Skip to main content

Full text of "The Times , 1986, UK, English"

See other formats


s 




fi^Sgu, 

-...*■ °ut j, f. 

?S!*$ 

of£j# 


t r\ : 

' '* .-' : V 


S&MI 

.■■r'chcS" 

a*\ » £? Or 

r.^ie? Jft ‘ 

ii 

■• -si-h f ^ Hr 
n ***, 

,-.k- ' nc le ^ 


J ^gSB 
- OBt 


•O^CL 

^‘.4v 


■ r| ' Moore 

■;.v7.. 2 ^ I 

' ' ■’*: r '-DUc 
' • '•• :;-Tnk r 

iV-^ar 


*-0 
«ia ^ 

• ^ ij, 

, Will 


Bank resigns 
as adviser 
to Guinness 


atic day in the City 


The Government's investiga- 
tion into the affairs of 
Guinness took a dramatic turn 
yesterday when Morgan Gren- 
fell the merchant bank, re- 
signed as adviser to the 
company. 

At the same time the bank 
announced that Mr Roger 
Scclig, a senior director who 
played a vital role this year in 
masterminding the takeover 
by Guinness of Distillers, had 
resigned from the bank. 

In a lersclyworded state- 
ment Morgan Grenfell said; “ 
ft has decided that its group 
companies should cease to act 
as adviser to the company and 


By Lawrence Lever 

n ° further comment until cent allegations that it owned 
then”. or paid for a block of 2.1 

Mr Scclig was one of the million Guinness shares, 
main architects behind the which has triggered off a 
bitter and protracted battle dispute between Morgan 
fought for control of Distillers, Grenfell and Henry 
between Guinness and Argyll. Ansbachcr this weekThe DTI 
His resignation is understood inspectors are already examin- 
to have been triggered by his ing the circumstances behind 
conduct during the course of this transaction. 





the bid. 

It is this takeover bid upon 


The shares were purchased 
by clients of Henry Ansbachcr 


which the Department of during the course of the 
Trade enquiry is focusing. Id takeover battle and frans- 


The new City watchdog, the 
Securities and Investment 
Board (SIB) will be authorized 
to investigate Investment bosi- 


has informed the board of nesses from January 12. Its 

m‘n rwvtc onnnrrliwAVM** a __ n* 


Guinness accordingly". 

Mr Seelig was asked to 
resign alter a meeting yes- 
terday morning with the 
bank's chairman. Lord Catto, 
and the Group Chief Exec- 
utive, Mr Christopher Reeve. 
And he did so immediately 
after the meeting. 

Mr Seelig is widely regarded 
in the City as a high flier and 
one of the most prominent 
takeover specialists. 
Commenting on his resigna- 
tion he said last 
night^Throughout my time at 
Morgan Grenfell I have 


other powers under the Finan- 
cial Services Act will not come 
info fort* until later. 

particular the DTI investi- 
gators arc looking at purchases 
of Guinness shares by a 
number of parties during the 
course of the bid. 

The effect of these pur- 
chases would have been to 
boost Guinness’s share price 


ferred afterwards to a subsid- 
iary of Ansbachcr at a price 
above the prevailing market 
price. 

Ansbachcr claims that Mr 
Seelig had agreed to indem- 
nify it on any loss on the 
shares and arranged payment 
for them. 

A Morgan Grenfell spokes- 
man said that the bank had 
"neither owned or paid for die 
shares". However it emerged 
yesterday that Morgan Gren- 
fell had in fact paid all the 
stamp duty of the share 
purchase. 

The resignation of Morgan 



^ vaIue of its Grenfc ! 1 31141 MrSedigare the Roger Seeing: known as high fliw in the takeover business 


bid for Distillers. 

Morgan Grenfell's resigna- 


tion as adviser to Guinness is Guinness. 


latest in a recent series of 
damaging events to befall 


rngnu inrougnoutmytuneat the end of a relationship that 
S" 1 Jj?'* had become strained after the 

"“ft. announcement of the DTI 
my abduy the interests of the enquiry on December 1. 
house and its clients. I shall Guinness had already ap- 
await the outcome of the pointed another merchant 
Guinness enquiry and make bank, Lazard Brothers, to 

advise it about the inquiry. 

. t/? /• _ Guinness was given no 


— ^dd— 

• The £4,000 prize in 
yesterday’s Times 
Portfolio Gold 
competition was won by 
B. Wilson, of 
Newmarket, Suffolk. 
Details, page 3. 

© Portfolio list page 
21; how to play, 
information service, 
page 16. 


me ena or a relationship that On December 1 8th 
had become strained afterthe Guinness admitted that it had 
announcement of the DTI invested some $100 million of 
enquiry on December 1 its shareholders money in a 

Guinness had already ap- fund managed by Mr Ivan 
pointed another merchant Boesky the disgraced Ameri- 
bank, Lazard Brother, to can arbilrageur.The DTI eo- 
advise it about the inquiry. quiry into Guinness is 
Guinness was given no believed to have been trig- 
advance warning from Mor- gered by information about 
gan Grenfell that it was going Mr Boesky's activities relayed 
to resign as its adviser. No-one to the DTI by the American 
from Guinness was available authorities. 


New Year CBEs 
for fictional PM 
and his partner 


for comment last night. 

In a separate develo 
Morgan Grenfell denii 


last night. Mr Boesky is known to have 

ate development owned a large number of 
□fell denied re- Distillers shares. 


Towns cut ! Samantha 


New year 
confidence 
from CBI 

The Confederation of Brit- 
ish Industry is expecting better 
prospects for business and a 
quickening in the rate of 
economic growth in what is 
expected to be election year. 

In his new year message 
today, the CBI president, Mr 
David Nickson, savs manu- 
facturing will grow faster than 
the economy as a whole in 
1987, with consumer spend- 
ing. investment and exports 
all buoyant But the number of 
manufacturing jobs will de- 
cline. 

The pound has been rel- 
atively stable, supported by 
rising oil prices. 

: Details, page 17 

City tumult 

A tumultuous year in the City 
^aw the arrival of Big Bang 
nd reverberated with insider 
Jealing allegations and the 
ppcarance of the government 
inspector Page 18 


TIMES SPORT 


Pakistan win 

Pakistan provided a surprise 
in the opening match of the 
Benson and Hedges Challenge 
in Perth when they beat West 
Indies by 34 runs Page 28 


off by 
flooding 

By Michael McCarthy 

Torrential rain brought 
flooding to parts of North mid 
Mid-Wales yesterday, cutting 
off towns and villages, 
disrupting train services and 
leading to evacuation of 
homes. Thousands of acres of 
farmland were under water. . 

Worst affected were the 
rivers flowing west from the 
mountains into Cardigan 
Bay — the Dovey, Mawddach 
and Rheidol and their tribu- 
taries — while further north 
the Conwy was also badly hit. 

The town of Machynlleth 
on the Dovey was at one time 
cut off by flooding on roads. 
Numerous cars were aban- 
doned and livestock was 
moved from low-lying fields. 

The most serious flood 
alert. Red Three, was in 
operation in the valley and ( 
further downriver families 
had to leave their homes in the 
village of Pennal. 

British Rail suspended ser- i 
vices on the Mid- Wales line as 
the Dovey flooded tracks. 
Buses ran passengers between 
Newtown and Aberystwyth. 

A girt aged 1 1, fell into the 
river Rheidol at Aberystwyth 
and was swept 100 yards 
downriver before two men 
waded in and rescued her. 

A youth in Lancashire who 
tried to flee from police across 
the swollen River Irwell was 
feared drowned last night. 

The youth, aged about 17, 
whose identity is not known, 
was challenged by police offi- 
cers who saw horn riding an 
unregistered motorcycle on 
the pavement. He abandoned 
the machine and jumped into 
the river at Stacksteads, but 
was swept away. 


lived on 
chocolate 

By Chris Steyn ai/i 
Stewart Tendler t 

Samantha Ettridge slept ita 
car and lived on Mars bars 
and Coca Cola during the five 
days she was missing, her 
parents said yesterday. 

They revealed details of 
how the schoolgirl spent 
Christmas living rough, while 
police searched nationwide for 
her and Mr Peter Chmilow- 
skyj. who is under arrest 

Last night Miss Ettridge, 
aged 17, finally returned to her 
parents’ home in Cheshunc. 
Hertfordshire. 

Mrs Carol Ettridge said her 
daughter had coped very well 
during the incident which 
ended on Monday when the 
car she was in crashed in 
Norfolk. 

She said: "Sammy seems 
OK. She has been very brave.” 

Mrs Ettridge said her 
daughter had spent most of 
the time inside the car. 

“They did noi go to hotels. 
They did not eat anything 
except Mars bars and Coke. 
They were just driving, talking 
and sleeping.” 

• Villagers in Letheringsett 
Norfolk, were yesterday 
mourning the death of five- 
month-old ■ Gemma Small- 
bone, who was killed -when her 
parents' car was in collision 
with the vehicle in which 
-Samantha was a passenger. 

Gemma's 'mother Diane, 
aged 28, was released from 
King's Lynn Hospital yes- 
terday. after being treated for 
head injuries. Her husband 
Derek is “comfortable” in the 
same hospital. 

Gemma's step-brother 
Terry Jonas, aged five, -es- 
caped unhurt. 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 

Thank you. Prime Minister. Ayckbourn, the playwright 
The acting partnership who receives a CBE 
have exposed the supposed Sporting honours include a 
mysteries of Whitehall to- the CBE for Frank Williams, brad 
homes of millions are rec- of the Wiliams grand prix 
ognized in the new year motor racing team, an OBE 
honours, list today in a - way for Pat Jennings, the former 
ti. 'iy ft* ikinr-I*. c-’-fepettrs /Jttses&L' Tottenham Ho! 
''■would have approved. asiT Northern Ireland ; 

Paul Eddington and Nigel keeper, and MBEs for Si 
Hawthorne, Prime Minister Lyle, the former British ( 

Jim Hacker and Cabinet Sec- golf champion and E 
retary Sir Humphrey Appleby Troke . the badminton pL 
in the BBC programme Yes, Three Conservative 
Prime Minister, are awarded are knighted: Mr Ba 
CBEs. Hayhoe, who lost his po 

Mis Margaret Thatcher, not " 

a frequent television viewer. Honours lists 
has never made any secret of ■— i— 

her liking for the programme. Minister for Health in 
and its predecessor. Yes, Min- September’s reshuffle, 
ister although the word in Alex Fletcher, a former t 
Whitehall has long been that it and inustiy minister who 
is less popular with senior served recently as chainrc 
civil servants. the Commons Select C 


British 
pride is 
‘back in 
fashion 9 

By Piulip Webster 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

The Prime Minister yes- 
terday underlined her desire 
to stay in power to eliminate 
socialism, still manifested, she 
said, by ibe activities of left- 
wing Labour councils. 

In an upbeat new year 
message, Mrs Margaret That- 
I eber said that pride in Britain 
was back in fashion. But she 
lambasted as “a monumental 
act of folly” Labour’s non- 
nuclear defence policy. 

Her message, as expected, 
gave no hint of the timing of 
the next election but was 
strongly electoral in tone. 

Even more so was the new 
year message issued last night 
by Mr Nei! Kinnock. the 
Labour leader, as he described 
1987 as a year of opportunity 
for Labour. 

Mrs Thatcher said that the 
Conservatives had given new 
freedoms, new rights and new : 
responsibilities to union 
members, council tenants, 
employees in state-owned in- 
dustries and millions more, 
and Britain today was more 
truly democratic titan it ever 
was under socialism. 

But the Prime Minister said 
“Although we may have 
beaten back socialism we have 
not yet overcome it. 

“There are some 'tin-pot 
socialist republics* in local 
government where you can see 
today’s Labour Party in ac- 
tion: action which involves 
intimidation, harassment and 
anti-police activity, action 
which is alien to our true 
British character.” 

She launched another on- 
slaught against Labour’s de- 
fence policy. Nuclear defences 
have kept the peace in Europe 
for more than four decades. 
“To discard those defences, as 
Labour proposes, would be a 
monumental act of folly. It 
would put the Western alli- 
ance and peace itself at risk.” 

She restated the 
Government's commitment 
to abolishing the rating system 
m England and Wales “as 


pf Nort^ro n ^ami c goal- | SSfBTJS JS 

keeper, and MBEs for Sandy 


Lyle, the former British Open 
golf champion and Helen 
Troke . the badminton player. 

Three Conservative MPs 
are knighted: Mr Barney 
Hayhoe, who lost his post as 

Honours lists 4,5 


legislation and said that the 
“dismal defeatism” of the 
1970s had been replaced by 
Continued on page 16, col 2 


Moscow 
rejects 
new year 
message 

From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

Relations between the two 
superpowers ended 1986 on a 
sour note when the Kremlin 
announced yesterday that Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov had re- 
jected an invitation from 
President Reagan to exchange 
televised new year messages, 
as they did for the first time 
last January 1. 

The Kremlin's flat refusal to 
have any part in the inter- 
national goodwill exercise sur- 
prised Western diplomats 
here. Some saw it as a sign that 
Mr Gorbachov may now be- 
gin adopting a tougher nego- 
tiating stance in the face of the 
recent rejection of a number of 
bis disarmament initiatives. 

The absence of new year 
greetings from the two leaders 
will make a bleak contrast 

Hope amid gloom 12 

with last New Year's Day, 
when the historic messages 
were well received bv ordinary 
citizens in both capitals. 

Explaining the rejection of 
Washington's invitation, Mr 
Gennady Gerasimov, the 
chief Kremlin spokesman, 
said testily in answer to a 
question from an American 
correspondent: “Why should 
we create any illusions about 
our relations? 

“Despite good statements 
by the US side, including the 
one saying that in 1986 we 
have allegedly drawn closer on 
many issues, we nevertheless 
see no reason for an optimistic 
tone” he said. 

• WASHINGTON:The Un- 
ited States said it was dis- 
appointed by Moscow's 
rejection (Michael Binyon 
writes). 

The Administration has 
been campaigning hard for 
greater direct access to Soviet 
television. 

Meanwhile, a development 
that in the long run may be 
more important is still to go 
ahead. US and Soviet officials 
have agreed to broadcast a 
series of joint television pro- 
grammes by satellite that will ' 
depict the political- and cul- 
tural life of both countries. 
The first broadcast, a debate 
between policy-makers of the 
two countries, is scheduled for 
March. 


Lord Stockton tribute 


Sir Woodrow Wyatt, news- 
paper columnist, former La- 
bour MP and chairman of the 
Horserace Toralisator Board 
(the Tote) since J 976, is one of 
two new life peers created in 
today’s list. 

The other is Field Marshal 
Sir Edwin Brain all Chief of 
the Defence Staff from 1982 to 
1985 and the present Lord 
Lieutenant of Greater 
London. 

Many prominent figures 
from the world of the arts are 
honoured. Iris Murdoch, the 
novelist, is made a DBE; Peter 
Maxwell Davies, the com- 
poser, is knighted, and Alan 




Minister for Health in last 
September’s reshuffle, Mr 
Alex Fletcher, a former trade 
and inustiy minister who has 
served recently as chairman of 
the Commons Select Com- 
mittee examining the Channel 
Tunnel Bill, and Mr Carol 
Mather, the long-serving for- 
mer government whip. 

Eye-catching awards to 
prominent figures in the arts, 
entertainment and sport 
worlds have been a regular 
feature of the honours lists 
since Mrs Thatcher came to 
power in 1979. But she more 
than many other prime min- 
isters has used the twice-yrarly 
distribution to recognize 
political service. 

Today's list is no exception. 
The three new backbench 
knights swell to 65 the total of 
Tory MPs who have received 

Continued on page 16, col 1 


Mrs Margaret Thatcher last 
night described Lord Stockton 
as “a very remarkable man 
and a very great patriot” as 
tributes to the former Prime 
Minister poured in from poli- 
ticians, academics and imer- 


Commons to offer his full 
support, and bad advised her 
to set up an emergency com- 
mittee of no more than five. 

Mrs Thatcher said his dis- 
like of “selling the family 
silver” had never come be- 


national leaders (Martin Flet- 

cher writes t twecn them * He Unique 

In a personal tribute from " ?f..? ffecl, ° a British 


the steps of 10 Downing 
Street, the Prime Minister said 


people”. 

A private funeral for Lord 


that on the weekend of the Stockton, who was aged 92, 
Falklands invasion. Lord will be held next Monday. 
Stockton bad visited her at the Tributes; page 2 


Stockton bad visited her at the 

Zambians ° 
to release | 
Londoner 


Tomorrow 

• The Times will be 
the only quality 
newspaper to publish 
tomorrow. To mark 
this special New 
Year’s Day edition: 



Looking 

back... 

• Sir Geoffrey Howe, 
interviewed by David 
Watt, on Britain’s 
changing role on the 
world stage. 

• Is the campaign to 
slow the spread of 
Aids working? An 
exclusive 
Times/MORl poll 
reveals surprising, 
sometimes shocking, 
answers. 

Looking 

forward... 



• Miles Kington offers 
some offbeat 
predictions in his 
Almanac of 1987 

• From Nero’s birth to 
Chamberlain’s death 
— the Anniversaries of 
the Year 


Looking 

good... 



o The Times profile of 
Paula Yates, once 
dubbed the Princess 
of Punk 

6 Whither football: a 
major four-part series 
by the game's 
administrators 

• To be sure of ail 
this, plus our usual 
coverage of news and 
sport including the 



in rcrui wnra uiey oeai west ,h e over at siacKsteaos, out | icrry junta, aecu uve, -ca- i Actors Paul Eddington ami Nigel Hawthorne, who 
Indies by 34 runs Page 28 was swept away. I raped unhurt. J CBEs in the NewYear Honours. 

Sl a S er ra ^f s or Dial a debate at Commons — for 38p a minute 

RI.-irL-hlll-n Ik. Mn.n » 


By Nicholas Beeston 

Zambian authorities will 
release a Briton and an 
Australian today, nearly three 
weeks after they were detained 
and accused of planting 
bombs in a southern town 
near the Zimbabwean border. 

Mr Christopher Bennett, 
aged 27, from London, and 
Mr Graham Crowther, aged 
24, from Tasmania, have bran 
held in Lusaka since Decem- 
ber 13. 

A third detainee carrying a 
New Zealand passport is not 
expected to be released. 

A spokesman for the British 
High Commission in Lusaka 
said yesterday: “Mr Bennett 
will be released on Wednesday 
and driven straight to the 
airport where he will lake the 
flight to Harare.” 
Mngabe-Kaunda talks, page 6 


Blackburn Rovers, the strug- 
gling second division club, has 
bran dismissed Page 28 

Back in favour 

Paul Moriarty. the Swansea 
Rugby Union forward omit- 
ted from the Welsh trial after 
being suspended by his club 
lor punching an opponent, has 
beep invited to rejoin the 
national squad Page 28 


Ho®* News £3 Featms 8-12 
OverwK 6.7 Honours AS 


A PINs 14 

Arts id 

Births, deaths. 
Manages JS 

Basraess 17-21 

Chess 2 


14 Law Report 
10 Leaders 

Iks, Letters 

15 OWtoary 
17-23 Science 


Chess 2 Snow Reports 26 

Court 14 Sport 23-2W8 

Crosswords 9J6 Theatre* etc 10 

Diary 12 TV & Radio 27 

E*eats |6 Weather 16 


By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 

From the people who 
brought you the Speaking 
Clock,- Buzby, and recorded 
cricket scores, there may soon 
be a new service — Dial-a- 
Debate live from the 
Commons. 

For-38p per minute, or 2Sp 
after 6pm. anyone would be 
able to ring in and hear MPs 

sounding off. 

Fifteen minutes of solid 
abuse during Prime Minister's 
Question Time would cost a 
mere £5.70. and British 
Telecom expects such demand 
that recordings of that twice- 
weekly event would be avail- 
able to subscribers for the rest 
of the day. 

Unveiling the proposed ser- 


of its kind in the world, MPs ", ■ 

yesterday invoked visions of u* » wnT 

President Reagan and Mr * S 

Gorbachov listening from 1,1 . 

their offices to Sir Geoffrey h|A^ r '' i 
Howe pronouncing on / Jk I ca* SlbUSB 
developments in British for- fowL 1 
eign policy. vlffw > w 

As revealed in The Times -7 J i; i<p 

last month. Sir Philip Vf H*** 1 

Good hart, chairman of the J 0 ■. 

Commons sound broadcast- ' / y 

ing committee, has been se- ( 1 

cretly discussing the feasibility 1 /v 

of such a service with British j / 

Telecom for a number of < J 

months. F ' 

Agreement has been 
reached, and shortly before j ^ 1 

Christmas Sir Philip wrote to • LZzL-l 
MFJohn Biffen. Leader of the 
House, outlining Bic pro- 

posals and arguing their merit , to be agreed on the floor of the 
Before such a service could' House, but Sir Philip believes 


the narrow defeat ofproposals 
to televise the Commons 
would not apply. 

There would be no cost to 
the public. Indeed, if BT 
eventually makes a profit it 
would be expected to share the 
revenue with the Commons. 
Nor. as it would be a continu- 
ous live service, would there 
be any danger of the editorial 
control which has led radio 
broadcasts to concentrate on 
■'our more uproarious 
moments'. 

“It would be difficult to 
object to it,” Sir Philip said. In 
theory the House had already 
given tnc public the right to 
listen in at will by allowing 
radio broadcasts. 

He sees Dial-a-Debaie as 
providing an invaluable ser- 
vice to embassies, provincial 


unions, the City and other 
specialist interests for whom it 
is often impossible to attend 
the Commons in- person but 
none the less' vital to know 
quickly what has happened. 

GEC employees could have 
listened to the Nimrod debate. 
The financial world could 
have tuned in to the 
Chancellor's autumn state- 
ment — “arguably the second 
most important statement of ! 
the year” which BBC radio j 
failed to broadcast live. j 

If agreed to, Dial-a-Debatc j 
could be introduced on a trial 
basis next summer. If success- 
ful. it could be extended to 
coter select and standing 
committees, the House of 
Lords, the European Par- 
liament. even local council 


EXPERIENCE 
THE ULTIMATE 
THIS WINTER 

If you are taking a Winter holiday in 
one of Europe’s premiere resorts this 
season, go one better and experience 
the ultimate with the Venice Simplon- 
Orient-Express. 

With the restoration of this great 
train you can now travel in superb style 
across Europe. 

St Moritz, Davos, Klosters and St 
Anton are just some of the excellent 
resorts featured in our inclusive 
holidays brochure available at your 
travel agent now. 

Complete the coupon or ring for a 
brochure direct on 01-928 6000. 


M VENICE fts. 

z^JsimplonL^ 

ORIENT-EXPRESS 

¥ss mttr 


The World's 

Most Romantic Adventure 

{‘WoM ■■‘ tld Kt ii i r.-fiy • r tltr Oiwwf-Ex/r.'Si M inter htvt bare 

\rniet* Simplon-Orii nl-Expres!- Lid 
PO Box Kf». Abingdon. Oxnn OX14 ::RF. 


NAME 

AUDREYS. 


POSTCOFiF 

Y- iik a - Lid 

»ICH ■ INNSBRUCK - VENICE 


J" 




HOME NEWS 


tttf TMS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986_ 


NEWS SUMMARY 


Willis predicts 
a ‘dodgy’ year 

Mr Norman WOlis, General Secretary of tbe TUG has 
pledged support of the iouobs in reviving flic country's eco- 
Bonuc fortunes in 15)87, provided tbe GorennnM and 
employers play their part. 

Tbe offer came in his sew year message in which be said 
that “despite the open would of Wapping”, the trade 
Bupns were in good shape and good heart and ready to do 
their best 

He said the new year ms likely to be “dodgy”, with bal- 
ance of payments, intolerable stress on social sum) health 
services, all problems that complacency would make 
worse. 

ted 1987 Public Services 
could mute the British 

Parrots’ 
nest egg 

Mr Jim Dyer, a Conner 
executive with British 
Petroleum from Stow-on- 
the-WoU, Gloucestershire, 
has left £2,000 in his will to 
a pair of African grey 
parrots. 

“It’s enough to keep them 
in birdseed for at least 100 
years,” Mr Chris Mc- 
Cormack, Mr Dyer’s 
nephew, said. 

The parrots, EBa and 
Tank, named after tbe 
Idols of jazz enthusiast Mr 
Dyer — Ella Fitzgerald 
and Louis Armstrong — 
are to be kept at a bird 
sanctuary in Farnham, 
Surrey. 

Irish island for sale 

Great Blasket, off Co Kerry on the sooth-west coast of 
Ireland, where literature in the Irish hmgnage once 
flemished, is being offered for sale for $1 million (about 
£689,000) by Mr Taylor Codings, its American owner. 

The island, three miles by half a mileydiew scholars from 
throughout the world in the hatf-centmy before its small 
community left in 1957. 

A frad-raising group 1ms been set up to try to buy the is- 
iaiid for the nation, and yesterday Mr Dick Spring, tbe dep- 
uty prime minister, said it was imperative that the island be 
preserved in Irish hands. He said it should be des ig na ted a 
national heritage area, thas re quiring the owner to offer it 
first to the government. 

Norman 
conquest 

Barry Norman, pre- 
senter of BBC Tderishm’s 
Film 86 has been elected 
Pipeman of the Year by the 
Pipesmokers’ Council. 

Mr Norman (right), aged 
51, has smoked pipes since 
he was 18 and relies on his 
briars when writing scripts. 

"Pipes are a great aid to 
concentration. I love die 
smell of tobacco and the 
rituals of pipesmoking — 
sheer Miss,” he said. 

A confessed, tobacco ad- 
dict, he has lately cut back 
on cigarettes in favour of 
pipes. His coflection in- 
dudes a meerschamn and a 

p wwhfll. 

Heart woman moves 


said the TUC had „ 
Year, as the one big issue 
people. 

Thatcher 
tops poll 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher' 
and Mr Terry Waite, the 
Archbishop of Canter- 
bury’s envoy, were dear 
winners of this year's BBC 
Radio Four “woman and 
man of the year” polls. 

The Prime Minister came 
second last year after being 
top the previons four years. 

This year, the Duchess 
of York came second, with 
Princess Anne tfamL 

In the men’s poll, Mr 
Ne3 Kimmek, the Labour 
leader, was second, Mr 
Norman Tebbit, the Con- 
servative Party c h a i rman, 
third, and the Prince of 
Wales was fourth. 



Mrs Davma Thompson, the world's first triple 
transplant patient, has made such good progress that 
yesterday she was moved om of the intensive care unit at 
Papworth Hospital, Cambridgeshire. 

Mrs Thompson, aged 35, of South Yorkshire, was 
transferred to a general surgical ward, where she can talk 
with other patients. 

A hospital spokesman said doctors were very happy with 
her progress since she received her new heart, tangs and 
liver two weeks ago. 


Local master 
settles for 
a chess draw 


Correspondent 

Two of the three adjourned 
games from round one of the 
Foreign and Colonial Hastings 
Grandmaster Chess tour- 
nament were completed yes- 
terday. 

Stuart Conquest the local 
master, found his slight 
advantage against last year's 
winner. Petursson. in- 
sufficient to force a win and a 
draw was agreed at move 44. 

Peter Large, last year's win- 
ner of the Challengers’ Tour- 
nament, was able to make his 
advantage tell against the 
Soviet Grandmaster Gufeld 
and he won an excellently 
played ending at move 59. 

The other outstanding game 
between the world women's 
champion, Maya 

Chiburdanidze, and the Dan- 
ish Grandmaster, Bent 
Larsen, was again adjourned 
after 60 moves. 

In other games on Monday, 
when the tournament opened, 
Hodgson gained some attack 
against Lputian in a lively 
struggle but the players agreed 
a draw at move 26. 

Plaskett and Chandler in- 
dulged in a complex struggle 
but Chandler forced Ptaskett’s 
resignation at move 39. 

Speelman and Kudrin 
agreed to a draw at move 29. 

Mestel and Adoijan agreed 
an uninspiring draw after only 
12 moves. 

Results: J Speelman (Eng- 
land) drew with S Kudrin (US), 
Queen's Indian Defence; Dr J 
Mcstcl (England) drew with A 
Adorjan (Hungary). Sicilian De- 
fence; j Hodgson (England) 
drew with S Lputian (TJSSR). 
Trompowski Variation; J 
Naskeu (England) lost to M 
Chandler (England), Queen's 
Indian Defence: M Petursson 
(Iceland) adjourned game with S 
Conquest (Hastings). Grunfeld 
Defence: E Gufeld (USSR) ad- 
journed game with P Large 
(England). Ruy Lopez: M 
jrdamdze (USSR) ad- 


Airline offers 
500 part-time 
cabin jobs 

British Airways is advertis- 
ing for about 500 extra part- 
time and temporary cabin 
staff as part of a recruitment 
campaign. 

It hopes to lake on the 
stewards and stewardesses at 
its bases in London, Manches- 
ter, Glasgow and Birmingham 
in the next few months. 

It is intended that the new 
crew will work between 10 and 
20 days a month on a mutu- 
ally agreed basis. 

“it is ideal for people who 
already have another job and 
want a chance to work part- 
time. 

“Our existing ‘support' 
cabin crew have jobs such as 
nurses or secretaries,” British 
Airways said yesterday. 

Temporary staff are bong 
recruited alongside the part- 
time support crew and will 
work for six months during 
next year’s busy summer holi- 
day season. 

British Airways introduced 
the concept of part-time sup- 
port staff more than a year ago 

It says it has been popular 
with management and the 
staff involved. 


‘Bri tain has lost one of its finest statesmen 


Country pays tribute to Stockton 


Politicians of all parties 
continued to pay tribute yes- 
terday to Lord Stockton, tbe 
former Prime Minister, Mr 
Harold Macmillan. They de- 
scribed him as “Father of the 
Nation” and “one of Britain’s 
finest statesmen". 

It was also announced that 
Lord Stockton, who died on 
Monday evening, is to be 
buried next Monday after a 
private funeral at noon. A 
memorial service will be ar- 
ranged for a later date, prob- 
ably in Westminster Abtey. 

Lord Stockton is to be 
buried in the family plot at the 
church of St Giles in Horsted 
Keynes, West Sussex, not for 
from his home at Birch Grove 
House, Chelwood Gate, near 
Haywards Heath. He will lie 
alongside his wife. Lady Doro- 
thy, who died in 1966. 

Lord Stockton's heir and 
grandson. Lord Macmillan of 
Ovenden, said last night that 
his family had been “touched 
and moved” by tbe many 
tributes from friends, royalty 
and aO parts of the polnkaal 
spectrum. 

“So many people have rung 
up or sent massages to say how 
sorry they are - and particu- 
larly the message from the 
Queen - we have been very 
moved.” 

Among those who paid 
tribute to Lord Stockton yes- 
terday were four former Prime 
Ministers: Lord Home of the 
Hirsel bis successor. Lord 
Wilson of Rievauix, Mr James 
Callaghan and Mr Edward 
Heath. 

Lord Home remembered 
particularly Lord Stockton’s 
“almost paternal relation- 
ship” with Mr John Kennedy, 
the American President, with 
whom he got on “like a house 
of fire”. That had fostered 
Anglo-American relationships 
at an important time and they 
had remained strong ever 
since. 

Lord Wilson recalled his 
“classical” debates with Lord 
Stockton when they were 
shadow Chancellor and Chan- 
cellor respectively. “Wien he 
and I were debating some 
financial question the House 
would be absolutely packed. 
But after the vote, when the 
Conservatives had won with a 
big majority, be and 1 would 
often be seen having a quiet 
drink and smoke together. 

“The debates were always 
lively, despite it being a dull 
subject. But there was no 
feeling of hatred or animosity 
between us.” On one occasion 
Lord Stockton had passed a 
note across, the chamber 
congratulating him on a de- 
bate add saying how much he 
had enjoyed it “He was great 
fun. but absolutely dead 
serious,” Lord Wilson said. 

Mr Callaghan claimed that 



Mr Adam Macmillan, Lord Stockton’s grandson and brother of the heir to the title, at Birch 
Grove House yesterday; and the plaque on the family plot at St G3es dnnch, Horsted 
Keynes, where Lord Stockton is to be buried privately on Monday (Photographs: Nkk 
Rogers). 



Lord Stockton’s Fust World 
War experiences had shaped 
his political outlook. “There 
was a certain comradeship in 
the trenches which had a 
lasting effect and led him to be 
deeply and genuinely con- 
cerned throughout his whole 
life with social matters and 


particularly unemployment” 
In a~ further tribute, Mr 
Healb, who had been Lord 
Stocpion’sdief Whip, point- 
edly praised his intolerance of 
dogma. “If we fried to use that 
approach over a problem is 
the House then he promptly 
killed it dead. He was delight- 


ful to work for because he was 
always so stimulating.” 

Lord Hailsham of St 
Maryiebone, the Lord Chan- 
cellor, who has served under 
every Prime Minister since the 
war, described Lord Stockton 
as “one of tbe most skilful, 
and perhaps the most skilful. 


He was a real professional 

His greatest achievement 
had been to reunite me 
Conservative Party, and to 
some extent the country, after 
the Suez crisis. He was a truly 
“Christian” man and his lire 
had been “rather glorious”. 

Mr David Steel the Liberal 
leader, said Lord Stocktons 
death marked the end of an 
era. “He will be remembered 
for the great style and flair he 

brought to the office of Prime 

Minister. 

“His genuine, personal con- 
cern for the housing of people 
at home, and the granting of 
freedom to the peoples of 
Africa. wiH be his lasting 
memorial as will his more 
recent speeches as Earl of 
Stockton. 

“In these be acted as Father 
Of the Nation in drawing 
attention to die unemployed. 
His was a glorious career.” 

Mr Peter Walker, the Cabi- 
net member most in tune with 
Lord Stockton’s political 
philosophy, said that Britain 
had lost “one of its finest 
statesmen". 

Determined to eradicate the 
misery and poverty of the 
1930s depression, 20 years 
later he had put into practice 
the policies he had preached as 
a backbencher and given the 
nati on a period of un- 
paralleled prosperity. 

He was “a man well-read, 
deep thinking , humorous and 
kind, whose ideas and 
thou ghts should influence ns 
aB in the next century”. 

An unexpected tribute came 
from Mr Oliver Tam bo, presi- 
dent of the outlawed African 
National Congress, who in a 
letter, to Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher described Lord 
Stockton as a “distinguished 
statesman”. 

He continued: “As South 
Africans we shall always 
remember him for his efforts 
to encourage the apartheid 
regime to bow to the winds of 
rhany that continue to blow 
in South Africa. 

Further tributes came from 
Oxford University, of which 
Lord Stockton had been chan- 
cellor since 1960. 

Sir Patrick Neill QC, the 
vice-chancellor, recalled how 
“his eloquence, wit and charm 
continued to delight his audi- 
ences, even in his last public 
appearances in the summer of 
1986”. 

Sir Patrick spoke particu- 
larly of how he enjoyed die 
company of tbe young. “He 
would talk late into the night 
with eager groups of students 
who were often startled by the 
radical views he put forward, 
well into his last decade. 

“It was dear that he loved 
and valued die university and 
it loved and valued him in 
return. 


Fireman 
killed in 
terrorist 
attack 

part-time firemen were 
shocked yesterday when they 
discovered they had removed 
the body of a colleague from 
an Ulster public house at- 
tacked by terrorists. 

Another part-time fireman 
was injured in the bomb blast 
after an attempted armed 

robbery. , 

Mr Liam McShane. aged 24, 
and Mr Christopher Glass had 
both been missing on the lam 
call-out at Magbera. Co 
Londonderry. 

They had been clearing up 
after dosing time at the Cen- 
tral Bar in the main street, 
where Mr Glass was a co- 
owner and Mr McShane 
helped out occasionally. 

Three or four men knocked 
at the locked front door, asked 
to buy beer and produced 
pistols once inside. 

They ushered Mr Glass to 
the sale and knocked him 
unconscious with a pistol bun 
when they found it was empLy. 
As they fled they planted a 
bomb, which exploded mo- 
ments later. 

Mr McShane died instantly 
and Mr Glass suffered facial 
and aim burns, but his con-’ 
dition is not serious. 

The explosion started a 
fierce fire. It destroyed the 
public house, but was was 
prevented from reach jag 
neighbouring houses, which 
were evacuated . for some 
hours. 

The injured man and Mr 
McShane’s body were both 
taken to the Mid-Ulster Hos- 
pital, where the dead man’s 
wife was on night duty as a 
nurse. The ample had a one- 

year-old daughter. 

Mr McShane was the 62od 
person to die in terrorist- 
violence in Northern Ireland 
this year, but the Provisional . 
IRA denied that any of its 
units were involved in the 
attack. It blamed “loyalists". * 

Mr Jim McGuigan, the. 
leader of the Maghera fire- 
men, said Mr McShane was “a 
very lively lad, very jolly and 
popular who will be sadly 
missed in the town” 

They had feared the worst 
when the two men had not 
arrived for the call-oat and 
when they heard that one man 
was trapped. 


HMS Challenger controversy 

Ship ‘outdated when built’ 


The Royal Navy’s new div- 
ing support ship, HMS Chal- 
lenger, which is undergoing a 
multi-million pound refit less 
than two years after it entered 
active service, was up to 10 
years out of date when h was 
completed, it was claimed 
yesterday. 

Mr Alex Ogle, general man- 
ager of Humber Ship Repair- 
ers, which is carrying out 
much of the repair work on 
the troubled vessel said that 
the specialist diving equip- 
ment which is central to its 
role was designed too far in 
advance of construction. 

His comments are sure to 
cause further embarrassment 
for the Ministry of Defence, 
which yesterday conceded that 
£148 million has been spent 
on repairs and improvements 
to HMS Challenger. 

These have led to a massive 
escalation of the £7 1 .5 million 
she was supposed to cost when 
approved in 1978. Taking 
inflation into account, the 
total amount spent on the 
vesseL which entered service 
in 1984. is just under 
£170 million. 

Mr Ogle declined to com- 
ment on reports that HMS 
Challenger was regarded as a 
defence procurement disaster 
by senior naval personnel but 
said: “A lot of it you could put 
down to the feci that the 
design went on too long before 
the ship was actually built 
Standards change and the 
design of the diving system 
was ten years out of date by 


By GuyKer 

the time she was ready to go to 
sea. 

“Diving support systems 
are moving very fast because 
of the development triggered 
by North Sea oil exploration. 
But the feet that it is a Naval 
vessel makes the work that 
much more complicated, and 
compared to commercial ves- 
sels, which are built on much 
shorter time scales, it was out 
of date.” 

The latest work, which 
started in April, involves tbe 
replacement of the vessel's 
high-technology Saturation 


Diving System, which allows 
divers to operate at depths of 
up to 1000 ft for days at a 
time. The work also involves 
some routine maintenance. 

The latest refit comes after a 
catalogue of flaws that started 
with wiring problems when 
the ship was under construc- 
tion, which delayed the 
completion date. 

The 7,000 ton ship was on 
the drawing board for two 
years before work began at the 
Scott-Uthgow yard on the 
Clyde in 1979. 


Union dismisses plan 
for ‘merchant reserve’ 


By A Staff Reporter 

Government proposals for a 
Merchant Navy Reserve have 
been dismissed as “unwork- 
able” by Mr Sam McGuslrie, 

General Secretary of the Na- 
tional Union of Seamen, in a 
new year message to his 
members. 

Mr John Moore, Secretary 
of State for Transport, an- 
nounced the plan to the 
Commons on December 10. 
when he said the merchant 
reserve would be called on in 
time of war to man British- 
owned ships under foreign 
flags. 

Mr McCIuskie. calling the 
proposal tbe creation of a 
“Dad’s Navy”, said the re- 
serve would be manned by ill- 


trained and inexperienced ex- 
seafarers. 

He said that while he was 
not opposed in principle to a 
Merchant Navy reserve, tbe 
plan as proposed would be 
unworkable. Tbe Government 
had also to be committed to 
preserving a reasonable-sized 
core fleet of merchant ships 

Mr McCIuskie said: “A pool 
of skilled and experienced 
seafarers cannot be main- 
tained if the fleet fells to 100 
ships, as the General Council 
of British Shipping is predict- 
ing will happen by the mid- 
1 990s unless the Government 
provides the right commercial 
conditions.” 

Letters, page 13 


Science report 


Prostitute study backs advice on Aids 


By Peter Brock 

Hie km prevalence of sex- 
ually transmitted disease in a 
group of female prostitutes 
investigated by Danish phy- 
sicians is, they believe, partly 
explained by the widespread 
ase of condoms, a finding of 
particular relevance to the 
safer sex campaign in Britain 
intended to curb the spread of 
Aids (acquired immune de- 
ficiency syndrome). 

Dr Kim Kogggaaril and his 
colleagues' at Hvidovre Hos- 
pital University of Copen- 
hagen, and at the State Swum 
Institute, conducted a study 
that was an extension of work 
in tbe spread of hepatitis B. 


its high incidence among male 
homosexuals, had not spread 
to the general population, the 
Aids epidemic was not re- 
stricted by the same bound- 
aries of sexual orientation. 

After male homosexuals 
and intravenoBS drug abusers, 
prostitutes form a group at 
high risk, according to evi- 
dence of a high prevalence of 
antibodies to the human 
immunodeficiency virus, HIV, 
found among female pros- 
titutes in Central and East 
Africa. 

Tbe prostitutes in the Dan- 
ish research were found 
through their advertisements 
in Copenhagen newspapers 


tually, 201 non-drag addicts 
were recruited to the study. 

All but two were white and 
they were aged from 19 to 60, 
with an average age of 28. 
They had been pr o stitute s for 
a month to 26 years (average 
two years); 26 worked as 
escorts and 75 worked in 
massage parlours. 

Their blood was examined 
for markers of sexually 
transmitted disease and they 
gave details of previous dis- 
ease and sexual behaviour, 

A quarter of the women 
suspected that 20 per cent of 
their clients were homosexual 
or bisexual and 37 occa- 
sionally had clients from the 
United States, Africa or the 


Apart from the low preva- 
lence of more common sex- 
ually transmitted disease, 
there was no evidence of the 
Aids virus in the women, 
which accords with recent 
preliminary observations 
among condom users from 
England, France and Italy. 

Although that is partly ex- 
plained by the widespread use 
of condoms, an important 
social factor emerged among 
the Copenhagen group. “Ev- 
idently, men visiting pros- 
titutes are often middle-aged 
and may have only Jew extra- 
marital relations,” tbe re- 
search team says. 

Source: The British Medical 
Journal ; Vol 293, No 6560, 



Cinderella 
f seat for 
Alliance 

By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reported 

The Liberate and the SDP, 
who put up opposing can- 
didates in a couple of bitterly 
disputed seats at the last 
election, now have the novel 
problem of a constituency 
where neither party wants to 
stand. 

Ogmore, in the Welsh val- 
leys. is one of Labour's safest 
seats — no other party has 
come dose to winning it for 
decades and Mr Ray Powell, 
the sitting MF, has a majority 
of more than 17,000. " 

The local liberal party is in 
such disarray that even its 
nominal chairman, Mr Philip 
Loomes, is unsure whether it 
is still recognized by the 
national party. Regular meet- 
ings are no longer held; it does 
not appear in the Welsh 
Liberal Party's directory, and 
at the last general election a 
candidate was found only at 
the eleventh hour. 

For tbe next election, the 
constituency has again been 
allocated to the Liberals, but 
this time no candidate has 
been forthcoming. Nationally 
the division of seats was tilting 
rather too fer in the Liberals 
favour, so last month SDP 
headquarters wrote to the 
Bridgend and Ogmore SDP 
area party informing it that 
the SDP should fight the seat. 

But Mr Russell Smart, the 
SDP parliamentary candidate 
for the neighbouring constit- 
uency of Bridgend wants noth- 
ing to do with it 

Mr Smart and his colleagues 
do not want precious re- 
sources diverted, as Bridgend 
is considered the fifteenth 
most marginal seat in Britain. 
Mr Peter Hubbard-Miles, tbe 
Conservative MP, has a 
majority of just 1,327. 

It is understood that the 
local SDP party has now 
agreed to fight the seat, but 
only on condition that all the 
election expenses are borne by 
the national party. 

Mr Loomes was rather up- 
set by the affair last night, 
claiming that the Liberals 
would have liked to fight the 
seat 

Mr Smart claimed that it 
was necetsary to fece political 
realities. It would be best to 
concentrate on the winnable 
seats and. not on a “lost cause” 
like Oumore; he said. 


Desire for 
farm home 
aids prices 

By John Young 
Agriculture Correspondent 

The demand by wealthy 
townsfolk for period farm- 
houses in the CutswoUs and 
other fashionable areas has 
cushioned the effect of the 


according tea leading firm 
land agents. 

Mr Richard law, managing 
partner of Bruton Knowles and 
Co, of Gloucester, says that in 
spite tf n general fall of some 
20 per cent in land vntaes 
during foe Inst year, selling 


and 
counties have 
misleadingly 


parts of 
neighbouring 
remained * 
high” 

The average price for land 
sold with a farmhouse is about 
21,500 an acre. Had knot been 

for this residential influence, 
foe price would be down to 
about £1,200. 

But despite the attraction of 
“Royal” Gloucestershire, 
where bath the Prince of 
Wales and Princess Anne 
have made their homes, and 
foe influx of foenew rich into a 
corridor that roughly follows 
foe line of dm M4 motorway 
between Windsor and Bratol 
foe present recession in farm- 
ing is still malting itself fait 

In 1983 Mr Law was achiev- 
ing average retmms of 22£42 
an acre on behalf of dietos. 
However, although foe av- 
erage has nearly halved, small 
parcels of tend are stifl 
co mm an ding h%h prices wd 
many farms are selling readfly 
through private treaty. 


Unionists’ 

£90,000 

protest 

Unionist members of Bel- 
fast City Council have voted 
to spend £90,000 of 
ratepayers’ money on an 
intensified campaign of opp- 
osition to the Anglo-Irish 
agreement 

They ignored a written 
warning from the town cleric 
that their proposed action was 
“not n ecessarily lawful” and 
could mean their being sur- 
charged personally. 

The decision, reached by a 
vote of 23 to 18 after an hour’s 
debate on Monday night, is 
virtually certain to be chal- 
lenged in the courts by other 
political parties and possibly 
by individual ratepayers. 

The likelihood of further 
legal action arises only two 
weeks before the Alliance 
Party is due to bring the 
Belfast council to court again 
after attempts by the control- 
ling “loyalist” members to 
frustrate an earlier high court 
order that the council should 
resume normal business. 

The nationalist Social 
Democratic and Labour Party 
yesterday called on Mr Rich- 
ard Needham, the Northern 
Ireland Office minister 
responsible for local gov- 
ernment “to lake his bead out 
from under the sand where be 
has been hiding it for months, 
ever since tbe loyalist protests 
started, and do something 1 
save local government here' 

Mr Eddie McGrady, tl 
SDLP Chief Whip and loc. 
government spokesman 
added: “He should not fc 
leaving it to the Alliance Par: 
or to private citizens to do 
for him” 

Tbe £90,000 which the 
council voted represented a 
quarter-penny rate to be spent 
on meetings, rallies and 
advertisements and grant aid 
to other bodies. 

The first such spending 
could come tomorrow night. 
Tbe resolution instructed Mr 
Cecil Ward, the town clerk, to 
organize bonfires across the 
city on January I, to be lit by 
tbe Lord Mayor or by local 
loyalist MPs to signify the 
city’s resistance to the 
Hillsborough Accord. 


Tunnel publicity drive 

By Rodney Cowton, Transport Correspondent 


Eurotunnel the Anglo- 
French company which is 
promoting the Channel tun- 
nel, is to launch a programme 
of advertising, exhibitions and 
seminars during the next few 
months to publicize the bene- 
fits it believes the tunnel will 
bring 

The company said there was 
“an enormous amount of 
ignorance” about the project, 
with people not knowing 
whether a tunnel or a bridge 
was to be built 

Among the possibilities be- 
ing considered by the com- 
pany is the use of a special 
train to tour the country with 
disolav material. 


There may also be regional 
seminars for businessmen, at 
which they could give their 
views on what impact they 
thought the tunnel planned to 
open in 1993, would have. 

One of the main purposes of' 
this approach would be to try 
to stimulate the use of tbe- 
lunnel for carrying rail freight. 

At present a much higher 
proportion of freight is carried 
by road in Britain than in 
France, and it is hoped that 
the long hauls which will be. 
possible through the tunnel to 
continental destinations will 
stimulate a big increase in the' 
use of rail by British industry. 




I « 

i ter f(iri 

!*S& 

■ s'^ P >C 

1 a C r ‘ m 2?* gj 

, V ■ ; r,0l ^r 

• r v >.r*&- 

“Nff* 

-;-:;*nj. ^ 

-■ - '•• ‘■•■■d t>w . 

V1 ,n th e jJUfe 

.. Mr Gi^n, 

- - V, 

• -'-2 on: a *r ii* 




"■ 

--4^ 

;|jSH 


- - «,. 




•' iiT 

'■ r-:J! ^ 

-■--.* fj* ■>. 


r- .- v '^ <1 

■ \ - ...= n ou^ 
for ' 

• :-^-tf35r 

-‘ j :■ -'--.we lad [ 

• . ‘- - -“i lij., 

a Hr 

". _ -nhfmfc 

. ' Je Pwe 
l - ,; t am f 
• f 

~ 'i..* 

• ‘s-Uaja 

' .■“ r*3e< 

. - - ";^ak\ 

.' ' -- '■•^•iofc 
'- -ills. 


.r?OA 


, .;,. dri' :| 

> : .ii j m u* 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Couple take 
RSPCA to 

court over 
noisy dogs 






ft .;.j» 

— .jfc, 







A couple who are taking the 
RSPCA to court after years of 
being disturbed by barking 
dogs have won much praise 
from pressure groups dedi- 
cated to the reduction of 
environmental noise. 

The action being taken by 
Mr and Mrs Cedric and 
Muriel Wills, of Preston 
Street, Exeter, in seeking to 
have a noise abatement order 
served on the RSPCA kennels 
near their flat is nothing short 
of courageous, according to 
Mr John Connell, chairman of 
the Noise Abatement Society. 

The couple say they have 
been forced to go to court after 
being driven “practically 
insane'* by the noise from up 
to 20 dogs nine hours a day. 

Mr Connell said the consid- 
erable financial resources of 
the RSPCA meant it was able 
to mount appeals against ad- 
verse decisions and so buy 
iiselfa measure ofkgaJ protec- 
tion few individuals were 
willing to take on. 

He said: "You have to be 
very brave to sue the RSPCA. 
It can go to the High Com 
and cost you a lot of money." 

The RSPCA yesterday 
claimed that there has been 
little legal action against noise 
from animals under its care 
because most pounds and 
kennels were deliberately lo- 
cated well away from residen- 
tial areas, and because most 
people were sympathetic to 
the animal welfare cause. 

But Mr Connell said actual 
disputes were fairly common, 
including another situation at 
present unfolding in Hollo- 
way, north London, where the 


RSPCA had told a female 
complainant that since the 
now-defunct GLC had ob- 
tained the land on which her 
flat had been built by makings 
compulsory purchase order, it 
was hardly responsible for the 
problem. 

Mrs Wills told The Times 
that the barking of up to 20 
dogs at a time, nine hours a 
day, seven days a week, from 
kennels only 50 yards from 
her council J!ar had “prac- 
tically driven her insane" over 
the past few years, and she had 
little option but to seek a legal 
noise abatement order. 

She said: “I'm becoming 
suicidal. I’ve complained 
enough times but nothing has 
been done. All wc want is 
some peace." 

Another group that is ex- 
pected to lake a dose interest 
in the case when it appears 
before Exeter magistrates at an 
as yet unspecified date in the 
new year is the Noise Council, 
a watchdog group in the 
Institution for Environmental 
Health. 

According to Mr Stephen 
Battersby, assistant secretary 
to the institution, noise com- 
plaints to local authorities 
have increased more than 
tenfold since 1974 and there is 
an urgent need to establish 
why. 

He said: “It could be that 
people moan more, and they 
know they can complain now- 
adays. or it could be that with 
more machines and more 
powerful hi-fi systems people 
make more noise." 







f, ! -yjs-j; '4 r :.'p^ rr 




Raids fail to stop 
pirate broadcasts 


Safety error led 
to silo deaths 

By Craig Seton 

Two members of a fanning hosepipe, through which air 
family who were killed as a was being pumped by a motor 
father tried in vain to rescue outside the silo. When he 
bis son from a suffocating collapsed inside, his father 
grain silo probably died bo- climbed in to rescue him. but 
cause strict safety procedures he too collapsed. 


The association, which is 
opposed to unlicensed 
broadcasting, says 115 radio 
“pirates" have been on the air 
since July 1. 

Sixty-five of the stations 
have been monitored in 
London, another 21 on 
Merseyside, and the remain- 
der are scattered throughout 
the country. 


were ignored. 

Mr Crawford Perkins, aged 
63. clambered into the 40ft 
deep silo to try to save his son, 
David, aged 31, who was using 
only a garden-type hose to 
provide oxygen as he worked 
in the dusty atmosphere. 

The Health and Safety Exec- 
utive yesterday opened an 
inquiry into the deaths of the 
two men on Monday at 
Church House Farm, More ton 
on Lugg, near Hereford, where 
they lived with their families. 
Both are thought to have 
suffocated. 

Mr Perkins junior, who was 
married with a son aged three, 
had climbed into the half-full 
silo to repair a fault 
Instead of full respiratory 
gear, he was using only a 

Gala ball I 
returns to 


Firemen wearing breathing 
apparatus recovered their 
bodies. 

The Rev William Price- 
Johns, who comforted the 
wives of dte two men, said 
yesterday: “The village is shat- 
tered and stunned. Mr Camp- 
bell Perkins was a leading 
figure in the village and a 
prominent farmer." 

Mr John Woolley, senior 
agricultural inspector for the 
Health and Safety Executive 
at Worcester, said yesterday: 
“Confined spaces of this sort 
are leihaL" The atmosphere 
inside the silo would have 
been almost oxygen-free and 
containing carbon dioxide to 
preserve the grain, be said. 

“Both men would have 
become unconscious almost 
immediately." 

Man of 86 
trussed 


the Savoy and beaten 


A man aged 86 was trussed 
By a Stan Reporter and beaten yesterday by a thug 

A traditional gala ball to be caught raiding his home, 
lebrate New Year's Eve is Mr Richard Tinsley was 
ing revived at the Savoy forced upstairs by his attacker 
Mel. London, this year after who bound his legs, arms and 
ree decades. mouth with tape. 

Then as he lay defenceless 
The £t00-a-head Lancaster on his bedroom floor he was 


By a Staff Reporter 

A traditional gala ball to 
celebrate New Year’s Eve is 
being revived at the Savoy 
Hotel. London, this year after 
three decades. 


Ball win be held in a room 
created from a courtyard once 
flooded with champagne by 
revellers, who then took to 
gondolas. 

Other holds reported sell- 
out bookings for dinner 
dances. “It seems to be 
becoming more and more 
popular to eat out on New 
Year’s Eve." the Inn on the 
Park Hotel in London, said. 

As preparations for the 
annual celebrations got under 
way, Scotland Yard yesterday 
issued safety guidelines for the : 
thousands expected to pack 
Trafalgar Square tonight. 

Police advised revellers 
against using cars, bringing 
large sums of money, or 
carrying handbags. Parents 
were warned to leave babies 
and small children at home. 

They also urged people to 
drink ’ moderately and said 
that patrols would be on the 
lookout for any suspected 
drink-drivers. Special trains 
will be running from Charing 
Cross station until tarn. 

This year’s drink-driving 
campaign seems to have had 
an effect, judging from the 
reconi sales of alcohol-free 
beers reported by Paine’s 
brewery, of St Neots, 
Cambridgeshire. Sales were 
said to be 1,000 percent up on 
last year. 

At Wembley Stadium, of- 
ficials are dealing with book- 
ing inquiries for the end of the 
milleirium. Two had already 
been received for December 
3J, J999. Both involved live 
pop concert performances to 
be beamed by satellite around 
the. world. 


kicked and punched by the 
intruder. 

His attacker then fled with 
his life savings of about 
£ 1 , 000 . 

After lying helpless for an 
hour Mr Tinsley managed to 
raise the alarm by throwing a 
shoe through his bedroom 
window. 

Mr Tinsley, of Bramwell 
Street, Pajr, Merseyside, was 


Mr Ivon Flagg walks over the remains of Nether Adbee, a 
medieval village on his form at Mars ton Magna near Yeovil 
in Somerset, which he has advertised for sale in The Wait 
Street Journal. 

The eight and a half acre village site is a scheduled ancient 
monument of meat archaeological value. 

Mr Flagg has been prevented from ploughing it by an injunc- 
tion taken out last year bv English Heritage. 

After a two-year battle for compensation over leaving the 
land fallow, Mr Flagg* supported by his MP, Mr Paddy 
Ashdown, has decided to sell the site where be used to graze 
his dairy cows before the introduction of milk quotas. 

Mr Flagg, who has not specified the price, says the adver- 
tisement has aroused considerable interest. 

“1 have had a lot of calls and a couple of offers so far," he 
said (Photograph: Nick Rogers). 

Tourists I Raids fai 

S P irate br 

g lUUOUt^ By Jonathan Miller, I 

Wherever the Britishftmmt ^ Goveramenl is “dearly 

on holiday »o this country goes losi y* ^ again5l U n- 

licensed radio stations, 
tomist board has been there according to a report prepared 

"wUer holidaymakers ^ lio < 2“ Iy ^ 
‘plan to stay in a caravan park, ASSOciaTlon ' 
a hotel or a farmhouse, an The association, which is 
army of sig ns displaying opposed to unlicensed 
crowns, “ticks" and roses wait broadcasting, says 1(5 radio 
to guide them in their choice. “pirates” have been on the air 
Tomorrow sees the launch since July 1. 
or the “crown classification" Sixty-five of the stations 
scheme for serviced accommo- have been monitored in 
dation. London, another 21 on 

The English Tourist Board Merseyside, and the remain- 
says the crowns scheme means der are scattered throughout 
places offering room to stay for die country 

s»jeksk& j * L £* j * gs ? 

largest hotel will be graded Jr 

firoma simple listed” to five gKTSpSJht ^ 

They are aimed at helping 
the public select their accom- Jj'jJ 

modation more easily and with **“* -21* ^ ^ made 

confidence, and establish- “ 84 , unlj “^S 
meats will be inspected once a jjjj ‘Lj nonlhs t0 m < ^ 
year for cleanliness, courtesy November, 
and service. He said 39 of the stations 

The more crowns, tiie wider were in London. 14 on 
the range of facilities. Crowns Merseyside and the remainder 
do not judge quafty, but in Sussex. Birmingham, North 
facilities most be well main- Wales, Telford, north 
tained and fit for their in- Hertfordshire, Rugby and 
fended purpose. Basildon. 

The tourist board says the 

crown signs are going up 7 

throughout Britain and will « 

soon be the most familiar 

SST" sign i» .be C Drl J| g j 

1 he tourist boards of Eng- 4 O ^ 

land, Scotland and Wales have By Mark Dowd 

also got together with other Education Reporter 
relevant bodies to grade earn- — 

van and camping parks with The Government wfli un- 
one to five ticks. Graded parks 

gta&re 

HS.’S'j’Si S! M? Pteter Dawson, general 
more bets are awarded, tne KmiCwmo 

tourist boards say. Small 

sSE?ffSfcrE 

Wood, marketing doctor of 
the English Tourist Board, 

some 50 million domestic holi- tn lah}p 

day nights in Britain are spent We ? <*■"* 1° to £5 
in static caravuns.Tbe British Tmeef 

Graded Holiday Parks Na- 
{tonal Gr ading Scheme -Mlbe 

Mema* parts -bid, bare likely to 

achieved foar or lire dchs. ^ 

- . , leaders of the larger unions 

BP Oil Held IS wh ° re** unKMfs mav- 
















-v- 


!?VVs-:- 




By Jonathan Miller, Media Correspondent 

The Government is “clearly Mr Butcher said that of- 
losing the war" against un- ficials had raided PCRL, an 
licensed radio stations, unlicenced station in Bir- 
according to a report prepared mingham, more than 30 
by the Community Radio times. 

Association. When the Government 

issoctation, which is withdrew, in June, its plan to 
d to unlicensed introduce a new community 
ding, says 115 radio radio service, the Community 
' have been on the air Radio Association said that 
iu l the decision would lead to an 


Wasteful Britain 
is put to shame 

By John Young, Agriculture Correspondent 


Dustbins and plastic sacks 
overflowing with the debris of 
Christinas should bring a 
blush of shame to the British 
cheek, according to Mr Stan- 
ley Clinton Davis, the EEC 
Environment Commissioner. 

Mr Clinton Davis, who has 
the task of masterminding the 
European Year of the En- 
vironment, which starts on 


in the number of I officially the firm 


oixty-nve ox tne siauons unlicensed stations. 

Z J*” nn "This is exactly what has 
mdon. another _i on .L- i__, _;v 

erseyside, and the remain- owrjte ta sx 

r are scattered throughout momhs - Hre report sa,4 

e country. Solar Radio, a London sta- 

Mr John Butcher, Under 

Secretary of State at the 2 ^ 

ly.-u.rt -tv. j„ licence, is among those that 

Department of Trade and have relurned l0 ^e air. and is 


Industry responsible for the 

Radio Invention Service, ^S u i° ° a 
told Parliament last month h0uT Sthe0ute - 
that 218 raids had been made There are eight 24-hour 
on 84 unlicensed stations in pirate stations operating in 
the 12 momhs to mid- London, with more expected 
November. to go on the air soon, the 

He said 39 of the stations rc P° rl said \ 
were in London. 14 on In spite of a number of raids 

Merseyside and the remainder in the London area on Decem- 
in Sussex, Birmingham, North ber 22, all were back on the air 
Wales, Telford, north by Christmas Eve, when mon- 
Hertfordshire, Rugby and itors picked up transmissions 
Basildon. from 14 stations. 


day of spring, is up against the 
foci that his own countrymen 
are among the most wasteful 
in Europe. 

Next year, unless as a nation 
we suddenly change our ways, 
the average family of four will 
use enough paper to require 
six trees to be felled; if 
Christmas wrappings had 
been kept for further use, that 
would have helped a little. 

The same family will also 
throw away 1121b of metal 
and 90ib of plastic, much of 
which will further disfigure 
streets, roadside verges, 
beaches and leisure areas. As 
well as being wasteful, the 
British are also untidy. 

One purpose of the environ- 
menial year campaign will be 
to show that 80 per cent of the 
2,000 million tonnes of waste 


Teachers’ pay dispute 


Spring deadline predicted 


Street, Parr, Merseyside, was * avinn/Iorl 

taken to St Helen’s Hospital 10 DC 6X16006(1 
and admitted to the intensive Brh ; sh Petroleum has been 
care unit with a fractured skull given permission to extend 


and several broken ribs. 


Britain’s second largest on- 


By Mark Dowd 
Education Reporter 

The Government will im- 
pose its own pay and con- 
ditions settlement on 440,000 
teachers in England and Wales 
by no later than spring 1987, a 
union leader predicted last 
night 

Mr Peter Dawson, general 
secretary of the 35,000-strong 
Professional Association of 
Teachers (PAT), said that 
there was practically no pros- 
pect of unions and the local 
authority employers agreeing 
on a package acceptable to the 
Government 

“We had a chance to table 
new proposals on the number 
of promotion posts at a meet- 
ing on December 19 but we 
spurned it because a majority 
in the teachers’ panel refused 
to budge," he said. 

His comments are likely to 
be greeted with scorn by 
leaders of the larger unions 
who resent the union’s mav- 
erick image- The PAT is the 
only association with a no- 
strum clause and was respon- 
sible for inviting Mr Kenneth 
Baker, Secretary of Stale for 
Education, to intervene in the 


Cash warning 
by university 

A leading don from Edin- 
burgh University has berated 
the Government and the 
University Grants Committee, 
the body which channels funds 
to Britain's 46 universities, for 
their increasingly heavy- 
handed approach which, he 
says, is leading to a damaging 
breakdown In trust. 

In his introduction to the 
annual report of the university 
published today Dr John Bur- 
nett, the university’s principal 
is critical of the Government's 
“insidious tendency" to apply 
indastrial and commercial 
management terms to higher 
education institutions. 

“The work of universities is 
in danger of being judged both 
mechanically and in the con- 
text solely of monetary raises, 
not least by ministers in their 
public expectations," he says. 

talks at the conciliation ser- 
vice, Acas, and go straight to 
Mr Baker with its suggestions 
on salary structure at the 


Police said the attacker isi shore oil field near Lincoln. pay dispute at the end of beginning of this montit has 


described as aged about 30, 
stocky, with a beard. 


A new well is to be opened 
at Siainion by Langworth 


October. 

Its decision to bypass the 


left it with even fewer friends. 
The next stage in the dis- 


pute is on January 7 when the 
local authorities meet the 
teachers in a full meeting of 
the Burnham committee to 
ratify the deal agreed at Acas 

However, it looks increas- 
ingly as though the deal will be 
stillborn because both sides 
depend on the Government to 
provide 46 per cent of its share 
towards any final settlement. 

With Mr Baker expressing 
displeasure at the small num- 
ber of incentive posts in the 
Acas deal, he will not release 
the money. 

As the prospect of im- 
position looms, it seems 
increasingly likely that some 
of the more moderate unions 
will increase their campaigns 
to gain approval for their own 
compromise pay frameworks 
from Mr Baker. 

A PAT delegation will see 
Mr Baker on January 6, the 
day before the Burnham meet- 
ing with the employers, to get 
reaction to its pla n s. 

The National Association of 
Head Teachers, which has also 
put together an outline on pay 
structure, said yesterday that 
it would seek further audi- 
ences with Mr Baker if no 
amendments are made to the 
existing deal at the Burnham 
meeting next week. 


Research into The Singing Detective disease 


By Pearce Wright 


there is a surprising lack of returned from Paris where he 


a- — K- h |- ^ awareness of the disease. 

which affects more than 4 per 


. . , - • r „ rt. gy m 7 wiuui umn uitiic uou uci 

the television sertes, 7Tx S,,g- , f popular ^ b 

iire Detect it&, m which the ....111 


ing Detective* in which the 
central character Michael 
Gambon suffers from a crip- 


SS* fluently in patients with a 

drum Psoras*. «s the subject history of psoriasis. It 

of research, can affect children, although 

ZrSgnjFiA b> ®ost cases it is relatively 

and often limited to 
tatees, elbows and the scalp. 


The Singing Detective, became 


posable" after > b5Z£ £ Bta. W 

toW rwLShLni^hfai crippling and excruciatingly 

constructed ‘y™ ^ painful, corering the whole 

laboratory. This provided a 

test tube technique for growing yf, e new research technique 
psora sis ceils. means that layers of normal 

and defective skin can be 
C SmSlJ7Sft ISZ analysed **" <** laboratory as 

and Professor And Larnt at from siz£ J f a 

Westminster Hospital, to several inches in 

London, has ahready indicated J ianiefer 
a more complicated cause of , , _ \ . , 

the disorder than previously Or Rowland Payne, consul 
thnadir mnl dermatologist at West- 

Dr Rowland Payne says minster Hospital, has 


rareness of the disease, studied with Professor Louis 
uch affects more than 4 per Dnbertret, who pioneered the 
at of the population and is techniqae for producing re- 
often unresponsive to constructed human skin, 
treatment. Its use in Britain in looking 

The OTness occurs fre- for a treatment, or possibly a 
entiy in patients with a cure, for psoriasis embraces 
nily history of psoriasis. It several areas of medical re- 
11 affect children, although search. It involves collabora- 
most cases it is relatively tion frith, laboratories at 
Id and often limited to Oxford University, The 
ees, elbows and the scalp. London Hospital Si John’s 
Bui as in The Singing Hospital for Diseases of the 
fectivc, the illness can be Skin in London, and the 
ppting and excruciatingly University Hospital of Wales, 
infill covering the whole Dr Rowland Payne says 
Ay. research has been handi- 

rhe new research technique capped by lack of funds— the 
sans that layers of normal project needs £280,000 for 
d defective skin can be further studies— bat early re- 
alised in the laboratory as suits have given a new insight 
!> grow from the size of a into the mechanism of the 
1 bead to several inches m disease and have provided a 
imefer. way of testing possible 

Dr Rowland Payne, consol- treatments, 
at dermatologist at West- Normal skin consists of twno 

inster Hospital, has parts. The surface layer is 


taut dermatologist at West- 
minster Hospital, has 


called epidermis and is com- 
prised principally of epidermal 
cells, which grow up to form a 
multi-layered covering that 
protects the body from the 
environment 

The underneath part is 
called the dermis, and is 
composed mainly of fibro- 
blasts, which lie in a matrix of 
fibres made from collagen. 

Previous laboratory tech- 
niques for growing skin cells 
have concentrated on either 
epidermal cells or fibroblasts. 

Reconstructed human skin 
differs fundamentally from 
other tissue culture techniques 
in several ways. 

Most important, it allows 
the scientists to examine and 
analyse the exchange of natu- 
ral molecules between the two 
layers as the skin develops 
from a tiny spot into a mature 
layer. 

During this process. Dr 
Rowland Payne and his col- 


leagues can examine a cascade j t wou 
of chemical reactions that constai 
happen at different stages of [ance. 
development of normal and po ur j'n 
abnormal growth. 

Wben the red thick blotches ; n t y ie , 
of skin of psoriasis appear, we ha , 
there is an alteration in the while t 
normal chain of -chemical 
events. have b 

The disorder starts with ers. Oi 
overactivity in ceils in the move i 
underlying part of skin, but The 
the biochemical cause appears be mo 
to originate from cells in the . added. 

upper layer. It is this sequence . . 

of events which the research 
team is studying in more ; nlr f f 

effort 1 

]n addition. Dr Rowland toll of 
Payne suggests that the use of poisoi 
reconstructed human skin will fishing 
provide an alternative to re- The 
search with patients, volon- rity is 
leers and animals in studies deter 
into other diseases, as well as weight 
psoriasis. mum I 


generated in the EEC every 
year could be reused or 
recycled. 

Now, only a fraction is 
saved, although some coun- 
tries have made greater efforts 
than others. For example in 
The Netherlands 53 per cent 
of usable glass is recycled, 
compared with 36 per cent in 
Belgium, 31 per cent in Ger- 
many, 25 per cent in France 
and only 9 per cent in Britain. 

(In Britain's defence it has 
to be said that it is the only 
country to have retained a 
nationwide doorstep milk dis- 
tribution system, which allows 
millions of bottles to be used 
many times over.) 

The campaign is intended 
to encourage concern about 
the reckless consumption of 
raw materials and energy, the 
decay of forests, river and sea 
pollution, and chemical and 
nuclear accidents such as 
Seveso and Chernobyl. 

“The list of environmental 
pollution appears infinite." 
Mr Clinton Davis says. Much 
of the waste was dangerous 
and, although most of it was 
now buried, that was not 
always done properly. 

Electronic 
ally for 
the badger 

By Our Agriculture 
Correspondent 

Badgers who, what with 
gassing, trapping and the il- 
legal digging up of their sets, 
have not had much recent 
cause to feel well disposed to 
the human race, may be facing 
a happier new year than for 
some time. 

Hard on the heels of the 
Ministry of Agriculture's de- 
cision to modify its pro- 
gramme of eliminating 
badgers suspected of being 
earners of bovine tuberculo- 
sis — a campaign widely de- 
nounced as far loo indis- 
criminate — the badger 
appears to have found a new 
ally in the form of an elec- 
tronic “bug”. 

It is a small black-box 
transmitter intended to thwart 
the activities of those who dig 
up sets and drag the animals 
from their homes 10 take part 
in illegal fights against dogs. 

Under a pilot scheme the 
transmitter/s hidden in these! 
and detects the vibrations 
from digging. It transmits the 
signal to a monitoring centre 
manned by wildlife enthu- 
siasts. 

Dr Gordon McGlone, of the 
Gloucestershire Trust for 
Conservation, a leading cam- 
paigner for badgers, said that, 
if the scheme were successful 
it would obviate the need for 
constant on-the-spot surveil- 
lance. often at night and in 
pouring rain. 

“There has been an upsurge 
in the diggers’ activities. What 
we have been finding is that, 
while badger lovers have been 
watching over sets, the diggers 
have been watching the watch- 
ers. Once they go, the diggers 
move in.” Dr McGlone sajd. 

The new device could easily 
be moved from set to sei, he 


• A han on anglers' lead 
weights of less than loz comes 
into force tomorrow in an 
effort to stop the annual death 
toll of 3,000 swans from lead 
poisoning. Lead-weighted 
fishing flies are exempted. 

The Thames Water Autho- 
rity is planning heavy fines to 
deter fishermen using lead 
weights. ,There will be a maxi- 
mum tint of £1.000. 


—^cld— 

Best way 
to end 
the year 

There was just one winner of 
yesterday's Portfolio Gold 
prize. 

Mis Betsie Wilson, aged 49, 
an unemployed schoolteacher 
of Newmarket, Suffolk, will 
receive £4,000. Mrs Wilson, 
who has been playing Portfolio 
Gold since the game started 
was absolutely “elated" at 
being the sole winner. “Being 
unemployed, the money will 
come in very handy", she said. 
“My year has had its ups and 
downs, and there cookl not 
have been a better way to end 
iL" 

Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold 

The Times 

PO Box 40 

Blackburn 

BB16AJ 

Concern for 
hill walker 

French police have been 
asked to search fora man ona 
400-mile walking trip in the 
Pyrenees whose family in 
Bournemouth, Dorset have 
not heard from him for a 
mouth. 

Robert Stevanato, aged 24, 
who began the trek in Septem- 
ber, failed to collect a monthly 
pared sent by his family, and 
did not, as expected, get in 
touch with them over Christ- 
mas. His parents have ap- 
pealed to the gendarmerie to 
help trace him. 

Robbers use 
petrol threat 

Three masked men threat- 
ened to douse an elderly conple 
irith petrol and set them alight 
in an attack at their home b 
Higbgafe, north London, 

yesterday. 

The men grabbed the man 
aged 71 and his wife as they 
returned from a shopping trip, 
tied them up, beat them and 
robbed them of watches, 
jewellery, a mink coat and a 
camera. Police said the coople 
were bruised and shafca. 

Ban on bowler 

A last bowler with Surrey 
County Cricket Club was fined 
£250 with £50 costs and 
disqnalified from driving for- 
12 months by Uxbridge mag- 
istrates yesterday. David 
James Thomas aged 27, of 
Seer Green, Beaconsfield, 
Buckinghamshire, had 1 
pleaded guilty to driving with 
twice the legal maximum of 
alcohol in his breath. 

Train death 

A woman was killed by an. 
express train as she took a 
short cut home from work, 
alongside a railway track. Mrs 
Roma Frettmgham, aged 28,! 
of Hebdon Close, Tbatchanv 
bad got off a train at 
Tbatrbam station, near 
Newbury, Berkshire, just be- 
fore the accident 

Baby in a box 

A day-old giri was found 
abandoned in a cardboard box 
at Bromley Hospital sooth- 
east London, yesterday. She 
was left in a corridor with a 
note saying: “Please look after 
Emma Lonise better than my 
girl friend and I can.” Police, 
have appealed to the parents 
to get in touch with them. 

Green years 

Almost a million trees and 
shrubs have been planted in 
Norfolk during the past 10 
years to counteract the effects 
of Dutch elm disease. The 
renewal scheme was in- 
troduced after a survey showed 
that the disease was killing 
most of the comity's ehns. 

Happier cats 

An appeal to give a Christ- 
mas dinner to stray cats 
proved so successful that the 
food wDl last until Easter. 
More than 3,000 tins iff food 
were given to the Avon Rescne 
Centre by pet lovers in 
Warwickshire. 

Crutches plea 

Addenbrooke's Hospital in 
Cambridge is appealing to 
former patients to return un- 
wanted crutches and walking 
sticks. The hospital speeds 
more than £16,000 a year on 
walking aids, but few are . 
returned. 

Police injured 

Two policemen were hurt 
yesterday when their car was 
in collision with a stolen car 
during a lOOmpb chase along 
the Mil in Essex. Two men 
are being held by Harlow 
police. 

Nose severed 

Surgeons attempted ves- 
terday to sew back a man's 
nose after his dog bit it off as 
he was walking the animal in 
Hailsham. near Eastbourne, 
East Sussex. He was not 
named. 



HOME NEWS 


NEW YEAR HONOURS 


TH~F TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


Awards for Yes Minister duo, Pat 


Life peerage goes to 
Woodrow Wyatt at 
head of varied field 

By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 



W3 


I 


% $ 

•V i 


Sir Woodrow Wyatt; chairman of the 
Tote, former Labour MP and minister, 
is one of two life peers created in the 
New Year Honours today - the other is 
Field Marshal Sir Edwin Bramall, 
Chief of the Defence Staff from 1982 to 
1985. 

The newspaper columnist is noted for 
his outspoken attacks on the left and his 
autobiography, entitled Confessions of 
an Optimist, heads a list which features 
many names from the worlds of sport, 
the arts, music, fashion, business and 
politics. 

The world's most capped goalkeeper, 
Pat Jennings, of -Northern Ireland, 
Arsenal and Tottenham, receives an 
OBE to add to the MBE he already 
holds. After a long career with Spurs 
and Arsenal, he established a world 
record of 119 international appearances 
before retiring after his participation in 
the World Cnp games in Mexico this 
summer. 

Another sportsman to be honoured is 
Sandy Lyle, the former British Open 
champion, who gets an MBE. 

There is an OBE for Mary Goldring, 


named by the Broa d casti ng Press Guild 
for her outstanding personal contribu- 
tion to radio as presenter of the current Knighted in 1983, 
affair s Analysis series. he is now chairman of 

W inning early recognition is Simon «te fo tafeator 
Rattle, the brilliant young conductor of 
the Birmingham Symphony Ozcestra journalistic and 
who formed his first orchestra at the political career. His 
age of 15; he is made a CBE. 

Sir John Summerson. former curator jvBdsLTUrn Again, 
of Sir John Soane's Museum, is made a Westminster and 
Companion of Honour for his services The Exp loits o f Mr 
to file history of architecture. Saucy Squirrel. 

A second Companion of Honour is 
Sydney Brenner, one of the founders of 
molecular biology. 

There is a knighthood for Mr 
Bernard Ashley, widower of Lama 
Ashley, founder of the fashion and 
design group-He and his wife, who died 
in an accident last year, formed the 
company 32 years ago and he Is now die 
chairman. 

The Queen has used die Royal 
Victorian Order to give special recog- 
nition to six people for services they 
gave in connection with the Hampton 
Court Palace fire. ^ . 



Mark Weinberg 
(Ki), 55. former 
chairman of the 
Marketing of 
Investments Board 
organizing committee, 
was responsible for 
formulating roles 
governing the 
selling of life assurance 
<nit milt Crusts to 
tbe public. He was 
recent!; appointed 
deputy chairman of the 
Securities and 
Investments Board. 


. iiSM 


Peter Maxwell 
Davies (Kt), 52. A 
composer whose 
music ranges from 

opera to carols, 
chamber musk to 
children's songs, be 
was awarded the CBE 
in 1981. He bas 
travelled the world 
lecturing and 
conducting. 




m> i 



LIFE PEERS 
BARONS 

Bramall, Field Marshal Sir Ed- 
win (Noel Westby). Lord 
Lieutenant of Greater Lon- 


PRIME MINISTER’S LIST 

MoD; J D Riming! on. dir gen, 
HSE; O Roith. cb engr and 
scient, DTI; J M Tudhope, reg 
procurator fiscal Glasgow and 
Simthkelvin; R G H Watson, 


Wales; G M Nissen, for serv to 
Stock Exchnge; J H Northard, 
operations dir, Brit Coal: R S 
O'Brien, ch exec, busnss in 
commty; T B Owen, man dir. 


STudfamcK *** Reraptoy: C F Payne, cb const. 

Defence Staff. Env; ** Wcslon . under sec, Bd of Ceveland pol: Mis P E Phillips, 

Wyatt. Sir Woodrow (Lyle). Customs and Ex. for pol and publ serv. 

chainnan. Horserace Total- riRnrn nr st j M Rankin, g^tch exec, Sca< 

isator Board ORDER OP 51 and Newcstle Brewrs; S D 

fOMPANIONQ MICHAEL Rattle, conductor; O J Rich, dep 

OF HONOITR AND ST GEORGE chmn, Alfred McAlpin* D G M 

m Roberts, snr pinr, John Taylor 

Breaner. Sidney, for services to CMC and Sons; V A B Rogers, rorp 

Newe- ?- L - RobertS - ““ '“ rier Wh aj«t. W*l3Ej P? 
nham. for services to the 
history of Architecture. 


Customs and Ex. 

ORDER OF ST 
MICHAEL 
AND ST GEORGE 


Gordon Brook- 
Shepherd (CBE), 68. 
Author and 
journalist, he was a 
foreign 

correspondent for 21 
years and retired as 
chief assistant editor of 
The Sunday 
Telegraph. He has 
written several 
books, inctoding The 
Anschluss. 


Sheila Quinn 
(DBE), 6fc Awarded 
CBE in 1978. 

Nursing adviser to 
British Red Cross 
Society, and lately 
president of Royal 
College of Narsing. 
Published Nursing 
in the European 
Community and 
Coring for the Carers. 


RobmLeigh- 
PemberUm (PC), 59. 
Governor of the 
Bank of England since 
1983. Called to Bar, 
Inner Temple, 1954. 
Was member of SE 
Economic Planning 
Conndl 1972-74, 
Prime Minister's 
Committee on Local 
Government Rales of 
Conduct 1973-74. 


Raymond Carr (Kt), 
67, distinguished 
Oxford historian 
and Warden of St 
Antony's College, 
Oxford, since 1968- 
Former member of 
the National Theatre 
Board, author of 
works on the Spanish 
Civil Warandfox- 

hini tvng- 


PRIVY COUNCILLORS 

Puttie. Geoffrey Edwin, Min- 
ister of State, Department of 
Trade and Industry; Mem- 
ber of Parliament for Cher- 
tsey and Walton. 

Leigh - Pemberton, Robin (Rob- 
ert), Governor. Bank of 
England. 

Waddington, David Charles. 
Minister of State, Home 
Office; Member of Par- 
liament for Ribble Valley. 


KNIGHTS BACHELOR 

Alan -Jones, John Derek. Mana- 
ging' Director, Ferranti pic. 
For services to export. 

Ashley, Bernard Albert, chair- 
man. Laura Ashley pkr. 
Benson, William Jeffrey, chair- 
man. Export Guarantees Ad- 
visory Council for services 
to export 

Bows ess. Peter Spencer, for 
political an tf public service. 
Brierley. Zachry. for political 
and public service. 

Bright Keith, chairman and 
chief executive, London Re- 
gional Transport 
Barnett, John Harrison, prin- 
cipal and vice-chancellor. 
University of Edinburgh. 
Carr, Albert Raymond Mail- 
lard, historian. 

Davies, Peter Maxwell comp- 
oser. 

Denton, Professor Eric James, 
for services to Marine 
Biology. 

Dick, John Alexander. lately 
Sheriff Principal Gla^ow 
and Strathkelvin. 

Dnthie, Professor Herbert Liv- 
ingston, Provost, University 
of Wales College of Med- 
icine. 

Dnthie, Robert Grieve (Robin), 
chairman. Scottish Develop- 
ment Agency. 

Elton, Arnold, for political and 
public service. 

Fletcher, Alexander MacPher- 
son. MP for Edinburgh Cen- 
tral For political service. 

Gibb. Francis Ross (Frank), 
chairman and chief exec- 
utive. Taylor Woodrow Gr- 
oup. 

Graham, Peter Alfred, chair- 
man. Crown Agents. 
Hargroves. Robert Louis, for 
political service. 

Hayhoe, Bernard John (Bar- 
ney), MP for Brentford and 
Islewonh. for political serv- 
ice. 

Landau. Dennis Marcus, chief 
executive. Co-operative 
Wholesale Society Lid. 

LoriH John Roger, lately chair- 
man. Association of County 
Councils. 

Mather, (David) Carol (Mac- 
donnell). MP for Esher, for 
political service. 

Newsam, Peter Anthony, chair- 
man. Commission for Racial 
Equality. 

Scholey. David Gerald, chair- 
man, Mercury International 

Group plc. 

Templeton. John Maries, for 
charitable services. 
Weatberall David John. Nuf- 
field Professor of Clinical 
Medicine. University of 
Oxford. 

Weinberg, Mark Aubrey, lately 
chairman. Marketing of 
Investments Board Organiz- 
ing Committee. 

Wilson, Robet Donald, chair- 
man. Mersey Regional 
Health Authority. 

ORDER OF THE BATH 

KCB 

-Manzie, (Andrew) Gordon, Sec- 
ond Permanent Secretary 
and Chief Executive. Prop- 
erty Services Agency. 

CB 

A B Fallows, ch valuer. Bd ofln 
Rev; R FelJowes. dep private sec 
to the Queen: L P Hamilton, sec. 
Dept of Ag and Fish for Scodd; 

G A Haul, dep sec DHSS: G A 
Hosker. dep treas solr. J R 
Jameson. Illy under sec. DES; G 
J Jenkins, Igl advr. Min of Ag, 
Fish and Food: J A Johnson. 
FCO. 

Miss J Kelley, under sec. 
Treas: J L Kilgour. dir, prison ; 
med serv. prison dept. Home 
Off. M C Neale, asst under sec. 


ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 
DBE 


Roney, ch commoner, City of 
Lndn: W M Ross. Itly pres, Roy 
Coll of Radiolgste; W G 

R unci man. chmn. Walter R un- 
ci man; Mrs J B Scroxton, pres, 




Jessel, Mrs Penelope, for politi- YWCA; J B Sharp (now deed), 
cal services. asst sec, DHSS: T Sharp, gr 5, 

Murdock, Miss Jean Iris (Mrs DTI; Miss H B Shuard, dir, oat 
Bayley), novelist. currclm devel proj, prim init in 

Prendergast, Mrs Simone Ruth, maths educ; J P Some, Itly 


for political and public convnr, Grampian Reg Cel; W 


service. Stapleton, lily dir, Nat Assn of 

Quinn, Miss Sheila Margaret Waste Dspsl Contmrs; D E 
imelda. lately president. Stringer, for pol serv, I G 
Royal College of Nursing. Tavlor, prof of audiology and 


Royal College of Nursing. Taylor, prof of audiology and 

educ of deaf. Mnchsir U; N S 
KBE Thornton- Kem&Jey, chm n, bd of 

Beckett, Sir Terence (Norman), gov, N of ScotW Coll of Ag; L 
lately Director General van Praag, chmn. Sabre Internal 
Confederation of British Textls. 

Industry. J Wedgwood, for serv to R 

Caldecote, Viscount Robert An- Hosp and Home for Incuxbls; J 
drew. Chairman, Investors Whaley, asst sec, Dept of En- 
in Industry Group pic ergy; G O Whitehead, Illy chmn, 
Norman, Professor Richard Os- Laing Mowlem ARC it venture; 
waid Chandler, Chief Scien- W L Wilkinson, dir. Spent Fuel 
tific Adviser, Ministry of Mangmnt servs, BNF; F J K 
Defence. Williams, chmn NW EngJd and 

Swumertoo-Dyer, Professor Sir loM TA and Vol Res Assn; F O 
(Henry) Peter (Francis), G Williams, man dir, Williams 
Chairman, University ’ Grand Prix engtg; RL Williams, 


Jlii r 

A. J9 


Mary Gotdring 
(OBE). A freelance 
economist and 
broadcaster who has 
presented the 
Analysis programme e 
BBC Radio Four 
since 1977, she was 
aviation 

correspondent, then 

business editor of 
The Economist 1949- 
74. 



Simon Rutile 
(CBE), 31. Probably 
Britain's best- 
known yooug 
conductsr.be 
became principal of the 

Symphony Orchestra 
in 1980. He sprang 
to prominence by 
winning the 
Bournmnooth 
conducting . 
competition st the age 
of 19. 




Alan Ayckbourn 
(CBE). 47. One of 
Britain's most 
prolific and widely 
enjoyed dramatists, 
he has written, directed 
and produced plays 
for television and 
theatre which have 
consistently received 
critical and popular 


urkttan. serv to devd of am. semis mys Lob; Mrs E Carter, serv to 
tnd fats trde. eexnrocy. Ley (and. Lancs: J S Chara- 


G rants Committee. 


dir. Forensic Sci Lab. Met pol C 
Wills, prin insp, Bd ofln Rev; H 
C Woolley, cnsltni BICC; A J 
Young, for pol and publ serv; A 
J Youngson. chmn, R Fine Art 
Commn for Scodd. 

OBE 

C Adam, snr exec. expt group- M & S. 
servs to exp L S S Adams, res and 
devel coord. Boots: Mrs P A Ade. area 
sec. cd memo N wales. Soldiers' 
Sal tors' & Airmen's Families Assn: A 
K Ad maul, consult ptiysn. Trent RHA: 
A M A dye. dir. marine lech dJrectne. 
SERCR H AHardtce. dir. proc tech 
and salty. Risky. UKAEA: P J S 
AUlngtan. dir oprra. electron systems 
and eouip dlv. Bracknell. BAe: J 
An dll. dimo. Walsall & woivlun 

Area Mnowr Bd. MSG a A Artaud 

serv agrir Scodd; RJE Arthur, dep ch 
const. Taytrtde. 

C Allwood. chmn. StoUdon & Sedge- 
fid Devel Any: B C Atwood, gen sec. 
Assn Sd Educ: DC Austin, marine 
busnss mgr. Rons Royce: S Baker, itly 
mgr dir. Brit Electr Internal: J W C 
Barr. mbr. Scott vin Advry Cd: H B 
Bassett. dir. Internal Consutty serv. 
BrU Gas: J Baxter, mbr. Alnwick Disi 
Cd: B w Broken, trdg smd offr. Avon 
Cniy Ccfc R D Bril. Illy hd. os div. Nat 
Inst of Agric Engrg: D M Sevan, 
tad mast. Rose Hill Spec S. WorCK W O 
Blnns. prln sclent offr. For Commn: 

. hdleacb. Bebfcad 
SpecS. Ipswich: W A H Blair. ndntasL 
Croxteth S. Liverpool. 

R J C Boyd, ch comxnr. Ni Seoul 
Assn: D C A Bradshaw, prin. Doncatr 


Trust for Conan Vob: F C Broth 
erston. sen asa «l Dept of Offd Rut 
Ho of Crrmns: A F Brown, mgr. M & 
S Bell: J B C Brown, asa! eti commr 
ScoOd. Scout Assn; J C Brawn. co-Ur. 
R Opera H0_Orch: M A Brown, pol 


CBE C Woolley, cnsltni BICC, A J 

A V Alexander, dir, Sedgwick Young, for pol and publ serv; A 
Gp; P W Allsebrook. chmn, J Youngson. chmn, R fine Art 
TNT (UK); R J Attwell, gr 5, Commn forScotid. 

Min of Ag. Fish and Food; A 

Ayckbourn, playwright; D C 

Back, for pol and publ serv; J D wriTHT s"s m Adm._ns and 
F Barnes, chmn, Pharmaceuti- *c. *§Sia£§ 

^sEron Devel Cttee;JG Bell 

chmn and mgg dir, Richards a m Aaye. dir. marine teen directne. 

(Shipbuilders); P M Biggs, dir, __ _ 

Houghton Poultry Res Sta, ALU^dtrwrn^^ 
Huntngdn; R Birch, ch const, AntuLchmD. waisaii & w«vhm 

educ in Scotid; J M Boyd, for c° 2 «- . - . 

serv to conserv of nat env in nd nnS" 

Sc S?* I F . b^ss 5 ^. Rons Royce: S Baker. Itly 

auth and jrnlst Itly chf asst ed. 

Sunday Telegraph; J L Broome, 
chf exec, Alton Towers. 

K Cameron, prof of Eng lang; - oorlxi: Wo Spiri& m! gsdiv?Nat 
hd of dept of Eng studies, 

Notinghm U; W M Campbell 
for pol and publ serv; P Clark- 

Eddington. acton C N Clarke. __ 

chmn, Bristol and Weston hlih amii“ ~ 
auth: S G Gurney Clarke, for _ 
serv to nwspr indust: Miss E M * ■“-**= 

L Cole, mbr. Post Off bd; M G 

Compton, kpr of museum serv, ^ u tu i „ ^ 

Tate; R J Cramp, commner, Sre TT R~Bm\£au£.' ^ry"f^'‘prpfn 
Hist B kings and Mnmms ft 1 S&. 

commn for Engld; JH Crouch. BfSST^ 

Itly dir. rnkung. Cable and rca- 

Wlrel«s E H Cullinan. sen D 2£ n *T & 

Davies, lily ch exec, Newcastle g™ enu Exec, tsb; g a ctwaier. air 
nnnn Tvnr f'itv Cr 1- A I ouler area. Commwlth War Graves 

Upon lync L.liy l_Cl, A J Commn: D Cheettiara. dir sod sen.-. 

Dewhirst, chmn and ch exec, I J u«ni mm bwccuhs cowiraM. 
Dewhirsl Hldngs; BCR 
Dojwmtl^ under sheriff of PK’SWj 
Y orks; W B Dunn, man dir. Br vono water awh: Mrs j w craven, 
ufnni Msrhna Rrl chm. S Cumbru HA. j r Crook. Illy 

w SPL l S? anax, l * _ . dir. ROSS Foods: J CruahJey. asst ch 

H Ellis, prof of srgry. Channg "JjC. 

Cross and Westminster Med S. poi and pu&i sm : c j j Davies, iih; 
Undon U;‘ D I Evans, gr 4. Mu^Sa^gS"* ^ 

DoT; R Evans, ch exec, Bnt r Dean, poi mi 

Gar, N G D Ferguson, chmn, N KewS-jEitnbvii: a Duncan. cur 

IreM Housg Exec P Firmston- E^bUh^Sw crm! 

Williams, chmn. Covent Gdn Mrs f m da toil ch nuns ofrr.-unit 
Mrkt Auth; D F^her. co educ ST 

and publ serv; p □ Fraser, Itly chm and man dir. Boxmore inL H I 
asst sec gen. Western Eurpn AbCTronwv Como ®- 

Union: R A Garrett, chmn. Nat p ^rrtowh. imj iur aiuro ««. 
Assoc of Boys' Clubs; P J Sito-tFM.w 
Grimmer, for pol and publserv 

M J Hampshire, chmn. Dept of new. sen- n commty. MaxmM: c o 
ciAn<rn^ ciom r._ r_i Fountain, dir. puth aflr. vauxhall 

Eleclrnc and Elect Engrg, Sal- Mtrs; R A Pryan. lUy aovsr to tenets 

ford U: A G Hatchett dep 

■ D n, xt d Rpsrcn LOT. J uiw. air. CtucfMKi^r 

Chmn, P & O Containers: N B Festl liiaw; A O tj r iu j gi. ctun and 

Hawthorne, actor. Miss D V __ 

Hayward, ch nurs offir. DHSS; S ron aii , 

Mre S Hill: for pol serv. R s h Gan. br pres. Gwynedd. Bril Rati 
Hope, Itly dir. Marine Soc; J H gg%VtiLS£fii 
Hose, for serv to the agne ennwe wn: r a _ ' 

indust; D H Irvine, Itly chmn of char wrv panic to gk» 

cd R Col of GPs. Co bail Unit. Chefinhm Gen Hosp: Mrs 

uict C liflUH A-.+ E E W awl publ Serves C 

Miss S Jefferies, dep dir gen. Hammg. poi ai 

“ "l e ^ 0rc ^ Audit HjfnoJ twiiandVuW scrv^ M 1 Harris. 
Off N A Jepson, acdmic advr, nnne. cum cou of he: miss m m m 

Prison Serv Coll; J E Jones. 

chmn. Welsh Water Auth; A S SSMttCTI WSa. , 3£ 
Kark, Itly man dir, Extnl Yorks r™ ha a Heaiey. am ch pa 

Dnlrctna- Urc P W Ifollv fnp Oftr. HM PTOOh SMV: MT»S MHetUV. 
Bfdcstng MIS ■ K w Keiiy, lor ch m . e Derbyshire CHC: P M (Ms. 

serv to NHS; W R Knight, mbr. *!? "*51: 

TVEl nat Sieemg gp; D A fwF’^icot s«c mg 
Larkins, chmn. Lading: Mrs P 

A Lee. er 5. Home Off: J Lvles, uov: j l Hunt, sen med offr. i 
chmn and ch exec, S Lyles; AG Ki wKomK 
J Macfariane, for serv to eng*: SSarSTC. WlSS ^ 
K L Maidmcnt. pres. Br Film immiup ajoww. 

_ j Tl . n .,,. | , . /— * m«pt wn lo Ann FW. panic NI: h Jonn. 

and Tv Prodcrs Assn. G A Marr, pun. mod. h f Jones, aeo iVouiiu. 

.hnm I Marr and .Son- D K wiml LEA: J Jones. Mr. Vale of 

enmn. j Marr ano oon. u r. ^ Hone D«t ecu r jonra. kc. 
Mason, prof of oral med. Glas- u«r saw^ cnee, w KenyoiL 
BOW U: B J McMaltrr. 8™ figStrtFS?. 

Jdni.mr. Welsh Njl Opera: J L 

Millar, man dir. William Low w camriwy: j fljcitw. d ir. cgid wn 
and Co; J C Nicholson, dep 

?° nl f ^. a, S!t L h 

for Local Auth in and hgiiWys and trmpL Cheshire; G S 


w a Lewis, serv to mining la devel 
entrs: J K Lyden. admin dir. Shonon 
F4gtr MUls: J J MacAlesian. prtnc 
profnl and Inch offir. Drat of Env. NI: 
J S Mackenzie, chm. . vttttoradlv. 1986 
Cormnwth Games: E D MackJe. man 
dir. Gov an Shpbidrs: J Mdr. pol and 
publ serv: Mis J O Marsh, ao-v lo 
Magsms' Assn: j ft Massey, grp dm 
anj di exec Sigatxw mtntnl: T L 
McGann, mlm prof and tech offr. 
MoD: R M McLeod. My chm. Gen 
Dental Srvce Cttee. NtTMdfai. asst 
ch const West Midlands pot J F 
Mrnar. convnr. aackmannan Dttt Cct 
F C Mills, my hdmstr. MonhalswKk 
S. st Aflano: G M W MUaom. v-pres. e 
A nolla Tours! Bd: P J MttdieiL pol 
and puM serv: A D Montgomery, gp 
exprt dir. Stoddard Hotdngs. sen to 
^mj^B P Moss, ai exec. No-Aire: 
■i ■ M Munin. Itly hdteachr. St 
Gregory's RC Comp S. Klrkfay: M H F 
Murphy, ch offr. Western Ed and 
Library BiNtACW Neely, serv lo 
road hauue u A Onions, enty srvyr. 
Staffs Cct MM H R Palmer, pol 
and publ serv. 

R W Palmer, aerv to sport: N 
Parker, chm BrU Rollings Mills and 
deo chm Brit Bright Bar^VJ Parker, 
admin. Tudor Chartb+e Trusl; a 
ParkeL hdmst Redrulh OS; H N 
Pauliey. far poi and putt serv: B B 
PhllKpa, my sec. CUy and Guilds of 
Lndn Inst: J L Pickard, asst mkta dir. 
cnOI mJdg. Marconi Radar Systems, 
serv to exprt: H W Poole. Uy dim. 
Bra Parapigc shorts Soc D B Price, 
lily ch conunr. Wales. SJAB: R W 
Rarasdaie. my dim. Maynards, serv to 
confCtmy tnd: K G ORead. MoD; 
L T Rees, con anaeMh. s Glamorgan 
HA: N B R Reeves, itly prof German, 
head dept in^cs and Ini studies. 
Surrey Ui MrsM J RekL pol and publ 
■serv: K Renshaw. lobby cost. Sunday 
Express: A S Road. consltnL Cne for 
"Mkkue East Trade, ant Ovrss Trade 
Bd. serv to exprt: Mbs A M Robertson, 
botch. Andrraoo HS. Lerwick: 
dir. Gtosgpw CnL Scott 
CurTCtm Devel Serv: j Ross. InqxBd 
of In Rev: A W Rudge. man dir. ERA 
Technology: K V Runcle. dir of 
euensn serv. East of Scodd Coll Of Ag. 

J Schofield, hdmst. Spndey Hey HS. 
Manchsor: H S ScoMe. serv lo Urban 
Devel Gram Sctunr. wales: J Scott, 
erts admnstrtr. Shefnd. Lord 
Chancors Dept: J B Scott- Wilson dlv 
lech dir. CtvU AlrcraR Dtvsn. Hatfield. 
BAe: Mr* J A ScornekLi Idy dlv vet 
oftt. Min of Ag: D N Sharpe, dun. 




CTree: C R Shotbott. pol 1 
service: R P Smith, boro uorarn. 
Sutton: D A Souttiwtck. poi and putt 
service: D H Stroud, s in ger: mis D 
Sutton, pol and pttd serv: C H 
Thomas, chief proon offr. S Yorks 
Prob Sen-: j H Thornton, my deo 
asm conunr. Met Pol: M C Thunby- 
PeUiam . ray dir gen. Bril Heart 
Found tn: CMC Tlbta. lUy sec. R Coll 
Ptiystctans: J Towey. Itly chief exec, 
town clerk. Rochdale: M G w 
TTumper. serv to ag tn wales F J 
Underhill, gen sec. Brit Grevhnd 
Racira Bd. sec. Nor CreyTwd 
Ob. R D Unwin, pol and putt 
J viner. ray scctn hd. ttitosdepL 
Martttme Mus A F Walls, serv to w ». 

alls scoot: J warden, gr 

Warren- serv to devel of 


Dial HA: M»OE Edwards- Jones. 
ot prog din. ITN. TF Elion, ch Offr. 


and putt serv: R D Wdr, v-dnan. 
Grampian HIUi Bd: W H WhltHiouse. 
dir, Signal and Telecom Gngnrng. 
BR: j P Wiltshire, dun. Ayrshire. 
Dumfries, and Calloway Area Man- 
iwer Bd: J J Woodcock, dir. Inst for 
— udy of Drag Depndnce; W woof . 
serv lo housg mgemt In publ sector. 


Aldridge, pod exec B. SW Dttt 

Off. Lndn. Post OR: A B Mien, pel 
serv: Mrs I AOtaon. local off D. DHSS: 


commty. Leytand. Lancs: J S Cham- 
Dkjo. relief bkng clerk. LRT: B E 
Chapman, chm. ARwrt E Chapman: 
Mrs J I Charlton, exec ofTr. Dept of 
Emp: Mrs B Cbernf. mbr. 
Rfchnicndshtre DC: Mrs K E Childs, v- 
Chm. Portsmouth and SE Hants HA: 
Mra F M CMshofan. exec o Or. MSG 
Mrs A M dark, that ora. htverdyde 
WRVS; J K dark, main gr engr 
(telecommsi. ud dlv. Com Serv 
Agency. Scot Huh Serv: J S dark, 
man dir, Lndn car Telephones: J B 
Clarke, sub-unit mgr fr MnU Him 
Serv. Ealing HA: RBCtoUfllk KW hd. 
Aftra- Sec. HQ. DrBai™*'s A j c 
Cochrane, vllge comnxtt. 1986 
Comm with Games- 

_ C R Cocks, him and stty consltnL 
EngEmptyrs E Midlands Assn: Mrs M 
E Collins, idr. Rlwndda BG A P 
GonnoBy. man dir. InterroO: F Con- 
way. mans offr. med/ gertre unL 
Gtatmd HA: K E Coo fc. SEX) . Bd of 
Customs and Ex: Mrs J Oorcoran. serv 
to speech thrpy: D M Cense. HEO. 
DHSS: M J Coyne, serv to commty. w 
Lothian: Mrs E Cross! ey. org. 
Horsham CAB: MISS B M Crump- serv 
lo com n tfy. Hamstead Marshall. 
Berks. 

P A Cubbage. mgr. Spec Pr ol ec ta 
Dlv. Midlands Res 3n. Brit Gbk D F 
Davie*, hdtdir. Knighton CPS. 
Powys: Mrs E M Davis, asrv to 
oonumy. Auester. Warwtck 3Mr e: Mrs 
F m Davis, exec offr. DHSS L w 
Oavts. ch bldg contrt offr. SotfliuO: H 
%Unsoft. serv to NW Area. RAF A: L 
A Dodson. HEO. pmnl rgstry of hnv 
<Mv. Lord Chance Dept: Nttss F P 
Doherty. IQy stfT am-. Pol Auth NS O 
T Donnelly, serv to commty. panic 
wlfre of young. NtJA Douglas, tuy 
3t amr fr nautical studies. Scot 

Bd: R Dove, ch suot. Trinity 

House: c Downie. gmiia group mgr. 
Scot Devel Drat Mrs m tjoyie. chm. 
■Assn of Bourne mo uth Orm for DsbM: 
r Dayte. exec oerr. dHsa c o 
Oraycott. serv to The Queen's Own 
Regimental Assoc: Mrs L P Dry. DUtd 
service. Dorset. 

G 8 Drysdaie. serv to anbntt well: 
Miss D M Edwards, prop. Brechin 
Advertiser: E D Edwards, fguun env 
■offr. Burmaft Oil Trdng; J F Elms. sec. 
tngl Bowing Assn: Mrs J C M Evans. 
pots sec. DoT; J Every. lUy area supt. 
SE area off. Hist Bldgs and Monrants 
Commn: Mrs M Faulkner, serv lo 
commty. Co Tyrone: J W Pcenin. 
serv to dsbld. Tyne and Wean H 
Fisher. Itly dir of mug serv. Mend 
Hndcp. Denys Hun Auth: J Flynn, 
stores offr gr A. MoO: E Forrest, chm. 
Acorn Enterprise. Miss B M Fox. lUy 
admin sec. Bristol Old Vic: P F 
Freeborn. SCO. Bd of Customs and 
EX: RO Fysoo. chmn andtedidir. C J 

Fyson and Son. 

T Gardner, oen med pracL 
HOOrt. HEO. DHSS: Mrs_ 
hdtehr. Margaret Sutton So 
Shields. Tyneside: Mrs F I 
Goodenough. poi and putt serv. Mrs V 
m Goodhew, luy 




S Grauoob. cnrtMs serv: J A Gray, 
serv to commty. partK wlfre of dsttd 
In NI. 

D I Green, serv to Nelgtibrhd 
Energy Aetata Mm T GVeevm. ora sec. 
NI Cel for Orth Devel: J H Griffiths, 
my gen ser. i n corpor a ted B r e w er s * 
GKL j D Griffiths, riunn. COo* Comm 
cel: K Guiver. ch scient offr. S Water 
Auth: R T HalL sec. Yorks Fed of Coat 
Merchants' Assn & N of Engkl Coal 
Trdrs' Assn: W J G Hanna, sec. Ag 
Res (nat. NL Mrs A Hanson, den 
hdtehr. I odd So S. Gravesend: PE 
Hinson, luy dtv commdL Yorks Sp 
Oonstalx H Hanfe rag sec. S and w 
Wales. GMBATXJ: C I Henderson, hd 


Macleod. sen- to erttng. Scodd: B 
Macnab. prog mgr. Marlin Baker 
Aircraft: ASF Malr. mgg dir. 
Caithness Glass, tor serv to exprt: G J 
W Marsh, serv to ptrabng tndust: Miss 
V i Marsh, nty cirri oar. MoO: J M 
Mason, serv to chrty thru mine A W 
Maxtor, treas. BrttAssoc of Hard of 
Hearng: B a McCandiess. org sec. 
Leprosy Missn NT: Mrs B McCann: lea 
n. Dept era and Adult Educ N 
TTafford Coil FERA Mcdeerv, sec 
Brit Fflm Frtd Any: Miss S K 
McCuilagh. writer: Mbs M D McCuH- 
orh. drriassL Bd of In Rev: 8 D F Mc- 
Dowell. Gov ID. NI Prten Serv: R D 
Mctotyre. Reg ArriL Ch ArctUcTs 
DepLBR: M J A Mens. Sen Prof and 
Techno! Offr. Dept of Env: Mrs A R 
Mranie. dir. Glasgow br. Bril Red 
Cross: Mks S MttriteU. Asst Exprt Pts 
Admnstr. ERF: B C B Mote. Biy dlr 
terii sves. Teimibrldge Dtet Cch J 
Monks. Sen Tecfinolgt. Sect and 
Comm Steels. BSC Mrs F M Moore, 
fid dir. Lebanon. Gaza and West Bank. 
Save the Chidm: P H Morgan, ora sec. 
Lancs Youth Outs Assn: 0 P 
Moynan. prol mgr. Vehicle Instains. 
Hunting HI vote Mrs C M Myer. Itly 
dir. White Lodge Cent Cbertsey. 

H J Nanoollas. hdteh. Bodsham CoC 
E PS. Etmatead. AshfonL Kent; R M 
Nicholson, asst wfcs dir. Londndrry. 
Du Pont fUKk MRS M Oakley, serv to 
Girts- Venture Corps. Smethwick: B D 
G Ogle. mbr. B5L D I Olds. HEO. 
Home Off: Mrs S M Osborn: toy Ubry 
nv. Letts br. Brit Red crass: P L 
Osborne: aerv to Dyfed Marr GuM Cri: 
T c O’Sullivan, exec offr. Welsh Off: J 
D Owen, curator. Cmdlgkm Mus. 
Aberystwyth: Rl Owen, serv to ag. 
Gwynedd: A F Owens, ch supt. RU& 
H Owens. FCO. 

Mrs A M Parsons, serv to stdentt 
educ: Miss J E Parsons. HEO. MoD: H 
M Penny, ptanst: J H Pen ton. ptnr. 
Pralon and Smart G H C Perkin. Ed. 
Concrete Quarterly: K p Perry, ctrri 

Ptnkerton, pnnrWnroy advsr. Belfast 
Educ and Ubry Bd: M J Poison, serv 
to StteUd fshng todust R a Polwin. 
reg rictr. Bd of tn Rev: Mrs J Pooley. 
org. Royston CAB: J T E Porter, serv 
toRoshnbrch. RBU A P Powell, 
HEO. Crime Corns Dept. Off of 
Comm Met, Pol: Mrs B M Prestt. dir. 
Cm for lndust Sri. Techno! Educ Lsn. 
for serv to inmnt Year. Mn A E pyne. 
pol serv. 

_ R L Ramstiaw. pot and puu serv: J 
T RatcWto. serv to YMCA: S G 
Rcdpave. serv to rowng; C w Reeve 

® and publ serv : J D Reynolds. 

ch. Peiunys Jnr GPS, TWwaowii. 
Rhondda. Mm Clam: D H Richards, 

■or Meat Trade: Mrs A M Roberts, 
mar. Crewe and Nantwtcti Bor ecl: J 
A Robertson, toy mgg dr. J A 
Roberts o n and Sons fOumntest W A 
Robinson chm. N Yorks war Pensions 
Cttee: Mrs R M D Roe, chm. Brnringhm 
and Sudan Cokind Crime Prvntn 
Pan!: Miss E P Roy. SEO. Drat of 
Emp. 

Mrs E Sandercock. pal serv:. A 
Sandier, luy chm. Licensed Taxi 
Drivers- Asst: K A Sankry, dstrtm 
mgr. E Dlv. N-w Water Auth: Miss w 
M T Sayers, ruth vtstr. Tomes clinic. 
Torbay HA; Mrs M A SctiuUnan. PM 
and jxitt serv: K senraatr. lay chm. N 
Of Engid Mus Serv; A A Sharp, serv to 


Artificer fL) J 


Terence Becketi 
(KBE), 63, is retiring 
stiortiy as director 
general of die 
Confederation of 
British Industry after 

more than six 
campaigning years. He 

was earlier 

chairman of Ford 
Motor in Britain. 


THE ARMY LIST 


Peter Swinnertoo- 
Dyer (KBE), 59. 
Chairman of the 
University Grants 
Committee since 
1983. Educated Eton 
and Trinity College. 
Cambridge. Professor 
of mathematics, 
Cambridge University. 
Published numerous 
papers in mefftetnatic al 
journals. 


ROYAL AIR FORCE 


FOREIGN AND COMMONWEALTH OFFICE 


P Simpson, area dir, N Africa. 
OMnmwitn War Graves- Commn-. D S 


Wales. GMBATXJ; C I Hmdmon. hd Stnnotx pol serv: A SMhom. treaa. 
of sdvncd med Unr accuv drvci. Nrthrn Cel of Grocers G R Slater, poi 


? £ P«h*mler Btotog Aaon. NERC: Mrs P 
W cownuft. Matdenhd. E D | Allwrlgm. pol serv: D Aired. Itly 


Flew, serv lo commty. Matdenhd: E 0 
Fountain, dir. pum aflr. vauxhall 
Mtrs R a Fryers, niy aavar to sencts 
and systems asynnt dept, Tttnpt and 
Rd Rcsith Lab: J Gale. dir. Chichester 
Festl Theatre: A Grtrznger. dim and 
man dir. Universal News Serv: Miss M 
. _ . serv to econ truism and 

brdrsuig: M S Goodfrtfow. nighi op 
exec. Civil Aircraft Dlv. HatneiiT BAe: 
H Gall, br pres. Gwynedd. Bril Rad 
Dos G M R Graham, gp man dir. 
BIS CD of Comens: Mrs C v Green, 
chritte serv: R A Gun trip, prin sd 
offr. MoD. _ 

F A Hanna, char serv panic to Glas 
Coball Unit. Chefinhm Gen Hosp: Mrs 
E E Harding.. Pol and .publ serv. S c 

Harley.” pra. R Forestry . Soc: A J 
Harms, pol and pu&l sm : M ! Harris, 
urine. Curat COU Of HE: MISS M M M 
Harrison, ed offr. SandweU LEA: D w 
Hart, chf res engnr. W S Atkins & 
Pann: Mss J Hassali. dsgnr. wood 
engraver, ilfctrtn B Hayward, mbr. 
Yorks Reg HA: A Healey, dep 
onr. HM Prison Serv: Mrs S M Henry, 
chm. S Derbyshire CHC: P M Higgins, 
orof of gen pracL Guy's Hosp Med S. 
London u: Miss M R Hope, reg mgr 
iwi. Scot Spec Hsg Assn. L K 
Howanh. man dir. Campbeltown 
Shpyrd: J A HucKvaJe. Insp. Bd tt In 
Rev : J L Hunt sen med otfr. DHSS: w 
ibfiwwn. TUy iransp and salty co-onL 
Albnghl and Wilson: D F Jackson, 
serv 10 women's Engnrng Soc: MBs C 
Jackson. Illy dir. Lndn Boros' Train 
tng Comm (soc sen i: P A Jemilng*. 
serv lo A«n Fttt. panic Nl: K jonn. 

K in. MoO. H F Jonra. AEO lYoulh). 
irrai LEA: J Jones. Mr. Vale of 


mM. Bradford Telegraph and Araux 
D N Arnold, nd. dept maths, getenee. 
Rraipote PS. Weymouth: R B 
Attenburrow. man dir. Doboon and 
Crowtner; S Azam. mbr. Bradford 
Area Manpwr Bd. MSC. 

R J Banner, ch desgnr. ran arafl 
dlv. Ktogstn-upn-Thras. BAe: a w 
B arnes, serv tech and devel mgr. SC 
Regn. Bril Gas E G Barnes. H& hd. 
Dept of Food and Domes! Trades. 
Sotdhmptn Tech Cob: Mn M M 
Barrariough. dir of nursg serv. 
Airedale Gen Hosp. Airedale HA: Mn 
M Baron, mbr. Bd of Vstra. HM 
Prison. Maze: B BashalL air trafr 
r I. coast gd ban offr. CAA: Mrs 
Batey. serv to presvn and rain of 
hst gdns: Mbs B S Beech, dir or nursg 
serv. Ho» fr Side ChUdrra. Gt 
Ormond w: D BeD. Serv to mob* 
raeng: j w Bril. imp. Notts Constab: T 
S Bell. Illy advls offr grade m. Min 
Ag: D B Bmaiar. pol serv: Mm K _ 
Benn. pal and publ serv: R Beresford. 
serv to oonumy. Harunrsmoi and 
Flhm: Mrs E Bertram, dir and Co sec. 
Bertram Bools; A R BaseL cum. Del 
Guerra: R F Booth. !Uy hghr profnl 
and tech offr. MoO: R Bodirk. dicta 
hghr gr. Bd of In Rev, J E Bowden, 
serv to Dot. Road Cnstra setms. 

P A Bown. chm .and cb exec. 
Brushes intertiaa: FJ 
engr (irffcL Bocks Cn 
Brtogs. serv to commty. 

M Briggs, dir MUdiemace: Mm h 
B rlghrmore. my ndteh. Thomas 
Buxton Inf S. Tow*j - Hamlets; Mrs C 
M G Brock, serv to commty. Plym- 
outh: Mias B Brasnan. admtnstr. 
Servile House Home for Phys 
Hndcppd: K H Brown, toe ana seny 
offr. Wei Rome Gp: TN l Browning. 
SEO. DHSS: D J Buckle. (Ust sec. 
Oxford TGWU: Mrs M Bun. Pol and 
uubi aerv: P Burch. .««> prof and 

icchnoi offr. MOD; D W toairigh. lerti 
dir. Bvflect fetry, Britaw Excetfcr: R J 
Burrows, sav .to. ag. Lrics. Mm M H 
Bunon. My 

C«t. Pawcv. , 

O w omeron, gen med praemr. 
Hawick: C W Carter. *c*M offr. Nat 


MEL: J C Henderson. Diy dir. Wood 
Llthgow. Lerwick: B J Hcskerh. lay 
sen electron news gmrng CWWWi, 

BBC: H W Heywooa. poT serv: A J 
HUhnan. serv to cozrumy. W Mia- 
tonds, 

Mrs H HlnchUfTe. serv to Newbury 
Arts Wriahxta P A Hind. My hang aid 
offr. Erewaalt 8C G wHJmL reg 
contr. Bd of in Rev-. Mrs M 1 Hirst, gtt 
and publ servnS AM Hodgson, serv to 
ropey football; Miss R HgMbwortlb 
COUta. Bd of In Rev; R G HotL prod 
man. swtchv nod Igntn prdet gp. 

Lucas Aerospace. 

Mbs P Hotraear. sen pa. RIBA: Miss 

D L Holmes, Itly ltd lehr. Ravenswood 

Inf $. Newcastle upon Tyne; KE Hoy. Ittywpfbr 
Itly co-otdlnalor. fid sidy coil Wah R F Sutton. 
Biam Cross: Mrs M O Hubfcki. serv to man dir. M 
muse in nqsp:.w j L Hughes, myoa y Szubvroki. 

ora. Hereford. Fed of Yng Frmrs 
owe O l Hunter, chm. Buxton Fstvl: 

Miss S S Hunter, snr pets sec. BT; T 


K J Hyde. dcp hdmajL WUSthOrtM S. 
Long Eaton. Dtrty. 

D N tog. serv to Fine Serv Nat Ben 
Fnd: w E G Januo, niy man dir. 
Western Gazette: S Kelly, plant mger, 
SUunnln. Fort Molar CoT Mrs V 
Kennedy, pm. Lge ofFnitb. Si 
Atoans City Hosp: I C King, dep 
hdtehr. Downs Sec S. Danfort: Miss 
M Kiog^. illy guldcr-ln-chargc. 
Foxlease Trainng Cent. GG Assita w 
jting . aery toDinnf rka ana Gaitoway 
Lraftaenda Fno: G Klrtpn. sen tutor In 
psyc. Macclesfield Httn Auth: F W J 
Landragto. Id Offr I. DHSS: R 
LangdSe/FCO: P J Lanimer. pol aerv: 
V Lawrence, exec offr. Bd Of tn Her. 
wrs D H Lawry. gee. comteh Fish 
Producers' Ora and Cornwall inshore 
FMinrnl Fed : B A Laws, lily prof 
enqr. Marconi Uncbwtr Systms: Mn 
M Leech, serv to Doncstr cel for vol 
Serv; Mias H E Lewis, pol serv: D C R 
Link, prog mgr. sgacc and communs 
di v. BAc: Mrs V J Urrnard. 
insOT r^WOT tair. Bournemih. Nat Cy- 
dlng Prof Scheme: Mrs J Locking, pol 
and putt serv. 

_ R J Logan, v-efim Lanarkshire Him 
Bd; PCS Low. mgr. Ifhey Meadows 

M Lyne. mgr. tiv ' 7 - 

Macieay. mbr. IJ — -• ^ 


™Tfi!L QUEENS,JWD 

A knights bachelor 

and suiion cokind ertme prvntn Andrews, Mr Justice Dormer 
pmu: MH. E P Roy. SEO. ora, or Geo^e, Chief Just& S 

_ Mrs E .Sandercock. pol serv: A Queensland. 

iSKSv Aram *k*a sa^nL 1 omun Hidscher, Leo Arthur, Under 

Treasurerof Queen^and. 

agSJFg 

«f EngdM«S«v^AA MVIo MICHAJEL AND 

S?; K Sr “° RGE 

Nrthrn SMnniog Dlv. Counauids: Mbn CMG 

M H Simpson, itly exec offr. Long rw D u/ 

Ashton Rra am. afrc. Dr k W Strong, serv to med 

P Simpson, ira dir, N Africa. PTOfii. 

Gommwith War Graves- commn: D S OCntTt> GP rur 

Slnnon. Sat serv. A Sieihorn. treas. U ltUB Jt Ur 1HE 

Nrthrn Ccl of Grocers: G R Slater. PO! BRITISH FIWPIDP 

and putt serv: c H Sira, advr tor oldr wiviiton IMVlrlKL 

educ. Nortfunbrtnd : Mies W Smaltey mr 

IMrs Hamilton). nura dir. BNAiAWA „ , _ UHE 

M J Conomos, serv to commty. 
Ednbrgti and E Scotind: Miss H Smith. OBE 

serv to eommly. Halifax: Mrs M A R K Bougtah. serv to muse j r 

1*5 Sind cab. MeMaa*«,SratottongindLrt-iw5-S 

P MOr ‘ IK sS - ”- 

man dir. M K SkawK , „ MBE 

to ons, paroc A ’ Bray, serv to commty: Mrs w j 

ward, serv to Jov ce. serv to commty: S Ungara 

winn's section. RBU Mrs J B Sumner, tory to hra bwte V r Luck, serv to 
emc offr, HSE MTS M A_w_Sumner. fiffiMfeMgi M £ PUgeon. serv to 

blang induse N v nice, serv to iw. 
keepg: M D Sheehan, serv to nuraa. 

