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THE 



TIMES 


\52'v&? 


TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


Kinnock 20CS ^ un * en( * s at CQtmtr y house after death crash 

on offensive I unharmed as 

avpr HpfnneA I man surrenders 

\*P T V'l. I yl| VV B By Stewart Tendler and Chris Steyn 

ji| . ' Miss Samantha Ettridge, containing Mr and Mrs Derek 

By Philip Webster. Chief Politica l H aged 17, the Hertfordshire Sraallbone and their two 

"Jere their poliCT has struck a of date and, for a variety of ■ ' 1^ Chri?tmas W Eve di ^ > SlSied Ch (]ta££ia SmaUbone was 

>e onensive last night on the chord with the electorate. obvious technical reasons, ■ . • v * . I «riih her famih/ last nieht as killed and her oarents. from 


the offensive last night on the 
critical genera! election issue 
of nuclear defence, describing 
Naio's nuclear strategy as 
outdated and incredible and 
accusing the Government of 
adopting policies which in- 
creased the likelihood of a 
nuclear confrontation. 

The Labour leader re- 
sponded to the party's recent 
slump in support, in which the 
restatement of its non-nuclear 
policy is accepted to have been 
a key factor, with an aggres- 
sive defence of Labour's 
stance combined with a strong 
recommitment to close 
consultations with the Ameri- 
cans over its implementation. 

It came in a letter to Mr 
George Younger, Secretary of 
State for Defence, and re- 
flected the belief of the Labour 
leadership that the acknowl- 
edged damage done by the 
launch this month of the new 
policy. Modem Britain in a 
Modern World , can be 
contained. 

The Prime Minister is ex- 
pected to return to the attack 
in her new year message to her 
party tomorrow and Labour 
leaders believe there is noth- 
ing to be gained through being 
seen to be on the defensive 
and intend to stress areas 

Tomorrow 

That was 

the year... 


m 


I ...in which Heseftine 
and Chernobyl 
exploded, Botham 
and Galtieri were 
put out of action. 
Prince Andrew and 
Geldof were 
married, and the 
Iceland summit 
froze over. As 1986 
fades away, our 
Review of the Year 
recalls the best and 
the worst of it 

New Year with 
The Times 
A major series on 
football’s future 
begins on Thursday 
in The Times , the 
only quality 
newspaper to 
publish on New 
Year’s Day. To be 
sure of this, up- 
to-the-minute 
racecards, and full 
coverage of news 
and sport, order 
your copy today. 


• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £4,000 was 
shared yesterday by 
two readers: MrfLA. 
Thompson of Dorking, 
Surrey; and Mr J.W. 
Davis of Hetton-le-Hole, 
Tyne & Wear. Details, 


pageS. 
• Portfc 


• Portfolio list, page 
21; how to pfay, 
information service, 
page 16. 


TIMES SPORT 


New trainer 

The Aga Khan has appointed 
Luca Cumani as his third 
British-based trainer, sending 
him 1 5 two-year-olds for the 
coming Flat season Page 28 


Home News 2-5 
Overseas 6-8 
Apply 14,18 
Atnaeofagy 15 

Biithsdeaifis, 

■arrisges 15 
Business 17-22 
Coen 14 

Crreswn h H.lt 
Diary 12 

Events 16 


Law Report 23 
Leaders 13 
Letters 13 
OMtmy 14 
Science 14 
Snow Reports 26 

Sport 23-26,28 
Tbeatres^tc 8 
TV & Radio 27 
Uanostfes 14 
Weather 16 
Wats 14 


cnora with the electorate. 

The party has internal poll 
evidence suggesting that 
labour’s policy of using cuts 
in the nuclear arsenal to 
strengthen conventional de- 
fence is finding favour with 
the electorate, and that people 
are at least questioning, where 
in the past they accepted 

Greenwich misgivings 2 

without argument, the 
desirabilily of Britain remain- 
ing a nuclear weapons power. 

In a Channel 4 television 
interview last night Mr Nor- 
man TebbiL Tory chairman, 
said that Labour had made the 
fetal mistake of offending its 
supporters on key areas such 
as defence. Defence, he said, 
was good issue for the 
Conservatives. 

He said that the main thrust 
of the Tory attack on Labour 
would be over its 'Incom- 
petence, inexperience and 
neglect” of fundamental is- 
sues, such as defence, and the 
ending of the defence consen- 
sus which had lasted for 40 
years. 

Mr Kinnock was replying to 
a letter from Mr Younger in 
the wake of statements the 
Labour leader made at the 
defence policy launch. 

He told Mr Younger that 
cuts introduced by the Gov- 
ernment in conventional de- 
fence increased dependence 
on nuclear weapons and low- 
ered the nuclear threshold; 
while Labour would con- 
centrate Britain's precious de- 
fence resources on improving 
conventional forces and rais- 
ing the nuclear threshold. 

He said that Nato's strategy 
of ‘‘flexible response”, the 
resort to first use of nuclear 
weapons in retaliation for a 
conventional attack, was "out. 

PO chief 
criticizes 
‘sell-off 

By John Winder 

Sir Ronald Dearing, chair- 
man of the Post Office, yes- 
terday criticized detailed plans 
published by a Conservative 
research organization for 
privatization of the corpora- 
tion in sections. 

He remained impartial on 
the merits or otherwise of 
denationalizing the whole 
Post Office, a question, he 
said, for the politicians. 

Mr Robert Albon, an 
Australian lecturer, is the 
author of a 44-page study for 
the right-wing Centre for 
Political Studies, released yes- 
terday, in which he puts 
forward a timetable beginning 
in 1987, to hive off each 
section of the Post Office to 
the private sector, starting 
with the Girobank, which is 
already a separate limited 
company. . . 

He recommends privatiza- 
tion of counter services and 
the complete removal of status 
; tory monopoly on letters in 
1988 and privatization of the 

Continued on page 16, col 2 

ihs4H*S~l 







obvious technical reasons, 
incredible.” 

However, Mr Kinnock and 
Mr Denis Healey, Labour's 
foreign affairs spokesman, 
have underlined that Labour 
will accept Nato strategy until 
it can change it. 

He reiterated that a Labour 
government would not ask the 
United States to initiate a 
nuclear war on its behalf by 
first use of nuclear weapons 

Mr Kinnock demanded that 
Mr Younger explain the pre- 
cise circumstances and pur- 
pose for which the British 
Prime Minister would order 
the first use of British nuclear 
bombs and what calculation 
had been made of the likely 
consequences, the size of any 
retaliation, and the effects of 
radiation blast and fell-out on 
British troops and civilians. 

Mr Kinnock’s intervention 
comes as politicians in ail 
parties continue to speculate 
on the likelihood of a general 
election in the spring, 

Mr David Steel, the liberal 
leader, said yesterday in his 
new year message that the 
election had become an end- 
game for the Government. 

The long-term interests of 
the people and the economy 
had been subordinated to the 
electoral cynicism of tax give- 
away, credit boom and sho p- 
ping sprees. Behind the 
gleaming high street facade the 
real economy was in a parlous 
slate. 

Mr Steel said that Britain 
was moving towards the status 
of a third world economy, 
hashing and bending metal for 
more successful societies 
while the City looked more 
and more like the centre of 
casino capitalism rather than 
the way of steering resources 
into productive use. 

Manifesto 
on schools 
derided 

By Mark Dowd 
Education Reporter 

Conservative-controlled lo- 
cal authorities and teachers 
were last night united in their 
condemnation of a radical 
right-wing manifesto for the 
reform of the state education 
system which, if im- 
plemented, would sound the 
death knell for local authority 
control of the service. 

The document. Whose 
Schools? compiled by a team 
of politicians and educa- 
tionists, including Baroness 
Cox and Professor Roger 
Scrulon, advocates the return 
to selection and says local 
education authorities (LEAs) 
have “ a standing ability to 
corrupt the minds and souls of 
the young”. 

Those words were dis- 
missed last night by Dr David 
Muffett, who is chairman of 
Hereford and Worcester 
education committee and de- 
scribes himself as a “high 
Tory”, as grossly insulting to 
the vast number of LEAs 
which have conscientiously 
carried out their tasks over the 
years. 

“What I object to is the 
arrival of these johnny-come- 
latelies setting themselves up 
as judges of the maintained 
sector when so few of them 
have any (Erect experience of 
life at that level,” he said. 

A growing number ofTories 
in local government fear that 
the Conservative Party, and iq 
particular Mr Kenneth Baker, 
the Secretary of State for 
Education, is intent on a 
substantial reduction in local 
authority power after the next 
election and will use the 
activities of the “extremists” 
as his justification. 

Mr Bill McNeill, the leader 

Continued on page 16. col 1 




Mr and Mrs Ettridge (above), delighted at their daughter's return. Below, Sir Samuel Rob- 
ots, who called in the police and Samantha Ettridge. 




X:' 

a.'KLi 


Wasps bow 
to Brent on 
apartheid 


A47 | 

^Swaffhamt 


CockJey 

Ctey. 




'CRASH 
I HERE 


L ■ 




Wasps, the rugby union 
dub whose three junior teams 
play on pitches owned by 
Brent Council, have been 
forced to caned Thursday's 
match against Rosslyn Park 
because their London rivals 
had chosen tyro South African 
internationals who 'are on 
holiday in Britain. 

Garth Wright, a scrum half; 
and Anton Barnard, a loose- 
head prop, who represented 
South Africa in the unofficial 
series with the New Zealand 
Cavaliers last May, were to 
have made guest appearances 
in the top rugby game in the 
capital on New Year’s Day. 

Mr Neville Compton, the 
fixtures secretary of Wasps, 
said last night that they had no 
option because of Brent's 
policy of no sporting links 
with South Africa, and the 
dub’s joint community pro- 
ject with tiie local counaL 

Wasps asked the opposing 
dub to leave out the two 
South Africans, but Mr David 
Whittam, the secretary of 
Rosslyn Park, said: “We do 
not want to be dictated toby a 
council on who we should 
play. If we did not sdect the 
players we would be kow- 
towing to political pressure. 
Bui we bear Wasps themselves 
no animosity." 

The pair, who had been 
given permission to play in 
England by the English Rugby 
Football Union, represented 
Rosslyn Park's second team at 
Bedford last Saturday. Mr 
Whittam added: "Neither 
player is now likely to play for 
the first team before returning 
to South Africa next month.” 

A spokeswoman for Brent 
Council said: "We are de- 
lighted by Wasps’ decision 
which follows council policy 
which is not to have any links 
with South Africa until apart- 
heid is abolished.” 


Pretoria imposes 
new restrictions 
on black students 

From Ray Kennedy, Johannesburg 


The South African Govern- 
ment yesterday gave powers to 
the Director-General of the 
Department of Education and 
Training which allow him to 
restrict and control the move- 
ment of Mack pupils. 

According to a notice in the 
Government Gazette signed by 
President p.W. Botha, any 
person who contravenes the 
orders will be liable to a fine of 
up to 4,000 rands (£1,280) or 
two years' jaiL 

The orders cover a wide 
range of activities, including 
the presence of pupils on 
school premises, as well as the 
types of reading material and 
clothing they may display. 

The new measures are in 
addition to steps introduced 
in July forcing black pupils to 
cany identity documents and 
the employment of security 
guards at schools. 

An estimated 20 percent of 
the 1.7 million black pupils 
under the jurisdiction of the 
department refused to register 
and were barred from school 
for the rest of the year. 

As boycotts mounted the 
department closed down 





President Botha: He signed 
the tough orders 


schools in the Eastern Cape 
province, the East Rand and 
in Soweto, and announced 
. that. 40 Eastern .Gape_schools- 
would remain closed next year 
unless pupils demonstrated a 
willingness to return to 

phfjWK. 

But according to figures 
released by the department in 
Pretoria, just over 50 per cent 
of Wade high school pupils 
who sat for the year-end 
matriculation examinations — 
the equivalent of British “A” 
levels — in their segregated 
schools have passed. 

Although the success rale 
contrasts sharply with a record 
80 to 90 per cent pass rate 
among white matriculants, the 
department says it is en- 
couraged by the results. 

According to the dep- 
artment's figures, a total of 
89,235 pupils sat the examina- 
tions, of which 34,733 (38.9 
per cent) obtained passes and 
a further 11,664 (13.07 per 
cent) matriculation exemp- 
tion which entities them to 
university entrance. The total 
pass rate was 51.99 per cent. 

In 198S, the pass rate was 
49.3 per cent, including 12.5 
per cent of pupils who gained 
matriculation exemption. 

A spokesman for the depart- | 
ment said yesterday: “Any- 
thing that represents an 
improvement is always 
satisfactory. ' 

The spokesman claimed 
that the disparity between 
black and white matriculation I 
results was irrevelant. "It has ; 
taken decades, and many ups 
and downs, for white educa- 
tion results to achieve the < 
level of success it has now 
done.” 


DTI inquiry widens to stockbroker 


By Lawrence Lever 
The government investiga- 
tion into suspected insider 
dealing by a civil servant has 
widened to include a small 
firm of stockbrokers, White- 
hall sources said yesterday. 

The firm carried out share 
deals on the basis of price 
sensitive information ob- 
tained by the civil servant in 
question, the sources said. 


The civil servant a junior 
employee at the Department 
of Trade and Industry, is 
understood to have relayed 
price^sensilive information 
concerning the results of 
monopolies investigations to 
her brother. 

The sources said the person 
concerned had not been dis- 
missed or suspended, al- 
though it was possible she had 


been given "gardening leave” 
— an informal form of suspen- 
sion 

They added that the DTI 
was likely to pass its file on the , 
investigation, when conclu- 
ded, to the Director of Public 
Prosecutions. 

The DPP will decide j 
whether an insider dealing! 
procecution should be 
brought. 


50 flee 6 violent and permissive US’ for Moscow 


■to it tr It & it 


From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

Disillusioned with life in 
the United States, 50 Soviet 
emigres arrived in Moscow 
yesterday from New York, the 
largest group to return to their 
homeland from here at one 
time. 

Many had lived in the US 
for between six and eight 
years, but were unhappy, 
homesick and unable to get 
good jobs. They said that they 
were looking forward to seeing 
their femilies again, although 
they did nol know whether 
they would be accepted by 
friends and neighbours after 
years in the West 

The group included many 


Jewish emigrants and at least 
seven were naturalized US 
citizens. They were seen off by 
Mr Alexei Zhvakin, the Vice- 
Consul at the Soviet Embassy 
in Washington. 

Many of the emigres came 
from the New York area, 
where most Soviet im- 
migrants settle. Their return 
was not publicized, but ru- 
mour spread quickly, and 
hundreds of relatives and 
friends came to see them off 
with tearful farewells. 

The Aeroflot desk was 
mobbed and the regular 
weekly flight was delayed for 
five hours until a larger jet 
could be provided. 

Some of the emigres said 


they were homesick for rel- 
atives, while others felt they 
did not belong in the US. 
“Russia for Russians, Amer- 
ica for Americans. I want to go 
home to see my mother,” said 
Vladimir Proshinsky. who 
lived in New York for eight 
years as a taxi driver and 
mechanic. 

Alexander Cherkasets, who 
left a good position in a travel 
agency in the Soviet Union to 
work as a limousine driver, 
said he hoped he could get his 
old job back. “It is hard to 
imagine what I will do. The 
Soviet authorities here said we 
should not have any problems 
with the authorities there.” 

The group's return is the 


third repatriation in as many 
months. In October and ' 
November, Soviet officials 
said 17 others had gone back. 

The flow comes as the 
Kremlin appears to have be- 
gun a conciliatory policy to- 
wards dissidents and emi- 
grants. It announced that Mr 
Yuri Lyubimov, the theatre 
director stripped o this citizen- 
ship two years ago would be 
welcomed back and before 
Christmas Mr Gorbachov 
personally authorized the end 
of Dr Andrei Sakharov's in- 
ternal exile. 

Some of the emigres ex- 
pressed lingering guilt at hav- 
ing left Russia and several 
thought they would face harsh 
treatment on their return. But 


one added: “The Russian 
people can forgive.” 

Two femilies of five were 
among those returning, but 
some couples left behind chil- 
dren who arrived as teenagers 
and had been able to adapt to 
the US more easily than their 
parents. 

Mr Zhvakin said those tak- 
ing their children back were 
worried over the violent and ! 
permissive society in the US 
and did not want their chil- 
dren "to be criminals”. 

Asked for a comment on the , 
departure, a Slate Department 
official said: "This is a free 
country. People are free to 
travel and do what they 

Leading article, page 13 


Miss Samantha Ettridge, 
aged 17, the Hertfordshire 
schoolgirl who disappeared on 
Christmas Eve, was reunited 
with her family last night as 
detectives questioned the man 
suspected of her abduction. 

Miss Ettridge, tired but 
unharmed, and Mr Peter 
Johan Chmilowskyj, the sus- 
pect, were found by police at a 
Norfolk country bouse after a 
car crash in which a baby was 
killed. 

The giri and the man 
reached the bouse through 
dense forest after their car had 
collided bead-on with another 
car shortly after dawn yes- 
terday, killing a five-month- 
old giri in the other vehicle. 
The infant's parents were both 
injured in the crash. 

Last night Miss Ettridge's 
parents left the family home 
under heavy police escort for a 
reunion with their daughter at 
a secret rendezvous. Police 
indicated that the giri was not 
yet ready to be reunited with 
the family in the full glare of 
publicity. 

The giri was found just over 
12 hours after Scotland Yard 
launched a manhunt naming 
Mr Chmilowskyj as the man 
believed to be bolding Miss 
Ettridge. and who was also 
suspected of kidnapping a giri, 
aged 19, from north London a 
few days earlier. 

When Miss Ettridge tele- 
phoned her home at Cbes- 
hunt, while waiting for the 
police to arrive at the country 
house, she said of her ordeal 
that she had "just talked my 
way through it”. 

Mr Chmilowskyj was also 
said to have spoken to her 
parents. He allegedly told her 
father “Hello. It's Pete. 1 
would like to apologize for all 
the trouble what I gave you.” 

In London, Detective Sup- 
erintendent Fergus Corcoran, 
in charge of the search for the 
missing giri, said that he was 
delighted at the news of her 
return' hnt-sadderied~ar "the 
death of the child. 

The crash took place at 8.15 
yesterday morning on the 
A 1065 near Hi! boro ugh, in 
Norfolk. 

Miss Ettridge and Mr 
Chmilowskyj were in a blue 
Talbot Solara car which 
crashed with a Ford Capri 


containing Mr and Mrs Derek 
Sraallbone and their lwo 
children. 

Gemma SmaUbone was 
killed and her parents, from 
Holu Norfolk, were taken to 
hospital with their son, aged 
five. Mrs Diana SmaUbone 
recieved head injuries and her 
husband had leg injuries. The 
boy was discharged. 

Thirty-five minutes after 
the crash Miss Ettridge and 
Mr Chmilowskyj turned up 
three miles away at Cockley 
Gey Hall, the home of Sir 
Samuel Roberts, a barrister. 

The wanted man told the 
barrister “I want to give 
myself up”. 

Sir Samuel, aged 38. rec- 
ognized them at once and 
asked them if they were the 
couple whose pictures had 
been on television. The girl 
said that they were. 

Sir Samuel said: “She was 
pale, shaken and seemed very 
subdued, almost depressed. 

“The man was also very 
quiet and not at all threaten- 
ing. He was bleeding from a 
gash on his forehead and had 
dried blood caked on the front 
of his clothes. 

“I took them into the stfedy 
and told them to sit down. The 
girl asked to make a phone call 
to her parents and 1 dialled the 
number for her. 

“1 heard her say ‘It's me, it’s 
all over. I'm safe. I'm coming 
home.' The man then took the 
phone, and said 'Hello, it's 
Pete, I would like to apologize 
for the trouble what I gave 
you’.” 

Sir Samuel telephoned a 
local constable, PC Michael 
Lane, and within minutes a 
police car had arrived at the 
remote bouse. 

“My wife had made them a 
cup of tea but the man didn't 
have time to finish it The 
policeman said T am arresting 
you’, handcuffed him and 
took him out to the police car. 
He didn't resist at all” 

■The barrister said: “His 
attitude was one of remorse, 
dejection. He said he was 
sorry. 

"Samantha looked pale, 
quiet and depressed. He had a 
two-inch gash on his forehead 
covered with dried blood." 

Mrs Ettridge said that her 

Continued on page 16, col 1 


Racal buys in Vodafone 


Racal Electronics is buying 
in the 20 per cent of its 
Vodafone subsidiary that it 
does not already own for 
$160.85 million (£110 
million). 

Vodafone is attracting 1.000 
new customers a week and has 
more than 63,000 subscribers. 

It estimates it has 53 per 
cent of the market, beating 


Gelinei. its British Telecom 
rivaL By the end of 1989, it 
reckons it will have 200,000 
subscribers out of a total of 
400,000. 

Racal expects to break even 
on Vodafone in its current 
financial year. 

It has invested £1 10 million 
in its cellular radio network 

Racal pays £110m, page 17 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TTMFS TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


NEWS SUMMARY 


Police gain drag 
fight powers 

customs officers are empowered to investigate 

*--* J ' * i to- 


“^cocaine became law oa September 30. 

J“se new weapons m the armoury of drag prevention 
*™»odties win be completed oa January 12, when police 
will be aUe to freeze the assets of suspected drug 
traffickers in advance of court cases and confiscate them 


once 


Cavalry Funeral 
crossing missed 


Aldershot could become 
the first town in Britain to 
have a pelican crossing for 


The Ministry of Defence 
has asked the local council 
to help urinary mounts and 
their riders cress the busy 
A32S during exercises. 

An Army spokesman 
said it would pay for the 
crossing, where there 
would be two posh buttons 
to operate the signals — 
one for pedestrians and 

another at a higher level for 

riders. An Army horse was 
killed on the road fore 
years ago. 


Dr David Owen is suffer- 

isg from back trouble and 
wm miss the funeral today 
of Mr David Fenhalfjgan, 
the Liberal MP for Trara, 
who was killed in a car 
crash a week ago. 

The SDP leader is 
suffering a recurrence of 
back pain caused by an 
injnry in a motor cycle 
accident in Cambridge 25 
years ago. Dr Owes is bed- 
ridden at his Wiltshire 


The private service for 
Mr P enhflKgan is being 
held at All Hallows 
Church, Rea, near Tram. 


Two gunshot deaths 

Ulster police were yesterday inv estigating the death by 
gnusbot wounds of two men, but they believe that in each 
case the wounds were sefftoffidal. 

The first casualty was Lance Corporal Gary Kiteley, 
aged 21, from Middleton Cheney, Northamptonshire, who 
was serving with the 1st Battalion, the Grenadier Guards at 
the bonier village of Castlederg, Co Tyrone. His death 
from a head wound in an Omagh hospital on Sunday was 
disclosed yesterday. 

Mr Brian Felix Watson, aged 26, who Eved with his 
mother in Greysted, tedoiateny, died in hospital early 
yesterday, also from head wounds. Police said that a legally 
held shotgun was recovered from his home. 


Disputed 


news 


Mr John Hmnpbrys 
(right), the new p rese n ter 
of Radio 4^s Today, has 
laimched a rigorous per- 
sonal attack oa Sw Alastair 
Barnet, anchorman of 
UN’s News at 10. 

Mr Hmnpbrys, former 
presenter of BBC 1*8 Nine 
O’clock News, accused Sir 
Alastau- in an interview in 
Woman magazine of mis- 
leading the public by claim* 
mg that News at 10 was 
superior. 

“If, as Fleet Street and 
Sir Ahstair claim, ITN is 
so superior, why does it 
consistently lag behind the 
Nine O’Cwck News to the 



Cold cash plea 


At least 5,800 Scots die each year from illnesses related 
to the cold weather, according to the Scottish National 
Party. 

Riembos of toe Federation of Student Nationalists, the 
SNP’s student wing, demonstrated in Glasgow yesterday, 
danning that many families and pensioners freeze because 
they cannot afford to pay their Aid bills. 

_Mr Alan Douglas, the federation president, said: “No 
civilized society can allow this scandal to continue. It is a 
simple tat off life tint It costs more to keep warm in Scot- 
land than in England's deep south. 


Inquiry on 
sinking 
rejected 


Gibraltar is responsible for 
any inquiry into the stoking of 
the Icelandic tanker Syneta, in 
which six Britons died, be- 
cause the vessel was based on 
the Rock, the Department of 
Transport said yesterday in 
reply to calls for a Gov- 
ernment inquiry. 

Twelve seamen died when 
the 1 .260-ton vessel hit a rock 
off Iceland on Christmas Day. 
Iceland began its own inquiry 
two days ago in the port of 
Eskifjourdur, from where the 
ship had left for Liverpool 

The union representing 
British ships 1 officers, 
Nuinast, is demanding a gov- 
ernment inquiry into the in- 
cident, but the Department of 
Transport said yesterday: “It 
is down to Gibraltar to hold 
an inquiry, because that is 
where the ship is registered. 

“The Gibraltar Marine 
Administration will be receiv- 
ing a copy of the Icelandic 
report." 

Mr John Prescott, shadow 
employment spokesman, has 
called on the Government to 
urge the Gibraltan authorities 
to act amid claims that some 
ships based there foil to meet 
sea safety regulations. 

Mr Eric Nevin. 

secretary of Numast 

that some ships are registered 
in Gibraltar to escape strict 
regulations in other countries. 

He added that his union 
wanted the Government to 
hold a public inquiry so there 
would be an opportunity to 
cross-examine witnesses. 

Haggerstone Marine of 
Hornchurch, Essex, managing 
agents for the Syneta, would 
not comment yesterday. 

Disease cases 

Four cases of meningitis 
were reported in North 
Staffordshire over Christmas, 
but ah are said to bave 
responded to treatment 


Anti-Aids 

campaign 

delayed 

The start of the national 
television advertising cam- 
paign warning about the dan- 
ger of Aids has been delayed 
until at least next Tuesday. 

A provisional schedule for 
the campaign, released last 
month, said that the first 
commercials would go to air 
last Saturday. 

But the Department of 
Health and Social Security 
said last night that the hunch 
had been delayed for logistical 
reasons 

The national distribution of 
leaflets about Aids, which was 
also due to start last Saturday, 
would not begin until January' 

• Dr John Habgood, Arch- 
bishop of York, said in his 
New Year message yesterday 
that the communion cup 
should be cleaned after every 
use as a “sensible 11 precaution 
against the spread of Aids. 


MPs’ dilemma on private coal industry 

__ _ " ... n mi'mhpf* 


TbeD”* Tra fficki n g Offences Act, passed this year, 
also allows law enforcement officers to arrest and detofri 

people who tip off suspected drug barons about police 
* 


Other sections of the Act, the introduction of 

legal provisions designed to prevent the laundering of 
nuney amassed h the dreg trade, and p risio a s which 


Martin Fletcher 
Reporter 

A Tory-controlled select 
committee is likely to call for 
back-door privatization of the 
coal industry in the new year, 
but in doing so could split 
down party lines. 

The eneigy committee has 
spent more than a year inquir- 
ing into the state of the coal 
industry in Britain, but three 
Labour members who are- 
former miners would be under 
intense pressure to reject any 
report that threatens state 
ownerships 

However some Conser- 
vative members are equally 
determined that the report 
shall make definite recom- 


mendations on the future 
structure of the industry. 

While they accept that the 
peculiar characteristics of 
British Coal make its direct 
privatization impractical, they 
believe that si miliar results 
can be achieved over a longer 
period by lifting the 
“scandalous” restraints that 
hinder the industry’s small 
private sector. 

Under existing legislation 
some 40 small independent 
opencast mine operators, 
producing about 10 per cent of 
Britain's opencast output and 
employing 1*500 people, have 
to be licensed by British Coal, 
pay it substantial royalties for 
each tonne mined, and free a 
25,000-tonne statutory limit. 


Independent deep-mine op- 
erators, of whom there are 
well over 15Qi free si miliar 
restrictions, and are also 
prohibited from employing 
more than 30 miners in any 
operation. The independent 
operators argued that they 
coukl produce much more 
coal with more jobs and at 
very economic prices if freed 
from the sharifje s of British 
Coal, which is also their main 
competitor. 

In addition, private com- 
panies are prohibited from 
investing in the coal industry, 
with the result that British 
Petroleum mines nearly as 
much coal in Australia and 
America each year as British 
Coal does in Britain. 


Tory MPS believe that the Conservative members 
Department of Energy, not' acknowledge . 

British Coal, should issue dangers titat die compe 


JHlUaU VAHU, aUUUKJ laws v*4.*tr— - - * J *!«« 

licences and receive royalties, might not be fair ana 
and by liberating the private British coal i ndus try jcoino 

camnr mmwliin, namnnA i*nm_ SCfiOUSly UDdCnUIflW- 

Tbe Labour members have 
also enlisted sympathy on the 
Conservative side for their 


sector introduce genuine com- 
petition into the coal industry 
as well as much-needed capital 
and management expertise. 

Aware of the potentially 
divisive issues involved, the 
committee has had an infor- 


Conservative side — 
arguments about the social 

cost of pit closures. They say 

mal reading of the draft report that closures should be stag- 
in order to try to achieve gered, that efforts 1 ® provide 
unanimity before the formal new industry should be made 
reading on which there are in advance of closures not 
recorded votes. afterwards, mid that the effect 

Labour MPS are concerned on communities and the cost 
at suggestions that coal should of redundancies should be 
be imported in large quantities taken into account . before 
from abroad if cheaper t han dosing pits on economic 
domestic coal, but some grounds. 


Prospects of 
down 
for the start 
of new year 

By Guy Ker 

A leading independent sur- which has not shown a rise in 


vey of employment trends 
published today shows a slight 
deterioration in overall job 
prospects with sharp regional 
fluctuations emp hasizing the 
North-South divide. 

Fewer companies believe 
they will take on more people 
in the first quarter of 1987 
than at this time last year, 
according to the latest quar- 
terly survey of 1.530 employ- 
ers earned out by Manpower, 
the temporary employment 
specialists. 

Nineteen per cent of the 
employers surveyed expected 
to hire new staff during the 
next three months, 16 percent 
expected to reduce the size of 
their workforce, and 63 per 
cent foresaw no change: 

A similar survey at foe same 
time last year showed a 
slightly more optimistic pic- 
ture, with 20 per cent of 
employers hoping to hire new 
staff and only 14 per cent 
envisaging a decrease. 

Both manufacturing and 
service industries forecast a 
decrease in employment dur- 
ing the next three months 
while the strongest prospects 
for increased employment are 
to be found in the public 
sector, especially in local gov- 
ernment, where activity is 
being generated In the ran up 
to the May local government 
elections. 

Twenty-six per cent of town 
balls forecast that they would 
hire more workers in the first 
three months of 1987, com- 
pared with 24 per cent in the 


employment prospects for two 
years, offered no better pros- 
pect, except among local en- 
gineering firms; service 
industries were much slacker 
Transport, retailing, cater- 
ing and banking all forecast 
reduced employment pros- 
pects. Only insurance resisted 
the trend with more than 6ne 
third of employers hoping to 
hire more staff 
The contrast between North 
and South is hi g hli g hted by 
the difference between the 
Home Counties, where a 10 
per cent employment increase 
was expected and Scotland 
and the north-west of Eng- 
land, where employers pre- 
dicted a 2 per cent decrease in 
employment in the first quar- 
ter of 1987. 

Mr John Daly, general sec- 
retary of the National and 
Local Government Officers’ 
Association, said the overall 
employment p ro s p ects “re- 
mained depressing”. The 
Association of Scientific, - 
Technical and Managerial 
Staffs, and the General, 
Municipal, Boilermakers and 
Allied Trades Union said the 
figures showed unemploy- 
ment would get worse. 

But Mr Michael Jackson, 
director-general of the In- 
stitute of Purchasing Manage- 
ment, said the economy as a ' 
whole was improving and 
better job prospects existed, 
particularly for young 
graduates. 

“Chi the whole, engineering 
is going up and it is creating 



NKner Ian Grady _ cradles ope of 50 tamer pit canaries at the mines rescue station in 
Ilkeston, Derbyshire. The birds are being given to mineworkers now that they have been 
replaced by electronic meters to test for underground gases. (Photograph: Phil Dunn) 


last quarter of 1986 and only more jobs. Generally on the 
11 per cent this time last year, retailing side there is more 
The manufacturing sector, capital spending.” 

Industrial relations 
are best since 1964 

By a Staff Reporter 


Britain is on target to 
achieve its best industrial 
relations record since 1964, 
with fewer working days lost 
in strikes this year than at any 
time in the past 23 years. 

Preliminary estimates by 
the Department of Employ- 
ment show that in the 10 
months to fast October strikes 
cost Britain 1.607 million 
working days. 

The final figure should 
show an improvement mi 
1964, when 2278 million 
working days were lost 
through strikes, and finish a 
close second to the 1963 tally 
of 1.7 million working days 
lost because of industrial, 
disputes. 

The 1986 estimates show a 
big improvement on the past 
decade, when an annual av- 
erage of 1 1.1 million working 
days were lost in strikes, and 
should help to counter Bri- 
tain's international reputation 
for industrial strife. 

The figures are also ex- 
pected to endorse the Govern- 
ment's statutory curbs on 
unfettered trade union power, 
and will provide the Prime 
Minister with political ammu- 
nition in the run-up to the 
general election. 

In 2984, Britain lost 27.1 
million working days, of 
which 22.5 million’ were 


caused by the miners’ strike, 
giving it the worst strike 
record in the world. In 1985, 
the number of lost working 
days dropped to 6.4 million, 
partly due to the influence of 
the Trade Union Act of 
September 1984, which tight- 
ened the law on strike action. 

The encouraging estimates 
for 1986 come in spite of 
disruption caused by the 
teachers 1 strike, which had no 
impact on industrial produc- 
tion but which cost one-fifth 
of the 2.1 million woridn 
days lost in Britain in the I 
months to last October. 

Signs of further gains in 
manufacturing productivity 
have also been established, 
with a 3.6 per cent rise 
between the three months to 
October 1985 and the 
period this year. 

Manufacturing productivity 
is up by 5 per cent overall 
since 1980 and should con- 
tinue to consolidate its gattis 
when the figures for 1986 have 
been analysed. The total 
employed labour force, inclu- 
ding the self-employed and the: 
Armed Forces, now stands ax 
24.042 million, while there 
were 3216 million, or 11.7 per 
cent of the working popula- 
tion, unemployed fast No- 
vember. 


Park fears 
advancing 
thickets 

The rhododendron is eras- 
ing a £30 mxDiofl headache for 
officials of the Snowdonia 
National Park. 

The species rhododendron 
ponticam now takes op 34sq 
ton of the park, an area the 
size of a small city, and is 
spreading. The brakes, which 
produce a purple flower in 
early spring, spread to thick- 
ets 30 ft high. 

Eradication programmes 
are costly and time-ceBsmB- 
ing, and park officials have 
called a c o nference, with for- 
estry commission exports and 
scientists from the Institute of 
Terrestrial Ecology to seek 
new ways of combating die 
menace. 

The national park, hi north 
Wales, has drawn op a pro- 
gramme which would cost £30 
million, using conventional 
methods such as chopping 
down tire plants with a chain 
saw and spreading herbicides 
to stop the spread at seedlings. 

The Forestry Commission 
in north Wales said: “Un- 
usually, foresters, formers and 
conservationists are united. 
This particaLar species is of no 
use to anybody. It spreads to 
exdade everythrag else, and is 
not a suitable habitat for 
wildlife.” 


Lifeboat hitch 

The lifeboat at Skegness, 
Lincolnshire, came ashore 
yesterday after spending 19 
hours at sea because the 
tractor unit used to haul it in 
had sunk in the mud. The 
lifeboat was on a training run. 


London is host to 

25,000 pilgrims 

By Clifford Longley, Rdjpons Affairs Correspondent 

and 2,200 from 


Four important church 
buildings in London - St 
Paul's Cathedral, Westminster 
Abbey and Westminster and 
Southwark Roman Catholic 
cathedrals - were filled last 
night with up to 25,000 young 
men and women for the start 
of this week’s Taiz£ Commu- 
nity pilgrimage to the capital 

They were welcomed by 
Brother Roger Schultz, the 
founder and leader of Taize, 
the ecumenical monastery in 
France, who spoke to all four 
of the meeting places by five 
relay from St Paul's, where the 
largest group assembled. 

Tonight they win be ad- 
dressed by the Archbishop of 
Canterbury, Dr Robert 
Runcie, and tomorrow night 
by Cardinal Basil Hume. 

The largest contingent is 
from Italy, from where 5,000 
arrived in Britain yesterday . 
Nearly the same number has 
come from Spain and Ger- 


many, 

Yugosfc 

Yesterday afternoon the or- 
ganizers estimated attendance 
at 22,000 from overseas, and 
upwards of 3,000 from 
Britain. They are all being 
accommodated with famin e s 
in the London area, and fed 
mid-day by mass catering in 
marquees at Westminster Ab- 
bey. 

The event consists of twice 
daily mass gatherings for ring- 
ing and prayer in the four- 
main buildings, with smaller 
groups taking pan in medita- 
tion sessions and in visits to- 
church and community 
projects fa London. 

Brother Roger said yes- 
terday he was astonished by 
the numbers who had come. 

Taize is a mixed Protestant 
and Catholic group of men 
who have taken monastic 
vows together, while retaining 
their ongmal denominational 
allegiances. 


Sad task for RSCPA 


The annual post-Christmas 
slaughter of unwanted dogs 
got into hs gruesome swing 
yesterday. 

Between now and Easter, 
the RSPCA is expecting the 
traditional influx of puppies 
given as Christmas gifts but, 
subsequently, found to be an 
unwanted. 

The organization said that, 
nationally, returns for the first 
two weeks of December 
showed a higher number of 
dogs than normal being 
handed in to be pat down. 


. The RSPCA office in Not- 
tingham put down 100 dogs 
during Christmas week after 
almost 200 unwanted animals 
were handed in the previous 
week. 

At Battersea Dogs 1 Home in 
south London, 1 50 dogs have 
been handed in since 
Christmas. 

“Happily, we have found 
new homes for more than 70 
dogs so far,” Colonel Harry 
Sweeney, the home's director 
general, said yesterday. 


Police are 
battling 
to capture 
soldiers 

By Craig Setofi 

West Midlands police have 
started a recruiting campaign 
among soldiers serving with 
the Bntish Army of the Rhine 
in West Germany. As a result 
82 soldiers, including some 
who saw action in the Faik- 
lands and Northern Ireland 
have applied to join West 
Midlands police when their 
service with the Army ends. 

A police recruiting team 
spent two weeks touring II 
BAOR centres looking for new 
recruits as part of th e forc e & 
p lan to achieve its full strength 
Of 6,700 officers. 

Inspector Philip Raw. of the 
force's recruiting office, said: 
“We are looking to the .Army . 
because the potential recruits 
it offers are older, wiser and 
more stable. 

“It does not mean we are 
looking for tough recruits: 
simply those who have seen a 
bit of the world, are used to 
discipline and responsibility 
and are physically fit. Many of 
them are soldiers who have 
got married and want to settle 
down.” 

West Midlands police are 
the first provincial force to 
recruit within the BAOR, 
although the Metropolitan 
police annually hold a recruit- 
ing campaign in West Ger- 
many to attract soldiers 
nearing the end of their 
service. 

Insp Raw said the campaign 
by the Midlands force did not 
mean that it was unable to get 
all the recruits it wanted from 
the civilian population in the 
West * Midlands, where un- 
employment is high. 

He said: “We are still 
actively recruiting in the eth- 
nic population ana among the 
unemployed at job centres, 
but Army recruits have certain 
qualities in a higher percent- 
age than in the general 
population.” 

New police recruits from 
the Army will start as proba- 
tionary constables 

Anderton 
angry at 
probe call 

Mr James Anderton, Chief 
Constable of Greater Man- 
chester, yesterday rejected 
calls for a public inquiry into 
the running of his force after 
“completely unfounded” re- 
ports of low morale. - 
Mr Anderton issued a states 
mem after criticism from two 
Labour MPs following the 
resignation last week of Mr 
John Stalker, his deputy. 

Mr Anderton and his force 
have also been criticized for 
launching the now-postponed 
search for more possible vic- 
tims of the moors murderers, 

Ian Brady and Myra Hindley. 

A Sunday newspaper has 
claimed that senior detectives 
held secret meetings to voice 
concern about the way the 
force was being run and about 
Mr Stalker’s departure. The 
deputy chief constable had 
earlier been reinstated after an 
inquiry into allegations of 
misconduct 

Mr Anderton said yes- 
terday: “I have no knowledge 
of any clandestine meetings. 

On the contrary I have today 
received, from senior detec- 
tives in the police divisions 
said to be affected, the stron- 
gest protestations over the 
latest revelations in the 
media.” 

He said suggestions that 
resignations bad left the force 
with insufficientofficersofthe 
right calibre were “an insult to 
the integrity and ability of 
serving officers”. 

The statement said that 
detectives were “appalled by 
stories of low morale, which 
they contend are untrue.” 

Labour MPs Mr Terry 
Lewis (Wors(ey) and Mr Tonv . 
Lloyd (Stretford) have written 
to the Prime Minister and Mr 
Douglas Hurd, the Home 
Secretary, calling for an in- 
quiry into the running of the 

liSSS S33S 


DM 3 60 : diSilSrftfta- 

'WjKWE 




vo * ers voice their misgivings over Labour extremism 


By Robin Young 

Labour stands to lose votes 
in tihe forthcoming Greenwich 
b y-elec tion if die local party 
insists on selecting an ex- 
tremist candidate. 

A_ small straw poH taken 
outside the local Labour Party 
headquarters in Woolwich 
Road (locked np and with a 
sad annotmeement of toe me- 
morial service arrangements 
for the late MP, Mr Guy 
Barnett, pinned to the door) 
revealed that fully three-fifths 
of former Labour voters ware 
doubtful that they would con- 
tinue to Support the party if an 
extremist candidate was 
chosen. 

At toe same time there was 
some evidence of Labour sup- 
port slipping to both the 
Conservatives and toe Social 
Democratic Party. 

Nonetheless, an overwhelm- 
ing majority of the local voters 



■ ■ ■"*** • i u, — - l — i mil Mi ii' i. ten&ir-v wi 

Voters in Greenwich: (from left) Jean Bennett, Hilary Marshall, Veronica Waller, Alan Webb and Ernest Abraham. 

newspapers ont of om local 
Binaries.” 

The other issue that seems 
Bkely to cost Labour votes is 
non- 


qnestioned said that they ex- 
pected Labom* to win. 

Mr Barnett's majority of 
121X gave him only a 3.5 per 
cent lead over the Conser- 
vatives last time, and Green- 
wich is Labour's nineteenth 
most vulnerable seat, but elec- 
tors of all parties stiD regard it 
as a traditional safe seat 

That feeling is to a large 
extent confirmed and justified 
by local election results in the 


constituency since the 1983 
general election, which have 
largely gone Lahore’s way. 

Loral res iden ts do com- 
plain. though, about the La- 
bour council’s extremist 
altitudes. One couple ques- 
tioned yesterday said: “The 
council frighten us with their 
interference in schools, their 
support for homosexual 
groups and the like, and the 
bans they used to keep some 


nuclear policy. A fifth of the 
former Labour voters ques- 
tioned yesterday mentioned 
this as a principal reason why 
they thought they might not 
vote Labour again. 

The Conservative candidate 
for the by-election is Mr John 


Anteiifie, aged 25, a financial 
adviser with a mer chant hawk 
and a local councillor 
representing Bbckheath ward 
whicb is fa the Greenwich 


Mr Antdiffe has lived is 
Greenwich borough all his life, 
and in the, parliamentary 
constituency since he was six. 

His qualifications as a local 
man he described yesterday as 
“the strongest card I have”.. 


The SDP- Alliance can- 
didate for toe by-election will 
be Mrs Rode Banes, who was 
adapted just two weeks ago to 
replace toe candidate who ran 
a strong third at the last 
fpraeral election. 

The misgivings which some 
voters have for Labour were 
echoed by several of those 
contacted for the straw poll. 

, Mr Ernest Abraham* a 
shopkeeper, of Woolwich 
Road, said: “I am 77 and I can 
never remember voting for the 
winner in an election yet. I 
don't think there will be any 
change this time either.” 

Mis Marilyn Webb: “I 
voted Labour before but I 
would be very adamant against 
their non-nuclear policy. I am 
thinking of my children. If we 
get rid of our nuclear defences 
I think the country would be 
too much at risk.” 

Mr Abu* Webb: “I voted 
Labour last time, but I think I 


will vote Conservative now. I 
by some of the 

*®|^Goreniment « d °- 
o^^ WJKlbo “s h '"y 

#ll £jfss Hilary Marshall: “l 
tank I voted SDP fast time, 

{SLJ * newcomer to 
Greenwich. I might cm* 


bore here 


might vote La- 

- “ there was a 
moderate candidate 

Staffs-,? 

treme left.” 83 ex " 

Labour. conM support 

"Sn^Su taE btfore, and I 
who. 

candidate, ^ ch00se as 


1-2.150; 

8.783. 


T. Ford, 


Roifc. (Ci; 
(SDP/All). 






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THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


Faster services and 
better stations in 
Inter-City shake-up 


Improvements in 
Rail's Inter-City services, 
including the extension of a 
fully electrified service from 
London to Norwich from next 
May. are announced today. 

Among the changes are the 
introduction of two Pullman 
services linking Birmingham 
and Sheffield with London. 
Day visits from many main 
centres will be possible using 
new earlier morning or later 
evening return trains. 

The spread of trains over 


By Rodney Cowton, Transport Correspondent 
British the day is to be unproved on 
many routes, and extra trains 
are to be added to some 
services to ease overcrowding 
on Fridays. 

Dr John Prideaux, director 
of Inter-City, said the new 
services formed pari of a 
Package of improvements for 
htter-Ciiy in 1987, its twenty- 
first anniversary year. Other 
improvements include easi er 
access to many stations, with 
better car parking, provision 
of more air-conditioned ser- 


vices, and big investment to 
improve train catering. 

There will be later trains to 
York, Leeds and Newcastle 
upon Tyne and there will be 
two new Friday services to 
Edinburgh and Newcastle to 
ease congestion. 

On the west coast mainline 
to Scotland, there will con- 
tinue to be six weekday trains 
each way between London 
and Gla^ow. Some trains will 
have additional stops at key 
intermediate stations, includ- 
ing Milton Keynes, Warring- 
ton and Oxenholme. for the 


end of cheap first class 


BR cash rolled in after =£■£....». 

land line should be reduced by 
a few minutes as re-signalling 
at Leicester is completed ana 
more trains are hauled by the 
high speed Intei^City 125 
units. 

Cross country services wifi 
also be improved. On the 
north-east to south-west route, 
all the basic services will be 
operated by Inter-City 125 
trains. The mid-morning 
Newcastle to Penzance run 
will take two hours less. 

In the late afternoon two 
new services will run from 
Liverpool to Poole, Dorset, 
and there will be an additional 
midday train from Poole to 
Manchester. 

• More than 44,000 miles 
of new railway is proposed or 
being built in spite of the 
economic recession which has 
blighted development in re- 
cent years, according to a 
worldwide survey. 

The rail survey, to be pub- 
lished in January, shows that 
79 countries see investment in 
railways as vital for national 
prosperity. 

However, Britain has only 
five miles of line being built, 
another 26 miles planned and 
a further 17 miles being 
considered. 


British Rail has agreed to 
re-examine the case for b ri ng - 
ing back cheap off-peak first 
class day return tickets, bri 
their abolition in 1983 does 
not appear to hare had macb 
impact on revenues since then, 
according to the British Rail- 
ways Board annual report for 
1985-86. 

It shows that first class 
travel accounted for 1.6 per 
cent of total passenger jour- 
neys, but 10.5 per cent of 
passenger receipts. In 1981, 
probably the bet reasonably 
typical year before the aboli- 
tion of first class day returns in 
May 1983, the figures were 
similar, although with first 
class travel accou n t in g for just 
under 10 per cent of total 
passenger receipts. 

British Bail said that first 
class travel contributed so 
much more to total receipts 
than to the number of journeys 
because many second class 
journeys woe made at reduced 
lares, while first dass journeys 
tended to be for longer dis- 
tances, mainly at foil fores. 

The Central Transport 
Consultative Committee. 


which has been pressing Brit- 
ish Rail to bring back the off- 
peak first class return ticket, 
has wanted British RaO that 
by (ailing to do so ithas nearly 
destroyed first dass travel for 
ordinary, non-business 
travellers. 

However, it is understood 
that an internal British Rail 
report shows that first class 
travel is growing mere rapidly 
than most other categories. 

A first dass ticket is nor- 
mally abost 50 percent dearer 
than a standard second dass 
ticket, costing, for example 
£76 for a retina journey 
between London and Man- 
chester, against £50 for the 
standard second dass retina 
fine. However, some tickets 
offer second dass return 
travel, subject to restrictions, 
for as little as £23 between tfae 
two cities. 

There remain a number of 
ways ha which it is possible to 
travel first dass for below the 
standard first dass fore. They 
indnde season and Rover tick- 
ets and bargain first dass 
travel on some Inter-City 
trams at weekends. 


Expansion of Tube ‘at risk’ 


Threatened industrial ac- 
tion by 1 3,000 London Under- 
ground workers could 
jeopardize massive gov- 
ernment investment in the 
system and lead to expansion 
plans being scrapped, London 
Regional Transport said 
yesterday. 

The result of a strike ballot 
among the workers- which the 
National Union of 
Raihvaymen is confident will 
result in a “yes” vote - will be 
announced next week. 

NUR leaders claim the vote 
will not be used to call an 
immediate strike but to put 
pressure on LRT to review its 
efficiency plans which the 
union believes will lead to 


By David Sapsted 

compulsory redundancies and 
pay cuts. 

Both claims are denied by 
LRT and executives fear that 
the union, which campaigned 
vigorously in the months lead- 
ing up to the pre-Christmas 
ballot, wiB consider a substan- 
tial vote in favour as giving 
the green light to a strike 
which could cripple inner 
London commuter services. 

“We are, in fact somewhat 
mystified by the balloL We are 
not in dispute with the NUR 
but the union is saying that it 
wants to force us into proper 
negotiations. In feet, we are 
committed to proper negotia- 
tions and that is how we will 
continue,” an LRT spokes- 


man said. 

He admitted that die 
continuing search for in- 
creased efficiency would lead 
to manpower cuts, 

“In the last financial year, 
the Underground carried 
more passengers than at any 
time in- its history. A strike 
would put at risk all the 
tremendous achievements we 
have made, with foil union 
agreement in the past few 
years,” the spokesman added. 

“We are now beginning to 
talk about expansion for the 
first time in many years and 
we are justifying the massive 
investment put into the 
Underground by the 
Government-” 


Five die in 
fire set off 
by candle 

By Craig Se ton 

A candle used by a disabled 
woman because she could not 
reach a light switch probably 
started the blaze which killed a 
family of five in a crowded flat 
in Birmingham, fire investi- 
gators believe. 

Mrs Patricia Bossom, aged 
34, who was confined to a 
wheelchair, died with her 
three sons and their grand- 
mother aged 70, when the 
blaze destroyed their two bed- 
room council fiat in King’s 
Norton, Birmingham. 

The three boys — from Mrs 
Bossom’s first marriage — 
were John, aged 14, Simon, 
aged nine, and Paul, aged six. 

A male relative, aged 33, of 
Mrs Bossom, escaped from 
the inferno, but suffered se- 
vere burns and yesterday was 
seriously ill in Bir m in gham 
Accident HospitaL 

Firemen wearing breathing' 
gear fought through toiefc' 
smoke and fierce flames in an 
attempt to rescue those inside.. 
They found Mrs Bossom lying 
next to her wheelchair and due 
boys in a bedroom with then- 
grandmother. 

Two of the children died on 
their way to hospital. 

Mrs Bossom’s husband, 
Patrick, aged 39, tried un- 
successfully to tackle the fire 
when it swept through the flat 
late on Sunday night before 
running for help. He escaped 
serious injury. 

' Assistant Divisional Officer 
David Bayes, of West Mid- 
lands Fire Service, said yes- 
terday: “Mrs Bossom was 
disabled and in the evening it 
was common for her to read 
by candlelight after the others 
had gone to bed because she 
was unable to switch off the 
lights.” 

Fire investigators believe 
that Mrs Bossom fell asleep 
and the candle toppled over 
and started the fire. 


Cross divorce 

Lord Cross, the underwriter 
and former racing driver, is to 
end his third marriage to the 
former Mrs Patricia Rossiter. 
The couple's names appear in 
the list of divorces to be heard 
in the High Court in the near 
future. 


BBC ‘cowardly’ in 
halting Biggs film 

By Jonathan Miller, Media Correspondent 


The film-maker who di- 
rected Slip-up, the Great Train 
Robbery drama withdrawn 
from tonight's BBC schedule 
at the demand of a retired 
Scotland Yard detective, yes- 
terday accused tfae corpora- 
tion of cowardice, incom- 
petence and waste. 

“I'm extremely angry and 
the actors are furious,” Mr 
James Cellan Jones said. He 
directed the £600,000 film, 
one of the most expensive to 
be produced by the BBC. 

He said it was now unlikely 
that the BBC would ever show 
his film about the capture of 
the train robber, Ronald 
Biggs, in Brazil by former Del 
Chief Supt Jack Slipper and 
the antics of Fleet Street 
journalists covering it. 

He chimed that the BBC 
had lost its nerve in the wake 
of the libel case brought by 
two Conservative MPs against 
a Panorama programme, 
which ended in a £250,000 
settlement 

Defying a BBC order to 
keep silent about the circum- 
stances surrounding the film, 
Mr Cellan Jones daimed that 
the decision to postpone the 
film was taken in spite oflegal 
advice that the programme 
was not defamatory. 

Tfae film was delivered to 
the BBC eight months ago but 


had not been screened by 
executives until three weeks 
ago. after it had been sched- 
uled, he said. 

The BBC said yesterday that 
the film had been postponed 
pending the outcome of dis- 
cussions with lawyers rep- 
resenting Mr Slipper. 

Mr Slipper said that he was 
prepared to sue the BBC for 
libel if it had gone ahead with 
the dramatization of Ibe cap- 
ture of Biggs and the failed 
attempt to extradite him. 

The film was defamatory 
and misleading, Mr Slipper 
said. “I was amazed al the way 
I'd been portrayed. Besides 
the numerous inaccuracies 
throughout the film, it didn't 
do me justice.” 

Mr Slipper said be was 
pleased dial the BBC had 
postponed the film but would 
be satisfied only when it was 
scrapped. 

The film, scripted by Keith 
Waterhouse from a book by 
Anthony Delano, stars Jeremy 
Kemp as Mr Slipper. Larry 
Lamb as Biggs and Nicholas 
Le Prevost as Colin MacKen- 
zie, the Daily Express reporter 
who ted Mr Slipper to Biggs to 
gain a world exclusive. 

The fihn was replaced on 
BBC-1 tonight by a repeat of 
the Noel Coward drama, Mr 
and Mrs Edgehilt. 



Jonathan MesteL an 

the 62nd Foreign and 


Racehorse 
trainer is 
found dead 

Mr Paul Doyle, an Irish 
racehorse trainer, was found 
dead with gunsh ot wounds to 
the head in a barn on his 
stables at the Curragh in Co 
Kildare early yesterday. 

Mr Doyle, in his late thir- 
ties. who had an international 
reputation as a bloodstock 
agent, had been ill for some 
time. A shotgun was found 
close to his body and police 
have ruled out foul play. 

Driver's claim 

Mr Carl Lawrence, aged 49, 
of Albert Terrace, Newcastle 
under Lyme, Staffordshire, a 
security van driver, is to claim 
unfair dismissal against 
Securicor before an industrial 
tribunal in Birmingham next 
month over the loss of his job 
after he handed cash to armed 
raiders at Trent Vale, Stoke on 
Trent, last July. __ 

Ex-MP sues 

Sir Stephen Hastings, the 
former Conservative MP, yes- 
terday issued a libel writ 
against The Observer and its 
correspondents David Leigh 
and Paul I ashman The action 
is over a report of an alleged 
ML5 plot to oust Sir Harold 
Wilson as Prime Minister. 

Burial ruling 

Mr Jack Heath, from 
Fenton, Stoke on Trent, 
Staffordshire, has been told he 
must wait five years before the 
body of his wife. Mis Annie 
Heath, aged 71, who died .on 
holiday in Spain and was 
buried near Bemdorm last 
week, can be exhumed and 
brought to Britain. 

Search fails 

Police divers searched Ulls- 
water in the Lake District 
yesterday for a missing Scot- 
tish solicitor. Mr Gerard 
Devlin, aged 30. left his home 
in Uddingston, Lanarkshire, 
last Tuesday, to visit two 
Glasgow prisons, but he did 
not arrive. His car was found 
the next day at Gowbarrow, 
Ullswater. The lake search is 
expected to resume today. 

Cars blasted 

Police are hunting a man 
with a shotgun who has been 
blasting cars in Newbury, 
Berkshire. A driver returned 
to his parked car yesterday to 
find it peppered with shot 
apparently food from a mov- 
ing car. There have been 
similar incidents. 

Erosion chief 

A full-time management 
officer is to be appointed to 
tackle severe erosion caused 
by thousands of hikers along 
the Penine Way. National 
Park Rangers say new tech- 
niques are needed to cope with 
wear and tear on the 250-mile 
footpath. 


Road safety campaign 


Drivers steer clear of drink 


Motorists earned the praise 
of police in most parts of the 
country for their response to 
the Christmas “Don't Drink 
and Drive” campaign, but 
that was tempered by 
warnings for equal vigilance 
over the new year. 

Many forces reported pos- 
itive breath tests and injury 
accidents down cm last year's 
figures. One noted an increase 
in cars with drunken pas- 
sengers but sober driven. 

Spearheading the campaign 
was Nottinghamshire, where 
positive breath tests over the 
Christmas period were down 
38 percent compared with the 
rest of the year. 

Of the 4.364 drivers stopped 
during the year, 123 breath 
tests proved positive: This 
figure of 2.8 per cent com- 
pared with 3.2 per cent for 
■si milar campaigns during the 
past three years. 

Supt Roger Storey, brad of 
the county's traffic division, 
said the campaign had un- 
doubtedly saved many lives 
and injuries. 

In Wiltshire, police intens- 
ified their level of enforce- 
ment throughout the year, 
culminating m the Christmas 
campaign. The result was a 
reduction by almost a half in 
positive breath tests. 

Between December 19 and 
28, 34 tests proved positive 
compared with 66 over the 
holiday period last year. The 
number of injury accidents fell 
from last year’s 76 and two 
fatals. to 49 and one fataL 

A spokesman for the force 
said they were “overjoyed”. 
The campaign would continue 
at its present level throughout 
1987. 

In Gloucestershire, where 


Thief is sucker 
for scotch 

Police in Somerset are look- 
ing for a thief with a long straw 
and a penchant for 12-year-old 
malt whisky. 

Their hunt follows the 
discovery of an empty oae- 
and-a-half litre bottle of Glen 
Moray on the doormat Inside 
an off-licence in the town of 
Street When the shop was 
shot for Christinas the bulky 
bottle was standing on a 
display unit near the door. 

“It’S amazing what SOBe 
people win (to for a drink,” 
Chief Insp Rod Dean, of 
Somerset police, said yes- 
terday. “We can only think the 
thief used straws or got the 
neck of the bottle through the 
letter box and drank it.” 

Alternatively he may have 
decanted some of the whisky 
into another container on the 
other side of the door. “We 
have often had people going on 
fishing expeditions in shops 
before but usually they drag 
clothes and staff out through 
the totter box,” be said. 

“They didn't spill any and 
we have never had anything 
like this before.” He warned 
other shopkeepers to keep 
their Christinas displays well 
away from their front door. 

almost exactly the same num- 
ber of motorists were breath 
tested over the holiday as last 
year, positive tests fell from 60 
to 39. 

Police voted the Christinas 
campaign a success in Devon 
and Cornwall where drivers 
failing the breath test were 
down to 87 compared with 


106 over toe holiday last year 
and injury accidents were 
down 18 to 93. 

Arrests for drink-driving 
offences in Sussex fell to 267 
in toe four weeks to Boxing 
Day, 85 fewer than in the same 
penod last year and injury 
accidents were also down, 
from 494 to 319. 

In Avon and Somerset, 
there wasa 50 percent drop in 
positive breath tests, but offi- 
cers reported an increase in 
the number of cars with sober 
drivers and drunken 
passengers. 

There were fewer drinking 
drivers in Sussex during the 
holiday, with 217 arrests com- 
pared with 352 in toe same 
period last year. Provisional 
accident figures also showed 
an improvement, to 319 from 
494 last December. 

The figures in Derbyshire 
were against toe general trend, 
with 53 drivers over the drink 
limit compared with only 40 
last year, but at the same time 
injury accidents in the county 
dropped from 94 last Christ- 
mas to 75 this year. 

Also showing a slight in- 
crease was Staffordshire where 
36 drivers gave positive 
breath samples which was 
three more than last year. 

Brawls in which 23 Thames 
Valley officers were hurt, 
prompted Assistant Chief 
Constable Peter Winship. to 
appeal to new year revellers to 
go easy on the alcohol. 

With 13 of the officers off 
duty because of their injuries, 
Mr Winship said: ‘These 
people made a mockery of the 
season of good will. All the 
disturbances were started by 
people who had too much to 
drink 



m 

—% old 

Hopes of 
new TV 
realized 

Two readers shared 
yesterday's daily Portfolio 
Gold prize of £4,000, each 
receiving £2,000. 

Mr R A Thompson, of 
North Holmwood, Dorking, 
Surrey, who is in his eighties, 
had been hoping to bay a 
replacement for his television 
set. “Now the extra money will 
make that easily possible,” he 
said. 

Mr J W Davis, aged 49, an 
former licensee from Hetton- 
le-Hole, Tyne and Wear, plans 
to use his winnings to re- 
decorate his flat. 

Readers can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold 
The Times 
PO Box 40 
Blackburn 
BB1 6AJ 



Thompson: share 
£<,000 prize. 


Slimmers vote 
Duchess as 
the top figure 

Britain's slimmers' vision of 
perfection is a combination of 
royal reality and film star 
fantasy, according to a survey 
by Slimming Magazine of its 
15 million readers. 

Nationally, the Princess of 
Wales is voted the most 
attractive woman in toe public 
eye, with the Duchess of York 
second, ahead of Joan Coffins, 
toe actress. 

The Princess of Wales led 
two other categories, toe 
prettiest face and best dressed, 
bnt 58 per cent of the respon- 
dents preferred the Duchess of 
York's size 12 figure to the 
Princess's 5ft lOin, size 10. 

The Dnke of York was voted 
most attractive man ahead of 
Tom Selleck and Richard 
Gere, toe actors. Robert 
Bedford, Cliff Richard, Clint 
Eastwood and Paal Newman 
were remembered with a 3 per 
cent vote. 

Daly Thompson, the ath- 
lete, shared toe “best body” 
title with Tom SeOeck. 

The snrvey shows that the 
average slimmer in Britain is a 
woman, aged 29, married with 
two; children, 5ft 4in who 
weighs list fdb. 

Sbe believes that overweight 
people are less attractive. 

Chocolate, bread and sweets 
are b lamed for her difficulty in 
attaining her ideal weight of 


9st6Ib. 


The Bench is 
very much a 
man’s world 

The bench is stflJ predomi- 
nantly a man's world, accord- 
ing to statistics from the Lord 
Chancellor's Office on judicial 
appointments. 

Out of a record number of 
39 1 crown court judges sitting 
in England and Wales only 16 
are women. 

And out of a record 50 new 
judges appointed to crown 
courts last year only three 
were women. 

At the top of toe legal tree 
there are about 80 High Court 
judges, only three of them 
women. There are no women 
Court of Appeal judges or 
women dealing with House of 
Lords appeals. 

The problem is that there 
are not sufficient women suit- 
able to become judges, a 
spokesman for the Lord 
Chancellor’s Department said 
yesterday. 

“As the pool of women 
suitable to be appointed be- 
comes larger, hopefully we can 
look forward to being able to 
appoint more women as 
judges.” 


Babies thrive with singing mothers 


A reawakening of the im- 
portance of the hdlaby to the 
healthy development of ba- 
bies, even before birth, was 
recommended at a meeting in 
London yesterday by Profes- 
sor Michel Odent, an eminent 
French obstetrician. 

He supplied evidence to 
show the benefits of singing in 
families. 

He was supported by Sir 
Yehudi Menuhin, who said: 
“It is only in oar vast and 
synthetic civilization that 

mothers no longer sing to their 
children.” 

He was convinced it was 
“absolutely indispensable” in 
forming a balanced and con- 
tented child- 

The observations came 
when both men were attending 


the foundation of a new organi- 
zation dedicated to improving 
toe welfare of the unborn 

child, called the British Soci- 
ety flu* Pre-Natal Psychology 
in Medicine, at which Sir 
Yehndi accepted an invitation 
to be patron. 

The first president, elected - 
at the meeting. Dr Michele 
Clement, an honorary consul- 
tant obstetric neurophysiolo- 
gist to the Middlesex 
HospitaL west London, said 
that it was well established 
thqt drink, smoking and drugs 
during pregnancy put the nn- 
born chOd at considerable 

risk. There was also dear 
evidence that stress could be 

just as damaging. 

Dr Clement said that it was 
essential to recognize that 


society had changed, and that 
we lived in particularly stress- 
ful and anxious times. 

She said that the new 
organization aimed at counsd- 
fing from before conception to 
after-care of both the mother 
and the mborn child, bnt was 
particularly concerned that 
mothers did not feel afraid. 

She said it was essential 
that the pregnant woman's 
emotional needs were ap- 
proached with the same care 
and attention as her physical 
ones, and to recognize that the 
psychological development of 
the mbora baby was insepa- 
rable in the process. 

Dr Clement spoke of her 
own research in the develop- 
ment of apparatus for monitor- 
ing early development of toe 


unborn baby. She dem- 
onstrated the device far detect- 
ing tbe response of the baby to 
mrcic and other vibrations. 

The instrument has been 
used to demonstrate interfer- 
ence in activity in the mens 
because of drags, cigarettes 
and akohoL 

The device has shown 
impairment of babies whose 
mothers have been on tong- 
term tonics. Other effects have 
been observed in babies of 
mothers who take bicarbonate 
of soda, to relieve heartburn 
and abdominal discomfort. 

It has also shown content- 
ment in babies who have 
experienced soothing lullabies 
and other soft music early in 
their development 



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THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


5 


Housing finance: 2 


Societies aiming at 
urban renewal and 
specialized homes 


it is natural that the Halifax, 
as the biggest, should lead the 
building societies into the 
housing market. But it has not 
been driven into it “by some 
confused notion of social 
duty". Mr John Spalding, 
director and chief executive, 
says. 

“Our investment rests on a 
hard core of commercial logic: 
to maintain and improve the 
condition of housing in this 
country, and to secure our 
longer-term lending markets,” 
he said. 

Already the Halifax has. 
some 120 projects under way, 
mostly with housing associ- 
ations. and a total of about 
£130 million committed to 
provide about 5,000 homes, 
largely in urban renewal 
schemes and providing shel- 
tered homes for the elderly. 

Support for housing initia- 
tives and urban renewal began 
with a special budget in 1982 
of £35 million. The allocation 
has grown to £300 million in 
1986. representing 5 per cent 
of tom! lending. 

The new subsidiary com- 
pany will normally use a 
"design and build” approach, 
using large or medium-size 
builders. 


In the second of two articles, Christopher Woman, 
Property Correspondent, describes building societies' 
plans to move into housing and particularly into 
specialized developments. 


Mr David Couttie. the 
society's housing develop- 
ment controller, hopes for 
involvement in a greater mix- 
ture of tenures than in the 
past, concentrating on: 

• Uwner occupation, which 
the society believes could' 
reach saturation at 70-75 per 
cent (it is now about 64 per 
cent in England); 

• The specialist market, such 
as homes for single people, 
and developments incorporat- 
ing offices or showrooms u 
bousing projects, because 
more people work from home; 

• And ways of developing 
private rented housing. 

The Halifax also has big- 
urban renewal projects, such* 
as at Swansea docks. 

it is involved in shared 
ownership schemes and is also 
enthusiastic about the 
regeneration of private rented 
housing. 

Index-linked finance seems 
to be the answer, it believes, 
and suggests the partnership 


ol budding societies, provid- 
ing index-linked loans, and 
bousing associations. 

The Nationwide, which has 
already completed about 
1,600 units, will aim at 2,000 a 
year, and perhaps more after 
its merger with the Anglia 
Building Society. “It is hot our 
job to compete with foe 
volume builder,” it states. 

“The overtones of our work 
are social, and we will be 
aiming at the elderly, disabled, 
first-time buyers, and those 
with special needs, extending 
the range of bousing supply 
and widening the choice 
through different funding 
arrangements.” 

The Woolwich Equitable 
Building Society "funds 
schemes where the purchasers 
are nominees who buy a 
leasehold interest through the 
local authority. The society is 
determined to pursue its 
philosophy of providing hous- 
ing for people who could not 
otherwise afford it on the open 
market. Concluded 



Ray Reardon in jovial mood at the table with Mr Charlie Pearce and Mrs Helen Hamlyn (Photograph: Mark Pepper). 

Snooker gives the elderly a new life 


Snooker and pool are wdl in 
favour amoqg elderly residents 
of Ellesmere Home in Fulham, 
west London, after a coaching 
session yesterday by Ray 
Reardon, the former world 
champion. 

Mr Reardon coached Mr 
Charlie Pearce, aged 80, one ol 
95 male and female residents 
of the residential and day care 


home, after officially present- 
ing foe table as a Christmas 
present. 

The gift was organized by 
the Helen Hamlyn Founda- 
tion, an organization estab- 
lished 12 months ago to seek 
creative solutions to the prob- 
lems of the aged. 

Mr Denis O'Hearn, the 
Ellesmere administrator, said 


that foe table bad been in 
constant use since ft was 
unveiled three weeks ago. Mrs 
Hamlyn is a frequent visitor. 

While lobbying the Gov- 
ernment to improve conditions 
for the elderly, foe foundation 
has co-sponsored an ex- 
hibition of products at The 
Boilerhouse, Victoria and Al- 
bert Museum. South Kensing- 


ton, west London, designed to 
help the aged remain 
independent. 

Mr O'Hearn said that a 
special feature of life for 
Ellesmere residents was foe 
opportunity for (hem to meet 
and work with three un- 
employed 17-year-olds, who 
are spending a year on work 
experience at the home. 


Mystery 
caller says 
she knows 
murderer 

An anonymous woman tele- 
phone caller has told detec- 
tives that she knows the killer 
of foe Bradford teacher. Mr 
Donald Swaine. 

Detectives leading the in- 
vestigation said yesterday that 
an officer received a telephone 
call at foe Batley police sta- 
tion, 10 miles from the mur- 
der scene. 

The woman said she knew 
who was responsible for the 
death of Mr Swaine, aged 48. 
but refused to give personal 
details or elaborate. 

Det Supt Ken Baines, who 
is leading foe murder investi- 
gation, pleaded for the woman 
to get in touch again. “The 
officer who took foe call had a 
feeling she was being 
genuine,” be said. 

The woman who rang the 
police station could be a 
prostitute who works in the 
red light district where Mr 
Swaine's body was found. 

Mr Swaine, who worked at 
foe Drummond Language 
Centre in Bradford, was walk- 
ing home to Hazelhurst Road. 
Heaton, Bradford, on Christ- 
mas morning after a drink 
with colleagues from the 
Youth Hostels Association. 

He was dragged to a back 
yard at Highfield Place. Brad- 
ford. where he was attacked. 

Mr Swaine's widow, Bren- 
da. aged SI. and their chil- 
dren. Martin, aged 15, and 
Helen, aged 13, were being 
comforted by relatives. 


Fair rent 
panels 
criticized 

By a Staff Reporter 

A bousing aid centre has 
alleged that a system of fixing 
a fair rent for private tenants 
seems loaded against foe 
centre. 

The criticism comes in the 
wake of a case of a Norwich 
man whose rent was first 
lowered by £15 a month by a 
fair rent officer, then increased 
by £70 a month by a rent 
assessment committee after an 1 
appeal by his landlord. 

Shac. the London housing 
aid centre, said such cases 
were common and called for 
assessment committees to be 
scrapped, leaving the fair rent 
officer’s decision to be chal- 
lenged in the courts. 

The fair rent system, 
administered by the Depart- 1 
mem of the Environment, was 
designed to stop unscrupulous 
landlords charging excessive 
rents. 

Shac points out however, 
that according to government 
figures for 1985, assessment 
committees increased rents 
above a rent officer’s recom- 
mendation in 57 per cent of 
cases. A lower rent was recom- 
mended in only 16 percent of 
cases. 

In London, committees in- 
creased rents above an 
officer's recommendations in 
70 per cent of cases and 
reduced rents in 7 per cent 

Shac said: “One criticism of 
these committees is that they 
are packed with ‘property 
professionals' appointed from 
the local great and good, and 
they tend more towards foe 
landlord’s point of view." 

The Department of foe 
Environment dismissed the 
criticism and pointed out that 
people from different walks of 
life were appointed to foe 
committees. 


Dog-bite 

athlete 

reassured 

Eamonn Coghlan, foe inter- 
national athlete who was sav- 
aged by a dog set on him by 
two teenagers as be was out 
training in Dublin, hopes to be 
back m training when he 
returns to the United States 
next week. 

Fears that severe tissue 
damage caused by bites to his 
right calf and left thigh could 
put his career in jeopardy were 
allayed by surgeons yesterday 
after the athlete underwent 
two operations. But it will be 
some days before the full 
extent of the damage is 
known. 

The world 5,000 metres 
champion and holder of foe 
indoor mile record said he 
hoped to resume training for 
the United States indoor sea- 
son. His left hand was broken 
when he tried to ward off foe 
terrier dog, which had been 
told “get him, get him” by foe 
teenagers. 

He had rebuked them for 
shouting bad language to a 
woman and her child. 

Mr Coghlan, aged 33, was 
visited in hospital yesterday 
by his wife, Yvonne, and their 
two children. 

Rescuer dies 

Miss Gladys Gale, aged 64, 
who was badly burnt rescuing 
her collie dog from her blazing 
Wiltshire home last Friday, 
died late on Sunday. Bremen 
took her from her house in 
Codford St Mary still clutch- 
ing the dog. 

Blandford case 

Lord Blandford, aged 31,* 
will appear before magistrates 
at Thame, Oxfordshire, on 
January 15 accused of speed- 
ing on the Oxford ring roqd. 


Shelbourae dispute 


Elegant hotel is 
unusually quiet 

By Richard Ford 


Things are unusually quiet 
at the Sbelbonrne Hotel “the 
most distinguished address in 
Ireland”, as a strike by more 
than 100 workers enters its 
twelfth week. 

Visitors arriving at the 
Trust House Forte hotel in 
Dublin are greeted by picket- 
ing staff dem&awiifflg better 
pay. Where once sfee head 
porter, Mr James Dixon, 
would greet them inside the 
hotel's foyer, he can now be 
found along with other col- 
leagues out on the street with 
fellow members of foe Irish 
Transport and General 
Workers' Union. 

Although the management 
has entered the festive spirit 
by decorating the hotel's 
ground flow function rooms, 
staff admit privately that busi- 
ness has been affected seri- 
ously by the dispute. 

The 177-room hotel's ban- 
queting facilities are not 
operating, and while the bar, 
dining room, and lounge re- 
main open they are not as busy 
as usual for foe Christmas 
period. Other hotels in foe city 
report an increased number of 
people who used to stay at the 
She! bourne coming to their 
premises during foe past few 
weeks. 

Staff from the hotel gronp in 

Britain, together with people 
recruited since the dispute 
started, have helped keep the 
Shelbonrne’s doors open dur- 
ing a strike that shows little 
sign of an early settlement. 

It is being organized by the 
ITCWU, which as part of its 


camp ai g n published a mock 
mean listing meals and their 
prices opposite job descrip- 
tions and baric rates of pay. It 
described a day at the 
Shelbonrne, adding, “with ma- 
jor reservations about the 
wage levels", and compared 
the Ir£l8 for slices of fresh 
salmon cooked in batter and 
served on a sauce of white vrine 
and samphire with the 
h£13.60 earned by a waitress 
for an eight-hoar day, and 
added: “She couldn't afford 
the meal she served." 

The ITGWU says that basic 
earnings at foe hotel, which 
employs 170 people, are lower 
than in other comparable 
establishments in the dty and 
in particular with THFs other 
property, the International 
Airport Hotel. The union also 
complains about the distribu- 
tion system of the IS per cent 
service charge payable on food 
and room receipts churning 
that foe company takes 23 per 
cent to supplement the earn- 
ings of a number of employees. 

THF said that it. would not 
negotiate under dnress, but 
added that it had implemented 
a 6 per cent pay award plus an 
extra Ir£3 a week recom- 
mended by foe Labour Court 
in the republic. It said: “We 
haw acted in accordance with 
accepted practices in dealing 
with disputes of this kind.” 

It claimed that foe hotel was 
operating normally. 

On Friday evening at 9pm, 
however, there were just 22 , 
people in foe bar and four in j 
foe lounge. | 



9 0 m That's the net interest 
i the Halifax is paying up 
/0 to these days. 

It’s over two and a half times the 
current rate of inflation. 


But you don't need to be a big 
investor to achieve high interest 


So join the World’s N° 1, join the Halifax. 
Simply fill in the coupon^ 


To: Halifax Building Society (Ref. 1KW), Freepost, Trinity Road. 
Halifax HX1 2BR. (No stamp required.) 

1/We enclose a cheque, no: 1 lor 

£ (minimum investment £500) 

to be invested in a Halifax 90 Day Xtra account. 

. I/We would like the interest to be: 

□ added to balance □ paid half-yearly □ paid monthly 


Just £500 allows you to open a 
Halifax 90 Day Xtra account, which starts 
earning a rate of 8.75% net immediately. 

Keep your full half-yearly interest invested 
and the compounded annua] rate dumbs to 8.94%. 

For those with £25,000 or more the interest 
is a very attractive 9.00% net. 

And again, if you leave your full 
interest invested the compound annual 
climbs to a full 920%. ^ j 

If you want monthly income we/ 
can pay the interest into your Halifax 
Cardcash or Paid-Up Share account, or 
your bank account each mbnth / 

When you need cash fop an 
increase in personal spending there's 
no problem. / 

Leave a balance qf at least £5,000 
and you can have instaiit access without 
penalty. 

Otherwise just give us 90 days’ 
written notice and you won’t lose any j THE WORLDS |^b| j 

interest But if you do want it right away ' -2?LJ 

you only lose 90 days’ interest on the amount 
withdrawn. 


FUU.NAME<S)_ 


ADDRESS. 


. POSTCODE- 


SIGNATURES. 


■DATE. 


HALMX 


ALL INTEREST RATES QUOTED ARE NET OF LIABILITY TO BASIC RATE INCOME TAX AND ARE VARIABLE. HALIFAX BUILDING SOCIETY. TRINITY ROAD. HALIFAX HXI 2RG. 







OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


Secret inquiry 
clears Shamir 
and puts Shin 
Bet case to rest 

From Ian Mnnray, Jerusalem 

M?HtzhS^ ha h^ a ^ WaratsofSaianii!! 1 

** report is based on a 

&£? VSREi 

tftesSSSuSg -“^“wayth* 

fiance agency and for the 
subsequent cover-up. 

The scapegoat for what 
happened is Mr Avrabam 
Shalom, who was forced to 
resign as head of Shin Bet over 
the affair and who, like ten 
other a gents involved, was 

The High Court granted a 
defence request and post- 
pone!, untO Frebrnary 16, the 
hearing of war crimes charges 

¥ n • s . 


^ .... • 


s' ■ 

;';.v . V _ 

IS? vsli; 


alleged executioner " of 

TreMiaka. 

granted a Presidential pardon 
after ad mitting improper and 
criminal behaviour. 

The report also exonerated 
Mr Shimon Peres, who was 
Prime Minister during a 
rigged inquiry into the case, 
and Mr Moshe Arens, who 
was Defence Minister when 
the killings occurred. It con- 
cludes there is no point in 
prosecuting any of the par- 
doned agents nor the un- 
pardoned former deputy head 
of Shin Bet, Mr Reiiven 
Hazak, who knew what was 
happening but who then 
forced the affair into the open. 

Mr S hami r was delighted 
with the outcome and “sat- 
isfied that the truth is now 
out”. Those who had criti- 
cized him should now eat their 
words, he said. 

There has been immediate 
criticism of the report's find- 


two Palestinians were beaten 
to death by Shin Bet agents 
after being taken off a bus they 
are said to have helped to 
hijack in April 1934. 

Two official inquiries into 
the matter felled to reach any 
meaningful conclusions 
largely because the evidence 
put to them was rigged by Shin 

Bet lawyers. After Mr Hazak 
revealed what had been going 
on the Government agreed in 
July with the utmost reluc- 
tance to the police inquiry. 
The 65-page report has 

found that Mr S hamir , al- 
though Prime Minister and so 
responsible for Shin Bet at the 
time of the irilling a, - was 
personally unaware of what 
happened. More importantly 
it discounts the allegation of 
Mr Shalom that the killing s 
and cover-up had been carried 
out “on authority and with 
permission so as to maintain 
the security of the state”. 

This dear suggestion that 
Mr Shamir directly ordered 
the murders and rigging or 
evidence was later watered 
down to the allegation that he 
had issued a general instruc- 
tion to kill all captured terror- 
ists. In an interview when the 
inquiry was set up Mr S hamir 
denied that any such instruc- 
tion existed but went on: u It 
wasn't in the form of instruc- 
tion. It was a conversation ... 
there was no instruction, 
that’s mere talk. 



Redundant labour 
faces socialist 
version of the dole 



1 r G £ rr 

at v. ■ 

* F *»* 


In the second article of his two- 
part series on Hungarian 
financial reforms, Roger 
Boyes, East Europe Corres- 
pondent, looks at their impact 
on employment prospects in 
industry. 

Next year is the year^en leaders deny u, 

the sacredrows of Hunganan the u ^ ysJcm sounds sus- 
mdustry begin to buckle at the |[j doud y fife the dole. 

