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No 62,371 


THE 



TIMES 


TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 


Tomorrow 


Rise in base rate 


It*- 


Pc.: :■. 







;%#W. 


'vT 

f .is ■;— 


Year of disruption 
The teachers’ 
dispute -a 
parent’s view 


feared as oil 


Emergency! 
One night 
man 

accident ward 


and sterling slide 


Safety 
checks 
ordered 
on 747s 


Lawyers 
threaten 
action 
on fees 


First ladies 
Mrs Marcos or 
Mrs Aquino, the 
Filipino choice 


By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

JJf was I ? ari P !d R opened in London two in the December banking 

2ELJ"* ip 3 OT f *»*wn cents down on Friday's month, 
ttcnange markets yesterday, closing levels, with the ster- On the on spot markets, 

irfliratma rwii — i; « ■ • a ■ . r a 




| From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

The Federal Aviation 
Authority has ordered all US 
airlines to carry out immedi- 


By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs 
Correspondent 

Leaden of the Bar yes- 
terday put forward to all 


renewing City fears that the 
Chancellor, Mr Nigel 


The cue king 
David Miller talks 
to snooker 
champion 
Dennis Taylor 


bank base rates. 


ing levels, with the ster- On the o3 spot markets, 
irate* 13 points lower at two large cargoes of North 

I mien. ul ‘ c iv®~‘ Later, in response to a Sea crude changed hands at 

1° finrang of money market SS16.82 a barrel. April deiiv- 
St a dmnagmg nse m interest rates m London, the eries are being forecast at 


-r. - „ -- . _ Poimd steadied foghdy, the $16.70 a wu.w. 

^s yptid oil sterling index dosing at 733, Heavy fuel oil is now berng 


pM&m. 


ate checks on their Boeing barristers retaliatory mea- 
747 jumbo jets alter cracks surcs almost tantamount to 


pnocs resumed their down- stiU 1.1 points down on the priced at $96 a tonne. At 


ti&f- * 


woe found m the frames of industrial action in the face 
four of than. At least 200 of the Government's refusal 


planes are affected. 

The directive was issued at 
the weekend after the discov- 


to negotiate on higher fees for 
criminal legal aid work. 


The proposals expected to 


ward spiral in u, e wake of previous dose. 


rlenr ii 7 .Hr ,rtiT. — ~ I? — below $102 8 iuuib u 

Against the dollar, the undercuts coal prices. 
Poridiost^ cenis ro The latest feu coma a 
OwntriS^i, Py“'' s , specM commimc 

g«tace » fcnoffwW 

a level defe n d ing market share^neets I 


Against the dollar, the undercuts coal prices. 



x«md lost . 22 cents to The latest fall comes as ' 
•13865. Money market in- Opec’s special committee I 


ery of the cracks in planes be endorsed at an extraor- 
bdonging to Pan American, dinary general meeting of the 
Trans World Airlines and Bar on Saturday, came after 

Qrvtfck diruKitW TTia <L A 


British Airways, rhe cracks the Government s consistent 
were in the forward pan of refusal to respond u> the 
the plane, near the line of Bar's claim for pay rises of 


about oil market stability. 

In London, traders were 
quoting the key Brent North 
Sea crude at below $17 a 


defending market share meets 


consistent with a half point in Vienna, with Sheik Ahmed 


rise in hank base rates. 




windows beneath the cockpit 
The FaA said that one found 


30-40 per cent 
In a letter yesterday to aD 


Zalri Yamani, the Saudi oil, 


in the Pan American plane ] barristers in England and 


economists believe minister and Opec’s most 


” ^ Timeal barrel, a level last seenin the that the Chancellor will try to 
53&a2SFS*±T &*hatfqf 1979, Prices for avoid a base rate increase but ^ 


gm 


bled to £4,000 because there] heavy fuel oft for use 


was no competition on Sat- 
urday - was shared by three 
readers, Mr Vincent Fiat, of 
Gosport, Hants, Mrs Sheila 
Durbar* of Herne Bay, Kent, 
and Mr Don Watkins, of 
Aylesbury, Backs. Portfolio 
Bst, page 20; bow to play, 
information service, hack 


stations were less than 


that the period of 
financial pressure wi 


r a t ret - chance of non-Opec oil 
be m producers such as Britain av 


was “raiber severe”. Wales, Bar leaders proposed 

Planes with between 10,000 authorizing banisters to 
and 14,000 landings must refuse to undertake any 
submit to visual inspections prosecution work 
within the next 50 landings. Yesterday Mr B 
Those that have flown more Alexander QC, chainr 
must do so within the next the Bar. said: 


Yesterday Mr Robert 
Alexander QC, chairman of 
the Bar, said: “The 


25 landings. In addition all Government’s response so for 
planes must have regular has been almost insulting to 

inrnnrfionr nftoi* otronr “** " 


solution on its own. 

A leading oil analyst said 


Kissinger 

pulls 

out of race 


price weakness, the political the end of January: If they so*® 1 ®* 1 on own - 
pressure on Mr Lawson to bawe fallen sharply, it will A leading oil analyst said 
keep interest rates from rising indicate that the Bank of last night: “Sheik Yamani is 
has inrwwawd following the has been trying to signalling a fen in prices to 

publication in the last few prop up the pound unsuccess- $15. He holds the key to 
days of recorel inrenrolov- by intervening in the when the fen will stop”. 


sm 


inspections after every 60 
landings until the cause of 
the cracks has been deter- 
mined. 


the profession.” 

The Bar had agreed with 
the Government that negotia- 
tions should be completed by 


publication fa the last few 
days of record unemploy- 


ment figures and a gloomy foreign exchange markets. The drop in oil prices has 


industrial trends survey from Also due today are money eaten into the Chancellor's 

■ N - -A A V « , a - ■» U . _ _ “ • I 


Mr Anatoly Sh ch aran s ky: Bonn Goverement sources say Japan Air Lines crash in 
privately that his release is now frmwnwmf August that killed 520 people. 


Two 747s were involved in the end of last mouth and the 
big accidents last year - the Bar's ad visas, the manage- 


ment consultants Coopers & 


the Confederation of British supply figures for last month, freedom to cut taxes in the 


Industry. These are expected to show ttnd g * on March 18. Indeed, 

With a special committee bat bank lending is focreas- some City economists are 
of the Organization of Petro- ing very sharply, possibly by saying that if oil prices do not 
leom ExDortme Countries as much as £3 billion in the recover from yesterday's lev- 


leom Exporting Countries 


meeting fa Vienna to rfiffmet January hanking month. 


recover from yesterday's lev- 
els, Mr Lawson could be 


Dr Henry Kissinger, the] market share, oil prfee tin- The last rise m base rates, forced to raise overafl tax- 


former US Secretary of State,] certainties were again the three weds ago, was trig- atioa if he is to stay within 


has decided not to challenge 
Mr Mario Ctyxao for the 
governorship of New York 
Stole in November, Repub- 
lican party leaders said. 


main fictor 
potwd. . 


hitting 


off by news of a £2 his maliim term 
bank lending increase strategy. 


iy wiuun 
financial 


Soviet dissident 
set for release 
in big spy swap 


August that killed 520 people, Lybrand, had been willing to 
and the Air-lndia crash in discuss any criticisms of their 


June off the coast of Ireland report on which the pay 
in which 329 people died, claim is based, he said. 


The JAL disaster occurred I “The Government has de- 


wfaeu the plane struck a dined to discuss the report, 
mountain in Japan. A bomb made no attempt to negotiate 


blast is suspected in the Air- 1 and made no offer. 


India tragedy.Offidals said I At the extraordinary gen- 


that neither of the two plane era! meeting leaders of the 
crashes appears to have Bar are proposing two resolu- 


Hire purchase 
hits record 


Hire purchase rose to. record j .... ByPfutip Webster, Political Reporter 
sjrite 5 the Stalgo™** ftxtish Leyland the Laird group, the London 

5. °f .December. £19,5 - IL&S %**£****« ^ 

Stoldferitilfcd:’ 

SS^* 8 - Amow^n nvd, ^ . Qo^mr Motors, it 
John- Bariy, ^ agpdt 22, « rintnnjR to . would be willing togive“fidl 

soldier iaT the Ulster Defend «*“ w foe Austin Rover undertakfo^ihat: most to- 11™ 

Regiment (fied yesterday ih i ca ^ dwi ^L. > hides sold by the business STStSSl m Manchester 

bombblastnear Bdcoo^dose t °£oPpasti»m involved would be manufrm- ^iSK* 

to the border yMtTibt Irish pmUxiMrVani (amnoqAc tureti in the United King- 
RepoMfc. . new, Secre te? or S ate -for . dom the products 3 

Trade and Indnstry,toW the continue to have a high * f* 

Commgs to talks btoween -jod contend there wSffi is punted under 

BL pd ^enaal Motms be a substantial level of ^ t 

c ov e tin g Leytand Tracks, exoorts- research and - ri * e . conipaay B 8180 seck ' 

r c*pon», researen ana __ tn rwumt a 


Americans near to Murdoch 
BL takeover i? sue ? ne lT 


By Our Foreign Staff 

The biggest East-West spy on the 
swap since the Second World Sftchanu 


9 J UTVMM crashes appears to have oar are proposing two resolu- 

. ^ anything to do with cracks, dons for debate: first, that the 

ign Staff • LONDON: The crack 'Bar deplores the fkilure of the 

mi the deal nr nn Mr found “ a British Airways Government to negotiate 

Sfu-hflmiKbv'c irinw bn t 747 ^ weelc during routine over Crown prosecution fees 

aocnaraasKy s release, n t ^ ,v». wi w 


War, involving the jailed said: “There is no skldect J™™* ™ m 
Soviet dissident Mr Anatoly that we have worked on' ^ or V arc * passenger cabin 


the and legal aid fees. 

bin Second, that the Bar en- 


huderor # d» — ■ -*«-* fioro its 


Sogat writ 

By John Young 


was outstanding. 


News International yes- 
today issued a writ against 


Soldier kitted 



ranged by die United States, mure difference to people in 
tiie Soviet Union and East the West— Hub release if 


BA started flying jumbos in 1 executive body, the 


Committee, namely: that it 


and West Germany, sources dissidents 
in the US and West Germany Union—" 
said yesterday. Mr She 


BA immediately reported would be authorized to take 
the defect to Boeing, which such action as deemed appro- 


Mr Shcharansky, aged 37,1 


issued an informal airwoithi- priate to influence the Gov- 
ness directive. BA has since eminent in the negotiations 


Reverts Aa swan had «n ti ***** ml “C® mreenve. oa nas since eramem in me negouanons 

h? S checked all its 747s at risk - and that until an acceptable 


been carried by the Wert prison and labour camps in , . 

Goman newspaper, BUd, 1978 on charges of spying 18 ot ■ SU_ , f , structure is aoeeci, jnem- 

whk-h «aid timtflw wu »sj. Hhe defea was only found bers of the Bar should 

n^ towrfw^r-^esteiw i“ one. of our 747s and that “execute their right to require 

scents held in the Soviet blue SM *»» repaired,” a spokes- that the fee for aS Grown 


18 of a fleet of 30. 


fee structure is 


which said that tire deal 


Jtiffi-.I&xiy;' aged . 32, ■ 
soldier in the Ulster Defiant 
Regiment, (fied yesterday iti 
bomb blast near Belcoo, dm 
to the border with the Iris 
Republic. . :*• . 


agents held in the Soviet Woe s*jd the swap woald be the 


being exchanged -for an m- biggest 


specified number of com- world War and weoM take 


rtUr cL™i 111411 * r *>d last night prosecutions service brieft to 
me aecono There would be no delays on be agreed before acceptance 


mrasts. 


place ot the border between 


jumbo flights.” 


of that brief” 


The writ claims damages I Soifa affinals fe Moscow West Berlin and East Ger- 


for “blacking” action by staff I «**sed to comment on the aanym 


M ^kema for The report in Bild was 


Booster rocket blamed 










?Q, 


1 


fj 




contract 

The company is also seek- 


flfee US ami leading Wert capable of raising such j Washington - Nasa experts side. Film shows hot 


land Rover and other opera- detdop^tfedSfes would 

trons were at au advanced be mamtetoed and developed V?* 1 *™ a ?°°- vbv ^ 

stage” : . totoeuSSEmTS SEJSHrtJfiS? “ 

Talks with other car mamz- an appropriate level of ■ for ^ P 851 ^ 


IsrapMn esssbas^ there expectations because the pa- were examining yesterday flames were spewing 
sam fliey teew arthing of an per has in the past been growing evidence that a right-hand booster 14 


ex^g& Bnt US sources dearly used by the Soviet 
con&med that a major swap Union for leaks. It has twice 


ty booster rocket caused onds before the explosion. 

j:.- A II. ■ J >, 


fecturers, some wide-ranging investment would be injected 
but at an exploratory . to achieve competitive future 


but at an exploratory . to achieve competitive 
stage.were in progress but it models and feeffities. 
was toO eariy to say whether If the talks succeed* 


weekends. 

It has already obtained an 
injunction requiring Sogat to 
lift an instruction to its 
members at wholesale depots, 


wnsmumneot and [said ttiras printed video pktares of Dr 
to take place ra Wert Berlin Andrei Sakharov taken in his , 


the shuttle disaster and of- Mr Graham said that, if 


on February 11. 

In Bonn, Wert Goman 


exDe in Cork 
If East Beri 


Goals suggested frights could the shuttle commander or 
resume in June (Michael pilot had known rh«. they 


tire site of I 


Binyon writes). might have been able to 

separate from the boosters 
Mr William Graham, act- and glide back to Earth. But 


was too early to say whether If the talks succeeded, the 

they would lead to an equity Government aimed to make IhGm^to 6 ^^ 

stake, acquisition ot merger, sure that jobs and the future i^LTniamai 

be added. Government of- of L and Rover and the other i^winn 1 81 

involved. be more secure and not less. xiot; An «i r^ n KL 


Govenunest sources said pri- toe «» * • <•!*>> ngp , it is 
valeg that the exchange that it witt take place m the 


would go ahead soon, and middle of the Glieakker 
that the only question now Bridge, which links West 


ing Nasa administrator, has other experts said the crews, 
said the rocket boosters were had never trained for such aj 


was the date. Berlin to East German terri- j had no sensors to detect 

A family spokesman in tory, and has often been flame that burnt through one 

Jerusalem said that Mr chosen for exchanges, inctod- - 

Shcharansky^ wife is seep- ing that of the U2 pilot 

tteal of the repots. Mr Avi Francis Gary Powers for the 

Maoz, a leader of the Israeli Russian spy Rudolf AbeL — — - — - - 

Association for the Release of Western diplomats in Bonn I 


involved. 

The negotfettonsiwitfa Gen- 


The proposed sale was 


eral Motors which have been condemed m the Commons 
going on for several months, by Labour MPs. 


but vriuch the Government 


Campbell- 


says it has hot revealed for savo^ Labour MP for 


against the National Graphi- 
cal Association over the 
blacking of work on The 
Times supplements, and 
against the Transport and 
General Workers’ Union 


considered so reliable they difficult manoeuvre, 
had no sensors to detect Photograph,page i 

flame that burnt through one Letters, page 1: 


Assodatiea for the Relc 


- -^ 1 ,^nrnnr n .„v| ™ \JVUUIOi v/uivu 

,* j 1 i con ]? 1 ^ Sr Workington, said ft was over instxiKtioos to lorry 

Westland pleat d^ms 


Anatoly S hcha ransky. said said they attached credence to 
that Mrs A vital Bud’s report that Moscow 


’ T Z. r ZV Lauour arauums w a . simp- ping Union Jack and 

Westland, the afling heft- menl on the fiitnre of British ^ srars and Stripes 

copter company, is Ley land. over British industry”, while 


lines. 

Yesterday,Mr Murdoch 
disclaimed responsibility for 


Shcharansky, aged 35, had had refused to include Dr 
left her Jerusalem flat to Sakharov in the proposed 


- « _ “ ■ I " VTVi Aniuou unuii I UIJV.MUII1W M 

shareholdere not to sen thOTl . Q^annon told MPs the Mr Patrick Cormack, Conser- job fosses arising from the 

riw«M tn thf» Hnmnean COO- 1 ... u wn <• o . i . < ... i., ..... 


avoid pablirity surroundiag exchangeJn Boston, the news 
the deaL of the swap was said not have 

In Washington, Mr George gbea Mrs Yelena Bonner 
Shultz, the Secretory of State, hope that Dr Sakharov, her 
said that he had no comment husband, would be released. 


* 7 '*'*' ^ United Kingdom commercial reference to the Westland new plants in Wanting and 

Sikorsky-Fiat. vehicle industry* 4 . affair, inquired whether there in Glasgow. 

T TaatiiIo it licit Discussions about the fa- might not be a “European “When people walk oat on 

Uganda ptl»U tore of the Leyland bus solution.” 

The National Resistance division are proceeding with Morale cn*mMes,page2 

Army of President Museveni . — — : 

Baby Doc takes to the streets 

Q 1 MHU W 3 «« . .. , Pon-au-Prince, Haiti - In a blazoned with a heart bearing least three times that mrra- 

Troops torn. Page #! dramatic display of con- his name. ber. 

fidence, President Jean- During toe tour the Prea- But in the present arcum- 


“Wben people walk oat on 
Continued m page 2, col 8 


Four Russians thrown 
out by France as spies 


n»iuj «• * . . s 

of Uganda claimed control or 
all but northern Uganda after 
capturing the main north 
eastern city of Mbale. 


France has expelled four and provocative character” of | 
Russian diplomats from Paris toe French action. I 


following the arrest 12 days It is the biggest French 



igo of a retired French Air counter-espionage coup since | 
Force officer charged with the expulsion from France of I 


— *| > |i fidence, rresiaem jean- uunns me lour me nea- bui m ine prcseni arcum- ^ \ r- • 

IVlRnila tOU Claude Dovalier yesterday dent, who appeared to be stances ft is impossible to ™ M ^ stry 

i !«.« *2 Deooie h,™ died nade » wfairiwiiri tour .of r efaed, told a ropo ng to ^aro^jpomffldat (D^a 


spying for toe Soviet Union, 47 alleged Soviet spies in 


.. «•> HMwnfa, have died made a wumwnm umr or rcnuiou, mm n icuoiwa ms vcniy wtsuauj »q 

At least 82 p«Hjtetaw streets m Ftot-au-Prince, toe Government was m control best they can 

in euerrilla violence I ^pitaj (Trevor Fishlock of the situation in troubled estimates. 

wntesL Haiti. The Govenunt 


foe French Foreign Ministry March 1983. 

confirmed yesterday (Diana The information leading to 


toe latest arrests is believed 


Phifippiii* m the tort two 
weeks of campaigning ft» wntes) - 
Friday’s presidential dec- 
tions. the mihury The 
Reports, page 1 


aiti. The Government has told 

There are varying reports reporters to stay in toe 


The diplomats, aD of to have been provided by M 
whom are said to be mem- Bernard Sounsseaux. a re- 


The presideot was in a about the number of people c^titaL Some who have tried 
nous, motorcade of vehicles killed ance the present iron- to reach the interior have 

said Kcpons, accompanied by heavily Wes began last week. Some been stopped and turned 

Rnvpr« anneal annedTmdress*, »me of doctoraqnKlion.lhe. officiai back by toe Amy or militia. 
DOXcia lh# , m taring j-duris em- figure of 16, saying it is at Fever of freedom, tack page 

Two former British world — — ’ “ “ “ ~ * 

champions, John Conteh and 
Maurice Hope, have appealed 


bers of the GRU, the Red tired NCO who was charged 
Army's intelligence service, in Rennes last week with 


have flown hack to Moscow, passing secrets of the move- 
file Soviet Embassy in meat of French nuclear 


Paris protested last night at submarines to a KGB officer 
“the manifestly unfriendly based in Paris. 


Every storey 
has a 

happy ending, 


te 

of 

re 

:n 

re 

ul 

tic , 
ne 

in j, 

ist 

be 

in : 
be 1 
nd 5 l 
ice -d 
ra- i ; 

ati 
ed th 

f s * F 
for sot 
tes ol 
ers 
the 
dee 

C fi rvr. 




iac° lvc 


3 to rg 
tefliiL 
hie 
-del 
9pui 
B) w 
Hour 


to Frank Bruno not to go 
ahead with his bout apnst 
Genie Coetzee ofsoufo 


Museum stands by admission charge policy 


By David Hewson 
Arts CmrespoodeBt 


risftms are “We haw had very few 


~ H, — 
* $ ' ’ 


Show success 

The National Exhibition 
Centre in Birmingiara tas 
^Wished itself as Britain s 


wo 1 - quested at toe entrance. Most 

The ' Victoria and AIM SSc riritora m aothmg 


to pay fbe £2 re- comphunts abort die way and aitoosiartic supporter 



ttusgs are organized within foe fond, 
toe museum,” the spokesman (£1,092# 
said. “When toe scheme was personal 


eo a long-standing One condition which Miss 
siartfc supporter of Woodroffe attached to her 
left £1,075,947 net bequest is flat none of the 
13 grass), mid after money must be used to boy 
bequests of contemporary art Mr George 


aapomteed toe trustees £31400 toe balance was Heunugtoo, the fund's admin- 
toat they woaW fike it tn bequeathed to the fond. irtrafor, said: “We iriD follow 


rirtnal halving m r 1 *™ 1 16 ? have opposed toe charge ran for a couple of years The legacy has excited the terms of the will to toe 


in toe three »ntos since it smK ^ was first mooted, toe before they feft they could speculation that it mfeht jet letter.” 

: n <wutaiwH ■--» - - Liu. ■ J ■«.. 11. ” it . 


, I U UK uu*- ; ww « uioi ranm, iw 

largest exhifatiop was intradsced. scheme has been a “total 

Visitors to the mmeamfcB. 

by 20 per cent m November, A y&A spokesman said 
47R per cent m Decenmer, ^ admissfon figures woe 
and 38.7 pm 1 erts-tamy. explained by the absence of 


judge it” be posriMe to save toe Apart from toe offer to 

• The National Art Cblleo- Bernini sculpture of Arch- assist in toe purchase of toe 

two Fund, the principal bishop del Poxto for the Bernini, the fond has also 

charity helping museums and nation. Last week toe V&A offered a £250,000 grant 

galleries to purchase works of announced that it could not towards the £765,000 


tort pul 


n-nTnfi' li iitin im iv pawmi; ouwawm uuu n umu inn wnwna uk <U<U,UUU 

™^ or e^htoitioiis at toe art has received its bfggert raise the £3 million required needed for the Tintoretto 
mtv abort tne Jm. a. l.. ^ < r a 7. , „ y. * ■ ^ ua, , . . - 


museum during the tone bequest wen more than f I to purchase the piece, despite painting, “Christ washing the 

oitths. mutton iu the will of a Dorset a grant from toe NACF of feet of toe disciples'', on sale 

The museum woofd cairy spinster who died last year £250,000. from $ Nicholas Cathedral, 


onions may berespansum: $w The masetna would carry spinster 
re®* ^ art market research in toe aged 

. „ They & A hasrefosedto spring to ascertain toe impact, mftes). 
;«rt® .twHfcj fe® 5 ^ of foe charges on visitors, tat Miss 

been raised by the *ia^ brt foere would he no early re- Wftdtaj 
trade nmon semices say tort exnBdnrtioa of the policy. bourne. 


research m toe aged 95 (SofrzB Young The scalpturo, at present in Newcastle. 

stain toe impact, writes). the collection at Castle How- The Lang Gallery in New- 

s on viators, tat Miss Aileen Woodroffe of ard, Yorkshire, is estimated castle is interested in buying 

be no early re- Wftdumptoa near Wire- to be worth £10 mflliod at toe picture. 

of toe policy. bourne, who is described as auction. wills, page 14 


* The only kind of project which interests 
Rovis Omsmicrion is the one that turns out^ welL 

Whether we’re builders or management 
contractors, the story is always the same: superb , 
quality of work; swift compledon; unrivalJol value t 
for money. 

You can find examples throughout the country ^ 

But if you vxmt the happiest en£n% of all, try tfris m: !i 

Cali Bernard Hodgson on 01-422 3488 for 
UK pro jects, Charles Chevasco on 01-995 8961 for 
International 

Or write to Bovis Construction Limited, Bo vis 
House,NortholtR4, Harrow; 

Middlesex HA2QEE 







2 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 


ml 


MPs draft £3.3bn 
package to help 
long-term jobless 


By Richard Evans, Lobby Reporter 


A radical £3.3 billion 
package of measures to tackle 
long-term unemployment, 
including a specific job guar- 
antee, will be unveiled today 
by the Commons Select 
Committee on Employment 

The MPs' proposals, con- 
tained in a unanimous report, 
come only days after the 
announcement of Britain's 
worn jobless figures. Of those 
out of work, 1.500,000 have 
been unemployed for more 
than a year and count as 
long-term unemployed. 

In a three-pronged attack 
aimed at achieving a job 
guarantee for such people, the 
committee recommends: 

•A new building improve- 
ment scheme to provide 

300.000 extra year-long jobs. 
•The employment of 

100.000 in the social services 
and the National Health 
Service. 

•The introduction of a sub- 
sidy to private employers to 
take on 350.000 long-term 
unemployed in addition to 
existing employees. 

The all-party committee 
also looked at the alternatives 
of tax cuts and increased 
public expenditure in dealing 
witithigh unemployment, but 
it concluded that special 


employment measures were 
the "best buy” for the 

Government. 

In particular the new mea- 
sures are intended to lower 
the jobless figures in the 
short term in a cost-effective 
way. while other policies take 
effect and help them even- 
tually to find permanent jobs. 

The MPs envisage their 
proposals could be put into 
effect over three years and 
provide 750,000 extra places. 
The scheme should be run by 
the Manpower Services 
Commission, they say. 

The proposed building 
improvement programme, 
which is similar to sugges- 
tions made by the Confedera- 
tion of British 

industry, would provide a 
wage of up to £105 a week. 
The MPS noted that many of 
the areas of highest long-term 
unemployment are also the 
most physically derelict. 

It is estimated the new 
building jobs would cost 
between £4,000 and £5,000 a 
head. 

With health and personal 
social services being labour 
intensive, the MPs recom- 
mend 50.000 long-term un- 
employed could be found 
wont in each sector. Recruits 


would be given a normal 
employment contract for one 
year and be paid at an 
average rale of £120 a week . 

Lastly the committee sug- 
gests a subsidy of £40 a week 
to private sector employers 
who take on long-term un- 
employed. Far £1.4 billion 
about 350,000 new jobs 
would be created, at a cost 
per job of £4,000. 

The launch of today's 
report is likely to be clouded 
by the refusal of Mr Ron 
Leighton, the Labour chair- 
man, to answer questions 
from News International 
journalists, as he is sponsored 
by the print union, Sogat ’82. 

•Fifteen hundred jobs at 
the Kent coalfield's three 
threatened pits could be 
savedbecause of a plan put to 
the unions yesterday (the 
Press Association reports). 

The scheme lifted the 
closure threat over 
Tilmanstone colliery, after a 
significant rise in production 
figures. 

In December the National 
Coal Board announced that 
another pit, Betteshanger. 
had been reprieved .Now the 
board wants talks to extend 
the life of the third pit, 
Snowdown. 


Survey for 
the Briton 
on holiday 

By Derek Harris 
Most complaints about 
package holidays concern ho- 
tels but 94 per cent of British 
holidaymakers last year were 
prepared to recommend their 
hotel to family or friends^ 
Those findings 


from a survey by Limn Poly, 
the travel agency chain which 
is part of Thomson Travel. 

Holidaymakers were 
particularly concerned about 
food, the location, and 
whether the hotel staff were 
friendly and helpful. Britons 
preferred self-service meals 
and disliked sharing tables 
with strangers. 

They also objected to 
dining room queues, the high 
cost of drinks in hotel bare, 
haring to pay for hotel sun- 
loungers , and did not favour 
entertainment that lasted be- 
yond midnight in an hotel's 
public rooms. 

The best hotels in the eyes 
of holidaymakers were not 
necessarily the high class 
ones or die most expensive, 
according to Mr John 
MacNeill, Lnnn Poly's 
managing director. 

He said that some of the 
most highly rated hotels were 
In the budget category. 

The study was made for the 
company 'stalest free Guide to 
Good Hotels. 


No prosecution in 
police assault 

By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


Metropolitan Police offi- 
cers who assaulted five 
youths, two of whom needed 
hospital treatment, will not 
be prosecuted or disciplined. 

Describing the attack by 
unidentified officers as 
“disgraceful", the Police 
Complaints Authority said 
yesterday: “Despite the most 
thorough investigation, it has 
not been possible to establish 
to the required standard of 
proof which of three Transit 
vans conveying officers in the 
area at the time was 
involved". 

Because of the lack of 
proof of identity the Director 
of Public Prosecutions did 
not consider that criminal 
proceedings could be taken. 
Mr Peter Imbert the deputy 
commissioner, said that for 
the same reason he did not 
propose to bring disciplinary 
charges. 

At the authority's request 
the officers on duty in all 
three vans in the area at the 
time, apart from two who 


have retired, were paraded 
before Mr Bob limes, the 
deputy assistant commis- 
sioner. 

The complaints authority 
saidTThey were told in no 
uncertain terms of the anger 
and disquiet felt about the 
incident They were told that 
although officers in only one 
of the vans were involved, all 
the officers in that van must 
have known what happened 
and both the public and the 
Metropolitan Police regard 
such actions as outrageous 1 

Also at the suggestion of 
the complaints authority, the 
police have agreed to clearly 
mark about 570 vehicles, 
including all Transit vans, for 
ready identification. 

Two brothers, Baltimore 
and Eric Ranger, aged Id and 
17, who claimed they were 
beaten by between 10 and 12 
uniforms police officers in 
the Holloway Road area of 
London in April 1983. re- 
ceived £4,000 in an out-of- 
court settlement last April 


£21 m more to protect 
9,000 poly places 


M25 progress 

The section of the M25 
from Swan ley to Sevenoaks 
will open on Wednesday 
February 19. completing the 
southern ring around London 
and linking Heathrow and 
Gaiwick airports to the 
Dartford Tunnel. The final 
section of the motorway, in 
Hertfordshire, will open in 
November, 


By Lucy Hodges Education Correspondent 

a 3.5 per cent 
its funding for 


The Government is ex- 
pected to announce today 
that it may give an extra £21 
million to the polytechnics to 
protect 9.000 student places 
which might otherwise have 
been lost. 

Sir Keith Joseph. Secretary 
of Slate for Education and 
Science, is writing to the 
National Advisory Body, 
which supervises public sec- 
tor higher education, to say it 


can expect 
increase in 
1987-88. 

That should give the poly- 
technics half of the extra £42 
million which they say they 
need in 1987-88, a possible 
election year, to avoid losing 
18.000 student places. 

Mr John Bevan, secretary 
of the body, said that tbe 
extra money was not yet 
guaranteed. 


Counting the legal cost of divorce 


IP 


Divorced couples were warned 
by two Conn of Appeal judges 
yesterday of the dangers of 
amassing a large legal aid bill 
by arguing in the courts over 
who should get what from the 
proceeds of a broken marriage. 

The court was told the Legal 
Aid Fond has a prior claim on 
family assets and, at the end of 
the day, that can seriously 
deplete available funds. 

The warning came from Lord 
Justice Pure has and Mrs 
Justice ButJer-SIoss in a di- 
vorce case estimated to have 
incurred legal costs of about 
£23,000. 


The divorced couple, who 
both received legal aid for their 
courtroom conflict, will have to 
reimburse the Legal Aid Fuad, 
leaving them with less than 
half of the £43,000 in assets 
available at the time of the 
marriage break-up. 

Lord Justice Pure has said 
the case was typical of many In 
which aiready-modest family 
assets were ‘"seriously 
depleted** by the cost of 
litigation. 

"It is imperative that liti- 
gants who receive assistance 
under the legal aid scheme 


should frilly understand tike 
danger of this when deciding to 
pursue contentious matters", 
the judge said. 

Toe judges upheld an earlier 
court rating that Mr Keith 
Mason, a joinery manufacturer, 
of New Yatt Road, North 
Leigh. Witney, Oxfordshire, 
should pay his former wife, 
Jacqueline, of Woodside, 
North Leigh, an end-af-mar- 
riage settlement of £27,000. 

They raled that if Mr Mason 
cannot raise the money within 
six months, his house, the : 
former matrimonial home val- 


ued at £53,000, should be sold 
to raise the money. 

Settlement of . the mortgage 
loan will leave about £43,000. 
But before tbe couple receive 
any money themselves, legal 
costs of £12350 for Mrs 
Mason and £10,400 for Mr 
Mason will have to be paid. 

Lord Justice Purchas said 
the judge who originally heard 
tike case had commented that 
If the parties had settled their 
differences, the sale of the 
house would have provided 
sufficient cash to comfortably 
rehouse both. 



Mr Fox-Andrews half way to the top of the cathedral dome 

Judicial steeplejack takes a look 


A High Court referee 
scaled one of Britain's most 
distinctive cathedrals yes- 
terday to inspect it 
MrJames Fox-Andrews, 
QC is presiding over a 
dispute between the Roman 
Catholic Arcbdiocese of 


Liverpool and the architects 
and engineers of the city's 
Metropolitan Cathedral 
The archdiocesan trustees 
have accused the architects, 
Frederick Gibberd and Part- 
ners. and tbe engineers Lowe 
and Rodin, of 


negligence^alleging structural 
feults-Negligence is denied. 

Yesterday Mr Fox-An- 
drews put an tennis shoes 
and an anorak to climb tbe 
290ft cathedral. He picked his 
way nimbly along a 70ft- ' 
platform which surrounds 


dome, followed gingerly by 
barretters, solicitors and ex- 
pert witnesses, and climbed 
to the base of the tower, 
about 200 feet up. 

MrFox-Andrews returns to- 
day to see the interior. Tbe 
hearing resumes tomorrow. 


Deaf mute 
freed by 
tribunal 

A man who is a deaf mute is 
to be released after a cam- 
paign to save him from 
indefinite detention in hos- 
pital for allegedly stealing £5 
and three light bulbs. 

Glenn Pearson, aged 33, 
spent a week in Lincoln 
prison before Christmas and 
was transferred to a hospital 
for the mentally handicapped 
after he was found unfit to 
plead. 

Yesterday a mental health 
tribunal decided that he 
should be freed 
Under the law, the judge 
was forced to send him to a 
secure hospital indefinitely 
after the jury found him unfit 
to plead because he could not 
understand the court 
proceedings. 

He was sent to jail because 
a place could not immedi- 
ately be found but a judge 
later ordered that be be sent 
to a hospital for the mentally 
handicapped. 


Speculation on foreign control of vehicle makers 

Morale crumbles in British car firms 


By Clifford Webb 

Motoring Correspondent 

Months of speculation and 
rumour suggesting that BL's 
commercial vehicle opera- 
tions are being sold to 
General Motors of America 
and that Honda Japan is 
about to buy a stake in 
Austin Rover cars are seri- 
ously undermining morale in 
both companies. 

A Leyland trucks executive 
said yesterday: “The talks 
with GM have been dragging 
on for so long that people 
here are beginning to have 
doubts about their future yet 
again. We urgently need an 
announcement to put an end 
I to this damaging 
speculation." 

Austin Rover's worries are 
even longer standing Since 
| January 1985 when Honda 
bought a 330-acre site at 
I Swindon there have been 


persistent reports that the 
Govermem was encouraging 
Honda to acquire control of 
its state-owned car maker. 

These reports intensified a 
few months later when leaks, 
allegedly from the Prime 
Minister’s office, raised 
doubts about Austin Rover's 
ability to survive without 
relinquishing large parts ofits 
business to Honda. 

Swindon is being devel- 
oped as a Honda distribution 
and parts centre and rumours 
persist that it will eventually 
become a manufacturing 
plant. 

In Tokyo yesterday Honda 
again denied that it had any 
plans to acquire all or part of 
Austin Rover. 

A view being increasingly 
voiced ai all levels in Austin 
Rover is that it has become 
an embarrassment to tbe 
Government.which is 
pledged to privatize it during 


the present Parliament. The 
is not returning to profits fast 
enough to be sold on the 
open market like Jaguar, nor 
is it making such a hash of 
things that the Government 
has an excuse to close it 
down. 

Seen against that lack- 
ground a takeover by Honda 
or even a substantial 
shareholding would seem to 
offer a way out 

Land Rover/Leyiand, the 
commercial vehicle side, has 
been losing money for years. 
But more recently there have 
been some encouraging signs. 

Leyland looks attractive to 
GM for two reasons. In 
recent years it has launched a 
complete new range of trucks 
at a cost to the taxpayer of 
£350 million. This contrasts 
with the out-dated range of 
trucks sold by Bedford, CM’S 
European trucks subsidiary. 

Leyland has also recently 


modernized its factory near 
Preston but it still has 
considerable spare capacity. 
This would enable GM to 
switch truck production from 
Luton to Preston allowing 
Luton io concentrate on van 
production including vans 
based on designs by Isusu 
and Suzuki in which GM 
already has holdings. 

There is little doubt that 
GM has been stung into talks 
with BL because it recently 
lost third place in the British 
truck market to Daimler 
Benz, of West Germany. A 
combined Leyiand-Bedford 
range, backed by the financial 
resources of the largest motor 
manufacturer in the world, 
would make a formidable 
contender even for Daimler 
Benz. 

Land Rover is in the final 
stages of a three-year 
reorganization. 


Protective wear 
for riot police 

By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 
Police units feeing rioting ^ ^ finished report was 
mobs may m future wear on its to sir Kenneth 


special padding over their 
limbs and face-guards similar 
to those used by cricketers 
after an internal Scotland 
Yard analysis of the Totten- 
ham riot last October. 

The report, based on inter- 
views with 400 officers at the 
riot, suggests the Yard might 
also consider improvements 
in its riot training so that 
officers have a strategy for 
dealing with complex urban 
estates like the Broadwater 
Farm Estate where tbe riot 
broke out 

Most present training 
envisages handling mobs out 
in open streets and not on 
walkways or the pedestrian 
areas of tower blocks. 

The report of more than 
300 pages was prepared by 
Chief Supt David Williams, 
who worked alongside an 
observer from the Police 
Federation. The report partly 
sprang from strong criticism 
of police strategy at the riot 
by junior ranks in the 
aftermath of a disorder which 
left one constable dead and 
another 232 injured. 

Yesterday Mr Williams 


Newman, Commissioner of 
the Metropolitan Police. It 
would be presented by the 
Deputy Assistant Commis- 
sioner. Mr Michael Richards, 

Tbe report made a number 
of general recommendations 
and suggested areas where 
evidence showed police plan- 
ners should review strategy 
or equipment, Mr Williams 
said. 

An examination of the 
number of police attacked 
with tnaefaettes or knives 
showed that chin or cheek 
guards may be needed in 
future. The Nato helmet used 
by police for riot protection 
was adequate but the neck 
and face were still exposed. 


Inquest delay 1 

An inquest on the 13 
victims of the M6 pile-up last 
October was further ad- 
journed yesterday after the 
Director of Public 
Prosecutions' derision to 
press charges of causing death 
by reckless driving against 
the coach driver involved. 


Unionists 

threaten 

boycott 

Official Unionist MPs will 
withdraw from Westminster 
and return to Northern Ire- 
land if the Prime Minister 
insists on going ahead with 
implementation of the Anglo- 
Irish agreement 

Tbe protest action will 
begin if at a meeting tbe two 
Unionist Party leaders have 
with Mrs Margaret Thatcher, 
she refuses, as is expected, to 
scrap the deal signed last 
year. 

Mr James Molyneaux, 
leader of the official unionist 
Party, ended doubt about his 
party’s position on a Com- 
mons boycott when he said 
yesterday: “If she continues 
to implement the agreement 
we would not be taking pan 
in the general sense.” 

Flanked by Mr Harold 
McCusker, official Unionist 
MP for Upper Bonn, who has 
already withdrawn from 
Westminister, Mr Molyneaux 
said if the Government went 
ahead with the agreement, 
which gives Dublin a consul- 
tative role in the affairs of tbe 
province, “elected 
sentatives become no: 
more than a veneer”. 


Liverpool rates appeal 
begins in High Court 


The 48 Liverpool coun- 
cillors feeing dismissal over 
the £106,000 bill for lost rates 
because of their alleged “wil- 
ful misconduct' 1 launched 
their appeal for survival in 
the High Court yesterday. 

Mr Stephen Sedley, QC, for 
the councillors, told Lord 
Justice Glidewell, sitting with 
Mr Justice Caulfield and Mr 
Justice Russell in the Queen's 
Bench Divisional Court that 
the councillors had used their 
“honest efforts'' to secure the 
three Es; economy, efficiency 
and effectiveness m the use 
of resources. 

He said that Parliament 
could not have intended that 
to mean wilful misconduct 
Mr Derek Hatton. 


Liverpool’s deputy leader, 
was in court as the appeal 
began against the decision of 
the District Auditor to make 
the 48 personally responsible 
for the shortfall caused by the 
delay in setting a rate.. 

Last week the judges re- 
served judgement in a similar 
appeal by 32 rebel Lambeth 
labour councillors, said to 
owe more than £126,000. 

Judgement in both cases 
will be given after the 
Liverpool case. 

Among those in court to 
support the councillors were 
Mr Eric Heffer, Labour MP 
for Liverpool Walton, and 
Mr Tony Mulheam, the 
District Labour Party presi- 
dent.. 


Laity outside Cburcb 
‘must not be ignored 9 

By CKffbrd Longley, Religions Affairs Correspondent 

Those outside the institu- open meeting of the House, 
(tonally-minded or church- which is a direct descendent 
going community should not of the House of Laymen for 
have their views excluded the province of Canterbury, 
from the inner deliberations “ * “ * 

of the Church, the Arch- 
bishop of York, Dr John 
Habgood, said yesterday. 

Addressing the centenary 

meeting of the the House of Abbey and a banquet, both 
Laity of the General Synod of attended by the Prince and 
the Church of England. Dr Princess of Wales and the 
Habgood said they should Archbishop of Canterbury, 
not forget the “workl-ori- Dr Robert Runrie. 
en rated Christians” who may Dr Habgood said those lay 
simply be too busy to involve churchmen actively involved 

in r'hunrh'c in th> lie. ..j 


founded in 1886 after 30 years 
of discussion. 

The open meeting was 
followed by a commemo- 
rative service in Westminster 


themselves in the Church's 
internal life, but who were 
the Church's “eyes and ears 
and hands”. 

He was speaking to an 



• till 


lasis 


NouaTl 
incurable. 

Shek learning to swim. 

Nona Thomas was training as a nurse 



ting wool shop proved too much and she 
now lives at the RHHL confined to a wheel- 
chain Nona suffers from Spinal Muscular 
Atrophy which restricts her very severely, 
but sne doesn't let these limitations beat her 
She’s often in the patients’ kitchen. 


lespite tier tear or water and she goes 
outings whenever possible. 

We care for over 270 incurable patients 
like Nona and through individual medical 
attention, therapy and nursing, we try 
to retrieve as much of their indej 


as possible. 
We, 


tependence 


are a registered charity (No. p< 
205907) and rely upon donations, *' 1 
covenants and legacies. Please help. 


The Royal Hospital &Home far Incurables. Hvl 


Patrons: HMThe Queen andHMThe Queen Mother 


lb:AirCoaunodoneD.F.Ruaon,OB£.DFC. 
AFC. Director of Appeals, The Royal 
Hospital and Home for Incurables. 
Depi DTN. West Hill, Putney. 

London SW1S3SW 
Yes.I would Uke io help. (Please tick) 

Q I enclosed donation to the RHHL 
, — . Please send me the RHHTs leaflet on 
L-i making covenants or bequests. 

— Please send me more information 

LJ about the KHHL 
Name. 


ihiock terras. m«*i 


Address. 


in the church's’ life and 
worship should not ignore 
“those whose primary voca- 
tion ties in their work and in 
their secular relationships. 


Man charged 
with murder 
of hotelier 

David Wyo Robots, aged 
31. of no fixed address was 
yesterday remanded in cus- 
tody by Kendal magistrates, 
charged with the murder of 
Mrs Bronwen Nixon, a 
District hotelier. 

He was remanded until 
Friday when he will appear at 
Windermere Magistrates’ 
Court 

Mrs Nixon, aged 66, was 
strangled in her cottage next 
to the Rothay Manor Hotel 
Ambleside, on January 19. 


Youth accused 
of Brixton 
riotskilling 

A youth of 18 was accused 
at Camberwell Magistrates’ 
Court yesterday of killing 
David ! George Hodge, aged 
Z9, a freelance photographer, 
who died from head injuries 
after last September’s Brixton 
nots. 

Elroy Palmer, described as 
a security officer, of Eflra 
Parade, Brixton, was 
remanded in custody until 
February 19. 


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Murdoch 
issues 
new writ 
to Sogat 

Continued from page 1 

you again and again and 
again, and yon have got a 
£100 million investment in a 
company that your life's 
riding on, you've got to make 
plans,” he said. “You can’t 
go on waiting for people who 
say they’re going to set a 
bomb off." 

Mr Murdoch was speaking 
on TV<em breakfast tele- 
vision after claiming that a 
record 4,615,000 copies of 
The Sun had been printed 
and distributed. He empha- 
sized again that there would 
be no deal with the 5,000 
dismissed {Hint workers, and 
agreed that for about three or 
four months preceding the 
strike he had been budding 
up a "parallel workforce". 

Of the strikers be said: 
“We did what we felt we had 
to do. We didn't fire them - 
they fired us. They thought 
that they could bring us to 
our knees, as they had done 
every year for Id years." 

Despite a shortfall of about 
30,000 copies in production 
of The Times, due to tech- 
nical problems. News Inter- 
national refuted suggestions 
by the print unions that tbe 
company was beset with 
breakdowns. 

Sogat officials claimed that 
there had been shortfalls in 
production at the Wapping 
plant with press breakdowns 
and deteriorating working 
conditions. 

But company officials said 
it was nonsense to suggest 
that production staff had 
been forced to clamber over 
tbe machinery to repair paper 
breaks. 

f Tower Hamlets council 
said yesterday that the 
Wapping plant could be shut 
down unless News Inter- 
national look steps to reduce 
night-time noise, which has 
annoyed residents near by. 

"The last thing we want to 
do Is to put a company out of 
business or stop its 
production,” a council 
spokesman said. "But we 
have been speaking to News 
Internationa] about this since 
early December last year, to 
no avail” 

Its action in serving an 
enforcement notice requiring 
action to be taken by 
February 27 was “not 
political" 

In an obvious reference to 
the Wapping dispute. Lord 
Murray, former general sec- 
retary of the TUC, said that 
talk of “no strike” deals was 
misleading. 

He told a meeting in 
London, organized by the 
Royal Society of Arts, that in 
his view there could be no 
question of denying to any 
group of people the right not 
to work for an employer 
except on terms and con- 
ditions that had been mutu- 
ally 


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Obstetrician exposed 
mothers and babies 
to danger, inquiry told 

Rv NMiaIm T i— e.j.i n . <« j * 


w_ ,,, , Nicholas Tftnmin$.SociaI Services Correspondent 

1 l le or do not subscribe. in manv the same i 


handling of five childbirth 
cases, yesterday went on trial 
for her professional life. 

Counsel for her employer. 
Tower Hamlets Health 
Authority, described her han- 
dling of one case as “bizarre*' 


inquiry at Addison House, 
north London^ 

The issue was not about 
the principle but “how it is 
being put into practice in 
these five particular cases," 
he said. It is an inquiry not 
about theories but about 


- - J .. . — , — “uuui uinmn DUl 

™.i,S < L t 5 a L5 1 5 W" 1 dangers in obareiics." 


mothers and babies to dan- 
gers that were “both real and 
not necessary”. 


Normal obstetrics carried 
unavoidable dangers. But the 


Savage's belief in individual 
plans of management for 
each case of childbirth rather 
than an overall plan required 
that those plans had to be 
“very dear and very specific. 

“In some of these cases the 


w_ o_. - . .. . tmuiuduun ui ma- 

Savage. aged 4 2, is temal death in childbirth and 
®3S L?iT pLnaiy inc l u \ r y die still falling figures for 
SSf i***" P^rnaial death .were being 


virtual elimination of ma- plans were neither clear nor 
temal death in childbirth and specific.” he said. 


ESJT of P 1-0- achieved both by research 

incompetence over and by technical advances 


the cases which date back to 
1983. 


Mrs Savage sat calmly 
through the opening of the 
inquiry after being greeted by 
a cheering group of 50 
supporters, including mothers 


e cases wmeu date back to which allowed doctors to supporters, including mothers 

rr; t v j identify the early warnings of with babies, on her arrival at 

Mr lan Kennedy'QC, coun- danger before the foetus and the council chamber of ihe 


sel for the health authority, 
told the inquiry that the five 
cases included one stillbirth 
and one neo- natal death. The 
inquiry would be told that 
“both these sadnesses could 
and should have been 
avoided", be said. 


mother were at risk. 

Mr Kennedy acknowledged 
there were difficulties at Lhe 
Mile End site of the London 
Hospital which meant that it 
took an hour to organize an 
emergency caesarian delivery. 
Unless and until that time lag 


Opening the case against was reduced, obstetrics had 
Mrs Savage he said that in to be practised “in the 


the remaining cases “the 
management was outside all 
normal accepted procedures. 
It exposed the mothers and 
babies to risks which were 
both real and not necesarry.” 

Mrs Savage's suspension 
has led to a campaign for her 
reinstatmenl backed by 
family doctorsmalional child- 
birth organizations, her medi- 
cal students and others. But 
Mr Kennedy told the inquiry 
that only one side of the case 
had so far been heard. 

“This case has been pre- 
sented as if it were a contest 
between old and new, be- 
tween a male medical 
establishment and a women- 
orientated movement: be- 
tween the impersonal 
imposition of technology and 
the freedom of a woman to 
choose how, where and in 
what manner she will have 
her baby, and between the 
concept of a patient and the 
concept of a well woman.” 

The inquiry would not 
resolve those issues, he said. 
“The doctors who are her 
colleagues in no way criticize. 


mother were at risk. North East Thames Regional 

Mr Kennedy acknowledged Health Authority where the 
there were difficulties at Lhe hearing, expected to last 
Mile End site of the London about four weeks, is being 
Hospital which meant that it held, 
took an hour to organize an Outlining the five cases, 
emergency caesarian delivery. Mr Kennedy said that in one. 
Unless and until that time lag identified only by the initials 
was reduced, obstetrics had SP on the instruction of Mr 
to be practised “in the Christopher Beaumonuthe 
knowledge that one must inquiry chairman, the patient 


walk correspondingly further spent eight hours in the 


from danger”. 

It was not an answer to 


second stage of labour in a 
pregnancy which was a 


argue that in some of these breech presentation which 


cases no harm had been 
done. That was the argument 


ended in a caesarian section. 
Expert witnesses had de- 


of the driver rounding a blind scribed the handling of that 
comer on the wrong side of case as “inexcusable" and 


the road and tbe answer was “not in any way acceptable". 



lot m anyway acceptable . 
Mr Geoffrey Chamberlain. 


Mrs Savage arriving at the 
inquiry yesterday 


professor of Obstetrics at St 
Georges Hospital. London, 
who had reviewed the cases 
on Mrs Savage's behalf, had 
said the handling of the case 
was “most unusual" and that 
it was “difficult to defend” a 
second stage labour of that 
length, Mr Kennedy said. 

In the second case, where 
the baby was stillborn, the. 
case was not suitable for 
“shared care” between Mrs 
Savage and the patient's GP, 
Mr Kennedy said. 

The patient should have 
been admitted to hospital for 
care much earlier when it 
became clear, be maintained, 
that the baby was not 
growing property inside the 
womb. 