IMPERIAL SERVICE 

ssssai J Nlr%?S™iwSSa DOV Sr^^L™ r 

Tf m Thomas, serv to RAF Bra BRI1 mStS1? PIRE 

Fund: F J Thrower, design dir. MEDAL 

Darrnqtn GtoerMrs MM S TUhiry. Mrs M □ Anderson, serv to commty 
serv lo commt y. R fldjUWll_ P JS Mrs B A Bennett, serv to commry- a 
T imms, chmn- man dir. nexltt e M FraiotL serv to commty: mm j 
Technology. Rottwaasn R D Tovto’. Hickhng. serv to commiir: iwrs w 1 
asst ping nigr. CatwKk. BAA: N ~M Ltoyd. wv to COmmlv. in partic Dllmr 
TosIlpoI serv: R ATpwers. ffiO. T W McLucas. serv lo eommly: Dm 
MOO: Miss H S Trahg._aerV to McPherson, serv to commty: Mrs D 
badrnnto: 0 C J Tgnier. SEO. Acacl Nichpfegn, serv to commty; m b 
N Turner, chmn. Bristol Churches Hsg RyaQs. serv to commty: Mrs J H A 


and putt serv: G H $iw. advr tor oidr 
educ Northmbrtnd : Mias w Smaltey 
(Mrs Hamilton), ours dir, SNA: A W A 
Smith, my pres. AiumlMun window 
ask the Rev G Smim. serv to deaf. , 
Ednbrgh and E Scotind: Miss H Smith, 
serv to commty. Halifax: Mrs M A j 
Smith, serv to commty. Lerwick: Miss i 
K M Sne win. SEO, Moth Mm G 
Snow, serv to Maccfand CAB. 

G Spence, toy POn aost ttradhxi) 
YEB: Miss EM staddon. rxec offr. 

man dir. M K shows: 
Stevenson, serv u> arts, parte 
music, foW: Mrs M Steward, aerv to 
Vann’s section. RBU Mrs J B Sumner, 
exec offr. HSE: Mm MAW Stunner. 
Ittv srp fire entai offr . St affs 1Mfc - 

.. HEO. DHSS: M 

man dir, MoorOte Dectrd: Mias t 
Szubyraid, itly commty mtowtry 
ttttowMWth Auth: R Tarleton 
Hodgson, sunt. B Pol: H JTftdjf. 
observer cdr. No 6 group Norwich- 
ROC. 

P F M Thomas, serv to RAF Ban 
Fund; F J Thrower, design dir. 

Timms, chmn. man dir. nexltte 


OBE 

A»mbto iSh, ” r ’ IUV S***** 1- - of 

S' ££“"«•■ jetv.toS mul commty: T 
G Hodge, serv lo hndcppd chidm. 

IMPERIAL SERVICE 
ORDER 

l A KocrtriJD, serv to AiulusL 

BRITISH EMPIRE 
_. „ „ MEDAL 

T r Avery, serv to co m uit v p u 
5*fratt- serv xo ag. cornmiy; Mre E iwv 
P** coc. soc wc^wrtc. Mrs E M 

QUEEN'S POUCE 

H L SotrthcmJ'SP^Lvmta. 

OVERSEAS TERRITORIES 

BRITISH EMPIRE 
_ „ A MEDAL 

iurrau^^f’ K^H P oU n ol, ^ 1 pf,n 
offr . Customs and Ex. HK' pji jS? 
snr cier offr. ends cul- Hk- . u 

was sSnfiS?® 

QUEEN’S POUCE 

R.m^ mhan, ^SA L RHK Pol- T 
RHK ' CPM - Ml conunnr. 


a eng. MkTCOhl 
on. wks ac aw 


serv to co mm iy: c Shaw 

commiy: E L voungT serv u 

canunty. 


space Syflems: R wanon. wks accnr 

oovri. Mil Alroun Dlv. warton. BAn. caovndy, 

aL! QUEE^rs POUCE 

SSS.'S ... . . , M EDAL 

servtortMnmty » Batemo. _MWto- J M 

thian. J A w wtotf iafl. ch si mt- Mf QUERN'S FIRE 

o!ritown U c2S^-^.*S , A^Tc SERVICE MEDAL 


QUEENS POUCE 
. MEDAL 


lhian. jaw wMdirid. ch sxmt. Mf QUEEN'S FIRE 

SERVICE MEDAL 
JM^-rtftroWtyonr.SateFlro 
matron. Joan Htfl stewmt Ejctra -■ 


House. Ednbrgh. AbbeytWkl Soc: R C 
winton. serv to meng: Mrs _P 
Woodford, au x offr; NwcsOo upon 

Tyne. RN Aux Scrxv 

DLV Woodham. chmn. Woodhnm 
Bras: Miss Sm whom, lamiy chmn . 
Nat assoc of Nranr andjFatnty Care. 


xy\: 



STATE OF TASMANIA 
ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 
CBE 

D V Gunn, for publ and 
commiy serv. 


QUEEN'S FIRE 
MEDAL 

Garainer. ctf roc 

COL fS5 AL POUCE 

AND FIRE 

ROBe.??« ^CE MEDAL 

Fire Serv M sin offr hk 

Fire sen- nV rtSSi dlv oflr HK 
S-T Charia mn Oremn |5}K 

Dunn, mpi . RHif’ffiP.- J*#* Pol; Nfl 

M tee. stain Pol™ 

RHlTpS^ Po): M-t Lee. 
MrGill . Pol: J T 

Man. stain jq. 'oSTOBi b Pei- w.y 

ST?- BplWfcWSsS* 

HK Fire sir.:. i’£ rw - Star di v 
Pol.' RhK 






up <JS 



H Crc t 


" J 1 i} ^ i \ ft 

_ ■‘•o jVs 


i^d, 


■^ii^NAyv 


— — — THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 

Bernard Ashley, Terence Beckett and Alan Ayckbourn 


HOME NEWS 


NEW YEAR HONOURS 


r 

■ 

• -f Jjii V S 

J**** 

•‘v,. r 

V-H .5 tT*r. 

-■SI® 

. . Ow ji® J- 

- '*■ 

■yfjm, 

* t 


vraaj# 

; : ;^ross 
' * 
k t*-. 

.. *'• 

; ' V -v9%5 

* . : -.a. 4, s? 

■ 

,.;v# 

■ - '.T 

; tv 7 VJ 


=’- -v. y- 


diplomatic service and overseas 


-■*■<••• 
. • :. '•*’ 


f: 

\ r S'EE 

- .1? 


KNIGHTS bachelor 

Alien. Peter Austin Philip 
jermyn. lately Chief Justice or 
Uganda. 

Cheong. Oswald Victor, for 
public services in Hong Kong. 

ORDER OF ST 
MICHAEL 
AND ST GEORGE 
GCMG 

Bollard, Sir Julian. H M Ambas- 
sador, Bonn. 

KCMG 

Audbuad. Christopher John, 
lately Dirccior-Gcncra! for 
Energy, Commission of the 
EC, Brussels. 

Ewans, Martin Kenneth. British 
High Commissioner. Lagos. 
CoodaflL Arthur David Saun- 
ders. Foreign and Common- 
wealth Office. 

Thomas. Jeremy Cashel. H M 
Ambassador. Athens. 

Lire, John Bums, H M Ambas- 
sador. Brasilia. 

CMG 

R J Alston. HM Amb. Muscat: J 
A Birch. Dep Perm Rep. UK 
Mission to UN. New York: G S 
Burton. FCO: CDS Drace- 
Francis. HM Charge d* Affaires. 
Kabul: M A Foley, lily dep Dir- 
Gen for Dcvcit Co-opertn. 
Comm of EC. Brussels: P E Hall, 
hlv FCO: P W Heap. Minister, 
Brit High Comm, Lagos; A J C E 
RcUte. FCO: S Stephenson. Illy 
Brit Consul-Gen, Vancouver; M 
L Tail, HM Amb. Abu Dhabi; E 
M West. Illy dep Dir-Gcn, FAO 
Rome. 

ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 
CBE 

E G Baber. Illy Justice of the 
High CrL HK: R Hutchcon. for 
serv to jmlsm. HK; A A Kjnch. 
lily bd of Reg Pol D»v, Comm of 
the EC. Brussels: P B Naylor, 
lily Bril Crl Rep. Greece; C H 
Seaward. Illy HM Coo-Gen. Rio 
dc Janeiro. 


OBE 

£2L£J2f v 3h a ? ,,i *">*»• wrv to 

cofnmly. luimbn. r d Butterfield 
crnnmjy. J W 

*«- Gout senailat. HK: D 

v raSSTSl lu iLS£ M Cncl rcoTuCoihw 

WjfWWtWi. serv la rammir. 

to ap dovrt. 
Dinwiddle. 8ni OU Reg 
wp. CAlcutlii: W A EbmUtn, ser\ lo 

£****“"• B *2 r «*■. HK; A K Grom. 
« leomifinto, hm eiw». t« 

_ M«P O HarrKon. Consul. Oril Con- 
Pyynw/: C N M,JMn. my 1=1 
H igh Comm. New Delhi: J E 
#"S. wsl1 *« lo CDTnmUi. 
R L Keatmg. Hon Brit Con. 
TjenorHo: j G UMuy. tuy isl wr 
iC^^Jlarj. Bril Hlqh Comm. Logo*: C 
MonlosnKo men wolf mv lo 
romnwv. CJbraiiar: O H Recover. illy 
ronwl icommrrrii. ant Con -Gen. 
Dtawtoart. DT K M Roferrtaon! med 

WcammlySSwKCR 

-S12l w J ce . jjM Emh. Knew: J T 
25?{22v R"'. Cv * Awln. HK: n P 
wmitofi. Isl sre (Acbnuu. BrU High 
Comm. Nicosia: Mm E Wong Bel-lee. 
X5J°J!P , L. m « 0 *a- HK: J * wrigni. 
CulBrt Attache i Ur It Com. HM EmO. 

MBE 

*£ns E Sracfcra. sirngphr. BrH Oon- 
Ceo Auckland: Lady JE BmnrMw. 
wclT «h to mrrtly tiandcppd. HK: KC 
Oun. Wit coni f Telecoms t. PO. HK: J 
Ctoen M-h. wrtf mv to commly- HK; 
E DWn. admin. Min of Edur. 
Berm'xtj pc Dunn, admin o«r, hm 
E mh. Aden: M C Dutton, uty Attache. 
HM Lnm. Beirut: R B Edmonds, serv 
I# B«1t rommtv. Los Angeles: J H 
Evans. Min nr Wfr. inf Serv Oepl. 
HK: l A Par lo. valln oftr. Crown 
Lands Dept. Glbrur. 

Miss M Hayes, non am d hw serv to 
comnriy. Niger; JIB Hiakjp. dir cvl 
asm. Cayman K: uk* Rev W H Howe. 
MTV to commly. Uonhnril; Mn M P 
Jar Ison, snv M Bnl commly. Ceou. 

cxmioms and rt serv. Hk; e R 
Lawrence. Hon But con. Monterrey. 
^xico^D Lee S-u dir of admin. Bril 

.Ma s MCA Unes. lUy Pa to HM 
Consul. Durban: Miss a L Lupo. v- 
con. Bnl CoivGen. MarseUJea: Mfco M 
J McShera iSr CvrUL nun and wed 
serv to commly. Kenya: Dr Mok W r. 
oep comm. Auxty Med Serv. HK; D o 
MorOock: niy sen supt. RHKP: C J 
Ptzarro. scr lo edur. Gibrtir: Mrs I H 
Pringle, serv la ex Scr-vtcmn. Oublui. 

C E Ranee, imol serv. Bermuda; 
Cowilm Mrs A Rey. Perm Sec. 
Anguilla: Miss m d p Reynolds, son 
ser lo HM Amb. Lisoon: A A 
Robinson, deo Jin sec. Turks and 
Caicos fa; D M Row. illy aal comm 
oi Pot. Konya; R f Sutnr. 2nd Sec. 
HM Emb. Bonn; Miss D E Tabmiacie. 
nun, and writ serv lo co nanny. Ghana; 
P H walker, av sec. Fire serv Dew. 
Hk. J Walters, sen to Bril shipona 
inirsts. Kenya: Mrs I J A Zimmer, 
nvmn. romml asst. HM Emb. Bente. 

IMPERIAL SERVICE 
ORDER 

H M A Bristow, dep dir. Urban Serv 
Dent. HK: U T-m. awl dir of munepi 
sery. hk: F □ Roane, pnn Govt Land 
HK". 


ROYAL VICTORIAN ORDER 


GCVO 

Hamilton of Dalzell, Baron 
John d’Henin. 

K.CVO 

Batten, John Charles. 

Pullen. William Reginald 
James. 

evo 

Maj S G B Blewitu Maj RAG 
Courage: D G Illingworth. 

LVO _ 

canon A D Caesar P ECraw P W 
Flaxman; J P Kyle: G G N Mackenzie; 
Canon J G M W Murphy: V L Seyd. 

MVO 

D Chappell: Mrs E CnU 9 -Coooer; R L 
Day: Capt P M Heming. RM; G A 
Hiscock: v G Jewell: Miss R W 
Menztea: Insp FG Sndth. Met Pol: R £ 

wuuon. 


IMPERIAL SERVICE 
ORDER 



GRENADA 


ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 
OBE 

C A John, serv to edur J E Butler. 
puw serv. 

MBE 

D E Hypoitte. sen. to etfuc, LA 
Robert, serv lo educ: J E tXUMI. serv 
lo commty 

BRITISH EMPIRE 
MEDAL _ 

A A Lewis, serv as shpwrghi. 
seafarer: D B Joseph, serv OS 
snpwrgtiL fshrmn. 


ORDER OF ST 
MICHAEL 
AND ST GEORGE 
CMG 

C Walker, Min for Primary 
Inds. 

ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 

CBE 

Mrs J Perks, publ serv. 


For services in connection with 
the Hampton Court Ore. 

Mi* J M Band: J Cowell: C GeoTSe; I 
K Cray. 

ROYAL VICTORIAN 
MEDAL 

PCAlhOwM isitecljoravitw 
P J Bruton. RAF; Mrs E M ^penten 
J E Ctartu H G Court: PO WEM 
(Rad to j a R J Daughtry: CotTN 
Davies. RAF; J J w Devonshire: V J 
DunsUn: B E Farrow. Mrs N 
Fenwick; C FlpwJen C L Godfrey; 
CPO Steward J I Maudsicy : r j Pine: 
Sgt R Porter. M*( POL A E Robinson: 
F Smith. 

For services in connection with 
die Hampton Court fire. 

j R Daniel: K Taylor. 

ROYAL VICTORIAN 
MEDAL 
(Honorary) 

M. G S Georges. 


MAURITIUS 


Knight Bachelor 
Raffray, Put Joseph Raymond 
Andre, QC. for public service 
and service to the legal 
profession. 

ORDER OF ST 
MICHAEL 
AND ST GEORGE 
CMG 

P V Y Lagesse. serv to bn kng. 
ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 
CBE 

A V Che mar, po! and publ serv; 
A V C FonSing, serv to trdeand 
rnd: D Ramdharry. vot soc wrk, 
serv toind. 

OBE 

M Y BetueL orom of shlppng: G 
jmgree. vm soc wrk: R T Naik. serv In 
fid of Only pinning. 

MBE _ u 

P Ganeshan. wrv to prmry educ Mre 
MLS OdM. serv in .nrsnw P 
Hookoom. wol soc wrtr. P Luximow. 
voi soc wrk: B Mutty. voi soc writ R 
Ramchurn. voi soc wrk: Q Raroduny. 
voi soc wrk: S Sunassce. voi soc wrk: 
r B TacoontyaL voi soc writ. 

IMPERIAL SERVICE 
ORDER 

A B Khadaroo, publ serv. 

MAURITIUS POLICE 
MEDAL 

L F R AssareptiL My ch tnsp: R 
Locfiantianie; Illy sgi: R F 
Rangapanaiken, lUy pc. 


OBE 0 c 

P J Doyle, serv to ksursm. R S O 
Nawakrwolo. publ serv: S M K 
Sheranl. serv to rnusuin commly. 

MBE _ _ 

M R Akbar. serv lo sowing, commly: 
S L Bigan. serv lo an. commly: R 1 
Buaserau- serv to mea care, commty: 
Mrs K T Bouwalu. sen- I# an. 
commty: R Singh, serv to gum tmsprt. 
commly. 

BRITISH EMPIRE MEDAL 

M S ail serv to commly: T L Joe. 
publ serv: D M M Khan, putt sov 
Mrs M Mucvoab/hi. PUM serv: h P 
Natr. S*rv lo as. commty. 





Viscount Cahkcote 
(KBE), 69 retire* next 
Jolj after seven 
years as chairman of 31 
(Investors in 
Industry). 




Roger Birch (CBE), 

56, bead of Sussex 
force, is due to 
become president of the 
Association of Chief 
Police Officers. 






Sandy Lyle (MBE). Kenneth Maidment 

leading British golfer (CBEX 64. President of 
who has won 16 the British Fnm and 

important tournaments Trtrtidoo Prodacers 
indodiiiR the Asseriatkm since 

British Open in 1985. 1976. 


m 



■ ■ ■ il, _ ■ • “n 








Graham Dowling 
(OBE), 49. Opening 
batsman who 
captained New Zealand 
in 19 of his 39 Tests 
before back problems 
brought retirement 
in 1972. 


Barney Hay hoe 
(Kt), 61. Tory MP Rw 
Brentford and 
Islewortb. Minister of 
Slate. Treasury. 
1981-85 and previous 
government posts. 


Iris Murdoch 

(DBE), 67. Novelist, 
poet, philosopher 
and playwright. She 
was made a OBE in 
1976. Her novels 
mdndc The Bell, 
and The Sea, 


f tv^r'7 T* 


Bernard Hesketh 
(MBE). 60, retired in 
August alter more 
than 30 years as a BBC 
news cameraman in 
which he covered the 
Falklands conflict. 





Frank Gibb (KtJ, 
59, was appointed 
chairman and chief 
executive of Taylor 
Woodrow, one of 
Britain's largest 
construction 
companies. 




Alexander Fletcher 
(Kt),57, Tory MPftw 
Edinburgh Central 
since 1973. Former 
junior Scottish 
minister and consumer 
affairs minister. 



Fat Jennings 


for Watford, 
Tottenham Hotspur 
and Arsenal: played 
in record number of 
first-class matches 
(1,097). 


C R Andrews, prof and gen supenry 
C. MOD: Mis P a Andrews, roy UDnr 
on*. Holme Valley. WRVS; B Armll. 

a lrtnn. Stevenage. .Space .and 
muns Dlv. BAe: Mrs K Arm- 
strong. serv to contmlv. Fortro&e. 
Rcs-shlrr: R C Anwood. ch phoio- 
nrlnter. DTI: G M Bain, coral. 
Strathclyde: Mrs J W Baker, serv to 
commly. Lavmhara. Suffolk; V M 
Bali. «»l supplies offr, Dept of Euv. S 
J Bamford. club mgr. RAF St 
Mawgan. Naafl. 

K Cl Barningham. consL N Yorks 
Mn A L Barron. Shop Sherd, branch 
sec. TCWU. MuUard: E W Barton, aut 
planl attdl. waler trtmnl seel. 
Slay i home. Mid Reg. ,CEOB: P M 
ftu-Jiua. re catoed sub-ot/t. warwfcks 
Fire Bode: Mrs R Bradnell. dlv supl 
nursg. Cleveland SJAB: A D BennetL 
sgl mat inslr. ACF: D S Benn etL. suh- 
pstmstr. Sioctnon Brook SPSO. sukc- 
on-Trenr. Mrs m Benson, serv to 
commiy. Wigan; C D Bercsford. Wg 
(non, staffs: Mrs J E Bcynon. serv to 
commly. Bristol: A L Bhattl. dvr. 
Ros&endale Trtul. 

A Bietny. serv lo commly. Dartngln: 
C G Blurt i . Inwi. For Commit: E C 
Bollon. serv to commly. Cardiff: SW 
Bowman. lUy fttter/imr. MOO: Mrs D 
N sown. Cent org. Mortlake and E 
Sheen Ot Flwshp of serv: F H L 
. Boxer, seiv io_Fnends of Hwertmty 
Hosp Assn: J T W Brings, irmn crane 
dvr. Swadlincote Wrksnps. Brit Coal: 
L BroadhursL FCO. _ 

J Burton, sgl- Notts Consiab: MBS R 
Camobell. sub-PO assL BaMvaruch. 
Benbecula: D G Chalk. Indr. WUIon 
and DcJ Ylh Rnd: E S Chambers, engr 
inttn. SouLhmpln Ocn Hosp: G 
Ch artery, peed oprive. Birds Eye 
Waits. R w Cnawrw. see ofll. w 
Midltjh PTE; C B CJwew-man. const. 
Mel Pol: J G Childs, clerk class m. Nl 
prison serv: D R Clark, dfairtb offr. 
wales rrg. Brit Gas: J R dark, area 
entrtr. Asmngcon waierSupply DepoL 
Nodfuttbm water Auffi: B G Clay, 
machnr a arf. KMSO. 

E Coleman. iuy back rhgmn. LMR. 
BR: D L Collins, bosun. Bril and 
Cofnmwith Shiog: A S Cooke, lay 
crane aptr. Nl mys: J CoraetL sgL 
RLC: P Cotsonb. FCO: Mis J C 
ColUss. fosir prnl. Cairns soc sm 
dept; H J couch, aually aitrt offr. 
Bunons Gold Medal Biscuits: J H 
Common, ora irmn icivUL PI of 
Sunder Ind A nth: Mrs N E Cowin. serv 
lo Ute of Frnds. R Morsden Hosp: P 
Cratolc. sec. E Reg. Scot jun FA: Mrs 
E M Cummin. Mind dub org. York. 
WRVS. 

J E R Davies, serv to dsblil in 
Rhuodtan and <usL Ciwvd: Mrs C 
Dokic. clnr. S Yorks Pol: J R Dawdle, 
sub-ostmsfr. Ganrarfficn M 5 u&PD. 
Swansea: Mrs J T Drummond, sen- to 
HealhBd. E Sussex Dlv. SBAFA: T 
Duckling- off kpr IA- Met Pol; D A 
Each 11 s. sgl. Thames VJly: MrsFME 
Edmonds, tectr. SJAB: D Edwards, 
vhrie Ur. motor dlv. R-R: J T 
Edwards, bailiff. Percance Co Cl: D w 
Emmetl. cons. Hants: Mrs V E L 
England. Lndn nor Org. Havering. 
WRVS: Mrs C R Farrell, nghbriy aide. 
Wandsworth soc sen- dept. __ 

W Farcies, chief obs. NO 22 Cp. 


British Empire Medal 


Grattan, dep. TharaW OoUry. Notts. 
Brit coat. 

S Hadaway. dvr. S RfH- SR: C F 
Hamer, prof ana lech ofir. Moth L w 
Hankin. snr motrwy supl Hants: L 
Hants. (oofriT) macnnsi. Raven E R 
Harrison, gas meter examr gdc IL 
Dept of Energy; Mrs E M Hawes, serv 
to commly. Stradbrok e. S uffolk: A 
Henson, dm cnee mtr. ttjwu. Alcan 
HWt Duty Extrsns: A C HecUonL toy 
irmn electrn and dep cut of wte. 
WeMntfitster Abbey: F W Herbert 
prof and (ecbnol offr. MoD. 

G Hibbard, snr lech. Sheffield U: R 
Howlen. parks frmn. Grantham. S 
Km even DC. G Hudson, sen- to 
Furness War V« Bet> Assn and 
Funiess tv. King's Own Royal Border 
Re« Assn: A H WHamnifes. sery to 
Na&worUi Beys' Oub. Gtoucs: Mrs W 
M Irving. Iwroe care asst. Cumbria soc 
serv dept 

Mrs H F jagaard. Illy SEN. 
Loavestfen Hosp. SW Herts HA; Mrs J 
M Jenkins. co-onL Women's HUh 
Concrn: F A Johnston, snr drgtsmn 
icartog and recdg). Ord sn J H 
jotumon. iuy otsmn am . tchr. 
fronbntge Co roe Muk L G Jones. 
fHbin superv. Porttintti Watert lC N 
Jordan, enkr. Omagh CPS. wstn 
and Lfl» Bd: vT J Kidd. frmn. 


RusejL sec gtf. Dert or 
Persnnl. Nl: Mrs V Rvan 
commiy. LivrpL W 
Scout Assn. Lake DBt J _ 


Jordan, cnw. Omagh CPS. Wstn 
Educ and Lfl» Bd: w J Kidd. frmn. 

Dept Of Env: F j Klnseila. — 

HOSP. Eastern Health and,. 

Bd: M A Klrtc. COBSL W Yorks met 
PM: K C KreUe. serv to Scout Assn, 
Mrs K M A Lacy- serv to DarOra 
Rural Dlv SSAFA: T H Lane, ships 
supvsr. TUbury Dries. Pi of Lndn 
Auth: Mrs J L Laurance. chm- Fanny 


conlrir. Rac*i-Mot>ilral: O e Findlay. 
10 incr. hand.vman. Craigte C of Ed. 
Ayr: n Fltzpoirlek. InshitM njKr. 
MOD: R J B For rmu. mOLRUC C w 
Foster, ch offr I. Leeds Prison; L T 
Fronds, mtr tramp and mcch eng 
mgr. staraied airpt. 

C Fraser, dvr. Soutfuoptn City 
Trans: H Friend, coral. S Wales; F K 
Call] more. lUy rrtkr. Lcffwich HS. 
Norwich: G A Gardner, serv lo iacouf 
Ann. Essex: J Carrtly. Insp. James 
Hawdeir R E Gear. Crtkr. Fotkestnc S 
ir Gris: Mrs K Gem. serv lo coranuy. 
Carlisle: Mrs J B Gentrv. ch obs iW>. 
No 4 Group. CoKlfiff. ROC: J Gibson. 
siorkmn. Moredun Res Jnsi: D 
GUmartln. consL Gtr Manch: M W 


Leyland. lUy com*. Meesrade nol: C 
LiddlcoaL det agL M£l pol: C AlJcyd. 
iuy assy shop supL Fajrey Kydrics: C 
R Lawman, serv to Seoul Assn in 
Hemyock. Devon. 

McAfee. _gr D roadmn. Dept of 
Env. Nl: C C Macdonald, nrtn offr. 
HM Prison Inverness: 

Mcflvcep. serv 10 commly. 
Lymtotone- Devon: S McK Mc- 
Laughlin. caulker. Hartand and WqW; 
Miss a McNally, serv lo Hexham and 
Newcstle Diocn Rescue Soc. W 
Maddocks. kta ambteemn. E HUh and 
Soc Serv Bd. >0: J Main. hartJT mar. 
Burahcad.- J H W Martin, coon mecfi. 
.Hastngs EffLRNU: R 
ndcr^NW Tnmsmism DHL MWlds 
Reg. CEGB; W H Martin. NO 2 oar. 
Secondry Sleeimakng Unit. 

Rayenscratg. BSC. ^ 

G Matte, mn-wy from. Durham CC: 
G A Meacham. sen wksbp superv. 
Neasden Ruo Stock DepoL unto 
Lmdrond.' J Mercer, oft kpr H. MoD: R 
C MUam. m ej aar and post aaL 
Fareham Bor Cri. 

J A Moona-. sol RUC: D O Moore, 
ch offr B. HM Prtton Ranby: F W J 
Moore, serv to commly. Wlmborne 
Miraier: Mrs I R Moore, sec olft- g- V. 
Crown Prosn serv; J Mortice, dvr. 
Fife Scot Omnknses; J H Morris, serv 
lo commty. Rom f ord:. L Morrison, 
farm tiuff. Min of Ag. Fish and 
Fm^k l^Ntorphy.jch petty offr Instr. 

ltd stiptind. - — 

Dumfriesshire: 8 Nelld. frmn 
wrhsmn. Longton Storage and Tram. 

Mrs A S Newman. Wr pmL Leeds 
Soc Serv Dept: Mn N Newsome, serv 
to commiy. Come, uack f C NIML 
«gf mil bear, jst Catfrt Bartn. Ckn 
ACF: A N Nwrti. lOyestai 
. MOD: m B K MCB LNwn 
ring superv. Duncan of Jordans one 
Coll of Art: J G Oliver, retnd stam 
offr. Tyne and Wear Fire Brig: R J 
Owen. mstr. Trtn Hse ligil VM serv: 
B B Palfrey, superv. Wine and Spirit 
Store. Greene King: J Parkin, phar- 
macy asst. Manners (HaiswontU D j. 
Bamty. 

R W J Pearce, veh msp. Frghi Trans 
Assn: Miss E Pedley. sub-pstmstrss. 
Crfnton. Richmond. N Yorks: > L 
Peters, frmn. For Comian: Mrs M E 


and 

" Ryan, serv to 

_ Sadler, serv to 

Scout Assn. Lake DOI. J H SoUon. snr 
frmn. Brush Transfrmrs: D Sayers, ch 
Offr 1. HM Prison FranktoBd^K 
Sharkey, chghnd ovhd lasnui. YEB. 

W B Sbotbcm. chgfmd sewer man. 
Middlsbrgh BC; Mm S J. Shore, snr 
stoceknr ilnduutL Home Off: C R 


recdg). Ord Sur« A Sanh. fl___ 
prodn pckgg. Ford: A F stnha. del 
con. Met Pot Mrs E Smith. £str pou. 
Lefts soc serv dept: J H Smith, serv to 
RBL. SotnrsL J W H Snriih. sub-ofir. 
Essex Fire Brig: H W Smy. serv to 
commiy. isle of Arran: Mrs B R 
Soartes. accts superv. Ho of Qim- 
maoa: S Spiers. Illy prsn offr. Nl Prsn 
serv: E Stevens, serv to commty. E 
Sraeex: Min P N steveraon. serv to 
Nl Reg Cci of Chinch Miesmy Soc: J E 
Stride, const. Mel pal: W Sturman. eti 
offr I. HM Youth Custody CenL Glen 
Parva; R G Sweetiand. serv 10 Devons 
OW Comrds’ Aka: Mrs A TaiL serv 10 

P C Tate, hd custdn. Avebury Stone 
Circle. Hist Bldgs and Mnmis Oomtnn 
for Etorid: Mrs I M Taylor, ettst org. 
Matostoae. WRVS: L G Taylor, prof 
and teen offr. MoD: H L Theobald, 
tech. SriMra: D J Thompson, sgt. 
Norfolk pot: _Mfcw E D Thompson, rier 
assL Nttm ConsL 

R C M Thomson, otr ode F. Nai 
Mus of Scot: Miss R S TtxkLsgL RUC: 
F W ToraUn. serv to commty. 
ReddUriL worcs: J C K TrewheUa. 
prof and technoi offr. MoD: A 
Truscott. frmn efedrn. Amoco Fab- 
rics: f w J Tuvey. stores offr. gr D. 
MOD 

Mis F j Vann, schf cro s s g win. 
Lancs ooratab: j d wake. lUy charge 
ftr. Cortnwd COIL S Yorks. Bril Coto: 
Miss 1 s Waittce. serv 10 victoria 
Oriatrc UnU Aur cUee. Glasgow: 
Miss D E C W allis, prof and tecnnol 
offr tv. DHSS: Mrs S C I Wall work, 
dist org. High Peak. WRV& H 
WaJmsley. depot serv offr. NW Water 
Auth: Mn B vtoale mow decdk jerv 10 
Forces He® Soc and Lord Roberts 
WkshopKMlss A E Weam. serv to 
Northmptn Gen Hosp: C West, my sen 
trap. Btodcbm factory. Remptoy: R 
WetheriU. prod wrkr i. Leeds. R Ord: 
Mrs 1 F W Whitby, cent org. 
Fakenham. Norfolk br. Brit Red Cross. 

A Whitehead, princ procss superv. 
SeUadeid. BNF: H Whitehead, dvr. 
lmr. BR: J D whnahouse. ami 


A r wtonalLotswn. Lytham St Anncs 
LfbL RNU: S Wilkinson, aux cat aril 
‘ c. Bailtntoy Cst grd Rescue. Nt . . 

. " .jwi shop Rewd. AEU. 

WesUand: G W Wiseman, portr. 
Gilbert Bain Hasp. Shrtfnd With Bd: J , 


postmn hghr gr. Spibby. Boston area: 
Mrs c wyad. serv to Cham wood 
Nursty cent. Chesh: C E Yorfce. iUy 
wrhse m®-. Flowers TTOrk. 


rv to Cham wood 
It: C E York*. iUy 


Enterprise allowance scheme 


The trials of getting cash for a small business 


By Ronald Faux 
Employment Affairs 
Correspondent 

Pete Edwards and Carol 
Sharpe, a pair of recently 
fledged business executives 
from Liverpool, believe they 
have something to teach peo- 
ple who think they can escape 
unemployment by setting up 
their own business with gov- 
ernment help. 

They have discovered it is 
neither a ready path to instant 
wealth nor an easy answer to 
the tfiidmma faced by more 
than three million jobless 
people. 

Both were nnemployed 
when they started their busi- 
ness, Reindeer Hampers, a 
year ago on their combined 
enterprise allowance grants. 


but they have faced many hard 
times since then. 

Pete, aged 38, had to forfeit 
his £95 per week unemploy- 
ment benefit and allowances to 
enroll on the £40 a week 
enterprise scheme for the self- 
employed. 

Sadly the b&siness did not 
get off to a flying start and 
they were surprised when a 
local exhibition advertising 
Che enterprise scheme pre- 
sented them as an example of 
success. 

“We were actually hanging 
on by the skin of our teeth at 
the time, with few thanks to 
any of the schemes that are 
supposed to finance enterprise 
in Liverpool,'" Pete said. 

It may be, of course, that the 
line of business chosen by 
them was unwise. If so. no one 


THE TIMES 

CLASSIFIED 

01-4814000 


advised thqn against going 
ahead. 

“No one said we shonld 
think of another way and we 
both believe that a hamper 
business that gives good value 
for money should succeed, 
especially m Liverpool. 

“It is the cheapest possible 
way of making sure there is 
food in the house at Christmas 
time for families with limited 
means," Carol said. 

Clients buy the hampers 
through agents on monthly 
instalments. 

Each contains a selection of 
tinned and packaged food, 
provided at a net saving of 
about 7 per cent off the 
cheapest possible retail price. 
The saving is achieved by 
dealing direct with manufac- 
turers and ordering in bulk. 

It is a simple idea and one 
that has made several fortunes 
in the Liverpool area, where 
the Christmas hamper is a 
popular tradition. 

They cost between £5 for a 
small selection of food suitable 
as a gift and £80 for the 
groaning, luxurious variety. 

A network of agents was set 
np to act for Reindeer Ham- 
pers, bat the company quickly 
ran into a cash flow problem. 

Pete said: “We went to 
seven different banks for help 
and they turned ns down. They 
fangbed at the financial guar- 
antees offered to small 
bos messes. 

“We. also went to 14 dif- 


ferent organizations locally for 
lacking. Some were extremely 
helpful with advice, butnoo&e 
would actually produce the 
hard cash any business needs 
in its early stages. 

“Our competitors present 
their hampers in colour bro- 
chures In lavish style that we 
have no hope of affording. In 
bet we make a virtue of our 
black and white tench ore. 
People are paying for the 
actual food and not the gloss.” 

An approach to the Depart- 
ment ofTrade and Industry for 
regional development grants 
fared well at first, with sums of 
£100,000 being mentioned for 

warehouse and working 
accommodation. Bat it turned 
out that only 5 per cent of what 
the business needed would be 
available in actual grant. 

“We would have had to find 
all the rest ourselves. We went 
right Bp the garden path and 
back down again. Every alter- 
native bad a Catch 22,” Pete 
said. 

The most promising renam- 
ing possibility is a grant of 
£3,000 from the Department of 
Trade and Industry to anyone 
who succeeds m creating a job 
that lasts for more than a year. 

Both Pete and Carol qualify 
for that, although much of 
their working time is spent 
searching for funds with which 
to run their business or 
producing cash flow forecasts 


and business plans for poten- 
tial backers. 

The money has yet to arrive i 
and meanwhile Reindeer 
Hampers is bumping along on 
an overdraft seemed on their 
joint home. 

Pete said; “I was a soldier, 
1TI keep fighting. We are 
growing stowty and we are, 
determined to make it But 


up a business is an easy way 
out is in for a shock.” 

Carol said: “We have got a 
viable idea but we need the 
resources to get it further off 
the ground. 

“We have a service to 
offer - cheap food for people 
without jobs and we've got the 
enthusiasm to make it work. 
But all the red tape and 
qualifications we've met have 
made me very cynical about all 
this proposed help to industry 
that is advertised.” 

An enterprise officer at 

Merseyside Education Train- 
ing and Enterprise limited, a 
joint local authority and Man- 
power Services Co mmi s si on 
Organization, which helped 

Reindeer with business advice 
during its first year, claims 
tint seven ont oflO businesses 
they help survive tonger tban 
three years. 

But the officer admitted: “It 
is true that so many institu- 
tions offer loans — until you 
actually get round to asking 
them.'' . . 


PAPUA NEW GUINEA j 

KNIGHT BACHELOR 
Sarei. Dr Alexis Holyweek, for 
services to diplomao and ! 
public and community 1 
affaire. 

ORDER OP 
ST MICHAEL I 
AND ST GEORGE 

CMG ! 

G Wamta, \1P. publ and , 
commiv serv. 

ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE i 
DBE 

Kekedo. Mrs Mary .for services 
io community and women's j 
affaire. 

CBE 

Brown BaL publ serv. 

OBE 

1 R Ammon, sm to sprt and edur; D 1 
MUM. «t\- to commty en sn« and : 
loans sock L Donna, serv U> commiy 
and publ: Dr G J McArthur, commiy 
sen and rangy rrtf wfc. s paiauu. 
***'“ TL 2vot and commiy . 
wry: P W Quodlmg. srrv to rommre 
and tocnmtv Xli,: L C Sru wn lo 
imisnx; Mrs iSri M Soroda. sm lo 
nursg and commty. 

MBE 

D H Bnggs. serv to ronmirce: D ; 
Btvan.serv atvotnir sren and me eo- i 
ordntr: H Oaroa. serv to constblv and 
commtjr. Mrs w Dina, serv 10 wrant 
jfirv ana pal: S CiU. commis serv : P 
Kero. RPNC CoqsUj: W P I Jill , publ 
and commty serv: B Motor, commty 
serv: D Nana. PMCOF: Ms iSrl H i 
Roberts, serv to orsg and commly: E i 
Wan. putt serv. 

IMPERIAL SERVICE 
_ . ORDER 


NEW ZEALAND 



HL — 


Field Marshal Sir 
Ed win BnunaU (Life 
Peer), 61 Former 
Chief of the Defence 
Staff. Sir Edwin 
was commander, 
British Forces in 
Hour Kong. 1973-76 


PrtRL see. Exmnt br. Save Utc 
CfaMfti Fund: H P Peterson, eng sum. 
Yarrow SMpbtdrs: Mrs A E R 
Peterson, sett crossg ptrt. Met Pol: E 
R Pinkerton, bulk issue store mgr. 
Naan: T w PoH. sWR grid contrtr. SW 
reg. Brit Gas: Mrs r EPHace. serv to 
Overton Child HUh CtK Mrs L B 
Purdy, serv to Commly. Crossgar and 
Newcwe. CD Down: p W e PisflehL 
tOy son Iran. RYS 

J C Radford, res hd_ ordnr. 
Csmmwnb War Graves connrn: S 
Ramsden. Wy wt offr. Rainhatn 
DetchmnL 1039 (Gttttogham) Squad- 
ron. ATC: Mrs P M Rawscn. lunch 
club org. Lythara St Anno, wrev&c 
Redmond, reined suhstllr. Somrsl 

MrsM ; A Rees, sery to commty. W 
Gtacn: a Reilly, tobr and chgnnd. 
MoO: D H Rtgg. snr mectl I frmn. R-R: 
H E Robins, rat grd offr: S Ro ttnson . 
Ittv Stmerv. cleansing dept. Harroae 
BC; RP Rogers. coraL Staffs tjtTW 


, (Military Division) 
wo tsm sgu E. fi Booea. pngdF: l- 
Crt J DamW. PNGDF: Cdi S KabU. 
PtvGDF: Sgl Y Sanaa. PNGDF. 

QUEENS POLICE MEDAL 

CO Buica. ch ins>: R Korns, cn sum 

ST LUCIA 

ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 
OBE 

J e Edmunds. St Lucia Amb u US. 

MBE 

M P Toroatm. serv to educ and 
commty: MTS George, serv to cduc 
and Girt Cutoes. 

BRITISH EMPIRE 
MEDAL ^ n 

M Daniel, serv to corainty and Red 
Cross: L FeUx, serv to educ and 
commty. 

ST VINCENT AND 
GRENADINES 


ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 
MBE 

0*N S Barrow, my perm sec. Min of 
Ext Affrs: L E Findlay, pen to 
commty rets. London. 


ST CHRISTOPHER 
AND NEVIS 

ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 

MBE 

Mrs E M Slacken, serv to comm ty. 

BRITISH EMPIRE hffiDAL 

J O Brookes, serv to caowiuy: G s 
Hun tons, serv la commty: Mr E 
Pemberton, serv to commiy. 

BELIZE 


ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 
OBE 

S Dtsz Sr. serv to commty. 

MBE 

MBs m Bahadur, serv to irtowny: Mrs 
E V Charley, serv to educ. commty. 


vu 


KNIGHTS BACHELOR 
McMuUin, Duncan Wallacv. 

Judge of the Court of Appeal. 
Rewraf, Francis Henry, for phil- 
anthropic services. 

ORDER OF THE BATH 
CB 

R Adml L J Tempero. RNZ 
Nfltrv. 

ORDER OF ST 
MICHAEL 
AND ST GEORGE 
CMG 

A M Begfu cbmn. NZ Meal 
Producers Bd. 

ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 
DBE 

Clay, Dr Marie M, for services 

to education. 

Fraser. Mrs Dorothy R, for 
services to the Otago Hos- 
pital Board and the com- 
munity. 

CBE 

R G Collins, publ serv; Dr D M 
Davin. senr to lit: R H L 
Ferguson, serv to mcd. educ. 
local govt and commty: G A 
Hnchtngs. NZ Forces. S£E Asia; 
Mrs A M Holst, serv to home 
science; Mrs J M Keith, serv to 
nreng; E J Neilson. serv to mktg, 
expn and commty; E M Prich- 
ard. lily judge of High Cn; K O 
Thompson, coramr N2 pol; Mrs 
M A Tiller, for serv to commty. 
OBE 

C A Cammed- serv to meat indust and 
local body affair*: W R Donaldson. 
RNZ Air Force: G T Dowling. s«y lo 
meld: It W Earp. serv Jo uwifruli 
■itdusi; J L F«day. mgg tor. Acoorat 
ConwrasaUoo Coro 1981-8S. D K 
Haimltofi. snv lo lours; todust: T J 
Harm, puw.verv: l a Jotuwon. *er\ 
IO IIL J R Joyce, tore to localbody 
and trade union aifrs: D McGregor. 
Terr Free; D MacLeaa. sen lo local 
body allr* 

J F Mann, serv to educ and 
commty: w H Martin, serv lo fisting 
Indust: J R Mime, sen lo lours indust 
and commiy:, Mr* E M Page. sery. lo 
art. Dr W J Pryor, sen to anaestmev 
and med otof: K J Robertson. RNZ 
Navy: W J Robertson, sen to edne: L 
M Slovens. N2 pol: N B Ullncn. serv 
lo sort: Mrs V I M Young, sen. to athi. 

MBE 

Mr* M E Bamford. sen io edurt o N 
Bartleu. serv to enhinmnl: J R BrtgfiL 
RNZ EML Mbs L M Brook. sen_to 
muse: F J Cameron, sen- to orkl: C L 
Campbell. RNZ Navy: T M Chaoraaiv 
snr to Colt of Niue Aloft. Niue. M G 
Check, serv to edur and commly: A E 
Coaies-Earl (Mrs Armstrong), serv to 
commty: Mrs H L Coder, sen' to 
commiy: F L Courts. *n to trade 
union tnvtnm and commly. . , 

JAM DougaU. NZ poi: Mr* V I 
Dowle. serv to women: □ J Janus, 
serv to commly : M A McDowell- serv 
io coranuy: Mis J l Mdim sen' to 
commty: J D McNab. lUv 
duties). Min or Ag and Fish: E P 
Markham, serv to comraty: R G 
Mortal, serv lo Id govt: Mrs L J 
Murdoch, sen- to hefcy and ctcm. 

I BOtene. RNZ Inf RegcJS PhUUns. 

ANTIGUA AND 
BARBUDA 

ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 
CBE 

C L Lake, surg speclst, med 
advsr to gov. 

MBE 

A R A Lewis, serv to muse, commty. 


BARBADOS 

ORDER OF ST 
MICHAEL 
AND ST GEORGE 
KCMG 

Tudor. James Cameron, Min- 
ister of Foreign Affairs and 
Leader of the Senate. 

TUVALU 

ORDER OF THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE 
„ MBE 

Dr T Koto. Gov MO. 


Ills dir ol Clinci *rv an . or pi cjjrtiin. 
N A Rej-nolds. «n io RosiirA Ch ami 
runnilv. I & Rirwcii. ■*[' io swntjyi 
and commly. Mr* R H Somprviiif. 
w io aduli educ: M J Turnbull. RNZ 
Ur Free- E M Uainscoil verv lo arch 
prtwn J Williams, ven to commrv 

BRITISH EMPIRE 
MEDAL 

J Military DivisionJ 

PO P Cullen RrSz CN 

Evcull. RNZ Air Force- W Off II.L J 
Janet! . RKZ Corps of Trn*prl. 

Sgl L T Nenoun. Terr Free. RNZ Inf 
Reg 

QUEEN'S SERVICE 
ORDER FOR 
COMMUNITY SERVICE 

R L Hall. Judith. Lady Hay: P G 
McCormack. Mto E Mavali <Sr M 
Catherine'. P A Walden 

QUEEN'S SERVICE 
ORDER FOR 
PUBLIC SERVICES r 

J C C Bird: W K Comoran; J E 
Keaney: P H C Lucas, ity dir gen of 
Lands. G B Nelson, pn lc *£c lo Min or 
ihe Crown: E M Oula- C P Powlrt: A 
T Rogers: Mm J Vets in 

QUEEN’S SERVICE 
MEDAL FOR 
COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Mn J M Andrew. Mrs . J _ M 
Armstrong. Mrs V M Beomgftcld. Mn 
J B Bennea: Mrs M C Bumun: Mrs E 
C J Campbell: M C I Jamesl Cniu: Mrs 
B aims: Mrs M J Fage: Mrs E I 
FilraoIncK: C Caiger: Mrs J B Gatoert 
L vv Craham: Mrs L \ J Gunn. E T 
Haddock: J J Harley; C K Hau-ej. A J 
Heme, n P Heinz. J Lloyd Mrs b V 
Mon loo m er l e. G E Munro: L F J 
Shakk-rs: L F StoeU. WH Straw: E Tv 
Paa: BCJ Turpin: T T H S Warn: W 
A Whitehead. Mrs A J Willing: Mrs D 
L L Y armll 

QUEEN’S SERVICE 
MEDAL FOR 
PUBLIC SERVICES 

Mrs E V Ail ken; G C Apperley. 
rnstreui* raor. HMNZ Dockyard^ 
MoD. Auckland. R Behnell: R G 
Brown J C ButierfieW. traffic supt. 
MoT. Cnrstctirch: H N Chalken: F C 
Chandler. E T Cheer: MfiS R A Copra: 
Mrs W CruicWunk: Mrs K Hcmi: H O 
Ht-nsman. U .V Jaram. lily dir. Drpt 
ol Maori Alirv Rotorua: C C Leathern: 
W E Lineham. ch lire brig offr. 
karamca voi fire brio. T M S 
Mrlnwa . „ _ „ 

Mrs m Niumala: A C Paine. G 
Picketing: Mrs M E Powell: R G 
Powell: FAG ftaMrfi: J -l Rredmaft: 
Mrs M Siephera. p F L Stephenson: L 
G Trott. Mrs A E Van Caalra: T S 
WH*ok A L Welle 

QUEEN'S FIRE 
SERVICE MEDAL , 

C P H Smith, fire edr and ch lire olfr. 
Taupo Fire Bng. M J Robinson, uird 
ofir. Carterton Fire Brig: R J Kerr, 
stm ofir. Sumner Voi Fire Brig 

QUEEN'S SERVICE 
MEDAL FOR 
PUBLIC SERVICES 

W A Apes. L N Maihcson. C BerguLst 
and T L Henderson, all sen cnsibis. NZ 

^ QUEENS POLICE 
MEDAL 

G C Cunneen. del ch insp. NZ pol. 

THEQUEENS 
COMMENDATION FOR 
VALUABLE SERVICE 
IN THE AIR 

Fit U R Howard. 


QUEEN'S POUCE 
MEDAL 

D S Alichison. ace. ch eoosi. 9raUi 
Clyde: J McK Anderson, ch ■ supl. 
Northumbria: T W Bailey, rti supt. 
Derbyshire: R B»ham. ch supt. 
Cleveland: B Bnre. £* supl HM InsW 
or Coratab: J W canton, ch supL N 
VoTkshire: H G Clark, dep ch conn. 
Lothian and Borders: R CoUingwood. 
Ch supl. Hertfordshire: A N Cooper, ch 


supt. w Yorkshire. „ , , , 

C w dans, asst ch const. S Wales: 
M J Evans, dep asst comm. Mel Pot; J 
A B Gordon, const. Met Pol: h G 
Graham, irae. RUC: G P Hammond, 
const. Met Pol: M A Huttev. Jnsp. 
Dorset: W. Hlg Wards, ch supt. RUC. R 
Inoes. dep asst comm. Mel Pol: O 
Kelly, comm. Cny of Lndn: N G 
Oven*, dtp ch const. Cheshire; J 
Reddinglon- ch const. UkAEA: C J 
RidrouL cdr. Met Pol: C B wood. edr. 
Met Po!. 


QUEEN'S FIRE 
SERVICE MEDAL 

E S Sergeant, asu B 

A Leech, sen dlv o«r. Sultolii: H G 
stmt on. dep ch offr- Hants. D J 
Howarth. dep th offr. W Yorkshire: L 
E Smith, div olfr I. Shropshire: M j 
Hughes, assl.ch offr. Ewy.J Fai nter. 
sen dlv ofir. London: S H Walker, asst 
ch offr. NL 

THE QUEEN’S 
COMMENDATION 
FOR VALUABLE 
SERVICE IN THE Ant 

M Beits, ch test pilot and instrmt ratng 
exagr. Bristow Hetcptr Gp. 


* 

cQ 


FURNISHING FABRICS 

. * * " 

r< . - - 

l.-.rlirtn Lc " r. -:ij •. • 12C . (’. 

Ch.iO 


CoH.crC : ■ ;t.: N-'.vSccct--, C.". • 



Pnr.r. *05 ct 

t.5.95 

£5 55 

Liber-/ l3Scm.‘ 

• • • . '■ -.9 95 

ut 50 

L-Cc-.t, ?- vC.— cinlengtr-i 



\l0rp • ' Cr£;-r.) 

C99.5C • 

*;;c 05 

CARPGTS (j FURNITUR€ 

.Only one of t-a<j 


N.-p jli iC - . -.cire.r ■ 



r 1 1 *. -j ••• 

t.1 rt;')0 

• - ' 70 

KsvvenTu 1 .- y ' t ~ ‘ 

£.3.950 ' 

500 

Ircnicn A*.r.-- bf^WcclCc'Cvr 



■13 2 “2 

L-.2.CC0 


Ar.fi q-j€- oo'rg.; -> Zztc Tcb.e 

£925- .. 

•775 

0$:-;h:r? 2 See- Sc :c 0 Che:' 

£. 1 7 S6 

i.995 - 

DR€5S FABRICS 



W.SitoCc'" - .-.-a* .1 13::f / 



Pr:n'eoC -. 1 3 

1.5 9 3 

£3 50 ‘ 

L'beny Pr.-r N rnous Voile C9Ccm; 

£7 5Q ■ 

■ ---.SC 

Liberty c ee Shirred 



Recc.-:cSe.v Skirrj 

... 1 19.95 

•59. 55 

'.iberr/ ?n." C-c-pe dc- Chine (50:.— , 

• C2C CQ 

1‘ C.C0-- 



-V c i oo 

■W? C2.CC 


NGW YEAR'S DAY 

HALF SAL€ PR1C€ 
BARGAINS 


5CARV6S 

Pr.;^ 


HALF 

SALE PRICE 

Liberty ?/cin V/cc) Shcv.is (1 40cfr.)~ : 

£25:0C • 

£12>.5C-. 

£6.25 

Chloe Silk Sqjores (60cm)" i ■' • 

. C2Z50' 

£1-1 93 

£7.00 

Liberty Y ern Dyed Wccl Shc-.vls' (I40crn)- ' 

£35. 0C- „ 

£2p:co ‘ 

£10.00 

Liberty Print & Woe'. Showls (1 1 2cm) ■ ■ • 

£70 CO 

• £35 00 ‘ 

£17.50 

Louis Fercud Silk b Wool Showls; : 1 4Gcm) 

■ £60. CO ■ 

£40.00,; 

£20.00 

M€N5W€AR 



HALF' 

SALE PRICE- 

•Silk-Ties 

ii 0 .CO. ' 

\4. SO" 

62.25 

CcsucISbins. " ’ y ( 

£26:00.;;' 

£16:50- 

£9.25 

LeSq-JOdra Jumpers - 

£t 09.00. 

: £5C 00 

£25.00 

Lub : .cm IfciicriWoc! Suits 

■£147 .00 

'£99.00 •; 

£49.50 

FASHION ; : 



HALF 

:• SALE PRICE 

■ Lombswool Sweaters _ 

£55.00 

627..50 

£13^75 

'Wool Rib Ski:Ts 

' £62.00 

£49,00 

£24.00 

Norben NeiRcincccts .. . • • .. 

-.£162.00 

. £69.00: 

£44.50 

Liberr/ Print Vc;uno Wool '. • • ' ;>. 

; ) .. , ; 



fcVeivc-J Dresses 

£'169.00 

£94. 50';' 

£47.00 

Lcrcon Mj}\ar.y Evening Oressc-;:. 

£27,9.00 

'£ 139.06 . 

' £69.50 


.MiM:! CfJP.:.'- VI, 511 P-JKVAjl.OVtf.i ►>.; 

KNGlt »uKCM«E OVER L'.500 -1 S "C.IIH.Y Pi 
piu>Li;f;Fo?.'»*. 7 TtH 5 nA.ji. .. . 


REGENT STREET 
LONDON WI 
TeL 01-734 1234 


TOMORROW 

JAN 1 ONLY 

10am -5 pm 


REGENT STREET ONLY 


- 1 - * 




S 51 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


tttf TTMF.S WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


WORLD SUMMARY 


Army major may 
face ANC charges 

Johan nesburg (Renter) — Sooth African police yesterday 
confirmed that they were holding a white army officer, and 
|ocal press reports said he was likely to face charges of spy- 
ing for the banned African National Congress (ANC). 

lieotenant-Geaenl lan deesm, acting chief of the Sooth 
African Defence Face (SADF), said thk month that 
a soldier had been arrested for alleged subv ers ive activity. 
Local press reports named him yesterday as Major Andre 
Pienaar, an officer believed to be »t*arbed to military 
intelligence. 

An onsourced report in the Johannesburg Star linked his 
alleged espionage to “the activities of the ANC”, the main 
guerrilla group fighting white domination in South Africa. 

A police spafceattncMfiniied that Mtier Pienaar was be- 
ing held nnder Section 29 of the Internal Security Act which 
permits indefinite detention without trial with no access to 
lawyers. The Star report said two more people were believed 
to have been detained in the Investigation. 

Church 
car check 


A crop 
of gold 

Warsaw (Renter) — Gar- 
deners in Leszno, western 
Poland, could have a for- 
tune buried nnder their 
allotments, according to 
the PAP news agency. 

It said that a recently 
discovered manuscript in- 
dicated that gold treasure 
was buried near a place 
called “Lesno" in 1572. 

The gold was being 
taken from France to Po- 
land in 1572 when the 
convoy was attacked. 


Jerusalem — The cars of 
senior Christian church- 
men are to be s earche d at 
the Allen by Bridge be- 
tween Jordan and Jeru- 
salem (Ian Moray writes). 

The order affects four 
Roman Catholic, three 
Greek Orthodox and one 
Armenian church cars. 
Israelis deny any sugges- 
tion that the churchmen 
would sample, bid say 
others, might fry to hide 
thing s in them. 


Budapest reshuffle 



Budapest (Renter) — 

H ungar y has appointed a 
new finance minister and 
p lanning chief to oversee 
the shake-up in its banking 
and planning system. 

Mr Laszlo Marothy, left, 
a former deputy Priam 
Minister, becomes Presi- 
dent of the National Plan- 
ning Office, replacing Mr 
Lgjos FnlevegL The new 
Finance Ministar is Mr 
Peter Medgyessy, who re- 
places Mr Istvan Hetenyi- 

Tomorrow five profit-ori- 
entated commercial banks 
wfl] take over from the 
National Bank the job of 
running accounts for state 
enterprises. 

Left for 


Bail 

refused the dogs 


Bangkok — Thirty-three 
men, most of them Army 
NCOS and junior officers 
on trial for attempting to 
overthrow the Thai Gov- 
ernment last year, were 
denied bail again yesterday 
(Neil KeUy writes). 

The seven chief defen- 
dants were given bail al- 
most a year ago. A court 
ruled tint there were no 
grounds for giving the 
defendants temporary free- 
dom and rejected claims 
that they were not being 
treated in the same was as 
the alleged plot leaders. 


Athens — Greek police 
have launched an i ntens i ve 
search fa the driver of a 
car who, after ranting over 
a pregnant woman , instead 
of driving her to a hospital, 
abandoned her in a de- 
serted plot along the na- 
tional highway (Mario. 
Modiano writes). Her body 
was found later, mangled 
by wild dogs. 

Police have issued a 
detailed description of the 
wanted man obtained from 
two people who had helped 
him cany the woman into 
his car. 


Punjab strike bites 

Delhi — Telephone wires running alongside railway lines 
were cut in several areas of Punjab yesterday, the second day 
of a hartal (closure of shops and businesses and traffic stop- 
pages) called by die All India Sikh Students Federation 
(Knldip Nayar writes). Most trains and buses were stopped 
and most people remained in their homes. 

Railway sources said telephone wires woe cut on branch 
railway lines. Only two instances of sabotage on bunk routes 
were reported to the police ami they did no damage. 

Even shops belonging to Hind ns remained dosed in 
different parts of the state. At Phagwara, near Jalhmdhar, 
about 300 Sikh youths blocked the Grand Trank road, 
between Amritsar and Delhi for five boms. 

In Phagwara town, a clash between Hindus and Sikhs was 
averted by the police who persuaded the groups to take foeir 
p recessions along different rentes. 



Stop 


. Jf. M 1 *1. - 3. * — ... 

Victoria Jostuiani, centre, spokeswoman 'for the tmdensnmnd women’s group Malribaka. which acmes Prudent Aquino of the FfifippiMs of breaking 
election promises, leads guerrillas in a protest song daring a press conference at a rebel stronghold m Quezon province, south-east of Manila. 


Jungle rail 
link opens 
in Gabon 

Franceville, Gabon, (AFP) — 
The French Prime Minister, 
M Jacques Chirac, whose 
country is at present m the 
grip of a national rail strike, 
visited the West African state 
of Gabon yesterday to open a 
mulli-bi! Lion-pound railway 
cut through the tropical 
jungle. 

M Chirac rode with Presi- 
dent Omar Bongo of Gabon, 
and President Denis Sassou 
Nguesso from neighbouring 
Congo, along part of the 400- 
mile Trans-Gabon line, which 
links the Gabonese coast to 
Mr Bongo’s home town of 
Franceville. 

The line, which the World 
Bank refused to finance, has 
taken 13 years and cost some 
£2 billion to build. 

Although it is expected to 
cany tropical timber and 
manganese from the Gabo- 
nese interior, the railway is 
not expected to become profit- 
able in the near future. 

It has been built across 
some of the most difficult 
terrain on earth and was 
started in 1974. 

The consortium CCI Eur- 
otrag was formed specially for 
its construction by 19 firms 
from six countries — Belgium, 
Britain, France, West Ger- 
many, Italy and The Nether- 
lands. It is one of the world's, 
as well as black Africa's, most 
ambitious civil engineering 
projects. 

The World Bank considered 
the scheme economically un- 
sound. But Mr Bongo, whose 
oil-rich country, a former 
French colony, is one of the 
smallest but wealthiest in 
Africa, argued that it was the 
“spine” of the economy and a 
symbol of national unity and 
other aid donors, led by 
France and the European 
Community, stepped into the 
breach. More than 4,000 men 
from about 20 countries 
worked on it. 


Kaunda and Mugabe in surprise meeting 

Frontline sacrifices expected as 
decision on sanctions looms 


From Jan Raath, Harare 



Leaders of Zambia and 
Zimbabwe held a surprise 
meeting yesterday at which 
they were widely expected to 
be putting finishing touches to 
their plan to implement the 
Commonwealth mini-summit 
recommendations for sanc- 
tions against South Africa. 

Dr Kenneth Kaunda. the 
President of Zambia and the 
chairman of the southern 
African frontline stales group- 
ing, and Mr Robert Mugabe, 
the Prime Minister of Zim- 
babwe, flew to the northern 
Zimbabwe resort town of 
Kariba, accompanied by fi- 
nance and trade ministers, for 
talks devoted to what was 
described as “regional issues”. 
At the end of their talks late in 
the afternoon it was said the 
two had discussed “joint eco- 
nomic ventures to reduce 
economic dependence on 
South Africa” 


The meeting followed a full 
gathering of all six leaders of 
the frontline states, which also 
include Angola, Mozambique, 
Tanzania, and Botswana, on 
December 21. No commu- 
nique was issued after the 
meeting, which was disrupted 
by President Kaunda' s depar- 
ture after he was told of the 
death of one of his sons. 

Officials here, however, 
confirmed that the six-hour 
meeting was devoted consid- 
erably to discussion of timing 
for foe implementation of foe 
1 1-point August mini-summit 
recommendations. 

Observers believe Mr Mu- 
gabe may well use his regular 
New Year’s Eve address to- 
night to mak e an announce- 
ment He, Dr Kaunda and 

their Cabinet ministers have 
frequently stated since August 


That the recommendations 
will be implemented “by foe 
end of foe year”. 

In tite months of apparent 
inactivity since the mini-sum- 
mit, scepticism has mown 
here among some of the 
business community about 
Mr Mugabe’s sincerity in im- 
plementing restrictions that 
are expected seriously to dam- 
age his country's economy, 
and those of the other 
frontline states which 
part i cipate. 

However, others point to 
Mr Mugabe’s deep and emo- 
tional repugnance to apart- 
heid and his obvious willing- 
ness to put his money where 
his mouth is when it comes to 
isolating Pretoria on every 
front possible. 

Government officials here 
say that behind the apparent 


inactivity has been a host of 
private contacts between foe 
frontline and Commonwealth 
countries, as Mr Mugabe and 
Dr Kaunda try to coordinate a 
final announcement. 

Observers are also hopeful 
that Mr Mugabe’s new-year 
address will contain another 
announcement — that of unity 
between his ruling Zanu (PF) 
■Party, and the opposition 
Zapu Party of Mr Joshua 
Nkomo. Negotiations have 
been proceeding for more than 
a year now, and Cabinet 
ministers have promised that 
unity, as well as sanctions, will 
have been achieved by foe end 
of foe year. 

Zapu sources confirmed 
that Mr Mugabe and Mr 
Nkomo held another round of 
talks on Monday, but no 
details were available. 


Commerce alarmed at curbs reality 


The self-imposed deadline fin* foe 
southern African frontline states to set up 
their first trade barriers against South 
Africa expires tonight. 

Of the six frontline countries, Bo- 
tswana, Tanzania, Zambia and Zim- 
babwe are Commonwealth countries, 
who have to deride whether to follow the 
recommendations of foe body's mini- 
summit in August for a package of trade 
and economic sanctions against South 
Africa. 

Business comm unities In foe region 
have progressively become more alarmed 
as the realization of foe implications of 
the planned restrictions has grown. 

Of the four Commonwealth countries, 
Botswana has already given strong indica- 
tions that, as a matter of survival, it will 
not follow suit 

Looming larger behind foe frontline 
sanctions is the question of what South 
Africa can, and will, do to retaliate. 
Observers expect anything from delib- 
erate and frustrating delays by foe South 
Africans moving goods north to a 
complete bonder closure. 

The level of economic dependence of 
foe frontline states on South Africa 
varies. It is virtually non-existent in the 
cases of Tanzania and foe former 
Portuguese colony of Angola. 

In others, it is all but total. Botswana re- 
lies on South Africa for 90 per cent of its 
transport needs, all of its oD, 150,000 
tonnes of food a year and 40 per cent of its 


From Oar Correspondent; Harare 
electricity. Nearly 20 percent of its labour 
force works in South African mines. 

Zambia is deeply dependent on South 
Africa for investment, trade and trans- 
port, with 67 per cent ofim ports and 33 
per cent of exports going through South 
Africa. 

Zimbabwe uses South African ports 
and railways for an estimated 93 per cent 
of its external trade and with about 20 per 
cent of its trade going across foe Limpopo 
River has its biggest trading partner in 
South Africa. 

Zimbabwe’s rich and intensive mining 
sector, its highly successful fanners and 
its widely diversified manufacturing sec- 
tor make it by far foe big brother of the 
frontline region. 

It stands to lose perhaps more than any 
of foe other nations in foe region with 
implementation of the min-summit 
recommendations. 

The bans on new investment, imports 
of agricultural produce, termination of 
taxation agreements, government con- 
tracts with majority-owned South African 
companies and bank loans are not 
expected to create serious repureusskms. 

But foe other six measures are a 
different matter. 

The ban on air links will stop the 38 
weekly flights between Zimbabwe and 
South African airports and cost an 
estimated loss of 110,000 passengers 
annually, which amounts to 80 per cent of 
its regional traffic. 


The termination of government assis- 
tance to investment is predicted to cost 
exporters to South Africa a tax-free export 
incentive of some £4 million. 

The ban on the promotion of tourism 
to South Africa is unquantifiaMe. but foe 
fret that 40 per cent of Zimbabwe's 
foreign tourists are South Africans is 
regarded in large part as due to foe 
>us advertising campaig ns in South 


The cessation of coal, iron and steel 
imports is expected to hit hard, with 
supplies from alternative sources re- 
garded as well-nigh impossible. Accord- 
ing to the latest available figures, 
Zimbabwe in 1984 imported £12 million 
worth of coke and steel products from 
South Africa. 

The withdrawal of consular facilities in 
South Africa will result in major inconve- 
nience for thousands of Zimbabweans 
living and working there. 

The ban on all government procure- 
ment in South Africa is expected to strike 
at the national railways of Zimbabwe, 
which depend considerably on South 
Africa for servicing their locomotives. 

The vulnerability of the oil pipeline 
(inking foe Mozambican port of Beira 
with Zimbabwe was exposed recently 
with foe report that problems there 
resulted in an order of 34,000 tonnes of 
petrol, gas and diesel from South Africa. 


Counting 
the cost 

of child 

murders 

From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

A record number of 41 
children were shot dead and 
317 were wounded this year in 
Detroit America’s “murder 
capital' 1 is trying to grapple 
with an “epidemic” of killing 
which is claiming more and 
more children as its victims. 

Police statistics show that 
with a murder rate double that 
of New York, Detroit suffered 
a sharp rise in child killings m 
the test year, when 29 people . 
.under 16 were killed and 237 ; 
wounded by gunfire. The fig- 
ures for 1984 were 16 dead and . 

1 92 wounded. 

The rate far surpasses any 
other US city. Houston is 
nearest with 26 children killed 
this year, including six child 
abuse cases, followed by Chi- 
cago with 15. Three-quarters 
of Detroit rictims were boys. 

But what worries foe 
authorities particularly is foe 
racial imbalance in the 
shootings: in Detroit, where 
blacks comprise between 65 
and 70 per cent of foe popula- 
tion. all bnt one of the 41 
victims were black. 

The random nature of the 
lriiimgc has bonified foe city. 
According to foe Detroit Free 
Press, which is leading a 
campaign against child 
shootings, 33 of the youngsters 
were shot directly and a 
farther eight were caught in 
crossfire or were suicides. 

Of the 33, six were shot by 
people playing with guns, five 
in suspected drug bouses, fire 
by bullets intended for others, 
four in grudge or revenge 
fights, two girls were killed by 
boyfriends, two killed in rob- 
bery attempts and two at 
parties. 

Murder is already foe most 
likely cause of death of Ameri- 
can blacks aged between 18 
■and 24. Two graphic cases this 
year illustrate how increas- 
ingly innocent children, either 
outstanding pupils or those 
who have otherwise kept out of 
tronUe, are being killed. 

Melody Rncker, aged 16, 
was lulled on August 16 by 
teenage gnmnen spraying a 
crowd with guns at a back-to- 
scbool party in someone's 
borne. Hit by 100 shotgun pel- 
lets, she died two hoars later. 
She had been among foe top in 
berdassand was considered a 
“role model” pupil. 

Two 17-year-olds were con- 
victed of first-degree murder 
and sentenced to life imprison- 
ment A third boy was con- 
victed of second-degree 
murder. 

Jeffrey Hinton, aged 11, 
was walking home with a 
friend on September 30 when 
he was confronted by two 
youths who told him to “check 
in” (hand over) his $20 purple 
shirt As he raised his arms, 
he was shot in the abdomen, 
and died in hospital two hours 
later. 

. Police estimate that there 
are about 1,500,000 guns in 
Detroit for a population of 
1,250,000 people. The city 
council has just passed a law 
which wifi come into effect 
next month imposing man- 
datory prison sentences of 
between 30 and 90 days for 
anyone found carrying un- 
licensed firearms. 

Many law-abiding people 
who have been buying guns to 
protect themselves against the 
ever-rising homicide rate say 
they will be defenceless if foe 
law is enforced. 


Strike unchecked by pay concession 



Stopped in their tracks: passengers oa the express from Para to Basle had to leave the train 
in the snow 10 miles from Belfort station, after striking railway workers blocked the line. 


The French rail strike 
continued unabated yesterday 
despite foe Government’s 
agreement to suspend foe new 
merit-based salary scales, and 
the opening of negotiations on 
working conditions between 
the unions, management and 
Government representatives. 

As on the previous day, only 
30 to 40 per cent of normal 
train services were operating. 
The Paris suburbs were part- 
icularly badly hit. with only 
one in eight trains running on 
some lines. 

Paris commuters suffered 
further inconvenience from a 
strike by public transport 
workers in foe capital- How- 
ever. the disruption was not as 

- bad as feared. 

The management claimed 
that 87 per cent of Mfetro 
•_ trains and 72 per cent of buses 
were running normally yest- 
erday. 

Three-thousand special 
coaches and several extra 
internal air flights have been 
laid on throughout the coun- 
try. But not even the extra 
coaches have been able to 
cope with all the increased 
passenger traffic over foe busy 
holiday period. 

Meanwhile, road haulage 
companies are attempting to 
carry the bulk of the mail and 
' perishable goods normally 
transported by rail. 

A three-week-old strike by 
merchant seamen is aggravat- 
ing the already badly dis- 
rupted transport system. 
-Twelve of foe country’s 1 6 
. commercial ports are affected. 

The Communist-led CGT 
.‘union, which is a particularly 
active participant in all foe 

- current strikes, has now called 


for a strike next Monday by all 
its members working in foe 
government arsenals in pro- 
test against a merit-based sal- 
ary scale '- and an alleged 
“process of privatization.” 

Worries over the sudden 
upsurge of industrial unrest in 
France after a long period of 
remarkable calm on the trade 
union front has caused foe 
franc to fall to its lowest level 
against foe deutschmark since 
its devaluation last March, 
and produced a sharp drop 
yesterday on foe Bourse, foe 
Paris stock exchange. 1 

About 5.000 rail wav' work- 


ers demonstrated in foe streets 
of the capital yesterday as foe 
conciliation negotiations got 
underway. 

Leading foe march, M 
Henri Krasucki. the general- 
secretary of the CGT, said that 
foe Government would not be 
able to get out of foe present 
dispute by engaging in simple 
“pirouettes.” 

AU the unions involved 
have dismissed as inadequate 
the Governments offer to 
suspend foe new. merit-based 
salary scales while awaiting 
the recommendations of an 
indeoendent arbitrator. 


They are demanding foe 
total withdrawal of the con- 
tested scales which, they 
maintain, will lead to promo- 
tion through favouritism. 

• MADRID: A pay strike by 
ground crews of foe Spanish 
domestic airline, Aviaco, led 
to the cancellation of 67 of foe 
airline’s 97 scheduled flights 
yesterday . and forced 5,000 
travellers to change their plans 
(Harry Debelius writes). 

This first phase of the strike 
was to last 24 hours. Another 
24-hour stoppage is planned 
for next Monday. 


Tokyo puts 
off decision 
on defence 

From David Watts 
Tokyo 

After the historic decision 
by Japan to breach its cus- 
tomary ceiling on defence 
spending, foe country's Na- 
tional Defence Council was 
yesterday unable to agree on a 
new spending guideline. A 
decision has now been post- 
poned until late January, be- 
fore the Diet reconvenes. 

The council was seeking 
consensus on foe wording of a 
new guideline, but failed to 
reach agreement after foe 
opposition denounced foe de- 
cision to bread) foe limb - 1 
per cent of GNP. 

Miss Takako Doi, leader of 
the main opposition Japan 
Socialist Party, said it was not 
only a violation of the 
Government’s self-imposed 
limit “but also an act of 
outrage that deviates from the 
spirit of the peace constit- 
ution”. 

Mr Yasuhiro Nakasone, the 
Prime Minister, said: “The 
question of whether to abide 
by foe 1 per cent of GNP 
ceiling or to attain foe defence 
outline has been a major 

S on that we have been 
and we gave priority to 
foe task of attaining our 
defence goals. 1 don't see any 
grounds for charges that we 
are headed towards mil- 
itarism.” 

The new defence budget, 
which foe Government says is 
essential if Japan is to achieve 
its planned defence build-up 
plan, puts Tokyo comfortably 
in the top half of the world's 
biggest defence spenders. 

Leading article, page 13 


Order to 
release 
‘jazzmen’ 

Vienna (Reuter)— A Prague 
court yesterday ordered the 
release of two members of the 
Czechoslovak Jazz Section 
and told the prosecutor to 
review charges a gainst group 
members, their lawyer said. 

But the prosecutor appealed 
against the court’s decision to 
release Vkstimil Drda and 
Cestmir Hunat, and they wfll 
remain in detention until a 
higher court hears foe appeal, 
their lawyer, Mr Josef Prusa, 
said by telephone front 
Prague. 

Seven members of the Jazz 
Section leadership were de- 
tained last September and 
charged with illegal commer- 
cial activities aid issuin g 
publications far profit since 
1985, a crime under Czecho- 
slovak law. 

The Jazz Section, which has 
a membership of 7,000, has 
acted as an unofficial forum 
for these opposed to state- 
dictated cultural policies. 

Mr Prnsa said the court 
ordered die release of Mr 
Drda and Mr Hmut at a 
dosed bearing to review the 
indictment foe group, 
a move which usually means 
die presiding judge cons iders 
there is lack of evidence or 
there are legal flaws in foe 
tmenL 

At foe weekend, the court 
ordered foe release of two 
more of the detainees, MDos 
Drda and Josef Skalnlk. 

The fate oi ' e other three 
members of foe group who are 
also still in police custody — 
Karel Srp, Vladimir KmurQ 
and Tomas Krivanek.— was 
not immediately known. 


Director ready to 
return to Moscow 


By Mary Dejevsky 

The Soviet theatre director, 
Yuri Lyubimov, who has 
lived in foe West since being 
stripped of his Soviet citizen- 
ship three years ago, is pre- 
pared to return to his 
homeland. This was disfioro ] 
last week after it was learned 
that he had been approached 
about returning to his old job 
as director of the avant-garde 
Taganka theatre in Moscow. 

Interviewed by Yuri Goli- 
gorcky of the BBC Russian 
Service, Lyubimov said from 
Wa sh in gt o n that contractual 
obligations would keep him in 
the West for the next few 
months, but thereafter he 
would be prepared to return 

and take up where he left off. 

In between rehearsals for 
his production of Crime and 
Punishment in Washington 
Lyubimov said he attached no 
conditions to his return, al- 
though he hoped his produc- 
tion of his controversial play 
about the late Soviet ballad 
singer, Vladimir Vysotsky 
would be finally staged for foe 
50fo anniversary of foe 
singer’s birth on January 25. 

It was this play, banned 
only after its final dress re- 
hearsal, that brought Lyub- 
imov into direct conflict with 
the Soviet authorities and 
precipitated bis exile. Once in 
the West, he gave an out- 
spoken interview to The 
Times , which is believed to 
have angered Moscow to the 
point where it deprived him of 
his citizenship. 

Lyubimov noted that Mr 
Pyotr Demichev, foe former 
Minister of Culture, and Mr 



Lyubimov; still hoping to 

stage controversial play 


Mikhail Zimyanin, the Cen- 
tral Committee Secretary 
whom he described as his 
personal enemy, were still 
active in foe Soviet leadership. 
But he said enormous changes 
were in tram in Soviet life and 
he trusted Mr Gorbachov to 
ensure his safety. 

!*£ Goligorsky also spoke 
by telephone to an actress at 
foe Taganka theatre, who 
*5?“* excitedly of foe prospect 
0f ^ bimov ’ 5 return. She 
99 per cent of the actors at 
foe theatre petitioned Mr 
Gorbachov to restore 
Lyubimov’s citizenship and 
allow him to return to his old 
job. 

Dn December 22 Lyubimov 
was telephoned in Wash- 
lngton by a leading actress at 
*2® taganka who asked him 
forectly about the possibility 
of his return. He was advised 

“"foe* the Soviet embassy 
m w ^ s hmgton with a view to 
reapplying for his citizenship, 
inis he has now done. 


fttPJMirtt 


-S3' 

, T-- ;r V?4>\ 1 

•’ • .•?.;*.**£?*»* 

■..';^?Sjg 

••'.’..txw 

7.' V .. .V®»0 fl . 

■ . 7^^ 


s~:\ v : 

*> 


'r^i c~^ 
i s ^ 


" •■ 3 >'S 

•■7^f 

- .v<5sy 
• : L 

... I=3 aii» 

■ • .. ■ •;;; 1 * yn 
' 

.. -..;•? 

7 J?oc^ 6 

.‘i-rffwia* 

."!" '•* 

. . ^!3ml 


' "' J: ' *** 
"•sia-fAq* 

;- - ;- r -W3 ji 

'. '" -SCTts. 

.' . ■'" '3ft 

"."P’tttfh 

' •'■ J >3 k 
- !: it 

' * ■ - KliV 

“-as. 

’S' 5 " 

uj;. 


— ^ 

„ r J 




Gemayel and Assad seek 
a new political solution 


After a year of strained and sometimes 
non-existent relations. President Gem- 


From Robert Fisk, Beirut 
Mr Beni’s call for a truce, four people arc 


meet next week, since Damascus wants to 


:i>el of Lebanon and President Assad of 2*1 wounded. 


reported to have been killed and a further see a new political initiative under way in 


S"> na are expected to meet in the new year 

for a ^ nf 5^ C . e ,n D ** mascu sin Syria's war in west Beirut, where the WhaT is “not clear, however, is what 

“.-.WKL2. Pf „ .5®* another “security plan” introduced in July - and Syria intends to do about the new power 

political formula to unite Lebanon and brought to life by the arrival of at least of Mr Arafat’s PLO men who have 
prevent the country s further economic 500 hiehlv discinlined Svrian regular effectively defeated ail Amni'sanemnf!; in 


Lebanon before the Islamic summit 


Mr Beni’s men. of course, are fighting meeting begins in Kuwait on January 26. 
yria's war in west Beirut, where the What is not clear, however, is what 


collapse. troops — is now all but a memory. crush them since late November. 

. yesterday The growing factionalism and un- None of this has blunted the sense of 

standing at 84! to Uie US dollar— against a certainty in the Muslim sector of the city, radicalism that has gripped west Beirut 
figure of only four just five years ago — the and the increasing evidence of Christian this Christmas, when few shops have 
by-nans oeiieve, wtut reason, tftaf both support for the Palestinian guerrillas in displayed decorations, and where only the 
3nd ^ forces are in a their battles against the Shia militia, make secular Syrian Social Nationalist Party 
mooo ior compromise. a new political initiative by the Syrians ostentatiously erected a Christmas tree 

In west Beirut yesterday however, imperative. above a local petrol station and held a 

there, was little sign of this. Mr Nabih President Assad's plans for a summit party for children in the Makhoul district 
Bern s instructions to his Sma Muslim have been carefully prepared. Three days on Christmas Eve. 

Amal movement to Ufi its siege of the ago. Dr Mustafa al-Haj Ali, director of the In Sidon yesterday, a group calling 
Palestinian camps in Beirut and southeni office of the Syrian Vice-President, Mr itself the Shebcb Isfami (Muslim Youths) 
Lebanon lessened ratherthan stopped the Abdul Halim Khaddam. was sent to was reported to have called for a ban on 
righting between the PLO guerrillas of Mr Lebanon to hand personal messages from New Year celebrations on the grounds 
\assir Arafat and the thousands of Amal the President to Mr Rashid Karami, the that these arc held according to the 


brought to life by the arrival of at least of Mr Arafat’s PLO men who have 
500 highly disciplined Syrian regular effectively defeated all Amai’s attempts to 


troops — ts now all but a memory. 

The growing factionalism and un- 


Yassir Arafat and the thousands of Amal 


militiamen who have been surrounding Lebanese Prime Minister, to the Speaker Christian calendar. 


them for more than a month. 

Antal's artillery, some of it dug in near 
the runway of Beirut airport, remained in 
position and the airport road, which runs 
past the Bourj al-Barajneh camp, was still 
dosed yesterday because of sniping. Since 


Pretoria 

arrests 

township 

reporter 

From George Brock 
Johannesburg 

The South African authori- 
ties intensified their attack on 
journalists this week by 
detaining a journalist working 
for a respected financial 
newspaper. 

Mr Sipho Ngcobo, aged 3Z 
was arrested at his desk in the 
newsroom of Business Day, a 
relatively restrained daily pa- 
per serving the business 
community. 

By way of reply the news- 
paper laid aside its sober style 
in a biller front-page leading 
article which described Sec- 
tion 29 of the Interna] Security 
Act (under which Mr Ngcobo 
is held) as “fascist". 

It went on to say that Mr 
Ngcobo's reporting on life in 
the black townships “done 
sometimes at the risk of his 
very life, has given Business 
Day readers a unique and 
illuminating view of township 
affairs. His detention puts out 
their eyes and increases their 
uncertainty" 

The editorial ended with a 
passionate call for all demo- 
cratic South Africans to unite 
to “end the long dark night of 
Nationalist (Party) misrule." 

Mr Ngcobo had worked for 
the now-defunct Rand Daily 

Exxon Corporation, the 
world's largest oil company, 
announced yesterday that- it 
had sold the shares of its 
former South African affiliate 
to a trust established to con- 
tinue the operations (Mobs in 
Ali writes from Washington). 

It said in a statement that 
with the sale it relinquished all 
ownership and management 
control of its former Sooth 
African activities. A growing 
nnmber of moitinationa! 
corporations have recently an- 
nounced that they are palling 
out of South Africa because of 
dissatisfaction with the pace of 
change in the apartheid 
system- 

Mail before joining Business 
Dav last year. He had special- 
ized in the reporting of life and 
politics in the black town- 
ships, producing excellent 
articles recently on the “street 
committees” and “people's 
courts” which have been 
springing up in black areas. 

It is his reporting of these 
sensitive and difficult subjects 
which is most worrying his 
colleagues. “We are worried 
about his safely when he is 
released,” Mr Michael Acott, 
Business Day’s acting editor, 
said "because his township 
sources are likely to assume 
that any assurances of conf- 
identiality they may have 
been given will be comprom- 
ised." 

Mr Ngcobo had previously 
been detained in 1982 and 
went on trial the following 
year, charged with “furthering 
ihe aims of a banned org- 
anization.” by possessing Pan 
Africanist Congress doc- 
uments. 

.Along with three other 
defendants, he served part of a 
jail sentence before the sen- 
tences were quashed on ap- 
peal. He was released in 
January. 1984. 

At the turn of the year, the 
current state of emergency will 
be 200 days old. The South 
African Government has nev- 
er released comprehensive 

numbers or details of those it 
either holds or has released. 
The Detainees' Parents Sup- 
port Committee estimates that 

more than 25.000 people have 
been detained in the course of 
the year, almost all of them 
under emergency regulations. 

In a magazine interview 
conducted before the Jaiest 
wave of restrictions and ar- 
rests earlier this month, the 
Justice Minister. Mr Kobre 
Coetsec, said that at any one 
moment rherc were 6.000 to 
7 000-plus" people in deten- 
tion under the regulations. 


of the Lebanese Parliament; and to Dr Neither the identity nor the strength of 
Selim al-Hoss, the Education Minister, this organization has been determined. 
All three letters contained Syria's reply to but its statement has served only to 
President Gcmayel's proposals for politi- reinforce Christian fears that extreme 
cal reforms. *i->— 


The Syrian and Lebanese leaders may Lebanon. 


Muslims want to “Islamicize" southern 


‘Reform enthusiasm' in Peking 


Inquiry chief treads softly 
as student protests continue 


Peking (Reuter) - The head 
of a task force inquiring into 
China's wave of student pro- 
tests said yesterday that most 
demonstrators were patrioti- 
cally showing their enthu- 
siasm for reform and none had 
broken the law. 

Mr He Donchang. Vice- 
Minister of the Slate Educa- 
tion Commission and leader 
of the task force, was speaking 
at a news conference after 
about 400 students from Pe- 
king Teachers' University 
staged an early morning pro- 
test for democracy. 

It was Peking's second 
consecutive night of protest in 
defiance of a ban on un- 
approved demonstrations in 
pans of the capital. 

Wall posters, outlawed 1 
since 1980, appeared on the 
campus, calling for an end to 
one-party Communist rule 
and the launch of a multi- 
party system — illegal de- 
mands, and some of the 
boldest made in nearly a 
month of nationwide college 
unresL 

Mr He told reporters: “God 
allows young people to com- 


mit mistakes. When we were 
young, we did more or less 
similar things at times. This is 
our basic approach.” 

At least seven people, none 
of them students, are reported 
to have been held during the 
protests. 

His soft lone contrasted 
with the harsher line taken in 
the official press, which kept 
up warnings yesterday to stu- 
dents to siay off the streets and 
not put up wall posters. 

The Peking Daily said that 
citizens of the capital would 
not allow people to destroy 
their unity and stability - a 
key slogan used by the official 
media in attacks on the 
protests. 

The vice-minister said it 
was too soon to say how the 
authorities would handle a 
rally rumoured for New 
Year's Day in a central Peking 
square where gatherings were 
banned under rules in- 
troduced a few days ago. 

A stream of top Communist 
Party leaders, ministers, pro- 
fessors and workers have ap- 
peared on Slate television. 


repeating the theme that in- 
stability would threaten the 
unprecedented prosperity of 
the past seven years won after 
years of hardship and struggle. 

h is illegal in China to 
challenge the leadership or the 
Communist Party and the 
supremacy of socialism. 

The People’s Daily carried a 
long article yesterday saying 
that democracy in China was 
superior to that in the United 
States, which it called a vi- 
olent, unequal sociely run by a 
tiny minority of people 
backed by big business. 

Some students have called 
for the introduction of aspects 
of US democracy and thou- 
sands want to study in Amer- 
ica. Students on at least 10 
campuses across China have 
taken part in the demon- 
strations. 

The main evening news on 
state television showed, for 
the first time, footage of a vast 
demonstration held in Shang- 
hai 10 days ago, when tens of 
thousands of people marched 
into the city centre, led by 
students. 


From John England is also guaranteed by the 
Bonn constitution.” she said. 

»n, ■ L m ,„ Legal experts believe that if 

JETrSES.™ H* women go to court, they. 


wi« *1". Government circles 

month, it will have to deal Ch mcdtor ^ who 

■ai nM i r K«it is expected to oe returned to 

vmh a reiauv dy new tm month , Iherefbre 

rapidly growing demand from oonos _ .he Defence 

” Ministry 5£Si' 'SE 

lS hi been no women’s SL ™Sons UPP mainrcS' 
unit in the West German 
Bundeswehr (armed forees) or “'-traffic 
since it was formed in 1955. •„ ... ...... , . 

Indeed, the West German ,< ■: 

Basic Law of 1949 rules that * 

women “may on no account vj.. 1 ®?. • *• 

render service involving the ' 

use (of) arms”. ';.«&> I©,.' 

The only West German . . 
women in uni form are 140 .. j yx nr . ■ /"* L- 

medical service officers, who • r : m 

were allowed into the armed • ■ | • * J r pi. 

forces only 10 years ago. '• Jr- \ ,!j|| 

Frau Regina Send, the lead- JI Ml 

er of the Women To The 

Forces group, has warned the v - x- # Ba 

Government that if it does not ■■'■T B| 

immediately clear the way for IB£; 

womentojoin the colours; her gH 

group will take it to the 

Constitutional Court. m- HH 

“It's a basic question of Chancellor Kohl; Unlikely to 
equal rights for women, which oppose women in uniform 


«**-*■■. 



Sensoji Temple where worshippers will pray for good fortune at midnight tonight. 


West German election winner will 
be urged to allow women to join up 


The idea of women in 
uniform has been circulating 
around the Defence Ministry 
for several years in the face of 
a threatened shortage of 
servicemen in the 1990s be- 
cause of the country's low 
birth rate. Bonn's defence 
commitment to Nato requires 
an armed force of 495,000 
men. but conscripts account 
for 5 1 per cent of its Strength- 

National Service is to be 
extended from 15 months to 
18 months from June 1, 1989. 
Some experts, however, say 
this win not compensate for 
the future manpower gap. 

For many years after the 
Second World War, Bonn was 
against women joining the 
services because it recalled the 
fete of many of Hitler's 
470,500 women auxiliaries 
who fell into Soviet hands in 
1945. They were thrown into 
prisoner-of-war camps and de- 
ported to the East as slave 
workers, suffering treatment 
hardly less harsh than that 
meted out to male captives. 

The women's rights groups 
now demanding uniforms, 
however, are of a new 
generation. 


Fish puts 
Iceland 
at the top 

By Tony Samstag 
Nordic Correspondent 
Iceland is expected to show 
the highest growth rate in the 
Western world for the past 
year as a result of record fish 
catches and high prices 
reflecting the new world-wide 
concern with a healthier diet 
According to its National 
Economic Institute. Iceland's 
gross domestic product (GDP) 
for 1986 will show an increase 
of 6 per cent and growth in 
national income wDl be 8 per 
cent, bringing the country’s 
balance of payments out of die 
red for the first time since 
1978. The economy as a whole 
is about 70 per cent dependent 
on fisk 

Only three years ago this 
large but mder-populated is- 
land - with a quarter of a 
milli on people the most 
sparsely inhabited country in 
Europe — was reeling under an 
annual inflation rate of 130 per 
cent. 

In 1985, the inflation rate 
was still an alarming 34 per 
cent. It is now a manageable 
11 to 12 per cent and a total 
catch of well over a million 
tons — a second record year in 
succession — which has also 
served to fuel tile great british 
fish boom on hmnbersidehas 
steered the nation country 
conclusively towards what one 
analyst described recently as 
“the exit from its long timuel 
of economic 2 auriness.” 

More than 60 per cent of 
fresh fish auctioned at 
Grimsby, and more titan 70 
per cent at Hull, is supplied by 
Iceland. Without the Icelandic 
catches it is almost certain 
that both Humberside ports 
would have collapsed long ago. 

Renewed international de- 
mand for fish has coincided 
with advances in refrigeration 
and transport technology en- 
abling Icelandic entrepreneurs 
to carry their catches for long 
distances. 


Kenya’s new confidence 


Dissent no brake 
on boom times 


From Charles Harrison, Nairobi 

A 12-month economic kilogram, but the total return 
boom, brought about by low from Kenyan coffee exports 
world oil prices, high coffee nearly doubled during 1985 to 


prices and a record number of nearly £400 million, 
tourists, has given Kenya new Tea export prices are run- 
confidence despite niraours of ning above last year’s levels, 
political dissent Some 50 compensating for the expected 


Kenyans have been jailed or 
detained in recent months for 
supporting a clandestine anti- 
government organization. 

For months now, news- 
papers have been recording 
the sentences of numerous 
young intellectuals who have, 
in every case, pleaded guilty 
either to supporting the shad- 
owy “Mwakenya” organiza- 
tion or failing to inform the 
authorities of its existence. 
Mwakenya,' the courts are 
told, wants to overthrow 
President Daniel arap Moi 
and his Kanu Party Govern- 
ment. 

Despite the incarcerations, 
Mwakenya appears to be a 
small organization with no 
substantial public support. 

Mr Robert Ouko. the 
country's Planning Minister, 
has told Kenyans that their 
economy is the soundest it has 
been for many years, thanks to 
stable political leadership, a 
favourable economic climate 
and the energy and dedication 
of ordinary Kenyans. 

There was a double windfall 
from lower oil prices — Kenya 
has no oil resources, but 
exports refined products from 
the Mombasa oil refinery to 
several neighbouring coun- 
tries - and high world coffee 
prices caused by shortages 
after frosts in BnudL 

By international agreement, 
export quotas for coffee were 
suspended throughout 1986, 
enabling Kenya to sell — at 
high prices — coffee which had 
been held in store due to quota 
restrictions. 

Coffee prices fell during 
1986 from roughly £4 to £2 a 


fall from last year's record 
147,000-ton production, and 
are believed to have brought 
in £175 million. 

The number of tourists 
visiting the country rose from 
about 450,000 in 1 985 to some 
600.000 in 1986. and Kenya is 
well on the way to its target of 
a million tourists a year in the 
1 990s. A fell in the value of the 
Kenyan shilling has held hotel 
prices down, and tourism 
probably brought in £200 
million during the year. 

Oil products, the biggest 
single Kenyan import item, 
are well down from last year’s 
£280 million, and the net 
result is a return to a 
favourable balance of pay- 
ments and a rise in national 
productivity of more than 5 
percent 

Good rains throughout 
1986 produced bumper food 
crops, enabling Kenya to ex- 
port surplus food. Only two 
years earlier severe drought 
made it necessary for Kenya to 
import food. 

There has also been a 
welcome revival of the 
country's herds of livestock, 
which were greatly depleted in 
I9S4 and 1985. The traumas 
of the drought years are still 
sufficiently fresh to make 
Kenyans look anxiously to the 
skies when the rains are due. 
The hope now is that the long 
rains due next April and May 
will again be plentiful. 

A big problem remains the 
embarrassingly high birth rate 

— more than 4 per cent a year 

— which Government efforts 
to promote family planning 
have so far hardly dented. 


Vietnam 
accused 
of Laos 
killings 

Bangkok — Vietnamese 
troops in Laos killed 43 hill- 
tribe people trying to flee 
across the Mekong River into 
Thailand last Friday and Sat- 
urday. according to Thai of- 
ficials in Noogkfui Province, 
who said survivors told them 
that women and children were 
among the dead (Neil Kelly 
writes). 

About 19 of the Meo hill- 
tribe people managed to reach 
safety using life-jackets given 
to them earlier by Lao sol- 
diers. Fourteen others were 
captured by the Vietnamese 
who, Thai officials said, had 
kept up a barrage of gunfire 
against the escaping people for 
several hours. 

287 Poles 
jump ship 

Lubeck (Reuter) — Border 
police and officials in this 
West German city said 287 
Polish tourists staved behind 
when three Polish liners left 
the Baltic pon of Lubeck- 
Travemunde after a Christ- 
mas visit. 

Federal border police said 
the vessels. Lancut. 
Pomerania and Wilanow. 
carrying a total of 622 pas- 
sengers had arrived in the port 
between December 23 and 
December 26. 

Train crash 

Warsaw (Reuter) — Four 
people were killed and 16 were 
injured when a train collided 
with a bus at a level-crossing 
in Suwalki during a snow- 
storm in north-east Poland, 
the PAP news agency said. 

Afghan toll 

Islamabad (AP) — The 
death toll in an aerial bombing 
of civilians in the south- 
eastern Afghanistan city of 
Kandahar on December 8 has 
risen to 450, Western dip- 
lomats said. 

Cutoff 

Noumea (Reuter) — The 
French Pacific island of Fu- 
iuiia, battered by Cyclone 
Raja last week, was still cut off 
from the outside world yes- 
terday after attempts to fly in 
food and medical supplies 
failed. 

Ecevit boost 

Ankara (Reuter) — Nineteen 
defectors from Turkey’s opp- 
osition Social Democrats have 
joined the Democratic Left 
Party of the former Prime 
Minister, Mr BuJem Eceviu 
after dissolving their own 
four-day old party, the Anato- 
lian Agency said. 

Smugglers fire 

Zamboanga City (AP) — A 
woman was killed and seven 
other civilians were wounded 
as Philippine Navy patrol 
boats exchanged fire with 
suspected smugglers. 

Fatal skid 

Athens (Reuter) - Two 
Greek airmen were killed and 
10 others seriously injured 
when an Air Force bus skid- 
ded off an icy road into a 
ravine, police said. 

Reporters out 

Paris (AFP) — Four journal- 
ists. working for Reuter. 
Agence France-Presse. Le 
Monde and Le Figaro, who 
had recently arrived in Chad 
to cover the fighting between 
Libyan and Chadian forces in 
the Car north of the country./ 
were expelled on Tuesday. / 

Tamils killed / 

Colombo (Reuter) — Fiy 
Tamil separatist guerrillas a j 
a soldier were killed in a a 
battle in northern Sri Lard 
the Government said. / 


Where neighbourliness is a diplomatic convenience 


Britain and Guatemala this week announced the 
restoration of full diplomatic links after a break 
of 23 years, but agreed to differ over Belize. In the 
first of two articles, Rodney Tyler reports on 
the delicate relationship between the former 
British colony and its Latin American neighbour. 


MEXICO, 


The opening of “Crosby's 
Convenience” four weeks ago 
by Mr David Joy, bead of the 
Foreign Office's Mexico and 
Central America Department, 
was by all accounts an occa- 
sion which owed more to 
Carlton-Browne than it did to 
Carlton House. 

Mr Joy, accompanied by 
Her Britannic Majesty's High 
Commissioner, after whom the 
two-seater wooden structure 
perched on the end of a short 
wooden pier out over the 
Caribbean was named, broke a 
bottle on the first of the two 
doors, then, appropriately, 
snipped a ribbon of toilet 
paper to declare the twin 
cubicles officially in use. 

Tbits were Belize and 
Guatemala brought a signifi- 
cant step closer to settling 
their differences. 

Improbable as it may sound, 
the short ceremony — wit- 
oessed only by a handful of 
British soldiers, one Belize 
policeman and a bunch of 
totally bewildered Guate- 


It encapsulated perfectly the 
shy diplomatic minuet being 
danced by the two Central 
American nations emerging 
info democratic adulthood, one 
from behind the skirts of 
dictatorship, the other from 
behind the skirts of colonial- 
ism. 

It demonstrated equally well 
the importance of the role 
being played by the British — 
particularly by the British 
armed forces - and the threat 
to the region's stability that 
the withdrawal of those forces 
would inevitably create. 

Equally improbable, yet 
equally important, was die 
siting of Mr John Crosby's 


GUATEMALA 


SOmites 


BELIZE/ 


HONDURAS 


Manabique. And therein lies 
its significance. 

For Belize, the size of 
Wales, but with the population 
only of Swansea, is Britain's 
other Falkiands- Guatemala 
has, since (be 1930s; claimed 
the country — formerly British 
Honduras — as its own. 

Once, under a Labour Gov- 
ernment, and once more in that 
crucial year of 1982, the 


somewhat basic diplomatic Foreign Office has been 
initiative: the tiny, bat beauti- ™ the : act of giving all 


fol Hunting Cay (pronounced 
"bey") — a 25£yard triangle 
of coconut palms and brilliant 
white sand. 

The Cay, part of the Sapo- 
dilla group, lies at the soath- 
em end of the Belizean barrier 
reef. 36 miles out to sea from 
the nearest Belize port, Punta 


mahu i holidaymakers in their Gorda, yet only 22 miles from 
swimwear — was all of these the nearest point of Guate- 
t l ungs and more. malan coast, the Punta 


the signals which traditionally 
precede an attempt to off-load 
an embarrassing problem. As 
with the Falkiands, Belizeans 
felt they were being prepared 
to be sold dawn the river. 

The second occasion came 
shortly after the country had 
gained independence. Not very 
helpfully, Britain made clear 
to this tiny new nation that it 
could not go on relying on the 


presence of some 2,000 British 
troops to keep ont the Guate- 
malans, and that a deal had to 
be done. 

Fortunately, the military . 
dictatorship in Guatemala did 
not grasp the significance of 
the move — as did the 
Argentinians further south — 
as a coded message and pour 
its vast and well-trained army 
across the disputed border. 

In the past two years, 
however, relations between 
Belize and Guatemala have 
significantly Improved, to the 
extent that the border dispute 
is now wi thin sight of 
settlement 

After years of dictatorship, 
Guatemala has begun to 
emerge as a fledgling democ- 
racy under the cautious guid- 
ance of President Cerezo, who 
came to office pledged to find a 
solution to the problem. 

It is now np to the Guate- 
malans to suggest a new set of 
proposals for fresh talks in the 
new year. This time there is 
real hope. The Belizean Prime 
Minister, Mr Manuel Esqui- 
vel, told me: H 1 very much hope 
we can settle the matter in the 
next year. We recognize that 
President Cerezo has to be 
able to go hack to his people 
and point to some benefit they 
trill get from dropping their 
claim." 

Exactly what the nature of 


that benefit is likely to be is The question now being 
not yet dear. But it seems asked is: What if Guatemala's 
certain that Hunting Cay will rights and privileges were 
come into it extended in this area? What if 

Belize ran offer the Gusto- some form of joint usage, jnsf 
malans economic and social short of a total transfer of 
co-operation. It can help It to sovereignty, conld be found for 
pipeline and port f acilities on the Sapodiiias? More by lock 
the Caribbean. It easier than judgement, the Foreign 
access to the remote Peten Office may thus find itself 

, . — ... sitting in on a settlement of a 

TL- dispute being worked ont to 

. I n© Til III re the satisfaction of both prin- 
of Belize '^Perhaps also more by luck 

D--+ -< than judgement, the Foreign 

rail 1 Office finds itself with Mr 

Crosby in Belize. This genial 
region — down which most of roly-poly figure is as vitally 

— » -a — n II 


its straight border rims — than 
does Guatemala City, and can 
thus ease the off exploration 
planned for the region. 

These and many other genu- 
ine benefits can and wUl be 
shown. But they are the icing. 
The cake is territory: and that 
Belize cannot give — at least 
not on the face of it 

It is out of the question for 
Belize to give away mainland 
territory. But territorial waters 
and the Sapodilla Cays are a 
different matter, and that is 
where the crux of the solution 
is likely to lie. 

Belize has ne^pr imposed 
the common 12-mile limit, 
because to do so would virtu- 
ally cut Guatemala off from 
the Caribbean. 


pro-Belize as Sir Rex Hunt 
was pro-Falklands. 

He begs you to talk about 
the good tilings that are 
happening In the country — the 
growth of its banana industry; 
the stability of its sugar crop; 
the arrival of the Coca-Cola 
Corporation and the totally 
democratic change of gov- 
ernment at the last election. 
Every one of them is a beacon 
of light in the political, social 
and economic chaos of the 

re Si° n ' . ... - , 

But it is his convenience for 
which be will be best remem- 
bered. For its building may 
well turn out to have played a 
central part in the settlement 
with Guatemala. 

Because of its proximity to 


Guatemala, citizens of 
country have been fon 
years In the habit of cob 
Hunting Cay for boihu 
weekends. j 

Apart from one unf/ 
incident in September/ 
sides have got on / 
ignoring each other/ 

construction by a 
Guatemalan risitaf 
months ago of a toflfc 
own was deemed, by 1 
Belizeans and the B| 

imply a permanence 
Guatemalan presence 
(hey had no right. I 

Mr Crosby's solutioi 1 1 
ask the Royal Engiii 
build the short wood] 
and the two cubicles. Tj 
soldiers knocked do4 
Guatemalan structure ] 
nobody was offended. 

The Engineers are 
bunding another con v el 
a mile away on Lime, o*< 
Cay. Already, their wof* 
Crosby II is being desf®, 
as an exercise in *iowp 
diplomacy. 

Much higher key will n* 
negotiations over the lt> 
role of the 2,000 Br 
servicemen when the H 
Guatemala issue is ng 
finally. Already a supple 
number of sarprisinsn to 
are campaigning for J 
stay. -gsence 

Tomorrow: Britain 












i t 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


* * * * ft ft SL 


SPECTRUM 



The Times review 


Crowds under clouds 


I f you have been troubled 
since July 7 (a Monday, 
of course) with a faint 
sense of diminished el- 
bow-room, of finding the 
world too much with you, it 
has not been just a freak of the 
imagination. That was the day 
on which the computers cal- 
culated that the population of 
this planet would rise above 
five billion for the first time. 

It would be heretical to 
quibble over the Oracle's 
computation. It went on to 
■-predict that die population 
would double in the lifetime of 
-that day’s crop of babies, and 
would then perhaps stabilize. 
Elbows will be worn close to 
the body for the foreseeable 
future, it seems. 

In this increasingly cramped 
tenement, the capacity of the 
tenants to commit public nui- 
sances against their neigh- 
bours has never been greater. 
The inescapable master-image 
of 1986 was the unseen cloud 
which ambled across Europe •' 
from the embers of Chern- 
obyl, demonstrating that no 
part of the continent was 
exempt from the risks of 

technological miscalculation. 

The reindeer of Lapland 
gnawed up contamination 
from the arctic moss, lambs in 
Snowdonia were reprieved 
from slaughter until their 
geiger-count fell (rt is an ill 
wind that blows no Iamb any 
. good), and we celebrated May 
Bank Holiday, with the usual 
■ muggings and Morris dancing, 
under a thin radioactive driz- 
zle. Later, as if to reassert the 
efficacy of conventional tox- 
ins. tlfe river Rhine ran poi- 
soned from Switzerland to the 


the public. Mr Michael 
Heselnne pranced out of the 
Cabinet room and departed 
into oblivion, leaving the 
Cabinet to send a messeng e r 
to ask if be had made it any 
dearer to the photographers 
outride 10 Downing Street 
than to them whether he had 
actually resigned. 

Mr Leon Brittan behaved 

like a gentleman and made the 

supreme sacrifice to protect 
the honour of a lady — or at 
least that of Mr Bernard 
Ingham, a figure less 
dispensable to Downing Street 
than any number of Cabinet 
Ministers. The Head of the 
Home Civil Service was en- 
gaged in a fracas with a 
photographer at Heathrow — 
an unthinkable event — on his 
way to endure unthinkable 
humiliations in Australia. 

In successive masterpieces 
of paradox. Labour assailed 
the Tories for skimping on 
defence spending and failing 
to control the crime wave. The 
Tories at last grew tired of 
being Mamed for cutting pub- 
lic spending when it had in 
fact risen 16 per cent in real 
terms since they came to 
power, despite all their efforts. 

They began instead to claim 


Jeffrey Archer 
laid on a scene 
from one of his 
own novels at 
Victoria station 


'sea. 

It is too pat to suppose that 
Chernobyl shocked the 
■world's leaders into a keener 
appreciation of the need to 
control the arms race. But 
something did seem to have 
changed when Mr Reagan and 

Mr Gorbachev met a t Reyk- 
javik, in the most enigmatic of 
summit meetings The agree- 
ment which they almost 
readied startled the leaders of 
Europe into wondering wheth- 
er they wanted a disarmament 
after which war in Europe 
could be possible without 
precipitating Armageddon. 

President Reagan found 
himself dragged into the heat 
of the kitchen after his at- 
tempts to combat world ter- 
rorism by a strategy of 
bombing its promoters and 
also selling them arms. The 
bombs exploding in Libya 
caused shiverings in London. 
The number of American 
summer visitors to Britain 
dropped by one-third, though 
Prince Andrew’s marriage did 
much to repair the damage. 

British politics was in gen- 
eral going through a period of 
more colour than substance, 
with MPS perpetually in a 
state of pre-election jitters, 
and frightfully excited over 
min or helicopter companies, 
long-dead spies and other 
.topics of deep unconcern tc 


credit for their failure, leaving 
the voters perplexed as to 
whether they should vote 
Tory in hopes of further 
inadvertent social services 
spending, or Labour in hopes 
of fiscal rigour enforced by a 
run on the pound. Ned 
Kinnock laboured valiantly to 
purge his party of Militants 
and multilateralism, with only 
partial success. 

Meanwhile the unemploy- 
ment rate, paused at its peak 
and seemed with majestic 
gradualness to be about to 
creep down. The ■ Tories 
claimed it was on the way 
down already, but since the 
fall on paper was almost 
exactly the same size as the 
number of more or less arti- 
ficial jobs created by the 
efforts of the state, the situa- 
tion remained tantalisingly 
unclear. 

In the arts, the golden age of 
British musicals continued, 
while the long Hall-Nunn 
hegemony in the subsidised 
theatre drew acrimoniously 
towards its end. Amis Senior 
won the Booker. Goldcrest 
Buttered to earth. Richard 
Rogers erected a contrivance 
of drainpipes and frosted glass 
in the City, to clothe Lloyd’s 
with all the glamour of an oil 
refinery. 

England rather surmised 


themselves by reaching the 
last eight of the World Cup 
before being eliminated by a 
sublime piece of deceit from 
Maradona. In cricket, the 
most stimulating contests 
were off the field, between the 
Pavilion and the Players, with 
Boycott, Botham, Richards 
and Garner losing their wick- 
ets. Dancing Brave romped 
home in the Are, and Britain’s 
athletes returned from the 
European championships 
loaded with medals. 

Matters went downhill in 
South Africa with alarming 
speed: Eminent Persons came 
and went, and Big Business 
washed its hands, leaving the 
country prey to the censors, 
flaming “necklaces” and the 
police. 

In an emblematic act of 
betrayal worthy of Dante, 
Nizar Hindawi at Heathrow 
entrusted a parcel to the 
fiancee who was carrying his 
child. The last shreds of 
civility in European politics 
seemed to be extinguished 
when Olof Palme was shot 
down in the street 

But the year also saw the 
Duvallers hustled out of Haiti, 
a government worthy of re- 
spect restored in Uganda after 
many years, and President 
Marcos fleeing from the Phil- 
ippines with his First Lady. 
The couple took £ I million in 
unused notes, but left behind 
1,000 pairs of shoes, 30 wigs 
and 30 bottles of anti-wrinkle 
cream. And, a pp ro pri ately, 
the year of five billion saw 
what may have been the most 
extensive display of human 
unanimity in history, when a 
horde of 20 milium ran, 
jogged, walked and tottered in 
the Race Against Time, to 
raise funds to combat famine 
in Africa. 

The Space Shuttle fell out of 
the sky, two Soviet liners went 
to the bottom, the price of oil 
plummeted, and the Stock 
Exchange moved upstairs. Sid 
became a Capitalist, the 
Queen Mother became a 
member of the Transport and 
General Workers' Union, and 
Bri tannia steamed on an er- 
rand of mercy through a 
Levantine war zone, with her 
band on deck playing medleys 
from Gilbert and Sufizvan. Mr 
Jeffrey Archer laid on a scene 
from one of his own novels at 
Victoria Station. A Dutch 
nurseryman hit on the 
Philosopher’s Stone of horti- 
culture by perfecting a black 
tulip and Halley's Comet 
proved to be Mack, too. 

Mr Shigechiyo Izumi died 
aged 120, the oldest person 
reliably attested to have 
reached that age. He had given 
up smoking on medical advice 
at the age of 1 16, but in vain. 
Deprived of his familiar pres- 
ence, the planet continued 
impassively to spin on 
through space with its freight 
of five billion souls, a soaring 
population of computers, and 
one black tulip. 

George HID 


JANUARY 


Business 1: US businessmen 
arrive in Britain to campaign 
for their Westland hefcopter 
rescue package. 7: Anglo- 
European consortium's new 
£75 million offer is foBcwed by 
resignation of Michael 
Hesehine as Defence 
Secretary. 1ft Home Secretary 
Leon Brittan apologizes - and 
days later resigns - over his 
earlier denials of receMnga 
British Aerospace letter. 2ft 
Go-ahead for a 1893 Channel 
tunnel rati link. 

People 1: Entertainer and 
famine relief organizer 8ob 
Geldof omitted from New 
Year's honours list President 
and Mikhail 

swop TV pledges 

of peace. 

Weather 1: Britain slips and 
sSthersin 1986 with Mack ice, 
snow drifts and floods. 31: 
Bfizzards hit Eraope and state 
of emergency declared In Turin 
where worst weather since 
1956 cages. 

Crime 1: Provisional IRA 
makes first attack of new year 
in Northern Ireland, kilting two 
policemen. 7: Margus of 
Btendford, heir to £50 mRDon 
fortune, branded “a common 
criminal" and jafled for three 
months on ckugs offence. 9: 
Uniformed police appear at 
Heathrow, carrying firearms 
for the first time in pubticx 

Abroad 3: US task force satis 
from Naples towards Libya as 
President Reagan accuses it of 
being behind December 
terrorist attacks at Rome and 
Vienna airports. 17: Royal 
Yacht Britannia spearheads 
beach evacuation of foretanei 
from Marxist-captured Aden. 
21: Car bomb explodes in busy 
Christian sector of Beirut ktitirig 
27. 25e Sikh mffitants smash 

Golden Temple shrine, 
Amritsar. 

At home £ Ministry of Defence 
to place £1,000 mtiaon order 
for torpedoes and submarines 

Leaving: Mcftasi HesaMna 



FORCED DISPOSAL SALE 

PER CUSTOMS WAREHOUSING REGULATIONS OF 1979. NOTICE 232. 

NOTICE GIVEN BY 

HER MAJESTY’S CUSTOMS & EXCISE 


A MAMMOTH INVENTORY OF OVER 3500 

MMEHMOHMS 


Ate RUGS ItaaOVH) FROM TIE BOMH) STORES OF IKE WOOD'S lARGESTWHOlESAlER 
FOllOWING NOTICE FROM HE8 HAJESITS CUSTOMS ft EXCISE 

m NOW ON 

DAILY 9AM-9PM 

INCLUDING TOMORROW. NEW YEARS DAY. 

AT THE WAREHOUSE, KT* LONDON SW6 

Directions: Travelling west along Old Brampton Road take first turning left after West Brampton 
tube station into Seagrove Rood -Take first left again into Roxby Place. 


for Navy and Air Force. 9: SDP- 
Ltoeral Alliance victory in a 
Liverpool by-election naked as 
a rejection of city’s Militant 
dominated Labour councti.30: 
Jobless total surges to record 
3,204,900. 

MecSa 9: News Internationa) 
gives print unions six months’ 
notice of termination of 
agreements. 1& TUC 
electricians' union to 
special supplement printed at 
the N. Int east London plant at 
Wapping. 26c More than 3-5 
miUJon copies of The Tones 
and Sunday Tones produced at 
Wapping. 

Sport 2: England B cricket 
team’s Bangladesh leg of 
overseas tour off after row 
over four members' South 
African connections. 7: 

Cannon (UK) pulls out of 
Football League. 

Science 28: US shuttle 
Challenger, carrying crew of 
seven, explodes in a firebati 
over the Atlantic. 

The arts 28: Cargo of China 
porcelain from bottom of South 
China Sea is conservatively 
valued at £3 million. 29: 
London's Sadler’s Wells 
theatre to dose and go into 
liquidation unless public 
subsidy is found. 


FEBRUARY 


Aniwing: Cory Aquino 


fl ITT TI7T1 

I 


N 




2 


l 




PAKISTANI FINE 
DOUBtfKNOT 6 x 4 * 

SUPER WORSTED 
PAKISTANI 12*x9* 

HAMADAN TxA' 

CHINESE SUPER WASHED 


MBOED 

EM4WO rare 

£425 £1*5 

£1, 150 £690 
£475 £280 


*PtlE 
PNE KESHAN 
TURKISH KHEUiM 
BOKHARA TABLE WATS 
QUOM SILK 
ISPAHAN 
MAIN-. PART SILK 
OLD AF5HAR 
iSENNEH 
I SILK HEREKE 
LsilK KAISER! 

AELAS 
QCAU 


12*x9* 

6*9’ x 46- 
6*X3'6- 
i'x r 
5'x3* 

8**5- 
6*2* x 37‘ 
TYv.W 
5*4' x 3*10* 
5*1* x 3*2' 
6*2* x4*3* 
7*2' x 4*3' 
6'n-x3*10- 


£2,250 

£1,750 

CI7S 

£12 

£2,800 

£6,000 

£1.350 

£900 

£850 

£4,200 


£800 

£900 

E60 

£7 

£ 1,350 

£ 3,000 

£675 

£525 

£360 

£195 

£150 


TAIEMEH 
DOSHEMEAITI 
SHIRAZ 
AFGHAN 
BALKAN TABRIZ 

cSnuuk 

ANTIQUE 

CAUCASIAN SHIRVAN 

BELOUCH 

TABRIZ 

JAIPUR 

MORIBOKHARM 

PU5HTT 

OLD AMATOL 

KELLIM 

SAMAECANO 

RUSSIAN BOKHARA 

SINKIANG 


STX3* 
6T’x4'1" 
5*1" X 3' 
12x9' 
10rx7*IV 


4'10-x3T 

ri-x4*4- 

6Tx4*2" 


9*a*x5'ur 

5T*x3T 

io-i*xr3- 

5x3T 


1NTi*3> 

RcatTC FHQ 
£525 £360 
£450 £175 
£360 £175 
£1.150 £550 
£1,200 £675 

£3,200 £1,400 

£3,500 £1,800 
£95 £50 

£2.150 £1.100 
£295 £145 

£45 £25 

£400 £195 
£195 £90 
£2.600 £1,350 
£110 £55 


SFVkCE SIMPLY DOES NOT PERMIT LISTING ALL 

Alt prices ex- warehouse. excluding VAT. 


PLUS SIZES RANGING FROM 3'x 2' UP TO T8'x 12' 

IN SILK AND WOOL. AND A HUGE INVENTORY OF RUNNERS. 


RMS OF MYMEHT: CASH. CHEQUE AKD AIL MAJOR CRTOIT CAROS 


ADMINISTRATORS; 




Business 10: Europ ea n 

Consortium offer for Westland 
shares fails. 18: Rank 
Organization makes 
unexpected £740 million bid for 
Granada. 

Peopte&HeScoptormffionaire 
Alan Bristow says he was 
Offered a krsghtnood in return 
for d r o ppi ng support for the 
European consortkim’s 
Westland rescue plan. 11; 
Soviet (fissktent Anatoly 
Sharansky walks to freedom 
across icy GHenicke bridge, 
Bolin. 

Weather 26: February 1936 
confirmed as second oddest 
this century after 1947 

Crane 10: Opening of Italy’s 
biggest trial of 474 Mafia 
bosses in Paiermo.12: Police 
file on Derek Hatton, deputy 
leader of Liverpool City 
Council, sent to the Director of 
Public Prosecutions. 27: 

Twelve held after officers 
restating a multi-million 
VAT gold fraud search records 
of Johnson Matthey Bankers. 
28: Sweden's Prime Minister 
Olof Palme killed by gunmen in 
Stockholm. 

Abroad 4: Israeli aircraft force 
down an executive jet in an 
unsuccessful bid to catch 
suspected terrorists. 3: Bomb 
terror in Paris. Two explode, 
one defused. 7: President-for- 
life Jean Claude DuvaBer flees 
Haiti. 1ft President Marcos of 
the Philippines challenges 





D«uh m the afc aD sereo astromots killed (January 28) *s apace shuttle Challenger explodes within minutes of launch 

i. Later, Stalker is 


Cory Aquino’s claim that she 
has won the presidential 
election. 16: President Marcos 
quits and flies to sanctuary. 

At home 4: Two biggest 
teachers* unions to take joint 
action against new GCSE 
exam. 5: Conservative 
backbench revolt over 
proposed British Leytand sale 
to General Motors and Ford. 
17: Burke's Peerage to be 
wound up after 160vears with 
debts of over £8,00u. 

Mocfia ft Rupert Mradoch tens 
his 5,000 dismissed print 
workers that he wffl never 
allow fractional print unions 
toto his Wapping plant 1ft 
Sogat '82 fined £25,000 and 
£17 mfifion assets seized in 
High Court after ignoring court 
injunction over pfdteting. 

Sport 18: England's cricketers 
lose by six wickets to West 
todies as Mike Gatttog’s nose 
is broken. 


3: Inquiry opens into 
allegations of professional 
incompetence against London 
Hospital consultant 
obstetrician Wen cty Savage, 
but is subsequently halted by 
General Metical Councfl 
i nter v ention. 11: GMC 
overturns ruling on Pfll 
confidentiality for gbls under 
16. 


MARCH 


Retr ea ting : Derek Hatton 



Business 2: Land Rover 
ma nagement submits firm bid 
for the company under US 
takeover threat 2ft Industry 
minister Geoffrey Pattie dears 
Guinness £2.4 bflfion takeover 
bid for Distillers. 

People 4: Dr Kurt Waldheim, 
Austrian presidential 
candidate, accused of Nazi SS 
involvement 20: M Jacques 
Chirac (53) finally appointed 
Prime Minister of France, two 
days after being offered the 
job. 

Crime 3: Riot police take to 
streets of Northern Ireland 
after mob protests against 
Anglo-Irish agreement 12: 
Dublin Police arrest Evelyn 
Glenholmes, wanted in 
conjunction with the Brighton 
bombing. Days later she walks 
free from a Dublin court over a 
legal blunder in London. 

Abroad 7: South Africa's state 
of emergency suspended after 
229 days and 757 deaths. 9: 
Hopes fade for superpowers’ 
summit as Washington cuts 
number of Soviet (Mfiomats 
working in New York 25: Libya 
threatens to turn the 
Med i t e rr an ean into a “sea of 
bkxxT as US warplanes inflict 


dsputed coastal waters.. 

At home 2: 5,000 miners march 
through London aiming to win 
reinstatement tor 500 sacked 
colleagues and to win freedom 
for 10 stiB In prison. 7: Formal 
Labour Party charges of 
Mifitant membership served on 
Derek Hatton and 15 other 
srpool party workers. 14: 
raervative MP Geoffrey 
Dickens uses parliamentary 
tfege to name Essex doctor 
iged to have raped a gtri of 
eight 27: Greater London 
Council disbanded. 

Media 4: Eddy Shah’s 
new national colour tabloid 
paper. Today, goes on sale. 

15: Iron bare, broken bottles 
and flame canister found by 
police at 7,000-strong 
demonstration outside News 
International Wapping plant 

Sport 13: Dawn Run ridden by 
Jonjo O’Neill becomes first 
horse to land Cheltenham Gold 
Cup double. 21: Mark Hughes, 
of Manchester United, joins 
Barcelona for record £2 million 
25: West Indies win third Test 
match in Barbados. 


Medicine 10: Doctors attack 
announced 20p prescription 
rise to £P.PO. an eleven-fold 
rise from 1979. 29: Martin Guy 
(18) receives double heart and 
kidney transplant at Papworth 
Hospital. 

Royals 19: Engagement is 
announced between Prince 
Andrew and Sarah Ferguson. 
31: Queen vistoly shocked as 
she sees wreckage at 
Hampton Court Palace after a 
tire which failed a general's 
widow. 