As the Government The unions have become an 


Hungary’s 

economy 

Part 2 


B iW HIPMWI HI HW WWM W 

is Christmas celebrations in a cave, thus perpetuating the ancient tradition of early 
; who sought to keep their worship secret from persecutors. 


Happier to live in Siberia 


Moscow branded Maryana as a witch 


From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

The latest and most bizarre 
result of the Soviet media’s 
new policy of gtasnoxt (open- 
ness) has been the disdosure 

of the extent to which medieval 
superstitions and a belief In 
old-fashioned witchcraft are 
still thriving among well-edu- 
cated young urban dwellers In 
the Soviet Union. 

The finding was published 
in the latest edition of the 
popular magazine, Rabmdtsa 
(Working Woman), which in- 
vestigated the disturbing case 
of a young woman identified 
only as Maryana, who was 
faced into self-imposed exOe 
in Siberia after being con- 
demned as a witch eb the 


Moscow suburb in which she 
lived. 

The article has provided 
public confirmation of the 
conviction held by many lead- 
ing Western observers that 
superstitions of all kinds re- 
main for more deeply rooted la 
the Soviet character than 
Soviet officials have nntil re- 
cently been prepared to admit. 

The investigation was 
bandied after the woman, 
branded as a 20th century 
Soviet witch, appealed to the 
magazine ’s editors fur help 
after being driven from her 
home only “a 40-minnte train 
ride” from Moscow. 

“It seems Oat a seat many 
people beliere in all sorts of 
incantations, fortune-teDisg, 
bewitchment and casting of 
spefis,” Maryana wrote. 


"Eves a high education (toes 
not hinder this belief. Is it not 
time that some serious dis- 
cossioa of this dreadful 
phenomenon should appear in 
print so that victims like 
myself, of such absurd tales, 
should find support in sensible 
public opinion.?” 

The magazine reported that 
the woman’s troubles had 
begun at school when she and 
a friend were going out with 
two local boys, one of whom 
died suddenly of brain cancer 
Their dm nh t i y to»rih>r 
suggested that an evfl spell 
had been cast on the dead boy 
and rumours began circulating 
that Maryana was a witch 
Ho* friend then claimed she 
had cast a spell which bad 
wrecked her marriage and a 
teacher claimed that her son 


find been bon with a congeni- 
tal disease only because his 
birth coincided with th e yea r 
Maryana arrived in the town. 

“Maryana's friends and 
acquaintances all accepted the 
fed that’ she was indeed a 
witch and whenever she met 
them they would either lower 
their eyes or cross the road,” 
the magazine said. 

“It would be timely to 
remind the reader that this 
took place not In the dark 
middle-ages, but in our own 
enlightened century, which we 
call atomic, not to mention, 
civilized.” 

The article added that the 
w oman became such an “ob- 
ject of fear and haired” in the 
town that she finally left fa 
northern Siberia, where she 
uow lives much more happily. 


_ Government 
withdraws subsidies from 
traditionally protected sectors 

— the steel and engineering 
industries, meat processors 
and coal mines, among others 

— so kuge*cale redundancies 
are becoming more common. 

It is officially estimated that 
between 150,000 and 200,000 
jobs will have to go between 
now and 1990, with workers 
bring “redirected.” Some of 

the cats that come into force 
this year indude: 

• Seven thousand railway 
jobs. Because the authorities 
reduced their subsidy to 
Hungarian Railways, operat- 
ing profits have dropped from 
about 10 billion forints (£140 
million) to the 1986 level of 


i There is no room 
any more for 
evangelists of simple 
socialist equality in 
Hungary 9 

600 million forints (just over 
£10 million). 

• About 200 workers will be 
tiled from the Meat Process- 
ing Company in southern 
Hungary and several other 
plants, processing mainly 
pork, will be announcing simi- 
lar redundancies in the next 
few months. 

J Plant closures in a Hungar- 
ian foundry near the Czecho- 
slovak bonier will lead to the 
dismissal of about 600 work- 


Instant access rates 
climb even higher. 



ers, and a fhrther 1,500 will be 
laid off before 1990. 

There is officially no un- 
employment under commun- 
ism and all the dismissed 
workers will be offered new 
jobs. But with scores of enter- 
prises dose to bankruptcy, 
there are doubts about 
whether die Hun garian econ- 
omy is elastic enough to 
absorb quickly those made 
redundant 

The new year is expected to 
bring a much sharper im- 
plementation of the Hungar- 
ian bankruptcy laws which 
permit creditors and unpaid 
suppliers to take defaulting 
companies to court It is all 
part of a structural upheaval 
and a large number of workers 
in sick industries are likely to 
Isufier. 

The unions have negotiated 
a special “reintegration” grant 
for laid off workers. But 


important part of the equation 
in Hungary — and indeed in all 
Soviet Woe countries prepar- 
ing to introduce market-style 
measures. Since the banning 
of Solidarity in Poland one 
noticed a distinctive trend; 
Communist unions now form 
the fiercest resistance to 
reform. 

This emerged not only at a 
recent congress of the Polish 
Government-sponsored 
unions - where the speech of 
union leader Mr _ Alfred 
Miodowicz sounded distinctly 
conservative — but also in 
Hungary. One of the top party 
leadership in Hungary, Mr 
Karoly Grosz, sometimes re- 
garded as a hard-liner, las 
recently been emphasizing the 
need for income differentials. 

“We are constantly required 
to call to account those people 
who are smarter, more dili- 
gent and more talented than 
others in order to ask them to . 
explain their high wages,” Mr f 
Grosz said. “But it is obvious; 
their incomes are higher be- 
cause they are smarter, more 
diligent and talented. Should 
we hit these people on the 
head and force them con- 
stantly to defend themselves? 
We will not choose this 
approach.” 

. This could be regarded as a 
direct assault on the trade 
unions which have been press- 
ing for much smaller incomes 
differentials. But there is no 
room any more for evangelists 
of simple socialist equality in 
Hungary. When the party 
leadership makes a rare ref- 
erence to equality it refers only 
to the somewhat dubious 
“equality of opportunity ” 

The deeper one probes the j 
‘ more obvious become the * 
parallels between what -is 
happening in the East and the 
changes underway in the 
West That does not necessar- 
ily mean that Hungary is 
smuggling capitalism into the 
Soviet bloc. Rather it suggests 
that industrialized countries 
in both East and West are 
feeing difficult problems of 
modernization and that there 
are few available options. 

But after four decades of 
shriterecflrving the new finan- 
cial revolution in Hungary 
will be profoundly shocking to 
ordinary people, more un- 
nerving than similar dev- 
elopments in the West 

Concluded 


„---c 


f ? r , f 






Now there’s even more in Abbey 
National’s Five Star Account for you. The 
two top rates of interest climb even higher. 

When your balance reaches £5,000, 
you’re now up to 8.50% net p.a. and at 
£10,000 or more you reach a new top rate of 
8.75% net p.a. - on all the money in your 
account. 

INSTANT ACCESS- 

Your Five Star money is still ready 
money - instandy available when you need 
it. You can withdraw up to £250 a day cash 
or £15.000 by cheque from any Abbey 
National branch. 



To Dept. FSB, Abbey National Budding Sorioy, FREEPOST, 
201 Grafton Gate East, MILTON KEYNES MK9 IDA. 

I/We would like Five Scar treatment for my/our money and 

apply immediately, enclosing a cheque Tor £ 

to be invested in a Five Star Account at my/our fool branch in 


Please send full details and in application cani I/We andersond 
the mes might vary. I/We understand that the interest will be 
credited annually on 1st September to this account 

Full namefs) Mr/Mrs/ Miss.., 

Address 


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You can also apply for an Abbeylink 
card which allows you to deposit cash or 
cheques into your account, check your 
balance or withdraw up to £250 cash at any 
Abbeylink machine - 24 hours a day, 7 days 
a week. 


Five Star instant access is free. No 
penalties. No loss of interest No charges. 
Make sure your interest keeps rising in a 
Five Star Account now. You can start with 
as little as £500 at any Abbey National 
branch. Or post the coupon. 


Postcode. 


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Signatures). 


-Date^_ 


735 


ABBEY NATIONAL BUILDING SOCIETY. ABBEY HOUSE. BAKER STREET. LONDON NWI 6XL. 





ABBEY 

NATIONAL 



18 die in 
Christmas 
massacre 

From Almted Fad 
Dhaka 

Eighteen people were killed 
in a Christmas Day massacre 
as separatist tribal guerrillas 
raided a border village in 
Banglad e sh’s troubled south- 
eastern Chittagong Hill Tracts 
region, the In tenor Ministry 
disclosed yesterday. 

The guerrillas came from 
the eastern Indian state of 
Tripura. 

The massacre occurred two 

days after at least 20 people 
were killed when the outlawed 
Shanti Bahini — which has 
been fighting for a separate 
homeland for half a million 
Chakma and Manna tribes- 
men since 1976 - attacked the 
frontier town of Ramgarh. 

Police said most of the 
Christmas Day victims were 
ethnic Bengab M uslim ^ re- 
settled in the tribal village of 
Marishya. 

Authorities said the two 
bloody incidents halted the 
repatriation of more than 
10,000 tribesmen who fled to 
India last April as security 
forces stepped up an anti- 
insurgency drive. 

I Meanwhile, Bangladesh and 
Indian officials began tniire 
Yesterday to halt the cross- 
border fighting, 


Punjab at 
standstill 
for protest 

From Kuldip Nayar 
Delhi 

Following a call by the All- 
India Sikh Students Federa- 
tion for a two-day hartal 
(closure) from yesterday, the 
state of Punjab was practically 
at a standstill and even Hin- 
dus did not open shops, 
despite the advice of Shiv 
Sena, a Hindu militant body. 
Apart from isolated incidents 
of violence, the protest was 
peaceful. 

The action, supported by 
militants and the AkaJi break- 
sway group of Mr Prakash 
Singh BadaL, the former Pun- 
jab Chief Minister, was called 
in protest at death sentences 
imposed on three assassins of 
Mre Indira Gandhi, the late 
Prune Minister, and delay in 
me release of more than 300 
Sikhs detained at Jodhpur 
since 1984. 

. ..Buses and trains remained 
idle m most parts of the state. 
In many cities Sikhs youths 
went on to the streets to shout 
slogans in support of 
Khalistan, the concept of an 
independent state for Sikhs. 

In Amritsar district police 
yeste rday arrested 12 ex- 
tremists who were said to have 
been responsible for the death 
of a village headman 


f 


Hn 


■J 

\ 


- 07 MWWtllOU, 

Rebels renew attacks 
after Barre victory 

Froni Our Correspondent, Nairobi 

10 give Fr^dens£l&ma ffie SorSali 6 KS 881 ® 10 wp P le 
—g* 99.93 percent® was 

confidence, returning him to accident ^ Ma V w a car 
power for another seven-war Aithn i. . . 
tonm. rebel foreesof 1 ^ offirS l?^ he “ his 

Somali National Liberation ln Mogadishu 

Moveme nt (SNLM), suddenly J s 

renewed ttar anti-Govem- dav m ^ A 0 hours a 
ment attacks after a lone ■ TS-® 1 adv,ce * 

dormant period. 08 nfied^ hS?" 1 resu, *s. sup- 

Accordmg to the Ethiopian- rnral &£?■ c ? um, 7’ s Sec- 
basal Radio Halgan, operated that 48 m S 0n ’ “Seated 
bytbeSNULa^buSdi poffi™f or ^25 VO[ed » 

major attack on an army base dIwH? “ le candidate 
in northern Somalia, kS ^ *>-93 

more than 100 Government 9991 vnS^ifa. 00111130 ^ 6 * a 
troops, including their com- rectilvSrJ Vv*¥ Q Sl d t0 have 
mander. Colonel Ahmed Na- S3T£dt^l2? d?Ctl0n ' 
gaye. siances. clrcuiT i- 

The rebel broadcast said the A rally took ■ _ 
attack was on Gumburra, seaside osnitSi n ? c ? the 
nearly 20 miles from Hargeisa, celebrai^fr 1 ^ v g 1n ? u “ da y t0 
which serves as the Array’s dier-poiitician for .sol- 
battalion headquarters. poweri if! ’ J°. 

The radio also denounced President Ban? k ???- 
the latest presidential election aged 67 butwmLi; ,P mc, aHy 
as a fraud and pledged 10 ^ mu?h oS heve him 


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Pretoria (Renter) — 
South Africa yesterday 
confirmed reports it had 
plans to build an airstrip on 
Marion Island in the Ant- 
arctic, hot ignored allega- 
tions that it was connected 
with nuclear missile tests. 

Mr John Wiley, the 
Minister of Environment 
Affairs and Fisheries, said 
Pretoria was investigating 
the “ecological” effects of 
building an airstrip on the 
island. He said an airstrip 
would improve Sooth Afri- 
ca’s control of tire fishing 
zone around the island. 


Nairobi — Before the 
rebel troops of the Sudan 
Peoples* liberation Army 
(SPLA) declared a Christ- 
mas truce, they killed more 
than 70 Government sol- 
diers in heavy fighting near 
Juba, capital of the south- 
ern Sudan (A Corres- 
pondent writes). 

According to a rebel 
broadcast, monitored in 
Nairobi, the main battle 
took place outside Mon- 
golia, on the White Nile, 
and also resulted in the 
destruction of some mili- 
tary vehicles. 


Singapore reshuffle 

Singapore (Renter) — Mr Snppiah Dhanabalan, the 
Singapore Foreign Minister, was given the additional 
portfolio of National Development Minister in a Cabinet 
reshuffle announced yesterday and due to effect from 
January 1. 

Also promoted in the reshuffle were the acting Trade and 
Industry Minister, Mr Lee Hsten Loong (son of the Prime 
Minister, Mr Lee Knan Yew), the acting Labour Minister, 
Mr Lee Yocfc Suan, and the acting Community Development 
Minister, Mr Wong Kan Seng. All three were made full 
minister*. 

Mr Dhanabalan takes ova - as National Development 
Minister from Teh Cheang Wan, who died on December 14. 
_ In other changes, Mr Richard Hu Tsn Tan relinquished 
his concurrent appointment as Health Minister bat will 
remain as Finance Minister. 

Mr Yeo Cheow Tong, Minister of State for Health, was 
named acting Health Minister . 


Libyan 

victory 

Paris (AP) — Press re- 
ports said yesterday that 
the desert outpost of Zonar 
at the edge of the Tibesti 
Mountains in extreme 
northern Chad fell to the 
Libyan forces that bad 
been attacking it since 
December 19. The Chadian 
Embassy would not con- 
firm or deny the report 

Unnamed sources in 
Paris said the Libyans 
seized Zonar in fighting 
Sunday night and yester- 
day morning. 


Refugees 
to move 

Bangkok (AP) — A mar 
jor Cambodian refugee 
holding centre will be 
dosed on New Year’s Eve 
and its 25,000 residents 
will be sent Id border 
camps, a senior Thai of- 
ficial said yesterday. 

Mr Prasong Soonsiri, 
secretary-general to the 
Thai Prime Ministetsaid 
the decision stemmed from 
Thailand's dissatisfaction 
with the slow rate of accep- 
tance of Indochinese refu- 
gees by Western nations. 


Arabs’ second 
satellite 

Aim Dhabi (AFP) — The hoard of the Arab Organization 
far Space Comnumfeoiiona and Satellites (Arabsat) began a 
two-day meeting here yesterday to discuss plans to bunch 
the second nnnation of Arab satellites. 

The meeting, the 39th of the 22-member organization, is 
chaired by Mr Faisal Zeidan, the Saadi Arabian 
Communications Under-Secretary, and is being attended by 
representatives from the United Arab Emirates, Libya, 
Kuwait, Syria, Oman, Algeria and Morocco. 


Birthday 

amnesty 

Kathmandu (AP) — 
Some 202 prisoners had 
their prison terms remitted 
and were set free yesterday 
on the occasion of King 
Birendra's 42nd birthday, 
the Home Affairs Ministry 
announced. 

The men had been serv- 
ing terms ranging from one 
month to 20 years after 
being convicted of theft and 
otter crimes. 


Shuttle 

payouts 

Washington (AP) — The 
Justice Department said 
yesterday it has reached 
confidential, out-of-court 
settlements with the fam- 
ilies of the school teacher, 
Mrs Christa McAulifie, 
and three other astronauts 
who died in the explosion 
of the space shuttle Chal- 
lenger. The settlements are 
to be laid “over an ex- 
tended period”. 


Voyager couple set 
for the big sell 

From Ivor Davis, Los Angeles 


After collecting medals 
from President Reagan here 

■ today, Dick Rulan and Jeana 
Yeager, the pilots who went 
around the world on one tank 
of fuel in their experimental 
aircraft. Voyager, will embark 

■ on a whirlwind journey to 
conquer the high-flying world 
of marketing. 

Mr Rutan. aged 49, a Viet- 
nam combat veteran and his 
pretty 34-year-old co-pi lot, 
have already become the dar- 
lings of the American talk- 
show circuit. But just days 
after the historic trip they 
begin a high-powered cam- 
paign that could bring them 
millions of dollars from 
books, television appearances, 
-commercial endorsements 
and even a film based on their 
-pioneering flight. 

Dan Card, the business 
manager for the Voyager, 
admitted that the two pilots 
“have been aggressively and 
actively marketed and pro- 
moted. A book is in the works 
and a movie is bound to 
follow.” . * 

In one office in the Califor- 
nia desert town of Mojave, 
where the Voyager began and 
finished its global journey, 
'Peter Riva had been hired to 
• answer hundreds of telephone 
* calls requesting interviews. 
Already there are invita- 


tions to travel to London, 
Paris, Tokyo, and Milan. 

Mr Riva is a New York 
literary agent and the grand- 
son of the film star Marlene 
Dietrich. “Fd . love to see 
somebody exciting play the 
parts. Maybe Robert Radford 
for Dick and somebody with 
spunk and character like Sissy 
Spacek to do leana's role.” 

Since the end of their jour- 
ney Miss Yeager and Mr 
Rutan have been trying to 
catch up on their sleep and fit 
in television talk-show 
appearances. 

Mr Rutan told interviewers 
there had been moments of 
fear during the nine-day, non- 
stop 26.000-mile odyssey."! 
was scared a few times, going 
through ferocious thunder- 
storms and on the last leg 
when we lost our rear engine.” 

Then turning to his slender 
co-pilot, he added: “The cour- 
age of this thing, rubbing my 
neck and my shoulders and 
saying, ‘We can get through. 
We can gel through', was 
tremendous.” 

The interviews ended with 
Mr Rutan noting: “Here are 
the answers to the two most- 
asked questions — No, Jeana is 
not related to Chuck Yeager 
and we put it in a bag and 
dropped u overboard.” 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 



WORLD SUMMARY 


Risk of new blast 
at German hotel 

Bonn — Firemen yesterday were burning off leakhm luraiif 
gas at a Bavarian winter resort hotel amid the risk of arar- 
ther explosion following a blast test Saturday that mi~» 
seven guests and injured 12 others (John Englan d writes). 

The Hotel Rtessersee, in Gainmisch-Partenldreiiea, near 
the Gentian- Austrian border, was declared a high-danger 
area after unsuccessful attempts to introduce nitrogen into 
the gas pipes to prevent another explosion. 

Four of the injured, who suffered barns to up to 80 per cent 
of their skin, were still critically ill yesterday. 

The last of the dead, a man whose body was recovered from 
a wrecked wing of the hotel on Sunday, had also not been 
identified. 

A guest from Bona, named as Herr Eckhart Mateo, aged 
46, was reported as miss in g as experts from the state police 
bureau waked for firemen to give them the all-clear to kgm! 
sifting the wreckage for definite evidence on the of the 

explosion. 

Airstrip 70 killed 

proposal in Sudan 



Striking French raflwaymen marching in front of a stranded train yesterday during a protest demonstration at Marseille's Saint-Charles station. 

French mil Britain and Guatemala resume diplomatic relations 

peace hope 7 ~* n 77 

grows after Treaty ignores Belize question 

pflflppcciftn By Andrew McEwsn of the agreed statement was no reference to the British colony was granted self-gov 
VvlIVvij»31Uli Dinlomatic Corresnondent one Daraeraoh shorter than earrisnn hut ihe sources said: pmmraL and then in 1 QR 


By Andrew McE win 
Diplomatic Correspondent 


of the agreed statement was 
one paragraph shorter than 


From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

Fresh hopes for a settlement 
of the 12-day-old French rail 
strike arose yesterday when 
the SNCF management 
announced that it was ready to 
re-open official talks with the 
unions today in view of what 
it described as a significant 
improvement in train serv- 
ices. 

Last week, M Jean Dupuy, 
the head of the state-owned 
French railways, had said that 
negotiations on pay, working 
conditions and the new merit- 
based salary scales, could not 
resume until all the strikers 
returned lo work. 

However, by the weekend, 
M Dupuy had already begun 
talking of the possibility of 
opening informal talks, as it 
became dear that the rail- 
waytnen had no intention of 
calling off their strike. 

Now he has changed his 
m»nd again to allow the 
resumption of formal negotia- 


Britain and Guatemala yes- ** Spanish document. Al- 
ttrday announced the resump- tiKMigh uuvaitaUein Lon- 
don of full diplomatic re- do * t ^\ S ^ h ,1? curnent 
lations after a 23-ycar break. *■“* *?y Whitehall sources 


Both countries are to nomi- J? “ nta “ « .reference to 
nate ambassadors soon. Guatemala s claim. 

The cause of the long si- The sources expected the 
fence, however, remains un- agreement's wording to in- 


settled. Guatemala has not 
renounced its territorial 
claims to Belize, formerly the 
colony of British Honduras, 
and Britain has not under- 
taken to withdraw its 1,600 
troops from Belize, which it 


dicate that Britain would try 
its hardest to settle the ques- 
tion of territorial claim. But 
Britain's position is that it has 
no jurisdiction and only direct 
talks between Guatemala and 
Belize can resolve their dif- 


keeps there to guarantee the ferences. Britain has acted as 


country's independence. 

Underscoring continuing 
differences, the British version 


an observer in direct talks in 
the past 

The announcement made 


no reference to the British 
garrison, but the sources said: 
“It will remain for an appro- 
priate period to assist with 
external defence and the train- 
ing of the Belize defence 
force”. 

The Belize issue bas under- 
mined reiatioDS between 
Britain and Guatemala for 
nearly half a century. As long 
ago as 1939 Guatemala de- 
nounced the UK-Guaiemala 
Treaty of 1859, which re- 
cognised the boundaries be- 
tween British Honduras and 
Guatemala. 

Guatemala broke off rela- 
tions in two stages. Dip- 
lomatic links were severed in 
1 963 when the newly renamed 


colony was granted self-gov- 
ernment, and then in I9S1 
when Belize attained indepen- 
dence, it cut consular 
relations. 

The establishment of a civil- 
ian Government in Guate- 
mala this year paved the way 
for talks. These led to a 
resumption of consular rela- 
tions in August with a de- 
clared goal of full restoration 
by the end of the year. 

Until November it ap- 
peared unlikely that the target 
date would be achieved, but 
the goal was realized after a 
meeting in Miami between 
Lady Young, the Minister of 
Slate at the Foreign Office, 
and President Cerezo. 


Monks in clash over 
Bethlehem clean-up 


From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 
Armenian monks shouted traditionally theirs, 
down a Greek monk from a Two years ago 
ladder in the Basilica of the and Greeks came 
Holy Nativity in Bethlehem over the waff and I 
yesterday when he tried to uneasy trace was < 


■ - | m ■ • j TVOIWIMJ nuwu UV W lUII I*/ 

hons, broken off eight days clean more of the church than 
ago, after what appears to was permitted in a com- 
have been only a munmal plicated inter-confessional 
improvement m an otherwise agreement 
chaotic situation. Yesterday was general 

Indeed, the only sig nifi cant cleaning day in the basilica 
change yesterday seemed to be when the Greek, Armenian 
the partial re-opening of the and Roman Catholic churches 
GareduNotd in Paris permit- all clean those parts of the 
ting, according to the manage- ancient building which are 
menl, the resumption of 40 


Two years ago Armenians 
and Greeks came to blows 
over the waff and last year an 
uneasy trace was only main- 
tained when one Greek monk 
on a ladder was allowed to 
clean as much of the wall as he 
could reach with a hand 
broom. This year, however, be 
tried to stretch further. But the 
shouting of the Armenians 
below persuaded him to leave 
the greater part of the wall 
dirty. 


Juan Carlos ignores 
ski resort hotel blast 

From Richard Wigg, Barcelona 
King Juan Garios of Spun If responsibility is con- 


was out on the slopes ski-ing 
as planned in Baqueira Beret 
yesterday, in spite of a bomb 
exploding only hours before in 
the leading hotel of the Pyre- 
nean resort where some of his 
security men were staying. 

The bomb, claimed by Eta 
to be its work, went on less 
than 1,000 yards from the 
chalet the royal family owns. 
No one was injured but the 
third floor of the hotel was 
badly damaged. 


firmed, this will be die nearest 
the Basque armed separatist 
organization has come to 
striking against the King and 
the royal family. 

An anonymous caller gave 
two warnings about three- 
quarters of an hour before the 
7 am explosion, including one 
to the fire brigade in Viella, 

The bomb had been planted 
behind a water meter near one 
of five bedrooms badly 
damaged. 


per cent of normal services, 
though that figure is contested 
by the strikers. 

Elsewhere, conditions 
seemed to be much the same 
as on the previous day, with 
only between one-in-three and 
one-in-four trains r unning , of- 
ten at unscheduled times, and 
frequently subject to un- 
predictable delays caused by 
strikers blocking the lines. 

Meanwhile, the Gov- 
ernment is con tinuin g to 
refuse to intervene directly in 
the dispute. Nevertheless, M 
Jacques Chirac, the Prime 
Minister; who cancelled a 
planned New Year's holiday 
in Tunisia in order to follow 
developments, called a min- 
isterial meeting yesterday to 
discuss the political implica- 
tions of the strike and _ to 
consider possible alternative 
means of transport. 

Earlier, M Chirac held talks 
with President Mitterrand on 
what was described as the 
“internal French situation.” 

President Mitterrand is due 
to go on television tomorrow 
to give his traditional New 
Year's Eve address. 

Coming hard on the heels of 
ihe student demonstrations, 
the present rail dispute is seen 
as another potentially damag- 
ing blow to the conservtative. 
Government’s image, as well 
as to its wages policies. M 
Chirac is determined this time 
not to give in so easily. 

“The whole Government is 
keeping a close watch on 
developments in this social 


Iran and 
US closer 
to deal 

From Mohsan Ali 
Washington 

American and Iranian nego- 
tiators were meeting at The 
Hague yesterday to discuss 
$500 million (£342 million) of 
frozen Iranian assets held in 
US accounts, according to a 
spokesman for the Iran-US 
claims tribunaL 

The tribunal was set up in 
1981 to settle compensation 
claims by both countries as 
part of the agreement reached 
in Algiers that year to resolve 
the crisis over 52 American 
hostages held in Tehran for 
more than a year. 

An Iranian official in The 
Hague yesterday expressed 
optimism and said a deal may 
be worked out within two 
days. The talks could have 
significant political by- 
products. 

Iranian leaders have re- 
cently suggested that the un- 
freezing of their assets, 
including the $500 million, 
could encourage Tehran to 
intervene on behalf of Ameri- 
can hostages held in Lebanon.. 

Iran is claiming $500 mil- 
lion in assets plus interest 
accrued over the years. This 
case is one of about 4,000 stiff 
outstanding. 

Since the tribunal was set up 
five years ago about 900 cases 





The peace activitist, Mr Philip Berrigan, left, among demonstators removed by police from 
the Pentagon in Washington where they protested against US testing of nuclear weapons. 


protested against US testing of nuclear weapons. 


Losing face on the beat 
in western Japan 


conflict, and hopes that have been settled. 
aaeptaWe solutions - which The US is reported to have 


will not undermine the eco- 
nomic-recovery now in pro- 
cess — will befound in order to 
bring an end to a dispute 
which is harmful for the 
nation,” M Denis Baudouin, 
the Prime Minister’s spokes- 
man, said yesterday. 


agreed in principle to return 
most of the $500 million plus 
interest, but details still have 
to be worked out, including 
the wording of an Iranian 
pledge that it would make no 
further demands once this 
case is dosed. 


Tokyo — Police in western 
Japan are stiff shamefaced 
over the day they bad to 
launch a big manhunt for one 
of their own officers, after a 
case of bicycle theft. They 
found him 17 hours later, 
cycling away from his pursu- 
ers (David Watts writes). 

It was 19-year-old Patrol- 
man Yuji Kurita's first week 
on duty, and one night be 
conscientiously radioed in to 
report that he was questioning 
a young lady about a bicycle. 
But the last thing his superiors 


heard him say was: “She fled 
north." 

When Patrolman Kurils 
had not returned to his police 
box by the next morning, 
Himeji police launched a 
manhunt with 440 men, two 
dogs and a helicopter. When 
found, he explained that he let 
the woman go when she said 
the bike was her brother’s, 
only to' be informed minutes 
later that it was stolen. Instead 
of admitting he bad been 
duped on his first case, Kurita 
set off on his 1 7-hour odyssey. 


W'/fT 


27th* De6s^ber 


Tokyo 
to end 
defence 
taboo 

From David Watts 
Tokyo 

The Japanese Government 
has removed an important 
psychological brake on its 
defence expenditure with a 
decision to exceed a self- 
imposed limit of 1 per cent of 
gross national product next 
year. 

The decision came as the 
climax of several days of 
bargaining between the Direc- 
tor-General of the Defence 
Agency, Mr Yuko Kurihara. 
and the Minister of Finance, 
Mr Kiichi Miyazawa. as the 
Government and bureaucracy 
put the final touches to next 
year's budge l 

Only overseas development 
aid and domestic provisions 
for investment by Gov- 
ernment and local authorities, 
apart from defence, will be 
allowed significant increases 
in expenditure in the budget, 
details of which will be an- 
nounced today. 

The 1 per cent ceiling on 
defence spending, first in- 
troduced a decade ago. has 
been an important reassur- 
ance to many members of the 
opposition and the public that 
the country's defence spend- 
ing would not run out of 
control and. for neighbouring 
countries, a reassurance that 
Japan would not again be- 
come a military power. 

The possibility of breaching 
the I per cent barrier has been 
discussed for years but only in 
the past year or so has the 
Government indicated it was 
likely to come soon. 

The decision to allow de- 
fence spending to rise to 1 .004 
per cent of GNP for the 1 987 
fiscal year brought immediate 
condemnation from the opp- 
osition and the Government 
can expect an exceedingly 
sticky reception when the Diet 
resumes deliberations next 
month. 

Nakasone the man 
to break mould 

The US Government will be 
delighted that Japan is now 
demonstrably willing to share 
more of the burden of its own 
defence and that of the Pacific. 

Hie Government of Mr 
Yasuhiro Nakasone, himself a 
former Director of the De- 
fence Agency, dearly felt that 
there would never be a more 
propitious time than now to 
break this particular taboo 
after the Liberal Democratic 
Party’s (LDP) landslide elec- 
tion victory in July. . 

Mr Nakasone is the most 
popular Japanese leader in 
recent history and no one is 
better fined than he to dispose 
of potentially unpopular deci- 
sions before he is due to leave 
office in October next year. 

The Defence Agency origi- 
nally requested a 6.7 per cent 
increase in defence spending, 
the Finance Ministry cut it 
back to 4.1 per cent in initial 
bargaining but after interven- 
tion by senior figures in the 
LDP several of the agency's 
requests were restored and the 
increase went up to 5.2 
percent 

The practical effects of the 
decision - the restoration of 
four FI 5 jet fighters, three 
Lockheed P3C Orion anti- 
submarine aircraft and one 
support vessel and other less 
glamorous items to the 
military's shopping list — are 
miniscule compared to the 
psychological effects of allow- 
ing defence spending to take 
up a larger part of (he budget 
each year. 

Japan's constitution, after 
all, still maintains that the 
country will not retain armed 
forces and pledges forever to 
renounce the right to settle 
disputes by force. 



January;1987 


' Bond SLJ7 Old Qpc$£r. 

.73 Knigf^steidger^ : ..y.'.V,' * jig* 
s 46 Curzbri St .r ?• , • • " " :\-nisSk 

29 Lime St.. : 

5 Cor 



German election to cost SPD dearly 


From John England, Bonn 


If the predictions of the 
latest opinion poll on next 
month's West Genian federal 
election come true, not only 
will the Social Democratic 
Party (SPD) emerge with its 
dream of toppling Chancell o r 
Kohl shattered, bet also with a 
huge mmpaj gn debt. 

The SPD is spending the 
equivalent of £17.4 million on 
its election campaign, more 
than any other party, but 
according to the opinion poll it 
will win less than 34 per cent 
of the vote, compared with 
about 55 per cent for the 
government coalition parties. 

For the SPD, that result 
wonkl mean die party would 
end op £7 million hi (he red. 


(Under the West German 
system a rebate of campaign 
costs is paid to the political 
parties at the rate of £1.74 per 
bead of the electorate — about 
45 million — calculated on 
votes won.) 

Calls on the party by Herr 
Johannes Ran, the SPD's 
rflimtftiqte for Ihe chancellor- 
ship, to fight for every vote in a 
bid for “onr own majority” are 
therefore given a fervent 
“amen* 1 by the party treasurer. 
Nevertheless, the SPD would 
have to gain 55.6 per cent of 
the vote to break even on its 
investment 

Herr Kohl's Christian De- 
mocratic Union (CDU) will 


spend £13.9 million on its 
campaign. Meanwhile, its 
Bavarian sister-party, the 
Christian Social Union (GSU) 
of Herr Franz Josef Strauss, is 
still doing its sums. 

Herr Martin Bangemann's 
Free Democratic Party (FDPX 

the junior partner in the 

Government coalition, has 
allocated £2.09 million for its 
campaign, less than half its 
expenditure on Ihe last elec- 
tion in March 1983- If it 
achieves the 8L5 per cent given 

to it by the opinion poll, it will 
show a profit on its rebate. 

If (be Greens Party, as the 
poll forecasts, wins 10JJ per 
cent of the vote It will also 


return a profit on its campaign 
outlay of roughly £1.2 million. 

The anti-big business 
Greens, according to its an- 
nual report released in Octo- 
ber, is now the second-richest 
political party in West Ger- 
many, with much of its money 
Invested In shares and bonds. 
The report said the party was 
worth a total £11,9 million at 
the end of 1985. 

Despite its campai&i badge! 
worries, the SPD remains the 
wealthiest party with a re- 
ported £59.7 million to its 
credit The CDU bank balance 
is pet at £2.9 million, while the 
FDP is suffering a deficit of 

£2v* ouUhkl 



’■ tjcrwncfessie oxford 

£49j30. : 





■OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


Students defy Judges 

authorities tackle 

with Peking “ Dg | } e 

protest march 

„ One of the most contro wr- 

icking (Reuters) — Students units were responsible for snJ legacies of the McCarthy 
at Peking Teachers’ Univer- seeing posters were not put up era 3%® widespread authority 
aty . staged a march early on their premises. Wail-post- of US to prohibit 

yesterday morning in defiance ■ ers have been widely used by entry to the United States by 
of a ban on unapproved students in rallying support anyone suspected of being a 
demonstrations and amid for marches in at least 10 cities f OTwi ^mfo f lmMing tHn ri s 
increasing official impatience across China this month, call- deemed hostile to the Ameri- 
with China's wave of campus ing for more democracy and can way of life. 

freedom. After a recent rash of in- 

A Western diplomat said d dents in which left-wing 
the stem language used in the journalists, writers and ac- 
official press over the past few frosts were denied entry with- 
days showed growing impati- out bring told the reason, the 
ence with the student unrest, issue has now gone to the US 
“Protests now are becoming Supreme Court for a derision, 
increasingly dangerous. The At issue is the nding by the 

price of dissent has risen in the State Department to deny 
past few days,” he said. visitors’ visas to four left- 

Tbe Peking Evening News wingers from overseas who 
said yesterday’s march was were invited to various meet- 
illegal and its organizers had mgs in the US three years ago. 
committed criminal offences. They were Sefior Tomas 
A foreign student at the Burge, toe Nicaraguan In- 
Teachers' University said the terhnr Minister, an Italian 
students chose to ma»d i in the peace activist, and two Cuban 
early hours of the morning to Communist Party experts on ; 
catch the authorities unawares women’s rijjMs. Ike Admin- 
and reduce the risk of identi- istration said their entry would 
fication. harm public interest. 

The students set out on the . A d&tito comt j®3ge ruled 
march banging drums and m 1984 that the adn was 
chanting slogans railing for with® the State Department’s 
democracy and freedom. legal authority and dismissed 

A foreign reporter disputed sunJont a comt m ap- 

the Peking Evening News ac- Pwu^maZ-lruftigmJVIarc^ 
count, saying he saw the rented the stut andacaised 
students enter both Pricing feC^verHn^ofpracto.nga 
and Qinghua universities, "brand of gnat by assooatMm” 
where the numbers swelled to whrch Congress had banned 
up to 3,000. He said that up to specifically nr a 1977 taw 
30 police in cars accompanied dealing _ with visas for 
them as they marched from OMaunfab. __ 

Pricing to Qinghua oniver- A etuet “«ention behind of 
sitiesbut made no arrests. flustaw was to permit eirtry to 
people as long as they did not 

filiation ends 'TSJtBtMS 

1 that the Administration still 

• had u broad discretion* 1 over 

ITIO $|0illTI the admission and exdnrioo of 

•*&•**“ aliens, but said that this was 
• -m .not boundless. 

IfACmDTlt It extended only as tar as 
" ft %^>3JI\ft%7ftfr ft the legal authority conferred 

by Congress and could not 
the country’s Defence Min- transgress constitutional 
ister who has not been seen in limitations, 
public since July after an The Reagan Administration 

alleg ed traffic accident, also protested rigorously a gains t 
retained his top post. the rating, saying that ft would 

It said the party’s Central create substantial problems 
Committee, in a plenary ses- for the Government's conduct) 
si on on Saturday, reconfirmed rtf foreign policy and would 
the 76-year-old vice-marshal necessitate “unseemly bi- 
as a member of the North quiry” into its deririon-mak- 
Korean Presidium and Polit- ingia this area, 
buro, and therefore as the The suit has been fownrfifd 
third most powerful man in by a diverse group of people, 
the country behind President fori rating members of Cou- 
Kim and his son. cress, university professors. 

President Kirn and his son jourmilists «««i religious lea- 


protest. 

The Peking Evening News 
reported that shortly after 2 
am between 200 and 300 
students marched to three 


freedom. 

A Western diplomat said 
the stem language used in the 
official press over the past few 
days showed growing im pad- 


other city campuses. But stu- ence with the student unrest, 
dents there refused to join “Protests now are becoming 


them, so they dispersed increasingly dangerous. The 
“disappointed”. price of dissent has risen in the 

The march, the first in past few days,” he said. 
Peking since tight controls on The Peking Evening News 
demonstrations in the capital said yesterday’s march was 
were announced on Friday, illegal and its organizers had 
was held despite a barrage of committed criminal offences. 


official warnings to students 

to stay off the streets. 

Yesterday, aO main news- 
papers carried to ughly- worded 
editorialss taxing that it was 
unconstitutional to oppose 
socialism and the ruling Com- 
munist Party and told people 
not to ape what it called “the 
fake democracy of capitalist 
countries.” 

At the weekend, television 
quoted Mr Wang Zhen, a 


who spread nihilism, deni- 
grated China and advocated 
all-round Westernization. 

The Peking paper carried a 
warning yesterday against the 
use of wall-posters, which is 
illegal, and said that all work 


Tokyo (AFP) — Mr Kim II 
Sung was re-elected President 
of North Korea yesterday as 
the co mmunis t nation’s Par- 
liament opened its first ses- 
sion since national elections 
on November 2, Radio Pyong- 
yang reported in a short 
broadcast monitored here. 

The session was expected to 
name other top state leaders 
and Cabinet members, and 
adopt a much-delayed eco- 
nomic programme to lake the 
country into 1993, Tokyo- 
based analysts said. 

Attention has also been 
focused on the status of Mr 
Kim's son and presumed heir, 
Mr Kim Joog D, aged 44, who 
is the second secretary of the 
ruling Korea Workers’ Party. 
Some analysts predict he will 
be named First Vice-President 
during the session. 

President Kim, aged 74, a 
former anti-Japanese guerrilla 
leader, has ruled Norm Korea 
since Japan renounced its 
colonial rale of the Korean 
peninsula at the end of the 
Second World War. 

He was elected Premier in 
1948 when the Soviet-backed 
republic was formed in the 
northern half of the divided 


Manila claims Marcos 


A foreign student at the 
Teachers' University said the 
students chose to march in the 
early hours of the morning to 
catch the authorities unawares 
and reduce the risk of identi- 
fication. 

The students set out on the 
march banging drums and 

chanting slogans railing for 

democracy and freedom. 

A foreign reporter disputed 
the Peking Evening News ac- 



Manfla (AFP) - The Gov- 
ernment filed its first suit in 
the Philippines to seize wealth 
allegedly plundered by the 
deposed president, Mr Ferdi- 
nand Marcos, with a claim for 
more than $700 mfllfon (£500 
milli on) hi damages. 

A commission created hf 
president Gorazmt Aquino to 
recover the Marcos fortune, 
qfctwMfPd at more than SS 
h fflwa , also named as respon- 
dents two US real estate 
qgpnfcj Mrs Irorida Marcos, 


The suit was intended 
mainly to establish Manila's 
riahn to the New York prop- 
erties of the Marcoses, who 
fled to Hawaii after the com- 
bined tivflian-mflitary revolt 
here ended his 20-year rule in 
February. 

The suit was filed by toe 
P residential Commission on 
Good Government (PCGG) 
with an anti-corruption court 
in Manta in order to comply 
with US legal requirements, 
toe chairman of the PCGG, 
Mr Jovito Sa tonga, told a 
news conference. 

“The US Court of Appeals 
which froze toe Marcos prop- 
erties in New York said toe 
evidence that Marcos owned 
four braidings in Manhattan 
was strong, but these corals 


held though front companies- 
They were the Crown Budding 
on Fifth Avenue, toe Herald 
Ontre on Sixth avenue; a 71- 
storey b uilding on Wal» Street, 
and an office building on 
Madison Avenue. 

The complaint also tew 
claim to the Liudenmere Es- 
tate on Long Island, a former 
resort earlier reported in toe 

US press as Marcos-owned- 

Mr 8 a|nn B a said the FCGG 
asked that the court order the 
defendants to render an 
accounting id all income and 
disbursements, and seeks toe 
biggest award of damages ever 
in the Philippines. 


Two die as 

helicopter 


into ocean 

Perth (Reuter). -Divers 
recovered two bodies from the 
sunken wreck of a helicopter 
which crashed into the sea off 
north-west Australia. 

The two men, aged -wj and 
39, had been trapped mside 
the helicopter which was ferry- 
ing workers from a giant oil 
and gas rig 85 miles north of 
the coastal town of Karrathg. 

Rescue boats earlier picked 
up 15 survivors. 


The New York properties _T 
have an estimated gross value JJOJf V^UTuiiU 
of six to seven billion pesos j 

(£208 m31ion)and a net value CODQQCrBQ 

.r.LM* half that ilMtIllMIK ” 


of about half that, doe to loans 
■ml obligations, he said. 

“The PCGG complaint al- 
leges tha t the wrongs commit- 
ted by Marcos and his co- 
defendants consist of toe 
purloining and misappropria- 
tion of poblic funds, bribery, 
blackmail, embezzlement, acts 
of corruption, betrayal of pub- 
lic trust, brazen abase of 
power, and the plunder of the 
nation’s wealth,” he said. 

Mr Salonga said simitar 
suits would follow in Califor- 
nia, Hawaii, other US states 


tW toe basic issue of and other countries. 


Mr Jovito Salonga, head of the commission trying to rec- 
over the Marcos’s wealth, detailing his allegations. 


rnilaw fhl fairings should be 
decided by Pbflsppine courts,” 
Mr Salonga said. 

He listed four buildings m 
high-priced sections of Man- 
hattan as Marcos properties 


The bulk of the Marcos 
fortune is believed to be in 
Switzerland, whose Gov- 
ernment has frozen suspected 
secret bank accounts of the 
former president 


veteran Communist Party count, saying he saw the 
leader, as criticizing people students enter both Peking 


and Qinghua universities, 
where the numbers swelled to 
up to 3,000. He said that up to 
30 police in cars accompanied 
them as they marched from 
Pricing to Qinghua univer- 
sities but made no arrests. 


Dialogue 
to resume 
in Delhi 


North Korea speculation ends 

Kim H Sung again 
elected president 


si on on Saturday, reconfirmed of foreign policy and would 
the 76-year-old vice-marshal necessitate “unseemly te- 
as a member of the North quiry” into its detishMa-mak- 
Korean Presidium and Polit- inj* m this area, 
buro, and therefore as the The suit has been fownrfigd 
third most powerful man in by a diverse group of people, 
the country behind President forinfling members of Cou- 
Kim and his son. gross, university professors. 

President Kirn and his son journalists religions lea- 
also retained their posts, along ers. 
with Mr O, in toe three- One of those refused a visa 


member Central Committee -was 
Presidium. form 

At the party meeting, Mr here 
Kang Song San, the Premier, was 
and Mr Yon Hyong Muk, the unde 
First Vice-Premier and Min- Bosh 
ister for Metal and Machinery Th 
Industries, were elected for the been 
first time to the party oars 
secretariat. City: 

On November 17, South De 
Korean officials claimed that case. 
North Korean propaganda ties s 
loudspeakers - placed along deny 
the border — had announced theii 
the death of President Kim, dipto: 
But the communist leader On 
turned up the next day, before asked 


pe nin sula. He became Pre$i- television cameras, to wel- 
dent in 1972. come President Jambyn Bat- 

Earlier yesterday, the of- monh of Mongolia to Pyong- 
ficial radio said Mr O Jin U, yang. 


was Signor Nino Fasti, a 
framer Nato general and mem- 
ber of the Italian Senate, who 
was invited to address a 
unclear disarmament rally te 
Boston. 

The two Caban women had 
been invited to attend semi- 
nars organized by New York 
City and various universities. 

Despite the Supreme Court 
case, US iramigrathm authori- 
ties still have broad powers to 
deny entry to aliens, whatever 
their visa, apart from 
diplomats. - 

One notorious question first 
asked of visa applicants in da 
McCarthy era was whether 
they were sexual deviants, and 
this has been used to keep out 
homosexuals. ■ 


From Hassan Akhtar 
Islamabad 

After two days of talks here 
the foreign secretaries of India 
and Pakistan announced at 
the weekend that the dialogue 
aimed at nor malising rela- 
tions between the two coun- 
tries would be resumed in 
Delhi early in the new year. 

Mr A.P. Vankateswaran, 
the Indian Foreign Secretary, 
besides bolding talks with his 
Pakistani opposite number, 
Mr Abdul Sattar, also met 
President Zia and Mr Junejo, 
toe Prime Minister. 

Both foreign secretaries 
conceded at a joint press 
conference at the end of their ; 
meeting . that the normaliza- 
lion talks had been slow 
because of the cumulative 
effects of past strains and three 
armed conflicts. 

Comparing the situation 
since the early 1970s, when 
the two countries went to war 
over Bangladesh, Mr Sattar 
said that the present state of 
relations was vastly improved 

However, it was evident 
that the two sides wens still 
wide apart on key issues. 

* But . there were also en- 
couraging and hopeful point- 
ers, according to the Indian 
Foreign Secretary, who staled 
that they had agreed to hold 
meetings of die Indo-PaJri- 
stani Joint Commission to 
take tangible steps fra co- 
operation between the two 
'countries in the first half of 
1987. 

Mr Vankateswaran con- 
firmed that Mr Rajiv Gandhi, 
the Indian Prime Minister, 
who had cancelled his prom- 
ised visit to Pakistan last 
summer, would be travelling 
to Islamabad in 1987. 


Haiti in a power vacuum 

Parties struggle to emerge 
from Duvalier’s shadow 


From Alan Tomlinson, Port-au-Prince 
The shaky provisional Gov- General Namphy sees him- vac 


eminent in Haiti appears to be self surrounded by a political 
hanging nn tn power largely by vacuum. “The parties have 


default 

Supporters and opponents 


wasted nine months . . . They 
have had nine months to 


milit ary-dominated organize themselves and have 


vacuum. Does this mean he 
wants to go on filling it?” 

He is also concerned by tbe 
Army chiePs reluctance to 
place the running of elections 
in toe hands of an indepen- 


Kassel (Reuter) - A 22- 
v ear-old East German escaped 
to the West by using home- 
made climbing gear to scale a 
fence on the heavily-guarded 
frontier with West Germany. 

The man. an ornamental 
blacksmith, cut his way 
through a first fence set bad 
from the border and scram- 
bled over the second chain- 
link fence using a wire rope 
and home-made crampons. 

Out of touch 

Paris (Reuter) — The cy- 
clone-hit French Pacific island 
of Futuna has lost its last link 
with the outside world — a 
police radio — and attempts to 
fly in badly needed food and 
medical supplies have failed. 

Lost at sea 

Ankara (Reuter) - A driver 
sleeping in the cab of his truck 
aboard a Black Sea ferry boat 
drowned when it was dumped 
overboard in a storm. 

Fuchs tribute 

East Berlin (Reuter) — East 
Germany’s official media pub- 
lished a birthday tribute to 
atomic spy KJaus Fuchs, who 
spent nine years in a British 
jail for betraying secrets of the 
US atomic bomb programme 
to tbe Soviet Union. 


Junta agree it has lost most of not done so. Nature does not dent commission. The poll |J §0611 


the backing it enjoyed after tbe 
popular uprising in February 


tolerate a void.” 
Western diplomats 


SUS"* 1 * r Jean_ClaUde no* to ££tolfidd 


narrowed to about a dozen 


But as strikes and demon- ^es^ie^f moun^i 
Strattons continue to put pro- f^tic challengT^t 

November’s election! Hai- 
tian journalists say the num- 
« serious contenders 
could be as few as four. 

eminent to take its place. „ , 

Political oarties. banned One. however, is Mr Leslie 


a viable civilian-led Gov- co^ffe fora 

eminent to take its place. couw be as tew as tour. 

Political parties, banned One. however, is Mr Leslie 
under M Duvaher, are still Manigat, whose National 
organizing after their long Democratic Progressive Party 
oblivion and remain for from was formed in exile in Ven- 
ready to assume power. ezuela seven years ago and 
Some of them have formed DOW has offices and an 


remains the responsibility of 
Colonel Williams Regala, the 
Interior Minister who is seen 
by many as the guardian of the 
old regime. 

Yet Mr Manigat has re- 
mained aloof from popular 
movements and political alli- 
ances seeking the Junta’s re- 
moval “When you want to 
overthrow a military gov- 
ernment you have to ask 
yourself if there is a viable 
alternative,” he cautioned. 
“We have no interest in 
exposing the country to the 
risk of civil war.” 

Another serious presiden- 
tial contender and the one 
favoured by Washington is Mr 
Marc Bazin, a banker and 
leader of the Movement for 
the Installation of Democracy. 


oblivion and remain for from was formed m exile in Yen- ~w e have no interest in 
ready to assume power. ezuela seven years ago and exposing the country to the 

Some of them have formed now J? 35 offices and an ^sk of civil war.” 
alliances with trade unions, expanding party machine in Another serious presiden- 
tivic o r g aniz ations and hu- the capital of Poit-Au-Fnnce. ^ contender and toe one 
man rights groups to demand Mr Manigat doubts that favoured by Washington is Mr 
a change of leadership, but General Namphy will not Marc Bazin, a banker and 
they lave Insufficient co- contest the presidential race; leader of the Movement for 
hesion to agree upon an “He says there is a political the Installation of Democracy, 
alternative. 

Lieutenant-General Henri 
Namphy, the Army chief who 
heads the Junta, has said he 
will step aside In February 
1988, three months after toe 
general election which, he 
claims, he will not contest 

He says he cannot hand 
over power earlier because 
Haiti, after three decades of 
iron-fisted dictatorship, is not 
ready for democracy. He 
points to toe creation of more 
than 60 political parties and 
die declaration of more than 

200 presidential candidates as 

evidence of the immaturity of General Namphy, left, says Haiti is not ready for democracy 
the emerging Haitian politics, despite the foD of the dictator, Mr Jean-Qaade Dnvalier. 



: ' - . :-~ 

ipiii 





Tokyo (Reuter) — The cap- 
tain of a Japanese airliner said 
he saw three spaceship-like 
objects, including a huge 
"mothership", flying near his 
cargo plane for about 50 
minutes over Alaska. 

Cake delight 

Belgrade (Reuter) - Bulgar- 
ian Communist authorities 
have delighted children by 
sending Father Christmas fo 
distribute giant cakes despite 
toe country's food shortage. 

Too late 

Tokyo (AP) — A warning of 
dangerous winds apparently 
came too late to stop a train 
that plunged off a narrow 
bridge, killing six people and 
injuring six others. 

Upset by play 

Istanbul (Reuter) — The 
playwright and director of an 
anti-fundamentalist play are 
to be tried on charges of 
obscenity and degrading 
religion. 

Top dressers 

New York (AP) - President 
Reagan and Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachev have been selected 
as two of toe world’s best 
dressed men for 1986 by the 
Fashion Foundation of 
America. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 

THE ARTS 


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risers 


Making a desirable sort 
of influential mark 

N o major museum h I Iasi few years to have been set parallels, derivations, sketches 

director in Britain I GALLERIES I against acquisition, at any rate (if any can be found) and all 
over the last ten unless it is supported by a die products of modem tech- 

years can have bad _ lavish private subsidy. How- nology in the service of 

»* «>« u IVwurffcJo * — -J nj- scholar s hip The whole thing 

is fascinating, m essay in 
connoisseursnip which makes 
it vivid to a non-expert 


Even the 
blues are 
welcome 

Now that the Ashes are se- 
cure. we can affotd to be 
sanguine about the Aus- 
tralians* pre-eminence in vir- 
tually every other sport in 
which they compete. We can 
especially afford to indulge 
their pride at haring won the 
America's Cup in 1983, die 
subject of the The Challenge 
(Thames). This dramatized 
mini-series set saB last night 
and, perhaps incredibly, still 
has another three and half 
hours to go before the winning 
line. 

TELEVISION 

Winning lines of dialogue 
are already thick on the water. 
Tim PiggOtt-Smith, glintin g 
with high-octane oil as the 
British challenger Peter de 
Savary, bounded oat of a top- 
level parley with the words 
"Excuse me, 1 must be going, 
there's someone I have to 
sack* 1 . Meanwhile, somewhere 
down under, the prospective 
captain of the Australian 
yacht paused between press- 
ups to complain "I got me 
family in Korea to think 
about”. Several scenes later — 
no South-East Asian connec- 
tion having emerged — one 
suddenly twigged that he had 
been referring to his family 
and career. 

It is the womenfolk's sole 
function here to grouch about 
hearth and home with routine 
resignation while their men 
are being unfaithful with 
computers and test-tanks. It is 
the mat’s function to chew 
agars and aphorisms while 
plotting their bellicose strat- 
egies. This isn’t sport, tins is 
war” — and the self-made 
millio naires who funded die 
challenging yachts left no 
possibility overlooked. Peter 
de Saraiy hanassed the 
Americans’ boat trials with a 
video-dinghy, the Australian 
magnate Alan Bond, evoking 
the memory of Don Revie, 
compiled dossiers on the 
opposition. 

Bat, if me is to time in on 
the coming Mondays, it will 
sanely be tegs for the ufakfiBg 
drama (whose outcome will 
scarcely be a surprise) than fir 
the opportunity to soak up 
much-needed blues above and 
below the horizon. One cannot 
spend the entire winter look- 
ing at designer-grey walk and 
bath-water skies. 


Martin Cropper I Prey to eorrHptMHi: David McKay in Red Riding Hood 


N o major museum 
director in Britain 
over the last ten 
years can have had 
an easy ride. Con- 
stantly strapped for money, 
whether it is scrabbling round 
for an extra half warder or 
puzzling over how to acquire 
the latest masterpiece to come 
on the market (at a cost, these 
days, of probably more than 
the entire budget), 

these men have to be brave 
and resourceful, diplomats 
and fund-raisers as well as 
scholars. The departure of Sir 
Michael Levey from the Na- 
tional Gallery, after 13 years 
in the hot seat, is marked 
appropriately by a Director’s 
Choice show (until February 
IS) in which be gathers to- 
gether nearly 40 of the ac- 
quisitions made in his time 
which give him the greatest 
pleasure and satisfaction. It 
also gives us a chance to look 
back over the development of 
the gallery under his rule. 

Of course, the major bun- 
gles the general public im- 
mediately thinks of in con- 
nection with the National 
Gallery — the question of 
what, exactly, is going to b£ 
built on the adjoining site; the 
fumbled appointment of Sir 
Michael’s successor - are 
nothing to do with him. 
During his time the northern 
extension has been opened, 
and it has become possible for 
the gallery to show all its 
reserve collection as well as 
the main (possible, at least, 
whenever chronic staff short- 
age does hot enforce closure of 
the lower floor). The collec- 
tion as a whole has been 
rehung, with varying results — 
some section curators, it 
would appear, have a feeling 
for how to hang pictures, some 
not - and the latest achieve- 
jneni in tins sector, the 


| GALLERIES j 

Director’s Choice 

National Gallery 

Paintings and 
Their Contexts I 
Dulwich 

The New Thracian 
Treasure /Modern 
Chinese Prints 
British Museum 


reordering of the British 
collection in the newly re- 
stored Barry rooms, is prob- 
ably the best . 

Also in Sir Michael's time 
an Education Department has 
been encouraged, the Sunley 
Room has been opened for 
temporary exhibitions, even if 
it does seem strangely poky 
next to the absurdly pushy 
central shop (priorities more 
commercial than artistic, 
maybe?) and excellent series 
of small shows like The 
Artist's Eye (important artists 
make their own personal 
choices) and Acquisition in 
Focus have been instituted, as 
well as the more arguable 
notion of an Artist in 
Residence. 

And then there have been 
the acquisitions themselves. 
Something of a sore point in 
many ways, since Sir Michael 
has always stressed the im- 
portance of the gallery’s being 
able to buy major works to fill, 
whenever possible, important 
gaps in the national collection, 
while the policy of gov- 
ernment grants seems in the 


Iasi few years to have been set 
against acquisition, at any rate 
unless it is supported by a 
lavish private subsidy. How- 
ever, looking around Dire- 
ctor’s Choice , there is a 
distinct feeling that we have 
not done too badly. 

Masterpieces? Well, pos- 
sibly non h all depends what 
you mean. Bui Claude’s The 
Enchanted Castle must surely 
by any method of accounting 
be somewhere in the right 
area, and then there are the 
Altdorfer, Christ Taking 
Leave of His Mother , Monet's 
The Gore St Lazare, Rubens’s 
resplendent Samson and Deli- 
lah and Caravaggio’s Boy 
Bitten by a Lizard, which 
when domed and sent to the 
recent Age of Caravaggio show 
was almost universally up- 
graded to the status of an 
accepted original. When these 
are put together with perhaps 
lesser but still fascinating 
works like Parmigianino's 
Portrait of a Man or Wright of 
Derby's dashing Mr ana Mrs 
Thomas Coliman, and the 
addition to the collection of 
Klimt and Redon, one cannot 
help feeling that Sir Michael 
has left the mark he would 
most like to have left 

Significant of his effect has 
been the tendency for other 
galleries to take a leaf out of 
the National Gallery's book. 
The Dulwich Picture Gallery, 
for instance, has just staged 
the first of a projected series of 
shows under the title Paint- 
ings and Their Context, this 
one concerning itself with 
Poussin's Venus and Mercury 
(until January 18). Though it 
is hardly an acquisition, hav- 
ing been in the collection since 
1 81 1 , the format of the show is 
almost identical to that of the 
National Gallery’s Acquisition 
in Focus shows: around the 
central attraction are grouped 




Among the most common 
criticisms made of string play- 
ers (and of singers) is that their 
sense of pulse is often found 
wanting. And cellists, accord- 
ing to some, are the worst 
culprits. Given such asser- 
tions, together with the fact 
that interpretation is almost 
invariably a matter of wis- 
doms received from the fore- 
going generation without 
question, it is hardly surpris- 
ing that Ralph Kirshbaum, in 
his performances of the Bach 
Cello Suites, should be heard 
following the same path of 
rhythmic liberalism as that 
trodden by Casals, Tortelier 
and so on. 

Of course, great artists have 
always created great perfor- 
mances while meddling some- 
what with note-values. The 
question is whether dwelling 

upon notes that are in any case 
naturally stressed, and taking 
lavish gulps for breath be- 
tween phrases, amounts to 
interpretation, mannerism or 
even sheer technical conve- 
nience. In Kirshbaum’s case 
the answer is not easily found. 


1 CONCERT 

Ralph Kirshbaum 

Wigmore Hall 


at least on the evidence pre- 
sented by these readings of the 
First, Third and Fifth Suites 
(he plays the others on 
Friday). 

Undoubtedly be feels the 
music, but one senses that he 
concentrates a little too hard 
upon squeezing meaning from 
the notes when they might 
make themselves clearer by 
being left more to themselves. 
Morever, one could often 
accurately predict the weight 
of an accent here, the extent of 
a rubalo there, so perhaps 
mannerism played a part. 
Frequently in the fester move- 
ments a deliberately length- 
ened note was made unnec- 
essarily ugly by an over-savage 
bow-stroke, while in some of 
the slower movements Kirsh- 
baum’s meticulous attention 
to the colour of each sound. 



admirable in "other circum- 
stances, worked against equi- 
librium of mood. The vio- 
lently changing dynamics in 
the Allemande of the Thud 
Suite, for example, turned that 
movement into somethin un- 
necessarily gawky. 

But even for those who 
prefer their Bach approached 
in a different way there was 
plenty to admire in Kirsh- 
bauxn’s playing. In the Fifth 
Suite, for instance, the Prelude 
affectingly took its cue from 
the subdued timbre of the 
cello’s higher register, the 
result of tuning the A string to 
a G instead. While the same 
work’s ADemande was a dance 
of nobility, broad and digni- 
fied, the Sarabande, which on 
paper looks as though it might 
be over in the twinkling of in 
eye, attained a stature of real, 
tragic moment in Kirsh- 
baum’s hands. 

It is prtibably too much to 
expect a performer to go 
against the tradition in which 
he lives; but within it 
Kirshbaum showed that he 
does have vital things to say. 

Stephen Pettitt 


| THEATRE \ 

Sleeping Beauty 
Tron, Glasgow 

Red Riding Hood 

Citizens*, Glasgow 

While the traditional panto- 
mimes are packing them in in 
Glasgow and Edinburgh with 
the well-loved comic actors 
Stanley Baxter and Rikki Ful- 
ton, Glasgow’s Tron Theatre 
have taken the enterprising 
risk of casting a young and 
upcoming local comedian as 
the comic linchpin of their 
Skating Beauty. 

Craig Ferguson has estab- 
lished quite a following in 
Glasgow in bis stage persona 
of Bing Hitler, an hysterical, 
self-appointed dictator. Work- 
ing this character into the 
framework of a story (as be 
and his co-writer Peter 
CapaJdi do here) is quite a 
different matter, however. It 
works surprisingly welL 

Bing emeiges as Prune Min- 
ister in the Kingdom of 
Vulgaria, where the dimin- 
utive and desirable Beauty 
(Jenny McCrindle) becomes a 
pawn in the stniggje between 
the Good Fairy, a frayed 
district nurse, and the evil 
Hexx, an uncommonly sadis- 
tic dentist When the kingdom 
turns into Slumbeilnd it is left 
to Bing and his sly accomplice 
to seek out the prince who win 
save the day. What follows is 
an endearing travesty of the 
tale. 

It gets offto a slow start and, 
giving the impression of hav- 
ing been written in pieces 





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The British Museum, with 
the astonishing spread of its 
collection, has to serve several 
masters at the same time, and 
that goes also for the tem- 
porary exhibitions there. The 
two latest-comers are The 
New Thracian Treasure (until 
March 29) and Modern Chi- 
nese Prints (until January 11), 
which could hardly be more 
different. 

T he Thracian trea- 
sures in question 
come from Rogozen, 
Bulgaria, and are 
“new" by virtue of 
the feet that they were un- 
earthed only late in 1985, and 
in relation to the previous, 
enormously successful show 
of Thracian treasures held at 
the British Museum in 1976. 
This time there is less gold 
around, but the silver with, 
here and there, touches of gilt 
is splendid enough. And the 
design, mostly dating from 
around the fourth century BC, 
is of considerable sophistica- 
tion and grace. 

The Chinese prints are also, 
in their various ways, highly 
sophisticated, and make a 
strong contrast to the sorts of 
peasant woodcuts which used 
to circulate is the West 
around the time of the Cul- 
tural Revolution. Most of the 
prints on show are very recent, 
but there are also some by 
senior artists like Gu Yuan 
and U Hua which go back to 
the Forties. It is encouraging 
to see, in this way, that not 
only have the arts in China 


rather than as a whole, hiccups 
through the story-line in 
places, but the humour is keen 
and the whole thing (directed 
by Michael Boyd) has tremen- 
dous zest. Jimmy Chisolm 
provides a wonderful alter- 
native prince as Rupert, the 
unrascally RascaL 

The Citizens', Glasgow, 
have picked another winner 
by again inviting Myles Rudge 
to write their Christinas show. 
Red Riding Hood explores the 
same fertile area of fantasy 
combined with psychological 
analysts as did last year’s 
Hansel and GreteL, Rudge’s 
version of the tale leading us 
into the semi-real world that 
dreams are usually made o£ 
where acquaintances, fears 
and desires assume more 
significant proportions. 

As the children Peter and 
Anna (David McKay and 
Maureen Carr) journey thro- 
ugh the forest, her red riding 
hood, made with love, pro- 
tects her against temptation, 
evil and the Wicked Wolf— in 
this case a more whiskery 
version of their rich neigh- 
bour, whose spoilt daughter 
(Joliet Cadzow) also under- 
goes a transformation. Her 
brother has no such protec- 
tion, fallin g prey to the Wolfs 
corruptive offers of power and 
wealth. 

Rudge explores the sub-text 
of the fairy tale with tremen- 
dous invention, creating a 
double-tiered fantasy that is at 
times really uncanny. In 
places he becomes too in- 
volved and complex, but the 
whole dung is ingeniously 
staged by Giles Havergal and 
designed with economy and 
style by Kenny Miller. 

Sarah Hemming 



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One up to Sir Michael Lever* Albrecht Altdorfer’s Christ Taking Leave of His Mother 


recovered with remarkable most traditional, taking up the 
speed and efficacy from the ancient Chinese tradition of 
aberrations of the Gang of observing nature and then 


most traditional, taking up the China eastern and western 
ancient Chinese tradition of approaches to the graphic arts 


Four but that continuity has 
been effectively preserved 
through the years of the Red 
Guard. 

There does not seem, even 
now, to be any dominant style. 
Little interest is manifested 
hoe in abstract art: the most 
abstract pieces are also the 


turning one’s back on it to 
draw. Within representation, 
however, styles range from the 


are being crossed with each 
other, and the resulting strain, 
if a little mongrel, has all the 
vitality and intelligence so 


Expressionist distortions of often denied to those more 
Chen Jinrong’s A Day at the carefully bred for purity. 


Dockyard to the almost photo- 
graphic quality of Wu Chang- 
jiang's Highland Cattle Farm. 
G early at the moment in 


John Russell 
Taylor 


Words above the music 


The silent noise of “ sartM es” 
has been growing for a while, 
but their antral at Covent 
Garden for the new Jen&fa 
does demand, as I said in my 
review, some thought. On the 
fees of it, we are confronted 
; with a new version of the 
wordsror-tnnsic argument. As 
dm Royal Opera Hoase inele- 
gantly pot the case, “With the 
use of smtitles audiences can 
have the opportunity to follow 
more dosely the intricacies of 
a libretto simg in a language 
they do not speak, while at the 
same time being able to hear 
the somids envisaged by the 
composer*. 

Bat sorely tills Is a very 
enrioas account of operatic 
experience to be em a n a tin g 
from an international com- 
pany. Assuming that the first 
danse refers simply to oar 
anderetanding of what is 
happening in the stage action 
and not, say, to oar apprecia- 
tion of the verse-forms, then 
that understanding is con- 
ditioned not by any printed 
text bat by words delivered to 
as through singer and score. 
As Aoden pointed out, once 
the librettist’s written words 
have given rise to marie, their 
work is done. To present than 
now again, at this late stage, is 
to present a ghost, and at least 
this Hfelessness of the text is 
well illustrated by the grey 
projections at Covent Garden. 

Bnt the second half of their 
justification is also strange. 
The reason for preferring op- 
era in the original language 
cannot hang on “being able to 
hear the strands envisaged by 
the composer” since, with the 
possible exception of Stravin- 
sky setting Hebrew, compos- 
ers have been concerned not 


merely with strands bnt with 
elements in a meaningful 


The introduction of 
surtitles in opera has 
created at least as 
many problems as it 
has solved, considers 
Paul Griffiths 

an assimilated knowledge of 
the opera, or dm libretto, or at 
least the synopsis, the dif- 
ference being that this does 
not require one to read along 
with the show, and so concern 
oneself with the spectral em- 
bryo rather than the thing 
itself! 

Reading is also a quite 
different sort of activity from 
responding to an operatic 
performance, and by its dif- 
ference may suggest that 
something is braking from the 
experience. If Covent Garden 
really do fed that their audi- 
ences need help, then mach 
the more obrions course, 
particularly in an opera where 
virtually all the cast are native 
English speakers (what price 
those “sounds en visaged by 
the composer”?), Would be to 
pn g in translation. 

Perhaps the essence of the 
problem is the assumption 
that knowledge of the constit- 
uents enhances an aesthetic 
experience; but there is no 
reason why it should. Knowing 
the text of an opera may be as 
useful as knowing the struc- 
ture of chlorophyll when one 
looks at a landscape: a slight 
enhancement, bnt not one to be 
Mown np in letters a foot high. 

There are, also, severely 
practical objections to snr- 


titles. From the'npper parts of 
the boose, apparently, they 
can be taken In along with the 
stage, bnt certainly from the 
level of the stalls one needs to 
flip one’s glance upwards in 
order to follow them. An 
audience with divided visual 
attention is inevitably going to 
miss some of the action, ami I 
cannot imagine that producers 
and singers are going to like 
being upstaged by the public's 
autocue: I understand that 
.Yuri Lyubimov, the Jen&fa 
producer, is firmly against the 
innovation. 

Wisely Covent Garden are 
asking customers to complete 
a questionnaire designed to 

test the acceptability of 
snrtitfes and, though you can- 
not avoid them if yon want to 
see Jen&fa, there will be 
performances of ZuuberfWte 
and Rosenkavalier both snr- 
titled and not IT there should 
be any demand for surtitles, 
then at least this option should 
remain. But, if surtitles are to 
become a part of life, then 
there' needs to be some 
improvement on their pretty 
crude state at the moment 
For, despite computer control, 
they cannot easily distinguish 
who is singing what in en- 
sembles, nor convey long sen- 
tences, nor always keep pace 
with the action. They may, 
indeed, create so many prob- 
lems that some help will be 
needed for one to be able to 
understand those faltering 
words up on the screen. Per- 
haps, then, they could be acted 
out somewhere, maybe with 
mnsical support . . . 



which composers tarn into 
sounds: surtides allow you to 
have both at once. What is 


theatre, about lira coUabora- 


condacfeOTS in toe delivery of 
words with a fine control over 
timing, accentuation and in- 
flexion available to no other 
form, and certainly not to 
writtrai dialogue. 

Offering a crib is no help 
here; what can ami does help is 



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THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBEJ8^30_198_6_ 




SPECTRUM 



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Going to earth: Luigi Pertkarari, king of the Italian grave-robbers, slips through a hole revealed by the plough to discover yet another Etruscan tomb in the of Tarqnmia 

Plundering the underworld 


L uigi Perticarari is a tomb 
robber. In Tarquinia, 
• which was one of the 
/ greatest Etruscan cities of 
1 antiquity, he is known as i! 
mago — “the magician” — because 
of ms apparently supernatural abil- 
ity to find tombs still unrifled after 
2,000 years. He is one of Italy’s 
many hundred tombaroli and 
danaestini (tomb robbers and il- 
legal excavators) who rifle the 
buried settlements of antiquity by 
night and sell their finds to foreign 
dealers. 

Luigi is the self-appointed spokes- 
man of the tombaroli. He published 
his memoirs in June. I segreti di un 
lombarolo ("The Secrets of a Tomb 
Robber”), and speaks with charm 
and pride of his trade, pouring scorn 
on the state archaeological service 
for not seeking his advice. He 
claims more first-hand knowledge 
of Etruscan tombs th an any living 
archaeologist, probably with Justice. 
But he fails to appreciate that his 
activity has destroyed for ever the 
possibility of others sharing his 
knowledge. 

His story, multiplied many hun- 
dred times over, explains the dev- 
astating pillage of Italy’s 
archaeological heritage that has 
taken place over the last 20 years, 
and its gathering momentum. It also 
highlights how inadequate the Ital- 
ian authorities’ efforts to protect 
their patrimony have been. 

From around the eighth to the 
third century BC, the Etruscans 
buried their dead with rich grave 
furnishings, painted terracotta vases 
— some imported from Athens — 
bronze ornaments, gold and 
jewellery. The grandest tombs were 
frescoed with scenes from earthly 
lift: — banquets and hunting scenes 
— or mythology. 

Luigi claims to have emptied 
3,000 to 4,000 tombs during 30 
years of activity, despite spending 
II of them in prison. He lives 
modestly in a suburb of Tarquinia 
in a house he built for himself — he 
is a stonemason when he can find 
time for a legitimate trade — 
incorporating secret hideaways and 
storerooms. 

The Etruscans chose a long 
hillside -above Tarquinia for their 


Helped by the smugglers of the Mafia, Italy’s tomb robbers supply the 
world’s major museums every year with Greek, Roman and Etruscan 
treasures worth millions of pounds. Geraldine Norman investigates 


ceremonial graves. It commands 
magnificent views of the mountains 
and the sea. Over the principal 
graves, already excavated, little 
cement huts with sloping moves 
have been erected and the curious 
are locked out. A small enclosure of 
tombs at one end of the ridge is 
open to the public. The rest of the 
area is ploughed and planted every 
year. 

Luigi calls it his it mio regno — his 
“kingdom”. Beneath the plough are 
literally thousands of graves, many 
of which he has visited and denied. 
The heavy modern tractors rum- 
bling overhead are now ca using 
annual damage to the caverns 
below, he says. Only 100 yards from 
the road that runs along the crest of 
the hill Luigi could show us a round 
hole in the plough where the roof of 
a tomb had collapsed. “It was 
robbed in antiquity,” he said. “They 
took the bronzes and the gold, but 


the vases are still there.” In broad 
daylight we slipped into its cav- 
ernous depth. 

Beneath the road itself the men 
from the Arts Ministry are busy 
recording for posterity a tomb 
nainted with scenes from the under- 
world which dates from the end of 



Rich pickings: an uptuuderal grave 


the fifth century BC They came on 
it when checking the route of a new 
water supply pipe. The aim was to 
ensure that no important 
archaeological evidence was de- 
stroyed by the pipe’s construction; 
luckily it runs a few feet away from 
the newly discovered tomb. 

The necropolis at Tarquinia is 
accepted as the most important 
burial complex of the Etruscan 
world. Many of its magnificent 
■grave furnishings are now on dis- 
play in foreign museums, bereft of 
their history, tbanks to the activities 
of Luigi and his friends. Meanwhile 
the I talian authorities permit a 
water supply pipe to run through the 
necropolis and tractors to shake in 
the rooft of tombs. The creeping 
presence of the town itself is also 
invading areas of archaeological 
significance. 

The proceeds earned from smug- 
gling artefacts out of the area over 


the last 20 yrars would have paid for 
its conversion into an archaeolqgi- 
cai park. Had the Italian authorities, 
not the tombaroli, told the treasures 
to museums, they would have had 
the money to excavate and land- 
scape the area for visitors. But since 
buried treasures are the inalienable 
property of the State under Italian 
law, no official sales can take place. 
Museum storerooms are overflow- 
ing with matwrial from official 
excavations, not to mention ma- 
terial confiscated from tombaroli by 
the police. 

The same opportunities exist at 
other Greek, Roman and Etruscan 
sites up and down Italy. Scholars 
estimate that only some 20 per cent 
of the tomb fu rnishing s of antiquity 
have yet been unearthed or de- 
stroyed. This extraordinary buried 
museum could be bnn^ht to light in 
an ordered manner, leaving the 
monumental remains open for in- 
terested visitors to explore and the 
treasures on display in museums 
with full identification of how and 
where they were found. Or else it 
can be left to the tombaroli, tractors, 
civil engineers and builders to 
gradually destroy the lot 


FROM TOMB TO MUSEUM SHELF: HOW THE SMUGGLERS LEGITIMIZE THEIR TREASURES 


s 


mce the last war more 
Greek, Etruscan and Ro- 
man treasures have come 
to fight, mostly as a result 
of illicit digs, than had 
surfaced in the preceding 2,000 
years. They have been found in 
other Mediterranean countries but 
tbe prime source is Italy. 

The material is smuggled into 
Switzerland, mostly by lorry drivers 
carrying ordinary merchandise for 
export. Once in Switzerland it 
enters tbe legitimate art market and 
is sold to museums and private 
collectors. The rarest treasures lend 
to be negotiated privately by dealers 
while the bulk of more ordinary 
material is consigned to Sotheby’s 
and Christie's in London, or lesser 
auction houses in France, Germany 
and Switzerland. 

Tbe well-publicized sales of 
antiquities at Sotheby's and 
Christie’s, with glossy catalogues 


and high prices, are a major 
encouragement to the tombaroli. 
They provide information on prices 
and demonstrate that there is a 
ready market Most of the material 
now circulating in tbe market comes 
from post-war illegal digs but since 
its excavation was not documented 
and pieces have changed hands 
several times, this is impossible to 
prove. 

The auction houses are sig- 
natories to the London art trade’s 
code of practice which outlaws 
handling a sale when there is 
reasonable cause to believe “that an 
imported object . . . originates 
from an illegal, clandestine or 
otherwise unofficial site”. They 
defend their involvement in the 
antiquities market on grounds of 
ignorance. It is impossible, they say, 
to turn away vendors who have 
legitimate legal title to the goods 
they offer for sale just because they 


could have been excavated illegally. 
Indeed, the only way to avoid 
handling illicit finds would be to 
drop out of the antiquities market 
altogether and this the auction 
houses are not prepared to da 
Auctioneers, however, are only 
the middle men. The Getty Mu- 
seum in Malibu, California, has 
formed a superb collection of 
antiquities over the last 10 years, 
mostly from illicit excavations. 
“Sbno nemici di cu/runa" growls the 
Soprintendente of Southern Etruria 
- “they are the enemies of culture”. 
The Metropolitan Museum in New 
York has made several spectacular 
purchases over the same period, 
including the famous Si million 
Euphronios vase. “Every scholar 
knows it can only come from 
Cerveteri,” complains Professor 
Palottino of Rome's Tuscia In- 
stitute. “but they continue to pre- 
tend it was found in Lebanon.” The 


recent purchases of the Basle and 
Copenhagen Museums are also 
roundly condemned. 

Only one important museum in 
the world has so fir taken a dear 
stand by refusing to purchase any 
material which could be smuggled — 
the British Museum in London. 

The purchasing power of muse- 
ums outside Italy is enormous and 
there are also several multimillion- 
aire collectors in tbe market: Bunker 
Hunt, the Texan oil millionaire, for 
instance. 

The big money has attracted 
organized crime. “The use of drugs 
is spreading into the country towns 
of Italy" explained an authority 
who asked not to be name d. “The 
drug dealers ran across the 
tombaroli and saw the rich pickings 
to be made from oiganizing the 
business on an international scale.” 
The Mafia has taken up 
archaeology. 


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Two cheers for the resolution 


he queues are already 
stretching around the 
block for festive spirit 
but thanks to the anti-aL 
coholism crusade of Mikhail 
Gorbachov h looks set to be 
an unusually dry New Year for 
most east Europeans. 

Alcoholism is tbe Slavic 
disease. Peek on pay day into 
the alley-ways and - windy 
stairwells of the seedier hous- 
ing estates of Warsaw, Buda- 
pest and Prague and the whole 
world will seem to be in an 
alcoholic haze: flushed men 
and women bump into each 
other, slump to the ground, or 
laugh raucously, their breath a 
fire hazard. On Friday nights 
in Warsaw's Praga district, the 
moonshine merchants do 
flourishing trade; all week they 
have stockpiled sugar, and the 
potatoes that will form the 
basis of some of the most 
potent vodka in the world are 
on the bofl. 

Tbe most comprehensive 
statistics come from Poland 
where, even before Gorba- 
chov came to power, al- 
coholism was regarded as a 
serious social malaise. Hun- 
gary admits to a big alcohol 
problem. So, less publicly, 
does Bulgaria. Czechoslovakia 
and East Germany also have 


New Year’s Eve offers the last chance 
for the heavy drinkers of the Soviet 
bloc to charge their glasses freely 


bad drinking habits but con- 
cede this only in restricted- 
circulation medical journals. 
It is difficult to know whether 
Poland has the worst al- 
coholism rale in the bloc or is 
simply the most open about it 
Last year Poland's per cap- 
ita alcohol consumption 
amounted to 6.8 litres of 100 
per cent alcohoL The per 
capita calculation distorts — it 
includes a few million babies 
and toddlers. The estimate 
also exdudes moonshine li- 
quor (which accounts for 
about 20 per cent of alcohol 
consumption), wine and beer. 
There are almost 1 million 
alcoholics in Poland and 
according to police estimates, 
two million Poles become 
drunk every day. 


i 


Miners’ earnings 
The figures for miners’ 
compensation (table. Spec- 
trum, December 23) should 
have been in milli ons 


n East Germany, the per 
capita alcohol consump- 
tion is even higher than in 
Poland — about 13 to 16 litres 
a year -which seems to reflect 
the Germanic custom of mix- 
ing beer with schnapps rather 
than sticking to vodka. 

