. 

This led to absurdities, such 
as the case of a man from 
Orlov imprisoned for 18 
months for taking two jars of 
pickled cucumbers from his 
mother-in-law, and a man 
from Ulyanovsk jailed for two 
years for failing to return a 
pair of borrowed sunglasses. 



The Rhone Valley's white Christmas did not enchant many motorists, but skiers in this picture are delighted to take over the 
main street of Lyons after six inches of snow caused serious traffic problems. 


Sultan of Brunei gave 
Contras $10 million 

From Christopher Thomas, Washington 



Luxury cmwn aooamnoda- 
Uontnpopi ia r Bunch resorts 
Excdent on-site facirties 
inducting swimming pools and 
shops 

lypJcaly ftwidi b**and caffe*. 
Our caravan parts make 
Splcnctid bases tar beach and 
towing hotidsys 
Mats indude route imps and 
ferry crossings. 

Write id is or phone for our free 
brochure. 


Hawn Abroad 
Dept FTTOt Freepost 
PO Box IOOO, 

Croydon CR96ES. (No strop 
neqirtied). Or telephone 
Catertam (0883) 40721 or 
sec ywjrVsvd Agent. 


X 6 



The Reagan Administration 
has uncovered a $10 million 
(£6.8 million) contribution 
from the Sultan of Brunei to 
.the Nicaraguan Contras, a 
figure much larger titan 
congressional investigators 
had suspected. 

The money was paid into a 
Swiss bank account set up 
under the direction of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Oliver 
North, the former White 
House staff member, accord- 
ing to government officials. 
Additionally, the Admin- 
istration has traced about $10 
million in private donations 
to the rebels. 

The money is on top of 
funds diverted to the Contras 
from the profits of arms sales 
to Iran, a figure variously 
estimated at between $10 
million and $30 million. The 
Contras have consistently 
claimed that they received far 
less than the $20 million 
widely estimated to have been 
raised through private dona- 
tions during the two years that 
government aid was banned 
by Congress. 

The Administration es- 
timates that $10 million in 
equipment and arms reached 
the Contras during the past 
two years, although the precise 


source of the money is not 
clear. 

Despite the congressional 
ban the Administration was 
free to solicit non-military 
funds from other sources for 
the Contras. It approached the 
Sultan directly and his dona- 
tion is described as “human- 
itarian”. 

According to Administra- 
tion officials, the money from 
the Sultan was sdught by the 
State Department on an initia- 
tive by Mr Elliott Abrams, 
Assistant Secretary of State for 
Latin America. 

In another development Mr 
Lewis Tambs, US Ambas- 
sador to Costa Rica, has been 
closely associated with the 
construction of a secret air- 
strip in Costa Rica for use by 
foe Nicaraguan rebels. 

The New York Times , quot- 
ing a senior government of- 
ficial in Central America, said 
Mr Tambs and other officials 
in bis embassy had main- 
tained close contact with foe 
private supply network for the 
rebels set up by Colonel 
North. Mr Tambs was said to 
have secured initial Costa 
Rican permission to build foe 
airstrip and was deeply in- 
volved in overseeing its use. 


Moscow reports ‘loss 
of life’ in mine blast 


Moscow (Reuter) — The 
Soviet Union has reported a 
big methane gas explosion at a 
coal mine in foe Donbass 
region of the Ukraine, but 
local Ukrainian officials de- 
clined to say how many 
miners were killed. 

A Ukrainian Coal Ministry 
spokesman, contacted by tele- 
phone, said Jie could give no 
details of the accident A local 
party official said a commis- 
sion had been set up to deal 
with Wednesday’s accident at 
the Yasinovskaya-Glubokaya 
mine . 

First word of foe explosion 
came on Thursday in a state- 


ment from foe party’s Central 
Committee and foe Soviet 
Government in Moscow. 
Such high-level announce- 
ments are normally issued 
only after serious accidents. 

The statement said the 
explosion had caused “loss of 
human lives" and foe authori- 
ties had sent condolences to 
workers at foe mine and 
relatives of foe dead. 

“The Soviet Government 
and foe republican authorities 
are taking measures to pro- 
vide assistance to the families 
of the dead and to liquidate 
foe consequences of foe 
disaster.” It added. 


Shamir testifies 
for defence in 
land bribery case 

From David Bernstein, Jerusalem 


Mr Yitzhak Shamir. Israel’s 
Prime Minister, took the wit- 
ness stand in foe Tel Aviv 
District Court yesterday to 
tesiifc for the defence in a 
bribery case involving a prom- 
inent Israeli land dealer. 

It was only the second time 
that an Israeli Prime Minister 


the problems they were en- 
countering in buying land for 
Jewish settlements in the West 
Bank would be dealt with. 

Mr Shamir told foe court 
yesterdav that he had indeed- 
met Mr Einav and other land 
dealers in 1984. and bad told 
them that he would “try to 
' problems . He 


Minister. Mr Mosbe he haa agreeo 


Prime 

Shaneti testified in a case 
involving a ^cement factory 
owner in 1953. 

In foe current case. Mr 
Shmuel Einav. an agent for 
two companies specializing in 
the sale offand to Israelis in 
foe West Bank, is being 
charged with giving some 
$10,000 (£6.900) in bribes to 
Mr Shamir’s Likud Party dur- 
ing the 19S4 Knesset election 

campaign. . . . 

Mr Einav claims he had 
been asked to give $10,000 to 
help pay for tours of Jewish 
settlements in the W est Bank 
organized as part of the Likud 
election campaign. 

He had subsequently twice 
met Mr Shamir, who was 
Prime Minister at foe time, 
and along with several other 
land dealers had been prom- 
ised “in a general way" that 


to receive a 
contribution from Mr Einav 
to the Likud's election fund in 
return for special favours. 

Mr Shamir went on to say 
that he saw no impropriety in 
foe Likud receiving donations 
to its election fund from land 
dealers involved in settling foe 
West Bank - a project to 
which the Likud is ideologi- 
cally committed and which it 
enthusiastically promotes. 

• Shamir cleared: Israel Ra- 
dio reponed yesterday that the 
investigation conducted by 
foe Attorney-General’s office 
into foe killing of two 
Palestinian guerrillas after 
foev were captured in 1984 
has’ found no ground for 
criminal proceedings against 
Mr Shamir, who was Prime 
Minister at foe time, or any 
other member of Israel’s 
political echelon. 


Israel explains Vanunu 
‘hijack in Rome 9 claim 

From Our Correspondent, Jerusalem 

has provided Italy dard in London. The Stan- 
dard's correspondent in 
Jerusalem, Mr Bernard Jo- 
sephs, has been questioned by 
the police, but strongly denies 
that he was the source of the 
story- 

The government press of- 
fice has raised foe possibility’ 
of suspending Mr Josephs' 
press credentials pending foe 
outcome of the investigation. 

Mr Josephs holds dual Is- 
raeli and British citizenship 
and is permanently resident in 
Jerusalem. 

• TEL AVIV: An American 
convicted of spying for Israel 
was told to collect potentially 
damaging information about 
Israeli politicians, foe Jeru- 
salem Post said (Reuter 
reports). 

The paper’s Washington 
correspondent wrote that foe 
man, Jonathan Pollard, re- 
ceived foe order from Rafael 
Eitan, head ofa special intelli- 
gence unit for which he 
worked. 

The paper said Mr Pollard, 
a navy intelligence analyst 
had refused to search US 
intelligence files for 
embarrassing material on Is- 
raeli ministers and 
parliamentarians. 


Israel 

with foe clarification it had 
requested concerning the 
claim made by the nuclear 
technician, Mr Mordechai 
Vanunu, earlier this week, that 
he had been “hijacked” in 
Rome. 

A Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man said yesterday that 
clarification had been submit- 
ted to the Secretary -General of 
the Italian Foreign Ministry 
by foe Israeli .Ambassador in 
Rome. He would not divulge 
foe substance of foe message 
and had no information about 
any Italian response. 

Mr Vanunu, who is stand- 
ing trial for selling details of 
Israel's alleged nuclear capac- 
ity to The Sunday Times last 
September, wrote on foe palm 
of his hand that he had been 
hijacked at Rome Inter- 
national Airport on Septem- 
ber 30 and taken to Israel 
aboard British Airways' flight 
504. He flashed foe message to 
waiting reporters and photog- 
raphers as he was being taken 
to the Jerusalem district court 
last Sunday. 

The message was sup- 
pressed by foe censors here, 
but appeared foe following 
morning in foe Evening Stan- 


Alfonsin is quick to curb rights trials 


From Ednardo Cue 
Buenos Aires 

President Alfonsin of Ar- 
gentina announced yesterday 
that he had signed into law a 
Bill designed to end the trials 
of military officers accused of 
human rights violations dur- 
ing foe former dictatorship. 

Although he did not say, it 
appeared that the legislation 
was signed on Christmas Day, 
just one day after foe Lower 
House of Congress passed foe 
Bill by a 126-16 vote. The 
Senate had given its approval 


to the controversial initiative 
on Monday night by a 25-10 
vote. 

By signing foe BiD immedi- 
ately into law foe President 
underlined foe unexplained 
urgency with which his Gov- 
ernment treated the issue. Dr 
Alfonsin announced his con- 
troversial initiative only three 
weeks ago and it took foe 
normally ponderous Argen- 
tine Congress only two days of 
lacklustre debate to approve 
the measure. 

Despite foe ease with which 


the taw was approved, it is 
likely to extract a significant 
political price from foe Gov- 
ernment Dr Alfonsin's reput- 
ation as a fearless fighter for 
human rights has been irrepa- 
rably tarnished and the ur- 
gency with which the Govern- 
ment treated foe issue has also 
raised questions about foe 
extent of military pressure on 
foe civilian authorities. 

Sefior Luis Caceres, a leader 
in President Alfonsin's own 
Radical Party, said over 
Christmas that foe new law 


"can be interpreted as a step 
backwards in the 
Government's policy towards 
human rights and will extract 
a very high political price 

The law sets a 60-day time 
period in which prosecutors 
must obtain new indictments 
of military and police officers 
suspected of having kid- 
napped, tortured and assas- 
sinated terrorist suspects du- 
ring the former regime's war 
against subversion that led to 
the disappearance of more 
than 9,000 people. 








j 


> 


Those who made 

£40,000 BY INVESTING WITH 

Henderson in 1974 Those who didn’t 

SHOULD SIGN HERE. SHOULD SIGN HERE. 


To: Vicky Law, Henderson Unit Trust Management Ltd., FREEPOST London EC2B 2LJ. 
I am one of those who had £500 invested in each of the 10 unit trusts listed 
below, in October 1974, and still hold those investments. I am delighted that 
I am now £40,000* better off. 

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Henderson income and assets trust • Henderson high income trust 
Henderson international trust • Henderson European trust 
Henderson global resources trust • Henderson Australian trust 
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Please send me my complimentary bottle of vintage port to celebrate 
the success of my vintage portfolio. 

Naim.' 



Aildrw 


Otf- » mi h*«l Kims, no: mount' jJJi.J m 1,1 ’.Mo 


L. 




Henderson unit trust management ltd 


To: Vicky Law, Henderson Unit Trust Management Ltd., FREEPOST London EC2B 2LJ 

I didn’t invest in Henderson’s 1974 vintage portfolio and I would like to take this 
opportunity not to make die same mistake again. Please send me details of the vari 
investment opportunities available from Henderson. 0us 


Name 


Address 


Henderson unit trust management ltd 





f i-mi 0 


J*J>I L>» U 


\r t 




v *Ci£C\» S> 

■^Wi ?, rf^ex 




" si iElQ 

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-aim 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


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January 1st 


I Will Give Up Drinking? 


“I Will Give Up Smoking? 

“I Will Give Up Paying 
So Much To The Taxman.” 


— ir^A-w 


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10 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


thf times SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


Chinese employ tougher 
curbs against students 
in Shanghai and Peking 


Shanghai (Renter) — The 
Chinese authorities yesterday 
tightened regulations on pub- 
lic meetings in Shanghai after 
a week of demonstrations by 
students Hgm^n^'n g greater 
democracy. 

A Public Security Bureau 
statement said rally organizers 
would have to apply for a 
licence 72 hours in advance of 
a meeting, giving the number 
of participants and proposed 
route of any parade. 

In Peking, the authorities 
yesterday banned rallies and 
protest marches in parts of the 
capital and warned students 
against “bourgeois Western” 
ideals. 

Peking’s state-run television 
and radio said public gather- 
ings were banned in Tian- 
anmen Square in the centre of 
the capital, in areas near the 
Great Hall of the People, 
Zhongnanhai — the residence 
of Co mmunis t Party leaders— 
and roads leading to the 
airport. 

Under the rules, effective 
immediately, march organ- 
izers will be reponsible for 
maintaining order and must 
not allow unauthorized people 
to take part. 

The security authorities re- 
tained the right to stop meet- 
ings if any law was broken. 

Only a small crowd gath- 
ered iii Shanghai's People's 
Square yesterday, the birthday 
of Mao Tse-tung, who led the 
1949 Communist Revolution 
and died in office 10 years ago. 


Mao, with the support of 
radicals in Shanghai, launched 
the extreme leftist Cultural 
Revolution in 1966 during 
which he deposed President 
Lin Shaoqi and purged the 
Government and party. 

Last weekend, 10,000 stu- 
dents demanding democracy 
and press freedom demonstr- 
ated in People’s Square. Stu- 
dent leaders said they were 
planning further protests and 


China has cnt by almost a half 
the general staff of its armed 
forces and reduced the 43. 
million strong Peoples libera- 
tion Army by 410,000 of a 
planned one million redaction, 
according to the New China 
News Agency (Reuter reports 
from PekingJ.The cuts were 
announced at a meeting of the 
Communist Party's Central 
Military Conunmission in Pe- 
king chaire d by Deng Xiao- 
ping- 


had applied to the authorities 
for licences. 

Student fervour has appar- 
ently tempered in the past two 
days with the city free of 
protest marches that obstr- 
ucted traffic and affected busi- 
ness in shops and restaurants. 

A foreign student contacted 
by telephone in Nanjing, cen- 
tral China, said that several 
thousand students and work- 
ers had marched through the 
city on Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday this week calling 
for freedom and democracy. 


The student said dem- 
onstrators were keeping in- 
formed of other protests in 
China, mi 
radio 

the Voice of America. 

Official newspapers re- 
peated calls for restraint, urg- 
ing unruly students not to 
undermine stability. 

In Peking, leading academ- 
ics yesterday called on stu- 
dents to stay off the streets as 
Western diplomats 
China for handling the pro- 
tests with a sophistication and 
tact rare in a communist 
country. 

The People’s Doily yes- 
terday quoted Professor Fed 
Xmoiong of Peking Univer- 
sity as saying that Chinese 
people did not, for many 
historical reasons, know bow 
to use democracy. 

“We cannot attain it in one 
step. We are still in the process 
of studying how to use it,” be 
said. 

The People’s Daily . 
commenting on the student 
protests, drew parallels with 
the Cultural Revolution. 

The official campaign warn- 
ing students against dem- 
onstrating has spread to radio 
stations and television news, 
which showed soldiers on the 
Vietnam battlefront visiting 
three universities in Peking. 

“We at the front are very 
concerned that China is stable 
and united in the course of 
national construction,” one of 
them said. 


Democracy and the Chinese 


Shanghai (Renter) — For 
Yao Minzu, a 22-year-old 
chemical engineering student 
here, democracy is about the 
good things in life — higher 
Bring standards, good jobs 
and personal freedoms. 

After protesting for five 
days on the streets of China’s 
hugest port city, few students 
are wining to talk to foreign 
reporters. Those who do usu- 
ally insist on anonymity. 

The name Yao Minzn, 
which means “demand for 
democracy” was chosen by 
the lanky, bespectacled yonng 
man to emphasize his determ- 
ination to pursue the student 
campaign. 

“Many students have been 
discreetly told by university 
officials not to talk to for- 
eigners. They said this is a 


purely family affair which is of 
no concern to others,” he said. 

“We" have little democracy 
here — we can't even choose 
our own jobs. We have very 
few human rights.” 

’ Another student leader, who 
called herself Liang Xin, 
"wwiing “consdcace , said 
that discontent in Shanghai's 
seven major universities had 
been simmering for some time 
and readied a boiling point on 
December 9. 


University authorities ban- 
ned students from celebrating 
the anniversary that day of a 
big student movement during 
China’s war with Japan in the 
1930s, she said. 


Liang said students from 
Fudan, Tongji and the Com- 
munications Universities 
fanned the backbone of the 


first wave of protests m 
Shanghai last Friday. 

More than 10,000 students 

f athered in China’s biggest 
emOBStratioa for years in 
S hanghai ’s People’s Square 
on Sunday to demand democ- 
racy and press freedom. 

A scuffle broke oat when 
police tried to disperse the 
crowd and some students were 
seen being dragged into police 
cars. The authorities have 
remained silent on student 
arrests but said they had 
detained two workers on 
charges of creating disorder. 

Liang said one cause of 
unrest was a proposed gov- 
ernment price increase on 
some food items, cigarettes 
and other consumer goods 
scheduled for the end of this 
month. 






. . .. V- ' a Aj>So mV*- - A -~ 



The Pope] 


from the balcony of St Peter’s Basilica, overlooking St Peter’s Square, 
vas broadcast cm radio and television to millions around the world. 


MP to visit 
rebels’ 
stronghold 


From Vqitfca Yapa 
Colombo 


An MP from Sri Lanka's 
ruling United National Party 
has been in touch with the 
Northern Province leaders of 
the Tamil guerrilla group, the 
Liberatio n Tig ers of Tamil 
Eelam (LTTE), to arrange a 
visit early next year to the 
guerrilla-controlled province's 
capital, Jaffna. 

The MP for Yatiyantota, 
Mr Vincent Perera, who was 
involved in the negotiations 
last week whic h led to the 
release by the LTTE of two 
captured soldiers in exchange 
for two of their men, is 
planning to take a delegation 
of at least two other gov- 
ernment MPs and a few 
Buddhist monks to Jaffna in 
the first or second week of 
January, according to a gov- 
ernment source. 

A Tamil businessman who 
helped secure the release of the 
soldiers is also involved in the 
present attempt at negotia- 
tions with the LTTE, the 
source said. 


Punjab crisis 


Delhi worried by priest 


From Knldfp Nayar 
Delhi 


Mr Buta Singh, the Home 
Minister, has flown to Chan- - 
digarh to have argent talks 
with the Punjab Government 
in the wake of violence in the 
state and the appointment ofa 
chief priest at the Golden 
Temple in Amritsar. 

Eight people, including 
three from Pakistan, have 
been killed. There was also an 
attempt to blow up an express 
train near Amritsar. Six 
bombs were placed on the line 
and services were suspended 
for several hours. 

The change of high priest in 
the Golden Temple has 
caused greater worry to Delhi. 
The Shiro mani Gurdwara 
Parbandhak Committee, 
which was taken over by the 
militant Akali breakaway 
group earlier in the mouth, 
has appointed Mr Darshan 
Singh as High Priest of the 
Akal Takht, foe highest seat of 
religious authority among the 
Sikhs. 


Gnrkha mQftants raided a 
village in- the tea-growing 
Darjeeling district mid set fire 
to 25 houses of Commnmst 
Party supp orte d, according to 
state police (AP reports from 
Calcutta). At least four people 
wane injured and police said a 
mob of about 1,000 Gurkhas, 
armed with gnns and kukris, 
raided the Himalayan village 
of Phagu Basti. In addition to 
setting homes on fire, the 
Gurkhas, Indians of Nepalese 
descent, hurled crude bombs 
and opened fire on fleeing 
residents, police said. 


is that the moderates are test 
losing ground to the militants 
in the Sikh feith. 

Even the ruling Akali group 
is becoming restive. In an 
attempt to retrieve its sagging 
ima g e, it has asked the Chief 
Minister and the party chief; 
Mr Suijit Singh Barnala, to 
hold immediate “final talks” 
with Delhi .for the im- 


plementation of the Punjab 


year for having sung songs in 
‘ ‘ ; of Punjab in 


the countryside 
praise of the assassins of Mrs 
Indira Gandhi, the late Indian 
Prime Minister. 

The removal of the former 
Head Priest of the Akal Takht, 
Mr Giani Kripal Singh, is 
ominous enough, but the 
appointment of Mr Darshan 
Singh has added a new dimen- 


lent signed between 
ii, the Prime Minister, 
and the late Sant Harcfaand 
Singh Longowal, last year. 

In the north-east state of 
Tripura, where the Com- 
munist Party of India (Marx- 
ist) is in power, Tripura 
National Volunteer (TNV) 
guerrillas are being blamed for 
killing eight people yesterday 
— including three women and 
three children - in the north- 
ern area of Kamalpur. The 
number of dead in the past 
three days has risen to J& 


Mr Darshan Singh was in 
prison forseveral months this 


sion to the present situation 
because he is known to sym- 
pathize with the militants. A 
still more disturbing message 


The TNV is an extremist 
group of tribals, who has been 
indulging in violence and 
demanding the removal of 
non-tribals from the state. 


Pope calls 
for end to 
hate and 


violence 


By Onr Foreign Staff 


The Pope has called for an 
end to a clamour °J hate 
violence and said foe grid's 
powers have aroused fears ot 
apocalyptic destruction. 

Heexpressed his hopes and 
worries for foe future in his 
Christmas Day message read 
from the central balcony of St 
Peter's Basilica to about 
20.000 people in foe square 
below and televised to mil- 
lions in more than 4U 

countries. „ 

The Pope wove his address 
around foe multi-religious 
peace prayer meeting he 
hosted in Assisi on October 
27, during which many gov- 
ernments and guerrilla groups 
heeded his call for a one-day 
truce in their conflirts. 

In Peking more than 1,0W 
people packed a Gothic 
church on Christmas Day to 
hear Mass sung in Latin in foe 
only country where Latin 
Mass is still foe norm. 

Three Catholic churches m 
Peking held Christmas ser- 
vices with two offering Mid- 
night Mass. Witnesses said 
one Mass was halted abruptly 
by church officials, who told 
the congregation to leave after 
only a few dozen had received 
foe sacrament 

In foe Soviet Union Catho- 
lics and Protestants attended 
Midnight Mass to mark the 
start of the Christmas holiday. 
Tass said Christmas services 
were held at the Roman 
Catholic church of St Ludovic 
in Moscow and in Estonia. 
Latvia and Lithuania. 

It said sermons were de- 
voted to peace and “a world 
without nuqlear weapons”. 

On Bethlehem’s 20th 
Christinas under Israeli mili- 
tary occupation, pilgrims 
flocked to foe Judean town 
and chanted prayers in from 
ofa figure of the infant Jesus 
in a grotto revered as His 
birthplace. 

Israeli troops eased security 
after Midnight Mass, taking 
down booths where they had 
used metal detectors to search 
visitors for weapons. 

In Manila fireworks lit up 
foe skyline as revellers across 
foe Philippines enjoyed foe 
first Christmas Day in nearly 
two decades that promised 10 
be free of guerrilla violence. 

In Sri Lanka government 
forces and Tamil guerrillas 
observed a Christmas truce as 
thousands thronged churches 
to pray for peace and unity for 
the violence-torn island. 


Pat them onyour New Year reading list 




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HENRY PORTER IVAN FALLON 



MICHAEL JONES DIANA WRIGHT on Racing 

on Politics an Personal Finance BRIAN WALDEN - GODFREY SMITH PETER JENKINS 

Cornmentary on tiie Lighter Side eftife on Politics 














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December 27, 1986 - 
January 2, 1987 


SATURDAY 


A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 



Methuselah lived to be 969. A 
few millenniums later, we 
have little chance of spring 
1 10. Fear not — the quest for 
longevity still obsesses 
scientists, some of whom 
believe our lifesp ans may 
double by the year 2000. But 
how? Andrew Duncan looks at 
the conflicting theories 




i elixir of youth, the dream 
a longer life, spare-part 
gery, anti-wr inklin g creams 
his is the time of year when 
mghts of staying young are 
kened amid the dyspeptic 
tritus of over-indulgence. . 
For centuries there have 
jn controversial attempts to 
ag to youth and prolong life 
potions, monkey-gland im- 
ints, goat-testical trans- 
mis, injections with the cells 
newly killed lambs or camel 
am, the nip and tuck of the 
[Stic surgeon's knife and 
merous drugs — but al- 
tugb the average lifespan 
i increased dramatically, 
i maximum authenticated 
: is still no more than 120. 

[here are those who say this 
ild double for people born 
he end of this century, but 
voukl be unwise to become 
i excited by the prospects, 
e mice might be no sex 
cfl middle-age, a head trans- 
ni, a severely reduced diet 
massive doses of vitamins 
1 nutrients. 

‘Nevertheless, human life 
ension is going to occur 
ether we like it or not," says 
bert Reynolds, manager of 
e Extension Foundation, 
research organization in 
irida. “If you want to 
culate, you can talk about 
ing to a thousand- For the 
irage person, I suppose, 
i is inconceivable — but a 
torian engineer would 
re said the same about 
‘vision, so who knows?” 
ike any other field of hope 
[ wishful thinking, longev- 
bas its charlatans as well as 
serious researchers, 
jere’s all sorts of Quackery 
nit," says Sir Cyril Clarke, 
■ctor of research at the 
Jal College of Physicians, 
j is trying to find out why 
number of people tiving to 
i has risen tenfold in the 
t 30 years. “But there are 
ay factors in living longer 
xercise, weight reduction, 
ibiotics- I think the Clean 
Acts have done a great 
l You could say people are 
ng longer because of the 
line in religion- Not many 
pie believe in the hereafter, 
hey keep going." 
nd is it true that female 


eani it rumoured. it 
to do with not having a 

i The ageing process 
plex and varies^ from 
iety to another. It is 
y assumed that cur- 
espan is based on a 
ation of environment, 

are and genetic factors 

your own potential 
it is said, divide the 
’lengths of your 

rents’ by four, 
leaves plenty of room 

tudulent claims, 

L Cutler, a researcn 
it at Baltimore s 
jlogy Research Centre, 
the National Institute 
ms. says: “One of our 
^problems is that for 
«od scientist in mis 
iere are 10 quacks, 
such a long history of 


trying to lengthen life that 
everyone has given up hope, 
but the exciting thing is that 
we are now at the stage where 
we might be able to do 
something about h. There will 
be giant leaps in the next 10 
years. 

“We don't really know what 
makes people age, and people 
are usually put off studying it 
because it's so complex. The 
basic biology of chimpanzees 
is remarkably gmihr to hu- 
man - yet they have a 
maximum lifespan of only SO 
years. We're investigating to 
see if we keep ourselves better 
maintained against the nor- 
mal by-products of 
metabolism.” 

Oxygen, he believes, nay be 
a culprit, so even breathing is 
bad for us. When we breathe, 
toxic by-products called 
oxiradicals are formed which 


61 am on 
this life 
curve that 
terminates at 
130, but don’t 
know when 
I’ll fall off’ 


destroy other chemicals in the 

body and cause havoc with the 

DNA, the genetic material 
which instructs the body’s 
cells. The body produces en- 
zymes to counteract the 
oxiradicals but the rate of 
enzyme production reduces 
with age. “We're not looking 
for some magic potion," Dr 
Cutler says, “but it is possible 
tha t longevity can be in- 
creased by antioxidants like 
Vitamin E." 

One of the most prominent 
contributors to the anti-ageing 
circus is Dr Christiaan Bar- 
nard, who promotes dyed, a 
range of cosmetics which are 
supposed to “rejuvenate” the 
skin - a claim greeted with 
scepticism by other members 
of the medical profession. The 
cosmetics, are expensively 
packaged in bottles containing 
GSL,“an ingredient devel- 
oped in Switzerland by Dr 
Christiaan Barnard”, who re- 
ceives 5 per cent of the 
company's 3 per cent royalties 
on sales. 

Independent tests suggest 
that the “cremes" and lotions 
are basically made of distilled 
water, sheep grease and 
Vaseline. Nevertheless 
$4 minion worth was sold in 
the first few days in America, 
and Harrods - which sells it 
exclusively in Britain - says 
that sales have been very 
good. An ounce of cellular 
anti -aging cream costs £55, 
and 6.6oz of cellular cleanser 
is £25. _ 

•■The controversy is mainly 
due to a misunderstanding of 
my involvement," Barnard 
says. M 1 did basic research into 


the biology of ageing and 
discovered the role of a mole- 
cule called Glyco- 
sphingolipids (GSL) which 
plays a part in the repair of 
damag e d cells. I had no part in 
developing the cosmetic. 

“My approach to methane 
is not to prolong life, bat to 
improve its quality. People 
think if s strange that I have 
pone from being a scientist 
into something non-srientific. 
Infect, what I am now doing is 
more in the realm of science 
than a transplant because a 
transplant is just a surgical 
technique, whereas this is 
basic scientific research.” 

However, it does seem to 
the uninitiated — and also to 
doctors like Professor Albert 

Kligman ) a I paffag Hp imatn ln. 

g is t — that Barnard is merely 
flogging an expensive skin 
cream. “We had designer 
clothes and designer 
perfume,” Kligman says. 
“Now it seems to be the age of 
the designer doctor.” 

At the WoMson Institute of 
Gerontology at Hull Univer- 
sity, research lecturer Dr Brian 
Merry has been keeping rats 
alive until four years old — 50 
per cent longer than their 
normal lifespan — by feeding 
them half a normal diet. “If s 
been known since 1917 that 
you can slow down ageing by 
reducing diet; but we don’t 
know why,” be says. 

“We’re interested in the rate 
of protein turnover. It slows 
down as animals age, which 
means proteins are hang in g 
around fora long time and are 
likely to become defective. 
This causes cells to age. But in 
diet-restricted rats protein 
turnover is quicker and the 
cells stay young longer. 

“You wouldn’t do the same 
thing with humans because 
you’d end up killing them," 
Merry continues. “Ageing is 
extremely complex, and I 
don't think life will be ex- 
tended in the foreseeable fu- 
ture. Even if I could do for 
humans what I can do for rats 
today — which means we 
could live to 150 — it would be 
undesirable. Every time I 
speak to economists they 
throw up their hands and say 
‘We've scheduled everything 
for people dying at 70. You’ll 
throw afi our calculations out 
of the window*.” 

There is no such squeamish- 
ness in America, where an 
authority on ageing, Dr Roy 
Walford, a 63-year-okl re- 
search pathologist at UCLA, 
has reduced his weight to 10 
stone; cutting his calorie re- 
take down to 1,500 a day 
supplemented by vitamins. 
(The norm would be between 
2^50 and 3,000 a day). “It is 
u/icferantrition, not 
malnutrition," he says. “Peo- 
ple suffering from anorexia 
nervosa may starve to death 
but if they’re studied early 
enough they are found to be 
super healthy and very resis- 
tant to infection because they 
are on such a high-quality, 
low-calorie diet 

“I am on this life curve that 
terminates at 130, but I don't . 
know when HI fen off You 


can retard ageing and extend 
maximum hfespanby.tm to 60 
per cent. I think people bora at 
the end of the century win he 
living to 120 and the probabil- 
ity of staying alive to 130 is 
very high. People assume that 
means being decrepit, but in 
feet you stretch out your youth 
into middle-age so the ques- 
tion to ask is: *Do you want to 
be young longer?* 

The trouble with you 
Europeans is that you accept 
your individual fete more 
than we do, which is one 
reason why innovative culture 
has shifted to the Pacific." 

Indeed it has, and two 
fellow Californians are also 
leading searchers far the foun- 
tain of -gputh. Durk Peaison 
and Sandy Shaw, both 42, 
have sold 2.5 minion copies of 
their Life Extension bodes. 
“They’re charlatans,” Dr 


6 Maybe I can 
have my brain 
relocated to a 
computer, 
until I can 
return to 

human form 9 


Walford says. “They are the 
latest manifestation of a breed 
that has been prospering in 


Pearson and Shaw daim 
that human lifespan can be 
increased by large doses of 
nutrients and vitamins and 
say that over the past 18 years 
they have each undergone 
more than 1,000 clinical tests 
to ensure they are not damag- 
ing themselves with excessive 
vitamin E and BHT, a food 
preservative they say removes 
tat deposits in the arteries. 
“We’re both dedicated gour- 
mets and eat a lot of fat," 
Pearson says, “and even 
though I have the genes for 

familial bypcr-lipidemia (ex- 
cess fat) which killed my 
grandfather with a heart attack 
and my father with a stroke, I 
have a cholesterol count which 
would be great for a healthy 
teenager.” 

“Of course, there's a lot of 
jealousy in science and Roy 
Walford’s book {Maximum 
LtfeSipan) dropped into a hole 
and has sold about one per 
cent of ours. He’s a nice 
person, but a liar." 

Not everyone believes in 
the chemical approach. 
According to Professor Mi- 
chael Rose, associate profes- 
sor of biology at Dalhousie 
University, Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, evolution may bold the 
key. He suggests that by 
delaying reproduction into 
middle age - through several 
generations — humans can be 
programmed to live longer. 
“Medical people think that 
they will find a magic potion 
to cure- aeons. I study it 


within the evolutionary 
framework." . . 

“There are a variety of 
antagonistic- relationships be- 
tween sex and living longer. A 
female fhiitfiy which lays 
more eggs young will die 
sooner than one that doesn’t. 
The mate experiments are 
more controversial, but there 
is evidence that more mating 
gives rise to a decreased 
lifespan.” 

In laboratory tests Dr Rose 
kills the young that fruitflies 
produce in the early stages of 
adulthood and allows only 
those produced later to sur- 
vive. After 15 generations he 
produces a “superfly” which 
can hvc twice as long as 
normal. “Over time, evolu- 
tion selects a longer lifespan, 
and our research suggests that 
this could work in h umane 
Contrary to .the bi 
approach, there is no 
damental problem in tiving 
longer." 

But Darwinian theories 
may, according to Dr Arthur 
Harkins, an anthropologist at 
the University of Minnesota, 
be made obsolete by astonish- 
ing electronic progress. Within 
years, he claim miniatiirira- 
tion of micro-ticniitry will 
have resulted in biochip im- 
plants for sphincter control, 
blood-pressure monitoring 
and a new type of artificial 
heart developed from the back 
muscle of a patient and con- 
trolled by a micro-processor. 
In laboratories, biochips have 
already been developed that 
are far in advance of today’s 
heart pacemaker. He says that 
within two decades they will 
be injected through a hypo- 
dermic needle to become the 
body’s early warning system 
for cancer and other illnesses. 

“The implications for peo- 
ple in the medical profession 
are overwhelming," he says. 
“It inv alidates them and takes 
away their work in much the 
same way that dentists have 
seen the rise of dental hygien- 
ists, decay injections and 
plaque-removal solutions 
becoming a threat to their 
income. Doctors will have 
their work taken over by cell 
biologists and electronic ex- 
perts who will develop min- 
iaturized robots to clean out 
arteries.” 

Dr Harkins, now 50, was 
one of the few people who 
expressed a personal interest 
in all the research. “I never 
want to die," he said. “The life 
expectancy on my father’s side 
is 60 ana it's 100 on my 
mother’s. I'm hoping to live to 
80, when technology should be 
advanced enough for me to 
have my brain or bead re- 
moved and transplanted on to 
another body, perhaps one 
cloned from my own. This has 
been done fonnany years with 
dogs and cattle. Or maybe I 
can have my brain relocated 
to a computer, until such time 
as I can return to a human 

fi ft 

roniL 

Ax least, that way, be will 
save money on Dr Barnard’s 
cremes. 

CTHM»HMW p SpS l» l«1W8 


ISATURDA! 

New Year entertainment a guide 
to films on television - page 18 
The Times Restaurant of the 
Yean who came top of the 
eating tables in 1986 - page IS 


Arts Diary 

Bridge 

Chess 

Caoceits 

Crossword 

Dance 

Drink 

Eating Ont 

Films 

Galleries 


17 

17 Ontandi 

17 Open 

18 Radio 

17 Review 

18 Rock & Jan 18 
IS Sho pp i ng 14 
15 TckvMn 18 
18 Tnues Cook 
18 Travel 






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Tel; 01-734 1234 


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617.45 

CARPGTS (j FURNITURE 

U'.to: trke 

SALE Pf.lCE 

Old Afghan Wool Rug (5 4"" ; 3 ‘9 ) _• • 

6565 

£280 

‘ Pakistan Bokhara Carpet (11 8 >. 9 3') 

61,950 

£985 

‘ Ushok KeJim (14 1 1 ' - 12'1 1") 

63,950 • 

61,975 : 

French Cherry-wood Single Dedsread Complete 

' : -(6 3 >:3‘) 

61.549 

£774 

De Sede Swiss 3 sect Sofa in Hide 

62.734 

£1,367 


DR€SS FABRICS 

WwnPeriM 

VwM— 

Hwarfer 

PER METRE 

Printed Cotton Jersey <1 40cm) 

69.95 

£3.50 

liberty Prior Comargue Popfin Cl 37am) 

€9.95 

£4.95 

liberty Prim Varuna Wool (1 87cm) 

615.50 

£10.00 

Uberty PrinMyrian SNk House lengths (2L5m) 

627.36 

&12L50 


)- 620.00- 
622.00 
6118.00' 
6199.00 


68-50- 

610.00? 

666.00 

699.00 


.: ?U5CrilSE OVTI IZTj - Ci V.CNThLT ? 
OVEF. SISCO - 1 0 MOFiTH'.T PAYMENTS 
! AJKfOA'*"'.:TTEM.ErA-.LS-.. , . 






Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


TRAVEL 1 


Yielding 
marsh 
of time 

Water, water everywhere, but the flat 
landscape of Schleswig Holstein is also 
awash with an ageless and resilient 
character, as Hilary Finch discovered 


A CND sign and a Made and 
white cow rose out of the 
North Sea. A sandbank sidled 
past After 20 hours of sailing, 
the first sign of land was the 
nudear-free island ofFan. Ten 
minutes later came the Danish 
port ofEsbjerg, and the start of 
a drive along the first part of 
the Green Coast Road from 
Jutland to Holland. The idea 
was to discover that Germany, 
too, had a coastline. 

With obstinate and thor- 
ough perseverance, the North 
Sea makes its presence felt in 
every grass blade of Friesian 
Schleswig-Holstein, the 
marshy borderland between 
Denmark and Germany, 
where the land is as flat as the 
sea, and the natives daim you 
can see on Friday the visitor 
who is coming on Sunday. 

Water weighs down the 
clouds in the vast sky, and 
permeates the paintings of the 
local Expressionist, Emil 
Nokie, flooding his vibrant 
sunset marshscapes, dripping 
through his Ungemalte Bilder ; 
the “unpainted’ 4 watercolours, 
long hidden from Nazi pred- 
ators, and now most beauti- 
fully displayed in the smalt 
Nolde Museum at SeebulL 

Life is, in turn, conflict and 
compromise with the sea. 
Dykes, bumpy with sheep 
silhouettes, are buih and re- 
built; cycle roads and cycle 
maps, tide-plans for swim- 
mers and walkers proliferate; 

DENMARK. 
(Jutland) 


drainage canals form a grid for 
fields of Friesian cattk; and 
low, thatched farmhouses, like 
the Arlau-schleuse Hotel near 
the shipbuilding town of 
Husnm, offer peaceful sane* 



the focal Friesiengeist, a grain 
schnapps laced with pepper- 
mint and aniseed 

It is a landscape whose 
spaces demand time: Take 
plenty of ft, visiting perhaps 
the little marshy islands of 
Nordstrand, F6hr and Sylt, 
before curiosity leads you 
astray to the other, eastern 

Simstrack fields of 
rape and cosy 
brick architecture 

seacoasL For when Germany 
comes face to face with the 
Baltic, a sea no longer inter- 
cepted by dyke walk or fil- 
tered by marshland, it 
imposes a rather different type 
of control. 

The land is still on the 
defensive. But now the sea has 
become an embarrassment 
rather than a danger. In little 
faceless resorts like Laboe, 
spawned by Kiel, even the tide 
is put in its place, recreated 
more comfortably in indoor 
healed tidal swimming pools. 
And on the white sands of 
Travemunde, Lobedds mari- 


Jo 

Husnm 




' ' ' ■ .Nordstmrtit. 

WM Schleswi 

H oTs t e i n 


:Liii 


Hamhmg 


WEST 

GERMANY 


immmde 


EAST , 

GERMANY! 
200 miks 


tune neighbour, parade-lines 
of IJoyd-ioom sentry-boxes 
provide upholstered comfort 
and protection from the wind. 

The traveller is driven back 
inland to a feudal landscape of 
agricultural tend whose sun- 
struck fields of rape and cosy 
brick architecture quietly 
contradict the troubled, wran- 
gling history of Schleswig, 
Holstein, and the post-war 
compound. At Emin, prepar- 
ing to celebrate tlx 200th 
birthday of its son, Gail Maria 
von Weber in its own open air 
lake theatre, I stopped to eat 
trout in the dark panelled 
rooms of the Restaurant Voss 
Haus, once the meeting place 
of German poets and philos- 
ophers following Rousseau's 
call back to nature. 

It is quite possible, in fact, 
to mend a month walking, 
driving or boating your way 
round Schleswig-Holstein and 
eat nothing but fish, such is its 
infini te variety. I found two 
long menus of trout and 
Matjes (tiny, so-called 
“virgin” herrings) alone in 
Lunenburg’s Bismarckturm 
restaurant and in the base- 
ment of Hamburg's Belle Vue 
Hotel 

Lubeck offers nothing less 
than the apotheosis of the fish. 
A golden galleon, glinting high 
above the red-brick gables and 
grey spires, signals the 
Schiifergesdlschaft, a medi- 
eval tavern, once the home of 
the guild of fisherman, and 
now a meeting place fin 1 every 
fish created in the firmament 
below. This, too, is foe place to 
learn the real meaning of 
schmalzz a dripping, piquant 
with apples and spice, to be 
spread thickly on foe blackest 
bread you can find. 

Lubeck prides itself no less 
on its Niederegger marzipan, 
than on foe fact that this free 
Hanseatic town was actually 
ostracized by Hitler after he 
had been forbidden to speak 
in h. An uncompromising 
sense of Protestant austerity 
and mercantile pragmatism 


• \ 4 r : ' ■ v ? :‘v . ;*•> *• " 



/wk?? ■■■ , 

House and horse power: one 
and (above) a coach takes visitors across the 


. attractive farmhouses (top) 
to one of the nearby islands 


Classic river cruises with P&O 

The Danube. 
Rhine & Moselle 

Discover lhe heart of Europe cruising one £577. see your travel agent, ring us on 
of Its magical waterways in comfort with 01-831 1221. or send the coupon to: 
P&O. For a copy oT our Great Kver P&O Air Holidays, 77 New Oxford 
Cruises brochure, with holidays from Street. London WCiA 1PP. 


YlHW 


\iIi1ptnS 


RKVATOI.9SB 


P&OAIRIMday^| 


WgSi 


8 


|j|£^ 


ask anyone who** been there 



"Walking Lyding, walcrsports - 
I love the outdoor life and thank 
my lucky sum l found Jersey. The 

countryside^ as pretty as-a picture, 

the sportS great- and so are the 
people. Everyone gets a friendly 
xcelcome here” 

The good things you’ll re- 
member about Jersey will last far 
longer than your suntan. 

Like theexceflenrvalue 
no VAT makes. How. 
little it costs to hire 



a can Marvellous beaches, hidden coves, 

winding country Janes. Good meals at 
reasonable prices. Ask anyone who^ been 
there, ask your navel agent, or ask us. 
Ring 01-200 0200, or write to Dq)L 144, 
Jersey Tourism, Sl Heliet; Jersey, CL 

Jersey. 

Nearer to France, closer to home. 


Name 



»: ■ . Adrlrpcc 

!i . *#*L 







— 


pervades this red-brick island 
on the Trave: the massive, 
obese Holstentbr fortifies the 
harbour; 16th-century houses 
huddle in others’ back gardens 
in order to get a foothold in 
property rights; and only re- 
cently have the zealously 
whitewashed walls, of the 
seven-spired • Lutheran 
churches been scrubbed to 
reveal foe most delicate leaf- 
frond patterns of pre- 
Refonnation terra-cotta and 
lichen green on roof and pillar 
of the Marienkudie and 
jakofaikircli& 

Marzipan really is the only 


TRAVEL NOTES 


To enter or leave North 
Germany by sea, DFDS 
Seaways provide c om forta ble 
and spotlessly dean safflngs 
from Newcastle or Harwich to 
Esbjerg and Hamburg. Prices 
from Harwich to Esbjerg range 
from £99 midweek return for 
couchette, to £137 one-way for 
single cabfci deluxe ■ 
Commodore class. 


indulgence in this city of 
irresistible austerity. But its 
apocryphal etymology (Mara 
panis — St Marie’s bread) 
carries a scent of Venetian 
spice on the tradewinds of 
continuing east-west maritime 
commerce. It lingeis inescap- 
ably in the air of Hamburg, 
too. Behind the Posddorf is a 
village of fin-de-siede ware- 
houses, busy still with the 
bartering of silk, spices, coffee, 
tea and tobacco. 

Persian carpets hang from 
their windows, awaiting 
favourable exchange rates, 
and an entire day can be spent 

DFDS Longship holidays offer 
setf-catermg, farmhouse and 
hotel hoSdays throughout 


Information from DFDS 
Seaways, Parkeston 
Harwich, Essex CQ12 
(0255 554681). . 

For general and specific 
information, write to the. 
German National Tourist 
Board, 61 Conduit Street, 
London W1ROEN. 


happily along foe waterways 
ofa city with more bridges and 
canals than Venice. 

For Hamburg, too, is ruled 
by water, and its ebb and flow 
makg it the most unpredict- 
able of dries. It is Germany's 
largest industrial centre; yet it 
is posable to walk in parkland 
from the Alster lake to the 
Elbe without crossing a angle 
road. It is Luther's mighty 
fortress of Protestantism; yet 
his statue stands stolidly out- 
side North Germany’s most 
outrageously baroque 18th- 
century church, the Michel 

It is a city in which a leading 
whore may be asked to bring 
Touk>use-Lantrec to life in a 
stage-show at the Kunsthalie, 
and where, at the Cafe 
Schwender in the 
Groszneumarkt, coffee and 
dassical music strike up at 
630am on a Sunday morning 
if anyone wants it. It can take 
five or six hours to leave 
behind if you sail away up the 
Elbe bade to the North Sea, 
jnst long enough to recover. 


An independent 
reign in Spain 


travel news 


A new range of package holi- 
days in Span, aimed at youn- 
ger and more independently- 
fnindad travellers, has been 
launched by Thomson Hob- 
days under foe “Simply 


modation-only system which 
applies on United Slates Pack- 
ages. All excursions, 

Sd meals on a. half-board 
basis are included in the pnoe, 
which ranges between £738 
and £850 for two weeks. The 
excursions include fall-day 
wrier foe “Simpiy visits to the Hpcot Centre, bea 
Spain” label It covers a World and foe ken^ySl*rc 
number of smaller resorts not Centre, and the hohefaypnee 
included in mass-market also covers a foree-aay 
package programmes and is “passport 
based on simple accommoda- Information: 0306 8S5044. 
non in hostels, vfllage rooms, g^jpgs attached 

pensions, CTna H hotels and ° 

apartments. iuse Forte group 

■ ^ has extended the range of Us 

mmneai^mciiidingSevfile „ Music m ig^re" weekend 

and foe Batene ] breaks this winter . The price of 
seven or 1 4 nights. The cost of u . ^ekerul packages includes 
a typical hostel holiday in i u M.f )oa fd accommodation 

XZert tickets and prices 
a bed-araHjreakfest baas ^ £42 for one night or 

£68 for two nights at the 
Beverley Arms. Beverley, for a 
concert by the young Scottish 


starts at £88 for seven nights 
and goes up to £235 for two 
weeks in peak season. 

“Poundsaver” holidays, on 
which accommodation is allo- 
cated on arrival at the destina- 
tion airport, will be available 
in most resort areas, with 
sample prices in Ibiza ranging 
between £75 and £184 for one 
week. Information from 
agents or from Thomson on 
01-435 8431. 

• A new air link between 
S outhamp ton and the 
Channel Islands is to be 
opened by British Air Ferries 
and its sister company 
Guernsey Airlines from April 
2. A one-way fhBy flexible 
fare of £29 will be available on 
an flights and there will be 

up to ei ght services a day at 
weekends to both Jersey 
and Guernsey. Information: 
01-440 7866 or 0703 
614821. 

Seats to the sun 


percussionist Evelyn Glennie. 
Three concerts will be given 
over the weekend of January 
30-February lot the Brudeneli 
Hotel. Aldeburgh. by students 
of the Yehudi Menuhin 
School, with an inclusive price 
of £82. Information: 01-567 
3444. 

Wild west coast 

Prc-booked accommodation 
packag es on US fly-drive holi- 
days are being offered by 
British Airways’ Pound- 
stretcher subsidiary in 1987. 
The offer is available on 
planned itineraries starting 


Low-cost charter fores to most 
Mediterranean holiday destin- 
ations are being offered for the 
remainder of the winter in a 
"seat sale" mounted by Enter- 
prise Holidays, owned by Brit- 
ish Airways. Bookings can be 
made up to 24 hours before 
departure and flights are avail- 
able from eight UK airports. 
Typical prices, for a flight from 
Gatwick to Malaga, range 
between £89 and £155 return. 
Information on 01-434 2451. 

Island fan 



Lanzarote Villas is expanding 
its range of windsurfing holi- 
days in the Canary islands 
next summer in conjunction 
with Lagoon Windsnf Tours. 
Typical price for a holiday on 
Fuerteventura using apart- 
ment accommodation is £240 
or £290 for one week depend- 
ing on departure date and 
£285 or £340 for two weeks. 
Information; 0403 51304. 

All aboard 


Kuoni is introducing genu- 
inely inclusive hotel hohdays 
in Florida next year, as op- 
posed to foe normal accorn- 


New views: the Grand Canyon 

from Los Angeles or San 
Francisco on which accom- 
modation is prepaid by 
Poundstretcher while still 
leaving travellers free to 
choose when and where they 
eat 

Prices start at £199 for one 
week for a trip between Los 
Angeles and San Francisco, 
with children travelling at half 
price, while a 14-day tour 
through the Grand Canyon 
country and Sequoia National 
Park costs £385. The basic car- 
hire charge has to be added, 
but this can be a nominal £1 
fm a one- week holiday with 
three or more adults in a car. 
Poondstretchef’s charter fares 
from Gatwick to Los Angeles 
range between £349 and £479 
return. Information: 0293 
518060. 


Philip Ray 


Go Venice... Go Concorde 
and Orient Express. . . 
GoCitaiia 


GO FOR CHOICE. 
QUALITY 
AND STYLE 



The short break ofa 
lifetime- fabulous 
Venice, travelling super- 
sonically by Concorde 
and romantically by 
Orient-Express. 

The most memorable, 
exciting, stylish holiday 
imaginable! And the 
cost is from only £760. 

See page 2 30 of the 
Citafia summer 
brochure. Just four 
opportunities in *87 
| departures 21 and 25 
February, and 2 arid 6 
Aprill-so contact your 
travel agent now. or ring 
01-680 3 100l24hrej far 
special leaflet 

Citafia. Dept TTLC 
3-5 Lansdowne Road. 
Croydon CR9 ILL 

CitaUa 

for the best of Italy 

ATOL 28 SBCO 


Holidays 
Gran Hotel 
La Toja 

First class (5 stars) Galicia 
North Spain, tennis, golf 9 
holes, casino, swimming pool 
climate, congress pavwon. 

Tefc 010/34/986 730025 
Telex 88042 toxae 


The Romance 
of the Metro 

LYN MACDONALD 


Fora free copy afrits 


buMuldtr. write kk 

Tone Off Lid. 
bCtmaCloK 
London SWIX7BQ. 


—Sicily— 

ART AND 
ARCHAEOLOGY 

OsotM* BIB K8MVS ti Bw (MdSCi 
uumgcamuy ihflMee.n«mAdiws. 

<0 (utwcsmd ndm uMpcm 
M93».an»MI»i««*WC3l romans. I 
Miy (nanny paoM. rake Sciy tv env 

pm MuMQ *IMW V» 

mg or twang 

Pneet tom C 2 M per warn aa mm 
DtrMA9>aiBCaBnBWiyVUadiKsdqr 
at 1 *00 now Mm GdMIw MMng 
SNovanoir 

an Mrt*, SWy a »Ca* hun ClM 
pv wacte 

WnenwioriSinpaeacluava mi 
tradum sq 

island sung* 




n 

Vfenenahopho^sBe^en 


osar Zorich 


Your health 
and well-being 
in good hands, 

Indoor and outdoor thermal suimming pools. T i;" 

Our thfrmol ipnngi hove the highe»l mineral contonl |!| 

of any in Switzerland. 


Ihke the road to 
freedom this summer 

A french Life mooni^j holid&i/ give 
freedom lo gp as you please. To take i 
or speed u 

Our self catering holidays offer t] 
choice of holiday homes you a 
for -a rural retreat In (he Don 

1 an apamneni near lhe Med . 

1 camp sue In Brittany. P 

tranquility or activity ar, 
l With over 17 years expe 







M6nm. 


More chdee than a smOrgasltord. 


The Fred. Olsen Lines 
brochure is simply packed 
appetising with t; i 
holidays. 





1987 Self-catering, farmhouses, ship’n 1 
shore breaks and lake and mountain 
tours, all at easily digestible prices. 

Our two ships, the mus. Braemar 
and m-s. Bolero, sail regularly to 
Norway and Denmark. A trip aboard 
either is a holiday in itself. 



To see what's on the menu, send 
for our 1987 brochure today. 

Either fill in the coupon, ring 
Brochureline 0235 353535 or see 
your Travel Agent. • 

ISFred.Olsen Lines 


I Tffi'Vrei OUwi Lines RO. Sox 35, 

| Abingdon, Ovqii OX 14 3RQ. 

( PlwwfwndmcyourNorwa) & OCTimari, l 

l NAME. *■ Ure ' 










TRAVEL 2 


Fifty is a dangerous age 


snora Qwwtord Poole 




SWITZERLAND 


' Chamonix 


•l- 


It occurred to me the other 
day that independent travel, 
where you reject the pre- 
booked package and elect to 
assemble the components 
yourself: is rather like a jig- 
saw*. all the pieces are irregular 
but you have to make them fit. 
Should any foil to do so, 
Murphy's Law comes swiftly 
into force. 

This thought should have 
occurred to me before, be- 
cause on the first of the 
expeditions which marked my 
50th year there came a mo- 
ment when half the team was 
lost in a howling blizzard, 
dinging to the Italian side of 
the Matterhorn, while the 
other half, plus all our bag- 
gage, was somewhere in the 
mist on the Swiss side. Some- 
thing had gone seriously 
wrong — and it was clearly aU 
my fault! 

To begin at the beginning: at 
50 years of age, you are not 
finished with the active life. 
Assemble a few good friends, 
plan a journey which com- 
bines an element of excite- 
ment with a little comfort and 
good food at the end of the day 
and life can begin to look 
invigorating. Our intention 
was to ski from Zermatt to 
Chamonix, following the line 
of the classic Haute Route. 

Ours would be the Bas 
Rome, with lifts to help us up 
and regular evening descents 



Adventure-filled 
holidays are not 
exclusively for the 
young, says Rob Neillands, who 
reports from the wrong side of the 
Matterhorn in the first of a series 


uno the Alpine villages of 
France, Italy and Switzerland, 
where the Thomson Holiday 
reps would await our arrival 
with smiles, rooms, mwit and 
(if need be) hot water bottles: 
after all, when you get to that 
uncertain age, you are not out 
to prove anything. 

Our party of six arrived in 
Verbier for a two-day waim- 
up.where we stayed in a 
marvellously well-equipped 
Thomson chalet, ate excellent 
meals and skied about the 
mountains in pouring rain. 

Then on to Zermatt, and the 
real start of our tour, up and 
around the Matterhorn into 
Italy and then down to the 
resort of Cervinia. The day 
was glorious as we rolled along 
from Verbier in our little bus, 
but the clouds socked in as we 
arrived at Zermatt and the rep 
was doubtful about us crossing 
the frontier. 

We refused to be put off and 



WYE 
VALLEY 
Builth Weils 
Distance: 6 mites 
“A tender, beanti- 
fill haze veiled the 
w distant hills and woods 
with a gauze of blue and 
silver and peart It was a 
dream of intoxicating 
beauty.” This was die valley 
of the Wye as seen by the 
Rev Kflvert a century ago 
and time has treated tie 
vistas kindly. 5 

Kflvert was an mveterate 
walker, often covering 20 
miles a day. This walk from 
Builth WeOs is a modest six 

miles, part of it along the 

Wye Valley Footpath. 

He A483 crosses the 
tumbling Yrfon River. Turn 
along the lane past tire golf 
clubhouse. As the lane tinsts 
left, a footpath starts. This 
soon hogs the gloriously 
indecisive Wye. 

The railway which, argu- 
ably, would have beat tfe 
prettiest in the principality 

had it survived, nuT on the 

opposite hank. The tine had 



just arrived when Kflvert 
came and he used it exten- 
sively on his travels. 

The path plunges in and 
out of autumn clothed wood- 
lands then under the high 
rail bridge; there is an 
unfortunate plethora of “no 
fishing” signs that withstand 
the eager waters. 

After three miles by the 
riveade, a yellow wnymark 
arrow directs the walker out 

of the wood and up a steep 

meadow. Look for a stile to a 

lane. Turn left. The tranquil 

way dips and rises towards 

Builth. Near tire clubhouse a 

final path chases the waters 

downstream to the town. 

Richard Shnrey 


OUTINGS 


MODEL ENGINEER 
EXHIBITION: Model makers 
who specialize not only in 
engineering but In making 
planes, boats, vehicles, space 
figures and artefacts, soldiers 
and numerous other Hems. 100 
trade stands, over 40 clubs 
and societies, demonstrations, 
competitions and a large junior 
section. Refreshments. 
Alexandra Palace, London N22 
1-883 6477). Thure-Jan 8, 


6 


0am-7pm (Jan 6, 1 Dam-9pm). 
Adult £3.50, child El B0. 

THE GOLDEN BOX: Multi- 
screen video show telling the 
story of British television over 
the past 50 years. Show lasts 
an hour and should interest 
both adults and children. 
Commonwealth Institute, 
Kensington High Street, 
London W8 (01-603 4535). 

Until Jan 4, dosed Thurs. Mon- 
Sat six showings between 
noon-7.30pm, Sun four 
showings, 3pm-7.30pfli. Adult 
£2-50, child El .25. 

THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN: 
Unique collection of items of 
horticultural interest from 
paintings to porcelain pea 
pods. Including some of the 
Royal, Family's personal 
possessions. 


islands. 


land specialists 

9 UPAR1Q SARDINIA 

RStCA &SKIATHOS 
VIA 0 MENORCA 
nawnaifl bI MaB Utraaw n 

Self-Canring P Ffy/Dnve 
Turn Centra F 

• rjMii ante an* treirtrhils. 
W«fl7 — *■— ' 


— 

„l Bite, LflMkjfl *P 
ret 01-222745 2 w w 
(gamteriwfcpartKiB) 
iwniiminwfiBfcOiwv — 


Sotheby's Main Galleries, New 
Bond Street London W1 (01- 
493 8080). Fri-Jan 28. closed 
Jan 5, Mon-Sat 9am-5.30pm, 
Sun 2.30-5 .30pm. Free. 

RIPON 1100 OFFICIAL END 
OF YEAR CELEBRATIONS: 
Entertainments in the Market 
Place start at 10am with morris 
dancers and a disco. Service 
of thanksgiving in the 
Cathedrals! 11.15pm, followed 
by torchlight procession. 

THE CITY IN MAPS: If you're in 
London di 

to see this excellent 
which illustrates the 
development of urban 
cartography over 22 canttuies 
in cities throughout the world. 
Most of the Hems on display 
never previously exhibited. 
British Library Exhibition 
Galleries, Great Russell Street, 
London WC1 (01-636 1544). 
Fran today until Dec 1987. 
Mon-Sat 10am-5pm, Sun 2:30- 
6pm. Free. 

VOLKS RAILWAY SPECIAL 
OPENING: The electric raflway, 
first opened in 1883 by its 
inventor. Magnus Volk, Is a 
great summertime favourite 
with visitor's to Brighton. 
Opened for the first time for 
Christmas and the New Year, 
you can ride the 1 %-rrtiJe track 
from the Aquarium to Keck 
Rock. Hot mince pies, muted 
wine and hot Rfbena served. 
Aquarium Station, Brighton, 
East Sussex. Today, 
tomorrow, Jan 1. From 
10.30am-330pm each day. 
Adult £4, Child £3. 

MINCE PIE SPECIAL: Take a 
50-minute ride on a steam train 
with hot mince pies served 
aboard; visit the engines, the 
museum and model railway. 
Midland Railway Centre, 
Butterty Station, Ripley, 
Derbyshire (0773 49788). 
Thurs, trains between 
11-30am-4pm. Adult £1.90, 
child 95p. 

Jody Froshang 


Continental 
Motoring Holidays 

France UrUyum. Holland. Germany and Spain 
Lcriion of scll-ruierim! holiday* m coaslaL rar.il 

■■" K "'AKo"«';«^n^r, ho.cls and « 

holidays. Frico Include relum how reran erossmi- 

Wi " U Sr a copy ofoor new- tan.-ln.rf. seeym.r navel 

ilSen ' ^^I'e-^'T- rSFX-ed Ud.Fre^asL 
oS- flneens Gardens. Do« 

Kent L'Tl 7 f »HW- 

— — ro.il.n- -ni.il MnloruwJ 

J'lr.iM •' 1 T/l 



set off uphill, from where we 
would ski across the col while 
our baggage went down the for 
side on snowcats. When we 
got to the top the weather was 
awful and the visibility nfl. 
However, the last tow for the 
col was still working, so we set 
off again — or, rather, three of 
us did. 

This drag lift to the Matter- 
horn col stops somewhere 
short of the crest, over which 
the wind was booming. I was 
kneeling in the snow, thinking 
of England, when the other 
two arrived behind me with a 
crash and a curse, and we set 
off to crawl uphill, since that 
seemed the best idea at the 
time. 

■ It took us about 20 minutes 
to get to the crest, where we 
somehow got our skis on, slid 
down slowly through the 
clouds and foil at last into an 
Italian cafe. Our problem now 
was to contact the others back 


in Switzerland, but none of us 
had our glasses and the num- 
bers in the local telephone 
book were much too small to 
read. 

Contact was eventually 
established and we skied on to 
Cervinia, for a night at the 
Hotel Cri stall o. where our 
dishevelled appearance in the 
cocktail bar caused some sur- 
prise among the other guests, 
who took us for eccentric 
millionaires. There we stayed, 
gracing the cocktail bar in our 
ski-suits and socks until the 
others turned up with our 
luggage, after a -nightmare 
journey in a howling blizzard 
over the St Bernard Pass. - 

That evening we moved on 
to Courmayeur, at the foot of 
Mont Blanc, which is, to my 
mind, one of the most delight- 
ful ski resorts in Italy, with 
lots of nice varied runs on 
slopes well-supplied with nice 
varied bars. We were led 
around these by two relentless 
lady skiers, the Thomson rep 
and the guide from the Ski 
Club of Great Britain. 

The final leg of our trip was 
to be the elastic descent from 
the top of Mont Blanc down 
the Vailfie Blanche and the 
Mer de Glace glacier into 
Chamonix, but this descent, 
like the Matterhorn ascent, is 
influenced by the weather. We 
had therefore allowed two 
days for this section and were 



FRANCE V- I © Verbier 



MlBlaOg? ^ Jtton urdPMS ^Zermatt 


Comma >eur 


' Cervinia Matterhorn^ 
ITALY '.!/•. 

5 miles 


. -x. J: 


Frozen oldies: Rob Neillands (front) and friends 


finally cleared to go on Day 
Two. 

The ascent from the valley 
floor to the top of Mont Blanc 
is made in a series of ever- 
smaller cable cars, the last the 
size of a telephone box. Look- 
ing up from the top of Stage 2, 
I was a little concerned to see 
the empty, descending cable 
car being blown out sideways 


by the wind, a fairly alarming 
sight which I decided was best 
kepi from the others, who 
were chatting in the comer, 
and so upwards and into the 
crowded top-station cafe for a 
glass of Dutch courage and a 
short delay while our guides 
conferred. 

The snag with the Vailfee 
Blanche run is that if the wind 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Thomson Holidays does not 
normally cater for private 
tours, but it does offer a two- 
centre holiday in Zermatt and 
Chamonix which, weather 
permitting, offers visitors the 
runs to Cervinia round the 
Matterhorn and down the 
Valfee Blanche from 
Courmayeur, at prices from 
£452 for one week. 

Thomson Wlntersports also 
offers a range of high mountain 
Ski Safaris in Francs and 
Austria, at prices from around 
£444 for one week. Fun details 
in the Thomson Wlntersports 
brochure. 

drops, the clouds come in and 
you can’t see the crevasses, 
while if the wind is high, as it 
was, then just getting down on 
to the glacier is a nightmare 
trip, inching in ski boots along 
a narrow, slippery path, with a 
nasty void on either tide and 
the wind blasting you about I 
could happily have waited all 
day for the wind to drop, but 


the end was in sight and we 
bad to get on. 

We managed to descend on 
to the snow by about noon, 
and set off down the glacier for 
Chamonix. This Mer de Glace 
skiing is not difficult, and the 
scenery is splendid, so the best 
way to do this trip is to get a 
group together and take a 
picnic lunch, stopping half- 
way down the run to sunbathe, 
admire the crags and listen to 
the creaking of the ice. 

Unfortunately we didn't 
have a picnic with us and our 
Courmayeur guide who must 
have been at the back of the 
queue when the Italians were 
getting their charm, was in a 
great hurry to get home. We 
whizzed down to the end in 
uqder a couple of hours, then 
sploshed through the melting 
snow into Chamonix and got 
our ski boots off at last Then 
it was imo our “Been-There- 
Done-Thai*’ T-shirts for our 
final dinner. 

What shall we do at 60, I 
wonder? 



FERRY SENSIBLE 

Now Brittany Ferries sail direct to Brittany Normandy 
and Spain, landing you often hundreds 
of miles nearer your holiday destination. 


FERRY BIG NEWS 

Our new and hugely successful Portsmouth- 
Caen Holiday Route - the Calais, Cherbourg, 
Le Havre, Dieppe By-Pass offers a clear run 
into all of Holiday France and beyond. 



FERRY BEAUTIFUL 

A wealth of holiday pleasures, countless 
secluded beaches, breathtaking countryside 
and friendly people. 


FERRY ACCOMMODATING 

We’re now No. 1 for Car Holidays. Our huge range indudes Gites, Car Touring Holidays with 
Hotels, inducting Go-As-You-Please, Seaside Apartments and Breaks to Brittany Normandy 
and Spain. Arid we’ve new Ski-Drive; low-cost skiing holidays at top resorts. 




For yourfreel987 Col ourBroch ures either 
Ring our 24- hr Brochure Service 
on Portsmouth (8785) 751708 or 
Plymouth (0752) 269926, or contact your 
travel agent or complete the coupon. 

Please send me your Brochures on 
France □ Spain & Portugal □ Tick Bn 


Name 


The Holiday ferry 


For information and bookings ling: 

Portsmouth Tel: (0705) 827701, Plymouth Tfel: (0752) 221321, Cork Tel: 507666. 


| Address. 

I 


I 

I Semi to: Brittany Brochures, 

■ RO, Box 14, Raymoutb Road.: London SE16 1BR. 


Ti 


I 

I 

I 

I 

J 








ll-ifc HlVlfcS 5AI UKDAX UCfi^EJn DC.IS. -d. / i7oy 


SHOPPING 


Big rush for the bargains 


Nicole Swengley’s 
guide to sale 
time in London 

It’s a bit masochistic embark- 
ing on another shopping spree 
as soon as Christmas is over. 
Bat London's sales offer an 
excellent opportunity to stock 
op on cut-price household 
necessities, pkk op a fashion 
bargain or brighten ap your 
borne with low-cost fnmisb- 
ings. Many stores open on 
New Year's Day but check 
times with shops direct 

BEDDING 

London Bedding Centre 
(Dec 27-Jan 31) 26-27 Sloan© 
Street, London SW1 (01-235 
7541) has discounts on beds, 
sofa beds and water beds. And 
So To Bed (Dec 27-Feb 1) 638- 
640 King's Road. London SW6 
(01-731 3593) offers reductions 
on beds, divan sets, mirrors, 
lamps, bed linen, towels; also 
at 7, New King's Road, SW6 
and 9GB Camden High Street, 
NW1. 

ELECTRICAL/HI-FI 

Dixons 1 sale starts at all 
branches on December 27; 
video recorders, in particular, 
are reduced. Currys’ sale runs 
from December 27 -February 
28 at all branches in England 
and Wales (Dec 26 in 
Scotland); special lines Include 
microwaves, food processors, 
televisions, video recorders. 
Rumbefows’ sale starts on 
December 27 at all branches 
and runs for about a month; 
reductions include televisions, 
vacuum cleaners and small 
electrical appliances. Laskys’ 
sale runs from December 27 
for four weeks at 42 
Tottenham Court Road, 

London W1 (01-636 0845) and 
at other branches. 

FASHION 

Benetton (all brandies) from 
December 29 for about three 
weeks. Coles’ sale starts on 
December 29 at 131 Sloane 
Street. London SW1 (01-730 
7564). Sales at Country 
Casuals shops start on 
December 27. Fenwick (Dec 
29-Jan 17) 63 New Bond 
Street London W1 (01-629 
9161); reductions on winter 
coats, co-ordinating separates. 
Inca (Jan 28-Feb 14) 45 
Elizabeth Street London SW1 
(01 -730 7941); reductions on 



Peruvian hareftnits. Jaeger 


(01-734 8211);! 

Road, SW3 (01-534 2814); 163 


; 96-88 Brampton 
1-584 2814); If 
Sloane Street SW1 (01-235 
2505). Laura Ashley (all 
branches) from December 27 
for about two weeks. Moss 
Bros (Dec 27 for about two 
weeks) 21-26 Bedford Street 
London WC2 (01-240 4567) 
and at other branches. Next 
fen brandies) from December 
27 for about three weeks. New 
Man (Jan 3 for about three 
weeks) 69 Duke Street 
London W1 (01-408 1102) and 
6F Sloane Street SW1 (01-235 
3030). Scotch House sale now 
on at 187 Oxford Street 
London W1 (01-734 8802); 
starts December 27 at 84 
Regent Street W1 (01-734 
Street W1 


to 191 Regent 
(01-734 4816); 


SW1 (01-581 2151). Simpson 
(Dec 27-Jan 31) Piccadilly, 
London W1 (01-734 2002); 
reductions on classics and 
high fashion. Warehouse (all 
branches) from December 27 
for about three weeks. 

FURNITURE 

Stylish, modem furniture is 
reduced at Ligne Roset (Dec 
29-Jan 31), 130 Shaftesbury 
Avenue, London W1 (01-434 
2071) and at Maison Designs 
Dec 17 for about two weeks) 
17-919 Fulham Road, London 
SW6 (01-736 3121). Sofa So 
Good (Dec 27-Feb 14) 2-10 
Jordan Place, London SW6 
(01-385 4719) offers discounts 
on sofas and sofa beds. 
Shelving, trolleys, plan chests, 
tables, chairs, sofas are all 
reduced at Estia Designs (Dec 


29-Jan 31) 5 Tottenham Street 
London W1 (01-636 5857). 
Oscar Woodens’ sale of 
modem furniture is now on and 
runs for about a month at 421 
Finchley Road, London NW3 
(01-4350101). Traditional 
chairs, dining and bedroom 
furniture ana three-piece suites 
are already reduced at Maples, 
Waring A widow: the safe 
continues for about eight 
weeks at 1 45 Tottenham Court 
Road, London W1 (01-387 
7000) and at all other 
branches. 

INTERIORS 

B & Q D4-Y Supercentres 
(from Dec 27) 243 Ealing Road, 
Alperton, Wembley. Middlesex 
(01-998 9019); 3 King's Street 
Acton. London W3 (01-992 
1 1 82 ) and at other branches. 


co-onfinatira bedDnens and 
bathrobes. Futon Company 
(Dec 27-Jan 24) 82-83 
Tottenham Court Road, 

London W1 (01-636 9984); 

654a Fufoam Road, SW6 (01- 
736 9190); and at Futo, 138 
Netting HU Gate. W11 (01- 7Z7 
9252); reductions on futons, 
furniture, bedlinens. Habitat 
(Dec 27-Jan 10) 196 Tottenham 
Court Road, London W1 (01- 
631 3880h 206-222 Kira’s 
Road, SW3 (01-352 12fiy, 191- 
217 Finchley Road, NW3 (pi- 
328 3444 ); King's Mall, King's 
Street Hammersmith, W6 (01- 
741 7111) and other branches. 
Hears (Dec 27-Jan 24) 196 
Tottenham Court Road, 

London W1 (01-630 1686). 
Laura Ashley (Dec 27 for 
about two weeks) 256 Regent 
Street London W1 (01-437 
.9760) and at other branches. 
Reductions indude wallpaper 


Littlewooda 


mishingfat 
roods (Dec 


27 for about 


: (01-221 9112) and 
9, Central Avenue, The Market 
Covent Gardon, W°2j01 -636 


8 


(01-4340784); redi 
upholstery, china, beds, 
lighting, rugs, ceramics and 
selected ColoroU coordinated 
ranges. The Conran Shop (Jan 
1 (Wan 24) 77-79 Fulham Road, 
London SW3 (01-589 7401); 
reductions on selected items. 
Covent Garden General Store 
(Jan 10 for about two weeks) 
111 Long Acre, Covent 
Garden, London WC2 (01-240 
0331). Cyrus Carpets (Jan 2 
for about two weeks) 47-48 


ks) 47-48 
iSWI (01- 


PiccadHiy. London ! 

7347141). Desca m pa (Dec 30- 
Feb 4) Sloane Street London 
SW1 (01-2356957); 
reductions on 


three weeks) 203-211 Oxford 
Street London W1 (01-437 
4171). Neal Street East (Jan 3 
for about two weeks) 5-7 Neal 
Street London WC2 (01-240 
0135); reductions on vases, 
fans and lights. Next interiors 
(Dec 27 for about two weeks) 

1 60 Regent Street London W1 
(01 -434 251 5) and at other 
branches; half-price ceramics 
and bedlinens. Perfect Glass 
(Dec 29-Jan 3) 5 Park Walk, 
London SW10 (01-351 5342); 
reductions inckfoe table-top 
glasses, decanters, Jus. 
Practical Styling (Dec 31 -Jan 

7) 16-18 St Giles Street 
London WC2 (01-240 371 1); 
reductions in fighting, furniture 
and ceramics. Sanderson (Jan 
3-24) 52 Berners Street 
London W1 (01-636 7800); 
reductions on furnishing 


fabrics. Upstairs Shop (sale 
now on) 22 MroRoid. 
London SW1 (01-730 7502); 
small sale of sele cted^ 
wafl papers and quitted 
bedspreads. World’s End Tiles 
(Jan 8. 9; morning only Jan 10), 
British Ran Yard, SHverthome 
Road. Battersea. London SW8 
(01-7208358). 

KITCHENWARE 

Prices of kitchen tools and 
equipment are reduced at 
David MeBor {Jan 10-17)4 
Sloane Square, London SW1 
(01-730 4259) and 26 James 
Street Covent Garden, WC2 
(01-379 6947); at Dtveribnenti 
(Jan 10-24) 139-141 Fulham 
Road, London SW3 (01-581 
8065) and 68-72 Marytebone 
Lane, W1 (01-935 0689); at 

Covent Garden Kitchen 

Supplies (Jan 2-mid Feb) 3 
North Row, The Market 
Covent Garden, London WC2 
(01-8369167). 

LIGHTING 

London Lighting (Jan 10 for 
about two weeks) 135 Fulham 
Road, London SW3 (01-589 
3612); Artemide (Jan 9-17) 17 
Neal Street London WC2 (01- 
2402552). Mr Light (two-week 
sale starts the second week of 
Jan) 275 Fulham Road, London 
SW10 (01-352 7525); 
reductions indude ceramic 
table lamps and brass floor 
lamps. 

SPORTS EQUIPMENT 

UBywhftes (from Jan 2) 
Piccadilly. London SWl (01- 


930 3181) and at other 
branches (from Dec 
reductions indude tr 
skirts, men's shirts and shorts, 
training shoes. 


TOYS 


Hamfeys (Jan 2-17) 188 
Regent Steat London W1 (01- 
734 31 61); reductions on pre- 
school toys, dolls, board 
games and chSdren's books. 


STORES 


Army a Navy (Dec 27 -Jot 31) 
Victoria Street London SWl 
(01-834 1234); reductions on 
fashion, bedBnen® and 

furniture. Selected 
merchandise throughout the 
store is half the normal price 
on January 17, white Brown 
Cross Day, (Jan 24), offers 
further reductions. ^ 
Debenhams (Dec 27 for about 
two weeks) Oxford Street 
London WT (01-5803000); 
reductions on bedlinens, 
towBls. manswear, laefies 
knitwear and Bngerie. 

D.H. Evans (Dec 27-Jan 31) 
Oxford Street London W1 (01- 
629 8800); selected 
merchanefise throughout the 
store is haff the normal price 
on January 17 while on Brown 
Crass Day, (Jan 24), f urther 
savings are offered. 

Fortnum & Mason (Jan 2 for 
about two weeks) RccadBly, 
London W1 (01-734 8040); 
preview for account customers 
on December 31. 

Harrods (Jan 7-31) 

Knights bridge. London SWl 
(01-730 1234); reductions in aB 
departments including carpets, 
furnishing fabrics, china and 
glass, linens, household 
appliances and food. 

Harvey ffidrate (Dec 31 -Jan 
31) Knightsbridge, London 
SWl (01-235 50)0): preview 
for account customers on 
December 29 and 30. 

John Leans (Dec 30-Jan 10) 
Oxford Street London W1 (01- 
6297711). 

Liberty (Dec 27 for three 
weeks) Regent Street London 
W1 (01-734 1234); reductions 
on furnishing fabrics, dress 
fabrics, china, coats and 
designer-label clothes. 

Peter Jones (Dec 30 for about 
two weeks) Sloane Square, 
London SWl (01-730 3434) 
reductions on linens, china and 
glass. 

Selfridges (Dec 29-Jan 31) 
Oxford Street London W1 ( 01 - 
629 1234); reductions 
throughout the store. 


IN THE GARDEN 


Back to earth 
with a bump 


Festivities over, now 
is the time to tackle 


outdoor chores, says 
Francesca Greenoak 


After the stuffy, inward-look- 
ing days of Christmas, we look 
to our ga r dens for a breath of 
air anrf the chance of sonie 
outdoor activity. Even a win- 
ter garden has its changes, and 
than will be evergreens, col- 
oured baik, the opening of the 
brilliant seed pods of the 
gladdou iris, and new winter 
blooms to observe. 

Each year is different When 
I looked round my garden a 
few days ago there were a 
dozen or so summer plants, 
including a Welsh poppy, 
marigolds and fresh bursts of 
arabis and violas which had 
endured up to and beyond the 
winter solstice. Best of all, the 
winter honeysuckle by the 
door, raised from a cutting, 
has at last produced a few 
creamy white, heavily fragrant 
flowers, while the buds of 
another fragrant shrub, Maho- 
nia, are just showing yellow. 
The weather up to Christ m as 
has been so mild that in some 
places the starry yellow winter 
jasmine and the fragrant white 
Viburnum bodnontense are 
already past their best bloom. 

The mild weather has also 
encouraged a regrowth of 
weed species and it is a good 
idea to get to grips with these 
now. If like me you hadn't the 
heart to cut back perennials 
which were still flowering, you 
might need to remove be- 
draggled foliage and dead 
stems. Brand new Christmas 
secateurs could also be put to 
their first use on wisteria, 
taking side shoots back to 
three or four bods from the 
base. It is better to leave rose 
pruning until later in the 
winter. However, roses and 
other plants received as 
Christmas presents may be 


WEEKEND TIPS 


• Most house plants on 
window sills win need to be 
turned to allow all sides to 
get some light. 

• Christmas cacti which 
are in flower need to be 
treated gently and not 
moved or the buds will fan. 


planted now provided the sod 
does not become owsn'gj 
wet or too frosty. If: 
garden tools for Christmas, 
Sake sure they are wiped with 
an oily rag before you store 

them. . 

Other minor jobs are clean- 
ing bamboos and disintoi^ 

seed trays. Tidy the shed and 
make sure the greenhouse or 
conservatory panes are clean 
- to make the most ot me 
weak, wintry sun. If you feel 
the need to demonstrate raith 
in a spring which seems s o far 
away, sow onion and leak seed 

in peat pots and seed trays 
respectively for planting out 
later under cloches. t _ _ 

The evenings have been 
lengthening since early 
December and soon the morn- 



ings will draw out too, and 
thing s will begin to grow 
again. Try to keep your bird- 
table well stocked as the 
weather begins to get colder. 
The birds will return your 
favours by picking off pests. 

Sharp-eyed robins can spot the 

tiny pupae which over winter 
in the soil and are turned up 
by di g gin g . I hang a wire 
peanut basket in my old apple 
fra and the tits seek out the 
eggs of pest species in the 

crevices of the baric while they 

are awaiting their turn at the 
nuts. 

• If yon have bare spaces 

in your garden or are planning 
a new one, take advantage 

of any fine weather to plant 
roses, fruit trees, hashes 
and hardy herbaceous species. 

• Over-developed bods on 

blackcurrants indicate the 

presence of the big-bud 

mite: pick off the infected 
buds and burn them. 



OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


D0NT JUST 
SIT THERE! 
DO SOMETHING! 

Order your copy 
of the new 1987 
Twickersworld, 
Wilderness, 
Wildlife, 
Expedition and 
Cultural brochure 
today. 


T\V I c K L: ’ l.S W(. .) R L ! ’ 


123 CHURCH ST. TWICKENHAM] 

|01 - 892 7606/8 164 - 


IIAIA Mr u HU, I 



■n» Idrftte T, Cm HwH jmd V An bj its ms 
Mil iDwif mfic 7 

fet mmt on 
Iriwfc call cor Inikx 
OI-TJeOlel 


On the island 
bf’Gozo the only- 
chi ng chats 
spoilt: is you. 


Ok MedolKOT Hcaljda yT 

Mw^AnatonauiSNKau 


ITS ALL AT 
TRAILFIMDERS 

_ WcrWwtt Km cost lights 
11 b best - ad w can prove ft 
1 KL 000 ctants shea 197? 
M0IMD THE MOULD ROM E7M 
0/W RTN 

SYDNEY 
PERTH 
AUCKLAND 
BANGKOK 
SINGAPORE 
HONG K0KG 
DELHI /BOMBAY 
COLOMBO 

mm 

JOBUftG 
UMA 

LOS ANGELES 
NEW YORK 
WASHINGTON 
BOSTON 
HONOLULU 
GENEVA 


£374 ESS) 
£403 EOT 
£390 £748 
£209 £385 
£209 £418 
£248 £496 
E231 £385 
£242 £440 
£248 £396 
£270 £487 
£275 £506 
E1B7 E30B 
£ 89 £198 
£119 £207 
£137 £274 
£281 £457 
E 75 £ 89 

€MI EARLS COURT ROAD 
LONDON W 6 £f 

ntn 01-937 5400 
0i -an »is 
ist/ftrineas Om 01-938 3444 
S ownmant Ucanrea/Bondad 
ABTA 1ATA ATOL 1458 


EuUW/USA 
Loro Hart 


Fari* worktwitte. 

I economy. 01-387 9100 


WOBO C C O BOUND. Repent St 
Wl. 01 734 5507. ABTA/AU1 
847. Tac* 27376. 


SKN.Y FHM £139. Taormina 
hotels. Sicily a la Carte. Grand 
Tour. FUghl only from £89 rtn. 
ISLAND SUN 01-229 7462. 
AST A/ ATOL 1907, 


beaches, islands, lakes, dtles 


The Magic 
number is 

01-749 7449 


■ SupotoiskiKte, be<Khes(Hba Sardi nra,lscbta.Sfc8y). 
Unknown Grodo, exdusivB Porto Rafael, stylish San Remo. 

■ Beautiful vitas and totals in unspoiled hideaways -ta 
Tuscany, on he legendary kftes, In Ravoflo an ttie glorious 
Amalfi coast. 


■ Fabulous ctiies — from Venice, Rome (Bid Florence to the 
medieval gems of Siena, Asstef, Perugia. 

trsafl in otx new 1987 brochure. 

Pure magiefrom covafa cover. 


The ^ 

Magic of j 
Italy 


01-749 7449 or 7440(24 Iw) 
Magic ct My LU., ^ 

47 snepherts Bush Green. 
London W128PS. mi« 



Tl« Had Conao hn An «bb ttted afl n> 
■*■•** ■-"—*-* - 7 **"■*— ‘--f 

Fo. nm «■ MUB. Gobi, m Cm 

aB o« kHkic 01 -TUOKI 

^MedcfionHoSdays 

\Afe know more crfiautMcAa. 

We arooat spedefisis ter nothing 


DISCOUNTED FADES 

Hn n am 

NW08I E3H SYtKCY ?7B0 

BLmS 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVa LTD 

WEX/HSA 


AUSTRALIA 

ss 


HEW ZEALAND £W9 
ROUND THE W0MD £829 


JAN -FEB 87 TRAVEL 


.Mr- c *iTX»i j 

Ki 

te*! -'iiww y.-^w it(- 

a*f IRA/BfiAG s 


STS/KL CUS Perm C56B. All 
major carrtan M Aas/NZ. OS- 
es# 7371 ABTA. 


VUCHTS WortdwUM. 
KaymartM 01-930 1366. 


LATM una Law cad 
lUghta e.B Mo £ 488 . Lima 
£498 rtn. Also Small Gnu 
HOUoay JHintyueg Paru 
Aon £ 3 BOJ JLA 01 - 747-3108 


Ml/ 


m 

The Maltese doric 
speak one 
word ot English. ■ 
Rain. 


They speak all the rea.especmilj 
'wdcooK'. Temperatures reach 
90°.soyDu1]sdOneedanaiD- 
brella. Fbr more on Malta, Gazo. 
and Cornino call ourboOine 

01-7360161 

^MeddfionHokbys 

VMbIokiw more about Ataba. 
642 Kings Road SW6 2DU 


mommptm 

mm 

ATASNAiCSPME 

aoM^hcidnritar lezyboan 
HaUconlvS. Wpafataad rmda, 

ukjutiri Bopw^ 

cjrtng n Hie umni gppa Iotp 
a^wawsImRar par rignahn 

Or OBtOMlcraH, ■*' Of 

*• M«S. owl wnl mu' Huough 


PHOW NOKRHBM nan 
n Mic Hnomota hdIcdio. 

CM.1U1 

EshoILNimIhnIi CMn 
GM 3 H (MW 33 TB 6 J 



COSTOUI IU 1 ON nwits/hoi! 
£^| ir S 5 *- 1 ff 1 * $ "ww donna- 
S5h DTOUnui Travel: 01-730 
a=OI. ABTA 1ATA ATOL. 


“59 LA/San 
Ftlin £329 KumM £399. 

WJ. Syfl/Mel £669. 
Banghok £369. All direct oasLy 
rngaita oi aw 7144 


MALAGA CUUIHE& Tm’dwUo 
01 441 ml. A6U. Atoi 1788. 


DKCOUnr FAMES World wkVK 
01-434 0734 JunOnr tiwa 


XMAS/NEW YEAR FWM* & 
tigoia MAM9A. TereerUlPe. Faro. 
Pahna. btambul. Cairo & otter 
dMUnanom. Vonturai 061 834 
8033. ATOL 2054- 


Walkmg (from relaxed easy rambling to lough treks 
and explorabons); sightseeing tours; chmbmg; special 
interest (especially for flower lovers); idyllic days on a 
Greek island; a romantic Dalmatian Coast cruise; plus 
special programmes for the not-so-young. Our 
holidays are designed for people who want to enjoy 
the true atmosphere of the country they visit. 

Our small, friendly parties are accompanied by 
an experienced leader who knows the country; our 
prices are excellent value for money. For example: 

YUGOSLAVIA bora £235 DOMINICA from £1295 

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TURKEY from £498 ALASKA £2240 

SWITZERLAND from £276 KOREA £1598 

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Available in Algarve, 
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241 . 

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01-640 >418 or B4S 6443. 


tur apw LB 

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j.-.wf 




THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 



* 

1-^ 

• ' '-C-f^bes i. 

•', ,i 5l:n * *. 

V':* nn s M* 

, said 

. . . :• * h <> iqia 
.. '- after 

- • Kceiitf 

-Xl****> u 

• •*■* is aitemy “ 

■ -- .0 H'i- 1 - T- 

-- ihe 

-_ Vj.'^^dav. 

- iij ^p_ ^ 

.'. V: .Roman 
_ uidttvk 
' . ' Pricing. 

■' *ir; fc. 

- • • "i 

• -' * '-Mr.;- 

" :oit 

• ‘ ciUi. 

' . • _ ripm 

. _ . -?*t! 

• - 

. • 

• • ■- y : H*' 




Supremo 

from the 

reserves 

Jonathan Meades takes the wraps off 
his top spots for gastronomic honours 

THE TORES RESTAURANT OF THE YEAR 
Le Poulbot, 46 CheapskJe, BC2 (01-236 4379). 
Newcomer of the Year 

U Bastide, 50 Greek Street, W 1 (01-734 3300). 
Non-European Restaurant of the Year 
Laurent, 428 Finchley Road, NW2 (01-794 3603). 

Italian Restaurant of the Year 

Orso, 27 Wetfington Street, WC2 (01-240 5269). 

Out-of-town Restaurant of the Year 

Su™ y )S“>I) UPPar MUl9raVe Road - Ch9am - 

Bargain of the Year 

Pizzeria CasteJto. 20 Walworth Road. SE1 (01-703 2556). 


EATING OUT 




3C" 

7 , 

j® e i fi 

] ^ 

■“'•'Si ! 


f-S I 



Leeds lost the European Cup 
Final in 1975. Had the man. 
ager, Jimmy Annfield, sent on 
his sub, the spectacularly 
gifted inside forward Duncan 
Mackenzie, the result would 
have been very different. 

I watched that game at 
Caspar John’s house with 
Martin Cropper and Rowley 
Leigh who now and again 
drowned David Coleman’s 
voice with recipes from the 
Jane Grigson book he was 
reading with the eye that 
wasn’t on the screen. This was 
the first Fd heard of his 
enthusiasm for cooking — 
though the stale of the kitchen 
should have been clue enough. 

Soon after he joined the 
Roux Brothers’ organization 
as something like a plongeur, 
the Roux, for a long tune, 
treated him the way A nnfield 
treated Mackenzie; they 
wouldn't risk him with his 
own kitchen. When, even- 
tually, they did send him out 
on to the park, the results were 
electrifying — in the past 
couple of years he has trans- 
formed a restaurant that was 
competent into one which is 
exciting. And exciting for the 
right reasons. 

Le Poulbot was decked out 
by the interior decorator, 
David Mlinaric, who made a 
spectacularly ghastly job of the 
place. Thus there is nothing to 
detract from Leigh’s cooldng. 
The most recent meal I had 


there included a subtle con- 
somme, a quite extraordinary 
daube of beef and sweet- 
breads, which was gamey and 
unlike any such dish Fve ever 
tasted, and a dessert that 
comprised five or so different 
chocolate confections. 

Leigh’s cooking, pace the 
Good Food Guide, is not 
recognizably of the Roux 
school His style is unfussy, 
direct, muscular. His dishes 
are not especially easy on the 
eye; he caters rather for the 
tongue and the nose and the 
tummy. His is a restaurant to 
make sybarites of us alL It is 

‘Beating the French 
at their own game 9 

also for rhwHpw than most 
establishments of its standard 
— about £60 for two. 

Other things in its favour 
are the courteous and prompt 
service, the superb cheeses, 
the muted hum of voices — 
there is none of the echoic din 
that clatters through more 
hard-edged places. Again, its 
set lunches (it is open only at 
lunchtime) offer about six 
choices per course; and there 
is no carte, so the sharp 
practice of trying to steer 
customers in that direction is 
obviated. 

Le Poulbot is not a fashion- 
able restaurant and duly 



scores highly. Its wine list gets 
low marks, though there are 
some drinkable (and afford- 
able) bottles. I’ve enjoyed the 
three Fve eaten here 
more than those at any other 
place Tve visited in the six 
months Fve been doing this 
column. Leigh is to be 
congratulated on his inven- 
tion, his consistency and, not 
least, his ability to cook meat 
as well as he does fish — this is 
becoming an increasingly un- 
usual talent And the Roux 
Brothers are to be applauded 
for giving so singular a mav- 
erick his head, and for having 
trained an En glishman to beat 
the French at their own gam** 
Rowley Leigh was at Cam- 
bridge, Nicholas Bladdock at 
Oxford. This helps. I mean 
that if you are not born into a 
gastronomic culture, if you are 
born British, and you’re going 
to live by your stove, then it 
helps if you can read and write 
and think a bit 
London is foil of dim 
second-raters who have learnt 
to cook by rote: their twee 
productions are everywhere. I 
don’t think if s a coincidence 
that the best of the “new” 
British cooks — Leigh, 
Bladdock, Alastair Little, Si- 
mon Hopkinson — are people 
one can talk to on other 
subjects than the price of 
sweetbreads or the state of 
their rivals’ restaurants. 
Blacklodf s La Bastide has 


been open just over a year and 
so, I think, qualifies as a 
newcomer. In that time, Fve 
been six times and have not 
been disappointed by his 
properly executed French 
provincial Hichi-c- duck confit, 
a fine potee that induded 
heart and tongue, brains in 
beturre Mane and so on. 

There is nothing trendy 
about the design, which may 
be the reason that the video 
yobs who roam Soho at lunch- 
time give it a miss; also, it is 
bereft of a gimmick. It is 
simply a senous (and very 
reasonably priced) restaurant 

‘London is full of 
dim second-raters’ 


doing fairly simple thing s and 
getting them right: the only 



which is the apt accompani- 
ment to some of its northern 
and eastern Fren ch dishes. But 
these are tiny quibbles. The 
wine list is outstanding, strong 
on the more obscure regions, 
and the service is charming. 
This is the sort of place 
London needs more o£ 

It could also do with more 
places such as LaurenU the 
Tunisian restaurant in a 
missable stretch of the Finch- 
ley Road, which does what is 


easily the finest couscous in 
town. It is small, famil y run, 
very friendly and good value. 
A fair proportion of the clien- 
tele seems to be Bench, 
expatriates nostalgic for Rue 
de la Huchette and Barbes 
Rocbecbouart The decor is 
foigenable, there is good 
Moroccan wine, the brik & 
Toeuf is splendid, the portions 
copious. 

I had hoped to dole out 
these gongs entirely to places 
untouched by Design. How- 
ever, Orso is certainly the best 
I talian restaurant Fve been to 
in London and is also undeni- 
ably the produce of a fashion- 
able hand at the drawing 
board. But never mind — the 
food is what counts and it is as 
nfKkT m north Italian home 
cooking as you'll get 

Al San Vincenzo is as close 
to Neapolitan home cooking 
as you’ll get Like Laurent, it’s 
a small, family-run affair, and 
like Laurent again, its owner's 
enthusiasm and p»«boh and 
scorn of shortcuts are manifest 
in all the dishes. 

Finally, the Pizzeria 
Costello : undoubtedly foe bar- 
gain of foe year, but even if its 
pizzas cost twice what they do, 
it would still be worth crossing 
London for. As I said when I 
wrote about it in the summer, 
foe pizzas are foe best outside 
Italy and better than many 
within. 


THE TIMES COOK 


Shona Crawford Poole transforms the remains of the turkey into a classic meal 

Ideas for left-over luxuries 


Nothing less than transmog- 
rification will do for foe last 
earthly remains of foe turkey. 
Goose and duck are so good 
cold that those blessed with 
leftovers count themselves 
fortunate. Cold game presents 
no disposal diffi culties either. 
Its strong flavours stand up 
well to recycling in pies, 
pancakes, croquettes and 
hashes. 

Turkey is trickier, especially 
if it is even slightly dry 
through overcooking. My best 
shot with cold roast turkey isa 
adaptation of foe classic Ital- 
ian vitello tonnato. In the 
original a speciality of Pied- 
mont and Lombardy, slices of 
cold braised veal are layered 
with a smooth, tuna flavoured 
mayonnaise and chilled for at 
least 24 hours before serving. 
It is an excellent buffet dish 
and best served with a selec- 
tion of simple salads. 

Another festive idea, this 
time for foe stock made from 
game or poultry carca ss e s , is 
consomm6 dimed not in 
daiDty cups, but in small 
bowls topped with light pup 
pastry lids. The good smells 
trapped under foe pastry are 
released right under expectant 
noses. , , 

Clear,* bright stock for con- 
somm£ results from long, slow 
cooking. If foe stock is cooked 
at foe gentlest of simmers — an 
occasional shiver on the sip- 
face of the stockpot - the 
liquid will need no more 
clarification than straining 

through a clean doth. 

Reduce the stock by further 
simmering until the flavour is 
strong enough, and season it 
while it is still hot. Interesting 
additions to the basic soup 
might include Madeira, shav- 
ings of fresh or pmse™ 

truffle, or a little of the liquid 
used to soak dried or 

porcini and, or, small pieces oi 
cooked poultry. 

Soup surprise 

Serves six 

1 litre (1 % pints) consomm6. 

chill 

home 



pastry will be golden and the 
soup inside piping hot Serve 
ax once. 

Tuna mayonnaise 

Serves eight or mom 


200g (7oz) tin tuna In oBve ofl 


30g (loz) anchovies 


30g(1oz) capers 


Juice of 1 lemon 


250 ml (S fl oz) ftgftt oftve oil 


300ml (K pint) home made 

mayonnaise 


Salt 


Put the tuna, with its oil, the 
anchovies, capers, lemon juice 
and olive oil into foe goblet of 
a Mender or processor, and 
blend until smooth. 

Whisk the tuna mixture into 
the mayonnaise and add salt, 
if needed. 

Spread a little of this sauce 
over the bottom of a shallow 
dish and top with a layer of 
sliced turkey. Continue 
assembling foyers of tuna 
mayonnaise and sliced turkey, 
ending with a foyer of may- 
onnaise. There should be 
enough sauce for about 1 kOo 
(2141 b) of turkey. Cover and 
chill until needed. 


DRINK 


Break out the bubbly 
to ring in the new 


New Year’s Eve is foe one 
night in the year when cham- 
pagne should be in everyone’s 
glass. Even party-throwing 
Scrooges should treat their 
guests to champagne, if only 
one bottle to drink as foe dock 
strikes twelve. 

As non- vintage champagne 
is now a commonplace on shop 
shelves I decided this year to 
hold a tasting of foe d»«iw 
vintage champagnes, includ- 
ing foe new, comparatively 
inexpensive, own-label ver- 
sions from supermarkets and 
off-licences. 

AD the Yjtggrendes numptes 
names were mclnded in this 
Mind tasting, but sadly all four 
tasters — wine oonsnltant 
James Rogers (JR), Master of 
Wine Maureen Ashley (MAX 
Robin Young (RY) from The 
Tima and myself (JMQ) — 
were disappointed. With most 
of foe champagnes priced at 
£15*plns, we exp ec te d a lot 
more dass and excitement for 
our money. The main problem 
is that the 79 vintage, from 
which most of our champagnes 
come, is mostly a disappoint- 
ing year (despite its reputation 
in ChampagneX and the ’82s 
are far too young. Still, we did 
at least find some starry 
vintage my 

advice is to celebrate the New 
Year with a wine from one of 
onr top three categories. 


Eric Beaumont 



STARS 


1979 King, Peter Dominic 
£3435, The Champagne 
House, 15 Dawson Puce, 
London W2 £34.10, Homy 
Townsend, York House, 
Oxford Road, BeaconsfMd, 
Bucks £32. 

Krug, the king of champagne, 
was essay voted the most 
majestic bubbly in this line-up. 
“Rich buttery toasty flavour 
and gratifying finish" (RY). 
"Classy, stylish . . . a great 
glassful of champagne 1 (JR). 
"Excellent balance of yeast 
and fruit that realty makes one 
sit up and take notice" (MA). 
Only JMQ was less star-struck: 
Good mousse and bead, 
elegant flowery-biscuffy nose, 
but a touch metallic." 

1979 Perrier-JouBt, The 
Champagne House £1540, 
Fortnum ft Mason £17.90, 
Cinofi Wine Company, 11 
Curaon Street, London W1 
£15.42. 

Known as PJ to the trad8 and 
seen in aD the best ice- 
buckets, tins *79 is one of the 
choicest bubblies from a 
disappointing vintage. JMQ 
adored this ‘Very fine biscuity- 
brioche nose and delicious 
deep, rich, toasty palate ... I’d 
love to celebrate New Year 
with this”. RY enjoyed its 
toasty vigorous flavour”. 

1981 ModtetChandon Dry 
Imperial Oddbins £13.95, 
Peter Dominic £1339, The 
Wetorta Wine Company 

This “fine, fresh flowery 
champagne" (JMQ) proves 
that quality can go hand in 
hand with quantity, for this firm 
is the biggest champagne 
riucerm the woridMA faced 
Its "light style" that she felt 
would make "easy party 
drinking"; RY appreciated its 
soft, pleasant, characterful 
creamy flavour”. A bargain 
buy. 


1981 Lambert Blanc de 
Blancs, Peter Dominic E8JKL 
At this tow price Peter 
Dominic's own-label vintage 
fizz is practically given away. 
JMQ enjoyed its <T elegant 
Chardorinay style” and MA Its 
"biscuity -yeasty" nose and 
"dean light lively’' palate. 

1981 Charles Herdslecfc Brut, 
Fortnum ft Mason £17.25, 

Find later, Mackie Todd, 92 
Wigmore Street, London W1 
£14.81. 

A step up for Charles 
Herds leek, for this champagne 
house generally produces 
more disappointments than 
detights. JMQ found this a 
jgjgagl fruity-flowery 

1982 Champagne de Saint 
Gafl, Premier Cru, Extra Brut, 
Marks ft Spencer £10.99. 
Considerably better than the 
’80 edition of this chamr 
the *82 Saint Gall Is made! 
one of the largest co- 
operatives in the region: Union 
Champagne. JMQ liked its 
"frothy bubbles, tight crisp 
zasty-meaty nose backed up 
by an "assertive full-bodied 
hefty-beefy palate”. 

RECOMMENDED 


ne, 


BORDERLINE 

1979 Louis Roederer Brut, 
Henry Townsend £15^0, The 
Champagne House £1836. 
“Good mousse, rich golden 
colour, big fat yeasty nose and 
taste but let down by a dull 
metallic finish” (JMQ). MA 
found it "soft, alluring, 
developed, well worm 
drinking”. 

1982 Deutz, Caves de la 
Madeleine, 301 Fufliam Road, 
London SW10 £13, M alma Ison 
Wine Club, 28 Midland Road, 
London NW1 £10.75. 

Definitely too young for this 
company: "lovely rich flowery 
nose backed up by a young 
appley aspect ... got it all 
there, just needs time" (JMQ); 
"serious" (MA); "very fruity" 
(JR). 

1979 Laurent Perrier Brut, 
Henry Townsend £14, Curzon 
Wine Company £15.83. 
Laurent Perrier are welHcnown 
for their well made, lively, fruity 
champagnes but this wine had 
a mixed reception; JMQ liked it 
but RY and JR found it young 
and lean. 

1979 Boizal Grand Vintage 
Augustus Barnett £11195. 
Nothing too grand about this 


not what I want to 


HIGHLY 

RECOMMENDED 


Champagne House £18^5, 
Lay ft Wheeler, 6 Culver 
Street West, Colchester, 
Essex £16J£2. 

Streets ahead of the 79, '80 
and *81 vintages this '82 is a 
good champagne; it just needs 
time to develop. MA astutely- 
noted “serious, big style for 
contemplation, not parties". 

RY and JR were less 
impressed. 

1980Trittinger, Brut, Henry 
Townsend £16.30. 

1 980 was the year that most 
Champenois prefer to forget, 
butTaittingers '80 is an 
admirable example of what can 
be done in a difficult vintage: 
"big frothy-foamy bubbles, 
pleasant rich buttery nose and 
the same rich buttery palate” 
(JMQ). MA thought It “well- 
made, interesting, plenty of 
guts". 