APRIL 


Bo mbin g : BoroM Reagan 



Bustoess 7: Sir Clive Sinclair is 
forced to pay his debts to £5 
million patents sell-out 18: The 
Johnny Walker whisky and 
Gordon's Gin drinks group falls 
to Guinness. 

People 16: Devon's exclusive 
Dartinqton Hall school closes 
after disclosures of under-age 
sex and drug-taking. 22: Al 
Capone keeps the secret of his 
hidden fortune as the opening 
of his Lexington Hotel vault 
reveals only dust 

Crime 5: Bomb attack on West 
Berlin discotheque kflis two, 
injures 204. 10: Jennifer 
Guinness, wife of a wealthy 
Dubtto banker, kidnapped and 
held for a £2 mRtion ransom. 
She is freed six days latte’, 
unharmed. 14: Keith White (ties 
after being struck by a police 
buute during Easter 
ly rioting in Portadown. 
17: Attempt to bknv up an B AJ 
plane from London to Tel Aviv 
ts foiled after discovery of 101b 
bomb in hand luggage of Arab 
terrorist’s pregnant Irish 
girlfriend. 

Abroad 2: Four passengers 
kffled after an explosion ripped 
through an Athens-bound 
Boeing TWA airliner. 15: US 
jets based to Britain kiH 
reported 100 people in series 
of air attacks on Libya. IT: 
Extremist Arab groups in 
Lebanon kill three British 

kidnap a British TV 
journalist and attack British 
Ambassador's Beirut 
residence in bloody retaliation. 
21: EEC toughens sanctions 
against Libya, to be followed 
by British deportion order of 21 
Libyan nationals. 

At home 9: Mrs Thatcher 
meets two Ulster Statesmen, 
amid growing speculation of 
Unionist concessions over 
>- Irish agreements. 11: 
ur takes Fulharh In morale 
boosting by-election victory. 

29: All-party MPs round on 
the Government for falling to 
aidi 

tin mines. 

Media 4: Print unions ottered 
free gift of News International 
Gray’s ton Road plant in new 
bid to settle Wapping dispute, 
plus £15 million compensation 
package. 

Sport 5: West Tip wins Grand 
National at Ain tree. 6: England 
cricketer fan Botham denies 
rug abuse allegations made in 
the Atews of the Work!. 2& 
Oxford United beat Queens 
Park Rangers 3-0 to win Milk 
Cup final. 

Science 8: US cans off 
underground nuclear blast test 
at Nevada after Greent 
protesters enter site.; 

Massive radioactive leak 
reported at Chernobyl nuclear 
power station. 29: Anger 
mounts at Moscow's failure to 
warn of spreading radiation 
from Chernobyl fire. 

Royals 23: Spanish King Juan 
Carlos becomes first foreign 
monarch to address 
Parliament 24: The Duchess of 
Windsor dies at her Paris 
home, aged 89. She is later 
brought home for a simple 
funeral service before being 
buried at Frogmore. 


MAY 


Bustoess 2: ABC cinema chain 
faBs to American-based 
Cannon group. 

People 7x Salvation Army’s 
new international leader and 
general is Eva Burrows (56). 
21: In the Cabinet Kenneth 
Baker takes over education 
and John Moore, transport 23: 
Mrs Thatcher urges American 
holidaymakers to come to 
Britain as tears of terrorists 
reprisals cost country millions. 

Crane 17: General Galtieri and 
members of Argentina’s 
former ruling military junta 
imprisoned for launching and 
losing FaDdands War. 21: Art 
treasures valued at £15 million 
stolen from Irish Republic 
country mansion. Some of the 
paintings are later found by 
boys on a fishing trip. 

Abroad 3: 14 people killed in 
Air Lanka plane bomb tragedy. 
5: Western leaders meeting in 
Tokyo issue six-point plan lor 
tackling state terrorism. 29: 
Bitter battle over President 
Reagan’s renunciation of Salt 
2 Treaty. 

At home 1: Prison officers call 
off industrial after wktesi 
destruction in jails. 17: 



officially suspended from duty. 
23: Brighton bomber Patrick 
Magee jailed for 35 years for 
planting Provisional IRA bomb 
at Conservative conference in 
Brighton. 23: Paris murder 
wave of the elderly claims 1 1th 
victim. 

Abroad 6: World protest at 
election of Dr Kurt Wakfteim 
as president of Austria. 12: 
State of emergency declared in 
South Africa after arrest of 
hundreds of dissidents in dawn 
raids. 24: Denis Healey arrives 
in Johannesburg on four-day 
visit but is barred from seeing 
imprisoned Nelson Mandela. 

At home 5: David Steel warns 
Dr David Owen that Alliance 
faces almost certain disaster at 
the next General Section 
unless it can settle nuclear 

differences. 12: Government 
confirms dissolution of 
Northern Ireland Assembly set 
up in 1982. 

Sport 10*. David Gower sacked 
as England cricket captain and 
replaced by Mike Gatling. 19: 
England eliminated from World 
Cup as Argentina's Diego 
Maradona says "Hand of God” 
intervened in his first goal. 25: 
African nations threaten to 
boycott Commonwealth 
Games if Zola Budd and 
Annette Crowtev compete. 23: 


Argentina beat West Germany 
3-2 in World Cup final. 29: 


Richard Branson 
trans-Atlantic Blue 


captui 
e Ribs 


res 
iband. 


bundled out from S 

after a High Court writ 25: two 
RAF officers killed when two 
vintage planes collide in front 
of spectators at MiktenhaH Air 
Show, Suffolk. 

Media 3: 175 police officers, 
150 demonstrators injured, 81 
arrests. In worst violence 
outside News International's 
Wapping plant 26: Rupert 
Murdoch makes new final £50 
million offer. 30: Cash crisis at 
Today, 11 weeks after 
euphoric launch. 

Sport 5: Snooker outsider Joe 
Johnson beats Steve Davis in 
Embassy world snooker 
championships at Sheffield. 

14: Italian Formula 1 racinq 
driver Eko de Angelis dies 
during race practice in Prance. 
25: Runners to 30 cities help 
raise £100 million in the “Race 
against Time.” 29: England all- 
rounder lan Botham banned 
from first-class cricket after he 
admits taking cannabis. 

Science 14: Gorbachov admits 
Chernobyl disaster figures of 
92,000 people evacuated, nine 
dead and 299 injured. 2ft 
Chernobyl death toll climbs to 


JUNE 


Pu"d*ig: Qtogo Maradona 



People 9: PoBceman George 
Hammond back m uniform 16 
months after being seriously 
injured as he tried to stop a 
robbery. 10: Bob Geldof 
becomes honorary knight. 
Marries Paula Yates on 21st. 
11: OBva Channon (22), 
daughter of Cabinet Minister 
Paul Channon, found dead 
after party at Oxford 
University. 12: Derek Hatton, 
Militant's deputy leader of 
Liverpool City Council, finally 
expdlled from Labour Parly. 

Crime B: Colin Sampson. Chief 
Constable ofWest Yorkshire, 
to take over RUC alleged shoot 
to kill polity inquiry from John 
Stalker, whose conduct he is - 


JULY 


People 13: Eduard 
Shevardnadze, Soviet Foreign 
Minister, arrives in Britain for 
' arms limitation talks. 30: 

Robert Ki Iroy-Silk, Labour MP 
for Merseyside Knowsfey 
North, quits politics claiming he 
has been driven out by 
members of Militant Tendency. 

Crime 4: Brian Chester 
acquitted of unlawful killing of 
John Shorthouse (5) during 

S slice raid on his parents' 
irmingham home. 

Calombtan visit me Popa 

>■* • 



21: Sidney Noble, notorious Dr 
Death who preyed on sick and • 
frail elderly women, given six 
life sentences. 2& Estate agent 
Susannah Lamplugh, 25, 
vanishes after taking "Mr 
Kipper" to see a west London 
house. 

Abroad 4: President Reagan 
unveils refurbished £1 71 
million Statue of Liberty 6* 

Pope visits Amarmero, 
Colombo, which vanished in 
• floods and mud after volcano 
eruption. 10: Sir Geoffrey 
Howe sent packing by 
president P w Botha on 
mission to Africa; rejected bv 
President Robert Mugabe of 
Zimbabwe. 15: President 

in1iirSva 9rSeS ^ 2 ta,ks 
between No 

10 and Buckingham Palace is 
gmedfollowingVeport in The 
Sunday Tones. 22: MPs deride 

^ one vote to ban 
punishment in state schools. 

5n^i 6 ii Bo, !! s Beck®' retains 
Wmbiedon Mens Singles^ 
championship, beating Ivan 

tfarfn^i? men s cham Pion is 

MfllS. N ® vraWova - Nigel 
ManseB wins French Grand 

British wins 
f2S\? rand Pr*. 20: Boxer 
wSd kr !°<*ed out in 

* fight with 

SinJ?K rspoon - 27 :Greg 

&=& Tourde 

u,. . . erguson married at 
Westminster Abbey PrfoS ie 

^SbSF eameswith31 


i 





Wifi 


‘ r • j»i . i* 


-w* - 
.T 



\ I 


.. % 

' i’ " ’ . 






















':. .^Paaf 
. :.:;>;i»sb 

-'-. 1 


-i-'tel 

*“sa 

■ : ~23e 
1 ’='":i 

p'ae 1 ' 

- 7. 2P^ 

"y-Z'i 


• :“sl 
H-'-rc 






‘ ' -«i :■ 


• J 


SPECTRUM 


. . . disaster and royal delight 



Nuclear blast and nuptial Ulss: radiation spread : 


(April 28) ‘after Chernobyl reactor fire, while the world rejoiced (Jaly 23) as Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson married 


AUGUST 


Repckig: John and ! 

JFj" 



Business 6: Shares suffer 
record £4 billion one-day drop. 
IS: Rolls Royce wins £600 
million contract to buRd 
engines for Boeing 747s. 


People 1% Prime Minister's 
personal popularity sinks to 
lowest level since last General 
Election. 22: John Stalker, 
suspended deputy chief 
constable of Greater 
Manchester, reinstated. 2& 
Mrs Thatcher returns to 
refurbished Grand Hotel, 
Brighton, 22 months after the 
IRA bomb. 31: US journalist 
Nicholas Danitoff arrested by 
Russians for spying* 

Weather 24: Despite popular 
impression, summer nas been 
about average, say Met Office. 


Crime 15: Jayne Scott sent to 
risen for seven years after 


prison for seven years after 
found guilty of frenzied attack 
on her homosexual lover. 20: 


John Fleming, wanted for 
questioning in connection with 


Brinks Mat gold robbery, held 
roefrtg 


by US emigration after b 
deported from Costa Rica. 

Abroad 4; Commonwealth 
summit on South Africa ends in 
failure with Britain isolated. 
British Army dismisses 1 1 1 
Gurkhas after a brawl in which 
two senior officers were 
injured. 


25: Volcanic gas from Lake 
Ny on in Cameroon kffis 1 ,500, 
affects another 20,000 and 
devastates lakeside 
population. 27:21 die and 98 
injured in feared rent eviction 
clashes wfth police m South 
Africa. 29: East German 
family make dramatic escape 
to West by driving lorry 
through Checkpoint Charfie in 
BerHnWail. 

At home 20: Government 
agrees to buHd another lane at 
cost of £20 million on busiest 
section of overcrowded M25. 
27: 18 American FI-11 aircraft 
fly into Wiltshire as US defence 
department denies any 
connection with Libya. 


MecSa 1: Police inquiry into 
attack on TNT newspaper 
distribution centre by 200- 
strong mob who burnt copies 
of The Times and the Sun. 22: 
£7 million campaign launched 
to increase ailing circulation of 
Today as Lonrho assume 
control. 


Sport 3: Wembley turf is 
invaded by the padded giants 
of American football, tbs 
Chicago Bears and Dallas 
Cowboys. 20c Bobby Robson 
to continue as England's 
manager until after World Cup 
in 19». 21: In Third Test 
against New Zealand, fan 
Botham takes three wickets to 
set world record of 357 wickets 
in Test matches. 


Medicine 6: Dr WHliam 
Schroeder, who lived record 
620 days with mechanical 
heart, dies in US hospital. 7: 
President Reagan and White 
House staff submit to drug 
tests as part of toe 
administration's war on drugs. 


Science 19: Setiafteld nuclear 
reprocessing complex shut 
after radioactivity is found to 
be above government safety 
limits. 


Royals 5: Princess Anne has 
her first raring victory at 
Redcar. 7: Prince and Princess 
of Wales and children arrive in 
Majorca for a non-package 
holiday as guests of King and 
Queen of Spain. 

Amtivefsaries 13: Armed East 


German border guards and 
Serf iners i 


angry West I 

across the Berlin Waif. 25 
years after toe city was split b 
barbed wins. 18: Reykjavik, 
capital of Iceland, celebrates 
its bicentenary. 


SEPTEMBER 


Observing: Roban RundB 



Business 9: Bedford trucks 
announce cut back in 
production with 1 ,450 jobs 
loss. 11: WaQ Street share 
prices tumble In sharpest fail 
since 1929 Great Crash. 
London prices crash in 
sympathy. 24: TSB share offer 
ends. 25: Three senior Austin 
Rover executives including 
chairman Harold Musgrove 
leave Rover Group. Company 
loses £200 million in first six 
months of 1986. 


People & Archbishop of 
Canterbury visits Crossroads 
squatter camp with newly 


enthroned Anglican 
p or Cape 


Archbishop of Cape Town, the 
Most Reverend Desmond 
Tutu. 24: Mrs Edwina Currie, 
junior Health Minister. heavBy 


criticized for teffing people of 
Newcastle that their 31 health 
was linked to poor diet, 
smoking and alcohol. 

Crime 9: British footbaH 
supporters Hnked to Heysel 
stadium disaster, Belgium, 
formally accused of 
manslaughter at London court 
11: Strongpofiba operation In 
Bristol St Paul's area against 
drug dealing and violent crime 
erupts into riots with 75 
arrests. 29: Sheffield solicitor 
Ian Wood wanted In 
connection with murder of his 
pregnant mistress and her 
young daughter climbs 200 
feet up an Amiens cathedral 
tower. 


Abroad 5: American airliner 
seized by five gunmen In 
Karachi who tall 18 of the 400 
passengers as plane is 
stormed by Pakistani 
commandos. In Istanbul, 21 
worshippers are Idled In their 


synagogue; one woman dies 
andi 8 Injun 


injured in. Paris bomb 
attack. 7: Soviet Union s&ys 
ftum aH stJ N jchote DanflorTts^ 

ITTgri^^iers 
more than one m3e 
underground at Kinross mine, 
Transvaal. 1& French mMKary 
attache in Beirut Is shot and 
killed outside French Embassy 
in east Beirut 29: Release of 
Nicholas Danitoff and two 
prominent dissident Jews after 
superpower crisis and 
expulsion from New York of 
American accused spy 
Gennady Zakharov. 
Superpower leaders announce 
surprise summit to Iceland. 


At home 4: At TUC congress 
Neil Kinnock is told unions wfl 


S ht relentlessly his policy of 
ncT 


Inding down nuclear power 
industry. 8: Mrs Thatcher 
Japanese car factory 
in Washington, County 
Durham. Labour Party 


take British 
elecom arid other privatized 
industries into "social 
ownership-" 19: Two 
passenger trains crash head 
on in Staffordshire, one dies, 
many injured. 23: Heathrow 
swamped by immigrants 
before British introduction of 
visas for pa s sengers from 
Nigeria, Ghana, Pakistan, India 
and Bangladesh. 26: Defiant 
Liberal leader David Steel 
vows to keep nuclear 
deterrent 28: At Labour Party 
conference Nefl Kinnock 
pledges to reject US nudear 
cover and to dose down their 
bases In Britain but defeats 
Arthur ScargOTs attempt to 


commit phasing out of nudear 
y within five 


energy within five years. 

Sport 14: Australian Gi 
Norman wins European 
Golf Championship at 
Sunning date and Aston V3fa 
manager Graham Turner is 
efismissed. 23: Cabinet anger 
over Footbafi League 
expulsion of Luton Town from 
Uttlewoods Cup for refusing to 
aUow Cardiff Cay supporters 
into toelr ground in a fight 
against hooliganism 27: Lloyd 
Honeyghan of Bermondsey 
becomes world welterweight 
boxing champion. 


Meffidne 5: Survey reveals 
British senior executives work 
stressful 53 hours a week and 
a quarter are too tired to make 
love after a workingj day. 22: 
Ten-week-old Jem Paterson 
becomes world's youngest 
heart and lung transplant 
patient after London hospital 
operation, but later dies. 

Royals 12: First public 
engagement together as Duke 
and duchess of York as couple 
visit a County Durham school 
for efisturbed children. 17: 
Princess of Wales brings back 
Fifties nostalgia as she sports 
swept back '*0 A" hair style. 


OCTOBER 


Tounng; The Queen 



Business 27: The City's Big 
Bang turns into a shambles as 
computer falls. 


People 1: PC Ph9lp Olds, shot 
and paralysed white tackling 
two gunmen, is found dead. 19: 
President Machel of 
Mozambique and other 
government members killed 
when their aircraft crashes on 
South African borders. 26: 
Jeffrey Archer resigns as 
deputy chairman of 
Conservative Party after 
allegations in a Sunday 
newspaper. 

Crime 24: Nezer Hindawi, who 
tried to use his pregnant 
girlfriend as a human bomb, 
sentenced to 45 years. Britain 
breaks off tfiptomatiefteks with 
Syria. 28: Jeremy B amber 
handed five Fife sentences for 
murder of his family at their 
Essex farmhouse. 

Abroad 10: Earthquakes shake 
El Salvador. Death ton 
eventually reaches 890 and 
10,000 injured. 11: Resident 
Reagan and Mr Gorbachov fafi 
to agree arms control after 
two-day summit in Iceland. 
Followed by retaliatory 
expulsion of diplomats. 

At home 1: Labour Party to 
phase out nudear power in 
decades rather than months. 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1143 


ACROSS 

1 Clothes dose: (8) 

5 Formerly (4) 

9 PuriGer(7) 

10 Short-sighted person 
(51 

11 Light racing boat (5) 

12 House beetle 15) 

13 Burdened (Si 

15 ■PuioflTfS) 

16 Get lo(5) 

18 Monk's community 

(5) 

20 Greek underworld 
god (5) 

21 Instil (7) 

23 Story (4) 

24 Geremonial garment 
(8) 



DOWN 6 Midday (4) 

1 Employee (6) 7 Cricket team (6) 

2 Rabble (8) 8 Unimportant people 

3 Gallop (3) (SJ) 

4 Smetana's humorous 11 1 8th century 

opera (8.5) nituie maker (8) 


24 Watercourses system 
( 8 ) 

15 Tyrant (6) 

17 Large wasp (6) 

19 Two-man combat (4) 
22 Obtain (3) 


SOLUTION TO NO I 142.,^. cNit 9 Behest Id Orphan 11 


OCninala U DfrSWjW-, glTiW .imp. 7 


DOWN: 2 Opera -- - 
Coastal 13 Esplanade 15 
Sweep 22 Far 


16 Average 18 Outdo 20 


. What do 714 bottles of our wonderful 
lH £2.65 Cavalier bubbles add up to, Mr Clarice...? 
A sparkling 19.8?, Mn Johnstone... I 



A; only £2.65, sparkling Cavalier from Mftfestic will 

of 1 £?55 SSSj 5* * 16(1 ° nly ”!** ' hr 

^ rSte wnbfra glass loan, local delivery 

aU your vrines, we’ll have you 

SS SEhSt *** 0V<TI 

Vfc’re open lale Decvtuber 
27-51 to help you 
all too New Year 


bargain?. 

ging 01-751 SSI 





Famous figures who died 


Gamat Miss R Addis; S Allan; 
Dame G Aves: Baron G von 
Banfjeld; B Bishop; S Bourne: A 
Courtenay: M Dassault; Lady D 
Cooper; Le Duan; P Ellis; Lady 
Fisher of Lambeth; Lady Flem- 
ing; Dr P Grove; G Hatherill; 
Mrs E Hayihomihwaite; Sir W 
Hildred; E Hiscock: Sir F Hoare; 
G HorsfeU; Lord Kalder, Vis- 
count Knutsford; B Lawrence; R 
Leewy; Miss B Markham; Mr J 
B Millar. Glubb Pasha; D 
Perkins; Sir A Peterson; G 
Rainbird: G Rowett; Sir M O 
Ah Saifuddin; Mrs D Russell; M 
Sacher, C Unwin; Sir R Waites; 
Sir K. Wood; Lord Woolley. 
Medicine: Sir H Osmond 
Clarke: Prof Sir S Clayton; Sir J 
Croom: Prof K Dodgson; Prof F 
Hellier. Dr C Langton; Dr H 
Jolly; Sir i MagiU; Sir C Morgan; 
G C Uoyd-Robens; Maj-Gen R 
A Smart. 

Fine and graphic arts: L Conran; 
A Free tit; Miss G O'Keeffe: P 
Gardner C Lavenstein; Hon P 
Lindsay; H Moore. 

VC and GC holders: Col J Came 
VC; Lt-Col D Currie, VQ R 
Rauuy. VC Capt R Ryder. VC 
Grp Capt L Trent, VC; H 
Wilson. VC 

Armed services: Air Cdre Sir V 
Brown; Air Vice- Marshal D 
Bennett: Ll-Gen M Brennan; Ll- 
Gen Sir C Bird; Air Vice- 
Marshal RN Bateson; Air Vice- 
Marshal Sir C Collier, Gen SirT 
Creasey; Air Vice-Marshal L W 
Cannon; Rear Admiral D H 
Everett; Air Vice-Marshal K 
Garside; Air Comm D D’Arcy 
Greig: Maj-Gen Sir E Hakewill 
Smith: Major-Gen L Hawes; 
Marshal Ye Jianying; Air 
Comm J Ken Gen Sir C 
Laewen: Rear-Admiral A J 
MQler, Maj Gen R W Madoc; 
Gen Sir G Macmillan of Mac- 
millan; Lt Gen Sir H Redman; 
Admiral H G Rickover. Vice 
Admiral Sir M Richmond; Gen 
Sir O Roberts; Air Cdre A P 
Revinglon; Gen Sir H 
Stockweli; Lt-Gen A Vaidya; 
Rear Admiral GAM Wilson; 
Air Chief Marshal Sir A Walker. 
Sport: E de Angelis: R Aird; 
Prince Birabongsc: E Brown: J 
Bevanp: K Carter. B Edrich; B 
Fabi; T Farr D Frey: R Jones: J 
Laker. E Roderick; Sir S Rouse; 
Captain H Ryan Price; R Shade; 
Sherpa Tenzing; H Toivonen: P 
Waterman; Lord W de Broke. 



Christopher Duchess of 
Isherwood Windsor 


Osbert 

Lancaster 



Finlay; Dr J Fletcher Lord 
Fulton; Prof A Gemmell; F 
Herbert; Dr G Herklots; Miss S 
Jameson; Dr L Jeffery; Prof F 
Lipmann; Miss A ErsJdne- 
Lindop; B Malamud. Prof A 
Headlam-Morley; Miss N 
Strealfrild; Dr C H V Suther- 
land; C Sykes; Mrs D Tangye; R 
V Tooley; Prof J Toynbee; J 
Tripp; Prof B White; T H White. 

Theatre, riaema. broadcasting, 
ballet and music: H Aden; R 
Armitage; E .Bruhn; Miss H 
Baker, Miss H Baddeley; M 
Croft; B Crawford; P Curran; J 
Cagney, Miss L Chase; R 
Cawston; W Dollar, D S tori e s; 
Miss V Elliott; D Gee; Mrs G 
Wyndham Goldie; C Grant; J 
Gibbs; B Goodman: Sir R 
Helpmann; D James; Miss E 
Lanchesten Miss B Love; L 
Lupine Lane; A Jay Lernen L 
Lister, Miss S - McKenna: R 
Milland; V Minelli; G Mills; T 
Moult; Miss D Nichols: Dame A 
N eagle; Dr B Naylor. O 
Preminger; Mrs L Palmer; Miss 
P Phoenix; Sir P Pears; Miss D 
Reed; Dr E Rubbra; R Steven- 
son; G Byam Shaw; Miss M 
Silver, H De Silva; N Stock; J 
Trevelyan; G Wartack; Sir H 
Weldon; H Wallis: S Young; W 
Simpson. 

Government, diplomatic and 
public life: Lord Booth by; C 
Bowles; Sir A Clegg; Sir C Oegp 
F Cousins; Lord Crawshaw, Sir 
M Creswell; Lord Derwent; J 


Dillon; Dame _ A Dpu^hty, 


Otto 

Praninger 


Lord 

Shinwell 


Alan 

Gemmell 


Lord 

Boothby 


Ecclesiastical: Ri Rev J Baker; 


Bishop C Butler Mgr J CaJlai^ 


Gen F Coutts; Very 
Crooks; Rt Rev H F Davies; 
Very Rev Dr H Douglas; Fr K 
Foster. Rev R Foxcroft Bishop 
M Hariand; Rt Rev E B Hender- 
son: Rt Rev M Hollis; L R 
Hubbard; J Krishnamurti: Most 
Rev J McQeney S J: Rt Rev A 
Oner Rt Rev V J Pike; Rt Rev 
G Sinker, Dr P Tournier. 

Journalism: A Bestall; J Coliart; 
S Dowling; J Greig; Miss P 
Glynn; I Hamilton: T Hey; Col 
Sir A HorsburRh-Porter. H de 
Ctonon Hastings; D Hart; P 


Montagne-Smith; H Kay; O 
Lancaster; A R Winthrop 
Saigeant: Sir W Richardson; J 
Sutton; E Shaw; M Setb-Smith: 
E Waring. 

Literature, edcuatlon and 
scholarship: Prof D Arnold; 
Miss E Barker. J Luis Beiges: Dr 
C Bosanquet; E Bradford; J 
Braine; C I sherwood; Prof K de 
Burgh Cbdrington; V Channing; 
Lord D CeciTCH; Prof S G 
Checkland; Sir N Chester, Prof J 
Cocking: Prof R Collar; G 
Gangerfield; Prof G Daniel; J 
Daniels: Prof J M Dodd: Rev E 
G Evans; Dame H fisli; Sir M 


Prince Gemg of Denmark; 
Gerstenmaier, Earl of Hadding- 
ton; A Harriman; Sir P Hay; 
Cram dr T Uoyd-Hughes; P 
Kanellopoulos; Lord Murray- 
King: President S Machel; S 
'Mahon; Air Marshal Sir L 
Pend red; D Penbatigon MP; 
Lord Plant; A Powell; Sir D 
Scott; Lord ShinwelL Earl of 
Stockton; Sir I Sutherland; Rev 
L Valentine; Sir R Webster, 
Duchess of Windsor Sir E 
Youde. 


Law: Judge P Ingress Bell; Mr F 
W Beney, QC: Mr C Graham- 
Dixon. QC; Sir V Lloyd-Jones 
QC; Judge J Maude; Prof O 
Hood Phillips. QC; Mr Justice 
Tudor Price; Sir A Rawlinson; 
His Hon G Rees; Lord Russell 
of Killowen; Mr S Seuffert. QC; 
Mr Justice Skinner, His Hon A 
Trapnell: His Hon Judge Sir T 
Williams. QG 


but votes in favour of a non- 
nuclear defence policy. 14: 

Angry parents withdraw 
chwfren from a Haringey, 
London, council primary 
school over “gay lib" policy. 
21: Rumours of a marriage rift 
between the Archbishop of 
Canterbury and his wife are 
condemned by his bishops as 
“scurrilous and baseless". 2 & 
Peace movement plans to 
distribute white poppies rattier 
than traditional red for 
Remembrance Sunday. 29: 
Mrs Thatcher opens final 
section of M25. 


Media 22: Ki 
receives Booker 

OUDevBs. 


Amis 
for The 


Sport 5b I 
Prix de I'Arc de ' 


Brave wins 
riomphein 


record tima^Gar^ Kasparov 


[chess 


retains the > 
championship i 
Karpov. 26: Nioef Mansell fail 
top win world formula 
championship when a tyre 
bursts during Australian Grand 
Prix.17: Birmingham loses to 
Barcelona in bid to host 1992 
Olympics. 


Royals 12; The Queen and 
Duke of Edinburgh visit China. 
The Duke tetls English 
students if they stay in China 
too tong they will become 
"slitty-eyed . 


libraries are declared unlawful. 
12: Michael Lush dies while 
practising for Noel Edmonds's 
Late Late Breakfast Show. 21: 
Robert Maxwell awarded 
£55,000 libel damages against 
satirical magazine Private Eye. 


Medicine 21: AIDS cases In 
Britain reach 512 . Government 
reacts with £20 million shock 
tactics campaign. 


Royals 26: Historian Francis 
Watson says rang George V 
died prematurely because his 
doctor administered injections 
of cocaine and morphine so 
that the morning newspapers, 
including The Times, would be 
the first to carry his death 
announcement 


DECEMBER 


Business 19: Government wins 
its case to scrap GEC's Nimrod 
spy plane in favour of 
American AWACS. 


People 12: A doctor is 
acquitted of raping a girl (8) 
white she slept at nis home. 20: 
John Starker.toquit 


NOVEMBER 


Business 23: Bar 
announces seffing of its 
interests in South Africa. 26: 
More than 250,000 completed 
application forms arrive for 
sale of British Gas shares. 


People 17: First day of 
Australian court hearing to 
stop former M15 counter- 
intelligence officer Peter 
Wright publishing Ifis memoirs. 

Crime 10: John Steed, dubbed 
the M4 rapist, given four life 
sentences for attacks on 


|OLmg women in southern 


■land. 17: Georges Besse, 

' _ (firector of Renault, 
shot dead in Paris. 


Abroad 4: l 

US hostage amis deal. ■ 
later goes on television to 
assume ful responsibility for 
secret US operation. 25t Vice 
Admiral John Poindexter, 
Reagan's national security 
adviser, resigns and Lt Col 
Oliver North, shadow military 
adviser, is sacked over Iran 
affair. 


Accusing; Peter Wright 

v' W.VT 

it • * 1 — - 



At home 4: Brent infants* 
school headteacher Maureen 
McGddrick is reinstated after 
being suspended for alleged^ 
making racist remarks. & 45 oil 
rig men die as a Chinook 
helicopter crashes into the sea 
in the Shetland Islands. 28: 
Education secretary Kenneth 
Baker publishes his Biti giving 
him sweeping powers to 
determine teachers' pay. 


Mmfia 5: Ban on News 
International papers in three 
Labour council-run public 


Crime 5k Sebastian Guinness 
jailed tor his part in the death 
of Olivia Channon who died of 
drink and heroin overdose at 
an Oxford party. 1& Moors 
murderess Myra Hmdtey 
returns 20 years later to bleak 
Saddleworth Moor, Yorkshire, 
to help search for more bodes. 


Aboard 7: French Premier 
Jacques Chirac withdraws his 


controversial University reform 

Bin student rioting. 11: South 


Bin student rioting. 

Africa imposes sweeping new 
censorship of radio, 
newspaper and TV reporting. 


Rttjming: Myra HincSay 



14: 98 die and 310 injured in 
ethnic 


worst outbreak of i 
violence in recent history of 
Karachi. 19: Soviet Union 
announces end to the internal 
exile of Dr Andrei Sakharov. 

At home 7: . Left-wing Brent 
counts drops proceedings 
against Miss McGofdrfck. 11: 
Seflafteld nuclear plant 
threatened with closure unless 
modifications are made. 2tfc 
Conservatives leap to 8£ per 
cent lead over Labour in Gatiup 
survey. 

Sport 14: America faHs to 
reach America's Cup final for 
first tmiB in 135 years after 
being beaten by New Zealand. 
IS: rage! Short, Britain's top 
ranked chess grandmaster, 
defeats Soviet World 
champion, Gary Kasparov. 19: 
Former champion jockey 
Lester Piggoti accused of 
making a false tax statement 
27: England retain Ashes after 
innings and 14 run-victory. 


Mecfictne 1& Miner's wife 
Dawna Thompson (35) given 
new heart, lungs and fiver in 
seven-hour transplant 


Arts 1: Sunfit street scene by 
Manet becomes most 

expensive modern pakrtfog 
sold at auction at £7.7 million. 


Compiled by 
Suzanne Greaves 




THE RIDDLE 
OF THE 
>> SPHINX 

£ “Where can one find 
such quality and 
service - at prices 
yet undreamed by 
mortal man?” 


The answer is - 
ONLY at 
FORTNUM & 
MASONS 
REDUCTION 
PERIOD 


2nd to 17th 
January 

(Closed New Year’s Day) 




fortnum &Mason 

PKcadiOy London Wl A lER- TdrphdnrQl-7S4 8040 j- 


. . *•-' r 












Humour 

undated 

“Long time, no see” was bow 
Detective Chief Superinten- 
dent Slipper apparently gree- 
ted Ronald Biggs on the ninth 
floor of his hotel in Rio. It is a 
phrase, now shaped as a 
promise, which he is eff- 
ectively repeating to the BBC 
Denied, through his legal ac- 
tion, knowing Biggs’s drama- 
tized reply due to the 
postponement of Slip-up 
(BBC1)» one had to make do 
with Archive Might on Chan- 
nel 4 and programmes one had 
not seen since 1968. 

I TELEVISION I 


Do Not Adjust Your Stock- 
ing, featur in g most of the 
Monty Python team, was 

black and white and scratched. 

The clothes had dated and so 
had the haircnts, bat most of 
the subversive, confident he- 
moer had not. A Movietone 
take-off of the Royal Father 
Christmas College assured ns 
“it's a man's life in the fairy 
grotto". (Watching the men in 
red at practice tumbling down 
dmuneys, we had to remember 
that on Christmas Eve “they 
do all this in the dark.") Best 

of the lot was Denise Coffey in 

feather boa, sequins and 
Tbora Hird glasses as she 
.introduced Terry Jones for his 
■impersonation of the London 
Symphony Orchestra going tip 
the Zambesi in a storm. It 
worked because we seemed to 
be eavesdropping on a private 
joke (<mt being treated as this 
joke). There was no qnestbm 
of having to sit listening while 
it was explained. 

- Tie Lowers, by Jack Rosen- i 
rt»al — who has been monopo- 
lizing the December screen — 
had also survived well from 
1970. A neatly twisted comedy 
abocrt would-be marrieds, H 
reminded one of a time when 
British Rail had pictures in 
compartments, when girls got 
tiddly on egg-flips and when 
MaHreen Lipman was not only 
a good actress but beautiful. 

JVew Faces, New Stars did 
not come up from the cellar 
with such a pleasant bouquet. 
Messily edited, this compila- 
tion of various winners showed 
that some of the people im- 
personated had lasted an even 
shorter time than those taking 1 
the mickey. The “sensational 
"Roger de Coarcy" was any- 
thing but; Gary Wilmot was 
frenetically unfunny; and 
Aiden J. Harvey proved he 
could not impersonate his way 
into a dry cleaner's. By far the 
most talented and enduring 
wen black performers like 
Lenny Hairy, Patti Boulaye 
and Sweet Sensation. 

. Finally, since we are dealing 
with coldish turkey, it is unfair 
■ that Harty’s Christmas Party 
(BBC2, Christmas Eve) 
^should pass without a belated 
belch. Random comments 
from a room of six people aged 
between 20 and 83: “Who's 
that awful man? — he's 
terrible." “Oh, bat the man 
behind is even worse." “I 
Slink it's so bad it toast be 
live." “Is that a real fire? It 
looks tike a pub." “1 don't 
know why we're watching h." 
And, to your critic — con- 
demned as the person who is 
“meant to know something 
about television" — “How on 
earth is this allowed?" 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


W ith a fist on his lips. 
Sir' Michael Levey 
stares into the dark 
surface of his long 
dining -table in the 
National Gallery. “The value of a 
work of art, like a house in 
Dulwich, is established by demand, 
if you want to buy a Barrett Home 
there, a) you have my sympathy, b) 
you know it's not worth it. 
Nothing's worth anything. It's like 
saying how much would you pay if 
your children were kidnapped.” 
With an animated b link, he looks 
up. “Do you remember that Said 
story where someone paid for their 
children not to come back?" He 
shakes his monkish bead at the 
thought of a man about whom he 
was once keen to write a biography. 
“What a great awful writer he was.” 

A “gifted amateur" is how Levey 
recently described himself, one 
who has risen to the top without 
formal training and who would 
"rather be dissolute and sexy than 
respectable”. He conies over as a 
nervous hedonist, though, with 
something of the White Rabbit 
about Him : an air of impatience 
and hurry as he is jerked by a 
watch-chain from one meeting to 
another. This too belies a ran* 
damental toughness, for he is 
outspoken in his quiet, determined 
way. It is a way that has served our 
premier art gallery well in the 13 
years £ince his appointment as 
Director. 

“I always wanted to go while I 
retained the odd marble”, be says 
of his retirement. “I want to see 
what leisure is. I want, Garbo-like, 
to slop around and be left alone. 
I'm going to be a different person, 
hopefully — as they wrongly say. 
All this writing about art is litre 
camping at the gates of a great 
house and hoping you might be 
mistaken for the owner." Instead of 
adding to his'long list of mono- 
graphs, on Tiepolo and Watteau 
and the history of painting from 
Giotto to Cezanne, he will take off 
bis jacket and tie and write fiction 
— like his wife, the novelist B rigid 
Brophy. While admitting he was “a 
nit" to think no connection would 
be made between his respectable 
public position and his authorship 
of two dissolutely sexy novels, he 


THT: TTMFS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 

THE ARTS 


growing 



Sir Michael Levey (right) today retires aftei 
1 3 years as Director of the National Gallery 
taking with him memories both bitter and 
sweet interview by Nicholas Shakespeare 


wants at last “to have a shot at 
being the creator, not the 
interpreter". 

Were his younger, interpretative 
self to enter now and see whether 
the retiring man had fulfilled the 
hopes of 13 years ago, Levey 
admits he would find some things 
undone. "I haven't succeeded as 
well as I'd have liked at attracting a 
wider segment of society. It’s 
nothing to do with numbers; 
they've risen dramatically (by a 
milli on to nearly three million). 
I'm just haunted by a feeling there’s 
an audience out there who would 
find it mightn’t be terribly different 
from choosing a certain tie or 
blouse. One ought to be able to 
come in here and enjoy oneself 
partly by saying T absolutely loathe 
that 3 ." Picking up a paper napkin, 
he prods an old chestnut — the feet 
that our system of education has 
never fostered an interest in things 
seen; that the very English ad- 
monition “Don’t Look” has meant 
our appreciation of painting is 
relegated to a pastime, a wet 
afternoon pursuit “Our country 
should generate as much interest in 
coming to see Titian as in being 
aware of Shakespeare." And, twist- 
ing the napkin, “I consider that 
painter as central to a civilized 
person as the Bard". 

Unlike Kenneth Clark, Levey 
was an inside appointment He had 
worked in the gallery since coming 
down from Oxford in 1951 — his 
first task was to put books away in 
the library — and become assistant 
to Sir Martin Davies,- his scholarly 
predecessor. When offered Dav- 
ies's job. he immediately scurried 
round to Downing Street, rang the 
bell and handed in his letter of 
acceptance. “There was a head of 
steam by a staff altogether begin- 
ning to be impatient that the 
National Gallery could do more. I 
suppose I was 'the people’s 
choice'.” Many innovations or his 


reign were introduced in conjunc- 
tion with this staff. The Artist in 
Residence, for instance, was an 
idea of Alistair Smith of the 
Education Department, who also 
came up with the Artist’s Eye series 
(pitting the work of a contem- 
porary artist against the Old Master 
pointings of his choice). Both 
emphasized continuity in art. Both 
encouraged penetration of the 
Portman stone facade and .the 
notion, dear to Levey, of enjoy- 
ment through understanding. As 
for how he saw his own task, “it 
was to preserve and display the 
collection 1 inherited and do all I 
could to enhance it, extend it and 
extend an appreciation of it”. 

Under Levey’s aegis, the gallery 
crossed the Rubicon into tire 20th 
century, with purchases of Matiss e 
and Picasso. Though it remains 
deficient in David, Munch and 
Gauguin — and 19th-century 
France as a whole — the collection 
has been augmented by about four 
major paintings a year since 1973. 
“The opportunities that have come 
my way may not be repeated", he 
stresses. 

H is pur chasing grant has 
been pared to £2.75 
million, “a figure kept 
at last year’s level, itself 
a figure of the year 
before which was cut by Gowrie. 
And this has to last us to March 
1988. It makes you whistle”, he 
says, not whistling. Indeed, with- 
out the Getty windfall of £50 
million, one wonders what exactly 
the gallery could now purchase. 
Recent Old Masters like Mantegna 
and Turner have gone for £8 
millio n — which is still cheap 
compared with the budget of a 
movie. But, in a year or so, Levey 
can imagine a Rembrandt fetching 
£30 million. 

“The present position is indefen- 
sible. It is deeply shocking that 
someone bears the title of Minister 


for the Arts and does nothing for 
them. It makes one wonder 
whether the arts would be better 
without a minister. We used to 
have a Minister without Portfolio. 
We’re in danger of having a 
Minister without the Arts.” Warm- 
ing to his theme, Levey includes 
the whole of the present admin- 
istration. “They don't come and 
see the pictures. They don’t under- 
stand what art is about Very few 
have the courage to say ‘I am 
illiterate’. Very few have the cour- 
age to say ‘Every time I see a book, 
I throw it on the fire'. They’re 
precious near to that in the visual 
arts, whose neglect has shown their 
basic lack of imagination. It's no 
different to saying No Saunas or 
Gymnasiums, where bodies are 
exercised. These places”, he says, 
looking around, his napkin now m 
pieces, “are about exercising the 
visual muscles. Yet they say ‘It’s 
super as it stands — it needn’t 
expand’. It's like telling someone of 
ten ‘You needn’t grow up any 
more, you're a marvellous height 
for a boy of your age’.” 

There is no better testimony to 
Levey’s temperament and achieve- 
ment than the current exhibition of 
his selected acquisitions, reviewed 
by John Russell Taylor on this page 
yesterday. Walking up the stabs, a 
white-bearded man recognizes him 
and throws out his arms. “Sic 
monumenturo requiris”, he says, 
quoting Wien's epitaph, “dreum- 
spice.” Levey laughs nervously - 
his own preferred epitaph would be 
“He wrote some things it is a 
pleasure to re-read” — and shows 
me round his monument. It is a 
monument constructed with paint- 
ings by artists like Rubens, 
Caravaggio, Monet and Klimt — 33 
in all, roughly the number of the 
original collection in 1824 when it 
was located in a private house off 
Pall Matt. He halts before his 
favourite, a portrait of the Balbi 
children by Van Dyck. He remem- 
bers, when he was five, a reproduc- 
tion of it in his parents’ bedroom. 
“I love the grandeur, the glamour, 
the poignancy", he says of the 
original, his fist on his tips again, 
his eyes roving over the three boys. 
“They’ve all been told they can 
grow up.” 


Playful surface 


| THEATRE | 
Losing Venice 

Lyceum Studio, 
Edinburgh 

Since it was first shown 18 
months ago the Traverse 
production of John Clifford’s 
Losing Venice has travelled a 
long way in more than one 
sense. Before moving on to 
London and Hong Kong, ft 
returned to Edinburgh, bring- 
ing with ft the freight of 
international aedaim that it 
has accumulated and that is, 
in one sense, a burden — both 
deadening the palate to the 
play's freshness and raising 
expectations for something 
more complete. 

Gifford’s play is not a 
weighty masterpiece — it is a 
gentle and playful comedy 
which, for most of its length, 
works well on its own terms. 
The trouble with it eventually 
is that the themes it takes on 
begin to demand more in- 
volved and meaty discussion. 

Gifford sketches out life in 
the decaying grandeur of the 


Spanish empire, ironically and 
ingeniously calling upon tra- 
ditional elements of Spanish 
drama to do so, combining 
poetic fantasy and earthy re- 
alism. Here a tiresome war- 
mongering Duke (Andrew 
Wilde) is sent, with his poet 
Quevedo and his servant 
Pablo, to “rescue” Venice 
from the Turk — his departure 
engineered by his distracted 
wife and ageing King so as to 
be rid of his pompous 
presence. 

When it was first shown the 
implied contemporary par- 
allels struck home and clearly, 
behind its loose historical 
setting, is a more general 
comment on imperial power 
and the nature of war. For the 
Duke, war is the means of 
finding purpose within a 
declining empire and, as he 
constantly seeks resolution 
and domination, his blinkered 
outlook makes him imper- 
vious to the more harmonious 
existence that Quevedo and 
Pablo discover in Venice — a 
lost state of a different kind 
that changes their lives. 

In the larger space of the 
Lyceum Studio (being used by 
the Traverse in a laudable 
attempt to extend to a wider 



Andrew Wilde as the Duke 
who finds purpose in war 

public), Dermot' Hayes's pale 
wooden two-tiered set creates 
a bright, light atmosphere that 
complements the feeling run- 
ning through much of Jenny 
Kiliick’s production. Now far 
tighter and more crisply 
choreographed, it is a viva- 
cious production, balancing 
the play’s farce and banter 
with its more poetic elements. 

There are some lovely 
performances; from Bernard 
Doherty as a world-weary 
wordmonger who finds him- 
self regenerated, from Kate 
Duchene as a crisp Duchess, 
from Penny _ Bunion as a 
beautiful, placid Venetian nun 
and from Ralph Riach and 
Roger Hyams as the monarch 
and his unctuous servant 

Sarah Hemming 


The time-honoured art of 
“borrowing" someone else's 
tune, adapting it slightly to 
suit a new medium, and thus 
creating without too much 
mental anguish a tidy little 
earner for oneseff has not 
entirely been forgotten in our 
century. But those tiresome 
laws of copyright have ren- 
dered such enterprises more 
hazardous. The heyday of the 
great musical plagiarists was 
undoubtedly in late 17th- and 
early 18th-century- London, 
when Handel was (to quote 
one charitable contemporary) 
“taking other men’s pebbles 
and polishing them into 
diamonds", John Playfbrd 
was recycling folk-tunes for 
domestic use and John Gay 
was happily beggaring every 
ballad he could lay his hands 
on. 

Tracing family connections 

The tragic death of the young 
pianist Terence Judd in 1979 
has brought in its wake an 
important and lasting tribute: 
a biennial award given in his 
name, which is now settling 
down as a regular event with 
the Wigmore Hall appearance 
of its third winner, William 
Stephenson. 

On this occasion ft is clear 
that the judges have chosen an 
able technician. In the most 
taxing Liszt items Stephenson 
ensured every note was in its 


proper place, and the exultant 
asp as he brought “Vallee 
cTObermann" to a spectacu- 
larly vehement dose showed 
how much he enjoys the 
physical side of playing. Yet 
even here it is arguable how 
much music he was finding in 
the notes. Tire only points 


11 * ■ -/ if 

‘v )• - 





I CONCERT 

Broadside Band 

Wigmore Hall 


between popular 17th-century 
tunes was the prime purpose 
of this entertaining Broadside 
Band programme. In one vir- 
tuoso sweep, for instance, we 
heard the famous I talian 
chord sequence “La folia’’ first 
in its English ballad versions, 
then in Scottish (“Gillie- 
crankie”) and Irish (“Planxty 
Davis”) forms and finally in 
the folk-song versions aurally 
transmitted down the genera- 
tions and collected by Vau- 
ghan W illiams as “The Miller 
of the Dee" and “Dives and 
Lazarus" 


LONDON 

DEBUTS 


Similarly a French tune was 
performed first in its stately 
pa van form, then in Playford’s 
English country-dance version 
“Parson upon Dorothy” - a 
title which suggests the sort of 
1 7th -century pastime that put 
the pep into Pepys. A little 
more pep in the Broadside 
Band's playing would have 
been welcome; perhaps a 
drum might have enhanced 
some of the jigs. Jeremy 
Bartow’s spoken introduc- 
tions had their languid areas 
too, solidly informative 
though they were. 

Nevertheless, there was 
much inventive embellishing 
to admire, particularly from 
the lutenist -George Weigand 
and the viol-player Rosemary 
Thorudycraft as they turned 
the variations on “Go from 
my Window" audaciously 

which really struck home were 
isolated ideas that he seized 
upon with force, a feature that 
was just as evident (thought 
less welcome) in the Beetho- 
ven and Debussy that made 
up the first half 

No such problems troubled 
the viola player Prunella 
Pacey. If anything, the opp- 
osite was true: her Purcell 
Room debut with the pianist 
Frank Mol was full of genuine 
and understated musical vai- 


away from the dignified orig- 
inal and towards something of 
almost Spanish fervour. The 
four-strong band was at its 
best, though, m big tuiti 
numbers, where the whirl of 
improvisation was firmly and 
rhythmically underpinned. 

John Potter, usually such a 
stalwart ensemble singer, 
sounded awkward here. Many 
of the Beggar’s Opera tunes' 
seemed to take his tenor into 
uncomfortable regions, and 
his diction was not quite dear 
enough to put across every 
salacious detail of “T was 
Within a •Furlong of Edin- 
burgh Town". But he made a 
bold fist of characterizing 
“Mad Tom of Bedlam”, and 
his versatility helped the med- 
leys to flow freely. 

Richard Morrison' 

ues, as one might expect from 
a chamber music player with 
her depth of experience. Any 
fault came in a tendency to let 
the tension in the perfor- 
mances sag. But Brahms's F 
minor Sonata brought forth a 
stronger, more resilient style 
and there was real eloquence 
in her playing of the mournful 
Elegy for solo viola by Britten. 
The virtues of simplidty here 
were well stated. 

Richard Fairman 


nf 


1 5 n c 

! IL, 4, 


to tw 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


CONCERTS 


ALDWYCHOI 356 6*04/0641 ce 
Ol are 6 255- 0 1 741 9999 
DORO THY TUTW 




M HALL 638 0796/653 
Toni A Tomer 7.-16 1 


Sy mph o n y Orchestra. 


OPERA & BALLET 


COUHUM S 836 3161 cc MO 
B2S8 ENGLISH NAHONA1. 
O PERA T oni ^7.30 ^Wa 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 933 
3191 CC 928 8800 Until 17 
Jon. Eves 7.30 M49 3om 

LONDON FESTIVAL 
BALLET 


Today Sum; Hafl/Albern/ 
Flaming/ Armand/Jadas/ 
Jahnson/Lta. Toni 7J0c 
Tarabust/SevlDano/ 

Schaidun/Skoeg/Bruce/ 

Grani/Uas. 

ROYAL OKRA HOUSE 3*0 

1006/1911. SUbV Into 836 
6003 8 CC. -ncHrrt C1O2Z30 
<BallcO IMW (Oporto. 66 
nrophi avafl on the day. 
Toni Tamor 7.30 THE ROYAL 
BALLET Tba HatonNfMT. Ballet 
conns mo: 01-200 9916. 


SADLER'S WELLS 278 8916. 
raw Con CC 2*lB- 7 day 240 
7200. Uoffl 17 Jan. Eva 7J30. Sot 
Man ? 

SADLER'S WELLS 
ROYAL BALLET 

TonT. FM A Sac THE SHOW 
QUm. Mon ip Tburs. 



THEATRES 


AKLPM 836 7611 or 240 7913 
/A CC 741 9999/836 7338/379 
6433 Orp Sales 930 6l23 Ftrw 
Cau 24hr 7 day oc 240 7200 (BKa 
<M> NOW BOO KMC TO MAY 30 
1907 ' 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 

Nightly 4 730 MOD Wed at 230 
A am 4304 8.00 
"THE lA PH i r r SHOW 
m TOWN- S Expreo 

ALHEKY 836 3878 CC 379 6665/ 
379 6433/ 741 9999 CTOt* 
Saks 836 3962. Eve* Ban 
LIM IT E D LONDON SEASON 

DAVE ALLEN LIVE 
•WVAlTA'nMLY HJHHV" 

ALBERT 836 3078 CC 379 6666/ 
3796433/741 9999/On»B36 
. 3962. 1.30 * 4.15 dafty. LAST 
WEEK. David Wood's 
THE OLD HAM 
OP LQCHNACAR 
A. MiMcai nay for children. 
From me book by HRH The 
Prtnce of Wales. 
aMOASAAPORS 01-836 6111 CC 
35b 1171. First can (24 tus/7 
Urol 240 7200 0*B ft*). Eva 
7.3C- Wed JWta^ SM 4 68 

LES LIAISONS 
* DANGEREUSES 

Rwr 4 “COT PLAY" 
jUdnir Om msmn 'BtCT 
ACTRESS” OBvtar AwwdO ’*8 


D En> 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Muric by 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
Lyrics by RICHARD STTLGOC 
Directed by TREVOR NUNN 
APPLY DAILY TO BOX OPPICE 
FOR RETURNS Sped*! tow 
dm at £6 on Turn macs tor 
GAP'S 

NOW BOOKKI TO SEPT 19S7 


BARBICAN 01 628 8796/638 
8891 cc (Mon-Oun toaattRO 

ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 

COMPANY 

RARBWAN THEATRE Octets 
available FINAL PERFOR- 
MANCES tonl A FH 730 
tomor & Sat 2-00 A 7.30 
SCENES FROM A MARBUOE 
by Feydeau “Magnificent.. 
IBM ewoyaote." D.TH. MIS- 
ALLIANCE by Shaw returns 6 
A 6 Jan 

THEPfT tonT & Fn 7 JO, t oner 
A Sat 2-00 A 730 THE 
AHCraSHOP'S C PLjjjB_W 
Arthur Miller. PMHCWIA 
SCMPTOHIAE by Richard N«9 
eon returns 6*6 Jan. 


IUMMHSBUKV, Cordon SL wci 
387 9629 CC 380 1453. Unm 
Today. Fri * Mon 2m. Tomor 
2pm A 7m- GBt 2pm A 6pm. 

Tue lO30am & 2nm 
THE ADVENTURES OF MR 
TOAD, The SpwMfal Haw 
Warn Hf MmkaL “ Cn n t i itt y 


aWB Bl Broml ey 460 6677 
DICK WMITMVrtN Rot 
HUH Royer de Ctnney A 
Nookie Bear, nil Pcrtwec. 
jimmy Thompson- Lyn PanL 


BRIGHTON BEACH 
■ MEMOIRS 

Otreaed by MICHAEL RUDMAM 
A NaOonai mean* Production 
-H u mo u r al la boL ■ rich and 
. loving praducMm- Drily Man “A 
h—nwn.Ki' shaped ranMy 
, comedy- Tbnea “ It MB ran tor a 
long imr Time Oat 
Eves Mon - Fn 7.30 Mats weds 
3.0 Sato 300 & 8.30 First Can 34 
hr 7 day ce Ol 240 7200 too bxq 
feel Ttatstmaster 01 579 6453 too 
. bag too Cm Bates Ol 930 6123 


APOLLO THEATRE 437 2663 

43« 3698 First Can 01-240 7200 
TKaetmasier cc 579 6*33 
M0B-FYI a. Sal 4.30 A 8.16 
Thurs Mala 5. 

PAUL sconau 
“MASTERLEY- F .Times 
HOWARD ROLLINS 
-MAGNIFICENT- DJHMl 

I'M NOT RAPPAPORT 

“ Wonderfully nm«y“ D.Ejcd 
TONY AWARD BEET PLAY 


COMEDY THEATRE 930 2678 
CC 240 7200/579 6433/741 
9999 Orps 930 6123 

**A s npae* aeMna M rtsw d to* 


GWEN SUSAN 

TAYLOR PEMHAUGSH 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

A Com edy by Wc hsnl H s rrte 

_ WONDERFULLY FUNNY** 
N of toe W 

■The appla u s e ol rapturous 
n co p untB - □ Mail 
-Very funny Indead" &E» 
Mon-Thu 8 Frl/Sal 5.306 8.30 





[HAMPSTEAD 722 9301. Eves 8. I LYRIC RJU— M—lll 01-741 | OLD W 
I Sal Mai 4.30. SCLUNO THE I 231 1 Eves 7 30 (Base office tor I Eve* 7. 


■w C smsdy by 

"GtanoiB Mah- 
■mance i from 



CHTTERMH S 930 3216 CC 579 
6863/579 6433/741 9999. Cm* 
836 3962. Evp 8 00. Tnu mal 
2.30. Sat 650 A 850 

M anfnsn FARCE AY ITS BEST” 

D Mad 

The Theatrw of Comedy Company 

DEREK ROVCE 


ANITA 

OHAHAM 


■iP 


serfs 
a Ex 

Good SCAD AYAH Thors RHM- 

P OMW WBN THEATRE 080 8846/ 
9862. ALL tel CC Dkgs FIRST 
CALL 24hrT day On 836 2428 HO 
BOOKING FIX Orp Sales 930 
6123 

DAVE CLARK’S 

TIME 

IMS UL1HHATC EXPERIENCE 

CUFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAR' 

THE PORTRAYAL OF 'AKASW 
BY 

LAURENCE OUVIER 

MOn-Frl 7.30 Thu Max 250 An 4 
A 8.16, At Thurs mail only The 
Row Star" will be performed by 
John ChrlsOe SPECIAL CONCCS* 
SMHS ai £7 all perft except Fn & 
Sat eves Mr (JAP'S. UB40Y. «v 
derm A under 16’s avail I hr 
before pert. Reduced prices Thurs 

mats o*Ur H A CIO 

Not BssMni la April *87- 
SCATS AVAIL P OR PDF TONT 


DONMAR WAREHOUSE 240 

8230 CT 379 6666/0433 TH 10 
in evrnOpm. Sal mAh BPfti 
DORY PREVIN. (Th e Mr s rioaad 
In i) 

DUKE OP YORKS 836 8122 2d 
Hr cc 240 7200 836 9837 741 
9999 379 6433 EveaB. Thu 3. Sal 
6 A 850 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Stoddard Drama Award 19*4 

STEPPING OUT 

HU Comedy by Richard Harris 
Directed by Julia MeKouie 
-TRIUMPH ON TAT* SW 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 

DUCHESS S 836 8243 CC 200 


42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL THE PASHLY 
Wkaar aldto beat 
M ai I ml Awards ter 1884 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE OUVIDI AWARD 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

PLAYS * PLAYERS 
LONDON THEATRE CR ITI C S 
AWARD 

EV98 8.0 Mats Wed 3.0. Sol 5 0 A 
8.30 Red u ced price mal Weds. 
Siudeoa and OAP"l standby. 
Croup sales 930 6123 


^ FORTUNE aO/CC 836 2238/9 
Agy F CALL, -day 2<»hr 240 
7200 'bkg fee) Crps 930 6123 

PONT mss 
Ftmt UK atone i rrelen 
UUL ToOdsa’a 

THE HOBBIT 


magic" Times 

1 Tues-Frl al 5.00 A 7 30pm Sal 
at ZOOwn. 600 a 8.00pm 9ua 

at 4 JO A 7.3QPto 

CARRSCK S Ol 379 6107. let call 
24/hr 7 nay 240 7000. Grp Sales 
930 6123. TkkMmasnr 379 6433 
etcs 75a sai a a a mm Tut agm 

JUDI MICHAEL 
DENCH WILLIAMS 
“Ckm of their own" Std 

MR «no MRS NOBODY 

by Keith Waterhouse 
Directed by Ned Sheffln . 

“The hen cemrdy to nub the 
WOT End tola year" Timas 
"EVERYBODY MUST SEE DM 
NOBO D Y" D.MaU 


GLOBE 437 1592 CC OPEN ALL 
HO URS 3 7? 6433 1st CBB 2« nr 
240 7200 i no bkg feel 741 9999 
too bkg teei Grp sales 930 6123. 
The from W H Smith Travel 
BrsnchesCwes 8 Mats Wed 3SM 4 
HsnlaHil far 
. COMEDY or TMt YEA* 
l auretice 01 trier A w nfc LOBS 

LEND ME A TENOR 

-8 its laughter you're after... 
then the fun cranes n owhere 
thicker and laster* Std 
A Comedy by Ken Ludwig 
Directed by David QUraorc 
LAST Z WEEKS 

OLOBE 01-477 5667 ee 741 9999 
1H Call 240 7200 » hr 7 day it*g 
feel cm sates 930 6123 
Frato 14 J anua ry 
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT 
AWARD . Ottrier Armrda 'SO 
oiranA WAR 

JACKSON PkOWRNUrr 

in Lorca's "th tilling" Ob» 
THE HOUSE OP 
BERHAEDA ALBA 
with PATRICIA HAYES 
Maria Cepori - Bast Director 
SCUMani Drama Awards 


ThratodT* Times. “ Very 
SAT?'" ° F ' 1 * SXD 


Bax effitt A CC 01-930 9830. IK 
CHI 24hr/Tday cc bfcge 2*0 7200 
TkhaanaKer 379 Aa33 Eves 750 
Wed A Sa l own 2.SOMU 

DCRCK JACOBI to 
“A Truly M m lap 

BREAKflVc'lfae'^DE 

by HUGH WHriEMORE 
Joanna Darid hehU B e en 

Mich ael Beosh 

Dtr by Cufford williams 

“TH» H UMAM. HUMA NE. 
SERIOUS AND MU PFWI B 
PLAY VERY MO U LT 


— IN W C H THEATRE Ot 88B 

7765. First Can cc 24iws 240 
7200 it)k9 fee). E we 7,48 . MSB 
sat 250 menu MUST FALL 


■MM MAJESTY* Haymseftet 839 
2244 CC 0909 ALL HOURS 
579 6131 FlfSI Can CC 240 
7200 

ANDREW LLOYD WOMEN'S 
AWARD W1MMSB MUSICAL 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

S miluu 

MKHAEL CRAWFORD 

SARAH STEVE 

BfttCHTMAN BARTON 


at certain pcrtormancoB 
dream by HAROLD PRINCE 
Eves 7.48 Mats Wed Jr Sal 3 
Now Booking id Oct 87. acme 
Wed mate avauame. mease coo- 
tact buy office tor returns 



THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

PALLADIUM ROAR OP 
APPROVAL" LTD 

Mon.Frl 75a Mats Wed 2.00 

sat 9 yr & 8-00 

Stdnt rtinrfum avail st door 
Mco-FTt a Sat mats 
SCATS AVAILABLE FROM £740 


LYRIC THEATRE Shaftesbury 
A vp wi O1-457 3686/7 01-434 
1650 01534 1060. 01-734 

6166/7 

COLIN BLAKELY 
-A DrBlDmi a taymnty 
comic FBfermancc’* F Tima 
la 

The Mammal Theatre's acc laime d 
grodiintoo of 

ALAN AYCKBOURN'S 

A CHORUS OF 

disapproval 

"IfeawbraaMngiy furmy- Gdn 
■■Hilarious...- s Tiroea 
"A rare evening of 
cmwc exhilaration" Tbnm 
El-os 7.30. Ma& Wed M Sal 3.0. 
Group Sales 01-930 6123. 

Reduced price mate Student A 
OAP sanOby 

Hrri CaS a Ohr T day oe baafclap 
— Otad0 7200 (04 boridntf-*) 
TMMtaaaasrOL ZTO 6433 (mo 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL ‘87 


deuditol mats) ALICE IN woti- 
DDtLAKD adapted by John 
Weto with music by Carl Da- 
rio. MR SPOON ON BUTTON 
MOON CTeL box Office tor part 
ttanesV 

STUDIO E*es Bom THE BUEHS 



LYTTELTON <S‘ 928 2282 CC 
(NanenaJ T h a sir eY pruscenlin 
stood Today 2.16 daw price 
mao A 7.43. Tomor 7 46 TONS 
OF MONEY by win Evans and 
valentine Previews Fn. SM 
Man. Tue 7.45. Oasis Jan 7 at 
7 00. Then Jan 8 at 7/46 COM- 
BSC Ol TO LAND. (Jan 7 & a 
SOLD OUT1 

MAYFAIR 8 CC 629 3036. Mtov 
Thu 8 Fri/Sat 8.40 A 8.10 

RICHARD TODD » 

"lliilli ITIaMsi far >bmi~SII 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

“An unabashed winner” B Exs 


SORRY ALL SEATS SOLD 

SOOTY’S XMAS SHOW 

■EE YOU NEXT YEAR 

MOtHUUD THEATRE 01-336 
8868 24tor CC 240 7200/ 379- 
6433/741 9999 Gtp SR 9306123 
Kennet h (ManW wonderful 

THE WIND IN THE 

WILLOWS 

Twice daily 2 A 6. 

Ends January 10 

NATIONAL THEATRE Sth Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COM PANY 

Sm SEPARATE EH IHIE8 under 
OUytDt/ LYTTELTON ! 
COTTESUM, ExRUenl Chaw 
•eats oava o f p aft an thaaDPes 
from IO am. RESTAUBAffT (928 
2033k CAST CAR PARK, Into 
633 0880 




THE WOMEN 

by Clare Boothe Luce 
“AM ha* rttnr nbmsn” 
FT. “DELICIOUSLY FU NN Y " 
Times. “Witty. wKKsd women's 
wor m- S-E jg > “STY mss, STAR- 
STUDDED PRODUCTION” o 
Mirror 

LAST 2 WEEKS - MUST EMM 
JAN tO 


PALACE THEATRE 434 0909 cc 
0904 ALL HOURS 979 6433 
nm CteU 24HT 7Dny cc 240 7200 
Cm Sales 930 6123. This from 
W H Szulih Travel Branches 
THE MU SICAL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLES 

-W YOU CAN T GET A 
TICKET - STEAL ON E P* SM 

Eves 7.30 Mate Thu * Sal 250 
Latecomers not admitted until the 
Interval 

BEAT T HE TO UTS BY EJSQtlHt- 
DIG FOR RETDRMS AT YRB DOX 


F SPICE EDWARD Bax Office 
734 8961 Rral Call 24 Hr 7 Days 
CC Booking B36 3404 Civ Sales 
930 6123. MrnfiM 7.3o Mato 
Thun A Sol 230 


-A GRAND MASTED OP A 


Hot hoshlws (a March 28, 1S07 

MAT SEATS SOMETIMES 
AVAILABLE ON DAY 



Cats 

APPL Y DAILY TO BOX OFFIC E 
FOB EX TURNS Group BooHDai 
01 40 6 >867 or 01 930 6123. 
HOW R OOSCWSB TO MAY 98 
1907. Eaten MJaZd 3pm. 
Seals available in Jan 

OLD VIC 928 7616 cc 261 1821 
Pf riaw a team Id Jaa. Opens 20 
. Jaa at 7tm 


ui 1 : 



HOLIDAY 

a comedy by Mis 
Dir by UMBATM 


OUVBCR <8’ 928 2262 CC (Na- 
tional Theatre's open stage) 
Toda y. Tu e lo.a oam a 2.00 
THE MB PPIlt a m laical 
Show teem Browning's poem 
if or 6-1 > year olds, low urices.) 
Toni Tomor T.16 THE AMER- 
ICAN CLOCK a vaudeville by 
Arthur Miller. Fit 7.13. Sat 
2 M (low Brice mal) A 7.18 AR- 
IMAL FARM Man. Tua 7.00 
prnmni KMQ LEAR. 


I SAVOY THEATRE Ol 836 8888. 
CC 379 6219, 836 0079. First CPU 
24 hr 7 day «no bkg feel 240 7200. 
Krllh Prawn 741 9999 ino OKg 
fee) Grp Sates 930 6123. Eves 
Mon-FVi 8pm. Sal 6 A 8.50. Wed 
Mat 3pm 

PATRKH MACNEE 
DAVID EHNE 



A Mystery Thriller for 
aB the Family 

KILLING JESSICA 

Directed by RRVAN FORBES 
“RanhluB wHb * 11 — th* for —r- 
priM A to— Rjr~ D MalL la On 


“THIS SHOW B A SURE-FIRE 


SHAFTESBURY THEATRE OF 

C0MEDY01379 63O9CC0I 379 
6433/ 741 9999 . Flrtl Call 24 hr 
240 7200 ibkg laei. Crp Sales 930 
6123 

MonFrlB WMl SMB.lSA8.ao 
THE THEATRE OF COMEDY 
00*8 

lavish nrw production 
TOM CONTI in 

AN ITALIAN STRAW HAT 

■ by Eugene LabKho 
with CUVE DUNN 
004 STRATFORD JOHMS 

ST MARTlirs 01-836 1443. Site 
rial CC No. 379 6433. Evgs 6 0 
Tues 2.46. Sat SO and 8.0 
AGATHA GHRISTIE'a 

THE MOUSETRAP 

STRAND 836 2660 CC 836 
4143/6190. 741 9999. M Cedi 
24 Hr 7 Dares MO 7200 (Pa 

Sm} Crp Sales 930 6123 

CABARET 

“The Oi mi A md aep l il etlr a i 
ad, mast ihjlbirir aiualisl now 
ninnlin la Ma Wwt End” SW 


Ewes 7.3C 

EXTRi 
I Jan uary 1 
1 uio extra 
'240 7200 
SONO A 


CHARUE GIRL 
ONLY 2 WEEKS LEFT TO 
SEE THIS FABULOUS 
CAST. LAST PERFJAN 10 

PAUL MCHOLAS 
CYD CHAR1SSE 
DORA BRYAN 
NICHOLAS PARSO NS 
MARK WYNTER hi 

CHARLIE GIRL 

GROUP SALES OL 930 S1Z3 
BM PARTY DISCOUNTS 

Also book. TKketmaster 379 6433 
or any W H Smith Travel Branch 


CINEMAS 


C 8 M 0 GH PLAZA opp Camden 
Town Tube 485 2443 . DAVID 
BOWIE In LABYRMTH rv> film 
al 2 00 4.10 6.20 8.36 Re- 
duoM ncKcts for children. 


0«L«A CINEMA Kings Road 
SW3 351 3742 a*CN <15i Film 
« a25 4»b.-0 8.S5. ENDS 
Thur* STARTS Frt 2 Jan 
Chabrol n INSPCcmm 
LAVARD1N .151 


VICTORIA PALACE Boole now 
through First Call exclusively Ol 
240 7200 2«hr 7 nay 

TREVOR STEPHEN 

EVE REA 

NATASHA RICHARDSON 
ANGELA RICH ARDS 

HIGH SOCIETY 

Directed by Richard Eyre 
Prws Feb IS 1st Nlgtu Feb 29 
Mon-Fri 7.45 Wra Mal 3 Sal 4.46 
A 8.15. Gp Sales 930 6123 


FEEJ 340 7200 

’ALLO’ALLO 

with the TV SHOW STARS 
“H*a BO sa uc e at (tea caM *4 
ludu " □ Exp. Evas a. Fn a sal 
5,306 8. 40 EXTRA PCRF 31 Dec 
at 2.30 

NOW OOOHBI8 TO SO MAY 


QUEEN’S 01-734 1166/1167/ 
0961/0120. 24hr cc 340 7200/ 
379 6433 Qlp Sales 98Q 6123. 

“THE BEST MUSICAL M 
LONDON” Gdn 

-A WONDERFUL STAR- Mail 

MAUREEN LIPMAN m 

LEONARD OCKRSTEM’S 

WONDERFUL TOWN! ■ 

“It ripples with excitem ent " 

8 Times ''Just wonderful- D.Exp 
Mon-Sol 8 Mats Wed 2.30 Sat 5 


ROYALTY 01-831 0660 34 IW ee 
NO 7200 cc 379 6433 741 
9999 Group Sales 930 6123 
JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING 
TECHNICOLOR DSEACKOAT 
Twice daily at 2.30 A 7.30 
ErNImus) 17 


WAYNE SLEEP 

Directed A ChojYOOraohed by 

OlSaa L»u« 

Mon .Frt 7.43. MM Wed 3.00 
Sat 4.30 & 8.15 

OAP REDUCED PRICES MATS. 
BOOHING NOW UP TO APRU. *87 

Spec aerf New Year's Eve Tpm 

STRATFORD UPON AVOW 
CD7B9) 298623 ROYAL 
SHAKESPEARE COMPANY at 
nsr. Wtotor'e Tab TonMd 
T5a Tomor 1.30. MsbartTH 
Tburs. Fn 730. Dnuua Sat 
130. WMfcatli Sal 7.3a Swan 

VSHLZS'tSShi'ZSL 

Fab Staid Ttxnor. Frt. Sal 750. 
Sot SM 130. 

THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

“The very best et Omanis 
cettoc utem" Daay Mail 
See separate mmes under 

CRITERION THEATRE 
SHAFTES HUNY THE ATRE 

OF LU ai E DT . 

VAUOCVKLE Box OH1M * OC 
836 9987/5646 Flrn call CC. 24 | 
firs 240 7200 ibkg feci i 

Tk-ketmasur 379 6433 fbkg fae}. 1 
Evgs 8-0, Mate Wed 25a Sal &a 
85a 

JUUAMsKENZn: 

BEST ACTRESS OF THE YEAR 
Standard Drama Awwfl 
MARTMIARVU 
PETER BLYTH E . 

JOSEP HI NE TESTSOH to 

ALAN AYCKOOWUFS New Flay 

WOMAN IN- MI ND 

•'THM MUST BE THE FUNHKST 
PLAY m LONDO N, IT B JUO 
THE MOST PUnrURUtd r STM 
"ALAN ATOWOURN IS WIRT-- 
MO AT MS BEST- S. Times 


WUmiNSTCR Ol 834 0283/4 
ce 834 0048. CC TKfeeUnaster 
3796033. Mon-Sal 3 00 *6.30 
(Dec 31 to 3.00 only' 

3rd Magical Season 
T» UOH, THE WnCH A 
THE WARDROBE 
h» C .s. Iran 

WMfTEHALL «H IMalpr k 01 
930 7763/ 839 4488 CC Ol 379 
6666/379 6433. 74 j 9999. Grp 
sales 930 6123/836 396? 
JIAJE_ OERALDWE 

WALTERS JAMES 

MWIA JOHN GORDON 

RD» SB CLAIR 

The Award winning Comedy 
WHEN I WAS A GIRL 
I USED TO SCREAM * SHOUT 
by Shannon Macdonald 
Directed by Stolon Stokes 

OF RECENT YEARS'* Ohs 

Eves 8. Wed mal 3. 

Sab 8.30 A 8 30 


WVHDNAirS S 836 3028 cc 379 
6666/TK*etiTWSWT 379 0433/1 U 
CaU 34 hr 7 days 240 7900/741 
9999/Orp Sales 930 6123/836 
3962. Eves 7.30. Sto mala 3 
For a uiiHted Mason 
“A p a rt a rm a nc a i pa r aB al od far 
Hw WOT End" htdcpenderl. 

VANESSA REDGRAVE 

TOM tdlLKINSOte IB 

Tha Yam Vis pradastl an of 

GHOSTS 

By Henrik Ibsen 
Dlrrctnf by DnM Thacker . 
“SRHAiAHT PRODUCTION. 
DON'T MISS’* ary Limits 


AST GALLERIES 


BARBICAN ART GALLERY, Bar- 
h|ran Centra ECS. 01-635 
4i4i. dmn 4 jan: Darid Rah- 
Srtl (L70S*1SS4); panning! of 
Euroo r A the Hear East PLUS 
LMtt-Rups by nomadic Fan 
Mae wo men. Tue* - S« 10- 
0,46. Sen A B Hols 12-6.46 
dosed Mondays. iOp*n I Jan 
125A6J AOaSZ A El. 


CUTOH MAYFAIR Curaon Si 
I Lanrmann s 

BHOAH (PC) Part | Tues & 

I h ,TVw? 46 1 1 SOam 6 

F H rt ‘ Mon - Wra «• Frt 
« 46 Surnun Pan 1 at 

I I 30am Pan 2 al 5 05 •■Total- 
saw- tee the Him- Sid. 



CURZON NUt END Srumevniry 
Atrnuv WI 439 4806 Maaqie 
fcmHh. DmlnliT, Elllou. Juoi 

VDEW rst.V* 00 " Wm * * 
J*W IPG). Film ai 1 30 1 Nol 

Sun>. S 4Q. o IQ 4 8 40 “A 

15 “0 fSo'bfriS'sj 

Nlahl Show Nightly 1 1 46*Snf 

0691 ‘ROUND MIOMGHT fSS 

[Jim al 1 QO 3 W6on Bv ^ 
^ormance aiB^ 0 ^ 

40tancrior ,n 

® , iSi!a , v o S»- 

vjv,/ Lira, 

3232/ 839 

'Ire Ul.SG VT " 

Manduy j|| 5 *^ailtoft| w 

cOl 1 1 U.iiir *7 i*r; «■* 

Pj'*’ BAS ii^KL 

DBnEnwF 

ow, Men 

_ra'd hgjdere. v^^^.SnMeni 




S p3E! 

/ ? ort 




D 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1 1986 


WEDNESDAY PAGE 


Safer sex, couple power and bosoms 


I gel quite weak whenever I walk 
by a newsagent's and this week 
was no exception. It started when I 
noticed an article titled “Smart 
girls cany condoms** on the cover 
of January’s Cosmopolitan maga- 
zine. Next tiling I knew, I bad this 
great plastic sackful of women’s 
magazines, all full of predictions 
about female behaviour in 1987. 

Z don't want to rattle on with 
sociological dap-trap about why I 
purchased EUe and Options when 
1 would have reached for them 
under the hairdryer in any 
but in truth I was professionally 
curious about what the m« g y had 
to say. It’s a journalistic conven- 
tion that the January issue of a 
magazine sums up received 
wisdom. 

Most of the magazine articles 
are about sexual and human 
relationships. A universal theme 
seems to be that the men and 
women of 1987 will drastically 
alter their sexual behaviour to 
cope with the spectre of Aids. The 
sensible woman will have neat 
little packets of protective con- 
doms in her handbag just in case 
she has an attack of casuat sex but 


more likely we win all “redefine” 
our sexual needs. 

Redefining sexual needs is a 
euphemism for having fewer of 
them. To help us during this 
period of austerity we have a new 
jargon- We aren’t really having 
less sex, we are having less 

penetrative" sex. Women are 
rediscovering a sexual emphasis 
on “communicating, kissing, 
touching, talking*’. 

It all sounds very healthy, and 
anything that combats the spread 
of Aids must win the support of us 
all, but 1 can’t help feeding just a 
teeny bit sceptical. First, I don’t 
believe that the threat of a 
terminal disease has much effect 
on random sexual encounters. 
After all, it wasn’t until 1909 that 
Salvarsan was discovered as a 
treatment for syphilis. For most of 
human history people have known 
that sexual intercourse can spread 
a fatal disease but sexual activity 
has maintained an unshakable 
popularity. 

As for women rediscovering 
relationships without penetrative 
sex, well, I have always thought 
that compared with men, women 


Paula Youstk 


X) * 




X&Vv/T' 


more often preferred emotional 
content in their sexual relation- 
ships and now they have a good 
hygienic excuse for demanding it 

The magazines seem split on 
whether die 1987 woman will live 
alone or be married, but which- 
ever she does there are new 
phrases to describe its joys. The 
single woman will be glad to know 
that “the tyranny of the couple" 
has been replaced by “the positive 
single". 

Positive single women enjoy 
eating at home at peculiar hours 
and making a mess with news- 
papers and crumbs. They “wear 
their selfishness on their sleeves 
with pride" explains one article. 




which does not sound tike a great 
leap forward for our side. 

The magazines claim that 
women have not been very good 
in the past at being selfish and they 
must improve this lack. Of course, 
Tm no Margaret Mead, but I 
always thought that men and 
women had a similar capacity for 
selfishness. Biologically speaking, 
one assumes that women, being 
the physically weaker sex with the 
responsibility of breeding and 
nurturing, taxied to have a greater 
capacity for selfishness in order to 
pxotea their young. 

There is good news for those of 
us who are married. We may not 


have the selfish ecstasy of a 
positive single but we can have 
“couplepower". According to one 
magazine, “couplepower stems 
from a confidence that, whatever 
success your partner achieves, 
they will ’love you just as deeply 
should you fail dismally". In bed, 
making a souffle or in the board- 
room, one assumes. It is nice to 
see marriage celebrated again for 
the support it gives each partner in 
their chosen field, but one can’t 
help wondering bow often we have 
to rediscover this particular wheel 

Quite often. I fear. Over at 
Cosmopolitan, the magazine is 
grappling with the pain of un- 


requited one-night stands. “He 
tells you he’s had the best night of 
his life and he’s mad about you" 
the article reads, “but a week later 
you're still pretending not to listen 
for the phone." That does sound 
like a nasty way to behave and so 1 
put it to a single chap I know. He 
was quite taken aback. He thought 
that it simply went to show that 
men still had very good manners. 
“After all,” he said, “what are we 
supposed to do? Tell the woman 
that she is mediocre?" 

According to the magazine, the 
solution for the 1987 woman who 
is wounded by a hit-and-run one- 
nigh ter is to realize that men who 
behave this way are deeply in- 
secure, have a highly narcissistic, 
personality and may also have low 
self-esteem. I think the solution 
may be not to go to bed with chaps 
you don’t know well but that 
solution is implicit 1 expea in the 
new Don-penetrative sex. 

Finally, the word is quite defi- 
nite that the 1987 woman will 
sport a bosom. Actually, I never 
realized that bosoms were out and 
I don't think most men did either. 
Breasts, being a secondary sexual 


characteristic, were developed by 
Mother Nature to excite men ami 
keep females attractive ro them all- 
year around. Women are fertile all 
year, which means that unlike 
most animals we don't have la 
sniff each other lo see when the 
female is in a state of oestrus. This 
may have more to do with the 
eternal appeal of breasts than the 
whims of fashion designers. z'r 

Still the breast as an objea Of 
attraction is once more news to. the 
women’s magazines. Perhaps it Is 
because in this century we have 
discovered so many new thing£ 
from moon travel to heart trans= 
plants, that we feel obliged to see 
ancient things as if they were nevj 
discoveries. But sex and human 
relationships have been with us 
for a very long time and while 
what the ancients knew about 
medicine may be irrelevant to 
modern medicine, what they knew 
about love is dol If we really want 
to understand the 1987 woman, 
perhaps it is to Ovid and Petrarch 
that we should turn. 

Barbara Amiel 

© Tfcoas Newipap«ra Ltd TB88 




Sean Macaulay talks to some of the 
converts who are staging their < 


adaptation of Alice in Wonderland 


A century ago this Christinas 
Lewis Carroll's Alice in 
Wonderland made its stage 
debuL While the Lyric The- 
atre in Hammersmith is now 
staging John Wells’s more 
faithful adaptation of the play, 
over at The Hammersmith 
Odeon the Nichiren Sboshu of 
the United Kingdom are 
about to stage their own 
special adaptation. 

The NSUK is the English 
branch of a Japanese Buddhist 
sea which promises its con- 
verts their hearts* desires in 
return for repeating the words 
nam-myoho-renge-kyo over 
and over again. (Strioly trans- 
lated the words mean devo- 
tion, mystic-law, lotus flower, 
teachings.) 

Their version of Alice in 
Wonderland is simply called 
Alice! It features a punk 
heroine and songs, written by 
NSUK members, with titles 
like “Dare To Believe*’ (sung 
by the White Rabbit), “Relax” 
(sung by the Mushroom, and 
Flower Chorus) and “Apathy 
Rap” (sung by the sea’s 
Apathy Rap Dancers). 

Richard Causton, chairman 
of NSUK, says: “Alice! is the 
produci of our members’ 
faith, their belief in the future 
and the richness of the human 
spirit” 

Although based oq the 13th 
century teachings of Nichiren 
Daishonin, the Nichiren 
Shosbu sect was not in- 
troduced into this country 
until 1964. The person respon- 
sible for this has the unlikely 
nam e of Mrs Lynch, a. Japa- 
nese who met and married an 
English postal worker in Yo- 
kohama Bay before returning 
with him to spread the word. 


From Karen Robinson, 

Worcester Court, Worcester 

Buildings, Bath. 

On the question of breast- 

might I 

a$it which spectacle Barbara 
Amiel finds most “tasteful 
and decorous" — an infant 
bawling its head off with 
hunger in a public place (to 
the infinite annoyance of 
everyone) or a mother dis- 
creetly feeding the duH? 

The hunger of a tiny infant 
is no respecter of time or 

place, Ms Amiel The sugges- 
tion that this is unreasonable 
and ought not to be tolerated 
is absolute humbug. 

However, if it’s taste and 
decorum which is to take 
precedence, might I suggest 
that we abandon not merely 
breast-feeding, but having ba- 
bies altogether? Then we 
could all settle down to our 
rounds of shopping, dinner 
parties and visiting stately 
homes imtil we became ex- 
tract. But with what taste and 
decorum would we do it. 

From Louise Graham, 
Lansdoume Road, 

London WI L 

Many adults have psycho- 

SSieueis 

f®Qll from 

I FgH AMi 

Mail-order artatoSN? VJJ Rd w 

g-SKuSsass**- 




Today, the NSUK boasts 
over 3,000 members and 130 
branches. The sea differs 
from other Buddhist groups in 
that its members do not wear 
special garb or adhere to rules 
and rituals apart from chant- 
ing and reading from the 
teachings of Buddha. 

Sue Thornton, the director 
of Alice!, was an eariy convert 
Her interest in Buddhism 
began after her plans to marry 
a young Jewish man were 
dashed by his disapproving 
parents. 

“Even after a two-week fling 
in Morocco 1 stiB felt terribly 
disillusioned. A friend was 
trying to get me interested in 
Buddhism but I only got as far 
as secretly chanting in my car. 

“Then two weeks later, 
completely out of the blue, I 

It was like a 
magnet I was just 
drawn in’ 


landed this really incredible 
job — totally unapplied for — 
as production assistant on a 
new Diane Glen to play being 
directed by Sean Connery." 

Initially she was reluctant to 
believe that the chanting was 
responsible for her change of 
fortune. Her suspicions were 
confirmed when the play I'd 
Seen You Cut Lemons folded 
after a less than fruitful ran. 
But her friend was undeterred, 
and tricked her into going to a 
communal chanting session 
by pretrading they were off to 
a party. 

“After asking all these ques- 


TALKBACK 


logical problems which can be 
traced hack to being left ahrne 
as babies to scream fur hours 
w hile waiting for the “four- 
hourly" formula feed from an 
unwelcoming bo ttle . Many 
more suffer from physical 
diseases which could have 
been prevented if they had 
been breast-fed. 

While there are women 
who feel guilty because they 

were too selfish to devote time 
and energy to breast-feeding 
their babies, and others who 
are jealous because they are 
arable to bear children, 

breast-feeding mothers will 
continue to get a hostile 
reception. 

From Edna Ashton, 

Warton Street. Lytharn, 
Lancs. 

As a mother who has breast- 
fed nine children for at least 
six months for each baby I 
have never fonnd it n e c e ssa r y 
to do so in public. 

From Janet Dent, 

Feathersion Road. Streetfy, 
Sutton Coldfield. 

I used to live in Zambia where 
breast-feeding in public is 
completely acceptable and 
fa k for granted. The only 
tune I saw any reaction to 
public breast-feeding was in a 
cafe, when a mother paused 
for a moment, stack her 
nipple in the sugar bowl, then 
put it in her baby’s month. A 
nice little treat for baby, but it 
did cause a few open mouths 
among the other diners. 



Nirvana in Wonderland: (from left) Sid Haywbode, Nancy Wood and director See Thornton, in rehearsal for Alicel 


lions I suddenly realized that 
my beliefs were really similar 
to their beliefs, we both 
wanted the same things. It was 
like a magnet, I was just drawn 
in." 

Since then she has success- 
fully combined her career with 
being a single mother (her six- 
year-old son is quite happy to 
chant along) and at present 
heads the stage management 
course at the London Acad- 
emy of Music and Dramatic 
Art. 

Like her fellow converts, 
she now attributes her success 
to the chanting. “I thought 1 
wouldn't get the job but my 
friends encouraged me and Z 
chanted very hard for it” 

The star of the show, Ameri- 
can actress Nancy Wood, 
became interested in the sea 
four-and-a-half years ago 
while working on the film of 
the Pirates of Penzance “At 
the time 1 was suffering from 
insomnia, working crazy 
hours, totally inhibited, think- 
ing and worrying too much." 
She was so shy that her father 
would say to her “Nancy, do 
me a favour. Say hello to 
people when you meet them." 

Like Sue Thornton, she 
began chanting on her own in 
her car. After two weeks, she 


says, the results began to 
show. Set technicians began 
asking: “Why are you smiling 
so mudi? What have you been 
drinking?” After becoming 
familiar with the sea's philos- 
ophy she became convinced of 
its benefits. “It’s an outward 
chant — your eyes, your senses 
are open and you're tapping 
the potential within you. It’s 
hard to explain it though, it’s a 
mysterious process.” 

Another of the show’s play- 
ers who is convinced of the 
beneficial effects of chan ting is 
Sid Haywoode, a 25-year-old 
singer, who was once a hum- 
ble member of the Top of the 
Pops" dance troupe; “Zoo 
After becoming a Buddhist 
she had a top-ten hit with 
“Roses" and now has a three- 
year contract with CBS.' 

Sid, who was converted 18 
months ago, says: “The last 
thing 1 felt 1 needed at the time 
was any transcendental stuff 
Also being black and Jewish, it 
was quite a leap.” 

Sid attended her first meet- 
ing on the advice of her make- 
up artist while her flatmate, a 
male model was away. When 
be returned, she says she 
resorted to chanting quietly in 
the bathroom. But she says 
that after it began to pay its 


promised dividends, she be- 
came much more open about 
her new religion. Today, even 
Sid’s sceptical flatmate has 
joined the bandwagon. 

Buddhism is a proselytising 
religion and members of the 
NSUK must encourage others 
to join, with targets set every 
year for new recruits. But Sid 
says she doesn’t need to 

‘You’re tapping 
the potential 
within you’ 


preach. “People are always 
coming up to me and asking 
how tray can get involved.” 

Working on the publicity 
for the show, as well as 
NSUK’s other activities, is 
public relations power-house 
Lynne Franks. Her chanting 
sessions are now one of the 
unofficial highlights of 
London Fashion Week which 
rite organizes twice a year. 

Lynne, too, is a great be- 
liever in the benefits. “My life 
is more centred now as I have 
a real direction and purpose. I 
used to suffer from the John 
McEnroe syndrome, very 


Surviving joyless January 


I’m starting a campaign for a 
decimalization of the cal- 
endar. Ten months instead of 
, the traditional 12 would be 
more than adequate and the 
major advantage is that, with 
one stroke, we could abolish 
January. 

We could also gel rid of 
whichever month we next like 
least but that’s a detail 
Joyless January, slap bang 
next to wonderful December, 
is the real target. Every year it 
catches us at our worst, while 
it is meant to be a new 
beginning, a fresh look for 
one’s life 

Yet how are we prepared to 
face it? Half a stone fatter 
since pagan yule, with a 
liverish complexion like with- 
ered putty and an overdraft 
which allows the bank man- 
ager to snatch a week in 
Madeira. And that’s only our 
children. 

We adults are in ft far more 
deeply than that. We are 
depressed. We crowd out 
doctors' surgeries in the vain 
hope of giving the GPS flu. 
Alas, some of us will bump up 
the obit columns in our local 
papers now, the peak time for 
geriatric deaths. 

My message is this: don’t 
give in. Tackle January before 
it gets you. Here’s how. 

• Ignore such notions that 
tempt you to go the other half 
of the hog you went at 
Christmas. Drink January 
away? Yes, but spend all 
February - like a ghost, re- 


Feeling jaded after 
the festive season? 
Here are some tips 



arranging the drinks cupboard 
into a medicine chest every 
evening. 

• Cut up your cash card. Buy 
now and you’fl later only be 
able to shell out for very little 
Easter eggs for the family. 

• Seep it away. This is easily 
the bat solution during the 
first week or so while your 
body is on its post-festive 
metabolic nose-dive. 

• Be logical. Be analytical 
Ask yourself, wbat's so tedious 
about these 31 days dedicated 
to Janus? Well, for a start 
there's still no sunshine. So 
while your best friend goes 
skiing in France for two weeks 
steal a march on her by 
booking a fortnight’s sun bed 
sessions. 


aggressive, but now I'm much 
more considerate." 

One of her companions on 
the NSUK’s public relations 
committee is the 36-year-old 
Italian, Connie Fillipeilo, who 
is now a publicity agent for 
celebrities like George Mi- 
chael John Hurt and Terence 
Stamp. 

At 28, confused and fed up 
with being a dancer, Connie 
noticed that a- friend seemed 
to be rejuvenated by her 
involvement with this particu- 
lar land of Buddhism. “It was 
so simple — by praising life, 
it's returned. Chanting is life, 
by chanting you tap that life 
force within you.” Connie's 
mother, a Catholic, was aghast 
when she heard the news. But 
Connie's younger brother 
Sammy is now also a Buddhist 
and her mother has accepted 
it 

Connie says: “When you 
become a Buddhist you realize 
that Christ and so on is too 
complicated. You don’t need 
it. Life, the potential oflife, is 
enough. And through Bud- 
dhism you realize it" 

© Thw H wpapw Ud 1MB 

Alice! is at the Hammersmith 
Odeon on January 17 and 18 
(01-748 4081). Proceeds go to 
charity. 


BRIEFLY 

A round-up of news, 

views and information 

School 
for skill 

The dnD-soonding Industrial 
Society’s Peppendl Unit is 
actually very exciting news 
for women eager to improve 
their skills in the workplace. 
Between now and June, they 
are planning a series of short 
courses and one-day work- 
shops such as “Dealing with 
People Effectively” and “New 
Technology for Women”. Ap- 
plicants may other be spon- 
sored by their company nr 
attend as individuals (at a 
redneed rate). For full details, 
contact The Pepperell Unit, 
48 Bryanston Square, London 
W1H7LN. 

Hobby hols 

If you've vowed to master a 
computer, take up hang- 
gliding or (earn lacemaking in 
1987, a holiday is the perfect 
way to do it The English 
Tourist Board's 1987 Activity 
and Hobby Holidays book 
(£2.25 from bookshops and 
selected Tourist Information 
Centres) lists many or- 
ganized craft and sport 
breaks. Topics range from 
gardening to hot-air 
ballooning. 

Wise waists 

Women are increasingly in- 
volved in business lunches but 
are rarely keen to indulge in 
three-course feasts washed 
down with brandy. Wheeler's 
restaurants (which can now 
be found in most corners of 
the country) have made a 
sensible New Year’s resolu- 
tion — to offer a set lunch 
menu for £1250, with tighter 
food and infinitely more man- 
ageable portions, this allow- 
ing female executives to enjoy 
the ambience without fretting 
about either the size of the bill 
or their waistline. 

Knit picking 

Keen knitters have known 
about London's Ries Wools 
for years. But their unbeat- 
able selection of designer 
knitting books, glorious 
yams and kits has meant a 


pilgrimage to Holbom - unfii 
now. Knitz is Ries's new 
newsletter, which offers out- 
of-towners publications and 
wools by post Ries will also 
dispatch the newest knitting 
magazines, sometimes not 
available nationwide, as 
soon as they are published. 
For the unhandy who low 
hand-knits, Ries also off ere 
a knitting service to make up 
any sweater for £39.50, plus 
the cost of the woof. Dial 
Ries By-Mail’s 24-hour tele- 
phone number, 01 -242 7721 , 
for your free copy. 

Low liquid 

“You are what yon drink" 
doesn't have quite the same 
ring to it — but if Coca Cofa 
have their way, it will soon be 
true. Ever-consrioas of tile 
increasing focus on health 
and low-fat diets, with the 
shift away from dairy 
consumption, a new version iff 
their low-calorie brand Tab is 
being test-marketed in the 
US. It lu« calcium — a 
mineral fa which many 
women are deficient and a 
lack of which can lead .to 
osteoporosis. But it probably 
still tastes terrible on mnesH. 

Quote me... 



“Before my book toe re was 

only the child-bearing roia, 

or the career woman who 
didn't marry. Men have the 
jobs and women serve them. 
Women in Africa were worse 
off than Negro slaves.” 

Betty Friedan, author of The 
Feminine Mystique. 

Back rest 

Became women carry small 
children, heavy shopping or 
sit fa sedentary jobs for hours 
on end, they are espedaly 
prime to backache. The 
Teleos Clinic (9 Cavendish 
Square, London WIM 9DD) 
creates individually-tailored 
lower back supports to align 
your spine. Appointments can 
be made on 01-637 3088. 

Josephine Fairley 


• If your good looks have 
vanished, take a trip to one of 
those store counters where the 
assistants sport lip gloss you 
can see your face in. Be noble 
as you reflea that you are 
giving them real pleasure in 
raw working material Try 
then- cell renewal therapy at 
five drops a night and a bottle 
of anything containing colla- 
gen or elastin. 

• Buy a track suit You 
don't have to do more than 
ran up and downstairs in it if 
•you’re scared of showing the 
world how your bottom has 
dropped to keep company 
with your face. 

• Finally, if the parties have 
all ended and your social life's 
gone back to zero why not 
resurrect the old idea of a 
Twelfth Night party? Samuel 
Pepys was always late to bed 
on this night of the year while 
he and his family, servants 
and friends joined is the fist. 

Twelfth Night is remem- 
bered in our homes these days 
only for the frantic bad- 
tempered clear-out of festive 
gear before we tempt fate and - 
bad luck by carrying on 
Christmas for too long. 

Who cares if we leave the 
mistletoe where h is, the 
cracker eDds still stuffed down 
the sofa and the tree listing 
gently in the corner? Can 

anything worse really happen, 
that hasn’t already, once Janu- 
ary tightens its grip? 

Vivien Tomlinson 


Multiyork’s 
Winter .Sale. 






The Suffolk Range 

With its classic lines and lovely 
rounded arms, this is our most 
traditional range. 

All priced examples are in 
selected *E' Range Country Plains 
at £L2 per metre. 


WUM TO ORDER UPHOUTHTT 
WCLUWWC COVERS UST PRICE 

ARMCHAIR £ 504 

EX. LARGE ARMCHAIR £ 584 

SMALL SOFA £ 734 

MEDIUM SOFA £ 849 

LARGE SOFA £ 939 

EX LARGE SOFA £1109 

FOOTSTOOL £ 142 


ADDTKHML 

COVERS 


IMIS IS JUST ONE OF OCR TRADITIONAL RANGES WHICH ARE HANDMADE IN OUR SUFFOLK WORKSHOP 


99-101 PRWCE OF WALES ROADl 
NORWICH (06031 625886* 

THE OLD MIL NOUS. EVE. 
SUFFOLK 103791 83«3* 


1 MUON ROAD. 
CAMBRIDGE (K£3> 313463* 

165WCH«W>.LOUCHTON 
01 50? 4123* 


S2BTHUR10E PLACE. 
LONDON SW7 01 5892303 


MULTiYORK 

iLdLl HiiUthnude in Suffolk- l_ =-= 


ALL SOFAS, SOFA-BEDS AND ARMCHAIRS HAVE TCOALiV 
BPQgBl E O «W0N and BOW COWERS FOB DRV CLEANING, 

NO pQtmBETHAWE FOAM INTEREST FREE CREDIT 
SQUp BEICHWOOD FRAME WITH SI EEL CQLSPRWGIMG 


CHOUS OF SEAT DEPTHS. BACK HEIGHTS AND CUSHION FI LLINGS 
~RANGE Of B-tfttl FABRICS. WITH OFF TOP 400 SELiC HON 


SALE OFFERS ALSO ON MADE 1Q4KASURE CURTAINS 


4-6 CAMDEN ROAtt 
LONDOHNW10I 4M 

66-68 CHURCH STREET WE YBHDCE 
|093?|593W» 


W- 1? WESTMORELAND PLACE. 
BROMLEY 0) 464 7253* 

16 SI CHRISTOPHER FUUX 

ST ALBANS 0PENWQS00W 


0PENMQ7MV5AWEEKXD-5 
SUNDAY VtEVWG* EASY PARKMG 













THE 


WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 





THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Oxford’s 

choice 

Who wffl succeed the Earl of 
Stockton as Chancellor of Oxford 
University — a post he filled from 
196 1? The office usually goes to an 
Oxonian elder statesman, but 
today’s political world offers few 
suitable candidates. Lords Hafl- 
shflin and Home are too old, while 
Ted Heath is too unpopular. As 
for Mrs Thatcher, Oxford even 
refused to give her an honorary 
doctorate, so she is likdy to be 
passed over. Roy Jenkins is a 
possible front-runner, and would 
dearly love the job, but arouses 
scant enthusiasm among the Tory 
establishment. Among non-politi- 
cal candidates, Lord Seaman is a 
contender. The mantle conld even 
fall on a distinguished academic, 
and the university net could be 
widened to induce non-Oxford 
men; Lord Carrington and James 
Callaghan, for example. However 
there is no recent precedent. The 
last such appointee was the Duke 
of Wellington. 

Supramac 

It is of course more than 20 years 
since Harold Macmillan had the 
constitutional right to counsel the 
Queen, but one piece of advice 
from those days was dearly in- 
tended to be heard from beyond 
the grave. Just before his retire- 
ment in 1963 be sent the Palace a 
delicate reminder that on the 
death of his life-long hero, Dis- 
raeli, Queen Victoria erected a 
memorial at Hughenden to that 
statesman's “dear and honoured 
memory”, from “his grateful sov- 
ereign and friend”. There was a 
nice old Norman church in 
Horsted Keynes, Sussex, mused 
Superman, adding: “There would 
be room on the wall, when the 
time comes ...” As a further 
reminder, M acmillan quoted the 
letter in his memoirs. Some 
emb ar rassingly fulsome endear- 
ments passed between Disraeli 
and his Queen, but one suspects 
that he would have drawn the line 
at solidtug such a testimonial 

Macmodest 

When Macmillan became prime 
minister in 1 937, his appointment 
took second place on the front 
page of his local paper in Sussex to 
a report of a Brighton and Hove 
Albion football match. He used to 
keep the cutting on his desk at No 
10 in order, as he said, to prevent 
himself from indulging the im- 
pulse towards self-importance. 

BARRY FANTONI 


THKeTENEES 

BABIES 

BENEFIT 

FROM 

5IN&1N& 

MUMS 


‘OK. Right Here's a track from 
the new Wham album’ 


Discord 


Jazz pianist Stan Tracey cele- 
brated his 60th birthday yesterday 
wondering if private sponsorship 
is quite the answer to arts-fimdmg 
that the government sometimes 
suggests. He spent four months 
composing an hour-long-work. 
Genesis, but now Peter Aldlnch, 
his sponsor for an album and a 
ten-city tour in March, has pulled 
out after contributing only £2,000. 
Aldrich's management consultant, 
.Jim Stansbie, confessed yesterday 
that the project had run out of 
control. “If anyone is to blame it is 
me. But it is also an indictment of 
the whole jazz world. No one 
understands anything about mak- 
ing money from this music.** The 
disappointed Tracey plans to dig 
into his own pocket to ensure that 
the recording is made and is 
looking for another tour sponsor. 

Seeing believing 

The long love affair between the 
French and their furniture seems 
to be clouding their judgement A 
reader tells me of a recent visit to 
the French consulate in Kensing- 
ton where, with time on his hands, 
his eye was drawnto a list of those 
exempt from having to obtain a 
visa to enter France — among 
them nationals of EEC nations, 
Switzerland, Lichtenstein, and the i 
Holy Seat 

Royal retreat 

Foreign monarchs are thin on the 
ground these days, and royal 
residences in Britain even thinner. 
But for social climbers seeking 
vicarious glamour I have news of 
one on the market for a trifling 
£1 10.000. It is a modem, detached 
house in Marston Road, Sher- 
borne, and was the home, during 
his spell at Sherborne School, of 
: Prince Makhosetive of Swaziland, 
installed in April as King Mswati 
;i 1 1. Regrettably it has no African 

features, and the only hint that it 
was the home of someone special 
is the sophisticated security sys- 
tem (local gossip of bulletproof 
windows is somewhat exag- 
gerated). Clearly it could not have 
; been kept on as a pied-d-terre; it 
F has only four bedrooms, and if 
Mswati runs true to family form 
his number of wives win soon run 
into three figures. p|jg 


The many faces of Harold Macmillan: Roy Jenkins charts the underestimated 
achievements and Norman Gash (below) assesses his legacy to the Tory party 

How should we rate him? 


O f the 49 prime ministers 
in the series which 
began with Walpole, 
Harold Macmillan was 
the longest-lived. 
Yet in a remarkably durable 
occupational group (79 has been 
the average age of those dying this 
century) he wins by only a short 
head from Churchill, who had 
Gladstone only a nose behind. 

What is remarkable about 
Macmillan's very long life is that 
nearly the whole of it was required 
to make his reputation. Church- 
ill's feme would have lost nothing 
by having 10 years cut off) and 
might even have gained by losing 
20. Gladstone's could have done 
without his last 12 years, Lloyd 
George's the last 20, Asquith's and 
Baldwin's the last 10, Eden's at 
least the last 20, and Rosebery's (a 
rather extreme example) the last 
36. But Macmillan required nearly 
all the long years of his retirement 
for the development of the patina 
of his reputation. Had he died in 
1963, when illness drove him out 
of office, his place in public esteem 
would no doubt have recovered 
somewhat from the low point 
which it then occupied, but would 
have lacked the essential appurte- 
nances of venerable sagacity and 
elderly wit. 

An important factor in the 
brilliance of Macmillan's after- 
glow was that he gave every sign of 
greatly enjoying being an old man. 

I do not think that Churchill did, 
and Gladstone referred with dis- 
taste to “the gradual closing of the 
doors of the senses”. But Mac- 
millan, while no doubt he felt 
acutely the inability to read in his 
last years, found compensation in 
the aura of age: in, for example, 
the suspense inevitably created by 
audiences waiting to see whether 
he could mount very slowly to his 
rostrum (particularly in tire 
Sheldonian Theatre in Oxford at 
one of his virtuoso performances 
as Chancellor of the University), 
and whether he could remember 
or improvise his lines when he got 
there. His hooded eyes added to 
the mordancy of his wit, his 
shuffling gait (which he had 
adopted many decades ago, al- 
most before it was necessary) to 
the authority of his experience 

In his earlier years, by contrast, 
he was probably under-esteemed. 
The friends of his youth, be 
frequently stated, were nearly all 
killed in the First World War. “It 
was a city of ghosts”, I remember 
him dramatically saying about 
1919 Oxford. Among those who 
survived, he was rather friendless. 
He was an MP at 30 and as a 
young and early middle-aged poli- 
tician he behaved with outstand- 
ing political bravery, renouncing 
the whip and speaking for anti- 
government candidates at Mu- 
nich-time by-elections. But he was 
certainly not a nodal figure among 
anti-appeasement Conservatives, ■ 
and even more certainly was not 
regarded as a witty and sparkling 
companion. “Harold can be 


Mnt00VON&: 


SUPER MAt 


colleagues, who had all been in the 
best position to observe these 
tergiversations. . 


Andrew McEwen 

Arms: hope amid 
the gloom 

. . ■ _ with the 


-X-A i 


It is perhaps fortunate for world 
arms control prospects that the 


a bipartisan approach with the 
Democrats. 

His analysis has much to CMJ- 


"ESS hoover, thfcde- -sen of e,«ss ™.l ^be over, «•**>£• — lent; 

strays the view that Macmillan Many- a sa ^ r wor y foreign affairs precedents for a 

(mb biwwvIpH have* beeo^nSng an^^estiye jomi^DernoOTt-Repubhran^ ap- 


y As rr wiawf 

' ' - -j Cjt 1 5TXPHEMPWTBR 

iwTbWibeoim^i&srw 

HAW1N& BEEN THERE 

MOTE : MACS WGO t5.OFOXm.PmED 

Evening SUndanl 

counted on. but don't let's have sector of the political battlefield, 
him to dinner because be is rather and he made the most of it. As 
a bore”, was what one Edenite MP Minister of Housing he built a lot 
later told me about his position in of houses (and the first high-rise 
those days. fiats), and he exploited this success 

JgjgHBgasa: 

the Commons behind him, he was «> be part ofhis character, 
miles from the most junior of None the less his political 
offices. Even when the balance of advancement was relatively sk>w- 
power in the Conservative Party moving. He is the only prime 
stuffed a year later, he was for minister of the past 100 years who 
from bounding forward. His years reached the age of 60 (and after 30 
as Minister Resident first in North years in the Commons) without 
Africa and then in Italy amounted occupying one of the great offices 
to a considerable public service of state. That came only in 19SS 
(despite recent calumnies) and when Ire became Foreign Secretary 
produced his best book, but they and then, eight months later, 
hardly made him central to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, but 
political process. By the last years again for months (13) rather than 
of the war he was no more import- years. He was at both the Foreign 
ant a politician than Duff Cooper Office and the Treasury for too 
(four years his senior) and incom- short a time to make much mark 
parably less so than Anthony Eden upon them. Had the government 
(three years his junior). (and not just the prime minister) 

collapsed at the time of Suez, and 

L osing his seat in 1945 Macmillan gone into retirement at 
might have been ex- the age of 63, he would have left 
pected to bring a middle- less imprint than most politicians 
rank political career to a who have recently got near the top 
middleyaged end. In feet without wearing the crown — 
galvanized his party political Bevin or Cripps, Butler or Mac- 
ro mi tment in a way electoral leod. This illustrates again his 
xess had never done. Stockton, need lor a long career, 
i . scene of his ^defeat, was to However, far from Suez des- 
am its place m his nostalgia and trying ^ appeared to make 
uch later) achieve a new one 9 n SnS^sstraSSfor his part 

iifhSSf ™ tb® events of those months was 

““S? neither wise nor glorious, less so 

s his realistic base for the probably than his rec o rd in an y 

r„S? n t ? , S: h !S othermajor conjuctureof his Ufe. 
o opposition to the Attlee He was before the harth* and 

VarriSn 311 for Quiclc retreal when ft# gUDS 

p ay of partisan relish. As a / of Wall Street) started ' firing. 

Harold Wilson’s jibe that be was 
u -11 ^ u “first in and first our was folly 

justified. Yet when Eden resigned 
t in one of the highest offices. ^ Januaiy l957 n^ped mu, 

ie had, however, a job which 10 Downing Street with the over- 
5 temporarily in a very active whelming support of his Cabinet 


L osing his seat in 1945 
might have been ex- 
pected to bring a middle- 
rank political career to a 
middle-aged end. In feet 
it galvanized his party political 
commitment in a way electoral 
success had never done. Stockton, 
the scene of his defeat, was to 
retain its place in his nostalgia and 
(much later) achieve a new one on 
bis escutcheon, but Bromley, its 
antithesis in almost every respect, 
was his realistic base for the 
future. Macmillan threw himself 
into opposition to the Attlee 
government with an apparent 
display of partisan relish. As a 
result he was a feirfy automatic 
choice for the Cabinet when 
Churchill came back in 1951, but 
not in one of the highest offices. 

He had, however, a job which 
was temporarily in a very active 


and would not have succeeded 
otherwise. Even without the Suez 
dtf lfc fc it is unlikely that Eden 
would have survived long enough 
as prime minister to enable a 
plausible successor other than 
Macmillan or Butler to emerge. 
And after the end of 1955 Mac- 
millan would always have been 
pre ferred to Butler by the Conser- 
vative Party. 

S o Macmillan achieved his 
premiership, and with the 
clearance of the high but 
by no means impossible 
hurdle of the 1959 elec- 
tion, became one of the longest 
serving and more significant 
prime ministers of the century. As 
a peace-time h ea d of government 
he is in a group with Asquith, 
Baldwin, Attlee and, of those 
whose term is complete, no one 
else. How he should be rated 
among quartet is difficult at 
present to appraise, but it would 
not in my view be top. His 
government did not leave the 
imprint on the nation's affair of 
those of Asquith or Attlee; nor 
could it match them for strength of 
personnel For much of the time 
his principal ministers were 
Setwyn Lloyd and Heathcote 
Amory. 

Nevertheless the Macmillan 
government was not without its 
achievements; it picked Anglo- 
American relations up off the Suez 
floor and brought them to a high 
pitch of intimacy during the 
Kennedy presidency. It took the 
first, belated steps towards 
Britain's membership of die Euro- 
pean Community. It carried 
through the major second phase of 
the ending of empire. It played a 
useful role on the world stage, 
giving folly adequate support to 
the United States at the time of the 
Berlin Wall and the Cuban missile 
crises, while constantly urging 
dialogue with Moscow, and help- 
ing to secure the nuclear test ban 
treaty. And it maintained full 
employment and low inflation at 
home, even if it missed the full 
European surge to prosperity. 

Macmillan himself was very 
much the animator of all these 
different but consistently mod- 
erate polities, which be often 
executed behind a partisan facade 
and with an exhibitionist flourish. 
This dissimulation was more ad- 
mired by Harold Wilson than by 
Hugh GaitskeU, who were his two 
principal opponents. The latter 
thought him tricky to the verge of 
dishonesty. In retrospect I think 
this was a superficial judgement. 
Macmillan often finessed, but 
underneath he was broadly and 
steadily true to a loose doctrine of 
expansionary economics, social 
emoHience and liberal inter- 
nationalism. There are many : 
worse combinations. 

QTlW W— p t p— b 1386. 


The enigma who strayed 


have been enjoying an umesuve 
binge of pessimism which. luce 
much else at this time of the year, 
has been overindulged. It owes 
more to the slough of Republican 
despond than to reality, but could 
turn the setbacks of 1986 into foe 
stalemate of 1987 unless positive 
thinking resumes. 

In the West, pessimism focuses 
on the calendar- The Reagan 
administration is running short of 
time to pull itself out of the Iran 
quagmire, negotiate a post-Reyk- 
javik compromise with Gorba- 
chov and persuade the Democrat- 
controlled Congress to accept it. A 
superpower agreement would be 
needed by summer 1988 to 
achieve ratification before elec- 
toral paralysis takes bold. Some 
well-placed experts go farther, 
givin g the New Hampshire pri- 
mary, now only 1 3 months away, 
as Reagan's deadline before the 
lame-duck effect becomes mortal. 

Soviet pessimism takes a dif- 
ferent form. Their negotiators find 
it hard to distinguish between 
political fine-tuning and bad faith 
in Washington. They keep men- 
tioning what they see as the untrue 
account of the Reykjavik near- 
agreement which Reagan gave on 
his return to Washington. 

Reagan said he had been willing 
to accept elimination of all ballis- 
tic missiles over 10 years, while 
Gorbachov still maintains that all 
nuclear weapons are to go. The 
West recognized that as part of the 
ordinaiy diet of politics — adjust- 
ment in response to pressure. 
Reagan simply toned down what 
both supporters and opponents 
said was a Utopian approach. 

The effect on Gorbachov has 
been greatly underestimated in 
Washington. In his eyes Reagan's 
back-tracking reduced his credibil- 
ity as leader of the western 
alliance. It was compounded by 
subsequent events at the Geneva 
arms talks, at the Reagan- 
Thatcher meeting at Camp David, 
and at December’s North Atlantic 
Council meeting in Brussels. 

A battery of side issues lends 
further weight to a gloomy forecast 
for 1987. Washington's uncerem- 
onious burial of the expired Salt-2 
treaty, the updating by both sides 
of early warning systems with new 
phased-airay radars in breach of 
the spirit (but not the letter) of the 
1972 ABM treaty, Washington's 
failure to respond to Moscow's 
unilateral 16-month nuclear test 
ban, and Moscow’s decision to 
abandon it after the next US 
nuclear test (scheduled for Janu- 
ary 29) are all relevant 

Compelling though all this mis- 
ery may appear, some people still 
take a positive approach. Among 
those who refuse to view 1987 as a 
lost year is David Owen, leader of 
the SDP. He believes that the 
Reagan administration could re- 
cover its authority and popularity 
through an arms control agree- 
ment and should begin by seeking 


proach and it would overcome any 
Soviet tendency to wait for a new 
president With the Democrat 
firmly in charge of the 100th 
congress, which begins on January 
6, any treaty struck between the 
administration and the Kremlin 
could face ratification problems 
without such an approach. 

The most influential Democrat 
on arms control is Senator Sam 
Nunn, chairman of the Senate 
armed services committee. Owen 
believes that Reagan should strike 
up a partnership with him as 
quickly as possible. The most 
serious Nunn-Reagan difference 
centres on the Strategic Defence 
Initiative, which Reagan views as 
sacrosanct His refusal to counte- 
nance using it as an East-West 
bargaining chip contrasts with 
Nunn's more equivocal attitude. 

A bipartisan approach would 
transform the prospects of the 
next Geneva arms talks, starting 
on January 13. As matters stand 
neither Max Kampelman, the US 
chief arms negotiator, 'nor Viktor 
Karpov, the senior Soviet nego- 
tiator, is likely to make con- 
cessions. But flexibility could be 
revived if both sides knew that 
there was nothing to be gained by 
waiting. 

It can be argued that Reyk- 
javik's failure was just as well and 
that events in 1987 could create a 
far sounder basis for arms control 
Commendable though Gorba- 
chov's ideas may be. they call for a 
breathtaking leap of trust The 
coming year will test whether that 
leap is justified. 

Around February II it could 
become dear bow far Gorbachov's 
hinted new policy on Afghanistan 
will go. Quick agreement on a 
timetable for Soviet withdrawal at 
the UN-sponsored Geneva proxi- 
mity talks between the govern- 
ments of Afghanistan and Pak- 
istan would boost western faith in 
Soviet intentions. Secondly, it will 
soon be seen whether Moscow is 
about to allow large numbers of 
Soviet Jews to depart. 

The third and most important 
plank is progress on troop cuts. 
Crucial Nato meetings in Halifax 
and in Brussels, and a Warsaw 
Pact gathering in Budapest 
showed that there is political will 
on both sides. The focus now 
moves to the Conference on 
Security and Co-operation ia 
Europe at Vienna. A forum for 
talks leading to the withdrawal of 
up to one million troops between 
the Atlantic and the Urals should 
emerge from that conference. 
Gorbachov has said that this 
forum wifi not be stalemated by 
the verification issue, unlike the 
Vienna Mutual Balanced Force 
Reduction Talks. If the West 
receives signs of his sincerity it 
could afford to be less cautious on 
the nuclear front. 

Taken as a whole, the prospects 
for 1987 look far from depressing. 


T here can be little 
disagreement that Har- 
old Macmillan, with 
Baldwin, Churchill, and 
Margaret Thatcher, will 
rank as one of the outstanding 
leaders of the Conservative Party 
in this century — and there is not 
much time for a fifth to make his 
mark. His place in Conservative 
history will be more ambiguous. 

In the 1950s he brought to the 
party all that Eden had been 
expected, and so signally failed, to 
bring: renewed impetus, new 
ideas, fresh faces, under a man 
with a record of success in high 
office, personal stature, and a 
certain elegance of style. Yet the 
leader who restored the party’s 
morale after the Suez disaster and 
led it to the triumph of the 1959 
general election, was also the 
leader whose misfortunes and 
misjudgements in his last two 
years of office ensured the failure 
of his personally chosen successor. 

There was an even deeper 
paradox than this. Macmillan 
liked to think of himself as a 
radical Tory in the Disraeli tra- 
dition. It is a nostalgic phrase with 
little historical meaning, not least 
because Disraeli was not basically 
a radical Peel and Mrs Thatcher, 
on the other hand, can justifiably 
be called radical Conservatives 
since they took drastic decisions in 
the long term interest of their 
party which were not very pal- 
atable at the time. 

In his European and imperial 
policy Macmillan too was a 
radical statesman. He not only 
restored the Churchiilian tradition 
of dose co-operation with the 
USA after the Suez rift but began a 
new era of defence strategy based 
on nuclear deterrence and the 
American Polaris missile. His 
rapid liquidation of the old colo- 
nial empire in Africa between 
1959 and 1963 created party 
unease but it took place relatively 
peacefully. The legacies of Empire 
— massive coloured immigration 
and the untested structure of the 
“new” Commonwealth — took 
longer to reveal themselves. 
Nevertheless, for a party which 
since Disraeli’s tune had prided 
itself on its imperial sentiment, 
the retreat from Empire went 
against its instincts, even if it was 
fain Macleod as Colonial Sec- 
retary who took the brunt of 
unpopularity. 

Macmillan’s decision to apply 
for entry into the EEC was by 
contrast tardy and ineffective. For 
the principle of European union 
he could invoke the counsel of 
that great Victorian Lord Salis- 
bury and the authority of Winston 
Churchill Certainly the marginal 
loss of political control and 


constitutional sovereignty in- 
volved was not to the liking of all 
Conservatives; but, aided by the 
opposition of the Labour Party, 
Macmillan successfully wrote 
union with Europe into his party’s 
future agenda. Only de Gaulle's 
vote in January 1963 denied him 
— more truly, perhaps merely 
postponed — an historic achieve- 
ment 

On ail these large issues 
Macmillan's quick mind and 
political courage led him to firm 
and momentous derisions. Signif- 
icantly it was the problem of EEC 
membership, on which he had the 
longest time to reflect, that suf- 
fered most from procrastination 
and missed opportunities for 
which be was at least partly to 
blame. He was at his best dealing 
with affairs as they arose: For 
British parties, however, as for the 
British public, the ultimate test of 
leadership is home policy. It was 
here that Macm illan departed 
most widely from fundamental 
Conservative tradition: a curious 
circumstance which no ritual ap- 
peal by his supporters to the 
Disraelian legend can disguise. 

Concern for the “condition of 
the people” is a Conservative 
tradition which goes bade to the 
time of Lord Liverpool and Peel 
It was reasserted by Disraeli and 
Lord Salisbury, formed part of 
Joseph Chamberlain's tariff re- 
form programme, and helped to 
inspire Baldwin’s New Conser- 
vatism of the 1920s. The real issue 
is how to t ranslate that 0000011 
into policy within the framework 
of Conservative principles. In the 
prewar years Macmillan's ad- 
vocacy, as an Idealistic, slightly 
rebellious backbencher, of un- 
orthodox ideas which his party 
chiefs had little difficulty in 
resisting, is reminiscent of Dis- 
raeli's group a century before of 
ardent young aristocrats with a 
social conscience. The parallel, 
however, is inexact “Young 
England” sprang from Tory 
romanticism, not the Whig- 
Liberal-radicalism of their par- 
liamentary opponents. In any 
event Disraeli dropped it as soon 
as he entered the more exciting 
world of real power. 

The case of Macmillan offers 
significant contrasts. His recipe 
for the poverty and unemploy- 
ment of the 1930s - control of 
economic strategy by the state, 
nationalization of key industries, a 
dash of Keynesian theory (spend- 
ing one's way out of recession), 
and an element of social engineer- 
ing (common schooling for all 
classes) - was, despite the promo- 
tion label of The Middle Way, 
closer to contemporary socialist 
policy than any recognizable Tory 


_ «!'«"♦ « 




The complete aristocrat, but 
troubled always by what he 
had seen at Stockton-on-Tees 
in his early days as an MP 


tradition. Had it not been for the 
war, as Clement Attlee reputedly 
said. Macmillan would have 
ended up is the Labour F^rty. 

W hatever the chances 
were of that, he 
undoubtedly allow- 
ed these collectivist, 
dirigiste ideas to 
colour his outlook for the rest of 
his life. They made him an 
influential contributor to RA 
Butler's Industrial Charter in 1947 
and a powerful defender of 
Butskellism in the 1950s. When in 
power himself from 1957 to 1963, 
he was a convinced (one is 
tempted to $ay doctrinaire) expan- 
sionist Though the warning sig- 
nals of inflation and financial 
instability had already appeared 
under Attlee, Churchill and Eden, 
Macmillan as prime minister re- 
tained the attitude which he had 
taken up in his political youth. 