From January 1. 1987, the 
counter-offensive begins, at 
least in some of the Soviet 
bloc countries. Sales and 
consumption of alcohol in 


Hungarian offices and fio 
tones will be banned during 
working hours and violators 
will be fined more than a 
month's wages. Exceptions 
can be made for office parties 
but only after working hours. 
Bulgaria is cutting the produc- 
tion of alcohol for domestic 
consumption and turning 
some bars into cafes. 

If the Polish example is 
anything to go by, the mea- 
sures will have no great im- 
pact on drinking mbits. In 
1982 the Poles introduced an 
anti-alcohol law that was re- 
garded as a model of its kind. 
It bans the sale of drink before 
lpm, banishes drink from the 
workplace, restricts the num- 
bers of sales outlets, with 
particularly tough penalties 
for moonshine dealers, and it 
has introduced the idea - if 
not the practice - of control 
squads to check tbe sobriety of 
factory workforces. 

Notices are pinned up in 
cafes and bars warning about 
the evils of drink, and ah 
alcohol advertising is banned. 
The Cathob'c church has been 
persuading workers to re- 
nounce drink. All to no avafl. 

The profit motive is at 
work; although tbe losses from 


drunken labour are huge, so 
too are the state profits from 
the sale of alcohol. Poland 
regularly publishes a list of the 
500 most profitable com- 

S ‘ s and Polmos, the of- 
producer and distributor 
of alcohol, is always at the top. 

Last year, Poles spent 687 
billion zlotys (£300 million) 
on alcohol in official hard 
currency stores. 

Vodka is the sustaining 


A 


force on the blade market An 
increase in the official price of 
vodka leads immediately to a 
rise in the black market value 
of the dollar. 

lcohol bought for dol- 
lars or pounds rather 
than zlotys is slightly 
cheaper. And the law has other 
loopholes. 

Restricting opening times 
simply encourages the moon- 
lighters (15,000 illegal stills 
were dosed down last year) 
who can sell thdr wares at any 
time. Checks on workers’ 
sobriety are haphazard — 
some leeway, for example, is 
given, to building workers who 
need to fortify themselves 
from the cold 
Somehow, despite tbe best 
efforts of Gorbachov, the east 
Europeans will find a way of 
getting drunk this festive sea- 
son. But the traditional toast 
of Na zdrowie (“To your 
health”) may ring a little 
hollow. 

Roger Boyes 


Econometric 

crystal balls 

One prediction for 1987 can be made 
with certainty: hi-tech business 
forecasting will be back in fashion 


j 


A dozen years ago you could 
hardly open a newspaper 
without reading either 
pessimistic forecasts for the 
world and its environment or 
the gong-ho technological 
utopianism of fdarohuists 
such as Herman Kahn of the 
Hudson Institute. 

Pundiiry was ultimately 
overwhelmed by the oil price 
explosion of the mid-1970s. 
By the economic recession at 
the turn of the decade, the 
tfamk tanks simply could not 
keep up. Not that they lacked 
influence; much of the supply- 
side economic rhetoric of the 
early Reagan years, and its 
accompmrpng social theory, 
were based on Kahnist prin- 
ciples of abundant natural 
resources and man’s ability to 
transform them to his re- 
quirements. 

But as James Bellini, a 
Briton and former colleague 
of Kahn, points out, many of 
the models of world economic 
growth or ecological disaster 
which proliferated in the 
1970s wav based oa the 
premise that economics is a 
laboratory science. Unem- 
ployment, global debt and tbe 
distorting influence of grow- 
ing black economies changed 

all that. 

LONDON BUSINESS 
SCHOOL 

With N3ESR (see below) one 
of Britain’s big five non- 
governmental economic fore- 
casting units. Classical 
econometric model of the UK 
and world economies. Pro- 
duces forecast three times a 
year. Figures go to businesses 
like ICJ and Midland Bank - 
mainly for strategic planning. 

• Output growth 3 per cent 

• Inflation under 4 per cent 

• P(lbSC! 


Now besutesses want to 
know about emerging trends 
in people's bants. They 
might employ market re- 
searchers tike Gallup or 
MORL The Henley Centre 
for forecasting would offer 
either/or scenarios - for 
instance, the prospects for a 
company’s leisure sales given 
certain behavioural tenden- 
cies and different Conser- 
vative, Labour and Affiance 
economic policies. In this 
kind of forecasting there is 
little guesswork. Tbe infor- 
mation is already available. It 
is a matter of coming to the 
right conclusions. 

New economic circum- 
stances have also created a 
market for country risk 
analysis, which combines 
political, ecoaomic and social 
forecasts to determine 
whether a country is worth 
investing in. 

This does not mean that 
econometric models have 
been discarded. They are 
regarded as important stan- 
dards on which further analy- 
sis can be based. Here we 
profile some of the major 
foreca st ers and offer a sum- 
mary of their main 
prediritions for the year 
ahead. 



?i . 








*?• 

gf 




-?3S 


. •:*« 
.... 

. its; 

’■ • * 


rax cut of 2p in the pound in 
budget 

• OECD growth 3£ per cent 


NIESR ' Thatcher back wHh reduced 

The National Institute for SIKiergenceofthe 
Economic and Social Re- conoisseurconsumenboom 
search fa another of tbe in food marketing 

• Decline in youth population 
makes marketing for the 
middle-aged important 


is 

mathematical of the 

economy. Publishe s four 
times a year. Over 200 vari- 
ables. “We try to make 


, <r s klee 



UOU 




forecasting a statistical sci- 
ence, as opposed to people 
who look at tea leaves,” says 
Director Andrew Britton. 

• GDP growth 2.4 percent 

• Unemployment SL94 million 

• Retail price index up 5.75 
percent 

• Manufacturing output up 
3.6 per cent 

• OECD growth 2L9 per cent 

THE ECONOMIST 
PUBLICATIONS 


Intelligence 


Its Economist 
Unit publishes 
teriy reviews ami 
140 countries. 

• Swing back to “Mg is 
beautiful" in management 

• Japanese takeover for a 


GLOBAL ANALYSIS 
SYSTEMS 

Recently formed information 
data base offering clients in 
industry and fmance instant 
on-line computer access to 
experts’ opinions on world 
economic and political 
developments. 

• Early autumn election 
against background of 
pressure on sterling as 
current account worsens 

• West Germany; Kohl 
election victory 

• France: Chirac government 
flags; Mitterrand finds pretext 
to can early presidential 
election exploiting divisions 
on right 

JOHN NAISBITT 

Author of Megatrends, chair , 
man of the Nesbitt Group, 
Washington D.C Formerly a 
political scientist. 

• “Expert systems" will be 
the technological buzz-word 
(computer programmes that 
store the knowledge of 
humans and mimic their de- 
cision making} 

• Ceramics will become the 
new super material for 
technology 

JAMES BELLINI 


4 


major Wan Street firm 

• Alarming widening of the 
Gulf war 

HENLEY CENTRE FOR 
FORECASTING 

Offers economic, demo- 
graphic, political, technologi- 
cal and cahural/serial or life- 
style forecasts. 

• Autumn election; Mrs 


qoar- - 

of Author, former colleague of 
Herman Kahn, the father of 
frrtnrology at the Hudson 
Institute. Iconoclastic analyst 
of emerging trends. 

• A major toxic catastrophe 
(the environment wiH become 
a major political issue within 

— five years) 

• Japanese banking power 
reveals its true strength^ 

• a non -political initiative i 
Ireland 


ion 


Andrew Lycett 

© Times Nmnpapara Ltd 1988 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 142 


ACROSS 

1 Hairpiece (6) 

5 Wince (6) 

8 Nothing (3) 

9 Order (6) 

id Parentless child (6) 
IS Scots gni (4) 

12 Parody (8) 

J4 “Castle of Otranto” 
author (6,7) 

17 Identify Alness (8) 
19 AsweD<4) 

21 Odd one out (6) 

23 Pink rhododendron 
( 6 ) 

24 Arehaeokigieal 
excavation (3) 

25 Bizanttype(6) 

26 Excused (6) 

DOWN 

2 Musical drama (5) 

3 Compel to duty (5,4) 
4 Qualify (7) 

<5 Plant life (5) 



6 Scamp (3) 

7 Littoral (7) 

13 Promenade (9) 
15 Vent (7) 


wSS^ ounl(7) 

2D Brush^ 9 
22 Distant (3) 


SOLUTION TO NO 1141 
ACROSS: 1 Barrel 5 Mute 8< 
fizz 15 Gan baldi iSLooc 19] 

Espy 25 Nuzzle. 

DOWN: 2Ahea 3 Rag 4 Little Bighorn 5 Mind 
Doubt ID Lazy 12 Guru 14 Slap 
Angel 21 Vary 23 Fez. 


13 

^Ugue 24 


iSGc^TT 


20 
















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THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


11 


FASHION by Sixzy Menkes 


The weird and the wearable 


close up 


JEAN -PAUL 
GAULTIER 


The newest shape A 
of things to come - 
is stretchy and 



shiny and uses 


man-made fibres. 


British street style 
has paved the way 
for the naughty 
boy of French 


fashion, with his 
love of futuristic 


fabrics and blatant 


artificiality 


Harry Karr 



'7 feel much too old to be an enfant 

fabovi 


terrible 9 * Jean-Paid Gaultier (above) 


T he naughty boy of 
French fashion 
will be 35 in April. 
But designer Jean- 
Paul Gaultier still 
i^ts his kicks from 
mocking the bourgeoisie. In 
his surreal fashion shows, 
nothing is quite as it seems. 

He has made the corset and 
the bra his signature — but 
worn chastely oif tbp‘bf folds 
of fabric. A regular man’s 
tuxedo jacket turns to reveal a 
naked cut-out back. Quilted 
eiderdowns are puffed out into 
full skim. A simple sweater 
glows with luminous lettering 
when the lights go down. 

Behind Gaultier is a train- 
ing in conventional French 
couture where he learned to 
cut and sew. Ahead, be sees a 
future for clothes moulded out 
of new materials. 

“We have done everything 
we can with the silhouette,” 
says the designer who pul his 
fashion stamp on the A-line 
skirt a year ago. “People are 
not prepared to be dictated to. 
It is new fabrics which give 
modernism to fashion." 

For Gaultier that means, as 
wztb his clothes design, buck- 
ing the current trend. He was 
the first designer to renounce 
natural fabrics for mode 
leather and stretchy ski pants 
in his dfebut collection of 1979. 
Now he has become tlx: high 
priest of nylon and viscose, 
using anything that seems 
“stretchy, shiny or false”. 

“I was very naive in that 
first collection,” he says. “All I 
wanted to do was the opposite 
of the very loose clothes that 
were being made.” 

Jean-P&ul Gaultier has al- 
ways seemed closer to the 
iconoclastic, whacky spirit of 
young London, than to the 
hidebound chic of the Paris 
boulevards. His collections of 


tail and mixed prints, 
use of Russian Cyrillic script 
and his heavy post-punk boms 
with spindly striped legging, 
seemed to be inspired by 
British street style. Although 
he denies it (“I think what I do 
is very French’^, English stu- 
dents fed that their cult hero 
absorbs ideas, and then pro- 
duces them, with infuriating 
skill, asdesitaUe highrfasbiou. 

Now those students have a 
chance to collaborate with 
Gaultier on a fabric scheme 
for Gourtaulds. Gaultier has 
set a project for the Courtefle 
Design Awards, Britain’s most 
important student design 
competition, to design a 
futuristic fabric round which 
Gaultier will produce a -cap- 
sule collection next summer. 
Five colleges are being asked 
to design up to three Courtefle 
jersey fabrics on a theme of 
“modernity, technology, 
artificiality and futnrism”. 

Ga ulcer's passion for man- 
made fabrics started when he 
“opened his grandmother’s 
cupboards” and gazed at her 
corsets inside. His synthetics 
have included a CourteUe 
paring velvet used in his first 
collection and imaginative 
variations on once-despised 
shiny and streeby materials, 
which be is convinced will 
mould the shape of clothes to 
come. 

The first corsets came in 
Gaultier's spring collection 
shown in October 1982, when 
a II the garments expressed 
themselves in movement, 
looked extraordinarily odd, 
and were his attempt at Dada- 
ism in dress. 

The impish Gaultier draws 
in references from different 
cultures, sending up the Dis- 
creet Charm of the Bourgeoisie 
in a collection of clothes 
inspired by the French con- 








MOVE: “Everything stretchy, 
shiny and false” for Jeao-Paul Gauffer's 
black corset top and stretch girdle 
girdle skirt from hte spring coM o c tt on at 
A ia Mode, 36 Hans Crescent, SW3 from 
toe end of January. Sheer ruffle 
gloves from Harvey Mchols, 
KrtghtsbrkJge, SW1 . Red suede 
shoes by Johnny Mote from 396 
Kings Road, SW10 


TOP RIGHT: The Gauffer puffbat 
a polka dot pleated Jong skirt 
pufed up on an elastic hem to double 
over. Narrow-shouUared spot blouse. 
Both from A la Mode, end of January. 
Lace-up ankle boots from Barrett 


Make-up by Ruth Sheldon 
Hair by Mario for Schumf 
Photographs by CHRIS DAWES 


ABOVE RIGHT: "I was brought up in 
fashion to know how to use a knife and 
fork,” says Gaultier of his training. 
This taflorad body-skimming 
black and white checked coat 
dress by Jean-Paid Gauffer from A La 
Mode, end of January. Red mittens 
from Fenwick, New Bond Street, W1 . 

Suede cap from Workers for 
Freedom, 4/4a Lower John Street, W1 


deiye class, and shocking tbe 
straight fashion world with his 
men's collections of high 
heels, powder pufls and lace. 

“My menswear is not gay,” 
he ays indignantly. “I was 
challeng in g fashion history by 
showing that lace for men 
does not only mean Louis 

XIV, and high heels Louis 

XV. The liberation of women 
has also brought us the new 

man, " 

Gaultier showed skirts for 
men (albeit as apron-fronted 
trousers in sober pin stripes) 
and a witty collection of 
gingham beach wear offering 
up men as Bardot-styie sex 
objects. Both were fashion 
milestones in that they de- 


fined how far the peacock 
male was prepared to strut 
Gaultier points out that he 
offers more than one fashion 
in his collections. The 
that he is able to weave 
tbe wearable in with the weird, 
is his strength (and tbe reason 
why Italian and Japanese 
companies continue to sup- 
port* him). 

Like a Dali, who had to 
know how to draw before he 
could break tbe rules, 
Gaultier’s surreal fashions 
start from a classic base. His 
jackets, buttoned askew and 
asymmetrically draped, were 
actually masterpieces of cut- 
ting. Gaultier had two spells 
with the house of Cardin, the 


first at .the age of 18, and two 
years in the haute couture 
studio of Jean Patou, where he 
worked with Michel Goma 
and Angelo Tariazo. 

“I was born in the 1950s 
and I love the fashions of toe 
Fifties,” says Gaultier. “I like 
modernity, but I think I take a 
little from the Fifties, some- 
thing of today and a hope of 
tomorrow.” 

The chic and kitsch sexual- 
ity that permeates Gaultier's 
collections has nothing to do 
with toe' status-conscious 
world of French couture. Nor 
have his shows, which them- 
selves are directional; fashion 
as theatre in a circus ring; the 
more recent shows exhibited 


on scaffolding with the models 
making a fashion still life. 

And the corset dresses? 
They have been interpreted 
variously as a return to wom- 
anly curves or to toe rigidly 
controlled bodies of the 1950s; 
as a send-up of a society 
obsessed with sex, or as a 
fashion statement about man- 
made, second-skin fabrics. 

“Sex is a part of life,” says 
Gaultier. “I won't say that the 
Twiggy look is past, because 
that suggests that I am defin- 
ing a fas h ionable person. In 
Paris, prostitutes would wear 
corset dresses. But only men 
of another generation would 
see it Hke that The idea is to 
play with toe code.” 


ENRICO 

COVERI 


SALE STARTS ON FRIDAY 
JANUARY 2 

Substantial reductions on exclusive pret-a-porter fines 
for men, women and children 
Furs, knitwear, daywear, evenlngwear, 
Skfwear and accessories 

ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED - 
72 NEW BOND STREET LONDON W1Y 9DD 
TELEPHONE 01-629 4005 


Sanderson Sale 

January 3 ^January 24 

Mondaj-Friday 9.30nn-5.30pm. Ssmrttoy 9 00am-5.30pm 


15% off 

Quitted Fabric and VariouB ex Display Items. 


Sanderson, Berners St, London W1 

Coffee Shop . 

" f„ - ^ Tv^t.nham Court Road ’Itabe Stations 


G-I-A-N-T 

S-A-L-E 


LONDON’S FINEST LOXORY BEDS 
& LflXQKY BEDDING. ALL REDUCED 

HURRY! HALF PRICE BARGAINS 


SrtJcctMktag 


sHchUydormik*) 
WAS MOW 

V&roKDdoDMciteMreeMV CI.SW £94$ 

DEAUVILLE Sopcttobata&vool double dfcao MTS £479 S95S ' £479 

ASHTOKmnAHD double bed *tae-W£50i a, 000 UM 

MHU0Wsci«iPdwAirta e^M» eo<ta pm me 


BED BARGAINS. VAST SAVINGS 


Pocketed apriagiatcitar i 


m Apfluc edfc Ams. 

WAS NOW 

*V » 6'6" RECTON CAKZTONMVS £S4» £2J57 0,917 

6lT X 6'6"S1Afl£i DmOHATSAn Sdld 0.441 El 34$ 

IVilVSHZKBCHUNCIIMIMM ' n,bW 0^71 

S'Crx 6 ' 6 *nCffiK AMBASSADOR WE 049 WJ €744 

57>*ra if»BU ElBCCllVHfl«BM £943 £7*5 

♦viiTgaiarouMwoii mo a 99 

AlIbed»lal5efaME<oa.iacA»aorlm.lBnTi»leM oaetrvbcd. 


SPACE SAVERS -MONET SAVERS 


WAS NOW 

IBUNDUBBDVwidt. Solid pw.aarpanckHnUM £529 £423 

SXKXnGBEDV.Qiii«m» 2 iii^ebcdLSJin£ 9 C £479 <383 

OBCTBtSTDBAGEdKqojaJ’ir.SAraCSS £324 £359 

0 TltMUNSnH«fiEiirnua 3 , Q'.SA«£Sr 5335 £268 

laeofdta fi pw* 4 takM«ilbbhwhg. 


ALSO: LUXURY BEDLENENS HALF PRICE 




Srrf tti n i Jkahtctt. 


pi ts - ini Rv BF.ni i\t:w. i-ki;i; i rc kydipi 


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wins. 


BUT ATSUMNE SC AFTEE CBBSIMAS. 
free pariOag. free glfi^faataatta bargains- sod the beat a elee awi In town. 
Shop earty fbrtfag best offers. 


Free Misery « orders ow S100 a £agbad ad WaJo. Scon open Si dm i nek. 
M j f bi ft w e f or p aint « ^ o( biiklin p. Ewsftjte retro TO ItCLD wfckfi hm been 
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is iHnlir . 


5 KQAU 

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26-27 Sloane Screa, London SWlX 9NE TeL- 01-235 7541/4 


WINTER SALE 
EARLY BIRDS 


ONE ONLY SPECIALS 


MARO' MULTIGYM 

KENT OLYMPIC 
COMPETITION SADDLE 

SET OFT1TLEIST 
IRONS (9) 

O'BRIEN BLACK MAGIC 
WATERSKI KNEEBOARD 

TURNER SNOOKER 
TABLE (6'x3') 

TUNTURJ GL ROWER 


XM0CT 

Lm 


£150 

£75 

£35 

£25 


jQ75 

£Ms5 


£25 

£15 


HEAD SCORPIO SKIS 




£10 





Sale starts 8.30am Friday 2nd January 



PEOPLE 


Soviet 


style 


The new fashion awareness 
by Russia's first lady Raisa 
GoriMehof seems to be 
bearing unexpected fruiL 
Nine outfits from the bulg- 
ing closets of Peter the 
Great go on display at toe 
Barbican at the end of the 
month, in a rich and rare 
exhibition of Russian 
dress. The costumes, which 
also include Catherine toe 
Cheat’s fanciful military- 
inspired dress, are from toe 
25.000 pre-Revolutionary 
fashions stored away in 
Leningrad’s Hermitage 
and oever seen outside the 
Soviet Union. Mrs 
Gorbachov, whose taste is 
for foreign design over toe 
stodgier native products, 
can find fashion precedent 
in this exhibition which 
includes clothes made dur- 
ing toe Romanov years by 
Puqsinand Poiref in Paris 
and by that English fashion 
man abroad, Charles 
Worth. 


Go show 


Is the Chambre Syndicate 
in Paris about to fold its 
fashion tents? Ten years 
after the areas spectacu- 
lars were launched, I hear 
that the Chambre's Direc- 
tor, Jacques Moodier, is 
hoping to build a more 
permanent home for 
France's bi-annual ready- 
to-wear shows. Architects 
running their slide 


are 


rules over the basement of 
the new Mnsde de la Mode 
to see if it can be made into 
a fashion show centre. But 
just as American buyers, 
and several of the leading 
designers, have announced 
that the days of the tents 
are numbered, a new group, 
calling themselves La 
Moda anx Tnfleries, ia 

planning fo pitch camp 

down toe road from the 
Louvre to cash fa on the 
official showing in Match. 


Royal red 

It was a great Christmas for 
coats when the royals 
turned out in the rain for 
morning service at. St 
George’s Chapel, Windsor. 
Shapely tailoring rather 
than street-wise oversize 
was the look, from Prince 
William's nanny-knows- 
best coat to Lady Helen 
Windsor's floor-sweeping 
swiri, by the royals’ favour- 
ite, Catherine Walker of 
Chelsea Design. Diana and 
tbe Duchess of York made 
a double act in Father 
Christmas scarlet and cos- 
sack hats. 



LOEWE 


PRET-A-PORTER/ FASHION AND TRAVEL ACCESSORIES 


SALE 

NCWON 


THE MOST 
EXCITING WINTER 
SALE ON THE 
FINEST LEATHERS 
IN THE WORLD 


LOEWE 

25 OLD BOND STREET 
LONDON W1 
01-4933914 


47-49 BROMPION ROAD 
KNIGHTSBR1DGE 
LONDON SW3 
01-5814014 


EDINA RONAY 


HALF PRICE 


SALE 


STARTS 


10AM 

SATURDAY 3 JANUARY 


141 KSNG’S ROAD 
LONDON SW3 


r 






THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 3019 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Driving a 
wedge 

After four years of prevarication 
by his Department, Nicholas Rid- 
ley, the Environment Secretary, 
has just approved a plan by the 
Earl of Scarbrough for a golf 
course on Maltby Common in 
South Yorkshire. This has quite 
bunkered local opponents of the 
scheme. At a public inquiry in 
1982 objectors claimed that the 
Earl did not own die common and 
was therefore debarred from mak- 
ing the application. However, the 
then Secretary of State, Tom King, 
subsequently declared that he had 
seen documents which “suf- 
ficiently substantiated” the Earl's 
claim. The objectors at the inquiry 1 
asked to see this evidence, but the 
request was turned down. I expect 
the local objectors to drop the 
matter, for they would now have 
to take legal action through the 

High Court, which they could ill 
afford. 

• A useful tip for newspaper 
owners engaged in circulation 
warfare comes from this advert in 
a Fulham Road pet shop: “Bull 
Terrier; £250 for quick sale. Good 
with kids and with newspapers.” 

Pious hope 

A reader tells me that a wall of 
Richmond parish church in 
London carries a memorial to a 
vicar who died in 1806. “Pore, 
Just, Beneficent, liberal and 
Pious” is the inscription. Sitting 
below it on Sunday mornings can 
often be seen Alan Watson, 
Liberal candidate for the marginal 
Tory constituency of Richmond 
and Barnes. Could he be hoping 
the electors of Richmond win 
make a connection? 

Colonel Clint 

is Gut Eastwood trying to make a 
point or is it just coincidence that 
the poster for his latest blood and 
guts extravaganza. Heartbreak 
itidge, a homely tale of machine- 
guns, Marines and the island of 
Grenada, portrays him as a dead 
ringer for the ubiquitous Offie 
North, even down to the decora- 
tions? Cynics might suggest that 
Warner Brothers is just cashing in 
on another old actor’s hardship. 

Kicking it 

The Dutch Reformed Church in 
South Africa is slowly coming to 
terms with the new reality. 
According to the Catholic Herald, 
DRC ministers are doing their 
best to cut down on racist re- 
marks. And, rather like drinking, 
they are restricting themselves to 
one in the morning, one at lunch, 
and one good one with friends. 

Knock in vain 

City communicants looking for 
seasonal spiritual solace will find 
no room at the High Anglican 
church of St Mary Aktermary in 
Bow Lane. If s shut. A note pinned 
to foe door reads: “Closed for the 
Christmas holiday (December 
20th to January 6th).” What of foe 
vicar and his verger? Watching foe 
telly with foe rest of us, I suppose. 


BARRY FANTONI 



Sends Shock Waves Through City* 

Telefission 

Irish television is celebrating its 
twenty-fifth anniversary to general 
acclaim. Not such ordinary news 
as you might think, in view of the 
caution with which foe service was 
greeted on its foundation. Presi- 
dent de Valera considered that the 
possible results, “for good or evil”, 
would compare in magnitude with 
tire splitting of the atom. Veteran 
parliamentarian Oliver J. Flan- 
agan dismissed establishment 
fears of its effects on foe nation's 
morals with the immortal ques- 
tion: “Was not sex in Ireland 
before television?” Happily foe 
consequences appear to nave gone 
1 DO further than “bringing I reland 
out of its comer of the world”, as 
one critic put it this week. 

Island TT 

How inappropriate of the Jersey 
Tourist Board to ran a television ; 
ad in which actor John Nettles, 
who plays the title role in Ber- 
gerac, is seen swigging a pint of 
lager. Did it not realize that the 
character, portrayed as something 
of a hero on Jersey, is meant to be 
a reformed alcoholic? 

Losing height 

Another example of bookshop 
rnigfflmg, this time from Norman 
Gelb, the mildly miffed author of 
a recent work on foe Battle of 
Britain entitled Scramble, When a 
friend tried to buy it in a London 
bookshop he was instantly re- 
ferred to the fiction shelves. 
Hardly feir testimony to the 
book's veracity. PJ£§ 


The crisis over US arms sales to 
Iran is described in Middle East- 
ern toms, but is really about 
America. The Iranian regime is 
pursuing its course more or less as 
it was doing before the bizarre 
arms deliveries. 

The Iranian revolution is sav- 
age, but it is not small-minded. It 
is a serious chapter in foe history 
of ideas and it is not going to be 

dethr fwiivl nr HwmnniTPri hy trivial 

doak and dagger gestures. That 
some US officials believed Iranian 
“moderates” could be won over 
by sending foe regime inconseq- 
uential packages of arms lefts an 
ominous story about decision- 
making in Washington. 

If responsible Israelis believed 
such things, we would be in 
serious intellectual trouble^lore 
likely, they woe acting out of 
friendship for an American ally 
with an unassailable daim to our 
solidarity. 

George Shultz, Secretary of 
State, was tire most lucid voice 
during foe recent turbulence, and 
his present counsel is that we all 
return to rationality in dealing 
realistically with hostage problems 
and in avoiding the reinforcement 
of anti-western Islamic fim- 
rianwntaKsm. 

There is no reason for any of us 
to be delighted about the victory 
of either Iran or Iraq in the Guff 
War. But an Iraqi victory —which 

is unlikely - would be the success 
of foe army of a country whose 
interventions against Israel have 
been mischievous but marginal. 

On the other hand, a triumph 
for Khomeinusm, aided by West- 
ern arms, would be the triumph of 
a contagious idea. If that idea were 
to sweep across Iraq, Saudi Ara- 
bia, foe Gulf states, Egypt and 
Jordan, the Middle East would be 
an uncomfortable place for Israel 
and a poor environment for the 
survival of humane values or 
stable societies. 

It is a dear case for a hands-off 
policy until real opportunities for 
influencing the Gulf area arise. 
The war is more likely to end in 
compromise between exhausted 
belligerents than in the creation of 
a new power centre in tire region. 
To divide ourselves into pro- 
Iraqis and pro-Iranians is folly. 


Abba Eban, former Israeli foreign minister, 
pats the tumbles now besetting President 
Reagan into an overall Middle East context 

Don’t let Iran 
divert us from 
path of peace 


One lesson to be learned would 
be a less deferential attitude to 
rfonrfesrine diplomacy in all free 
societies. These are more colour- 
ful than regular statecraft fid far 
more productive of best-sdfing 
novels and investigative journal- 
ism, but they rarely affect tire large 
currents of history. 

If the Middle East is relatively 
unchanged by the recent tumult, 
the same cannot be said of 
America. Friends of the United 
States in Europe, the Middle East 
and elsewhere have a helpless 
sense oHreing crucially affected by 
events in which they have no right 
or capacity of direct influence. 
Because Europe's immense eco- 
nomic and inteDectual potential 
has not been reflected in an 
autonomous international role, 
tire United States is tire only free 
society whose domestic events 
cast their shadow across the entire 

tinman All that o ther family 

members can do is indicate as 
tactfully as possible what they 
would Hlce it to da 

We must first hope that Wash- 
ington trill break out of its 
obsessive preoccupation with a 
single issue. The s pectacle of a 
great power having little time for 
anything except relentless self- 
investigation drives its friends to 
compassionate frustration. 

It is beyond question that the 
Watergate crisis of 1974 impeded 
the solution of international prob- 


lems. James Callaghan has in- 
stanced the case of Cyprus. My 
own conviction is that a continu- 
ation of HexUy Kissinger's mission 
in tire summer of 1974 might have 
added an Israeb-Jordanian dis- 
engagement agreement to those 
already reached with Egypt and 
Syria. If that had occ u rred, the 
Arab-Israd area would look dif- 
ferent today. 

The effective and dignified 
working erf the US preadency is a 
crucial component of the inter- 
national balance. Many non- 
Americans are thus the allies of 
those in tire US working for the 
restoration of domestic stability. 

It would be defeatist to regard 
the Reykjavik summit as the 
collapse of hope for arms control. 
The intervening discussion menu 
to for limite d agreements for 
control rather than a Utopian 
vision of abolition. But the main 
question is whether arms control 
should pre-empt the US-Soviet 
agenda to exclusion of *t«» 
regional tensions which are more 
likely to threaten world peace. 

Even spectacular redactions in 
nuclear weaponry would still leave 
the world exposed to the threat of 
a nuclear holocaust On the other 
hand, wars raging in the Gnlf and 
Afghanistan and unresolved ten- 
sion in the Caribbean and the 
Middle East could conceivably 
lead to fetal miscalculations. And 
Reyjkavik has been followed by 


some hopeful first signs of 
progress in human rights, as foe 
release of Sakharov proves. The 
pretence that arms control is the 
only key to detente has not stood 
any emp irical test 

It might seem unrealistic fin* me 
is Jerusalem to assume that a 
tormented Washington might now 
give its attention to encouraging a 
peace process in this region . Yet 
the objective possibility of success 
for American good offices is 
great e r than is widely assumed. 
President Mubarak and Mr Peres, 
at their Alexandria meeting last 
November, urged that 1987 be- 
come the “year of negotiation". 
Jordan has endorsed that hope. 

Mr Peres, in his two years as 
prime miniker, managed to ex- 
punge the idea of annexing the 
West R«t>v and Gaza from toad’s 
official doctrine as defined in the 
1984 Coalition agreement Over a 
miTH frn Israelfes voted for vig- 
orous anti-annexationist plat- 
forms in foe 1984 election. The 
maintenance of a deadlock with 
continued Israeli rule over a luge 
Palestine Arid) population might 
soon weigh more painfully on 
Israeli democracy rtian on the 
Arabs who live under that rale. 
There are Palestinian leaders who 
are now beginning to understand 
that the traditional PLO slogans 
envisaging Israel's disappearance 
are idle fantasy. 

Those who strive for peace in 
tins region must be thankful for 
such small mercies, in which case 
we would cease calling them smafl. 
US mediation contributed to 
Israel's five signed agreements 
with Egypt and Syria between 
1974 and 1979. Many Israelis 
aspire to a structural condition 
which would give our country the 
hope of reconciling its security 
with its democratic vocation. But 
if 1 987 is to be a year of American 
paralysis, it is unlikely to be a year 
of Middle Eastern negotiation. It 
is for the United States to deckle 
whether this vision is less alluring 
or worthy than a prolonged in- 
vestigatory ordeaL Its friends can 
only hope that it will add a 
capacity for resflknee to its other 
proven qualities. 

This article is also appearing in the 
New York Times. 


Roger Scruton 

Exam figures 
— and facts 


A report published yesterday ar- 
gued that the state education 
system is in a state of crisis and 
that only a new dispensation tan 
give the rfiiMm of poorer families 
the opportunities they need. Read- 
ers of this page may greet the 


ing to destory every f—ing gram- 
mar school in England. _ And 
Wales. And Northern Ireland- 
Fortunately he did not succeed. 
We can therefore compare what 
happened in England a™ 1 ‘ 
“reforms” with what happened m 
Northern Ireland, which remained 


ing Anne Sofa's article two weeks ««?» 2 
agL Mm Sofer produced figures f *™^***^ dSrii 
from a DES report showing a kvd fofoe 

email imnmvement m examine- the 1950s and ws. Then, 



'fit/' 

</ /9 a 




ki&e 



Excuse, my lord, the liberty J take 
By thus addressing this raw piece of verse. 

I need the man who's had the greatest stake 

In twelve months bigger spending , Aids and worse 

I’ve looked around and bade but sadly fear 

That, good Lord Whitelaw, you've had an awfully good year. 

Two introductory notes: the first on style. 

You certainly still have it to the tee, 

A fleshy grin, a sudden dash of bile, 

An eyebrow hoist amid the bonhomie. 

You may not rouse a pack of rabid haters. 

But many though ’re your underestimates. 

The second is of literary convention 

Where I’ve aimed high (how wisely you will see) 

At Bvron, Wystan Auden and James Fenton, 

At rhymes that riled Dick Crossman and Southey. 

But since this is a journalist ’s excursion 
I’ve dropped two lines — a subedited version. 

Relax, I shan’t chastise you for the time 


Full of real power, when Thatcher’s digit did decline 
Too close for comfort to her comely wrist. 

You held the reins as tight as tight could be. 

Not bad for a Viscount in the twentieth century. 

The job in question, that of Deputy Prime 

Minister, does not of course exist 

Except in fact. But what else matters at a lime 

like that? Downing Street stood quiet as summer mist. 

You held the button (would you trade Bryansk for Bute?) 

While Margaret slept on morphine substitute. 

The crisis passed. Were crises all so easy! 

Westland had left the lady rather sad 
And Bernard Ingham's men distinctly queasy. 

But. as for you. things were not half so bad. 

That thing called “ Thatcherism ” not half so hearty. 

A helicopter had come to the cud of the Party. 

You’ll say, perhaps, that’s very well with hindsight. 

It didn't seem so rosy in the spring 

When what and why and how Mayhew might write 

Made every little Labour heart to sing 

“All hail to them who knew no better 

Than to leak that cruel Solicitor General’s letter”. 

There were, I grant, a few uncertain days 
When Margaret seemed to miss her very courage 
When Norman showed anticipatory ways 
And Denis urged the gentle road to Dulwich. 

Then faith returned, the prayer not "deeds” but unity. 
When that’s the word, your lordship has impunity 


To do what’s needed for faint hearts in Surrey, 

To stop the sale-of British Leyland cars. 

To keep control on rents (damn Lawson's worry!) 

To scrap M3, send monetarism to Mars. 

While Baker tried to sort out education 
You saved the Rover losses for the nation. 

The Cabinet's quieter now with Michael gone 
To Henley, where he builds a landscape garden. 

He had his points but balance wasn’t one. 

And as for weight, a babbling brook at Baden 
has more. He spoke a lot for town and inner city 
But ended more like Brown, Capability. 

The same goes for your colleague Britton, Leon. 

(He never was as interesting as Sam) 

While Minister for Crime he’d tried to be on 
Good terms with those who like to flog and hang. 

He made you out a slave of Queen Anne's Gate. 

How sad he met so miserable a fate ! 

As if one Heseltine were not enough 
The summer saw the rise of Bill, another. 

“The Queen was cross that Margaret was so tough 
With K.K., Bob Mugabe and their brothers”. 

While grandees were in action for the Palace 
You stood accused of mischief, even malice. 

For Queenly worries “didn't stop at Bothas 
Or threats to our great commonwealth of nations 
They stretched to all unhoused and would-be workers. 
To other totems of the wet persuasion”. 

It took a letter from her Private Secretary 
To end the tabloid tales of tricks and treachery. 

As Auden said, “sex, e'est une autre affaire ” 

Though now with Aids at large, perhaps it's not. 

Who would have thought in January this year 
That you would be the man to stop the rot. 

Discussing with a civil service force 
Each finer point of safer intercourse? 

It's time to end : come, Juan, "carpe, carpe ”, 

Or so great Byron once so gaily wrote. 

His use of foreign words is so relaxe. 

All imitators have to follow suit. 

I’ve spared them since you show no little peur. 

That Russian trip with Healey, de rigueur. 

It served, howe’er, to reinforce what all the polls display 
That Labour’s new defence plans are a loser. 

Denis, of course, knows it (although he does not say). 
He’d rather talk of Mahler or Marcuse. 

And thus the new year auguries are in. 

A woolly Whitelawed Tory team to win. 


email improvement in examina- 
tion results between 1976 and 
1985. Thus 16 per cent of pupils 
left school with one or more A 
level passes in 1976, and 17 per 
cent in 1985. Of those without A 
levels, 8.5 per cent had 5 or more 
O levels (or CSE equivalent) in 
1976, 1 1 per cent in 1985. 

Moreover, in 1976 69 per cent 
of pupils were in comprehensive 

schools; in 1985, 85 per cent u If 
the standards of our education 
system,” Mre Sofer writes, “are 
behind those of some other coun- 
tries, it is because we started 
further behind, in that pro-com- 
prehensive era often evoked now- 
adays as a golden age.” In other 
words, the figures are a vindica- 
tion of tiie comprehensive system 
which Mrs Sofer, then a member 
of the Labour Party, worked so 
assiduously to instaL The feet that 
the “other countries” which put us 
to shame — West Germany and 
J ap a n — have retained a system of 
selective schooling is of course 
irrelevant. 

As a grammar school boy and a 
u n ive rsit y teacher, I can remem- 
ber obtaining a real education 
through the stale system; and I am 
in a position to compare that 
education with its modern sub- 
stitute^ foe situation most likely 
to test the level of a pupil's 
knowledge. So my instinct is to 
ask whether the figures which she 
has chosen reflect a real tendency; 
and, if they do, what is foe 
explanation? 

The first thing that we notice is 
that the DEE'S figures were gath- 
ered from aB schools — indepen- 
dent, comprehensive and select- 
ive. More discrimina ting research 
is difficult to come by, and the 
DES has a habit of publishing 
tendentious statistics. Neverthe- 
less it has been established that no 
less than 63 per cent of pupils 
leave independent schools with at 
least one A leveL And while only 6 
per cent of school leaven are from 
the independent sector, these pu- 
pils obtain about 16 per cent of all 
O level passes, 25 per cent of A 
level passes, and 50 per cent of 
grade As at A leveL In the light of 
such statistics, it is surely non- 
sense to suppose that figures 
which refer to an overall improve- 
ment tell us much about the state 
educational system. 

Fu rthermore, it has been estab- 
lished by the National Council for 
Educational Standards (and ag- 
reed, after scandalous attempts at 
sabotage, by tire statisticians of the 
DES) that roughly 25 per cent 
higher results are to be expected 
from a selective system than from 
a system that is fully comprehen- 
sive. No overall improvement can 
neutralize the implications of tins 
astounding piece of evidence. 

It was in 1965 that Anthony 
Grosland - issued his circular 
requiring all local education 
authorities to adopt the com- 
prehensive system. With that 
concern for foe lower orders which 
has ever animated the true 
Wykehamist, he told his wife that 
“if it is the last thing I do. I'm go- 


1970s, as CrosJand’s measures 
took effect, they suddenly levelled 
off showing almost no significant 
imnmvement during the decade 
fens 1970 to 1980. In Northern 
Ireland however, where the selec- 
tive system remained, examina- 
tion results continued to rise and 
now stand (in respect of those 
achieving cnie A level or five O 
levels) some 50 per cent higher 
than in England. The levelling off 
was totally unexpected. In 1970 
the DES, extrapolating from exist- 
ing trends, predicted t h a t , in 1980, 
212,000 school leavers would have 
at least one A level; in feet there 
were only 120,000. 

In interpreting Mrs Sofer s fig- 
ures we should also remember foe 
following: the enormous increase 
in educational resources, which 
have more it™ doubled in real 
‘terms per pupil since 1961; foe 
constant decrease in pupil-teacher 
ratios, now at their lowest ever 
level; the introduction of new, less - 
demanding and more widely sat 
examinations: the radical im- 
provement in educational opport- 
unities for girls; the long-term 
effect of raising the school-leaving 
ji gp; the advance of “curriculum 
reform”, and the introduction of 
“soft options”, so that, for exam- 
ple, arts and craft and sociology 
now rival FngKsh and maths ax A 
lcvd in the ILEA. 

Such fectS make it imm ensely 
surprising that the proportion of 
pupils leaving school with an A 
level has not doubled during foe 
period to which Mrs Sofer refers. 
In feet it has remained almost the 
same. In any case, what does this 
constancy prove? What matters is 
not the number of pupils who 
pass, but the standard which is 
required of them in order to do so. 
When I sat O level English 
literature I was compelled to read 
Chaucer in the original: this is now 
generally expected only at A level 
When I studied for S level 
mathematics, 1 had to solve the 
differential equations in Piaggio, 
something that is now expected 
only of university students. 
Moreoever, pupils increasingly 
leave school with A levels in 
subjects like sociology, which 
demand fittle ««demie expertise. 

It is therefore quite wrong to claim 
that the slight improve meat in 
passes noticed by Mrs Softer is 
sufficient to prove that standards 
are rising. 

So great has been the commit- 
ment to egalitarian reforms font 
people have refused to notice foe 
extent to which the educational 
opportunities of poorer children 
have been damaged by the com- 
prehensive system. Anne Sofer 
claims that foe facts to which she 
refers have been concealed in the 
interests of politics. Perhaps she is 
right But what of those other facts 

— for more telling, and to a 
university teacher even alarming 

— which have been concealed in 
the interests of the politics of Mrs 
Softs? 

The author is editor of the Salis- 
bury Review. 


Paul Pickering 

Painting the 
tree red 


By the middle of next month the 
Monopolies Commission is due to 
pronounce on who should control 
Britain's sugar industry. It is a 
subject that arouses strong 
passions, and whatever verdict the 
commission readies is certain to 
be bitterly criticized in some 
quarters. 

At the centre of the dispute is 
the British Sugar Corporation, 
whose 13 factories process all 
Britain's home grown sugar beet, 
which last year amounted to some 
7,700,000 tonnes. The rival bid- 
ders are Tate and Lyle, whose 
refineries at Sflvertown, east 
London, and Greenock, in Scot- 
land, process all the cane sugar 
imported from Third World coun- 
tries; and the giant F e rmzzi 
corporation of Ravenna, Italy's 
third largest private sector com- 
pany after Fiat and Montedison. 

Femizzi appeared to steal a 
march on its rival lari month 
when, through its British subsid- 
iary, Agricola UK, ft acquired a 70 
per cent stake in BSC from its 
present owners, the commodity 
brokers S & W Berisford. But foe 
deal is subject to the approval of 


Who should be our 
sugar daddy? 


the commission, which could well 
decide foal neither takeover 
would be in foe public interest 

Tate and Lyle are arguing that a 
monopoly - or, to use their 
preferred phrase, “a unified Brit- 
ish industry” — would be in a 
better position to defend the 
interests of British growers; a view 
which most growers and the 
National Fanners' Union appear 
to share. 

The NFU was more than a little 
miffed earlier this year when the 
man chosen to take charge of 
Agricola's British operation, at a 
reported six-figure salary, was 
none other than fts former presi- 
dent, Sir Richar d Butler. It made 
its displeasure known by publicly 
withdrawing its nomination of Sir 
Richard to be the next chairman 
of foe promotional and marketing 
organization. Food from Britain. 


But it is not jost pique that 
motivates foe NFLTs opposition 
to the Femizzi deal David Nrish, 
its deputy president, is concerned 
about foe “huge power” it would 
give Femizzi, which already has 
big interests in France and Italy, to 
manipulate the European sugar 
industry as a whole. 

. Whileit would be unlikely to be 
able to “fiddle” the national 
quotas, which are established by 
foe European Commission in 
Brussels, it might well be inclined 
to favour its French subsidiary, 
Begin-Say, when it came to dispos- 
ing of non-quota surpluses, to foe 
extent that British growers might 
be faced with competition from 
cheap French imports. “It is 
difficult to see how the same 




its interest in developing indust- 
rial uses for sugar, and if it needed 
to grow more beet fin- this purpose 
would be more likely to choose 
France because of its more favour- 
able climate, Naish believes. He is 
also concerned about foe increas- 
ing competition from sweeteners 
derived from iso-glucose and 
about Ferruzzi's dose links with 
the Montedison chemica l group. 

Sir Richard counter-claims that 
Tale and Lyle would find it 
equally difficult to reconcile foe 
interests of British sugar beet 
growers with maintaining the 
profitability of the Sflvertown and 
Greenock refineries, which are 
virtually the only outlet for cane 
imported into the EEC under the 
Lome Convention. He has also 
given an undertaking that no BSC 
factories would be closed for at 
least five years, and that present 
BSC management, staff and fac- 
tory workers would be retained; 
something that the Tate and Lyle 
management, in talking about 
“consolidation”, has pointedly re- 

fUgdtod o ' John Young 

233H|^cu/ture Correspondent 


After watching a film about wild- 
eyed Japanese warriors shouting 
“Banzai” and hacking each other 
to pieces, a friend remarked: “Of 
course, they’re just like us these 
days.” But foe/re not; my good- 
ness they’re not 

•I don't mean that car boot 
quality controller Yamashfta at 
foe Nissan plant in Co Durham 
will commit ritual suicide at the 
end of his shift if he leaves his raw 
fish lunch in the model meant for 
a VIP. Nor do I share my uncle's 
fear that a Japanese ratchet factory 
m his area is the advance guard of 
a creeping Nipponese menace ti «* 
will take over the country. 

But some differences go deep. 
Recently, when offered extremely 
lucrative work from the land of 
the felling cherry blossom, I was 
silly enough to question whether, 
being so fer away, they might 
forget to part with foe yen on rim# 
“Such a thing could never 
happen,” I was told rather huffily. 
“If we do something dishonest we 
are written in red on our family 
tree.” Being blackballed by the 
Garrick Chib apparently has noth- 


utgoniL 

Those written in red are also 
governed by a rigid set of rules. 
One is allowed to steal, extort and 
rob only from other criminals, all 
of which makes the job of foe 
police much easier. In doubting 
the willingness of die company to 
pay I had inadvertently been 
comparing my would-be employer 
to the likes of Ronnie Kray. It is 
easy to see how misunderstand- 
ings arise. 

The businessman then told me 
the sad experience of a Japanese 
couple on foe London Under- 
ground. The girl's purse was 
stolen, but ho* stocky boy friend 
cornered the m ugg er and ordered 
him to give it back. Mugger No 1 
started to comply, then a larger 
mugger No 2 appeared on foe 
scene. ... 

“You too will wait here white I 
get foe police,” said the tourist, 
imbued w^h the Japanese ethos 

1 



that vfllaifts still play by foe rules 
of “it’s a fair cop, guv”. Of this foe 
muggers were unaware. They sim- 
ply hit him as hard as they could 
and ran off with the girl’s purse, 
into foe hands of less gentle 
railway bobbies. 

At the court case, when a 
counter-charge of assault against 
the Japanese boy was filed, he said 
fo al suc h a thing could not have 
happened because Japanese peo- 
ple do not like tonching others, 
ewaally muggere. But what 

really bewOdered foe court was his 

refosal — having flown all the way 
back fr om Japan to testify — to 
answer questions under cross- 
examination. 

His argument was a simple one. ■ 

He bad travelled a long way to tell 

the truth and sworn to do so Why 

was the man in the black cloak 
raffing him a liai? He had come 
teckto see foe guilty punished. To 
doubt his story was to imply that 

in red on his family tree . , . it wax 

f «P judge warn 

to eat his wig. 

But such British attitudes to the 

one senior 

“““J? a Japanese company 
P?t steel bars on foe windows of 
ffisHome Counties house. 

TTbere are still many divide 

U5, ’J le as we ate 
feed bran curd washed down with 

dSbes^ired hi? i? thei : 
msnes served by his wife “Take 

foe Japanese approach to womem 

wfe of course permits 

£ to a dub with hostesses/n^tte 

the Japanese way.’' His deliow^ 

spouse smiled dutifiSv de “ ght#ilJ 

At half past six foe next 

schist W &* 5 ■ 

wouldn’t tell “J 

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THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


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1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


IF.... 


Imagine a vast country of 280 
million people constituted as a 
federation of states which 
remains united out of the 
political and economic self- 
interest of each. Imagine that 
same country governed by a 
federal parliament in which 
each representative has had to 
compete for election and 
stands regularly for re-election. 
Imagine that country as a 
socialist state in which, outside 
the large state monopolies, the 
market rules and the small 
entrepreneur flourishes. Could 
this vision ever be the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics? 

As 1986 passes into 1987, it 
looks improbable. But it is 
easy to forget that only 70years 
have passed since Russia be- 
came the first state to attempt 
to implement Marxism. There 
is a tendency to forget (and in 
the Soviet Union that memory 
lapse is state policy) that less 
than a century ago the Russian 
Empire was just starting out on 
a road that might have led 
towards Western-style democ- 
racy and that it was embarking 
on industrial and agricultural 
modernization on a scale that 
could have incorporated Rus- 
sia into the rapidly growing 
international economic sys- 
tem. 

The years between have seen 
the Russian Empire become 
the Soviet Empire. The 
lumbering imperial bureau- 
cracy has been rebuilt. The 
finer points of cultural heritage 
have been disowned; intellec- 
tual traditions and the pursuit 
of knowledge have been 
extinguished by the new ortho- 
doxies of Mandsm-Leninism. 
But the greatest indictment of 
the Soviet system in its seven- 
tieth year is that it has failed 
even in its own terms. 

As a nominally socialist 
country, the Soviet Union has 
one of the sharpest real income 
differentials in the world. As a 
state governed nominally by 
the workers for die workers, 
fewer than SO per cent of all 
Co mmunis t Party members 
are classed as. workers. A 
nominally democratic coun- 
try, it has no mechanism either 
for replacing its leaders or for 
voicing criticism. As a state 
professing to lead the world, it 
falls behind not only on 
measurable indices (such as 
infant mortality), but on less 


quantifiable tests, such as pro- 
bity in public life, as welL 

Until recently uncomfort- 
able facts such as these have 
been studiedly ignored inside 
the Soviet Union. Indeed, they 
have been systematically 
covered up by those with 
access to the information and 
enshrined in a mythology of 
optimism — the inevitable 
“bright future**. Those like 
Academician Sakharov, with 
both die access to the informa- 
tion and die courage to inter- 
pret it, have been silenced. 

The “contradiction” of the 
“ideal" state turning up crime, 
corruption, scientific and eco- 
nomic stagnation, into the 
third and fourth generations, 
has been successively ascribed 
to the remnants of history, the 
rtairpy sustained during the 
second world war, Statin’s 
“personality cult” (in retro- 
spect), malign Western in- 
fluences and sabotage by 
sundry “imperialists”. Neither 
Soviet leaders, nor their 
ideologists, nor their econo- 
mists could bring themselves 
to look straight in the minor. 

Within a few decades the 
reflections would anyway have 
been distorted. Surveys and 
statistics produced by official 
agencies for the ruling Com- 
munist Party were themselves 
embellished. Unfulfilled plans 
were fulfilled and overfulfilled 
on paper. Crime statistics were 
sanitized. When the truth 
about alcoholism, family 
breakdown and life expectancy 
became too unpalatable, it was 
suppressed. 

Recognition of the gulf be- 
tween tile ideals from which 
Marx and Lenin proceeded 
and their embodiment in the 
Soviet Union of today has 
been a constant theme of 
Soviet dissenters since the 
1960s. It is one reason why, in 
his first extended interview 
since his release. Dr Sakharov 
described dissent as a moral 
phenomenon. Morality, like 
culture and learning, has been 
subsumed into Marxism- 
Leninism. Above all, the qual- 
ity of honesty has been lost, 
subordinated to a political 
theory which was elevated to 
the status of truth. 

Now that protracted dis- 
honesty has begun to damage 
the national interests of the 
Soviet state — as this year’s 
embellished performance 


COMPETITION AND GAS 


It is pleasing, if curious, to find 
British Gas extolling the mer- 
its of competition. The newly 
privatized corporation wants 
to import gas from Norway 
(and also perhaps from Algeria 
and the Soviet Union) because 
it wants maximum com- 
petition among its suppliers. It 
reckons thereby to obtain the 
keenest prices. 

Most consumers would ac- 
cept that logic. But the Gov- 
ernment would prefer the 
company to buy more of its gas 
from the British sector of the 
North Sea. No doubt there are 
several different views in 
Whitehall It is hard to see the 
Treasury either happily impos- 
ing additional costs on British 
industry or forgoing Corpora- 
tion Tax on profits. Yet the 
collective view of Ministers is 
that British interests and jobs 
require pressure on a private 
sector company to act against 
its own best interests. 

The argument is familiar 
from other public sector de- 
cisions. Yet the Department of 
Energy's position seems 
particularly difficult to defend 
here. Gas extraction is not a 
labour-intensive manufac- 
turing process but a highly 
capital-intensive operation. 
The numbers of jobs involved 
cannot be large in relati on to 

Patent protection 

From Professor Sir John 
Butterfield 

Sir, As a former Chairman of the 
Medicines Commission I can well 
understand the frustrations of our 
pharmaceutical industry as re- 
flected by the recent letters from 
Sir Graham Wilkins (November 
26) and Sir John Harvey-Jones 
(December 1). 

Ph armac eutical manufacturers 
in this country are being denied a 
full opportunity to recoup tbe 
rewards of their inventiveness as a 
result of the licence-of-righi pro- 
visions in the 1977 Patents Act 
which the last four years of 
patent protection vulnerable to 
“ copying " companies of home 
and overseas origins. 

I appreciate that the Gov- 
ernment sees complexities in in- 
troducing, at this time, the wider 
In tellectual Property Bill that was 
the piece of legislation earmarked 
for the commitment to repeat 
licences of right for medicinal 
products, which Lnra dentally p«£ 
vide a balance of trade “surges 
for this country of over £800nui- 
lion a year. 


the money at stake. They could 
well be fewer — though more 
visible — than the jobs which 
might be lost if Britain's gas 
consumers have to pay more, 
or if returns on investment fall 
because British Gas is pre- 
vented from buying in the 
cheapest market 

British technology is at is- 
sue, but it is not strategically 
vital and it will probably 
survive on a diminished diet 
from British Gas. If the Gov- 
ernment was right to go for 
Awacs rather than Nimrod, 
then it is surely right to allow 
the private sector to buy 
foreign gas. 

The rising oil price may well 
mak e tiie exploitation of Brit- 
ish gas from the North Sea 
more profitable. But if not, 
there is no point in developing 
high cost resources ahead of 
low cost resources simply be- 
cause they happen to be Brit- 
ish. That would only penalise 
consumers. 

However, the economic 
argument is one that cuts both 
ways. If it is right for the 
corporation to be free to shop 
around among competing 
suppliers, then it must also be 
right for the consumer to be 
able to shop around. Com- 
petition bring s benefits both 

Surely, tbe balance must now be 
struck between tbe industry and 
Government in this sector of our 
economy. It is my earnest hope 
that someone in Westminster will 
step forward and accept the chall- 
enge to repeal the unfair aspects of 
the 1977 patent laws through a 
private member’s Biff or some 
other parliamentary device, that 
will enable the Government to 
honour its commitment to one of 
the most successful sectors of our 
commercial economy. 

Yours fai thfully, 

JOHN BUTTERFIELD, 
Cambridge University School of 
Clinical Medicine, 

The Clinical School 
Addenbrooke's Hospital 
Hills Road, Cambridge. 

Firm in the seat 

From the Chairman of the Side 
Saddle Association 
Sir, I must disagree with the 
sweeping statement, in your report 
(December 23) on tbe Queen’s 
decision to give up riding side- 
saddle at the Trooping die Colour 
ceremony, that riding side-saddle 
is “a physically fatieuing and 


when its suits British Gas and 
when it does not 

So far as domestic con- 
sumers are concerned, com- 
petition is unfortunately not 
likely to become a reality. The 
Government’s dubious de- 
cision to privatize the gas 
industry en bloc rather than 
after separating out the dif- 
ferent businesses means that in 
tbe forseeable future the small 
consumer is unKkeiy to have 
any alternative to British Gas. 

The same is not true of 
industry. Under the Oil and 
Gas (Enterprise) Act of 1982, 
large consumers of gas can 
negotiate directly with in- 
dependent gas producers and 
then take delivery through the 
British Gas pipeline network. 
Ofgas, the industry’s watch- 
dog, has the duty to ensure that 
charges levied by the corpora- 
tion for use of this network are 
not excessive. 

No large consumer has yet 
made use of this opportunity. 
But the fact that in one case 
British Gas undercut a poten- 
tial rival producer suggests 
that more vigorous com- 
petition might well hold down 
prices. It is time for one of the 
independents to challenge 
British Gas on its charges and, 
if necessary, take its case to 
Ofgas. 

potentially dangerous 

equestrianism that most horse- 
women no longer even attempt”. 

The Side Saddle Association has 
more than 1,000 active riding 
members;' in addition, many la- 
dies who are not members of our 
association and who show, hunt or 
ride for pleasure, do so side- 
saddle. 

■ Miss Sylvia Stanier has recently 
revised and updated Doreen Ar- 
cher Houbion’s book. Side Saddle 
Chapter 1 says: “Nevertheless, it is 
an undoubted fact that a side- 
saddle can give a woman a far 
firmer seat than she would ever 
have astride”. 

Burmese has been a loyal ser- 
vant to her Majesty the Queen and 
it is right and fitting that she 
should enjoy honourable retire- 
ment. I cannot, however, accept 
that riding side-saddle is a dan- 
gerous form of transport 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Keeping abreast of technology 


statistics form the basis for 
next year's projections and 
rote-learning replaces the mas- 
tery of knowledge for 
qualifications — the leadership 
has finally addressed itself to 
the problem. It is the single 
development that could trans- 
form the Soviet state. 

So far, the pursuit ofhonesty 
has been manifested only 
modestly. Since the nuclear 
disaster ax Chernobyl it has 
begun to penetrate the official 
media — though Chernobyl, 
like the unrest in Kazakhstan, 
demonstrated that tbe new 
openness was distinctly lim- 
ited by Western standards. It 
has begun to penetrate the 
economic establishment, with 
the delayed publication of 
missing statistics from recent 
years. It has touched the 
cultural and academic 
establishment, with belated 
recognition for hitherto sus- 
pect artists and scholars and a 
new encouragement for in- 
terest in the Russian pasL 

Beginning with the new 
edition of the Communist 
Party Programme, it has also 
begun to penetrate the morass 
of ideology which underpins 
Soviet practice. That pro- 
gramme, subdued in tone, 
shorn of its earlier confidence 
in the eventual victory of 
communism, reticent about 
the worldwide application of 
the Soviet experience, gave the 
first sign that the Soviet 
Union’s self-righteous 
aggressiveness might one day 
be tempered. 

At the end of 1986, there are 
only faint intimations of 
change- If they become dearer 
is 1987, it may then become 
possible to talk of a second 
phase of the October Revolu- 
tion. This would be a phase in 
which the sense of mission 
coupled with insecurity which 
has penraded Soviet foreign 
policy is replaced by a Soviet 
r eadine ss to take its place in 
the international arena as a 
normal state. It would be a 
phase in which criticism of the 
Communist Party was pennit- 
ted, in which the remaining 
heirs of the Russian intelli- 
gentsia could play a role with 
pride. It would be a phase in 
which the invasion of Afghani- 
stan, the detention of Andrei 
Sakharov and the death of 
Anatoly Marchenko could not 
happen. 


From Mr Frank Gfyn-Jones 
Sir, Mrs Thatcher’s Government 
has been in power during almost 
the whole of the period when 
Nimrod was developed. At tbe 
heart of Britain’s manufacturing 
problem is tbe difficulty in keep- 
ing up with advancing technology, 
and with every wave of new 
technology we have become more 
dependent on overseas manufac- 
turers. Computers have largely 
been in the hinds of foreign multi- 
nationals. 

Now a vast new industry is on 
tbe horizon, one that will provide 
products to work with the digital 
telephone networks, and already 
there are signs that Japanese 
industry as well as American is. 
setting up subsidiaries in the UK 
in preparation for this opportu- 
nity. Few foreign MNCs achieve a 
net export/import balance in 
Britain’s favour. 

Sooner or later Britain must 
break the mould and once again 
build new world-class industries. 
The Government believes that- 
this function is not its role and 
that it must rdy on market forces 
and initiative from within in- 
dustry. Bat market forces are not 
succeeding and the situation is 
getting desperate. 

The Government has had a 
glorious opportunity during the 
last seven years by determination 
and leadership to make certain 
that the Nimrod project did 
succeed. The major issue seems to 
be that the cream of our talent, 
which is needed to build these new 
industries, is attracted elsewhere, 
some of it to the USA. 

Whatever the factors, here was 
an opportunity for Government to 
find out at dose quarters what tbe 
real problems woe and acting in 
par tnership with industry to t»l» 
the necessary actions. 

If there is one lesson from 
Nimrod which we must heed it is 
that we need a Government that 
understands manufacturing in- 
dustry and provides the leadership 
for which the nation craves. 

Yours sincerely, 

FRANK GLYN JONES 
15 Bolton Avenue, 

Windsor, Berkshire. 

From Mr Alistair Home 
Sir, Your leader of Friday 
(December 19) states, with 
surprising mildness, that “die 

Family life 

From Professor R. C. Whitfield 
Sir, Digby Anderson (December 9) 
property sharpens the debate 
about family life by associating 
divorce with child abuse: Sustain- 
ing children’s rights is only tardy 
. compatible . with the; separation or 
> divorce of their parents. 

More perhaps than previous 
generations we now expect per- 
sonal fulfilment from our mar- 
riages, but most of us have 
received little or no direct educa- 
tional assistance regarding the 
skills of achieving that over the life 
cyde within a framework of 
personal responsibility to those 
who depend upon ns. 

We must therefore have a major 
change in our educational prior- 
ities so that we arc better prepared 
for the productive work for our 
kith and kin which we cany out in 
the home environment. 
Everyone's personal and collec- 
tive futures are, in fact, home 
made. 

Yours faithfully, 

RICHARD G WHITFIELD, 

Hon Chairman, 

National Campaign for the Family, 
c/o The Salvation Army (Legal 
Section), 

101, Queen Victoria Street EC4. 

From the Chairman of the 
National Family Conciliation 
Council 

Sir, I welcome Digby Anderson's 
anguish in drawing public atten- 
tion to another rise in the divorce 
rate and tbe consequences for 
children, which he calls “child 
abuse on a grand scale.” 

He criticises “progressivist 
ideology” as both cause and 
response. Any remedy is, of 
course, as complex and long-term 
as are tbe causes. In the meantime 
the 40 or so voluntary conciliation 
services which belong to the 
National Family Conciliation 
Council have sprung from local 


whole business of defence 
procurement . . . must be re- 
examined”. But what is surely 
needed is a really far-reaching 
investigation into why British 
industry, in conjunction with the 
MoD, persistently fails the Armed 
Forces, and the British taxpayer. 

It is not as if Nimrod was a one- 
off disaster. We have had it all- 
before. In tiie late 1950s, much 
money and effort was expended 
on developing Blue Steel, an air- 
to-surface “guided bomb” that 
was to provide the main delivery 
vehicle for the British nuclear 
deterrent. This was then scrapped 
in favour of Blue Streak, a ground- 
based rocket. 

But in 1960, on the persuaave 
technical arguments of the Chiefs 
of Staff Blue Streak was also 
scrapped. £60mil!ion (multiply by 
10 for today's equivalent) had 
already been spent on develop- 
ment, and a further £500mi0ion 
would have had to be spent on its 
production. 

Britain was thus left high and 
dry, without any strategic missile 
of its own. Tbe Americans then 
came along obligingly with 
Sky bolt, another air-to-surfecc 
weapon, offered on most “attrac- 
tive terms”. But by the end of 
1 962, this too was scrapped - with 
no warning to the British —by tbe 
Pentagon. 

The result was one of the worst 
Anglo-American rows since Suez, 
only defused by some skilful 
personal negotiation between 
Macmillan and Kennedy; which 
led to Britain getting Polaris in 
lieu of SkybolL But the mainstay 
of British defence remained, and 
still remains, conditional upon 
factors within the US, and out of 
British control And then there 
was TSR-2 . . . The list goes on. 

Tbe question that should have 
been a&ed 25 years ago is the 
same today: what is wrong with 
British high tech? Is management 
less efficient than that of our 
competitors? Have we failed to 
spen d enough mi technical train- 
ing and research, over the years? 
Tbe answers need to be found 
even more urgently now than in 
Macmillan's day. 

Yours faithfully, 

ALISTAIR HORNE, 

21 St Petereburgh Place, W2. 

community concern. They focus 
parting parents’ concern for their 
children's needs on planning to 
continue their joint parenting as 
co-operatively as they can in order 
to prevent the worst of the 
“abuse" 

Our frustration is due to the 
almost total lack of Government 
support for these or any other 
initiatives during the last 10 years 
while the divorces have been 
reaching their present rate. There 
have been Government commit- 
tees, but we have yet to believe in 
the emergence of any committed 
social policy. 

Yours faithfully, 

THELMA FISHER, Chairman, 
National Family Conciliation 
Council 
34 Milton Road, 

Swindon, Wiltshire. 

first things first 

From MrUR. Jessel 
Sr, I have no doubt that a 
Government, supported by its 
Civil Service (and this includes 
HM Treasury), that, on tbe one 
band, can tolerate wasting 
£900million on mismanaging the 
procurement of a conventional 
weapons system, fight tbe Falk- 
fands war, fail to reinvest the 
proceeds of North Sea off sell off 
the nation’s capital assets from 
British Telecom and British Gas 
and spend tbe proceeds as rev- 
enue; and, on the other hand, can 
fail to pay its teachers and nurses 
adequately and require the Nat- 
ional Health Service for dentistry 

and spectacles to wither away, and 

finally squeeze tbe Arts CouncS 
grant to less than it requires to do 
its job, not only has no principles 
worth speaking ofbut also a wrong 
sense of priorities. 

Yours faithfully, 

ROBIN JESSEL, Finance Director, 
Kent Opera, 

Pembles Cross, 

Egerton, Ashford, Kent. 


Yours sincerely, 

MARIE STOkES (Chairman, 
The Side Saddle Association), 
Higham Fans, 

Chap el lane, 

Guestling Green, 

Nr Hastings, East Sussex. 
December 23. 


The evil that men do GSSS£iSj3R£i 

From his Honour Judge Lipfriend or evil bui and this must not be ig- 

Sir, The tide re Bernard Levin’s nored, tbe choice he makes may be 
article (November 24), “Theevil considerably influenced by bis 
some men do is bom within genes, his upbringing and tbe 
them”, is not supported by all that history and cultureoi his people 

follows. It is true he writes that and of his environment, 
some people “are evff not are For Beck ermnn to argue that 
made evil” and that “only a very because philosophers cannot ex- 
small number of people are like plain why two people with identi- 
f Comrade] Trie, or could become cal y uf tic. endowment and 
like him”. And he further suggests identical environmental experi- 
that because some people from tire ence coukl behave d iffere n t ly,' 
Broadwater Farm estate did not then there is no possibility that 
riot, then those from the estate they would behave differently is, 
who did are evil and were born with respect to h™, unsound. 

evfl. Perhaps the philosophers cannot 

That Tek [described m the book explain it now to his satisfaction, 
Cambodian Witness) was evil in, hut what might they be able to 
say, 1980 at the age of, say, 30 is explain, no doubt with some 
clear. But was he evfl at 20 or at 10 further help from the scientists, in 
or at one? 10 or 20 years' time? 

Levin also writes, and with this Beckerman’s the s i s is a dan- 
I am inclined to agree, “The gerous one, but so I believe is that 
greatest and most dangerous lie of implicit in the title to Levin's 
our time is that we are solely tbe article, 
result of our upbringing, ere” Yours truly. 

Presumably, therefore, he accepts ALAN UPFRIEND, 
that upbringing, etc, has some 10 Woodside Avenue, N6. 
influence on our behaviour. December 28. 

However, I strongly disagree 

with Dr Beckennan’s thesis (fea- From Sir George Engle. OC 
ture, Dece m be r 17) that the Sir, On the subject of moral 
suffering in this world “is the education Fanny Kemble has 
product ofa strange mix of genetic always seemed to me to have said 
and environmental characteris- the last word. In her Journal of a 
tics, for neither of which are Residence on a Georgian [slave] 
people morally responsible”. Plantation she wrote: 

I believe there is something in The half-wicked of the earth are the 
man apart from the strange mix leaks through which wickedness is 
Beckennan refers to and that we eventually swamped, 
must rid ourselves of the dan- Yours faithfully, 
gerous view of the deter minis t, GEORGE ENGLE, 
that man has no moral res- 32 Wood Lane, Hiahone, N6. 


Locust threat 
in Ethiopia 

From Mr David Young 
Sir, It is essentia] that we in tbe 
West act now in order to avert 
another influx of refugees from 
Tigray, Ethiopia, into Sudan. Of 
the 200,000 who trekked into 
Sudan in 1984 over two thirds 
have returned to their land to sow 
their crops. They woe provided 
with seed by the Relief Society of 
Tigray, an indigenous humanitar- 
ian organisation, but now, just as 
they are on the verge of becoming 
self-sufficient again, another 
threat stands in their way. 

1 am referring to tbe millions of 
locusts that have been breeding 
after the last major rains which 
also enabled their crops to grow. 
These locusts are not yet at their 
most jfomwflring stage, but if aerial 
spraying is not carried out soon a 
far worse tragedy win strike the 
already weakened people, who are 
only now recovering from the 
most recent drought. 

Two planes equipped for spray- 
ing are stationed in Ethiopia, but 
the Government, which is fighting 
a civil war in Tigray, will not allow 
the spraying to go ahead and will 
not grant permission for inter- 
national agencies to spray there 
either. 

It is thus of paramount im- 
portance to put pressure on the 
Ethiopian Government to allow 
the spraying to go ahead before it 
is too late. 

Yours sincerely, 

DAVID YOUNG, 

3 Roehampton Close, SW15. 
December J8. 

Cheaper power 

From Mr N. Barnes 
Sir, I confess to being puzzled by 
the frequent references to the 
prospect of cheaper electricity 
from nuclear power following the 
example of the French who gen- 
erate 60 percent of tbezr electricity 
from nuclear fori. 

In fact a householder in France 
pays more than 1 do here in 
England. Moreover tbe French 
electricity supply system derives a 
considerable amount of its power 
from hydroelectric stations which 
have relatively low running costs, 
lower, perhaps, than nuclear sta- 
tions. 

A comparison between similar 
. tariffs for householders in France 
and England is as follows and the 
figures seem to speak for them- 
selves. 


Off -peak (night) 

Day 

Annua! fixed charge 


Bedrid* S Eastern 
de France BBCtrtdty 

Sp/KWh 1.9P/WM1 
531 p/KWh 5£4pfcWh 

cna e«056o 


the rale of exchange used In convening Fnmdi 
currency to Starting was 9.35F «= El. 

There is a further sting in the tail 
for the French consumer who has 
VAT and local taxes added to his 
biff amounting in one typical case 
to some 26 per cent. 

Years faithfully, 

N. BARNES, 

Doveridge, 

Sponden Lane, 

Sandhurst, 

Cranbrook, Kern. 

December 15. 

Can one credit it? 

From Mrs Pamela Duckham 
Sir, I read with interest tbe article 
by Richard Thomson (December 
10) on credit cards because of a 
recent experience. 

Preferring to pay my credit 
account in full and finding that 1 
had used my last cheque, my 
husband obligingly wrote one for 
the amount. This private domestic 
arrangement resulted in the 
following: 

1. An inquiry from his bank if he 
would like his credit limit raised as 
they noted be had an account with 
another bank for a credit com- 
pany. 

2. A second tetter wondering why 
there had been no answer to tire 
first. (We hadn't stopped laugh- 
ing). 

3. My latest account includes the 
information that my credit limit 
has been raised. 

WiD they retract all these offers 
when die reciprocal cheque is paid 
in, we wonder? 

Yours faithfully, 

PAMELA DUCKHAM, 

19 Amersham H3J Gardens, 

High Wycombe, 

R iiriringhamshir e- 

Benefit for disabled 

From Mr A. A. Aston 
Sir, The Government has ann- 
ounced a change in the rales for a 
proposed benefit payment to se- 
verely disabled people (report, 
later editions, December 12). But 
this is no “victory” for disabled 
people. Fewer people will receive 
the payment than the Gov- 
ernment originally estimated and 
many disabled people will be left 
ouL 

Ministers originally estimated 
that 10,000 people would be able 
to receive a planned new severe 
disability premium as part of the 
social security changes in the 
Social Security Act Now the 
Government has accepted it was 
wrong. 

Even with a change in the rules 
to allow recipients of both higher 
and lower rates of attendance 
allowance to be eligible for tbe 
premium, the Government now 
expects only 7,000 people to be 
eligible. At tbe same time, tens of 
thousands of disabled people face 
being worse off in the future than 
they would be now because of the 
overall changes introduced by the 
Act 

It is hard for the Government to 
claim to take proper account of the 
needs of severely disabled people 
if it makes such extraordinary 
errors as it has now revealed in its 
statistical estimates. The Gov- 
ernment should provide foil 
protection to prevent present and ’ 


ON THIS DAY 


DECEMBER 30 1930 

Sir Leonard Woolley (1880-1960) 
mas knighted in 1935 on the 
completion of 13 yean’ 
excavations at Ur of the Chaldees 
in what is now southern Iraq. 
Many ofhisjinds arc on display in 
the British Museum 


EXCAVATIONS 
AT UR 

THE TOMBS OF 
KINGS 

HOPES OF TREASURE 
(By Leonard Woolley) 

UR (By mail) 

The Joint Expedition of tbe 
British Museum and of the Muse- 

im of the University of Pennsylva- 
nia has begun its ninth season’s 
work at Ur with a startling 
discovery, that of the to mb s of the 
great kings of the Third Dynasty. 
The rich graves of tbe prehistoric 
cemetery were those of kings whose 
names, where they have been 
recovered, were new to us: U- 
Engur, who about 2400 B.C. built 
the ffiggurat, his son Dimgi, his 
grandson Bur-Sin, bmkters of 
many temples and rulers of an 
empire which stretched to the 
Mediterranean, stand for the most 
Splendid age in the history of Ur 
and axe fawiHar figures, and sow 
their burial-place comes to light. 

Late last season we exposed part 
of a waD-front whose bricks were 
stamped with the name of Bur-Sin; 
the excavation of the building was 
one of the wiwn in our 

programme for this year; it proves 
to be an annexe of a much larger 
buildmg erected by DungL The 
clearing of this is heavy work; for 
the enormous mud-brick walla 
which Nebuchadnezzar built round 

the Sacred Area ran right across 
the site and have to be due through; 
below these are private houses of 
about the twentieth century B.C., 
anditisoniy when these have been 
swept away that we can lay bare 
the work of the Third Djraasty. 
Probably not more than half of 
DungTa building has yet been 
broight to light, a biriknng with 
immensely solid walls of burnt 
bricks kid in bitumen, with square 
and rounded b uttresses along its 
outer face and flights of steps 
leading from its central court to 
high-lying chambers at the south- 
west raid of it 

Bur-Sin’s annexe is more mod- 
est, hot it is still one of tbe best ex- 
amples of buildmg preserved at Ur. 
The fitting) of one room in the 
«niura» show rim* it was intended 
for the worship, presumably that of 
the deified king, but the buildings 
are primarily tombs. In Bur-Sin’s 
courtyard a Bmall shaft teadB under 
a wall and through a corbelled 
doorway into a long vaulted cham- 
ber, still standing almost intact, 
which can only have been the 
king’s grave . . . 

It is too much to hope that the 
royal graves should have escaped 
the notice of the enemies to whom 
Ur so often fell a prey, though until 

the last tomb has bear opened hope 
persists; but even if not a single 
object should be found we are 
amply rewarded. The actual tomb 
of Bur-Sin is one of the finest 
monuments at Ur, but it is almost 
insignificant empsred with what 
we have, even at this stage, in 
DungfB building. At the bade of 
this two flights of stairs lead up to 
what was a high paved zoom: 
beneath its floor there lies a huge 
hrick-Hned pit, more than 20ft. 
deep, which had been filled in with 
dean, packed soil. In a recess on 
one ride of it is a hricked-op door 
through which steps ted down to a 
square brick platform at the pit’s 
bottom: from this b™*! stairs ran 
down to left and right and, passing 
beyond the limits of the pit, enter 
long vaulted rooms or passages. 


are in a dangerous state an d must 
be shored ig> before we can enter 
them — at present they are 
supported by the earth filling, 
which we dare not remove. 

— Already- with tbe work only 
half done, we have one of the most 

mnm imgnta 1 TUUftS wwifing in 

Mesopotamia: the splendid brick- 
work, more than 70 courses of it, < 
going down sheer into the ground ; 
with the great staircases at the - 
bottom is more i mp ress i ve than if 
it stood up above the surface and - 
makes a much stranger appeal to 
the imagination: what may be 
below and behind it all we have yet 1 
to learn. 

future disabled claimants from . 
being left worse off than they are ; 
undo* existing benefit arrange- 
meats, if tbe Government is to 
prove its caring credentials. 

Yours faithfully, 

TONY ASTON (Director, 
Vocational and Social Services . 
Division), 

Royal National Institute for the 
Blind, 

224 Great Portland Street, Wl. 
December 12. 

Odds-on chance 

From Mr F. G. Si Clair Strange 
Sir, It seems a pity to “cap” Mrs 
Welchman's letter (December 17) 
but I cannot refrain from recalling 
that, at about 2 pm on a Saturday 
in May, 1949, 1 was driving up 
Park Carriageway . East (when it 
was still a two-way street) and was 
following a car with the registra- 
tion number RT 6334. I noticed 
this because my first car, which I 
had sold 10 years earlier, was RT 
6333. 

After spending the weekend in 
Kent I bad to return to Marble 
Arch and was again driving up- 
Park Carriageway East at 9 am tbe 
following Monday, when one 


the West End. I was following RT 
6334. 

Yours faithfully, 

F. G. St CLAIR STRANGE, 
Church HiH House, 

Harbledown. Canterbury, Kent 


r 



14 




COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


SOCIAL 

NEWS 

The Princess of Wales win 
attend a performance of High 
Society, m aid of Help the 
Hospices at the Victoria felace 
on February 23. 

Princess Anne will visit Stock- 
port Grammar School, Greater 
Manchester, on February 24. 
Princess Anne, President of the 
Save the Children Fund, will 


visit the ASHA Neighbourhood 
Project at 43 Stratford Street, 
Beeston, Leeds, on February 24 
and will be entertained at lunch. 
Princess Anne, as President of 
the Save the Children Fund, will 
attend a preview of a sale of 
work at Hugh Ripley Hall, 
Ripen, North Yorkshire, on 
February 24. . 

Princess Anne, Chancellor of 
London University, win attend 
the senior student's dinner at 
Hughes Parry Hail. Cartwright 
Gardens, WC1. on February 25. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Captain MB. Andrews 
amt Miss FX. Outer 
The engagement is announced 
between Martin Andrews, Royal 
Engineers, eldest son of Mr and 
Mrs D.C. Andrews, of 
Lighrwatex, Surrey, and Finola, 
younger daughter of Brigadier 
and Mrs Gerald Carter, of 
Longcot, Oxfordshire. 

Lieutenant ILP.W. Bell, RN 
and Miss JJE. Bofron 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul, son of Lieuten- 
ant-Commander and Mrs 
R.B.E. Bell, of Asbey, Isle of 
Wight, and Janet, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs R-A.G. Button, of 
Ryde, Isle of Wight. 

Dr NJHX Bryson 
and Miss SJ. Gibson 
The engagement is announced 
between Neil, eldest son of Dr 
and Mrs T.H.L Bryson, of 
Upton, Wirral, and Sarah, eldest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs EJ. 
Gibson, of Kidderminster, 
Worcestershire. 


Mr Ml Hall 
and Miss EJS. Maybe 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, eldest son of 
the Rev John and Mrs Hall, of 
Tooting, London, and Elizabeth 
Sarah, only daughter of. Mrs 
Olive Mayne, of Stockport, 
Cheshire. 

Mr T. Thurston 
and Miss JLS. Williams 
The engagement is announced 
between Trevor, only son of Mr 
and Mrs N.L. Thurston, 
Underbeig, South Africa, and 
Katharine, eldest daughter of 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs 
R-J.B. Williams, of Rochester, 
Kent 

Mr P.S. Vainber 
and Miss SJ. McPherson 
The engagement is announced 


ip, younger son of 
M and Mme r. Vainker, 
l'Ancienne Solfe, Briey, France, 
and Sbelagh, youngest daughter 
of the late W. Duncan 
McPherson and Mrs D.C. 
McPherson, of St Albans, 
Hertfordshire. 


Appointments 

Ljentenant-Colenel 
GUbart-Denham to be 
Equerry in succession to 
Lieutenant-Colonel Sir John 
Miller, who has held the 
appointment since 1961 and 
who is to retire next August. 
Professor Barry Ctraliffe and 
Mr John Newman to be mem- 
bers of the Historic Buildings 
and Monuments Commission 
for England (English Heritage). 
Mr LM. Osborne to be Head- 
master of Belhaven Hill. Dun- 
bar, in succession to Mr D.R.D. 
Vass, who is retiring next July. 