1982 Sainsbury’s Blanc de 
Blancs Brut, Linard Gontier, 

Salnsburys £9.95. 

Similar to the Talttinger style 
with "frothy-foamy bubbles" 
backed up by a "pleasant ( 


1979 GH Mumm ft Co, Cordon 
Rouge Brut, Oddbins £13.75, 
Gough Bros £1449; 

Previous bottles of this 79 
have been raw and i 
but this i 
bubbly did: 
here-. Love 

reen herbaceous Pinot- 

bm'mant wine -good with 
food" (JMQ) and "good Pinot - 
. . . powerful assertive biscuity 
flavours — main course 
champagne" (JR). 


perfume . . . fruity 
fizz” (JMQ). MA picked up a 
"marzipan" scent but then 
noted "too young, not 
together . . . quite well-made”. 

1979 Piper Heklsieck Brut 
Roberts ft Cooper £17.25. 
"Biggish bubbles, confected 
nose but chunky, foil, burnt- 
toast taste, metallic 79 finish, 
palatable, OK with food" was 
now JMQ summed this one up. 
MA found this "warm, vinous, 
easy but harsh up front". 


taste . . 
find in my glass on New Year's 
Eve” (JMQJ.RY noted Bofeel's 
"composty nose" but stffl 
found it "acceptable", as did 
JR: “toasty, crtrlc-g reen fruit". 

1979 F Duchatel ft Cie, 

Unwins £11.99. 

An expensive own-label 
champagne. "Fresh green 
yeasty-snerbety Chardonnay- 
tnfluenced stuff with an odd 
light vaniffa-Kke taste - not 
unpleasant” wrote JMQ. 

1981 Ruinart Brut, Fortnum ft 
Mason £17. 

"Ordinary, dufl, some aged 
fruit" was JMQ's comment and 
no one much disagreed with 
that "surprisingiyltght and 
unrounded" (MA), "overdosed 
young vintage (RY) and "one- 
dimenslonal, very short" (JR). 

1979 Joseph Perrier, Cuvfte 
Royafe, Henry Townsend 
£13-40. 

Both Queen Victoria and 
Edward VII apparently loved 
this but none of us was that 
keen: 'Young, lean, youthful" 
(JR), “tight, lively, fruity” (MA). 

• Also tasted but not approved 
were 1981 Merctor, 1980 
Pommery, 1982 Wattrose 
Extra Dry, 1981 Lanson, 1980 
Veuve Clicquot, 1979 
Heidsleck Dry Monopote. 

• Included in the tasting but 
excluded from this list is 1979 
Pol Roger. Sadly we had two 
corked bottles. 

Jane MacQuitty 


Small pudding basins would 
be another suggestion. 

Divide the consomnte be- 
tween foe bowls, plus any 
additions of wine, truffle or 
poultry. 

On a lightly floured surface 
roll out the pastry very thinly 
and cut out six circles which 
are a good 1.25cm 0* inch) 


larger all round than foe tops 
of the soup bowls. 

Mix the egg yolk with the 
milk and use a little of this 
glaze to dampen the edges of 
foe pastry circles. Lay foe 
pastry over foe bowls, pressing 
foe edges firmly to seal them 
and taking care not to pull or 
stretch foe pastry. Chill for at 


least 30 minutes. 

Brush foe pastry tops with 
egg glaze and bake the soups in 
a preheated hot oven 
(225°C/425°F, gas mark 7) for 
about 10 minutes, then lower 
the heat to moderate 
(180°Cy350°F, gas mark 4) 
and bake for another 15 
minutes, by which time the 


Light post-Christmas pudding 



Muffed wteesytabt* 

Serves 12 to 14 

pint) red wine 


1 tablespoon milk 


Ovenproof bowls are foe A ^ 
requisite for thisjecipe. I 
those white lion-head handled 
bowls like miniature tureen* 
half-pint souffte dishes * 


i iQo (4oz> light brown sugar 
Thinly pared zest of 1 orange 

1 stick cinnamon 

iowhoie cloves 

450 ml (%p*nt) double cream, 

chiliad 

300 ml (k pint) strained 
Greek yogh^ - 


Combine foe wine, sugar, or- 
ange zest, cinnamon ««h 
doves. Bring to foe bofl, and 
simmer imtfl reduced to 250ml 
(8fl ozX Remove from the heat 
and infuse overnight. Strain 
and discard the solids. 

Put the wine in a luge bow) 
with foe cream and whisk 
together mitQ foe mixture will 
hold soft peaks. Whisk in foe 
yoghurt. Turn into individual 
glasses add sene chilled. 


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THE ARTS 


Meaning 
oflife 
at eighty 

The fanjnression that the main 
pse of television at Christmas 
is to show old films, of which 
there were 11 on Boxing Day, 
was”- " " 


mg documentary, Ltarens van 
derPostatEigkty(BBC 2 ). 

Sir lanreas Is sometimes 
r eferre d to as Prince Charles’s 
“guru”, a word with connota- 
tions of crankiness. This pro- 
gramme also dispeBed the kiea 
that he is a crank. Anyone in 
England who risks touring 
about the meaning of fife, let 
alone tiie inserts of Jimg, is 
open to mockery, aid can be 
made, by selective quotation, 
to sound bonkers. 


TELEVISION 


Last night we were re- 
minded not only that Sir 
Lanrens does not sonnd bon- 
kers when be talks aboat Jung 
(himself quite sane, albeit 
discredited, for those who have 
not read him, by his funny 
name) but that be talks wd] — 
he is both amusing and serioes 
— on a wonderful diversity of 
subjects. 

When he was small, his 

father gave him an abridged 

version of The Tala of Trap. 
Larsens started a game called 
Greeks and Trojans, and 
discovered tint in a village in 
South Africa which was en- 
tirely ignorant of Greece and 
Troy, people yet fell naturally 
into one or other camp. He 
thought be had foand “a 
fundamental bridge in human 
character”. Which side was he 
on? “I wanted to pick and 
choose in both camps,” he 
replied. U I was on the side of 
invididuals in both.” 

This him difficult tD 

place. He does not take sides. 
He has been, among other 
occupations, journalist, nov- 
elist, explorer, firmer, soldier, 
prisoner of war and conserva- 
tionist. Jonathan StedaO, who 
made the programme, must 
have had great difficulty 
deciding what to leave oat, 
when there was less than a 
minute to give to each year of a 
life co ntaining material for a 
dozen books. He managed this 
selection extraordinarily welL 
At the end, the biographical 
sketch was completed, yet one 
would willingly have listened 
to Sir T ^ftrana indefinitely. 

Andrew Gimson 


Ivan, more terrific than ever 



CINEMA 


Ivan the Terrible 
(PG) 

The Boyars’ Plot 
(PG) 

Everyman Hampstead 


Eisenstein’s unbeatable epic has been revived together, for the first 
tim^ with its suppressed second part David Robinson welcomes it 
back and hands out his personal film plaudits for a generally thin 1986 


Sergei Eisenstein’s Ivan the Terrible 
is one of those very rare films that 
grow only better with the passage of 
time. The first part was finished and 

released in 1944; The Boyars' Plot, 
the second part of the intended 
trilogy, was completed hr 1946, but 
fell under official disapproval and 
was suppressed. It remained on the 
shelf 1958, the sixtieth 

anniversary of Eisenstein’s birth 
and the tenth of his death, and was 
finally released in Britain in 1960. 
The Everyman revival is the first 
time that both parts have been 
shown together in a single 
programme. 

Ivan was one of a number of 
Soviet historical epics planned in 
the early Forties as wartime patri- 
otic propaganda. The scenario was 
an extremely free and selective 
account of the reign of Ivan IV 
(1530-1584), concentrating on his 
achievements in unifying Russia, 
breaking the power of the boyars, 
and appointing a new meritocracy. 
The most dubious of his creations, 
the Oprichniki — a land of com- 
bined praetorian guard, personal 
entourage and secret service — was 
shown as a distinctly ambivalent 
elite of favoured young zealots. 

The Central Committee's stric- 
tures on the film, in feet, accused 
Eisenstein of “portraying the 
progressive army of the Oprichniki 
as a band of degenerates similar to 
the American Ku Klux Klan, and 
Ivan the Terrible, a man of strong 
will and character, as a man of no 
wifi and character, something like 
Hamlet”. Given the character of the 
times and of Stalin hims elf, Ivan 
ymn, with hindsight, dangerously 
near the knuckle — with its subtle 
drama of power play and its portrait 
of a despot progressing into para- 
noia and using his elite corps to 
carry out purges of suspected ene- 
mies. In one horrific scene, Ivan 
advances towards a group of be- 
headed victims, crosses himself 
piously, and then snaps: “Too few!" 

The two parts are alike in their 
rich visual texture, but different in 
narrative style. The first is a linear 
chronicle of Ivan’s early career; the 
second is more dramatic in 
construction, rather like a Jacobean 
revenge play, with Ivan manoeu- 
vring an assassination plot to turn 



Screen icon: the great classical actor Nikolai Cherkassov making eyes as Ivan the Terrible 


back upon the pretender to the 
throne. 

In both parts, however, 
Eisenstein’s astonishing achieve- 
ment— which makes the film just as 
remarkable after 40 years — was to 
create what is practically a new 
medium, a pure musical film, to 
meet the needs ofhis epic narrative. 
“We strove ... to convey the sense 
of grandeur, to get away from the 
ordinary features of the hero and 
stress the tragic nature of his 
historic role.” These aims deter- 
mine the film's style, tempo and 
rhythm. The grandeur of the theme 
required monumental resources erf 


Prokofiev was Eisenstein's most 
complete collaborator. The 
contribution of the two is indivis- 
ible. Eisenstein recalled that some- 
times Prokofiev devised the pattern 
and emotional structure of a se- 
quence mid he edited his film to it, 
while at other times, Prokofiev 
would mould the score to the 
images. Perhaps in no other film has 
music been so integral, underlying 
the speech and the choreography of 
theactors, moving dose to ballet or 


opera as a chorus brings in a 
co mm entary on the action, the old 
boyarina croons an eerie lullaby to 
her simpleton son, the mirade play 
of the fiery furnace is chanted in the 
cathedral, or the Oprichniki per- 
form a wild and menacing choral 
dance at the final feast of death. 

The collaborative role of other 
members of the team was limited to 
realizing Eisenstein's own auto- 
cratic conception. The designers 
and cameramen were precisely 
guided by thousands of drawings in 
which he anticipated every com- 
position, ever camera movement, 
even the tilt of a beard or the 
direction of an eye. (Eisenstein 
manag ed to make every actor's eyes 
seem enormous, and directed every 
glance.) The great classical actor 
Nikolai Cherkassov was never fully 
reconciled to Eisenstein's method, 
his insistence on controlling the 
performance from outside the actor, 
shaping his body to make it part of 
the plastic composition and using 
his voice as an element in the 
musical score. Cberkassov’s Ivan 
remains, for all that, one of the great 
screen icons. 

Eisenstein had long been fas- 


cinated with the problems of colour, 
and in the last three reels of The 
Boyars' Plot {Hit his theories to the 
test for the firet and only time. With 
the film unit evacuated to Ahna Ala 
in Kazakstan, ntehmarf resources 
were limited and the results in- 
evitably fell short of Bsenstem’s 
ideal conceptions. The newly re- 
stored print showing at the Every- 
man, however, grves a better 
impression of the colour than ever 
before, and demonstrates 
Eisenstein's adventurous 
expressionist exp erime nts. 

Eisens tem was the complete in- 
ventor and creator. A man of 
awesome culture, in Ivan he sub- 
sumes to his own grand design 
influences as varied as Kabuki, 
Disney’s Snow White, ancient icons 
and religious frescoes, opera. The 
Gold Rush, Wagner, Goya, Rublev 
and Repin. From a lifetime of 
intellectual, artistic, sensual 
explorations, he devises a com- 
pound of his own, an audio-visual 
experience and spectacle mi like 
anything else. 

The only serious mark of age is 
the limited quality of the sound. If 
the Soviet studios were to re-record 


the Prokofiev score with modern 
techniques (a perfectly .practical 
underraking) Ivan the Terrible could 
challenge comparison, as epic cin- 
ema, with any fib* 1 of the interven- 
ing years. „ „ _ 

Returning briefly tkmfopva 
2946 to the vanishing 1986, this 
year has been dominated, as far as 
the pfaema fs concerned, by the 
phenomenon of Golan and Globus, 
lbs Israeli cousins. In 1986 every 
second cinema, at least, in the West 
Fnd — and in a lot of other 
European cities too — changed its 
haiwi* to Cannon; and Cannon films 
were in production in practically 
every part of the western world. 
Meanwhile every financial paper 
carried articles speculating if and 
when the bubble would burst, and 
puzzled over Cannon accounting 
systems; while the cousins cheer- 
fully protested their unalterable 
confidence, and went on hiring 

everyone who was anyone. 

Apart from that, the year has 
mostly brought rewards for medioc- 
rity. Out of Africa ran away with all 
the Oscars while Kurosawa’s mag- 
isterial Ran was passed over; The 
Mission took the Cannes Grand 
Prbc from Tarkovsky’s visionary 
Sacrifice. The best films of a 
generally year are so varied in 
theme; scope and origin that they 
defy direct comparison; so my 
contribution to the annual awards 
game is a personal Top Ten (in 
alphabetical order): 

After Hours (Martin Scorsese, 
USA) 

Ginger and Fred (Federico Fellini, 
Italy) 

A Girl of Good Family (Huangjiang 
Thong, China) 

Hannah and Her Sisters (Woody 
Allen. USA) 

An Impudent Girl (Claude Milter , 
France) 

Miss Mary (Maria Luisa Bemberg, 
Argentina) 

’Round Midnight (Bertrand 
Tavernier, France) 

The Sacrifice (Andres Tarkovsky, 
Sweden) 

Shoah (Claude Lanzmann. France) 
Sweet Dreams (Karel Reisz, USA) 
Best Debut- ESU Sherwood, with 
Parting Glances 

Best Literary Adaptation: James 
Ivory’s A Room With A View 
Best British : Bill Douglas’s Com- 
rades, Derek Jarman ’s Caravaggio, 
Alex Cox's Sid and Nancy, Stephen 
Bayly’s Coming Up Roses 
Most Demoralizing Film of the 
Yean Tony Scott's Top Gun 
Personality of the Yean liifon 
Gish, who at 90-plus, and after 
three-quarters of a century in pic- 
tures, appeared in Sweet Liberty, 
and went on to play the main role m 
Lindsay Anderson's forthcoming 
Whales of August. 


Spandau Ballet 

Wembley Arena 

During a six-year period that 
saw the like* of Adam Ant and 
Culture Club sprint to glory 
onJv to collapse m an abrupt 
finish, Spandau Ballet started 
their own New Romantic 
movement and plodded onUke 

Aesop’s tortoise to read i» 
secure point from which they 
pn now sell out Wembley 
Aram five times over. 

The sturdy artifice that they 
have constructed rests on the 
twin pillars of Gary K emps 
workmanlike songwritmg and 
Tony Hadley’s resonant, but 
rather pompous, singing style. 

However, these assets were 
not enough to mitigate the 
pronounced lack of inspiration 
that attended the band's ap- 
proach to executing a live 
performance. 

They led off with honied 
versions of “Cross the Line , 
•‘Highly Strong” and “Only 
When Yon Leave”, melodic 
stadram-rockers with a touch 
of wide-boy soul that quickly 
exposed the wooden touch of 
both Martin Kemp on bass 
and the dnnnmer John KeeWe, 
who played a large kit with a 

showy but entirely superfluous 
doable bass dram. 

Steve Norman, one of those 
average saxophonists who 
seem to think that the in- 
strument should be played 
from the crotch, was notice- 
ably under-employed, and 
apart from a bit of keyboard 
and vocal colouring Emm guest 
musicians, it was down to Gary 
Kemp and the gifted Hadley, 
who was in fine voice, to keep 
the ship afloat. 

This they managed to do, 
bat time and again the group's 
performance failed to match 
the very high standards of 
their records. Despite incisive 
lighting changes, “To Cut a 
Long Story Short” suffered 
from elementary mistakes on 
the sound mixing board 
“Chant No 1” missed the horn 
section and “lifeline" was 
similarly uninspired 

The UHgainly Hadley, 
stuffed into a pair of Mack 
leather trousers, always 
looked as if he was about to 
fell flat on his backside as he 
charged awkwardly around 
the stage, and that was pre- 
cisely what happened daring 
“Gold”, providing a welcome 
moment of levity in an 
otherwide stodgy 

entertarnmenL 

David Sinclair 


Worthy successors to 
the Donizetti crown 


OPERA 


] 


Lucia di 
Lammermoor 

Covent Garden 

The lights may shine less 
brightly these days from 
Raven swood Castle; the fire in 
Enrico's study has burnt low; 
the fountains no longer play in 
the wooded grounds. But tire 
remnants of Franco Zeffirelli's 
production of Lucia di 
Lammermoor, coming up to 
30 years ojd before long, can 
often be relied on to house 
some of the best bd canto of 
the season. 

Sutherland and Bergonzi 
provided a remarkable 
partnership a winter or two 
back. Now Alfredo Kraus and 
June Anderson, appearing to- 
gether for the first time at 
Co vent Garden, are challeng- 
ing to become an equally 
formidable Donizetti team. 

It is over a quarter of a 
century, as Hilary Finch re- 
minded us just before Christ- 
mas, since Alfredo Kraus 
made his Royal Opera debut 
as Edgardo. in the intervening 
years he has been heard all too 
rarely, so the chance of catch- 
ing him while the tenor still 
has its sheen, with each phrase 
polished to maximum bril- 
liance within the confines of a 
voice that has always relied 
more on its cutting edge than 
on sheer volume, is one to be 
seized. 

He is careful not to release 
too much too soon. The 
Fountain Scene was a touch 
restrained. Michaelangelo 
Veltri, who began as an anony- 
mous conductor before he had 
felt his way into tire score, had 



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not yet relaxed into the sway- 
ing rhythms of “Verrano a te”. 
but Kraus can still make as 
dramatic an entrance as many 
a younger tenor to start the 
sextet, and the final scene of 
the opera is Edgardo and no 
one else. The plangency which 
is never far from Kraus's 
timbre is ideal for the religious 
melancholia of “Tu cbe ra 
Dio”, and he ended both aria 
and evening with the voice 
sounding quite fresh enough 
to start the whole thing over 
again. There's paring for you. 

June Anderson, who has 
been teamed with Kraus in 
Donizetti before, notably in 
La Fille du Regiment in Fans 
and on record, drew security 
from the partnership. The 
shadow of Sutherland must 
haunt her, especially in this 
production, as the ghost of the 
girl murdered by the 
Ravenswoods haunts poor 
Lucy. “Regaava nel silenzio” 
was polished rather than an 
interpretation to send a ripple 
down the spine. The Mad 
Scene grew in stature and 
security, rising to its peak in 
“Spargi d’amaro” where Miss 


Anderson let forth some of; 
those guttering runs of which 
she is so capable. . . 

Luckily she is here for a 
considerable number, of 
performances and it is a 
reasonable bet that at the turn 


her best and most 
form — especially if Kraus is 
by her side. 

Alberto Rinaldi familiar 
from his Glyndebourne 
apperances, is the new Enrico, 
firm in timbre and delivery. 
Gwynne Howell's Raimondo 
is also sturdily sung, but too 
bland for this cleric who 
diverts Lucy from the course 
of true love in “Cedi Cedi”. 
The smaller parts were indif- 
ferently taken from a wimpish 
Arturo though a weak 
No man no and Alisa. 

The production may look 
poverty-stricken but the stars, 
Anderson with a midnight 
blue gown and contrasting 
plaid and Kraus ever svelt, 
scintillate in the murky Scot- 
tish Lowlands. 

John Higgins 


Pilgrims’ surprising progress 


New World 

BBCl, tomorrow 


At first sight the story of the 
voyage of the Pilgrim Fathers 
and their arrival in America in 
December 1620 looks to be 
fairly unpro mising stag 

Certainly Hollywood’s vari- 
ous attempts tx> bring the 
opening chapter of the 
nation's history book to the 
big screen have largely turned 
out as dull ifas worthy, as the 
pilgrims themselves were al- 
ways assumed to be. 

It seems all the stranger then 
that it should have been left to 
BBC Wales to produce the 
first absorbing film yet on the 
beginnings of America, and 
for a fraction of what Holly- 
wood would have spent on 
such an endeavour. New 
World, which gets its premiere 
screening on BBCl tomorrow, 
was shot mainly on locations 
in sand dunes near Bridgend, 
the requisite Red Indian walk- 
on parts apparently taken by 
Peruvians from Deptford. The. 
strengths of the production, 
however, are the perfor- 
mances of a cast which in- 
cludes James Fox, Betsy 
Brantley, Bernard Hill ana 
Joss Addand, and a story-tine 
which spins, among other 
things, adventure, romance, 
violence, intrigue and argu- 
ment from the previously 
unyielding source material. 

Writer William Nicholson 
shares the surprise at the lively 



Mayflower mare Bernard EGA plays John BflHngtoa, leading the Strangers to get rich quick 


tale be has come up with. T 
thought that the story of the 
Pilgrim Fathers would turn 
out to be rather boring low on 
conflict and high on hardship, 
and I didn’t see much miteay 
in that. What I discovered by 
returning to the sources and 
getting the story from the 
horse's mouth, as it were, was 
that it wasn't at all as I had 
supposed.” 

The two details which in- 
trigued Nicholson most 
strongly were firstly that half 
the passengers of the May- 
flower were the so-called 
Strangers, people who were 
paying their way and whose 


motivation was simply to get 
rich, and secondly, that when 
they arrived in America, the 
real Pilgrims, the so-called 
Saints, planned a communal 
state and did indeed put their 
plan into action. 

The drama he has created 
from eye-witness accounts 
centres on the dash of values 
between tire two groups. 
Partly because of the resis- 
tance they encountered from 
the Strangers, and partly be- 
cause of the dilemmas of 
increasing prosperity, the 
Saints eventually abandoned 
their attempts to live accord- 
ing to the model of the early 


Christians. Nicholson, how- 
ever, perceives the conflict of 
ideologies as an important 
legacy of America’s early set- 
tlers to their descendants. 
“Out of that first collision has 
come the spirit, the character, 
and the style of modem 
America,” he says. 

Nicholson admits that be 
expects to get “some flak” 
when New World is shown in 
the United States. He refuses 
to accept what seems to be a 
likely comparison with either 
the BBCs The Monocled 
Mutineer or with Roland 
Ioffe’s box office success, The 
Mission. Perhaps all three in 


their varying ways might 
said to present views of t 
past highly coloured by thi 
particular perspectives on t 
present 

“I wasn’t trying to u 
history to make points abo 
the present” he insists. “ 
you think about it in tellii 
any historical story we a 
selecting, and, in effect wh 
we usually select are tJ 
aspects that we find mo 
relevant to our curre 
condition.” 

“I think with any of the 
dramas,” Nicholson coi 
dudes, “it’s also wort 
remembering what claim? a 
made fra- them. At the start i 
The Mission, somewhat in 
fortunately I thought there 
a caption which says This is a 
true’ or something like tha 
And I t hin k the same sort i 
bald claim was made for 77 
Monocled Mutineer. 

“We do no such thing, nt 
could we, for New World. Tb 
major incidents did happei 
and that I think, makes it a 
the more interesting, but i 
the end, even the character 
who have real names ar 
largely invented because w 
have so very few clues as t 
what they were really like 
That’s a licence that everyon 
wio m a k es a drama out c 


Resurrection of 
comic energy 


THEATRE 


] 


The Country Wife 

Royal Exchange 
Manchester 


The reemring snag in revivals 
of Wycherley’s omsedy has 
been in the casting of its hero, 
Horner, a sfaDhm of HmMro 
appetite who has himself 


gain free access to the best 
wires in town. 

U is a star role, and it has 
gone to star actors who, from 
Laurence Harvey to Albert 
Finney, hare beat unable to 
resist the temptation to appeal 
.for sympathy. Spared if bis 
author, Homer has been 
tibsatrioriDy castrated by his 
actors. 


He undergoes no 
mutilation in Nicholas 
Hytaer's production. No trace 
of charm, exquisite breeding, 
or generous feelings under- 
mine Gary. Oldman's treat- 
ment erf Horner as a single- 
minded sexual machine. As a 
result, the co riedy takes on a 
great charge of hitherto buried 
energy. No time is wasted on 
looking for a moral centre of 

S rity; there is none. Erery- 
ig is focused on the mas- 
terly display of knaves 
outwitting fools. 

The production abo breaks 
out of period so as to relate 
Wycherley's privileged hood- 
lums to those of The Clock- 
work Orange. Costume (by 
Mark Thompson) combines 
eighteenth-century silks and 
ribbons with Ertt and punk 
fashion. Evening dress is worn 
with Bermudas and 



— — wau 

themselves, and is entitled 
permit themselves. U’ s ; 
important that you tell 
audience what you’re doinj 

Simon Bann 

seen as a rat-like scavem 
unshaven and dishevel 

Mg the preening gang, 
bait hnn with their disco? 
f *“* wife. But 

isantat^nf-! — 
down ini 


nwrauiueae 
and developing 

— hfc 


Hair raiser: Cheryl Campbell as Mrs Margery Pinch wife 


t 


earrings- Jewel chains adorn 
the crotch. Women emerge 
from immense trains and bows 
to heads of spiked hair. Even 
the negro servant announcing 
Spar lash’s arrival shimmies 
os in dark glasses with a 
walkman damped over his 
ears. 

Rock Baroqne similarly dic- 
tates the music, which shifts 
between Corelli and Grappelli; 
mid galvanizes the company 
into heavy beat pantomime 
between the scares which 


extend (be action into pobiic 

places. We do not only hear of 

trips to the theatre; we see the 
fwnpany fanght in the OOSS- 
fire of a pastoral masque and 
Berenice: and after Horner's 
famously amMgBsas “chips 
scene with Sheila BaDantine’s 
Mrs Fidget, the episode ex- 
pands into a faB-scale ch i na 
auction. 

To match the new ruthless 
-Homer he has a really dan- 
gerous enemy in Inn 
McDcunuurs Prachwife: fint 



cence 
She hST , 
repertory of 
'*“• 1 invofara 


tights. Bat 


on a rag doO, a 
fable fail of sc 


height of his ft 
some great 


bring Wardli 








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THE TIMES 
ARTS DIARY 

Begging 

bowler 

The British Council, buoyed 
by an independent report 
saying it should have more 
Government funds, is anx- 
iously awaiting the outcome of 
an inquiry by the Commons 
Foreign Affairs Committee 
into British cultural diplo- 
macy. Meanwhile, the 
council's director-general. Sir 
John Burgh, observes gloom- 
ily that nothing has changed 
since 1920, when a Gov- 
ernment spokesman described 
the promotion of our culture 
overseas as “not quite 
cricket". 

But his deputy, Roddy 
Cavaliero, concludes that 
according to the Darwinian 
theory of survival, the council 
has proved a past master in 
doing its job. 

No tanks 

A deft bit of cultural diplo- 
macy was displayed recently 
by the Arts Council, following 
a visit from an unhappy 
Hungarian attache. Doubts 
were expressed about posters 
for a London Sinfonietta- 
Gyorgy Kurtag tour which 
featured a large tank, and a 
reference to the Hungarian 
uprising. The tank was hastily 
deleted from concert pro- 
grammes about to go to the 
printers. 

Eyre apparent 

Aspiring directors who re- 
sponded to the National 
Theatre's advertisement (in- 
sisted upon by the Arts Coun- 
cil) for a successor to Peter 
Hall may be disappointed. 
Informed sources tell me an 
in-house candidate has passed 
his interview with flying col- 
ours, and is expected to be 
approved by the board at its 
next meeting in January. He 
is, of course, none other than 
Sir Peter’s own recommends- 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


REVIEW 


Military airs and grace 


CLASSICAL RECORDS 


O^^tteLaFBteduRAoimem 
Anderaon/Kraus. Paris Op6ra 
g^/^gjaneUa EMI EX2704873 (2 

Adam: Le PostOon do Lonjumoau 
Andereon/zuer, Monte Carto 

g^g MIELK 27 04353 * 

EMI moved speedily to get out its 
recording of Donizetti’s first Paris 
opera. La FiUe du Regiment, from the 
rell-out performances last May at the 
Opera Comique. This version — very 
much a live one complete with the 
Comique's creaky floorboards and a 

good deal of regimental stamping and 

thigh-thwacking — may appease those 
who could not get in to bear Alfredo 
Kraus and June Anderson firing off 
the vocal pyrotechnics in a house 
small enough to put no strain on their 
voices. 

Donizetti's Fills is a highly 
commercial work which splices to- 
gether languid, even sentimental 
numbers with military gusto and 
many a “rataplan!". Nowhere is ft 
seen better than in Marie's Act n aria 
when, like Manon, she complains 
that her new-found riches are hut 
useless baubles while her lover is 
absent. Then, as a militar y march is 
heard and the glorious 2 1 st are on 
their way, she launches into an 
ecstatic hymn of praise to France. 
Donizetti knew how to seduce the 
audience. 

June Anderson despatches the aria 
in bravura style, using tor Lucia di 
Lammermoor voice for the first 
section and launching into the highest 
of high spirits as she begins to sniff 
the scent of musket fire again. This 
was for a long time Joan Sutherland's 
role. Now that Miss Anderson, on 
stage almost a Dame Joan lookalike, 
has arrived on the scene there are two 
prima donnas to fight it out . 
Until video CDs come along, there 



Public pleasen Donizetti, seducing the audience in military style 


will be no chance of seeing Alfredo 
Kraus still looking pretty good close 
to 60 years old in a pair of fawn 
Tyrolean pants. But the tenor is there, 
as Tonio, a markedly unwariike m an 
who joins the 21 st only in order to be 
close to his beloved Marie. The 
famed high notes are on remarkable 
display, notably in the aria “Pour 
Mon Ante” and Kraus has never 


lacked anything when it comes to bel 
canto. 

FiUe is a two-singer work. The 
supporting cast is satisfactory, as is 
die orchestra under Bruno Cam- 
panella - no one could claim this as 
one of Donizetti's more subtly scored 
works. So, enjoy it for two artists on 
peak form and for Donizetti knowing 
how to please the public, not least in 


SfceOiH: KuHerao Symphony 
Helsinki PQ/BeralundEMI 
HMV CDS 7 47496 (two CDs, 
also black discs ana cassettes) 
laNer: Symphony No 3 
Battsa/VPO/MaazeL CBS 12M 
42178 (two Hack discs; also 
compact discs and cassettes), 
evtioz: Romto et Juffette 
Norman/Aler/Estes. 
Philadelphia Orchestra/Muti. 
EMI HMV CDS 7 474378 (two 
compact discs; also black 
discs and cassettes). 

Paavo Berghmd has recorded 
Sibelius's Kullervo Sym- 
phony for EMI before, with 
the Bournemouth Symphony 
Orchestra, but in his new 
version, in which he conducts 
not arny the' Helsinki Phil- 
harmonic but additional forces 
also entirely Finnish, one 



Alikin and Eyre 

lion, Richard Eyre, who has 
been an associate director at 
the NT since 1981. As artistic 
director, he is unlikely to be a 
lone supremo. David Aukin, a 
recent arrival as executive 
director, is tipped to share the 
burden by assuming overall 
administration. 

• Audiences at West End 
theatres are filling the pockets 
of more than impresarios. 
According to a recent survey, 
they spent almost £2 million 
last year on baby-sitters. 
Other beneficiaries, to the 
tune of an estimated £5 mil- 
lion, include taxi-drivers — 
despite complaints about the 
chronic difficulty of finding 
one after the show. 

Over the top 

It appears surtitles may have 
an extended run at Covent 
Garden. More than 90 per 
cent of the first 3,000 replies in 
an audience survey favour 
captions in selected operas. 
Gratified assistant director 
Paul Findlay is now contem- 
plating a surtitied Wagner 
Ring. His enthusiasm is not 
shared by Rodney Mflnes, 
alitor of Opera ma gazi ne. “I 
am sure they are going to be 
very popular", he growls, “hut 
so were public executions." 

Gavin Bell 


A Woman’s Place; The 
Changing Picture of Women in 
Britain by Diana Souhami 
(Penguin Women's Studies, 


Power and the glory 


senses instantly a special em- 
pathy with this extraor- 
dinarily granite-like, 
enormously powerfnl, 
creation. 

Structurally there are Hnks 
with Bruckner, hot Beiuhmd 
also reveals enthusiastically 
the symphony’s Wagnerian 
features; the furious dissipa- 
tion of energy in the fourth 
movement, the merciless inter- 
jections of Fate as Kullervo 
sings of bis discovery that it is 
his sister whose honour he has 
violated, the dark shad- 
ows. of die finale. There is 
some excellent singing from 


Brides 


A Woman's Place 
is based on a 
British Council 
exhibition of 
photographs, de- 
vised and re- 
searched by 
Diana Souhami, 
which was shown at the Royal 
Festival Hall in 1984. Nearly 
half its pages are given over to 
photographs ana the text is 
supplied by several women 
contributors. It therefore re- 
sembles a magazine rather 
than a book, and for this 
reason is at once interesting, 
provoking and somewhat 
disconnected. 

The first three chapters give 
the reader a quick aerial view 
of women's struggle to obtain 
an education, voting rights, 
and the right to work outside 
the home. On this last point 
the Edwardian street-scenes 
speak for themselves — a sea 
of cloth caps, boaters, and 
police helmets, with scarcely a 
woman in sight' 

The suffragist campaign 
started quietly in the 1860s 
with Miliicent Garrett Fawcett 
and the National Union of 
Women's Suffrage Society. In 
1905 Mrs Pankhurst and her 
suffragettes began to bring 


and 


prejudice 

violence and fame to the 
movement. 

Hear activist ideas caupht on, 
c ulminating in 1913 with her 
attempt to set fire to Lloyd 
George's house. 

After the Fust World War 
women made enormous 
strides. They could train as 
lawyers and accountants. Ox- 
ford University and the Givi] 
Service opened their doors, 
mid the much needed Law of 
Property and the Matrimonial 
Causes Acts helped to equalize 
women’s position in the law 
courts. These familiar topics 
are well covered and reawake 
one’s admiration for the 
tenacity and courage of those 
earlier generations of women. 

Halfway through, however, 
A Woman's Place begins to 
lose its way. A resentful tone 
of voice and the continuing 
complaints, justifiable in the 
earlier pages, begin to jar. The 
guns are still levelled at the 
male sex, frequently male 
employers, but also “the be* 
wigged judges, generals with 
their mortals , 1 and bosses and 


Eva-L3sa Saarinen and Jenna 
Hynninen, while the fiD-ops, 
the cantatas Oma Maa and 
Tula Sjmty, are both rare and 
fascinating. 

If the La Salle's mnsac- 
mahing is epitomized by ab- 
solute fidelity to the score, that 
of Lorin Maazel has some- 
thing altogether more theatri- 
cal about it, not necessarily a 
had Hi mg for Mahler. In Ids 
new recording of the Third 
Symphony, mare of the .detail 
emerges even on black disc 
than with Abhado’-S reading' 
with die same orchestra for 
DG on compact disc. 


bankers in their city suits, who 
want their colleagues to be of 
the same class, colour, sex and 
style as themselves." 

We are told that “only five 
per cent of the population live 
conventional family lives, 
while the other 95 per cent 
yield no cohesive picture of 
who is Irving with whom, 
under what contract and for 
how Jong.” It is hard to believe 
these figures. 

Furthermore “Mother. . . is. 
fast developing a multiple 
personality. . . she may well 
drink her beer in pints, aye her 
hair, like disco dancing, and 
leave the washing-up in the 
sink for somebody else. She is 
increasingly liable to have sex 
when she wants and with 
whom, to divorce, remarry or 
even choose to raise her 
children alone.” 

Too often Ms Souhami and 
her contributors seem to be 
recommending a return to an 
atavistic, even primitive, way 
of life, but without any of the 
strict taboos associated with a 
genuinely tribal society. 

Finally, A Woman's Place 
points to the women's peace 
camp at Grecnham Common 
as a new focus of female 
solidarity. This is indeed an 
area where file women’s 
movement may bring new and 
beneficial pressures to bear. 

Isabel Butterfield 


Sometimes, and especially 
in that vast first movement, 
the effect is slightly disturb- 
ing, as though Maazel were 
playing far the moment rather 
than the whole organism, and 
the tempo seems a teach setf- 
consdously deliberate. Simi- 
larly, in die finale, he relishes 
the sheer quality of sound, 
leaving momentnm to look 
after itself; bat took after itself 
it does. 

Rtecardo Muti’s way with 
Berlioz's equally hybrid sym- 
phony Romeo et Juliette is 
eqtrally . sensitive to colour, 
which is at it should he in a 


the Rossini parody trio ‘Tons Les 
Trois Reunis ". 

Five years before La FiUe du 
Rigimem Donizetti managed to go 
straight to the public heart with Lucia 
di Lammermoor which touched 
many a fictional heroine from Ma- 
dame Bovary onwards. The year 1 83S 
was also tbe year of Adolphe Adam's 
Le Postilion de Lonjumeau. It is not 
easy to come across stage perfor- 
mances of this opera nowadays, 
although it does occasionally turn up 
in small German houses, tor in its 
simple style it is likely to please an 
audience happy to hum Lortzing 
tunes. 

Wagner once complained angrily 
that he had a sleepless night because 
he could not get Postilion's melodies 
out of his head. It is hard not to 
sympathize. Once the tenor aria 
which gives its name to the opera- 
comique is in the skull — and it is 
heard often enough - it is difficult to 
dislodge, including the high D scaled 
to imitate the post-born the postillion 
doubtless blows while riding. John 
Aler copes with this and much else 
with a good deal of charm as the 
coachman who deserts his wife for 
money but eventually manages to 
remarry her — no bigamy when the 
lady is one and the same. 

June Anderson turns up again as 
the girl who has to catch her man 
twice. There is no pretending that tbe 
role is on a par with that of Marie in 
FiUe, although it does offer one 
bravura aria in Act n which she 
delivers with the clean-cut skill of a 
surgeon slicing the top off his 
breakfast egg. 'There may be com- 
plaints about some of the French 
from two American singers, but at 
least they are not above proving that 
Adam was more than just the 
composer of Giselle. Thomas Fulton, 
another American, motivates the 
Monte Carlo Orchestra but it could 
use a little more fullness of sound. 

John Higgins 

score with so many touches of 
telling orchestral originality. 
And the PhSodelpMa Or- 
chestra plays superbly. They 
. ., .are aptly nimble, robust, or 
"Y ! sonorous wherever those qnal- 
“ 5 * ities are required, and play 
■JJ™ - remarkably accurately. 

Ither Jessye Norman takes “Pre- 
ami miers transports" at a nicely 
se jf_ judged tempo, aided by a 
Snii . glonons solo cello in the 
second strophe, and the tenor, 
)m A John Aler, sings with just the 
look right combination of charm 
itBelf and malice in the dashing 
Scherzetto. Simon Estes as 
Friar LaHrence makes the best 
with of what I cannot help feeling is 
sym- an awkward ending to the 
te fa piece. 

lour i 

fa a Stephen Pettitt 


Jumbled fantasies 


PAPERBACKS 


Tunc by Lawrence Durrefl 
(Faber, £4.95) 

DurreO described this novel 
(first published in 1968) as 
“the first deck of a double 
decker novel". The second 
deck is Numquam. “Here and 
there in the text,” he said, “the 
attentive reader may discern 
the odd echo from The 
Alexandria Quartet and even 
from The Black Book; this is 
intentionaL" Really attentive 
readers wfll indeed find echoes 
from all sorts of places, and 
will not dare doubt that they 
are intended. 

The narrative rambles 
luxuriously backwards and 
forwards in lime and from one 
country to another. 

The central character is an 
inventor or developer of elec- 
tronic devices caught up in a 
sinister financial empire re- 
ferred to as “the firm" Every- 
thing about it is mysterious. It 
is a secret society manipulat- 
ing its members, driving them 
when necessary to death or 
distraction. 

There are realty two views 
one can lake of DurrelL Either 
he is a brilliantly inventive 


storyteller creating a highly 
intellectual pattern of images 
and myths, or he is a charlatan 
throwing together a jumble of 
self-indulgent fantasies enig- 
matic enough to arouse our 
bemused curiosity. Perhaps be 
is both. 

An Unofficial Rose by Iris 
Murdoch (Penguin, £2.95) 

Iris Murdoch's houses and 
gardens are distinctive, and 
send out subtly different 
vibrations. The house at the 
centre of this novel is “dark 
and damp, centred, as round a 
vast atrium, about the cold 
stone-flagged still room, full of 
rain-soaked overcoats and 
rows of muddy wellingtons." 
Attached to it is a large rose 
garden full of carefully tended 
and labelled plants. In this 
house and garden various 
people wander about looking 
for — and finding — each 
other, constantly sorting 
themselves out into different 
patterns: Some are dearly 
manipulative, others simply 
wait. All of them, however, are 
caught up in a restless process 
of evaluating themselves and 
each other, and then regulat- 
ing the framework within 
which they can interact. 

Anne Barnes 


CHESS 

Masters turn tide on 
the battle of Hastings 

« d- 0 11 h5 MoS 


This year the once famous 
Hastings tournament, found- 
ed in 1895, has a generous 
new sponsor in the shape oj 
Foreign and Colonial, and 
now top players are queueing 
up to compete from 
Monday.The partierpauon ox 
two members of our brilliant 
Olympic squad, who cap- 
tured the silver medals m 
Dubai, demonstrates clearly 
that Hastings’ fortunes are in 
the ascendant on the world 
stage. 

Here is a sharp battle from 
Dubai between two of me 
favourites for top bo 0 ? 111 ?. 

White: Petureson (Iceland* 
Blade Speelman (England) 

Modem Defence 
i at Ncfi 

Unorthodox, but not neces- 
sarily bad. Black has plenty 
of resources after 2<b Ne5 j 
e4 e 6 


11) 04 

Too wild; 10 Qb4 is more 
testing. 


«) _ D-0 II US NBS 

12 Oc2 ® ... 

Black has seized the uutia- 

11 ? !§■ ? 

19 BjeM uH ® (HS ^ 

An admission of defeat. 
There is no way that White 
can now hope to defend his 
King's side against Blades 
Bishops and Queen. 

20 Oh* 21 Mjrt Bo* 

Stripping away the last barri- 
cades around White’s King. , 
__ rmS 27 ChdB 

8 & 

SC US. 5R 
White resign. 36 Kdl Rd3+ 
37 Kcl Rc 8 + 38 Nc3 
R8xc3+ leads to mate. 

0 The Foreign and. Colonial 
Hastings Grandmaster Tour- 
nament runs at the Queens 
Hotel, Hastings, until Janu- 
ary i3- pla y ,s eve tf 
frrim 1 pm - 6 pm. but wim free 
days on January 2, 7, and 12. 
Spectators are welcome. 


Raymond Keene ( DLier wSt 8 ^ 


The Lederer Memorial Tro- 
phy, played at the Young 
Chdsea Club, demonstrated 
that people wfll watch bridge, 
provided that it is good brirtee. 
Attracted by a galaxy of big 
names, an enthusiastic audi- 
ence attended all three ses- 
sions . of this, the sole 

surviving Invitation event in 

the bridge calendar. 

The result was: 1st, Eng- 
land (Tony Forrester, John 
Pottage, Sally Horton, Steve 
Lodge) 321 VPs; 2nd, Profes- 
sionals (David Edwin, . Rich- 
ard Sampson, Norman 
Selway, Bod Rowlands,, Hen- 
ry Bethe) 268; '3rd, London 
(Victor Silverstone, Chris 
Dixon, Irving Rose, Robert 
Sheehan, 71a Mahmood) 262. 

Jo hn Pottage 1 m* already 
made his mark as one of 
England's best young players. 
But if this victory is his 
greatest achievement so far, it 
will surely -be the first of 
many. 

The prize for tbe best 
defended hand went to 
Selway and Rowlands. Ironi- 
cally, their victims were the 
ultimate winners. 

Teams. Point-a-board with 
graded aggregate. Game aR 
‘Dealer West 


BRIDGE 

Youth shows the way 
to live entertainment 


♦ A J 2 
V AJ97 
O' 9542 
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♦ 10743 


7T“U K O 1093 
, N C PKB 6 


ly. E IVISOO 

0 A O 76 f W c E |0 KS3 


ft 876 

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4 J 9 865 


Pottage Sampson Forrester Edwin 


The events at Table One 
took an ohhodox course. 
Forrester led a top spade and 
when permitted to hold the 
trick switched to a heart 
Sampson won tbe heart in 
dummy and played a club to 
the King and Ace. But when 
Forrester found the {tilling 
switch to a diamond, the 
defence were in control 
Sampson could only make 
four tricks, 300 to East-West.. 

. This was the bidding at 
table taja. 


W N E S 

Rowlands Lodge Sohmjr Horton 


Selway's double of a strong 
no trump was possibly in- 
fluenced by the method of 
scoring. If ins point count was 
a sub-minimum, at least he 
had a good lead, an important 
criterion in a close decision. 
Sally Horton took refuge in 
two clubs, but Rowlands 
pounced like a starving cat 

Rowlands put the defence 
on the right track when he 
found a spade lead. Selway ' 
won the first trick with the 
♦9 and continued with the 
♦K. With no entry to her 
hand, declarer tried a dia- 
mond, which ran to the 0Q. 
Rowlands switched to a 
heart, which Sally Horton 
finessed, losing to the VtL 
Selway took the' 4K before 
making the key play of 
cashing the diamond King! 
Whp Selway continued with 


a fourth spade, Horton ruffed 
with the 4*9, and Rowlands 
discarded a heart 

In desperate trouble, Hor- 
ton played a trump, which 
Selway sagely ducked. When 
Horton played a second 
round of trumps he won with 
the +A. 

This was tbe end position: 


The great Philly 
Sound system 


Selway played the 43, , 
ruffed by declarer and over- 
ruffed by Rowlands. Not con- 
tent with an 800 penalty, 
Rowlands tried the seven of 
diamonds , a move which 
could not cost and would gain 
an extra trick if declarer could 
be lulled into playing low from 
dummy. But Sally Horton 
smartly hopped up with 
dummy's N9, to restrict the 
loss to 1 1 IMPs. 


ROCK RECORDS 


Various Artists The 
Philadelphia Story 1971-1986 
(Streetsounds PHST 1986) 

When in 1971 Kenny Gamble 
and Leon Huff concluded a 
distribution deal with Colum- 
bia for their newly-formed 
independent label Philadel- 
phia International Records 
(PIR), it is doubtful that 
Columbia saw the arrange- 
ment as anything more than a 
convenient way of maintain- 
ing a profile in the minority 
R&B chans. 

Yet through their develop- 
ment of an outstanding rosta 
of performers whose records 
established a distinctive, care- 
fully groomed “Philly Sound” 
Gamble and Huff created an 
empire built on the black 
independent entrepreneurial 
traditions that Beny Gordy 
had established in the 1960s 
with the Motown label. 

Like Motown, it is impos- 
sible to calculate the influence 
of PIR and its sister label. The 
Sound Of Philadelphia 
(TSOP) established in 1974, in 
bringing about a wider critical 
and commercial acceptance of 
black music, but The Philadel- 
phia Story, a 14-album boxed 
set that features all the major 
acts and others besides, con- 
firms the wealth of talent that 
the labels nurtured: The 
O’Jays, The Three Degrees, 


Billy Paul Jean Cam, Archie 
Bell and the Drells, Lou 
Rawls, to nam e a few. 

Harold Melvin and the 
Bluenotes, whose “Don’t 
Leave Me This Way" pro- 
vided a recent number one for 
the Communards, best typi- 
fied the original Philly Sound, 
with the swirling strings and 
brass of the superlative Sigma 
Sound Studio's session mu- 
sicians (collectively known as 
MFSB) embellishing Teddy 
Pendergrass’s rich baritone 
vocals. 

Pendergrass, a prototype of 
the Rums T. Wildebeest 
character, went on to become 
the label's biggest solo star, 
and with the arrival of the 
multi-talented Dexter Wansel 
in 1976 as head of A&R and 
leader of MFSB, the Philly 
Sound was able to embrace the 
disco/fank challenge of the 
late 1970s with dance floor 
hits like McFadden & 
Whitehead's celebrated an- 
them “Ain't No Stopping Us 
Now”. 

On The Philadelphia Story 
this vast catalogue of material 
is intelligently organized into 
themes — Mellow Moments, 
Party Party, and so on — and 
also develops in a roughly 
chronological pattern over tbe 
28 sides. At £35 for 140 songs 
a reservoir of classic sounds is 
now available at 25p a shot 

David Sinclair 


Sonny and heir to 
the air waves 


JAZZ RECORDS 


Miles Davis/Sonny Stitt Live in 
Steokhoim 1960 (Dragon DRLP 
129/130, 2 discs) 

CNd( Corea Trio Music Live in 
Europe (ECM 1310) 

Stan Qetz Voyage (Blackhawk 
BKH 51101-113) 

When Miles Davis's five-year 
association with John 
Coltrane ended in the spring 
of 1960, the trumpeter invited 
Sonny Stitt, a saxophonist of 
far more conventional in- 
stincts, to be his front-fine 
partner. The arrangement 
lasted only six months, not 
long enough to be engraved on 
an official recording. They did 
tour Europe together, though, 
and it is from radio broadcasts 
of two of those concerts that 
Live in Stockholm I960 has 
been taken. 

While not as exalted as tbe 
Davis/Coltrane concert re- 
leased by the same company 
to widespread acclaim a 
couple of years ago. the new 
set certainly contains much 
fine playing, notably by Davis, 
whore jabs and feints are in 
fine form on “Autumn 
Leaves", and Wynton Kelly, 
whose piano solo on “If I 
Were a BelT is among his 
best. Stitt, although living up 
to his reputation as a first-rate 
craftsman with his swaggering 
tenor on “W alkin ' " and 
Parkerish alto on “Autumn 


Leaves", never really inte- 
grates himself into the unique 
Davis atmosphere, and can 
clearly be hard to be 
floundering in the open spaces 
of the scale-based “All Blues". 

It is recommended, never- 
theless, on both historical and 
musical grounds — with the 
grieving codicil that there 
Dragon issues have shaken my 
faith in that neat drummer 
Jimmy Cobb, whose speeding- 
up of “If I Were a Bell" and 
si owing-down of “All Blues" 
parallel his similar inconsis- 
tencies, on the earlier set 

Such a thing could certainly 
never happen with Roy 
Haynes, whore drums are 
aligned alongside Chick 
Corea's piano and Miroslav 
Vito us's bass in Trio Musk- 
Live in Europe, recorded dur- 
ing their 1984 tour. I could 
have lived without Corea's 
contemplation of Scriabin’s 
Prelude No 2, but the group’s 
versions of “I Hear a 
Rhapsody” and “Night and 
Day" are attractive enough, in 
a microchip pish son of way. 

There is nothing pro- 
grammed about Voyage, in 
which Stan Getz and a hand- 
built rhythm section perform 
a well chosen sequence of 
standards and originals- The 
great tenorist is at the top of 
his form, and the result is a 
five-star record. 

Richard W illiams 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 140 

Prizes of the New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the first two 
correct solutions opened on Friday, January 2. Entries should be 
addressed to The Times Concise Crossword Competition, l 
Pennington Street, London, El 9XN. The winners and solution will 
be announced on Saturday, January 3, 1987. 


ACROSS 
1 Mexican guerilla 

leader (6) 

4 Nearly (6) 

7 Require {4) 

8 Abject coward (8) 

9 IWj'car sleeper 

15 Solemn promise (6) 

16 Snooker cne lift (6) 

17 Gunner (12) 

23 Desen stinger (8) 

24 Roiisserie<4) 

25 Proper (6) 

26 Guard (6) 

DOWN 

1 Comica] (4) 

2 RepubTic head of 
staie (9) 

3 Highest mark (5) 

4 Glowing (5) 

5 Stupid person (5) 

6 Three legged seat (5) 13 Ireland (4) 19 Against the property 

1? « W Sunoi rapiul (4) * 

12 Stevenson’s Balfour 18 Preliminary inspec- 21 Take up again (5) 
novel (9) uon(5) 22 Astound (4) 

Solution to No 1139 (yesterday's Concise crossword) 

ACROSS: I Salopian 5 Gaff 9 Big bang 10 Omaha It Adorn 
12 Treat J3 Tagus 15 Butte 16 wedge 18 Semen 20 House 21 Ner- 
vous 23 Ally 24 Commuter 


liiina mmmmmm 


MMmummmzimama 


■ ■ ■ ■ mm 
Mmmmmmm jbh 

«]■■■■■ _!■■■■■ 


memento 6 Away 
it 15 Brahma 


DOWN: 1 Submit 2 Ligament 3 Pea 4 
7 Fracas 8 Downtown 11 Attested 14 Gs 
17 Eraser 19 Lull 22 Rum 


Name 

Address 


Solution to last Saturday’s non-prize Conrise Jumbo crossword 

ACROSS: 1 We plough the fields and scatter 15 Showbiz 16 Para- 
phraser 17 Asexual 18 Upper storey 19 Torpedo 20 Drive in 21 Ac- 
crete 225biksas 23 Spasmodical 25 Dross 26 Raise a cheer 
28 Dedicates 30 Restoring 33 Megalopolis 35 Golan 36 Calvados 
39 Rim 40 Upset 4] Ignites 43 Austral 44 Usury 45 Sea 46 Re- 
strict 4BUrae 49 Inoperative 51 Full cycle 53 Oversight 55 Door- 
keepers 58 Pams SOJqytessnera 61 Effects 63 Bravado 64 
Rena per 66 Overrun 67 Large amount 68 darida 69 Ejaculation 
70 Set ways 71 Organisation de TAr-mee Secrete 


Jeremy Flint 


DOWN: 1 Wash up and dry 2 Prospectors 3 On borders 4 Gazet- 
teer 5 Top dressing 6 Early life 7 Impetus 8 Lord Russel] 9 Suspen- 
se 19 Norroy and Ulster 11 Stardom 12 Aperiodic 13 Truce 14 
Relentiessness 24 Catalytic 27 Cogency 29 Dismissal 31 Obverse 
32 Indulging 33 Marquee 34 Passage 35 Generic 37 Austerely 38 
Spur of (Be moment 49 Unstick 42 walls of Jericho 47 Sense of taste 
50 Above ground 51 Fed strange 52 Confabulate 54Sheepskin 55 
Desperado 56 Excelsior 57 Submerses 58 Pragmatic 60 Surpass 62 
Fantail 65 Prang 





FILMS ON TV 

NO LADY: Dustin Hoffman in Tootsie 
plays a man with a problem: an actor 
who cannot get work. His solution is 
to dress as a woman and pass 
himself off as an actress, which he 
does so successfully that he lands a 
star part in a soap opera. Hoffman's 
drag act is richly comic but more than 
just a caricature. Jessica Lange (who 
won an Oscar) and Ten Garr lend • 
strong support and the director, 
Sydney Pollack, plays Hoffman’s 
agent Made in 1982, Tootsie has its 
first British television showing 
tomorrow, BBC1, 7.50-9.45 pm. 


RADIO 

LOOKING BACK: John Houseman 

won fame (and an Oscar) as the 
irascible professor in The Paper 
Chase. He was over 70 and it was his 
first big acting role. Before that he 

had a distinguished career as a 
producer, in Hollywood and on 
Broadway, while in the 1930s he set 
up the Mercury Theatre with Orson 
Welles and played a vital part in the 
preparation of Citizen Kane. He is 
also a splendid raconteur as he 
demonstrates in four conversations 
with Christopher Cook, starting on 
Radio 3, tomorrow, 6.50-7.1 5pm. 


TELEVISION 

GHOST WRITER: Hannah Gordon as 

Edith hi Day After the Fair ; taken 
from a short story by Thomas Hardy. 
Locked into a dry and bitter marriage 
to a wealthy brewer, she tries to 
experience romance at second hand 
by helping tor illiterate maidservant 
write love letters to a dashing 
banister. Shot in Salisbury and 
strongly evoking the rural England of 
Hardys day, the production also 
stars Kenneth Haigh, Ana Massey 
and, as the servant girt, a promising 
young actress, Sam mi Davis. B8C1, 
Wednesday, 9.50-1 1.25pm- 


TELEVISION 

NORMAN CONQUEST: Norman 
Wisdom, with his crumpled suit 
battered cap and flair for mayhem, 
was a top British comedian of the 
1950s and 1960s. in films to may 
have been too reminiscent of Chapfin 
but to was a huge draw at the box- 
office. As the old cancer patient in 
Going Gently, he made a successful 
transition to straight actor. Just 
Wisdom, a biography which mixes 
interview and dramatization, is today, 
8-9pm, followed by his 1968 fBm, The 
Night They Raided Minsky’s, 11pm- 
12.50am. both on Channel 4. 


FILMS ON TV 

STREETWISE: Meryl Streep as the 
Polish girt in New York trying to live 
down memories of her wartime 
experiences in a concentration camp 
in Alan J. Pakula's conscientious and 
often impressive 1982 film, Sophie's 
Choice. Streep won her second 
Oscar in four years, but there is 
acting of equal force from the less 
well known Kevin KEne and Peter 
MacNico! as the men in Sophie's life. 
Handsomely photographed by 
Nestor AUnendros, the film is having 
its first showing on British television. 
BBC2, tomorrow, 9.45pm-l2.10am. 


TELEVISION 

thwarted COP: Jeremy Kempas 
the hapless detective Jack Slipper, in 
Slip-Up, a wickedly drajraby 
Keith Waterhouse about the abortive 
attempt to extradite the great tram 
robber, Ronnie Brags, from Brazil in 
1974. The expedition arose from a 
scoop by the Daily Express aria 
developed into a comedy of errors as 
rival newspapers stabbed each other 
in the back and poor Slipper, who 
tried to maintain dignity in the face of 
chaos, was forced to come back 
empty-handed. BBCl . T uesday, 
9.30-1 1.1 5pm. 


TODAY 


• ••GREAT 
EXPECTATIONS (1946): A 
David Lean season opens with 
his finely crafted Dickens 
adaptation, superbly designed 
and photographed and with a 
gallery of nch characters 
including John Mills's Pip, 
Finlay Currie's Magwttch and 
Martita Hunt's Miss Havisham. 
B8C2, noon-1 ,55pm. 

• THIS HAPPY BREED (1944): 
Noel Coward’s homage to 
London suburbia, made before 
the British cinema had any 
genuinely lower class actors. 
Robert Newton. Celia Johnson 
and others do their not always 
convincing best 
BBC2.2-f5-4.05pm. 

• •IN WHICH WE SERVE 
(1942): Heavily patriotic, 
immensely stylish tribute to tee 
wartime Royal Navy. Written 
and co-dinected by Noel 
Coward, who also plays tee 
Mountbatten figure of the 
captain trying to lift his men as 
the ship does down. 

BBC2, 4.05-5.55pm. 

• • • DR STRANGELOVE 
(1963): Stanley Kubrick's 
brilliant outrageous black 
comedy about the outbreak of 
World War Three which stffl 
rings alarmingly true. Peter 
Sellers has three meaty parts 
but the more restrained playing 
of George C. Scott and Sterling 
Hayden is equally effective. 
BBC1, 12.05-1 .40am 


Selection on the small screen 


• SOPHIE'S CHOICE. See top 
ofpaga 


MONDAY 



tX-m 





TOMORROW 


• TWO-WAY STRETCH 
(I960): Diverting British prison 
comedy with inmates Peter 
Sellers, Wilfrid Hyde White and 
company planning tee perfect 
crime and new warder Lionel 
Jeffries getting in tee way. 

BBC1 , 10.55am-12.25pm. 

• •REBECCA (1940): Joan 
Fontaine as the shy bride living 
in tee memory of husband 
Laurence Olivier's dead first 
wife. Gripping, atmospheric 
Alfred Hitchcock version of tee 
Daphne du Maurier novel, with 
Judith Anderson as the creepy 
housekeeper, Mrs Danvers. 
Channel 4, 2-4. 30pm. 

• • THE RAILWAY 
CHILDREN (1970): Lionel 
Jeffries again, making his 
directing debut with a nicely 
judged version of the E. Nesbit 
story of three children and their 
adventures in Yorkshire while 
their father is in prison. 

BBC1 , 4.40-6.25pm. 

• • TOOSfE. See top of page. 

• BEING THERE (1979): Peter 
Sellers, in his penultimate fBm, 
realizing a long cherished rote , 
as an illiterate gardener who 
unexpectedly becomes a 
national celebrity. A gently 
ironic fable, not quite sure 
where It is going. 

Channel 4, 9-1 1.25pm. 


• •BRIDGE ON THE 
RIVER KWAI (1957) marked 
director David Lean’s transi- 
tion from intimate British 
subjects to international epics. 
It was a huge critical and box- 
office success and won seven 
Oscars. Partly written by tin 
blacklisted and hence un- 
audited Gail Forman, it 
charts with intelligence and 
cinematic skill the psychologi- 
cal battle of wits between 
British POWs and their Japa- 
nese captors in a camp in 
Burma. Alec Gnmness (above) 
gives a strong and finely 
measured performance as the 
anguished CO, Colonel 
Nicholson. BBC2, 3.50- 
&25pm. 


• • BUGSY MALONE (1976): 
Alan Parker's original and 
delightfully inventive gangster 
musical hi which the guns 
shoot ice cream, the getaway 
cars are kiddy carts and a* the 
parts are played by children. 
BBC2, 7-8. 30pm. 

• • NEW YORK, NEW YORK 
(1977): Bitter-sweet romance 
between saxophonist Robert 

Liza MhinSii1n%e^^^^f 
era of tee 1940s. Director 
Martin Scorsese is paying 
homage to the classic 
Hollywood musical whfle giving 
it a contemporary edge. The 
first television showing of the 
complete version. 

Channel 4 9pnvmidrright 

• ••MY DARLING 
CLEMENTINE (1946): John 
Ford re-worldng tee store of 
Wyatt Earp and tee OK Corral 
into one of the great Westerns, 
a rich confection of conffict, 
poetry, humour and sentiment 
buHt round tee Fordian themes 
of community and order. Henry 
Fonda plays Earp as a man or 
quiet integrity, out to avenge 
tee murder of Ms brother. 
BBC1, 11.45pm-1.25am. 


The great picture show continues cm television. 
Hie ratings system, in our critical guide, isz 
• • • not to be missed • • highly recommended 
• well worth watching 


a famous 
BBC2,4.' 


.30pm. 


Johnson. Impeccably directed I • 


by David Lean. 

BBC2, 3.50-5.1 5pm. 

• THE FORBIDDEN PLANET 
(1956): Handsome and 
ingenious sci-fi story loosely 
derived from Shakespeare’s 
The Tempest Waiter Pidgeon 
to the Prosper© figure, 
conjuring up monsters, with 
Anne Francis in the Miranda 
role and CaJtoan turned into 
Robby tee Robot 
BBCf.11.45pm-1.25am. 


NEW YEAR’S EVE 


•• - * v 


• YOUNG WINSTON (1972): 
The eventful earfy fife of 
Winston Churcha given 
polished treatment by director 
Richard Attenborough. With 
Simon Ward as Winston and a 
fbrmidabta supporting cast 
BBC1,2-4w20pm. 

• • HOBSON’S CHOICE 
(1953): Towering performance 
from Charles Laughton as the 
tyrannical Lancashire 
bootmaker getting his 
comeuppance from his wilful 
daughter and her meek 
husband. Strong adaptation of 


v.f, 



*v, 

*> 

r?& 


• •• BRIEF ENCOUNTER 
(1945): Noel Coward story of a 
guilty affair between a doctor 
and a middle-class housewife, 
sometimes derided for its 
understatement and clipped 
accents, but given emotional 
conviction by the playing of 
Trevor Howard and Celia 


• ••AN AMERICAN IN 
PARIS (1951) is a magical 
MGM musical buQt around 
the romance between a foot- 
loose American painter and a 
young french girl (Gene Kelly 
and Leslie Caron, above). The 
cfimactic highlight to a 17- 
nrinnte ballet for which each 


seme to designed in die style, 
of a French painter; other 
dgfightv include Kelly flanring 
over Oscar Levant’s piano and 
a charming performance from 
the young Leslie Caron in her 
tost film. Vincente Minnelli 
directs with style and verve. 
BBC2, 1 1.55am-1 j45pm. 


• • GJGI (1958): Sumptuous 
musical version of the Colette 
story of a young Parisian girt 
who is groomed for high 
society out falls for a rake. 
Lesli e Caron, Louis Jordan and 
Maurice Chevafier ooze charm; 
Cec3 Beaton designed tee 
elegant costumes. 

BBCl, 12.10am-2.05am. 


NEW YEAR’S 
DAY 


• MON ONCLE (1956): 
Jacques Tati's accident-prone 
M. Hutot reappears as the 
unde of a sevan-year-okJ boy, 
frying to make sense of 
modem technology. Gentle, 
amused look at the 
technological age. 

Channel 4, 12.05-2 pm. 

STAR WARS (1977): Powerful 
mixture of comic-strip heroics 
and dazzling effects which 
became the most successful 
film ever made. Proves that 
even in this cynical age there is 
stffl a place for the old- 
fashioned fairy story. Wrtti 
Mark HantiD, Harrison Ford 
and Alec Guinness. 
fTV, 1.15-&3Qpm. 

• • MARY POPPINS (1964); 
Julie Andrews in her 
triumphant film debut as tee 
magical Edwardian nanny 
floating In on her umbrefla to 
take charge of two naughty 
children, ©ever use of 
animation; catchy songs. 
BBC1.2J50-4.45pm 


• THE STUNT MAN (1979): 
Unusual film about a Vietnam 
veteran on the run from the 
police who accidentally causes 
tee death of a stunt man on a 
film and is hired in his place. 
Peter O'Toole in fine form as 
the autocratic director. 

Channel 4, 9.30-11 .55pm. 
British television premiere 


■15pm. 

• • TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT 
(1944): Witty, cynical drama of 
the French resistance, taken 
from a Hemingway story and 
expertly directed by Howard 
Hawks. Launched tee screen 
partnership of Humphrey 
Bogart and the slinky Lauren 
("if you want anything, just 
whistle") Bacall. 

BBC1, 11.35pm-1.15am. 



• •LOCAL HERO (1983): 
Bin Forsyth’s gently under- 
stated comedy about an 
American oil company trying 
to build a refinery in a remote 
Scottish village against the 
wishes of die camy locals. 
Burt Lancaster (above) gave 
the project a big star name but 
foUowing Forsyth’s usual pref- 
erence most of die cast were 
relative unknowns. This is the 
film's first showing on British 
television. BBCl, 9.45- 
11.35pm. 


Bowing out with classics and dramatics 


RADIO 


John Ford (the Jacobean playwright, not the 
man who made Westerns) to known almost 
entirely for one work, *Tis Pity She’s a Whore . 
Now Radio 3 has dug up another, Love’s 
Sacrifice. As for as can be established, it has 
not been performed professionally for more 
tiun 350 years. The omission to repaired on 
Tuesday (7-30-9 JOpm). 

Using the Othello themes of jealousy and 
betrayal, it is the story of a duke's wife who to 
falsely accused of infidelity. John Sbrapnd 
plays the duke, with Sian Thomas as the 
duchess and Anton Lesser as (he supposed 
lover: The play has been adapted by an 
authority on Jacobean drama, the actor and 
writer, Brett Usher. 

There is drama with a more familiar ring in 
the Radio 4 Afternoon Flay, Bear Bratus (Fri, 
3-4 30pm). J. M. Barrie’s fantasy takes place 
in a magic wood on MMsumi&ejr’s Eve and 


gives people who have taken a wrong tuning 
in life a second chance. Barrie, as Barrator, to 
played by Alec McCowen. 

The second Jane Austen of die festive 
season is Penaasum, a tbree-parter which 
runs from Wednesday to Friday (Radio 4, 
1 lam-noon). 

In 1939 Joan littlewood presented The 
Classic SoH, a radio documentary on social 
conditions in Manchester which took its cue 
from Friedrich Engels's famous survey of 
nearly 100 years before. Plucked from the 
BBC Sound Archives, the programme is 
repeated mi Wednesday (noon-1 2JT7pra) as 
one of a series of Classic Features that also in- 
cludes Ren£ Cutfortfa on the Korean War. 

Quiz addicts wiD not want to miss 
Masterbram, an amalgam of Brain of Britain 
and Mastermind (Radio 4, Tinas, 1227- 
12.55pm). Jennifer Keaveaey, who never 
seems to forget anything, is pitted against 
other minds and brains muter the gently 
morfring chairmanship of Robert Robinson. 


TELEVISION 


Casualty, a generally successful attempt to 
translate the Hill Street Blues format to a 
hospital casualty department, has its final 
episode tonight (BBCl, 9.25- 10. 15pm) when 
the night shin is threatened with the axe. Mis 
Edwina Currie wiD no doubt detect anti- 
Govemment propaganda. 

If you had to nominate the archetypal 
Channel 4 documentary, a good candidate 
would be International Sweethearts of 
Rhythm (Mon, 8.30-9pmX The Sweethearts 
were a 1940s jazz band, multi-racial and 
composed entirely of women. 

New Year’s Eve on Channel 4 has a 
television version of Wayne Sleep’s multi- 
faceted stage show, Dash (7-8.05pm), and a 
long, sceptical look at Beauty (8.05-9.35pm), 
which takes in the art of the ancient Greeks, 
male st ri pper s and Zandra Rhodes. The 
conclusion, not very original, is that beauty is 


what you and I think it is. The turn of the year 
is usually the cue for the BBC to show a play 
in Welsh. The offering this time is 
Gwendnlaid (Swallows) (BBC2, today, 8.35- 
9.55pm). It deals with the evacuation of 
Cockney schoolchildren to a North Wales 
village during the Second Work! War and the 
prejudices thereby aroused. English sub-titles 
are provided. 

Stanley Baxter remains one of our fresher 
entertainers, thanks mainly to not appearing 
on television too often. In Stanley Baxter's 
Picture Annual (BBCl, Mon, 9. 30- 1 0.25pm) 
he gets through 37 characters, from Mae West 
to Noel Coward and the Pope. 

Fond memories of Christmases past are 
provided in Morecambe and Wise Classics 
(BBCl, Tues, 8-9pm), though Angela 
Rippon’s legs are no longer tire novelty they 
once were. Another worthwhile repeat is Silas 
Maraer (BBC2, New Year’s Day, 5.05- 
6.40pm), with Ben Kingsley’s superb perfor- 
mance as the recluse weaver. 


FRIDAY' 


• rrSAMAD, MAD, MAO, 
MAD WORLD (1S63): Stanley 
Kramer’s audacious attempt to 
mount the comedy to end all 
comedies. A massive 
compendium of frantic jokes, 
wild chases and pited-up cars 
and a cast that is a who's who 
of vaudeville, running from 
Jimmy Durante to Phil Silvers 
and Ethel Merman to the 
veteran Buster Keaton. 

BBC2, 1 1 .30am- 2pm. 

• FIDDLER ON THE ROOF 
(1 971): Topol repeating his 
stage success as the Russian- 
Jewish milkman trying to find 
good husbands for his five 
daughters. Dutifully directed by 
Norman Jewison, who 
stresses the realism of 
characters and setting. 
BBC1.2-4.55pm. 

• LAWRENCE OF ARABIA 
(1962): David Lean’s huge 
biography which tries, and 
ultimately fails, to explain one 
of the most enigmatic figures 
offodSOth century. Written by 
Robert Bolt; intelligent central 
performance by Peter O'Toole; 
strong character playing by 
Alec Guinness, Jack Hawkins 
and Claude Rains. The striking 
desert landscapes inevitably 
lose some of their impact on 
the small screen. 

BBC2, 4.55-8.1 Opm. 

• POLTERGEIST 1982): 
Suburban California provides 
the placid setting for this clever 
horror piece from tee Steven 
Spielberg stable, in which a 
young girl releases something 
nasty from her television set. 
Director was Tobe Hooper, 
best known for The Texas 
Chainsaw Massacre. 

BBCl, 1Q.30pm-12J20am. 
British television premiere. 

• • WINCHESTER *73 (1 950): 
The title refers to the repeating 
rifle which passes through 
various hands as James 
Stewart tracks down his 
father's killer. Fine, taut 
Western, one of a series of 
collaborations in the 1950s 
between Stewart and the 
director Anthony Mann. 

Channel 4, 10.30pm-l2.15am. 

• THE PHANTOM LIGHT 
(1934): Interesting low budget 
comedy- thriller, with tee 
Cockney actor Gordon Harker 
as a lighthouse keeper 
threatened by a gang of 
wreckers. The director, long 
before he was a name to 
oonjure with, was a young 
Michael Powefl. 

Channel 4, 12.15-1 .35am. 



r--i .-<• 

M IS- fT? 

2 ■ ■.Ma 


\ V A 





THE WEEK AHEAD 



THEATRE 


PINOCCHIO: Spirited 
pantom i mo Italiano; engaging 

hero and joyful performances. 

Top choice for panto hunters. 
Theatre Royal, Stratford East 
(01-534 0310). 

BREAKING THE CODE: 




GALLERIES 


1 


Jacobi as tee enigmatic' 
computer genius and 
homosexual. 

Haymarket(0l-930 9832). 

WHAT ABOUT LUV: Three in- 
matched lovers keep meeting 
on a New York bridge; witty 
musical version of Murray 
SchisgaTs Luv. 

Orange Tree, Richmond (01- 
940 3633). 

THE AMERICAN CLOCK: 

Arthur Miller's musical 
cavalcade of America since the 
Crash. Persuasive medley of 
the sentimental and the 
shrewd. 

National (01-928 2252). 

NIGHT MUST FALL- Emlyn 
Williams's first play stffl has its 
scary moments. 

Greenwich (01-858 7755). 


MARILUON: Initially 
branded as a poor man's 
Genesis, tee quintet from 
Aylesbury converted a 
fanatical hard-core 
following into international 
success, with a series of 
Intricately arranged albums 

Tonight and Tome 

Maxwefl Hall, Ayta , 

86009); Monday arig x 
A Tuesday, Royal Col, \ ti 


FAfRPORT CONVENTION: 

No Thompson or Swartorick, 
but Simon Nicol, Dave Pegg 
and Dave Mattaoks are 
present and correct at the 
start of a 40-day tour for tee 
old masters of foik-rodc. 

Mon, Tues, Half Moon 
Putney, London SW15 (01-788 
2387); Wed. Com 
Exchange, Cambridge (0223 
257851); Fri, Leisure 
Centre, Leateerhead (0372 
374109). 

HARVEY & THE 
WALLBANGSRS: The cabaret 
troubadours open a new 
stow with the old formula; a 
Bght melange of jazz, 
swing, doo wop and rock. 
Mon-Jan 10, Bloomsbury 
Theatre, London WC1 (Crl-387 
9629). 


JAZZ 


GEORGE MELLY: The bawdy 
blues singer shares the bffl 
with the proprietor's excellent 
quintet 

Tonight and Mon-Sat, Ronnie 
Scot? s Club, 47 Frith Street 
London W1 (01-439 0747). 

DUDU PUKWANA: Perhaps tee 
most distinctive voice among 
the small but significant band 
of expatriate South African 
jazz musicians, Pukwana's alto 
saxophone leads a vibrant 
outfit called Zite. 

Tomorrow, 100 Club, 100 


SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS: 
Traditions and revels of tee 
season, from the yule log to 
food, explained and exdtingl 
displayed with riddles and 




Green Museum of 
Cftfldftood, Cambridge Heath 
Road, London E2 (pi -980 
241 5) 


'' 3 ‘ iff'"'’ 



• James Heard, wfrst and art 
historian, has previously im- 
personated Holbein, Seurat 
and Gainsborough. This year 
he dons foe garb of 15th 
century Florentine painter 
Paolo Ucceflo for his “Meet 
foe Artist"' event for children. 
Heard's hour-long perfor- 
mances are at 2-30 pm 00 Dec 
29, 30, 31 and Jan 2, 3. 
Admission is by free ticket 
or details contact The Na- 
Sallerf. London WC2 


HELLO DOLLY: 200 doHs 
dating from 1700 to the 
present, including a Victorian 
Christmas tableau and Queen 
Mary's dofls' house. 

The Museum of London. 
London Wall, London EC2(Ol- 
600 3699). 

ELIZABETH H: Sixty years of 
paintings, sculptures and 
studio photographs of The 
Queen. 

National Portrait Gallery. St 
Martin's Place, London WC2 
(01-930 1552). 


OPERA | 


ROYAL OPERA HOUSE: Just 
one opera evening this week: 
on Tues at 7.30pm, the 
House's revival of Lucia dr 
Lammannoor . ; write a last 
chance to hear Alfredo Kraus 
as the Edgardo (Dennis O'NelU 
takes over for the remaining 
performances), and with June 
Anderson to the title role. 
Covent Garden, London WC2 
(01-2401066) 

ENGLISH NATIONAL OPERA: 
Tonight and Wed at 7.30 pm tee 
seasonal Fladannaus with 
Valeria Masterson doing 
sterling service as Rosalinda; 
on Mon and Jan 3 at 7pm 
David Pourrtney’s sleazy new 
Carmen, tee scourge of every 
critic in sight; and cm Tues and 
Fri at 7.3(fem the serious stuff: 
a powerful double-bffl of 
Janacek's Qsud(Fate), and hte 
Diary of One Who Disappeared 
with Arthur Davies and Jean 

Cojfeeum , St Martins Lane, 
London WC2 (01-836 316l)i) 



summer ki their 
grandfather’s village. A 
gentle delight from Taiwan, 
(greeted in 1984 by Hou 

Hsiao-hsten. 

ICA Cinema (01-930 3647), 
from Fri. 


SELECTED 


HEARTBREAK RIDGE (18k 

Hollywood's latest jingoistic 
extravaganza, with dint 
Eastwood as a Gunnery 
Sergeant; he also directs. 
Warner West End (01- 
j^^rei|Cannon Haymarfcet 

IVAN THE TERRIBLE IPG): 
Etnstetfi's towering axe, 
revived bn a new print struck 
from the original negative, with 
Nikolai Cherxassov as a 
ruthless tOte-century Tsar and 
wonderful music by Prokofiev. 
Everyman Hampstead (01- 
435 1525). 


• Jean Poirot plays foe in- 
solent cop pursuing foe case of 
a Catholic writer found naked 
and deal on a Brittany beach 
in Inspedeur LannUn (15), 
Claude Chabrol’s sequel to 
Cog as Via. With Bernadette 
Latent, Jean-Chnde Brialy. 
Chelsea Cinema (01-351 
3742) from Fri. 


Street London W1 (Ol- 
935 2141). Tuesday, 7.30pm. 

BALLET MUSIC: Bramweti 
Tovey twice conducts the 
Orchestra of Sadler's Wells 


i-rayai uauec ui c 
Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake and 
Nutcracker, Delibes's 
Coppm, Harold's LaFitiemal 
Gam Se, etc. 

Barbican Centre, Silk Street 

London EG2 (01-628 8795, 
credit cardsBI-638 8891). 
Today, 3pm and 7.45pm. 

JUNG'S CONSORT: The 
Wig more Hall's New Year 
Concert is part of their "Early 
Music and Baroque" series, 
and has the King's Consort 




CONCERTS 




WEBER BICENTENARY: The 
bicentenary of Weber's bath 


BOB 



decorated, a feast for the eyes, 
rrtiridandheart:' r - 
Renoir (01-837 8402). v ‘ 


have been expected to attract 
more attention during the past 
year, but fust in tern to salute 
ft, (he Endynwar? EnsemWe 

performs several of his most r 
delightful works on Tuesday at 
the Wlgmore Hall. A novelty 
here is Quentin Poole's m&il- 
orchestrattofi of Invitation to 
the Dance, and the other 
pieces are Weber's Ruts Trio 
and Clarinet Quintet tee latter 
with Mark van der Wiei. 

Wig more HaU, 36 Wlgmore 


performing Bach's Cantata No 
51 JauchzetQottinanen 
Lamten, Part 5 of his 
Christmas Oratorio, and some 
Telemann Tafeimusik. 
Wigmore Ha& Thurs, 7.30pm. 


DANCE 


SADLER’S WELLS ROYAL 
BALLET: Opening a three- 
week season In its home 
theatre* this week's offering Is 
The Snow Queen, David 
Bhtttey*s treatment of tee Hans 
Anderson story (Tues, Wed, Fri 
& Jan 3). Three other 
pro gramm es to follow. 

Sadler's Wells (01-278 891$ 

LONDON FESTIVAL BALLET: 
Peter Schaufuss's new 
production of The Nutcracker 
to given twice daSy aH this 

week, with different selections 
of the company's leading 
dancers at each performance. 

- Season continues until Jan 27. 

■ Festival Hall (01-928.3191) 


BOOKINGS 


FIRST CHANCE 

ROYAL OPERA: 

Personal/phone bookings this 
vreek for tow production of 

a ! K/ 3 ® Zauberflote, 
with English surtitles. Feb- 

no^v“e t r kin9, ° rDer 

»^°06 u r Lond °" 

SOinH BANK: Advance postal 
bootang open for Feb, 
mdudmg John Ogdon 50th- 
btrteday concert, the 
Alternative Music Company in 
^reecomic operas, and* 
®y™teb°ume production of 

®SB5iK8Ei5 























THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1 986 


ENTERTAINMENTS 



. A^spu TH m 

Hh _ BANK ^ 

llff •( :i- \ i km ; ~ 

fadWbJMJB Hr 


iEKCac 
ie ' ex* 


’'•'it ssdc 




ROYAL I'HSTIVAL HAL1 







OLLHX KLIZABLTH A-IAU. 



Pl’RCEU'/ROOM 

mm 


SOUTH BANK CRAFTS 

((ft • for perfect gifts TvA-s un 'i:ALn.'7, 




■ ' : : :s wiomof.c street *>h s.of 

MANAGia WILLIAM LY.KS 

sor. office C133: wa.'uac. :i;r co 


3!5 





’ll 






7.30 fun. Joe<efanuion wcfaqin^ aw txrmo»)« « 


JMwy 


AnOumlni 






Song Rectal Saris*. 

Songs by Mozart, ScMM R. S 
AH soon sou (Hawns only) 




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upaOTWATM «w »a 
Ss?3B» fW « “iSMOg 800 
tidunoMer * 379 *1® 

m£™Ts««o & ais 

pSST^^d 

rfftSSFfessi 

^SJSyawJSo best play 


IAKY 

OF 

TIMES 


i|SS barbican hall 

■l|| Barbican Centre. Silk St. EC2Y80S 
oi •638 aagi /.62a a?95 
Telephone Bookings 10am-8prn ? days a week 

»■- lu-ctc j"2 "j'jgec.:, t*#- f:e»;>c>.'.»i -it »r**; c •' r o* , 




TOMORROW at 3 p.m. 

Bach.... BRANDENBURG CONCERTO Ns. 3 

Mozart HNE KLEXNE NACHTMUSIK 

Mozart. VIOLIN CONCERTO No. 4- 

VivakU THE FOUR SEASONS 

ENGUSH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 

CnndKiorFRIUP LEDGER JOSE LUB GARCIA vHa 
ALAN BRIND viola (BBC Vnns Maridn of As tea* lMCy 
£5 50. Cl £&ift <9 50. 00.50 


ST NMmn 01-036 IMS. Soe- 
dal CC No. STS 6U3 Lvo ao 
run 2<6 Sat SO and BiO 


THE MOUSETRAP 


m 


] W" ,- ■ ' V. T~ — pr~TiT 


JRG 


77 'r^sv r rff ; ' ';1 { 

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iTHEBLDEOMUBEIttaz 


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1 r*' ' . iT.Vi ' , 1 M U -J’ i. j I'V f A •* '.1 



TOMORROW at 7.30 

TCHAIKOVSKY 

PHTLHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 
BAND OF THE SCOTS GUARDS 

Introduced & conducted by: ANTONY HOPKINS 

Soloist: ALLAN SCHILLER 

Marche Sim, Salic *Tbe Sun Lab’. Plano Concerto No. I, 
SnttTkNucradtr' 

OVERTURE *1812’ WITH CANNON 
AND MORTAR EFFECTS 


THURSDAY NEXT JAN. 1 at 7.30 

E 



Spec parr New Veer's Eve Tpra 


iMir 


NEW YEAH VIENNESE COMCBnS 
31 Docomher&l 


m 








TUESDAY NEXT 38 DEC EMBE R at Z4 5 p-m . 

Mwi d rl— oha HEBRIDES OVERTURE 

Tchaikovsky VIOLIN CONCERTO 

Dvorak _ SYMPHONY No. 9 (NEW WORLD) 

f<D PHILHARM ONIA ORCHESTRA 

4S/ CondocEon SIR YEHUDI MENUHIN 

HU KUN violin 






THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 



VAUOCVajUC Boa omn a cc. 




at the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 
Sunday 4th January at 7.30 

GRAND OPERA NIGHT 

Q elll^ !■ nine — t Kmtma te wM. n ajipene iwiH Hn 

concert will be dunged as follows 
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



HQ AT Ktt mr S . Trntes 




-rrrrrri~t:i*rrrrF- 




lj.il I :» « jg WXl*M ♦ J I 


P ^— 

iiV'‘Trr' 'fawWM# 




Barbican Hall New Year 's Day 3pm 


HUMMUS 


for Children 
Celebrate tbc New Year in a 
magualunrld^gnatmuac. 
Spellbinding stories jor all tbe family featuring 
’Little Boy Bach*. ’Papa Haydn's Surprise' 

' & The Witch’s Revenge' 
with Ann RachHn, story-teller. 
London Symphony Orchestra 

Ezra RachHn, conductor 

Adults £5.50. Children £330 IfcL 01-636 8891/628 8795 


B5i5gE 

i i 




Saturday 3 laxmaiy 7.45 pn 

MURRAY PERAHIA 

BERLIOZ Overture 'Beatrice and Benedict’ 

SCHUMANN- Piano Concerto 

SIBELIUS - Symphony No ,5 

SIR COLIN DAVIS 

Sponsored by Harris A&kaltmalGmep Limited 
Seal prices £1Z50, £10.50, £8 JO, £6J0, £5. £3 JO 
Bo* Office Td 10-8 ewry day Ik Sbo 01-6388891/6288795 


ROYAL ALBERT HALL SUNDAY 18 JANUARY as TJOjmh. 

Handel: MESSIAH 

A l a l c< rfin Sargent Festival Choir -800 voices 

md Guest QuurSonmifntn-Bnlznri 
EOD WEN HAKRHY SALLY BURGESS 
THOMAS EDMONDS STEPHEN ROBERTS 
WREN ORCHESTRA OF LONDON 
Conductor CHARLES FARNCOMBE 




CHARLIE GIRL 



tbrough m CaO ocaiMnb Ol 
2<to 7200 aahr 7 day 



nanuooH theatuc box or- 
ace oi 540 owe unm Feb 7th. 
London - * fax uull t ibmfljr 




Jtnany Tbompson, Lyn 




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Only a moral revolution can contain this scourge 

.*mri “stable 


I have delayed publicly expressing a view 
on the awesome menace of Aids now 
hanging like a monstrous medieval 
plague over mankind, despite pressures 
from within my community and beyond 
to make some authentic Jewish 
pronouncement This is due not merely 
to the feet that most authoritative Jewish 
statements on the moral issues were 
made thousands of years ago. 

The earliest sources of Jewish law and 
morality are quite unambiguous. The 
Bible brands homosexual relationships 
as a capita] offence (Lev. 20:13), and 
execrates any sexual licentiousness as an 
abomination, whether in the form of pre- 
marital “harlotry” (Deut 23:18) or of 
extra-marital adultery (Lev. 20:10). 
Equally stem are the warnings of 
national doom consequent on any 
defiance of these principles: the land 
itself will “vomit our peoples violating 
these injunctions (Lev. 1828-29). 

My hesitation in adding a Jewish voice 
to the many religious and moral state- 
ments already widely publicized, and 
worthy of endorsement, has been accen- 
tuated by the uncompromising nature of 
these biblical strictures. The difficulties 
go beyond the dilemma of choosing 
between soothing platitudes and un- 
palatable truths. 

I am still racked by doubts mi how to 
react to such a horrendous threat, how to 
address an age not exactly attuned to the 
puritan language of the Bible, how to 
transcend the perplexities which baffle 
medical and government experts, and 
how to present deeply held convictions 
without causing offence, panic; or dis- 
dain for the very teachings 1 espouse. 

There are questions to which I simply 
know of no categorical answers. Some 


are practical: is it right to advocate "safe 
sex”? Or, should all citizens be subjected 
to screening tests to identify carriers, and 
if so, how is this information to be used? 
Some questions are theological: can a 
rfispagft like this, patently rti«riininaft«g 
against certain sections of society, be 
attributed to divine wrath, or altogether 
be adjudged in moral terms? 

And some are purely human: how can 
one reassure without spreading com- 
placency, warn without condescension 
or self-righteousness, and highlight the 
horrific without inducing immunity to 
shock by honor? Altogether, are habits 
and behaviour susceptible to change by 
moral exhortation, by publicity cam- 
paigns, or even by medical information? 

Inscrutable as the answers may as yet 
be, and rudimentary as may be our 
understanding of the long-term effects of 
Aids and its spread, not to mention the 
prospects of halting its ravages, certain 
facts seem incontrovertible as a basis for 
some conclusions in the light of Jewish 
insights and moral principles. 

Both at the individual and the public 
level, we are certainly never entitled to 
declare a particular form of suffering as a 
punishment for a particular manifesta- 
tion of wrongdoing. We can no more 
divine why some people endure terrible ■ 
ills without any apparent cause than we 
can comprehend why others prosper 
though they dearly do not deserve their 
good fortune. 

Even less are we ever justified in being 
selective, subjecting some scourges to 
this moral analysis while exempting 
others (Aids, yes; but earthquakes or 
floods or droughts, no). There is no such 
simplistic relationship between evil and 
misfortune, if only because there are too 


Immanuel Jakobowits, the 
Chief Rabbi, discusses 

Aids and the deeper 

implications for society 



many exceptions. According to Jewish 
exegesis, the prophet Isaiah had his lips 
scorched because be sinned in saying, "I 
dwell in fee midst ofa people of unclean 
lips” (Is. 6:5-6). 


There is all fee difference — even if the 
distinction is a fine one — between 
ascribing massive suffering to personal 
or social dep r a vi t y as a divine visitation, 
and wanting feat such dep ra v ity may 
lead to terrible consequences. If I warn a 
child not to play with fire, and it ignores 
fee warning and gets burned, fee hurt is 
not a punishment but simply a con- 
sequence. If people recklessly indulge in 
infidelity and ora up in the agony of a 
broken marriage, they suffer no ven- 
geance; they simply pay the inevitable 
price for moral negligence or turpitude. 

Public information ft a m p arig ns should 
therefore be explicit and unequivocal: 
Aids is the price we pay for the “benefits” 
of the permissive society which, helped 
by the pifl, liberal legislation arid more 
“enlightened” attitudes, has demolished 
the lart defences of sexual res train t and 
self-discipline, leading to a collapse of 
nature’s self-defence against degeneracy. 


An even greater price in human misery 
than deaths from Aids is being paid for 


violating fee imperatives of sexual 
morality: fee devastation of fee family, 
with millions of casualties, especially 
among young people driven to nee and 
crime by fee absence of a loving home. 

The provision of condoms, condoning 
and facilitating sexual irresponsibility, is 
therefore hardly fee answer, even if they 
temporarily reduce tire transmission of 
Aids. They would only increase the 
ravages, of personal degradation and 
social disintegration. In any what 
has to be carefully weighed is individual 
safety against fee erosion of public 
standards. The principle is illnm mate d 
m a striking precedent — Jewish law and 
thought must invariably search for 
guidance in earlier sources. 

A leading 15tb-centnry Spanish-Jew- 
isfa scholar objected to fee establishment 
of facilities for communally controlled 
prostitution to keep licentiousness from 
running wiki — erven if th*< objection 
meant failing to prevent married part- 
ners from committing the capital offence 
of adultery (as implied m fee Ten 
romitiamintgrm Judaism makff$ no 
difference between killing a person and 
killing a marriage). He argued feat 
however culpable individual mdisciplme 
is, its mitigation cannot be sanctioned at 


the expense of the slightest public 
compromise with fee Divine Law. 

True, in Jewish law the saving of life 
overrides afl religions precepts. But even 
this pro-life stance has three cardinal 
exceptions; forbidden haisons, murder 
and idolatry are proscribed even at the 
cost oflife. This, too, would seem torule 
out recourse to any measures, such as 
rnnrinm« for unmarrieds, which would 
encourage indecent conduct, tho ugh fee 
rule mi ght be invoked to treat more 
leniently fee distribution of dean nee- 
dles fordrufrabuseis. 

No less important than dean needles 
are dean speech, dean thoughts and 
dean conduct- What will be crucial is the 
cultivation of new attitudes calculated to 
restore reverence for fee generation of 
life and the enjoyment of sexual plea- 
sures exdnsivdy within marriage. Noth- 
ing short of a moral revolution will in 
time contain the scourge: _ . 

The role of governments in achieving 
these objectives is admittedly limited. 
Morality cannot be legis taiftd . nor can 
jWmrwmg and civil servants become 
preachers. But the administrators of our 
natfnnal qffirfrs cannot remain morally* 
neutral either, when fee eventual cost 
may he counted in millions of lives. 

Governments help to re fine 

frirman behaviour — for instance, by 
opposing any legislation liable to weaken 
the bonds between husband and wife or 
parenis and children. Equally, govern- 
ments can, by the careful use of langua^ 

in official speech and documents, elimi- 
nate from the common vocabulary fee 
kind of euphemisms or misnomers feat 
make p e r vers io n s acceptable. I think of 
words like “gav” for homosexual, 
“heterosexual” for normal “safe sex” for 


charge of us all 

Every action to promote these ideals 
has now become a lifesaving operation — 

inrlnrtino savine marriages as fee sole 


has now become a uiesavmg operation — 
including saving marriages as fee sole 

le gitima te origin Of all human fife. 


► acceptable. I think of Kgmmaie ongm oi au numan wc. 
y” for homosexual. Sir Immanuel Jakobowits is the author of 
r normal, “safe sex” for Jewish Medical Ethics. 





system in which political corruption is now endemic 


Time for Parliament 


to clean up the great 
British gong show 


T wice a year a huge hand- 
out of titles and miscella- 
neous “gongs” occurs. 
The first of these for 
1987 will be next week, 
when fee New Year Honours list 
is published. It will contain, as 
usual, a few demotic touches— the 
odd figure from sport and the 
media — but these will merely 
distract attention from the list as a 
whole, which will be as archaic, 
confused, illogical and scandalous 
as ever. 

Honours are given in the name 
of fee Queen, and most of them 
are conferred by her personally at 
investitures. But the largest part of 
every honours list is drawn up 
under fee auspices of the prime 
minister, so providing a for- 
midable adjunct to the already 
vast patronage of fee office, which 
most of its holders do not hesitate 
to exploit. 


sible connections between 
honorands and the sources of 
party funds. 

Too much, however, should not 
be of the financial aspect, 
because far more serious is the 


being systematic The whole busi- 
ness has become a mess and 
drastic reform is needed for that 
reason alone, quite apart from the 
argument about political patron- 


political corruption inseparable 
bom having such an engine of 


Financial corruption is one 
notorious aspect of the system, 
which some rather naive people 
appear to think more or less began 
and ended wife Lloyd George It 
was, of course, flourishing long 
before his time — even in the 
heyday of Victorian rectitude — 
and certainly survived the hon- 
ours row in the last phase of his 
premiership. 

Stanley Baldwin, who posed as 
his moral superior, continued the 
practice in a more discreet and 
hypocritical fashion, and others 
have followed Baldwin’s example, 
though wife varying degrees of 
discretion. There can be tittle 
doubt feat the practice persists 
today, however artful the camou- 
flage, since it is hardly to be 
supposed that the political 
establishment has become more 
scrupulous while standards of 
financial probity have, in general, 
been declining. 

The Political Honours Scrutiny 
Committee has neither the will 
nor the resources to probe 
prospective honours lists with the 
thoroughness needed to trace pos- 


from having such an engine of 
patronage in fee hands of the 
prime minister. In an average 
honours list up to 20 per cent of 
knights bachelor are cited as 
receiving this high distinction for 
“political" or “political and 
public" services: that is, wholly or 
mainly for services to the party in 
power, and more especially to its 
leader. The recipients are 
backbench MPs, area chairmen, 
etc. A similar proportion ofCBEs, 
OBEs and MBEs is awarded to 
party activists, and the number of 
Tory organization women who 
have received fee rare honour of 
DBE is particularly striking. 

Under Labour, political hon- 
ours were for a time ostensibly 
dropped, but careful students of 
fee lists could see feat the dis- 
appearance of the citation 
“political” did not mean that 
honours were no longer being 
conferred for political reasons. 
Many were dearly attributable to 
no other suffident cause, what- 
ever the cosmetic citations. 

So long as any prime minister 
has such a power to reward those 
who toe the line, or who make sure 
that others toe it, it is asking too 
much of human nature to imagine 
that he or she will not use the 


power. 

Political work is not, of course, 
inherently dishonourable. On the 
contrary, it is vital to democracy, 
and as such deserves recognition 
along with other forms of meri- 
torious work. But the decision as 
to which politicians or political 
workers should be singled out for 
honours should not be left to the 
exclusive discretion of party lead- 
ers. 

Whatever else may be said 
about the way honours are now 
distributed, it shows little sign of 


A mong orders of chivalry 
the Bath (founded 
1725) and St Michael 
and St George (founded. 
1818) are relatively up- 
market below the Garter and 
Thistle, certainly, but wife a 
higher rating than the Order of tire 
British Empire (founded 1917). 
The Bath is divided into a military 
division, which is monopolized by 
senior officers in the armed forces, 
and a civil division, virtually 
monopolized by the admin- 
istrative civil service. 

The Order of St Michael and St 
George used to be bestowed upon 
diplomats and colonial servants,' 
but now, in the absence of the 
latter, goes to the former almost 
exclusively. Honorands failing to 
fall into any of these few privileged 
categories have to make do wife 
the Order of fee British Empire, 
and most of their names and 
bewilderingly abbreviated cita- 
tions are lost in the grey expanses 
of the CBE. OBE and MBE lists. 


Dream 


team 


To win the popls is to give up fee 
mundane details of existence (like 
work) and to start living the life of 
dreams. Paul Britton is a dreamer 
who has just won £200,000, and 
his greatest joy is that he will have 
all fee time in the world to give to 
football. To Mangotsfiekl United, 
to be precise. Britton is unpaid 
secretary of Mangotsfiekl, second 
to bottom of fee Premier division 
of the Great Mills League. Their, 
average gate is less than 300. 
Britton, who is 33 and unmarried, 
will give up his job as engineer 
with British Aerospace in the New 
Year. Bristol Rovers, the nearest 
league dub to Mangotsfiekl, were 
almost as quick on fee draw as 
Britton was, and made an ap- 
proach to him when they heard of 
his win. But they never had a 
chance. “I have decided to remain 
wife Mangotsfiekl, give up work 
and give more time to them. They 
ate a very friendly dub.” 


SPORTS 

DIARY 

Simon Barnes 


inspires fee horse to a classic win, 
there is a shdkhly bonus of £1,000 
for the namer. 


ual innings ever compiled entirely 
in boundaries wife ms 44 against 
Tasmania last week. Of particular 
interest is his legside “mad 
axeman” stroke. It involves a 
complicated scything, hammering 
movement, followed by his own 
crashing fall to the deck in the 
manner of a stricken oak. His 
Tasmanian devilry is not his first 
piece of im pr e ssiv e hitting: he 
once scored 52 in 22 balls for 
Western Province against Eastern 
Province in Cape Town. The 
innings included a seven-ball pe- 
riod in which he struck six sixes. 
Statisticians do not record how 
many times he fen over. 


Brass monkeys 10 000 not out? 

Tallrimr of fhmrand-niii'ri hand- U VI UUl. 


Name game 


It is important for a racehorse to 
have a good name. Northern 
Dancer, Nijinsky and Dancing 
Brave show across three victori- 
ous generations what a decent 
name can do. But when you own 
around 700 racehorses, you tend 
to run out of ideas. True, this is 
not a problem that curses every- 
one, but Sheikh Mohammed has 
found it a teaser. The owner of 
such horses as the nicely named 
Oh So Sharp has asked everyone 
involved with his racing empire to 
suggest names for his latest bunch 
of vearlines. And if the name, 


Talking of thousand-quid hand- 
outs, I am sure that anyone who 
receives such a bonus will in- 
stantly declare it to the tax man. 
The prosecution of Lester Piggott 
for alleged tax discrepancies has 
sent a chill wind blowing through 
racing ... a world in which cafe 
(the poor man’s credit card) still 
rules. Everyone in the game, from 
the mighty Lester down to the 
humblest stable-lad, knows foal 
gratitude is traditionally expressed 
m folding stuff They may call it, 
in their picturesque way, ponies 
and monkeys ana what-have-you, 
but it is still money so far as fee 
taxman is concerned. Now mur- 
murs run through racing that the 
tax boys are planning to dig their 
way through fee entire industry. 
There are fears feat they will be 
overturning a veritable wagon- 
load of monkeys. 


Sunil Gavaskar, fee Indian bats- 
man who makes Geoff Boycott 
look litre a dilettante; win soon 
pass the mightiest st ati stical mik- 


BARRY FANTONI 


Heart of oak 






John Emburey’s batting style is 
worthy of study, as he showed 
when scoring fee highest individ- 




As well as fee prime minister's 
list, which is always the largest 
ingredient, honours lists indude a 
few other categories. The Royal 
Navy, the Army and the RAF each 
has its own list of awards. There is 
a list labelled “Diplomatic Service 
and Overseas”, and various 
Commonwealth countries or terri- 
tories have their own lists. 

The lists also indude appoint- 
ments by the Queen in her own 
personal order, the Royal Vic- 
torian Order, though her patron- 
age additionally extends to our 
two most glamorous orders of 
chivalry, the Garter and the 
Hustle, and to our most pres- 
tigious award for talent and 
achievement, the Order of Merit 
These, however, are apparently 
considered too grand to appear in 
ran-of-the-mill honours lists. 







The limited and invidious use of 
the Orders of the Bath and of St 
Michael and St George seems 
totally out of date and quite 
unjustified. Should they not both 
be open to merit of all kinds? And 
why, incidentally, p reser v e tire 
division between dvil and mili- 
tary in the Order of the Bath? 

Should the Order of the British 
Empire have a future? It was 
created at a time when the British 
Empire was nearing its greatest 
extent. Should it not now follow 
fee Orders of the Indian Empire 
and the Star of India into limbo? 

It has always been anomalous in 
the sense feat most of the awards 
in it were from fee first for services 
ax hftme rathe r than in fee Empire. 
The case for phasing it out seems 
strong. The Bath and MG Orders 
could be expanded to fill the gap 
left by it Existing holders of the 
BE could be given equivalent 
grades in fee other orders, to 
hasten the EE’s demise. 

There are far too few top awards 
for women. The equivalent of a 
knig ht is a dame, bui in an average 
list there are several dozen knights 
but fewer than half a dozen dames. 
Moreover there is no female 
equivalent of the category 
“knights bachelor”. Dames have 
to be DBE, DCVO (in fee Royal 


feature of peerages feat they are 
partly recognition of merit (in the 
case of first creations) and partly 
appointment to the second cham- 
ber of Parliament. Among life 
peers the title is fee same whether 
conferred upon an eminent ser- 
vant of fee state at fee end of his 
career, or upon somebody still 
relatively active, wife fee osten- 
sible purpose of enabling him or 
her to make a contribution to the 
work of the second chamber. 


It seems quite absurd that there 
should not be separate categoriza- 
tion in the honours lists for areas 
of activity which, quite as much as 
the armed forces, arc manifestly 
important for example, fee pol- 
ice, education, health, literature 
and the arts, manufacturing in- 
dustry, voluntary work, entertain-, 
ment, sport, etc. Without such a 
breakdown the gross distortions 
and inequities of the present 
system are disguised from the 
public. 

How is it to be rationalized and 
reformed? The prime minister, 
cabinet secretary and Downing 
Street staff would obviously not 
have fee time to do the job; even if 
they felt the urge to do ft. It must, 
therefore, surely be entrusted to a 
high-powered . body with this 


responsibility alone. The appro- 
priate sort of body would seem to 
be a landing commission. 