Historically, however, the tra- 
dition of the Conservative Party 
has been one of prudent national 
housekeeping. Macmillan was the 
first Conservative prime minister 
of whom it could be said that he 
got rid of two chancellors of the 


exchequer because they tried to 
put a brake on excessive pnblic 
spending. Under him inflation 
b eca m e, so to speak, institutional- 
ized as a method of paying for the 
growing demands of a socially 
conscious electorate. It is true that 
he saw the latent perils; but his 
tentative remedies, characteris- 
tically involving more planning 
and more controls, were as ineffec- 
tive as his occasional warnings 
were unheeded or misinterpreted. 

It is true also that his social 
policy was based on personal 
conviction; he never forgot the 
Stockton-on-Tees of the 1920s. 
Yet in the 1960s that policy had 
become dangerously facile: the 
line of least resistance and greatest 
electoral advantage. It led on to 
the disasters which overtook his 
successors in Downing Street and 
in the end provoked the emer- 
gence of a new radical Conser- 
vatism which rejected Butskellism 
and saw Macmillan's domestic 
policy asa Tory aberration. 

I n the history of Conservative 
thought aim practice Mac- 
millan is likely to remain an 
enigmatic figure. As a politi- 
cal virtuoso he has few rivals. 
In his astuteness and resilience, 
his studied nonchalance and care- 
ful cultivation of an impressive 
public image, and in the relentless 
ambition evident after 1945, he 
was the nearest approach to a 
second Disraeli that the party has 
seen. Yet there are important 
differences. Macmillan's style was 
aristocratic rather than exotic; he 
was less romantic, more ruthless 
(even Disraeli would have hesi- 
tated to get rid of half his Cabinet 
in one day), more practical, a 
bettor organizer admin- 
istrator. With greater opp- 
ortunities in office (and no 
Gladstone to contend with), he 
showed himself the more com- 
plete politician. He was attrac- 
tive, cultured and intelligent; yet 
somehow failed to convey the 
seriousness and integrity which 
one finds in Peel and Mrs 
Thatcher. 

What appealed to him most 
perhaps was the practice rather 
than the principles of politics, the 
use of power rather than its 
purpose. In a previous existence 
one could imagine him as an 
adroit and subtle Highland chief 
tain, but hardly as a solid English 
country squire. Yet if not a great 
conservative leader, he was a 
memorable leader of the Conser- 
vative Party. 

© TIribs Nawapapara, 1S86. 

Norman Gash is Emeritus ProfeSr 
sor of History at the University cf 
St Andrews. His books include a 
two-volume life of Sir Robert Peel. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Now check your 
questions 


Here are the answers to our 
Christmas quiz. 

Eitfertaiunrat 

JL Richard Ingrams has twice 
refused this title. 

2. It was recorded by Myra 
Hindley with the Yorkshire Police 
Choir. 

3. All are television personalities 
except Russel] Harty. 

4. The collected speeches of 
Robert Maxwell, which have been 
in the Bulgarian best-seller list 
since 1979. 

5. It is the television programme 
which Terry Wogan does abroad 
every day that he is on holiday. 

6. The technical name for 
Auberon Waugh’s haircut 

7. The name of a new pop group 
formed by the remnants of the 
Somerset cricket team. 

8. The amount of money spent by 
Bob Geldof trying to get back into 
the charts. 

9. The sound of Odin Mclnnes 
turning in his grave. 

10. The technical name for Robert 
Robinson’s haircut 

Sport 

1. A new county formed specially 
to provide a cricket team for 
Geoffrey Boycott and fan Botham. 

2. He was sold to Manchester 
United but lost in the post 

3. The first referee ever to be sent 
off in an FA Cup tie. 

4. They are inflatable shoulders 
used in American football. 

5. Hie last time Ivan Lendl 
smiled. 

6. The point in a snooker game 
where all the TV viewers have 
fallen asleep. 

7. They are inflatable salaries 
in American football. 

8. Ian Botham’s moustache, for a 
fee of £5, 000. 

9. The annual cricket match 
between the Labour Party and 
Militant Tendency. 

10. They are inflatable footballers 
used in American football 

Politics 

X. All received money from Jeffrey 
Archer to keep quiet. 

2. A mysterious hole in Michael 
Heseltine's flak jacket 

3. They all still believe that 
Francis Pym can become prime 
minister. 

4. The date of Mrs Thatcher’s 
official birthday. 

5. A department of the Kremlin 
formed to': counter the Liberal 


Party's defence policy. 

6. The theory that President 
Reagan has been dead since 1981. 

7. A type of paranoia found only 
among Tory MPs, consisting of an 
overwhelming desire to destroy 
BBC television and an equally 
strong desire to appear on it 

8. A department in the Kremlin to 
which Sir Michael Havers and Sir 
Robert Armstrong are directly 
responsible. 

9. The technical name for Neil 
Kinnock's haircut 

10. Mrs Thatcher’s real age. 

Arts 

1. All are owned by Peter Hall. 

2. Only if Andrew Lloyd Webber’s 
wife is given the main part. 

3. In Jonathan Miller’s new 

production, the title role is sung hy 
a parrot. ^ y 

4. A secret society dedicated to 
stamping out the Last Night of the 
Proms. 

? r . money received 
oy BBC television travel pro- 
grammes m 1986. 

6. The technical name for Russel] 
Harry’s haircut 

L A LPrf a. 0 ” w 5 icb Prad'Kes 
an LP of foe soundtrack music 

even though nobody can reme m : 

berany music in foe film at all 

U™ “BMW in foe world 
which has ever featured Pant 

Q 5a J ie rwL ,tS posta £ e stamps. 

9. An Oscar award made to film 
stars who too old to die ™ 

NIAny record never held t>y R oy 

, , Science and Travel 

1. A reference to Fred Hovfe'c 

Aids may wefi half 
been brought from fo c foturekS 

2. The Nobel Prize forChiropodv 

ly 

HanudstfspT^ f0r ® av ° u nqg 
6. It is foe motorway service 

EUST" 1 »y S3 


t : \ 

; s % 


iurm of niat-n' Zir-lr**' 

inciminguishable from Jm is 





ndr ^v\ lcE 

horw 




le §loo^ 


■ ^ n^i _ f 

• ■>— 


":> or 


■ =s>3$§ 

- -;r -.; Cai »on 

- • :S 8 *0* 

■ :■■■&&* 

- - . . ■•‘in 


•?.:■■■ 'V* 
r'-C\"»2L* 
,>fc> 
■-: H ..-1 

' ■ ',-:-' r J c n <*% 

' •. ,: ", So "«te 

: -:s3& 

: W s> 

_:. - 7*x ih 2l Rv 

• : 

- 

-. ^ ft 

-• • J;>Tt 


2 


U w. 


L •, A’Ii2t03 


r - .—1,1 1 1 4 

A v UU i 


v-* r 

115 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 



1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 

HAROLD MACMILLAN 


Future generations are no 
more likely to think of Harold 
Macmillan as the Earl of 
Stockton than we think of 
Disraeli as the Earl of Beacons- 
field. Their reputations out- 
shine their titles. Both men 
combined the radical and the 
traditional in their politics and 
thus were able to persuade 
conservative parties to cany 
through far-reaching changes 
of policy at home and abroad. 

Yet when he first became 
Prime Minister, the news- 
papers were instinctively in- 
clined to write off his Prime 
Ministership in advance. They 
could hardly believe that Mac- 
millan, with his patrician style 
anbd his often baroque ora- 
tory. was the man either to 
reunite the Tory Party which 
had been riven by internal 
conflict over the Suez fiasco, 
or to revive public support for 
the Conservatives. 

That assessment was gravely 
false. Macmillan quickly 
showed himself to excel in the 
art of communication. Above 
all, he was the first Prime 
Minister to master television 
as a means of communicating 
with the masses. Here, as in his 
policy making, he showed that 
he had an instinctive under- 
standing of what ordinary 
people thought and felt 

What is more, in the very 
different social climate of that 
time when class demarcations 
were still strongly discernible, 
the mass of the people were by 
no means disposed to spurn 
Ma cmillan for his patrician 
style, or for being unlike 
themselves. On the contrary, 
his confidence and self-assur- 
ance reassured them of his 
capacity to manage the 
nation's affairs. 

Rebuilding national and 
party confidence, he led his 
party to a third successive 
victory in 1959> and presided 
over a period ofrising prosper- 
ity for all classes. The extent to 
which today some of Mrs 


Thatcher's supporters (though 
not Mrs Thatcher herself) have 
blamed Macmillan personally 
for the inflation which fol- 
lowed his neo- Keynesian poli- 
cies is almost as unfair as 
Macmillan's latter-day chiding 
of the Thatcher government 
for its denationalisation poli- 
cies as selling the family silver, 
or his dissociation from the 
Government's resistance to 
the miners' strike. 

Neither view makes the 
practical concession that 
things have changed. Mac- 
millan seemed not to under- 
stand the difference between 
the miners' situation in the 
twenties and their union's 
attitude at the outset of the 
eighties. Equally the critics of 
his Prime Ministership tend to 
overlook the extent to which 
his economic policies were an 
almost automatic response to 
the climate of his time. 

Macmillan was Prime Min- 
ister at a time when the 
smallest upward movement in 
the unemployment figures 
caused political consternation. 
Full employment was then 
regarded as something which 
governments could achieve by 
fiscal manipulation and thus 
as a principal obligation upon 
them. In addition. Macmillan 
was personally affected by his 
memories of high unemploy- 
ment and lack of decent social 
protection in the thirties. 

Though there was much of 
the histrionic in his nature, 
there is no doubt that his 
distress at the hardship of that 
period was deeply felt and 
coloured his approach as 
Prime Minister. His * con- 
sequent wish that the broad 
mass of the people should have 
it as good as possible did much 
to promote social cohesion 
and to maintain the Conser- 
vatives as a popular party. 
Whiggish his manner might 
be, but his realisation that the 
Tories could only survive as a 
broad-based national party 
with working class support was 


TIME, PARLIAMENT, PLEASE 


Licensing boms were first 
restricted during the First 
World War to deter industrial 
workers from spending time 
and money in the pubs — and 
thus to pave the way to 
victory. (Lloyd George even 
persuaded the King to go 
“dry” — to set an example 
which nobody, including 
Lloyd George, rushed to fol- 
low). Seventy years later the 
restrictions remain, though 
more relaxed, as a monument 
to. the national fear of change. 

But change must come, and 
there is a growing recognition 
that this is so. The issue now is 
not so much whether as when 
— and on how grand a scale. 
Those are the questions which 
one might hope to have an- 
swered when Mr Allan 
Stewart's private member's 
bill receives its second reading 
in the Commons next month. 

Mr Stewart’s bill would 
extend weekday opening hours 
from 10.30 am until 11.30pm 
in England and Wales, thereby 
stretching them at either end 
of the day and closing the 
afternoon gap. Publicans 
would not need to be open all 
that time, but they would need 
to apply annually for their 
licences to be renewed through 
the courts. To those seeking 
tidy — let alone total — re- 
form, it therefore foils short of 
the mark. For that reason it 
has won the approval rather 
than the enthusiastic support 


of Whitehall, despite reports 
that Mrs Thatcher is in favour. 

One reason for Government 
caution is an official pref- 
erence for a root-and-branch 
job, which would, among other 
things, simplify the procedure 
for granting licences. Another 
reason no doubt is that Min- 
isters, having burned their 
fingers over Sunday trading, 
are reluctant to risk them again 
before testing the par- 
liamentary temperature. 

Mr Stewart is lined up to be 
Downing Street’s walking 
thermometer. If a Commons 
consensus emerges on January 
30, the Government could 
take over his bill and present it 
as a popular reforming mea- 
sure in its next manifesto. If on 
the other hand the anti-drink 
lobby in Westminster looks 
belligerent, Mr Stewart can be 
thrown to the wolves and his 
bill quietly forgotten. 

Sound politics this may be, 
but also pusillanimous. There 
are a number of good reasons 
why the present irrational 
system should be changed — 
tourism being only one of 
them. With supermarkets sell- 
ing liquor all day, it is hard to 
see how the present licensing 
hours keep people sober. In- 
deed, it may be preferable for 
people to drink under some 
sort of convivial scrutiny in a 
public bar, than miserably on 
their own at home.' 


The Government has a 
responsibility to those who 
live near pubs as well as to 
those who drink in them. 
Public houses should not be- 
come public nuisances. So it is 
understandable that Ministers 
should be reluctant to support 
an open-all-hours regime. 

In Scotland, however, not 
dissimilar legislation was in- 
troduced ten years ago. And 
last December the Chief 
Inspector of Constabulary dis- 
closed that cases of public 
drunkenness there had fallen 
by 8.5 per cent in 1985 to reach 
their lowest level for 30 years. 
This may not have been 
directly caused by the 1976 
reform. Matters had been 
improving anyway and prob- 
ably reflected a more fun- 
damental shift in people’s 
lifestyle. What is significant, 
however, is that the improve- 
ment was not reversed by 
reform. Indeed, further lib- 
eralization is now being 
considered. 

For all that, any bill which 
seeks to change the habits of a 
lifetime is bound to be 
controversial. The main 
attraction of Mr Stewart’s bill 
is that it is a woririmg com- 
promise which promises to 
lead the country forward at a 
broadly acceptable pace. 
Rather than meekly following, 
the Government should give it 
a helpful shove in the right 
direction. 


JAPAN REARMS SLIGHTLY 


Since the ratification of the 
Japanese-US Security Treaty 
in 1952, Japan has enjoyed the 
luxury of security at minimal 
cost But it is a luxury that can 
no longer be reconciled with its 
new status as a major power 
with global economic and 
political interests. 

It is now widely recognised 
that the US cannot be expected 
to shoulder indefinitely a dis- 
proportionate share of the cost 
of maintaining the Security of 
the industrialised democ- 
racies. Consequently, 
yesterday’s decision by the 
Japanese Cabinet to breach the 
one per cent of GNP ceiling on 
defence spending should be 
welcomed as a first step to- 
wards the assumption of its 
responsibilities. 

The critics of this decision, 
both domestic and foreign, 
will denounce it as a dilution 
of Japan’s Peace Constitution, 
and a dangerous precedent 
which could ultimately lead to 
the revival of ’’Japanese 
militarism.” In feet, that is for 
removed from reality. 

Under Article 9 of the Peace 
Constitution, Japan forever 
renounced war as a soverign 


right of state. But it retained 
the right of self-defence. Every 
Japanese political party, ex- 
cept the Japanese Communist 
Party, now acknowledges the 
le gitima cy and constitutional- 
ity of the Self-Defence Forces 
( SDF ). . 

Despite this 

acknowledgement, defence 
spending has been so low that 
the SDF has been left with 
obsolete equipment, in- 
sufficient levels of ammu- 
nition and an unconvincing 
capacity to defend Japan’s air 
space and sea lanes. Moreover, 
during the past five years the 
Soviet Union has increased its 
deployment of intermediate 
nuclear forces in Soviet Asia, 
expanded its conventional 
capability and enhanced its 
Pacific naval presence. 

The Japanese people have 
therefore been confronted with 
the need to abandon their self- 
imposed limit on defence 
spending, it has proved a 
source of great psychological 
discomfort. To his credit. 
Prime Minister Yasuhiro 
Nakasone has laboured assidu- 
ously to prepare them for this 
long-overdue adjustment He 


has also gone to considerable 
lengths to assuage the in- 
evitable anxieties that in- 
creased Japanese defence 
spending has generated among 
Japan's regional neighbours. 
Fortunately, these efforts have 
not been undermined by his 
occasional rhetorical excesses. 

Japan is now able to embark 
on the second year of a five 
year defence build-up which is 
widely acknowledged to be 
necessary and correct At the 
end of the decade, Japan will 
be able to defend its own 
territory and air space from a 
small scale assault, and protect 
its sea lanes over a distance of 
1,000 nautical miles. 

The Japanese, however, still 
need time to become fully 
accustomed to their new de- 
fence responsibilities. Much of 
the progress of the past few 
years could be placed in jeop- 
ardy if the US, especially 
Congress, tries to exert pres- 
sure on Japan to aederate 
increases in defence expen- 
diture faster than the Japanese 
can realistically be expected to 
adjust to them. It is in the 
interests of all concerned that 
such a contingency be avoided. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


solidly in the tradition of 
Disraeli who (as an 1883 
leading article in The Times 
put it) “in the inarticulate 
mass of the English populace, 
discerned the Conservative 
working man as the sculptor 
perceives the angel prisoned in 
a block of marble.” 

As a politician who wanted 
above all to improve the 
condition of the people, Mac- 
millan was the right man to 
lead the Tories mass post-war 
house-building programme. 
His heart was in it In other 
ways too, be was in advance of 
his time. He sensed the wind of 
change in Africa before most 
politicians and went with it 
He maintained the indepen- 
dent deterrent in difficult 
political conditions. 

Finn for the Atlantic alli- 
ance, he was also a path-finder 
for British entry into the 
European Community, 
conditioning his party and the 
public gradually to accept wbat 
his successor, Mr Edward 
Heath, finally achieved. 
Above all, he deserves grati- 
tude from people in and 
beyond this country for his 
part in the achievement of the 
test ban treaty. 

The end of his Prime 
Ministership was bedevilled 
by political difficulties, and his 
retirement years by contention 
over the part he had played in 
the forced repatriation of the 
Cossacks to Russia when he 
was Head of the Allied 
Commission in Italy. On these 
matters, as on his govern- 
ment's economic perfor- 
mance, history will have to 
judge. But it is not necessary to 
await an historical judgment 
to say of him that he was a 
humane politician and Prime 
Minister, anxious to weld to- 
gether both the national tra- 
ditions to which he was 
devoted and the improvement 
of the condition of the people. 
He was at his best a great 
unifier, and that is no mean 
title. 


Ways to arrest 
fleet decline 

From the President of the General 
Council of British Shipping 
Sir. Public opinion is becoming 
increasingly aware of the danger to 
the country's strategic interests of 
continuing inaction by Gov- 
ernment to strengthen the invest- 
ment base of the British merchant 
marine. Next year's Finance Bill 
may be the last chance to do this 
before the next election. 

An example may help to point 
to the decisive role Government 
can play, or refuse, in encouraging 
investment in ships by British 
companies. 

Intra-European seaborne trade 
is still largely carried in European 
ships with European crews paid 
European wages. This is the 
market in whidh our still substan- 
tial fleet of coastal and short sea 
ships seeks its living and in all 
respects except capital costs it is 
fully competitive with the fleets of 
our European neighbours. 

However, capital costs amount 
to 60 per cent of non-voyage costs 
of operating a new short sea vessel 
and these costs are largely under 
the control of Government 
through its fiscal and related 
policies. As matters stand, and 
since the 1984 Budget, the aids ro 
investment offered by our Euro- 
pean competitors are significantly 
better than our own. the results 
are becoming clear. 

In recent years our short sea 
fleet has reduced sharply 10 size- 
and increased in age whereas that 
of. say, our German competitors 
has not Moreover, investment in 
ships for British registry is at an 
all-time low. 

This is not the place for a 
detailed comparison of the fiscal 
regimes applicable to investment 
in the countries of the EEC But a 
German owner contemplating 
investment knows that he will get 
a 40 per cent investment allow- 
| ance in addition to the standard 
rate plus a 1216 per cent invest- 
ment grant and the ability to place 
the proceeds of the sale of a ship 
into a tax-free reserve pending 
, reinvestment. None of these 
advantages are available in the 
UK. 

In significant areas of the inter- 
national shipping industry the size 
and health of national fleets is at 
least as much a matter for national 
governments as it is for owners 
and seafarers. 

Yours faithfully, 

W. G. RUNCIMAN, President, 
General Council of British Supping, 
30-32 St Mary Axe, EC3. 
December 19. 

Heveningham fears 

From Mr R. D. Bloomfield 
Sir, A significant feet omitted 
from your report of December 16 
is that when the Vanneck family 
trustees put Heveningham on the 
market in 1970, a campaign to 
save h from the risk of undesirable 
ownership, in which The Times 
played a leading part, caused the 
then Ministry of Housing and 
Local Government to step in and 
buy the house, the original fur- 
niture and the estate. 

This great architectural master- 
piece was thus, to quote the 
official guidebook of the time, 
“purchased for the nation by the 
Government". It was a disgraceful 
betrayal of the responsibility 
inherited by the Department of 
the Environment when, early in 
the life of the present Gov- 
ernment, as an ill-contrived econ- 
omy measure, Heveningham was 
put up for sale. 

G early the proper course for the 
department to take now is to 
repent of its former philistinism 
and once more acquire 
Hevenin gham for the nation. 
Yours faithfully, 

R. D. BLOOMFIELD, 

30 Fair Green, 

Piss, Norfolk. 

December 17. 

History and hope 

From Mr Toby Horton 
Sir, For Peter Ackroyd to have 
reviewed (December 18) the new 
folio edition of Macaulay's His- 
tory was a positive step. It could 
also bring forward the day wheat 
Macaulay, rather than Marx, is 
seen as ‘the seminal 19th-century 
thinker, whose woric is taught in 
our schools. 

The contrast is all too clear 
between Macaulay's optimism 
and Marx's pessimism, his 
generosity and Marx's poverty of 
spirit, and his essentially construc- 
tive, and Marx’s destructive, na- 
ture. 

The revival of interest in 
Macaulay is a sign of hope. When 
his spirit comes to imbue our 
schools as thoroughly as does 
Marx's now, then it can safely be 
said that all will be well once more 
with our country. 

Yours faithfully. 

TOBY HORTON, 

Minster House, 

Arthur Street, EC4. 

December 19. 

Coon ting the pence 

From Mrs Margaret WaUey 
Sir, It may reassure your readers to 
know that, on the night of 
December 22, at the time the news 
of the income tax problem of 
Lester Piggoti was broadcast to the 
nation, my flagging energies were 
engaged in explaining to HM 
Inspector of Taxes, Cardiff, why 
my 99-year-old aunt's two half- 
yearly 43p interest payments on 
her unsaleable 3ft per cent British 
Transport stock bad not been 
included in her income-tax re- 
turns. 

Yours faithfully, 

MARGARET WALLEY, 

1 3 Julien Road, 

Coulsdon, Surrey. 

December 23. 


Undue delays in planning process 


From the President of the Royal 
Town Planning Institute 
Sir, The article “A master plan for 
planning" by Geoffrey Rippon 
(December 22) deserves support 
for most of its proposals- Mr 
Rippon is right to say that 
planning inquiries into renisal of 
permission by local planning 
authorities are falling into 
disrepute and that law and proce- 
dure need drastic revision to 
remove delay. Fortunately the 
Department of the Environment 
recognises this and has taken some 
steps to improve the situation and 
is to be congratulated for so doing. 

My Institute would support all 
but three of Mr Rippon's pro- 
posals. I do not accept there is a 
wide consensus to end all statu- 
tory development plans; indeed, 
my evidence is to the contrary and 
the development industry and the 
public seek certainty from the 
present statutory system. 

The proposal that permission 
should be deemed to be granted if 
any applicant has not heard 
anything within 42 days from the 
local planning authority may 
appear superficially attractive; but 
it is likely to result in more 
refusals being issued towards the 
end of the 42-day period, with an 
increase in the number of plan- 
ning appeals and a consequent 
delay to the applicant. 

Thirdly, the planning tribunal 
suggestion to replace the inspec- 
torate could lead to delays in the 
appeal system and bring greater 
uncertainties. The present im- 
provements recently announced 
by the Department of the Environ- 
ment in respect of appeal proce- 
dure suggest a better solution to 
this problem. 

The proposition that the rem- 
edies have been analysed in detail 
over and over again and all that is 
necessary is the will to act is totally 
supported by the planning pro- 
fession. The profession has a 
vested interest in ensuring that the 
system works without undue de- 
lay. 

Yours faithfully, 

GEORGE McDONIC, President, 
The Royal Town Planning Institute, 
26 Portland Place, Wl. 

From Mr Sean O’Grady 
Sir, Geoffrey Rippon states that 
there is a wide consensus to end all 
statutory plans. Yet the present 
Secretary of State for the Environ- 
ment has just issued a consulta- 
tion paper, “The Future of 
Development Plans”, advocating 
mandatory statutory local plans to 
cover the whole countty. where is 
this consensus? Certainly not even 
within the Conservative Party. 

Mr Rippon suggests that all 
planning applications should be 
determined within 42 days, ir- 
respective of the circumsiances. 
Yet one of the reasons for delay is 
the applicant's inability to provide 
the correct information to enable 
the local authority to make a 
sound decision. Sometimes this is 
unavoidable, especially where sev- 
eral parties are involved. 

Craft fellowship 

From Mr Philip Venning 
Sir. It is indeed true that craftsmen 
with the traditional skills used in 
historic buildings projects are not 
a dying brad (“Horizons”, 
December 8). But there is an acute 
shortage of trained craftsmen with 
the wider knowledge and under- 
standing of what they are doing 
that is needed to transform merely 
mechanically competent restora- 
tion into inspired workmanship. 

Too many historic buildings 
have been damaged because the 
craftsmen involved have used 
technically acceptable repair 
methods which are dangerously 
unsuitable for the particular situa- 
tion. For example, early stone 
carvings that should have been 
conserved have been replaced by 
crude and lifeless copies. Dec- 
orative plasterworfc that should 
have been repaired has been 
stripped out, and imitated. 

To meet this need, a group of 

All the difference 

From Mrs Mary Mmro-Hill 
Sir. Wbat a dangerous statement 
Philip Howard makes in his recent . 
article (December 17) “Pre- 
postdioms”! He tells us that 
“different than ” is the only pos- 
sible form to use when “different” 
is followed by a “comparative 
than -clause”. Mr Howard should 
know that the very structure to 
which he refers does not exist in 
good Fn glisty .“different” is not, 
properly speaking, a comparative 
adjective, though “other” is an 
entirely different (!) matter. 

Both the unfortunate examples 
be quotes are taken from A 
Comprehensive Grammar of the 
English Language (Randolph 
Quirk, et al., 1985), more note- 
worthy for its breadth of coverage 

CAP breakthrough 

From Mr C M. Coffin 
Sir, In your leader today (Decem- 
ber 18) you expressed relief at the 
breakthrough in the EEC agri- 
cultural policy- 1 share your views, 
but with some reservations. 

The fabric of rural society is 
under threat from tile control 
being imposed on dairy fanners. 
The smaller producer, who is both 
the backbone and lifeblood of the 
industry, is being destroyed. 

Milk quota is being transferred 
at prices which only the larger 
producer can afford to pay. Unless 
a governing body is appointed to 
administer these transactions. I 
see the future British countryside 
dominated by large-scale factory- 


type forms. 

Yours sincerely, 
CHARLES COFFIN, 
Cross Farm, 

Leigh. 

Sherborne, Dorset. 
December 18. 


A further reason is that, as 
custodians of the environment on 
the local community's behalf, the 
planning authority has a duty to 
ensure the best possible scheme 
for a site. This may involve 
negotiation, and is often to the 
mutual benefit of the developer 
and the community in that it can 
avoid a refusal of a planning 
application. 

A third reason for delay is the 
inordinate delay of the Depart- 
ment of the Environment in 
responding to consultations, es- 
pecially where listed buildings are 
concerned. 

Mr Rippon says that “comput- 
erization of the planning process is 
long overdue”. My present 
employers introduced a comput- 
erized system four years ago, as 
did many other authorities. The 
effect on speeding up decisions has 
been negligible. It has merely cut 
out a few repetitive administra- 
tion functions (with consequent 
loss of staff). 

Finally Mr Rippon says that 
£42million per annum is raised 
through “charges for planning 
permission” He seems unaware 
that fees are charged for processing 
the application, whether permit- 
ted or refused. 

Yours sincerely, 

SEAN O’GRADY (Principal 
Planning Officer, Siraiford-on- 
Avon District Council), 

8 Oswald Road, 

Leamington Spa, Warwickshire. 
December 23. 

From the Director of the British 
Road Federation 

Sir, Geoffrey Rippon's proposals 
for improving our planning sys- 
tem make admirable reading. 
Widespread concern about the 
length of a number of major public 
inquiries highlights the tendency 
for these local inquiries to become 
a forum for debating, or even 
formulating, national policy. In 
the case of SizeweU this approach 
was encouraged by the Gov- 
ernment, who surely should be 
placing such decision-making be- 
fore Parliament 

The recent Government re- 
sponse to the House of Commons 
environment select committee re- 
port on planning was that 
there may well be a case in which a 
'major public inquiry is a perfectly 
reasonable instrument for inquiry 
into the policy background as well as 
the suitability of the particular site 
or sites. 

It is a great shame that the 
Government was not prepared to 
support wholeheartedly the 
committee's recommendation 
that 

as for as is practical, the questioning 
of national policy determined else- 
where should not be allowed to - 
impinge upon public inquiries. 

Yours faithfully, 

PETER J. WITT, Director, 

British Road Federation, 

Cowdray House, 

6 Portugal Street, WC2. 

December 23. 

major conservation bodies, 
including the National Trust, 
English Heritage, the Society for 
the Protection of Ancient Build- 
ings and others, has just launched 
a new training programme The 
William Morris Craft Fellowship 
will be awarded to three outstand- 
ing young craftsmen or women 
who have completed their basic 
training They will spend six 
months on an arranged pro- 
gramme studying historic build- 
ings, repair methods and 
traditional materials throughout 
the country: 

We hope that over the years the 
fellowship will not only help to 
raise the standard of craftsman- 
ship on historic buildings but also 
give some recognition to the value 
of the craftsmen. 

Yours faithfully, 

PHILIP VENNING, Secretary, 
William Morris Craft Fellowship 
Committee, 

37 Spiral Square, £1. 

December 21. 

than for its quality. As if it were 
not enough to tolerate — and even 
to admit to using in his own 
writing — the expression “different 
titan", he goes on to define “really 
bad” grammar as “the idiolect that 
obscures your meaning and ruins 
the sense”. 

With a definition so loose in 
every sense, foully utterances such 
as “Between you and I”, “I ain't 
got no books" and "You wasn’t 
there, was you?” become accept- 
able. one must suppose, on the 
grounds that they are intelligible. 

Come, come, Mr Howard. Quis 
custodiet ipsos custodef! 

Yours truly, 

M. MUNRO-HILL, 

Glebe Corner, 

Lockington, 

Driffield, North Humberside. 
December 19. 

Music on trains 

From Mr T.P. Hudson 
Sir, I hope that no one at British 
Rail will take up seriously Carol 
Illingworth's suggestion (Decem- 
ber 18) of performing musicians 
on trains. 

A recent 4'A-hour journey from 
Cordoba to Madrid on Spain’s 
crack train, the Talgo, was spoilt 
for me by orchestra! music, quite 
loud and relentlessly jaunty, 
which was piped through to all 
carriages — and obviously meant 
to be an added “luxury”. The only 
respite came during the showing of 
the film, when the sound track was 
relayed through headphones. 

May British trains long keep the 
relative quietness they have, for 
the benefit of those who want to 
read, to sleep - or even to 
compose letters to The Times. 
Yours etc, 

TIMOTHY HUDSON, 

23 Glenwood Avenue, 

Boenor. Sussex. 



DECEMBER 31 1790 

Them was little to quicken the ' 
pulse on this tost day of the year — ! 

no backward glance at the 
previous 12 months or forecast for : 
the coming deeade; and not muck 
room in a four-page paper for 
anything else beside the 
continuation of a scholarly article 
on the late Lard Chatham and the , 
tedious details of a lawsuit 


that catch the eye. 


WINDSOR. 

DECEMBER 29. 

The King’s hunt on Tuesday last 
afforded amp le amusement for the 
lovers of the chocf- A stag was 
turned out at Two Mile Brook, 
near Sntthsil . soon after eleven; and 
taking for the upper part of 
Buckinghamshire, fed the sports- 
men a severe run through a woody 
country to Beacons field. Here the 
doe headed bade and running over 
the country, gained the Thames 
near Water Oakley, which it 
crossed, bidding defiance to the 
pack, which were not backward in 
a very gallant and vigorous pursuit. 
His Majesty and the horsemen 
were obliged to pass over Maiden- 
head Bridge — His Majesty rode 
with great spirits the whole day, 
and was in at the taking of the deer. 

The Managers of Covent Garden 
Theatre should employ some Con- 
stables to clear the avenues of that 
Theatre from pickpockets, as sev- 
eral persons have had their pockets 
turned inside out, within this week 
in going there. The lobby should 
likewise be well watched, as very 
improper persons axe frequently 
admitted towards the close of the 

play — 

ST ORM IN THE NOR TH. 

The floods and the melting of the 
late snows in this quarter have 
been so rapid, that with a succes- 
sion of heavy Tains, a greater swell 
of tbe waters has been occasioned, 
than can be remembered — From 
12 till two o’clock on Thursday last 
the rain near Leeds fell in torrents, 
with lightning and wind equal to a 
hurricane. The waters rose so 
suddenly that a woman was swim- 
ming about the room in her bed. 
before she knew what was the 
matter! In the lower part of Leeds, 
they were glad to get into the upper 
rooms, ana take their pigs, etc., 
with them — The upper part of tbe 
steeple of St Mary’s, Leicester, 
was blown down, as well as that of 
St Nicholas at Worcester; with 
chimneys, bants, hay-ricks, etc., 
innumerable. Five wrecks are on 
shore between Eastbourne and 


NORTH WALES. 

... It [the storm] has quite 
unroofed the house of a Gentle- 
man. blown the bell which stood in 
his coach-house near 200 yards 
from its place, and very much 
shattered the gable-end of his 
stables, in which were six fine 
coach horses and five hunters ... A 
very firm large hot-house, which-he 
built last summer, is entirely 
levelled with the ground; and the 
gardener, who lives dose to it, has 
suffered very considerably; for 
some bricks, tiles, etc, fell through 
the roof, and through the top of his 
bed, which broke his left arm, and 
bruised one of his thighs. His wife, 
though in bed with him at the time, 
was not in the least hurt. 

On Sunday evening between 
eight and nine o’clock a dispute 
arose in Wapping, between some 
sailors, about the pre-eminence to 
a lass of universal condescension, 
and some very severe blows ensued, 
when tbe victors, to the number of 
six, bore the fair prize off in 
triumph aboard a New York vessel, 
from New York, lying in the river, 
to which they belonged; when, to 
the surprise of the whole crew, in 
about two houra after, they were 
alarmed fry the cries of a new-born 
female infant? Tbe Captain direct- 
ed every assistance to be procured 
for the innocent offspring, and the 
mother; and the Bailors jovially 
joined in affording every accommo- 
dation, and are determined to 
stand sponsors for tbe fair fugitive, 
who is to be christened on board 
the vessel - 

Bang to rights 

From the Editor of Current 
Archaeology 

Sir, Before 1986 fades into obliv- 
ion is there still time to raise ouur 
glasses for a rather important 
anniversary? For 1986 has been 
lhe eleventh centenary of the 
foundation of the City of London 
by King Alfred. There can be no 
doubt about the date — it is 
recorded clearly by no less an 
authority than the Anglo-Saxon 
Chronicle. However, everybody 
has ignored the porn’ old /4-5 1 
Chronicle in the past on the 
grounds that the Roman city had 
never been abandoned and could 
not therefore be “founded”. 

However, recent archaeological 
research has shown that we were 
all wrong: the old Roman city was 
abandoned and a new undefended 
settlement (or “wick”, from the 
Latin virus) was set up to the west, 
along tbe Strand, in what is today 
the West End. What happened in 
886, therefore, was that Alfred, 
having recently recaptured this 
settlement from the Danes, de- 
cided to move hack within the old 
Roman walls. The abandoned site 
then became known as the Old 
Wick, or Aldwych. 

It is time, therefore, to take the 
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle seriously. 
Hurrah for Alfred! Could we not, 
belatedly, in this year of the Big 
Bang, raise our glasses to him and 
the rather bigger bang of 11 
centuries ago when the City of 
London was founded? 

Yours nostalgically, 

ANDREW SELKIRK, Editor, 
Current Archaeology. 

9 Nasxinirfnn Road. NW3. 


i 


I 


14 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


</ 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


OBITUARY 


THE EARL OF STOCKTON 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

SANDRINGHAM 
December 30: The Queen was 
represented by the Lord Hes- 
keth (lord in Waiting) at for 
Funeral of Sir Gilbert Laith- 
waite (formerly High Conunisr- 

sSoner in Karachi) which was 
held in Westminster Cathedral 
this morning. 

A memorial service for Sir 
Henry Osmond-Oarfce will be 
held at St Clement Danes, 
Strand, at noon on Wednesday, 
January 7, 1987. 

Tbe infant daughter of Viscount 
and Viscountess Gamock was 


christened Frances Mary by the 
Rev David Reid at Kifconquhar 
Parish Church On Monday, 
December IS. The godparents 
are Baron St Clair Bdnde, Mr 
Charles Ian Wotrige-Gordon, 
Mrs James Lonsdale. Mrs Jef- 
frey Green and Miss Carol 
Maytag. 


Intellectual statesman who achieved mastery in his day 


The Earl of Stockton, 
who as Mr 


Earl of Stockton 

The private funeral service for 
The Eari ofSlockton win be bdd 
at the church of St Giles, 
Homed Keynes, West Sussex, 
at noon on Monday, January 5. 
Details of a memorial service 
will be announced later. Flowers 
may be sent to Kenyon Limited, 
74 Rochester Row, London 
SW1, for the church. 


Forces’ promotions 


. R A Batter: M 
Crawford: N G 
A Wyatt: P N 


Gom- 


Royal Navy 

The provisional Royal Navy 
and Royal Marines selections 
for promotion to date December 
31, 1986 are confirmed 
Tbe provisional Royal Navy 
and Royal Marines selections 
for promotion to date June 30. 
1987. 

General List 

Seaman 

Commander lo Captain: M J Sant: B J 
Adams T S Taylor CKD Coblev: T 
L M StuUer J H S McAnafly: C W 
Roddta: M L Ladd: A G McEwexu M A 
Johnson: G M F Uwno. 

Lieutenant Commander to GDRh 
ni»dtn M J PrMMr. A J K NlctioB: 
O J D Adand: J W Parker: CMS 
Cotfaer MA: O P Baudain* R J 
AkKiy; C W Waite: AM wnimett : W 
N P Batlto: MOP Sam borne: M R 
Swales: j w t Wr+gftt: i C Webb: J P 
K Rookn D J FHMSd: H G B Slade: G R 
^Joh nson: P A Lewis: H B DagUati; T P 

awh utiUw 
Commander k> Captatn: 

L D Kendrlcfc CM C C 
W de Brunner: P J A 
Galloway: D H C 
Lieuienam Commander 
manden 
M Den 

Wefclr _ _ 

L Sooner: S W HowKk: J W R Grant: 
J B BfniK A J Norton: A J Hunt: G M 
Fair hunt: R F CneadK: W K Rkflor; B 
i? Eastley: T C CMBende ri : E L 
WamctL 

and Secretariat 

mder to Captain: A E 

Lieutenant Commander to _ 
mander: P S Eagtestane: A 
Hamilton: M A Barge: W J 
peimeratfMR R J Aytard. 

instructor 

Commander lo Captain: MJR Nestor. 
Lieutenant commander lo Onn- 
ntander: T A Soiree A E Miwn: 1 
Edwards: L P BnMMNk: C 8 H 
Stevenson. 

Medical and Dental 
Medical Branch 

Commander to Sts^eoa 
___ M a Macteod: A R Marsh. 
Surgeon Lieutenant Commander to 
Surgeon Com man der: I C Grant C J 
Kalman: N S Sevan: A E J Hodges. 

Dental Branch 

surgeon Commander <D1 to Surgeon 
c aptain ten - I: E J Orant 
Surgeon Lieutenant Commander fD) 
to Surgeon Commander (D> - a D L 
Thomas: M J Lovett. 

Royal Maitoes 

Lieutenant CatonsS to Colonel - 3: M 
H H Evans: l M Walden: R c van der 
Herat. 

Major lo Lieutenant Cotanel - 4: R 
Turner: DAS Rennetather: B L 
carter; c J O wtUsDHe. 
captain lo Malar -4:JR Wilson: R M 
Bundle: R P W Wttuy: R A Fry. 

Tbe Array 

The Ministry of Defence an- 
nounces the following Array 
promotions, all effective from 
June 30. 1986. 

Colonel to Brigadier 

E H Barker: W J Billies: A H Boyle: D 
ROauuDmM R I Constantine: SD 
A Firth: J C M Gordon: B D Goose K J 
Hamaway: M a Hearn, NCR 
Hepworth: G S Hollands: G Hyde: A 
ktnvte W A Le Blanc -Smi Be M T A 
Lord: S W st J Lytle: C J D Nftsdi: J J 
j Phipps: R F Powell; D H D Setwood: 

R A Smith: D P Thomson: C B Q 
Wallace: P E Woolley. 

Ueutenant-Colonel to Colonel 
R F Saw: M F Brcn u t d ge: G BuBodn 
A E Cornicle A E F Cowan; D L De 
Beatdeu: A J Dobson: B H Dutton: D C 
J Goodban; H O Husb-Smith: A R 
Jones: CMS Kaye: C A Less: P S H 
Lefeyer: C J Marctiant-Smffii: R D 
Nicholas: P D Penurew: C J Pickup: e 
D PoweH-Jones: E C TalL DAB 
Wfflkains: A G Wltlterkige: T B 
Wright: M J Woodcock- 

Malor lo Lieutenant Colonel 
Royal Armoured Corps 
M R Butler: D A H Stevwrtght J M 
Templar: N J Tuck. 

Royal Pegte mn a of ArtUlery 
FAB Cement: B J Falrman: S P 
Harris: T M Lyons: J R M POL R J M 
Stewart: TOG Stoke: MCSWrtgm. 
Corps or Royal Engineers 
R C Morgan: R J A Paterson-Fox. 
Royal Corps of Signals 
I C Shifter: A M Wallace 

infantry 

The Guards Dtvtsion: 

Breakwell: J J Cargtfl. 

The Scottish Division: J C Finlay: A P 
Grani-Penrkbi. 


q Mac C A Smart: J Morris: D G 
Hai ilngtuiL K E J Mcnktiouse: P D 
dark: D R French: S A Jones. WRAF. 

General Duties 


Vino Ci 
K McK'i 


Nunn: 

J St an 
L Jarron: 


to Craw Captain 

fro: R Kidney: B J Mather: G L 
E Dumam: J D LimE B E 
A W Drew. JDL Feexy. A 


J Stables: A McKay: JKWJIIas T E 
D G Hawkins. 

Leader to Wing Coro- 


Squadron 
mander 

A H Jones E P KendaH: R M 
TTowun: K F G E Ifflte: M A Gaynor: 
B Rutledge: R J wank N J Hughes: A 
M Carter: J R Oaten: J C W Marshal: 
G P Smith: R C Moore: M J Bfijtsy: P 
A Smith: A J Mawts W A B Roberts: 
M S Hoimes N C RmUng: S J Gosling: 
D T Calvert: J H Easton: S G GrtBUhs: 
D H MUne-SmUh: J Meehan: M d 
T ones M R Trace: R D rveaon; t g 
H anlon: W Metcalfe: 1 M Hcaky; B M 
Cottanu J L Buckler: AM Martin: ' 


Montgomery; 
Hudson: D M 


, JKAC 

G A Miner; N c L 
Barr: B G McLaren. 


Flight Lieutenant to Sanadnm Leader 
T w Spittles R E Byfteid: K MeK Rea: 


PWalfis D H Humnhl.'’ S-Evsm: G T 
Smith: J T Gamer: W F M withers: R 
C Smith: J B Dodd: M J Hunt: J A 
Close: P J Compton: R Irving: S W 
Odes: G L Reekie: D A C Lemare: R S 
Dixon; j Dungate: R B Font: N May: 
G A MootkMW Brown; C saner P 
s Smttfu J D BabMngtocu P Bayer: G 
H LMbetter D P Calvert K Siuttc R 
L King: J J McNed: P W Grice R 
BnlK-y: j D Cunntmduun: H C 
Burgoyne T P MaraH-J R_M Prince I A 
Maxwell. R A Keedi: R D Hamer: N B 

Randall; S J Wood: S H Bedford: N R 

Jaggen I B Walker; J Tbraen P R 
Beard: P J Coffins; S J R PartUfc w j 
Bint C M Rowley: B J Baton: D R 
Hammond: A J Barrett G M Vhjey; R 
TAttken: D A Wusotu N IPAyresTc M 
Stags E G Jones H Stewart P A 
Davies; D W Knowles T L Boyle: MC 
Barter: P R Cockman: F B Prescott P 
H Budd: A G wafton: S D Button D R 
fldsor® J A Cooke: P D Ugg A D 
PuIfonL F D Ryall. 

General Dubes (Ground} Branch 
Wing Commander to Croup Captain 
P J P Hutchings. 

Flight Lieutenant to Squadron Leader 
K P Dafley; R B Handy: D J Burchett; 
I W Holt D J Botcher: C IM Chothta: R 
l Tattoo: j C w Bi o ught on : j G S 
Laker: R N Williams: K p ShenHey: l 
A B WUson: j s La w: ,Q dough; D H 
HfcMtnbottom; M S Dzhiba: M A Best 
b RPtckthaH: I Gault N WUHams A 
O C oi m ar tyr a P KnUl: B P Gregson. 


Photographic interpreMon 

Wing Commander to Group Captain. 


Wing Com- 


Boarwrlgtrt. 

Squadron Leader lo 
mander: N J Pearson. 

Fktfil Lieutenant to Squadron Leader: 
MR Hauam. 

Eng in eer Branch 
Wing Commander to Group Captain 
R J Gartlcfc K G Bennett; C R BaSTs 
G Dm Drury. S E Clark. 

Squadron Leader to wing Com- 
ntander 

T A Sailer D L wintanw: P M Font B 
M Mcfntee; R H Grtfflths J W 
Stewart P W Giles D W PedrtCLCC 
R own tree: D C Hyde; B A Jones J J 
W Mcdarty: J Turner: C J Hockley: P 
D Cults; M S Taylor: J C Wild man: M 
Davies L M Down: M J ScaMtng. 

Fbgtri Lieutenant to Squadron Leader 
N J B Craddock; P C GarrtU: P J 
BonsaB: R L Denham: M Scothem: P 
Jewkes E Connolly. J R Motley: F J 
Clarke: G B Jones J Martin: E R 
Wyes; S J Colbourne: S R Daniels W 
T D Pearce: M E McIntyre: B G A 
Foster P G Humphrey. A J Howem k 
L Wtclu F H K Farquharson: L J T 
Hendry: I D Matthews G Bronnutg; C 
M Wiritamson: S M Phdps. P N Amey: 
G N Adamson: R P Smith: j McHale: 
R D Rackharn: J Bsont M A Barken 
A N Caffefl; S J Taylor R N Jones: A 
Deytrtkh: R Watson: P J Gow: C J 
POtler M R Jenkins CR Edwards N 
J E Kurth: B A Moore: R G Torrens A 
L Wilson: P Q Barnard: E A Brown; E 
W Madge. 

JPrtV LBranCh 

I Commander lo Group Captain 
Griffiths N W Buchanan. 
Squadron Leader to Wing Com- 
mander 

M S OUver G S Harrison: D C 
gurnard: G Morion; C CRbk C H J 

Fltaht Lleutenaid to Souadron Leader 
P H Steiner T D Gould: S Oakley: D 
Parr L A Mbaoo; A MacBeatt K P 
tnaR: A J Mason: S L Walker 
I AFT. P M Kins T Kerr M 
B M KellettC R Markey: S F 


Off 

N M i 


Hcwat A 


Count: A S Glng^: P D Britton: "CJ 9 


R Markers 
■BbtUuh^M 

Davenport: 


H F 


O R St J 


The Queen's Division: G B M Carter. 
The King's Division: E J Downhanu P 
C C TTousdalt T C E Vines. 

The Prince of Wales's Dlvteton: J H C 
Brown: D A C Hannah: P D Harry: R 


J Lem. 

The Light Division; T 
Hearn. 

The 


Harris S C 


of Gurkhas D H M 

8S® A c J gESA ummM; A 

The Parachute Regiment J H 
Qrcsland. _ _ 

Army Air Corps Lord CasUe mat n: N 
S C HalL c S SOsun; p L W Wood. 

Royal Corps of Transport- B C Neeves. 
Coro* of Royal Electrical and 
Mechanical Engineers R D Plan. 
Cot«s of Royal Military Police: D W 
Wonson. 

Royal Pioneer Corps G R Cooper. 
Women's Royal Army Corps M J 
Rook. 

Royal Air Force 

The Ministry of Defence an- 
nounces the following RAF 
promotions, all effective from 
January 1. 1987. 

Air Rank Promotions 
Air Marshal to Air Chief Marshal 
Sir David Harrourt-Smtth: Sir Joseph 
Gilbert. 

ait Commodore lo Air Vtee-Marcbal 
D B Leech: T H Skmrr A L Roberts 
R A F Wilson: C J Thomson. 

Croup Captain to Air Commodore 
ACOxrry: DJHIne: PDLGover: P 


Administrative Branch 
Wing Commander to Group Captain 
K if Minton: M L Jackson. 
Squadron Leader to Wing Corn- 
man der 

M E Wadtey. W J Bevan ; W W 
Wright: R w Kermeen: J I Cason: D R 
Phillips: P J Howard: M J SfflHh: D O 
W Wallace M H Codd: R K Littlejohn: 
G P Canon: J G R James: O D L 
Detany. 

Flight Lieutenant to Souadron Leader 
T 5 Robson: P Rooney: W F King: D 
Devlin: C J Browning wrap, m r 
M acKenzte: D B Dunsmulr: M B 
Fran (cling: B C Oebenham: I R 
Macrae; A Clark: A Godfrey: C S 
Davhbon: B A Chown: T S Moore: A 
F Cat fril WRAF: D J Hayward: D 

^S&= r l m c'SSS2S:^^S^ 


WRAF: C Allen: . , 

WRAF: D W Benfleki: A Hastings: C 
Cordery. p Broekhutzen: R L Jones: T 
j Bacon: S P Howard: K J Harden. 

Security Branch 
Wing Commander lo Group 
T T Wallis T W Godfrey. 

Squadron Leader to Wing Com- 
mander. A V SchofHkt: M C val- 
entine: R McConnell; M T McGmty. 
Flight Lieutenant lo Squadron Leader 
I A McPhee: A D Wcavil: M K Parker. 
G J P Moore: K J h Morris. 

Dental Branch 
Wing Commander to Group Captain: 
R J Lane. 

Medical Secretarial Branch 
Souadron Leader to Wing 
mander: C Hawke. 

Flight Lieutenant lo Squadron 
K W Pudney: R J 
Woods. 


T L 


branch 

. Commander to Group Captain: 
Jones. 


Birthdays today 

Mr Douglas Anthony, CH, 57; 
Mr Glanvill Berm, 81; Mr 
Michael Bonallack, 52; Sir 
George Christie. 52; Mr Stephen 
Cleobury. 38; Air Marshal Sir 
Patrick Dunn. 74; Major-Gen- 
eral J. D. Frost, 74; Mr Jack 
Hargreaves. 75; Mr Anthony 
Hopkins, 49; Mr Ben Kingsley, 
43; Mr E. B. Mackay. 64; Mr 
Peter May, 57; Mr Nathan 
Milsteto, 82; Dr Valerie Pearl, 
60; M Jean-Pierre Rives, 34; Sir 
Joshua Rowley, 66; Sir John 
Sainty. 52; tbe Eari of Strath- 
more, 58. 


Dinner 


Maceabeaas 
The annual Chanukah dinner of 
die Maccabaeans was held at the 
King David Suite last night and 
Sir Immanuel Jakobovits, Chief 
Rabbi, was the guest of honour. 
Sir Alan Marie, president, was 
in the chair and Mr Ian 
Gaiosford also spoke. 


OM, who as Mr Harold 
Macmillan was Prime M inis - 
ter from 1957 to 1963, died on 
December 29 atthe age of 92, 
He was one of the outstanding 
political figures of his time, 
and a person of unusual 
interest and complexity. 

The air of nonchalance that 
be cultivated in his later years 
concealed an intensely ner- 
vous temperament, and the 
impersonation of a traditional 
English grandee that be per- 
fected in middle age belied the 
feci that he was, essentially, a 
Scottish bourgeois with the 
appropriate qualities of canni- 
ness, toughness and addiction 
to hard work: a feet of which 
he was himself well aware, and 
justly proud. 

He was the first leader of the 
Conservative Party since Bal- 
four who could property be 
described as an intellectual, 
and he showed, during his 
years of power, a capacity for 
Balfourian deviousness which 
surpassed that of his rival and 
victim, R. A. Butler, without 
being so apparent 
As a young MP he was 
regarded as unduly earnest 
and rather a bone. Yet he 
emerged from bis proconsular 
reign in North Africa and Italy 
with a reputation for worldly 
wisdom and sophisticated wit 
that the passage of time served 
only to enhanoe. He also 
emerged with a more ruthless 
ambition and a determination 
to beat at their own game tbe 
sort of people who, before the 
war, had despised and humili- 
ated him. 

During the brief Eden pre- 
miership he was in turn 
Foreign Secretary and Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer. He 
was well qualified for both 
posts, but in neither had time 
to achieve major results. In 
the Suez crisis his role was 
erratic, not to say equivocal; 
but when Eden resigned in 
January 1957 he nevertheless 
‘won the succession, through 
the obscure backstage machi- 
nations that then governed the 
choice of Conservative lead- 
ers. It was probably for the 
best that he was chosen, 
though the methods were 
dubious and many at the time 
preferred him for the wrong 
reasons. 

As Prime Minister he was 
able to restore unity, morale 
and self-respect not only to his 
party, but to the country as 
welL After winning a decisive 
electoral vistory in 1959 he 
quickened the pace of with- 
drawal from Empire, and 
began the process of orientat- 
ing Britain towards Continen- 
tal Europe. But his realism in 
deciding on this course of 
policy was flawed by an 
unrealistic hankering after tbe 
kind of Anglo-American rela- 
tionship that Churchill had 
sought in vain to re-establish 
in the post-war world. The 
result was de Gaulle's veto in 
1963, which more than any- 
thing else undermined 
Macmillan's prestige and 
authority. 

At home there was for more 
merit in his conduct of affairs 
than it has recently been 
fashionable to admit, though 
he suffered at the time, and 
continued to suffer, from the 
remark almost invariably mis- 
quoted as “you've never had it 
so good.” The impression of 
materialism and cynicism that 
the incorrect version of this 
remark has served to create is 
largely, though not perhaps 
wholly, false. On some issues 
it must be said that Macmillan 
as Prime Minister did tend to 
take soft options and short 
views. 

Just as Baldwin was the first 
British leader to make effect- 
ive use of sound broadcasting, 
so Macmillan was the first 
fully to exploit the medium of 
television, as he gradually 
adapted his style from the 
orotund to the conversational 
In the House of Commons, 
too, he achieved something 
like mastery at the height of ' 
his premiership, though per- 
haps the greatest Parliamenta- 
ry triumphs of his life were 
scored a quarter of a century 
later when, as a frail old man, 
speaking without notes and 
leaning on a silver-headed 
, he held the House of 


From 1919 to 1920 he was 
ADC to the ninth Duke of 
Devonshire, then Governor- 
General of Canada. While in 
Ottawa, he became engaged to 
the Duke's third daughter. 
Lady Dorothy Cavendish, to 
whom he W3S married at St 
Margaret's, Westminster, in 
April 1920. The marriage was 
not all plain sailing, but it held 
firm and was a source of 
strergth to him, particularly 
when he was Prime Minister. 

. He retired from the Army in 
1920 and went into the family 
business. Three years later he 
began his political career. At 
the general election of 1923 he 
was the unsuccessful Conser- 
vative candidate for Stockton- 
on-Tees. But the following 
year he was elected for it and, 
tho ugh defeated in 1929, re- 
gained it in 1931. He then held 
it until 1945. 

He soon became known asa 
thoughtful and independent 
backbencher, though he was 

also regarded by his fellow 
Conservatives as too earnest. 
Because of bis rebelliousness 
on key issues, domestic and 
foreign, he had to wait until 
1940 to receive office, while 
other young men of his gener- 
ation were promoted. 

Representing Stockton dur- 
ing the Depression gave pith 
and point to his convictions as 
a Tory social reformer. In 
1 933 he published Reconstruc- 
tion: A Plea for a National 
Policy, a book notable for a 
Conservative in those days in 
that it advocated economic 
planning. 

This theme was further 
developed in a sequel The 
Middle Way (1938), in which 
he advocated a wide extension 
of soda! enterprise and credit, 
while insisting that outside the 
range of minimum hu man 
needs, which were to be 
secured by a minimum wags, 
there should be a deliberate 
preservation of private 
enterprise. 

He renounced the whip in 
the summer of 1936 in protest 
against Baldwin's policy to- 
wards Abyssinia and, though 
he took it bade a year later 
under Chamberlain, he re- 
mained a bitter and consistent 
opponent of Appeasement 
He supported A. D. Lind- 
say, the Master of Balliol 
against the official Conserva- 
tive candidate, Quintm Hogg 
(now Lord Haflsfaam of St 
Marylebone), in the celebrated 
Oxford by-election of 1938. 
He became during these years 
a member of the “Churchill 
group." 

In the early months of the 
war, he became increasingly 
disenchanted with what be 
consdered to be its spineless 
conduct by the Chamberlain 
Government. When Russia 
invaded Roland he joined 
Leo Amery's committee 
formed to help the Finns, and 
after the collapse of that 
country’s resistance attacked 
Chamberlain in a speech in 
the House. Later, in the debate 
of May 7 mid 8 on the 
Norwegian campaign, be was 
one of the thirty Conserva- 
tives who voted against the 
Government, inflicting a mor- 
al blow that helped to precipi- 
tate its fall and to bring 
Churchill to die premiership. 

When the Churchill coali- 
tion was formed Macmillan 
was offered only the modest 
office of Parliamentary Secre- 
tary to the Ministry ofSupply, 
but at least he was able to put 
into practice ideas about plan- 
ning which he had been 
formulating since he entered 
politics. In June 1942 he was 
appointed Under-Secretary at 
tbe Colonial Office - another 
rather humble position, in 
view of his record. He felt 
considerable disaffection at 
this time. 

But in November of that 
year the decisive break 
occured. when be was ap- 
pointed Minister Resident in 
iers after two others bad 
the post. Macmillan 



mg 


Appointment 

Mr Nicholas Addison Phillips, 
QC, to be a Justice of the High 
Court in tbe Queens’s Bench 
Division. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr 8J. Anthony 
and Miss R.C. Tankard 
The engagement is announced 
between Roderick James, only 
son of Mr and Mrs J.H. An- 
thony, of Combe Martin, North 
Devon, and Rachel Clare, youn- 
ger daughter of Mr and Mrs K. 
Tankard, of Gamston. near 
Retford, Nottinghamshire. 

Mr R.G. Chambers 
and Mbs CB. Johnson 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert second son of 
Mr and Mrs P.B. Chambers, of 
Rushford Hall Norfolk, and 
Belinda, only daughter of Mr 
and Mis R.D. Johnson, of 
Holmcroft, Bassingboura, Hert- 
fordshire. 

Mr N-H. Freeman 
and Miss HjC. Marriott 
The engagement is announced 
between Nigel elder son of Dr 
and Mrs G.H. Freeman, of 
Wellesboume. Warwickshire, 
and Helen, twin daughter of Mr 
and Mrs R. Marriott, of 
Clevedon, Somerset. 


Mr V J. Jerrard 
and Mira LA. Lee 
The engagement is announced 
between Vincent John, only son 
of Mr and Mis DJ. Jerrard, of 
Heme! Hempstead, Hertford- 
shire. and Elizabeth Anne, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs M.P. 
Lee. of Morys. Great Cox well 
Faringdon, Oxfordshire. 

Mr J.CJR. Kittow 
and Miss DJ. Lnppriaa 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan Charles 
Rosewarne, elder son of the late 
Mr J.A.F. Kiuow and Mrs P.A. 
Kittow. of Broad hem pston, 
Devon, and Deborah Janet, 
second daughter of Dr and Mrs 
Keith Lupprian, of Exeter, 
Devon. 

Marriage 

Mr A.M. Sharkey 
and Miss A.T. Gorst 
The marriage took place on 
Christmas Eve in Edinburgh, 
between Mr Andrew Sharkey 
and Miss Teresa Gorst. 


cane, ne 
Lords spellbound. 

Maurice Harold Macmillan 
was bom on February 10, 
1 894. the third son of Maurice 
Crawford Macmillan, a direc- 
tor of the publishers Macmil- 
lan and Company, which had 
been founded by Harold 
Macmillan's grandfather. His. 
mother was an American, 
Helen Hill, nee Belles. 

He was educated at Eton 
where, like Orwell and Keynes 
- the two other Old Etonians 
this century of unquestionably 
firet-raie stature - he was a 
Colleger. He then went to 
Balliol College. Oxford, where 
he took first class honours in 
Classical Moderations, the 
war intervening before he 
could sit his finals. In the 
autumn of 1914 he joined the 
King's Royal Rifle Corps, but 
in March the following year 
was gazetted to the Special 
Reserve Battalion of the Gren- 
adier Guards. 

He saw action in France and 
was wounded three limes, on 
one occasion being rescued 
from a shell hole in no-man's 
land by his sergeant. That was 
in 1916. He did not finally 
leave hospital until after the 
armistice, and his wound give 
him pain, and a shuffling 
walk, tor the' rest of his life. 


re 

suspected that it would be a 
“political Siberia,** but in fact 
it was the turning point of bis 
career. For the first time he 
had independent power, and 
could display his administra- 
tive gifts and his flair for 
negotiation. 

French North Africa had 
become an American sphere 
of influence, with General 
Eisenhower as Supreme Com- 
mander. To Richard 
Cross man Macmillan made 
tbe much-quoted remark; 
“We, my dear Crossman, are 
Greeks in the Roman empire. 
We must run the Allied Forces 
HQ as Greek skives ran the 
operations of the Emperor 
Claudius.” 

Macmillan was also inti- 
mately concerned with the 
French. It was his task to 
promote unity among the 
French themselves, and be- 
tween them and the “Anglo- 
Saxons.” On the whole, he was 
quite successful, assisted by a 
fluent command of Frendi. 
although, unfortunately for 
the future, he did not establish 
anything like as close an 
understanding with de Gaulle 
as he did with Eisenhower. 

When the long-delayed Ital- 
ian armistice was signed, Mac- 
millan was appointed head of 
the Allied Commission and 
Minister Resident in Naples. 
In December 1943 he became 
Minister Resident for the 
Central Mediterranean. 

In November of the follow- 
ing year he became head of the 
Allied Commission in Italy 
with responsibility for assist- 


Italian reconstruction. 
Moreover his responsibility 
stretched beyond Italy, em- 
bracing Greece, Yugoslavia, 
Lebanon and Syria. 

He played a leading part in 
handling the civil war that 
followed the liberation of 
Greece. He ordered British 
troops to “neutralize” the 
Qnmmnnist guerrillas, advo- 
cated the regency of Archbish- 
op Damaskinos, and oversaw 
the peace conference at 
Vaiidssa. 

Near the end of his time in 
Italy, after VE Day, he visited 
a British Corps HQ at Klagen- 
furt in South Austria, and 
evidently sanctioned the 
forced repatriation of several 
thousand Cossacks who were 
not Soviet citizens, as well as 
many thousands of anti-Tito 
Yugoslavs. This act of Realpo- 
lutk, possibly understandable 
in the circumstances of the 
time, returned to haunt him at 
the end of his life. And he did 
not then improve his reput- 
ation by either refusing to 
discuss the matter at aft, of 
discussing it disingenuously. 

In the Conservative Care- 
taker Government formed in 
May 1945, he was Secretary of 
State for Air. But two months 
later he lost both the office and 
his seat at Stockton in the 
general election which 
brought Labour to power in a 
landslide. (He had tried to 
transfer from Stockton to the 
safe seat of St George's, West- 
minster, but was told by the 
Party managers that be must 
fight at Stockton, since he had 
the best chance of holding the 
seat.) 

In November 1945 he re- 
turned to Parliament at a by- 
election as MP for Bromley, 
tbe seat that he bdd for the 
rest of his time in the Com- 
mons. During the years of 
opposition, 1945-51, he was 
one of the major spokesmen 
for his Party, both in Parlia- 
ment and in die country. 

The Conservative Govern- 
ment that returned to office 
after the 1951 election was 
pledged to build 300,000 
houses a year, and Macmillan 
was given the job of redeem- 
ing the pledge. He did so, 
thereby greatly adding to his 
popular standing. 

He was promoted Minister 
of Defence in October 1954, 
but was one of a succession of 
men who held this post for too 
short a time to be able to 
achieve much. 

At this time the retirement 
of Churchill from the premier- 
ship seemed overdue, but the 
old man, despite his failing 
powers, was reluctant to go. 
Macmillan (whom Churchill 
had called “the captain of my 
praetorian guard”) alone 
among his friends had the 
courage to give him the unwel- 
come advice that he ought to 
leave. 

When Eden succeeded to 
the premiership in April 1955, 
he appointed Macmillan For- 
eign Secretary. At first it 
seemed that he was ideally 
suited to the job. But to be 
Eden's Foreign Secretary was 
no easy task for a man of 
Macmillan's experience, and 
the two men did not love each 
other. 

Hie summit conference in 
Geneva in July 1955 encour- 
aged premature hopes of a 
settlement with the Soviet 
Union. It was left to the 
foreign ministers to discover 
in a wearying, fruitless, de- 
tailed negotiation that the 
agreements in principle on the 
problems of European sec- 
urity and German unification 
could not yield a solution in 
practice. 

In December of that year 
Macmillan was transferred to 
the Treasury, but as Chancel- 
lor his career was also too 
short for any clear-cut judge- 


with the economic 
consequences- 
It will however, always 
seem very odd that, with hjs 
knowledge of tbe Americans, 
and of Eisenhower in particu- 
lar, he failed to make a correct 
assessment of the American 
attitude when he visited the 
United Slates shortly before 
the Government’s disastrous 
decisions were taken. 

Nevertheless, the crisis ted 
the effect of bringing him to 
the top. Within a lew weeks of 
his 63rd birthday, he succeed- 
ed to the premiership on the 
resignation of Eden. 

Tbe effective choice was 
between him and R. A. Butler, 
and there seems little doubt 
that Macmfflan was preferred 
both by tbe Cabinet aid by the 
parliamentary party. He was 
elected Party trader on Janu- 
ary 22, 1957, and, in a buoyant 
mood, be embarked upon the 
task of restoring confidence. 
He began his policy of adjust- 
ment to the realities of dimin- 
ished power, using a technique 
which he himself later admit- 
ted to be a “very common 
method.” that of doing one 
thing while saying that one is 
doing another. 

In the early months of his 
leadership, with a backbench 
revolt over his advice to 
British shipowners not to 
refrain from using the Suez 
Canal and some unpopular 
austerity measures, be ap- 
peared to be making little 
impact on public opinion. But 
when, in January 1958, on the 
eve of his departure on a 
Commonwealth tour, he was 
faced with the resignation of 
his entire Treasury team led 
by the Chancellor, Peter (now 
Lord) Thorneycroft, because 
of a difference over the level of 
Government expenditure, he 
described this as "a little local 
difficulty a piece ofbravado 
which did much to enhance 
. his stature. 

He had also shown his 
independence of the Conser- 
vative right, and of the Party's 
traditionalists, when he allow- 
ed Lord Salisbury to resign in 
protest against the release of 
Archbishop Makarios, whom 
Eden had incarcerated m the 
Seychelles. This led later, after 
much travail to a settlement 
of sorts in Cyprus. 

In the early phase of his 
premiership he took, however, 
one very bad decision in the 
search lor popularity. Instead 
of ending compulsory military 
service while retaining the 
principle of compulsory Na- 
tional Service, with a variety 
of options, he abolished Na- 
tional Service outrighL 
In February 1959 he and tire 
Foreign Secretary visited the 
Soviet Union. At first, they 
were well received, but later 
Khrushchev discovered that 
be was “suffering from 
toothache” and the success of 
the visit seemed in doubt. But 
he deckled to recover, and in 
the discussions that followed 
the Russians agreed to a 
foreign ministers' conference. 

While this visit was one of 
limited diplomatic value, it 
further consolidated 
Macmillan's standing at 
home. It was at this time that 
the nickname “Supcrmac,” 
coined by the cartoonist 
Vicky, passed into currency. 

In August 1959 Macmillan 
welcomed President Eisen- 
hower to Britain. The Prime 
Minister had restored rela- 
tions between Britain and 
America, profoundly dam- 
aged by Suez. He and Eisen- 
hower appeared together on 
television, a broadcast more 
valuable to Macmillan than 


the Central African 
Federation. 

He left in January 1960 fora 
tour of Africa that took him 
through Ghana, Nigeria, Rho- 
desia. Nyasaland and South 
Africa. On February 3 he 
addressed both Houses of the 
South African Parliament and 
told them with courteous 
frankness what was the atti- 
tude of the United Kingdom 
to the Union's racial policies. 

“The wind of change is 
blowing through the conti- 
nent whether we like it or not 
this growth of national con- 
sciousness is a political fact 
We must accept it as a fact 
Our national policies must 
take account of it” 

Meanwhile be had been 
elected Chancellor of his old 
university of Oxford, after a 
diverting spell of academic 
electioneering. He proved an 
outs tanding ly good Chancel- 
lor- 

In Europe, the prospects for 
the Great-Power summit in 
Paris were not improved by 
the **U2 incident," the shoot- 
ing down over Soviet territory 
of an American photo-recon- 
naissance aircraft At the time, 
Macmillan had no idea that 
Khrushchev would refuse to 
take part in the negotiations. 

After the breakdown of the 
summit, Macmillan began to 
rake a closer interest in the 
possibility of Britain's joining 
tbe Common Market He had 
been in general terms a 
“European” and had certainly 
shown more sympathy to- 
wards European unity than 
either Churchill or Eden. Bui 
like Churchill he also had 
hankerings after an Anglo- 
American special relationship, 
which tended to confuse his 
thinking. 

In his approach to the 
Common Market he moved 
with great caution. The Cabi- 
net contained several who had 
doubts, and the party could 
only be brought to accept tbe 
implications of entry by the 
most tactful persuasion. 

He went to Washington 
where he found President 
Kennedy strongly in favour of 
British entry. Soon afterwards, 
Edward Heath recommended 
full membership in a Com- 
mons speech, and three emis- 
saries were sent to 
Commonwealth capitals to 
reassure those countries. 

At the end of July 1961 
Macmillan made the formal 
announcement to Parliament, 
stressing Britain's place in the 
vanguard of the movement 
towards the greater unity of 
the free world. In the division, 
twenty Tories abstained and 
one voted against, but Mac- 
millan triumphed. In the au- 
tumn, negotiations began at 
Brussels under Mr Heath's 
leadership. 

Macmillan was well ahead 
of public opinion. His Cabinet 
was still divided and Mr 
Heath was handicapped at 
Brussels by havin| to proceed 


at the speed of its most 
doubting member. Progress 
was slow, and it was not until 
the following summer that Mr 
Heath was able to make 
ground. 

In September 1962 the 
Commonwealth prime minis- 
ters met in London. This was 
an important meeting, for 
opposition to British entry 
was strongly expressed in 
Canada, Australia and New 
Zealand. It was a stormy 
meeting. Nevertheless, in the 
communique the Common- 
wealth freely acknowledged 
that Britain had tried to 
safeguard Commonwealth 
interests. 

It had long been clear that 
the French attitude towards 
Britain's entry would be of 
decisive importance. In 1961 
Couve de Murvilie had been 
encouraging, but as the negoti- 
ations proceeded, so the 
French attitude became 
equivocal 

In June 1962 Macmillan 
bad visited de Gaulle at the 
Chateau de Champs and had 
come away confident of suc- 
cess. Nevertheless, tbe negoti- 
ations at Brussels took on 
increasingly the aspect of 
Britain and the “Five” against 
France. 

Macmillan’s persuading 
President Kennedy at Nassau 
to substitute Polaris for 
Skybolt, thus preserving 
Britain's independent deter- 
rent only exacerbated the 
problem in the eyes of de 
Gaulle, who disapproved of 
the growing integration of 
British nuclear power with 
that of America, and would 
have preferred a joint Europe- 
an force. This, more than 
anything, precipitated the 
veto with which de Gaulle 
ended the Brussels negotia- 
tions on January 14. 1963. 

The breakdown of the nego- 
tiations was a disaster for 
Macmillan. At a blow, the 


pause which was more gener- 
ally unpopular- , . 

Several bv -election defeats 
in the firsi half of 1962. 
particularly the one at Orping- 
ton. led to what seemed to be a 
major loss of nerve bv Mac- 
millan. With a further humili- 
ation for the Government at 
Leicester predicted by Conser- 
vative Central Office for the 
July by-election there. Mac- 
millan embarked on his dras- 
tic cabinet surgery in the 
notorious “Night of the Long- 
Knives” of Friday. July 1 3- 

At a stroke, seven cabinet 
ministers were purged. These 
events had a traumatic effect 
on the Party but more impor- 
tant: they implied that 
Macmillan's sangfroid had de- 
serted him. 

In September 1962 VassaU, 
a minor civil servant, was 
arrested and convicted of ' 
spying for the Soviet Union. 

The resignation of Lord 
Carrington, First Lord of foe 
Admiralty, was called for in 
the Commons; Mr Thomas 
Galbraith, Civil Lord of the 
Admiralty, in whose office 
Vassall bad been employed, 
became foe victim of a cam- 
paign of innuendo; and, fol- 
lowing the publication of 
letters that he and his wife had 
exchanged with Vassal!, Gal- 
braith offered his resignation. 

Macmillan set up a tribunal 
under Lord Radcliffe which 
resulted in tbe imprisonment 
of two journalists who refused 
to reveal their sources, and 
which d eared foe ministers 
concerned. Galbraith was re- 
instated in the Govern menu 
but it was felt that Macmillan 
should not have accepted bis 
resignation in the first place. 

The winter of 1962-3 was 
the most severe for 200 years; 
unemployment rose to four 
per cent. and the 
Government's popularity de- 
clined. 

In June tbe Profomo scan- 
dal broke. The War Minister 
wrote to Macmillan admitting 
to a lie - his statement to tbe 
Commons denying impropri- 
ety between himself and Miss 
Christine Keeler - and saying 
he wished to resign. 

At this the storm broke. 
But foe party leaders rallied 
to foe Prime Minister, and a 
debate on Lord Denning's 
report on the affair was held 
on June 17.- Macmillan's de- 
fence ws that he bad not been 
told foe foil evidence, and he 
concluded his speech: “My 
colleagues and I have been 
deceived, but we have not 
been parties to deception, and 
I claim that, on a fair view of 
the facts, I am entitled to foe 
sympathetic understanding 
and confidence of the House 
and foe country.” 

Twenty-seven Conserva- 
tives abstained, and Nigel 
Birch made a savage attack on 
the Prime Minister - “never 
glad confident morning 
again.” Nevertheless. Macmil- 
lan survived. 

Only July 25 he was able lo 
announce to the end-of-term 
meeting of foe 1922 Comm- 
ittee the initiating of foe Test 
Ban Treaty. It was the fifth 
time that Macmillan had tried 
for a ban, and at last he 
succeeded. When the treaty 
was signed in October Presi- 
dent Kennedy wrote him a 
letter. In it he said: “History 
will record your indispensable 
role in bringing aixrut foe 
limitation of nuclear testing: 
but I cannot let this moment 
pass without expressing to you 
my own keen appreciation of 
your signal contribution to 
world peace 1 ’. 

In spite of his repeated 
denials there were still many 
who believed that he would 
retire, and his future was a 
matter for specular ion 
Ihoughout the recess. Al- 
though there were limes dur- 
ing that summer when he was 
inclined to give up, for the 
events of 1963 bad severely 
taxed his strength, in foe end 
he decided lo stay. But on 
October S he awoke in pain, 
and his doctor diagnosed a 
blocked prostate gland. 

, *5“ evening he was 

told that he must undergo an 
operation, and it was an- 
nounced that he would be 
absent from offical duties for 
some weeks, while Builer 
would be acting Prime Minis- 
ter. Next day Macmillan an- 
nounced his resignation. 

From the ensuing confusion 

Lord Home emerged as the 

nexi Pnme Minister and lead- 
er of the Conservative Panv 
Many wrll feel fo a t Macmillan 
should have introduced a 
more rational and above- 
board method of choosing a 


Conservative leader! ^ 
events of 1957. c 

r _iJ* - ,eft lhe Commons the 
foUowmg year, at fo* ^ 

11 ^fusing bofo an earldom 

_ fo^be^ ^ arler : went back 

any party-politiraL and one Entire rtraw if" L.Wubfefo™ hL 
that set the scene for the ment was destroyed; had the tween 1966 3 iBS Be ' 

negotiations been successfully — *j=-« — -» 


ment to be made. His single 
budget is best remembered for 
foe introduction of premium 
bonds. 

The Suez crisis in the latter 
half of 1956 imposed new 
strains upon foe economy as 
well as on loyalties within foe 
Conservative Party. At first 
one of the most militant 
supporters of foe venture, 
Macmillan was later, as Chan- 
cellor, brought face to face 


general election in October. 

In this the Conservatives 
were returned with a majority 
of 100 seats. It was their third 
successive election victory, 
and in each their majority had 
been increased. Macmillan 
was at the apogee of his career. 

In his new government after 
the election one of the most 
important appointments was 
that of Iain Macleod as Colo- 
nial Secretary. This signalled a 
rapid process of granting inde- 
pendence to former colonies 
in East and Central Africa, 
and foe dismemberment of 


concluded, it ts probable foat 
an election would have been 
called for 1963, and that foe 
Conservatives would have 
won iL As it was, the Govern- 
ment and Macmillan himself 
were left vulnerable to casual 
vicissitudes. 

At home the Conservatives 
ted seemed for a time secure, 
but tbe budget of 1961. with 
its reduction of surtax usher- 
ing in the threat of another 
balance of payments crisis, led 
to further imprudent econom- 
ic tinkering- inducting a wage 


I97fi C S L made an OM in 
a ? d h,s belated accep. 
^ nce an earldom in I9 Sj 
caused, mild surprise anH 
d,w PP°‘ nt!cn enl in view 

fhrrnal‘h riier d,sdain Of such 
M-oura, which he had 
y ^Pensed for the 
™ Of buttressing^ & 


power. 

Lady 





-cl’ 


- 


it' 1. 


rf*- 

*L.1. 

$T‘ f 

f|?l 

ai.- 

irf 

a**'. 


* - 


ni-r- 


mru-- 


i :■ 


3l 


Dorofoy 


died in l%6rfhey^teS T1 , I h an 
daughters and S 

whom two daughters £** 


BBC 

t • 


H;- 

tUi 


V . 
ft- • 
t. 

* ' 

* 

Ps- 

if 

t- • 

■tei 

it . 

W* ; 

Pi 

o* 

Etej 

Ifq 


•* . 
jtec ‘ 

£ ; 

tete. 

PHr ■ 
fit- ' 

t: 

for. 

Cfc. . 

«■: 

Ot. 

£ r 

<*:. . 
c* 

V 

c «: 

te. ■ 

*•:. - 
K 

tr 

or’ 

<1 ■ 
ft -• 

h 

f-' 
<*- - 

i: 

S'- 


S' 

& 


t 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


! ^I'lrC 

i*'- 

• • -Ai 

-■ - l."' 

' • ■ WB 
ir.jlh 
■ “IK 

• fcCT 

• r.i>! 

-.Jj 

A 

: hi 


- .ciui 
*-l -.-c^ 


‘•d 


■ ■ ■* ■ '.■] 


-i IS! 
" . " iiO 



•'? °nta, 

v'^in 

. Juk if- 

— ntoi* 

'• r * Lord of?* 

: 4: tsfr 

L'" 0 * «£ 

. ^ 

" '■■ r » itiiujj 

,:***. S 

v. >*■;**»& 

•' J ''SiBiih, 

; !r:i Plate 

- '.- ' *9 

:■ _-• :bli 
; * ,‘ J lour 
‘ rj ill; 

: 

ivSB. 

_• y - ! mas 

.:Ii 3 . 7 : :;i ? 

- ■• •■ -. .•:• itc 
- “ 1 P‘opn- 
~ ■ ::J ,\j«y. 


^/:^S 3 r^s^rsi 


BIRTHS 

ARNOLD - B EBMNtti «nd Twit on 
December 2901 1986 a daughter. 
BROWNS- On 2lal December 1986. at 
The West London Hospital to San 
• nee washinotMU and Outo. a son, 
william Benedict, a brother Tor 
Louis. 

CAREY ■ on December 24tn at 
woouffl Part HaapUaL To Jtrmy 
•nee Dtcfci and Peter, a son. Edward 
□aiuL a brother for Jenna. 
CAMLAKE - On 7th November, to 
Hugh and Helen a son. brother far 
HUary. Thomas. WlBtam. Rosamond 
and Jowl 
C HI 1 1 mo ot - On 26th December to 
Rosamund into CodlsonJ and Chris- 
tooher. a daughter. Anna. 

D ADR OCK— THOMPSON • On Dececn- 
b« 28th i486, at SI George's 
Hospital, to Claire ( 06 * Darroch of 
GourocM and Matthew, a son. Dun- 
can John, a brother Tor Cetta. 
EDMUNDS - On 1 9th December, to 
Elizabeth and Richard, a daughter 
Mary Pamela. 

GRANT . On December tESth 19B&. To 
Nicola (nte SavUl) and DenztL 
daughter Charlotte May 
Maeonochle. a sister for Alexandra 
md Dtana. 

HUSHES - On 28th December to Char- 
lone (m-e Parry) and Jeremy, a son. 
Thomas Peter Jeremiah, a brother 
lor Alice. 

JENNINGS - On December 23rd at The 
W est London Hospital io Susie and 
Charles, a son. AUstalr Edward. 
JONES . On 19th December. 
Vanesa and Phillip, a daughter. 
Anna Leonora, a sister for Emma 
ana Sara. 

KELWAY- RASTOtia. - On December 
25ili. ui Apt. France to Jiii and 
Tacky, a son Beniamin, a brother for 
Thomas. 

MACKINTOSH - On December 28th. to I 
Jam and Cotin. a daughter. Alice. 
MAUDE - On December 36th. to Onis- 
Una (nee Hadfleldi and Francis, . 
daughter. Julia Elizabeth Barbara. 
MAYHE - On December 18th to virgin- 1 
ia ■ nee Hail) and wauam, a daughter. 

Emily Alice Pamela, a aster for Hen- ] 
neiia and Thomas. 

MELLON On 30th December to Sasha) 
nee Carter) amt Peter, a daughter! 
suumu Made Lime, a staler fort 
Nicholas. 

MILNE - On December 30th at the I 
Luido Wing. SI Mary's Hospital lo| 
Cmma and Oirlstophcr a son. 
OGLETHORPE - on December 29th 
1936. to Judy infe Carter) and 
James, a son David Andrew Edward. 
PARK ■ On 23rd December, at home, 
to Carol and Kevin, a daughter. End- 
iv Clare Rachel, a sister (or Robin. 
PAUL - On 17th December to Claire 
•ne<- BarrowcKmgh) and Nicholas, a 
•laughter. Phoebe Henrietta, a sister 
for Flora. 

PlTKER - On 22nd Dec em be r, to Jane 
• n«e Roberts) and Charles, a daugh- 
ter. Stephanie Jane Eleanor, a staler 
for Claire and Kale. 

RAMAMUKTHY - On 19th December ! 
: 986. at Westminster Hospital, to Ja - 1 
net <n4e Robinso n ) and BaMon. a • 
daughter. Sarah. 

THOMAS - On December 29th. to An- 1 
nic uter Baker) and Morey, 
daughter. Vanessa Kate Margaret. a j 
suer for Jamie. 

T 1 ^ HERNE - On December 28th. to I 
AnnabeDe tn*e Condyl and Rhodn. a| 
daughter. Emma Louise. 

WHITWORTH ■ On December 29th to I 
Julie tnee Miller) and Simon, a son. [ 
Lucas, a brother for Archie. 

WYNDHAM - On December Z7tti in I 
London, to Susan utee Woodall) and j 
Hairy, a son. Alexander. 


COLVILLE - On December 29th i960. 
Kathleen Myrtle Dowager VKcoont- 
ws Connie of Culross OBE,. at 
{nvernervie. Kincardineshire. Scot- 
land. Funeral Monday January 8 m. 
Flowers and enqiunes to J D Comer. 
HaUoreen House , Inv e ibervle CTeie- 
poone Inverbervie 0861 61305). 

CURRAN • On December 29lh 1986. 
peacefully at home. Harry Gibran 
Curran C.M.G- aged 85. of Fab-mile 
House. St Mark's Avenue. SaUsbury 
betoved husband of Bony- Funeral 
wtn be private. No ftowera please. 

G MLIE II - On December 27th 1 < 
Peaoefidly at his London homo. 
■Mho. aged si. one or Brown's fore- 
mmi Ughung designers. Much loved 
wtyeonof Phyllis and Jack, hrother 
J*S2«d Judith. Funeral Service 
■1 MorUake crematorium. Monday 
5» January at 12.50 pm. Cul white 
flowers or donations if desired io 
^norr Research or The Mkjddlesex 
HfHPital. Flo wen to J H Kenyon. 49 
Martoes road. London wg. 01-937 
D 7 S 7 A thanks tfvtng service U to be 
hHd at The Mlddteenr HoroUal Cha- 
pel on Tuesday January Dw 6 m at 
1 1 . 00 am 

DAWKINS - On December 28th. peace- 
fulty al Klunenloy CaaDe. Beatrice 
Romney Dawkins. «g«d 86 years, 
widow of Reverend Frederick Vtn- 
c*nt Dawkins. The Funeral Service, 
followed by HitermettL win be Iwm at 
WeotUey Pariah Church on Friday 
January 2nH at 3ptn. Fmi tributes 
^se Vo Dnwe Bros, westfailng 
StreeL Hereford. 


NDTT - On December 25Ui 1986 
Wtnilred Grace. M-B.B.Ch. aged 90. 
Honorary Fellow of B MA Utterly 
of Stoke Bishop, last sumver of 10 
children of Louis and Mary KotL A 
Service of Thtm k sgtv in a io Cod for 
the oractoue Ufe of a Christian wit- 
ness and loving care os a Medical 
Pmomoner. In Briaiol. for very 
many year* will be twM al Westbury- 

on-Trym Baptist Church. Reediey 
Road. Bristol on Friday January 2nd 
1987 at 2 pro. (allowed by Interment 
al Canford Cemetery. 

PACE -On 26th December 1986 at her 
home, l Clare Terrace. Falmouth. 
Cornwall, after a King (linen. Joan 
Newton, beloved wtfe of the tale Ma- 
ter Frank F B Page. Funeral Service 
at Penmouni Crematorium, hue 
on Monday Die 6 tn of January at 2 
pm. Flowers and enquiries io The 
Funeral Directors. W j Angove a 
Sons. 28 Wctengtoo Terrace. FM 
month. Tel K 0326) 312576. 


On December 26 1986. 
soddemy. Dons (nee HarkeriagM 81 
years. Loved sister and aunL Crema- 
tion service. Fnaay January 2nd at 
ll.30am at Kettering crematorium. 


EA6T0** - On Dec e m b er 25m 1986. 
suddenly at home. 20 Drove Court. 
Dorchest er . Elizabeth McDtarmid. 
aged 77 yean, mother of Stewan 
and Gavin. Funeral service Dorches- 
ter United Church. Monday January 
6th al 2 pm. followed by cremation 
at Weymouth crematorium. No 
flowers please, donations for Arthri- 
tis Research, c/o Woods (Dorchester) 
Lid. lla icon Way. Dorchester. 


EOUUIE*- on December 29Ui 1986 m I 
hownat after a stroke. Motor General 
T H F routers (Tom) me Royal Engi- 
neers. Dartlnq husband of Del ptune. 
loving father of Robert and Howard. 
Funeral, family only but donations 
may be sent to the Royal Engineers 
Benevolent Fund. Brampton Bar- 
racks. Chatham. Kern. Thanksgiving 
service (o be announced m the Spring 


FOX - On December 26 1986. peace-i 
fully at Bridpart General HospttaL 
Mary Rose, aged 68 years of, 
Brldpon. younger daughter of Eve'l 
Fox and Lieutenant Commander 
Charles Leonard Fox R.N-. Captain 
of HJL6, Maty Rose, sister of the 
late Eleanor. Funeral Sovice on 
Monday January 5 1907 at St'] 
Mary’s Church. Bridpart at I pm fal- 
lowed by cremation at Weymouth. 
No flowers by request but donations 
for Oncer Rese arch may be sent to 
A G Down Funeral Directors. 66 
South Street, Bridpart. 
TeW 0308)22643. 


DEATHS 


AVERY - On December 26th 1986. 
peaceftdhr In the Kent and Sussex 
HospttaL Tunbridge Wells, after a 
short litw-tv. Malor W5 Avery, late 
noex Cmuikar cm.. Tburactas- 
8ui January at 3 pm at Tunterldae 
wens Crematorium. Flowers to E-R 
HlckmoB A Son. 41 Grove HOI Road. 
Tunbridge Webs or U desired, dona- 
lions to ihe Heart Foundation. 102 
Oouchestar Place. London W1H 
4DH. 


FRAYLW8 - on 23nl December 1986. 1 
Bryan Edwin Frayting. O.B JL C.B£. ( 
Much beloved husband of Mary. Pri- 
vate cremation. Service of 
Thaidagtvtng at FtimweB Church. 
12.00 noon on 4th January 1987. 
No flowers. Donations. If desired, to 
the Ijrague of Friends. Hawkhurat 
Cottage Hospital, c/o C Waterhouse 
& Sons. High StreeL Burwash. East 
Sussex. - 

GARDNER - On Dece m ber 21st sud- 
denly but peacefully at home Alan i 
James Gardner F.R.CXPsyth. Funs-- 1 
al at Putney Vale Crematorium. 
SWIStm January 6Ui at ^tn. Flow- 1 
era may be sent to F Paine. Funeral 
Dtrndors. 6 Coombe Lane. Raynes j 
Park. SW20. Donations If desired to 
R-S.P3. Memorial service to be an- 1 
neunced later. 


PARKER -On 25Ui December, sudden- 
ly at his home at BoMngdon Green. 
Herts. Arthur Sidney, beloved hut 
hand of Joan, treasured brother of 
Frank and very dev uncle. Great un- 
rio and Godfather. Cremation _ 
ClUlirms crematorium. Amershara. 
Wednesday January 7th at 2.00pm. 
Piesoe. no Rowers bus H desired do- 
nations maybe sent to King Edward 

The vn HospRBi for orncere. 6 Buck 
Ingham place. London SW1E 6MR. 

PERTMfEE - on December 28m. trag- 
ically in a motor cycle accidem tn 
Adelaide Australia. NlrboUa aged 
19. youngest son of Christopher and 
Carole. Private trematton. Memorial 
service to be arranged. 

RORATHAN - On December 26Ui 
peacefully. The Reverend Canon 
Frederick Norman O.B.E-. mjl. 
Hon C.F.iibi class) of Mevaglssey. 
corn watt, a beloved father and 
grandfather. Funeral at Truro cathe- 
dral on Friday January 2nd. at 230 
pm. followed by cremation. Family 
flowers only- Donations In Ueu for 
ihe Mount Edgcutnbc Hospice. 
Porlhpean Rd. St AustaU. Cornwall 
may be sent (o Uk Bursar. 

ROUSE - On December 27th. Kathleen 
Dorothy Rouse of Panerdale. West 
By Meet. Cremation at St Johns' cre- 
matonum. near Wotono an 5th 
January at 2 o' ctock. No ftowers. 
but donations If desired to Guide 
Dogs for the Blind 

SCHUNKER - On December 25Ui 
1986. peacefully in hosnttal. Des- 
mond George Anthony, age 60 
years, of Had low, Tonbridge. Kent- 
Beloved husband or Patricia, father 
of Dominic and Adam. Funeral 
strive* on Tuesday January 6th 
1987 at Tunbridge Wens Crematori- 
um at 11.30 am. Att Rowers and 
cnauta-les please to Francis Chappell 
& Sons. 10 Quarry Hill Road. 
Tonbridge. KenL Tel: 0732 3E3741 

SHALE - On December 26m 1986. in 
hospital. Brian, dearly beloved hus- 
band of VaL devoted father of 
Steven, dear brother of Mavis. Ser- 
vice af st John's Church. Henley -In- 
Arden on Friday January 2nd 
1.16 pm followed by private inter- 
ment. Family Dowers n«ty nut 
donations if wished may be sent to 
Mrs Sheila Nicholson. Nice's Folly, 
Edge Lane. Heniey-tai-Arden. soU- 
huU. West MUSands for the Henley 
Evergreen's. 

STORRS - On December 28th. at home 
In Woodmancote. Cheltenham. Syl- 
via Utee Peters), betoved wifeofSam- 
Funeral nt Chettenham Crematorium 
on Monday January 5th al 2pm. 
Family flowers only please. 

SUTTON - On December 29th. peace- 
fully at Fa rite House. W 
Norwood. Mary Winifred, aged 94 
years, much loved by her sister, four 
generations of Iter family and her 
many friends. Cremation at 
Streatham Vale Crematorium. Row- 
an Road. SW16. on Friday January 
2. 1987 al 11.45am. Flowers to A 
Smith. 122 Southwark Bridge Road, 
SEl . or if preferred, donations to the 
Royal National Institute For The 
Blind. 


BEALE - On December 29 Ul peaceful- 
ly al home after a lovely day. Peler j 
Scoa. Captain Royal Navy, dear love | 
of Ann* and betoved father and 
grandfather. The cremation sendee 
on Wednesday January 7th for fam- 
ily only. Thanks giving se r vice 
Wednesday January 14th at 2.30 at 
SL Catharines Church. HotL Trow- 
bridge. Wins. 


• On December 28th at Ms home. 
Peter. Department Financial Direr- 
lor. south Western Electricity Board, 
and fraetay of The Sooth Eastern 
Electricity Board. Beloved husband 
of Marga ret and fisiher of Susan and 
Christopher. Funeral service Mon- 
day January 5th 11.00 am. at 
WpsUavsuper-Mara Crematorium. 
Foamy dowers only please, but do- 
nations for the Marie Curie Memorial 
Foundation, maybe sent C/O 
Cootdey & Son. 1 waDtacote Road. 
WesloMopa^Mare. 

BLACK - On December 19th. Arthur 
Kenneth, dearly loved husband of 
Faith aid father of Sarah and nficoia. 
Service « Tunbridge Wells cremate 
rium at lljnn January 6th. No 
flowers. Donations to Mr & Mrs 
Lapage-Brown. 3Da GTOencroft Gar- 
dens. London. NW6. 

SOILEAU . On 25th December 1986. 
peacefully at Bath after a yews Ill- 
ness. Ivan BoUeau. formerly , 
Professor a Auckland University. 
Auckland. New Zealand. Loved hus- 
band or Barisara and rather of Julian. 
Joanna and JaiwL Cremation 
private. 

B*oWR - On December 26th. pare 
fully. Marion Elizabeth (ni6e Caster), 
wife of ihe late Captain Stuart Brown 
R N.. much loved mother of SaOy. 
Toby (Mereytu and Bridget and 
srandmoflier of 12. Funertf private. 
Donations, ir wished, to R.N. Benevo- 
tent TrusL High StreeL Brampton. 
Gillingham. KenL MET 5QZ. 

BRUNTDK • On 27th December 1986. 
peacefully m home after a long Ill- 
ness. Harold. Funeral service at 
Randalls Park Crematorium. 
Leathertwad on Monday 6th Janu- 
ary al 160pm. No letters please 

B U I AL SKI - on December 27th 1986. 
peacefully In hospital. Alexantter 
aged 77 years of Letaton. Suffolk. 
Dearly beloved husband of Beatrice 
iformerly Motor of the Polistt air 
forceL Funeral service at Ipswich 
Crematorium West Chapel on Mon- 
day January 3Ui 1987 at 2pm. By 
request bo Dowers please. 

CARTER . On December 28th. peace- 
fully at her home tn Wareham. Ann 
Arabella (Araby). itee Mcamtock. 
widow of Cyril Carter. Deeply loved 
and missed by her family and many 
friends. Funeral Service at Lady SL 
Mary Church. Wareham at l pm on 
Friday 2nd January to be followed 
by conuniual at Poole Crematorium 
at 2 pm. Family flowers only please 
but contributions to the N.SJ>.C.C. or 
Gardeners Benevolent Society. 

CHALKLEY - On December 27Th. 
peacefully, at The Royal Star and 
Carter Home. Richmond, after a long 
titness borne with great courage, pa- 
tience and humour. Cyril John 
Baron, dnariy loved by his wife 
Anne, and children Jack and Kather- 
ine. Funeral service at Holy Trinity 
Church. Roehampton. SW16 on 
Tuesday January 6lh 1.30. followed 
by cremation Friends welcome at 
the church. Family flowers only 
Pfease. but donations If desired, to 
mo Putney s mbIW oti, 106 
Frisham Road . swis. Emntirtes to 
T H Sanders. Roehampton 01-789 
68 S3 


On. December 27 th I 
loos, peacerony in Gaolby. Lak»-( 
lershtre. after - a very I 
Christmas surrounded by family- 1 
Ion*, beloved mother of George. [ 
Brigttta and Rainer, and wife of the) 
late Fritz Bernhard. 

CWATKtN - On December 25Ui 1986. 
peacefully on Christmas day. Thom- 
as Ley of Fownhope. Abereiddy. St ' 
Davids. Dyfed Beloved husband of 
ihe late Sheila Rose and toved father > 
of Geraldine and Fiona. Funeral 
LLanhrtan Church at 1 1 am January 
5Ui- Enquiries to G Rice. 
Tel :( 03483)344, 

QOUSH - on 25 th December 1986. 
Winiam E Gough, at The Oange 
Nursing Home. Lytbam St Anna 
aged 89 yean, beloved husband of 
Mariorie. Funeral service at St 
Cuthberts church. Lytham. on Fri- 
day 2nd January at 12 noon, prior to 
cremation at Park crematorium. 
Lytham St Anns at 12.30 pm. Fam- 
ily (towers only please, donations tail 
lieu, u so desired to The Hospice tn 
the Fylde. 153/166 Devonshire Rd. 
Blackpool. Further enquiries ptaase 
to J A Porter. Tel: 02E3 735423. 

HEATH- On December 27th. peaceful- 
ly al home after a long Illness. 
Frederick, aged 75. husband of Mar 
torte (nee Le Bosquet). Requiem 
Mass. 10.00 am. January 5th. St 
John's Cathohc Church. Tadworto. 
Surrey. 

HICKS - On December 27th 1986. 
peacefully and with courage at 
Derriford Hospital. Plymouth. Othrta 
Susan, aged 45 years, dearest wtfe of 
Roger and mother of Henrietta and 
Marcus. Funeral Service at St Domi- 
nick Parish Church. Cornwall, on 
Tuesday January 6th at 1 1 am. Fam- 1 
Uy ftowen only, but donations tf 
desired to tbe League of Friends. 
Derrtfbrd HospttaL Plymouth. 

KMC - On December 26th 1986.; 
peacefully after a long illness all 
Oaklelgh Nursing Home. 
Grtnstead. William Alan, aged 80. 
Late or Hove. Will be sadly mimed by 
his Brother John and sister-in-law 

Christine. Funeral Service and cre- 
mation at the Sumy and Sussex 
Crematorium. Worth on Friday Jan- 
uary 2nd 1987 at 11 .30 am- Flowers 
to F Brinkhurst A Son. Hotnetea, 
Lingfieid Road. East Grtnstead. 
TCU0342) 23092. 


TAYUM - On December 3QQi 1 

peacefully altar a tong titness. Mgd 
Julian Thy lor LDS. RCS (Eng). 8DS 
(U Lon) aged 42 years. Funeral Ser- 
vice Steslnghursl Church. Monday 
Jamary 5th at 12 noon. Flowers and 
enquIriH to K B Sills. Funeral Direc- 
tors. Cranbrook. (712284). 

THOMASON - On December 23rd 
peacefully at home Reginald Harold 
aged 87. Fond Father and Grandfa- 
ther. Funeral service at Randalls 
Park Crematorium. LeathertteaiLat 

2.30 pm on Wednesday 7th January. 
Ftowers to James Thomas. Min 
Road. Gobham. Surrey. 

TOMPKINS -On December 27th. after 
a short fflness. Joyce Mariorie 
Sunder Tompkins D.L1L tn her 90th 
pear, late reader in English at Royal 
Holloway College, greatly missed by 
an her many relatives, friends and 
colleagues. Funeral at 3 pm on Fri- 
day January 2nd at St Johns 
Crematorium. Woking. Family flow- 
era only to Woking Funeral Services. 
Goktaworth Rd. Wotdng. Donations 
If desired to The British nmniw 
Society. 

VAN-DEN-RERGN Norah Gilbert, 
peacefully, at The HaU. Thornton 
Dale, on December 26th 1986 aged 
92 years. Laving mother. Grand- 
mother sand Great Grandmother. 
Funeral, private, at York Crematori- 
um. on Friday January 2nd at 9 am. 
No Gowers, donations to the dies! 
Heart and Stroke AoKociatlan. 


LEAVER • On December 26th. to | 
Bextrttl Hospital. Gladys Edith Sarah 
Leaver. MJE. dearly loved by her | 
family and many friends. Funeral 
Service al St Barnabas Church. 
Bextdll-on-Sea on Tuesday January 
6th at 1.30 pm followed by burial at 
Bexhifl Cemetery. Flo rah tributes to 
Mummery F.D.. 31 Devonshire \ 
Road. BexhOI-on-Soa or. If d e sire d, 
donations to Raystede Centre tor An- 
imal Welfare, ttingmer. East Sussex. 1 

LEDGER - On December 24th. Kath- 
leen Margaret, aged 83 years- Much 
loved by all who knew her. peaceful- 
ly in too Clarence Nursing Home. 
Tunbridge Write- Funeral ax Tun- 
bridge Writs Crematorium 
Tuesday 6th January at 3 DO pm. 
Family flowers only, bat IT desired 
donations to the Dorothy Kerin Nurs- 
ing Home. Berrswood. Groombrtdge. 
Kent TN3 9PY. 

LEWYS— LLOYD - On December 29th 
1986. peacefully. Kathleen CKltty). 
dearest wife of L W. Lewys-Uoyd. 
deeply mourned by family and 
friends. Funeral service at CaUy 
Church. WbTal. 1 JSOpm. Friday Jan- 
uary 2nd. Family nowera only 
please. 

MarPOHBAl.f - On 27th December 
1986. suddenly at Harefleld Hospi- 
tal. London. Christine (nfe MacRae) 


Tavistock House. North Tavistock 
Square. London WC1. 

WADDE1L - On Dece m ber 29th. Rose- 
mary. peacefully at home. Dearly 
loved mother of NlgeL PauL NeO axtd 
Catherine, and wife of David- Funer- 
al. family only. Memorial service on 
February 14th at Fetatead School 
Chapel at 3pm. Family flowers only. 
Donations to Chetmsfonl Hospice 
Fund. 212. London Road. 
Chelmsford. 

WALTON - On December 29th. peace- 
fully at Fbmborough HospttaL after 
long Illness. Derek. William, of 
Bromley Common, beloved husband 
of Angela and dear father of Tim and 
Sarah. Funeral service on Tuesday. 
January 6th. at Beckenham Crema- 
torium. at 4pm. Flowers i 

enquiries to Francis OiappeU Sc Sens. 
332 Crofton Road. Fbmhoroush. 
KenL TeL (0689) 63277. Memorial 
service to be held taler. 


SWEET & MAXWELL LTD 

PUbaahon or lit Journal ol PtaaMBB 
ana rninrnnmr Mil Law. are Nnud 
to annoance the rowl n unti i i Bf victor 
Moors bo Editor from January w 
1007. victor Moore. u_M- r — re to 
lawyor u the UM wwItf o» n cod top 
and a dbUoguttlwl eoaUMnkalor on 
DUnoino lawyor. n a ao Harold 
■town who acted an Editor for Mar 
SO years. 


- On Decem b e r 28th 
suddenly at heme. Kattie. widow of 
EmU. Funeral private. 

WILLETT ■ On December 25th 1986. 
suddenly at tits son’s home. 
Uppingham Rectory. Rutland. Hany 
Leslie. O RE. F.Eng.. DSc. aged 
76. husband of Jane and tether of 
John. Funeral RcquHra at 
Uppingham Parish Church, on Mon- 
day January 5Ih at ll am. followed 
by private cremation. 

WIMBLE - On December 28th. peace- 
fully in Tunbridge wells. Helen, 
beloved wife of Peter and mother of 
BOl and lan. Funeral at Tunbridge 
Wells Cemetery on Friday January 
2nd al 11.45 am. Family Dowers 
only. Donations If desired, to Imperi- 
al Cancer Rese a rch. 

WRMHT - On December 27th. at East 
Moiesey. Surrey, aged 82. Lnroa 
Emmeline, eldest daughter of Ihe late 
F Arnold Wright, and stater of the 
late C Arnold w right 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


M-B.. C.H.B.. tn her 87th yoar. Last Ik-j- 

nunrer nr ih* ramiiv of I"™' Ronald MeUowes. A Memorial 
Service will be hew on Saturday 
14th March 1987 at 3.30pm In 
Bxyanston School Church, near 
Btandford. Dorset. 


on December 28th 1986 
peacefully at Queen Elizabeth n Hos- 
pital. Welwyn Garden City. Alfred 
William (BUD OBE aged 87. one time 
Chairman of the Advisory Commit- 
tee on the Courage of Dangerous 
Goods in Ships and also Central 
Rhine Commissioner. Dear husband 
of Gladys, father of Diana and Molly 
and grandfather of Christopher. 
Darryl Lesley and Dominic. Crema- 
tion on 7th January 1987 al West 
Herb Crematorium. Garston at 1.00 
om: Famuy flowers only. Donations 
>o Imperial Cancer Research Fund, 
po Box 123. Lincoln* ton Fields. 
London WC2. 


surviving number of the family of 
ihe late Alexander and Zella 
MacRae. Upper Ardslve. Lochalsh. 
Beloved wtfe of Ihe tate Oonald 
MacDougaU and much toved and 
supporting mother of John and ZeUa 
and grandmother of Donald. Alexan- 
der and Eleanor. Funeral Service on 
Wednesday 31st December at 2 ten 
from Ardetve's Free Church, there- 
after. to Ctaehandulcti Churchyard. 
All friends respectfully Invited- Me- 
morial Service to give thanks for her 
life and wort will be held in RitisUp, 
Middlesex on a date to be announced. 

MARSHALL - On December 26th. sud- 
denly. Florence Edith Emma. 
Funeral Tuesday January 6th at 
Wet Stoke Church. Chichester at 
2 l30pti>. Flowers and enquiries to 
Edward White & Son. 5 South 
PaD&nL Chichester. Tel. 782136. 


I MARKHAM - A service of Thanksgiv- 
ing will be held for Or. Arthur 
Markham OBE„ U-D- at All Salats 
Church. Lime walk. Headmgton. Ox- 
ford on Saturday iTth January at 
2.30 pm. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


IlMKKIN • Mrs Life- Webber Jackeon. 
in ever Icing and grateful memory a 
Dearest Mother an this 26lh anniver- 
sary of her Passing and especially on 
4Ut January her Birthday. Always In 
my thoughts Graham. 


FKASCK. Ken ana Kate, mm wedding 
A nniversa ry Conor ami anon* Bom Ltt. 
David and Alloa, wnn tore. 


..J AflML New Bread 81 Home. SB 
i Bread Srret -London CC2M INH 


SERVICES 


SlAX. 14 RaWKhamp PI. SW3. 01267 
6066. EMM aw. Ol SO* 4142. Hlflta 


FRKPMMP. Lore or M a r r la pi All a** 
araaa. PatoBBa. Dqi iQX0i2S AouwMn 
Road. London WB. TeL- 01-938 IOIL 
MlMHia r a ADVICE Bureau Katharine 
aim irx Faruan OfDcej mmi Inter 
views. 7 MW PI. Wl. Ol 409 2BE& 


WANTED 


WAKTKD Edwardtoa. Vic to rian and ad 
rein led fummirr. Mr AWWi Ol 947 
B946- 067-669 Garran Lane. Earanakj. 
SW17. 

AC WAH1VD Lame Vic wardraoa. 
chaus, extending taWu . 

beats, bookmre. buruu a od pawnn 
He. 01 946 7685 (W -Ol 7090471 (VU. 


paid for carty asnxttanas. T4: 
Ol 370 4722. 


FOR SALE 


RESISTA CARPETS 
SALE STARTS 
MONDAY 
29 th DECEMBER 

HxMsnds of square ysnb of all 
qualities at bargain prices vnxb interest 
free credit on selected lines. 

182 Upper Richmond Road 
London SW 14 

01-876 2089 


DtDNri* YOU OFT A PIANO 
M YOUR CHRISTMAS STOCKING 9 

Don't worry we’ve lotra of iamu a 
grand pianos for sale or take advan- 
tage of our unique (Ure wtth opoon lo 
purchase plan (Mm only £>6em. 

MARKSON PIANOS 

Albany SL NW1 
Ol 935 8682 
AnUtory mace. SEl 8 
01 864 4517 


IWUim or METTUCHD wood carving 

and French gonahtog drenonahatton ra 

our own crafOtocn a our usua furni- 

ture naitomon on New Year* Day. Also 
an exhfbUkm of locally made model 

wooden beau. Ne m eb ed Showroom s . 

High StreeL NetUeoed. Nr Hcntey on 

~ (0491)641110. 


duality wool carpi da. At trade 
prices and under, ateo avouaue totra 
extra. Large room (tie reronams under 
half normal price. Chancery Carpets Ol 
405 0453. 

IITHNCR Ebonisad irand. number 
68132. matmamod to concert pitch, ho- 
raWRer metuoed- £3^00 or pari 
axenange for C 2.000 Ptos q n a H iy tm- 

rigm. Teh 07S3 2399a 

StATPIM»M. Beet UCkate Mr an 80(4- 
out evena. Our rUrnw mduda most 
major co mu a iwa . Creak carta a rm w ti d 
01-828 1678. 


wuuam TBtman. Ovoch Lane. Borough 
Oven. Kent. 0732 88327m 
MC n«l a 1 796 MU . Other ntles 
avao. Hand bound ready tor preaenta- 
Uon - also "Sundays”- Ci2J». 
Rem e mber When. 01-6B8 6323. 
TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT, Phantom. 
Cats. SzarUgm Exp. Ore. Leg Ms. All 
theatre and sporta/riel: 821 - 6616 / SaS- 
oMSAEr / vw / omen. 
■ZCffSTDH Oraod. 19X4. 6 h- EbonKed. 
MvoteSana Inatrumenl. CA. 200. 01-686 
4981. T. 

MCKSTEM Rosewood Grand. 6 11 1929 
Excellent cowbUon. C&800 ono. Ot-686 
49BI. T. 

CATS. BEK . Lea MB AM Phantom. An 
ineoire and soon. Tel 439 X763u ah ma- 
tor credo cds. 

Enam-SKMAVOMY. laaoosg 
ft of Reproducnan Furamn. States. 
Beds etc. Open 7 days. (0873) 2ES44. 
Kra ONt aqutament - camera, editing, 
sound and Mahttag- CSjOOO ono. Tel: ox- 


TUSCAN TRAIL 


we wrek acronine Tuscan into from 
Eiruvao voiiena. via San Onugnano 
wun as famous towns, to Medieval 
Sura. Night* sprat at ton* and B ata ta 
u ancient tuflup towns and visages. 


food and wine. Luggage transported 
co route 

Other trim include: 

SlcUv. Portugal -The Minno, Path 
to Rome. Dordogne. Provence. 
Way to ASNSL Little Caucasus. 
Cappadocia etc. 

ON HORSEBACK. FOOT, 
BICYCLE OR CANOE 


THE ALTERNATIVE 
TRAVEL GROUP LTD (TI) 
1-3 George Street. 

Oxford 0X1 2AZ 
let 0865 251 195/6 

ITS ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 

wortdwMe low coot monte 
Tna bat • and we can grave a 
IHJMO dam anc* 1970 
AROUND THE WORLD PROM £766 



o/w 

RTN 

SVONEY 

£374 

£6® 

PERTH 

£403 

£600 

AUCKLAND 

£390 

£748 

BANGKOK 

£209 


SINGAPORE 

£209 

£418 

HONC KQNQ 

£248 

£496 

DE1HI/80MBAY 

£231 

£386 

COLOMBO 

£242 

£440 

NAtflOSI 

£240 

£396 

JO-BURG 

£2 70 

£467 

LIMA 

£276 

£506 

L06 ANGELES 

£167 

£300 

NEW YORK 

£ 99 


WASHINGTON 

£1 19 

£207 

BOSTON 

£137 

£274 

HONOLULU 

an 

£457 

GENEVA 

£ 75 

£ 89 


42-48 EARLS COURT ROAD 
LONDON W8 6EJ 

Europe/USA Flights 01-937 6400 
Long Haul nwn 01-603 XBtS 
I st/Bustness dan 01936 3444 
Gov ernment Licensed /Bonded 
ABTA 1ATA ATOL 1458 


*AU FUGHTS BONDED* 
7b* HUGE DISCOUNTS*^ 
★★TOURIST CLASS** 
**CLUB CLASS** 
**IST CLASS** 
★★CONCORD* ★ 

• SVONET * * 


* POOR 

* HOBART 

* Aj-BOTO 

* AUCKLARO 

* HH 

* BANGKOK 

* SINGAPORE 
» DUBAI 

* MO EAST 

* LUSAKA 

* TORONTO 
6 L ANGELES 

* CARIBBEAN 


* * 


* * 
* * 


ADELAIDE * 
S AFRICA ★ 
waUNGTON * 
FT MORESBY * 
TOKYO * 
MANLA * 
BAHRAIN * 
NAIROBI * 
HARARE * 
VANCOUVER * 
inara a 
SFHANCtSCO * 


* * 

* * 

* * 

»* SOUTH AMERICA ** 

* USA * USA * USA *V3A * 

SUNWORLD TRAVEL 

(Eat'd 1969) 

59 South St, ^san , Sunty 

(QJ737) 27S38/2S53Q/27109/ 
25315/24832/26097 


DISCOUNT FUGHTS 


Sydney 

O/W 

£490 

Rta 

£785 

Audfand 

£480 

£775 

Los Angeles 

£168 

£336 

Jotrat 

£290 

£490 

RtMlsIl 

£220 

£360 

Ru 

£320 

£570 


LONDON FLIGHT 
CENTRE 
01-370 6332 


o/w 

SYDNEY /MELBYE £426 
AUCKLAND! £470 
BANGKOK £230 


L AVTV Cl 09 

LOS ANOSLES £200 

NEW YORK £140 


£779 
£760 
£385 
£390 
Cl 60 
£372 


TOP DECK FUGHTS 

01-373 3391 


Dec. mg reductions. Interest tree credo, 
an very large sel ec tio n at famous 
names, ft penis tor Btugtmre. Hoff- 
manns. Weinar. KrdghL Young Chang. 
Fazer. etc. Written auotanoftS. free cata- 
logue. 30a Htghgato Rd. NWS. 01-267- 
7641 


FLATSHARE 


COUPLE for double room U benuUfiA lux- 
ury 3 bed house. Harrow £80 gw. Ol 
206 2296 

KM HSOM XT 1 rain ton woe- O/R & 
bathroom tn owners ant, au mod cans. 
1260 pan tori. OX 937 6532. 

SWL Light, raw end wami e u r . Om 
room in a maoMficeni ma nskm IM. 
£1 12 per week mctota Pt . 01-389 0910. 
<2 - Large room ta flat for male/ fem ai«. 
£160 pan «d. Tel: 01-724 T918twarkl 
01-232 LOCO n atolAMM 
t. KIN. Own room tor M person in 
msteonetlc. £QOpw exc. TeL Ol 603 
4418 (p refe rab l y 4-7puM. 


LUTE B OOKI W O B New Year avau to Ca- 
naoean * Seychelles wan accom. Cab 
buerUne Travel 01-209 8663 ABTA 
Bonded. 

LUXURY VILLAS For the discerning tew 
to France. Spate. Portogol A Greece. 
Tel: 01-409 2838 ITP VILLA WORLD 
T4I 


rente. Zurich. The Hague. PubMn. 
Rouen. Boulogne & Dieppe. Time Off. 
2a. Chester Close. London. SW1X 7BO 
01-238 8070. 

AUAan tor toxury vfltaa wun poota & 

mate service si Portugal's osefutove 
Carvoetre Ctob phone Patruda 
WOdHood Ltd 0249 817092 or Ol 688 
6722 ABTA ATOL 1276 
MtT & Sunshine In Southm India. Exclu- 
sive naan group staying luxury bones 
and game reserve. Few places rentam- 
tog- £2180. Feb 25-Mar 15. Ring Ol- 
248 9398. 

TRAVEL cram Special deals to USA 
and Canaria Budget tores is Annie. 
NZ. South Africa: USA and Portugal 
with acc o m. TH Ol 666 HOI. ABTA 
73196. 

CR EE K MUWS. Algarve. Turkey. Te- 
nerife. Menorca. Villas, ante, mafl 

hotels. Hob. IDs. Summer /winter. Ven- 
tura Houaaye. Tel: 0742 351 lOO 
UNBEATABLE OFFERS. Last min vacs. 
3rd. 10 Jan - cod chalets, ante, id top 
resects. Ft £99 tad. SM Total 0932 
231113 

HONG KONB MM, BANOKOK £369. 
Singapore £467. Other FEcmra. 01-884 

6 814 A BTA. 

LOWEST Air rims. Schemdeo Europe & 
Worldwide. Med Star TtavaL Ol 928 


MALAGA Xmas fUtfits 21 Dec 2 weeks. 
£148 Ol 836 8622. Buckingham 
Travel 

ALL US CITIES. Lowest farm aa malar 

d-584 TJ71JWTA 


ALOANVE VUamoara ad] 14 ftorway. Su- 
rer taraUy Wa. Sfln 8/10. caspapw 
061 269601B 


WANTED 


AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK 

AMtoua and Modern Jewellery, watches. Sffver and Plate. Furniture. Bronzes. 
Enamels, iwones. Jade. Pewter. Clocks. Patnongs. Porcelain. Caass. Old Dolls. Toys 
and TOddy Bean etc. Anboue A Pro 19107 ao dirs . Paway and giber. Shawls. 
Patch work Quits, sam p l ers. Cotoume Jrwtley. Lace. Llnana. on Masonic (terns. 
OM musical boxes A trotrumems and all other id ( rma.no aruclea. brauedtate cash 
by return for Jewellery and odwr Arnctea aent by pool 

Ctar expert can can on you. er call pmssaily wttboot oMtoanon. 
open Man - 8to 9.00 - UO pjn. 

Oreens Antique Galleries. HT Kensington Churtoi Street: 

London we 7LN. Tri 01 229 9618 
(Also In New York! 


JOURNEY LATIN 
AMERICA 

Wc specialise: Small group tours. 
S-6 week*. & (gw cost rushes for 
huteoendem travellers. Ask for 
brochures 

Journey Laan America 
16 Devonshire Road 
London W.4. 

Tel: 01-747 3108 


UP UP & AWAY 


Flamingo Travel, 

76 Shaftesbury Avenue 
L0o6op WJV 7DG 

01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


COfTCurtm oh OMnn/bate to Eu- 
rooe. lsa A moat o wumw o n a. 
DtPlomM Travel: 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL 


BAKTADL N Yam £229 LA/San Phan 
£629 Nolrebl £399. JOTnup £499. 
Svd/Mto £669. Bangkok U69. AU di- 
rect dally until* Ol 839 7144 


Regent SL wi. Oi 
734 8307 ABTA/ Alto 847 Telex 
27376 


nro/MEL £638 Perth £665. AH major 
carrier* io Aus/NZ 01-884 7371 

ABTA. 


CHEAP HJGKTS Worldwide Hayinerket 
OI 930 1366 


OtSCOUNTXS « BMW FAKES world- 
wide. Tri E.T C *0763) 0STO3S. 


MSCOUICr FANES WartOwMc 01-434 
0734 Juetu-r Travel. 


njONTROOKENS DMOwn Fares wortd- 
wide. laa/ccenomy 01-307 9100 


S. AFRICA From £468. 01-884 7371 
ABTA. 


WOOER SPORTS 


SKI 

SUPERTRAVEL 

JANUARY BARGAINS 
Chalet Parties in the top itsom 
FR£!89 

S/C from £138 inc ffi#ts 
01-5S4 5060 (24 hrs) 
Snowline on 01-584 0174. 


y In all < _ _ 

ft rare. Amnia, ntey nr Swltzertand. 
Save pounds A slip off io tha gapes in 
January. Ol 785 9999 C24 hrs brochure 
request). 


UNUAKY SKRHB low prices tn N«n re- 
sorts. V al dl a e re. Tlgm. Los Ares A 
MerujtL Suserb snow automata Ski 
ValOl 2006080 (34 hTWOl 905 4444. 


Super value seif c»- 
tarug au bohdays ta tha best French 
resorts. 01-789 2S92 (24 hra brochure 
reauen). 


SKIWOStftA Jan Bargatos. No surcharges. 

Andorra coach (rm C79- air fern cus- 

Ausina £26 ofr an fit hols- Muntcn nts 

£49 rm. T Xgato/2 Atos/Avoriaz coach 
s/c-Brodwre. 01 602 4826. ABTA. 


MMMR HtoUtaye tn France. Auaana a 
Switzerland. Appartmcms from £62. 
Hotels from £t«4. Special Chamomlx 
aDoaibuents offers - 6Bi aduu free) 
Phone Ski SaOy on OB45 S9G622 now 
for brochure - reservation. 


SKI THE CANA DI AN RO CKIE S Mvate 
Crow itoMuiuag March lOtt tor 16 
days. Luxury uip tnciudes downhill, 
craas-country A hcU-sKUng. For detain 
oleate phone 0904 702966. from 5«h 


SKHM ta Banff. Canada. Schrt fughte to 
Cakte a Inc hotel. Lift pas*, car hoe 
from £«79. Cafl HKkto Borman Hob 
days on 01-393 0127 ABTA. 


SKI SCOTT DUNK. BKtuMwe chalet bod- 
days. Qiampery. Fortes dc SoUri. No 
Surchtoges. Huge dlicounw for Janu- 
ary can DOW! 0489 877839- 


VAL P9BIH1 Sen catering apis lo Iri. 
Central location. FuD services. Let by 
the week. TtosOl-WS 6441. Offln hrs 


COURCIKVEL S/C naL W8_ beds. 
£175/366 pw. Ol 737 3426 / 6324 
lans wetnhnne ). 

MU FLKHTS. Dtoty to Geneva. Zurtra. 
Munich etc. From £69. SKI WEST Tel 
Ol 785 9999. 

sn FUOII& Dally to Genev a. Zu rich. 
Munich ate. Freni £69. SKI WEST Tri 
Ol 786 9999. 