Birthdays today 

Professor Sir Roy Caine, 56; Mr 
Anthony Cripps, QC, 73; Gen- 
eral Sir David Fraser, 66 ; Sir 
Reginald Groom, 80, Lord 
Harrington, 79; Professor J. T. 
Houghton, SS; Lord Howick of 
Glendale, 49; Air Chief Marshal 
Sir Edmund Hudleston, 78; 
Professor Rosalinde Hurley, 57: 
Sir John Prideaux, 75; Sir Albert 
Robinson. 71; Lord Taylor, 76; 
Lord Temngton, 71; Sir Eric 
Weiss, 7$ Sir David Willcodo, 
67; Mr Gifford Williams, 60. 


Latest wills 

Mr William James Ferguson, of 
Westminster, formerly Chief 
Executive and Secretary of 
Lloyd's Register of Shipping, 
left estate valued at £104,916 
net 

Mr Geoffrey Le Mare, of 
Uttle bourne, Kent, left estate 
valued at £904,747 net. He left 
£10,000 to the Imperial Cancer 
Research Ftmd- 

Mr David Cook, of Burnham 
Market, Norfolk, brush manu- 
facturer, left estate valued at 
£19,913 neL 

Mr Geoffrey Gould Marler, of 
Fulham. Jen estate valued at 
£452,424 net He left 16 large 
measures of whisky to Mr John 
Triggs and nine gallons of beer 
to Mr Harold Biirdon, both 
available at Barnes Sports Gub, 
London. 


Polytechnic 

news 

North Staffordshire 
Mr K. B. Thompson, acting 
director, to be the new director 
of the polytechnic next year, in 
succession to Dr J. F. 
Dickenson. 

Middlesex 

Professor David Marks, former 
senior lecturer in psychology at 
the University of Otago, New 
Zealand, to be head of the 
school of psychology. 

Professor Michael Hall, former 
head ofhydrology unit, Hal crow 
and Partners, to be bead of the 
school of civil engineering. 

Mrs Sheila Tan, former prin- 
cipal lecturer in constructed 
textiles, to be bead of the school 
of textiles and fashion. 

Miss Janet Goodridge, former 
principal lecturer in dance, to be 
head of the school of dance. 



OBITUARY 

SIR DOUGLAS HADDOW 

Scottish administrator in 
the Johnston mould 


j 


Sir Douglas Haddow, KCB, 
who devoted his life to admin- 
istration. in Scotland, and who 
served for eight years as 
Permanent Under-Secretary 
at the- Scottish Office, died 
suddenly on December 26. He 
was 73. 

Thomas Douglas Haddow 
was bom on February 9, 1913, 
and, after schooling at George 
Watson’s College, Edinburgh, 
was a star student of mathe- 
matics at Edinburgh Universi- 
and Trinity College, 


Joanna Pickard, of Notting H01, London, showing off the finery of a Victorias comt dress 
from the Kensington Palace collection daring a chidren’s morning at tire museum yesterday 

(Photograph: Tim Bishop). 

From ‘heretic’ to hero 

Spain reclaims philosopher 


Miguel de Unamuno, the 
most famous of the Spanish 
intellectuals of the Second 
Republic, who was twice dis- 
missed as rector of Salamanca 
University during the political 
storms of his times and 
branded by a Spanish Catholic 
bishop even in the 1960s as “a 
master-teacher ' of heretics'’, 
has finally come into his own 
these days in this ancient 
Castilian town. 

A new and much deepened 
understanding of the 
contradictions in thought and 
deed of the Basque philos- 
opher, poet and journalist has 
emerged from an inter- 
national congress of Una- 
muno scholars just ended 
here, where he died 50 years 
ago tomorrow, isolated from 
everyone. 

‘We have a giant on our 
hands, that's clear”. Dr Nicho- 
las Round, of Glasgow 
University dedared,“and this 
congress, which has revealed 
the full extent of his stature, 
could only have taken place in 
a democratic Spain, aware of 
its obligation to understand its 
own roots”. 


From Richard Wigs, Salamanca 


Half the participants, many 
of them undergraduates from 
Salamanca and other univer- 
sities, were under 30 years of 
age. . 

The 10-day congress opened 
in the presence of the Queen of 
Spain, un derlining a posthu- 
mous reconciliation between 
an opponent of King Alfonso 
XI 1 1 and Spain’sTulmg Bour- 
bon house. 

It took place in the same 
hall of the university where in 
October 1936 one of the most 
famous episodes of the civil 
war occurred, Unamuno's 
courageous clash with Millan 
Astray, the Nationalist army 
general who denounced him 
with the cry “death to. 
intellectuals” 

Unamuno's equally famous 
prophecy of the outcome of 
the war - “you will win 
because you have enough 
brute force bat you will not 
convince” - inevitably 
haunted the congress. 

But the Spanish, British, 
American and French scholars 
who spoke mi those last 
crucial months of his life. 


charted the evolution of a 
lifelong liberal Disgusted by 
the anarchy of the Second 
Republic, Unamuno mistak- 
enly but sincerely, they ar- 
gued, believed Banco would 
restore order. 

Finally, he realized, amid 
the horror and cruelty the civil 
war, that these generals were 
going, as Professor Elias Diaz 
of Madrid's Autonomous 
University put it, “for 
regime based on terror”. 

In his native Basque coun- 
try Unamuno has been 
remembered, even though he 
opposed the emerging Basque 
nationalism and derided the 
Basque language. 

Only Spain’s ruling Socialist 
Party seems to have forgotten 
the young Unamuno writing 
articles for Bilbao's pioneering 
Socialist press in much harder 
times. 

Tomorrow, a plaque is to be 
unveiled in Salamanca's Plaza 
Mayer tty the authorities 
recalling the great man on the 
day he died, isolated and 
vilified by both sides in the 
civil war. 


He then derided to sit for 
the Administrative Qvfl Ser- 
vice and did so well in the 
examination that he could 
certainly have had a place in 
the Treasury. But he chose 
instead to enter the Scottish 
Office. 

After working for six years 
in its health department he 
became, in 1941, private sec- 
retary to the wartime Secre- 
tary of State, Tom Johnston, 
with whom he remained until 
1944. This was a formative 
.experience in his life. John- 
ston was perhaps the greatest 
Scottish Secretary in the com- 
paratively short history of the 
office, and Haddow was an apt 
pupil as well as a highly 
competent aide. 

During the period immedi- 
ately following the war he 
played a leading part in estab- 
lishing the National Health 
Service in Scotland, and he 
was later, from 1959 to 1962, 
secretary of the department of 
health. He was a powerful 
influence in the process of 
reorganizing the Scottish Of- 
fice, which led among other 
things to tire creation within it 
of a department of develop- 
ment. Of this he was the first 
secretary, from 1962 to 1964. 

In 1965 he was appointed 
Permanent Undersecretary, 
and he held the post until 


1 973. He gave strong direction 
to the cavil service in Scotland, 
while proving a formidable 
advocate of Scottish interests 
in Whitehall where be was 
much respected. He was par- 
ticularly keen on economic 
development and emphasized 
its importance in the work of 
the Scottish admini stration. 

Some eyebrows were raised 
when, on retirement from the 
civil service, he became at 
once chairman of the North of 
Scotland Hydro-Electric 
Board. But any breach of 
protocol (by the unwritten 
standards then in force) was 
more than justified by his 
performance in die job, which 
he combined with part-time 
membership of the South of 
Scotland Electricity Board, so 
ensuring close cooperation be- 
tween the two bodies. This 
phase of his career ended in 
1978. 

He was then a director, for 
five years, of the British 
Investment Trust, and was 
chairman of the court of 
Heriot-Watt University from 
1978 to 1984. 

He was a Fellow of the 
Royal Society of Edinburgh, 
an hon LLD Strathclyde, and 
an hon DUtt Heriot-Watt 
Haddow had a restless and 
resourceful temperament a 
min d that was quick to grasp 
problems, the capacity to take 
decisions, and a fiery, tena- 
cious quality in argument. He 
was forthright but kindly to 
his staff; usually apologizing 
later for any rebuke. 

Oulside the office his main 
interest was golf at which he 
excelled. Since be tended to 
play in khaki shorts, be was an 
all the more notable figure on 
a golf course. 

His wife, Margaret Rowat, 
whom he married in 1942, 
died in 1969, but be is 
survived by their two sons. 


MR ANDREI TARKOVSKY 



Pollution from vehicle exhausts in Stockholm, where low temperatures mak e the fumes more conspicuous. 

Science report 

London lead pollution falls by half 


The level of lead pollution in London's 
air fell by half in 1986, according to the 
most detailed study to be carried out 
anywhere in the United Kingdom in the 
first fhll year since the amount of lead in 
petrol was reduced. 

But while this improvement repre- 
sents one of the biggest contributions to 
reducing environmental pollution re- 
cently, the fell was still Iowa* than 
expected. The level of lead in dost, 
thought to be a major source of exposure 
to lead for young children, has remained 
unchanged in background areas such as 


The reduction of lead concentrations 
in petrol from 0.4 to 0.15 grams per 
litre, which came into effect between 
November 1985 and January 1986, was 
the first step to the removal of all lead 
from petrol. A study to measure foe 
extent to which foe cut has reduced the 
public’s exposure to lead was carried out 
by the Air Pollution Group of London 
Scientific Services, formerly the GLCs 
Scientific Services Branch. 

Measurements of concentrations of 
lead in the air were taken at 13 sites, and 
17 sites respectively for concentrations 
of lead in the air and in dost, in or near 
London before and after foe lower limit 
was introduced. 

Reductions of lead levels in foe air 
were found to range from 53 per cent at 
foe roadside to 34 per cent at back- 
ground sites - those more than five 
metres from foe kerb of a busy main 
road, at a time when lead in petrol fell by 
between 60 and 65 per cent 

These findings suggest there is a 


By Gareth How Davies 

residual component of lead in air which 
is unaffected by foe reduction of lead in 
petrol although even after this is taken 
into account the foil was still less than 
expected. Further monitoring will be 
needed to find foe reason for the 
disparity. 

Lead in dost levels was found to have 
dropped alongside busy roads by be- 
tween 10 and 40 per cent. But no overall 
change was observed at background 
sites such as playground where children 
are particularly vulnerable. 

This may be doe to a large pool of lead 
in dust which is tong-tasting, said Dr 
Duncan Laxen, of London Scientific 
Services, who researched and compiled 
the report with Bob Jensen. 

If this is the case, said Dr Laxen, then 
the change in lead in petrol may take a 
long time to work through to back- 
ground dusts. Or it may be that petrol 
lead makes only a small contribution to 
the amount of lead in this dost 

Further monitoring will be required to 
test these hypothesis and to see whether 
other measures are required to reduce 
the amount of lead in the environment 

Dust and air are two of the most 
important pathways carrying lead into 
the body. More detail on how foe 
reduced lead levels are directly affecting 
the bloodstream will come in the 
findings of a Department of the Environ- 
ment study to be published next year. 

• A new study concludes that many 
American children may be 
mild hearing loss from exposure to ) 
Using data collected on more than 3,000 
children and teenagers, the researchers 


4 . 


V 



found that even low levels of lead in the 
blood increased foe likelihood of subtle 
hearing loss H»r could affect a child’s 
ability to understand speech. 

The study also found that low levels of 
lead could delay foe time when a child 
first sat up, walked and and that 

exposure to lead increased foe likeli- 
hood that a child woold be hyperactive. 
The study showed that the mme lead in 
the child's body the greater the chance 
of impairment 

The report was conducted by Dr 
David Otto, a research scientist at the 
University of North famKna, in 
conjunction with Dr Joel Swartz, of foe 
Environmental Protection Agency’s Of- 
fice of Policy Analysis in Washington. 

Dr Otto said : u This is one more piece 
of evidence that lead produces detri- 
mental effects on the nervous system at 
very low Jevefc”. 

He added the research found hearing 
loss associated with lead In the blood 
below tiie Centers fin- Disease Control's 
current standard of 25 mkrograms of 
lead per tenth of a litre of blood. At 
levels as low as 10 micrograms per tenth 
of a litre, lead interferes with the 
Synthesis elf haem, a component of blood 
that carries oxygen to the body’s cells. 

Lead is used in many prod nets, 
including petrol batteries, paint and 
brass. Children are especially vulner- 
able. They breathe in more lead because 
their respiration rate is higher than 
adults. When they Ingest it, their bodies 
absorb it at five times the rate of adults. 
Thumbsncking, mouthing objects and 
crawling around on foe .ground also 
expose them to mme lead. 


University news 

Oxford 

A benefaction erf 1 £700.000 has 
been announced for the 
establishment of the M. and F. 
Soudavar Professorship of Per- 
sian Studies. An appointment is 
expected early in the new year. 
Cambridge 
Elected into a research fellow- 
ship m chemical physics from 
October 1, 1987: Donal Donat 
Conor Bradley, BSc (Load), of 
Churchill College, Cambridge. 
Exeter 

Dr Charles Longhurst, BA, PhD 
(Exon), senior lecturer and head 
of the department of Spanish 
and Portuguese, Leeds Univer- 
sity, has been appointed to the 
chair of Spanish with effect from 
April 1. 

Sheffield 
Mr Derek Lovqoy. senior part- 
ner in Derek Lovqoy and 
Partners, has been appointed 
visiting professor in landscape 
architecture for three years from 
January 1. 

UM1ST 

Appointments as lecturers 

naocHmeni sciences. Dr A M 
McGoldflck; instrumentation and 
ananlyucal science. Dr R D Snook: 
mechanical cn^neerlng. Dr P 
Brunn: management sciences t“i 

blood"!. Mrs H C Ingham: electr. 

engineering and electronics. Mr A N 
Brydon and Dr J D Nicholas. 

Bradford 

A personal research chair in 
international management and 
organization has been estab- 
lished with the support of the 
Berlin and New York publisher, 
Walter de Gruyter and Co. The 
new professor. Professor David 
Hickson, has already taken up 
his post. 

Bath 

Dr P. Towner, BSc, PhD, has 
been appointed lecturer in bio- 
logical sciences. 

Queen'S, Belfast 
Dr Robert Hamilton and Mr 
John McGuckian have been 
appointed pro-chanceDors. 

Other appointments 


Mr Andrei Tarkovsky, Rus- 
sian film director, died yester- 
day in Paris. He was 54. 

He was one of a generation 
of talented young directors 
who broke with orthodox 
“socialist realism" after the 
death of S talin in 1953. 

He won international ac- 
claim when his first feature, 
Ivanovo Detstvo, gained the 
Golden lion award at the 
Venice Film Festival. 
Throughout his career his 
films eqjoyed a greater reput- 
ation abroad than in the 
Soviet Union, where he was in 
frequent conflict with the 
authorities. 

Tarkovsky was born in 
Moscow on April 4, 1932, the 
son of a poet He was a 
graduate of the Soviet State 
Film School where he studied 
under the director, Mikhail 
Romm. His first film, a short 
called There Will Be No Leave 
Today, was made in 1959. His 
diploma work. The Steamroll- 
er and the Violin, won a prize 
at the New York Festival 

Ivanovo Detstvo (Ivan’s 
Childhood, 1962) is the story 
of a boy whose chfldhood is 
ruined ity the Nazi invasion of 
Russia. Unlike most Soviet 
war films, this is free from 
sentimental stereotypes. 

His best known picture is 
Andrei Rublev (1966). This 
tale of the medieval Russian 
ikon-painter was hailed in the 
West as a masterpiece, and 
won the International Critics’ 
Prize at the 1969 Cannes Film 
Festival. It has strong parallels 
with the career of the director 
himself, who was a devout 
Christian. 

It was banned in Russia for 
five years, though, as one 
critic has suggested, more on 
account of ns length (over 
three hours), violence, nudity 
and arbitrary structure than 
because it was any threat to 
the regime. The film eventual- 
ly won orthodox acceptance in 
Moscow, where critics praised 
its patriotic theme. 

Tarkovsky’s disenchant- 
ment with the authorities 
intensified over the next de- 
cade. as projects were blocked 
and the films he did manage to 
complete were riven a mini- 
mum release. He was, be 
complained, being allowed to 
work “for export only " 

Solaris (1972), a science 
fiction film short on special 
effects, follows three cosmo- 
nauts in their exploration of a 
planet Shot in black and 


declared too obscure for 
Soviet audiences, but received 
another award at Cannes. 

Mirror (1975), also fell foul 
of the Soviet authorities, and 
this time Western critics had 
to concede that its fragmented 
plot did not make for easy 
viewing. A meditative account 
of his own childhood, it 
features Tarkovsky’s mother 
as the matriarch. 

Stalker (191%), his last Mos- 
cow film, was a return to 
science fiction. An allegory of 
the human condition, it was 
shot with Soviet funds and 
facilities, but shown only for a 
few weeks in the Soviet 
Union. 

He eventually applied to 
work in the West, making 
Nostalgia in Italy in 1983. 
Cerebral, enigmatic and dif- 
fusely plotted, it is a return to 
the stranos universe of Solaris 
and Stalker ; with their haunt- 
ing visions of fire and water. 
The following year he an- 
nounced his decision not to 
return to Russia and was 
stripped of his citizenship. 
The film has never been 
shown in Russia. 

In October 1983 he made 
his d£but in opera, staging 
Boris Godunov at Covent 
Garden. Widely acclaimed, 
the production was an attempt 
to get beneath the pomp and 
explore the inner drama. 

Last year he went to Sweden 
to begin work on a new film - 
The Sacrifice - shooting on the 
eastern coast ofGotiand, with- 
in a hundred miles of Soviet 
soil. The film received the 
jury's special grand prize at 
Cannes in May of this year, 
but he was too ill to receive it 
in person. Instead, the award 
was collected by his teenage 
son, Andrei, who was allowed 
to join his parents in Paris in 
January after an J 8 -month 
separation. 


John Brain McFerran. 

(Edin), PhD, DSc (Bdf). 

Senior lectureship in ( versus the maleriaL It was 
rheumaiolgy. Aubrey Leathern 


Earlier this year, too, 
Tarkovsky was invited back to 
Covent Garden for a new 
production of The Flying 
Dutchman, but was forced to 
withdraw through illness. 

He rarely admitted to 
speaking English, mostly tum- 
bling recklessly in and out of 
Italian and Russian, which 
was translated by an interpret- 
er. In keeping with the mood 
of his films, he kept his actons 

in the dark, giving them only a 
bare story-line each day, and 
noscripL 

He was twice married, and 
both wives survive him, to- 


PROF DUMAS 
MALONE 

Dr Dumas Malone, Ameri- 
can historian and biographer 
of Jefferson, died on Decem- 
ber 27. He was 94. # 

Bom in Mississippi on Jan- 
uary 10, 1892, he graduated 
from Emory University, At- 
lanta, and then went to study 
and teach at Yale. After war. 
service in the Marine Corps, 
be was awarded his doctorate , 
in 1923, in which year he was 
appointed assistant professor , 
at the University of Virginia, 
Charlottesville, becoming pro- 
fessor three years later. 

Between 1929 and 1936 he 
was first, editor, then editor- 
in-chief, of The Dictionary $ 
American Biography, and 
from 1936 until 1942 editor- 
in-chief of the Harvard Uni- 
versity Press. 

Returning to Charlottes- 
ville, he then started work on 
his Jefferson biography. This 
eventually ran to six volumes, 
entitled " Jefferson and His 
Time, and the whole work 
took him four decades to 
write. He completed it in 
1981. despite being nearly 
blind since 1977. 

Though considered by some 
to be over-indulgent to 
Jefferson's attitude to slavery, 
Malone is on the whole quite 
ready to acknowledge faults in 
his subjert. 

In an interview two years 
ago be compared later leaders 
unfavourably with Jefferson 
and his great contemporaries. 
They, he said, "thought more 
about the future, and they 
knew more of the past.” 

Malone was professor of 
history at Columbia from 
1945 to 1959. Then he re- 
turned, finally, to Virginia as 
Thomas Jefferson Foundation 
professor, becoming professor 
emeritus and biographer-in- 
residence in 1962. 

In 1975 he received a 
Pulitzer Prize for his magnum 
opus, and in 1983 the Presi- 
dential Medal of Freedom. 

He married, in 1925, Eliza-, 
beth Gifford, who survives 
him with their son and 
daughter. 

PROFESSOR 

HERBERT 

DIECKMANN 

Professor Herbert 
Dieckmann, authority on Di- 
derot and Avalon Foundation 
Professor Emeritus of foe 
Humanities at Cornell Uni- 
versity, dial at Ithaca, New 
York, on December 16. He 
was 80. 

He was born at Duisburg, 
Germany, in 1906, and stud- 
ied at the universities of Bonn 
and Paris. He held teaching 
posts at the Turkish State 
University in Istanbul and at. 
Washington University, St 
Louis, before becoming Smith 
Professor of French and Span- 
ish at Harvard. He joined the 
Cornell faculty in 1966 and 
retired in 1974. 

It was at Harvard that he 
made his major contributions 
to the study of French litera- 
ture. He had found the Dide- 
rot papers, in a dosel in a 
chateau near Fecamp owned 
by Diderot's descendants, and 
his analysis of these drew wide - 
attention, especially in 
France. 

Dieckmann's major publi- 
cation, Cinq Lecons Sur Dide- 
rot, appeared in 1 959, and was 
based on a series of lectures 
which he had been invited to 
deliver at the ColJ&ge de 
France in 1957. They empha- 
sized the importance of Dide- 
rot as an artist as well as a 
scientist and philosopher. 

Like his authoritative . 1955 
edition of the Supplement au 
Voyage de Bougainville ; these 
lectures were based upon a 
combination of thorough 
scholarship in the Germanic 
tradition and a perception and 
lightness of touch which made 
an immediate appeal to schol- 
ars m France, as well as in the 
English-speaking world. 

Dieckmann is survived bv 
his wire, Jane, and and their 
three children. 

SIR TOM HOOD 

Sir Tom Hood, KBE CB 
businessman and Territorial 
officer, died on December 14. 

He was 82. 

Tom Fieiden Hood was • 
born on March 16, 1904, and 
educated at Clifton College, of 
which he later became a 
governor. 

He trained as a chartered 
accountant, and from 1931 to 
I ■ . a Partner with the 

Gardner & Co. ° f Lawrence ' 

From foe foie 1920s he was 

active m the Territorial Army, 
being commissioned in fo e 




Bel], MD (Bdf). 

nt of titles 


F. 


Conferment 

Emeritus professor Dr 
Glockling. professor of in- 
organic chemistry, 1966-83, and 
Dr KJ. Ivin, professor of phys- 
ical chemistry, 1966-84. 
Professorial fellow of the 
university: Dr D.V. 

McGaughan, technical director 
of Marconi Electronic Devices 
Ltd 

Grams 

£110.000 (ran the European Eeo- 

Wurzburg Institute lor Virology anti 

ImmunoWlogy. for research on n 
study of uw iramunoanHcUy « 
measles and canine distemper 
viruses . 

£41.969 from Btc Joscnti Rowntn* 
TTUSI ID Dr SI Leper, of uie University 
of Ulster at coteraine. (or re sum ed on 
■■informal welfare In I wo Beirut 
communities''. 

£4S.ioo crier (wo anp a half yean 
from the united Kingdom Aundc 
EncH^y Authomy to Dr J. Hughes for 

a on P* "assessment and 

compllatton of numerical atomic 
data* . 

£43.000 (ran the Multiple Scuroeto 
Action Croup to Professor &ssMd 
ABen (or research on Uie inmumafogii 
rai aspect of multiple sclerosis 


white, it sticks to Tarkovsky's geiher with a son and daughter S’ Second World 

favourite theme: foe spiritual of the first marriage, and a sou !* e served with the 61st 

of the second. Scottish Command 

and foe Second Army, and 
was promoted colonel in 1945 
He was director of 
National Employers' 

General Insurance 


GENERAL HUANG KE-CHENG 


General Huang Ke-cheng, a 
companion to Mao Tse-tung 
and veteran of the Long 
March, who was pinged dur- 
ing the Cultural Revolution, 
died on December 28. He was 
84. 

Bom in Hunan province, 
Huang attended the Wham- 
poa Military Academy in Can- 
ton, under the control of 
Chiang Kai-shek. He joined 
the Communist Party in 1 927. 

He was one of the com- 
manders of the Eighth Route 
Army and New Fourth Army 
during the war against Japan, 
and played a decisive role in 
the capture of Peking and 
Tianjin during the civil war 
against the Nationalists. 

In 1958, aftertheCommu- . 
nisi takeover, he was made 


chief of staff of the People’s 
Liberation Army, an appoint- 


the 
Mutual 
Associa- 


ted taken to indicate floater I n °d J- 9 u° 1 976 - 

political control of the aimed BmIdfo P w!i, 0 f £l e Poit nian 
forces. The next year, howev- 5932 . 118 ^ oc,ety ^° m I960 to 

He was appointed a DL for 

STS'lSSh “ r 1950 - Md 

Hbchaired the commission of 

rar„^ 6 r ofiie 


er, he was replaced after a 
speech by Mao heralding a 
campaign to counter right- 
wing tendencies. 

Huang was denounced as a 
rightist u 1967, during the 
Cultural Revolution, and re- 
mained out of the public eye Hood <■»„ „ r 
for the next rierarfe He 


turned to favour in 1978 when 


3 1978 when niaver in D f en a nigby 
he was elected a member of fol^but likeable 11 ' force ' 


the Party’s Central Committee 
and secretary of the central 
discipline inspection 
commission. 

With other ageing leaders, 
he resigned from both posts 
last year. . ■ 


encouraged manv C;- 

TAaiaiKhM , 0J r 0ni ,he 

were low. In bu^np-f.\ r,Unes 
shrewd and sSy ’ he Was 

hSM- Jjg 

With their two son™ ^ 


ef ' 

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THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


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births, marriages, deaths PERSONAL COLUMNS 


, rente* commaweawn 

art of W ipauBi taui 
» good » me me or 
cdUviot. »rt u may mnWcr 

* OMMm 1:39 

BIRTHS ~\ 

AljKEN - on 2Btb December In Nortn 

Carolina. u> Martha (n*e Sizemore) 

and ceorgo- a son. Junes Stephen. 

BCNHCTT - On ?™» December. In 
WohmgtH D.C.. to Zac inee Spen- 
cer* and Adam, o son. Oscar FTanu. 

BUUCUM — On Decemtav 26th in 
Brtsbaae » Jame toe# Fair child) and 
Straiten. a **>. James WuRam. 

mom . On 26ih December >986. to 
Lynne tn4e Shearer} and Graham, a 
son. Jonathan James Edward. 

CUR - On 27lta December, to Sarah 
and Julian, a son. 

F05H - On December 22nd to Lucinda 
and Simon, a dauganer. Emma, a sta- 
ler for Timothy. 

UOLROVDE ■ On December 26th. to 
Miranda htee Slone) and Tim. a 
daughter. Caroline Louise. 

MURRELL - On December 22nd to Wtz 
and Wil ton, a son. 

LAME -ROBERTS ■ On December 17lh. 
In Bd Air. Los Angeles, to Susan and 
Anthony, a daughter. Ashley Jane. 

LETT - On 23ra December at The Port- 
land Hospital Wl. lo Angela inee 
Jaquai and Brian, a second son. 
Robin Jonaihan Hugh, a brouter for 
Julian. 

HAWES - On 23rd December, to Eliza- 
beth in re Tetferdl and Jonathan, a 
von. Alexander James. 

REED - On 28th December to Sulla 
■ nee Walpole Browni and Norval. 
livmv a son and daughter. 

SEWARO - On 28th December, to Lin- 
da and Robert, a daughter. Alysson 
Eli nor 

STCRMR - On 28th December, at 
Queen Chari one's Hospital, to Caro- 

■ line me* Chapman) and Chrtstopbcr. 

a son. Sebastian James David. 

WARMINCTON - On 26lh December, 
in Brtelal. to Lucs- cnee Artuw and 
Kcilh. a daughter. Hannah Louise. 



EADS: BROWN On 30th December 
1961 at Congregational Church. 
Gerrards Cross. WUUam to Mary 
now al East Sheen SWJ4 
SIMMONS.OACGCR - On 3001 Decem- 
ber 1961. at SI Mary's. Cadogan St. 
London SW3. Terry Simmons lo n- 
(rtca Dagger. 


DEATHS 


AtfRfKMLM - On 2Sth December 
peacefully, at home. Dr. Margaret 
Agerboim. Much loved and admired 
stater, mother, grandmother and doc- 1 
tor. Funeral 11.30 am. Friday 1 
January 2nd at Crematorium. Ran 
dans Road. Leather-head. Flowers 1 
and enquiries lo L Hawkins & Sons. 
2 Highlands Road. LeaBierhead. 
0372 572436. 

BAUMGARTNER - On December 28th 
W Julian, late St Albans School lov- 
ing son and Husband, peacefully In 
his beloved Lake District. 

—tt - On December 34tfi 1986. 
peacefully at home in Cumbria. Jean 
Chalmers. Dearly loved wife of John 
BlrrelL formety of Wlnbcme. Dorset 
Private family funeral. 

«|M - On December 28th after ID- 
ness gallantly fought. Ptiytlts Mary, 
widow of Peter, mother of Catherine 
and Tovtng grandmother of Ashley 
George. Burial service at St Mary's, 
Caterhara-On-HIH on Friday Janu- 
ary 2nd at 10.15 am. Donations In 
lieu of Dowers to the Marie Carle 
Fund. Crterham- Galyer & Co Td 
0883 842313 

BRUNT ; On December 27th. peace- 
fully after a short Alness at the 
Princess Grace Hospital NWi. Photo 
Robert, husband of FeJJetty and fe- 
Uier of Julian and Andrew. Funeral 
Service at Si Saviour's Church. Wal- 
ton Street SW3 on Wednesday 
January 7th 1987 at 11 am. fol- 
lowed by private cremation. Family 
flowers only. 

BHOPtUUP- On December 2BB11966. 
peacefully In SL Helen’s Hospital 
Hastings. Dr. Harold Swatamn aged 
76 yean beloved husband of Rente 
and much loved father and grandfa- 
ther. Funeral service at SL Mathew's 
Parish Church. SL Leonards-on-Sea 
an Monday January 5th at 1 1.45am. 
Family Dowers only. Donations If de- 
sired, lo SL Michael's Hospice 
•Hastings) Lid .C/o of DC- Mercer 
and Sons. 29 Sedlescwnbe road 
North. SL LeonardsofFSen. Tel 
0424 421805 

BROWNFELD POPE- On December 
29th 1986. at SouthllL Chagford. 
Devonshire. Peter Moiteaux. Hus- 
band of the tale Joan Pope, father of 
Victoria and Virginia. Funeral pri- 
vate. By request no letters or flowers. 
Donations to Cancer Research. 

BUXTON - On December 29U> at the 
Nuswd Hospital. Cheltenham. Rulh 
Cream, aged 91 years, of 22. Clan 
House. Bath. 

CECIL - On December 27th. 1986. 
peacefully at home, after a long Ill- 
ness bravely fought. Peter Garnet, 
dearly loved by family and many 
friends whose Uvcs he enriched. Pri- 
vate family funeral- No [lowers 
please. 

CHAMBERS - On December 29th 
1986, Sylvia Lucy to her 90th year. 
Private cremation, no flowers or let- 
ters please. Donations if desired to 
R.N.L.I. 

CHURCHES - On December 28th. 
peacefully at Foxleigh Grove Nursing 
Home. Hoiyport Barbara Mary, 
aged 82. dearly loved mother of Car- 
oline. Timothy and Nicholas. 
Funeral service Wednesday Decem- 
ber 319 ai n.l5am. Holy Trinity 
Church. Windsor. Flowers to E. 
Sargeanl A Son. 61 SL Leonards Rd. 
Windsor. 

CLIFFORD— SJHTTfl - On December 
27th. Pauttne Elizabeth, tovtng wife 
or John and mother of Jonathan. 
Peacefully to her sleep at home, aged 
60 years. Funeral at St Albans 
Church. Tflford Road. Htodhead. 
Monday January 5th at 12 noon. 

COBB ■ On 22nd December 1986. Ar- 
thur H K (Cobby), suddenly and very 
peacefully at home In bis 91st year, 
beloved husband of Silvfe and the 
late Winnie, greatly loved by his 
sobs. imutdchUrfren and many 
friends- Funeral private. Thanksgiv- 
ing service In St Lawrences' church. 
Chabtuun at 12 noon on Thursday 
22nd January 1987. Family flowers 
only. 


C °* J L 9 11 December 27 Ut peacefully I 
to Rinh Court. Wallingford, Oxon 
aner a shon nines*. tAyn uitoiiaM 
94. beloved wue or ihe laie lleuien- 
S*1 “J?"** H W cote M.B.E. 

I ^ d earc8t mother or Tteh 

ana Audrey ana tne late Ivy and 
“K. 4nd mother in law of omr and 
Ron. wcatly loved by ninagrandcMI- 
dren and nine great grandchildren. A 
tody cl great ioruiude and courage, 
loved and admired by many. Funeral 
Friday 2nd January 1987 
«S am at Oxford crematorium. 
All nMUines and flowers to J W 
Mareham. 55 Wood Street. Walling- 
ford 04 91 36146. 

- On December 28th. to Bar- 
tato. Cedric, beloved husband of 
Doroth y and tether of Lytwyn. 

n*W«XL- on December 23rd. peace- 
ftoly u home in Grew Fans. Virginia. 

Frederick, husband of 
Joate tether of Jane. John. Michael. 

| Santo and Tim. 

BA*® 5 - On December 27th 1986. 
suddenly. George John Davies, aged 
73 years of Astartc Gallery. London 
wi . Much loved husband of Audrey 
anil father of James. CmrnUoi) at 
c«ders Green Crematorium on Frl- 
dj»- January 2nd at n.20am (East 
Cnabell. An enquiries to A France A 
Son Telephone Ol 405 4901. 

MMtf - On December 27th 19B6. 
Peacefully. Christopher Wyndham. 
Most dearly loved by Ms family ana 
many friends. Funeral to be held at 
St Leonard's Church. CHd warden, at 
3.00pm <m Friday January 2nd 
1987. No memorial strive? at Ms 
own request Fondly flowers only, 
but donations can be seat to (be 
CARR COMM SOCIETY. 36 Comm 
Road. London . SE16 

DUFF - On December 27th 1986. 
peacefully to Washington D.C., 
US -A.. Carmel, much Loved mother 
of Jacqueline. Oecton. Graham and 
Anthony. Funeral to be held to 
USA. Memorial service to be an- 
nounced taler. Contact Jacqueline 
Doyle. 01 427 2074. 

EVERY - On December 26th 1986. 
John Reginald. Wing Commander 
< retired i, O-BX-. aeed 72 years, the 
very dearly loved husband of Mary 
(Jane) of Old Farm Cottage. Chanel 
Lane. Northmoor. Oxfordshire. Fu- 
neral service at SL Denys Church. 
Northmoor on Friday January 2nd 
al t lam. followed by private crema- 
tion. Family flowers only draw. 
Donations li desired to (be R. A F. 
Benevolent Fund. 

FOLEY - On the 24th December, oeace- 
/USy at Melrose. Margaret Inee Bruce 
Leslie) cherished wife and compan 
ion of G Cameron Foley. Family 
funeral. No Dowers please. 

FORBES - On December 22nd 1986. at 
Bemerton Nursing Home. Torquay 
Winifred Mary Barton (Daphne), 
aged 87 years, wife of the late Leride 
Forbes of Crockham HfH. Funeral 
service at Torquay crematorium on - 
Friday January 2nd 1987 al 11.30 
am. Enquiries lo Torbay and District 
I Funeral Sendee. Tel: 0803 22447. , 

FORSTER - On December 27th. at Si 
Katherine's Wantage. Ethel, four 
days alter her 95th birthday. Last 
surviving daughter of the late Rever- 
end Beimel Forster, of Scvtoglon. 
Kent. 

GIBBOUS - On 27th December In hos- 
ptol in hta 84th year. Leonard John 
(Johnny), husband of Anne and 
brother of Hilda KntghL Funeral ccr- 
■ vice at toe chtmch of si main and si 
James, Haaow. near Worcester on 
Friday January 2nd at ZA5 pm. foL 
lowed tty cremation. Family flowers 
only, donations if desired, to Hallow 
Church Fund. 

GBLCMRIST - On 2Sth December. 
1986. suddenly at her home. Doro- 
thy Joan (ttee Nartaano; at 
Ardtngty. Sussex, dearly loved wife 
of Finlay, mother of Graeme. Caro- 
line and Colin, and grandmother of 
Simon. Jonathan and Kate. Virginia 
and Mark, and Thomas. Funeral ser- 
vice private. Donations, tf desired, to 
the British Red Ores Society. Cam- 
den Division. London. 

ROW - On 25ttt December 1986. at 
Queen Maty's Hospital. SMcun. Dr 
Leslie Eastham Burton Cow. aged 72 
years. Deeply mourned by bis loved 


CM - On December 27th 1986. 
peacefully at home. Brigadier John 
Wesley Harper Clack) Gow C3E. 
ILL,, aged 88- Husband of the late 
Jeon Begg XP- end father of Sandy.' 
Michael and Jock, also a much lowed 
Grandfather and Groat Qrandfittlier. 
Cremation private. Service of 
Thanksgiving at Paisley Abbey. Sis- 
ley. Scotland, on thumday ath 
January 1987 at 12. noon. No flow- 
ers pl««M 

■ADOOW - On December 26th. to Ed- 
inburgh. Sir Douglas Kaddow. KC8. 
fond father and txa n d f bl h n-. Crema- 
tion at Warrlston Cramatorftnn on 
Wednesday December 3lst at 
10i30am. There w® be no memorial 
service and no flowere at Ms requesL 

HALLETT- On December 24m 1986. 
suddenly. David of Gathriney HalL 
Chartynch. He win be very sadly 
missed by Ms family and aH Ms 
friends. Memorial service at The Par- 
ish and Priory Church of 9t Mary 
The vtrgbi. Camtogtan on Wednes- 
day December 3lst at llXStan. 
followed by private aemaBon. No 
flowers please, but d o na t i ons may be 
sent to. The British Heart Founda- 
tion. 102 Gloucester place. London 
Wl. 

HART - On December asm. 1986. 
peacefully. Gwen (nfe PosneneL 
Cremation January 6th. &30nqi- 
v inters Parte. Maidstone. Kent ' 

KILL - On pecember 27Ut. Mary HOI 
of Chipping Campden. peacefully to 
her sleep after a long antes*. Funeral 
service at St James* Church. Chip- 
ping Campden on Friday 2nd 
January al 2JCpm. No flowers 
please bui donations may be sent to 
The Mid-Co untfes Autistic Society, 
c/o Ltoyds Bank. Chlpptna Campden. 
dos- 

KERR - On December 28th. suddenly 
at home. Captain Mark W B Kerr 
D.S-C Royal Navy (Rid). Dearly 
loved husband of PaL loving lather 
of Bun and Alex and devoted grand- 
teihcr to thetr chUdren. Funeral on 
Friday January 2nd at St Swithuns 
Church. Lftt/eham. at 2.t5 pm fol- 
lowed by private cremation. Family 
flowers only donations If desired u> 
. toe R N L l or to the SWp Wrecked 
Ftaherman and Mariners Royal Be- 
nevolent Society. Chichester. 

MABEY - On Christinas Day at The 
Royal Northern. Holloway, aged 88. 
Lludy) Ellaline Ursula May. widow 
I or Commander Claries Mabey. 

much loved mother of Ntna. Peter 
I and Robin- Funeral al Ootders Green 
Crematorium. Bedford ChaneL at 
i 3.10pm Frtitay January 2nd. 


Archaeology 


MACKBfTDSH - On 26ut December 
1986. in Edinburgh. Angus HacKoy 
MocKinKan K.C V.O.. C.M.G. djc.. 
N&AJ.U. aged 71 loving and be 
tan) husband or Mangold, dear and 
devoted tetbar of Hrten. Awe. Eneas 
ana the late Qsaetb and much loved 
by thetr fhmtues. Service al 
Mortonhau crematorium. Pentland 
deMen Wednesday Slsi December 
at t2.I5pm. FaruOy dowers only. 

BUU2RUS • On December 24th. pencB- 
fully after a ahori oness- Greta Inte 
Siegel). Dearly loved and terribly 
mimed by her husband Nortert. her 
sister to law and ail tier many 
Mends. Funeral Tuesday 2.00 pm at 
wmestan United Synagogue Ceme- 
tery. Boaconsfletd Road, wuteston. 
NWio. 

MOORE - On Botov December 2lst 
1986. in me County Hospind. Kendm 
Marjorie Pamela, dearly loved wife 
of George; Jevtng mother of George. 
Jobs and Tom: and grandmother M 
Julian. Anna aad John. Our most 
generous, cheerful and c on stant 
companion win be deeply missed. 
Cre ma ti on at Lancaster sntt Mare- 
combe Crematorium. 

MAYDOM - On December 27th. peace- 
fully. Geoff ry- Funeral Nether Wa 
Uop Church. Friday January 2nd al 
Liam. Family flowers only, dona- 
tions lo Neuter waBop Church. 

O CATHAIN - On 29th December 1986 
suddenly on holiday « .Turtcy 
CaotmhgblQ of Oubtto and Arundrt. 
West Sussex dearly loved father of 
Delta. Kevin and Mary-aalra deertv 
regretted. May he rest In peace. Fu- 
neral arrangements later. 

PHAtLF - On December 26m. 1986. 
Geoffrey Anderson Photo. C-BX- 
T.Dm aged 71. A loved hutoand. te- 
ther and graodfamer. Service ai 
Lodge Hill Crematorium. Wcoity 
Park Rd. Solly Oak. Blrratorttam on 
Tuesday. January 6ih 1987 at 12 
noon- Please no flowers. 

ROBINSON - On December 20m. Phil- 
ip Napier MG., mjl. at Frenchay 
Hospital. Bristol, peacefully after a 
long tbness. Beloved husband of 
Anna and loving father of James. 
Jonathan and Victoria- Cremation 
Service has taken place. 

ROCMELLE-TMOMAS - On Deeember 
2501 1986. Edtth (Mbs. Fowieri- Cre- 
mation 4.oopm 5th January al 
Mortlake. 

RQ&OtfELDER - On 27th December 
1986. pcaceftdty. CM Ztpora. aged 
86. wife of the tale Max. mother of 
Walter and CarmeL 

ROWLAND • On December 26th. 
peacefully at EdentiaU Nursing 
Home. Her Honour Judge Deborah 
Rowland. Deeply mourned by family 
ana friends. Funeral at Bushey Jew- 
ish Ceroetry at 1.00 pm today. 
Tuesday. 30th December. No flow- 
as, family and dose friends only. 

RUSSELL • On December 29th. at 
home. Denis, adored husband of 
Verona and a much loved tatoer. fa- 
Iher-to-law. and Braftd-faUier. 
Funeral private, by Ms own requesL 
Family flowers only. No letters. 

SBIWELL - On December 27th. Doro- 
linr EnkL loved wife of Leslie, dear 
mother of Richard and JflL adored 
granny of AUce. Cremation at Gwent 
CremntorUan on Friday Janaury 
2nd. at il.4Qsra. Family Dowers 
only please, bur do na tions may be 
seqi to. the Guildford Area Branch. 
PPfldnsoM N«*»c« Society. 6 
Fairiawn Oese. Ctaygate. Surrey. 
KT10 OEM. 

Hinwm dun • On DfrewUMT 23rd. 
peacefully at her home. The Orange 
Tree. Sea view. Sheina. Much loved 
cousin to many. Funeral service at 
Saint Peter's. Seaview on Tuesday 
December 30Ut at 1.30. Enquiries lo 
H.V. Taylor and Son. 46 Green 
Street Rytte. Tel: Hyde 62082. 

SMEPHERD - On 26th December, 
peacefully at Ms home to Ipswich. 
Gerry Sheph e r d TJX. dearly loved 
husband of Lesley, father of Anne 
and MchaeL and grandfaiher of 
Timothy and Sarah. Funeral Ser- 
vice. Ipswich Crematorium. North 
Chapel. Wednesday 31st Dscember 
at 230 pm. Family flowere only 
please bid donations. If desired (Or 
MaanUtan Ntnstng Fund, c/o Mi- 
chael Smy Funeral O tractor. £45 
Febxtowe Rd. Ipswich. 

SMITH - On December 26th 1986. Dr 
Andrew CTovden Smith. Consultant 
Psychiatrist Greenwich and Bexley 
HctodtaL aged 51. Cremation. Janu- 
ary 2nd 1987. South London 
Crematorium. Streafliara. at 2 30 
pul No flowere, doaattoqs If desired 
to Canca- Research. - - 

SMOJLBCB - On December 23rd 1996. 
stoktenty at home In EaUog. West 
London. Angela Amw. aged SSL The 
dear daughter oi Thomas Archibald 
and (he late PhyUs Henrietta of 
Maidenhead. Dearly loved and sadly 
mis sed tar tar friends and t e taM on s . 
Deans of funeral ar ran g era entefwra 
W S Bond Limited. £9 Bond Street 
Eating. WS. Tet 01 S67 0422 (Mr 

PatkerL 

8TANNARD • On December 26th. 
peacefully Rt Rev Robert WUUam 
Stannard aged 91. snnoUine Bishop 
of Wootwtdch and Dean of Roches- 
ter. Loved and Loving hioband of Uw 
late MurieL father of Michael and of 
Peter kflled to action 1946. Grandfa- 
ther at David and Richard. Funeral 
Service 230 pm. Monday January 
6th at Fleet Parish Church. (Hants) 
followed by private cremation. Fam- 
ily flowers only but dona dons tf 
desired to corporation of Sees of the 
Clergy Fund. or. Gardeners Royal 
Benevolent Fund. C/O £. Finch and 
Sons Ltd. 125 High Street Aldershot 
Hants. I 

STEAD - On December 29th 1986. 
Peacefully after a long mness. Patri- 
cia Cecfl. aged 39 yews, of 
Turfcshead Cottage. Leek Old Rood. 
Sutton. MacctesflekL dearly beloved 
wife of Michael and mother of All- 
son. Ctatra and PhdtoDa. Funeral 
Wednesday December 31st 1986. 
service at SI James Parish Church. 
Sutton. Maoclesfletd at 3.15pm. Pri- 
vate committal at Macclesfield 
Crematorium. Enquiries to Hootay 
and Watson. 7 James Street Mao 
ClesllekL Teh 0625 2273*. 

SUTlBfRt WMIARRtS - On Decem- 
ber 28th 1966. Sir Jack Sutherland - 

Harris K.CV.Ou CJL. dearly loved 
husband of Rachel, devoted father of 
Patricia. Richard. Mark and Nicola, 
and loving grandfather. Service at 
Bury church on January 2nd at 3 
pm. Donations If desired to King Ed- 
ward Vll Hospital. MtdhureL. 

WOOLLEY - On 24U> December 1986. 
in South Africa after a short mness.. 
Sir Richard Woolley FJL$~ former 
ly Astronomer RoyaL aged 80. 

| HV MEMORIAM PRIVATE | 

BRADLEY - Harry CLB£. treasured 
loving memories from Bertha. Gor- 
don. Hilda and Brenda. 

BENSON - Beatrice, loving memories 
of ray dear aunt also imcie Abraham. 
Gertrude Shitting. 


Early German bell foundry found 

By Noraum Hammond, Archaeology Correspondent 
Six years of digging in the ground railway and car park, numerous pits, wdls and la- 
hSr/SDuSb^lofWest §2 Niederrheinisches Mu- jn»« 


heart of Duisburg one of West 
Gennany's leading industrial 
centres, has revealed well 
preserved remains of the 
medieval city, including an 
imperial palace of the twelfth 
century and the earliest medi- 
eval bell foundry north of the 
Alps. 

The discoveries are consid- 
ered of such importance that 
the entire excavated area will 
be incorporated into a new 
development - 

Modem Duisburg is the 
largest inland barge port in 
Europe, and throughout the 
Middle Ages the city con- 
trolled the confluence of the 
Rhine and the Ruhr. It was 
already a fortified oppidum 
when the Vikings over- 
wintered there in AD 883-4. 
and a royal manor existed 
there by the end of the 
century. 

Under the Emperor Henry I 
(929-936) this was expanded 
into an imperial palace, in 
1980 the trenches cut for gas 
and water mains revealed part 
of an extension some two 
centuries later. Since develop- 
ment of the area as a shopping 
complex was planned, as well 

as {he huiiding of an under- 


setun earned out a long term 
excavation on the site, di- 
rected by Dr G On ter Krause: 

The centre of the site was 
the Alter Markt. the medieval 
market square beside the pal- 
ace; archaeological deposits 
some four metres deep were 
found, as well as walls of the 
palace sriB sianding two me- 
tres high. Ninth century pot- 
tery amphorae, and lava corn- 
grinding querns from the 

Niedermcndig quarries tuij 

ther up the Rhine, indicated 
the early impcirtance of Duis- 
burg as a trading centre. 

The market square revealed 
successive cobbled surfaces 
interleaved with thick layere 
of mud and rubbish, in which 
the tracks of human feet, the 
hooves of caltle and the 
wheels of wagons have been 
fossilized by their m tilling 
with gravel, thrown down to 
support the next layer of 
cobbles. _. , 

Numerous pieces of leather 
suggest that a shoemaker 
worked here, and the eariijst 
bell foundry north of the Alps 
nearby emphasizes the indus- 
trial as well as mercantile 
nature of the market area. The 


| ANNOUNCEMENTS | 

NON NOT IBNIW9 flMDUU. Soak £2 
(Mai ttta MM Hunta Ak I Rd 
CMrtOU 13 Prince of Wtai Terr. Wl. 


SERVICES 


rust ramos. rtnue unr«4uc- 


tn vttea deci—«nl» Details: 01-031 

aaaa 

imwnB P. Lowe or Mteriim . AO mm. 
sr t ta . nwrtin s. Date lOKHab Ati l n g inn 
tend. Lo ndon ws. Tel: 01-938 ion. 


WANTED 


WAMHB Edwardian. VKranaa and an 
WitotMl IMtura. Mr AaMan Ol NT 
69*6. 067-069 Cato Lana. EBrieOeW. 
awiT. 

EM. M1NTD Lam VK asriraM. 
cktara. ooesdtoo tat**-, 

dokuooacate*. bnnnaa Aon natiNtnoi 
OK. 01 906 7683 day Ol 789 0471 evn. 


RENTALS 


If you have auaUty arooerty to let 
ten m. 

LANDLORDS - OWNERS 

Expert profa wkw m sente* 

QURAISHI 

CX3NSTANTINE 

370 Carta Court Road. SW5 

01-244 7555 

THE VERY BEST 

1 «Vw vI. A TctoBB 
come lo ns tor 
BELGRAVIA. HAMPSIE4D- 
KENSINGTON, WIMBLEDON 
wwi areas. 

Phone now. 

BIRCH & CO 
01-734 7432 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


ITS .ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 

More Ion-cost Otetus ™ more 
mutes k» more desunauom 
ilto an> oibcr agency 


• Fas. expert, bigb-trch service 
• Fire ttorfdwtde hotel & 
eat hue pass 
• up to 60S rfwcaaata 
bnmmiszbon. ins ura nce. 


FOR SALE 


RES I ST A CARPETS 
SALE STARTS MONDAY 
29th DECEMBER 

Tbouands of square yards of all 
qualities aitaffaai prices wnb interest 
fire credii oa selected Lmes. 

348 FnUuun Road 
Panuna Green SW6 

01-736 7551 


WEDDING SUITS 

Dinner Sum 
Evening Tad Sum 

SwdiB to idra 
BARQAtaS FROM C30 

LIPMANS HIRE DEPT 

28 CWntng CZoaa M 
London WC 2 
Nr Lalcnw 6q tuee 
01-940 2310 


MMNT1 OF NETTLEBXO Wood ranlog 1 
and F rental oodalilna deraonsiraBaRs OV 
our own aaltete an ui our rreuca (urn- 
lure exWNUon on New Year* Day Also 
an exNMDon of locally made model 
wooden bo«». Nrtlltort 

ShownM«ttJ«gti Street. NetUebed. Nr 
Henley oa Thames (0491) 641116. 


Tito MONO WORKSHOP Frea crafil over 

1 year (Ora APfri on toe btm octeetton or 
mwI. rami etenoo-Low (merest over 

2 yn 6 3 yra. Written Quotations. Proe 
Cauiogtie. 30o Higngote Rd. nwb. ot- 
267 7671. 

CU YORK fUOSTONBL Cobble MR* 
al c. Naltonwide MUvrrin. Tel: IQ38Q) 
030039 (WHO). 


FMEST ouatqy wool carpeta. Al trade 
price* aad under, atao available 100'S 
ran. Lm rooie Kie remnants under 
half normal price. Chancery Carpets Ol 
406 0463. 


ilATFMKJtl. Beal octets (Cr ad sold, 
out nienra. ov clients maudr moe 
toNor eoRvaala. Credo cm6s accepted. 
01-828 1678. 


toC IBB ITfS-tMS- Other nOes 
avail. Hand bound ready tar nrraraua- 
Uon - also -Staidayr*. £ 126 a 
nununte When. 01-688 6323. 


noun fob any Etmrr, pttamon. 
Can. SttaUpM Exp. Chms. Les Mia. AH 
Uraatee and soofta-TH: 821-6616/826- 
0496JSXS / Visa / Dinara. 


■CCHSTEPf Odd. 1914. 6 It EMM. 
Mustdtari Instrument. £4.200. 01-586 
4981. T. 

CATS, OH, Lae MUM Phantom. A* 
Ibatara tart toOR. Tel 439 1763. ABOSh- 


r m 0*79 (ManaaemeM 

Outre properties m On 


SarutemlUdi 
ML South at 


MIOX MID I W6 had price Mow. 
Family honse mid Jan end May ■ Compa- 
ny let <mty. Tec Ol 602 7426. 

Mi ii H ftiii n aa n w SwtcT te 

DM/how. up lo £0OOse loc al fees 
rra man Key & Lews. Sou® « me 
Para Cbtasea omcr. 01-362 ail! or 
North ol tor Peril. Repent's Dark oBtce. 
Ol 606 9882. 


DOCXLUM ruts and houses to let 
uu ouubmjl toe Dockland* area. Tel. Ol- 
790 9660 


ftflatri. 26. N/S. seeks 
/ widMita won 


refs avao. 01 229 1640. 


WISH Dost - Charmtag spm ievri flat 1 
doable bedroom, own parking or da- 
(ton. Conass and shops £96 pi*. O: 
947 3130 


of good standard avail. Short/umo 
terms Rum Ol 980 «346. 


BUVTAn , Hy69 Park mo roost luxurious 
Mnp/shert MB 1/6 beds. Best pnm 
OMc Apartments Ot 936 9612 


dm TODAY For yew rental property 
W t d W to to so please call Gaobaa A 
Gaseter 589 6481. 

KensKotan. 
CoUtDghAiQi 




FLATSH.4BE 


ledUTCTOH- O/RJbr non smeter to 


SOL Light, space and q ran deo r. Own 
room to a n ia orSfirmt mamtnn QaL 
£112 per week uchtove. 01-689 0910. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Leer 


Tofedwr we caa best k. 

We hod okt one third of afl 
iwarch into the pr e t ciitk p and. 
core of oncer fat the UK. 

Hdp in bf fendtog a donafato 
or make a legacy ux 

Sit 

Z Grin Honor Terrace, 
{DCF— TT 30/12 LaufanSWlY 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING SITUATIONS 


DRIVER 

Required for basmcssmaiL 
References required. 
Remunenuioo and bouis 
negotiable. 

Call between 9 - 12am. 

01-402 3797 


RESIDENT Domestic / Housekeeper re- 
quired . Beaoltfrt modem home. 61 
Johns Wood. London NWS. 2 Adults. 2 
Children. 2 small dbpa. Car driver pre- 
ferred. Own room / Bathroom, colour 
tv. ate. other heto kol. ExceOeert rets 
mulrttf. Please 7d, Ol 722 8816 . 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


TAKE INK OPT to Ports. Antecedent. 
Brussels. Bruoes. Oeneva. Peru*. Lan- 
s e raie . Zurich. The Hague. Ditatm. 
Bourn, aool ttoif A Dieppe. Tbne Off. 
2a. Che ster O osa. London. SW1X 780. 
01-236 8070. 


AUBANVE for tunny vum wn pools * 
naea a tt s teo at BotepTi ex c lus i v e 
carvue tr o Ortt phone Patricia 
wartdood Ltd 0049 817003 or 01 e&a 
6722 A8TA ATOL 1276 


MKT & fadtak Betohan tadio. Exch>- 
stve small pup staying Mm h o t lee 
and game reserve. Few p tacra tmnnln- 
tsg. CZJSa Feb auor 16. Rtog 01- 
046 7338. 


ALOaBIVE. Greek Wands. Turtey. Tenre - 
tte. Meonre a. vUtat. wa. em a a intfete. 

Hots. (tts. SomTOr/Whder. Ver tfnr a 
HMdW m Ol 261 6406 ATOL 2064 

LAW A—WW Uw frt Wto eg. 
MO £486. Uni £496 rt*. AMO SM 
Group Hobday JourndThteg Peru tram 
£380) JLA 01-747.5108 
1 MBZATASLE OFRjtS. Last (Mb «*» 
3rd. to Jan - end chatets. apes. «s ten 
resorts. FT £99 taO. W Tots* 0933 
231 1 IS 

■KIU SIM Soariais Brices 10 Cyprus. 
Malta. Mororeo. Graeco, mmm A Te- 
ntrile. January . Fatauaiy. March. Pan 
World Holidays Ol 734 2682 Atrt 1*38. 
MONO MM 8488. BAMOMM. £369. 
Stogepore £407. Other FC CfUes. 01-684 
6614 ASTTA- 

KjBWBT Air FbraoL Scheduled Eqropo A 
Wertqwtdo. Med Star Travel 01 928 
3200 

■ALACA xmas (hgbts 21 Dec 2 weeks. 
£148 Ol 836 8622. BuCktortm 
Travel. 


TRAILFINDERS 

42-fS Earls Court Road 
London WS 6E) 

OPEN 9-6 MON-SAT 
Une-Hanl 01-603 15 IS 
Europe A'SA 01-937 5400 
la/Bowness 01-938 3444 

Govenuncoi lifwaed/Bmhtal 
ABTA IATA ATOL/1458 


DISCOUNT FLIGHTS 

O/W Rm 
Sjdeey £C90 £785 

AucUerul £480 E77S 

Us. Angles £168 £33o 

JoTsore £290 £4W 

Baadrak £220 £360 

Rw £330 £570 

LONDON FLIGHT 
CENTRE 
01-370 6332 


UP UP & AWAY 

NatrcbL Jo’Btng. Cairo. Dual, 
rtcmaol. snueere. K_i_ dmm. 
Baaafco k. Heap Keng-Sy dn sy. 

Etawpei A The AJWricas. 

Flamingo Travel 

76 Snaflesbury Avenue 
London W1V7DG. 

01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


WOULD %HOC CHKARES We Mat any 
tare Id any ononanon In tha world. 
NEVER KNOWINGLY UNDERSOLD. 
EAUNG Travel Ol 679 7776. ABTA 


LATE MBA* m New Year avnq to Cah- 
ten * Seycaefles ullh a t, co m . CaU 
Mourn Travel 01-249 8643 ABTA 


eonomm ON npiu/Ms to o 
I re m*. USA A moo) drewnalUaw. 
TTInbimiT Travel: 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL. 


BAKTAHL N York £229u LAfSan Fran 
e sag. Nairobi £399. JoTxcg £499. 
SM/Md £669. «»— r*—* r £309. All di- 
rect Mv fligo 01 899 7Z44 


AFRICAN SEAT SHSAIBTS. World 
Travel Centre. Ol 878 8146. ABTA. 
IATA. 


6 BHOC C O BOUND. Regent SL Wl. Ol 
73* 6307. ABTA/AW 8*7. Tote* 
27376. 


8 Y0/MCL £636 Perth £668. All mater 
earners to Aoe/NZ. 01-684 7371 
ABTA. 


CHEAP FUCHT9 Worlftwtde. Haymaricot 
01-930 1366. 


OtSCOUHVED A OMP FM» Worid- 
wkla. Tel U.T.C. (0783) 857036. 


onoatarr fares wondw«»: 01-434 

0734 Jupiter Travel. 


FLKEHTBOOKEHS Discount Fares worid- 

wkto. Ut/ecanuny. 01-387 9100 


MUM. CAMARKS. Ol 441 1111. 
DMIwbS WM. AtoL 1786 


S. HHBCA FVam £466. 01-684 7S7I 
ABTA. 


LUXURY VftlAS Fhr toe dterarnlng tew 
in Franco. Strata. Portugal A Oreece- 
Tet 01-409 2838 ITP VILLA WORLD 


WINTER SPORTS 


Franc*. Austria. Italy A Swttaertand. 
Save pounds A slip off to ibeaMpee to 
Jattoary. OI 786 999904 hr* brochure 


low orices la hWi re- 


Val 01200 6060 (24 MB) Ol 903 4444. 


SKI JUST FRANCE - Soper mlm sotf en- 
tering ski holidays In toe beet French 
resorts. 01-789 2692 (24 hra brochure 


SKI TNE canon* AH ROCKIES: Private 
Group itenarnuu March >8th for 16 
days Luxury trip raefudes OownUB. 
uuju u e umy A hriMilng. For dtaaiis 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKI 

SUPERTRAVEL 

JANUARY BARGAINS 
Chaloi Panics ia the top resorts 
FR£189 

S/C tom £138 inc Qigho 
01-584 5060 (24 hrs) 
Snowline on 01-584 0174. 


■ted. TM: Ol 223 0601 


JUST FRANCK - Supre value- eeff catering 
sHMUbyskiiM bee* French resorts 

Rug for now brochure now. 

Tri 01-789 2892. 

ABTA 69286 MSI 1383. 


MX. HOLIDAYS 


INSTANT FLAT. Luxury Serviced Ken- 
e t n g mn . Octal from £326 pw. rang 
Town House Apartments 573 3433 
INSTANT FLAT. Luxury Serviced Ken- 
•melon. C hris— (ram £306 pw. Rtop 
Town House Apartments 373 3453 

NORTH WALES 790 canapes, caravan* 
Shaw's Holidays. Pwllheli. (0768) 
612654. (24 hourei. 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


INVESTIGATION BY THE 

MONOPOLIES AND MERCERS 


and Chemical Corporation of imperial 
Continental Gas AseocMMan 
The Secretary of state tor Trade and 
Industry nas referred to toe M o n opoUte 

and Hi ria (i Catanuseian for 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE HIGH OOUKT OF JUSTICE 
No. 008076 of 1986 

CHANCERY DIVIS ION 

Bsl THE MATTER O F 
GAVEL SECURITIES LIMITED 
AN D 

84 THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1986 
NOTICE S HEREBY CXVETJ Out Ae 
Order of me Hta Court ot Justice 
(Chancery Dtvteton) dated 8th December 
1906 rrmnrmtwb ea jiancet tenon of 
£9201264 stimng to me oeW M toe 
snare Premium Account or the abovo- 
■unM randteny was rep mere d by tne 
Registrar of oorapeedcs an 23rd Dece m ber 
1986 

Doted lies 30to day ot December 1986 
NORTON ROSE BOTTERELL * ROCHE 
Ketmnon House 
Camcmnr Street 
Londeo CC3A TAN 
Kef; OBA/6&/K1 11014 
B o w aiors ter the ebove-nned Oempany 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 
NO. 004268 of 1988 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
COMPANIE S COU RT 
CM THE MATTE R OF 
HAMPSTEAD VINTNERS LTD 
By Order of toe Mob court of Justice 
rated 22nd January. 1986. Mr. Patrick 
•talker John Harilpan or Messrs. Boom. 
Volte A Company. 1 wannabe Puce, 
tarter Lae. St. Ponte. London. EC4V 
1AJ nm been appointed Liquida tor H Uw 


P.W_J HART1CAN 
_ L1QLTPATOW 


LOHMANN A COMPANY LIMITED 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to 

Section 98 of toe insolvency Act 1986. 
Rule Misting ot me creditors of Lohiunn 

A Company umued. hh be iku at CK» 
pet Yard, la Union Sard. London 6E1 
ISC on Tuesday iSOr day or January. 
1987 at 1 1 00 O'clock la toe lore noon, for 
toe purposes prorated far in Sections too 
and tot 


A tot of tne names and ridrmu of toe 
company's rredllora wra be amiable for 
inspection al the company's office al 6 
Longbridge way. Uxbndoe. Mtodlesea. 
UBS 2YQ and at toe offices of Price 
waiernouse. no. 1 London Bridge. Lon- 
don. SEl 9QL I reference MDO on the 91h 
and 12tn day of January. 1987. 

Dated toe |9B» dea» of December. 1986 


son* of Die Far TMtao Act 1973 me 
propos ed acanuaian by Cdl b u o w cb 
and Chamcai Corvorridon of Imperial 


give lnfMnwhon or views or 
acoutetDon m»'id write ae < 


The Secretary 


London WC2A 2JT 


The BRrtlSH RAILWAYS BOARD hereto 
csvr advance nonce, to ntraiance ol Sec- 
doc 64 of toe Transport act. 1986. tou 
tore Man to withdraw imgiit tacOUes 
irom me Mtowteoatedono m tor mentti oa 
Feoruaiy 1987:- 
8BRMINCHAM INLAND POR T 
BIRMINGHAM LANDOR STREET 
FREIGHT DEPOT 

Pardcuiars of toe data on wMcti toe taeiti- 
ttes wU be uWdnwn and of the 
tecnauw taewmre win be a n nounced 


COURSES 


THE M0Y5ES STEVENS 
FLOWER SCHOOL 

Three week courses in Flower Arrang- 
ing and Flanary held throughout the 
year. 

Tiro day courses also avaitebie. 
PUosertag! 

01-493 S17I forfaiter details. 
6BraunSoeeL 
Laadan WIX 7AG. 


SUPER SECRET ARIES 


rinrttera ra. Porinanesd A teraBorary 
porioans. AMSA Soectelka Rocnatmenl 
Constdnnta. Ol 734 0632 


WINTER SPORTS 


BLADON LINES 
The Biggest Choice on Skis 

JANUARY BARGAINS 
CHALET PARTIES AND CHALET HOTELS 

VAL DTSERE (ram £149 

CRAN5 MONTANA from £149 

v KHmm from £169 

miiwn 1 FK aLLUES H orn £149 


SELF CATERING 

01 785 3131 
CHALET PARTIES 


01 785 7771 
S/C AND HOTELS 


anchester Deps. 
0422 78121 


General Enquiries 
01 785 2200 


ABTA 16723 
ATOL 1232 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity. 

102 Gloucester Place, l 

London W1H 4DH. a > 


MUM in Banff. Canada. Sated togras » 
Calgary me baud. Lin pass, car tare 
from £479. OU Htrtoe Borman Ho8- 
Oayi on 01-393 0127. ABTA. 


COUMKVII. a/c tm. o/a aecw 
£176/366 pw. Ol 737 3426 / 6524 


SKI fUGBTS. Pans- m Orae ra . Zurtg*. 
Munich «&. From £59. SKI WEST. TM 
Ol 786 9999. 

SKI WORLD Top rewrite Prance. Italy. 
Austria A AZMorra Ooach/afe- a/c. Bro- 
chure Ol em 4826 24hr» ABTA 
TAKE ADVANTAOe of m O Junto 
vratder. vutere. Mettf Megeve. SM 
Les Alpes. Ol 602 9766. 


trines have yielded animal 
bones, seeds and parasites 
which will reveal much about 
medieval German . diet and 
disease. 

Last winter the Carolingian 
settlement of 1 he ninlh cen- 
tury was further investigated, 
and wattle-and-daub walled 
timber buildings were 
documented as they were cut 
away on the line of the new 
underground railway. The 
range of material suggests that 
Duisburg was as important as 
the berter known emporia of 
Hamwih (now Southampton), 
Doicstad in Holland and 
Haithabu in north Germany. 

The importance of the site is 
such that the Alter Markt 
complete with the cellars and 
lower storeys of the brick-built 
market halls, is to be pre- 
served as an “archaeological 

conservation” area, but at the 
same time. Mr David 
Gaimster, of the British Mu- 
seum, reports in Rescue News 
that medieval buildings axe 
being destroyed bv other 
developments, and funds for 
further work, including study 
and publication of the mass of 
material, are drying up. 
Source: Rescue News No 40. 


BE FIRST 
ON THE 1ST 

From 

MDs to Marketing 
Sales to Secretaries 
Accountants to Engineers 

The highly successful recruitment section will 
appear on January 1st 1987 giving over 1V4 million 
readers a head start for the New Year. 

To place your advertisement please ring 

01 481 4481 

TODAY! 


PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 

BROOK GENERAL HOSPITAL 

Business Services 
Manager 

Salary up to £19,800 
This is a key post within die new management 
structure which is now being implemented within 
this Acute Unit which has an annual budget of £21. 
million. Reporrii^ directly to the Unit General 
Manager and member of tne Unit Advisory Board, 
the Business Service Manager will have prime 
responsibility for controlling and developing all of 
the financial services and systems operating within 
the Unit- Yon will be responsible for toe Unit 
Planning Section co-ordinating the formulation of 
long and short term programmes and capital 
projects. Yon should be a qualified Accountant 
looking for an opportunity to develop your skills in 
General Management. 

Informal enquiries are welcomed. Please contact 
Mrs. J. Sunderland, Unit General Manager - Tel: 
01-856 5555 Ext. 201. 

For information package, job description please 
ring the Unit Personnel Department Ext 205. 

^ jig Appti catioas required 

S 2 jL with fan aurkdnm 
/M B Sk vitae: address to Unit 
J/mRL B2. Personnel Officer, 
S9| Brook General Hospital, 
^■IflUPPL Shooters Hill Road, 

Greenwich ss «£* iab 

HEALTH AUTHORITY’ 1 ‘ J 


To Place Your 
Classified 
Advertisement 


Please telephone the appropriate number listed 
below between Sam and 6pm. Monday lo 
Friday, or between 9.30am and 1.00pm on 
Saturdays. 

Birth, Marriage and Death NoncesOl-481 4000 


Birth and Dead) notices may be accepted over 
the telephone. For publication the following day 
please telephone try 1.30pm. Marriage notices 
not appearing on the Court & Social page may 
also be accepted by telephone. 


Trade Advertisers: 


Appointments 
Public Appointments 
Property 
Travel 

UJL Hobdays 

Motors 

Personal 

Business to Business 
Education 


01481 4481 
01481 1066 
01481 1986 
01481 1989 
01488 3698 
01481 4422 
01481 1920 
01481 1982 
01481 1066 


Forthcoming Marriages, Weddings, etc for the 
Court and Social Pag: 

Cannot be accepted by Telephone 

Please send Court and Social Page notices to: 


Court & Social Advertising. 

Times Newspapers LnL, 

1, Pennington Street, 

London El 9DD 

Please allow at least 48 hours before publication. 
Any enquiries for the Court & Social page may 
be made after 10.30am on 01-822 9953 


You may use your Access. Amex, Diners 
or Visa card. 




Missing girl turns 
up unharmed as 
suspect surrenders 


THF. TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


Contmoed from page 1 

daughter called at about 9am 
yesterday and said: “Fve 
never talked so much in four 
days. I iust talked my way 
through it-" 

Mrs Ettridge said that her 
daughter was “m complete 
control of herself* during the 
conversation, describing how 
die had built up a “one-to- 
one” relationship with the 
mac she was with. 

The girl’s father said that he 
had reacted in “a non- 
commital way” to the man's 
apology. “I did not know what 
Circumstances Samantha was 
finding herself in at the time, 
and I did not want to antago- 
nize him any further.” 

Mr and Mrs Ettridge ex- 
pressed their condolences to 
the family of die baby who 
was killed in the crash. 

“The death of a baby has 
spoilt our celebration. I feel so 
sony for the baby’s parents,” 
Mrs Ettridge said. 

“But we are very, very 
happy that Samantha is safe 
and we are looking forward to 
seeing her. 

“It is going to take her a 
little bit of time to recover. 
But she was all right and quite 
calm when she contacted us,” 
she said. 

Det Supt Corcoran said that 
Mr Chmilowskyj would be 
held at an unnamed police 
station for questioning by 
officers. He had been exam- 
ined by a doctor after tbe crash 

Manifesto 
on schools 
derided 


Continued from page 1 

of the education committee on 
Kent County Council, the 
largest Tory-controlled 
authority in England and 
Wales, said that parts of the 
education manifesto con- 
tained some astounding and 
offensi ve propositions. 

As a life-long Tory, he said 
he found the present vogue of 
blanket condemnation of 
LEAs distressing. 

Mr David Hart the general 
secretary of the traditionally 
moderate National Associ- 
ation of Head Teachers, said 
the report in particular the 
suggestion that every school 
should be free of local 
authority control, was “totally 
impractical” in its outlook 
and that the report was pep- 
pered with gross exaggerations 


Today’s events 

Musk 

Philharmonia Orchestra; Bar- 
bican Hall, Silk St. EC2, 7.45. 

End ym ion Ensemble; 
Wigmore Hall, 36 Wigmore St, 
Wl, 730. 

London Festival Ballet. The 
Nutcracker, Royal Festival Hall, 
South Bank, SE1, 3 and 73a 

Exhibitions in progress 
Leicestershire Guild of Crafts- 
men Christmas Exhibition; Rui- 


and was certified as fit to be 
held by police. 

Asked about die issuing of 
the description and photo- 
graph of the wanted man on 
Sunday night the detective 
said the situation bad been 
looked at very carefully. The 
decision had been taken by 
Assistant Co mmissioner John 
Mow, head of the detective 
force at Scotland Yard. 

Questioned about the use of 
the photograph and whether 
this had any connection with 
the crash, Det Supt Corcoran , 
said: “We had a duty to 
protect tbe public... I am 
quite sure in my own mind 
that had the accident not 
occured the man would have 
been arrested very, very 
quickly.” 

According to Scotland Yard 
sources yesterday, the wanted 
man was first identifed before 
Christmas in connection with 
the disappearance of Miss 
Catherine Ainger, a student 
from north London, who was 
held for three days after going 
on a date. 

Miss Ainger was found just 
as the Yard was about to issue 
a picture and description of 
Mr Chmilowskyj. 

The identity was not re- 
leased because the girl was 
safe. Police knew who he was 
and expected to capture him. 
There was no suspicion that 
he might strike again. 

At the weekend, when the 
link between the two cases was 
made, the full identity and 
picture were issued. 

PO chief 

criticizes 

‘sell-ofF 



Letter from Jerusalem 

Children failing 

Israeli spy class 

Israel's P ‘Snal heroM whileXc p'SportW^ 

intelligence field is minute. 

country. To merge into the back- 

It is a picture of Elie Cohen ground it is essen tial for an 
hanging from a gallows in ■ 1 * 

STS? Summer school for 

1965- For three years before WOUld-be agents 




hanging from a gallows in 
Damascus after being exe- 
cuted for spying in May, 
1965. For three years before 
he was caught he had been 
one of the most successful 
agents in a secret service with 
a reputation for success. 

To the growing consterna- 
tion of Israeli intelligence the 


nation. 

Elie Cohen was one of tens 
of thousands of Jews who 
spoke Arabic as his mother 
tongue. That made it possible 
for him to infil trate the 
highest echelons of Syrian 
society and, in the end, come 
away with the master plan for 
the Syrian defence of the 
Golan Heights — a piece 


schools run by the corps in 
Jerusalem and Haifa give six- 
month-long courses in Arabic 
and high technology to se- 
lected students and the results 
are considered excellent 


highest echelons of Syrian But they are not as good as 
society and, in the end, come tbe real thing. 

Bie Coten was born in 
* Alexandria in 1924 and spent 
Golan Heights - a piece ^ firs[ 32 years of his life in 

■ Egypt Even be needed a cover 

Arahir pwntiftl 11131 Uved in Ar S eD ’ 

Aiamc essenuai ^ for years to expiain ^ 

for Elie Cohen non-Syrian Arabic accent in 

— Damascus. An agent who has 

learnt Arabic only in Israel 
of intelligence that allowed foe would n even more 
Israeli army to conquer this difficult lo fit in. 


seemingly impregnable for- 
tress in a matter of hours 


Obviously Jewish intelli- 


Continued from page 1 
parcels division in 1989 and 
the letters division in 1990. 

Sir Ronald said that he was 
surprised that Mr Albon had 
not even considered whether, 
if the Post Office was pri- 
vatized, it should be done as a 
whole. 

He said that, as for as he 
knew, the present Gov- 
ernment had not taken a 
decision to privatize. 

He said that outside consul- 
tant advice on the Post 
Office's present divisional 
structure had concluded that it 
was was efficient 

The chairman emphasized 
the interdependence of the 
four divisions of the Post 
Office: parcels. Girobank, 
counters and letters. 

Coal dSemma, page 2 


The remains of Frog’s restaurant in St Peter's Street, Canterbury, yesterday after the fire and car crash in which a man died. 

By a Staff Reporter 


A man was (tilled yesterday when 
his car crashed into the front of a 
restaurant and exploded in flames. 
Police believe the dead man was Mr 
Oscar Rudolph, the restanranfs 
owner, who was thought to be in his 
early fifties. 

They said the blaze had already 
started when a Volvo saloon 
crashed into Frog’s restaurant in 
Canterbury, Kent, shortly before 
dam yesterday. 

The fire destroyed the listed build- 
in*, part of the city’s historic St 
Peter’s Street 

Up to 60 firemen fought the blaze, 
which took several hours to control 
as a crowd of sightseers hampered 
the emergency services. 

The restaurant was a Grade 2 listed 
bnflding, with an eighteenth cenfany 


land County Museum, Catmos 
St, Oakham; Tubs to Sat 10 to 1, 
2 to 5 (ends Jan 10). 

/Lvuiral 

Babes in the Wood ; 
Sittmgbonrne Town Hall, 230 
and 7.3a 

Planetarium: Christmas 
Night Watch programme; shows 
at 1. 15, 2.15, 3.i5; Mayer 
Guided Tours: 130 and 2.30: 
Liverpool Museum, William 
Brown St, Liverpool 
Snow Queen ; Regent Centre, 
High St, Christchurch, Dorset, 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,240 



ACROSS 

1 In another country, Edward 
brooded (9). 

6 Many keen for old City fig- 
ure (5). 

9 Creep in a romper-suit (7). 
30 Decorative little bird (7). 

11 Ma not saying any thing ? 
Good Heavens! (5). 

12 Gentle, in a strange way — if 
unrefined (9). 

13 Point to new tactics in 
transports (8). 

IS Sea-birds return with an- 
other (4). 

19 Unlikely to be high (4). 

20 Due a nice new house (8). 

23 Everybody in the list is doc- 

24 Dash with daughter from 
wild animal [5). 

26 A plan to throw out (7). 

27 Old single chap is very 
demanding (7). 

28 Place of debauchery with 
the French touch (5). 

29 Hell — pearls squandered in 
dissipation (9). 

DOWN 

1 Lying clergyman (9). 

' 2 a ^ 0ul 10 cause inlury 

3 Splendid paper to attack 
with abusive language 

4 . . . causing greai fear? Ex 
cellenl (8). 


5 Lightly touched a fish on the 
bottom (6). 

6 Gibbon's answer in support 
of the Scotsman (6). 

7 Old sbe-cat merciless to a 
Liberal family (6). 

8 Corgi got a bit of the joint ; 

14 Dancing with a sailor — a 
true blue (9). 

16 This sort of story can lead to 
disaster (9). 

17 Shrewd point shows ingenu- 
ity (8). 

18 Rescue device on hand (8). 

21 Breathe badly? Here’s a 
clever plan (6). 

22 Paddy, taken in by pub- 
licity, weakened (6). 

23 Drinks from pith helmets 
out East (5). 

25 The regions are Anglo- 
Saxon (5). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17339 


7.30 Fantastic Mr Fox; Gardner 
Arts Centre. Sussex University, 
Falmer, Brighton. 230 or 6. 

Pinocchio;. Gateshead Inter- 
national Stadium, Neilsou Rd, 2 
and 7. 

Talks 

Mice and Men, lecture with 
film The Mouse’s Tale; Natural 
History Museum. Cromwell Rd, 
SW7, 3. 

Him, Volcano: The Geologi- 
cal Museum, Exhibition Road, 
SW7.230- 

Reflections on Peace by Sister 
Sudesh, of tbe Brahma Kumaris 
World Spiritual University, 
Charing Cross Hold, WC2, 

6.30. 

Events for children 
Pie Flinging and Roller Skat- 
ing: for under-! Ts; Barton 
Stone Community Goitre, 2 . 

Stuff and Nonsense Puppet 
Workshop; Colchester Castle, 
11 and 2.15. 

“The Saxons are Here”: An- 
glo-Saxon activities for children. 

10.30 and 1 130, Liverpool Mu- 
seum, William Brown St. 
LiverpooL 

Children's Tour, Fact and 
Fantasy, Rotunda, Tate Gallery, 
Millbank, SW1, 11.30. 

Wizards of Steam, 
demonstration by Aubrey 
Tulley, Science Museum, Ex- 
hibition Rd, SW7. 3. 

Young People's Christmas 
lecture by Robert Swan “In the 
footsteps of Scon”; Tbe Royal 
Society of Arts, John Adam St. 
WC2.23a 

Christmas Planetarium 
Shows - The Stars at Christmas 

2.30, Exploring the Planets 3.3a 
National Maritime Museum, 
Greenwich, SE 10. 

On Safari at Kensington Pal- 
ace; 10 to 1, Seventeenth Cen- 
tury Harpsichord Music, 
Kensington Palace State Apart- 
ments. W8. 2 10 4. 

In the Wardrobe, designing 
and making strange costumes: 
Hampton Court Palace, 10 
prompt 


facade covering fifteenth century 
timbers. 

Police took seven horns to recover 
the wreckage of the car, which was 
then examined by forensic scien- 
tists. 

A police spokesman said: “We are 
not looking for a third party”. 