Sinclair 
reduces 
TV prices 


Officers saved by 
police dog 


A police dog gave its life 


By BBl Johnstone 
Technology Correspondent 
Sinclair has reduced by 20 
per cent the price of its flat 
screen pocket television, 
which was launched 1 8- 
months ago and is still to 
prove a commercial success. 

The price reduction is part 
of a new marketing deal 
struck between Sinclair and 
Timex, which manufactures 1 
the televisions. 

The deal gives tbe manu- 
facturer tbe worldwide rights 
to the marketing and 
distribiiion of the novel 
television set 
The television price reduc- 
tions are the latest in a 
number of discounts that 
have been offered on Sinclair 
products.Tbe television sets 
have bad .£20 taken off the 
£99.95 launch price.The flat 


saving police and security 
guards from two armed bank 


screen television has not fully 
realized its promise although 


realized its promise although 
it was considered by Sir Clive 
Sinclair.its creator.at the time 
of launch to be revolutionary. 

The television. Sir Clive 
maintained, would have _ as 
much impact on television 
viewing as the transistor had 
on radio. The launch 18 
months ago was accompanied 
by much publicity and the 
disclosure of the company s 
plans to launch a special 
version for export to the US 
market- 


guards from two armed bank 
robbers, the Central Criminal 
Court was told yesterday 

One robber shot Yerba, the 
dog, three times with a 
handgun as they were chased 
from Lloyd's Bank in Station 
Road, Petts Wood, Kent- The 
first bullet hit the dog 
between tbe shoulder blades 
and he fell bleeding but 
staggered up and went after 
the robbers. 

The gunman fired again 
and shot the German Shep- 
herd dog in the face. As 
Yerba tried to get up again a 
third shot -killed the animaL 

But the dog's bravery 
prevented Tony Baldessare, 
aged 45, from turning his gun 
on police officers and finally 
led to the capture of the two 
robbers, the coun was told. 

Baldessare had escaped 
with Patrick Murray, aged 40, 
after a car chase by police. 
Six months later detectives 


trapped Baldessare m a bouse 
in Gleneldon Road, 
Streatham, south London. 

Police laid siege to the 
house and be dared them to 
join in a shoot-out, but tie 
finally committed suicide 
with the revolver he bad used 
to (till Yerba, Mr Paul 
Purnell, for the prosecution, 
said. 

Murray was captured at 
Gatwick airport as he tried to 
flee to Spain. 

Murray, of Windmill Walk, 
Lambeth, south London, was 
jailed for 12 years. He 
pleaded guilty to attempting 
to rob the Pens Wood bank 
in August 1984 and robbing 
two other banks of £32,000. 
He also admined having an 
imitation firearm. 

.After the trial the judge 
commended all the officers 
involved in the robbers' 
capture and the courage of 
Yerba. who has a plaque 
marking the spot where he 
died. 


Dispute over 
custody of 
addict baby 

A girl, aged 11 months. 


Crown yields 
in murder 
case appeal 




’Jvj; 




,’irr 




‘.VO 


School bias cuts 
girls’ chances, 






governors told 






By Lucy Hodges, Education Correspondent 


consultant ota MririarPa* Ik °E not subscribe, to many the same in both cases. In the 

toe philosphies which Mre case of the peri-natal death. 


Instead of widening though there is little dif- 
opponunities for girls and ference in the actual ability of 


London Hosnirai' c‘ mc pD,10s P mKj whlCh Mrs case of the peri-natal death. 

since last April S hS su PPo^ be told the he said, the course of 

. ... _ A P ni over her mamrv »» 


management had been de- 
scribed by expens as 
“bizarre". 




bovs, schools condone and girls and boys, they are 
exacerbate sexual inequal- unintentionally treated dif- 


.•V 


tt 


He also argued that Mrs 
vase's belief in individual 


.. ,4! , 

■ ■ V- : Vi.*4v 1 ±M1‘ 


nies. a Labour Party research fcrently in schools, not be- 
document published yes- cause ‘of any difference in 






terday says. skill or aptitude but solely on 

_ . . . . grounds of their sex.” the 

Fathers and male teachers Report savs 

should prepare and serve School’ text books give 


refreshments on prize days. , s a ltmitcd view of life 

the paper says, while mothers |n whjch wonien slav al 








x> 


and women teachers make ^omc while the men go out 
the speeches and look after lQ w0r k document savs. 
financial matters. Similarly. » Instcad of widening 
gni pupils should show guests opponu/lit ,„ for girls and 
round the school, while boys ** 00 , s ,n the main 


present flowers to VIPs. condone and exacerbate so- 


The 15-page document, cial inequalities." 
which has been drawn by up The paper particularly 


Labour educationists, repre- criticizes careers education 
sents advice to Labour school because ii says boys are 


governors rather than official introduced to more varied 


party policy. and better paid jobs than 

“Research shows that, girls. 


Parental control cuts 
crime by girls 




By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


With brim fills of hearts, flowers and 
feathers, milliner David Shilling celebrated 
the rites of spring with the launch of his 
1986 couture collection yesterday (Suzy 
Menkes writes). The new geometry of hats 
brings in corkscrews of crisp straw brims, 
angled and curved, and giant Ups cut oat 
like a visor to make a peep show of the 


face (top). The straws are also made into 
taU pyramids, square boxes or a neat beret 
with a tail (right). Black 2 nd white is a 
favourite colour theme for perky uptilted 
hats or for jaunty bowlers. And any woman 
wbo wants to wear her heart on her sleeve 
can find scarlet hearts sprinkled on a straw- 
cone (left). (Photographs: Harry Kerr) 


Drive against child drinkers 


Police launched a cam- of regular drinking by chil- 
paign against under-age dren as young as 1 1. 


drinking yesterday and said 
that they were ready to send 
plain-clothes officers into 
public houses to catch and 
prosecute landlords who 
serve the youngsters. 

Devon and Cornwall police 
are taking action after reports 


. Discos, off-licences and 
supermarkets wifi also be 
watched. 

Mr John Balding, of the 
Schools' Health Education 
Unit at Exeter University, 
said that a nationwide survey- 
showed that 56 per cent of 


boys aged 11 had admitted 
drinking alcohol in the pre- 
vious seven days. 

Of girls, 29 per cent had 
drunk alcohol during the 
same period 

Figures show that there is 
more under-age drinking in 
Scotland than elsewhere in 
Britain. 


More parental control is an 
important reason why girls 
generally commit less crime 
than boys, according to the 
latest Home Office research 
bulletin. 

Parents' supervision in- 
fluenced bow girls spent their 
rime away from home with 
friends. “Girls were less 
likely to go out to meet their 
friends in the evening and 
after going out were expected 
home earlier than boys. They 
were also less likely to spend 
their leisure time away from 
home.” 

Official statistics show that 
in the peak ofTending age 
group of 14 to 16 six 
indictable offences are 
committed by boys for every- 
one by girls. But when 


surveys are done of young- 
sters io see who admits crime, 
the ratio is 2:1 or even lower. 

One recent study of those 
aged 14 to 15-year-olds and 
their parents showed that 49 
per cent of boys admitted 
ofTending in the past year 
compared with 39 per cent of 
girls. But where there was 
equal opportunity to commit 
crime — such as with fare 
evasion, school vandalism, 
thefts from home and false 
emergency calls and graffiti — 
girls were as guilty as boys. 

With group delinquency 
that occurs in a group, boys 
dominated in a ratio of 3:1. 
Examples were smashing bot- 
tles in the street, carrying 
weapons and breaking win- 
dows in empty houses. 


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who was boro a drug addict 
was at the centre of a legal 
dispute in tbe High Court 
yesterday. . 

The girl became addicted 
to the drug while in her 
mother’s womb. By tbe time 
she was three weeks old she 
was seriously ill and showing 
signs of withdrawal Mr 
Christopher Critchlow, for 
the bale’s guardian, said. 

He was appearing >n an 
appeal before two Family 
Division judges, Mr Justice 
Boilings and Mr Justice 
Waite, against the care order; 

Her mother, aged 30, was a 
registered methadone addict, 
and her father, aged 35. had 
also been a registered drug 
addict. 

The bearing continues to- 
day. 


Legion patient 

An unnamed man is in 
Derriford Hospital, 
Plymouth.suffenng from 
Legionnaires’ disease. The 
man, in his forties* was 
admitted to hospital more 
than a week ago. 

Exports up 

British pottery exports 10 
the United Stales exceeded 
£33.6 million in the firet 10 
months of this financial year, 
nearly twice the total ex- 
ported in the same period last 
year. __ 


The Crown yesterday made 
a concession in an appeal by 
Ernest Clarke, aged 55. who 
was jailed for life in 1980 for 
a murder of a girl he says he 
did not commit. 


After Court of Appeal 
judges and barristers had 
adjourned for a private show- 


ing of a BBC Rough Justice 
television programme, Mr 


television programme, Mr 
Brian Walsh, QG announced 
that the prosecution accepted 
that clothing, found near the 
body of Miss Eileen 
McDougall aged 16, in South 
Shields, Tyneside, did not 
belong xo her. 

The clothing was said by 
Clarke's lawyer to be the 
most damning piece of ev 
idence against him. 

The appeal hearing contin 
ues today. 


•Motor morons’ threat to cyclists 



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The attack came frimi a 
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iSSber of 'M«**3fpS e SI 

to like. 


foster, and more often, then 
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roads will continue mth 
cyclists becoming more and 
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Lynn, editor of Bicycle 

Time^saU . rimmmn 

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and roads will be built for 
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1994, a 3 per cent increase 
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1984 there was 3 per cent 
drop in cycle usage but a 5 
per cent Increase in adult 
fatalities ami serious injuries 
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The total annual cost to the 
country of road accidents is 
now £2,650 mHlioa, or £47 for 
each person in Britain. Each 
fatal accident costs tbe coun- 
try £127,700, according to the 
Department of Transport. 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 


PARLIAMENT FEBRUARY 3 1986 


British Leyland • Teachers’ dispute 


Commentary 


Channon pledge on 
Leyland trucks 


INDUSTRY 


While no decisions had been 
reached in (he talks between 
British Leyland and General 
Motors, were any deals to be 
reached. GM would give full 
undertakings that the majority 
of vehicles sold by (he busi- 
nesses involved would be 
mamifaciurerod in the UtC. Mr 
Paul Channon. Secretary of 
State for Trade and industry, 
declared in the Commons. 

He added that the products 
would continue to have a high 
local content and there would 
be a substantial level of 
exports. Research and develop- 
ment facilities would be main- 
tained and developed in the 
UK. Land-Rover would retain 
its distinct British identity and 
a proper level of investment 
would be injected into the 
business to achieve competitive 
future models and facilities. 

If these talks were to come 
off (he went on) it would be 
Govern mem's aim to make 
sure that the jobs and future of 
Land Rover and other compa- 
nies will be more secure, not 
less. That is what we are 
fighting for. to get a viable 
industry that will be secure in 
foiune. 

He was replying to a private 
notice question from Mr John 
Smith, chief Opposition 
spokesman on trade and in- 
dustry, who feared a surrender 
of crucial British interests. Mr 
Channon told the House that 
with the approval of the British 
Leyland board, discussions 
were in progress between BL 
and General Motors with the 
aim of creating an internation- 
ally competitive United King- 
dom commercial vehicle 
industry. The talks covered 
Leyland Trucks, Land-Rover. 
Freight Rover and certain 
related overseas operations. 

Mr David Model (South West 
Bedfordshire. O said General 
Motors had a long and distin- 
guished history of supplying 
defence equipment for Britain's 
needs. 

Mr George Park (Coventry 
North East Lab} said a recent 
Conservative motion paid trib- 
ute to the workers and manage- 
ment of Leyland. Did Mr 
Channon imagine that his 
announcement was any en- 
couragement to them"? 

Mr Channon: I do believe my 
announcement should be a 
comfort to the workforce to 
realize their future is likely to 
be secure. Mr Park should 
remember that well over £2 
billion has been pumped into 
British Leyland in the last few 


Mr Cbaimoa said he welcomed 

his support- 

Mr Alan Befell (Berwick-upon- 
Tweed, L) said one of the 
duties Mr Channon had taken 
over was to ensure a viable 
British-owned motor industry. 
Was the Government’s policy 
now one of selling off job lots 
for the American market? 

Mr Channon: What . I am 
seeking to do is to try to create 
the conditions in which these 
companies will be able to have 
a more secure future than they 
have had in the past and where 
people will be able to look 
forward with confidence to the 
future of their companies. I 
would not have let talks 
proceed unless there were 
substantial assurances to that 
effect. 


Talks with other car manu- 
facturers were in progress but 


some were at an exploratory 
i early to tell 


stage and it was too early 
whether it would lead to a 
stake, acquisiion or merger. 

Mr John Smith said the 
statement revealed things were 


at an advanced stage yet up til 
been told 





Channon: No decision yet 


Mr Dale CampbeD-Savotrrs 
(Workington. Lab) asked if this 
were not another example of 
dropping the Union Jack and 
raising the Stars and Stripes 
over British Industry. Had not 
this American corporation al- 
ready made it dear that they 
did not want Leyland Buses 
and if that was the case what 


was going to be done with 


them; 

Mr OuutBOB said separate 
discussions were taking place 
with the Laird group about the 
future of Leyland Buses. He 
would have thought that Mr 
Campbell -Savours would have 
welcomed that. 

Dame JU1 Knight (Bir- 


mingham, Edgbaston. Q said 
the future ol scot 


scores, if not 
hundreds, of small businesses 
in the West Midlands de- 
pended utterly upon their 


ability to provide British Ley- 
Tould the 


land with parts. Could 
House be certain that their 
future was being considered in 
any arrangements that were to 
be made? 

Mr Cbannou replied that be 
bad the point very much in 
mind. 


now the House had 
nothing. It. confirmed fears 
expressed the previous day by 
Mr Roy Halteisley, the shadow 
Chancellor. 

It was appalling that the 
Government was willing even 
to contemplate the disposal of 
the largest part of the British 
truck and bus manufacturing 
industry to an American 
competitor. In October Mr 
Leon Britten, the previous 
Secretary of State, bad said that 
despite lengthy discussions 
General Motors were not ready 
to prove they were a British car 
producer. 

Was there no part of British 
industry sale from the destruc- 
tive performance of this Gov- 
ernment? 

Is there (be asked) anything 
that is not for sale? Will be 
confirm there is a team from 
General Motors currently 
within Leyland doing a detailed 
dossier on the business? 

The purpose of GM in 
buying Leyland would be to 
buy out the British market 
share and get their hands on 1 
modem facilities provided on a 
public financial basis at a cost 
of £320 million. 

Would there not be large job 
losses at Bedford as well as 
Leyland. What was the es- 
timate of the number of jobs 
lost? 

What future would there be 
for Land Rover and Range 
Rover? Would not the job lot 
disposal of this prestigious 
British product be seen at 
home and abroad as a dreadful 
and shameful retreat. Was it 
not a sad day that a British 
Government could even think 
of such a thing. 

If the deal went ahead was it 
not the case that the British 
armed forces would have no 
British supplier of vehicles on 
which they could depend. 
Could the Government explain 
why all other countries in 
Western Europe wanted to stay 
in this industry but this 
Government did not? 

What protection would there 
be for independent British 
research and development? 

This episode was typical of 
the Government's industrial 
policy involving the destruc- 
tion of jobs. 


More money for 
BR to extend 
rail tracks 


of the Channel fixed link, and 


CHANNEL LINK 


that BR s other requirements 
be curtailed. 


The Goveramral's While Piper on 
the Channel link was being pub- 
lished tomorrow (Tuesday) and 
from that would be discovered best 
guesses atom extra employment 
and where it would &U, Mr 
Nicholas Ridley. Secretary of State 
for Transport, said during Com- 
mons questioning. • 

It would be. be said, for the many 
industri al ffi m miiiw in the Mid- 
lands and North lo make sun: they 
won the contracts when they were 
put out to tender. The Government 
recognised that British Rail would 
require a higher level of external 
finance than would otherwise be (be 


Some £700 million or £800 
million of railway . investment 
would flow from the decision to 
build the Channel Tunnel Group 
scheme. The railway workshops 
were in the North and Midlands 
and jobs would go to those areas. 
Later. Mr Ridley confirmed 
that British Rail's external 
finance limits would need to be 
set far enough ahead for 
everyone to see what was 
happening to the development 
and extension of services in the 
south-east, the north and in 
Scotland. 

He also gave an assurance 
that the finance limits would 
be expanded to take account of 
British Rail's needs in the light 


would not __ ... 

Mr Jonathan Akkra (Thanet 
South. O said Mr Ridley had 
previously given . the im- 
pression that he would not 
allow taxpayers’ money to be 
spent oh the Channel project. 

Since then, and today, he 
had given a different im- 
pression of expanded finance 
limits and railways for the 
north. There was a danger of 
schizophrenia here. (Laughter). 

Mr Ron Lewis (Carlisle, Lab) 
said Mr Ridley had suggested 
the fixed link was going to 
mean extra funding for British 
RaiL Is that (he asked) why Mr 
Ridfey so opposed to the 
scheme origin: . 

Mr Ridley: I was opposed to 
the scheme II years ago, 
because it was to be paid for by 
taxpayers. This will not involve 
taxpayers' money for construc- 
tion. Therefore, it will not be at 
the expense of other Govern- 
ment programmes. 

He also said be bad always 
made it dear that the Govern- 
ment would accept essential 
road links and railway invest- 
ment resulting from the fixed 
link, just as the Government 
accepted the need to build 
roads and railways in any new 
port, town or factory where 
traffic justified an increase in 
infrastructural investment. 


Government concern 


at EEC budget 




John Carlisle (Luton 

North. O said General Motors 
had an excellent record and he 
had every confidence that if the 
merger took place it would be 
of benefit to all the workers. 


Discussions were at an ad- 
vanced stage but a number of 
important issues remained to 
be settled. As for other British 
Leyland business, it remained 
policy to return them to private 
ownership as soon as prac- 
ticable. 


Mr Channon said he strongly 
refuted most of what Mr Smith 
had said No decisions had 
been reached in the talks 
between British Leyland and 
General Motors. When firm 
conclusions were reached he 
would make a full statement to 
the House. 


Attorney rejects claim 


There was no truth at all in the 
Labour allegation that Sir 
Patrick Mayfeew. the Solicitor 
General, had been used by the 
Prime Minister in a war against 
Mr Michael Heseltine. Sir 
Michael Havers, the Attorney 
General, said to Labour pro- 
tests during Commons ques- 
tions on the inquiry into the 
leak of the letter sent by the 
Solicitor General to the Mr 
Heseltine on the Westland 
Affair. 

He said he could not give a 
Conservative backbencher an 
assurance that the practice of 
government using leaks by 
public servants would cease. 
There had not been any leaks 
in his depanmem while he had 
been in office. Leaking of any 
kind was deplorable. 

The Attorney General said 
that the two letters from the 
Solicitor General to the then 
Secretary of State for Defence, 
dated January 6 and January 7 
this year, which had been place 

in the library of the House, 
revealed that advice was given 
by the Solicitor General on 
December 31, 1985 and on 
those two days. 

In accordance with the 
convention on law officers' 
advice (be continued)! am not 
prepared to disclose if I or the 
Solicitor General was asked to 
give legal advice on the 


proposed financial reconstruc- 
tion arrangements for Westland 


pk on^aoy other occasion. 


Mr Jack Straw (Blackburn, 
LabV.On the leak of the 
Solicitor General's letter, the 
Prime Minister had admitted 
to the House that at least by 
January 7 she was told in 
general terms that there had 
been talks between her own 
office and the Department of 
Trade and Indusry in advance 
of the leak. 

Did the Prime Minister at 
any time (that is what she told 
us on January 23) between 
January 7 and January 23, 
share this general knowledge 
with the Attorney General or 
the Solicitor General and. if so, 
on what date? 

Sir Michael Ha vers: The only 
time I had any communication 
with the Prime Minister was on 
January 22 when the Secretary 
to the Cabinet gave us an 
outline of his report 


Mr Jeremy HayesfHariow, 
OrThis is the son of question 
which amplifies the Labour 
Party’s policy of only obeying 
those laws which it finds 
advantageous to itself. They 
have said numerous times that 
this sort of question, about 
advice between the law officers 
and members of the Cabinet, is 
a matter which is forbidden 
territory. 


Sir Michael Havers said be 
agreed it was a long convention 
that neither the fact of the 
advice nor the contents is 
disclosed. 

Mr John Morris, chief 
Opposition spokesman on legal 
affairs: When the Attorney Gen- 
eral answered the House in a 
written answer on January 16 
that an internal inquiry into 
the leak was still a considerable 
way from being completed, was 
be aware that it was an inquiry 
into an official leak, and what 
legal advice was he then 
tendering? 

Was not the department 
consulted as to the proposed 
use of the Solicitor General's 
letter? 

Are there precedents for law 
officers' letters being used as 
weapons for publicly chastising 
ministerial colleagues? 

Sir Michael Havers: Having 
consulted the Secretary of the 
Cabinet and expressed my view 
that it was essential that a leak 
inquiry should be set up. 1 did 
not know any more about that 
inquiry until I was informed of 
the results, first in summary 
form and then being provided 
with the actual document on 
January 22, the same day as it 
was given to the Prime 
Minister. 

On leaking, I have nothing 
really to add 


MPs could not draw a parallel 
in debate between the British 
court cases of Liverpool and 
Lambeth councillors to respect 
of disputed budgets and the 
positions of members of the 
European parliament as a 
result of the contentious EEC 
budget approved in December. 
This was said by Sir Paul 
Dean, the Deputy Speaker, 
after two Labour and two 
Conservative MPs bad raised 
points of order at the beginning 
of a speech by Mr Peter 
Brooke, Minister of State, 
Treasury, on supplementary 
estimates for 1983-86. 

The Deputy Speaker ruled 
that MPs must abide by the 
precedent that they could not 
say anything that might prej- 
udice a case before the British 
courts had decided upon u. 
This did not apply in inter- 
national cases, such as the one 
involving the EEC budget, 
which would come before the 
Euro enurts. 


amounting to some 
million above that agreed 

5 ' the Council of Ministers, 
ntil the differences 


the dinerences were 
settled, the Government would 
pay in full, on a without 
prejudice basis. 


Mr Brooke said the Govern- 
ment took an extremely serious 
view of the European 
Parliament’s approval of. a 


Mr Brooke was continually 
interrupted by Conservative 
backbenchers who wanted to 
know why the Government 
was going ahead with paying 
the disputed money to the 
EEC Commission when the 
matter was before the courts. 

He told them that even if i 
the Commission spent the 
money a most important 
battle would have been won 
in terms of establishing where 
the power lay between the 
European Parliament and 
European Council. (Laugh- 
ter). . 

The Council was taking 
legal action against the Euro- 
pean Parliament and the 
British Government was also 
doing so. 


Peers seek assurance 


on Sadler’s Wells 


HOUSE OF LORDS 


ft would be a disgrace if a 
theatre as historic and nation- 
ally important as Sadler’s^ Wells 
were allowed to dose for lack 
of adequate funding, peers said 
during question tune in the 
House of Lords. 

Lord Bdstead. the Govern- 
ment spokesman, answering a 
question on Government plans 
to assist the theatre, said: This 
is a matter for the theatre itself 
and for the Arts Council which 
has been asked to replace the 
GLC funding of Sadler’s Wells. 
The Arts Council has consid- 
ered ways in which Sadler's 
Wells can be helped, but it 
would be contrary to its 
declared policy for it to fund a 
building as distinct from a 
performing company. Negotia- 
tions are continuing. 

Lady Niool (Lab): In 1984 the 
Earl of Gowrie and in 198S the 
Minister in the Commons 
assured Sadler’s Weils by 
saying the GLC allocation to 
them had been taken into 
acconnt when giving extra 
money to the Arts Council. 
Are we now to understand that 
these ministerial assurances are 
meaningless? 

Lord Belstead: Both considered 


specifically for post-abolition 
funding has taken account of 
this. 

Lord Nugent of GmhUord (CV- 
The theatre is of historic and 
national importance and the 
opera and ballet has made an 
outstanding contribution to our 
national life. 

While i normally sympathise 
with government policy of leaving 
the Arts Council to make its own 
judgement about distribution of the 
very large funds provided from the 
Government, the Arts Council can 
be capricious about about its gisau 
sometimes. 


Because it is vital that adequate 
funding be provided to keep the 
theatre open, would the Govern- 
ment reconsider giving the Arts 
Council some firm advice about 
grams to Sadler’s Wells? 


the implications of the aboli- 




Wells, and the £25 million 
allocated to the Arts Council 


Lord B e lstea d ; The theatre does 
play a vital pan in the cultural life 
of London and the nation. It is 
essentially a matter for the Arts 
Council to work out the possibil- 
ities in consultation with Sadler's 
WeOs and other interested parties. 

Dud Jealous of Potacy (Lab); 
The theatre is in a frightful 
position. It will have to dose on 
May 17 unless something is done. 

Lord B fh s te ad: Consultations are 
going on with a view to securing the 
future of buildings outside Greater 
London. I believe it is going to be 
possible to find a solution within 
Greater London. 

La n* Strabolgi (Lab); There is a 
shortfall of £10 million between 


Joseph asks all 
teacher unions 
to join talks 


EDUCATION 


Although the biggest teachers’ 
Union, the National Union 
of Teachers was not a party 
to the provisional agreement 
to end the year-long dispute 
in schools, the Government 
hoped all the onions in the 
profession would join in the 
talks that lay ahead for 1986. 
Sir Keith Joseph. Secretary 
of State for Education and 
Science, said in a Commons 
statement. 

Mr Giles Radice, chief 
Opposition spokesman on 
education, said Sir Keith 
Joseph and the education 
department had done nothing 
to help bring about a settle- 
ment of this highly-damaging 
dispute. The statement did 
nothing to make a long-term 
settlement more likely. 

The Secretary of State had 
not offered local education 
authorities any extra money 
to help pay for a provisional 
settlement, nor a government 
contribution towards a 
longer-term settlement next 
year. 

When would the Govern- 
ment accept a simple truth: 
that raising educational stan- 
dards and giving teachers 
decent salaries required 
substantial extra investment? 

By announcing he would 
not be seeking re-election as 
an MP, Sir Keith had been 
transformed overnight into 
the lamest of lame ducks. 
(Conservative protests). 

If he really cares about 
education he should an- 
nounce he is resigning as 
Secretary of State. 


persuaded to accept the outline 

of the ACAS agre ement . 

Sir JKritli Joseph: It is 
important that teachers m the 
unions should understand whai 
is on offer and that the 
Government has. already set 
aside a substantial sum of 
money to be released on 
condition that die bargain to 
which i have referred should be 
made. 

One of the unions has 
already called off disruption; 
another union is balloting its 
members now - and we 
understand toat wifi take much 
of this month. 

I very much hope that the 
NUT. , which has called off the 



strike on which it prow:orf| 


derided, will also decide ro 
off the disruption. 

Mr Clement Frew! (North 
East Cambridgeshire, L): The 
more intransigent he is, the 
more succour be gives to tbe 
hardline unionists. 


Sir Keith Joseph: If we had 
not been firm in saying extra 
pay for teachers would only be 
forthcoming from tbe taxpayer 
if. hi return, they accepted 
duties and a new pay structure 
and extra promotions, we 
would not even. I believe by 
now, have got the discussion 
on that bargain on toe agenda. 


Mr Patrick Thompson (Nor- 
wich North, Q: Z join him in 
deploring the damage done to 
our children's education by ibis 
long-running dispute. We must 


somehow find* a way of 
loderate 


encouraging those m< 
and conscientious t ea che rs, 
who dislike intensely the strike 
weapon and, in many cases, 
have rejected it. 


Ctinnot we -in the toqger-cemi 
move towards some kind of 
professional teachers* council 
and a situation where we can 
actually negotiate a no-strike 
agreement? 



Mr Koto Joseph: I agree in 
paying tribute to all those 
teachers and particularly beads 
who have carried on without 
disruption.' 


Joseph: Teachers deserve more 


Sir Keith Joseph said 
teachers deserved more pay, 
so that the right people could 
be recruited, retained and 
motivated. 

But it would not be right to 
pay out more public money 
without an agreement over a 
new pay structure and an 
acceptance by the teachers’ 
unions of duties. 

Mr Radice was active in 
accepting pay for teachers, 
but would not accept that 
teachers duties were a nee-, 
essary part of the bargain. 
(Cheers). 

Mr Ahm Haselhurst (Saffron 
Walden, CD: If we are to get 
complete resolution of this 
dispute it is crucial that the 
rank and file teachers should be 


I stand ready to support me 
idea of a general teachers’ 
council, if that were the wish of, 
the majority of teachers, but I 
would need to be convinced 
first that a general teachers’ 
counci! would really operate on 
behalf of the children as well as 
taking an interest in teachers. 
Mr John Thompson 
(Wansbeck, Lab): Even if there 
is a settlement, normal working 
in schools, as we recognised it 
before the dispute, will not 
come bad: again. Teachers are 
specifically resisting the de- 
mands for resuming out of, 
school activities. 


Sir Keith Joseph said things 
would return to normal, except, 
that the Government was now 
financing midday supervision 
by separate meams and asking 
tor appraisal to be considered 
as part of teachers' duties. 

Mr Robert Key (Salisbury, Ck 
The majority of teacher unions 
are prepared to talk about 
restructuring and conditions 
and appraisaL Tbe Acas panel, 
being established should be- 
come the son of Burnham as 
an embryo future negotiating 
body. 


Sir Keith Joseph:. Burnham is 
needed under the law to 
validate and implement any 
agreement made under the 
Acas umbrella. 


Law on age to 


remain 

The Government was not 
prepared to introduce legisla- 
tion making age discrimination 
'(legal. Lord Yonng of 
Iraflbam, Secretary of State 
for Employment, said during 
uestion time in the House of 


quesuo 

Lords. 


what the Government is giving and 


whai the GLC gave 


Bffvmg: 

before. 


He told peers: I am deeply 
concerned that skill and experi- 
ence should not be wasted, but 
seek to interefere in 


to 


employer’s derisions about 
whether, in their particular 
circumstances to recruit an 
older or a younger person, 
would run counter to the 
Government’s policy of reduc- 
ing the administration and 
legislative burdens on business 
in encouraging tbe provision of 
jots for people of all ag 


Tube crime 


report soon 


More measures to protect 
women travelling on public 
transport were called for by Ms 
Jo Richardson (Barking. Lab) 
during transport questions in 
tbe Commons. She said a GLC 
survey showed that more than 
75 per cent of women felt 
unsafe travelling at night and 
more conductors and staff were 
needed as machines could not 
respond t cries for help. 

Mr Nicholas Ridley. Seel 
retary of State for Transport. I 
said a study of crime on tbe | 
London underground, which . 
covered the safety of women 


was expected to report by tbe 
end of July. His Department' 


had also set up a working | 
group to examine violence on 
the buses which would be 
reporting shortly. 


How far are members of 
tbe House of Commons 
defence select committee jus- 
tified In demanding that ChU 
Savants should give evidence 
on the leak of the Soiidtor- 
GenentTs fetter? The ques- 
tion needs to be asked not 
only by those wbo wish to 
preserve the Government 
from farther embarrassment 
but also by those who are 
concealed that individual 
ChU Servants should not be 
so a false position. 

It might be aigoei that this 
committee is rather stretching 
its field of responsibility in 
about tbe leak. As it 
in the Department of 
Trade and Industry, should 
this line of questioning not be 
left to that committee? 

Bat it is relevant to defence 
policy whether the Govern- 
ment has conducted itself 
property over Westland, and 
it was the Government that 
suggested that the committees 
should examine the sags. So I 
do not think it would be wise 
to be fastidious on that point 
But b it unfair to bring 
ChU Servants into it? Two 
arguments can be advanced 
against doing . so, one 
constitutional and the other a 
consideration of personal jus- 
tice. < 

The convention has always 
been that it is tor ministers to 
take responsibility far what 
happens in their departments. 
That convention was set out 
explicitly by the Cabinet 
Secretary, Sir Robert Arm- 
strong, in his memorandum 
last year on the duties and 
responsibilities of Civil Ser- 
vants: “It is toe minister who 
is responsible ami answerable 
in Parliament for the conduct 
of toe department's affairs 
and toe managment of its 
business.” 

The CTril Servant does not 
have a constitutional 
personality or responsibfffty 
separate from his minister. 
That is why in toe past 
ministers have resigned when 
Civil Servants have erred. 

That convention should not 
be lightly cast aside. It is in 
particular necessary' to pre- 
serve the ability of Civil 
' Servants to offer confidential 
advice to their monster. 
Otherwise the pressures of 
them to be cautions wfll be 
even greater than now. 

Bat it is the Government 
which has disregarded the 
convention in the Westland 
controversy by publishing tbe 
official record of Mr Bri Han's 
meeting with Sir Raymond 
Lygo, by naming officials who 
support Mr Brittan's 
recollection of that meeting, 
and now by potting part of 
the blame for the leak upon 
misunderstand ings between ■ 

officials. 

The committee has been 
left with no alternative but to 
question officials if it is to 
find out what went 
The only other option 
be for senior ministers to 
appear as frank and forth- 
coming witnesses themselves. 
There is constitutional logic 
in Dr John Gilbert's 
tion that the Prime 
herself might give evidence. 

that idea should be 
seen at this stage as no more 
than a political signal to the 
Government (hat toe commit- 
tee will not be satisfied unless 
other witnesses are more 
helpful than Mr Brittan was 
on bis later appearances last 
year. It b not only the 
Labour members who are 
determined not to be fobbed 
off. 

Tbe committee can afford 



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Police drug team network 
delayed by cash problems 


By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 


Hans for a national network 
of detective teams specializ- 
ing in big drug cases have 
been delayed by problems 
over the scheme’s financing . 

After six months the teams 
are now unlikely lo start until 
i the new financial year at toe 
earliest 

The network was an- 
nounced last summer as part 
of a government strategy for 


fighting drop trafficking and 


dealing. More than 220 
detectives would be dittoed 
into toe nine regional crime 
squads which cover Britain to 
form a total of 17 “drug 
wings”. The teams would 
cost a total of £6 million to 
£10 million a year and are 


seen as a key component in 
the police effort against drug 
abuse. 

But the teams were an- 
nounced halfway through the 
financial year, which left 
financially stricken local 
authorities with fresh prob- 
lems. The Horae Office win 
pay half toe cost of the teams 
but local authorities have 
found difficulty finding their 
share. 

Astown hails draw up 
budgets for the new financial 
year, police are trying to find 
out what will happen to the 
teams. The Association of 
Chief Police Officers is 
surveying all chief constables 
to see how plans for recruit- 


ing the teams have pro- 


No one yet knows which of 
the English or Welsh regional 
crime squads will start teams . 
The Scottish police are ex- 
pected to start this summer 
in a staggered arrangement 
which will also be used across 
the border. 


Next month repre- 
sentatives of county and 
metropolitan authorities are 
to meet Home Office officials 
to discuss problems in setting 
up the network. The authori- 
ties agree with the Home 
Office about the seriousness 
of toe drug problem but are 
worried about cost. 


Heart link check on cot deaths 


Thomson Prentice 
Correspondent 


Research is being launched 
into the links between heart 
defects in babies and cot 
deaths. 


newborn and young infants 
and its relationship to sudden 
infant death syndrome will 
be carried out at the John 
Radclifie Hospital. Oxford. 


An investigation into toe 
causes and nature of damage 
to the heart muscle in 


Dr Helen Porter, of the 
Nuffield department of 
pathology at the hospital, will 
oraduct the project funded 


by the British Heart Founda- 
tion. 

Tbe charity is also funding 
research into “hole in the 
heart" congenital defects at 
toe Institute of Child Health 
at Alder Hey Children’s 
Hospital, Liverpool. The 
nts are two of nine worth 
4,837 by toe foundation 


Elgar song 
found 



in drawer 


An nnpnblished manuscript 
by Edward Elgar, tbe com- 
poser, has been found after 
lying in a desk drawer for 40 
years. 

The folded foolscap sheets 
bearing tire words “mask of 
an ondergraduate’s drinking 
song” were amograpbed by 
the composer in June 1924. 

Covered by old newspaper 
cuttings, Christmas cards and 
family documents, they were 
only revealed when Mrs Jane 
Mdnnes, aged 55, of Rich- 
mond Park Road, Bourne- 
mouth, Dorset, was 
persuaded to have a cfearouL 

Mrs Mdnnes, who was 
paid a four sum, 

handed over the four sheets 
at her home yesterday to the 
Elgar Foundation. 

For years the foundation 
have had a rough pencil 
sketch of the song — without 
being able to compare it to a 
foil manuscript. 

Mr Wnlstan Atkins, aged 
81, the godson of the com- 
poser and chairman of the 
foundation, safd: M It*s a 
wonderful find. We believe it 
was the last nnpnblisJied 
manuscript iff Elgar's stiff 
-^discovered.” 












Mrs Jane Mclrmes faokfing the autographed 
raanoscrqit— “musk of as mutergradnate’s drinking 


Pop music 
publisher 
dies at 65 


By David Hewsoe 


Dick James. the music pub- 
lisher, died of a heart attack' 
-on Saturday, two months 
after losing a court case 
brought by the musician, 
Elton John, which could cost 
his company up to £5 
million. He was 65. 

Mr James was one of the 
most successful publishers of 
toe pop music boom. A 
singer by profession — he 
recorded the theme music for 
toe 1950 b television series 
Robin Hood - he was a key 
figure in the growth of 
Northern Songs, which pub- 
lished the Beaties, and later 
formed his own company, 
Dick James Music. 


Last November DJM lost a 
case brought by Elton John 
and his songwriting partner, 
Bemie TaopnuMr Justice 
Nicholls said that Mr John 
and Mr Taupin had been 
deliberately underpaid while 
they had been employed by 
DJM with whom they signed 
a publishing, recording and 
management agreement in 
1967 when toey were “young 
and inexperienced 7 ’.. 


Obitnaryjage 14 


to take a strong line in this 
instance without fear of 
impairing the principle that 
advice should be confidential. 

It is the actions of officials, 
net their advice to ministers, 
that is at issue. 

Bat there is stiff the risk of 
officials bring placed in an 
invidious position. Tbe roles 
governing their conduct be- 
fore sefect committees in- 
struct them not to be 
forthcoming abort “toe level 
at which decisions were taken 
or [he manner in which a 
minister has consulted bis 
colleagues". But just bow 
certain derisions were taken 
is precisely what the commit- 
tee want to know. 

Because there is obviously 
-a danger of officials bring 
jlit between conflicting 
requirements that is toe stage 
at which certain principles 
should be set out. Except in 
so far as toe y may already 
have been granted immunity, w 
officials should be liable to 
disciplinary action for any 
personal misconduct over the 
leak. But they should not be 
penalized for tbe evidence 
they give to toe select 
committee. 

I see no reason for the 
committee to be inhibited on 
that score. Its task is to 
conduct its inquiries as well r t 
as it can. It is to their CirO * 
Service and ministerial 
superiors that rtRrfat* should 
look for the 
protection they deserve. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Aden carnage survivor 
tells of party 
leaders’ execution 


All Salem al-Beedh sat on a 
rowsofe, gnnmng con- 
aantly clutching a brown 
walking stick in his left hand. 

fcf? 5 was wounded, we 

asked, and he grinned, pulled 

ULH ^ patted the 
blue T-shirt which covered 
nis stomach. 

It was, in feci, a lime woisc 
than that. Ali Salem's would- 
be assassins had shot him in 
the thigh and lower abdomen 
after the original murder 
attempt at the Politburo on 
January 13. 

He had escaped President 
Ali Nasser Muham mad 's 
South Yemeni Politburo liq- 
uidation with two colleagues, 
Abdul Fatah Ismael - one of 
the leading figures in the 
anu-Bnii&h struggle of the 
1960s — and Salem Saleh 
Muhammad, a secretary of 
the Central Committee. All 
three, he said, had been 
rescued by the Army. But 
where, we asked, was Abdul 
Fatah Ismael now? 

“I withdrew with him 
(after the shooting) at 7 
o'clock on January 13,” he 
said. “But I escaped on one 


From Robert Fisk, Aden 
he escaped 


on 


tank and 
another. 1 " 

All that is known, there- 
fore. is that Mr Ail Salem 
and Mr Salem Saleh Muham- 
tnad are the sole surving 
members of the old 1 1 -strong 
Politburo in Aden and the 
only ones wielding power. 
Three were killed on January 
13, four fled with Mr Au 
Nasser Muhammad, and one, 
Mr Abdul Fatah Ismael, is 
missing. 

. Mr Ali Salem al-Beedh 
sipped a glass of water on his 
sofe. He liked to talk about 
his life. He was 46, married 
with eight children, himself 
“a struggled in the war 
against the British. A Hadra- 
maut man with long, dark 
hair, he smiled a lot. 

Did the foreign journalists 
have any questions? There 
were a few. Were these 
battles in Aden not, perhaps, 
just tribal warfare? Ali Salem 
chuckled softly at so prepos- 
terous a notion. 

“The feci is,” be said, “that 
Ali Nasser did not believe in 
socialism." 

“Our differences with him 


were well known - there was 
tension even before the third 
conference of our party. For 
the sake of the national 
interest, we tried to sacrifice 
so many things for unity. But 
who would have thought Ali 
Nasser would try to kill us?" 

Ali Salem chose not to 
elaborate on just what the 
'‘tensions and differences” 
were with Ah’ Nasser — 
"ideological, social 
questions,” he would only 
say; but be insisted that “ibe 
Soviet stand is with the 
Yemeni Socialist Party". 

As for Mr Ah Nasser 
Muhammad, Ali Salem 
evinced astonishment that 
the former President could 
even contemplate the murder 
of h is party colleagues. “It 


was a crime against the party 
and the reputation of our 


revolution,” he said. 

But had not Ali Nasser 
been elected by the party? 
Had he not been Prime 
Minister as weH as President 
— and for a long time? “That 
was our mistake,” Ali Salem 
replied. And t his time, he did 
not smile. 


Party officials accused 


Moscow steps up 
corruption war 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


There are increasing signs 
that the Kremlin's new drive 
against corruption, in- 
efficiency and excessive se- 
crecy in Soviet public life, is 
being intensified in the ran- 
np to the crnrial 27th 
Communist Party congress 
which opens here on Feb- 
ruary 25. 

Reporting the local party 
congress in the southern 
Soviet republic of Azerfaaqaa, 
the official party newspaper 
Pravda yesterday disclosed 
that Mr Farkhad Sahaaaov, 
the republic’s former —hiisfgr 
for the cotton-dearaig In- 
dustry, had recently been 
brought to trial on of 

corruption and nrisnse of 
power. 

Mr Safananev, who' was 
sacked, as minister., hot 
December after boUmg the 
post for five years, wasione of 
a number, of senior Soviet 
officials accused publicly at 
tire congress of serions 
fellings. In keeping with the 
nationwide drive to dean ap 
the administration, Mr 
Kyaaraa Bagaov, toe local 
party chief, admitted to 
delegates that be shared some 
of the Maine for wot weeding 
oat more corrupt officials and 
remedymg inefficiency. 

Pravda had on Sanday 
accused a number of former 
senior officials in the central 
Asian repnbtic of Uzbekistan 
- one of the most notorioosly 
corrupt areas of the Soviet 
Union - of being “state 
criminals". 

The attack arose out of toe 
party’s five-yearly congress in 


personally by Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov, the Soviet leader. 

Late last month, the former 
bosses of toe 
Moscow city Communist 
Party — also one-time asso- 
ciates of Brezhnev — were 
subjected to a savage public 
harang ue by toe city’s tough 
new Siberian-boni party 


chief, Mr Boris Yefcgfo, aged 
frMr 


55, a strong sspporter of 
Gorbachov 9 * new policy of 
“soda!- discipline”. . 

Mr. Yeftsfo's outspoken 
indictment of .incompetence, 
corrupt practices and adann- 
Ktradre remoteness in the 
capital was remarkable net 
only for toe directness of 
language bat also becanse his 
predecessor for 38 years, Mr 
Viktor Grishin, was sitting in 


:• ' Sirri 




<J 


<wV 


Mr Grishin: fikely to lose' 
. Politburo seat 
the audience to hear it being 


Mr Grishin, once known 
for his closeness to Brezhnev, 
is confidently expected to lose 
seat on toe reding 


the republic, part of prepare- Politburo by the cod of the 

tious for the national meeting, congress. He had to sit stomF- 

feeed at toe meeting of toe 


which will be attended by 
5,000 delegates. Pravda dis- 
closed that the Uzbek party 
bad accused several officials 
of corrupt practices on a vast 
scale. . 

The paper said distortion 
of statistics, embeszferaeat 
and bribery had become 
widespread in the republic, 
and that falsified figures and 
miscalculations had led to 
serions problems in the 
Most of 


city party organization 
tfwougb repented condemna- 
tion of, among other things, 
fraud, had transput, rude 
shop assistants and open 
corruption in the city’s hos- 
pitals. 

Another aspect of Soviet 
life singled out for criticism 
hi the run-up to the congress 
has been excessive secrecy. 
On Saturday, the official 
paper Sovietskaya Rossiya, 


region’s economy. Most « m* 

those singled out for dernmo- which has been . m to- 
atom vreretopares who held vanguard tffte Kremba < Jm* 


power during the Brezhnev 
era. 

Western observers de- 
scribed toe criticism and 
other widespread 

against corrupt, fcte ffiri e nt 

and elderly officials as part of naoms 

8 P r ®cess j i dareagboat the Soviet Union. 


for more openness, attacked 
the secretive style of work of 
local Communist Party 
committees. 

It alleged this ms largely 
for the unfounded 
which frequently 
circulate like wildfire 


Brezhnev izatioo 


90 Tamil 
rebels die 
in pitched 
battles 


Colombo (Reuter) - The 
Government has appealed for 
help from Buddhist mnnVs to 
solve Sri Lanka’s ethnic 
.conflict after at feast 90 
Tamil rebels were reported 
killed in weekend battles with 
security forces. 

President Jayewardene, 
speaking at a Buddhist cere- 
mony at Wathnruwila near 
Colombo, asked monks to 


propose “a strategy based on 
non-violence". 

At least 60 guerrillas fight- 
ing for a separate Tamil state 
were killed in a 72-hour 
period in pitched battles at 
Kilinochchi in Northern 
Province, security sources 
said. A curfew was imposed 
on the area. 

Thirty rebels were killed in 
Eastern Province .when land, 
sea and air forces stormed a 
guerrilla stronghold. 

Mr Jayewardene had been 
due this week to discuss the 
violence with Mr Romesh 
Bhandari, a senior Indian 
Foreign Ministry official, but 
the talks have been post- 
poned. 

The Indian High Commis- 
sion in Colombo said that Mr 
BhandarTs visit was pot off 
owing to unforsqen 
developments” and fresh 
dates would be announced. It 
did not elaborate. 

Reports from India said 
that Mr Bhandari had 
readied Madras, where be 
had talks with Tamil leaders, 
on his way to Colombo 
before the visit was called off. 


• Kidnapped Briton: A 

senior official of the British 
High Co mmissio n in Co- 
lombo has flown to Jaffna in 
Northern Province to help 
with the ' release of the 
kidnapped British freelance 
' iraafist, Mrs Penelope Wil- 
(Vijitha Yapa writes).Mrs 
Wiffis, aged 64, was kid- 
napped by Tamil guerrillas of 
the Eelam Revolntionaiy 
Organization of Students 
(Eros) on January 17 at 
Mullativu in north-eastern 
Sri Lanka. The guerrillas 
accuse her of bring a spy. 

On Sunday they released a 
five-page document in which 
they smd that Mrs Willis had 
seen a number of people 
involved with security in 
Colombo. They also released 
a photocopy of an. identity 
can) showing that she is a 
member of the Royal United 
Service institution for De- 
fence Studies. 


Omani pitfalls 
of marriage 


UU w 

(Gen 

Kuwait, 


f 

1 





- 


to foreigners 

Muscat, Oman (AP) - 
Omani citizens who marry 
foreigners will be smppedof 
their nationality, the Ministry 
0 f the Interior has an- 
nounced. 

The announcement ex- 
cepted from the punishment 
citizens marrying nanong 
fromanyofthesixawntiiK 
that make up toe | Outf^Co- 
operatiou Council 
Oman, Saudi Arab 
the United Arab 
Bahrain and Qatar- . 

Badr bin Saud bin .Hareb, 
told reporters toe ruling was 
Kline with an amendmentof 

the Nationality 

“5* into ^effert on February 

L Omanis who married for- 

SgSL&S 

Effc'SSlkc ^ 


Romania puts lock on 
dissident typewriters 


From Richard Bassett, Vienna 


Forced to endure shi 
of food and fad unpai 
in Eastern Europe, tong- 
suffering Romanians must 
now subject their typewriters 
to the rigours of bureaucracy. 

Typewriter owners who do 
not register _ their machine 
with the police will race stiff 
fines and risk having their 
machines confiscated, Roma- 
nian newspapers warned. 

The warning was part of a. 
well-orchcstralcd press cam- 
paign to enforce a law passed 
£ 1983 banning the pos- 
session of unlicensed typo- 
writers in Ronwnia. 


The law, also prohibiting 
private ownership of telex 
machines and photocopiers, 
has been enforced more in 
recent months following an 
increased circulation of 
Hungarian dissident material 
in Transylvania and the 
Banal in western Romania. 

The official Romanian 
dail y in Timisoara this week 
printed instructions on how 
to register typewriters, saying 
owners would also have to 
gfgn an undertaking that 
under no circumstances 
would their machines be lent 
or hired to anyone else. 


Hungarians hit bottle 


toe world as cotameo of 
hard spirits, the Hungarian 
daily Magyar /info? reported 
yesterday (Richard 
writes). 1 
. Last year the *\ 
Hungarian cons um ed 
tres af spoits as well as 89 B- 
tres of beer nail 33 litres af 
wine, 

Haugaiy, snHke any other 


country m Central 
has mfimfted access, at 
reasonable prices, to some of 
the best alcohol produced on 
eitoer aide of the bun 
Curtain; beer from Bohemia, 
wine from Tokay and whisky 
and gin from the west. 

. The report said Hnngar- 
hutt m average spend more 
than a tenth of their monthly 
income on afoohoi. 



South Africa inquiry 


Commonwealth’s 
team to start on 
apartheid report 


By Nicholas Ashford, Diplomatic Correspondent 


Two senior Common- 
wealth officials have left 
London for Cape Town to 
prepare the way for the first 
visit to South Africa later this 
month by members of the 
Commonwealth Group of 
Eminem Persons io promote 
a “dialogue for democracy” 
between the South African 
authorities and representative 
black leaders. 

The Commonwealth has 
opted for a phased approach 
in canrying out its delicate 
and difficult mission. 

The first phase will take 
place later this month when 
three of the seven-member 
group - Mr Malcolm Fraser, 
the former Prime Minister of 
Australia, General Olusegon 


Obasanjo, the former Presi- 


Mr Carl McNair, brother of Ronald McNair, who was killed in the Challenger shuttle 
disaster, being comforted by his wife at a Sooth Carolina memorial service 


Reagan starts spending cuts 


From Michael Binyoo, Washington 


President Reagan has given 
tiae go-ahead for the first 
round of $11.4 bilfion (£8.14 
bQtion) in automatic spending 
cats, while holding fest to his 
demand for defence spending 
increases, domestic budget 
cuts and no tax increases to 
reduce toe deficit 

Standing firm in the face of 
pressure from his own party 
for an early compromise on 
this year's contentions bud- 
get, Mr Reagan said in his 
weekly radio broadcast that 
any tax increase Congress 
salt to him would be “DOA 
— dead on arrival”. 