SKI VALAIS Haute Nendaz. Flat stem 
4/6. Rent from £100 pw. TeL 0223 
276331 


TAKE ADVANTAGE of us to January. 
Vert Her. vim. Menori. Megeve. Sto 
Les Aloes 01 602 9766. 


U JL HOLIDAYS 


CHUB TMO THE CNLIONL Canal 
bOBB. 04427 36X5. 

NORTH WALES 750 cottages, caravans. 
Shaw's Holidays. Pwuheh- <0766) 
612864. (24 hours). 


To Place Your 
Classified 
Advertisement 

Please telephone the appropriate number listed 
below between 9am and 6pm. Monday to 
Friday, or between 9.30am and 1.00pm on 
Saturdays. 

Birth. Marriage and Death NoticesOl-481 4000. 

Birth and Death notices may be accepted over 
the telephone. For publication the following day 
please telephone by 1.30pm. Marriage notices 
not appearing on the Court & Social page may 
also be accepted by telephone. 


Trade Advertisers: 


Appointments 
Public Appointments 
Property 
Travel 

U.K. Holidays 

Motors 

Personal 

Business to Business 
Education 


01-481 4481 
01-481 1066 
01-481 1986 
01-481 1989 
DI-488 3698 
01-481 4422 
01-481 1920 
01-481 1982 
01-481 1066 


Forthcoming Marriages, Weddings, etc for the 
Court and Social Page 
Cannot be accepted by Telephone 

Please send Corot and Social Page notices to: 

Court & Social Advertising, 

Times Newspapers Lid, 

I, Pennington Street, 

London El 9DD 

Please allow at least 48 hours before publication. 
Any enquiries for the Court & Social page may 
be made after 10.30am on 01-S22 9953 

You may use your Access, Am ex. Diners 
or Visa card. 


PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
nt Church Commssonere have are- 
pm) dralt pastoral stenn provtomo lor 
orctarauom el iMunUsci- ui respect of 
the nunm too church of &ami Margaret. 
Harwood Ogle In Uw Mbh of Hackiww 
with Harwood Dote: and In mwa ol uv 
nance cnapri of ease o» 8aun Peter wtuun 
(hr parton of South Dalton and Homeen- 
Bte-viiotoi iMtorwtw mown as Dalton 
Hotmri rYorK diocrsei Cs oi ei oflhr draft 
scMm may Or oMalnce from mr Church 
ComraBMoncre. i M i nn a n k. Loudon 
SV> »p uz to whom any ngmu auoni 

should Or MW wtuun 21 day* to die guba- 
ralm of this nonce. 


PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
The Church COmmisuaners Iter pre- 
pared b draft redundancy a rtrau a 
graiidlng for ter aoproprunoa ol (he re- 
ouiwaM church of waign Saint Hcten 
OM error ch. Rudgeway to use as a uranu- 
raenr and (or purposes ancillary thereto 
•Bristol a t oc ree i copms of me Oran 


•enema may oe obtained from (hr Church 
CommauonertL t M illh m K . London 
SW1P 3JZ to whore any rrpresentanom 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 
No. 004448 Of 1986 
CHANCERY COYtSION 
MR. JUSTICE HOFFMAN (tor die Hon- 
outbdip Mr Junra Marvyn Dnirai 
Mcsidae me 3*n day ot movemsor 1906 
IN THE MATTER OF HAS TE 
INTERN A TTOn. AL GROUP LIMITED 
IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NOTICE ts HERESY-GIVEN (bat the 
Order of die High Court Ol JutUCP 
(Chancery DltbMiUM November 
1986 confirming the reauenoo af (he 
caakta) of the above named Coranany tram 
£ 2 ^ 00.000 to £84g_32&60 and (he 
Minute ap pr o v ed by me Court thowlng 
with re ap ect lo (he capllal of (he Company 
av altered the several particulars required 
b> the above mentioned Act were regts- 
lered by Ihe Registrar of Companies on 
OKI December 1906 
DATED (Ilia 23rd day to December 1986 
Boom 6 Co 
Sovereign House 
South RuaM 
Leeds LSI I HQ 
So&cttors tor the above named Company 


IN THE HIGH COVRT OF JLSTICE 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
Leasehold Reform Act 1967 
Re: 47 Bentogton Road. Ashton. 

Stevenage. Hertfordshire 
BY ORDER OF MASTER 
CHOLMONSELEY CLARK dated 29th 
August 1986 

TO WHOM fT MAY CONCERN: 
ADOtieamm a being rnsdr under Ore 
■hove Act by Joann Scales and Margaret 
Rose Scales reran Order dial the Freehold 
imeresl In Ihe above property be VMM In 
■he AppUrani The Apparatus are lenajus 
under a lease created on 20ta October 
1564 by Sir John Boeder. 

Any person ctaonmg lo be the Freehold 
Owner In sue moon lo Die ongtnal Free- 
holder Sir John Botcter or lo be (hr 
personal rcpreteti lath es or assigns of any 
Free note owner of tor above pr o p ert y 
should communicate wttb Mr D Walmsley 
Of Messrs Hawkins Sobaiors of Town 
Sauare Chambers. Stevenage- Hertferd- 
smrr (Triegnone 0438 3i2849j wtuun 28 
days after me date of pubdca t ioti of mis 
advertisenwnL 


THE COMPANIES ACT I9B5 
TRISTAR WINE A ND SP IRIT AGEN- 
CIES LIMITED 

•company B eg un a lien No 1288023) 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thal tlw 
Crrdliore at me above named COMPANY 
are reouircd on or before toe 6th day of 
February 1987. to send their names and 
add mars and ine particulars of th«r debts 
or nouns, and the names aPdaddiraMs of 
toon- Sobcuors If any. to Mr Brian Hunter 
Larkins of Price wairrhouee. 1 London 
Bridge. London SCI 9QL. tor Unutoator 
of toe said Comoanv. and. U so required 
bs- notice ui wnltog from die said Liquids-, 
lor. are by tnelr Soncitora. or personally, 
lo cone to and prove Iheir said debts or 
danns at such tune and place as snail no 
soeraied In such notice, or tn default 
thereof they win be excluded Irena toe 
benefit of any onRrtounon moor before 
such debts are prosed. 

Dated tots 22nd day to December 1 986 
B H Larkins 

LiquKiaior 


IN THE HIGH OOLUT OT JL-STH3C 
NO. 006101 Of >986 

CHANCERY DIVISION 

B T HE MATTER OF LBSURETTMC ‘ 
INTERNATIONAL PLC HOLOtNC 
PUBLIC LIMITED COMPANY 
a nd 

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPA- 
NIES ACT 1906 

Notice la Mreoy given tool toe Order to 
■he (ton Court of turner iCiwimtt> Dirt- 
MOfl) dated 8 December >986 confirming 
the cancrilaimn of the Share Premium Ac- 
count of toe above-named Company was 
regi ste re d by Ihe Registrar to Companies 
tea 18 December 1986 

Dated mu 19m day of December 1966 
Asfturd Morris crisp 
ot Broadgale House. 7 Eldon Street 
London EC2M 7HD 
Soncllors far ihe above named Company 


ROYAL BRITISH LEGION CLUB 
LEYTON LIMITED <TN LIQU ID ATTON) 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1986 
1. Norman Cowan. F CA to 96 High 
Street. BameL Herts, give ncdier that I 
was appointed Liquidator In uie above 
matter on 22nd October 1 986 by the High 
Court No 003452 to 1986 AU debts and 
clatfns should be acnl to me al tbe above' 


FINANCIAL NOTICES 


HERTFORDSHIRE COLTvTY COUNCIL 
6 'Via REDEEMABLE STOCK I9B5/S7 . 

Barclays Bank PLC 
Rcguiraiioa Department 

Radtxoke HaU . 

Kmdsford 

Cheshire WAlfi 9EU 
Hereby give noucr Uiai in Order la pre- 
pare toe Interest due on me is! February 
1987 toe balances of toe several accounts, 
to toe above Suck wUl be siruck al the 
ciote of business on 2nd January 19B7- 


WINTER SPORTS 


BLADON UNES 
Tbe Biggest Choice on Skis 

JANUARY BARGAINS 
CHALET PARTIES AND CHALET HOTELS 


VAL D'CSERE 
CHANS MONTANA 
VERBIER 

MERISEL LES ALLUES 


from 

Prom 


£149 

£149 

£159 

£149 


SELT CATERING from £ 99 

01 785 3131 01 785 7771 

CHALET PARTIES S/C AND HOTELS 

Manchester Deps. General Enquiries ABTA 16723 

0422 78121 01 785 2200 ATOL 1232 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


IMPERIAL COLLEGE OF SCIENCE 
AND TECHNOLOGY 

(University of London) 

SECRET ARY /SHORTHAND-TYPIST 

with good background of education and secretarial 
training required for undergraduate course office 
offering contact wttti students and industrial training 
peisotmel- Position calls for enthusiasm, initiative 
and abtfty to work in a team. Willingness to use 
word-processor (training given) is desirable. Four 
weeks' holday + extra week Christinas and Easter; 
Season Ticket Loan Schema; good leisure feel — 
including swimming pool; pension scheme: salary in 
range E7278-E8632 Inclusive ot London Weighting. 

Applications, with CV to Mrs K M Dean, Department 
of Mechanical Engineering, imperial Cofege, 
Exhibition Road. SW7 2BX. 


SECttETARY PA wtih shorthand 
for oraanWng 2 mo> In Hofland 
Part area. Immediate man. 
£11.000. Rtag for Imme di ate 
Interview Mrs Dewar Ol 749 
8987 C tty Centre. 
SECWCTAKY audio l lttgnttnm exp. 
Working for partner. £l 1.000. 
Age 26+ For bamedlate inter- 
view ring Mrs Dewar 01 749 
2987. Ctty Centre (Legal). 
SECRETARY audio conveyanc- 
ing cm. Working fbr paruter. 
£ 11.000. Rtag lor immediate 
Interview Mm Dewar 01 749 
2987 City Centre (Legal). 


COURSES 


THE MOUSES STEVENS 
FLOWER SCHOOL 

Three week counts in Rower 
Ananausaad Flonstry beld 
ihnMKhoat (be year. 

Two <&y cooncs also 
available. 

Please nag: 

01-493 *171 far fiader . 

S Brans Street 
W1X7AG. 


French In France. Art HWoiy 
in Florence. MbnaMon from 
John Han. 36 Kings Rd . Lon- 
don SW3 4NB TH. 584 7335. 

VOUCC PRE-UN IV kMS< IT SUM- 
MER COURSE. Information 
from John Halt. 36 Klnos Rd- 
London SW3 4N8. TH 584 
7335. 

WOLSCY MALL: Home study tor 

GCE. Degrees. P retato l. Pro- 
spaetts: Dept AL2. Woteey HalL 
Oxford. 0X2 6PR. TH 0868 
52200 124 fur). 



NEWS/ 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

ASSISTANT 

Internationa] editorial 
director of major oil 
news organisation 
needs assistant to help 
run correspondent 
network with offices in 
London. Singapore, 
Tokyo, etc. 

Organisational skills 
including (be ability to 
cope with unruly 
reporters essential. 
Personal computer 
skills and languages 
would help, loo. 
Mayfair office. 

CV‘s please to> 

Jim Trotter, Platt’s 
Energy Services, 
McGraw-Hill, 

34 Dover Street. 
Lomkm,WlX 4BR 


RENTALS 


Continued from page 22 



cm) af n wA a tto raoc 
Baorri catmm mr oara No dm 
« ta |tt DldK. S rebib 
SnoBBOa. b H6L Hko An HL a 
D Beds. 1 S. Bed Baton Ctom 

SRb. in M aty atcon aw) &' 
osttUy tairaqMaoaadR sd sn 
3d. 3d A «oi near of HUM 
md DBttM E. Htf Heap. C. l 
DM3 S fita. 2 BMtaQTSpw 
aeg 



SHORT LET Chetare. 2 bedroom 
mataOhHU. £350 pw tael. TH 
OI 351 2939. 


_ locally 
located for Knipnctondee and 
South Ken. 2 dM bedroom. Hi- 
ung room, k and b Colour TV 
Full CH. CHW and Her tnc. 
Holiday or Co Ml. 3 months 
max. £360 pw TH 3B1 2939. 


Urgently require rials A houses 
in central London from £160 lo 
£2DOO pw Please call Sally 
Owen or Lorraine Campbell on 
01-937 9684. 


on 01-256 eaoi for too best ■ 
lecdlon of tarntahed ttua and 
hoian lo rent tn KiughEsondse. 
ChHseti and Konttngton. 


W6 half price 
IHHOC Family homo mid Jan 
end May. Company tel only. 
TH: 01 602 7426 


F W GAFP (Management Sec- 
vices) Ltd require properties In 
Central. South and West Lon- 
don Areas for . waiano 
applicants M SI Sfii 8838.- 


W2. SoaciouB one ante bed ftal In 
ganten square. Lge recTP A 
lultir fit. kll/b Iasi rm. natftfm. 
£130 pw TeL 10722) 27144 


Hot). 

day flats/ Inn In London 
•vsaaMe now. Bargain yrtee* 
Palare Properties 01-486 8926 


AMERICAN EXECUTIVE Seeks 
lira flll/hUHC. up ID JEBOOpw 
Usual fees req PhulIM Nay a 
Lewis. South to toe Park. ChH 
sea Office: 01-352 81 1 f or 
North of the Park. Regmrs 
Part office. Ol -686 9882 

£X - MARLBOROUGH pbl. 26. 
N/S. seem flat / maltonrtlo / 
arcoraodation with family in 
central Guildford DOM refs 
avail. Ol 229 1540 


COITAGC In 
Ho noway to tef from Jan. 2 
Beds it dbti. all mod cons, near 
City £120 pw. TH Ol 996 
- 6244 (Thursday evening) 

WIMBLEDON - Charming soul 
level ftal l douMe boa room, 
awn partdng nr station. Com- 
mon and shops £96 p.w 01 
947 3130 


* Vtsuors South Ken- 
inpM. Fully serviced flats for 
2 Lilt. Phono Col TV He. Ol- 
58a £014 or 0372 64281 

WEST HAMPSTEAD Lux 4 bed 
man. near snore a. lube, inter 
corns. CH. garden. £220 pw Co 
let TH: 01-433 1238. 


HAMPSTEAD: 1 bedroom very 

large luxury furnished flat. Co 
let C145BW Tat Ql -348 6936 


IWlz i bed- 
room flat- 5126 pw. needs 
decoration. TH OI 727 3220 


Kensington Cel T.v 24 hr 8w 
Teini Gaungltam Apartments. 
01.373 6306 





Government puts 
more money into 
Aids treatment 


THE TIMES WEDNE SDAY DECEMBER 3M986 “ ~ 

the death of Penhaligon, MP 


-w _ _ 


By Jill Sherman 


' The Government is to allo- 
cate more money for the care 
and treatment of Aids vi ctims, 
the numbers of which are 
doubling roughly every ten 
months. 

; the extra money, expected 
to be announced during the 
next two weeks by Mr Nor- 
man Fowler, Secretary of Slate 
for Social Services, will go 
towards clinical care and 
counselling for Aids patients 
and people with the Aids- 
related virus, HTV. 

' Yesterday a spokesman for 
the Department of Health said 
that the money would be in 
addition to the allocations tor 
health authorities announced 
before Christmas. 

Health authorities, particu- 
larly those in the London area, 
have faced spiralling costs due 
to the increase in the number 
of Aids patients. Although the 
Government recently an- 
nounced an injection of 
£20 million for its public 
education campaign, it has so 
forgiven little extra money for 
victims of the disease. 

In 1985, the three London 
regional health authorities 
which dealt with the majority 
of Aids cases were given a 

Politicians 
honoured in 
new year’s list 

Con turned from page 1 

knighthoods since she became 
prime minister. 

The list contains 54 names 
who have received political 
honours, the large majority 
eminent figures in the Conser- 
vative Party organization 
across the country. Six are 
Liberals recommended by the 
Prime Minister after consulta- 
tion with Mr David Steel, the 
Liberal leader. As usual Mr 
Neil Kinnock made no 
recommendations. 

In the business world Sir 
Terence Beckett, former direc- 
tor general of the CB1, is made 
a KJBE. Mr Dennis landau, 
chief executive of the Co- 
operative Wholesale Society 
and Mr David Scholey, chair- 
man of Mercury International 
also receive knighthoods. 

Other awards include a 
DBE for Miss Sheila Quinn, 
former president of the Royal 
College of Nursing, and a 
knighthood for Mr Peter 
Newsam, chairman of the 
Commission for Racial 
Equality. 


total of £680,000. This year, 
the same regions — North- 
East, North-West and South- 
East Thames — were given a 
total of almost £3ra. 

Next year, all health 
authorities are expecting a 
much bigger allocation. 

Mr Colin Reeves, assistant 
director of finance for the 
North-West Thames region, 
said that the Riverside district 
health authority in West 
London, which neats at least 
half the region’s Aids patients, 
is about to put in a bid for 
£3 million revenue money 
and £1 million -capital for 
1987/88. This year it submit- 
ted a bid for £1.5 million in 
total but was only allocated 
£500.000. 

The Paddington and North 
Kensngton health authority, 
which contains St Mary’s 
Hospital, where many of the 
country's 599 cases have been 
treated, is calling for substan- 
tially more than the £500,000 
it got this year. 

Health economists have es- 
timated that the cost of treat- 
ing and caring for an Aids 
victim is about £2 0,000 per 
patient. 

Thatcher says 
British pride 
back in fashion 

Continued from page 1 

the “steady successes” of the 

1980s. 

Mr Kinnock again took the 
nuclear defence argument 
head-on. One of the six 
choices he highlighted as fac- 
ing the nation was whether 
Bmain “pays to keep up 
nuclear pretence or invests its 
resources property in real 
defence.” 

The others were whether 
Britian was to be a modern 
manufacturing country or a 
warehouse economy; whether 
it employed people and capital 
to maximum advantage or 
surrendered to a future of 
mass unemployment; whether 
it strived for modem stan- 
dards of pensions and health 
care or settled for second rate; 
whether it was to be a country 
of opportunity for women as 
well as men, blade as well as 
white, disabled as well as fit or 
a place where the talents and 
needs of millions continued to 
be ignored because of prej- 
udice and permy-pinching; 
and whether it was to be a 
united, productive and just 
nation or a split society, 
divided stagnant and unfair. 




Mrs Annette Penhaligon, with her son, Matthew, and brother-in-law, Mr John Penhaligon. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Liberal 
leader 
weeps at 
funeral 

By Howard Foster 

Mr David Penhafigoflu the 
Liberal MP, was boned yes* 
terdayra a hillside dose to his 
home town of Truro. A 
COnushman bom and bred, 
the funeral service reflected 
his strong ties with the West 
Country constituency he rep- 
resented for 12 years until his 
frwrth in a car accident three 
days before Christmas. 

Extra sealing was installed 
to accommodate 300 family 
and friends, including Mr 
David Steel the Liberal lead- 
er, and Mr Roy Jenkins, of the 
SDP, who crowded into the 
tiny Victorian church of AD 
Hallows St Kea where Mr 
Penhaligon was married 18 
years ago. 

His widow, Annette, who 

wanted to acknowledge the 
Cornish element of her 
husband's life, chose the local 
hymn, WtB Yotsr Anchor 
Hold, to open the service. 

The wind and ram that had 
lashed the granite church gave 
troy to sunshine as the cortege 
arrived to the sound of muffled 
bells. 

The choir, in red surplices, 
led the procession, followed 
by Mrs Penhaligon, who was 
flanked by her son Matthew, 
aged 14, and brother-in-law, 
John. Her daughter. Anna, 
qgpd pine, remained at home. 

Aithnngh the family had 
requested that wreaths and 
flowers be sent by relatives 
and friends only, die ivy- 
co loured lychgate of the 
church was filled with tributes 
to a man whom die world will 
remember for his rich Conrish 

accents and irrepressible 
sense of hmnonr. 

A message attached to one 
wreath read: “They must have 
had trouble at the pearly gates, 
mechanical and political, to 
call yon away so soon”. Mr 
Penhaligon never tired of tell- 
ing his political colleagues 
that he was a qualified en- 
gineer as well as a Member of 
Parliament 

A wreath from his mother, 
Sadie, aged 73, read: “The 
growth of the oak trees yon 
have planted will continue to 
grow giving strength to us who 
have known and loved yon. 
Mom”. 

The vicar, die Rev Robert 
Redrsp, a family friend, re- 
minded die mourners of Mr 







Mr David Steel and his wife leaving All Hallows St Kea. 



? & 


p .*“**,. 





Mr Roy Jenkins at the 
funeral service. 

Penhaligon’s legendary exube- 
rance. 

“My mind goes back often 
to a garden party a ample of 
years ago. Every one was 
crowding around the dart 
board. David and his opponent 
were each trying to outdo the 
other. The hiianty and laugh- 
ter ami cheers that came out of 
everybody . . . David was a 
man who was always frill of 
laughter and fim,” be said. 

Mr Steel who wept behind 
the coffin as it was carried to 
the graveyard about 40 yards 
from the side entrance of the 
church, said: “David Penhali- 
gon's death was a tragedy 
which was felt throughout the 
nation by people who weren’t 
necessarily of his political 
persuasion but who valued his 
honesty, his humomr and his 
common sense. 

“He will be sadly missed, 
not just by his family and 
friends, but by politics in 
general which is the poorer 
for his passing.” 

Dr David Owen, the SDP 
leader, was unable to attend 
the funeral because of back 
trouble. Bat a ' number of 
Liberal and SDP party figures 


Mr Penhaligon, “a man full 
of laughter and fim”. 

were in attendance, including 
Mr Alan Beith, the Liberal 
deputy leader, and Mr David 
Alton, liberal chief whip. 

Mr John Pardoe, former 
MP for Cornwall North, who 
is mooted as a front runner to 
take Mr Penhaligoo's seal 
denied yesterday that he would 
contest the candidacy. It is 
thought that Mrs Penhaligon, 
who has also been suggested 
as a candidate, will not apply 
for the job because of her 
commitment to her children. 

In her absence, one of the 
safest Liberal seats in Britain 
could be inherited by Mr Paul 
Tyler, tbe former MP for 
Bodmin, who also attended the 
funeral. 

Local people, who respected 
the family’s wish for a private 
service, will attend a memorial 
service in Truro Cathedral at 
2pm mi Saturday, January 10. 

Mr Steel Mrs Penhaligon 
ami Mr Julian Williams, the 
Independent chairman of 
Cornwall Connty Council 
have been appointed trustees 
of the David Penhaligon Me- 
morial Trust which will aim to 
help Cornish people. 


•i :V >' 

/■v" 


l- t 
■ V- £ 

; ■; \ 

I ' * 

\i » 

I c 


Today’s events 

Last chance to see 
Exhibition of paintings, 
sketches and etchings by 
Alexander Charles-Jones. Char- 
lie Mackesy and Harold Sayer; 
Niccol Centre. Brewery Crt. 
Cirencester. 9.30 to 4.30. 

Original gifts by British crafts- 
men; Godfrey & Twatt, 
Contemporary Crafts. 7 West- 


minster Arcade, Parliament Si 
Harrogate; 10 to 5.30. 

Second exhibition of staff and 
student prints from the Royal 
College, Royal Academy and the 
Slade School; Symondsbnry 
School of Art, Bridport; 10 to 4. 

Scunthorpe - 30 years a 
borough; Scunthorpe Museum 
and Art Gallery. Oswald Rd; 10 
to 5. 

The Elements, represented by 
sculpture, paintings, photog- 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17 ,241 



ACROSS 

1 Way to get extra, say? Gm't 
answer that (6). 

4 Exchange employee for one 
in the theatre (8;. 

10 Her hundred and two arti- 
cles are about Ireland (9). 

11 The snake featured in 
Korda's pictures (5). 

12 Miserable old soldiers re- 
jected this dance (7). 

13 Not in a state to accept busi- 
ness pay-off (7). 

14 Murdered man found betide 
Egyptian tree (5 Jl 

15 Latin? No, a different sub- 
ject (8). 

18 Standard weapon, in a man- 
ner of speaking (8). 

20 Jack has a vessel to varnish 

(5). 

23 A security organization ca- 
pable of being friendly (7). 

25 Even California shortly may 
be a segregated area (7). 

26 Game has directions, albeit 
imprecise (5). 

27 Around the Styx, say, 
they're provided for suckers 
(9). 

28 Time turned back so by a 
nymph (8). 

29 Cosed securely, but once 
contained drink (6). 

DOWN 

1 Encourage bird's impudent 
repartee (8). 

2 Shoot — and get a mess like 

fhir 1 ! 


5 One of tbe ruling classes 

equal to 15 (4,233). 

6 Expose to heal as in hill- 
climbing (5). 

7 Apricot not right with a bat- 
ter pudding (7). 

8 Reprimand for a high-flyer 

( 6 ). 

9 Uncomfortable feeling in 
legs — and mostly un- 
necessary (4,3,7). 

16 Article I possess in this case 
(9)- 

17 One in Pans rarely wrote 
poems, being without skill 
( 8 ). 

19 Too fat, surely, to be a girl 
model (7). 

21 Bird finds seed revolting, by 
the sound of it (7). 

22 Dish for father and daugh- 
ter, possibly? (6). 

24 Church worker seen fim as 
supplier of pig food (5). 


Solution to Puzzle No 17340 


raffirosnssn 

[5I3BSEI!1KI0 
!if3B[23En itJHBHSEHCin 
0 H S E B „ 

^Hsacnns arantj 
ns ra e h a a no 
anas ftBEimraHS 

a £3 r3 a , ■ E 

ra am n m e eh 

m is- a m S E E 

anirn t-jnssnESCTH 


. . „ W"** AVfc H 1I1WOO UlUf 

this? (7). 

3 Want fittingly chosen as 
for expedition (9). 

Concise Crossword page 9 
fhe Times Jumbo Crossword will appear tomorrow 


raphy and videos; Milton j 
Keynes exhibition gallery, 555 i 
Silbury Boulevard; 9.30 to 6. 

Paintings, ceramics and 
jewellery by Rosemary 
Lowndes. Elizabeth Raeburn 
and Catherine Mannheim; Ox- 
ford Gallery. 22 High Si 1 0 to 5. 

Music 

Terry Lightfoot and his 
Jazzband; Winter Garden, East- 
bourne: 8.30 to 12.30. 

Blues De-Luxe at Jazz 32. Earl 
| St, Maidstone, Kent; S.30. 

! General 

Torchlight procession, 
commencing with a service in 
Ripon Cathedral and celebra- 
tions on the Market Place to 
mark the close of the Ripon 
1 100 festival yean Die Cathe- 
dral; be seated by 1 1. 

Pinocchiar, Gateshead Inter- 
national Stadium. Neilson Rd; 
2_ 

Christmas night planetarium 
watch programme; 1.15, 2.15. 
3.15; MayerGuided Tours: 130 
and 2.30; Liverpool Museum. 
William Brown Si Liverpool. 

Fantastic Mr Fax : Gardner 
Arts Centre. Sussex University, 
Palmer, Brighton: 2.30. 

Tourist boards 

Who’s Who of British Tourist 
Boards has been published by 
the British Tourist Authority. It 
sets out the responsibilities, 
main activities and principal 
publications of the regional 
boards and of the statutory 
tourist boards. It also lists 
BTA’s overseas offices. 

Who's Who of British Tourist 
Boards is available free from- 
George Horton. BTA. 4 
Bromells Rd. London SW4 
OBJ. 

Help with heating 

Help with Heating, a focisheet 
published by Age Concern Eng- 
land. gives information on fuel 
problems and how best to 
handle them. 

It outlines the financial help 
available to elderly people on 
housing or supplementary bene- 
fit and also details how to apply 

for insulation and draught- 
proofing grams. 

It gives advice on what to do 
when threatened with dis- \ 
connection, and lists addresses j 
for further information. 

Help with Heating, is avail- 
able nee with a stamped ad- 
dressed envelope from the 
Information and Policy Depart- 
ment. Age Concern England. 60 
Pitcairn Road. Mitcham Sur- 
rey. CR4 3LL. 

Anniversaries 

Births: Charles Edward Stu- 
art, ‘Bonnie Prince Charlie'. 
1720; Giovanni Pascoli. poci 
1855; Henri Matisse, painter. 
1869. 

Deaths: John Flamsteed, first 
astronomer royal. 1719: Gus- 
tave Coorbel painter. 1 877: Sir 
Malcolm GunpbelL land and 
water speed record breaker. 
1948. 


Books - biography and history 

Thg Literary Editor’s selection of biography and history of the year: 
Between the Woods and the Water, by Patrick Leigh FBrmor (John Murray, 
E13.95) . . .. 


G. K. Chesterton, by Michael Ffmch (Welder 
Homage to QWERTY UlOP, by Anthony Burj 
Pagans and Christians, by Robin Lane Fox I 
Road to Victory: Winston S. Ctmrchffl If 


(Heinemann, _ 

Some Small Harvest, by Gtyn Daniel (Thames & Hudson. £1255) 
Sound-Shadows of the New World, by Ved Mehta (Coffins, £15) 

Tire Dictionary of National Biography 1971-1960, edited try Lord Blake and’ 
C. S. Nicholls (Oxford, £60) PH 


sss (Hutchinson, £19.95) 
fitting, £17.95) 

*1-1945. by Martin Gilbert 


Travel guide 

British Rail 

New Year's Eve: Normal 
service except some peak hour' 
and late evening trains will not 
run. There will be no overnight 
trains except for Irish Mail boat, 
trains to and from Holyhead. A : 
Saturday service operates on. 
Merseyrail and in Scotland the 
last trains will be running before 
10 pm. 

New Year’s Day; Normal 
service starting about 8 am with 
some alterations. There is no 
service in Scotland, or local 
trains in NE England, and 
Intercity trains will not ran. 
north of Carlisle or Newcastle; 
Sunday service operates on 
Merseyrail and there is a special 
service on the Manchester Vic- 
toria to Southport and Man- 
chester Oxford Road to Chester 
lines. 

January 2: Normal service 
except some peak hour trains 
will not run, Saturday service 
operates on Merseyrail and on 
the Manchester Victoria to Bury 
line. , 

London Transport 

New Year's Eve and January- 
2: Most bus services will run to 
Saturday timetables. 

New Year's Day; Buses and 
Underground will run to Sun- 
day timetables. 

On New Year’s Eve travel on 
London buses and Under- 
ground will be free after 1 1.4S 
pm. 


The pound 


AustralaS 2.17 

Austria Sch 21.00 1330 

Setckra Fr 6230 59.20 

Si £09 ZOO 

Denmark Kr 11 37 10.67 

RntandMck 7.49 639 

France Fr 930 130 

Germany Dm Z9B 231 

Greece Dr 236 216 

Hong Kong S 11.7D 11.20 

Ireland Pr 1.10 134 

Italy Lira 2050 1960 

Japan Yen 247 233 

Netherlands GU X3SS 3.175 

Norway Kr 11-35 10.75- 

PortugalEse 223 211 

South Africa Rd 6-00 400 

Spain Pta 200 190 

Sweden Kr 1030 9.83 

Switzerland Fr 2.49 2JS 

USAS 1-53 1-46 

Yugoslavia Dw 82Q 72Q 

Rates for small denartnation bank nates 
only as suppled by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Different rates apply to travellers' 
cheques and other foreign currency 

business. 

Retail Pnce Index: 371.7 

London: The FT index closed up 13 at 
1308 G. 


r WEATHER \A frontal trough over northern Scotland will move slowly 

v - — as another depression approaches southern Britain. 

In central and northern Scotland it will be rather cold with rain at times and over 
high ground sleet or snow Is likely: mainly dry weather will spread slowly from the 
S. Over the rest of Britain there will be broken dond and scattered showers with 
sleet or snow on northern hills: in southern parts of England and Wales rain may 
become more persistent later. Temperatures will be a little above the seasonal av- 
erage. Outlook for tomorrow and Thursday: Colder with showers or longer periods 
of rain. Snow on northern hills. Overnight frost 

( HIGH TIDES 'l ( AM } ( PM ) 


HIGH TIDES 


Roads 


London and the South-east: 

I A2: Contraflow on the London- 
| bound carriageway at Barham 
I crossroads, Kent. A120: Round- 
about construction along 
Stortford Rd. Gl Dunmow, 
Essex. 

The Midlands: A43: Di- 
versions due to roadworks at 
Brackley on Northampton to k 
Oxford rd. 

The North: MI: Delays be- 
tween junctions 31 and 33 (A57 
Worksop/A630 Rotherham). 
M6: Roadworks at junction 23 
(Merseyside) and contraflow be- 
tween junctions 29 and 32 (A6 
Preston/M55). 

Wales and the west: MS: Lane 
closures due to roadworks at 
Avon/Somerset border. A3&- 
Delays between Exeter and 
Plymouth due to lane closures 
in both directions at Haldon 
Hill. 

Scotland: A77: Single line 
traffic with temporary lights N 
of Ballantyre on Glasgow to Ayr 
rd. 

A92/A978: Restrictions due 
to roundabout' construction be- 
tween King St and St Macbar 
Drive, Aberdeen. 

Information supplied by AA 

New Year calls 

Cheap-rate local, national and 
most international calls will be 
available in England, Wales and 
Northern Ireland from 6 pm 
today to 8 am January 2. 

In Scotland tbe reductions 
will ran to 8 am Monday, 
January 5. 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 


1.23 

8.7 

1.46 

69 

Aberdeen 

1290 

4 3 

1.09 

44 

Avaranouth 

7.03 

13.1 

790 

13(1 

Belfast 

10.40 

3.7 11.06 

35 

Cardiff 

648 

129 

7.15 

129 

Deronport 

5.38 

69 

6.11 

5.4 

Dover 

ia<2 

65 11.19 

6.B 

Falmouth 

5.08 

S3 

5.41 

62 

Glasgow 

Haunch 

1294 

1140 

49 1294 
39 

45 

Htjrhead 

10.02 

6i03 

5.7 1091 
79 634 

5.6 

73 


5.39 

9.1 

697 

9? 

Leffli 

297 

55 

999 

55 

Liverpool 

1059 

95 1197 

9,4 

Lowestoft 

9.07 

25. 924 

25 

Margate 

11.44 

4.7 

- 

ra 


598 

7.0 

627 

7.0 


449 

79 

6.1/ 

7.0 


596 

4 1 

ate 

39 


494 

5.6 

69/ 

55 

Ported 

690 

29 

721 

22 


11.11 

4.7 11A5 

4J 


ms2 

69 1129 

69 

Southampton 

1094 

45 11.11 

45 


694 

95 


95 


121 

SA 


56 

yntun-on-Nze 

1192 

42 1157 

4.1 


AROUND BRITAIN 


-mu- 

„ . . PiJtlBflo - bow to play 
Monday Saturday record your dally 
Portfolio lotai. 

Add these together to determine 
y«ir weekly Portfolio total. 

Jr your total matches me published 
weekly dividend figure you have won 
oumotii or a share of the prfee money 
staled- for that week, and must claim 
your prize as Instructed below. 

No dams can be aMaptM snows meat 

DOWS 

Vou must have your card wllh you 
when you Meoitone. 

N you are unable to telephone 
someone eKc can claim on your behalf 
but they mini nase your card and call 
The Times Portfolio ctatim hne 
between Uw stipulated times. 

No mponattHUty can be accepted 
for failure to eonnei the claims office 
lor any reason wunin trie stated 
hours 

.The above Instructions are ap- 
plicable to both dally find weekly 
dividend claims. 


Scartwro 

Brkfington 

Cramer 

Lowestoft 

Ctocton 

Soettend 

Margate 

Fofcestune 


Brighton 
Worthing 
UttWraptn 
Bognor R 
SQUthaaa 
Sandovn 
Shanttin 
BoumamOi 
Root* 
Swamjo 
Weymouth 

Ejuiouth- 

Trignmoulh 
Torquay 
Falmouth 
Penzance 
ScOy fetes 

Jeraey 

Guernsey 


(Tpool Airpt 

Motecantbe 

n»Kdas 

BhnAM 

Bristol (Ctrl) 

Caiflste 

London 

Manchester 

fTcd-it-TyiM 

Nottingham 


Sun Rain Max 
In in C F 

- .19 9 48 .rain 

- .11 11 52 cloudy 

03 - 11 52 cloudy 

1.5 - 10 50 cloudy 

i:i - 11 52 du« 

* - 11 52 bright 

08 - 11 52 rain 

02 - 11 52 doudy 

0.1 - 11 52 doudy 

- - 9 48 doudy 

0/4 -11 52 rate 

0.1 - 11 52 doudy 

02 - 11 52 cloudy 
0.7 22 11 52 Cloudy 

09 ■ 11 52 bright 

0.1 .02 11 52 cloudy 

- .01 11 52 drizzle 

- .02 12 54 cut 

- .06 11 52 shower 

- - 11 52 dud 
09 .02 12 54 doudy 
21 .(ft 12 54 doudy 

03 -04 12 54 bright 

* - 12 54 dl2f 

09 .01 12 54 doudy 
0-3 - 11 62 bright 

1.0 - 12 54 doudy 

09 - 12 54 cloudy 

- - 12 54 doudy 

■ .20 11 52 rain 

0.1 22 9 48 rate 

- 24 9 48 rain 

- .19 11 52 rate 

1.1 • 11 52 shower 

09 JM 11 52 sowers 

- .44 6 48 rate 

0.1 - 11 52 doudy 

09 .04 11 52 rate 

- 49 8 4fi rate 
0.1 91 10 50 rate 

- .07 10 SO ram 
l - .08 10 50 rain 

* .03 13 55 doudy ' 

- 92 11 52 ram 

- 4 39 doudy 

- .23 4 39 ram 
r - 3b 5 41 rain 

- 90 4 38 Sfoet 

- .06 4 39 doudy 
09 .04 4 39 haH 

- .64 5 41 rate 

- .04 5 41 doudy 

- 90 3 37 ram 

- 98 ♦ 39 shower 

- .11 10 50 ran 


f XJ ** 

4 





%“7 * 


B,Sn m & 



0 


'h civ* ^SSSTtw? sS ri'j'iii .^SSSi L. 


S'. ©V -MODERATE 

LIGHTING-UPTIME 


London 431 pm to 796 are 
Bristol 4.41 pm to 7.46 am 
E dtotnre rii 4.18 pm to 8.14 are 
M a n ch e st er 4.29 pm to 795 are 
Penzance 499 pm to 791 am 


LONDON 


mean sea levs*. 6 pm, 10009 mSbers] 
rising 

1,000 m*bare-2993ta. 


1 - 1 4 * *rOOERATE j 

■ Sot rises: Sunsets: 

a 06 are 4.01 pm 

Moon rises Moon sets 
999 are 356 pm 

New moon 3.10 am 

( YESTERDAY ) 

Temperatures at midday yesterday: c, 
doud; f. fair; r, ram: s, sun. 

C F C F 

Belfast c 948 Guernsey r 1050 
BYrnghani r 11 52 Inverness c 439 
Blackpool c 1050 Jersey r 1050 
Bristol r 11 52 London r 11 52 
Cardiff r 1050 Mtochster c 1050 
Ean b urg h r 541 N c wc a tete r 643 
Gtesgow r 439 H’nJdsway r1050 


NOON TODAY 






/y- 






ABROAD 

MKXMY: c, doutt d. drizzle; t, tdr tg. tog; r. rate; s, sun; an, snow; L thunder. 


Cardin (CM) - .06 10 50 rain 

Cofcryn Bay • .03 13 55 doudy' 

Teahy - 22 11 52 ram 

Aberdeen - 4 39 doudy 

Edinburgh - -23 4 39 rate 

Eakflatomuif -3b 5 41 rate 

Glasgow - 90 4 39 stoat 

Kintoss - 96 4 39 doudy 

Lerwick 09 .04 4 39 haU 

Prestwick - .64 5 41 rate 

Sto rn ow ay - .04 5 41 doudy 

Thee - 90 3 37 ran 

Wick - 98 4 39 shower 

BeUast - .11 10 50 rate 

These are Monday's figures 
-Figures not a*afta»« 

grriMES NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 
r*iee. Printed bv London .Post r Print- 


AkrotM 

JUnraria 

Algiers 

Amsfdm 

Athens 

Bahrain 

Baibads* 

Bareetoa 

Bated 


C F 

c 13 55 Cotogne 
s 15 59 Cphagn 
f 16 61 Corfu 
s 17 83 Dublin 


C F 

r 9 48 Maj orca 
s 0 32 ttteaga 
1 14 57 casta 
r 11 52 MeBt'rac 


9 48 D u bro vn ik c 12 54 Mexico C 


s 16 61 Faro s 16 61 Miami* 

s 21 70 Florence c B 46 Hian 
s 28 82 Frankfurt r B 46 Momma 
S 10 50 Funchal c 17 63 Moscoe 
Grama s 6 43 Munich 
s 13 55 GteraHar s 14 57 Nairobi 
I 4 39 HsMsrid sn -8 18 Naples 


ers) limited of 1 Virginia Street. 
London Cl 9XN and by News 
Scotland Ud.. 134 Penman Street. 


Bermuda' 
Biarritz 
Borde'x 
. Bourne 
Brasses 

B Aires* 

Catau 

CapeTn 

Cbianea 

Chicago* 

Ch’churcb 


C F 

S 15 59 Rome a 
s 14 57 SaUbwg c 
C 14 57 S Frisco* I 
1 35 95 Saretago* s 
S Prado* c 
I 23 73 Seoul r 
S 6 43 Stogtoor f 


s 20 68 HongX 
1 12 54 I wfeu ra h 
S 11 52 IctanM 
Jeddah 
r 9 48 JotMire* 
r 7 45 Kraxcn 


in *8 18 Naples 
f 20 BS MMM 
I 6 43 N York* 
s 11 52 Wee 
s 25 77 Osfo> 
f IS SB Paris 
C 21 70 Peking 


s 29 84 L Patera s 20 68 Path 
f 16 81 Lisbon fg 8 46 Prague 

5 22 72 Locarno s 8 48 Rsytnil 


s 12 54 LAngois* s 19 66 Rhodes 
e 0 32 Lu5toratog d 6 43 RtodeJ 
c 12 54 Madrid s 5 41 


-sn 13 9 Stmsb’rg f 
C 9 48 Sydney s 
f 25 77 Tamper f 
f 14 57 Tetavhr I 
s 18 84 Tenerife s 
I 4 39 Tokyo s 
e 9 48 Toronto* c 
9 11 12 Tunis t 
c 10 50 Valencia s 
Vanc'W r 
t 23 73 Venice s 
sn 0 32 Vienna s 
S -2 28 Warsaw f 
S 13 55 Wash too* s 
c 23 73 WeTnton c 
s 26 79 Zurich f 



* denotes Monday’s figures are latest avadatae 


/ 



•V 


ty < JS 


on 




-jiv-"- * !“■■ •■ iic *■ W 

:.- + : -.'■ •• ; vivvrnsC-v'j 


m 





< **' 



:r i ■ 

'-" j ndfu n - 

•^avs 


. , , 

■ 'ihJisun’i k 

- & 

7 y ? <nb& 
-*'■' «*» s»*s. 

' : * jle - S| H BW jjp 

brt Ju» *4 
-j her cbildns, 

• - ’-.Sis. OTfc of c 

in Bii 

' •-; ,, a In M;p- 

• ' ■'Tier \|p { 

• ' “"•iCjluat; 

■ ; : U : 1 f«p«i 

i-r j pni; 

" • ' '- J iHHifc 
- • ■ ' v -uh^itn] . 
I^amrj ;» 

; ' '■•!•* Kali 

• -' '■’ MLHv & 

■ - ■ .'j'rKi ■ 

-■': Owe 
-'■ ■-it 
- \ 


■ .-.-t Brie 

>r'J' i QP 

. .. -u inu; 

■i-; 

■«:!•.> rain i 
v. 'jjvuul: 




7 - a£ 


— -.7 /-V 






BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 


Wall Street 18 
Money Mrkts 18 
PoretHi Exrh 18 
Traded Opts 18 
T«bd» 19 
Co Ne»s 19 


Comment 19 
Stock Market 19 
Unit Trusts 20 
Commodities 20 
USM Prices 20 
Share Prices 21 



TIMES 


17 

SPORT 23 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 27 


WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 

STOCK MARKET 

FT 30 Share 
1308.6 (+1.5) 

FT-SE 100 
1673.1 (+1.5) 

Samains 
25720 (22827) 

USM (Data stream) 
130.65 (+0.19) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 
1 .4690 (+0.0010) 

W German marie 
2.8601 (+ 0 . 0078 ) 

Trade-weighted 
59.0 (+0.1) 

US leading 
indicators 
rise 1.2% 

The US index of leading 
indicators, the government's 
main barometer of economic 
trends, rose a healthy 1.2 per 
cent in November after a 
revised 0.5 per cent increase in 
October, the Commerce De- 
partment said yesterday. 

The index, which measures 
a wide spectrum of economic 
activity, foreshadows the eco- 
nomy’s performance in three 
to six months’ time. 

The department had pre- 
viously said the index rose 0.6 
per cent in October. The 
November increase was the 
hugest since January 1985 
when the index rose 1.3 per 
cent, and matched gains of i .2 
per cent in April 1986 and 
December 1985. 

Hillsdown in 
£8.5m buy 

Hillsdown Holdings, the 
acquisitive food manufac - , 
luring to furniture company, j 
is buying Forrest Hodgkin son ! 
Holdings for about £8.5 1 
million.Forrest made taxable 
profits of £860,000 in the year 
to June 30. The company, 
which produces animal by- 
products and high-quality tal- 
lows. meat and bone meal 
had net assets of £7.95 
million. 

$lm contract 

A SI million' (£685,000) 
contract has been placed with 
Buiterley Engineering of Rip- 
ley/Derbyshire, to supply a 
1.500-ton bunker for the Beth- 
lehem Mines Corporation 

Siebe buy 

Siebe, the engineering 
group, is stepping up its 
expansion plans in the United 
States. It is paying £19.6 
million for W.H. Salisbury of 
Chicago, Illinois, which makes 
high voltage electrical safety 
equipment Salisbury made 
profits of £2.5 million on 
turnover of £128 million last 
year. 

Forecast lifted 

Fothergill & Harvey, the 
advanced materials processor, 
has forecast second-half pre- 
tax profits 23 per cent higher, 
making a total of £2.7 million 
for the year, h also forecasts 
an II per cent rise in the total 
dividend to 9.75p and again 
urges shareholders to reject 
the £28.2 million bid from 
Courts u Ids. 

ITT $3bn deal 

The ITT Corporation is to 
transfer its telecommunica- 
tions operations to a joint 
venture with the French 
Compagnie Generale 
d’Electricile for $125 billion 
(£852 million) in cash includ- 
ing repayment of inira-com- 
pany debt and a 37 per cent 
interest in the new company 
valued at $1.6 billion. 


Strong backing for Tories 

CBI confident 
for New Year 


By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 

Britain's manufacturing in- growth and better prospects more than offset the loss to 
duslries, though still Strug- for business. bring a slow bin sieadv fall in 

filing to boost their Output in manufacturing unempl 
international competitive- should rise by more than 3 per 100,000 
ness, are nevertheless entering cent during the year, he said- CBI s 
the New Year with confidence “The economy as a whole is tou i u 
without their traditional likely lo grow by 2.7 per cent, 
hangover. with export demand and c m Ai n ., 


hangover. 

Stable wage rates, the pros- 
pect of tax cuts as government 
revenue from North Sea oil 
rises and privatization pro- 
ceeds enter the system, plus a 
booming export potential all 
bode well in what seems 
certain to be an election year. 

The Confederation of Brit- 
ish industry-, always the sup- 
porter of righi-of-centre poli- 
tical party policies thaL will 
benefit and sustain the free 
enterprise system, has for the 
first time openly put its mus- 
cle behind a Conservative win' 
and warned the country of 
what it secs as the dire 
consequences of a Labour 
victory. 

More privatization, more 
cuts in public expenditure, less 
Government tinkering with 
industry, continuing low infla- 
tion rates, and lower interest 
rates are seen by industry as 
the priorities. 

Mr David Nickson. the CBI 
president, said in his New 
Year message today that 1987 
should bring with it a quicken- 
ing in the rate of economic 


with export demand and 
investment joining consumer 
spending as the engines of 
growth.” 

Exports, he said, were al- 
ready benefiting from the 
lower pound ana should in- 
crease by more than 3 per 
ccnL Imports were likely to 
increase even faster, however, 
leading to a current account 
deficit of about £2 billion. 

Mr Nickson warned of 
fewer jobs in manufacturing in 
1987. but demand for labour 
by service industries should 



Nfckson: ‘picture is 
steady growth* 


bring a slow bur steady fall in 
unemployment of about 
100.0(a) over the year. 

CBI staff forecasts point to 
total unemployment falling 
below 3 million by 1988. 
Employment in manufac- 
turing is expected to decline 
by 8.000 a month in 1987 and 
slow to 6,000 a month in 1 988. 
although employment in the 
service sector is expected to 
continue to rise. 

Mr Nickson said; “Overall, 
the picture is one of steady 
growth in line with the in- 
crease in world trade. 

“International markets will 
continue to be intensely 
competitive and the ability of 
British firms to win a larger 
share will depend on their 
success in holding down costs, 
particularly unit labour costs. 

Mr Nickson, chairman of 
Scottish & Newcastle Brew- 
eries, believes that Industry 
Year, which ends today, has 
improved public awareness of 
the importance of wealth cre- 
ation. 

“But Britain needs to be 
industrious every year if we 
are to generale the increased 
wealth needed to improve 
living standards,” he said. 

The coming year has been 
designated Europe’s Year of 
the Environment 



Prior Call by 
bars gas MP for 
share tin debt 
sellers meeting 


World economy 

Yen boost Tightest Japanese 
fo B !'£°!L ar budget in 32 years 


By Rodney Lord 
Economics Editor 

The dollar rallied yesterday 
after a rather different mess- 
age about the Japanese 
government's preferred dol- 

iar-yen rate to- that indicated 
at the weekend. 

Mr Kiichi Miyazawa, the 
Japanese finance minister, 
said the dollar needed to 
strengthen by up to 10 yen to 
about Y170. This followed 
earlier remarks by Mr Satoshi 
Sumiia. the Japanese central 
bank governor, that a lower 
dollar-yen rate of Y! 59-Y 160 
would be acceptable. 

The dollar closed at 
Y 159.90, compared with an 
opening of YI60.45 and a 
previous close of YI 59.05. 
Dealers said the fluctuations 
were exaggerated by thin trad- 
ing. Against the mark the 
dollar traded quietly at about 
DM1.9480. 

Sterling rose with the dollar, 
closing little changed against 
the US currency at $1.4685. 
Cross rates against continental 
currencies firmed with the 
mark rate te pfennig higher at 
DM2.8614. The sterling index 
dosed 0. 1 above the previous 
close at 69, the same level as 
before Christmas. 

Sterling continued to attract 
support from the firmer oil 
price and the intention of 
Saudi Arabia and Kuwait to 
return to fixed prices on 
February 1. Market move- 
ments. however, were de- 
scribed as largely technical. 

Mr Stephen Lewis, econom- 
ics director of Phillips and 
Drew, said: “The general view 
is still that the next move in 
British interest rates is more 
likely to be up than down, but 
the fear of a sterling crisis in 
January has receded.” 

Three-month money in the 
interbank market generally 
regarded as a bellwether of 
bank base rates, was frac- 
tionally easier at 1 1 ’/a per cent 


From David Watte, Tokyo 


The Japanese government’s 
1987 budget features the 
smallest increase in spending 
in 32 years. 

Only defence, up 5.2 per 
cent and overseas develop- 
ment aid, increased by 5.3 per 
cent have been allowed to rise 
significantly in a 54,101 bil- 
lion yen (£231.7 billion) 
budget 

But the budget is unlikely to 
meet Western hopes that Ja- 
pan would help to lead the 
world out of recession. 

Japanese officials who say 
the budget will be “mildly 
stimulative” believe the year’s 
delay before the introduction 
of new taxes should provide a 
stimulus of some 4 per cent in 
domestic demand next year. 
They expea external demand 
to contract by 0.5 per cent 
giving growth of 3.5 per cent. 


As an added stimulus to the 
shift of emphasis from exports 
to imports, Exim Bank loans 
for exports, wifl Jms YI78 
billion in fiscal” 1987 "com- 
pared with this year's Y325 
billion. Loans for import and 
investment finance will rise 
from Y362 billion to Y397 
billion. 

The government admits, 
however, that much of the 
Y25.279 billion fiscal invest- 
ment and loan programme is i 
dependent on the central gov- 
eminent succeeding in con- 
vincing cash-rich local autho- 
rities to increase spending. 

The budget is also predi- 
cated on the belief that the 
much-publicized savings rate 
will continue at the same pace, 
despite the introduction of 
taxes on small accounts. 


Michael Butt to head expansion at Eagle Star 

New chief for Eagle Star 

By Alison Eadie Mr Butt, who is 44, said 

Mr Michael Butt is leaving yesterday his more to Eagle 
Sedgwick Group after 22 years Star will not involve him in 
to become chief executive of competition with Sedgwick. 
F*» pip Star, the insurance “It was particularly important 
subsidiary of BAT Industries, to me not to be in the same 
on March 1. business,’' he said. Eagle Star 

He will also join the arts as a principal in insnr- 

board of BAT and succeed Sir mice, whereas Sedgwick is an 
Jasper Hollom as chairman of intermediary. 

Eagle Star during 1987. He His brief will be to expand 
was a deputy chairman of Eagle Star both through ao- 
Sedgwick Group and chair- quisitions and organically, 
man of Sedgwick Ltd, the BAT is bnilding op its finan- 
group's worldwide insurance dal services through Eagle 
broking arm. Star and Allied Dunbar. 


By Alison Eadie 
Mr Michael Bcrtt is leaving 
Sedgwick Group after 22 years 
to become chief executive of 
Eagle Star, the insurance 
subsidiary of BAT Industries, 
on March 1. 

He will also join the main 
board of BAT and succeed Sir 
jasper Hollom as chairman of 
Eagle Star during 1987. He 
was a deputy chairman of 
Sedgwick Group and chair- 
man of Sedgwick Ltd, the 
group’s worldwide insurance 
broking arm. 

North Sea oil 
production 
starts to slip 

North Sea oil production 
has started to fell from the 
peak of 2.7 million barrels a 
day it readied during the 
summer months. 

Production in December 
totalled 2.48 mbd acording to 
the latest Royal Bank of 
Scotland ofl price index. It 
forecasts 2.56 mbd average 
The value of oil output is 
continuing to rise as the world 
price firms but although nine 
smaller fields increased 
production this was offset by 
reductions in output from the 
giant Brent, Forties and Mag- 
nus fields. 


By Cliff Feltham 

Details of the events leading 
up to the unexpected decision 
of the Department of Trade to 
send in a provisional liq- 
uidator to the securities dealer 
Prior Harwin two days before 
Christmas are likely to emerge 
when the company holds its 
annual meeting today. 

Investors who dealt through 
Prior Harwin — mainly to sell 
British Gas shares — will not 
be admitted to the meeting 
although many questions are 
certain to be raised by the 200 
shareholders, many of whom 
bought and sold shares 
through the company. 

The special manager ap- 
pointed to the company. Mr 
lan Bond, of accountants 
Deloitte, Haskins and Sells is 
expeaed to give details of its 
financial position. 

Unofficial estimates put the 
company’s assets at close to £ 1 
million but there arc no firm 
ideas on the size of its 
liabilities. 

At the close of the meeting 
Mr Tony Prior, the Prior 
Harwin chairman, will make a 
Statement on the Department 
of Trade decision to force bis 
company to stop trading. A 
winding-up petition is due to 
be heard in the High Court 
next month. 

Meanwhile, cheques are 
now being sent to about 500 
investors whose allotment let- 
ters arrived after the special 
manager's appointment But 
an estimated 3,000 other cli- 
ents must await the outcome 
of the court action before 
knowing whether they have 
lost all or part of their money. 

A constant stream of anx- 
ious investors concerned 
about their money have vis- 
ited the Prior Harwin offices 
since the arrival of the special 
manager and his team. They 
are all being advised to set out 
their claims in writing which 
can be handled after the court 
hearing. 


By Colin Narbrough 

Mr Kenneth Warren. MP. 
the Conservative chairman of 
the select committee on trade 
and industry, yesterday called 
on the Government to request 
an emergency meeting of the 
22 countries behind the Inter- 
national Tin Council. 

He wants the meeting to 
work out “collective 
responsibility” for the 
organisation's debts. 

His appeal followed 
Monday's disclosure that a 

£ >up of the ITCs creditor 
nks are bringing claims for 
more than £300 million 
against the British Gov- 
ernment and the other states 
who are signatories to the ITC 
agreement 

Three banks — Klein wort 
Benson, Australia and New 
Zealand Bank and Arbulhnot 
Latham Bank — had High 
Court writs served on the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry just before Christ- 
mas. At least seven more are 
likely to follow. 

The ITC collapsed in Octo- 
ber last year when it could no 
longer finance its buffer stock 
— used to regulate the world 
tin price. The banks' legal 
moves come alongside at- 
tempts by 1 1 metal brokers to 
recover £165 million oflosses 
arising from the ITC failure. A 
High Court judgment is due in 
mid-January on a brokers’ 
petition to have the ITC 
wound up. 

A DTI spokesman said the 
Government stance remained 
unchanged. “We do not accept 
any liability for the debts of 
the ITC." 

Mr Warren said that he 
would table a question when 
Parliament reconvenes next 
week, asking the Government 
to state its position. He would 
also bring the matter of the 
ITC debt claims to his 
committee’s attention. The 
Government is due to reply 
formally by the end of Feb- 
ruary 


Go-ahead for US airliner 


By Teresa Poole. 

Business Correspondent 

McDonnell Douglas, the 
US aircraft manufacturer, yes- 
terday gave the go-ahead for 
its new MD-t! long-range 
airliner, and said deliveries 
would begin in April 1990. 

The announcement puis re- 
newed pressure on the Euro- 
pean Airbus consortium 
which has planned for its rival 
aircraft — the A-330 and A- 
340 - to enter service in 1992. 

McDonnell Douglas said 
orders and options worth $9 
billion (£6.16 billion) have 
been received for its aircraft. 
Twelve customers have or- 
dered a total of 52 MD-lls 





The MD-11: long-range 
and taken options on another 
40. It also emerged that Rolls- 
Royce. the British aircraft 
engine manufacturer, is in 
detailed talks with McDonnell 
Douglas about the suitability 
of its RB21 1-524D4D engine 
for the MD-1 1. 

Rolls-Royce said technical 
issues were being addressed 
and business arrangements 
reviewed “with the intention 
of concluding an agreement" 
with McDonnell. 

It is likely that McDonnell 


would then offer buyers of the 
MD-1 1 a choice between the 
Rolls-Royce engine and two 
US engines, the PW4QOO from 
Pratt and Whitney and the 
CF6-80C2 from General 
Electric. 

The RB21 1-524D4D was 
the engine chosen by British 
Airways in August for its new 
fleet of Boeing 747-400 jumbo 
jets. 

Earlier this week Airbus 
■Industrie announced that a 
consortium, including Rolls- 
Royce, had been selected to 
manufacture the engines for 
the A-340. 

But so far Airbus has no 
customers for its new aircraft 


New Year Honours 


White knights in the City 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


Nor York 

Dow Jones 

Tokyo 

NftkeiDow 

Hong Kong: 

Hang Seng 

Amsterdam: Gen 

Sydney: AO 

Frankfurt 
Commerzbank ... 
Brussels: 

General — . 

Pahs: CAC 

Zurich: SKA Gen 
London: FT. A .... 

FT. Gifts 

Closing prices 


1904.67 (-7.45)* 
Closed 


RISES: 

Whltecroft 

WHSams Holdings .. 
F. Copson 


— 248p 


... 2559.36 (+6.91) 
i ....... 278.4 (-1.1) 

1470.2 (+2.7) 

...... 2048.4 1-2.6) 

. 4095.61 (+14.10) 

398.4 (-7.4) 

.... 558.10 (+6.10) 

....Z.B3.52 [+02T) 

Pago 21 


Ipeco — 

1 (+6.91) B8A Group 

.4 f— 1.1) Yorkshire TV 

2 (+2.7) Bernard Matthews - 


1O0j 

— 113f 

142, 

194, 

— 284p 

675p (+10p) 

.... 450p (+45p) 

— 285p +12p) 
.... 617p +12p) 

— 245p +17p) 
.... 595p +13p) 
_1575pt+12p) 


INTEREST RATES 

London: Bank Base: 11% 
3-month- Interbank 1 1 K-1 1 
3-month eligible biBs:10 n ic- 31 32% 


buying rate 

US: prime Rate 7’4% 

Federal Funds 15%- 

3-month Treasury Bins 5.6B-5.66"** 

30-year bonds 100 6 i«rl00 ,l w»* 

CURRENCIES 


London: 

£: $1.4890 
S: DM2.8601 
£: SwFr2.39Ql 
£ FFr9.4714 
£ Yen234.97 
£: Index '69.0 


New York: 

S: £1.4690’ 

S: DM19460* 

$: SwFr1.6255‘ 
$• FFr6.4420* 

S- Yen1S9.85‘ 
Sc Jndex:108.9 


ECU £0.725956 SDR £0.836022 I * Denotes latest trading price 


Bernard Matthews - 

Hillards 

MelaJ Closures 

Liberty 

Barton Transport .... 

Hunslet 

Pearson 

Appledore Group — 

Midland Bank 

Pearl Assurance ..... 

Standard Secs 

British Aerospace ... 


APV 582PMIW 

Western Motor I96p (-12p) 

Prices are as at 4pm 


GOLD 

London Fixing: 

AM $389.40 pm-$388-7S 
close $389.50*390.00 (£265.00- 
265-50) 

Maw York: 

Comex $388.80-389.30* 

NORTH SEA OIL 

Brant (Feb) pm S17.75bbl ($17.80) 
• Denotes latest trading price 


Industrial and financial 
leaders who have been in the 
for^ttmt of change — from the 
thrust for exports to Big Bang 
in the City — figure in an 
honours list notable for the 
inclusion of many business 
personalities. 

New growth areas like 
retailing and leisure, aad the 
s mall business sector, also 
receive recognition. 

There are nine bssiness 
knights. Two from the City are 
David Sc holey, chairman of 
Mercury International Group, 
and Mark Weinberg, who was 
Chairman of the route-finding 
Marketing and Investments 
Board Organising Committee 
(Miboc) and who then became 
deputy chairman of the Securi- 
ties and Investments Board 
(SIB). 

Mr Scboley beads one of the 
biggest City conglomerates 
that includes S G Warburg, 
the merchant trank, MnUins 
the Government broker, and 
Rowe & Pitman, the Queen’s 
stockbroker. Mercury is in the 
van of the battle against fierce 
foreign competition 

Mr Weinberg is the life 
assurance luminary whose! op 
Allied Dunbar, now one of the 
biggest life assurance com- 
panies. 

Another City leader, George 
Nissea, who has bad a number 
of key appointments at the 
Stock Exchange and who 
played a crucial rote in getting 
the new gilts system opera- 
tional, receives a CBE. 

FERRANTI 

Knighthoods earned by ser- 
vices to Britain's export drive 
go lo Derek Alun-Jones, 
managing director and chief 
executive of Ferranti, the de- 
fence electronics specialist 
and Jeffrey Benson, the 
banker who is chairman of the 
Export Guarantees Advisory 
Council. 


Defence electronics prod- 
ucts account for 60 per cent of 
Ferranti’s turnover and a fifth 
of that is exported. Ferranti 
has been notably successful in 
breaking into the tough United 
States market with safes of 
technology to prime defence 
contractors. 

Mr Benson is a deputy 
chairman of National West- 
minster Bank and a former 
president of the Institute of 


Among the other business 
knights is one of the leaders in 
the construction world, Fran- 
cis Gibb, chairman and chief 
executive of Taylor Woodrow. 
He is a member of the council 
of the Confederation of British 
Industry. 





There is a knighthood for 
Bernard Ashley, chairman of 
La ora Ashley, and the 
organising force behind this 
international fashion empire 
even before his wife's untimely 
death. 

Dennis Landau, who joined 
the Co-operative Wholesale 
Society in 197J and has for the 
past six years been its chief 
executive spanning not only 
Co-operative mannfactnring 
bat some retailing, is also 
awarded a knighthood. 

The two other business 
knights are Robert Duthie, the 
accountant who is chairman of 
the Scottish Development 
Agency, and Keith Bright, 
chairman and chief executive 
of London Regional 
Transport. 

There are two notable KBE 
awards. One goes lo Sir 
Terence Beckett, who is to 
retire shortly after six years as 
director-general of the Confed- 
eration of British Indnstry- 


His “bare knuckle" speech 
seems to be fading into history 
as the CBI has thrown its 
weight behind Tory policies. 

ICIBIII 


Viscount CaMecote. chair- 
man of 3i (Investors in In- 
dustry), Britain’s leading 
venture capital organization, is 
the other KBE. This doyen 
amoag professional engineers 
has been at the bead of 3i since 
1980, daring a crucial period 
for business start-ops. 

Among other leading 
businessmen awarded the 
CBE are A lick Rankin, gyoup 
chief executive at Scottish & 
Newcastle Breweries, Joseph 
Crouch, until recently director 
of marketing at Cable and 
Wireless, Robert Evans, chief 
executive of British Gas, and 
Alan Hatchett, deputy chair- 
man of Peninsular and Ori- 
ental Containers. 


Which broker now offers 
more technology 
more backing 
and more service? 




In the small business sector 
a CBE goes to Stephen 
O’Brien, chief executive of 
Business in the Community, 
the umbrella body for local 
enterprise agencies. 

That fashionable source of 
job creation, the ieisore in- 
dustry, also gains an honour. 
A CBE goes to John Broome, 
chief executive at Alton 
Towers, the man who gave 
Britons their first real taste of 
a Disney-styfe (heme park. 


Youtve got it in 1 

No. I London Bridge, that is. Sheppards' new home. 

it houses die very latest computer systems, so we con 
give our clients swifter dealing information. And it's home 
to die BAH group, whose backing mokes our autiiority in 
die market even stronger. 

Add 10 this die quality of our ad rice, and youll see 
wlwr we mean by ’more service! 

Call us and see for yourself. Now we're at No. 1, you're 


numherone. 


Sheppards 

rsr BAli # 


Nu. 1 London llridgc, London SKI 9QUL Telephone: 01-378 7000. Telex: 888282. Fax: 01-378 7585. 
A Member of The Stock FxcJiange. 


t 


i 


f 


i 



I 


.$/ 


li. 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


British Coal poised 
for ‘watershed’ year 


Fire, tw ym Rig tone- then came a series of great explosionsjntheOty 


Year of reverberations 


Forty years after 


nationalization , 
chairman Sir 


■ v 

.r 

i * 


Robert Haslam 


looks forward to 


further increases 


in productivity 


The year 1987 will provide a 
watershed for the coal in- 
dustry, Sir Robert Haslam, 
chairman of British Coal, has 
told staff in a message to mark 
the 40th anniversary of the 
industry's nationalization. 

He said that productivity in 
the pits was standing at a 
record 3.64 tonnes a manshift 
with the record being broken 
eight times in recent weeks 
and some areas producing 
more than four tonnes a 
manshift Seven of the nine 
areas of British Coal were now 
operating profitably. 

“1 know of no other in- 
dustry which has recently 
matched our productivity ad- 
vance over the year of 23 pa 
cent. In fact, in the past 12 
months we have made sub- 
stantially more progress in 
improving productivity than 
in the previous 1 2 years, when 
the increase over this long 
period was only J per cent a 
year.’" 



T 


Champion of coal; Sir Robert Haslam after visiting the 
coalface at Bickershaw Colliery, Manchester 


Sir Robert said the industry 
lo break 


remained on target to 
even in 1988-89. 

“It is with great confidence I 
express the belief that in two 
to three years' time we will yet 
again have a stable and pros- 
perous coal industry to which 
we will all be proud to 
belong.” 

The industry should com- 
plete its reorganization pro- 
gramme by the spring whicb 
would allow increased recruit- 
ment of young people and 
allow existing workers to plan 
their careers in mining. 

“By the spring, the industry 
should be entering calmer 
waters after the widespread 
and dramatic restructuring of 
the past This will be replaced 
by the measured and healthy 
restructuring which is normal 
in an extractive industry.” 
The chairman said be hoped 


that the problems arising from 
the year-long national strike 
would soon be finally re- 
solved. It . was the 
management's intention that 
it would adopt an even- 
handed policy towards the 
National Union of Minework- 
ers and the Union of Demo- 
cratic Mineworkers. 


“Having returned to the 
coal industry where I began 
my career, ! have rejoined the 
small band of people who 
were working at the collieries 
at the time of nationalization 
and are still here. 


“Many, but not all of 
people's aspirations at that 
time for the future have been 
realized in 40years of public 
enterprise. The dominant 
change in our industry is that 
in 1947 the industry was 
virtually an energy monopoly. 


but it now feces fierce com- 
petition from oil, imported 
coal, gas and electricity gen- 
erated by nuclear and other 
sources. 

“Consequently, there has 
been a major change in the 
size and scale of the industry. 
Never has this change in our 
environment been more 
starkly demonstrated than in 
1986 when, following the col- 
lapse of oil prices, we immedi- 
ately had lo concede £400 
million a year of sales revenue 
to our customers.” 

Sir Robert added: “Impres- 
sive achievements with 
greatly improved performance 
at colleries and cost reduc- 
tions in all our activities have 
ensured a major change in the 
coal industry’s prospects.” 

David Young 

Energy Correspondent 


MONEY & GOLD 


WALL STREET 


BaeRates% 
Clearing Banks 11 
Finance House 11% 


Discotrat Market Loans % 
Overnight High: 11 Low 1 
Week See* 10ft 
Treasury BBs (Discount %) 


2n intfi 10* 

3 mnth 10"<s 


2mmn 10"i. 

3mmn 10 % 


r Billsfpiscount %) 

I0=*u2 mnth 


1 mnth Utyn-1 
Smnth 10 ll is-10> , 376mntti 10 2 i *-10 , »e 
T rade BMs (Discount %) 

1 mntti n n» 2mrth 11 * 

3 rrmth 11 6 i* Smnth 11*33 


(%) 


Overnight open 11 ctose 6* 

1 weak 11 K- 11 * Smith ii u-li>i t 
1 mntti 11 X- 11 H Smrhi 11 K- 11 * 

3mn#i 11 »b-ti»» ttmft ll J w-11'n 


Local Authority Deposits (%) 

2 days 10* 7 days 10* 

Imnth 10* 3nmth 11 

6imth 11 12 mtfi 11 


Local Authority Bands {%) 
imnth 11 K- 11 K 2mnth ii*-ii* 


Smnth ll*-m 
9 mnth 11»iB-il* 


Smnth ll'w-lix 
12mth 11%-11U 


Staffing CDs (%) 


1 mnth ii*,#. 
Smnth lix-ii 
Defer CDs (%) 

1 mnth 655-6.45 
6 mnth 6 . 10 - 6.00 


3mmh m*-ii<» 
12mth t0»^-l0Mi« 


3 mnth 620-6.10 
12mth 6.1 0-6. 00 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 10-20 
Smnth Pie-S^ia 


7 days 5!J-5 
3 mnth 4 Ui#-4'*ib 
F lench franc 
7 days 1QX-10 
3 mnth 10-9* 


7 days 2%-2% 
Smnth 3 13 m 


7 days 4%-«* 
3 mnth 4%-4% 


caJJ 7-6 

Imnth 6%-6% 

6 mnth 6*-6* 
cai 5%-*% 

imnth 4>»w-Uu 
6 mnth 4'*it-»ia 
calf 8K-7* 

1 mnth 9* <6* 

6 mnth 9 ,, ie-9'i# 
cal 2B-1 X 

1 mnth 3 ’«>«- ci ib 
6 mnth 3 , *i#" n i# 
cal 54 

1 mnth 454-4* 

6 mnth 4*-4U 


BULLION 


G<*£S3SS.50-390.00 
Krugerrand (par com. ex i 
S 387.0089000 (£26325 
-Soversnns (new, ex vatt 

Piatrnum 

S 472.75 (£322415 ) 
$527-529 (£358-3.60) 


50) 


ECGD 


Fixed Rata Sterling Export Finance 


Scheme IV Averege'retarenee rata lor 
riod November 


interest period November 1. 1986 to 
November 28. 1986 Mckoire: 11248 per 
canL 


Bond market weakness 
causes slow opening 


Shares traded lower on Wall 
Street yesterday, doe to early 
weakness in the bond market, 
a declining dollar and strtra- 
ger-than-expected November 
leading economic indicators. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average dropped 7 points to 


1,905 in early trading, while 
the New York Stock Exchange 
composite index was down 
0.59 to 15930. 

Declines led advances by 
three to one on a volume of 38 
million shares. 


Dec 

29 


Dec 

26 


AMR 

ASA 

AMed Signal 
AJfiadStrs 
AlfisChlmrs 
Alcoa 
Anax tnc 
Am'rdaHs 
Am Brands 
Am Can 


AmCynm'd 
EfPwr 


Am 
Am Express 
Am Hama 
Am Motors 
Am St'nrd 
AmTeieph 
Amoco 
Armco Steel 
Asarco 
Ashland 04 
AtRIchMd 
Avon Prods 
BkrsTstNT 
Bankamer 
BkofBston 
Bank of NY 
Beth Steal 


54 
35* 
40* 
6814 
2 * 
33* 
12 
24 Vi 
42* 
84* 
79* 
27* 
58* 
77* 
3 

42* 

25* 

66 * 

5* 

14* 

S6* 

61* 

27* 

46* 

14* 

41% 


Bse 
Brtian 
Bg Warner 
Bnst Myers 
BP 

BurT ton ind 

BcxI'tonNtn 

Brunsvwck 

CmpbeUSp 

Can Pacific 

Catwpilier 

Celanese 

Central SW 

Champion 

Chase Man 

CbmBkNY 

Chevron 

Chrysler 

Cutaxp 

Clark Bjjp 

Coca Cola 


Cl 

ClmbiaGas 


Cmb'tnEng 
hEd 


TO PLACE YOUR 

MOTORS 

ADVERTISEMENT in 

THE 

TIMES 


TRADE ADVERTISERS 
TEL: 01-481 4422 
ADVERTISING 
FAX NO. fll-481 3313 
TELEX 925088 
PRIVATE ADVERTISERS 
T&: 01-481 4000 
US? YOUR ACCESS OR BARCLAY CABO 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABN 11.00% 

Adam & Company 11.00% 

bcci.„„ n.00% 

Citibank Savingsf 12.45% 

Consolidated Crds„ -11.00% 

Co-operative Bank 11.00% 

£• Hoa J0 & Co 11.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 1.00% 

Uoyds Bank 11.00% 

Nat Westminster n oq% 

^yal Bank of ScoUandll.00% 

11 . 00 % 

Citibank NA..... 11 . 00 % 

t Mortgage Base Rate. 


Comwtoi 
Cons Eths 
Cn Nat Gas 
Cons Power 
CnteData 
doming Gl 
CPC but 
Crana 
Cirtes Wrt 

Data Gem. 
Deers 
Delta Air 

Detroit Ed 

Digital Eq 

DowChem 
Dresser Ind 
Duke Power 
DuPont 
Earn Kodak 


Eaton Com 
ion B 


Emerson l 
Emery Ar 
Exxon Corp 
Fed Dpt Sts 


6 
53 
60* 
47* 
39 '1 
83* 

42* 

41* 

54* 

34'/. 

59* 

12* 

40* 

240 

35 

31* 

36K 

43* 

45* 

38* 

53* 

20 

38* 

41* 

128 

45* 

32* 

34 

47 

32* 

15* 

26* 

55* 

79* 

33* 

53* 

29* 

23* 

48» 

16* 

106* 

43* 

60 

IS* 

46 

86* 

67* 

74* 

85* 

11 * 

72% 

83* 


54* 

35* 

41% 

68* 

2* 

33* 

12 * 

24* 

42* 

84* 

79* 

27* 

58% 

78% 

3 

42* 

25% 

67* 

5* 

14* 

56 

60* 

27* 

46% 

14% 

41* 

39* 

6* 

53* 

61 * 

47% 

to* 

85 

42% 

43* 

54% 

34* 

59* 

12% 

40% 

240* 

35 

31* 

37* 

43* 

45% 

38* 

53% 

20 

38* 

42* 

129* 

45% 

32* 

34 

47% 

33 

16 

27 

56* 

80* 

33% 

54% 

30% 

23% 

49* 

18% 

108* 

43% 

80* 

19% 

46* 

87* 

60* 

75% 

86* 

11 % 

73% 

85* 


Dec 

29 


Dec 

26 


Firestone 
Fst Chicago 
FstlmBncp 
Fst PennC 
Ford 

FTWachva 
GAF Corp 
GTE Corp 
Gen Corp 
Gen Cymes 
GenEfectnc 
Gen Inst 
Gen Mills 
Gan Motors 
GnPblftrry 
Geneeeo 
Georgia Pac 

fflUcta 

Goodnch 


28% 

29* 

52% 

8% 

57% 

38* 

38* 

59* 

72* 


Inc 

Grace 

Gt Att&Tac 

GfTmd 

GnananCor 

Gri&Vtfest 

HtaizHJ. 

Hercules 

Weft-Plod 


Honeywell 
1C finds 
tngersoa 
Irwnd Ste 


Steel 

IBM 
INCO 
hit Paper 
im Tel Tel 
Irving Bank 
JMisn&Jhn 
Kaiser Alum 
Kbit McGee 
KmOlyOrk 
K Mart 
Kroger 
L.T.v7corp 

Litton 
Lockheed 
Lucky Stra 
Mon H'nver 

Manwfe Cp 

Mirico 

Marne Mid 

MrtManetta 

M8SOO 

McDonalds 

McDonnell 


86* 

18* 

42* 

66 * 

22 % 

3* 

38* 

48* 

44% 

41% 

17% 

49* 

23% 

31* 

25* 

63% 

41* 

52% 

42* 

58% 

23* 

57* 

18* 

120* 

11 % 

76% 

53 

47K 

66 % 

13% 

28% 

80* 


28% 

30 

52% 

9 

57% 

36% 

3814 

59* 

72* 

69* 

87% 

18* 

43 

87% 

23* 

3* 

38* 

48% 

44% 

41* 

17% 

50% 

24 

32 

26 

64% 

41% 

53* 

43 

59 

23* 

58 

18% 

122 

11* 

76* 

53* 

48* 

67* 

13% 

28% 

82* 


Unrefc 

MhtstaMng 

MgHOfl 

Monsanto 

Morgan J.P. 

Motorola 

NCR Corp 

NLlndstrs 

Nat Digues 

Nat Med Em 

NatSmoidt 

Norfolk S8i 

NWBanerp 

OcctontPel 


OfcCorp 

Ow*»-fi 
Pac Gas B 
Pen Am 
Penney J.C. 
Pennzoi 
Pepisco 


29* 

1* 

75% 

50* 

28* 

45% 

1* 

60* 

45% 

39* 

28% 

62* 

72% 

55% 

124* 

117% 

4014 

76* 

B47i 

36% 

45% 

5% 

44% 

23* 

10 * 

»% 

37% 

9% 

44% 

4154 

52 

24* 

4% 

72* 

66 * 

26* 


30* 

1% 

76% 

50% 

27* 

46% 

2 

61* 

46 

39* 

29* 

63* 

74* 

57* 

128* 

117* 

40* 

77 

85% 

36* 

46* 

5% 

43% 

23% 

11 

85% 

38* 

to* 

44V, 

41* 

52 

24% 

4* 

74* 

66 

26* 


Dec 

29 


Dec 

26 


Pfizer 
Phelps Dge 


PhffipMrs 
PhBps 


ps Pet 
Polaroid 
PPG Ind 
frctrGmbl 
PbSE&G 
Raytheon 
RynWsMet 
RockwaUInt 
Royal Dutch 
Sara Lee 
SFESopac 
ScWher^r 
Scott Paper 
Seagram 
Sears Rock 
Shea Trans 


Singer 

SmWdn 


Bk 


SthCalEd 
S'Wstn Bel 
SWOfl 
Staffing Dm 
Stevens JP 
Sun Comp 
Teledyne 

T enoec o 

TexMECor 
Texas Inst 
Texas Utts 
Textron 
TravIrsCor 
TRW Inc 
UAL Inc 


61% 

21 

73* 

11 % 

87* 

73* 

78* 

40% 

67* 

40* 

46% 

95* 

34 

29* 

31% 

62* 

61% 

40* 

57* 

38% 

93* 

21 

34 

113* 

49% 

46* 

39 

to* 

302 

38* 

36 

27% 

116* 

32* 

63* 

44* 

85* 

53* 


62% 

20 * 

73* 

11 % 

67% 

73% 

79% 

40* 


he past year has not 
exactly been a quiet 
one in the City. If it 
had just been the 
year of Big Bang, 
that would have been loud 
enough- But 1986 has her- 
alded also the Financial Ser- 
vices Act and the Inter- 
national Stock Exchange. And 
of course insider dealing and 
the Government inspector. 

' A good deal of what Big 
Bang entailed had happened 
already by the time the start- 
ing gun was fixed on October 
27. The realignment of 
broking firms, the huge pay- 
ments for partnerships, teams 
and plain individuals, had 
been going on since Sir Nicho- 
las Goodison, chairman of the 
Exchange, strode his famous 
deal with the Government in 
1983. 

Some outstanding points 
were tied up. The future of the 
ity Cazenove & Co as an 
jKndent broker was guar- 
anteed and a number of 
provincial brokers decided to 
for security while latge 
such as Mercantile 
House, gobbled up other 
provincial firms to increase 
their geographical reach. 

Since Big Bang did not take 
place until late in the year, the 
pundits were left several 
months to speculate on what it 
would mean. Would the Stock 
Exchange floor and the 
concomitant system of dealing 
fece-to-fece survive? What 
would happen to commis- 
sions? Was there a living still 
to be made as a pure agency 
broker? And what was going to 
happen to a very crowded 
dense gilts market? 

No-one bothered to ask 
whether the Stock Exchange's 
computer system would stand 
up to the transformation al- 
though the dress rehearsal for 
the equity market, a week 
before the big day, did not go 
smoothly. 

The drama of October 27 
was greatly heightened when 
Topic, the Exchange's prices 
dissemination system, proved 
incapable of handling the 
increased curiosity from its 
users. The Topic network 
collapsed at 8.30am on the day 
that many dealers were unable 
to update their prices in time 
for the 9am start 
The system also foiled at 
lpm on the following day. 
overwhelmed by a flood of 
pices from the North Ameri- 
can over-the-counter market 
— NASDAQ. The litany of 
failures continued, although 
their effect diminished as the 
Stock Exchange cut back the 
services provided to Topic 
users... 

Extra capacity has been 
ordered and users can antici- 
pate a trouble-free system next 
year. The Exchange's plans for 
cerfificateless trading 
(eliminating the need for share 
certificates) are still in 
pTOgrtess. Likewise the Ex- 
change is hoping to introduce 
automatic execution for pur- 
chases and sales of small 
parcels of shares. 

While preparations for Big 
Bang went ahead. Parliament 
and the City had to grapple 



GOING, GOING ... the bustle of pre-Big Bang activity 
with the intricate provisions number of self-regulating 


of the Financial Services BflL 
published in December last 
year. 

The Bill laid down a new 
system for regulating the 
investment industry. Self- 
regulation was the catch- 
phrase although it rapidly 
became dear that self-regula- 
tion as per the Financial 
Services Bill would not elimi- 
nate bureaucracy or the 
lawyers. 

t provided for a des- 
ignated authority to pol- 
ice the City and after 
much huffing and puff- 
ing in Parliament, the 
Securities and Investments 
Board, chaired tty Sir Kenneth 
BerrilL was specifically named 
in the BiU as the new 
authority. 

Everyone knew it would be 
the SIB which would fulfill 
this role. Mentioning it in the 
Bill gave it what the Conser- 
vative back-benchers who 
pressed for its indusion de- 
scribed _as “ statutory 
recognition”. 

It certainly did not convert 
the SIB into a Securities and 
Exchange Commission, along 
American lines. However it 


I 


organisations or SROs. 
operating at a lower level than 
the SIB and under its 
authority. 

The SIB would have legal 
immunity. It could not be 
sued for exercising its powers 
in good forth. The Bill did not 
give the SROs the same 
protection so they launched a 
collective campaign. 

Mr Michael Howard. Min- 
ister for Consumer and Cor- 
porate Affairs at the DTL, was 
at first reluctant to grant 
immunity, saying that one 
must tread carefully where a 
derogation from the law was 
sought A few weeks later, a 
clearly uncomfortable Mr 
Paul Channon, Secretary of 
State for Trade and Industry, 
said the SROs would receive 
their immunity. It was a 
pragmatic move, he ex- 
plained. In other words, with- 
out the SROs, the BiU would 
not work. 

Professional bodies such as 
the Law Society and . the 
Institute of Chartered 
Accountants, tried have* 
imra unity for themselves writ- 
ten into the BiU. They foiled 
although the Government did 


GONE . . . to be replaced by computer-controlled peace 
protection and the SROs will functions of the two bodies are 


have their own rulebooks 
which must provide at least 
equivalent protection. 

In some cases the SIB's 
rules aroused considerable 
controversy. It was asked to 
rethink its stance on disclo- 
sure of commissions and 
charges by life assurance sales- 
men after pressure at during 
the Bill’s committee stage. 


A 


was given limite d powers of ■ fP ve gave some ground. 


prosecution and the promise 
of more prosecuting muscle to 
come. 

Another big tussle with the 
Government was fought over 
die question of legal immu- 
nity. The Bill envisaged that 
the day lo day policing of the 
investment industry would be 
carried out by an unspecified 


While Parliament grappled 
with the structure of self- 
regulation, the SIB put out 
ream upon ream of draft rules 
in an attempt to make precise 
the way in which investment 
businesses should conduct 
themselves. 

These rules will form the 
benchmark for investor 


nd the SIB has 
stuck to its policy of 
not requiring inter- 
mediaries to make 
full disclosure ex- 
cept in limited instances. 
However, it belatedly an- 
nounced the setting np of an 
enquiry into whether some 
form of across-the-board 
disclosure would be helpful to 
the consumer. 

There were two mergers 
among the intended SROs. 
The most Double was that 
between the Stock Exchange 
and the International Securi- 
ties Regulatory Organisation 
tlsro).; 

The Exchange was con- 
cerned that a considerable 
amount trading in leading 
stocks would be lost to the big 
international houses that had 
formed under the Isro banner. 

Hie result, announced in 
September, was the formation 
of the International Stock 
Exchange — a joint Isno-Stock 
Exchange body operating, in 
Britain, markets in domestic 
and foreign stocks, gov- 
ernment securities and op- 
tions. The regulatory 


to be conducted by the Securi- 
ties Association. 

Meanwhile the passage of 
the legislation which 
prompted these changes was 
delayed so that the Financial 
Services Act 1986 did not 
emerge until October. 

One part of the Act was 
rushed into force ahead of 
schedule. Provisions giving 
the Government for reaching 
powers to investigate insider 
dealing were bought in after 
the resignation of Mr Geoffrey 
Collier, former bead of Mor- 
gan Grenfell Securities, who 
was charged with insider 
dealing. 

Tremors from the other side 
of the Atlantic, notably the 
Si 00 million penalty imposed 
on Mr Ivan Boesky. the 
arbitrageur, also played a part 
since Mr Boeksy's dealings 
encompassed important Brit- 
ish companies. 

Earlier, the Government 
had signed a Memorandum of 
Understanding with the 
.American regulators whicb 

provided for the exchange of 
information. The full implica- 
tions of the Boesky affair are 
still to emerge. 

On December 1 the Gov- 
ernment announced a DTI 
investigation into the affairs 
of Guinness pic, while two 
days later Exco called in -the 
Fraud Squad to investigate 
theft at one of its companies. 

The litany of City scandals 
was tty now in full swing. 


Lawrence Lever 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


UndevarNV 235* 
Unisys 81% 
Un Cartxte 22* 
Un Pac Cor 
UtO Brands 
USGCorp 
UW Techno* 

USX Cop 
Unocal 
Jim Walter 
WmerLmM 
WeBs Fargo 
WstghsoB 
Wgyerh’ser 
Whkipool 
Woohvortti 
Xerox Cons 
Zenith 


62* 

35 

38* 

46% 

21 % 

27* 

SO 

58% 

102 * 

57% 

39* 

88 % 

38 

61* 

21 * 


40* 

47 

95* 

34* 

30 

32* 

63% 

61% 

40% 

57% 

39% 

94* 

21* 

35 

114* 

49* 

46% 

38% 

57 

306* 
38% 
35% 
to* 
118% 
32% 
65 
44% 
67* 
54* 
235* 
83* 
22 * 
63* 
35* 
38* 
47* 
21 % 
27* 
50% 
60* 
103* 
58* 
39* 
68% 
37* 
62 V. 
21* 


Three Month Storing 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 — __ 

Sep 87 

Dec 87 

Mar 88 

Junto 


previous 
Three 
Mar 87 
Jun 87 
Sep 87 
Dec 87 


1.91 

88-27 

89.41 

8932 

NT 

88.85 


89-38 

89.46 

89-35 


Low 
88 51 
8927 
88.41 
8922 


s lota open interest 14414 


8&to 


Close 

8847 

6925 

B9X7 

8926 

89.12 

8827 


1380 

207 

to 

30 

0 

5 


9341 

9342 
9345 


total 


US Treasury Bond 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sep 87 


96-25 

NT 

NT 


„ Prwrio«is< 

9341 

9342 9347 9048 

9345 93-80 9342 

9349 9344 93.66 

Previous dw*8 total open ir 
99-00 9948 55-12 

97-15 


2023 

561 

156 

98 


1816 

0 

0 


Short GM 
Dec 86 — 
Mer 87 — 
Jun 87 — 


NT 

NT 

NT 


Previous day a total open Interest 109 
97-10 0 


Dec 


cat 


Mar 87 

Jun B7 


Sap 87 

FT-SE100 

Dec 88 

MV 87 


112-18 

112-10 

NT 

NT 


Previous 

112-20 111 _ 

112-10 112-10 


112-09 

112-14 


167.00 

17020 


Previous day's total 
16740 167.00 

17120 17020 


10052 

1 

0 

0 


I open i 
167.15 
170.70 


114 

177 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


RretOeafegs 
NOV 17 
Dec 1 
Dec 15 


NOV 28 
Dee 12 
Jan2 


Left Dedaretton 
Feh 19 
Mar 5 
MV 19 


FarSantonmt 
Mer 2 
Mar 16 
MV 30 


CM options were token out one 30/12/88 
Channel. Camtord Engineeri n g. Blackwood Ho 
Beley, Morgan Grantee, Hawfiy Group. B. 
Mununs, Cnoride. TdcentroL 
Put Audlotronie. 

Puts 8 Caos: O a wood. Royal Insurance. 


Amstrad, Fergatvook, Seen. Bristol 


Pete. Rntoy, Pavion intnL. 
jfeL Up Tcp Stores. 


CopteS, 

>, Dares Estates. Fteafirook. 


CANADIAN PRICES 


AgncoEag 
Men Alum 

AJgomaSfl 
Can Pacific 
Cortinco 
Con Sathrst 
Hkr/S«3 Can 
HdsnBMIn 
I masco 
Imperial OS 
In Pipe 
Ryl Trusted 


Co 
VwmnN‘A' 
Vjgyc-p 

Weston 


25% 

38* 

11 

17* 

13 

30* 

26* 

22 % 

32 

51% 

39% 

30 

84% 

19 

30% 

2.70 

12 % 

34% 


to* 

38% 

11 

17V, 

12% 

-30 

26 

23* 

32* 

51 

40 

30* 

65* 

19% 

30* 

2.70 

13 

34% 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 


Ashtoed ft 
British Gas 
Cap 4 
Daniels S II 


Gaynor 
Geest (1 
Gtentrae 
Gordon 



150+2 
65 -U 
66 


FteWtor Kig (I 


Hate Homes 



Guthrie Corp (1! 

“ " " A Grins (95p) 


Harmony Leisure (23pj 
Hornby (1" ' 


. _100p) 
Hoskyns Gp (128p) 
Johnson Fry 
Uoyds Chemist (I05p) 
Logrtak (6Sp) 

| 

) 


178 
107-1 
171 +«2 
51 
207 
170 
105 
26-1 
103+2 
148 
160+2 
131 
67 
168 
146 -1 
76 
108 
153-2 


Northumbrian Fine (60p) 
Plum Htogs (top) 
Spandex (170p) 

Surrtt (135p) 

TSB Chan Isles (70p) 
TBS Grain (100p) 
Virgin (140p) 

■“ - roup (97p) 

Office fl35p) 


Ward 

WBdtog 


90-1 
113 
245 +B 
138 
110 
75+3* 
132'a-l 
102 
145 -1 


RIGHTS ISSUES 


Avon Rubber N/P 
Birm Mint N/P 
Leisure Imr N/P 


Marling N/P 


Munton 

New Court N/P 
Property Tsl N/P 
Paricdale N/P 
WadtSngron f/P 
Walker (Alfred) N/P 

{issue pnee m brackets). 


31 *3 
20+2 
4-1 
11 
5 +'2 
Va 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 

»■— ■ — ■ — — 

day%tengt dose 

Decembers) December 30 IbocA 3 months 

N York 1.4686-1.4605 1 .4660-1. 4695 057-044prem 1.73-l48prem 

Montreal 24238-24323 24287-24323 0.6344Zprem 1.47-1 SS 

S3s.ii 58 

ftankhal24533-248Z4 24570418810 1%-1%prem 4%4%oram 

Ustan 21514-21631 215-1441642 119-1%5T 

Madrid 193.65-185.03 1&446-1S443 !0-35dis 20-78t** 

sr agss sms s®* ussaa. 

IfS™ B8HS& JSSS 

sss s^- 39 r^ 05 ill™, IJE1L 

wanwjeis lyS, 

Storitog index compared with 1975 wee up at 600 (day's range 69449.1 ). 

OTHER STERLING RATES DOLLAR SPOT RATES 

Banram dinar — O.K(XM)4540 

Braal cruzado* B14^Suntt 5S 

Cyp»us pound 0.73404.7440 ftSSr — 

SSgaa.r- tk 70940 SSSBzrmriMBMSI 

2024M0440 Norway I 74175*4225 

krt?r^S2i < * 0Uar 11-420-11431 Denmark 74700-747S0 

— 19 05-1940 West Germany 14485-1.9500 

SS* = :: ~ £5 SSf.- — - 

New Zealand dollar 2.7923-24050 1354 0^13564 

Saudi Araha nyal 54810-55210 ..404840 55 

StoWPOre dofiar 31^1 4-3.1986 Hoi^Kong 77900-7.7920 

£.2219-3.2385 PorSff?™. 14450^lS 

i| 54565*3885 Spate 13245-132.60 

U °y ca tenk Austria 13.70-13.73 

BAtoe etapfed by Barclays BonkJfiOFeXandEneL 






Cate 



pm 



Series 

Jan 

-J5EL 

M 

Jan 

Apr 

M 

Alfied Lyons 

280 

42 

53 

60 

1 

S 

8 

1*318 ) 

300 

22 

to 

45 

1% 

6 

15 


330 

2 

17 

to 

17 

22 

30 

British Gas 

50 

15% 

17* 

19* 

* 

K 

S 

r&5) 

80 

6 

9 12% 

* 

2 

3 


70 

1 

3* 

6* 

5* 

8* 

7% 

BP 

600 

185 

135 



1 

6 



1*720) 

B50 

75 

to 

102 

1 

12 

20 


700 

28 

45 

62 

6 

28 

40 

Cons Goto 

550 

117 

140 


2 

6 



(*860) 

600 

67 

100 

110 

2 

13 

18 


650 

25 

60 

80 

13 

27 

37 


260 

54 

S3 


1 

1 % 

— 

(*310) 

260 

34 

43 

52 

1 

3 

5 


300 

IB 

26 

38 

2 

7 

11 


330 

3 

13 

21 

20 

23 

26 


260 

11 

21 

28 

6 

11 

15 

(*2 86) 

280 

2 

11 

2U 

17 

22 

26 


300 

1 

6 

12 

to 

41 

44 

Cable & Wire 

300 

34 

52 

SO 

1 

6 

12 

(*331) 

325 

13 

30 

— 

6 

14 



350 

2 

14 

— 

22 

28 

mm. 


375 

1 

— 

— 

45 

— 

— 

GEC 

160 

27 

33 

37 

H 

2 

6 

r*B4) 

180 

8* 

17 

24 

4 

8 

12 


200 

1* 

8 

14 

17 

20 

24 

i Grand Met 

360 

103 

108 


1 

1 


t T+Sfl) 

390 

73 

78 

mmm 

1 

2 



420 

45 

54 

88 

1% 

7 

13 


460 

12 

33 

46 

12 

25 

25 

IC1 

1000 

85 

102 

125 

2 

14 

20 

(*1076} 

1050 

37 

67 

90 

6 

28 

37 


1100 

10 

45 

62 

30 

60 

84 


1150 

3 

22 

42 

to 

92 

92 

Lana Sec 

300 

40 

•50 

M 

1 

3 

6 

(*337) 

330 

13 

29 

35 

4 

8 

13 


380 

2 

13 

18 

25 

27 

30 

Marta 4 Soen 

180 

5 

17 

?1 

4 

10 

13 

C79) 

200 

1 

8 

12 

23 

26 

27 


220 

* 

3 

6 

43 

45 

48 

Shell Trans 

900 

87 

105 

122 

2 

13 

*22 

(*979) 

950 

40 

60 

83 

5 

27 

37 


1000 

10 

28 

53 

28 

to 

58 

Trafalgar Hou$8 

230 

14 

24 

%> 

3 

8 

12 

(*271) 

280 

4 

13 

20 

12 

18 

22 


300 

1 

7 

12 

31 

33 

35 

TSB 

70 

8 

10* 

13* 

% 

2* 

4 

CT8) 

80 

1 

4* 

7 

S 

7* 

a% 


90 

* 

2* 

2* 

16 

18* 

18 * 










Serin 

Mar 

Jun 

Sep 

Mar 

Jun 

Sap 

Seecham 

380 

S3 



1* 


_ 

(*441) 

390 

65 

78 

to 

4 

7 

10 


420 

to 

to 

RO 

in 

17 

20 


460 

13 

24 

38 

25 

35 

40 

Boots 

200 

37 

45 


1 

4 


cm 

220 

23 

30 

35 

6 

11 

14 


240 

9 

16 

23 

14 

20 

25 

BTR 

260 

23 

31 

to 

6 

10 

13 

(*271) 

280 

13 

19 

24 

17 

21 

to 


300 

5% 

IT 

— 

33 

35 


Bass 

650 

107 

120 


3 

8 


(T40) 

700 

65 

to 

82 

;• 9 

18 

25 


750 

30 

48 

65 

35 

47 

57 

Blue Circle 

800 

to 

>08 

127 

“4 

ID 

17 

(■873) 

B50 

43 

70 

88 

■12 

22 

28 


700 

23 

37 

to 

37 

45 

52 

Da Beers 

850 

135 

_ 



12 

_L. 


(*750) 

700 

to 

120 

— 

20 

33 



750 

to 

to 

no 

45 

to 

70 


NO 

35 

to 

to 

» 

to 

105 

Doans 

300 

29 

32 

50 

7 

12 

18 

(*316) 

330 

16 

24 

32 

22 

28 

30 


380 

4 

13 

— 

48 

48 

— 

GKN 

240 

38 

45 

51 

3 

8 

8 

(*269) 

280. 

34 

30 

38 

y 

12 

15 ■ 


280 

13 

18 

28 

1/ 

23 

24 


300 

5 

— 

— 

34 



Gla<o 

900 

180 

PCS 

* 

5 

8 


(■1050) 

-950 

1» 

165 

96 

10 

20 

25. 


1000 

95 

130 

80 

18 

35 

43 


1050 

60 

95 

30 

40 

S3 

65 

Hanson . * 

ISO 

34 

’ 


1 

««.■ 


nag - 

180 

7* 

24 

30 

4 

6% 

7% 

; — L 




Cafe 



Puts 



Series 

Mar 

Jen 

Sep 

Ms 

Jun 

Sep 

Hanson 

200 

7 K 

13* 

18* 

13% 

16 

(8 

(atet) 

220 

2% 

7 

— 

31 

31* 

Jaguar 

-r5Bi> 

500 

550 

52 

16 

70 

40 

87 

57 

12 

27 

18 

36 

25 

45 


800 

7 

— 

— 

68 

— 


Them EM 

420 

65 

77 

_ 

2 

6 

— 

(*409) 

460 

35 

SO 

6? 

1? 

20 

27 

500 

14 

28 

38 

37 

40 

SO 


550 

& 

— 

— 

B3 



Tesco 








(*382) 

380 

47 

58 

70 

6 

10 

14 


too 

25 

40 

50 

15 

7? 

28 


420 

10 

18 

30 

33 

38 

40 


Sariee 

Fab 

May 

At* 

Feh 

May 

Aug 

Brit Aero 

420 

100 

108 


1 

2 


(*513) 

460 

to 

72 

83 

3 

7 

13 


500 

30 

43 

52 

10 

18 

28 

BATInds 

390 

87 

95 


? 

3 


(*469) 

420 

80 

68 

82 

3 

6 

12 


460 

30 

40 

57 

14 

23 

28 


500 

9 

- 22 

35 

37 

45 

50 

Barclays 

460 

62 

72 

82 

3 

6 

15 

(*511) 

500 

32 

43 

55 

12 

23 

30 


550 

/ 

16 

30 

42 

to- 

52 

Brtt Telecom 

180 

37 

43 

48 

% 

2 

4* 

n i4) 

200 

17 

26 

to 

? 

6 

9 


220 

5^ 

13 

17 

12 

13 

19 

Cadowy Sctvnppa 160 

to 

36 

41 

* 

2* 

5 

nwi 

180 

14 

21 

26 

4 

7 

11 


200 

4* 

11 

16 

14 

17 

21 

Guinness 

280 

24 

35 

4? 

10 

13 

18 

(294) 

300 

14 

25 

32 

19 

27 

28 


330 

4 

12 

20 

45 

4B 

50 

Ladbrota 

330 

80 

67 

75 

1 

3 

5 

(*382) 

360 

33 

45 

53 

5 

10 

15 


390 

13 

26 

35 

16 

25 

25 

LASMO 

130 

31 

34 


? 

4 


(*■158) 

140 

24 

28 

33 

3 

7 

9 


160 

11 

18 

23 

11 

15 

18 

MtfandBank 

500 

107 

115 

125 

2 

8 

U) 

(*595) 

550 

65 

72 

R? 

8 

15 

22 


600 

24 

32 

47 

18 

35 

42 

P*0 

460 

73 

85 

97 

? 

7 

12- 

(*523) 

600 

38 

52 

65 

7 

17 

22 


550 

9 

23 

to 

37 

45 

50 

Racal 

160 

27 

37 

44 

2 

4 

& 

H86) 

180 

13 

21 

30 

6 

11 

15 


200 

4 

13 

— • 

18 

24 


RTZ 

550 

162 

_ 


2 



(*693) 

600 

112 

127 



3 

10 



650 

87 

8/ 

110 

15 

27 

37 


700 

37 

57 

70 

34 

52 

00 

Vaal flees 

70 

14* 21* 23* 

1* 

4* 

4* 

(*82) 

80 

8 

4* 18% 

6 

8* 

6* 


90 

2* 

8 

11 

11 

13 

15 


Series 

Mar 

Jon 

Ste" 

Mar 

Jun 

Sep 

Lonmo 

200 

51 

54 


1% 

3%'“ 


(*247) 

220 

33 

37 

41 

4 

7% 

11 


240 

18 

22 

27 

11 

16 

20 


280 

/% 

12 


24 

30 



Series 

Fte May Aua 

^eto May Auq 

Tr 11%% 1991 

100 

2% 

3* 


% 



(Tt02) 

102 

I*.* 

2* 



i% 

1'H, • 


104 

% 

*» 


2% 

2% 

Tr 11*% 03/07 

104 

Pis 

7% 

7* 


I^TT 


fftlOJ 

106 

4% 

5% 

Pis 

% 

r ? i* 

2% 


108 

3 J w 

4% 



2’i« 


110 

2\c 

3% +>« 2^16 

Pu 



112 

l^ih 

2% 

— 

3% 

4% 



114 



— 

4% 

5% 



Oec Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Dec 

Jan 

Feb 

filar 


FT-SE 

index 

ri673) 


1550123* 
1575 98* 
1600 73% 
1825 48 

1650 23 

1675 3* 
1700 * 


138 

115 

93 

73 

55 

37 




105 

85 

68- 

82 


118 

97 

80 

63 


» 

% 

% 

1 

7 

30 


1 — 
2 - 
4 8 

8 13 

14 20 

25 30 


13 

» 

28 

37 


_ Cafe 12896. 
FT-SE faulta. OfeM . 


Puts 5478. 
Putss»19 


'Underlying security puce. 


■JIM 


111 


f 


£ - 
w t 15 









• : y 

1 ’ 


.. ) ’ 

■ I ■ 

.. ; 1 

t 

t ' 


• : « 

.. ? • 


. i 

i i 


; 

■i t ■ 

: i 
: i 
- ■! 






^ I lf <J 


le lPiosio ns j 

1 ^ 


5«!sa 





gs«awp^2‘ S: ^ : ;: 

-■ ■"" ” -” • '. -» •: i» 






i 


••.-Vs.-;* 


. . , *?V 




'^P*, 

. V*' '.'•tPOJk 

?*■ fetS* 

._.; l *assi 


••• 

■c ahead 

: ' r - pi? 
r r3C5C 
«e* 

» E 
■"'jfof 

’*^•3 


r, nee Lera 


..-.ir Tuf 


; ■ W J j£ 


. ■ * 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


STOCK MARKET 


Pilkington defence hinges on 
forecast of big profits 


[COMMENT] 


* i immi 1 1 h m 

Time running out for 
BTR’s bid strategy 

T^ihus far, the £1.2 billion bid lor producing steadily rising earnings p 


By Michael Clark 


Pilkington Brothers, 
Britain’s biggest glass manu- 
facturer. which is fighting oft 
an unwanted £1.2 billion bid 
from BTR. the industrial 
conglomerate, is likely to 
weigh in with a profits forecast 
of more than £200 million as a 
maiorpart of its defence. 


Sir Antony Pilkington, 
chairman of Pilkington, is 
expected to publish the 
group's long-awaited defence 
document within the next few 
days, and this should reach 
shareholders by Monday 
morning at the latest. 

It will continue to urge them 
to reject the offer from BTR 
and will forecast a jump in 
pretax profits for the year to 
March- 31 way above what 
most observers in the City had 
been anticipating. 

Brokers like County Securi- 
ties, the broking arm of the 
Nat West Bank, are reckoned 
to be looking for a figure as 
high as £215 million. That 
compares with the £157.8 
million last yeas. Interim fig- 
ures from Pilkington were 
better than expected and led 
most analysts to upgrade their 
profit forecast for the year 
from £175 million to about 
£190 million. 

Pilkington shares were un- 
changed at 66 Ip yesterday, 
but already stand more than 
iOOp above BTR’s original 
offer. Dealers are already brac- 


ing themselves for an in- 
creased offer from BTR of 
about 700p a share once 
PiUdngton has published its 
defence document. At this 

? ricc Pilkington is valued at 
1.5 billion. 

But it is far from certain that 
any increased offer from BTR 
will guarantee it victory. Most 
market men are predicting a 
close finish by the lime the bid 
closes on January 24. BTR 
finished 3 p higher at 271 p. 

The rest of the equity 
market remained in confident 
mood as hopes continued to 
rise for an early cut in bank 

• This time of year fund 
managers are on the look out 
for recovery stocks. One 
worth considering is 
Securiguard, the cleaning 
and security group. Full year 
profits are expected to rise 
from £715,000 to £] million. 
That will be good news for 
the shares already standing at 
a peak of 138p. 

base rates after the pound’s 
stronger performance against 
the dollar on the foreign 
exchange market. 

However, the continued ab- 
sence of fund managers and 
brokers because of the ex- 
tended Christmas break again 
had turnover down to a 
trickle. Leading equities en- 


FTA ALL SHARE 
MDEX 


Wf STARTING TO BUILD UP 
y FULL HEAD OF STEAM ? 

- "--t - - i — i ■ i : r ■ “ i " i l — t- - i i ■ i 

Jan Feb Mar Apr. May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 


joyed selective support, but 
dosed below their best levels 
of the day. 

The FT 30-share index 
traded in narrow limits for 
much of the day before closing 

1.5 up at 1,308.6. The FT-SE 
100 recovered from an earlier 

3.6 fall to show a lead of 17 at 
midday. It finished the session 
1.5 higher at 1,673.1 

Government securities 
showed signs of running out of 
steam after their recent good 
run, but perked up in late 
trading as the pound contin- 
ued to make headway against 
the ailing dollar. Prices at the 
longer end of the market 
sported gains of up to £'4. 

British Gas slipped 0.5p to 
64.5p in its partly paid form as 
turnover reached 41 million 
shares. Peninsula & Oriental 
Steam Navigation is enjoying 


something of a re-rating after 
this month's clearance by the 
Monopolies Commission of 
its stake in European Ferries 
and its subsequent decision to 
launch an agreed bid for the 
rest. 

The shares, which advanced 
another 6p to 522p yesterday 
- for a two-day rise of 14p — 
have featured prominently 
among the list of new year lips 
in the financial press. 

Dealers are convinced that 
the £287 million Euro Ferries 
acquisition is good news for 
P&O. It is also another success 
story for Sir Jeffrey Sterling. 
P&O’s shrewd chairman, who 
has followed an aggressive 
acquisition policy since he 
joined the company in 1984. 

He first merged his own 
publicly-quoted vehicle. Ster- 
ling Guarantee, with P&O in 


High Urn Cowpany 

383 283 Aflta-Ljms 
174 126 ASOA-MFI 
455 STS BET 
330 241 BTR 
491 361 BAT 
572 448 Barclays 
840 62S Bibs 
450 3S6 BMCftsm 
726 S26 Blue Orcta 
383 293 BOC 
288 170 Boots 
SOB 423 Br Aerospace 
654 61 Br Gas 
722 530 &■ Petrotam 
280 I77*z8r Telecom 
183 88 Brftoi 
354 256 Burton 
389 277 CSOle & Wtofess 


BM OHf Ch*ge 

316 321 • +3 

152 156 

435 440 -8 

288 273 +2 

465 470 -2 

505 510 +3 

735 745 * +3 

438 443 • -3 

673 878 +5 

388 372 +1 

229 232 • -1 

508 S13 +6 

64*a 66’» +4 

717 722 -2 

212 216 • 

168 170 -2'i 

282 288 • -3 

325 332 -1 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


WM % P/E HOC Htfi Lo» Company 

US 45 143 493 381 312 LMUroke 

AS 23 108 1.200 349 276 Land Securities 

243 [ 55 15* 318 288 133 Legal & Gen 

9* 3LB 18* 884 484 293 Lloyds 

184 3* 12* 588 283 183 LonlwO 

28.1 SS 7* 1.100 , 231 183 Mario 8 Spencer 

2*5 35 T51 32B 589 417 MWand 

17.1 3* 183 372 593 426 Nat West 

30* 4 A 9* 272 576 428 P&O Dint 

154 42 14* 388 618 383 Pearson 

106 48 15.1 1300 664 315 PWngton Bros 

234 46 10* 1.100 248 162 Ptessey 

93 143 .. 41*00 942 718 Prudential 

48.8 6* 7* 583 234 146 Ratal Bad 

113 53 125 3,400 589 421 Rank Org 

9* 55 4* 8300 goo 605 Reckftt & Coleman 

8.1 2* 16* 2*00 584 ’>345 Radars 

73 22 18* 318 791 511 RTZ 


(tv W traded 
mcm % P/€ TOO 


380 385 
338 339 
252 2S7 
433 440 
248 248 
177 180 
590 597 
598 545 
S28 525 
613 BIB 
857 682 
162 188 
796 805 
168 190 
523 530 
862 889 
555 560. 
695 7D2 


165 44 
145 43 
123 4* 
25* £7 

17.1 6* 
5* 33 

37.1 63 

27* 5.1 
264b 5* 
154 25 

214 33 

73 3* 
385 4* 
43 23 
225 43 

23* 2* 
54 1* 

314 45 


183 325 

226 221 
325 1.000 
7* 700 

122 2.100 
214 2300 
22* 755 
5.7 978 

15* 864 

205 2 3 0 0 
175 2.100 
135 1500 
52* 850 
19* 12*00 
185 447 

187 90 

423 1*00 
93 193 


196 

158 

Caitiuy Schweppes 186 

189 



&7 

45 

21* 1.200 

532 

365 

Itowntrae 

397 

402 

• 

.. 

18* 

45 

11.1 

547 

564 

426 

Costs VJyeOa 

464 

468 

• 

-2 

17* 

35 

13* 

322 

967 

762 

Royal Ins 

840 

847 

• 

-6 

385 

4* 

69* 

277 

336 

257 

Com Union 

264 

267 


+3 

17* 

65 

. . 

1500 

426 

344 

Sakatwy (J) 

416 

420 

• 

+1 

&4 

20 

245 

73 

704 

409 

Cora Goklfiekls 

668 

685 



35* 

5* 

18* 

332 

148’j104 

Sean 

122* 

2124 


-1 

5* 

4* 

15* 

1*00 

330 

2S2 

Courtauus 

305 

308 

• 

-6 

102 

3* 

105 

2100 

415 

300 

Sedgwick Gp 

297 

302 


-4 

17.1 

57 

145 

696 

290 

201 

Dee Corn 

208 

213 


+1 

105 

5* 

17.1 

3200, 

984 

S3 

She! 

977 

962 


-1 

51* 

52 

57 

445 

438 

218'2Dfa(Ofs Grp 

315 

319 



45 

15 

225 

730 

132 

93 

Smith & Nephew 

124 

128 


-1 

35 

28 

215 

881 

650 

406 

Faotn 

532 

537 

m 

-2 

84 

1* 

Mf) 

304 

177 

96 

SIC 

174 

178 


-1 

2.1 

1* 

163 

2BB 

954 

701 

Gen Accident 

795 

802 

• 

+1 

34* 

45 

20.1 

74 

894 

419 

Stan Chart 

786 

790 


+5 

464 

59 

97 1500 

228 

158 

cec 

182 

186 


-1 

65 

34 

115 

1500 

ass 

2S6 l aSlorahouaa 

283 

288 

• 

-1 

11* 

3* 

152 

950 

MV WiQno ■ - 

10% 10'i 


. . 

20* 

1* 

22* 

• 612 

772- 

520 

Sun AHance 

835 

642 

• 

4-1 

275 

4* ' 

575 

138 

481 

328 

tend Met 

457 

462 


-1 

14* 

32 

135 2500 

1 81% 72 

TSB P/P 

74*2 754 


+4 

61 

61 

. , 

___ 

11*721 

GUS 'A 

10'* 10* 


. . 

15.7 

T5 

14* 

14 

420 

265 

TOSCO 

390 

393 


+1 

69 

23 

224 

172 

774 

720 

ORE 

770 

777 

m 

+6 

425 

55 

224 

49 

529 

374 

Thom EMI 

467 

474 

• 

+2 

25* 

53 

345 

444 

385 

235 

G(KN 

268 

289 

9 

+1 1 * 

17* 

&7 

9* 1.100. 

349 

209 

Trafalgar House 

270 

272 

• 

-1 

iaa 

7* 

10.1 

347 

355 

274 

Guinness 

287 

282 

9 

+3 

11* 

4* 

11* 3200 1 

209 

139 

Thnthouso Porte 

178 

178 


+*a 

73 

45 

175 

727 

215*f 141 

Hanson 

189 

191 

9 

-■* 

&1 

32 

12.1 

3*00 

22 

13**UnHeMer 

214214 



661 

28 

20* 

58 

623 

403 

Hawker Skldeiey 

440 

448 

9 

-5 

21* 

4* 

95 

450 

269 

216 

UM BtocuBs 

231 

233 

• 

+1*1 

135b 

5* 

125 

253 

12 , b734 

Imp Cham tnd 

10«>s1(P. 



485 

45 

12* 

802 

235*2174 

waBcome 

233 

235 

• 

-h 

3* 

15 

267 1500 

583 

335 

Jaguar 

528 

533 


+7 

12-7 

2 A 

11* 

657 

925 

430 

Ut— L.lrth 

ttoonwnn 

708 

713 



p?a 

32 

165 

365 r 


COMPANY NEWS J 


• TR TRUSTEES 

CORPORATION: Interim 
dividend 2.4p (same), payable 
February 2. one-for-ooe 
capitalization proposed. Total 
revenue 4,622 <4,478). net rev- 
enue before tax 3.396 (3,302), 
tax 1,016 (1,062), earnings per 


TEMPUS 


Slow market reaction leaves 
Barrow’s flank exposed 


of not less than the 2.4p at May 

• NORSK DATA: Mycro-Tek 
Inc and Norsk Data have en- 
tered into a joint marketing 
agreement which provides for 
the exclusive sales and support 
of Norsk Data's “comiec" inte- 
grated publishing system into 
the North American market by 
Mycro-Tek. This _ agreement 
covers an initial period of three 
years, during which Norsk Data 
expects that $50 million (£34.7 
million) of revenues to Mycro- 
Tek and in excess of $30 million 
to Norsk Data will be generated. 
Mycro-Tek has independently 
raised fresh capital to fond its 
expansion to support this 
agreement 

• A MONK: Six months to 
Aug. 31. Turnover £64 million 
(£73 million). Pretax loss £1-54 
million (£419,000 loss). Loss per 
share 9. Ip (2-4p). The board is 
optimistic that pretax profit, 
before exceptional items, for the 
foil year will be in tine with 
expectations. 

• GLEN ABBEY: An of&bOOL 
Glen Abbey Hosiery, has been 
sold to John Pulsford for 
£200,000. The assets being sold 
have a book value of £424,000. 
Glen Abbey Hosiery has experi- 
enced severe competitive con- 
ditions in the domestic market. 
In the 1 1 months to end-Nov„ it 
made a loss of £67,000 on sales 
of £3. IS million. 

• FORMJNSTER: Half-year to 
OcL 31. Interim dividend 2_24p 
(2.03pX payable on Feb. 17. 
Turnover £8.63 million (£7.45 
million). Pretax profit 698,480 
(623.4SO). Earnings per share 
1 1 .05p (8. 1 8p). The directors are 
confident that the full-year re- 
sults will compare favourable 
with previous years. Current 
sales are encouraging. 

• WPP GROUP: The company 
is to buy Harvard Capital 
Group, a financial communica- 
tions company, based in New 
York. The price will be based on 
a multiple of 10 times the 
average profits after tax of 
Harvard for the three years to 
1991. subject to a maximum of 
$12 million (£8.3 million). An 
additional performance pay- 
ment of up to $2.4 million may 
be made in 1992. 

• KELLOCK TRUST: Mr J N 
Oppenheim has sold 77.250 
ordinary shares, reducing his 
holding to 6.502.750 ordinary 
(4.00 per cent). 

• TOUCHE ROSS 

MANAGEMENT CONSUL- 
TANTS: The firm has acquired 
the specialist distribution 
consultant. Planned 

Warehousing, of Guildford. 


Defending yourself against a 
hostile bid is difficult at the 
best of times. For Barrow 
Hepburn, this looks like the 
worst possible moment since 
1986 profits are apparently 
set to fall well short of last 
year's £2.3 million because of 
a poor performance from the 
engineering division. 

Analysts have been down- 
grading estimates and are 
hoping that any shortfall will 
not point to a further decline 
in 1987. This may come as a 
shock to shareholders who 
had been led to expect better 
for 1986. 

Looking on the brighter 
side, the most exciting pan of 
Barrow Hepburn is a promis- 
ing chemical compounds op- 
eration — which no doubt 
caught Yule Catto's eye. 

Even the engineering di- 
vision has, in theory, the 
potential to provide a sound 
contribution to profits. 

However, the market has 
been slow to appreciate Bar- 
row Hepburn’s move away 
from its origins in the tanning 
and leather goods industry 
and the quality of its earnings 
has been unimpressive. 
There has, for instance, been 
a stream of extraordinary 
items which have signifi- 
cantly eroded the asset value. 

Yule Catto itself has had to 
live with a particular label — 
in this case plantations. But 
with the acquisition in 1980 
of Reveriex, a rubber and 
polymer operation, it became 
more vertically integrated. At 
the same time, a dutch of 
businesses which have pro- 
vided attractive development 
opportunities were revealed. 

Even so, the plantations 
label has stuck with Yule 
Catto to the extent that this is 
the main reason for the recent 
poor share price perfor- 
mance. Plantations profits 
suffered during 1986 and will 
represent a smaller propor- 
tion of the group profit — 
under lOpercenL 

Yule Catto is expected to 
make virtually the same 
profit in 1986 as last year — 
about £10.5 million. How- 
ever, earnings, helped by a 
lower lax charge and the 
plantations minority, could 
rise by as much as 1 5 per cent. 


Share prices rotative 

to the FTA AS share index * 

OATASTREAM 1 A. 




■ i- : .a 




1884 * 1985 


Its strategy of moving into 
industrial chemicals and 
building products appears to 
be working well and the bid 
for Barrow Hepburn re- 
inforces this policy. 

Superficially, the structure 
of the bid (a convertible 
preference share plus cash or 
loan notes) suggests that Yule 
Cano is keen to avoid im- 
mediate dilution of its big 
shareholders’ interests. How- 
ever, the relatively low rating 
of the Yule Catto share price 
is a more likely explanation. 
An ordinary share alternative 
would, however, be wel- 
comed. 

Yule Catto’s record looks 
the better of the two but in 
the right circumstances Bar- 
row Hepburn ought to be able 
to make at least £3 million 
pretax, especially if it had the 
backing of the Yule Catto 
balance sheet. 

Given the undoubted 
attractions to YuJe Catto of 
Barrow Hepburn's chemicals 
business, a modest uplift in 
the current bid with an 
ordinary share element 
would prove more 
appropriate. 


Financing 


Institutional shareholder dis- 
pleasure with Tootal’s 
method of financing its latest 
acquisition, Siandard-Coosa- 
Thatcber. turned out to be 
muted. 

Only M & G voted against 
the acquisition on principle. 
The Prudential and other 
institutions, which had also 
raised objections to the 


financing, voted in favour. 

The institutions, however, 
have fired a wanting shot 
across the bows of any com- 
pany not willing to heed their 
sensitivity over pre-emptive 
rights. 

The institutions believed 
the discount of 8.6 per cent 
on the new Tootal shares was 
too great. A rights issue or a 
placing with 100 per cent 
clawback to the existing 
shareholders should have 
been used. 

The institutions are stick- 
ing firmly to their guns that 
existing shareholders should 
have access to new shares and 
should not have their hold- 
ings diluted. 

The investment committee 
of the Association of British 
Insurers has laid down guide- 
lines of acceptable financing. 