The restaurant was only 400 yards 
from Canterbury rath^ral.wnd its 
destruction was the second time in 
recent years that fire has destroyed 
an historic building in the city. 
Three years ago a blaze destroyed 
the weavers' bnflding, which dated 
from tbe time of tire early textile 
industry in Kent 

Police said that Mr Rudolph lived 
above the restaurant, had two 
children, and was estranged from 
his wife. 


Books - silly titles of the year 


* '-'X* 


- . -Y^ 

, i 


\ t. 

* ... *. . - >.„♦* 


The Archbishop of Canterbury at the scene. 


during the Six Day War in gence can still count on skilled 
1 967. Arabic agents in the field. The 

But the days of mass migra- £53?™. frtS'SSLi™ . ^ 
tion from Arabic speaking 

countries to Israd are over. te 

The only relatively large year shows that very detailed 
Jewish community in the information must have been 
Arab world is in Morocco, acquired on the ground, 
while those who arrived from . , 

countries like Syria and Iraq „ , .^^uar raids on 
over 30 years ago are now too la .^ ets 

old for spying and their chil- 800(1 on " 

tiren have grown up proudly the s P° t intelligence, 
speaking Hebrew. . Beyond the needs of war are 

The migrants themselves, ^ peace. Tbe 

once they reached Israel, *»■«* education com- 
learnt the language of the new ™. ,n “ “* accepted this pan 
Jewish state as a step towards .jr® ¥®EP^|5 n m , s *-. tUn £ 
finding a national identity. It Jfmmm 8 ^0,000 (about 
proved very unifying but it ^’OOg^syear from the 
also meant that youngsters in wretched budget to lannch an 
Arabic femflies did not only Anblc W ect in schools, 
not learn Arabic but tended to 11 is recognized that a 
regard it as an inferior Ian- knowledge of Arabic is essen- 
guage. It was smart to speak for understanding in nego- 
Hebrew. tiations and for forming solid 

_ _ . . . peaceful relationships into the 

™ “ th ? t out ° f the future. But this is an argument 
30,000 students who each year which fells on deaf ears among 
stert Arabic studies, only Israel’s Hebrew-speaking 
about 1,000 a year complete young, 
the course to the level required T . . 

by the intelligence corps. Ev- J.SIH MlUTSy 


■■ WK WUV-I WiajMW UJUUII WMMU imtzututzil, i, 

Collection tor Enjoyment and Investment by Loretta 

How to Boi an Egg. Simple Cookery for One, byJ. Artdaw (Biot Right Way 
Books, £1-20) 

Katt Your Own Skyscraper, by Tom Wombat (Angus & Robertson, £230) 
Sex as a Siriftratfon lor Tennis, from the secret writings of Freud, com- 
ptad and annotated by Theodor Savetsky PhD (Pagoda, £330) 

The Aerodynamics of Pork, by Patrick Gale (Sphere, £335) 

The Old Brown Dog, Women, Workers, ana Vivisection in Edwardian 
England, by Coral Lansfaury (University of Wisconsin. £2330) 

W« Wtekets and Dusly Balls, by Ian Mater (Hamlsh Hamilton, £935) 
Whereon The W3d Thyme Blows, Some Memoirs of Senrice with the Hong- 
kong Bank, by J.F. Marshall (Tokea £1235) PH 

Top films in 1986 I Anniversaries 


( WEATHER Frontal systems will affect all areas of the British Isles. 
~Z M j ; Apart from die far NE, where it will be bright and show- 

ery for a while, all of N, E and central Scotland will have a dull, wet day. Some hiiu 
may have a spell of sleet or snow. N Ireland, along with SW Scotland, Wales and 
all western comities of England will have rain at first, with extensive hill and coast 
fog, giving way later to colder, showery, but brighter weather. Eastern areas of 
ptgland will remain cloudy and mild most of the day, with rain at times. Outlook 
N* 1 ThHrsd * y: CoIder * showery westerly wind spreading to all areas. 


HIGH TIDES 


1 Back to the Future 

2 Rocky IV 

3 Out of Africa 

4 Top Gun 

5 Santa Claus - The Movie 

6 Aliens 

7 FoTice Academy Ilf: Back h 
Training 

8 Clockwise 

9 Teen Won 

10 The Jewel of thB Nte 

11 Mona Lisa 

12 Peter Pan 
13Bambi 

14 The Karate Kfd Part II 

15 A Room with a View 

16 Hannah and her Sisters 

17 The Black Cauldron 

18 Spies L*e Us 

19 Cobra 

20 Jagged Edge 

This mart covers the year Decem- 
ber 1 1965 to November 30 1986. 
Supplied toy Sure n Irarmauanal \ 

Roads 


Births: Rod yard Kipling, 
Bombay. 1865. 

Deaths: Robot Boyle, chem- 
ist, London, 1691; Str Sanwri 
White Balter, explorer, Sanford 
Orieigh, Devon, 1893; Alfred 
North Whitehead, math- 
ematician and philosopher, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, 


The pound 


TODAY 

AM 

HT PM 

HT 

London Bridge 1Z29 

BB.12J0 

67 

Abenteen 

- 

- 1222. 

43 

Avonmouth 

BJJ8 

12JB 635 

12.7 

Belfast 

9J53 

35 10.17 

33 

CanSff 

5J3 

11.7 6-20 

113 

Devonport 

A39 

63 5.11 

S3 

Dover 

9A6 

63 1027 

64 

Fehaoutb 

4.09 

61 4A1 

5.1 

Gteagow 

11.43 

4-8 


HanwsSi 

10.46 

a? 11.17 

67 

•gr*— 

S.12 

5.08 

5£ 939 
7.0 534 

53 

7.1 

■Hracomoe 

4.47 

67 613 

89 

LeHh 

1.12 

53- 139 

54 

Liverpool 

10.09 

92 1034 

93 

Lowestoft 

8J39 

23 640 

2.4 


10.44 

43.1133 

43 

■*nofO iiavcm 

5.04 

67 532 

68 


3£0 

68 423 

BR 

Oban 

4.47 

33 610 

33 

Pssaaaco 

339 

5.4 4.09 

5.4 

Portland 

5.52 

£1 623 

2.0 

PBtluauHjSi 

10.17 

4.7 1031 

43 

Shonsham 

10JU 

G.1 1034 

8.1 


9.45 

4.4 1020 


Swansea 

5.12 

93 639 

93 

Toes 

2J27 

53 231 

5.4 

Wtton-on-Nze 

10.37 

4.1 11.08 

4.0 


fp } <©. .. -f 


MODSUTF 1 




AustralaS 
Austria Scb 
Belgium Ft 


lisa sa@ia fanassiHtss 
1 n n n 0 -'H s pj ■ 
laHBijsSiiiiSiiinnns MJ 31510 
h 12 rs n gs n 3 
aciBmEnEEi- assnnn 
■ - C5 IS - ra 

aans. • ■ liaEBsa^BfiB 

n i=> ig- n- 

rs -*-• . ‘ 'is m -si n 

@buhsiseksb 

: 0 S-S D . R :••• 

riiPSB.aEiciaiiiesnsnE 

a m a s 0 gj- 


Passport applications 

In need of a passport - then 

apply now rather than in the 

spring and summer. The 
application forms state that a 
minimum period of four weeks 
is required but during the 
summer months it could take up 
to eight weeks to issue a 
passport. 

Application forms are obtain- 
able from any of the Passport 
Offices, or from any main Post 
Office, except in Northern Ire- 
land. Tbe completed form 
should be sent to the Passport 
Office with the necessary fee, 
photographs, and supporting 
documents. 





Canned food 

When you open a can of food 
always empty out all the con- 
tents. Keep the food that is not ; 
being used in a covered bowl in 
the refrigerator. Do not keep 
food in the can because once it is 
opened air starts to attack the 
lining, spoils the food, and 
increases the risk of food 
poisoning. 


L o ndo n and the South-east: 1 
A 1 20 : Roundabout construc- 
tion along Gt Stonford Rd, Gt I 
Dunmow, Essex. A2: Road 
width reduced along Walling St, 
Gillingham. 

Tbe North: Ml: Delays be- 
tween junctions 31 and 33 (A57 
Worksop/A630 Rotherham) 
and slip road closures al junc- 
tions 31 and 32 (M18). M6: 
Work at junction 23 
(Merseyside) and contraflow be- 
tween junctions 29 and 32 (A6 
Preston/M55). M63: Delays be- 
tween junctions 1 and 7 (Eccles 
Interchange/A56 Stretford) due 
to work at Barton Bridge. 

Wales and the west A38: 
Delays between Exeter and 
Plymouth due to lane closures 
in both directions at Hakfon 
Hifl. A38/A35& Alterations to 
Blackbrook roundabout near 
M5 junction 25 (Taunton). 

Scotland: A198: Temporary 
Iightsai Meadowhifl junction, E 
Lothian, new roundabout. 
A92/A978: Restrictions due to 
roundabout construction be- 
tween King St and St Machar 
Drive, Aberdeen. A77: Single 
line traffic with temporary lights 
N of Ballon tyre on Glasgow to 
Ayr rd. 

Information supplied by AA 

Lloyd’s of London 

The Lloyd's of London vis- 
itors exhibition is closed to the 
public until January 2 when the 
permanent display of moving 
pictures, sounds and models: 
reopens at 10 am. 


DmmaricKr 
FMandMkk 

France Rr 

Germany Dm 
QrmccDr 

HangKongS 
Inland Pt 
Italy Lira 
Japan Yan 
tteOmriamteGM 
Norway Kr 
PortogalEac 
South Africa Rd 

Spate Pta 

Sweden Kr 
Swltreriarxl Pr 
USAS 

YogoateiriaDar 

Rateo for srtraB denom mafl on bank notes 
only as suppled tiy Barclays Bank PLC. 
OiHerent rales apply to traveHars* 
cheques and other foreign currency 
ousawss. 

Retell Price indCE astJ 

London: The’ FT kKto« dosed up 5.9 at 
1307,1. 



ABOUND BRITAIN 




^ - how to play 

Moodav-^aturday record your dally 
Fonipho ImoI, 

Add them mwui«r to datdmlne 
your weekly Portfolio touL 
if your total matches the oubUshod 
weekly dividend injure you have Won 


Torquay 
Unauk 
Ro man ce 
Sefl^rtoas 
Jenny 
Quaw m ap 

K3S. 

[ 

i ■WBUHIW 

Douglas 
BTamAiml 
Bristol (CM) 
Carflato 
London 
Manchester 
N’cti-n-T ytm 
Nottlngh®^ 
Anglos 
CardMf 
Cotwyn 

ISXn 

EtMwrgh 


have won 

outrlB hi or a toare of the prt» money 
staled for that week, and must cUHm 
your prize as lnstrurted bawl. 

How to daks 

can t» aoceptod owdda thete 

You must nave your card with you 
when you telephone. 

ir you are unable to telephone 
someone cbe can claim on your behsir 
but they must have your card and call 
EJf ^Claims une 

between the stipulated Umci. 

No responsUHiity can be accepted 
for (allure to contact the claims office 
•tor any reason within the stated 
hours. 

dividend claims. 


Son Bain Max 
hre In OF 

- - 10 50 gala 

; - 11 52 cloudy 

0.1 - S 48 doudy 

0.4 - 10 SO doudy 

- - 11 52 cloudy 

* - 11 52 dull 

- - 10 50 cloudy 

- - 10 50 doudy 

- - 10 50 duS 

- - 9 46 dufl 

- - n 52 doudy 

0.1 - 11 52 doudy 

- - 11 S2 AH 

- - ii 52 doudy 

- - 11 52 dufl 

- - 10 50 doudy 

- 43 10 SO doudy 

- - 11 52 doudy 

02 - 11 52 doudy 

- .02 11 52 dufl 
1-fl ■ 13 55 ctoudy 

14 - 12 54 doudy 

2.0 - 13 55 bright 

* SO. 11 52 dul 

- J03 11 52 cloudy 
04 XG 11 52 bright 
0.7 .07 11 $2 drizzle 
02 .03 11 52 shower 

- M 11 52 nki 

* .11 11 52 shower 

- .11 9 4B rain 

- SB 9 48 shower 

- .03 11 52 doudy 

02 Sn 11 52 rm 
02 - 10 50 doudy 

- .04 11 52 r»n 

* • 11 52 cloudy 

- .13 12 54 rein 

0.6 - 12 54 doudy 

- - 10 SO doudy 

- .04 11 52 rata 
0.1 20 0 48 rain 

- .09 13 55 doudy 

- .15 11 52 doudy 

- - 12 54 bright 

- JH 11 52 rein 

‘21 11 52 rain 

- 24 T 1 52 rain 

- .04 10 50 rate 

- 36 7 45 shower 

- .19 12 54 rain 

- 2A 10 60 rata 

- 32. 11 52 rah 
■ 20 9 46 rate 

* .02 11 52 ram 


_ -e— 11 ***< 

grs j* _r nta-f u— - aOt 

(TlGHnNG-UPTIME 

SaSSJ* 4j» pm to 7 36 am 
fktiM4M pmip7AB am 
& 8 ntaigh 47l7pm to 8.14 am 
Handi eater 4.28pm to 7.55 am 
Panranee 4ii8 pm to 7.51 an 




if *: 


nn & 


. MODERATE 


C LONDON ^ 

YMMntey: Tmp: inax 6 am to 6 pin, 1 1 C 

6 pm. a trace Sun 24 hr to 6 pm. 0.1 hr 
aw* b pm. ,«« 

1 .000 mfift»f»=28^3ki. 


ROUGH j* 

Sf/8 1 


HbBKBb S« rises: Sunsets; 

H 8-06 am 4.00 pm 

flfflffii Mnonsets 

i5551S5no m JS"' 2J9pm 

C YESTERDAY ^ 

at mdday yesterday; c. 
cfoud; I. lar; r. ram; s, sun. 

J ,§48 Guerns ey cl ? 52 
PSSS r 337 


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NOON TODAY" 


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: v'™/ j^toi wmifte* ■AhObhumI 1 . 


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WODAY: 


Abroad 


Lerwick 

Presaridk 

Stoma wa y 

Then 

Wide 

Belfast 

These area 
■figures not 


fifflMra NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 
£986 Printed by London Post (Print- 
ers! Limited or 1 vi rants street. 
London El 9XN and By News 
Scotland Ud„ 124 Poriman Street. 
Kiruiing Para, caawow ai iej. 
Ttjwjmy. December 3Q. .. IWfc 
^dtstered as a newsapa- at the- Post 
Office. 


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Algiers s 
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Bahrein a 
Barbatfa 
Barcekn s 
Beirut 

B al gwda c 
Berm r 

Bermuda' r 
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Cbtanea S 
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17 63 Lisbon s 9 as f 22 

25 77 Locrene 5 9 4 S c 6 

17 63 LAmets* s ii 22 SW* & J 


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2 36 Kerecit 
27 81 L Palmes 
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25 77 Locrene 


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BUSINESS ANDlFINANCE 


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TIMES 


17 

SPORT 23 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 27 


TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 

STOCK MARKET ~ 

FT 30 Share 
1307.1 (+5.9) 

FT-SE 100 
1671.6 (+6.5) 

Bargains 

22827(10000) 

USM (Data stream) 
130.46 (+0.27) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 

1.4680 (+0.0100) 

W German mark 
2.0523 (-0.0141) 

Trade-weighted 

68.9 (-0.1) 

Takeover 
help for 
Barrow 

Barrow Hepburn, the spe- 
cial chemicals and engineering 
company fighting a bid from 
Yule Cano, is buying Tor 
Coalings for an initial sum of 
around £3.1 million. 

The issue of Barrow shares 
to Tor. representing 12 per 
cem of the enlarged equity, 
will help Barrow in its fight 
against Yule. Tor is not allow- , 
ed to assent to any bid before ; 
December 31 1987 unless the 1 
bid is recommended by the I 
Barrow beard or unless die 
offer has gone unconditional 
with over SO per cent accep- 
tances. 

The Tor acquisition was 
almost completed before the 
“unsolicited” Yule bid was 
launched, Barrow chief exec- 
utive Mr Ray Way said. Tor 
ma kes anti-graffiti paint is 
capable of being expanded 
greatly, he said. 

Texas Air wins 

Shareholders of the finan- 
cially troubled People Express 
have approved a $11 5 million 
merger with Texas Air. The 
approval makes Houston- 
based Texas Air by far the 
nation's largest airline com- 
pany, and means the end of 
People Express, which will be 
absorbed into one of Texas 
Air's carriers, airline officials 
have said. People Express lost 
$245.4 million in the first nine 
months of 1986. The vote by 
People Express shareholders, 
about a third of whom are 
employees, was the final hur- 
dle in Texas Air’s bid to take 
control of the pioneering cut- 
rate airline. 

Blue Arrow’s 
US hat-trick 

Mr Tony Berry’s fist grow- 
ing Blue Arrow employment 
agency has dinched his third 
big acquisition in the United 
Stales. He is paying £10J 
million for Career Employ-, 
ment Services to boost ms 
chain of temporary, 
perm ament and franchised 
agencies to more than 200 
branches. The earlier ac- 
quisitions include 

Temporaries Inc and Po- 
sitions Inc. 

Pro ADRs 

Prudential Corporation is to 
sponsor the issue of American 
Depositary Receipts in the 
United States. It follows 
Prudential’s £405 million ac- 
quisition of Jackson National 
Life. 

Japan rebuff 

The European Commission 
rejected as insufficient tax 
reforms which Japan hoped 
would defuse complaints of 
unfair taxation on imported 
wines and spirits. The 
Commission is to take its case 
to Gan next month. 


£300m claim against Government 

Banks sue on 
tin collapse 


A group of banks is to bring 
claims of more than £300 
million against the Gov- 
ernment for its role in the tin 
crisis. 

Three banks — Klein wort 
Benson, Australia and New 


By Lawrence Lever 

wort Benson, Australia and 
New Zealand Bank, and 
Aibuthnot La tham Bank is- 
sued writs in the High Court 
against all 22 governments 
and served writs on the 
Department of Trade and 


Zealand Bank and Arbuthnot Industry on the same day. 
Latham Bank have issued Between them, these banks are 
writs against the Government, claiming about £15 million, 
n emerged yesterday. They are The TSB will be issuing a 


Ukdy to be followed by at least writ against all 22 member 
seven more separate legal governments today and serv- 
actions taken by bonks. mg it on the DTL 

Ail the banks are creditors In each case the hanks are 


of the International Tin Coun- accusing the 22 governments 
cil, which collapsed on Octo- of breach of contract,' rag- 


her 24 last year. Their action 
will coincide with an attempt 
1^ 1 1 metal brokers to recover 
at least £165 million in losses 
incurred through the closure 
of the ITC. 

The hanks have chosen a 
more direct route by suing the 
British Government in addi- 


ligencc and misrepresentation The Government has de- 
over their roles nied liability for the ITCs 

The banks’ legal proceed- debts, claiming sovereign 
mgs are being orchestrated by immunity and that the word. 
Slaughter^ May, the solid tor, ing of ITA6 does not make it 
to reduce costs. Each bank, liable, 
however, is taking separate Earlier this month it joined 
legal action in its own name to with the ITC in a High Court 
retain individual control over action opposing a move by 11 


governments of the ITC 
On December 18, Klein- 


action by ail the banks is 
considered too unwieldy. 









The Jetstream 31: winning the hattle of the skies . 

British Aerospace 
wins £90m orders 

By Onr Industrial Editor 

Aircraft orders worth £90 The orders are from two US 
million announced yesterday operators, Piedmont Airlines, 
by British Aerospace indudes -which is to buy 14 Jetstreams 
a £40 million boost for its to add to its existing fleet of 13 


Jetstream 31 light commuter 
aircraft which promises to 
take it “just about past the 
break-even point amf into 
profitability," according to the 
company. 

There are also more Orders 
‘ for its successful 125 business 
jet 

The 19-seat twin-turboprop 
Jetstream, has been built at 
Prestwick, Strathclyde, for 
three years. Its order book, 
increased by 1 8, now stands at 
148 aircraft 

According to British Aero- 
space, during 1986 the 
Jetstream 31 captured 63 per 
cent of its sector of the 
pressurized turbo-prop air- 
liner market British Aero- 
space is increasing production 
further to 48 aircraft a year 
from 36. 


tion to the other 21 member its claims and because a single metal brokers to wind up the 

action by ail the banks is ITC Judgment has been re- 
considered too unwieldy. served until mid-January. 

500 gas 
investors 
will not 
lose out 

By Cliff Fettham 

More than 500 investors in 
ng the I doe of the sloes British Gas who sold their 

shares through a grey market 
Tl€l securities dealer which was 
-V'X. Vrk3 JLM forced to stop trading by the 
-m Department of Trade and j 

*%i fYI*M A1*G Industry will not lose their I 

The special manager pot in 
stria] Editor to the dealer. Prior Harwin, to 

The orders are from two US J^jdle iis assets has decided 
operators, Piedmont Airlines, i!ES 

which is to buy 14 Jetstreams 
to add to its existing fleet of 13 

and Air New Orleans, whose P***?? 1 e y“ ^ ^ 
four Jetstreams represent its 

first use of the aircraft fSSSSS^ST ' “ “ 

Orders by seven companies normally: _ 

in three countries, worth This means that investors 
about £50 million, were also receive cheques or will 
announced for another 11 of h** 6 their allotment letters 
the BAe 125 series 800 bust- returned, so they can retain 
ness ownership of the shares. 

Nine of the 125s wfll go to The news will come as a 
five US companies, one of relief for thosewho had spent 
which has bought five of the 311 uncertain Christmas in the 
aircraft The other two orders belief that they had either lost 
are from companies in Britain hIJ or most of their money, 
and New Zealand. It is the ^ However, a spokesman for 
first 125 sold into New Zea- the special manner , Mr ton 
l and although the aircraft has B°nd, of Deloitte, Ha s kins 
gone to buyers in 39 countries and Sells, the accountant. 


and Air New Orleans, whose 
four Jetstreams represent its 
first use of the aircraft 

Orders by seven companies 
in three countries, worth 
about £50 million, were also 
announced for another 1 1 of 
the BAe 125 series 800 busi- 
ness jets. 

Nine of the 125s wfll go to 
five US companies, one of 
which has bought five of the 
aircraft The other two orders 
are from companies in Britain 
and New Zealand. It is the 


altogether. i 

Total order book for the 
125. built at Broughton near | 
Chester, now stands at 655 I 
aircraft Sales during this year . 
have readied 31 I 


British Gas pressed 
to buy from UK 

The Government is likely to It had wanted to buy £20 
argue forcefully that British billion worth of gas from the 
Gas should buy as much of its Norwegian Sleipner field, but 


supplies as possible from the 
British sector of the North Sea 


the deal was vetoed by the 
Government because of its 


pointed out that other clients 
of Prior Harwin — thought to 
be about 3,000 — whose 
allotment letters arrived be- 
fore December 22 must await 
the outcome of a winding-up 
petition to be heard in the 
High Court in January. 

The spokesman said: “It 
might seem a bit unfair on 
people who sold their shares to 
Prior Harwin on the same day. 
One person may have posted 
his allotment letter promptly 
and is now an unsecured 
creditor. The other may have 
delayed sending his letter so 
that it subsequently became 


to create jobs in the offshore effect on the balance of j an action against us which we 


construction industry. 


paymentsand the assertion by 


British Gas management is the major oil companies that 
preparing to re-open talks with they could supply all British 


Wall street 18 Stack Market 19 Statutory OUty 10 mai 
Co News 18 Tempos 19 supplies. Now it will 5 
Money Mrfczs 18 Unit Trusts 2f tha t it ha e a Iflpa l respon 

tESoS? ii usmmS 20 W - 

Connont 19 Stare Press 21 secure the best contracts. 


the Norwegian Government Gas's needs from the J 
for the purchase of gas from sector of the North Sea. 
the Troll field. The Deportment of Energy 

Before privatization British is under increasing pressure to 
Gas argued that it had a keep intact the country's off- 
statutory duty to maintam shore construction capability 
supplies. Now it will argue Other alternatives which 
that it has a legal responsbil- British Gas is considering 


holders to include buying gas from Rus- 
i tracts. sia and Algeria. 


ssertion by fed we are able to settle.” . 
parties that The rising market in British 
all British Gas shares has helped the 
the British special manager to settle the 
Sea. transaction without harming 
L of Energy the position of potential cred- 
pressureto itors, he added. 

[miry's off- Meanwhile, the special 
capability manage r said that investors 
res which unsure of their position 
onsiderrng should write to him at Prior 
from Rus- Harwin, setting out any 
claims. 



RosDrMwater 

. : 


The biggest threat to the 
British Government is the 
assertion by the banks that the 
member governments of the 
ITC are jointly and severally 
liable for its debts. 

This means that one gov- 
ernment could be made liable 
for all the ITCs debts. The 
British Government could 
therefore have to pick up the 
bill for all £300 million plus, 
even though under the terms 
of the sixth International Tin 
Agreement its share of the 
ITCs liabilities is limited to 4 
percent 

The Government has de- 
nied liability for the ITCs 
debts, claiming sovereign 
immunity and that the word- 
ing of ITA6 does not make it 
liable. 

Earlier this month it joined 
with the ITC in a High Coun 



Ansbacher ‘no 
loss’ claim over 
Guinness stock 


By John Bell, City Editor 


Henry Ansbacher, the mer- 
chant bank, believed its clients 
would be indemnified against 
any loss when they purchased 
Guinness shares from Morgan 
Grenfell shortly before the end 
of the takeover battle for 
control of Distillers. 

The 2.1 million shares, now 
the subject of a dispute be- 
tween the two banks, were 
later purchased from Ans- 

bacher’s diems through an 

Ansbacher nominee company 
after the bid battle ended at 
prices about 50p higher than 
the present market price. 

Morgan Grenfell, which 
acted as leading financial ad- 
viser to Guinness throughout 
the £2.7 billion bid for Distill- 
ers, would not comment on 
Ansbacher’s version of events, 
although a spokesman denied 
there had been any indemnity- 
agreement. 

Lord Patrick Spens, Ans- 
bacher’s managing director, 
said the arrangements had 
been made verbally. 

Much Jater, in October, be 


met Mr Roger Seelig, a direc- 
tor of Moigan Grenfell, to 
finalize matters. It is believed 
they foiled to agree on the 
details. 

“It is now just a matter of 
one merchant banker's word 
against another,'' Lord Spens 
said yesterday. 

The 2.1 million Guinness 
shares concerned are involved 
in a bizarre wrangle over who 
has actual ownership and is 
entitled to receive the divi- 
dend payments. 

Lord Spens said he under- 
stood that when the Guinness 
shares were bought from 
Ansbacher s clients through 
the bank's nominee company, 
Down Nominees, the pur- 
chaser was Morgan Grenfell 
since the stamp duty was paid 
by Morgan Grenfell Payment 
was also arranged through 
Morgan Grenfell. 

A spokesman for Morgan 
Grenfell said yesterday: “At 
no time did we ever own the 
shares as a principal” 




Sir Ernest Harrison: ‘Vodaphone outstandingly successful’ 

Racal pays £1 10m 
to own Vodafone 

By Alison Eadie 


Dollar falls Oil prices 
under yen stay below 
pressure $18 target 


Racal Electronics is taking 
100 per cent control of 
Vodafone, its cellular radio 
network, through the $160.85 
mill ion (£110 million) ac- 
quisition of the 15 per cent 
stake held by Mflticom, of the 
United States, and the 5 per 
cut stake held by. Hambras 
Advanced Technology Trust. 

Sir Ernest Harrison, chair- 
man of Racal, said yesterday 
that the purchase was being 
made because Vodafone was 
“an outstandingly successful 
business” in possibly die fast- 
est growing sector of electron- 
ics. Buying the outstanding 20 
per' cent gave Racal 'total 
flexibility in its s tr a tegy to 
develop its telecommunica- 
tions business. 

Mfllkom and Hambros wffl 
take as part payment 52 
motion new Racal shares 
worth $130.85 million, which 
represent lost under 10 per 
cent of RacaTs enlarged 
equity. 

They most hold at least 80 
per cent of the shares for one 
year, and they can then sell the 
rest only after consultation 
with Racal The rest of the 
payment wfll be in cash. 

Racal has increased its 
operating profit forecasts for 
Racal-MOticoiB to £10 million 
for this year, £34 million for 

City & Foreign 
transforms for 
£6m takeover 

City and Foreign, part of Mr 
David Stevens’ Montagn 
Investment Management 
group, is shedding its invest- 
ment trust status as part of a 
£6 million takeover of Lan- 
guage School Holdings.- ■ 

LSH will emerge with a 51 
per cent stake in the enlarged 
holding firm. Further ac- 
quisitions are planned. 

LSH, which operates a 
chain of 34 language schools, 
six of them in the UK, earned 
profits of £355,000 last year 
and forecasts about £760,000 
this year. 

Shareholders who prefer not 
to remain with the enlarged 
group will have the option to 
sell their shares for 95 per cent 
of the 135p current asset 
value. 


By Rodney Lord 
Economics Editor 

The dollar came under new 
pressure yesterday in the wake 

1987- 88 and £57 miifioa for of remarks by Mr Satoshi 

1988- 89. Interest costs each Sumita, the Governor of the 
year are expected to be £10 Bank of Japan. 

“Bf* 011 * . _ Mr Sumita said a rate for 

Forecasts last January were ^ currency of between 159 
for operating profits of £5 yen and 160 yen would be 
nriflion. £20 million and £37 acceptable, causing the /foliar 
mmionu the three years, to drop from Y161.95 at the 
^Vodafone has more than previous dose to about 

63.000 subscribers m Bn tain, yi59 35 

or about 53 per cent of the total * * t 

market It is adding 1,000 Concern about the US bal- 
sabscribers a week, half of ance of payments figures, due 
whom are in the South-east tomorrow, added to the gloom 
Racal expects that the total surrounding the dollar. But 
British market will grow to dealers said trading was light 

210.000 by the end of next between the two holidays at 

year, 301,000 by the end of Christmas and the new year, 
1988 and 400,000 by the end of exaggerating the pressure on 
1989. the currency. 

Racal-Millicom was The pound had an erratic 
awarded the hcence to operate day, foiling at first with the 
a fflstkmwide^ cellular ndm dollar and pushing the trade- 
setnoe in Bntam m Iw3. It weighted index down from 69 j 
has since invested £110 nril- w 68.6. Later, it found some 
lion in esta Is lashing its support helped by the rising 
Vodafone network. Inc opp- 0 jj price and the continuing i 
osition is provided by British high level of British interest 
Telecom’s Cellnet ra tes 

The market for cellular .... 

radio has grown more qakkly , At the close, stertmg was l % 
than expected, partly because! pfennigs downatDM2. 85 43 
of fierce competition by retail- 'but apnrt thedoUarrt was a 


By David Yi 


ers to sell the equipment: 
There have been price wars 
with the cost of car telephones 
falling by up to 40 per cent last 
summer compared with prices 
a year earlier. 


cent higher at $1.4675. 

Interest rates in money 
markets were steady with 
three-month interbank rate at 
1 1*32 percent 

Comment, page 19 


Oil prices remained below 
the new Opec target price of 
$18 a barrel yesterday, with 
small volumes of North Sea oil 

changing hands at between 
$1730 and $17.75 a cargo. 

A price boost is likely now 
that the three mam Middle 
Eastern producers — Saudi 
Arabia, Kuwait and Iran — 
have officially told their cus- 
tomers of an end to net-back 
deals ander which they sup- 
plied oil for the past year. 

The net-back deal tied the 
price paid for erode oil by the 
principal refining customers to 
the price received for the 
products made. 

This meant that while crude 
prices fell those ofl companies 
with refuting subsidiaries in- 
creased profits from product 
sales. 

This also meant that the 
huge oil buyers turned away 
from those producing coun- 
tries not prepared to offer net- 
hack deals, depressing die 
spot price further. 

The three have followed the 
Opec directive issued on 
December 20 and tohf their 
clients that net-backs would 
end on February 1 and oil 
would be sold mi fixed price 
contracts at $18 a barrel. 

Most industry analysts ex- 
pect the $20 a barrel mark to 
be reached by fiie end of next 

m o n t h, . 



-MARKET SUMMARY 





MA IN PRICE CHANGES STOCK MARKETS 

Maw Yoifc 

Dow Jones 191173 1-1 1-S7T 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow Closed 

Hong Kong: 

Hang Seng 2552.45 {+2JL531 

A m sterdam: Gen 279.5 (-OJa 

SydnejjjjjjAO 1467.5 (+5.2) 

Commerzbank 2049.0 (+5.4) 

Brussete 

General 4081.51 (+35.12) 

Paris: CAC 405JJ(-2.7> 

Zurich: SKA Gen ..... 552.00 (same) 

London: FT. A n/a 

FT. Gflts 83^ (+0.11) 

Closing prices Page 21 


M&S expands out of Canada 

Sparks fly in to US 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


Marks and Spencer, which 
has 250 stores in Canada, is 


a foray into the rich US 
market and especially the 


INTEREST RATES 


London: Bank Base: 11% 
3-month Interbank 11 6 i8-11!4% 
3-month eligible biflK'IO ,, ie-* lt 3J% 


dipping a toe in the US market heavily-populated band across 
with four outlets to shopping the country south of the border 
malls in New York State, with Canada. 

Three are expected to be 
trading by the spring. 

Hie plan is to nse the 
D’AUaiid’s store banner from 
Canada, and to extend the The M&S operation in Can- 
experiment by opening M&S ada is based in Toronto, well 
stores selling St Michael mer- within management reach, 
dumdise, probably adding, particularly of the Mid West 
initially, about die same nun*- and the north-east of the US. 



buying rate 
US Prime Rate 7»% 

Federal Funds 8%* 

3-morrtft Treasury B«s 5.70-5.67%' 
30-year bonds ibi%-ioi*i«%‘ 


London Fixing: 

AM $391.40 pm-5390. 10 
dose 5389.25-369-75 (£265.00- 
265.50 ) 

New York: 

Cemex $390.40-390.90* 


NORTH SEA OIL 


3rtwrt(F<?!>} pmSI7.6CbW|$17.20) 
1 Denotes latest tnftng price 


CURRENCIES 


London: 

£: SI .4680 
£; DM28523 
£ SwFr2.3826 
fc FFr9.4466 
£: Yen233.4t 
£: index68.9 
ECU E0 727738 


NewYotto 
5: El -4690* . 

$: DMIJSMUy 
S: SwFrl.6250* 
$: FFr8.4285- 
$:Yenl 58.95* 
S.- Irui0X:lO3.7 

SDR £0-832515 


ber of outlets. D'AfllainFs US outlets will 

D’Atiaird's and the People’s be comparatively small with 
stores chain were acapired 14 about 4,000 square feet of 
years ago to give M&S a setting space and stocking 
foothoM in Canada, only women’s outerwear. 
D’ADaird’s uses its own label Maries and Spencer admits 
on goods .Canada has 100 it had a learning curve in 
JEVAillaird's outlets, 80 Canada where, with M&S 
People's stores and 70 M&S outlets it began with shops of 


foothold in Canada. 
D'AIlaird’s uses its own label 
on goods .Canada has 100 
D’Aillaird's outlets, 80 


shops. ap to 25,1 

M&S said yesterday a can- then brw 
does approach was being abont 10J 


ap to 25,000 square feet and 
then brought them back to 
abont 10,000 square feet and 


adopted. But it added that located them afi in shopping 

results tit Canada had en- malls. 

couraged the company to make For the M&S outlets in the 


US snffident space will be 
sought so that a wider range of 
goods than at D’Allaird’s can 
be carried, including food. 

In Canada mostly local 
goods are used, and the US 
outlets at first are expected to 
be supplied from Canada, 
where some of Marks and 
Spencer's British suppliers 
have set ap production to 
continue their link with the 
store chain. 

The drive into the US could 
give M&S its third key stake 
abroad. After Canada, the 
company turned to Europe, 
and it ins seven outlets in 
France with two m Belgium. It 
also has one store in Dublin. 

Bat 98 per cent of M&S 
business is still in Britain 
where the company’s latest 
thrust, while expanding its in- 
town stores, is toedge-of-town 
developments. 

The first of these opened at 
the Metro Centre, Gateshead, 
Tyne & Wear.in the autumn. 


HOW YOU CAN 
MAKE MONEY WHEN 
INTEREST RATES FALL 


When interest rales fall, there will be significant profits to be made. 

For example, a 2% drop in interest rates could mean an 18% rise in 
capital value, on long-dated gilts. . 

Gilts still offera return of over 11% ayear-over7V£% 
higher than the current inflation rate. It’s time to buy- 
the clever investor is already beginning to do so. 

Etna's Gilt-Edged Bond is an actively managed fund which offers one of 
tne most cost effective ways to invest in Gilts. 

^ No Front End Load - initial 5% saving over most gilt funds. 

* Up to 90% cost savings # No Capital Gains Thx * Up to 10% a year 
over direct investment withdrawal facility 


^ W)ted Financial Product of the Year 1986 
by the Financial Weekly/ Martin l^terson 
award panel - including first for value for 
money and investment performance 


ACT NOW -while gilts are still cheap 

>Elna is Bve UK aimollhevioritfs largest publtdy quoted htsurancr group with assets equivalent lo £38 billion. 
.Ema Lite Insurance Qunpany Lid. 401 5L John Street .London ECt V4QE. Reg. No. I76622D. 





Name of usual Professional adviserlif any 


R5. Ilyou ate «H-emp*oyed or have no 
company pension, pkase tick Ihe boaao 
w? can also send you details of /Etnas 
newGiU-Edged Pension BondTl 




I mmsk 

hS&ABSfaBON D 







18 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


WALL STREET 


- Wall 

afreet shares eased en nod- 
crate relume in eariy trading 
!«■** following the 
““wt on a d ow n win d path. 

I bs trading face was ex- 
pected to hnprove from 
Friday’s post-Christmas loll 
hnt analyst were generally 
expectkg an uneventfiil week. 

The Dow Jones fndostrial 
average fell S20 to 1.925.20 at 


mm stage when the transport 
indicator was down 2.18 to 
817.47 aad the utilities av- 
erage down 1.21 at 208-26. 

Declining shares led 
trancing issaes by two to odcl 

The brooder New York 
Stock Exchange compomte in- 
dex slipped 033 to 14031 
while Stnadard & Poor’s 
composite index fell 038 to 
24634. 


Japan prepares for 
stem budget today 


Dec Dec; 

26 24 


AMR 
ASA 
AJfiod! 

AMedl 

ASsCfXnvs 

Alcoa 
Amaxtoc 
Am'rdaHs 
Am Brands 
Am Can 
Am Crat'd 
AmBPwr 
Am Expos 
Am Homo 
Am Motors 
AmSfnrd 
AmTeteph 
Amoco 
Amro Steal 


Bankamar 


SbBi Steal 


Bnfen 


BP 


Brunswick 

CmpboflSp 

Can PactOc 

C awiptat 

Cetanese 

Central SW 

Chsnpion 


Chevron 

CTvyster 


dark I . . 
Coca Cota 


CmbtnBx 
ComwMhEi 
Cons Bis 


CntrfData 
Coming Ql 
CPC Ira 
Crane 
Curtiss Wfrt 
Data Gem. 


Delta Air 
Detroit Ed 
Digital Eq 
Disney 
Dow Own 
Dresser bid 
Duke Power 
DuPont 
Kim Kodak 
Eaton Coro 
Emerson B 
Emery Air 


DK Dec 
26 24 


54% 

54% 

Prestons 

28% 

26% 

35% 

35% 

Fat Chicago 

30 

29% 

41% 

68% 

41% 

to 

FsttatBncp 

Fn Forme 

52% 

9 

52% 

9 

2% 

» 

Pond 

57% 

57% 

33% 

33% 

FTWachva 

36% 

38% 

12% 

12% 

GAFCorp 

38% 

38ft 

24% 

24% 

GTE Carp 

59% 

59% 

42% 

42% 

GonCorp 

72% 

73 

84% 

79% 

84* 

79% 

GonDyincs 

GonEfectrfc 

69* 

87% 

68ft 

87% 

27% 

26 

Gen bat 

18% 

18% 

58% 

56% 

Gen MBs 

43 

42ft 

m 

77% 

Gan Motors 

67% 


a 

2ft 

GnPbUtny 

23 

23% 

42% 

42% 

Qenosco 

3* 

9% 

25% 

25% 

Georgia Pac 

38% 

38% 

67% 

67% 

GNare 

48% 

48% 

5% 

5ft 

Goodrich 

44% 

44% 

14% 

56 

14% 

56 

Goodyear 

Gouiotac 

41% 

17% 

41% 

17% 

60% 

61% 

Grace 

50% 

50% 

27% 

77% 

GtAtt&Tae 

24 

24% 

46% 

46% 


to 

32% 

14% 

15 

GrumanOor 

26 

26% 

41% 

41% 

Gutt&Wkst 

64% 

64% 

39% 

3SX 

BatazHJ. 

41% 

41% 

6% 

6% 

Hercules 

53% 

53% 

53% 

54% 

mett-PknJ 

43 

43% 

61% 

47% 

61% 

47* 

Monnywel 

tCtacn 

59 

23X 

58% 

toft 

39% 

to 

39% 

83% 

tngeraofl 
raid Steel 

to 

18% 

to 

18% 

42% 

42% 

IBM 

122 

121% 

48% 

43% 

NCO 

11% 

11* 

54% 

55 

M Paper 
htToTOf 

7fi% 

76ft 

34% 

34% 

53* 

53% 

SB* 

59% 

taring Bank 

48% 

46% 

12% 

12% 

Jhnan6Jhn 

67% 

66% 

40% 

40% 

Kaiser Alum 

13% 

13% 

240% 

240% 

Ketr McGee 

28ft 

28% 

35 

35% 

KrnbTyQrk 

K Marl 

82% 

82% 

31% 

31% 

44 

44 

37% 

37% 

Kroger 

L-fSTcorp 

30% 

29% 

43% 

43% 

1% 

1% 

45% 

45% 

Litton 

76% 

76% 

38% 

38% 

Lockheed 

50% 

Rl% 

53% 

53% 

Lucky Sirs 
Man (freer 

27% 

28 

20 

70% 

46% 

47% 

38% 

39% 

MenvIfeCp 

2 

2 

42% 

42% 


61* 

61% 

129% 

129% 

Marine mu 

46 

46 

45% 

45% 


99% 

39% 

32% 

32% 

Masco 

29% 

29% 

34 

33% 

McDonalds 

63% 

63 

47% 

4/% 

McOorawl 

74% 

74% 

33 

33% 

Mead 

57% 

57% 

16 

16 

Merck 

128% 

123% 

27 

27% 

MnstaMng 

117% 

117% 

55% 

55% 

Mouaoe 

40% 

39% 

60% 

80% 


77 

77% 

33% 

33% 

Morgan JP. 

85% 

85% 

54% 

54* 

Motorola 

36% 

36% 

30% 

30% 

NCRCorp 

46% 

46 

23% 

23% 

NLlndstre 

5% 

5% 

49% 

49% 

NatOtetfes 

43% 

44 

16% 

16% 

NatMedErt 

23% 

23% 

106% 106 I 

NatSmcndt 

11 

11 

43% 

43% 

NoricrikStti 

85% 

85 

60% 

toft 

NWBancrp 

38% 

88K 

19% 

19% 

DccktatPet 

28% 

28* 

46% 

87% 

48% 

87% 

Ogden 

OwiGorp 

44% 

41% 

43% 

41% 

69* 

69% 

Owens-Hi 

52 

51% 

75% 

75% 

PacGasB 

74% 

24% 

86% 

66% 

Pan Am 

4% 

4% 

11% 

11% 

FtannayJJX 

74% 

74% 

73% 

73% 

PenrnoB 

66 

64% 

as* 

86% 

rfrpiSCO 

26% 

26 


Dec Doc 
26 26 


Pfizer 82% 60% 
Phelps Doe 2M 21% 
^Mrs 73% 73% 


PHBpftM 
Pt3«PM 
Polaroid ■ 
PPG tod ■ 

PrctrGmti 


11 % 11 % 
87% 67% 
73% 73% 
79% 79% 


PbSE&G 40% 41 
Raytheon 68 68 

RynktaMat 40% 40 
RoctaMilnt 47 46% 

Royal Dutch 95% 95 
Sanlee 34% 34% 
SFESodk 90 30 

ISISSar 32% 32% 
Scott Paper 63% 63% 
Seagram 61% 62% 
Sears Ffe* 40% 40% 
ShsaiYm 57% 57% 
Stager 39% 39% 
StmMlBk 94% 91% 
Sony 21% 21% 
SthCalEd 35 34% 

S’WttnSeH 114% 114% 
StdOfl 49% 49% 
46% 46% 

38% 30% 
57 57% 

306% 306% 
38% 38% 
35% 36% 


Stevens 
Sun Comp 

Tenneco 

Ti 


Texas E Cor 28% 28% 

Texas Inst 118% 116% 
Texas Utas 32% 32% 
Textron 65 64% 

Trades Cor 44% 44% 
TRW Inc 87% 87% 

UAUnc 54% 54% 

Unfever NV 23SH 23434 
83% 83 
UnOrtfcto 22% 22% 
UnPacCor 63% 63% 

(ltd Brands 35% 35% 

USGCorp 38% 38% 
UldTachnol 47% 47% 
USX Carp 21% 21% 

Unocal 27% 27% 

Jim Wtfter 50% 50% 
WmerLmbt 60% 58% 
WsBs Fargo 103% 103% 
WstghseB 58% 59% 

" 39% 39% 

68 % 68 % 
37% 38% 

Xerox Oorp 62% 53 

Zenith 21% 21% 


CANADIAN PRICES 

sses? 101 

AJgomeSti 
Can Pacific 
Cominco n/a 
ConBathrst 
Hkr/SidCan 
HdsnBMn 
Imasoo 

Ofi 



ETBS? 1 

In Pipe 
Ryl Trustee 


Co 

ThmsnM'A’ 

l» Co,p 



From David Watts 

Tokyo 

Japan will today introduce 
an austere budget alter its 
most comprehensive tax re- 
vision since the war. 

The Japanese await the 
budget as the rest of the world 
looks to Japan to stimulate hs 
economy to take up the slack 
in the global economy. 

The most important tax 
reform is the elimination of 
tax exemption on small sav- 
ings and the break-up of the 
postal savings system winch 
should free a large amount of 
savers’ money which has been 
so important in developing 
Japanese industries since the 
war. 

The proposed sales tax is 
gening a hot reception from 
the opposition, which began 

its attack with a series of visits 
by its leaders to the office of 
the Prime Minister, Mr 
Yasuhiro Nakasone. 

The government has appar- 
ently abandoned its hope of 
riddug itself of deficit financ- 
ing in a 54,101 billion yen 
budget with increased treasury 
loan and investment pro- 
grammes which w£D probably 
help to boost the domestic 
economy to what the gov- 
ernment hopes will be 3.5 per 
cent real growth next yearjed 
by domestic demand. 

The Japanese-style value- 



Yasuhiro Nakasone: under 
pressure from opposition 

added-tax, doe to be in- 
troduced at the beginning of 
1988, is likely to put a damper 

on consumer spending — not 
that foreign imports gained 
much from such spending 
anyway. 

Changes in liquor tax are of 
particular interest to the Euro- 
pean Economic Community. 

Under the proposals, which 
are unlikely to satisfy the EEC 
and which must be approved 
by the Diet next month, the 
government plans to abolish 
the grading system fa- whisky, 
as demanded by the EEC, by 
the simple method of re- 
classifying all domestically- 
produced whisky, which the 
EEC did not regard as such, as 
spirits. 


Whisky will be known as 
Scotch, but the tax on it will 
still be seven times that levied 
on its rival Japanese “spirits”. 

The Japanese government’s 
chief taxexpert, Mr Sadanori 
Yamanaka, a m?" not known 
for his humility, is un- 
repentant “The EEC did not 
ask for the same monetary 
value but said it should be 
treated on an equal basis with 
the Japanese product-. It 
(Japanese whisky) may con- 
tinue to be a barrier to 
expanded sales of Scotch.” 

He gave this warning: “Ja- 
pan is at long last awake. 
Japan is at long last on its feet 
And the bluff in diplomatic 
relations with Japan will no 
longer be usabfc~Japan be- 
came an ordinary member of 
the worid community and will 
behave as such, in other 
words, will become a for- 
midable partner in any 
discussion.*' 

The tax reform, which win 
simplify the system from 
1988, is designed to be rev- 
enue neutral with tax cuts for 
corporations and wealthier in- 
dividuals . balancing tax in- 
creases, which include 5 per 
cent VAT, from which 40 
items will be exempt 

The budget holds spending 
to just 0.02 per cent above that 
of the current year. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• RADIANT METAL 

FINISHING: Half-year to Aug- 
31. Interim dividend lp, pay* 
able on Jan. 16. Turnover 
£733,100 (£463,937). Pretax 
profit £90.125 (£174,490). 
framings per share 4_28p 
(8.59p). _ _ 

• MONKS A CRANE: Con- 
tracts have been exchanged for 
the purchase of Salients Tool 
Stores. The price win be based, 
on the net assets and will be 
£92,000 in cash and £200,000 in 
loan notes and a further 
£108,000 in cadi next March. 

• READICUT INTER- 
NATIONAL: The acquisition 
of F Drake (Fibres) has been 
completed. Probate has been 
granted to the executors of J 
Hoyle who held 10 per cent of 
Drake's capital and this holding 
has been purchased for £1.25 
milli on in cash. 

• FASHION & GENERAL 
INVESTMENT: Six months to 
Sept. 30. Interim dividend lOp 
(same). Pretax revenue 
£311.000 (£343,000). Earnings 
per store 13 Jp (14.9p). 

• SUTCLIFFE, SPEAKMAN: 
Turnover £8L55 milli on (£7.94 
million) for the half-year to 
Sept. 30. Pretax profit £302,000 
(£270,000). Earnings per share 
(folly diluted) 2.2p (nil). 

• EUSTON CENTRE PROF’ 
EKTU23: Six months to 


appointments 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


dirtnngi 


N York 1.4565-1.4685 
Montreal 26095-2X287 

AmsdanOXI 02-3X342 

Brussels 59. J 1-59.61 
Cpftgen 117799-10X383 
Dub* 1X492-1X557 
Frankftrt2X395-2.8G03 
Lisbon 21455-217.17 

Madrid 192X7-194X4 
Mfen 1978X9-1994X5 
Oslo 10X412-10X890 
Paris 9X948-9.4592 
St krikn 9X480-10X073 
Tokyo 231X9X33X0 
Vtana 20X220.17 
Zurich 2X719-2X896 

SMtagMH 



215X0-216.75 

193.70-194X4 

1985/17-1994X5 

10.8632-10X890 

9.4392-9.4592 

93824-10.0073 


12 




lX2-iX7pnm 
1X2-1.17tran 
1%-1pram 4-3%pram 

17-12prem 5l-42prem 

2%-IKpceni 6-4%prem 

n/a 0/8 

1%-1pram 4%- 

1Q2-150ds 
10354s 
5-4prem 
3%-5%4s 
1K-%pnm 
1%-lprem 
1%-1%pnsm 
9%-7%prom 
114-1 pram 

at68X (day's range 68X-88X). 


OTHER STERLING RATES 

Argentina austral* 1X224-1X296 

Australia dofiar 2X12B-2XI61 

Bahrain dtaar 0X500-0X540 

Brad cruzado * 21X249-21.7469 

Cyprus pound 0.7340-0.7440 

Ftaiand maria 7X220-7X620 

Greece drachma 203X0-205X0 

11-4210-11-4234 

19X0-19X0 


tember 30 (figures in £000)- _. 
revenue from properties 4,610 
(4;473), interest receivable 300 
[458), interest payable 988 
1988), pretax profit 3,902 

(3,911): 

• AJ WORTHINGTON: Half 
year to September 3a Turnover 
£1,761,000 (£682,000), pretax 
profit £48,000 (£49,000 loss), tax 
.£5,000 (nil), ep& 0.8p (l.Op loss). 
The group’s turnover has in- 
creased as a result of the 
activities afWH White and Son, 
man u facturers of knitwear and 
other dothing. 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


HDA Forgings: Mr Peter 
Masters has been named as 
company sales and marketing 
director and Mr Charles 
Anderson director and general 
manager of the blade forge 
division. 

Massey-Feiguson Tractors 
and Farm Equipment Mr 
John Sword is now president 
Glaxo: Dr Richard Sykes 
has been appointed chief exec- 
utive of Glaxo Group Re- 
search i ini fieri. Dr J Barrie 
Ward, director of micro- 
biology, has joined the board 
of Glaxo Group Research. 

The Union Discount Com- 
pany of London: Mr WB 
Carmichael becomes a dir- 
ector. 

RedEand: Mr Christopher 
May will become financial 
director is March. 

Harrison Industries: M 
Jean-Claode Canari is made a 
director. 

Farr Europe: Mr Don 
Parker becomes manufac- 
turing director. 

Newcastle Budding Society: 
Mr E A Cowan has been made 
deputy chief executive. 

Ijgase Management Ser- 
viqes_Mr Alastair Lawson has 

ing director an^Mr”^^ 
Deacon, chief accountant and 


company secretary, becomes a 

^Commercial Industries 
(UK.): Mr Viv Dandson has 
been appointed the chairman 
and chief executive. Mr An- 
drew Brown managing direc- 
tor and Mr Bryan Stewart, 
financial director- 

Allied Dunbar Mr AUan 
McCoIriUe is to be executive 
director, northern region,. Mr 
Derek Riley executive direc- 
tor, sales, Mr Nigel Burton, 
executive director, inte^ 
national and new projects and ■ 
Mr Brian Thomas executive 
director, actuarial, ail to take 

effctt from next TOursdav. 

Morgan Grenfell: Mr u G 
Hill has been appointed jomt 
managing director of Morgan 
Grenfell Inc, New York, with 
Mr KR Harris, also as joint 
managing director. Mr N J D 
Bull will be chief executive of 
Morgan Grenfell Australia 
Limited. Mr Bull and Mr W G 
M Michie wifi also become 
joint managing direct ors of 
Morgan Grenfell Australia. 
Mr Bull and Mr Michie have 
also been appointed to the 
board of Morgan Grenfell 
Australia Holdings. 

Hollis: Mr Jim Docker has 
been managing director 
of the Solicitors’ Law Sta- 
tionery Society. 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


20- 76ds 

21- ISprem 
12%-13%ds 

3- 2prem 
3ft-3ftprem 

4- 3%prem 
28%-24%pren> 
4%-3%pram 


L4270-0.4310 


.3X0133X084 France 


Hong Kong dollar . 

tatflaruns 

kaqdnar 

Kuwait dinar KD _ 

Mateysta defer — 

Mexico peso 1300-0-1 35a 0 

New Zealand doBv 27923-2X050 ttahr 

Saudi Arabia rival 5X7203X120 BetgiumfCOnnii) 

Singapore dota 3.1944-3X010 " " 

SouthAMca rand 3X3823228 

UAErfirham 5XS703397D 

Uoyds Bank 


Australia , 
Canada. 
Sweden 
Norway. 


1X900-1X850 

2.1790-2-1620 

2X9303X660 


West Germany 
Switzerland . 
Netherlands. 


0X620-0X625 

1X800-1X810 

6X020-6X070 

7.4025-7X075 I 

7X840-7X690 

1X450-1-9460 

1.6260-1X280 

2.1985-2X000 

6.4350-64400 


Clearing Banks 11 



Loans % 

Overnight High; 11 Low ID 
Wdflkfee±TO% 

Traasny BSi (Discount %) 

Buying SeBng 

2 nH« 10 % 2mnta 10"i« 
3nwth 10 " w 3mnh-10% 

b (Discount %) 

1 mrth 10 ra i*- 10 ”s 22 tnnth 10 %- 10 "» 

Smnta 10"is-1D J, 328inrtn 10 N w-10% 
TMeBHa (Discount's) 

1 ninth 11 7 m 2nrth 11 % 

3 mrth 11 *m 6 ninth 11 k ia 

py 

Overnight: open 1 1 % dose 1 0% 

1 week 11%-11 Gntnm 11»n-11K 

1 mrth II’m-II'm 9 ninth 11 %- 11 J » 
Srnnm 11 b w- 1 l% 12 mtti 1 l%-ll*w 
Local AaBMrityDepos8s(%) 

2 days 10% 7 days 10% 

1 mrth 10% Snrith 11% 

6mntfi 11 % 12 mth 11 % 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 9-12 
Smmh 6%-6% 
Dautsdmk 
7 days 9X% 

3 mrth JpKhS'ie 
French FTanc 
7 days 9-8% 

3 mrth 9%-aifi 
Swiss Franc 
7 days S-2% 

3 mrth 4-3% 
Yen 

7 days 5-4% 

3 mrth 4 7 is-4 ** 


1 mrth 
6 ninth 
cal 

1 mrth 
6 mntti 
c afl 
1 BMrtl 
6 ninth 

can 
1 mrth 
6 mrth 
calf 
1 irailh 
6 mrth 


7-6 

7%-7% 

6%XK 

10%-8% 

e'is-5 1 ^ 

6U-7U 
9-8% 
9ft-9 
2M-1 'A 
43% 

43% 

54 

4%-4% 

4*-4K 


BULLION 


How Kong . 
Austria- 


158X0-159X0 

13S3X-1355X 

404540X2 

, 7.73107.7940 
146X0-146X0 
132X5-T3225 
_ 13X0-13.70 


nataaenppieri by Barclays Bank HOrat and Bttei. 



RE CENT ISSUES 


1 ninth 11H-11K 
3 mrth 11%-11% 
9 mrth 11%-llK 

Star6agC0s(%) 

1 mrth 11 3 m- 11% 
6 mrth 11>is-11% 
DoferCOanu 
1 mrth 7.65-7X0 
6 mrth 6X56X0 


2 mrth 11%-11K 
6 mrth 11%-11% 
12 rath 11X-11 

3 mrth 11>w-11% 
12mth 11%-11 

3 mrth 6X5-6.60 
IZmtti 6X0-6.15 


GoidX389XS-389.75 

33k 

Sovereigns (new. ex vrtt 
S92i»93X0 (£62X033X0) 
Ptattaum 

S 476X5 (£324X5) 

Siver 

55X9-5X1 (£3X03X1 ) 


ECGD 


Fixed Bate Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference rate for 
Merest period November 1. 1986 to 
November 28. 1966 inclusive: 11X46 per 
cent 


EQUITIES 


British Ges 
Cap & Regional (6Sp) 
DonM sTfOTp) 
Fletcher Khig fl75p) 
Gaynor (S4p) 

Geest (I25pj 
Qentree (lap) 

Gordon RussaD aaOj 

Gutoria i Otvp n 


148 -2 ; 
65U +'« 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Harmony Letaura (23p) 
Hornby (100|A 
Hoskyns Gp fl28p) 
Johnson Fry 
Uoyds Chemist (105p) 
Loaltek ffi5o) 

Lon& MetropoBtan (145p) 
MIL (1440) 

Me zza n in e g50p) 


156 4-1 
178 
108-1 
170*1 4-1 'a 

a?* ! 

Gdns (95p) 105 


HretDeaBn LaeiPeeltaja Laat DeetaMton ForSeUtanMnt 

Nov 17 Nov 28 Feb 19 Mar 2 

□eel Dec 12 Mar 5 Mar 16 

Dec 15 Jan 2 Mar 19 Mar 30 

Ctai optfons were taken oat are 29/12/86 Ahaco, 7SB. British & CommonweaHh 
k>- GEC. United SctenUflc, Sqrtrrel Horn. Asda-MH. Pavton Mamabonal. 
Amstrai Seers, Wtsdown HokHngs. R8v Leisure, Hawley &oup, Guinness, Morgan 
GrenM, Dares Estatm, Garfunkafa Restaurants, Norfok Cmital Group. Cannon 
Street tovestments, TW, Marks & Spenoer, Campari, Chkxlde Group. British I 
Metal Ckjsuns Group, 


i Benzol, 


Maybam (IQS 
Nooo (152p) 


'OVp, 

ig Office (135p) 


NoihumbrSan Rne (60p) 
Plum HUgs (SOp) 
Spandex n 70p) 

SumS (135p) 

TSB Own tales (70p) 

Ward G 
Wlcfing 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

Avon Rubber N/P 
Birm Mtat V 
Leisue tnv 
Marflng WP 
M unton N/P 
New Court N/P 
TstN/P 
N/P 

Waddtnglon F/P 
Walker (AtfrerQ N/P 


N/P 
r N/P 


27 
101 
148 4-1 
158 
131 -1 
67 

*9 

78-1 
108 
155 
91 
113 
237 
138 
110 
74U 4-1*4 
133*1 
102 
146 4-1 


28 

18 +6 

5 

11-1 

4'z 

1* 

3 4+'4 

6 

203 4-13 


FutCttyvteton. 
i&CMaen 


Puts&i 


Pavlon Intw n afl uuii l. Royal tasutence. 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Time Month SMteng 

Mar 87 

Jun87 ; 

Sep 87 

Dec 87 _ — 

Mar88~_~_~. 

Junto 

Previous 
Three 
Mar 87 
Junto 
Sep 87 
Dec 67 


USIHmuvBead 

Mar 67 1_ 

Junto 

Sep 87 


89X4 
89X8 
89X4 
NT 
NT 

i Interest 14444 

63X7 
93X9 
93X2 
83.73 


££ 

Low 

. dose 

EatVoi 

88.88 

68X2 

568 

86X6 

69X4 

89X5 

65 

89X8 

89X6 

89X8 

42 

89X7 

. 89X4 

89X7 

B 

Mi-i 

Ml 

89.05 

0 

— 

— 

88X0 . 

0 

Previous day's total 
93X6 93X2 

open internal 22009 
93X2 822 

93X9 

93.93 

93X3 

123 

93X2 

93X7 

93X5 

60 

93.73 

93.70 

93X7 

44 


Start Gtt 
Dec 88 — 
Mar 67 — 
Junto — 


LoogGa 
Dec to — 
Mar 87 — 
Junto — 

. 67 

'-SC 100 


!R 


1004)0 

NT 

NT 


NT 

NT 

NT 


NT 

111-23 

NT 

NT 


Previous day's total open interest 3172 
1004)1 99-<n 99-04 795 

9637 0 

Prevtousda/s total open interest 212 

— — 96-61 0 

— — 97-14 0 

"Previous day% tool oponinterea 1 tolS 

— — 111-12 0 

112-15 111-13 112-13 4665 

— 112-18 0 

Previous day's total opsn interest 3138 


We make sure America gets its fast food fast 



r 



You don't waste time when you’re 
supplying names like McDpnakfs. 

In the United States, DaJgety guarantee 
tfie client and consumer top service through 
the biggest single fast food distributor in the 
world. 

And in Canada, Brazil and Mexico too. 

It's one more way we're into die food 
business on an international scale. 

In the UK, for instance, Dalgety brands 
are household names. 

Golden Wonder with its famous crisps 
and pot noodles. 


And Fred the Flour-Grader, famous for 
Homepride Cook-In Sauces as well as for 
Homepride flour these days. 

Among petfoods, winners like Winalot, 
Prime, Bonio and KattomeaL 

Not that strong brands are all we have 
to offer. 

Dalgety 

A name that goes from strength to strength. 


All round the world, the name Dalgety 
is also famous for food in bulk. 

\Xe sell formers animal feed and seeds, 
then sell the graincrop to millers, and millers' 
flour to bakers. 

Brewers buy our malt for their beer. 

We’re a major worid force in 
commodities like cocoa, coffee and sugar. 

In all these ways and more, Dalgety has 
become a powerful name in the worlds food 
business. 

And no one gets there by being slow off 
themark. 


(issue price hi brackets). 

Mar 87 


170.00 

171X5 

170.00 

17050 

441 

®1|| 


■ 


H 

i 

B 

1 

1 



Series 

Jen 

CMS 

Jrt 

Jan 

tats 

_£EL 

M 


Series 

Cafe 
Mar Jun 

Sep 

Mar 

PUS 

Sap 

Atari Lyons 
(*315) 

280 

300 

38 

20 

50 

35 

55 

40 

1 

3 

5 

0 

10 

15 

Hanson 

160 

180 

34ft — — 

18 24ft 30ft 

1 

4 

8 

7 Ym 




15 

23 

16 

22 

32 

Hanson 

(am) 





13 

30 

16 

31 

17% 

British Gas 

50 

16 

17* 

20 

H 

% 

1 

220 

3 

7% 



70 

i 

3% 

6% 

5% 

6% 

7ft 

Jaguar 

500 

550 

600 

46 

to 

80 

16 

20 

25 

BP 

(*722) 

600 

125 

135 


1 

6 



13 

6 

30 

50 

35 

78 

42 

48 


700 

30 

45 

65 

7 

32 

42 

Thom EMI 
(*468) 

420 

to 

77 



2ft 

6 

_ 

Cons Gold 
(*662) 

550 

600 

650 

117 

67 

30 

140 

100 

63 

112 

80 

2 

2 

IS 

6 

13 

27 

18 

37 

500 

550 

35 

14 

5 

50 

28 

82 

38 

12 

37 

to 

20 

42 

27 

50 

CbutauMs 

(*313) 

200 

280 

300 

56 

36 

18 

65 

45 

53 

1 

1 

1% 

3 

"S 

Tesco 

(*391) 

360 

390 

420 

47 

25 

10 

58 

40 

18 

70 

50 

30 

7 

15 

33 

10 

22 

38 

14 

28 

40 


330 

3 

13 

22 

19 

22 

25 


Series 

Fata May 


Feb Mav Ain 

Com Union 
(*263) 

260 

280 

300 

10 

2- 

1 

19 

11 

6 

27 

20 

12 

6 

19 

39 

11 

to 

42 

15 

26 

44 

Brit Aero 

C505) 

420 

460 

500 

95 

57 

25 

103 

68 

40 

80 

47 

2 

5 

13 

3 ' 
10 
to 

17 

Cables Wire 
(*330) 

300 

325 

360 

375 

34 

13 

Z 

f 

52 

30 

14 

60 

1 

6 

22 

45 

6 

14 

28 

12 

’ BATtndS 
(-470) 

390 

420 

460 

500 

90 

62 

32 

10 

97 

70 

43 

?? 

85 

58 

37 

2 

3 

13 

35 

3 

6 

22 

43 

12 

27 

GEC 

Cl®) 

160 

180 

200 

28 

9 

2 

33 

18 

8K 

37 

24 

14 

% 

4 

17 

2 

8 

19 

6 

12 

24 

Barclays 

(*505) 

460 

500 

550 

55 

23 

5 

to 

37 

1? 

75 

50 

4 

15 

13 

27 

18 

35 

Grand Met 
(*461) 

360 

390 

420 

460 

103 

73 

45 

13 

108 

78 

55 

35 

70 

SO 

1 

1 

1% 

10 

1 

2 

8 

25 

13 

Brit Telecom 

C214J 

180 

200 

220 

37 

17 

5 

43 

26 

13 

46 

32 

17 

% 

2 

12 

2 

6 

13 

4ft 

9 

19 

ICf 

(*1079) 

1000 
1050 
. 1100 

90 

42 

12 

105 

69 

130 

957 


2 

6 

14 

26 

20 

37 

Cadbury Schwpps 

160 

180 

200 

33 

14 

5 

36 

21 

11 

41 

26 

16 

ft 

4 

14 

2ft 

7 

17 

5 

11 

21 


11» 

3 

23 

48 


75 

87 

90 

Guinness 

280 

22 

33 

38 

10 

14 


Land See 
(*336) 

300 

330 

39 

13 

49 

28 

54 


1 

3 

6 


300 

330 

12 

4 

23 

12 

30 

18 

20 

50 

30 

53 

32 

55 

380 

2% 

13 

16 


27 

28 

30 

Ladbroks 

330 

58 

to 

73 

1 

3 


Marks ASpen 

nei) 

180 

200 

6 

1 

16 

8 

21 

12 


4 

23 

9 

to 

45 

13 

2fi 

45 


360 

390 

32 

12 

4b 

27 

52 

37 

5 

17 

11 

25 

15 

to 


220 

% 

3 

5 


43 

LASMO 

130 

32 

34 

_ 

2 

4 


Shea Trans 

(*3*1) 

600 

too 

90 

43 

105 

60 

120 

80 


2 

s 

14 

27 

“22 

37 

SB 


140 

160 

24 

12 

26 

18 

33 

23 

4 

11 

7 

15 

9 

18 


1000 

11 

30 

52 


28 

50 

Midland Bank 

500 

92 

97 

107 

2 



Trafalgar House 

cm 

260 

280 

15 

5 

25 

14 

33 

20 


3 

8 

18 

33 

12 


550 

600 

60 

17 

57 

25 

67 

37 

10 

to 

17 

4f| 

25 

300 

1 

7 

12 


31 

35 

P&O 

rsigj 

460 

70 

82 

92 




TSB 

(*74) 

70 

80 

5% 

% 

9% 

12 


1 

3 

6 

17 1 

4 

500 

toO 

35 

8 

47 

22 

62 

as 

8 

40 

20 

48 

4 ‘ 

23 

53 

6 

90 

ft 

2 

2 16ft 

7ft_ ' 

focal 

C182) 

160 

26 ” 

33 

42 

2 


Baoctam 

(•443) 


Mar Aw S«p life Jun Son 


390 

420 

460 


95 - — 

65 75 63 

40 53 62 

14 24 40 


1 % ~ — 

4 7 ID 

10 17 22 

23 34 40 


(*232) 


200 

220 

240 


39 45 — 
» 30 35 
9 17 23 


1 4 - 

6 11 14 

1* 20 25 


BTR 

(*269) 


260 

280 

300 


to 31 35 

12 19 23 
5 % 10 - 


7 10 14 

17 21 25 

35 38 - 


Bass 

650 

105 

1» 

WWW 

3 

8 


cm 

700 

65 

78 

to 

9 

JB 

30 

750 

28 

47 

53 

37 

45 

60 

Sue Octe 

800 

90 

KM 

127 

4 

10 

17 

(-671) 

650 

S3 

70 

68 

12 

22 

28 

700 

23 

37 

to 

37 

43 

52 

DeBoers 

850 

145 


WWW 

12 




(*753) 

TOO 

105 

125 



20 

33 

— 

750 

70 

95 

115 

45 

WJ 

70 


800 

40 

70 

to 

75 

90 

100 

DtaCWS 

300 

32 

44 

48 

8 

13 

18 

(*317) 

330 

16 

26 

» 

22 

25 

30 

360 

4 

13 

— 

48 

50 

— 

QKN 

240 

X 

43 

50 

3 

6 

9 

(*267) 

260 

22 

29 

3/ 

y 

13 

1b 

280 

11 

17 

V 

18 

24 

28 


300 

b 

— 

— < 

35 

— 

1 — 

Glass 

BOO 

180 

205 

_ 

8 

10 

— 

n05t) 

550 

135 

IS 

195 

12 

20 

24 

1000 

97 

128 

IS 

20 

» 

45 


1050 

60 

95 

182 

40 

55 

K 


R7Z 

(*693) 


MO 3% 11 ? g 2 


vaaiRoefs 

(*82) 


Lonmo 

(*243) 


gO 157 
600 107 
650 65 

700 35 


70 14% 
60 8 
90 2% 


125-4 
55 *65 35 


*1» 23% 1% 
15 16% G 

8 W 11 11 


11 — 
28 40 
57 67 


4% 4% 
8% 9%- 

13 15 


200 48 M ~ 77 

30 34 M 5 

SS ’J » ■ 




DMteKitar 29,1986. Total i 


» 14987. C 
FT-ae Index. 


11344. 

702. 


•UMertyma# 


Puts 3643 
Puts: is 



THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


19 


( STOCK MARKET) 

Traders fear oil prices may fall 
again if Saudis unload reserves 


Fears that 

may be planning to unload its 
huge oil reserves on the world 
market in the new year have 
led to speculation that Opec 
may have to consider another 
cut in production if it hopes to 
maintain prices at about SIS a 
barrel. 

Saudi Arabia is estimated to 
have about 60 million barrels 
of oil stored in tankers around 
the world and it could wreck 
Opec efforts to boost the price 
of crude oil if it suddenly 
starts to Hood on to the 
market. 

Mr Philip Kapadia, oil an- 
alyst with Raphael Zorn, the 
broker, says the Saudis hope 
to sell their reserves before the 
market is tested in February 
and this, combined with a 
mild winter and stalemate in 
the Iran-Iraq war could bring 
the price of crude oil back to 
about SIS. 

Earlier this month, Opec oil 
ministers agreed to cut 
production to 15.8 million 
barrels a day. Saudi Arabia 
was allocated a production 
quota of 4.1 million barrels. 
But Mr Kapadia warns that 
Opee’s efforts might not be 
enough and another reduction 
of at least I million barrels a 
day may be required. This is 
likely to be bad news for oil 
shares which were enjoying a 
bout of selective support 
yesterday. 

Among the leaders, BP 
firmed 6p to 72lp, Britoil 2p 
to 17Jp, and Shell a similar 
amount to 982p. 

Meanwhile, Mr Kapadia re- 
gards the onshore operators as 


By Michael Clark 

Saudi Arabia more attractive and singles 


out Enterprise, up 2p at i 80 p. 
Clyde Petroleum, Ip firmer at 
SSp. Sovereign Oil & Gas, 
unchanged at 33p. and Triton, 
steady at I38p, as likely buys. 

The rest of the equity 
market continued to enjoy 
selective support, but turn- 
over was pitifully thin with 

S dealers and investors 
ing to extend the Christ- 
mas break. The FT index of 
top 30 shares dosed 5.9 up at 
1,307.1. while the broader 
based FT-SE 100 added 6.5 at 
1,671.6. 

The stronger pound ena bled 
government securities to score 
sizeable gains with prices at 
the longer end of the market 
stretching to £%. 

As expected, mud) of the 
attention was focused on the 
steady stream of new year 

• United Biscmts, fire 
McVUie and Crawfords 
group, has been a dull 
market after the abortive 
merger with Imperial 
Group. The shares. Ip higher 
at 231 phot |nst 14p above 
the year's tow, have dearly 
been left behind. Now bro- 
kers like County Securities 
believe a rally is overdue. 

share lips that induded com- 
panies such as Woohvorfe, up 
20p at 7 lOp. Dee Corporation, 
3pio2Ilp, P&O IlploS19p, 
Full an Group 7p to 99p, 
Vickers 8p to 399p, Burton 
Group 9p to 287p and Bruit 
Walker 4p to 217p. 

Pearson, the conglomerate 
which owns The Financial 


PEARSON ENDIN G THE YEAR 
ON A HIGH NOTE I 





-r 


-r 


Jen FebMar Apr ' May Jun Jut Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 


3SQ 


Times and Lazatri Brothers 
merchant bank, looks like 
ending the old year on a high 
note. The shares, which have' 
been the source of persistent 
takeover speculation in recent 
months, surged hack through 
the 600p levd to dose I2p 
higher at 602p —just 6p below 
their peak. 

Once again, the pundits are 
talking of a bid for the 
company in the new year with 
Hutchison Whampoa, headed 
by Li Ka-shing, one of Hong 
Kong's most powerful 
businessmen, still topping (he 
list of likely predators. 

In September, Hutchison 
announced it had bought a 
near- 5 per cent stake in Pear- 
son, worth £50 milion, and 
expressed an interest in 
increasing its holding and 
creating commercial links be- 
tween the two companies. At 
the time; U Ka-shing said he 
had no interest in making a 
full bid for Pearson, but 
Pearson said it would “not 


welcome any further increase 
in the Hutchison bolding." 

Marketmen are now f 
feat Hutchison has chang 
its mind about a foil bid for 
the company and speculation 
has been heightened in the 
past few weeks by news of a 
big overseas buyer bidding 
575p for stock outside the 
market. 

Pearson is regarded as a 
good break-up candidate and, 
at these levels, commands a 
stock market capitalization of 
£1.18 billion. 

The £[.2 billion battle for 
control of PiUrfogton Broth- 
ers. Britain's biggest glass 
producer, is intensifying. Yes- 
terday PiUcingion advanced 
8p to a new high of 66ip, still 
awaiting higher terms from 
BTR shortly. Pilkington now 
stands more than lOOp above 
BTR's original offer with deal- 
ers anxiously awaiting details 
of a big profit forecast. 

Interim figures from Pil- 
kington recently were better 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at &45pm 


19M 

Mgk L am Company 

Me* 
BU Off* 

r ChTge 

Onm 

on 

YM 

% 

V 

1 

WE 

leaded 

*000 

11 

Mat 

m 

i Low 


Price 

BU Offer 

amge 

Qm 

dhr 

Wd 

% 

Pie 


pflDta 


383 

283 

AHed-Lyons 

315 

317 

• 

+4 

143 

43 

144 

435 

391 

312 

Ladbreka 

378 

382 


+3 

HLB 

44 

18.1 

308 

174 

126 

ASOA-MF1 

154 

156 


+14 

43 

23 

163 

1.700 

349 

276 

Land Secuties 

335 

337 


+2 

its 

40 

225 

639 

455 

375 

BET 

439 

442 



243 f 

53 

163 

107 

288 

133 

Legal & Gen 

245 

247 


-1 

123 

50 

315 

1500 

330 

241 

BTR 

268 

270 


+2 

S3 

33 

107 

564 

484 

293 

LtoydS 

433 

437 


-2 

250 

5.7 

7.0 

129 

401 

361 

BAT 

468 

471 


-4 

18.4 

33 

123 

3300 

283 

193 

Lonhro 

242 

244 


+1 

17.1 

70 

120 

677 

572 

449 

Barclays 

503 

5 07 


-4 

28.1 

53 

73 

283 

231 

IBS 

Marta & Spencer 

tBO 

182 


+2 

SO 

32 

210 

1500 

840 

62S 

Bass 

735 

738 

• 

+11 

243 

33 

13.1 

328 

580 

417 

Midland 

580 

585 


+1 

37.1 

64 

210 

204 

450 

356 

Beecham 

442 

444 

• 

+3 

17.1 

33 

104 

1600 

593 

426 

Nat West 

530 

535 


+1 

27.6 

52 

50 

289 

72S 

526 

Okie Crete 

668 

673 


+9 

300 

43 

SL5 

726 

576 

4 ZS 

PtODW 

517 

520 


+11 

224b 21 

140 

479 

383 

293 

BOC 

368 

371 


+3 

153 

4 2 

14.4 

302 

605 

383 

Pearson 

603 

607 


+15 

15.4 

25 

20 2 

2200 

289 

170 

Boots 

231 

233 

• 

+1 

103 

4.6 

15.1 

1300 

664 

315 

Pttktogion Bras 

659 

662 

• 

+9 

214 

32 

175 

2100 

608 

423 

Br Aerospace 

503 

507 


+6 

23.4 

43 

106 

431 

248 

162 

Homey 

184 

1B5 



70 

29 

126 

1500 

as 1 . 61 

Br Gas 

66 

65*2 


+4 

83 

143 


52600 

942 

718 

Prudential 

735 

787 


-3 

380 

40 

625 

246 

722 

530 

Br PBtrataum 

720 

723 


+7 

486 

67 

73 

1.100 

234 

146 

Racal Beet 

181 

183 


+1 

44 

24 

195 

5000 

280 

177*2 Br Tehran 

213 

215 

• 

-1 

113 

53 

12 5 

2.100 

589 

421 

Rank Org 

523 

527 


-3 

225 

40 

185 

1500 

193 

98 

Brito! 

171 

172 


+24 

93 

54 

46 

2600 

900 

605 

Rectal A Coleman 

861 

886 

• 

+5 

229 

28 

127 

58 

354 

256 

Burton 

285 

288 

• 

+9 

8.1 

23 

lOI 

3300 

584’ a 345 

Reuters 

563 

565 


-1 

5.4 

1.0 

427 

784 

369 

277 

Cable & Wireless 

328 

332 


-1 

73 

22 

183 

320 

791 

511 

RTZ 

690 

695 

• 

+1 

314 

45 

92 

366 

19S 

158 

Cadbury Schweppes IBS 

189 


+5 

8.7 

43 

226 

2 .100 

532 

385 

Rtanitree 

396 

402 

• 


ISO 

45 

11.1 

214 

564 

426 

Coats Vfyela 

466 

469 

• 

-2 

17.9 

33 

146 

328 

967 

762 

Royal tns 

848 

852 

• 

^5 

380 

45 

69.7 

2100 

338 

257 

Com Union 

282 

264 


-1 

17.4 

63 


334 

426 

344 

Salisbury <J) 

416 

418 

• 

+1 

84 

20 

242 

24 

704 

409 

Cons OotlMds 

660 

664 



35.0 

53 

709 

55 

148blD4 

Sears 

124 

125 


+3 

50 

40 

120 1 0.000 

330 

2S2 

CounaitfdB 

312 

314 

• 


102 

33 

103 

244 

415 

301 

Sedgwick Qp 

302 

305 


-6 

17.1 

50 

145 

1,000 

290 

201 

Dee Com 

209 

211 


+2 - 

106 

53 

176 

1600 

884 

653 

She* 

980 

982 


+2 

514 

52 

27 

435 

438 

218*3 Otara Gfp 

316 

318 


+3 

43 

14 

223 

1400 

132 

93 

Smith & Nephew 

125 

127 


+1 

as 

20 

215 

291 

650 

408 

Rsona 

536 

538 

• 

+2 

04 

13 

233 

201 

177 

96 

STC 

176 

178 


+3 

21 

12 

124 

456 

954 

701 

Gen Accident 

795 

BOO 

• 

-1 

343 

43 

201 

272 

894 

419 

Stan Chan 

760 

785 


-1 

464 

50 

27 

4 

226 

158 

GEC 

184 

186 


-1 

63 

34 

116 

3.000 

365 

256*7 Storehouse 

285 

288 


+4 

110 

35 

155 

700 

11*. 