He announced that the 
spending cuts for the current 
fiscal year, mandated by the 


Gramm-Rndman Balanced 
Budget legislation, will take 
effect on March 1, »nl*«e 
they are successfully chal- 
lenged in court. They repre- 
sent a 43 per cent cut for 
domestic agencies and a 4.9 
per cent cut for defence. 

Mr Reagan said that pas- 
sage of the Gramm-Rndman 
law was “an admission by 
Congress Hw»i zero hour is 
upon ns”. He insisted that 
government services could be 
maintained, bat complained 
that the budget savings made 
no distinction between high- 
priority programmes and 
those of little merit. 

Both Congress and the 
Administration have resigned 


themselves to this first swing 
of the Gramm-Rndman bud- 
get axe. 

The real fight will come 
over next year's budget, when 
more swingeing cuts will be 
needed. The President is to 
submit his spending plan 
tomorrow, and Congress is 
hoping that last year's pro- 
tracted and bruising budget 
Cgbt can be avoided. 

Senate Republicans have 
circulated a letter urging the 
President to act on deficit 
reduction before tax reform. 
The party leadership has, at 
meetiitgs,pressed on him the 
need not to wait until Angnst 
or September before com- 
promising on the budget. 


dent of Nigeria and Dame 
Niia Barrow, a president of 
the World Council of 
Churches — bold a prelimi- 
nary round of talks with 
black and white South Af- 
rican leaders. Their visit, pre- 
ceded by a meeting of the fall 
group in London, will begin 
on February IS. 

Depending on the outcome 
the second phase will occur 
later in the spring when the 
lull group will descend on 
South Africa for farther talks 
before reporting to the 
Commonwealth on progress 
in dismantling apartheid. 

The decision to set up the 
Commonwealth group was 
taken at the organization's 
summit meeting in Nassau 
last October as part of a 
compromise to prevent a 
split between Britain and the 
rest of the Commonwealth 
on the question of economic 
sanctions against South Af- 
rica. 

The group has until June 
to assess progress towards 


removing apartheid and the 
effectiveness of the political 
and constitutional reforms 
which President Botha has 
announced in recent months, 
most notably in his speech to 
Parliament last Friday. 

The Commonwealth has 
warned it will consider 
imposing new restrictive 
measures on South Africa — 
such as banning flights to and 
from South Africa or boycott- 
ing its agricultural produce — 
if it is not satisfied that the 
apartheid barriers are begin- 
ning to come down. 

As part of its carrot-and- 
stick approach to South 
Africa, the Commonwealth 
has also called on the 
Pretoria Government to take 
a number of actions, includ- 
ing promoting a political 
dialogue with black leaders, 
lifting the state of emergency, 
lifting the ban on the African 
National Congress and releas- 
ing Mr Nelson Mandela. 

One of the first points 
which the Common welaih 
officials must establish is 
exactly to whom the group 
will be able to talk and who 
is prepared to talk to them. 

Much will depend on 
whether or not the Common- 
wealth team is allowed to talk 
to Mr Mandela. So far the 
South African Government 
has given no undertaking 
beyond saying that it is 
prepared to consider ways of 
facilitating the group's work. 
• CAPE TOWN: Mrs Win- 
nie Mandela yesterday 
contemptuously rejected the 
proposal by President Botha 
to free her husband in 
exchange for a South African 
soldier captured in Angola 
and two Soviet dissidents 
(Reuter reports). 

Lusaka meeting, page 8 




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TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 




/ -1 


kin 



i ,'rrts^ 


ry > / 





r i 




er»H 


for Gonzalez 
over Spanish 


First 100 
days’ rule 
outlined 
by Aquino 


•■*•••>; .-V? 


Marcos still holds all the 
aces to preserve dynasty 


poll on Nato 

From Ow Own Correspondent, Madrid 


From DavM Watts 
Manila 


_ _ _ _ 

S'*.. \ 

: ' ■ » ■■ ■ 

' V M -" ‘ ‘ •' l 

'\ s “j»lSs*l 

roaroan wno nau cnsiavcu v . 

the country for 20 years, her ; 
opponent President Marcos. • Vsv.-; 

Mrs -Aquino received a . •• V ’fey-. -W-. . ‘ 

rapturous response to what is TRt*. ^ 

likdy to be her main, cam- : • 

paign statement. ~ ^2 §p?5| 

Fbr most of the time she • ■ *•.''• 

sounded lilre the victor al> '■•;• ■ . ^ 3]S|p|jg 

ready acknowledging success, 4 \ li SKE 

a device clearly intended to • 0. ' 

convince the many waverers ' \ ' wlk^uS 

within the ruling New Society ; \ |Sx«if 

Movement that there is no V^'Jg 

-stepping her bandwagon. Sk ffi*Z 

was repeatedly interrupted by sjRF 

applause in an address foil of ; . <£? ■ ■■ 

purple passages about the ; >’ -1 

“pyramid of disgrace” that . . ..'.I V-f 

President Marcos bad builL 

Mrs Aquino promised to 'rj. ■ V ’ ’’ 

dismantle the monopoly hold ' 

that friends of Mr Marcos % - v,-. 1 : " 

have over the coconut and V ' . ' ' f 

sugar industry. She also plans V ' • • • 

to negotiate better terms for V ’’ . jfi 

the Philippines foreign debt '% 

of $25.6 billion (£1&2 bil- . . • y.% L 

lion) the postponement 

of import liberalization mea- Mis Conzon Aquino, the opposition’s candidate m me 
sues. Philippines presidential election, at hmeta in Manila. 


■ 


- 'v • 

77 ## 

,<3 

* . . - • .'"■J 


*h* Government main tains tha t 


Ananich ” ““ yv*wuxncui maintains mat 

^ uste J r - goes It is -utterly serious” about 
JESS today to leaving the affiance if it loses. 

< * ec * oon 10 hoW a Privately, managers of 
'?**«»* °“ membership Spain's two main 

“** admit **«• on Naio, they do 
ronfusion that has damaged not control their own follow- 




'TK-i - 


his unap and strained the era. Parry membership of 
jmity of his party and the both accounts, anyway, for 
trade unions. _ less than 400,000 of more 


lift ,, _ “«««■ iw,uw ui muit 

when a. centre-right gov- than 27 min i on people eH- 
eromeni in Madrid took gibte to vote. 


^ ^ PoUs.show Span- 
cateii te ted. that the Socialists lands widely divided on raio. 
would never be able to take with manv criti imrfrruiH 


•y >• .'jA. . 

' . ■ 


wuld never be able to lake with many still undecided, 
the coontry out again. It may The Sjpanisb press hardly 


still prove to have been right, helps. It sees the Naio debate 
put it reckoned without not as an nnnortunitv. for 


c - ■ r- re S. 0De " without not as an opportunity for 
aenor Gonzalez, then leader educating the pubHc about 
of the Opposition. world realities after decades 


To ensure enough votes for of isolation, but to parade 
victory in the general election ideological differences. 

that ailtnmn ha tMaa^^l O L!.l . j: I 


that autumn, he inserted into Spain's bishops, divided 


the party manifesto a prom- over Nato, have been obliged 
ise to bold a referendum on to tell Roman Catholics that 


future membership if he won. they must vote “in 
Today that commitment conscience”. This will hurl 


catches up with him. 

With the Socialist MPs' 


Sefior Fiaga. 

Spanish industrialists know 


disc ipline - , and _ ' then* big that their country's high- 
majority, there is no doubt technology needs require 


that tire ‘ referendum for S pain to be in Nato. Senor 
MardT 12 win go through, Narris Ferra, the Defence 


but the threoday debate Minister, has emphasized 
si gn a l s the opening of a this, but h y? told tire service 




■jg ’-KIrv V s - ■ ; 


In his second article on 
the Philippines presiden- 
tial election, DA VID 
WATTS reports from 
Manila on the likely 
outcome and post-elec- 
lion prospects. 

President Ferdinand Mar- 
cos is not in the habit of 
losing elections. 

Until the 1984 par- 
liamentary elections, he 
looked almost unassailable. 
Bat that election proved that 
where the opposition could 
rnooi tor the coant and ensure 
its version of the tally got oat 
quickly to the public, govern- 
ment manipulation of the 
results could be limited. 

Since then the emotive 
figure of Mrs Corazoa 
Aquino bos become a power- 
fid $ymbol of the opposition; 
so powerful that Mr Marcos 
tried to persuade the Supreme 
Court to declare die election 
unconstitutional. He failed, 
but that does not mean be 
will not find some other way 
to maintain the influence of 
the Marcos family should the 
polls go against him on 
Friday. 

His options are al m os t 
limitless because of his power 
to change the composition of 
the New Society Movement 
(KBL) ticket until noon of 
election day. 

Both sides know that 
history is coming to the boiL* 

At risk for the Marcos dan 
is the future of its dynasty. 
For the opposition and the 


public at large, this may be 
the last opportunity both for 
peaceful change and to pre- 
vent what coqW develop into 
an irrevocable slide into a 
people's democratic republic. 

Reviewing the spectrum of 
Filipino ophrion, it is hard to 
find a sector of society that is 



PHILIPPINES 

ELECTIONS 

Part 2 


not ready for change. The 
business sector was one of the 
first to come out against Mr 
Marcos. Electioneering tit- 
bits, like promises to reduce 
interest rates and a cut in the 
price of petrol, have not been 
enough to change many 
minds so far. 

The strength of Mrs 
Aquino's following in Manila 
Is somewhat taken for 
granted, but appearances can 
be misleading. Last week in 
the capital, two polls were 
taken among stndruts at the 
middle dass Jose Rizal 
College. In the first, a show- 
of-hands ballot, Mrs Aquino 
was an 80-20 winner, but in a 
secret ballot it was much 
closer at 60-40. 

This false band-wagon ef- 


fect may go some way to 
discount opposition claims 
about tbe size of its plurality. 

More sensitive is the atti- 
tude of the military and of the 
small reform movement 
within it whose dislike of Mr 
Marcos is already well 
known. 

The military has by aad 
large stayed oat of Filipino 
politics and the American 
revelations about the faked 
elements of Mr Marcos’s war 
record have embarrassed and 
dishonoured it. Bm the real 
test of the military's loyally 
may come after the election if 
an unpopular Marcos victory 
brings unrest and an order to 
suppress it. 

Two other dear stances, 
one foreign and one domestic, 
make Mr Marcos's position 
increasingly precarious: the 
US Government has indicated 
it is time for a change of 
leader and so has the Roman 
Catholic Church. Never be- 
fore has the Church, which 
has great influence in the 
Philippines, come out with 
such a forceful and unified 
message: without naming her, 
it dearly indicates its pref- 
erence for Mrs Aquino. 

It is not dear whether all 
this will be suflideat to give 
Mrs Aquino victory. As the 
opposition says, she may win 
the vote but Mr Marcos may 
win the court. If that proves 
true, the immediate future is 
bleak. 

Conducted 


am 
001 
re- 
I of 
ipy- 

arid 

lay. 

tire 

pwr 

583, 

eilo. 

tire 

■ouj 

ars. 

jvie 
tin 
jvie 
ex 
mat 
•- Ii 
nioi 
Mo 


£? ie 


cam paign full of risks for the chiefs to stay out of the 
Government to convince referendum de b?** 


Spaniards, and especially Tbe Nato issue is more 
Socialist s uppor ters, to vote complex in Spain than in 


nd >ud£ 
k* r ebeJ 
ra- 1 St 
atio 
*d the< 
e’sn pa 
for soul 
ies off 
en 
the 

dcB 

ea PI) 


01*** 


“Yes”. OYercommg a power- other European countries, 
fill tradition of non-mvolve- Public opinion reflects the 


raent in Spain. 


same worries about the risks 


Citizens will be asked now of' involvement in nuclear 
to approve Spain in the ma« destruction. But anti- 


Atlantic •• Alliance (not Nato smMunent also stems 
“Nato”, which has strong from Spanish history. As 


emotional overtones) pro- 
vided, as the Goiadlez Gov- 


Sefior Gonzalez has put it 
“The United States never 


eminent now requires of its liberated us from Franco but 
Nato partners, there - is no helped him stay in power 
integration in Naio’s military after World War n”. 


commands, non-nuclear star - • To galvanize the reluctant 


tus for Spain, and a progres- working-class vote, Senor 
srve reduction by the United Gonzikz has mobilized party 


States of its forces hero \ : members now holding public 


Biit the Opposition^ led by offioe. Their jobs, andha, are 
Senor Manuel Fraga,' has got "on the line, be has warned. 


itsdTin an equal 


The Government’s prob- 


wantrng'&il integration, Se- ferns give a gokfen opportu- 
nor Fraga - will nevertheless nity to the Communists to 


urge his sippoitere.’ to at^ seek to recover their ascen- 
stam. The aim is tb invaH- dancy over tbe left, and they 


date the referendum, ; are behind I 
nicknamed by the Opposition tions planned 


demonstia- 
oughout the 


“confoundendunfV Yet the referendum, run-up. 


PRISONERS I 

SSSJc 


OF CONSCIENCE 


Advice on 
a loveless 


Philippines: 

Alberto de 
la Cruz 

By Carofine Moonhead 


Alberto de la Cm h t 
fanner and traditional healer. 
Some tone in the :- earty 
su m mer of 1982 he,, was j 
among at least 26 people, 
most' of them Carmen an t 
members of rura l self-he lp 
groups, who ware arrested in 
the Bahuaban and Asturias 
areas of Cebu and charged 
with rebellion, as alleged 
members of the New People's 
Army — the anned branch of 
the Communist Party of the 
Philippines. 

Rural organizations are 
frequently accused of involve- 
ment with the NPA. which b 
active in the countryside. 

All but five of tbe original 
26 prisoners are reported to 
have obtained their relea se by 
pleading ffdfty- 
Alberto de ta Crpre and the 
three others who first came to 
trial later in 1982 are said to 
have been intimidated fa» 

rmif^Mpaiiwi involvement with 

since retracted foeu sfate- 
tnents. Ttey renuun m jaiL 

Despite pressure on .tiiem 
to plead 

written to J* 

prepared to sacnfice the rest 
rather than plead 
guilty. God knows that we are 
innocent. 


marriage 

. Peking <UPI): - Chinese 
newspaper readers are urging 
a : 39-yeawrfd woman who 
refuses to grant her husband 
a divorce after 13 . years of 
sexless, loveless marriage to 
fide reality and “look for new 
fove”, according to the of- 
ficial China Daily. 

. Both the woman and her 
husband-have threatened to 
commit: suicide if they lose 
foe divorce case — but the 
Chinese public has so for 
largely aided with the hus- 
band. . 

“The ’relationship deteri- 
orated when the wife suffered 
from anr illness, which ended 
their sex life and shattered 
their . hopes . of haring a 
child.” China Daily sad. 

The couple lived together 
“without sex or . mutual 
affection” for 13 years. TTie 
husband .'finally filed for 
divorce in 1983, oyer - his 
wife’s violent objection. She 
later agreed to divorce him, 
but only if he paid her : 3Oj0OO 
yuan, or £6,400. 

In letters to China Daily. 
readers urged- tbe woman to 
“face reality, to try id break 
out of the tragedy and to took 
for new love”. 


Pack ice halt 


p- \v^ 








Albert# de la Cm drerged 
with rebellion. 


plan for base 

Sydney (Reuter) . ■- The 
Greenpeace Antarctic.. ' ex- 
pedition was heading for 
New Zealand yesterday after 
aban donin g; equipment for a 
planned base camp bec a use 
of impenetrable pack ice, the 
expedition director said. 

”We simply can’t get in 
it's unsafe” Mr Peter Wil- 
kinson said. 

The - 35-man crew had 
hoped to reach a site on Ross 
island to unload equipment 
and supplies after thick ice 
forced them to give up plans 
to build a . camp to support 
Greenpeace's campaign Jo 
declare the continent a.wond 
park. • 

“It is a prudent with- 
drawal- and without a doubt 
we will be hack next summer 
to build the camp,” Mr 
Wilfcinsoa said 


YY UiilV/U tvw v. ““ 

.. .. ^fiipn Mkaaoat m unchanged. 

Vaduz, The NrtwriJJre. Party 

- Women who wjed kept power with eight seals 

thefirettmwjt ^ ^ the People VProgresave 


fte first and the People VProgresnve 

nrompdy fwy sWd *n opposttn# 

^rJromau » with seven seats. ; : 

1 5_ m eiiiber Parliament- Mrs . Emma E igenmapn , 

_ . a- 27.000-strOBg tlie first female deputy, her 

prinSpafity, Austria, "Anew Lfoenl party feSed 

S, H?j?I 984 women to wi n thed^ tpe t cqitef aB 

^«.^t£iS^ecfio«s. rotes required far represeiita- 
of the «ew tioa. J,. 






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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMESTUESPAY FEBRUARY 4 1 986 


The Pope’s visit to India 


Mother Teresa’s happiest day 


From Michael Hamlyn 
Calcutta 
Just as the sun was sinking 
over' Calcutta's fetid pools 
and teeming slums, the Pope 
visited the woman who 
perhaps more than an y other 
has come to symbolue the 
Roman Catholic church in 
India. 

The tiny founder of the 
sisterhood she called the 
Missionaries of Charity, 
brown and wrinkled as a 
walnut, wailed anxiously for 
more than an hour for the 
Pope to arrive in the gleam- 
ing white Land-Rover with a 
bullet-proof glass tower 
known as the Popemobile. 

Mother Teresa, overjoyed 
to welcome him to the people 
she earlier called “the poorest 
of the poor”, clambered 
aboard his vehicle and sank 
to her knees kissing his hand. 
The Pope bent and kissed the 
top of her head. 

Then she led him inside 
Sirmal Hriday. The name 
means simply Sacred Heart, 
the home she founded in 
October 1950 for the desti- 
tute dying. The home is in a 
wing of the Temple of Kali, 
the Goddess of Destruction, 
which she was offered on a 
temporary basis 36 years ago. 

Yesterday there were still 
inside the home 42 men and 
44 women being cared for by 
Mother Teresa's white sari- 
clad sisterhood. The Pope 
gave their evening meal to 
five of the patients, and 
offered a prayer, calling on 
God to bless the dying. 

“Bless those who will soon 
meet you face-to-face.” the 
Pope prayed. **We believe 
you have made death the 
gateway to eternal life.'* 

“1 have never seen the 
Holy Father so moved.” said 
a member of the Vatican st3if 
accompanying the Pope. 
“When Mother Teresa asked 
him a question he was simply 
unable to spr^ " 





A joyful Mother Teresa being embraced by the Pope as he arrived at her Sacred Heart 
home for the dying in the slums of Calcutta as part of his tour of !«»»- 


The Pope tried to feed one 
of the dying patients, and 
kissed and embraced several 
more, both men and women. 

,4s for Mother Teresa, she 
said it was “the happiest day 
of my life”. She declared: "It 
is a wonderful thing for the 
people, for his touch is the 
touch of Christ" 

Afterwards the Pope ad- 
dressed a short homily from 


a platform erected in the 
street outside. 

' A 'irmal Hriday is a place 
of hope”, he said. “A house 
built on courage and faith, a 
home where love reigns, a 
home filled with love”. 

The Pope also offered 
prayers for two inmates, an 
old woman and a young 
child, who had not been able 
to wait to see him. but had 


died earlier in the day. 

Earlier yesterday the Pope 
was welcomed to the poorest 
most depressed area of India 
and declared that the Church 
insisted on a “just wage for 
workers, a wage that takes 
into account the needs of 
their family” 

Then to the densely-popu- 
lated state of Bihar, where 
rivalries are such that one 


caste recently wiped out an 
entire village of a rival but 
inferior caste. 

The Pope met half a 
million Adi casts, the bottom 
of ibe social heap in India. 
They are the tribals — the 
name Advhvsi means aborigi- 
nal — and are descendems of 
those dark-skinned people 
who arrived in the sub- 
continent thousands of years 
before the arrival of even the 
Dra vidian people of the 
Southern Plateau. To say 
nothing of the comparatively 
latecoming Brahmin-led Ary- 
ans with their paler skins and 
rigid class distinctions. 

The Adivasis have wel- 
comed Christianity as a relief 
from the oppression of the 
upper castes, and the church 
that the Pope was anxious to 
present to them was the 
working-class Church. 

"Jesus Christ was a 
carpenter’s son.” the Pope 
said as he celebrated Mass 
under brilliant spring sun- 
shine. “He worked for the 
greater pan of his life in the 
same trade as his foster 
father, Joseph. By working. 
Jesus proclaimed in the 
ordinary activities of his 
daily life the dignity of 
work.” 

The tribal people wel- 
comed the Pope by washing 
his feet and hands and by 
having him walk on a series 
of baskets to the rostrum. 
They danced for him to the 
sound of the tribal mander 
drum. 

The Pope responded by 
saying that his heart went out 
especially to the unemployed, 
who want to work but can’t 
"because of discrimination 
based on religion, caste, 
community or language”. 

Police in Ranchi, the chief 
town of the largely tribal 
area, said that 35 arrests had 
been made before the Pope's 
arrival to forestall possible 
trouble. 


Fleeing Ugandan 
troops turn to 
halt NRA push 

From Richard Dowden, Kmbo Masindi, Uganda 


2,000 held 
In protest 

Delhi (Reuter) - Police 
yesterday arrested 1000 dem- 
onstrators protesting at sharp 
rises in petrol and food 
prices. 

Only about 200 protesters 
escaped arrest as police’ 
moved in to stop a noisy' 
column marching on the 
office of Mr Rajiv Gandhi, 
the Prime Minister, to 
present a memorandum 
against the increases. 

The Government last week 
increased the prices of rice, 
wheat and petroleum prod- 
ucts by between 25 and 40 
per cent. 


Europe firm on sanctions 


The first meeting between 
the foreign ministers of the 
southern African front line 
states and the European 
Commission began in Lu- 
saka, the Zambian capital* 
yesterday, with Che Europe- 
ans firmly resisting pressure 
for intensified action against 
Sooth Africa. 

Sr Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, set the 
tone when he told delegates 
from the front line states of 
Angola, Botswana, Mozam- 
bique, Tanzania, Zambia and 
Zimbabwe and dm 12 EEC 
countries that it would be 


From Jan Raath, Harare 
wrong to increase pressure on 
Sooth Africa now when there 
were some signs of rfmny 

Referring to the speech to 
the South African Parliament 
last week by President Botha, 
Sir Geoffrey said the signs 
were still “desperately slow”, 
bat that the process of change 
should he encouraged. 

Earlier, Mr Hans van den 
Broek, the Focetgh Minister 
of The Netherlands, which 
bolds die presidency of the 
EEC Council of Ministers, 
said in a speech at the 
meeting’s opening in 
Lusaka's Mnlongnslii Hall,. 


that the body was not now 
to more beyond the 
package of sanctions 
imposed on Sooth Africa. But 
he accused South Africa of 
being the “ fundamental 
obstacle” to to peace in the 
region. 

President Kaanda of Zam- 
bia made an emotional appeal 
at the opening for comprehen- 
sive economic sanctions, and 
warned the Europeans that 
their investments in South 
Africa would “go up in 
flames” before long because 
of the impending conflagra- 
tion there. 


The Army can help 
educate your offspring. 

In more ways than one. 


Angolan 

ministers 

sacked 

Luanda (Renter) - Presi- 
dent Eduardo Dos Santos of 
Angola has sacked three 
members of his Cabinet and 
named three super-ministers 
to oversee several depart- 
ments. 

Political sources said those 
dismissed were: Mr Evaristu 
Domingos, the Minister of 
Provincial Co-ordination, 
better known by his guerrilla 
nickname “Kimba”; Mr 
Diogenes de Assis Boavida, 
the Minister of Justice; and, 
Mr Horacio Perre ira Bids da 
Silva, the Minister for La- 
bour and Social Security. 

Mr Pedro Van-Dfinem, the 
Minister for Oil and Energy 
better known as “Loy”, now 
takes on the additional role 
of Minister of State. 

Mr Knndi Payama, the 
Benguda Provincial Com- 
missar and, like Lqy, a full 
member of the Politburo of 


Uganda's National 
tence Amy has beat halted 

in its northward advance near 
>l»k riDage, IS miles north of 
Masindi. 

The NBA, in effect the new 
govern m ent Army, is facing 
an estimated 900 Uganda 
National liberation Army 
(UNLA) troops from the 
former regime who have 
occupied Kigmnba, a road 
ictiott two mfles from what 
the last village before the 
strategic Earama Falls bridge 
over the Nile. 

The 900 UNLA soldiers 
e the remnants of the 
garrison from north of Kam- 
pala who fled but decided to 
take a stand at Kigiwnha, 
where the road from Ka mp a l a 
meets the road from Masindi. 
The NRA has occupied 
Masindi Punt and Puma at 
both ends of the Victoria 
Nile, and have cot the road 
from Kampala. 

They were waiting on 
Sunday to catch cbe rest of 
the fleeing troops still strag- 
tbe road from 
before attacking 
and advanci n g to 
the NSe. At Masted! Fort, 
where the Nile ts about half a 
mile wide, the fleeing soldiers 
had taken the ferry and left it 
m the far bank wfafle others 
had crossed in dug-out ca- 
noes, leaving their heavy 
weapons behind. 

About 50 young NRA 
soldiers here were crouched 
in the elephant grass in a 
hollow each side of the road 
just north of the village. They 
were very tired but alert. The 
only cape they had was laid 
over their light machinegna 
and rocket-propelled grenade 
launcher. It ts difficult to 
remember that they are now 
the Government Army and 
not a guerrilla band. There is 
only a low rise between them 
and Kigumba, and the sol- 
diers were very tense. There 
had been skirmishes earlier 
hi the day, but the NRA wifl 
not attack until its rear is 
secure and it has mote troops 
here. 

Families from villages 
t up te the fighting were 
down the road to 
Masindi, carrying their scant 
possessions in bundles mi 
their beads. They brought 
tales of atrocities and looting 
by the NRA troops. 

One said that four villagers 
had been burnt alive when 
one of them refused to gfve 
petrol to the soldiers. Others 
said that the troops at 
Kigumba were divided among 
themselves; some wanting to 


and fight, others to 
■ continue north- One report 
said that Achoti troops had 
blocked the bridge and were 
forcing their colleagues to 
torn back south and fight the 
NRA. 

Dared Cmyefnza, the com- 
mander of the Western Bri- 
gade of the NRA, said that he 
would press os over the Pffle 
as soon as toe NRA had 
taken Karmna Falls. A quiet, 
thooghtfid young man who 
was a policeman until he 
joined the NRA, Mr 
Onyefeza said that he would 
use the same tactic on the 
other side of the Nile as he 
had used until now. 

“There are some people 
here from that side who are 
sympathetic to ns and we vrilL 
send them across first to tell 
toe people we are friendly 
and will not harm anybody,” 
he sate. “ We will tell those 
soldiers to surrender and then 
when aO is prepared we mil 
more in.” 

But the Nile crossing wffl 
test NRA tactics. So for the 
NRA has operated n toe 
west and soeto among its own 
lie, who have been 
In the north they 
will encounter the Nilotic 
tribes at AcfcoBs laugb and 



toe people of West Nile who 
comprised the bulk of the 
former Army. 

Id! Amin, Obote and Tito 
Okello all came from these 
areas and ruled through toe 
dominance of (heir tribes. 
The NRA’s policy of being a 
liberating dfsdpfiued army os 
toe side of toe peasants will 
be set against traditional 
tribal loyalties. 

At Masindi, toe NRA was 
holding about 302 prisoners, 
of whom 120 were from toe 
Uganda National Rescue 
Front, the gnerrilia group 
which operated in West Nile 
in support of Mi Amin after 
his overthrow, and which 
joined forces with the Okello 
regime after the coup in July 
last year. The NRA overran 
Masindi T ea Thursday last 
week* 


Leaders of Greece and 
Turkey meet at last 

From Alan McGregor, Geneva 


The Greek Prime Minister, 
Mr Andreas Papandreou, and 
his Turkish counleipan, Mr 
Turgui Ozai. met for the first 
time and shook hands cor- 
.. .. „ ... dially at toe weekend - but 

toe rahngPopular Movement they had no opportunity to 
17011 ** A***?* discuss the issues of Cyprus 
^ or_the Aegean. 


The Army needs well educated 
Officers and we’re prepared to help 
bright people up the ladder of 
success. 

A way to A’ levels. 

VVe will help boys and girls who 
have the qualities of potential 
Officers while they study forA levels, 
with a grant of A'Z.50 a term. 

When they pass their ‘A* level 
exams they’re guaranteed a place at 
Sandhurst and paid the going rate 
while they’re being trained. 


levels they too are guaranteed a 
place at Sandhurst. 

And yet another. 

If you have a technically minded 
son between the ages of 16 and I7*v 
and he can meet the requirements 
for a Science Scholarship (see box) 
he could be eligible for Welbeck. 


training course at Sandhurst to 
confirm their commission. 


WHAT IS REQUIRED TO 
GET A SHOT AT A 2 \ EAR 
ARMt SCHOLARSHIP 

Inter we as are held in rhe Spring 
and Autumn for boys, and just in 
the Autumn for girls. The purpose 
is to discover whether applicants 
have the potential to become Army 
Officers. 

At the lime of their application 
they must be between 16 years 
and 16 years 6 months. And must 
have, or be expecting, at least 
five high grade ‘O’ levels, including 
English Language. Maths and a 
science or foreign language. 


WHAT (S NEEDED TO 
GET A 1 YEAR SCIENCE 
SCHOLARSHIP. 

The applicant must have excellent 
grades m *0‘ level Maths. Physics. 
English and at least two other sub- 
jects. And have the ability to con- 
vince an interview board that he 
has got what it takes to be an 
Army Officer. 


THE REQUIREMENTS FOR 
AN UNDERGRADUATE 
CADETSHIP. 

The applicant must be over 17 and 
intend to graduate before 25; be 
at. or have been promised a place 
at. a university, polytechnic or 
college of higher education ; be able 
to pass the Arm/s 3 -day Officer 
Selection Board and be willing to 
serve at least 5 years as an Officer 
(including the course at Sandhurst). 


for inspection 
and state control 
Mr Maria Mam bo Gafeh, a 
candidate member of toe 
MPLA Politburo, is now 
responsible for overseeing 
planning, finance, lab our and 
social security. 


They took pan in a round- 
table session at toe Davos 
IMF work) economic forum, 
seated either side of the 
chairman, Mr Gaston Thom. 
With them was Mr Malcolm 
Baldridge, the US Commerce 
Secretary. 


After Mr Papandreou had 
said that toe EEC needed a 
common industrial policy. 
Mr Ozal asked if he wanted 
something like the EEC 
Common Agricultural Policy, 
with its much-criticized sub- 
sidies. Mr Papandreou agreed 
that CAP discriminated 
against southern Europe’s 
formers 

The two leaders’ prede- 
cessors. Mr Constantin 
Karamanlis and Mr Bulent 
Ecevit, met at a Montreux 
conference in March 1978 to 
discuss issues dividing them. 


Costa Rica goes for youth 


However, this doesn't preclude 
fiiversity. 

Another way. 

Boys who are already embarked 
‘A’ level courses in Maths and the 
ences can apply for one of the 
rty Science Scholarships we 
j-ard each Spring. 

The object is to help potential 
jftcers on their way to a career in 
; of the Army’s technical corps 
h a scholarship for one vear at 
50 a term, 

(Boys from both fee-paying 
l non fee- paying schools are 
ible.) 

When they complete their A' 


Welbeck is an exclusive, resi- 
dential, tith form college in the 
Nottinghamshire countryside run 
by the Army. 

The curriculum is designed to 
equip students for careers as Officers 
in the technical corps. 

Again, on completion of ’A’ levels, 
the student is guaranteed a place at 
Sandhurst. 

About two thirds of the students ‘ 
go on to complete a degree course, 
the majority at Shrivenham, the 
Royal Mill tar) College of Science, 
although some may compete for 
places at a civil university. 

Two other ways to 
a university degree. 

If your son aims to get a degree 
and wishes to become a Regular 
Army Officer; hecan try foran Under- 
graduate Cadetship. 

The requirements are demand- 
ing but successful applicants get a 
probationary commission and their 
tuition paid, plus at least pa. 

When they finish their degree 
course they go on to an Officers 


On the other hand, if your son or 
daughter is already reading for 
a degree, he or she could apply for a 
Bursary. This amounts to £900 a 
veac. is tax free and additional to any 
education authority grants. 

It is intended to help people who 
want careers as Army Officers to 
complete their degree courses. Appli- 
cants have to meet toe challenge of 
the Army’s three-day Officer Selec- 
tion Board. 

On graduation Bursars also do 
the seven months Officer training 
course at Sandhurst On completion 
of which they can take up either a 3 
year Short Service Commission or a 
Regular Commission. 

At the end of a Short Service 
Commission, a useful tax-free gratu- 
ity is paid. A Regular Commission is 
pensionable. 

Can we help you? 

Write to Major John Floyd, Army 
Officer Entry Dept F6lfi, Empress 
State Building, Lillie Road, London 
SW6JTR. 

Tell him your son or daughters 
date of birth, school and academic 
qualifications and we will clarify and 
expand on what we have to offer. 

^ Army Officer 


From Martha Hooey 
San Jos£ 

Dr Oscar Arias SSncbez,toe 
centre-left candidate of the 
ruling National Liberation 
Party (PLN), has been elected 
President of Costa Rica. 

He gained 53.6 per cent of 
the votes in Sunday’s elec- 
tions, against about 45 per 
cent for his chief opponent, 
Senor Rafael Calderdn 
Fournier, of toe more conser- 
vative Social Christian Unity 
Party. 

Sear Calderon, who ran a 
well-financed campaign, is 
said to have been preferred 
by big business, toe United 
States and anti-Sandinista 
Nicaraguans living in Costa 
Rica. 

Dr Arias’s victory is nota- 
ble in several respects. At 45, 
he becomes Costa Rica’s 
youngest President. Also for 
toe first time, a woman, 
Sefiora Victoria Garron 
Orozco, was elected as one of 
the two Vice-Presidents. 

In his victory speech. Dr 
Arias said he would enforce 
Costa Rica's policy of neu- 
trality and would be in- 
flexible with the Nicaraguan 
exiles who have been using 
Costa Rica clandestinely as a 
rear base for attacks on then- 
homeland. 



AK- ?• 

WM 

***'-.)$ 


Dr Arias of Costa Rica celebrating his election victory. 

He expressed support for 
the four-nation Contadora 
group, which has been seek- 
ing a negotiated settlement to 
the Nicaraguan and other 
regional problems. 


In recent months Dr Arias 
emerged as the “peace 
candidate” and braan to edge 
ahead of Setior Gtiderdn u 
the polls. According to one 
public opinion poll, peace 
was the main issue. The polls 
consistently show that more 
than 80 per cent of Costa 
Ricans favour neutrality, op- 
pose building an Army and 
do not want their country 
used by foreign troops or 
Contras to attack Nicaragua. 


In his speech. Dr Arias also 
pledged to work to renego- 
tiate Costa Rica's $45 billion 
(£31 billion) foreign debt, one 
of toe highest per capita in 
the world. He proposed that 
Costa Rica should in future 
pay less than 25 per cent of 
each dollar received in for- 
eign aid to sendee the debL 
The new President is a 
lawyer and economist edu- 
cated at the University of 
Essex and the London School 
of Economics. He has served 
as Minister of Planning in a 
previous Government, a 
member of the Legislative 
Assembly, and Secretary 
General of the National 
Liberation Party. 


Flaws in Soviet arms offer details 

But a senior Naio diplomat 
pointed out that there were 
elements of linkage, in 
particular with the American 
Defence Initiative 
which were unacceptable! 
Alth ough Mr Gorbachov had 
retrained from 


From Frederick Bonnart 
Brussels 

The text of the Soviet arms 
i control proposals tabled at 
Geneva at toe beginning of 
the present round of negotia- 
tions shows several inconsis- 
tencies with toe public 
i statement made by Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov on Janu- 
ary 15. 

The Nato council was 


briefed yesterday by the three 
American negotiators at Ge- 
neva, Mr Max Kampel man , 
Mr John Tower and Mr 
Maynard Gltunan. They 
have been examining the fine 
print of toe Soviet offer, 
which had originally given a 
certain amount of encourage- 
ment in that it covered some 
common ground with the 
American proposals. 


the research aspect of sSfit 
«s not dear whether Russia is 

3®S5. % “*<* it. CVCT 
?® Vle f research 
continues into similar fields. 


Briton 
dies in 
holiday 
isle fire 

Madrid - A 34-year-old 
Wolverhampton man was 
among seven people; four of 
them children, who died 
when a fire swept through a 
holiday chalet m San Jose. 
Ibiza, on Saturday night 
(Richard Wigg writes). 

Police said John Walter 
Spittle bad arrived that day 
and was staying with a Dutch 
couple, who also died in toe 
fixe with their two children 
aged seven and four. 

The fire was discovered 
when a Swiss couple went to 
toe chalet to collect their ax- 
year-old twins who had been 
saying there and found them 
dead. Police suspect toe blaze 
began at a wicker table near 
an open fire. . 

Beirut bomb 
kills nine 

Beirut (AFP, Reuter) - At 
least nine people were killed 
and six were injured when & 
bomb hidden in a handbag 
.exploded in a busy street in 
northern Beirut, in the fifth 
-attack in a Christian area in 
four days. 

The bomb was apparently 
intended for an office of 
President GemayeTs Pha- 
lange party near by.The 
Voice of Lebanon radio 
station appealed for blood 
donors. 

Grim secret of 
Can berra lake 

' Canberra (Reuter) - Blood 
.and human remains have 
been flowing unseen into toe 
ornamental lake in the centre 
of Australia's capital for the 
.last 30 years, according to 
'city health officials. 

Refuse washed from the 
tables of Canberra's morgue 
'after post mortems has been 
directed down drains wrongly 
connected to a stormwater 
system instead of a sewer. 

Suitcase body 

Warsaw (Renter) - Police 
hunting the killers of a 
taxman, whose dismembered 
body was found in two 
suitcases, have arrested a 
man and woman be visited 
just before disappearing last 
month. They owed more 
than 12,000 zlotys (£50) in 
arrears. 

Euro MP held 

Brussels (AFP) - Mrs Anne- 
Marie Lizin, a Belgian Social- 
ist member of the Europe a n 
Parliament, and Mr Jean- 
Paul Procoreur. a journalist, 
are being held in Algeria 
accused of travelling on raise 
passports with the intention 
of smuggling out three chil- 
dren removed from their 
3dgjan mother in defiance of 
i court order. 

Rodent bounty 

Dhaka (Reuter) - Bangla- 
desh, suffering from chronic 
food shortages, has launched 
fo six-week campaign to hunt 
■down rodents which h says 
destroy crops worth nearly 
£350 million every year. The 
(Government is offering a 
bounty worth about £7 for 
the bodies of every 1,000 
rodents kilted. 

Ordered out 

Johannesburg (Reuter) - 
Lesotho's new mihlary rulers 
have expelled 19 North 
Korean technicians, toe 
South African Press Associ- 
ation reported. It said the 
group, engaged in agricultural 
projects and reconstruction of 
the national stadium, were 
flown out on Sunday. 

Final fling 

Wellington (Reuter) - Cir- 
cus knife-thrower Jenny Cbn- 
way admitted she was "a 
little rusty” after hitting her 
partner in the arm during 
toeir act in Rotorua. Her 
partner, Larry Roper, said: 

Its the third time sire’s bit 
me _ there win never be a 
fourth.” 

Heart implant 

. Pittsburgh (Reuter) - A 39- 
year-old man from, western 
Pennsylvania who had a 
heart attack two weeks ago 
teen given a Jaivik-7 
artificial heart until a human 
transplant can he found, 
officials at toe Presbyterian- 
. University Hospital said. 

Death penalty 

Peking (Reuter) - A man in 
tne north-east China city of 
Shenyang who slashed the 
©roasts and buttocks of 25 
women with a fruit knife has 
oeen sentenced to death, the 
S#«w>*z«£ Daiiy newspaper 

Tribal clash 

i«5 ra ??” ,in flkute) - At 
least 13 people were killed 
and scores wounded in tribal 
fighting in toe Red Sea city of 
Pon Sudan over the week- 

rewnld 300 ™ “"Wrs 

Luna blackout 

.Lima (AFP) - The Peru- 
^anayttai was blacked out 
after a string of 
^cpkKions brought town 
etectnnty pylons/ 


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10 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 


SPECTRUM 






Two faces of Farmer Giles 


If public image was a crop, farmers would 
reap a poor harvest. The once highly-regarded 
ruddy-cheeked honest toilers of old are now 
seen as wicked despoilers of the countryside. 

Yet the reality of farm life is very different 
with contrasts even between close neighbours 


The typical British farmer does not 
exist. He may be anything from a 
millionaire landowner, squire of a 
hereditary great estate, to a tenant 
scratching a living from tending a 
flock of sheep on a remote Celtic 
hillside. 

Even in the countryside fanners 
have become less conspicuous as 
their numbers have progressively 
declined. Once highly regarded as 
honest toilers, the salt of the earth, 
they are now more commonly seen 
as subsidized “whingers", paid to 
produce food which no one wants 
to buy, chopping down trees and 
ripping out hedges, polluting the 
earth with agro-chemicals, and 
doing all they can to deny their fel- 
low citizens access to the country- 
side. 

Almost everything said about 
them, good or bad, is an 
exaggeration, for the simple reason 
that the)’ cannot be grouped in a 
single category. Even among dose 
neighbours it is possible to find 
sharp contrasts in circumstances 
and outlook. 

Peter Sowray, for example, 
grows wheat, barley, oilseed rape, 
potatoes and feed peas on 400 
acres of the Vale of York between 
Bo rough bridge and Easingwold. 
The land is rented from the Crown 
Estate - as long ago as 1969 he was 
chosen from more than 200 
applicants, probably, he thinks, 
because he was a local lad, brought 
up on the farm next door - and he 
has since bought a further 100 
acres of his own about nine miles 
away. 

He is a pleasant, philosophical 
Yorkshireman. well aware that the 
peace and comfort of his daily life, 
and the beauty of his surroundings, 
more than compensate for occa- 
sional frustrations. 

Although not wealthy compared 
with the hereditary owners of 
thousands of acres, be is happy to 


and Geoff Hudson 




Id the United Kingdom there are 
nore than 46,677,000 acres of 
armland, employing more than 
<00,000 people on nearly 240,500 
toldings. There are nearly 13 
trillion cattle and more than 35 
uliion sheep. Crop output is worth 
tore than £3 trillion and livestock 
early £44> billion. The total net 
inning income is just over £1 
illion but the formers’ average 
come (including part-time form- 
's) after deducting costs, rents and 
West charges, is £3366 net 

bootok Gorornmert Annual Revtow of 
Wcutare 1988. Figures an tor June 1385. 


admit that his is an enviable 
existence. Of his three children the 
eldest, a daughter, is at Newcastle 
Polytechnic; his 1 8-year-old son, 
Robert, has just started at an 
agricultural college in York, and 
the younger daughter is still at 
school and “mad about ponies". 

There is time enough for 
holidays and for social life, 
including occasional visits to 
theatres in York or Harrogate. He 
concedes that, apart from a few 
frantic weeks at harvest lime, it is 
not a particularly arduous life. In 
addition to help from his son in 
the holidays, he employs two men 
full time. 

Farmers as a social group are 
surprisingly prone to suicide and 
mental illness, and Peter mentions 
a neighbour who recently hanged 
himself. 

“You get this image of the 
happy, bucolic, ruddy-cheeked 
Fanner Giles, but some people are 
just not cut out for the life, and it’s 
very easy to get depressed alien 
things go wrong. 

“As farmers we’ve had a bad 
press in the past couple of years, 
and perhaps we're oversensitive to 
criticism. But I still think we're 
misunderstood. Everyone thinks 
that fanning is riddled with 
subsidies, but in feet the return on 
capital is ridiculously low. It’s a 
good life but not as easy or rolling 
in money as some believe." 

A few miles away Geoff Hudson 
is not so sure about the good life. 
Now in his mid- 50s, he keeps a 
herd of 49 Holstein and crossbred 
dairy cows and heifers on 75 acres 
rented from North Yorkshire 
County Council. He has the help 
of his wife Anne and his son 
Stephen, aged 19, although since 
the imposition of dairy quotas 
there has not been enough work to 
employ Stephen full time, and he 
has tod to seek casual work 
elsewhere. 

“We're getting paid less for milk 
than we were a year ago. but the 
housewife isn’t paying any less", 
he says. "She’s paying 23p or 24p a 
pint, which I'm told is the highest 
in Europe, and I’m getting 6p. 
Somebody in between is making a 
lot of money. 

“All our milk goes to Associated 
Dairies in Leeds, and they’re the 
people who are building all these 
hypermarkets out of the profits 
they've made from milk. The man 
who does the local milk round 
makes twice as much money as I 
do. new car, foreign holidays and 
all the resL" 

For Geoff and Anne there are no 
foreign trips, just a one-week 
busman's holiday, a series of farm 
visits organized by the British 
Holstein Society. Anne describes 
their present life as a treadmill 
Despite his difficulties, Geoff 
talks happily about his three 
daughters, the youngest an Army 
physical training instructor who 
has climbed in the Himalayas. 

He has mixed feelings about 
whether to cany on. "1 never felt 


Pt w tomom a g a by Michael 


Freeing Siberia’s 
frozen assets 


Excavating the 

mineral riches that 
lay beneath the 


Soviet perma-frost 
exacts a ferocious 


human price 


that milking twice a day was 
monotonous, so long as we were 
making money. But in the last two 
years it's begun to get to us. On the 
other hand I don't want to go out a 
beaten man.” 

Farmers have a long-standing 
reputation for taking a gloomy 
view of their circumstances. But 
there is within the industry an 
inescapable sense of impending 
change. 

A 43 per cent drop in incomes 
last year is not quite as bad as it 
sounds since the Government’s 
definition of farm income is more 
accurately the profit made after the 
deduction of costs, rents, and 
interest charges. 

But that may be only the start 
After four decades of being 
cosset ted and cushioned, first by 
the post-war Agricultural Policy, 
farmers are having to come to 
terms with both the “green" 


Farming is 
not just 
another 
business 


politics of the late 20th century 
and market place realities. 

For hardline monetarists that is 
none too soon. Fanning, it is said, 
is a business like any other. But 
the recent flood of bankruptcies 
across the farm belt of the United 
States has demonstrated the prac- 
tical and political difficulties of 
applying undiluted Reaganomics. 

Another difficulty is that much 
of our agricultural policy is now 
determined in Brussels and not in 
Whitehall. EEC officials have 


made it dear that, to cut costs and 
reduce surpluses, their main aim 
will still be to protect the small 
formers for whom the CAP was 
originally designed and who are 
still a significant political force in 
several member countries. 

British fanners, whose holdings 
are on average twice the size of the 
next largest in the EEC and whose 
vote, except in a handful of 
constituencies, nowadays hardly 
counts, may fed that they are 
being left out in the cokL 

Most will probably survive the 
frost, but it is well to remember 
that in two important senses 
farming is not just another 
industry. Not only does it provide 
our most basic need, but it still 
shapes the greater part of the 
landscape in which we live. 


John Young 


In the winds of a famous 
Russian folk saying: “In 
Siberia, 46 degrees below 
zero is rot a frost, 100 
kilometres is not a journey 
and a litre of vodka is 
not a drink." 

The sentiments behind that 
saying still remain surpris- 
ingly true, despite the recent 
arrival here of U-tech, jet 
aircraft, a new railway, Japa- 
, aese finance, Mikhail 
< Gorbachov’s controversial 
anti-alcohol campaign and 
discotheques for bored teen- 
agers. 

Siberia is still one of tbe 
most forbidding and awe- 
inspiring wildernesses in the 
world. Tbe use of superlatives 
seems justified to portray tbe 
reality of a region once 
immortalized by the author 
Maxim Gorky in his dulling 
phrase “a land of death and 
drams". 

Although the salt mines 
have long lost their im- 
portance, it is ironic that 
Siberia, which was for so long 
associated with the worst 
kind of human degradation, 
now bolds the power to make 
the Soviet Union the world’s 
richest country. 

Mining of salt continnes, 
bat it has been superseded in 
importance by the hmat for 
other riches bmried in the 
deep-frozen sub-soil, indod- 
mg 65 per cent of the nation's 
explored off resources, 82 per 
cent of its gas, over 80 per 
cent of its coal, and diamond 
deposits so large that tbe 
Soviet Union is now the 
second largest producer after 
Sooth Africa. 

Less widely discussed, bat 
of equal importance, is tbe 
strategic value of an area 
which was the first place 
selected for the stationing of 
SS20 missiles. From the 
Soviet Union's point of view, 
Siberia's vital defence role 
stems mainly from its loca- 
tion dose' to tbe Chinese 
border. 

It Is no secret that the 
proximity of the old Trans- 
Siberian railway to the Chi- 
nese border was one of the 
main reasons prompting tbe 
Kr emlin to sanction the 
hngely expensive and 
problematical new line known 


as BAM (the Baikal-Aimr 
Mainline) in 1974. some 
2,000 miles of which me now 
complete. _ . ■ , 

As part of Mr Gorbachov's 
new information policy, a 
emit group of Western 
reporters were permitted to 
travel along the newest sec- 
tion of the trade for the first 
time. Known as Mali, or 
Little Bam, it is scheduled to 
link the new mainline with 
the regional capital of Ya- 
kutsk in 10 years' time, ami 
to become a major factor in 
opening up this remote cor- 
ner. 

The ride mi single track 
through males of uninhabited 
and inhospitable countryside, 
provided a graphic reminder 
of the engineering sinus and 
bravery of the 106,600 Soviet 
citizens who have so far taken 
part in the construction. 

Mach of the work has been 
done in temperatmes as low 
as minns 60°centigrade. but 
even at a mere 35 degrees 
below zero the inter-connect- 
ing corridor between coaches 
was thick with ice. 

Tike many of the other 
Siberian industrial enter- 
prises, Bam is a considerable 
economic risk and stands 
little chance of becoming cost 
effective in the lifetime of 
even such a youthful Kremlin 
leader as the 54-year-old Mr 
Gorba chov. 

Living conditions 
are bad, despite 
the high wages 

Yet when Mr Gorbachov 
makes his keynote address to 
tbe 27th Communist Party 
Congress later this month, he 
will be only too aware that 
his' hopes of reselling the 
Soviet Union from economic 
decline wffl depend largely on 
the speed and efficiency with 
which Siberia can be per- 
suaded to yield its riches. 

Bat the omens for the 
Kremlin are not good. 

Mr Gorbachov paid a 
significant visit to. the largest 
Soviet o3 field at Tyumen 
last September, and later 
lambasted the Siberian oil 
industry bosses for their 
inefficiency. 

And to those who do come 
to work in Siberia firing 
conditions are not good .des 
pile the high wages. “What 
good is money without any- 
thing. yon want in the shops 
to Spend it on?", one recent 
arrival, complained. . 

Christopher 

Walker 


On the tracks: Railway workers on tbe perma-frost 


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I 

— JJTTLEWOODS POOLS. ITS DAFT NOT TQ I 


£1 million 
uncovered 

More than a 
million 
pounds was 
given for 
archaeological 
digs in ihe 
City of Lon- 
don last year surprisingly, 
almost all of it by developed. 

The Department of Urban 
Archaeology at the Museum 
of London has established a 
cordial relationship with the 
relatively few firms of archi- 
tects and developers working 
in the City, so that “it is not 
unusual for developers or 
their agents to telephone the 
DUA even before they have 
made a planning 
application”, says Mr John 
Maloney, the Excavations 
Officer. 