Its membership would need to 
be such as to inspire foil public 
confidence. The commissioners 
should be people of exceptional 
distinction, proved integrity, and 
with varied interests; very well 
paid, of course, and ex officio 
appointed to fee Privy Council if 
not already members of iL All 


O -- ^ 

recommendations for honours, 
including those from the gov- 
ernment, should be sifted and 
assessed by the commission, and 
special efforts should be made to 
encourage ordinary members of 
fee public to write in wife 
nominations. 

Since fee volume of work would 
be large, and a good deal of careful 
research and checking would need 
to be- done, fee commission 
should have a substantial and 
skilled staff As well as considering 
riflimg mgHp on behalf of individ- 
uals for recognition, it should 
devote itself to improving the 
system as a whole. 

The range of its potential work 
may be indicated by a few 
suggested guidelines. Granted feat 
tiie present structure of the lists is 
plainly ridiculous, with a very few 
occupational groups shown sepa- 
rately while most of the honorands 
are lamped together, how should a 
reformed list be organized? How 
many, and which, addi t ional .cate-, 
gories should be brought into 
being, and what, roughly, should 
be the ration of honours for each? 
These should be the first questions 
considered. 

But there are plenty of others. 


Household) or — very rarely 
DCMG. There are no dames of t 


DCMG. There are no dames of the 
Bath. There is surely room for 
change here, more especially if 
DBE disappears along wife the 
order of which it is part 
One vexed point is that, when a 
man has a title, his wife shares it, 
but a wife’s title is not shared by 
her husband. The wife of a peer, 
baronet or knight becomes lady, 
but the husband of a peeress or 
dame does not become lord or sir. 
For that matter, the wife of a king 
becomes queen, but fee husband 
of a queen does not become king. 
In this one respect women have 
the advantage; but in the rules 
governing inheritance of titles 
they are heavily penalized. Primo- 
geniture operates with a pre- 
emptive bras in favour of male 
bens, and most titles cannot be 
inherited by women at alL 
Should there be hereditary hon- 
ours? The case for abolition is 
powerful, but there is a fair case to 
be made on the other side. What is 
indefensible is the present situa- 
tion, where the stale recognizes 
hereditary titles that derive from 
fee past, but is embarrassed about 
creating new ones. A dear de- 
cision should be taken on heredi- 
tary honours, one way or fee 
other. 

. It Iras always been an awkward 


T he honours commission 
should be asked to con- 
sider this problem and 
might well decide that 
the only solution would 
be for members of a reformed 
second chamber not to have titles 
as such, fan to retain their 
ordinary style (unless already a 
peer or peeress honoris causa). 
wife the letters LP (Lord of 
Parliament) after their names. The 
inheritance of seats in Parliament, 
and fee appointment of people to 
life peerages — with fee right to sit 
in Parliament for life — should in 
any case be abolished, but that is 
an issue of parliamentary reform 
rather than reform of the honours 
system. 

The Queen is theoretically the 
fountain of all honour, but die is 
also, in a real and practical sense, 
the fountain of a considerable 
number of honours, and fee extent 
of her personal honours patronage 
need not be regarded as sacro- 
sanct The Victorian Order should 
remain under her direct control, 
since it exists for no other purpose 
than to reward personal services to 
the sovereign. But there seems no 
good reason why fee Garter and 
Thistle should not be awarded on 
the honours commission’s advice, 
and so placed on fee same footing 
as fee other orders of chivalry. 

The OM'is a borderline case, 
but sine* it is conferred upon 
outstanding citizens of other 
Commonwealth countries besides 
Britain, fee head of the Common- 
wealth seems a suitable person to 
make fee choice. On the whole, 

selections for it have been good 

One of fee principal virtues of 
an honours system is that it 
provides a criterion of merit and 
prestige other than that of wealth. 
Without applying any kind of 
means test, fee commissioners 
should make sure that relatively 
underpaid but particularly deserv- 
ing individuals and groups receive 
at least their fair share of honours, 
and that fee highest honours do 
not appear — as now — to be 
largely reserved for fee highly 
paid 


stone in cricket history. His recent 
score of 176 against Sri Lanka has 
brought his aggregate of Test runs 
to 9,748 — mues ahead of Boycott, 
in second place with 8,148. It 
would take an act of God to stop 
him passing 10,000, with two 
more Tests against Sri Lanka soon 
to be followed by five more 
against Pakistan. 


Not quite a new epoch 


Taking stick 


One of fee things that puzzles 
many people about golf is why 
they cany all those ally sticks 
about. So, someone wondered, 
why not take just one? It is called 
fee Acma. Super-stick, is adjust- 
able and has a telescopic shaft It is 
a 1-9 iron: a standard wedge, sand 
iron, super wedge, overspin iron, 
loft putter, chipper and driving 
iron. It folds down to 2ft The only 
snag is that ft is illegal. George 
Wilson, secretary to the Im- 
plements and Ball Committee at 
the Royal and Ancient, said the 
design contravenes Rule 4-la: “All 
parts of fee club shall be fixed so 
that fee club is one unit. The club 
shall not be designed to be 
adjustable except for weight" So 
fee miracle dub can’t be used in 
competition. Ah, but a friendly 
round for the travefliug man — 


that’s the point, say the marketers. 
“You could use fee end of your 


umbrella for a friendly round,” 
says Wilson. “If they let you on the 
course." Yours for- £369. 


Green belt 


‘Learing Man United was a wrench, 
bat j fad to Play In E u r op e som ehow* 


A MORI poll has revealed the 
fascinating fact that two-thirds of 
fee population see televised 
snooker at least once a year. There 
is one major field for speculation 
here: how do fee remaining third 
manage to ajroid ft? 


Events in the Soviet Union over 
the past fortnight have called forth 
whoops of joy from correspon- 
dents who at last had something 
worth reporting. They have also - 
less forgrvably— bronghta similar 
reaction from sovietologists, who 
should know better. 

The received truth is that in 
mid-December 1986 the new 
Soviet leader, Mikhail Gor- 
bachov, won his liberal and 
reformist spurs. Singtehanded be 
freed Andrei Sakharov, sanc- 
tioned fee frank and open report- 
ing of nationalist riots in 
Kazakhstan, and courageously 
sealed the end of the Brezhnev era 
by approving an out-and-out 
condemnation of the former 
Soviet leader in Pravda, in the 
teeth of fearsome opposition from 
Politburo hardliners. Well, he did 
and he didn’t . 

The release of Sakharov is an 
event that justifiably inspires hope 
for the Soviet Union’s dissenters. 
The news has not exactly been 
splashed on the front pages of the 
Soviet newsp ap ers, but then that 
was never to be expected. 

The reporting of tho Alma-Ata 
disturbances is quite a different 
matter. The emphasis has been 
less on the fact of the unrest — 
unusual rhn ngfr that is — than OH 
the frankness and speed with 
which the rioting was reported in 
the Soviet Union. The reports 
were a little tardy (24 hours and 
more) and, yes, there were a few 
casualties that the Soviet versions 
did not mention, but in general it 
was a commendable effort. Wefl 
dope, Mr Gortw-hnv! 


Mary Dejevsky on 
how to interpret 
the Soviet news 


There is no doubt that for 
Moscow to report such an occur- 
rence is a considerable step in fee 
direction of more open reporting. 
However, that is all ft is. 


According to the official Soviet 
news agency Tass, “A group of 
students inched by nationalist 
elements ... took to the streets of 
Alma-Ata to e xp r e ss disapproval 
of the decisions of the recent 
plenum of the CP of Kazakhstan 
Central Committee. Hooligans, 
parasites and other anti-social 
persons resorted to unlawful ac- 
tions ... They set fire to a 
fbodshop and private cars and 
insulted townspeople ... All 
enterprises, institutions, shops, 
utilities and city transport are 
working normally.” This was fee 
dn gig account of fee violence. 
There were of course no reports 
from the burning streets of Alma- 
Ata. In Kazakhstan itself fee press 
said nothing about the rioting. 


Along wife wanting to give an 
impression of openness, fee Soviet 
leadership had a reason for 
establishing the existence of. dis- 
satisfaction in Kazakhstan. It 
n gfd«T to justify the u npop ular 
appointment of a new first sec- 
retary there. By depicting the 
rioters as parasites and hooligans, 
not a single taboo in- the Soviet 

cannn was breached. The view was 


established that strong rule from a 
good efemc Russian boss was 
needed if undesirable elements 
wwe not to gain the upper hand. 

Stmdar qualification must be 
applied to fee “epoch-making" 

Eft ™ 1011 ^ ^ late Leomd 
Brezhnev on the front page of 
^ on December 19. It%»2 
Stt’ thoroughgoing 

n Tj* 6”* described Leonid 

^ tlle second bis 

tortTmirw “ *f nerai secretaiy 
in the 1970s, when fee Soviet 

economy was making pnS^J 
Only mihethird J^on fcS 
years, did the article speak of fee 
stagnation he allowed todevd£>! 
the taxness in public life, and oth£ 

Soviet The 
**5 jP° ke of fee new 
raogy^needed in fee post-Brezh- 

“ced assessments of a 

was making com™!? ever 3™>e 
Nikita Kn.sbch?“*^?5L wit * 1 
ation of Stalin Tbi “: d ? lun p- 
^ade was precisely *° ^ 
between rtf 

condemnation, betwrS^u of 
shebev ad Gor&J^n;- 
fee 1950s and the iff ifc 611 
sadly, was ignored. 5Us ‘ ® ut ****** 


reiauo - ■ ^ demonstrates 


^Tfae Jewish experience demonstrates 
♦wPfn the final analysis only spiritual 

jVtThi« is oerhaps reflected m ooser- 
ISt S*. howe«r addicted to smoking. 
™dtaT*e Sabbath proHbmon agma 
liehtinfc a cigarette far more effective 
She moil I Oanning harfe M 
^securing complete abstention from 
smoking for one day in seven. 

They have also discovered feat a 
conscience so trained prevails evenin 
fee most intimate relations between 
husband and wife: fee religious ban on 
any physical contact for some I - days id 
every normal month, regularly _ re- 
juvenating the marriage through an non 
self-discipline, achieves more than fee 
most skilled marriage counsellor could 
in regulating the rhythm of Jove and 
longing. Natural urges can be bn died nj 
submission to a higher law. 

What is needed, then, is a massive 

fg m paign mobilizing government re- 
sources T* n| i citizens of all faiths and of 
none to strive for moral excellence, to 
avoid the arousal of passions in literature 
and entertainment, to extol fee virtues of 
fidelity, and to promote the utmost 
compassion for those struck by a hideous 
killer as a result of failings which may not 
be theirs but the society's into which they 
were born, and which to ennoble is the 
charge of us all. 










- N* 


Oil 


->■ Si 



THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


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I Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


THIS SPORTING LIFE 


While 

sporting 

Mansell 


1986 has had its 
heroes, like Nigel 
in motor racing, 
Lloyd Honeyghan in boxing, 
or the Australian Greg Nor- 
man in golf and the new 
American world heavyweight 
Mike Tyson, the sporting 
world in general and our 
comer of it in particular, 
should come under closer 
scrutiny next year. Team 
. games especially, all too often 
reflect such unappealing qual- 
ities as greed, mediocrity and 
the cynical spirit of the pro- 
fessional fouL 

It is increasingly difficult to 
claim, whether one is a parent, 
a headmaster or a member of 
the Sports Council, that sport 
offers us a laudable 
demonstration of how we 
should lead our lives. This is 
particularly unfortunate at a 
time when traditional educa- 
tionalists are striving to resist 
the sharp decline in team and 
competitive sports in stale 
schools brought about in def- 
erence to left-wing ideology. 

Cricket has not been without 
its crises in recent years, both 
on and off the field. Even 
Lord’s, headquarters of the 
game, has been faced by 
problems of public behaviour 
on the one side and the 
contemporary addiction to 
success on the other. It has just 
appointed an England team 
manager (after seven consec- 
utive defeats and unending 
fruitless tours) — and must feel 
encouraged by the better news 
from Australia. But the game’s 
administrators remain chroni- 
cally inhibited by their in- 
decision over die conflicts 
between traditional amateur 
principles and a wholly pro- 
fessional environment A feint 
nostalgia for English 
corinthianisin lingers still, 
fanned by the film Chariots of 
Fire, yet commercialism has 
re-written the rules and 
changed the boundaries. 

Rugby is in an even greater 
state of flux than is cricket ■ 
France exposed this year the 
continuing amateurishness of - 
England's game — best exem- 
plified by the selection of non- 
athietic forwards. This was 
further demonstrated by the 
notably athletic Australian 
side which benefited from the 
astute coaching of Alan Jones. 
But should one be wary of 
change? 

The International Rugby 


Board has lurched guiltily 
towards the professionalism 
which cannot be fended off for 
much longer. More honestly, 
international tennis, en- 
couraged by British repre- 
sentatives — even if Britain has 
no top quality players — has 
been pressing the International 
Olympic Committee to accept 
and rationalize the inevitable: 
open professional Olympics. 

It is sad that amateurism 
should be everywhere so be- 
leaguered. But if the pressures 
towards professionalism are 
genuinely irresistible, then 
they should be surrendered to 
openly and cleanly rather than 
surreptitiously — by degree. 
Tennis tong ago recognized 
that It is no good Twick- 
enham pretending inter- 
national rugby is some thing 
which it is not. This merely 
retards the development of the 
standard of play without 
retaining the real moral advan- 
tages of genuine amateurism. 

Much more alarming in 
Britain however is the un- 
checked growth of thuggery: a 
situation epitomized by tire 
scorn occasionally poured on 
referees when they try to stand 
up to it, and by the civil 
prosecution of David Bishop, 
resulting in a suspended prison 
sentence. Mr Bishop has too 
many in-house defenders for 
rugby’s comfort Indeed, an 
instinctive defence of mis- 
creants in sport is widespread- 
There is an unfortunate ten- 
dency to assume that if the 
sporting offender is good 
enough, an excuse should 
somehow be found for him. 

English football finds itself 
in a multiplicity, of quandaries: 
how to control hooligans, how 
to return legitimately to Euro- 
pean club competition, 
whether to restrict artificial 
pitches in the League, and how 
to restrict the surge of our best 
players towards lucrative over- 
seas contracts. The Football 
League has myopically re- 
jected Mrs Thatchers demand 
to control travelling support- 
ers with the help of identity 
cards. The Football Associ- 
ation is, as ever, equally 
hesitant. Fifteen years after 
Leeds were permitted to estab- 
lish new depths of unsporting 
behaviour, that dub’s support- 
ers are uncontrollable. Yet 
when the police banned them 
from an FA Cup-tie at Telford, 
the FA touted the match 


around to alternative grounds 
instead of enforcing the simple 
solution: disqualify Leeds 
from the Cup. 

In the World Cup in Mex- 
ico, England’s manager 
moaned about an illegal goal 
by Argentina, thereby 
camouflaging the modest qua] 
ity of his own team. Yet it was 
a further cause for sadness that 
Maradona’s handled goal was 
not uniquely unfair it was the 
face of contemporary football. 

Expediency rules, and no- 
where more than in boxing. 
Mike Tyson is possibly the 
hardest, most frightening 
puncher in the history of the 
sport Commercial British in- 
terests are concocting an argu- 
ment for putting into the same 
ring next year pleasant Frank 
Bruno, who has a retina defect 
corrected by surgery and was 
comprehensively defeated by 
Tim Witherspoon, who him- 
self has since been obliterated. 
The progenitors of this plan 
should be required to think 
again before proceeding with 
what looks alarmingly like a 
mis- match. 

Purity in sport tends to lie 
nowadays with the tone rang- 
ers of individual disciplines: 
Steve Redgrave in rowing, 
Jeremy West in canoeing, the 
Blacks, Crams and Coes of 
athletics, competitors whose 
international achievements 
are initially self-motivated and 
unfinanced. The rewards in 
team games are too often 
destructively dispropor- 
tionate. How can the good, 
honest professional in football, 
of whom there are still many, 
justify a situation in which 
Lawrie McMenemy is paid 
£166,000 a year as manager of 
a struggling second division 
club at Sunderland? 

Such rewards reflect the 
unrealistic and distorted val- 
ues which infect too much 
national and international 
sport today. Too many in top 
sport take more than they give. 
At best they are inspired by a 
spirit of commercial 
showmanship, at worst by 
unqualified self-interest. Sport 
was once a refuge from such 
values, but it can no longer be 
held up as an alternative 
model of the way we should 
live our lives. We look to it for 
good examples of social behav- 
iour which might influence our 
rising generation, but too often 
find only bad ones. 


FOURTH LEADER 


The art world is agog at the 
news that a computer has 
revealed, at any rate to the 
satisfaction of its programmer, 
that the two great mysteries of 
the Mona Lisa (the identity of 
the sitter and the meaning of 
the enigmatic smile) have 
yielded to science: the subject 
was Leonardo himself, dressed 
in women’s attire, and the 
smile on his face doubtless 
indicated his satisfaction at the 
great trick he was about to play 
on the world. 

The discovery gives an en- 
tirely new meaning to the term 
“drag-artist”; but that is by the 
way. We have to ask, as we 
seem to be asking more and 
more these days: where will it 
end? 

Any minute now there will 
be evidence that when Galileo 
dropped the stones off the 
Leaning Tower of Pisa he was 
giving an exhibition of jug- 
gling, and dropped them by 
accident After that the song 
the sirens sang (which reminds 
us that Achilles hid himself 
among women — who was he 


pretending to be?) wiH not only 
be identified but climb to top 
of the pops. Then someone 
else will cause pi to recur, and 
eventually the crew of the 
Mary Celeste will turn up and 
say mat they had only popped 
out for five minutes and didn’t 
realise bow the time was going 
by. Finally, another computer 
will discover that Shakespeare 
wrote the works of Bacon. 

Leave us our mysteries; we 
have few enough remaining, 
after all. What good will it do 
us, when we next visit the 
Louvre, to start peering at the 
Mona Lisa to see whether she 
needs a shave? Or imagine the 
feelings of Captain Boyle if, 
when he murmurs “what is the 
stars, what is the stars?”, some 
interfering busybody tells him. 
And indeed, though we de- 
voutly believe that there is a 
crock of gold at the end of the 
rainbow, we shall not risk 
disillusion by going there to 
check up. 

“Happy the man who has 
found out the cause of things” 
sang Virgil; it serves him right 


that the line is now the motto 
of the London School of 
Economics, where some would 
say that over the years they 
have found out more than is 
good for them, or for us either. 

As for the four great riddles of 
the Book of Proverbs, they 
have, of course, long been 
solved; the way of an eagle in 
the air and of a serpent on a 
rock are analysed in detail by 
Sir David Attenborough; the 
way of a ship in the midst of 
the sea is no mystery to the 
contestants in the America’s 
Cup; and when it comes to the 
way of a man with a maid, 
there are plenty of mail-order 
booksellers who will, for a 
modest sum, send an explic- 
itly-illustrated solution of the 
problem, under plain cover, to 
anyone over 18. And now it is 
the turn of the Mona Lisa to 
give up her — or we suppose it 
must now be his — secrets. 

Who fished the murex up, 
asked Browning; what por- 
ridge bad John Keats? We 
don’t wish to know that 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Planning to more effective purpose 


Judging evil 

From Mr A. V. C. Schmidt 
Sir, My friend Wilfred 
Beckerman’s argument that we 
should condemn only acts and not 
people as “bad” rests on the 
proposition that we are not free 
moral agents because we are 
environmentally or genetically 
determined in what we do (“in- 
finitely variable robots”). 

But is it true that I am “a slave 
lo what is inside” because I am 
influenced by hereditary factors 
and by people and events around 
me? I do not see that I am not free 
because I am not perfectly free, 
any more than Tam blind when 
driv ing on a road with limited 
conditions of visibility, or en- 
slaved in weighing up the plea- 
sures of tobacco against the pains 
of catarrh when deciding whether 
or not to smoke my pipe. 

My “freedom" is undoubtedly 
restricted, because I am a being 
interacting with an outside and (I 
WOUld mai ntain agains t Dr 
Beckermanj an inside world (my 
memories, desires, feelings) which 
is yet distinct from my choosing 


assumption, by a deep-seated 
unconscious need to fed totally 
independent) but in the reasoning 
that informs and underlies my 
judgement that 1 shall make this 
choice rather than that. 

The conclusion that I would 
uphold is that we ore right lo judge 
persons as well as acts as “bad”, 
though with the important 
qualification that the knowledge 
on which we base our judgement is 
necessarily limited, sometimes 
very limited, and with the no less 
important rider that we ourselves 
might well, under certain con- 
ditions, perform acts that we 
would judge intolerably bad. 
Yours faithfully. 

A. V. C. SCHMIDT. 

Baliiol College, Oxford. 

December 17. 

Industry and pupils 

from Mr John Tomlinson 
Sir Mr Robin Pittman, Head 
Master, St Peter’s School, York 
(December 17X chides mdustty 

'for neglecting to keep in touch 
with schools about the careers 
opportunities on offer. May I 


SdSTselcTt ZsiZTnol out. hoover, that fa to 

primarily > my choice as such. eng.o«nng ^ suffer 


considered as a pure act of will 
(which could itself be 
“determined”, on Dr Beckerman’s 


this very purpose. 

One way to impart a two-way 


flow of knowledge which we have 
used in the past is to organise joint 
conferences for head teachers and 
industrialists as a starting point 
for practical initiatives. The En- 
gineering Careers Information ~ 
Service plans to ran a number of 
such events in 1987 and it may be 
that one venue should be York* 
Yours faithfully, 

JOHN TOMLINSON, Head, 
Engineering Careers Information 
Service, 

54 Clarendon Road, 

Watford, Hertfordshire. 

December 17. 

Lick and promise 

From Professor H. H. Huxley 
Sir, Readers of Sir Francis Avery 
Jones's admirable letter (Decem- 
ber 20} on the healing powers of 
saliva may have been reminded, 
as I was, of Christ's successful 
treatment of die deaf and dumb 
man beside the Sea of Galilee 
(Mark vii .33) and of the blind 
nan a! Befosaida (Mark viii.23). 
Even the imperial spittle ofVespa- 
sian, if we trust Tadtu$ (Histories 
iv.Sl), achieved remarkable re- 
sults. 

Yours sincerely, 

H.H. HUXLEY. 

12 Derwent Close, Cambridge. 
December 22. 


From Sir Peter Lazarus 
Sir. As a recently retired perma- 
nent secretary of the Department 
of Transport, I am continually 
told by my friends that I and my 
colleagues were culpable because 
we always failed to provide suf- 
ficient transport infrastructure 
(particularly roads and airports) 
and that was usually late. 1 agree. 

The main reason was the overall 
planning system, which takes 
much too long and which de- 
mands a degree of certainty about 
estimated demand which means 
that, faced with local objections, 
we played safe by underestimating 
what was really needed. 

I therefore write to urge that Mr 
Geoffrey Rippon’s proposals in 
his article ofDecember 22. which I 
wholly support, ought also to 
cover transport. 

I suggest that the first step 
should be for Parliament to ap- 
prove the notional strategy. In- 
quiries about particular roads or 
airports should then with the 
local issues but only those. Other- 
wise we shall just go on hampering 
industrial success by denying to 
users the transport infrastructure 
they need and have — at least for 
roads - already paid fin*. 

Yours faithfully, 

PETER LAZARUS, 

The Athenaeum, 

Pall Mall,SWl. 

December 22. 

From Mr Theo Burrell 

Sir, Geoffrey Rippon in his article 

is right about the problem of 


planning delay. Cause is another 
matter 

As one who had the job of 
preparing a structure plan, I know 
that both delay and obscurity of 
content can come as much from 
central government as from local 
government. It was perhaps 
significant that in the case of the 
structure plan for the Peak District 
National Park there were far more 
objections to the minister’s 
modifications than to the original 
plan. 

As for the time public inquiries 
take, why not set a time limit on 
the length of presentations? This 
was done in the case of our 
structure plan and the examina- 
tion in public of the Peak’s 
original document took only three 
days. 

The plan for planning should 
not as suggested be laid down by 
annual national edict. 
Centralisation has gone far 
enough. The need is for fore- 
thought, boldly and clearly con- 
ceived and imaginatively 
implemented. We need not more 
edict, but less; not an annual 
m ake shift, but a return to long- 
term vision and local government 
enterprise. 

Yours faithfuly, 

THEO BURRELL (Former 
National Park Officer, Peak Park 
Joint Planning Board), 

Coombs Lea, 

Trinkey Lane, 

Stoney Middleton, 

via Sheffield, South Yorkshire. 

December 22. 


Cost of tension in family life 


From the Principal the National 
Children's Home 

Sir, Digby Anderson's article 
(December 10) on the recently 
published divorce figures for 1985 
criticises the advocates of “easy, 
simple, cheap, and pleasant 
divorce”. Anyone who has experi- 
enced divorce, or who works with 
the adults or children concerned, 
knows that divorce is very rarely 
any of these. 

Marita] breakdown is not 
caused by “easy” divorce; changes 
in the divorce laws have, if 
anything, been a response to 
increased marital breakdown in an 
effort to minimise the pain and 
misery involved in the families 
concerned. But a far more coher- 
ent response is vital if real action 
is to be «?Vgn to tackle the rising 
tide of family breakdown. 

The single most important 
innovation would be nationwide 
reconciliati on and, conciliation 
services, attached to courts and 
independently run by voluntary 
organisations. In those areas 
where .such services do exist a 
considerable proportion of those 
contemplating divorce change 
their intention after entering into 
reconciliation procedures. For 
those who pursue divorce 
proceedings, conciliation proce- 
dures enable more amicable 
arrangements to be made concern- 
ing custody and access of children. 
Funding such a nationwide ser- 
vice would cost a fraction of the 
present financial and social costs 
of divorce. 

The speedy introduction of 
family courts in this country is 
equally important The present 
adversarial style of proceedings is 
totally nnsuited to family matters 
and often results in increased 
bitterness between parents, to foe 
great detriment of the children 
involved. 

More generally, but in foe long 


term more pervasively, continu- 
ing high levels of long-term un- 
employment amongst those with 
children is far more destructive to 
family fife than foe easy- or 
otherwise of divorce laws. The 
1,250,000 children living in fam- 
ilies where foe chief wage earner is 
unemployed are seriously affected 
by the inevitable loss of self- 
esteem and rising tensions in 
family life which long-term un- 
employment engenders. 

Let us not put the blame on 
legislative arrangements when the 
true causes and important rem- 
edies lie elsewhere. 

Yours sincerely, 

MICHAEL NEWMAN, Principal, 
National Children’s Home, 

85 Highbury Park, N5. 

From the Reverend D. J. Breckneil 
Sir, Mr Digby Anderson draws 
attention to the suffering iff chil- 
dren caused by the divorce of their 
parents and criticises the increas- 
ing ease with which divorce can be 
obtained. 

Would it also be useful to 
question the ease with which 
marriage can be contracted, es- 
pecially between partners still in 
their teens? Statistics indicate that 
a marriage between young people 
is more likely to end in divorce 
than one between those who 
marry later. 

• One simple reform would be to 
return the age of majority once 
again to 21. Then those who wish 
to many undo* that age would 
require the written consent of 
parent or guardian before their 
marriage could take place. This 
would remind them and os that 
marriage is not a private contract, 
but of concern to foe family and to 
society as a whole. 

Yours faithfully, 

D. J. BRECKNELL, 

Saint George's Rectory, 

Whyte Road, 

Chichester, West Sussex. 


Short of a name 

From Mr Basil Boothroyd 
Sir, The acronym is. the darling of 
our age. One wonders how, com- 
ssed into their unpronounce- 
able initials, such backward bodies 
as foe British Kjnematograph 
Sound and Television Society 
(BESTS) or foe Cambridge 
University Rugby Union Football 
Qub (CURLTFC) get into a 
conversation, let alone a headline. 

How many takers would there 
have been for the State gambling 
machine, trotted out ai its full 
length of Electronic Random 
Number Indicator Equipment? 

Your leader (December 13) on 
foe new nationwide computer 
installation for the police, reveals 
an ingenious touch of official 
whimsy. The thing is apparently 
called Holmes, for Home Office 
Large Major Enquiry System. -No 
news yet of any back-up from 
Watson (Wits Against Terrific 
Spate of Nefariousness). 

It could be needed. Moriarty, or 
Malefactors Operating Ruthlessly 
in Arson, Rape, Theft and You 
Name-It, still lives. 

Sincerely, 

BASIL BOOTHROYD, 

Peelers. 

Church Street, 

CuckfieM, Sussex. 

December 13. 


Aids as moral issue 

From the Chairman of Islington 

Health Authority 

Sir. The Government and local 

health authorities are now moving 

to combat the spread of Aids in 

Britain. 

My own authority recognized 
foe early warning signs of Aids and 
directed resources towards the 
appointment of an adviser who 
has the responsibility for alerting 
local schools, educational 
establishments and factories. 

It is all foe more distressing that 
the Bishop of Birmingham, the 
Right Reverend Hugh 
Montefiore, found it necessary to 
say (report, December 16) that the 
Church of England is “advocating 
chastity, not because we are 
moralising, but for practical 
prevention”. 

In public life we are all m the 
business of prevention, but should 
not the Church go further and 
advocate chastity both for reasons 
of “practical prevention” of Aids 
and to protect the sanctity of foe 
family? Moralising is a 
responsibility spiritual leaders 
should not avoid. 

Yours faithfully, 

ERIC MOONMAN, Chairman, 
Islington Health Authority, 
Whittington Hospital, 

Highgate Hill, N19. 


Strains on the 
older surgeon 


From Mr R. 
others 


C. Shepherd and 


Sir. The recent publicity surround- 
ing foe General Medical Council’s 
reprimand of Mr Weale. a consul- 
tant surgeon, who failed to pro- 
vide adequate care for a patient 
with a ruptured abdominal an- 
eurysm (reports, November 20, 
21; leading article, November 27; 
letters, December 1 2) draws atten- 
tion to an underlying problem that 
is really at foe root of foe matter. 

In 1984, over 7,000 people in 
the United Kingdom died from 
aortic aneurysms and nearly ah of 
these would have been ruptured 
aneurysms, demanding a 
competant trained vascular sur- 
geon at the operating table. For a 
surgeon under 50 it is a challenge, 
from 50-60 it is a long and stressful 
operation, but over 60 it becomes 
an increasingly heavy burden. 

As four of foe eariiest, and 
therefore foe oldest, surgeons 
appointed to a district general 
hospital with an interest in periph- 
eral vascular surgery, we are 
concerned for our colleagues and 
ourselves, who without the benefit 
of a senior registrar and often on a 
rota of 1:2, or 1:1 for vascular 
surgery, (quite apart from 1:3 or 
1:4 on general surgical caD), are 
expected to continue this until 
retirement age, (65 if you reach it 
unscathed), or leave early. 

There is no “half-way house” of 
being allowed to shed foe feeling 
of always being on-call and being 
expected to answer it at any time, 
even on Christmas Day; nor is 
there any recognition of what at 
present is foe considerable dif- 
ference in emergency input be- 
tween the “general” and foe 
“vascular/generaT surgeon. 

The possible solutions must 
await the future; perhaps the 
promised but never achieved 
consultant expansion will occur. 
Perhaps peripheral vascular sur- 
gery will become a separate spe- 
cialty, but dearly only if 
adequately staffed. Vascular sur- 
gery is still regarded as a part of 
general surgery, but should it 
continue to be so? 

In our opinion, the recent sad 
event shows that it is time that this 
problem of the older, and we 
admit it, ageing surgeon, is tackled 
by those still young enough to do 
so before the same fate overtakes 
them and a worse fate overtakes 
their patients. 

Yours faithfully, 

R. C SHEPHERD (Poole General 
Hospital), 

C. M. VICKERY (Royal Cornwall 
Hospital), 

R. G. ROTHNIE (Royal 
Berkshire Hospital), 

J. FAIR GRIEVE (Cheltenham 
General Hospital), 

Poole General Hospital, 

Longfleet Road, Poole, Dorset 

In Christ’s name 

From the General Secretary of the 
British Council of Churches 
Sr, It is regrettable that your 
correspondent Jessica Douglas 
Home, (December 19) should seek 
to use a document discussed but 
not accepted by the British Coun- 
cil of Churches to establish its 
attitude to those imprisoned for 
consciences' sake in foe Soviet 
Union. 

A better indication is to be 
found in foe action of foe BCC 
delegation to foe USSR earlier this 
year, led by the Archbishop of 
York and the President of foe 
Baptist Union, which raised this 
issue of prisoners of conscience 
both with various church leaders 
and with the officers of foe state 
committee for religious affairs. 
One person for whom representa- 
tions were made was Irina 
Ratushinskaya who happily ar- 
rived in this country fin- medical 
treatment last night. 

This represents the consistent 
stand taken try the BCC for foe full 
implementation of human rights 
in foe Soviet Union as in every 
other country. 

Yours faithfully, 

PHILIP MORGAN, 

General Secretary, 

British Council of Churches, 

2 Eaton Gate, SW1. 

December 19. 

Hitman face of law 

From Mr John Bate-Williams and 
Mr Ian Ashford-Thom 
Sir, For those of ns with receding 
hairlines, a horsehair wig provides 
warmth and comfort in court. If 
foe Lord Chancellor decides to 
adopt Mr Ludovic Kennedy’s 
suggestion (December 22) that 
wigs should be abandoned, may 
we one final plea? May we 
wear them until the spring? 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN BATE-WILLIAMS, 

IAN ASHFORD-THOM, 

1 Temple Gardens, Temple, EC4. 


-) 


Aircraft noise 

From the Director-General of the 
Air Transport Users Committee 

Sir, Your Air Correspondent’s 
article, “Whispering through foe 
ground barrier” (Spectrum, 
December 18), discusses the bal- 
ance between environmentalists’ 
understandable dislike of all air- 
craft noise and what should be* 
done in foe way of phasing out 
older and noisier aircraft together 
with what, if any, restrictions 
should apply to newer and quieter 
aircraft. 

The huge aviation industry in 
this country is vital and desirable 
to all of us. Vital to business men 
wishing to export vital to overseas 
industrialists wishing to invest 
here and create employment de- 
sirable as a simple and fast way of 
travelling long distances for lei- 
sure purposes. The hardware of its 
activities — airports and aircraft — 
arc vastly expensive and efficient 

V 


use of these assets is necessary if 
costs are to be contained and 
therefore the expense of flying 
kept economically possible for 
business men and the holiday- 
maker alike. 

For the entire industry to be 
closed down for one third of each 
24-hour day is quite simply not 
affordable by this country, nec- 
essarily having to operate in an 
ever more unified (in business and 
aviation terms) world scene. 

No one is suggesting that air- 
craft noise which at night is 

offensive should be other than 
regulated. But to the extent that 
enormous sums of money have 
been spent to lessen the adverse 
impact of noise (spent not only on 
qinetening aircraft engines but 
also on foe dwellings over which 
they fly) then it is fundamentally 
unreasonable and disadvanta- 
geous for foe country at large foal 
all the consequent environmental 
gain should accrue only to the 


people who five in the noise 
footprint areas dose to airports. 

It is an emotional appeal by a 
small minority to say “it would be 
sick logic to use the improvement 
chat has taken place as a reason for 
increasing foe number of night 
flights”. 

It is a great misfortune that an 
offended environmentalist is an 
instant voter against the decision- 
maker, whereas long-term strate- 
gic decisions affecting airports and 
aircraft that use them are slow to 
attract voting support One can 
only hope that Ministers respon- 
sible will not be found wanting 
and so mate decisions that will 
result in future noise reduction 
bong at the very least shared by 
those benefiting from it and the 
users and operators of aircraft and 
airports. 

Yours faithfully, 

RICHARD P BOTWOOD, 
Director-General, 

Air Transport Users Committee, 
129 Kingsway, WC2. 


ON THIS DAY 


DECEMBER 27 1854 

The Surrey Theatre in Blachfriars 
Road, London, had a chequered 
career. It started as a riding school 
in the 28th century, which 
explains its capacity to house a 
vast audience. In 1782 it opened 
as a circus, and subsequently 
staged opera, ballet and plays. 
Under Shepherd and his 
successor it aaptired a reputation 
for rough-and-tumble melodrama 
and fine pantomime. Before 
finally becoming derelict it was a 
cinema in the 1920s 


CHRIS TMAS PANTO MIMES 
THE SURREY 

A visitor to the Surrey on 
Boxing-night has the advantage of 
a duplicate interest— in those who 
come to see, and those who come to 
be seen. It would be delusive to 
suppose that the actors are heard, 
and as delusive to imagine that the 
three or four thousand people, 
wedged together in the densest 
possible masses, are only seen. The 
management, therefore, with a true 
appreciation of the prevailing 
taste, usually serves up some stock 
piece (concerning which the most 
i nfinitesimal curiosity is never 
exhibited), to induce an evapora- 
tion of the more noisy excitement, 
and to prepare with comparative 
decorum for the grand attraction of 
the evening, the Christmas panto- 
mime. A custom so convenient was 
duly observed last night, when, as 
the bills declare, foe favourite 
drama of 77ie Foundling of die 
Forest was presented; but no one, 
unacquainted with the merits of ao 
sounding and dramatic a title, was 
fifcdy to score it as a favourite in 
his or her recollection. There was 
an insuperable difficulty to the 
appreciation of the piece, for 
thoug h several gentlemen, dressed 

~m rli n/TTra mnVp) y nn VlnmlM : 3 

rawww iT Brt tannin ue , an f—nni, 
non -descript officer, a full- 
phrnied villain, and Po kudus, were 
most vehement in action and 
energetic in speech, the times of a 
sweltering pit, not yet into 

tranquility, were far too vehement, 
and energetic to p er mit of many 
consecutive sentences reaching any 
of the audience. Of course, it is a 
complizxtent to rtM thm pn audi- 
ence; at any rate, so prematurely. 
The action waa intelligible enough- 
There was the venerable viHam. 
whom the oldest playgoer knew in 
his youth, and the persecuted hero 
of doubtful paternity, and the 
protecting female of uncertain age. 
The hairbreadth ’scapes and des- 
perate hand-to-hand encounters 
were not omitted, and somehow 
virtue triumphed at last. It seemed 
to be a considerable relief when 
virtue did triumph. Gentlemen in 
the pit resumed their waistcoats 
and coots, and betook themselves 
to the replenishing of flat bottles 
and the reckless purchasing of 
oranges for their fair and wans 
co mp a ni ons. Knots of oppressed 
individuals ma d e a gasp for relief j 
by standing on the benches, and 
here and there, constantly recur- 
ring, yet never seeming to lead to 
any disagreeable consequences, 
were pugilistic m a t c hes , worthy in 
scientific display, of the wannest 
admirers of Savflle-house. Indies 
disencumbered themselves of their 
bonnets, and screamed lustily 
when stout men were passed over 
their heads re thrown unreservedly 
upon them. The demands for 
“porter” and “order”, were about 
equal, though the former only was 
laudably attended to by a persever- 
ing potboy of compressible quali- 
ties. When the orchestra had been 
assisted through the overture by 
the shrillest of whistling of the 
chorus” to “VfllUrins and his 
Dinah”, a complete change as if by 
magic, more potential than harle- 
quins, came over the spectators. 
They sat themselves in regular 
layers, instead of contused heaps, 
and positively observed a modified 


silence. It was dear they had come 
to see the pantomime, and consid- 
ered all preceding matters purely 
prefatory if not ingenious inven- 
tions to postpone their pleasures 
that it might come upon them with 
keener rest Suddenly there was a 
quiet well-conducted audience, 
mad wefl were they rewarded by a 
most gorgeous and patriotic panto- 
mime, under the title of 'Harle- 
quin and Little-One Eye, Little- 
Two Eyes, and Little-Three Eyes; 
or Beasts and Beauties. Mr. Shep- 
herd has transformed Brother 
Grimm's Household Story into an 
excruciating funny representation 
of the person and fate of the Czar. 
King Uraaworaagrowialouda was 
not to be mistaken, even before 
abandoning the bear’s head and 


assum ing those speaking musta- 
chios and expressive boots. 

. . . And as for gargeonsnees of 
scenery, nothing at the Surrey has 
ever exceeded the satin boudoir of! 
foe I sla n d Queen and foe Regal 
Palace of Beauty, where the trans- 
formation is effected. Then, in- 
deed, the enthusiasm of applause 
reacted its cKmax, and seemed 
scarcely satisfied with foe entrees 
and acknowledgements of Mr. 
Shepherd. It would be imHnd to 
remove an atom of the charm and 
novelty, which by a judicious 
sile nc e, may for some time Test on 
all the quips and cranks, tte fun 
and fancy attending the revels 
which succeed — It is scarcely 
necessary to add that there was a 
dazzling denotement at last, and. 
[if it came late, it still seemed to 
come too soon for many of the 
delighted and vociferous 
spectators. 


Slightly off 

From Dr V. P. Geoghegan 
Sir, Many of us in mature middle 
age have become accustomed t 
being termed wrinklies o 
crumblres. We arc even amused a 
being “in injury time”. I don 
however care for my family' 
latest term, “well past his seU-fr 
date.” It has a ter minal ring to it 
Yours faithfully, 

V. P. GEOGHEGAN, 

3 Somerstown. 

Chichester, West Sussex. 
December 4. 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1 986 



Chad Varah 


Heaven and hell on earth ? 


OBITUARY 

SIR RICHARD WOOLLEN 

Major astronomer who jibbed at space tra\ ei 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


WINDSOR CASTLE 
December 26: The Queen was 
represented by Mr Nod Jones 
(Charge d’Aflaircs at Ulan Ba- 
tor! at the Funeral of His 
Excellency Mr Jamba) yn Banzar 
(Ambassador of the Mongolian 
People’s Republic to the Court 
of St James's) which was held m 
Ulan Bator today. 


George Brush is my name, 
America's my nation, 
Luddington’s my dwelling place 
And Heaven s my destination. 


The last line of this jingle from the 
flyleaves of innumerable school books 
in the mid-West gave Thornton Wilder 
the title of his fhnniest novel, and in The 
Bridge of San Luis Rey he explored the 
same subject as the old film. Friday the 
13th, namely, are accidents accidental, 
or does the providence of God deter- 
mine who dies and how and when? 


Is there greater bliss than the best of 
earthly bliss, if this were unalloyed and 
enduring? 

We pray? Thy Kingdom come on 
earth as it is in Heaven. “0 God that 
madest this beautiful earth", cried 
Shaw’s St Joan, "when will it be ready to 
receive thy saints? How long. 0 Lord, 
how long?" 

As for hell, we have only to open this 
or any newspaper to know how hellish it 
is, here on earth - man made, by those 
with no fear of God before their eyes, i 


Birthdays 

TODAY: Sir Gordon Bnrnton. 
65:. Miss Marlene Dietrich, 82; 
Professor Brian Griffiths, 45; 
Air Chief Marshal Sir Derek 
Hodgkin son, 69; the Earl of 

Inchcape, 69; Sir William Kil- 
patrick, 80; Miss Pat Moss, 52; 
Dr J. N. L Myres. 84: Professor 
D. H. North cole. 65: Sir An- 
thony Plowman, 81; Professor 
B. R. Rees, 67; Sir Norman 
Reid. 71; Sir Jeffrey Sterling, 52; 
Miss Janet Street-Poner, 40; 

Brigadier Dame Mary Tyrwhitt, 
83. 


If heaven, or hell, is my destination, 
what and where is it, and how long am I 
given to reach it? The Church of 
England gives no precise teaching on 
this point It does emphasize that the 
Christian does not merely believe in the 
immortality of the soul but looks for the 
resurrection of the body, but fails to 
specify the manner of this. It is explicit 
only in teaching that it is not a matter of 
"dem dry bones" coming together in a 
misunderstanding of Ezekiel's sym- 
bolism. 


TOMORROW: Sir Henry 
Bland, 77; Mr W. A. Camps. 76; 
Mr H. D. B. Carr, 60; Sir 
Andrew Maitland-Makgill- 
Crichton, 76: Sir Bayard Dill, 
81 ; MrT. W. Gould, VC, 72; Mr , 
Max Hastings, 41; Mr Roy j 
Hatiersley, MP, 54: Mr Max 
Jaffa. 75; Lieutenant-General : 
Sir George Lea, 74; Lord Justice 
O’Connor, 72; Mr Simon 1 
Raven, 59; Professor E. J. 
Richards, 72; Lord Salmon, 83; 
Miss Maggie Smith, 52; the 
Right Rev WJ. Westwood, 61. 


Daily, indeed momently, on our 
earthly pilgrimage we become (as C.S. 
Lewis put it) more heavenly or more 
hellish persons, but he does not try to 
explain the pilgrimage of a human being 
who lived omy a few seconds. His 
descriptions of hell and of the ap- 
proaches to heaven (in The Great 
Divorce) are recognisably earthly, and 
carry more conviction to a twentieth 
century reader than either the Book of 
Revelation or the repellant account in 
James Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a 
Young Man. 


Could we wish a worse hell on the 
most cruel and vicious of our kind than 
what is suffered by many a man, woman 
or child who in this life, so for as we can 
ascertain, has done nothing to deserve a 
hundredth part of it? . 

"Who did sin, this man or his parents, 

that he was bom blind?" Jesus's* 
disciples asked him of a beggar near the 
Temple (John 9. 2). Our Lord's answer 
is well know, but what about the answer 
he didn’t give? He did not say: "O 
foolish and thoughtless disciples, bow 
could this man sin before he was bom, 
seeing that he did not exist until he was 
bom?” 


the blessedness of the redeemed should 
be augmented by gloating over the 
miseries of the damned (and we all 
know holier-than-thou people who can 
believe that). - 

The Roman Catholic Church makes a 
brave attempt to deal with this difficulty 
with its doctrine of purgatory, and 
presumably erven the merciful Ongen 
would have permitted varying doses of 
this to precede universal salvation. But 
if puigaloiy is not on earth, where is it, 
and how can it be effective on some 
other stage than our earthly home? 

A Christian doctrine of rcincamaiion 
differs from oriental ones in confining 
successive lives to human lives, distinct 
from that of animals lacking sen 
consciousness and moral sense. 


Sir Richard Woolley, OBE. 
FRS, Astronomer Royal from 
1956 to 1971, died on Christ- 
mas Eve at the age of 80. 

He was the eleventh holder 
of the office in the 300 years 
since its establishment. 
Though it had tong appeared 
to be his inevitable destina- 
tion.- he reached it by a route 
that had taken him far afidd 
He came to the post with a 
wider range of experience than 
any predecessor had had. and 
this was to prove of lasting 
benefit to British astronomy. 

Richard van der Riet Wool- 
ley was bom at Weymouth on 
April 24, 1906, the son of a 



consciousness ana jhujoi seux. paymaster rear-admiraL He 

Its most distinguished exponent was. was educated at Cape Town 
the late Dr Rudolf Steiner, but you do University before going to 
not have to be an anthroposophist to Cambridge. He entered 
find it thought provoking. He takes very Gonville and Caius, and like 
seriously Our Lord's identification of several other members of that 
John ihe Baptist with Elijah (Matthew college, his subsequent tuni- 


17. 10-13). "Elijah has already come, 
and they railed to recognize him - the 
disciples understood that he meant 
John the Baptist”. 


Of course, acknowledgement of the 
pre-existence of the soul before birth 
does not necessarily assert the doctrine 
of reincarnation,- for the soul could have 
existed in the spiritual world; but if 
incarnation is necessary for the soul to 
experience its separateness from God 
and from other souls, it is difficult to see 
how the soul could develop towards 
perfection without it, or with only a few. 
seconds of it in the case mentioned 
earlier. 


What if not only Elijah, but every 
human soul except Christ's, lives 'many 
limes on earth, experiencing the prob- 
lems of every age and of berth sexes, of 
power and of poweriessness. of different 
relationships with groups of familiar or- 
un familiar people? 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 

Mr Richard Neiison to be | 
Ambassador to Colombia, in 
succession to Mr J.A. Robson, 1 
who will be taking up a further 
Diplomatic Service app- 
ointment. 

Mr .Arthur GoodaD to be High 
Commissioner to India in 
succession to Sir Robert Wade- 
Gcry. who will be retiring from 
the Diplomatic Service. 

Mr Michael Males, MP, to 
succeed Sir Humphrey Atkins, 
MP, as Chairman of the House 
of Commons Defence Com- 
mittee from January I. 

The Duke at Abercom to be the 
Lord lieutenant for County 
Tyrone. 

Miss Margaret Ctaydcm to be 
Headmistress of St Felix School, 
Southwold, in succession to Mrs 
Anne M us toe. who retires next, 
year. 

Dr GJVL Stephen. Second Mas- 
ter of Sedbergh, to be Head-' 
master of The Perse School,. 
Cambridge, next August, in 
succession to Mr A.E. Melville. 


Heaven, to a degree, is experienced 
transitorily here on earth by nature 
lovers, art lovers, poetry lovers, music 
lovers, and indeed lovers, not to 
mention worshippers and contemplates. 


Heaven lies about some of us in our 
infancy, as it did about the Christ Child, 
but not about the millions of children 
who die of disease, neglect or cruelty 
each year. 


The Christian, his thinking shaped by 
the mind of Christ through the working 
of the Holy Spirit within him, cannot 
feel comfortable with the idea that the 
Creator, whose name and nature is 
Love, can doom any of bis creatures to 
unending and inescapable torment on 
the basis of their behaviour during a 
lifetime which may be brief and brutish. 

•It is as unthinkable as the notion that 


What was Mozart before he was a 
musical genius as a small child? As 
whom will Einstein return, if he has not 
already? Or Hitler, or Stalin? We are 
unlikely to find out and speculation is 
vain, for how may our guardian angel 
convert us between earthly lives? Might 
not Verwoerd choose to be reborn as a 
black African? Or worse, a black African 
woman? Does this not merely postpone 
the problem to an unimaginable future? 
Yes. That is one of its chief merits. 


The Rev Dr Chad Varah, founder of the 
Samaritans, is Rector of St Stephen 
Watbrook, City. 




Forthcoming 

marriages 


Mr J.WJH. Wantie 
and Miss CJ-U. Martens 
The engagement is announced 
between Jamie, second son of 
Sir John and Lady Wordie, of 
Dodington House, Breamore, 


. ' ■ ■ 


Hampshire, and Cordula, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs M.W.F. 
Martens, of Moorbirkenweg 7, 
Munster, West Germany. 


Latest wills 


' mk . 5 


The Hon Mrs Sonia Rosemary 
Cobitt, of West Meon, Hamp- 
shire, president of the Hamp- 
shire branch of the St John 
Ambulance Brigade 1957-70, 
left estate valued at £1,806,506 
net She left most of her estate to 
her family. 

Mis Kathleen Sylvia Duke 
Fiddes Watt, of Fulham - Sylvia 
Coleridge, the actress - left estate 
valued at £86.004 net 
Elizabeth Smart, of 
Homersfldd, Suffolk, the Ca- 
nadian-born writer, best known 
for her book. By Grand Central 
Station / Sat Down and Wept, 
left estate valued at £46,61 6 net. 
Mrs Kathleen Mildred Jordan 
Lloyd, of Teignmouth, Devon, 
left estate valued at £558,578 
neL After various bequests, she 
left the residue of her estate 
equally between the Teign- 
mouib and District Housing 
Association for Quinnell House, 
the Distressed Gentlefolk's Aid 
Association and the Cancer 
Research Campaign. 



Mr PJP. Balcombe 
and Miss VJVL Piepenstock 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul Philip, youngest 
son of Mr and Mrs Philip 
Balcombe, of London, and Vic- 
toria Maria, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Brian Piepenstock, of Pin- 
ner Hill, Middlesex. 


Mr CJL Kreftmg 
and Mile DJLG. Foubert 
The engagement is announced 
between Caff elder son of Mr 
and Mrs Rudolf Krefting, of 
Pynchfield Manor, West Hyde, 
Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire, 
and Dominique, only daughter 
of the late M Gat Foubert and 
Mme L. Burm. of KeethoC 
Rupelmonde, Belgium. 


MrSJW. Bree&e 
and Dr C.W. Cottam 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon, son of Mr and 
Mrs M.M. Breese, of Hardmead, 
Buckinghamshire, and Gediia. 
eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs 
K.W. Cottam, of Camberiey, 
Surrey. 


Mir R.G. Cooke 
and Miss &A. Stibbard 
The engagement is announced 
from Plymouth, between Rich- 
ard Graham Cooke, of 
Cranleigh, Surrey, and Simone 
Ann Sibbard, of Sydney, 
Australia. 


Mr LC Piper 
and Miss EJVL Corby 
The engagement is announced 
between Ian Crispin, eldest son 
of Mr and Mrs K. Piper, of ! 
Cherhill, Wiltshire, and Emma 
Michele, daughter of Mr M- 
Corby, of Maidenhead, and Mis 
SA. Corby, of Weston-super- 
Mare, Avon. 

Mr MS. Robinson 
and Miss AX. Anderson 
The engagement is announced 
between Mathew Seymour, 
younger son of Mr and Mrs 
O.H. Robinson, of St John's 
Wood, NW8, and Anita Louise, 
elder daughter of Mrs Greta 
Anderson, of Barnes, SW1 3, and 
Mr David C. Anderson. 


The Princess of Wales, 
leaving St Georee's Char 


is of Wales, wearing a stylish Cossack outfit, 
eorge's Chapel, Windsor, in the rain with Prince 
after the traditional Christmas Day service. 
(Photograph: Julian Herbert). i 


Snrgeon Lieutenant AJPX. 
Goodwin, RN 
and Miss J.MJL Bacon 
The engagement is announced 
between Alexander Paul Lamy, 
only son of Mr Aubrey Good- 
win and the late Mis Aubrey 
Goodwin, of Hillside, Furneux 
Pelham, Hertfordshire, and Juli- 
ette Mary Edith, daughter of Mr 
and Mis Arthur Bacon, of The 
Old Rectory, Sacombe Green, 
Hertfordshire. 


AJPX. 


FORCED DISPOSAL SALE 

PER CUSTOMS WAREHOUSING REGULATIONS OF 1979, NOTICE 232. 

NOTICE GIVEN BY 


HER MAJESTY’S CUSTOMS & EXCISE 


Mr TJL Hotham 
and Miss S.V. Holt 
The engagement is announced 
between Timothy, younger son 
of Mr and Mis Anthony 
Hotham, and Verity, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Mi- 
chael Holt, both of Barn t Green, 
Worcestershire. 


AU RUGS RBMNH) FROM THE BONDB) STORES « THE WOOD'S LARGEST W 

fouowwg notice from hbl iiajestts customs* excise 


SALE 




UUJERQAD 


OU) HtOffiFTON ROAD 


Mr N.A. Hunt 
and Miss CAA. Findlay 
The engagement is announced 
between Neil Andrew, son of Mr 
and Mrs Graham Hunt, of 
Jersey, Channel Islands, and 
Caroline Alison Ann, second 
daughter of Dr and Mrs David 
Findlay, of St Albans. 


DAILY 9AM -9PM 


N 

O 


s» R0XBTPL 


I WBTB80BPT0N 

WARE- TUBE STATION 

HOUSE 


Mr BP. Isaacs 
and Miss D. Monies 

The engagement is announced 

between Bruce, son of Kenneth 
Isaacs and the late Cynthia 
Isaacs, of London, and Debbie, 
daughter of Fred Menzies and 
the late Louise Menzies, of 
Melbourne. 


Mr ILN. Smith 
and Mbs CJR. Young 
The engagement is announced 
between Howard, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs A.E. Smith, of 
Bexley Heath, Kent, and 
Chrysogon, daughter of Dr and 
Mrs Anthony Young, of Nai- 
robi, Kenya, and Norwich. 

Mr T J. Strong ' 

and Mrs J £. Read ! 

The engagement is announced . 
between Timothy, younger son 
of the late Professor DJE. Strong 
and of Mrs S.K. Strong, of 
Chislehura, Kent, and Janette, 
daughter of Mr AJ. Gaywood, 
of Hartley. Kent, and Mrs J.L. 
Butler, of Shortlands, Kent. 

Mr RJHLS. Teague 
and Mrs J. Hatcher 
The engagement -is announced 
between Richard FLS. Teague, 
of Westbrooke Court, Baltic 
Wharf, Bristol, and Josephine 
Hatcher (nee Dean), of Coo m be 
Dingle, Bristol. 

Mr J J JN. Wilson 
and Mbs CJL Handley 
The engagement is announced 
between Julian, youngest son of 
Mr and Mrs C.W. Wilson, of 
Ongar, Essex, and Clare, youn- 
ger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
W.A. Handley, of Gi&sing, 
Norfolk. 

Marriages 

Dr C-J.T. Baftwwn 
and Mrs J.V. Astley 
The marriage took place in 
Chichester, on December 17, 
between Dr Christopher 
Bateman and Mrs Val Astley 
(ufie Cann). 


Mr T. Wright 

and Mrs P. Egremout 

The marriage took place on 

Wednesday, December 24, in 

Andover, between Mr Tim 

Wright and Mrs P. Egremout. 


AT THE WAREHOUSE, 


ROXSY PLACE 
FULHAM 


Church news 


Directions: Travelling west along Old Bmmpfan Road fake Hist turning left offer Wfesf Brampton 
lube station into Seograve Road -Take first left again into Raxby Place. 


BAKI51ANI FINE 
DOUBLE KNOT 


MENDED Wt 

mna tun 


SUPER WORSTED 
PAKISTANI 1 

HAMADAN 7 

CHINESE SUPS WASHED 


£1,150 £690 
E475 £280 


%P1LE 

FINE KESHAN 
TURKISH KHELUM 
BOKHARA TABLE MATS 
QUOM SILK 
ISPAHAN 
NAIN-PART SILK 

Old afshar 

SENNEH 
SILK HEREKE 
SILK KAlSERl 
MBAS 
YAYAU 


T2'x9" 

6‘9*x4V 

6x3*6' El?5 £60 
J'xf £12 £7 

5'x3' £2.800 £1,350 

8'xS' €6,800 £3,000 

6'2'x37' £1,350 £675 

7*2* x 4*0' £900 £525 
S‘4'x3ncr £850 £360 
STsir £4.200 £2,200 


£2^50 £800 


£1750 £900 
£175 £60 


6*2' x 4*3' 
7*2'x4'3' 


6*ll‘ , x3 r Kr £325 


L250 £1(600 
75 £1M 


YALEMBH 

DOSHEMEAUTl 

SHIRAZ 

AFGHAN 

BALKAN TABRIZ 

ANTIQUE 

CAUCASIAN KAZAK 

CAUCASIAN SHIRVAN 

8EIOUCH 

TABRIZ 

JAIPUR 

MQRJ80KHARM 

PUSHT1 

OLDANATOL 

KEUJM 

SAMAKAND 

RUSSIAN BOKHARA 

5INKIANG 


5n'x3: 

6*l"x4T 

5M'x3' 

T2'x9* 


•maos SMI 
EittPeff PRICE 
£525 £360 
£450 £175 
£360 £175 
£1,150 £550 


Apppoinlments 

The Rev R M AH. Vicar. Si Peter, 
lyna t eri. Taunton, diocese ef Bath 
and wells, so be Rector. Dutvertan 
and Brustiford. mme diocese. 

The Rev A W Bennett. Vfcar. $t 


The Rev R A Hanson. Incumbent. 
Holy Trinity. Pauiey, diocese of 


Glasgow, to be vicar. St Andrew. The 
Btrctuns. Walsall, cttocose or LKMekL 

The Rev M HUL Vicar. St Oswald. 
Oswofry. diocese of UcnMd^teDe 

Canon issTKndey. v»ear, St Johnl 
Percy Mam. tUocesc of Newcastle, to 
.be vicar, wylam. same dlocne. 

The Rev N K Lrtner. Assistant 
Curate. BKtston. diocese or Chester, lo 
be Team Vicar. SI Mark. QiUdwall 
Valley. Galea ere Team Ministry, 
diocese of Liverpool. 

The Rev B - McMurray, Parish 
PrtesL Borden, diocese or Canterbury, 
to be Vic.ir, Borden, same diocese. 


Peter. Soberton and Holy Trinity. 
Newtown, diocese of Portsmouth, lo 
be Rcctoi*. Aston canton with 
Buekiand and Drayton Beauchamp, 
.diocese of Oxford. _ . 

The Rev R J M BtarkalL Master at 
HM Detention Centre. Blantyre 
House. AShfonL KenL lo be Rector. 
Edith Weston with North Luffenham 
and Lyndon with Manlon. diocese of 


!QTx7*ir £UOO£675 


£3^00 £1^900 


£3^00 £1^800 
4'J0*x3'r £95 £50 

7T’x4’4* £2,150 £l,100 

6TX4T £295 £165 


wxynr £4oo 


5*Tx3T 

io*rx«* 

5’x3T 


SPACE SIMPLY DOES NOT PERMIT USHNG ALL 

All prices ex-warehouse, exd tiding VAT. 

PLUS SIZES RANGING FROM 3'x T UP TO 18' x 12' 

IN SILK AND WOOL. AND A HUGE INVENTORY OF RUNNERS. 


TKMS OF RArt®^T: CASH, CHH3UEAHD All MAJOR OfiMT CARDS 




and Lyndon with Manton. diocese of 
Peterborough. ^ 

The Rev B A Brownbrtdge lo be 
Priest >in charge. iNS M). .Mrd aaM with 
L^un (renrwneni nwnlstryL diocese 

The Rev P J_ Bryars. Curate. St 
Martin with the Transnauradoo. Hull, 
diocese of York, to be Team Vicar in 
Uie Diypool Team MtnWrv. with 
vsedal resDons&KUty for the St John's 
area, same diocese. 

The Rev C J Sudden. Curate. 
Gaywood. diocese of Norwich, to be 
Team Vicar in the Brtxham Team 
'Ministry, diocese of Exeter. 

The Rev S Doubtflre. Vicar, St 
Matthew with St Franck. Barrow lo 
Furness, diocese of Cartiaie. to be 
Rector. St Agnes. North Reddish, 
diocese of Manchester. 

Canon A D Duncan. Vicar. 
WarSeworth with Arfciinoion. diocese 
or Newcastle, to be Vicar. Wniiicy St 
Hetefl. same diocese. 

The Rev i Earn. Team vicar. St 
Mark's. Khmuiorpe. Northampton, 
aifflesssa of FwtertxinHJBh. to be RN 

a r5?* i Rev I M Finn. Curate. The 


Canon F H w MiUen, to be 
Honorary Canon Emerttus or Norwich 
Cathedral, diocese of Norwich, on Bts 
rearenwm t as vicar. St Giles. Nor- 


rettranwmt as vicar. St Giles. Nor- 
wich. same diocese. 

The Rev S A J Mitchell, curate. St 
Stephen. Chatham, diocese of Roch- 
ester. lo be Associate Vicar. 
E denb ridpe with GrocUiam HBL same 

The "Rev G ipgilvie, lecturer at 
WydtfTe Hall. Oxford, to be PrlesMn- 
cnarac. Sr PauL Hartow New Town, 
and Croon Chairman desismate of the 
p ropose d Harlow <hvup Ministry. 
dlo«9e_of Chrtnwford. 


The Rev J E G Oswald. Prtest ln- 
charge. Great Somcrtord with Little 
Somerford. and Seanv. and Prt#st-tn- 
chame. Corston with Rodbournc. 
diocese Of Bristol to be Vicar of the 
benefice. 

The Rev N Pound*, recently re- 


turned from ministry overseas (Malay- 
sia). to be Team Vicar in Inc 
Wolverhampton Tguni Ministry, with 
responafouity for St Chad, diocese of 
UcttfteW. „ _ 


The Rev M S, PhUps. Oirate- 
Woodford Wens, diocese of OMlms- 
rord. to be Vkar- St Matthew. Tipton. 

« W^Ss. TenVHK* 

KSfT "USE 

NeRwIon. same diocese. 


caster, same diocese. 

The Rev J Hampton. Prf*st-tn- 
ctiarpe. Broadway, diocese at Worces- 


ter, to be also Rural Dean of Evesham 
Deanery, same diocese- 


u*i: 



University before going to 

Cambridge. He entered 
Gonville and Caius, and, like 
several other members of that 
college, his subsequent turn- 
ing to astronomy was influ- 
enced by F. J. ML Stratton. 

After taking the mathemati- 
cal tripos in 1 92S. be worked 
for a year under Sir Arthur 
Eddington. His promise as a 
scientist and as a personality 
were sufficiently recognized 
for him to be appointed a 
Commonwealth Fund Fellow 
(now Harkness Fellowship) at 
Mount Wilson Observatory, 
California. 

There he worked for the 
next two years and had his 
first experience of practical 
astronomy in observing the 
sun. He soon showed his 
insight into the manifold 
problems of using large instru- 
ments, and his resourcefulness 
in extracting the maximum 
amount of information that a 
given instrument could be 
made to yield. 

In 1931 he returned to 
Cambridge as Isaac Newton 
student, and was there until he 
became chief assistant at the 
Royal Observatory, Green- 
wich. m 1 933. There he took a 
leading part in the work of the 
solar department. He was 
particularly happy in his col- 
laboration with die then As- 
tronomer Royal. Sir Frank 
Dyson, one result of which 
was their joint book, Eclipses 
of the Sun and Moon (1937). 

In 1937 he returned to 
Cambridge, this time as John 
Conch Adams Astronomer, 
which meant that he became 
Eddington's assistant at the 
university observatory. There 
again he did the best he could 
in exploiting the available 
equipment, antiquated though 
it was. 

Two years later he became 
director of the Common- 
wealth Solar Observatory, 
Canberra. This proved to be 
the great opportunity of his 
life. He will always be remem- 
bered for his contribution to 
the remarkable growth of sci- 
entific activity in Australia 
during and following the wan 
in particular, for developing 
tiie Mount Stromlo Observa- 
tory until it became the pre- 
eminent institution of 
astronomical research in the 
southern hemisphere. 

At first the observatory was 
largely given over to the 
design and production of opti- 
cal equipment for the armed 
forces. Starting from nothing, 
success was achieved in a very 


short time. This meant that 
afterwards Woolley was left 
with greatly extended work- 
shop facilitieSL Another out- 
come of the war was that he 
was able to recruit displaced 
European scientists who co- 
operated effectively in the 
resumption of astronomical 

work. 

He was a! wavs making 


Melbourne Observatory. 


Jones, visited Mount Stromlo 
and strongly recommended 
the purchase of a large, mod- 
ern telescope. A 74-inch reflec- 
tor was, a few years later, 
installed. 

His most notable achieve- 
ment there was. in making a 
new determination of the 
brightness of the sun by 
comparing it with the 
brightest star, Sirius. In the 
course of this work Sirius was 
found to be less bright than 
previous measurements had 
indicated 

By the lime Woolley left for 
Greenwich in 1956 the small 
solar observatory of 1939 had 
become equipped and staffed 
for first-rate work in almost 
the whole range of optical 
astronomy. As well as cooper- 
ating with other scientific 
bodies in Australia. Mount 
Stromlo had become a centre 
of international work on the 
southern sky. 

On his arrival in England, 
accosted by reporters at the 
airport, he declared that inter- 
planetary travel was “utter 
bilge." Referring to the cost of 
spacecraft he maintained that 
if astronomers were given a 
fraction of the money they 
could make more interesting 
discoveries. 

The re-building of the Royal 
Greenwich Observatory at 
Heratmonceux, through many 
economic vicissitudes, had 
been the great work of Sir 
Harold Spencer Jones during 
the ten years before Woolley 
succeed©! him as Astronomer 
Royal in 1956. By 1958 Wool- 
ley was able to announce that 
all existing instruments had 
been installed and put into 
operation, and that the Gov- 
ernment had agreed to the 
resumption of work on the 
Isaac Newton telescope. 

He decided that it should be 
a large reflector. Originally 
sited at Herstmonceux, it 
introduced British astrono- 


mers to the problems of big 
telescopes. But climatic diffi- 


telescopes. But climatic diffi- 
culties soon became a limiting 


MR GUY BARNETT 


Mr Guy Barnett, Labour 
MP for Greenwich since 1971, 
died suddenly on Christmas 
Eve. He was 58. 

Nicolas Guy Barnett was 
born on August 23, 1928, into 
a comfortable Dulwich home. 
He was educated a 1 Higbgate 
and St Edmund's Hail, Ox- 
ford, where he read PPE and 
was secretary of the union. 

But a more important event 
while he was at Oxford was his 
conversion to ■ Quakerism, 
which shaped his future ca- 
reer. It did not turn him into a 
pacifist -when called up he 
served with the RAF - but it 
did make him a political 
radical of the left-wing sort, 
whose concern for underdogs 
became especially focused on 
the Third World. 

He chose teaching as a 
profession, and in 1953 joined 
the staff of Queen Elizabeth 
Grammar School, Wakefield, 
where he taught English for six 
years. In 1960 he went to the 
Friends School at Kamusinga 
in Kenya, and could later 
claim that many younger 
members of the Kenya gov- 
ernment had been his pupils. 
In 1962 he moved into famine 
relief with the Christian Coun- 
cil of Kenya. 

From 1966 to 1969 he was 
on the staff of Voluntary 
Service Overseas, and from 
1969 to 1971 was chief educa- 
tion officer at the Common- 
wealth Institute. 

His first attempt to get into 
Parliament was in the 1959 
genera] election, when' be 
stood, unsuccessfully, at Scar- 
borough. Bui in November 
1962 be had a stroke of good 
fortune, at least for the short 
term, when a by-election took 



after thirteen years in opposi- 
tion. Despite being nearly 
selected on at least two occa- 
sions, he was unable to secure 
another seat until 1971, when 
Labour was in opposition 
again. 

In that year he won his 
home seat of Greenwich, 
when Richard (now Lord) 
Marsh resigned ro become 
chairman of the British Rail- 
ways Board. Barnett held the 
seat through four general elec- 
tions, though at the last his 
majority was reduced to 
1,211. This reflected loss of 
support for his party rather 
than for himself; any other 
Labour candidate might well 
have lost the seat in 1983. 

In J 974-5 he served as PPS 
to Mr John Silkin, whose 
views he largely shared and 
whose faithful ally he re- 
mained. Both were members 
of the Tribune Group. 
Barnett's absence from the 
House during the previous 
period of Labour government 
meant that others, not neces- 
sarily his superiors in ability, 
were in line for office ahead of 
him; and it was not until Mr 


place in another Conservative Callaghan became prime min- 
seat, South Dorset With an isterin 1976 that he was given 


anti-Common Market Con- 
servative running against the 
official candidate, so splitting 
the Tory vote, Barnett was 


a ministerial post 
As under-secretary at the 
Department of the Environ- 
ment overthe next three years 


able to win the seat for labour he made a good impression. 


by a majority of 704. 

More remarkably, he foiled 
by fewer than 1,000 votes to 
bold it at the ensuing general 


His particular sphere of re- 
sponsibility was new towns, 
and he piloted the bill that 
transferred housing assets to 


' In opposition again, he was 
a from bench spokesman on 
overseas development ( 1 980-1 
and 1 982-3). and on European 
affaire (1981-2) - rather un- 
suitably. because his Com- 
monwealth and Third World 
loyalties prejudiced him 
against the EEC. 

In 1983 Mr Kinnock. for no 
obvious reason, dropped him 
from the front bench, but he 
was soon very active as joint 
secretary of the Parliamentary 
group on overseas develop- 
ment. He would have been 
visiting East Africa again next 
month, as guest of the three 
governments there. 

His many other public 
included membership of the 
Select Committee on Race 
Relations and Immigration 
(1972-4); the BBC’s general 
advisory council (1973-6); the 
Public Accounts Committee 
(197^); the European Parlia- 
ment, before it was elected 
(1975-6); and the board of 
Christian \id since 1984. He 
also acted as Parliamentary 
adviser to the Society of Civil 
Seirams (1973-6) and to the 
National Union of Teachers. 

In his constituency, he was a 
trustee of the National Mari- 

time Museum U974-6), and in 
1984 succeeded Lord Vaizev 
as chairman of the Greenwich 
Festival trustees. 

r ^^lyP^lication.Bu^ 
Lake , 1 964), derived from his 
years in East Africa. 

' was exceptionally 

well liked, both in and out of 
rail lament. He was a practical 
jdrahst whose warm-hearted 
radicalism, inspired by Chris- 
enm- k J r h v earned him no 
enmity from most political 

?2E, nen - lhou S h il Sled to 

SSL S lo u th e more 
extreme and mechanistic Left 

l eTy musical, i 
his mother had lau&hi the 
violin, and he pl&vgri ihg 
c annet well enough to have 
Pan 




factor, and a ne» site had w be 
found for the telescope in the 
Canarv Islands. . 

While aL Herstmonceux he 
promoted year!> conferences, 
md occasionally international 
meetings to which inmous 
foreign astronomers came. Al- 
ways mindful of the next 
generation, he founded a 
Suree for university students. 
Later he gave much assistance 
to Sussex University in acvcl- 
oping its astronomy centre. 

In 1972 he went to bouth 
Africa as director of the 
Astronomical Observatory 
there. But on his retirement m 
1976 he came back to Sussex, 
where he studied the lives ol 
Wellington and Napoleon, 
and also took up painting. 

Wool lev’s work, though 
nearly always pioneering, was 
scarcely such as to make a 
nopuiar appeal or to lend itself 
io easy description in general 
terms. His predominant inter- 


plans for the future and ready est in the first half of his career 
to put them into vigorous was in the atmospheres of the 


execution as soon as the war SU n and stars. He made many 
was over. In 1944 the observa- contributions both theoretical 


lory absorbed the staff instru- and observational v.hich have 
meats and duties of the become part of the general 


body of knowledge of the 


In 1947 the Astronomer subject. His work culminated 
Royal. Sir Harold Spencer in the publication o. The 


Outer Lavers of a Star {with D. 
W. N. Stibbs. 19531. 

His main interest then 
turned to the study of groups 
of stars, and initiated work on 
the measurement of radial 
velocities that would give 
fresh information about the 
dynamic evolution of stellar 
clusters. Thus it came about 
that some of the chief work of 
the Royal Observatory was 
complementary to the distin- 
guished theoretical researches 
being done in Cambridge by 
Professor Fred Hoyle and his 
school, and so gave a unified 
direction to much British 
astronomy. 

His interest in radio astron- 
omy was somewhat re- 
strained. Above all. he 
beiieved that the devotion of 
vast sums to rocket and 
satellite research was not justi- 
fied. His judgement in these 
matters appeared to show 
some lack of vision, and cost 
him support for his own 
scientific aims. 

He was vice-president of the 
International Astronomical 
Union 11952-S): president of 
the Australian and New- Zea- 
land Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science (1955): 
and president of the Royal 
Astronomical Society (1963- 
5). Among his many honours, 
the one that be most prized 
was honorary fellowship of 
Gonville and Caius. 

Woolley carried out official 
duties with dignity, but a 
ready sense of humour saved 
him from the slightest trace of 
pomposity. In professional 
matters he could be bluntly 
outspoken, but ir. personal 
dealings was charming and 
sociable. He was a man of fine 
physique and a keen sports- 
man. He was also an accom- 
plished pianist 

He married, first, in 1951 
Gwyneth Meyler. who died in 
1979. His second wife, Patri- 
cia Marples, died last year. He 
is survived by his third wife, 
Sheila. There were no children 
of any of the marriages. 


in Mozart's cefehramn a • 
ter o,£L Ce !5 brale < 3 qum- 


election in 1964 - evidence of local authorities when the 
his personal qualities as an development corporations 


un^ue.an.ongMPs" 


MP. But it was a bad time to 
be out of Parliament, with 
Labour returning to power 


reached their targets. But his 
ministerial experience was re- 
grettably brief 


he 




him, with 
daughter. 


: \ rii* 

< ■ i I 


ha 





THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


: 

of 'if 

■ " ‘"iifcD 


’ ^ortg 

' Vj, 

• Gij'il* 

■ y^. 

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•• ■ j‘:d is 
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rvi-i 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


For INtlcm* mfMCaL mat W, 
ken Ml romnwMmnn, a»a 
ms commauanwim an not 
grievous- “** 

I John 6:3 


B8WKLET - On December aotn ** 
OueenCUr lone's Hospital, to Jenny 
inee Prest) and John, a daughter 
Olivia Lucy. «wwr. 

EP MF AP PS - On December zi« long. 

to Debtne (Me Harman land Hugh, a 

son- Harry Peter Richard. 

PIPE* • On December Z2nd al st 
njom»"s Hospttai. London, to Sarah 
*”*5, Dacw - » m Shoiio 

ARstair Piers, a brother lor Etane 
and Helena. 

BOS E ■ On D ecember 2nd 1986 in 
Gtoucaiargiirg. to Anthony and An- 
***?*' a •w- Oliver Louts 
Christopher. a brother for Katherine 
Dominic and Alexander. 

December 23rd to vm... 
Ccoroli ia H annah Alice. 

KANMtti I • on December 22nd to 
Caroline in6e Manmoale} .inrf Bin a 
daughter Elizabeth Anne. 

WILLIAMS On December 21 sl in Mor- 
Mstawn. New Jersey. USA. to 
Fenclia itiN- Pauli and Mark a 
daughter. Elbe Abnec. 


MARRIAGES 


EVAHbUXXAMER. on December 
2*th In Kenya. Dr. Peter Evans to 
Mm Ccba Alexander. 


| DEATHS | 

CArnBMOU - on December 2«th 
1986 Jesse Alma peacefully at Ida 
home at WestbampneU Chichester 
Dearly loved husband ol Daisy and 
bcloied father of Paul. 

COOK cm December 22nd 1966. 
peacefully in hospital. Ida unary 
Bure hell) dearest sister or Louise and 
Jtm. A brave generous and true 
friend to so many. Cremation al 
Pulncy Vale crematorium on Tues- 
day 30Ui December at 2 46 pm. 
Family flowers only but donations 
please in lieu !o the Leukaemia 
Reasearch Fund. 43 Great Ormond 
Sued. London Wi, 

DALGLEfSH - On December 19th. sud- 
denly. Arthur George, dearly loved 
husband of Joan, father of Sarah and 
grandfather of Justin and Zeno. Ser- 
vice at Wcs&cton Church. Suffolk. 

1 1 00 am. Tuesday December 30th. 
Family flowers only, donattons if de- 
sired to The Society of St Francis 
Ceme Abbas. 

FfSTERE - On December 23rd. peace- 
fully In Westminster Hospital. John, 
aged T9. Much loved husband of 
Isobel. both of New York. Lebanon 
and 17 De Vere Cardens. London 
W8. Father of Susan and John. No 
Rowers please. 


- On December 2Srd 1986 

EMSM 1 *" O.BX. C.8J2, 
Much beloved husband of Mary. Prt- 
J*. cremation. Service or 
SUmwea Church. 
'£^Onoon dm January 1987. No 
Rgwws. PonaPonq if deafn-d to the 
Hawmwnd Cot. 
Waterhouse A 
gjg^Hlgh StrveLBurwmh. East 

■ On December 22nd. Sadie, 
wile, raoihar and grand- 
nwiher. oner a long Illness serenely 
Pf? ™ ; Funeral Service at St 
^dJ^ChurdKMaiwoey. Norfolk 

?30Wh^ V De ° ffn,beT ' 29»» *» 

****Jtnr- on December 20th. peace- j 
Sj&* W ol M. CUn 
Oaabeth^ Her warmth and zest far 
We vrtabegresto raiseed by her fam- 
****** « December 
zvthat 2.30 pm at the Margate Cns- 
JMJwInm Flowers to H Noble. 1 
North down Road. St Peter's 
Broads! airs. Kent. 

*®*5®y**K - On December 23rd 
1986. peacefully In hospitaL Richard 
AsKcy Hrraebyk. of Flat l, PoteOeU 
^tevae. Hautertey Road. Chrtten- 
ham. Gtas. beloved husband of unity 
and father of Gina. DavM. Paol and 
Cay. Funeral Service an Tuesday 
December 30th at SI Gregory* Cafa- 
oUc Church. St James Square. 
Cheiicnham at 2 pm. Famfty flowers 
only but dona bona if desired to 
Aizhehoem Disease Sodety. Bank 
BuMnn, Fulham Broadway. Lon- 
don SW6 1EP. 

*KVm ■ On December zi. peacefully, 
toes wesiey. aged 88 yean, wife of 
the lair Angus Irwin. 

K**®STO* - on December 2i*t 1986. 
suoterty Mi home. Laurence Cnari«. 
aged 79. beloved husband of Oh.e 
Hathaway and fattier of Richard. 
DonaW. Brian. Valerie. Alan and 
June. Funeral service at Holy Trinity 
Oiurcn. North wood on Monday jan- 
umy 5th 1907 at 12.00 noon. , 
Followed by Interment at Woodcock 1 
Hm Cemetery Flowers 10 E. Spark ! 
U«L 104 Pinner Rd. Norliiwood. 
Middlesex. 

VMWO W BMBi ■ On December 20Ui 
1986. suddenly at Wotthlno Hospl- 
Ui). H«9en Pamela, tovtofl mother of 
Diana and dear grandmother ol Sa- 
rahyaBe and Nigel. Funeral on 
Tuesday December 30th at Worthing 
pmnatacium at 2.00 pm. Enquiries 
lo H Dmiibe Limited. Broadwater. 
Worthing 34316. 

HTCMEU. - On December 23rd. Mary 
Evelyn, at The Deans Lodging. The 
Liberty. Waite. Somerset, aged S3 ■ 
years, wife of Patrick (Dean or Weils) 
md mother of Sarah. Andrew, ja- 
llan and Nicholas. Private cremation. 
Funeral Service at WeBs Cathedral 
on Wednesday 3lst December ai 
2.30 pm. followed by interment of 
ashes. Sung Eucharist of Thanksgtv. 
ui9 -u Wetb Cathedral on Saturday 
17th January, at n.30 am. Family I 
Rowers only, but donattons If desired 
for St Margaret's Hospice. Taunton, 
c/o T Wicks and Soil 13 Sadler 
Street Wells. (Tel: 78884). 


SMLLITO ■ On Friday December 19th. 
at The London Hospital. Martin, 
aged Gil yean, of SL Bernard RonL 
Colchester. Funeral Service on Tues- 
day December 30m at Sr. Anne's 
Church, Compton Rood. Catehemr. 
at i.ispm fallowed by cremation at 
coletwuer Crematorium. Family 
novum only. Donattons If desued » 
London Hospital Special Trustees 
(Renal Research Fund). The London 
H ospital . Whitechapel. El- 
Stainer > On 21*1 Dec e mber, after a 
short nuwss. Dr. David straon aged 
30. son of Lora* and Ted. brother of 
Trevor. Sway missed. Service al 
Holy Trinity Church. Guilford. 
ilwm on Monday 29m December. 
Ah flowers to Ptmma at GuUfbni 
673 94 

TUMBLE - On December 18th >986, 
suddenly In London. Henry George 
Many) Trimble FACE.. of 
Teddtogion and formerly of 
HotywootL Go. Down. Funeral Ser- 
vice at 2-30 pm. Tuesday 30th De- 
nsnber at South west MMdlesex 
Crematorium. Hounslow Road. Han- 
worth. enquiries to F W Paine. 
Funeral Directors, telephone Ol 977 
1627. Donations. If desired, to the 
BNU West Quay Road. Poole. Donat 
WOLFE - on December 22 1966. sud- 
denly at Ms office, working as aver. 
Pater Bernard, aged 67, aimed hus- 
band and father. Funeral at Surrey, 
ana Sussex Crematorium on Tues- 
dav 30re December at 11-g Sam. 

FUNERAL ™~1 
ARRANGEMENTS | 

PLATT . The Funeral service of SJr 
Many Piatt bl wu be on Tuesday 
December 30Ui at 1.30 pro « St Pe- 
ter's Church. Presttmry. fonowod by 
private Interment. Family flower* 
only. Donations if desired to the Na- 
tional Fund for Research tauo 
CrtppUng Diseases, Vincent House. 
Horsham. Wen Sussex 

JWEMORIAL SERVICES 

MOOT ■ a Memorial Service far Major 
. General Sir Robert Plgot will beheld 
<a Holy Trinity Church. Cowes. We 
, of WlghL on Friday 9lii January at 
Noon. 


Qnmemoriam-privateJ 

HEfiGK - Mary dearest mother 
through loll and troubles triumphant. 
Tib. 

STEEL - Sir Lincoln. December 27th 
1966. in loving memory. Barbara 
and all the family. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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Patriarch’s plan rejected 


Science 


Wrangle threatens Universal 
Bethlehem basilica contempt 

From Ian Murray, Bethlehem By Pearce Wright 


The fabric of the Basilica of 
the Holy Nativity here, one of 
the oldest churches in 
Christendom, is- in dang er 
because of rivalry between the 
different Christian confes- 
sions who have ancient rights 
10 worship in it 

This year the argument has 
become so bitter that 
Diodorus I, the Greek Ortho- 
dox Patriarch, is threatening 
10 cancel his traditional 
Christmas procession on 
January 6 and has issued an 
ominous warning .that his 
monks will “excersise their 
rights” to clean a disputed 
area of wall just above the 
entrance to the grotto where 
Christ is believed to have been 
born. 

The cleaning is due on 
Monday and the Israeli 
administration is struggling 
without much success so far to 
find a way of heading off 
potentially violent trouble. 

The cleaning day is the 
annua) occasion when the 
three different churches using 
the basilica - the Greek Ortho- 
dox. the Armenian Orthodox 
and the Roman Catholics - 
symbolically clean the filthy 
walls of the 1,600-year-old 
building in order to mark out 
their territory in one of 
Christianity's holiest sights. 

In a letter to the Israeli Civil 
Administration of Bethlehem, 
the patriarch has rejected a 
'compromise proposal which 
Iasi year succeeded in keeping 
the peace on cleaning day. 

The areas each group is 
allowed lo clean are carefully 
described in a book written in 
1928 under the British Man- . 
date which sets out the status 
quo in the holy places. The 
Greek Orthodox have exclu- 
sive rights everywhere save in 
ihe northern transept and the 
entrance from it to the grotto 
below. 

The problems are all 
centred in this transept, which ' 


is Armenian property. In the 
euphemistic words of the 
book: “The procedure for the 
cleaning of this* past of the 
church is very complicated” 

Essentially the Armenians 
have the right to clean the 
lower pan and the Greeks the 
upper part, although their 
(adders are not allowed to lean 
on an Armenian wall. The 
entrance to the grotto itself is 
cleaned by all three churches 
in pre-ordained turn. 

The book unfortunately 
overlooked who had steward- 
ship over the curtain wall 
from the roof down a to the 
pillars around the main altar, 
which rises behind the door to 
the grotto. Two years ago on 
General Cleaning Day baton 
wielding Israeli border police 
had to drag fighting Armenian 
and Greek monks apart after 
the Greeks tried to dean the 
wall 


The facial expression of an 
individual registering con- 
tempt is expressed on only one 
side of the face, which differs 
from the grimace of the whole 
visage that reflects other 
emotions. 

That was one of the in- 
cidental findings of scientists 
who explored the possibility of 
the facial expression of con- 
tempt being a adtore-spedfic 
trait 

Contrary to their expecta- 
tions, contempt is recognizable 
in the cosntenance of people 
from places as diverse as 
Scotland and West Samaria. 

The details of this revelation 
are reported by Dr Panl 
Eknan ami Dr Wallace V. 
Friesen, of the University of 
California at San Francisco, In 
the journal Motivation and 
Emotion. 

When the research began, 
the scientists snspected - 
wrongly - that contempt was 
rooted in culture and entin- 


alL don. Instead, they found that it 

was universally recognized, as 
Last year, after hours of are anger, fear, surprise, sad- 


tense negotiations, the Israelis 
ruled that a Greek monk could 
climb a ladder and while 
s tanding on it dean that part 
of the wall which be could 
reach with a normal 
handbroom. The rest of the 
wall was to stay dirty. 

This is the compromise that 
the Greeks have now .thrown 


Daring the research 554 
people were asked to describe 
the expression on photographs 
depicting each of those emo- 
tions, representing eight lan- 
guages and both Western and 
non- Western cn/tures. 

Dr Ekman said the first 
difference they observed be- 

tween contempt and the other 

out- They want to take over emotions was that contempt 
the entire section as part of iras expressed on only one side 
their efforts to become un- of the free, whereas the other 
disputed owners of the roof of feelings manifested - tbem- 
Ihe basilica. This is now selves symmetrically. 


leaking badly and real struc- 
tural damage is occurring. 

Both the Armenians and the 


He said people expressed 
contempt by tightening one 
corner of tire month, cocking 
the head to the side and 


Roman Catholics are prepared raising the chin, so as “to look 

to allow the Israeli gov- down yonr nose at the object of 

eminent to repair the roof, but contempt”. 

the Greeks will have none of In contrast, anger was sig- 

it. They insist the roof is theirs nailed by farrowed Mows, 

and that until everyone ac- pressed together lips, glaring, 

cepts this they will not carry and clenched jaws. 

out the repairs needed to save He believed contempt dif- 

the church from the damage fered further from the other 

being caused by this year’s emotions in that it reflected a 


exceptionally heavy rain. 


| moral judgment 


| ^ J ■ 1 n i r. t 




1 1 j .vT^ir 


lSESESJ 


H Un i Mm ftLomv Muiw - AH ms, 

irear n i rtlis , D«gl 03161 as At to pa on 
Road, iomor wa twi cn-me ton. 


MARRIAOC «. ADVJCE Bureau KMuiim 
M ton i« Fonm> txne*) neneaai (ntcr- 
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WMN M LONDON rant a vun/rv by 
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A-IXVEL turn GOUMBh Franco to 
France Art HMory In rtormce infor- 
■nanoo own Jotui Man. 36 Kpxa Rd.. 
London SW3 WB T*L 684 7336. 

VCMOE Mtt-UWI i » im 1 SUMMER 
COURSE. Information rran John Halt. 
36 Kind Rd- London SW3 4NB. Tat 
733S. 




auamy cteoor 2~ cam only. VfetgM 
Sto No SitSO £1-500 01*00. Phone* after 
6 Worktop <0909 » 078026. 


*44. haaiKBUH eond. low mflaaae. seen 
to ac believed, must sen £13.800 on o. 
Ol soe 4464. 


M A RTH A La Alcwabn. Super luxuri- 
ous 3 bedroom apartment, every 
coDcettn£to faculty in complex- Private 
*Me wtoi Jarge nvtnp. need price 
£120.000. tone eve and w/rogi 
4433, day 041 331 1866 


lUTnim. Best tickets for aH aoM- 
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01-828 1678. 

TW TKOC8 *T0*4WM. older naes 
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bureau* 6 oil pawning, 

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FOR SALE 




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OLD VORX FLAGSTONES. COM4* mb 
etc. Naoonwtae Mvain. Tel: cossat 
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GOLDEN I 

ANNIVERSARIES | 

STAFFORD NORTHCOTE : dp LOBAII 
WILLIAMS. On December 28th. 
1936 at St Marys Chnrcti. East 
HendrsL Berkshire. Cecil lo Fmta 
now at Btehton. Stall ord 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity. 

102 Gloucester Place, 

London W1H 4DH. 





Hooligan or Stereotype? 

Football violence, old ladies being mugged, cars 
written off. homes ransacked - is this your view 
of crimes committed by teenagers today? 

But most crime is more mundane: around 90% 
of teenage crime is non-violent and 50% is 
petty theft. 

For most young ‘ criminals’ committal to courts 
and prison is no answer. Up to 85% re-offend: 
they become trapped in a criminal career. 

Since 1976 Rainer has pioneered vital ‘last 
chance' alternatives to Care and prison for 
nearly % million teenagers. Rainers' smaD-scale 
community-based projects focus on specific 
individual needs helping to build self-esteem 
and responsibility. They successfully divert 
young people from crime. 

But we need your committed support. Please 
sand your donation, or for more information to 
Chris Naylor, RAINER FOUNDATION. 232 
Tooley Street, London SE1 2JX (01-403 
4434). And help the teenager behind the 
stereotype. 


FLATSHAKE 


WS snort m bi jzmaoaa oat. o/R 
o/looUno mows. a/a. phone, beobno. 
cl our tab o. £17Qpcro end. Ol 9335188 
WAWTXO Pr o fujrt o imi mac 28 ■» cat oeeka 
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RENTALS 


HEMnr A JAMB Qwitort us now oo dl- 
233 8861 Kr Die best se l ectio n of 
limsheo Ibb and ho u se s lo rani In 
KntflpMnoge. CMm and Kansmoum. 


■ROOK GREEN we hair price house. 
Family bouse mM Jan and May. Compa- 
ny let only. Tel: 01 602 7426. 


If more people left money feus then perhaps 
fewer people would have to leave money to 
charities that deal with alcohol ism, drug abuse 
and cruelty to children and animals. • 

Ybu don’t have to be about drugs or vent their frustrations, 
to kill yourself to ringThe Please call Slough (0753) 

Samaritans. 32713 or write to: David Evans, 

People will call long before The Samaritans, 17 Uxbridge 
they reach that point Before, Road, Slough SL 1 1SN for 

perhaps, they turn to drink, further details. 


The Samaritans. 


PROPERTY 



'i s ; kS J.ifl *J ;Ti ; s ; iil : : ; 5 1 ! s; :;1 


OFFS! 

SPAM - Gsnma. Enftato period praperty 
(1680's) to be sold tudy hnfttad - back 
nb required. 

S WTZEfl LMD - Genwe. Supat Maade 

- 4i pm Truly oowmng 
dMadwd vtta. 

■NffanEB 



Buy wRh cnAhaee 
Sei wilbnrt teats 






D.P.B LTD.. Freepost*, Penn 
High Wycombe, Bucks HP10 BBR. 
Tet (0494) 35452 • Tetax 837225 


Coatiaaed fien page 14 


SPECIAL INTEREST 



Continued firm page 19 


KINO ou m t u un CmOy or 96 Avtetford 
StTNt. London. SWiv swv died on 94th 
November 1986. Paracidoni lo Stmpaon 
MlBar SoUcttora ot XOl Bonugh HKfti 
Street London Bridge. Si 1NL before 
2nd March 1987. 


TtaempMm oxen late or On Tynemouth 
UML L o ndo n . SW6. 4b Menu 

Faron CranmveU A- iDOMm. 867/9 FUham 
Rood. London. SW6 1EU tv 3 1st March 
1987. 


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22 Uoyd Street, (31) 
KancbestMlCSWR. • 


Spanish Rhnu School 
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resorts. AM a/c apar. Ski 8a- 
vote. faymoidb (0702) 263603. 




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per beach floe. As 3. Tv. bale. 
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NORTH WALKS 780 cottaoes. 
carav an s. Shawl Holidays. 
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WINTER SPORTS 


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and IT* oreon Our cttoMi next u> 
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the TTMFS SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


Jr Jz «fc -C -S g SL 


The ‘nightmare’ 
of Christmas 
in Kaunda’s jail 

From Michael Hardtack, Harare 


Hong Kong blaze leaves 1,700 homeless 









A “nightmare” five days in 
Lusaka's Kamwala remand 
prison was described by Mr 
John Edlin, aged 41, a jountal- 
ist from New Zealand, when 
beflew back to Harare, Zim- 
babwe, on Christmas Eve. 

Mr Edlin, a correspondent 
for the American news agmcy 
the Associated Press, was 
appalled by conditions under 
which, he said, boys as young 
as seven years old are sexually 
assaulted each night by adult 
c riminal s; guards connive to 
steal the limited rations; and 
hundreds of prisoners have 
been detained without charge 
for up to four years. 

Among them are fugitives 
from repressive African gov- 
ernments who are not receiv- 
ing the help they are due from 
the United Nations' High 
Commissioner for Refugees, 
Mr Edlin said 

Those include black South 
Africans who claim to be 
members of the African Na- 
tional Congress and the Pan 
Africanist Congress, three 
whites with South African 
connections, and Malawian 
Jehovah’s Witnesses whose 
sect was banned by President 
Karnuzu Banda. 

Mr Edlin was arrested at 
Lusaka's Ridgeway Hotel on 
December 19 while on his way 
to report on recent food riots 
in the Zambian copper belt. 
He believes that the action 
stemmed from an admin- 
istrative muddle. 

Mr Edlin was held in a cell 
measuring 15 paces by nine 
paces, with 108 other de- 
tainees who had not been 
convicted by the courts, and a 
cell “captain”, a hardened 
criminal serving a lengthy 
formal jail term. Mr Edlin had 
to bribe the cell captain with 
the food and cigarettes which 
friends brought to him. 

The convicts were given 
coarse maize meal and beans, 
contaminated by cockroaches. 
Their meat ration was 
commandeered by the guards. 

More than 500 prisoners 
shared three cells of differing 
sizes, into which they were 
locked from 4.30pm to 9.0am 
each night The cells were 
infested with bedbugs and lice 
and the prisoners, who were 


each given a single blanket 
slept on the concrete floor. 

A group of 18 juvenile 
offenders, between the ages of 
seven and 14, arrested for 
pick-pocketing and petty of- 
fences, were smuggled into the 
adult cells where they were 
hired-out as prostitutes, Mr 
Edlin said. Marijuana smok- 
ing was rife. 

“There is very little evi- 
dence in the prison life of the 
sort of humanism as a philos- 
ophy that President Kaunda 
preaches," Mr Edlin said. 

“Zambia, as chairman of 
the Front Line states, is one of 
the major critics of the policies 
of South Africa, and yet one 
sees the same sort of thing in 
Zambia, only worse in regard : 
to detention of children as 
young as seven years old.” 

Mr Edlin said British High 
Commission officials hoped 
to obtain the release shortly of , 
a British citizen who has been j 
living in South Africa, Mr ' 
Michael Howard. Mr Howard, j 
aged 23. has been detained in 
Kamwala for three months 
since his arrest at the 
Chinmdu border post, shortly 
after crossing from 
Zimbabwe. 

After completing immigration 
formalities he went down to 
the Zambesi River to wash his i 
hands but was arrested by 
security guards who suspected 1 
him of spying on the strategic ' 
Chirundu Bridge. 

Mr Howard was taken to 
Lusaka and declared a prohib- j 
ited immigrant but the unex- I 
plained delay in carrying out 
his deportation is minimal 
compared with the plight of 
hundreds of blade detainees in 
Kamwala. 

One white security prisoner ! 
in Kamwala, Mr Duncan 
Vaiise, aged 30, is held tv 
special order from President 
Kaunda. With three other 

South Africans, Mr Vause was ! 

arrested while on in Zambia 
shortly after the South African 
raid on African National Con- 
gress targets last May. 

Recently, three other whites 
have been detained on allega- 
tions of spying for South 
Africa, but none is held in 
Kamwala. Mr Edlin said. 


. 







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Injured 
Botham’s 
five for 41 

Continued from page 1 

damaged canilage-He has. 
used a machine, widely em- 
ployed to help horses and' 
greyhounds recover from in- 
jury, which puts a magnetic 
frdd onto the damaged area of 
the body to help its healing. 

MrBrown added: “I used 
both ultrasound and 
Magnetapuise on fan. Bat the 
important thing is that he has 
been careful in his movements 
and has prepared for the 
match with running and twist- 
ing exercises to make certain 
the chest muscles are fully 
stretched. 

Leading article, page 21 
Match report page 37 


Critical by-election looming 


Continued from page one 

its representation at last May’s 
local elections. 

The Alliance acknowledge 
that a left-wing Labour can- 
didate represents their best 
chance of success, and fear 
that Greenwich could torn out 
to be another Fulham, where 
they were squeezed out by the 
polarization of run-down 
council estates and smart 
gentrifreation. 

However, the neighbouring 
seat of Woolwich is held by an 
SDP MP, Mr John Cartwright, 
and the SDP Alliance can- 
didate, Mrs Rosie Baines, a 
market researcher who lives 
locally and has three children, 
can expect a flood of support 
at grassroots level from Alli- 
ance activists. 

Another nearby Alliance 


stronghold is Bermondsey, 
where the Liberal MP Mr 
Simon Hughes overturned a 
17,000 Labour majority in a 
1983 by-election. 

The Conservative candidate 
is Mr John Antcliffe, a young 
local councillor, who can rely 
on a substantial bedrock of 
solid Conservative support 

Mr Baroetl, who was aged 
58, had held the seat since a 
1971 by-election, caused by 
the resignation- of Mr Richard 
Marsh, now Lord Marsh. 

Earlier he had entered Par- 
liament by winning a dramatic 
by-election in the Tory strong- 
hold of South Dorset in 1962, 
only to lose that seat again at 
the 1964 general election. 

Mr Barnett, who leaves a 
widow, a son and a daughter, 
was a junior environment 
minister in the last Labour 


government and would un- 
doubtedly have held min- 
isterial rank were Labour to 
win the next eleetzon. 

Mr Neil Kinnock, the La- 
bour leader, sai± “Many 
thousands of people, far be- 
yond the Labour movement 
which he served so well and 
loved so much, will be 
shocked and distressed to bear 
the news of Guy Barnett’s 
death. 

“Guy, with his quiet and 
persuasive manner, was a 
devoted servant not only to 
the people he represented in 
his constituency, bat also to 
those deprived people in the 
Third World, whom lie be- 
lieved we had a dutv to serve 

ttec flop r egoH: L^ txnr 
13^61 <38.2 pa- cent), conservative 
12.150 <34.8 per cent). SDP Alliance 
8.783 (25,1 per cent}. 

Obitnary, page 22 


- 

. -v 


Hong Kong (Ad?) — A 
fire yesterday left 1,700 
people homeless and de- 
stroyed 170 boats in a 
cove popular with tourists 
for its floating res- 
taurants. Two people were 
slightly injured in the 
blaze, which firemen in 
boats and helicopters 
fought for four hours. 

They were hampered 
by strong winds which 
fanned the flames and 
caused the fire to spread 
quickly through con- 
gested Aberdeen cove. 

The firemen's efforts 
were further hindered by 
numerous mooring lines, 
and other residents 
attempting to escape. 

None of the floating 
restaurants, which are 
built on large barges, were 

damage d. 


quiet on 

roads. 

and rail 

By Kenneth Gosling 
and Guy Ker 

Police and eraergenev ser- 
vices vesierday reported a 
quieter* than normal Unnst- 
mas, after an unseasoned spdj 
of mild weather which caused 
few serious road problems. 

Motoring organizations 
were kepi busy, with the RAC 
answering an average of one 
call every three minutes over 
the entire holiday period, but 
a spokesman said the majority 
were for minor problems. 

Travel was little problem 
for those with cars: the chaos 
on French Railways was 
neatly avoided in this country 
by having no trains at all for 
two days. 

British Telecom is expected 
to face the wrath of the 
Telecommunications Users 
Association on Monday, after 
thousands of callers were frus- 
trated by the virtual shuidown 
of the operator service on 
Christmas Day and Boxing 
Day. 

There were the usual Eng- 
lish eccentricities like taking 
to the sea for charity dips. 
More than 100 brave souls 
plunged into the English 
Channel to mark the 40th 
anniversary of the traditional 
Christmas Day immersion: at 
Hastings the oldest “dipper” 
was a man of 79. 

At Eastbourne, the youngest 
was aged eight. 

Another two dozen hardv 
folk swam across the harbour 
at Weymouth, in Dorset, and 
more than 700 people braved 
the chilly North Sea yesterday 
in what was claimed to be the 
biggest Boxing Day dip in the 
world. 

The annual event at 
Seabum, Sunderland, brought 
out thousands of sightseers 
who helped raise an estimated 
£14,000 for 30 charities. 

Project Mother Christmas 
was operated on Christmas 
Day by British Airways, 
whose kitchens were used to 
prepare four-course turkey 
lunches for distribution to the 
needy in various parts of 
Britain. 

More than 2,000 meals were 
prepared and sent to commu- 
nity halls from BA kitchens. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Solotioa to Puzzle No 17,234 SohitioD to Puzzle No 17,237 ■ Today’s events 


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The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,238 

A prize o/The Times Concise Adas of the World will be given 
for the first five correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should be addressed to: The Times. Saturday Crossword 
Competition, PO Box 486. Virginia Street, London El 9DD. 
The winners and solution will be published next Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturday's competition are: H M Bibby, 
DyffrynAled, LLansannas, Denbigh Clwyd; Mrs F F Bowsher. 
Quarry Hills Lane, Lichfield, Staffs; J R Gallimore. Fern 
Cottage, Stewkley. Leighton Buzzard, Beds; Oh PM Latham. 1 
Old Palace Lane, Richmond, Surrey; Mrs M Morawetz. St 
Mary’s. Poles Lane, Ouerboume, Winchester : 

Name 


Address, 



ACROSS 

1 In France. I accept glasses 
on a man from the East (8). 

5 Coat could be altered as a 
result (6). 

8 She wrote a note, carried by 
ravens, moreover (6,4). 

9 Ruth is mine and yours, not 
ours (4). 

10 Besides where contractor 
enters (4,3,7). 

11 Gave Bums, the poet an- 
other name (7). 

13 The answer I place in a note 

CO- 

15 Fool invites lady in for a 
smoke (7). 

18 Trouble for horses when one 
interrupts villains (7). 

21 Nursery characters - 1 find 
them incredible, absolutely 
fantastic (5,5,4). 

22 Branch member (4). 

23 Formerly one with the right 
temper to irritate (10). 

24 A group is abroad in a film 
scene (6). 

25 Hardly knowing about qual- 
ity (8). 


DOWN 

1 Can trap get sprung first by 
fool? (7). 

2 Lying and abandoned 
woman brought up in dis- 
course (9). 

3 Denied the need to cany a 

gmU 7 )- . . 