Vendor placings without 
clawback are permissable 
where less than 1 5 per cent of 
the equity of a company is 
being placed, but only if the 
discount from the market 
price is 5 per cent or less. 

Even when less than 15 per 
cent of the equity is being 
placed, companies should try 
to place the shares pro rata 
with their shareholders. 

In all cases of more than 15 
per cent of the equity being 
placed, there should be a 100 
per cent clawback arrange- 
ment. 

The committee alsq sug- 
gests that “vendor rights" 
should be used wherever 
possible. By using an inter- 
mediary, shareholders are 
given the opportunity to sell 
their rights to shares not 
taken upi 


January. 1985 before launch- 
ing a bid for Stock Conver- 
sion. the properly group, 
earlier this year. 

P&O has certainly shrugged 
off its sleepy image since Sir 
Jeffrey look over the reins and 
the City believes the best is yet 
to come. 

Shares of Pearson, the 
conglomerate which owns the 
Financial Times and Lazard 
Brothers, the merchant bank, 
hit new heights, looking for a 
takeover approach in the new 
year. 

The price advanced lOp to 
61 Sp, after 622p, as about 2.5 
million shares changed hands 

Lonrho, the overseas trader, 

• Apex Group, the New 
Zealand company winch 
failed in its partial tender 
offer for PHIT is rumoured to 
be behind bid talks at 
property group. Standard 
Securities, op 15p at 250p 
yesterday. It is believed Apex 
wil! pay at, or above. 
Standard's 2l7p net asset 
value. 

enjoyed renewed selective 
support, climbing 4p to 247p 
with 2.1 million shares traded. 
Full-year figures are due next 
month, and investors already 
have their eyes focused on the 
expected handsome dividend 
of of about 1 1 p a share. 

The figures themselves are 
unlikely to make exciting 
reading, with analysts looking 
fora rise in pretax profits from 
£158.3 million to about £163 
million. 

Guinness, the brewing and 
distilling company, continued 
to put up a fierce rearguard 
action in the face of more 
disclosures about the reasons 
for the Department of Trade 
inquiry. 

Brokers report that there 
have been buyers of the stock, 
and this has kept the market 
short of slock. But the news 
after hours that Morgan Gren- 
fell, which helped mastermind 
the acquisitions for both Ar- 
thur Bell and Distillers and 
has become embroiled in the 
DTI inquiry, had resigned as 
adviser to Guinness, hit the 
shares. 

They eventually closed un- 
changed at 290p. The Morgan 
Grenfell share price lost 
ground with the news that Mr 
Roger Seelig had resigned 
from the board. The price 
closed 13p down at 370p. 

The big four high street 
clearing banks were being 
chased higher as dealers 
braced themselves for the 
interim dividend season later 
in the new year. 


T hus far, the £1.2 billion bid lor 
Pilkington Brothers has been 
more a phoney war than a bloody 
battle. Any day now it is due to enter the 
second phase with BTR's Sir Owen 
Green, acknowledged master of many a 
takeover, in an unaccustomed position 
— on the ropes and apparently lacking a 
winning strategy. 

By early next week Pilkington must 
disclose a profit forecast and any other 
fresh information it wishes to lay in 
front of shareholders before they decide 
the fate of a world leader in its industry. 
Soon after, probably next week, BTR 
will put a serious offer on the table. 

So far the City has regarded Sir 
Owen's opening offer at best as a 
misjudgmeni of how investors rate 
Pilkington, and at worst as a misguided 
attempt to lever down expectations of 
what would be needed to win the day. 

The original terms, presently worth 
about 540p a share, contrast with the 
confidently rising price of Pilkington 
shares, now standing at 66 Ip. The 
chasm between those two figures is a 
measure of the credibility gap which 
BTR has to bridge before investors will 
even start to assess its arguments for 
putting the two very different com- 
panies under a single management 
BTR has so far failed to persuade with 
the detail of its arguments. More 
seriously for Sir Owen, his efforts have 
been and will continue to be hampered 
by a substantial shift of attitude towards 
conglomerate mergers in the past year or 
so. 

Wall Street has long since finished its 
love affair with conglomerates. Few of 
those that were the glamour stocks of 
the 1970’s managed to live happily ever 
after. Their spell of popularity ended for 
the most part in tears. Using highly 
rated paper to buy more lowly rated 
companies can look spectacular, 


producing steadily rising earnings per 
share. All too often, in American 
examples, when the growth ran out, 
what was left lacked logic, impetus and 
manageability. 

It has taken longer for Britain to 
question seriously the long-term viabil- 
ity of the conglomerate. The defenders 
of Imperial Group in its long and 
unsuccessful fight against Hanson Trust 
raised most of the crucial arguments. 
Indeed, some would say that Hanson's 
shares have never recovered their poise 
since. 

Meanwhile, a parallel debate has been 
developing over the bias in favour of 
conglomerate mergers embedded within 
Government attitudes toward com- 
petition policy. Since Norman Tebbit 
decreed that competition should be- 
come the prime criterion for assessing 
proposed mergers, it has become easier 
for businesses with widely disparate 
activities to grow by takeover. By 
definition, there is far less likelihood of 
overlap or conflict 

Hence a glass maker has little defence 
on competition grounds when con- 
fronted with a predator who makes 
everything but glass. 

There is growing uneasiness about 
this side effect of Mr Tebbit's policy, 
otherwise considered a welcome 
improvement by most investors. But as 
Sir Gordon Borne has pointed out it 
produces a steady loss of independent 
decision-making centres in British busi- 
ness. Countervailing benefits are not 
always easy to find. 

Apart from coming up with a 
reasonable offer for a company which 
has pulled itself up by the bootstraps 
magnificently over the past few years, 
BTR has also to persuade the world that 
a conglomerate has anything at all to 
offer a company with Pilkington’s 
special characteristics. 


A watery sunrise in Japan 


The Japanese budget announced 
yesterday is hardly one designed to 
lead the world into a new boom. 
Spending is to rise by the smallest 
amount in 32 years with only defence 
and overseas aid rising significantly. 
The only stimulus comes from the 
delay in implementing some elements 
of the tax reform package, in particu- 
lar the new VAT and removal of the 
tax exemption on small savings. . 

El is not the budget which the US 
Administration would have preferred, 
saddled with its huge balance of 
payments deficit. When US officials 
concluded the exchange rate “pact” 
with Japan in the autumn they were 
surely hoping for a little more 
expansion on the other side of the 
Pacific. And to rub salt into the 
wound the Japanese finance minister 
Kiichi Miyazawa yesterday said the 
dollar needed to rise by about 10 yen. 


seemingly contradicting the message 
given over the weekend by Japan's 
central bank governor Satoshi Sumita. 
Relations between treasury and cen- 
tral bank are seldom altogether 
harmonious even in as close-knit a 
nation as Japan. 

The consolation is that Japan is' 
officially expecting the contribution to 
growth from net exports to contract by 
0.5 per cent next year. The massive 
fail in the dollar against the yen since 
the Plaza agreement in September last 
year has made life difficult for 
Japanese exporters. 

Today’s US current account figures 
will offer new evidence on whether the 
difficulties of Japan’s exporters have 
provided relief for the US. So far the 
fall in value of America’s own exports 
coupled with the efforts of other Far 
Eastern producers have kept the US 
deficit high. 


UNLOCK THE SECRETS OF 

PENNY SHARE 
PROFITS® 


Did you know that there are thousands of WHAT ARE 
men and women in this country quietly PFXnslY CHAR FC7 
making money out of low priced Penny * onAKhaf 


cajjci rouLc. uuiiic iicvci uuy 

any other sort of share. What is the secret 
of their success? 

FANTASTIC GROWTH 
RECORD 

Sixteen out of last year's top twenty per- 
forming shares were Penny Shares. Here 


Penny Shares of the moment, and keeps 
investors in touch with his past recom- 
mendations. You only make money when 
you seU, and it's the aim of PENNY 
SHARE FOCUS to get you out at the top of 

the market so you can move on to the next 
Penny Shane winner. 


making money out of low priced Penny PENNYSHABES7 

. ..JUld WHY IS THEIR you sell, and it’s the aim ol 

record so OOOD? 

hundreds pounds. Few had any previous . p 

stockmarkei experience. Some never buy A Penny Share is quite simply a share that y 

any other sort of share. What is the secret you ran buy for mere pennies. The shares 

of their success? are cheap because the City has lost confi- APPLY NOW FDP 

FANTASTIC GROWTH YOUR MEMBERSHIP 

« ECORD . - AND SAVE *2° 
Sixteen out of last year s top twenty per- price of the shares means something has 

forming shares were Penny Shares. Here to be done — something has to change. An annual subscription to 


AND SAVE £20 


Noble & Lund 
W A Holdings 
Woodhousc RatttKi 
Somportex 

Ashley Industrial 
AC Cars 
TnzerKemsfey 
British Benzol 

U regroup 
Spencer Clark 


from 

to 

gain 

lOp 

lOtp 

-4-910-;. 

9p 

45p 

-f 40(71. 

»Sp 

78p 

+420-.. 

!9p 

188p 

+88<r.. 

»4p 

88p 

+528-.. 

30p 

12f5p 

+316-4 

26p 

115p 

+347U 

Mp 

83p 

+654".. 

»4p 

120p 

+757%. 

35p 

172p 

+381-4 


spencer Clark 35p 172p +391% company was down. 

Imagine how much your capital Remember, ihese companies are still 

would have increased if you had invested trading and they often have quite sizeable 
in any of these Penny Share winners. But assets. Apart from the very few that do ‘go 

where do imii find them? aftw oil ch«. in tha unll' 


where do you find them? _ after all, sha- 
res do not rise in value just because they 
are low priced. 

If you had the time, and the know- 


— # — T7 • ■ T* — ^ •'wui utc b ciuij oikut: uivtbunTiiuuiw 

now you could isolate the potential win- and subscribe now to claim a discount of 
ners and then complete a thorough inve- £20 off your first years membership sub- 
cation Of the comoanv. srrinlinn sand ho u>4«k «... 


so gat ion of the company. scription and be fully protected with our 

Now there is an easier route to Penny unique MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. 
Share success. Each month the Penny The editor of PENNY SHARE 


to be done — something has to change. An annual subscription to PENNY 

In some cases the company may be SHARE FOCUS is normally S5850-a 
restructured, new management installed, sum easily recouped by investing in ust 
new products launched, new ideas and one Penny Share winner, 
techniques introduced. Alternatively, the As a first time subscriber you aua- 
company’s shares may be so cheap that a lily for a S20 discount, IT you complete 
rival company moves in to take them over, and return the imler form Ih+iw within the 
Or a successful private company might next seven tfciyx. 

buy them out as a cheap way in to the That’s right, you pay just S 3 P 5 Q for 
stockmarkei. Whatever happens, it’s twelve month’s issues of PENNY 
nearly always good news for the investor SHARE FOCUS that will put you wefl 
who was brave enough to buy when the on the road to stodanaricet riches- sim- 
company was down. pfy follow our advice. 

Remember, these companies are still - 

trading and they often have quite sizeable UNIQUE MONEY BACK 

assets. Apart from the very few that do ‘go nTTAPANTPl? 
to the wall' -and they’re really surprisin’ I/MSAUT1IHS 

gly few - the on)y way a share price that We are confident that you will 

has fallen to mere pennies can go is up. make money from our tecotninen- 

Join the Penny Share investors today ? t * ons ' ^ ^ ou “ west equally in any 

and subscribe now to claim a discount of " ve our recommendations over 

£20 off your first years membership sub- ,he 1 nexl months, and don't 

scription and be fully protected with our make enough money to recoup the 

unique MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. 0081 °f your membership sufascrip- 
The editor of PENNY SHARE bon 31 16351 times over by this 
FOCUS has for more than ten years been tu ^ e ^ i" ear > we will refund your 

the country's leading authority on Penny subscription in FULL in CASH fay 

Shares ~ the man who sootted Wire and return of post. 


ry — * "“V ■ nr oi reJNNT DIIAKL . — ay UUS 

Share Focus team of analysts condense FOCUS has for more than ten years been hme next year, we will refund your 
days or research into a six page no non- the country's leading authority on Penny subscription in FULL in CASH fay 
sense action guide. Its sole aim _ to pro- Shares _ the man who spotted Wire and return of post 

vide investors tike you with opportunities Plastic when it was just 27p, and then wat- w T 'Z-"";'. 

for big capital gains. By carefully monito- ched it rise to S4.70- put another way, if r65earrfnn S severe! 

ring every Penny Share on the market - you had invested just S500 in Wire and 'bargambasemenf 

by collating masses of financial and com- Plastic when he told you. that investment nh-SSiSSS* Se L!? r 

pany data _ by making painstaking enqui— would how be worth more than £8yB0D! iff?? 0 !???'” , gow H 1 ~ Ere, *f re **** don ' 

ries into the company's management. You can now have access to this y0ur 

sometimes even visiting their offices, valuable information each month through menibers f 1, P application today. 

PENNY SHARE FOCUS helps you to spot the pages or PENNY SHARE FOCUS. In © Penny Share Focus Ltd. 1986 
^ Share winner, and keeps just 6 tightly written pages he reviews the Registered in England 1846796 

you clear of the lose rs. latest news, recommends the hottest, 1 1 BiotnfieJd Street London EP2M 7AY 

| SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY MEMBERSHIP OFFER - S20 OFF FIRST YEARS SUBSCRIPTION | 

■ Please return this form to Penny Share Focus, 1 1 Blomfield Street London EC2M 7AY 5 

TW/31/12 


YES Please show me how 1 can make money with 
Penny Shares and enter my subscription to Penny 
Share Focus on the understanding that I am fully 
covered by your Money Back Guarantee above. 

Name 

Addrchs 


To 

Branch Address 


— Rank pic 


....Post Code 


i* ■Kun'fc mi. i » INI.V 


A/c Name ami No. (if known) 

Please pay to NammaJ Westminster Rank PIC (tiO- 18-4JT). 

2 Si AJ phage High walk, Ismdnn Wall. London ET2 for die arrouiu 
tif Penny Share Focus. Account number 400799*8 the sum «f 
5:DJi0 on receipt of this order and ihcrraftfrSfiflJiOun the saint 
ilaic each year unbl rountrnnanded by me. 

Daft* Signed 


i 






BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE' TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


* * * * * * sl 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


Bd Oltar COTg % 


BB oner Oma YM 


W 0% On YU 


MMMSWLSY 

SEW 2821S8 +15 144 

go Boon* 153.8 T82JJ +U 098 
hot income cac 7X7 .. SjM 

fw ” „ _ . ni DU 404U1 

Mew ftwtW u Inc «U tu +05 281 

on«ee 111 « «t «w .. 

tanai 84.4 582* -06 1.51 
W* 87 .1 932 +04 023 


Bd Oner cmg Yd 


» Offer Oro 


BUCaUXTERMAMAGSefT 

Tft I to* B CCHWB9 Lonaon fCSf ZJT 


Wtowdtofno 510 54.3 .. 100 

GyWfcW ^9 2884* .. 257 

■ P° A ecnw (4) 3690 3786 .. 457 

Irane ROT O) 1016 1086 .. 605 

OotaunS IBS.1 1834 .. 5.05 

Who R 1857 M1J -10 067 

_ Do Acam Q) 180.8 18U -2.1 007 

«0B «45« .. 2XS 

®» Adeem 95.4 Mi .. 273 

CSfUMDNMiMBIB 

125- HOT Hotnm London MC1V SPY 

0VZ42 I14J 

C3 Juan Find S4J 827* -00 098 

CMMON HMD MUMOEW 

Di-SrSra**' n* 9 °® 

awft 2955 3127 c 400 20Q 

Inenro* 3434 3834c 400 451 

toEkS 2455 2596 +09 024 

NMI Attn 1460 1565 -17 059 

GOTef 310 540 -03 003 

Eurapem 570 809 *01 123 

Jacwn 81.1 647 ..000 


Os ham 131.8 1390 +1.1 303 

HOTtr Ire A CUD 2574 2730 +22 406 

Johww 2034 2103 +10 409 

QtB/ftxed Aoasn 840 KUO +1.1 803 

Do hero 760 04.1 +13 493 

MftAM»T««cn»n 131.7 1401 -15 087 

F«r EM TU Man 1705 187.7 -X2 0.07 

Euro T* Actual 1735 1045 -2.1 OJO 

Omni Trust 2(2 6 2679 +15 334 

FOCUHtrilAHAUnKHT 
1. Imnna Poutney HU, Landed EC4H DBA 
01 -623 (880 

US Smetor Con 8M »04 -04 022 

came Pud 1129 120.2 -1.1 023 

UKIncoaw Red 707 830 +05 470 

Fkr Bwm Fund 780 005 -08 000 

Oiewu Income 735 708* -08 343 
Read Mm* 545 503* +Oi 350 

Naked Res ROT 465 515 -03 350 

BenpiM tneoew 865 013 -1.1 277 

Rnandefc ROT 484 ST5 -03 251 


m West GaxOT SL GhegoM GZ 2P* 
6*1-388 3131 


-04 022 
-1.1 023 
+05 470 
-08 OOO 




BUHicad O0i Inc 
Do ten 
Income QOt Inc 
Do Acorn 
SerMn Go's me 
Do Aemen 


445 473 
454 483 
405 43.11 
434 485* 
515 545 
524 557 


mm T 


ra Bogt 551 Bond Mark! London ECS 7J0 
01-681 0011 

CaoOT 3735 3065 402 178 

Income Z070 3092 +X0 455 

Norm American 2865 9045 -2.1 151 

CHBIAUH „ 

1. Hng Wn Sl EG4N 7AU 
OT4E3 014 

G* Trust 894 945 +011257 


raBilYRNEBTMENrSBnncaUD 
HMr warn, TWridge. ™9 iw 
0732 361144 

tan IBM MM -14 

An>er Equfy loogma 342 365 -04 

M«Spm£bSU £-1 *6 -1-0 

AOTfe 325 3*5 -04 ■ 

firtMM 485 487 +01 


229 802 +01 

97.1 me* +04 

425 447 +07 

1605 1815 +2.1 

14X5 152.1 -03 

84.1 885* 

34.1 384 +04 

44.1 <75 -0.1 

1734 1855 -05 


Fkr Esq me 
an&RsedH 
OowOi & hero 
Jeppn SpecfsJ S*s 
Japan 

Managed M 
tofcorae torts 
Pi D f esw ai M l G*i 
South East AM 


Algerian Ekmrpt 08(5 3714 
J«>1 ExsrrOT £4845 4137 
Am Properly Trt 9 10 0005 c 
Propgny Trust £20235 



Do 4rr.«< « 1354 V43.7* -15 162 

Bn Gome 1345 1426* -OB 1.38 

Dote* IGUB 1718* 4W 1-g 

mJS^pJUioSo 533 XA -03158 

o^mCcs *e 122.0 1294 . . 230 

L Do*aun 130.1 136.1 -0-1 238 

mdmuy jomcstone uormutT 

MANAGEMENT 

163. Hope We*. GOTgo* G2 2UH 
0*1 221 8252 

Amerton "jUJ 1212 -44 3.11 

gumoeea 2692 2873 

SmfirCos 2253 3405* -0-1 140 

NATONAL HtOVWetT MVESIMBfT 
HUNACBIS 

*OC«*d«tiig.a»'3HH 

01-883 4200 &a 269 

NR UK 2042 2173* +04 3.10 

Op Acbjo, OT5 «45* +06 3.10 

W OOTW £0.1 -|4 1-10 

Aft *£3 ml - 1*060 

Mdwta 613 &9* -07 3-10 

' R inrun Ace 594 632 -Ol fi.® 

So iSS* ACC 584 564 -04 1.10 


SCO M O 

Scotsten 

WZSZr*** 

Smxsar Cosine 
temlteuamm 
W6wD 
US Growth 
UnvWSd GWPfH 


805 324* 
133.4 1415 
1542 164 0* 
1506 tffl7 
014 67.1 
M55 17SJ 
985 105.1 
1847 1964 
724 77.0 
820 975 


SOMODBHBtfri HUBT _ 
Bnan arise Ho taO, rtflMOrtn 
0705 887733 


UK BpeoaM Trams 
Grawgian 597 605 

SaMerCo's 1422 1504 

UKMHtatFMim 863 815 

DO Acctrtt 904 864 


UCQfOWOi 
iUragmf ksr 


275 4028 
585 824 


NPI UK 2042 2173* +B-* + « 

DO Accuo, ^5 «45* +06 3- 0 

W OOTW ^5 870.1 -&A 1.10 

JfflEs »4 ml -^9 030 

Mdwta 614 -07 3-10 

’ Rrrrrtin Ace S9A 832 -Ol 040 

WOfS a a ACC 583 SB4 -04 1.10 

NORWICH UT BAHAAS 
PO B os 4. M prwOT NR1 3NG 

Gram Tnitt 0248 ill* +050 3£ 

us Trust 139.1 1464 -15 131 

ORSMEIMEIt TRUST MANAGEMBfT 
66, OMion SVBM. LaOTn EC4N 6AE 
oedkOT 01-296 38S98PWSV0 
UrniOTand Orarrift 1534 1g5 - Offi 

tacameOQmrtl 595 E3 .. 160 

WD OkM Hee 975 1037* - - 085 

Acmdean Growth 323 344 . ■ ■ 

Japan Grow* 545 £5* - 050 

E ur cc oan Gromth 762 904 - 003 

M.1 srs* . 153 

PMSc Growth *S5 46.7* - -■ 

HGhta anm 344 £2 .735 

PrKbcmmosm* BOO W3 - 15| 

Do ACoae T185 1225 • 150 

PEAR. TROT __ 

252. HOT Homan. WC1V 7EB 
01-405 6*41 

Oramtl Rmtf be 82* 983 *0.1 

138.7 1875 +02 2^ 

hSoiftS 1255 t»5 +03 377 

SnSLrirlOC 1*00 M89 -1-0 130 

Dp Aran. 1412 1502 -15 130 

[ottKot wiraw .. |K 

Op Man 2293 244.3* ZJS 


American Asc 
AueUeto Ace 
European me 
Da Aceam 
Gft & Fheri me 
GcM ROT lee 
Do A caan 
leone 
M Home 
Do Acam . . 


1335 142.0* 
884 945 
1310 1383 
13S2 1435 
925 S55 
415 444 
445 46J 
1812 192.7* 
120.7 1283* 
1865 1774* 


PrnA: Growth 
Hghbxae* 


92.4 963 
138.7 1875 
1255 Ttt* 
1400 M09 
1413 1502 
1212 1395* 
2295 2443* 


NLA Tom. MrimniM WOT. Croydon 
01-806 4356 Ot-626 8011 


HOT maane Raids 

Ban me 564 825 

Get 240 2S3* 

me 6 Growth 207-7 »4 

NM MOT ho 201-4 2167 

M MU 173 163* 

Sector SpaoMat Funds 
ConaoHH 1437 1S25* 

FOTncfet Sees 462 81.1* 

GOT 685 827 

Da Acorn 805 645 

H Uu* 165 163* 

Prop Show. 656 BS5 

IM» Eneroy 435 452 

world T«?l 423 445 


0 OWETUAHB8TTRU8T 

48. H art SO0 8L Heday Oi TTanm 
0491 57B8B8 

bn) Growth 2J95 2975 


u mm i OT o Rae 
Amer Qrowtfi 
U BnaTO Ctfa 
Per EsUGnHB 
Etaopeen GEi 


2795 2975 
19X5 206.1 
1557 1682 
667 7L2 
62.7 883 


-3M 074 
+02*78 

-OS 053 
+07 058 


SS4 913* -07 OlM 

62.1 683* -OS 129 


PROUaC UMT TROST KAHMOm LTD 


EaamptFkaOT 

Era np t 


Amar Grown 
Aust Growth 
Europ ean TOT 

Do Acam 
Ban Smrimr 
Fm Ess 

£5T8^? 


1005 W&S 
8*2 803 
923 973 
923 98.1 
173 164 
612 645 
352 37.4 
383 4G3 
WX4 11X1 
7*1 785 


Japm. Snotar Cm 195 185 
Sarafl Co 865 695 

Do Aeoan 


BhRppr.8. DeaoMMro 8a London BC2M 4VJ 
01-293 2875 DeOTig 01-62B 9431 

s 6X7 845 -06 1.10 

1035 1102 .. 270 

MOO 1585 .. £70 

765 635 +05 EDO 

1965 1947 -09 170 

1742 1057 +03 090 

513 GG3* -05 050 
00.7 845 -05 1.10 

2483 2020 -47 att 

1232 131.1* -07 040 
279.1 2S75 +05 030 

775 825 +07 050 

805 542* -Ol *50 


(0303m 93364 

Equity 8 Qua 461 402 .. 153 

5ST Rxod W ROT 624 864 -.1058 

MOT* IK 1185 127.1* +0.1 552 

mm 612 647* +0,1 3 M 

feUnrOTaOT 2735 2325* -20 150 


KSSSfeSB 


m hot me 

US hcan 
OP Acctan 


HU Amerkan 
MLA Ganaral 
MU mearnafla 
MA«IM 


St Georoea way. 
0*38 35*101 
Qrowtfi links 
OktRMM 
MOT Incamu UnM 
Man vwd GB (Jn 
tni apwth links 
N AlMrieai lines 
nr EM Unto 
Senator Cos ROT 


668 895 

682 702 


124.1 mi -08 052 
KOT tacOOT 824 665 +02 *11 

far Gum 1633 2005 -0.1 0.18 

North American 1265 13*7 -02 OS7 

liw+ia. 714 764* +01 151 

T OTOT ttOT 11*2 122 29 +04 OJDO 

Miknra 91.1 975* -02 *49 

EuroGm&iac 48.*. 612 -02 xm 

PRUDOfTHLUemHIST MANAGE 
31-89. Word Ml Dftari Enk K31 SDL 
01-478 3377 

41X1 <37.1 +05 601 

11 BO 1182* -15 05 

329 555 +03 058 

865 66.4* +01 6.13 

10X6 1095 -14 070 

1055 111.1 -1.6 005 

755 785* -09 051 

685 TX1* +0.1 151 

825 S75 -0.1 156 

1659 1937 +1.1 24* 

512 54.1 +02 213 

487 515 +02 <5* 

QUXTERMANMffiHBir COMPANY 
3M5 Gaalwo SL Leokai EC 2 V 7LH 
01-600 4T77 

Ouattare CanartH *614 4777 +&5 275 

QBa am i f tan* 2*95 28** +27 525 

OOTOTC haf Fd *105 4408 . . 158 

COTOM Racoaery 2805 2575 +67 255 


234 245 -05 150 

3*5 385* .. 258 

caw ran . _n+ ntn 
225 235* +011092 
434 400* .. 459 

3X1 3*0 -03 073 


SI Semin Lane. London EC*P 40U 


Ac 1405 1482 
&6UdKAee 67.4 715* 

^eBRAB 139.1 1539 
SpaeH Ste me 109.4 1162 
»toOTi JJU 

Tokyo Find t* 239-8 »J5 

Do from 2415 2575 

USSmSrCPVAc SOI 532* 

106-1 1125 
CtaAoLw 1S*5 1761 

RrE« GBi Acaaa M5 605 

Extra me 010 VM 

33-38 GncecMdi St Loodan BC3V 
Q1-C23 5770(8711 

if 

ttoSnCmc a» 3M* 

Do Acc 285 9Q5* 

&abd ah mo M5 315* 

Do Ace 3X0 315* 

Managed EMM* 

Pacdic BMn 5L0 255 

SCOTTISH BMTMUL 
28. a Aobmrt SO 6dW*aOT 
031-568 9101 

md Income UoBs 1535 183.1 

Date* 231.1 84&B 

sconsHUFi wyanranv 
H.9JWM sa EdOTurOT 

031 2ES 2211 

UK Baxfy 1047 1975 

jwSS 1469 1501 

PncHc 2017 2173 

European 2 8*3 2827 

SCOTTISH MUTUAL MVEBTNENT 
lUNAjQERS 

101. Mmrt SL GMagnr G2 5HN 
041-3(8 6100 

IK Equn 1715 1825 

OH iftod 11X1 1193 

UK SnHr Co e EQ 
Europwn 2195 2345 

N Amartcan 1174 T245 

PBCOT 1973 2105 

SCOTTISH imr trust 
2X Oenoao Sa Edtfturgh 
031-228 4372 

RUJfc 717 7X2 

Wbrid Growth 395 4X1* 

N Amenaai 3X2 3*2 

tacomw Fund 463 492* 

Etaopaan *65 495 

NAmwrlOe 267 264 

UKGrowdi 317 337 

Extra me 335 361* 

Scottish wiocrars 
TO Boa 90X Edctxagb BUS 58U 
031-0916000 

PMSQlec mi 

Do Acaun 2765 2944 


-03 £58 
+03 *58 
+08 *38 
-03 1.11 
+05 *29 
+ 0.1 
+05 
-09 132 
-05 1 13 


-15 050 
+33 1.11 
-1.1 050 
-15 050 

+ai am 

-02 150 
-03 1.B0 
+06 658 
-0J 053 
-05 053 
+05 000 
-05 050 
.. 1.14 
+0.1 053 
+01 033 
-2.1 OOO 
-27 a 00 
•05 050 
..321 
+ 0.1 1 21 
-03 050 
+02 75* 


+03 620 
+0.4 .. 
-02 020 
•02 .. 
+05 0.70 
+03 . 

+15 Z55 


+15 250 
+25 259 


+03 1.78 
-25 152 
-XT am 
-25 051 


+Ot 25* 
+04 8.13 
+03 252 
-0.1 05* 
-15 147 
-15 058 


-05 000 
-02 075 
-Ol 050 
+02 *65 
.. 078 
-03 158 
.. £01 
+01 559, 


+05 256 
+08 £55 



785 835 
1065 1107 
1195 1270 
575 595 
14X2 151.1 
737 775 
1027 109.1 
785 835 


NCfeicoae 
NC Jwpwa 
NC Km UK CD 
NC Slam Am 
NC American Me 
□a Ancon 
NCSmaaar COT 
NCSwtoEsraCcr 
NC Baatt S 


695 962* +02 85* 
1S7J3 2095c -27 .. 
52J3 5X3* .. £27 

894 735 +05 177 

2732 2905 -27 1.19 

2982 3175 -25 1.19 

145-5 1545 -02 158 

1975 2095* -15 027 
EltOO 1240 .. 921 


rnCAP OWT TRUST 

Uracorn hn. SSL RhM Rd. E7 

«-8M 5644 

Maecap 187.1 1*80 

mCSBYHJND MANAGERS LTD 
33. HngWMm SL HMR 9AS 
01-2002080 

Anw aouffi 965 101.1 

Do Aeoan 99S 1013 


Roman Dwmnsr 

33 Hng Want SBaaL London K*R OAS 
01-638 5678 

American (A 22S5 2300 ., 170 

SnranB 7425 7575 +235 £25 

MOT Ytod (S) 1785 1805* .. 65* 

Maria (3) 4300 43&0 .. 156 

fixed m aw eat 18XS 1635 +15 £50 

MOT fcteraat iiOD 1115* -051378 

Fv EOT R 205 2475 +65 055 


33. Cay Rd. London EC1Y 2AY 
01-836 8011 

Amer Ttocfi A Gen 1025 IMS 
Parade 2135 2275 

Sac home Fnd 1102 1875 
Special ammaana 2315 24&0* 
[rS&Owa 435 485 

Aorofean UMora 89.1 7XB* 

Smto Co s 4X5 45l2 

Japmi Tadi 6 Can 1105 117.4 
maan a Son e l row S85 E* 

Emenad 58X4 0095 

UKGerm 3a* 37.7* 

Eut> Grow* 415 4+5 

Etao tacome SOB B35* 

STAMUHDUFE _ 

XQwge^ KntoOT SB 2KZ 

Income Unfa 255 27.1 

Do Aram Unto 265 304 

snWARC. SfORY (Mr TRUST 
MANAOCRS 

46. CharioOw 9a BMuOT 
031-228 3271 

American ROT 2175 2815 
Dp Actum 2465 281.8 

Do mmwat i*az 1595 
Aaafrefen Raid 1387 1477 
Dd Ann 141.1 1302 

Bridtfi FM 8107 6504 

Do Aoaan SS72 0917 

Ekacpm ROT 333.7 365.4 
Do Acorn 33X0 3755 

Japan ROT 885 G95 

Do Aeoan USA 702 

SNnta PPP 18X4 1925 

SUM ALLIANCE 

Sun l laaa Hxa ikaOTam, Sussex 
0*03 50293 


-OS 054] 
-05 0501 
-04 *841 
.. 149 
-04 018, 
-05 126 
.. 157 
-15 OOO 
.. £53 
-02 225 
.. 353 
-04 052 
-04 *00 


ITT] 


F ‘t 


htH 









965 101.1 
995 1065 
805 S3L5 
5*0 57.1 
1435 1815 
1484 1575 
2512 2B&S 
4125 4385 
8X3 827* 


-15 157 
-15 157 
-08 £5S 
-08 £55 
+05 05« 
+06 054 
-03 250 
-04 £00 
+05 654 
+05 PM 
+02 *12 
+02 *12 
-15 154 
-24 15* 
-25 050 

£23 

+07 222 
+Z7 251 
+45 291 
+05 346 
+05 S48 


ROYAL UR FW0 HMMOBMSir 
Naar Hd Race, Liverpool LEO 3KS 
051-227 4*22 

Equra Trust 625 862 +02 250 

M True 775 61.7 -05 140 

(SB That 2(7 2S5R +0.1 858 

US That 33.1 355 -0.4 152 

PaaSe Basm Ta 485 485 -05 048 

20 CMm Sl London EC2 
01-920 0311 

Bpny DNt 116.1 1215m :+OS 158 

DO Aram 10X5 17£0m +OB 153 

MOT moon* Ttnt 915 S69# +0.1 *58 

DO Acan WMLS iiE5m . . *50 

US Grow* 564 597 -05 055 

Do Aceam 875 615 +02 ass 


Equity Trust Ace 401.1 42* 4 

naS That Ace 585 835 

m BM That Acc 916 977 

Watdwkfi Bend 5150 S611 

European GOO 505 

Eqaky km Tat 505 535 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


High Low Cangmir Bd 


15 BhA A U Gp 13 

ffi 46 ATASOThoa « 

13 9t AMMyasat 11 

6* 33 tomtom 3* tea « 

M3 45 AmsaSMa 
HB 34 Aaaa etna S 

19 B’tAcsa Juamiy l< 

a T* Atom Loan V 

27B l£t SC&ato UBS V‘ 

IK ® Aop hOT Ml 

^ s x Sp- a » 

| | Wot™ ss s $ 

i i » § • 

233 155 AED 165 1% 

t '% S£W “ f 

70 6* BBSoSgr 0B 0 

« 43 BCE 45 48b 

a 1BBJ 199 209 -0 

85 70 BT5 Op 70 73 

120 SB Bsaad MM 107 107 -3 

a itp.umn 1 Faunae 2* a m 

S3 37 Bosons Cnajc 45 0 +2 

17** 9 BctMtoy A Mv 17 in. 

90 72 tori Sb» 91 64 

123 122 Bmyjfirth 8 NdM IX 123 
*43 Ml BHNn&Branaa 138 143 

M 10 BO MOT 15 17 +1 

34 IB BovKhtiaa 23 25 -1 

44 tobBCN 39 39 

m m UnM ii2 116 m-t 

iss na BhamaaEM ia 155 

295 168 BkcM Toys -2Sa Z93 

« 37 Bureta TV 47'.- 50b +7 

ISO 133 Budad 131 1S4 m-l 

27 18 BMMMIm 19 21 

195 70 Buna 99 104 m + 1 

250 ISO 8r BtaatoM 170 ISO +6 

S 48 ft bis* 45 52 

S 42 Biot a 44 0 

358 180 toOOtoOOuM 330 3*5 • -2 

Wi 115 Kon reran*) is uoe 

3*5 1S5 aymhM^ 220 230 

3b 2 Xe R otto S. 3 b 

M3 73 CCA OMans 78 61 -1 

in 130 CM. MOT IS IB 

47 35 CPU Cmw 38 37 

178 130 OVD 145 165 m 

210 86 CtMuOTOfl IS 145 

B G2 Canuck S3 ~~ 

205 a damn SUM la* 10 

71 S3 Cap 6 HIM 6< 

Mi 74 Oraory Sea na 

25 .2 Ss*" 1 ni i* 

161 IS CHm Wo M3 

13 fibOma Uatfeoda « 

370 158 Caesbn W X7 

73 8bC9ir 22h 

IDS IS Coygme 0 

46 25 ^nen 44 

0Z 475 Ocyram 1% 300 

IIS 67 OOTWI 95 

173 140 Dan* thxwr izr 

33 M Qoma Gold 3 

57 25 Cjf U Hdsi 53 

IS 87 COUM Bunds HZ 

88 B Cm Enurdd U 

«6 ill Colne 183 

133 71 CMaqga W 2* 

171 U3 Daap Famwal 13 

S3 30 ConpMtl IS 

170 81 CasufUnB 167 

0 38 Cm Tara toe 40 

172 b tQS CMItoMM IfiQ 

IIS 83 Canto 0 

133 S3 cm S3 

430 308 OampDani 40 

75 46 Cratnm 52 

If* 93 Cron* 0 

111 75 D88B Ladga B 


Bd Dear Oihmdap % P/C 



Ra 

Bass V» f 

[ Mgi Low OBOTny 

BU Otor 

OTOTfirp % P/E 



+0.1 264 
+0.1 254 


-27 1*3 
-X0 7.43 
-15 19*3 
-05 055 
-04 055 
+04 *34 
+128 *34 
.. 848 
.. 045 
-07 021 
•07 0121 


6B0 595 
505 5X9 


+05X70 
-07 L50 
-13 050 

-ssss 

+01 551 




SUM LIFE OF CANADA 

L34. Codapur StrawL London 9WTY 8BH 

latong noth -830 2002 

UK hem 255 21.1 +0.1 451 

Da Gromh S*J 592 .. 255 

rSSIMT TRUSTS LTD 

Keen Hama Andmar. hot* SPiO IPG 

(B84 58788 DeMhgs: Q2B4 BH32f3{4 


IroeriGm me 
Do Aceam 
heorne Inc 
Do Accuw 
Ganaral U* be 
Do Aram 
GHtSFbmSiRc 
Da Aram 
neonm 
lean 
bench* 

Do Accom 
Mine 
Do Accaa 
Semaed Oppe toe 
Do Acam 
Mhato Ftee 
Do Aeon 


11*8 1215 
1201 1277 
HOT 1267 
14X8 1515 
10X3 17Z8 
2072 28*2 
469 485 
6X2 860 


-15 155 
-15 158 
+04 527 
+05 627 
401 251 
+0.1 251 
+03 9.18 
+04 6J5 


msmsmm 


2206 2845# +04 *51 
8495 3721m +05 451 
1845 1965 -15 086 


1905 8B5 
3875 359.1 
4185 446.7 
685 7X3 
782 795 
583 595 
583 625 


-i5 ose 
-XO 050 
-35 156 
-*3 158 
.. 150 
.. 150 
-05 150 
-05 150 


TAMETTROST MANAGERS 

ton Ggasnh. AylMbwy sudm 

Amor Btsto 735 775m -05 009 

Auskaton 2X2 2*0 -02 0.10 

CwnmodSy 032 085 +02 152 

Burns 295 31.0 .. 151 

Emiky 1295 1375m +03 £57 

Europeon Spec SM 1204 127.7 +05 084 


1 -*■* 


||||§ 



[V*. iW.H.I'f.'f 




fan; 


















1 




13b Mb 

m 0 m 

IX 19* 

45 a 

51 S 

17 a 

M 16 
96 101 m-2 
274 Z77 
112 118 +1 
M7 10 


ISS 153 Bagiaon nos 

5 2 S®" 0 w Pl#4 * H 

ra om a 

73 *3 ME Tack 42 

MO S3 01 Sec Atoms IW; 

86 0 Uraa 55 

216 190 Dam (DT) S3 

W § Dm** B" 1 ®* 89 

V 21 Oe Bn (fake) 24 

g « Don* 47 

UB T08 tortva 112 

115 70 Dmm Bet 0 

135 B Dewey Warm CB 

» IX DOTat 275 

«B 345 Dart 4GS 

2*b » ban 23b 

58 0 oar 82 

148 104 Meg Bui Otto 123 

37 11 fame IB 

35 238 Edo Fm4 260 

*1 22 Etna Ol e to 29 

431 31S Bento ftp* 'A' *n 

'« UK Bearac Ham 12D 

110 7? bottw Dmr 102 

45 24 CdAOT X 

II 6 GKROTOTI Me ID 

20 122 BW 2*5 

1(5 KB Evt CanmchH iO0 

400 131 M 370 

380 181 FKfl Gp 237 

% 1 aw- s 

6 I il 


1 13 

M lib +'j 

SL Sl • +2 

2b US +b 

n m 

« « +1 

80S 8SD 

S3 in +3 

137 K 

29 Sb 
0 SO -1 
112 117 « . 
50 SB -5 
103 168 

2 P 
IS 163 

3S 40 -2 

167 172 +6 
40 44 +2 

ISO 170 

5 » 

410 4^ 

» as m 

s a u 

B 71 

13 143 m+3 
<2 47 +2 

IMS IDSb +10 

1 a* 

B 72 ll 
24 25 
172 177 
47 « 

112 117 
00 90 

zrs 8) +3 

4fiS 400 -8 

23b 25 +b 

M a +3 

123 127 
IB 20b 
2B 265 -2 

29 31 +1 

410 418 
WD 15 •-£ 
102 T08 -0 

38 I 
ID 12 
7*5 255 
K» IU 
370 380 
737 242 
137 14? 

s 0 m 
If 17b -b 
130 133 +4 


O0f *J 200 
£1 *2 1X4 

16 25 127. 
1.7 ■ 15 114 
*8 

17 

U 

15 

11 82 . 

73 05 331 


43 19 155 

*4 14 01 

95 60 133 

1*3 25 188 

77 

113 17 73 

7.0 45 H7 
85 28 185 

14 21 183 

71X5 1X7 
67 73 15 

54 61 27 

03 25 70.6 

US 
302 
85 

60 *9 M2 


15 *7 95 

63 56 114 

20 20 US 

SO 1.7 ZL3 


1.1 Sl5 108 
60 35 13 

125 72 63 

40 85 61 

15 15 .. 
SlD IS M.4 
43 23 215 

115b 52 80 

14 42 li> 

25 15 164 
219 


25 45 133 

36 15 239 

'll 22 185 
.140 

23 18 245 
30 273 
62 10 289 

d .. 767 

35 18 ISA 


18 15 113 

19 11 160 


56 49 134 


33 30 296 

64 

15 1.1 01 

71c 159 262 
12 IS ISA 
17 27 139 

25 25 M3 

80 21 M2 

are 13 M5 
14 69 81 
31 IS 198 

53 11 01. 

LS 11 167 

• 41 -7 

XI 20 64 

1.4 XA 102 

S 8 

29 60 95 

20 23 169 

54 64 64 

U74 157 43 

43 IS 154 
69 13 as 

05 24 as 

25 46 167 

11 25 21.7 
Q4f 20 149 

S3 15 157 
e 730 

10O 24 167 
49 JO 16.1 
25 24 izi 

49 

H 25 709 

58 1X5 

15 15 87 

15 25 2u 
* 14 


63 

12 

17.7 

O 

14 

153 

37 

*8 


24 

65 

113 

52 

58 

160 

67 

24 

252 

8 

63 

29 

>:» 

161 

43 

29 

188 

43 

34 

I1J 

33 

46 

112 

74 

45 

118 

*9 

33 

153 


Ham Cat 
r lUa t lWa 


Kfi 

rm 


i^i 



20 

75 


2 B 5 

300 m .. 

41 

42 

♦ 4 . 

110 

120 


KD 

1 TO 

4 ' 

43 

47 

-i 

118 

13 9 ., 

ot 

ao 

+2 

« 

52 

-a 

22 

23 


177 

m 


150 

155 


S 3 

a 


128 b 133 b 

+6 

137 

142 


20 

23 

♦i 

33 

35 

+i 

a 

31 

+2 

TO 

T 4 

-1 

70 

73 


173 

170 

-2 

112 

114 


W 3 

UB 

-a 

95 

HO 

m +2 

77 

82 


128 

13 ? 


218 

20 

♦Y 

MO 

105 

. . 

41 

55 

44 

GO 

m +4 

IQS 

110 

-2 

15 

18 

-1 

112 

117 

. . 

81 

G 5 

+1 

58 

63 


23 

S 


122 

128 

•i' 

61 

68 

-l 

TO! 

HR m+i 

97 

102 


120 

IS 

-! 

150 

152 

m .. 

79 

M 

m+t 

71 

» 


125 

129 


97 

142 

+i" 

1*3 

147 


138 

UO 

+2 


MOT Lot Coma* 


Bd Odar OfiRldUp % P/E | M OT Law CtoKtoy 


Rib Bose Vhs 

BN «r ChUgetor p % P/E 


34 13 202 

85 75 69 
43 13 367 

20 1.7 283 

09 15 aw 

17 *8 143 

73 13 17J 

51 23 160 

I J b OLB 210 
1J 43 

*J 25 


16 

28 

252 

3L8 

17 

415 

*4 

30 

407 

63 

22 

610 

03 

OB 

8X2 

- *4k 

12 

472 

U 

06 


23 

45 

268 

03 

23 

875 

228 

*7 

307 

IS 

13 

423 

3IA 

13 

346 

06 

02 


123 

83 

I7A 

114 

*1 

34> 

16 

06 


14e 

02 


13 

40 

355 

03 

06 

875 

53b 

12 

47.1 

66 

16 

709 

55 

12 

4U 

2J9 

13 

636 

U 

1J 

746 

27 

21 

673 

11 

03 

BU 

0.1 

08 


153 

*4 

326 

82 

M 

943 

1A 

17 

363 

123 

40 

356 

1.4 

09 


36 

25 

552 

14 

1.8 

713 

56 

32 

447 

19 

22 

861 

U . 

XI 


21b 

16 

TBit 

£46 

22 

7*2 

20 

86 


23 

1.4 


173b 

14 

55 

13 

& 

63 

*1 

336 

*3b 

29 

442 

13. 

16 


64 

20 

876 


MOT Lear Comm 


Pries 

Bd One 


nr 


428 

<35 

300 

300 

213 

215 

1D5 

110 

BBS 

SB 

263 

286 

155 

160 

68 

87 

HB 

111 

184 

156 

305 

315 

258 

261 

57 

59 

SB 

98 

131 

132 

25*. 


240 

242 

163 

185 

180 

IS 

376 

01 

222 

220 

490 

+93 

87 

a 

ft 

245 

BJb 

s 

262 

379 

77 

» 

428 

40 

113 

IM 

49 

51 

40 

41b 

+43 

«8 

IS 

196 

% 

293 

§§ 

385 

15b 


156 

159 

488 

412 

88 

99 

13 

10 

» 

97 

577 

500 


330 

755 

TO8 

84 

95 

05 

88b 


2A 

06 .. 

04 

27 Stt 

04 

10 47 1 

U 

09 r 

17.1 1 

OB 206 

71 

46 216 

07 

1.1 

17 

14 41* 

18 

13 .. 

170 

36 .. 

89 

35 315 

17 

04 llJ 

i.le 

16 026 

<L4b 

*9 3*7 


117 81 TH AasfeOT 
« 49. nHQfyOfLaiOld 
1T3b 77bRI M l ta 1 
I4S HJObTR HaCUrd to 

189 139 TRTnORn 
1G8 IS Tonpd Bu 
390 237 TtapraarKr 

S&.1&2Z* 


95 79 Tmtoiwaf he 

330 217 US DttMtn 
51 3& VKrnlBCTm 

S iSSW- 

118 SObWtal 


Gross YU 

Qi nga tor p % P/F 


1 13 2a 00 

31b 60 293 

20b 25 to.1 

» ■ ■ 55 42 300 

•-2 23e 28 513 

1.4 07 .. 

I .. 15 26 460 

P-b 26 22 504 

61 12 420 

91b 43 295 

+2 115b 17 383 


-• 61 27 467 

♦1 40 IS 464 

.. 171261 77 

93 29 B5J 

+f 15k *2 

29 U 82 

23 17 315 

25b 23 653 


ml FINANCIAL trusts 


47 94bAmu» Bgnss 

V- 41 tab 

X 21 BoSad 
154 120 mrmirn 
8b iPsOato Mad 
2S !5b Do -A’ 

159 137 Buka 
179 ® to That 

279 187 Erne 
113 88 toman 
773 37S IT iiteUmi 
18 81 Fms d 
223 10 GT tonntl 
188 75 Gaato (O i 
Ub490 Hsed us wi Adttta 
2T8 153 Of 
44S 2TD MAI 
305 190 M 6 G 
382 353 Mmcst to Home 
US 88 PacfctoiT* 
47b >9 Do Harm 
208 IS 8nA Mot CM 



COMMODITIES 


Mar 

May—. 

Jd 

Sap 

Nov 

Jan 

Vofc 

SOYABEAN 

Fab 

Apr 

Jun 

Aup 


1835-33 

— 1665-60 

— 1700-90 

— 1720-10 

— 1750-30 

— 1780-40 


12R5-25J5 

125^3*5 

121.0- 20J) 

120.0- 1 9J 

T 21 .8-20.7 

123A3Z0 
125*235 
1 


Tone 

SILVER SMALL 

Cash 

TTiree Months . 

Voi 

Toon - 

ALUMINIUM 
Cash 

Three Months . 

Vb» 

Tona 


OiAet 

358-00-358^0 

36WXM66J0 

Ml 

kfle 

777.00- 779.00 

793.00- 7941)0 

1750 

. Beraly StBatly 


too as rs 


K^o 95.00 
9^50 9590 


Pig Moot vofc 10 

LheCMtoConlrw 

p. per Idlo 


10190 101.50 
101J0 101.50 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
Unofficial prices 
OtfleWTumovtt- figures 

Price in £ per motric tome 
SNver In Mfiee Mr tray ounce 
RurioP Wolf & Co. Ltd. report 


K W** »+»■> ■* \ 


NUOIW w« & Co. LBL report 
COMER GRADE A 

Cash 907^0-908^0 

Throe Months . 932^0-933.00 

Vol : 2150 

Tone Steady 



\towtoei 57 

Rim *» Q 

**«*» Bksc he 

wS*»i5rts»in 5§ 

jemyte^ m 

.**an Sr* ID 

.-man IRbj HBto 18 


Wo ■ Lflrrrr 
toe 


Yens Trite 
Da ri 

2lOT Dvotnb 


■ lOb +■« 

19 
340 

X *1 
80 

20 m+Z 

*»* 


•4 55 1X8 
13 11 «4£ 
73 14 75 

U 31 112 

0.4 20 143 

57 59 133 

67 34 129 
18 15 223 

460 

11 79 145 

27 03 515 

09 24 03 

73 29 2)3 

36 25 154 

17 SI 07 


mu.. 
0.7 13 1.1 


GASOIL 

Jan 

Fob 

Mar 


— 144.75-44.50 

147.^47.50 

.... . 147.75-47.50 

— t4*5044J)0 

U1.50-4050 

— I45.oo-4o.no 



STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash 881JMW82JM 

Three Monthe . 909.0o-9io.00 

Vo) 200 

Tone — - OuM 

LEAD 

C^) 355.00^56.00 

TJne Months . 3l5.00-3l6.00 

424 I Tone, Steady 

ZINC MGH GRADE 

Cash 561.00*562.00 

Three Months . 5*4.00^45.00 

V0» 50 

Tone — Barely Steady /Quiet 

SILVER LARGE 

Cash 358.00-35B.50 

Three Months . 368.00-38850 
Vd 


ttsh 2370-2375 

Three Months 2435-2440 

vot 510 

Tone Steady 

MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 
COMMISSION 
Average fatMocfc prices at 
representative merieeta on 
December 30 

g^^perkgte 

no?r sa4aopperh9 ' 

77.15p per kg hv 
* est dead carcase weight 


LONDON GRAM FUTURES 
CparteiBw 

Wheat Bailey 
pose Close 


113.15 113.40 

115.40 114.85 


LONDON POTATO FUTURES 
£ per tonne 


« ^ 'I 


Sco Man tl ; 

Cattle nos. up 12JM6. ave. 


Open Close 

9*B0 S4Rn 


JSfl 87 710:703.0 71SL50 
Apr87 745JJ-737D 74300 
JW87 W7Xh64X0 647.00 
Oct 87 751.0-750.0 750.00 

Vofc 203 loa Open frrtst 20i5 
Spot manat commentary; 


Dup ID on 29/12/88 













































'■ :• rir. Wi. * 

'> Hi 

U* „ t; 

1?|5 * 

T ._ *S| «0 * 


•t ; 




3 “*4 


*ta 
«4 
«ta 


.-:J^" Sc 

Si gi . 

- •-- cj 5»» e ■(» 

■-H 9 & ? 

n- ^|fV' 

^ I! & v 

' *' -a I*] 3*8? ■{; 

- 4wL* 

v f a |.. 

P; J 

•-. Sftt- 

-£'! tei + 

: r- ;-. ,-Ji Sft £ 

. ;£*: * 

■= Aft * 

- : >!**** • ’ 

;- : 

igsgi ... 

as 

.•:• $ 3:: 

: . ••• I S 

tffcfc* 4 
*. ; %£ ^ 




A!' 

•«• 

j., 

-11* 

■S': 


;:: :‘.| -ic 
.• :: ?? i: 
' •■■ ^ 5? 

- ■■'.■-rmsisj 


• s _- 

i V i-s 
;«"■ 
;."|^ 
V .TS- 

j r«s- 




:' jj *C 


it* 



• 1; <: 
:; i 





_.jg 

•:+- ! U+ 






THE 11 MES WEDiNtSDAV DECEMbcR 3 i ivoo 


bU 6 UNt 52 > aNjD riNANCE 


-<8dd- 

From J<wr portfuliu card check your 
viphl share price movemcois, on (hk page 
ums.. Add ihnn up to use jeu your 
osciatl total and check, thu agntnsi Lhc 
djili dividend figure. II 1! nutches, you 
hj\c von outnpht or a share or lhc Uttal 
darlv prize monev suicd. if vou an.' a 
utnocr (oilure itu claim procedure on lhc 
hack of >our card. Vou muu always have 
yciar card available when daiminf. 

Cain or 

No. ftoto) Grap Iks 

i-I 

BUA 

I Industrials A-D 


P 

\u.Varrfl led*. 

iii.'iMmAhiiaia 


rr 

Wcurru Bins 

BuldiiitRudi 


E 

VCnnleJlc Funrat 

Umncah 


In 

Bm»I 

NoraspapervPub 


MO 

Oceoaics 

EJeancals 



D»ek 

IndusutaK A-D 


m 

Biu 

Bmenes 


n 



■■ ■ 

■a 

Tcc HMjs 

ICEEE32ai 

■■ I 

IB 

UrCjnTic A 3 

'imv.,— ra ; 7. 

H I 

IB 


Properly 


IB 

■ 1 iirw-PM 

Buikline. Roads 


IB 

Lbnih 



IS 

ramsb JT 



x& 

fiwuls 

Induunab L-ft 


IB 

(.fines Paper 

Paper J’nciiOf 


KQ 

AAH 


■ 1 

IQ 

| 1 ~ 

uiniizxEi 

■ 1 





£0 

■iPP’WMI 

lixUmnab 


IS 

M-i n™. 1 4r 



K 

VSCL 



E 

Lyle IS) 

Te rules 


E 

Tomkinons 

Tallies 


E 

Houjs Of Look 1 

Drapcniliofes 


E 

Mnorofl 

Tanks 


E 

Her dancer 

Px opens 


E 


Drapery Acres 


CD 

Nal «• «! 

BjnksXhvmjni 


E 

Loo RarV Hotels 

Hmets-Cxcren 



Mritne* (John) 

Drapery Jtioics 


& 

aGB Research 

Iwlimnnk A-D 


B 

S-.hnne 

Industrials S-Z 


E 

Cornea (> 

Ekctncah I 


ES. 

P-E ImeraaiumaJ 

EkctncaJs 


ES 

CambrxbK Eke 

Ekemcah 


E 2 

Alnaodo Vwear 

lndusinals VD 


EQ 

Hwoe Counties 

NewspapenJ’ob 


E 

Edbm 

iodusimis E-K 


ED, 

.4pei 

Property 


E! 

UadcUan LP&W) 

Induunals L-R 


B! 

Sow 

Industrials S-Z 


B, 

I 1 ill'll 1 1 1 — 

Foods 




Please take account of any 
minus signs 


Mg LOW S*04b 


Pno» Cup* 


rm. 




SHORTS (Under Rve Yeats! 

103 83'jEbSi 13%% 1087 100% to .. 

100% 83’« Trees 10q% 1967 99% 

99% ffi'.Exrii 2*5% 1987 98% . . 

■992% 9S%ExCb 10%% 1967 W% .. 
96% Wifirad 8%% 196&-S7 98% .. 

101% Wi Trans 10% 1967 98% .. 

97% W.TrOBO 3% 1987 97 to .. 

1M% 94%TUto* 12% 1967 100% .. 

99% B2% Trass 7%% 1965-88 S7',to.. 
104% 93%Exeft 10%% 1986 99% .. 

102 % 93% Tress C9%% 1988 08% . . 

94% 99% TORS 3% 1978-88 S2%# . . 
IQ?* SahTnea 9%% 1988 «7% . . 

JM 40% 7MB 11%%JW8^— 100% 

«8i aa-.Tren io%% 1889 » 

104% 92% EB* 10% 1989 97%« . . 

111% 94% E«* 104 1989 100% +% 

107% 58%Exrti 11* 1988 M0 
93% 84 ■: Tress 5* 198889 BB 
103% 92%Treas C9%% 1988 97 

92 82%Tkass 9% 1989 ' 

1 14% 97% Trees 13% 1900 
•S'. 78%EmSi 2V% 1990 
106'. 94% Caen 11% 1990 
.113*. tan Been 12%% 1990 
. 89’* 79% Trass 3* 1990 
100% 88% Trass B%% 1967-90 93 -% 

106% 33% Trass 10% 1890 97% 

86% 76%Eacn 2%% 1090 
9B% BS% Treat C1D% 1991 
112% as '•Treat 11%% 1991 
94% 84% Find S%% 1987-81 
110% 97% Ejtdi 11% 1081 
OB'* 78% 11883 3* 1991 

RVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 

118% 88% Trass 12%% 1982 lOTSe+V 
107% 91 ‘.Treat 10% 1992 
109% B2% Tree* C1D%% IBS? 

nr%ioa%EMn »’•% 1992 

m% 102% Ban 13'i% T9S2 

108 92% Treat 10% 1983 
.121% 98% Tress 124% 1933 
91% 79%fiml 8* 1983 
128 WcTraas 13%% 1993 
13341044 Tress 144% 1994 

122% 974 Baft 124% 1094 

t2T.nK%e>ca t3v* t99* 

■103% B6% Treat 9% 1994 

120 98 Trare 12% 199S 

7B»4 mass 3% 199085 75% +4 

H0% 901* Escft 10%% 1995 87% •+-% 

t» IK’.Treai 12%% 1995 
133% 108 Treat 14% 1986 
103% 86% Traas 9% 1992-88 81 
1424114 Treat 15%% 1996 
1304 1QV4 Escft ia%% 1996 


— . -4 
I05%« .. 
81% -% 
100 

104% .. 

8*'. 


81% -% 
99% 0+4 
10P. 0*4 
67 -4 

1004 .. 
79% -4 


+% 

WHS +4 
IWt +% 
96>* +4 
10740+% 
82'. -i, 
1134 +% 
119 +4 

108 'a +4 
112 % +% 
914 +% 
10640+% 


W* 74%Rttnpt 3% 1 996 


IH'i +% 
11740+% 
81% +% 
124% +4 
114% +4 
004 .. 
954 +'. 
11440*4 
98'. +4 


UM% +4 


1294 +4 
106% +4 
93% 0 .. 
110 

994 +% 
974 

11640+4 

904 +4 
88'.- +4 
94% +4 
+% 


_ B840onw 10% 1996 
131 1054 Traas 13%% 1997 
1124 93 Ettft 104% 1897 

101% 794 Traas B%% 1997 

T«24I16%Ej«*i 15% 1997 .. 

SiV 71 Traat S>4% 1996-98 774 +4 
1074 K74 ExtJi 94% 1988 94.40+4 

1484 122% Trata 15%% 1998 
U4%l0l4E«ii 12*1998 
1074 864 Tress 8%% 1998 
1*64 flB% Ettft 12%% 1989 
IU 984 Traas 10'i% 1999 
1124 91 Cm 10'* 1999 
1334 1054 Traat 12% 2000 
98 M4Cm 9% 2000 
>714 90% Traas 10% 9001 
US*. 99 Com 9%% 2001 
1374 IIP. Treat 14% 1998-01 120 

OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

1114 BO’.Com 10% 2M2 96% .. 

13*4 99% Eld) 12% 199MB 10640.. 
MB’* 994 Treat 8%% 3002 9£. .. 

1124 91% Traat 10% 2003 _ W4 .. 
W94TfO%TratS tt%*2D0MS 12040+4 
1234 1004 TTaas 114% 2001-04 I0P* +4 
112% 91 % Trata io% mo* W 
604 474 Fund 34* 199901 5040-% 
M84 874 Com 94% 20H 93 . +4 

108% 874 Cow 9'* 2005 93% .. 

1174 914 Each 104% 20CB 1014 .. 

1344109% TIME «4% 200346 1164 +% 
CF* 75% Treat 9% 2002-08 82 
19T1 09% Can* 9%% 2006 954 +4 

127% 101 4 Trees 11%% 2003-07 110 % 0+4 
944 794 Trass 8 'j* 2007 >54 0.. 

1434113% Trees 13 'j% 2DP+ 06 IMS +% 
954 76 Treat 8% 2009 81*. . . 

724 55% Traas 64% 200012 584 - . 
B3% 73% Treat 74*2012-15 7940-% 
136 TOB%E«Sft 12% 2013-17 116% +'• 

UNDATED 

an 37% Conoofe 4% 

42 32% War Ln 34% 

52% 444 Cm 3'.-* 

34% 28% Trees 8* 

20% 2Z%Cmok24% 

294 23% Traas 24% 

INDEX- UNKED 

125% 103% Trass 1 2% IBM 1W. -4 
109% 984 Trass 8. 2% 1U0 1OMt0-% 

122 100% Traas 8. 2% 1986 117'. -% 

1074 85% Haas 824% 3001 100% - • 

107% 934 TreralL2'*% 2003 «4 -4 

1104 BB% Treat S. 2% Mfi tra 0-4 
1064 B24 Treat ft2'J% 2008 974 -4 

1114 97 Treat IL2']% 2011 IMS -S 
54% 79% TIMS 024% 2013 85 -% 
102% 87% Trees a2'j% 2016 M4 0-'i 
99% 904 Treat 824% 2016 A 9340+% 
104 064 Trass 1124* 2020 90% -«*• 


39>*0 .. 
34>. .. 

47 +4 

29>* +% 
24% 0+% 
24% ♦% 


132 10202 
103 11119 
26 9.711 
105 11.135 
SjS 9J90O 

108 njxn 

31 3664 
lie 10963 

30 10550 
103 1CLB73 

9L9 10525 

32 0212 

37 11JW 
I1A 10950 
-106 10922 
102 11 DOB 

102 9901 

IU 10976 
36 9522 

95 10961 
34 8355 

125 TO 878 

31 8-144 

1U> 109*0 
120 10942 

39 8460 

89 ID 075 

103 10936 
31 10905 

10.1 0526 

119 10962 

09 10 BOO 

109 8948 

38 


119 10.779 
103 I0.7S7 

108 1075* 
110 10868 

122 10067 

102 10877 
119 10928 

73 9624 
121 10066 

123 10 7® 
119 10981 
129 10909 

99 10822 
113 10935. 
49 6955 
1015 10 750 
119 10909 

119 10945 
99 10 542 

122 10954 
110 10279 
37 „. 

105 10725 
110 10041 
107 10776 
99 10548 

120 11930 
37 lOCT 

103 10870 
119 10335 

11.1 10733 

102 10433 
11.1 10 . 7 % 

109 10595 
105 10596 
112 10724 

.. 103® 

>04 10-46) 

103 10.438 

11.7 10905 


103 10448 
11.1 1CL73B 
103 10 425 
103 10399 
179 10819 
100 10573 

103 10382 

09 9185 

102 10337 

102 10322 

104 10340 
109 10.477 

89 10 125 
1 02 1 0260 
107 10462 
95 10.114 
109 10.4® 
99 10037 
92 9008 

99 9955 

103 10.1 » 


109 

1CL0 

7.4 — 

109 

10.1 • — 
10.1 — 


21 1511 

21 2775 

24 3964 

21 2338 

21 3 BBS 

27 3.786 
32 2728 
32 3972 

32 3563 

02 3582 

27 ._ 

33 3544 


19K 

Htfi lre» Compare 


Gross *1 

CtnyiB* p % P/E 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 



2g MS 

P’S — 

315 I E Hnbns 
4J0 S2S hasmh 
«% S HE SB 
530 JIB Joswn 
IX JSS'iSbj S 
570 377 On* 

3 % “W 

599 417 HSU 
516 368 Hmqn GMeB 

3*1 191 W Aid t* 
"SW C6 MV0» 
is n ontren 
3M 258 P* 1 *" 

86 d Hre Bes Bn 


247 2U 
& 87 
2S7 261 
ID - 
197 202 

240 200 
294 337 
6* 70 

5 S 

m m 

51 52 

3f% - 

£ : 

^ » 
2ao 7te 

87 86 
245 2«8 
398 40} 
79 80% 
480 475 
134 138 
512 518 
438 M2 
71 74 

358 362 
119 122 
593 557 
375 3» 

261 as 

538 540 
126 

278 282 
78 83 


+2 

-2 

+2 


0-% 


’+* 


0+2 

0+1 

-1 

0-10 


+5 

-1 

-1 

-1 

*/ 


11.7 

8.7 

74 

lU 

277 

373 

140 


90b 36 70 

.. a . 448 

I5flb 58 

1>j J 89 

t7 07 
707 52 


3.1 55 

23 J9 
1X9 24 

3U 97 

25 59 
MB 55 
208 5 7 

00 01 
200 43 

13 O 
66 33 

“ji 51 

1000 44 

15 4? 

i H 

iao ij 

250 S7 
17 51 

86 Z4 
D£ 71 
»« 

12.1 

51 

GQO 4lA 
W6b 09 


32 


208 

122 

145 

100 

as 

187 

110 

110 

71 

09 


221 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Selective support 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on December 22. Dealings end January 9. §Coniango day January 12. Settlement day January 19. 

§Forward bargains arc permitted on two previous business days. 

WIm» 0 6tock» have only ompsioa quoted, 81080 mn middle poem W l r<mrtB ayrt5pm.Yteld.ctaPQ« and P/E ratio are o i hai bmi d on the midtag price 



— (Qold' 


Q Tiraes .Yrequpm Liatired 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£ 4,000 

Gaims required for 
+43 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £8,000 m 
Saturday’s newspaper. 


HOB 

TUE 

WED 

TUI 

FH 

sw 

31 









BRITISH FUNDS 



1986 

♦“OH lire Csngusy 


nee _ bass ft 
U DM OmgcBap % 


U5 116 MtttMS U) M8 131 132 0+1 79 59 157 

« 89 MMUSm lot ret •+? 18* U 74 

c» Hi SefitMt im 715 ni It txa 


BM 419 

8« in 


777 _ 

- ~ - «65 8& 

jr. «'.*(** Tagt sk . 0-i% . i .. 

320 220 MM 100 318 77 U 158 


♦» 464 59 B7 

.♦?. 521 79 673 


BREWERIES 



317 319 t*i 
737 742 0+3 
®% 87 0*% 
129 IU 
KB 563 0 . 
IU >61 0+2 
14? 145 0 .. 
CE3 era 0 . 
435 4*0 
1® 200 0+1 
187 1® 0 .. 
IS 250 0 . 
m 295 0+7 
BE K *1 
■ 70 0 .. 

139 141 0 .. 
tao res 0 .. 
Ill 113 0 .. 
MS 355 0-* 
273 230 -W 

m us 0+% 

4*5 i» 0 .. 
MO 263 0+3 
Z76 278 0 . . 
233 238 0 .. 
M SO*.. 
282 292 -1 


M5 

242 

12 

re'o’b 

77 
164 
II 4 

29 

8.4 

179 

37 

21 

69 

80 

23 

too 


49 MS 
23 131 
14 365 
27 7*4 

18 3B6 
27 37J) 
S3 MS 
23 IU 
Zl Ul 
20 176 
42 94 

32 MJ 
39 111 
42 MQ 

49 ^ 


45 


29 MO 
28 MJ 


To 

115 

119 

110 

139 

IM 


_ 52 120 

iff 37 IBB 
44 12.1 
42 129 
49 304 
25 155 
40 194 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 



SSSS 2&- 

2 £*3*~ 

223 M4 

550 33 BPB 

K6 « SSlfi«~ 156 

« *1 May {B*aJ tan 30 

i97 mo Sre iso 

7C 131 SdMit® 2M 

is S Wta 62 

io%ars taun mo 

778 5a SUCnb 671 

275 233 BoreHOCUlU ZM 
IM 89 BrDraMra 87 

s s 

% 1 Sa f 

« SS5*** iS 

BO *63 Com 494 

488 296 Cwtirs* 475 

725 174 Dcocfi SM) 308 

- - - m 



i* 106 GMS4 8M9QM IS 

j 85 254 S te ““ 

152 88 HAT 

5M r - 

256 1}_ 

79 <2 

244 144 Hu— * -l— 

so 4a mbs s hi 

59 *9%HSnriSM 

203 126 tentm* 

470 385 JmUli Sre 



m isthi kmc 

1® 161 SnW ! 

M2 87 Step* 6 RflW 
87 70 Smart (J! 

481'J19%T5«t . 

348 236'jTnW Modnw 
2tt 1*6 Tsoy Grow 
436 210 Trerts 6 NircH 
an 75 Trart 
are ts itarer 

assr 

£$SS’& m 

134 67 M«an Bms 

161 41 

290 157 

225 720 Mam I 


119 50 214 

194 91 M9 

nit ai in 
7.1 32 M7 

M3 27 159 

125 29 129 

115 1* Mt« 

04 13 64 

107 81 85 

33 19 235 

44 89 180 

389 40 13.4 

300 45 95 

MB 59 235 
43 40 163 
416 

30 64 355 

SJn 33 113 
.. . 14 

40 25 

36 24 221 
250 SI 93 
85 19 128 
75n 37 W0 
ee ta kj 

32b 2.4 283 
59 44 210 

29 25 133 
29 39 00 

50 43 12.4 

54 53 295 

19 7J Mfl 

28 15 MB 

84 24 15 

54 39 M2 

«9 S 56 114 

29 39 13.4 
KL1 45 152 

20.1 37 149 

20 40 280 

71 39 161 

143 30 97.1 

HU 20 W7 

s « 

55t 120 £0 

114 25 134 
7.7 31 293 

129 35 MS 

M *2 

31 81 

Ml 46 120 
40 U 113 

85 II MS 

14 37 .. 

03 84 187 

707 57 109 

15.7 25 111 

114 37 IU 
90 30 10.1 
.. a .. U 
200 53 107 
209 30 M3 

17.1 63 130 

12fi 43 104 
*4 52 20 1 

3s zb as 


2M -<s 
136 +4 

148 

242 +1 

183 0-1 



CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 


51% 40 AKZO Hfl 8a 
242 ID AftedDEMl 
454 290 01601 
tor m M “ 

1» 132 B1P 
113 81%Braa BM5Q 
133 102 OvMl 
184 m Mom 
180 64 ft BM9I 

306 248 ££■'"’ 

216 135 Come ftOJ 

179 ia Ob ■ or 

jNsa**^ 

168 119 DOOM 
223 156 Etefi Ere re* 

OS 113 hoft 
298 208 F a— 48 — 

173 113 H—M—B 

<63 330 Moot 
101% 72%Hooft9 DMGO 
we 68 Not Uatf 
tt'4734 tap Cbrei U 
415 333 Ups® 

116 99 L— 

iS'j 11%)— Hftao 
in m Pffio 
no a%Hiren* HHgs 
>78 » AH*f _ 

330 215 9HBffi 
73 38 Stem 'Minin 
256 176 1MM ntata eMM 
170 67 


48% 

. 

-% 

400 

63 


237 

240 


40 

1.7 

251 

ess 

455 

• I! 

M5 

29 

Z30 

245 

as 

+1 

51 

25 

M4 

HI 

154 

• +2 

7.1 

AS 

U0 

111% 


-% 

7007 

63 


{3D 

133 

+1 

703 

70 

193 

150 

152 


60b 

44 

ITS 

73 

re 

-i‘ 

14 

10 

1#0 

(9 

142 

+1 

51 

35 

237 

XI 

283 

• 72 

111 

39 

IDS 

ZB 

217 

• .. 

70 

U 

132 

ire 

1TB 

• .. 

70 

40 

11.1 

19 

X 

-% 

LD 

£1 

60 

177 

178 

-% 

MO 

50 

IU 

158 

(59 

• .. 



164 

221 

222 

“% 

ai* 

30 

183 

123 

us 


50 

A4 

M2 

2« 

2*3 

• II 

129 

53 

99 

15B 

Ul 

+1 

7.1 

A4 

02 

4U 

021 

+> 

219 

£2 

708 

04% 

m 

-% 




1®} 

VO 

• .. 

62 

61 

MJ 

■lfP„ 

HP. 


460 

AS 

120 

410 

412 


120 

31 

17J 

105 

107 

• II 

50 

52 

155 

13 

ire 

170 


OJ 

27 

10 

227 

00 

102 

+2 

17 

27 

116 

730 

Ml 


17 

28 

173 

243 

. 

-5 




» 

61 


II I 


§38 

ao 

255 

ft II 

114 

AS 

285 

Ml 

183 


43 

2.7 

M0 



326 >75 — > TV -A- 
4«%212 Gcnnl TV 
52 27 1_ 

240 176 MV 
477 263 UKI 
363 188 Seal TV 
276 1 TV5 a/V 

50 31 TSW 
Ml 210 Tfeastt TV 
228 137 TV-45 
152 7TiU— TV 
194 1 — TV 


318 

3X 

-2 139 

44 

UL7 

3B8 

403 




X 

« 

•+% 23 

50 

70 

an 

aa 

.. 12.1 

60 

67 

438 

*40 

■ .. 258 

S3 

113 

3® 

342 

.. 159 

A7 

112 

247 

3C 

•1 1*3 

50 

722 

47 

<7% 

29 

E.1 

64 

S3 

296 

• +1 15.0 

£1 


210 

213 

64 

30 


re 

re 

• 69 

119 

33 

HZ 

18 S 

4 83 

40 

120 



36 90 Atom 
21% 14 Mt 0« 

SS 61 A—rtmn ’• 

240 105 «4Mty 9—1 
SB 85 BMP* gurnet} lo- 
an 123 Ba- 
re 1’jBOdo U* 

78S 3B a«»57»0 
72 40 Bmraos 

848 40] Brarei « 

354 258 Barw 
173 83 Canxt ‘A 

K 37 cure (SI 
435 305 Oudl _ 

564 426 CMS VMM 
a® M9 Ctarewf i 
ms its Owsjftn 0 A - 
425 210 HAAS Man -A' 
119 74 Oerem (U) 

438 218*; Dares Era 
589 MS Cart* 

Ml 73 Eta A 

™ 5£ Bra il — m p 
226 1*6 f—e SBCS 
274 U9 

05 » 

197 105 teMDt 
133% 51 Fad (SAetft) 

211 183 FiUTrtaittf 
484 310 r i uuiBU 

6* U MSI 
158 BO QttjtaJAi 
m 172 SoMi tat® 
16%B3D GUS 
_|f%72l OB A" 

2fW 190 Hurt: (—may 
46 23 Htfan 01 Lor— 
« jo note 
i7s he hmm or Lmra 
90 74 J— 

295% » Lades 
200 lWiLff. 

310 135 Ire Cota* 

830 645 1—7 
2B5 165 LJA— 

231 183 ■— A 
350 283 Items 
B35 MB Was Bra 
297 189 Not 
353 305 (Mar (G3 
■7% 56 “ 

153 100 
2M 1® 

365 220 Bert IAMB) 

1® 135 Ot’A- 
55 31 S« 0 S 

148% 104 * 

'72 ~47 Do 
95 ES SUM 
1® 74 Swdl 

3B5 25S%S»Btaast 
24% 10 ' 

43 21 
523 413 
« 127 

80% P'tTtatl-^ — 

IW IX T* Too On* 

198 158 ItamO 
378 235 Vtain— 

(85 38 I— ft 
107 88 MMratW 
925 QO WMSOtt 


JOT 

210 • >3 

(4% 

15% 

a 

65 to-1 

in 

170 to-1 

n 

94 +1 

142 

MS to -2 

zS* 

1 


284 

285 to-2% 

HO 

IX -1 

77 

B -1 

425 

435 

486 

488 to-1 



MO 

7*2 




.sau 


400 430 0-10 
81 83 

3M 318 -2 

543 545 0-1 
88 JB 

555 60S -10 

178 ISO 0-% 
3E JM»4 
(18% 115% +2 
US US 0 .. 
64 88 -I 
208 212 
380 382 .1 

SB 62 -2 

144 147 
2GZ 286 0-1 
M% 15 
10 % 10% . . 

H 33 0^ 

4 » * 

Ot 47% 

186 1® 0-% 
307 312 
650 880 -TO 
243 2S3 +3 

178 MO 0-2 
315 317 0+2 
575 590 
225 226 0-1 

^ s •.% 

5 3% 

350 MO -a 
194 U6 
as 52 

123 IH'i -1% 
776 270 “2 

57 9 -i, 

87 88 

9G 100 .. 

293 287 0-? 
11% T2% 

27 32 -1 

445 450 -2 

1® MJ .. 
83 64 # 

I58*i ira% -4 
173 175 
277 280 M 

173 f» 

70 74 
708 7T3 


£7 

27 


35 

56 

ft A 

25 

13 

»9 

30 

41 

130 

13 

23 

»7 

Id 

04 

745 

1* 

80 

21 

21 

ft 

21 

23 

HU> 

32 

70 

MS 

21 

33 

273 

121 

20 

17.3 

179 

30 

1A0 

(0.4 

50 

168 


49 


MO 

24 

113 

13 

43 

10 

1.4 

ft 

86 

ID 

783 

25 

AI 

110 

130 

23 

*25 


30 


03 

31 

1*0 

29 

70 

u 

£1 

33 

210 

86 

48 

87 

706 

20 

163 

IA 

23 

Ml 

53 




43 

578 


21 


157 

IS 

MS 

7fi 

35 

180 

23 

7.1 

106 

31 

74 

123 

129 

67 

123 

S3 

80 

IM 

11 

29 

340 


A7 


63 

20 

05 

III 

17 

270 

100 

40 

170 

58 

32 

214 

80 

19 

150 

04 

1.4 

270 



>9.7 

131 

37 

»3 

1.1 


720 

53 

40 

9£B 

AI 

fJ 

a* 

73 

27 

310 

80 

4b 

161 



336 

£0 

rail 

159 

00 




20 





51 

£2 

(80 

710 

39 

!£Z 



173 

76 

T? 

247 

50 

35 



ax 





43 

25 

IU 

pare 

30 

150 

ast 

20 


2200 

32 

163 


396 IBS AB BeC SS SS 

740 133 A— — 2W 213 . . 

150 S'rto— na la *' 

im 43 Una 0— cos a -f 

110 63 AllCT. _ tw w 0+2 

300 225 Atttoc —8 m 30 * 

n SO AKta >— y 73 75 


a ,7J 


V U 214 
U U IU 
e . ai 

D7 07 IDfi 
4.1 1.4 90 

17S 




1986 

Wgh low CttBBWy 


. te _ owe W 

ft* 06a CbngiitaD \ Pf 


270 <a ure £*c 
370 235 MX 

is a K 

U7 1 He* 

168 rn MM 

595 375 h un t, 
M3’.-rfi? ism StoMnr 

as , s ,, &rss4- 

« 

MS 277 040 A m I II 
313 191 C— Bra 
743 1 OP Op 

57% 43 QHDM 
ZB 113 no 7’A ZPf 
too in Cam M 

|| S& 

IB3 126 «{|BM 
76 49 OfttOKt 
745 T*0 onsar 
55 3 DMU 

52 28 DP* 

385 2E2 Ik— 

48 37 MM & Mis 
190 tre Stare 

448 3S2 EtanoHOMi 

K 50 EUrelu 

62 « HB—tank 

337 ZBS E— i w itm iMi 
310 243 bHWtanS^ 

96 V F)Q Ehd 
253 i<7 HntaBca 
158 n — 

H 34 toredTaA 
226 154 QIC 
MB 90 ft aaiti 

IS SST 80 * 

355 225 M State & Oo04i 
» 175 JmSta 
790 65 404* 

59 go LM jte o — 

423 270 U?TtoC 
222 1 Idas * 

433 115 W— 

91 52%AtejB BS 
250 S3 
430 385 

HO 125 

220 134 Mlta 
457 203 MU 
u 33 tan Eva 
65 a M— EM 
313 238 Knout (IMS) 
MS': 74 Ml 

49 9 Demon 

580 378 O —ta- 
in 156 Pt — irerere 
3? 18 Rrerea 

164% spur— fn S%» 
rapu-NV 

190 120 Da'A'ltf 
248 162 T 
34% 15% 

171 II* 

95 a 

234 M6 State BW 
IX 1 Sc— K 
333 223 SO0EIOI) 

5fl% 30%SBW — 

177 96 SIC 
216 V sura 1 
IM 44 Systaa 
18% T2%1uX 
253 170 Tteiptail 
IS a Ttarerere 
53 374 ngaan 
3B 225 Treat 
350 286 US 
273 MS kHOta 
205 IS UH 
190 116 IM 
515 320 VC 


. . 23 U 

re+5% uj 60 
-1 25 10 


2» 227 0+3 


55 57 


272 277 +1 

97 S3 0+1% 


Zl 10 


10 43 
20 69 


AS U 

in 29 

U 25 
IJ l« 
SB 19 
20 25 

10 >0 
U U 


7.1 IS 
21 11 
21 10 

0L« 02 

03 06 

200 69 

75b 69 


114 



HO 50 Whom StkOtea 
131 75 KMMxnacI 

310 230 — F— 
KB 91 Mobaatn rfl 


o% - 0-% 
2£0 2E8 +* 

171 Ml +4 
183 MS +% 
M • +% 

ms no 

71 07 

im us +r> 
no me.. 
330 SX B .. 
54 3% -I 
176 177 -% 

102 105 .. 

si e 
16% - -% 
as 187 -1 

S 57 

488 470 0 .. 
» 310 • 

340 3(4 +2 

MS MO -3 
180 IBS 0+2 
156 IS 0-2 
408 410 -5 

225 230 0-2 
W% 71% 0-% 
08 133 +1 

ZSO 300 +» 

173 17# 


72 3* 

34 21 

A3 23 
25 23 
MA 49 
07 12 

21 12 
&9 «0 


250 53 
25 1.1 
M 22 
80 49 


43 1.1 

152 U 
42B Sl7 


FINANCE AND LAND 


20 205 Mbeatft 
177 TS MUUM 
178% B MAM 
240 WS Sarttoj Ticb 
22 IB Mil 
2K3 2(9 

43 a , 

* 17 Eotey 6 tan 
185 M2 My IBM 
207 153 Ik— 

110 58 M Hotv Lons 
110 78 Do BOX 
M8 IM Mett W 

" ****£?*«> 


235 ZB 
MB Ml +1 
MS MS -3 
237 242 0 .. 
«% 20% .. 
235 248 +4 

a <2 
x a 0 .. 

155 (80 0 .. 
204 207 0 .. 
U7 no • .. 
no no .. 

118 S3 ... 
350 380 +€ 

20 212 


U 49 


MS 

5J 


13 43 

7.1 45 

U 42 
24 24 
825 74 


U 


£ 



IB BS 

532 457 Aran 
400 2a BatesS— 

162 » Briar SDd& 

380 28 Bri IMS 
213 170 ft— IF— 

•re 73 owns 
ua ms aqrei 
287 133 B—Bl 
118 B BtaMCM 
35 308 BBOta 
75 a At— ft 

H6 158 

183 W CM . 

295 IS Woos BMS 

245 141 Do 'A' 220 

280 105 C—S 120 

30 201 Or 210 

SS iMFA iS 

315 238 WiLoS^ 280 

167 103 GrimMs (57 

20 188 Bm fiber 248 

M* m Hats uo 

250 ISO Mftns 172 

?C. l3P.H»0rea — 210 

112 75 Hon Fun 105 

189 115 H— Swta 170 

298 20 Kaftta Fran 2EB 

28 2 220 Hfti 242 

143 B (res (JM J) 132 

U» 50 LeraTB) S5 

620 SJS UmfiSof 575 

3D0 T22 TlllTl 1 (Itr 1) 280 

im 93 IM Tad* sore 150 

236 150 Ifcwrenm 200 

257 205 Sttafc (JV(V— 210 

82% 51%4tanraB 55% 

300 2M ttta Foods 2(3 

M3 152 Itado 8 PbkscA 192 

171 127 Pat Freds IB 

ZK (57 ftWf 282 

532 385 Bb— UK 397 

<26 3*4 SaBArey U) 416 

163 t22 s—n (Ocre) 137 

248 154 ft— OB 215 

gsb S 02 tSTuib sgo 

m 40 ib— Mupi 43 

420 265 Tires 390 

£S no 0MB 315 

169 2T6 Utt snob 231 

181 04 M&aa&PBbp 19 


.... 150 

Ml 32 122 
50 45 330- 

174 XT 150 

IU 44 as 

Ul 41 80 

MO 53 UJ 
11 34 Ml 

41 17 17.1 


9% 


58 .S 3 

233 0+1% 
MS +1 


74 87 SIS 

170 54 MS 
1.1 U 
87 47 214 

&3 5.1 U 
ns ia ws 
114 43 oi 

MS 30 17ll 

12 VS 294 

ISO 57 Ul 
14 12 214 
SB 24 115 

S I7 211 
27 154 
A7 22 U7 
U 42 U 
30 23 224 

4S IS 24.1 
U 35 IU 
16 27 MB 

50 41 90 

IU IJ til 
4A IS 244 
74 44 328 

20 10 TOO 

P G M2 

24 50 230 
11.4 46 12J 

S3 34 MB 
80 35 MS 

24 IX 174 
180 AS 11.1 
BA 20 242 
44 34 174 

Sfl 50 It* 
.. .. 64 

u a ai 
14* AO til 
08 U 126 
Bib 80 156 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


155 BJ —W 
«i M SaodTta 
X6 208 

3B1 312 

5G5 447 (re tab I— 
MB 7B>,» 


ns mb 0 .. 

4S7 49 -3 

2S7 29 0-1 
3ST 383 +4 

463 49 

T 95 9S% 

115 87 ntBft 01 W HlMi no 115 
9%48%<tanai— , 57 68 

405 348 SM)y HBUb ‘A 37S 378 

81 BB Stare » 76 

209 US ft— SB Foot ire 178 


xo 07 626 
HI U 02 
26b 1.1 Ml 
MB 44 M2 
+3 143 11 M2 

£1 22 157 
.. 21 10 .20.4 

+% 23 16 -17J 

+1 50 13 MB 

+% 20 26 MS 

*% 74 AS 174 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


J» 179 AAH 

239 W4 fCB MiiibiIi 

131 96 AH 

675 316 AW 

T10 75%Aamn 

29 206 mbbs 

304 20? Atarefta VTtn 

255 M* AbtBBK 

315 MS MW In* 

» « Are w te n 
SO X AWHHI 
C 23 Ararat 
4A> 373 AM 6 larey 
91 30 AsMn 
530 183 fcaftr Gbo 8% 
S3 B%Mrea 
333 253 km Attar 
ao *8 Areblre HtM 
xa n7 ita 
49 375 BET Ote 
65 62 BETEC 

333 232 0OC 
330 2*1 SIR 
218 153 Brent* 

21% 18 MrefCHl 
*20 280 B»d fltttj 
310 zi4 Breratatas 
?T0 in Bren 
rm n&iBriv 

397 227 areewRred 
eo 9 tarawHatan 
475 ix ftnaT—i 

241 ,g BS.S V? 
GQ iS 



2GB 270 +5 

MS 170 ' +8 
125 MB -2 

382 383 -0% 

93 94 -% 

224 226 .. 

3® 307 +3 

191 61 -2 

SB 310 0 .. 
2X HO +« 
47 a *-i 

Si 

3B 41 

Z6 770 +20 

ia ^ 

40 40 

>35 140 +4 

<38 440 -2 

77 10 0 .. 
370 372 +1 

29 271 +1 

122 184 -1 

2T% 22 +% 

383 387 • . 

2)4 237 0+2 
HO 154 

141 1*3 

230 

*25 on 0+45 
23 31 -3 


110 

94 

42 

Z57b 

60 

127 

U 

12 * 

AS 

15 

as 

»4 

.. 9 

114 

1.4 

BJ 

14 

14 

346 

26 

154 

94 

114 

MJ 

n.i 

S3 

16 


41 Ml 
17 250 
55 129 
44 M7 
84 M4 

54 114 

24 240 
M3 

At 140 
XB tU 
3J X0 
14 Hi 
70 110 

.. 35.1 
AS .. 
14 122 
U SJ 

23 50 

25 MO 

55 MS 
34 107 

42 MS 
34 180 
82 134 

725 
50 124 
47 07 

6.1 122 

24 MB 


34 52 130 
3141 70 52 

10b 63 ... 

107 5J 1X6 
30 55 97 

87 14 110 

17.1 30 MX 

14 36 362 



... TB3 ft— 1104 
197 13* fiftc* Inw 

, S%S&S?U 

405 (74. Bhtkrew 

22% 1. 

175 100 
378 249 

«C iffl BnSrt-Gunby 

ss'-SF 

143 72 ft SMai 
291 130 ftW* 

423 296 MHO 
1*5 9 Braraarai Ms 
3* T7 Bran tig 
40 3i BrxAb low 
78* 140 ftBM>4 73KS 
7* 48 ftnta& (Hus) 
350 1® EdtaJBh 
268 138 Baps 

nX 58 hmMHft 
108 8* utteord Etg 

9 25%0—M 



340 350 
200 205 
112 IM • . 

97 99 +3 

42% 43% +% 


IS86 . 

np la* Cesprey 


ftre *311 re 

fta Oxer Cn c&to 3 *, P T 


505 253 Caere bq 


s% 4'iOmni A Stair 
8% 4%Gm* 6 Stare 
zr> M Creuwra i u 
» 68 Of M _ 
91% 82 a— t P* 

ns a —MtiH 

300 231 am am 

«40 sn 



17* 

234 

OT'i'WV . 

•I XI DSC 
310 2DB DTO 
305 308 O— 

25% 17 -Su 
80 45 Bscs 6 MBA- 
33 183 DhbI' 

* * D» 

XO 233 DeUlfer 
753 159 E*Ba 
2S3 110 Drareftm 1 
315 167 DenSH 
27 15 Dcka Mate 
385 150 OptaRt 
102 S3 Oc&saa tab 
ltd 79 Dm 
123 X Dnooran to 

154 74 OMk 

97 re DitaWI 
85 88 DO r” 


ZB 248 Etstaw ItaG 
271 ISO EOB 
205 3» BS 
43% 34';E9tal 
153 HE'iBKD 
34% 24%EfcOB*Bi (HE) » 
104 61 Eltrei |8| 

3% 2T%EBAM 
381 285 byfenOtnM 
20* 20%fncssia (UQ % 
181 % 136 Infant Hast 
tffl 114 Ererereatam 
M3 112 Qd 5ft M 
SO (87 EMM 
215%122 Eanet 
<28 312 Etta 
55 22 Ma» 

47 28 FtUtaH 
214 186 frenr (AQ 
75 49 F4r MB 


71 81 • 

(SO 4000 3 0 
6^j acrz •-> 

7 6 

7 t 

30 31% 

91 92 0 .. 

W< 00 0 .. 
105% 110% -3 
270 273 • 

505 905 #-5 
3M 3M 

31 34 
ZB 243 
112% 177% 

5*5 S5 B .. 
225 738 • . 

H8* ?« re-'l" 

6 & s*. 

*50 453 -1 

Hfi 110 +7 

EO 84 re +2 
182 « 

§6 80 +1 
tso M2 *6% 

07 (92 • 
wg H5 re .. 

m 280 re +3 

55 i ’* 
280 285 0-3 


it 


It 36 121 
_J 50 05 

«6 46 94 

14 02 1i> 
..4100 SO) 
. 1 .. no 
. * . . 151 

25 33 112 
59 BE Ul 
50 46 110 

160 62 (49 

236 29 11 1 

70 25 71.4 

470 

65 27 550 

tax 61 117 

180 29 

2 ij ™ 

04 54 112 

14 16 216 

7.1 XT 173 
118 20 123 
25 23 *80 

50 54 (32 

36 53 170 


42 a; 
59 Mi 


U3 _ 

375 23 .. 
14 21 
26 10 20* 
186 67 (23 



*3 


84 Hereto csw 

28 FoM 

4?’.- gv ftS^'a B re KA' 
253 (57 FsBreoD 6 Katay 
67 « FreacbOta— 
131 84 68 H 

SIS m aa , 

3M 280 OR 
IM X Gnan Eag 
206 98 GeiKBnr 
(S3 111 BM 
I1%756%ttn 
344 794 Gfalwad 
505 240 Soup far 

« ffl N— 

3(2 206 toadi 

ran 153 aom 

90 9%Htt taesm 
252 IM MEM 
222 120 UK 
285 175 HUH* 

290 235 Htkre 
57% 2T;llTBren M 

fs 20 nano 
215%U1 HMM 
2M M5 OaKOV 
686% 96 0o5%ftH 
Q*%1tS% Ob Mft 

S IS BCjSrt 

623 403 HMIresSElto 

S SSTfE— 

221 140 HeMMUCftanc 

201 58 H— 

222 65 HM10 

220 722 H—B SJgb 
02 17 —Bros 
356 146 KO— ore 
166 78 HMM 
348 234 Kmmb Aaac 
tffl SB Hreretoft are 
<08 207%itadan «— n 
191 IB IB 
3(5 IB taboo 

« JHHC 

S%fS?r 

?g^sst s — . 

TS ® 

8 21 narano 

u a Otar 
325 188 UbayW 
138 HS RonadySrata 
290 230 Km&mJn 
270 IS HMB-E-2B 


ia%na lip 

323 IK fared 
75 42 1MB 

iS'-Sir 

92 84 (Ante 

1 » ® ” 

x% a 

no ire (on 

145 95 DaDtt 
8* 9 tin* Mba 
m 19 UnM 
2S3 159%Lbw S Bosv 
467 306 K. ftta 
119 64 ft M 
49 Xl HTHaHMg* 

79 43 MMtaBMFUQ 

312 185 BteSaSsse 
OB 78 U«taU 
713 485 WmrtBtre Skip 

91 14 " “ ' 

a ® 1—310— 

H6 KC 

207 95 __ 

IM 105 ttoairer 
194 RB IM CO- 
SI 55 B — . 

78% 45 HtataXtota 

137 « MacMISm 
?70 NX Mam 
315 212 Harare I. 

208 a%HSrinr 

216 135 ulfJ) 

41 a Hmbob tads 
1BJ% S? hire Torts 
133 9 MtallJfld 

» * SSL 

2B 70S tan 

216 S (restart ws 

258 171 Ofei Bed Ifacb 
MS 247 PMtlta 'A' 
70 B%Pta«b JT 
618 383 FW9BB 
SI 
136 


227 237 
»% *% 0 .. 
211 213 • . 
»% X +% 

85 n re-i 

86 91 -1 

127% IS?’i +2 

S S - 2 . 


313 318 -4 

IB 170 re+3 
275 280 • +2 
*1% 42% 

MO MS • . 
31% - -% 

re 72 re .. 
22% - -% 
307 309 -I 

2P« . -% 

743 M8 0+J 
728% 127 •+% 
IB 1* 

ISO «< 

IB 185 +2 

4H 4 S 0-1 
X 37 
77 33 0 .. 

T29 in • 

a S3 

533 535 re-3 
77 BO • .. 
X 9 0 .. 
S 9% 
t55 19 0 .. 
31 are.. 
793 2S +3 
S% 82% +2 

29 29 5+2 
305 315 
102% 705% -1 
2BS 207 +3 

M8 145 -2 

70% 0% .. 

g ffl.:: 



272 


ft 

45 

64 

60 

110 

m 

35 

152 

27 


190 

79 

£0 

138 

43 

61 

173 

09 

61 


179 

90 

U 

MX 

57) 

3* 

147 

M 

54 

9J 

71 



57 

30 

104 

ft 

£4 

37 

Ml 

Ml 



511 

21 

68 

69 

7l 



50 

62 

177 

84 

15 

216 

10 

13 


59 

£1 

87 

09 

05 


£1 

39 

!D0 

20 

69 

7J 

12.5 

49 

>69 

4 1 

BB 


84 

Si 

121 

17.9 

67 

no 

Mil 

32 

20 2 

50 

AB 

re 

Zl 

10 

185 

so 

as 

183 

m 

to 

220 

120 

4? 

tt« 

185 

£5 

MB 

60 

41 

M7 

122 

AI 

US 

20 

27 

»1 

120 

53 

110 

60 

49 

100 

149 

60 

138 

20 

10 

280 

U 

11 

1A2 

A 

32 

A3 

121 

#7 

77 


0 

92 


70 

20 

M0 

132 

57 

OJ 

214 

40 

99 

27 

20 

63 

54 

35 

XO 

MB 

56 

159 

61 

3/ 

194 

A7 

24 

170 



574 

43n 

54 

289 

118 

33 

(30 

55 

68 

68 

121 

35 

MB 

80 

60 

61 

>3 

AS 

MB 

21 

17 

205 

M 

aj 

210 

304 

62 

02 

57 

23 

145 

0* 

17 

(19 

118 

30 

UO 


52 

70 

55 

A7 

H7 

14 

SS 

705 

& 

£0 

39 

40 

tut 

u 

132 

214 

62 

213 

80b 

32 

23.1 



STt 0 . 

a 0 . 

MS 
105 110 
78% 79% 0 . 

244 245 -1 

227 ZS 0 . 

40 453 +1 n.4b 

It -1 29 


9 82 0+3 27 

236 238 0+3 M3 

M2 (12 -3 " 

670 EX 


*1 D 

09 WO 


91 U 0+2 40 

re re • .. 

a OT •* 


_ no 

123 125 -% 

177 180 0+1 

ire ire e+a 

re 77 0 


13% 177% • -3 

52% 30 -% 

173% 178% 

35 37 -% 

157 150 

90 8* 

« X 0+2 
3C BM e+1% 130 

as 217 +3 57 

173 178 +1 121 

412 MB.. 17.1 


15 
#6 
46 

IP 

46 

ft 

96 
U 
+1% ai 
.. 55 

.. IU 
U0 
M 
ai 
MO 
10 
M3 
10 
17 




K OB 154 


43 IU 
17 242 
39 .. 

5.4 as 
43 129 
Si 230 
42 MJ 
S9 00 
41 170 
06 .. 
03 174 
57 U 
39 545 
65 02 
12 2t5 
35 XI 
00 »0 
27 2X9 
89 72 

AI 109 


♦% 


ao 

280 

to 

68 

21.4 

41 


39 2(5 

3M 238 Petal Otdbjn 

ssmr 

2S ns taaana Stas 
IX ^ taebtt ^t a BUta d 

m m reg— — 

309 U 

HO W* taym 



gag : 

"13% 

89 0-3 

263 0+5 KU 
» 295 .. 33 

2B7 290 0+3 221 

no 1T3 +2 

•83 1G5 0+3 

I 3 5 

?U 215 +3 

9 S3 0 .. _ 

K3 667 0+1 239 

325 328 86 

aa 3*3 0 .. 

303 307 0-t 

MS 790 -a 


12 

7.1 

azf 

7A 

tr 


■ss ^ ssa^- 


55 X 

19 Ml flamer 
MS ”■ 

is 116 Ronrt**" 
uo n —raw 


61 53 

134% 09% re +2 
557 500 -5 

9% a 0-% 


■S5.BV: SS i\ 


41% « 
ee as 0-2 
m ar *2 
40 51 +1 

111 im 0+1 
MS rn 0+1 
2% 2% 

TX MQ 

mere.. 


87 

360 

.. t 

9J 

93 


25 206 


59 210 
47 UO 


32 174 
64 IU 

42 11.1 
1.1 354 
70 209 

1.1 109 

43 04 

3 S 

35 17J 

19 33 
2B 167 

20 89 

20 156 
37 151 

” V 

50 1*7 
ID 423 
40 121 

“ ^ 
230 

4.1 JOS 
U 39.7 

119 
82 78 

87 74 

1.1 

50 MS 
20 S3 




+3 


... A' 

1 1 £- 
jssJSa 



a a% 

795 200 
KT1 104 

C *4 

230 210 0-2 
IS 15S 0+2 
143 M7 
(47 IS 

ua ia -2 

145 150 
ua 1*3 

47 40 

2W 225 .. 

90 95 0 .. 

?« 733 -1 

B W 0+1 
595 298 • -7 
704 >06 0+1 

417 421 re-3 
33% - -% 

125 126 -■] 

S4 37 +1 

283 255 re+2 
775 MO -2 
150 79 

225 230 .. 

9 M3 -2 

105 170 +a 
5*2 570 re-2 
« 49 
>50 770 

HO 245 
73 78 

j5 re 

SO 225 +3 

215 2(8 +3 

175 IT# ■ -I 

27 X 

165 1S5 0+5 
490 494 -4 

17B 02 -3 

re » 

» «S re +25 
112 % ■ -I 

8 8%+’. 
rr ; 80% -1 
IS 07 0+4 


Mft 

(0 

10 

U 

SO 

54b 

40 

1.4 

14 

u 

H 

an 

29 

12* 

83 

77.1b 


37 127 
27 157 
09 39* 
09 380 


s 


M 
27 IU 
A4 .. 
43 J02 
70 12* 
65 162 


35 20 
04 AI 
79 20 
M 40 
70 A7 
IJ OB 
79 70 

14 13 

257 45 

™ 3 H 

41 U 

17.1 70 

U IU 

743 &« 
60 20 


214 

20 

(04 

1X7 

120 

at 

99 

132 

120 

130 

370 

50 

U 

21 

7U 

a? 


MX 70 17.4 
200 4.1 M3 

43 is iLO 
122 31 131 

!! i Mi 

44 50 BA 
04 51 no 


19£ 

LS 




Pnct Gres tta 

U Oner Ca age i> 0 % P. f 


CQ 91 TRta lira 
331 E9 (transoi T La* 
3J8 203 lanttre(H4i 
3*9 303 la— Mam 
to 200 ftre rarararara i 
207% 12* T tataW I On 
22 fjTnraem 
38 5B TtKte 
1*4 7B Tnstcx 
241 75 Timer ( tour 

125 75 Unpora 
22 73%liaaM 
SC. 56 -UMMr ffiVj 

293 212 vraa 
50 33 von 
IX -O Vtaar PradatK 
135 O) Vasa 
2»%134%reanwt B tw 
mo ua van. 

255 116 WSL 
IB es MB* tarn 
270 156 whom me 
69 39 Mta. G rte— 

544 S3 IUMWSW 
ISO ISO IHCSWS 
558 239 HtaStari 
» S On 

235% 174 tatfce a a 
sr.- M%wuwan 
no £5 

133 15 

110 78 
75 X 

305 210 

04 6? ft team 

255%170%MbraebB 
res ao woes urawo 

740 395 WtocHrep 
186 120 WAS to 
549 382 mm 
98 56 waaiMret ) 

60 26 VMM rswj 

93 43':«— A Rat 
138 SB H^aanHO 
173 03 VcraglH) 


UO IX -1 
388 S3 
288 282 
770 217 •-! 
SB 213 
200 202 
X 20% 

59% a% .1 

124 IZ7 ■ . . 
170 (81 +1 

A A :: 

9G'a ■ -1% 

276 279 re-6 
403 487 +6 

97 HE +2 


3* 

. ■ 
52 
1X0 
9A 
9J 

Oil 
29 
78 7 
16 
Ml 


if 


2*0 

101 

mi 

17J 

375 

504 

136 

09 

186 

200 


Cl 

IM 


iT'.n 


-2% 

H7 

302 1 

B+2 

IB 

IBS « 

• +Z 

152 

157 1 

B .. 

35 

57‘J 

2 


116% 

117% 

-V 

>85 

im 


550 

555 

-2 

Cl 

H? 

+2 

20 

335 4 

B-% 

43% 

44% 

♦% 


70 27 154 

200 49 117 

71 7.1 51 

45b 32 245 

01 41 90 

10 06 110 
50 22 t5D 

179 50 1X3 


P+ll 


80 B* 

St K2 
WS% 108% 

*3% *8% 

300 310 
90 91 I 

246 ?M I 

K7 122 
5tn SB +14 

ire wo .. 

588 580 • .. 
78 82 

a 5* . . 

63 6* +2 

07 13? -5 

IU 109 0 . . 




297 KB AWMUr 
3 IBVJio & Am 
888 620 « eVK 
29% 23%Arr Gen 
*(5 273 Bacaoa 
9D* 79$ 3ram; 

335 257 Con ten 
32* 230 Ererey 8 Law 
405 164 FAI 
954 701 Gen AcctbM 
774 720 GR£ 

.TS Ci Hancr 

361 2*7 Itoga Btoff+on 
258 IX lapi&Cew 
C4 173 Man i (too 
500 257 Lea Ul kn 

a% a'oora 5 wan 

305 220 Hera 
30 223 PK 
15% 12 PHI 
EC 718 ftadmtf 
454 Si Mrae 
667 7E Rayd 
415 -TO SedpratGB 
4» 3C Stmrei Wrtat 
MS 380 SBtta MOM 
m 520 Sea Ata 
933 772 Sue 
345 IZD Tredv ta 
494 3W HH Fore 

tayea tmreal Tiunta 


ran Page 20 


144 85 Bn 6 WO A 1 

220 128 BtBtaf&tetat 
m 98 Bren wraar 

132 C ctmpi c 
225 1 Otyrera 

416 325 FreletaW 
68 *9 GM 
115 tD MabregBr ftotes 
151% S3 HMui IM 
131 94 MlBM 
148 S JttabTS H4gt 
187 137 UIW 
160 101 " 

UO IX 

361 280 

403 32fi Mft (MB 
54 X Rtoy Ural 
220 129 Sfti hM» 

XO 748 srare ttan to 
191 119 Satan Iran 
34 51 Ttatah taJ i Htapre 

M3 tX%ZBM3 


132 M2 -3 

185 >95 +2 

274 2(7 0-1 
IM 117 -1 

171 174 0+1 
<15 417 0+0% 
67% 68% +2% 
no ia .. 
M6 M7 +1 
122 125 0+1 
45 48 
151 153 •-% 
115 125 
IB 173 0 . . 
323 325 -2 

3SD 365 -2 

S3 54 +1 

158 159 +% 

im uo 

ns 189 

ss a 

201 20* +1 


too 

.. b 

79 

1.4 

ao 

flj 


U 

7A 

19 

30 

U0 

09 

111 

Ml 

80* 

a 

71* 


73 107 
.. 3X4 
X7 W7 
12 310 
AB 17J 
22 213 
.. S7.1 
.. MS 

43 70 

00 119 
30 104 
26 144 
83 69 

&3 M2 

14 134 

44 MB 

.. as 

42 134 
10 «4 

“ 1.0 

15 110 


13 3%Abo 4bw CM 
11%630 Mgtei 
63 31 taiGoU 
58 X%AAIT 
X 32 teM 

a a fa a 

ISO 120 ' 

s*.. _ 

21% s%fttaito 

:m 226 CRA 
a 39 Can Bari 
re* *09 CtasGBMHft 
Hfi 314 to BUS 
248 MS Dam* 

9% 4%0oor*w«aj 
13% 7 ontabtan 
9 r.DatHn 
302 150 E Own 
EX 258 Baauand 
20 171 P OB 
205 85 Gkiua 

321 200 E tato GoM 
5% 2%E AM Plop 
9% <%FS Com 
2(3 33 ES On 
re 15 Gam Tre 
H% 6 GtnUreag 
31F 0 5%GfSA 
758 313 GM Ktagoaf 
63 X GBXbft 
16* 85 fttwtaolkt 
375 165 GraOOM 
19 91 HnmakMS 
9% 4%Hrairaw 
408 175 tartta 

12% stltam 

A 2'tXkal 
HD 85 Into 
13% 6%UMH 
475 170 Lome 
157 64 MIX 

44 75 MtaitaM Metafl 

84 i4%Mnto Era 
B 5%1b . p 
655 (SB wreore 
142 73 WlBotaatU 

57 XVMbKiM 
24% (Atooe Trie 
128 85 PHAa Tin 
XI 2D* Ptare Atatad 
a 8%ltata aanra US 
4*5 170 MWatsPlep 
73% » MtoHM 
459 225 Rarest) 

791 511 RTZ 
8% 4'tRBtaSrag 
10% S°*St Hetat 
31% H%saatai< 

a 273 SMtatare 
IX 70 S«ra> Ben 
IX n Treopb 
569 300 ted 
Ci 31%VM Ms 

658 233 UMB— 

90 X tag* 

17 lD%*Btere Ctattry 
SX 288 Wtaen 
313 IX Wfcstan Airas 
30% 15 Wtaaro Dctp 
Bl IM Wsown (tea 
2S3 80 Wtan Crete 
17% 7%«Wtto 
18% KPrtatara Copper 
200 26 


4% 5% 
9S3 073 
47% 49% 
9 54 
27 X 
27 31 

ho ire 
sauisa 
M7 127 
10 % 11 % 
329 334 

72 re 

658 662 
588 513 
IU 36 
6% 7% 
9>m (0% 
7% 7% 
247 
581 511 
210 215 
162 172 
288 308 
3% 4 
7% 7% 

■s * 

8 5% 
8% 9% 
710 ra 


287 -U 


45 

750 

237 

% 

325 

Pi 


4% 5% 
81 81 
n% 11% 

368 38B 

■s s 
3 1 
s s 

44% 46 
18% 20% 
100 UO 
280 2E5 
0% (1% 1 

2B0 3X 1 
81% 63% 
<X 

680 702 1 
6% 7 
7% 7% 
»% 29% 
381 *11 

£ 1% 

S 3 

546 568 
45 55 
13% M% 
509 529 
2*4 2H 
25% B% 
245 2U 
2C 247 
12% 13% 
10 % 11 % 
54 ■ 


»-% 

1+37 

-% 

-70 

(+7 

-% 

-% 

-3 

+5 


.. ft .. 810 

540 50 .. 

441 92 .. 

Z7I 52 

HZ A# .. 

M2 49 .. 

Si ii .: 

2ED 222 

282 230 .. 


350 5J 109 
M 15 
40 20 .. 

920 129 .. 

>x ta < .. 


(20 20 .. 
00 01 MJ 
M0 04 .. 

280 a* 


870 UM .. 
400 01 

200 409 " 

540 219 y. 
54 17 300 

628 aj .. 
770 50 .. 

880 TOO .. 
400 80 .. 

280 317 .. 

115 91 .. 


MO 10 II 


UO 39 .. 

551 09 .. 

314 A5 03 
200 18 518 

125 ta* .. 

118 AI .. 


*60 8b* 

BB T00 
5X0 07 
43 #0 

an as 

230 61 

171 60 

30 12 

ire 139 

37 00 


05 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


340 70 AC 
■286 138 AC 
21 U%Atarawes 
IX 75 AratataO 
Ml 104 ft H BbBB B 
56 3*%BSG 
3J4 140 tarara (CD) 

608 <23 ll A Tto t yira 
182 118 BrCartattcm 
273 176 Qd7w» 

2i6 70 Cbm nj 
144 X Oms (Georgy) 
241 (77 Datay 
115 41 Bf 
357 253 ffl ten 

213 OS foal taaor 
131 X Gas (fat* 6} 
296 2n Gbhh Man 
(67 51 Gfatatad 

114 X tattofls 
812 373 tatti M 
583 335 te- 
IC 72 

in ** — 

«2 2B9 (rer 
216 BO Item 
663 432 Laos 
M2 111 rear m 
101 60 Ftato 
M5 SI (U* 

71 28 tea 

91 43 Sran 

110 66 HUM 
70J 32 HOnAtta (Jamtj 


335 345 
261 283 
M% 15% 
175 IB 
129 130 
48% 48% 
IX 143 
512 5U 

173 ire 

20 250 
20 21B 
1C 145 

% ¥ 

m » 
118 122 
227 . 

83 87 

85 68 


530 532 
US 112 
* * 
ZED 28S 
287 212 
473 <77 
IB 1C 
X K>1 
M3 146 
X 42 
88% 91% 
B 0* 


+1 M7b 


Ub 

39 

1.7 

dS 

04 

93 

97 

04 

79 

49* 

70 

A3 

250 

ia* 

30 

127 

84 

27 

151 

70 

100 

04 

64 

43 


4.1 120 
.. 294 

40 84 

10 U5 


a 


0+6 


_ 100 
17 150 
37 .. 

ZJ TOO 
44 129 
30 152 
30 

16 200 

SB 

16 U9 
119 .. 

44 107 
00 .. 
24 110 
50 314 


30 Ul 
39 9J 
AS (29 
04 ZLB 


+1 34b 30 1A0 

49 

+1 14 14 (S3 



ITS MS torn) 

2B IX Assoc Bam 
CO 2lB%AtoKlkbraraa 
330 288%Bta»(UC) 

753 Sffi BraH 
500 430 Cotas (MB) 

383 X5 Do A- 
205 (15 BMP A 
370 205 Htom Btalto 
270 04 Herat Camn 
345 153 Wraato l 
704 404 M tboosae 
ip* 15% Mews Cara 
21S6X H 


X) 


+1 44 

27 

202 

730 

243 

82 

34 

ISJ 

408 

411) 

-7 89 

10 

224 

SX 

330 

.. M0 

45 

179 

Tto 

758 

to +3 414 

55 

717 

485 

475 

.. 11/4 

24 

212 

330 

335 

114 

34 

150 



• +1 34 

79 


30S 

315 

to .. 200 

60 

160 

255 

275 

+5 120 

48 

1/2 

on 

m 

.. 120 

ai 


683 

tni 

.. M0 

29 

78.1 

no 

bio 

♦15 . 



71% 

21% 

.. 129 

00 


505 

510 

to +3 104 

20 

UO 

157 

M2 

.. 59 

37 

B7 



• .. 225 

40 


3X5 

387 

• +1 229 

63 

.140 



lit 122 ... 

27 20 

29 31 +1 

X 103 -3 

Wi 18 -I 



310 

70 

15? 

466 

67 

79 

80 

50 

40 

162 

40 

110 




M 

£/ 

93 


781 

2.1 

30 

67 

til 

67 

70 

14 

M 

u!i 

29 

40 



ftflO 

Lot Cerap«7 

Bd 1 

3Sp Cange e<p % 

P.T 




| 


IS 

« teCflg 

132% 

137% 

138 Ml 





OM to -2 






42 -1 



38 


6 



a* 




11 

. . £ . . 





ir*B (10 


30) 


155 

167 to . 

627 394 


21 

6 ta* Carat 

6% 

7 ♦% 


10 



a 




7 

2%Drtsato 

4 

4% 




40 

41 -% 



110 












41 


38% 

S 


240 

G3-; 


84% 

B -% 

226 35 


964 

ss3 a* 

980 

XI -% 



1K> 

(23 Stam 

IU 

IB to .. 

65 £4 

2*4 

97 


33 

31 +% 


22 

S3*- 

11 TO Eras® 

13% 

14% 


»/ 

22 

6%Tar (B 

S 

23 

Vie IQ7 





87 +2 




135 




Z1B 


155 

HO to-1 

75 *7 

49 

a 

X'zthotaet 

B 

69 




OVERSEAS TRADERS 


29 K . 

107 75 Fatoy t- 
325 teSml 
505 303 tataraa 
37 M'rJtes (Wn) 
2X3 183 (BtaBD 
E7 34 Ocean (Atari 
291 (90 PltaSSBZacb 
290 HO DO A 
213 IX PBByPte 
II 31 So Dbby 
66 545 Sbtoftm 
224 01 TataKeBtay 
271 (53 110 CBO 


T3J 133 • 

MB*.. 

*a res -2 

502 501 re.7% 
3S 1 ! 36% 

246 248 +4 

82 87 «+2 

288 S +7 

2X5 30 
173 177 
55% «T» -% 

577 6*7 
15* 156 +*> 

2*3 345 ♦? 


too 

70 

116 

£9 

69 


as 

53 

ai 

269 

£2 

306 

!7b 

47 

04 

171 

69 

123 

38 

42 

149 

93 

32 

75 

93 

32 

74 

90 

55 

31 

229 n 

39 

177 



555 

72ib 

50 

177 


PAPER, PRINTING. ADVERTS j 


Tl 


2*5 XI AMmo Mae 

IS] KB Adam Ce« 

57 <5 Man ta 

3B 225 ferae Paaer 
158 90 Bate (Oates) 
795 US Bo**S5* 

SB 2C Bom Harare* 

3X) 230 BPCC 

in ms : 

237%1S6 , >8 

XSjtaggBtabtetaS, 
178 CT 

1 1 

£i«S 

277 1 

3 KS _ 

m IS Ubte 
Hi 93 Hon draw 
155 11s tow Ops 

3 F&V 

Btt 5(3 a 
90S 570 sorett^- 
lSD 90 Da Otat 
353 171 SltataiO 
as 124 StaraB (M) 
220 200 UMwWSr 
215 125 Wto fttaen 
ts « too 
225 713 btatttaae» 
303 238 mt ra h tfl 
565 320 HCRS 



230 

2» 

+3 

*0 

18 

213 

112 

IM 


3D 

27 


47% 

«% 


16 

21 

187 

280 

SB 


100 

.15 

130 

102 

107 


A3 

41 


IX 

H2 


1140 

60 

776 

770 

2 a 

to -a 

68b 

25 

180 

M3 

2*5 


XO 


XO 

10/ 

re? 

-1 

70 

4* 

401 

X/ 

ftfl 

-1 

57 

?7 

71b 

10% 

10% 


11.4 

1 1 

ai 

77G 

77S 


121 

S.4 

779 

w 

33S 

to? 

43 

13 

75 

mo 

304 

+3 

123 


129 

1C 

137 

-3 

39 

29 

131 

875 

BS> 

-5 

7.1 

06 

(£1 

2H> 

ZiU 

-1 

125b 

AB 

MB 

782 

787 


BO 

31 

MS 

S3 

X 


43 

5T 

Ml 


no 


14 

08 

176 

137 

142 


70 

£0 

239 

jp 

3B 


100 

30 

121 




57 



j4n 

xa 


90 

73 

207 

7VA 

m 

+1 

39 


120 

170 

no 


61 

41 

161 

IU 

11/ 

■ -I 

57b 

50 

104 

20% 

- 

-% 




53 

SB 

*7 

. . e 


519 

XX 

830 


129 

15 

MB 

7TS 

723 

-6 

m 

32 

14.1 

112 

113 


90 

60 


330 

335 


60 

T0 

170 

313 

3(8 


A7 

IS 


708 

273 


100 

51 

91 

HO 

T/D 

+0 

IJ 

10 

XI 

BB 

Tl 




H4 

H? 

X 


79 

*D 

J37 


305 


97 

32 

MO 

5H 

525 

to .. 

69 

10 



PROPERTY 


S% »%Aara 

H B AMO baa 

93 70 Ste 

211 IS 
370 275 


. M SBot (P) 

466 M-iOuftta 
•87% 147 ft lata 
17# UO Braaan 
57 40 CarapMASoax 
ID 78 CAIA 

33 223 era & Coma 

330 ZX CataiO nap 

uo ix CMmtm 

<95 335 QtatorfUt 
ITT 131 a 
280 229 Cbytona 
295 198 Comtes 
22 14 Cette Secs 

140 Its Coosoy 6 flaw 
198 150 QarayT 
250 175 Qtata 
755 470 toqta 
X 9 tors 
175 ia ESBH5 0 Agony 
(X 7t town Ttaa 
120 105 ns 6w> 

IS* 150 EsoaraPitoi 
118 S3 Em a Loads 
70 X Fta 004 
223 (70 Ftogaon 
56 35 Gtataff 
215 (46 & Pordwl 


IE 

UB 

54 

Ml 


+3 

-3 

-4 

-1 

+1 

M 

-1 

0+1 

+1 




0-1 

-a 


274 202 team 
11 u rawetd 


to 


M's 

«0 204 

«s 410 

4X5 360 DO 1 *' 

60 34%toxp» Tst 
23 130 Hum Don 
355 233 
m «%hbbbi 

425 278 toy 
320 155 -fancy* 

320 264% Lana rev 
349 278 Lrae SootaM 
6S1 %35B un 0 Eta Td 
SB 147 Do 6%ft 
305 21# LOB 0 toft# 
IX 751 Lm Stop tap 
3S5 288 LW 
300 275 UEK 
211 90 HBramy 
IS 100'aHcKgy Sacs 
eo *4 ItaHfata 
ZB 125 HbHta Man 
640 187 tartar Ed 
11*510 H am gh 
7B0 364 Mra twew 
188 82 ktadtow IAAJ4 

g re% 

? 2 
S8%255 
X5 72%Plftd 
33 176 Pop fi tor 
ISO 107 PrapMto 
IX IX Prop Saoev 
U% 0%)toto 
3SB 180 Rental 

no to nto 

66 313 flOCStatal 
2S7 215 Run XT* 

103 78 Scot M 
(38 145 Stoll ' 

■WJ 1*2 ~ ‘ 

46 20 
25D 7*4 
to GO 

298 85 

B 45 To* Carat 
275 KB TrMTort Part 
£55 95 t* LW 
m ere 
are 475 
ub as 

g mmob ewi 

\x todcctrarey 




87 69 

it a 
73 re 

1X2 187 
338 348 
120 IM 

280 as 

483 481 
171 
171 
57 

— KJ4 
250 280 

an 3K) 
185 190 

eo sb 

16 IB 
232 237 
270 275 
17% (9 
UO IX 
170 175 
225 235 
655 875 
15% 16% 

8 150 
ffl 
IDO 113 
19 182 
116 118 
81 82% 
214 218 
« 53 
213 216 
246 250 
12 % - 
120 330 
470 480 


55 56 0-1 
218% 223% 0 .. 
375 385 0+5 
58% 60 -1 

330 39B 
275 325 
29B X2 

336 338 +! 

MQ 545 r -2 

20 wo- 
re xo.. 

177 180 .. 

375 380 • +5 

337 349 • 

198 m -5 

115 IX 

55 50 -1 

2S 235 0 .. 
570 585 
11 11 % 

73) 780 .. 

HQ M5 0+% 
store.. 
1D2 1W 0+3 

7i re 

28* 287 
227 237 -3 

205 270 0-3 
IB IX 
13* IX -I 
18% ID's +% 
3H 325 re-5 
122 (25 -1 

£15 B2D 
229 234 -I 
» .SO 0+% 
IBS ITS 
mm.. 