“Developers have come to 
recognize professional 
archaeologists as a necessary 
part of the redevelopment 
team along with architects, 
structural and civil engineers 
and quantity surveyors. They 
have come to be persuaded 
that the full cost of excava- 
tion is a legitimate charge on 
the redevelopment budget”. 

Sometimes, even the 
archaeologists have been use- 
ful to the builders. There 
have been embarrassing 
misjudgments of subsurface 
features from boreholes 
which have been corrected 
during excavation. 

Working together 

Sometimes an 
unexpected 
discovery will 
bring 

archaeologists, 
developers and 
planners to- 
gether in an effort to resolve a 
crisis - the most recent 
example is that of the Flying 
C'hapc! of Holy Trinity. 

Holy Trinity Priory was 
founded in lltiS hy Matilda, 
wile of King Henry l. on a 
site just inside Aldgate. 


The Priory Church lav in 
the southern part of the 
precinct. adjacent to 
Lcadenhall Street, and recent 
redevelopment by Speyhawk 
Estates has m ealed part of 
its remains. The foundations 
for the south wall of the choir 
were found, together with 
almost the whole plan of the 
south transept, bur the sur- 
prise came from two chapels, 
one on the cast side of the 
transept and the other on the 
south side of the choir aisle. 

The former was still stand- 
ing 12 feet high. The entrance 
to the second chape I survived 
as an arch still rising 23 feet 
above foundation level. 

The arch has been known 
since 1900, and was already 
pnneaed as a Listed building. 
The more complete transept 
chapel was unexpected and 
unprotected, howex er. Preserv- 
ing u in situ would have 
meant a lot of expensive 
redesign. 

Instead, it was lifted out far 
later rcinstallaiion. ' The 
stones were injected with resin 
to gum the whole chapel 
together, the foundations were 
underpinned, and then the 
whole package was lifted out. 

More masonry 

More frag- 
ments of medi- 
eval masonry 
have turned up 
just north of 
the former 
borne of The 
Times in Blackfriars. where 
tbe Priory of the Dominican 
Black Friars existed from 
1276 to 1538. A moulded pier 
base was found which could 
be matched with a carved 
stone found on the sire in the 
1920s. Together they can be 
used to reconstruct on paper a 
fourfold column with a plan 
like a lucky four-leafed clo- 
ver. 

Sir Christopher Wren re- 
cycled medieval masonry 
from churches burned in the 
Great Fire of 1666. At 
Christchurch, Newgate, 
which was destroyed in the 
Blitz, the Museum of London 
has recovered stone 


(findings ) 

A series reporting 
on research: 
ARCHAEOLOGY 


mouldings from tbe Wren 
chnrch which were in all 
likelihood window tracery of 
the medieval Greyftiars, tbe 

Franciscan monastery dose 

to St Paors. 

In the church of St Mary- 
at-HHL between the Mono- 
mem and the Tower and close 
to tbe start of the fire that 
gave Wren his great opportu- 
nity, it was found that he had 
incorporated the standing 
wall of the medieval bail ding 
into .his own. 

Glorious mud 

The objects 
found along 
the Thames 
frontage, lost 
in the river 
mud and often 
preserved by 
waterlogging, are among the 
most important finds from 
recent work in the City. 
While some of them are 
Roman, including a lead 
alloy seal depicting an ele- 
phant with its rider, most 
date from the Middle Ages. 

Metalwork has been recov- 
ered in great quantity, the 
most notable is a complete 
14th-century straight trum- 
pet- without valves, made of 
copper alloy, and found in 
the foreshore at Billingsgate. 


textile fragments, including a 
9ih-cenlury lozenge twill in 
wool, from a site at Milk 
Street, a piece of 14th-century 
checked cloth from Baynard's 
Castle, and a rare Islamic silk 
with K.uifc writing found in a 
cesspit at Holy Trinity Priory 
by Aldgate. 

Rarest of all were two 
fragments of Chinese silk, 
found in a dump of the 1340s 
at Baynard's Castle. 

Walking the Walls 


From Roman 
times until af- 
ter the Middle 
Ages the walls 
ol London pro- 
tected and en- 
closed the city, 
and were studded with forti- 
fied entrances at places such 
as Bishopsgatc. Moorgate. 
Ludgatc ana Aldgate. 

The walls, and their gates, 
haw almost entirely vanished. 
How a London Wall Walk 
has been instituted, complete 
with a guidebook which way 
published last year. 

Four years of 
went into the 


of pit 
Walk . 


'anntng 

which 


consists of a series of illus- 
trated panels strategically 
placed along the line of the 
former walls. "It provides the 
visitor to the City of London 
with an informed history trail 
along two thirds of the wall’s 
circuit from the ’ Tower of 
London to the Museum of 
London ". says Ms Jenny 
Hall, of the Museum of 
London. 

There arc no visible re- 
mains beyond the Museum 
(which lies just west of the 
Cripplegate Fort on the north- 
western angle of the circuit J 
which Justify an extension to 
Blackfriars. she says, but the 
numbering scheme of the 
panels will allow new discov- 
eries to be incorporated. 

There are 21 blue and 
white ceramic panels in the 
Walk, of which the first is the 
medieval postern gate near 
the Tower excavated a few 
years ago. and the fourth a 
section of the Roman wall 
and a tower base preserved in 
a new office block at Vine 
Street. 

Norman 

Hammond 


Many metal finds have 
been made by the Society of 
Thames Mudlarks and Anti- 
quarians. an amateur group 
who scour tbe river banks 
with metal detectors. 

The value of pursuing the 
quarry to the bitter end was 
demonstrated by the recovery 
of a youth's sword, spotted in 
the half minute between 
excavating machine and lorry 
at Billingsgate. 

Among the finds preserved 
by damp were a number of 


CONCISE CROSSWORD (No 866) 


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THE TiMES I u'ESDaV htBRUARV 4 lV6o 

FASHION by Suzy Menkes 


Paris: Re-vive La Difference 


£ Si State 

sEiS ^•srsatrs s 

1 , 980s - ^ French fashion indnstry te i , 
^on g p ush to re-establish itself Jthe ondispoted 
a sniiHarlh^r-tt style. New show groupings suggest 
S2K"* of ** the British M^indStnJ 

S"“«5* 4 F "™* Promotion? SmoZ 

JSL™?!? rL put F 2? ch fasWon in London centra 
2£ V* ««sage from Paris is that the female 
woman is hack, the peacock male has reverted to 
more conventional plumage. 


Ptwosrapns Oy Many Ken 





Y ves Saint Laurent, 
the king of Paris 
couture. whose 
collection last week 
was the summit of perfection, 
is distancing himself horn bis 
own ready-to-wear. 

A senior design assistant 
has been appointed to ta ke 
over the Rive Gauche collec- 
tion under Saint Laurent's 
direction, while the most 
influential designer of his 
generation concentrates on 
haute couture. 

An announcement will be 
made imminently by Pierre 
Beige, Saint Laurent's partner 
and himself a forceful figure 
in the French fashion in- 
dustry. The new arrangement 
will operate from the designer 
pret-a-porter shows in March. 

Fifteen years ago, the 
young Yves Saint Laurent 
abandoned haute couture for 
a brief period, announcing 
that the future of fashion lay 
in ready-to-wear. 

His couture collection last 
week, cheered to the echo, 
confounded his own predic- 
tion and crowned an impres- 
sive fashion week. 

Saint Laurent's success 
came from his perfection of 
cut and line that made his 
new fitted suit jackets and 
bias-cut crepe dresses look so 
deceptively simple. He also 
has an absolutely sure touch 
with colour, brightening - a 
black suit with a grass green 
satin blouse, using pale fon- 
dant pink or powder blue 
satin for draped evening 
dresses and sculpting on the 
curve out of the plainest 
white crepe. 

T he message was fit 
and shape with seam- 
ing marking the bust 
and waist of jackets. 
Saint Laurent, who put 
women in trousers for city 
life, has all but abandoned 
them ip favour of sophis- 
ticated short skirts. 

Cardigans, embroidered to 
look like crocodile skin, 
slithered over columns of. 
tobacco brown crepe and 
added an exotic feel to this 
fruitless collection. 

The return of the female 
woman is the message from 
all the Paris couturiers who, 
next season, will show under 
one roof at the Grand Palais. 
The curvy theme comes from 
Azzedine Alaia who shows 
during the ready-to-wear sea- 
son, but whose career has 
been made-io-order clothes. 
The renaissance of haute 
couture stems from the feet 
that it can best tailor fabric to 
the female curves. 

The couture season also 
produced a new French 
fashion star - Christian 
Lacroix, the 35-year-old de- 
signer for the established 
house of Jean Patou. Lacroix 
was overcome by emotion as 
he received the Golden 
Thimble, the prestige award 
sponsored by Helena Rubin- 
stein. 

The youthful creative spirit 
of the new couture was 
captured by Lacroix in his 
tongue-in-cnic homage _ to 
fashions past: trapeze-line 
dresses in psychedelic prints; 
guipure lace, a favourite Pans 
febric. whipped round the 
body for a short sheath dress; 
mock Cocteau embroideries 
on short raidnff tops, and 
cartwheel hats with every- 

^Chanei found a new youth- 
ful mood in designer Karl 
Lagerfeld and he produced a 
cracking collection. , . 

The fitted jacket, curved m 
at the waist over a short tight 
skirt is Lagerfeld's new 
Chanel line. He played many 
variations on that theme with 
curw riding coats, nuts 


T 


CUT ABOVE 


The hour glass siuwuw* 
the female woman was ex- 
p^swt most dromti ally 
Ungaro’s shapely sheath 

(right). This i s 
skflbi of haute conture - the 
art of cutting, drapmfi 
bias and inserting 
challenges _ ready-to-we^j 


■I !■ 


patterned to look like Chanel 
tweed, and strict shantung 
suits or trim dresses touched 
with white pique. 

The hat, low-crowned and 
jaunty, was an essential 
accessory, and so was the 
new miniature Chanel bag, 
dangling from its chain han- 
dles. 

Youth was the message 
from Givenchy whose elegant 
silk dresses were cut with 
sweetheart necklines and 
made in the prettiest colours 
in Paris - orange sherbert, 
aqua blue and sunshine 
yellow. There were also pale 
fondant greens and misty 
Impressionist prints on chif- 
fon. Givenchy also showed 
more trousers than any other 
designer but they were all 
softly draped. His master- 
stroke in a strong collection 
was a cape-back dress with a 
key-hole cut-out showing 
bare flesh. 

Dior was young and sporty, 
with the only long skirts in 
town — a column of shantung 
pleats worn as an alternative 
to short tight skirts. The 
three-quarter length riding 
jacket, curved in at the waist 
over a slim skirt, looked 
fresh; and so did the 1960s- 
inspired T-hack and key-hole 
cut-outs and short geometric 
dresses tailored in crepe. 

Ungaro came up with the 
most sensual clothes, all cut 
on the bias, swathed round 
the curves and using his 
vivid mixes of colours: or- 
ange and lavender, fondant 
pink with yellow and tur- 
quoise. 

Pleats and drapes were a 
strong story here and 
Ungaro's frankly feminine 
dresses, clinging and caress- 
ing the body, seemed a work! 
away from the androgynous 
and oversized clothes that 
started their pugnacious pa- 
rade through the 'earlier 
1980s. 

Right. Patou: Sexy sixties 
revamped for couture. 

Below. Saint Laurent Fit 

and shape moulds a spot 
suit 

Below right Chanel: Knit 
patterned to look Hie 
tweed. 
















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RISING SON 


Christian Vadim, (left) the 
craggy young son of French 
film actress Catherine 
Deneuve and director Roger 
Vadim, was star model at the 
Dior menswear show. Vadim 
junior not only showed off the 
crisp Dim tailoring and its 
impeccable accessories. His 
free also expresses the male 
model look of the momedL 

The dean-cut, lithe and 
healthy model has replaced 
the mwhoieseome post-punk 
style of the earlier eighties. 
Cadaverous bodies and 
sunken cheeks once seemed 
the height of male model 
style; so did a brooding, 
moody Latin lover look. Now 
the models - many of timn 
from England and America - 
positively glow with health. It 
is all part of the fashion 
dean-up which has brought 
tailoring, suits and con- 
ventional haircuts, back in 
style for -young men, who take 
to the streets in s collar and 
tie and Church's brogues. 




The naked ape - broad chest 
and shoulders, a defined 
middle and narrow hips — is 
the shape of men's fashion. 
Pretty boy clothes and over- 
size separates have been 
abandoned for tailoring. 

The aU-male torso emerged 
most dramatically at Mon- 
tana. He endorsed the return 
of the tailored jacket with an 
important new shape - thigh 
length, buttoned high and 
shaped in at the waist. 
Montana, king of the macho 
shoulder line, has kept his 
pads but dropped the sleeve 
slightly, for his long fitted 
coats, his Beatles jackets and 
pin-striped suits buttoned 

from the breastbone. 

Jean Paul Gaultier, who 
put men in skirts (at least on 
the fashion runway) is now 
dressing them in tailored 
suits. This is good news for 
the button business, for 
Gaultier buttons two and 
shows two on his double 
breasted pin-stripe suits and 
has three on regular jackets. 

In a lively and cheeky 
collection, Gaultier also used 
“female" fabrics - wool 
jersey, stretch Lycra and fake 
fur. 

The volnminous Japanese 
layers at Comrae des G argons 
have been pared down. De- 
signer Rei Kawakubo shirred 
the body of jackets until they 
looked as shrunken as last 
year's school blazer. 

Jersey for men is the big 
fabric story, but jacquard and 
tweed are also used for a 
sportier image. Jeff Sayre 
produced husky sweaters with 
geometric patterns that 
seemed to grow out of his 
tweeds. Kenzo’s mixes of 
Peruvian blanket wool and 
Fair Isle looked more famil- 
iar. 

The dash and drama once 
reserved for women's clothes 
now goes into the staging of 
the French menswear collec- 
tions. 

Twenty-one designer shows 
now support the menswear 
exhibition (SEHM) at the 
Porte de Versailles, which 
has 900 exhibitors from 25 
countries - including a strong 
contingent of menswear 
manufacturers from Great 
Britain. 

The 40,000 visitors 
are not only buying but also 
looking for menswear trends 
in a fashion area that has 
flourished during this decade. 

According to Claude 
Miserey, head of the French 
menswear industry, the men's 
shows may soon be grooped 
in one locale in recognition of 
their increasing importance. 
A new architect-designed por- 
table structure will become a 
moveable show-place for 
French fashion collections. 

Above left Montana: 

Elongated threfr-button 
wasted jacket 

Below. Jeff Sayre: Husky 
geometric knit. 

Below left Kenzo: Check 

suit and savage print. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 




THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Single- 

minded 

An embarrassing legal fight 
between the Labour Party and its 
former local goverrmem officer 
is about to go to a seventh round. 
Barbara Tumer.who is divorced, 
discovered she was unable to 
pass her pension entitlement 
onto her three children. After two 
court hearings, four industrial 
tribunals and an Employment 
Appeal Tribunal, she is still 
determined to prove that passing 
pension rights after death only 
onto married partners infringes 
the Sex Discrimination Act and 
EEC directives. Labour, however, 
has just decided to defend the 
rule at yet another employment 
appeal. Previously, it asked her 
for £5,000 costs after a hearing 
found against her — a re-quest 
dismissed as "startling'* by the 
tribunal. The funny thing is that 
in Larry Whiny's 1983 Pelican 
Women's Rights in the H'ork- 
placc. Labour's general secretary 
complains that many pension 
schemes do discriminate against 
women. “Such discri mi-nation 
also ignores the feet that many 
women have dependants.” he 
writes. You said it Larry. 

House work 

The deadlock between the gov- 
ernment and the Commons select 
committee on defence caused by 
the Westland leak affair is likely 
to be discussed. I understand, by 
the House's liason committee on 
Thursday. The committee, com- 
prising representatives of all 
the other select committees, 
monitors the relationship be- 
tween government and Par- 
liament and will discuss consti- 
tutional aspects of the row. The 
most pressing matter is whether 
the investigatory role of select 
committees, which shadow the 
departments of state, can (unc- 
tion if the executive refuses to 
allow civil servants like Colette 
Bowe to give evidence. 

Winding down 

Leon Brittan. 1 can reveal, is not 
spending all his new-found lei- 
sure lime worrying. He is having 
fun playing with one of his 
favourite Christmas presents: a 
clockwork helicopter given by 
one of his cheekier journalist 
buddies. "I am delighted with it. 
You simply wind it up, aim it 
correctly and it rescues toy 
children from a boiling sea with 
the help of magnets.” savs 
Brittan. Simply winding up the 
Westland affair remains, of 
course, another matter. 

BARRY FANTONI 


Punjab: Gandhi’s new gamble 

by Michael Hamlyn 


Delhi 

Some Indians believe that Rajiv 
Gandhi has failed in his policies 
to restore peace to Punjab. They 
sav the situation in the holy ciiy 
of Amritsar is becoming as bad 
as in 1983, when armed Sikh 
extremists led by Sant Jamail 
Singh Bhindranwale were 
organizing disaffection and 
shouting their defiance of Delhi 
from the sanctuary of the Golden 
Temple. 

Soon, it is feared, there may be 
another confrontation on the 
lines of Operation Blue Star, 
when the army stormed the 
temple and set in motion the 
chain of events that led to Mrs 
Gandhi's assassination. 

More likely, however, we are 
seeing a vindication of Gandhi's 
policies. Admittedly the ex- 
tremists are again in charge of the 
temple, the holiest shrine of the 
[ Sikh religion. Hooligans from 
I Sant Bhindranwale’s former tem- 
ple. the Damdami TaksaL re- 
cently seized control of the 
building and called a sarbai 
khalsa — a general assembly of 
baptized Sikhs — a move un- 
precedented for 200 years. 

Sikh religious and political 
power is supposed to spring 
directly from the wishes of the 
community, and the militants 
rammed through a series of 
resolutions dismissing the temple 
management and the head 


priests, excommunicating India's 
president (a Sikh) and the only 
Sikh in the centra! government, 
the agriculture minister, Buia 
Singh. 

Today the portrait of Sant 
Bhindranwale, who was killed in 
Operation Blue Star, hangs prom- 
inently in the temple, and the flag 
of the separatist Sikh state of 
Khalistan — the word Om, or 
God, in black on a saffron 
ground — flies over the AkaJ 
Takhi. the throne of Sikh power. 

Militants are dismantling the 
Altai Takht which they say was 
desecrated when rebuilt under 
government supervision after 
being badly damaged in the army 
assault. 

The failure of the central 
government, its critics believe, 
lies in handing over power in 
Punjab to a weak government of 
the Sikh religious party, the Akali 
Dal, and by weakening its 
influence still further by failing to 
implement last July's accord 
between Delhi and the state 
government and handing over 
the state capital Chandigarh, to 
Punjab alone by Republic Day, 
January 26. 

Chandigarh is still the joint 
capital of both Punjab and 
Haryana state, and the extremists 
make much of the fact that the 
Punjab state government of Akali 
moderates has so far no solid 
achievements it can point to. 


Sikh sentiments have been 
further disturbed by the death 
sentences imposed on Mrs 
Gandhi's murderer and his co- 
conspirators, and the sentences 
on the hijackers of an Indian 
airliner by Pakistan, no doubt 
influenced by a desire to achieve 
better relations with Delhi. 

But the truth is that both sides 
in the Punjab accord got them- 
selves into the present fix over 
Chandigarh by agreeing that it 
should be handed over "simul- 
taneously" with the transfer of 
sonic Hindi-speaking areas to 
Haryana in exchange. 

Both sides agreed that the 
principle of contiguity should be 
a consideration when deciding 
the areas to be transferred despite 
the fact that the two districts that 
Haryana had in mind. Abolhar . 
and Fazilkar is the rich cotton- 
growing area, are not in feet 
contiguous to it. 

The Akalis offered instead 31 
other Hindi-speaking villages in 
the less prosperous Patiala dis- 
trict. close to Chandigarh, but the 
Haryana chief minister turned 
this down. 

The central government could 
lean on the chief minister, 
Bhajan Lai, but Ghandi could 
not afford agitation in two 
adjoining stales, and in any case 
he has been warned that his 


Congress party could lose control 
of Haryana if he did so. 

Non-Congress parties rule in 

states speaking languages other 
than Hindi, but if Haryana foil it 
would be a serious inroad into 
the Congress's Hindi-speaking 
heartland and something that 
Gandhi's advisers are anxious to 
avoid. 

Whether or not Gandhis 
critics are correct in judging bis 
policies a failure is to be tested 
on February- 16. The Punjab 
government. led by Suijit Singh 
Bamala, has announced a sarbm 
khalsa of its own. If sufficient 
moderate Sikhs turn up it will be 
able to regain control of the 
Golden Temple, restore the 
management committee, and 
drive the extremists away. 

The auguries are good. The 
moderate Akalis have always 
defeated the extremists when it 
has come to an appeal to the Sikh 
public, as in elections. Recently 
an extremist-led rasia roko — an 
attempt to block the roads by 
mass demonstrations — . was a 
failure. 

If Surjit Singh succeeds, the 
problem of Sikh extremism will 
have been bandied and solved by 
a Sikh government, and not by 
the external force of the Hindu- i 
dominated central government | 
That for Gandhi would be a ; 
considerable achievement 


Digby Anderson 

Living it up on 
Grub Street 


/ . • •> 
/ 

r]LV>’ 


George Schopflin on the Kadar succession struggle 

Will 

Hungary 
goon 
leaning 
West? 




[thatches 

leader- 

ship 

h-HBEAT 


‘Do we bid for her memoirs now 
or after die Fulham by-election? 

Car choke 

Top marks to the Police Federa- 
tion monthly. Police, for this one. 
A Liverpool youth, arrested' for 
wrapping a stolen car around a 
lamp post took advantage of the 
new procedures under the Police 
and Criminal Evidence Act by 
demanding a particular lawyer by 
name. Duly rung, the lawyer said 
he knew the chap and would 
come down at once. Two hours 
passed, however, before he finally 
arrived, gasping: “Sony I'm late 
but someone's stolen my car.” 
The charge sheet all too quickly 
revealed the thief's identity. 

• And I thought I was bad a boat 
returning library books. A Goes 
amnesty in Gateshead has tempt- 
ted 'the return of 5,000 books 
. . . including some which are 25 
years overdue. 


A Pravda article in January about 
Hungary, critical of the country's 
Western connections, sent cold 
shivers through most of the 
people who were aware of it in 
Budapest It marked renewed 
Soviet disapproval of what many 
in the West regard as Hungary’s 
“liberalization”. But it should be 
seen for what it is — pari of the 
power struggle in the Hungarian 
leadership and a way to frighten 
supporters of the more open 
course in foreign relations that 
Hungary has been following, with 
Soviet approval, for many years. 

This power struggle is at the 
back of the extraordinary sense of 
drift that one finds in Hungary at 
I the moment. The two favourite 
words about the situation heard 
in every conversation are “fluid” 
and '•crumbling”. There is no 
sense of puipose or direction in 
the leadership. It is in any case 
deeply divided by a number of 
major issues. 

The most cogent comment that 
a senior party official could make 
in a lengthy conversation was, 
**We are building democracy and 
socialism here. It will take 15 to 
20 years.” This is hardly different 
from saying that one would like 
the sun to shine. 

Several intractable factors have 
combined to worsen the drift that 
afflicts Hungary. Succession is 
the most significant Janos 
Kadar. who in October will have 
been party leader for 30 years, is 
now 73. The elite has come to 
recognize that he must soon leave 
the political stage and its factions 
are engaged in a power struggle. 

There are four main currents 
in conflict The Kadarists aim to 
keep things as they have been. 
They have no new magic formula 
and are content with reiterating 
that in the Kadar era Hungarians 
have never had it so good. 

Second, there are the neo- 
hardliners. close to Moscow, who 
regard Kadarism as something of 
an aberration and would like to 
shift Hungary towards a more 




! Janos Kadar: leader for 30 years — but how mnch • 
i longer? Above, Budapest market: a plentiful supply of 
! goods belies the belt-tightening for many 


orthodox system — to become a 
poor man's East Germany, as 
someone unkindly commented. 

Thirdly, the economic prag- 
matists want to maintain the 
present Western orientation and 
accept that the discharging of 
Hungary's debt of about S9 
billion, means a serious burden 
on consumers. But the only way 
forward is to make industry more 
efficient by pushing ahead with 
genuine reform as distinct from 
the tinkering of the last two or 
three years. They are concerned 
that Hungary will be left out of 
the revolution in information 
technology, that it will never 
reach world market levels in the 
quality of its output and that it 
will slide quickly towards Third 
World levels. 

Last, there is the so-called 
“trade union opposition”, which 
is well organized. It articulates 
the interests, above all of those 
branches of industry which are 
least efficient — the commanding 
depths of the economy, in a 
word. This cureem does not 
accept Hungary's Western 
orientation, does not believe that 
the need to trade on the world 
market is all that important and 
insists that the relatively privi- 
leged position of sections of the 
manual working class must be 
safeguarded. 

These factions can all call on 
considerable support within the 
elite. For the moment, they have 
weakened the ability of the 
leadership to provide a sense of 
direction. This has its advan- 
tages. In the short term, there is 
an amazing diversity and even 
informal pluralism. The eco- 
nomic aspect of this is the most 


visible, notably in the upmarket 
boutiques around the Vati utca 
so beloved of Western television 
crews looking for capitalism in 
the communist world. They 
seldom venture to Budapest's less 
salubrious districts. 

Even more extraordinary is the 
variety of cultural and semi- 
political activism. Some 300 
private foundations are officially 
registered, and administer their 
funds without state interference. 
One or two of these are close to 
the threshold of politics, such as 
a foundation to provide aid and 
support for the Hungarian minor- 
ity in Transylvania. 

The views of the political 
reformers, who are in no way 
connected to the opposition 
which publishes in samizdat, can 
be startling in their radicalism. 
Many of them feel that the 
system as it now operates has 
exhausted its options, that only 
thorough-going political change — 
not pragmatic shifts in emphasis 
— can achieve what Hungary, 
needs, revitalization and recovery 
of purpose. Without popular 
involvement in political decision- 
making which is genuiae rather 
than cosmetic, the drift will 
continue. And if it goes on for 
much longer, the ever more 
visible and alarming trends in 
society will become irreversible. 

Two patterns are most evident 
Atomization is one of these. 
There is a minimum of trust 
between people, transactions are 
carried out in an atmosphere of 
suspicion and the criteria by 
which a society derides what is 
positive and what is negative are 
eroding. This undermines a sense 
of community. In the public 


context this can be seen in the 
continuous, low-levd aggressive- 
ness which permeates people's 
dealings with one another. 

Second, the only reliable yard- 
stick left is money. The chase for 
money is extraordinary and is 
made worse by the deterioration 
of living standards over the last 
few years. Hungarians claim that 
they already put in the highest 
number of working hours per day 
in Europe. Irritation and stress 
are relieved by drinking. Heart 
disease is increasing. The suicide 
rate is very high, and rising. 

Often people expect to receive 
a certain amount of money 
regardless of whether they per- 
form a service in exchange. This 
can go to ridiculous lengths. At 
the elegant - Pannonia Hotel in 
Pecs, I was woken at 4.30 am by 
two waiters demanding that I 
settle a bar bill at once. They 
hoped I would be loo befuddled 
with sleep to argue about the 
■ rather inflated amount and 
would just pay up. They forgot 
that foreigners use credit cards. 

At a deeper level Hungarian 
society seems to have lost not 
just the unity that was so evident 
during the 1956 revolution: its 
sense of ethical cohesiveness is 
disappearing too. People’s loyal- 
ties are overwhelmingly to them- 
selves and maybe to their 
immediate 6 mi lies. Their con- 
cept of the future is very short- 
term and vague. If they have 
expectations, these are neutral or 
negative. While there may be a 
good deal of hay to be made just 
now, the future looks bleak. 


This column is usually cautious 
about ambitious solutions to 
complicated social problems, so 
it is a pleasure when a case arises 
to which there is an. obvious and 
practical, if only partial remedy. 
At first sight it concerns Julie, a 
student struggling to make ends 
meet on her grant but on closer 
inspection it might concern many 
students who are campaigning for 
more of the taxpayers* money, 
and indeed many who are not 
students but for one reason or 
another, have problems paying 
for the standard of living they 
expect 

Julie’s income and expenditure 
were revealed in a recent Sunday 
Times article about student 
grants. Julie does not lead an 
unpleasant life — she spends £15 
a week on drink and entertain- 
ment — but she . overspends. As 
we might expect this overspend- 
ing was presented by the article 
as a problem requiring a political 
solution — i.e-a bigger grant in 
fact pan of the solution clearly 
lies in Julie's own hands. She 
does not get maximum value for 
her money. The hugest single 
item in her list of expenditure is 
food: £18 a week plus £5 a week 
on "basic foodstuffs and 
toiletries” — of which, say, £3 is 
on basic foodstuffs — a total of 
£21. And what does she eat? 
What is the result of this not 
. inconsiderable sum in the hands 
of one of the most intelligent 
sections of the population? “Ba- 
sic foods, such as fish pie and 
cauliflower cheese.”; £21 worth of 
cauliflower cheese? 

What could be done? 

Tuesday breakfast: 2 boiled duck 
eggs (15p), toast — I assume 
home-made bread throughout — 
<4pk butter (4pl tea (3p). Dinner 
potato salad (6p) — steam and 
reserve two extra potatoes; sprats 
(use recipes for anchovies, e.g. 
alici al gratia or sardines Neapol- 
itan), 8 or sprats (20p), 
breadcrumbs, tomatoes etc (8p); 
pigeon aux olives (pot roast 50p 
plus 10p); Stilton (2Gp); aranci 
caramellizzati (20p); coffee and 
amaretti (7p). bread (4p). 

Throughout the week these 
quantities allow enough over for 
sandwiches next day or to cater, 
with easy additional ingredients, 
for an unexpected guest 
• Wednesday breakfast: Grilled 
pig's kidney (iSp) with saute 
potatoes (from Monday) (4p), tea 
(3p)* Dinner soupe de poissons, 
croutons, rouille (acquire the fish 
hods and bones when you buy 
the sprats (probably (reel but 
add a few mussels and their juice 
(30p) — reserve six of the steam- 
opened mussels for Thursday, 
hock of pork, boned and rolled 


(75 pi stuffed with garlic, parsley, 
and diced coppa —get the end of 
one cheap (lOpl. Serve with 
baked onions (8p). After dinner, 
boil hock bone with pigeon 
carcass and any remaining onions 
for stock. Green salad (12pfc .* 
glazed pear <!2p) in red wine 
(25pk coffee (5p). Bread f4p). 

• Thursday br eakfa st: Crumpets 
(20p). tea (3pl Dinner, salade de 
to mates et moules-. rissoto con 
fungbi — rice (!5p); stock from 
Wednesday, mushrooms (25p y, 
grilled chicken wings (36p) with 
lemon (12pk saltan (20p) with 
celery (20pK coffee <5p), bread 
<4p). 

• Friday breakfast: Anchovy 

toast (lOp). tea (3p). Dinner 
cucumber in yoghurt (32ph 
grilled spiced mackerel (30p); 
lentil puree (8p) with fresh 
coriander <25p): mnl (whatever is 
cheap, I2pl coffee (5p>, bread 
<4p). .4 

Saturday breakfast: Homo-made 
sausages (pork belly, 3Sph bread 
(4p), tea <3pL Dinner for two: 
spaghetti con mc lan za n e (pasta 
25p. aubergines, 50p; Cervefles 
au beurre noir (use bo flocks* 
brains 80p): braised celery 
(remainder of Thursday’s), salad 
(40pk stilton <30ph coffee (lOp), 
Bread (8p). And so on for Sunday 
and Monday, when you are taken 
out for dinner by the chap who 
came on Saamday. 

The total bill will be about £13. 
Some items may have been 
forgotten but the point remains. 
One can eat excellently for well 
under Julie's total. Put more 
generally, some of those who 
can't live oq their incomes have 
a problem of personal budgeting 
rather than political oppression. 
This is particularly true of certain ‘ 
items such as food where 
knowledge, time and work can 
save considerable expenditure. 

Many of these items, readily 
available from butcher’s shops, 
would cost three times as much 
on the Continent, where their 
culinary value is appreciated; 
indeed, the fact that ingredients 
such as fish-heads, bones, pig's 
extremities (ears, tails, heads) are 
regularly thrown or given away 
by retailers in Thatcher's alleg- 
edly harsh Britain shows that it is 
not a case of the odd student who 
has not yet foamed to cater and 
cook. These prices are tow or 
zero because next to no one 
knows about God's good things, 
has the taste to enjoy them, or 
can be bothered to prepare them. I 
There may be more talk about 
good food, and even occasionally 
a little more good food among an 
interested few, but most Britons 
eat less well than they could and 
spend much more on food than 
they need. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Auntie’s place 
in the country 


The other day I visited a large 
building, cordoned off from the 
surrounding town, where they are 
producing a daily newspaper in 
conditions of some secrecy, and, 
extraordinarily, it isn't owned by 
Rupert Murdoch or Eddie Shah 
or anyone like that. It's owned by 
the BBC. Cavers ham Park, on 
the outskirts of Reading, is where 
the BBC Monitoring Service 
listens to news broadcasts from 
all over the world, and every day 
puts out a 90,000-word digest of 
what it has heard, called Sum- 
mary of World Broadcasts . 

The secrecy attached to the 
SWB is quite accidental —-ft's 
simply that most people haven't 
heard of n. The circulation is 
only a liule over 2.000. and the 


unless far-reaching change is I .main customers are Fleet Street 

a.j .kM. i:mi. I ' ■ . , « , 


introduced. And there is tittle 
sign that the leadership has the 
energy or determination to do it. 


Breathing old life back into poetry 


No Tessa 


David Steel's personal secretary 
for the past 12 years, Tessa 
Horton, has announced she is 
leaving the Liberal leader to open 
up a health food shop in 
Qapham. This comes only a 
month after his other secretary, 
Beverley Miles, left to become a 
parliamentary consultant His 
two trusted minders, who helped 
him through his post-election 
blues in 1983. will be sorely 
missed. 

Coat-racked 

There was consternation when 
executive members of the North- 
ern Ireland Police Federation met 
unionist leaders Ian Paisley and 
Jim Moiyneaux for an unpubli- 
cized pow-wow before the recent 
Ulster by-elections. One of the 
Federation officials realized, to 
his horror, that he was carrying a 
briefcase from the Republic of 
Ireland's police force, a souvenir 
from a recent international con- 
ference. He carefully draped his 
coal over the briefcase and was 
later seen smuggling it out of the 
building, clutched awkwardly to 
his chest. PHS 


The award of the Whitbread 
prize to Douglas Dunn honours a 
fine poet and remarkable book — 
Elegies, poems written in mem- 
ory of his wife, whose early death 
tore his life apart. It also 

emphasizes what has become 
apparent in the past dozen years, 
that poetry, which had threatened 
either to dwindle into insignifi- 
cant occasional verse or to 
become something hermetic, acc- 
essible only to initiates, is on the 
way to regaining its position as 
the literary form most capable of 
conveying feeling. 

Dunn's elegies render an 

experience that is, in his own 

words, “common as dirt”. “How 
strenuously the English language 
has gone out of its way in recent 
years to avoid the lyric cry,” he 
sa ys. “Contemporary poetry has 
sidestepped what most ordinary 
people expect from poetry.” 

Elegies meets that expectation 
head-on. 

Dunn was born in 1942 in a 
Renfrewshire village called In- 
chinnan overlooking the Clyde. 
He describes his background as 
“ordinary working-class”, adding 
that “with a few exceptions Scots 
poets come from the lower end of 
society”. This, in his opinion, is 
one of the historical differences 
between Scots and English poets 
(although this is changing in 
England), and perhaps one reason 
why ihe language of Scots poetry 
has always been direct 

He trained as a librarian, 
married young and went to a job 
in Ohio. The affinity between the 
west of Scotland and the United 
States has often been noted. 


Glasgow having been described 
as the most easterly American 
city. The consciousness of demo- 
cratic equality on which Scots 
pride themselves is especially 
strong in western Scotland. 

Rudyard Kipling brought the 
Scots engineer into literature, and 
Dunn picks up the theme in a 
poem. Ships. 

They leave restless boys without 
work in the river towns. 

In their houses are fading 
pictures of fathers ringed 
Among ships' complements in 
wartime, model destroyers. 
Souvenirs from uncles deep in 
distant engine-rooms. 

Then the boys go out down 
streets that look on water. 
They say "I could have gone 
with them," 

A thousand times to themselves 
in the glass cafes. 

Over their American soft 
drinks, into their empty hands. 
The directness, the sense of a 
voice speaking straight to the 
reader with deep feeling, is 
evident; the expression is classi- 
cal in its precision. 

As a boy Dunn read more 
history and poetry than fiction, 
though he is now a notable short- 
story writer, most of the stories 
having appeared first in the biew 
Yorker: Faber (publisher of Ele- 
gies) put out a collection called 
The Secret Village last year, and 
issues a paperback edition soon. 

Dunn came back to study 
English at Hull, and then worked 
as a librarian there. Philip Larkin 
was a senior colleague, and Dunn 
acknowledges his influence, al- 
though “more in things I beard 



Douglas Dunn: precision and 
depth of feeling 

him talk about” than his poetry. 

For all the romanticism asso- 
ciated with Scotland and the idea 
of Scotland, many of the best 
Scottish poets have written with 
classical clarity and sense of 
order, it's the directness again 
which you find in the ballads, in 
Burns, in Scott and in Byron, 
whom he has edited. 

You get it too in modem poets 
such as Garioch. MacCaig and 
Crichion-Smith. often in Mac- 
Diarm id. and very evidently in 
Douglas Dunn. John Buchan 
wrote of “the sharp concrete 
experience” you find in Scots 
poetry. That phrase might have 
been carved for Dunn. Yet the 
melody is always there. “Scots 
poetry.” he observes, “has never 
been deficient in lyricism.” 

His poetry is always open to 
the reader. There’s nothing poeti- 
cal in his lan guag e, for the poetry 


comes from real life; yet it has 
never dragged down to a pedes- 
trian level. The intensity of 
feeling ensures its vitality, and 
the discipline of form its dignity. 

He writes in English and has 
used Scots only for dialogue in 
radio plays and fiction. Yet it is, 
we agree. English with a dif- 
ference, Scots English. Some- 
body. incidentally, should . do 
some work on Scots English. This 
might well start with Dunn 
himself or Muriel Spark, whose 
writing even now retains an 
Edinburgh intonation. Muriel 
Spark has said that the word 
“nevertheless” was the pivot of 
her education, and that she writes ; 
novels on the nevertheless prin- 
ciple. I would say “nevertheless” 
is strong in Dunn also. It 
represents an insistence on seeing 
both sides of a question. 

Dunn is now working on a 
novel set in foe west of Scotland 
in the 1930s, and on a long 
poem. How long? “About a 
thousand lines. Nowadays they 
call it a long poem if it goes over 
the page.” But it will be a poem 
with a narrative element. As we 
get older, narrative seems more 
to be valued in poetry as in 
fiction, though Dunn also likes, 
“spacious digressive imaginative 
novels”. 

Certainly, the poem will be 
accessible and not shy of emo- 
tion. It will like Elegies, be 
undeniably poetry. The 
Whitbread award could not have 
gone to a poet more easy to 
admire without reservation. 

Allan Massie 


papers, foreign embassies. British 
government departments mid 
large companies — anyone, in 
feet, who might want to know 
which way the wind is blowing 
before anyone else has noticed 
there's a wind at all The day I 
was there everyone was mutter- 
ing a lot about South Yemen, 
and it wasn’t for another day or 
two that l started reading about 
Aden’s troubles in the papers. 

Not that they attach much 
importance to boosting circula- 
tion. As I was there to help 
prepare a talk for Radio 2, 1 was 
allowed into the “morning 
prayers” meeting where they 
swap the latest hot news and 
developments: it reminded me 
not so much of an editorial 
| meeting as a get-together of 
i Oxford dons — professional 
sharp and underspoken. 

Thanks were voted to the Arab 
section, which had been doing 
double shifts to cover Colonel 
Gadaffi’s latest outpourings. We 
were told what Moscow had been 
saying about the Yemen. The 
African expert vouchsafed the 
news that Zaire's export figures 
of bat dung were up again. 
Someone, bemused, asked him 
what bat dung was used for. He 
said he. would look into it 
Next door to Caversham Park 
there is an even more obscure 
BBC department. Written Ar- 
chives. where they have kept not 
only ail the scripts they could lay 
their hands on but a host of 
letters, complaints, memos, 
plans, reports and soft answers 
turning away wrath. Amanda, 
who was _ showing me around, 
was bubbling with excitement at 
*the stuff she keeps finding. 

“Here's something I found the 
other day - the first letter that 
Gerald Hoffimng ever wrote to 
the BBC, covered with his 
drawings. And here’s a very odd 
letter about Guy Burgess.” 


Odd indeed. Someone had 
written in 1937 saying he had 
heard the BBC wanted a young 
man to take part in an Angio- 
Russian programme and 
recommending Burgess. He 
knows Russia welL said the 
letter, though his politics are 
liberal .Tory, rather like Harold 
Macmillan’s . . .The BBC answer 
said that as Burgess had been a 
communist at Cambridge, he did 
not seem quite right for the pan. 

“There's another letter about 
Burgess, from 1951,” said 
Amanda. “Apparently he had 
borrowed some books from the 
BBC library several years before 
and never relumed them. Well 
suddenly these books had been 
returned to the BBC from desk in 
September 1951, but the writer of 
the note asks the librarian not to 
make a song and dance about it, 
as the Foreign Office is very 
anxious to establish Mr Burgess's 
whereabouts.” 

In other words, one of the last 
things Burgess had done before 
defecting was to clear his guilty 
conscience about bis years-over- 
due library books. Curious how 
the human mind works. Wonder- 
ing if I, too. could turn up some 
amazing discovery, 1 opened a 
box of papers when Amanda 
wasn't looking and found a series 
of BBC audition reports from 
1958. There was a man who 
twirled 13 plates on sticks. Nice, 
said the report, but not really 
right for the radio. There was an 
Indian singer called Raj Kumar. 
Nice, said the report, but a bit 
lacking in character. Also, he has 
previously auditioned under the 
name of Jamie Farrar. 

I left feeling the pleasure vou 
get from having scratched the top 
of a barrel of treasures, from 
havjng touched on the million 
different routes the human mind 
can take. My two strongest 
memories are of seeing a Russian 
monitor watching Moscow tele- 
vision (a programme for chess 
beginners — nice to know they're i 
not all experts in Russia) and of ' 
hearing the latest inquiry that 
had come Amanda's way. 

d;ii A rang . up Md asked how 
52 Be . n k tJ,e Flowerpot Men, 
haddressed from the waist down, 
tasked why she wanted to know, 
wen, she said, her two children 

af re R?n“! *I anCy dness 
as Bill and fen; she could 

remember their top halves but 
not the rest” 

The BBC lays on this service of 
public information free. It's the 
son of thing that suddenly 
i^aUthe faith in the Beeb 
flat had been taken away by that 
John Cleese advertisement 



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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 



jPgggjggton Street, LondonFi Telephone 01 481 4100 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 




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„ BEWARE SAFE HANDS 

Conservative back wnShi ful ^ sl ’ ,^ Illcest fa® 4 * tb* government to its present, 

beats out a threatening note. nfrffSlL tbe dullest) degree state. Mrs Thatcher would do 
The natives are restless. The £fi? S T?? ul ^ lf * ,lie ““P*® 15 of well to tread carefully before 
message is filtered tiWh S . ^^ s administra- she sets any such process in 
the loyalist and not so loyalist °Tt jf n ? 10 dragged hack, motion. Her most important 
press, it is occasinnath/ 0ng been a P^dox policies are long-term in their 

contradicted iw iZZJi of “*» government that its intention and long-term in 


Making us all 
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The natives are restless. The 
menage is filtered through 
the loyalist and not so loyalist 
Press- It is occasionally 
contradicted. But still it keeps 
■ coming. 

The codeword is “a safe 
- E air °f hands”, a metaphor 
borrowed from cricket and 
rame usually applied to 
mmdle-ranking civil servants 
and executives than to mat- 
ters of national leadership. 
This is the phrase that hanpc 
on so many lips, that appears 
m so many newspaper pro- 
files^ that is in turn repeated 
on more lips and recycled 
into further prognostications 
of the parliamentary mood. 
Sir Geoffrey Howe bias a safe 
pair of hands. So has Mr 
Douglas Hurd. Mr Norman 
Tebhit and Mr Peter Walker 
perhaps, do not Thus do last 
year’s potential titans become 
this year’s nearly has-beens as 
the drum of rumour drones 
on. 

The Prime Minister’s 
friends can be forgiven for 
.taking a fairly ' indulgent 
attitude to most of this 
Politicians have always 
thrived on talk of sackings 
and succession. While some 
of the key players may have 
been planning their leadership 
campaigns from • their min- 
isterial cradles, the supremacy 
of Mrs Thatcher during the . 
past decade has made 
speculation rather dull and 
plotting mostly pointless. The 
fact that Sir Anthony Meyer 
and others are now letting 
their true feelings - show 
should lead noone in 
Downing Street to lose sleep. 

That is not to say, however, 
that the Westland saga can be 
safely left, like some ill- 
crafted melodrama, to fade 
away to the final cur tain. 
Until the Prime Minis ter 
accedes to the wishes of the 
select committee on defence 
and allows those now 1 so wel£ 
known civil servants to an- ‘ 
swer questions about the 
afternoon of January 6th, the 
fears and the murmurings mil . 
go on. Tfcere.is no aheniatxYe - 


greatest successes have been 
achieved' with barely more 
than the tacit approval of its 
elected representatives, often 
in _ tiie teeth of their oppo- 
sition. The giant gains of 
privatisation, trade union re- 
form and anti-inflation strat- 
egy would never have been 
made under the gnidancco f a 
safe pair of hands. 

Mrs Thatcher knows that 
Sir Anthony Meyer is at the 
tip of a substantia] iceberg. 
She knows too that the 
barrier to good government 
which he and his lrinri 
represent is one which she has 
charted, skirted, ignored (and 
too often fled from) for many 
years. What she does not 
seem to know is that there is 
another iceberg which is 
hoving into view. It is madi* 
up not just of those who are 
cautious about policies, ner- 
vous about their electoral 
chances, and utterly un- 
interested in any thing but 
being an MP; it is formed 
from those who are afraid 
that the Prime Minister will 
slowly and painfully be re- 
vealed to be involved in a 
sordid-looking cover-up- Only 
quick action on her part can 
stop that becoming the ob- 
stacle beneath which she 
could be crushed. 

And then what? If West- 
land is taken off tbe agenda of 
her friends and. party col- 
leagues, remaining only as a 
nasty echo in the speeches of 
her opponents, what can be 
done to put the government 
back' on course? The same 
rumour machine that is 
producing, thoughts of succes- 
sion is^also generating alleged 
plans for an emergency re- 
think of government strategy. 

It is a tempting prospect to 
believe that this is what is 
required. It is .especially 
tempting, to those in the 
cabinet and outside who 
think that the - neglect of their 
advice in: the past has brought 


intention and long-term in 
their effectThat is the way 
‘ they should stay. 

The most important short- 
term priority is to ensure that 
long-planned programmes are 
earned through to fruition. 
Those, for example, who have 
always opposed the 
privatisation of British Air- 
ways can now see the pros- 
pect of its cancellation.They 
can look at some small US 
law suits and argue that, with 
all its other troubles, this is a 
boat that the government 
should leave resolutely 
unrocked, if it has half a 
chance to do so. It is 
important that this decision 
and others like it continue to 
be judged on their original 
merits. 

The second priority is to 
begin the process of preparing 
policies for the third term, of 
- continuing the commitment 
to change which is Mrs 
Thatcher’s most singualar 
contribution to British public 
life. There remains much to 
be done in the coordination 
of education and training, in 
the relaxation of planning 
regulations and rent controls, 
in the weening of the elec- 
torate away from the distort- 
ing lure of tax, rebates and 
preferential privileges. 

None of these will come as 
shafts of original light to 
those who sit around the 
policy planning tables. They 
are the issues, that have 
suffered from feint-hearted 
ministers, insufficient thought 
and from too . long a sojourn 
in the Prime Minister” “too 
hard” tray. . They are the 
issues that require the hardest 
th inking if they are to have a 
chance to survive in the 
political battles ahead. They 
are the issues that divide 
those who wish Mrs 
Thatcher’s, achievements to 
be entrusted to safe hands 
from those who can recognise 
an incompleted job and have 
the wifl to see its completion. 


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POLISH JUSTICE IN ACTION 






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Next week Lech Walesa is 
due to stand trial, accused of 
“slandering!” some of the 
country's electoral officers by 
announcing Solidarity’s ,own 
estimate of the turnout in last 
autumn’s parliamentary elec- 
tions. The precise details of 
the charge are unimportant, 
since this is a purely political 
trial. Poland’s law books now. 
contain so many elastic para- . 
graphs that the authorities 
could certainly have found an 
offence to charge him with at 


During the four years since 
the imposition of martial law, 
Walesa has been interned, 
summoned for questioning 
and subjected to police con- 
■trols : - . But until now they 
have never actually dared to 
pul in the dock the man who 
is probably, beside the Pope, 


nities for raising our hu m a n 
rights concerns, as Sir Geof- 
frey Howe did most convinc- 
, ingly on his tour of Eastern 
Europe last year. 

What has been wrong with 
- some recent contacts is not 
that they occurred, but the 
way they occurred. This is 


the best known Pole in the particularly true of a clumsy 


any time. . . . . 

Why are the Polish authori- 
ties m a kin g such a highly- 
charged political move now? 
The Soviet Party Congress 
meets this month, his own 
party congress is scheduled 
for June, and General 
Jarnzelski may fed that this is 
an opportune moment to 


demonstrate that he, like Mr 
Gorbachov, has “iron teeth.” 

Yet the answer is probably 
that they now reckon they can 
get away with it. For the 
Polish authorities have them? 
selves long wanted to dp to 
Walesa what they have al- 
ready done to almost every 
other Solidarity leader who 
has remained politically .ac- 
tive, and whom they have 
manag ed to lay hands on. 


world. 

Now they think they can 
break this last taboo, without 
nnmanageable domestic and 
international : repercussions. 
In the domestic assessment 
they . are almost certainly 
right 

What of the international 
reaction? The government 
recently boasted that 198S 
was the year in which Poland 
had emerged from its dip- 
lomatic isolation. With Gen- 
eral Jaruzdski being received 
by President Mitterand and 
Herr Wily Brandt being feted 
in Warsaw at the year’s end, 
there was some justification 
for this boast Should a 
Walesa trial , put Poland back 
into quarantine? 

There is a difficulty for 
Western governments here. A 
complete boycott cannot be 
sustained indefinitely. Re- 
newed high level diplomatic 
dialogue can provide opportu- 


visit by France’s deputy 
foreign minister, and even 
more of the strange perfor- 
mance of Herr Brandt whose 
expressions of concern about 
worsening repression in Po- 
land were so perfunctory as to 
be inaudible. 

Such omissions are bound 
to give foe Polish authorities 
the impression that foe West 
is not really serious, let alone 
united in its concern about 
for example, the country’s 
more than 200 political pris- 
oners and foe purge of its 
universities; that human 
rights are not as we profess, 
an integral part of our 
Helsinki agenda for East-West 
relations. Walesa in the dock, 
on an obviously political 
charge, must be an occasion 
for Herr Brandt and M 
Mitterand, in common with 
other Western leaders, to 
demonstrate that such an 
impression is mistaken. 