4 Stay blue about America (7). 

5 Where to find the Ashes ex- 
posed to criticism (5,4). 

6 Voice of parson faltering 
over nothing (7). 

7 Obsolete letter, so they say, 
can cut out ‘IT (7). 

12 Staff given a rise, celebrated 
— but not in Sight (9). 

14 Pretended to be different, 
and so it is (3-6). 

16 It may be called on in an 
emergency (3,4). 

17 Something to eat going up 
river — a short river (7). 

18 Bob, for instance, freed me 
from rheumatic disorder (7). 

19 Part of England - or, rather, 
part of Europe (7). 

20 Hats in a row. a line (7). 


The Duke of Edinburgh, Pa- 
tron of the Ely Cathedral 1986 
Appeal, visits the cathedral, 
noon. 

Last chance to see 
Craftsmanship for Christmas; 
Cirencester Workshops, Brew- 
ery^Couit, Cirencester, 10 to 

General 

Trade/craft fair; The 
Fisbexgaie Centre. York; 10 to 4. 

Mayer guided lours; Liver- 
pool Museum, William Brown 
Si, Liverpool; 1.30 and 2.30 
(until Jan 6, except Dec 28 and 
Jan 1). 

Snow Queen, Regent Centre, 
High Si, Chrfctcbnrcfc; 7-30 
(until Jan 3, except Dec 28 and 

3D- 

Hot air balloon meeting. 
Brass Monkey Meet, Harrogate; 
until Dec 29; contact 0969 
40674. 

Fantastic Mr Fax ; Gardner 
Centre for the Arts, Sussex 
University, Palmer, Brighton; 
230 and 6. 


Tomorrow’s events 


Music 

Alex Welsh Reunion Band 
play jazz; the Hazlitt Theatre 
Lounge, Mudstone; 8. 

General 

Didcoi Steam day, Dhtax rail- 
way centre; 1 1 to 5. 

Steam Weekend; Ryehope 
Engines Museum, Snnderland; 
li to 5. 

Antique Fair Railway Hotel, 
Buxton, Derbyshire; 10 to 5. 


Travel guide 


British Sail 

Today: Normal Saturday ser- 
vice, though most early morning 
trains will not run. 

Tomorrow; Normal Sunday 
service. 

December 29 and 30: Normal 
weekday sendees, but with re- 
duced commuter services. 

December 31: Wednesday 
service in Scotland with last 
trains generally running before 
10 pm. No overnight trains 
except for Irish Mall boat trains 
to and from Holyhead. 

January I: No services in 
Scotland; InterCity trains will 
not run north of Carlisle or 
Newcastle; no local services in 
NE England; most Network 
SouthEast services will operate 
to a Sunday timetable. 

London Transport 

December 29, 30. 31 and 
January 2: Most bus services 
will run to Saturday timetables. 

January I: Buses and Under- 
ground w31 run to Sunday 
timetables. 

On New Year's Eve travel on 
London buses and Under- 
ground will be free after 1 1.45 
pm. 


Roads 


London and the South-east: 
M275: Construction of flyover 
between M27 intersection and 
Rudmore roundabout, Ports- 
mouth. AJ016: Work on dual 
carriageway between Britvick 
roundabout and A12 at 
Maigaretling. Essex. Kingston: 
Work S of A3 Kingston by-pass 
between 8 am and 4 pm. 

The North: Ml: Work be- 
tween junctions 31 and 33 (A57 
Worksop and A630 Rotherham) 
with various slip road closures 
at junctions 31 and 32 (M 18 
interchange)- M6: Work at junc- 
tion 23 (Meneyside) and 
contraflow between junctions 29 
and 32 (A6 Preston and M55 
interchange). M63: Widening 
work at Barton Bridge with 
motorway restrictions between 
junction I (Eccles interchange) 
to junction 7 (Chester Rd, A56 
Stretford). 

Wales and die west: A3& 
Lane closures in both directions 
at the top of Haldon Hill with 
delays between Exeter and 
Plymouth. A38/A35& Link 
road to junction 25<M5) with 
alterations to Blackbrook 
roundabout. 

Scotland: A19& Temporary 
lights W of Meadowhiil junc- 
tion. A92/A978: Restrictions at 
St Machar Drive, King St, due 
to roundabout construction. 
A68: Resurfacing on Edinburgh 
to St Boswdls Rd near A6I24 


lights on Glasgow to Ayr rd, N 
of Bailantre. 


Anniversaries 


( WEATHER > A fairly dondy north-westerly airflow wifi cover the British Isles. Some south-east- 
^ ^ ern districts will start bright, and the extreme NE of Scotland will be bright at times, 

with some sleet or snow showers, hut most of the British Isles will be cloudy, with some showery rain likely in 
many places. More persistent rain may affect parts of western Scotland. It wffl bezatber cold in tbeNE, other- 
wise temperatures will be near normal, though the wind will be chilly. Outlook for tomorrow and Monday: Gen- 
erally mild and dondy, some rain, chiefly in the N and W. 


LIGHTING-UPTIME 


AROUND BRITAIN 





















25 


BUSINESS AND FINAN CE 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 36 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 41 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


STOCK market 


FT 30 Share 
1,301.2 

FT-SE 100 
1,665.1 

Bargains 

10,000 

USM (Data stream) 
130.19 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 
1.4580 

W German mark 

2.8664 

Trade-weighted 

69.0 


Bank pulls 
out of 
new office 

Lloyds Bank is pulling out 
of taking phase four of 
Rosehaugh/Stanhope’s 
Broadgaie development at 
Liverpool Street, London. But 
the bank will still be providing 
a non-recourse loan for the 
240.000 sq ft phase. 

Lloyds is reorganizing its 
space requirements in the City 
of London and is to decen- 
tralize about 700 staff to new 
headquarters in Bristol. 

The bank announced its 
intention last May by stating 
that it was taking 160,000 sq ft 
in St Martins Property 
Corporation's London Bridge 
City development on the 
south side of the Thames. But 
it refused to confirm its inten- 
tion of moving to Broadgate— 
which later proved to be the 
case. 

Lloyds says it is now re- 
assessing its space needs. 
There is the possibility that it 
will redevelop its two City 
offices at 71 Lombard Street 
and 40 Queen Victoria Street. 

Rosehaugh, the developer 
of the 2.S million sq ft 
Broadgate development, says 
that it has several other ten- 
ants lined up for phase four. 
Lloyds was to have paid £35 a 
sq ft for the space, but the- 
company believes the rent 
could be nearer to £40 by the 
time the building is completed 
in March, 1988. 


Royal Bank of 
Canada sale 

The Royal Bank of Canada 
is to sell its freehold building 
in the City of London at 6 
Lothbuty, opposite the Bank 
of England, as part of its move 
to its new, purpose-built head- 
quarters in Queen Victoria 
Street. The Lothbuiy budding 
with 17,400 sq ft of space will 
be sold by tender in March by 
Debenham Tewson & 
Chinnocks. 



The Lothbury boilding 


Commodities Re- 
view of Year 26 
Wall Street 26 
Memey Mrkts 26 
Foma Excfa 26 
Traded Opts 26 
Comment 27 


27 

Stock Market 27 
Co News 27 
Urt Trusts 32 
ConBBodities 32 
USM Prices 32 
Share Prices 33 


Government may invest in space 

Airbus project 
takes a dive 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


Prospects for a continuing 
British presence in the Euro- 
pean Airbus Industrie con- 
sortium have taken a nose 
dive after a growing convic- 
tion that the rival airliner, 
developed by McDonnell 
Douglas of the United States, 
will be formally launched on 
Monday. 

Thirty-two customers have 
appeared for the American 
aircraft, the MEM 1. More are 
likely to be announced and the 
aircraft is likely to be well 
advanced before the Airbus 
partners make up their minds 
about the proposed A3 30 and 
A340 jets. 

Department of Trade and 
Industry ministers are known 
to be sceptical about the 
wisdom of launching new 
Airbus types in the light of the 
growing success of McDonnell 
Douglas’s latest venture. 

British Aerospace, which 
has a 20 per cent stake in 
Airbus, is seeking government 
aid of about £750 million — 
the entire cost of developing 
and . producing the wings for 
the new airliners — and it has 
made known its reluctance to 


go ahead with anything less. 

But Airbus has so far failed 
to convince the British Gov- 
ernment that there is a big 
potential market for the four- 
engine A340 — the group’s 
answer to Boeing's dominance 
of the long-range jumbo jet 
sector — and the DTI is 
awaiting more detailed market 
studies from the consortium. 

There will be further pres- 
sure on the department from 
the announcement that Airbus 
has made a deal with the 
consortium company. Inter- 
national Aero Engines, which 
includes Rolls-Royce, to pro- 
vide engines for the A340. 

Ministers are studying, on a 
vaJue-for- money basis, the 
potential of investing in the 
airbuses or, instead, in space, 
through the European Space 
Agency and the new British 
National Space Centre. 

The Government is show- 
ing considerable interest in 
developing Hotol, BAe's pro- 
posed space aircraft which 
would carry people and cargo 
at a fraction of the cost of 
rockets. 

The development costs are 


estimated at £4 billion, of 
which the Government would 
provide about £i billion, the 
rest coming from other Euro- 
pean countries. 

In making dear its need for 
100 per cent Airbus launch 
aid, BAe is seen in some 
circles to be signalling its own 
disquiet about the A330-A340 
project 

The issue is complicated by 
BAe's wish to be seen to be a 
loyal Airbus member with its 
French, West German and 
Spanish partners, all of which 
are committed in principle to 
Airbus producing a full family 
of aircraft in an effort to 
compete more effectively with 
Boeing. 

But while the medium- 
range, twin-engine A330 is 
seen as an ideal aircraft to 
bring to the market, the A340 
is not. 

Further trouble could lie 
ahead as the result of the 
growing pressure on European 
governments from the US 
Administration to stop giving 
Airbus such massive 
“subsidies.” 


Fielding takes 
over at Heath 


By Alison Eadie 


Mr Derek Newton is step- 
ping down as chairman of the 
troubled Lloyd's broker CE 
Heath at the end of the month. 
His place will be taken by Mr 
Richard Fielding, who became 
chief executive last month. 

Heath has suffered from a 
continuing exodus of senior 
staff this year c ulminating in 
the walk-out a few weeks ago 
by 28 broking staff to Citicorp 
Insurance Brokers. 

Mr Fielding, became chief 
executive after Heath share- 
holders approved the ac- 
quisition by Heath of Fielding 
Insurance. The deal was in 
effect a reverse takeover as it 
gave Mr Fielding, founder of 
Fielding Insurance and a for- 
mer Heath director, the chief 
executive's job at Heath. Four 
more Fielding directors have 
since been appointed to 
Heath's main board. 

Approval of the Fielding 
acquisition meant the auto- 
matic lapsing of the hostile 
£173 milli on bid from PWS 
Holdings, another Lloyd’s 



Derek Newton 
broker. Heath's shares were 
unchanged on Wednesday at 
427p. 

Heath has warned of a 
substantial shortfall in profits 
this year and the City has been 
downgrading its forecasts. Al- 
though most analysts are 
expecting about £25 million 
pretax compared with £30.4 
million the previous year. 
Quitter Goodison is shooting 
for only £17 million in the 
year ending March 31. 


£45 million European 
buyout financed by 3i 


By Our City Staff 

What is believed to be the 
biggest management buyout 
on the continent of Europe by 
a British-owned venture cap- 
ital group has been led by 3L 

It -has financed the S65 
million (£45 million) buyout 
of the Electro-Nite division of 
American Midland-Ross 
Corporation. 

Electro-Nite, of Belgium, is 
a world leader in the supply of 
devices for measuring the 
temperature and carbon and 
oxygen content of molten 
steel. 

More than 50 managers 
from the company’s principal 
operating territories will put 
up $5.2 million. The 3i com- 
pany has arranged finance of 
559.8 milli on, of which $45 
million will be syndicated by 
the London branch of Banque 
Francaise du Commerce 
Exterior. 


Land Instruments Inter- 
national, of Sheffield, the 
British distributor of Electro- 
Nite's products and a long 
standing customer of 3i, in- 
troduced 3i to Electro-Nite. 

Electro-Nite has production 
facilities in Belgium, France 
and America, and assembly 
plants in Australia, Brazil and 
South Africa. 

Despite the problems of the 
steel industry, tire company 
has 'grown strongly in recent 
years in response to steel 
producers needing to use the 
latest technological. 


Japanese 
divided 
on growth 
prospects 

By Graham Seaijeant 

The Japanese government 
is engaged in a fierce debate 
with outside forecasters over 
whether the Japanese econ- 
omy can grow by the 3.5 per 
cent it is predicting for the 
1 987-88 financial year without 
a further stimulus, as the rise 
in the yen increasingly hurts 
expoh industries. 

Figures released over 
Christmas show vehicle ex- 
ports falling farther in 
November to 537,000, down 
nearly 15 per cent on the 
corresponding month. 

Vehicle exports for 1986 as 
a whole are estimated to have 
fellen by only 1.9 per cent 
because of buoyant trade ear- 
lier in the year. But the slump 
has caught up with the motor- 
cycle industry whose exports 
are estimated to have fallen a 
cumulative 30 per cent in the 
first 1 1 months of the year. 

The overall trade surplus 
fell slightly —from $8.7 billion 
in October to $8.5 billion in 
November — but it is still 
running well ahead of 1985 
levels. 

Japan's finance ministry 
has drafted a tight 1987-88 
budget for agreement in Cabi- 
net at the end of the year, 
proposing the smallest spend- 
ing increase for 32 years to 
reflect lagging lax revenues. 

Consumer prices fell by 0.5 
percent in November, leaving 
prices unchanged over the 
past 12 months. 

• The flotation of Nippon 
Telegraph and Telephone has 
been delayed by a week to 
mid-February because mul- 
tiple applications have heaped 
confusion over the privatiza- 
tion issue. 

More than 10 million 
applications have been made 
for the 1.7 million shares 
initially being sold. 


Sterling shrugs off trade figures 


By David Smith 

Economics Correspondent 

Sterling's end-of-year rally 
continued on Christmas Eve, 
shrugging off gloomy balance 
of payments figures. The Opec 
settlement also buoyed the 
pound. 

Against the dollar, 
gamed 95 points to S1.4S 
breaking through an im- 
portant resistance level on the 
darts. It also rose by 23 
pfennigs to DM2JF700. 

The sterling index rose by 
0.4 to 69.0, 2 points above its 
record low, providing the Gov- 
ernment with a cushion as the 
pound enters the nervous New 
Year period. 

Unlike the run up to Janu- 
ary 1985 — the most serious 
sterling crisis in recent years — 
the pound strengthened during 
D ecem ber. 

Dealers said that although 
the November trade figures — 
showing a trade deficit of more 
than £1 billion and a cu- 
mulative current account defi- 
cit of £224 million for the year 
— initially depressed the 
pound, the prospect of $18 a 
barrel oD prices and the 
Government's improved show- 
ing in the opinion polls 
weighed sentiment in 
sterling's favour. 

The ponnd has been 
remarkably stable against the 
dollar, moving within a narrow 



JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 


10 per cent range. Against the 
dollar, the ponnd has experi- 
enced one of its most stable 
years since floating exchange 
rates began in 1973. 

The low for the year was 
slightly less than $138 and 
the high just above Si 35. For 
most of the year, the pound 
has moved in the Si. 40 to 
$1.50 range. 

Exporters selling in dollars 
have thus enjoyed a period of 
relative c ur re n cy stability, un- 
like their counterparts selling 
to Europe and Japan. 

Rather than “shadowing” 
the European Monetary Sys- 
tem, the pound has uninten- 
tionally shadowed the dollar. 
This has undoubtedly exerted 
a restraining influence on 
Britain's inflation. 


Had the pound's sharp fall 
against the European cur- 
rencies been matched by a 
similar fall against the dollar, 
Britain would have lost many 
benefits of lower oil prices and 
weaker commodity prices. 

Fortuitously, the pound 
managed an almost ideal pat- 
tern of adjustment this year. It 
fell against the currencies of 
Britain's large competitors, 
dropping by about 25 per cent 
against the mark. But it held 
steady against the dollar, in 
which many essential imports 
are priced. 

The pound has matched the 
experience of the dollar for 
several reasons. The first is a 
change of sentiment in favour 
of the traditionally strong 
currencies. The mark and yen. 


buoyed by the large German 
and Japanese current account 
surpluses, have thus scored 
against the dollar and pound. 

Secondly, relative tu Ger- 
many and Japan, both Britain 
and the US are dependent 
upon off. The dollar and 
sterling therefore suffered 
when world oQ prices plunged. 

Thirdly, the folio w-threragh 
of the September 1985 Group 
of Five agreement, pushing the 
dollar down against other 
currencies, has emphasized 
dollar movements against the 
yen and mark. The pound has 
had no explicit role or support 
and it has been possible for the 
Bank of England to allow it to 
drift down with the dollar. 

The dollar has been weaker 
over Christmas, presaging new 
strains ou internatio nal cur- 
rency agreements if the trend 
continues. On Christmas Eve 
it steadied against the mark to. 
DM1.9660 but fell against a 
strong yen from Y 162.45 to 
Y161.90. 

- Yesterday, however, the dol- 
lar also dropped back against 
the mark in thin trading in the 
Far East and North America, 
losing almost a pfennig to 
DM1.9620. This in turn, pnt 
pressure on the franc, which 
fell virtually to its floor of 
333.03 per 100 marks under 
present European Monetary 
System parities. 



Brunei ‘set 
to seize 
hotels’ 

Singapore (AP— Dow Jones) 
— The Brunei authorities are 
reportedly set to seize Tan Sri 
KJhoo Teck Puat's majority 
stake in the Southern Pacific 
Hotel Corporation (SPHQ, 
which operates and owns ho- 
tels in the Travelodge, Boule- 
vard, ParkroyaL, Holiday Inn 
and Beachcomber chains in 
toe Pacific basin. 

According to reports in 
Singapore and Hong Kong, 
Brunei gained control of 9.996 
shares of a total of 10,000 
issued shares in SPHC when it 
seized control of a bank on 
November 19. 

The shares were pledged as 
security for a loan of Bru- 
nei 39 5 million (£125 mil- 
lion), made by a bank to Leo 
Investment Corporation - a 
company controlled by Tan 
Sri Khoo's family — and for 
which Tan Sri Khoo himself 
has been sued as guarantor. 


Hanson sells 
SCM offshoots 

Lord Hanson, above, has 
sold two American subsid- 
iaries of SCM for a total of 
$133 million (£9.6 million). 
Kleinscfamidt Computer Ser- 
vices has been sold to its 
management for $5.1 million 
and Hudson River Conference 
Center to Gladne Facilitators 
for $8.7 miliiOH. Hanson Trust 
has more than recouped the 
$930 util lion purchase price of 
'SCM through sales. It has 
retained the titanium dioxide, 
paper and Smith -Corona type- 
writer businesses. 

Comment, page 27 


Holmes a Court 
bids for Herald 


Sydney (Reuter) — Mr Rob- 
ert Holmes a Court, the 
Australian businessman, has 
joined battle with Mr Rupert 
Muidoch's News Corporation 
for control of the Herald and 
Weekly Times (HWT), 
Australia’s biggest newspaper 
group. 

Mr Holmes a Court has 
offered Aus$ 1 3 (£5.95) a share 
with scrip alternatives for 
HWT against News 
Corporation's Aus$12 with 
scrip alternatives. The new 
bid is worth Aus$2 billion. 

Mr Murdoch whose pro- 
posed bid, if successful, would 
give him control of 75 percent 
of Australia's daily news- 


papers. gave no immediate 
hint of a higher offer. 

HWT said that no immedi- 
ate decision would be made on 
the counter offer before next 
week because it was unable to 
get all its board members 
together. 

Mr Holmes A Court, who is 
making his bid through a 
listed subsidiary, said it was 
conditional on approval by 
HWTs board and 90 per cent 
acceptance by shareholders. 

News Corporation seemed 
to have clinched the deal on 
December 12 when Mr Ron 
Brierley, the New Zealand 
entrepreneur, agreed to sell his 
12 per cent stake to the media 
group for A us$22Q million. 


STC to buy Whitworth 


By Cliff Feltfaam 


STC, the electronics com- 
pany, made a rare excursion 
into the takeover market on 
Christmas Eve with an agreed 
£5.2 million bid for Whit- 
worth Electric, a wholesale 
electrical distributor. 

The offer sent Whitworth 
shares up to 1 30p, a jump of 
39p, matching the terms of the 
share and cash offer. These are 
three new STC ordinary 
shares for every four Whit- 
worth shares or 51 Op cash. 

Whitworth directors and 
shareholders speaking for 52 
per cent of the equity have 
backed the offer. 

Whitworth will be devel- 
oped as part of STC Distrib- 
utors. STC says combining the 
two businesses will increase 


sales and reduce overheads. 

Whitworth recently repor- 
ted an annual pretax loss of 
£423,000. compared with 
profits of £15,000 on little 
changed turnover of £16 mil- 
lion. The company has suf- 
fered from price cutting with 
insufficient sales to cover 
rising overheads, 

•Stockley, the property com- 


it 

European Ferries for 
£61.4 million last year. It has 
sold two non-income produc- 
ing buildings in London for 
£] 5.25 million. 

The company bas also 
bought the freehold of 
Stockley House in Victoria, 
London for £3.5 million cash. 


•. ^MARKET. SUMMARY 


First, catch your £20,000. . . 

How to be a local hero 


STOCK MARKETS 


1926.83 (+12J51) 


New Yoffc 

Dow Jones .... 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow 18902*5 (+94 JO) 

Hon g Konc 

Hang Seng 2523.92 (+21.92) 

Amsterdam: Gen 280.3 (-0.40) 

Sydney : AO 146&S(-1-7) 

Frankfurt 

Commerzbank — Closed 

Brussels: 

General 4046.39 (same' 

Paris CAC 408.5 (same 

Zurich: SKA Gen — 552.00 (same! 


London: FT. A — — n/a 

r. Gilts 83.14 (+0.18) 


FT. 


Closing prices 


INTEREST RATES 


London: Bank Base: 11% 

3-month Interbank 11 s ie-H’«4% 
3-month eligible MIs:10 ,, ib- 2, 32% 
buying rate 
US; Prime Rate 7K% 

Federal Funds B*io% 

3-month Treasury BiBs 5.57-5.55% 
30-year bonds lOl 29 ^ 1 ® 

CURRENCIES 


London: 
£.$1.4580 
£: DM2.8664 
£: SwFr2.4021 
£: FFr9.4187 
£: Yen236.05 

£: fndex:69.0 
FCUEr/a 


New York: 

$: £1.4632 
$: DM1,9655 
S: SwFrl.6420 
$: FFr6.4705 
$: Yen161.Z5 
S; Index-- 109.6 
SDfl £0.83854 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 

RISES: 

P & 0 SOSpJ+lOp] 

Blue Circle 682p(+7p 

Countryside Preps — 474p (+6p 

Whitworth Elect. 131p (+39p 

Hopkinsons 350p (+6p 

Laird Group 246p (+7p 

Keep Trust 223p <+17p 

Shiloh 223P i+15p 

Halite 220b(+19p; 

Hambro Country 323p (+8p 

Early's Witney — 158p (+17p 

Rosehaugh B15pJ+15p 

Ricardo Eng. 148p(+6p 

Bui lough 350p (+5p 

Norman Hay 160p (+5p. 

Wellcome MOp (-7pl 

Hid Samuel 395p(+5p) 

FALLS: 

TUbuiy Group IgfPHg 

Berisfords 108p (-5p 

Bernard Matthews — 264p(-7p, 
Prices are as at 4pm 


GOLD 


London Fixing: 

AM $391.00 pm-Sung. 

OoseSS 90.56391 2S (£267.75- 
268-25 ) 

Mew York: 

Comax S390.01V390.50 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent (Feb.) pmSI 7.20 btt ($17,15) 
* Pesetas tetsst fradstg price 


If your partner seemed less 
than delighted with your 
Christmas gift of a pair of 
diamond-studded Gucci shoes 
or yawned when you unveiled 
yet another Cartier watch* 
take them back immediately 
and buy the ultimate Gty 
present for 1987: membership 
of the Stock Exchange. 

No longer do you have to do 
anything as tedious as join an 
established stockbroking firm 
and work your way to the top. 
Now individuals can become 
members of the stock market 
in their own right, allowing 
John Smith and Joe Soap to 
become household words 
along with those peculiarly 
named entities such as 
W iliam s de Broe and Kitcat & 
Aiticen. 

The cost of this, wonderful 
present — a veritable licence to 
print (or lose) money — is only 

£10.000. If you are feeling 
really generous, you can also 
throw in the extra £10.000 in 
liquid capital needed to show 
the burghers of the Stock 
Exchange. You could also help 
by hiring a tutor to help 
prepare for the market's en- 
trance exams. 

There are a few restrictions 
under the new entry rules 
announced by the Stock Ex- 


By Richard Lander 

change this month. Yon will 
only be allowed to do business 
on the traded options floor 
and, unlike the big boys, you 
will only be allowed to act as a 
broker or principal. However, 
as any insider will tell you, 
traded options are the thing of 1 
the future and in any case, 
everybody had to choose a 
single capacity for centuries 
before Big Bang. 

Individual members, or 
“locals” as they are called in 
the trade, have been around 
for some time on the London 
International Financial Fu- 
tures Exchange (Liffe). As Mr 
David Morgan, one of Liffe's 
most respected locals said, it is 
a job for the true free spirit. 

“It's a perfect job for some- 
one who is an entrepreneur in 
the old fashioned sense. You 
can go into it without the 
problem of having a large 
staff, stocks, plant or heavy 
capital requirements,” he said. 

Mr Morgan, a former 
businessman and restaura- 
teur, has been on Liffe for 
almost four years and it would 
be hard to find anyone who 
enjoys his work more. He 
positively bubbles with the joy 
of trading on the floor ana 
finds the camaraderie of the 


market a positive incentive to 
go to work every morning. 

He is cagey about exactly 
bow much he has made as a 
local, but as be has built up a 
five-person team around him, 
he would appear to have done 
reasonably well He does ad- 
mit to a few unpleasant mo- 
ments along the way. 

“In four years I’ve had five 
or six nasty experiences where 
I lost thousands of pounds in a 
day. But given the gearing of 
the market, recovery can be 
very quick. It just con- 
centrates your mind a great 
deal more when you’re 
down.” 

His advice to the prospec- 
tive local? Do not get greedy 
and do not panic and what- 
ever you do follow these three 
basic rules of investing: 

• Cut your losses as quickly as 
possible; 

• Never add to a losing 
position: and 

• If you go wrong, cut out and 
ihke a small opposite position. 
Then stop and rethink your 
strategy. 

Sounds easy. Now all I have 
to do is ask Santa to take back 
those paisley socks and sub- 
stitute a cheque for £20,000. 



CHARLES CHURCH 



4,000 Quality Homes of Character 

IN BERKSHIRE ■ BUCKINGHAMSHIRE 
HAMPSHIRE • OXFORDSHIRE 
SURREY AND SUSSEX 

TELEPHONE (0276) 681661 






26 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


thf TTMFS SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986_ 


■WALL STREET 


Dow rises slightly 
in slow trading 


New York (Agencies) - The 
da; after the Christmas holi- 
day brought some of the 
dullest trading of 1986 as the 
market rose only slightly hi 
early dealings. 

; One trader said: 'There is 
just nothing going on."* 
Few stocks changed hands. 
The Dow Jones industrial 
average rose by 3 points to 
1,929.60. 

Advancing and deHintng 
stocks were almost even on a 
vonfane of 11 million 
Earioerjn the first hoar of 
trading, oidy 9 million shares 
changed hands. Drag shares, 
however, poshed ahead. 
Merck rose by 2% to 125, 
SnuthkliBe by 1% to 93%, 
Pfizer by 1% to 62% and 
Squibb 1% to 118. 


1,926.60 as shares dosed 
higher in slow trading. 

Tax-rehued selling that had 
pot pressure on prices in the 
previous two sessions eased, 
allowing the market to re- 
bound with the help of some 
fhturesHrelated haying and 
strong gains in a handful of 
Mae chip stocks. 

Strong performances in 
Merck and IBM helped to 
bolster the industrial average. 
These stocks rose by a com- 
bined 4% points, accounting 
for more than 5 points of the 
Dow'S advance. 

Advancing stocks led 

rahime shrank to 9&2 minion 
shares from 188.7 million on 
Tuesday. It was the slowest 
day since November 28, the 


Commodities look set for another dull year 

All quiet on the buying front 

^ arm ,„ n .t 

c 


On Christmas Eve, the Dow day after Thanksgiving Day, 
Jones indastrial average when 93L5 aii®i ' 
dosed 1223 points higher at changed barafo . 



Bse 
Brian 
Bg Warner 
Bnsf Myers 
BP 

Burrton hd 

Buri'tion Ntn 

Brunswick 

CmpbeflSp 

CanPadflc 

Caterpdter 

Cetertesa 

Central SW 

Champion 

Chase Man 

ChmBkNY 

Chevron 

Chrysler 

Citicorp 

Oark Equip 

Coes Cota 


C'bntaaGas 
Cmb'tnEng 
Comwttti Ed 
ConsEdis 
Cn Nat Gas 
Cons Power 
CntriOsta 
Corning Gt 
CPCIffll 
Crane 
Curtiss Wrt 
Data Beni. 


DeltaAir 
Detroit Ed 
Digital Eq 
Disney 
Dow Cham 
Dresser Ind 
Duke Power 
DuPont 
Estm Kodak 
Eaton Corp 
EmersonB 
Emery Air 
Exxon Carp 
Fad Dpi Sts 


43% 

43% 

LTV. Corp 

1% 

i% 

45% 

45% 

Uttar 

75% 

75 Ji 

38% 

38% 

Lockheed 

50% 

50% 

53% 

20% 

53% 

20% 

Lucky Sirs 
Man H'nver 

28 

47% 

28% 

47 

39% 

39% 

Manvels Cp 

7 

1% 

42% 

43 

Mapco 

61% 

62 

129% 

128% 

Marine Mid 

46 

46% 

45% 

44% 

Mrt Marietta 

39% 

39% 

3 ?% 

37% 

Masco 

79% 

73% 

33% 

34% 

McDonalds 

63 

62% 

47% 

47% 

McDonnell 

74% 

75 

33% 

33 

Mead 

57% 

57% 

16 

16% 

Merck 

123% 

119% 

27% 

26% 

MmstaMnq 

117% 

117% 

55% 

55% 

Mobil 09 

39% 

39% 

80% 

79% 

Monsanto 

77% 

77 

33% 

33% 

Morgan JJ’. 

85% 

85% 

54% 

54% 

Motorola 

36% 

38% 

30% 

30% 

NCR Corn 

46 

45% 

23% 

23% 

NLIndstrs 

5% 

5% 

49% 

49% 

Nat Distirs 

44 

43% 

16% 

16% 

Nat Med Ent 

23% 

23% 

106 

105% 

NatSmcndt 

11 

11 

43% 

d4% 

Norfolk Sth 

85 

84% 

60% 

61% 

NWBancre 

38% 

37% 

19% 

19% 

OcddntPat 

28% 

28% 

46% 

47% 

Ogden 

Owi Corp 

43% 

44 

8/% 

8/% 

41% 

41% 

«f% 

69% 

Owens-BI 

51% 

50% 

75% 

75% 

PacGasQ 

24% 

24% 

86% 

85% 

Pan Am 

4% 

4% 

11% 

11% 

PBfwiejrJiJ. 

74% 

75% 

73% 

73% 

PennzaK 

64% 

64 

86% 

88% 

Peprsco 

-iL- 

26 


Wstghsel 


Srovwts 
Sun Comp 
Tefedyrw 306% 3Q61S 
Tenneco 38% 38% 

Texaco 38% 35 
Texas ECor 28% 28% 
Texas Inst 1183 1183 
Texas Utte 32% 32% 

Textron 64% 66% 
TraWrsCor 44% M 
TRW Inc 87% 88% 

UAL Inc 54% 57% 
UtttnerNV 234K 235 
83 82% 

22 % 22 % 
UnPacCor 63% 64 
Uld Brands 35% 35% 

USGCorp 38% 38 

UtdTactmol 47% 46% 
USX Corp 21% 31% 
Unocal 27% 27 
•Mm Walter 50% 50 
wmerLmtx 58% 58% 
Wells Fargo 103% 104% 
rises 59% 59% 
39% 38% 
68 % 68 % 
Wbofcorth 38% 37% 
Xerox Corp 63 63M 

Zenith 21% 21% 


| CANADIAN PRICES 

! AgncoEag 
AfcnAkxn 
AlgomaSn 
CanPadflc 
ComkKo 
ConBathrst 
Hkr/SklCan 
HdsnBMki 
Imssco 
Imperial Oil 
In Pipe 
Ryl trustee 
Seagram 
StndCo 
ThfnsnN'A' 
v^con, 

Weaion 



ommodities have done 
their fair share of flattering 
to deceive in 1986. Almost 
every dog in the commod- 
ities world has had its day at 
some time daring the year, but as we 
enter 1987, traders and analysts are 
being forced once again to hedge any 
optimistic forecasts with a festive 
sprinkling of“ife”. “maybes* and Tn 
some tiraimstanoes**. 

With high real interest rates and 
continued incremental growth in the 
Western economies - not to mention 
increasing prudence by the Chinese in 
their buying programmes — there is 
still no clear sign that commodities 
are coming back into fashion. 

Gold and platinum are really the 
only two commodities to buck the 
trend this year. After a long spell in 
the doldrums, gold broke out above 
the $400 an ounce level, although it 
has since found it difficult to stay 
there. Sentiment has been helped by 
huge Japanese purchases for the 
Emperor Hirohito commemorative- 
coin, worries about political develop- 
ments in South Africa and that old 
gold-bug’s stand by. inflationary 
expectations. 

Whether such factors are enough to 
drive gold markedly higher next year 
is questionable. Memories in the 
financial markets are short and 
inflation paranoia may come to be 
seen as an animal of the 1970s now 
dose to extinction. It will certainly be 
a long bard struggle before we see gold 
even approaching its record high of 
$830 an ounce. 

If anything, platinum has rather 
more going for it next year. It is true 
that a South African supply disrup- 
tion now seems unlikely, but it is a 
metal of the 1990s whose industrial 
uses are orientated towards high-tech 
conservationist uses such as electron- 
ics. 

However, it would be unwise to 
expect anything spectacular from the 
silver market next year. The metal, 
much of which is located in romantic 
but near-bankrupt countries such as 
Peru and Mexico, has now been 
firmly rerated as a base rather than a • 
precious commodity and has be- 
haved as such, although it 



Japan is to ent the number of gold coins to be issued early next year 
from 5 million to 1 million, because an estimated 10 per cent of the 10 
million coins issued on November 10 to co mmemo rate the sixtieth 
anniversary of the reign of Emperor Hirohito (above) were unsold. 
The Bank of Japan will eventually boy hack unsold coins from finan- 
cial institutions. 


T 


occa- 


sionally takes succour from 
developments in gold and platinum. 

allting of base metals. 1986 
will not go down as one of 
their greatest years. “From 
the fundamental point of 
view the year has appeared 
to be a slow motion replay of the two 
preceding years,” said Mr David 
Williamson of Shearson Lehman 
Brothers, the metals trader. 

“The only tiny bright spot, I 
suppose, was that the year repre- 
sented a further step in the long 
trudge towards the time when mining 
capacity will not be sufficient to meet 
immediate consumer needs.” 

Whether it was end-of-year merri- 
ment or something else, some an- 
alysts were prepared to present 
another production of that old Christ- 
mas favourite “The Copper Price 


Should Move Higher Next Year”. 

According to Mr Anthony Hodges 
of Rudolf Wolff, the metals trader, 
the impetus to higher copper prices 
might come from the changing buy- 
ing patterns, which has led to 
consumers holding much lower 
stocks. 

“A rush to lengthen the (stocks’) 
pipeline could be triggered by supply 
disruptions, loner interest rates, 
heightened inflationary expectations 
ormerely a perception that prices win 
no longer be lower next month.” 

“We believe that the mood is now 
finely-balanced and that it would not . 
take much to turn consumer senti- 
ment in favour of buying forward 
more extensively." 

Another bullish factor for copper as 
it enters the New Year is a strike at 
the Noranda refinery in Home. 


Quebec, where about 800 workers 
stopped work on November 5. 

r n act. if there were any thread 
connecting the various metals in 1 986 
-4SI frwastadustria) strife. Some disputes 
had a tang ible effect on prices, 
especially in lead and zinc. 

But such supply disruptions are bv 
their very nature temporary ana it 
testifies to the toipid fundamentals of 
the base metals markets at present 
that they become so excited by such 
passing phenomena. 

Him soft commodity markets teye 
had an unusually lively year- much to 
the jov of the London Commodity 
Exchange where volumes have shown 
healthy increases. However, just like 
a coincidence of bad biorhythms, all 
three large soft markets have ended 
the year on a down note- 

n wf in particular inspired 
great expectations in the 
early part of the year when it 
was hoped that a substantial 
. — supply deficit could eat into 
world stocks. But the year ended with 
the US announcing a 41 per cent cut 
in import quotas for 1987 — a 
devastating blow for many of its 
impoverished Third World suppliers. 

The cocoa world managed to 
restore our faith in commodity pacts, 
badlv dented by last year's tin 
disaster, by hammering out an agree- 
ment in Geneva during the summer. 
But without US membership, a 
prospective production surplus in 
1986-87 and huge amounts of cocoa 
in the pact’s buffer stock, prices are 
once again on a bearish tack. 

Coffee prices are also on the 
slippery slope downwards and have 
ended the year about 40 per cent 
below their peak As in base metals, 
consumers have ag ain shown their 
ability to live from hand to mouth 
and have refused to be panicked by 
reports of drought in Brazil or indeed 
the shenanigans of the Brazilian 
Coffee Institute. There is, it tran- 
spires, plenty of coffee of Brazil. 

Come to think of it there is plenty 
of most commodities everywhere. 


s 


Richard Lander 


APPOINTMENTS 


Change at 
Viking 
Packaging 

Viking Packaging Group: 
Mr Martin Thompson is now 
financial director and com- 
pany secretary. 

Canadean: Mr Richard Hall 
is made director and general 
manager. 

Associated Book Publish- 
ers: Mr Michael Turner be- 
comes deputy group chair- 
man, Mr David Evans deputy 
group managing director and 



Mr Martin Thompson 
Mr William Mackarefl, Mr 
Richard Stileman and Mr 
Alan Turnbull directors. 

McKechnie Brothers: Mr 
CG Barrell is made managing 
director of Geeco Products 
and Mr BA Berry has rejoined 
Dedon as production dir- 
ector. 

Lazard Securities: Mr 
Philip DarwaU-Smith, Mr 
Christopher Edge. Miss Avrfl 
Griffiths and Miss Patricia 
Maxwell-Arnot are made 
directors. 

Financial Print & Commu- 
nications: Mr Keith Leathers 
joins as financial director. .Mr 
Bob Bonaey becomes group 
sales and marketing director 
and Mr Mike Bantkk sales 
director. 

Ad west Group: Mr Ted 
Jones has joined the board. 

Lancashire Enterprises: Mr 
David Taylor has been named 
managing director. 


Hongkong Land switch 


Hongkong Land, the Crown 
colony’s largest property com- 
pany, is to restructure its 
property board after the 
demerger of Dairy Farm and 
that proposed for the Man- 
darin Oriental Hotel Group. 

Mr Simon Keswick remains 
chairman with Mr Nigel Rich 
becoming chief executive offi- 
cer. Mr Andrew Denman will 
be chief operating officer, a 


post previously held by Mr 
David Davies who resigned in 
July. 

There will be two new board 
appointments. Mr Tony 
wareham will be the director 
of property management with 
Mr Jonathan Petit becoming 
the director of leasing. These 
appointments follow foe resig- 
nation of Mr Jeremy Priestley, 
the managing director of leas- 
ing and management 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


HntOMHngs 

Nov 17 
Oecl 
Dec 15 


imtDoofings 

Nov 28 
Dec 12 
Jan 2 

24. 


Feb 19 
Mar 5 
Mer19 


For SeUement 
Mar 2 
Mar16 
Mar 30 


. 12/88 Amstrad Consumer Boctronlcs. London 
Soorttas. Norte* Capital, Parian, Berkeley & Hay HB, TV-am. Dares Estates, Keep 
Thist, Bristol Ofl & Minerals, <3. Daws, Astra. Kwahu. 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


Three Month Storting 

as 

Htoh 

Law 

Close 

ph on 

EstVel 

Jun 87 

88-26 

8026 

89.24 

8885 

9 

Sep 67- 

Dec87 

6947 

NT 

89-3i 

89.37 

89-38 

8924 

10 

o 

Mpr 88 

NT 



89.02 

0 

.bin Aft 

NT 



88.77 

a 

Previous day's total open 
Three Month EnrodoBar 

Merest! 4411 

Previous day's total 

open merest 21798 


93JB9 

94.00 

S3B8 

9398 

84 

Sop87 

93.89 

33.89 

9389 

93J31 

5 


NT 

93.71 

a 

US Treasury Bond 

100-08 

Previous daw's total open interest 3235 





99-10 


Sep 87 — 

NT 



..... 

0 


Shortest 
Dec 88 — 
Mar 87 „ 
Jun 87 


oat 

Dec l 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 
Sep 87 — 
FT-SE100 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 


NT 

97413 

NT 


NT 

111-18 

111-31 

NT 

165.80 

168.60 


PrevxMB day s total open interest 21 2 

97-03 0 

97-03 97-03 97-07 10 

Previous day's total open taterattlfiCS 

111-20 0 

111-28 111-14 111-25 2392 

11201 111-01 111O0 100 

0 


16830 

189.10 


Previous da^s total ggenjntan»t 3227 


1G5J 

16830 


16830 

169.10 



UNIT 

TRUSTS 


With over nine hundred unit trusts available and more being launched each month, how do you 
know which to choose? In reality there are only three basic types of unit trust, and M&G has an out- 
standingly successful example of each: Recovery Fund for capital growth. Dividend Fund for an 
increasing income, and SECOND General for a balance between income and growth. 

You should remember that new funds or 


funds which suffer a change of management 
are likely to be more of a gamble than those 
which can point to a long and successful record. 
M&G’s investment team has remamed largely 
unchanged for many years, and our long-term 
performance record reflects this. Past perform- 
ance cannot be a guarantee for the future, but it 
is usually the best measure you have of a fund’s 
likelihood of achieving its objective. 

Wte are offering an extra 1% unit allocation if 
you invest £1,000 or more and 2% if you invest 
£10,000 or more per Fund. 

The price of units and the income from them 
may go down as well as up. This means that unit 
trusts are a long-term investment and not suit- 
able for money you may need at short notice. 


Growth 


M&G Recovery Fund is probably the most successful unrt trust ever 
launched and the tablfe below shows just how well rt has achieved its aim 
of capital growth. The Fund buys the shares of companies which have 
fallen on hard times. Losses must be expected when a company fails to 
recover but the effect of a tumround can be dramatic. 


Income 


If you need income which will grow over the years M&G Dividend Fund 
could be your ideal investment The Fund invests in a wide range of 
ordinary shares and aims to provide above average and increasing 
income and a yield about 50% higher than theFT. Actuaries AD-Sharelndex. 


COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE TABLE- £10. OOu wrested in ftwome unus Jl mo 
launch oi MSG Dr wdendFuiKr on 6th May. t964. oarnwred with a s miw 
m u«l men! tn a Buikkrm Society 

War ended 

31 DECEMBER 

INCOME 

CAPITAL 1 

M&G 

DIVIDEND 

BUlEOING 

StKICTV 

MUS 

DIVIDEND 

BUILDING 
SOCIETY 1 

6 May' 64 

1965 

1970 

1975 

19S0 

1985 

1 Dec '86 

£396 

463 

828 

3.6GO 

2278 

2,680 

£536 

650 

871 

1^00 

907 

744* 

£10.000 

1XL200 

10,760 

16300 

24280 

66JLSO 

82.060 

tn 

ooooooo 

NOTES All income figures sliown are n*toltuso: rale la* 

Ttw EhuKme Society income luturesare l L .- r t atjove m* average of the rales 

Ottered m each year (source: Bu+Jaig Sooehes AiaoOkrliWI 

IMG Dwidend caudal figures are aHre^sohon values. *£stnruted. 


Balanced 


M&G SECOW General Trust Fund aims for consistent growth of both 
capital and incomeand has a 30-year performance record which is second 
to none It has a wide spread of shares manly m British compare©. 


COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE TABLE. Value Of IlOjOOO nvesled at the launch 
of M&G Recovery Fund on 23rd May. 1969. mth net xiccxne reinvested. 

Year ended 
.11 DECEMBER 

M&G 

RECOVERY 

F.T.ORDINARY 

INDEX 

RETAIL 
PRICE INDEX 

BUILDING 

SOCIETY 

23 Mav 69 
1970 
1975 
1980 
19S5 

1 Dec '36 

£10^)00 

11.760 

26.400 

102^60 

270900 

381320 

£10.000 

8.570 

11.121 

17J287 

49J74 

57.697 

£10.000 

11.020 

21J2S3 

40.175 

55.233 

57.041 

£10.000 

11958 

16.178 

25921 

40.164 

43508* 

NOTES M frjtuvs mdufle revrwstecl income nef <Jf bJSK-ratefa*. 

TneBusdniE sooery (rpu'esare tuMtn ancAlra-mleiesi account oirernifil^ i 
ahinolhe uueiaecycartv tale (source Budding Societies Association). 

MSG RKUuerv f«ur« art-jU rearviiir.fl values *€stimafed. 


FUKTHEltlNKWHIinON On 22nd DeiMrtter 1936 oflered 
prices and eshmalod pas., current y»*% were 

Income Accumidatfon Yield 
Recovery Fund 394-2p xd 516. 4p 3-37% 

Dividend Fund 439-Op xd 1314-2p 5-19% 

SECOND General 770 2p xd 1542 6p 3 60% 

Fines jnd yields appear daily in the Financial Times. The 
diHKtaico between the 'offered' price fat which you buy units) 
and the 'bid' price (at which vnu sett) is normatlv 6V An imlnl 
civifge of 5' a is included in the ottered price and an annual 
charge of up to l'b of each Funds value - currently M'.'b - pfuS 
VAT is deducted from gross income. Income for Accumulation 
units is reinvested to increase their value and I or Irrcomeunitsit 
is distributed net of basic rale tax on the toftowing dates. 


COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE TABLE. Value cailO DOJ <nvested at Ihe 

Uunch of M&G SECOND General on 5th June. 1958. with riel n tcome < einvested 

Year ended 

JI DECEMBER 

M&G 

SECOND 

FT ORCHNARV 
INDEX 

RtTAIL 
mu INDEX 

BUtDKG 

s<icer: 

5 June '56 
I960 
1965 
1970 

1975 

1980 

1935 

1 Dec '86 

£10^)00 

19520 

31320 

4&4SO 

79340 

195/400 

546.000 

716^80 

£10.000 

20.080 

26.230 

30.540 

39.620 

61.600 

176.240 

205530 

£10.000 

11293 

13.492 

17.143 

33.107 

62.404 

85.918 

S3.730 

£10.000 

12.483 

16.093 

21.636 

31.651 

49931 

7S.580 

84935* 

NOTES AH t«wr« indude /«i vested mcome nei of & i« r ate tax 

The BuVflifig Socieh ligure 1 , ire based on jn etira mierest account offer mg !>•, 
above the average yearly rale (wurce: Bum in g Societies Assouanonj . 

M&G SECOND Caieral 1 cures are an realisation values *Estirraled 



SPECIAL OFFER CLOSES 5th APRIL 


AH applications received by 5th April 1087 will be given an extra 1% attocation of urits. 
*TWs wifl increase to 2% for applications of £10,000 or more per Fluid. 

To: M&G SECURITIES LIMITED .THREE QUAYS. TOWER HILL. LONDON EC3R 6BQ 
Please invest thesum’ls) indicated below in theFundis) of my choice (minimum investment 
in each Fund : £1. Op 0)ui ACCUMULATION/ INCOME unite (delete as applicable or 
Accumulation units will be issued for Recovery and SECOND and Income units will be issued for 
Dividend) at the price ruling on receipt of bus application, do not send any money. 

A contract note will be sent loyou stating |f ~ H hiiliml.!;. 1 ' 

exactly tww much you owe Jiid the settfement |«g 
dale, vour cemficne witt I afloat shorn* 


Distributions 

20 Feb 

20 Aug 

15 Jan 

15 July- 

15 Feb B 
15 Aug I 

RECOVERY 

iMiri 114001 

£ 

■00 

Next distribution 
for new investors 

20 Aug 
1987 

15 July 
19Sr 

15 Aug " 
1987 | 

DIVIDEND 

run il oooi 

£ 

•00 

Vcui can buy or itM units on <inv business dav Contract. Itu ® 
inurchw or sale wifi be due for sertfemenl two to three wwAs ■ 

SECOND 

ilCft:i 

£ 

00 



jvjiMhieon inquest ilie TrusW Inr Dividend and Recovery is, 
Ba'Uiys&diiK Trust Co Limited ji id lor SECOND isUovdsBank 
PI,; 7m? Fund*', .w» ad wide range investments and aie 
jntiiuiised bv the Secretory of Stale for Trade and Industry. 


REGENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 

Ashtead (122p) 

British Gas (50p) 

Cap & Regional (65p) 
Danraf S n30p) 

Fletcher King (l7Sp) 
Gaynor (94p) 

Geest (125b) 
GtertreeJ16p) 

Gordon Russefl (I90p) 
Guthrie Carp (15Gp) 

Halls Homes 1 Gdns (95j 
Harmony Leisure (23p) 
Hornby (lOOp) 

Hoskyns Gp (I28p) 
Johnson Fry 
Lloyds Chemist (105p) 
Logrtek (65p) 

Lon& Metropolitan (145p) 
MIL (144p) 

Mezzanine (150p) 

(152p) 

Nothunbrian Fine (60p) 
Plum hfldgs (90p) 

Spandex p70p) 

Sumit (135p) 

TSB Chan Isles (70p) 

TSB Group (100p) 

Virgin (140p) 

Ward Grow (97p) 

Wtkfing Office (135p) 


150 

65 

66 
155 
178 
109 

168 -1 

51 
207 
170 
105 
. 27 

101 


77-1 


RIGHTS ISSUES 
Avon Rubber NfP 
Bimt Mnt N/P 
Leisure Inv N/P 
Mailing NIP 
Munton N/P 
New Court N/P 
Property Tst N/P 
Partcdale N/P 
Waddmgton F/P 
Walter (Alfred) N/P 
(issue price in brackets). 


160 

52 


• 28 
12-2 
5 

12 +1 
4>x 
V* 
'a 

6-3 
190 -13 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Market cates 
day's range 
□eeoraber24 
N York 1.4540-1.4595 
Montreal 2JD01 4^.01 08 
Ams dam!235f -32540 
Brussels 59.58-59.91 
Crptaan 103207-10.8842 
DubEn 1.0543-1.0616 
Frankfurt 2^600-25752 
Lisbon 21552-217^0 
Madrid 19325-194.10 
fcMan 19SC.35- 1999.50 

Oslo 10.8S81-10.S317 
Pans 9.4168-9.4641 
SrkMm 99715-100238 
Tokyo 235.40-23&51 
Vienna 20.12-2024 
Zurich 22875-24130 


Market rates 
dose 

December 24 

1.4565-1.4595 

24050-2.0108 

3.2400-3J2540 

59.64-59.91 
1 0.8473-1 0.8842 
1 0582-1 .0592 

28849-2.8752 

216.30-21750 

193-25-194.10 
1988.1 CM 999 .50 

10.B94S-10.9317 

9.4300-9.4641 
9-9887-10. 0238 
23673-23651 

20.15-2024 

24000-24130 


1 month 
0.38-0 55prem 
0.50-0.41 prom 
1 VIew an 
19-14prem 
v.->-%pfem 

r.S-lprem 

102-l50cfc 

10-350*5 

lpnmv2dts 

4'4-5'idis 

1%-lprem 

l%-%prem 

1%-1%prem 

9%-7%prem 

IVAprem 


3 months 

1.58-t.53prern 

272-247prem 

4-3’jCre-Ti 

50-41 pfKTI 

2V2prorn 

n/a 

4%-3%pren 

242-aSdis 

20-76*3 

2prem-3<te 

Ilfi-^ViCiS 

3'.V-2\prem 

3K-2Sprem 

4-3^.prem 

28%-24 3 4 prem 

3'«-3%pr«n 


SterBng h m e x cou i p eradwHh 1975 vmiy at 600 Way's range 629-69.1). 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Ai gun i iua auMraT 

Austral doflar 

Bahrain dinar —— 
Brazd cruzado* _ 


- 1J91 1-1.7994 
-.22025-22090 
0.5465-05505 


Greece drachma. 
Hong Kong dttfar 
India rupee 
traqOnar 

Kuwait dinar KD 
M alaysi a doflar . 
Mexico peso — . 
ttew Zealand doflar ... 
Saudi Arabia dyal 
Singapore doflar 
South Africa rand 
UAEdkham 
*UoydsBank 


213550-21 .4908 

0.7370-0.7470 

7.0420-75820 

202.75-204.75 

11-3550-115579 

1850-19.10 



Ireland „ 


gxs* 

r 1 i?lr 














Netherlands 

Wkjc- * j * 

France -. 


Baiy 


i^Comm) >■■■■»■■ 





Austria 

13J5-13.88 


(Mas aopfAed by Barclays Bank HOFEX and ExteL 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS .W V-.' 


91 

113 

237+1 

138 

110-1 

73 

133'j +' 3 
102 
145+2 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD V. 


Base Rates % 
Clearing Banks 11 
Finance House 11% 


Ovamiont High: 11% Low 10 

Waakfied-To* 

Treasury BMi (Discount %) 


2 ninth 10% 2mrtfi 10% 

3mnttrl0"w 3mnth 10% 

Prim Bazdc Bffla (Dteraunt %) 
imrrih 10 is i«-1tra 2 ninth f0%-iD»n 
3mnth 10"ia-10*'»7flmnth 10 »»- 10 % 

Trade BMs (Discount %) 

1 mnth ll'n 2mnth 11% 

3rmth11>w 6mnHi 11 »,» 


{%) 

Ovamight open 1 1 K dose 5 
1 weak 1C5W 0% 6 mnth 

1 ninth 11*»-1l , n 9mnth n^w-liaw 
3 mnth teia-IIU 12 nKh 11 B »- 11 J., 

Local Authority Deposits (%) 

2 days 10 * 7 days iMs 

Inmtti 10% 3 mnth 11 W 

6 mnth 11% 12mth 11% 

Local Authority Bondi {%) 
ti 11%-11% 2 mnth 


1 mnth 
3 mnth 11%-11% 
9 mnth 11%-nit 


1 mnth 1154-11 
Gmnth II^m-II'm 

Doflar CDs (%) 

1 mnth 7.65-750 
6 mnth 830825 


2mndi 11%-11% 
6 mnth 11%-11% 

12 rtrth llli-11 


3 mnth 11>ia-ll>ia 
IZmtti n%-ll 


3 ninth 6.65650 
12 mth 650625 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 6%-6S 
3 mnth G%5% 
De uts chmark 
7 days B%-8% 

3 mnth 54% 
French Franc 

7 days 9-8% 

3 mnth 9%-8i 
Swiss Franc 
7daya 14-13 
3mnfh4%-4» 
Yen 

7 days e^ie^aie 
3mntn VHr&w, 


cal 6J4-5J4 

1 mnth 754-7% 

6 mnth 

caS 5)4-47, 

1 mntti 554-5% 
fimnih 4 ,s ir'*iB 
call 8K-7% 

1 mnth 
Gmnth 96% 
cal 1%-V 

Imnth 5-4% 
BntfHh 4 s i»4'» 
cal 94 

1 mnth 4 l3 w n ie 
Gmnth 4’w4^ia 


BULUON 


GdttS3805069125 

aerrandfpwwfr.exvaty 

S920O®D(D53JoS75) 
Platinum 

S 476.00 (£327.15) 
cftvar 

S 520-632 (£2638-3.660) 


TREASURY BILLS 


lets: £386. OM aflOtedrSIOOM 

c £97348% racrtvwfc90% 

Lest week; 0724% rwajretk885%' 

Avge rata: E103492% last wk £10.8648% , 

Maxt week: £1 00m replace £TOOn J 




Cafle 



Puts 



Series 

Jen 

Apr 

Jot 

Jan 

Apr 

Jut 

Alfiad Lyons 

200 

37 

48 

55 

J 

5 

10 

rai2) 

300 

18 

33 

40 

4 

11 

16 

330 

1% 

1b 

23 

20 

23 

33 

British Gas 

50 

15% 

17 

19% 

% 

% 

1 

(-64) 

60 

8 

9 

12 

1 

2% 

4 

70 

1 

3% 

6 

6% 

7% 

8% 

BP 

600 

120 

130 


1 

6 

_ 

(-714) 

650 

70 

87 

103 

% 

15 

23 

700 

26 

42 

62 

9 

3b 

43 

Cora GoW 

550 

120 

142 



2 

6 



C662) 

600 

n 

102 

115 

2 

13 

18 

660 

Xi 

65 

82 

15 

27 

37 

Courtauids 

260 

56 

65 



1 

1% 


r3i4> 

280 

38 

45 

53 

1% 

3 

5 

300 

18 

29 

39 

4 

7 

11 

... 

330 

3 

13 

22 

19 

22 

25 

Com Union 

260 

11 

19 

28 

5 

11 

15 

T264) 

280 

3 

11 

21 

18 

7?. 

25 

300 

1 

6 

13 

36 

41 

43 

Cable & Wire 

300 

34 

42 

60 

1 

6 

12 

(*331) 

325 

13 

30 

— 

6 

14 

— 

3S0 

2 

14 


Z» 

28 

— 


375 

1 

— 

— 

45 

— 

— 

GEC 

160 

28 

33 

37 

% 

?. 

6 

T16S) 

180 

9% 

18 

24 

4 

8 

12 

200 

1% 

8% 

14 

17 

19 

24 

Grand Met 

360 

102 

107 


1 

1 


T4S7) 

380 

72 

77 

— 

1 

2 

— 

420 

45 

b3 

70 

7 

8 

14 


460 

12 

33 

50 

14 

27 

30 

ta 

1000 

95 

112 

137 

2 

13 

17 

HOBS) 

1050 

52 

75 

107 

S 

23 

Si 

1100 

U 

47 

HO 

2/ 

bO 

57 


1150 

h 

26 

52 

67 

80 

84 

Land Sac 

300 

35 

48 

50 

1% 

3 

6 

r334) 

330 

10 

28 

35 

4 

9 

15 

380 

2 

12 

17 

29 

29 

32 

Marks 8 Span 

180 

6 

16 

21 

4 

91 

13 

nao) 

200 

1 

6 

12 

35 

26 

28 

220 

» 

3 

b 

4b 

46 

48 

Shell Trem 

900 

90 

105 

120 

2 

14 

22 

cm 

950 

43 

60 

80 

6 

27 

37 

1000 

12 

30 

52 

26 

bO 

56 

Trafalgar House 

260 

13 

22 

30 

3 

8 

12 

(*266) 

280 

3 

13 

?U 

1b 

20 

24 

300 

% 

7 

12 

34 

34 

36 

TSB 

70 

5 

8% 

12 

1 

3 

4 

03) 

80 

% 

3% 

SK 

8 

8% 

9% 

90 

% 

1% 

2 

7% 

17% 

18 


Seriee 

liter 

Jim 

Sep 

Mar 

Jun 

Ss. 

Beecfiain 

350 

SB 




2 

_ 


f440) 

380 

63 

73 

80 

5 

7 

11 

420 

38 

50 

60 

11 

19 

23 


460 

14 

25 

38 

27 

38 

43 

BOOtS 

200 

39 

44 



1 

4 

_ 

1*231) 

220 

"A 

M 

34 

6 

12 

IS 

240 

10 

16 

22 

16 

21 

26 

BTR 

260 

22 

31 

35 

8 

10 

14 

r267) 

280 

12 

19 

23 

17 

21 

25 

300 

5% 

10 

— 

33 

38 

— 

Rrss 

650 

93 

105 



6 

10 

— 

(*726) 

700 

5b 

70 

90 

10 

20 

30 

750 

2/ 

45 

6b 

40 

bb 

60 

Hue Crete 

600 

85 

102 

118 

6 

13 

17 

rS62) 

650 

48 

8b 

62 

1b 

27 

32 

700 

20 

33 

47 

42 

b2 

57 


SO 

145 


— 

12 

— 

— 

rraoj 

700 

105 

125 

— 

20 

33 

* 

750 

70 

9b 

115 

4b 

60 

70 


800 

40 

70 

95 

lb 

90 

100 


300 

32 

42 

48 

8 

13 

18 

rsi<4 

330 

18 

2B 

32 

22 

36 

34 

360 

4 

13 

— 

46 

50 

“ 

GKN 

240 

35 

40 

48 

3 

7 

9 

raas) 

260 

20 

Z7 

3b 

10 

14 

17 

280 

ID 

16 

26 

19 

28 

28 


300 

4 



3/ 

— 

*— 

Glaxo 

900 

175 

200 



6 

10 

— 

(-104S) 

950 

130 

160 

195 

12 

20 

24 

1000 

95 

125 

16b 

20 

37 

45 


1050 

60 

95 

135 

42 

bS 



160 

33 

_ 


1 

— 

— 

C!33 - 

180 

17% 23% 29% 

4% 

6% 

a%_ 



Serin 

Mar 

Cato 

Jon 

Sep 

Mar 

Puts 

Jun 

Sep 

Hanson 

(com) 

200 

220 

7% 

3 

13 

7 

18% 

14% 

32 

17'.! 

33 

19 

Jaguar 

r5i7) 

500 

550 

600 

43 

13 

6 

57 

28 

77 

48 

16 

38 

83 

22 

45 

27 

52 

Thom EMI 
(*467) 

420 

460 

500 

550 

65 

35 

14 

5 

77 

50 

28 

62 

38 

2% 

14 

36 

87 

6 

20 

43 

27 

52 

Tosco 

(*387) 

360 

390 

420 

40 

23 

7 

55 

32 

18 

63 

43 

27 

7 

18 

43 

11 

27 

47 

15 

30 

50 


Series 

Feb 

-May Aug Fab Mav 

Aug 

Brit Aero 
r«97j 

420 

460 

500 

85 

48 

20 

93 

58 

32 

70 

43 

2 

5 

18 

4 

12 

27 

18 

35 

BATtnds 

(*474) 

390 

420 

480 

500 

90 

63 

32 

10 

97 

70 

43 

24 

85 

58 

34 

2 

3 

13 

35 

3 

6 

22 

43 

12 

27 

48 

Barclays 

(*508) 

460 

500 

550 

55 

23 

5 

65 

37 

12 

75 

50 

4 

15 

47 

13 

27 

55 

17 

35 

BritTetoeom 

(■B15) 

180 

200 

38 

18 

6 

44 

27 

13 

49 

33 

17 

H 

1% 

9 

1% 

5 

1? 

4 

9 

Sir 8 *""* J& 
200 

30 

12 

4% 

34 

19 

9 

41 

26 

15 

% 

4 

16 

2% 

8 

19 

5 

12 

21 

Gtsmess 

(281) 

280 

300 

330 

IB 

10 

3 

32 

20 

11 

35 

28 

17 

13 

29 

55 

16 24% 
32 35 

55 57 

Ladbroka 

C376) 

330 

360 

390 

55 

30 

11 

65 

42 

25 

73 

52 

35 

1 

6 

20 

5 

13 

77 

6 

17 

LASMO 

(*158) 

130 

140 

160 

32 

24 

12 

34 

28 

18 

33 

23 

2 

4 

11 

4 

7 

15 

9 

MdiandBsnk 

(*583) 

500 

550 

600 

92 

50 

17 

97 

57 

24 

107 

67 

37 

3 

10 

30 

7 

17 

11 

25 

P&O 

(*508) 

460 

500 

550 

58 

27 

6 

68 

40 

IB 

82 

55 

32 

4 

12 

50 

9 

23 

60 

13 

27 

62 

Racaf 

H81) 

160 

180 

200 

25 

12 

3% 

33 

21 

10 

42 

28 

3 

8 

Pi 

~4 6 

12 16 

RT2 

rfiso) 

550 

GOO 

fco 

700 

154 

104 

64 

35 

124 

82 

42 

100 

62 

3 

4 

17 

37 

12 

30 

42 

Vaaf Reefs 
(*81) 

70 

80 

90 

If 21% 23% 

■ M* 16% 

8 n 

2% 

6 

11 

6% 

13 

5 

9% 

15 

Lnnrtn 

(*242) 

200 

220 

240 

260 

g 52' I 

30 35 38 4 

BY Ti * W 
6% 11-28 

jun gep 

4 _ 

a 12 

18 23 

33 - 

Tr 11%% 1991 
(*£103) 

100 

102 

104 

g-r* 1 FW» M»y 4--n 

v. i z * J !;-* 2% 

Tr 11%% 03/07 
(**110) 

104 

106 

108 

no 

112 

114 

Dae Jan 

6 6% 7% 

3* t K ^ 

. w j*i« — 
1»«» _ 

% ”tK - 

^ Mar Dee “ 

,1 > a 
s a 3 * 

4*; _ 


FT-SE 

index 

C1665) 


1550 

1575 

1600 

1825 

i860 

1875 

1700 


115 

90 

85 

42 

16 

3 

■4 


123 

100 

80 

63 

45 

33 




92 

75 


100 
83 

42 L° 


1 

4 

IS 

40 


2 

4 

6 

12 

20 

30 




18 

37 

28 35 

36 _ 


December 24, 1986. 


Total contracts 8997 . 

PT-SE Mdax. CaHa£B2 . 


Puts 1085. 
Mct» 


‘•JWarlying aaciedy 


price. 





_ Vjjt * 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


- ,r C^' 

’ >, \ l 

. ••• 

"s j,.: 5 d e&n. 


!n ! Ron 'Pv ffl 

Mr 

•! i.r-J? Mr 


' ,yn % 
Mr 

:.c .; v : i h 'If 

- ..-'-VsAvrt 

-••.i ... ‘^4 

■• - :.t ‘-^B- 

•— »«• Lcaijj^ 

•"•■j" Mr 

. . . ,7-. 

.7 


- S T^ V *“• 


' > "•7r7 7-7-.3 


l‘" v 


:■ 

■ • ■ 




STOCK MARKET 


Trusthouse Forte in demand 
on talk of stakebuilding 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


[COMMENT] 


Hanson’s unseasonal 
pensions message 


By Michael Clark 


Trusthouse Forte, the hotel 
and leisure group, was being 
chased higher on Christinas 
Eve amid suggestions that a 


succeeding virtually 
impossible. 

As expected, the rest of the 
equity market continued to 


WELLCOME: 

hopes of a prosperous 230 
New Year a / 220 


mystery overseas buyer was extend its firm start to the new 
attempting a stakebuilding account, still drawing strength 


exercise. 

The shares responded with 
a 5p rise to 1 76p as 1 .5 million 


from the Government’s 
performance in the latest 
political opinion polls and the 


shares changed hands before agreement on oil production 
the rmd-day dose. levels at the meeting of min- 

huetnwon Gnveson, the ■ isters of the Organization of 
broking arm of KJeinwort Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
Benson. the merchant bank, tries in Geneva, 
led the buyers, bidding !72p Predictably, however, turn- 
and forcing other market- over was down to a trickle as 


f oI,ow suiL A to*® °f dealers and investors ended 
300.000 shares was quickly the shortened session and 
snapped up followed by sev- made tracks for home to make 
oral lines of 250,000 shares. an early start to the seasonal 
The low turnover among festivities, 
the other alpha stocks only There were hopes that the 
served to highlight the flurry FT 30-sharc index would 
of activity m THF. break back through the 

There was speculation last psychologically important 
month that one of the big ^ 

Antipodean corporate raiders A Mb „ „ f . . . - . 

was trying to build a near 5 per d n 

cent stake as a chunk of 1.2 2J£Stt L552?2r 
million shares was snapped «»ik 

up. More than 10 miK 2&X Zt?™* 
stores c^ng^i hands that d,y „ Z%e- 

tract to boild the new 
London taxis, has lifted the 
group's reputation. Several 
brokers are recommending 
Laird as a buy. 

1.300 barrier and end the 
session on a high note. 

But it ran out of time and, 


The names of Mr Robert 
Holmes 2 Court and Mr Ron 
Brierley have been mentioned 
in the past as buyers of the 
stock, but there is little evi- 
dence to support this. 

There has also been talk in 
recent months of heavy 
United States support for the 
shares and speculation that 
the panel of trustees, which 
controls 50 per cent of the 
equity, was about to liquidate 
part of its holding. 

Lord Forte and his family, 
who own a further 25 per cent, 
still have the backing of the 
trustees. This makes the 
chances of an unwanted bid 


Hut it ran out ol tune and to 152p after 154p, with 
by the mid-day close the index 848,000 shares traded while 
was 5.2 up at 1,299.9. The rise British Aerospace advanced a 
in the broader based FT-SE similar amount to 498p after 
100 was restricted to 4.2 at reaching 500p. BAT In- 


1,665.1. 

Government securities 
made a bright start, helped by 
the encouraging performance 
of the pound against the dollar 
on the foreign exchange mar- 
ket Investors were able to 


f>fv»MFiAAU. SHARE 

MDEX 160 

FES MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 1b ° 

shrug off the recent gloom, 23 Ip in Wellcome, the 
stemming from the dismal pharmaceutical group, which 
November trade figures and came to market on St 
last week’s issue of £600 Valentine’s Day at 120p. 
million of Treasury index- Brokers believe that the 
linked stock. group will be given permission 

The pound gained almost a by the Federal Drugs 
cent to close at S 1.4850, and Authority to market AZT, its 
rose from DM2.8470 to anti-Aids drug, in the US in 
DM2.8700. Its trade-weighted the new year, 
index against a basket of The drug, designed to slow 
currencies improved 0.4 to 69. down the spread of the disease 
Prices failed to maintain in the body, is already being 
their best levels and earlier sold in this country on 
rises of up to £'A ai the longer humanitarian grounds even 
end of the market were soon though it has not been fully 
halved. tested. It has been adrnin- 

Tu mover in British Gas istercd to a number of suffer- 
partly-paid shares slipped to ers and the results have been 
its lowest level since they were encouraging, 
floated on December 5. About Dr John Reeve, analyst with 
32 million shares were traded, KJeinwort Grieveson. the bro- 
Lhe price firming 0.5 to 65.5p. ker, said that the potential for 
Elsewhere among the alpha AZT is unknown. “It is dififi- 
slocks, ASDA-MF1 firmed 2p cult to know whether it is 
to I52p after 154p, with going to be a £20 million seller 

48.000 shares traded, while ora £100 million seller.” 
British Aerospace advanced a But a move to market the 
imilar amount to 498p after drug in America must be 
aching 500p. BAT In- regarded as encouraging. “As 
nstries shrugged off worries soon as that happens, who 
bout a new cigarette price knows what is in store for 
ar with a 6p rise to 474p as sales?” 

71.000 shares changed Dr Reeve gave a warning 

ands. that it might be at least two 

Some bear dosing was years before the benefits of 
sponsible for an 8p rise to AZT begin to filter through to 


iraging. 

John Reeve, analyst with 


dustries shrugged off worries 
securities about a new dgaretle price 
, helped by war with a 6p rise to 474p as 
srformance 871,000 shares changed 
t the dollar hands. 

lange mar- Some bear dosing was 
re able to responsible for an 8p rise to 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


1986 

High Low Company 

353 283 Afied-Lyms 
174 126 ASDA-MF1 
455 375 bET 

330 241 BTR 
491 381 BAT 
572 449 Barclays 
840 625 Bass 
450 356 Beecham 
728 526 Blue Circle 
383 293 BOC 

289 170 Boots 

808 423 Br Aero sp ace • 
65*4 81 Br Gas 
720 530 Br Petroleum 
280 1 77'j Br Tetocom 
193 98 BrttoB ? 

354 256 Burton 

369 277 Cable & Wireless 
196 158 Cadbury Schwepp 
564 426 Coats Vlyella 
336 257 Com Union 
704 409 Cons Gotofletos 
330 252 CourtauMs 

290 201 Dee Corp 
438 218‘jDaons Grp 
650 408 FIsona 

954 701 Gen Accident 
226 158 GEC 
11 756 ^ Glaxo 

481 328 Grand Mat 
11*7 721 GUS 'A 
774 720 GflE 
385 235 GKN 

355 274 Guhmess 
215': 141 Henson 

823 403 Hawker Siddetey 
12 ? a734 Imp Cham bid 
583 335 Jaguar 


Price 

Bid Offer 

CVgo 

Gross 

A* 

P«noo 

YU 

« 

VohfflM 
traded 
P/E *000 

1968 

Mgli Law r '"*TT 

met! 

Bid Offer 

Cb'ge 

Gross 

Ar 

p^nca 

Yld 

% 

P/E 


310 

313 

• 

+1 

14.5 

44 

144 

313 

361 

312 

Ladbrake 

375 

378 


+1 

164 

46 

184 

69 

152 

154 


+3 

4Ji 

23 

16.7 

848 

349 

.278 

Land Securities 

332 

335 



144 

44 

224 

223 

438 

442 



24a [ 

54 

164 

85 

288 

133 

Legal & Gen 

245 

246 


+i 

124 

5.0 

316 

280 

2G6 

268 


-2 

9a 

3.7 

184 

311 

484 

293 

Lloyds 

433 

440 


. . 

254 

5.7 

74 

199 

47S 

475 


+6 

18.4 

34 

12v4 

671 

283 

183 

Lontno 

241 

243 


+i 

17.1 

7.1 

114 

1.000 

505 

512 


+2 

28.1 

54 

74 

2Z7 

231 

163 

Marta & Spencer 

177 

180 

• 

+2 

54 

36 

214 

1.000 

723 

728 

• 

-1 

24 a 

34 

124 

0 

599 

417 

Mdtand 

578 

585 


+3 

37.1 

84 

214 

490 

438 

441 

• 

, , 

17.1 

34 

164 

329 

593 

426 

Nat West • 

528 

535 



274 

54 

56 

556 

660 

683 


+7 

30j0 

44 

&4 

1400 

576 

428 

P 8 O DW 

505 

510 


+10 

2B Ab 

5 2 

146 

220 

386 

388 


+2 

15.4 

44 

144 

272 

603 

383 

Pearson 

588 

592 



15 A 

24 

19.7 

299 

229 

232 

• 

+3 

10.6 

44 

1&1 

1.000 1 

662 

315 

PBtdngton Bros 

650 

853 

• 

-i 

21.4 

34 

174 

377 

495 

488 


+1 

23 A 

4,7 

104 

94 

246 

162 

Plsssay 

184 

188 


+i 

74 

34 

13.7 

525 

64'?B5'j 



9a 

144 

.. 32000 

942 

718 

Prudential 

795 

802 



384 

44 

52-7 

341 

713 

716 



48.5 

64 

74 

3S1 

234 

146 

Heart Beet 

160 

182 


+i 

44 

24 

194 1400 

214 

216 

• 

-i 

11.2 

54 

124 

2200 

589 

421 

Rank Org 

526 

530 


+i 

224 

44 

184 

50 

.168 

170 



94 

44 

'44 

751 

900 

605 

Reckitt 8 Coleman 

855 

862 

• 


234 

24 

186 

.11 

276 

280 

• 

+4 

8.1 

24 

154 

1400 

i 584*3345 

Haulers 

563 

587 


, , 

M 

14 

42-7 

44 

328 

333 


+2 

74 

24 

iai 

90 

791 

511 

HTZ 

688 

695 

• 

+10 

31 A 

46 

94 

216 

i 183 

184 


_i 3 

a? 

4.7 

214 

150 

532 

365 

RowntTM 

398 

402 

• 

, , 

184 

46 

11.1 

40 

468 

471 

• 


174 

34 

144 

13 

967 

762 

Royal Ins 

853 

857 

• 

-2 

384 

46 

70.1 

135 

262 

265 


, . 

17.4 

6.6 


164 

426 

344 

Salisbury (J) 

414 

418 

• 


84 

24 

244 

50 

659 

665 


+1 

35.0 

54 

184 

66 

' 148 ’ 5 104 

Seers 

120 >2122 


+1 

54 

4.1 

15.6 1400 

312 

314 

• 

-1 

104 

34 

104 

105 

415 

308 

Sedgwick Gp 

307 

312 



17.1 

56 

144 

90 

206 

209 



10.6 

5.1 

184 

1400 

984 

653 

SMI 

977 

980 


+i 

514 

54 

94 

947 

312 

315 


+3 

44 

1.4 

224 

638 

132 

93 

Smith & Nephew 

124 

126 


+2 

34 

24 

214 

891 

533 

537 

• 


8.4 

14 

234 

195 

174 

96 

STC 

173 

175 



2.1 

14 

164 

207 

795 

802 

. • 

+2 

344 

44 

20.1 

47 

894 

419 

Stan Chen 

780 

787 


-3 

46.4 

5.9 

9.7 

.175 

185 

187 


+2 

64 

3.4 

11.6 

1,000 

385 

256** Storehouse 

280 

2B5 

• 

+3 

114 

3.9 

154 

564 

lO’.KPr 



20.0 

14 

214 

152 

772 

520 

Sun AUance 

638 

642 

■ 

+1 

274 

44 ‘ 

574 

0 

456 

458 


+i 

14.6 

34 

134 

B10 

81'. 

i 72 

TSB P/P 

72'j 

73’r 


. . 

6.1 

84 



10'. 

1(Pe 



30,0 

24 

144 

22 

420 

265 

Tesco 

385 

388 


+2 

84 

24 

22.1 

130 

785 

772 

• 

+2 

425 

54 


29 

529 

374 

Thom EM 

465 

469 

• 

. _ 

254 

5.4 

344 

386 

264 

265 

• 

+1'j 

174 

64 

84 

61 

349 

209 

Trafalgar House 

288 

270 

• 

+1 

184 

7.0 

10.1 

2400 

280 

282 

• 


11.6 

4.1 

10.7 

319 

SB 

139 

Trusthouse Forte 

174 

178 


+4 

74 

46 

176 1600 

189 

190 

• 


6.1 

34 

121 

8S5 

22 

13'«UnlBW 

21*»21»* 


. . 

60.1 

24 

204 

0 

442 

447 

• 

+2 

21.4 

44 

94 

195 

269 

216 

Utd Biscuftu 

229 

231 

• 

+1 

136 54 

124 

327 

Iff’.IO 3 . 



4&6 

44 

121 

510 

231 

174 

Welcome 

229 

231 

• 

+7 

34 

14 

m a 

965 

515 

518 


-i 

127 

24 

10.7 

101 

925 

430 

Woodmrlh 

685 

695 


+5 

22.9 

34 

154 

238 


TEMPUS 


Cheers! The famous five bring 
a sparkling 39% profit in 1986 


Did anybody buy. the shares 
recommended in Tern pus 
this time last year? 

If so, fill up your glasses 
and have a good New Year, 
because all have gone up and 
four of the five rose by more 
than the index. 

A £5,000 investment, 
£1,000 in each recommenda- 
tion. would now be worth 
£6.970 — a 39 per cent rise. In 
contrast, the FT A All Share 
Index rose only 2 1 per cent in 
the same period, so £5,000 
invested in the index would 
be worth only £6,050. This 
means that those with a nerve 
strong enough to buy our 
selections beat the index by 
15 percent. 

However, just to show we 
are not perfect, we start our 
review with the one we had 
wrong. Yet another year has 
passed leaving the General 


INCHCAPE SHARE PRICE 


JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC" 



Price 

% Rise 

GEC 

185 

11 

Grand Met 

457 

25 

Meyer Int 

270 

45 

Triplevest 

1178 

53 

Inchcape 

494 

63 


Electric Company in the 
wings. While the price rose by 
19p to 185p, it under- 
performed the market by 8 
per cent. 

We picked it as our punt of 
the year on the back of the bid 
for Plessey last December- 


max imizing its potential. The 
earnings outlook for the next 
year or so is also. uninspiring. 

To make matters worse, 
the receni loss of the much 
needed Nimrod airbom early 
warning system contract will 
not only have left a bole in 
the order book but will also 
affect morale. 

The problems facing GEC 
are wide reaching and a 
solution is not immediately 
apparent There may, how- 
ever, be shareholders pre- 
pared to hold out in case 1987 
is their lucky year. 

For most of this year it 
looked as if Grand Metropoli- 
tan was going to do no better 
than the index. But a spurt in 
the final quarter in expecta- 
tion of good preliminary 
results took the share price to 
457p. an increase of 25 per 
cent on the year. 

The shares were initially 


Even pessimists could see the . recommended on predictions 
combined group had the 0 f a buoyant year for con- 


potential to become a signifi- 
cant player in the inter- 
national electronics arena. 
However, this was not to be. 
The bid was blocked by ihe 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission in AugusL 

Since then, GEC has 
continued on in its own 
inimitable way. Its interim 
results at the beginning of this 
■month showed it was still not 


sumer spending. The benefits 
of this, however, were over- 
shadowed by the group’s 
vulnerability to the weak 
dollar and fears that terrorist 
activity would hit the group's 
InterContinental and Forum 
hotel chains. 

The shares are still stand’ 
ing at a 5 per cent discount to 
the market. They should 
really be at something like a 


10 per cent premium, so 
investors should stay with the 
shares for the time being 

Meyer International has 
been one of the genuine 
success stories of the building 
materials sector. Not long ago 
it was a traditionally cyclical 
timber stock. Although there 
are still benefits from the 
fluctuations in the cycle, 
Meyer has been successful 
because it has developed 
parts of its business which are 
less dependent on risks and 
rewards of timber importing 
and wholesaling 

Builders' merchanting is an 
increasingly important part 
of the business and the 
acquisitions during the year 
of the merchanting interests 
of Powell Durnyn and 
Brownlee have made Meyer’s 
Jewson chain of merchants a 
sizeable force in the industry. 
Reflecting this, the shares 
advanced 84p during 1986 to 
270p, beating the market by 
20 per cent. 

Bid speculation at the end 
of last year surrounded an 
antipodean shareholding in 
Meyer which was sub- 
sequently dispersed. Magnet 
& Southerns, a fellow timber- 
oriented group with a retail 
flavour, has a ! per cent 
holding which should be 
watched carefully. 


' Profits this year ought to 
exceed £40 million and the 
long-awaited peak of the 
cycle is still not upon us. The , 
shares look reasonable value. 

Triplevest Trust sounds ' 
less like an investment trust 
and more like an un- 
glamorous undergarment 

However, its performance 
bas been the opposite of un- 
glaraorous. It did consid- 
erably more than keep its 
shareholders* savings warm, 
increasing them by 53 per 
cent, more than twice the* 
market’s increase of 21 per 
cent. 

The capital shares started 
the year at a discount to net 
assets of 34.5 per cent. As 
forecast then, the discount 
has narrowed as the trust 
approaches the period during 
which it can be wound up — . 
anytime between 1987 and 
1991. The discount to net 
assets is 17.4 per cenL 

Inchcape is our star per- 
former for 1986, having risen 
from 303p to 457p during the 
year, beating the market by 
63 per cent. This strong 
recovery will have brightened 
the lives of those who saw 
their shares slump from 455p 
to 293p in the previous year. 

Inchcape’s exposure to 
South-east Asian economies 
and associated currency risk 
were the primary factors 
which eroded the group’s 
profitability. 

The trading outlook for the 
group, however, is more 
promising The rationaliza- 
tion programme undertaken 
by the new chairman, George 
Turnbull, is as yet in- 
complete. so there may be 
benefits still to come. . 

©We are putting the final 
touches to our selections for 
the Tempus portfolio for 
1987 and all will be revealed 
next week. 


profits, but he is already 
recommending the shares as a 
shon term “buy" to his dients 
and emphasizes that the out- 
look for the company remains 
bright. 

The benefits of recent tax 
changes in the US are also 
expected to benefit the group 
eventually. 

Kleinwort is looking for 
pretax profits of about £155 
million in the year to August. 
That compares with the bet- 
ter-ihan -expected £125.3 mil- 
lion announced last month. 
Some dealers claim that the 
shares will feature strongly on 
the lists of new year tipsters. 

There was further support 
for Blue Circle Industries, 
Britain's biggest cement pro- 
ducer. The price increased by 
8p to 663p after confirmation 
earlier this week that the 
Adelaide Steamship Co. an 
Australian investment com- 

• Dixons’ shares, which 
have been under a cloud, 
continued to recover with a 
3p rise to 314p. Dealers say 
selling has beta overdone 
and that interim figures in the 
New Year will make pleas- 
ant reading. Analysts look for 
full-year pretax profits to 
rise from £78.1 million to 
£102 million. 

pony controlled by the finan- 
cier, Mr John Spalvin, has 
increased its holding to 1 1.57 
million shares, or 8.99 per 
cent of the total 
Mr Spalvin has invested a 
total of £76 million in Blue 
Circle, and hopes are high that 
he will eventually launch a full 
bid. 

British Telecom, which has 
enjoyed a good run this week 
after the Government’s strong 
showing in the opinion polls, 
came in for profit- taking, 
sliding 2p to 2I4p. The La- 
bour Party’s threat to re- 
nationalize at the original 
offer price of 130p or to offer 
non-voting bonds to inves- 
tors, still weighs heavily on the 
shares. 

BTR lost an early lead to 
finish lp lighter at 268p. The 
dosing date for hs£1.2 billion 
bid for PiDtington Brothers, 
Britain biggest glass manufac- 
turer, runs out on January 3, 
and it is likely we shall see a 
higher offer from BTR next 
week. But it is doubtful that 
Sir Owen Green, chairman of 
BTR, will choose to pay over 
the odds for-Pilkington. 

Suggestions that he may 
decide to offer 750p a share 
appear to be exaggerated. The 
increased offer is likely to be 
under 700p a share. 


R eaders who did not find that 
Christmas food provided enough 
weight and want to tuck into 
some unseasonal heavy reading cannot 
join Mrs Thatcher, who planned to tuck 
herself up with the unpublished Sizewell 
report. An acceptable substitute would 
be the High Court judgment on Lord 
Hanson’s attempt to strip £70 milli on of 
surplus from the Courage pension funds 
as he effected their passage from the old 
Imperial Group to Elders-IXL. 

Imperial had made special provisions 
prior to the takeover to stop a predator 
removing the surplus, particularly by a 
provision closing the funds to new 
entrants in the event of such a takeover. 
Hanson wanted to undo these and other 
changes to the pension funds's rules and 
remove the surplus. Having expelled the 
Courage workers to a new (adequately 
funded) scheme run by Elders, it would 
either open the funds to the rest of the 
Hanson group (removing its need to 
contribute £70 million) or simply 
remove the surplus, having substituted 
itself as the company organizing the 
funds. The funds’ committees of 
management (which had the usual 
powers of trustees) were still made up of 
old Courage men and asked the court 
whether they legally could, or indeed 
had to, make the changes- Hanson 
requested. 

Mr Justice Millett comprehensively 
rejected Hanson's designs, although 
maintaining, very reasonably, that sur- 
pluses essentially are for the employer, 
subject to negotiation. This is good for 
the pensioners and gives continuing 
Courage employees some leverage to 


bargain over their expected 10-year 
contributions holiday with Elders. It 
costs Hanson nothing since it had a fail- 
safe deal for Elders to pay an extra £50 
million, the expected after-tax benefit of 
withdrawing surpluses, if the ruse was 
stymied. 

It would, however, be a big mistake 
for employees to think they are now safe 
from predators after their pension fund 
surpluses or for companies to think they 
can easily cut their vulnerability to a 
takeover by neutralizing these sur- 
pluses. The Hanson asset-stripping ruse . 
was ruled out principally because it sold 
the Courage businesses to Elders within 
months of acquiring them. 

Had Hanson continued to own 
Courage, it might well have been able to 
re-open the funds and gain much of the 
benefit of the surpluses. Likewise, if it 
had then run down the businesses over a 
period and sold the rump, it might well 
have been able to retain the surpluses. 
The remaining Imperial funds within 
Hanson have larger surpluses. 

Hence, if companies want to protect 
their employees' potential benefits and 
fond members want to make sure 
surpluses cannot be stripped by new 
owners, they will need to think hard 
about rules, the powers of trustees and 
who they represent The problem will 
shrink once the Finance Act require- 
ments to run down surpluses by 
increasing benefits, taking contribution 
holidays or withdrawing money, come 
into foil effect. Meantime Mr Justice 
Millett has laid down the rules of the 
game and both predators and their prey 
should provide a field-day for lawyers. 


Opec’s differential problem 


T he market is clearly impressed 
with the degree of unity expressed 
at the last meeting of the 
Organization of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries. Agreement, with the excep- 
tions of Iraq and the Neutral Zone, was 
reached very quickly, and with only a 
modest amount of bickering by Opec's 
standards. But the seeds of its destruc- 
tion, if they do not lie in the ever- 
present danger of overt cheating, may 
find fertile ground in Saudi Arabia's 
insistence on fixed price differentials, 
giving an $18 a barrel average for the 
main crudes. 

No two oilfields produce the same 
quality of crude, hence the need for 
differential pricing. However, differen- 
tials are determined by the market. 
The first real test will come in 
February when the old contracts, 
including net-back deals, expire. In 
February, the industry is beginning to 
look towards Its spring requirements, so 
market differentials could be different 
from those just agreed by Opec. In the 
scramble to renew contracts, any mem- 


COMPANY NEWS 


ber whose crude looks relatively expen- 
sive could find itself at the back of the 
sales queue, and tempted to discount 

The formal mechanism for altering 
differentials is to refer requests to 
Opec's pricing committee. It has prom- 
ised to process requests in two or three 
weeks to produce a recommendation for 
a change in the differential for approval 
at the next conference. This can be oflit- 
tie comfort to the producer 

The industry, on the other hand, is 
likely to feel flexible about purchasing, 
given its high stock levels. When it can 
choose between using stocks, bought 
very cheaply, and buying crude which is 
too expensive, the answer is very 
simple. The industry will draw down 
stocks. Most observers are predicting a 
stock drawdown of 2.5 to 3.5 million 
barrels a day for the next two months, 
the upper figure being dependent on a 
spell of severe weather. Such high levels 
of stock drawdown could bring the 
industry into equilibrium in the spring; 
but by then the discounting may have 
started and the damage done. 


• GDLLOW: Two furnishing 
store chains are to be acquired 
for a total of £8 milli on. The 
cash element will be financed by 
a £6 million rights issue, which 
will also provide additional 
working capital. Gillow's main 
acquisition, for £7.3 million, is 
the Wade Group, of Sheffield. A 
further three stores come with 
Homestore, to be acquired for 
£750,000 in new G illow s hares. 

• MARTIN MARIETTA: The 
company has agreed to sell its 
fed Li ties and property in St 
Croix. US Virgin Islands, to Mr 
Edmund Blankenau. who will 
be joined in the purchase by 
diems of Bain and Co, an 
Australian investment banking 
Arm. The sale, for $45 million 
(£31 million) cash, is expected 
to be completed by March. 

• HONGKONG & SHANG- 
HAI BANKING: The bank is to 
sell Carlingford Australia Insur- 
ance, its Australian insurance 
subsidiary, to C1C Holdings for 
an undisclosed sum. 

• A CAIRO & SONS: The 


not to refer the proposed pur- 
chase by Impala Pacific Corp. of 
a 29.78 per cent share in Goode. 
Durrant and Murray to the 
Monopolies Commission. He 
has also cleared the proposed 
acquisition by BellSouth Corp. 
of Dataserv Inc. 

• FREDERICK PARKER: 
Following a period of severe 
financial difficulties, the board 
has appointed administrative 
receivers to the group. The joint 
receivers are Mr Michael Jordan 
and Mr Robin Addy of Cork, 
Gully. 

• INTERNATIONAL BUSI- 
NESS COMMUNICATIONS: 
The Prudential Corporation (to- 
gether with the segregated funds 
which are managed for its 
diems) is now interested in 1.21 
million ordinary shares (S.03 
per cent). 

• MIDSUMMER LEISURE: 
A circular has been posted to 
shareholders proposing the sub- 
division of the ordinary shares 


• RAINE INDUSTRIES: With 
a view to maintaining a 
constructive and friendly 
relationship with the board of 
Tilbury Group, Raine has given 
an undertaking not to make a 
general offer to the other 
shareholders of Tilbury before 
the end of next June without the 
board's recommendation - un- 
less there is an offer from a third 
party. This undertaking is pub- 
lished in a document which has 
been issued to Raine's 
shareholders on the proposed 
purchase of 20.3 per cent of 
Tilbury, which will give Raine a 
total stake of 23 J2. per cent. The 
document also contains a fore- 
cast that Raine’s pretax profits 
for the half-year to Dec. 31. 
1986, will not be less than £1.4 
million. 

• EXCO INTERNATIONAL: 
As a result of further informa- 
tion becoming available sub- 
sequent to the posting of the 
formal document dealing with 
the offer by British & Common- 


an undisclosed sum. and the introduction of an the offer by British & Common- 

• A CAIRO £ SONS: The executive and a savings- related ■ wealth Shipping for Exco, the 
acquisition of the development -share-option scheme. An EGM summaries of dealings of in- 
site at 56/60 Guildford Street, to approve these proposals has siilutional investors between 
Chertsey, Surrey, has been com- been convened for Jan. 20. The Nov. 21, 1985 and Dec. 9. 1 986, 
pleied- The price of £325,000 circular also contains informs- contained in the document 
has been satisfied by £94,825 in tion on the proposed application should be as follows: Dealings in 
cash and 495,000 ordinary f 0 r the ordinary shares to he Exco shares — Mercury Warbuig 
shares at 46 Jp, which have been admitted to the official list and Investment, total purchases: 
placed, mainly with institutions, the conditional purchase of the 35.05 million; range 21 6p-266p; 

• DEALS CLEARED: Mr Paul Derby Signs Group. The maxi- total sales 4.47 million, range, 

Channon, the Secretary for mum price for Derby is £1.25 I90p-272p. Postel Investment, 

Trade and Industry, has decided million. total purchases 8.9 million. 


Nov. 21, 1985 and Dec. 9. 1986, 
contained in the document 
should be as follows: Dealings in 
Exco shares - Mercury Warburg 
Investment, total purchases: 
35.05 million; range 2l6p-266p; 
total sales 4.47 million, range, 
I90p-272p. Postel Investment, 
total purchases 8.9 million. 


range 1 90p-279p. Total sales 4.4 
million, range 2 1 0p-272 p. BZW 
Investment Management, total, 
purchases, 3.3 million at 266p. 
Electra Investment Trust, total 
purchases, 1.53 million, range. 
240p-266p; total sales 400,000 at 
232p. Globe Investment Trust 
total purchases, 5.95 million, 
range 212p-266p. Total sates, 
300.000, range 21 3p-243p. 

• ALFRED WALKER: Of the 
1.06 million ordinary shares 
offered by way of rights, 285,668; 
shares (26.79 per cent) haver 
been taken up. The remainder, 
has been taken up by the' 
original placees under the ac- 
quisition of the Green Lane. 
Group. 

• A COHEN: The company has 
bought the remaining 20 per 
cent of Nonferral Propriet a ry, 
from Comal co. Nonferral is an 
Australian company and its 
principal activity is refining and- 
trading non-ferrous metals. The 
price will be Aus!2.75 million 
cash (about £1.28 million). 

• GARFUNKELS RES- 
TAURANTS: The group bas. 
bought the freehold of 1 9 and 20. 
Irving St, Leicester Square, 
London, for £1.35 million. 
Garfunkels holds a lease (due to 
expire in 1991) on which an. 
annual rental of £99,700 is 
payable. This lease will merge - 
on completion of the purchase' 
of the freehold. 



1984 

ifcS 




1985 

1 st - 


Every six months since January 1982 ‘Harmed Savings' magazine assesses the performance of the 
leading unit trust portfolio managers. Regularly Richards Longstaff Unit Trust Portfolio 
Management walk away with the winner's Laurels for Capital Growth. Success in the expanding 
world of unit trusts necessitates specialist professional advice on the choice from over 900 funds 
and often rapid changes in prospects for international stuckmarkets. We are even more delighted 
that our Portfolio Management Service is providing consistent lung term value. 

£ 10.060 invested in our competition portfolio on 4 th Jan uary 1982 . would 
have been worth £46,101 nn 9th December 1986. 


1986 

1 st 


. vtV 



If you want 

to know how 

Richards Longstaff 

Unit Trust Portfolio Management 

can achieve a winning 

investment performance for you, contact 

Mark Daniels on (0272) 294313, 

or post the coupon. 

To: Richards Longstaff Lid. Name 

Broad Quay House 

Broad Quay Address 

Bristol BS1 4DJ 

I Please send me fell details' 

| of your unit trust service. 


Tie FmotuuJ /nttrmedtana, .Umagm and Bndrrs .hsofiuUni: \ 


m. 


/ Invest with V 
r The Winning Team 

Richards Longstaff 
Unit Trust Portfolio 
\ Management / 




} 


> 



THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


Edited by Peter Gartland 


FAMILY MONEY/1 


Take-off time for PEPs 


SELECTION OF PEP SCHEMES 


The official start date of 
January I for Personal Equity 
Plans (PEPs) is now just days 
away and the market is begin- 
ning to shape up after the 
lukewarm reception given by 
the institutions to PEPs when 
the Chancellor Nigel Lawson 
first announced their in- 
troduction in his 1986 Budget 

In recent weeks Commer- 
cial Union, Prudential and 
Schroder have been among 
the institutions to unveil their 
PEPs schemes. They now take 
their place in the marketing 
line-up alongside previously 
announced plans from com- 
panies such as Fidelity, Mid- 
land Bank and MIM 
Britannia. 

More than 20 financial in- 
stitutions now have PEPs on 
offer and most of these have 
more than one version. Than 
are clearly many more plans in 
the pipeline. According to a 


the process — the positive 
aspects of PEPs are now 
beginning to be recognized. 

Foremost among these is 
the appetizing level of tax-free 
growth projections now start- 
ing to be quoted by PEPS 
promoters. 

Save & Prosper, one of the 
early supporters of PEPS, has 
done a tew sums on the basis 
of a £2,400 tump sum invest- 
ment made in January 1976. 
The £2,400 figure has been 
chosen as it is the maximum 
annual amount that an in- 
dividual can invest in a PEP. 

S&P calculates that on 
November 1, 1986, the £2,400 
invested in the UK stock 
market would have grown to 

£14,190 net of basic rate tax 
and net of liability to capital 
gains tax, bat with income 
reinvested. 

If a PEP had been available 
back in 1976 S&P reckons that 


WHAT IS A PEP? 


As from January 1 everyone 
aged 18 and over will be abuts 
invest op to £2,400 a year 
(£200 a month) in ordinary 
shares of UK companies listed 
on the Stock Exchange or in 
USM companies; op to £420 
or 25 per cent of the invest- 
ment (whichever is the higher) 
may be put into authorized 
unit trusts or investment trust 
companies. 

Provided the PEP invest- 
ment is held for a minimum of 
between 12 months one day 
and two years (the time period 
will vary according to when the 
plan is taken out), then any 
capital gains and reinvested 
dividends will be entirely free 
of tax and will continue to be 
so for as long as the Investor 
keeps his PEP. 

It follows that the longer the 
investment runs the more tax 
relief will be buOt up. If the 
investor pulls oat before the 

list compiled by the Inland 
Revenue in mid-December, 
no fewer than 127 organiza- 
tions had registered them- 
selves as plan managers, 
authorized to deal in securi- 
ties. 

In other words the market is 
beginning to look like -a real 
one. Not surprising, really. 
Now that the PEPs concept 
has overcome the initial objec- 
tions — that it would be too 
expensive to administer and 
that it should have provided 
tax breaks at the pay-m end of 


minimma period has elapsed, 
he will lose the tax reliefs, and 
any capital gain and dividend 
income will be taxed hi the 
usual way. 

Plans win operate on a 
calendar year basis. An invest- 
ment win be treated as having 
mitered a plan in the calendar 
year in which it is first used to 
buy shares. To qualify for the 
tax exemptions, it must then 
remain within the plan for the 
whole of the next calendar 
year. Ir respec tive of when hi 
1987 a PEP investment is 
made, it forms part of an 
investor’s permitted allocation 
of £2,400 for 1987. 

The investment must be 
retained within the plan 
throughout the following cal- 
endar year 1988, and the 
earliest it can be realized 
without loss of tax exemption 
will be January 1, 1989. 

the same £2,400 would have 
grown to £1 7,532, boosting the 
stock market investment by 
well over 20 per cent The PEP 
figure assumes that gross in- 
come has been reinvested with 
no liability to CGT, and the 
result is net of charges that 
S&P would normally makes 
on its PEP. 

Startling though the results 
are, they should be treated 
with caution. First of all, there 
is the practical obstacle to 
getting a spread of shares 
representative of the FTA All- 


Share Index on a lump sum of 
just £2,400. Then there is the 
general caveat that S&P itself 
highlights and that is that past 
performance is not necessarily 
a guide to the future. The 
value of shares, and the in- 
come from them, can go down 
as well as up. 

Nevertheless, the figures as 
they stand are encouraging 
and that is before the financial 
services industiy gets down to 
the serious business of lobby- 
ing the Government to raise 
the annual contribution that 
individuals can make to PEPs 
and to persuade the Chan- 
cellor that tax breaks should 
be allowed at the pay-in end of 
the process. 

Also, even at this eaily 
stage, some financial advisers 
are beginning to id en tify 
particular uses of PEPS. 

Financial advisers Hargreaves 

Lansdown reckon that The tax 
a nd ch a r g in g advantages of 
PEPs make them a first-class 
vehicle for the planning of 
school tees. 

But whether investors use 
PEPs fora particular purpose 
or simply as a first line of 
defence in the tax sheltering of 
income and capital gains, 
there are two main points they 
should keep firmly in mind in 
their selection. These are 
charges and investment 
performance. 

The accompanying table 
compiled by financial advisers 
Richards Longstaff shows the 

initial and annual charges On a 

selection of PEPs. At the top 
end of the range, the charges 
quoted by companies such as 
Fidelity, Hill Samuel and 
MIM Britannia are com- 
parable to initial unit trust 
charges, whereas Save & Pros- 
per, for example, shows up 
much more competitively on 
the initial charging scale; 

What is rather more diffi- 
cult to measure is the likely 
investment performance, 
which, if good enough, could 
n ullif y the highest Of initial 
charges. 

Among die pace-setters here 
are likely to be Equitable Life, 
Fidelity and Prudential. 
Equitable's Mark Daniel can 
boast an enviable track record 
of providing value for money 
on the company's regular 
premium endowment insur- 
ance contracts and both Fidel- 
ity and Prudential usually 
show up well in the unit trust 
performance league tables. 
Hill Sainuel too is likely to be 
among the PEPs performance 
frontrunners. 


# - ^5§:W 




Mark Daniel at Equitable: 

good investment record 

Framfington bay come up 
with fan inte resting variation 
on the PEPs theme. It is a 
combination of PEP and unit 
trust and is due to be launched 
on Janu ary 24 under the name 
of PEP 87. It will have a fixed 
investment of £420. 

Although Framlington's 
new scheme is a unit trust, and 
therefore to some extent an 
institutional investment in 
which the investor is sepa- 
rated from the shares he owns, 
Framfington maintains tha t 
the PEPs spirit is fully ex- 
pressed within the structure by 
the provisions for detailed 
reporting, annual general 
meetings, and polling mem- 
bers on major issues such as 
take-over bids. 

Also worthy of sp ecial note 
is one of the PEPs options 
available from N.M. 
Schroder. This is the single 
share scheme, through which 
the maximum PEPs sum of 
£2,400 can be invested in a 
single share chosen by the 
investor from' a list of 30 
provided by Schroder. The 
scheme is aimed at investors 
who already have invested 
portfolios, and the initial list 
of options includes the Burton 
Group, GEC, Hanson Trust 
and the Rank Organisation. 