756 Glaxo 

10’j 104 



200 

13 

226 

588 

772 

520 

Sun Aliance 

635 

640 


-2 

27S 

45 

574 

103 

481 

328 

Grand Met 

458 

482 


+4 

146 

02 

133 

582 

81'* 72 

TSB P/P 

74 

74*, 


+1*« 

6.1 

82 



11 'a 721 

GUS A 

10*« 104 



306 

23 

146 

27 

420 

26S 

Tosco 

300 

382 


+4 

8l9 

25 

223 

171 

774 

720 

GHE 

785 

770 

• 

-i 

423 

53 

223 

75 

529 

374 

Thom EMj 

467 

470 


+2 

250 

55 

345 

177 

385 

235 GfKN 

266 

267 

• 

+2 

173 

6.7 

83 

204 

349 

209 

Trafalgar House 

271 

273 


+3 

129 

60 

102 

209 

355 

274 

Guinness 

285 

288 

• 

+6 

11.6 

43 

103 

2600 

209 

139 

Trusthouae For® 

176 

177 


+1*» 

70 

45 

175 

814 

215’.- 141 

Hanson 

190 

191 

• 

+1 

6.1 

33 

121 

5600 

22 

13'sUnlewr 

21H21 3 * 



60.1 

28 

220 

32 

623 

403 

Hawker StaMey 

446 

450 

• 

+3 

21.4 

43 

09 

319 

269 

216 

Utd Biscuits 

230 

231 



128b 

50 

125 

755 

12'. 734 

Imp Cham kid 

ip.iO*i 


- _ 

48.6 

43 

12.1 

839 

1 235*2 174 

Welcome 

234 

235 


+4’» 

20 

15 

aao 

1500 

583 

335 

Jagiar 

522 

525 


+7 

127 

24 

106 

410 

[925 

430 

Wootaorth 

708 

713 


+21 

229 

32 

165 

991 


ferm expected and analysis 
have already hoisted their 
profit forecasts for the year 
from £175 million to about 
£190 million. 

However, suggestions that 
BTR will launch a knockout 
bid of 750p a share appear to 
be wildly optimistic and there 
is growing speculation in the 
market that its next offer may 
be less than 700p a share. BTR 
finished lp firmer at 269p. 
The dosing date for the bid is 
January 24. 

Guinness recovered from an 
early setback following more 
disclosures over the weekend 
about the latest twists and 
turns in the Department of 
Trade and Industry's in- 
vestigation into the com- 
pany’s affairs. 

The DTI is now looking at 
evidence provided by Guin- 
ness’s own financial adviser. 


• The recovery continues 
apace at First National Fi- 
nance Corp, rescued from 
the fringe banking crisis in 
1975. Fall-year figures ex- 
pected on Monday should 
show pretax profits op 
from £22 millkii) to £34 na- 
tion, where the shares, un- 
changed at 200p, yield a 
healthy 5.6 per cart. 


Morgan Grenfell, about a 
parcel of 2.1 million shares 
bought by another merchant 
hank. Henry Ansbacher, at 
prices above the current ruling 
market price. At one stage, the 
Guinness share price came 
within a whisker of its low 
before rallying to close 9p 
dearer on the day at 290p 
following news of a succesfol 
outcome to a law suit it had 
brought in the US and a new 
year press Up . 

Morgan Grenfell's own 
share price, which has been 
under a cloud since the in- 
quiry into Guinness was an- 
nounced, suffered a relapse, 
tolling 9p to 384p, having hit a 
low of 353p earlier this month. 
That compares with the 500p 
the shares were floated at this 
summer. But Henry Ans- 
bacher shrugged off the con- 
troversy, firming 0.5p lo 
84.5p. 

Shareholders or Mitchell 
Cotts, the engineer-to-trans- 
port-and-trading group, must 
still be hoping for a pros- 
perous new yea r. Tipbook, the 
container and trailer rental 
group, headed by the am- 
bitious Mr Robert Montague, 
has built up a n ear-5 per cent 
stake and is mentioned as a 
likely bidder for the 
remainder. 

Last year Mitchell Cotts 
shareholders saw pretax prof, 
its of the group for the year ro 
June plunge from £12 million 
to just £39,000. Mitchell Cotts 
ended the session l-25p dearer 
at 66.25p where it is valued at 
£64 million. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Range of Guinness 
inquiry widening 


T hrough a series of not dis- 
interested leaks, confessions and 
publicised statements, the 
Department of Trade and Industry's 
inquiry into Guinness is beginning to 
have shape. It is fairly dear that the 
inspectors have concentrated on the 
nature and significance of dealings in 
Guinness and Distillers shares during 
the crucial period between March 17 
and April 18, the date when the 
Guinness bid for Distillers, in com- 
petition with Argyll, finally succeeded. 

The sale, or placing, during the battle 
of some 2.15 million Guinness shares by 
Morgan Grenfell, Guinness's principal 
financial adviser at the time, with 
clients of Henry Ansbacher, is, to say the 
least, interesting, especially in the light 
of the subsequent purchase, after the 
battle had been won and lost, of the 
same shares by Down Nominess, a 
subsidiary of Ansbacher, at a price 
noticeably higher than the the market 
price at the time. 

As the focus of the investigation is 
narrowing, the range of the inquiry is 
also, unavoidably, widening. When the 
DTI inspectors went in on the morning 
of December 1, they required access to 
records not only at Guinness but also at 
firms which were during the bid for 
Distillers advising or acting for 
Guinness, chiefly Morgan Grenfell, 
Gazenove, Wood Mackenzie and Rob- 
ert Fleming. The trails cannot in their 
nature stop at any of these points — as 
the statement volunteered to the DTI 
inspectors by Richard Fenhailsy 
Ansbacher s chief executive, shows. 

Guinness is finding itself increasingly 
isolated. Morgan Grenfell has 
endeavoured to put as much distance as 


it conceivably can from the client for 
whom it fought a long and bloody battle. 
The company, and in particular the 
chairman and chief executive, Ernest 
Saunders, is being subjected to a covert 
public relations campaign of mis- 
information and damaging innuendo. 
In Scotland great pressure zs being put 
on the two new Guinness non-executive 
directors with Scottish backgrounds. Sir 
Norman Mactorlane and Ian Chapman, 
to resign, from the Guinness board, 
preferably in dramatic fashion. 

Judgement can be fairly made only 
when the inspectors have completed 
their report Meanwhile, the debate on 
the broader issues raised by the 
Guinness affair will, and should, con- 
tinue. Two stand out: 

First The techniques (legal if unlikely 
to command universal approval) for the 
successful conduct of contested take- 
over bids, whicb are becoming better 
understood, rapidly, in industry, are 
such that it may be questioned whether 
the fete, ie the onwership, of major 
companies should be determined by 
their use. Takeovers, in a sense, are too 
easy. 

Second. The close relationships, 
partly because of their large size and 
limited number, between the major City 
firms — merchant banks, stockbrokers, 
solicitors and other professional advis- 
ers — put enormous strains on their 
ability to act independently in the 
interest of a client 

The conflicts of interest of the kind 
coming to light in the Guinness in- 
vestigation put a question mark not 
only over individual firms but over the 
system itself. 


Japan lays dollar low 


W hen even the Japanese talk of a 
lower dollar who is to gainsay 
them? Not yesterday’s dys- 
peptic foreign exchange markets. After 
the remarks by Satoshi Sumita, the 
Japanese central bank governor, that a 
dollar rate of YI59 to Y160 would be 
acceptable they promptly marked the 
dollar down to the lower end of the 
indicated range from the previous close 
ofYI61.95. 

In relatively thin markets between the 
two holiday periods the movement is 
probably less significant than it seems. 
But combined with concern about 
tomorrow’s US trpde figures and general 
gloom about American economic pros- 
pects in the new year Mr Sum i la’s 
remarks made for a decidedly weak 
dollar. . 

The central bank governor's interven- 
tion marks another chapter in the 
somewhat uneven relationship of the 
US-Japanese exchange rate pact So for, 
Japan seems to have gained more from 
the deal than the US, having done 
relatively little to reflate its economy 
and enjoying a more stable dollar-yen 
rate for its exports. But yesterday's 
movement, if maintained, will make it 
that bit harder for Japanese exporters. 


Elsewhere in foreign exchange mar- 
kets the pound moved erratically, first 
falling with the dollar and then recover- 
ing to close just 0.1 below its previous 
dose at 68.9 in terms of the trade 
weighted index. Against the dollar it was 
more than a cent higher at Si. 4680 

The main immediate influences on 
sterling are the oil price and the opinion 
polls. Both are going sterling’s way. Oil 
yesterday rose another 30 cents to 
$17.60 a barrel 

The polls, too. are reassuring the 
market The most recent evidence 
suggests Mrs Thatcher has every chance 
of being returned in the coining election 
which the markets equate with rel- 
atively sound finance and less 
uncertainty. 

This degree of support for sterling has 
only been purchased at the cost of very 
high interest rates. If international 
investors feel happier with a Conser- 
vative government that does not mean 
that they feel comfortable with a fuzzy 
monetary policy and uncertain fiscal 
policy. What would really reassure them 
is for Britain to become a full member of 
the European Monetary System. The 
fact that this is very unlikely leaves 
sterling more exposed than it need be. 


( TEMPUS ) 


Goliath Courtaulds needs a 
bigger sword to beat David 


Courtaulds is out of practice 
in the corporate arena as its 
bid for Foihergjll & Harvey 
clearly shows. Unless it wants 
to be billed as the Goliath in 
this encounter, it is going to 
have to sharpen up its ideas. 
There is a very hklf-hearied 
feel to its £282 million offer. 

The predator is hampered 
by the feet that its shares are 
selling on about half the 
prey’s rating but the lack of a 
straight share alternative to 
the cash-loan note offer has 
not won over Fothergill 
shareholders. 

Their response last week 
was a unanimous thumbs 
down — only 0.94 per cent 
accepted - so the offer has 
been extended until January 
30. Courtaulds owns only 0.8 
per cent of Fotheigjfl. 

Courtaulds' motives are 
not hand to fafeom. There is 
industrial logic in buying into 
the fast-growing area of ad- 
vanced materials while en- 
gineered fabrics and en- 
gineered surfaces fit well into 
the group's portfolio. 

Both companies have been 
striving to move away from 
the vicissitudes of the textiles 
industry. Fothergill, helped 
by its size, Iras, however, been 
able to explore many more 
avenues. 

But the strain of having to 
finance heavy research and 
development has made itself 
felt on the smaller company. 
And given the long lead time 
involved in developing prod- 
ucts, decisions on expen- 
diture allocation have been 
hard to make. Esoteric aca- 
demic considerations have 
frequently had to vie with 
xmimercial ones. 

Courtaulds argues that 
-olbergflTs style of operation 
would thrive within the co- 
x>on of a larger organization. 
-othergiH hotly disagrees, . 
laying it$ skills would wither 
n thin an organization geared 
o quantity rather than 
tualily. 

The "poison pill” - a joint 
renlure with the American, 
company Cyanamid with the 
option to buy out the 


partner’s share in the event of 
a takeover — was apparently 
known to Courtaulds. 

Assumptions should have 
been made; therefore, on the 
value of Foiheigil] without 
the joint venture. Some care- 
ful negotiations may retain 
the status quo but Cyanamid 
may be tempted to buy out its 
partner if freed to do so. 

A profit forecast for 
Fothergill for the year to 
December 1986 of about £2.7 
million is imminent. 

In the new year there will 
be the opportunity to fore- 
cast, albeit tentatively, for the 
year to the end of Decembe’ 
1987. More than £3.5 million 
could be on the cards. 

Fothergill has a promising 
but disparate collection of 
businesses. Although the core 
of the company is in better 
shape than before, it is not yet 
clearly equipped to drive fee 
group forward. 

To expect Courtaulds to 
inject an element of entre- 
preneur-ism may be mis- 
placed, but the expertise 
presently within the Fother- 
gill camp should continue to 
flourish under the Courtaulds 
banner. 

Courtaulds should not be 
carried away by the desire to 
win tins battle at any cost, but 
it could afford to pay at least 
270p without regretting its 
decision. 

Malaysia 

Watchers of fee volatile 
Far Eastern economies are 
fixing their beady eyes on 
Malaysia. This traditionally 
commodities- based economy 
has been behaving out of 
character, the economy and 
stock market have not been 
reflecting the mood in the 
commodities market. 

Commodity prices, while 
well below their historical 
heights, recovered well dur- 
ing 1986 but the economy 
and fee stock market were 
pedestrian performers by 
comparison. 

Although the Kuala Lum- 



-15500 


4750 


32S0 


2500 


1750 


pur industrial index moved 
ahead by about 15 per cent 
during fee year, this was a 
modest advance compared to 
the impressive showing from 
Singapore’s stock market, 
which increased by more 
than 50 per cent. 

Bui indications are that fee 
imbalance wifi soon be 
corrected. 

The rubber price has risen 
from 1.83 ringgits a kilo- 
gramme (48p per 2.2081bs) to 
2.16 ringitts since fee end of 
last year, while palm oil has 
moved up sharply since Au- 
gust from 450 ringgits a tonne 
(£1 1&26) to 700 ringgits. 

Present prices are. slightly 
below fee levels achieved in 
recent weeks. But although 
they are well below their 
peaks of 198 land 1984, when 
rubber and palm oil stood at 
3.04 ringgits and 2,000 
ringgits respectively, analysts 
are not expecting prices' to 
drift off further. 

This relative stability in 
commodity prices should 
help to underpin a recovery 
in the economy. 

The reason given for the 
feeling of despondency in 
Kuala Lumpur is lack of 
confidence. Some banks have 

accumulated impressive 
portfolios of bad debts, while 
the property market, another 
indicator of sentiment, is 


suffering from considerable 
oversupply. 

In an attempt to improve 
matters, the central bank is 
believed to have been supp- 
orting fee system. At fee 
same time it has discouraged 
tending to anyone wife less 
than perfect credentials. 

This has had fee effect of 
gumming up the lending 
channels, feus making an 
improvement in the eco- 
nomic situation hard to 
envisage. 

A change of style in politi- 
cal circles is thought to hold 
the key to the Malaysians' 
problems. This could come 
about at fee governing party's 
genera l assembly m fee 
spring. 

Mr Martin Wedgwood of 
Smith New Court (Far East), 
the stockbroker, believes feat 
although some problems will 
undoubtedly remain, the 
downside in the market is 
limited. He expects the 
bounce in commmodity pri- 
ces to feed through to a 
stronger economy and stock 
market next year. 

The canny but brave inves- 
tor, keen for a bit of oriental 
flavour in his 1987 portfolio, 
should, therefore, buy into 
fee Malaysian market ahead 
of any recovery in con- 
fidence. This market is not 
known for dragging its beds if 
things look good. 


Embattled tobacco industry 
weighs up its strategy 


By Derek Harris 
Industrial Editin' 

A fraught new year — likely 
to bring squeezed profit mar- 
gins and the most intense 
marketing battle for years — 
lies ahead for Britain's be- 
leaguered tobacco industry. 

New pricing tactics have 
introduced a fourth sector to 
an increasingly fragmented 
.market while increasing fee 
possibility erf - an ever-widen- 
ing price war. 

The room for manoeuvre by 
manufacturers trying to seize 
more market share through 
lower pricing is also tight. This 
is because a substantial tax 
increase in fee next Budget 
could push many premium 
brands over the psychologi- 
cally important level of £1.50 
for 20, toeing manufacturers 
within a few months wife a tor 
tougher selling climate in 
which price wifi assume even 
more significance for the 
smoker. 

Another key factor is a 
sharper rate of decline in sales. . 
In October there was an 
annual decline of 6 per cent, 
aocording to trade estimates, 
although there has been some 
recovery since. 

But the present sales level, 
put by many in the industry at 
about 4 per cent town- than 
last year, is still double the rate 
of decline sees over the past 
few years. 

The British manufacturers 
are also under pressure from 
cheap imports. These have 
risen from 7 per cent of fee 
market a year ago to 10 per 
cent Tobacco manufacturers 
wife spare capacity, mostly 
West German, have been 
supplying mainly own-label 
products for supermarkets 
and other retail chains which 
have been selling at prices 
about 20p below the main 
branded cigarettes. 

The manufacturers blame 
rises in British taxation for 
treating the pricing conditions 
in which the cheaper cigarettes ' 
are thriving. But there is also 
pressure from smaller British 
manufacturers like the Lon- 
don Tobacco Company and 
the Manchester Tobacco 
Company which are also 


UP IN SMOKE 


Janl 


Retail 

price 

(pence) 


Tax Costs 

S ic plus 
T) profit 


1978 

55 

38 

17 

1979 

57 

39 

18 

1980 

66 

46 

20 

1981 

73 

52 

21 

1982 

96 

67 

29 

1983 

105 

76 

29 

1984 

112 

82 

30 

1985 

126 

93 

33 

1986 

136 

101 

35 

1986 
(Mar 21) 

149 

112 

37 


supplying the own-label mar- 
ket, including Victoria Wine, 
the Allied-Lyons off-licence 
subsidiary, Britain's biggest 
cigarette retailer. 

These variously-sourced 
lower price cigarettes have 
probably moved in a year 
from an overall market share 
of9-5 per cent to 12.5 percent 

So for in this mice war 
Philip Morris, maker of Marl- 
boro, the world's best-selling 
cigarette, has cut Sp off its 
king-size pack to bring fee 
price down to £1.45, wife 
lower-tar brands also reduced. 
It has also cut 4p off a pack of 
Raffles, its most recently 
launched brand, which had 
been selling at £1.44 for 20. 

Philip Morris, which claims 
a 2.5 per cent share for the 
Marlboro and a similar share 
for Raffles, imposed the cuts 
expecting to win a bigger 
market share while not expect- 
ing to provoke the bigger 
selling brands into retaliation 
because price-cutting fin them 
is more costly. 

Of fee five best-selling ciga- 
rettes, GaHaber’s Benson and 
Hedges, which has a recom- 
mended retail {nice of £1.53, 
has more than 17 per cent of 
the market. Imperial 
Tobacco's Snpericings (£1.51 
for 20) has 6.3 per cent, 
Gafiahef’s Sific Cut, market 
leader in lower tar, 6 per cent. 
Imperial's Regal king-size 5.6 
per cent and Imperial's John 
Player Special king-size 5.4 
percent, 

A full percentage point mar- 
ket share in fee cigarette 


market is worth about £54 
million in annual sales. 

Imperial, part of Hanson 
Trust and Britain's biggest 
tobacco manufacturer, how- 
ever, has cut 5p off John 
Player Special, reducing the 
price to £1.45. 

It says that, wife a glossier 
pack, this is part of a relaunch 
strategy for fee brand to 
bolster Imperial's overall mar- 
ket share which has been 
shrinking for several years. It 
is also introducing a tonger- 
length John Player Special at 
£1.47. 

Competitors see it as a 
marketing tactic to improve 
sales for a brand which has 
lost its momentum. 

Although there are no signs 
that Imperial is planning price 
cuts on any other brands, it is, 
given the John Player Special 
market share, an aggressive 
move which its other main 
competitors will find hard to 
ignore. 

Rothman, whose brands in- 
clude Dunhill and Peter Stuy- 
vesant as well as the Rothman 
label, is still considering the 
situation and does not expect 
lo make a statement before fee 
new year. 

Gallaher, fee second-biggest 
British manufacturer, says it 
has no immediate plans for 
price changes. It argues that 
the Imperial move does not 
necessarily upset fee whole 
market. 

There has already been 
some other price repositioning 
of brands as the threat of the 
cheaper imports and own- 
label brands has grown. The 
big manufac turers have lO 
some extent been plugging fee 
gap between the cheap ciga- 
rettes and fee main brands. 

The market could end up 
wife four distinctly priced 
sectors, ranging from the 
cheap imports and own-labels, 
through fee Lambert and But- 
ler segment and fee new John 
Player-Mariboro sector to fee 
premium brands. 

If as seems likely, the 
Chancellor brings in another 
hefty lax increase on cigarettes 
in fee coming Budget — h was 
an extra 1 1 p a pack last time — 
fee fear is that cheap imports 


could grow further, and feat 
would mean fee British manu- 
facturers could be faced wife 
more closures and job cuts. 

Six tobacco factories have 
been closed in three years, and 
fee Tobacco Advisory Coun- 
cil, fee manufacturers’ trade 
body, expects that jobs, which 
numbered 27,500 m 1984, are 
likely to be down to 20,000 at 
some stage next year. 

Earlier this month, Im- 
perial, which has closed a 
factory at Stirling and stopped 
cigarette production in Glas- 
gow, announced a further loss 
of 350 mainly administrative 
jobs, bringing fee total of job 
cuts over fee next 12 months 
to 550. 

Prico-cutting is bound to 
squeeze profit margins. This 
will make the manufacturers 
look even harder at factory 
capacity and workforce levels. 

It is almost certain that in 
January they will forgo what 
has become almost a regular 
price increase, usually 2p a 
pack, matched by a similar 
increase in the summer. 

It looks like a bumpier ride 
from now on for all the big 
tobacco manufacturers, leav- 
ing one big question mark on 
strategy. None of fee 


British makers has yet n 
to supply the own-label mar 
kcL As things get tougher tha 
could still come. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN. 


. 11 . 00 % 


Adam & Company 11.00% 

BCCt 11.00% 


Citibank Savings! 12.45% 

Consolidated fads 11.00% 

Co-operative Bank 11.00% 

C. Hoare & Co 11.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 1.00% 

Lloyds Bank 11.00% 

Nat Westminster 11.00% 

Royal Bank of ScodandT1.00% 

TSB — — 11.00% 

Citibank NA 11.00% 

t Mortgage Base Rate. 





BUSINESS AND FTNANnE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


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867 922V 
744 7X1 
824 87.7 
B43 GX9V 
478 503 
6X1 504 

4X7 513 


OH Treat 
Cm Badly 
Nuhaal St 
N American That 
13C Spacfel 3ta 
tuuuMMUf Bend 
Jbpmhhw Tn 
uanapad TM 


+1X3 273 
+63 273 
+63 481 
+13 15 5 
-OS 070 
+63 775 
-02 134 
-03 179 
+04 IBB 
+07 030 
+62 882 
-0-3 021 

+02 250 


89-100. SmHta Rd. Mfedatom. Kant M14 DOC 
0823 874751 

mla Amertean 212 253 -0.1 087 

MIA G+noral 33 3 353V +0.4 XI 0 

MLA tnMmafeaud 599 634 (IlS 033 

MLA Get UnK 222 235* +92113B 
MLA Inca™ 432 4&7m -02 482 

MLA Empaan 323 844 +04 072 


+X1 281 
+6.1 743 
+43 438 
+0.1 831 
-03 0X2 
-03 071 
+14 0-17 
+48 2W 


at gbotobi wm 
0438 3S61D1 
GtowHi Units 
ms Fhmd W 


Way, Steuetmga Herts 


7X9 8X8 
10X9 1107 


Europe Growth Ape 1M8 127-7 






LV. 


i tom IMS 1193 1272 
i Yield OH Ik* 575 595 


IndOmti IMS 
N Aimncan Urta 
Rr EKtUfete 
Snnlar Cos Find 


14X2 151.1 
7X2 773 
YB7 109.1 
7X8 8X5 


■LLOYDS BAM UtVT^ ntUSTaUNAGeftS 
RegtsUfes Dpi. QartnvVy-Saa. WDrtpmg. W 
Swan 


MBICAP UNIT TRUST 

Unicom Hsa 292. Rattan! Rd. E7 

01-23* 5544 

Menem 1382 144.1 

MEHCUNY WJM1 MANAGERS LTD 
3X King nsam Bt. BC4R 9AS 
01-280 2000 


Do Aocun 
Conn Euro Gth Inc 
Do Accun 


Do Accun 
Extra hHsxno 
Do team . 
Qamvn 08i tc 
Do Acctm 
tncome 
Do Aocun 
kH Tech 
Do Accum 
Jnmi Growth 
Do Aeon 


1843 19X7 +26 at? 

33X7 3543 +6.1 XT7 

473 503 +69 030 

47.5 ms +03 0-50 

503 601 +02 238 

632 873 +62 238 

1803 1713m +1.1 S.1B 

394.7 31XBV +18 X1B 

7X1 7X3 +03 a 18 

1X3 BX1 +63 aia 

275.0 2925 +23 430 

5524 5873 +52 430 

1958 2D8SV +65 025 
2048 2178V +63 625 
823 8X0 -13 082 


+03 618 
+63 616 
+25 430 
+52 430 


Amer Growth 
Da Accun 
Amer Income 
Do Accun 
Brrcpwn du nCi 
Do Accum 
Getwal 
Do Accum 
cat A FtexJ 
Do Accun 


97.1 10X7 
101.1 1088 
5(3 543 
553 585 
1442 1523 
1493 1573 
24X7 26X1 
40X3 4320 


+13 13S 
+68 139 
384 
-61 334 
+17 081 
+1.7 081 
+18 188 
+X0 188 


_ „„ -13 032 

Do Accun 833 8X3 -1.1 60S 

N Aim A Gen W.1 1138 +04 1.15 

Do Accun 1157 1230 +63 1.15 

Pmtic Bnefei 1468 1582 -21 032 

Do Accun 15X3 1033 -22 a 02 

SraaM CM A Roc 1903 2092V +13 206 

DO Aocun 222-3 236.4m +23 206 

WtHfeMde Growth 21X7 2294# +13 039 

Do Accun 3038 323.1m +13 039 

UK doeVl Ftmd 4X8 513 +67 ZOO 

LONDON* HAMCMffTBI 
ta wefede Paife. Earn EX5 IDS 
0992 52155 

general Trow 438 467V +68 360 

tawos I Hun g.l 394 +05 6.1 □ 

tawn a done l Tnm 363 40.7 +61 0.B0 

American 333 3S.1V -61 Z3Q 

tan 478 S69 -93. 600 

That at few 322 3*2 +62 ZW 

MiasectnmEB 
Thrao OM, Torn m EC3B SBQ 
01«B45» 

Aim a Gen me 22x7 2300 -12 1*0 


1X5 814 +13 341 

782 01.im +03 558 
903 5X2 +04 885 


Fry H at h Paficen 
Bh.t*™ That 
GK A Fixed kx 
TW 01 few Trials 
Special Sts Trust 
WhAmr Trust 
For Eaetem Trust 
Ml Gfeowfli 


EQUTTYS LAW 

StGtmgo Haa C upui O u i St Cownoy CVi 
®&93 553231 

UK Grwuh Accum 1522 1618 +27 320 


7X5 782 
77.1 82.1 
5X9 633 
993 10X7 
684 061 


+04 885 
+64 181 
+1.1 220 
-03 138 
-07 043 
+65 187 


442^32 St Mig+st+VL LUHon EC3P 3AJ 


Do A ocun 

'% > Acaim 1868 1977 SO 000 

Becorory 2064 21X4 +28 229 

DO ACCum 2227 23X0 +62 229 

eu*i«X Dtet 2463 25X1 +17 233 

Emm AccUh 3827 3925 +23 203 

bn) Income Ffcnd 025 872V +67 X44 
Do Accun 818 8976 +63 344 

KjDLANDBANK (MW UWT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Cmi-gdHM. Sh-SL HUH. Mhdd SI MO 


013 017V +08 7.12 
843 882m +13 7.12 
8X5 904 +03 429 

9X3 10t8 +6fi 429 
2888 2845V +03 137 
33*8 3842# +64 137 
1823 1832 -20 000 


-20 000 
-2D OO0 
+28 229 
+82 2 a 

+17 233 
+23 243 


m 


CnM incoom 7X8 ax? 

_ Do Accun 1073 1143 

Cmnodiy A Gan M08 13X3 

DO Accun 1854 19X7 


B*a ftgh Ik 
D o Accun 
OVA Rxad he 
Do Accun 
HMi YMd 
Do Ana 


Jann A Pacific 
Do Accum 


+13 231 
+14 231 
+04 274 
+64 274 

.. ana 
+6.1 xob 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


H0h Compny Bd ORcr aTaoidhra % ■ P/E 


i.i 

55 

18 

89 

56 

& 

126 

74 

X 

46 

89 

X 

SS 

26 

16 

10. 

43 

23 

2U 

lUb 52 

u 

34 

46 

114 

26 

U 

w> 

” 


zu 

26 

46 

tu 

U 

16 

294 

21 

26 

HU 


jjv 

Ml 

23 

6U 

36 

Tin 


XZ 

15 

ZU 

u' 

.. 

751 

36 

10* 

16 

16 

KL5 

U 

24 

m 

u 

49 

04 

39 

23 

ib 

*33 

29 

2SL6 

, „ 


67 

15 

M 

321 

7.1a 176 

au 

32 

15 

tu 

37 

37 

139 

25 

28 

142 

AA 

21 

182 

B7» 

U 

MB 

84 

89 

XI 

11 

35 

136 

U 

32 

2X5 

15 

U 

1X3 

.. • 


3X0 

W 

23 

76 

14 

24 

DU 

46 

25 

216 

26 

41 

17.1 

04 

16 

na 

57 

33 


29 

86 

xs 

U 

25 

09 

54 

84 

64 

1070 169 

45 

46 

15 

ma 

66 

15 

223 

U 

25 

276 

23 

46 

156 

11 

2S 

21.7 

04« 

20 

H9 

U 

35 

156 

.. c 


725 

«6 

24 

TX7 

46 

39 

<84 

25 

23 

127 


l® fitoSlUh 

05 rcT" 1 ***** 
m ferhkm 
44 FKVcfin 

83 taUMd Cp 
10 FUMlS 
17 Parian 
H ^wtaa 
P few 
a PhtasW 
m Pmnl Cenph 
128 PAR (MUM 

^SSK’rwo 

a* f« Pm 

3! tape 


7 RKfewcd 
« RdfeANM 




340 CT i 

P 53 1 

113 SO I 
113 87 | 
83 37 I 
W I 

j* 

95 1 


77 

wr ms 
1 

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i&L- 


jjgia. 


113 She Bee 
n SWRowus 

iV 


w taTsS? 


104 Thaft Face 

RfttTL 

Ts'&SSSte 

a ™Sri*M 

34 fen 
H Urn Santa 
P Ttaw 

S Tomgnde Sac 
% Trade htnsfem 
70 TmtancM 
G) Ttaon 

3 2?^' 

a ufevr 

S3 UdFKfaBM 

a imtuqS 

si uomiFoa*) 

B taasfca 
53 taMMt 
ra mum mm 


M Wear tatt* 

» dfefees 
4(.UMMtan 
MfeMHun (ilm) HMp 

93 1MUH 

94 WW ^ 

IB Ntuhris Bar 

St floras* 

<3 tadUM 

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at a 

as an v .. 

4Vi « +<. 

no m -2 
no in 

• 44 48 +1 

1U 123 V+3 

1# S J 

ttffl 155 -6 

33 a +2 
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137 UZ 
10 22 +1 
32 34 

a a +1 
- w n +1 

SJ 73 ft 

in no -2 

112 1M 

tas 112 .. 

93 a m-2 

77 82 +z 

181 IS .. 
217 222 

100 101 +2 
41 44 +1 

S3 a m-i 
107 112 +2 

W 19 

112 117 +4 

« 64 +2 

I 58 83 +J 

a a 

IZ3 127 +* 

62 67 

103 KB m+2 
97 M2 +2 
121 W +3 
ISO IS *+<> 

78 S3 m-2 

21 24 +4 

is a 
97 101 

S se 
138 
H 15 

3 a mm.. 

62 87 

250 260 
163 195 +4 

in ia m^i 

9 %" 1 . 

ire iS .. 

38 43 

1» 177 

i&£ :: 

?!?•■* 

w a 

9B W m .. 

33 & 
aw 20s 

S S ml.- 

S S3 

IDO 140 .. 

W 265 
2® 250 
113 118 -2 

1M III V .. 

» 111 .. 

MS 110 

W 218 
70 IB 

as as .. 

W7 177 -a 

74 n m -1 

139 142 +3 

223 za V .. 
m m v+6 
■a 45 v .. 
m ns 

32 37 

no «6 -a 

*73 485 -3 

n « 

w ai -« 1 

IBS 120 

SSS 503 .. s 

MO 113 

*30 490 m-3 J 
113 118 m-2 
si ta m+i 
® 68 -2 
HB 110 m .. 

S 2l ♦'j 
P V .. 
«« 6 
M4 m • .. 

9*1 1C'« .. 

; 13 19 -fe 

330 340 .. 

34 37 +1 

m so , 
270 ao m-i 
m 1*5 -a 

63 85 -1 

137 M2 V I! 

31 34 -1 

H 01 m+1 

sb a -1 

™ • v 1 

52 07 -3 1 


47 U 3U 

XI 52 Hi 
45 10 1X1 

48 98 1U 
58 4* IT-1 

" e " 22 j 
.. a .. 41 

17 ZB 17 J 
35 24 W3 
17 47 17 

13 XI 128 
17 ZB Z35 

2B U *3 

16 M 16 
45 25 128 
48 as 1BL7 

29 36 129 
U U 17 


.. .. X* 

SO 89 63 

1A U 19 
-. < .. ** 
77 U U 
64 06 915 

29 46 178 


29 28 £3 
48 48 121 

29 18 135 
12 46 ZM 

48 14 112 

57 56 11 

5* S3 127 
29 ZB Si 

14 15 208 

05 75 U 
45 15 . 367 

29 U 288 
05 14 204 

57 48 145 
75 15 178 
&1 Z7 T7.B 
1.4b DA 216 
1.7 4.1 122 
48 25 10 1 

.. .. 18 
26 U 106 

3J X4 KJ> 


29b 13 1X4 

aa a? si 

48 78 M2 
.. .. 385 

11 15 21.7 
48 12 2X2 
29c 25 56 

23 25 1X3 

25 23 158 

75 35 161 

13 M3 75 
4,6 12 391 

21 12 104 

XI 41 Ml 
71 52 1M 
39 13 X* 

32 15 315 
*1 93 15 
A7 22 M5 

5S2 

62 32 Til 

76 12 222 
15 21 166 

195 75 i* 
54 42 192 
260 *9 .. 
45 41 A* 

m 11 .. 

64 55 132 

15 36 254 

21 14 75 

38 XI 132 
04 ZO 146 
57 52 1X0 
57 34 139 

38 12 SO 


27 05 S15 
02 25 321 

79 29 2X0 
38 25 144 

17 55 97 


800 86 .. 
07 18 75 


m 



536 825 .. 866 

<®7 746 +0.1 XOB 

504 525# +07 954 
.85.1 «2 > +1-9 854 
W76 1W7 +06 571 

036 2303 +1.1 671 

1760 18X5 +1.1 361 

2096 3075 +26 361 

002.1 3205 +22 021 

31X9 33X2 +25 021 

1155 1229m +OI 148 


SS +’ 

ore +2 

IS - lH 

402 

m ■ 

133 +1 

288 +3 

1 evi •+■« 

1 33fe m-4 
v .. 
toe 

BUS -I 
245 ^ 

147 .. 

185 -1 

5 :? 

m -a 
Z17 +1 
TM 

m +1 

S • 

SS +I 

n v+T 

s?s +1 . 

IT* +4 

s s 

WJ +4 
Mg +1 
IS 

m 

3 ■?. 

is? +1 
no +1 
102 m.. 

33 

2M 

J30 .. 1 

179 -1 

IMS m+1 
tti m+i 


The prices in this 
section refer to 
last Wednesday’s trading 


• Ex dfektond. c Cum cMdoncL k Cum 
stock spfiL 9 Ex stock spot m Cum 88 
(any two or more of abotm). 0 Ex aft (any 
two or more of stow). Dealing or 


(9? ZSt tiof month. (91) 2nd Thtirsday of 
month. ^ 1st *nd 3rd Vtackwsday of 
month. (2 a 20th of month. (24) 3rd 
Tuesday of month. (25) 1st and 3rd 
Thunxtayof month. (26) 4fh Tuesday of 
month. (27) 1st Wednesday of month. (28) 
.LartThwwtay ofi month. (291 3rd working 
dw of month. (30J 16th ofmonth. (31) Irt 
worfeng toy ofi monOt (32) 20th of month. 
(33) l« da y of February, May. August 
Nowra fcgr (34) ivst work ing day of 
month. ( 35) 15th of month. (36) 1*0i of 
month. (37) 21 si of month. (38) 3rd 
JJtednasday of month. (39) 2nd 
Wednesday of month. (*m Vatuad 
2«jWy. (41) Last Thursday of Stock 
Exchange account (42) tast day of 
US*;- am and 4th Wednesday of 

wtsna of ™ w ' 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


np law ce w v 1 


*S3 244 GenMr 
33 2TS Gurimn Hum 
215 158 IWta 
K» KM ride Frad 
fflo MSkiSBmn 

SB* 244 feta 

us is hoy A am 

«•>« jMta0 

110 m Khtoewt Ckwfer 

to 119 iwmo'ta 

315 237 KMMSmBar 
ZB2 180 Lwktai. 
72 50 LoaNwduCSK 
71 53 UuTrari 

133 m Ma l ta * 

107 its Mfeovvoeme 
182 137 IfenvrHI 
388 215 ItatvStaf 
435 159 Moray Mm 
490 414 Km Cent 
67 49 Nh Data a 
243 138 928 
B MbBWWa fee 83 
271 MS Ifew TUK 
are Z78 Mb tank Sec 
81 m JM See AtMi 
429 279 MMtar 
T14 H ffeofle mots 
a S Do Mw 


We* Bon Yn 

BM tap Pilyetap % P/E 

4® 435 ZA 00 

300 SO .. 34 27 333 

ns 216 m+2 X* 3J> 475 


26 06 .. 
29 16 .. 

176b 15 886 
34 16 727 

53 4.1 332 

4JI 29 44J 
33 1J .. 

54 26 876 


m 

II &s 


3K5 377 
ST 30 
427 430 
H3 ii« 
« SI 
40 4Vj 
445 430 
BE 195 

a ■ 

257 - 

ssa 385 
101 *. .. 
156 ia 

408 412 I 

80 88 I 

ra in 

M 97 

S® 

are 330 
7S 780 
I 94 >j B55 
85 KTi 


175 15 9U 
Ub 52 304 
7.1c 39 3X7 
40 16 .. 

7.1b U 5L3 
22S 45 2X9 

Mi 16 736 
XT 24 486 
46b 76 176 
1.1a xe 
*9 13 .. 


85 12 .. 

17.1 36 4X4 

B5b 44 3X7 
124 43 318 


113 115 m .. 
«f «3 +fe 
113 1M +fe 
« Mi m„ 

m ™ v+i 

207 209 

2 JH 

119 izi m .. 
187 ISO +1 
568 170 .. 

316 ra .. 
38 238 .. 

222 225 V+1 
15B W2 

Sih V .. 

are ass 

41 43 m+z 

42 43>I 

62 64 S+T 

115 us a+c. 


XI 27 4X7 
46 25 *1 

1T.1 »1 7.7 

86 £6 6X3 
Ub« “ 
29 17 216 
3-3 a? 31 JB 
Ub U 856 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


COMMODITIES 


m 



47 ST. I raki (aw 
92 42 fenfe ^ 

* * Bwmbm 

FSB?*" 

ft'SHSUw 
m m W 

jn 

4*0 320 HUI 
305 HO HAS 

S ^ (SStam* 


SILVER SMALL. 

Cash 360.00-382.50 

TTlWMonlftS . 370Jft57ZSQ 


16 

485 


81.1 

42 

180 

25 

lfll 

29 

109 

3/ 

38 S 

IA 

196 

27 

176 

26 

M6 

17 

2X1 

56 


21 


12 

377 

23 

101 

05 

87 

56 

91 

25 

374 

0/ 

57 • 

0L4 

65 

76 


12S.S-24-0 

1Z1.HU 

120J5-1X0 

122HI.0 


SteTfeig stwngm fiamparod the London markets yes- 
terday. Ona exception was Aluminium which was aided by 
trf l^torvms in IME stocks. TM market also saw 
<totor^s«J Mjrtnfl^toftovmg a break above chart 
reslstanoe at St, 150. Comment by GNf, 

INTERNATIONAL 

PETROLEUM EXCHANGE 
Suppbedwa Commodity 
Market Services Ltd 
HEAVY FUEL OIL 


irbfcc 


LONDON C0MW3OITY 
EXCHANGE 

G W Joynaon and Co report 


“eatand livestock 

COMMISSION 

Average fta tpcfc prices at 
Ttaweswiretlw meriteb on 
Decemtora 

wwf fle,9348pp " k9 * w 

MreplUppirV 

«Pfe9. 7 9i3pperkg( w 


•M 114.1 
■J5 un 

■29 1004 

-ffi 102.4 


SUGAR (From C.CzaraNunr) 





Cash 340D5-342-00 

Three Month* . 310JXK31T.00 


sst. need carcase weight 

EflfltadandWaleK 

CatUonpS. up 1387 <*, avo 


ScettoiAi: 

Catuanvs down 17.7 ta 



LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
Lire Pifl Contact P. per kiln 












































THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 50 i9o0 


BudiiNcaB Alnl> riiN/ilNCii 


s* 'as < 




l, ***Ar'£jao 



—^cld— 

From yoar m por tfolio card check year 
eight share price movements, on this p»f 
only. Add them up to give you your 
ovenill total and c h eck ink the 

daihr dividend figure: If it matches, you 
have mm outright or a share of the total 
rfnity prize money maul If you are a 
winner follow the daim procedure on the 
hack of yoor card. You must always have 
your card available when dainring. 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Turnover at low ebb 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on December 22. Dealings end January 9. §Contango day Janairry 12. Settlement day January 19. 

§Fonvard hafgains are permitted on two previous buaness days. 

VWiore»teck»riavocmlyoo«price<p wto d, th e ra arepdddte p ri co» taltandiah>atSp«a. Yfo l d, c haufl e and P/Etado are ca ta d it md on the mkkaa price 



— ( Sndd — 

Q Umct N n t gi p m ti nted 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+38 points 

Claimants should line 0254-53272 


>TS 


El 


EI 


BM EB Si 




ESI 


■El 


IETSES 


Font (Marnn) 


ic r-T^ :.TMi 
32311 
H2S55 EB5M I 


I ESSE 


Brail Walker 




LOT 


Elys (Wimbledon) 


UEl I Electricals 


usssaza i 




_3Cnj 


Please take account of any- 
minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 


IM lit Amato i 

SB KB/ 1 

SB8S“- 


129b U1 • M u ru 

mo asz e-i ti« u m 

go ns ■* is-* *2 ijjo 

m m -i w u v 

m tn -a si » im 

n - *-ib .... 

M m 77 is ISO 



• .. auu 

•-1 u 

S3 & 

« 

• .. 70 

m .. M 

■d tfjB 

-1 zu 
• .. 11 

S:: a 

• M 

• .. HD 

• .. 

■ .. «u 
• .. trj* 
•42 115 

*-1 115 

■ no 

■4i no 

*8 115 


it 


m 


BRITISH FUNDS 


4 


3 


fi * 


(Under Five Years! 


t 


7T? 






n£ 


uiSbsJb 

film** 

US’s +b 
BS'« ♦b 

101 '4 +b 

IIS’. ♦% 
Bib +% 
■Sb +b 


UNDATED 

46S STUConaota 4% 

48 32% War Ui 3W 

62% 44b Cato !» 

34% auTns S% 
m szhcaimamm* 
m ZPnTrmB aw 

INDEX-LINKED 

1»MMWl»«J 

iob% l a * tan 

122 MP.HW kl a* «w 

TOTS aSVUias 62%% 8001 

w. M-iT^imvato 

nob se’* rraw 52*. aw 
mb flPiTNM 68%% an 

111b w TwuiLZwani 
9A 78V Dan lL2b% SgIS 
102b B7bUe*aiL2b%zoiB 
98b WbTnwtiWMMA 

104 Mblta* 52b%20BD 


Wtb*.- 
37b ... 

IDSb 4b 
BP* -b 
Mb 041 
93b 

92% 41b 


£1 1509 
£1 £746 
£« SMB 

£1 3328 

2-1 ISi 

8J 1780 
53 5719 
52 3557 
52 3539 
32 3567 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


R 


m 


42 Mb SB 72 

4b .. I . - O* 

-1 1Mb 57 .. 

■* tWo' 85 :: 

\Y 03 «> 

J 207 52 57 


29B 174 MOW 700 

36# 191 Ann Grab 230 

297 MB Mk 269 

JS v Anew SB 

273 144 Mhmfi 217 

S XB BPB Mms 575 

2U BqninM « 

K5 ITS taM (few 158 

« 21 Btoey Pan Cam 3D 

1BZ MO BWMy 15B 

H! 134 BDUfr Go m 

75 O EtoO Bras 67 

TO'MS Btodtajs MB 

m 528 BUM* 668 

275 233 baWKKMM 238 

1® B9 BiSnriM) 9D 

27 tfibBmm Sicken 15% 

80 37 D »lf*JU 60 

'g ‘f^sim. i?% 

145 85 CUMdunm Ml 

150 78 Cento Grp MS 

a® 453 CssSsia 494 

<88 296 CoMryofa <75 

32b 124 Canto (Out) 2W 

1M 84 On (Gunge) 113 

137 72 tttuSbs 0*4 I JO 

114 78 6* 11Z 

103 75 F» m 

73 54 Do 'A 64 

172 51 fttoWMHn 115 

182 54 FM»Go 87 

S4 68 COM 88 

H5 106 Sfflss 5 (My M 138 

385 154 Gbcsn (1U] 343 

ISZ 86 MT 138 

5m SB KM Be 04 

258 172 Htnfcto* 170 

79 42 KMUm-StoBl 70 

244 144 HtfMOd UMbas 222 

843 4S Halt Hi 540 

59 29'lliSSM SU 48 

203 IS tSKb JgbHM UB 

co as jm u A Sam jg 

1 1 ar s 

429 298 UwA W 397 

292 IS Upxl ! Sub 242 

a«3 in Sdn 321 

135 181 IMy 

210 161 MMMtofHtoCO 187 

1S1 SO Mnr « Hum 170 

448 3H McAlptaa « 394 

313 226 MtCanby & 5 293 

297 171 Uner Id 2BB 

42 23 Kmi (Shtoy) 38 

5S4 sf® HO* ft} K3 

444 306 MriMtMrt | 364 

m 798 Knave sm 

338 163 MUBtam Bricfc 300 

254 115 MHH 248 

110 7« PVamtuTnur 85 

395 385 PUtoS 370 

W 440 nwc 680 

471 332 feint 399 

323 m UHB 2BB 

191 mbAidir DtoM 182 

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I 


H 


i: 




— 22 BUSINESS AND FTNANTF. 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


Big bids take the limelight 

keover battles boosted the r anks of 


Takeover battles boosted the ranks o f 
stock market front-rmmers 
as losers slipped on lower oil prices 


T his has proved to he 
a year of more spect- 
acular leaders than 
laggards on the stock 
market. Hardly 
surprising, given that the mar- 
ket is ending 1986 much 
higher than when it started 
and the FT All-Share index is 
nearly back at its year’s high. 

Top of the leaders’ list is our 
very own News International, 
owner of The Times, Sunday 
Times, The Sun and News of 
the Wodd. The restricted vot- 
ing shares registered a 
spectacular 247 per cent gain 
in an extremely thin market 

The move to a high technol- 
ogy printing plant at Wapping 
in East London, shedding 
several thousand print jobs, 
helped to boost NTs profits in 
the half year to June 30 by 67 
per cent, before taking into 
account the £663 million 
exceptional costs of the move. 

Next came Peotiand In- 
dustries with , a 242 per cent 
advance, the second succ- 
essive year of heady growth. 
Pentland’s star performer was 
Reebok, a 37 per cent owned 
American associate which 
makes the Yuppies' favourite 
jogging shoe. It contributed 85 
per cent of Fentiand's pretax 
profits in the half year to June 
30. 

Mr Alan Sugar's Amstrad 
Consumer Electronics fin- 
ished third, after a year in 
which Amstrad took over the 


once mighty Sinclair and 
launched its own, hugely 
successful IBM compatible 
personal computer at a highly 
competitive price. 

Amstrad is also part of the 
consortium which earlier this 
month won the Direct 
Broadcasting Satellite contract 
from the Independent 
Broadcasting Authority. 

Several of the other winners 
were on the receiving end of 
bids. 

APV Holdings, which 
showed a 141 per cent gain, 
fought offSiebe's £220 million 
bid, but earned itselfa rerating 
in the process. Its defence 
inducted a forecast of an 80 
per cent profit increase in 
1986. 

Wedgwood was another bid 
beneficiary. It was taken over 
by the Irish crystal maker 
Waterford to save it from the 
unwanted dutches of London 
International Group. 

AE, which showed an 86 per 
cent advance, was the one that 
nearly got away. It fought off 
Turner & NewaH*s bid by the 
narrowest of squeaks, only to 
have the escape disallowed by 
the Takeover PaneL T&N 
rebid and outbid the rival 
Hollis Group. 

. T&N also came out of the 
experience well, gaining more 
than its prey at 103 per cent 
over the year. Pretax profits in 
the half year to the end of June 




book and strong profit gro 
Hopes of a bid, which W-- 
some share price support eany 
in the year, were dashed when 
the Monopolies Commission 
said no to GECs bid for 


FALLING BEHIND 




rose 40 per cent, aided by a fell 
in asbestos claims. 

Other bid situations in- 
ducted McCorqaodftle, the 
specialist printer taken over 
by Norton Opax after a hard- 
fought struggle; Bryant Hold- 
ings being bid for by English 
China Clays; Impend Conti- 
nental Gas which has found 
temporary respite in the 
Monopolies Commission 
from a bid by the Barclay 
brothers and Ptikington 
Brothers, the glassmakcr on 
the receiving end ofa bid from 
BTR. 


Tozsr Kemsley & MBboom, 
the motor trader and property 
developer, had a rewarding 
year under the New Zealander 
Mr Ron Brieriey, who took 
control in the middle of last 
year. Drastic slimming action 
has paid off and the ac- 
quisition of Kenning Motors, 
which will double TKM's 
turnover, has yet to be felt 

Other leaders that were not 
beneficiaries of bids included 
Ahflco, the rapidly expanding 
financial services group that 
recently sold a 12 per cent slice 


THE LEADERS 


THE LAGGARDS 



Price (p) 

Price (p) 

Chng 

Value 

Value 


Price (p) 

Price to) 

Ctwoe 

Value 

Value 


end 85 

D0CZ2&J 


£'000 

£'000 


end 85 

Dec22 86 

(Si 

£TO0 

£'000 

News International 

620 

£21.5 

247 

492.726 

1,708,648 

Triton Europe 


138 

-61 

231,000 

113,850 

Portland Industries 

142 

487 

242 

132,525 

452,910 

CE Heath 


432 

-35 

209,309 

192,456 

Amstrad 

38 

122 

221 

207,176 

665,144 

LAS MO 

243 

159 

-35 

397,324 

261,682 

APV Hofdinos 

245 

590 

141 

77,665 

188,033 

Ferranti 

144 

97 

-33 

619,272 

418,448 

Tozer Kemsley . 

65 

153 

135 

69,777 

164,896 

Diploma 

288 

213 

-26 

150.854 

120,558 

Wedgwood 

239 

555 

13? 

108,410 

251,748 

Trafalgar House 

346 

260 

-25 1, 192,229 

954,745 

Jefferson Smurfit 

145 

330 

128 

285,041 

653,558 

Dee Corporation 

268 

204 

-24 1,292,295 

1,790219 

Myson Group 

65 

147 

126 


118,938 

Avana Group 

589 

463 

-21 

205.679 

161,679 

Ratners 

117 

258 

119 

41,113 

227,556 

Ultramar 


- *160 

-20 

548.641 

438259 

Mountleigh Group 

510 

£11.1 

118 

55,610 

133,244 

Britoil 


171 

-18 

1,045.075 

862,454 

Britisfi Vita 

131 

285 

117 

59.328 

129.629 

B rammer 


273 

-15 

135,902 

114,665 

Aba co 

30 

65 

115 

32,381 

120.965 

CaJedoniatnv 

313 

268 

-14 

302£84 

259,424 

Daily Mail & Gen 

£13 

£28 

113 

65.468 

139.664 

Boots 

261 

226 

-13 1.903.712 

1,077.489 

Blue Arrow 

184 

390 

112 

43,727 

145,907 

Northern Foods 

286 

248 

-13 

605.130 

528,607 

1C Gas 

298 

611 

105 

395,658 

811,506 

European Femes 

139 

121 

-13 

310,544 

280232 

Turner & Newall 

84 

172 

103 

96,721 

233,653 

Hams Queensway 


202 

-13 

352,668 

474.892 

Bernard Matthews 

138 

280 

102 

88.378 

178,360 

Guinness 

321 

280 

-13 

693.899 

2224200 

Pritchard Services 

58 

117 

102 

67,027 

135,210 

Sedgwick Grotv , 

1 

317 

-10 1.059,966 

1.097,041 

Regaliafl Properties 

166 

325 

96 

39,999 

121,758 

British & Comm 


288 

-10 

655,744 

590,169 

Henderson Aomin 

500 

963 

93 

103,440 

199,341 

Argyll Group 


313 

-10 

691,751 

625,774 

Daily Mail A 

£12 

£23 

90 


1144 

Matthew Hall 

154 

140 

-9 

118,826 

108,024 

Assoc Newspapers 

223 

423 

89 


5655 

British Telecom 

232 

211 

-9 

13.920m 

12.660m 

H Samuel A 

81 

152 

88 

66,579 

124,938 

Laura Ashley 

184 

168 

-9 

367,264 


AE 

139 

258 

86 

137,521 

255,255 

Famell Electronics 

211 

193 

-9 

264,721 

242.137 

J Cruwther Group 

83 

153 

84 

26,895 

142,651 

Lucas Industries 

486 

456 

-6 

588,492 

557,674 

McCorquodale 

151 

278 

84 

77,227 

142,481 

Hawker Siddeley 

461 

434 

-6 

908,428 

855223 

J Waddmgton 

109 

202 

84 

57,133 

129,902 

Irish Distillers 

205 

194 

-5 

118,146 

111.806 

Companies capitalized at 

£100m ormore 




Companies capitalized at £1O0m or more 





of itself to Standard Chartered 
Bank. 

Rainers, the jeweller, was 
buoyed by the takeover in July 
of its rival H SamueL 

Blue Arrow was similarly 
boosted by acquisitions both 
in Britain and, for the first 
time, in America. 

In the laggards list, oil 
companies stood out as the 
losers from the drastic fell in 
oil prices. Several blue chip 
companies and household 
names also pepper the list. 

Triton Europe, the oil and 
gas exploration group, saw its 
pretax profits feu dramatically 
u the second half of the year 
to May 31. London & Scottish 
Marine Oil's p ro fits also suf- 
fered from the slump in oil 
prices 

CE Heath, the long estab- 
lished Lloyd's broker, man- 
aged to end the year down 35 
per cent, despite attracting a 
hostile bid from its fellow 
broker PWS Holdings. Heath 
has been losing staff at an 
alarming rate. Its team of 
North American brokers weal 
several months ago and this 
month 28 brokers from the 
international, marine and, 
most importantly, aviation 
divisions walked out to join 

Gticorp- 

Ferranti, the electrical and 
electronic engineer, upset the 
market with an unexpected 
announcement last July of a 
fell in 1985-86 profits. Interim 
results announced in Novem- 
ber feiled to mollify, despite 
the company’s optimistic . 
noises about a record order 


i gar House, the prop- 
, construction and ship- 
idfng group, was hit by the 
fell in oil prices. In the year to 
September it wrote off more 
than £100 million because of 
its exposure to oil and gas 
production and the offshore 
construction industry. Pretax 
profits only managed a 2 per 
cent rise to £145.8 million. 

Doe Corporation, the super- 
markets group, went on an 
extensive buying spree in 
America and Britain and is- 
sued 400 million shares to 
fund the activity. In Match 
Dee bought Herman's Sport- 
ing Goods, the largest retailer 

otps kind in the US, for £278 

million. 

I t followed this with die 
acquisition in June of 
Fine Fare and Stoppers 
Paradise from Asso- 
ciated British Foods for 
millio n. Finally, it added 
M&H Sporting Goods in the 
US for £44 mfflion and Medi- 
care in B ritain for £20 million. 

The glut of paper and fears 
thm organic growth was giving 
way to acquisition-led growth 
have caused share price weak- 


Avana, die food manufac- 
turing group, followed dis- 
appointing results for 1985-86 
with disappointing interims to 
September 27, showing pretax 
profits only 6-5 percent higher 
at £8.8 milli on- The company 
is suffering from stagnant sales 
in mature marke ts and is 
investigating new projects to 
take it out of the traditional 
grocery areas. 

Boots, the chemist, has 
suffered this year despite bid 
speculation. The £400 million 
acquisition ofFlint, an Ameri- 
can manufacturer and distrib- 
utor of prescription 
medicines, was not rap- 
turously received. The ac- 
quisition involved die largest 
ever vendor placing in 
London and the first with 100 
percent clawback for ordinary 
shareholders. 

The drinks and brewing 
group Granness also rates as a 
laggard. Although it won 
Distillers after a bitter battle 
with Argyll Group, its stock 
has fallen after wrangles over 
who was 10 be chairman and, 
.worse still, the appointment of 
a Department or Trade and 
Industry inquiiy inti) the com- 
pany over suspected insider 
tradmg. 

AlisonEadie 


News Corp to 
raise £878m 
for H&WT bid 


Melbourne (Reuter) - Mr 
Rupert Murdoch's News Cor- 
poration said yesterday it 
would raise AuwI-87 billion 
(£878 million) through the 
place ment of shares or notes 


licence for channel HSV-7 in 
Melbourne, and its 59 per cent 
stake in Television Broad- 
casters, which owns channel 
ADS-7 in Adelaide. 

The Trade Practices Corn- 


placement of shares ornotes t0 allow 

SCS .0 sell 

discounting fecility if its cash News corpu inlerest5 


MUf AW - - 

subsidiary, is offering Aus$ 12 
a share or a scrip alter- 
native of two News Corpora- 
tion shares or two convertible 
notes for every three H&WT 
shares. 

The offer document said 
Aus$750 milli on would be 
raised by placing 41.67 mil- 
lion News Corporation shares 
or convertible notes under- 
written by JB Were and Son 
and Bache Corns and Carr. 

The remaining AuS$1.12 
billion would be raised 

through a 24-month bill 

acceptance-discounting facil- 
ity with optional letters of 
credit provided by the Com- 
monwealth Bank of Australia, 
the offer said. The bank 
plann ed to syndicate the 
facility. 

News Ltd and News Cor- 
poration expect to provide the 
funds to service the debt from 
foe fecility from their own 
resources, it said. Hie fecility 
would be refinanced with 
long-term debt and the 
amount outstanding would be 
reduced by AusS250 million 
within six months of foe first 
drawdown, it said. 

After conversion of all 
News Corporation convertible 
notes, foe group's issued cap- 
ital mil rise by 16 per cent if 
every offeree accepts the cadi 
or by 41 per cent if every 
offeree takes foe alternatives 
of News Corporation shares or 
convertible notes. 

If the takeover succeeds, 
H&WT win sell wholly-owned 
Herald-Sun TV, which has the 


The commission _ 
that if it is satisfied wih the 
sales agreements and the pro- 
posed buyers, it will not object 

to foe H&WT takeover. 

It is also seeking an under- 
taking from Mr Robert 
Holmes A Court’s JN Taylor 
Holdings that it win not 
dispatch its proposed offer for 
H&WT shares until it . too 
satisfies ownership conditions. 

JN Taylor, a Bell Group 
subsidiary, bid Aus$I3 a share 
with scrip alternatives for 
H&WT on December 24, 

three weeks after the News Ltd 

bid. . 

Mr Holmes A Court said m 
Perth yesterday that he ex- 
pected H&WT to decide on 
his takeover bid by foe end of 
this week. 

Some market analysts be- 
lieve the H&WT board may 
recommend both foe JN Tay- 
lor offer and News 

Corporation's scrip alter- 
native, which at present share: 
prices place a similar value on 
foe H&WT group. Both offers 
include a choice of cash, scrip 
or convertible notes. 

Mr Holmes A Court said 
such a recommendation 
“would be nonsense. If there is 
not a dear recommendation, 
we are entitled to withdraw 
our Aus$13 a share bid. If 
there is, we are obliged to. 
proceed.” 

Both foe Taylor counter bid 
and News Ltd's offer are 
conditional on a favourable 
recommendation by the 
H&WT board. 


New ship orders plunge 


Paris (Renter) — The world 
shipbuilding industry saw a 33 
per cent fell in new orders in 

foe first nine months of this 
year compared with foe same 
period last year, the Organiza- 
tion for Economic Co-opera- 
tion and Development said. 

The OECD report showed 
Europe foe hardest hit, with 
new orders dropping v3 per 
cent to 499 vessels, against 
1,870 in the first nine months 
of 1985, 

This was four points worse 


than the 69 per cent fell' 
recorded in the first half of 
1986, compared with the same 
period last year. 

Japan's new orders dropped 
19.5 pa* cent to 4,510 vessels 
against 5,604 at the end of the 
third quarter in 1985. 

West Germany received 
new orders for 73 vessels, 
compared with 596 at the 
same time last yean France 
had 57 new enters against 251; 
Italy 18 against 307; and 
Britain 36 compared with 284. 



P & I CLUB 


International 

Lawyer 

An able and energetic young lawyer preferably 
with some experience at the Bar or as a 
solicitor is required to handle the claims 
involving our shipowner members. 
Knowledge of charter party disputes would be 
a distinct advantage and languages useful. 

Please apply by handwritten letter with CV 
to:- 

KA.C. Patteson 
Tindall Riley & Co., 

Southwark Towers, 

32 London Bridge Street, 

London, SE1 9RR 


Professional 
Patents Staff 



The Glaxo Group of companies, which researches and 
develops, manufactures and markets a wide range of 
pharmaceuticals, is heavily dependent on the innovation 
emanating from its extensive R&D establishments. The 
protection of new inventions is therefore of paramount 
importance in maintaining the Group's success. 

We are seeking two high calibre professional patents staff to 
join our Group InteHectual Property Department based in 
Islington, North London. The successful app Scants will have 
several years of experience of patents work in 
pharmaceuticals. While Glaxo has not, up to the present, 
employed Chartered Patent Agents (or European Patent 
Attorneys), applications are invited from cancfidates with 
these qualifications. 

Suitable candidates w3 have a good honours degree in 
Chemistry arid possibly a Ph.D. or D. Phil. They will be strong 


in Organic Chemistry. A lively interest in the biological 
sciences will be an asset For one of the posts, a degree in 
Biochemistry wiH be considered as an alternative. 

Both positions will have a wide ranging involvement in all 
aspects of international patent protection relating to the 
Group's pharmaceuticals and wiR centre on the preparation 
and prosecution of patent applications relating to inventions 
deriving from the research establishments of the Glaxo Group. 
The whole spectrum of patent work associated with a major 
pharmaceutical company will be involved. 

The remuneration and benefits package wiH reflect the 
importance of the Patents (unction within Glaxo. 

Please send a detailed CV to Miss Pat Sandry, Senior 
Personnel Officer, Glaxo Holdings p.I.c., Garges House, 
&-12 darges Street, London W1Y SDH, or telephone 
01 -493 4060 Ext. 300 for an application form. 


Glaxo Holdings p.I.c. 

Clarges House, 6-12 Garges Street, London W1Y 8DH. 


BARNSLEY MAGISTRATES’ COURT 

Appointment of a 
Trainee Court Clerk. 

Salary £7,806 - £8,664. 
(Under review). 

Apportions are Invited tor the above post from persons wishing 
to commence or further a career In the Magisterial Service: 

Applications should be from newly qualified barristers or 
solicitors or paduates who have pasted the Law Society final 
examinations (Articles of Clerkship are avallabte In appropriate 


Cflnmwnting salary will be determined in accordance with aoe. 
gwgi ca bon s and e x perience. Th e post Is superannuate and 
sufrett to medical assessment and the J.fTc. terms and 
conomons or sorvics. 


-^i- education - .W^cations and 
eJteerenoe, together with the names and addresses of two 
referees to reach me not later than Monday the 12th January 

„ . . „ .. . Jff FERY P. BLACKBURN, 
Ctoik to be Magistrates' Govts Coonittee. 

Court, 


Court 

P.0. Box 17, 



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THE TIMES TUESDAY nFrTMRFR 30 1986 


SPORT/LAW 


CRICKET 


Atkinson and Somerset 
cling to faint hopes 
of recapturing Botham 


Ginny Leng and Murphy Himself combine to produce all that is best in sport 

A purple patch of pure pleasure 



Simon 

Barnes 


% fj • * » 

\ ij* J 


Somerset have left the door 
open for Ian Botham to 
reconsider his decision about 
leaving the county in protest 
over the sackings of Viv 
Richards and Joel Garner. 

The Somerset president, 
Colin Atkinson, a former cap- 
tain of the county side, said: 
“During the last few weeks] 
Ian has spoken to both our 
chairman and our secretary on 
the phone foom Australia and 
he is adamant he still intends 
to leave. 

“That makes it 99.99 per 
cent certain he will be going. 
But as long as there is .01 of a 
chance, we are not going to let 
down our members by pulling 
up the stumps while the march 
is in progress. 

“Ian's contract with us does 
not run out until the end of 
1986. Until that happens, 
there is still a chance he will 
slay, however slight, A new 
contract is still on the table 
and still on offer to him." 

If Botham does leave 
Somerset, he will go with a 
glowing reference from Atkin- 
son, who is also the head 
master of Millfield. the public 
school in Somerset renowned 
for its sporting prowess. 

Atkinson added: “Because 
of the publicity Ian Botham 
has attracted, a lot of people 
do not realize he is the sort of 
person who would share his 
last biscuit or sandwich with 
you. 

“He is also the kind of 
cricketer who would, in the 
right circumstances, give up 
his wicket if the side had 
plenty of runs on the board 
and if another batsman 
needed some practice. 

“He is also the sort of 
bowler who would happily 
take one for 100 on a plum 

SKI JUMPING 

i 

Edwards the 
pioneer has 
long way to go 

Oberstdorf, West Germany, 
(Reuter) — Eddie Edwards, the 
first Briton to take part in a‘ 
World Cup event, failed to reach 
the distance at which official 
measuring starts in yesterday’s 
practice session for today's 
opening contest in the annual 
Four Hills series. 

The 22-year-okl plasterer 
from Cheltenham was credited 
with an estimated distance of 55 
metres after he foiled to reach 
the 70 metres mark at which 
official measuring starts. The 
best mark was recorded by 
Finland's Jukka Kalso who 
jumped 103 metres. 

TODAY’S FIXTURES 

7.30 unless stated 

FOOTBALL 

CENTRAL L£AGl£; Ffrsf drvBBon: Sack- 
bum V Evenon (7.0); Manchester City V 
Hul (6.45). 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Charlton V 
Oxford United (at Bromtay FC. 3J)fc 
MiUwaJt v Swmdon (2.0). 

SOUTH EAST COUNTIES LEAOUE: Rfot 
dhiistorE Cambridge United v Portsmouth 
P-30). 

RUGBY UNION 

CLUB HATCHES 

Covwrcy w Nottingham 0.0); Cross keys v 
Glamorgan Wanderers (7.0). 

OTHER SPORT 

HOCKEY: Women s territorial tournament 
(at Starhome SchooL Dorset. 9.0am). 

SQUASH RACKETS: Walthamstow Burn- 
ing Society Connaught junior open tour- 
nament (Connaught Cm). 

TENM& Junior covered court champion- 
ships (at Queen’s Ctub. West Kensington). 


By a Special Correspondent 
wicket against two batsmen in 
form when some other men 
would say, i don't think I'll 
howl today, thanks very 
much. There's nothing in it for 
me. 

“Ian Botham is not the sort 
?f cricketer who thinks self- 
ishly and looks to h is 
averages. 


, - 

% & - --a&V'. L ,-> 



Atkinson: conciliatory 
Atkinson, a 55-year-old 
Yorkshire man brought up in 
Durham, added: “One of the 
things Ian is very good at is 
accepting authority. 

“Only on rare occasions has 
he had a disagreeable word 
with an umpire and for less 
frequently than most pace 
bowlers who tend to become 
more frustrated than slow 
bowlers because of the extra 
effort they put in. 

“Every now and then fast 
bowlers come out with the odd 
word that they should not 
come out with, which is 
perfectly reasonable. It is a 
man’s game, after alL 
“Ian Botham has hardly 
ever made any more fuss 
about anything than any crick- 
eter would. He just gets more 
attention because his nam e is 

Ian Rnlham. 


“You ask first class umpires 
about him and they will tdl 
you he has a good reputation. 
He *oes not cheat He just 
plays his heart out 

“We do not want him to 
leave Somerset His contract 
with us runs out on December 
31 and we still want him to 
stay. But if he goes, I would 
like to wish him all the best of 
luck in the future with 
Worcestershire or wherever.” 

Rain holds 
key to 
Test result 

Nagpur, India (Reuter) - 
The bed weather which dis- 
rupted the second day’s play 
in the second Test between 
India and Sri Lanka could 
hold the key to the outcome of 
the match when play resumes 
today after yesterday’s rest 
day. 

India, chasing the tourists’ 
first innings total of 204, 
scored only 54 for one in reply 
on a day in which nearly four 
and ban hours play was lost 
through rain and bad light 

No play was possible before 
lunch and when the resump- 
tion was announced after the 
interval, Dulecp Mendis, the 
Sri Lankan captain, had an 
angry altercation with P D 
Reporter, one of the umpires, 
over the condition of the 
ground. 

Mendis argued that the 
outfield was too slippery and 
after play finally started there 
were further interruptions 
when Asanta Gurusinghe re- 
fused to field in one part of the 
outfield. 


ICE HOCKEY 


Fera equals record 
in Racers’ spree 


Qy Norman de Mesqmta 


As the Heineken League ap- 
proaches half-way. Marrayfield 
Racers continue to dominate 
the premier division and two 
more emphatic wins, against 
Solihull Barons on Saturday 
and at home to Whitley on 
Sunday, increased their lead ' 
over Du n dee Rockets to five 
points. 

Solihull led 3-1 early in the 
second period but eventually 
found the renowned Rick Fera 
and Tony Hand double-act too 
much for them. Fera bad five 
goals and an assist. Hand two 
goals and five assists. These 
impressive figures were nothing 
compared to -Sunday’s perfor- 
mance against the Warriors. 

Fera equalled a dub record 
with 10 goals — to which be 
added three assists — while 
Hand had four goals and six 
assists as the Racers won by the 
remarkable scoreline of 20-10. 
The Warriors, for whom Jim 
Earle sowed four goals, could 
perhaps fed hard done by in 
scoring 10 times away from 
home but still finishing on the 
losing side. 

Dundee were so dominant in 
their home game with Ayr 
Brains that their goaltender, 
Martin McKay, changed roles in 
the last period and, playing left 
wing, scored the Rockets’ 10th 
goaL 

Nottingham Panthers con- 
firmed their status as the best 
team in England with a home 
win over Darhain Wasps and an 
away win against Str e a tham 
Redskins . Ian Woodward saved 


40 of 43 shots to earn the man- 
o Pth e- match award against the 
Wasps 

The Redskins proved tougher 
opponents than the Panthers 
must have expected, twice lead- 
ing during the first period as the 
teams shared six pain. 

Streatham were once again 
without their captain, Tony 
GoJdstooe, who is still serving 
his suspension. Also missing 
was Mike Rocdo, suspended for 
the match penalty be incurred in 
the game against Solihull 

While Murrayfield dominate 
the top of the table, Cleveland 
Bombers are in danger of losing 
touch at the bottom. Outsbot ; 
56-17 at Fife, they are still 1 
looking for their second win. 
Solihull Barons are not doing 
much better and, although, 
Brian Puhalski, who scored four 
times at Durham, seems a 
valuable acquisition, he needs 
help. Wasps' win took them 
above Ayr into fourth place. 

In a -relatively light holiday 
programme, there was only one 
match in the first division but il 
was enough to allow Irvine 
Wings, following their win over 
their local rivals, Glasgow Ea- 
gles, to hand over bottom place 
to Swindon Wildcats. 

RESULTS: Premier dMstae Rto Fhwre 

12. Ciewtand Bomoers 2; Nottingham 
Panthers 7. Dunam Wasps 3; SoNxil 
Barons 6. Murayfietf Racers ft; Omtoe 
Rockets 12. Ayr Bnans 1 ; (Xirtiani Wasps 

13, SoNiua Barons 5: MurayfiaM Racers 
20. WMttey Warriors 10: Streatham Rad- 
Suns 6, Nottingham Partners 9. Ffcst 
dMaiotK Irvine Wngs ft Glasgow Eagles 
5- 


This is the time of year 
when wise people take the top 
off the GlemBorangie bottle 
and talk ahoot sport. Discuss- 
ing anything over Gles- 
moran g ie tends to bathe the 
subject in golden light. What 
was the finest sporting mo- 
ment of the past year? Which 
athlete most memorably lifted 
the hearts daring the past 12 
months? 

The point of sadi disenssiaa 
is not to reach a condnshm, 
bat to recall and to share die 
nnsoOed and ancompUcalad 
pleasures that sport, more 
than anything else, can bring 
so readily and so often. 

Another log on die fire? 
Another drop? Why not? And 
we can talk about the glorious 
Dancing Brave's thundering 
flight to victory to the Prix de 
L’Arc de Triomphe or of the 
joys of WiDesden and the 
hockey World Cap and the 
aice and modest trend of PE 
tea cher s and sports goods 
salesmen who so nearly won it 
for England. 

We can turn to Nigel 
Mansell, so amiable and so 
talented and so very Britishiy 
not quite victorious. And then 
die England football team, so 
very English!? not quite 
victorious against the Ar- 
gentinians. linker was sweet ’ 
(did yon know he has never 
been booked in his life?) but ia 
the end, we had to hand it to 
Maradona. 

But as I look for the one 
moment to savour, I cannot 
help but return again and 
ag«m (o the same rt«w»g- Visual 
memory is an odd thing: 1 can 
recall with perfect vividness no 
more than one second of the 
event: a grey horse suddenly 
breasting a fold In the ground 
with an e x tra or d in ary bond- 
ing elastic stride, ridden by a 
dashing lady in purple. End of 
snapshot: bat that was the 
moment of the year for me. 
The occasion was the Burgh- 
ley horse trials, the rider, 
Ginny Leng. the horse, Mur- 
phy Himself. 

But already I find myself 
embarrassed. How could I 
explain? For 1 am trying to 

rnmnumiratp a kind (f joy *t«*t 

only horsey people know 
about, a joy that no one else in 
sport can truly raderstamL 
Indeed, non-borsey people 
find talk ahoot sack joys 


- •* ’■ ■' 




t 

' -■ ■ v-.-V*" 

" V - " ■ -. "i'M 
# ;• - 






*£• 

-v 






'j : f^r- 

*3» . . 








Togetherness: Leng and Morphy Himself welding a winning combination at Burghky 


ir ri tating, nonsensical, af- 
fected. For the townee, hor- 
seyness ft no more than a 
target for traditional jokes: I 
recently read in a thriller that 
“sire was a tall, buxom young 
woman of narrow intelligence 
and lusty appetites. Since her 
husband was rarely at home 
she sublimated these appetites 
to some extent by riding 
horses, but not entirely . . .** 

Ho ho ho, jolly original and 
amusing. Fra sure. There is an 
enormons gap of understand- 
ing between the horsey person 
and the townee. It is n mutual 
failure of the imagination: the 
townee cannot imagine what it 
is like to be involved with a 


horse, and horsey people can- 
not imagine what it is like not 
tube. 

The result is that horsey 
people tend to dose ranks, 
once the outsiders guffaw and 
sco<L and nurture something' 
very tike hostility. Yon have 
only to watch drivers passing 
horses on the road to be qmte 
sure about that The horse 
world is a tight and closed one. 
But so is the world of motor 
sport, and that attracts noth- 
ing worse <h»n indifference. 
Perhaps this is because every- 
one has cars, and so everyone 
has some understanding of car 
nuts. But today no one has 
horses except horse nuts. 

After Ginny Leng had com- 


pleted her dazriing cross- 
country run on Murphy 
Homseif, she was ecstatic. She 
looked radiant even by her 
own dizzy standards, ami she 
gushed and gashed and said 
again and again how pleased 
she was for the horse. The 
townee might have thongfat 
this performance ludicrously 
over-the-top. Only those who 
have been let into the secret, 
who have known themselves 
some of the vast joys that 
horses can bring, would under- 
stand that her behaviour was 
incredibly restrained, a mas- 
terpiece of understatement, a 
triumph of self-controL In her 
heart she wanted to tom 
cartwheels and whoop and 


cheer and weep and drink 

champagne from the bucket: 
instead she smiled and said 
she was pleased for the horse. 

Non-horsey people have an 
idea that riding horses is about 
domination. It is not. It is 
about co-operation. If the 
understanding between horse 
and rider is not a two-way 
thing, yon neither do any good 
nor have any fun. The ultimate 
skill of any person involved in 
any of the horsey sports — 
whether race horse trainer, 
jockey, show jumper, dressage 
specialist or eventer — is to 
understand exactly how much 
the horse is capable of; then to 
bring out that ability on the 
chosen day. 

Ginny Leng done this 
a gain and a gain- in the year 
just ending, she became world 
champion with Priceless, and, 
showing a great sense of style, 
promptly retired the horse to a 
life of pleasure and indul- 
gence. She then went on to win 
Bnrghley with the young, in- 
experienced and boumungly 
eager Murphy Himself. As a 
personal achievement, this 
was immense. The original 
selection of the horse, the long 
process of training and the 
riding of the horse on the day 
all demonstrated that Ginny 
Leng is the greatest. 

But that was not why Ginny 
was filled with delight The 
pleasure was that her horse, 
her putter, had shown all the 
straight-running courage and 
spring and genuineness she 
had believed he possessed. 
She was rejoicing not in her 
own achievement bat in what 
the horse had given to her. It is 
a purer and more complete joy 
than any of the many joys that 
sport can bring. 

In the course of writing 
these tines, it is jnst possible 
that I may have revealed my 
own bias In favour of horses 
and horsey people. But one of 
the great riilng g about people 
like Ginny is that they are able 
to break the barriers and 
communicate the joys of the 
horsey world -to outsiders and 
townees. Her achievement and 
her nature pass cm something 
of the boundless pleasures that 
horses can, in their bounding 
generosity, give to people. 

That is why Ginny Leng 
gets the vote as my own private 
Sportsview Personality of the 
Year. In second place comes 
Murphy Himself. Now, pass 
the Glenmorangie, and if you 
have another three hoars to 
spare, Td like to tell you about 
my own horse . . . 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


Redskins kicked out of hock 


The coach of a National 
Football Le ague dub recently 
called Erie Dickerson “a touch- 
down waiting to happen.’’ On 

Sunday, Dickerson more closely 
resembled a disaster waiting to 
happen — and the wail was not 
long. Dickerson fumbled three 
times and the Los Angeles Rams 
coughed up the ball six times as 
the Washington Redskins woo 
the National Football Con- 
ference wild-card play-off game 
19-7. 

In the American Football 
Conference wtidkard game, the 
New York Jets rebounded from 
five successive defeats to beat 
the Kansas City Chiefs 35-15. 

“The good news is we won,” 
Joe Gibbs, the coach of the 
Redskins, said. “The bad news 
is we have to go to Chicago." In 
advancing to a divisional semi- 
final against the Chicago Bears, 
the Redskins relied on a resusci- 
tated defence and Jess Atkinson, 
who two weeks ago was training 
to be a loan officer for a 


By Robert Kirley 

mortgage company. Presum- 
ably, Atkinson's colleagues in 
high finance smacked their lips 
at the efficiency of his foreclo- 
sure on the Rams as he kicked 
four field goals. 

Washington's kjw-ranked de- 
fence intercepted Jim Everett, 
the Rams' quarterback, twice. 

Dickerson, who led the league 
in the regular season with 1,821 
yards on 404 carries, gained 158 
yards on 26 runs oti Sunday, but 
his fumbles were critical The 
Rams have not defeated the 
Redskins since 1974. 

The Jets changed quarter- 
backs and returned to their early 
season form. Pat Ryan, who 
started in place of the ineffective 
Ken O’Brien, threw three touch- 
down passes and the New 
Yorkers shifted their emphasis 
to short passes and runs by 
Freeman McNeil, who gained 
1 35 yards and scored twice. 

AFC vdd-catd game 

New York Jets 7 14 7 7-35 

Hasan C3y Chiefs 6 0 0 9-15 


SCOBN6 Rnt quarter; Kansu* Chp J 
Smith. run pack Usd). 6min 59sec 
elapsed, wear Wortc F McNal, 4yd run (P 


elapsed, wear Vtadc F McNaf, 4yd nm (P 
Leahy tot*). 14:14. S ec o n d ipiwtar. New 
York: F McNafl, 1yd pass from P Ryan 
(Leahy kick). 5:48: AToon. 11yd pass from 
fryan (Leahy Mck). 14*1. Thfrd quarter 
New roric K McMhir. Z\<M Manpan 
return (Leahy kick). 0:13. Fourth quarter 
Kaaeas Ohp A Lewis, recovery o» blocked 

C ln andzone (Lowery lock). 0:14. New 
: W Onggs. 0yd pass from Ryan 
(Leahy tockgr4:lf. fans CUyr D 
Jennings ran out of and zone tor safcrty. 
Amndanc e 89^07. 

NFC wM-caRt game 

WastYn Redofctos 10 3 3 3-19 

Los Angetes Rams 0 0 0 7-7 



Saaaday Janwy 3 
unless stated 

FIRST DIVISION 
X Leicester v Shelf Wed 
1 Liverpool » West Ham 
1 Luton vCtwteaa 
IManCvOxford 

1 Newcastle v Coventry 
2QPflvEvorton 

X Southampton v Man U 
XWknhiedonv Watford 
Not on corpora: Aston 
Villa v Nottnatam Forest 
Norwich v Chariton: Tott- 
enham * Arsenal (Sunday) 

SECOND DIVISION 

2 Bamstey v Okfiam 

2 Btackhum v Portsmth 
X Bradford v Bnmtogham 
XC Palace vOerhy 
1 Grans** v BngMon 
1 Leeds v Hudderefieto 
X Mtftwal a Stoke 
1 Plymouth v Hu* 

X Reading v Sunderland 
ISheHUvWBA 
X Shrewsbury Ipswich 

THRO DIVISION 
1 Blackpool v Brentford 


2 Batten v Mansfield 
X Chesterfld v Soumemth 
1 Ftawm * Caritete 
1 Nods Co w GHUngftam 
X Rotherham v Bristol C 
1 Swindon vBury 
1 Wateal v York 
1 Wgan v Darflngton 
Not on coapo na : Bristol 
Rovers v Chasten Mddie- 
sfarough v Newport; Port 
Vale vDoncastar (Sunday) 

FOURTH OWISI ON 
1 Cardiff v Stockport 

1 Colchester v Scunthorpe 
X Crewe v Tranmare 

2 Exeter v Northampton 
2 Hartlepool v Swansea 
1 Hereford v Torquay 

1 Lincoln « Burney 
1 0nentvHsftax 

2 Rochdale v Aldershot 
1 Southend y Preston 

1 Wrexham v Wolves 
Not on coupon s : Peter- 
borough v Cambridge 
Ur*8d(Smday) 

GNVAUXHAU. 