TAKING THE GOSPEL TO THE CITIES 


• The dust has settled since foe 
Church of England’s last 
intervention in national 
political debate; its essay in 
December on foe inner cay. 
The Government has sub- 
. sequently settled for an atti- 
tude of politeness towards foe 
initiative, a shrewd response 
thkt might have commended 
itself earlier, for .surely there 
is not much political prom ip 
quarrels with clerics. Tne air 
has cleared for discussion of 
the role of the Churdi of 
England in the inner city - 
■whatought to have been the 
i Commission's 

‘ anyway. The General Synwi 

wtdeh beings today wdlde- 

vote foe larger part ot ib 
meeting to this more eccte- 
siastical side 

appropriately, because ttus is 
where churchmen have the 

benefit of expertise 


a harsh critique of foe Churdi 
of England’s performance in ’ 
foe inner urban areas, admit- 
ting things which have long 
been obvious but unmention- 
able. The national church can 
claim at best a marginal 
influence and a shadowy 
presence there. In so fer as 
the flag of Christianity has 
been kept flying at all in the 
sometimes derelict cores of 
foe peat cities, it ‘has been 
through the efforts of the 
black-led churches and foe 
Roman Catholics. 

The trap ahead is fin foe 
Church of England to believe 
that it without great difficulty 

. . . r. if -L_ ' 'J : - .. 


on unexamined and 
controversial assumptions 
about this transfixguation, 
and foe synod ought to 
unpack them. : 

Inner city areas are very 
largely , bereft of spiritual and 
religious leadership; very 
largely, to. use an old- 
fashioned word, unconverted. 
The Churdi of England might 
convert its surplus church 
buildings into community 
centres (and where appro- 
priate into flats for regenerat- 
ing private sector sale). 

Its essential 

contribulionfoowever, is foe 
one imposed by its title 


re-establish itself by admin- - ‘ deeds. That is to preach foe 
istrative and organisational GospeL The more it can 


means, while re ma ini ng its 
staid character as ah institu- 
tion with a unique, relation- 
ship to the State. Its 
traditional identity be. frtting 
in the suburbs and country 
towns still, but the inner 


. .t never m-uiv 

; : r * They would JfJJSiSrS towns !? ut innH ' 

- S' foe less, to W«gh ratify dries are mission tenftoiy of 

\ A advice the ^ EW'dannltac'ai 

..,o : giving them. There* different, jnh^ps ; ‘-a reeved 

•• •'% opportunity and a trap spirit. • Tae- .t Commission’s- 

of them. -Hvanced . recommendations are based 

The Cwnmissiou aavan 


concentrate on urban teaching 
and preaching, and be seen to 
be so concentrating, the better 
will it be respected as a 
commentator on soda! policy 
and inner city politics. Noth- 
ing has been more damaging 
to foe church's case, in its 
recent tangle with foe poli- 
tirians, than the charge that it 
does not even know its own 
b usiness in foe cities. 


During ihe miners’ strike, 
through your columns. I begged 
the Prime Minister to address the 
nation and tell us the frets. I 
believe that many of us were 
bemused then. also, by contusing 
and sensational reports. 

Prime Minister’s question time 
in Parliament is a fine demo- 
cratic institution, but it is not 
enough in these days of rapid 
mass communication. 

May I once again, through 
your columns, urge the Prime 
Minister to give greater consid- 
eration to the bemused man in 
the street by giving regular 
televised Press conferences to 
keep us properly informed of the 
frets? If such constituted “party 
political broadcasts” I believe 
party managers would find that 
the allotted time was well spent. 
Yours faithfully, 

LANSDOWNE, 

House of Lords. 

January 28. 


In the bag 

From Dr J.W.King 
Sir, Apropos the acceptance of 
new technology, one wonders 
whether even in high places 
modern alternatives are always 
given due consideration. 

I understand that a debate is 
currently in progress about 
whether the Woolsack should be 
refilled with wool or 
horsehair.but I have not heard 
any mention of the possible use 
of a man-made stuffing. Surety at 
least one good British factory 
could produce something which 
would satisfy the twin criteria of 
comfort and durability. 

Imagine, Sir, the pleasure of 
explaining to foreigners that the 
Woolsack no longer contained 
what once upon a tune it used to, 
thereby proving that as a nation 
we lave indeed accepted the 
spirit of the twentieth centnry. 
Yours sincerely, 

J. W. KING, 

8 Potters Cross. _ 
Bangors Road. South, 

Iver Heath, 

Bucki ngham s hin e- ■ 

January 30.. 


From Dr Nicholas Jeffs 
.Sir.Conceming the contents of 
the Woolsack, the Lord Chan- 
cellor may be in greater dis- 
i comfort than previously 
i suspected by your correspondent. 
Dr Barbara Reynolds (January 
22). The relevant passage is from 
“The Entertaining Episode of the 
I Article in Question” in Lord 
Peter Views the Body. It reads: 

, It was his idiotic enquiries as to 
what the Woolsack was really 
stuffed with that led the then 
Lord Chancellor idly to investi- 
gate the article in question, and 
to discover, tucked deep within 
its recesses, that famous diamond 
necklace of the Marchioness of 
Writtle. 

Diamonds are considerably 
Harrier than emeralds. As to tire 
idleness of the then Lord 
Chanocflor, I am not qualified to 
speculate. 

Yours faithfu lly, 

NICHOLAS JEFFS, 

28 Lndiow Avenue, 

Luton, 

Bedfordshire. 

January 23. 


Policies of ‘Freeze’ 

From Dr William Howard 
Sir, I "wish to clarify several key 
points raised in Bernard Levin's 
recent column (January IS) on 
the new Nuclear Weapons Freeze 
organisation. 

The simple answer to his main 
question - is Freeze a front or 
stalking horse for CND? - is most 
definitely no. If Mr Levin had 
consulted Freeze’s widely distrib- 
uted leaflet, instead of the 
advertisement which he quotes, 
he would have read: “Freeze 
campaigns * for a halt (to the 


testing, production and deploy- 
ment of new nudear weapons) 
and' not for unilateral 
disarmament by Britain Or any 
other country”. 

‘ Mr Levin may have difficulty 
understanding the Freeze philos- 
ophy because it does not conform 
to the sterile and polarised 
nuclear debate of the last five 
years in Britain. International 
arms control has been missing 
from this discussion. Freeze has 
been formed to fill this gap and 
reflect a new consensus in this 
country. 

In this nuclear age, when the 
security of nations is interlocked, 
of course a “freeze” would have 
to be mutual and verifiable. The 
USSR has indicated h may be 
willing to take this course. Now 
is foe time to see if they mean it 
Yours frithfufly. 

WILLIAM HOWARD, 

Freeze National Coordinator, 

82 Colston Street, 

Bristol 

Avon. 


Lessons from space disaster 


From Lord Lansdownc 
Sir. For those of your readers 
who may not have seen tbe letter 
addressed to you on January 27 
by Mr Anthony Swainson. I 
quote two sentences from it 


The man in foe street is 
bemused. It is the Government's 
duty and self-interest to keep foe 
voter property informed of the 
facts, rather than having to rely 
upon sensational journalism de- 
signed to sell newspapers and 
attract viewers of television. 


The Times regrets that h is 
temporarily unable to notify 
correspondents whose letters are 
not selected for publication. 


From Mr J. L. Hudson 
Sir. The tragic loss of the shuttle. 
Challenger, and its crew of seven 
has once again raised foe issue of 
the place of man in space. In his 
article today (January 30) your 
Science Correspondent would 
seem to favour the development 
of remote probes and satellites. 
The ptai success of Voyager 2 at 
Uranus shows indeed what the 
remote robot craft are capable of. 

This seems to me, however, a 
short-sighted view. If one surveys 
foe story of our species in the 
long term, then surely one 
characteristic is its evolutionary 
infiltration into ever more di- 
verse environments so that today 
mankind can be found over the 
entire free of our earth. 

Viewed on this historical 
perspective it is dear that we are 
privileged to be witnessing tbe 
first tentative steps of mankind 
into the endless ocean of space. 
In this exploration there will be 
setbacks and disasters as there 
have been in tbe past with the 
exploration of foe seas and air. 

It would be much to our shame 
if future generations were to look 
back ana say that tbe free world 
failed to recognise its role in 
mankind’s destiny at this exciting 

and challeng in g time. 

Yours faiihntily, 

J. L. HUDSON, 

107 Appledore Avenue, 
Wollaton, 

Nottingham. 

January 30. 


From Ms Carol Bundock 
Sir, Seven people died as tbe 
result of a fault in a multi-billion 
dollar venture - thousands die 
daily from lack of food. For 
whom should we grieve 
more^nd where should our 
attentions be turned? 

Yours etc, 

CAROL BUNDOCK, 

Chapel End, 

Norwich Road, 

Corpusty, 

Norwich, 

Norfolk. 

January 29. 


From Mr Henry Knowles 
Sir, I am sure that we are 
appalled at the catastrophic 
setback that the American space 
shuttle has suffered and that we 
share some of foe grief that- the 
families of the seven astronauts 
are now feeling. It is for this 
reason that I think we should all 
show some compassion and not 
subject them to the rigours of 
having that grief publicly shown 
on the news and in tbe papers for 
all to see. 


Unfriendly outposts 


From Mr Terence Richardson 
Sir, As a British expatriate with 
over 13 years’ residence in the 
Turks and Caicos Islands, I 
would like to correct and amplify 
some of Mr Hetherington's state- 
ments (January 6) regarding these 

island x_ 

Applicants for citizenship 
based on residence may only 
apply for and receive British 
Dependent Territories’ citizen- 
ship (BDTQ status. Belonger 
status is generally acquired 
through birth here or through 
parents who were bom here. 
BDTC status has no particular 
meaning in the application of 
local ordinances as it has not 
been incorporated into the local 
ordinances. 

If one acquired one's citizen- 
ship by application then one’s 
business licence application, fin- 
example. may still be refused, as 
only bdongers'may receive busi- 


ness licences by right This two- 
tier citizenship, belonger and 
British Dependent Territory citi- 
zen, condoned by tbe British 
Government is as distasteful as 
that in South Africa, but as a 
reverse situation is unlikely to 
appeal to those who usually 
criticize such injustice. 

Long-term residents of these 
islands may not expect to 
auiomaticafly receive citizenship 
on application following a period 
of residence. One must first 
obtain a permanent resident's 
certificate, which application usu- 
ally goes unanswered. 

Although a British citizen may 
vote after he/she has been here 
five years, and may even stand 
for election after IS years’ 
residence, he/foe cannot, accord- 
ing to the Governor and the 
Aitiorney GeneraTs office, ever 


Food poisoning 


From Mr Eric Silvester 
Sir, A major factor in respect of 
food poisoning and salmonella 
infections generally, and so far 
not mentioned, is that, unlike so 
many other trades, professions 
and activities affecting other 
people, there is no statutory 
obligation for proprietors and 
managers of food premises to 


prove their competence (such as, 
for example, in the driving test) 
to deal satisfactorily and safely 
with foe food in their care. 

It is still legally permissible for 
an ignoramus to start up and 
mara g p a food shop or catering 
business, and the tragedy is that 
that is just what some of them 
have done through the years, 
lacking even an elementary 
knowledge of food hygiene, 
requiring ranch individual on-site 
correction and education. I make 
this observation from my experi- 
ence of 33 years as an environ- 
mental health officer, now 
retired. 

In the interests of public health 
there is need to correct this 
situation. 

Yours sincerely, 

ERIC SILVESTER, 

57 Park Avenue, 

Chippenham, 

Wiltshire. 


It is hard enough coming to 
terms with such a tragic loss as 
this without feeling that it has 
been shown worldwide. 

Yours faithfully. 

HENRY KNOWLES, 

West Bank, 

Uppin gham, 

Rutland. 


From Mr Robert A. McDougle 
Sir, To Quote your leader of this 
morning (January 30)^The pres- 
ence on foe Challenger of Mrs 
Christa McAulrffe, a teacher, her 
vocation an expression of faith in 
the future ...” leads me to wonder 
from which profession the British 
Government would have selected 
their first civilian astronaut. 

1 fear that teachers would come 
very far down tbe list. 

Yours faithfully, 

ROBERT A. McDOUGLE, 
Co-proprietor, 

Tbe Red Lion, 

Market Street, 

Dalton-in-Furness, 

Cumbria. 

January 30. 


From Mr Simon Pashby 
Sir, I was shocked to read about 
the space shuttle disaster and the 
tragic loss ofiife. I think it would 
be fining if the newly discovered 
moons around Uranus were 
named in honour of the brave 
crew; and as a symbol of man’s 
desire to venture into the 
unknown. 

Yours faithfully, 

S.M. PASHBY, 

15 Robert Cecil Avenue, 
Southampton. 

Hampshire. 

January 29. 


From a great height 


From Mr Andrew J. Wait 
Sir, When William Herschel 
came to Bath in 1766 he no 
doubt noted the strange local 
custom of adding a letter when 
pronouncing Bath, i.e^ ''Barth”. 

Lalerjn 1781. when he discov- 
ered Uranus from his obser- 
vatory in Bath, as a mark of 
respect for his adopted commu- 
nity he pronounced it “Urainus”, 
adding foe letter “i”. 

Whilst applauding the magnifi- 
cent achievement of the Ameri- 
can Voyager space programme, 
please can we not adopt foe more 
lavatorial United Slates 
pronunciation and keep faith 
with this obscure part of our 
heritage? 

Yours faithfully, 

ANDREW J. WAIT, 

109 Manor Road, 

Keynsham, 

Bristol Avon. 


obtain belongership or British 
Dependent Territories’ citizen- 
ship and thus have the right to 
work and the right of abode- . 

The bottom hne is that foe 
British taxpayer, who foots the 
bills here, is at the very bottom 
of the list, if he can be said to be 
on it at afi. when h comes to 
citizenship and security of tenure. 

Developers and investors in 
territories such as these, particu- 
larly Americans and Canadians, 
come here with a sense of 
confidence that a British legal 
system is in force and law and or- 
der and an atmosphere of British 
fair play permeate all aspects of 
society. The recent decline of 
investors and developers here 
shows only too well what 
happens when they lose that 
confidence. 


Yours faithfully, 

TERENCE RICHARDSON, 
President, 

International Surveys Limited, 
Surveyors/real estate brokers, 
Providenciales, 

Turks and Caicos Islands. 
January 27. 


Staying power 

From Mrs J.D. Ware 
Sir, Forty years ago. and stitch by 
stitch. I unpicked a white, silk 
wartime parachute. The resultant 
nightdress, coupon-free and with 
many strange diagonal seams, is 
worn by me to this day. 

Now a very subtle shade of off- 
white, it is happily reunited with 
a former member of The Para- 
chute Regiment - my husband. 
Yours sincerely. 

CONSTANCE WARE, 

Coach House. 

4 Cooks Folly Road, 

Bristol 

Avon. 


Arab arrest 

From Mr David Astor and others 
Sir, We have learned of foe bouse 
arrest on “national security 
grounds” of Mr Saleh Baransi 
director of the Arab Heritage 
Centre in foe Arab township of 
Tayiba in IsraeL Mr Baransi is an 
outspoken critic of Israeli Gov- 
ernment policy towards Israel's 
650,000 Arab community. 

He has always pursued their 
interests by legal means. His first 
attempt, through an independent 
Arab political movement led to 
his imprisonment in 1970 for 10 
years. He next applied, un- 
successfully, for permission to 
start a new university. Finally, he 
set up a cultural centre, which 
does not require a licence, with 
financial support from church 
societies in Europe and the USA 

Mr Baransi was about to leave 
for Europe on a fund-raising tour 
when be was arrested on January 
12. We believe that better 
treatment of Mr Baransi could 
make a valuable contribution to 
Jewish- Arab relations. 

Yours etc, 

DAVID ASTOR. 

D.W.BOWETT, 
t TREVOR HUDDLESTON 
ANTHONY PARSONS, 

9 Cavendish Avenue, NWg. 
January 30. 



ON THIS DAY 


FEBRUARY 4, 1935 


The international Rugby Union 
season is now in full swing, as it 
was 51 yean ago ( then without 
France). It ended with Ireland at 
the top of the table with 4 points, 
England and Wales 3 each, and 
Scotland 2. the latter honing the 
consolation of winning the 
Calcutta Cup. Our correspondent 
was O.L Owen. 


RUGBY FOOTBALL 


SCOTLAND BEATEN 
AT CARDIFF 


AN AMAZING DROPPED 
GOAL 

FROM OUR RUGBY 
FOOTBALL 
CORRESPONDENT 

A drop-kick at a venture enabled 
Wales to beat Scotland at Cardiff on 
Saturday far one dropped goal and 
two tries (10 points) to two tries <6 
points). 

Scotland, in the broad sense, 
hardly could chim to have beat 
unJocfar. for their opponents, when 
playing against a strong wind, bad 
scored six points to throe and looked 
set for a mneb more decisive win 
miHl , just before half-time, a dreadful 
thing happened. D.W. Jones, the 
presiding genius of Rugby at the 
moment, Welsh and otherwise, in 
defending his goal line, was injured 
bo badly that he had to retire 
■inyih»r from the frpy. Against a 
temporarily demonised fourteen 
Scotland «w*nnp»d to draw level early 
in the second half, but Wales then 
recovered and used the wind so wed 
that the Scotsmen, for all the 
greatness of Beattie and others in 
the loose, not to mention the 
desperate and successful expedient of 
moving Shaw up into the stand-off 
position during the last quarter of an 
hour or so, mostly were pinned in 
then* own quarters, 

The dropped goal that d inched 
matters was an extraordinary 
achievement fay Jenkins, the full- 
back. who had ran up to cover a 
breakdown in the p e e ring on the left 
only to find «i«« m a tangU, 

Just when the slowness which had 
served him so badly on several 
p re v io us occasions was threatening a 
Scottish breakaway into the open 
graces behind him Jenkins effe ct ed a 
turn and - whether fay inspiration or 
in desperation is not for a mere : 
spectator to say - swung his leg and 
sent the twll damming over the 
croarinr. Tbe range was folly 40 
yards. Show and the Scottish 
forwards made the match exciting 
for the 10 mhnites that 
remained, but Wales kept their goal- 
line "fr by bard imIKh and long 

kirfcing to touch . ■ ■ 

If the Scottish kicking with a 
powerful wind b*i«l it bad been as 
good as their forward play Wales 
must have found it infinitely harder 
to set up the attacks that led to their 
two tries. The Gist sign that time 
was a weakness in the Scottish 
defence, however, came when Powell 
sent out a pass direct to Bassett, who 
rounded Johnston with ease and. 
having kicked ahead past Marshall, 
looked as if he would snatch a try in 
that way. It required a swift dash 
bed by Shaw to saw the situation 
by inches. Meanwhile Janesb dever 
running and kicking had e ncouraged 
the Welsh forwards to open up the 
game and 10 minutes after the kick- 
off it was a pass from a hne-out that 
sent Jones on his masterly dia g on al 
nm for the goal -line. Speeding ahead, 
yet ahrayB leaving a surprised 
defender a yard short of his right 
shoulder, Jones at last reached the 
goal-line fairly wide of the posts . . . 

A GREAT TRY 


Wales, moreover, were now on top 
for a bit at forward as we& as behind 
and inside a very few mi nu tes the 
backs as a body had gone into action 
and added the kind of try that 
promised more - perhaps even many 
more - to come. Passing from the 
scrummage firet of all sent Jones 
through a gap, and then Davey. The 
latter almost got home before he had 
to pass to Wooller. Here was some 
first-dass passing and two perfect 
OpfningL It atill mnimri U> rentie r 
little that Jenkins could not place 
goals against the wind... 

. . . Scotland recovered well from 
this shock and soon the forwards 
were fairly hammering at tbe Welsh 
line. One tremendous ran by Beattie 
led to another - a drop at goal by 
Grieve being charged down in the 
TiHqintjmg - >>n d. thu , Tbom got 
over and Shaw missed the place-kick 
from an angle. 

Wales were at sixes and sevens at 
the start of tbe second halt and 
when Dick kicked ahead Jenkins let 
the ball bounce so short of him that 
Beattie was able to pick up 
comfortably in hk stride and pass to 
Shaw. The latter's turn of speed did 
the rest, and. though tbe place- kick 
failed, Scotland were level and, apart 
from tbe wind, more than level — 

Two long shots at goal fay Day and 
Jenkins, the i>"» from a mark anH 
tbe other from a penalty and a gran d 
bash by Wooller further raised Welsh 
hopes before Jenkins, as already 
described, placed his side four points 
in final. .. 


WALES 

V.GJ. Jenkins (Bridgend), back; L 
Rees (Swansea). C. Davey (Swansea 
and Sale) (captain), W. Wooller 
(Cambridge University), and A. 
Bassett (Aberavon), three-quarter 
backs: C.W. Jones (Cambriee 
University) and WJC. Powefl (North! 
ampton), half-backs; L Day (Swan- 
sea), C. Murphy (Cross Keys), T 
Rees (Newport), D. Thomas (Swan- 
sea) T. WjffiamB (Cross Keys), J. 
Lang (ZJaxwfly), AJIL Rees (Cam- 
bridge University) and A Fear 
(Newport), forwards. 

SCOTLAND 


K.W. Marshall (Edinburgh 
Academicals), back: W.G. Johnston 
(Cambridge University), RCA. Dick 
(Guy’s Hospital), R.W. Shaw (Cam- 
bridge University), three-quarter 
becks; (IF. Grieve (Kelso), J. Beattie 
(Hanriek), WJL Burnet (West of 
Scotland), DA. Tbom (London 
Scottish), JA. Waters (Selkirk) and 
LB. Lamhfe (Glasgow High School 
F -P ) fo rwartb 

REFEREE - F.W. Hasten (Ireland). 


Three-legged race 


From Mr Maurice Ross 
Sir. The isle of Man an English 
island, forsooth (1 across, 
yesterday’s crossword). I hope 
that “Fortress Wapping” proves 
equal to the task when your 
Manx readers take to the 
longboats. 

Yours faithfully. 

MAURICE ROSS. 

18 Fieldway, Hoole. Chester. 
January 31. 


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inc. mvicj i U auA t ftBKiJAKt 4 iyao 



COURT AND SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

SANDRINGHAM 
February 3: The Queen, 
Honorary Air Commodore, 
visited Royal Air Force 
Marftam today. 

Having been received by the 
Station Commander (Group 
Captain P.C- Norriss). Her 
Majesty visited 57 Squadron in 
the No. I Hangar and later 
visited the Air Traffic Control 
Building. 

The Queen then visited the 
Sergeants' Mess and sub- 
sequently honoured the Station 
Commander with her presence 
at an ail-ranks luncheon in the 
Officers' Mess. 

In the afternoon. Her Maj- 
esty visited the Nursery School 
and afterwards opened the 
Married Families' Club and 
unveiled a commemorative 
plaque. The Queen then met 
the Crews who took pan in the 
1985 Strategic Air Command 
Bombing ana Navigation Com- 
petition and visited the San- 
dringham Centre. 

Mrs John Dugdale. Mr 
Kenneth Scott and Lieutenant- 
Colonel Blair Sreward-Wilson 
were in attendance. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, 
President of World Wildlife 
Fund-International, left Royal 
Air Force Marham this morn- 


ing in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight for Switzerland 

where His Royal Highness will 
address the European Manage- 
ment Forum Foundation at a 
Plenary Session of its 1986 
Svmposium in Davos. 

'Squadron Leader Timothy 
Finneron is in attendance. 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
February 3: The Pnnce and 
Princess of W** ^ attended 
Evensong in Westminster Ab- 
bey followed by a Reception in 
the Banqueting House. White- 
hall. to mark the Anniversary 
of 100 years of lay participation 
in the central councils of the 
Oiurch of England-. 

Miss Anne Beckwith-Smith, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Jack 
Stenhouse and Lieutenant- 
Colonel Brian Anderson were 
in attendance. 


the life of His Honour "fudge 
Christopher Hilliard will be 
held today at St Sepulchre- 
witbout-Newgaie at 5pm. 

A service of thanksgiving for 
the life and work of. His 
Honour Brian Gibbens. QC, 
will be held in Gray's Ion 
Chapel tomorrow at 4.45pm. 

A service of thanksgiving for 
the life of Peter Curtis wfll be 
held at St Margaret's. 
Loth bury. EC2. on Monday, 
February 10. at noon. 


Luncheon 


HM Government 
Baroness Young, Minister of 
State for Foreign and 
Commonwealth Affairs, was 
host yesterday at a farewell 
luncheon at Lancaster House in 
honour of the High Commis- 
sioner for Guyana. Among 

Hon Sir Eustace Cabas. Sir peter 

Mi rah all. Mr and Mrs S D Lawrence. 

Mr ana Mrs Amok) Nactmuuxxr. Mr 

and M» Alan Forster. Mr and Mrs 

□avid josop. Mr Maurice Chandler. 

Mr Allan Ramsay and Mr Rouen 

Barnett. 


Das. chairman. 

pore Trade Development Board. 

No Pock Too. political secretary to Ihe 

Prune Mntfsiei and deputy director. 

National Trade Unions Council. Mr 

Cheons Choong Kona, managing 
rti reel or. Singapore Airline*. Mr John 


Ye®, chairman. Singapore 

DeieJopmi-ni Board. Mr Lee Suan- 


Hiang. director (Europe). Singapore 
Economic Development Board. Mr 
George Teo. chairman. J M Sassoon 
and Company Ply. Singapore. Mr Tan 
Eng Soon, managing director. Tan 
Chong and Sons MotorfS) Ply. Stag* 
pore. 

Mr Denis Child, deputy group chief 
executive. National Westminster Bank 
pic. Mr Guy Check etis. deputy- chair- 
man and managing director. Hawker 
Siddeley International. Mr Tam 
Eassie. chief executive. Roiorv pic. Mr 
Jim Fitzpatrick, chairman, the Mersey 
Docks and Harbour Company. Mr 
Terry Harrison, chief executive. 
Northern Engineering Industries pic. 

Mr Daniel Hodson. financial director. 

Unlgatr pic. Mr John Lloyd, deputy 

managing director. Portals Holdings 
pic. Sir Patrick Meaney. chairman. 
The Rank Organisation pic. Mr David 
Millar, executive director. Standard 
Chartered pic. Mr Dick RlngwaM. 
chairman. Laporte Industries Holdings 
Pic. Mr Pratt Thompson, chairman. 
A i DCOM international pic. Mr Chris- 
topher Powell -Smith, managing part- 
ner. McKenna and Company. Sir John 
WiDiams. chairman of lhe board of 

governors. Commonwealth Instirute. 

Representing Peat Marwick 
were Sir John Grenside. Mr 
Jim Butler, Mr John Adcock 
and Mr Chris Sneath from the 
UK practice and Mr Keith Tay 
and Mr Victor 
Ng from the Singapore prac- 
tice. 

Birthdays today 

Vice-Admirat Sir Peter 
Ashmore. 65; the Hon Sir Clive 
Bossom. 68: Dr P.E. Thomp- 
son Hancock. 82: Sir Robert 
Haslam, 63; Mr R.C. Hoban, 
61; Mr Erich Leinsdorf. 74; 
Lord Shawcross. QC, 84; Dr 
Hugh Sinclair, 76; Dame Mabel 
Tylecoie, 90. 

Church news 

Canon Stephen Smalley. Pro-, 
centor of Coventry Cathedral, 
to be additionally Vice-Provost 


Dinners 

Overseas Bankers' Club 
The Lord Mayor and the 
Sheriffs were present last night 
at the annual dinner of the 
Overseas Bankers' Cub held at 
Guildhall. Sir Timothy Be van. 
president of the club, was in 
the chair and the principal 
speaker was M Jacques de 
Larosiere. Mr Robin Leigh- 
Pemberton. Governor ot the 
Bank of England, also spoke. 
Inter-Parliamentary Union 
Mr David Crouch. MP. Chair- 
man of the British Group of 
the Inter-Parliamentary Union, 
was host a a dinner held at the 
Athenaeum Hotel yesterday in 
honour of a parliamentary 
delegation from Poland, led by 
Mr Mieczyslaw F. Rakowski, 
Vices Marshal of the Sejm. 

Peat Marwick 
Brigadier-General Lee Hsien 
Loong. Minister of State for 
Trade and Industry and for 
Defence of Singapore, was the 
guest of honour at a dinner 
held by Peat Marwick at the 
Berkeley Hotel on Thursday 
night- Among the guests were: 

IX Ho Guan Um. hmd Commissioner 
IOT Singapore. Sir Hamilton Wtiyte. 


Forthcoming 
marriages 

Mr S.D. Ball 
tutd Miss S. Hanprnn 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, only son of] 
Mr and Mrs D.R. Ball, 
of Camelford. north ComwalL ■ 
and Susan, only daughter of Mr I 
and Mrs L.T. Hampson, of I 
Cardiff. South Wales. 

Mr RJi. Green 
and Miss SJL. Hum page 
The engagement is announced i 
between Richard, only son of) 
Mr and Mrs F.C- Green, of) 
Bournemouth. Dorset and Su- 1 
san. only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs T.E. Hum page, of] 
BrickhilL Bedford. 

Mr JJLB. Benin 
and Captain S-F. Parker, I 
RAMC 

The engagement is announced 
between James, son of Mr and 
Mrs M.G.M. Be van. of] 
Longstowe. Cambridgeshire, 
and Susan, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs A.V. Parker, of Appleton, 
Cheshire. 

Marriages 

Mr G.W. Swainson 
and Mrs A. Bittner 
The marriage took place oo 
January 11, in Melbourne, 
between Mr Geoffrey Swainson 
and Mrs Anne Bittner (nee du 
Vail on). 

Mr J.C. Robinson 
and Miss N. KembaJI 
The marriage look place on 
January 25. 1986. at St 

Etheldreda's. Ely Place. ECU 
between Mr James Robinson, 
son of Chris and Margaret 
Robinson, of Nazeing. and 
Miss Nicola Kemball, daughter 
of John and Rachel Kemball, 
of Vila Praia de Ancora, 
Portugal. 

Judge Starforth Hitt, QC 
and Mrs WJL Stavert 
The marriage took place on 
January 31, 1986. in Hamp- 
shire, between Judge Ian 
Starforth Hitt, QC. and Mrs 
Wendy Elizabeth Stavert. 



OBITUARY 


DICK JAMES 
Force in pop music 
publishing 


Middlesex 
snatch win 

There was an exciting finish to 
the final of the Croydon Bridge 
Championship teams event 
held at Fairuekl Halls, Croy- 
don over (he weekend when a 
Kent team, captained by A.D. 
Price, winners for the past two 
years, were overtaken by one 
victory point in the last round 
by Arthur Robert Robinson. N. 
VaiL N. Selway. and A.M.G. 
Thompson of Middlesex. 

ChampAmhip teams: 

R. RoMnsoa. N. Van. N. Selway. 
A. mg. Thompson CMJddJwexL toe 
A.D. Price. B.M. Uptwird. T.P. GkJid- 
smlUi. G.B. Soper (Kent) 144 
Secondary I earns: 

Mrs r.f. A bsalom. NXJLDavies. J.C 
Street. D-Beever (Surrey) 

D.W. Patterson (Simeil. LPayn, D. 
Clinch- R-Burhentan tKent) 

Mixed pairs: 

w. Durden. Mrs M. Wood. 336 
BTerneyhaugh. Mrs A. Flntumn. 

Mr A Mrs P SouDkhi. 3t9 
R A. Oliver. Mis E. WhUehome. 310 


New lease 
of life for 
lavatory 

By Charles Kneritt 
Architecture Correspondent 
A disused Victorian pub- 
lic convenience in Lille 
Road Park,Fulham, west 
London, is being con 
verted into an architect' 
office by Paul Brookes 
Associates for their own 
use. 

The London Boroough 
of Hammersmith and 
Fulham offered their 
redundant loo for lease- 
hold sale last March 
because of the installa- 
tion of a new “super 
loo“.Mr Paul Brookes 
acquired the lease with 
an option to purchase 
the freehold and expects 
to move into what will 
be known as The Old 
Conveniences next 
month. 

The converted loo will 
provide) ust over l,000sq 
ft of offices for the staff 
of five 


Science report 


Computer aids diabetes diagnosis 


By Bill Johnstone, Technology Correspondent 

A method of diagnosing the with type IL, or adult-onset, laboratory samples and the 
early metabolic changes in diabetes are overweight If we 
me human body which are can identify people who show 
■ lOKalors of a pre-diabetic early signs of developing the 
state has been developed in disease , we could advise 
California using computer them to keep their weight 


science techniques. 

A computer model which 
simulates the body's metabo- 
lism has been developed at 
the University of Southern 
California School of Medi- 
cine. The computer program 
allows accurate 

diagn os is. replacing the com- 
plicated techniques used at 
present. 

Professor Richard 
Bergman, professor of 


down . Perhaps we could treat 
them, too, with drugs that 
reverse insulin resistance; 

"Another application is to 
screen women on the piQ, 
since oral contraceptives ap- 
pear to exacerbate pre-di- 
abetic symtoms in some 
women". 

The USC test requires the 
patient be injected with glu- 
cose and 12 blood samples 
are taken over a three- hour 


P R l0 F biophysics. 

a*d insulin in the sampleTare 


says 

earlier screening of large 
numbers of people. 

Earlier detection, the 
researchers believe, will pre- 
vent the development of overt 
diabetes. 

Professor Bergman says: 
"About 80 per cent of people 


detected in laboratory tests 
and then the data "fed" into 
the computer model, which 
took five years to develop. 

It is able to determine the 
exact level of insulin secretion 
and the insulin behaviour in 
the body. The computer 
analyses the data from the 


model shows whether the; 
pancreas is releasing enough 
insulin and how responsive 
the body is to that release. 
Diabetes can develop Cram 
the pancreas fading to secrete 
enough insulin to regulate the 
level of sugar in the blood or 
when the secreted insulin 
proves to be ineffective. 

There are about 12 million 
diabetics in the United States 
and Britain. 

Says Professor Bergman: 
"Large groups of people are 
at risk. Because the disease 
can be controlled by insulin, 
some people think it's cur- 
able. It is not And it has 
terrible king-term effects. It 
leads to kidney failure and 
vascular disease, and it is the 
leading cause of blindness in 
the United States". 

"These and other complica- 
tions occur even when di- 



abetes is controlled by 

insulin, so it is important to _ . 

develop earlier and better I Rector of Warden, Kent in 
treatments". I 1953. 


Oldest priest 
dies at 106 

The Rev H. Clement Wil- 
liams, aged 306, who died 
yesterday at his home in 
Canterbury, was believed to 
be the oldest Anglican 
yman. He was ordained 
at St Paul's Cathedral 81 
years ago. Much of his 
working life was spent in 
London and he retired as 


Outlet sought in 
lakes dispute 


By Hugh Clayton, Environment Correspondent 
Ministers are trying to ab °ve erowti level 

defuse a dispute about res- ^ 
ervoir safety which has led to °* rne, | °* lakes bolding more 
some owners threatening to ^ five million gallons of] founded his own company, 
drain ornamental lakesbefore water to accept and pay for| Dick James Music (DIM) 

safety precautions laid down 


Dick James, who died of a 
heart attack in London at the 
weekend at the age of 65. was 
an influential pop music 
publisher who played a for- 
mative role in the early 
career of Elton John whom 
he sighed up, with lyricist 
Bernie Taupin, when both 
men were unknowns. 

Reckoned one of the 
shrewdest music publishers 
in Britain, James also had a 
hand in helping the Beatles 
and many other leading pop 
names of the Sixties, to fame 
and fortune. But last year he 
was bested in the High Conn 
by his principal protege when 
he lost a legal battle over 
royalties to Eton John. 

James began his career as a 
singer himself m a north 
London dance band, when he 
was in bis teens. At 17 he was 
a full blown professional 
singing at the Cricklewood 
Palais and he soon graduated 
to sing with Henry HalL 

After the war came top 
billing with orchestras like 
Gerald a, and then, on the 
threshold of the pop era, be 
became a member of The 
Siaigazers group in the early 
FifuesThrough them, be was 
beard widely on radio. 

Nevertheless at this period, 
perhaps his greatest claim to 
fame was his singing the 
theme song to the television 
series Robin Hood which 
starred Richard Greene.Birt 
singing for Robin Hood was 
decisive to his career in 
another sense, as it was 
through the recording 
session's producer, George 
Martin, that James was 
subsequently to meet the 
Beatles. 

James had already derided 
not to prolong his career as a 
vocalist and in 1953 had 
gone into music publishing 
with Sydney Bron. Eleanor 
Bron's fatherJn 1961 he 



tougher safety rules are im- 
posed in ApriL 

The conflict centres on the 
difference between remote 
lakes and reservoirs from 
which a flood through a burst 
wall would pose no threat to 
human life and those near 
towns and villages from 
which a flood could swamp 
homes and streets. 

The long-running dispute 
between landowners and 
ministers was made more 
sensitive last year by the 
burst and subsequent flood in 
northern Italy that claimed 
hundreds of lives. 

Now Mr John Fatten, 
Minister of State at the 
Department of the Environ- 
ment responsible for water 
supplies, has agreed to write 
to engineers' professional in- 
stitutes about landowners' 
fears. 

New rules due to start in 
April will cover about 2,000 
lakes and reservoirs with 


by inspecting engineers. 

The Country Landowners' 
Association, which represents 
many lake owners, wants Mr 
Patten to tell the engineers 
that their safety standards are 
unnecessarily tough. 

The rules will also make it 
more expensive to dram 
lakes under independent 
supervision, so that some 
owners may drain lakes 
before April unless there is a 
settlement with engineers. 

No lives have ban lost in 
Britain from a lake burst 
since 1925, but there were six 
incidents classed as 
“emergencies" as recently as 
1969. 

The association would not 
name owners who had threat- 
ened to drain lakes, but said 
many felt that the new rules 
would force them to pay for 
safety work that was un- 
necessary because their lakes 
woe too remote for a burst 
to pose a risk to life. 


with which he was to make 


his fortune through his astute 
recognition of the talents of 
the then obscure Elton John. 

Then, in 1962, George 
Martin introduced himn to 
Brian Epstein, who was 
Hying to sell an unknown 
Liverpool group to an indif- 
ferent ' London. James, in , 
another udent-spotting coup- 
d'areilfe, recognised the 
Beaties' potential and fixed 
them a television appearance 
after their first Pariophone 
release. Thereafter he set up a 
company. Northern Songs, to 
publish Lennon and 

McCartney's compositions, 
launching himself onto a 
course which was to make 
him a millionaire. 

During these years he 
handled a host of other top 
names including Billy J. 
Kramer, Gerry and the Face- 
makers and Cilia Black. 

But last year Elton John 
sued his publisher over the 
level of royalties from his 
songs and after a six month- 
long legal action a high coui?. 
judge ruled in November that 
John and his songwriter 
Bernie Taupin were entitled 
to a greater income from a 
publishing, recording and 
management agreement they 
had signed with DJM in 1967 
when they were 'young and 
inexperienced. 


PROF ERSKINE WRIGHT 


Professor Erskine Wright, 
who died on January 27 at 
the age of 83, was Professor 
of Humanity ai the Univer- 
sity of St Andrews from 1948 
to 1962^ a classical scholar 
who devoted a long and 
fruitful professional life to 
the cause of the universities 
and the imparting of tra- 
ditional learning to the 
young. 

Bom in 1902 in Stirling in 
the house in which he lived 
until his death, Thomas 


was thus placed centrally and 
benevolently in the univer- 
sity scene in Scotland until 
bis final retirement in 1969. 

In particular he served on 
the founding body of the 
University of Stirling which 
awarded him an Honorary 
Doctorate in 1984. 

As a teacher he mfluencec . 
many, and they still speak at 
St Andrews of his last lecture 
in General Humanity, an 
occasion of rumbustious 
good humour on which he 


Erskhne Wright, son of two ' disbursed the class certifi- 


University news 


Oxford 

Elections 

Richard S.Dtmn, of Pennsylva- 
nia University, US, to be 
Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth 
professor of American history, 
in succession to the [ate 
Professor Herbert G.Gutman. 

BRASENOSE COLLECT; 

Own oxIUMUons tat law; c MOT. 
formerly of wouur hC for Boys. 
ggnmo nyrof the collage: G Mead. 

monar. ■ 

Ope n a cftolarsMpa tn maOmaUcs: P 
Brartrfuw. SI Aldan's RC School 
Sunderbund. rXIUbOtonar: M Ellta. 
P**r Symonds College. Wtert wm ar. 
commoner: open exhibition In 
mathematics: S-WeUtam. Luton Sixth 
rorm toiiegn 

MAGDALEN COLLEGE 

FeOowsMiM tn modem Mstory: J0W 
Nightingale. of Magdalen and Merton 
from January 22: MtTmTJ Webber, 
of Somerville and. WoHsoci. from 
October 1: frtkr^sblp kijaDonmtiy: 
Dr Gfl GEkil of SI Om (ram 
January 22. 

ST PETER'S COLLEGE 
Beccnam Pharmaceutical award for 
Omnany: SA FretwHL formerly of 
AshvtUe College. Harrogate, ex- 


SctmoLTUbe HflL London: Easier 
term. DC Morgan, at Norwich Cttyf 
Goucge. 
rorfc 
Grata 

Ecooornic artd Soda! Research Qoan- 
dL £58.87a la Professor MJ Chad-I 
wtofcta Shaw add nut In Europe and 
U»e development of regkwxaUy co- 
ordmafal tunlniinii policies. 

WOTtd WDdnfe Fund: £168.976 to Dr I 
D. Selby to research maximizing me 

educational efforts of envtrouinental/ 

devetapmeni educators. 

Manchester 
Appointments 

Sebjor Jechaera: Dr SL Schor (bade 
denial sciences and ora) oncology!: Dr 
S nrorh imanteroancjl naUaOerf. Dr 

R H artley (Optranopal research in : 

matnemam) from October I: Or H 

Sf55SSS‘SM^S3. Mr 


generations of the manse, 
exhibited all those qualities 
for which Soots scholars have 
been celebrated- A brilliant 
career as a pupil at Stirling 
High School and later at the 
University of Glasgow, cul- 
minated m a First in Hon- 
ours Mods and Literae 
Humaniores at Balliol Col- 
lege Oxford, in 1928. 

Among other honours he 
bad also won the 
Chancellor's Prize for both 
Latin Prose and Verse. 

Appointed an Official Fel- 
low of Queen’s College. 
Oxford, he remained there 
for 20 years as, in turn. 
Classical Tutor and Senior 
Tutor. 

Elected to the chair at St 


cates with kenspeckle 
showmanship. 

Although be extolled the 
virtues of what he rightly 
called ’the master language of 
western Europe' as being 
highly relevant to the 
precisions necessary to life 
today, he was no dryasdust 
scholar or technical ignora- 
mus. A man, whose head was 
more often seen in public 
stuck under a car bonnet 
than in a volume of classical 
literature, must necessarily . 
excite admiration for thev 
technologkal virtues of an 
education based on the stern 
virtues of Latin prose 
unseens. 

He often walked the hills of 


Andrews in 1948, he was for his beloved West Highlands, 
a time Dean of the Faculty of as he walked the heights of 

A rfc •art/i in IQCd nn«> a — 71 i - _ 


LertunersDr LC Best (eeH Motowk I 
and CP Bradley (general pracaawT j 

Exeter 

Grants 

Government of Oman: 
£425,000 to the Centre for 
Arab Golf Studies to develop 
study of the economics of the 
Gulf 


Arts and in 1954 was 
appointed to the University 
Grants Committee. 

Retiring early from his 
chair in 1962 he became 
Secretary and Treasurer of 
the Carnegie trust for the 
Universities of Scotland and 


classical literature with his 
favourite poet, Horace, yet he 
was never afraid to descend 
fo the market place to engage 
in the aflairs of men in the 
defence of the standards and 
tradition of liberal education 
so dear to the Scots. 


EDWARD BEBERMAN 


Cambridge 

Elections 

_ CORPUS CHFUSTI COLLECT 
School . teacher fellow 

comraofMnMneMlcliaehnas term. RJ 
MannK. of Crown Woods School. 
ERham. London: Lent Turn. Ruth t 


Edward Hibernian, the Therefore in 1953 a group 
American artist whose mu- called the Native Sons of the 

«udy en gineering faiume* and te i rals were -investigated for Golden West, which had set 

$j3s£: Dr 1 possible subversive content, itself to root out any subveiv 

dSS »*£S»k£i for^SiSSSf SPaS I during the witch hunts of the si on which might have at- 

McCartfay era in the 1950s, “ ’ ‘ *“ 


SSSSK SPSSS 

"is ad 


falims 


CM 

to 

Bw 


suborn toed MTUhrOc auaijw».«il 

Military of Defence: £ 42.923 
Professor jc Kfaon tar Jta| 
wort into Um unvatM of 


Webb, of Si Marta -fn-Ehe-Fleita High, well super tatocea. 


CHRISTIE’S WEEK IN VIEW- 

A selection from our 18 sales in London this week. 

English Drawings and Watercolours: Tuesday 
4 February at 1030 a.m.. King Street: Hunting scenes, 
landscape, foreign travel, botany caricature; all these 
especially English traits are represented in this comprehensive 
sale. A verdant tnewoJBalmoralby Ebenezer W. Cook, and 
Robert Waite’s Harvesters lunching show contrasting views of 
Victorian Britain. Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones’s Raising of 
Lazarus and John Dawson Watson's Bathers represent the 
more academic tradition. 

Continental Pictures of the 19th and 20th 
Centuries: Friday 7 February at 11 a.m-. King Street: 
This sale embraces most types of 19th century painting, from 
the sentimental pastiche of the ‘Cardinal School’ to the 
healthily efficient nordic nudes in chilly landscapes. The 
traditional Dutch view of landscape is represented by Pieter 
Kluyver’s Landscape until Haarlem beyond, while The Prisoners 
by Eugenio Lucas y Padilla is a gloomy but impressive 
Govaesque work. A view- of Cologne Cathedral fay Vincent • 
Gormer, 1890, with paddle boats steaming at their pier, is an 
impressive work. 

Fine British Ceramics: Monday 10 February at 
11 a ju. and 2.30 p.tn.. Ring Street: The catalogue cover 
rightly tearures an extremely rare Bow blue-and- white ink- 
pot. inscribed Made: at New Canton 1750; with an estimate of 
j£l0,000 to £ 15,000. It has pride of place in an interesting 


sale which ranges from medieval wares to die sophisticated 
products of Chelsea, Derby and Spode, most with that 
charming quality which distinguishes much of British 
ceramics in the 18th century. This charm is well shown in the 
Wedgwood basalt model of Hogarth's dog ‘Trump’ after 
Roubiliac's model, a version of which was seen at Christie's 
in the Wedgwood sale in 1781. 

An Important Collection of French 
Paperweights: Tuesday 11 February at 11 ajm.. King 
Street: Eighty-six examples of this shortlived art form 
which — almost literally — flowered in the mid- 1 9th century, 
are the most important group to be seen on the market for 
many years. It is a comprehensive collection, ranging in 
value from a few hundred pounds to the heights of a possible 
,£iX>,00D expected for a St. Louis, pink-ground Hly-ot-the- 
valley weight which is an apparendv unique example. 

Viewing: King Street: Weekdays 9 a.m.-4.45 p.m. 

Enquiries: (01) 839 9060 

South Kensington: Mondays 9 a.m.-7 p.m. 

Tuesday to Friday 9 a.m. -4 .45 p.m. 

Enquiries: (01) 581 7611. 

Christie’s have 22 local offices in 
the U-K. If you would like to know 
the name of your nearest representative, 
please telephone Caroline Trefltgarne on 
(01) 588 4424. 



Latest wills 

£1 million for 
art galleries 

Miss Aileen Beatrice 
Woodroflfe, of Wiicbampton, 
Dorset, left estate valued at 
£1,075.947 netAAer various 
Personal bequests, she left the 
residue to the National Art 


Collections Fond for the pur- 
chase of works of an (other 
than, contemporary ones) by 
English galleries and museums. 

Mr Charles Douglas-Home, I 
of London NW, Editor of 
The Timei from 1982 to I 
1985. left estate valued at 
£197,193 net. 



died at bis home in Holly- 
wood Hills on January 27. 
He was 81. 

Biberman, whose work was 
noted for its stark realism, 
had arrived in Los Angeles in 
1936 and in 1939 was chosen 
to execute two murals for the 
Federal Building's post office. 

However his brother Her- 
bert, was one of the Holly- 
wood 10 group of writers 
who were jailed during the 
McCarthy period for what 
were thought to be 
unacceptably left wing 
convictions, and it was felt 
that Edward's work, too, 
warranted scrutiny to ensure 
its political 


tached itself to government 
property, inspected 
Biberm an’s work at the post 
office, but after due consid- 
eration, declared it free of 
leftist infiltration. 

When the post office was 
eventually moved from the 
building in 1964, the murals 
were carefully taken down 
and stored, on account of 
their artistic merit. 

Biberraan’s work was 
represented in many museum 
collections in 
the United Slates and his life- 
stze portraits of Lena Horae 1 
H*™ 1 *** were 
purchased by the Smilhso- 
nian Insmutution’s National 
Portrait Gallery. 


SIR GRAHAM ROWLANDSON 

Sir Graham senior committees of the 
Greater London Council 
He was chairman of En- 
for 

1 940-42 and was at sometime 
connected with 


Rowl3ndson,MBE4P,FCA. 

• has died aged 77 . Apart from 
conducting the aflairs of his 
chartered accountant practice 
and. the Rowlandson 
organisation, he dedicated 
most of his lifetime to public 
life, mainly centering around 
local government and medi- 
cal appointments. 

For the past 40 years he 
had conducted his lire from a 
wheel chair having con- 
tracted poliomyelitis. . V eam nr* hi- ■ *«■ — r 

Amongst his dozens of of 

appointments the most im- RMionaJ nS:^! c l rop ^'’ t ^ 

portam were as a Common from?9v> Boa tf* 

Councihnan of the City of e£si ^"1974 " ceased ^' 

London from 1961 until his 11 £■ ' 

-- ‘tealb and he also became h* proud claim that 

mg sent to 35,000 schools m Britain I chairman of the Finance J5,/ ,ad I / or ^ctal years oast 

(ftoSgraph: Chris Hams). I Committee and ^any^ ^ *e ^longest 


evey?s 

committee of the Middlesex 
bounty Council of which he 
Became chairman. He was 
also High Sherriff of Middle- 
sex in 1958. 

His connection with medi- 
cal matters centered for 22 


Duncan Goodhew, the Olympic swimmer, 

launch a scheme yesterday which offers op to 

worth of free sports equipment to schools. Details of the 
offer are bein 


* 



f' 

\ 

to 








% 


~ / Mr ^ 1 » 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 


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THE ARTS 


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Television 

Battling 

bugs 

Supexbugs versus wonder- 
drugs was die theme of last 
night’s Horizon documentary 
on BBG2, which reported on 
the contamination of half the 

hospitals in Melbourne by a 
strain of staphlococcus which 
was resistant to almost afl 
known antibiotics. 

The programme was not 
intended as a companion to 
the previous week’s history of 
the discovery of penicillin, 
but there is a degree of logic 
in .screening them as a ‘pair, 
the Fifties and early Sixties, 
when it seemed that infec- 
tious disease might be elimi- 
nated, doctors are now facing 
the possibility that the bene- 
fits of the antibiotic revolu- 
tion have been squandered 
by over-prescription, and that 
the virulent “Golden Staph** 
will be merely the first of a 


Galleries 

Lively professionalism 
among the primitives 



" JUWWJ UM' HIM ui tt 

.*! - generation of microbes 


( which, far -from being con- 
v : ;d tr.^ ■ trolled by drugs, thrive on 
them. 