It will undoubtedly be sev- 
eral months before the PEPs 
market settles down but even 
at this early stage it seems 
clear that PEPS are set to 
become a key ingredient in 
investment and tax p lanning . 

Peter Gartland 


PLAN MANAGER 


Barclays Bank 

Managed PortfoBo 
Unicom 

Bfuker Hnandat Semes* 
The Practical Blue Chip PEP 
The Practical AB-Share PH* 
Tha Personal Portfolio PEP 
Brown Shipley 


FA Assurance 


Rdsfity 

Unit Trust 

Managed Porlfofio 


Mi Samuel 

British Industry Fund 

Unit Trust Plan 
Aggressive Growth Rind 
Lloyds Book 
Managed Scheme 


Choice Scheme 


CHARGES 


INVESTMENT LIMITS 


Initial and first year 


Up to £1.200: £25 
£1,201+: £40 


Annual 


Up to £1,200: £15 
£1.201+ : £S5 
£4 per share : max tio 


5960 fBachcortrfixr 6 on 0 . 75 % of fund value 


3% of each co n tri b ution 

(min £20) 


1 % of fund value 


Presently 0.75% 
increasing to i% of 
fund value 


£120, including ZA% levied morrtWylnclwIes 
brokerage charge (a) brokerage charge (b) 


5% of each contribution 125% erf fund vatoe 

5% of each contribution 1.25% oHund value 


MkSand Bank 
Managed 

Bespoke 


Unit Trust 


Special SKuaflons Plan 
National West mi n s ter 
Spread Plan 


1 % of each cxmtrfcution 
(min £ 10 ) 


1% on equities (mir £15} 
+5% Unit Trusts 

As above 


1 % of fund value 
(min £5) 


1 % (min £ 15 ) 


about 1 % 


Share Plan 
Save a Pro sp er 
Unit Trust 


Managed 


2 % hatf-yearfy 
in arrears 


1.5% less 1.725% 
off offer price 


0.75% (includes 
admin charges) 

2 % h alf-yea rly 
in arrears 


Dealing 15% 125* 

Charges subject to (he a ddition of VAT. exempt stamp duty 

Certain plans anqw some alMmr charges to Be payabla tnadeMontolhe mad ma n ol 0.400 

(a) £80 initial 

(b) End of second and third year 05% of arid-yaw vafcM 


Minimum 


£35 monthly 
£500 single 

£20 monthly 


£35 monthly 

£420 single 


£20 month 
£ 1,000 sing 


£2.400 single 


£35 monthly 
£420 single 

£75+ monthly 
£1,000 single 


£35 monthly 
BOO angle 

£35 monthly 

E2A00 single 


£25 monthly 
£300 single 

£25 monthly 
£300 stogie 


£20 monthly 
£200 single 


Maximum 


£200 monthly 
£2,400 single 

£35 monthly 


£200 monthly 
£2,400 Single 


£2,400 single 


£2,400 single 


£35 monthly 
£420 single 

£200 monthly 
£2.400 single 


£200 monthly 
£2.400 single 

£35 monthly 

£2.400 single 


E 200 monthly 

£2,400 angle 
£200 monthly 

£2,400 angle 


£200 monthly 

£2,400 single 
£2,400 single 


£25 monthly 
£420 single 

- £35 monthly 
£420 single 

£50 monthly 
£1.000 sh^fo 

£200 monthly 
£2.400 single 

As Stare 

As Share 

£20 monthly 
£420 single 

£35 monthly 
£420 single 

£36 monthly 
£450 single 

£200 monthly 
£2.400 single 

£1,200 single 

£2/00 single 

£20 monthly 
£250 single 

£35 monthly 
£420 single 

£S0 monthly 
£400 single 

1 £2.400 single 
£200 monthly 

£500 angle 

£2.400 Single 


Source: Rttnrds Longstaff 


UNIT LINKED INSURANCE INVESTMENTS 


AETNA urea 
401. St John : 
01-837 MB4 
L4e Funds 
Sraanwi 


Weekly 

Bid Offer ch'ng YM 


London EC1V ME 


1030 11-40 «0O1 
1079 1136 40.11 

11-57 tan +0.10 
iaiB 13.88 
1293 13-62 


G* Edged 

1447 

+099 

Oeposn 

991 


tensions 

Squn* 

11.79 1642 


Beer 

11.74 1238 

+0.17 

Owl 

1297 1334 

+9.15 

Bun 

1*98 1687 

+091 


14 07 16*5 

+095 

ssr 

iara 

10.10 

+4L10 

+401 

Exempt App Mtxad 

1339 1360 

+492 


ABBEY LIFE 
80. Hotenhurst Rd. 
0202 292373 
Property Find Inc 
Da Accun 
EfWty Fund kan 
Da Accum 
Setoahw Fund 
Money Funa 
Prep Fd Sor 4 

S^sT * 4 

Con* Ser 4 
Money Ser « 

Fixed tat Fd Ger 4 
American Ser 4 
Utah he Ser 4 
taunted In* Ser 4 
Jtoun Ser 4 

ALBANY LIFE 
3. Dartae Lane. Poo 
OT07 42311 
Equty Fd Acc 
Eiropron Fd Accum 
Fuad rm Acc 
GM Mona* Fa Acc 
tan Men Fd Acc 
H rm M Fd Acc 
Japan Fund 
«h American Fd Acc 
Prop Fd Acc 
Mcisoto tav Acc 


Baumemaiflli BUS SAL 

202.1 Z12.B +02 . 

ZBZQ 2969 +02 

1042 1103 +1 B . 

1107 119.7 +18 . 

2-103 253.0 +1 7 . 

221 9 233.fi +03 . 

2210 2343 +02 . 

1163 1225 +1.7 . 

352.4 371 -Q +23 . 

1993 2097 +02 . 

199.0 2095 +02 . 

175.7 1859 +1.1 . 

2572 2700 +12 . 

2933 3000 +32 . 

1093 1157 -1.1 . 


7203 757.9 
2109 2203 
2952 3107 
2043 214.7 
3403 3504 
1862 1963 
263.7 2773 
1843 173.1 
203.3 

5282 5533 


ALLIED DUNBAR ASSURANCE 

weed IXntrar Aasusnce Swindon SHI 1EL 

0793-28231 

Fixed im Dep Accum 2253 238.9 

Equty Accun 655.7 BB03 

Property Accum 319.1 335$ . . . 

Far East Accum 1672 178.1 .. . 




319.1 3359 
1872 178.1 

316.1 3323 
5142 541.7 
4163 4404 


Overseas Accum 4183 4404 
OB Edged Accum 2583 2719 
Amur Equity Accum 375.4 3952 
Am er Man Accum 1707 1602 
Amer nop Accum 130.1 137.0 

BALTIC ASSURANCE 

2526 Atemarie Swot. London W1X 4AD 
01-493 9699 

Managed Growth 261.0 274.6 +741 
Managed Income 1183 12*2 +085 

m a ntnroon a l 204.7 2154 +OS4 

raui income 1583 1672 +0.09 

Incoma A Growth 2005 219.5 +239 

Base Recoura 1072 1123 +1.B0 

AmwWm 1833 204.0 +139 

Far Eastern 369-3 388.7 +064 

Smaier CCl 1 783 187 4 +1136 




Income A Growth 2063 2105 

Baric Resource 1072 H23 

Amman 1933 204.0 

Far Eastern 3693 388.7 

Smaier Co - * 1789 187 4 

BARCLAYS UFE 

262. Romford Rd. London E7 9JB 
01-634 5544 

Eqyfty Accun 4383 482.1 

HE mm 3833 404.1 

OR Edged Accun 1993 210.0 

□o maul 1753 16S.1 

Jraemeun* Accun 274 7 2892 

Do freSal 2407 2334 

Managed Accum 303.1 319.1 

Ooliwaa 2068 2793 


W" 

Do Htw 
Do weal 
■ Do btrual 

WS 


1783 1863 
1502 1682 
207/t 21 M 
1793 189.4 

179.6 189.1 
1993 166.4 

189.7 1753 
l«.0 1563 

205.0 2153 
1623 1823 
2222 2343 

195.1 2054 


Japan Ken Acc Z X U 3383 
Do WW2 3807 2952 


Do ve nal 2 
Income Accum 
■ Do MtU 
LfibuB Accun 


3807 2952 
2427 2552 
2152 2283 
149 6 1673 


Specs! Sts Accun 1223 1293 
Unw Tech Accun 109.6 H64 


BLACK HORSE LIFE 
'3464. Hdi St Chatham 
0634 405161 

Bam Horae Man Fid 36539 -0.47 . . 

.Managed to* fimd 2502 2614 -1.42 .. 

Property Fund 1823 1923 +020 . . 
Rued Marat Fund 17«3 1843 +004 . . 
Cash Fund 1673 176.7 *422 . . 

Income FinS 336.1 3533 *1 S3 . . 

Extra income Find 31B.8 3354 +038 . . 

MuMwteSmthfil 331.1 3405 -233 - 
Balanced find 295.1 3108 -033 . ■ 

Sr® Co s 8 Rc Fd 3663 3852 +242 . . 

N Technology Fund 3273 3442 -3.50 .. 

N Amer « Gin Fund 2092 2202 +238 
Enaray tot Fund 1201 1284 +1.03 .. 

Pactf* Bftim Fund 3173 280 4 -048 .. 

BRITiSH NATIONAL LIFE ASSURANCE 
Brash Nsaanal Ufa House Perrymount Rond 
Haywards Hearn west Sussex RH16 3TP 


2084 2194 
172.1 1812 
2423 2543 
2778 29SL5 
133.7 1407 
1214 1273 
1523 1602 


Managed 

Property 

'EfW 

towroa+onal 

Fixed neroa 

Dwosk 

New Taennoioflv 


CANADA UFE 

2-6. Hqh SL PWtfin Bar. Herts 


»P Bar 51122 
Eqrity Growth 
Managed 

OUfUlM 

hdax-linkad 

Bf*Y 

Cash 

Mdand Bk ur 
wound Bk tm 


1 Olympic Way. 
01-902 8876 


Weekly 

BM Offer ch'nq YW 


M63 .. . 

1702 1843 *1.7 . 

1209 1357 +12 . 

1303 1373 *1.1 . 

1124 1184 +03 . 

1909 2013 +28 ■ 

1384 1457 *02 . 

1883 1983 +1.1 . 

2247 2388 +03 . 

CE -• 

motor, Middx MAS ONE 



CRY OF WESTMMSTER ASSURANCE 
Sentry Mouse. 500 AWtiuy Bird, 

Cr« MDon Keynes MK9 2LA 
0908608101 

Property Fund 1207 127.1 + 

Money Fund 2Z73 2303 + 

Managed Fimd . 4152 437.1 + 

Equity Fund 2633 2773 + 

Fried Manat Fund 1443 1513 + 

FOr East Find 2206 2323 + 

Nth Amur Raid 1B55 1743 

NM Raeauroea Find 153.7 IS13 + 

SUN Flag Fund 1287 1334 

PBR Fund 1283 1354 

C LERIC AL BEPtCALJFaBJTY 

MTEflNATKMAL 

Narrow Rrin. Bnriol BS2 OJH 

0272 290566 

Assurance Funds 


Mixed 1373 144.fi 

Equdy 1533 181.7 

Property • m3 117 4 

GO 0 fixed H 1103 1102 

indmed Secs 988 1033 

Cash 109.1 1143 

Wh Amancui 1113 117.7 

Far East 135.1 1423 

maati a uanal 1305 1374 

SpeoU Sts 1483 1567 

ind Income M5.0 1S27 

European 1573 168J 

FtoxAto Ralkamant Plans Funds 
1413 
148.4 
1169 
B 1182 

1013 
1173 
1183 
1547 
K 1-H5.fi 

189.1 
1963 

108.1 
1113 

135.1 
1303 
1483 
1453 

122.1 
1573 

COLOfOAL MUTUAL 




Cap 2302 248.7 
inv 2613 2754 


St Hewn's. 1 unorisnatt. ECS 
D1-2B0 7500 

Var Aim Accun (Si 277.45 
V* Ann <51 5436 

Prune- Managed 229 7 2413 +2 

Prime- UK Equty 2533 2873 +8 

Prime- bn Equity I9fl3 306.7 +4 

Prime- Property . 1200 132.7 +0. 

Prime- fixed Intaraa 1353 1425 +1. 

Prime- Wax-United 98.1 1003 4. 

Prime- Cash 123.1 1293 +0 

CONFEDERATION LK 

SO Chancery Lane. Londui WC2A I HE 

01-242 02® 


6143 6163 
^07 7983 
821.103 


01-242 0282 
Managed Fund 


CROWN FINANCIAL * 

Crown House. Woking GU21 1XW 
04662 5033 

LBa Managed Acc 2153 3313 
Ufa Fried mt tacun 214.9 2202 
Lds Equty Accun 3709 3998 
Ufa Money Accum 1800 1894 
Lde kn Trust Accum 4163 4409 
Uto hi* Accum 3401 3643 
Ufa Hieh he Accm 3593 3783 
Die Plqpwty Accun 1607 1963 
Crown &rt tw A 4682 


Crown frit to» . 
Brown Equty 
088 khaiaaod 


4602 

4995 525.7 
1863 196.1 


BM Offer ch i 

CRUSADBt M8URAHCE 
Rrigne Suroy RM2 88L 

07372 42424 

Meaaurad pari 903 106.1 + 

Pertqr ma nce fioa 1013 106.7 i 

wan Prow nn g&o MC3 + 

UK Opporuwy 963 1020 + 

Bmi Opporturiy 1104 1183 + 

North Amir opp 953 mi 

Far Earn Opp 1022 1077 + 

am Prop Swtoa 1 1883 1503 

Oh Prop Sartos 2 965 1015 

Fixed M 933 39,3 + 

Caxh 96.7 1022 + 

Managed Pans 2809 2974 

EASLE STAR INSURANCE 

Bam Road. CneHan haj n.^aoucerier O 

0242 521311 

Secue Fdnd 103.7 1093 + 

Bkia CHp Find 1233 1295 + 

Adventurous Find 148.8 1544. + 

Performanca Fund 1503 158-3 + 

EAGLE SrAMROLAND 
1 Ihraacraeda SL London EC2 
01-588 1212 

Ea^e/Mtotond Unta 1995 1883 + 

EQUITY A LAW 

Ameraham Road. Mgh Wy ux i4 ai 
0484 33377 

434.7 4575 + 

4105 4383 + 

264.6 2705 + 

2273 2305 + 

1005 1073 - 

1777 1870 + 

235.9 2403 - 

2973 3123 - 

2375 250.0 + 

2909 3063 + 

8453 363.7 + 


nxham End, DuUng RIM 1QA 
0308 



tAeCash Accum 
UK Eq Aecua 


1193 125.8 
1773 1867 


SliwanMip Accum 1654 1742 +2 

LHoFhed M Accun 1223 1283 +1. 

UMndk-Lnkd Acc 100.7 1003 +0, 

UteMbcad Accum 15*5 1620 +1. 

LKkO-mto Eq Acc 1693 1783 +0 

LitoiYopmy ACOtm 1383 1453 

GT MANAGEMENT 

16 Ftoebury Circus. London EC2M 7DJ 
01-828 812T 


GT Ron Bond Fund 187.0 1883 
GT Rtoi High YMd 1903 2004 
GT Pton fS East 213.6 2243 
GT Pan North Amar 1384 1457 
GT nan UK a GE 2507 2633 
GT Paul WortdwIOa 2833 3084 

GENERAL ACCIDENT LINKED LIFE 
20/24 AdmsromtM Road. Croydon 1 
01-688 0411 

Managed 1133 1109 

UK Emily 134 0 1417 

Ftoad M 1013 115.1 

todmc-LUAed . B 8.1 1013 

casn Daporil 1063 1124 

Propirty 1073 1133 

tommnl fa ral 1075 1133 

American 942 992 

Japan 1204 1352 

Japan SnUr Co s 1222 1235 
Euopean 1135 1215 

OENERAL PORTFOLIO LK 
Croraorooh EL Cbestwnt Herts 
0992 31971 

PanMo Rl Ace 4107 

DO W 237.7 


Do Inv a 
UK Equity 

on Pms 
Do 88 

fixed kit Dap 


4107 

Z37.7 

4106 4323 
2045 2153 
1456 1534 
1152 1 214 
M25 1165 
114.1 1202 
113-1 1192 
164.7 1734 
14*7 1545 


GRESHAM UMT 

2-6. Prince of Waias Road, auunamoulh 

0202 752122 

Managed Bond *263 4+9 S 

MonayFuid 1883 1907 +02 

Equity Fund 3493 388.1 

fixed Maras Fund 1433 1307 

Property Find 2225.2345 +33 

Gresham ft a mtegton 
American 8 General 2743 2899 -30 

Biconw 3605 3709 +24 

ImanatoM Gnidi 3021 3183 -2.1 

<WM Fund 3839 <045 +1.7 

necoawr Find 2S35 2734 +13 

Japan a General 1830 1715 -05 


OUAHOUN TOT ALEXCHANGE 
Rmil Exchange London ECS 
01-583 7101 
Aee Prop Eds 


Do Accun 
EoAy H(M 
Do Accun 
Fixed M MW] 

Do Accum 
MhM 
Op Accun 
Nik Amur Intel 
Do Accun 
Padfle irrtai 
Do Acsm 
Property kitel 
Do Accun 
Mtowunmad mntol 
- Do Aeon 
DtfiMlI MtM 
Do Accun 

HENDERSON ADMMSTRATKW 

28 Fnhn square. London £C2A iDa 
01-838 5757 

High tncorao Fund 2815 2780 +45 . 

SMarU: : 

Taehnrtqoy Fund 1773 1873 -43 - 

NaiuM%OUtM 13*3 MI-7 • 

Sonoal Sanrtaa 2887 3007 +81 - 



Weekly 

Bid Offer ch'ng YId 


North America Fund 2319 2*49 -84 

Far East Fund 3899 3S99 +29 

Mwngad Fluid 3025 3199 +12 

Daporil Fund 1429 U02 +09 

Prim RasktomM 1785 1879 +04 

Priority Fund 1529 1809 -09 

Mwnged Currency 1105 1185 
OoMHaanCaro 1287 1389 +05 

HJ. SAMUEL UFE 

NLA Tower. Addto u a M w Road. Crojuon 
01-886 4355 

Gacurily Fund 2584 Z729 +19 

British Fond - 8482 2592 +21 

ManHun a l Raid 2902 3063 +19 

Defer Raid 2053 21 42 -19 

capital Raid 2502 2B34 +14 

Income Fund 2989 8187 +1.1 

Property Series 'A' 2239 2359 
Property umn 3606 3707 
FhuncM Fund 2389 W9.4 +89 

Managed Sorias 'A' 2742 2887 +05 

“ +04 

+19 
+19 



MWII AL UFE OF CANADA 

Imperial Lfe House. London Road. GuRdtoid 

(M3 5712S 

Growth Fund (4 2B09 2839 +19 . 

Unit Linked Men 246.7 2S9.7 +19 . 

Unit LHrad Rued tor 209.1 220.1 +22 . 

Unit LkMd Sec cap 1887 1705 +02 . 

(Ml Lkried Eq fit 551.7 500.7 +0.1 . 

UM Linked prop Fd 1786 1880 +42 . 


Ur* Linked Men 246.7 258.7 
Unit Unkud Fixed tor 209.1 220.1 
Ur* Linked Sec cap ieo7 1785 
UlB Urtrod Eq Fd 551.7 500.7 
Una Linked Prop Fd 1786 1880 


HISNLffE ASSURANCE 
Longbow House, 20. CHewtoi 


SL London EC1 



LAS GROUP 
10. Gearoe Son 
031226 8*9*. 
Maraoed Find 
UK Equity 

Mralty’Umat 


EOnbugh EH2 : 

2164 2299 
2572 2729 
189.1 20D6 
1424 1503 
1642 1742 
2904 3174 
1373 14K7 
1804 21 13 
703 749 
1606 1909 
118.7 1264 
072 1024 
1049 1109 


LEOAL A MMRAL UNIT ASSURANCE 
2. Momflore Rd. HOW. SUSHK BNS ISC 
0273 734588 
Bldg 3oe Lnkd Ink 
Do Accun 
Caen mam 
Do Auaan 
EmAy Into* 

Do Accum 
Fried total 
Do Accun 
butox-lMwO OR 
Do Accun 
M Intel 
DO Aaun 

MtoBOM mat 

Do Accum 
Property Irrtte! 

DO Accun 

LBQAI. A QEHBIAL PROPERTY 

11, Queen Ulc St London EC+N 4TP 
01-2*8 9678 

LAG (£} 162.6 1709 

LONDON UFE 

10ft Tampta Gam Bnytol, BS1 SEA 
0272 276179 

Equty 445.7 +2-5 

Fbted Wriest 3069 +29 



Equity A 104 .7 

iWn A 942 

Property A 1037 

Deposit A 1092 

MiHU A 1033 

Index Stock A 34.1 

tow mia o M l A ' 1106 

Equity P 3660 

fixed bit P 237.1 

Property P 1043 

Daposa p 1871 

fSradP 270.1 

todftx Stock P 1309 

menusanil p 1339 

LON A MANCHESTER ORCUP 
• Wnuada Pirk.-Exatar EX5 IDS 
0392 52155 

Inv Trust Cap 429-7 

Do Aoaan ' 5182 

Property cap ms 

Do Accun i»3 

FMd Imrieet Cep 1455 

. Do Aeeum 171.9 


Etnky Cap 
Do Aeeum 
k aanM on N CM» 


429.7 +04 

5182 +48 

1285 -41 

1403 

1465 +19 

171.9 +22 

2029 +2.7 

2*09 +83 

1869 


Vtaekfy 

BM Offer ch'ng YM 

Do Accum 2242 +4.1 . . 

Old Deposit Op 1473 . . . r 

Do Accun 1729 . +4.1 .. 

FlaxtUe Cep 3*42 +O.S .. 

DO Accun 2839 +1.1 . . 

Moneymaker Fund 2319 +49 .. 

Capfial Growth Fund 7383 +84 .. 


Tower HN EC3R OBQ 


WaeWy 

Bid OBSr ch'ng YM 


Weakly 

Bkf Otter ch'ng YId 


Weekly 

BM Offer di ng YW 



MGM >*a Heine Rd. * 
0908 20*031 
UK Eraay find 
Do Accun 
Sped* Sits Fund 
Do Accun 

Blnrfle Imnli toil Df 
win niiMMi ro 

Do AcCUU 

Paafc aaaln find 
Do Accun 
Fried Muesi Rjod 
Do Accun 
Property Find 
Do Accun 
Dapost find 
Do Accun 
Managed Fund 
Do Accum 

MANUFACTURE LH 
Si Georoofi Mty- Otntm 
0*38 380101 



Managed find 
Prooriw find 
Equity Fund 
oh Edged Fund 
Dapgrif find 
kwa a tmant Find 


3619 3846 
261.6 Z7S4 
3889 *009 
329.1 3404 
1B3.0 an? 
104.0 172 2 


kdantekMl Fund 3809 4105 

MERCHANT BCTESTORS 

Lean House. 233 High Si Crttydon 

01-868 8171 

ssru su 

Moray Marital Band 279.0 
Dapoaa Fund 228.1 

MawM find 2394 

h* Equity 3032 

Ml Managad 27*9 

North American 1 213 

Far Eaa 2802 

tod Curancy 1882 

NATIONAL PROVIDENT 
a Sracocnucti SL EC3P 3HH 
01-633 4300 

Maagad 2559 2669 

UK Eouty 300J 3169 


UK Equty 
O roraara Euety 
Americas 
Far East 
firopriiy 
Warast 
todaaed G* 

Deport 


2X3 242.7 
3002 31BJD 
1282 1303 
1888 1889 
11CM 1163 
1289 1359 


NORWICH UMON 

TO Ba* 4. Nonrien Idftl 3NG 

0603 822200 

Managed Fond 8709 70 

' Equity Find £13.19 13 

Property find « 30S.1 31 

fixed bit findjffl 3244 34 


DsBoot find - 1999 21 c 
iaf find (30) 1343 Ml 

UMUnkaflFU 7429 

PEARL ASSURANCE 

252 Mgh HoBnm. WC1V 7a 
01-405 8441 


8700 7059 HL7 

£13.19 1388 +421 

308.1 319.1 +4.1 

3244 S419 +32 

1999 2109 +41 

1343 M14 
7435 


01-405 8441 

in* Prop DM 
Do Acoum 
to* Equty 
in* UrniagaO 
Ret Mumped 


1299 1389 
2104 321 5 
5669 5963 
3079 4083 
3829 381.1 


PHOENX ASSURANCE 

4-5. Kng WfcSJI SL EG4N 7BR 

01-628 9376 

weed Assured 3589 3749 
tear Pheanri EqUty 2739 2945 

PR O P ER TY QI« »T H 
Leon House, Croydon CRB 1LU 
01-680 0606 
Property fi** 1 

SSHW 

Aerie find W 
ABtwy NU Fund 
ADOmr Nat Fund (A) 
toTOy to iri* find 
ln*aaB«nt find (A) 

Ecus* find 

^•Snd 

Haney find (A) 

Actuarial Fund 
Gn-Bwa find 
m-sa&xs Find (AJ 
Reura ArauBy 
leaned Amity 
tma ma donai find 
Bldg 8 k We find 

PHOWDENCE CAPITAL ; 

34 Uxfcndga Rd. W13 8PG 
01-748 Blfi 


Equity Fund Accum 1889 1752 
S5o Hriiat Acc 106.1.1129 
kd ama bon a l awub 1839 »8 
Mungea Aucua «as 1S19 


Proparty Accum 1629 1719 
Money Accun 902 852 
jSpacri Ukz Accun U2S 110.1 
Jepan Growth Acc 1135 1152 
N MW Accun 1002 1059 
Photic Accun aai 8*9 
Tectaoiogy Accun 1019 107.1 
Kmnd Hh Accun 500 €22 
Japan Gn*9i Accun T842 19*4 
E u wpnan Aocm 859 903 

ntOVtOOfT MUTUAL _ 

25/31. Mooraato UMdon K2H 6BA 
01-«a 3232 
MnagadOrd 


Equty Pmkai Cap 5115 5384 
Ovanaaa Penoton 27S2 2899 


is® St vinoara St Gtosgow 
0*1-2482323 


mana t 

kfern a acni i d 

PnWrty 

cron 

Msneaed 


3109 3 Z 72 
1792 1892 
2305 251.1 
1812 I38J 
1342 1+59 
2884 252.1 


EqUty OTO 

StfUkd OBOnl 
todex Unfed OB W 
Oiaro Equity Ord 


Property HtH 
Fbod tat Old 
find tat Intel 
Daporil Ord 



SCOTTISH BOOTABLE 

24 Si Amknw 5q, Edktough EH2 ' 

031 558 9101 


Carii 

BK*U-L«*«d 


Mtxad 

UXEtyriy 


PROVWCIALLNC 
Smsoogm Kendal Cumbria 
0539 28415 


ssr° 

Te ct inotagy 

fivrignBcQCurancy 


1032 1049 
919 999 
102.7 1083 
1304 1447 
1219 128.1 
1989 1843 
1242 131.4 
1019 1912 
1679 1789 
1689 1769 
1349 1412 
1839 141.1 



HaOwoi Bus. EC1H 2NH 
01-405 S222 

Mmgad 1814 1899 

ROYAL HEMTAOE LFE ASSURANCE 
20, cam StosaL London BC2A 41 
01-920 0302 0733 262524 
Ml* Grow* («R 
MUB GrowOTA'HS) 
op 0 Prop 
Op 6 Eu*v 
Op0 HKyi YiaU 
Op B Managed 
Op B Depcnit 
Op 8 IK Dote 
Amer Snu rir 
CUainty 
I Extra toe 
Far em 
FMS aa 
Grid Gen 
too on 
ind find 
Japan (tori 
Japan Sadr 
Nafl H*i 
Prop 9v 
mu n ac o ra y 
Sntonar Cos 
Unto Burn 
World Tat* 

Nfeugulfrh 

SK ?#" 9 

froann 

Sfiaui 
CDumodty 
Bdra Inc 
Far Eastern 

&iasf* 

wghtoCTO 

tocome 

Sirs* 

W&*Co-8 
Man froanh 

ROYAL UFE HSUUNCE 

New Hat Placa. Uverpod 129 3HS 

081-227*422 

Royal SMrid Fund 5224 5522 

Royal Lila IM Linked 
Managed Fund «30 2250 
Baii tyfiaid 2672 2713 

Property Fund 1879 1883 
tmu na hn n ai find XUS 3T|9 
Pacflc Bate Fund 1722 1812 
IMM SM9f find 1329 1S2 
GM Fund 1532 1612 

Many find 1299 1322 

SAVES PROSPER 

1. finsouy mb UnmECai ZQY 

0708 88886 


SCOTTISH LIFE WVESTatefTS 

^ Edtobush BC 

081-326 2211 

fijrany 1173 1299 

1 * Equ ty 1722 1812 

Amencan i«5 1522 

Patec 1892 1892 

European »12 254.1 

W ri wtt na l 1762 1663 

pWra? 1139 1199 

| teM L fc*ad 1D42 110.1 

7182 1192 
ManagwJ 1554 163J 


SCOTTISH MUTUAL ASSURANCE 


-41 .. 
+09 .. 
+19 .. 
-19 .. 
+0211.07 

-1.1 920 
+04 .. 
+09 .. 
.+12 .. 
+49 .. 
+44 .. 
+09 .. 
+95 .- 
-41 .. 
-52 .. 
+19 .. 
•+82 .. 
+2.1 .. 
+19 .. 
-09 .. 
+19 .. 
+03 .. 
+13 .. 
+134 .. 

+4B .. 
+22 .. 


Flax Fond (35) 


acornsH mutual mvestnents 

109. Si Vhcan SL Glasgow 
041-346 6331 

1172 1249 
12&3 1318 
131.7 1389 
1059 lifts 
206.4 219.4 
10B.I 111.7 
989 1029 
1587 167.1 
1189 1242 
1947 207.1 
WID 1085 
1233 1248 
1362 1449 


SCOTTISH PfMVBBfr 
8 St A«frowx S4 EdMaagh EH2 2TA 
031-650 9161 

MM 1629 161.1 +6 

Equriy . 1641 1749 +1 

totoro ea o na l 183.B 1939 -6 

Proorty 1183 1194 

fixed Merest 1117 naa +1 

Max Linked 101 1 mi -1 

Cam 1169 121.1 +0 



SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

§2 25b. Erfitourgh SriB 6BU 
031-6SS 0000 


kw Pal 1 
Uw Pol 2 
to* PUS 
knr Cash 
Mixed fimd 
Equty find 


47*9 

4377 4 E 02 
427.7 4503 
1824 182.1 
2414 2 SSJ 
2789 2949 


Properly Fu rl 143JJ im? 
totornautolFtand 2599 2739 

Fried iniriwi find una isi.o 
todaxod sack Find 110.0 1152 
Cam find 1349 1429 


skanduufe 

FMWiwr Haa. Nrisona Ban. SouHtompkn I 
0703 334411 


Btt to* Find 
Deposit find (2} 
Q* find 
GUM Etstty fia 
Prepriiyfind jS 
AQ Bute Fund 


3822 4052 +12 

(Z m3 2362 -HU 

2848 2372 *22 

find 1345 U62 +09 

1(48} 654 58.7a +0.1 

d 905 882 +09 



scHRomura 
Enter prise Ha a. P 
07D5 827733 


STAMMRD1M 

MaragM 


Rxad ntoran 
Index Unkad 

Cam 


Efltohutyi QQ 2XZ 

3479 3663 +82 

1882 1992 +4U 

484.1 4889 +109 

3869 3859 +24 

2100 221.1 +22 

1143 1204 -09 

1602 1GB3 +42 


an A fi xed M 
incoma Accun 
tacomo Dtofeib 
U na r na floori 
Japui Smaoer 
Stogmora & MM 


SUN ALLIANCE 

Sui Arianca Hse. Hordraev Sraaox 
0403 84141 

3873 3869 +23 . . 

*567 4802 +59 .. 

248.1 2612 +34 .. 

1504 1584 -45 .. 

2679 2819 .. .. 

347 8 3B9 -14 .. 

1239 1302 +2.1 .. 

1727 1812 +24 .. 

1789 1002 +43 . . 

E444H -403 .. 

62.1 554 -41 698 

1148 1167 +84 



SUN UFE OF CANADA 
22AC0Ckspu SL SW1Y 5BH 
01430 5400 
Orowdi Account 
Mnstyi^ Acoouk 
Equity Account 
Mnrjd find Accun 
Equty find Accun 
Prop Fund Accun 
Fixed h Fd Acc 
tnu Fu* Accun 
Moray fimd Accun 
hdx-LrM Scs Acc 
Para Ram Account 
Pom Mrgd Account 
Pans Giwamm 
Ttonj Equity 
fix* fioperty 
Para Fried H 
Pens M 
Pans Moray 
tens Indx-Lrftd 

SIM LIFE UNTT 

St James Britan. Bristol BS89 7SL 
0272 49911 



Mumped Accum 4360 4599 
Propritv Accum 2169 220.1 
Equty Accun 5009 617.7 
find n Accun 1957 2069 
ftfe*4Jnked Accun 1102 1161 
Cam Accun 1839 i960 
Amer EqUty Accun 194 .B 205.1 
IM Bonds Accun 138.8 1469 
Japan Accun 2349 z*64 

FtoUBc Actum 140.6 1579 
Far Eastern Accun 437.0 460,1 
wanwoa ra l Accum 350.1 3770 
US Deter Accun 98.7 1039 
Yen Accun 1259 1339 

EuoCw Accun 1169 125 2 
OMnbuOon fimd 1769 1829 


1269 1339 
1169 125 2 
1769 1829 
1109 1167 


+61 . . 
+29 .. 
-19 .. 
+41 .. 
-02 .. 
-03 .. 
+1/4 . . 

+19 .. 
+49 .. 
-02 .. 
-09 .. 
-44 .. 
♦12 .. 
♦O.B 447 

+44 .. 


TS* UFE LTD 

[JojraHouso. Andorar. Haiti, SP10 IPG 
0264 56783 

MwagedFunti 1484 1543 +09 .. 

finportyFund 1179 1249 -19 .. 

Fried ktereM Fund me isoa +19 .. 
Money fimd 1189 1249 .. .. 

Eu*y Fund 1919 2029 +09 . . 

TARGET UFE 

Target hubs. Gatanouse Road, Aylesbury Buck* 
Ayiasbury (0296) 394000 * 

Arawran Eagle 1129 1188 +09 .. 

07.8 929 -09 .. 

gS'* 1SS18S »■:: 

gL .S£ .-,i ■■ 

fixed totamasoml 155 7 1619 +09 

+03 : : 

•ncome 2259 237 a +1 1 

kturaHonil ECMty 3322 349.7 +li " 


Japan 294.0 2999 -1 1 * 

Matoyi Singapore M ™ - 

_ 3949 4167 +19 . 

Esas +04 . 

Mmgaa Prop 142.0 i<9£ 

Kmce IS ; 

SjWOri Staulong ffiSS iSo I 

fsfEsS" 9*9 +01 : 

He - 4 SQ -0 4043 + 3.0 . 

US Spn oM Bora 17B3 1050 +1 1 . 

Era, SCuUons 1954 2067 + 3.4 . 

? W«SBI TEHNATIOMAL 

™ ’NO 

Sarin 2 Man Fund 2569 2794 

§j£“ 2 ., E £*y fix*! 3155 332o ;; ; 

Sanra 2 Ftojp Fund aa94 3019 .. . 

Su tra 2 fix un F und 2132 2244 .. . 

SISK r : 

Si 155 :: : 

TMOGNTUFE 

J9nten Road. Gkmeasiar 99999 Gtos 50050Q 


&3S3 

gREdgao Find 

Money Fmd 
tatomutanal 
Growth Cap 

_ Do Accun 
Aa 

■tonoarBBn Act 

TO&W-L assurance 
f 0 . 1 - Si 

8 London EC1V 4QE 01-837 6*9* 
WNtyfima 
Equty 

frwi 

Praparty find 

5 «a- 

oppose 

&PP 

StoMtyda 

grir Mm 4 

88to fingg s 

SJH^WUPEASS 

Stag Plata ificten SWi sba 

3*:: 

K&lSft If :: 









THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


29 


FAMILY MONEY/2 


Good start for 
quids-in kids 

■ Wondering what to 
advise your godson or 
granddaughter to do with 
that £50 he or she has 
accumulated over 
Christmas? The banks and 
building societies wffl be 
more than wilting to offer a 
helpful suggestion. It 
usually runs along the lines of 
"Get little Matthew or Sarah 
Jane to open an account with 
us. Yes, we know it wiH turn 
them into taxpayers on the 
interest they earn but it will 
get them Into the saving habit 
and we also have free 
goodies to entice them." 

One of the best on offer is 
the Griffin Savers Account 
tram Midland Bank. It is 
available to savers aged from 
seven to 16 on an initial 
deposit of at least £10 and 
pays a current net interest 
rate of 6.4 per cent But more 
important than the precise 
rate of Interest is the selection 
of goodies that a Griffin 
saver gets. This includes 
spots bag, geometry set 
dictionary and an action file, 
which can double as a 
science notebook or a secret 
diary. 

Party game 

■ UK investors should 
choose income fends in 1987, 
according to Dylan Evans, 
investment marketing director 
of the Target unit trust and 
insurance group. Mr Evans 
reckons that assuming 
there is a general election, the 
yield offers protection from 
the uncertainties beforehand, 
and income fends should 

be strong afterwards, 
whichever party is in power. 




Little winner 


B The best interest-rate 
deals often come from smaH 
building societies and a 
new 18-month bond from the 
Walthamstow is no 
exception. On a minimum 
investment of £3,000 and a 
maximum of £30.000. this 
society is offering m 18- 
month bond at an Initial 
interest rate of 10.3 per 
cent This is payable at the end 
of the 1 8-month term and is 
equivalent to a compounded 
annual rate of 9.97 per cent 
There is a guarantee that the 
rate wiB remain at least 4 
per cent above the prevailing 
contractual ordinary share 
rate. Immediate access to your 
money is available but with 
a 90-day loss of interest on the 
money withdrawn. 

The Walthamstow aims to 
attract £15 million into this 
bond. That may sound a lot 
of money but do not be 
surprised if it reaches this 
target within three months, 
then either closes the offer 
or revises the rate downwards 
for new savers. 

Details; Walthamstow 
Building Society, 869 Forest 
Road, Walthamstow, 

London E174BB (01-531 
3231). 

Pension boost 

■ An additional voluntary 
contribution sounds tike 
something you deserve 
after too much cold turkey and 
reheated Christmas 
pudding. A mouthful it may be, 
but in fact an AVC. as It is 
known in the pensions world, 
is a form of retirement 
planning which should be 
serious! 


Dylan Evans: optimistic 

The market will rise with a 
Tory victory, argues Mr Evans, 
thus benefiting any portfolio 
of large, highly marketable 
stocks. If Labour wins and 
makes overseas investment 
more expensive, UK 
income funds, with a portfolio 
of good, low-risk 
companies, should do well 
Target's view is that the UK 
stock market is probably 10 .. 
per cent below where it 
would otherwise be because 
election jitters are 
compounding the traditionai 
New Year nervousness 
over oil prices. 


everyone in pe 
employment, especially 
those within 10 years of 
retirement 

AVCs are a means by which 
employees can top up their 
contributions to existing 
company sponsored pension 
arrangements to the 
permitted maximum of 15 per 
cent of earnings. They are 
probably the most tax-efficient 
way to supplement pension 
benefits and provide a more 
financially secure 
retirement Commercial Union 
has now confirmed that it is 
making available both its unit- 
linked managed fund and 
its with-proms fund in 
connection with AVCs. 
tf you are interested in 
topping up your pension 
expectations in this way, 
you wifl need your employer's 
co-operation. But from Aprt 
1988 employees wffl have this 
option as of right 



.33 


14.55% GROSS EQl 



Financial journalists oHen recommend Friendly Societies as ideal for savers 
bwvwwe BUILDING SOCIETY SAVINGS EARN 30*. MOKE WHEN INVESTED 
THROUGH A FRIENDLY SOCIETY Homeowners, ibe largest, invests £M0 million 
on be halt m Ifltl/WU savers. 


Thee are tax free monthly and annual savings plans 
1.0001 to 




jnd attractive lump sum sclwnes ( £500 or £1,000 
choose from. Funds are wfdy invested in Bradford & 

Bingley Building Society sr. there's absolutely no risk 

involved. Your savings could be earning l n -33“»p.a.tax on ATUYWT1 
tree U-t-55“» grass equivalent)." with no tax liability TTT7 

whatsoever. Send tor AetatlsTODAY ^Without obligation. ^ BENGlEl 
- ttfr promise no salesman will call ). 


•FREEPOST - NO STAMP NEEDED 


Send today to: Homeowners Friendly Society, FREEPOST, Springfield 
Avenue, Harrogate, North Yorkshire HC1 5BR. TS2712K 

MR. MRS MISS 


I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

! ’tSf ssssssm — -r-, _ , 

[srssssiia rKsSsDB^j 


ADDRESS 


IBIOCKCAPTIALM 


POST 

CODE 


"limaWe Gross equivalent for basic rate 

taxpayers. ___ 


■x 


Will you get a high 
income next month 



...and every month? 


lire Prolific Monthly Income Portfolio 
offers you an income payment on the 7th of 
every month from a portfolio of four success- 
ful unit trusts. Unlike a building society, the 
Portfolio offers you the prospect of both 
increasing income and capital growth. 

To find out more, simply return the coupon 
today. 

I ^o: Prolific L'nit Trust Managers I. id., --- Bishopsgare, 
London EC2.M 4JS. 

Please send me further details about the 
Prolific Monihlv Income Portfolio. 


27 12 


Name. 


Address. 


1^ 


•^-Prolific 

Prolific Unit Trust Managers Ud j 


Home sweet home . . . for the taxman 


(CAPITAL GAINS) 

Our boose is now too, 
big for es and we are 
thinking of letting tire 
basement, which amounts 
to aquifer of the 
property. Does this mean 
we shall eventually 
have to pay a substantial 
capital gains tax bill? 
DANBY BLOCH and 
RAYMOND 
GODFREY advise 

Freedom from capital gains 
tax (CGT) on your home has 
always been regarded as one of 
the most important exemp- 
tions since the tax was in- 
troduced in 1965. And if you 
let pan of your home, there is 
a strong possibility that y ou 
are opening the door to CGT. 
But how great is this danger in 
reality? 

The basic rule is that your 
main residence is not subject 
to CGT, unless you cease to 
occupy all or part of h for any 
period — in which case, a 
proportion of your total gain 
could be subject to tax. Any 
gains accruing before 1965 are 
ignored and so, generally, are 
the last 24 months. 

The total gain on which the 
calculation is based is the sale 
proceeds less the costs of 
acquisition, as well as expen- 
diture on any capital improve- 
ments and the costs of 
disposal, such as the agent's 
commission. 

Most people usually forget 
to retain records of their home 
improvements, because it 
never occurs to them that a 
chargeable gain might ever 
arise on their homes. 

Then, when circumstances 
change and they decide to let 
all or part of their home, it 


becomes very important to be 
able to establish such costs, in 
order to cut down the poten- 
tially taxable amount So you 
should always keep all trills for 
home improvements. 

The CGT exemption on 
your home will be lost only if 
part of it is used exclusively by 
the tenant. Thus, when you 
have a lodger living as a 
member of your famil y, shar- 
ing accommodation and tak- 
ing meals with you, the CGT 
exemption should not be 
affected. 

It however, you let an 
entire basement, it looks 
reasonably certain that the 
tenant is going to have exclu- 
sive use of it — perhaps as a 
self-contained flat So in this 
case, CGT could be payable 
on a proportion of the total 
gain made on the house. 

Various reliefs will 
reduce the charge 

This proportion is cal- 
culated basically according to 
the length of time you let the 
property, in relation to the 
total period that you have 
owned it, and also in relation 
to the percentage of the house 
yon have JeL 

So. for example, if you let 25 
per cent of the property for six 
out of the 12 years in which 
you own the home, the taxable 
proportion is in principle; 25 
percent x ®/ia = '/a of the total 
gain. 

Hius, if your total gain 
were, say, £100,000, then the 
taxable proportion would be 
one-eighth of this amount, 
that is. £12,500, and the tax 
would be £3,750. 

Fortunately, there are vari- 
ous reliefs that will reduce, 
and quite possibly elimina te, 
this potential chaigc. 


In the first place, there is the 
indexation relief which ap- 
plies to gains accruing since 
March 1982 and revalues the 
base cost of every asset at 
March 1982 value, if you 
acquired it before that date. 
So, for example, you bought 

S or bouse this year for 
30,000 and you sefl it in a 
few years' time for £300,000. 
During the intervening period 
the Retail Price Index moves 
up 10 per cent. The total 
on your property would i 
be £100,000, less indexation 
relief of 10 per cent of 
£200,000, that is, £80.000. 

If only one-eighth of this is 
taxable, then your potentially 
chargeable gain is £10,000 and 
your tax mil is £3,000 — a 
saving of £750 on the earlier 
figure. 

The corollary is that hence- 
forth, if your properly in- 
creases in value no faster than 
the general rise in prices as 
measured by the RPL then 
you should not pay any CGT 
on a gain. 

In the past, this would have 
held true for many parts of the 
country such as most of 
Scotland and the North of 
England, but it would not 
have been the case in London 
and the South of England. 

Another important factor is 
the CGT small gains exemp- 
tion, which for the current tax 
year is £6,300 per individual 
or married couple and which 
will probably be indexed in 
future years. The first £6,300 
of gain would be free of tax, 
unless your exemption had 
already been used for other 
chargeable gains during the 
year. 

There is, however, a very 
specific CGT relief for people 
who let part of their homes. 
This applies where you rent 
pan or your home to a 


residential tenant. In other 
words, it does not apply if you 
rent off a room for the 
purposes of a business. 

The taxman is very particu- 
lar that you should not claim 
this relief for a property that is 
not pan of your own home. 
The normal case which should 
qualify would be, say, a set of 
rooms that might have their 
own kitchen and bathroom 
but which required little or no 
structural alteration in order 
to be let. 

The Inland Revenue would 
not allow the relief where yon 
spin a house into two separate 
cottages with their own en- 
trances. And, indeed, if your 
flat has its own separate access 
from the road, it would not 
qualify for the relief. 

The relief could be well 

Keep a note of 
all expenditure 

worth having, for it can be up 
to half the value of your total 
gain on the property — with a 
maximum relief of £20,000 of 
gain. 

If you want to save as much 
CGT as possible, then you 
should: 

• Retain a note of all your 
expenditure on improving 
your property, because that 
would count towards increas- 
ing your base cost and 
indexation relief. 

• Make sure that the section 
of your home that you let 
remains an integral part of 
your property and. in particu- 
lar. does not have its own 
access to the street This may 
be a less convenient arrange- 
ment, but it could be a lot 
more tax-efficient. 



Our best rate 



guarantee 
thefutur 





£1,000 or more in an Abbey 
National Gilt-Edged Bondshare 
guarantees you 3.25% more than 
our Share rate, now and for the 
next two years. Though the Share 


take your money out of a Gilt- 
~ Bondshare any time. If you 
90 days’ notice there’s no 
penalty and, even if you can’t give 
notice, you only lose 90 days’ 
interest on the money you take out 

Monthly income option. 

Your annual Bondshare interest 
can either be reinvested or be 
paid direedy 


Hurr y. 

If you want to make sure of a 
Gilt-Eaged Bondshare future for 
your money, post the coupon for 
an application form now. Or call 
in at any Abbey National branch. 


r 


n 


rate may vary, currently that 
means your money nets 9.25% p.a 
if you’re a basic rate tax payer. An 
unusually high rate of return and a 
valuable guarantee for the future. 
But remember, it is a limited issue 
from Abbey National, not a 
Government gilt-edged security. 

Easy access. 

High interest doesn’t mean 
your money is tied up. You can 



into one of 
several Abbey 
National accounts 
or into your bank. But 
we can pay interest 
monthly, at 3% above Share 
rate, if you prefer. In this case 
partial withdrawals can’t be made. 


ABBEY NATIONAL BUILDING SOCIETY. ABBEY HOUSE, BAKER STREET, LONDON NWl 6XL. 


To: Dept BS.14.. Abbey National Building Society. FREEPOST, 

201 Grafton Gate East, MILTON KEYNES MK9 IDA 

I/We endose a cheque for £ 


to be invested Ina Gilt-Edged Bondshare Account at my/our local 

branch in 

Please send full details and an application card. 

Minimum investment £1 XW0. Rates may vary. 

I/We would like interest: 

A Annually at 3J25% above Share rate □ 
B: Monthly at 3.00% above Share lateQ 

Full name(s) Mr/Mrs/Miss 

Address 


Postcode. 


.Telephone. 


T34 


Sgnaturels)- 


_Date_ 



ABBEY 

NATIONAL 


J 







30 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/3 



The real value of a spring move 


( property ) 

Foreigners Uve' in lots oi 
places, but Engfishmen live at 
home. Whether castle or cot- 
tage, our properly often repre- 
sents our largest personal 
investment and, as with 
shares, its value is set not only 
by demand but by perfor- 
mance as wdL 

The latter point is less 
keenly appreciated than the 
former, but will become plain 
to the point of shock when the 
market wakes from its Christ- 
mas hibernation to a clamour 
of instructions to sefl. 

Many intending vendors are 
just waiting unnl after the 
festive season to start the 
chain which will, they hope, 
end with completion in time 
for the traditionally favoured 
“spring move”. 

In addition to customary 
: frustrations caused by buyers’ 
mortgage problems and last- 
minute reversals, their (dans 
will be vulnerable to that 
apparently vague, elusive fee- 
tor known to estate agents as 
“saleability”. 

Definitions of this vary, but 
it is generally influenced by 
price, age, area - and con- 
dition. This in turn is a 
misunderstood aspect, neglect 
of which can render quite 
academic any expectation of a 
neatly-timed move. 

For sale purposes, condition 
can mean literally everything 
from structural soundness to 
psychological appeal — or, 
equally important, lack of iL 

“Most purchasers decide to 
buy a property within a few 
minutes of their first inspeo 
tion and it is, therefore, first 
impressions that count more 
; than anything else,” says Gra- 
ham Brown, of northern 
Home Counties’ estate agents 
Brown & Merry. 

He and his colleagues be- 
lieve the essentials are for a 
property to be put into smart 
decorative order and for 
kitchen, bathroom and garden 
to be well presented. They say 
many a sale is lost before the 
buyer even enters a house 
because its exterior and gar- 
dens show signs of neglect 

Philip Crosth waite, of Lon- 
don international agents 
Knight Frank & Ruiley, is 
even more forthright about 



The most popular installa- 
tions since 1981 have been 
double glaring or replacement 
windows, fitted by 36 per cent 
of respondents to a recent 
Building Societies Association 
survey. The other le adin g 
favourites are revamped 
kitchens and bathrooms and, 
lows [down, central heating. 

This order might well have 
been revereed if homeowners 
had been more aware of 

agents’ consensus view that 
whereas a wet, radiator central 

heating system, preferably gas- 

fired, always improves the 
value of a property by the cost 
of installation plus possibly 5 
per cent, double-glazed units 
will add only a very small 
percentage of their average 
£3,500 capital outlay to the 
sate price. 


Peace fo the library: fin: many a stffiieiti a covenant can 


make the college years anxiety-free 


The deeds that count 


A humble home, bat still an E n g l ishm a n ’s castle; ft fetches the right price if treated weD 


first impressions: “It is quite 
amazing the number of places 
we go into that smell of 
breakfast, or of a dog that's 
been asleep on the sofa. We’re 
speaking of houses and flats 
worth £100,000 upwards in 
Kensington and Chelsea. 

Advice leaflet to 
help vendors 

“If you go into a house and 
it’s dirty, untidy and smelly, 
you immediately discount the 
price in your own mind, or 
say, T don’t want it at any 
price’” 

East Anglian agents Wat- 
sons are so concerned about 
such aspects that they are 
producing an advice leaflet to 
assist vendors. 

Estate agents everywhere 
are unanimous on the sale- 
enhancing value of a don, 


tidy and fresh-smelling prop- 
erty, repainted and re-papered 
where necessary in simple, 
inoffensive colours — 
“builders’ magnolia” will do— 
and well maintained, even to 
the point of remedying un- 
hinged doors, scuffed darting 
boards, dripping taps and 
cracked window panes. 

Total redecoration just be- 
fore sale is questionable. Be- 
tides, surveyors’ suspicions 
about possible hidden defects 
may be aroused. 

On the other hand, a prop- 
erty needing complete re- 
furbishment and modern- 
ization can command at least 
as much interest as a similar 
place that has been well 
maintained, because the pot- 
ential buyers peroeive the 
possibility of grants available 
that will allow them to pay 
more for it than its “true” 
value. 


What of that much debated 
issue concerning the add-on 
value ofhome improvements? 

Buyers of properly in the 
middle ami upper reaches now 
generally expect to find foil 
central beating, cavity wall 
insulation, double glazin g and 

Extravagances 
In the garden 

fitted kitchens and bath- 
rooms. The absence of such 
items is regarded as a minus to 
be reflected in the price of- 
fered, says Ian Littlewood, 
director of southern England 
its Everett Masson & 


First-time buyers, however, 
are resigned to having to carry 
out certain »n«i«ihtinM to 
improve the value of their 
properties, he adds. 


always recoups its 
replacement cost, although 
vendors often overspend on 
units that simply do not 
possess wide appeaL Similar 
extravagances go on in the 
garden, when buyers are usu- 
ally interested solely in size 
ana ease of maintenance. 

Definite no-no's are large 
patios and swimming pools — 
the latter can actually detract 
from the sale value: 

In summary, home im- 
provements make a property 
in any area more attractive to 
prospective buyers, especially 
when these provide advan- 
tages over others that are 
similarly priced. 

Yet they will not necessarily 
add value and should be 
undertaken for the owner’s 
enjoyment, not solely for ul- 
timate profit The outlay may 
be recouped only with infla- 
tion and the rising prices of 
property. 

This process now takes at 
least two years, much longer 
in low-demand areas, such as 
Scotland and the North-East, 
and is making some vendors 
impatiently greedy enough to 
risk prosecution by cutting out 
instructed agents, while selling 
only on condition that buyers 
purchase their contents at 
grossly inflated prices. 

Nicholas Cole 



NET 


ANYTHING MORE WOULD BE GREEDY. 



It is human nature to always want that little 
bit more. 

Which is what makes the Britannia Crown 
account so attractive to investors. 

It currently offers the very highest interest 
rates of any national building society. 

For a minimum investment at only £1,000 
you can earn 930% net (1310%* gross) per annum. 

Furthermore, die differential over net ordinary 
share rate is 330%j* guaranteed for 12 months. 

Alternatively you can enjoy a monthly income 
of 8.92%net(9J0%CAR.). 

A return which should satisfy all but die most 
avaricious. 

To want more from a building society, really 
would be a mite greedy. 


Q Please send me full details of the Britannia 
Crown account as soon as possible. 

□Please send me full details of your even 
higher rates of interest for UJK.. Non-Residents. 


Name_ 

Address. 


PostCode. 



Post to: Britannia Building Society, FREEPOST, 

Newton House, Leek, Staffs STD 5ND. 


+For those receiving interest annually. 
Rates are subject to variation. 

No withdrawals allowed during the first six 
months, thereafter withdrawals can 
be made with 28 days notice or 
immediately with 28 days loss of 
interest. 

*Gross equivalent assuming basic rate tax. 

DON’T INVESTA PENNY UNTIL YOU’VE CHECKED WITH US 

HEAD OFFICE: NEWTON HOUSE,LEEK, STAFFS ST13 5RG. TELEPHONE: 0538 385i31 


( COVENANTS ) 

Most people think it 
would be easier to get 
blood out of a stone 
than fin win hack 
income tax from the 

Inland Revenue. 

A covenant makes 
it ranch easier, says 
AMANDA PAEDOE 

A deed of covenant provides a 
dmplw and tax- effici ent way to 
transfer income. Conse- 
quently, it is most widely used 
for the benefit of charities and 

Stm fgntR- 

For charities, it is much 
better to receive covenanted 
payments than an outright 
gift This is because charities 
are not subject to tax, and can 
th erefo re daim back the basic 
rate income tax on the pay- 
ments made under the 
covenant. 

The payer can benefit from 
favourable tax treatment too, 
as foe Inland Revenue deducts 
foe covenanted sum from the 
payer's total income before 
calculating the liability for 


linked to the single 
person's allowance 


higher rate tax. And there is no 
limit to foe _ covenanted 
amount qualifying for this 
relief 

As far as students are con- 
cerned, a covenant is well 
worth considering. After all, 
most parents have to make a 
contribution towards their 
son’s or daughter's grant, so 
why not ease the burden? 

Assuming that the student 
has no other inco m e — and 
that me fades vacation earn- 
ings— foe covenant should be 
lmkwt to foe single person's 
allowance, currently £2,335. 
In this way, If a net covenant is 
made for £1,657.85, the stu- 
dent will be able to reclaim 
£577.15 from the Revenue, 
which is the *n«Timnm tax 
recoverable. 

There are, however, a 
couple of points to watch. 
First, if the covenanted pay- 
ments are made on a lermly 
basis, it is unlikely that in the 
first tax year life full aim 
undercovenant will have been 
paid, and so the full rebate will 
not be received by foe student 
So, to be on the safe side, it is 
wise to make one annual 
payment. 

Another factor is foe 
student’s age and status. Stu- 
dents who are over 24 or who 
have supported themselves for 
three years before the course, 
are classed as “independent”, 
which means that foe grant- 
awarding body takes into ac- 
count any covenanted in- 
come When assessing the grant 
application. 


If foe covenant is to work at 
all, foe student has to have 
reached 18, as parents cannot 
covenenant minors. Un- 
mar ried children under 1 8, 
however, are still entitled to 
foe single person’s allowance. 

Moreover, they can receive 
covenanted payments from 
friends or relatives other than 
their parents. In feet, a deed of 
covenant is ideally suited to 
grandparents who want to 
help with foe upbringing of 
their grandchildren by con- 
tributing towards school trips, 
foe cost of their uniform or 
even school fees. 

School fees, of course, are 
expensive, and foe only eff- 
ective way to ease foe burden 
is to plan ahead. By using a 
deposited deed of covenant, a 
grandparent can make a single 
lump sum payment which can 
be used to set up either an 
educational crust or a capital 
plan. The tax relief is then 
recovered annually for the 
normal term of foe covenant 
on the child's behalf 

Another way to save for a 
grandchild, is to direct cov- 
enanted payments into a 
building society account. 
Alternatively, unit trusts may 
be bought N.M. Rothschild 
Asset Management for exam- 
ple, encourages grandparents 
to contribute to its Regular 
Savings Plan for their 
grandchildren. 

To date, the plan has been 
available for just over a year, 
and of the 400-plus accounts 
opened, about 25 pier cent are 
paid through a deed of 
covenant 

Young and old alike can 
benefit from a deed of cov- 
enant For example, where an 
elderly relative's pension plan 
is less than his or her tax 
allowances, including foe age 
allowance, covenanted pay- 
ments are a good way to boost 
foe income. However, in this 
situation, the covenanted in- 
come must not restrict any 
social security benefits being 
claimed. 

Not surprisingly, regardless 


for seven or four years, respec- 
tively. Both parties can, how- 
ever. agree to rescind the deed 
before the stated period with- 
out losing any income tax 
benefit already claimed. 

Strictly speaking, foe donor 
is free to decide on the amount 
of foe covenant However, to 

produce the maximum recov- 
erable for a non-taxpayer, the 
optimum sum should be 
linked to foe single person's 
allowance, as demonstrated 

earlier. 

Although a deed of cov- 
enant is a legal document, 
which can be drawn up by a 
solicitor, there are standard 
forms available from the Rev- 
enue (IR47). Alternatively, 
most banks include forms in 
their student literature. 

The document requires the 
name and address of both 
parties and the signature of a 
witness. Payment details and 
the amount have to be in- 
cluded, of course. This can be 
expressed either as a fixed 
gross sum, so that the amount 
payable alters when foe basic 
tax rate changes, ora fixed net 
sum which remains constant 

Trustee claims on 
the child's behalf 

The completed deed should 
then be sent to the tax 
inspector straight away. 

In order to recover the tax 
paid, at the end of every tax 
year foe grantor completes 
form R 1 85(AP), and gives it u> 
the recipient to forward to the 
Revenue. Where a student is 
foe recipient, form R40(S) 
must also be completed. 
Where foe recipient is a 
minor, a trustee is appointed 
(usually a parent), who claims 
on the child’s behalf. It could 
not be easier! 

On a cautionary note, how- 
ever, although a covenant is 
simple enough to set up, a 
careless slip could result in a 
tailed claim. If you are in any 
doubt, check with a solicitor. 


of who the recipient or the 
donor is, there are some 
general rules which must be 
observed in order to make a 
covenant effective for income 
tax purposes. 

For a start, the deed must be 
drawn up correctly, and it 
must be capable of lasting for 
more than six years. One off 
the common misconceptions 
of a deed of covenant is that it 
must run for seven years, or 
four years in foe case of a 
charity. In feet, a deed of; 
covenant could be operated 
for any number of years. 

But to qualify for tax relief 
the deed must be able to run 
longer than six years, or three 
years for a charity. So, to err 
on foe side of caution, most 
covenants are drawn up to run 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABN.. 11.00% 

Adam & Company -.11.00% 

BCC1 11.00% 

Citibank Savings! 12.45% 

Consolidated Crds 11.00% 

Cooperative Bank 11.00% 

C. Hoare & Co -11.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 11.00% 

Lloyds Bank- 11.00% 

Nat Westminster 11.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotfandll.00% 

TSB 11.00% 

Citibank NA 11.00% 

t Mortgage Base Rate. 


PEP 

PORTFOLIO 


If the l!K 
Stockmarket 
were ______ 

predictable 

you would not need 

Hoare Govett to manage 

your Personal Equity Plan 


A Personal Equity Plan is the tax 
effective way to invest in the 
Stockmarket. 

Who better than Hoare Govett, 
a leading UK Stockbroker, 
to manage your PEP Portfolio. 

A Hoare Govett PEP Portfolio offers you: 

• A portfolio management approach 

• A competitive and straightforward 
charging structure 

• Lump sum or monthly payments 
(maximum £2,400 - minimum 
£900 annually) 

Providing you keep your 1987 Hoare 
Govett PEP Portfolio until January 1989 
you will pay: 

•No tax on income 

• No tax on disposals . : 

Your Hoare Govett PEP Portfolio 

will be impartially selected based 

on our wide experience in managing 
money for private clients. 


For further information about openino 
a Hoare Govett PEP Portfolio contact 
Andrew Townend on 01-404 0344 or 
complete the coupon below. 



| Postcode. 


! hoare 

GOVETT 





yJfPjt } L>° I 



THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/4 


Buying abroad? 
Remember, it’s 

not all sunshine 


Paying your own damages 


INSURANCE 


In the wintry limbo 
period between 
Christmas and the 
New Year, thoughts often 
turn to the joys of 
owning yonr own 
property on some sun- 
soaked islan d- But, as 
RODNEY HOBSON 
points out, there are 
many practical pitfalls 
to look out for 


1 1 | 1 ^ II I Tj P If you have to take procecd- 

ings for damages following an 
noranee of differences in na- accident it can be a worrying 
tional laws or customs, and lime - Tte possibility that any 
the feet that you will see your ■ judgment may not be paid will 
property only intermittently increase the anxiety. 


All the more reason to check 
out anything you ran. 

• Be sceptical of company 
names and addresses. 

The developers may be 
using a name of international 
repute but there could be no 
connection with that well- 


w.uuaoouor known film Possibly they 

_ were in the same erouo once. 

^jsnotffmi.Itustan.Itts and the local coSpaiy w5 
that golden brown colour that spun off to local management, 
other people get on a Medi- or perhaps the name was 
terranean beach outside the “borrowed” to deceive people 
flat or villa they own and you such as you. 
do S The Swiss-based manage- 
. But 35 with many other ment company that promises 
those Swiss efficiency may have no 
who believe only the glamour more than a name plaque on a 
side of the story - soaring wall in Switzerland. For exam- 
property values and free pie, one such company with a 


holidays. 


bead office address in the 


They think that as long as Italian-speaking part of 
you have the sense to stay Switzerland was run by Ital- 


clear of fly-by-night operators, ians over the border, 
buying foreign property is a m . . 

gold mine that just cannot go • Assume that rental income 
wrong. *“1 not cover your mortgage. 

The reality is that, as with Rentals are likely to be less 


every investment that «in than the developer c la im s and 
offer a good return, there can ^ ^ eno< ^ s w ^ ien 

also be problems. But what 15 n0 not buy on 

mortgage unless you can cover 

the payments out of your 

salary. It is simply not true 
that rental will cover a 50 per 
cent mortgage, as the devel- 
oper is likely to state. 

• Expect delays in letting your , 

Possible delays are caused 
by such items as the letting 
agency proving inefficient, the i 
fridge being on the wrong 
voltage, the flat needing more 
furniture and crockery. 

These difficulties take time 
son 0“*. partly because you 
Egsgp are not on the spot and partly 
HmT * ,ecause otiier people do not 
hV^I Jjg W'.b\[ ^. ve y 0UT Problem as their top 

Kg 0 fl 4 • Be prepared for heavy 

Wr ji oa *8°* n 8S- 

Even when your property is 

— I \ * et> a substantial proportion of 
If — TMlNi 1 p the rent will go as agency fees, 

•x&l M i tvl’ 1 f immunity management fees 

|)C>|C KIM IV and repairs. Regum- use from 
— 7/ P^ple who do not take care of 
your property means regular 
£*Oc TFT 111? WH* for repairs and 
v— ^ 9 cf II l II I \. .{• -1 ? replacements. 

0/rJ* I If you do not keep yonr 

^*£-lr 'xm/ZL property up to standard, it 

1 {jecoujgs harder _ to let and 

tenants will take even less care 
you can do is to minimize the of it 

risks. Here are a few tips. • Vo nm^i»tbe.b>'t»g<**t 

9 Don't take anything on trust the profits, 
if you can avoid it Until you sell your projp- 

The seller, the developer, ® osl , of ^ Potential 
the mortgage bank, the agency pront is only on paper any- 


Take the case of David 
Brown. He was walking in the 
lane near his home in the 
spring of 1985 when be was 
knocked to the ground by a 
man who was riding his 
bicycle carelessly. 

Fortunately, Mr Brown was 
not seriously hurt but he did 
lose a couple of teeth as well as 
suffering cuts and bruises. He 
sued in the county court and 
was awarded £850 damages 
and his legal costs and that is 
when his troubles started. 

The bicycle rider had no 
insurance and was impecu- 
nious. Though a whole 
armoury of enforcement 
methods is available, it was of 
no effect. 

Mr Brown might have been 
left to savour his Pyrrhic 
victory were it not for a clause 
in the personal liability sec- 
tion of his household contents 
insurance policy which meant 
that his own insurance com- 
pany paid the damages and 
costs. 

This little known and often 
overlooked type of insurance 
is called variously reverse 


liability, reverse damages per- 
sonal liability, or irnecov- your family arising out of 
erable court awards, although participation in some sports 
it is not included in every such as golf, angling, football 
household contents insurance or roller-skating, 
policy or personal liability It will even cover your 
policy. liability if you negligently set 

The effect of this clause is fire to a barn while out 
that if you suffered injury or picnicking, 
damage to property, sued and But the personal liability 
obtained a court judgment provisions invariably do not 
that the person found liable cover your use of a motor 
cannot pay, then your own vehicle. It is no substitute for 
motor insurance. So if you 

Policy’s exact terms have *** judgment 

are important SSS^SST^SSSS 

. driving, any reverse liability 

insurers will pay the da ma g e s in your own household 

awarded up to the maximum contents policy will be of no 
in the policy - usually use. 

£500,000 or £1 million. The To recover damages after a 
payment will be made only if road traffic accident the ap- 
tbe liability section of your proach is quite different. For a 


against you or members of obtaining recompense. 


own policy would have start, most motorists do have 
covered you had the award motor insurance. Though the 
been made against you rather legal requirement is only to 
than in your favour. have insurance to cover per- 

The sort of risk for which sonal injury to third parties, 
you — and generally members this bare minimum — the 
of your family living with you compulsory insurance — is not 
as well — are covered in the readily available from insur- 
personal liability provisions in ance companies. Most motor- 
your household policy de- ists have a policy that includes 
pends on the exact terms of cover against damage to prop- 
the policy and varies from erty as well as personal injury 
company to company, but it is to third parties. 


surprisingly wide. 

It can cover, for example, 


Therefore, if you are in- 
volved in an accident with an 


claims made for damage or insured motorist you may 
personal injury caused by your think that if he is to blame 


domestic 


claims there will be little difficulty in 


Bui the negligent motorist 
may refuse to notify his 
insurance company of the 
accident although be is 
covered. You may be left with 
no alternative but to take 
court proceedings against him. 
Immediately the question 
arises as to whether you will 
get your money. 

If there are personal injuries 
the negligent motorist's insur- 
ance company will pay, even 
though it has not been told of 
the accident by the insured. 
The Road Traffic Act puts an 
obligation on the company — 
subject to limited exceptions 

— to pay any judgment ob- 
tained against the insured. But 
it wifi pay only if the liability 
is one which legally has to be 
covered by motor insurance — 
at present personal injury only 

— and if it is told of the court 

Changes are now 
on the way 

action either before it starts or 
within seven days. 

If the claim is for anything 
other than personal injury, 
then as the faw now stands, 
unless you can look to some 
insurance policy of your own, 
you will have to rely on getting 
the money from the negligent 
motorist — and that may be 
diffic ult. 



People get hart — but what if the driver could not pay? 


This will be changing when 
the United Kingdom im- 
plements the Second Euro- 
pean Community Motor In- 
surance Directive. The 
changes required to our laws 
have to be brought into effect 
by December 31, 1988, al- 
though the Government has 
said it hopes to bring them in 
much earlier. The most 
significant change will be the 


court action will still have to 
be given. 

Though, strictly speaking, 
the insurance company has to 
be involved only when court 
proceedings are about to start, 
in practical terms it should be 
told of the situation as soon as 
there is a suspicion that the 
negligent motorist is not going 
to teU the insurers himself If 
insurance details of the motor- 


extension of the definition of isi were not given at the iinw 
compulsory motor insurance of the accident, then in most 


to cover damage to third party 
property as well as personal 
injury. 

Once these changes are 
made the insurance com- 
panies will have to pay any 
judgment obtained against 
their insured for damage to 
property, as well as any dam- 
ages for personal injury. There 
will still be some limited 
exceptions and notice of the 


cases they can be obtained 
from the police. 

Frequently, once the insur- 
ance company has been told of 
the situation, its very involve- 
ment persuades the negligent 
motorist to complete an ac- 
cident report form. The com- 
pany will then usually deal 
with a claim in full. 

Ian Brewer 



you can do is to minimize the 
risks. Here are a few tips. 

• Don't take anything on trust 
if you can avoid it. 

The seller, the developer, 
the mortgage bank, the agency 


^oS^S^haJTin- It is likely to be taxed and 

terests that are different from you .may have difficulty 
yours. repatriating the proceeds be- 

,, ...... u cause of foreign control 

You will find that you have regulations in the country 

to take a lot on trust bt«use of where yonr * 


WHERE YOUR MONEY 

SHOULD BE BY 

3-30 PM, FRIDAY, 

16TH JANUARY. 1987! 


Announcing the ultimate “ground floor” investment opportunity 


a special launch offer of three new Commercial Union 
Unit Trusts at a fixed price of50p per unit 


distance involved, ig- located. 


CU is pleased to announce Proven Performance: 
the launch of three new Unit 151.65% In 45 Months 

Truste on 29th December, 1986 ^ Funds ^ mani 

...and a very special launch hv1hfi CAl investmen 


offer. 

Until 16th January1987, gravW/, in the 45 months from . uw.™ » « ,u 
you may purchase units in the launch for investors in the CU despatched within 28 days. P 

newCUUnitTrusteatthefixed SSufcSui^Fundi ceedsofsaleswillbesentoul 
price of 50p perunit...an6 rec- AhhnuohthPnri& ofunits within 7 days of receipt by the 

ei'^AJP-to 40 units free for every andSZefmmmem mS Managers of the renounced 
£1,000 invested according to the go down as well as up, we be- certificate, 
sum you invest lievethese three Unit Trusts will Fixed Prices 

Announcing CU’s three offer a solution to most invest- ^? s ^ rve 2 e 

new Unit Trusts mentgoals. to closethefixed pnee offer ol 


Proven Performance: or sold on any business day at 

151-65% in 45 Months! prices and yieldsquoted in 

-me Funds will be managed f^ nation^ news^pers. 
by the same CU investment Applicationsw.llbe acknow- 

team that achieved 151.65% £^7, 


Nowit’s t 
too late to ask 
James Capel 
o help you with 
Inheritance J 
i. Tax 


Fund. Income is accumulated 
for holders of accumulation 
units. 

Yield 

Estimated gross yield at initial 
offer price of 5% Income Fund 


despatched within 28 days. Pro- and 3|% UK & General Fund 


sum you invest 

Announcing CU’s three 
I new Unit Trusts 


ceeds of sales will be sent out 


Fixed Prices 


and 2% Worldwide Special 
Situations Fund. 

Managers 

Commercial Union Trust 
Managers Limited (Members 


The M anagers reserve the right of the Unit Trust Association) 
to close the fixed price offer of Registered Office: 

units before 16th January 1987 if St. Helen’s, 1 Undershaft, 




Before your family receives a penny from your 
estate the executors have to pay the Inland Revenue 
any I nheritance Tax due and, faced with a large bill for 
Inheritance Tax, your executors may have to sell some 
of your property. 

In the end the Inland Revenue could benefit more 
than the individual members of your family 

If that’s not the way you want your estate distri- 
buted, you should talk to James Cape! without delay 

Sensible Inheritance Tax planning can consider- 
ably reduce any charge for Inheritance Tax after your 
death. 

James Capel Financial Services provide practical 
solutions to InheritanceTax situations. Wehaveaccess 
to the best legal, tax, life assurance, pensions and unit 
trust advice - and it’s available now to all our clients. 

Well be happy to send you a copy of our book- 
let ‘Inheritance Tax Planning -just send off the 
coupon. 

James Capel &Co. 

Advice beyond 

TlTi” Capel Financial Sunta* Lid-, / ji 

James C.ipL-1 House. 6 Bet* 0 

London RC3A 7JQ. Telephones OI-b21 OUliy /// 

Plra.T send me a copy ol your buokl. t / /// 

Inheritance Tax Wanninff /// 

__ / 

— / «sg}* I 


the unit price moves by more 
than 2§%. After the close of the 


1 m i e. .nH- £1,000 Minimum the unit price moves by more 

TNs Fund is designed to Investments... toan^%^Afterttie close of the 

provide maximum income You need only invest £1,000 ^’“S^l availableat,fie 

immediately by investing in UK to start... and can increase your daily quoted pnee. 

gQujties. investment at any time, up to any Charges 

amount in increments of £1,000. An initial charge of 5% is included 
^ CU UK & General Fund: in the price of units. The annual 

Jar “Blue chip” UK equities will r xJF u l onou,a charge is based on the value of 

form the investment backbone ®y January, 1 987 the Fund and is 1 % + VAT for 

of this Fund aiming to achieve a To take advantage of this UK & General and Income 
stable balance between capital ‘ground floor/ fixed price offer of Funds, and 1 1 % + VAT for 


growth and income. 

3 CU Worldwide Special 
Situations Fund: 

The investment strategy behind 
this Fund is to exploit CU’s inter- 
national investment network, 


50p per unit. .you must invest 
by 16th January, 1987. 

In addition, any invest- 
ments you make before 31 st 
January, 1987, will qualify for 
extra units as follows: 20 free 
units for every £1,000 you invest 


by seeking out attractive invest- up to £4,999... 30 free units for 


Worldwide Special Situations 
Fund. The annual charges are 
deducted from the trusts’ in- 
come. The 3 Truk Deeds per- 
mit a maximum annual charge 
of 2% , subject to 3 months 
written notice to unitholders. 
Commission 


.lirtii'H — 


/T-g7/12| 


ments worldwide that offer dra- every thousand pounds investee 
matic growth potential. between £5,000 and £9,999... 

The Intelligent VV^yto ggS^iStSSKooa 

Invest in the Stockmarket To invest in the three new 

CU clearly recognises that CU Unit Trusts. . .and qualify for 
not all investors have the same yourfixed price offer and your 
needs. CU’s 3 new Unit Trusts free units ...just return the cou- 
are designed to meet the varied pon...to reach us no later than 
needs of CU investors. Each 16th January, 1987. 

VSSZSSSiZ- 

tries to achieve these different Dealing in Units 
investment goals. Units may normally be bought 


every thousand pounds invested Commission is payable to auth- 


16 th January, 1987. 

General Information 

Dealing in Units 

Units may normally be bought 


orised professional advisors — 
rates are available on request. 

Income 

Unitholders have a choice of in- 
come or accumulation units. In- 
come is paid to holders of in- 
come units on 31 st January, 
30th April, 31st July, 30th 
October for the Income Fund; 
31st January, 31st July for the 
UK & General Fund and 28th 
February, 31st Augustforthe 
Worldwide Special Situations 


London EC3P 3DQ, 

England No. 2026410 
Trustee 

Midland Bank Trust Company 
Limited 


□ YES, I wish to invest in the new CU Unft Trust 
Funds at the fixed price ol 50p per unit valid 
until 16th January 1987. ! understand that I will 
receive 20 free units for every £1,000 1 invest 
up to E4,999 ... 30 free units for every £1,000 

I invest between C5,000andC9,999.„and 40 
free units for every E 1,000 i invest over 
£10,000 if I invest before 31 st January 1987. 

P lease invest the amounts) indicated below in 
the Fund{s) of my choice (minimuni investment 
£1,000 in any one Fund). I have enclosed my 
cheque made payable to Commercial Union. 

Income Fund £ 

UK & General Fund £ 

Worldwide Special Situations Fund £ 

Total C_ 

I wish ftie income from my units to be accu m ulated 

□ YES P NO Iptmsebckapprofxailetxut) 


Daytime Telephone No. 

FuflftanMK*)tnwMc*i certificate to be Issued 


agmiX- 


[fnvesfora must pea r/eaa iSjoasDfcQ 


I Post this coupon to: 

■ Commercial Union 
| Trust Managers Ltd 
I FREEPOST, 

■ St Helen's, 1 Undershaft, 
! LONDON EC3B3BP 


Burnt 

trusts 

MTD 


NO POSTAGE REOUfftED T ,, 
























































J5yg nr y°y. (”"**0 cam check your 
price movements, on ibis rae 
only. Add them up. lo give you voSr 
overall total and check this amiMiiw 
daily dividend Ogurc. If it maSef 
have wop outright or a share of the total 
tody Pn* money stated. If you are a 
w i n ner foitow the daim procedure on the 
back of your card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Trend remains firm 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



(Current o 
ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings 


Wham stocks have only one price quoted, these are mkfcfle prices takes daBy at Spin. Yield, change and P/E am cakurtertrd on the middle price 



— 'vtcld — 

DAILY WEEKLY 

DIVIDEND DIVIDEND 

£4,000 £8,000 

Claims required Claims required 
for for 

+38 points +109 points 

Claimants should rtno 0254-53272 



_ no am vu 

M Otar fe'md* P * P/E 


Man in* Cmvmv 


BREWERIES 





E3E I f Mum 


Industrials E-K 



BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £ 8,000 in 
today’s newspaper. 



BRITISH FUNDS 





H-CT’.'.-tl 




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21 K New Cam 

48 15 Blm> Luma 

7 2-rOftsam 
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19 D De A' 

126 W» Peek 
30 one Dmr 
545 Steel Bras 
61 Tom homier 
153 Trie Can 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


ip 


iMiltai 


ARCHERY 


Fab 6-2 European indoor 





April 5: National indoor, RAF 

Cosford 

May 30-31: FteM archery 
championships, Rhondda. Mid- 
Gfamorgan 

June 13 -t4:IIK Masters, 


championships, 


ATHLETICS;- 


Jan MO: Cosford games 
Jan 23-24: National Indoor 
c h am p i on s hi ps. Cosford 
Jan 31: Peugeot Talbot indoor 
games, Cosford 
Fra 1: European cross country 
Cup for dubs, Clusona, Italy 
Feb 7-2 Hungary v UK, 
Budapest 

Feb 14: National women’s 
cross country championships, 


Mar 12: European Champions 
Cup final (women), Salonika, 
Greece 

Mar 17: European Cup Winners 
Cup final (men), Novi Sad. 
Yugoslavia 

Mar ISand 25: Korac Cup Final 

(men) _ , 

Mar 28: British Masters Final, 
Gateshead 

Apr 2b European Champtons 
Cup final (men), Lausanne, 
Switzerland 

Apr 3-4: Cartsberg National 

championships. Wembley Arena 

June 3-14: European 
Championstup finals (men). 

Greece 


f- ; V BILLIARDS j 


Jan 19-26: UK professional 

championship, Stockport 

Mar 2-fc World professional 

championship, Botton 
May 15-16: English amateur 
championship, venue to be 
announced 


Feb 21: National men's cross 
country championships. Luton 
Feb 21-22: European indoor 
championships. Lievin, France 
ft* 27-28: US indoor 
championships. New York 
Mw 6-8: World indoor 
championships. Indianapolis 
Mar 13: Kodak Classic: England 
v US. Cosford 

Mar 15: Dairy Crest invitation, 
Cosford 

par 20-21: AAA and WAAA 
Untier-20 championships. 
Cosford 

22 World cross country 
championships, Warsaw 
April 3: International cross 
country. Preston 
Aprs 4: AAA 1 Okm road race 
championship final. Hem el 
Hempstead 

April 11-12: World marathon 
Cup. Seoul. Korea 
April 25: AAA 12-stage road 
relay, Sutton Cottifleid 
May 2-3: World race walking 
Cup.NewUork 

May 1th London marathon 
May 24-25: UK championships, 
Derby 

May 30-31: AAA and WAAA 

combined events 
champtonships. Stoke 

June 6-7: France v UK, Aries 
June 13: Kodak Classic. 

Gateshead; Bratislava meeting 
June 19-20: Sco trail national 
championships, Meadowbank 
June 20: Dairy Crest 
international, Portsmouth 
June 27-28: European Cup 
final. Praque 

July 4-5: European Cup of 

combined events: men. Basle; 
women, Aries 
July 9-15: World Student 


July 11: British Rail Welsh 
Games. Swansea 
July 17: McVitie's international 
Birmmqtiam 

July 18-19: AAA Under-20 
championships, BuTrtngham 
July 20: Ulster games. Belfast 
July 24-25: WAAA 
championships. Birmingham 
July 26: Pearl Assurance 
invitation. Gatesnead 
July 31-tag 1: AAA 
championships. Crystal Palace 
Aug 6-9: European junior 
championships. Birmingham 
Aug 12: City of Viareggio 
meeting: International 
Leichtathtetik. Koblenz 
Aug 14: IAC international. 

Crystal Palace 

Aug 15-16: GRE Plate and Cup 
final. Birmingham 
22: Dairy Crest games. 



Jan 21-29: Cappa d’Aosta, 
Cervima 

Jan 31-Feb 8: European 
champi o nships. Cortina 


r?. : BOWLS 


Feb 7-15: World indoor men’s 

singles championship. 

Coatbridge 

Mar 2-5: English women s 
indoor championships. 
Northampton 

Mar 9-13: British men’s indoor 

championships, Aberdeen 
Mar 16-19: British women s 
indoor championships. 

A uctunlack 

Mar 23-28: World indoor men s 
parrs cnamponship. 
Bournemouth 

Apr 6-11: English men s indoor 
championships. Hartlepool 


championship final. Hartlepool 
May 29-31: Gateway Masters. 
Worthing 

jun 29-Juf 1: British women's 

internationals. Jordanstown 

Jul 2 British women's 
championships. Jordans town 
Jul 6-ilfc British men's 

championships and intemationaJ 
senes. Uanefli 



mm 


Aug 29-Sept 6; World 
championships. Rome 
Sept 11: iAAF Grand Frix final. 


Sept 13: McVitie's challenge 
invitation, Crystal Palace 
Sept 14-16: Nike Ptaymakers 
international, Delhi 
Sept 15: International meeting 
of Lausanne 

Sept 20: Glasgow marathon 
Nov 21: Women s world 1 5km 
road race championships, 
Monaco 

Nov 28: McVitie's challenge 
international cross country, 
Gateshead 

Dec 21: International cross 
country. Cardiff 


v BADMINTON^' J 


Jan 31: Cartsberg Engfish 
national championships, Crawley 
Feb 17: England select v 
Scotland 

Feb 18-19: England v Denmark 

Marll-15: Yonex AH-England 
championships, Wemney Arena 
April 18: European junior 
championships 
May 18-24: World 
championships, Beijing, China 


^BASKETBALLS 


Jan 1-4: World Invitation Ckib 
Championships, Crystal Palace 
Mar 11: European Ronchetti 
Cup final (women), Wittelshewn 


Benson and Hedges CttaHrage 
(Perth) 

Jan 1: Australia v England 
Jan 2: Australia v Pakistan 

Jan 3: England v West tatties 


Ryder tradition keeps 
sportsmanship safe 


By Mitchell Platts 


“We have nothing to fear 

any more. It will be hard but 
1 have no doubt that we can 
win.*’ With those words 
Tony Jacklin, captain for 
the third successive time, 
launched Europe’s golf cam- 
paign to retain the Ryder 
Cup against the United 
States at Mtrirfieid Village, 
Dublin, Ohio, on September 
24 to 27: 

Jacklin, of course, pro- 
vided the inspiration at The 
Belfry in 1985 when Sam 
Torrance reached to the sky 
as he secured the winning 
point for Europe. It was the 
first time the United States 
had been defeated in the 
biennial match since 1957. 

In 1983, when he cap- 
tained the team for the find 
time, Jacklin cajoled 
Europe’s golfers to within a 
finger-touch of a first suc- 
cess on American soiL They 
lost and the result 

provided abundant evidence 
of the United States's 
increasing vulnerability. 

Jack Niddans was the 
United States’s captain on 
that occasion. He was ab- 
sent in 1985, when some 
observers cruelly suggested 
that he was concerned by 
the possibility of defeat, but 
he has been restored to the 
front line for 1987. AU of 


which is hardly surprising 
since M Airfield Village is 
the course that Jack built. 

Nick Faldo, who has’ 
played the course on several 
occasions, said: “It is a 
severe examination. One of 
the tonghest second-shot 
courses that I know. It Is 
easy to miss the greats.” 

Nicklaes is relishing the 
prospect of being the United 
States captain on his own 
course. Jacklin, of arose, is 
also relishing the chance of 
leading Europe to a second 
successive victory. It could 
be so close that both of them 
might be prepared to settle 
for a similar result to the 
1949 match at Royal Birk- 
dale. Then Nkrklaas gen- 
erously conceded Jacklin a 
putt of three feet on the last 
green so that the match 
itself was halved. 

It was the kind of sporting 
gesture that Samuel Ryder 
had hoped would become a 
symbol of the match from 
the moment of the first 
official encounter in 1927, If 
the result in 1987 cannot be 
predicted then it would 
appear reasonably safe to 
assume, that with Jacklin 
and Nicklaus at die helm 
aga i n, the tradition of 
sportsmanship will con- 
tinue 



June 6-7: Mans sabre 


hhh 


FOOTBALL 


RwrStare.MoorParfc 

***$*£ 52 ^*** 

Prestwick St Mjggs 
jun 3-6: McEwansWomen s 


jun *7: bunhffl British Masters. 
jmMtt-14: Peugeot French 


i 1 1 Sfta 

n*l l c 1 1 1 nffiwiBi 

mmssm 


Early days: the only known print of cricket on Thomas Lord’s first ground, winch he opened at Dorset Heads in 1 787 

Celebration of an undefeated 200 


By Marcus Williams 


Aug 10-19: English women’s 
champtonships, Leamington Spa 
Aug 10-21: English men's 
championships. Worthing 
Aug 30: Men's champion of 
cnampiors tournament venue to 
be announced 

Sept 13: Kodak men's Under- 
25 championship, Worthing 
Sept 19-20: National mixed 
pairs championship, venue to be 
announced 

Oct 12-17: Liverpool Insurance 
Indoor Superbowl, Manchester 
Oct 31 -Nov 8: UK men's indoor 
singles championship. Preston 


BOXING^' j 


Jan 22: Scotland v England, 
Dundee 

Feb 9: Young England v Young 
Yugoslavia, Hilton Hotel, London 
Feb 22: World welterweight 
champtonsnip: Lloyd Honeyghai 
(GB) v Johnny Bumphus (US), 
Wembley Grand HaH 
May 1: George Wimpey ABA 
finals. Wembley Arena 
May 21-31: European senior 
championships. Turin, Italy 
May 23: ABA junior finals, 
Bletchiey Leisure Centre 
Jul 4-12: World junior 
championships. Havana, Cuba 


CANOEING 1 


Apr & EngBsh Open wild water 
champtonships, Washburn. 
Yorks 

Apr 23-24: National junior 
raang regatta. Holme Pierrepom 

May 30-31: British Open wM 
water championships, Tryweryn. 
Gwynedd 

Jul 2-5: World junior racing 
championships, Belgrade, 
Yugoslavia 

Jul 10-12 World slalom and 
wild wafer championships, 
Boura, France 

Jul 11-12 Nottingham 
international regatta. Holme 
Pierrepom 

Jul 2S& World Cup marathon 
race, Shannon, Bre 

Aug 19-22 World senior 
racing championships, Duisburg, 
West Germany 

Aim 29-31: National marathon 
championships, Worcester 

Oct 24-25: British national 
slalom champtonships. 

Liangoilen, Owyd 

Oct 31 -Nov Is International 
slalom. Ltengoflen. Ctwyd 


Two events will make 1987 
a special year in the world of 
cricket The first, at Lord’s 
in August, is a five-day 
match involving 22 of the 
game’s best players to cele- 
brate MCCs bicratenary; 
the second, in October and 
November, is the fourth 
World Cup, which will be 
staged in India and Paki- 
stan. 

The Lord’s match on Au- 
gust 20 to 25 will be the high 
point of the festivities mark- 
ing the 200th birthday of the 
most famous cricket dub and 
ground in the world. The 
talent likely to be assembled 
for the occasion will be as 
great as any for a single 
match throughout the 
ground’s distinguished his- 
tory. 

MCCs team will be cho- 
sen from all players perform- 
ing in English cricket to 
1987, both from home and 
overseas, so the likes of 
Greenidge, Marshall, Had- 
lee and the young Zim- 
babwean, Hick, could be 
seen alongside Catting, 
Botham, Gower and other 
England players. 

Three English-based over- 
seas players not chosen by 
MCC will be eligible for the 
Rest of the World, who will 
be captained by Allan Bor- 
der, of Australia, and man- 
aged by Clive Lloyd, the 
former West Indies captain. 
Cricket followers will have 


Jon 4: AustraSa v West Indies 
Jan 5: England v Pakistan 
Jan 7; Final 
England tour 

Jan 10-1 5: Australia v England, 
fifth Test Sydney 
World Series Cup 
Jan 17: England vWestlncfies, 
Brisbane 

Jan 12 Australia v England, 
Brisbane 

Jan 20: AustraBa v West Indies, 
Melbourne 

Jan 22 AustraSa v England, 
Sydney 

Jan 24: England v West Indtos, 
Adelaide 

Jan 25c AustraSa v West Indies, 
Adelaide 

Jan 26: AustraBa v England, 
Adelaide 

Jan 28: Australia v West Indtos. 
Sydney 

Jan 30: England v West Indies, 
Melbourne 

Fra 1: AustraBa v England. 
Melbourne 

Feb 3: England v West IncBes. 
Devonport 

Feb 6: Australia v West Irafies. 

Sydney 

Feb 8; First final, Melbourne 
Feb 11: Second final, Sydney 
Feb 13: Third final (If required), 
Melbourne 

Other overseas fixtures 
Jan 3-8: fntfia v Sri Lanka, third 
Test, Cuttack 

Jan 10: India v Sri Lanka, one- 
day international, Gauhati 
Jan 12 India v Sri Lanka, one- 
day international. Delhi 
Jan 14: Inda v Sri Lanka, one- 
day international, Baroda 
Jan 17: India v Sri Lanka, one- 
day international, Trivandrum 
Jan 27: India v Pakistan, one- 
day international, Indore 
Jan 30-Feb 4: tntfla v Pakistan, 
first Test Ahmedabad 
Feb 11-16: Indta v Pakistan, 
second Test Calcutta 
Feb 12 India v Pakistan, one- 
day international. Calcutta 

Feb M-24: New Zealand v West 

Indies, first Test Weffington 
Feb 21-22 India V Pakistan, 
third Test Jaipur 

Fab 27-Mar 3: New Zealand v 
West Indies, second Test 
Auckland 

Mar *2 India v Pakistan, fourth 
Test Chandigarh 
Mar 12-16: New Zealand v West 
Indies, third Test Christchurch 
Mar 13-18: India v Pakistan, 
fifth Test, Bangalore 
Mv 18: New Zealand v West 
Indies, one-day international, 
Dunedin 

Mar 20: India v Pakistan. one- 
day International, Hyderabad 
Mar 20-2* Sheffield Shield 
final, AustraBa 

Mar 21: New Zealand v West 
Indies, one-day International, 
Auckland 

Mar 22 Inda v Pakistan, one- 

day international. Poona 
Mar 24: India v Pakistan, one- 
day international, Nagpur 
Mar 25: New Zealand v West 
Indies, one-day international. 


Mar 28: India v Pakistan, one- 
day international. Jamshedpur 
Mar 28: New Zealand v west 

Indies, one-day international, 

Christchurch 

EngSsh season 
Mar 22 National Indoor sJx-a- 
skte dub championship finals. 
Lord's. 

Apr 18: First-class season 


the added attraction of a 
competition to predict the 
composition of the sides. 

Most of the cricketers 
appearing in the MCC Bi- 
centenary match will be in 
the Indian sub-continent a 
few weeks later to represent 
their countries in the World 
Cnp, which is being played 
for the first time outside 
England. It opens on Octo- 
ber 8 and lasts tor just over a 
month. 

The seven Test-playing 
countries are joined by Zim- 
babwe, whiners of the ICC 
Trophy tor the smaller 
cricketing nations in Eng- 
land last smrnner and worthy 
conquerors of Australia in 
the opening round of match- 
es in the tot World Cup in 
1983. Matches will be of 50 
overs a side, the fewer hours 
of daylight In India and 
Pakistan causing a reduction 
from the 60 overs played in 
En gland, and the champions 
will receive £30,000 and the 
Reliance Cup, put op by the. 
Indian sponsors. 

India caused a stiO hardy 
credible iqiset in the last 
final when they defeated the 
mighty West Indies by 43 
nms at Lord’s, and there wifi 
be fervent local hopes of 
them taking taking their 
place to the final this time at 
a teeming Eden Gardens, 
Calcutta, on November 8. 

Home advantage most 
m«ha India favonrites to 


Apr 25: Britannic Assuranoe 








'i.iifiiTi'-' il'v'f 1 

l-’Li. 
















TTriiti 






match, MCC v Rest of the 
Lord's 

Aug 21-24: England v AustraSa, 
women's second Test, 


Aug 28: National dub knock-out 

championship final, Lord's 
Aim 29-Sept 1: England v 
AustraBa, women's thin! Test, 
Hlov 0 

Aug 30: Warwick Under-25 


rlf i nW 


mm 


CROQU ET 


Jun 6-7: Home internationals, 
BucMgh Salterton 
June 14-20; Men’s and 
women's championships, 

Cheltenham 

Jul 11-12 Junior championships 
July 11-12 Open 
champtonsraps, Hurfngnam 
S^WwAB-Engiandarea 

Sept 8-12 President’ s Cup, 
Hirfngham • 

Sept 18-22 Peel Memorials, 
Wrest Park _ • . 

Sept 22 Longman Cup final, 
venue to be announced . 


reach -the semi-finals from 
Group A, in which New 
Zealand may well oust 
Australia as the second 
qualifiers. West Indies, win- 
ners of the first two World 
Cups in 1975 and 1979, wifi 
be expected to win Group B, 
which is mostly being played 
in Pakistan. 

England and Pakistan will 
battle fra the second semi- 
final place from that group, 
with England opening then- 
campaign in tiie hardest 


possible way against West 
Indies on October 9. Eng- 
land’s next three matches 
are also in Pakistan and then 
they go to India tor the 
retBrn matches against West 
InJix at Jaipur on October 
23 and against Sri Lanka at 
Poona on October 27. 

lafw in the winter Eng- 
land wffl be back hi Pakistan 
fra a Test series, going on to 
New Zealand and briefly to 
Anstrafia for a Test match to 
celebrate that country's bi- 
centennial. 






finals, second leu 
Mar 14/15: FA Cup! sixth round 


gap? 






WORLD CUP FIXTURES 


Sill 

F V r-i * I - 


Winners’ Cup final 
May It FA CUp final. Wembley 
Hay 12 England v Braza, Rous 


Group A 

Oct 2 Inda v Australia. 

Madras 

Oct 12 New Zealand v 
Zimbabwe, Hyderabad 

Oct 12 Australia v Zimbabwe, 
Madras 

Oct 14: Incfia v New Zealand, 
Bangalore 

Oct 17: India v Zimbabwe, 
Bombay 

Oct Ifc Austrafiav New 
Zealand. Indore 

Oct 22 India v Australia, Delhi 

Oct 22 New Zealand v 
Zimbabwe, Calcutta 

Oct 26s India v Zimbabwe, 
Ahmedabad 

Oct 27: AustraSa v New 
Zealand, ChamSgarti 

Oct 30: Australia v Zimbabwe, 
Cuttack 

Oct 31: ln«fla v New Zealand, 
Nagpur 

Group B 

Oct 2 Pakistan v Sri Lanka. 


Oct2 West Indies v England, 


Gu jr anw a la 

Oct 12 Pakstan v England, 
Rawalpindi 

Oct 12 Sri Lanka v West 
Indies, Karachi 

Oct 1& Pakistan v West 
Indies. Lahore 

Oct 17: England v Sri Lanka, 
Peshawar 

Oct 20: Pakistan v England, 
Karachi 

Oct 21: West incSss v Sn 
Lanka. Kanpur 

Oct 25: Pakistan v Sri Lanka. 
FMnUMd 

Oct 22 England v West 
kxfies. Jaipur 

Oct 30: Sri Lanka v England, 
Poona 

Oct 30: Pakistan v West 
kxfies, Karachi 

Earn! Until 

Nov 5: Group B winners v 
Group A runners-up, Lahore; 
Group A winners v Group B 
runners-up, Bombay 

Final 

Nov & Calcutta 


Hay 121 
Cup 

May 221 


CYCLING 





Jte 30-tag 2 Sfflr Cut Derby. 
Hickstead 







Aug 20-22 World pahs 






mm m 




DARTS 


Jan 2-2 MR British Open, 
Kensington Rainbow Suite, 
London 

Jan 10-12 Embassy world 
professional, Frimley Green, 


Mmmm 


trials, Worksop; 

Oct 1-4: Chatsworth horse 


Feb 2-4: Dry BlacMhom Cider 
Masters finals, Oldham 
FUb 13-12 MFI world pahs. 

Carwey Island, Essex 
Marl: Scotland v Wales, 


Mar 2 England v Scotland, 
Preston 

Mar 12 Watos.v England, 
Cardiff 

Mar 22 Nations Cup and 
Nations Triples, AJexanth 
Pavffion. London 
Wfey 30-31: Fhrtand Open, 
Turku 

Jon 0-7: Canadian Open. 


Oct 5-10: Horse of the Year 
Show, Wembley 
Oct 9-11: Goodwood 
International tono-tfetance r 

D wSnT«toSf^mw jlhping 
championships, London 


FENCING 


• Afl events at the de 
Beermat Centre, West 
ij, LondoR,i 


May 22 UEFA Cup final, 

second leg 

May 22 Scotland v England. 

Rous Cup 

May 27: European Champions 
Cup final 

May 22 Luxembourg v 
Repubfe of Ireland, European 
championship 
Aug 1: FA Chanty Shield. 
W&nbtey 

Aug 8/2 Football League 
Centenary match. Wembley 
Aug 12 Football League 
season starts 
Sept 2 WMes v Denmark, 
Repubfe: of Ireland v 
Luxembourg, European 
championship: West Germany v 
England, friendly 
Oct 14c Yugoslavia v Northern 
Ireland, England vTurkey, 
Denmark v wales, Scotland v 

Belgium, Republic of Ireland v 
Bulgaria, European 


Northern Ireland v Turkey, 
Czechoslovakia v Wales, 
Bulgaria v Scotland, European 
championship 

Dec 2 Luxembourg v Scotland, 
European championship 


GLIDING 


Jan 17-Frai: World 
champtonships, BenaBa, 
Australia 

June 20-22 Open dass 
national championships, Lasham 
Airfield, Alton, Hants 
Jane 27-Joty 4: Co mp etition 
Enterprise, Aboyne AJrffeW, 
Dinnet Aberdeen 
July 16-12 Standard dess 

national championships, 
Wycombe Ah Park, Marlow, 
Bucks 

Aug 1-2 15-metre class 
national championships. 
Husbands Bosworth Airfield, 
nr Lutterworth, Leics 


Jan 8-11: President's Putter, 
Rye 

Mar 12 Berichamsted Trophy, 
Berkhamsted 
Mar 17-12 Avia Women's 
Foursomes, The Berkshire 
Mar 19-22 Moroccan Open, 
Rabat 

Mar 20-21: Oxford v 
Cambridge, Formby 
Mar 24-27: Sunningdale 
Foursomes, Sunningdato 
Apr 2-5: Dunhfll Cup qualifying. 
Rome 

Apr 9-12 US Masters, Augusta 
National; Jersey Open, La 
Moye; Halford Hewitt Royal 
Cinque Ports Kid Royal St 
George's 

Apr 16-12 Cannes Open. 


ESs||§j|jg| 

pi r 'jwM 

L u-LjL ul. , 


ttfsaeimw# hMi 


Oct 1-2 Dunh# Cup. St 
Androws 

Oct 1-4: James Capel Guernsey 
Open, Royal Guernsey 
Oct 22-24: Commonwealth 
Trophy, Christchurch, New 
Zealand 


r GYMNASTICS 


Jan 17; Gold Top Champions 
Cup, Albert Ha* 

Apr ih: VitalHe, W6mbley Arena 
May 2 Thames Televteton's 
Junior Gymnast of the Year 
finals, Wembley Arena 
May 18-25: European 
ctatnpionships. Moscow 
Jun 12 Nalwest Bank 
gymnastics and sports 
acrobatics display. Crystal 
Palace 

Oct 19-22 World 
ch am pton sh ips. Rotterdam. 
Hofiand 

Oct 31-Now 1: Daffy Mirror 
British national championships 
Alexandra Palace 
Dec 19-22 Kraft Gym nasti c s 
International. Wembley Arena 


HANDBALL 


Mar 14-12 Intern ati o na l Cup, 
Salford 

"g^SS nd,&sto “' 

Mm 9-12 British Cup finals, 


May 9-10 
Kirkby 
June 13- 


Apr 23^M: Cepsa Open, Puma 
de Hierro 

Apr 29-May 2 Ford women's 
Classic, Woburn 


June 13-14: Six nations 
.twjroariwntGtasgow 
Aug 25-32 Commonwealth 


HANGGLIDING 


•to 2fr4=ra 7: Australian World 
Masters, Moura.Buffalo 
May 2-4: British women's 
^fflhpionship, Hawes. Yorkshire 
dales 

May 23-JunG: Austrian 
Masters. Kossen 
Jim 8-1& Lariano triangle. 