CONFERENCE 


1 Maidstone v Both 
1 Nuneaton « Weymouth 
XRunoom vEnwkf 

1 Scartsoro vTeHord 

1 WBaktetora v Fricktoy 

SCOTTISH PREMER 

1 Cette vHamaton 
X Dundee v Dundee U 
1 FeHrk vHtoemwn 

1 Hearts v Clydebank 

2 Motherwafi y Rangers 


I v Rangers 
* Aberdeen 


1 KettBring v Gateshead surfing 


SCOTTISH FIRST 
1 Airdrie v Perth* 

1 Clyde v Montrose 
1 Dumbarton y Brechin 
X East FUe v Morton 

1 Farter vQ of Sfii 

2 Kamemock v Ounfmfine 

SCOTTISH SECOND 

X Arbroath v Albion 
Not on comma: Berwick 
v Ayr; Cowdenbeath v St 
Johnstone: Queen's Park 
y Mssdowhank: Sten- 
housamur v Alloa-. StMng 
v Rarth; Stranraer v East 


Division semMmafe 

SATURDAY: AFC: Ctovetand Browns v 
New York Job. NFC: Chicago Bears » 
W ash ingt o n Redskins. SUNDAY: AFC 
Denver Broncos v New England Patriots. 
NFC New York Grams v San Francisco 
49ert 


TREBLE CHANCE (home teems); South- 
ampton. Wimbledon. Bradford. MUwalL 
Reading. Chesterfield. Rotherham, 
Crewe. Runoom. Oiatoee. East FHb, 
AftXOBttL 

BEST DRAWS: Southampton. MBwafl, 
Chesterfield. Curate* East Fife. 

AWAY& Evenon, Portsmouth. Swansea, 
Aldershot. Rangers. ^ 

HOlCSt Leeds, Plymouth. FUtoam. Swin- 
don, Waisa*, Wigan, Canfilf. H er eford , 
Celtic, Heats, Arale, Dumbarton. 


FKED ODDS: Homes: Plymouth. Futtism. 
Wgan. Away* Everton. Portsmouth. 
Rangers. Draws: Rearing, Chesterfield, 


In the money 

Martin FJoofc. a selfmade 
millionaire and the former 
chairman of third division Bris- 
tol Royers, is £25,000 richer 
after winning the club’s Christ- 
mas lottery. 


Law Report December 30 1986 


Pending trial in libel action not sufficient to postpone statement in court 


-».y 


Barnet v Crazier and Another 
Before Lord Justice Nourse and 
Lord Justice Ralph Gibson 
[Judgment December 11] 

Parties who had made a bona 
fide settlement of a libel action 
and sought leave to make a 
statement in open court might 
expect to be allowed to-do so 
unless some sufficient reason 
appeared on the materia] before 
the judge why leave should be 
refused. The judge bad to have 
regard to the interests of all the 
parties. 

In the instant case the judge 
had come to a correct conclu- 
sion in directing such that a 
statement should be made 
pursuant to 8 settlement .be- 
tween the plaintiff and the 
second defendant in respect of 
the publication in the second* 
defendant’s journal of an alleged 
libel in a letter from the first 
defendant before the trial of his 
action since the making and 
publication of the statement 
would not prejudice the tnal of 
his action and was not delama- 
lory of him. , . 

. The Court of Appeal so held. 

dismissing an interlocutory ap- 
peal by Mr Brian Crazier, the 
first defendant in a pending Ubel 
action brought against him and 
against Spectator Newspapers 
(1928) Ltd. the second defen- 
dants. by the plaintiff Mr Rrch- 
ard Jackson Barnet, from Mr 
Justice Tucker who approved 
and directed the making of a 
statement in open court pursu- 
ant to an agreed settlement ot 
the action between the piauipn 
and The Spectator. 

Mr Crazier sought to post- 
pone the making of foe state- 
ment until after the conclusion 
of the trial of il» action. 

Mr Roger Buckley. QC and 
Mr Richard Walker for Mr 
Crazier Mr Patrick Milmo, V*- 


and Mr David Parsons for the 
plaintiff, Mr Mark Warby for 
The Spectator. 

LORD JUSTICE RALPH 
GIBSON said that the plaintiff 
had helped to found the In- 
stitute of Policy Studies (IPS) in 
Washington in 1963 and was a 
co-director. He had written a 
number of books. 

One, Allies: America and Ja- 
pan since the War, was pub- 
lished in this country in April 
1984. A review was published in 
The Spectator on April 7, 1984. 
The review prompted Mr Cra- 
zier to write a letter U> The 
Spectator. 

His letter referred to the 
plaintiff as a mainstay on the 
DPS and to the IPS as a “front of 
Cuban Intelliance, itself con- 
trolled by the Soviet KGB”. 

The plaintiff issued a writ and 
in his statement of claim as- 
serted that the words com- 
plained of meant and were 
understood to mean that be was 
the mainstay of and knowingly 
helped to run an instituuon 
which pretended to be bona fide 
but was in fact a front for coven 
operations by Cuban Intetii- 
cence at the instigation of the 
Soviet KGB. 

In his defence Mr Croaer, 
who was a journalist of distinc- 
tion and a writer on inter- 
national affaire, denied that his 
letter was defamatory and that 
the letter bore the meanings 


He also asserted that lhe 
words in the letter were true in 
substance and in feet He gave 
many particulars m support of 

that pica of justificaUML 

The Spectator pleaded a simi- 
lar defence relying on substan- 
tially similar parttculare of 
justification as Mr Crazier bat 
the newspaper had rome to 
terms With the plaintiff and 
wished to settle the action. 


Under the terms of the settle- 
ment The Spectator would join 
in malting a statement in open 
curt to the effect that The 
Spectator accepted that neither 
the plaintiff nor IPS was a front 
for Cuban Intelligence and that 
neither was controlled by the 
KGB. An agreed term of the 
settlement was that the terms of 
the statement in open court 
would also be published in The 
Spectator. 

The proposed statement was 
submitted to Mr Justice Tucker 
who on November 27. 1984 
approved its terms and directed 
that it be made in court at as 
early date. Mr Crozier opposed 
the making of the statement 
until after the conclusion of the 
trial of the plaintiffs claim 
against on the ground that 
the making of the statement pnd 
the reporting of it were cal- 
culated to prejudice that trial 
and were defamatory of him. He 
appealed to the Court of Appeal 
to set aside the judge’s order. 

His Lordship referred to the 
established practice of the courts 
over many years when a libel 
action had been settled to 
permit counsel for the parties to 
make statements in open court 
which had been agreed between 
the parties and approved by the 
judge. His Lordship said that the 
importance of malting the state- 
ment in open court was that h 
was likely to come to the 
attention of the press and since 
the statement was part of a 
judicial proceeding it was made 
on an occasion of absolute 
privilege. 

The procedure offered a 
means by which settlement of an 
action could be reached and, 
when appropriate, announced is 
appropriate terms between two 
parties without risk of further 
litigation arising out of that 
announcement. 


Jt was a grievous burden to be 
sued in a defamation action 
even if one won in the end. 

In his decision the judge had 
said that balancing the interests 
of all the parties this was not a 
sensational case and none of the 
parties was famous or notori- 
ous. He did not think that a 
statement made in open court in 
November 1986 would have the 
slightest effect on a trial taking 
place in March to May of June 
I9S7. 

Potential jurors would be 
unaffected. Any publicity result- 
ing from such a statement would 
have passed out of their minds 
long before the trial He took the 
view that it was right lhat the 
statement should be allowed to 
be made forthwith. 

His Lordship said that the 
Court of Appeal had given Mr 
Crozier leave to appeal. The 
judge's reference to the date of 
trial had not been shown to be 
wrong. 

It was said that the acceptance 
by The Spectator lhat the IPS 
was not a front for Cuban 
Intelligence directly contra- 
dicted Mr Crater’s letter and 
what, in his plea of justification, 
he would be seeking to prove. 

He submitted that the 
publication of the apology and 
the statement would directiy 
affect the issue to be tried and 
would create a risk of prejudice; 
that save in exceptional circum- 
stances it would be wrong to 
permit the making of such a 
statement before the trial and it 
was the party who sought to 
make the statement to show 
good reason why it should be 
made. 

His Lordship said that there 
was no reported authority upon 
the issues raised in the appeal. 
The practice of making state- 
ments in open court had cer- 
tainly existed before 1920: see 


Sievier v Wootton ( The Times 
February 13, 1920k cited in 
Galley on Libel and Slander. Slh 
edition (1981) paragraph 1179. 

In 1933 there were changes in 
the rules. Observations by Lord 
Justice Greer in Wolsey v Asso- 
ciated Newspapers Ltd ([ 1 934] 1 
KB 448) and by Lora Justice 
Lawton in Church of 
Scientology of California v 
North News Ltd (unreported. 
May 17. 1973) were of assis- 
tance. Tire court was not there 
dealing with a case in which the 
interests of the defendant who 
had not taken money out of 
court or who had not settled the 
case against him required to be 
considered. 

Nevertheless, looking at those 
authorities, it seemed to his 
Lordship that an opportunity to 
make a statement in open court 
was thus seen more than 50 
years ago as something that was 
an incident, or part of the 
available procedure in a 
defamation action which the 
plaintiff at least was entitled to 
expect to be available to him. 
provided that the terms of the 
statement were approved by the 
judge and that there was nothing 
in the case which made it unfair 
to another party for the state- 
ment to be made. 

The present rule. Order 82, 
rule 5 of the Rules of the 
Supreme Court, which derived 
from the previous Order 22. rule 
2 introduced in 1933, provided 
for the making of a statement in 
open court with the leave of the 
judge, both when there bad been 
acceptance of money paid in 
and when the action was settled 
before trial without payment 
into court. 

The judge was right to regard 
the settlement of proceedings as 
a public good which the court 
should encourage and facilitate 
if having regard to the interests 


. of all the patties, it was right and 
just to do so. 

Although a party had no right 
to make a statement in open 
court upon which he could insist 
if the circumstances were such 
that the judge could not in his 
discretion approve that course, 
it seemed to his Lordship that 
parties who bad made a bona 
fide settlement of a defamation 
action and asked leave to make 
a statement in open court might 
expect to be allowed to do so. 
unless some sufficient reason 
appeared on the material before 
the judge why leave should be 
refused to them. 

By saying that he did not 
regard either party as having a 
burden of proof; while 
acknowledging that it was de- 
sirable for a settlement to be 
facilitated, the judge meant that 
he had to have regard to the 
interests of all parties; but, if 
there was no sufficient reason to 
refuse it, a plaintiff who had 
reached a settlement with a 
defendant should be allowed to 
make an approved statement. 
The judge was right in his 
approach. 

As to prejudging the fair trial 
of the pending action by the 
making and reporting of the 
proposed statement, the judge 
was right in his conclusion and 
the reasons be gave. 

Counsel for the plaintiff and 
for The Spectator had pressed 

the court that the test for proof 
of prejudice to the trial of the 
issue between the plaintiff and 
Mr Crozier was that laid down 
in section 2 of the Contempt of 
Court Act 19SI. They had 
aigued that it would be ir- 
rational to have any stricter or 
other test so that the court 
should only decline to approve 
die making of a statement in 
open court if there was shown to 


be a substantial risk of serious 
prejudice. 

His Lordship did not accept 
that submission. Mr Justice 
Tucker Had said the* there had 
to be a real risk, not shadowy or 
fanciful, and that meant that the 
risk of prejudice had to be real 
for h to be taken into account at 
all in the balancing exercise 
which be set himself to carry 
OUL 

The weight to be given to it 
would depend on the serious- 
ness of the risk and the gravity 
of the prejudice threatened. The 
judge did not mean that, if there 
was any real risk of prejudice, 
the making of a statement had, 
for that reason alone, to be 
refused. His Lordship thought 
that approach right. 

His Lordship said that on the 
facts the judge was right in 
taking the view that the making 
of the statement would not have 
the slfahtesi effect upon a jury 
trial of those issues taking place 
in March to June of 1987. 

If there should happen to be 
any jurors who noticed and 
remembered any report of the 
statement, the very great 
probability was that they would 
think lhat The Spectator had 
concluded or formed the opin- 
ion that the words could not be 
shown to be true and had, 
therefore, to be acknowledged to 
be untrue: The jurors would not. 
therefore, conclude that The 
Spectator's opinion bad to dic- 
tate their opinion or that Mr 
Crozier must be wrong. 

They would listen to the 
evidence and make up their own 
minds on what they heard in 
court. The opinion formed by 
The Spectator did not suggest 
the possession by them ofany 
information tending to discredit 
Mr Crorier or any primary 
evidence he had to lay before the 
jury. 


As to the defamatory nature 
of the terms of the statement, be 
did not accept that the absence 
of reference to the issue of 
defamation meant lhat the judge 
did not consider it The explana- 
tion in all probability was, as 
Lord Justice Nourse had sug- 
gested in argument, that the 
judge considered it and thought 
nothiiK of it 

His Lordship had been at first 
troubled by that part of the case. 
In the end, however, he had 
been driven to the conclusion 
that at any risk of defamation of 
Mr Crozier was not such as to 
require or justify refusal of leave 
to make the statement. 

His Lordship was not per- 
suaded that the statement was 
defamatory of Mr Crozier. If 
there was any real risk of the 
publication being injurious to 
Mr Crozier because defamatory 
of him, the extent of any injury 
likely to be caused (o him would 
be negligible. There was no 
reason to doubt the bona fide 
nature of the settlement. 

The court should be vigilant 
to see that the benefit of the 
procedure of making a state- 
ment in open court was not used 
to the unfair disadvantage of a 
third party. 

There would, no doubt, be 
cases in which, on balancing the 
interest of all the parties, where 
one or more defendants conti n- . 
ued in the action after a settle- 
ment by the plaintiff with one or 
more of them, the court would 
conclude that the facts were 
such that the making of a 
statement had to be postponed 
until after the trial of the 
remaining issues. 

The judge held that this was 
not such a case 
Lord Justice Nourse agreed. 

Solicitors; Peter Carter-Ruck 
& Partners; Bindman & Part- 
ners: Richard CM. Sykes. 




J l*r 


SPORT 


TIM1 


RACING 


Encouraging signs that 
Morning Line is ready 
to collect for Kennard 


Les Kennard is always a 
force to be reckoned with at 
Taunton, his local course, and 
he can provide the day's best 
bet there with Morning TJm> 
in the Castle Green Printers 
Handicap Hurdle. 

Although Morning line's 
form figures look disappoint- 
ing they obscure evidence of a 
horse improving with every 
run. It has taken some time for 
him to come to peak fitness, 
and even on his third outing 
he was still considered back- 
ward in condition. 

However, his last two starts 
have offered every encourage- 
ment of a much bolder show- 
ing very soon. In his 
penultimate race he finished 
about seven lengths seventh to 
the promoted Whither Thou 
Goest in a highly-competitrve 
handicap hurdle at Worcester, 
and last time, when amateur 
ridden, be was a dose fifth to 
Master Cone at Chepstow, 
weakening only in the closing 


By Mandarin 

He runs well at Taunton 
and over this 2m If trip can 
beat Kennard’s Doubleton, 
who is penalized 71b for 
winning at Devon & Exeter. 

French Flatter was an am- 
bitious entry for a IR£ 10,000 
race at Leopardstown on Box- 
ing Day. He did not run but if 
he is anywhere near that 
standard he should have no 
trouble winning the second 
division of the Holly Tree 
Novices' Hurdle. 

Royal Cracker is due a 
change of fortune and it may 
come in divison two of the 
Midnight Novices' Hurdle at 
Worcester. He was an en- 
couraging second to the 
promising newcomer Positive 
at Nottingham and then had 
little chance against the win- 


ner when beaten by Special 
Vintage at Catterick Bridge. 


That Chepstow race was 
over 2% miles and as Morning 
Line has always shown his 
best form at around two miles 
today's trip should be ideal for 
him. 

Another reverting to a more 
suitable distance is Atataho in 
the Somerset County Gazette 
ISO Handicap Chase. He be- 
gan the season with a comfort- 
able win at Worcester over 
two mdes but he seemed to 
find the near 2% miles at 
Towcester, a particularly test- 
ing track, beyond him. 


Full service for 
New Year’s Day 


There is a fall programme for 
racing this Thursday, New 
Year's Day, with six meetings 
scheduled. 

The Tima win be paftriBslung 
ob this day — the only quality 
newspaper to do so — offering a 
cranprcheBsire service for all the 

cards Btdulmg exclusive ratings 

for the top meetings at Chelten- 
ham and Catterick Bridge, pins 
news and resahs from the two 
New Year’s Eve "wthp. 

Make sure you have a com- 
plete guide to the holiday racing 
by pladng a regular order Cor 
The Tima with yotr n e wsa gen t. 


This opposition looks 
rather less fierce and he can 
take advantage of the hefty 
10ib allowance from Bangor 
winner The Mississippian, 
while the National Hunt Flat 
race winner Pride Hill is 
untried over hurdles. 

Brown Tribe is still not foot- 
perfect over fences but he will 
get few better opportunities 
than in the New Year’s Eve 
Handicap Chase. He was still 
in contention when unseating 
his rider three fences out in foe 
Towcester chase won by 
Qreenbank Park earlier this 
month. 

The best of the limited 
opposition, both numerically 
and in ability, may be Bashful 
Lad, a course and distance 
winner. 

Whatever foe fete of Bash- 
ful Lad, his trainer Michael 
Oliver can win foe Father 
Time Novices’ Handicap 
Chase with foe consistent New 
Song. He was beaten only a 
short head by Torkana at 
Wolverhampton last month 
and later ran respectably when 
last of three finishers behind 
Tarqogan’s Best in a better 
race at Haydock. ‘ 

Mr Candy can make his 
abundant stamina count in 
foe Racing Post Handicap 
Chase at Piumpton. He was 
fourth to Steel Yeoman over 
foe course and distance earlier 
this month, a much stronger 
race than today’s, and should 
hold another dour stayer De- 
lator, a winner at Piumpton 
last month. 




ll. 


~ -J'-*-* . . ■ 


lan WardJe’s Debtor, the winner of the Peter Cazalet 
Memorial Challenge Cap Chase at Piumpton earlier this 
season, will have his favourite soft ground when he returns to 
the Sussex course for today’s Racing Post Hamlkap Chase 


WORCESTER 


Guide to our in-line racecard 


00*38 TBE5F0RM|CD£F) (Ms J Rytoy) B Httf 9-100. 


BWMW 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


Racecard number. Draw in brackets. Six-figure 
form (F-fetL P-puitad up. U-wtseatod rider. B- 
braugn down. SMIppad in. R-rafuswfl. Hone's 
mme(BOankere. V-SGw.Tfhood. E-EWet**. G- 
course winner. D-dtemnce winner. CD-course 


and defence winner. BFbeatan favourite in latest 
race). Owner to brackets. Trainer. Age and 
weight. Rider plus any aBowance. The Time* 
Private Han dc apper's raring. Approximate starting 
price. 


12.45 True Spartan 
1.15 Maitredee 

1.45 Poets Day 


2.15 Brown Trix 
2-45 New Song 

3.15 Royal Cracker 


2.15 NEW YEARS EVE HANDICAP CHASE (£2^323: 3m) (5 runners) 


Michael Seely’s selection: 1.15 Hiz 3.15 Pride Hill 


Going: good to soft 


6 P21-10F MBSTEIl (d {A Dalton) J Old 6-11-7 

12 11FV42-U BROWN TRBt (CCranfaJF winter 8 - 11-1 

15 188083 BASHFUL LAD (CD.BF) (Mrs F Porices) M Ofmr 11-10-8. 

17 FOSMM DMGBAT (C) (T Raggett) Mrs S Daraipart 10-100 

22 O130PF BROWWSSTAH (H Tonkin) D Ougtnon 6-100 


— 89 3-1 

. P SadBTOB 98FB-4 

_ R Daawoody *99 94 

— 96 11-2 

P Doable S0 15-1 


1245 MIDNIGHT NOVICE HURDLE (DivL £1 ,074: 2m) (15 runners) 

3 U9P/ BASL THYME (W Donohue) MCesteS 8-110 JD0ayta(4) — 25-1 

7 0 DANNY'S LUCK (F Clegg) D Barons 4-110 PNfchota — 7-1 

13 FMBAflR (Mrs J Painting) N Pairing 01 16 S Lovayoy (7) — 25-1 

16 0 PORT AGUADA(HMcEiwn)NVlgora 4-1 1-0 H Dawn — 4-1 

19 OF/D- nLFORD (A Sharp) P Ransom 6-11-0 P S cu da m o r e — 14-1 

as IOWI VAD VC R FouBiaa tSonaUd)D Barons 4-11-0 N Hawks {7) — 14-1 

24 0 MAUNDY BOY (N Robarts) Mrs I McKie 5-1 1-0 M Bosley (4) — 16-1 

26 PAMPOLLY {A Gooda) M Robinson S1 1-0 J D u ggan -20-1 



245 FATHER TIME NOVICE HANDICAP CHASE (£1,932: 2m 41) (10 runners) 


30 ammo SAINT MAL0 (Mrs B Taylor) MMcOourt 0 ll 6 .... 


34 003«V STAMTAS (Iris R Ocktesan) M DkMtton 5-11-0 

41 Ml TRUE SPARTAN P)(TEcM 6 y)G Price 6 - 1 1-10 

44 P WGHDALE (Mrs PCosgrave) J Cosyave4-10-8 

48 0 MY PURPLE PROSE (N Dempster) J Old 5-109 

«9 U OM.Y1RaUBL£(rHoufcroato)T Houtbrooks 5-106 

51 0000/10- VOXACANA (Mot D Onions) Mrs O Onions 7-106 

1965: no ti ng ebendewed — Hoot 


— HRielteRfa — 14-1 
PDnr — 10-1 

C Price D99FS4 

— — 15-1 

C Llewelyn (7) -10-1 

— — 12-1 

R Dermis — 10-1 


1 00 / BRASSEVS COPSE (Mba J Harwood) MtosJ Harwood 7-12-12. 

2 102012 GOLD TYCOON PLBF) {C Wootfoid) J Spearing 7-12-7 (7ax) 

8 084000- POLISH (R BreoMwiisa) J Cpt te fap w-ior 

9 2F-3F23 NEW SONG (J Sandora) M Otror 7-105 

10 306 LLANPA0C9Q(Lard Mostyn) N Henderson 6-10-4 


13 UO60OO ASWD (B) (Mrs J Chadwick) Ms J ChacMdr 7- 


CODM UANlPrSlJUCK(!l- 0 ) never ttwaatenod the teaders. but rtwiiM Improve ona9Mi to HegalSteej 
rvnm ni-0)«Lidkiw(2m,E^goo(lt^26.17ranJ.«IAUN(n r BOY(10-10)teanotriarwhortwi4d 
come on for aTtft to rtgh Plains fl 1-0) etLetowter pm, £1748, soft, Dec 15, 22 ranLTRUE SPARTAN flT-o» 
never had a serious cftaBenger when making al at Warwick fast Safcaday (Zhi. SS80. good to soft, 18 ran) 
beattogGraat Aunt Stay (1 06f 5f. MY PURPLE PROSEntW) was nmr jlangwoue eftw ■■ iflnti tertsetaundar 
wtnmih toPoyle'sExpnne (10-10) at Devon (2m II, £720. soft. Dec 5. 17 ran). VILLAGANA (106) needed the 
run when 181 4th to Dick's Foby (10-11) at WDrwick (2m. £1167, good. May 2k 12 ran). 

Selection: TRUE SPARTAN 


21 1802F8 BEUJVER PRINCE (Casa Co Ltd) J Baker 6-106 

22 PO/ONO QENBML BREYFAX (J GUo) M McCourt 8-100 

23 ayooous- EXCLUSIVE FOX (Exam of tfie fat* J Morris) Mbs P Morris 9-106. 

30 PQ0-30F ROVMG GLBi (Ms L Dresiw) R Atmytaga 5-10-0 


A Webb 09 7-2 

P Darner — 7-1 

. RDuewoody 8311-4 
MBowfaytf) 90F2-1 
H Bosley (4) 94 16-1 

G Lsodse (4) 9 99 8-1 
_ ■ Rfabante 89 12-1 

C Smith 92 16-1 

-QHHtepi — 14-1 




VHI ATANA (10-6) needed the 


1.15 AULD LANG SYNE HANDICAP CHASE (£1,707: 2m) (8 runners) 

2 424-3F3 BROAD BEAM (D)(J Jennings) Mrs M Rimed 6 - 11-10 — *99 F3-1 

4 11JM34 THE WELDS (D)(H Yates) C Jackson 011-7 R Hyatt 90 7-2 

5 22-3141 HE(0>)(GMcferran) I Dudgeon 8-1 1-4 (7ex) D Brown* 97 4-1 

6 FV138B AOARE(D Hodgson) 0 Hodgson 7-116 JPhstan(7) 98 8-1 


MCE (11-6) last successtu men beating Final Clear ( 11 - 6 ) 1141 at Newton Abbot (2m 9fjn953. good to 

n. Wl 4, 9ran)GSiBtAL BREYFAX ni-^351 5«h to Kocrfc ( 11 -a at Towcester (2nr,£1 258. goodtD soft, 

c 13TT5 ran). EXCLUSIVE RJX (106) ended last season with a 5*1 3rd to FltBi Column (106) at WOnmck 
«, £1024, soft. Apr 1R13ran) 

PMNCE 


3.15 MIDNIGHT NOVICE HURDLE (Dfv lh £1,001: 2m) (7 runners) 

1 01 THE MS8K9HPPMH (J Abbey) M Ecktey 5-11-10 

5 062 BELY’S BRIDGE (PMatSgari)JJankrns 5-116 


10 FFI- 1 FP MAITRBlEEm (Mrs A Watas)RGow 7-10-7. 


11 -MP034 OAKLAND JASON (D) (D Davies) Mm W Sykes 8-1 0-4. 

12 PDF2-20 CHELSEA ISLAND (D)(W Taylor) W Taylor 11-106 — 

13 2003-42 FARE LOVE (E Evans) E Evans 7-10-2 


P Scudamore 

C Smith 

- M Bosley (4) 
P Werner 


FORM BROAD BEAM ( 11 -fa beck to 
run ™ Chepstow Em 4 fl salt); earter (1 
7) another lOt tack hi 4th at UttoKotor (2m. £ 


7 03200- CWBSJ 1 AN SCHAD (Miss M Prtetefl) O OTieM 4-116 — 

17 13 PRIDE MLL (fare BGMraJD Barons 0116 

19 REMEDY THE MALADY (JBsastey)M Robinson 5-116. 

20 Q/P2622 ROYAL CRACKER (Hattow Bros) T BN 5-116 

37 ODFFP- SPACE KATE (E Evens) EE Evans 5-106 


— 88 9-2 

— 98 3-1 

A Wet* • » 7-1 

PM cI Wa — F2-1 

H Davies — 20-1 

ROeS 92 3-1 

Mr R Betamy (7) — 25-1 


WELDBHn-7)10>H3nJ 

(2m. £2177, “-•« = * 

swift earfer 


| near his best when 3rt to French Captain (10-13) at 

■over 5J 3rd to Utfle Buy (12-71 wtti rig WEL DER Q0 

-m at uttcwotiBf (2m. £2448. good to firm. Oct 23. 7 
3rd to Severn Sound (106) mi OAKLAND JASON (lO-SHM 
iNov 6 . 9 ran]. HIZ (106) not fuBy extended to beat Bright Motmfli 

l beat Severo Sound ( 11 - 1 ) 121 . with OAKLAND JASON (1 1-7) a wefl beaten 

■(11-9) fast successful when beatxig Shannie (106) a short head at 
hL MMIREDEE has faBm twice skies (106) beatnw Latm American 
M soft. Nov 10. 12 ran). FARE LOVE (10-1) had OAKLAND JASON 
2nd to Johns Present (12-7) at Bangor (2m, £1756. soft, Dac 8 . 4 




Cm. £1784. soft, Nov 19, 5 rari). ADA 
Doncaster On, £1195, good, Dec 12, 5 

S 1 -2 3 m Piumpton (2ra4». £2813,< 
0 -l)a long way beak in 4 m when a 
ran). 


FORM THE MBSOSPRIANflfr-TJorty needed to bepuahedetear at 
risnm 17 nn) heattog HU BemSa fid-10) 7L EHLLYS BRIDGE (11-4 
whan 151 2nd to Musical Myserypi-efat FOBcastone btsrtkne (2m 110 y. b 
SCHAD*S best Mtort test year was at Chetafaiam a 1-6) vriwi 10 2nd to 1 
further back (2m, £4188, swL Jan 1. 11 ran) but rtsappomted subsequently. 


i at Bengor ( 8 m 41. £906. soft, Dec 8 . 
1-4) handed the heavy mound wel 
r. £884, Dec 1SL 15 ram. CWMSTtAN 
la Tangomrat I1 16) w«i the 3rd 201 
tty. PRDE fOX ( 1 1 -3) has run in two 
to - ( 2 m 150y. £826. good, Dec 13, 18 


ran). 

Selection: 


ROYAL CRACKER 


145 CELEBRATION SELUNG HURDLE (4-Y-O: £897: 2m 21) (8 runners) 

3 004F-3Q WARRIOR UNCLE' (C) (Mrs E Robinson) D Robinson 11-7 HrDRcbi 

5 PF- CHARLE BURTON^G Jones) G Jones 716 

6 OP ITS A LAUGH (M Pipe) M Pipe 116 R< 

10 000 SITTING BULL (C Donovan) J Jenkins 116 HD 


Robinson 81 8-1 

— — 18-1 

. R Aridns — 3-1 

H Davies — 7-2 


Course specialists 


4341FD TRACK MARSHALL (H Mtoy) D WUams 116 

HOOF LA CHARMH (Top Mustrisi Mlg Ltd) P Davis 10-9 — 

000003 POETS DAY (MBeStteU) Mm SCMwr 106 

6 FD- RALEXUiGAZELLEIR Newton) WGM Turner 106. 


D Warns 

_ MBovriby (4) 

J Hoggin 

A Sharpe 


• 89 9-1 
— 20-1 
97F7-4 
— 18-1 


J Jenkins 
F Winter 

iir*’ 9 

Mrs M RsneS 


TRAINERS 

Winnen Rimnore Per Cant 


JOCKEYS 


32 

131 

244 



Rides 

Par Cert 

n 

52 

212 

P Scudamore 

38 

235 

16.1 

13 

72 

18.1 

H Davies 

30 

203 

14.8 

12 

87 

172 



12 

119 - 

10.1 


Only two quatflers 




FORM W *™* 8 UNCLE ( 103 ) was 111 3rd to Flaming Pearl ( 11-1 
Plungton on seasonal debut ( 2 m, £716. good to soft. Nov 10. 1 


(shed 121 2nd to WMar Eaton Sandy (106) in a Hereford NJLRat race i 
dCoppomtod m seOng company tvnee sutocquonOy. TRACK MARSHAL 
carter (1 0-1 0) a 2W vainer from Reluctant Gift (l05Hn a similar event at 
2. 20 rari) with LA CHARMIT (10-5) faBng 3 out POETS DAY ( 10 - 9 ) was 
first Omethis season when liKi 3rd to Kuwait Laal (116) here at Wbrce 


7th to a Towcester SeSer last Ome; 
ireford (2m. £515. good to soft Dec 

irpmar, ei 120/heavy. Dec 17, 12 


TRACK MARSHALL 


• Rogalrfo, who has proved a life saver this season for lus Salts bary trainer Peter 
Bailey, made H four wins from four starts Hik term, rngtrmg tigh t of g 51b~penalty in 
the J H Rowe Challenge Trophy at Stratford yesterday. 

The ten-year-old has provhkd four of Bailey’s six su ccesses thk season and the 
grateful trainer said : “He’s come back well after a soft palate operation ami he’s gone 
up 191b In the handi c ap since winning here foe first week in November. He loves 
going left-handed bat he’s amt robust enough for fences like at Newbury.” 


Rewarding Nicholson plfiDD®? 
campaign Irish encore with 
for French y ery Promising 

Captain Fro* <mr lih Siting Cou*spoDde n t_D»blta ^ ^ 


Lsvinia, Duchess <rf Norfolk 
received a trophy even bigger 
than foe one she reflected for the 


David Nicholson’s confident 
prediction font, give 0 
^m„mi Verv PromisiQR would 


raanuKOKsiKinKaNHriM v PramisinR wouia 

S. l^ger vicftHT of Moon M*A- in 

ness, when French Captain gtL ctaEiiMi of foe 

iwmtMi rtw> Whitelaw rhaUenoe yesterday s_nrsi 


PLUMPTON 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


2.0 RACING POST HANDICAP CHASE (£2,435: 3m If) (10 runners) 

2 U/1216P DARGAI (CO) 04* J Urquhort) R Armytaga 10-11-7 MrM Aimyttga (7) 9* 8-1 

3 30P4W SAUNDERS (CD) (Mrs LCfay) Mrs LCtay 12-71-4 J Lowboy — 14-1 

5 332-343 MR CANDY (A Moors) A Moors 7-11-1 G Mom* 94 7-1 

6 30041P DEUTOfl (CO) (P Brawar) I Wartflo 9-10-12 R Strong* 98 7-2 

8 1230P0 MXSHTY DISASTS1 (D Hammond) W Komp B-10-7 SSMvton 9710-1 


9 D63U24 DOUBLEUAGAW (B CfartQ C HdlmW 12-104- 


. — *99 9-2 


1.00 Flower Of Tin tern 
130 Solent Breeze 

2.00 Mr Candy 


2J0 Prince Satire 
3.00 Mansion Marauder 
330 Topsoil 


10 021402 ANSWER TO PRAYER (J Ffhch-Hoywa) J F-ttoyat 7-106 Ptewy H Mc fa lteyv (7) 

11 PIF-POO MOUNT FEOOANE (8,0 (G Beer) P Jones 10-10-0 CWaa 

12 30111XV DBiYCAN (CD) (Lady S FtoAiarv+toward) Lsdy Harries 10-106 MMnrn 

13 RWfli PLAYRELDS (A Bafcd TannB Courts) P Bugoyns 12-106 — 


ttoy«v( 7) 96F3-1 
.CWn 92 6-1 
MKbtem — 12-1 
— — 20-1 


2J30 OFFHAM NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £685: 2m) (9 runners) 


Michael Seely’s selection: 1.00 ICKWORTH (nap) 

The Times Private Handicapper’s top rating: 2.30 PRINCE SATIRE 


Going: soft 

1JJ HEATHF1ELD NOVICE HURDLE (£703: 2m) (18 runners) 


0 CAPISTRANO CUMAX (S M Dam Ltd) W Komp 10-10™, 
OP HBLVICK BAY (Ifrs R Henriqws) M Hmiques 10-10 — 

442 PRMCE SATIRE (A Gpaneo) R Atahmt 10-10 

00 PRICK (W Wightman) W VWghtman 10-10 

00 STADIA PUBLICITY (J Bndger) J Bridgar 10-10 

F300 TUMBA (Racegoars CU> Ownora Group) K Ofivar 16-10. 

P WILLOW GORGE g Barr) Mbs B Sanders 10-10 

00 BAYTMO (R Brown) H CoOnyWga 10-5 : 

00 HSS VBJEZUELA (Mrs S Pupomch) B Stevens 106 


SSMteon — 14-1 

— — 16-1 

Date MeKaown (7) «99P46 

MHaifagton — 7-1 

MKkuna — u-i 

RGoWatefa 80 8-1 

W Morris -20-1 

R EamiMw — 12-1 

RSowgo — 10-1 


000 ANOTHER BING (Miss B Patching) A Moore 4-116 


7 P6222B CANUCK CLOWN g Bird) A Moore 5-116. 


Candy Moora (4) -14-1 

G Moora D99 8-1 


DUKE OF ARUM (B Seal) Mrs L Clay 5-116 J Lomjoy 

FO DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE (Mrs E RJchartfa) H O'Neffl 4-116 REaraahaw 

00060 EVESHAM BUTCHERS (Evesham Buchers] Mrs J Croft 4-116 NON-RUNNER 

P FAitAPOUR (P Hayward) P Mftcrion 4-116 — 

P-10 FL0WS1 OF TW1ERND (Mrs A Chattan)D Ringer 4-116 DHntphy 

0 HKSH COVERT (G Qragson) G Grogson G-1 16 — 

24 ICKWORTH (lord Bristol) Mrs DHston 4-116 SSnWiEcdu 

U- NATYAPOUR (S M Dem Ltd) wltemp 5-116 SSMstta 

NEW BARNET (Mro N Thesiger] J Jenkins 4*116 MPsmn 

36 MCE BU$MES$(RSaxby)JJenMn 8 4-116 — 

P ORRAVAN(MraMGoftson)R Hoad 5-116 M Hoad (7) 

F004-3 SITAR THEME (D Roxburgh) RAkehurn 4-116 Data McKaowa (7) 

00 (NT 1 ENt|B) (Adas D»s Lid) Miss B Sanders M16__^™. W Morris 

00 UPTOWN BOY (TBurrtgeJMMadgwiBk 4-116 ■— 


3X1 RINGMER CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS HANDICAP CHASE (£1,651: 2m) (4 runners) 

4 021410 MANSION MARAUDER (CD) P Hedger 10-11.12 (Box) Penny FHayea (7) D99F46 

14 OOO-PPO UNCLE DAI (E Treacy) J Bridger 7-106 — -10-1 

15 OFOOO-P WEAVBtSLAKE (B Daley) G Rplay 10-106 ATGamun(7) 91 4-1 

16 3040B6 HANOVHI PRINCE fG Graham) G Graham 11-106—. — HHoad 91 7-2 


HHoad (7) 

- Data McKaowa (7) 
WMorri* 


34 00GXMI F0B4HMBLE LADY (MraRNawwnjW Wightman 4-106 


M Harrington 


0 LADY EUROUMC {Ejrcrink Corral Sar LKJ) P MKehefl 4-10-9 G Landau 

1985: Maa t tag aba ndoned -troat 


,1^0 ARDINGLY SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE (£718: 2m) (11 runners) 


&30 ROTTINOBEAN HAlffilCAP HURDLE (£1,289: 2m) (13 runners) 

1 006001 WINDBREAKS* (D) (A Pfajpw) A Moora 8-11-11 (10fiX) CttX)y M0on(4) 

3 2360PD HALL'S PRINCE (CD) (J Hoptonl D Grissat 5-116 RGokfatein 

4 040670 CELTIC HONEY (D) (Mrs J CoGrts) G KMenlay 8-11-1 KTowaandpJ 

6 (K2106 MISS (EVER HYDE (CQ) (JUMrtS)JJenkn 4-10-13 — — 

8 00*163 TOPSOl. (ILBR [T Romsdan) D Winks 4-10-1 1 A Carrol 

10 002000 PRECHEPrAM (CD) (B Pearce) J Long 8-10-10 : — 

11 OmOOS DERWENT KMQ(D)(R Craft) MmJ Croft 9-10-8 W H uwp k ra y a (7) 

12 140000- GODFATHER’S OFT (Mrs J Osborne) MreDHak»4-10-7 SStetoEodas 

13 OOOP-OO WAR AND PEACE (CD) (S Ms) D MHs 7-10-5 R Rowell 

14 402201 TIN BOY (T Fry) w Kemp 7-10-4 SSMttan 

15 003060 COURAGEOUS CHARSR (CD) (RHemfaon) A MOpra 4-106 MPtefaM 

lO 006000 BARRERA LAD (P) (R Townsond) R Towreaxf 6-106 Penny F fac fa l lfly aa (7) 

17 OFF6FO WYA JUDGE (D) (Mrs L Ripley) Q Ripley 8-106 Mr A KeBewey (7) 


WHwnpteeya(7) 
-SSoMiEcdas 
R Rowell 


SSMbttoo «S9 3-1 
. MPeoett 9125-1 
i-Ho y aa (7) — 25-1 
tetany (7) —25-1 


2 006302 THAtCS TRADER (H Boary) P Haynes 5-11-7 Mr R BoAwal (7) *99 1(M 

4 2-F1P44 UNGF 1 BJJ LADY (BF)(D Crompton) W Kemp 4-116 SShBmon 88 (52 

8 000600 MBS ME NOT (MTranwlBWbe 4-10-13 R Rowel 8220-1 

7 011430 MAMUTTAN BOY (CD) (J Blackman) J F-Heyes 4-10-12 Penny PMch-Heyes (7) 95 8-1 

3 06000 WB MCGREGOR (CDriSCOiJHO'Naa 4-10-11 REamahaw « 16-1 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 


JOCKEYS 


g F60323 TAME DUCHESS (A CStnrOJ Bridger 4-10-11- 


10 000- CHBWYWOO0 ROSE (Mrs RSm«i)HONeffl 4-10-11 — R Chapman 

11 0032 SOLENT BREEZE (V,BF)(J Tombs) B Steven* 3-10-11 A Cam* 

12 UFP060 KAUMPONG(P Butter) PBuder*-l06 A T Overman (7) 

13 POO RC VIC (V SWrie) N Lua-Judson 3-106 RSntmge 

14 000P0 RHODE BLAND fiO){JBnitonJ A Moore 3-1M GMoare 


PMtehefl 
j Jenkins 
B 
R 

DGrtste 


Wknera Rumen Percent 
6 17 

13 64 

Z7 143 







Winner* 

Ridee 

Percent 

17 

m 

206 

16 

110 

16.4 

6 

33 

164 

11 

73 

16.1 

5 

41 

122 

Only qualifiers 



boded foe Whitelaw Challenge 
Cup Handicap Chase by 12 
logths at Fontnefl Park 
yeSterdiy. 

The ex-lrBb gdding, carrying 
a 91h-penaUy after victories at 
Chepstow and Piumpton, was 
left in the had when foe long- 
time leader Autman Zulu came 
dawn at foe fifth-fast fence. 

French Captain, foe 7-4 
fevaoite, survived a bod Wonder 
at the second-last and went on 
for an easy victory. 

Pkugada was confirmed foe 
winner of foe Brighton Novice 
Httnfie after a lengthy stewards’ 
inquiry, bat the minor pbrings 
were reversed with Gex getting 
second place and Rnubayd rele- 
gated to third. 

After a phote-fiaisli had 
shown Jodi Gifford’s ne w co me r 
Ftagada as the head winDo- foe 
stewaris la un ched an inquiry 
into interference at foe final 
flight. 

The first three jockeys, Rich- 
ard Rowe (PragadaX Alien 
Webb (Ronbayd) and HyweJ 
Davies (Gex) were called in and 
with foe Whitelaw f*»nwy 
Cup Chase, in which Rowe was 
engaged, already ten minu tes 
late, the stewards deckl e d^to 
postpone the inquiry until after 
the third race. 

It was a naH-biting delay for 
retired Brighton businessman 
Eric McGfoae win was celebrate 
ing Iris fost success with his first 
horse. 

Dark Raven 


Black and White Whisky Cham- 
pion Chase was well substen- 
tiated at Leopardstown when 
foe eight-year-old ran out a 
convincing tight lengths winner. 

Over the last three fences only 
three of the seven runners. Very 


hv Paul Green in spri 1 ^ ^. d 
hehas won two big 

Sksc® 

hoptS ID bring very Promising 
to Leopardstown m 
Febuary for the Vincent O Bnen 


°The C distance of _foat ra« « 


Promising, Bobsline and Royal ^i^Jesand Nichoteon said: 
Bond woe in contention as at here, 1 would 

it,* mwimis fence the second 1* oe gets . ___« jm- run- 


the previous fence foe second « .oserioudy consider run- 
English challenger,. Oregon tew l ° Cheltenham 

TraiL made a brt mistake and S? other hind, i 

lost a lot of ground. . x9 ia J^ p ,hows no a lack of 


Roj^J Bond, now rising 14 
yeare of age, struggled gamely to 
stay in touch but he was done 
with between the Iasi two 
obstacles. 

Very Promising touched 
down threequartera of a length 
in front of Bobsline over the last 
and although Bobsline held him 
for another few strides Veiy 
Promising began to assert his 
superiority on the run-in, draw- 
ing well dear. 

Frank Berry, Bobsline 1 * rider, 
accepted the situation 100 yards 
from home while Very Promis- 
ing kept up a good gallop to the 
line to win in style. Ten lengths 
further back was Royal Bond 
who stayed, on gamely to take 
third prize 

Very Promising was acquired 


^^tteSTwSjdbehapw 

distmice > a^uiate foe Queen 
Mother Two Mile Otampion 
Chase his Cheltenham 

° b Sline will again takefom 
on in foe Vincent O’Brien Gold 
Cup and Frank Beny is hoping 
for much softer ground for then- 
next encounter. 


Leopardstown result 

aS®?** 1. vew PROWOTMIR 
O^S?Tril (Slh). 12 Hard Case 


■8R 56 Oregon Trafi^jz 

IOLsT 1 L «fet- O Nicholson at Stemjon- 
the-WoftLTi _ “ 

CSF: £5-10- 


Corporal dinger to mount 
another successful raid 


doubtful 


Dark Raven is a doabtfol 
starter for foe Champion Hvrtle 
at Cheltenham reported his 
trainer, Dermot Weld, yesterday 
(oar Irish Racing Correspondent 
writes). 

Dark Raven, oat of work for 
foe past week after rapping 
himself, did not please Weld 
when he exercised him at The 
Omagh yesterday mannng. 
The trainer said: "The setback 
appears to be more serious than 
I had imagined and while foe 
Ch am pion Hurdle Is still more 
than 10 weeks away, I would 
have to regard him as an 
unlikely contender. 

“I win defer a dedaoo about 
scratching him from foe race for 
some weeks bat in foe meantime 
I think foe bookmakers should 
delete him from ffab fists.” 


Following Very Promismg’s 
win yesterday Corporal Clinger 
can take another I R£ 50,000 
prize, foe Sean P Graham 
Memorial Hurdle at Leopards- 
town today, back to England 
(our Irish Racing Corres- 
pondent writes). 

Corporal Qinger, trained by 
Martin Pipe, has become very 
m uch a one-track performer and 
this will be his first race away 
from Cheltenham in two sea- 
sons. He beat Kesslin there last 
year in foe Bub Hurdle, and as 
the runner-up later won the 
Wessd Cable Champion Hur- 
dle, although be subsequently 
lost the race on a controversial 
riiwpMiificBH nii, h is easy to 
make a case for Corporal 
Clinger. 

On paper, the pick of the Irish 


sixth to See You Then in foe 
Champion Hurdle. 

However, Bonalma ran most 
disa ppointingly behind Dark 
Raven at Naas and I have more 
respect for Deep Idol who 
earned lop weight of 12 stone 
into a creditable third placing 
behind The nUad at Fairy house. 

Bookmakers William Hill re- 
pent substantial Champion Hur- 
dle support lor Corpora! Clinger 
and have laid him to lose almost 
£200.000, cutting his Chelten- 
ham odds to 14-1 from 25-1. 

Fergy on right track 

Fogy Foster has really taken 
to Newcastle. He has won three 
times this season and all have 
been at foe course. His latest 
victory came in the Game Bird 
-Handicap Chase yesterday when 


runners would be Bonalma, who he beat Ivacop by two lengths, 
won the last running of the The ax-year-old is owned by 


won the last running of the The ax-year-old is owned 
Sweeps Hurdle over this course Frank Scotto, chair m a n 
and distance before finishing Sedgefield racecourse. 


TAUNTON 


12.45 Oly 
Dangerous 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

Eagle. 1.15 Repetitive. 1.45 
te. 2.15 Atataho. 2.45 MORN- 


ING LINE (nap). 3.15 French Flutter. 


Going: soft 

12A5 HOLLY TREE JUVENILE NOVICE HURDLE 

(Dtv fc 3-Y-O: £466: 2ra IQ (14 runners) 


2.15 SOMERSET COUNTY GAZETTE 150 
HANDICAP CHASE (£2,209: 2m If) (8) 

1 2840 OT1IILUAM(C)R Hodges 9-11-11 P ete r l lo t Ji a 

2 3-18 ATATAHO ICO) J Roberts 10-116 SNontad 

3 3221 D0UBLE1W (8,19 LKooond 5-11-6 (7(00 — BPomte 

5013-F GRKGO JHoneybal 7-11-3 PMchota 

fl 416 MOOD MSK OMR Hodges 14-104 Wbw»(7) 

10 -408 HOPE GAP QBLWHtaglO-lOO Gunns Knight 

11 32/0 MISTY FANTANFHrtBs 10106 BHSman 

120F30- SCOTTISH AM B Semen 0106— A Jones 

5-2 Ooubiston, 100-30 Atataho, 02 St HWanu 01 Gringo. 
Mood Music. 01 Hope Gap. 10-1 Scottish Air. 



145 CASTLE GREEN PRINTERS HANDICAP 
HURDLE (£2^46: 2m If) (14) 

3 000 DC1PS HEVENGE R Hodges 7-11-7 SEaris(4) 

; fl 0000 M OPM N B LINE LKenmnl 011-4 B Powell 

• 7 4U6 THETHUNDERERDBSMrti 011-2 C Brown 

9 PM WiNAflTP Bedford MI-1 CGrey 

10 8200 BATON MATCH (WJ A Edeonfa 0116 P Barton 

12 00RJ MEZUBA (CD) WRWOans 01042 CCOx 

13 000 KWAODoldgs 7-1010 — 

14 mi C4HffN(CtoMPfae0109 S Crook (7) 

15 022U REDGRAVE BteL (CO) K Btsbop 4-107 

17 3000 CORAL MmOUBfBjXfMManta 0194^ H Baggan 

18 2900 TOP GOLD P)R Hodges 7-106 Wlntoe(7) 

19 0P6 CB1YANTE80VE^GN(D)J Roberts 7-101 


04 Otympfc Ea 
Upham Queen, 12-1 


02 Shear Nectar. 01 Tinas Las, 01 
i Bfcie, 14- 1 Gay 0188*0.101 others. 


20 100 LCMD MURPHY (CD) RHokter 0101 PltatpOy 

21 3|B0 KEEP SMMTBMB W G Turner 7-100 

Ttecy1faur(7) 

01 Careen, 7-2 The Thunderer, 01 Coral Hv&our, 01 
Redgrave GW, 01 Moming Line, 01 Wnart. 101 Top Gold. 


1.15 HANGOVER NOVICE SELLING HURDLE 

(£467: 2m IQ (12) 

1 803 BOULEVARD HOY RHoMsr 011-7. PMumhy 

2 0 PAMELA HEANEY H Beastey 011-7 COn 

3 ROBROBFHtefe 011-7. CGTSV 

8 000 CHATIHtSPARK R Hodges 0107 BPtrac* 


8 On CHATIBISPAIK R Hodges 0107 BPDmR 

9 PPM KO BLAND W Tuner 0107 TtacyTfanerp) 


10 n RUSSM K Cunmhem-8rown 0107. 

11 SRTAK! DMC9F HoObS 0107 _~ 


11 SWTAKI DANCST P HotfcS 0107 Peter I to tes 

14 ^00 QOtnCT^BJA RBngj ^ni01O 2— — H JBeggsa 

nmawsrimm 

18 3422 RBC1T1IVEMPIM01O6 NDaste 

19 on soar RYBIBSfflVBns 010-2 SHOOK 

20 P WATBMDLATH R Frost 010-2 J PmM 

Evens Repetitive. 11-4 Boulevard Roy. 01 Solent Flyer, 01 

SirtaM Dancer, 101 Pamela Heaney, 101 otters. 


3.15 HOLLY TREE JUVENILE NOVICE HURDLE 
(Div lh 3-Y-O: £467: 2m IQ (14) 

1 1 

2 1203 


ns m 


1.45 TANGIER PRESS NOVICE CHASE (£1,884: 
3m IQ (14) 




9-4 Train 
French Flutter. 


Trefawney. 01 Tinste Rose. 01 Autumn Flutter. 01 
Rutter. 01 Sandron, 101 Sousaga. 


Course specialists 


1 5 hum 53. t® R 


156 Dangerous Game. 76 Our White Hart 4-1 Brytm.01 
The Thirsty Farmer, 101 Stand Ffcm. Rodger Dofl. 


JOCKEYS: C Brown. 14 wfanets from 94 rides. 140 %; p 
n Peter Hobbs, 7 from 57. 123%; B 

5ftom*9ft SSL 108, ia7%: R MWman ' 5 hwn «. 76%; JFroau 


Results from yesterday’s three meetings 


Fontwell Park 

Gotag: good to soft 



SNnwyood (5thL Hrt Handed. 16 Our 
Nobby 20 Tight Turn (Kh), G6 Arte 
Cfttef. 9 ran. NR Rusty Rupert, -ft. hd, sh 
hd. 23, 4L I Dudgeon a Warm inste r- Tote: 
£7-50: £260. E1.7D. £1-60. DP. £1350. 
CSP £33.01. Trtcast £9062. 

PtaOSpOfc £17265. 


Newcastle 

Gotag: good 10 soft 



Stratford 

Going: good to soft 

&JE2. ' ■ A CPMTUM (M Rich. 

Ud (MPaiiwn. 01k 3 . pB utai ie'a Mia fj 
HureL 01). ALSO RAta1l4fev todiflv 
(4th), 14 TTafan PrinaTto 
^wdabwp. SO Banner Coin, Busted 


-T-30 tan fata) 1. KUWAIT LEEL (C 

2- RWe-fW (T Ptatau. 


^■ytolfTPtnfieM. 

Ttwnsrtfa (pu), 5 


1A5 (2m 41 cl 
Larte. 11-10 lav* 
3, PrinroM Wo 


RAN: 7-2 Royal 
Fancy, a, law 
Auckland. Tata: 
£5.10 



(toft 50 Ctetten'S Pet 11 raruNR 
Tfltosco. Aphrodefac. 20, 81 . 3. a a F 
Jordan al Leominster. Tata jam. n ui 
DR £050. CSF- EIsJS; 

Tncast £216.65. Bou^rt in SJOOgns. 


26 (3m a ch) l. rogakuo « 


2.15 (2m 120yd Mte) 1. DHOtll (M 
Hammond. 01 ); 1 Path Jaatar (R Lamb, 


[torahead. 54 favj? j 

SS^snaasss 


Secret Master Music 


33 Jimmy* 
ADAOraam. 


^ , i.Croamft(6tfft12 

ran. 41 , * 1 , SO. 1V,L 29. G M Moore at 
Mlddfabam. TOW: £530; £2^0, £1,10, 
£1^50. DF: £5.00. CSP. E9J7. 

2L4S (3m eft) t, VALIANT WOOD (T G 
Dun, 01); 2, Don OOrflfr T Rend. 94 jt- 
fawL 0 Handy THcfc (R Lamb. 94 JMm). 
ALSO RAN: 9 Mighty MarK (4th), IB Owen 
Duff Qxft to Not Easy far). 33 Ken 
raanSng (5dft Oartaw (ft 8 ran. I® 
Oaken, Your Dead RigM. & 81. m ia 
Mrs W TuSe at Eysmoum. Tote: £320; 
£1j», £140, Elia DR £3.90. CSF: 
£9.55. 



015 (2m 41 
Lamb. 156 


pm 

jayBelha 

Squad (5th). 
fou)- 9 ran. 


115 (2m 21 MW 1, WHARRY I 
Barton, 0ik 2. ttMther Goest 1 


r,3, Daw's WWr( 

iti 03 lav Beech 


Sob: £ 160 . 

CS F: £23-79 ... 

PfacepocCS2& 





WoSeLodoS 1 ^^ 

PtotapofcClSJSB. 






THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 3Q 1 986 


SPORT 


25 


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fesnit 


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right track 

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' 'i-i 
— -t -V4 


David Miller predicts loss of grass at Kooyong will end Davis Cup greatness for Fraser’s men 

Australia may never surface again 


The Australians should savour 
tb^r triumph in the Davis Cup. It 
may sever happen again -and 
almost certainly not for a very tong 
time. The days of Pat Cash may 
become a fond memory like Britain's 
pre-War era with Fred Perry. The 
reason is that the Australians could 
be abost to commit tennis sudde. 

The abandonment of the Victoria 
Lawn Tennis Association’s tra- 
ditional home at Kooyong — the 
scene of so many historic marring 
ii yfiyHng Sunday’s wonderful di- 
max between Mikael Pemfors and 
Cash — tor the £25 million new 
national centre at Flinders Park has 
one over-riding snag; die surface. 
White the nation basks in self 
acdaim at the recapture of the Clip 
from Sweden, it should pause to 
reflect that on almost any artificial 
surface, such as Flinders Park will 
have, the Swedes would probably 
have won 5-0: and that with almost 
any trio selected from seven or eight 
players. 

The bold switch decided upon by 
the Australian association could 
change the lace of their national 
game in several ways. The rest of the 
world’s players would no longer 
make the long trip so readily for 
gaining experience on grass, which 
would then become almost exdnsive 
to Wimbledon; Australian players 
would simultaneously have to breed 
a new competence on a different 
surface, with fewer foreign players 
against whom to test themselves; 
and Australia would lose its invalu- 
able home advantage in the Davis 
Cop, being under contract to play all 
its ties at the new centre. 


Cash, for the moment regarded 
locally as superman, on account of 
his second, and exceptional, perfor- 
mance in four years in Davis Cup 
“Mi s, has won only a single Grand 
Prix tournament in Ids car ee r, here 
in Melbourne. Without grass, with a 

wlthifew players aid 

the hmizira^A^trafia wflibe hard 
pressed to sustain its prestige in this 
competition. 

To install artificial gra ss , which 
many performers regard as dan- 
gerous, rather than cement or 
anoth er synthetic surface, would 
further discourage visiting players. 
It will be a critical dedstoo which 
Brian Tobin, the president of Tennis 
Australia, and Neale Fraser, fee 
non-playing captain, must soon 
make. 

For Sweden, however, the future 
stretches inv itin gly towards an in- 
visible horizon. They have a uiqne 
depth of talent and, significantly, a 
sporting temperament that is 
equally unique. 

During his speech at the celebra- 
tion banquet, Fraser congratulated 
Sweden on their sportsmanship and 
said that Australia had something to 
lean! from the manner in which the 
Swedes can accept defeat In sport- 
ing terms they are, as we discovered 
with Borg, about as emotional as a 
snowman. It is as much the secret of 
their winning as of the congeniality 
in defeat. 

When, in Munich last year, WB- 
ander and Nystrom woo the doubles, 
always so important, against Becker 
and Maurer, the Swedish squad was 
wholly without elation as it returned 


to the locker room. “It was quite 
mHke anything I have ever experi- 
enced when anyone has just won a 
vital match,” Tony Pickard, who b 
personal coach to Edberg, says. 

“They were quite amoved. This 
Swedish temperament, while it can 
exasperate you when trying to get 
them motivated, H is a tremendous 
asset, because they can also recover 
instantly firm defeat, which seld om 
undermines them. They are ail like 
Jt.” 

When Edberg was interviewed 
immediately after defeat in last 
Sunday’s doubles, he was eerily 
detached. How are Sweden's 
chances now, going 2-1 behind, he 
was asked? Almost wife a shrug he 
replied: ‘Tomorrow b another day.” 

German welcome iestivetimt 

Australia’s Davis Cup victory has 
earned it a place in World Team 
Cup from May 28 to 24, organisers 
of the S 500,000 (about OWOOO) 
tournament in Dflssekiorf an- 
nounced yesterday. Australia’s en- 
try as a wild card joins France, the 
holders, Sweden, the beaten Mel- 
bourne finalists. United States, 
(yoptipytwqirifl, Spain, Argentina 
and West Germany who qualified 
on the basis of the rankings of their 
top two players. 

It was a* sharp contrast with the 
intensity exhibited by the Austra- 
lians; an attitude with allows fee 
Swedes to retain, in contemporary 
professional sports, a rare equilib- 
rium. If a or umpire makes 

a monumental howler ... well, 
tomorrow is another day. 


Yet. so difficult did both Pickard 
and Hans Obses, the Swedish team 
manager, find the task of encourag- 
ing the phlegmatic Edberg to wind 
himsdfnp last weekend that he may 
wefl have forfeited, for the time 
being at least. Us place in the team: 
certainly when they travel to Italy 
for the first round next year. The 
«wwn that is likely to he Witander 
and Nystrom, with Pemfors the 
alternative choice for singles. 

Even afire winning the doubles 
third set on Saturday to keep the 
match afire, as empty Edberg said 
to his manager during the 10 -mintite 
interval in fee dressing room: “I Jnst 
can’t play It has to be wondered 
whether Obsn made a mistake in 
permitting tie squad to brag their 
tirlfrieods, as a concession to the 
Cstive time of the final. 

“The doubles was the turning 
point,” Otssen s aid. “We would 
have won with Wflander — but Fm 
not critidzang him tor staying away 
for his wedding. He has dime so 
much for us tome past.” 

The revelation of the tie has been, 
of come, Pemfors. Both CHssen 
and Fraser are of the opinion that he 
has the ability to win Wimbledon, 
never nrind bis lack of experience on 
grass. Those who have been present 
at Kooyong down the years were 
Saying ye sterday that the fourth 
rubber between Pemfors and Cash 
was fee best Davis Cup encounter 
since Hoad beat Trabert in 1953. 

Ola Mahnqrist, Pent fo r s ’s coach, 
who is only 28 and has won the 
Swedish doubles tide wife hb 
“pupa,” is worried that Pemfors 
talent to do fee 


extraordinary that it creates a 
problem: be is occasionally reluctant 
to play the safe shot, preferring the 
spectacular, as when he squandered 
set point to win the second set 64, 
instead of 6-2. 

In the next game, he played one of 
the most remarkable shots ever 
seen, wife the width of fee court to 
cover m order to reach a drop-shot 
by Cash, he seemingly had no hope 
of getting there. He at only did so, 
bat then, with a diving forehand 
scoop when falling head over heels, 
hooked an acute cross-shot which 
left Cash stranded and the crowd 
astonished. They rose to applaud. 

It Is symptom atic of the Swedish 
attitude that Pemfors, rather than 
play in the Australian Open starting 
in two weeks, is going home to 
practice for a month with Malm- 
qrist “We can improve everything 
to his game, especially his serve and 
forehand,” Mahnqrist said. “We 
want to establish a place In the top 
ten.” This puts into perspective the 
understandable yet exaggerated 
claim by Derek Hardwick, the 
International Tennis Federation’s 
chairman of the Davis Cup Com- 
mittee that “rankings don't matter, 
the Davis Cnp is the essence of the 
game.” 

It may once have been, bat no 
more, never mind an onforgetaMe 
frrwih certainly not without the likes 
of McEnroe and Lendl in the com- 
petition. These days, professionals 
range their season by where they 
finish in fee rankings. If you lose 
me match . . . there is always an- 
other day. 


Gomer confidence wad card 
receives a tonic 

From Barry Wood, Brisbane 


Sara Gomer, from Devon, 
made a satisfactory, if slightly 
premature, start to her 1987 
season yesterday by beating 
Etsuko Inoue 4-6, 7-5, 6-3 in the 
first round of the Jason 2000 
women’s tournament. 

The Japanese player may not 
bear a name that leaps immedi- 
ately to mind when thinking of 
fee world’s better grass court 
exponents, but fee did perform 
commendably during last 
summer’s Dow Chemical event 
in Birmingham. At times fee 
also performed with credit 
against Miss Gomer. using a 
beautifully fluid serve and vol- 
ley game that had her British 
opponent struggling during the 
early stages. 

“She’s the kind of player who 
plays a few games as if fee can't 
possibly lose, and then she plays 
some awful games,” Miss Go- 
mer, the No. 14 seed, explained. 

Fortunately the story un- 
folded as expected. Miss Inoue 
became erratic and Miss Co- 
mer’s confidence rose suf- 



ficiently to produce victory 
from a lacklustre performance. 

“The first set was strange. I 
was returning a lot better than 1 
usually do and wasn’t serving 
that badly, but she was returning 
well” Miss Gomer said. “At the 
beginning of the second set I 
wasn’t really there mentally, but 
she let me back in by malting a 
number of errors.” 

Miss Gomer hadexpected 
problems however. “The first 
match is obviously difficult after 
a long journey,” she said , haying 
spent Christmas in Australia to 
prepare for fee tournament “If 
you can squeeze through while 
playing badly then it gives you 
confidence in the next round.” 
Her next match will be against 
Eva Kind, a tall Swiss who 
should give her an easier ride 

Anne Hobbs is another Brit- 
ish player to have arrived early 
to prepare for fee Australian 
Open which brains on January 
12. Miss Hobbs should win 
against Carin Bakkum, although 
fee is capable of losing to almost 
anyone if the moon is m the 
wrong phase or her egg at 
breakfast is undercooked. How- 
ever, if Miss Hobbs does nio- 
ceed then fee will have to face 
Pam Shriver, the No. 2 seed. 

RESULTS: Hntrciwi* Italian 
stated): S McCann WSFaJvwrWJ.S-fc 



Gomer. kept steady 


Prog* E Pfa« . 


granted 
to Lendl 

Adelaide (Agencies) — Ivan 
Lendl, the world number one, 
has been granted a wild-card 
entry to play in the doubles 
competition at the South 
Australian men’s open 
championships which started at 
the Memorial Drive grass courts 
here ye ste r da y. 

The Czechoslovak player, 
who has not entered fee singles 
competition, arrived here yes- 
terday after a 30-hour flight 
from the United States and w ifl 
partner the American Bill 
Scanlon in order to pun some 
extra grass-court practice before 
the Australian Open starts al 
Kooyong on Janumy 12. He last 
played here six yeare ago when 
he spearheaded a rest-oftbe- 
worid team against an American 
trio in a challenge series. 

In one of the tournament's 
opening si ng le s matches, Amos 
Mansdor£ an Israeli army ser- 
geant who is seeded second, 
survived to fight again after two 
tough tie-breaks in bis en- 
counter with Peter Doohan, of 
Australia. Mansdorf, who com- 
pletes his three-year compulsory 

military service next mouth, 
was taken to three sets by 
Doohan before winning 7-6, 2-6, 
7-6. 

Doohan, who beat Mansdorf 
here last year, lost the first tie- 
break 8-6, played consistently to 
take the second set and kept op 
the pressure in the third only to 
lose the tie-break 7-4. Mansdorf 
ranked 39th in the world, attrib- 
uted part of his success to his 
new coach Peter F ishb ac h , with 
whom he has been training 
officially for only a few days. 
RESULTS: Hnt row* (Austratai irtera 
statedfc A Mansdorf (MU P Doohan. 7-6, 
2-6. 7-6; ALar»WBPBarC8(USl 7-5,6^; 
8 Dyka fat J Bates (GO), M, 6-4: G 
MfcHtata (Para bt DTVsdn. M. M: M 
iXti) tit 8 Yom. 7-6. 7-* B 
I M J Frtna (Aig). 4-6. 64, 6- 



Sfrfugzug it together for 1987; Alex Niepef 
in the Prudential junior indoor championship, 


ATHLETICS 


Why professional 
running is 
starting to go flat 


By a Special Correspondent 


Professional athletics is under 
threat from the increasingly 
affluent amateurs and, in 1987, 
could all but disappear. 

la Australia, for example, one 
of the bastions of that code, 
historic moves are afoot for a 
complete take-over by the ama- 
teura. subject to negotiation 
with the International Amateur 
Athletic Federation. 

One or two small enclaves 
survive, however, and one such 
is at Edinburgh's Meadow bank 
Stadium where the annual new 
year sprint takes place on Thurs- 
day and Friday this week. 

Formerly known as the 
Powderhall Sprint, alter the 
stadium where it was held for 
many of its 1 17 years, h is now 
called fee Chrisbeig Sprint after 
its sponsor. But, compared to 
the rich pickings of the so-called 
amateur circuit with its road 
races and grands prix, the 
Carisberg is small beer. 

A first prize of £1,400 is only 
£400 more than when George 
McNeill — the only man to have 
won both it and Australia’s top 
event, the Stawell Gift — won 
the centenary sprint in 1970, its 
last year at Powderhall. 

Though fee traditionalists in- 
sist that Meadowbank, with its 
modem synthetic track, has not 
fee same atmosphere as the 
grass and cinders of fee Edin- 
burgh greyhound and speedway 
stadium, it is not the switch of 
venues which has been respon- 
sible for the decline in popular- 
ity of this once great Scottish 
sporting fixture. 

It is rather its growing irrele- 
vance compared to the rewards 


of the amateur code where 
runners also gain the benefits of 
representing their country at 
Olympic and Commonwealth, 
games. 

Runners will not readily go on 
a “preparation”, as it is known, 
giving up jobs, homes and even 
wives, going on special diets and 
training bard for weeks on end. . 
all far rewards less than 
Scotland’s outstanding women . 
runners Liz Lynch and Yvonne . 
Murray can regularly command, - 
albeit via their trust funds. 

Only the betting, one of the 
main stumbling blocks in 
integrating the span with the 
amateurs, made the ale rel- 
atively palatable with the 
possibility of a “sc bool'' making 
£10,000 or £12,000 with a: 
cannily-placed early 

investment. 

But now there is scarcely any •' 
ante-post betting and there 
could be 135 mystery runners in ' 
the 20 beats on New Year's Day. • 
from which only the winners 
progress to the semi-finals or 
cross-ties the following day 
when the final is also held. 

Of course fee 1 10 metres race 
is a handicap event and hiding 
form to beat the handi capper 
and the bookmaker has always . 
been pan of the game. 

It is difficult, however, to hide 
class altogether and feat is why .. 
fee entry of two Americans. - 
Kipper Bell and Bill Snoddy, has 
added interest to fee 1 987 event. 
Bell was fee 1984 winner and- 
fust American to succeed while - 
Snoddy has the fastest 100 
metres time on record to his 
credit, a wind-assisted 9.87 - 
seconds. 


BASKETBALL 


Edwards puts his 
case for United 


By Nicholas Harting 


The elegant glass statuette 
which has become fee latest 
addition to fee Manchester 
United trophy cabinet could be 
used as evidence on behalf of 
Martin Edwards. 

The chairman of both the 
football and the basketball dub, 
Edwards may now be able to 
appease some of those 
shareholders whose wrath be 
had to endure at the club's 
annual meeting last month, 
when be was questioned about 
the £66,000 loss suffered on the 
basketball front 

The trophy won by United at 
the weekend in the Tournament 
of Champions, when they de- 
feated Polycell Kingston in a 
memorable final, is confirma- 
tion that Edwards does at least 
have a team capable of giving 
value for money 

With the shareholders 
expressing dissent. Sharp, fee 
sponsors, more than half-way 
through their three -year 
£250.000 contract, a team out of 
the running in their defence of 
the Carisberg League champion- 
ship, and another £30,000 loss 
budgeted for fee forthcoming 
year, Edwards has had to face 
speculation as to United's future 
involvement in fee game. 

While not completely dispel- 
ling the tumours, Edwards is 
clearly reluctant to end United's 
association with basketball. 
“We are conscious of the fart 
feat people are looking at us and 
if we have to pull out. obviously 
it will set the game back,” he 
said. “Wie wouldn’t tightly pull 
out.” 


The first chair man of a foot- 
ball club in Britain to own a 
basketball club as well, Ed- 
wards, who has since been 
fallowed by John Deacon at 
Portsmouth, seems keen to 
maintain the link. “We are 
doing all the things we can to 
keep it going,” he said. “Slowly, 
but surely, we are bringing the 
losses down.” 

With six full-time pro- 
fessionals and a limited capacity 
of 1,500 at their home court, fee 
Stretford Sports Centre. Ed- 
wards is only too aware of fee 
financial handicaps, particularly 
since Salford City Council re- 
cently refused permission to 
build an extension at the foot- 
ball dub’s Cliff training head- 
quarters. which could have been 
used for basketball. 

In United’s favour, however, 
is the fact that they have no 
difficulty attracting individual 
sponsors for each home match, 
fee veteran Royal Bond. 

“If sponsors see more games 
like the final against Kingston, 
they realize they are getting 
something bock for their 
money,” Edwards said. “If there 
were no interest in basketball, it 
would seem a fair question for 
fee shareholders to ask when 
they look at the figures. To tell 
you fee truth I wouldn't mind if 
we were only to break even.” 

Since it is Edwards’ belief that 
United already languish behind 
Kingston and Portsmouth in 
terms of players* earnings, il is 
vital fee club should find an- 
other sponsor in fee event feat 
Sharp cease their sponsorship. 


VOLLEYBALL 

Scotland 
lure top 
US coach 

By a Correspondent 

The Scottish Volleyball As- 
sociation-will spend £4,000 to 
bring Doug Beal, coach to the 
1984 American men’s winning 
Olympic team, to Scotland from 
July 4 to ! 1 to take a coaching 
seminar in an attempt to up- 
grade domestic standards. 

Nick Moody, the technical 
director of fee SVA, said yes- 
terday: “It's an exceptional 
opportunity for Scottish coaches 
— Beal is without doubt the 
best coach to show an interest in 
coining to the United King- 
dom.” The English Association 
also hope to tempt Beal south to 
lake a clinic. 

Wife Scotland edging towards 
the (op level. Moody sees Beal s 
interest as one of the most 
significant developments for 
Scotland in several years. 

• Barry Swann, fee England 
coach, has named one uncapped 

player in his squad of 1 2 against 

Cuba in fee Pickfords Travel 
international women’s tour- 
nament at Alexandra Pavilion 
from January 7 to 9- The 
newcomer is Sue Risbriger. aged 
23, from Ashcombe, the league 
leaders. Her team colleague. 
Ann Jarvis, aged 3 1 , wifl bring 
her cap tally to 167 in this 
match. 

England and Sweden are tak- 
ing part as guests as their 
performances wifl not count 
towards the trophy. Norway, 
ranked second in Western 
Europe, have taken the place or 
Peru, fee Olympic silver 
winners, in a tournament likely 
to be dominated by the East 
Germans. Cubans and Japanese. 

Cuba and East Germany both 
finished in fee top four ui fee 
laa world championships and 
Japan, who are seventh in the 
wo rid rankings, are at a critical 
stage in their build-up for the 
1988 Olympics in Seoul — thus 
bringing together fee finest array 
of latent ever assembled in 

Britain. ' 



HOCKEY 


Indoor world cup 
brought up short 


By Sydney Frisian 


Neither West Germany, the 
European champions, nor The 
Netherlands are among the 1 1 
entries for fee first World Cup 
indoor hockey tournament to be 
held in Canberra from March 2 
to 6. 1988. Efforts are still being 
made to induce fee Germans to 
play, but their reason for staying 
out is that the event is outside 
their normal indoor season. 

The entry list does not include 
an Asian or African country for 
the simple reason that they do 
not play indoor hockey and so 
Australia, the host country, will 
be joined by Argentina, Austria. 
Canada. England, Fiji, France, 
Ireland. New Zealand, Scotland 
and Spain. , 

There could be a medal Here 
for one of the home countries 
and it would not be carrying 


optimism too far to forecast a 
final between England and Scot- 
land, in which case it seems an 
awful long way to go to see it 
Although the tournament does 
not have true world representa- 
tion, the International Hockey 
Federation is determined to go 
through with it 

Australia^ having already won 
the outdoor World Cup must 
fancy their chances to achieve 
the double. They will be seen in 
action at the Glenfiddich tour- 
nament in Glasgow on January 
10 to 11 and also in the six- 

nation tournament in Dublin 
from January 16 to 18. 

The Australian squad in- 
cludes Treva King, Warren 
Birmingham and Peter 
Haselhurst from fee outdoor 
World Cup team- 


West continue their 
impressive start 

By Joyce Whitehead 

The first three of fee 10 Margaret Souyave. fee former 
Territorial matches played yes- England captain in the Ln- 
* Sh " b ° rne WOT VHy 

Arainst East, South started fast and looked very fit but the 
well and dominated fee. first watch was memorafete for some 
Elf Wife Lesley HobJey giving fine rartebng from both wtes. m 
Ihpm a 1-0 lead, tat in fee particular by Goacher (Nortb- 
Sid half they were subdued ampuroshire) and Crook 

KlSJSSSSSfc a 1TfeTL match of the 
ufe?iem poamenTwas right afternoon West romped home 
S£dTa last-minute to a 2-1 win agamst East After 
35 a goal from fee example set by their B team 

aESrtttSdm Bn&Sag fee on Sunday, when they had fee 
l in the Soufe?fav°iir. best result of the five territories 
“KnriS ‘hSaKIKSBl « two matches. West sensed 
in the 69xh minute, victory from the start and 
MrdteMS”* fee venahy Denise Sborney soon scored 

Jackie 91°?? halfaftar from a penalty corner. But by 

stroke in fee fost ™ ^id- balf-timT Jane Newton had 
Margaret I f*^!^_ TX i llc ed a cleverly followed up a shot at 

xejgjSSa SEWrssK 
afcKSfS.'raa 

fee ball into fee nej a secon^ sho| brought West victory. It 
beio re fee f 1 "f 1 ,£!]“ OD nonu- was a very good start to the first 
lands had u ^ ‘ r t e^Jw-erc major tournament staged in fee 
nities but feetr shots at goal mere ^ on lurf , 

feeble. 


BOXING 

McKenzie 
on course 
for record 

Tony McKenzie, the British 
fight-welterweight champion 
from Leicester, goes fora record 
when be defends his tide against 
Lloyd Christie, of Wolver- 
hampton, at Fairfield Hall, 
Croydon, on January 28- 

Cbristie, aged 24, the elder 
brother of the middleweight 
Errol Christie, stands between 
McKenzie «»i his third British 
championship victory, which 
worid give has a cham pio n s hip 
belt outright to the space of 130 
days. 

This compares with 203 days 
by the British featherweight 
champion, Robert Dickie, of 
Swansea, who recently took the 
record from PatCowdelL 

McKenzie stopped Us name- 
sake, Clinton McKenzie, in 
three rounds on September 20 
and made his first defence on 
October 25 when be beat Mike 
Harris over 10 rounds. He has 
won 16 of Us 19 professional 
toms fa a t hro e- yea r career, aad 
is Leicester's third recent cham- 
pion, foDowiag Toay Sibson and 
Chris Pyatt. 

On the same Croydon bOL 
Terry Marsh makes his come- 
back after eight months oat iff 
fee ring an American 

opponent yet to be named. The 
London lightweight. Mo Hus- 
sein, meets Laagtoa Imago, of 
Zimbabwe, for fee Common- 
wealth title. 


No deal 

Brentford have decided agai- 
nst offering a contract to David 
Geddis, the Birmingham City 
forward, wbo has been on loan 
wife the dub for the last month. 

• Nottingham Forest who have 
collected only two points from 
fee last three games, keep an 
unchanged team for fee New 
Year’s Day home match with 
Liverpool which means there is 
no place for Johnny Metgod 
whose contract is due for 
renewal. 


FOOTBALL 


Taitand 
Gilbert 
to appear 

The Portsmouth defenders, 
BiJIy Gilbert and Mick Tail, 
have asked for personal hearings 
on their ‘disrepute’ charges and 
will appear before an FA 
Commission in London on 
January 7. Both players were 
sent off in a second division 
game at Sheffield United on 
December 13. 

• Luton Town expect to have 
another of their key players, 
Ricky Hill, returning to action 
when they play at Coventry on 
New Year’s Day. Hill has been 
oat for six weeks wife a knee 
injury. Mick Harford, wbo 
played his first match in six 
months at Nottingham Forest 
on Sunday, reported no adverse 
reactions from fee knee injury 
which required four operations 
in 1986. 


• The police have relented on 
the kick-off time for 
Tottenham's visit to Charlton 
on New Year’s Day. Wife a 
20.000 crowd expected at 
Selhurst Park, the police orig- 
inally requested a morning start, 
tat now the game will have a 
3pm kick-off John Pearson 
could find himself in Chariton’s 
attack after coming on as a 
substitute in the 5-0 Sunday win 
over Manchester City. Lennie 
Lawrence, the manager, must 
aitn decide whether to recall 
defender Steve Thompson, fit 
again, or retain Andy Peake. 

• Leicester City wife only one 
win in their last 12 league 
games, are set to recall their 
winger. Steve Lynex, from Bir- 
mingham where he has been on 
loan for fee past two months 
because they have five regular 
first team players under 
treatment. 

Lynex could line up for 
Leicester at West Ham on New 
Year’s Day where they will 
definitely be without their cen- 
tral defender, Russell Osman, 
who received a hamstring injury 
in the Boxing Day draw with 
Arsenal. Walsh (groin strain) 
and Sealy (knee) are also 
doubtful 


Hughes goal keeps 
Barcelona on top 


Marie Hughes, the Welsh 
international player, scored the 
goal which ensured that Barce- 
lona begin 1987 two points clear 
at fee top of the Spanish league 
championship. The Catalonians 
won 1-0 at Cadiz on Sunday, 
and have taken 30 points from 
their 20 matches this season. 

Hughes ended a personal 
goal-drought which has lasted 
for two months wife a header in 
the 49th minute. Barcelona 
relaxed after he scored, and fee 
borne side, although unable to 
match the technical excellence 
of the leaders, fought hard but to 
no avail for an equaliser at the 
end. 

Beal Madrid, the champions, 
stayed in second place after 
scraping to a point m their 2-2 
draw with fifth-placed Sporting 
Cijoa 

Real playing before 95,000 
spectators at fee Bernabeu sta- 
dium. scored first through San- 
chez, their Mexican centre- 
forward, in fee 12th minute. He 
is now the leading scorer in fee 
league this season, with 18 goals. 

But Eloya equalised for Gjjon 
before half-time, and. three 
minutes after the interval. 
Ablanedo sent the visitors 2-1 
ahead from a swift counter- 
attack. Wife the pressure on 
them. Real managed to save 
face, and a point, in the 82nd 
minute, when their other Latin 
American import, fee Argentine 
Valdano, chested a cross into 
fee net. 