,* **« - Since 1977, when the 
^st widespread presence of “Gol- 
: . n ' den Staph” was acknowl- 
ed 8 ed “ Melbourne, the 
■ -‘-nn t- cit y' s laigEst hospital has 
Jj ln * St waged war on the microbe by 
^ old-fashioned but effective 
Pt methods — strenuous pursuit 
tq-' of sterile procedures, cease- 
‘ ^ v less monitoring and in- some 
!. * ,a tttS - cases the modification of 
r . . Uur tai,; hospital installations to ™iw 
. r gi^jui lb,! . disinfection easier. It cost 
x t $2m in the laundry alone. 

The professor of micro- 
- ^ort^, biology who spearheaded the i 

" ’ •‘n operation happily has a 


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-*cfeh*S robust Antipodean sense of 
- Srcfe' humour, and tectured with 
T'^r. t- the aid of sinks of arang- 
1 utans to demonstrate the 
:. h r. hijl' difficulty of communication 
: ir to pigheaded, petty-minded 
~"n:olir/>' medial staff He marvelled 
p,jjC that, in a situation in which 
^.,7: infection was widespread and 
v- 4 ,-; one-rixlh of infected patients 
died, doctors still behaved 
like prima donnas when 
■ asked to take preventive 

measures. 

, ■ Unlike the preceding pen- 

- ! ifjT' : icillin film, this documentary 
was discursive and at times 
. ' v dull, and chose to offer on- 
.... the-spot coverage of a ie- 
: newed outbreak of infection 

_ , rather than follow up some of 
“ ^ i- the more startling revelations 
>■- e — such as the length of rime 
^ the public was kept in 
: - T[r ignorance of the proWetn. 
Nevertheless it was a valu- 
able record of what mqy be 
- only the first stage" of' a; 
"te worldwide medical problem. 


CeEaBrayfield 


Whitechapel 
Open 1986 

\Miitechapel 

KenKiff 

Serpenti ne 

Renata Snrbone 
Quinton Green Hne 
Art 

Mark Wallingen 
Hearts of Oak 
Anthony Reynolds 

.The main lesson to be learnt 
from this year's Whitechapel 
Ope; exhibition, - at the 
Whitechapel Art Gallery until 
February 16, is the extraor- 
dinary variety of styles and 
approaches available to 
today’s artists, almost all of 
them equally acceptable to 
. critical orthodoxy. If this 
makes the practice of art 
sound rather like putting 
together a meal from the sdf 
service counters of a cafe- 
teria, the impression 
sometimes seems not too far 
wide of the mark. On the 
other hand, it is probably, 
preferable to the situation up 
to the quite recent past, when 
a readier metaphor might be 
that of selecting what to wear 
from a dictatorial conturiec. 
The freedom of the moment 
can be abused, but at least it 
malcfts fix' stimulatingly un- 
predictable viewing. . . 

So, this year m White- 
chapel, you . can find tire 
visual mdodramatics of the 
German and Italian Neo- 
Expressionists next to the 
camp Neo-Classical pastiche* 
of Pittura Colta, hard-edged 
Sixtyish abstraction,- splashy 
Rftyish Abstract Expression- 
ism and tranquil; Seven tyish 
Minimalism all jumbled to-, 
gether,- and the relics of Fop 
Art on the same wall as 
. meticulous Photorealism. 
Frequently, as one would 
expect with primarily young 
artists, the smeerest form of 
flattery is aD too visible — a 
splash of Kiefa- here, a glow 
bfUglow there, a heavy dose 
of Auerbach... But the 
overall' effect is imderibhiy. 
Hvdy, and unexpectedly po- 
fossiopaL 

. Unexpectedly, because the . 
old image of the Whitechapel 


Open was of a Polytechnic 
self-educative kind of art, 
most of it from amateur or 
Sunday painters in the local- 
ity. Bin, though there has 
been, preaxmaixy, no dim- 
inution in the gallery’s 
crusading fervour about 
bringing art to the people and 
the people to art, the last 
seven or eight years have 
seen a gigantic influx of 
professional artists into the 
area, in search of inexpensive 
studio space. Consequently, 
the natural balance of toe 
potential exhibitors has 
changed, and now the hand- 
ful of Sunday painters left 
(plus this year some invited 
child-art from local schools) 
look more and more like a 
token of purely historical 
significance. Unless, that is, 
the majority of the East End 
primitives have become in- 
distinguishable from the pro- 
fessionals, or vice versa, in 
the present stylistic mish- 


it would be quite con- 
ceivable, for example, that a 
genuine primitive could paint 
one or two pictures like Ken 
Kiff, a middle-generation art- 
ist (SO last year) who is at 
present being necongnized 
with a well-deserved 
retrospective at the Ser- 
pentine Gallery (until Feb- 
ruary 23). The difference is 
that -a primitive, necessarily 
hit-or-miss in his effects, 
might marrafp * ft pnnff or 
twice, bat Kiff has been 
painti ng with a maz i ng consis- 
tency, and an amazing ly high 
rate of success, for more than 
20 years now. He even 
proves to be one of the 
relatively few artists who 
benefit from showing in bulk: 
bis curious world of private 
Symbolism, full of dwarfs and 
monsters and anthro- 
pomorphic animals and 
plants, can seem arbitrary in 
small doses, but assumes an 
obsessive force and convic- 
tion when allowed to fill a 
whole gallery. 

Nor, perhaps, is it as 
private as it first appears — 
not, anyway, if you follow the 
teaching s of Jang. We learn 
from the catalogue that Kiff 
began to paint fantasy pic- 
tures in his mid-twenties 
(which could hardly have 
been more out of fashion 
around I960), but found the 
results .frightening and re- 
sorted to Jungum analysis. 
Through this he began paint- 
ing a lengthy sequence of 


John Perdval reports firoui Monte 
Carlo, wheretaflet^ flourishes again 


• ' -: i ‘ 


Once upon a time, and not so 
very Jong ago, the n a m e s 
Ballet and Monte Carlo were 
almost as dosdy linked as 
Shakespeare and Stratford. 
To restore such a condition is 
the ambitious purpose of a 
new ballet company just 
launched under what one 
gathers to be the very . active 
presidency of Princess Caro- 
fine of Monaco. It will not be 


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Times now are different 
from when IMaghilev found a 
refiige in the principality after 
. bring cut off from his 
Russian links. After 
Diaghilev's death, Monte 
Carlo was the nursery of both 
the rival companies whidi 
disputed supremacy as. his 
true successor during^ the 
Thirties. Later, Serge^Ufor 
and the Marquis de Cuev as 
successively launched compa- 
nies there in the middle 
Forties, and Anton jDohn 
( Him Lifer, a survivor from 
Diaghilev’s company) foood 
support for his struggling 

young Festival BaDet through 
the Fifties. 

Part of Festival Ballet’s 
problem was that die inspira- 
tion of Etiaghiley’s tows had 
marif ft more difficult tor a 
company to survive by tow> 
ing; a new generation pt 
national or regional compa- 
nies had appeared totakea 
grip on the maorkeL Fe^rval s 
breakthrou# came m Monte 
Carlo when its contribution 
to the wedding celebrations 
of Prince Rainier and Grace 
Kelly was televised all over 
Europe. 


Did the various ballet galas 
given around those nuptials 
play any part in. canting 
Princess Grace to dream » 

r " ig new life to Les Ballets 
Monte-Cado? The idea 
persisted, and Balanchine 
and Nuteyev were both, at 
different times, invited to 
direct the company. But it 
remained a dream until her 
daughter made it real. 

As joint directors* she 
chose the French ballerina 
Ghislaihe Thestnar and her 
choreographer . husband, 
Pierre Lacotte. They are best 
known in Britain for the 
production of La Sylphide 
which Paris Opera Ballet 
brought to Covent Garden in 
1982, although they did also 
work here staging and danc- 
ing more modem pieces as 
guests with Ballet Rambert in 
1966. 

They took with them to - 
Monaco two or three dancers 
from the Opria and recruited 
ot her s at auditions in Pans 
and New York. There are 37 
dancers m aH mostly young 
and premising, plus two 
“permanent guest st ars”, 
Tbesmar herself and Kevin 
Haigeou the American who n 
also the company’s principal 



At the one extreme, 
Lacotte has mounted Giselle 

using reproductions of the 

original 1841 settings, and 
costumes, and the attractive 
Pas de Six from La Vivah- 
ditre in Saint-Leon’s choreog- 
raphy of that period. At the 
same time he invited three 


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The temperature 
^ in Surrey 

today is 82° F 

Port Antonio Is in Surrey. J®^ ica - 

And rlghl now its warmer than 

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r Jamaica Tburisc 

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GhblaiaeThesnarasthe 
stylish woman m 24 Hearts 
de lane thou femme 

lesser-known choreographers 
to create an evening of new 
works. . . .... 

. One of Lacotte’s creations 
is particularly apposite to 
Monte Carlo, bring based on 
a short story by Stefan Zweig 
about a woman’s brief adven- 
ture there with a younger 
man whom she unsuccess- 
fully tries to wean away from. 
gambling . Lacotte has up- 
dated 24 Heures de la vie 
d’ime femme, by about 20 
years so that its main action 
zs set at the turn of the 
century, and Joaquin Tor- 
rents Llad6 7 s settings are a 
ravishingly pretty, series of 
femiliar landmarks as they 
once were: the "space outside 
the Casino (aria the Opera 
House) amazingly rural, for 
instance; with trees flourish- 
ing where lower blocks now 
loom. 

Unfortunately, Lacotte has 
not found a way in move- 
ment to . parallel Zwriffs 
device of framing the tale in 
a confession,, years later, 
brought on by a similar 
incident Tbesmar gives a 
stylish performance as the 
woman and Paul Chalmar 
brings an anguished intensity 
to the young man. With a 
pastiche - score by Herve , 
Niquet, 24 heures looks a 1 
Bute: thin spread over a full | 
evring; shortened and re- ; 
shaped from two acts into 
one . it - might make more 
impact. 


snail works — there are now, 
it seems, some 200 of them — 
and found that way a kind of 
coherent infrastructure for 
his work. Certainly the same 
figures tend to recur in the 
same apparently horrific 
situations: trees bristle with 
human Hwrfc monstrous 
women, even if labelled 
"'generous, frightening and 
serene", spout Wood or 
juggernaut down the sum 
Spreading death and disaster, 
and even in the psy- 
chiatrists’s office ghosts and 
ghouls break irresistibly 
through the w&H 

The images embodying fear 
or dislike of women have, of 
course, brought down a deal 
of feminist wrath on Kiffs 
bead — though ft is difficult 
to see why, if he is actually 
prey to these emotions, be 
. should not work them out in 
paint. But curiously enough, 
the overall effect of the show 
is not gloomy or violence- 
obsessed. In many ways 
Kiffs world is rather cheery: 
natural and supernatural, 
love and death, co-exist 
without a ppare n t problems, 
and his rich and strange 
colours really light up a drab 
winter day in Kensington 
Gardens. 

Renata Sorbose is two 
years younger than Ken Kiff 
and las been living ami 
working in London for the 
last 20 years. As can be seen 
from the show of recent 
works on paper at Quinton 
Green Fine Art until Feb- 
ruary 28, her approach is in 
its own way quite as single- 
minded and obsessive as 
Kiffs, and her style has 
evolved with equal disregard 
for passing fashi on. Her 
medium is pen-and-ink on 
paper, sometimes with added 
washes of colour, but usually 
stark black-and-white. Her 
visual world is constantly in 
fhuc rocks turn into people 
or people into rocks, her 
human nudes are covered 
with the scales of a reptile or 
a fish, or like Daphne seem 
to escape our inquisitive gaze 
by transforming themselves 
into trees. Even at her 
lightest, in the Archim- 
boldesque fantasia where by 
changing focus we can read 
feces and figures in the 
accidental conformations of 
natural - objects, she still 
manag es to distil a sense of 
existential unease. 

Apparently there is some 
specifically political concern i 


4 * i *- 


mmm 





*ir~ 

jit (t-i 'iS : Ti \.i.\ ,:VV33J 



involved in the creation of 
Surbone’s uncomfortable im- 
ages, but it would be impos- 
sible to guess just what it was 
without annotation. It is not 
too difficult to work out what 
in the outside world provokes 
Mark WaUmger’s indigna- 
tion, even were the title of his 


show at Anthony Reynolds 
(until February 17) not a 
dear pointer in 1986 no one 
could call a show Hearts of 
Oak without bitteriy ironic 
intent. 

In fact, much of the raw 
material of Wallingerfs com- 
plex images comes from 


Concerts 


Primitive or professional? — 
Jack Miller’s Cafe (Cups of 
Tea) at Whitechapel; and 
detail from Renata 
'Surbone’s Portrait 
Landscape^ Ilsussurro, 
reading face and figure into 
natural objects 

evocations of an England on 
the eve of the Industrial 
Revolution: Gainsborough’s 
Mr and Mrs Andrews posed 
in their ancestral acres, 
Stubbs’s harvesters, an 
anonymous print of some 
gentleman's seat in the Home 
Counties. These are re- 
produced on plywood or 
packing cardboard, then care- 
fully perverted or defaced to 
produce an image of a 
country going to the dogs, a 
society in decay or set to self- 
destruct. Not, 1 would imag- 
ine, that Wallinger is 
unaware of the anti-arcadian 
thesis embodied in John 
Barren's The Dark Side of the 
Landscape, but Blake’s Jeru- 
salem makes a useful stick 
with which to beat modem 
times. John 

Rnssell Taylor 

Theatre 


Rock 

ZZTop 

Civic Center, Lake 
Charles 

Although a low-profile start 
to their lengthy American 
tour, ZZ Top’s performance 
at this small lakeside town- 
ship in Louisiana was any- 
thing but understated. With a 
new stage-show and a re- 
vamped repertoire incorpo- 
rating much of the material 
from Afterburner , the Texans 
captivated and delighted an 
8,000 capacity crowd of their 
neighbours, using many 
imaginative and typically 
comic touches to highlight 
their increasingly sophisti- 
cated power rock format 

In dapper, matching long 
black coats, Billy Gibbons 
and Dusty Hill ranged the 
foreground hooking into ten- 
sile riffs and formation two- 
steps with thunder and an 
easy grace, while Frank Beard 
sat impassively at his leop- 
ard-skin -finished drum kit 
his headphones providing a 
dick-track to keep the tempi 
on perfect course. 

The use of backing tapes 
on many of the newer songs 
gave the sound a disiinctve 
textural edge, unique for a 
guitar trio; the thrumming 
synthesizer parts on “Legs” 
and “Sleeping Bag" and the 
lulling chords behind “Rough 
Boy" facilitated performances 
which were surprisingly faith- 
ful to the recorded versions. 

Following an extraordinary 
moment of cartoon drama 
when Gibbons and Hill, their 
matching fur-coated guitars 
twirling full-circle, effected a 
disappearing trick of which 
Paul Daniels would have 
been proud, the stage set 
changed from a giant rep- 
resentation of a hot-rod 
dashboard into that of a hi- 
tech spaceship command 
module, and the band re- 
appeared to play “Planet of 
Women". 

Perhaps their greatest tri- 
umph was to blend success- 
fully such pseudo-sci-fi 
imagery of the Eighties with a 
grand blues tradition as long 
as their beards, balancing the 
percussive oddities or the 
mysterious “Velcro Fly" 
against the heavy thud of 
“Jesus Just Left Chicago" 

Despite the muted critical 
reaction to Afterburner, in 
performance it is dear that 
ZZ Top have consolidated 
the monumental success of 
Eliminator with a body of 
new material which confirms 
their sense of purpose as an 
Eighties band while preserv- 
ing the integrity of their rock 
V roll heritage. 

David Sinclair 


F^vStoU ^ FeSivS HaU 317 Fine fit in Scottish clothing 


Two more victims of this 
winter Sunday night’s con- 
ductor and tenor soloist both 
fell 31 before the London 
Choral Society's Britten con- 
cert, Nicholas Oeobury and 
Kehh Lewis, who stepped in, 
gave us, 1 suspect, a some- 
what different Serenade for 
Tenor, Horn and Strings and 
Sr Nicolas from those we 
would have been offered by 
Richard Armstrong and An- 
thony Rolfe Johnson. But 
they were busy, intelligent 
and assured performances 
which amply redeemed the 
evening. 

The thought 1 of Rolfe 
Johnson’s warmly attuned 
responses to Britten’s Sere- 
nade poems and of Arm- 
strong's eagle-eyed projection 
of them had been irresistibly 
tempting: the experience of 
Lewis’s lucid musical mind 
and strong, polished tenor, 
and of Cleolmry’s h a n dli n g of 
the F.ngiish Chamber Or- 
chestra was both revealing 
and rewarding. The eyes, it is 
true, were pretty firmly glued 
to the music-stand, but some 
rare concentrated moments 
shot their way over the top to 
the audience. The “Noc- 
turne”, for example, with 
Michael Thompson, born, 
had a marvellous command 
of air and space and Lewis 
was able to capture the 
nervous desperation behind 
the .narcotic trance which 
Britten’s music points in 
Keats’s sonnet “To Sleep" 

No sooner had the hushed 
casket of Keats’s soul been 
scaled than his Hyperion was 
being evoked in a bright A 
major awakening. The vision 
of Apollo’s “limbs celestial” 
at the end of the poem had 
inspired Britten in his Ameri- 
can years to write a short 
piece called Young Apollo for 
piano, string quartet and 
string orchestra. It was not 
revived until 1979 at Ald- 
ebujgh, and given another 
welcome hearing on Sunday. 

It was a freak out of its 
time: not until Death in 
Venice was ApoOo to sum- 
mon from Britten that mi- 
rage-like writing with its 
white-hot glissandi and wide- 
split chords. But the work 
compels from its very limita- 
tions. Its near-minimalist 
repetitions and driving 
amplifications have a cun- 
ningly kinetic effect which 
Juhan Jacobson and the ECO 
recreated in all their brittle 
brilliance. 


After all the high expecta- 
tions ft finally did not 
happen. A high temperature 
prevented Daniel Barenboim 
from travelling from Paris for 
his London recital, forcing 
his agents to look hastily for 
a hero to save the day. They 
found one, too, in Tamas 
Vasary, who though not in 
die best of health himself was 
even able to preserve the 
balance of Barenboim’s pro- 
gramme, substituting two ear- 
lier Beethoven Sonatas for 
the scheduled “Hammer- 
klavier” and Liszt’s Italian 
Annies de Pelerinages for the 
Swiss book. 

It says much for Vasary 
that he has the soul of this 
music at ready command. 
One might have wished that 
the first of the Beethoven 
Sonatas, Op 26 in A flat, had 
begun with more fluidity, but 
he dearly sees this music as 
rather hesitantly mini native. 
And the sharp bite of the 
Scherzo, the mournful chant 
of the Funeral March, and 
the brilliantly executed brittle 
counterpoint of the finale 
made for a satisfying cycle, 
without perhaps the breadths 
of the “Hammerfclavicr” but 
in its own way quite as 
profound 

For sheer control, however, 
nothing throughout the after- 
noon excelled the first move- 
ment of the “Moonlight” ; 
Sonata. Op 27 No 1. Here the i 
exquisite cue with which 
Vasary played every note 
compelled one to forget how 
hackneyed this music has 
become; ii was almost dis- 
turbing in its seriousness and 
introspection. The same ap- 
plied to the agitated finale, 
where Vasary’s explosive 
playing hinted at things to 
come. 

Yet explosiveness was far 
from being the only feature of 
the Lisa cycle, which passed 
by like a whirlwind In 
“Sposalizio" and “D pen- 
seroso” Vasary’s sometimes 
idosyncratic shaping of 
phrases was helped by his 
warm singing tone, while he 

managed jJje gradual bu3d- 

dp through the three Petrarch 
Sonnets to the enormous 
“AprSs une Lecture du 
Dame” with compelling 
poetical sensibility, and the 
climactic movement itself 
was, until the final pages, a 
remarkable exhibition oi con- 
trolled virtuosity. A pity, 
then, that it had to end in 
such a scrambled, ugly mess. 


Hilary Finch Stephen Pettitt 


Tartuffe Royal 

Royal Lyceum, 
Edinburgh 

It is difficult to assess 
precisely why Molifrre seems 
to have adapted so success- 
fully into Saits in the past, 
but he certainly has done, 
and in this, Liz LochheacTs 
new adaptation of perhaps 
bis most potent play, the 
tradition is more than 
consolidated Lochheatfs is a 
marvellously inventive and 
warmly furray verse transla- 
tion that delights in transpos- 
ing not only the spirit but the 
tetter into the Scottish con- 
text and only begins where 
others might stop — with the 
undeniable gift of a premise 1 
that the tale of the religious 
fraud who worms his way ; 
into the home, heart and < 
purse of the gullible property- 
owning Orgon cuts particu- 
larly dose to the bone here. 

The Scots are no strangers 
to the power of threatened 
hell-fire and damnation, and 
Andrew Dallmeyer’s Tartuffe 
is a windngly sly, grotesque 
perversion of the Wee Free 
minister, forging his hold on 
the weakest point of his 
victim’s conscience with a 
combination of insinuation, 
ingratiation and chilling 
rhetoric. But bringing the 
hypooite into dose and 
identifiable range is only the 
starting-point. 

In the array of characters 
brought closer to home by 
Loch head's translation and 
lifted on to the stage in Ian 
Wooldridge's ana Colin 
MacNeil’s co-production is a 
cannily achieved blend of I 
character and caricature, ; 
bringing to life the potential ! 
in the original - a comic ! 
machine that works by being ; 
so structurally exact and yet ; 
dependent entirely on the | 
invention of those on stage 
for its precision to strike 
home. Here we have both 
sides of the equation and the 
characters, the more rec- 
ognizable for being local, are 
the funnier and more caustic 
for being recognizable. 

Behind the safety-curtain 
of comedy Moliftre is con- 
cerned with potent forces — 
power, sex and money — and 
the greed, guilt and bang-ups 
that attend them. While 
TanufTe's success lies in his 
calculating and shrewd 
exploitation of a willingness 
to be ted (and this production 
b set unobtrusively in the 


1930s), hfa intrusion into 
Orgon's household lifts the 
lid off a whole range of 
delusion and self-delusioa, 
scheming and machination, 
however comically handled. 

Where Molfere inserts a 
precise scalpel between marie 
and reality, Lochhead's 
translation builds on this 
beautifully, not only keeping 
the play in verse but using 
the power of rhyme and its 
comic possibilities to make 
language part of the theme. 
Characters use language as a 
mask, both to conceal and 
reveal, and work their way 
through a whole range of 
Scots idioms to suit their 
status and purpose. Their 
combination of local patter 


and verse is irresistibly 
funny, their coloquiallisms 
bringing them dose to home, 
their awareness that they are 
speaking in rhyming couplets 
providing a buffer of unreal- 
ity. 

The cast enter into thus 
with tremendous good hu- 
mour and agility, particularly 
strong performances coming 
from Juliet Cadzow as the 
wise and witty maid, Anne 
Myatt as the sanctimonious 
harridan of a mother-in-law, 
Graham Valentine as the 
gently moderating Clean te 
and Andrew Dallmeyer as a 
snake-like Tartuffe, supple, 
soft and twice as evil. 

Sarah Hemming 


HAYWARD GALLERY 

SOUTH BANK, LONDON Information 01-261 0127 

HOMAGE TO 
BARCELONA 

including; GAUM, PICASSO, M1RO, DALI 
Sponsored by 5Ef%T 
Until 23 February 1986 


The Royal Opera 


Charles Gounod w 

“Samuel Ramey’s well-cast vocal prowess properly 
hypnotizes the ear with its superb co mman d of 
Gounod’s devilish writing” - The Time? 

“Miriciofti makes the heroine a real charmer... 

with foe voice, both strong and brilliant, 
beautifully the sharp changes of mood. 

“B u rr o ws... in fine, ringing voice with beautifully 
even legato.” — The Guardian 


Conductor: 

Michel Plasson 

TODAY FEB 4 & FEB 7 at 7.00 
FEB 15 at 7.30 

Tickets from £7.00 
Reservations: 01-240 1066/1911 
Access /Visa/Diners Club 


House 


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travellers Bond when you take your car abroad 
,, ^P ensiv e ? Extra Cover Plus costs a lot less 

Your Fond dealer will make all the arranqements 

foryoaAndifsworthrememberingthatshouldyou 

deade to sell your car before the Extra Cover Plus 
expires, the new owner inherits the remaining coven 
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W»JH »> *jlS*> 



THE TliViiiS TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 



finance and industry 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 

from reserves 
d sink sterling 


SE unveils plans to boost 
personal share ownership 


m^^ent^f^rir^w™?L. ^ ’J 1160 ** rates ** depositors, in effect, the present lev-d or 6 per cent "the market’s retail 
serves littii* r®" demand compensation for the cur- of adults to nearer the 17 and development advisory 

rtf nrtn-int**™™!^ 1 ^ < * ur * n & y®ars rency risk. So, not putting interest 18 per cent of the adult committee has drawn up a 
~Li~£!f “S 0 * ®ay PT° v e more rates up has actually required a population who enjoy direct three-point plan to reverse 
explosive man the normally signifi- determined Dolicv to keen them down ownership m France the flow of savings away 

cant numbers for money suddIv and hv thr* Ra«tVvfTc„«io,wi and toe United States. from direct investment in 


By Jeremy Warner. Badness Correspondent 

Wide proposals to officials said that recent 
encourage share ownership privatizations, such as the 
| among individuals were an- British Telecom. i$*n* had 
i nonneed yesterday by the done little more than offset 
i Stock- Exchange. the inroads building societies 

Officials said the effect were continueing to make 
could be to boost share into the personal savings 
I ownership is Britain from pool 




Another would be to in- 
troduce individual retirement 
accounts on the US modeL 
Under those, designated an- 
nual contributions are put 
into a tax sheltered fund but 
withdrawals are fully taxed. 

A third option suggested by 
the committee as a halfway 
stage would be for an 


IN BRIEF 


£8.7m bid 
agreed 

Thomas Robinson, the en- 
gineer and machine mater, 
has made an agreed £8.7 
million bid for Wadkin, the 
woodworking machinery 
company. 

The terms are one Robin- 
son share for one Wadkin or 
a cash alternative at !65p a 
share. Robinson has received 
irrevocable acceptances from 
the Wadkin directors and 


hank l«uW t£c“ 0IU ? n up ? ly and b * Bank of England pumping in 
Ctufifly money. Interbank rates remain dlter- 


shaics Its main recom- Sir Nicholas Goodison: top uwTt retirement 


all tW “* UUC J> *uw»uaiufc i«lcs ICUKUII ueier- pinfeed hv ihe ^inr* Fr- mA*riat«/«,e am * vr *** icuihikul n.u mi.u.vu »»>» 111 

SnSv mmedly above base rates, .but without SaS^^^KliS^. 2 sS to eSS for share pnonty for prom*** The role of stockbrokers as S*S*£*Jg r °* 

kets — the kev to ^lervention base rates might be three man. Sir Nicholas Goodison, investment with other forms and establishing a Stock investment advisers who can Wadidn^^esrimaied io 

a^d be^sLth^ “* P° mts higher. A sharp new fell in ster- who plan to give them the 0 f saving: . Exchange Nomfoee service counsel individuals on kSTVl 

ana Because me reserves may rave a line wnuM a mnet ivrtainlu m»lr» it huh«t nnnntv after de- m a miri-Mins mm. ♦« achieving a telanced non- maoe a loss in i*#sx 


priority for promotion 


individual to make contribu- their families for 18J2 per 
tions which are not tax cent of the shares. The 
allowable to a fund which Robinson pension fund al- 
would be allowed to a ecu- ready owns 2.6 per cent 
mutate “gross”. Withdrawals Full acceptance of the bid 
would then be made fire of would involve the issue of 
tax at retirement. 4.8 million new shares in 

The role of stockbrokers as *? obin *> n - ^ 55 “■* 


ease access to achieving a balanced pon- 

uai tire ownership of securities, folio should be actively I IVnrclr riGA 
res The committee sn gys fed advertised both by member [ i-VUloik I Wv 

to that one method of achieving firms and the Stock Exchange I Norsk Data, the Norwegian 


of . a All that must affect Nigel Lawson's 

25m? 1 ™? oper ^ tl ?° for ^ggirig Budget thinking. He can be foi»ven 


through in October. 


and in particular to 


Norsk rise 


Direct investment in eq- capture a proportion of the the first objective would be to itself, the committee says. 


pound. The pound has continued to forgoing into ouidah for reasons J^bes has feUen senousty saving over £5.000 now held copy the successful French 
sag. If the new reserve fiimres show nncrtm^«f«StK P S2S5L/ if befaznd . other . metho * of «n brnidmg society accounts: Loi-Monory scheme. This 

that suDDort also vainlv mnrinTM>ri , secrecy^ It must be personal saying, such as • Seek io reduce transaction allows for an additional lax- 

rr> a rirpt oiv-. tempting either to ignore the off effect building societies, pensions costs for small bargains by free allowance of around 


Building 


have I lifted 


ts to NoKJi 


in building society accounts: Loi-Monory scheme. This been outstandingly successful million (£34.3 million J from 

• Seek io reduce transaction allows for an additional tax- in increasing their share of NoK233 million in the year 

costs for small bargains by free allowance of around savings by advertising, at to December 31. Tempos, 

developing an automatic £500 to to be used to buy estimated promotional costs page 18 


Xf ■ J - — , tuaw WSWMIi r*XIU OViUb ' J— "■■XT OIUuU VlUbl I 

resierday s sharp setback in mom- revenue still left for tax cuts, or even *t 
ing trading was less a response to spe- to compensate in fiscal terms for pAimvnAi* 

esne news from the Opec ministers, tightness in financial markets that he VxWVvJTUHjR 

meeting than evidence of the does not believe justified on domestic 1 

currency s general weakness which monetary grounds. Sadly, these factors WfilCOlTlM 
halted its earher recovery. News of a cannot be separated from one another ** 
reserve, fall greater than that in in the market dealer's eyes. After all, fAnreltAi* 

December (yesterday, talk of £500 Iqssof 0 il exports might Adeemed to IOUgHer 
million was common) would probably require a compensating cut in domes- j* j 

send sterling further on its way. De tic demand to. avoid a trade gap. S HT fiPIl flr nS 
Zoete & Be van see $130 or DM3.25 Certainly, there is a danger that an y O 

as the next support levels. attempt to offset the domestic By Richard Thomson 

A hefty rise m moncry supply could tig htening that an oil-induced fall in Banking Correspondent 
do the same. But the foreign exchange . sterling would naturally bring would Mr R _ h : n 1 ^ 1 . December, 

men usually judge the figures against againbe interpreted by the markets as governor oftSe Rankof cons “™. er 
expectations rather than by absolute another sign that the British govern- England, yesterday defended OU iSS? < ?Si 
tests and this month City forecasts meat is soft on i nflati on. the City's reputation against 

vary so much that they do not know . For that reason, perhaps, the smart accusations of fraud and 
what to expect Stephen Lewis of political talk is that tax cuts can safelv but said new 

Phillips. & Drew is looking for a 1 per be delayed for a year because other 

bent nse m sterhnp M3 fthe measure essary. unprovanents to the 


sniau oraer execution service snares in a quauiyuig iuna. oi t/u miinon a vear. mrn v 

— — — — — - FNF change 

Hire purchase hits Tesco sells 
record £19.5bn discount SJ3S5J32 

_ rtfAitA rthom of no more than nine times 

By Out Economics C or resp on dent vlltllll adjusted share capital and 

■ Hire purchase and other The index of retail sales By Our Industrial Editor reserves, 
instalment credit rose to volume was 117.3(1980 = T«m ctmet the «mv»r T lfiflllO cnntrlit 
record levels before Christ- 100) in December, compared SSL tm l^SUllg SOUgllt 

mas, despite flat retail sales with ! 17.4 in November. The victor Valuediscount stores Hanson Trust is to seek a 
volume. At the end of peak was reached in August tn .k* fimer »m(k listing for its shares on the 

December, £19.5 billion of at 117.5. ^Sp^atoi^Si SSB Jew York Stock Exchange. 

consumer credit was _ p ... “ Rothschild Ine k tn advice 


December, £19.5 billion of at 117.5. 
consumer credit was 


Officials at the Department I * n ijji° n SJ 055 - . . 

Trade and Tndiistrv said I The 45-StOfe Chain W3S 


Rothschild Inc is to advise 
on the listing, which will take 
the form of Anerican depo&i- 


New crSit advanced was of Trade and Indmaiy said ite Torn of^ri^n^ 

£1.177 billion, compared that the pattero of retail sales m 1982 to ^ 

with £1 078 billion in remained as originally es- sell a limned line 01 goods at J 

November^aml the J^vioS P°°f iSore NO dividend 

hieh of £1 P4 billion in produced strong retail spend- North west ana London, itu UIUUCUU 

October. In December 1984, « August followed by a Andre de, Brett has not 


slmnp in-Septemter ^ed divided .p^te^ 

The rfesnite reach. October and then the tra- (O achieve tire most effiaeut despite a leap in pretax 


ferred by markets), a modest rise in should draw more comfort from the T . ■ ■ , . . The^ne^ , despite reach- ditional November-Decem- stock control. profit from 1 P £3 , 7 0o8 rct ro 

the hitherto undershooting MO, but a possibility that oil prices will have __5f ^Suhi^hS n ® reco1 ? und£ ?'" ber strength of sales. The contribution of trading £112,000 and a fell in interest 

return to a more usual £L8 billion rise recovered somewhat from their 25SL^ stale ^ 5™™* ,n profits from the division tS payJSentsXm £76 OOoS 

in bank lending. Panmure Gordon present propagandardepressed levels ha^^d^Sh^a teSS S^SdW^l^hfre^S? monlh,y ^ *0 be £64^000 for the »x months to 

^ 1 I s ? S nTr^i SeplOTber3 °- 

bank lending, but possibly a fall in BudgeL supervisory system. He innovations such as in-store volume up by 4.2 per cent of the acquisition. T IQ nrHprc 1111 

MO. . ... Meantime, it must be galling to see pointed out that much of the credit cards, including the compared with the previous Tesco raid Victor Value OiUCrS Up 

problem with Johnson popular Marks and Spencer year. had been useful for EPOS 


bank lending, but possibly a fall in Budget. s^Srrisory system! He h^Tvati^s^ Tin^re 5S^T U 

MO. ■ Meantime, it must be galling to see pointed out that much of the credit cards, including the compared 

Pressure on the pound certainly long-term interest rates coming down problem with Johnson popular Marks and Spencer year, 

puts the Chancellor cm the spot The across the Atlantic and in Germany Majjhey Bankers, which had chargecard. 

apparent choice of taking the fafling (where a 10-year loan was floated at Retail sales volume in The F 

oil price on the exchange rate or on in- 6 34 per cent, yesterday, five points SkViH racustome^ December, originally es- sa«i that 

terest rates is not as simple as it lookk below comparable gilt-edged yields) no t fraud bv the bank itsS ttmat ® d to have risen to a that 1W5 

Tire normal maiicet mechanism would while Britain, once more, loses out on . .. reconLactuafiy fell rompared aj^essfid 

translate a Ming pound into higher (his desirable turn of events. 




Two weeks ago Robin Leigh- weighting requirements to^ meet. 

tHe Bank of- - Equally,' capitaf ratio iequirenients RoddD Commission report 
^stwa^y^^r^a more vary widelyfrom country to country, Whft ^ ted> * wili ? 1 
interaationm systeni of regulating but Britain’s are among the most reC0I ^ ne J lds cha ^ £ L-^ „ e 
securities mariciets as large institutions stringent 

became promin ent in mre th an one Sir Timothy is not, however, in U^cTs of 

financial centre, such a system is still favour of harmonizing everything in Loudon led by Sir Patrick 
m its earliest stages of planmng but m the Gty with practices elsewhere. He Neill but added that aU 
the tcrea of banking tnerattempt to har-, delivered a plea for restraint by instances of fraud- at Lloyd’s 


Robin Leigh- weighting, requirements 


I Mr Leigh-Pemberton said with November, after 
I that no system of supervision seasonal adjustments 
Icould be guaranteed to pre- taken into account 
vent fraud but there needed 1 
to be an effective method of 

I detecting fraud. He welcomed 
the urgency with which the 


ber sales, up 
year earlier. 


had been useful for EPOS US factory orders for 
evaluation but the chain was December rose 2.7 per cent 
Retail Consortium now outside the mainstream a^inst a revised 0.8 per cent 
; the figures showed of Tesco’s developing 'November rise, white Decem- 
5 was an extremely superstore business. In the -ber construction spending 
j year, despite the current financial year, Tesco rose 2.8 per cent after falling 
isappointing Decern- is spending about £200 mil- a revised 0.4 per cent in 
up 3.5 per cent on a lion in new-store develop- November, official figures 
ier. merits and refurbishing. released yesterday showed. 


haf ratio requirements I Raskin Conunisswr .report 
wn country to coantiy, I "as befog treated, which 


Neill but added that aU 
instances of fraud at Lloyd's 


mouize the regulatory arrangements of international banks entering the Gty had taken place before the 

different countries, is further forward. ^ a resyjt Q f big bang in the amount 1982 , y°>f s 

The Bank is instrumental : . in this 1 ° regulated the international 


The Bank is instrumental .in this — — — — — . — — — 

process, but yesterday it received Owing to technical difficulties asso- insurance market 

strong support from Sir Timothy dated with the transfer of The Times New legislation contained 

Sevan, chairman of Barclays Bank, to Wapping, it 4s not yet possible to m- in the Financial Services Bill 
. Addressing a gathering of distin- dude all the regular services, es- and the Banking Supervision 

euished names . at the ' Overseas pedally market reports and Imanrial White Paper would pve 

^ _ • j- j • _ tfvmVAr nmlpctwwi to Dnvalfl 


Property firm to raise 
£5 6m in unusual deal 

By Judith Huntley, C omm ercial Property Correspondent 

Wates City of London ing technique is common for 
Properties, the company with large companies but unusual 
a portfolio entirely comprised for small companies like 
of office buildings in the Wales. 

Square Mile, is raising £56 The loan fecility is an 
million in an innovative attempt to lower interest 
funding package. rates and give the company 

The company has nego- ^ flexibility to call on the 
dated a deal with five money when it needs it 
underwriting banks for seven- About one thud will go to 
year money at a base of 0.03 W ousting debt with the 


Boots to test laser 
system at tills 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 

Boots, the pharmaceutical pects 70 per cent of goods 
retail chain, is planning to sold to be bar-coded, 
introduce electronic poim-of- Boots will be the first 
sale equipment at 170 of its European retailer to install 
tugger stores, using a new the IBM 4680 system, which 


IBM system on offer for the uses 


first time in Europe. 


personal 


computers. As well as bring 


at iS £oS Ee" cTbe Sfft 
S+lT checking the validity of credit 


per cent over Libor. 


rest being used to finance 


Peterborough store, and if 
that proves successful the 


cards. 

IBM said the cost of the 




called for a system of bank regulation possible. Mean while we ask readers to the institutions were 

which would be the same in every ma- bear with , ns during our temporary expert enough to protect 

ior country. Mach remains tabe done tone of triaJL . themselves, the governor 

despite the efforts of the Basle . said. 

Committee, and in the meantime they pay to employees. His argument He added that however 
British bankers have the distinct against what he calls grossly inflated thorough the supervisory 
fppline that they . are losing • a remuneration packages is not the sustem became it should not 

UAJiug ... - rlwnintinn I* rancM tA art flrdprlv f.l/. «.nv rKnnrKlhilitV 


stitutions. This was correct j ra ie than that agreed by the 'pony, is using the same 
because the institutions were [ underwritera-This fund -rais- method to raise £200 million 


_j,u- iwu ai uidLiuuD diiu JU 

thrw v ^ e4,mPPed WIthm terminals, and including soft- 


three years. wiuuiuaa, auu .uwuu«. 6 son- 

J ’ ware costs, would be less 

At Peterborough Boots ex- than £104,000. 


C °TheBank of Englandwas one of the employment market in the Otv ' of. 1 1 
&st regulatory agencira to_mpose a Sir Timothy’s objections, are Supervisors wic 

risk/asset weighting for off-batonce founded rather on the bad image inhere to ran companies 
sheet lending, currently one of the inflated salanes give the City at a time instead of their directors and 

boom areas of international banking, when scandal seems to have become — ,j — * :v - 

While British banks are subject to a commonplace. Yet it is hard to avoid 
0.5 per cent weighting, the banks of the impression that his plea has come 
many other countries have no too late. • 


themselves, the governor 
• . said, 

they pay to employees. His argument He that however 

against what he calls grossly inflated thorough the supervisory 
remuneration packages” is not the sustem became it should not 
disruption it causes to an orderly take away the^ responsibility 


of a company's directors to 
use their own skill and 


many oxner uuumj jc 


Hawley pays 
£3.6mfor 
golf company 

Hawley Group, Mr Mi- 
chael Ashcroft’s Bermuda- 
based home impro vements, 
security and contract cleaning 


NEWS BACKGROUND 


Sky-high loan rates too big 
a price for strong pound 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


West loses 
in steel 
production 

By Edward Townsend 
Industrial Correspondent 

Suanrial Steel production in the West- 
institution because of bad era worW stebili^ last year 
business decisions. at just under 450 million 

tonnes, less than one per cent 
higher than in 1984, and the 
established producers have 
suffered at the expense of the 
developing nations. 

Figures released by the 
Brussels-based International 
Iron and Steel Institute show 
that total world steel output 
rose by 1.4 per cent to 720 
million tonnes, but most of 
the increase came from the 


company, has bought W°dd fairing exchange wing a version of the for every 10 per cent drop in developing nations such as 

OnW Manawment and Its wnen mm s a »_ 1* I~ Jt rhina and Brazil — both now 


Coff Management ano n* higter Tre^ury’s economic model crude oft prices. Omm ana Braai - ootn now 

Montreal affiUtate. Imer- j, yTST* developed by Oxford Eco- This ®3 per cent reduction ahead of the United king- 

national Goff for C$7.2 . drop in oU nomic Forecasting, provide in the retail price index is the dom in the world lam : table 

miffion (£3.6 milbon)- S. Tte pSs sl&e om support for toe view that shortterm effect. Longer - while the United Slates 

The group marked ah- Se^ towweeks, whk* “taring toe pound take toe term, a further IS per cart output dropped to jurt over 

inclusive golf toms from . ,estmday as the sfrainT is fikely to be broadly cut fa retail prices can be 80 million tonnes from 84 

North Amenta to 12 coun- news neutral in its effects on expected to feed through, milkon tonnes in 1984. 

tries with particular emphasis Onaunzatom of inflation. ' What also conies. out of toe The _ United Kingdom 


China and Brazil — both now 


bma toe Organization of inflation. What also comes out or toe ‘7 , . 

on Scotland „ , Petroteura Exporting Conn- - Attempting tn shore up the', model calculations, and these P™? uc ?J° n ,s 

The purchase will be sat- not yet pound torougli h^ber interest are IflteSy to be broadly the 15 -7 1 “S&SJP, 1111 ® 8 fo u 

isfied by the issue of one ^ Treasury's inffatioii rates, onthe otter hand, same as those availitote to the up by^OO.OOO i°nn^ but sull 

million shares m Hawley and would require big increases in Chancellor and his Treasury behind the -1.5 million 

sufficient cash to add tip to because there is a already high base rales. .officials, is that defending the tonnes produced m 1979 and 

Can$5.5 million. The final between toe adverse The Treasury's economic pound when it is felli ng representing a six-year fell of 

CanS1.7 miffion will be paid _ . w of the forecast at the time of toe l *aase of sliding off prices is almost 27 per cent, 

one year after the completion ^ depredation, and the Aittnm Statement in Novemr expensive. According to j n mtal, the developing 

of the deaL ■ weficial effects that arise ber way based, it fa believed, Lawg & Crutekshank. every nations’ output rose to 75 

lower world oH prices, on an oil price of $26 a barrel $5 a haitel off toe ofl pra* million tonnes, a rise of 38 

Altfci sto toe pound has and an exchange rate against knocks 15 cents, or around 10 ^ ^ since 1979. 

folk, byarwaM* 16 per cent, toe dollar of about $2^0. per cent at current levels, off .. .. , 

' * waieis. from its levels Assuming a new o0 price of toe pound. 

-Lfa in Ttesmbe*. toe Tret- $20 a barveL toe $6 a barrel By the same tidton, each 1 


lending 


ABN 

Adam & Comp*iy3|jMJ 


Citibank Savmgst— 

COosotidatea I Crib- I2«J 



early in 


■, toe Trea- 


By toe same token, each 1 


In Europe, the largest fell 
in steel production over 1984 


in base rates!™ 5 1 «» nled J£g u “: 


This is even more toe case 


fared m Sri^tok^tte pomrf ^ Kin^om induces, boto of 
^TtoSi thate^ Ig^J^haveffiib? 


if toe astoori ties are correct. thc ride rf thmnb that erety when ofl prices hare fallen by thefr onSaSs 


«r the Bound’s fell reflects the price results in a 5 per cent calculations, necessitate about Awimnnitv 


Bowring 

Results for the year ended 
31st December, 1985 

(Unaudited) 


£ million 



1985 

1984 

Operating Revenue 

137.1 

111.7 

Operating Expenses 

(02.1) 

(78.3) 

Operating Profit 

45.0 

33.4 

Other Income 

Z4 

1.4 

Profit before tax 

47.4 

34.8 

Provision for UK tax 

(21.3) 

(15.8) 

Profit after tax 

26.1 

19.0 


exchange markets to to retailers. rates, wane anotner nse m 

overxbooiin* that toe level This- reduction is on toe base rates cannot be rated out 36 *** respec " 

iSmt toe exchange rate is non-duty dement of the final -with this week's combination uv “ y> 
likely to settle at -even with petrol price. After allowing of Opec, money supply and The world's biggest 

3 d prices in toe S15-20 a for . duty, which remains reserves figures,* the Treasury steelmakers — the USSR and 

band range — is somewhat unchanged and is about half appears to have decided that- Japan — produced respec- 


retaitei rates. Wh3e another rise m « SiE 

This- reduction is on the base rates cannot be rated out , 3 6 *** 1 Tes P ec ~ 

ij-. -• x jxt. j- — « _?xt .lv j — i.»- — — — uveiy. 


non-ditty dement of the final with this week's combination 
petrol price. After allowing of Opec, money supply and 


world’s 


higher than yesterday 
* Economists at toa steefc- 


of .toe forecourt price, tire there is a Until to the price it lively 1552 million tonnes 
price can be expected is prepared to pay for a and 105.2 million tonnes in 


Operating Revenue has Increased by 23%. 
Profit before tax has increased by 36%. 


The above figures do not constitute full group accounts for the Bowring Group and 
have been adjusted to comply with generally accepted accou nting practices in the United 
States. Earnings of companies which were sold during 1984 and 1985 together with other 
items which are not relevant to operating performance have been excluded. The T384 
comparatives have been restated onto abatis consistent with that used for reporting the 
results of 1985. 

The fun financial s t ate me n ts for the year ended 31st December. 1984 of C. T. Bowring & 
Co. Limited have been filed with the Registrar of Companies and the report of the auditors 
thereon was unqualified. The full financial statements for the year ended 31st December, 
1985 have not yet been reported upon by the auditors and have not yet been Red with the 
Registrar of Companies. 

Copies of the announcement may be obtained from 
the Secretary, C.T. Bowring & Co. Ltd., 

The Bowring Building, Tower Place, London EC3P 3BE. 


A Member of 

Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. 


trokm Infog * Cruictshaak, to fr# bf akwt 25 per cent strong exchange rate. 


1985, a similar level to 1984. 


a fts 
r om 
ts re : 

i 

z *py- 

Z T* 

* the 

, pior 
h ^ret 

1 Em - 

“ 583. 

^ rilo. 
,d ihe 

- ’Oup 

5 an. 

2 

m jyjf 

re ex 
“1 mat- 
ac .. ]| 

9* nioi 
in upfo 
ist 
be 

£ ie 

□d Suds 
ux rebel 
ra- J St 
alio 
=ed thei 
e’s q pa 
for soul 
ies off 
erc 
the 
deg 
ea H) 

lacT^i; 


S forg 
necfilL 
ble 
— de! 

Bnui 
Bi w 
Kud 










DAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 


TEMPUS 


COMPANY NEWS 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 



BICC pension savings 
to put £ 1 Om on profit 


BICC has found a cheap way 
of boosting profits. Like 
many other engineering 
companies, it has an 
overfunded pension scheme 

and it can therefore afford to 
cut its contributions to the 
scheme. 

The unusual feature of 
BlCCs plan is that the 
resultant saving will be used 
to boost profits. The de- 
cision. which has been 
cleared by the company’s 
auditors. Arthur .Andersen, 
will add £10 million to the 
pretax result in both I9S6 
and 1987. by when the 
surplus should have been 
cleared. 

The company defends this 
move by pointing out that it 
has in the past charged the 
costs of increased pension 
contributions as and when 
they have occurred. This 
raises the question of what 
will happen to profits in two 
years' time, when contribu- 
tions will be resumed. Will 
the company be able to keep 
profits moving forward? 

The stock market, short- 
sighted as ever, was more 
concerned yesterday with the 
immediate' attraction of a 
boost to earnings and the 
shares rose I Op to 298p. 
There was a similar reaction 
last year when Lucas In- 
dustries announced that it 
would boost annual profits 
by £20 million by the same 
method 

Dealers argue that the pen- 
sion fund move is one of 
several factors now support- 
ing BICCs shares. For 
example, yesterday was Mr 
Robin Biggam’s first day as 
managing director of the 
company. Mr Biggam, best 
known tor his work at 1CL. 
has until recently been chief 
executive of Euro Route, the 
defeated Channel fixed link 
consortium. Ironically. 
BICC is part of the succesful 
Channel Tunnel Group 
through its its Balfour Beatty 
subsidiary. Whether this 
switch of allegiance is 


enough to power the com- 
pany forward two years 
hence remains tyo be seen. 


Gilts 


The kicking and gouging 
continued yesterday in the 
gilts and money markets, 
but such has been the sheer 
longevity of the present 
crisis that even the latent 
violence had a faintly re- 
hearsed air to it. Oil fears 
and some particularly 
unchum my words from 
Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Ya- 
mani. the Saudi oil minister, 
took the sterling index down 
at the opening from Friday's 
close of 74.6 to 73.3. 

Taking their cue from this 
weakness, gilts opened about 
'£ point down, and that 
decline later widened to 7 < a 
point, after genuine selling 
in some volume. But the 
selling dried up almost 
immediately, and to the 
astonishment of some trad- 
ers. prices drifted upwards, 
offering further proof that 
the gilt market in its current 
mock possesses an almost 
muscular resilience. By raid- 
afternoon. prices were some 
¥i point easier, but the 
underlying tone was firm. 

Stupefaction at what was 
taking place in money mar- 
kets might almost account 
for the inertia. It is possible 


period rates, from overnight 
to six-month, went over die 
1 3 per cent mark, providing 
some covert support for 
sterling in the process. But 
in the minds of market men. 
like Stephen Lewis of Phil- 
lips & Drew, this means 
only one thing — base rates 
are poised to rise. Con- 
ceivably. it is not now a 
question of whether rates 
will rise, but when and by 
how much. 


• SMITH WHITWORTH: 
Results for the six months to 
September 30t No interim 
dividend (nil). (£ 000 ): Turn- 
over |,462 (2,415) pic and 
posoax loss 129 (131 profit). 
No tax (0.5). Loss per share 
3.26p (3.22p earnings). The loss 
for the six months is in line 
with the chairman's statement 
in August. The group will be 
back in profit in the second 
half and it is hoped that there 
will be a satisfactory outcome 
for the year as a whole. Careful 
Cut has made substantial 
progress during the past few 
months and is expected to 
contribute a small profit in the 
second half. 


Shares turn nervous on 
oil and rate worries 


Norsk Data 


to argue that yesterday saw 
yet another shift in tactics by 


the authorities, as they battle 
to contain the upward pres- 
sure on rates. 