Como, Italy • 

lea Sue finals, 

JMaaa eaaa 1 ” 

^^ripjorohfes. Mffliax, France 


Aim 14-12 North American 
Open, Las Vegas 
Oct 2 British Matchplay. Great 
Yarmouth 

Oct 9-11: World Matchplay. 
BasBdon 

Oct 23*4; World Cup, 


Jan 17-12 MfflfieW Cup, Under- 
18 men’s foil IntemationaJ 

Jan 31: De Beaumont Cup, 
woman's tofl in ter na tional 
Feb 1: De Beaumont Cup, 
women's fofl international 
Feb 7-2 Lera Paul Cup, men’s 
ToO Internatio nal 
Mar 7H6t Chaflenge Martini 
International eo6e grade A 


Monticetio. nr Milan 
May 2-2 Lytham Trophy, Royal 
LythamandStAreies 
Mw 7-12 Epson Grand Prix, St 
Pierre 

May 14-17: Psu«ot Spanish 
Open, Las Brteas, nr Matera 
May 15-17: Brabazon Trophy, 


May 19-22 English women’s 
amateir championship, 
Alwoodfey 


S^U-12 US Masters, Grand 

gjg^rtain. Unvllte, North 


HOCKEY 


Home Countries 

■JKSSSBBfiSL. 


Denmark Open, 


England prepare for final assault 


Oct 31-Nov 1: British Gold Cup. 

Stoke-on-Trent 
Nov 7: Home internationals KO 
Cup, Swansea 
Dec 4* Wfemau wortd 

championships, Kensington 
Rainbow Suite, London 


By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 


Mar 11-17; World dressage 04 a 
final, Essen 

Apr 8-12 Volvo World Cup 
final. Paris-Beroy 

Apr 9-12: Badminton three-day 
event Gios 

Apr 28-May 2 Rome Nations 

May?4-17: Royal Wfindsw 
Horse Show. Windsor Great Park 

May 22-24: Windsor horse 
trials, Windsor Great Park 

May 28-31: Everest Nations 
Cup, Hickstead; Bramham horse 
trials, Wethetoy, Yorks 

Jun 13-21: Rc^af international 
Horse Show, NEC. Birmingham 
Royal Show. 

Igh. Warwickshire 


Tbe qBaffiyisg stages of 
the European cnampiaaship 
will form an extensive high- 
light of the second half at 
this football season and die 
first hatf of next By Decem- 
ber, the winners of the seven 
groups and the hosts, West 
Germany, will be pr^iaring 
for the finals, to be staged in 
the summer of 1988. 

Fngfanrij the only Euro- 
pean nararn to take an 
unbeaten record into the last 
World Cap finals, are 
considered one of die 
favourites. So tor in Group 
Four, they have won 3-0 
against Northern Ireland, 
who are being rebuilt by 
Billy Bingham, and 2-0 


Irish hopes, which were 
slender anyway, diminished 
still farther when they were 
held to a goalless draw in 
Turkey. Potentially, the 
most significant fixture of 
those that remain will take 
place in Belgrade in Novem- 
ber, but by then England 
could already be assured of 
finishing on top of the groqp. 

Wales have played only 
ooceand the outcome of their 
visit to Finland, a 1-1 draw, 
has reduced their dunces. 
They are unlikely to offer a 
serious challenge to ddier 
Czechodovakia or particu- 
larly Denmark, one of the 
most talented, albeit ' 31- 
disdplioed, sides to appear 
last summer in Mexico. 




*A 1*. aZT™ “uaortiine 
to be drawn m gna ^ 

tain against 

respectiydTT 

sMe, lEtay’J** 

dissss 

JJdgana. ThebbSS 

Wortd Sf 

to toil toqimfig/^ certain 

























Undec-21 tournament Old 
Traflord 

Mar 7: Wales w England. Cardiff 
Mar 21: Trpp-Ex Trophy. 

Enoland v USA. WemWey 
Mar 28-29: International 
weekend, Gateshead 
Apr 10-11: Home Countries 
schoolgirls tournament Larqs 
•Am 5-8; European Club 
championship 

Jun 26-28: Four Nations Under- 
_ 21 tournament ColchBster 
Sep 3-13: NatWest Bank 
European Cup, Picketts Lock. 
London 

Nov 27-29: Home Countries 
indoor tournament Crystal 
Palace 

Dec 18-20: European Indoor 
Cup, Bad Neuenahr. West 
Germany 
Men 

Jan 17-18: Home Countries 
indoor tournament Dublin 
Feb 27: Indoor dub finals. 
Crystal Palace 

Apr 12: HA Cup final, WiKesden 
Jun 18-28: Champions Trophy 
tournament, Amsterdam 
Aug 20-30: European 
championship, Moscow 
Oct 10-11: International 
tournament, WHiesden 
Dec 13: County championship 
final, Willesden 


Mar 15-23: World junior 
championships. Pool C. Esbjerg 

Aprs 3-9: European junior 
championships. Pool B, 
Bucharest, 

April 17-May 3; World and 
European championships, Poo) 
A, Vienna 

April 25-26: Heineken British 
championships, Wembley Arena 


ICE SKATING ' 


Jan 17-18: Women’s Europe en 
speed championships, 
Groningen 

Jan 24-25: Men's European 


speed championships. 
Trondheim 


Jan 31-Feb 1: World sprint 
champion shipB, Samtefoy, 

Feb 3-7: European figure and 
dance championships. Sarajevo 


Feb 14-15: Men's world speed 
championships, Heerenveen 
Mar 7-8: Europe Cup 
(indoor ice speed), Aviemora 
Mar 9-15: Worn figure and 
dance chamWonships, 
Cmdnnatti [ 

Mar 19-20: British indoor speed 
championships, SolihuU 
Apr 3-5: WorM indoor speed 
champions/rips, Montreal 
Nov 21: Britiai dance 
champtort&iips (provisional) 
Nov 23-25: Bittshfigure 
championihips (provisional) 


Jan 24-25: I 


champiorlships and trials for me 
and wonpn, Crystal Palace 
April: Brash Open men's 
chamokyiships, Crystal Palace 
Hay 7-10dEuropean 
championships for men and 
women! Paris 

Oct 3: Brtish Open women's 
chamnbnships, Crystal Paiaoe 
' Nov 5-7:European men's 

Underj2i arid women'sUnUer-- 
18, Gdansk, Poland 
Nov 19^2: World 
championships for men and 
women, Essen 


LACROSSE 


Women . 

Feb 7-8: territorial 
championships, Wycombe Abbey 
School, High Wycombe 
Feb 21-22 Territorial 
championships, Royal Masonic 
School. Rickmansworth 
Mar 7: England v Scotland, 

OPR 

Mar 21: England v Wales. 

Liverpool CC 

Aug 27-3tk Festival of lacrosse, 
Moreion Hal) School. Shropshire 
Mctfft 

Jan 10-25: Dertison University 
(US) lour, various venues 
April 11: Sou* of England 
Sixes, Orpington 
April 12: Nor?) of England Flags 
final. Oidsbury 
April 19: Easter Festival 
tournament, Stockport 
April 25: South of England 
Rags final Enfield 


M PENTATHLON -3 j 


Apr 9-12: Men s international, 
Crystal Palace 
May 9-1tfc National triathlon 
championships, Portsmouth 
Jul 3-5: National mBns 
charn p*on ships . Milton Keynes 
Jul 24-26: National junior and 
women's championships. 
Wantage 

Aug 2-8: Women's world 
championships, Bensheim. 
Germaiy 

Aug 12-16: Senior world 
championships, Moulins, France 
Nov 28-29: National biathlon 
championships, Southampton 


MOTOR ‘CYCtINGt 


Grand Prix 

Mar 29: Japan, Suzuka 
Apr 28: Spain, Jerez 
May 17: Germany, Hockenh&m 
May 24: Italy. Monza , 

Jun 7: Austria. Safzburgrmg 
Jun 14: Yugoslavia. Rijeka 
Jun 27: Holland, As sen 
Jui 5: Belgium. Spa 
Francorchamps 
Jui 19: France, La Mans 
Aug Z Great Britain, Donington 
Perk 

Aug 9: Sweden; Anderstorp 
Aug 23: Czechoslovakia. Brno 
Aug 30: San Marino. Misano 
Sept 13: Portugal. Jarama 
TT Formula One Worid 
championship ! 

Apr 19: Italy, Misano 
May 3: Hungary, Hunga raring 
May 31: Great Britain, Isle of 
Man 

Jun 25: Holland. Assen 

Jtd 12: Portugal. Vitareal 

Aug 2: Finland, Imatra 

Aug 15: Ireland, Dundrod 

Aug 3th Japan, Sugo 

Sept 20: Germany. Hockenham 

Sept 27: Great Britain, 

Donington Park 
British championship 
Sept 5-6: Mallory Park 
Sept 19: SHvdrstone 
Sept 26-27: Donington Park 
Oct 24-25: Brands Hatch 
Moto-cross 
Apr 26: World sidecar 
championships, Streatly Hills, nr 
Residing 

MaylOc ftitish 250cc Grand 
Prix, Hawkstone Park, nr 


-My 12: British 500cc Grand 
Prix, Farfeigh Castle, nr 
Trowbriaoe 

Sept21-26flntemstional sw- 

day Enduro. Poland 


Formula One worid 
championship 

Apr 12: Brazil. Rio de Jwflj* r 
toy 3: San Marino. Imola. Italy- 


ill 


S African absence 
means dilution of 
World Cup power 

By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


i and trials for men 


A world cap tournament 
for rugby muon has been 
theorized and argued over on 
various occasions since the 
Second World War, nsnally 
at times when supporters of 
one or other of the Inter- 
national Rugby Football 
Board comitries fed particu- 
larly well-placed to lay claim 
to a factual rather than 
mythical premiership. 

The threat of a pro- 
fessional world tournament 
in 1983 undoubtedly gal- 
vanized the thin king of the 
northern hemisphere conn- 
tries in regard to the idea of 
an official World Cop pro- 
posed by New Zealand and 
Australia, and the fruits of 
that proposal will be on offer 
in Australasia daring May 
and Jane when the inaugtni 
World Cup will be held. 

In some respects it is an 
answer to the plea from 
Australasia for a tournament 
of their own to match the 
annual five nations* tour- 
nament involving the fore 
home countries and France. 
It would have been better, 
both in terms of traditiion 
and practical detail, if the 
tournament had been ar- 
ranged for Britain, where the 
stadiums are b igg er and 
better and the miles in 
between shorter than in 
Australasia, bat mixed feel- 
ings about the concept of the 
tournament and the threat it 
might pose to amateurism 
left the inspiration and 
organization in New Zealand 
and Australian hands. 

The 16 countries invited to 
take part have been drawn 
from the eight International 
Board countries (the senior 
rugby-playing nations) and 
dime ether countries with 
the longest and strongest 
rugby traditions. There is 
one obvious exclusion: South 
Africa, whose internal poli- 
cies have created such diffi- 
culties in sporting rel- 
ationships with the rest of 
the world. 

May 17b Belgium, Spa- I 


May 31: Monaco 
Jui 14: Canada, Montreal 
Jun 21: Detroit 
Jui 5: France, La Caateflet 
JuM 2: Britain, Siverstone 
Jul 26: West Germany, 
Hocksnhaim 

Aug 9: Hungary. Budapest 
Aug - 16: Austria, Zeftweg 
Sept 6: Italy, Monza 
Sept 20: Portugal, Estorl 
Sept 27: Spain, Jerez 
Oct 18: Mexico. Mexico City 
Nov 1: Japan, Suzuka 
Nov 15s Australia, Adelaide 


Feb 21: England v Scotland 
Gravesend, Kent 
Mar 21: England v Wales 
Cardiff 

Apr 25: Barclays Bank National 
tournament finals, Ealing 
May 9: National Clubs' _ 
tournament final. East Essex 
Aug 15-29: Worid 

tournament, Glasgow 

Nov 28: England v Canttean, 
Wembley 


Apr 15: European Free ■ 
Handicap. Newmarket 
Apr 20: Irish Grand National, 
Fairyhouse 

Apr 2& Whitbread Gold Cup, 
Sandown 

Apr 28s French 2JOOO Guineas, 
Longchamp (provisional) 

Apr 30: 1,000 Guineas, 
Newmarket 
May 2: 2,000 Guineas, 
Newmarket 

May 3: French 1.000 Guineas, 
Longchamp (provisional) 

May 5: Chester Vase 
May 13: Dante Stakes, York 
Hay 18: Irish 2J)00 Guineas, 
Curragh 

May 22b rant to Point 
Championship final, Towceatar 
May 23: Irish 1,000 Guineas, 
Curragh 

Jun 3: Derby, Epsom 
Jun 4: Coronation Cup, Epsom 
Jun 6; Oaks, Epsom 
Jui 7: French Derby, Chantfijy 
(provisional) 

Jim 14: French Oaks, Cbantlty 


Glasgow JuvlffcGoi^up, Royal Ascc 

id vCarribean. Jun 19: King's Stand Stakes, 


Jan 18: National event 
Aldershot 

May 2Hk British relays 
weekend, Hexham 


Jul 25: King George 
HSElSfSE?™ Queen azabetn E 


May 24-25: National event 
Kidderminster 
June 6-7: National event 
Aberfoyle, Perthshire 
June 21 : National event 
Keswick 

Sept 26-27: National event 
Plymouth 

Oct 11: National event Buxton 
Nov 8: National event Prttochry 


June 30-Jul 7: The Queen's 
Cup, Windsor 
June 11-21: Royal Windsor 
Cup, Windsor 

June 23-28: Warwickshire Cup, 
Cirencester 
Jul 1-19: British Open 
championship. Cowdray Park 
Jul 23- Aug 2: Cowdray Park 
Challenge Cup 
Jul 23-Aug 2: Harrison Cup, 
Cowdray Park 
Juf 26: Cartier International. 
Windsor 


Jun 18: Gold Cup, Royal Ascot 
Jun 19: King's Stand Stakes, 

Royal Ascot 

Jun 27: Irish Derby, Curragh: 
Northumberland Plate, 
Newcastle 

Jul 4s Eclipse Stakes, 

Sandown 

Jid 9: July Cup. Newmarket 
Jul 11: Magnet Cup, York: Irish 
Oaks, Curragh 
Jul 25: King George VI and 
Queen Bizabefn Diamond 
Stakes, Ascot 
Jul 28: Stewards' Cup, 
Goodwood 

Jul 29: Sussex Stakes, 
Goodwood 

Aug 9: Heinz 57 Phoenix 
Stakes, Phoenix Park 
Aug 18: Matchmaker 
International, Yorkshire Oaks, 
York 

Aug 19: Ebor Handicap, York 
Aug 20: WWamHiH Sprint 
championship. York 
Aug 29: Waterford Crystal Mile, 
Goodwood 


Sep S: vernons Sprint Cup. 

^xrPhoenix 

^^ak^RTaeSc^aS 0 ' 1 
Sep 9: Park HJH Stakes. 


Sep 12: St Leger, Doncaster 



Sep 26: Queen Elizabeth » 
Stakes, Ascot 

Sep 30: Cheveley Park Stakes, 
Newmarket 

Oct 3: Middle Park States, 
Cambridgeshire Handicap, 


,T ; 


k t ‘- . ' J C - * 1 






Unfortunately, if South 
Africa are absent, it is 
difficult to regard the world 
tournament as a genuine 
competition, such is the 
republic's strength. Not for 
Berthing have Australia, the 
strong lavishes to win the 
world title, received an in- 
vitation to tour South Africa 
immediately after the World 
Cup which the Australian 
Rugby Union have yet to 
accept. 

The other notable absen- 
tees are the Soviet Union, 
whose limited toning liniw 
with other conn tries largely 
account for invitations going 
elsewhere, to soch as Zim- 
babwe, Tonga, the United 
Slates and Canada, all of 
whom might stru gg le a gainst 
the Soviet Union. 

The 16 competing coon- 
tries are divided into fonr 
pools, one of which operates 
exclusively in Australia and 
the other three in New 
Zealand, where there is a 
multiplicity of suitable stadi- 
ums (Australia have appro- 
priate facilities only in 
Sydney and Brisbane). One 
Pool Two game, between 
Ireland and Tonga, will be 
played in Brisbane, other- 
wise the other three pools 
must wait until the knock- 
out stages before moving to 
play in Australia. Winners 
and runners-up in each 
group wOl play out the 
quarter-finals in Christ- 
church, Auckland, Sydney 
and Brisbane. 

There win be an opening 
ceremony on May 17 in 
Auckland, which will be 
duplicated in Sydney, and 
the final will be staged in 
Auckland on Jime 20. De- 
tails of ticketing arrange- 
ments are still bring neg- 
otiated, but the marketing 
agents for the tournament 
hope that games wiD be 
televised worldwide, and 
have negotiated contracts in 
Britain, Australasia, Japan, 
Sooth and North America. 


V&i 


i* •- ’ 




ixm 




r.-y . TS'SPU 

tt . ... • - 







Flying wing: Rory Underwood, one of England’s Cup hopes 


WORLD CUP FIXTURES 


May 22: New Zealand v Italy, 
Auckland 

May 29: Austrafia v England, 
Sydney; Romania v Zimbabwe, 
Auckland; France v 
Scotland. Christchurch 

May 24: Japan v USA, 

Brisbane; Canada v Tonga, 
Napien Argentina v Fqi, 
Hamilton 

May 25c Ireland v Wales, 
Weffinqton 


May 27: New Zealand v Fqi, 
Christchurch 
May 28: Argentina v Italy, 
Christchurch; France v 


t 30: England v Japan, 
fctaey; Canada v Ireland, 
unedfli; Scotland v 


Triomphe, Longchamp-*' 
(provisional) 

■Oct 11: Irish St Leger, Curragh 
Oct 16s Dewhurst Stakes. 
Newmarket 

Oct 17: Champion Stakes, 
Cesarewttcn Handicap, 
Newmarket 

Oct 24: WHttam HiB Futurity. 
Doncaster 

Oct 25: French St Leger, 
Longchamp (provisional) 

Nov 7fNovember Handicap, 
Doncaster 

Nov 14: Macfceson Gold Cup, 
Cheltenham 
Nov 21: Breeders Cup, 


Zimbabwe. Wellington 
May 31: Australia v USA. 

Brisbane; Fiji vltaiy, Dunedin 
June 1: New Zealand v 
Argentina. Wellington 
June 2: France V Zimbabwe, 
Auckland; Romania v Scotland. 
Dunedin 

June 3: England v USA, 

Sydney; Australia v Japan, 
Sydney; Canada v Wales, 
InvercargiB; Ireland v Tonga, 
Brisbane _ 

June 6)7,8: Quarter-finals, 
Christchurch, Sydney, 
Auckland, Brisbane 
June 13 and 14: Semi-finals, 
Sydney. Brisbane 
June 18: Play-off for third and 
fourth places. Rotorua 
June 20: Final, Auckland 


Feb 21-22: Sea court Silver 
Racquet, Hayling Island 
Mar 1-5: Worid championship 
eliminator, Queen's Club 
Mar 13-17: World 
championship chafienge. 
Queen's Club 

Mar 20-29: Amateur singles, 
Hotypart 

Apr 23-26: Women’s world 
championship. Seacourt 
May 8-10: Amateur doubles, 
Leamington 

May 16-17: Profess iorrals’ 
singles championship, 
Cambridge 


Hollywood Park 
kw28: Hennessyi 


Nov 28: Hennessy Gold Cup, 
Newbury 

Nov 29: Japan Cup, Tokyo 
Dec 5: Glen International Gold 
Cup, Cheltenham 
Dec 19: SGB Chase. Ascot 
Dec 26: King George VI Chase, 


Dec 2 k Welsh National, 
Cheostow 


• AH events at Queen's Cfub, 
West Kensington 

Jan 1-4: Open under 24 singles 
and doubles 

Jan 8-18: Amateur singles 
Feb 6-15: Amateur doubles 
F«b 14-15: Professionals' 
sing las. Winchester 
Mar 14-22: Open singles 
Mar 25-31: Public schools 

dtxrtjias 

Mar 31 -Apr 12: Open doubles 


RALLYING 


World rafiy championship 
Jan 14-27: Monts Carlo 
Feb 13-15: Sweden 
Mar 10-15: Portugal 
Apr 16-20: Satan, Kenya 
May 7-10: Tour of Corsica 
May 30-June 4: Acropoks, 
Greece 

Jime 25-29: CHympus, 
Washington state. US. 


July 11-14: New Zealand 
(drivers' title only} 


Aug 2-9: 


Ain 26-30: 1,000 Lakes, 
Finland 


Co-encestar 


Oct 4: Prix del' Arc de 


(drivers' title drily) 

Oct 11-17: San Remo, Italy 
Nov 22-26: RAC, Britain. 


REAL TENNIS 


Jan 1-3: Scottish Amateur 
singles and doubles, Troon 
Jan 9-11: Professionals’ 
doubles and woman's doubles, 
Canford 


Feb 25-28: Oxford Univeretty 
torpids; Cambridge University 
Jems 

Mar 12: Schools head oMhe 
river, Chiswick to Putney 
Mar 14: Women's head of the 
river, Barnes to Putney 
Mar 28: Oxford v Cambridge 
Boat Race, Putney to Mortlaki; 
Head of the river, Morttake to 
Putney 

Apr 11: Scu Iters' head of the 
river, Mortiake to Putney 
May 27-30: Oxford University 
summer eights 
May 3931: Nottingham 
International. Holme Pierrepont 
Jun 3-6: Cambridge University 
May races 

Jun & National schools 
regatta. Holme Pierrepont 
Jul 1-5: Henley Royal Regatta 
Jul 18-19: National 
championships, Holme 
Prerr spent 
Aug 24-30: Worid 
cnampronships, Copenhagen 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Jan 10: John Player Specif 
Trophy final 
Jan 24: Great Britain v 
France, World Cup 
Jan 31 -Feb 1: Silk Cut 
Challenge Cup. first round 
Feb 8: France v Great Britain 
Feb 14-15: Silk Cut Challenge 
Cup, second nxmd 
Feb 28-Mar 1: Silk Cut 
Challenge Cup, third round 
Mar 14; Silk Cut Challenge Cup, 
first semi-final 

Mar 28: Silk Cut Challenge Cup, 
second semi-final 
Apr 26: Stones Bitter 
Premiership, first round 
May 2; Silk Cut Challenge Cup 
final. Wembley 
May 10: Stones Bitter 
Premiership, semifinals 








RUGBY UNION 




SPEEDWAY 


May 31: British championship. 
Cowfintry 

June 14: lnctivtdual worid 
championship, Commonwealth 


final. King's Lym 
July 5: Individual world 
championship, overseas final, 
Odsal Stadium, Bradford 
July 19: Team worid 
championship. Group One, first 
round, Coventry 






senu-finais; 

Pacific/Hong Kong 
Apr 11: Thom EMI county 
championstap final, Twickenham; 
Melrose sevens 
Apr IB: Ulster Cup final: 




Welsh Cup final. Cardiff; 

French chib championshtp fin^. 
Paris 

May 9: Middlesex sevens. 
Twickenham 

May 10: GlenSvet Monte Carlo 
sevens 

Srat 2& Scottish Districts XV v 
French XV. venue to be arranged 
Nov 7: Wales v USA, Cardiff 
Dec 8: Oxford University v 
Cambridge University, 
Twickenham 


SHOOTING 


Fteb 27-Mar 3: European air gun 
championships. Bratislava 
Apr 18-20: Easter rifle meeting, 
Rtslftv 

Apr 24-25: British open 
universal trench Grand Prix, 
Haverfordwest 
May 14-17: British open 
sporting championship, Hod net 
Shropshire 

May 23-25: England XX rifle 
and pistol '87 meetings, Bislay 
June 26-28: Nonfic 


British open automatic 





Jan 23-25: Golden Cup, 


Jan 30-Ffeb T: Swedish games, 
Boroange; International Open, 
Paris 

FOb 3-4: NOK, East Berlin 
Feb 6-8: Arena festival, Bonn 
Feb 27-Mar 1: International 
Open. Ipswich 
Mar 14s British Club Team 
finals, Leeds 
Apr 11-12: European 
Community Cub Team finals, 
Leeds 

Apr 1B-19e Eight-nation junior 
meeting. Crystal Palace 
May 2-4: speedo meeting, 




Aug 14-18: British open skeet 
championship. Ida of Sheppey 
Aug 26-31: NRA and NSRA 
pistol championships, Btsley 
Sept 19-20: British Open Grand 
Prix ISU Skeet EvershoL Dorset 
Oct 9-11: British air gun 
championships. Cartfiff 
Oct 19-26: World air gun 
championships, Budapest 


SKIING 


Jan 2-5e British tree-style 
championships, Saalbach, 
Austria 

Jan 17-18: Lauberhom races, 


Jan 21 : Feb 3: British nonfic 
and biathlon championships, 
ZwieseL West Germany 

Jan 24-25: Hatmenkamm races, 
IQtzbuhel, Austria 

Jan 25-Feb 8: Men's and 
women's world championships. 
Crans Montana, Switzerland 

F#b 9-11: FIS European free- 
style championships, Le Sauze, 
France 

Feb 9-15: British atom© 
championships. Courmeyeur, 
Italy 

Feb 10-14: World biathlon 
championships. Lake Placid, 
USA 

Fteb 13-22: Worid nonfic 
championships, Oberstdorf, 
West Germany 

Apr 3-5: British amateur ^eed 
championships, Gienshee, 
Scotland 


SNOOKER 


Jan 2-11: Mercantile CredBt 
classic, Blackpool 
Jan 25-Feb 1: Benson and 
Hedges Masters tournament; 
Wembley 

Feb 9-13: Welsh professional 
championship. Newport 
Feb 15-Marl: Du!ux Brittsn 
Open championship. Derby 
Mar 7-15: BCE Belgian 
classic, Ostend 
Mar 18-21: Worid team 
championship, Bournemouth 
Mar 24-29: Benson and Hedges 
Masters tournament. GoffS, Co 
Kildare 

Apr 18-May 4: Embassy Worid 
professional championships. 
Sheffield 

May 23: Women's amateur 
championships, Loughborough 


May 16-17: Holland vGBv 
West Germany. Holland 
May 23-25: Belgian Cup, 
Antwerp; Monk Multi-nation, 
Ljoods 

May 30-31: Seven Hills, Rome 
June 18-21: Scottish Open, 
venue to be announced 
July 17-19: Welsh Open, Cartfiff 
July 23-26: European Junior 


championships, Rome 
uiy 30- Aug Z National ( 


Jufr30 : Aiig Z National Open, 
Crystal Palace 
Aug 3* National age group, 
Coventry 

Aug 16-23: European 


Aug 16-23: European 
ortarrexonships. Strasbourg 
Sept 13: Speodo National 
Laagua final, Leeds 
Oct 30-31: English Schools 
championships. Hull 
Nov 19-22: National short 
course, Ipswich 
Nov 22 Inter-county final, 
Nuneaton 

Nov 27-29: Esso Open, Toronto 
Doc 4-6: US Open, Orlando 
Dec 12-13: European Cup, 
Monaco 


A double 
chance 
for Stoute 

By Phil McLennan 

Michael Stoute, the 
frfl riin g Flat racing trainer 
of the year, cannot realis- 
tically hope to improve on 
his staggering 1986 prize 
money total of £2,778,405 
next season. In Ajdal and 
Milligram, however, he has 
two top-class prospects 
who coold add to his 
impressive classic tally this 
decade. 

Stoute has won the 
Derby twice and the Irish 
equivalent three times in 
the last six years and 
Ajdal, a son of the leg- 
endary Northern Dancer, 
showed sufficient quality in 
his three autumn victories 
to suggest he might emu- 
late Shergar, Shareef 
Dancer and ShahrastanL 
He is already one of the 
warmest winter iavoarites 
of recent years for the 

2.000 Guineas, a race 
Stoute won in 1985 with 
Shadeed. 

The Newmarket trainer 
has yet to win the first 
fillies' classic but Milli- 
gram, a daughter of MiO 
ReeL has the speed and 
scope to become a leading 
contender for both the 

1.000 Guineas and Oaks. 
The Newmarket classic 
could well see another 
dash between Forest 
Flower and MmstreOa, 
whose rivalry was one of 
the hi g hli g hts of 1986. 

Rated 21b above Ajdal in 
the European classifica- 
tions was Reference Point, 
the current Derby favour- 
ite. Trained by Stoute's 
great Newmarket ad- 
versary, Henry Cedi, who 
won the Epsom classic in 
1985 with Slip Anchor, 
Reference Point is also by 
Mill Reef. 

On the National Hunt 
scene, one of the highlights 
will be See Yon Then's 
attempt to become the first 
triple Champion Hurdler 
since Persian War (1968- 
70). The Cheltenham Gold 
Cup winners, Bmrroagh 
Hilt Lad and Forgive *N 
Forget, are on coarse to 
meet in steeplechases 
Bine Riband event in 
March while West Tip is 
already favourite to repeat 
his Grand National tri- 
umph of nine months ago. 




Nov 16-22: Women's Circuit 
champiortebips. New York 
Dec 2-7: Masters. New York 
Dec 9-1% Nabisco Masters 
doubles, Albert Hall 


f TABLE TENNIS 


emiership, semi-finals 
May 17: Stones Bitter 
Premiership final 



Jan 2-4: European Top 12, 
Basle, Switzerland 
Jan 14: England v Finland, 
Norwich 

Jan 24-25: English national 
championsHbs, Crawley 
Feb 7: Denmark v England. 

venue to be announced 
Fteb 19-Marl: Worid 
championships, DeW 
Mar 31: Bigland v Norway, 
Braintree 

Apr 9: West Germany v 
England, Wurzburg 
Apr 11-12: European Junior 
Top 12, Topofcany, 
Czechoslovakia. 

May 10: English national team 
finals. Mansfield 
May 16: Stiga Three-star grand 
prix finals, Woking 


TENNIS 


Jan 12-25; Australian 
championships, Melbourne. 
Feb 23-Mar 8: Players' 
championships, Miami 
Mar 13-15: Davis Cup, first 
round 

Apr 7-12: WCT Finals. Dallas 
May 2&June 7: French 
championships, Paris 
May 18-24: World Team Cup, 


Jun 8-14s Stefia Artois men s 
tournament. Queen's Club; Dow 
Chemicals Classic woman's 
tournament Birmingham 
Jun 15-21: Bristol Trophy 
men's tournament. Bristol; 
PiHdngton Glass women's 
tournament Eastbourne 
Am 22-Juty 5: Wimbledon 
Jul 26- August 2: Federation 
Cup, Vancouver 
Sept 1-13: US championships, 
Ngw York 

Oct 19-25: Pretty Polly Classic 
women's tournament Brighton 
Oct 28-Nov 1: European 
Community Championship. 
Antwerp 

Oct 29-31: Wightman Cup. 
Williamsburg 

New 10-15: Benson and Hedges 


July 4: British national age 
groups, Gillingham 
July 18: British championships. 


Oct 17: GB Youth v West 
Germany, Grimsby 
Nov 14: International 
synchronized competition, Essen 
Nov 21: Hermesetas World 
Cup, Crystal Palace. 

Dec 5: European 
championships, Lisboa 


VOLLEYBALL 


Jia Mai g 






WATER SKIING 


Jirty 15-19: world Junior Cup, 
Sherbrooke, Canada. 

July 18-19: National 
championships, (Ortons Farm 






POWERBOATING 


Circuit boats 

jun 12-14: Bristol Grand Prix 
Aua 29-31: London Grand Pnx 
Sept 19-20: Nottingham Grand 
Prix 

Hydroplane 
Aug 29-31: World . 
cnampionsriips, Nottingham 

Offshore 

Aug 22-23: Needles Trophy, 

| 3 qq 1 p 

Aug 29-31: Cowes Classic 
Sept 21-27: Bournemouth 
festival 


RAGING 


Britain’s best determined to lick the cream 


By Pat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent 


WEIGHTLIFTING 


Apr 3-6: EEC champi on ships, 
Athens 

May 22-30: Worid junior 
championships. Belgrade 
Jun 6-7: British Masters, Milton 
Keynes 

Jun 13-14; British senior 


Jan 10: The Lad brake Handicap 
Hurdle. Uopardstown 
Feb 8: Irish Champion Hunfle, 
Leopardstown _ 
pob i4; Tote Gold Trophy, 
^Newbury: Vicent 0‘Bnsn GoW 
Cup, Leopartstowri 
Mar 17: Champion HurtSB. 
Cheltenham 

Mar 18: Queen Mother 
Champion Chase. Cheltenham 
Mar 1 9: Cheltenham Gold Cup 
Mar 29: Lincoln Handicap. 

National. A'mtree 
Apr 11: Scottish Grand 
National. Ayr 


After fee successes of last 
autumn's European athletics cham- 
pionships in Stuttgart, which left the 
British public with the alternative rtf 
counting gold medals instead of 
sheep to loll themselves to sleep after 
all the excitement, it is to be hoped 
that the second IAAF world 
championships, in Rome from Au- 
gust 29 to September 6, do not 
provide a rude awakening. 

For, strong as the European 
competition was, it did not include 
the collective might of fee United 
States teams, and several worid dass 
individuals like Said Aouita of 
Morocco, Gabriel Tiacoh of the Ivory 
Coast and Ben Johnson of Canada, 
all of whop, injury permitting, will 
be competing in fee Olympics Sta- 
dium in Rome at the end of this 
summer. 

But fee eight gold medals won by 
Britons in Stuttgart compared 


favourably with the fonr golds in the 
boycotted 1980 Olympic Games in 
Moscow. And the only political 
decisions likely to encroach upon 
these world championships have 
already been taken. The IAAF 
Presidency of Dr Primo Nebfolo has 
already ensured that many top 
athletics fixtures have been allocated 
to Italy in recent years, the culmina- 
tion being these championships, the 
biggest athletics gathering in Italy 
since the 1960 Olympic Games in fee 
same stadium. 

With the participation of around 
180 nations, the championships will 
undoubtedly be an eoormoas tele- 
vision success; but fee participation 
of fee Italian public is ‘ open to 
qnestion. Even following Italian sec- 
cess in Stuttgart similar to die 
British, there was a dismal crowd for 
fee Mobil Grand Prix meeting in 
Rome immediately afterwards. 


There are six British athletes 
assured of places already as a result 
of their Stuttgart golds, Linford 
Christie (100 metres), Roger Black 
(400 metres), Steve Cram (1,500 
metres). Jack Buckner (5,000 me- 
tres), Daley Thompson (decathlon) 
aim Fatima Whitbread (javelin). 
Sebastian Coe has turned down the 
800 metres place. 

Cram and Thompson, fee only 
British winners at the inaugural 
world championships m Helsinki In 
1983; and Whitbread, are already 
favourites in their events. Christie 
faces an enormous task in fee 
sprints. There will be much interest 
in Carl Lewis's comeback after two 
relatively low-key years, and an 
ankle operation last summer, follow- 
ing his three golds in Helsinki and 
four in Los Angeles. Johnson and 
Chidi I mob defeated him com- 
prehensively last year. 


One of fee most intriguing individ- 
ual confrontations will be between Ed 
Moses, undefeated over 400 metres 
bardies since August 1977, and 
Andre Phillips, another American 
who has finally got down to the sort 
of times to threaten Moses. 

And if Cram decides against 
attempting fee 800 metres as well, 
then fee likely 5,000 mud 10,000 
metres doable of Aouita, fee other 
most talented middle-distance run- 
ner of this generation, would be an 
appropriate farewell to Italy. After 
living there for four years, Aouita is 
to retail to his native Morocco. 

With European and Indoor 
championships in February and 
March, fee World Student Gaines in 
mid-July and fee European junior 
championships in Birmingham in 
early August, Rome should provide a 
marvellous conclusion to another 
year of quality competition. 




jjjgB 

YACHTING 


May 7-10: Lymington Cup 
June 5: RORC De Gulngand 
Bowl race 


furnms Admiral's Cup 


Sept 9-19: Division I worid 
championship, Pentewan, 
Cornwall 

Aug 7-14: Cadet worid 
championships, Pwllheli, North 
Wales. 


• Compiled by Paul Matter 

and Mef Webb 














SPORT/LAW 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


TENNIS: POWER AND AGGRESSION MEET ARTISTIC REFINEMENT WITH DEVASTATING RESULTS 


BOXING 


Cash’s victory against all odds 


a From David Miller 
Chief Sports Correspondent 
Melbourne 


t Animal power and aggres- 
sion against artistic refine- 
ment is perennially one of 
sport's most enthralling con- 
tests. The animal won here 
yesterday in a memorable 
opening match of the Davis 
Cup final , not so much 
because he was the superior 
tennis player but because he 
had the unyielding mental 
tenacity. 

Pat Cash, by his own 
estimation, played his best 
ever match to beat Stefan 
Edberg. who at No. 4 in the 
world isranked 21 places 
above him, by the slenderist of 
margins: a mere four games in 
58 over three hours and 44 
minutes, 13-1 1, 13-1 1, 6-4, for 
a critical and largely un- 
expected opening lead against 
Sweden in the competition 
sponsored by NEC. 

Then Mikael Pernfors, an 
extrovert college boy at Geor- 
gia. playing only his fifth 
match on grass, levelled the tie 
with astonishing two-handed 
control of the bail in little 
more than an hour. He de- 
stroyed a stunned and out- 
classed Paul McNaraee in 
embarrassing straight sets. 
What could Pernfors now 
achieve against Cash in 
Sunday's reverse singles? 

It had been sometimes less 
than technically brilliant play 
between Cash and Ed berg, but 
in this battle of young tigers, 
the Australian first string beat 
the Australian Open cham- 
pion simply because he 
wanted victory more than his 
rival. 

He played the handful of 
crucial points as though his 
country's name depended on 
iL h was symptomatic that he 
should close those two gruel- 
ling first sets each with an ace 
in a match which had only 13. 
eight of them from the winner. 
The other factor central to the 
outcome was that although 
Cash served 12 of the 25 
double faults, he did so par- 
tially because he relentlessly 
went for his second service to 
keep the pressure on Ed berg. 
Cash, looking like Maradona 
with the goal in sight, dosed 
in. 

Edbergfs confidence was 



Aiidries 
beaten 
by cable 
TV date 


Graham’s chance 
if McGuigan 
switches channels 


Dennis Andries’s proposed 
World Boxing Cotmcfl fight- 
heavyweight title defence 
against Tommy Hearns, of the 
Doited States. 'on February 7 is 
“definitely off", according to 
.Greg Steene, Aiidries 's 
manager.*! am hoping to talk to 
promoter Bob Aram by tele- 
phone soon with a view to fixing 
another dale and I am prepared 
to c om promise,” Steene said 
yesterday. 

Steene and Andries would like 
the boot to go on in late 
Febraary bat they are deter- 
mined not to wait until March 
20, the date on which Showtime, 
t he cable company which has 
bought the television rights, 
wants the matrftfn take place. 


By George Ace 

Bam McGuigan «.IM 


Graham is a contest that, for 
obvious reasons, will never take 
place in a ring- But the former 
World Boxing Association 
featherweight champion and the 
reigning European middle- 


weight champion have been at 
the centre of a lively contest 
between the rival television 
networks. 

The BBC have accepted un- 


offiriafly that Har^C^rpenter undtsputed champ, on. 
will not be the commentator Sugar.Ray dw to ake 


Steene explained: “AH oar 
training ami preparation has 
been geared to a fight in 
February- We can stretch It tor a 
few weeks, bnt not for as long as 
a month amt a ha lf 


Low blow: Playing his best match ever Cash lunges forward, pitting his strength and tenacity against Edberg 


“It is not the pr om ote r ’ s Eralt. 
Showtime want to switch the 
date becanse February 7 clashes 
with other big American sport- 
ing events. They have shown a 
lot of inexperience over this. 
Hopefully, we can all come toan 
acceptable arrangement.” 


whose confidence gradually 
slipped from him like the 
foliage of a dying tree. 

“I don't usually play well in 
the Davis Cup,” the forlorn 
Edberg said afterwards. “It 
might come in ihe future.” He 
has yet to win a major singles, 
and today's doubles will 
mightily lest his equanimity. 

The occasion yesterday was 
loaded with drama. A substan- 
tial portion of the crowd at 
Kooyong was Swedish, here to 
see whether or not their men 
win the trophy for the third 
year in succession in what 
may be the last Davis Cup 
final on grass, unless Britain 
should produce players ca- 
pable of reaching this stage. 
The home of the Victoria 
LTA, having failed to build on 
its traditions in modem times, 
is to become redundant, re- 
placed by a new Australian 
tennis headquarters adjacent 
to the Melbw-jme Cricket 
shredded: 48 games played in 
three hours, and two sets 
down. Hie authority of his 
play shrank, and though, all 


Ground, with an artificial 
surface yet to be decided. 

A strong east wind that was 
simultaneously blowing the 
yachts from Sydney towards 
Hobart stiffened the flags, and 
the noisy Swedish chants took 
one back to the heady, patri- 
otic days of 1958 during the 
World Cup in football when 
the Swedes were hosts and 
finalists. As the wind swirled 
the ball about in the midday 
sun. it seemed that Cash was 
caught in a whirlpool of 
doubts. In no time, he was 5-1 
down with Edberg serving for 
the first set. 

Yet at this moment Cash’s 
animal instincts were to res- 
cue him. Three days ago he 
was playing so pooriy he had 
stormed off court during train- 
ing and started practising his 
strokes on camera men. Now, 
about to be played out of sight, 
he held on like a clam. 

When necessary, he scram- 
too late, he hit two sensational 
forehands to save Cash's first 
two match points, his grad- 
ually drooping chin had said it 


bled. When possible, he 
whacked the ball fiercely. And 
after 35 minutes, with the 
same doubts and difficulties 
overtaking Edberg on his 
throw-ups and mid-court vol- 
leys, the match was level at 5- 
5. For another 12 games there 
was no break point Edberg's 
game was the more fluent, 
though he hardly hit a decent 
backhand, but Cash's the 
more gritty. Edberg, you felt 
would win if he could find his 
rhythm for his were always the 
more ambitious shots with 
less margin. 

Yet at 1 1-1 1 Edberg double- 
faulted and Cash hit three 
backhand passes and a lob to 
break service, and held his 
own service to love for the 
first set In the second, the first 
break came as Cash led 9-8, 
but Edberg broke back. Two 
net-cords going against him on 
successive points saw Edberg 
go behind again 11-12, and 
all. Cash had prepared for a 
month for this match, and he 
had his reward. 

“To play for your country is 


far tougher than to play for 
yourselt” be said afterwards. 
“The pressure of the Davis 
Cup makes you admire those 
who go to the line in the 
Olympics for sudden death, 
and win medals. A Wimble- 
don or US semi-final is noth- , 
ing compared to the Davis 
Cup. I reckoned I was playing 
better than he was when I was 
5-1 down, and after that it was . 
a matter of just a point here, a j 
point there — winning the 
right points at the right 
moment”. 


Steene added: “I have not 
been short of Offers and, if we are 
forced to poll out of the Hearns 
match altogether, I «n sure we 
would soon get something else 
fixed np.” 


Title decider 


Pernfors, the French Open 
finalis t, returned service with 
such sting and variety that 
McNamee’s game was dis- 
mantled: by the end of the first 
set he was missing the lines by 
yards rather than inches. 
Pernfors hit a succession of 
devastating two-handed back- . 
hand lobs; and also the stroke j 
of the day, a cunningly sliced 
smash which hardly bounced 
and obliged the crowd to look 
twice to see where the ball was. 


New York (Beater) — Mark 
Breland, of the United States, 
wiU meet Harold Volbrecht. of 
Sooth Africa, for the World 
Boxing Association welter- 
weight title vacated by Lloyd 
Honeyghan, of Britain. A 
spokesman for the promoter, 
Dan Doorer, has said the pair 
will meet in Atiantic City on 
February 6 . 


when McGuigan eventually 
makes bis ring comeback some- 
time in the New Year, the odds 
are short that it will be Reg 
Gutteridge whom McGuigan 
will be “thanking very much", a 
phrase that will, have a rather 
hollow ring in Irish ears. 

Independent Television had 
long cast envious eyes in 
McGuigan's direction but under 

the Eastwood banner he re- 
mained very much a BBC 
commodity. This was mainly 
because the Corporation’s head 
of sport in Northern Ireland, Joy 
Williams, was the young woman 
in Eastwood's corner who 
fought with an unrelenting fer- 
vour to have his protege's 
contests televised while he was 
in the novice ranks. 

Ms Williams has the reput- 
ation in Broadcasting House in 
Belfast of being difficult to 
dissuade if her instinct tells her 
she has spotted a winner. And 
the BBC on her recommenda- 
tion. backed a winner in 
McGuigan. Eastwood did not 
forget that and lucrative offers 
from ITV to change camps fell 
on deaf ears. 

But times have changed and if 
those who profess to know all 
things boxing are right and it is 
announced early in the New 
Year that McGuigan has formed 
an alliance with Frank Warren, 
the London promoter-manager, 
then it is a near certainty that 
ITV wiU have been heavily 
involved. 


place in Las Vegas on April 6. 

Thai would be some contest, a 
one fully capable of pushing 
McGuiean- whatever he may 
achieve in the vear ahead, off the 

back pages of the sporting Press. 

Graham tops the biQ ax the 
King's HalL Belfast on Sal- 
• urday. January 17, in & bout that 
has instant appeal since his 
opponent, Charlie Boston, from 
the United States, recently dis- 
mantled the highly regarded 
Errol Christie in eight rounds. It 
will be surprising if the BBC fail 
to show more than a pasting 
interest in that contest if not for 
what it may mean on the night 
but for what it may hold for the 
future. 

Graham is not, under any 
stretch of the imagination, 
compulsive viewing; his style of 
boxing does not lend itself to the 
cameras. But as the No. I 
challenger in the most difficult 
division in present-day boxing 
and under the wing of a man 
who has an uncanny knack of 
ending up with a winner, the lad 
from Sheffield may shed his 
inhibitions and realize there is 
more to boxing than superb 
defensive skills. 


His 37 wins in 37 professional 
contests prove his talent and 
with many of -his contests 
ending inside the distance he 
can obviously throw a punch. 
The time has surely arrived for 
“the Bomber” to go looking for 
his target 


New York inquiry on King 


New York (AP) — The state 
of New York is investigating 
allegations that promoter Don 
King's son. Carl, managed both 
Tim Witherspoon and James 
“Bonecrasher” Smith in their 
recent World Boxing Associ- 
ation heavyweight tide bout. 


at the commission's own bylaws 
and find out if they were 
followed,” Spinelli, a former 
FBI agent who once headed a 
federal investigation into box- 
ing, said. 


Putting baby carriages into perspective 


From Richard Evans, Melbourne 


Non all Pat Cash has to do is 
to learn ho» to fold a baby 
carriage. Minor problems that 
get passed off with a 
husbedswear word from the 
average father end up as hot 
news when daddy is a sports 
saperstar. pushing himself to a 
peak of physical conditioning 
few of us understand. 

Alter his superbly controlled 
performance against Steian 
Edberg. Cash’s uncontrolled re- 
action to an intrusive television 
camera crew three days before 
the Davis Cup final deserves to 
be put into perspective. 

Cash threw a punch at the 
cameraman when he realized his 
fumbling attempt to get DairieTs 
baby carriage into the boot of his 


car was being filmed at dose 
range for posterity. 

Foot years ago. Cash would 
have been exported to behave 
that way becanse, as a 17-year- 
old, be quickly earned a de- 
served reputation as a fiery, 
immature youngster with a chip 
on his shoulder. 

But two major occurrences in 
his life have changed tire best 
tennis player Australia has pro- 
dneed since John Newcombe, 
leaving Cash annoyed and frus- 
trated at this temporary slip 
back into old ways. 

First he suffered a chronic 
back injury that forced him off 
the tour for nine monthsAt 
Kooyong this time last year 
Cash appeared in the Press tent 


a couple of times to say a hello to 
friends. “Nobody wants to talk 
to me any more,” he joked. 
Suddenly he was realizing that 
fame, for all its drawbacks, is 
preferable to anonymity. 


Then Ann Britt Kristiansen, 
the tell Norwegian model who 
had stock with him during those 
dreary months of rehabiUtatioii, 
became pregnant. With no plans 
for marriage, a 21 -year-old 
might have run from the 
responsibtity, but Cash wel- 
comed it and adjusted to the 
demands of fatherhood with 
surprising maturity even if, tech- 
nically, he still needed a lesson 
or two on how to fold cots. 


There is little doubt that the 


long period of often painful 
training he underwent at his 
Melbourne home played a major 
part in the m al ax ing process. 
Under the eye of the trainer. 
Ann Qimin, Cash worked in 
short sports every hour for right 
horns a day to build up the 
muscles around his tower back. 
To call the workouts intensive, 
would be understatement. Those 
who saw him at it were amazed 
at what he pot himself through. 

The level of overall fitness 
achieved became apparent when 
Cash was able to recover from an 
appendectomy in three weeks 
prior to Wimbledon. Before his 
legs gave out in foe quarter- 
final, he had beaten the No. 3 
seed. Mats WQander. 


“He outclassed me,” 
McNaraee said afterwards, 
staring emptily around the 
interview room. “It will take 
me a while to get over this. I 
tried, I really did. to slow the 
game down, but he exploited 
my weaknesses.” 


It wiU be long alter Sunday’s 
fifth-match encounter with! 
Edberg. I suspect, that 
McNaraee will recover. So if 
Australia are to regain the Cup 
they have to do it in today's 
doubles and tomorrow’s first 
singles between Cash and 
Pernfors. It is tantilizingly 
evenly balanced. 


The New York inspector gen- 
eral Joe Spineiii. said his in- 
vestigation centres on a state 
athletic commission rule that 
bars a manager from having two 
boxers on the same card without 
special permission from the 
commission. He said the in- 
quiry was requested by the 
governor of New York. Mario 
Cuomo. 


Carl King managed 
Witherspoon and co-managed 
Smith when they fought for the 
WBA title on December 12 at 
Madison Square Garden. The 
contest was promoted by Don 
King. 


“Our major concern is to look 


After losing his crown by a 
first round knockout, 
Witherspoon criticized the 
commission chairman, Jose 
Torres, for allowing the younger 
King to manage both boxers iu 
the title bom. ' 


Torres said he had heard 
rumours before the bout that 
Carl King was one of Smith's 
managers, but be wis unable to 
verify them. 

“The commissiot was never 
notified that Carl King was 
involved in the management of 
*Bonecrusher* Smith,” be said. 
Because there has been no 
notification. Tones aid. King 
should not even be considered 
Smith's official co-manager. 

Eton King could no: be 
reached for comment but Mur- 
ray Goodman, a spokesman for 
the promoter, said King would 
not be upset ty the 
investigation.“Let them 
investigate,” Goodmai said. 
“He has nothing to hide” 


HOCKEY 


Territorial clashes promise much 


RESULTS (Awn 
Casft WSEtta 
McNamee lost to 
6. 


an nanus first J: P 
13-11, 13-11. 6-4; P 
Perntars.3-8. 1-6.3- 


TODAY: P Cash and J Rzgmd (Aus) v S 
Edbenj and A Janyd (Swe j. 

TOMORROW: P Cash (Aus) v M Pandora 
(SwaL P McNamse (Aus) v S Edberg 


Ten of the best women’s 
g am es of the season will be 
played at Sherborne School, 
Dorset, next week. They are the 
territorial matches and each 
team plays the other four in the 
space of three days starting on 
Monday (Joyce Whitehead 
writes}. 

The Sooth report that Lesley 
Hob ley has recovered from a 
broken toe and Jenny Mitchell. 


newly capped, has also recov- 
ered from injury. 

To the 12 originally an- 
nounced, the East have added 
Michelle Hal! (Huntingdon- 
shire). Debbie Rawlinson (Suf- 
folk) and the goalkeeper, Denise 
Feveyear (Suffolk). 

The Midlands are without 
Maty Chea tham but have back 
Jane Swinnerton after a year's 
absence. 


The West who lost: 2-3 to 
South Wales, will be hoping for 
great things from their new caps, 
Denise Shorn ey and Caroline 
Pocock, both from Avon and 
Sara Workman from Wiltshire. 

The North with their new 
captain, Norma Dix, are miss- 
ing Jill Brown and Gill Atkins, 
who are with Great Britain, and 
Unda Carr, their previous 
captain. 


Chancery Division 


Law Report December 27 1986 


Court of Appeal 


Multi-currency share capital is lawful 


Ending JCT form contract 


In re Scandinavian Bank 
Group pic 


Before Mr Justice Harman 

[Judgment December 15] 


The word “amount” in sec- 
tion 2(5Ka) of the Companies 
An 1 485 did not have to mean a 
single total amount and the 
memorandum of a company did 
not have to state a single figure 
as a total of the share capital. 
While the fixed amount could, 
not be stated in two currencies it 

could be stated in different 
currencies for different shares. 
Accordingly multi-currency 
share capital was lawful within 
the Companies Act 1985. 

Mr Justice Harman so held in 
the Chancery Division when he 
approved a minute referring to 

multi-currency share capital iu 
respect of a petition to reorga- 
nize the capital of the Scandina- 
vian Bank Group pic. 

Mr Robin Potts, QC and Miss 
Mary Arden, QC, for the com- 
pany; Mr Oliver Weaver, QC as 

amicus curiae. 


MR JUSTICE HARMAN 
said that the company was a 
recognized bank under the 
Banking Act 1979. Its published 
accounts for the year ending 
December 31, 1985 showed that 
its shares were held in va^ting 
amounts by five leading Nordic 
banks and its total assets were 
then nearly £3.3 billion. 

The petition showed that the 
company’s present authorized 
share capital was £75 million 
divided into 75 million shares of 
£1 each of which 64.37 million 
had been issued and were fully 
paid up. 

By a special resolution on 
August 26, 1986, the capital was 
to be reorganized so as to consist 
of shares nominated in different 
currencies. 

The means of reorganization 
was the reduction of the au- 
thorized capital from £75 mil- 
lion to £10.7 million which was 
achieved by the cancellation of 
proportions of the issued shares 
held by each of the five Nordic 
bank shareholders leaving 
64.770 issued shares of £1 each 
malting a total issued share 
capital of £64.370. 


The figure was of significance 
by virtue of section 45(2Xa) and 
section 18M) of the 1985 Act; 
the company's aliened share 
capital after the cancellation of 
laige parts of its issued share 
capital would remain above the 
authorized minimum of a pub- 
lic company. 

The son let' "* n| " -"-•srs 


shares be cancelled and that the 
64,370 issued shares of£i each 
be divided into 643,700 shares 
of 10 pence each by subdividing 
each £1 share into shares of 10 
pence each. 

Thus the net asset value of 
each shareholder’s holding 
would not be altered and the 
reduction did not affect cred- 
itors of the company at all. 

It might be wondered why 
such a petition should attract an 
extended judgment. The 
machinery was familiar to any 
company lawyer and specialist 
judge. 

The reason lay in the special 
resolution which also provided 
that the capital of the company 
be increased to £30 million, 
USS30 million. SwFr30 mil- 
lion and DM30 million. 

Each of those four classes of 
shares was divided into 300 
million shares of respectively lO 
pence each, lO US cents each, lO 
Swiss centimes each and 10 
pfennigs each. 

The minute for approval set 
out that new share capital in 
multi-currency form. In a sense 
the increase of share capita] was 
not a matter with which the 
court needed to be concerned 
(see section 121(2Xa) of the 1985 
Act) but the question whether a 
company could lawfully have a 
multi-currency share capital was 
of vital importance to the 
company for the purpose of 
satisfying the Bank of England. 

A point of considerable im- 
portance and public interest was 
involved and since the company 
alone was represented it was 
obvious that if his Lordship 
approved the minute as asked 
there was no prospect of any 
reconsideration of his derision 
by a higher court 
Since specialist company law- 
yers were at variance on the 
lawfulness of multi -currency 
share capital his Lordship had 
followed the precedent in In re 
Harris A Sheldon Group Ltd 
(ri971J 1 WLR 899, 900) by 
requesting the appointment of 
an amicus curiae. 

It was accepted that under 
section 2(5Xa) of the 1985 Act 
that although “amount” meant 
a monetary amount which had 
to be stated both for the amount 
of share capital and the fixed 
amount of each share it did not 
mean an amount capable of 
payment in legal tender. 

The questionthen turned to 


“the amount” using the definite 
article require a single total 
amount to be stated in the 
memorandum, or did the Inter- 
pretation Act 1978 apply so that 
“amount” could be read as “the 
amount or amounts”. 

Second, did the words “the 
amount” and the phrase “of a 
fixed amount” both read as 
meaning “monetary amount” 
require a monetary amount in 
English currency or could the 
amount expressed in any cur- 
rency satisfy the meaning of the 
words in the statute? 


and that the accounts of the 
company were drawn in that 
same currency, or that in which 
its share capital was expressed, 
the amount of each share would 
not be fixed. 


On the first point, although a 
company might have its share 
capital divided into several 
different classes of shares each 
of a different nominal amount, 
the question was whether the 
assumption that a total or 
aggregate of a company's share 
capital had to be stated was 

correct. 

Tt was submitted that section 
6 (c) of the 1978 Act applied 
unless the contrary intention 
appeared; see Blue Metal In- 
dustries Ltd v Dilley (fl970] AC 
827). 

In the 1985 Act no contrary 
intention appeared and accord- 
ingly although the assumption 
bad commonly been that a 
company’s share capital was to 
be expressed in one total there 
was no clear requirement for 
that to be so. 

The statute did not provide 
any clear policy, neither 
Ooregum Gold Mining Co Ltd v 
Roper ([1892]" AC 125) nor 
Waton v Sajjesy {[1897] AC 
299) were of assistance in soiv- 


That argument depended on 
the words “fixed amount” 
meaning “of a particular and 
underlying value”. Mr Weaver’s 
observation that it was nec- 
essary to have a measuring rod 
in order to draw accounts was 
true but it did not address the 
point at issue. 

No one doubted that accounts 
had to be drawn in one currency. 
It was probable that if a com- 
pany had a multi-currency share 
capital (he auditors would trans- 
late the left-hand side of the 
balance sheet into the one 
currency used for the accounts 
at rates of exchange ruling at the 
balance sheet date. 


figure as a total of the share 
capital. 

The amount of a share was a 
fixed amount if it was stated in 
the memorandum in monetary 
form. The fixed amount could - 
not be stated in two currencies 
but it could be stated in different 
currencies for different shares. 
Each share was and remained of 
a “fixed amount” notwithstand- 
ing that exchange rates varied. 

To hold otherwise would be to 
confuse “value" with “amount” 
and to hold that restating, fra - for 
purposes of comparison, of 
share capital as different sums 
according to different rates of 
exchange at successive year ends 
would make the amount of each 
share “unfixed” was to confuse 
the representation in the ac- 
counts with the actual nominal 
amount of a share for which a 
subscriber was liable. 


John Jarvis Ltd v Rockdale 
Housing Association Ltd 


Before Sir Nicolas Browne Wil- 
kinson, Vice^GbaitceUor. lord 
Justice Bal combe and Lord 
Justice Bingham 


[Judgment December 12] 

A building subcontractor’s 
defective work for which the 
main contractor might tech- 
nically be responsible was not 
“some negligence or default of 
the contractor" for the purposes 
of clause 28.1.3.4 of the Joint 
Contracts Tribunal 1980 Form 
(Private with Quantities). 
Accordingly the contractor was 
entitled to determine bis 
employment under die contract 
when the continuous suspen- 
sion of work exceeded the 
specified period. 


pended for a continuous period 
of the length named in the 
appendix (bring one month) by 
reason of architect's instructions 
issued under the contract, “un- 
less caused by reason of some 
negligence or default of the 
contractor then the con- 

tractor may thereupon by reg- 
istered post or recorded delivery 
to the employer or the architect 
forthwith determine their 
employment” provided such 
notice was not given unreason- 
ably or vexatiously. 

The plaintiff relied on that 
clause in giving notice of 
determination, since the 
architect’s instruction to post- 
pone the work had led to a delay 
of over one month. 


of the contractor's- directing 
mind or senior management. 
“The contractor” could natu- 
rally and sensibly be understood 
as referring to the plaintiff its 
servants and agents, through 
whom alone it could, as a 
corporation. acL 


It was possible to assume in 
the defendant's favour (but 
vgthoul deciding) that the effect 
of the subcontractor's breach of 
its subcontract was to put the 
contractor in breach of its main 
contract. 


Such was equally true of the 
tht-hand side of the balance 


right-hand side of the balance 
sheet If such a process was 
proper for the right-hand side of 

the balance sheet or for a 

statement of assets in a nar- 
rative form of accounts it did 
not appear inappropriate on the 
left-hand side or debits in a 
narrative form of account. 


The reserve shown np by 
alterations in accounts would 
not be a reserve capable of 
application either before the 
Companies Act 1980 by way of 

dividend or now by way of 
capitalization. 


The Court of Appeal dismiss- 
ing an appeal by the defendant 
employers, Rockdale Housing 
Association Ltd, upheld a de- 
cision dated November 29, 1985 
of Mr Recorder Bernstein, QC, 

sitting as an official referee, in 

favour of the plaintiff con- 
tractors, John Jarvis Ltd. 


Upon such determination, if 
valid, the plaintiff became en- 
titled to be paid by the defen- 
dant the total value of work 
completed at the date of determ- 
ination and of work begun and 
executed but not complete at 
that date and any sum as- 
certained as direct loss and/or 
expense wiw«i 


ingthe present question. 
The company submittf 




The company submitted that 
in the light of Militmgos v 
George Frank (Textiles) Lid 
([1976] AC 443) the second 
point should be answered by 
saying that an amount in any 
currency was an amount within 
section 2(5Xa) of the 1985 Act 
and that Adelaide Electric Sup- 
ply Co Ltd v Prudential Assur- 
ance Co Ltd ([1934] AC 122, 
155) should no longer be ac- 
cepted as correct; further, that 
“amount" in section 121(2)(a) 
of the 1985 Act was a fortiori not 
limited to an amount in English 
currency. 

Mr Weaver’s main sub- 
mission was not that an English 
company could not have a share 
capital measured by a foreign 
currency and consequently 
shares fixed in amount by 
reference to a foreign currency; 
but that unless the currency in 
which the share capital was 
measured was only one currency 
i 


The amount of the share 
capital and the fixed amount of 
eaai share was not altered by the 
figures appearing in the 
successive annual accounts of a 
company. The translation was 
necessary for purposes of 
comparison but did not alter or 
affect the amount of the under- 
lying asset or liability. 

A share represented a fraction 
of a company’s net worth as well 
as stating the amount paid up on 
it or for which the bolder was 
liable 19 pay. 

A share did not have a value 
in ihe sense of a monetary 
amount to which a shareholder 
was entitled or upon which a 
creditor could look as a fixed 
sum in En glish pounds. 

Directors could receive 
subscriptions for shares in a 
foreign currency, see section 
738(2) and (4) of the 1985 AcL 
Those subscriptions in one for- 
eign currency could at once be 
converted into another foreign 
currency. Provided the objects 
of the company were appro- 
priate no creditor or shareholder 
could complain. 

The words “the amount” in 
section 2(5Xa) of the 1985 Act 
did not have to mean a single 
total amount where they were 
first used. The memorandum 
did not have to slate a single 


The practice of fee Registrar 
of Companies was that increases 
of capital under section 121 of 
the 1985 Act would be accepted 
though in a different currency 
from that of the original share 
capHaL 


The derision to which his 
Lordship had come supported 
the Registrar's course of con- 
duct and he bad been told that 
no public authorities, notably 
the Bank of England and fee 
Treasury, were concerned in 
respect of that decision. 

The Official Receiver saw no 
difficulty in administering liq- 
uidations although be expected, 
following in re Lines Bros 


Mr J. M. Collins, QC and Mr 

A. J. Anderson for the defendant 

employer: Mr Anthony Colman, 
QC and Mr Graham Dunning 
for fee plaintiff contractors. 

LORD JUSTICE BINGHAM 
said that the plaintiff entered 
into a contract with the defen- 
dant for the building of 50 flats 
for the elderly plus two wardens' 
flats. 

Subcontractors were nomi- 
nated to carry out certain 
specialist works. The sub- 
contractor who was nominated 
to build 137 piles was late in 
starting with the work and the 
work when done was defective. 


The defendant argued that the 
contractor was not entitled to 
rely on that clause because fee 
architect’s instructions had been 
“caused by reason of some 
negligence or default of fee 
[plaintiff] contractor”; that 
“contractor’ 1 in its context was 
to be understood as meaning 
“the contractor, his servants and 
agents and any subcontractor, 
ins servants and agents” and 
that the subcontractor’s admit- 
ted breach of contract was feus 
fee default of the contractor. 


. 1 * was noticeable and 

significant that clause 28.1.3.4 
made no reference to breach of 
contract as such. That was 
surprising if fee existence of a 
breach of contract by the con- 
tractor was what determined his 
right to rely on fee da use. 

The language of the clause 
was directed to a much more 
practical fand to men on the 
ground much more easily an- 
swered) question: whose fault 
was ‘l. that the architect’s 
“Sfruction to postpone fee 
work was given? 


If it was the fault of fee 
contractor, his servants or 
agents, then the contractor 

could nnt iy*Iv m _ 


• . , ' — ~ Luuuduor 

could not rely on fee suspension 
of work which followed fee 
“jeto Rtwiwne-as a ground 
tor determining the contract. 

If it was not fee ; fault of the 
contractor, his servants or 
^ents. he could. That accorded 
H”* ° rdin ary notion of 
fairness and good sense. 

He did not lose fee right 

because a no minated 

oont^raclor chosen by the em- 

^® y ^ a d ^ *0 perfonn his 
oontran and so (on fee assump- 

m ^ contractor in 
nronch of fee main contract- 
despite fee lack of any actual 


([1983] Ch 1) to draw the 
liquidator's account of an insol- 


vent company in sterling as ai 
the date of the winding-up. 


the date of the winding-up. 

Following In re Lines Bros (at 
plS) a liquidator’s account did 
not have to be expressed in 
pounds but it did have to be 
translated into one single cur- 
rency. 


The subcontractor then with- 
drew from the site. Until the 
piles were properly built fee 
plaintiff could not cany on with 
the main con tract works. 


The point raised went to 
jurisdiction and his Lordship 
was satisfied that the court had 
jurisdiction to approve a minute 
referring to multi-currency 
share capital because such a 
form of share capital was lawful 
within the Companies Act 1985. 

Solicitors; Freshfields; Trea- 
sury Solicitor. 


Pursuant to fee conditions of 
fee main contract, the architect 
gave fee plaintiff an instruction 
to postpone fee contract works. 

Just under two months later,, 
fee plaintiff gave notice to fee 
defendant terminating the con- 
tract. The issue was whether fee 
plaintiff was contractually en- 
titled to give that notice. 

The contract was in the JCT 
1980 Form (Private with 
Quantities), clause 28.1.3.4 of 
which provided that if the 
carrying out of the whole or' 
substantially the whole of fee 
uncompleted works was sus- 


It was submitted that if the 
clause simply meant “con- 
tractor, his servants and agents” 
the result was the same since the 

contractor was contractually 
responsible for all sub- 
contractors, and eveiy breach by 
a subcontractor necessarily put 
fee contractor in breach of the 
main contract. 


10 technical 
breach of contract) on the part 

aeennL° ntraCl0r ’ ****** or 


The plaintiff relied on the 
absence of the words "servants 
or agents” and submitted that 
even if The contractor" was to 
be widely construed every 
breach by a subcontractor did 
not put tire contractor in breach 
since fee contractor's duty was 
to hand over completed work 
and until he failed to do that he 
was notin breach. 


In his Lordship's judgment it 
would make little commercial 
sense tf fee exception in danse 
28.1:3.4 operated only when 
there was negligence on fee part 


agents. 

On fee fecte of ^ . 

Mg*' 

DerfoJr5SS2 ntractor,K defective 

ss?s a 
asjyff&ss 

SnS 

G rammer * « ,n . s » 

Bayfield. Ham,u, i Squire 



ia 


his bow in Graham who may yet 
prove a more than adequate 
substitute for McGuigan. The 
European champion wtU never 
have fee mass .appeal or 
McGuigan but there is “distinct 
possibility feat be could nefore 
1987 faces into I98S be sharing 
a ring wife fee winner of fee 
world middleweight tide bow 
between Marvin Hagler. fee 




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THE TIMES SAT! JRDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 

CRICKET: DISASTER FOR THE AUSTRALIANS AS ENGLAND’S BOWLERS HAVE A Fifi n DAY 

Botham back to Sunday best 

From Tnhn i > ^ . . . _ V 


RUGBY UNION 


From Joba w <»*»ck. Cricket Correspondent, Melbourne 

t ? n v ^ s s ss^„ s l&ssysSL&M aa?**— 


the fourth Test match, which 
began here yesterday, was 
remarkable. Returning after 
suffering a nasty injury, he 
took five Australian wickets 
for 41 runs in 16 overs and in 
between times held three 
catches at second slip. With 
Small taking five for 48, 
Australia were bowled out by 
tea-time for 141. At dose or 
play England in reply were 95 
for one. 

Our legendary all-rounder 
was bowling off what in 
Somerset they call his Sunday 
run, coming in in rather 
gingerly fashion for fear of 
doing further damage to the 
triiercostel muscle in his left 
side which he pulled on the 
last day of the second Test 
match. As be usually does 
when things are running for 
him, be took wickets with long 
hops — two, if not three of 
them. But for the most part he 
had the good sense to bowl a 
fullish length. It was a fairly 
typical Melbourne pitch, on 
which the ball moved about a 
certain amount Hoping that it 
would, Gatling had chosen to 
field, as Border was thinking 
of doing bad he won the toss. 

It is the 27th time that 
Botham has taken five wickets 
in a Test innings (only Hadlee, 
also with 27, can equal that) 
and the first time that Small 
has, and I shall not be in the 
least surprised if Botham has 
made a hundred as well by 
tomorrow night. Small bowled 
a model line and length, which 
was what he was chosen to do: 
a nice follow-through places 
him on the fast side of 
medium. With Richards tak- 
ing five catches and looking 
more . secure behind the 
stumps than in earlier Tests, 
and nothing being given away 
in the field, England brushed 
aside some sadly irresolute 
Australian batting. 

Much the best moment of 
the day for the 58.203 spec- 
tators came just as 
McDermott was about to bowl 
the first ball of England’s 
innings. Prolonged cheering 
greeted the news that Cash 
had beaten Edberg in the 
Davis Cup final, being played 
up the road. Al lunch and tea 
the tennis bad been shown live 
on the . scoreboard, which 
serves also as a giant screen. 
For the most part the crowd 
had a miserable day. Having 
arrived with hopes and spirits 
high, they were leaving in 
droves long before the end. 

The only Australian bats- 
man to have any cause for 
satisfaction was Jones, a spir- 
ited player and fine runner 
between the wickets, who 
made 59. The rest of the side 
made only 67 runs between 
them. I suppose 1 should have 
seen it as a sort of delayed 
consolation for having had to 
watch England bowled out on 


fifth ball, attempting wfaat for 
him was a strangely in- 


halting even look the gloss off judicious hook. 
lh ®I: Not normally a booker. 

They blundered by leaving Marsh must have wondered 
out Ritchie, who has steadied . what came over him. So, I 
their innings more than once imagine, must Border when, 
m this series, basically because after playing perfectly easily 
he has a decent method, and for 40 minutes, he dashed at 
when they bowled they gave an off-side long hop from 
the new ball to Hughes and Botham and was out to a 
McDermott when the acc- diving catch by Richards, 
uracy of Reid would have After lunching at 83 for three, 
done them better. 1 am de- Australia lost their next three 
lighted for England, but a wickets to Small, 
minor county side would have Waugh, sparring at a short- 
been disappointed bad they ish ball, was well caught low 
not given England a better run down by Botham, diving to 
for their money than Australia his left; Jones, aiming to leg, 
did yesterday. was caught at mid-off off his 

With an injured knee keep- leading edge; and Sleep got a 
ing Dilley out of the match, it good one - that left him, 
was he rather than DeFreitas Zoehrer then played on to 
whom Small replaced. For the Bo th a m , deflecting the ball 
first time, therefore, England’s into his stumps as he tried too 
Test attack was opened by two late to withdraw the bat; 
cricketers of West Indian McDermott, mishooking a 

■ ... long hop, must have fanned 

Ws chance of getting away 
dCOreDOard with it when he saw Broad, 
Australia: FMMogi Small and Richards converg- 

a r M arin c_Rfcfaard» b Botham — 17 ing on the ball in the direction 
D M Jones c Gower b Small 59 of long leg; but the filSt two 

l A - R ..? ort ? f cWehBK te b Benrnm _ is backed off leaving Richards 
grj Miurtu hi e ■«*«« b i4 to take a fine full-length catch. 

p_R a »cp e I ftcfaartfe bs— o Like everyone else, wicket 

e/i^em«cnZ5sbioiSir. o keepers need confidence and 
m o htoghea c mebarcu b Botinn — 2 Richards’s was not sky high. 

8 A bSn? ft TTCfoTTZZTio He caught Hughes next, which 

tom ?3T gave Botham his fifth wicket, 

fall of wickets: 1 - 16 , 2-44, 3-8Q, 4- and finally, Botham teamed 
iSfai’. 11 "' 6 ' 118, 7 ‘ 128, s ‘ 133, *‘ 137, U P again with Small to get rid 
bowling: sou* 224 - 7 - 48 - 6 , DeFreitas of Matthews. Botham and 
Botham Small led England off in 

,bc s™ 

a c Broad not oat _____ 56 two England bowlers to have 
c wj A t*®* tow b Raid 21 taken five wickets each in an 
™ -«n innings against Australia since 

Total (for i aw) ' *ss Bedser and Brown did so here 

A J Lamb, P I Gower. I T Bo t h a m . fC J in 1951. In slightly less than a 

foil afternoon’s play Australia 
fall of wicket: 1-58. had lost seven wickets for 58 

BOWLING: McDermott 943*4 HugMS rUDS. 

England wem left With two 
Umpires: A Crofter and R A French. hOUIS baiting, long enough for 

Australia to have levelled up 

extraction. Small being a Bar- *ke day or for England to have 


Scoreboard 


AUSTRALIA: Hrat I 

G R Marsti c Richards b Botham 17 

D C Boon e Botham b Small 7 

DM Jones c Gower b Smafl _____ 59 
■A R Border e Rfctmrts b Botham _ IS 

SR Waugh e Bottom bSmal 10 

GRJ Matthew* e Both am b Small _ 14 

tT J Zsthnr b Botham ______ 5 

C J McOemott e IBchardo b Bottom . 0 
M G Hashes c Rlehaids b Bottom _ 2 

B A Rim not oat — — _ 2 

Extras (b 1, fcl, ml, ob7) 10 

Total — 141 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-16. 2-44, 3-80. 4- 
108. 5-118, 6-118. 7-12% 6-133, 9-137. 

10- 141. 

BOWLING: Smafl 224-7-48-6. DeFreitas 

11- 1-300. Emburey 40-16-0, Botham 
16-4-41-5, Gattofl 1 -0-4-0. 

ENGLAND: First toMaga 

BC Broad not oat 56 

CWJ Attwy tow b Raid 21 

*M W Gaokta iwt out 8 

Extras^ ft»4,w1,nb 3) .10 

Total (for 1 Wfct) 96 

A J Lamb. D I Gower. I T Bottom. fC J 
Richards, PA J OaFfotos, J E Etnbumy, 
P H Edmonds end G C Small to bet. 
FALL OF WICKET: 1-58. 

BOWLING: McDermott 9-2-344 Hughes 
10-0-25-0, Raid 7-1-18-1, Waogh 4-2-11- 
0, Stoop 1-6-14 

Ihnpbes: ACraftorand R A Ranch. 


M G Hughes c Rktorda b Bottom 
BA Reid not oat 


badian by birth and DeFreitas 
a Dominican. “A sign of 
things to come?** asked an 
Australian journalist wryly. 

Small launched the match 


made it most conclusively 
theirs. In the event. Broad saw 
to it that the good work in the 
field (where Lamb * p»in de- 
serves a special mention) was 
not undone. The odd ball 


with a wide, followed by a two from the fester bowlere beat 
and a four to third man in the Broad, but be played well. 


same opening over. He settled 
down after that, his line on 
and just outside the off stump 
being predicatably reliable. 


taking his aggregate for the 
series past 400 and his average 
into three figures. 

A they, when he too was 


DeFreitas, the fester of the doing his stuff was given out 
two, bowled much better than leg before to Reid, bowling left 
at the start of the Adelaide arm over the wicket, with the 
Test match a fortnight ago. score at 58. In the 50 min utes 
But it was some time before that were left Patting played 
the day began to move de- carefully but in a positive sort 
cisively England's way. Al- of way and Broad left us 
though Boon was out m the wondering whether be was to 
fifth over and Marsh just after become only the fourth 
morning drinks, it was not Englishman to scorea century 
until Border went seven min- in three successive Tests 
utes before lunch that Austra- against Australia. Hobbs did it 
lia looked particularly like twice and Hammond once, 
faltering. Boon pushed fest- You might not get the third 
footedly at Small, Botham unless I told you, so I wflt ft 
bolding a chest-high catch; was Woohner. If Broad fbl- 
Marsh was well caught, high lows them it will indeed be a 
up at the wicket, off Botham's feather in his cap. 



Charvet to play 
for Barbarians 
but Davies is out 

By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


Despue the withdrawal of 
Jonathan Davies and the shuf- 
fling around of the three-quarter 
line, the Barbarians still bring an 
attractive XV lo Welfbrd Road 
today for the annual Christinas 
game with Leicester. It is, loo, a 
team containing a French pres- 
ence in Denis Charvet after an 
intimation earlier ihis week that 
be would not be available. 

Davies, the delightful Neath 
stand-off half, has been nursing 
a hamstring injury for some 
days and. with a Welsh squad 
wedeend and the announcement 
of the team to play Ireland on 
January 1 7 looming, he chooses 
not to risk iL In his place the 
Barbarians introduce Rob An- 
drew who win enjoy rehearsing 
his skills in a match where both 
sides win be seeking the open 


Earlier in the week Geoffrey 
Windsor-Lewis, the Barbarians 
secretary, received a message 
that neither of his French selec- 
tions, Charvet and Jean- 
Bapliste Lafond, would be 
playing. It appears, however, 
that Lafond was making an 
overmen ihusiastic assumption 
on Charvet's behalf and the 24- 
year-old Toulouse centre is now 
expected to take his place in the 
team. 

His expected replacement. 
Will Catling, wiD still make his 
first appearance in a Barbarian 
strip, however, since Brendan 
Mullin went out for a training 
run just before Chrfcamag and 

tweaked a hamstring. 

The three-quarters are com- 
pleted by two seasoned wings, 
Mike Harrison and Mark TiUey. 


spaces and when atmosphere which means that, with Rory 


and a packed house can be 
assured. 


Underwood and Barry Evans on 
the other side; four or the fastest 


Indffd . the difference be- and most elusive wings in the 
tween Welfonf Road today and co untry w ill take the field, 
the attendances at most of the ubcester: w Hare: B Evans. T 
divisional championship games L 5 

will be marked for the 1 1 players Roberts, w Richards^ j Wai&^Snnh! 
(six from Leicester) who have M Fouaies-Amoid. r Teoouu. d Richards. 

from their club sides. Ancn- ctorvotpbUouse and France) wcw&v 


dances at the grounds of success- (Durham Unteersttg. M HaWM CWaka- 
fill club sides, like Barh and new and England};!! Andiaa (Wares and 
Uiccaer were weU down dur- 

mg the championship though If [Bsctfce Ranged andfoland). D Fttr- 
ibere are many more matches genu (Lansdbwne and Ireland), p Uat- 

dmched the title, they should irotandt O Rm (NoomghanT art Ena- 
gTOW. land), A Mcctartan* (Fytdc). 

Whitcombe back 

By David Hands 


The variety of games played 
yesterday has made selection 
difficult for today’s dub games, 
even if the three main West 
Country dubs chose, by and 
large, to field what amounted to 
second XVs against Clifton. 
Weston-super-Mare and 
Lydney, their traditional Boxing 
Day opponents. 

Bedford, at least, have had 
nothing to divert them from 
today’s John Smith's Merit 
Table B game against Rossfyn 
Park at Roehampton. They 
welcome back Martin 
Whitcombe from the divisional 
championshq>winning North 
side, and John Orwin from the 
Midlands. Both resume in the 
pack along with John Davidson, 
Glynn Wood and Andy Jasczak. 

Behind the pack Andy Key, 
Bedford’s captain, returns after 


three idle weeks among the 
Midland replacements and Ian 
Peck has recovered from injury 
to play scrum half. 

Earlier in the season Glouces- 
ter could hardly put a foot right, 
and that included their visit to 
Rodney Parade in mid-October 
when they lost 34-21. Now 
Newport pay a return visit 
against a side at strength playing 
confident and expansive rugby, 
the most formidable part of 
which is perhaps the back row 
where John Gadd returns to link 
with Mike Teague. 

Wasps ptay Steve Pilgrim at 
full against Blackheath 

today, Nick Stringer having 
requested a rest 

Both Wasps’ first-choice 
props, Paul Kendall and Jeff 
Probyn, are injured as is Simon 
Smith, the wing. 


Edinburgh out in strength 

rhe final rounds of the Fiskan (Eforoughmuir): D Wyill* 
: Ewan’s In ter- District (Stewart % Mel vilie). J Scott 
tmoionshins talus nlacetodav SOSO" 


Australians flounder in 
difficult conditions 


Interest in 
Jones is 




Bodtain celebrates a wicket taken (Photograph: (kaham Moris) 

Indians humiliated as 


The final rounds of the 
McEwan’s Inter-District 
championships take place today 
in London where the Anglo- 
Seots fice Glasgow and in 
Galashiels where Sooth of Scot- 
land play Edinburgh for the 
championship trophy (Ian 
Mclanchfan writes). The South 
have selected the side which 
demolished the Anglos while 
their visitors have Iain Milne 
and Rafferty back to strengthen 
their pack. 

SOUTH OF SCOTLAMkPDods 
Tan (Koteo). K Robertson i 
Hun (Hawk*), I Tukalo 


HtowlHariol^, J MMPMP 
Academicals). J Rw {Baroughmukt J 
I Crider (Stewart* s/M^rito).~ F Crider 


(Harters). I 
i (Edinburgh 


(Stawans/MetvaeLK 
ANGLO-8COT&D Cl 


P e ori e y (London 
(GiouceriBrt. R r 


(brig (Btoc 




Russel (Wasps). 

UnrawsByk D Sola (BathL IKfcfc (London 
SoMtehJ, J Raid (London Scoitosn), J 
Caan b ril Lamertoa (London Swwtati). P 
Cronin (Bath), I Momaon (Lendon Scot- 




R Kanp 


■Scotland), u McKee 
r (Gtasaow Academe 
(Aw): 6 Ma cG regor 
wAorion (Avrt. a 


Johannesburg (Reuter) — Bad 
light and rain brought some 
relief to the beleaguered ‘rebel’ 
Australians on the second day of 
their five-day match against 
South Africa yesterday. After 
dismissing South Africa for 254 
midway through the morning 
session, the Australians floun- 
dered to 125 for seven in their 
first innings before play ended 
early because of the poor 
conditions. 

Nothing went right for the 
Australians from the start when 
South Africa resumed their first 
innings at 221 for nine, bad tight 
having also ended the first day’s 
play on • Wednesday. The tail- 
enders, le Roux and Jefferies, 
managed a last-wicket partner- 
ship of 44 with le Roux scoring 
42 and Jefferies 27 not out- 

The last bowling pair then 
reduced the Australians to 24 for 
two, dismissing their opener, 
Dyson, for five, and Wessels. the 
South Africa n-bom former 
Australian Test player, for a 
duck. , 

Smith, with 29, and the 
Australians’ captain, Hughes 
(34), managed a brief resistance. 
But, apart from a 92-minute 
innings of 17 not out by 
Haysman, the rest of the side 
showed little resilience. 

The only encouragement for 
the Australians was the rest 
bowling of McCurdy, who fin- 
ished with six for 67. 


The Australians recently lost 
a series of day-night matches 
against the South Africans 2-1, 
and after some sporting dedarar 
tionsin the warm-up games they 
have lost five of the 15 matches 
on the tour so far, including the 
one-day ‘internationals’. 

SOUTH AFRICA: Rrst brings 

0 J WhlfeW b Rackamanrt 17 

SJ Cook b McCurdy — 28 

PNWretBncWBSseteb McCurdy — 14 

BMMcKMancRaenb McCurdy 1 

■CEB Rtas c Rfaton b Hadtamann — 61 
K A McKOBte c Wessris b Rackeraann 12 
A J Kourto ibw b McCtxdy ___. 3 
« J Rfctonfson c Roofi b McOrdy .a 

G Sle Roux tow b McCurdy 42 

H A Pags c Rfacon b Fariknar 5 

ST Jamies not out 27 

Exoaa (lb-5, nM «M) -15 

Total 254 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-36. 2-56, «3. 4- 

66. 5- 103, 6-12S. 7-164, 9-188, «10. in- 
254. 

BOWLING: McCurdy 24 5-7-67-6; 
RacKanwnn 25^703; 18^64- 

Ch Fauftner 21-2-58-1. 

AUSTRALIANS: First Innrigs 
S Smttfi c Rlctiaidson t> Rk» 29 

K Z! 0 

•K J Hughes tow b to Roux 34 

MD Taylor c«ctortteonbRtae .9 

MO Havanan not out 17 

P Foufcnar b Page 9 

IS J Rccon tow b Page 0 

J N Magrirs not <x4 0 

Extras (b-7. to-8. w-1. ntv6) 22 

Total (tor 7 wkts) 125 

R j McCurty. C G Radwmann to bat 
FALL OF WICKETS ISO. 2-24. 3-SI. 4- 

93. 5- 99, 6-125. 7-126. 

BOWUNG: Le Houx. 1V4j5a. Jetortos 
94F2S-1. Page 11-201-2. R«» 84-3-11-2, 
McMNan 9?T44). Kourta 2-2-04L 


esSiittag Ranatunge finds form 

* O’ V « - - a- - nkenniu 1 imnc 


Richard Renold, the Sussex 
secretary, has c on fi r m ed that 
Surrey and Somerset have gives 
the dub two weeks notice of 
approach for the unsettled fast 
bowler, Adrian Jones. 

Three counties In all are 
showing interest In Jones, who is 
set to leave the dub after 
refusing a new three-year con- 
tract- Lan c ashir e were the first 
aranty to contact Sussex about 
him. Surrey and Somerset in- 
tend ta lkin g to Jones when his 
contract expires on January 1. 

Jones, aged 25, had easily Ms 
best season with Snssex 
lastsnnnner, despite nagging in- 
jnry problems. He has ignored 
personal pleas to stay from the 
new Sussex skipper, Ian Gould, 
the chief c oa ch , Stewart Storey, 
and the chairman, Maurice 
Leadley. Snssex emphasize they 
wiD not break their wage strac- 
ture in order to keep Jones. 
Storey said: “Adrian b probably 
the best Sussex fast bowflng 
prospect since John Snow, bat 
be either stays on oar terms or 
leaves. He has had a consid- 
erable increase in salary, along 
with the other capped players, 
and what we have offered him is 
foe final take It or leave ft deaL” 

Jones made bis Sussex debit 
in 1981 and received his comity 
cap m August, when he warned 
rtik Jill not nrrrswarfly 
mean be would be staying. 


Kanpur (Reuter) — Sri Lanka 
sent India tumbling to a humili- 
ating defeat in the first one-day 
international on Christmas Eve 
after police had to beat back 
thousands of supporters trying 
lo join foe 55,000 spectators 
already in the Green Park 
stadium. 

The touring team won the 
opening game in the five-match 
limited overs series by 117 runs, 
with Asjuna Ranatunge playing 
a leading role by taking four for 
14 and hitring Sri Lanka’s 
second highest score of 31. 
Lifted by their lower order 
batting. Sri Lanka made 195 for 
eight in 46 overs and 
bowled India for 78. 

The Sri Lankans, put in to bat 
on a grassy pitch, were shackled 
and undermined initially by 
Kapil Dev, India’s captain, who 
captured two for 10 in seven 
overs. They slipped lo 43 for 
three before Ranatunge and 
Asanka Gurusingbe put on 52 
for the fourth wicket in 75 
deliveries. 

Maninder Singh, the left-arm 
spinner, checked the recovery 
by snapping up three for 24 in 10 
overs but Sri Lanka ended with 
a flourish when Asantha de Mel 
and Rumesh Ratnayake put on 
40 in an unfinished ninth wicket 
stand. 

India started shakily, losing 
Sunil Gavaskar and Raman 


Lamba cheaply to Rumush 
Ratnayake, ana after a brief 
recovery their last eight wickets 
crashed for 41. 

am LANKA 
H Matonama c Vongsarttar 

b Kapil Dav. 13 

JRRonayekatowbKapIDev 7 

A Gwvslnghe c Madanti 

bfctaninder 35 

P A de Silva c Maninder b Shanna — 3 

A Ranatunge bw b Aron 31 

R L Oas c and b MBrtndor 11 

L R D Mends b Sharma 26 

Gde AJwsbMaixndw 15 

A LFdeMol notout 23 i 

R J Ratnayake not out_.. — 19 

Extras (to 7. nto 3, w2) 12 

Totat grid s, 46 owrs) 195 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-15. 2-33. 343. 4- 
95, 5-101, 5-117. 7-150, 8-15S. 

EARdi Suva dd not tot 
BOWLING: Kapfl Dev 7-3-10-2; Aron 8-0- 
43-1; StomaOOSOfc Marfan Lat 8-1-38- 
0, Maninder 10-2-24-3; Shsstrl 5-0-25-0. 


SM Gavaskar cdeANrts 

£> R J Ratnayake 2 

K SrikXanJh c de Awts b Ranatunge _ 17 

R M Lamba Ibw b R J Ratnayake 5 

D B Venosarkar run ouL 15 

R J Shastrl b RaratungB 8 



SPORT 


An honour 
for the 
French free 
spirit 

From Chris Thau 
Toulouse 

Denis Charvet, eccentric 
sailor, amateur astrologer, saxo- 
phone player and fihu buff, is 
the epitome of a free spirit 
playing and living like a gemrine 
barbarian. That is why he 
regards die invitation to play for 
the dub against Leicester today 
as “one of the highest 
distinctions” a player can aim 
for. 

“It is a pleasure and at the 
same time a great honour for me 
and my dnh,” he said here. 

Born in Cahors 24 years ago, 
be played football and rngby 
u ntil his late teens. An above- 
average football player he was 
already earmarked by talent 
scouts but the rugby tradition of 
his family, deeply rooted in 
Toulouse, was stronger. 

Tradition has always played a 
significant role in his life and he 

tried to explain why he values 
foe invitation to play for foe 
Barbarians so much 

“Rngby without its folklore 
and history would mean very 
little to a lot of people. To me tt 
would be just another sport. 
Tradition and history make the 
game different. The spirit of the 
game is embodied in its tra- 
ditions and the Barbarians are 
just ooe of them, probably ooe of 
the best. I have always admired 
the British attitude and spirit as 
expressed in the Barbarians 
philosophy.” 

Charvet played for Cabas 
until Pierre ViUepreux saw him 
in a championship game and 
persuaded a teenager set on 
going to Nar bonne to play 
alongside his idol, Didier 
Codornioo, to dwnp» his mind 
and join Toulouse- Needless to 
say, the family supported the 
Toulouse wizard and Charvet 
has been playing for the family 
dub since. 

Nurtured carefully by 
VQlepreux be has developed into 
a most complete footballer 
whose constmaln slrills and 
blistering pace create geometric 
nightmares for foe opposing 

backs. 

He readied the inter nationa l 
scene in 1985 when be made his 
debut in a French jeraey agahut 
the Japanese tourists. But he 
impressed the British pundits 
for the fast time the same year 
when he found himself playing 
■hnw ah Jean- Pierre Rives, 
Andy Ripley and Hago McNeffl 
far n star-studded Major Stan- 
ley XV against Oxford 
University. 

His international debnt 
against Wales in die five-na- 
tions championship c o nfi rmed 
what everybody had suspected— 
foe birth of another French star 
in foe mould of his great 
predecessors Andrt Boniface, Jo 
Maso, and Codonrion. 

Belfast clash 

The dash between CIYMS 
and NIFC at Belmont this 
afternoon has an added appeal 
in that these two famous Belfast 
dobs may well be foe principals 
when promotion and relegation 
are dedded at foe end of the 
season (George Ace writes). 
North are at present propping 
up section one of the Ulster 
Sonor League whilst CIYMS 
are the pacemakers la section 
two. It will be interesthm to 
compare how the bottom or one 
section compares with the top of 
the other. 


YACHTING 


KapflD*vcandbJRRatrtayek8__ 9 

C 5 Pareffl c and b Ranatunge — 0 

B Ann c E A Rde S4va 

b JR Ratnayake 6 

Marfan Late Matonama 

b J'R Ratnayake 1 

C S Stoma c Gurosingto 

b Ranatunge — - 8 

Maninder Stotfi not out— 0 

Extras (B> i. nbl.w 3} 5 

Total (24.1 overt) 78 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-6, 2-18, «7. 447, 
5-56, 6-59. 7-59. 665. 9-78 
BOWUNG: ALFde Met 7-1-220: R J 
Ratnayake. 6-1-163; J R Ratnayake. 3.1- 
0-12-3: E A R da snva, 2-0-130; 
Ranauige. 6-1-14-4. 


Australians on 
course to beat 
11 -year record 

The 83ft Anstrafian, Maxi 
Sovereign, slcipperd by Bernard 
Lewis, was on coarse last night 
to break the 11 -year passage 
record for the 630-mile Sydney 
toHoh art race (Barry PfafcfoaD 
writes). 

After tending the 128-strong 
fleet out of Sydney harbour 
yesterd ay afternoon, the new 
Patrick design, branched four 
weeks ago, was malting the most 
of the USt naming 
fast ahead of the South African 
entry. Rampant It, Bob BelTs 
Condor of Bermuda and the 
former Whitbread Around The 
World race yacht, Atlantic 
Privateer. 

Initial position reports from 
the fleet last night placed the 
Australian leader five miles 
ahead of Jim Kilroy*s Xxalao HI 
when foe American maxi set her 
two-day 14-boor record for foe 
voyage back in 1975, bat if the 
wind swings to the south today, 
as predicted, this could yet 
protect foe record for another 
year. 


New Zealand under fire 

From Barry Pkfcthall, Fremantle 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL, RUGBY UNION AND OTHER FIXTURES 


3-0 uiless stated 

First division 

Arsenal v Southampton 

Cheteaa v A Vito — 

Coventry v Tottenham 

Manchester Utd v Norwich 

Oxford v OPR — 

Sheffield Wed v Liverpool 

Watford v Newcastle 

West Ham v Wimbledon 

SMIRNOFF IRISH LEAGUE (2.15): Ante » 
CSJMnvSte: BaBymena v DrewtefjrCamcK 
v Bangor: Crusarfara v CowmwK 
Gfentoran v Glenavoo Oift Newy * 
LrtMd; Portadown v Lame. 

80UTHERN LEAGUE: pwnd er *»M ob: 

DuJey: Bedworffi v 

urcti: Bromsgrova v Corby: 

ChNmsfbrd v Stapshed; rtstorv 

CtoMey: RjResioiie 

*«* v Danfort; RaOdto* v W***alL 
buy v Cambridge CWy: WHrsy v 
Ferahatn. IHwl «*!«» Bteron* 
Sutton CoMteM; Bridgnorth vfitou tosg; 

( 5 toSi Pf V V S, 

IWngdon * Rwste Canto tury v W 
togs Chatham w Asfrfort: 
ftwwt DutEtabto v Pww £“57 
Dorchester Trowbndge v Ei fgi aw- 
VBdare: Vtewtoovne * Onn«end and 
NonWteefc Woodtofd v Tonbrtdoe. 

VAIMHAU. OPfi. LEPOUEi PMBter *■ 
•Wofc Barking v St Atoans; Bogrwri i 


Second division 

Brighton v Reading 

Derby v Barnsley 

Huddersfield v Bradford 

HuR v Blackburn 

Ipswich v C Palace — 

Oldham v Leeds — 

Stoke v Sheffield Utd 

Sunderland v Grimsby 

WBAv Plymouth 

Boraham Wood: Epsom m d. Ewto v 
Oxtort Cfty: Rntitey* Grays; htoWjr 
inwes; Leytonstone Wort v La myrnoa d 
FQ: Souflwfck » Bfonca y: 

north; Barton v Hartng cy; guto wa J 
Che sham: CoUar R ow y H w Uort (63 0): 




U Sa”v Vauxhai Motors: wnm noy * 
Wta£«tpn_* HornCha rch- Sae- 




OiAreh v Bishop's Stanford: Haro wv 
Hgw: Hkctvn V Famborougfc Toatng 
and UKham v Worthing: StoughJ 
BronteK Wweombe v lUngaorian.^Teow 








SSSwtt Woking V Horsham 
yurrH EAST COUNTIES LEAGUE ( 1 1-0 ): 

m dhWoB GBrahflin v WatfonC 
F»™ U Tntfonham. 




Palace: 

arigoton: s*™ 11 * 

nRVBOROUGHS NORTHERN LEAGUE: 

s*? 

Watton. 


Third division 

Boranemouth v Fuiham 

Bristol Cv Walsall 

Bury v Notts Co 

Carite/e v Rotherham 

Chester v Blackpool 

Darfington v Chesterfield 

Doncaster v Bolton 

GSSngham v Swindon 

Mansfield v Mjddtesbrough 

Newport v P Vale 

York v Wigan 

GREAT MELS LEAGUE: Pnuter <S- 
vtsaon: Bristol Manor Farm v Frame; 
Listoart v Dawfsft: Meacsham v Exmomti. 

BUUWG SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Buy « Soham Town Rangers; Ctactan v 
Brantrae; Ely v Brantham: Febstowe v 
Great YarmouSi v Thettonf, 
naiwxxi and Parkaaton v H avertiN; 
Lowestoft w Colchastsr Unftad; Naw- 
maricat v Hlston; Stowmskat v Gortestorc 
Ttotreo v MAshech. 

ESSEX LEAGUE Sanior saeSon: Brent- 
wood v Chehnstort: East Ham v Bon 
Manor: Fort v Woodford; HNstaad v 
Brighton gsea; Maidon v Bumham; 
Purteet v East Thurrock; SanstaU v 
SawtxKJgewortt 

BASS NORTH WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: First drition; Cttharoe v 
Eastwood Hantey; Curzon Ashton v 
Contftoxc Fleetwood v Radefifls; Kfrifoy 
v Gfoseep; Laytend Motors v VHnafort; 
Hetheriwd v airscoudi: Penrith v btem; 


Rossendale v 
StaNbridge. Lai 
replay: Ashton v 


Fourth division 

Aldershot v Colchester 

Burnley v Crewe 

Half ax v Rochdale 

Preston v Hartlepool 

Scunthorpe v Lincoln 

Stockport v Peterborough 

Swansea v Hereford ... 

Torquay v Orient 

Tranmere v Wrexham (11 .30) 

Wolverhampton v Exeter 

BERKS AMD BUCKS SENIOR CUP: First 
rawd: RadnreB Heath v Buckingham: 
Windsor and Eton v Wantage. First round 
reptoy: UMnstow v WaNngtort (2JH. 

OXFOR D SHIRE SB QOR CUP: Find round 
raptejF Earengton v CharSxxy (26). 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE (LO): Pre- 
mier cfvisfon: Amareham v Bnmsdown 
(3-0); Corinthian Casuals v RedhN (3.0); 
Qown and Manor v Baridngtede: 
Edgwara v Southrote (LO); HanweB » 
Oansort; Pennant vBaaconsflelef: YeorSng 
m Badcton CLO). L segue Cup: Seconn 
rani repfar: Wafitom Abbey v 
NontiwoodriAn. 

NOmHERN' COUNTIES EAST LEAGUE: 
Armthorpe v Boston; Bentlay v Attreton; 
Brnflngttn TrinAy v Sutton Town; Bngg * 
Emtey;TarclByvLong Eaton; Pomafreav 
Gutseiey: HatTogete v Denaby. Thackiey v 
Eastwood. 


; Sr Haters v 
kx TbM round 
^onStantey. 


Multipart League 

Burton v Qoote — 

Buxton v Morecambe 

Chortey v S Liverpool 

Gains borough v Oswestry 

Horwteh v Bangor 

Hyde v Worksop 

Macdesfi eW v Rhyl 

Matlock v Workington 

Mosstey v Southport 

MWwst and Easetxxme v wiefc 
Whltehawk v Peacahaven and 
Talsoomba. 

WESSEX LEAGUE: Broctanhurst v 
Steymg: Eaattegh v WaBworthy; Havant 
v Romany: Homdaan v Road Sea; 
Lytrtngton v Shokntt Newport v Bouma- 
mouth, Thxteham Portato. 

HOCKEY 

PIZZA EXPRESS LONDON LEAGUE 
(2-15* Premier dMNon: GuBdtart v 
Hounslow. I — go e- Btacfcheath v St 
Atoans; WBybndga Hawks vSurbHOR. 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL TROPHYbSeml- 
tteafc Widnes v Warrington (at Wigan, 
2.T5) 

RUGBY UNION 

JOIW SMmrS MERIT TABLE B 
Rosstyn Park v Bedford 

CLUB MATCHES 


Scott ish premier division 

Aberdeen v Hamilton 

Clydebank v Celtic 

Dundee v Htoerra'an 

Hearts v FaDdrk 

Motherwell v St Mirren 

Rangers v Dundee Utd 

W d dteBbro wSi v Gosforth (2.15) 

Ucsetey vBbw Vate 

Neath v Panerth — - - 

Northampton v Bath 

Nuneaton v Oxtort (230) 

Ptymoteh v Chaftenham 

Richmond v Harlequins 030) 

Roundhay v Harrogate (230) 

Swansea v London Weteh 

Vais of Lone v Broughton Park 

Wasps v Btacfcheath (230) — 

Wdnes v Ones (230J„ 

wa n Bl ow v Sale (245) 


As the four remaining 
America’s Cop challengers pre- 
pare for their semi-final clash 
starting tomorrow, Marc Plot's 
French Kiss syndicate re- 
opened the “Glassgate” con- 
troversy surrounding New 
Zealand’s glass fibre yacht by 
threatening to seek an injunc- 
tion from the New York Su- 
preme Court unless core 
samples are taken from the 
composite structured hull to 
prove that the yacht is a legal 12- 
iQGtrCw 

In a letter delivered to the 
Costa Smeralda YC yesterday. 
Admiral Rene Marqneze, the 
chairman of the French Kiss 
syndicate, suggests that while 
ultrasonic and gamma ray test- 
ing devices were used by the 
Lloyds surveyor last week to 
check the bull thickness and 
density of the four challengers, 
these instruments were not ac- 
curate enough for testing 
composite materials. 

The Admiral also' complains 
that when declaring that New 
Zealand IV passed its re-survey, 
Lloyds gave no indication as to 


Scottish first division 

Airdrie v Dumbarton 

OydevEBfe 

Forfar v KHmamock 

Montrose v Partk* 

Morton v Dunfermline 

Queen of Sth v Brechin 


v Ipswich; Sudbwy Cout v O 
Kfngsburiana; Tabard v Stevenage; Thur- 
rock v Canterbury; Trojans v EaatlagtL 

OTHER SPORT 
BADMINTON: Cocfcbum junior opsn tour- 
nament (at Glasgow}; Cumbria under 
14/18 foamptonateps (at Garfish 

BASKETBALL: Cretabom TorenaoMat of 
Champion* Real (at Stretford 8.QL Hrat 


the calibration of its measuring 
instruments or accuracy of the 
data. As a result, the French 
group, who are first paired 
against the all-conquering New 
Zealanders, are insisting that 
Lloyds provide all the finalists 
with the results of their survey 
and take core samples from the 
yacht before the racing begins. 

“We have been advised by 
experts at the French aerospace 
company, Dassault, that while 
this equipment can provide 
significant dam on the thickness 
and density of homogenous 
mate rials such as al uminium, it 
is not accurate enough what 
measuring composite 
materials,’’ the french Kiss 

spokesman, Laurnet Lachaux, 

explained yesterday. 

In reply, the Costa Smeralda 
organizers issued a statement 
saying it considered that the 
conditions governing the Louis 
Vuition Cup challenge trails had 
been fully complied with and 
would be requesting no further 
action from Uoyds. 