335 3*5 • 

?F +? 
ft ® +1 

274 zre 
57 a 0 .. 

256 2® 

250 260 0 .. 
era 085 -5 

750 BB 
131 134 .. 

23 SO* .. 

tea on 


29 

24 

A3 


07b 04 614 

25 32 150 

a 

U 418 
64 52 Ul 
17.4 &1 (A3 
IU 31 at 
AB 27 M2 
85 50 200 

05 09 289 


70 

20 

80 

179 

901 

7.1 

70 

29 

50 

60 

200 

.. e 

43 

07 

37 

121 

59 

MB 

09 

10 lb 
15 


20 235 
09 .. 

49 5(5 
30 285 
60 227 
ID 119 
27 250 
24 

22 307 
32 50 

39 522 
30 (28 


50.4 


11 
00 
33 210 
79 127 
50 130 
60 

5J> 188 
10 430 
A7 2S7 
LI 460 


ae zb 2x2 

UB 29 294 
138 30 319 

10 28 
51 23 213 

152 49 Ml 

41 Zt OS 
20 10 
KL7 3fi 75 l2 
M5 <3 229 


24 76.4 
44 SB4 

29 Z7.9 

If ,U 

44 172 
54 202 
13 177 
10 577 
17 143 
09 110 
74 150 
08 451 
■0 KLB 
40 1US 
A5 159 


08 69 013 


XO UP Atmcfirton 
398 213 » C lMtittunito 
355 U6 catakta 
94 51 tea (Jams) 

603 430 Brag 
7G 54%toDbs(J) 

12% 4'ityte 
41 26 testy Dado 
255 180 Ocean Tempo! 
575 438 PAOttt 
173 B teem 
360 (77 TWte 
380 3B Tin*ra SnD 


378 322 
£4 » •+« 
272 275 ■ +2 
82 85 +2 

485 505 
68 68 
7 8+% 

»% ■■ 
230 Z32 
53? SO +4 
K IP*.. 
290 300 re .. 
370 3B 


80b 
8.1b 
74 
U 
214 
51b 
.. a 


27 m 
27 207 
27 401 
75 116 
43 4V5 
70 51.1 

05 

33 

56 Wfi 
50 150 
43 2ao 
19 195 
3d 529 



32 Ifrofbn Sara 
158 Lambert hVnortn 
54%toraMd 6 Bam 
B2 pasra 
118 StanoAtea 
ix sub 




SS 205 1HTM 
to in Bans — 

30 125 tele 
115 B 
36 IB — 

|« 125% ft 

136 77 Btara»Urab 
78% 61%0bta 
XO 252 CBHHMft 
1X2 74 CnM4tar(J) 

06 zn 

60 42 



{fa ?? l&f u 

x% R> tataB. _ . 


158 ' 9* PfaAtad A 1 
to'-- X Bead ed 
156 109 SSI 
IX 72'iSreao 
IX? 133 9d> 

79 4X SrrtAstwr 7R) 
33% 1i SbMdard K 
iffi 85 Taraaoi teay 
233 28 TfttoBBB 
109% re%Tt«C8 
350 735 YDrtly* 


107 

35 

205 




69 

35 

&1 

62 

ao 

120 

80n 

61 

85 

71 

£? 

31.1 

5/ 

BJ 


102 

33 

104 

45 

31 

121 


32 


07 

14 


45 

32 



Ai 


£0 

7.2 

80 

79 

70 

82 

50 

44 

M4 

40 

34 

»7 




50 

34 

732 

00 

40 

IU 

1.4 

10 

122 

a? 

50 

14.7 

67 

57 

17.1 



170 

69 

56 

152 

25 

£1 

UO 

70 

55 

77 

74 

B 

r* 

39 

u 

81 

86 

64 

78 

57 

24 

111 

50 

52 

107 


18 

61 


TOBACCOS 


ei XI BAT 487 470 -1 164 30 

HD 708 C+rol IM M3 

178 127 Mtnrat V 175 176 re+2% MO 57 


122 

U 


0 E* OMOenc t a Em al b Forecast d n/Uana re (ntodm 

E passed 1 Price at susocnsJor g Dividend and 
lode a special payment k Pro-merger figures n 
eannngs 0 Ex other r Ex nghts s 6x scrip or 
share 8pM t Tax-free . . No stgnfcant data. 


- "S' ^ 


■S' 





















































22 


LAW 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


Court of Appeal 


Law Report December 31 1986 


Queen’s Bench Division 


Adoption or custodianship 


Radiation victim can sue the Crown 


hireS (a Minor) 

Before Lord Justice Fox. Lord 
Justice Glideweli and Sir 
Roualeyn Cumming-Brace 
[Judgment December 19] 

Unless it was satisfied that an 
custodianship order would offer 
the child a greater benefit than 
an adoption order would do, the 
court on an application for 
adoption had to proceed with- 
out further consideration of 
custodianship. 

The Court of Appeal, in a 
reserved judgment, allowed an 
appeal against an order made by 
Judge Vemey whereby he re- 
fused an applicartion Tor adop- 
tion and made a custodianship 
order In favour of the ap- 
plicants. 

Mrs Diane Barnett for the 
applicants: Miss Florence Baron 
for the local authority; Mr 
James Holman as amicus cu- 
riae. 

SIR ROUALEYN CUM- 

MING-BRUCE said that the 
male applicant was the grand- 
father of the child whose adop- 
tion was sought The female 
applicant was his second wife. 
The natural mother consented 
to the proposed adoption. The 
case came before the judge as an 
uncontested application to 
which the provisions of section 
37 of the Children Act 1975 
applied. 

The appeal raised questions 
as to the proper construction 
and effect of section 37, and as 
to the proper procedure and 
practice to be followed in order 
to enable the trial judge to 
discharge the duties imposed 
Upon him by the legislation 
which came into force on 
December I, 1985. 

The child was born illegiti- 
mate in 1982 of a mother then 
aged 19. She was the daughter of 
the male applicant. The identity 
of the child's father bad never 
been disclosed to anyone in the 
mother's family, and be had not 
taken any interest in the child. 

At the age of six months the 
child, with the mother’s full 
agreement, was placed with the 
applicants, who had brought 
him up ever since and treated 
him as their own son. 

The application for adoption 
was made in April 1986. The 
court appointed Mrs Bertram as 
reporting officer. She duly re- 
ported and confirmed that the 
natural mother gave her full 
consent for the making of an 
adoption order, or alternatively, 
a custodianship order. 

As the child was not placed 
for adoption by an adoption 
agency, section 18 of the Act 
applied, and the local authority 
was given notice of the applica- 
tion, and thereby by virtue of 
rule 15(2Xd) of the Adoption 
Rules (Sf 1984 No 265) became 
respondents to the application. 

in accordance with rule 22(2) 
the local authority supplied a 
report covering the matters set 
out in Schedule 2 to the Rules. 

As provided in paragraph 6 of 
the Schedule Lhe report of the 
local authority, signed by Mrs 


McKay who carried out the 
investigation, expressed an 
opinion on the relative merits of 
adoption and custodianship, to 
the effect that an adoption order 
would not enhance the quality 
■ of the relationship which the 
boy and the applicants already 
had, and could confuse existing 
relationships. She expressed her 
belief that a custodianship order 
would be an appropriate option 
for the child and applicants. 

On September 3. the court 
gave directions of its own 
motion that the child attend the 
hearing, the social ■ worker 
responsible for preparing the 
report attend, the reporting 
officer be allowed to attend and 
the hearing do take place on 
October I. 

Inspection of the relevant 
reports was governed by a 
Practice Direction made by the 
President of the Family Di- 
vision on November 1 5, 1 985 to 
the effect that any application 
for such inspection should nor- 
mally be made to the judge at 
the actual hearing of the applica- 
tion for which the report had 
been prepared, and only in 
exceptional circumstances 
should the application for 
inspection be made before the 
hearing. 

In the present case no applica- 
tion for inspection was made to 
the judge because the applicants' 
solicitor was supplied with a 
copy of Mrs McKay’s report a 
week or so before the hearing, 
and did show the report to tire 
applicants . and discuss it with 
them very shortly before (he 
hearing. 

The first question on the 
appeal was the proper construc- 
tion of section 37. By section 
37(1) “Where ... the court is 
satisfied — (a) that the child's 
welfare would not be better 
safeguarded and promoted by 
the making of an adoption order 
. . . than it would be by the 
making of a custodianship order 
in [the applicant's] favour, . . . 
the court shall direct the 
application to be treated as if it 
had been made by the applicant 
under section 33 [of the 
Act] . . ” 

The first matter to which the 
court had to address its mind 
was whether it was satisfied that 
the child's welfare would not be 
better safeguarded or promoted 
by an adoption order as com- 
pared to custodianship. 

If the balance of advantage 
was exactly even, the court 
could not be so satisfied, and 
there was no occasion for 
considering custodianship any 
further. The court had thus to 
lake the view it was satisfied 
that a custodianship offered the 
child greater benefit than an 
adoption order would do before 
proceeding to direct that the 


i au»tur 

judge, 
% the 


out the delicate task imposed 
upon him by section 37 unless 
the local authority or adoption 
agency either appeard to argue 
for its view or at least authorized 
a member or employee to attend 
and address the court 

The court before or at the 
hearing should also consider 
whether ii could discharge its 
duty without appointment of a 
guardian ad /item. 

The court had had two advan- 
tages denied to the 
namely representation 
local authority and appearance 
by counsel instructed by the 
Official Solicitor as amicus cu- 
riae . and it was clear that the 
judge should not have had to 
carry out the section 37 exercise 
without any representation save 
the solicitor for the appicants. 

It was dear from his judgment 

that the judge thought that the 
conclusions expressed in the 
McKay report satisfied him that 
it would be premature to make 
on adoption order before the 
child appreciated the truth 
about his parentage. 

There was no indication that 
the judge addressed his mind to 
the proper construction of sec- 
tion 37, or considered the 
competing advantages for the 
child afforded by adoption as 
compared to custodianship, or 
earned out the balancing ex- 
ercise prescribed by the section. 
In those circumstances his judg- 
ment was unsatisfactory. 

The paramount factor affect- 
ing the child's future welfare was 
to make an order that would 
secure the child in his de facto 


relationships in such a way as to 
minimise the risk of the natural 
mother or anyone else seeking to 
disrupt them. That an adoption 
order could achieve with greater 
prospect of success than a 
custodianship order. 

The legal relationship would 
then coincide with the actual 
relationships on which the child 
was by now totally reliant 

An adoption order would 
promote the welfare of the child 
in another way. When be was 
tactfully introduced to the true 
facts about his parentage, the 
adoption order would have 
already conferred upon him the 
legal status of child of the 
applicants. That was likely to 
reduce not increase the risk of 
emotional confusion or the 
onset of insecurity. 

All the requirements for adop- 
tion were proved. Accordingly 
the appeal should be allouttd 
and an adoption order made. 

His Lordship would suggest 
that the President be asked to 
consider the problems that the 
history of the present applica- 
tion had illustrated, and be 
invited to consider whether any 
further action should be taken 
by Practice Direction or by 
reference to the rule-making 
authority in order to facilitate 
the investigation that the legisla- 
tion now imposed upon the 
judge in a section 37 case. 

Lord Justice Glideweli deliv- 
ered a concurring judgment and 
Lord Justice Fox agreed. 

Solicitors: Rimmers, Ayles- 
bury; Mr D. U- Pullen, Ayles- 
bury; Official Solicitor. 


Pearce v Secretary of State for 
Defence and Another 
Before Mr Justice Caulfield 
[Judgment December 17] 

A claim for damages against 
the Secretary of State for De- 
fence and the Ministry of De- 
fence for injuries caused to a 
member of the armed forces 
serving on Christmas Island 
from December 1957 to October 
1958. during which period 
employees from the Atomic 
Energy Authority were testing 
nuclear weapons, and those 
employees were not serving 
soldiers, was not defeated by 
section 10 of the Crown 
Proceedings Act 1947. 

The Crown's exemption, in 
section 10(2Xa) of the 1947 Act, 
from the broad liability in tort in 
respect of the duties attaching at 
common law to the ownership, 
occupation, possession or con- 
trol of property pursuant to 
section 2(1 Xc). had to be con- 
strued strictly. 

Accordingly, since the thing 
suffered was allegedly a continu- 
ing omission by the servants of 
the Atomic Energy Authority 
and the consequence was expo- 
sure to radiation, the thing 
suffered by the claimant was not 
suffered by or in consequence of 
the nature or condition of land, 
premises, ship, aircraft, vehicle, 
equipment or supplies. 

Mr Justice Caulfield so held 
in a reserved judgment in the 
Queen's Bench Division when 
he found in favour of the 
plaintiff Melvyn Bruce Pearce, 
on a preliminary issue of law to 
determine whether the 1947 Act 


provided the defendants with a 
complete defence to the 
plaintiffs daim for damages for 
personal injuries. 

The assumed facts were that 
ihe plaintiff a serving soldier of 
the Royal Engineers on Christ- 
mas Island from December 28, 
1957, to October 28, 1958, 
during which period Her 
Majesty's Government were 
testing nuclear weapons there, 
was owed a duty of care by the 
employees of the Atomic Energy 
Authority who were conducting 
those tests and who were not 
serving soldiers! 

Those employees were neg- 
ligent failing to give the 
plaintiff proper advice ‘ for his 
own safety or if they gave proper 
advice they failed to ensure the 
advice was followed by the 
plaintiff The plaintiff suffered 
serious injury because of their 
negligence. Certificates under 
section 1 0(1) and (3) were issued 
by the secretary of state. 

Mr Andrew Cniliiw, QC and 
Mr George Puirrtan for the 
defendants; Mr John ‘ Mac- 
donald. QC and Mr Patrick 
Elias for the plaintiff 

MR JUSTICE CAULFIELD 
said that the. tests in Christmas 
island were performed- by the 
Atomic Energy Authority pursu- 
ant to its p o wei s under the 
Atomic Energy Authority Act 
1954. 

By section 1(2) of the Atomic 
Energy Authority (Weapons 
Group) Act 1973, the Secretary 
of State for Defence assumed 
the poweis of the United King- 
dom Atomic Energy Authority 


Accordingly, the secretary 0 f 
stale's certificate under section 

lX n was of no 

The defendants 
cipallv on section 10!-) which 
prohibited Proceedings ; m to. 

By section 4(2) of the 1973 u ^?d!Ie to anything 

n there was cleariy.transferred pe^nal injurs £ 

forces if that thing was suffered 
by him in consequence of 
certain named properties used 
for the purposes of those forces 
His Lordship said ih3t it vws 
necessary to detcnntne on lhe 

vested in the secretary ofaateas bv foe plaintiff 

a™. - " - 

although the Atomic Energy 


to cany on any activities of the 
weapons group, and all liabil- 
ities as belonged, to 
incumbent on me a^hc>my 
were transferred to the secretary 
of state. 

By se 

Act there - 

to the secretary , of state any 
liability which might lie on ine 
Atomic Energy Authority by 
virtue of its operations in 
Christmas Island. 

Further, the powers of resis- 
tance to that liability were 


Tenant not liable to remedy original defects 


Post Office v Aquarius Prop- 
erties Ltd 

Before Lord Justice Slade, Lord 
Justice Ralph Gibson and Sir 
Roger Orm rod 
[Judgment December 18] 

A repairing covenant in stan- 
dard form contained in a lease 
of commercial premises did not 
impose liability on the tenant to 
remedy defects in the original 
construction of the building. As 
the buildi 
the same p 
want of repair had been proved 
by the landlord for which the 
tenant could be liable under the 
covenant. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
in reserved judgments dismiss- 
ing an appeal by the landlord, 
.Aquarius Properties Ltd, and 
affirming for different reasons 
the decision of Mr Justice 
Hoffmann in July 1985 refusing 
to declare that the tenant, the 
Post Office, was liable to cany 
out repair work to the basement 
of Nos 74/76 St Johns Street, 
London EC1. 


to 

application be treated as if it had 

been made under section 33. ...... . __ , 

Where the reporting authority Mr Malcolm Spence, QC and 

.'am i* down in favour of Mr A_ D. Dinkin for the 
custodianship instead of adop- landlord; Mr Paul Morgan for 
tion, but the applicants sought tenant, 
adoption, it would usually be LORD JUSTICE RALPH 
difficult for the judge to carry GIBSON said that tbe appeal 


raised questions of principle on 
the proper construction m law 
of repairing covenants in com- 
mon form. There was shown to 
bea defect in the structure of the 
basement of an office building 
which had been present from the 
time of its construction. 

The parties agreed that there 
had been a failure of the kicker 
joint between the floor and the 
walls caused by poor workman- 
ship which had resulted in weak 
ng was throughout in areas of concrete of a relatively 
physical condition, no porous texture. When the water 
table rose the defect permitted 
water into the basement and for 
some years it was ankle deep. 

Tbe defect had not got worse 
but was in tbe same condition as 
when lhe building was con- 
structed. No damage to any part 
of the building was shown to 
have been caused by the defect. 

The first question was 
whether it had been proved that 
tbe building was out of repair so 
as to give rise to an obligation 
under the covenant to put it into 
repair. 

The second question — being 
one that was treated as tbe main, 
if not tbe only, one at the trial — 
was whether, assu ming the 
building to be in a state of 
disrepair, any of the schemes of 
treatment put forward for curing 
the defect were to be regarded as. 


work oF repair as opposed to 
being structural alterations and 
improvements. 

The judge found that the 
treatment needed involved 
structural alterations and 
improvements to the basement : 
and as such did not fall with tbe 
tenant's obligations under the 
lease. 

Mr Spence argued that the 
work was work of impair because 
when it had been done it would 
not give the landlord a wholly 
different thing from that which 
had been demised. Further, he 
said, it would be work to a 
portion only of the building. 

He relied on foe test stated by 
Mr Justice Forbes in Ravensefi 
Properties Ltd v Davstone 

S QB 12, 21J. a decision 
y approved by foe Court 
of Appeal m Quicker Taff Ely 
* ? Times 


Borough Council (The 
August I. 1985; [1986] QB 809). 

However, foe landlord’s sub- 
missions were unacceptable. 
Tbe facts of tbe case seemed 

highly itmnmal 

There was no escape from the 
conclusion that if on the evi- 
dence, the premises demised 
were, and at all times had been, 
in foe same physical condition 
as they were when constructed, 
no want of repair had been 
proved for which tbe tenant 


could be liable under the 
covenant. 

That was sufficient to dispose 
of the appeal. Tbe question 
considered by Mr Justice Hoff- 
mann as to whether, as a matter 
of degree, any of foe schemes of 
work qualified as “repair” as 
contrasted with works of 
improvement or alteration thus 
did not now arise. No view 
would be expressed on whether 
bis conclusion on tbe point was 
correct. 

LORD JUSTICE SLADE, 
agreeing, said that a state of 
disrepair connoted a deteriora- 
tion from some previous phys- 
ical condition. 

It as there, a landlord let to a 
tenant newly built premises of 
which parts had been defec- 
tively constructed, clear words 
were needed to impose a 
contractual obligation on foe 
tenant to remedy foe defects in 
the original construction, at 
least at a time before tbe defects 
had caused any damage. 

Thai was sot an obligation 
which a tenant under a commer- 
cial lease might reasonably be 
expected readily to undertake. 

Sir Roger Orm rod agreed. 

Solid tors: Masons; Mr B. A 
Holland. 


Authority could not have raised 
a defence under the Crown 
Proceedings Act 1947, the sec- 
retary of state could raise such 
defence if one existed. 

Section 2 of the 1947 Act 
made the Crown liable for 
breach of statutory duty where it 
bore a statutory duty as though 
it were a private person, and it 
was plain from section 2(3) that 
where functions were conferred 
or imposed on an officer of the 
Crown as such directly whether 
by common law or statute it 
made no difference to the 
Crown's liability for the torts of 
the officer of the Crown. 

Mr Collins subm itted that as a 
matter of public law the confer- 
ring of functions on foe Sec- 
retary of State for Defence was a 
conferment on foe Crown, and, 
in foe context of foe proceed- 
ings, he was not to be considered 
as a servant of the Crown; he 
relied on Town Investments Ltd 
v Department of the Environ- 
ment ([1978] AC 359) and 
Linden v Department of Health 
and Social Security ([1986] I 
WLR 164). 

But, in his Lordship's view, 
those authorities were constru- 
ing a wholly different species of 
legislation from tbe 1947 Act. 
Under section 38(2) foe word 
“officer” in relation to the 
Crown included a minister of 
lhe Crown, and the combined 
effect of section 2(3) and foe 
definition of officer in section 
38(2) made the secretary of state 


Mr Collins said 
simply exposure to «u«nn, 
whereas Mr Macdonald said u 
was lhe negligent acts or omis- 
sions of the Atomic Energy 
Authority servants. 

His Lordship proposed to 
adopt the reasoning or the 
majority of their Lordships in 
foe Court of Appeal on their 
construction of "the thing 
suffered” in section ICX I tin BeU 
v Secretary of State for Defence 
([1986] QB 322. 332, 334o35). 

The words “anything 
suffered” and “that thing is 
suffered” were used in both 
section 1 0( I ) and (2» and should 
receive the same construction in 
both subsections. . 

The thing suffered could Dean 
event or happening or it could 
be an omission or indeed both; 
on the plaintiffs allegations, it 
was a continuing omission on 
the part of the Atomic Energy 
Authority scientists and the 
consequence was exposure to 
radiation. 

Further, the words “the lhm| 
suffered” or “anything suffered" 
contemplated some event, 
happening or omission other 
than death or personal injury. 
Therefore, foe thing suffered by 
foe plaintiff was the continuing 
acts or omissions of the sci- 
entists. and further that thing 
was not suffered by or in 
consequence of the nature or 
condition of land, premises, 
ship, aircraft vehicle, equip- 
ment or supplies. _ 

The construction of the 
exemptions in section 10 gen- 


liable in tort under section 2 of erally should be strict and not 
the 1947 Act, unless the 11 " 


plaintiffs claim was defeated by 
section 10. 

By section 10(1), the exemp- 
tion from liability was for foe 
tortfeasor personally and foe 
Crown, and the tortfeasor lost 
his exemption, but not the 
Crown, where foe court was 
satisfied that foe act or omission 
giving rise to the tort was not 
connected with tbe execution of 
foe tortfeasor's duties as a 
member of the armed forces. 

However, the defendants 
could not rely on section 10(1): 
(although at all material times 
the plaintiff was a member of 
the armed forces, the tortfeasor 
was not The tortious acts or 
omissions founding a tort 
against foe plaintiff were not 
those of a member of the armed 
forces while on duty as such. 

They were the acts or omis- 
sions of the servants of foe 
Atomic Energy Authority. 


liberal because section 2(1 Kc) 
was plainly included to subject 
the Crown to tortious liability in 
respect of the duties attaching at 
common law to the ownership, 
occupation, possession or con- 
trol of property. 

Section 1 0(2 Ha) was plainly 
intended to create an exemption 
from the broad liability imposed 
on foe Crown in section 2( 1 Kc) 
but extended to equipment or 
supplies. 

In his Lordship's view, sec- 
tion 10(2Xa) did not exclude 
acts or omissions such as those 
alleged against the Atomic En- 
ergy Authority's servants which 
were unconnected with the na- 
ture or condition of land, 
premises, ships, aircraft ve- 
hicles, equipment, or supplies. 
On ihe facts, foe claim was not 
defeated by section 10 of the 
1947 ACL 

Solicitors: Treasury Solicitor 
Fannone Napier. 



COUNTRY PROPERTY 


LONDON PROPERTY 


FAIRBRIAR HOMES 

Past Historic , Future Perfect , 

at King Geotge Square, Richmond 


Flats from £100,000 

Mews Cottages £207,000 

Town Houses from £272,000 

For details phone 01-940 0325 
Sales Office open ' 
throagboot New 
Year period. d 




A reduction of £10,000 on the first 
5 reservations taken in 


1987. 


MORTGAGE & 
FINANCIAL ADVICE 


r. 



• MORTGAGES * 10096 advanced up tc 
£ 120 . 000 • 3!6x main income plus- lx secondary 
Income • V* x Joint incomes taken • non status 

• REMORTGAGES For any reason, eg: 

• Home improvements • Business Reasons 

• Educational Expenses* Large Leisure Purchase 
(boat, caravan. etcJ • Second House. (U.K. or 
Overseas) • Matrf mortal Settlement 

• Consolidate Existing Borrowings 

• COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES 

• Shops, Factories. Etc. 

• PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT 
AND BUSINESS FINANCE ' 




BAKER ST W1 
A selection or 4/6 bedim 
flats available. Long/short 
leases. Modernised/ 
Unmodernised. 
FLATS AVAILABLE 
£200-£450.000 
PALACE 
PROPERTIES 
01-486 8926 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


GlcvstLine, 

London 

ECS 


—Robson 

• F INANCIAL SEPV'CSS 

Limited 

01-623 3495 


FerAOi-lce 

wsrry.Tjej, 

Finalizes. life 

Assurance. 

Pension' 

ir.ver.menr 
A3*let. Special 
Wrmqarrn 

investment Advice 

*cr5i-pjrMn. etc. 


TUFMELL PARK. 

Faniy Jut End tsnaett five 
beds. Two mass. Two tarns. 
Separate W&Lgs known. Duty 

rm. Cedar. 8CH Root ten. Pam 
Front ml back gdns. Conwwrt 
tocaion for afl transport, schools 
and Payment MIL Freetwd. 
£155.000. fa agent 
Teb 01-607 7273 

(w/ends, eras). 



THE 
MORTGAGE 


SHOP 


100% Mortgages Up fa £75.000 
95% Mortgages No limit 
Interest from 11.9% 
Re-mortgages Top-up loans. 
No status checks needed 
Council tenants welcome 
For farther Information call 01-684 3220 
All enquiries dealt with promp 


fines) 


DOCKLANDS 

HOUSESAM^^TBROMH- 

OUT THE DOCKLANDS A3EA 

RESIDENTIAL department 

TEL: B1-79S 9550 


HYDE PAHS W2 Ground Boor Rat 
n pawn block 3 beds, 2 re- 
47 

MEWS HOUSE W2 Bnnrtng free- 
hold house Mdi angs. Oust pri- 
vate Men. 2 douo w bus. dm 
reao. fitted kitchen, bath + dost 
E180JJ0D tor quefc sals 

PALACE PROPERTIES 
TR : 01-486 8926 


£360 

CONVEYANCING 

For Safes & Purchases 
for prices up to £80.000 
we charge £360+ VAT & 
. disbursements. 

Barretts Solicitors 
01-248 0551. 


CCOffCC Sire fr W1 . ciegant 

K*wik.T*fi —.•I". ‘L.*ni u.| 
in B' .“•*•** ► r.«« Maf-IM 

Arm t.. - v (► i -Bjinv ivu 

luim mi" - .n iwi -»_* v 
TO, - in c-‘-.l u-jjOO) 

Drwnr oi 42 i i 


PERIOD TERRACED 
COTTAGE 

wftm muses of Eteng Broadway. 
Light lounge Wth sterol stance sal 
attractive ma tte Swp tica. modem 
fnRraunmd M te ft tn unity room. 
2 bedrooms, m ft bate bedroom 
tad mg omg . ffo +tind root B race 
ffttb potenMI mr demooment tags 
away temroomw toi ore ceang and 

and Sew*. FroicriiiMoas Mbig 
onto paio ti front ol bouse 
rcorporang ttaasatt garden w*n 
■nubs. Ai roar at noun a owed ana 
suiteto hr bobecues and 
emntutlng. Bugtar atarre system, 
tii gas central haamg wth emersion 
neater, new rote. Outdo tfntng n 
front of (he bouse. 

00en le regia of Z13UM. 
Tot 01 988 0398. 


ST.JAME$‘S 

SW1. 

Oft Jarmpi Street BeauBM CM- 
t-tong In tta wet Gate 
Coneortfmion Area. Decorated to 
meiettroai award dmuttvuL i 

nousM beaioom, utog roan, 
mo dem tac non- bem oan. Lin. 

?no383 ter qucfcSr 
TEL 01-622-7354£VBS. 


WESTHUtSTIK. SWX. A JUWrt 
* bed mi rial in pnsogr block. S 
en mum bauinra. 9iwr tto. lor 
<ttde recep rm. dining rm. tuny 
rru ku - b'tet rm. All antenittak. 
Perfect cond. S7 yr be. 
£335.000. nOorn OI 221 2221. 

FULHAM large Period 3 bedr. OM 
overt BtStWM Pk. £93000. T. 
HOSKINS: 730 9937. 

LET oust ices Do Ur Working 
We'll (Md your Ideal home. Pe- 
■cnon Rum 741 7127 


CHELSEA & 
KENSINGTON 


CBSEBBSEEBD, 


CHELSEA 

S.W.10 

£122,500 

Light and pretty 

maisonette oaihe 2nd & 
3rd doors of period 
house on corner of 
[enact Entrance in 
^pccu Street <& private 
parking. 3 quiet beds, 
bath, large drawing 
room, modern kitchen, 
CR 95 years. 

CHELSEA OFFICE 
01-352 1484 


HOUSEBOAT 

Cheyne Walk, Chelsea. 

Superb new purpose built 
boat 2 Beds, Lge Living Rm. 
Kit/Dmer & suntJeek. Fuify 
serviced mooring. £75,000. 

Browett Taylor 

242 8275. 



BRAMMAM GDNS. SWfi. Baraun 
buy ai -86 prices, taimac 2 dou- 
ble bed n*L Lame recep. 
ku/break main. 2 urn <1 e/u, 
ln«DCH. Sflyn Cl 66.000. 
HOLMANS' 570 6701. 

GMNWAU GJSmeMS Beautiful 
2nd floor Rut. Imnut an). Lac 
umnq room. Du OMwan. 
KilCfwn. ts.ir.oc-n v io nq 
lew 1 1 li i.W. i _) , oi 

937 Jio2 'tin J - i 2t»ir 

HOCAIANS Jan Mb- Claris now 
u present UOCk niuti 90 IIK | 
S*v» 3 I II noor rwmv mod 3 dm 
Mi! Oftrp. hli. Bail., pair, mg 
C I'.H 87 i'Mis i.yt.BOO 

3TO 6701. 


HER CHURCH STREET, 

V8 

modernised 1 Bed flat I 
. Fitted Kitchen & Nsw 
Battvoom. Lge Recap. C/H. I 
Dbie Gtazinq. Low Serv 1 
Cfige. £87.500. Long base. 


Fuflyn 
Fuhy I 


THE PERIOD 
PROPERTY REGISTER 

Cottages, Chstles. Manors or Mansions. month 
hundreds of old and historic homes for sak nationwide. 
Baying or selling contact: 

The Historic B uildings Co, 

PO Box 150, Chobham GU24 8JD 


Browett Taylor 
01-242 8275. 


DEVON & CORNWALL 


HAMPSTEAD & 
HIGHCATE 


floor 2 baarooiTwd mataoneOe. 
Fined k & t. period features, 
roof terrace. 93 new lease, i 
ty completion required., 
£138X100. Tel OI 686 7709 


The home 
search service. 01-684 9171. 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


DEVON/CORNWALL 

BORDERS 

Itirinaiura&AtmMhtTman’A 
ham. atfkmaig formtr Bud* 
Core d mactoaToy ii r Lola* 

cotap, reap of 

““ffiwras sr 

DEVON 

JdMcounlo' mreoc 
M jrain 

tXL 



Hofarartfay, Devon EXZ2 6EL 
Td : (0409) 254238 


ESSEX 


WEST MERSEA 
FAMOUS 

YACHTING CENTRE 

Detached bunptav. tape comer 
site, targe lounge, dong room, 
rtrae Dodraoms, sartfy. toom 
bedroom, tw to U uiM i B . Ornate 
garage, cerate heateg. double 
Steed. E&tfSi 

TEL : 0206 383639 


HANTSJXJRSET, 

LO.W. 


3 


NORTHWEST 


orated modem 2 bedrootn e d 


and tube. 78 year lease.] 
J8&OOO L Tel: Ol 788 AS7T. 


sale £48.000 01-937 6739. 


■arson Huh 741 7127 


DOCKLANDS 


DOCKLANDS 

PROPERTY CENTRE 


FLATS & HOUSES 

THROUGHOUT THE 
DOCKLANDS 

TEL 790 9560 


I# Large freehold 

prope rty anida for isbwsm 

ton 6 nau with parkino. Rami. 
hr deve loping area, i mile 
StotpoaT Very daw Id proposed 
Ltok - «2«y00a 

Tel: Ol 699 6860. 


■AMR. Large luxury flat in 
converted riverside warehouse 
Exwave views. Double bed- 
nwra-ntted Mtenen. Carom. 

PoriWRV- Prtvste Safa, 


D OC KL A ND S - CUy - fl ow, 
gnecnon of period & Nrw 
Houses St Flats dose City and 
O yer ra g - £330.000 Phone 
"“Wvotrel: Ol 790 
9832 or 0860 711664. 


RICHMOND & 
KINGSTON 


l« (Her purpose; 
‘ bronn flat- CCh. 
ra^soo ior quick Hue T« oi 
940 9822 eves/weeKehds. 


WIMBLEDON 


VILLAGE Choraacr Edwardian 
hoi**. S ora. 2 Oam. 3 receo, 
“bar. ccuoic oarage, waned 
uouecapeo parpen. Can cenow 
mane, recently rencHaiM. 

io euMuuvii and snaps. 
£279.000. TOO! -946 1324. 



MOBBERLEY 

1597 Thatched Country 
Cottage with 2 beteooms. 1 
acre, targe garage, self 
contained Bat atwre aaota, 
swimming pooi WHnwftwv. 
Knutstora a motorways 

5 rrrtna. 

OFFERS OVER £100^)00 
TH. :(0SS587) 3770. 


SURREY | 

mi MIIH S. Spacious 3 Maw 
Vtcuman town bouse to quiet 
cul-dfraec. d dbte m. 2 receo. 
Wn rm, stir rm, CUk rm. ftneti 
kUdwft. utility rm. Wool ctr- 

g^yyyrorwm. C7H. cons 

£ 146.00a Ta: 0933 4404a 

SP9UM Ckaw M2S. Modern de 
raenco house. S two. 2 bam. 
■eunge/dbiing room. 2nd rocep- 
“«»; tes***" Oaraee. Oacictng on 
tea*. Shon watt snops/ctanoo. 
£210.000. Tel: 03737 29884. 

| OXFORDSHIRE | 

Hpur-m-lWAMES 4 bed dd 
"Wsr avaostue irnmamiiiihi 
TH- 0491 579000^^^ 

SCOTLAND ”1 


INVEHGORDQN 

ROSS-SWRE 

kfapificant view ovtr Craroty 

frin- famMM stone btet hse 
fweiSJy mod, era fir 5 baa. 
tam,**. ajo&orOs. is fir i 
■M bed. (oungr, feann fptacs, 

ansaa.babnfi.loBftW.iHi. 
stltty. dtta ObN, toH CH, ore ckg. 

Cpts & arts tnc. Offers tamed 

Teh 0349 852528 


SOMERSET & AVON | 


BACKWELL 

Near Bristol. 

An ■uracapnasy tm eoumy tea 
a vmaae crareav cbeo IBM at 
■*» 77B acres xuhuoci 7 rws. 3 

Ws. 5 rocs, gama mu sutao. hu 
vmt tautery/uRkty. 2nd floor fa. 

-*<■ Cm at gw. SUttM t guflMtO- 
"P Ofttro* Brass pt EMMNL 

hahtnbaSRS.wvcmk. 

(0272) 651101 


DORSET. 

REAR BUNDFORD 
FORUM 

3 raw brick and lint houses, 4 
Bedroom s . 2 b a ttrooo nw , 3 
Recaption rooms, lovely 
vttage setting. From 295,000. 

Senior & Godwin, 
(0258)52327. 


KENT 


------- -ay. sea views. 3 

beds. 2 reo». r/nt ku. 2 tnoa. 
dnp rm. imUQr rm. 3 bath. Rear 
cranny ror oat. 
£87.oog_<ypw». cunt md. 
Phone: 0843 695696 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


SUFFOLK NORFOLK 
BORDER 

BpIsndU Domed «* 


oat accasa m mapar cteas. CM 
beiftooms, 2 Mbfooms, 3 


Uhtetsn Mctoi. 

je.aCH.< 


Gereanw. 

fates nckroed. Need* aecoraM. 
Penal* funahed. 

CLIN ns 

Tefc 0379-75684 


KWOHAM, WON. To ik 1/2 
VW. Lovely period family 
house on village green. 6/6 
owe. S bams. Large drawing 
1BW i. bielrnoojes. 

wDodbia-nere. Mam Unaaaaon, 
Tel: (0608711 8030. 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY! 


NOTICE TO 
READERS 

wtrita PC akc reenable preten- 
naei "Hb ail sdvemwroesii. 
readenree aroejly edrtsed to bide 
p rofr monel ad rex better e ra a 
deposit or catenas iaia u| 
r rwnMwi 


CANARY ISLANDS 


IlNUtfl N/W. vuia. 2 double 
bedroom. New location. 3 nuns 
M. Lovely scenery Puny Kir- 
n niton / eowcpM. To let or for 
sum. Banpun re Mam prom 
lens. T« Oi 660 6534. 


CHANNEL ISLES ’ 


CUDIHWV. Private estate en 17 
won noon, a rtwn. 3 
ocoeenswu. Tm: lOos 11 29994. 


FRANCE 


routes.- AO IHMN - eettagej - 
cnawaipc iron LI 0.000 Fi- 
nance avail sac. Brochure. 
Yiltotel Ltd 01*489 2733. 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY | 



BUYING IN SPAIN 
GO IT PROPERLY. 


SANTA POLA 

FROM £13,100 TO 
£150^100 FREEHOLD 


* tatitnens. buoptoea ate eta ti nftsnie SANTA POU-] 
COSTA BARCA 

* Also tea; itwetcpneo e RATA HAKNGA aid CABO BOG 

* Properties butt u hfgbas sbnfstts ol consautim ■ 10 yean 


* Wa roenagmunt end tattog ladtte reaSable {pmantate ncorre 

* M deretepmonts Bate guaranteed (Aval Bantam) 

* UK v Sparert norma m apped 

* So w fa te tapatem tops £100 p« person) rehuteUt vA 


* Btittb slatf pemarenOy resident « Sftsteti Mate tejerfa 

* Member at btetate de Raptetens Ertranjeros. SA N6 01748 
BLN 

Venture Overseas Propbotes (UK) 

Pkasemz (0734) 594829 or (8344) 428201 (24 his) 
FOR NEW 1 986/V7 BROCHURE Am DETAILS 


\ \ \ W 



EXCLUSIVE CHALET FOR SALE 
VILLARS - SWITZERLAND 

A magntficent private family chalet with 5 acres of wood- 
lenda. ctosa to the centre of the resort 4 reception rooms, 6 
bed ro om s . 5 bathrooms, 3 Mtchera. jacuzzi. bar, library etc. 

Heated outdoor swimming pool and superb south (King 
Hews. Staff accommodation. 

Very secluded tastoi. easffy acceestoie to vttage centre. 
Approx Sfirs 3 mOon. 

Contact: HRary Scott Ud, 

422 Upper Richmond Rd West, 

London SW14. 

Tab 01-676 6555 
Telex: 927028 HSCOTT Q. 


GENERAL 


OVCRSEAS HOUSEHOLD Insur- 
ance arranged at Lloyd 1 *. 
English worded poucy. Claires 
said m sterling. Also Motor In- 
surance for U.KL regutered 
vrhwtes wtm Annual 
Card. Tte: (04862) 70707. 


GREECE 


nesv. 1 AI b edro o m rd gustier 

apartnwnls. Small coastal re- 

sort Magnificent c nv ir cauna u . 
From £ 20 . 000 . Koran Comma. 
10799} 22641. 


PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE 

Hetadr teas R better? 

Comorahanavs range of luxury 
psoas from £35400 - £300.000. 
Far tredura. pbone w vmr 
(TZ), Stephen Bancroft 
nnemmst, 

Ffwidawe House, 

Wm SML 
WtadstB’. Barks. 

T«t (0753) 86&Z75. 


ALGARVE 

Pretty stone cottage for 
renovation. 15 mins from 
sea. Lovely elevated 
position wfth superb 
views. Only £9,500. 
fllustrated particulars 
from Haft & Partners. 

(07031 887928 or 
(0703)228823. 


«4W»W - i «u runaned 
penouiuse as» ovenooJang main 
brocn wim lunarn coastal views 
^■5“ Tel Joan Browne Oto 
391 8906166 19 10 S) 


SPAIN 


LUX1BIV TMt»UM Condo, 
minium m fmcku. a wmm. 
Manner of R.CI. £ 9.000 ano 
Td. 061-662 6944. 


GENUINE 

BARGAIN. 

Sana M tadmai gsM teen 
tewtestf) teteteM m am te Mnttrs 



(Man 

Tel day D1 403 1178. 
feme 113132132. 


SPAIN 


COSTA BLANCA 

Golf/Luxury resort properties 
at La M8naa & ViKa martin 
(Torreviefa) at reasonable 
prices. 

01-398 5710 

(Bare^mg 



B rian 
ARRY 

(Promorion>)Lrd 


T0RR1EVEJA AREA 

Costa Blanca. Span. Vttas, 
apartments, chaites for sale 
from £ 10,000 to £60.000. 
We represent only txikters 
of good repute. 
FreeadvJca 
CostavOte Ltd. College 
Farm, PuNoxfVD, Bedford. 
Tet (0525) 718123. 


MUASBeautifUiy positioned new 
2/3 bed apl. IVj mites from 
beach. Small select community 
wtui all AKUfUes cso.aoo. Tel 
0004 696660 ICVesI 


1 Lovely period house in 2 *4 

acre woodland seRbie. 4 bed. 
rooms, etc. Private chapel. To 
let For 1 year or longer b| 
£4.000 pa. purduar option 
POtelMe. Write James Money ft 
Co Solicitors. 6 York sl Twick- 
enham TWI 3LO. 


COSTA DC LA LUZ Vina. 2 beds, 
balh. fully furnohad. grdn. On 
6th fairway of gsifcDurw. Ten- 
nis and pool, superb beaches. 
1W hours cabraltar C16.SOO. 
Tel«264 886316 (Cvesl. 


6/ SSARteCLLA Re- 

sates. co nu deraPte saving: Sole 
Agents for luxury vtna dewlop- 
ment ft Spanish resale agency. 
Fucngtrola.' Co ownership 
schemes. Tet 01-446 2481 it>. 

UiLlUl'E STM. Lux ttmettiare 
bungalows 2 ww f rom £1 . 79a. 
Brochure. 021-746 9806 


SWITZERLAND 


^ Resort. VlUars. 
Studio and apartmente In tradi- 
Uonal scyie chalets wtm 
ng nma sl views from 
£53-000 . luxury apartments 
and Chalets ITOm £120.000. OS- 
BORNES. So union. M 
Parkway. London NWi. Tel- 
OI-48S0811. 

teOftnmiX, Luxury three 

bedroomed apartmen ts In cen- 
tral location, panoramic views 
£800.000 awx. OSBORN^ 
Solicitors. 93 Parkway. London 
NWI. Tel: Ot -466 881 1. 


RENTALS 



DOCKLANDS 

PROPCSTV CENTS! 


(HOUSES AND FLATS THROUGH 
r QUT THE DOCKLANDS AREA 

residential letting department 
TH: 01-790 9560 


Home 


if IUI I I 


B this is whal you at looking 
for • *e will find IT for ynj 
We han a supob range ol 
Drtjperties from 
SISO-EliOOpw. 

OmP ***** il-9489447 
V-/I I IV> (CHELSEA) (WWBlHHHf) 

Property Management Services Ltd 


Guraishi 

Constantine 


WE WISH Ml OUR 
CLIENTS AND TENANTS 

A HAPPY 
NEW YEAR 


PRIMROSE HILL 

Beautful mtesonette (Treaty 
< ^^M^4bWroorT S 
Thorns a en sute). doutNi 
■wng rootn. lateien. dmtnn, 
tenge; r scanty 

aH mndern 

conw8n »v»s and 3Ktm isatiri 

CaH between 9 and 11 
“Mings 01 587 1392 


y 


sy>J> I 


Su etfes: 




:,i'35yfe 


; T : Vui 




.■' ■■■*- h. 


“ucH 


■ ; •: - A 

- • Lor, -'.hln 

-•• - . ■ “tos JK 

■"■ * ,i W "lK, i|h t 

, / 

■■ 


• '-- VT^ oflJ 

... 'tOBlijT 

. t;'* 4' 

..-V.' r . om, W;' 

..• , ’- ? v , im r 

• ."^"COfc 

- . Of £ 

' :,:^C 

-■ "fed £r 

*. V.fcC 

• /-Me. ^ 

- - ' of • 

; : jj. 

* — ' fin jug'. 
. -- ' ■ - “JOB J: 

- 

- - :--^iar 

. Vi flrp 


■--* 1?3|K 



•- =•:• :':r Wn 
- ■ 


«i 

' \v* 





rS* 1 !* 


- *3 1 


•• 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


SPORT 


i58fldy Lyle will be working hard to recapture his 1985 Open form for 1987 starting with the PGA Tournament of Champions 

Lyle stops pulling pints to lift weights Ne Y season §.^ s 

~ — ■ r G under way with 

fresh challenges 


The seasonal revellers at the Five 
Beils, Bailey, near Cheshara. have 
more than the New Year to cele- 
brate this evening. One of their 
occasional drinking companions, 
Sandy Lyle, has been awarded the 
MBE. Not that Lyle could be 
labelled one of the regulars. He is 
more than that, as he purchased! the 
Buckinghamshire public house last 
summer. 

“We saw it as an ideal business 
investment,*’ Lyle's wife. Christine, 
said. “If s run by the family with my 
sister, Liz. and her husband, Dave, 
as my hosts. Sandy and 1 try to go 
along as often as possible.** Even so, 
the celebrity owner is likely to be a 
less frequent visitor in 1987. 

Lyle, who won the Open 
Championship in 1985. is deter- 
mined to be successful once more 
after a disappointing 1 986. He failed 
to win on the European tour and he 
tumbled from No. 1 position to 
24th in the Epson Order of Merit 
with official winnings of £48,639 
compared with £162,552 the pre- 
vious season. 

Lyle, of course, is not unduly 
perturbed about the reduction in 
revenue from the fairways as his 
contracts with such companies as 
Adidas, Ballantines Whisky, Ebel 
Watches. Hawkstone Park Golf and 
Country Gub and Mizuno have 
elevated him to millionaire status 
since his Open triumph even if his 
natural modesty has enabled him to 
keep his feet firmly on the ground. 

But at a luncheon whh John 
Simpson, who handles Lyle’s affairs 
for the Mark McCormack agency, it 
became apparent that if 1986 was a 
year for consolidation it was also 
one in which he discovered that he 
needed to strive even harder. 

“The New Year message for me is 
quite clear.** Lyle said. “I'm going to 
have to work a lot harder. I did not 
really put enough effort into the last 
year. I was resting on my laurels a 
little bit 1 suppose it was a natural 
reaction after winning the Open. 1 
lost interest, what with everything 
else going on, and I struggled to 
motivate myself. 

“I accept it should not be that 
way. But, as the Open champion, it 
is fair to say that people expect a 
little more from you. And if it is not 
happening on the fairways then you 
seem to put more pressure on 
yourself.” 

Lyle has diagnosed that his 
problems in 1986 stemmed from a 
lack of desire to spend long and 
uncomfortable hours in driving rain 
or gusting winds on the inadequate 




By John Balia nfine 


Swinging in the new: Sandy Lyle and his wife, Christine, celebrate his MBE and the New Year at their public house (Photograph: Ian Stewart) 


practice ranges at some European 
lour venues. He worked as hard as 
any professional during the early 
part of the year when he was 
operating on the United States tour. 
The reward was a first official 
success on American soil when he 
captured the Greater Greensboro 
Open by two shots from Andy Bean 
at Forest Oaks. 

“In an up and down year, 
breaking the ice in America at least 
gave me one high spot,” Lyle said. 
“I started 1 986 in a good frame of 
mind and I do tend to work a lot 
harder in America. I am not too 
keen on hitting balls on busy and 
cramped practice ranges especially 
as it can be dangerous for caddies. 
The facilities in America are superb 
although we are making progress in 
the right direction in Europe. 

“But I will still have to overcome 
such apathy in 1987 and to do so I 
mean to be a lot fitter. Everything 
that you get in this game comes 
from the practice range but if you 
don't feel 100 per cent fit then it is 


hard to get yourself spurred on to 
spend the necessary hours working 
on the swing. And the only exercis- 
ing that I’ve really done in recent 
years is to squeeze power putty to 
strengthen my hands. 

“So one of my first duties when 1 
arrive in America will be to make 
contact with the people at the David 
Parry Fitness Training Centre 
which they have at virtually every 
tournamenL I want their advice on 
what exercises f should be doing.” 

Lyle leaves on Friday to prepare 
for the Mony Tournament of 
Champions, which begins on the La 
Costa course in California the 
following Wednesday, “m be hop- 
ing for a little more luck than last 
year when 1 had the chance of a 
good finish and then took an eightal 
one hole after playing the wrong 
ball,” Lyle recalled. He will play five 
successive tournaments through to 
the Hawaiian Open on February 8 
before he returns home for an 
intermission of two weeks. 

“Thai’s long enough to get men- 


tally fresh again but short enough to 
ensure that I do not lose the 
sharpness that I hope to have in my 
game by then. Most of my swing 
problems in 1986 stemmed from 
moving my head. It tends to sway to 
the right on the back swing then it 
drops down and I lose the whole 
swing alignment. The result is that I 
block the ball to the right or hit it 
fat. I also got my feet too far apart, 
became too stiff-legged and that 
meant my upper body was having to 
work too hard during the swing.” 

To eradicate such potentially 
crucifying problems Lyle has experi- 
mented by hitting shots with his feet 
together. He has also continued to 
work on the advice of Bob Tor- 
rance, father of the Ryder Cup 
player, Sam, who suggested that be 
needed to improve his posture. “He 
told me to stick ray bottom out, 
arch my back so that it is stiffer and 
the result is that I'm getting a much 
better shoulder turn. 

“I’m determined to get my game 
together. We have such an exciting 


year ahead with the defence of the 
Ryder Cup an obvious high spot 
I'm particularly looking forward to 
the US Masters. I was eleventh at 
Augusta in 1 986 and I now fancy my 
chances around that course. I've 
always found Augusta to be a 
comfortable course on which to play 
but to break 70, which I believe you 
must do at least a couple of times to 
win. you need to play really well and 
to do that you must understand the 
course. 

“I have now played enough times 
at Augusta to know it reasonably 
well and my goal in 1987. apart 
from generally lightening my game 
and becoming more consistent, is 
the major championships and the 
US Masters is the first.” 

Being the Master of Augusta 
would certainly give Lyle another 
gigantic lift and an excuse perhaps 
to take time off from his fitness 
programme for a drink or two with 
the locals at the Five Bells. 


Mitchell Platts fjg* 


BASKETBALL 


TENNIS: WEST GERMANS LIKELY TO DOMINATE IN PLACE OF CZECHS 


Life is no bed of Balance of power moving West 


roses for Titmuss 


By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


By Nicholas Hailing 


David Titmuss. the new Eng- 
land coach, is quickly finding 
out the demands of the job he 
has taken on. The lead-up to this 
week's Pohjola tournament in 
Finland was bad enough — with 
various players refusing to at- 
tend training — but then to 
compound matters, Portsmouth 
pulled out their four players who 
were required for their own 
inier-dub tournament. 

The tournament itself has 
hardly provided Titmuss, the 
successor to BiU Beswick. with 
the cosy fixtures be might have 
chosen for his opening games in 
charge. Of their 21 previous 
games against Finland, West 
Germany and Turkey, the three 
other competing nations. Eng- 
iand had only won four and 
Titmuss was soon to discover 
that his makeshift squad was not 
capable of improving on that 
dismal record. 

“But there were some en- 
couraging signs,” Titmuss in- 
sisted after England had lost 
their opening two games. “The 
key thing from our point of view 
was getting the players together 
and that we’ve done. Defen- 
sively we did okay but offen- 
sively it's clear we need more 
time together. Yet. it looks tike 
we can start to build with some 
of die younger players.” 

For Sunday’s game against 
Turkey, in which England were 
without, the four Manchester 
United and Kingston players 
required by their clubs for the 
Tournament of Champions at 
Stretford. Titmuss had only a 
squad of eight. With the Turks 
45-33 ahead at the interval. 
England seemed to be heading 
for a hiding but they rallied so 
well in the second half that the 
margin of defeat was only 7S-77, 


Oyde Vaughan and Mike Beti 
finishing equal top scorers on 22 
points. Roy Jordan, one of the 
three new caps blooded in that 
match, collected 10 points, one 
more than Peter Scanllebury, 
another newcomer. 

Russell Taylor, the third new 
boy. sat out Monday's match in 
which England, reinforced by 
two more new caps. Jason 
Fogarty of Manchester United 
and Ken Scott of Kingston, were 
overwhelmed 93-70 by Fin/and. 
Tiimuss had detailed bis players 
to keep a close watch on 
Heikkinen and Klingan. the two 
Finns who had looked most 
impressive in their opening 
victory against West Germany, | 
and so they did. Unfortunately 
for them, the hosts had so many 
other players capable of produc- 
ing the goods that England were 
trailing 46-28 at the interval. 

Although England again im- 
proved in the second half they 
had no one to match the Finns 
in the art of accurate long-range 
shooting, sinking not a single 
three-pointer in reply to 
Finland's 14 from 20 attempts. 
“It was a question of having a 
new team,” Titmuss added. 
“Having to integrate the four 
who arrived late meant that we 
were very under-prepared.” 

Vaughan (23 points) was 
again England’s top marksman 
with less support this time from 
Beit who collected only five 
points, the same as Dave Gard- 
ner, who recently collected the 
player of the year award. The 
three other late arrivals fared 
little better, Balogun sinking 
nine points. Scott eight on his 
debut, and Fogarty a single 
basket on his first England 
appearance. 


HOCKEY 


Poor play by Midlands 


Midlands' performances in 
the territorial matches at 
Sherboume yesterday were as 
dreary and dismal as the 
weather. They had plenty of 
chances both against South ana 
East but frittered them away. 

The first game between Sooth 
and Midlands was only brought 
to life by two goals by Lesley 
Hobley, one in each half, to give 
South a comfortable win. 

The East in beating Midlands 
2-0, had their first win of the 
tournament and they deserved 
it. They were faster onto the ball 
and were made to look even 
better than they were by 
Midlands' poor passes. 


By Joyce Whitehead 

nances in West held North to a (M) draw 

itches at in the first half and then their 
v were as attack crumbled. Suzanne 
I as the Grimble played well in defence 
plenty of but nothing could stop Helen 
So Ut h and Brown and Gill Huggon from 
n away. scoring to win 2-0. The goal of 
recn Sooth the tournament was scored by 
■ I v brought Julie Bannister. , 
by Leslev She hit the ball in at a penalty 

alf to give comer and then directed the 
anti shot into goal and that with 

another penalty corner by 
» Midlands Smith spoiled South s 

°‘ l ”5 unbeaten record and gave North 
/ deserved a vital win to end the second day 
,10 the ball jnlop place, 
look even RESULTS; South 2, Mktends 0: North 2, 
were by we«ftEs£l£MidtomlsO:Nor1h2.Soutfi 

c 0. 


*80115 Becker, aged 19, and 
Steffi Graf, aged 17, may be the 
lop people in world tennis by the 
end of 1987. Thai would not 
mean much of a shift for the 
game's governors: just a short 
trip from Eastern to Western 
Europe. 

The present rulers, Ivan Lendl 
and Martina Navratilova, live 
in the United States but are 
products of Czcchoslavak ten- 
nis. Becker and Miss Graf both 
come from the vicinity of 
Heidelberg, which could be- 
come the centre of a 
“Reformation" for the second 
lime in five centuries. 

Becker and Miss Graf are still 
improving, but in different 
directions. Becker is a natural 
grass-court player, who may be 
expected to graduate on hard 
courts before mastering the slow 
tempo of shale. By contrast Miss 
Graf is likely to become the 
French (shale) and United 
States (hard) champion before 
winning Wimbledon, a prize 
that may be within her grasp in 
I 1988. 

Miss Graf might have won the 
first two lilies in 1986. She was 
good enough U> do so. In Paris 
she had a match point for a 
straight sets win over Hana 
Mandlikova in a quarter-final 
and at Flushing Meadow she 
had three match points against 
Miss Navratilova in a semi- 
final Bui these were intimidat- 
ing. big-occasion challenges, 
even for a player with Miss 
Grafs strength of character. In 
addition, her service and volleys 
need sharpening. 

Becker, still learning his trade 
in the tougher school of men's 
tennis, was beaten by Michiel 
Shapers in Melbourne. Mikael 
Pemfors in Paris, and Miloslav 
Mecir at Flushing Meadow. 
Lend). French and US cham- 
pion and runner-up at Wimble- 
don, was almost as dominant as 
Miss Navratilova, who reached 
all four grand slam finals and 
lost only one: to Chris Lloyd in 
Paris. Mrs Lloyd was the only 
grand slam singles finalist, of 
either sex, who was not bom in 
Europe and even she has Mood 
ties with Luxembourg. 

Domestically there was noth- 
ing much to shout about in 
1986. Jo Dune, Anne Hobbs 
and Annabel Croft were the only 


British ptayersr of either sex to 
advance to the third round of 
the singles in a grand slam 

tournamenL Miss Durie and 
Jeremy Bates reached the quar- 
ter-finals of the mixed event. at 
Wimbledon. At the end of 1985, 
the last time the Australian 
championships were played. 
Miss Durie and Miss Hobbs got 
to the women's doubles semi- 
finals. 

The administration of British 
tennis has been discussed here at 
length. But this is as good a tune 
as any to remind the Lawn 
Tennis Association of two cau- 
tious. diffident decisions made 
in 1986. Beckenham considered 
inviting Jimmy Connors to play 
in their centenary tournament 

The grand prix council had 
suspended Connors but made it 
dear that they had uo jurisdic- 
tion over Beckenham, which is 
not a grand prix event 

The Internationa] Tennis 
Federation, on the other hand, 
insisted that Beckenham should 
honour the suspension — the 
LTA toed the ITF line rather 
than defending Beckenham's 
right to make up their own 
minds. Who runs British te nnis: 
The grand prix council the ITF. 
or the LTA? 

The second incident occurred 
earlier this month when the 
LTA successfully resisted a pro- 
posal that an additional, in- 
dependently promoted pre- 
Wimbledon tournament should 
be played in Edinburgh. There 
arc plenty of players to go round 
and the more grass-court events 
the better, especially if they 
promote the game in places 
where the celebrities seldom, if 
ever, compete. But instead of 
welcoming competition, the 
LTA backed away from it in 
horror. 

The LTA. like other govern- 
ing bodies, must repeatedly re- 
examine its policies. As another 
example, consider the tie-break. 
It has yet to be universally 
accepted that the lie-break 
should be used in every set or (as 
in the Davis Cup) not at all. 
What is the point of discarding 
the tie-break in the fifth set of a 
men’s match or the third set of a 
women's match? 


championships have been de- 



Steffi Graft success beckons, but not yet at Wimbledon 


cided by lie-breaks in earlier 
sets, in the 1986 US champion- 
ships, the only grand slam event 
to apply the tie-break in every 
set only four of the 127 men's 
singles were decided tw a tie- 
break in the fifth set. There is 

very little about the US tour- 
nament that could be regarded 
as exemplary. But at least its 
application of the tie-break is 
logical. 

Finally, the most bizarre ten- 
nis story of the year emerged 


Turnbull vows to shrug off set-back 

From Barry Wood, Brisbane 


Roses blossoming indoors 


England can look forward to 
the 1987 indoor scaKin with 
renewed confidence after their 
success in the Dundee "J ler “ 
national tournament on Mon- 
day night (Sydney Fnskin 
wntes). faying as 

they defeated Menzieshill 8-3 in 
the final. Uii , 

Purchase (three goals). H«u 
<21 Nick Clark (2>*ndShenvani 
scored for Roses, Yule, Bycr 

and Christie for Menzieshill- 
Robert Hill. orRoscs, was voied 
the player of the tournament- 
The next event for England & 

the international tournament n 

Dublin from January 16 to l» 


when they will face opposition 
from Scotland. Ireland, Wales, 
Canada and Australia. This 
tournament will include the 
home countries’ championship 
in which Scotland will defend 
their tide. The following week- 
end England, playing as the 
Roses again, will take part in the 
international tournament at The 
Hague. 

DUNDEE TOURNAMENT: Results; Sen*- 
Mensesmil «. Murray Interna hOOte 
Me** " 2. Gmomoen (Mm) 1. 

Final' Roses 8. Msnaeshrtlf TMrdpIjj**: 
Murray imemaDonal Meals it. Q ro- 
nrtMn 5 Rflta FirtOW* 8. tedisjansimi 
Toter; 3. Seventh: Bw*anham 5, 
Pte*us-Merrtan 5- 


Wendy Torn holt the former 
US Open and French Open 
finalist is anxious to prove, at 
the age of 34, that she is not 
ready for retirement despite 
suffering one of the most 
embarrassing defeats of her 
career yesterday hi the Jason 
2000 women's toarnament b ere. 
Miss Turnbull, ranked 18th in 
the world, was beaten 6-1, 2-6,6- 
2 by Heather LndtofC. an Ameri- 
can ranked 251st, hot has set 
herself a demanding programme 
for 1987. 

“I know at the moment I'm 
overweight and I’m not working 
as hard as I could,” she admit- 
ted. “I don't think I allowed 
myself enough time to prepare 
for the tournament and she had 
the benefit of playing through 
qualifying and first round 
matches." 

Despite her set-back she has 
no intention of retiring from the 
game. “I like to keep playing 


becaase I thrive on the com- 
petition. I don't like to play 
‘social tennis.* 1 find that very 
boring. I don't like to practice 
much bet I do like to go out on 
the court and compete. 

“1 have made a commitment to 
myself, to the rirenit and to my 
doubles partner, Hana 
Mandlikova, right through 1987 
and 1 have no intention of 
changing that at all,” she said. 
“What 1 decide to do after that 
will depend on what kind of year 
1987 has been/* 

Although stating that she 
woeld lose no sleep over the 
upset against Miss Lndloff. 
Miss Torn boll will certainly he 
re-assessing her commitment to 

the came that lougago made her 

a millionairess. It is tempting to 
speculate, from the evasive an- 
swer she gave when asked just 
how ranch she had prepared for 
her first match on grass since 
Wimbledon, that her ba3d-ap 


was restricted to the pre-match 
warm-np. Certainly she had 
taken her animal break at the 
end of the year as nsnat while 
ignoring the fact that the tonr- 
nament dates had been changed 
this year. 

Miss Mandlikova. mean- 
while, overwhelmed the unfortu- 
nate Marie Calleja, of France. 6- 
0, 6-0, in a mere 38 minutes. “I 
can't remember winning 6-0. 6- 
0, since the juniors. I was jnst 
happy I coaid gel settled becaase 
I haven't played for a long timet” 
the top seed said. 

Britain also had something to 
cheer about as Sara Comer 
reached a third round clash with 
Helena Sokova by defeating Eva 
KrapU of Swftzeriand, 6-3, 6-3, 
and Anne Hobbs won 7-6, 6-1, 
against Carin Bakum. a quali- 
fier. from The Netherlands. 
Hobbs meets Pam Shrirer, the 
second seed, in the next round. 
Results, page 26 


from Lagos less than four weeks 
ago. Four American pro- 
fessionals competing there were 
suddenly hit by what may 
delicately be described as a 
religious thunderbolt Two de- 
cided that each was Jesus Christ 
and that a third was Satan and 
could purge his sins only by 
jumping out of the hotel win- 
dow — which he did. The 
window and the injuries have 
been mended and, presumably, 
all sorts of lessons learned. 
Funny game, tennis. 

World’s best 
take home 
millions again 

Paris (AFP) — Ivan Lendl and 
Martina Navratilova, the world 
No, Is, earned nearly $2 million 
(about £ 1 .408,54 1 ) each to head 
the money-earning stakes for 
1986. Lendl, whose major vic- 
tories came in the French and 
US Opens and the Grand Prix 
Masters, earned 51,987,537 to 
bead the cash stakes for the 
fourth rime. His career earnings 
are $10,302,129. 

Navratilova's year, which in- 
cluded taking the Wimbledon 
and US Open titles, brought her 
5 1 .905.84 1 as she led the women 
for the ninth year in succession. 
Lendl's closest rival was the 
Wimbledon champion, Boris 
Becker, but he was more than 
half a million dollars down. 

No Americans appear in the 
lop 10. which includes four 
Swedes and three Frenchmen. 


The nearby Pacific glints like 
new-polished pewter, sad 
greenkeepers ami officials cut 
new holes and plant flags, 
followed closely by caddies anx- 
iously paring distances. 

Such scenes will herald the 
January 7 start of the US PGA 
tour at La Costa on the Califor- 
nian coast where Sandy Lyle, 
the winner at Greensboro last 
April, joins other 1986 title 
holders in the Tournament of 
Champions, a tall-masted flag- 
ship of the circuit. Nostalgia 
brings hack the bag-toting San- 
chos. too, the caddies, ioag after 
they hare sworn to give the 
addiction np and begin a bu rge r 
takeaway or rejoin a bui ld ing 
site. 

It brings back the writers also, 
not to mention the 140-odd 
qualifiers for the all-exempt 
toar. Gary Player, who competes 
in the seniors division at La 
Costa, always lamented how be 
missed the joys of watching his 
family grow np while, dearly, 
never ever i n ten ding to miss the 
seductive roar of the crowd, the 
thrill of the 12-footers rattling 
down tire metal cups, or any part 
of the whole spine-tingling 
affair. 

1 will be hoping at the very 
start of this Ryder Cap year to 
crack open chestnuts like; wOl it 
be Greg Norman's year? Can 
Jack Niddans, who is aged 47 
on January 21, continue to make 
an impact? Will Bernhard 
Langer's fire fade now that hr is 
a multi-millionaire? Can 
Severiano Ballesteros come to 
terms with his love-hate 
relationship with America? Will 
Lyle, Nick Faldo and Ken 
Brown finally break through to 
die American big-time or simply 
continue to fill the roles of 
extras? And perhaps most im- 
portant of all, point oat dees to 
the possible out come of the 
defence of the Ryder Cup at 
M oirfleld, Ohio, in September. 

One could aigne, of coarse, 
that 1986 was Norman’s year 
for, in addition to winning his 
first Open Championship in 

style at Sandwich, the 
Australian hawk ended op on 
top of the money-tree in the 
United States as well as leading 
in two of the nine statistical 
tables, potting and par-break- 
ing, not ooaatiog finishing third 
in scoring (an average of 70.22) 
and joint second in his number of 
eagles (12 to Joey Sindelar’s 

This golfing La Sonde begins 
to torn a gain, first on the West 
Coast and then on the East, bat 
always in the son, and thrusting 
newcomers from the qualifying 
schools will be ont to make their 
names, new stars like Bob TWay, 
Corey Paria and Sinddar will he 
hoping to consolidate, noo- 
I Americans saefa as Norman and 
i Laager mil try to WU on 
former success, while Faldo, 
Brown and — occasionally — 

Ballesteros fight for the total 
recognition that has always 
eluded them in the United 
States. Estabished names such 
< as Nicklans. Tom Watson and 
Arnold Palmer will look for 
Indian summers. 

The season of 1986 was 
thrilling, especially for non- 
Americans. Norman won the 
Arnold Palmer award as the 
i leading money-winner with 
$653^96, although this was 
only $516 more tun TWay, who 
took the Vantage Cap’s enor- 
mous first prize of $500,000 with 
3,105 points from 110 tour- 
nament rounds from Payne 
Stewart who gained 2£02 points 
from 95 rounds. Laager, who 
established a big lead in the 
Spring, was never going to win 
because of visa restrictions and 
be did very well to finish fifth 
and lift $120,000 with 2^55 
points from only 67 roends. 

BOXING 

Feeney will 
not quit 
the ring yet 

John Feeney, twice holder of 
the British bantamweight 
championship, will carry on 
despite a third successive British 
title defeat two months ago. 

Feeney's future was under 
discussion after Robert Dickie 
beat him by a large points 
margin in the featherweight 
championship in Ebbw Vale two 
months go. This followed a 
hotly disputed defeat by Dickie 
six months earlier, and a points 
loss to Ray Gil body in June 
1 985 which cost him the 
bantamweight tide. 

But he will try again, his 
manager, Denny Mancioi. said 
yestciday. “He still has his 
enthusiasm and be wall give it 
another season and then take 
stock of himself He was very 
disappointed to have lost to 
Dickie in October but did not 
agree with the verdict in the first 
Dickie fight Neither did 1 and 
neither did a lot of other 
people.” 

Feeney is prepared to meet all 
corners and his future may be in 
the super-featherweight di- 
vision. “At this stage of his 
career the pace may suit him 
better.’’ Mancini said. 

Feeney, a professional since 
1977. won the British bantam- 
weight title for the first time in 
1981 and again in 1963 before 
he was finally deposed by 
Gilbody. More than a quarter of 
his 46 fights have been for 
championships — British, Euro- 
pean or Commonwealth. 

• Dave Gardside, of Hartle- 
pool, will meet Steve Mamino. a 
American, over 10 rounds at the 
Mayflower Suite, Newcastle, on 
February 5. The bout will keep 
Garside busy while he waits for 
his British heavyweight 
championship meeting with 
Horace Notice, of Birmingham, 
which is scheduled to take place 
in May. 

Notice first has to go through 
with a delayed Commonwealth 

Commonwealth title fight 

against Proud Kilimanjaro, of 
Zimbabwe, which is scheduled 
for February. 


The German, who has built a 
home in Florida lor himself and 
his American wife, Vikki, was 
by far the most successful 
European, finishing tenth In the 
money with $379,800 (the next 
best was Lyle. 64th with 
S143.41S) 

Langer took part In one of (he 
season's 10 play-offs, losing to 
Tnay in San Diego at the second 
extra bole. Ballesteros, with two 
eagles in one round at the 
Masters, and Lyle, who won 
Greensboro with the largest 54- 
hole lead of five strobes, made 
less significant marks. 

Other vatber startling miggets 
from 1986; no fewer chan 21 
holes in one were scored, one 
“double eagle” or “albatross” by 
Mike Halbert at Cypress Point 
(be covered a 491-yard par five 
with a drive and a 1-iron); Dong 
TeweU at Los Angeles and 
Norman at Las Vegas shared 
the largest winning margin of 
seven; Nicklans at his own 
Memorial toarnament shared 
runs of six birdies with five 
others, while Tway held sway in 
the multiple winner division with 
four titles followed by ZoeUer 
with three and Norman, and 
seven others, with two. Calvin 
Pme won the straightest-driver 
category for the sixth consec- 
utive yean newcomer Davis Love 

1887 SCHEDULE: Jammy 7 -IOe Mony 
Tournament ot Champions (La Costa. 
Cabtormat 14-18: Bob Hops Chrysler 
ClassK (Palm Springs): 22-25: Phoenix 
Open; 29-Fflbnauy f: AT and T Pro-Am 
(Peb&u Beach): Febnmy 54: Hawatan 


' Open (HanoWuk 12-15 Shearson Lehman 
Brothers Andy w»ams Open (San Owgo): 
19-22: LOS Angeies Open: 2S-VUrch 1: 
Dora) Ryder Open (Manx): March 5-8: 
Honda Classic (Eagle Trace. FKU; 12-15: 
Bay HU Ctessic (Brtando): 19-22: Wew 
ms CtassJc 29-29: Tournament Play- 
ers Cftampwnship (Pome Vedra. Flafc 
April 2-5: Greensboro Open (North Caro- 
lina): 9-12: US Masters (Augusta. 
Georgia). 

took the long- hitters cro w n with 
a hit of 285.7 yards on average, 
and be and two others. Greg 
Ywiggs and John McComtsh, 
broke the record of 280.1 yards 
set by Dan Pohl in 1981. There 
most be a moral somewhere; the 
PGA training caravan's pres- 
ence at wanes, perhaps. 

After the 1986 champions soit 
themselves out at La Costa in a 
few weeks. Bob Hope, that 
apparently u nextin guishaMe ex- 
Brit, entertains them for five 
days on the lush Palm Springs 
desert courses before they travel 

inland to play their first Phoenix 
Open on tire new Tournament 
Players Qnb of Scottsdale. 

Back to Pebble Beach near 
San Francisco for the re-named 
“Crosby”, the AT and T Na- 
tional Pro-Am, where it will be 
interesting to see if tire new 
office of mayor of Carmel has 
affected the 18 handicap of Clint 
Eastwood. Over to Ha wan and 
breezy Waialae, near 
rwa ffmmiiiMii, a title I think 
Nick Faldo might win one day, 
and then back to Andy 
Williams's event oa the splendid 
North and South public courses 
of Tony Pines near San Diego 
before the rity-nm Los Angeles 
Open winds np the West Coast 

Even in lato February it fa 
important for golf to stay well 
sooth and so the Dora! Ryder 
Open on Miami's “Bine 
Monster” is next before the 
Honda Classic at Eagle Trace 
near Fort Lauderdale. Then 
Palma's invitational Bay Hill 
Classic in Orlando before New 
Orleans and Greensboro, where 
Lyle defends, builds up to the 
classic Masters. Although the 
cotnmisgiooer, Deane Beman, 
claims that 70 million more 
television viewers watched golf 
last year than three years ago, 
tire tom desperately needs more 
snperstars like Palmer, 
Nicklans and Ballesteros to 
keep die game in die forefront. 
Who will they be, I wonder? 

TABLE TENNIS 

Rankings 

under 

scrutiny 

Alan Cooke, who is officially 
ranked No. 2 in England, and 
Carl Prean. rated by many 
experts as the second best 
player, have the chance to settle 
that particular argument in the 
Triumph Adler national 
championships at Crawley on 
January 24 and 25. 

They are in the same half of 
the men's singles draw, which 
was announced yesterday, and 
are expected to meet at the 
semi-finals stage. The winner 
should go on to challenge 
England's No. I, Desmond 
Douglas, who is chasing a record 
tenth men's singles crown. 

Cooke has jumped over Prean 
in the rankings after beating 
Douglas last autumn in the 
national Top 12 tournament, 
albeit with games up to 11 
points instead of the normal 21. 
Douglas avenged the defeat last 
month in the Middlesex open 
tournament when the more 
orthodox method of scoring 
was used. 

Prean has dropped in the 
rankings because he plays very 
little in England these days, 
restricting bis activities largely 
to West Germany. 

The new entry procedure 
restricts participation in this 
event to the elite top 64 men and 
32 women in the rankings. But 
this has backfired because not 
all of these leading players have 
entered. Consequently there are 
fewer than 60 male competitors 
and only 28 women. 

The women's title is defended 
by Joy Grundy but the top seed 
is the National No. 1, Lisa 
Bellinger. 

TOjp SEEHNOS: Menc 1. D Douglas: 2. A 
Cooks; 3. C Prean: «. S Andrew. Women: 

1 . L Be&riger; 2. A Gordon; 3, J Gnjntly: 4. 
F BtooL 

TODAY’S FIXTURES 

RUGBY UNION 
CUJB MATCH; Swansea v LtinsB (7^. 
OTHER SPORT 

HOCKEY: Women's territorial tounameni 
{at SUBrtxJmeScriool. Dorsal, 9.30am). 
TENN& Junto# covered coin champion- 

slfos (at Ckjeen's Club, West Kensmgton). 


SfOKl ijut, iiMto WfcjL>i>ifcaL>A^ L/tsCfcMbbK 31 19«6 

RACING; CORPORAL CLINGER FAILS BY A NECK TO LAND LEOPARDSTOWN PRIZE 


Evergreen Crimson Embers to 
outstay the young pretenders 


By Mandarin 

Crimson Embers, who 
reaches the grand old age of 12 
at midnight tonight, can defy 
hjs advancing years by win- 
ning the $pa Hurdle on his 
seasonal debut at Cheltenham 
this afternoon. 

Fulke Walwyn’s veteran 
stayer, who has been a fine 
servant to the stable for six 
years, was as good as ever last 
season, gaining a 15-length 
triumph in the Waterford 
Crystal Stayers’ Hurdle, a race 
be also captured in 1982. 

The distance of today’s 
contest - 2% miles - would 
appear a little on the short side 
for him but with the going sure 
to be extremely testing, the 
emphasis will be on stamina 
and that is a quality he 
possesses in abundance. On 

this de manding course. I ex- 
pect to see Stuart Shilston's 
mount r unning on up the hill 
when some of his rivals have 
cried enough. 

1 have few doubts, either, 
that Crimson Embers will be 
fit enough to do himself 
justice. He was beaten on his 
reappearance last season but 
the stable was going through a 
poor patch at the time and 
that run can safely be ignored. 

The previous two seasons 
Crimson Embers won first 
time out and further evidence 
that he goes well when fresh 
was provided by his Festival 
success in March — his first 
race for 1 1 weeks. 

Pike's Peak was one of the 
leading novices in training last 
season, winning four ofhis last 
five races in good company 


and chasing home Ten Plus in 
the Sun Alliance Hurdle at 
Cheltenham in the other. 

He disappointed when a 
well-beaten fourth to Sabin 
Du Loir on his reappearance 
at Wolverhampton five weeks 
ago but was dearly in need of 
the ran that day and was badly 
treated by the conditions of 
the race. 1 expect him to step 
up on that effort today with- 
out troubling Crimson 
Embers. 

Sheer Gold finished just 
ahead of Pike’s Peak at 
.Wolverhampton but had the 
advantage of a previous ran 
there. She has been beaten 
twice since that race and will 
find it hard to confirm the 
form with a fitter Pike's Peak. 

The Grand National win- 
ner, West Tip. continues his 
build-up for Liverpool in the 
Old Year Handicap Chase 
and, while he will un- 
doubtedly be suited by the trip 
of four miles, he feces a 
formidable task here carrying 
1 2 stone. 

With the 19.87 National still 
more than three months away, 

1 feel sure Michael Oliver will 
not want to have his charge at 
his peak just yet and the 
Han dicapper would not look 


kindly on victory here when 
he comes to announce the big- 
race weights next month. 

For those reasons I will look 
elsewhere for the winner and 
Elm boy makes most appeal. A 
12-length winner of the 1985 
Cheltenham Foxhunters, 
Elmboy missed much of last 
season after finishing lame at 
Cheltenham in December 
when be was attempting to 
give Run And Skip 51b and 
was beaten only seven lengths 

Norman Mawle has nursed 
bis stable star back to health 
and he finished a most 
promising third under 12st 71b 
behind the fitter Greenbank 
Park on his reappearance at 
Towcester !8 days ago. He 
meets Greenbank Park on 
191b better terms today and, 
with this gruelling trip very 
much in his favour, is napped 
to take his revenge. 

Pearlymaa, reportedly none 
the worse for his Wetherby fell 
on Saturday, can defy his 
welter burden in the Fairford 
Handicap Chase. He looked 
an outstanding young two- 
mile chaser at the end of last 
season and again when re- 
appearing at Cheltenham ear- 
lier this month. Saturday's 
lapse should prove to be only a 


New Year’s Day service 


Unlike the other quality news- 
papers, The Times will be 
publishing tomorrow. New 
Year's Day. Our comprehensive 
racing service will include Mi- 
chael Seely's report from 
Cheltenham and Mandarin's 
preview of the five New Year's 
Day programmes. 

The five racecards wiD incor- 


porate form for the televised 
meeting at Cheltenham and The 
Times Private Handkapper's 
exclusive ratings fur Chelten- 
ham and Catterick Bridge. 
There will also be results in lull 
from today's two meetings. 

To be sore of your copy at The 
Times tomo r row, place an order 
with your newsagent today. 


minor set-back on the way to 
top honours. 

Townley Stone, one of the 
leading novices two seasons 
ago, has his fust run for Nick 
Heoderson but he is likely to 
need the race and, in any case, 
is a better horse on fest 
ground. A bigger danger to the 
top weight may be Roadster, 
who is well treated on some of 
last season’s good form. 

Emo Forever, a disappoint- 
ment over fences this season, 
reverts to the smaller obstacles 
for the Ernest Robinson 
Handicap Hurdle ' and the 
Coral Golden Hurdle runner- 
up has a leading chance on his 
best form. 

Playschool will be fancied 
to make amends for his Box- 
ing Day Kempton fell in the 
Broadway Novices’ Chase but 
better value may be obtained 
by supporting another West 
Country raider, Hinter City, 
who beat the useful Mr Frisk 
when winning over today’s 
course and distance in 
November. 

At Leicester, ray principal 
fancies are Bird Of Spirit and 
Ivy Leagne in the two novice 
chases. Josh Gifford runs the 
latter in the Gallowtree 
Novices’ Chase rather than 
take on Playschool and com- 
pany at Cheltenham and that 
looks a shrewd move at this 
stage in the six-year-old’s 
promising career. 

Bird Of Spirit won over 
today’s course and distance on 
his seasonal debut and has 
little to beat in the Quora 
Novices’ Chase. 


Derrymore 
Boy puts 
spanner in 
the works 

From Our Irish Racing 
Correspondent, Dublin 

That magical man, Paddy 
Mullins, made a mess of the 
Irish handicapper’s careful 
ratenfatinns for The Ladbrokeat 
Leopardstown on Saturday 
week by saddling Derrymore 
Boy to beat the even-money 
favourite. Corporal Clinger. in 
yesterday’s Sean Graham Me- 
morial Hurdle. 

In this conditions race, over 

the same course and distance as 

The Ladbroke will be ran, 
Derrymore Boy was only getting 
a 51b weigh t-for-age allowance 
from Corporal Clinger. In The 
Ladbroke. the English-trained 
horse has been rated no less than 

281b superior. 

The winner was never out of 
the first three at any stage 
yesterday and indeed made 
most of the running. At the 
second last flight, Bonalma, 
Corporal Clinger and Deep Idol 
all looked as if they would 
overhaul the pacemaker. 

Derrymore Boy is. however, a 
robust battler and even after he 
was briefly headed by Corporal 
Clinger on the run-in he rallied 
to go on and win by a neck. The 
winner collects a 61b penalty for 
The Ladbroke but has been 
promoted to joint-favouritism. 

An exciting finish is in store 
on the last day of the jump 
jockeys' championship at 
Punchestown this afternoon as 
Tom Morgan, with 51 successes 
to his credit has a lead of one 
over the perennial champion. 
Frank Berry. Berry has a good 
chance of at least fencing a tie as 
he has three mounts today 
against Morgan's one. 


*!* V.- • ■ ■ ■. 

• ' 'V 1 ’••• , /■ ■ ■■ ■ 

\ l : vV ' 





A. •• 

V..?; ... • 


‘ 1. 





I f 

.•/!*> ■ ■ ' '! 


*-jK »;> * 

:%p 4/> * 

■■ • • . *. ft a >\ 


-f y* V. ’ 



CHELTENHAM 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

103 (12) 00*32 meSFORM(COBF)(Vr5JRytey)BHaJl9-1CH) B West (4) 88 7-2 

RaeaeartJ number. Draw in brackets. Six -figure amt distance winner. BF-beatefl favourite in bust 
tom (F-leB. Routed up- IMnseated rider. B- race). Owner in br ackets . Trainer. Age and 
brou^it down. &-sipped in. R-refused). Horae's weight. Rider plus any alowance. The Times 
name(B4lnkera. V-wsor. H-hood. E-EyasfwW.C- Private Handicapper’s rating. Appronmats starting 
course winner. D-distance winner. CD-course price. 


12-45 Hinter City. 

1.20 Pearlyman. 

1.55 Crimson Embers. 


230 ELMBOY (nap). 
3.05 Emo Forever. 
3.40 Intuition. 


on latest start 


- -;Y> ^ * / ' 

V ' i ♦ ‘ 

r: v- 

' . ' . 



By Michael Seely 

12.45 Playschool. 3.05 Frenchmans Fancy. 


Going: soft 

12-45 BROADWAY NOVICE CHASE (£3,876: 3m IQ (7 runners) 

101 0/21F HMTER CITY (C)(H Handel) H Handel B-J 1-8 Was H Handel 88 12-1 

102 00-1FIF PLAYSCHOOL (RCotHB)DBaona 8-1 1-8 1 PHtaMb «99 F5-4 

104 014-40 GRAGARA PRIDE (J Foynton) P O'Connor 9-11-0 R Bagoan 75 15-1 

107 0-41102 tO UMMO ( Lady Harris) G BakBng 6-1 1-0 Q Bradley — 7-2 

108 42F433 LAKEFIELD (J Bufcovets) J Bukcwets 7-11-0 S Cusack 8016-1 

111 00400-3 STAR OF SCREEN (R McAQm) J Edwards 6-11-0 0 Browne 84 10-1 

112 303/0-11 THE HAOBOEROS (Mrs BCurtey)B Curley 7-1 1-0 DMupfcy 91 5-1 

1886: CROSS MASTBI 9-11-0 R Crank (9-1) T Bfl 10 ran 

wraonetos (1 1-8) on a ttote after beaftig Cunwew (1 1-2) by a tengm at Ungfieid (2m 4». E1486. soft: Dec 

Sciecte PLAYSCHOOL 



'Ml 




The champion jockey, Peter Scudamore, seen here winning on Moo-Dafa at Haydock, 
shows the power and determination which has pot him ahead In this season’s tide race 

Modest Scudamore keeps his 
title ambitions in perspective 


1-20 FAIRFORD HANDICAP CHASE (£4,149: 2m) (6 runners) 

5” PEARLYMAHJCD.BntMre P Straw} J Edwards 7-12-7 (Sex) P Barton 9BRS-2 

®0111/ TOWNLEY STONE (11) (Mm M Townley) N Henderson 7-11-11 _ S Satti Ecctee 98 4-1 

203 P-U4223 MUSK ) BE M AQC (CO) (N Mason) G W Ritarards 7-1 1-Z p Tuck •9811-4 

M4 13221-F RQADSIEH (CO) (C Nadi) C Mash 8-1 1-0 RDitnrady 98 7-2 

208 1F2400 CLAY HHJ- (IQ (P Durkan] J Giffaid 7-10-7 EMraphy 90 10-1 

210 011132 HOPE BB (D) (Mrs Y Atoop) R Dieldn B-10-0 .. W Humphries (7) 84 12-1 

19BG: RORQUAL 11-102 J Bryan (33-1) Mrs M RimeS 6 ran 

t^L 4 ^gooO « «nW! better Judged on p revious 
f2 rn,g711 9.good tosoft, Nov 29. 7 ran). ROADSTER 
n»*) oest cpMiderBd onfirai start of last season when beating Norton Cross (10-2) 3 here (2m. £4862. 
Apr 16, 8 ran). HOPE BO (1 1-7) 71 2nd to Cota Portar(U-7] at Huntingdon pm, Elffll , saftCtec26. S 

SetocttoE MUSIC BE MAGIC 


33 ERNEST ROfflfKON HANDICAP HURDLE (£2^55: 3m) (17 runners} 

502 12/43-01 MOOB. PURL (D)(Mbnd&TreacyConstr Co Ud)OOTIea 6-11-7- SJOWeM 

503 0-40RRJ EMO FOREVER (RCD) (A McOuskey) M H EasWby 6-11-2 LWyw 

504 104-412 DAD’S GAWLE (BP) (C Ataxandar) R Fniier S-11-1 HMtagtwr 

506 122-2 FRENCHMANS FANCY (B^ (R Jenks) N GaseM 5-10-13 D Browne 

507 FP24/4P- stLBrr MEMBER (Mrs D Stamp) G Gracey 11-10-12 RBeggan 

508 POP-4BO CELTIC CRACXEH (CD) (P Evans) RHartop 8-104 P Warner 

509 0-03424 VELESO (T Fordo) J King 8-10-7 SMcNea 

510 13POOP SUPER EXPRESS (B) (S Watems) D VWntie 5-104 Has T Davis (41 

511 OQ/OIP-O SHOEMBCER (P Rodtod) P Rodtod 9-103 CGroy 

512 FO0/2OO GENBMLCHHYSON(M Feraticos) J Giftoti6-10-2 EMraphy 

513 414400 DEW (C) (Kestrel Cases Ltd) R Holder 5-10-1 NCoteman 

515 01/0 RANCHB? (A fflf) L Keranrd 5-100 BPowel 

516 OOF1-0 SHSI STSL(D)(Staei Plata A Secbons Ltd) PCundel 6-10-0 — PSeudamera 

617 OZrPOOO BLACKWBL BOY (Triam South Weal Ud) A James 5-tOO — 

S18 P/OOPOO FARMER (RHanhsOR Hawker 11-100 EMM 

521 41P/0Q1 DOWNTOWN CHICAGO (A Brewer Pknbg Ud) F Jordan 6-100 CSatitt 

522 P0000- DM DRUBS (I Btek) I Kair 7-KW) P McDennott (7) 

1966: MICK’S STAR fr-11-2 P Tuck (4-1) M W Easterby 14 ran 

CnpM HODB. PUPR. no-71 ^ tuned hi an excetent effort to beet in-form Spiders Wb« (1( 
runm Ctiepetov witti BLACKWELL BOY (10-3) a distant 9tti (3m. BB9S0. soft, Nov 29. 14 
FOI«VER has been Osappointing over fences. DespAa Using a sketchy hunter had good farm in 
tost season, partioteriy (10-7)a & 2nd to Motivatv (10-71 here at the Festival meeting (3m If. £13! 
Mar 12, 31 ra nj . FRENCHUAITS FANCY (1^4) had KNERAL OAtYSM (1 OO) 8 K I b»Tvi 59) wfn 
RedRodcy (10-4) at Sandowi (2m 5f. £3^5. good to soft. Nov 29. 18 ran). SUPER EXPRESS, atac 
that occasion, showed better tom when (10-0) 221 5dt to irtander (10-0) at UnafleW (2m 41. £1236 


«4 re-i 
• 99 7-1 
91 11-2 
91 6-1 
— 26-1 
8710-1 
90 12-1 
90 25-1 
98 20-1 
9014-1 
8912-1 
— 20-1 
82 8-1 
9 38-1 
— 14-1 
6816-1 
-33-1 


1 tuned to an excetent effort to beet to-tom Spiders WbI ( 10-1) 1541 at 
BKWELL BOY (103) a detam 9tti (3m. E695CL soft. Nov 29. 14 ran). EMO 
over fences. Despite being a sketchy hunger had good farm to hanacaps 
2nd to Motivator hO-7) here at the Festival meeting (3m If. £13958. good, 
MOT M (M) had KNERAL CHRYtoN (1 00) 8K I b«£to 58) Wtien a &d to 
51. £3275. good to soft. Nov 29. 18 ran). SUPER EXPRESS, also to rear on 
when (104) 22f Silt to Inlander (10-0) at LtogMd (ten 41, £12367, good to 
L. needed raoe on reappearance, and is Denar (edged (11-05) on a XI win 


12.31 ra rri.FRENOIMAIfSFANCT (10-4) had GENERAL CHRYSON(1 0-0) 8KI back in 59) when fit 
Rocky (10-4) at Sandowi (2m 5(. £3^5. good to soft. Nov 29. 18 ran). SUPER EXPRESS, also tor 
Kcasion. showed better tom when (10-0) 22f Sdi to Inlander (10-0) at Ltogflald (ten 41, £12367, gi 
Mar 15. 16 rari). SHEER STEEL, needed raoe on rempaarance. and is benar (edged pi-05) on a' 
Cawies CtovnjVMO) at Ctnpetow (3nr, £1130. son. Mar 15. 20 ran). 


soft. Mar 15, 16 rah). SHEER STEEL, needed race on reappearance, and Is better tod 
ow Ca wi e s 81 Chepetmr (3rn, £1130. son. Mar 15. 20 ran). 

&40 WOODMANCOTE NOVICE HURDLE (£2^0: 2m) (IS runners) 


1-55 SPA HURDLE (£2£91: 2m 41) (6 runners) 

303 322/012- CHMSON aBB8(B£) (Mrs S Smart) PWMwyn 11-11-12 SShBstoo 98 3-1 

306 11211-4 FOIE'S PEAK (CD) (Lord Soames) N Henderson 5-11-8 SSmtBiEcckn 97F9-4 

308 111QF4I RIVA ROSE (W Gaff) Mrs JPttrnan 5-11-4 U Pitman 87 12-1 

310 30-330 2 SHE ER GOLD (D) (lady Harris) G Saldtog 8-11-3 G Bradley *99 3-1 

311 02002-3 CATS EYES (E) (T Ctwxter) M Pipe 6-1 1-0 P Leach 85 9-2 

312 01210ft/ CUT A DASH (D) (D Larfce) Mrs N Smith 7-1^ 1-0 C Brown — 8-1 

188ft CORPORAL CLINGER 7-11-12 P Leach (8-1) M Pipe 9 ran 


2T.£S74( _ _ _ _ 

PEAK (11-10) 1 '41 away 4tti at wSve rira mpi o i i (2m 


UlSrd toSabtodir 
to soft. Nov 24. 5 


Glodm(l1-^at 
Loir (10-12) with 
ran). CATS E YE 

no-10) at Sandown In 1984 an. £7293. firm. No* X a ran). ' ' 




Z3Q OLD YEAR HANDICAP CHASE (£4,612: 4m) (11 runners) 

401 0011-04 WEST TB* (C3 ( P Luff) M Otver 9-12-0 RDraiweody 

402 R21-24F PUMOWOfC) (Mrs M Vatentine) F Wtater 9-11-4 P Scudamore 

403 3/2102-3 ELMBOY (C) (W Mawle) W Mawie 8-10-13 C Brown 

404 P/34010 LUCKY VANE (CD) (Miss B Swire) G BakSng 11-109 J Frost 

405 30P-200 KUMBI (0(0 Lunt) D McCain 11-10-7 S Mershead 

406 IP-0410 KNOCK MLL (CO) (P Thompson) J Webber KK10-O GMemagh 

407 1-34030 WHY FORGET (PPOer)W A Stephenson 10-100 CGrant 

406 P0-422U BEWERSON (P Duiosee) P Dufosee 8-100 BPowel 

409 B114-32 NO PARDON (BF) (A Hobbs) P HoCbs 11-10-0 Peter Hafaba 

410 32W>-11 GREBiflANX PARK (R PBridns) S Christian 9-104) (Sax) RBeggan 

412 O4P/0-4O VUUKHTTS PIE (Mrs H Dawson) Mra H Dowson 9-100 J Sathem 

1986: KNOCK HM 10-10-1 G Memagh (12-1) J Webber 8 ran 


91 7-1 
94 6-1 
9512-1 
S7F4-1 
• 99 10-1 
93 9-1 
88 9-1 
9614 -1 
M 14-1 
80 9-2 
— 50-1 


601 22111 KEYNES (D) (D Dodson) J Jenkins 8-11-12 RDrawnody 

602 11 BfTUmaat(D) (A Spence) RAfeetant 4-1 1-8 Dale McKaown (71 

607 20 DOWJAK (Maj H Porter) Mrs M Rmefl 5-11-0 PScudaaw re 

609 OPP- nflSULY M98BER (R KaaAar) R Hawker 4-11-0 MrD WMaaa(7) 

610 M GOOD SAMARITAN (Lady Watos)RGo* 5-11-0 C Brown 

611 00430F/ GREAT SHADOW (Q (J Brtorots) J Bufcovett 8-1 1-0 S Cusack (7) 

615 MY KKALONG (Alton Ltodtad) J Gtftord 4-11-0 Eton*? 

616 RBMAIUEY (Mrs G Balding) G Baking 4-1 1-0 G Bradley 

817 D SCMMI OF MUU. (I Steers) PBetey 4-11-0 

620 TB£MASHQS(Mss A WtutfieW) J WWBekJ 4-11-0 SMcMeM 

624 FDO/POP TOUWiAUBfT LEADER (D Marks) Olteks 6-1 1-0 S Nonhead 

625 MAIHEA0S JOY (0 HobdeO Bfcjg Lid) N Henderson 6-100 SSnWhEcctea 

826 MARITA ANN (Mrs S Anderson) J Webber 5-1 0-0 Gtonndi 

627 24) vtPSAiflA (BF) (M Meade) Mrs M RlmaS 5-10-9 D Browne 

628 11 TIV1AN (Lady Matthews) I V Matthews 6-11-8 NON-RUNNB) 

1986: MRS MUCK 5-109 P Scudamore (14-1) N Twiston-Davies 18 ran 

FORM™ 

(11-6) had something n 
DOWJAK, unplaced on 
(dn. £1249. mm, Nov 5, 

%L victory aver Alaska 
Selection: INTUmON 


98 F9-4 
• 99 3-1 
83 8-1 

— 33-1 

— 33-1 

— 33-1 

— 10-1 
— 11-2 
— 20-1 

— 33-1 

— 33-1 

— 12-1 
— 33-1 

8014-1 


As the jumping season 
reaches the halfway point, Peter 
Scudamore goes to Cheltenham 
today with only a narrow lead 
over Mark Dwyer, his nearest 
challenger. The champion joc- 
key is more than happy with his 
progress, his sole reservation 
being that be mmU like to have 
ridden more winners for Fred 
Winter. 

“Fve had a mar vel tons nm on 
horses from outside the yard, 
particularly for Martin Pipe,” 
Scudamore said. “But I'm hop- 
ing for a bit more luck on Mr 
Winter's horses In the New 
Year- Hie stable is stOI not 
really firing.*’ 

Scudamore is not yet thinking 
about the championship itself. 
*Tw cracked the 60-winner 
mark and my next target is 70. 
IPs aO a matter of good fortnne 
and staying sound so well see 
how things are going in April." 

He speaks from painful 
experience. In April, 1982. be 
had ridden 120 winners and was 
apparently cruising to his first 
title when he broke his arm in a 
fill at Southwell. Only the 
generosity of John Francome, 
who caught him hot deliberately 
did not pass him, allowed him to 
share the tide. Bat, by then, 
Francome had already been 
champion three times; Dwyer is 
younger and hungrier. Scnda- 


By John Dorman 
more agrees: “TIT certainly have 
a job to keep Mark out.” 

In Scudamore's opinion, there 
is certainly no shortage of good 
jockeys around at the moment 
and he quotes Hywd Davies, 
Richard Dunwoody and Steve 
Smith Fxvto$ as s hining < * tam - 
ples. “I was jast tacky eaoqgfa to 
get a bit of a rim on the others at 
the start of the season,” 
Scudamore said. “Simon Sher- 
wood, for example, had a dis- 
appointing start-” 

Scudamore also rates Graham 
Bradley as one of the best of the 
current crop. u t think Brad is 
riding exceptionally well this 
season hot he can’t do the tower 
weights, otherwise be would bea- 
serious challenger." 

He also feels that there are 
several jockeys who simply don’t 
get the right opportunities. 
“Seamus O'Neill, for example. 
He's always ridden well bat 
doesn't get the chances he 
deserves,** Scudamore said. 

With his retainer from Fred 
Winter, and several other fram- 
ers and owners vying for his 
services, Scudamore often has 
the pick of the best horses. 
When Winter was without a 
runner in the King George, fur 
example, the champion's ser- 
vices were snapped up by Nick 
Gaselee for Bolands Cross, on 
whom he finished an excellent 
third. 


Jnst up from novice class, this 
young chaser greatly impressed 
Scudamore. “Bolands Cross ran 


Scudamore. “Bolands Cross ran 
very very well in the King 
George bat I think he's even 
better than that. He mil prob- 
ably have tiro more runs now 
before going for the Gold Cup “ 
The horse is currently quoted at 
12-1 for Cheltenham. 

Among Winter's horses, 
Scudamore is looking forward to 
riding Plundering in die fom- 
mfle chase today (although he 
believes West Tip will be hard to 
beat) and, later in the season. 
Baiun Sunshine. 

“Bgjan Sunshine win run at 
Leicester on New Year's Day 
bat he's really a spring horse. I 
believe he’ll become a decent 
chaser but he likes a bit of sun 
on his back. We also have some 
very good novices in the vard 
and I particularly like the look 
of Admirals AIL" 

Of his outside rides, Scuda- 
more was very impressed with 
Martin Pipe's High Kaowi, on 
whom he won at Chepstow 11 
days ago, and Peter Easterly's 
Nohalmdun. Although Floyd 
was upsides him when falling at 
the last at Kempton on Sat- 
urday, Scudamore had scarcely 
moved a muscle on Nohafandmi 
and believes be would have won 
anyway. 



Results from yesterday’s three meetings 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 


JOCKEYS 



Winners 

Runners 

Percent 


Winners 

RUes 


RFrsher 

5 

23 

21.7 

D Browne 

8 

36 

22.2 

J Jenktos 

8 

40 

20i> 

PTuck 

8 

42 

190 

FWrter 

40 

206 

19/4 

CGrant 

7 

45 

15.6 

FWalwyn 

20 

142 

14.1 

SSMston 

5 

33 

15.2 

G Rtcfiafds 

a 

58 

13-8 

G Bradley 

9 

85 

13.8 

MH Easterby 

9 

69 

1&0 

P Leach 

5 

44 

11A 


Worcester 

Going: heavy 

1245 (2m hOg} 1. MAUNDY BOY (M 
Bosley. 11-2^2. True Spartan (C Price. 4- 
5 fay); 3. Only Trouble (Mr T HouKxooke. 
9-1). ALSO RAN: 12 Fort Aguada («h>. 
Danny's Luck (5th), 16 Kiwi Lad (4th). 20 
My Purple Praze. 25 Saint Mato (pu). 33 
Kmbrd. Stanrtas (pu), VHIacana. 50 Best 


8 Ungfietd Lady (pu). 9 Fe Vic (4th), 12 Mr- 
McGregor. 14 Rhode Island Red (6thL 16 
Cherrmood Rose (I). 20 Kafanpona. 11 
ran. S, 3L 15L (fist, hd. J Fffich-Hews at 
Lewes. Tote: £5-20; £2.10. El .50. £3.40. 
OF: £10.70. CSF: £29.77. Tricest £259.90. 
Winner bou£H In lor 1.600gr». 

2J)j3m 11 ch) 1. DELATOR (R Suonge. 
S-1£ 2. Mount Feddane(C Mann. 14-15 3, 

Daroal (Mr M Aimytsge. 9-1). ALSO RAN: 
11-4 lav Mr Csndy (1), 94 Answer To 


14 ran. 41. a*, iki. fi Holder at Bristol 
Tote: £5.00; £1.80. £2.00, £3.50. DF- 
£11 30-CSR £28.84. 

2.15 (2m If ch) 1. ATATAHO (S 
Morshead. 7-2); 2. DooUaton (B Powell, 
a waftmlPeMF Hobbs. 13* lav). 
AjLSORAN;6G ringo( pu). 16 Mood Music 


LEICESTER 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


1.00 Smith's Gamble. 
1 .30 Career Madness. 

2.00 Claude Monet. 


2.30 Bird Of Spirit. 

3.00 Ivy League. 

3.30 1 Wonder When. 


Michael Seely's selection: 2.00 YOU'RE WELCOME (nap). 

The Times Private Handicapper’s top rating; 1 .00 SMITH’S GAMBLE. 

Going: soft (chase course); heavy (hurdles) 

1.0 PYTCHLEY NOVICE HURDLE (£1.739: 2m) (20 runners) 

2 1 SMnTOGA*mLE(to(ASmtth}MrtJ Pitman 4-11-4 MPnren 993 

3 0- ARCTIC BARD (T tffragg) D WSams 5-10-12 R Crank — 

6 CELTIC SHOT (D Horton) F Winter 4-10-12 J Duggan — 

8 FO HASTY MVER(K Britten) J Old 5-10-12 C Ueueflyn (7) — 

9 MALAMJflM (J Gaivanoni) O Sherwood 5-10-12 — C Cox — 

11 ft MORTHEHH GAMBLER (T Hanvninijy) $ 4-in-12i GUmfllluM) 87 

12 U-04Q30 OLD FORD TAVBM (O Donnelly) J Jenkins 5-10-12 FLeavy S3 

14 OVER THE SLANEY(H Mo) F Writer i»1(M2 BdeKaan — 

18 PROFESSIONAL VIEW (P SB Racing Lid) PCftartton 5-10*12 M Dwyer — 

19 PP SEAL COURT (Mrs M Gtea) J ScWtan 4-10-12 MFMong — 

22 0 TRUE JACK (R Rpei) G Ttiomar 5-10-12. — — 

24 P WORSTCA0 TYCOON (J B«S} M TonpHns 5-10-12 J Bartow — 

26 800(H)0 CELTIC MARY (A QodnchlJ Spearing 8-1D-7 PDevar — 

a CHMSON MOON (T Kersey) T Karssy 4-10-7 i Sumn Kersey (7) — 

30 GOUSN BAZAAR (K Ptofeld)J Cocgrave 4-10-7 TPkifidd(7) — 

31 0 MGH RIVER (F Lees) P C Lem 4-10-7 PCcxifgan — 

32 PP0-60D KHARAB BB1 (F Sron-BarratQ R DUdn 5-10-7 C Jones — 

PHI WOR TH GR ANGE (CPaakfl) Mrs A HflfWIR 5-10-7 M WSams 

PROCESS SABU(Exora of lattM^H Scudamore) M Scudamore 4-10-7 ASbarpe 

OOF-0 ROSE CORE (M Smrth) Mra P Sty 4-10-7 M Bastard 

1965: Meeting a bandoned - >n»t 


2-0 LEICESTERSHIRE SILVER FOX HANDICAP CHASE (£3.661: 2m 4f) (4 runners) 

1 17IIIBO- YOU’RE WELCOME (C)(S Embtoeos}J Otordl 0-1 MO R Rowe 90 4-1 

3 3813-02 R«STY FORT (OJ3F) (J Sumner) T Forster 8-11-2 HDavtea 9SF7-4 

4 20/04-32 CLAUDE MONET (D) (T Wfirttey) D Gandotto 8-10-0 HDwyar • 99 2-1 

5 121B2-0 MANNA REEF (D) (K Al-Sakft J Ecrivards 8-10-0.-. Mr M Mdnrris (7) 89 8-1 

2-30 QUORN NOVICE CHASE (21 ^66: 2m) (8 runners) 

1 2104712 BKtD OF SPIRIT {CS.B8) (E PraM) M Scudamora 6-1 1-12. ASbarpe U99 F6-4 

2 004 AVON VAl£(P Locke) PCundafl 5-11-4 tb S Cowtoy (7) — 4-1 

t “AOlEOFJAZZIKBrmanjJOtoS-lW CLtawaiyn (7)* 88 5-1 

t E ASBr Oia£ M (J Oxtos) j Cbugg B-11-4 M Bowftiy (4) — 16-1 

? ^SEN WOGE (Unicoi Group Hoktirap Lid) S Mater 7-11-4 MHraitogttm — 10-1 

9 00-2FFO KITTINGER <H JoeO A Tumafl 5-11-4 SWwKrdgM 98 8-1 

™ Wff >CTHBl WALLOP (Miss S Wetber) J Webber 9-11-4 MJnfttos -12-1 

DDnEn I e liii P ii in r*. m . * 


■ Stev e KnlglK 

... . “iv l"—- ' “ iraum j-l M Jnftlns 

14 PF22F0 LE MARSH (R Steward) J Seaton 9-10-1 3_ M Furlong 

3.0 GALLOWTREE NOVICE CHASE (£1.943: 3m) (11 runners) 

2 0Mri3 Fireworks night (CD£F) (j Rosa) N Handeraon 7-1 w M5aw&y{4) 

3 POPP-1 IVY LEAGUE (J HuteNnton) J Giflard 6-1 1-4 R Rowe 

6 0P4 DOREEN KING (G P S Pnnt Ltd) S Meter 5-10-12 MKraringtoa 

11 RENOWN (Dewfresh Mushrooms) J Jenkins 6-10-12 M Dwyer 

12 4QQP-0P LE SARTH01S (B) (B Lay) B Lay 9-10-12 Mr L Lay (7) 

16 F/00033- MY MAJOR (Mrs G Godfrey) P W Hams 7-10-12 RStronga 

17 MO-RK HEP LAWLESS (Mrs M Rtoiadsor) J Old 6-10-12 CLtowetonm 

19 P00C3 -3 OCSHD BAY (B) (R Sims) Mra J Pitman 9-10-12 , C Mm 

21 22032-3 REDOOWN (Mrs H Haynes) R Amtytago 8-10-12 Mr M Armytage (7) 

24 vmc*CK (G CfieetKra) D waiamsTio-iz _TdwS™ 

28 420ff4) PENNY FALLS (G Dock) Mrs C Dook 7-10-7 DSMw 

3^0 MIDLAND HANDICAP HURDLE (£940: 2m) (15 runners) 

1 22010/0- PEHTPAIN (D) (Mrs S Minns) Mrs J Pflman 5-12-0 M 0*C*te(tfw (7) 

3 UP4004 SMENIONWAY(D)(MHafcey)JJeiddns6-11-4 !_MDwJ|r 

4 00/0040 ROYAL MANX (D) (Bryn Paflng LM) B Patoig &-11-4 C Ev*» IQ 

6 13fP (D) (Mrs J MoMarion) B McMahan 9-1 1-0 Mr E McMahan (7) 

l Q Wee 5-11-0 Mr M Price (7) 

6 0301-00 EM>QFTHEROAO(D)(KPBrretqJPaneR 6-11-0.,^ R9toxn 

l 1 «W0M ^ Bedworth) K Bndgwater 8-10-13 W VtaSSS 

12 04-1000 FINALS SEPT (CD) (Mrs JGobigs)H Fleming 8-10-10 — 

'1 2SS5» l 2w^?™ Breuoumo) a Briaeowrw 11-10-10 M BriatMaroe 

15 00-0004 SAUNSON BOY (B4J) (T Htejack) J P Smrtti 6-10-fl - G Landau (41 

18 01M30 BLUE SPARWE(R Fry) J Oto 5-1M CUewMynm 

IB PP4I043 SHPWRIGHT (D) (R Bamsey) M O'NeU 5-104 

19 48PM0 WHAT WU I WEAR (D) (Mra P Speer) R Spicer B-1 0-1 SKteiMey 

20 03/DP03 HAZEL NUT (M Banks] M Banks sW 0 iS 

21 30FHJ0 StMNY REEF (K DowdesweS) J Cosgrave 6-10-0 TPtoHehl (7) 


• 99 FH 
— - 20-1 
— 12-1 

— 14-1 

— 6-1 
87 5-1 
S3 12-1 

— 7-1 
-16-1 

— 33-1 

— 20-1 
-25-1 
— 16-1 

— 33-1 
-25-1 

— 2S-1 

— 25-1 
-33-1 

— 25-1 
93 10-1 


1.30 HOBY SELLING HURDLE (£794: 2m) (14 runners) 

4 TO- BUNGfflEU£(PLee)CFLM4-11-2__ 

5 0020 RELUCTANT GFT (D Gandotto) D Gaidoifo 4-11-2 — 

7 0002 VULGARS (Top Indusind Manfg LM) P Davte 4-11-2.. 


— J A Harris 

C Evens (4) 

H Bowtoy (4) 

~ Tract Turner (7) 


• 99 7-2 
84 F3-1 

8814-1 

93 B-1 
6320-1 

94 16-1 
97 7-1 
— 7-1 
9310-1 
-25-1 
80 20-1 


Mrs I McKie at Twylord. Tata; £7.60: 
£280. £1.10. £320. DF: £6-40, CSF: 
£10.02. 

1.15 (2m eft) 1. MZ(D Browne. 5-2 lav); 
2. Broad Been (J Bryan, 7-2): 3. Fare 
Leva (P Warner. 1MJ. ALSO RAN: 7-2 
MattredBB m. 15-2 Adaro ff), 20 Ctratses 
Island Mto). The Wetoer ffimj. 50 Oakland 
Jason (pu). 8 ran. 41. 1 a. a. 30. 1 Dudgeon 
rat Warminster. Tote: £3X0: £1.10. £1.80. 
£230. DF: £4.70. CSF: £10.48. 

1^5 (2m 21 hdle] 1. STTTTNG BULL (H 
Davies. 5-2): 2. Poets DayJJ Duggan, 11-8 
lav); 3. Track Mara h to i (O Wtoams. 5-1). 
ALSO RAN: 7 Raleigh Gazelle (5to). 9 Its A 
Laugh (pu). 12 La Ctiarmtt MtoL 33 
Warrior Unde (6th). 50 Charlie Burton. 8 
ran. 2KL 201. 15L 3L 4L J Jenfcns at 
Epsom. TOM: £3.70: £1^0. £1.6ft £2,10. 
0^£2Sa CSF: EB.98. No ML 

2.15 (3m di) 1. BROWN TRDC (P 
Scudamore. 11-10 favj; 2, DMnt (G 
Mernagh. 3-lk 3. BaabM ud (R 
Dimwoody, 5-1). ALSO RAN: 7 Master 
(uri. 16 Brawn's Star (ft. 5 ran. 8i. dfsL F 
Whiter at Lamboum. Tote: £1.80: £1.10, 
£1.40. DF: £420. CSF: £4.40. 

245 (2m 41 d» 1. BBUVBR PRINCE «3 
Landau, 7-2 K-tav); 2, Uanpadrig (M 
Bowtoy. 7-2 |(-tev): 3. Roving Glen (G 
Mernagh. 10-1). ALSO RAN; 7-2 jHbv 
N ew Song (4tt). PoBShm. i2Genera! 
Breyfax (fflh), 16 Exclusive rat (pu), 33 
Asrrid (5tti>. 100 Brasnys Copse tau), 9 
ran. Nft Goto Tycoon. 151 20. 15L 9. 4LJ 
Bater at Thorton. Tote; E4.40: £1.50. 
£130. £250. DF: £5J0. CSF: £1185. 
Tricast £79.75. 

3.15 (2m hdle) 1. CHRISTIAN 8CHAD (A 
Wabb l 7^2.llteri80meker(ftCrank.2- 
1 fan* 3. Of* Bridge fP Scudamore. 1 1- 
2). ALSO RAN: 11-4 The Mttsssiftojan 
(4tiiL 6 Pride Hi (pu). 50 Remedy The 
Mabtoy (pu). Spue Kate (pu). 7 ran. 7L 
2)1. iSL O O'NdB a Cheltenham. Ton: 
£6.00; £3.0a £1.70. Dft SB. 20. CSF: 
£10.68. 

Pbeft w WlM 

Plumpton 

Going: heavy 

1JI (frn MM 1. SHAR TH BCd We 
McKaown. 4-1): 2 Canuck Own (G 


Prayer (ref to race). 13-2 Doubteuagato 
i-WiL 10 Saunders (6th). Mighty Disaster 

2/71. zs. I waroe at Wqhs. Totor £4_20; 
£1.60. EZ60. £1.80. DF: E98J0. CSF: 
£58-94. Tricast £538-84. Derycan (7-2) 
withdrawn, not ixxtar orders - rule 4 
■PPtes to all bets at tone of withdrawal, 
deductwn 20p in pound. 

IR GQtostein. 

3, Priok (M 


McKeown. 4-9 
\ 20-1). ALSO 
Miss Venezuela 
WHtow Gorge 

(f). 8 ran. NFfc 

rw'w Bay. 6L 12L 5). 101. H Oats at 
Carshdton. Tg*e: £5.70: 0.50. £1.10. 
0.90. DF: £3.40. CSF: £10.47. 

30 an di) 1. MANSION MARAUDER 
(Penny Ffttch41eyes. 4-9 fay); 2. Uncle Dai 
(Candy Moore. 12-1). MJ5Q RAN: 9-2 
Hanover Rrmce (ur). 5 Weaver-stake (ren. 4 

Pm Mte) 1. TOPSOIL (A Carrot, 


5 Mbs Never Hyde. 7 Celtic Honey. Tin 
<4 5L® And Paaoe. i2Hats 
Prtnc8.J3 Barrera Lad (Gto). Firs Chieftain 

MnLfiVEAR 

at Westburyon-Severn. Tote: 
OJOi O AO. £4.40. £2.70. DF; ££.70. 
CSF: £35.70. Tricast £660.87. 

Ptocepot £22.10 


Taunton 


10 

UO CAREB1 MADNESS (B) (Tflamsden) M Ryan 3-10-7 

JMcLougtriki 

— 9-1 





— 1B-1 





• 99F9-4 





-12-1 





— 15-1 


18 

03F TIBER GATE (R Hototehead) R HoBmshrad 3-HF7— 

0 Ctitewy’l (7) 

82 7-1 

N Henderson 

19 

20 

23 

030 CLAP YOUR HAlwJo (Mrs M Snaytsf) P Bevar 3-1 0-2 — 

FB DALBY GIRL (J Bantiaw) P Feiga» 3-10-2 . — s Johnson 

SPORTING PfDNCESS (tibs Brtdgwmor) K BnOgwater 3-HW . W WnriUtogton (7) 

— 804 
■—20-1 

j Edwards 

SMelor 

JJenkns 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 





Rate3 

For Cam 

32 

28.1 

18 

2 22 

30 

16.7 

32 

lft5 


■toon. 3-1 favt 3. Wnrorih (S Smto 
F ffl i a*. 6-1). ALSO RAN: 9-2 Uld; 
EuraBnk (upi 9-2 Flower Q f.Tft1w n. 26 
FormxteUe Lsdy (4th). New Banwt «hL 
Nice Business, 25 Hlgft Coven ©u), W 
Another Brno. Duke Of Anm t W» OF 
Cambridge, Farapour tou), Nawapotr 
(«h). Onavan.-UnitTenL Up Town Bov. 17 
ran. NR: EvesftelP Bulehera. RIB. X «. 
10L R Akefturet « Epsom. Tpte: £640: 
£2.60. £iaO. £1.40. OF: £11-80. CSF: 
E15JKL 

1J0 (an trie) 1, MANHATTAN BOY 


Going: soft 

12AS (2m II hdle) 1. FOREMAST {S 
MCNOAI. 12-1); Z Sheer Nectar (G 
Brettor.. 64 favV. 3. Tinas Lad (F Barton, 
33-1). ALSO RAN: 2 Otymjfc Eagto, 5 
Matetot Royal. 20 Gay GaaSe (eJiTcXff 
T&y (5th). 33 Royal Barks. 40 Fine Btoe 
(4m), Jdtown Lao (pu), Jane Crag (suL 
Mw Maid, Upham iQwwn. 13 tvl NFt 
Boto Fury. la. 101. IS. 41. 1L D Tucker at 
Crtompton. Tote: £16^0: £3.40, £1.20, 
aM-DFiEtlZO. CSF: £2956. 




PowML 11-2)*.2 

12-1); 3. Bootevard Roy (P Murphy. 3-1 
tev). ALSO RAN: 5 Gdden Azalia (&,). 6 
RepMRwe (6th), 7 Stftafc Dancer (pii), g 
Watentfath, 14 Robrob. 33 K 0 Island 
IBM, RuSSW (pin. Pates Special. Solent 
. 12 ran. A a, HL M/ah hd. R 

Hodges ai Somonon. Ttfa £550. £2.10. 
E33TCI.70. OF: £64.80. CSF. Eflij?! 
Wanar bought in ter ZOOOgns. 

1M (3m II ch) 1. THE THIRSTY 
FARMER (P Murphy. 10-1); 2, Dangerous 
Gane IK Mooney. 2-1 lav): 3, Air Space (B 
, Powell. 25-1)." ALSO RAN: 3 Our Whde 


Me Not (R Rowed/' 14-1). ALStfR^., 5 
Sotent Breeze ftxi). 6 Tame Duchess (6di). 


Kdcrsa Lad 
(49)).(mpou 


50 Fiytog Tenderfoot 
Master Brabtnger (pu). 


g-00. £1-5a £1.10. DF: £5.60. CSF:' 
£11.47. 

2AS (2m If ridfa) 1. LORD MURPHY (P 

SWStSSKZtt it 

16BManu. iwiMrt. 25 Coral HarSoi 
cn <P«>- Top Gold 

(Wi). 50 Iowa, Keep Satmtenng. 13 ran 
NR: Baton Match. XI. 2x1, w, fvii, hd pi 
Holder at Bristol. Tote: £1 7n 

£1-60. £9-80. DF: £15-40. CSF: £2078 
Tricast £698.07. 

115 ( 2 m If hdle) 1. FRENCH FLUTTER 

&2L^L§?SSS? W. 33 Archie's 

iw^?? e -^ Kteavoijr ‘ 

o«e Of Budapest Roberts Rower (pul 
Ta» Torn. 14 ran. 15L XI, zsl 20L 4L 

WowmartaL ToS: 

rap fctara ' ^ “■ DF: S9 ^- 

«*apoc £li0S 

Christian may close 

Simon Chrislian. the Lam- 
boura trainer, will decide today 
whether to temporarily close his 
stables because of a virus. 
Christian, disappointed with the 
runntng of Oregon Trail at 
Leopardstown on Monday and 
the poor performance of Olym- 
pic Eagle at Taunton yesterday 
said: -Oregon Trail linishiS 
very distressed. I’ve had a few 
horses coughing and I’ll eval- 
after Green- 
Dank Pant has run at Chelt- 
enham tomorrow. “ 

Charlet’s first win 

Newmarket-based French- 
man Claude Charlet saddled hi$ 
nrsi winner since lakine oui a 

when French Flutter won ai 
Taunton yesterday. 

Charlcl. who trains in Frank 
Durr's old yard, has 16 ho™ 
only three of them jumped "* 

Carlisle abandoned 

SS^B 5PSS- 

jaasr h —*-. i -sa£ 


4 wtl I ] 

\W" 

4 

i w * 


?' I 1 


• • . m ! * •: 

i v 1 i I 


1’ 


•* - 1 * 






v--; ar 


it: r 







^ . 

■v 


...» 

r’~ 

trj&rU . • ' - 
;V£/ 

*■ 




SlV_. . 

K v tss: - *•■• * 
’Vlc-.o 
\\ 

1 . *.\£ "i ’• V 

*>av. -■': 


■:v ’>■■ 





“ 5^ - 9L J\ 

vs*v- ' • 

**%.sJ*^ ‘ 

-- 

^ i 

' fj-.rVi 4i 


/’ 1 - ,4 '- ! Hzidocfc 

■. nxjf rait 

seps hfa , 


■ :; - ffwrf 
-kCwim 
'" U.r aij^ 
.'.* vs? rt a 
M: *31 pn *. 
■ "* "3» sm 


?’• Jmsa 
■* if Thirds 
■ 'fee far 

he 

- .’-bniB 

• "t ie !W. 


-. -/M rns if 
- [Ip 

•rw tat I 
*. - ™ £ 
. - . 51 « ?IB 
. ... h_‘t *)K 
. - us ;jri 

'■i; ra kofc 


STlih 
-;\-.»d mtb 
hi»«L ■ 
■ ._' t.p?;*" 11 

:.: Cx-urfj's 

■otftlaH 
,5 Sa- 
. ;.j oral* 
.. v hjiiaitai 
. •„ c»v *® 


^mes 

..... r ?.n3 


j-iTi'C “ 

• ; ; V* 1 




. ,n i- 1u - 


,v’ulf* 


... & 
■■■ ■-■■-.» 