After announcing a short- 
age of £850 million, later 
revised downwards to £800 
million, the authorities dealt 
twice during the morning, 
taking out nearly £600 mil- 
lion of the shortage. But the 
net effect of their activities 
during the afternoon was to 
leave some £100 million of 
the shortage still in the 
market 

Rates not surprisingly 
pushed ahead. Apart from 
one-month money, all the 


Norsk Data has two major 
handicaps that would floor 
most companies. It operates 
in the depressed world 
market for minicomputers 
and it is based in Norway, 
where the small size of the 
stock exchange would nor- 
mally be a limiting factor. 

Norsk Data overcomes 
these disadvantages, partly 
by having its shares listed on 
no fewer than seven markets. 

Yesterday Norsk Data an- 
nounced a 55 per cent 
increase in profits to 
NoK360 million (£34.3 mil- 
lion) for 1985 and disclosed 
that the current year had got 
otT to an excellent start. It 
has. however, had to aban- 
don 2 joint venture on 
artificial intelligence with 
Racal Electronics. On the 
whole it has avoided the 
market's doldrums , mainly 
because it is small and 
therefore more nimble than 
its mostly American compet- 
itors. 

The problem is that if 
Norsk Data continues to 
grow at its present rate it 
will no longer be in the 
small category. But with 
short-term prospects looking 
bright the market was con- 
tent to mark up the “A” 
shares to £3914 yesterday. 
Although vulnerable to 
sentiment towards high tech- 
nology stocks, especially on 
Wall Street, the shares 
should continue to be attrac- 
tive. 


• A & M GROUP: The 
company has announced 
completion of the purchase of 
BBRK. announced on January 
16. BBRK’S business has good 
prospects for growth and is 
exported to contribute substan- 
tially to the profitability of the 
enlarged group. 


• WHITWORTH'S FOOD 
GROUP: The chairman. Mr 
Tim Holt, said in his annual 
report that trading conditions 
remained tough but the com- 
pany could lace the future with 
confidence. It win continue a 
strategy of expansion within 
the food industry. 

• ELECTROLUX: On es- 
timated results for 1985 tire 
board intends to recommend 
an increase ia the div to SK.7.5 
(SK6.5). (Figures in SKI0 
million): Sales 39.500 (34.547). 
Income after financial items 
2,575 (2,470) income before 
appropriations and taxes 2,750 


Increasing concern over the 
prospect of a further rise in 
base rates coupled with 
unease over the outcome of 

the Opec talks in Vienna left 
the slock market in a jittery 
mood yesterday. Apart from 
takeover targets there were 
widespread falls throughout 
most sectors. 

The stores sector in 
particular suffered from a 
likely increse in interest rates 
and some shares suffered 
double figure falls. 

But attention was focussed 
on the oil ministers' talks and 
their consequent effect on the 
pound which fell back as 
crude prices continued to 
slide- 

Aloog with stores, build- 
ings and other consumer 
durables felt the pinch. 

However, there was a spin- 
off from the pound's ailments 
— as it slipped below L40 — 
in that companies with 
American involvement bene- 
fited on hopes of an increase 
in business. 


Jaguar raced ahead 18p to 
408p, ICI rose lOp to 826p 
and Glaxo, the pbannaceuti- 


(2.576). Earnings per share 
fully diluted SK20 (SKI 9). 
During the early part of 1985, 
demand in the group's most 
important markets, including 
the US, was weaker than a year 
earlier. However, towards the 
end of the year demand picked 
up slightly. Stiller price com- 
petition was noted for several 
of the most important product 
groups. The restructuring of 
Zanussi — which is not yet 
included in the consolidated 


cal company, moved up to 
875 d for an increase of L2p. 


875p for an increase of L2p. 
Currency considerations also 


By Onr City Staff 

Elsewhere on the bid front. 
Extel - the target of an 
ambitious £173 million con- 
sortium offer - eased off 9p at 
386p. The market is still 
talking of a rival offer, 
perhaps from United News- 
papers. which lost a battle 
with Extel several years ago 
for control of Benn . the 
publishing business, or Mr 
Robert Maxwell's BPCC 
organization. 

There was continuing sup- 
port for estate agents Maim, 
with the shares up 6p at 
234p. Wadfcin and Thomas 
Robinson came back from 
suspension with an agreed 
merger. WadJrin closed at 
I9lp against a suspension 
price of I70p and Robinson 
finished at I93p against L82p. 

BL was 6p ahead at 39p on 
the possible sale of its truck 
and bus division to General 
Motors. 

Davenports, after predict- 
ably rejecting the new bid 
from Wolverhampton and 
Dudley Breweries, fell 15p to 
395p. Everything now de- 
pends on the reaction of the 
charitable trust which sits on 
20 per cent of the Daven- 


good at 226p on a 22 per cent 
rise in profits while Textured 


rise in profits while Textured 
Jersey finished 8p better at 
123p following half year 
earnings 68 per cent ahead. 

BICC found support 
following its “pensions 
holiday" with the shares 
rising &p at 296p. Acorn, the 


computer company, dipped 
6p at 78p. The co-fou&deis of 
the business have unloaded 
more shares. With figures due 
soon, Rentas was buoyant 
gaining 7p at 385p- 

Banks were out of 
favour.The market took the 
view that the Third World 
debt burden could worsen on 
the baric of the problems in 
the oil sector and NatWest 
suffered from the reaction 
with a lOp fell at 684p. Its 
stablemate Lloyds finished 8p 
lower at 449p. 

The worries about dearer 
interest rates unsettled the 
stores sector. Dealers took 
the view that shoppers would 
up with less disposable in- 
come. Bartons felt the brunt 
with a feU of lip to 540p. 
Dixons was 7p easier at 967p, 
and British Hone Stines 
slipped a similar amount at 
298p. 

Roth maos, the tobacco 
company, was 5p lower at 
!32p following disappointing 
figures reported by its Ca- 
nadian onshooL 


boosted BOC 7p to 297p. 
In a dull oil sector BP los 


ports equity. If it decides to 
follow the board* s line then 


In a dull oil sector BP lost 
lOp at 568p. Lasso surren- 
dered 5p at 180p, and Shell 
fell back 3p at 673p. But 
Triceotrol was bolstered by 
continuing bid talk and went 
5p better at I45p. 


follow the board* s line then 
the new £34 million offer will 
lapse. 

Profit-taking clipped 8p off 
Antstrad at 248p and West- 
land fell 5p to I25p ahead of 
die next shareholders' meet- 
ing. 

BnOongh was !5p to the 


The market settled down 
after pressur e on the pound 

slackened bet it remained 
very sensitive with few op- 
erators anxious to open new 
positions as the Opec meeting 
in Vienna got under way. 

The pound, although off 
the bottom, was still well 
down. It showed a fell of 
more than 2 cents, while its 
trade index fell to 73.5 from 
74j6 Overnight 

The paernd was off low 
positions plumbed against 
leading continentals, recover- 
ing against the mark to 
3-3300 against 3_3707 over- 
night. 

A pessimistic statement 
from Saudi Arabia on o3 
production quotas was 
responsible for the pound's 
fresh decline. 

The dollar, meanwhile, ral- 
lied weU from a lower 
opening. It was op against the 
mark at 2-3950 (23870). 
Swiss francs were cheaper 
2.0320 (2,0270). 


[money markets 


•After a bumpy ride the 
FT Index was down 5.7 at 
11553. 


Rates were soon sharply 
higher with gains to a quarter 
of a point ia the periods as 
the sharp fell in the pound 
made itself felt. With sterling 
felling on oQ price ferns, 
money markets ran for safety. 
Long dated paper was timed 
out to the Bank of England in 
an early round of boi pur- 
chases totalling £413 million. 

Houses were striving to 
square their books as early as 
possible so as not to be 
exposed, even though mar- 
kets were quiet 

Tactics appeared to be 
more defensive than aggres- 
sive ahead of today's money 
figures with the possibility of 
a sharp rise in Mo. 


figures — is proceeding in 
accordance with the group's 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


accordance with the group's 
plans. The company has re- 
ported a net profit each month 
since last September. 

• NEW COURT NATURAL 
RESOURCES: Results for the 
six months to September 30 
(comparisons restated) show 
that the company is missing 
the interim dividend (nil). 
With figures in £000. turnover 
slipped to 2.012 (2321). gross 
prom to 700 (1,171) and pretax 
profit to 213 (919). 


Valkyrie Motor Holdings : 
Mr Eamon Bradley has been 


APPOINTMENTS 


named as managing director 
and will succeed Mr Basil 


and will succeed Mr Basil 
Brandon. 

British Airports Authority : 
Mr W.C. Shaw is to be the 
new group finance director . 

The De La Rue Co: Mr 
John White has been elected 
to the board and is now 
finance director. 


Freeman Fox : Mr Derek 
WolstenhoinK will become 
senior partner following Mr 
Jack Edwards' retirement on 
April 30. He will also become 
chairman of Freeman (Hold- 
ings). 

Si Lawrence Fluorspar Mr 
Donald Jamieson, formerly 
Canadian High Commisioner 


to Great Britain, has been 
appointed a director. 

Sims Catering Butchers: 
Mr Brian Glynn has been 
appointed a director. 

Northern Foods: Mr Mar- 
tin Clark joins the board as 
group finance director. He 
succeeds Mr Jack Gayton, 
who is reducing his 
responsibilities but continu- 
ing as a director. : 


• Nortbgate Exploration: 
Northgate has agreed to sell its 
10 per cem stake in Tara 
Exploration and Development 
for CS 12.57 million (£6.16 
million) to Outokumpu Oy, the 
mining group controlled by the 
Finnish government. 
Outokumpu intends to make a 
cash offer “as soon as 
practical'' to purchase all of 
Tara's outstanding shares at 
CS 19.00 per share. Nonhgate 
owns 661,741 (10 per cent) and 
Noranda owns 3,212,686 (48 
per cem) of the total outstand- 
ing shares. 


Amer T rust 136 

Ana Am Sac 291 

tendcra 1S4 

AMnttf Asset* 110 
Bankers 104 

&*T V (U 

Bonin a snvn tss 

> B» Assets 57 

Bf Ernpve Sec 32', 
Bne* m» 371 

Bruvr«i 83 

Charter Agency 67 

Cem*** 600 

Crescent Japan 164 

Deray toe 108 

Do Cep 110 

Drayton Cons 315 

frayim Far East 140 

Ihaytan Japan «72 

Drayton Plainer S>8 

Dundee Lon 161 

Eon Amer Aeeat i08 

fcOrturgn !*• 

0n3rc G*n 295 

ton 138 

Engtsn Scot 78 

tnptn NY 117 

Error I2S 

FAC AAianca 92 

FAC ParaSe 162 

Feme, 239 

Pnl Sent Amor 2S2 

Un (Sen 120 


3 th 3.1 364 
26.111 30 32 6 
43 33 3*3 

61 2-0 524 

A4 23 48.8 
08 07 .. 

1M 38 390 
15 09 

51 26 554 
27 4.7 31.8 

0.7 22 44.5 
2090 5.6 225 
3111 37 37.7 
33b 15 375 
30Ub A S 31.5 
05 00 . . 
120 11.1 128 


143 45 31 0 
16 1 I 821 

3*» 05 . 
162 3**02 

7.7 43 32 3 


03 08 777 

e 8b 3? 418 


Ffcmavg Oarer 282 
Oerrvng Entarratte 287 
Ftonrrg Fw Eaet 98 
Ftoararg ned^ig ill 

Rwrwig Japan 534 

nmq AM r ea rm* 126 
Flaming Oversea! 130 
FtomtaO Tech 14$ 
Fiema Umars# 343 
For CS 73‘r 

GDC Capa# 85 

OT Japan 137 

Genet# finds 146 


S.6fc 15 670 
5 0 36*05 

18 24 55.7 

36 31 433 
20 1 6 705 

25 27 520 

18k 11 363 

11371 47 34 6 
125b 4.4 41 1 
87 73 181 

75 15 B23 
145 5.0 281 
121 42 35 1 

15 18 960 

3.8 32 42.7 
5.7 l.l .. 
43 34 40.9 

19 35430 
33b 22 635 
71b 21 41.9 
20k 27 585 


General Cent Z78 

> GbHnow Stack 116 

OtoOe 3C8 

Oiaantnar 248 

Grattan* House 230 

Hamoros 170 

Ha IP} 273 

tmest+n Success sw 

bn Cep 255 

jeoBi assms 49 

Lake view 156 

Dwanbaa 196 

ton Merchant Sac 54 

ion Trust 69 

Itec M na 107 

UVU 170 

Mraray Hcoma 131 

Uraav MB 143 

tbaray 236 

Murray varauna 327 

New Court 389 

New Damn 04 62 

928 166 

Nwlbrog Me 83 50 'j 

New Tokyo 21J 

ton Attttc Sec 295 

NM Sea Assets 76 

Mix Amer 2SS 

Dtfwcn 147 

Pacrte Assets 76 

Do Wins 35 

Personal Mao 4g 

Reebran 345 

Rina A Marc 151 


1430 5 t 299 
25b 25 505 
145 4.7 288 

24 1.6 . . 

63 27 284 
81 36 386 

138 &1 2SO 

78 1 4 85 a 

88 26 635 
01 02 
33b 21 585 
68b 44 288 
32 50 184 

8.1 n 85 234 
S4h 59 353 
34b 20 755 
7.7b 59 250 
64n 45 315 
39n 1.7 

79 24 505 

284 52 273 

05 08 .. 

67 40 382 

4 2ft 83 180 
it 05 . . 
49 1 7 827 

0 7 0.0 664 

77 26 539 

44 30 425 


Sttaren Emvq 36 

StKkhoctn 132 

TR Ausrobi B9 

TH Ctfy Ot Loo (80 HU 
TR but A Gan 167 

TR Naur* Res 214 

TH Norm Amenta 94 


rift facet Basel 131 

TH Properly 144 


TH Properly 
TR Tecft 
TH Trustees 
Ten* Bar 
Ttoogmonon 


Throg secured cap 303 
Trans Ocaanc 160 

Tram 115 

Tnreerest Me bo 

liT Overture 224 

VbMg flomca £0 

WHOM 67 

Wn tarp cnp Enemy 86 
m»n 3 189 

yeoman 267 


06 16 
40 30 411 

31 35 313 

55b 56280 

5 40 32 443 

tor sor: 

260 26 477 
14b 11 . 
53 37356 
25 26 535 
53b 4 4 334 
7lh Si 284 
1070 42 37 6 


5 5 3 4 401 

33 29 393 
14 7 183 66 
93b 42 52 3 
>7 26 47 6 

22 33 483 
36 * ( 374 
42 25 904 

13 6ft 4 7 331 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


03 05 .. 
ISO 4 3 350 
7 9b 53 300 
187 45 31 3 


2011 15 938 
2.7 1*856 


SI Antaeus 
SaAsn 
Scot American 
Scot eastern 
Scot tege 
Scot Nu 
■ Seal Merc A - 
Second fr e e 
See Ot Scotland 
SmPNr Ctll 


4.1 34 403 

85 28 529 
84 30 485 
28b 32 489 
107b 25 520 
88 23 479 
258 69 219 
Zi 2 49 338 
89b 4*335 
1.7b 25 39* 


Ahmyd A Snrarars 550 
• American Ettresa £38 - 

AW* 36 

37 

Bnoma Arrow 133 

Den > Ua4 C14 . 

Do A £13 . 

Beam 136 

Eng Trust 93 

Em 21? 

Eiptorenon 70 

Framngton 3B5 

Frost Go 07 

Goons (DAM) 96 

H enow mn Mm Cio 

04 ITS 

MAI 325 

MAO 8TO 

MarcsnUe House 267 

Pact* ln> Tar 87 

Do Warrants 17'/ 

Snath Bromars 165 


m . 

• -IV 

280 

4 5 114 

+•■ 

14 

39 191 


I) 


- 1 " 

60 

4 5 fS I 

• - - 

693 

*8 10 1 

•+■- 

693 

52 94 

• . 

St 

40 3«fi 

+i 

+ 5 

?'l 169 


30 

4* 124 


7 1 

nr* 

• y. 

57 

86 120 


18 

19 167 

9 1". 

257b 26 14 4 

-s' 

22 9« 

70 8* 

-10 

214 

27 2*3 

-5 

18 9 

71 72 


r ~ - 


•,T <*./•' .. 


: -T RETIMES DN(T TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


Bid oner amg «d 


BkS Offer ChngYld 


Sd Offer Chug Ykf, 


Bid Offer Cling VU 


»d Offer CJmg Yld 


Bid Offer Cling Ykf 


Bid Offer Chpg YU 


BU OfferOmgnd 


ABBEY llWIT TRUST MANAGERS 
K» HoWeraiuru Ho. Boutnemoieh BHB 8AL 
0345 717373 (Lmhlrta) 

G4I A Fried 1074 1136 -03 1056 

Vbgh me Eou4y 7*8 64* *08 584 

WOrUinde Bono 1726 1649 *22 525 

American Growth 145 7 154* *35 190 

Asmt Panftc 43 0 452 +09 271 

Assets A Earns 84.7 905 *03 1 62 

COM Resen-e 60 6 609 

Comm A Energy 716 766 *04 1.10 

Euroown Cepul 718 763 *13 1 97 

General 120 3 128.6a -04 330 

•Moan 572 61 4 *19 

U>v Growth Inc 79a 6&J *05 1»1 

Do Aeon 1 13 7 1332 *09 

US Ermrang Co 
Faunas Pnxyrm 
MesierfstAcc 


japan Srane 143 794 *22 030 

j Fnst Snwbir Co'S 57 1 613s -04 270 

1 First Bsope 79.1 645 +12 OflO 

Fen N Amer 475 508 +15 140 


I BAHBIMOION W HA CEMP f r 
59. Qresnem St. London EC2P 20S 
01-606 4433 


CENTUM. BOARD OP FMMCE OF 
CHURCH OF ENG 
77 London Wad EC2 IDS 
01-566 1615 

bl* Fund 366 05 *840 484 

Fneo Ml 13255 -2*0 10 79 

ONKW ,. 11.70 


FUMIS IN COURT 

PUWe Trustee. Ketgnrsy. vrcZ 

01-405 <300 


3010 311 4 
127* 1312 
1630 1692 


WU. SAMUEL UNIT TRUST 1 
45. Baart St EC2P2U 
01-628 SOll 


1753 186 6 -0J 4 09 
53 4 56.8 +0* 1.76 


AUJEO DUNBAR UNTT THUBT9 
Ab«0 Duitsar Cemra Swnden SNl 
0793 610366 A 0793 28291 


| Planned b» 
Eumoean Inc 
Da Accra 
I General Inc 
Do Acoen 
Get Yiaia Me 
Do Accra 
Men TWO tnc 
Do *ccra 
Japan income 
Do Accra 
N Amerean tnc 
Do Accra 


Fra Trust 

194 0 

2085 

-0.7 

270 

Grower * memo 

117.0 

12* 6 

-05 

3*6 

Capital Trust 

stto.i 

2186 

-04 

201 

Balanced 

311* 

3317 

-1 1 

3*2 

Accra Trust 

4772 

5062 

-11 

221 

Amencan income 

29.1 

JIO# 

+0* 

4 19 

rapi toconra Tst 

2122 

2260 

-07 

512 

Email tocome 

114 1 

i?i* 

-02 

5*5 

rtgn raid 

1234 

1314 

-04 

601 

Own Secs Trust 

27 5 

267 

-Cl 

1003 

imcmonmiai 

87.3 

11 19 

*09 

139 

Japan F rai 

712 

169 

+1* 

001 

Paote Trial 

1276 

1361 

+3J 

102 

A«w Spd Sea 

Sec* Of *mer Tst 

631 

661 

♦08 

104 

190 3 

202.7 

+37 

a S3 

Aid As sol Vafce 

1901 

2024 

-09 

204 

Gm Growth 

331 

345 

-01 

328 

Smaller Cos 

1024 

1091# 

*05 

261 

2nd Vna"er go's 

136 B 

U57 

♦02' 

175 

Recovery Trusl 

666 

71.1 

-02 

263 

Met ten * Crony 

636 

89 0 

+06 

20? 

Oseas e*fojrvjs 

162.8 

1734# 

-OJ 

3.42 

TecraioiMV Tsi 
income Eiempt 

B60 

92* 

+ IJ 

104 

105 1 

1114 

♦Oi 

807 

ELuwira SnuferGos 

192.0 

3ft? «i 

*10 

308 

USA Exempt Trust 

307 B 

326-1 

+60 

109 


Do Accra 
Sir* Cot Inc 
Du Accra 


1030 1098 .. 293 

722 7594 -04 138 
865 920e -05 138 
1313 1397* *02 383 
177 7 1691* *02 3 B3 
1057 1090 -05 9*1 

162.7 1678 -08 9*1 

716 7829 +04 656 
139 4 146 4 +0 6 658 

167 5 1782 *34 032 

1881 1788 +33 032 

44 8 47 7e +13 105 
Si 9 552a +15 106 
10*3 1099 +25 055 

1172 1234 *28 055 

635 676 +04 236 

748 794 *04 238 


CROWN UNIT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown House. Wobng GU21 1XW 
04862 5033 


. OT UNIT MANAGERS 


am Floor. 8 Deiranslwa St). Union ECZM 4YJ 
01-263 2575 Ds»ng 01-826 9431 
UK Cap Fnd me 61.4 87 i* -03 260 

Do Accra 115* 1240* -04 260 

Income FraJ 704 753 -03 700 

Perara Ewmpi 139.1 !«?.&• +15 art 

b ne m eb o ne i 1361 143* *33 1.00 

US A Genera S45 583 *0 8 1+0 

Teen A Growth B7 KB +10 100 

Japwj A Genem 1581 1702 +J4 030 

Far East A Gen 756 60* +13 IDO 

European Fund 203 4 217 6 +3 4 0 70 

Germany Fiml 60* 652 +06 1*0 


•*9" Income Turn 1972 210* -1 1 583 

Grower Trust 186.7 201 6* -0* 357 

Ameneai Trust 118* 128+ +0 .7 879 


EFU UNIT TRUST MAMAGEHS 
4. M ora s Descant. Eonaurgn 
<01-226 3462 


BRITANNIA IMT TRUST 

74-78 Fnsbury Pavement London EC2A 1JO 

01-588 2777 DeabngOI -838 047879 MneyOede 


1 0808010333 
Growm Gfl . 55 5 583 -0.1 111 

mu fleecrary Si 3 974 230 

SrtuderCns 1220 1301 +03 182 

Ub Growth 340 363 .. 217 

Earn tnc 522 567* +1.7 6 IB 

OR 2*2 255 818 

UiC A G'OwBI 1734 1850 -07 474 

N« Wi me 1702 1615 -05 520 

Pref Shares 18 2 10 4 +01 10 15 

Comrnomy 1342 1431 *05 2*9 

Fmanoet Secs 39 1 41.7 -ai 247 

GOO 4 Gen 30 8 224 +0.1 2-71 

W Laura 1S.0 160 *03 1.14 

Prop Swat 515 549 *04 155 

Lbw Envoy 443 473* +03 0*2 

World Tew 428 45.7 *0 6 058 

Amer Grower 94 6 1 01.1 +1.6 3>7 

Amer breoere 569 80 7 *05 5*1 

*mer Smrter Ccft 230 1*5 *03 1*6 

Ausr GrpMih 70 9 75* *01 0 47 

Era Smaber 126 114 *0.1 043 

Far East 36 8 390 +0* 12Q 

Hong Kong Prt 23.7 253* *0 4 3*8 

mn Grower 31 6 339 *06 2*6 

J*Oan F»rf 426 45 tm +1* 

Japan Smaiw 120 128 *04 

Exempt 883 715 -05 4*5 

Exempt Mamet 647 67.7 . . 4 14 


AR8UTKN0T SECURITIES 

131 Fmstmrv Pavement. Lsnocn EC2A 1AY 

01-528 9876 01-260 BSiOnOtS 


Cjp+oi Qrowm me 

500 

534 

De Accra 

56a 

597 

Esstom 5 tad 

993 

U»1 

Do 6*. Wmvirawar 

547 

50* 


524 

560 

Gat S FnM Incotoe 

*17 

451# 

Do Accra 

710 

74 7# 

IM' twfe biC^TJB 

Oo Acewm 

630 


146> 

1S&1# 

Hrtr TttC tocome 

Dc. Accra 

632 

677 

1616 

1718 

bar tac 



Do Acc 



Do 5S Wddorwl 

607 

651 

Managed Fund 

538 

SB 7 

Oielwenc# tacrana 

263 

280 

Do Accum 

817 

073 


Amencan Fund 642 687 

CaorbH Fral 74 0 792 

Growtti A Inc Fund 1120 1198N 
tbgrr Or Fund 894 95 6 

brntnaunal Fral 1666 1784 

Rasowtes Fimo 21 0 22* 

Sri* Jap Cos Fnd 26 S 287 

Tokyo Fund 117 9 t*61 

tErt Amar <2> 126.8 1309 

(EjI Japan |3) 80 6 832 

(E*1 Paobc <4| 207 7 2155 

i&l Smaler Jap J4) 154a 1590 

Eratimd 236 25 2 


*09 247 
*06 215 1 
-1.7 4*0 
+05 706 : 
+24 126 ; 
-01 201 1 
+04 010 ; 
+24 020 I 
.. 229 

.. 029 


Bnbsb lira Uira 464 8 4945 -35 X46 

Sf 3 - 1 * 3* 1 

Oobar Tr«w (Jims lTt.s i(C5 -as 323 

ELveoaarr Trull 99.4 1«B« +05 033 

Fv East Tam 1009 107.4* +1.1 gji 

ftympel 7H*( gtOS 330* -32 278 

■? •* 3Z10 28.1 -0.1 10.41 

Do Orowlti 37 6 40 1 A -02 349 

Ibyi Ti ejd Tnat 54* 583 -02 5B3 

bteome Trust 693 743 -0J 522 

1065 113.4* *08 3DS 
Japan Tacn Tar 32 1 342 *05 U.43 

Mirai ftbwxcas 315 336 +0.1 226 

Secray Th* 157* |«77 -09 148 

SmaiWCos 66 0 703 -01 1*6 

Soecal&U 805 89.7 -22 285 


GBi a Pros bn 
Do Accra 
Gow bcora 
Do Accra 


tbgb income toe 
Do Accra 
M Growth Me 
Do Accra 
InOinc Inc 
Japan A Gen Me 
Oo Accra 


Eirarar Trust 
Far Ees True, 
Fbianoat 7h*t 

<Sn Fraed Ini Inc 
Do Grower 
MAjn r«d Thai 
btcomr Trust 
rauwne 
Japan Tacn Ter 
Hmint Resoraas 
Secray Trust 
Sane Cos 
Soaoai SO 


5&8 S8*o +03 102* 
81.7 85* +02 102* 

43* 46041 +05 244 
4*1 4B3 +0 4 244 

3824 7713 +09 5.71 

6853 737* +22 171 

. 8504 6959s +0.1 3*0 
11037 11.108 +000 2*8 
532 584 +07 547 

535* 5704 +187 018 
5738 6103 +179 018 


PO Etc* 4. Mndi NR1 3N0 
0803 622200 

Gnu) Trust £1027 10*2 - 0*6 A.n 
bid trust 1188 123 7 +3* 151 


9CUTTaH EOUTTABLE 
28 St AncMwe So- EmnOwcn 
031-558 9101 


tod income ums 
Do Accra 


1277 1358 
188.1 2001 


?AR7»0« FUNP MANAGERS 


l SlMm (u, Lonpon EC3A 8BP 
01-623 1212 Drang 01-623 57M Denies 01-833 
5886 


010 

-06 397 


Amencan Trun 89 1 953 +19 QQQ I 

Aueaatan Trust 209 222 -0 1 039 

Bros" Ta Accra 489 524 -03 Z37 

DO &M 43* 46*8 -03 237 

Conanojmr Sara SB2 619 123 

Eurocrat Trioj 425 455 +1* 0 72 

&Ora tnconw Trust 412 44 1 +02 569 

Far Eastern Trust 680 95.1 +25 0 45 

fiiec Interest Find 24 5 2619 .. 10 11 

9 * Trust 245 256 -01 1035 

GbJOM Fund Accra I35i 144* +21 037 

Do Dal 131 1374 *20 037 

Goto 9ur Trust 144 154 132 

Hedged Amencan 255 783 *05 C.iO 

mcome m« 115* law* +o« 591 
Nang rung Trust 27 2 290 +0.9 0 67 

tocome Fimd GO 4 64 78 4 04 

Insurance Agencns E3938 4242 +0*2 238 
Japan Trvist 924 962 *35 0 00 


Pie* Snares 
Cormrocoy 
Fuunoei Sacs 
Gobi « Gen 
tot Letsra 
Prop Snares 

(b» Envoy 

World Te* 
Amer Grow* 
Amer breoma 


EAGLE STAR UNTT TRUST HAMAGERS 
Bam Hoad. Orebenram. QWucasMr GL53 710 
0242 521311 

UK Brtancao bic 56 5 603 -02 332 

Do Accra 585 603 -02 132 

UK Grewdi Accra 60.0 64.0 -0.1 1 95 

UK Hgn Inc me 57 1 609 575 

N Amencan Accra 595 835 +10 1ST 

Fa Eastern Accra 57 4 612 *20 0*2 

European Accra 6*2 865 *09 126 

UK A FI toe 473 505 -02 990 

Do Accra 473 505 -02 990 


NAttrai Reearcss 315 336 *0.1 226 SnmSGm be 5792 6 

Seoeey T>uh 157* 1677 -09 348 nii 1 

Smraw cos 660 703 -01 IN S 21r? ; 

SoemiSto! 805 85.7 -22 285 ^dJacSS «89 \ 

felFUNDMARbOgtS T *S*4r^? ** « 1 

« Bm 6 O ie ab 1195 1272 +13 1 BO Char*und toc% 3172 3 

brume 513 54* . 950 Do Accra p) 0030 8 

P Secu rny_G4t 54 1 570 .200 Perron Ertmpt (1) 3675 4 

mvaomenl Tbl Fnd 60! 633 +«5 ISO KAAOF treS 84* 

KLEINWGRT BENSON 00 ACCU,T ’ 3871 

2D. FwrcJwcn SL London EC3 68 M1BffTWg TilMMQB»8 

01-023 am 11. Dencnatwe Sq. London EC2U 4YR 

Arm Oowm Inc 585 63 id -06 1J7 ^■ ea * zn 

Do Accra 600 54 5 d -05 SMy Eeampt art* a 

Frai (n* Tsttnq 17.4 185 .. 288 Jto Accra <327 4; 

Oo Accra 21* 23 2 1 *07 WC Marbat Fenaas 53 I 


Japan STOKr Aoc 713 759 +25 0*6 tooraa A Grora 

Utswrd A Gen bre 4587 484.1 +1.8 *30 Specaa S<i 

DoAoaen Eli 20 ii*a +OO* 4*8 Arancn Grew® 
Recovery Fund Inc 2854 3020 • +03 3*2 j eoan Gro wtP 
Do Accra 3659 3878 +05 332 Erapnan Growth 

Second Gan M 579 3 8139* +19 387 UK Grown 
Do Accra 11129 Ii97»+**S 3*7 Padfc Growth 
SmsferCoatoe 5615 6008c +38 2*8 H^r ncoma 


OPPOdWSI TRUST MANAGEMENT 
68 Cannon Sheet. London EC4N BAE 
tMbngs 01-236 388Sff/7/qW0 
i m e nd bo nd Qrown 121.7 T3Q2d +1.7 1*0 
H OW A GrtnrUi 47* 504 . 290 

SPaoN Scs 68* 734 +05 2i0 

Amencan Grower 31.1 33 1 *03 3.10 

Juan Growth 391 41* +1* 

European Growth SI* 552# +04 290 

UK Grown 462 484 +0.1 130 

Peofic Growth 334 35B +12 0.7D 

1*57, breoma 293 314 +0.1 810 

PracacN broom# 45 1 480 +02 220 


SUN ALLIANCE 

Stn Attanca Hsa. Horsham. Suasn 
0403 58293 


EprAty T»U»1 Acc 3387 3603 -07 269 
N Am Trust Acc 539 573 +>3 181 

Far Earn Truer Acc 579 61* *13 *06 


EOUTTABLE UNITS AD6UN«THATJ0N 
36 Fountain Sl MaPChester 
061-236 5665 

EquCWto Pebcan 65 3 69 5s 
**qh tocome trust 621 6£ 1 
Gut A Fbced art 47 0 50 1 • 
Tu Or mv Truna 578 615c 
Special Scs Trust 66 4 70 1 
Nor Amer Trust 50 6 54 1 
Far Eastern Trust 56 6 605 


Managed Exraot 2308 aw 5 -10 3 53 1 

04 AGrergv Trust 329 3SDd+02 102 
Scecn* Sits Tnat l*s 7 96 +05 1*3 ! 

UK Sn* Cs R«c Til 60.7 65* +05 1*6 1 


Arm Grown Inc 585 63 id -05 1*7 

a> Accra 600 B45* -05 .. 

Frai In* Tn me 17.4 165 . . 286 

Do Accra 21* 232* +01 

Htoh iro Inc 1062 114 7 +02 611 

Cto Accra 1750 IBS* +0 A 

bit nacovary tnc 81 6 665 *02 I.7S 

DP Accra 865 BO* +0L3 . . 

Japan Grown toe 61 7 6*+ 

I* Accra 619 666 -0.1 

smaflar Cos toe 1290 12S3 +0.7 224 

DO Accra 18(9 1662 +0* . 

UbEqGnwdhtoC 2+3 25? 1 *03 1.78 
Do Actra 39* 420a +0.4 .. 

Wortomda Tech bto 38 6 4i3 +02 0.15 

DO Accra 368 415 +03 .. 


3658 9678 +05 332 b*cam GrtJwth 518 Si 

5782 8139* +19 267 UK Grown 4*2 4f 

71129 1197»+0*S 287 PaOfc Growth 33 4 3t 

5615 6008 c +33 298 breoma 293 31 

8685 B27 6c +5* 266 PtacBBto tacoma 451 41 

3612 4079 +18 458 Do Aora 81.1 m 

t>C ™" a2 ,.* a0 ‘ PEARL TRUST 

38$ c :: ,iS ^^ Bim - vlc ' V7Ea 

S 38 S’?! !' 85 Q ™**5* fl ** 753 8t 

ss nS^ \£i lil 

387.1 c . . 856 k ’ B E»N7 toe 107.4 114 

00 Accra 107.4 114 

HAGERS Ur* Trust Inc 1068 111 

London EC2M 4YR Do Accra 182* 194 


81.1 865 +04 270 


12 320.4c .. 8*7 

(6 8137c .. 647 

15 4020 +121 451 
34* c .. 856 

387.1 C .. 858 


7S5 821 +04 263 

1113 118* +06 263 


1009 1073 -25 4*4 

107.4 1143 +15 175 


107.4 1145 +19 173 

1068 1139 -21 3*7 


7SBUMI MUSTS 

FO 0OiX Naans nsa.Andornar Hants. SP10 IPG 
IBM 82168 DarogbXOM 8432 
Amencan toe 1060 1128 *23 1 18 

DO Accra 1104 1175 *24 118 

Ernra breoma tac S3* 996 -02 562 

Do Accra 1060 114* -02 5*2 

General Uni toe 137.4 i«62d -Q* 300 

□o Accra 2234 23779 -07 mb 

G* A Fared toq 44 9 «« B« -02 9 47 

Do Accra 575 599d -22 947 

toc ome 184 1 1959 -09 4 75 

Actra 2825 3006 -20 475 

Paane be 120.6 1283 +37 270 


Do Accra 
General Uni toe 
Do Accra 
OR A Fared toe 
Do Accra 


Guy Eaampi 
Do Accra 


__ 3rt* 3628 _ ^ „ 

Do Accra 4327 4519 -01 8*4 

UKMartm FeabAds 573 01. 1 +0-3 214 * 

Do Accra 56 4 8 23 +02 814 tod Grc 

4MI Pettormanoa 9Q0 96.0 *10 QiS Mama 

Do Accra 903 963 +29 0.15 Worldw 

USSpacM Faabaas 615 6S* +13 090 Amar 0 

Oo Accra 62* 681 *12 090 Wfe 

Goto l Pradous Mm 42* «83 +05 216 Far Eat 

Do Accra 43* 47* *05 216 . 

USSCMONtoc 54.4 56 Od +07 6*8 fi*** 

th> Accra 57* 61 •• +07 6.06 722 2k 

BrapaanfferftoC 65* 720 +1* 1*0 01-2*7 

Do Accra 69* 720 +10 1*0 tro. 


Do Accra 
tot Recovery toe 
Do Accra 

Japan Grown Inc 
Do Accra 
Smaller Cur toe 
Do Accra 
UK Eq Onwdh toe 
Do Actra 


PERPETUAL I9OT TRUST 

-01 IS 

+03 214 

+05 814 tot) Grown 224 7 2411 


+29 215 
♦13 090 
+12 090 
♦45 216 
♦05 216 


Am» Growth 
M Emerp Co’S 
Far East Gram 


224 7 241 j 
1589 1712 
1276 |370« 
6X4 68 Id 
685 735 
S*9 329 


Accra 
Pacific be 
Oo Accra 
MB MC 
Do Accra 
S elec te d Opps toe 
Oo Aocum 
Natural Res 
Do Accra 


1236 1315 +36 070 

252 1 2799 +39 1 7B 


322* 3435 +71 176 

51 0 549 *0.1 197 


582 995 *03 1ST 

46 1 491 *21 £16 


470 90.1 *01 81* 


TARGET TRUST MANAGERS 
ggeUrtusa. GMbousa Rd. 


pRouncuMr trusts 


Amer Eagto 
Ausnfian 
Corwnooay 
Energy 


72.4 775 
2S8 Z78* 
762 841 
36.6 390 
1095 117 2 


LB C UWT TRUST MAAMOEMarT 


GOVETT (JOHN) UfeT MANAGEMENT 
Wtoc WB W Mse. 77. London dto*. London BSN 

IDA 


«erey House. Capital Are. EC2R 7BE 
01-568 2600 


BROWN 6MPLET 

9-17. Penytnaurt Rfl. Haywenfs I 

0444 456144 


SwwCoihc one I09 0 1165 
DO Accra 1175 1256 

World Penny Share B 1 93 

PortbSto TH UK 664 <«* 
Portfolio 7 51 Japan 64 5 66.6 
PcrflChO TR US 883 71* 
Porfiotto Tsi Europe 858 66 9 
POrlWto T « HK 412 42.6 


BS Fral Income 

510 

$40# 

-02 

426 

Da Accra 

860 

920# 

-04 


Financial 

ioao 

1>61 

-04 

212 

Grown, Accra 

1580 

1891 

*02 


Do Income 

1020 

109 1 

+01 

201 

t+gn tocome 

557 

599 

-03 

7.04 

Income 

6*4 

693 

-03 

5*4 

North American 

556 

59 6 

+0 6 

120 

Oram 

MO 

600 

*21 

020 

Recovery 

299 

32* 

-03 

3 31 

Technology 

1336 

1*29 

+30 

D«0 

German 

301 

320 

+04 

ZOO 


EQIHTT 8 LAW 

Si George Hsa Cotroraaon Si 
190 

0203 593331 

UK Grower Accra 1272 1253 
Do tocome 1119 1190 

H-grvn toe Accra 196 6 2114 

.t>0 Income 1628 1731 

G*s/F«ed Accra 90 1 94 8 

Dc Income 78 I B25 

Nm Amer T« Accra tzaa 126 5 
Far East Tst Accra 1069 1 13 7 
&KO Ta Accra 127 0 135.1 
General Tran 202.0 214 8 


-03 38? 
-04 332 
-05 547 
-06 547 
-05 3 05 
-04 30$ 
+27 034 
+ 33 080 
+20 152 
-08 309 


01-568 5620 
too Grcwrih 
American Growth 
Amencan toe 
European Grown 

Goto * LhT'+mH 
Japan Growth 
p»ofie focame 
UK Special om 


m-a68 2800 

toenma Find 980* 38794b 

InHrt ra on N 6 Gan 2130 217*« 


HLA UNIT TRUST MAAUOggVT 

Strong Rd. UacMone. Km MEM 1XX 
0622 674751 


High tocroa 
Conv 6 GBI 
Far Easam 


68 0 72 7 +10 190 

SB a 684 +15 1.65 c 

645 693 +1 4 6 15 1 

1832 1745 +82 02S 

*55 488 -03 175 

107 0 114 4 +3| 024 

81 6 65 8 +14 4.11 I 

71* 773# +01 235 , 


LEGAL A Q8NBM. UNTTIRUBT 
MANAGERS 

S^Rtoj to r gnH otM. Brant wood Eero 


MLAGtnarat 
MLA tmemnaon a l 
MLAOd urn 
MLA tocome 
MLA European 


285 302 
44 4 470 
21* 2ZB9 


334 354 • 
2962 311* 


92* 1000 +00 1.7D 

1«.7 158* -03 6*8 

«.« 887# -02 710 
1232 1325 +3* 030 

126.7 1362 +13 237 

165.4 175 4 -03 099 

107.9 1160 +1* 0S2 

784 74.7 -0.1 523 


EcaNv Ostnbubon 226.6 2S2.4 
bo Accra 365 1 3905 


GREUMT MANAGERS 

Ami Eiorange. EC3P 3DN 

01-669 9903 

G4t « Fuad tot 111 1 1 

Grpwitr Equey 1777 1 

Guarond 2580 S 


BUCKMASTBR MANAGEMENT 

The Stock Eacnange Lonoon EC2P 2JT 

01-568 2868 


BABXIE GIFFORD 


3 GlerrMii Sl Edrtm.rfi EK3 6VY 
031-225 2561 (Dealers Ml -228 6086) 
toe E* (32) 3526 366 0 


toe Ev (22) 

Japan E* (43) 

Uh E. Ot) 

PmI Pens MB 
P»# Pens UK 
BG America 
BG Enar-jy 
BG tocome Grwtn 
BG Japan 
BG Tacmwiogv 


245 ) 2554# .. 0 34 

1772 168 5 1 49 

3646 1882 +510 
147 1 154 9 

146 6 1583 +39 060 


General toe W> 
Do Accra Mi 
tocome Fraa il) 
Oo Accra (31 
Inu bw (2\ 

Do Accra Q 
Smaller toe ill 
Do Accra 1S1 


1789 IBS* 
261 7 296 7 
65 0 892 
1460 1532 
1059 1106 
1369 1450 
9935 9559 
94A51009J 


F A C UNrr MANAGEMENT 

1. Laurence Poumey i-W London EC*R OBA 

01-623 4660 

Amencan Fund 69 5 7* * . . 02 

Capew Fima 98* 1832 . . a* 

tocome Fund 674 72 1 5* 

Far Eastern Fund 56* 626 . . 0 4 

Oersoas mtxune 60 5 6*8 42 

F.*«j interest S2 7 56 1 .. 98 

Katun* fto» Fund 48 4 516 .. 38 

European tocome *70 610# .. *0 


Paofic 

Property Snare 


Smaber Comoanaa 174 0 iB52 


111 1 115* -02 969 

1777 1895 -IS 2*7 
2386 2670 -36 317 

131 1 139S +1* 214 

1543 164 1 *3* 061 ' 

>99* 212.1# +35 104 


Do Accra 
Do toconra 

European 
Far fcastom 
Qa Trust 
Ml Menaced 
Mural Rea 


2266 2S2.4 .9* 242 

3651 3505 -IS 242 
52* 681# -02 525 

SBi 632a +«0 237 
584 63* +8* 0.78 

580 72.0 6S1 

905 632 -5* 130 

46 5 49 7 +04 4 41 

66 4 722# +1* 205 . 
51.9 *5* -0.1 283 


S^Ge^way.Storo^HMi. 


PRgPmAL UMIT TRUST MANAGERS 
^rd HA Mord Error. K3l 20L 
01-478 3377 


European Spec Site BOS B54 
E*tra tocome 1024 1085 
finanoal 2282 242* 

G* Incoma 963 100* 

God tocome 63* 67.9 

Do Accra 1157 123.6 

5w*na 70* 75.4 

^P«". _ *14 

Mtor a Stogepora tu 19a 


Growth ums 
G4t 6 Find bK 
tegfi mo pe d Un** 


Huyi new Ob Unt 
tod Growth Urals 


N Amenran Urns 
Em East Lbm 
Smeller Cat Fral 


626 67.6 
981 1016 

95 6 101 6 
510 52. S# 
969 10*2 
63 9 67* 


Htrtom Equity 3510 3734 -IS 3*1 

Era*eMi 09.4 73* +12 057 

326 HtMrcnt Convns 495 528 *OjH a«3 

8*0 Mtfbom High MC 57 4 01.0# -02 724 

6*7 HtSbOtn tod 80* 650# +1* 079 

1151 Jfomn* 6S3 664 +2.1 DOS 

0«2 M Am yctto 58.6 634 +1* 1*7 

057 Hotoom Spec Scs 531 564 .. 2® 

050 HotKim UK Grown 70* 74 9 C -03 228 

1*4 Notoom Om Trust 158.7 1680 +02 8*7 


696 74 0 
57.0 606 


Paofc toe 7l.4 763 

Do ReewaM 672 930 

PnN 9ae Fd 161 172 

UK Cacnu MB 56*> 

Spec#1SKa 76 6 642# 

Tawnotopy 443 473# 

World tocra* 5Q3 536 

WrawwdBCspe# 121s '28.6 
E^wy&(3» 94« 687 

Oo Accra |3) 120* 1280 


+17 Qrt 
-02 0.10 
+05 209 
+01 139 
-0.1 112 
+ 10 029 
.. 831 

.. 206 
-OB BBS 
-02 1*3 
-04 1 S3 
-02 511 
*20 010 
+05 141 
•3* a os 
+40 009 
.. 1031 
-0* 227 
*0* 096 
+0 9 0 10 
+10 706 
*06 194 
. . 224 

.. 22* 


-12 172 
-07 076 


LLOTD8 BANK IRffT TRU8T MANAGERS 
R4»slrara DHL GOrtog-By-Saa. Watte*, w 
Sat# 


MENCAP UNIT TRUST 

Ujw. KJA. 252. nonoort Rd. E7 


WTBMANAqEMSirCOMPARY 
3'-£>Goi*nem 9*. London OSV 7LH 
01-900 4177 


21 WIT TRUST MANAGERS 

OtMaS6 /UfcU,n,,0,,EC3 * 8BP 

SottarCos 67 1 713 +87 010 


106* 1132 
1612 1715 
1217 129* 
156 9 1691 


+2 7 1 pi 
-08 570 
—4 * 000 
+24 201 


CS MM) MANAGERS 

125. r+gn Hotoorn. Lonofin wCiV 6PY 


FSELfTY PfTERNATIQNAL 
River IUA. TonCnaoe. TW9 IDT 
0732 362222 


QUHdCSS MAHON UWT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

PT Bo» 442. 32 St UBry-at+td. London EC3P 
3AJ. 