The French say they will also 
issue a formal protest - 


Scottish second cfivisioti 

Ayr v St Johnstone — 

Berwick v Queen's Park — 

E Stirling v Adoa — 

FLairn V Afoion 

Stenhsmuk v Cowdenbeath 

Stirling v Maadowbanfc — _____ 
Stranraer v Arbroath — — 


Team PtSycoO KfcifjBtan pUJ). 
tCE HOCIffiY: Hetnefcen league: Premier 
AMon (630k Fite Flyers v Cleveland 
Bombers (7.15); NottMiam Panthers v 
Durham Wasps; Soflhid Barons v 
MunayfWd Racare.RatdMaIaKGtes- 
gow t&glas v Kirkcaldy Kestrels (530). 
SQUASH RACKETS: Wetwyn Garden City 
Juilor open tournament (at Herts SC). 


TOMORROW 


NENE GROUP united counties 

LEAGUE: Premier Msforo AimM v 
Meser. Bafoocfc v StotfoU; Bracktey v 
Bourn: Eynesbuy w S and L Cow; 
Hefoeach v ktfdngDorougft: Long Buckby 
v Rotfiwtft Northampton Spencer v 
Kampetarc St Naofs v haunts: Spakftng i 
Pottto; Stamfort v Woottoro 


Crantaton * Hertay; Farieigh v Msfcten 
Town; Frtrrtey Green v Godalmm 
Hartley Wbitoey v Famftam; Maiden Vale v 

Iteretnam; wginia wstsr v BAe 
(Woybrtdge). 

SUSSEX COUNTY 1EAOE (2Jfr First 
Jrtatan: Haywar ds Heetfi v ButgMS HN; 
Horsham YMCA v Three Bridges (3.0): 


Cross Keys v AbecMery 
FyUs v Sheffield 
(frxjcesterv Newport - 
Heetfin^ey v WakeffeM ! 
Lefoaaterv Barbarian s (5 

UaneUv Bristol 

Maeeteg v Abarewn 


S Anglo Scots v Glasgow 

hrtoer Court, 2.15J; SorKh » Edinburgh 
Greenyarde. Gatashtas. 230) 

REK MATCHES: Arts v Bangor Malone 
w Academy; CIYMS v NFC; Queen's 
Unwarsity v CoteGfares Dundaflt v 
Portadown. 

LONDON AND SOUTH EAST: Askaem v 
Dambrcfare; Aylesbury v Northampton 
Wa ndatBta; Bancroft v Woo rt ord: Bsd- 
tort Atwaite rr Ohey; Bishop’s Stortfort v 
Upper Clapton; Brentwood v Thurrock; 
Cobnster v Ipswfcft YMCA; East 
Gmstead v westcombo Park; RNerians v 
Wasps Vbk»s: Grenwicti v GSSngham 
A n choriany. GuSdfort end Godafcwng w 
Esher; Havant r SaEsbunr; Ldatnm 
Buzzard v Stockwood Park; htatow v 
Henley; North Wafsaftm v Hertford: Nor- 
vrich v L owesto ft: O Emanuel v O 
Gwtonbns: O Patenas v Beckenham; O 
Rolgstens v Lewes; Oatartey v H a rro w. 
Sjdeup v O M BhB ans; Southend v O 
Cantflbrigjans; Stanes v Eafing; Sucfixry 


FOOTBALL 
Ffrst division 

Chariton v Manchester C 

Everton v Leicester 

Nottingham F v Luton 

Third division 

Brentford v Bristol ft — 

Fourth division 

Cambridge v Southend 

Northampton v Cardiff 

FA TROPHY: Ffcst round rep** Maid- 
atone vWBakMona(flJI). 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

STOICS BtTTgtCHAIWONS WP. Brat- 
fort v Halifax (330); FBsBwstane v Hu> 
(3301 S ec o nd dta W me Mansfield v 
ShefneU (330L 


RUGBY UNION 

CLUB MATCHES: Liverpool St Helens v 
Bkicenhe»i Park (230}: New B rig hton v 
Waterloo. 

OTHER SPORT 

BADMINTON: Cockbum juntar open tour- 
nament (at Gbsgow). 

HANDBALL: BrtW) Leoguro Satiord v 
Wakefield (2.0). 

ICE HOCXEY: Heinekan league: Premier 
division JS30k Dundee Rockets v Ayr 
Bruins (rJOk Durham wasps v Sottul 
Barons: MurrayfioW Bacere v WNtley 
warriors; Strsmun RedsWns v NMbnd- 

XSB3SigS8 ,mtm 

ROAD RUNNMG: ‘centrasport IQm 
races (at Crystal PMaen 

SQUASH RACKETS: Welwyn QsrtenCfty 
junior open townamant (at Hons fitg. 





38 


SPORT 


RACING: ELSWORTH TO COLLECT ANOTHER TOP PRIZE 

Front-running Floyd can lead 
Kempton rivals a merry dance 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


If form at the highest level 
means anything at all, the Top 
Rank Christmas Hurdle at 
Kempton Park today ought to 
be won by Floyd. 

At Cheltenham last March, 
only two lengths covered Gaye 
Brief. Nohalmdun and 
Prideaux Boy when they fin- 
ished, second, third and 
fourth, respectively, in the 
Champion Hurdle.' 

More recently, Prideaux 
Boy was hammered seven 
lengths on the same course by 
Floyd whose front-running 
style of racing should be 
ideally suited to the sharp 
Sunbury track where he has 
already won the Queen's Prize 
on the Flat. 

Racing with zest and jump- 
ing as well as be invariably 
does, Floyd is a hard horse to 
catch as anyone who watched 
him win the Imperial Cup at 
Sandown and the County 
Hurdle at Cheltenham, in the 
space of six days two seasons 
ago, will testify. 

After an enforced absence 
caused by injury, he has 
bounced back seemingly bet- 
ter than ever this season and I 
expect him to prove too good 
for Nohalmdun who was 


receiving weight from Floyd's 
stable companion Bambrook 
Again at Ascot recently. 

Gaye Brief stopped to noth- 
ing towards the end of his race 
at the same Ascot meeting 
while Prideaux Boy has seven 
lengths to find. Around a 
course as tight as Kempton, 
Floyd should have too much 
pace for that other renowned 
front-runner Tom Sharp. 

David Bsworth and his 
stable jockey, Colin Brown, 
can round the day off on a 
high note by also winning the 
Pinewood Handicap Hurdle 
with Blnelunit who caught my 
eye on his seasonal debut 
when finishing seventh be- 
hind Molojec at Ascot. 

That same afternoon, 
Annettes Delight might well 
have finished second to Desert 
Orchid, instead of fourth, had 
he not made such a hash of 
jumping the second-last fence. 
So with only lOst lib. to carry 
I give Terry Casey's ex-Irish 
seven-year-old a good chance 
of winning the Fourth Proto- 
col Handicap Chase now that 
be receives 191b from Berlin. 

Stirabout (12 40) and The 
Kulak (1 10), so promising at 
Warwick and Sandown, 


respectively, should also give 
their backers a good run in the 
Royal Garden Hotel Novices' 
Chase and the National Bingo 
Game Novices’ Hurdle. 

The Argonaut should only 
have to run as well as he did 
when finishing second to 
Desert Orchid at Sandown to 
give his owner, the Queen 
Mother, a victory in the 
Odeon Cinemas Handicap 
Chase. 

At Wetherby, the presence 
of both Peariyman and 
Badsworth Boy in the field for 
the Casileford Handicap 
Chase should help to shed 
some light on this season’s 
two-mue championship. 
Badsworth Boy had won the 
crown, in the shape of the 
Queen Mother Champion 
Chase, three times in a row 
before Buck House finally 
ended his reign last March. 

Sadly, Buck House is with 
us no more but Peariyman 
looked a very live wire indeed 
when he ran away with his 
first race of the current season 
at Cheltenham. 

Phil Tuck has a good chance 
of winning the fust two races 
on the Yorkshire track for 


Gordon Richards on Rule Of 
The Sea (12 45) and Jim 
Thorpe (1 15). 

Rule Of The Sea, my selec- 
tion for the Philip Comes 
Nickel Alloys Novices’ Chase, 
was a thoroughly convincing 
winner of his first chase at Ayr 
eight days ago. Formerly a 
smart hurdler for Andy Scott, 
he now looks the type to excel 
in this new field. 

Jim Thorpe’s form figures 
this season may not look all 
that inspiring on the surface, 
yet underneath they conceal 
sound efforts in tough assign- 
ments at Newcastle mid 
Sandown. 

Now that he is running over 
three miles again, BWF Core 
i$ napped to win the St John 
Ambulance Handicap Hurdle. 

He beat Kildimo on merit 
over this distance first time 
out at Cheltenham before 
finding 2'k miles at Ascot too 
short for him when runner-up 
to Molojec. 

Finalfv, my principal fancy 
at Warwick is Proud Pilgrim 
to follow that meritorious win 
at Leicester 13 days ago with 
another in the Jacob Marley 
Novices’ Chase. 



Floyd, who chases his third consecutive victory in today’s Top Rank Christmas Hurdle at Kempton rant 

Double for Fahey 


Richard Fahey brought off a 
7-1 don Me for Jhnmy Fitzgerald 
when landing the two divisions 
of the St Ito Novices’ Hurdle at 
Huntingdon yesterday, on Sister 
Claire and Weight Problem. 
Sister Claire, backed down to 
1 1-8 before her division 

by 15 lengths, was the Mahon 
trainer's 50th success of the 
season. Fahey said that be had 
once before landed a double — at 
Ayr on the Flat two years ago. - 


Barrow Line has Fairyhouse 
target after game success 

From oar Irish Racing Correspondent, Dublin 


KEMPTON PARK 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

1 03 (12) D4M32 TWEFFORM (CD£F) (Mrs JRytey) B Hall 9-t0-0 


B West (4) » 7-2 


12.40 Stirabout. 

1.10 The Kulak. 

1.40 Annette's Delight. 


2.10 Floyd. 

2.40 The Argonaut. 

3.10 BluelimiL 


By Michael Seely 
1.40 Berlin. 2.10 Nohalmdun. 


Going: soft 

1240 ROYAL GARDEN HOTEL NOVICE CHASE (£3,106: 2m) (11 runners) 

R 


102 44-2031 BLUECHER (D) (J SfrotgeO D GrtsseS 5-11-4. 

103 4QAH110 MFELDER (F Taylort A Moore 7-11-4 

104 200P/0 AZMNO(H Mould) DNteftftnn 6-1 1-0. 

106 

107 

108 
110 

ITT 

112 022-013 STIRABOUT (B) (Bile ThottMX) N H en ders o n 6-11-0- 

113 131/PO-O WOLLOW WILL (Mrs P Foul) F Winter 7-1 1-0 

114 00-3000 REMAINDER WYN (T Ttxxn) J Bndger 5-10-9. 


1010-2F DEER CREST |X Al-Seid) J Edwards 6-1 1-0 

3P2-FF4 GALA'S IMAGE (StesWl All Abu Khamsin) Mr* M Rimes 5-11-0- 

00202- GRSD (A Wftmscn) Denys SmithS-l 1-0 

0/42 PAUL PRY (H Joel) A Tumee 6-11-0 

F3U000- RYDER'S SON (A Wales) R Go* 6-11-0. 


M 6-1 

G Moore *M 8-1 

RDunwoody — 12-t 

— 97 4-1 

— 98 7-8 

— 14-1 
95 5-1 
78 20-1 
96F3-1 
— 8-1 
— 25-1 


R Rowe 

__ Steve KnlgM 

C Biown 

S Smith Ecdes 
P Scud amore 


1985: KALYA MAL 6-11-0 B de Haan (13-8 fav) F Winter 5 ran 

1.10 NATIONAL BINGO GAME NOVICE HURDLE (£4,062; 2m) (18 

runners) 


00-0140 DIMENSION (B£)(M Ingram) Mrs N Smith 4-11-7. 


030-FOO BOttHCKS (BF) (Mrs B Ciarko) A Moors 4-11-0- 


202 

0047140 

203 

341 

205 

4322-41 

208 

00- 

209 

0 

210 

030-FOO 

275 

D30-0 

218 

0B 

222 

00 

224 

030-3 

226 

4U 

228 

03 

229 

4 

234 

44 

235 

2 

238 OF/0040- 

239 

241 


. SSMMon 
BOe Hun 
. K Mooney 
_ R Beggan 
- A Wright 
G Moore 


WOLFHANQAR (Mrs B Samuel) F Winter 4-1 1-0 . 

LANDING POWER (Miss W verwey) Mss W Verwey 4-10-9.. 


H Donwoody 

Mr T Hmm Jams 
_____ S Sherwood 

R Rotvefl 

P Scudamore 


87 6-1 
91 4-1 
M 0-2 
— 12-1 
-14-1 
78 18-1 

— 70 18-1 

A Carrol *99 5-1 
82 12-1 
8210-1 
81 12-1 
82 8-1 
80 8-1 
91 12-1 
94 F7-2 
75 33-1 
- 10-1 
-33-1 


..... C Brown 
R Chapmen 
— R Rowe 


1885: OPPIDAN 5-11-OS Sherwood (9-q O Sherwood 13 ran 


FORM USDWGHTTRAM 
■ wniH en 15541a! Unnfial 


Son My Son (iu- 
Musical Mystery ( 
tDRut>yffigtrt(10 


II 1-0) won well 151 from IckwonfUll-Olwito MY HELMSMAN (11-0) 3rt beat- 
, fJ2m. E685. sott. Dec 6.20 ran). RAMADI DAWN 110-12) won wrt 4| from My 

a 1 (10-12 at Stratford (2m. £685. good, Nov 6, 17 ran). FOURTH TUDOR (10-1 1) 2nd beaten nk to 
(10-1 1)at FontweR (2m 2t. £085. good to soft Dk 2. 14 rard. KARIWAKd 1 -D) 3m. beaten 8MI 
M2) at Worcester (&n. £1 883. soft. Dec 17. 20 rari). NEW GOLD DREAM (ID-7) 4th beaten 251 
to Msttr Pbmt (ID-7) at Haydock (2m, £1404. soft. Dec 11. 20 ran). THE KULAK (11-01 4th beaten 111 to Robin 
GoodfeBaw(1 1-ffl at Sandown (2m. £3043. good to soft. Nov 2B, 1 2 ran). THE WEST AWAKE (11-0) 2nd, ml 
beaten behind, 41® Federal Trooper (ll-O) at Newbury (2m, £1434, good to soft. Nov 12, 14 ran). 

SMecHon: MDfMGHT TRAIN 


S Sherwood 


1.40 FOURTH PROTOCOL HANDICAP CHASE (£4,822: 2m 41) (12 
runners) 

302 Q/101FO FAR HUOGE (Duke of Athol] G Balding 10-11-7 — 

303 3-01321 MALTA MAL (GJ9 (Sheikh AD Abu Khamsin) F Winter 7-11-7 (4ex) P Scudamore 

304 1023-21 BERLIN (N MBs) N Gasakm 7-11-6 Dl 

306 2Q/I1FF- DRIVE ON JIMMY (D) (RE A Batt Ltd) O Sherwood 6-11-4 
308 1/11-PPP KYOTO (D)(BMonkfmuse}JJenWns 6-1 1-3. 

311 0-12110 WELSH OAK (G Amey) D GandoHo B-1M 

312 - 

314 

315 

316 

318 

319 


4FD-312 SOCKS DOWNE (D) (C Cowley) J King 7-10-6 

3000-13 WSLY YEOMAN (D) (Mrs H Alwen) J GHtord 7-1 0-3. 
1-00414 ANNETTE’S DELIGHT (J Upson) T Casey 7-10-1 „ 
31F-12F WHISKEY EYES (CD) (H PmkJ S Melar 5-10-1 


DR-04 10 WARNER FOR LEISURE (T Warner Spot®) D Gandodo 8-10-0- 
313 / SUN RISING (Oueen Modter) F Wafwyn 8-10-0.. 


1985: ROADSTER 8-104 R Ounwoody (3-1 fav) C Nash 8 ran 


SSmfihEcdm 

S McNeU 

R Rowe 

S Moors 

_ G Landau («} 

R Dtai w oedy 

K Mooney 


83 4-1 
92 5-1 
91 F7-2 

84 8-1 
— 20-1 
88 12-1 

95 8-1 
• 9910-1 

9012-1 

96 6-1 
81 16-1 
- 12-1 


Racecard number. Draw m brackets. Six-figure and distance winner. 8F-benan tavourite to latest 
form (F-ML P-pufed up. U-unseated rider. B- racaL Owner m brackets. Trainer. Age and 
brought down. S-sSpped up. R-refused). Horae's weight RUer plus any aOowance. The Tones 
nanwJB-bflnkers. V-vrsor. H-hood- E-Eyeshieid. O Private HantScappers rating. A p pro x i ma te starting 
course winner. D-distanca winner. CD-course price. 


8 ran), 
tec IE 


> MAL (11-5) led on the fiat® win 12 from CtessHad (11-1) at Hereford (2n4f, £i.6S4. heavy, 
060.1*7 ran). BEfttJN (11-2), was left durst me test after FAR .BRIDGE (11-flJtoahrs rider, won hd from 


Music Be Magic (11-7) at Sandown (2m. £711 
I yet to snow any ' 


(2n 

to soft. Nov 29. 7 ran). DRIVE ON JIMMY B 
won novtoe chases. WELSH OAK (1 0-2) 5tti beaten ! 

“ *“ 131 2nd beaten 2Si 


thought of yet® show any farm in this country in 

® Purtyman (11-13 at Cheltenham (an. £4565. good. Doe 8, 7 ran). WHISKEY EYES (11 
to Latin Amencan (10-6) at Cheltenham »n, £29187 good. Dec 5. G ran). WILY YEOMANn 
MBfahopsYMTim ^U wtth MALYA MAL (11-12) 2nd beaten 81 at Lmgfiefd (2m 4f. £2484 

Z10 TOP RANK CHRISTMAS HURDLE (Grade 1: £19,128: 2m) (7 
runners) 


1110/11 FLOYD (D)(M Walsh) DBswonh 6-1 1-3. 


403 

404 213F2P GAYE BRIEF (SMSthAI Abu Khamsin) MraMRimel 9-1 1-3. 

405 113U0-1 NOHALMDUN (D) (lllcaby Famw Ltd) M H Eastwby 5-1 1-3 — 

408 0141-02 PHH«AUX BOY (COBF)(C Roach) C Roach B-1 1-3 

407 220300 RA NOVA (CO) (Lady Matthews) I Matthews 7-11-3 

410 4/1130-1 TOM SHARP (D)(M Yarrow) W Wharton B-1 1-3 

413 101-344 MRS MUCK (DHNTVdaui Davies) N Davies 5-10-12. 


91 


52 

4-1 

. P Sc n da m ora 91 F2-1 

MBondby *99 9-2 

M Pnrratt 80 10-1 

_ SJOTtaB 80 6-1 

_ S Sherwood 75 12-1 


1985: AONOCH 6-11-3 J Duggan (14-1) Mrs S OCver 9 ran 

Eft DM NOHALMDUN (11-4) won we!2ttl from Bambroak Again (11-ftwith GAYE BRIEF ni -8) ptetod 
runm up or the flat at Ascot (2m. £4819. good. Dec 13. 5 ran) to tfta Champion Hurdte fCKAUHXRJ 
(120) 3rd. made ug a lot of ground dose home, beaten 8X1 taSea You Than (12-0)witfj PRIDEAUX BOY (124JJ 


4th beaten 8VL i 


2nd 


. . jm (2m. £15729. good to soft Mar 11. 23 ran). PRIDEAUX BOY (11 

beaten 7ltoFLOYD (11-2) with MRS MUCK (1G9) 4th beaten 12HI at Chetenham (2m. £9932. good. Dee 6.8 
ran). TOM SHARP (lY-0) made all to win by hd from Ballydunuw (11-0) at Newcastle (2m. £8544, good. Nov 15. 
10 rani. 

SafacftW NOHALMDUN 

2.40 ODEON CINEMAS HANDICAP CHASE (£3,215: 3m) (8 runners) 


23-1100 GOLDEN FRIEND <D) (D Meade) lvfr» M Rfcnel 8-11-10. 

133211/ ACES WILD (Mrs MVaienm)F Winter 8-11-1 

00-3 F40 OUR FUN (P Hopkins) J Gfflort 9-10-12 

U1F2/22 SIGN AGAIN (R Wright) J Fax 8-1 D4L 


SOI 

504 

505 
507 

510 4PJ012-2 GAMBIR (D£F) (Lord VeStty) D Nchobon 8-10-6 . 

511 0F11-1F JUST FOR THE CRACK (D) (G Wife) K Bafley 8-10-4 
513 1U10-22 TIM ARGONAUT (Queen Mother) FWtewyn 8-1 M _ 
516 1FF2-22 GOLD BEARER (BF) (Lady Joaepti) F Winter 6-10-0— 


- SMorahead 
. P Scudamore 
R Rowe 


9210-1 
— 12-1 
85 8-1 

— 96 F5-2 

— — - RD uu w uutl y • 99 5-1 

Mr T Thomson Jones 92 6-1 

SSHfaton 8S 3-1 

B Qe Haan 89 10-1 


1985: CHARTER PARTY 7-10-11 P Scudamore (2-1 fav) D Mchobon 7 ran 



I (11-2) at Nottingham rah. £23)54, good. Dec 1,4 ran). JUST FOR THE CRACK fastest fal 15th 
1Q)won 41 from Celtic Hamlet (9-7) at Ascot " 


Last Prince 

ea>8er(! 1-1Q) won 41 from CbMic Hamlet (9-7) ■t'Ascot^m. £3792. good. Nov 14. 3 ran).THE ARGONAUT (10- 
0) 2nd beaten 41 to Desert Orchid (10-3) at Sardowr gm 4(. £4950, aoocLftovI, 4ran). GOLD BEARER (1(W) 
2nd. causritctosa home, beaten head to Castle Warden (11-10) at Itempton (3m, £2^14. good to soft. Nov 20. 
4 ran). 

Satectiom THE ARGONAUT 

3.10 PINEWOOD HANDICAP HURDLE (£3,510: 2m 41) (14 runners) 

601 1040-22 TUGBOAT (CD) (Mrs G EvannetQPMtdMl 7-1 2£ RDunwoody 

1-000 BESPOKE (CO) (MraW Ham) T Forster 5-11-6 H Davies 


605 

606 
607 
610 


4100-10 JUVBI LIGHT (BF) (R DNsy) R Akehurst 5-1 1-5. 
04120-0 BURSJMfT (B) (□ WMtaid) D Bsworth 5-1 1-4_ 


Dale McKeown (7) 


. P Scnda mora 


612 

613 

F044-00 JOY RB)E(C Cowley) J King 6-10-9 

S McNeil 

616 


S Sherwood 

6TB 












825 



629 

PMOO SHIPWRIGHT (RBanraeylH O-Noil 5-10-0 

R Chapman (4) 


87 5-1 
9212-1 
95F2-1 
• 99 8-1 
9110-1 
9312-1 
87 6-1 
— 14-1 

90 S-1 
9016-1 

91 20-1 
53 20-1 
80 14-1 
75 8-1 


1885: TUGBOAT 6-11-7 R Dunwoody (5-1 Jt-fav) P MitcheB 13 ran 

Course specialists 

ERS JOCKEYS 




Runners 

Percent 


Winners 

Rides 

Percent 

J Edwards 

6 

16 

37J5 

RDunwoody 

7 

25 


SMoSor 

B 

29 

27.6 

SSWsJon 

7 

30 


F Whiter 

33 

137 

24.1 

R Rowe 

18 

97 

1&6 

FWaJwyn 

16 

74 

21.6 

SMorafuad 

7 

43 

76J3 

J Gttfort 

24 

121 

19.8 

S Smith Ecctes 

11 

90 

1Z2 

N Henderson 

12 

70 

17.1 

P Scudamore 

19 

157 

12.1 


WETHERBY 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.45 Rule Of The Sea. 
J.J5 Jim Thorpe. 

1 .45 Peariyman. 


2.20 Nos Na Gaoithe. 

2.50 BLUFF COVE (nap). 
3^5 Big Togger. 


Michael Seely's selection: 3.25 BIG TOGGER (nap). 

The Times Private Han dicapper's top rating: 3225 THE LODGE PRINCE. 


Going: good to soft 

1Z45 PHILIP CORNES NICKEL ALLOYS NOVICE CHASE (£2,622: 2m 
4f) (13 runners) 


1 1F4-122 DUTCH LORD 6BF) (D Knights) Denys Smith 5-11-5 — 

3 08140-1 RULE OF THE SEA (R Jeffreys) GW Richards 5-1 1-5. 

4 0-14FF0 TW wax (FScotto) W A Stephenson 7-11-5. 


C Grant 

P TOC* 

R Lamb 


5 ZP/430-0 ALLTEN GLAZED (Mrs w Wlddafl) M Naughton Mt-O. 
7 FFOO/P-P MJCKENCffUIVE (A Watson) A WWson 11-11-0 

10 0TM23F2 GREEN GOflSE PF) (3 Green) N Cnanp 8-11-0 

11 3100*00 HOLL1N BARN (Mrs S Philips) D Lee 7-11-0 — 

12 00-0232 MNOCCNT JOHN (J Hanson) J Henson 6-11-0 

14 000Q/F-F MASTER VULGAN (A Duffiekf) G Catvori 7-1 1-0 

18 211210/ PACIFISTE (M Hdtyer) Mrs M Oddnsor 6-11-0 

19 02/0B3Q SOLDBY (BF) (G Leatham) M H EastBiby 6-1 1-0 

22 OQ/F THORN PARK (Mrs J Wftson) J Bkmdafl 6-1 1-0 

25 0-G212U WHATS WHAT (Mrs D BousfwW) B Sousfieid 7-11-0..... 


92 F5-4 
94 4-1 
7718-1 
Hammond • 99 7-2 
M Pepper — 33-1 


.. C H awk ins 
G Hamer 
— M Dwyer 
. SKagMey 
G Bradley 

LWyw 

D Dutton 

REamahaw 


80 12-1 
77 16-1 

81 14-1 

— 25-1 

— 7-1 
80 8-1 

— 33-1 
- 12-1 


1985; No Cp rraspu ndft i p Rape 
PDBM DUTCH LORD (11-0) 2nd. caurtit after the test beaten 51 by Yt 
£2J06. soft. Dec 11, 7 ran). READY TOKEN (11-6) won 21 from 
SOLDBY (11-4) 5tti beaten 1055) to Ready Token (1 t- 6) and HDLUN barn (11- 


Yahoo (10-7) at Hajrdock (3m, 
“ a (11-11) with 


i Price Of Peace 

^ . . IBARN(11-*)Hhb6etenl3latCaltfirJcJ{ 

lt.£164a.Qajd,Dec17,14ran).RULE0FTHEI -- - — 

8) with ALLTOI GLAZED (11-2) Hh beaten 52) at Ayr (2rii, 

aid beaten 2S to Oaken (11-7) at Gattenck 0m. £T1 64. good to tern. Dec 8, & ran). 

over fences lost hts rider at the tterd. 

Setediorc DUTCH LORD 


weutowin I2t from General Cnandos (11- 
516, 90ft, Dec 19. 8 ran). (KEEN GORGE (11-0) 
nt WHATS WHAT on debut 


1.15 HOLSTEN P1LS HANDICAP HURDLE {£7,726: 2m) (11 runners) 

2 334-300 JM THORPE (D)(MC Inns Ltd) GW RWterds 5-11-7. 

00-2200 PETER MARTIN (V,D)(F Lee) FH Lee 5-11-5. 


4320-01 CAWARRA LAD (□} (Mrs M Holden) C James 7-11-4. 


._ PTock 
S Holtend 
P A FrineH (4) 


032-113 RECORD HARVEST (CD^F)rU ColR Warden) MHEasterby 5-1 1-3 LWyw 

314-443 MEHHY JANE (CO) (DScolflE Owen jun 5-11-0 DS*yrme{7] 

03Q212 BATTLEFIELD BAND (C) (Mrs I Dobney) J BtendeS 8-10-13 (8ex)... A J Qufrm (7) 

1/28000 GUSBOROUGH TOWN (CD) (Mss E Cwh^ G Calvert 6-1012 SKtegftttey 

040131 BALLYAfiRY (CD) (W Manners) W A Stephenson 4-1010 (fie*) RLamb 


100-321 COOL STRIKE (0) (T Knowles) G M Moore 5-100 (Sex)., 


11 IP-00 GRUNDY LANE (V.D) (A IMtwaTO) M Lambert 4-104 

2101 MOLOJEC (Mrs PCcw) A Bflfley 5-10-3 (6 «k) 


. M Hammon d 
_. R Mariey (7) 


96 14-1 
9514-1 

• 09F7-2 
95 5-1 

97 lOI 
97 01 
94 15-1 
91 4-1 
91 7-1 
87 14-1 
97 5-1 


1985: TURJ 00-11 P FarraR (11-4) A Srntet 8 ran 

CHDU JBl THORPE (100) fth. lost touch after mistake last beaten 91 to Aonodh (11-7) at Sandown 
rvinm (2m. £12-015. good toso ft. Nov 2 9. 17 ranj BATTLEF1E1JD BAWD (104) 2nd. caught « the Bnal 
fkgtft, beaten Abu Katfra ( 1 03) with PETBt MARTIN { 1 1 -5) 7th, at Doncaster (2>n 4f. £4285. good. Dec 1 3. 
IS fan). CAWARRA LAD (JO-1) soon dear and won easfly 201 from Seriates Lad (10-3) at FontwaK (2m 21. 
£4752, good to soft. Dec 1 11 ran). RKRRY JANE (10-12) 3rd. one pace, beaten nk 9. at Cheltenham Cbn 4t. 
£3950, pood. Dee S, 13 ran) BJUJ.YARRY (10-1) won hd from COOL STRIKE (10-0) with RECORD HARVEST 


COOL STRIKE (10-0) with RECORD 

— .Dec6. 11 rani. COOLSTRJKE(1i>9)*vooia from Shermai 

L 5 ran). RMLOJEC (9-i1)vvon 31 from Bluff Cove (105)at Ascot 


: MOLOJEC 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 


JOCKEYS 


Wsm Dickinson 
M H Easterly 
M W Eastsr&y 
w A Stephenson 
G Richards 
Denys Snath 


Wmnars 

Runners 

Percent 


Winners 

FWes 

Par cent 

8 

35 

229 

G Bradley 

17 

81 

21.0 

28 

152 

1B.4 

M Dwyer 

18 

S3 

1S.4 

13 

75 

17J 


27 

155 

17.4 

43 

250 

1 72 


27 

171 

158 

16 

104 

15.4 

REamshaw 

11 

73 _ 

15.1 


20 


142 


1.45 CA5TLEFORD CHASE LIMITED HANDICAP (Grade It £9.980: 2m 
50yd) (8 runners) 


1 14112-1 PEAHLYMAN (Mrs P Slaw) J Edwards 7-12-3 (4eod . 


2 1/D3P-2F BADSWORTH BOY (CtLBF) (D Anntage) Mr* M ftdrinnon 11-124) 

3 (1-12413 LTTTLE BAY (BF) (Mrs S Catherwood) G W Richards 11-11-7 

31FF-34 SOMERLED (R McDonald) R McDonald 7-11-5 ., 


P Barton «99 F&4 

97 9 -2 
94 12-1 

98 12-1 


42220/0 SEA MBtCHANT (CO) (T McDonagh) W A Stephenson 9-1 1-2. 

111-132 AMBER RAMBLER (&BF) (0 Sflvenon) H Wharton 7-11-2 

212-402 CHARCOAL WALLY (J MurseB) H Hodges 7-114) . 


— P Tuck 

C Hawkins 

— R Lamb 


SYmMenW 


22-12F1 MXTTQN CROSS (CD^F) (Ma| J LHeyJ M H Easterby 6-10-13 (4ex). — LWyw 
1385: OUR FUN 8-10-11 R Rowe (8-4) J Gilford 4 ran 


97 7-2 
96 8-1 
90 6-1 


CARM PEARLYMAN (11-13) won well 71 from French Union (10-10) at Ctwtertham (2m, £4^65. good, 
rvnirl Dec 6. 7 ran). RADGWORTH BOY latest lek at the last when he had his race won-Karenomoro 
was pre se nted wtth toe contest Eartter (12-7) 2nd beaten HI to Karoiomora (10-11) at Market Rasen (2m, 
£1525, good to soft. Nov 22. 3 ran). LTTTLE BAY (11-10) 3rd beaten 14»l to to Desert Orchid (11-6) with 
CH ARCO AL WALLY (11-3) 2nd, ought dose home, beaten 121 at Ascot (2m. £6801, good, Dec 13. 8 ranV. 
SOMERLED D 1-1(B 4th beaten 401 to F»r Bridge no-12} at Ascot (2m, £6388. good. Nov 15. 5 rani AMBLER 
RAMBLER (1 0-1 3) 2nd. laded to stay, beaten STtoRepington (10-3) at Doncaster (2m 4f, good to firm. Dec 12, 5 
ran)- Earlier AMBLBt RAMBLER (11-S)3rd beaten SHItoChurch Wenton (ID-7) wfUiCHATCQALWALLYIIl- 
7) 5th beaten 36%l at AscotCm 41. £1W4, good. Nov 15. 6 ran). NORTON CROSS fai 8ft. aariter (11-6) 2nd 
beaten beaten 31 to Welsh Oak (10-11) at Ascot (Grn, £0.719. good, Nov 14, 7 ran). 

S e lect ion: AMBER RAMBLER 


2L20 BRADFORD NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £2,094: 2m) (17 runners) 

212044 BRAMPTON LYH(D)(D Lee) D Lea 10-12 


4 

7 

11 

12 

13 

14 

19 

20 
23 
25 
28 

29 

30 

31 
33 
36 
39 


FP BURHAAHI (Fill Cfrcta C Pic) N Tinkler 10-10 

GLYNConmra (F Lee) fh Lee io-to 

GHEOORtAH CHANT (P ODonnaf) C Spares 10-10.. 
3 HAPPY KtSD(S HORS) JBUidea 10-10. 


ILLUMNATDR (I Anrttage) M H Easwrby 10-10.. 


32 MOS NA GJUOTHE (V) (P Green) M H Eastertry 10-10. 
PAST GLORIES (N Hetbenori) w Ssey 10-10 . 


0304F GUALTTA1R KWG(Outftalr Hotels) K Stone 10-10.. 
3 SPRMG PALM (D Hutchinson) RE Peacock 10-10- 
0 UtEX-PLAIMSD (B EdtSshaw) G M Moore 10-10— 


VICARS LANDING (Hffndroma Racxtfi) MW Eastarby 10-10. 

fl WATEHHJHU WAY (P White) R KaRnshead 10-10 

WJLU6 THE MOON (CaptR Johnson) C Spares 10-10 

00 HARSLEYSUPRSE(J Ban) MraJ B*T 10-5 

BO QUITE POKEY (Miss J Cook) M EBarby 10-5 

0 SKELTON (G Turner) M W Eastarby 10-5. 


— 86 10-1 

— .-NTMdar -33-1 

— S Hotad — 16-1 

N Carson (7) — 25-1 

— D Dutton 97 9-2 

.R Mariey (7) — 12-1 

LWyer • 99 F5-4 
— 20-1 
77 8-1 
88 7-2 
— 16-1 
— 20-1 
— 20-1 
— 12-1 
— 18-1 


PA Fansl (4) 

— A Stringer 
__ KRyan (7) 
.. M Hammond 

— G Bradley 

P Dover 


J McLeugNbi 

. Mr J Osborne (7) 


M Shalom — 14-1 


198S: No Corresponding Race 


2^0 ST JOHN AMBULANCE HANDICAP HURDLE (£3^67: 3m) (12 runners) 

3 FO-1324 TERN (CD^F)|G Leatham) MH Eastarby 5-11-7 


213-030 THE BLACK SACK (C) (North East Paper) W Bsey 6-11-6 


LWyer 
P Tuck 


4-40F31 SECRET FMALE (Regent Decorators Ltd) J Johnson 7-11*1 (5eX)_ REamahaw 

4211-12 BLUFF COVE CCLBn(DW*is Ltd] RHcanshWd 4-11-0 (5e*l PDmnr 

41020/1 TOFtElGH D (Mrs M Montetth) P Monteith 6-10-f2_»_ u ^. D Nolan *99 

13PU0-1 BfaGARONA (A Ranrrtgan) Mrs G Revatey) 5-10-10 P Niven 88 

10OMS OCEANUS(RMtKtite9 Denys Smith 5-KWS C Grant 


FOPF-OF CRAMMOND BRIG (W Jackson) M W Eastarby 5-105. 

000-000 WATBt CANNON (VJ5)(F Lee) FH Lee 5-10-3 

0004-02 WIL-TOT{ajJ)(J Norton) J Norton 9-1 03. . 


lOO/PFO LIGHT TRAVELLER (Mb* E Curtis) G Calven 6-1 04). 
30-0220 SHAGAYLE (Mrs JPeach)CJ Bell 4-104). 


« A Stringer 

- C Hawkins 

— MDywar 
SiWgWtey 


1965: MICK'S STAR 5-1 1-0 P Tuck m-4 fav) M W Easterby-13 ran 


425 BRAMHAM NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE (£685: 2m 4f) (13 runners) 

OU/O WBJJRUSH (J Mason) G Okkfryd 7-12-0, RMmley(7) 


0- DANTUNE (A Watson) A WWson 6-124). 


1 

2 

3 2234*21 BIG TOGGER (J Hanson) J Kansan B-1 1-1 1 (7ex) 

5 220213 CHRISTMAS HOLLY (R Wood) Mfa G Raveley 5-11-10-.., 
8 *42-410 SAHffEN (BF) (F BjHard) M H Eastarby 4-10-13 (7ex) — 

11 0/00-UF3 SWOP SHOP (J Lara) H Wharton 7-10-6 

13 340001 8UNBIA (G Tifritefl D Lee 5-11-7 (7m) 

16 


MPepper 

— M Dwyer 

Mbs A Beaumont (7) 

LWyer 

8 Youklen (4) 


9510-1 
9010-1 
98 6-1 
S8FS-4 
7-2 
9-2 
90 1«-1 
9812-1 
85 16-1 
84 8-1 
-25-1 
79 8-1 


— 25-1 

— 20-1 
84 4-1 
80 5-1 
92 F9-4 
75 8-1 
82 18*1 


22 

27 

29 

30 

31 


30043 THE LODGE PRINCE (Ouafitah-Hotete Ltd) K Stone 4-105 — 

00034)0 EYE FLASHER (B) (H Maddner) R Caner 4-100 

0-8303 NAUTICAL JOKE (W A‘ Stephenson) W A Stephenson 7-100- 

00004 MAOCAL MOMENT (A Carruttwrg) N Bycratt 6-10-0 

04QPPO- TCHI POUSSE (G Turner) D Lee 7-100. 





POO y SHOW NO MERCY (R Speecfaey] J Bkmde* 7-100 

1986; No C etreeponcang Race 


.... A Stringer • 99 6-1 

C Grant 8112-1 

K Jones 9212-1 

— 78 20-1 

PTwck 79 25-1 

A JQukm(7) 


Almost exactly 12 months to 
the day since Ere woo his first 
race. Barrow Line emerged as 
the top st 2 T at yesterday's Box- 
ing Day meeting at 
Leopardstown when carrying 
top weight of 12 stone to a 
splendid victory in the Dennys 
Gold Medal Novice Chase, a 
£20,000 added grade two 
contest. 

From early cm. Barrow Line 
hart to contend with the chall- 
enge of Weather The Storm and 
there was never more than a 
length between them from the 
second fence to the Iasi jump. 

They touched down together 
and for jnst a second Weather 
The Storm looked like profiting 
from his Sib allowance, but 
Frank Berry galvanized Barrow 
Line and he quickened away to 
win by wbm appeared to be a 
conservative three lengths over 
Weather The Storm. 

For a horse who broke down 


three umes before he saw a 
racecourse. Barrow Line is cer- 
tainly making up for lost 
opportunities and his trainer. 
Pat Hughes, nominated him for 
the first running of the race 
named after Dawn Run at 
Fairyhouse on January' 31. 

He will be entered in both the 
Arfcle Trophy and the Sun 
Alliance Chase at Cheltenham 
and Pat Hughes will keep bis 
options open, although at the 
moment he favours the longer 
Sun Alliance Chase. 

After Full Flow had landed a 
gamble from 8-1 down to 5-1 in 
the Duffy- Meats Three- Year- 
Old Juvenile Hurdle by three 
lengths from Mr Bones, his 
trainer. Mick O’Toole, was up 
before the stewards to explain 
the horse's considerable 
improvement on three unplaced 
hurdles starts. He pointed out 
that FuD Flow was now wearing 


blinkers for the first time and 
this had made all the difference. 

Full Flow, who will run again 
at Leopardsiown on Monday, 
got a 20-1 quoie from William 
Hill for the Triumph Hurdle. 

Earlier in the day. we saw- a 
brilliant novice hurdler make 
his jumping debut in the shape 
of L'Anc Rouge, who beat 16 
rivals on the bit. He is one to 
keep an eye on for the future. 

At Leopaidstown this after- 
noon. Omcrta. who captured the 
National Hunt Chase at 
Cheltenham in March, has to 
cany top weight of 12 stone in 
the £20,000-added Findus 
Handicap Chase, but while he 
showed his well being with a 
snug pre-Christmas win at 
Navan. he way fail to give l Jib 
to the Jim Dreaper-trained 
Sound Judgment, who won well 
at Fairyhouse earlier this 
month. 


WARWICK 


Selections 

By Mandarin 
12.45 Autumn Sport. 1.15 Proud Pilgrim. 1.45 
Misty Fort. 2.15 The A Train. 2.45 Backlog. 3.15 
Bold Illusion. 


Going: good to soft 
12.45 BOS CRATCHIT NOVICE HURDLE (£979: 2m) 
(19 runners) 

5 AUTUMN SPORT J EUwbCS 5-1 1-0 

e CHANCSJjDBSVUIEPW Haras 4-1 ]-0 — R 

10 COCKPI T CREW 0 Stavrood 5-114) CCoxfl) 

12 CSOHWGREENP 1-0 — 

U 0-P0 EVESHAM BUTCHERS Mrs J Croft 4-1 1-C JDoggan 

17 GOURRONZSTC WSdcan 5-114) — 

18 00-P GUN HAH M TalE 5-11-0 — — 

19 0-P LAST KIT KWBB 5-11-0 — 

3) LYTCHETT BAY R Hodges 4-11-0 Whme{7) 

22 3400 MONCLARE TROPHY PBevan 7-11-0 — 

24 2303 POLYNOR II Ryan 5-11-0 JMcLngMM 

26 KNG OF SECRETS RBJakaney 4-11-0 


00- SHOOT TO WIN S UeScr S-1 1-0„ 
00 SURGE (B) Mrs Jfttman 5-114). 
TOMAG WCtaries 5-11-0- 


JudyBtakaMT(7] 

M Hentsgton 

M Pitman 


cram 


28 

31 

32 

34 34)3 TRUE SPARTAN (BR G Price 8-11-0. 

E WO- TRUST THE GYPSTR Hodge* 4-114) 

38 230 GREAT AUNT SALLY (BF) TBaley 5-10-8 — 

41 0-0 NOT ENOUGH Mrs T Coma 4-1 M — 

5-2 True Spartan. 3-1 Ccckptt Craw. 7-2 Great Aunt SaBy. 
9-2 Ptotynor. 8-1 Surge, 10-1 Mondare Trophy, 16-1 others 

lllS JACOB MARLEY NOVICE CHASE (£2,044: 
2m) (16) 

1 pn AHWAMR Hedges 7-11-11 WMw(n 

2 3231 PROUD PtGRM J Webber 7-11-11 GMemegb 

7 OP-P DONPBWY WHTaytor5-11-4 — 

11 00U GREY GBBtALMOBver 5-11-4 

13 004- DiDWN RANGE Mrs MRunefl 6-1 1-4. 

16 600 MISTER KILO AW Jones 5-1 W. 


J Duggan 


17 224F MY 50N MY SON (BF) S MeOor 5-1 1-4 __ M Harrington 

18 4F0 NETiei WALLOP JWeMwr 9-lt-* — 

23 RELATIVITY A Taylor B-1 1-4 — 

26 224) SNOWY BOMHJURRBIakaney 7-1 1-4 


JudyBbtoneyp} 
■1 


29 P4M SUPERLMPW Hints 7-11-4- 

31 F4B TRBAL DRUM I Dudgeon 7-1 M 

35 PKJ4 ANKERDINE BELLE J Coteton 6-10-13 — 

38 l&F GABLES RJGOT CWBen 6-1 CM3_ MfasS Better (7) 

38 0-00 JATEYS DELIGHT T Hal 5-10-13 HtOnam 

40 /04 s WOOD POPPY RSheptwO 6-10-13 — 


11-4 Proud Pilgrim. 10030 Ajnwafr.4-1 My Son My Son, 5- 
1 lrxflan Range, 7-1 Snowy Bondtefr.10-1 others 

1.45 BLACKMORE HANDICAP CHASE (amateur 
riders: £2,127: 2m 4f) (6) 

2-134) IBSTYRJRTfWMT Forster 8-11-10- MArat|tege(7) 
8 1-F2 MA5TBI MBjODY (KLBF) W Hacked 15-10-5 


11 OOP- ROYAL MEW Mra M Blmefl 9-103. 


B Crawford ( 
H Pricel 


13 -600 FLYMG MISTRESS J Webber 6-1D4L W» J Henry 

14 P-FB RAQB-STRSET (B)J Harrimat 10-104) 

CHantem(7) 

15 0U40 GRH> (B) K Wingrove 10-104) — 

5-2 Royal Mere. 11-4 Misty Fort. 3-1 Master Melody. 6-1 

Flying Mistress. 10-1 Grid, 20-1 Rachel Street 


2.15 BOB CRATCHIT NOVICE HURDLE (£1.075: 
2m) (16) 

5 00-4 BAWffiS STAR N Lflfi-Judson 4-11-0 MKtaane 

10 2 OOWJAKCBFI Mrs MRunefl 5-11-0 — 

21 2P-0 LriTLE AND ROYAL M Tate 6-11-0.. 


23 F04- MtLLSfl) NOUS A J Witson 5-11-0- 
26 -000 MROMPEFRUIT A Nightingale 4-114). 
29 PETER’S SAVOURES 5 Motor 4-1141 „ 

35 ROtoNCROWN P W Hams 4-1 14) 

36 -822 ROYAL CRACKER T EUfl 5-11-0., 


0 SEVEN SWALLOWS H 
4 THE A TRAIN Mis J Raman 4-11 
000 VISUAL IDENTITY F Jordan 4-114). 


5-11-0. 


CCcxffl 

M Cftswel 

. MKamogtod 
RSeonae 

R Crank 


, M Pttran 

esmth 


KATES DBUITANTE J Webber 5-10-9 GMemagh 

LflJAUA W G Morns 5-10-9 WMorris 


SMOKIN' ANNA J Ok) 6-104L 


017- SUTT3NS HU. A James 6-10-9—.- 
4 TRACKERS JEWEL M Ryan 4-10-9 


C LteoeEyn (7) 
G Jones 


38 
42 
48 

52 

53 

57 

58 

59 

6-4 The A Train. 11-4 DoMjak. 5-i Trackers Jewel. 5-1 
Royal Cracker. 12-1 Uftte And Royal. 14-1 others 

2.45 CHRISTMAS PAST NOVICE HANDICAP 
CHASE (£2^50: 3m) (13) 

2 230F MWHTYDfiASTHtW Kemp 8-11-10 — 

4 24HJ VALLEY SO DEEP DGandoMd 6-11-3 MWiffiwro 

10 OOPF MGHBlBfOPBatoy 5-114) R Strange 

n -214 BACKLOG J Dalton 8-KM2 — 

13 343F CARftAMORE OUTLAW Mrs MRnM 7-10-7 — 

14 U3F0 JtWLff UOtTSP Pritchard 9-104 — 

17 mp DBEP AUBURN J Parish 7-10-3 — 

18 F320 GO ANNA GO TBaaey 5-10-2 — 

20 F30- DUSTY RUN (B) R Shepherd 6-104) — 

22 00FP HAWORTH PARK G Ham 7-104) 


23 040 GRETTA’S LEGACY J 0« 6-104) CUewo«yn(7] 

24 ffMJ ANA BROWN T Hfll 9-104) M Knane 

25 000- ISANEMOS A JWfcqn 8-10-0 CCo*(«) 

2-1 Backlog. 11-4 Mighty Disaster. 9.2 Go Anna Go. 13-2 

Carramora Outlaw. 10-1 Isaneraos, 12-1 otfwrs 


3.15 RACING POST HANDICAP HURDLE (£2,532: 
2m) (18) 

3 MO AVERONCWIMman 6-11-7 — 

6 084) M DAD jCD^jteJ Pitman 9-11-1 M Pitman 


WELSH I 


'Mrs JPaman 9-M-O.. 


a 121 / 

10 10/P BRICKEY RANGER (0) Ml* S Oliver 9-10-13 — 


12 -COO PEARL RUN (CD) R Defan 5-10-13- 
I MAN 1 * 


13 3134 MOUNTAM 
18 0000 AMAL LEES HOPE 


— CPiiee 

RDIckin 10-10-12 C Jones 

G Roe 5-10-10. 


19 M3 BOLD UJ1SK)N(Q}^M Eckley 8-10-10 — 


. Hodges 7-1M. 

A JtMson 6-10-7 

Mrs J Pitman 5-1 (W.. 


20 0330 DtCICS FOLLY 

22 1-02 FUEGOBOY 

23 1-PO HOW NOW fl 

24 104= MEESON GRANGE mF Jordan 5-10-2 - 

26 01-0 CLERMONT LANE (D) M TatB 4-104) - 

27 2430 THE DMXHAT (D) W Kemp 8-1041 

NLLO0N A James 5-104). 


W Irvine (7) 


CSntei 


G Jones 


6- 1D-0 — 


30 403/ 

31 0003 WLTSMRE YEOMAN (CO) P 

35 1F4) SON OF MANADO(D)J Parish 

36 234/ ANOTHER SPECIAL M James 8-10-0 R Crank 

3-1 “d Ukawn. 7-2 Fuegg B»ay. 5-1 How Now. 11-2 The 

optomat 7-1 Mountain Man, fo-l Averon. 12-1 others 

Course specialists 

TRAINERS: F Welwyn. 18 winners from 82 miners, 232% R 
Hodges. 8 Iran 33 1B_2%: Mrs J Prtman 8 from 47. 1 7 0%-Mre 
MRtetel. 9 ffl. 112%: J Webber. 12 from 92. 13.0%; T ForaiT? ' 
from o4 oJTo. 

JOOtPIfS: R Crank. 6 winnera from 41 rides. 14.6%. (Only . 


WOLVERHAMPTON 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

1.0 Bickerman. 1.30 Morning Breaks. 2.0 Big 
Brown Bear. 2.30 Kingswick. 3.0 White Rose. 
32J0 CaffierL 


Going: good 

1.0 WESTON NOVICE HURDLE (Div 1: 3-Y-O: £567: 
2m) (17 runners) 


2 

5 

9 

10 

11 
13 

15 

16 
18 

20 

21 

26 

29 

30 
34 
36 
42 


10 STRAWBERRY SPLIT (D) P Feigale 11-0 S Johnson 

BWCERMANJajwrttg 10-12 — P Warner 

0 CaaNLilATHDBurctiefl 10-12 — 

0 WCTAROUWGH Jones 10-12—.. G Jones 

ITORS GEM P Bevan 10-12. 


02 HHGEST ffl) Miss A Kite 10 

0 HANKER'S HOPE EH Owen 


10 - 12 . 


40 JU&7THEWAYY0UARE A I 
0 HOMnBfTAL LAD DMcftclaon 10-12. 


A Webb 

10-12 KBurka 

10 - 12 . 


:!SS 


0 PRMULA PLEASE A J Wilson 10-12. 
RQS1D HUP GRO0 10-12. 


WHunplmys(7) 
JSothsni 


PMcDetmon 


TOPBCA EXPRESS JBukoveiS 10-12 SCussecfc 

BROADHURSTMreP Sly UF-7 M 

P COUNTRY SOL GThomer 10-7 


«0 HHXGATE LADY M Scudamore 107. 
& MSS KAHLEQUMR Pugh 10-7. 

■aTw 


_ JDDoyfa(4) 
5-1 BWtenran, 13-2 


00 TUOOR DTORMCasteBlG?, 
11-4 Firmest 7-2 Justtbeiw 
BrowBHjrsL 8-1 Strawberry Sp#L 


1J0 STANTON CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS HANDI- 
CAP CHASE (£1 ,662: 2m) (10) 

2 1423 MOWUNG BREAKS (P)TCeaey 9-12-1 „ E Buckley (S) 

5 F203 DEMOS AUBUM (DAP) R Frmds 9-11-13~» — ~ — 

6 0B3F TlBt£NEE(CJ5) TBfl 8-11-8 N.Ftom 

7 U43P MARINA STAR ft» 0 0 NeU 7-1 M__ PGrasack (5) 

8 0104 TURKANA (C) T Casey 6-10-13 - — 

11-201 EAMONS OWEN Mrs S Oliver 9-10-10 JacguOBvW p) 
13ZU03 CHESTNUT PRJNCE(mPPradBn)11-lM-CWfllWfl 

14 D32U SPAMSH GOO CPophem 11-10-7 — 

15 -34P THE G0-6OY ffiD) Mrs WSMcn 42-10-4 MHMd 

16 P4 T HFTH COUftW TO MWIesnritfi 8-1045 — — 

3-1 Eamons Owen. 9-2 Morning. Breaks, 5-1 Tawmae, 13-2 

Dennis Auburn. 9-1 Sjankn God.'l2'l o8iers 


2 JO STAFFORD HANDICAP CHASE (£1,885: 3m 11} 

(ID 

1 0310 COVDT GAR0S( n,CD) W day 8-12-1 — ; 

2 OP-3 BIG BROWN BEAR TO G BvkwS-124) JSutoem 

5 -P03 SIR KENWM (C) R Annytoge 8-11-9 . . . 

PblG 

12 -400 LEDBURY LAD TO M VHefrMtl 9-11-1—- -~-T 

13 4320 COUNTY PLAYS) C F JaCteOri 9-U-0 - ,— ■- » ^ 
15 11124 NATIVE BREAK (BTONksWSykto 9-10-12--— — 
17 1-F2 CONEY GLEN TO VffiM0 10-109. 


19 0P4P SKEOBY (CD) 0 Bremen 1240??!!l!l 

a -132 OWEN OLEMOOWERBHQMer 9-104)—:- Ntteteraen 
28 P/PF BS ORCHID K Beley 10-10-0 - AJones- 


4-1 Native Greek, 9-2 Govern Garten. 5-1 (toneyfltenJS-S 
Big Grown Be®. 7*1 SirKemrin. 8-1. Coraity Player. 12-1 


2L30 ASTBURY TROPHY NOVICE CHASE (£3,518: 
2m 4f) (13) 

2 2321 A CE OF S PIES Mrs G E Jones 5-H-fl JSrvan 

5 -1U0 CWPPED METAL R Francis 7-n^._ ^arfm 

12 F123 VWLD ARGOSY T Bll 7-1T4) nTC u 

14 2043 BRONSKKBFIJJenlwtt 5-10-10. 

19 0-BO DAfCER m mns J Cosgrave 6-10^10 TPMteU 

ss BBRBsaSS^-feiaS 

28 F3Q3 KMQBWICKJ Francome S-IO-lh J Brawn 

30 SHI MISTER BOOT O O'NeVI 7-10-10 To.-^~ 

33 OOFS ROUGH ESTMATE V Rshop tO-iO-Tn' J S * hem 

37 PP-f VERONA MAGK P Bailey 6-10-10 

42 -3FP OUR GRACE TBulSn7:i0-5__ jfSSS 

43 -030 WOOnJWD 1^5pj Jones 7-liw”^;]]^. C*Mm 

HANDICAP HURDLE (£2^59: 

1 1-PO CELTIC FLEET JSpsatlTtt 5-11-13 

3 LEAfW)) 7-t t-io:::::: 


T3 


Bwchefl 5-10-13.., 


— R Crank 
W Knox (4) 


s & assB. e iSSa«g ::: =SK ; 

32 1030 FRANOSCIISCJVmKTm- “ • 

M TO/ LOOK AT THAT B Key 8-104)._ 

36 0U0- SasOHNE RECOROl) Nchofe* frlM^ ^ ^ 

37 0220 SIAGAYLECJBefl 4-104) WH “fopbray»(7) ! 

I S 

2 S& Sffif nuSb s==ss= 

N0 ' nCE (D „ ll; 3_ Y _o ; 


2 

3 

7 

9 

14 

21 

22 


210 CAFFB0TOT 
4P1 DIME AND A 


M AW Jam KT ' E &icklnr w • 

1 SSSgS&iESSlill — = 

DEVIL' S RUN T SSrm-12 s CuMack (7) 

. COTTAGO N StowSe 1^12 "“' CMann 

« f^jssmmss^esw 5 =-^ 


n LOVE ABOVE Mre g Elon^ rLT? w U) 

00 MARSHAL BLAKE OBinMl&ti JBm» 

25 0 M BGOHE TBI N HenSSTin-is 2 . — 

B ”ISSS 

35 30 BOLD PETALDBurohafiTlT?:;:^- Cby (7) 

CfatoiSSStoni OcaLiM^te^ 

Course specialists 

J^eerJ^ftfrmST. .. 






THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


SPORT 


39 



ft 


Use 


Si 


1 .'V ; tv 

■V. ‘-'fra. 

. »A 

.. {; 
,n - ULl7 L 

- 'j> 5 


5 •- 
•Tj>- 




'iKa; 

‘ ;v? 
'.Tt 

III— . 


I’ll-— 

-~e 


• : V}* 


I. 

7 


RACING: DESE RT ORCHID LEAPS TO KING GEORGE GLORY 

Elsworth’s flying grey leaves 
unfortunate Brown red-faced 


By Michael Seely 

Desert Orchid became the 
longest-priced winner of the 
King George VI Rank Steeple- 
chase since Grove Park in 
1956 when romping home at 
16-1 by 15 lengths from Door 
Latch, with Bolands Cross 
third, in Kerapton's Boxing 
Day feature yesterday. 

Forgjve'N Forget, the 2-1 
favourite, finished fourth just 
in front of Wayward Lad, the 
only other of the nine runners 
to complete the course. 

Richard Burridge’s front- 
running grey not only de- 
stroyed some mighty equine 
reputations, he was also re- 
jected by Colin Brown, David 
Els worth's stable jockey, in 
favour of Combs Ditch, who 
was pulled up before the 
second fence from home and 
suffered from cardiac restric- 
tions after the race. “I’m 
afraid I did a Walter Swinburn 
and went for the wrong one," 
said the jockey ruefully. 

Simon Sherwood, in only 
his second season to hold a 
professional licence, role an 
inspired race on the winner. “I 
was able to give him several 
breathers, particularly after 
turning into the straight. 1 
looked round after the second 
last and was a bit worried 
when I saw Forgive’N Forget, 
but then I realised he should 
have been closer. So I kicked 
on and Desen Orchid just 
look off again. He's a remark- 
able horse and loved every 
moment of it as he likes 
having things bis own way," 
the winning jockey said. 

Elsworth's flair and judge- 
ment have never been more in 
evidence than this winter. The 
Whitsbury trainer had empha- 
sized that Desert Orchid 
would take all the beating in 
yesterday's great race after the 
seven-year-old's 12-length vic- 
tory over two miles at AscoL 
"He just loves these sharp 
right-handed tracks," he said. 
"He stays three milles well on 
them. But in no way do I see 
him as a Gold Cup horse. In 
fact, I don't think he likes 
Cheltenham at all. I'd like to 
bri ng him back to two and two 
and a half mile conditions 
races, that is if the owners 
agree." 

The story of Desert Orchid's 
ownership and breeding 
encapsulates the whole ro- 
mance and sporting nature of 
the winter game. The winner 
ran in the colours of Richard 
Burridge, but the whole affair 
is a family enterprise as the 
grey was bred by the film 
director's father, James 
Burridge, from Rower Child, 
who was the daughter of Grey 
Orchid, a winner of the south 
Notts members point-to-point 
over 25 years ago. 

"I have to say that this is the 
proudest moment of my life," 
said the London company 
lawyer after receiving the tro- 
phy from the Queen Mother. 
“.And I'm only glad 1 didn't 



Safely over the last: Desert Orchid and Simon Sherwood on their way to a memorable 
victory in yesterday's King George VI Chase at Kempton (Photograph: Hugh Rontledge) 

take the advice of the breeding 5-1 with Ladbrokes, followed 
expert, who told me to shoot by Bunough Hill Lad and Run 
Rower Child and buy myself a and Skip at 9-1. They then go 
„ - !0-I Bolands Ooss and 


decent mare. 

Sadly, Combs Ditch, twice 
runner-up previously in die 
race to Burrough Hill Lad in 
1984 and again to Wayward 
Lad last year, had a recurrence 
of his breathing problems 
caused by lack of oxygen. "Til 
have to talk to Mr & Mrs Jim 
Tory, his owner-breeders," 
said Elsworth, "and if we have 
to retire him. he owes us 
nothing." 

Door Latch delighted Josh 
Gifford in staying on to finish 
second, five lengths in front of 
Bolands Cross. "He ran a great 
race and will have to go for the 
Gold Cup now, as he’ll be 
weighted out of- future 
handicaps," said the trainer. 

Mark Dwyer was dis- 
appointed with the running of 
Forgive’N ForgeL “He was 
never really going," said the 
jockey. Jimmy Fitzgerald 
commented, “I thought they 
all gave the winner too much 
rope and my horse didn’t 
jump as well as usuaL He’ll 
now go for the Vincent 
O’Brien Gold Cup at 
Leopardstown at the rad of 
February.” 

However, the troth of the 
matter is that Desert Orchid 
won entirely on merit, as he 
had set too strong a gallop for 
proven stayers on the type of 
course that suits him so welL 

Forgrve'N Forget remains 
favourite for the Gold Cup at 


Stearsby and offer 12-1 against 
Door Latch. 

At least the live prospects 
for Cheltenham were seen in 
action during a magnificant 
afternoon’s racing. Both 
Tawridge and Afaerlow 
stamped themselves as likely 
candidates for the Sun Alli- 
ance Chase with wins in the 
OSL Wayward Lad Novices’ 
Chase and Butlins Feltham 
Novices' Chase, respectively. 

Aherlow put up a fine 
performance when beating 
Master Bob, the only other 
runner to finish, but the issue 
was still in doubt, to say the 
least when Playschool fell at 
the fifth fence from home. “I 
was very pleased with that," 
said Simon Christian, the 
winning trainer, "Aherlow 
really needs to be covered up. 
Hell now go for the Peter 
Ross Chase at Ascot" 

David Barons, Playschool's 
trainer, soon had quick 
compensation when - Tanya 
Davis and Asa Spades sur- 


vived an objection from Ron- 
nie Beggan and Lady Newton 
to capture the Wings Handi- 
cap Hurdle. And finally Gavin 
Pntchaid-Gordon showed us 
the third Cheltenham can- 
didate when Agathisl easily 
accounted for Framlington 
Court in the Haven Novices 
Hurdle. The trainer said: "Ba- 
sically he needs 2Vi miles, but 
he'll be well suited by the stiff 
two miles of the Triumph" 

Tuck rebuked 

Phil Tuck pot up 21b over- 
weight on Centre Attraction, a 
flop when oddson at Ayr last 
Friday, but still rode his 301st 
winner on the gelding in the 
Towton Handicap CMse at 
Wetherby yesterday. However, 
after Tuck had partnered the 9-1 
chance to a 1 Vi lengths victory 
over Richdee, he received 
licking-off from the winning 
trainer, Gordon Richards. 

The Penrith trainer said: "The 
reason Centre Attraction 
beat at Haydock was the 
that there was only three run- 
ners in that race. He needs 
company and must he held up. 
He came much too quick today 
and I've just ticked Phil off for 
not bolding the' horse up 
longer." 


RUGBY UNION 


Scarlets 
seen in 
different 
light 

By Peter Marson 


Keen will to win 
brings Neath 
a lucky victory 


By Gerald Davies 


Llanelli 

London Welsh. 


41 

..9 


Aberavon , 
Neath.._., 


New Year’s Day service 


There is another full pro- 
gramme lor racing next week 
with six meetings scheduled for 
New Year’s Day. 

The Junes will be publishing 
on this day — the only quality 
paper to do so — often hr a 
comprehensive service for all the 
cards including exclusive ratings 


for the top m ee t in gs at Chelten- 
ham and Catteries; Bridge, plus 
news and results from the two 
New Year's Eve meetings. 

Make sure you have a com- 
plete guide to the holiday racing 
by placing a regular order for 
The Times with your newsagent 


Results from yesterday’s eight meetings 


Kempton Park 

Going: soft 


Knight 8-1); Z S 
lav); 3. Foyle FM 
1). ALSO RAN: 7-1 


1Z40 (2m 41 Ch) 1, TAWRIDGE (Steve 
6-1); 2. Summons (R Rowe. 8-2 
i (S Sherwood. 5- 

. . ’-2 man Bator (6th), 6 Flag 

Oi Truce (4(h). 10 Erick Of Rock (0. 10 
Evening Song Gtti), 68 Prudent Match 
(pu). 8 ran. NR: Dunkirk, Quarter Town. 3 l 
201,31, 121. vj. a Turned at East Hendred. 
Tota- £5.70: £1.70, £1.40. CT.60. DF: 
£6.80 . CSFt £ 19.82- 


£1.50. DF: £380. 


Ik 


13-8 lav; Mandarin 


ivsctxwJ (I). 13^2 Cevvies Clown {ut% 16 
Batymufesh (l).T 


NR: Aboroy. 2SL 5 Christian at U| 
Lamboum. Tote: E2-60; £1.80, 


33 Bold Acctekn (p). 6 ran. 
“ n at Upper 

i, £1.40. DF: 

£140. CSF: £6.91. 

1A0 (3m Wte)1. ASA SPADES (MteGT 
Davis, 20-1);2. Lady Newton (R J Beggan, 
TZ-1fc 3. light The Lot (S SharwoodTi4- 
1). ALSO RAN: 3 tev Powerful Poddy (puL 
4 MandavL 6 Copse And. Robbere (puL 7 
Kuwait Muter (pu), 10 GaSant Buck, II 
Battle King (4th). Mr Dtobs (6th). 14 Tirntwi 
(5Bi). 20 Crisp. Hoorah Henry. Mb- 
chievous Jack, 33 American Girl. IS ran. 
%]. 251. IS. Iffl. 1L D Barons at 
KnwabrkJge. Tote: £47.90: E6 JO. £5.10. 
£33 oDF!£ 15£39. CSF: £243.08. Tncast 
£3,175.62. An objection by Die second to 
me winner was overruled. 

2.15 KING GEORGE VI RAMt CHASE 
(Grade!: £31 .698: 3m) 

Sherwood (16-1) 1 

Door Latch ch g by Cantab - KaBy’s 
Door (HJoeO 8-11-10 R Rowe (HM) 2 
Bolands Cross bg by Weaver's Ha* - 
Miss Moree (Sheikh All Abu Khamsin) 7- 
11-10 P Scudamore (9-2) 3 

ALSO RAN: 2 lav ForaivB'N Forget (4 th). 4 
Combs Ditch (pu), 9-3 Wayward Lad (Stii). 
33 Beau Ranger (pu) Von i Trappe (pu). 
Western Sweat (pu) 9 ran. NR: 
Cybrandan. 151. 161. II. 31. D Bsvwrth at 
Wutstay. Tota- ndnsl "“SF 
£2.70. £1.60. £1.50. DF: E3S.00. CSF: 
£139.97 

245 (2m 41 hdte) 1. AGATWST (S 
Sherwood. 7-4); 2. FttwflngtonCowt (P 
Scudamore. 6-1): 3. Rafltes Rogiw (G 
Bradley. 16-11 ALSO RAN: Mto Alarm 
CeM (puL 14 Masnoon (5th). 25 Turn em 
Back Jack (4th). 33 Fruity O-Rooney (pu). 
River Gambler (pu). Doubter, tow 
Gorge (pu), Popthom (pu). 12 Ran. NR. 
AdburvL Arabian Blues, J aclt Tijnn 

For The Better, Bride. 151. 10L SL d«L G 
PntchardGordon at* Newmwkrt. Trier 
£3.00; £1.40. £1.40, E2J50. DF: £10.40. 
CSF: E1SL07. 

3.15 (2m hdte) 1. YABtS (PScudamora. 

15-5:3. WeirtWerriw (Steve Knight. 10- 
1). ALSO RAN: 7-2 tt-fav Pola r Bear (P«). 
11-2 Hypnosis (4th). 9 Young Nkteolas. ID 
aster Lee (Btfi), Oryx Minor. 14 Twryash; 
20 Admrab Ruler. Aprt Prince ©tin- 33 
Lite Guard [puL B GaSteo (puL 13 ran. 41. 
1L 1X1, laTS. J Edwards at R«s-on- 
Tote: £330; £2.00. S2.60^M- Dr. 
£17.00. CSF: £30.69. Trieast £22S=9- 
Jackpot Not wan. Ptecepofc E28a8a 

Wetherby 

Going: soft 

ID hdte) 1. HIGH PLAINS (P 
Dunwoody. 5-4 lav); 2, Bockmartm (□ 
WHdnsoa 4-1): 3. Trasidder (L MMH; 1& 
ALSO RAN: 9-2 Weanfele (4th). 7 
12 Spark Ot Peace (5ml. 16 
20 Rodney 


ZD (3m 100yd ch) 1, HR FRSX (A 
Jones , 7-4 It-fev: the Times Private 
Hancftcapper's top refing): 2. Yahoo (L 
WyerTlOMO): 3. TaetomTP Tuck. 7-4 ]t- 
fav). ALSO RAN: 7 Lei Him By (I), 9 Oaken 
(4ttil 5 ran. 61. dot, ML K Bailey at East 
lteteyTota£2S0;£l50.i 
CSF: £8.00. 

2^0 (2m 41 hdte) 1. WITHY BANK 
Wyor. 138 lav); 2, Secret Walk 
Dunwoodv. 13-2); a Hariey (P Tuck. 
Also RAN: 9-4 String Mayor (t), 7 Old 
Nick (6th). 14 Emo Forever (uri. 25 
C-amlormaae (4ihL Astral Lady (5tM. 
Burley HillLad. 50 Ba# Springs. ID ran. a. 
8L in. 4L 101. M H Easterly at Great 
Habton- Tote: £2.50; £1.30. £<8a £140. 
CSF: £14^4. Tricasc £42.66. 

3.0 (3m 100yd ch) 1. THE THMKER (R 
Dunwoodv. 12-1); 2. Repingtoo (C Haw- 
ions. 2-1 ray); 3. Grinders {M Pepper, 15- 
2). ALSO RAN: 7-2 Oybrandan (ur), 
Strands Of GdW (IV 13-2 Cross Master 
(5th). 7 Die Langholm Dyer (4th), 33 
Kudos (pu). 8 ran. 15L 201. 15L (fist W A 
Stephenson at Bishop Auckland Tow: 
ElTBa. £2.60, £1.40. £1.90. DF: £34.40. 
CSF: £37.81. 

3.35 (2m hdte) 1. ATIONSONS (P Tuck, 

Music Season (4th), 50 Whistfing Steflar. 
100 Melway Etoy. 10 ran. NFL Semen 
s. Sa voir Vi we. Golden Tuppence. 


2.15 (2m ch) 1. Mister Ftealhars (S 
McNedi. 16-1); 2. Gerami (6-1): 3, Bffltov 
(2S-1). Shaimte 4-1 lav. 14 ran. 10L 7V J 
Kino. Tote: £9.70: £2A0. £2^a E&9D. DF: 
. CSF: £ID2J0. Trrcast £2,149.58. 


Newton Abbot 

Going: heavy 
1245 (2m 150yd hdte) 1. Kandy LnlB 
PoweS, 7-4 j^tavk 2. The Bakewdi Boy [7- 
' Squire (16-1). 13 raa 


£2.40; £1.60, £120. DF: £2J». CSF: 
£4^2. 


Passaqe. Savon- Vi we, Gordon Tuppence. 
51 41. &. 31, 8L G Richards at &ovstoke. 
Tore: £3.40: £1 .60. £2.10. £1.60. DF: 
£20.60. CSF: £39.84. Trksst £203^4. 
Ptecepct £29.10. 

Huntingdon 


Going: soil 

1245 (2rn Sf 50yd hdte) 1. Staler OWre 

SflafiYarars 

E31.00.CS?; £1457. 

1.15 (2m 5f ch) 1. CteenA (Mte G 
Armwage. 7-21: 2- Fhmalaya (33-1): 3, 
Ne-/e»o5(8-1). Taiconey 9-4 fav. 11 raft 

Vo*. Page haoM-JftflLO 

jgjgAjStSAgt 

SSSa 

E^DF: £11-80. CSF: £15.74 

2.15 (3m Ml. ? 

novtage. 


(av . 13 ran. NR; Loddon Lad. SUence 
Ptease. Croghan Star. Rater tee. 2L hd. A J 
WSaon. Tote: £21 .10: £490. £290. £190. 
DF: £21890. CSF; £151.69. Trteast 
£633.17. 

Ptecepofc £40590: 

Market Rasen 

Going: soft 

1245 pm hdte) 1, The Yonv (J R 
Qum. 12-11: 2, Reel GuBty (64 (a^: 3. 
Kamarack P20-1). 19 ran. NR: won 
Venture. Nk. 3GL J Parkas. Tote: £11.00: 
£2.60. £290, £5.70. DF: £2320. CSF: 
£3697. 

1.15(3m ch) 1. ABtepafM Hammond. 5- 
4); 2, Mtek's Star (11-10 lavk 3. Pmce 
Metton6ctU14-1). 13 ran. 21. 13. G Moore. 
Tote: £3.70; £1.60. £140. £290. DF: 
£290. CSF: £390. 

1.45 (2m 4f hdte) 1. Conedy Fair (p 
Dutton. 5-2 lav): 2. Peace Terns (7-1): 3. 
Down Right (33-1) 15 ran. NR: 
CamiomiMe. Knight's Heir. Burley Hit 
Lad. Futt oi Draama. 31, 81. M H Easterby. 
Tote: £4.00: £1.80. £290, £1890. DF: 
£17.80. CSF: S2S2B. 

2.15 (2m cm 1. Price Of Peace (Mr J 
Osbourne. 7-2); 2. Kevmskut (4-5 tei* 3, 
Tartan Trader (9-i% 6 ran. a. tL C J Bed. 
Tote: £490; £190. £1.40. DF: £2.70. CSF: 
£7.16. 

245 (3m ch) 1. Cooaragh King U J 
Qum 4-7 fteft 2. RhoecusflW); 3. sfiver 
Cannon (25-1). 10 ran. WT: G mm 
Destiny. 151. dteL Jsnmy Rtzgeraid. Ton: 
£1.70: 0 .20. £1.10. E790TDF: £190. 
CSF: £2.40. 

3.15 (2m hdte) 1. St Gabriel (M Tate, 3- 
1); 2. Matedtw tav): 3. Anzona Dust 
n(M). 11 ran. fffi: Al Fair, Bfurays Boy, 
Mehoy Boy. Music Season, Skyboot,. 
Sweet Andy. 23M. 19. TTate. Tota: £490; 
£190. O.IO. £390. DF: £S.7a CSF: 
OZ73. 

Ptacepot 0295. 


. . . Kenrrard. Tots: 

£1.30, 0.70, £290. DF; £490. CSF; 
£691. 

1.15 (2m SfcMI. Royal HstawfC Cox. 
7-a 2. Gold Tycoon (Evans e 
Bettver Prince (12-1). 13 ran. NR 
Tenderfoot 0 Sherwood. Tots: 

090. 090. £290. DF: £3.10. CSF: 
E&30. 

145 Pm 160yd hdte) 1. Careen ( 
crook. 5-2 >ravk Z Whoevar (6-1): V 

Porto Irsne (9-1). Some Moor (5-2 (Mav). 6 

ran. NR Caiman, Gatofc BoequeL 31 4L 
M Pipe. Tota: £2.70; £190 £f.80 £190. 
DF: 590. CSF: £1697. Tricast £9893. 

2.15 (2m 5f 110yd hdte) 1, Super Grass 
(C Co*. 5-11: 2. Spiel's Wei (13-2£ 3. 
Sma (11-0; 4. Wnor’s Drive (frl). 
Amadis (110-30 for). 17 ran. NR: Kingior. 
71. lot. a Smart Tote: E4.70. E1.40; £X80. 
£290, £290. DF: £890. CSF; £48.15. 
Trteast: «B1 94. 

245 (3m 2M0Cjyds ch) 1, Sacred PaOi 
(C Cox. 11-10 favft Z Broadheath (11-0; 
3. Chearfle (kern (33-1). 7 ran. NR: 
Harvest Fortune, Delator. North Lon. 71, 
HL O Sherwood. Tote: £290; £190. 
£1.80. DF: £290. CSF: £398. Trteast: 
£3199. 

3LI5 (an 150yd hdte) 1. Kgfcway 
Express (B Powat. 11-1); 2. Doddycross 
Kulatfs Bettefr-4 lav). 10 ran. NR 


Lad. 


Lass. 11. 10L R 


Hodges. Tote: £1590; E2.00, £390. £1.10. 
[ffTElOTto. CSF: £6190. 

Ptecepofc E29S. 

Wincanton 

Going: good to eoft 
1290 (2m hdte) 1, Maladtelion (D 
Browne, 15-2t 2. Spring PhHre (65 lav): 
3, raghKMn Fontana (33-1). 18 ran. NR 
Perfect Dortete. Annie Ra, Sovereigntlno. 
71. 1 KL Mrs M RfatML Tote: E890:91.Sa 
£1.40, £890. OF £&00. CSF: £17.73. 

19(2m 51 ch) 1. Water Donut (W Irvine, 
9-1): £The Couray Stone (2-1 Jt-teit. 3. 
Siralght Accord (7-f j. AKed Newcastta 2-1 
tt-fav. 5 ran. NR Clara Mountaki. Btehope 
Yam. Atmaho. 4L 2L R Hodges. Tots: 
£890: £190. £1.60. OR £920. CSR 
£26.42. 



JS'^Ctaon at Stow-orv-ttie-Woki. Two. 
£-70: £190. £1.10. £5-10 DF: £3.90. 
CSF:£B22. 

190 jan 4( lOOvd Ch) 1. CENTRE 
ATTtoCniW (P Tuck, 9-1): 2. RfchdM<C 
towttns. 6-1); 3, Ryemm (L Vtm. j>-1). 
ALSO HAN: 4-5 m Rshops Yam (5rh)j4 
Durham Edition (4th). 16 Emandar. W 
Of Kelts tpuv. 7 ran. HR Voce Of 
PteWess. m. Oi. drsL G 

Tote: £6.10; £1.70. £240- DF: 
E17aO.CSF:£S9.11. 


Ifo 1 ran 2'»l. n. G Hubbard. Tore: 
Odrol Salk £190- £2-70- DF: «390. 
CSF. £4393. 

- 'C 12m 200yd ch) 1. Cote Porter (D 

sdflSSl: 2- Hope EMMSk 

IrrHknp (4-115 raaNR Sww 

reissriRfsudsras 

!r L-i-fiiWui (25-1). 8 ran. NH: Keyboard 

K,£ 3 9 P Smi* Tcte- £1 Sgci.10. 

S .£2J» DF. I3.10. CSF: £497. 
pra«jKr9'595* 

Woiverfcampton 

Going: good 

12.45 (2m hdle) 1. Steson j 

£Ci r?. CwS- 17 - 

- 1 -- ,2.t Ni'fii 1. Star Of iretafld (Mr M 
- OrorraJ Marojuvers ffl-2 
s i.i j. a. i Wonder When (5- 
„ ■ . bt>adi>' Going. Amal Lees 

' “ - ■ n Jqje Tors: £1 90. 

8*? ■ £ .Vi<:5 DF: £9.90. CSR 

iia£? l : :^:£fS781- 

, . - .-, r j] y, r. Cai^Kf D 0 ® 1 ,Mr p 
7J .?V| 2. Voirt CtProgrars(3- 
AKr-* -Ml s f 5 r - hr- new End. 
5;. II F /'inw r To;c: £240; 
IfxZM DF. 3 90. CSF £71! 


“| Sedgefield 

X Going: good More Orx> Way.'goocw Gt . 15L4J.MW 

mn isurDineMtoii to a c — ^i Davies. Tote: £1390: £290, £290. £190, 


Going: good 
1245 (2m 41 hdie) 1. Eknal (P A FarretL 
7-1); 2. Carflngtord Bey (12-1): 3, 
Donanus (12-1). Ground Master (11-4 
fav). 15 ran. 2’AI, 12L D Yeoman. Tota 
£790; £290. £290. £390. DF: £23.00. 
CSF: £9996. 

1.15 (2m 41 hdte) 1. Suntan (G Marker. 
10-1); Z Absonant (1l-4t 3. Rampant (7- 
1). Doughty Rebel (94 lavL 13 ran. NR 
Johnstons Baby. 41. 8L D Lae. - Tote: 
£15.00: £2.90, £990. £240. DF: £37.50. 
CSF: £4792. 


Prvx. c If 

ra»>. ’ 


145 Om 600yd ch) 1. Cottage Lees (G 
Harker. 7-1): 2 Day Of Wishes 111-2); 3. 
Easter Bngtfi-l). The Butoer (1 1-4 tav). 10 
ran. NR BaBy-6&. 7L fl. M W Btertoy. 
Tom: £ 790: £2.60. £230, £232 DR 
£28.40. CSF: a£44J9. 

215 Cm ch) 1 . Oman HaueelK Janes. 
11-4); 2 French Nephew (11-2): 2 The 
Howteb (4-1 L Border Kregnt (2-1 tav). 7 
raa 3L 3. W A Stephenson. Toe £S4ft 
£2.30. £1.80. DF: £1390. CSR £1891 . 

2.45 (2m 4f ch) 1. Keren (C Derails. 13- 
2t. 2. Wd&h Spirit (8-1); 2 Meggies Gcf (7- 
4 fav). 13 ran. NR Historic House. 3L 6L J 
Swkjrs. Tea; £6.30; £2.70. £280, £150. 
DF: £33^)- CSF: £5792. 

3.15 (2m tulle) l.Abert The Great (PA 
Parral 1>2); S, Sobntial Smg (7-2); 3. 
Sonne Nutt (S-1). 5 ran. 7l. 15L R Grav- 
Tote: £850. £200. n 60. DF; £1690. 
CSF. £26,05. Hotplate f trashed but was 
tfsduatned otter an objection. 

PlseepcMC £39045. 


More One Way, Goose Greea15L4L MW 
Davies. Tote: £1390; £290, £290, £1 SO. 
£190. OF: £57990. CSF: £1 b4.7G. Tricast: 
£53197. 

20 (2m ch) 1. KMuftteto Castle (K 
Mooney. 2-1); 2 Lochrwt (15-8 tetri; 3, 
Akramra-4). 4 raa 41,251. F Welwyn. Tote: 
£330. DF: £390. CSF: £892 
230 (Sm If ch) 1. North Leo* (M Barrett. 
13-2); 2, Harvest Fortune (7-2): 3. Fradwel 
(5-2 tav) 7 ran. 121, 4L M Pipe. Tote: 
£1890; £390. £1.70. DR £4190. CSF: 
£29.04. 

39 (Sm 61 hdte) 1, Bonanza Boy (Pater 
Hobbs. 0-lb 2 Abu Kadra (i3-8 fav): 3. 
Vino Fesia (10-1)- 14 nm. NR Model PupIL 
Oma, Gallant Buck, Prince's Drive, Super 
Grass, Royal C ra ftsman, Garry Doyte. 
Knobi 00L 5H. 20. PhSp Hobbs. Tote; 
£7.80; £1.70, £190. £260. OF: £690. 
CSF; £2492 Tncast £14283. 


9 Gee Annytage edged ahead 
of ebanifnoa jockey Peter 
Scudamore to become leading 
riders! Huntingdon this season 

when she and Gee-A repealed 

their success on the course last 
month in the Pepys Novices’ 
Handicap Chase yesterday. 

Miss Annytage went on to 
complete a near 40-1 double 
with Rhymer’s Tower, who was 
also trained by successful per- 
mit-holder Geoffrey Hubbard. 


In scoring seven tries before 
the usual enthusiastic Boxing 
Day gathering at Stradey Farit, 
Llanelli were often at their best 
and most beguiling. London 
Welsh who had surprised Lla- 
nelli and beaten them at Old 
Deer Park earlier m the season, 
now saw the Scarlets in a 
different light. 

Well though the Welsh 
played, Llanelli’s ample pos- 
session — May was master at the 
lineouts — gave them a consid- 
erable edge, and with their 
confidence spilling over in the 
second period, Llanelli won 
easily in the end by five goals, 
two tries and a penalty goal, to a 
go al and a penalty g»i 
For many in these parts, 
London Welsh’s *nnm»i pil- 
grimage to Stradey, which was 
begun on Christam Eve 100 
years ago, is the highlight to the 
dob’s Christmas festivities. 

The match has always en- 
joyed a reputation for long 
ssages of exciting, exhilarat- 
ing football. Phil Bennett's 
magic here a few seasons ago 
when he turned tire match in the 
last moments remains etched in 
the memory. 

Childs was Llanelli's stand-off 
half yesterday, and if he is 
perhaps, not yet in Bennett's 
class then he is an advocate of 
the running game. He not only 
performed admirably as a link, 
but kicked a simple penalty goal 
before putting the finishing 
touches to some excellent tries 
with five conversions. 

Of these, that by Nigel Davies - 
was one of the best Here May 
had won the ball at a line-out 
and neat slick passing by the half 
backs and centres gave Evans a 
chance to pot back his farad 
before passing inside to Davies 
who scored half way out on the 
right. 

This movement was topical of 
many exciting, colourful pas- 
sages in play and it says much 
for London Welsh’s gritty de- 
fence that they held on gamely 
until the last quarter when 
exhaustion made them a shade 
vulnerable. 

The crowd raised a special 
cheer for May, the captain, and 
his try. This was very much an 
effort by the forwards, with 
Antoniazzi, Fox and Griffiths 
taking pail. 

They were generous m praise 
for the Welsh's try, loo, which 
had been the product of dever 
play by Douglas, Leleu and 
Colyn Price, who scored under 
the crass bar and converted. 


The seasonal festivities some- 
how always contrive to affect 
the team sheet of the visitors 
rather more than they do the 
home team. Travel at this time 
of year is not much of a joy, I 
suppose. Neath, who have only 
to come from just down the 
road, had to make six changes 
for their visit yesterday to 
Aberavon. 

For the home side, Tim 
Fauvel. the No. 8, was the only 
change. This meant they had to 
reorganize their back row, but 
more it frustrated the intentions 
of Clive Rowlands, the Welsh 
selector who had come to see 
whether Fauvel, who ha s been 
playing well recently, bad any 
claims to make for inclusion in 
the Welsh squad. 

With so many changes, there- 
fore, Neath were rigq inf d to 
play without the cohesion they 
have shown hitherto rhig season, 
and, yet, as a marie of the spirit 
within the club and the keen will 
to win this inevitably brings to 
the players, they managed to 
steal a win by a try and a penalty 
to a penalty. They will not have 
a luckier win this season. 

Aberavon, whose fortunes 
may well be on the turn, had the 
most of this spirited game. The 
cloying mud made running diffi- 
cult, and the match developed 
largely into a tussle among the 
forwards with Giles and 
Gncyek, both experienced men 
of such games, looking for any 
ad vantage that might be going at 
close quarters. There was none. 


There were times when they 
looked to be more ambitious, 
but each team’s rugged tackling 
was equal to it. With the wind 
advantage of the first half Mike 
Lewis had missed an early 
penalty before be succeeded 
with his second in the 
ten ib minute, which was the 
only score of the half 

Alan Martin, belying his 37 
years, remains, when the occa- 
sion demands, a tower of 
strength in the lineout, and it 
was he, aided by Watts, who 
ensured after the interval that 
Aberavon should get enough 
possession to that Neath rarely 
bad the ball for any sustained 
attack. They lived, instead, on 
the home side's mistakes. 

From one such, Powell 
latched on to a loose ball and 
with long raking kick sent 
Aberavon back to their 22-metre 
line. From the resultant lineout, 
the home side were penalized 
and Laity kicked a penalty in the 
31st minute. It was he who until 
then had not had a chance to 
show his attacking ability, broke 
devastatingly through the 
Aberavon defence to set up the 
position on the home side’s line. 
From the attempted pushover at 
the scrum. Morgan picked up to 
plough his way over for the 
winning try in the second 
minute of injury time. 

SCORERS: Abwavou: Penally: M Lewis. 
Neath: Ity: D Moronra. Penalty: C Lany. 
ABERAVON: J GnfinJrs; R Reas-Enans. J 
Davonaid; G Matthews (rep: K George). R 
DtekX*. M Lewis. R Gitas; D Joseph. B 
James. C Yates, D More. M Walts. A 
Martin. P YarcBm, J O'CaHaghan. 

NEATH: S Rowrefl; E Rees. C8ridgnwater: 
C Ltaty. A Edmunds. S Griffiths (rep: R 
Griffiths), C Gnofefc: P Jackson, K PhiSps. 

J Pugh. R PhBSps. S Dando, B Ctagg. L 
Jones. D Morgan. 

Referee: A M Jones (Ar ma n lord)- 


Moseley shrug off 
injury setbacks 


By a Correspondent 


Moseley , 

Coventry 


18 

11 


SCOTERS: Uanolfc Dies Forego, N 
Davies. C Davies. S Davies (& May. 
Thomas. Coove rai otMc CftfdB(5). Penney 
goat Ctefds. Lot " 

ConMrataK C 
Price. 

UANBUJfc K Thomas; I Evans, S Davies. 
N Devtas. C Davies: B ChHds, S GresSe: A 
Buchanan, D Fox, L Detansy. A Qtfflths, P 
May (caps). J Antontazzi, M Forego, P 
Davies. 

LONDON WELSH: J Price: J Hughes, K 
Noble. G Leleu, S PR C Price JeapQ. M 
Douglas; T Jones, B Light, J Dawes. 8 
Morgan. R Ford. M Hal. R Johns, M 

ll a tere cW Jonas (Amm a rt o rri) 


: CttfdS- London Wtastel^ C Price. 

Price. Fenafty float: C 


Moseley overcame the prob- 
lems caused by having to bring 
on both their replacements in 
the first half and recorded a rare 
double in a fervent local derby 
at the Reddings yesterday. Cov- 
entry had a replacement on 
within five minutes, Thomas, 
the flanker, going off with rib 
injuries, but he could hardly 
have bettered the performance 
of bis substitute. Suckling. 

Moseley, on the other hand, 
suffered a setback when Colwell 
departed after IS minutes and 
Grist, the third team scrum halfi 
replaced him for a debut be will 
not remember with relish. His 
inexperience was a constant 
liability. Moseley’s second Mow 
came after 35 minutes when 
they had to replace their centre, 
Arntzen, with Denhardt, a lock 
forward. 

From a five-metre scrum, 
Moseley launched a forward 
drive which carried Lmnettover 
for their second try. Jones's 
conversion made it 18-7 and 
that was how it stayed until the 


dying- moments when Robbins 
claimed his second pushover 
try. 

Coventry took loo many wrong 
options and Moseley's defence 
took care of the rest Moseley 
accepted their chances splen- 
didly and had a fine kicker in 
Jones, who only came into the 
side recently after moving from 
Stourbridge- He converted both 
tries and two penalties — four 
successes out of five attempts. 
Wood converted neither of 
Coventry's tries but scored their 
other points from a simple 
penalty. 

The try which, in the final 
analysis, Coventry will ponder 
over was that by Goodwin, who 
ran through non-existent blind 
side defence. 

SCORERSe MoMtay: Tries Goodwin. 
LonetL Ponal S ca: Jones Bj. Conrar- 
3lw w- Jo^ '^CowenttyTiiw: Robbins 

MOSELEyT i Metcalfe: J Goodwin. A 
James, C Arntzen (rep: Denhardt), A 

Persons: M Jones, MColweii (rap: Grist); 
M UmetL C Baiter, G Stoth.S BoyteTfi 
Tuckwood. S Musters, R Barr. P 


M Wood; E Saunders. J 
Mtasfwe. K James, C Wynton C MBercfiip, 
A Savage; L Johnson, A Farrington. S 
wakes, B kw 


Kkfner. A Gunner. P^RSmas 
“ js» 3, R Traw 
(Gtaucastef). 


trap: SuddngkG Robbkis, R Truvors. 
Referee: G Crorawef K3ou 


HOCKEY 


No getting 
round 
Rogers at 
Cheam 

By Sydney Friskin 


Cheam 

President’s XI. 


0 

4 


There were a few numbed 
fingers on a cold morning 
yesterday at Peaches Close 
where the grip on hockey sticks 
was a Lmle insecure. Cheam. 
who did not take their chances, 
were comprehensively beaten 
by the President's XT in the R L 
Hollands Memorial Match. 

Tony Bennett, the dub presi- 
dent, made a wise choice in 
selecting the Surrey goalkeeper. 
Declan Rogers, who saved a 
number of shots fired at random 
by the Cheam forwards. Fore- 
most among these was Reed, a 
guest player from Bristol 
University. David Bennett was 
prominent in midfield 

Rogers was the central figure 
in the day’s early drama, when 
the President’s XI called on him 
to take a penalty stroke. He did 
not quite get hold of it, and 
Myers, his opposite number, 
made an easy save. 

Rogers, however, made im- 
mediate amends by saving 
successive shots at short corners 
from Bennett and Reed 


Women’s hockey 
on page 36 


The President’s XI settled 
down arid went ahead in the 
20th minute, Reay-Jones scor- 
ing from Marchant’s pass. The 
response from Cheam was to 
force two short corners, bin 
strong shots from Sudell were 
saved by Rogers. 

Five minutes after the inter- 
val, the President’s XI inerrased 
their lead Warn scoring off the 
rebound from a short corner, 
and after several attacks by 
Cheam had been repelled 
Marchant scored the third goal 
with a direct hit from a short 
comer. 

There followed an interesting 
duel between Reed the Cheam 
centre-forward and Rogers, 
w£o refused to be beaten, not 
even at three short corners from 
which two shots by Sudell were 
brilliantly saved 
Five minutes before the end 
Reay-Jones scored indirectly 
from a short corner to set the 
seal on an entertaining match. 
CHEAM; J Myers: P Sudan. W Davte. P 
Newntam. M Henwood. D Bennett. B 
AbdriBah, A dowel, R Reed, R Kerr. J 
Yo ung. 

PRESIDENTS Xfc D Rooms (Rlctanondh 
D Francis (SurMon). LMH» (Sutaton). 

S Bowing (Beckenham), S Cn (Old 
Ktagwunians), I Marsh (WoybrMge 
Hawke). D Mtau (GuftlkmJ), G 
Marchant (Surbiton), R toweria (Rjrtey). N 
Raay-JooeajDufwtah), II Warn (Marten). 
Umpires: W Stevens and D Am (Southern 
Counties). 

Cheshire rule 

Cheshire retained the annual 
Boxing Day trophy after defeat- 
ing Lancashire on goal dif- 
ference in a competition run at 
three levels, seniors, juniors and 
veterans. 

In the senior march. Cheshire 
beat Lancashire 4-1, Buchan 
and Grimley (one from a pen- 
alty stroke) scoring two each for 
Cheshire who led 2-1 at half- 
time. The goal for Lancashire 
was scored by Makin. . 


SNOW REPORTS 


Alagna 

Andajo 

Apricfl 

Arabtta 

B'cchia 

Bonrio 

Canazta 


ITALY 

Di«xti(cin) 

t*a Mx 1 

15 50 LMgno 
10 35 Ma&ffiimo 
15 50 MtfiCainp 
20 30 Mariteva 
10 40 Orttasi 
10 40 Plancavalo 


Rcfetto 
S CaTta 


30 70 
25 40 
5 30 
ID 30 
25 35 
5 40 
20 60 


Cteesav 

Cortina 

Corvara 

Cmayeur 

Falcate 

La Ttaiia 


20 60 
10 3S 

G 2 1 S SMTnortCZO 25 
* 90 Bmiifa « 7f1 


taa V 40 60 


15 35 
15 40 
30 90 
25 35 
30 80 


35 70 
dVM 15 40 

Sestrfsra 30 50 

Tonafe 20 40 

VipKano 10 40 


• Information from the Italian Tourist 
Otfioe. 

SCOTLAND 

C a irngorm : upper run. rum complete, 
' 3-padtad snow, mtarfla runs, runs 
iptete but narrow, hard-paclcad snow; 
tower stapes, some rum complete, hard- 
packed snow with Icy pa tche s: vertical 
rans, 1800ft id roads, dear; main roads, 


clear; snow levaL 2000IL Gtanaiwe; upper 
runs, runs comptots but narrow, hart? 
packed snow, mfdde runs, runs cornptett 
but narrow; harri-pactod snow; tower 
elopes, runs complete but narrow, harri- 
peefted snow; vertical runs, 800ft NB 
roads, sight snow; main roads, stigm 
snow; snow toml. 1200ft Gtanooe (week- 
ends only): reper runs, runs complete, 
new mow on a hard base; tower stapes, 
runs complete but narrow, now snow on a 
tad basa: vertical runs, 1300ft: tall roeds, 
dean mate roads, dean snow level. 
1800ft- Lecfct upper rites, some runs 
complete, hard-packed snow wtti icy 
patches; mfddb nms. some runs com- 
ptete; harbpacked snow wtlh icy patattos; 
tower stapes, ample misery areas, hard- 
pacfcsd snow with icy paleness vertical 
nets, 700ft: hU roads, ciaan mate roads 
ctaar; snow tovai, 2000ft. Format for 
skfing anas for today: maWy cloudy with 
scattered showers of sleet or snow; 
amounts of snow wN be genaraly omul 
but there wM be considerable drif 
rather cold wMi max temp of 5 C and nwi 
around 0 C: strong westerly wind. 

• Information from the Scottish Meteo- 
rological Office. 


FOR THE RECORD 


ATHLETICS 


ICE HOCKEY 


WMDLEDGM VILLAGE: i 


Q0 minutes): 1. J Gtadwki (Batarmtij. A 
Gsyton (Be*aw»). 6m Sf&ftsTz F Ward 

s# 1. G Spring. (Luton 

^ 2. M Shoiaott (Bodtord 

lissssest 


6 m 61 

BEDFORD (io mas# 1. G Spring (Luton 
UratBdi 49ndn I2sac; 2, M Shoioolt (Bedford 

•nd coony). 494K3, * ~ 

5034. Team 1. Me 

Bodtard and County, 

~ 1, C Whapshon (BmduQ. 5993. 

POOLE nunc nORmfci. J Boyes (Boumo- 
mnutii). 3001; 2 J PhHps (Bonmnoutfi). 
3191: T Smith (Boumemmvh). 32m Won£' 
cm: 1. D Part (Crawley), 3492. 


NORTH AMERICA: Nttiml .... 

Woodsy: Montreal CanatSons 4. 

PBngune 4; Los Angeles Ktafls 5, Calgary 

Frame® a T UM dmBBuHato Satan 2 
PHterWtWa Flyers 1; Dam* Red Wings 3. 

Chicago Btadtaawks v, Honhxd Whaltn 2 

Boston Bruins ft New York Rangers 8, New 

Jersey Oavfls 5; New York ffiaodi i 4. 

Pmsoumh Pengukis 3 lor): Taranto Maple 

Leafs 4. Mttwcota North Stare 3 <5* 
Wbmi|»g Jett 2 Edmonton Ottore 1: Vancou- 
ver Canucks 6. Los Angeles Kings 4 


TENNIS 


BASKETBALL 


UNITED 

(HBAfcHeadey in li In III M 

TEere ill: New York Knlehsl 03. Sen Antonio 

Sows 99- Tuesday: hvfena PBoere 111. 
□emit Parsons 98; Nm JerseyNets 1 12 Utah 
Jazz 96: Houstun Rockets 121. Los Angeles 
Otepere 96: Chicago Btos IBS. Ctowtand 
Cauiers 92 Mwa*ee Bucks HO. San 

taonto Spun 1QB: Rwenix Sure 120: Data 

Mavericks lift Los Angeles Lakers 127, 
Sannento Ktogs 1 l7(o£taUB Sworeon- 
fcs 127. Denser Mjggets 118: Golden State 
I Warriors >12 mm Trafl Bazsrs 111 


at 
76ets87 


WITA: Leedtag mnUnge (US 

I NewBtffl»fa; 2. CEwn-Uo]iti; 3, S Oral 
: 4. H MendHcove (Czfc 5. P Shriven B, H 
a(Czx7. C Honda-Kfacti n«Gfc B. Kathy 
c 9. G SaUaUni (Arg); 10. M Maleeva 

S&t BEACH, Ftorkte: Orange Bowl 

tionel ctanptonshipa: Boys: Uwfar-18 dM- 

aion Second round: M Jenswi (US) bt P 

Henrlcsson ($«*). 6-2. 7-5. J Sa 

Under-IE: A Oretaaso* (USSR) bt B Keren 

sse# 

CfixO, 62. 69c B Rite) (Am) « S Bemei 
628-1; R Ziutokow (STm AGracb 
rtrtt N Spiao (Sp) bi T Lain (USl 
UodaMft A Dechaurae (Ft) bt M 
(Austria^ 64, 6-2. 


TENNIS 


Leading seeds bloom 


Florida (AP) — The top seeds. 
Javier Sanchez, of Spain, and 
Patricia Tarabini, of Argentina, 
advanced in singles matches on 
Thursday in the boys and gifts 
18 and under divisions of the 
fortieth annual Orange Bowl 
international championships. 

Sanchez defeated the un- 
seeded Michael Bauer, of Aus- 
tria, 6-3, 6-2, 'while Miss 
Tarabini won her match over 
Evica Koljanin. of Yugoslavia 
6-3, 6-0. Also in the boys 1 8 and 
under division, the second-seed, 

Tomas Carbonell. of Spain, 
breezed by Louis Rue tie, of 
Mexico, 6-2, 6-2. The third-seed, 
Omar Camporese of Italy, de- 
feated Marcus Barbaza, of Bra- 
zil, 64), 6*3. 

In the girls IS and under 


division, the second seed, 
Benina Fulco, of Argentina, 
won her match over Sandra 
BerneL of Argentina, 6-2, 6-1 . In 
an upset, unseeded Ninoska 
Souto of Spain ousted the fourth 
seeded Tricha Laux, of the 
Unite d States 6-4, 6-2. 

Flying start 

Seoul (AP) — About 100 
sky divers from 25 countries win 
participate in the opening cere- 
monies of the 198S summer 
Olympic Games here,' or- 
ganizers said. The United States-I 
Skydiving Society chairman, 
Tony Broaden, said the display 
has increased significance be- 
cause skydiving has been des- 
ignated by the International 
Olympic Committee as a 
demonstration event for (he 
1992 Barcelona Games 


» CERTIFIED DIVIDENDS 


Alt dMdendB subject to rescrutiny. 


M matches tor December 28th 


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DIVIDENDS FOR MATCHES PLAYED SATURDAY, 
27TH DECEMBER WILL BE PUBLISHED IN 
THIS PAPER ON SATURDAY, 3RD JANUARY. 
NOTE: DUE TO THE HOLIDAY PERIOD 
RECEIPT OF WINNINGS MAY BE DELAYED. 


> 















SPORT THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 

FOOTBALL: GRAHAM’S MEN STRETCH THEIR UNBEATEN RUN TO 16 GAMES BUT FOUR-GOAL p whtON ARE NOW PRESSING HAR P — — — 


Functional Arsenal 
collect injuries 
as well as ridicule 



W2 




ssfiiMfr 


t 


5 # 







By Dennis Shaw 


Leicester City...... 

Arsenal 


Arsenal remain on course to 
begin the New Year on an 
elevated perch at the top of the 
first division, though the point 
they gained at Filbert Street 
yesterday seemed dictated 
more by destiny, than by 
design. 

“We can play better," 
George Graham, the manager, 
said with massive understate- 
ment after his side had failed 
to overwhelm opposition re- 
duced to 10 men for 45 
minutes. 

Leicester had laid the 
foundation for what might 
have been an enjoyable festive 
occasion with an eighth- 
minute goal cleverly con- 
structed by Osman and 
Wilson and efficiently taken 
by Moran. 