■ nJ^ 




ATHLETICS 


Memories of 
heroes at 
reborn Welsh 
road race 

By Fat Botcher, Athletics Correspondent 


The athletics New Year 
sians with the quick and the 
dead. The quick are the pro- 
fessional sprinters at 
Edinburgh's Meadowbank 
Stadium, contesting the 100 
metres handicap, formerly the 
famous Powder hall Sprint, 
which began 1 1 7 years ago and 
is now sponsored by 

CarJsberg. 

The dead are in Uanwonno 
churchyard in Mid-Glamor- 
gan, where the legendary Guio 
Nythbran is buried. Guio, 
whose tombstone alleges the 
unlikely feat of winning a 12- 
mile race "7 minutes inside 
the hour” (after which he 
dropped dead) was the in- 
spiration for the Nos Galan 
New Year’s Eve race, through 
the streets of nearby Mountain 
Ash. It began in 1958. was 
discontinue in 1973 and is 
being revived this evening by 
the original organizer, Ber- 
nard Baldwin. 

Through the sixties and 
cariy seventies. Nos Galan, 
which is New Year's Night in 
Welsh, was one of the great 
folk events in British athletics, 
the precursor of the fun runs, 
with hundreds of competitors, 
including many of the current 
distance stars, contesting the 
four-mile event. 

Tony Simmons holds the 
course record of 17min 41 sec, 
which he set in 1971, and the 
Luton-based Welshman will 
be competing again tonight, 
although the likely winner is 
Hugh Jones, 

The police claimed undue 
traffic disruption in 1973 and 
refused further permission- for 
the event, although Baldwin 
claims that the underlying 
reason was the removal of 
local council power from 
Mountain Ash to Aberdare. 

Baldwin ackowledged yes- 


CRICKET 


Stevenson 

considers 

Northants 

By Martin Searfry . 

Graham Stevenson, aged 31, 
the former Yorkshire and Eng- 
land fast bowler, has been 
offered a one-year contract by 
Northamptonshire some three 
months after be was released 
following a dismal two seasons 
in which be bowled only 102 
first-class overs for his native 
comity. 

Stevenson, who played in two 
Test inarches and fonr limited 
over internationals between 
1979 and 1981, has been 
plagued by a groin injury bnt a 
medical has satisfied Northants 
ahont his fitness. 

Stevenson took 486 wickets at 
284E each in a career dating 
back to 1973, daring which be 
and Geoffrey Boycott entered 
the record books in a stand of 
149 for the last wicket against 
Warwickshire at Edgboston. 
Stevenson's nnbeaten 115 was 
the best score made by a man 
batting as a genuine number ] 1. 

He is alio considering an 
approach from Surrey and was 
yesterday mailing over the offers 
at his Ackworth home, where be 
is confined to bed with fin. While 

Stevenson contemplates a move 
south, Neil Mallender, the 
Northants fast bowler, is consid- 
ering an offer from Yorkshire 
after refusing a new contract. 

Six years . younger than 
Stevenson, Mallender was born 
near York and has taken nearly 
350 wickets since he made his 
first appearance in 1980 and 
many considered him an Eng- 
land prospect fast season. 

Boycott is to lose two more of 
his supporters on the Yorkshire 
committee. Peter Charles, of 
Rotherham, is standing down 
after six years, as is Roy 
l ckringiii, the man who toppled 
the former cricket chairman, 
Ronnie Barnet, in his Harrogate 
seat in the pro-Boycott landslide 
three years ago. 


Hundreds 
for Indian 
batsmen 

Nagpur (Reuter) - M o hinder 
Amamatb and Dilip Vengsarkar 
scored hundreds as India built a 
commanding lead against Sri 
Lanka on the third day of (he 
second Test here yesterday. 

At the close India had made 
324 for three, a first innings lead 
of 1 20. with Vengsarkar 1 1 5 not 
ouL Amamath, playing in his 
sixtieth Test, passed 4.000 runs 
in Test matches at the point 
when he had made 61, and 
reached his hundred in 354 
minutes. 

Amamath, who missed the 
drawn first Test at Kanpur 
because of an injury, had driven 
fluently in hitting 14 boundaries 
in his innings ofl31. 

Despite the loss of nearly five 
hours of play on Sunday because 
of rain mid bad light, India arc 
now strongly placed to win the 
match and go 1-0 up in the 
three-match series. 

Victory would also avenge 
their heavy defeat a week ago in 
the first of the one-day inter- 
nationals in Kanpur. 

India started out again at 54 
for one. Only two wickets fell 
during the day. Just before 
lunch. Raman Lamba drove de 
Silva to cover, and in the final 
session Amamath fell to a catch 
by Mahanama at mid-on off the 
slow bowling of Roshan 
Jurangpathy. 

Amamath. who batted cau- 
tiously during his stand of 126 
with Lamba, became more 
adventurous when Vengsarkar 
came to join him, and the pair 
had added 173 for the third 
wicket before their partnership 
foundered shortly before the 
dose. 

For the remainder of the day, 
Vengsarkar batted with Sunil 
Gavaskar who. having recov- 
ered from a fever, had dropped 
down the order. 


. THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 

YACHTING: NEW ZEALANDERS PROVE THEY STILL HAVE IRON IN THEIR SOULS 


SPORT 



IS 






lerday the help in reviving the 
event he has received in the 
last two years from Dave 
Bedford, the former 10,000 
metres world record holder, 
who was also a Nos Galan 
winner, as well as one of foe 
famous mystery runners. 

From 1964, an athletics 
celebrity would carry a torch 
foe four miles down foe 
hillside from Guto’s grave to 
start foe midnight race. That 
tradition is also to be revived 
with a reunion of mystery 
runners, including foe 1958 
winner. Stan Eldon, Lynn 
Davies, Derek Ibbolson, John 
Merriman, the sprinters, Ron 
Jones and Berwyn Price, and 
John Wheuon, who was seven 
times foe winner of foe Nos 
Galan mile, which used to be 
held earlier in the day. 

The laws at the time did not 
allow women and men to race 1 
together, but changes in recent 
years will permit Kirsly Wade, 
double Commonwealth gold , 
medal winner for Wales. 
Christine Benning and Julia 
Gales to line up tonight 
among the 600 entrants. 'But 
the most famous Welsh ath- 
lete of the present, Steve 
Jones, will not be running in 
this event or in Saturday's 
Mallusk cross-country event 

Jones slipped on ice while 
out training two days ago and 
is nursing a muscle pull. But 
several of Jones's middle and 
long-distance contemporaries 
in British athletics will be 
racing in different pans of the 
world. Tim Hutchings, Dave 
Lewis, a former winner, and 
Steve Binns will run in foe 
Madrid San Silvestre road 
race and Steve Ovett will 
compete in a road mile in 
Phoenix, Arizona, against 
John Walker, Steve Scott and 
Ray Flynn. 


MOTOR RALLYING 


Peugeot are favourites 
to win Paris to Dakar 


Versailles (AFP) - More than 
500 vehicles will set off tomor- 
row from the Place D'Armes 
here in front of the magnificent 
Chateau de Versailles at the 
siart of the ninth Paris to Dakar 
rally. 

Three weeks and 12.297 
kilometres later the World's 
longest rally will end on a 
tropical beach at the West 
African coastal capital after 
crossing the most inhospitable 
terrain Africa can offer. - 

The rally is a big test for 
drivers but it is better known as 
a jet-set event made famous by 
celebrities who failed to finish, 
among them. Princess Caroline 
of Monaco, her brother. Prince 
Albert, and Mark Thatcher. 

Bui tragedy struck las! year 
when six lives were lost: the 
Japanese motorcyclist, Yasuo 
Yaneko. was killed on the first 
stage and the Paris- Dakar cre- 
ator. Thierry Sabine, was among 
five killed in a helico'ptcr crash 
in a sand storm in Mali. 

No celebrities are involved 
this year but (he event has 
gained credibility as a worthy 
challenge with the entry for the 
first time of Peugeot, the world 
rally champions. The Peugeot 
205 T16 drivers, Ari Vatanen, of 
Finland. Shekhar Mehta, of 


Kenya, and Andrea Zanusst. of 
Italy, are considered 
overwhelming favourites. 
Range Rover. Mitsubishi and 
Toyota lead a strong challenge. 

Some 300 cars. ISO 
moiocycles and 60 trucks will 
start the race. In motorcycling, 
Honda. last year's winners, are 
said to have invested more than 
$1_2 million (about £8 10.000) in 
a new machine for Cyril Neveu, 
four limes a winner, and BMW 
and Yamaha will be their prin- 
cipal rivals. 

Tomorrow's first stage ends in 
Barcelona, where the teams will 
embark for Algiers. The African 
leg will open on Saturday. 
Guided by map and compass on 
8.294 kilometres of special 
stages, the competitors cross 
Algeria. Niger. Mali, Mauritania 
and Senegal before the finish in 
Dakar on January 22. 

Everton plan tour 

gverion have planned a two- 
wcek tour of Australia and New 
Zealand, starling from May -4. 
Thcv will play one game in 
Melbourne, and three in New 
Zealand, including a fixture io 
celebraic the centenary of the 
Auckland FA 






Second division 
players, first 
division citizens 


Jr -s 




: -V 


- 

3 


R M 


>>: r :'' ■’ 


v. 

- ' 


M ^ 


Rock V iroU: USA travelling faster than ever before — tat stBl not fast enough to defeat Stars and Stripes yesterday 

French demoralized by New Zealand 


From Barry PkkthalL Fremantle 


Dennis 

^ Conner's Stars 

W and Stripes and 

r New Zealand's 

A “Plastic- 

. Jm Fantastic”, 

skippered by 
the irrepressible Chris Dickson, 
both moved three up in their 
best-of-seven semi-finals yes- 
terday. However, with the winds 
increasing to 25 knots over the 
America's Cup course off Be- 
rn anile, French Kiss came close 
to halting the winning ways of 
New Zealand IV. 

The French-New Zealand 
maid) proved a real nail -biter 
with Dickson and his crew 
throwing away a commanding 
lead when their spinnaker pole 
end fitting refused to unlock as 
they came to douse the chute at 
the end of the first running leg. 

As the crew struggled to pull 
down the sail. Bench Kiss 
moved up on their transom, 
then tucked away towards the 
favoured lefthand side of the 
course. 

By now, the winds had in- 
creased from 18 to 25 knots and 
the New Zealanders found 
themselves straggling with a 
second problem — a mainsail 
too powerful for the conditions. 
“We got a weather update 10 
minutes before the gun and 
changed the sail but ended up 
struggling in foe 25 knot winds. 
.Tbc mainsail was flogging all the- 
way up that second beat,” - 
Dickson said ruefully when 
-admitting that their call fora sail 
change had been wrong. 

The “Kiwi-machine’’, which 
until yesterday had won all but 
one of its 37 matches, looked to 
be on the ropes for the first time 
since Conner drew blood 27 
races ago. Rounding the second 
weather mark 23 seconds adrift, 
foe New Zealanders failed to 
make up any ground on the 
ensuing reach and dropped a 
further second behind the 
French on foe next leg. 

Upwind again, they reduced 
the French Kiss advantage to 
within three boat lengths, but 
then lost all they had gained 
when foe spinnaker pole end 
fining, now destined for the 


garbage can, failed to open once 
more when the crew came to 
pull down the spinnaker. 

Their cursing was matched by 
foe glee on the feces of the 
French who thought this race 
was all but wrapped up as they 
began the final beat to the finish. 
But as Dickson pointed out 
later, “The opera's not over 
until the Eat lady sings." 

Proving to foe doubters that 
they still have iron in foeir souls 
as well as boat speed, foe New 
Zealanders then hit back in the 
most aggressive fashion, putting 
in 32 gut-wrenching tacks that 
ground foe French down. 

Throwing their yacht around 
every 50 seconds or so, Dickson 
and his crew steady reeled in 
their rivals who found them- 
selves increasingly hard-pressed 
to match both the New Zealand 
yacht's fast tacking ability or the 
stamina of her grinders sweating 
blood for a win on their 
wynches. 

The New Zealand pace was 
remorseless, nibbling away at 
the Bench lead with every tack, 
reducing the gap first to three 
boat lengths, then two before the 
distance between bow and tran- 
som could eventually be mea- 
sured in feet 

Finally, just a quarter of a 


mile from glory, foe French lost 
their honour when skipper, 
Mare Pajot, attempted a “slam 
dunk" tack timed to finally 
throttle New Zealand's wind. It 
failed, and as the white bows of 
foe ’’Plastic-Fantastic" edged 
ahead, foe New Zealanders per- 
formed a perfect luff driving up 
into French Kiss before Pajot, 
whose duty it was to keep clear, 
realized what had happened. 

“It was quite a bang," 
Dickson said. “Yes, we got the 
Kiwi kiss,” Pajot admitted when 
agreeing that he had been in the 
wrong. The French protested 
about foe contact but were later 


disqualified. 
From that 


From that point on tne race 
was won. The demoralized 
French were forced to tack away 
leaving Dickson and his crew to 
chalk up yet another win. 

By comparison, the Conner- 
Torn Blackaller match was a 
tepid affair, with foe petrol-blue 
hull of Stars and Stripes march- 
ing on in remorseless fashion 
ahead of foe twin-ruddered USA 
II to win by a 2min 23 sec 
mss&iL 

“We're going faster than ever- 
before,” a philosophical, tat not 
downhearted, Blackalier re- 
ported after falling 3-0 behind 
foe San Diego yacht. “We're 


Ex-Tension triumphs 


Hobart (Renter) — The Syd- 
ney sloop, Ex-Tension, mm the 
Sydney to Hobart race on handi- 
cap yesterday after an agonizmg 
five-boor wait while the only 
boat capable oT overtaking it 
sailed up the Derwent towards 
(be finishing line. 

In the end. Impeccable, need- 
ing to finish at five miaates past 
five yesterday evenmg to win on 
corrected tune, missed ont by 11 
minutes. Soothers Cross was 
third on handicap, giving the 
first three places in foe bine- 
water classic to Anstralian 
yachts. 

Bob BelTs Bermuda-based 
Condor took fine honours on 
Monday, with Rod Muir’s 18- 
year-old wooden maxi. Wind- 
ward Passage, second. 


Condor completed the race in 
two days, 23hr 26mm 25sec, 
outside the record of two days 
l4hr 36mm 56sec set by the 
American maxi, Kiakm, m 1975, 
hot only the third boat to finish 
inside three days. The overnight 
favourite for handicap honours, 
the Sydney boat, Another Con- 
cubine, lost any chance of taking 
the nice after encoantering very 


light winds. 

Ex-Tensioo, the new Lanrie 
Davidson production 36-footer, 
crossed foe fmish line soon after 
soon to replace Paladin, the 
iwimiM-ap leader opto foot poiw- 

At last report 59 yachts had 
finished the 630-mile race, 
which started from Sydney Har- 
bour last Friday, leaving 47 still 
racing and 17 retired. 


going faster than when we beat 
them in the third round-robin 
series, but Dennis has somehow 
found a magical iwo-tenfos of a 
knot extra upwind. The way we 
see it, it’s as if he has taken on an 
extra 2.000 pounds of lead 
somewhere." 

The committee must have 
thought so too, for Stars and 
Stripes and New Zealand IV 
both faced spot flotation checks 
foe moment they docked, but 
were later cleared by the 
scrutineers. 

Out on foe defenders course 
Kevin Parry's two Kookaburras 
provided a water spectacular of 
their own, but like professional 
wrestling, their matches always 
seem fixed in favour of foe good 
guys, this time Peter Gilmour 
and his crew on Kookaburra II 
performing a knockout “big 
daddy splash” over Iain 
Murray's Kookaburra III on the 
last leg to the finish. 

Alan Bond's Australia IV, 
known to ringsiders here as the 
“Mean Green Fighting , 
Machine”, moved to foe lop of 
foe points table ahead of Task 
Force 10 champion. Kooka- 
burra III, after beating Steak ’n' 
Kidney by 14sec yesterday. 

However, with nine protests 
still outstanding from earlier 
races on Sunday and Monday, 
last night's points table remains 
meaningless until foe inter- 
national jury work through this ■ 
backlog of litigation. 

DEFENDER TRIALS SEMI-FINALS 
Kookaburra 0 bt Kookaburra U. 50sec; 
Australa IV M Steak Kidney, 14sec. 

DEFENDER STAramGS 

Won Lost Pts 

AustrsSa IV 2S 9 65 

Kookaburra HI 27 7 58 

Kookaburra fl 20 T4 52 

Steak 'n' Kidney 4 30 IS 

• Points amended after successful pro- 
test by Steak n' Kkfciey agansi Kooka- 
burra II after Saturday's race. 

CHALLENGER SEMt-FWALS 
New Zealand bt French Kiss, d&t Stare 
and Stripes bt USA. 223 

CHALLENGER STANDINGS 
(Bast of seven races) 

New Zealand leads French Kiss. 30 
Stars and Stripes leads USA. 34) 

• Today and tomorrow will be 
lay days for both the challengers 
and defenders. 


DAVID MILLER gives his 
selecJion of ihe best sports 
books of /5iS6 

The year has provided one or 
two worthwhile books reprinted, 
or rather re-edited with updated 
introductions, which usefully re- 
mind ns of other eras when life 
was, if not better, certainly 
different. 

Eamonn Dtxnpby recalls what 
was, in his estimation as a player 
of that time, the golden age of 
football in the 1960s: not, how- 
ever, the first division of 
Charlton, Law, Best, Mackay, 
Gilzean, Moore and Peters, hot 
the second division with 
MUlwall at Cold Blow Lane. 

Only A Gomel (Viking, £&95) 
is dedicated by Dnnphy to “the 
good pro". By that he means the 
good sportsman, which in turn 
means the good citizen. The 
good pro is a trier; he accepts 
responsibility; both bis and, 
when the going gels tough, 
yours. Almost by de f i n ition, be 
is not the star of the team, yet 
also almost by definition he is 
the backbone which gives sport 
its most fundamental values. 


Equity will never 
be achieved 


There are good pros in the teal 
world outside sport, Dmpby 
says, bnt that is not necessarily a 
prerequisite to worldly success. 
Now a journalist in Dublin, be 
writes: 

“For the most part, the values 
espoused by the good pro will get 
you into trouble out here ... In 
the real world the thing to be is 
smart . . . Almost a decade after 
tearing. I understand better than 
ever that what distinguishes 
sport from the real world is the 
degree to which the sportsman 
has to have values and has to 
adhere to them ... 

“In the darkening world 
where foe shadows of violence, 
political expediency, materi- 
alism and junk culture grow ever 
larger, sport, as it is practised by 
its good pros, remains a bastion 
of decency, a place where virtue 
is rewarded and cheating 
exposed." 

* There is, Dnnphy says, no 
true dub ethos in footinlL There 
never was. “In the past, you 
could be a great player and never 
become rich: now you can get 
rich without being a great 
player. Equity has never be 
achieved, and never will be 
now." 

Donphy's diary of fun, pain 
and disillusionment with 
Millwall is simHltaneonsly 
affectionate and bitter, con- 
ditioned by a world in which 
people are used. 

He lunches a sens i tive part of 
my own memories, for Pegasus, 
the amateur dub which finally 
died in the 1960s, also had that 
beckoning romance of the organ 
grinder's time, that promise of 
good times which so often ends 
in frustration in team sports, 
because of the failure of people 
administering it. Dmtphy's book 
is essentially about people. 

C. B. Fky was an eccentric 
genius who travelled the globe 
applying, but for foe most part 
failing to use folly, his intellect 
and versatility. He was a 
remarkable man. “The ap- 
proach to Hollywood by way of 
the Sooth Sea Islands is as good 
as any other," he writes 
bizarrely. 

The Pavilion Library has re- 


issued Life H'orth Living, which 
gives a fascinating view of that 
period ai the turn of the century' 
in which sport was dominated by 
the amateur. 

Fry competed in cricket, foot- 
ball and athletics for Oxford, 
missing a rugby blue only 
through injury, set a world tong 
jump record which survived 21 
years, played Cor Southampton 
in the 1902 FA Cup Final and 
for England's full international 
team and scored 30,000 runs, 
including 96 centuries. His era 
at Sussex with Ranji was one of 
the glories of Edwardian cricket. 

He recounts the deeds of such 
legendary performers as Mac- 
Lareo, Baines and Spofforth. 
yet it is his tales of meetings 
with Hitler and Gandhi, of Fleet 
Street and of South Africa, that 
entertain, even if an often naive 
view partially explains his lack 
of real achievement in mature 
life. Alan Ross, in a new preface, 
probably accurately reflects that 
Fry was more wearing to listen 
to than to read. 

For 30 years Brian Glanrille, 
passionate since he was a boy 
abont football in general and 
Arsenal in particular, has or- 
ganized a fringe park team 
mainly, h is friends would say, so 
that he is assured of selection 
which otherwise he might be 
denied. With Joy of Football 
(Hodder & Staoghlon, £12.95), 
his revised anthology 20 years 
on from The Footballer's 
Companion, Glanrille is once 
again able to align himself as 
author with such as Camus, 
Nabokov. Priestly and Pinter. 

His self-selection as stylish 
wordsmith, as opposed to agri- 
cultural full bade, brooks no 
criticism. Both his well observed 
fictional writing on football and 
his able reporting have consis- 
tently helped fill the gap in 
British sporting literature which 
is not there in the more contem- 
plative games of cricket, golf and 
tennis. 

His reputation as foe most 
internationally known English 
football writer of his generation 
has been dolled only by an 
obsession with affairs Italian, 
though he has repeatedly and 
bravely attacked their corrup- 
tion of referees. 


Enduring sports 
reference book 


In his i nt roduction, Glanrille 
suggests that, for literate 
credibility, football does not 
need to adopt a defensive stance, 
though that, of coarse, is pre- 
cisely what he is doing. His 
anthology wOl, however, be one 
of the most enduring of literate 
sporting reference books, 
embracing -some 30 observant 
writers. 

Unfriendly Games, Boycotted 
and Broke (Mainstream, £4.95), 
by Derek Bateman and Derek 
Douglas, Is an account of a 
miserable, ineptly prepared and 
organized Commonwealth 
Games fortnight in Edinburgh. 

The authors, who are report- 
ers for foe Edinburgh edition of 
foe Glasgow Herald, have laid 
bare the chapter of disasters 
precipitated by a vain, incom- 
petent and often ignorant 
organizing committee, into 
which farce stepped, for reasons' 
of publicity more than altruism,' 
Robert Maxwell. Neither Peter- 
Heatly, the chairman, nor Mr 
Maxwell retain a shred of 
credibility out of Edinburgh’s 
embarrassing Games. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Topliss avoids ban in 
successful appeal 


A great horseman retires after 25 years at the top in three-day eventing 

Meade’s roll call of champions 


By Keith Mackfin 


David Topliss, foe veteran 
stand-offhalfback who has been 
in the game 19 years, yesterday 
appealed successfully to avoid a 
ban at a disciplinary committee 
meeting at Leeds. 

Topliss was sent off for the 
first time in a long and success- 
ful career playing for Oldham 
against Halifax, and after 
considering foe evidence foe 
committee ruled that foe send- 
ing-off was sufficient 
punishment 

The Halifax player. Ben 
Beevers. also escaped a ban, and 
he too wasgiven a ruling that his 
sending-off was sufficient 

Much less fortunate was the 
Widnes second row forward, 
Richard Eyres, who received a 
six-match ban for illegal use of 
the elbow in an A team game 
against Hull Kingston Rovers. 

• Oldham, who have already 


been hit badly by injuries, have 
received bad news concerning 
their French Moroccan full back 
or winger. Hussein M’Barid. 
Fol lowing his injury against 
Salford on Boxing Day X-rays 
and tests have revealed a de- 
pressed fracture of foe cheek- 
bone, which means that 
M*Bariri faces an absence of at 
least six weeks. 

He rs one of four first team 
players 10 miss foe New Year's 
day game at Leeds, while a fifth, 
the Australian centre, Gary 
Warnecke. is doubtful. 

The Oldham manager, Frank 
Myler, has shown interest in foe 
Widnes forward, Fred 
Whitfield, who is on the transfer 
list at £25,000. Whitefield, aged 
27. has not played this season 
because of his commitments at 
work and has asked Oldham to 
wait until foe New Year so he 
can think things over. 


SKJ-JUMPING 


Narrow win for Opaas 


Oberstdorf (Reuter) — Vegard 
Opaas, of Norway, claimed 
victory by the narrowest pos- 
sible margin in a World Cup 90- 
meire competition yesterday, 
foe first event in the Mimwi 
Four Hills scries. 

Opaas. in fourth place after 
the first jump, produced the best 
distance in the second round of 
106.5 metres to beat Thomas 
Kiauser, of West Germany, by 
jusi 0.1 points. KJauscr finished 
on 195.6 points with Andreas 
Felder, of Austria, third on 
191.6. 

Opaas, a winner at Lake 
Placid in America 1 7 days ago, 
moved back to the top of the 
World Cup standings with 89 
points — 11 dear of previous 
leader Ernst Vetlori. of Austria, 
who finished seventh yesterday. 

Two Austrian youngsters, 
Harald Rodlauer and Oliver 
Strohmaicr. had foe day's long- 
est leaps of 109 and 107 metres 
respectively in the first round, 
leaving them in first and third 
place and poised for a major 
surprise. 

But they failed to repeat foe 
performance on foe second 


jump. Strohmaier fell back to 
eighth and Rodlauer, who could 
only manage 98 metres, finished 
ninth. 

Eddie Edwards, aged 22. a 

S lasterer. became the first 
riton to compete in a World 
Cup event but his opening leap 
of 65 metres was the shortest of 
all the 1 10 competitors, 

Edwards failed to qualify for 
the second jump but had the 
satisfaction of recording the best 
leap ever by a Briton on a snow 
hill, beating foe previous marie 
of 61 metres set 55 years ago by 
Guy Nixon. 

PLACING& 1. V Open 
flump® ot 1WL5 and 1 
Rtausar 195£ 


(Switz). 191.1 
(EG), 189.5(1 




104): 3. a Fetter 
- 4, G Baianctie 
U Findataan 
6. M DeMak 
_ 7. E Vetturi 
8.0 Strohmaier 
h9.H nottuer 

10, J Pirikkonen 

11, T Pedersen 
12, J Bottom 


S 184a (106/102); 12, J BokJO®* 
, 182.4 (10551103); 13. H Sftanten 
181.6 (101/103); 14, 0 Gumar 
ftftstoei (Nod. 1&6 (102/102); 15. M 
NySanan {fin). 180.4 (1005/103}. 

WORLD CUP STANDINGS: 1. Opal 
BSpis; 2, Venal 78; 3. P Ufam (Yticj). SfcA 
Njrkaner 55; 5. Kiauser 54; 6. J massflog 
(EG). 53. 


"He is probably the best competitive 
rider we've ever seen" was the sum- 
ming-up of Major Derek AUbusen, the 
president of the British Horse Society 
following Richard Meade's announce- 
ment that he is retiring from three-day 
eventing. 

AUbusen. whose own horse 
Lauriesion, carried Meade to his great- 
est triumph, at the 1972 Munich 
Olympics where they won two gold 
medals, was referring not just to 
Meade's horsemanship but to his 
attitude. Determination and the ability 
to keep a cool head underpressure have 
made him an invaluable team member 
since his first appearance in 1964. 

His list of successes during his 25 
years in the sport is an eloquent 
testimony to his skill: three Olympic 
gold medals, three team European gold 
medals, two World championship ream 
gold medals, two Badminton wins and 
one Burghley success. He has competed 
in four Olympic games and would have 
equalled the record of Australia's Bill 
Roycroft by making it five, had it not 
been tor the boycott of the 1980 
Moscow Olympics. 

“I have had a wonderful innings," 
Meade said, “and with the retirement of 
Kilcadiel it seems appropriate to call it a 
day." The Irish-bred KilcasheL now 16, 
brought Meade his last major inter- 
national success when they won the 
team gold medal at foe 1982 world 
championships. 

It was with a horse called Barberry 
that Meade first attracted the selectors' 
attention. Having won Burghley in 1 964 
they were picked for foe Tokyo Olym- 
pics, where they led after foe cross- 
country, eventually finishing eighth. 
Barberry retains a special place ‘ in 
Meade's affections, not just because he 
carried him to the top but because be 
was the only world class horse Meade 
actually owned. 

For the rest of his successful career he 
relied on foe generosity of owners. Most 
notable among these was Brigadier 
Michael Gordon-Watson who lent 
Meade, at very short notice, his great 
horse Cornishman V for the 1968 
Olympic Games in Mexico. 

It was a measure of Meade's talent 
that, having never compered on foe 
horse before Mexico, he finished with 
the team gold medal and was fourth 
individually. After all" the top dass 
horses be has ridden Meade is quick to 
refer to Cornishman as the greatest 
event horse of all times. 


The Poacher, owned by the late 
Martin Whiteley gave Meade his first 
Badminton win in 1970 and, the 
following year, the second of his three 
European team gold medals. In 1972 
came foe moment of Meade’s greatest 



Meade: seeking new horizons 

triumph. He was offered foe ride on the 
AHhusen's home-bred Lauriesion and, 
after finishing second at Badminton, 
went on to win foe double gold medal in 
Munich. Meade remains foe only 
British rider to have won an individual 
Olympic gold medal. 

Single-mindedness was the key to 
Meade's success. At foe time he started 
eventing the British relied on their 
superior cross-country skills to stay 
ahead in foe spori. Meade, seeing the 
need for all-round prowess, went to 
Germany to train with foe dressage 
rider OttokarBohmann, in Munich, tor 
three months. 

From the start of his career he aimed 
for the top — thinking in four year cycles 
as he worked towards each Olympics. 
His determination to succeed and his 
love of the big occasion sometimes 


compensated for a less than top class 
horse. 

His feat in coming fourth individually 
on Jacob Jones — “Never a natural 
event horse" — at Montreal in 1976 was 
as great a tribute to Meade's horseman- 
ship as foe double gold four years 
before. Speculator, on whom he gained 
his second Badminton win in I9S2, was 
another difficult horse who, in Meade's 
determined hands, rose to foe occasion. 

His will to succeed may well have 
stemmed from the difficult ponies given 
him as a child. Brought up on his 
parents Connemara stud near Chepstow 
he remembers bis first pony as being 
“Welsh and uncontrollable — it took me 
two years to learn how to get foe better 
of him.” 

His childhood hero was the Olympic 
showjumper Col Sir Harry Llewellyn, a 
neighbour, and it was on one of 
Llewellyn's ponies that Meade, 
representing the Monmouthshire Pony 
Club won the cup for the best boy at foe 
Pony Club championships in 1954. It 
was to be foe first of many prizes. 

Although the showjumpers Harvey 
Smith and David Broome are still 
dominating their sport after a similar 
length of time, a 25-year innings is long 
by most sporting standards. 

Meade's span has witnessed enor- 
mous changes in eventing, charac- 
terized mainly by foe increase in 
sponsorship (be was sponsored by 
George Wimpey PLC for six years) and 
in the number of participants in horse 
trials. There were just over 1,000 
competitors in 1963 compared with 
more than 20,000 last year. But to 
Meade, the spirit of the sport— which be 
likened to that of foe sieeplechasiug 
fraternity — has remained foe same. 

Although he will continue to do some 
training from his farmhouse near Bath 
and will continue his involvement with 
the development of the sport he has 
already set his sights on new horizons. A 
director of Chepstow Racecourse and of 
Equestrian Management Consultants be 
is now looking for new business 

opportunities. 

He savs it will be difficult to replace 
foe excitement of three-day eventing 
where he has always had a goal in mind. 
But he loves a challenge and one senses 
that his competitive spirit will not be 
idle for long. 

Jenny MacArthur 



v-iW* 


SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


RUGBY UNION 


Not even the sniff of 
a scoring chance for 
insecure Nottingham 


On the crest of a wave 


football 


"...h 


By David Hands 
Rugby Correspondent 


Coventry 

Nottingham 


13 

■ HHIIMH 0 


Another season goes by and 
still Nottingham must wait for 
their first win at Coundon 
Road since the war. They 
never even came as close 
yesterday as their draw of 
three years ago. going down by 


tained passage of play. James 
made a delightful break and 
when the Coventry forwards 
won the ruck. Kennell’s show 
of the bail all but put him clear 
only for a despairing hand to 
catch his ankle. 

But it was their forwards 
who paved the way for both 
Coventry tries. Gulliver, with 


faithful Travers was nearly 
propelled over the line from a 
lineout and. at the subsequent 
scram, Coventry wheeled and 
Robbins planted the baU 
down, Millcrchip judging his 
ojd version perfectly mto the 
wind. 


After the interval Coventry 


Travers, »as king^f Urc 


a goal,' a try and a penally goal 
to only their second defeat of 


to only their second defeat of 
the season — the other was 
also against a Midlands dub, 
Leicester. 

Not only did they lose, they 
hardly created the sniff of a 
scoring chance in a game in 
which Coventry's forwards 
held complete sway. 
Nottingham's dismay might 
have been more complete bad 
it not been for Thornley, 
whose magnificent covering 
and support of the ball carrier 
was one of the few positive 
features of the visitors on a 
cold and blustery day. 

Playing into the wind Cov- 
entry were 10-0 up at half- 
time. With the breeze behind 
them they gave their young 
backs more possession and 
there was a glimpse of bright 
promise from James and 
Kenneli during the best sus- 


lineout, which became a vir- 
tual Coventry preserve in the 
second half. It was Suckling's 


before he moved the ouly 
penalty attempt of the game. 
Wood looks the sort oraes- 




gave Savage room to dan to 
his right and feed Travers, for 
Saunders to go skipping over 
in the comer for the Gist try 
Nottingham have conceded 
since October, a run of 11 
games. 

Savage, who has played the 
last three games in Coventry's 
problem position of scram 
half but whose place may be 
under threat if Thomas, the 
former club captain, comes 
through his second XV game 
successfully at the weekend, 
had a useful match. He kept 
the ball in front of his for- 
wards and tested Notting- 
ham's defence close to the set 
pieces. 

The second try was a famil- 
iar sight to the Coundon Road 


like rugby but his catching and 
kicking were first class, in 
unfortunate contrast with the 
uncertainties of Nelson-Wil- 
liams, a converted wing, in- 
security, indeed, with due 
respect for Hartley's final 
gestures of defiance by way of 
a couple of slashing, b reaks. 
was Nottingham's downfall 
throughout. 


SCORERS; Coventry: Trias: Saunders, 
RWtoii*. Conver sion: Mfltorch*. Penalty; 
Wood- 


COVENTRY: U Wood frap: C Sbtayfc E 
Saunders, K Jwvis. K James. D Kenneli; C 
MBeretsp. A Savage; L Johnson leapt}, A 
Farrington, S Wifces. P Suckflng, A 
Guffiver, K Dodd, R Travers. G Robtns. 


NOnWQHAJIfc 


Netoon-WMama: M 



Young goalKeep«|| 
latest casualty g 
at Old Traffordgy 

Manchester United have suf- a medal of 7 
feted another double injuiy Bp 1 * 
jfow to add to manager Ales -- 

Fereuson’s mounting list of won that for 30 H ■ 




ivxv 


fered another double injury 
blow to add to manager Alex 
Ferguson’s mounting list of 
casualties. Their teenage goal- 
keeper Gary Walsh and Welsh 
international Clayton Black- 
more were both hurt after 
playing only five minutes of a 
{ naming match yesterday. Walsh 
twisted a knee and is out of the 
New Yearns Day match against 
Newcastle at Old Tranord. 
BLackmore .who damaged an 
ankle was also included in the 
squad. Ferguson said: ‘‘There 
seems no end to the list of 


The Luton midfield pjftfefv - 
Ricky Hill. *ho had hojxxm-.,-, ■ 
retumal Coventry. has ■ 
hopes dashed. . . 

self fit on Monday, after aSgg^ 
out for six weeks wtinj R rapr??. ~ 
ligament injury, but t th e pc^ *n 
iem flared up again da^gg^;;; 
training yesterday. v. ;Y ; • 

The Brighton forward, Ga*^, 
Rowell, will be out of second- - 
division football for up to-*** - • 
weeks with a broken toe; an /•; 4 
injury received in !>».>£_ . 




injuries. Walsh and Bteckmore injury rwn«u 
had only been on the field a few Satuntov s ■ draw wifo Reafej ; , 
minutes. I stopped the training The Bnghtwi man^r^A^ Jp-. 
session because I didn't want to Muilery. said. Thisisa feto,; 
risk any more injuries." us because he has lxcn pta™- ■ - 

Walsh said: “I just slipped well over the last ^.matches. - 
and when I got up I could not The Brighton captain. Oannx;.;, ' ; 
straighten my leg- 1 just hope it Wilson, who has not Pjjtyed a 
is not too serious." His absence full match for a monlt^D - • 
means a return for Chris Turner, return to fiisMeam duty against . . . 
dropped four matdies ago in Mill wall on Thursday, ms ^/tn _-v r 
fevour of the youngster birthday. =• 

Neal Cooper, signed by Gra- Plymouth became even 




ham Turner last July as part of shorter of forwards yesterday 


his £1 million re-building plan 
al Villa Park is at last ready for 


his debut, delayed for so long sciatic nerve ailment. The Sew 
because of a groin injury will be out of acnon at least unta 




Turner has long since de- next week, joining fellow marta- 
parted, his summer spending men Steve Cooper ana Kevm 

r. l - -7* • ” C i nn (h#> rasiraltv 


having failed to revive Summerfield on the casualty 
Villa’s fortunes. Now his list. 

successor, Billy McNeill, is look- Clayton's absence leaves 
jog to the former Aberdeen man Plymouth wrthout a recognised 


to help prevent a repetition of partner for Tommy Tynan in 


HfmJmarsh. 0 Bowysr. P Thomtey, S 
Hughes (capQ. 

Referee: I BiAerwall (East MdsndsL 


last season' struggle against 
relegation. 

Soon after his £350,000 move 


Cooper was struggling against have increased with the decision 
injury. Twice he has broken of Leicester City to recall Steve 


Beefing up Scottish back row 
Irish’pack trial of strength 


down. But three reserve games Lynex, who has been on loan at 
and a youth team match in the St Andrew's. 


%*X; 

■■ 


space of a fortnight have con- 


vinced McNeill the injury has Wayne 


i leading goal scorer 
arke returns from 


cleared up. 


suspension for the game. Bond 


His problem now is whether is now hoping to find another 
to bring in Cooper in for the defenderto take on loan. 

*«. — ® — * ru: — * division leaders 


By Ian McLauchlan 




Thursday's Trip to Evertiu, or 


By George Ace 

There wiD be an abundance of 
Irish prime beef on display at 
the Anns Park, Cardiff, oa 
January 17 when Ireland meet 
Wales in the opening match of 
the five nations championship. 
The pack will average around 
15st 51b per man, varying from 
Nigel Carr's 13st 71b at open 
side wing forward to Jim 
Gleason's near 18st at lock. And 
with that ring-wise former Brit- 
ish Lion and Irish front row 
man, Syd Millar, supervising 
the preparation of the forwards 
this term the debacle of Twick- 
enham last season when the 
Irish pack were shunted all aver 
the Park is extremely atllkely to 
be repeated. 

Millar spent most of the first 
session on die Sunday the team 
was announced, sorting out the 
Uneoot. This weekend he will 
concentrate on the scrum. “We 
mnst ensure that we get good set 
ball if we are to get the best out 
of our back row who can be 
relied upon to obtain rack and 
maal hall from the second 
phase.” Millar said. “There is 
no denying the physical strength 
of the pack that will play in 
Cardiff; what I will concentrate 
on is our technique and mental 
attitude to the importance of the 
scram in present day rugby.*’ 

Bat with all this avoirdupois 
in the air, oue man is determined . 
to shed die pounds be pnt on 
from last season: Willie Ander- 
son. The big Dungannon and 
Ulster lock forward had geared 
his season to playing in the 
second row where an extra few 
pounds never goes amiss. 

But a hand injury ruled out 
Michael Gibson and Brian 
Spfliane did not come up to 
expectations in the trial after an 
injury-riddled start to the season 
with the result Anderson was 
called upon to fill the No. 8 spot 
as be did against Scotland in the 
final match of last season. “I 
intend losing as dose to lOlbs as 
1 can before the match." he said. 
“I was ltist 31b when wed prior 
to the trial. That is too ranch to 
carry around from the middle of 
the back row.” 

Two seasons ago Ireland took 
the field against Wales with a 
side that contained not one 
player who had experienced the 
thrill of a victory over Wales on 
their own patch. That was a big 
psychological advantage to the 
Welsh. Next month, 12 of the 
men who fashioned that glorious 
21-9 win wO! again be in action 
with no inhibitions, despite last 
season's defeat in Dublin, about 
their ability to again bauble the 
Red Dragons. 


There will be a few players 
among the Probables for 
Scotland's national trial at 
Murrayfield on Saturday not 
just relieved to see their names 
on the team sheet but also 
pleased to note the calibre of the 
opposition. Not the least among 
these will be John Rutherford, 
who instead of facing the herd- 
running Wyllie will have him as 
his inside centre. Given the 
number of specialist centres 
available and the lack of out- 
half cover, this would appear to 
be a strange seJectoriai move. 

In the Probables' pack, which 
virtually picks itself, Jeffrey and 
Campbell have some ground to 
make up, though Campbell is a 
workhorse who provides so 
much good possession. 

The Possibles side looks to be 
one which will not give the 
Blues too stem a test, as there 
are better players sitting on the 
bench. This applies particularly 
in the case of the wings and 
locks, none of whom have 
exactly set the heather on fire 
during the recent McEwan's 


officials. There were three play- 
ers not considered because of 
injury. Johnston, Baird and 
Cram. 

PROBABLES: A G Hastings (Watsoriansh 
M D F ttaacan (West ofScotiand). D S 




wait for Saturday's home game Middlesbrough are confident 
with Nottingham Forest. Coo- their leading scorer Archie Ste- 


per was a member of the 
Aberdeen team which domi- 


pbens will return at York. The 
former Bristol Rovers forward. 


nated the Scottish domestic who has scored 13 goals this 
scene as well as winning the season, should recover from a 


Wyite (Stewart 9/MeMle FPJ.S Karinas 
(Watsortarak I Trieste (SefcwSjY 
Rutherford (Safer*). R J CaMtaw 




European Cup Winners’ Cup in fool injury that forced him to 
1983. Cooper is well remem- miss last Saturday's match at 


bered by McNeill from his own Mansfield. 


uedforest): D M B Sole [BafliL C T 
(Havrtck, eapt). I G Mfce (Harters I 
Campbol (HmricfcL I a M Panto 


[HawcfcL | a M Pnaton (Sef- 
Hhey (Kelso). J R Beattie 




days in Scottish football. 


Sunderland have bad their 


kirk). J Jaffcay (KrtsoL J R 

(Glasgow Academicals), F Gaidar 
(Stewarfs/MetviUe FP) 

POSSIBLES: P W Pods (Gatak S W 
McAsten (Hertafs FP), A EKemady 
(Watsontens), A V Taft (Kolso). T Pater- 
son-Brown (London Scottish)-. A D Kar 
flCeteo). G T OSwr (HawfckL A K Brewster 
jStewarfsAtalvfte PP|!o J CaKatwfer 
(Kelso, capt). T G Waite (Katso), H Parker 
(KUmamock). A J Tomes (Hawick! J 
Crider (Stewarfs/MeMlle FPJ.DB White 
(QaiaUJ Tdrubcfl (Hawick) 

RESERVES: P Hogarth (Hawk*). O M 


mm 








Despite his team’s poor goals two games this week called off 
against record— 47 in 21 games, by die Football League. A chest 


including five clean sheets — virus has left them with only 
McNeill will probably use Coo- seven senior players. “They are 


per in midfield. If it is an omen felling like ninepins.” the 
Villa are looking for. Cooper has Sunderland manager, Lawrie 




RESERVES: P Hogarth (Hawk*), G M 
McG okw as (West or Scotland), A J 
MackJin (London Scottish), K S Brine 
(He riot’s FP), J F RfchMson (Erfnbtxgh 

Blues too stem a test.'as there G MacGregor (Borcl^m^^iSa^ae Winters in Britain do not provide ideal 
are better players sitting on the £££*?£ J^anwa b). k t Moray anna tic conditions for water skiing - hence 
bench. This applies particularly SsESt FPi Seott cUUy look about Brett Hodgkins (above) 
in the case of the wings and as he prepares for another training session on. 

locks, none of whom have the water at Kirtons Farm near Reading (Roy 

exactly set the heather on fire T ICIILU IlcICdl Moor writes). Hodgkins's thoughts, however, 

forces changes 

(Ayr) and Campbell- Lam erton There are four changes in the sanshine of Honda. 


French defeat 


and one wonders why Munro 
(Ayr) and Campbell-Lamerton 
(London Scottish) have failed 
even to merit reserve status. Or 
indeed what White, who has 
played little rugby this season 
has done to deserve a trial place? 

On the positive side the 
rejuvenated Kennedy and the 
promising young Tart will pro- 
vide a good test in the centre. 
Oliver, al scrum half, is a player 
for the near future. The area 
which will provide most in- 
terest, however, will be the back 
row where Finlay Calder and 
Jeffrey will have to be at their 
very best in order to contain the 
other Calder twin, Jim, and the 
voracious Turnbull. 

The game will be refereed by 
Brian Anderson (Currie), who is 
one of Scotland's world cup 


Scottish schools team to meet 
the Welsh schools at 
Murrayfield on Monday. Sim- 
mers, Burnett, Bathgate and 
Hogg are brought into the side 
after the comprehensive 37-3 
defeat by the French schools 
earlier this month. 

TEAtt G J AftdtboN (MarcMston Cwtto): 
CRH Newton (Dundee HS), DMK Brown 
(Eartston HS). T R McCraatli (Loretta 
captain). I W Cdbertson (Keteo HSt C T 
Sfnanera (Glasgow Academy), N S Bur- 
nett (KefvWfe Academy); G T McKee 
(Hutchisons GSL G L nitmoa (Polar 
Academy). G M Kwtanl (Haris Acad- 
emy). p Writon (MereMston Castle l DO 
Bathgate (George Hariot’sL L M Mrir 
(Mercfeston Caste). C D Hogg (Eartston 
HS). J C Law {GtenaWjnoL Ranfece- 


sanshlne of Florida. 

Tbe Water Ski Federation think so highly of 
bis potential that riot only have they promoted 
him to the senior international squad but are 
sending him to Leesburg In Florida for special 
tuition from Mike Hazelwood, Britain's world 
record bolder who rens a training school tbere. 

Since Hodgkins, aged 17, from BeUmgay, 
Lincoln, won the world junior (16-18) slalom 
championship earlier In the year, many 


officials have been comparing him to 
Hazelwood. Like Hazelwood, for so long 
Britain's number one, he hav the daring «nrf 
excellent mortality for big competitions which 
comes through in jumps and slalom. He holds 
tbe British and European junior championship 
records and is also the unofficial world record 
bolder for the junior jump with 50.4 metres. 

While in Florida Hodgkins wiD al so come 
under the watchful eye of Andy Mapple, 
another of Britain's world winners, who 
coa c hes during the winter in Leesburg. 

Following the death of his father last year, 
fin an c i al difficulties arose for Hodgkins to 
continue in competitive water skiing bnt an 
announcement is expected shortly which 
should end any worries in this respect. 

(Photograph: Hugh Rontiedge) 


never finished a season without McMenemy, said. 

Osvold still Derby on 
keen to their way 
join Forest to the top 


Brian Gough last night 
poured cold water on speculation 
that the proposed transfer of 
fijetfl Osrold, die NomgEu 
international midfield player, to 
Nottingham Forest was in dan- 
gerof foiling through. “As far as 
I am concerned tbere are bo 
problems,” tbe Forest manager 
said. 

“We always knew we would 
have to wait a while for a work 
permit but we have not been 
informed of any hold ups,” 


By Dennis Shaw 


Clough added. “I expect Osvold 
to he here very early a the New 


SNOW REPORTS 


S W Paul (George Henofs). C H ... 
(Dunblane HS). A D tficol (Dundee HSL 
TJ Sa nder son (KsMnside Academy), 
A w H Dow (KaMntide Academy). 


Lancashire’s powerful 
pack in command 


ANDORRA 

AUSTRIA 

St Anton 100 290 good 

Excellent skraig 
FRANCE 

Msgdve 90 130 good 

Good skiing above 1500 metres 
Morzme 90 220 good 

Snow crusty first IWng 
SWITZERLAND 

Davos 80 160 good 

Excellent skiing 

Lenzerheide 110 140 good 


Conditions 
Off Runs to 
Piste Piste resort 


Weather 
(5pm) _ 


varied good 


GOLF 

Professional 
resigns 
from his post 

By a Correspondent 


By Michael Stevenson 


Lancashire 18 Group .. 31 
Cheshire 18 Group 6 


Cheshire's 18 Group match 
against Lancashire was trans- 
ferred at the last moment from 
the Sale pilch, which was water- 
logged. to a neaihy junior 
ground which was in remark- 
ably good condition. A further 


Cheshire by Ratclifle and 
Pritchard converted. 

The closing stages for Lan- 
cashire again established com- 
mand. A lovely handling move 
ended in a uy near tbe posts by 
RignaJI for Dolan to convert ana 
the talented Fielden broke 
crispley to put Kutkas clear for 
Lancashire's final score. On this 
form it will take a very useful 
side to beat Lancashire. 


Mumen 100 

SchiHhom now open 

AUSTRIA 


powder good 
powder good 
heavy good 


problem obtruded when it was 
, . » realized shortly before the kick- 

Goodwin gives 

i When one was provided an 

ITT) TT1SI I enthralling match resulted in 


up trial 
place for club 


John Goodwin, aged 23, will 
not be attending the England 
trial on Saturday as a replace- 
ment. Instead, the Moseley wing 
will be playing for his dob at 
Cardiff in his “new” position of 
centre. 


victory for Lancashire by two 
goals, four tries and a penalty to 
a goal and both sides but 
especially Lancashire are to be 
congratulated for some 
exhilarating handling in the 
diabolical conditions. 


SCORERS! Lancashire IB Group: Titoc A 
Smith. Mahon (2). Ftekkm. Rignai. 
Kutkas. Penalty: Dolan Cami nl on *. 
Dolan (2). 

Che shire 18 Gro y Try: Ratdiffe. 
Oonvenkwr Pritchard. 

CHESHIRE 18 GROUP: W BianeM 


Depth (cm) 
to! Mx 

BdKTchhm Q 40 
Brand 80190 
Hntretoder 801G0 
Innsbruck/I 20190 
Isefejl 80 145 
KitzbtiheJ 90100 
Lech 13S190 
Mayrtmfen 50 95 
Neustrft 20 30 
Nlederau 50100 


Obergural 60 90 
SaaBxicn 100160 
St Anton 110290 


Pritchard (Sandtueh). A fates (WinalL D 
Compton (Pointon): R Tushingham and P 
Ratcflfle (Winajl; S Tidbura (Wrraf). 0 
Smith (Whitby), R Hancock (Sandbach). U 
“cC*! 1 (Wjrrag. T WW (HossaU). I Raw* 
(Wirrali, R Poote-Joras 
Edge (Vwfcm Hifew). 


SeefekJ 80120 
Sttden 30 80 
Sot 100 140 

Ze ll am S ee 80190 

• lidrarrgbon from the Austrian National 
Tounst Office. 

SCOTLAND 

Cakngorac upper runs, runs constate, 
new snow on a firm base; mtddte runs. 


runs compete but narrow, new snow on a 
*vm base: lower slopes, ample nursery 
areas, new snow on a firm base: vertical 
runs. 1600 ft; hft roads. Icy; mam roads, 
dear snow level. 2200ft. Lecfae upper 
runs, some nns complete, new snow on a 
firm base: middle runs, runs complete, 
new snow on a firm base: lower slopes, 
ample nursery areas, new snow on a firm 
base: vertical runs. 700ft h* roods, 
moderate sixxv, drifting; mam roads, 
moder at e snow, drifting: snow level. 
2000 ft Gtenshi* upper runs, soma runs 
complete, naw snow on a firm base: 
middle runs, soma runs oompt ote , new 
snow on a firm base: lower slopes, soma 
runs complete, new snow an a firm base; 
vertical rims. 800ft M roads, shaft snow; 
msai roads, slight snow; snow level 
1800ft. 

Gfeecoe (weekends only): upper 
runs, some runs conylefe. n ew a new on a 
hard base; lower slopes, some runs 
complete, new snow on a hard base: 
vertical runs. 1300tt htt roads, dear: main 
roads, dear snow level 1 800 ft 


FOR THE RECORD 


c f „ . . LANCASHIRE 18 GROUP: A Dofam (Lan- 

Seven of the successful Lan- casts* RGS); SG® (Liverpool CoUem). M 
.v:- — FWden WJ RignaB A 


Goodwin almost won an Eng- 
land schools cap as a centre, hut 
soon after joining Moseley six 
years ago was switched to the 
wing and won caps for England 
U oder-23 and Errand B. He is 
reluctant to discuss his reasons 
for withdrawing from the trial 
but admits that he has slipped 
down the order among can- 
didates for the English wings. 
“The selectors know all about 
me and I don't believe I am 
anywhere near the team. I am 
just bandy to have around, a 
sorts of dogsbody, although J am 
not bitter about that.” he said. 


enshire side that toured Austra- J ^sna* 1C r. 

lia last summer were playing SSS 

and a single point defeat last a Smith (RcSffc . Se « ,and 
week was put firmly into HGBk. - . M swjefc (Rossaiix 
perspective with the return to N Stactalr 8 

the Lancashire pack of four Ftetam? AKtsght (Manctwaur 

forwards from the powerful 
Rossal) side, who had not been- « 

arable for the Cumbria DaVieS teSt 


BASKETBALL 


TENNIS 


ansa &2s ess 

JSSSS!* 

Rotareo: A KrVgtit (Manchester Society). 


UWTra STATES: Mati oon >iiaeM M 
PBA): WMuwten Blrttts 12S. Gotten Sim 
Wamora 105: Qovctenri Cavaflare 107. Aftgn- 
■ Hawks 106: Haw Jereay Mam 122. 
Mfoauhae Bucks 117; UM Mu. 109, 5» 
AnftMM Spurs 101: Boston Cafitcs 119 . 
Sacrammo Kings 102. 


NORDIC SKIING 


Both scram halves, Mahon 
for Lancashire and Ratcliffe, 
played splendidly as did Fielden 
and Rignall in the centre for the 
winners. Their pacey wing. 
Kutkas. also impressed. 

Lancashire opened with an 
excellent penalty from Dolan 
and went further ahead through 


Huw Davies, the England foil 
back, continues his comeback 
by playing for Wasps' second 
XV on Saturday. Davies has 
twice appeared for the third 
team since undergoing surgery 
on a shoulder injury received 
playing for England last season. 
John Gasson, a club spokesman, 
said yesterday: "His return to 


Goodwin is concentrating 
more on club rugby and appre- 
ciating his new central role with 
Moseley. ”1 am enjoying befog 
more involved in the game. 1 had 
forgotten what I knew about 
playing centre, he said.” 


a ,r Y W Smith from rack near first team duty will depend on 


the line sel up by a side-stepping 
ran by Egan: forward pressure 


Moseley have recruited an- 
other centre. Chris Allen, a 
Loughborough L’niversin stu- 
dent who has played for tbe 
L'AU and for Gloucestershire in 
this season's county champion- 
ship. Ailed nude a promising 
debut against Ebbw Vale and 
could be just the man to set up 
Goodwin for some or his power- 
IbI breaks. 


again played dividens when 
Mahon scored from a ruck, 
following a break by Rignall and 
the interval scoreline (17-0) 
resulted from a try by Fielden 
after deft work ‘ by Dolan, 
Rignall and Dolan convened. 


stepping how well he plays. He will need 
pressure to prove he is worth his place 
s when ahead of Nick Stringer before 
a rack, being selected.” 



Gruendel out 


SQUASH 


The second-half was played in 
driving rain and Cheshire 
pressed for much of the time. It 
was a rare counter attack follow- 
ing a long kick by Egan that 
allowed Mahon the opportunity 
to score his second try, again 
following a rack; a neat chip by 
Tushingham made a try for 


Hamburg (Reuter) — The 
West German league leaders. 
Hamburg SV. w^U be without 
the services of their inter- 
na lion a I forward, Heinz 
GraendcL for at least three 
months, the club doctor said 
yesterday. Gruendel. aged 29. 
bad an operation yesterday on a 
knee he injured last weekend 
during an indoor tournament 




The Cornish dub which 
boasts the first Jack Niddans- 
designed course in Britain is to 
part company with its pro- 
fessional. St Meltion announced 
yesterday that John Yen, the 
former Engimm amateur inter- 
national who has been with the 
dnb since it opened 11 years 
ago, would relinquish his pos- 
ition at the end of next month. 

Neither Yeo nor Martin Jnt| 
Hermon Bond, the co-owners of 
the dub, were available for 
comment yesterday, but it is 
believed that the move will pave 
the way for the arrival of a 
player of national repute before 
the official opening of the 
championship conrse next 
summer. 

The Bond brothers have spent 
£2 million on a course which 
NidUans believes wOl provide 
the best access for spectators of 
any in the world. A statement 
released yesterday by the South 
West region of the PGA said 
that Yeo, a Conushman, would 
leave his position. 

“The former England Inter- 
national, PGA team member 
and captain fo the PGA West 
region wishes to start a new 
career outside tbe game of gelL” 

the statement read. Yeo, aged 
39, represented Great Britain 
and Ireland in 1981. 


to be here very early fo the New 
Year and hopefully be wiB be 
playing for us before the end of 
January.” 

Osvold, who is f raming with 
an amateur dnb in Norway, 
said: “It is frustrating waiting 
for all the loose ends to be tied 
up but I am sure it wO) all be 
worthwhile in the end.” 

There are no restrictions on 
the mustier of foreign players 
English chibs can r y i , although 
Football League rales state they 
can pfay only two together in one 
side. Forest already have the 
Dutch internationals. Segers 
and Metgod, on their books. 


Not since the days of Brian 
Clough’S- two*- First 'Division 
championships in four seasons 
in the early 1970s has such 
expectancy surrounded the af- 
fairs of Derby County. 

Tomorrow's visit of Black- 
burn Rovers sees them challeng- 
ing for the position of front- 
runners in the Second 
Division's most open promo- 
tion race in years. 

The Baseball Ground is 
bound to be packed as County 
promise to repeat last season's 
achievement when, in escaping 
from Division Three, they 
timed their run-in to perfection. 

Relieved of the pressures 
heaped up on tbe favourites 
Portsmouth, Plymouth. Leeds, 
Ipswich, Oldham and West 
Bromwich Albion. Derby have 
reached the half-way stage as tiie 
team all of them fear. 

John Gregory, the former 
QPR. Brighton and Aston Villa 
midfield player, scorer of many 
important goals recently, says: 
“I was not altogether sure I had 


Norwich scoff 
at Bruce talk 


made the right move when I first 
came here from Loftus Road but 


now I know I am going straight 
back into the First Division.” 


Ken Brown, tbe Norwich City 
m an ag e r, yesterday dismissed 
as “a load of rubbish” reports 
that his central defender and 
captain, Steve Bruce, conld be on 
the move to Celtic. Brown, who 
sold his England goalkeeper, 
Chris Woods, to Rangers fo tile 
dose season was responding to 
comments from David Hay, tbe 
Scottish premier division dob's 
manager, that he would in- 
terested in signing Brace. 

Celtic watched the player fo 
action at Manchester United on 
Saturday but Bruce said: “It's 
obviously flattering, if a little 
unsettling, to be linked with a 
dnb like Celtic, bnt it would 
have to be a hell of an offer to 
make me leave, especially toe 
way tbe dab is going at tbe 
moment” 


County's arrival among the 
leaders has brought Gregory and 
several of his team colleagues 
into sharp focus. 

Tbe forward, Bobby Davison, 
has consistently rejected the 
chance of a transfer move into 
the First Division by a shorter 
route believing, like Gregory, 
that be will get there with Derby. 

However, the player who is 
described locally as “the darling 
of the Peaks” is forward Phil 
Gee, »ed 20, recruited from 
Derbyshire non-league side, 
Gresiey Rovers, who is gather- 
ing new admirers at every 
match. 

“He's the new Ian Rush,” says 
manager, Arthur Cox. a man not 


known for superlative judge- 
ments. Cox took Kevin Keegan 


Hart’s new beat 

Birm ingham City have signed 
toe Sheffield Wednesday de- 

r 1 n 1 yc . * . * 


merits. Cox took Kevin Keegan 
to Newcastle United, hauled 
them into Division One and 
then walked out when the Board 
consistently haggled over his 
new contract 


SKIING 


fender. Pad Hart, in an attempt 
to improve their chances of 
promotion from tbe second di- 
vision. The former Nottingham 
Forest and Leeds United c&itre- 
half, who signed for *a small fee', 
will make his first app earan ce 
for Birmingham a gaino Plym- 
outh Axgyle at St Andrews 

tomorrow. 


He then set about helping 
Derby away from the edge of 

bankruptcy. 

Thai experience plus a record 
of 10 jobs in 30 years, after 
breaking his leg and ending his 
playing career at where Walsall 
when he was 18 , combine to 
make Cox a seasoned pro. 

“Gee is the kind of player who 
doesn't have to think which foot 
to use because he is equally good 
with each of them,” added the 
County boss, an admirer of 
Clough. 

Cox's view on Gee is backed 
by Davidson who has watched 
from even closer quarters. “This 
tad is a purler,” he said. “He has 
plenty to learn yet but be is 
coming on at such a rate of 
knots that he is quite outstand- 
ing already.” 

To which Gee, a painter and 
decorator until only last year, 
replies “It sure beats putting 


tew- 


Andy Rogers, the Reading 
Belgrade (AFP) - Tbe coach linger who almost died in a 
to the Yugoslav women’s alpine ““fch at Swansea City last 
team, Janez Zibler, has quit in season after swallowing bis 
the wake of a row involving tongue, completed a £10,000 
MatejaSvet move to Southend United, tbe 

Sret aged 18, who woo two fourth division promotion cbal- 
giant slalom races last season Angers, yesterday. 

Parlane back 

w^‘sit < s?woddSiiSis lZ? 

demanding Zibier’s departure. forward, ana non contract basis. 

Zfoterralied for dfedpESiy ESS. ? laying “ 

measures to he taken against foe oe '& am ' 
two Sluera but, with Svet threat- Cnvnno nn l A nn 
ening to quit skiing only a month kJdrlllg UU lOaU 

v k> ” Sl 4? i Ma* Newport 

S-*- *"<*«!* tas Joined 


Rochdale have signed Derek 
Parlane, the former Leeds 
United and Manchester City 
forward, on a non contract basis. 
Parlane has been playing in 
Belgium. 


paper on walls. 
Cox is curre 


Cox is currently raising the 
Ise-rate at the Baseball 


ICE HOCKEY 


RUGBY UNION 





feftlluntardMBitMlBendMdtnUt 

lAtTWwonj cSStoSSSm 5 ASR3. 


C LUB - MAT CHES:. Cross Ksys » Oamoreafi 
WjWterere, cancsted. Gwentry laTfeXlSfl- 


team manage r, Toni Vogriaec, 
Preferred to seek a compromise. 

The girls, who had said they 
were tired by toe heavy pro- 
gramme, were given a holiday. 
Joze Drotaric replaces Zibler. 


Wolverhampton Wanderers on a 
month's loan. He ended a ran of 
111 consecutive appearances 
when he was dropped for 
Newport's home game against 
Port Vale, last Saturday. 


Ground by urging his team to 
aim for promotion by the 
adventurous route. 

• Derby are pulling down the 
wire fences at the Nonnanton 
End of ihe Baseball Ground as 
part of a new membership 
scheme which allows supporters 
into that section of the ground 
with a computerized key. The 
fences will come down for the 
home game with West Brora on 
February 21. 




when John Clayton entered ■ 
hospital for treatment for a 


- nr ■»■>.*- 


tomorrow's match at Bir- 
mingham. the problems of. 
whose manager John Bond, 




et fn 


cn 


arisl 




•5:.\ 


^ \ - V • 

v 


• i <4 




27 


Ur> lj 


£°otb, 


mg c 

test 

Old 


a5& 

1 Vci4!o V 


Mi 0fd 

■'* **-.:** , 

V-r? l, «* F S 




—;-; J «p h “'«hr i 

’ ®^sC" 

--, .. -fau >n i 


'•'. .:- ! ; r ''-.'n * 1, h fiJ- 
■ :■ 

: .^Cf* 
■ ■ • 

- -it «*£,•£ 
-.?S*«5s 


-.-V^Per^ 

^ on 


-(K ahSfnce fe 
, '®m¥ TvT^ 

' • Pn Jd.. ■*■ 


T r John L 5 


• *•£*»■*; 
^OOlo*. 

.'.V** goahto- 

-Vr..^ ■;?» leadtp 

.: * “■ awfid* 

. . ..'■ hut t 

' r ' : --ad 

■ '-■ «lkdw 
• y^i \ dgj 

■ - '.I ; ,lJ1 «ft 
•■-' "Tneja 

- - ■."“I 4 

• -?-• Uait 


Jerby on 
r heir way 
io the top 

"•' li.r.r.ijSiuw 

-• ::3'a 


.njltef 
- ■ >::n^ 


. :!*■ 

■ ■■:..>* 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 

TELEVISION AND RADIO 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 




All the best — in words and pictures 



Jimmy MnlrOle and Muriel 
Gray: on ITV, XL30pm 


630 Ceefax AM. News hoatffinos, 
weather, travel and sports 
bulletins. 

7.00 News, regional news and 
weather 7.1 5 The FEntetONs. 

(ri 7M The Pink Panther 
Show, (r) 8.00 Nows, regional 
news and weather 8.15 
MMmJaw Supenhark 820 
The Monkaes. (i) &45 Betties 
(r) 8.55 Regional news and 
weather. 

9.00 News and weather 9.05 Play 
Chess with wsffiam Hartston 
9.15 Dungeons and Dragons. 
(0135W1J Doirt You..? 
Diverting ideas for bored 

10.00 IS^Hrsaftdweather 10.05 
Neighbours. (r)1025 
Chfidren's BBC. PhHfip 
Schofield whhproCTamme 

details 1030 Play Scbool.(r) 
1050 Henry's Cat (r) 

10.55 Five to Eleven. Peter 

Sarkworth with a thought for 
the day 11.00 News and 
weather 11.05 Fame. Doris, 
researching a new role, meets 
a very unhappy young lady, (r) 

1 1.55 Open Am Viewers 
comment cm television 
progra mme s 12JS Regional 
news and weather. 

1.00 One O'clock News with Philip 
Hayton. Weather 125 
Neighbours. More dramas 
from Australian suburbia 145 
Bertha, (r) 

2.00 Film: Young Winston 11972) 
starring Simon Ward, Robert 
Shaw and Anne Bancroft A 
biographical film about the 
early years of Winston 
Church Ji, from his schooldays 
to his cavalry days in South 
Africa. Directed by Richard 

Attenborough. 

420 Film: The Camel Boy (1984) An 
animated adventure film, set in 
Western Australia, about the 
friendship between a boy and a 
camel. Directed by Yoram 
Gross. 

525 Work! Superdanca. Gary 
Davies and Cherry Gfllespie 
introduce the finalists in the 
MhJHxj Award, a trophy to be 


• So what win be my abiding 
memories of television and radio 
in 1986 ? I mustn't pretend that 
they come rushing back in hordes. 
But there are certainly enough of 
them to fill these four columns — 
and still leave a dozen or so 
without honourable mention. 
First, the feces, the bodies and the 
voices: Michael Gambon's peeling 
visage, certainly, in Potter's The 
Singing Detective, a work that, in 
my view, was a sue too big for its 
brilliant boots; David ThrafalTs 
chilling serpent's eye in 
Mortimer's Paradise Postponed; 
Hazel O’Connor's formidable 
bannere-on-ibe-barricades pres- 
ence in Fighting Bade; Wendy 
Hiller's elegant, new-found sturdi- 
ness in Ail Passion Spent; the 
resilient grin of Anneka Rice as 
she is asked to perform the 
impossible in Treasure Hunt (in 
my book, the year's most 


presented to the best couple or 
solo freestyle disco dancers. 
fi-00 Six (yOocx News with 
Nicholas WttehelL Weather 
6.15 Regional news 
525 Every Second Counts. Against 


( CHOICE ) 

consisently entertaining pro- 
gramme); and the Conan Doylian 
accuracy of Jeremy Bert's sleuth in 
The Adventures of Sherlock 
Holmes, in which even the curve 
of the body was made to fit the 
Paget illustrations. 

• And what of the year's pro- 
grammes themselves? 1 mall, 
without effort, the bitter-sweet- 
ness and the underlying pain of 
Anthony Minghella's Channel 4 
serial about a broken marriage. 
What If It's Raining ?; the 
excitement of seeing new windows 
being opened to let fresh light 
flood into a familiar room in Julia 
Cave's Lawrence and Arabia — 
and the same sort of thing 
happening with Percy Grainger in 
Barrie Gavin’s The Noble Savage; 
the sensitive probing of Jonathan 


9.00 Ceefax. 

1040 Harold Lloyd* Excerpts from 
the comedian's, Girt Shy. made 
in 1924, and For Heaven's 


Miller as he examined the amnesic 
world of a disorientated musician 
in Prisoner of Consdonsness; the 
teeth -grinding callousness of the 
four sportsmen who made such 
foots of themselves in that remark- 
able 40 Minutes documentary The 
Fishing Party; the insane effort 
that went into the shooting of 
Herzog's film Fiizcorrtddo as de- 
tailed in Les Blank's sweaty 
documentary Baden of Dreams; 
the deep humanity that informed 
the Omnibas profile of Alice 
Walker, who wrote The Colour 
Purple ; the blind-alley questioning 
of candidates by a Civil Service 
selection panel in two Forty 
Minutes films that must have 
caused testy interdepartmental 
memos to drop into Whitehall in- 
trays like Christmas mail; the 
quiet, idiosynchratic charm of 
Every Window Tefls a Story, in 
which stained-glass expert Mal- 


colm Miller got people to pretend 
they were cathedrals; and BBC 
Wales’s No Place to Rest, an 
exposure of the monstrous 
municipal insensitivity that led to 
coffins being stacked on top of 
each other m a Merthyr Tydfil 
cemetery, and skulls of the 
departed grinning at mourners. 
• The 1986 radio memories I 
shall cherish indude Sue Limb's 
outrageously funny take-offs 
featuring the Wordsworth set, 
Wordsmjths at Gorsemera; a 
rollicking production of Pinero’s 
Dandy Dick; William Trevor's 
haunting evocation of his troubled 
homeland. The News from lie- 
land; and Isabel Afrken's English 
version of the Yugoslavian radio 
feature about Auschwitz, Search- 
ing the Ashes. I have still not 
completely recovered from it 

Peter Davalle 



Martyn Stainbridge and Sammi Davis in a TV version of a Thomas 
Hardy story. Day after tire Fair, on BBC1 at 9.50pm 


ITV/LONDON 


CHANNEL 4 


6.15 TV-aro Good Morning Britain 


6.15 Regional news Sake, a 1926 production, (r) 

Every Second Counts. Against 11.05 RtninlngWBd. AThaWoria 

the dock comedy adz show. About Us docum en tary about a 

presented by Paul Daniels. scheme being tried ki the 


7.00 The World's Strongest Man. 
The Daf Trucks Trophy 
introduced by Archie 
Macphereonm Nice. Eight big 
men in tests of strength, 
stamina, and endurance. 
Representing Great Britain Is 
the holder. Geoff Cepes. 

8-00 Dalles. Mandy discovers the 
identity of her elusive 
benefactor. (Ceefax) 

&50 News with Jufta SomenriHe and 
Andrew Harvey. Regional 
news and weather. 

94)0 Dave AHen. The comedian 
comments on the wry side of 
Me that might have escaped 
our notice. 

9J50 Day After the Fair, an 

adaptation of a Thomas Hardy 
story, On the Western Circuit 


Kenneth Heigh, Anna Massey, 
and Sammi Davis. Set in a 
country town in Victorian 
England, the story concerns a 
young maid who is seduced by 
a barrister. He writes the girt a 
letter but being iterate, she 
asks her employer, Edith, to 
help. Edith finds that writing 
the aW's love-letters and 
reading the ones she receives. 
Is a way of escape from her 
own loveless marriage. 
(Ceefax; 

1125 Wogan. See the New Year in 
with Tarry and his guests who 
include Frankie Howard, Man 
Corea and Samantha Fox. 

12.05 Happy New Year. A message 
from the Archbishop of 
Canterbury. 

12.10 CSgl (1958) starring Leslie 
Caron, Lou® Jourdan, and 
Maurice Chevalier. A romantic 
musical about a young 
Parisian girl, growing up in the 
1890s. Directed by Vincente 
MirmelH. 


scheme being tried ki the 
United States whereby 
deUnquent youngsters are put 
to work wttn wika horses in the 
hope that each win tame the 
other, (r) 

11.55 Him: An American ki Paris 
(1951) starring Gene KeOy and 
Leslie Caron. A George and frn 
Gershwin musical about Jerry, 
an American painter Rving in 
Paris, who foils for an orphan 
who Is m love with somebody 
else. Directed by Vincente 
MlnneU. (Ceefax) 

1.45 The Story of Aland. A cartoon 
about a Chinese folk hero, (r) 

2.15 The Bolshoi in the Park. 

Highlights of the Bolshoi baBet 
company's week-tong London 
festival, held in a spectefly-bufft 
tent in Battersea Park. The 

programme includes Les 
Sylphides, starring the tour’s 
“ ulna. Nataiva 


Richard Kays. News with 
Gordon Honeycombe at 620, 
7-0^724 84X3,820 and JUX* 
Sport at 6-40 and 7.40; 
exercises at 625; cartoon at 
725; pop music at 725; a 
review of the year’s television 
highflghts at 825; and 
wScaday.i 



prima ballerina. Natalya 
Bessmertnova, and Act 2 from 
Spartacus,wtthlrek 
Mukhamedov dancing the fide 
roie-(r) 

425 News, regional news and 
weather. 

4.45 Film: Hobson’s Choice- (19SS) 
starring Charles Laughton, 

John Mils, and Brenda de 
Banzie. Delightful oomedy 
about a tyrannical bootmaker 
with three daughters who run 
his home and business. One 
day, one of the daughters 
marries and sets up a rival 
establishment with her new 
husband. Directed by David 
Lean. 

620 Ludwig van D e eth o von. Daniel 
Barenboim plays Beethoven’s 
piano Sonata No 2 Opus 2 No 2. 

720 86 Whistle Test 87 presented 
by Made SJen, Andy Kershaw. 
David hepworth, and Ro 
Newton. Rock and pop musk: 
untfl 1220 beginning with, at 
7.05 The PoSce Synctvonidty 
- Concert from Atlanta, Georgtau. - 

720 Africa Tomorrow. A 

documentary examining the 
problem of getting aid to the 
drought-stricken areas of 
Africa, interspersed with 
excerpts from the Live Aid 
concert 

825 Rendez-Vous Houston. Jean- 
Michei Jarre’s extravaganza 
which was part of Houston's 
sesquicentennial celebrations, (r) 

920 Pick of the Year, part one. 
Highlights from tfcs year's 
Whistle Tests. 

920 The Prince's Trust Birthday 
Party from Wembley Arena, (r) 
1125 86 Into 87 Wife Mm Wilde, Rve 
horn the stage of The 
GoJdiggers Club. Chippenham. 
12.10 Pick of the Year, part two. 

12.30 FHncZiggy Stardust and the 


Wacaday. presented by Tknmy 
Mailed at 925. 

i 925 Thames nows headUnes 

1 ' fofiowed by BMX Boat 

Inte rna t iona l. Gaz Top and 
Andy Ruffe! introduce the 
Cherry Coca Cota Freestyle 
Championships from the 
Sands Centre. Carfisto 920 
Disney. A cartoon double-bil!. 

1025 Film: Oklahoma! (1955) 
starring Gordon MacRae, 
ShWey Jones, and Rod 
Steiger. A Rodgers and 
Hammerstein musical 
concerning fhe fight to make 
Oklahoma a state of the Union, 
told around the story of 
feuding and romance between 

G^rtaGrahama, Gene 
Nelson, and Eddto Albert 
Directed by Fred ZJrmemann. 

1220 Wish You Were Here—? A 
repeat of Monday's 
programme which saw Judith 
Chalmers on a coach trip to 
Babbacombe in Devon; and 
investigating a pilot scheme to 
develop more country pubs 
into hoBday accommodation; 
Anneka Rice in the Seychelles; 
and Chris Ke&y on the Italian 
Riviera. 

120 News at One wHft Leonard 
Parkin 120 Thames news. 

120 FBm: The Island at the Top of 
the World (1973) starring 
Donald Stndea Adventure yam 
about a wealthy EngHshman's 
ex pedition to the Arctic In 
search of his missifM son. 
Directed by Robert Stevenson 
3.15 Disney. Three cartoons 
featuring Micky and Minnie 
Mouse, Goofy, and Donald 
Duck. 

320 Thames news haadSnes 826 
Sons and Daughten. 4.15 . 


Skating *86. Nick Owen 
presents highfights of the 
year's domestic and foreign 
competitions. The 
co mm e ntato rs are Simon Reed 
and Betty Callaway. 

5.15 Blockbusters. General 
knowledge quiz game for 
teenagers, presented by Bob 
Hotness. 

525 News with Alastair Stewart 
6.00 Thames news. 

625 Crossroads. 

720 Just lor Laughs. A cornprfation 
of dips from British comedy 
tarns. Among the many 
appearing are Dirk Bogarde 
and Arthur Haynes. 

720 Coronation Street Jenny's 
and Martin's old year ends on 
an anxious note; while the 
young bloods see in the new at 
Hilda s party (Grade) 

820 TMs Is Your Life. Eamonn 
Andrews presents a specially 
extended edition to end the 


920 Ffim: Monsignor (1982) 
starring Christopher Reeve, 
Genevieve Bupd, Fernando 
Rey, and Jason MiBer. Reeve 
swaps his cape for a cassock 
in this story of a yqwg 
American priest with a sharp 

financial brain v/ho is 

summond to the Vatican to 
help solve a nasty cash-flow 
problem. Once there, he 
becomes involved in the black 
market the Mafia, and a rather 
attractive nun. Directed by 
Frank Perry. (Oracle) 


1020 News at Ten with Card 


10.15 FQm: Monsignor continued. 
1120 The New Year Show 


Jimmy Middle. Scottish 
entertainment to see us to 
1987, including Lloyd Cde and 
the Commotions, Tne Boys of 
the Lough, and Big Country. 

1220 Fftnr Breakdenee (1984) 
starring Luanda Dickey. A 
musical made at the tie when 
breakdandng was al the rage. 
Directed by Joel Silberg. 

225 MgM Thoughts. 


Coronation Street New Year’s Eve party: Nigel Phare and Jean 
Alexander (on ITV, 730pm) 


-Cream tip No. 50 


Spider fiom Mars (1982) The 
1 973 concert given by David 
Bowie at the Hammersmith 
Odeon, filmed by 
D APeruiebaker. Ends at 225. 



Wayne Sleep gets off to a flying start as John McEnroe in Wayne 
Sleep's Dash on Channel 4, 7.00pm. 


1220 World Series B a s ebal l Martin 
Tyler explains the subtleties of 
the game and introduces 
htgWights from the climax of 

the sport's season. 

220 Rockinp and BoBtog With the 

Orchestra. Music from a 
collection of artists including 
dancers, back-up vocalists, a 
horn section, multiple 
keyboards, two drummers and 
a percussionist 

4.40 Him: The Munstera* Revenge 
(1981) starring Fred Gwynne, 

Al Lewis, and Yvonne Da 
Carlo. A made-tor-television 
comedy thriller which finds 
Herman and Grandpa doing 
battle with robot doppel- 
gangers created by a villain 
planning a Wg art robbery. 
Directed by Don Weis. 

625 Hannibal's [footsteps. In the 
third programme of his series 
retracing Hannibal's route from 
Southern France across the 
Alps, Bernard Levin goes from 
MonteiimartothefoothiKsof 
the Alps. Along the way he 
samples nougat nine courses 
of the 'Menu Rabelais’ at Le 
Pix; tries miflting a goat; and 
visits the village of Vassieux 
where ki 1944 Nazis 
massacred the local Maquis. 
(Oracle) 

720 News summary and weather 
followed by Wayne Sleep’s 
’Dash’ A showcase of the 

Terpsichorean talents of the 
ballet star mdudmg jazz, tap, 
ballet, comedy and 
contemporary dance. His 
supporting cast include Linda- 
Mae Brewer, Linda Gibbs, 
Wendy Roe, Kim Rosato, 
NichoM Trehearne, Rosalyn 
Whiten. Stephen Beegtoy, 
Simon Horral, and tan Knowles. 

825 Beauty. A fHm about beauty of 
face and form. Among those 
theorizing on how it is 
achieved are psychologists, 
tattooists, male and female 
models, night-dub dancers, 
and keep-ra fanatics. 

925 LateNigMWIthLettani»i.A 
'specter introducing a cult hero 
of young America, a man with 
a late night television show 

which ragteariy commands 
high ratings. 

1025 Come Dancing With Joois 
Hofland. The guests include 
Raw Sex, The Inspirational 
Choir, Rusty Goff and Bad 
News, alias Rflc MayaU, Ade 
Edmondson, and Peter 
Richardson. 

1220 FWn: Springtime in fhe 

Rockies (1942) starring Betty 
GrabJe, John Payne, Carman 
Miranda, and Cesar Romero. A 
musical about a pat of 
entertainers whose love affair 
is marred by petty jealousies. 
The man. Dim, pretends that 
he is haring an affafr with his 
exotic secretary; fin girt, 

Vicky, breaks-off their 
partnershfo and announces 
her engagement to her new, 
smooth Latin dandng partner 
Directed by Irving Cummings. 
Ends at 2.15. 


VARIATIONS 



Caron). Z35-Z4Q WMMr. NOtTTKERN 
BELAUD C.1S-&2S Northern Ireland Haws. 
2J&am-2.10am News and weather. 
n nr^O NQgTX E RMW EL AWOftXOaBi- 
ESisfc 1040 Box of OafighB. 

ANGLIA London except 

lUOpm-LM Gardens ter Al 
1.20-1.30 News &OHL35 About AngHa 
2.05am Into the New Year, Closedown. 

lesDERajssasg,,^ 

14S-4.15 Young Doctors SJ»-«35 
Lookaround i£30mi Aly Bata and Friends 
IJO Closedown. 

CENTRAL As London except 
UC " ' . "fife l-ape-IJO New 140 
News B.0MJS Central News I200an 
Nm Avengers 1.30 atoMndar 230 Ctoaadmm 
GRANADA As London except 
bwuwiM laaay-ijQQTiie a 

Dots of Monts Colo 1.2&-1.30 Grenada 




HiyWESTfe^S^evrorm. 

Year 120-1 JO News 620*35 News 



A perfect beauty ? Oa Channel 
4»at&05pra 

TfiW A* London except 12J0pm-1 JO 
1S3L Gardens forABLZO-UO New 5.15 
Gus Honeytjun's MagicBidhdeysSJO- 
545 Crossroads BJOToday South West 6J0- 
720 Who* the Boas? 12J0em Postscript 
1236 Closedown. 

TVS As London except IJJkxtt-IJO 

11= News MS-4.15 Young Doctors 6JU- 
635 Coast to Coast ZJSan Company. 
Closedown. 

TYWETEES^jgX^ 

tit Che Rich end Famous l iO News 135- 
130 Loakeround 630 Northern Ufa OiS-flJS 
TterSng the Tide t230wn EpSogue 12JS 
Flnt: Broafc d ance 2.10 Oosedown. 

ULS l bR ijoyjStSwSSoSsWM. 

wad. World of An Imale 630 Qood Evening 
UtetBr 635635 Foace Six 1235 Ctosedown. 

YORKSHIRE 

UffCMme live 13D-130 News 6JOO-6J6 
C&fBrate 1230am Must Box - Timrmr MeOatt 
130 Amanda Radngxxi Show 230 Mno 
Show 430 Simon Rotter 530 The Shadow 630 
Closedown. 




Racfidl 


Radio 3 


Radio 4 


Make some 
midwinter magic. 

'* ss ^sW Tuletide Chicken. 

~ Tkke a break from this month’s 

hectic pace with this simple chicken dish. 
Arrange 4 chicken portions in a shallow baking 
dish. Blend 150ml (V4 pint) fresh Single Cream with half 
a can of condensed mushroom soup. 

Stir In a little crushed garlic, salt and pepper and 
then pour over the chicken. 

Bake at 180°C (350°FX Mark 4 for 45 minutes. 

Serve with jacket potatoes and salad. 

Ibull want to make this magic long 
after Yuietide's gone! 


MF Imedkan wave). Stereo on 
VHF(see below) 

News on the han-hour from 
620am until 520pm then 720, 
820,9020 

530m Adrian John 720 Mfce 
Smith’s Breakfast Show 930 
Simon gates 122 0 Newsbeat 

l»DmLfflTrB^M ,yDa V' 0S 
Newsbeat 1986 (Frank Partridge) 
730 Janice and John’s New 
Year Special 930 Runrig in Concert 
1020 2.00m The Adrian Juate 
New Years Eve Disco Party md at 
1220 ntidhtatt Big Ban. VHF 
Stereo Ramos 1 S 2: 420am As 
Radio 2 920pm As Ratio 2 
230-430am As RarSo 2. 

c -Radio 2 . .) 

MF (medtern wave). Stereo on 
VHF (see Radto 1 ) 

News on the hour (except 


625 Weather. 720 News 
725 Concert Spohr (Duo 

Concertanteta D, Op 67 
No 2: Pinchas Zukerman and 
ttzfta kPertnan, woinsj, 
Mendalssotm (Konzertstk* 
in D minor. Op 114 No 
^Arranged by Sheen : Thee 
Kteg, d&rinet aito JtAffit 
Farreia. bssset-hwn). 
Schubert (Sonata in A 
minor, D821. Arpeogkxw: 
Bashmet viola and 
Muntyan, piano). 820 News 

8.05 Concert fcontd): Russian 
toft sorq My Garden 
(State Academic Russian 
Chobr). Stravinsky 
(Quatre etudes: French 


125 BBC Scottish SO in 
Sttfng (under Sir 
Charles Groves), with Erich 
Greenberg (rioun). Grieg 
(tfw suite Sflurd Jorealfei). 
Nielsen (Vtoan Concerto), 
HaNorsen (Entry of the 


On long wave, (s) stereo on VHF 
5L55 Shipping 630 News Briefing; 
Weather 

6.10 Fanning Today 625 
Morning Pretsa (s) 627 
Weather; Travel 
720 Today, tod 720, B20 
Today's news 720 
Business news 7JS, 625 
Sport 720 News 
Summary 725 Thought for 
the Day 735 Weather 
820 Cat's Whiskers. 

presented by Bernard 
brfcbtoa(s) 837 Weather; 

Travel 
920 News 

9.05 With Great Pleasure. 

Irene Thomas presents a 
se l ec tion of her favourite 
prosa and poetry. 

1020 News; Farrefi's Travels. 

Nigel Farrett goes in 
search of the extra or d in ar y 
side of British everyday 
fife. 

1030 The Fosdyfca Saga (s) 

10.45 Wives of toe Great 

Composers. Fritz Sptegl 
inve^igates toe tate ofthe 
two Mrs J S Bachs. 

1130 News; Travel; 

Persuasion (new series) 
Three-pert dramatization of 
the classic novel by Jans 
Austen. WNh Roger Hume 
and Claire Fatoonbridgs 
in toe cast Part 1 
1220 News; Classic Features. 

A 1939 portrait by Joan 
Littlewood of social 

conditions In 
Manchester, baaed on 
Enoei's theories. 

1227 PromptiTheatra quiz 
with two teams of stage 
and screen actors 1255 
Weather 

130 The World at One. News 
1.40 The Archers 1 JS5 

230 Newsfile immortal 
Bohemian. First of two 

ancfvrorks^ Giacomo 
Puccini (s) 

330 News; The Afternoon 
Play. What Every Woman 
Knows, by J M Barrie.With 
Phyffis Logan as Maggie 
and DavkfHaynian as John 
Shand. 

420 The Living World "Let's 
Hear It Again". Highlights 
from the past years 
programmes. 

535 PM 

530 The Fosdyke Saga (s) 

5.45 Radio 4 Christmas 
Competition. Another 
chance to hear the dues 520 
Weather 525 Shipping 
620 The Six O’clock News; 

Financial Report 
6.15 I've Been Together Now 
For 70 Years. Johnny 


720,82 

1.05pm, 


635 (mf only). 926. 

420am Cofin Berry 520 Martin 
Stanford 720 Bob Holness 930 
Jimmy Young 1120 Ken Bruce 
in Glasgow 125pm David Jacobs 
220 Maggie Phtotn is Joined by 
Tony Curtis who talw about 
antiques 330 Mice D'abo 525 
John Dunn 720 Folk on 2 920 
Listen to the Band (with Charlie 
Chester) 1020 Reriew of the 
Sporting Year 1986 1120 Ray 
Moore with a musical toast to the 
old and new years, tod at 1220 


Desks 

!, 422, 525, 622, 


Ippofitov-tvanov (Three 
romances to poems by 
Tagore: Irina Arkhipova, 
mezzo). Prokofiev 
(Romeo and Jufiet eutta No 
2: National SO of 
Washington). 920 News 

925 This Week's Composers: 

Constant Lambert and 
Friends. Lambert (the btflet 
Pomona: ECO), Berners 
(Tango and Waltz, A 
Wedding Bouquet 
Chores and Orchestra of 
Royal Opera House, 
Covent Garden), Lambert 
(batfet suite Horoscope: 


Boyaras), SboJlus 
(Symphony No 6) 

220 Record Review: Critics' 
Choice. Paul Vaughan to 
conversation with Alan Btyth. 
Richard Osborne, Lionel 
Salter and John Warrack 

420 Choral Evensong: from 
St CJement Danes 
Church. London. A five 
transmis si on. 428 News 

520 Midweek Choice: Mozart 
(Minuet, Diver ti me n to In 
D.K 334: Academy of St 
MartfrHn- Fields), 

Scarlatti (Sonata to D, KkSfc 
Li path, piano), Jacob 
(Barber of Sevite ogoes to 
trie DeviL- City of HtH 
Youth Orchestra). Foulds 
(Apri— England Peter 
Jacobs, piano), Vaughan 
WiUiams (Tuba Concerto 
in F minor John 


Fletcher/LSO), Satot- 
Saens (Etude en forme de 
valse: Qccoiini, piano). 
Ponce (EstreUita: Nktoe 
Koshetz, soprano), ^rrd 
(nwBettefi: Philip Jonas 
Brass Ensemble) 

6-15 Porgy and Bess: three- 
act opera by Gershwin, 
as performed last summer in 
Glyndeboume. With 
WUJard WWte as Porgy. 
Cynthia Haymon as 
Bess, and Damon Evans as 
Sportin’ Ufa. Simon 
Rattle conducts the London 
Phi lh a r monic Orchestr a 

and Glyndeboume Chorus. 
Act one and act two, 
scenes 1 and 2 

8.10 Houseman on 

Hodywooct the third of 
John Houseman's 
conversations with 
Christopher Cook. Tonight, 
Houseman touches on 

his days with Paramount, 
RKO (working on Cittzsn 
Kane) and MqM 

830 Porgy and Bess: Act 2, 
senes 3-4. And Act toree 

10.15 New Premises: another 
chance to hear the arte 
magazine, presented by 
Nigel Andrews 

11.00 Beethoven Piano 

Sonatas: John LIB plays 
the No 299 to B flat. Op 106 
(Hammaridarier) 

1127 News. 1220 welcome to 
1 987 with toe chimes of 
Big Ben. 


the cream this 




















. 8>&V Cw**'. 






Charles Nova presents 
mghtride I 

WORLD SERVICE 
SflONwwdaSfnnSre? 

Twsnty-IDur Houra 730 
830 ifcws *38 Refections 8L15 Classical 
Record Harisw ftJO Just 8 Mhuie 630 
Naurs 939 Review of British Press 9.15 
World Today 930 Rnandal Nam 940 
Look Ahead 94S Patrick Mortyn’S Male 
Box 1030 Nows 1031 Ommbus 1030 
Jazz Score 1130 Nam 1139 Nows About 
Britain 11.15 No Laughton Matter 1136 A 
Letter Rom WBtos (un» 1130) 1230 
Ratfo Newsreel 12.15 ItasMti 
muahm 1235 Farming Won 
Sports Roundm 130 Nam 130 Ta m ty- 
four Hours 130 Qavalciprnem "86 230 
Nam Mowed by: OudodCs Revisw of 
the Year 245 Report on RaHglon 330 
Recto Newsresl 3.15 A Rjbjts lor the Past 
830 TWo Chests for 1966 3430 News 
430 C o mment a ry 4.16 Rock Salad 445 
World Today £30 News SJ0 A Latter from 
Wales (unts5.ia 630 Nam 030 Twsmy- 
FOur Hours 030 Assignment 030 News 
931 Hava you Seen an oner? 9.15 Rock 
Safad 845 Recorxfing of tha Weak 1930 
News 1038 Tha Wbrid Today 1025 A 
Letter From Wales 1030 Hnandst News 
1040 Refractions 1045 Sports Roumfrj) 
1130 News 1139 Commentary 11.15 
New Year Outlook 1230 News 1239 
News About Britain 12.16 Radio Newsreel 
1230 TWo Cheers tor 1888 130 News 
121 Outlook's Review 01 the Year 145 
Body Tafc 230 News 239 Commentary. 
2.15 Have You Ever Seen an Otter? 230 
Assignment 330 News 330 News About 
Britain 3-15 The Wdru Today 330 
Sstenca end Sod 430 Newsocefc 430 
Cl a eet c ai Record Revtowfunf 445)545 
World Today. M timss to GBIT. 


1020 The Story of Babar. tiie 
Little Elephant: Cfive 
Swttt tees the story by Jean 
de Brunhoff. WNh music 
by Poulenc, played on toe 
pteno by David Mason. 

1030 Robert Rich* Medici 
String Quartet with Thea 
KJngTdarinet). Quintet in E 
flat mtoor.Op 102 far 
cKsmetano strings 

11.10 Hello, Modem Dey: The 
state of the American 
musical. Stephan Games in 
conversation wtth 
Charles Strouae. WBfiam 
Rnn and Mtcrtoel 
Starobin 

1130 Matinee musicato: BSC 
Concert Orchestra, with 
Gordon Fergus Thompson 


Wood (Marntin Veen). 
Satot-Saens (The swan), 
Chopin (Concert 
P ar aphrase Op 18 No 1). 
Johann Strauss (Wine. 
Woman and Song), 
Maforossy rFafcyTafe), 
Mendelssohn (Rondo 
ttofiam. Op 29) 

1230 Trsnsattontic B^es: 

recordings made by Stan 
Getz, witothe Swedish AU- 
Stav. 120 News 





Cyuthia Haymon: Porgy 
and Bess, R3, 6.15pm 

htorris reealts Ms chadhood 
in Wales. 

630 Paul Temple and the 
Conrad Case. Part 7 
720 News 
735 The Archers 
720 Goto' Bamboo. 3: Mr 
Yamada does Ms duty. 

730 Murder for Christmas: 
Trent's Last Case, by 
EC Bentley. 

930 The Impressartos. Daniel 
Snowman talks to Alan 
Sievewright and Denny 
Dayvtss, who for nearly 
20 years have periodkady 
staged opera 


world's greatest singers 
(Sl 

930 The Living Museum. 

Annie Afisebrook finds 
the Pitt Rivers Museum to 
Oxford a vibrant, living 
place. 

10.15 Ghost Story: A Little 
Place off toeEdgware 
Road, by Graham Greene 

1029 Weather 

1030 The World Tonight 

1130 News: workforce. Brian 
Redhead with a quarterly 
report on the world of 
employment. 

1145 Watchnight Service led 
by the Rev Noel Proctor, 
Senior Chaplain at 
S&angeways Pnson, 
Manchester (s) 1233 
Shipping 

VHP (available in England and 
S Wales only} as above 


S Wales only) as abc 
except 533530m 
Travel l25-220pnt 
Listening comer (s) 


Wbatoer 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1053kHz/285rn;1089kHz/275m; Radto 2: 693kH_z/4 33m; 9 09kHz(330«h; Raffio^g: 1215kHz, 
32_5 Radio 4: 200kHz/t500m; VHF-S2-95; LBC:1 152khiz/2B1m: VHF 97.3; Capita I548kH2/194m: VHF95.8; BBC 
1458kHz/206nv VHF 94.9; World Semico: MF 648kHz/463m, 


l7ra:VHF-90- 
do London: 




. .1 





- ••vy: 


28 


WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 31 1986 


THE 


TIMES 


First published in 1735 




■ -■ /■ ■ ' -A* 


West Indies wilt 
in the heat of 
Pakistan attack 

From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Perth 


They have been round the 
Australian pyjama shops 
again, finding a green strip for 
Pakistan, grey for West Indies, 
blue for England and yellow 
for the host country, in which 
to play the Benson and Hedges 
Challenge. Yesterday, in the 
first match of the competition, 
the greens upset the applecart 
by beating the greys. In other 
words. West Indies lost to 
Pakistan, which makes them 
slightly less hot favourites to 
reach the final a week today. 
They will not necessarily have 
to win their two remaining 
matches, but they well may. 

Put in by Richards, Paki- 
stan made 199 for eight, which 
should have been more after 
reaching 160 for two with 
seven overs left. Batting undeT 
the new "Perth lights, being 
used for the first time in an 
international match. West In- 
dies found a young Pakistan 
side set upon fighting every 
inch of the way. Pakistan 
fielded spendidly. and the 
running out of Richardson, 
when he was playing well, was 
the turning point 

The man of the match was 
Mudassar, who took three of 
the first five West Indies 
wickets to fall for 36 runs in 
his 10 overs. It could equally 
well have been Shoaib 
Mohammad, son of Hanifand 
nephew of Mushlaq, who had 
made a useful 34, held a 
brilliant catch at short extra 
cover to get rid of Dujon, and 
bowled his gentle off-cutters to 
good effect There was abbul 
Pakistan's cricket a youthful 
vigour that I had not expected. 
As Imran led them off at the 
end, 1 thought I detected more 
than a trace of emotion. 

Play was from 1.45pm until 
just after 9pm, and the game 
was watched by an estimated 
crowd of 1 0,000. England play 
their first match in the com 


petition tomorrow, against 
Australia. Needing to name 14 
players from whom to choose, 
they will probably leave out 
French ana Slack. As a Christ- 
mas present from the England 
side French, who is one of 
their favourites, was given a 
book with some such title as 
“What to do in your Spare 
Tune in Australia.*' 

Quite apart from the result, 
it was worth being at 


PAKISTAN 

Stoat) Moh d c Richards b Benjamin 34 

Qasim Omar rwi out 30 

Ranfe Raja cBld ia nte on b Gray — 42 
Javwi Mandad c Richards b Walsh - 53 

Imran Khan c Benjamin b Gray 16 

Marcoor Bfehl c R&artlson b Gray _ 4 

r Ahmed c sub b Gray 2 

i Akramc Harper o Walsh 9 

~ 7 

199 

Mudassar Nazar and SaJeem Jafler <Sd 
not bet 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-SI. 2-72. 3-163. 4- 
166. 5-177. 6-188. 7-188. 8-199. 
BOWLING: Gray 10-1-454: Watt) 10*0- 
48-2: Holding 1D-O30-0; Benfarran 10-2- 
35-1; Harper 10-0-38-0. 

WEST INDIES 

CGOeertdgebAkram 22 

D L Haynes c SaJeem b Mudassar — 25 

R B Richardson run out 38 

TV A Richards Bw U Mudassar 10 

A L Logie cSaleemb Mudassar 7 

tPJLbujonc Shoe* b JeBer 13 

R A Harper not out — — — - — 20 
w K R Benjamin c Jatfer b Shoafe — 3 

M A Hoidtog b Shoaft) f 

A H Gray c Imran b Jattaf 3 

CAWashbAkram 2 

Extras (lb 16, nbl) 

Total (482 overs) 


J}az Ahn 
Wasim i 


tSaHm Yousuf not out 


Extras (t> 3. w 3. nbl) 
Total (8 vrtds. 50 overs). 


_ 17 
165 

FALL OFWICKETS. 140. 2-71. 3-105, 4* 
106. 5-123, 6-128. 7-139, B-150. 9-155, 10- 
165. 

BOWUNG: Imran 7-2-150: Jafler 102- 
292; Akram 7.22-13-2: Manzoor 2-0-10- 
0; Mudassar 10-0-36-3: Strafe 104)432. 

yesterday's game just to see 
the great and glorious muddle 
the scoreboard operators got 
into when Pakistan began to 
vary their advertised batting 
order. They had no more idea 
than any of us which was 
SaJeem J after, Ijaz Ahmed or 
Wasim Akram, so that each 
time a wicket fell they took a 
punt and put Mudassar's 
name in the frame. Mudassar 
had been meant to come in 


early but never came in at alL 

First impressions of the 
West Indians were of the 
ferocity of their throwing and 
the height of their bowlers, 
who seemed to tower, like the 
towers of light, over all man- 
kind. Walsh, Gray, Holding, 
Harper and Benjamin were 
neither especially fast nor 
particularly hostile. Nor did 
they bowl short, the rules of 
one-day cricket making it not 
worth their while. 

But when Pakistan tried to 
accelerate over the last third of 
their innings the bowling was 
too accurate for them, the 
pitch a little too slow and the 
boundaries too long. To avoid 
being fined. West Indies 
bowled their oversat 16 to the 
hour, they can do it when they 
have to, as they could in Test 
matches if they were made to. 

After a slow start to their 
own innings West Indies built 
a position from which they 
could have won comfortably. 
Perhaps they should have 
done. They passed 100 in the 
28th of their 50 overs with 
only Greenidge and Haynes 
out, Richardson bursting with 
confidence and the great Rich- 
ards playing himselfin. By the 
end of the thirtieth over they 
were 106 for four and up 
against it. 

Having steered a ball to 
shortish third man, Richard- 
son made the mistake of 
following the stroke rather 
than attending to his partner’s 
intentions. Richards, mean- 
while. ran without looking to 
see that Richardson had his 
back turned. In no time they 
were both in the batsman's 
crease. Richardson, who had 
momentarily left it, had to go. 
England play West Indies on 
Saturday and after yesterday's 
result they -can expect no 
mercy. It should be quite a 
match. 


Worcester Step up One-day 
hunt for Botham s ame IS 


Mike Jones. 

Worcestershire's cricket com- 
mittee chairman, arrives in 
Perth today armed with a 
contract which the county are 
confident will soon bear the 
signature of Ian Botham. 

Worcestershire gave Somer- 
set notice of their intention to 
approach the England all- 
rounder two weeks ago, and 
will make their first official 
move towards tempting him 
to New Road on New Year's 
Day. 

“We've done everything by 
the book so far and realize that 
we are still not allowed to 
actually speak to the player 
before January 1," said Dun- 
can Feamley, the Worcester- 
shire chairman. “But our 
cricket committee were unani- 
mous in wanting to sign him 
and we don't want to slip up 
now. 


By Chris Moore 


“If all the terms are accept- 
able I would expect to have 
signed him by January 9 or 
10.” added Feamley, who 
plans to finalize the deal 
himself when he flies to 
Australia next week. 

“Mike Jones will make it 
clear before then that we are 
not prepared to consider any 
outrageous demands. But I 
don't think lan will be too 
greedy. He knows there are 
limited resources in county 
cricket and we certainly won't 
be going over the top” 

Warwickshire and Lan- 
cashire pulled out of the race 
to sign Botham earlier in the 
month, leaving Derbyshire as 
Worcestershire's only serious 
rivals. 

“As for as we’re concerned 
the matter is by no means a 
formality ” added Feamley. 


You’ll get caught up 
in Politics on the way 
totheTheatre. 


You’ll also find dozens of other 
categories in the TLS Listings. US a 
new, unique, accurate and up-to-date 
weekly listing of new and forth- 
coming books. 

It is organised by subject and genre, 
ranging from Art through to Zoology, 
and will include over 10,000 new titles 
every year. 

For all those interested in books it is 
indispensable. 

The benefits of the TLS - the worlds 
leading literary journal - are obvious. 
With the introduction of the 
invaluable TLS Listings you need to 
be sure of your weekly copy. 


Subject 
Classification 

Author ^ 

Title 

Publisher ^ 

Pagination 

Hardcover/ 

Paperback 

Price 

ISBN (hc&pb$ 
Publication Date 



Theatre and cinema 

Allen, Marlin Particular Friendships 
Tuber. %£)«,(! 57/ MU 7 X 17111,86 
BerturfT, Sinn K vetch and Acapulco 
filter 6Spp O WConW OJ. 0 5 71 MW I. n/lIJSb 
Gallagher. Tag John Ford- The man and hn films 
Cahlomui UP. S72pp . iHu, 535, 0 SJ0 DW’5. ^ 

Hare, David The Bay ai Nice and Wrecked Eggs 
94pp. 05. 0 57/ 1469* S. 17/11/86 

Fuller. Dnub The Singing Dctraiw 
filter. £9.05 fto&owrl. 14.VSJS9.95 Ipaptrbtck). 
0571 14631 7 the). 0571 14590 6 Ip6). 17/11.06 
Stoppard. Ton, adapted (ram Arthur Sctaiufer 
Dalliance and Undiscovered Couni ry 
Faber. Wpp a 05 (hankoirr). £? 05*5 0J IpqpftfwU.I 
0 571 14750 X (he). 0 57! 14'.W 0 (pb). 17,11/86 




TLS Listings 

Place a firm order with your newsagent now/ 


1 ; 


winning 

Cricket's dependence on the 
one-day game is expected to 
be underlined once more dur- 
ing the next week in Perth, 
where large crowds are likely 
to gather for the Benson and 
Hedges Challenge involving 
England. Australia, Pakistan 
and West Indies. 

The current Test series be- 
tween Australia and England 
is proving a financial dis- 
appointment to the Australian 
Cricket Board. 

England’s win in three days 
in the fourth Test at Mel- 
bourne is reckoned to have 
cost them at least $400,000 
(about £190.000) in lost gate 
receipts for the fourth and 
fifth days and with the series 
and the destiny of the Ashes 
decided attendances for the 
fifth Test in Sydney are not 
expected to improve matters. 
Only 13,000 advanced book- 
ings have been received so far 
for the final Test, which starts 
on January 10. ^ 

However, organizers in 
Perth are expecting capacity 
crowds of 30.000 for most of 
the seven one-day matches 
which comprise the Benson 
and Hedges Challenge, 
England's opening game in 
the series is against Australia 
tomorrow, with the final tak- 
ing place on January 7. 


TENNIS 

Wilkinson 
survives to 
fight again 

Chris Wilkinson survived 
heavy bombardment to keep 
his hopes alive in the Pruden- 
tial British junior covered 
court championships at 
Queen's Club yesterday, but- 
he knows he faces another 
dose of the same today, when 
he lakes on Marie Petchey, the 
second seed, for a place in the 
quarter-finals. 

Wilkinson must have felt he 
was on the receiving end of 
heavy artillery yesterday as he 
struggled to cope with the 
ferocious hilling of Garry 
Englcman. of London. 
Engjeman won the first set but 
Wilkinson proved the wilier 
and the more patient when he 
capitalized on his opponent's 
mistakes and took the next 
iwo sets for victory. 

Petchey beat Karl Burt of 
Dorset, while Danny 
Sapsford. of Surrey, the 
defending champion, had lit- 
tle trouble in disposing of 
David Harris, of Essex, and 
will meet another Essex boy, 
Dominic CouII. in the third 
round. 

All ;he seeds in the girls' 
event came safely through, 
with only number seven, Ali- 
son Fleming, from Melton 
Mowbray, dropping a set in 
her defeat of Amanda Gregory 
of Nottingham. 

Results, page 26 


SPORT 



Quick silver Hayes has made a fast Impression with Arsenal (Photograph; Peter Trievnor) 


Value of Hayes up tenfold to 
£250,000 in three months 


By Clive White 

On a day when football 
heaped a further accolade 
upon George Graham’s y oath- 
fill championship pretenders 
with the presentation of a third 
young player of the month 
award this year to Arsenal, 
the manager condoned to keep 
the pressure of expectation at 
arm's length by saying: 
“Personally, I fancy Everton 
to win the tide" 

Graham, who was present at 
a luncheon in honour of Mar- 
tin Hayes, the Flat Uno 
November player of the 
month, did at least offer the 
view that Arsenal would finish 
in the top five. Bnt of Everton 
he said: “They have a strong 
squad of players which I don't 
have. I don't envy them, I just 
want to emulate them. But I 
won't be panicked into 
buying." 

Presumably, neither will be 
be panicked into selling, at 
least not by stories in the 
tabloid Press, where it was 
suggested that West Ham 
United were poised to make an 
offer for Stewart Robson, the 
England under-21 midfield 
player whose absence through 
injury has gone almost un- 
noticed in the general well 
being of the Highbury dub. 

Graham, who earlier in the 
season rejected an offer of 
about £800,000 from Everton 
for Robson, seen by many as a 
fixture England captain, said 
that John LyalJ, the West 
Ham manager, had not been in 
contact with him and added: 
I've no intention of selling my 
best players." 

Robson, who has not played 
since September 6 after a 
hernia operation, is scheduled 
to make his reapperance in a 
reserve game in a fortnight's 
time: He, like Tony Adams, 
has also been a Fiat player of 


Punter’s £50,000 
bet on Arsenal 

An anonymous punter yes- 
terday walked into a London 
bookmakers and bet £50,000 
c3sh on Arsenal to win the 
first division title. Staff at the 
Walthamstow branch of 
Coral's could not believe it as 
the man. in his twenties, 
produced 20 bundles of £50 
notes. 

“He had the money in his 
pockets," said a spokesman 
for Coral’s, who will have to 
pay out £150,000 and return 
the £50,000 stake money if 
Arsenal triumph. “It's the 
biggest football bet we have 
ever taken, and it will be the 
biggest single pay-out on any 
bet if he wins. The man, who 
wants to remain anonymous, 
made just the one bet, on 
Arsenal to win the title at odds 
of 3-1.” 


the month winner in the last 12 
months. 

Graham almost made a big 
mistake the last time he was 
prepared to let one of his 
bright young men go. Three 
months ago he accepted an 
offer of £25,000 from 
Huddersfield Town for Hayes. 
But Hayes, who was consid- 
ered superfluous to require- 
ments, rejected the move after 
a short visit The East 
Londoner, aged 20. had not 
realized how far away 
Huddersfield was from his 
family. 

Injuries to Williams, Nicho- 
las and most relevantly Rix 
gave Hayes the chance to show 
Graham what he could do with 
an extended first-team run. 
What he could do was score 
goals, 13 to date including six 
penalties in 15 full appear- 
ances. Meanwhile Rix, back to 


full fitness, is playing for the 
reserves. 

Graham admits that he 
made an error when be consid- 
ered selling Hayes: “Yon 
could add a zero to that earlier 
valuation. He's unusual in that 
not many wide players are top 
goaiscorers. He is a right- 
footer who is playing out of 
position on the left, but it suits 
him because he can cat inside 
on his best foot. 

“It is one of the advantages 
of having a small squad that 
youngsters get a chance to 
show what they can do. We 
have had to persevere with 
them." 

Hayes, who received his 
silver salver from BUI Nichol- 
son, tixe former Tottenham 
Hotspur manager, said that he 
was upset when Don Howe 
left. “He was a very likeable 
person and gave me a lot of 

confidence. The new manager 
has pot a lot of ideas into the 
team. He has got players doing 
what they should be doing and 
he's put it across to them that 
if they drat do well they’re 
oat. 

“The older players have 
realized that they have got to 
help ont the younger ones. 
Sansom helps me, Anderson 
helps Perry Groves, Tony 
Adams has O'Leary and then 
there's Will iams in midfield. 
It's ideal." 

Graham, recognizing the 
value of first-team experience, 
yesterday agreed to loan Mi- 
chael Thomas, a 19^y ear-old 
full back of great potential, to 
Portsmouth, the second di- 
vision leaders, for a month on 
the understanding that he 
played in the first team. “It 
could be a bit of a gamble 
because of the size of our 
squad, but I’ve got to look at 
things in the long-term," Gra- 
ham said. 


Saxton sacked by Blackburn 


Bobby Saxton was dis- 
missed as manager of Black- 
bum Rovers yesterday after 
five-and-a-half years in 
charge. 

William Fox, the Blackburn 
chairman, broke the news to 
Saxton, who had six months 
of his contract to run, in a 
meeting yesterday morning at 
Ewood Park before placing the 
club’s coach Tony Parkes. a 
former Blackburn player, in 
temporary charge of the team 
for tomorrow's match at 
Derby County. 

Saxton's departure, follow- 
ing the dismissal of Mick 
Buxton by Huddersfield 


Dilley in 
demand 

Hampshire, generally re- 
garded as favourites to sign 
Graham Dilley if he decides to 
leave Kent, have notified the 
county officially of their in- 
terest in the 27-year-otd Eng- 
land cricketer. Lancashire and 
Somerset also intend to speak 
to Dilley. 

Dilley has already received 
details of a new two-year 
contract offered by Kent to 
replace his current agreement 
which expires today. 

Trial clash 

Harlequins* Rugby Union 
match against Wasps at the 
Sloop Memorial Ground on 
Saturday has been de-merited 
because Wasps have seven 
players involved in the Eng- 
land trial at Twickenham. It 
was originally a merit table 
“A" and London merit table 
match. 


By Steve Bates 

Town, means that the second 
division's two longest-serving 
managers have been sacked 
within a week. Buxton was 
appointed in October 1978 
and Saxton in June 1981. 

Although Blackburn nar- 
rowly avoided relegation last 
season, finishing 1 9th, and are 
presently second from the 
bottom of the table having 
won only four matches this 
season, the sacking shocked 
Saxton who has taken Rovers 
close to promotion in pre- 
vious years. 

He said: “It has hurt but in 
view of our position I have no 
complaints. It's been a plea- 


SPORT IN BRIEF: 



Dilley: Hampshire interest 

Cooper goes 

Homcspare Bolton's un- 
settled basketball player Mark 
Cooper has been transferred to 
the second division promo- 
tion contenders Oldham Celt- 
ics and will make his first 
appearance in Saturday's top- 
of-the-table meeting at 
Walsall. 


sure to serve the club for so 
long and I leave with no 
animosity on my part I didn't 
want to resign because 1 
couldn't have walked out on 
the players at a time when they 
needed support 

Yesterday Fox acknowl- 
edged that the decision to 
dispense with Saxton was not 
a pleasant one but he added: 
“lire hour has come for us to 
make a change, distasteful 
though it may have been. We 
know the squad is good 
enough to gel us away from 
trouble but the results haven't 
been coming so we had to take, 
action. 


In the swim 

Joanne Drewitt, the na- 
tional age group 200 metres 
medley champion from Lu- 
ton, will swim in four events 
in the international 
championships in Geneva 
□ext month. Her races are 100 
metres backstroke. 100 metres 
butterfly, 100 and 200 metres 
freestyle. Five others in the 
Esso youth squad going to 
Geneva are Nicole Bates {Nor- 
wich Penguins). Steven 
Dronsfield (Salford). Ian 
McKenzie (Braintree and 
Booking), Michael Hanby 
(Nova Centurion) and Mat- 
thew O'Connor (City of 
Manchester). 

Lancs defend 

Lancashire, who have won 
the British Amateur Rugby 
League Association county 
championship for the last 
three years, begin the defence 
of this season's tournament 
against Cumbria at Marypbrt 
on Saturday. 



1987: the year 
of a British 
Wimbledon win 


The uncanny infallibility of 
their prognostications makes 
it obvious to everyone that 
journalists, to a person, have 
the gift of second sight I have 
read the signs and portents for 
1987, and now propose to 
reveal exactly what will hap- 
pen in sport over the next 12 
months* 

Cricket 

New legislation will bring 
powerful punishment on any 
bowler who deliberately en- 
dangers a batsman. The era of 
the fast bowler will end at a 
stroke. At the same time, the 
law about covering wickets 
will be repealed. The West 
Indies will carry all before 
them with a four-man leg-spin 
attack. Cricket writers across 
the world will condemn it 
because of the mental torment 
it causes in batsmen. 

Ian Botham will issue the 
following statement: “I realize 
that I have been wrong in 
many ways. I see now that 
were it not for Press and 
television, I would not be as 
rich or as famous as I am. I am 
very gratefol to all that the 
media have done for me. Peter 
Roebuck is a lovely man, he 
and I are going on holiday 
together to Pakistan." 

The Radio 3 commentary 
team will be strengthened by a 
young and gifted former 
policeman from Hampshire. 
He likes wine rather a lot. 
Because of his genius. Radio 3 
will be forced to stop playing 
the giddy goat Once again 
listeners really will understand 
what's going on out there. 

Phil Edmonds will be made 
England captain. At his mod- 
est press conference, he will 
say: “I owe it all to my 
wonderful biographer." 

My batting average will be 
in double figures. 

Yachting 

The America’s Cup com- 
petition will stop dead on 
January 1 and will never be 
contested again. The or- 
ganizers will say: “The com- 
petition is not only silly, it is 
also incredibly boring and 
ridiculously expensive. In- 
stead of having a boat race, we 
shall give £100 million to 
Oxfam every four years." 

Tennis 

A previously unheard-of 
British boy, ago! 17. will win 
Wimbledon as a qualifier. He 
will be admired for his resolu- 
tion, his confidence in adver- 
sity, and his ability to deal 
ruthlessly with inferior play- 
ers. He will also win the mixed 
doubles in partnership with 
the marvellously consistent Jo 
Durie. As a result of his 
success. Boris Becker will 
retire. ‘Tm over the hill," he 
will say. 

Football 

Skilful legislation and the 
abnegation of all vested in- 
terest will turn the tide against 
hooliganism. Clubs will 
acknowledge their debt to 
Luton and Watford as football 
matches become sane and 
delightful occasions. 

The loyalty of clubs to their 
managers is justly celebrated. 
Football management is seen 
as one of tbe country's most 
secure jobs. All managers take 
a vow of public silence. 

So do football chairmen. 

All com petitions are banned 



Boxing 


The sport will ban itself all 
over ihe world. A spokesman 
will announce: “We see now 
that the sport is a barbarous 
anachronism. We will give all 
our money to Oxfam. The 
boys will take up croquet." 


RUGBY UNION 


Moriarty welcomed 
back to the fold 

By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


Paul Moriarty, omitted 
from the Weisfa trial and the 
subsequent national squad of 
33 earlier this month, was 
restored to favour yesterday 
when he was added to the 
Welsh forwards who trained 
in Cardiff during the evening. 

The interpretation to be 
placed upon this is that 
Moriarty has occupied the 
doghouse long enough after 
the incident during November 
when he injured a Richmond 
forward during the game 
against Moriarty’s dub, 
Swansea. 

Moriarty. who came into 
Wales’s back row against Ire- 
land last season and played in 
bis country’s next four games, 
was suspended for one match 
by his club after punching 
Gins Mills, the Richmond 
prop. 

Mills was forced to see a 
specialist about his damaged 
eye, though there proved to be 
no long-term injury and he is 
playing once more. The Swan- 
sea flanker was also left out of 
the Welsh trial, which was 
seen as an additional disci- 
plinary measure imposed by 
the Welsh selectors. 

Evidently all concerned 
hope that Moriarty, who 
proved one of the finds of last 
season for Wales, has learnt 
his lesson. He will certainly 
have to indicate as much, 
having drawn attention to 
himself by his own actions, 
but if he contrives to produce 
the same quality perfor- 
mances of the last year within 
a disciplined context for his 


country, he should hold off the 
challenge of such players as 
Phil Pugh (Neath) for the 
blind-side flanker's place. 

The fact that he is the only 
named addition to the squad 
announced just over a fort- 
night ago for duty in the five- 
nations Tournament means 
his rehabilitation begins now. 
He and the rest of the forwards 
worked out under the eye of 
Tony Gray, the Welsh coach, 
last night, the backs having 
done the same on Monday 
night 

The full squad will gather 
again in Cardiff next Monday 
and the Welsh team to play 
Ireland at the Arms Park on 
January 17 will be decided on 
January 8. 

Palmer leads 
depleted Bath 

The former England centre 
John Palmer will lead Bath at 
Cardiff tomorrow. Palmer, 
who recently opted out of 
representative rugby, makes a 
welcome return to strengthen 
a much depleted Bath side 
following an arm injury. 

The holiday match, spon- 
sored by British Gas , '"®s 
ruined as a showpiece game 
when the England selectors 
decided to hold an inter- 
national trial at Twickenham 
on Saturday and called up j * 
Bath players to take part in it* 

Two of them were willing 
turn out at Cardiffbut lhedW 
selectors decided not to 
udice their England , chan^ 
by choosing them. 1 


Simon 

Barnes 


except the League and the FA 

C TTie professional foul is 
punished bv instant dismissal 
from the field of play. The use 
of an offside trap is cate- 
gorized as a professional fouL 

Snooker 

The world snooker final 
attracts a television audience 
of nil. Television abandons 
the game and starts to cover 
croquet “the game of the 
nineties". Wall-to-wall cover- 
age of the President's Cup 
makes Stephen Mulliner the 
first croquet millionaire. 

Rugby Union 

The Rugby Union issues the 
following statement: "We now 
realize that our support of 
South African rugby has been 
a source of great comfort to 
those who operate the apart- 
heid system. We regret this 
with all our souls. We resolve 
to have no more to do with ' « 
South Africa until the apart- \i 
heid system is dismantled." 

Clubs will formally de- 
nounce players involved in 
violent play, and will dismiss 
them from their ranks. The 
game will acquire a reputation 
for its no-nonsense honesty 
and its total refusal to try and 
hush things up. 

The British Lions will play a 
Great Britain Rugby League 
XV in a charity game. The 
result of • this marvellous 
match is hidden from me. but 
it raises £1 million for Oxfam. 

The president of the Rugby 
Union says: “We salute our 
brothers from the northern 
code. Long may they 
flourish." 

Horse Racing 

The bookmakers will abol- 
ish themselves, and force the 
sport to establish a tote 
monopoly. A spokesman for 
the bookmakers says: “We 
have bled the sport white for 
years. It is time to give raring 
back to itself." 

Golf 

My next door neighbour 
Eddy will (a) get his handicap 
down to single figures and (b) 

'give up talking about the 
game. “It’s silly to gel obses- 
sive about golf," he says. 

“After all, it's only a game." 

Athletics 

The sport will get its 
relationship with money 
worked out perfectly and 
justly and — ah, but the glass 
has gone misty now. I can't _ 
quite see how this will be •? 
brought about 

No nation will boycott any 
event for any reason whatso- 
ever. A spokesman for the 
African nations will say: “I 
think boycotts are a waste of 
time, a cheap trick that quite 
apart from anything else, are a 
rotten trick to play on our 
athletes." 


I 


k 




-r irr^iTif j nn' !