Espaiiol. of Barcelona, main- 
tained their unbeaten home 
record wife a 3-1 win over Las 


Palmas, and stay in third place. 
Second-half goals scored by 
their Dane; Lauridsen. and 
Pineda, from a penalty, earned 
their points after a first half 
deadlock. 

In Portugal fee top two clubs, 
Porto and Beafica, both won. 
but a shock away result for 
Vitoria Gunnies, 3-1 victors 
over Sporting Lisboa, has 
intensified the close com- 
petition at the top of the table. 

Porto, fee reigning cham- 
pions, beat Ehras 2-0 away, and 
stay top on goal difference wife 
25 points from 15 matches. 
Gomes, their captain, scored the 
first goal, in fee 28fe minute, 
and a second from Luis soon 
after fee interval ensured the 
full points. 

But Benfica had to work 
harder to overcome a spirited 
Braga side 2-1 at home. After an 
own goal bad put them behind, 
the northern side drew level 
from a free kick by Santos, and 
resisted strongly until Nunes 
headed home the winning goal 
for Benfica in fee 72nd minute. 

Guimares moved into third 
place, a point behind fee lead- 
ers, thanks to their remarkable 
win at Sporting — fee team who 
themselves sensationally troun- 
ced Benfica 7-1 two weeks ago. 
The home side scored first, 
through their captain, Fernan- 
des, but were overwhelmed in 
fee second half. Nkama, fee 
Zairean player, Cosieado. and 
the Brazilian, Paulinho 
Cascavel, from a penalty, were 
their scorers. 


OVERSEAS RESULTS 


GRSK: Parnontos 1, Oiympfakos 3; AEK 
Athens 0. OH kakHon 1: Katamarta 1. 
Irakis 3: Eftnfcos 0. Penathmaikos 1: 
Unssa 1. Dtagoras 0; Doxa 0. Apofion (fc 
Yannina a Arts StfanBca 0. Postponed: 
PACK Satonka v Verb. Leading no- 

LEAGUE OF IRELANDe Premier dMalon: 
St Patrick’s Athletic 1 , Home Farm 1 ; Cork 
City 3. Athtone Town 1: Limerick City 1. 
Bray Wanderers 3: Skgo Rovera 2. 
Galway Utd 1 : Dundafc tTraartonl Utd £ 
Bohemians 1. Shamrock Roms 1. Lead- 
ing netmottK 1, Shamrock RonKS, ft, 
15 Z Waterford utd. 11. 18; 3. Bohe- 
mians, 11. 16. 

PORTUGUESE: Benfica 2. Braga v. Vitoria 
Gubnaraas 3. Sporting 1: Ehras a Potto 2; 
Chaws 1. Befenensas Ot Safouafens 2. 
Academics 1; Rio Are 1. Fonmonense tj 


Farense 1. Varafrn 2; MarHfmoZ, Boav&ta 
2. Lam in g positions: 1. Porto. IS. 25; 2, 
Benfica. 15. 25; 3. Guhtwas. 14. 24. 
SPANISH: Real Maflorca 3. Racing 1; 
Cadiz 0. Barcelona 1: SabadeT 3. 
Oaasuna Pamplona 1: Athletic Bilbao 0. 
Real Bus 0: Real VaKadoDd 1. Real 
Zfiragottl; RMf MaWd 2. Sporting (3}0n 
2: EepafiolZ Las Petros i : Real MuroaZ 
Attetco Madrid 1 ; Sevifle 1 . Real Sotiedad 

1. Leading portions: 1. Barcelona, 20, 

so- S rSt M aSTa, za a, spana, a. 

26. 

TURKISH: Sariyerepor 6. Bofci ft BertcfeS 

2. Buraaspor Z Trsfizonspor 5. Diyartoakir 

f; Edosehirapor *, Gatetasaray 1; 
Ankfii’agucu D, Sansunspor 1; Antalya 2. 
Genctertarioi 2; KocMfapv 1. Fener- 
bahee ft Amy 1. Denirfspor ft Rbespor 
ft Matatyespor 1. Loading portions: 1, 
Oabtasaray. 18. 27: 2. Sansunspor, 18, 
26; 3. Berthas. 18. 25 


YACHTING 

Condor is 
third in a 
special line 

From Barry Ptekthnil 
Fremantle 

Condor, the 80ft maxi, owned 
hy Bob BeU, the Bermuda-based ■” 
British tax exile, took the win- 
ning gun yesterday at the finish 1 
of the 630-mile Sydney to * . 
Hobart race, 20 minutes ahead 
of Windward Passage, now aged . 

18 and owned by Rod Muir, the - 
Sydney-based media bead. 

Flying her yellow spinnaker J • 
up fee Derwent river. Condor 
completed the course in two 
days 23hr 26min, making the 
British-built Ron Holland de- 
sign one of only three boats in 
the 4 l-year history of this classic 
event to finish within three 
days. 

Cbndor’s time; however, was 
nine hours outside fee record set 
in 1975 by Jim Kilroy’s 79ft 
ketch, Kialoa, but BeU, who has 
taken line honours in this race 
twice before, said it was great to - 
win without the controversy 
feat surrounded his last success 
three years ago. On that occa- 
sion Nirvana, the American . 
yacht, crossed the line first but 
was disqualified for forcing 
Condor aground near fee finish. 

Now the British crew, who 
suffered a number of blown out 
sails and other breakages during 
fee voyage, must wait until 
today to see if any of the smaller 
boats in this 126-strong fleet 
better their handicap time. 


Ford showdown 

Richard Ford, who resigned 
as managing director of New- 
port County last Saturday, faces 
a showdown meeting wife fee 
club’s board today. He resigned 
after demonstrating fans ' 
chanted “Ford must go” follow- 
ing fee 2-0 home defeat by third 
division tailenders Port Vale. 

He was persuaded to spend 48 
hours reconsidering his decision 
but he said yesterday: “My 
feelings remain unchanged. Fve 
had enough.” Ford has been • 
associated with the dub for ten 
years. 


26 


SPORT 


RUGBY UNION 


Mixed fortunes 
as England 
selectors are 
kept waiting 

By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 
It is the time of year when three tries in the second half of 


_ layers, ■ particularly those 
with international aspirations, 
start feeling those twinges 
which suggest that tnal 
matches may not be such a 
good idea. Scotland’s trial 
sides for Murrayfield this 
Saturday will be announced 
this morning, while England's 
selectors will await a series of 
casualty reports during the 
week to see whether their 
chosen XVs for Twickenham 
the same day remain intact 

For England the situation at 
lock forward has improved to 
a degree since Maurice 
Coiclough, who missed two of 
the three divisional games 
because of glandular trouble. 

Risk of injury 
depletes Bath 

Bath’s 11 players in the 
England trial have pulled out 
of their dab's visit to Cardiff 
on New Year's Day. The 
Cardiff match tabes place just 
48 hours before the trial and 
the Bath players, headed by 
their captain, Richard H3J, 
have decided not to risk injury.’ 

Their team secretary, David 
Lamb said yesterday: “We can 
fully understand them potting 
their coon try first and we have 
not pat any pressme on them.” 

played for Swansea on Sat- 
urday. Nigel Redman, how- 
ever, is on tenterhooks, 
wondering whether his 
bruised knee ligaments will 
permit him to play. 

Redman missed Bath's nar- 
row win over Northampton, 
as did Simon Halliday, who 
withdrew with a bruised 
shoulder but should be able to 
take his place at centre for the 
England XV. Should Redman 
miss the trial, Coiclough will 
presumably be promoted to 
die senior side and David 
Cusani is likely to come in. 
The other replacement lock, 
Neil Mantel), has withdrawn 
as has John Goodwin, the 
Moseley wing, who was also 
among the travelling 
replacements. 

Two of the North’s capped 
locks, Steve Bainbridge and 
Wade Dooley, are still hin- 
dered by injury, Bainbridge to 
the extent that he withdrew 
from Fylde’s weekend game 
after being chosen to play. 

Mantell is rested from the 
Nottingham side to play Cov- 
entry this afternoon, as are 
their triaiists, among whom is 
Chris Ori, the Rest's left wing. 
Oti went to hospital for a 
precautionary X-ray after 
receiving a kick on the jaw 
during his dub's game against 
Rugby on Saturday, but no 
damage was discernible. 

Since he went on to score 


the game - he has now scored 
eight from four holiday games 
with Nottingham - Oti may 
be said to have had the better 
of the overall exchange in 
what was described as a good, 
spirited . encounter during 
which Rugby held Notting- 
ham scoreless for the better 
part of an hour. 

Coventry, who have not lost 
to Nottingham at Coundon 
Road since the war, will have 
David Kerin ell making his 
debut on the wing. The former 
Warwick schoolboy is now at 
Bradford University and has 
been chosen for the English 
Universities team to play Irish 
Universities in Cork next 
week. 

There is more optimism 
that Paul Rendall will be able 
to prop for the Rest, after 
making headway with a ham- 
string injury which prevented 
him appearing for the Barbar- 
ians at the weekend. It re- 
mains to be seen whether 
Stuart Barnes will test his 
‘dead leg' in the New Year': 
Day fixture between Bath and 
Cardiff at the Arms Park. 

Barnes and Gareth Chilcott 
have both indicated a desire to 
play, two days before 
England's trial though the 
remainder of the Bath triaiists, 
including Richard Hill, the 
England captain, seem likely 
to be unavailable for the club 
game. 

The absence of so many 
players in recent weeks — 
among them Damien Cretan 
the young lock who played for 
the Anglo-Scots at the week- 
end - has given Bath the 
chance to bring in some recent 
recruits, including two in- 
teresting backs: Alan Buzza. 
the Comishman who is study- 
ing at Loughborough Univer- 
sity and who made his debut 
at centre against Northamp- 
ton. and Audley Lumsden 
from Reading, last season's 
England Coils' full back. 
Lumsden, a fast and powerful 
player who could do duty 
equally well on the wing, is a 
student at Bath University. 

Another more experienced 
player on his way back is Steve 
Barnhill, the Leicester and 
Yorkshire centre who toured 
in South Africa with England 
in 1984. After a knee opera- 
tion in the autumn he was 
plagued with illness and has 
not appeared for the club yet 
But recently he has played a 
couple of junior games in 
Leeds, where he is a teacher, 
and may be ready for first- 
class rugby at much the same 
time as Paul Dodge, the 
former England captain, 
whose broken finger should 
have healed within the next 
fortnight 


ninirs with a difference for the Rugby Union hopefuls ^ 

Big names bring the youngsters into line 


Welsh cup Turner on 
seeding brink of 
row is over ‘defecting’ 


The y ear-an d-a-halM ong row 
aver clubs’ seeding in the 
Schweppes Cup between the IS 
Whitbread Welsh Merit Table 
dubs and the Welsh Rugby 
Union is over. 

Ray Williams, secretary of the 
WRU, said in Cardiff yesterday: 
“After discussions with repre- 
sentatives of the merit table 
dubs on the future structure of 
the Schweppes Cup com- 
petition, a new formula related 
to seeded dubs and exempted 
dubs has been agreed. 

“There are some details to be 
clarified " 

The dispute centred on the 
proposed scrapping of the 
present system, under which the 
12 seeded dubs are decided on 
the baas of cup results over the 
past five years. 

The WRU wanted to make 
the last 16 in one year’s com- 

S ition the seeded dubs for the 
owing season's event, and 
the merit table dubs, claiming 
the WRU had gone back on 
their word, threatened at one 
stage to boycott the competition 


Welsh rugby’s top scorer, the 
Newport outside half, Paul 
Turner, is casting his eyes 
towards England for the elusive 
international cap. Turner, with 
230 points to his credit this 
season, is frustrated at being 
ignored after showing brilliant 
form throughout the season. 

“I don’t seem to have any 
chance of getting into the senior 
Welsh squad and I would grab 
the chance of an England place,” 
he said yesterday. 

Turner’s grandparents come 
from Warminster and he was 
approached two seasons ago as 
to his avilability for England’s 
tour of South Africa but bis 
presence in the Wales B squad 
for their tour of Spain prevented 
his selection. 

Whether this would rule him 
out of consideration for England 
is being investigated, but the 
Wdsh rugby union assistant 
secretary, Brian Kempson, said: 
“My view is that as he has not 
yet been a full member of a 
senior squad he is free to please 
himself.*’ 


TENNIS 


ATP still searching for 
perfect head director 

By Rex BeDamy, Tennis Correspondent 


The Association of Tennis 
Professionals, the men's tennis 
•players’ union', who have been 
without an executive director 
since August, are unlikely to 
appoint a successor to Mike 
I>avie$ until the end ofFebruary 
at the earliest The next meeting 
of the ATP board of directors 
wifl be held during the Lipton 
International Players Cham- 
pionships in Miami from Feb- 
ruary 23 to-Mareh 8. 

The ATP have had four 
executive directors; Jack Kra- 
mer from 1972-75, Bob Briner 
from 1975-80, Butch Buchholz 
from >980-82 and Davies from 
1983 to last August, when his 
contract was terminated. Since 
then the acting executive direc- 
tor has been Ron Bookman, 
Davies's former deputy. 

Bookman sakl yesterday that 
the experienced bead-hunting 
firm employed by the ATP to 
find the man most likely to meet 
their strict requirements was 
collecting and collating informa- 
tion on applicants for the job 


and was also looking beyond 
that list 

“I don’t think there is any 
rush," Bookman said “The 
board want to find the perfect 
person for the job.” 

The ATP executive director is, 
among the most powerful fig- 
ures in men's professional ten- 
nis and the year ahead is likely 
to be particularly challenging. In 
1982 the ATP, offered tempting 
financial incentives, agreed that, 
from 1983 to 1987 inclusive, 
they would work in harness with 
the governing council of the 
Grand Prix circuit — rather 
than play a neutral role in the 
rivalry between the Grand Prix 
and the World Championship 
Tennis circuit. 

But wi thin the ranks of the 
ATP there has always been a 
strong movement towards an 
independent, neutral players’ 
union - if ever the ATP could 
afford it. During the coming 
year they will re-examine their 
allegiance with the Grand Prix 
in tne light of an improvement 
in ATP finances. 


Of all the sports effected by the 
changing attitudes in society 
towards school sport, Rugby 
Union is one of the most 
vulnerable. Many believe that 
as a consequence the whole 
fixture of the game is in the 
balance. Within rugby, there 
are differing views of now the 
problem should be tackled. 
PAUL MARTIN describes a 
new scheme to send well- 
known players and personal 
hies to coaching clinics for 
schoolboys, while DA VID 
HANDS, our Rugby Corres- 
pondent. hears the cast for the 
rugby authorities to play a 
more dynamic role in develop- 
ing the game in the north, 
where the progress of Rugby 
League is posing a particular 
threat. 

David Barclay hardly looks 
like the Quixotic character 
Cervantes created, but he is 
not a man who shies away 

from tilting at w indmills. 

First, be helped bring out the 

hwff^pri^boks who are em- 
broiled in controversy over 
their inclusion in the Rosslyn 
Park team against Wasps. But 
these are sideshows in 
comparison with his latest 
project. 

Prodaiming it “a big rescue 
act for rugby,” the Rosslyn 
Park coach has launched a 
scheme that has as its am- 
bitious object tire reinvigora- 
tion of rugby among the 
country’s youth. His first 
“international rugby clinic,” 
held at Sevenoaks, Kent, on 
Sunday, offered a blitzkrieg 
style of coaching — modelled 
on those in South Africa — by 
some big names in the game. 

While Andy Ripley handled 
some of the forwards, teaching 
them bow to break,- burst and 
torn for the mail Alistair 
McHarg, the London Scottish 
coach and Scotland lock, was 
drilling them in the skills of 
lineout play and scrummaging. 

Garth Wright, the Spring- 
bok scrum-half was teaching 
Timothy Clark, aged II, and 
another budding half-hack, 
the art of torpedo and dive- 
passes, and bow to pick a ball 



off the ground. His fellow- 
Springbok, Anton Barnard, 
was showing front-row for- 
wards how to bind and shove, 
keeping backs straight and 
binding within the complex 
rales mat are a mystery to 
most schools’ coaches. A fierce 
competitive spirit was also 
being instilled for the matches 
that were to follow: "Are we 
going to win?” Barnard roared 
. “Yeh, yeh, yeh,” they roared 
back with clenched fist 
salutes. 

The children all enthused 
without prompting, mainly 
explaining that they had not 
known most of the rales and ' 
techniques they had just been 
tai^hL Most said they had 
been induced to come because 
they would be raider the wings 
of famous people. “I like ft,” 
James, aged 12, said. "It 
keeps ns off die streets and 


Showing the way: Andy Ripley puts young players through their paces at David Barclay's clink in Sevenoaks, Kent 

at some schools rngby Is dying 
out Teachers are not available 


you get to see the 
internationals.” Steven Sales, 
also 12, added: "It’s some- 
thing to get yon away from 
your relatives.” 

"I didn't realise it would be 
such good fan," exclaimed 
Andy Ripley as, like a latter- 
day Pied Piper, he led a troop 
of panting, sweating, chatter- 
ing, exhilarated boys off the 
field for a calorific snack of 
lunch time chocolate bars and 
orangeade. And Dick Best, the 
Harlequins coach, was equally 
ebuUienL “There’s tremen- 
dous enthusiasm. Tire beauty 
is yon can see the improve- 
ments immediately' whan yon 
are dealing with kids not 
adults.” 

Neither Ripley nor Best had 
ever coached children be- 
fore — indeed Ripley main- 
tains no-one has ever asked 
him to. And that in itself is an 


indictment of a system which, 
according to many of those 
present, has failed to garner 
the talents of ex-internationals 
to the service of a game they 
love. 

"I admit I am too lazy and 
full of intertia to organise 
something myself.” Ripley 
sajd, “but now someone's got 
me in on the act, I intend to go 
down to my local dub. East 
Grinstead, and do a bit of 
coaching with the youngsters.” 

Not even Barclay is rash 
enough to suggest that such 
duties will reverse the tide 
that is flowing against rngby in 
SChOOlS. But, be maintaiiK, 
drastic action is vital And 
mmi-rugby, played on small 
fields with small scrums, is not 
a panacea. 

"What we have tried to do,” 
said George Crawford, a lead- 
ing referee and Surrey exec- 


utive committee member, “is 
to give them some taste of real 
rugby and the ‘professional’ 
approach to playing and 
coaching it. We hope it wfl] 
inspire them, their parents and 
their local coaches to follow 
up." 

Crawford, who has refereed 
numerous schools matches 
this year, says be fears parents 
are withdrawing their children 
from the sport because of its 
image of violence as portrayed 
on television and in the media. 

The "yawning gap” between 
mini-rugby and the learns for 
18-year-olds was stressed by 
Peter Hunt, the Sevenoaks 
administrator. "Up till 12 
years they are terribly keen 
and enthusiastic,” he said. 
"But when they leave mini- 
rngby we lose a good half of 
them. Many go to schools 
where rugby is not offered, and 


to coach them any more. 

Hunt and Crawford both 
urged a much more aggressive 
drive by the rugby authorities 
to market the game to appeal 
to youth. 

There are plans for bigger 
clinks in April involving cur- 
rent and past interna t iona l s, 
as well as leading coaches, in 
the West and tire Midlands. 
The North would also follow, 
depending on whether or not 
Barclay runs out of money and 
energy. 

Meanwhile, at least one 
convert has been made. Liam 
Walker, aged 11, bad never 
played the game before until 
Sunday. "It was pretty 
brilliant," he said afterwards, 
aid a new prop forward in- 
tends to foresake football for 
rugby ration. 


Time for entrepreneurs to halt slide in appeal 


By David Hands 

It was a coincidence that, earlier 
this month, two north westerners 
should voice essentially the same 
plea on the same day regarding the 
development of rugby union: the 
firs! was John Dewhurst secretary 
of the Lancashire Schools Rugby 
Union, the second Brian Riley, a 
Liverpool referee who gave an 
outstanding speech at the annual 
dinner of the London Referees’ 
Society. 

The core of their comments, 
considering the constant opposition 
provided in the north by amateur 
rugby league, was that rugby union 
must sell itself if it is to survive the 
challenge not only of rugby league, 
but American Football. They were 
echoing a comment made by the 
Rugby Football Union seven years 
ago. that “a professional business 
approach is needed if we are to 
preserve the essentially amateur 
playing nature of the game.” 

That approach received a higher 
profile this month when the RFU 
organized a conference for physical 
education advisers and gave an 
indication that the union was aware 
of changing scholastic and social 
structures. The 1 RFU also tacitly 
admitted the fragmented nature of 
their efforts to develop the game 
throughout the country. 

That is the point that Mr 
Dewhurst, a first-class player with 
Loughborough College and Fylde, 
who has run rugby at Rossall School 
for the last 1 0 years, takes up. Rugby 
union in Lancashire has contracted 
at schools level over the last few 
years for a variety of reasons: the 


teachers' industrial action has thrust 
the load back on the shoulders of the 
independent schools; the with- 
drawal of local authority grants; 
declining interest among boys 
themselves. 

The vacuum created, he argues, 
has to be filled by rugby's own 
efforts."! have been pushing for a 
central office for the Lancashire 
area where you have a shop window 
for the development of the game, 
run by paid staff, entrepreneurs but 
sympathetic to the game, a secretary 
who can collate matters, correspond 
wilh clubs, referees, fixture banks, 
coaching courses, handle the min- 
utes of meetings at schools, colts 
and club level 

"In that way you take away your 
diligent, hard-working people in 
their own little vacuum and bring 
things together. The game has 
survived so for on small bodies of 
absolutely devoted people who 
approach things in an amateur way. 
But the game is going professional 
with a small ‘p’ and that approach 
will not suffice much longer. 

“I don't imagine the RFU could 
fond this so we come back to a 
sponsor, -say, a computer company 
whose equipment would be used in 
the office — and who, possibly, 
might be attracted by the thought of 
similar offices being established in 
other parts of the country — and 
affiliation fees of, say, £100 from 
each dub. The clubs would grum- 
ble, but a gneal deal of work would 
be taken out of their hands because 
a computerised central office would 
handle much of the wedk-to-week 
running of the game in their area.” 


The amount of work devolving 
upon clubs has increased dramati- 
cally anyway with the decline of 
rugby coaching in schools. But not 
all dubs are sufficiently well-blessed 
with either facilities or expertise, the 
expertise necessary to teach the 
game to boys as opposed to coach- 
ing young men. 

At the same time, dubs are,, 
enthusiastically entering a league 
structure which will place greater 
demands upon their financial re- 
sources in travelling and prepara- 
tion of their lower sides. All the 
while rugby union administrators in 
the north are uncomfortably aware 
of the strides being made by the 
British Amateur Rugby League 
Association (BARLA) whose dev- 
elopment office in Manchester does 
a wonderful job for their game. In . 
some ways it is a game for the 1980s, 
in the same way that fast-food 
businesses have developed during 
the same time. 

It offers instant action as opposed 
to the more deliberate build-up of 
rugby union which offers attractions 
of a broader nature and 
accomodates greater physical dip 
ferences. BARLA have taken their 
game into schools, using in some 
instances teachers who may have 
taken early retirement but who 
only need a video and a handbook 
to visit schools as a lecturer. There 
is no reason for rugby union not to 
do the same, if only there is an 
organizing agency to prepare such 
people and pay them for their time. 

The Sports Council's Digest oj 
Sports Statistics for the UK says that 
in recent years the “popularity of 


rugby league has seen a healthy 
increase after the static position of 
the 1960s and 1970s when there 
were only 30 clubs. The number of 
amateurclubs more than doubled in 
the decade from 1972/3 (150) to 
1982/3 (405) with a total member- 
ship of 21,700 players. In 1983 
BARLA estimated the rate of 
growth at about 100 teams each 
year.” 

Hence the reason for rugby union 
to improve its shop window, in the 
way that the technical adminis- 
trators in the four divisions have 
been trying to da But because there 
are only four of them covering large 
areas they can only hope to scratch 
the surface; too much of their time 
is taken by travelling on motorways. 

There is no doubt that constituent 
bodies all over England, and in the 
other home countries, are aware of 
the problem. The Scottish Rugby 
Union estimate that the game is 
played regularly by 5,500 school- 
boys aged between 12 and 18, as 
opposed to previous estimates of 
15,000, which the union rightly 
describe as a “ critical problem.” 

The SRU spent £12,000 last 
season in grants to dubs running 
rugby for ages 12 to 16 and reckon 
that more will be required this 
season. They have also appointed a 
youth development officer for Glas- 
gow and, after judging the results of 
his first season's work, the likeli- 
hood is that more such paid of- 
ficers - themselves still playing the 
game — will be considered. 

The Rugby Football Schools 
Union conference at Heythrop Park 


earlier this year mentioned the 
scope for joint use with schools of 
club facilities which are rarely used 
for as much as 12 hours a week. 
“Funds are already available for 
technical administrators on a local 
or part-time basis.” the conference 

X rt co rid tided. "County liaison 
srs between dubs and schools 
are needed and must be funded 
from this source. 

“Grants for further education 
courses will mean that rugby play- 
ers, not necessarily schoolmasters, 
will receive remuneration for part 
or full-time services and schools of 
sport will be an established part of 
the scene." (Nobody at the con- 
ference objected in principle to 
teachers being paid for coaching the 
game out of school). 

Such reports confirm the RFU's 
awareness of the enormity of the 
problem and there have been 
preliminary discussions with the 
Sports Council about the funding of 
extra staff. The eternal problems 
remain time and resources spread 
among 27 constituent bodies, a 
number which breaks down the 
limited financial help which the 
RFU’s youth development trust 
fund has available. 

But the final point from the 
RFSU conference was: “The whole 
pattern of the introduction of the 
game to young players is likely to 
undergo drastic changes in coming 
decades and maybe within five 
years." Rugby union, at central and 
Ipcal level, probably with commer- 
cial help, must learn to cope with 
those changes. 



ATHLETICS 


BARRY: Rouod Am Wnd (4K ndes): 1. R 
W» l&WBrt. 21 mn ifisac 2. G Hi 
(Swansea). 21.18: 3, 1 Bis [Newport. 21.19. 
VewwcA Roper (Swansea). 22Jl.7fcam: 1, 
ConHf. 2. Newport. 33: 3. Barry. 85. 

(Un Croupart, 15.14. Team: 1. Suramea. 
■Qpja: 2. Loa Croupiers, 54: 3, Newport. 58. 

DabrauMr (NettiUMO.OS; 3, D Ctortie (OBI 
19.4351; 4, A Zscnariasaen den). 2ttwi£- 
5. J lopes Egos (Spi. 2007.157 
ZUREfe! 5Hvastar U muBomI mod race: 
Mot AflMn): i. p Deism (Swuz* Z&ntn 
46.TOWC; 2. j Buchner (OS). 2251.10 
Hartmann (Aon Z258.C 


45.70SQC; 2. J Buchner (OB). 2251.19: a G 
Hartmann (Augl 2258.00. Women (SJOant 

BASKETBALL 


FOR THE RECORD 

Pacific Division W L Pet GB 
Los Angeles Lakers 21 6 .778 - 

Portland Trai Blazon 18 12 .600 4ft 
Seattle SuperSortcs 14 12 .538 BY, 
Golden State Warriors 18 13 .552 8 

Phoenix Suns 13 18 .448 9 

Los Angeles Coppers 4 23 .148 17 
PARtSf rrendi Christmas Inurnment: Float 

France ill.' ~ 

STRETFORD: 

Ftaefc Sharp 

(Phttps 3a Brown 23, BaJoqun 13), 
Pot^lWrgstwi 90 (BontragwSS. Clark 

BOBSLEIGHING 

KOQOGSSEE, We«l Germany: World Cud 

?-.l. A PP e U 91x1 J Wufe (Auswa). 237.66: 3. B 
Lehmann and M Hoyw (EG), 2J7.91: 4. C 
r and L HMSber IWG). 23&0& 5. M 
G). 236.19: f - 


Adams League 

Hartford WhaJera 
Montreal Can 
Boston Bruins 
Quebec Nord 
Buffalo Sabres 


W L 
IB 10 
18 14 
1615 
1516 
823 


TPS F A 
6 42113 106 
6 42133 118 

4 36118 111 
6 36 128 115 

5 21 110 141 


£*£££?* SSTE Ss®ap° nferen “ 


W L 

Minnesota North 15 17 
Osfroa Red Wmgs 13 15 


Toronto Maple 
St Louis Blues 
Chcago Hawks 

Smyth* Division 


14 16 
1316 
13 18 


UNITED STATES; NaOml A ea oc lMto n 
(NBA): Portend Trail Btazers 127, Seetde 
SupmSoiics 118; Los Angeles Lakers 111, 
mhxMpttt 78era 85. 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 

Atlantic DfvMon W L Pd 

Boston Cattles 18 9 .667 

Wbddphia TBere 14 13 £19 

Wastington Bufleu 13 14 .481 


Edmonton Oilers 

Calgary Hamas 
Winnipeg Jets .. . . 
LOS Angeles Kings T6 18 

Vancouver Canuck 1122 


W L 
23 12 
21 Id 

17 15 


GB 


New York KnfcAs 8 21 .276 
New Jersey Nate 7 20 2SS 


Out for Africa: Ari Vatanen (left), the Finnish rally-driver, and his Italian rival Andrea 
Zannssi, (right), preparing for the Paris-to-Dakar rally, which starts on January 1 


Central Division 
Atlanta Hawks 
MHwaukse Bucks 
Detroit Pistons 

Chicago a** 

buSara Pacers * 
Cleveland Cwattara 


W L Pd GB 
20 6 .789 - 

19 9 .879 2 

18 9 .840 3K 
14 13 SIS 6% 
13 15 M* B 
12 15 .444 8ft 


Zhnmwmann (WG). 23871; 9. F Pautwoter 
and H Tutzar Musma). 239.41; 10. M 
TJwoner and R §Un (EQ), 239.48 Own* 
JJ* ** M J Hwtwich 
39pts 2. Ftecher and Langen, 37; 
Pwmmer and M Bench (WGJT31 . 

. RUOBY UNION 

CUB MATCH; Pontypool 16, TreoagarT 

ICE HOCKEY 

Btacfchawfcc 7, 


T Pg F A 
3 33141 139 
7 33111 122 

5 33 121 120 

6 32119 135 
6 32 136 157 

T Pis F A 

2 48 168 13f 
1 43141 130 
* M 122 12S 

3 35 155 158 
3 25122 142 


TENNIS 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Wales Conference 

Patrick Division 


„ 4; Chcago 

Capitate 



RUGBY LEAGUE 


Rule book trips up Bishop’s hopes 


MUwMtOMsfcHi 
Dados Mavericks 
Utah Jazz 
Denver Nuggets 
Houston Rockets 
Sac ra mento Kings 
San Antonio Spin 


W L POt GB 
IB 9 .879 - 

IB 9 .867 ft 
13 16 .448 fift 
ID 17 J3BB 8ft 
8 19 .236 10ft 
7 21 150 12 


PhBadetoWaH 
New Yah Is 
Pittsburgh Pen 


w u 
2510 
19 14 
15 14 


New Jersey Devds 16 17 
NewYorfcnan 
Washington Cap 


T f A 

2 52 181 102 

3 41137 124 
7 37134 126 
3 35138163 

13 17 8 32145150 
1218 8 30111 141 


Paul Bishop, the Warrington 
scrum hall has suffered a blow 
10 his hopes of playing in the 
John Player Special Trophy 
final against Wigan at Burnden 
Park a week on Saturday. He 
learned yesterday that a Rugby 
League bye-law prevented play- 
ers appearing before disci- 
plinary committees until three 
clear days had elapsed between 
the sendiog-off offence and the 
committee meeting. 

Bishop was sent off in the 
semi-final Widnes on 

Saturday and the first disci- 


By Keith Maddin 

plinary meeting is today . As a 
result. Bishop's case wifi not be 
heard until January 8, two days 
before the final and a one-match 
suspension will be enough to 
keep the player out of thefinal. 

“Jhis, is a cruel blow for 
Bishop, the Warrington coach, 
Tony Barrow, said, "if he had 
been suspended for two games 
or less at the Tuesday meeting, 
he would have been free for the 
finaL If he is banned 1 shall play 
Steve Peters.” 

r on * brighter note 

‘ or Wamngton, Kevin Tamati, 


SNOW REPORTS 


their New Zealand hooker, re- 
turns after a two-match suspen- 
sion to play in the John Player 
final rehearsal the champion- 
ship game at Wigan on New 
Year’s Day. 

Milton Huddart, the Leigh 
second row forward, is not 
available to play in the match 
against Salford on the same day 
because of a freak mishap. 
Huddart was scalded by steam 
and hot water while trying to 
repair a damaged radiator on his 
car at the weekend. 


SCOTLAND 


C ai rngofra: upper runs, runs complete, 
hard packed snow wfto Icy patches; 
middle runs, runs ccm pf gw but narrow, 
hankpadcad snow with Icy patches; tow 
slopes, ample nursery areas, hard- 
packed snow with Icy patties vertical* 
runs. 1600ft Wfl roads, dear: main roads. - 
dear; snowfeveL 2200fL Otonstieae upper 
runs, soma runs complete, hantyacked 
snow wltii many icy patches: middfe runs, 
some runs convtien. nankpacked snow 
with many icy patches: tower slopes. 
Unwed nuswy areas, hard-packed snow 

Ml iSStehiwdifawttw 
tew*. 1800ft Glencoe (weekends only): 
upper runs, same runs compfate. hard- 
packed snow wnh icy patches; lower 
slopes, snow cover patchy, ftantpackod 


snow; vertical runs, 1200ft w roads, 
dean main reads, ctoac snow lawL 
2400ft Led* upper runs. Mme runs 
comptets, hard-packed snow with icy 
patches; midcfla runs, runs complete, 
hwcuwdred snow with icy patches; lower 
dopes, ample nursery areas, hard- 
padied snow with icy patches: vertical 
funs. TOGft; IM rosis, dean man roads, 
dear, snow level, 2000ft Forecast for 
skirtfl arew lor today: dcvdywtt) snow 
turning to ram during toe morning ft 
western areas and p er ha ps In eastern 
areas lato in day; freezing level 2000ft 
risaw to 5000ft from wean urang souffi- 
easwtywmte etangirtote southwesterly 
from wesLOuttook wteawrow: becom- 
ing bnghtor and colder wttft sunny 
mtoMfs and scattered showers. 

• Information from toe Scottish Meteo- 
rotogtoaf Office. 


sssfwtaSraSjTs 

54a2», w »' i ®SBa 

OUEEN-S CLUB. Lmden: 

Biwor cmbm Bnbafi 

“Jri round: D Reed IS JEW! tol'i 

ghtoPSk WL 6-2; i? nSSS mL G f«P« 

(Surrey). 4^> 7^5* J? 4 

swassS® 


ILotcs) 


(N Wales] s5ti , wei«l 

1" Wales), bt r 


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Lr 





THE TIMES TUESDAY PI 


[BER 30 1986 


AND RADIO 


Edited by Peter Dear 

and Peter Davalle 


fSrl I 


The Battle of Rose Cottage 








2V 

f*S 

J! 


■ cr?:>v 


-i' 


• • 


(»*• 


* •. •- 7* A 


Jubilant MrToad^ the finishing post: a aetr series of The Wind in 
the WiUows begins today (on ITV, 4.20pm) 


• Tonight, we get a reply to the 
rhetorical question Whose House 
Is It Anyway? (BBC2, 5.15pm) 
that has been tucked away in my 
subconsdousoess (and, I suspect, 
many another viewer's, too) ever 
since BBC TV first put out this 
anti-authoritarian documentary 
about the Barnsley brothers, Billy 
and Gordon Howard, who staged 
a Yorkshire version of Custer's 
Last Stand. When last seen, the 
defiant twosome were still threat- 
ening to do unmentionable things 
to any bailiff who attempted to 
oust them from the ramshackle 
world they dig nifi ed with the 
name Ro* CottageJn tonight's 
updated version of die docu- 
mentary, we learn whether their 
defiance paid off 

• Other recommended non- 
movie attractions tonight IThTs 


( CHOICE ) 

Review of toe Year (ITV, 
11.00pm) in which, not surpris- 
ingly, the siege of The Times at 
Wapping rates a mention; Jack 
Rosenthal's 1972 comedy Another 
Sunday and Sweet FA. (Channel 
4, 10.00pm) which shows us what 
Anne Kirk bride. Coronation 
Street's Deudre Barlow, looked 
like when she made her television 
debut; and The West that Never 
Waa (BBC2, 2.40pm), Tony 
Thomas’s long overdue tribute to 
those budget-conscious B-West- 
ems that were often far better than 
the expensive films • they 
supported. 

• On the movie front, indepen- 
dent television offers little to get 
excited about. All the goodies are 


on BBC TV. what with Brief 
Encounter (BBC2, 3.50pm) about 
which I refuse to listen to anything 
even remotely dismissive; 
Minnelli's Brigadoon (BBC2, 
! 1.55am) which is not, however, a 
patch on his An American in Paris 
which BBC 2 will screen tomor- 
row; Blazing Saddles (BBC2, 
9.00pm). Mel Brooks's raspberry 
Mowing western (I am templed to 
call a spade a spade, but wiser 
counsels have prevailed); and 
Forbidden Planet (BBCl, 
1 1.45pm) which is both great fun 
and a remarkable technical 
achievement, aud l advise you not 
to worry your head too much 
looking for parallels with 
Shakespeare's The Tempest. 

• Radio choke: Derek Parker’s 
portrait of Tito Gobbi (Radio 4, 

2.oopm). p^er Davalle 


BBCl 




BBC 2 







' J, 'not avai vS 

T - ; ^*fcrd to, 
— ‘ aporJ?* 




-‘"a > h -r \'£l? 


6 JO Ceefax AM. 

7J0Q News, regional news and 
weather 

7.15 The FUntetonea. (r) 7.40 Tbe 
Pink Panther Show (r) a.00 
News, regional news and 
weather 8.15 Materjaw 
Supersftarfc 8JG The 
Monkees (r) 8.45 Poor Uttla 
Me (r) 8.55 Regional news. 

9.00 News and weather 9 JOS Play 
Chess with Wiffiam Hartston 
9.15 Dungeons and Dragons. 
<r) 9 J5 Wry Don’t Youl? 
Entertaining ideas for bored 
youngsters. 

10.00 News and weather 10.05 
Neighbours (r) 1CL25 
Children's BBC. Programme 
details from Phillip Schofield 




1TV/LONDON 


Play Scho 

Wiflo the Wisp, (r) " 

10.55 Five to Eleven. Peter 

Barkworth with a thought for 
the day 11. 0G News and 
weather 1 1.05 The Dukes of 
Hazzard. Bo and Luke coma to 
the aid ol Deputy Enos when 
he is accused of a bank raid 
11.55 Open Air. Programme 
makers meet their critics 1255 
Regional news and weather. 

1.00 One O'clock News with Philip 


.... ’’."'.'W or m 
,J moaej aorf 

’• '«si not 

; "v.^-Ura 

‘ ■ ■ “at! Otrter 

- Tr r, rf«e Dm3 
r' t 

- afitnjuis. 
_ • ' • •-■r^ard in. 

‘ ’-jutoail for 


’i 93; 


Heyton. Weather 1.25 
Neighbours. Weekday soap 
set in a Melbourne suburb 1J 
Pigeon Street (r) 

2.05 Farm The tend That Time 


McClure. John McEriery. and 
Susan PenhaKgon. An 
adventure yam based on the 
novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs 
about the British crew of a 
German U-boat they have 
commandeered who discover 
a mysterious and uncharted 
island. Directed by Kevin 
Connor. 

3,30 Tom and Jerry (r) 350 Panto- 
tknel Brian Cant's version of 
Mother Goose 435 The AH 
New Popeye Show 4.25 Jonny 
Briggs 4.40 The Ready WBd 
Show. The first of a new series 
of nature programmes, 
presented by Tarry Hutkins, 
Nick Davies, and Chris 
Packham. 


5.10 Grange HBL Drama serial 
about the pupils and staff of a 
comprehensive school, (r) 
(Ceefax) 

SJ5 It’s Not Just Zammo 

presented bv John Craven and 
Nick Rots. A Ctrug-aiert 
programme based on the 
Grange HiB character who had 
a senous drug problem, (r) 
(Ceefax) 

6.00 Star O’Cfock News wfth 
Nicholas WttcheO and Phflip 
Hayton. Weather. 

6.35 London Phis. 

7.00 No Place Uke Home. Arthur 
decides he wB not finance Ns 
down-at-heel chi Wren and their 
friends this Christma s and 
suggests they make do with 
simple food and no presents. 

7 JO EaatEnders- With Lou and 
Arthur both unwell, Paufine has 
a double headache; and Pat 
has some advice for Angie. 
(Ceefax) 

830 Morecambe and Wise 

Classfcs introduced by Ernie 
Wise. HighSgMs from tee 
comic duo’s Christmas shows. 

930 ifine O'clock News with Julia 
SomervWe and Andrew 
Harvey. Regional news and 
weather. 

930 PteytMrandMraEdgetuQ, 
starring Ian Hobn and Jurfl 
Dench. A Noel Coward play 
about a bom loser and nis loyal 
wife.(r) 

11.05 Fflms of the Year. Barry 

Norman reflects on the year’s 
output and picks his ten 
favourite fims- 

11.45 FBm: Forbidden Ptanet (1956) 
starring Water PkJgeon and 
Anna Francis. Set in AD2200, 
this science-fiction landmark, 
loosely based on The 
Tempest is the story of the 
crew of a space cruiser which 
lands on a planet inhabited by 
the mysterious Dr Morbius, lus 
daughter, and their robot. 
Directed by Fred McLeod 
WBcox. 

125 Weather. 


930 Ceefax. - 

1030 Harold Uwd*. E x c erpt s from 
the comedian's MHonafce, and 
tha 1925-mada, Tfte 
Freshman, (r) 

1135 Blazing Padnea. A World 
About Us documentary about 
the Great Hawaiian Canoe 
Racs.(r) 

11 JSS FBoc Brigadoon (1954) 
starring Gene Kefly. Van 
Johnson, and CycfCharisse. A 
Lemra and Loews musical 
about two American tourists, 
grouse shooting in Scotland, 
who become lost on the misty 
moors and discover an 
unusual vfitage. Directed by 
Vincente Mtoroffi. 

1.40 UttfaNehza Fights Great 
Dragon Kings. An anfanated 
version of an old Chinese 

2.40 T§oWa£t That Never Was. A 
tribute to the stars of the B- 
Westems. 

3l 40 News, regional news, and 
weather. 

330 FHm: Brief Encounter’ (1945) 
starring CeBa Johnson and 
Trevor Howard. A sympathetic 
version of Noel Coward's play, 
StiB Life, about a happily 
married woman whose we 
changes when she meets a 
married man and they have an 
affair. Directed by David Lean. 


Is It Anyway? 


6.15 TV-am: Good Homing Britain 
presented by Jayne Inifng and 
Richard Kays. News vrith 
Gordon Honeycombe at 830, 
7.00, 7.30, 8Jw, 630 and 930; 
sport at 630 and 7 A0; 
exerdsas at 635; cartoon at 
7.25; pop music at 7.55; Jani 
Barnett's postbag at 8-35. 
Timmy Maflett introduces 
Waeaday at 93S. 


5.15 Whose 
Thesto 



brothers, BRly and Gordon 
Howard, and their battles wfth 
Barnsley Counca over a 
compulsory purchase order on 
the cottage where they five. An 
up-dated version of an earlier 
programme. 

6.00 Star Trek. Captain Kirk and the 
crew of the USS Enterprise in 
another space adventure, (r) 

&50 The Romance of Betty Booj*. 
The animated screen siren 
makes a re-appearance. With 
the voice of Desiree Goyette. 

7.15 SU-Junpingfrom Oberetdorf, 
West Germany . 

7 AS &oat Sporting Mome n t a . Ian 
Botham’s second knock in the 
1981 Headingley Test against 
Austrafia 

8.10 Son of a Gun. A documentary, - 
including offering s from 
Hollywood, about Sam Colt 
the designer of the Colt 
revolver, which helped to make 
the West wfid. 


followed by BMX Beat 
intern at ional, introduced by 
Gaz Top and Andy Buffed from 
the Sands Centre, Carttsie. Day 
two of the Cherry Coca Cola 
Freestyle Championships. 9£0 
Monte CnrioOrous. Award- 
winning acts from the 11th 
International Circus Festival 
held in MontB Carlo last 
December. The acts indude 
the Contortionists of Mongolia; 
the Liberty Horses of Yasmine 
Smart and the Flying 
Caballeros 

1055 Fttac Tbe Lest Warhorso 
(1986) starring Graham Dow 
and Ritchie Singer. The story 
of an old scrap-metal dealer 
and his grandchildren whose 
prime site Sydney waterfront 
property is threatened by a 
Japanese developer who 
wants to build an hotel on the 
adjoining site. Directed by 
Robert Mellon. 1230 The 
SufBvans. 

1.00 Ne w s at One with Leonard 
Parkin 130 Thanes news. 

130 m m : B eyo nd th e P o eek to n 


Tony Savates, and Peter Boyle. 
Two days after a freak wave 
causes the passenger frier 
Poseidon to capsize, a salvage 
tug arrives, closely folowed by 
a boat carrying a medcal team. 
The tug master is after the 
contents of the purser's safe 
whBs the leader of the medfcal 
team Is a gun-runner. Directed 
by Irwin Aden. 3 j 40 Thames 
news heaeffnes. 

3L45 The Young Doctors. 4.15 Deffy 
Duck. Cartoon. 430 The Wind 
to the WiBows. An animated 


■; \.- 1# — 


adventure narrated by to 
CarmiehaeL 4A5 Dranaramac 
Frankie’s Hat, by Jan Mark. 
The story of a gm who pays a 
visit to her married raster. 
Starring Zoe Nathenson and 
Vicky Murdcck. (Oracle) 

5.15 Blockbuster*. 

5A5 News with Alastair Stewart 
630 Thames News 

635 Crossroads. 

730 Name That Tune Special with 
Lionel Blair, Maggie Moons, 
Fate Brown and Joe Brown. 
The guest contestants are 
Brian Day and Barbara 
Wasterman. 

730 George and MGIdred. Comedy 
series starring Yootha Joyce 
and Brian Murphy as a warring 
couple, tonight recovering from 
Christmas and preparing for 
the New Year, m 

8.00 Dea O'Connor Tonight The 
entertainer's guests are Eaine 
Paige, Julie Waters, Paul 
Nicholas, Jimmy Cricket, and 
via satellite. Paul Hocmn. 

930 Fflrn: Best Friends (1982) 
starring Burt Reynolds, Gokfta 
Hawn, Jessica Tandy, and 
Barnard Hughes. A 
lighthearted tala of Richard 
and Paula, two Hollywood 
scriptwriters who have been 
living togettwr for years. They 
decide to buy a house, an 
event that prompts Richard to 
suggest that they marry. Paula 
is rrauctant but eventually 
agrees as tong as the marriage 
is kept a secret Directed by 
Norman Jewison. 

10.45 News with Sandy GaB. 

Followed by Themes news 
headlines. 

1130 86: Review of the Year. ITN’s 
review of the year's big news 
stories, presented by Michael 
Nicholson. 

1230 Stack Onyx. Laughter with 
music featuring one of the 
country’s tearing comedy 
show groups. 

1230 Alfred tktchcocfc Presents: 
Enough Rope for Two. A 
campmg trip takes a deadly 
turn. 

1235 Night Thoughts. 



BIQy end Gordon Howard, toe ; 

it Anyway? 


1230 Women's end Seniors' Golf 

from the NCR Country Club, 
Kettering, Ohio. The men’s 
competition features Gary 
Player, Arnold Palmer, Peter 
Thompson, Bob Charles, and 
Chi CW Rodrigues. 

130 ftigttfghts of the 1986 Tour de 
France, Introduced by Phil 
Liggett and Paul Sherwen. 

230 Fmn: A-ffmmting We WB1 Go* 
(1942) starring Laurel and 
Hardy. Stan and Ofly are hired 
to deliver a coffin but 
unfortunately they become 
involved with a magician when 
the box becomes mixed up in 
the man's props. Directed by 
Alfred Worker. 

3.15 Fam: Munster Go Home (1968) 
starring Fred Gwynne and 
Yvonne De Carlo. The spooky 
adventures of Hannan who 
has inherited an English 
country estate fromnis unde. 
Directed by Earl Beflamy. 

530 The Chart Show: 


635 HravdbaTs Footsteps. In part 
two of his four-stage meander 
Bernard Levin is in the Rhone 
Valey where he pays a brief 
visit to Avignon; enjoys 
Chateauneuf-du-Pape; fistsns 
to a performance of Don 
Carlos in the Roman 
amphitheatre in Orange; 
celebrates Bastfre Day In the 
village square of Tulette; and 
spends the ntaht at a Trappist 
monastry at [f Alguebelle. 

730 Channel 2 News with Peter 
Sissons and Anne Parkins- 
830 Brookskfe. Bffly decides to pul 


iao News .1S-S.45 Orff rent Sroksa 

&35 About Angla 1250am Tuesday. Tope, 

nrvmdown 

BORDER ^qchus 

Lookamund 1 Z 30 ma Ctosedown. 

Time 1J0 Nows ADMSSNmiS ttaOMB 
Jobfinder 150 Closedown. 

GBANADA iSiSESXSU,*. 

Ftec B odac GUore gorarid 

4.15 Sons and Daughters 6JX) Granada 
Reports 8J5 Tha is Tour RnM 6J0 Cross- 
roads 6J0-7A0 Crossroads IZJOam 
Closedown. 

HiywECTaigasggs,^ 

&SS News IZJMtam Ctoseduwa 
MTVWAI freAsWrvWast 


Sbc Witti Alan Ruaaad and 
Griffiths. 


caopm-saswaieeai 
and IE Uoyd- 





Madeline Kahn. A spoof 
Western about a black sheriff 
who saves his town from the 
dutches of a crooked 


1030 McCartney. An extended 
version of die film about Paul 
McCartney, inducing footage 
of Wings in concert and 
previously unseen fflrn of the 
Beaties at work in the Abbey 
Road studios. 

1130 Ctaasic Ghost Stories. The 
Rose Garden, by M.R James, 
read by Robert PoweB. 

11.45 Weafoer. 





Panbi WBcoz and Richard Beddusale in Tbe Loras, repeated on 
Channel 4 tonight at 9.00pm 


the electricity back on; Sheoa 
oereuades Karen to make the 


Gail catches Damon chatting- 
up Debbie. 

830 Stannakar. Programmes from 
the 60s and 70s that were the 
first stepping stone for now- 
established stars, beginning 
with Do Not Adjust Yow 
Stocking, a comedy starring 
Dense Coffey, Eric kfie, David 
Jason, Terry Jones, Michael 
Palin, the Bonzo Dog Doo Dah 
-■ Band, and Captain Fantastic. 

930 The Lovers, starring Richard 
Bedrinsate and Paul WOcox. 
Comedy about two young 
people, he trying to get into her 
bed, she trying to get him to 
propose. 

930 New Faces, Now Stars. 

Among those appearing in this 
edition of the tafent show are 
Patti Boutaye, Marti Caine, Les 
Dennis and Lenny Henry. 

1030 Another Sunday and Sweet 
FA, by Jack RosenthaL A 
comedy about a Sunday 
morning football match, 
starring Fred Feast, Joe 
Gladwin, and David Swift 


1130 F8ne Koyaanisqatra (1983) A 
silent celebration of 
contemporary life In the United 
States, featuring breathtaking 
landscapes anddtyscapaa. 
Directed by Go dfrey Reggio. 






site? 


The very soul of France 
in the very heart of London. 

the oak room 

LE MERIDIEN PICCADILLY 

T d h ; 

bv our own o - • 1 i' r r r' 

"d David Chamber Meridien s head cl>ef. Togeiher 

ihev present exeiting and hi^ V 

meridien 

Please call 734 8000 

. to make vour resection. ^ 

. Benton Pirrariilly. Pici-adiHy. London W1V0BH 
The Oiik Rnom He-slDumnl-^Lin ^ ^ ^ ^ p^ 1 . J j,||y Huu-Ii 



Radio 4 


&5S On VHP safe Weather. 

730 News 

735 Concert Marian 

matrpm, Ubre Vanwfl de 
MontsenaL anon (H esp arion 
Ensemble). Britten 
(Lachrymae: Kodousafc.vtola 
and Novotna, piano), 

Mozart (Divertimento In F. K 
247: Vienna Mozart 
Ensembte). 630 News 

835 Concert (contd)Hotet 
(Terzetto: 

Aden ey/Graeme/Arorrwttz). 
Butman (Pavan: 

Breemjute). Dvorak (Piano 
Concerto to G minor 
Moravec/Czech PO).930 

9.05 This Week’s Composers: 
Constant Lambert raid 
Friends. Lambert (Elegiac 
Blues: Richard Rodney 
Bennett, piano), Mflhaud 
(baSetLe craetton du 
monde), Lranbert (Sonata: 
GSespw, piano), Walton 
(m o ve ments from Facade 
suite: with Lambert as 
narrator, and In str ume nt a l 
Ensemble under the 
baton of the composer) 

1030 Stephen Bennett 

(ptano). vanhal (Sonata in B 
flat), Jenner (Sonata Op 
5) 

11X45 Strauss: Horn Concerto 
No 1 (TuckwsH/LSO), 
and syrrahoNc poem Also 


Mol, (with Brussels gold 
medaBst Hu Nra-Yuan), 
Delius's Caprice and 
B^y, Boar’s Stfut tfamour. 
Bear's vfafln Concerto in 
B minor, (soloist Hu Nai- 
Yuan) and Wierdawsld 
and Debussy works, Grieg's 
ToSprtTg(Falix 
SabnonC cdBo), and ^ar's 
Cate Concerto (Rose 
and Cleveland Orchestra 
conducted by Andrew 
Davis). 435 News 

530 tot e rpretatlorison 
Record: Stephen 




I 



Sr 4 ' s ; - 


WORLD SERVICE 






(Chicago SO. under the 
baton of Sir Georg SoW). 

1135 Simon Shewring: piano 
recttaL Uszt (Hramonies 
du sok). Chopin (Ballade No 
4 in F minor, Op 52). and 
Brahms Intermezzi (B minor. 
Op 1 1 S No 1; E major. 

Op I T6 No 4; A major. Op 
118 No 2 

12.15 Concert BBC Scottish 
SO (under George 


Hurstt. with Ernst Kovadc 
(vtoHn). Part one. Faurft 
(Pavahe), LatojSymphonto 


espagnoto). 130 News 
136 Ccxioertfconto): 

Tchaikovsky (Symphony 

1.50 Guitar Encores: Leo 


Sech's Suite in G minor. 


MuthspieTs TonspieL No 1 
230 Strings Pest and Future: 


and silver medaliste at the 

1985 Queen ERsabath 
Vtofo Competttibn In 
Brussels, and string 

players of earlier 
generatioRs. works 
Include Faure's Violin Sonata 


Clarinet Quintet K 581 

630 Britten/Tippett Festival ' 
BBC Singers. Britten 
(Five flower songs, A boy 
was bom. A shepherd's 
carol and a Hymn to the 
Virgin, and Choral 
dances, from Glortena). Abo 
Tippett's two madrigals 
—The windhover raid The 
source, and The weeping 
babe 

730 Love's Sacrifice: John 
Ford's play, written to 
1633. In Brett Usher’s 
adaptation. The story of 
a duke whose wife® falsely 
accused of infidelity with 
his Mend. The cast Includes 
John Shrapnel, Sian 
Thomas Anton Lesser. 

Tessa Peake-Jones, Kari 
Johnson and Nick Dunning 

930 John Stanley. A 
performance of the 
dramatic pastoral Arcadia, 
The Shepherd’s 
WedcSng. which incorporates 
the muracians Organ 
C o n ce rto to A. Op 10 No 5. 
and the Concerto &osso 
to D. Op 2 No 1 . Parley of 
Instruments Baroque 
Orchestra (under Roy 
Goodman), with Paul 
Nicholson (organ) and 
singers GW ton Fisher. 

Nancy Argenta. Bronwen 
Mils, John Potter. Simon 
Davies and Andrew Knight 

1035 Recorder and Guitar: 

John Turner and NeB 
Smith to performances ot 
Mchaet Berkeley's Pas 
de deux, John McCabe's 
Oasert f V and Vista for 
recorder. Lennox Berkeley's 
Theme and variations, 
lor gutar. and Margaret 
Lucy WUtins’s Aspects 
ol night 

1130 Beethoven Piano 

Sonatas: John LI( plays 
the No 16 in G Op 31 Nol, 
and the No 30 in E. Op 
109 

1137 News. 1230 Ckwedown 






Mi' Y* 1 ■ ", ■ V i 


PH 


mmm 














II 

I n U 1 ; ; • 1 


wmms 


in England and 
as above 


FREQUENCES: Radio 1:1 053kHz 
92.5; Radio 4: 200kHz/1500m: VF 
1458kHz/206m: VHF 943; World 1 


MF 648kHz/- 












28 


TUESDAY DECEMBER 30 1986 


FkrtisibBshed jni785 


SPORT 



Amid Australia’s 
agony, one-day 
cricket grinds on 

From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Melbourne 
While yesterday was a time made on the players and the with the last 


for relaxation and rejoicing in 
the England camp, the Austra- 
lian team returned to the scene 
of their crushing defeat on 
Sunday, to try, m their 
manager’s words, “to remedy 
what we are doing wrong". 
The warning issued by the 
Consumer A&airs Minister in 
the Victorian State Gov- 
ernment concerning “the dan- 
ger from flying corks from 
champagne bottles" was more 

likely to affect Gatting’s side 
than Border’s. 

“It is a time for shame and a 
time for change," comforted a 
leader in the Melbourne Her- 
ald on Australia’s perfor- 
mance. “The first thing to be 
said is that wholesale, in- 
discriminate and messy 
slaughter is not the long-term 
solution," Richie Benaud 
wrote. “The less said about the 
cricket the better," was the 
Australian Prime Minister's 
contribution. 

No one, meanwhile, keeps a 
lower profile in Australian 
cricketing circles than Kerry 
Packer and that is not surpris- 
ing. To use an Australian 
expression, it was Mr Packer’s 
hijacking of the game here that 
“rooted" it first by splitting it 
down the middle when it was 
flourishing, and then, after 
coming to an accommodation 
with the Australian Board, by 
glorifying and commercializ- 
ing the one-day game at an 
appalling cost to the tra- 
ditional version. 

The jamboree which begins 
in Perth today (one-day inter- 
nationals, of course) is useful 
only as a timely reminder of 
the fierce demands being 


excesses that arc being visited 
on the game. The West Indies 
and Pakistan are already 
there, just over a month after 
finishing a Test series in 
Pakistan. They meet today. 
The England and Australian 
teams will be herded some 
2,000 miles across the conti- 
nent this evening, driven like 
cattle before the whips. 

More cricket page 23 

They are going to Perth to 
oblige the marketing people, a 
Packer subsidiary, who have 
taken over the running of the 
Australian game and are using 
it to their own avaricious 
ends. The firm, PBL, have 
until 1989, when their con- 
tract expires, to reduce Test 
cricket in Australia to more of 
a relic than a dream. 

Because their overworked 
and under-talented Test team 
are doing so badly, young 
Australia is becoming dis- 
enchanted with the more 
genuine side of the game. 
Australia's success in the Da- 
vis Cup, which coincided with 
defeat in the Test match on 
Sunday, is expected to prompt 
scores of eager recruits to turn 
from cricket to tennis. Playing 
cricket for the school is no 
longer, anyway, the height of a 
boy's ambition. 

The ACB must know all 
this. Yet when England were 
here last, early in 1985, Border 
was already saying that he was 
sick and tired of one-day 
cricket. Australia at the time 
were playing 10 solid weeks of 
it. Today he faces another five. 


Imran is facing a 
fight for fitness 


Perth (Reuter) — Imran 
Khan, the Pakistan captain, is 
doubtful for today’s opening 
encounter against the West 
Indies in the one-day tour- 
nament being played here 
until January 7. 

The brilliant all-rounder has 
an injured left thigh and 
bowled at only quarter pace in 
the nets yesterday, saying that 
if he played he would bowl at 
medium pace or not at all- 

England and Australia are 
also competing in the seven- 
match competition which is 
part of a sporting festival 
surrounding yachting's Amer- 
ica’s Cup. 

The doubt over Imran 
means Pakistan may go into 
their toughest match without 
their two leading bowlers. 
Abdul Qadir, the leg-spinner 
and scourge of the West 
Indian batsmen during the 


recent drawn Test series in 
Pakistan, is definitely ruled 
out with a chipped knuckle in 
his left hand. 

Despite that, Imran is not 
too downhearted, claiming 
that his two all-rounders, 
Wasim Akram and Mansoor 
Flahi, would thrill the Perth 
crowds. Wasim, he said, is the 
best player in the world at his 
age, while for sheer power 
Mansoor rivalled Ian Botham. 

For their part the West 
Indies' only problems sur- 
round a decision on which of 
their six fast bowlers to leave 
out and whether or not to use 
Roger Harper, the ofT-spinner. 

WEST INDIES (from): V Richards (capQ, D 
Haynes, G OBonUge. R Bldianaon. L 
Games, G Logta.To^on, R Harper, M 
Marshall, M HokSng, W Benjaten, J 
Gamer. C Wabh. T Gray. 

PAKISTAN (franfc I Khan (apt), J 
Man dad. R Raja. S Mohammad, MNazar. 
O Omar, M Etatri, E Ahmad, A Muttava, S 
Yousef, W Akram, S Jaffar, Z Wan, T 
Ahmad- 


Test match 
sandwiched among them. 
Cricket is now* Bonder’s tread- 
mill. Since his first in 1 978-79, 
he has played 137 one-day 
internationals, a laughable 
ure if it were not so crazy. 
mid-February he could have 
played 152. 

Not, for the moment, being 
masters in their own house, 
the Australian Board convey a 
sense of wen-meaning im- 
potence. They will be pleased, 
though, that their tour to West 
Indies in the spring of 1988 
does not look like material- 
ising. A final decision on this 
will be made at the Board 
meeting in Perth on January 6. 

The reason is said to be a 
clash of fixtures. If it were the 
Australian Board's reluctance 
to subject a young side to the 
ruthless intentions of the West 
Indian fast bowlers in their 
own conditions, it would be 
understandable: the point 
would be a fair one, which the 
West Indian Board would be 
wise to take. Whether England 
are about to be brought dm 
to earth by the West Indians in 
Perth we shall know when the 
two sides meet on Saturday. 

The Australian selectors, for 
their part, will be looking for a 
combination with which to 
start 1987 on a happier note. A 
change of cap tain , though 
unlikely, would, I think, be 
beneficial, not least to Border 
himself 

Australia's present dilemma 
is not dissimilar to that in 
1970-71 when their cricket 
was also at a low ebb and 
England were here. For the 
last Test match then, corres- 
ponding to next week’s in 
Sydney, Lawiy was replaced 
as ca ptain by Ian Chappell, a 
surprising and controversial 
decision at the time but one 
which was to lead to a 
successful era. La wry had lost 
five and drawn four of 
Australia's previous nine Test 
matches. Owing to the loss of 
so many experienced players 
to South Africa, the situation 
now is, if anything, more 
critical. 

But who is there, as there 
was Ian Chappell in 1970-71, 
to revive Australia’s fortunes? 
The likeliest to do so m$ht be 
another South Australian in 
David Hookes, an inspira- 
tional player generally consid- 
ered to be the best of the state 
captains. At 31 he is a good age 
for the job. He would seem to 
be the most imaginative op- 
tion. But the Australian selec- 
tors, one of whom is . Ian 
Chappell's brother, Greg, are 
not currently renowned for 
their vision. They, too, caught 
some of yesterday's flak. 


Mill Hill’s offer lures Lock 


Tony Lock, at the age of 57 
stnt, arguably, the world's 
greatest living exponent of the 
Spinner's art, has been enticed 
tack to England from his 
hillside retreat in the sweetly 
named Darling Ranges in 
Western Australia. He has 
accepted a professional coach- 
ing engagement at MSI Hill 
School, north London, from 
next spring until the end of the 
summer. 

“Offer accepted," was 
Lock's typically terse reply to 
an inquiry from the indepen- 
dent school's master-in-charge 


By Paul Martin 

of cricket, Roger Denning, 
who met Lock while on a 
teacher exchange programme 
in Perth. “We're thrilled to 
have got a great man of 
cricket, who has proved he is a 
brilliant coach," Denning en- 
thused. “He win certainly pot 
some steel into the lads," he 
added. 

Though Lock captured 
2JJ44 wickets for England, 
Surrey, Leicestershire and 
Western Australia, where he 
spent his last eight playing 
years, the left-arm spinner had 
been overshadowed by his 


England partner, Jim Laker. 

With his reputation as an 
irascible yet scrnpnlonsly fair 
man. Lock is snre to be a tough 
taskmaster for the Uding 
cricketers in his charge. He 
ruled Western Australia auto- 
cratically, dragging them np 
from their also-ran status to 
great heights by the force of 
his _ personality: he even 

administer ed a timpne -lashing 

to the young Dennis Lillee. 

Mill Hill had also ap- 
proached other former top 
cricketers in Australia and 
Soath Africa. 





Hollins says 
Hazard and 
Wicks can go 


John Hollins, the Chelsea 
manager, has told Steve Wicks 
and Mike Hazard that they 
can leave the first division 
club if the right offers come 
along. Both players asked for 
transfers 10 days ago. 

Hollins paid Queen’s Park 
Rangere £450,000 for Wicks, a 
central defender, during the 
summer but he has played 
only half a dozen first team 
sniffs- Hazard, a midfield 

player, has made only three 
senior starts this season, his 
failure to win a place even 
during Chelsea’s bleakest pe- 
* for 


nod proving a puzzle 

Stamford Bridge supporters. 

Since his £300,000 move 
from Tottenham Hotspur in 
September 1985, Hazard has 
made 22 League apearances. 
Both have been out of the first 
team since Chelsea were 
crushed 4-0 at home by 
Wimbledon on December 6. 
Hollins said: “We haven't had 
any offers for either player 
yet.” Chelsea ended a run of 
10 games without a win at 
Southampton on Boxing Day 
and followed that with a 4-1 
home triumph over Aston 
Villa to move off the bottom 
of the first division. 


Meanwhile another London 
manager, John LyalL of West 
Ham United, has intensified 
his search for new players to 
arrest his side's alarming slide 
down the first division table. 

“We definitely want to 
buy " Lyali said. “ I would like 
to introduce new players at 
this stage because they could 
give us a Uft But it must not 
just be buying for the sake of 
it. “We had a superb defence 
last year but now we arc doing 
silly things and our distribu- 
tion out of defence is gi vmg us 
problems. We have a reput- 
ation for good attacking fooi- 
ball - getting things right in 
defence is important too." 

• Celtic are interested in sign- 
ing the Norwich City central 
defender, Steve Bruce. The 
Scottish premier division 
club's manager, David Hay, 
has discusse d Bruce with his 
directors but they have not yet 
made a transfer bid. Brace 
joined Norwich from Gillinjg- 
ham. of the third division, in 
1984. 

Celtic are five points ahead 
of Rangers in the league but 
Hay was unhappy at their 1-1 
draw with Clydebank 
Saturday. 


on 


Wave at ruling the waves: Dams Conner’s victory salute after Stars and Stripes beat USA 


Kiwi Artful Dodger on crash 
course with veteran Conner 


From Barry PkkthalJ 
Fremantle 


The final for the 
jra America’s Cup 
a Wr . challenge trials 
\ V . Y starting in a 
r 't' A fortnight, is 
shaping up to 
be a tattle be- 
tween Dennis Conner, the 
American master and Chris 
Dickson, from New Zealand, 
whose adolescent cockiness, 
aged 25, is surpassed only by 
the continuous winning ways 
of his 'plastic fantastic 1 New 
Zealand IV during this four- 
month series of races. 

Both skippers won the sec- 
ond of their semi-final heals 
with consummate ease yes- 
terday, Dickson, carrying the 
pre-start sparring against the 
French Kiss skipper Marc 
Pajot right into the spectator 
fleet to leave Gallic hopes 
wallowing in New Zealand's 
wake from the moment the 
gun fired. 

Conner’s start was less 
inspiring, with Stars and 
Stripes crossing the pin end of 
the line a second or so early. 
The uncharacteristic mistake 
cost this 12 metre veteran 18 
seconds, but Tom Blackaller, 
his Californian rival, made an 
even graver error of starting at 
the unfavoured end of the 
badly biased line, allowing 
Conner and his crew to get 
back in contention. 

The San Diego yacht all but 
clipped the stern of Black- 
aller’s radical twin ruddered 
USA II and when the two 
came together once more, 
Conner, displaying much im- 
proved speed in these 10-15 
knot winds was firmly in the 
driving seat At the first 
weather mark, Conner's petrol 
blue hull held a 16sec lead. 
USA halved the gap cm the 
following ran, but with 
Conner protecting the inside 
berth at the leeward mark, he 
dictated the tactics on the next 
beat picking up all the lav- 



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RACING 


The Aga Khan to send 
15 horses to Cumani 


Luca Cnmani, who trained a 
persona! best number of 67 
winners last season, received 
another boost yesterday when 
it was announced that he will 
train for the Aga Khan in 
1987. 

The Aga Khan will be 
sending Cumani 15 two-year- 
olds in the New Year with the 
rest of his string, expected to 

be about 80 -strong, going to 

Michael Stonte and Fnlke 
Johnson Houghton, who have 
trained for him since 1978. 

Itafian-boni Cnmani spent 
two years as assistant to 
Henry Cedi before setting np 
in 1976 at Bedford House 
stables in Newmarket Since 
then he has increased his total 
of winners almost annually. 
His biggest success came with 
Commanche Ron in the 1984 
St Leger. 

The Aga Khan's famous 
colours of green with red 
epaulets have been carried to 
victory in two of the last six 
Epsom Derbys, by Shergar 
(1981) and Shahrastani 
(1986). He also won the 
French Derby in 1984 with 
Darshaan and in 1985 with 
Monktar. 

The Aga^ decision to retain 
a third trainer in Britain fe in 
tine with his policy of increas- 


ing the number of his horses in 
this country. But he wiB still 
have about 100 horses based 
at his French framing centre at 
Aiglemont 

Cnmani said: “Obviously, 
it's very good news. I was told 
at the Newmarket December 
Sales and am delighted.*' 

Of the horses who gave him 
success last season, Cnmani 
confirmed that St Leger run- 
ner-up, Celestial Stem, and 
Then Again win stay in train- 
ing. “I'm not totally sure about 
my Guineas horse at the 
moment bat Imperial Frontier 
is looking the most likely at 
present," be said. 


Racing, page 24 


Atkins returns 
at Worcester 

The former jump jockey 
Ron Atkins returns to the 
saddle at Worcester today 
when he partners Us A Laugh 
in the Celebration Selling 
Hurdle. 

Since he retired 1 8 months 
aga Atkins has worked as a 
jockeys' safety officer and 
trainer, and has also opened a 
restaurant called 'Chasers' in 
Devon. 


ourable shifts to extend his 
lead to a 1:08 margin. 

Thereafter, the race, like 
that between New Zealand 
and French Kiss, proved to be 
a boring procession, with Stars 
and Stripes piling on the 
pressure on his hapless under- 
financed rival to finish a dear 
three minutes ahead. 

The New Zealand win was 
less impressive, the ‘plastic 
fantastic' taking 90sec longer 
to complete the 24.5-mile 
course than the San Diego flag 
bearer, but as Dickson pointed 
out afterwards to those 
wondering if some of the Kiwi 
magic had washed off the 
French had forced the New 
Zealanders to put in 16 more 
tacks than the Americans 
performed. 

DEFENDER TRIALS SERIES D 

MONDAY: Kookaburra II M Austria IV. 
59saGKookabuna HI bt Steak V Kidney. 
ZmlnOSsec. 

DEFENDER STANDINGS 

Won Lost Pte 

AustraSaiV 24 9 59 

Kookaburras) 27 6 99 

Kookabtm n 20 13 52 

Steak Yi* Kidney 3 SO 12 

NOTE Three points swarded for byes 
Mowfew the mtkoment of Australia Ifl not 
Inducted, firet two to finats. 

CHALLENGER SERIES SEMI- 
FINALS 

MONDAY: Stare and Stripes M USA. 302; 
New Zealand M French Ktes, 240. 
CHALLENGER STANDINGS 

Bwt ot w w w i races: Nar Zeeland toads 
French Kisa. 2-0; Stars and Stripes teaob 
USA, 2-0. 

TODAY’S RACES 

DEFENDER TRULLS SERIES D: Kooka- 
burra in v Kookaburra H; Australia IV * 
Steak YT Kidney. 

CHALLENGER SERES SEMI-FINALS: 
Stare and Stripes v USA; New Zealand v 
French Kiss. 

On die defenders course, the 
power of litigation appears to 
be taking priority over boat- 
speed, with Alan Bond's 
Australia TV crew once again 
locked in battle with Kook- 
aburra’s English sea lawyer, 
Bryan Willi s, who between 
them were taking issue on 
seven protests last night. 

A record? Very probably, 
but the most important in- 
cident was the collision be- 
tween the Bond boat and 


Meade to 


Kookaburra II shortly after 
the five-minute gun. Kooka- 
burra, steered by Peter Gfl- 
mour, which proved the easy 
winner on the course, was able 
to out-turn the Lexcen design 
before the start, then came out 
from under when both were 
on starboard tack to hiff 
Australia IV hard into wind. 
Gilmour had every right to 
push his rival up, but the 
question the jury must con- 
sider is whether Colin Beashei 
made every effort to avoid the 
collision. 

Harold Cudmore, the skip- 
per of beaten White Crusader, 
now tur ned c ommentator on 
Channel 7TV, suggested that 
the camara shot taken on 
board Kookaburra showed 
Beashei to have Australia's 
wheel hard over to starboard 
when the expensive chink 
occurred, but foen said wrily: 
“But, going before the race 
jury here in Fremantle is like 
going to the races!” 

Talking of backing losers, 
Syd Fischer, the 
Steak V Kidney boss yes- 
terday lost his protest against 
Kookaburra 12 on Sunday, and 
then suggested that Channel 7, 
who have fitted remote race- 
cameras on both Taskforce 
12 metres, suppressed evi- 
dence that is not favourable to 
foe Kookaburra team. The 
television station foiled to 
provide footage of the in- 
cident that led to 
Steak '□’Kidney's protest, but 
the Kookaburra syndicate are 
far from happy at Fischer’s 
accusation. 

Whatever foe outcome of 
this particular slanging match. 
Steak'n’Kidney's third loss 
yesterday in these final round 
robin trials, this time against 
Kookaburra IU, must halt 
Fischer’s claim that his boat is 
fastest among foe defenders 
and should be allowed to 
compete for a place in foe 
defenders finals starting on 
January 14. 

More yachting, page 25 


An age old Managers 
problem run out 
forStange of patience 


East Berlin (Renter) — Af- 
ter decades playing ‘ngfy 
sister* to Fast Germany's 
world-beating athletes and 
swimmers, the national foot- 
ball team are bemg primed for 
a share of the fadight by 
Bernd Stange, their ambitions 
young manager. 

“While the athletes and 
swimmers have swept the 
world, omr football team have 
never really risen above 
mediocrity," be said. Theefin- 
sive Stange, however, has no 
illnsioiis about the task ahead 
if East Germany are to develop 
into a top team. 

Their only high point came 
in 1974 when qnalicatioH for 
the World Cnp finals in West 
Germany was followed by 
Magdeburg winning the Euro- 
pean Co?) Whiners' Cnp. But 
tint record pates alongside 50 
gold, 49 silver and 41 bronze 
medals won by s w imm ers and 
athletes last year id world and 
European championships. 

Now Stange believes he has 
the nucleus of a formidable 
team for the late 1980s. Never- 
theless he has earned criticism 
for casting aside Uwe Pilz and 
Wolfgang Steanbacfa, the pop- 
ular veterans, and introducing 
Andreas Thom, aged 21, who 
emerged as the standard 
beam of the new generation 
with sparkling performances 
against France and Denmark. 
He switched easily between 
sltiUhl midfield ami sharp 
attacking roles. 

“It’s easy to get into the 
national side”, Stange sahL“If 
we had jnst five players like 
Thom, we amid achieve sne- 


Bnt Stange fears even his 
young talents snch as Thom, 
Rico Steinmann, aged 18, his 
newly-blooded forward and 
Matthias Sommer will fizzle 
oat like East Germany's many 
groat hopes of the last decade, 
“lime and time again we've 
seen players peter out at jnst 
the age when they should be 
reaching their peak, f simply 
lack players around the age of 
27 or 28," be said. 

Stange suggests the players 
lack the pressure that force 
professionals in the West to 
keep going and earn as much 
money as possible. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


retire 

Richard Meade, Britain’s 
three-time Olympic eventing 
gold medallist, is to retire 
from competitive riding, The 
48-year-old Englishman has 
decided to quit after 25 years 
at the top. following the 
retirement of his leading 
horse, KilcasheL, which he 
rode in Britain's gold medal 
winning team at the 1982 
World Championships. 

He rode in four Olympics, 
scoring a double triumph in 
1972, when he took the indi- 
vidual title and piloted Britain 
to the team victory on 
Laurieston, and collected a 
team gold at the previous 
Games on Comishman. 

Silver lining 

A Rolls-Royce Silver Spirit 
worth £69.000 is on offer to 
foe scorer of the first 147 
maximum break in foe new 
Rothmans Maichroom 
snooker league being con- 
tested around Britain from 
January to May, The league 
gets under way on January 1 7, 
when Steve Davis, Dennis 
Taylor, Willie Thorne and 
Terry Griffiths compete in the 
first two matches, at the 
Torbay Leisure Centre. By 
May 1 7, 28 matches will have 
been played at 14 venues to 
decide the first league 
champion. . . 



Close call 


Pyatt: first defence 

Pyatt’s defence 

Chris Pyatt will defend his 
European iight-m iddleweight 
title for foe first time, against 
Gianfranco Rosi, of Italy, in 
foe central Italian town of 
Perugia on January 21, the 
European Boxing union an- 
nounced yesterday. 

Injury blow 

Oldham rugby league dub, 
already badly hit by injuries 
this season, suffered another 
blow yesterday when Hussein 
M’Barki was ruled out for six 
weeks with a depressed cheek- 
bone. The French-Moroccan 
foil bade was injured in his 
side’s Boring Day win over 
Salford. 


England, who had beaten 
Turkey only once in seven 
previous basketball meetings, 
lost again, by 78-77, in their 
opening match of foe Pohjola 
tournament in Helsinki. After 
trailing 45-33 at the interval. 
England recovered welL but 
despite 22 points apiece from 
Mick Bett and Clyde 
Vaughan, Turkey held out 

Playing safe 

Winds gusting at speeds of 
more than 60mph and heavy 
sleet prevented ski jumping 
yesterday at a World Cup 
nordic combination event at 
Oberwiesenthat East Ger- 
many, forcing the event to be 
rescheduled for today. 

Second place 

Gary Lineker, foe England 
and Barcelona forward, has 
come second in a poll among 
European sports journalists to 
find foe European footballer 
of the year. The Golden Ball 
award, conducted by foe 
weekly France Football maga- 
zine, went to foe Soviet 
Union's Igor Belanov. 

Top man 

Philippe Sella, the Agcn and 
French international centre, 
has been named rugby union's 
player of 1986 by foe French 
weekly newspaper Midi 
Olympique . He succeeds foe 
Aigcntine stand-off Hugo 
Porta. 


By Chris Moore 

Ron Saunders and Billy 
McNeill kicked any remaining 
Chris tmas spirit firmly into 
touch yesterday after warning 
their respective West 
Bromwich Albion and Aston 
Villa squads that matters must 
improve. 

Saunders, dearly incensed 
at West Bromwich’s inept 
showing in their last three 
second division games, which 
have yielded a solitary point, 
told ms players that their day 
of reckoning was fast 
approaching. “At the moment 
my hands are still lied because 
of injuries so I cannot bark 
until I can bite," Saunders 
said, “but things are going to 
get a lot less comfortable 
around herejustassoonasour 
injury problems are sorted 
out" 

Derek Statham and George 
Reilly, neither of whom has 
kicked a tall in foe first team 
this season, are likely to be the 
first to benefit as Saunders 
sharpens' his act Both had 
another run-out in last night's 
friendly with Telford United, 
who return to foe Hawthorns 
in 11 days time for their 
controversial FA Cup third 
round tie with Leeds United. 

McNeill, meanwhile, was 
still smarting yesterday from 
Saturday’s 4-1 hiding at the 
hands of the then bottom club, 
Chelsea, which dragged Villa 
back into foe relegation 
places. Their next engagement 
is a New Year’s Day visit to 
Goodison Park where the 
Villa manager watched 
Everton humble Leicester 
City 5-1 on Sunday. 

“The same thing could hap- 
pen to us unless there is an all- 
round improvement on 
Thursday " McNeill said. 

Villa's £350,000 summer 
signing, Neal Cooper, who has 
been plagued by a groin injury 
since his arrival from Aber- 
deen, could make his long- 
delayed debut. 

Peter Reid will not be fit to 
return for Everton. Reid, who 
earlier this month made a 20- 
minute appearance as sub- 
stitute against Wimbledon, 
suffered a thigh strain in that 
match which is still troubling 
him. 

BOBSLEIGHING 

Germans 


home win 

Konigssee (Reuter) - West 
recorded their first 
World Cup victory when Toni 
Fischer and Christoph Langen 

^°^ an event on their 
nome track here yesterday. 

Fischer was foe fastest 
dnver on all three runs, 
ctockmg a total time of 2min 


nusmans 

logo Appelt Josef Muigg 
y three-quarters of a 


by exactly 
second. 

East Germany’s Olvmnir 

Lehman^ 31 w j nner ' Bernhard 

Lehmann, racing for foe first 

■MXSS*? 11)8 

fe:;®' 

Konigssee. d ***** to 

Fischer "Sf f victory, 
climbed to second nb» n ■ ha J[ c 
World Cud iS2 phceinlhe 

i"Ss. They gate 37^; ? tend ; 

points. oeriLh, by two 



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