However, things went 


ridden was the Arsenal 

scheme of thing s as stoppages, 

1 niggly, personal feuds, an 
1 outbreak of offsides, and the 
repeated appearance of train- 
ee to ers substituted for 
a an entertainment, 
if the The outcome was a grudg- 

xnnt mg sense of satisfaction for 
Street both managers left as they 
La ted were with bruises, strains, and 
i by twists among their players to 
sort out just when the holiday 
Iter," rush is on. 

agar, Leicester, had to dispense 
tele- with the slowed-down Wilson 
ailed and, having used their sub- 
n re- stitute, Feeley, were then 
■ 45 forced to use Osman as a 
limping left-wing makeweight 
the for the entire second half, 
light Arsenal were also reduced 
stive in effectiveness by injuries to 
jhth- Quinn, Anderson, and 
con- Groves, the latter playing for 
and part of the match with his 
aken thigh strapped before depart- 
ing in the second half, 
vent In between it all, there was 


progressively wrong during some football but not much, 
the course of a disappointing The best bit was Leicester’s 


match which deteriorated goal Osman chipped forward 
from promising to untidy and delightfully, Wilson placed his 


ultimately to downright 
belligerent. 

For much of the first half. 


downright right-wing centre to tempting 
perfection, and Moran clipped 
e first half, the inside of the post with his 


Arsenal were in dire danger of header. 

being silenced for the first The injury time which ac- 


lime in weeks, but a fortuitous crued cost Leicester dearly 
penalty emerged from an because they should have been 


innocuous situation on the sitting in the dressing room at 
stroke of half-time, and Hayes half-time when Sansom’s 
was able to stretch their cross made contact with 


unbeaten 

matches. 


sequence 


Feeley’s hand. 

Close encounters had al- 


Functional rather than flair- ways been of the obstructive 


kind, though the referee 
seemed strangely oblivious to 
the aggravation building up. 
This came to a head when 
Morgan was left stretched out 
by an off-the-ball challenge 
and retribution ruled for 
awhile. 

Anderson had been booked 
for dissent, and Quinn for a 
reckless tackle, but the punish- 
ment meted out did not match 
the ill-will of the action. 

Leicester never threatened 
in the second half as their only 
hope; the coveted Smith, was 
repeatedly either caught off- 
side or double-marked out of 
it 

It was left to the alert 
Andrew to prevent Arsenal 
gaining a victory they would 
not have deserved when he 
saved impressively from first 
Sansom and then Rocastle. 
“Boring, boring Arsenal," 
chanted the Leicester regulars, 
who lata* booed them off the 
field in uuseasonal fashion. 

LEICESTER CITY: I Andrews; S Morgan. 
M Venus. R Osman. J O'Nofl, G 
McASster. A MaucMen, S Moran, A Smith, 

I Wilson {sob: A Foetoyk R KeBy. 
ARSENAL: J LuMc V Anderson. K 
Sansom, S VMBams. D O'Lwry.A Adams. 
0 Rocastle, P Dawfe. N Oum. P Groves 

assrns^ 

Temporary safety 

Blackpool who were forced to 
play Richard Powell aged 17, an 
apprentice goalkeeper, in 
yesterday's 2-1 home win over 
York City, have signed 
Blackburn’s Vince O'Keefe on a 
month's loan. He will stand in at 
Chester today for regular goal- 
keeper, Barry SiddalL, who has 
tonsillitis. 




n&/ 




¥ 

l 4* « 

site 


•" 






mm 


Climbing via Bannister: the Queen’s p3k Rangers forward scoring his side’s second goal in their 2-1 win over Coventry 


Nervous 

Leeds 

struggle 


Everton unleash a challenge 
too powerful for Newcastle 


By John Wardle 


By Martin Searby 


Leeds United 1 

Sunderland — .... 1 


Newcastle United. 

Everton 


Pause for thought lifts City 


By Nicholas Hariing 


“ — rr 7 Hodge. White. 

1 The story of ihc match there- Moulden and Redmond, 

Sheffield Wednesday 0 after was of frenzied activity, other City youngsters, also 

■ Wednesday's immediate re- made significant contributions 
If there is one less recoin- spouse to the goal, an overhead to a performance that de- 
ni ended way of digesting the shot by Shutt that hit the bar, servedly lifted their club three 
festive nourishment than play- being just the prelude of what places up the first division table, 
ing for Sheffield Wednesday on was to come. No sooner had the goth were denied by late 
Boring Day. it must be faring second half began than Chap-- Worthington clearances off the 
the Yorkshire dub. Manchester man was also directing a header, line and either might have 


Gidnian made the decoy run, and penetration on the break of 
Simpson struck the ball past Varadi, against his old cluh. and 


festive nourishment than play- being just the prelude of what 
ing for Sheffidd Wednesday on was to come. No sooner had the 


however. 


line and either might have 


matched the jarring commit- ance. on to the woodwork as 
ment of the visitors yesterday. Wednesday continued to expose 


via Gidman's attempted clear- scored earlier, Redmond being 
ance. on to the woodwork as defied by Hodge's spectacular 


long ball for long balL challenge the anxiety in City's beleaguered 
for challenge, to gain their defence. 


fourth home win out of the last 
five in the first division. 

In a frantic, untidy match in . 


Somehow, though, that de- 
fence was to remain intact, 
thanks largely to its goalkeeper. 


which only Megson ofWednes- Suckling clutched Madden's 
day seemed to have time enough header, blocked Megson's lone 


diving save and Moulden by a 
hand ball decision that went 
against him. Indeed, there was 
so much excitement, so many 
incidents that even the most 
hardened of connoisseurs would 


Billy Bremner, the Leeds 
United manager, could not fault 
his side's commitment in a fast 
and furious match at EUand 
Road yesterday. However, after 
their 7-2 thrashing at Stoke City 
last weekend, the nerve ends 
were exposed during a first half 
in which anxiety came fearfully 
dose to despair. 

The nadir was when Gates 
used a good turn of foot to seize 
on an up-and-under from Bur- 
ley. reach the tail before Day 
and dip it into the empty net. 
There was a suspicion of offside, 
but two minutes later Leeds had 
not learned their lesson when a 
replica of the move almost 
provided a second goal 

Leeds got in enough crosses 
but it took some time to put the 
ball over and the competitive 
Baird. Ritchie and Edwards 
were marked by two excellent 
central defenders in Bennett and 
Comer. With the exception of 
Rennie, who tried hard to 


Everton capitalized in classic 
style on the pre-match news 
about Arsenal and Liverpool. 

The Merseysideis — and 
Trevor Steven in particular — 
made the most of the slip-ups by 
their title rivals to move within 
four points of the leaders. 

And you will not fmd many 
among the 3S.0G0 who mar- 
velled at their brilliance yes- 
terday who would bet against 
Everton's chances of coming out 
on top in May. 

They can rarely have played 
better in manager Howard 
Kendall's time at the club, 
giving an awesome display of 
running, precise passing and 
decisive finishing. 

It was a performance which 
totally overwhelmed weakened 


anything Newcastle could have 
offered. 

n Thev were sharper, stronger 
” 5, and more aware — all qualities 
— ^ displayed in their opening goal 

after 22 minutes. 

sic Heath. Harper and Power 
«c broke the length or the held 
before Power bundled in the bail 
[nd at the far post for his third goal 
_ in five games. At 33. Power's 
bv £60.000 arrival from Manches- 
iio ter City is proving one of 
Kendall's most astute buys. 

Lny The only surprises about the 

ar- goal was that it took so long 
es- arriving — and that Steven was 
nst not involved, 
hit The England international, a 

Newcastle supporter as a Ber- 
ried wick schoolboy, had featured in 
ird virtually every 1 other Everton 
Lib. attack of note, 
of Bat the Feast of Steven really 
ltd began 10 minutes into the 
second half as Everton killed off 
ich a promising speO by Newcastle. 
ied who had been denied a goal in 


another to send it firmly past 
Thomas. 

Sieves also hit the post two 
minutes later and completed a 
memorable personal spell with 
the third goal on tftc hour. 

Power acain creased it from 
the left and Steven’s mis-kick 
from riant yards deceived 
Thomas. leaving even the 
Everton player looking a shade 
embanras-sed. 

Bui he was not half as red- 
faced as Newcastle’s harassed 
defenders seven minutes from 
time as thev allowed little Heath 
to heed in a right-wing cross 
from, inevitably. Steven. Steven 
-.vas denied bis third goal when 
Thomas saved with his legs two 
minutes from time, but seemed 
strangely unconcerned. 


work by uieir goalkeeper, 
Segers. lo keep them afloat. His 
saves from DnnkelL twice, and 
Rosario were agile but his best 
was from Crook’s first time 
volley which be tipped dramati- 
cally over the bar. 

Although Norwich found it 
more difficult in the second half 
to move into top gear, it was still 
a surprise when Forest scored in 
the 64th minute. Metgod rolled 
a free kick to Pearce who, from 
25 yards, seemed to have 
extravagant space to aim at. The 
Scot had saved well from Bow- 
yer before, unexpectedly. Nor- 
wich drew level when Crook’s 
free kick was deflected off a 


Steven could content himself defender’s shoulder; 


Newcastle and renewed worries' the dying seconds of the first 


about the home team's ability to 
lift themselves from the relega- 
tion picture. Everton estab- 
lished their total mastery from 
the start with football which was 
rim ply on a different plane to 


half by Southall's fine save from 
Goddard. 

Then, with 55 minutes gone. 
Everton effectively settled mat- 
ters. Steven needed one touch to 
control Powers low cross and 


with the knowledge that Everton 
are surely about to unleash a 
challenge "which could prove far 
too strong for the other title 
hopefuls. 

NEWCASTLE UNITS* M Thomas; N 
McDonald. K Wharton. J Wrightson. P 
Jasfcssn. G Roeder. P Stephenson. A 
Thomas. P Got&aitL P Beardsley. D 
JssHaon. 

EVERTON: N Souttaft G Stevens, N 
Pcnton. K HatcTiffd. D Watson, P Power. T 
Steven. A Heath. G Sharp. A Harper, K 
Sfteedy. 

Referee: K Luplon (Stockton). 


have gleaned some kind of spread some calm, the Leeds 


for thought City paused for just advance with bis legs and 
long enough to score the only completed a remarkable late 


satisfaction. 


goal in the43rd minute. It came double save from Jonsson and 
after Varadi had made a long Shun. In between times he was 


run after picking Simpson’s indebted to Cements for also 
headed clearances inside his denying Megson. Wednesday. 


own halt Madden needlessly however, were never able to 


conceded a free kick by holding exert all the pressure they must 


Moulden 


have wished, such was the speed 


MANCHESTER CITY-- P Sucking; J 
GkJrnan. C Wilson, K Clements, M 
McCarthy. S Redmond, O Wife. N 
McNsb, f Varadi. P Moulden, P Simpson. 
Sutx I Brtghtnel. 

SHEFREu) WEDNESDAY: M Hodge; C 
Morris. N Worittngton. P Hart. L Madden. 
G Snocfin. S Jonsson. G Megson, L 
Chapman. C Chutt. G ShaRon (sub: D 
Hint). 

Referee: J Lovatt 


Rangers pair facing a 
prolonged suspension 


Glasfsffiw Rangers must app- 
ear before a European Football 
Union disciplinary tribunal in 
Zurich on February S and 6 as a 
result of having tiro players sent 
off dining their UEFA Cop third 
round match with Borussia 
Mdnchengiadbach in West Ger- 
many this month. There were six 
bookings in the match, three on 
either side. 

The eight-man comm i ttee will 
make their derision solely on the 
evidence of the referee, Alex 
Pounet of Belgium, and the 
Danish official observer, Eric 
Hyldstrop, who has publicly 
criticised botb teams. 


Rangers have already quali- 
fied for Europe n ext season as 
winners of the Skol Cap and, 
even if they survive in European 
action, the two players — Stuart 
Monro, the defender, and the 
winger, Davie Cooper - could 
receive a heavier sentence than 
the normal one-match ban. 

• Stirling Albion, , the Scottish 
second division cM, have ap- 
pointed George Peebles as then- 
new manager. Peebles has been 
assistant at the club for 10 years 
and succeeds Alex Smith, who 
was recently appointed as man- 
ager of St Mirren. 


Huddersfield 
in no hurry 
for a manager 


Huddersfield Town are not in 
a hurry to appoint a successor to 
manager. Mick Buxton, who 
was dismissed earlier in the 
week. 

Club chairman, Keith 
Longbottom. said they would be 
considering all applications re- 
ceived after the post is ad- 
vertised today, and would not 
make an appointment until at 


youngsters achieved little 
against a defence which made 
good use of the experience of 
Burley and Kennedy, formerly 
of Ipswich and Liverpool 
respectively. • 

For the early part of the 
second half Leeds looked a 
different side. Thompson, a 
local 19-year-old, pushed into 
space on the left and at last gave 
Sunderland something to think 
about. He produced two crosses 
from behind the defence before. 
10 minutes after the break, 
Leeds drew level with a cleverly 
worked free kick after Buckley, a 
tricky winger, had been held by 
Doyle on the edge of the box. 


Plymouth’s misplaced spirit 


By a Correspondent 


Plymouth Argyfe. 
Portsmouth 


The chances spurned by 
Plymouth Argyle, not those 
taken by Portsmouth, will be the 


abiding memory for die biggest 
League crowd at Home Park for 


Sheridan slipped the ball wide 
of the wall and when Thompson 
put in a hard cross from the bye- 
line Bennett could only knock 
the ball into the net under 
pressure from Ritchie. 


LEEDS UNITED: M Day. N Asph. D 
Rennie, N Thompson. J Ashunst, P Swan. 


least after January 10. Steve K Htwnte - 


Smith, the club's chief scout, is 
in charge of team selection until 
then. 

Huddersfield beat Blackburn 
Rovers 2-1 yesterday. 


ARttchte. Su& LWamjn. 

SUNDERLAND: B Mtrams, G Burley. A 
Kennedy, G Armstrong. D Comer. G 
Barmen, P Lemon, M Proctor. O 
SwSndtehureL S Doyle, E Gates. Sub: P 
Atkinson. 

Referee: J Ireland (Warrington) 


League crowd at Home Park for 
nine years. 21,249. The Devon 
dub wasted scoring opportu- 
nities with such extraordinary 
abandon that then- rivals in the 
second division promotion race 
were more than happy to accept 
their extended festive generos- 
ity. Portsmouth, who had not 
won away from home since 
September 6. created only a 
dutch of openings, yet scored 
three times. 

The purpose and passion of 
Plymouth’s approach play was 
made all but redundant by their 
finishing, which bordered on the 
inept A splendid performance 
by the Portsmouth goalkeeper, 
Knight added to their prob- 
lems. Portsmouth, by compari- 


son. prospered royally from a far 
leaner diet 

Quinn demonstrated the gulf 
in class as early as the 13th 
miDute. Plymouth's fullback. 
Nisbet, was pulled badly out of 
position and Hardyman, profil- 
ing from his absence, delivered a 
cross which fen invitingly onto 
the forward's head. Although 
the goalkeeper. Cherry, got a 
hand to the bad he could not 
deny Quinn his 1 8th goal of the 
season. 


award with a true shot but his 
colleagues failed lamentably to 
follow that example. 

Hilaire, the substitute, re- 
stored Portsmouth's two-goal 
lead, knocking home an astute 
cross from O Callaghan in the 
53rd minute but Plymouth re- 
sponded with 13 minutes 
remaining, Hodges — who could 
easily have scored time rimes, 
needing two attempts to force 
the ball in from eight yards. 


slipped and could not prevent 
the ball from ricocheting off his 
chest into the net. 

Four minutes later, Bruce, 
who bad been dominant at the 
back for Norwich, pumped a 
long ball forward which seemed 
to be well covered by 
Fairdough. But Rosario, hungry 
to bang on to his first team 
place, chased a lost cause, 
gained possession and embar- 
rassed Forest and their support- 
ers by poking a quick shot past 
the stranded Segers. 

NORWICH CriYr BGurm, I Cuhnwhouse. 
A Spearing. S Bruce, M Phelan. I 
Buttenwonti. I Crook. K DnnfceU. W 
Biggins. R Rosario. D Go rdon. 
NOTTINGHAM FOREST: H Sogers. G 
Fleming, S Itoarce. D Wafer. C 


Faireiough. I Bowyer. F Carr, J Metgod. H 
Dough, D Gempbafi, N Webb. 

Referee J Ashworth 


Maradona is 
willing to 
play in league 


PLYMOUTH: S Gharry, G Nisbet L 
Cooper. J UzzaS. Q Ucahinnay. J 
Matthews. K Hodgoa. R Cooghln, T 
Tynan, J Dayton. Q Nateon. Gut* D 
Rowbotham. 


G Nisbet 


Then a ballooning header by 
the Plymouth winger. Nelson, 
set up Dillon to score with an 
angled drive and stretch 
Portsmouth’s lead seven min- 
utes later. Plymouth required 
the assistance of a linesman to 
cut the deficit in the 3lst 
minute. 


PORTSMOUTH: A KraoM. K Swain. P 
Handyman, K DBon. N State. B Gflbfflt. K 
aCaHaghan. M Kennedy. P Mariner. M 
Qurinn. M Taft. Sub: V HBake. 

Referee: K Burge (Tonypsndy). 


The referee needed a pro- 
longed discussion with the of- 
ficial before awarding a penalty 
after Tynan had been bundled 
‘ over by Hardyman on the edge 
of the penalty area. Coughlin 
accepted the controversial 


Hopkins signs 


St Helens have signed Paul 
Hopkins, the British amateur, 
under- 19’s rugby league prop 
from Oldham St Anne’s. Hop- 
kins has also played with the 
colts at neighbouring Wigan. 


Buenos Aires (Reuter) — 
Diego Maradona, probably the 
world’s most gifted footballer. 

yesterday praised the English 
game and said be would be 
willing to play in the English 
League. 

“I like the football of that 
country (England), I'd accept to 
play there, but I'd like to finish 
my career playing in 
Argentina,” Maradona told 
reporters. 

He said that when he made a 
guest appearance for Tottenham 
Hotspur in a testimonial match 
for Osvaldo Ardiles last April, 
be was approached on the 
possibility of playing for an 
English dub. 


YESTERDAY’S FOOTBALL RESULTS AND TABLES 


Fnstcfivision 

A VILLA (0) S CHARLTON (0)0 

. Birch, Patey 16.682 

LEICESTER (1) 1 ARSENAL (1) 1 
Moran Haya$(pan) 

19,205 

LIVERPOOL (0) 0 MAN UTD (0) 1 


Second division 

BARNSLEY (0) 0 STOKE (1) 2 

Saunders. KeSy 
7,436 


Third dhrMon 


BLACKPOOL (1) 2 YORK (1) 1 

Stewart2(1 pen) GabUadM 

A515 


Fourth cflvfsion 

CARD HP (0) 6 i 


LIVERPOOL (0) 0 MAN UTD (0) 1 
Wtttesttte 

40.663 

LI/TON (0) 0 WATFORD (2) 2 

Porter. 
Richardson 

11.140 

MAN CITY (1) 1 SHEFF WED (0)0 

Simpson 30.193 

NEWCSTLE (0) 0 EVERTON (1) 4 

Power, Steven 2, 
Haatfi 

35,078 

NORWICH (0) 2NOTTMFOR (0)1 

Crook. Rosario Pearce 

22.131 

OPR (1) 3 COVENTRY (0) 1 

Byrne. Bannister, Gynn 
Aten 10.053 

SOUTH>PTN (1) 1 CHELSEA (0) 2 

Clarice McLaughlin. 

Bumstaad 

12.700 


BLACKBURN (1) 1 HUDOERSPLDfl) 2 
Gamer Shearer. Baker 

09 

7.144 


BOLTON (1) 2 BURY (1) 3 
Thompson, Ogham Lee, TayiOr. dark 
10.135 


COLCHESTR (0) 1 CAMBRIDGE (2) ^ 
Lowe Crown, Spri^E^ 


BRADFORD (0) 0 


DERBY (0) 1 
Gregory (pen) 

14502 


C PALACE (0) 2 
Irvine, Barter 

GRIMSBY (1) 2 

OFfordan, 
Henshaw 

LEEDS (P) 1 

Sennet og 


OLDHAM (1) 2 
FUtcher.WHaing 
6/69 

SUNDERLTI (1) 1 


BRISTOL R (0) 0BOURMTTH (1)3 
O'Connor. 
Richards, 
wnams 

3573 

CHBSTERF’LD(I) 4 DONCASTER ft) 1 
Bellamy (pen), Gomforth 

Caldwel2.AlTey 3.741 

FULHAM (1) 2GILLMQH1M (1)2 
Marshall. Davies Parker og. 

CoBns 


HHLLWALL 

Salman 


MnOLESBR* (0) 1 CARLISLE 
NOTTS CO (0) 0MANSFEL 


PLYMOUTH (1) 2 
Coughlin (pen), 
Hodges 


PORT8MTH (2) 3 
Quinn. DBon, 
Hilaire 

21549 


(0) 0 MANSFELD (0) 0 
8.180 


PORT VALE (0) 0 BRISTOL C 


TOTTENH'M (1) 4 WEST HAH 
CAfen^ Hodge, 
waddte 

WIMBLEDON (1) 1 OXFORD 
Hodges (pen) Aldridge 


READING <1) 2 
Bevon(pen). 
Bremner 

SHEFF UTD (0) 4 
Beagrte, Dempsey, 

Daws 


BtRMMGtfM (1) 2 

Lynex,Cteika 

7.442 

HULL (1) 2 

Jobson, 

Rounders 

11596 


ROTHBUPM (fl) 0 QARLMGTN (0) 0 
3572 


SHREWSBUY (0) 1 
Daly 


WESTBROM (0) 0 
9561 


SWINDON (1) 2 BRENTFORD (Q) 0 

Jones (pen), White 8.086 

WALSALL (1) 2 NEWPORT (0) 0 

ChnstteNaugMon &8S5 

WIGAN (1) 2 CHESTER 1 (2) 2 
Campbell, Bennett 2 

Thomp s on * 4.187 


PW D L F A PtS 
Arsenal 21 12 6 3 35 11 42 

Everton 2111 5 5 38 19 38 

Nottingham For 21 11 S 7 43 29 38 

Liverpool 2110 S 6 39 23 35 

Tottenham 2110 5 fi 32 23 35 

Norwich City 21 9 7 5 30 31 34 

Sheffield Wad 21 8 B 5 36 29 32 

Luton Tqwn 21 9 5 7 22 21 32 

WeriHamUtd 21 8 7 6 31 36 31 

Coventry City 20 8 6 6 20 19 30 

Watford 21 8 5 8 37 28 29 


Watford 21 8 5 8 37 28 29 

Wimbledon 21 9 210 27 26 29 

Oxford United 21 6 8 7 25 35 26 

Manchester utd 21 6 7 8 26 25 25 


21 6 6 9 22 27 24 

20 7 310 35 41 24 

21 5 510 29 43 23 


P w 

Portsmouth 21 12 
OMiarn/Uft SD12 
Dertty County 2112 
ipswfaiTown 21 9 
pjymouifi Armte 21 9 
West Br onwrich 21 9 
Sheffield Utd 21 8 
Leeds United 21 9 
Crystal Pal 2110 
Stoke City 21 9 
MBwall 20 8 

Birmingham City 21 7 
Sundefiand 21 fl 
Grimsby Town 21 6 
Shrewsbury Tn 21 8 
Brighton 21 6 


Manchester City 21 5 7 9 22 28 22 
Leicester City 21 5 810 23 33 21 


Newcastle Uid 21 5 610 23 35 21 

Chariton 21 5 SIT 19 32 20 

Chelsea 21 4 710 21 40 19 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Premier cBvMmk 

Alvochurcfi 1, RedtStchO; ' 


HufiOty 

Reading 

Brad fo rd 

Hudderef 

Barnsley 


20 7 
20 6 
r 20 5 
Tn 19 5 
20 3 


Blackburn Rots 19 4 


D L F 

6 3 28 

5 3 35 
4 5 30 

7 5 35 
7 5 32 
4 8 29 
7 6 29 
4 8 28 
110 31 

3 9 31 

4 8 2S 
7 7 29 
9 6 26 
9 6 21 
310 20 

6 9 22 

310 21 

5 9 30 
411 27 

311 21 
710 15 
411 17 


CREWE (1) 2 PRESTON (0) 2 

BSssettZ Thames, Atkins 

3,784 

EXETER (2) 2 TORQUAY (0)2 

Roberts. Kelow Kkig. Welsh 

4,327 

HARTLVOOL (0) 0 HALIFAX (IQ 0 
1,696 

HEREFORD (I) 2 WOLVES (0) 0 

Weds, Spooner - 5,828 

LMCOLN (Q) 0 STOCKPORT (0)0 

2443 

ORIENT D) 1 ALDERSHOT (1) 3 
Comwefi Bernes (pen). 

Langley. Mazzon 
2*16 

PETERBORO* (1) 1 SCUNnTRPE (1) 1 
Luke Hussefl 

4.267 

ROCHDALE (0) 0TRAMMERE (O) 1 

Moore 

1.452 

SOUTHEND 08 0M0RTHMPTN (2) 4 ^ 

H3I2, Benjamin. 

Donald 

8387 

WREXHAM (0) 2 BURNLEY (0)2 
Massey. Home Parker. Murphy 

4*568 



REGIONAL TELEVISION, VARIATIONS 


Continued from facing page 


SATURDAY 


BORDER ^gKtonexpapt: 

1 j«2Saiii-R35 Cartoon 
T200-12.15pm Cartoon 12.15am Close- 
down. 


RBd WALES 5.15-£20pa^H 
Sports News Wales. SCOT 


central aa&nsg 


and Sport 

TUXM235ohj Htac The Itaflan Jobl 
| (Mcftaal Catoe}12-35-l2-4»j W eethar 
IctoSB- NORTHERN IRELAND 




Northern Ireland resists (part of 
and) &15-&20 Northern ln£ 
j tend News 140-146n Northern Intend 
News Heaiflnes end weatosr. Close. 
ENGLAND 6-15-5J0p* South A East 
{London! - Snort South 6 West 

Sport end News. 
_ a — Regional 

news and sport. 


12JXMZl5pm CaT 
toon 12.15am Closedown. 






m 


: ;$$y 

■ - -W 

|f : 

/ . 4:' 

.. . 





:: :fc 




Wt- \ v 



• 1 




GRAMPIAN 


ANGLIA Aa London 


2-{»-£30 AwaTae Bethtehem To St"i45- 


Pratee. Mowed by Closedown 
nnnnPB As London. 


GRANADA ftWKgygy., 

The Boss? 1245 Closedown. 


^ v- 


JobfindviasCkreetoNn * 


KTY WEST AsLondon except: 
«^12.15pm The Smurfs 12.l5aj£c& 


Mdatesbrough 
GiEngham 
Notts Caere"? 


ford 2; Cbity^ 4, King's LyririO; Derttordl, 
Fisher 1; Faraham 0, Gosport 0; 


Fisher 1; Faraham 0, Gosport 0; 
“ id 0, Bedworth 1; WHbnhaa 2, 
. (h Worcester 0, Bromgrwe 1. 
Postponed; Aylesbury v Witney. Midland 
dMsem Banbwy United Z Buckingham ^ 
Coventry Sporting 2. Moor -Green 3; 
Forest Green Rovers 2. Gloucester ft 
Hednesfocd 1, Bridgnorth 1: Merthyr 


Wellii 

Hateeowenft .... 

Rovers 0; Grantham 4. Leicester United 3. 
Soothem dhtetan: Ashford 3. CantertM 
ft Dorchester 2, Trowbridge 0; Dover _, 
Thanet 1; Hastings 3. Tonbrictoe 3; Poole 
4. Andover 4; Snepbey 0, C 
WaterioovUe 2. Burnham and 

ft Woodford 1, Gravesend end — 

0. Fo s toemad . RlbsHo v Dunstable; Errth 

«i#i B flfca riaro u fl ft rmtiilfln 


GM VAUXHALL CONFERENCE M- 
nneham 2, SlafftMfft Barnet 1. Ertfitidft 
Boston 2, Fricktey 2; Chaftenham 1. 
KiddBrrtVn sto r 2; Daaertftan 1. Wefflng i; 
Maidstone 0, Sutton United 1; Nuneaton 0, 
Tettord 2; Runcorn 2, Northwich Vkaoria 
1: Seartnroutei 3. Gateshead ■ 2: 
Wbatostone 2, Kettering 1; Weymoidh 1. 
Bath 2. 

MULTIPART LEAGUE: Bangor 1, 
Caernarfon 0: Barrow 1. Wbrfckigton 0; 
Chortey 3. HorvAch ft Gaotsborough 1, 
Burton 4; Goote 0. Worksop 3: Hyde 7. 
Oswesby ft Madock 3, Buxton 3; More- 
cambe 2, Mossley 1: Rhyl 2. South 
Llvarpool 2; Southport 3. Marne 1; Wfltton 
i. Maoctesflew i. 


Blackpool 
Swindon Town 
Bristol City 
watoaB 
Wigan Attt 

Mansfield Town 
Chesterfited 
Doncaster Rvrs 

FUfoam 
Bolton Wandrs 
Brentford 
York City 
Bury 
Chester 
Rotherham Ute 
Bristol Revere 
Darlington 
Newport County 
Cartels Uid 
Port Vale 


p w D L F 
21 13 5 3 34 
21 12 5 4 31 
2111 5 5 38 
1911 3 5 30 
20 9 8 3 35 
2110 6 6 34 

20 9 6 5 30 

21 9 4 8 40 
21 9 3 9 38 
21 612 3 22 
21 8 5 8 34 

20 8 4 8 29 

21 6 8 7 30 
21 6 510 32 

20 6 5 9 24 

21 6 510 26 

20 G 7 8 28 

21 313 5 23 
21 6 411 22 
IS 5 6 8 23 

19 5 5 9 22 
21 4 710 27 
21 5 412 19 

20 4 610 27 


Nort ha mpton 
Southend Utd 
Swansea City 
Preston N-End 


Colchester Utd 
Exeter City 
Lincoln Qfy 


Cardiff City 
Scunthorpe Utd 
Cambridge Utd 
TVanmero Rvrs 
Woberttantelon 
Peterborough 
Hereford Utd 
Crewe Alex 
Orient 
Burnley 
HafifaxTown 
Narttepooi Utd 
Rochdale 

BBZ“ 


PW D L 
2117 3 f 
2011 4 5 
2110 6 5 
2010 4 6 

19 8 8 3 
21 9 S 7 
21 710 4 
21 8 7 6 
21 9 3 9 

20 7 8 5 

20 7 7 6 

21 7 7 7 

20 7 6 7 

21 8 211 


54 
u 

34 
32 
32 
31 
31 
30 


'21 8 7 B 
21 5 9 7 

20 7 310 

21 6 S10 
21 6 411 
20 4 8 8 

19 2 9 8 

20 2 9 9 
20 3 512 


DRYBROUGHS NORTHERN LEAGUE: 
First dMbfon: Fatertee 1, Easington 1; 
SouthBank4,Wht%ftS^rtymoorUtd 
4, Bishop Auckland 2. 


RUGBY UNION 

jam SMITH'S HBHT TABLE Be Ncxlh- 


CL^MATCHES: Abenwpn 3. HeaftTl 
AbertSery 20. abw Vafe 3: Batt.3P 
emton 9;Bridgend 16. Maestro ft& 

42. Westorm: par-Mare 14: CanMf 
Pontypridd 28: Fylde 13. Preston G kutSr 
hoppers ft Gloucester 25. Lydnoy ft. 
Goetorth 19. Northern 7; HtrtlffioS* 
Rovas 9. west Harfiepod ft Kendal 7. 
Vale of Luk 13; LtaneU) 41 . London WeWt 
9; London Irtah 28. Old MBMtete 15; 
Newport 52. Newbridge ft Mosritey 18. 

Coventry 11: Rugby 12. Nuneaton 12,-Sale 

»“ “^-"hton &uk 10; Swansea ft 


NENE GROUP UNITED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Premier dMshre Bourne i. 
Stamford £ Eynesbwy 1. St Neort 1; 
HofiMach 2, speksng ft Kempefon ft 
Wootfrol: Northampton Suncer 4, Lora 


B W RNOFF IRISH LEAGUE: Bangor 0. 
Ards 4; CUttonvOe 3. Ballymena 1: 
CateraJras 4. Camck ft Otetdery 1. 
Gtentnran ft Larne 0. Glenavon ft LfatfiaM 
3. Crusaders 1: Portadown 1. Newtv 1. 


Sussex COUNTY LEAGUE: Pint dh 
“takxr Arundel 3. Untehampton 4; 
KfiSsham ft Eastbourne Town ft Landng 
ft Shoreham 1; PortfMd 0. Chichester 
QtvO. 



CHANNEL A» London 


GRAMPIAN ** Loodon «- 

- ceia: IJgam Ra8eo- 

tlon9l48Ckae 


HTV WALFS As HTVWest 
24X)pm-2^0 Wales otfsunday. 


GRANADA As London. 


HTV WEST ^aSSSVrv 

weather and Ctosedown 


SCOTTISH As^dgn axcept 

Human 

am OWwy 1-ISpm B^S^ ar3 
28M£I AwaTae BeihlehOT^i^ 


HTV WALES Novartatteu 


TSW except 

7-n ',- JU . and See 930-&3S 


12^6 Closedown. 


Tue Aa London except 

. I.UBnm Company, toflowed by 
Ctosedown. 

TYNE TEES 

Jockeys of Nortoft. Comedy. IJOG 
Poebyoi the People 1.1 5 ckaedown. 

mm saga* 

flnwirt RiwirflB 

YORKSHIRE S” — 

VSdeopix L80 Music Bob Surochart 
100 SmtBfSmaodhSMnseS^rt 
44» Sunday Cteeme 5J» The Shad- 
ow 6410 Ctosedown 


T ~ ;. ,, - a * 5a ‘ a ~* l 35 Cartoon 12.00- 

SSJSEES™ 12 - 15amc «m. 

TYNE TEES 


ULSTER 


Mani 1220 Tennis ^ 
from K a mpton WftOBThe Queen 


T5SiioS^ WHeaimiZ20 

^RKSHlREJl^^pt 


IhePoumain'OJSThflRtortB 7|S 
Newyddion7^8StonaStan8.l9awriwm 
Breaiswu amflffc 

Headraom'e Glare CrranasTwkey 

KL4S The mtportanceof BatogBsr- 
neet -OSBam Closedown. 


Starts 

Hdwitt — Tha Law » Ronam^- imi* 


SUNDAY 


19. Broughton ftuk 10; Swansea ft 

ssRSSRt asms 


Whiteside on the warpath: tire Manchester United forward 
■ celebrates scoring the winning goal at Liverpool 


ANttlA ftagBgSSre.- 

IftOO wetwher 12JSp re:12l5 Can ogn 
1 2.45am FomSi Day Of Ctatetow, Ck* 


aSSSSSsa. 

Decnrau cfflfiSS^SSLLOete, ft3o 


s^^agaaga* 


111 


Forest miss 
Birtles 
as Norwich 
hit back 

By Gerry Harrison 

Norwich City...«»«» — •• J 
Nottingham Forest - < 


It took a goal from Notting- 
ham Forest's first dW« ® « 
taraei lo gali’amze Norwich into 
winning form at Carros-' Road 
yesterday. When Pearce sco«a 
in ihc (vlih minute it looked as if 
Forest, the first division s lead* 
ing scorers, had survived tig 
storms and battering of a hcroc 
afternoon and that safety was ra 

“ironically. Norwich, kept at 
bay during their best spell in the 
firet hour, fought back to scram- 
ble in two far from spectacular 
but thoroughly satisfactory goals 
which gave them their fiiat 
home victory over Forest in five 
attempts. 

h was not only the absence of 
their leading scorer. Binles, with 
a back injurv. which seemed to 
have thrown Forest out of their 
stride. Their form has spluttered 
of late and the reintroduction 
into midfield of Bowyer’s ball- 
winning powers did nothing in 
the first half to wrest control 
from Crook, Biggins and 
Phelan. 

Brian Clough, the Forest 
manager, was involved in much 
finger-waving and remonstrat- 
ing (as well as a head to head 
confrontation with some local 
spectators) as Norwich poured 
forward. Certainly Walker. 
Fairdough and Pearce defended 
well but it needed distinguished 
work by their goalkeeper. 



- ■ tt L; 
■ .=■*! 

. .S 


f 


J 


( 



THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


41 


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-S’' 


■ l*'* 

’ >\ C 


SATURDAY 


TELEVISION AND RADIO 

Edited by Peter Dear and Peter Davalle 


# Not one, not two, but three ( o uaioc \ 

David Lea movies on BBC2, V UflUJCfc ) 

including possibly the best 

attempt yet to put Dickens on 

the screen. Great Expectations 
(12-00 noon). Lean shared the 
directing credit with Noel 
Coward in In Which We Serve 
(4.05pm). One feels that its 
stiff upper ■ lip might have 
become intolerable if Coward 
had been totally in charge 
Coward restored full direc- 
torial control to Lean with 
This Happy Breed (2.15pm), 
but the words were Coward’s, 
and some of them brought a 
lump to many a throat in 
wartime Britain, mine in- 
cluded. The other high-quality 


movie on TV tonight is, of 
course, Kubrick 7 ; »r 
StrangelorejBBCl, 12.05am). 
still the definitive black com- 
edy about The Bomb. 

•Best of the rest today: fuliac 
and Gobbi in Act 2 of the 
Zeffirelli production of Tosca 
(Channel 4, 7.00pm); 

Barenboim launching his 
Beethoven piano sonata cycle 
with the No 1 (BBC2, 
9.55pm); and Ffergus Keeling's 
documentary The Great Sea 
Monster (Radio 4, 2.00pm). 
Fact with a dash of fantasy. 

Peter Davalle 





A night at the areas: Ruth Madoc and David Griffin in the 
comedy series HJ-de-Hi! (BBC1, 7.50pm) 


Janies Fox as the religious idealist and Betsy Brantley 
the widow in New World (BBC1, 10.00pm) 


as 


BBC 1 


8.30 Famfly-Nem. (r) 8X5 The 
Muppet Babies. 

9.00 Saturday Superstore, 
managed by Mike Read. 
10-45 Ftimrtom thumb (1958) 

Setters. Musicafv^ston of 
the Grimm Brothers' 

criawoodcutter andiils 
wife. Directed by George 
m PaL 

12.15 Grandstand introduced by 
Desmond Lynam. The 
line-up is (subject to 
alteration): 12-20 Cricket: 
the second day of the 

Fourth Test; 12-40, 1.10 
and 1.40 Racing from 
Wetfiarby; 12X5 and 1.25 
FootbaB Focus. 

1-05 News and weather. 1.55 
and 34£ BasJurtbaB: the 
Garisberg Tournament of 
Champions; 2.10 Rugby 
League: the second 
semifinal of the John 

HalTrlrne^^SF^Sr 

score. 

' 5.05 News with Moira Stuart 
Weather 5.1 5 
-Sport/reglonai news. 

5X0 Bob's Christmas Fun 
House. Bingo quiz show 

Monkhouse. (Ceefax) 

5.55 Fim: Escape to Athena 
- (1979) starring Taffy 
Savalas. David Niven and 
Roger Moore. Second 
World War yam about a 
group of islanders and 
Allied prisoners-of-war 
determined to escape 
from a supposedly secure 
camp on a Greek lstan 
Directed by George P 


'one 


of the campers. (Ceefax) 
8X5 The Paui Daniels Magic 
Christmas Show. The 


I expert Hany 
BJackstone Jr. (Ceefax) 
9.25 Casualty. The regular 
night staff cfiscuss how to 
make the general pubtic 
aware of tneir impending 
closure. (Ceefax) 

10.15 News and sport. With 
Moira Stuart Weather. 
10.30 FBncTheKaBanJob 
(I960) starrtag Michael 
Caine and Nciel Coward. 
Gold robbery caper, • 
backed by the imprisoned 
criminal czar, Mr Bridger 
(Coward), Including a 
breathless Mini-Cooper 
chase through Turin. 
Directed by Peter 
CoMnson. (Ceefax) 

12.05 FfomDrStrangelave* 
(1963) starring Peter 
Sellers and George C 
Scott. Black comedy 
about an unhinged United 
States general who sends 
a nuclear force to bomb 
Moscow. Directed by 
Stanley Kubrick. (Ceefax) 
1.40 Weather. 


iPilpitSliiS 


MF (medum wave). Stereo on 
VHF (see batata 
News on the haft-hour untu 
12JMpm. then 2.00, 3X0, 5X0, 
7.30,1x0, 12.00 midnight 

6.00 Mark Page B.00 Peter 
Powell 1000 Dave Lee Travis 
iXOpm Adrian Juste 2J00 
Madonna tafldng to Simon Bates 
3X0 The American Chart Show, 
direct from Now York with Gary 
Byrd 54)0 Saturday Live Review 
of the Year 6X0 m Concert 
featuring Sweet Honey and the 
Rock 7 Jo Simon Mayo 9X0-12X0 
The Midnight Runners Show 

with DMePsach. VHF Stereo 
Radios 1 82: 400am As Radio 

21.00pm As Radto 1 7XtM.00era 

As Radio 2. 


News on the hour unto 1.00pm, 

then 3X0, 6X0, 7X0 and hourly 

from 1O00. 

Cricket Fourth Test. Australia v 
England. Reports from Melbourne 
attIBam, 5.(0, 8X2, 7X5, 8X5 
end hLOSam, 1.02, 24)2 and 3.02. 
400am Dave Bussey 64)0 
Steve Truetove 8-©S ttevid Jacobs 

10.00 Engetoert Humperdinck 
11-00 Brian Matthew (visit to New 
York) IXOpm Radio Active 
Goes to the Movies 1 J30 Sport on 
2. tnciudes Rugby Union 
(London v Norm. Mkkands v South 
and South' 

ton the, 


and Racing from Kempton 
Park. SJJ0 Review of the Sporting 
Year 1988. 7JM Beat the 
Record (Kafth Fordyoe) 7J30 Jos6 
Cajaras In Concert with the 
BBC Concert Orchestra. i20^L40* 
interval, lan Waflace presents a 

radio biography of Carreras 9J0 
Suing Sound (strings of BBC 
Radto Orchamra) 1005 Martin 
Kalnar 12J»unNight Owls 

1 JO Jean ChaOe 3JOO-4JBO 1 
Metropote Orchestra 


• The 


WORLD SERVICE 


B4»M*v«d8«k (until BSmUO NflWsMS 

Twontyfour Noun 7J0 Old MW ol 

Logramr 7^*5 Network UK AflO News 

w^ , L3 , 23“^2£‘« 

grtWri MJM News 184)1 Hen-e ttarrpw 

w«tnK* 3 1X45 Sports Roundup 

1JM Twenty-R>ur Houra 1J0 

Rage N ow i iia el a 15 Satixday i 

*46 News AOS Commentary 4.15 
00 News 501 

O N — - 

CMstrms Pop 

■40 Yes MW»»r IClOO From our 

aasssxs 

1,U>0 News 1108 Co m mentary Ii.i5.1he 

5^0 of Christmas 1130 Anythin g Qoe« 

1ISS 1209 News About Bn^n 

13-15 Racfco Nawsmei imo From the 

5«n» '88 “LOO News LOT Hay of the 

Weak ■n» Grass ts Cleaner S^ao Nows 
ftaw Of the Britten Press 2.15 A 
2“V of Don Juan 230 Album Time 300 
N«W 3J» News about Brian 3.1S Rnom 

25°»»CcrraspondeM 130 Jazz Score 

J^kawsdaskMO N«flbv«a Ca«jui« 

^^ HowHomto Held me Bndoe 

Regional TV: on facing page 


BBC 2 


94» Ceefax 

11- 45 Popttye Meets Afi Baba 
and res 40 Thtovae. 

12- 00 Hte Great Exptctetiona* 

(1946) starring John MBs 
and Valerie Hobson. 
Dickens's classic tele of 
an orphan boy who 
inherits a fortune. Includes 
Alec Guinness's first 
screen rote. Directed by 
David Lean. 

1.55 The Sky at MghL Patrick 
Moore tafics about tha 
Galilean Moons, (r) 

2.15 FRm: This Happy Bread* 
(1944) starring Robert 
Newton. CeBa Johnson, 

, and John MBs. Noel 
Coward’s story of the 
trials and trfoulations of a 
London family between 
the Wars. Directed by 
David Lean. 

445 FHnc In Which Wa Serve* 
(1942) starring Noel 
Coward. A Second World 
War trftxite to the F^al 

under the commandof 
Lord Louis Mountbattea 
Directed by Noel Coward 
and David Lean. 

555 Testament to fin 
Buahmm. Programme 
one of a two pent 
documentary about Sir 
Laurens van da- Post's 
return, 30 yems on, to the 
Bushmen of the Kalahari 

6-45 Travellers In Tkne: Two 
Tales of Endeavour. 
Archive fflm shows Sir 
Tommy Sopwith's yacht 
Endeavour in an its mid- 
Thirties glory; recant 
footage charts John Amos 
restoration of the yacht's 
half-flooded hufit some 50 
slater. 

sand sport With 
Moira Stuart Weather. 

745 A Wak Through the 
Eighties. Patrick Lc 
Fermor talks about 
adventurous Bfe. 

8.10 Cricket Fourth TesL The 
second day's play. 

8J5 Swafiows, by Rhydderch 
Jones. A play, satin the 
summer of 1943, about a 
group of Cockney 
schoolchildren who are 
evacuated to a Weish- 


7J2& 


Wales, Erigfish subtitles, 
(first shown on S4C) 

SLK Ludwig van BeelhovaiL 
The first of a new series hi 
which Daniel Barenboim 


3 iarx> Sonatas beginning 
with the No 1 C^xis 2 No 1. 

I. 15 AH Passion Spent A repeat 
of Tuesday's fired episode. 
(Ceefax) 

II. 10 Comic Refief. A repeat of 
the Omnibus programme, 
recorded live In 
coloration with Charity 
Projects, of what must be 
the funniest Bne-up to be 
seen on television. Ends at 
12J5Q. 


ITV/LONDON 


SJBS TV-mn introduced by 

RJcriard Keys. Weather at 
6J58; news at 7.00. 

720 The Wide Awake Club for 
the young. 

9.25 The Dusty Snowman. A 
mystery story set in 
Sweden's Santaworld 
theme park 9J50 Donald’s 
P enguin. Cartoon, (r) 

SL55 FBnc DMqr - til# Bk»Mt 
Dog in the World (1973) 
starring Jim Dale. Comedy 
about a dog who 

ttly drinks a potion 
i to make 

vegetables grow to 
— u — — rtkxw. 


McGrath. 11 JO 

Mickey's Christmas Carol 
(1983) A cartoon version 
of Dickens's classic. 

Directed by Bumy ■ 
Mattinson. 

12,00 News. 

12JK Saint and Graavsie. 12J0 
Wrsstfing from the Royal 
Hafl. Harrogate. 

120 Dinosaur. Are there my 
stiflafive? 

2.15 FVm; The Scarlet 

Pknpernel (1982) storing 
Anthony Andrews. A 
mede-for-teievision 
vermon ol Baroness 
Orczy's dassfc tale of the 
aristocratic Engflshman 
who risks Ids Be to save 
his French counterparts 
during the Revolution. 
Directed by Clive Dormer. 
“ '•) 


4JS0 Results service 

535 News. 

5.15 Bobby Devro’s TV AnnuaL 
The impressionist, aided 
by Betty Martin, produces 
a host of television 
characters. 

&00 Beacflefo About With 
imy 


6J0 The Cannon and Ball 
SpedaL Tha comedians ’s 
guests include Little 
Richard, Kate O'Mara, and 
Kim Wide. 

730 The Price is (tight 


art 


&30 FitacSpMii 

Tom Hanks and 
The 

tala of a man 

tails for a mermaid 

who has developed legs 
and has folowed him TTOfn 
- - Cape Cod to New York. 
Directed by Ron Howard. 

(Oracle) 

10L30 News and 

1045 LWTNews 

foflowedbyHkn: 
Fi a s h d ence (19T 

starring Jennifer 

The story of a woman who 
works as a welder in a 
factory by day and as a 
cfisco dancer by night 
Directed by Adrian Lyne. 

1235 Simple Minds - Afive in 
Rottentam. A concert 
recorded last December at 


AhoyStadkm 
lit Thoughts. 



4£5am Out 

Fourth Test from 
Metbcmma. The 0iM 
day's piay.Until 7M 
635 On VHF. Weather. 7J» 
Mows 

7 JJ5 gtdv Church Music 

for four voices. Abo 
Bun's Five verses on SBve 
ret 

and TUBS 
Tails 

Anew 

8JX) Vienna Octet Michael 
Haydn's Dhr Br tfrnanto in 
G, Schubert's Quartet in A, 
The TrouL wHh Curzon, 

piano; and Mozart’s . 
Divertimento in D.BlOO 
News 

9.05 Your Concert Choice; 
Dvorak (A Hero's Life: 
Prague RSO), Poulenc (Les 
soirees da Nazeles: 

Fevrier, piano), Britten 
(Festival TeDeum; . 
Jubilate Deo; King’s College 
Choir and scrioiat^, Emst 

(The last rose: Kramer, 
violin), FaBe (B amor 


1 JO MgU 


_+■ + Siv .'-..i.-y 


11.15 From the Festivals: 

■ Franz Schubert at the 
Lake District Summer Musk: 
Festival. Schubert 


12.40 Alan 


CHANNEL 4 


935 FHnc The Son ol the 
Shofic* (1926) starring 
Rudofon Valentino In nts 
last fftn. The story ol a 
young sheik who become 
mvotved wHh the dancing 
girt daughter of a bandit 
lender, trectad by George 
- Fttzmaurica. 

1035 FtoeliSrecteon34th 
Street* (1947) starring 
Maureen O'Hara and 
Edmund Qwenn. A 
Christmas fantasy fibn 
about a New York store's 
Santa Claus who dabns to 
be the real McCoy. 
Directed by George 
Seaton. 

12J2Q Tennis. The doubles- the 
third rubber in thB final of 
the Davis Cu> between 
AustraHa and Sweden. 

1-00 Channel 4 1 

Kempton Park. ! 

Scott introduces i 
of the 1.10. 1.40, 2.10 1 
Rank Christinas i 
and the 2.40 races. 

330 FBnc Cottage to Let" 

(1941 ) stamng Leslie 
Banks, John Mis, Alastair 
Skn, and Geoge Cole. 
Second Wbrid War 
comedy thriller about a 
boffin, working in a remote 
Scottish home, who is the 
planned kidnap victim of a 
bunch of Fifth Columnists. 
Directed by Anthony 


BBC 1 


8-55 Play SchooL (r) 9.15 
U mb reta. Anewr “ 
series for chiklren 
This lb the Day from a 
marquee in the 


le grounds ol 
Abbey, 
tine. A 


Asquith. 

OnttM 


balletic 
the 12 


445 


5.05 

week's 
6JOO Right To 
rngnBgnts 


7JD0 


.A 
Of 

of Christmas. 
A repeat of the 
(Oracle). 
AnauaL 
year's 
.presented 
Macdonald. 


(Orack. 

News summary and 
weather followed by 
CaHaa Sings Tosca*. A 
rare 1964 reconfing of Act 
Two of Puccini's opera 
with Maria Cafias and Tito 
Gobbi In Zefflreffi's Royal 


A 

on the life 
and career of entertainer 
Norman Wisdom. 

9JOO CWf From the Hfo. C8ff 
Richard at the London 
Hippodrome with Eton 
John, BBy Ocean, Five 
Star, The Shadows, and — I 
Marti Webb. 

10.00 HnstraetBhiea.Adayof 
pressure ends with FunBo 
caving to and the mayor 
rrifevw^fwnofhis 
command, having him re- 
assteied to a lowly federal 
task force. (Or^ie) 

11.00 FiliR The Itiglit They 
Raided Mhnky’s (1968) 
starring Jason Robards. 
Comedy about a 
burlesque theatre 
threatened with closure in 
1920s New York. Directed 
by Wffliam Friedkin. Ends 
at12£& 


6-50 Houseman on the 
Federal Theaton John 
Houseman In conversation 
with ChristopTwr Cook, 
about his work with Orson 
Wetes’s Mercury 
Theater and as head of the 
New Dears I 
Theater I 


1(L00 Aslan Magazine, 
miscellany of musk; 
introduced by Ghazaia 
Amin 1QJ0 Carnival of the 
Animate. An animated 
version of Salnt-Saens' 
orchestral suite, (r) 

1055 Ffcn: Two-Way Stretch* 
(I960) starring Peter 
SeSers. Comedy about a 
gang of criminate who plan 
the perfect robbery - their 
afitu is that they are in jail 
Directed by Robert Day. 

1&25 F3m: Cany On Jack 
(1963) starring Bernard 
CriWwis and Kenneth 
WiBams. A farce set on 
board a Royal Navy ship. 
Directed by Gerald 
Thomas. 

1.55 News headlines 1.58 

Weather 2.00 BastEnders. 

3J30 %e%M?SafariBlnf 
ftatiy. BiH Ockfle is In one 
of seven teams 
in a 48 hours, 
bird-spotting reify to 
Kenya. 

400 Aled Jones and Friends. 
The 15-year-oM treble in 
St David's Had, Cardiff , 
with the BBC WMsh 
Chorus, soloists Vanessa 
Thomas and Don Smith. 

440 Film The Ralway 

Children (197(9 starring 
Dinah Sheridan, Jenny 
Aguitar and Bernard 
Cribbins. Lionel Jeffries' 
version of E Nesbifs story 
about the adventures of 
three children who Hve 
near a ralway. 

625 News with Moira Stuart 
Weather. 

B3S So^s of Praise from 
Trafalgar Square and, via 
satellite, Tonga. (Ceefax) 

7.15 Lest of the Simmer Wine. 
A Christinas special in 
which Seymour decides to 
put santa In his tracfltional 
place -on a roof, by a 
chimney. But who (sto be 
the volunteer? {Ceefax) 

7.50 Ften: Tootsie (1982) 
starring Dustin Hoffman. 
Out-of-work actor Michael 
Dorsey decides to play a 
woman in order to tend a 
role and becomes a - ~ 
sought-after actress. 
Directed by eydney 
Poflack. (Cfeafax) 

9.45 News with Moira Stuart 
Weather, 

1tM» *New Woritf, by WHIam 
Nicholson. James Fox, 
Bernard Hifl, Joss 
Addand, and Betsy 
Brantley star in this drama 
dramatizing the dash of 
ideas aboard the 
Mayflower which led to the 

birth of America. Directed 
'Norman Stone. 


12.10 


by Normal 


BBC 2 


9.00 Ceefax. 

10.00 Film: The Water I 

(1978) starring James 
Mason, BiHeWMtotaw, 
and Bernard CrtoUns. 
Charles Kingsley's 
cteRghfot tale of the secret 
We of a pond. Directed by 
Lionel Jeffries. (Ceefax) 
1130 The Cbarfie Brown ana 
Snoonr Show. Cartoons. 
11.55 WindmEBL Chris Serle 

introduces cflps from fims 
and programmes with a 
watery mama, (r) 

12^5 No Limits. Root n 
programme, (r) 

1^5 OtiYsslAnuObNo 
You're Not A celebration 
of pantomime. The 
narrattM' is Prunella 
Scales, (r) 

2j 50 Music In Camera. 
Dvorak's Amnerican 
Cfoartet performed by the 
Takacs Quarter of 
Hungary. 

320 Thmkfng Aloud. Humour - 
Where's the Joke? asks 
MichasUgnatiaff. 
Discussirm the qimstion 
are Nigel Bailey, Ben 
Bton, and Jonathan Miller. 
400 The Pyrates, by George 
MacDonald Fraser. A 
swashbuckling yam 
starring Malcolm Stoddard 
as Captain Blood, and 
Marcus Gilbert as the 
good Captain Ban Avery 
who has been entrusted to 
deliver the fabulous 

Madagascar crown to (to 
ightful owner. (Ceefax) 
Testament to the 
Bushmen. The second of 
the two-part documentary 
in which Sir Laurens van 
der Post returns to the 
Bushmen of the Kalahari 
6.15 Tomorrow's World 21st 


5L25 


FBghOghts from the series' 


l aTs Neg ro 
'Project. 


Sessions's Sonata No 3, 
MIHon Babbitt's It takes 
12 to tango, and Charles 
WUorinen's Capricdo 
146 Musical Times Past Fritz 
I on Victorian 

IW 

2.00 Bach: Christmas 
Oratorio. Concentus 

Musicus.Vtennfl/Vienna 

Boys' ChoWChorus^^ 

Esswood, Kurt Equiuz, 
Siegmund ffimsgem. 
Conductor Harnoncourt 
450 Sharon Hotenson and 
Paid Coker ceto and 

. Brahms (Sonata No 

, Schmidt (Three 

r Pieces on 


rHWb 

asS 

Fantst 


Tourangeau. mezzo) 
1030 Music week^: with 

Michael Otiver. Indudes 

a conversation with the 


5J0 New Premises; Nigel 
Andrews's arts magazine 

6.15 Liszt and the Pteno: 


7.15 Madeira Butterfly: La 
Scale production of 
Puccini's opera, sung in 
KaOan. With Yasuto 
HayasW and Peter Dvoreky. 
Conducted by Lorin 
MaazeLAteoanBBC2 

945 Organ music from 

fonsbrude ReWwd Jaid 
plays Hofhakner's Was ich 
diaeh Gluck; Naeh wHen 
din; Zucht, Bir und Lotr, rad 
(Cotter's Salve regina 

10.00 Currents from a Northern 
Land: Danish music. Kart 

Aage Rasmussen's Haflen 

Concerto, Pool Rutter's 

Corpus cum figuris, Hans 

Abrahamseris Six 
pieces for viafin, hom and 
pi,TO, Pane 

GudmundservHofengraan's 



and Mark Steyn aril 

Broadway musicaL Also, 

Christopher Headingtan on 

Constant Lambert 


On tong wave) 

; « Shipping 6JM News Briefing: 
weSw 6.10 Prelude ft) 
music. indMONewsteso 
Prayer tor the Day &55 
Weather; Travel 

7M News 740 TocteYs 
papers 7.15 On Your 
Farm 

7.45 In Perspective. Religious 
affairs with Rosemary 
HarthflL 

7 wj Down to Earth. Mike 
Giflfam talks to Alan 
Trtchmarsh 7^ Weather. 
Travel 
g m News 8.10 Today's 
papers 

chairs the panel of Don 
Mosey. Don Howe, 

Adrian Moorhousemd 
Edward Grayson as they 
try to answer this years 
sporting questions. 

presented by Wynford 
Vaughan Thomas. 

Story of Dr DoJittie- 

iot6 iSSSStSSm 

Bfoon’s 25 years of 
deoicafed sendee to 


Reminiscences de Luda d 
Lammarmoor, 
Reminiscences da Norma, 
and Polonaise from 

Eugene Onegin. 


TLQO News; Travel; Emma, 

Parts ft) 

12JU News; Fat Man on a 

Bicyde. Tom Vernon and 
his iron steed encounter the 
grapes of Sancarre and 
the gardens of a; 

home on their way to 1 


11.05 Beethoven Plano 

Sonatas: John Lfflpteys 
the fto 11 . and the No 15 

11- 57 News. 

12- 00 Fourtti Test from 

Mefooume. England v 
Austrafla. First session of 
day tour. Until 2.05 


Johnny 
j his dfltfliood 


and the 
Parti 


of 


ft 

1227 The Goon Show. The 
Siege ofFtort Night 1255 
Weather 

140 News 

1.10 AH in tha April Evening. 
Remembering the 

Glasgow Orpheus Choir and 
Rsfouidar.SIrHi. 
Robertson 1^5 Sh 

240 News; The Great Sea 
Monster Mystery- Are 
tiiere any undiscovered 
monsters talking beneath 
the ocean waves? 

SJM News: The Afternoon 
Play. The Winstow Boy, 
by TerenceRetttgan ft) 

430 A Winter's Tate. 

Intriguing story of a 
medieval Royal funeral 

procession (s) 

5.10 Tha Worta m Once Upon 
a Tana. The Snow 
Queen, comedy std 

- adverrttireU! (5)5^0 
Shipping 5£5 Weather; 
Travel 

tM News; Sports round-up 

6.15 I've Been Together Now 


tor 70 Ye 
Morrtsi-- 
in waies. 

6- 30 PaulTe 

Conrad i 

7- 00 

Frayllng with the 1 
two prograwnes renec 
the ife of trie modem- 
day Great American Cowboy 

ft) 

730 Murder for Christmas. 

Death and the Dancing . 
Footman, by Ngaio Marsh (s) j 

9- 00 An impossible Woman. 

The story ol the turbulent 
Mb of Dottoressa Moor. &58 

Weather 

1 0,00 Nbwr 

10.15 Evening Service ft) 

10- 30 A Warm and Sumy 

Christmas. A dose of 
warm Caribbean spirit 

11- 00 News Quiz of the Year. 

Richard Ingrams rad 
David Taylor are joined by 
guests to mul over the 
past 12 months (s) 

1140 Agnes Bemeift, Jewish 
performer and activist in 
conversation with Frank 
Delaney. 

12- 00 News; Weather 1243 

VHF (avalabfe in Engtand and 
S Wales wily) as above 
except 5JErtLOOam 
Weather; Travel 1-55- 
200pm Programme news. 




MF (medtam wave). Stereo on 
VHF (eee bekwy) 

6.00am Mark Page 8J00 Peter 
PoweB IOlOO MUce Read 12J0pm 
Jimmy Savtie's *Oid Record' 
ciub. Hit records from 1M2, 78 and 
70. 2J0 Radiol More Time for 

86 (John Peel and Mfca Read) 400 
CharttMJ&terafBruno Brookes) 

500 Top 40 (Bruno Brookes) 7J» 
anna N&ittigale Request 
Show SLOO Robbie Vincent 1100- 

1240 The Raddrig Mbs P (wtth 

Culture Rock). VHF Stereo Ratflos 
1 & 2> 400am As Radfo25u00 

AsRdtol 12JKMJOOanAsRadk> 

2. 


MF (medium wave). Stereo < 

VHF (see Radiol) 

News on the hour (except 
800pm). Sports Desto1ZQ2pm, 
6.02, 1002. Cricket Fourth 
Test Reports at 402am, 502, 6.02, 
7412. 806 and 12-OSera. 1.02, 

9 tt> 3-(P- 

44)0am Dave Bussey 6j00 
Steve Truetove 7 JO Rcner Boyle 
94)5 Mekxfles for You (BBC 
Concert Orchestra ana Richard 
Baker) 114) Teddy Johnson 
2.00pm Benny Green meets the 
Prisoner of Zenda 34)0 Alan 
Del 400 to the Ofdf &0 Kenneth 
McKeter Sings 530 

Soapbox 7 4m»3ng with 
starring Barbara Windsor 7. 
Operem Nights (MDgel Douglas) 
8^0 Sunday HeK-Hour &00 
Your Hundred Best Tunes 104)5 
Male Voice Choir of the Year 
Competition 11 4K) Sounds of Jazz 
100am Jean Chafe 34)0- 
400am A Uttie Night Music. 


WORLD SERVICE 

B4nNawsd8ak(unfl 7J0 Nbw»7jPB 

TtmArfour Hours 7 JO Horn Our Own 

Cocraqpandant 7-50 WmguMs aoo 

News B4S Brttecttans BJ5 -me 
Pleasure's Yours 9J)0 News 9JJ8 Review 
Of The Brush Press 416 On Father 

Christmas's Doorstep 046 A Future tor 

the Past KUO News Summary NL01 


SB" 


Suiday Service 1 U» News 1U» 

About Britain 11.15 From our awn 


News About 

Correspondent (unfl t13B 1230 News 

izOlPtay of me Weak The Grass is 

I Grssnar 1X0 News 1X9 Twenty-Four 

| Hows 1X0 Sports RounAp 1^5 Sand 

Jones Herwost Show hidudng el 230 

News 230 Runyan's Guys and Dote 3J» 

Radto Newsraei 3.15 Concert Hsit Weber 

1 4X0 News 4X9CommeniB>y 415 Science 

and God 4*5 Oto Man ol Lodhmp 530 
News 5X9 Reflections (until BA 5) BXO 

News 0X9 timntfFoir Houra 336 

Sunday Has Hour 930 Now 9X1 Story 

I 9.15 Ihe Pteeaure's Your* 10X0 News 

10X0 A Store ol Don Juan 1335 Book 

Chctoe 1030 Hnendoi Review ol the Year 

1 1040 Reflections 1045 Sports Roundup 

11X0 News 114)9 Commentary 11.15 

How HorWbB HWd toe Bridge 1130 
Shaman - The Turn of the Year 12X0 

News 12X0 New* About Britain 12.15 

Ratoo Newsreel 1230 Raitfous Banrioa 

1X0 News 1X1 Jumbo the Bephant ixo 

Itoss Dorothea's MBcM f5no 1X5 

I Music of Weber 2X0 News 2X9 Review ol 

the British Press 2.15 Peebles' Choice 

230 On Father Christmas's Doorstep 3X0 

News 339 News About Britain 115 Good 
I Boohs 3-30 Anything Goes 4-09 
I Nawsdask 4X0 Scoop runtfl *45) 545 
RBCorJng of too Woek Al tteestoQMT. 


7.15 Madam Butterfly. 

Puccini's celebrated opera 
recorded at La Scab, 
Milan. Yasuto Hayashi 
stags the title roie, and 
Peter Dvoreky is 
Pinkerton, wim the 
Orchestra and Chorus of 
La State, M8an. 
conducted by Lorin 
MaazeL (simultaneous 
broadcast with stereo 
Radio 3) 

9^45 Fibn: Sophie's Choice 
O 982) starring Meryl 
Streep, in an Oscar- 
wtontogperfomtance, 
Kevin rCnne, and Peter 
MacNicof. A drama about 
a Polish concentration 
camp survivor, her Jewish 
lover, arid a young idealist 
who becomes involved 
with them both. Directed 
by Aten J Pakula. (Ceefax) 
12.10 Cbicket: Fourth Test 
Highlights of the third 
day's play., 

IZ35 Ctassfc Ghost Stortafl. 
Robert Powell reads 
M-RJames's. The Wafing 
Wefl. Ends at 12^5. 




SUNDAY 


( CHOICE ) 

• Taking the Mayflower’s sea 
crossing as read. New World 
(BBCl, 10.00pm) embarks in- 
stead on a long voyage 
through the choppy waters of 
self-discovery. Like 

Shadowlands. which was 
made by the same team 
(writer William Nicholson, 
director Norman Stone, pro- 
ducer David M Thompson), it 
is an ambitious work from the 
Everyman stable, and it is 
tactually based on the dash 
between the rigidly godly Pil- 
grim Fathers and the less 
godly adventurers with whom 


ITV/LONDON 


643 TV-am begins with Sunday 
Comment; 74)0 Are You 
Awake Yat?; 7.25 Wac 
Extra. 

BJ30 David Frost on Sunday. 

9l 25 Wake Up London 8u35 
Ftae Ananatympics (1979) 
An animated fflm about the 
members of the anbnai 
kingdom who are 
competingata - 
meeting held in 
StarSum. Directed by 
Steven Ltebergor. 

11X0 Monting Worship from the 
Holy Cross Church, 
Bearsted, Kent 124)0 
PoficeFive. 

12.15 Film: Buck Roger* in the 
25th Centura (1979) 
starring G9 Gerard. 
Science fiction yam about 
an astronaut In a state of 
suspended animation for 
five centuries, who 
awakens to discover he is 
on board an alien space 
craft Directed by Daniel 
HaHer. 

24)0 Tbs Human Factor. Ted 
Harrison reports from New 
York on the plight of 
babies bom to mothers 
who are victims of the 
drug 'Crack'. 

£30 LWTNews headlines 
followed by Monster 
Trucks: The Rnal Battles. 
More oodsions than the 
Duke boys could imadne. 
3.1 5 The Little MatchgkL 
A musical set at Christmas 
1880 in London, about a 
poor tittle 
matches. 

Roger Dattrey, ancTNatefie 
Morse. (Oracle) 

445 Builseye SpedaL Darts 
and general knowledge 
game show. 

5J0 The Gnsnbkweeds 
Show. Comic sketches 
from five funny men. 

64J0 Winner Tates AB 

CiBtatmao Gpecfsl 


465 On medium wave only. 
Fourth Test in 
Mefooume. Una 74B 
6.55 WSalhar. 74)0 News 
7 JOS On VHF-Aubada: 
Kabalevsky (Cofas 
Breugnon overture: Boston 
POfte), PiemA (Aubacte 
Goossens/fooe, and 

, G O SBO C 

i Noel: Academy of 
ant Music). Poulenc 

:with 


Song from Lakma i 
JOffli Sutherland). Chopin 

miree waltzes. Od 70: 

(LacatedrakJohn 
waHams. guitar), Leopold 
Mozart fSfntoda 
pastorattalnAiwithMchei 

Gsrcin-MaiTou.afohorn), 
Martinu (Act 3, semes 24 of 
the baitet SpaJfcefc wftii 
Miroslav Kopp, tenod. BXO 

Nows 

94)5 Record Review: Critics' 
Choice 1986. With Paul 
Vaughan, Alan Btyth, Richard 
Osbome, Lionel Salter, 

John Warrack 

10.15 Stareo Release: 

Bruckner (Aettoate Nos 1 
and 2: wttft Corydori Singers 
and solo 

instrumentatists). Berfioz 

(Symphorte lunebre at 
triomphate. Op 15: Montreal 
SO rad Chores) 

11.10 Bach transcriptions of 
Busoni: Gordon Fergus 

Thompson (piano) plays 


On long wave (s) Stereo on VtF 

seteetton of musk: ft) 6X0 
News; Morning Has 
Broken 6-55 Weatiwn Travel 

74)0 News 7.10 Sunday 
Papers 7.15 Apna Hi 
Ghar Samataiye 7.45 Beti3 
on Sufxtey 7X0 Turning 
Over New Leaves 7^5 
weather; Travel 

BXO News 8.10 Sunday 
Papers 8.15 Sunday. 
Religious news and 
vtaws-XXO The Week's 
Good Cause. Lord Murray on 

satf-heip projects being 
set up by young and adult 
urwn^yed people 8^ 

94)0 News 9.10 Sunday 
Papers 

9.15 Letter From America by 
Alastair Cooke. 

9X0 Morning Service from 
The Crypt of Canterbury 
Cathedral (s) 

10X0 The Arehera. Omnibus 
edtion 

11X3 Emma, Part 4 ft) 

12X0 News; Fat Man On A 
Bicyle. Tom Vernon 
encounters spa watera and 
sausage machines ft) 

12X7 The Goon Show. Tne 
Internal Mowitato 12J5 
Weather 


larbuck-Thei 
include David Frost 

gjg flews. 

6-40 ^g iw a y. Sir Harry visits 

7.15 Star LiUe Staten. A 
portrait of ttie Walton 
sextuptate during their 
third year. Narrated by 
Michael AspeL 

8.00 Surprise Surprtae with 
CS9a Black ara Bob 
Caroigees. (Orecta) 

9X0 News. 

9.15 Clve Jameson 
Television. Cfips from 
tBieviston world-wide. 

10.15 TbiaLTtaa Tumor In 
concert at London's 
Camdan Pteace. 

11.15 LWTNews headlines 
followed by An Audience 
With BNy ConnoBy. The 
Scottish comedian In a 
show first seen on C4. 

12.15 Tales From theDari^dsL. 
A drank is plagued by a 
boy claiming to be his son. 

1240 Night Thoughts. 


works including Toccata 
and Fugue in Dminor. and 
Checome In D minor 

1145 Robert Mayer Concert: 
London Smfontetta 
(under Edgar Howerth),wtth 
Phtifo Martin (piano), 
Michael CoOtas (clarinet). 
Jopin (rags Inducting 

The Entertainer), tabs (In the 
inn), Gershwin 

rhiBlua), 


they set foot on the coast of the 
Indians’ America. One can 
quarrel with the odd bit of 
shallow characterization in 
the film, and- 1 could have 
done with more sparks in the 
script, but for all that. New 
World still manages to 
look^nd sound, like one of the 
more intelligent of television 
mini-spectaculars. 

• Best of the rest today: 
Maazel conducting a La Scala 
production of Madama 
Butterfly (BBCL and Radio 3, 
7.15pm), Hitchcock's at- 
mospheric Rebecca (C4, 
2.00pm), and Bach's Christ- 
mas Oratorio (R3, 2.00pm). 

PJX 


CHANNEL 4 


9X0 FHnc Sfuee 420* (1955) 

staipte^ut^rtel^anffnan 
who arrives in Ira Ug dty 
to seek his fortune and Is 
force to choose between 


to corruption and 

Directed by Raj 
Kapoor, (in Hindi with 
English subtitles) 

12X0 SBas Mamer. An animated 
version of George EBofs 
story of a weaver who is 
forced to become a 
recluse, (r) 

14X) Tranis. The concluding 
two sincries matches in the 
final of me Davis Cup 
between Austrafla and 
Sweden in Mefooume. 

2X0 Fftn: Rebecca* (1946) 
starring Laurence Oflvier 
and Joan Fontaine. Alfred 
Hitchcock’s version of the 
Daphne Du Maurier tftrfflar 
about a young woman 
who marries a man who is 
sta haunted by the 

memory of his first wife 
who died in mysterious 
circumstances. 

430 Gardeners' Calendar 


Susan Brookes. Amateur 
gardeners from the 
GtMford and Woking 
areas ply RHS experts 
with questions. 

5X0 News summary and 
weather followed by 
Bernard IMes on the 
Hafis. Lord Bernard recals 
the music hafl period of his 
career, with help from 
Spike Mlflgan and Beryl 
Reid, amongst others. 



_ Richard Rodney 
Bermatt (Friday's, 

• Saturday's and Sunday’s 
Chad). 1X0 News 

14)5 Smetana String Quartets 
Mozart (Quartet in E flat, 

K 4285. Smetana (Quartet No 

~~,Janac8k (Quartet No 


6X0 American Footoai. Tha 
New Btgiand Patriots at 
the Miami Dotohins. 

7.15 Perm and Talar Go 
PubGc.Thetwo 
e xtra ord in ary magicians, 

winners of this year's 
Golden Rose of Montraux, 
in a showcase of their 
talents. 

745 Ten Days That Shook 
Soho. HighHghts from the 
First Soho Jazz Festival, 
held in October. Among tha 
artists appearing are Ira 
Tommy Chase Quartet. 
Courtney Pine, the Jazz 
Defectors, Maria Murphy, 
and Stan Tracey. 

9X0 Fftn: Being There (1979) 
starring Peter SeBers and 
Shirley Maclaine. A black 
comedy about an tiflterate 
Washington gardener 
whose naivety is mistaken 
for tatoBoctual and political 
brffliancaby the 
kingmakers. Directed by 
Hal Ashby. 

11X5 Hank Wongfordat 

Strangevays. A concert 
.given by the country and 
western singer to a 
captive audience ta the 
chapel of Strangeways 
Prison in Manchester. 
Ends at 12^5. 


Bttn^cxL Wtfii Christopher 
Cook, Richard Cork. 
CttastophorDunWeyrad 
GBDan Reynolds 

845 Uszt BBC Stagers 

perform Via cruris, 1878 

7X0 TetomrorcChandos 
Baroftje PJayere. Trio- 
sonata hi G minor tor oboe 
and vlofln: Trio-sonata ta 
D minor, for recorder end 
vlofln. and Concerto m A 
minor for recorder, oboe and 
viofln 

BXO Die Ba hc ha n i ta n e n : Egon 
Weilesz's two act opera, 

sung in German. Act one. 

performed by the Vienna 
/Austrian 


* 


Performed by tl 
Stacpkagamlb/ 


SO/ cast tackicing 

c, Polgar, Mazzola, 


2X5 Sdnibert Piano Sonatas: 
Martino Tirimoptaya the 

G.D894 

&05 Organ music from 

Irmsbruck: Ronhard Jau) 

plays works by Johannes 

Luython, Oriaretas. and 
Christian Erbecta 
3X0 Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau 
at Salzburg: wflh Hartmut 

Hafl, piano. WOK songs, sat 

to poems by Eduard 
Morike. tadudtag Der 
Genesene an die 


Storchenbot a chaft, tai 

Fruhfing and Abachled 
5X0 Jazz Record Requests: 

with Peter Clayton 
545 Critics' Forum of 198& in 
the chair. Michael 


1X0 The World This 

Weekend; News 1X5 


Demltz, 

Brenda Roberts. 

Schuchter, and Sima 

9.15 Merely Presentation: 

AUstafr Ketheringfon on 

Poetical CommtOTc atio ns; 

The General Election 
carmaignof 1983 
9X5 DleBakchratinnercthe 
second act 

10X0 Invisible as Music: Hetan 
Horton as Emily 
Dickinson in a s otact fon ol 
her poems and tatters. 

Wflh Peter Dickinson (piano) 
11X0 Beethoven Piano 

Sonatas: the No 17 and 
the No 18, ptayed by John 

11X7 News. 12X0 Close 
12X0 Test Match: third day of 
the Fourth Test UntH 



2X0 Nevra; Pick of the Year. 
Margaret Howard selects 
highlights of the war’s 
programmes on BBC tv 
andradtoft) 

3X0 News; The Afternoon 
Play. Christmas Hoflday. 
by Somerset Maugham (s) 

430 The Impresarios. Danfle 
Snowman talks to Alan 
Slevwright and Denny 
Dayviss who tor needy 
20 years have periodtaafly 
staoedODoa 
extravaganzas with the 
world's greatest singers 
ft) 

54U News; Travel 

5-05 You Must R e member 
TWs. Nigel Andrews 
discovers tha toss tamiSar 

story behind the makfcm 

ofCasabfanca(r)ft)SXS 
Shipping 5u55 weather 

a im Nawg 

6.15 I've Been Together For 
70 Years Now. Johnny 
Morris recate hta ctlidhood 
ta Wales. 

7X0 Cowboyl Christopher 
Fraytlng with the Beoond 
of two programmes 
reflecting the modern- 


day iite of the Greet 
American Cowboy ft) 

7X0 Murder for Christmas. 

Unto the Grave, by John 
Perm ft) 

9X0 News; Actuary. 

Remember My Name. 

New York’s Htah School of 
Music and P i form tag 
Arts, made famous by the TV 

series Fame, celebrates 
its 50th anniversary this year. 
9X7 Weather; Travel 


10.15 The Mra Who Was 
Nobody, by Keith 

Waterhouse, featuring Judi 
Dench and Michael 
WUame in a close lock at 
the world and the diary of 
a Nobody (s) 

11X0 Seeds off Faith ft) 

11.15 Mexico at Christmas. 
Mexico spends 
Christmas this year with 
inflation at 100 per cent 
and with massive debts. 
What w9 the festive 
season be Ha? 


12X0 News; weather 12X3 


VHF 



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42 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 27 1986 


Foret pobfisfred in 1785 



SPORT 


aeb ea Dalglish loses out 
is no? in the tactical 

B^CfclKK battle of Airfield 


enough 

By Clive White 

A typically gritty per- 
formance away from the 
mtimMatiag environment of 
Stamford Bridge was still not 
enough to lift Chelsea off the 
bottom of the first division, bat 
the 2-1 victory — their first in 
the league in 10 games - at 
Southampton was much wel- 
comed by John HoUins, die 
Chelsea manager. 

Bmnstead scored the winner 
in the 87th minute for Chelsea 
after Clarke had given South- 
ampton tbe lead with his 17th 
goal of the season. Nixon, 
standing in for Shilton, who is 
still recovering from a broken 
nose, was at fault for die 
Chelsea equalizer, staying on 
bis fine as McLaughlin 
headed in Specific's cross. 

Luton Town, who normally 
delight in home advantage, 
lost for tbe first time at 
Kenilworth Road this season 
in the darby against Watford 
as Porter and Richardson 
scored in the opening 17 
minutes. Luton’s hopes of 
narrowing the margin dis- 
appeared when Nicholas blas- 
ted a penalty over the crossbar 
after Grimes had been fooled 
by Bardsley. 

Everton, the champions of 
two seasons ago, made a 
significant move towards tak- 
ing over command of the first 
division when they leap- 
frogged over Nottingham For- 
est and Liverpool into second 
place. 

They also ent Arsenal’s lead 
to four ponds as they scored a 
mightily impressive 4-0 vie- 


at St James' Park, ami their 
Boxing Day was made com- 
plete by Manchester United's 
first away win in the league 
this season — at Anfidd. 

With this victory Everton 
had overcome potentially die 
only awkward fixture of their 
holiday programme. They now 
have two borne games against 
Leicester City and Aston Villa. 
Trevor Steven, die England 
player, who stood on the 
Newcastle terraces as a young- 
ster, brought the Geordies to 
their knees with two goals in 
three minutes 

Kenny Dalglish, the Liver- 
pool manager, blamed himself 
for lack of organization in 
Liverpool's play as they failed 
for the seventh consecutive 
season to defeat United, for 
whom Whiteside scored die 
only goal of the game. 
Dalglish sank “Organization 
is a manager's responsibility 
and it jnst wasn't there In the 
first half. If I don't take full 
responsibility E would be 
shirking the issue and I have 
no intention of doing that" 

United themselves were or- 
ganized from the back by 
Bryan Robson, the England 
captain, who was drafted into 
die back four in the absence of 
the injured McGrath. 

Tottenham Hotspur also 
gained grand on their North 
London neighbours with a one- 
sided 4-0 defeat of West Ham 
United before a crowd of 
39,0X9. Clive Allen scored 
twice to take bis league total to 
. 21, an average ®f a goal a 
game, which keeps him well 
schedule to beat Jimmy 
Greaves’s dob record of 37 set 
in 1962-63. 

Arsenal's 1-1 draw at 
Leicester was slightly de- 
valued by the fact that Leices- 
ter were reduced effectively to 
. 10 men by injuries to Wilson 
and Osman. With the former 
substituted in the 26th minute 
Osman was required to travel 
on as a passenger near the 
halfway fine for more than half 
the game 


Liverpool 0 

Manchester United 1 

Manchester United’s splen- 
did Anfield record was sus- 
tained by a late goal of high 
quality from Norman White- 
side yesterday as Liverpool 
were punished for a mistake- 
riddled performance for which 
Kenny Dalglish, their player- 
manager, accepted 

responsibilty. 

The tactical gamble by Alex 
Ferguson, the United man- 
ager, of playing Robson at the 
heart of defence in place of the 
injured McGrath, paid a rich 
dividend as the England cap- 
tain and his back-four partner, 
Moran, not only effectively 
blocked out Dalglish and 
Rush but also set up United's 
first away win of the season. 

In contrast, Dalglish’s de- 
cision to operate Molby, his 
influential midfield player, as 
a fifth defender, backfired as 
United's midfield took com- 
mand to dictate the pace and 
ultimately engineer the game's 
winning goal. 

Dalglish said: “In the first 
half we were totally disorga- 
nized, which really is my fault. 

Organization is a manager's 

responsibility and it just 
wasn't there in the first half. If 
I didn’t take frill responsibil- 
ity, I’d be shirking the issue. 

“I was responsible for 
preparing the side before the 
match and I foiled in my 
responsibilities. The biggest 
problem we gave ourselves 
was ourselves and it was a 
disappointing display.” 

United, unbeaten in seven 
League visits to Anfield 
stretching back to 1979. 
achieved victory with a potent 
mix of aggression and flair. 
Duxbury and Olsen played 
leading roles against a Liver- 
pool side marooned by the 
breakdown of the passing 
game on which their success is 
based. 

Inevitably, that led to 
frustration for Liverpool and 
with tension running high in 
both camps, the pie-match 


By Steve Bates 
emphasis on comradeship 
swiftly subsided. In a first half 
dominated by United, Moran, 
Whiteside, Dalglish and 
Molby were all involved in 
confrontations which threat- 
ened to ignite an alreadiy 
charged atmosphere. 

The United players arrived 
at Anfield with Bob Paisley on 
their coach and they walked 
out alongside their Liverpool 
colleagues in an effort to 

present a friendly front But 

More football 

on page 40 

that dissolved as United 
ripped into a Liverpool side 
who were always struggling to 
cope with the pace of Olsen 
and United's probing 
midfield. 

Grobbelaar was forced into 
a desperate save to keep out 
Moran’s fierce shot from 
Davenport’s tenth minute 
pass and Liverpool survived 
again when Olsen’ s follow-up 
effort was deared off the line 
by Molby. 

As Liverpool struggled to 
cope with United's fluent and 
forceful football, Ferguson’s 
men gleefully took advantage 
of their opponents’ alarming 
disorganization. Liverpool's 
plight was perfectly dem- 
onstrated by a Grobbelaar 
throw which fell straight to 
Strachan, who beat Molby 
before crossing to the for post, 
where Olsen should have done 
better with a free h e a der . 

Liverpool's half-time talk 
inevitably led to a change of 
approach, with Molby revert- 
ing to his more accustomed 
role alongside McMahon and 
Whelan and Lawrenson mov- 
ing to right-back. While the 
different formation baited 
Liverpool's decline, it was not 
enough to stop a United side 
who by now were in full flbw 
and sensing an historic 
Anfield debut for their new 
manager. 

Stapleton and Whiteside 


Portsmouth’s play 
criticized again 


By dive White 


Portsmouth, who two weeks 
ago were involved in the most 
indisriplined League match in 
England for 31 years, stood 
accused again yesterday of 
violent behaviour, this time 
by the opposition’s jmanager. 
Dave Smith, the P ly mo uth 
Argyte manager, was so in- 
censed by one tackle, which 
left UzzeU, his centre bade, 
nursing a damaged shin, that 
he instructed the dub’s 
photographer to take pictures 
ofit 

Smith said after his team’s 
3-2 defeat at Home Park: “I 
am very upset because one of 
my players nearly had his log 
broken. I am glad we’ve got a 
full 90 minutes of film so we 
can look at every little in- 
cident that went on.” 

Alan Ball, the Portsmouth 
manager, refused to comment 
on the game, in which only 
two players were booked. 
Plymouth have now taken 
only one point from their last 
four games but Smith thought 
bis team deserved some re- 
ward from yesterday’s match. 
He said: “If it had been a 
boxing contest, the referee 
would have stepped in early to 


stop it They had five shots 
and scored three goals, but we 
created an awful lot more.” 

The season of ill-will 
abounded elsewhere, too, 
though it was refuted by Alan 
Mullery, the Brighton wad 
Hove Albion manager, who 
described the refereeing of 
David Elleray, of Harrow, in 
another second division game 
at Sdhurst Park as “farcical”. 

Mr Elleray sent off one 
player. Dale Jasper of Brigh- 
ton, and booked seven others 
in a fixture between Brighton 
and Crystal Palace which is 
well known for its hard, 
competitive nature. 

Two more players were sent 
off in the fourth division 
match at Roots Hall: Roy 
McDonough of Southend 
United and David Gilbert of 
Northampton Town. David 
Harte, of Scunthorpe United, 
was also dismissed in the 
match with Peterborough 
United. In a bruising 1-1 draw 
at Plough Lane between 
Wimbledon and Oxford Uni- 
ted, four players were booked. 

Portsmouth win: page 40 


both flashed headers over 
Grobbelaax’s bar before Olsen 
blotted an otherwise perfect 
display by hesitating too long 
as Liverpool's defence scam- 
pered back to smother a swift 
raid. The sweetness and pre- 
cision of United’s midfield 
allowed their full-backs, Gib- 
son and Sivebaek vital space 
to exploit Liverpool's 
stretched defence. 

As United kept a firm grip 
on Rush, who has foiled to 
score in 14 attempts against 
United, Whelan sliced a clear- 
ance over his own bar as their 
desperation grew. 

In the seventy-eighth 
minute their miserable Boxing 
Day was completed _ as 
Whiteside sent the United 
supporters in the 40,663 
crowd into raptures of delight 
Robson’s long ball was 
beaded-on by Stapleton and 
although Davenport saw his 
shot blocked, the ball fell for 
Olsen, who squared a pass for 
Whiteside to beat Grobbelaar 
with a stunning low drive 
which silenced an already 
subdued Kop. 

Venison was booked for a 
reckless challenge on the run 
but Liverpool pressed forward 
and they forced United into 
some desperate defending as 
they searched for an equalizer. 
Lawrenson’s cross was met by 
Whelan's header and the ball 
appeared to hit Robson on the 
hand but David Allison, the 
referee, waved away protests 
as United survived. 

Molby had a vicious low 
drive saved by Walsh, the 
United goalkeeper, as Liver- 
pool played their last card, but 
tbe day belonged to United, 
who continued their improve- 
ment under their new man- 
ager in style. 

LIVERPOOL: B Grobbetaar: G GBtespia, J 
Begin. M Lawrenson. R Whelan, A 
Hansen. K Dalgfish, B Venison, I Rush, J 
Moby. S McMahan. 

MANCHESTER UNITED: G Walsh: J 
Sivebaek. C Gibson, N Whtteskfe. K 
Moran, M Duxbury. B Robson. G 
Strachan, F Stapleton, P Davenport, J 
Olsen. 

Referee: DAfeon 

Rangers 9 
power 
should tell 

By Hugh Taylor 

A crowd of more than 
40,000 should see Rangers 
beat Dundee United at Ibrox 
today and leapfrog over their 
opponents into second place 
in the Premier Division. 

Rangers are ag ain oozing 
power and class. 

Celtic have lost some of 
their zest, having dropped 
four points in their last four 
matches. No one, however, 
can deny their determination 
and they have a chance against 
Clydebank at Kilbowie Park 
to repair a pattern which has 
become ragged because of 
slipshod passing. 

Exciting football can be 
expected at Fir Park, where 
Motherwell will have to be at 
their best to earn a point from 
St Mirren, who gave their new 
manager, Alex Smith, a win- 
ning start last week. 

Hearts should keep them- 
selves in contention for the 
championship with a win over 
Falkirk at Tynecastle but 
Hibernian are hardly likely to 
pull themselves out of a 
decline at Dens Park at the 
expense of the sturdy Dundee. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Wigan end unbeaten 
record of St Helens 


By Keith Macklm 


PAY THIS YEARS 

PRICE TO SAIL 
QE2 TO NEW YORK 
NEXT YEAR 

QE2 returns next April after the greatest 
refit in maritime history. During 1987 shell be 
crossing the Atlantic 25 times. 

And by booking before January list 198/: 
you can join any of these sailings at this yeans price. 

An Air-Sea package (QE2 one way. British 
Airways flight the other) starts at 1780. To upgrade 
to supersonic Concorde add £399 per person. 

Send for full details now. Contact Cunard 
at JQA Pall Mall. London SW1Y 5LS. call the 
number below ar see your travel agent. 



01-491 3930 

A member of [huTralalfpr House Group. 


The proud undefeated 
record of St Helens was ended 

yesterday as their old enemies, 
Wigan, won a dour and de- 
fence-dominated match be- 
fore a crowd of more than 
21,000 at Knowsley Road. 
With St Helens defending 
their undefeated league 
record, and Wigan anxious to 
take it from them, it never 
became tbe spectacular run- 
ning game most expected. 

Indeed, for long periods it 
was a dull encounter, punc- 
tuated by handling errors, 
ruthless tackling and the beep 
of tbe referee’s whistle. 

St Helens could never get 
their attack going in the free- 
flowing style of previous home 
matches, and Wigan's tena- 
cious tackling snuffed out 
most of the attempted attacks 
at birth. Clark, the Australian 
stand-off half; made several 
promising bursts, but was 
often unsupported as the St 
Helens threequarter line foiled 
to function as a unit 

Wigan scored the two tries, 
one in each half Stephenson 
got tbe first, beating three men 
to the comer flag from a pass 
by Lydon. He kicked the goal 
from the touchline, and with 


one by Loughlin for the Saints, 
foe score was 8-2 for Wigan at 
half-time. 


In the second half Wigan 
survived a few sporadic St 
Helens attacks, then came 
away with a good try, Gill 
going in at the comer follow- 
ing splendid work by Ed- 
wards, West and Goodway. 
Loughlin kicked a second 
penalty for St Helens. 

Hie brief revival of Hall 
Kingston Rovers ended in a 
16-10 defeat at Castieford, but 
the other Humberside dub, 
HnH, maintained their rapid 
improvement by winning 26-6 
at home to Feaiherstone 
Rovers. 

The champions, Halifax, 
are bidding to have a say in 
this season’s title, and they 
intensified the present gloom 
around Bradford with a 20-4 
victory in the West Riding 
local derby. In ano ther holi- 
day derby game, Oldham 
came from behind to beat 
Salford 34-18. 

In the second division, 
Hnoslet kept their top place 
with a win at Brantley, and 
Doncaster continued their 
promotion-chasing form by 
scoring five tries in an ex- 
cellent -24-14 success at 
Runcorn HighfiekL 

STONES BITTER CHAMPIONSHIP: 
Leeds 48. Wbkaflefd 4: Castiefort 1 6. Hull 
Kingston Rovers 10. Second s&fefe: 
Dewsbury B. Bothy 8; Btackpogl JL 
Rochdale 18; York M, Huddersfield 22; 
WdririMtofl 14, Whitehaven 22. 



By Clive White 

Tottenham Hotspur 4 

West Ham United 0 

The debutant, receiving a 
congratulatory pat on the head 
from Hoddle, left: the field 
yesterday self-consciously 
looking away from the appre- 
ciative glare of foe White Hart 
Lane audience. Steve Hodge, 
could have afforded himself a 
smile, having got what he 
wanted for Christmas — a 
place in a team of real 
championship capabilities. 

He dipped into his new 
Tottenham Hotspur position 
with the ease and comfort of 
someone pulling on an expen- 
sive, made to measure coat 
and he topped it off with a 
goal Tottenham were very 
much the toffs, shaming the 
Easterners with a perfor- 
mance of elegance that was all 
of four goals superior as West 
Ham suffered their worst de- 
feat to their London rivals in 
19 seasons. 

This was Tottenham’s sixth 
win in their last eight games, 
just the kind of consistency 
they will need if they are to 
mount a serious challe n ge 
upon foe northern fortresses 
not to menljon one much 
nearer home in north London. 
“The idea of push and run is 
just starting to get through to 
them as a group. I'm afraid we 
sold the crowd short in the 
later stages but by then the 
game had been won and we’ve 
got another one tomorrow,” 
David Pleat, the Tottenham 
manager, said. 

Less obviously, but no less 
vitally, Hoddle was again a 
major contributor to a Totten- 
ham success, having a foot in 
three of the goals. Pleat will no 
doubt be delighted if Hoddle 
can force him to reconsider his 
assessment of the Tottenham 
darling. 

Howie’s pride of place 


among Tottenham hearts is 
being challenged by Clive 
Allen who is scoring goals with 


were too many anonymous 
performances, notably from 
the likes of Devonshire, 


the regularity and reliability of Coffee and to a lesser extent 
a robot Another brace took McAvennie. 


his tally to 21 in the League, „.. , . 
which was where k teaUy * 2 

mattered Pleat said. start it was clear that West 

Ham s traditional dominance 
Give's cousin, Paul, helped in this fixture would not be 
to sustain foe Allen Show, continued as a Hoddle corner 
After a disappointing first was nodded on by Gough and 
season for Tottenham, made Qive Allen hooked the ball in 
more so by the contrary off the underside of the cross- 
fortune of his former West bar. Ward, with ill-judged 
Ham colleagues last season, . enthusiasm, attempted to halt 
Paul Allen is playing again the p rocess i on towards the 


Nothing can top 
Everton victory 

The Everton manager, How- 
ard Kendall, doubts whether 
his team will ever play better 
than they did in the 4-0 
thrashing of Newcastle Unified 
at St James' Park yesterday. 

“This is the best we have 
played all season,” he said. 
“In feet we wfll probably never 
play better. Obviously the 
result pleased me but so did 
the quality of the performance 
and the way in which tbe result 
was achieved which leaves me 
with a warm tingle.” 

To cap an unhappy day Jbr 
Newcastle their fuff hades, 
John Anderson (foot) and 
John Bailey (Achilles tendon), 
will both have their injuries 
pet into plaster today. 

Match report, page 40 

with the zest for life which first 
attracted Tottenham. He rel- 
ished tbe opportunity to dem- 
onstrate his new found 
enthusiasm to his old friends. 

The effervescence, though, 
has clearly gone ont of West 
Ham and for the third week 
running John LyaD, their 
manager, maintained the grill- 
ing they had just received 
from the opposition for a 
further hour after the game in 
a locked dressing room. There 


West Ham goal when he 
painfully cut down Mitchell 
Thomas 

But if Thomas had to limp 
out of the game with damaged 
ankle ligaments, and probably 
out of todays fixture at Cov- 
entry too, Tottenham were in 
no mood to retire. Anifles 
came on and Galvin was 
efficient enough a full bade to 
be considered for today’s 
game, which may also see foe 
return of Claesen. 

Another Hoddle cross and 
some diligent ferreting by Paul , 
Allen created an opportunity 
which Hodge accepted with 
foe sort of spontaneous finish- 
ing that has earned him 11 
F jigiBnd caps. Only a magnifi- 
cent, instinctive stop by 
Parties to a running header 
denied him a second. 

A minute later Waddle 
added a third with an unortho- 
dox prod with his left foot 
after receiving the ball in a 
rare moment of generosity by 
Clive Allen. The rout was 
completed by foe 69th minute 
as Hodge again immersed 
himself in foe action. 

IOI ILMIAM: R Ctomnoa: D Thomas. M 
Thomas (sub: O Antfos). S Hodge. R 
Gough, G MabbUt C Afcn. P Aten. C 
Wafifle, G HodtDo, A GaMn. 

WEST HAM UTD: P Parkas; S Potts. G 
Parrts, S Watford. A Marlin. A Devonshire. 

M ward. F McAvennie, A Dickens, A 
Cattee.NOrr. 

RH w s R S Lands (Surrey). 


Aerial dual: Frank McAvennie, of West Ham, gets the better of Clive Allen, his counterpart 
at Tottenham, during the London derby yesterday (Photograph: Ian Stewart) 

Hodge shows his pedigree as 
Tottenham turn on the style 


Mandlikova 
may switch 

Brisbane (AP) — The 
world's fourth-ranked 
women's tennis player, Hana 
Mandlikova, of Czecho- 
slovakia, is seeking Australian 
citizenship, a newspaper here 
has reported; 

Miss Mandlikova, who is 
aged 24 and married a Czech- 
born Australian this year, was 
here yesterday to practice and 
attend the draw for the 
women's classic tournament 
at Milton. 

The newspaper. The Cou- 
rier-Mail, said she would 
make a statement today, and 
reported her coach, Betty 
Stove, as saying: “It’s no 
secret, we've got nothing to 
hide” 




Mandlikova: in Australia 


Bids offer 

San Francisco (AP) — San 
Francisco must submit a bid 
by the spring if it is interested 
in hosting foe 1996 Olympic 
Games, officials said yes- 
terday. “There’s a great deal 
that has to be done to host an j 
Olympics,” warned the San 
Francisco mayor, Dianne 
Feinstein, who has written to 
city supervisors asking for 
their feelings on the matter 

George T. Miller, foe secretary 
general of foe United States 
Olympic Committee, has writ- 
ten to Feinstein and leaders of 
some other cities about foe 
possibility of bidding to stage 
the Games. 


Lush to 
protest 
over TV 
link 

By John Goodbody 

Peter Lash, the England 
cricket team manager, is to 
complain officially to tbe BBC 
saying that the touring party 
"were let down badly” during 
the Christmas Day live tele- 
vision li p k with Australia on 
the eve of the fourth Test in 
Melbourne. 

The England party, _ who 
were invited to hike part in the 
Noel Edmonds Christmas 
Show, bad expected to be 
linked by satellite from their 
hotel with their fa milie s at the 
studio in London immediately 
the programme began at 
11.30am. But other material 

was used first. 

Because of the tone arf- 
ference the players did notget 
to bed on til around 1130pm 
on the night before the fourth 
Test began. Lush sai d: “Th e 
BBC gave as an assurance 
they would be able to tal k to 
their families during the first 
15 minutes of the programme, 
that is to say by I0.45pai 
Melbourne time. 

“This undertaking was not 
adhered to by tire BBC who 
did not complete the inter- 
views until 11.13pm, and 
Mickey Stewart (the assistant 
manager) did not even have 
the opportunity to speak to his 
wife, who had made a special 
journey to London having 
altered important family 
commitments to do so.” 

John Woodcock, page 37 

Lush also complained that 
arrangements at the team's 
bote! were “totally 
inadequate.” He was 

not possible to see the pictures 
from England dearly on the 
monitor screens and the sound 
quality was poor, which made 
the link-up with relatives very 
difficult indeed. In addition, 
many people had to stand m a 
very cramped area for over an 
hour.” 

Lush admitted that he only 
agreed that tbe players could 
take part in the programme 
“with some apprehensfon.”He 
added:“My worst fears have 
been fulfilled. The players 
were deeply disappointed by 
what occurred and as far as 
they were concerned, the con- 
cept of the programme had 
been ruined.” 

A spokeswoman for the 
BBC in London said:“We were 
running about 10 minutes late 
but tire interviews were fin- 
ished by about 11.10pm. We 
agreed in writing tire players 
would be hi bed by 1130pm 
and we stiff fulfilled what we 
said we would do, although we 
are sorry that we were running 
late. 

“We are also sorry about 
Mickey Stewart hut tbe logis- 
tics that are needed for a live 
programme of this kind are 
considerable.” 

Slow pace 
suits 
England 

Ian Botham’s rib muscle 
injury may have been partly 
responsible for Australia's 
dramatic collapse on the first 
day of the fourth Test match in 
Melbourne yesterday. 
Botham took five for 41 as 
Australia were dismissed for 
141, with En gland r eariiing 
for one wicket by the dose. 

Botham said he was howling 
at about 65 per cent of bis 
normal speed. “1 don’t rtimir a 
slower pace did any harm in 
those overcast conditions,” he 
ssSied. “It may have helped to 
swing the hall about a bit 
more. We bowled well, made 
them play at everything and 
held our catches.” 

Gladstone Small, who also 
took five wickets, admitted to 
being nervous early on. “It’s 
rasay tire biggest crowd I’ve 
ptayed m front of,” be said. 
But i soon settled down and 

goton with the job.” 

Jack Richards, England's 

A lc l^?Ji eeper ’ rated the 
Australian captain Allan 

™! er s dismissal as the best 
of his five catches. “It came 

u* qBite tow. 

V? Borer's 
wickrt also made it special,” 


baswuted .so long for an 
Austrian victory, must be 
reflecti iig on a gamble that 

Wore the match started he 
£*««»«»<« a few 


secret, we ve got nothing to toon for inflatable dinghies „ „ . __ . 

hide” with crews oftwo on ApriT II Sally Timms, toe Prudential 

and 12. The two-day event is B nt3S& . Gimt tennis 
lVnrWftV^ rjofa open to all-comers. Teams champion from Woodford 
ilUl a take toeir inflatable dinghies Green, Essex, has been named 

Norway, ranked No 2 in with outboard motors along f? ^ e T ~“ *0 

Western Europe, will com- toe River TharSes and around Team Jaeger, a £ l u,uuu spoo- 
plete the field for foe Pickfoids adjoining canals and water- sored squad ot juniors 
Travel international volley- ways over a 40-mile circuit, launched last May. Miss 
ball "trophy at Alexandra carrying their craft past lock Timms, toe 1 7-year-oki win- 
Pavilion, North London, on. gates and other obstacles. The n ® r 2} "nusn womens 
January 7, 8 and % This dinghies pass the Houses of pre-Christmas tournament at 
toe withdrawal of Parliament and find toeir way Qu^u.s. Club, London, last 


ill w HBge D ,r f — “ ” "Mre mcicnred 

Dinghy deal theGan.es. ^ Sk 

Carisbeig is to sponsor the TJ , risks with 

Round London Boat Mara- T lltllll S CflOSeil 8° them id we *£12 
toon for inflatable dinghies . gamble a bit Trinn*»»- 

with crews of two on April 1 1 S e Potential ultimately lose ** ** 

and 12. The two-day event is hat r m notSi?fe. a P™ 1 

nnm tn Champion from Woodford it with a 


toe River TharSes and around 
adjoining canals and water- 
ways over a 40-mile circuit, 
carrying their craft past lode 


follows toe withdrawal of 
Peru. Norway will oppose 
Cuba (ranked No 2 in toe 
world), East Germany (No 4) 
and Japan (No 7). England 
and Sweden will also play 
friendlies against foe ranked 
countries. 


x ni iuuulul ouu i mu utcu wav ^ ( - - .i 

to Little Venice, through the original Team 

Regent’s Paric Zoi, audio me nibers Anne S.rnpk.n 

?MboSfinSan^ 

ofuatns &o m around the 


Australia have pUyed^rj 

sSrSgass 

doing *? 

femora to aE t te stiu 

tockmu that aArLX** 





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