01-623 9333 

IVfi inccme 4*7 SO. Id *02 631 

N Amar Trust 110*1175 +3* 0*4 

Reecwerv 1815 17t9 *01 290 

an Trt* 350 363d -011032 

Sivmcemtoc 712 766 -01 6.19 

Si Vincem US Gm 720 TSO *22 081 

Temste Bar Sm Go s 1417 149 5 3B5 


Do Accra 
Energy to* 

DO Accun a _ 

Etna mama ms 142.1 -83 see 

Do Ac cra 214 6 2511 -0* 589 

Gernra Gm toe 56.7 686 *1.0 026 

Do Accra 56 7 606 +10 028 

tosomd 2296 2444 +84 4.94 

Do Accra 443* 474* -13 404 

Itt Tech 1721 164 0 +13 0*6 

Oo taw 179* 191 9 *33 0*8 

Japan Down SID 5*5 +16 002 

Do Accra 51 0 54* +10 0*2 

N Amer * Gen 942 107*# +28 096 

Do Accra 102* 109* *23 036 

Pacrt« Baam 8345 99 85# +2*1 Q.4J 

_ Do Accra 87* 1042# +2* 0 43 

Smater Got A (fee 1521 182* +0,7 219 

Do Accra 1694 1B1 1 +0* 219 

WorMv w oa Growth 161 3 (72,7 +30 136 

Do Accra 2360 2417 +C3 J JO 


117 5 <684 -07 341 MERCURY HI 

277 3 2965 -13 341 33. Amo VWb 

46 1 483c *0 4 132 01-260 a» 

JI&! IS -sgr 


TFUBHAHAQSnLTD 

VWtefil SL EC4R BAS 


-03 40S aredram GanecM 3«0 3680 360 

Orabam tocome i960 21 0.7# .. 6*4 

aadrra M Fd 34S0 364 2 +13 122 

Quaran Recovery 2220 073 . . au 


TDUOCREMIANT 
Mjnrmd Hdusd. Z 

01-248 1250 


AttSe Dock. Lcntfon EC4V 


Amencan Conti 


CS Jotun Funo 


55 1 56 6 +2 7 037 


BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

25/26 * Germane SneeL IMM WtX 4AD 

01-401 0295 


CANNON FUND MANAGERS 


I Cbpraae Way Warn Dig,. HAS «W8 
01-902 6616 

Ocowfo 243 9 259 5 +11 352 

tocome 277 7 2954 +1O 5 08 

Fa> Earn 131 3 1391 *0 6 0 74 

North Amerasan 1304 1357 -09 136 


Amerrun 
Australian 
Japan 6 General 
t+rjn tocome 
mtemenonei Trust 

meow Gm Tst 
G'bs 4 Fried tot 
Dun 1 Manet* 
Special Smurons 


44 7 479# -0? 090 
19 6 212 +03 2 74 

71 4 76 4 *2.6 022 

416 44 5 .. 8.07 

660 706 122 

40 9 43Sd 4 78 

64 8 69 J +1.4 615 
3*8 341 .. 2 '9 

384 41 I 1*2 


Amencan 90* 96* 

Amn Emmy income 303 325# 

Amer Spec,# S«a *63 *9 9 

Far East toe 27 5 2 93 

G41 * F.vaa tat F! SO 

Growth 4 Income S3 3 69 > 

Jeoan Speo# Su rfl 9 sflfla 

jaoan Trust 8*9 904 

Manaceo im Tst 11*0 ISO 

Mav income Emmy 629 67 7 

Professorial Cm 29 1 3i 0 

South Earn Aw Tst 273 29 1 

Special Stt 1168 128* 


CAPO. (JAMES) MANAGEMENT 
100 OV Broad Si. Union EC2N ISO 
01-621 OOil 


♦21 O0« 
+07 SJB 
-OS 0*6 
-0.1 359 
957 
. 405 

*01 
*00 

♦19 0* 
.. S6S 
200 
*02 0 19 
.. 133 


HAM3R05BJU4AUNTTTRWT MANAGERS 
Premer UT Aonan. 5. Haytepn Ro. Br entwood 
Easa v 

0277 217916 


r Cos <011 1076# +00 241 
Hatn» N Amer 639 660 -12 097 

Htowos J# » F E SS 7 012 *20 049 

Hamoros Scarahm 67 6 721 +11 1 07 

Manor:* European 86 6 921 +1* 100 

Mamcrvs C#re#an 43 3 46 I +0 7 1.74 

Harare* Eqra. toe 70 8 75.1 -03 52* 

Harare* to^tr me 503 535 +01 628 

Himeros Res Assn SO 0 532# -81 33a 

HENDERSON AOABMSTRATNM 
Premwr UT A#nnsnauto 5. Dettora Rd. Hubpn 
Brentwoeo Essda 
0777-217236 

Soacui Sis be 1097 117 4 *03 1 S3 

Oo Accra 1536 184 4 *0* 1 S3 

1 Recovery Tnw 04 1 90 0 266 

. Coorai Grewm me *03 523 -Oi 141 

Do Accra 553 596 -01 141 

merae AMen 92 6 99* -03 4 38 

Ficancrtf Trust ms 1193 267 

tocraeiGrowmmc 1282 1293 -0* 352 

DO Accra 230 9 246 3 -I 0 362 


BARCLA-tS UNICORN 

Lrwxm House. 2S2. RoraNM Rd E7 

01-53* 5544 


America to 1 671 

Aust Accra 1430 153C 

Do income 1030 109J 

Camul eo 1 636 

E* enrol Trust 363 6 386.6 

Emra tocome 62 0 69 9 

Fmanoce SOO* 213 2 

500 222 6 236 6 

Genera! 1202 1275 

Md 4 Pond toe *98 *21 

Jeoan 4 Gan toe 1202 r27a 

Do Acc 121 3 '28 0 

Growin Accra TS69 <669 

tocome Trim 2796 2974 

Leeure Trust 70 5 7S 0 

Soeeal Sxuawn 12 1 » 129 t 

Reomrmv 1602 170 4 

Trustee Fund 923 96 1 

Unw Teen Accra *8 J 515 

Oo Income 48 2 512 

toortdwtoe Trust 133 3 141 H 

'B Tit urv Fund acc 2704 287 6 
Do me 177 3 I8A6 


B2* 67 7 +t* 228 

1430 153.0 -08 1.52 

1020 1093 -0 4 1 82 

60 1 6306 -0 1 3 42 
363 6 386.8 -29 a 35 

62 0 6? 9 -03 6 14 

200* 2133 +02 3 61 


Caprw OI 3039 3190 .. 197 

Income i3r 233 7 2460 .. Set 

North Amencan (31 3434 2663 1*5 

CHARmes OFFICIAL MVeSTMENTFUNO 
77 London Wefl London EC2N 109 
01-568 1615 

tocome 321 11 .. 548 

Accra 91663 


FLEMM3 (ROBStTl 
6 Crnuy VL London EC3A BAN 
01036 5650 


Amenc an Eiempt £333 2 3402 
Japan Erarat E27l2 2796 

Am taep+rry Tst Si '<27 0 

Prewenv Trust £3087 0 


365 
-OI 3 49 
-03 10.46 
*32 084 


1213 <290 +32 064 


CLERICAL MEDICAL UMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Narrow Plan. Brat* BS2 CUH 
0272 277710 

General Eorar 32 1 342 -02 

Eouty »gn mcrane 34 4 36 7 -02 

Gel i Fnreg tol Gto 25* 272 -00 

todar SacunDes 231 246 


fRAMLMGraN MAMAG0CKT 
3 London Wee Bugs. London 
EC2M 5NO 
01-628 5161 


Amer Turolma he 2020 215 1 


2796 2974# -09 4 II 
70 5 75 Od +06 162 
1214 1231 -02 278 

1602 1704 -08 300 

923 96 1 -03 341 

<8 5 515 +10 OM 

-62 512 -08 080 


133 3 141 B# +35 I 18 
2704 J87 6 -15 3 85 
177 3 1886 -09 3*5 


BARING niNO MANAGERS 

oi^seme 0#C * W * T ’ ^ *** 4X0 

Ml 567 -04 090 

Mifora 44 5 4 7 5 +05 060 

turow 88 7 !>a a .10 090 

Growm 8 toe 548 58 7 a 230 

DbAccra B2t nti 230 

Rrar Japan 582 02 2 + 1 6 DJO 

Japifi TSeoai KU Tbjj# -is g» 


COUNTY bank UWT TRUSTS 
161. CneemrOe. Londm EC2V SBJ 
i Ot-726 1999 

CaDM' Accra 244 7 280 3 
Energy TniSI 41 8 44 4 c 

ErtrJ tocome Ittfl 1487 

Fnanool 127 7 135 0# 

On Strategy 54 2 55 6 

Growtfl tovestomrn 2ar g 2S7 Jm 
income * Grpwm 36 2 37 td 
Japanese A FacAc 975 103 7 
Nm Amer Growth 94 2 1002 
ton Recovery 99 4 105 +d 

Smairer Cos 1784 1897 

GWN bta Tst Sl 4 54 6 


-OB 202 

*04 5 38 
-04 587 
+0.6 265 
193 
-00 3 01 
-03 510 
-34 OOl 
+ 18 235 
-02 305 
+0.5 >96 
+0* 648 


Op Accra 
Con. A Gil tac 
Do Accra 
E»ea hie rsi tac 
Do Accra 
inenme Truer 
Dry Accra 
tor G'owm Fd toe 
Op Accra 
Jasun 8 Gen me 
Do Accra 


208 4 2210 
172 4 1832 
205 5 2186 
78 4 83 4 
1028 1090 
1290 1380# 


-4 9 0*6 
-50 056 
—r 7 122 
+50 12S 


»4 950 +10 170 


SMT 

income Gmrti 
income Morafoy 
Japan Srawtn 
O'eaes Orowto 
SflttttCoa 
BpaoMOppa 


Do Accra 
Itt Tech 
Dc Accra 
Japan Oowm 

Do Accra 
N Am# 6 Gen 
On Accra 
Paote Baam 
Do Accra 


Oo Accra 
Ewopaan Grawtt 
Oo Accra 


680 490 +09 5 14 
481 51.1 .0 9 514 


1012 1097 *16 100 

1DSS 112* +1.8 1*0 


Oo Accra 3368 3M.Q 

Gar 77 9 7M 

088 Fbed Accra 8S0 B&1 

torome M! ITS 


Do Accra 
JJ S" Accra 


209 0 2223 *02 243 * 1 

3360 356.0 +0* 243 

77 9 7B0 -04 808 

Si S 5? iS 

rots ® 


LLOYDS LIRE lOPT TRUST 
20. anon Sl London EC2A844X 
01-920 0311 


Do Accra 
Earapl Quo 
Eaentt Accra 


2f7 3 2630 *81 140 

iteo me# *40 om 

1069 1137# +50 OOl 
IS66 186* -01 200 

1656 I7B1 -at 200 
1952 201 2d .. 205 

2850 304.7# 80S 


forar Ob 
.D o Accra 
Gto Trust 
Do Accra 


Do Accra 
US Growth 
Do Accum 


94* 100* +0.1 1.77 

1316 1401 *01 1.77 

470 490 *0.1 503 

496 - 530 -00 503 

754 «2d -81 500 
68 4 920# -01 5*0 
53 1 56* +14 1.16 

524 960 *\A 1.16 


MPLAMP BANK QROUP UNIT TRUST 


Hse. Sevor Sl tMML SieMau Sf 3R3 


899 740# -02 202 
942 KKXSd -04 202 


Ooenab t 6 Gan 1147 1220 +10 3*5 


I Oo Accra 55 9 598 

rncrae AMen 92 6 990 

Frcancrar Trust 111 5 1193 

mc£*neSGtov.n»tac 1282 1294 
OO Accra 230 0 248 3 


982 1044 
193 0 I OB 4 

147 6 157 0 
164 0 174 4 
MO HQ 
6*2 982 


ManO'iy income Fd 62 1 ! 6660 


4 91 
•21 00C 
-20 00C 
+ 19 0 10 
*19 de 
562 
. 2 I* 

111 


l«^i tocome Trust 1464 1560# -02 525 

Eura TOome 1362 146* +0 ' 5*8 

SmtoerCCeDw 94* 903# *06 592 

Piel 8 G»1 44 9 «80 -04 10*4 

Gto Trust 4Q1 4SL5# -02 10 12 

Fned toiw-si Turn Si S 65 1 . . 1006 

rSccai Heaancar* 548 521 .11 091 

GtoO+l Tech 10X2 109 4 +18 023 

Ge»d 47 2 502 1 10 

imtonauonei laaa 1552 *13 027 

04 t Hal Res S69 ?i Ed +0* 14* 

toonowde 1 Si 309 9 328 f 3 49 

Ausl'AAen 

Ewnean 

Era Smanar Cos 

UUr T-uu 


LONDON 8 MAMCMESm 

Wear aOe iro». Lour EM IDS 
0392 52155 

Ganerai Trust 370 360 -0* 380 

income Trust 308 33* -02 6M) 

b fl em alttral Truer +7 7 237 +410 100 


Do Accra 
Ena rap! toe 

Oo Accra 
Gto * FUed MB 
Do Accra 


MboSECunmEs 

Ttraagj.ToralttHaRBBO 


FiBENoa pnovwen- managers 
P tottm Ero. Dorheio. Srmay 
HX»B65r)S5 


CATER ALLEN 

1 . Km Wttam Sl EC4N 7AU 
gi-63 6314 

Gel Trust 950 101 lc -05 11*1 


FP Eouay Drst 
Oo Accra 
FP F..BC 1 nr Onr 
Oo Accra 

SltoetollllNj Dw 

Do Accum 


1756 1850 
2899 3057 
102.1 109* 

113 7 121.6 
1444 1578 
1485 157 1 


Cure Dr-7 
Jew" Eaempt <2| 

■« Am# 


585 

733 

-00 

089 






750 

+ 1 2 

COT 

101 a 

1070# 



1029 




584 

619 

-1 6 



296# 

+03 

Z 63 





503 

*45 

+31 

007 

1170 

1264 

•34 


1037 




1019 




953 

1003 

-12 

1 79 

100 3 

’05 a c 

*36 

1 17 

«? S 

W0 



6i 7 

HD 



149 T 

1576 

+2* 

1*4 


Amer I Gen toe 
Oo Aeon 
Amer Recovery 

□0 Accra 
»m S+MU r Cos 
Do Accra 

Aust i Gen toe 
Oo Accra 
Comnr 4 Gen Inc 
Do Accra 


207 7 22029 +40 1 77 
240 7 2561# +40 1.77 
233 3 247 3 +30 1.64 

2529 2861 +2* 1.64 

58 1 W.Qd +10 105 
SI 1 805# *O0 1 06 
759 812c *03 0S7 
825 883c +4)6 097 
1566 186*# -03 287 
203 1 217.3# -04 287 


Do Accra 
N Amencan he 
Do Accra 
Overseas Orowlh 

Oo Accum 

Smeaer Coe Inc 
Do Accra 


1569 169* +10 325 

52 1 550# 808 

580 622# -81 8*6 
490 520 -02 18.18 

78* fill -03 1218 
128.7 1370 -04 6*3 

*13* 327 7 -00 033 

”52 1K7# -OB 4.16 
237 6 253 4# -14 4 16 
186* 198 0 +5 7 022 

195* 106* +60 022 

968 1032 +32 1.16 

115* 1231 *40 f 16 

94 7 1010 +20 1.14 I 

113* 121.1 +2e l ie I 


SAVE* PROSPER 

26. Western Rd. Roodord RM1 3L8 

66-71 &i«ii SL EcMurah 0C 4A0C 

(Romford) 070866666 Or (£bn) 031-228 7351 
Am# foe 1 ttowtt 84 f 865 +00 7.60 

C#» Untt 91* B70 +10 204 

Conano dry 490 510 +0.1 T.&4 

Energy bw 47 7 51 0 -o* 331 

Eurcpaan Growth KM 89 1 *08 074 

titorajimcBod 678 710 .. 6 12 

DO imr [4 g 530 587 .. 310 

E m tor auu i 399 <20# -03 006 

HnattdlSeca 799 BS.4 +i.D 242 

Oto 8 n toe 50.1 520 -0* 11.75 

tagn ^nun una, 1500 iei*« -0 < 563 

RVr VKjd Lbtos Ml 0 150 1 -03 5 16 

tocome UnCS 840 904# *0.1 6A2 

b ben an em Trust 75 0 802 +4) 5 282 

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Scotch whisky is one of our leading exports. Overl6,CXX) 
jobs depend on it. 

Johnnie Walker &. Co. must be made stronger if they are to 
win the fight for overseas sales. 

There is opposition from the Far East, America and Canada. 

Each has its own thriving whisky brands. And powerful 
international corporations to market them. 

Scotch whisky needs a similar champion. And our merger 
with Distillers would create one. 

. ' Time and time again Britain has failed to wake early enough 
to the challenge from overseas. 

The alarm bells are now ringing on the world whisky market 

Help us respond. Support the Guinness Distillers bid. 

GUINNESS PLC 

Guinness and Distillers. A stroke of genius. 


This advertisement ispub 

and belief {having 


enfeO & Gbbmited and The British Linen Bank Limited on behalf of Gui n ness PLC. The Directors of Guinness PLC are the persons responsible for the information contained in this advertisement, lb the best of their knowledge 
care to ensure thar such is foe case) foe information contained in this advertisement is in accordance with the facts. The Directors of Guinness PLC accept responsibility accordingly. SOURCE: Scotch Whisky Association. 


•Xi 






















FINANCE A ND INDUSTRY 



THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


From your portfolio card chock tour 
eigiii shah? price movements. Add them 
up 10 give you \our overall icul. Check 
this auinsi the daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If it matches vou 
na«c won outright or a share of the total 
cUuiv prize money stated. If you are a 
winner 1'ollou the Claim procedure on the 
back of tour card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 





Jjncv SUuIhI 


MK Orel 


O'l'.ird IruimmrnLs 


Duhilirr 



Canum ’V 


BLu\s Lets 


Oiuwh 


Weekly Dividend 


Pleas: make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £ .000 in 
newspaper. 



BREWERIES 


306 

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LOCK 

INTO 

BIGGER 


IN THE 
SUNDAY 


loud vert is*? your cur, holiday 
hi »nw or pn iperly ft »r sale in 
The Sunday Times Classified, 
fill in your advertisement in 
the space below. I Longer 
messui^s can be atiached 
separately ). 

Rates are: W.SO per line 
{approximately 4 words, 
minimum.! lines I. 

L5f».00 pcrs.c.e. full display. 
Plus 15% VAT. 

Prior u» your adyertisemem 
appearing we will conluel you 
with ihe eosl and confirm the 
date of insertion. 

PAY NO POSTAGE. Send to 
The Sunday Times. Classified 
Deni.. Freepost. London 
WCl 4UR. Or phone 
III -107 .Vl| I /im 
Ad vert Lsenien t 


Address - .. 


Daytime Telephone: 




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I *TVl Srt >■ iOiLJ'U'J 


© Twiei Vtw n pm Limbed 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£2.000 

Gaims required for 
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To pay by Accessor Burcluycurd. 
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270 1 39 Evmwa 196 -2 

140 1 04 Earn 119 

146 90 Esoamel Ira 1*8+2 

403 27 2 EsW 390 -5 

42 23 Felon 25 

37 28 Faaou Aonc md 29 a-! 

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185 60 Fit* kxfcns 85 

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300 IBS OKN 292 -4 

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471 350 HawAra SrtWey 471 +4 

114 80 HSMMy 103 .1 

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SOURCE: GUINNESS SALES DATA. 


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Guinness is on the up and up. At home, and abroad. 
With Distillers well have the scope to grow even more. 

More sales mean more jobs. And my goodness, 
that must be good lor Britain. 




<4 


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GUINNESS PLC 




Guinness and Distillers. A stroke of genius. 


Its.:*-- 


. rtiserhew is published bv Morgan Grenfell & Co limited and The British Linen Bank Limiied on behalf of Guinness PLC The Direaors of Guinness PIC are the persons re>pon,iU i. 
~ ^ eir knowledge and befief ihavit^r taken all reasonable care to ensure that such is the case) the information contained in this advertisement is m accordance with the facts The D». i i . 


mm. 














crcrero sasn 


**•*-■* W.X. ,.-..--. - --T ;.V. AnJS^‘ 


Edited by Matthew May 


BT maintains its grip 
on Britain’s IT market 


British Telecom last week 
took one more step in 
consolidating its position as 
the dominant force in the 
UK. information technology 
market. In the face of a 
recommendation by the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission (hat the pro- 
posed takeover of Mitel be 
stopped the corporation 
snatched victory. 

The government, deter- 
mined to buiid BT into a 
multinational giant with 
manufacturing and opera- 
tional skills that can compete 
with the Japanese and the 
Americans in the information 
technology’ market anywhere 
in the world, disregarded the 
MMC recommendations. 

The government justifica- 
tion appears weak. It readi’Tn 
reaching this conclusion, the 
Secretary of State took into 
account the unanimous 
conclusion of the Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission 
that the proposed acquisition 
may be expected to operate 
against the public interest. In 
accordance with the majority 
view of the commission, the 
Secretary of State considers 
that the adverse effects on 
competition in the UK 
should be sufficiently reduced 
if constraints were placed on 
BTs ability to acquire tele- 
communications apparatus 
fmm Mitel". 

What those constraints and 


controls will be is not dear. 
The Government, as it has 
many times in the past three 
years, has refused to address 
the real question. Can the 
British IT industry — both 
telecommunications and 
computers — be expected to 
thrive and expand in the face 
of a dominating BT? 


(.THE WEEK ) 


By Bill Johnstone 

Technology Correspondent 

The Government justifica- 
tion continued; The Sec- 
retary of Slate has decided 
that the proposed merger 
could proceed, subject to 
conditions similar to those 
proposed by the MMC. He 
has, however, concluded that 
competition in the UK mar- 
ket for telecommunications 
equipment would be suf- 
ficiently protected by impos- 
ing a ceiling on Mitel's 
marketing to and through BT 
rather than imposing a com- 
plete prohibition on such 
marketing". 

"He is, therefore, asking 
the Director General of Fair 
Trading to seek undertakings 
from British Telecom on 
these lines to remedy the 
adverse effects from the 
proposed merger indentified 
in the MMC report". 


Instead of making a deter- 
mined judgement itself, the 

Government has left it to the 
Office of Fair Trading to try 
and reach an accomodation 
with a corporation which is 
bent on dominating the UK 
IT sector. It took a similar 
approach to the control of 
British Telecom in its net- 
work operations by creating 
an Oftel on a model of the 
Office of Fair Trading. The 
director general of the tele- 
communications watchdog 
has been devoting much of 
his energies in trying to come 
to "accommodations" with 
British Telecom and would 
clearly like to have more 
powers to thwart the am- 
bitions of the corporation. 

The Government’s de- 
cision in yet another monu- 
ment to the lack of industrial 
policy. That lacking is 
particularly evident in the IT 
sector where the growing 
trade deficit, the lack of 
investment and the dearth of 
skills is putting British in- 
dustry at the mercy of the 
Americans and the Japanese. 

.Are we to assume that BT 
win now manufacture every- 
thing that it needs whether it 
be paper dips or power lines? 
Hie answer is obviously no. 
Its function should be guard- 
ian of the national network. 
The government should tell it 
so. 


Meet the new boss face to face 

By Richard Sarson - Stands at the. fair fa 

UK's .fir* Computing (ft « £ 


By Richard Sarson 

The UK's first Computing 
Recruitment Fair is planned 
to take place on April 18 and 
19 at the Novotel Hotel in 
HammersmiLh. Thirty firms 
with jobs to fill will have 
booths for job hunters in the 
computing field to go to and 
apply on the spot 
The benefits of this ap- 
proach say the organisers. 
Intro UK. include cutting 
down the lengthy recruitment 
cycle so that candidates can 
have instant interviews. All 
the ardous work involved in 
filling out application forms 
and curricula vitae is re- 
moved as is the usual lengthy 
wait far answers. 


The idea far these job fairs 
started in Norway a few years 
ago and spread to Sweden 
and Holland. If all goes well 
the organisers of the UK fair, 
expect to host two more in 
London, in Sepiemeber and 
December, and introduce it 
to the regions next year. 

Nearly 1.000 job seekers 
turned up to the last Dutch 
fair with one software house 
hiring eight staff and Shell 
Nederland describing 100 
candidates as of "definite 
interest" to them. Eighty per 
cent of the exhibitors 
rebooked for later fairs. 


System Sales Exec. , £15k! 

IBM and Compaq business computer equip- HmJUUDflmgLJ - 
ment specialists have an opportunity for a 
young but experienced sales executive based 
at our High Holborn showroom. OTE at least 
£15k. Also a management vacancy at a some- 
what higher salary. Phone Nick Read at: 

MORSE COMPUTERS 78 HoBwm - wciv 6iS ' 

L - ■ * J Telephone 01-831 0644. Tele* 916509 


'A-thonsec 

Dea-erA; / • ; 
j • .. 


Stands at the fair have to 
be the same size and each 
costs £3.730. The organizers 
say firms are signing up fast 
and include a mixture of 
manufacturers, software 
houses and large computer 
users — mainly banks and 
insurance companies. Head 
hunters and other personnel 
agencies cannot lake part 

One particular class of job 
hunter who may well benefit 
from the concept of job-fairs 
is the over 40’s, whose 
applications are frequently 
consigned to the waste-paper 
basket by most personnel 
managers. Now, at least, they 
can confront them directly. 

Perhaps the major snag is 
what would happen to the 
person who finds their boss — 
or a subordinate — in the 
same booth. 


Imagine you could see what 
the batsman sees when he 
faces a fast bowler in the test 


match, or have a goalie* s-eye computer, but later versions 
view of a penalty kick in the employed a Motorola 68000- 


1 HE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 


COMPUTER HORIZONS 


The phone 
that is 
going 
places 

By Frank Brown 

Rood Vodafone’s latest big 
customer for its cel hilar radio 
service looks set to make the 
mobile telephone a powerful 
source of instant information, 
as weB as a bandy means of 
communication. 

I CL, Britain’s major com- 
puter company, has linked its 
nationwide internal tele- 
communications network — 
die largest of its kind in the 
UK — to the Vodafone 
service. 

Believed to be the first such 
link in Europe, it provides 
Vodafone users with dial-up 
access to ICL’s 20,000 tele- 
| phone extensions and vice 1 
I versa, and can handle 30 calls 
simultaneously between the , 
two networks. 

The arrangement means 
that senior managers and key 
sales personnel of 1CL and its 
parent company STC will be 
able to use their mobile 
telephones in exactly the 
same way as office phones. 

The link Is particularly 
significant because ICL’s net- 
work handles data as weD as 
voice traffic and provides 
access to message and 
information handling 
such as electronic mail and 
telex. 

ICL’s cellular radio users 
ran have automatically 
diverted from the office to 
their mob Ik phone and out 
rapidly access key extensions 
and dafu/message services 
within the ICL network using 
three-digit dialling codes. 

There are also long-term 
effects on its private wire. For 
example, the company is 
looking at the possibility of 
allowing users of its value- 
added netwo r ks (Vans) to 
access their databases via its 
internal network without hav- 
ing to go to their office or to a 
terminaL 

One sack Van is Tradernet, 
which ICL operates for the 
Article Numbering Associ- 
ation, to which most major 
companies and su pe rm arket 
riiiim belong. 

The extension of the 
Vodafone private wire link to 
Tradernet woald obviously 
increase its versatility, in 
terms of placing orders from 
bread vans and milk floats 
and sending information to 
and from delivery trades. 


Uum&oft- Stephen Johnson 


^fj 




r 




Keeping an eye on the ball 


By Richard Pawson 
an Osborne 1 portable micro- 


last moments of a Cup F inal, based computer to improve 
These are just two expert- the speed, pie control soft- 
eners ma de possible by wa - re is written in Forth, a 
Skycam — a computer-con- Programming language. 

trolled television camera - . . 

developed in the US. ^ “? tor wmch , h 

Instead of being fixed in ^ . mteUl gem control 
one location, Skycam allows 

.he camera .o be positioned *SS 


Each motor winch has its 
own intelligent control board 
and instructions are commu- 
nicated via a link equivalent 


ilk wuiiwa iv ui (nmuuucu l-_,| 

anywhere over the field of “■ «■ ■ 

play. The camera is sus- ^ office - ,. A . mmranirc 
pended on wires from the m,crowave hak commu - 
faur corners of the stadium 


nicales with the camera — 


ogy from one of bis previous 
brainchilds — Stea dicam. 

Used in such films as 
Return of the Jedi, Stead icara 
is a gyroscopicaily-controlled 
harness that enables the i 
cameraman to walk or run 
while still providing a steady 
picture. 

Skycam is still very much a 
prototype system and has not 
gone into mass production. 
Planned future developments 
include an obstacle avoidance 
routine that employs artificial 
intelligence 


remotely-controlled winch. SSJ? 


The operator initiates the 

movement via two joysticks s ^ slems tettenes - 

on the control panel in the th* 


since the steel cables are Skycam has. however, a'- 
already used to deliver a ready been successfully used 
trickle charge to the mobile to televise several American 


k^.~Ts.. Moving the camera at high near mime. I ucic a uu 

moms speed and .lien mulling ii to denying the quality of this 


football games — baseball and 
basketball will be tried in the 
near future. There is no 


are translated 


the four cable wracks. dotls usability problems. 

The first prototype was Here the inventor, Garrett 
actually constructed around Brown, applied the technoi- 


form of American sports 
coverage. Let us hope that 
Skycam is an innovation that 
British television will not be 
slow to adopL 


Silicon take-off near Heathrow 


Wright Air 

ft ! 


ntTtittmmiiiit.id 


-ftryoorasrpiterrocim 

COMPUTER ROOM CONSTRUCTION, AIR CONDITIONING 
MAINTENANCE & C0N5UIZANC7 02P773 8421 


BIRMINGHAM 
BRISTOL 
' . GLASGOW 
• LEEDS 
LONDON 
v NEWCASTLE 
WOKINGHAM 


Silicon Valley in California, 
Silicon Glen on the Oyde, 
! Silicon Fen in Cambridge 
and Sunrise Valley on the 
Thames will shortly have a 
rival, on a 60-year-old rub- 
bish dump near Heathrow. 

Stockley Park will become 
a new business park far high 
technology companies^ joint 
venture between property 
company, Stockley Group, 
the London Borough of 
Hillingdon and the Univer- 
sity of Superannuation 
Scheme. 

The first of the office 
buildings, which will finally 
cover 100 acres of the 350 
acre site, are due to be ready 
in the spring. Trees 50 feet 
high have been shipped from 

The developers promise to 
provide shops, restaurants, 
conference halls and banks. 
Tennis and squash courts, a 
gym and swimming pool will 


By Richard Sarson 

look out on to one of the 
several lakes. And, the cliffs 
of rubbish, in some places 30 
feet high, are being carved 
into an 18-hole golf course. 

From the course, you have 
a panoramic view of Sunrise 
Valley: to the east, IBM and 
Honeywell's Brentford 
Mocks: to the south, Tbom- 
EML to the south-west. 
Sperry and ICL in Bracknell; 
and to the west. Rank Xerox 
and the myriad s mall soft- 
ware companies in Slough, 
Maidenhead and Windsor. 

Because the new M4 to 
M25 link is only one mile 
away, tenants will be able to 
reach these hives .. of elec- 
tronic activity in' half an 


while the office buildings will 
be wired with optical fibre 
and cables. 

The developers invited 450 
of the world’s major com- 
puter companies to the in- 
troductory symposium before 
Christmas. Seventy per cent 
of those likely to take office 
space are reportedly Ameri- 
can. 15 per cent from the Far 
East and only 15 per cent 
British or European. 


Superficial 
response 
to decline 
in skills 


Reports from the Govern- 
ment on the shortage of skills 
cn information technology 
were superficial and burned, 
according to Professor 
John Ashworth, vice-chan- 
cellor of the University of 
Salford. Speaking at a lecture 
last week. Professor 
Ashworth, who is also chair- 
man of the IT Economic 
Development committee with 
NEDO. said the 
Government s response was 
inadequate in terms of the 
amount of money needed to 
bahthe decline and the 
quality of the solution offered. 


Russian service 

The Soviet news agency 
Tass has signed an agree front 
to sell its English language 
news service to the West by 
making it available through 
desktop computers. Announc- 
ing the agreement with the 
British company 
D atasotve ,T ass said it 
would give the world greater 
access lo first-hand news 
of the Soviet Union and be 
commerdatty profitable. 


AT&T factory 

The American communica- 
tions giant AT&T is planning to 
open a British factory within 
two years in a joint venture . i 
with Pnthps- The factory wfll T 

initially manufacture commu- 
n (cations transmission gear 
and is expected to provide 
about 350 jobs. AT&T re- 
cently announced it would 
abandon its Net 1000 A' 

communications network due - 
to poor sales. *; 


Systime sell-off 

The troubled minicomputer * 
company Systime has sold a - 
large part or its business to. Z. 
Digital Equipment As part of 
the deal DEC wiB drop a £5 
mfltion suit which alleges that?- 
Syptime copied its con- */ 
purer equipment DEC is to. ,'4 
take over Systime's cus- / -*• 
tomers services for its D-eerfieft 
computers. . 





wi&M: 


mm 

km*-, 

E&sdt'g- 


be myriad small soft- _ i -. . 

SS feSsf- IBM PC XT/FT) 10mb*£ 2295! 4 


“«* “ e “ w » IBM Personal Computer PC XT/FD, 256k 

™ «-»>*«■ ** 
reach these hives of elec- ;diske,te drive, monochrome monitor, mono 
Ironic activity in' half an dispfay and primer adaptor, UK keyboard, 
hour. British Rail may even manuals and diagnostics. IBM PC. complete, 
build a station between £1450. IBM AT, complete, from £2690. 

Hayes and West Drayton. A _ _ ..iv-mt 

satellite dish and 2,000 ex- MORSE COMPUTERS 78 Hi # Hotoom. London WC1V 6LS 
change lines. will be installed, " =«=== Telephone 01-831 0644. Telex 9 1 6509 


Authorised 
Dealer '' 



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Amongst IBM compatibles the Ferranti PC is 
quickly establishing itself as the top dog. 

There's little doubt it's a breed apart 

It's backed by a nationwide dealer network that 
will offer you the assurance of professional pre-sales 
consultancy and advice. And a post sales support 
package that includes fast response, on-site 
maintenance - free in the first year. 

It's worth noting too that you're buying from an 
all British company with a rock-solid reputation for 
quality computer products spanning four.decades. 

The Ferranti PC range is an IBM compatible - 

and then some! It's got memory capacity speed, 
expandability, value for money price tags and free 
business software that enables you to do all the 
everyday business tasks - immediately. 

What's more the latest addition to the ever 
expanding range, the AT with its distinctive stylish 
slimlin e casing, definitely offers more byte than bark. 

If youfd like to know more about the PC that's 
rapidly becoming management's best friend, send now 
for the Ferranti PC data pack. 


Ferranti C nmprtfrr SyttfPT Pt; T.imfhpy^ 
Deiker Street, Oldham, Lancs, OL1 3XF. 
Telephone: 061-624 9552 Telex: 665764. 


IvKK.WTI 

ipefSci^fcorTiphiters 


| Hease send me the Ferranti PC data pack. 




Position 

Company.. 
Address _ 


I Post to: Ferranti Computer Systems Limited, 

| Derker Street, Oldham QLI 3XF 

I Ferranti PC. 

! The PC with pedigree 




[ill] 


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i hn»3Ji O* i 


THE TIMES TUESDAY. FEBRUARY A IDS* 



ebal 


tvV i' - 1 .. - -" 

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If you want to know what 
to do about Hanson’s ‘paper,’ 
ask Hanson’s shareholders. 


‘ST 


•Jji *> 


t;ry .JY 

s: ' ■ : • 


“ . c>i 


-■~e s 



i Last summer, when Hanson Trust’s 
shareholders were invited to take more 
,, Hanson paper via a rights issue, they gave 
it a resounding ‘thumbs down! 

As well they might 

Since January 1985, Hanson has issued 
1,200 million new shares, and plans to 

HAhBCMPnCEPStFORMANCETSSS 
RELATIVE TO FT- ACTUARIES ALL-SHARE INDEX 

jan Ftti Mar Apr Muir Jun Jd Aug Sep pet Nov Dec Jan 24 

0 U\k FT-A ALL-SHARE INDEX 


HANSON 

.SHARES 


HANSON 

CONVERTIBLE 


Sour* finance Ttmae date 

issue hundreds of milliohs more in its bid 
io take over Imperial 

\ No wonder the market is appearing 
to be suffering from acute indigestion. 

The future value of this paper is ques- 
tionable, too, as it depends On a rate of 
growth which Hanson companies alone 
? ^11 find very difficult to sustain: 


Almost all 
of Hanson’s com 

P 
d< 

7 , 

Pi 

The choice of companies 
bricks, shoes, textiles, and batteries 
amongst them - is dearly a commit 
ment to industries in decline 


And the trading performance 
of the long-established Hanson busi 
nesses is largely pedestrian. 


Hanson’s growth rate can therefore 
only be sustained by ‘buying’ profit It 
has to make more and more acquisitions; 
something that becomes increasingly 
difficult as each one needs to be bigger 
thanthelast 

What’s more, in 1985 Hanson paper 
performed dismally felling some 20% com- 
pared with the FT All-Share index. 


Against this record, in the same 
year, Imperial shares outperformed the 
index by some 25%. 

And since 1981, Imperial profits 
have more than doubled. 

Behind Imperial shares is over 
£1-5 billion of shareholders’ net 
assets, and famous brands such 
as Courage Best Hofmeister, 
John Smith’s Bitter, Ross, Golden 
Wonder, Lea&Perrins John Player 
Special and Superidngs. 

We believe Hanson can b ring 
no industrial or commercial advan- 
tages to us at all. 

So if you want to know what to do about 
Hanson’s offer; the answer is: Hands off. 




jrhe (firertore of Imperial Group P* c (hidudmg those^^ supervision of this advertisement) have taken all reasonable care to ensure that the facts stated and opinions expressed haem are lair and sccunte. The directors accept itsponsibilrty accoidijiehe 

. : ■ ■ ■ ' > ' 


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.24 


Inc HMfcS TUESDAY - FEBR1) 


^NATIONAL EXHIBITION CENTRE/1 




A SPECIAL REPORT/By Craig Seton 




Full ahead 
to the 
big shows 






The building of the National 
Exhibition Centre could be 

• likened to a plan to launch a 
-.new ship into the teeth of a 
.•hurricane. 

I It faced strenuous oppo- 
‘siiir>n from a pro-London 
llobbv ana Degan operating a 
decade ago at a time of high 
. inflation, political uncertainty 

• and industrial decline, with a 
-ferocious recession looming. 
- Few people were inclined 

to take kindly to a largely 
'council-funded' project that 
was to require a capital 
investment of £50 million, 
-located on a greenfield site 
~ou\side Birmingham. 100 
.miles from the exhibition 
‘centres of London, if its 
-.chances of success seemed 
’remote even before it started. 

. There were those who 
.'would happily have seen the 
-NEC strangled at birth. 
Against that background the 
.centre h3d to fight for its first 
business and try to cane out 
a living — and a reputation — 
in the highly competitive 
world of British and Euro- 
pean exhibitions. 

. Ten years on, the NEC is 
'making money and has 
■established itself as the 
Country's largest exhibition 
location, at 105.000 square 
metres twice the size of 
■London's E art’s Court — its 
.nearest UK rival - and the 
tenth largest in western Eu- 
rope. 

A master plan has been 
evolved to double its size by 
the vear 2004 to take it 


and. after operating costs and 
debt charges bad been paid, 
contributed £3 million to 
Birmingham's rate fund, 
repaying the early fehh 
shown in the idea of a 
national exhibition complex 
by leaders of the then 
Birmingham Corporation and 
chamber of commerce and 
industry, which fought for a 
local site as long ago as 1969. 

Those financial results 
were achieved in a peak year 
in what is considered a four- 
year cycle of exhibition 
business at the NEC In 1985- 
86 the total income is 
expected to be £22 million, 
the repayment of debts £6.5 
million and the contribution 
to the rate fund £1.2 million. 

Behind the NECs record is 
the multi-purpose range of 
facilities available in its nine 
halls and elsewhere on site, 
its location on the motorway 
network and alongside an 
international airport and rail- 
way station ana a winning 
mix of events. They include 
trade and public exhibitions 
and shows, conventions, 
product launches, concerts 
and sports events. 



The ace card 
is access 


The greatest obstacle that 


£250,000 demountable 


appeared .to- confront the ice rink has now been 
NEC .in hs planning stage commissioned and its first 


was the proposed location — expected use wfl! be by 
a greenfield site on the Torvill and Dean during 
eastern rim' of Birmingham, SportAid, a Bob GekJof-style 
Britain's second city, 100 event to help famine victims % 
mikis Bom the crowd-pullisg in Africa, scheduled for May. 
attractions of London that Hal) 8, known as the 
were a magnet for exhibitors Forum, is a .4,000 square 
and their customers- metre “black box" facility 

Ten years on that location from which natural light is 


attractions of London that 
were a magnet for exhibitors 
and their customers. 

Ten years on that location 


is now overwhelmingly re- excluded in order to appeal 
g&rded as a great advantage to the organisers of private; 


and the centre's market! 
officials promote “ease 
access" for all its worth. 


corporate presentations and 
ritzy product launches. 

The NEC has two on-site 


On one day during the hotels, the Birmingham 
Motor Show, at the NEC Metrppde and- Warwick, 


120,000 viators poured into offering 700 .rooms. The 
its massive halls. The car Mettopole has a conference 


parks were jammed with centre for L200 delegates and 
15.000 cars, L000 exhibitor’s 1,000 banqueting quests with 


vehicles and 800 coaches. 34 meeting rooms and a 200- 
inter-city trains deposited seat dnezna. 


countiess thousands of pas- 


sengers at the modern railway marketing manager, . 
station adjacent to the com- sai±“ Accessibility is roily 


plex. That was a record day. our ace card, an almost 
Apparently the executives unique amalgam of road, rail 


who operate the eves huger and air facilities in a central 
exhibition centre at Dussel- position." 


dorf now describe the NEC as At the recent Interplas 


It attracts millions 
of visitors a year 


Each year it attracts three 
million visitors and the spin- 
off to the deeply depressed 
local economy is estimated at 
£bU million a year. 

■ All but £1.5 miltlion of the 


further up the European £50 million capital invested 
league and put it in conten- in the NEC on its site on the 


lion to stage some of the eastern outskirts of Bir- 
blockbuster European ex- mingham was raised by 
hi bit tons which bring prestige Birmingham City Council 
and vital foreign earnings and The NEC Company that 
recognition, although it will sprang from the early 
still be a lone way behind the partnership between a vie 
massive 471.000 square me- and business leaders now 
ires on offer in Hanover. manages and promotes the 
In 1984-85, from an in- centre, 
come of £25 million, the Terry Golding, the chief 


been a nightmare. He said; 
'Who would have chosen to 
open when we did, at a time 
of hyper inflation, just before 
the big recession and on form 
land in the middle of 
nowhere? 

“I think we have answered 
all the dismal jonas who said 
i t would not work by 
establishing a good, profitable 
and sound business with 
enormous potential for the 
future.” 

Mr Golding, who did the 
same job at Earl's Court and 
Olympia before he joined the 
NEC eight years ago, added: 
“It has been a resounding 
success. We have settled into 
a regular calendar of regular 
events and our consultants 
believe that given relatively 
modest growth in the econ- 
omy. we will tie required U> 
double in size to meet 
demand at peak times in the 
future." 


The centre, showing 
its large, lakeside site; 
inset, Terry Golding, 
chief executive of the 


NEC: “We have an- 


swered all those who said 


it would not work 


two years and u will be held 
;ain this year and in 1988. 
. egotiations are expected to 
start within the next few 
months for the prestige event 
to continue at the NEC. 


centre made a record trading executive, realizes that the 
surplus of about £9.3 milliion first decade could easily have 


Probably the most success- 
ful event at the NEC is the 
British International Motor 
Show. The centre signed a 
10-year deal to stage the 
crowd-pul! i ng show every 


Mr Golding said that when 
the show was hekl in London 
average attendances were 
about 400,000. with a record 
of 660,000 in its best year. It 
is now combined with 
commercial vehicles at the 
NEC where the attendance 
has averaged 750,000. He 
said: “That is a supreme 
example of something which 
has worked well for us and 
for the customer." 

The NEC has established a 
calendar of 98 exhibitions, 
including the nine biggest 
international trade fairs in 
Britain, and each year it 
holds about 45 trade and 10 
public exhibitions, more than 



competitive business. We see 
Eari’s Court, Olympia, and 
places like Harrogate and 
Manchester as breeding 
grounds for the NEC If 
smaller shows are successful 
elsewhere, they look for 
larger venues and we have 
the space to house them.” 

Future success, though, 
demands that the NEC looks 


to the European scene. At the 
moment it does not have the 


“the centre of the short Exhibition, an international 
walk", not simply for its plastics show, 26 per cent of; 
location alongside Bir- the visitors arrived from 103 


mingham International Air- overseas countries. The air- 
port and the main-hoe rail port is linked to the raiiwav 


station, but also because its station and the NEC complex 


huge exhibition halls are 
inter- linked. 


The NEC is only a stone's sit sysiem. 


the revolutionary Maglev 
rver tzam” passenger tran- 


rhrow from the Mb and M42 The new £60 million terrni— 


and is at the heart of the nal at the airport was opened.' 
motorway system. An es- in 1984 — an improvement- 


timated 28 million people which was largely attributed^ 
live within 100 miles of the to the increasing business at- 


complex, which covers 400 the NEC. 















£1 million profit is made 
from pop and other concerts 
in its acoustically treated 
Arena Hall, sporting events, 
product launches and even 
bird and dog shows. 

Successful exhibitions at 
the NEC include those for the 
gifts and hardware retail 
trade, machine tools, printing 
machineiy, building and 
construction, plastics, packag- 
ing and construction equip- 
ment 

International recognition is 
crucial and in 1984 about 
2,700 of the 12,800 compa- 
nies exhibiting at the NEC 
were from overseas, creating 
an estimated £15 million 
worth of invisible earning s 
for Britain. 

Nevertheless, there are 
periods of inactivity in the 
exhibition calendar so the 


pean exhibition halls, such as 
ITMA, the international tex- 
tile-machinery exhibition and 
EMO, the international ma- 
chine-tool event 


That is why the master 
plan to double in size by 'the 
turn of the century is vital, 
but the scheme to expand to 
such a degree north of the 
centre is bogged down, tem- 
porarily Mr Golding believes, 
because West Midlands 
County Council has its own 
plan to build a high-technol- 
ogy industrial .park. 

Should the council get its 
way, it would frustrate plans 
for additional car parking 
space and hotel accommoda- 
tion which are an integral 
part of the planned future 
growth. 


acres. 

Of the nine “halls”, two 
are promoted for purposes 


Scheduled “business”.- ** 
destinations from Bir- 
mingham now include 


other than simple exhibition Amsterdam, 


space. 

Hall 7 is better known as 
Birmingham International 


hagen, DusseldorC Frankfurt, 
Hanover, Munich, Paris, Go*" 
neva, Milan and Zurich and' 


Arena. It has a dear span all major British airports. Air 1 
interior and tiered seating for France is now operating a- 


12,000 spectators. Neil Di- daily Paris service/ 
amond, Diana Ross and Nether! ines flies to .Amster-- 


other superstars of the pop dam and Lufthansa starts 
world have played to packed services from next month: 


audiences there, while British The Birmingham Inters 
Telecom, at its first annual national railway station has 


general meeting since 8(T minute services linked to 
privatization, entertained a London and connects with 


more modest gathering of Birmingham city in less than 


4,000 shareholders. 


20 minutes. 


There are other exciting 


prospects ahead for the next 
tew years, in particular 


SdimiiaiKg 




few years, in particular 
Birmingham's "bid, -io stage 


the 1992 Olympic Games, 
which is no longer regarded 
as unrealistically optimistic 
Birmingham's success in 
sweeping aside rival bids 
from London and Manches- 
ter was achieved largely 
because of the facilities avail- 
able at the NEC for staging 
many Olympic indoor events 
and its proposal for an 
Olympic Village and a 
70,000-seat Olympic Stadium 
on site, all. withm a secure 
perimiter .fence. . 


NEC mast now 
look to Europe 


NEC has its own exhibition 
and events division, ' an 
entrepreneurial aim consist- 
ing of a team of organizers 
whose job is to identify new 
areas of business and pioneer, 
i new shows. The 10 that have 
been developed now contrib- 
ute about 8.5 per cent of the 
centre’s gross income'. ■ 

Other exhibition centres in 
the country are also intent on 
new ideas and new shows. . 
Mr Golding said: “It is a very 


Settingthestandards/ q 

inlnewiiesfr 1 \ • .j\;. ** 

overlOOyears gfjf i 

congratulate 

thoiirn //\ rr 




The International Olympic 
immittee will decide on 


Committee will decide on 
October which of the inter- 
national bids for the 1992 
Games will succeecLMr Gol- 
ding commented: “The 
Olympic Games — now that 
would be a feather in our 
cap." ■ - 



* 



one of the better 
Birmingham tradition^ 
are proud to have 
been suppliers 
to the NEC 
throughout their 
tenyear history. 













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S»*E2?***C S*s 


WSULTA ; 

TO THE 

WIONAL 

KHI8IT10 

CENTRE 

OFFER 
tSATULAT:- 
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Double 
in size 
is the 
target 

Jen years after n opened, the 
National Exhibition Centrals 
esuraated to have carved out 
a £71 m share, about 37 per 
ant, of the £!9m a ySr 
by British industry on 
trade shows and exhibitions. 
D . . “ as . ban traditional for 
Bntish industry to spend a 
much smaller proportion of 
its promotional budgets on 
exhibitions than western 
European industrialists. Be- 
fore the NEC opened, it was 
as uctJe as 3 per cent, but ihsit 
h ®f "On to a more respect- 
able 8 per cent in the last few 
years. 

•In spite of the increasing 
use of exhibitions over the 
last decade in the UK, it still 
lags a long way behind 
countries like West Germany 
where it was estimated that 
up to a quarter of promo- 
tional budgets went into 
exhibitions. 

The European 

industrialists’ commitment to 
exhibitions and trade shows 
as a successful form of 
marketing their wares created 
the demand for the huge 
exhibition facilities which 
now exist on the continent in 
cities such as Cologne, Frank- 
furt, Paris and Milan, all 
which boast over 200.000 
square metres and. Hanover, 
with its mammoth 471,000 
square metres, compared 
with the .105,000 square 
metres available at the NEC. 

Although the NEC is the 
largest exhibition centre in 
the UK - twice the size of its 
nearest rival - the feet that it 
lies tenth in the European 
table makes it essential that it 
should carry through plans to 
double in size by the end of 
the century and be in a 
position to compete for some 
of the giant international 
exhibitions which do the 
rounds of continental cities. 

Sandy Angus, the chairman 
of the Association of Ex- ■ 
hibition Organizers, pays due 
tribute to the NEC. saying 
that no one can compete with' 
it in Britain for major 
international shows. But be 
concedes that the Europeans 
have a number of consid- 
erable advantages. 

He said: ‘’Britain is less 
well -equipped than Europe 
simply because .we cannot 
build regionally the sizes of 


tFOCtJSl 


NATIONAL EXHIBITION CENTRE/2 


f 



Peter 

Fairfax 

thelbp 

Peoples 

Choice 
at the 

N.E.C. 


Peter Fairfax 

CATERING BUTCHERS 


meats to Rwtsfffflte, . 
etcttrogtiorithecftriry. 

PMw Mrtn Ud. DM MHmm 

lEwRM. 


WgiinUMUM 



TANNERS 



WINE MERCHANTS 
and SHIPPERS 

Suppliers of Fine 
Hines io 

The 

National 

Exhibition 

Centre 


, 36 WYLE COP 
SHREWSBURY 



The flagship of the city 


NEC people — Top left: Kenneth Baker (left), security manager, with Kenneth Stacey, die 
traffic inspector. Right Andrew Frayne with head chef Paul Gould. Above: Terry Golding 
(front centre) with fellow executives at the exhibition centre in Birmingham 


Birmingham has suffered the 
hammer bum of the reces- 
sion. but Tom Canton. the 
city's ebullient chief exec- 
utive, believes in shouting 
about its brash, go-getting 
image and says the NEC is an 
example of what that ap- 
proach can achieve. 

He said of the centre: “It is 
one of the flagships of tbe 
city. It has put us on the 
map. It shows we are a lively, 
go-ahead place that can turn 
projects that people said 
would never work into roar- 
ing successes. 

“It provides a shop win- 
dow for the area, boosting 
industry, and i: has created 
many jobs directly and in- 
directly. It is making money' 
for tbe city and for the 
region, yet I remember that 
people said it would never 
work, that it was going to be 
2 white elephant” 

Recent research, in feci, 
suggests that the economic 
“spin-ofT to the region from 
activities at tbe NEC is now 
well over £60m a year, 
compared with less than 
£50m in 1976-77, based on 
the amount estimated to be 
spent in an average year by 
exhibition visitors, exhibitors 
and non-local contractors 
Staff 


NEC FACTFILE 

Size: 9 hails. 105.000 
square metres 
Planned 

growth 200.000 square 
metres 
Capital 

investment £50m 
Total income 
1984-85: £25m 
Trading 
surplus: £9.3m 
Net profit 
1984-85: £3m 
Visitors: 3m annually 
Value to 

region: £80m annually 

Permanent 

staff: 350 

Local jobs 

supported: 2.600 

On-srte 

hotel rooms: 700 
Parking: 15,000 

A report by ECOTEC 

Research and Consulting 
Ltd., also calculated that 
2.634 jobs were directly 
supported by the NEC which 
themselves indirectly sup- 
ported a further ! ,288 jobs in 
local service industries, such 
as hotels and catering. 

The ECOTEC report said: 
“The NEC has made an 
important contribution to 
improving the image and 
reputation of Birmingham. It 


has provided an impetus for 
the major improvement and 
expansion to Birmingham 
International Airport and it 
has enhanced the conference 
market elsewhere within the 
West Midlands. 

Recent estimates also sug- 
gest that an additional 600 
jobs could be created during 
the next five years as the 
NEC puts in hand the first 
stages of its plan to double in 
size by the end of the 
century. 

Mr Caulcott said that the 
success of the NEC had also 
played a significant part in 
the decision to build a new 
convention centre, a £]06m 
city centre complex of halls 
and a five-star hotel, which 
would be financed in part by 
borrowing against the ’’asset" 
of the exhibition centre. 

The convention centre is 

expected to take about four 
years to complete and could 
provide up to 2,000 new jobs 
and bring an additional £40m 
a year into the local econ- 
omy. The two centres, he 
said, would be closely linked 
and complement each other’s 
activities. 

The collapse of industry in 
the West Midlands and the 
huge unemployment that fol- 
lowed has led Birmingham 


and the surrounding area 
increasingly into the service 
sector - the NEC and the 
proposed convention centre 
are proof of that. The 
massive number of visitors to 
the NEC - about three 
million a year - has boosted 
plans for* a new Bntish 
Caledonian Hotel in the city 
centre, a new hotel at ihe 
airport and hotel develop- 
ments in and around Soli- 
hull. 

Frank Graves, the Presi- 
dent of Birmingham Cham- 
ber of Industry and 
Commerce, said: “The NEC 
generates enormous business 
in hotels, restaurants and 
shops in the area. 1 know of 
one men’s outfitters whose 
owner stocks up with shirts 
every time there is a big 
exhibition because foreign 
visitors, particularly the Ger- 
mans. clear his shelves when 
they come to town. That is 
good business.” 

It is not surprising, consid- 
ering his background, that Mr 
Graves says the NEC has 
been a “gigantic success”. He 
was its project controller 
before it was built and is 
project controller both for the 
centre’s planned expansion 
and of Birmingham’s pro- 
posed convention centre. 


venues which the Europeans 
seem able to do with the kind 
of subsidies they get from 
local authorities, their gov- 
ernments and tbe EEC 

“In the UK we are prob- 
ably the least subsidized 
industry in the world and 
that is why our prices for 
stand space and hire of halls 
are among the highest is the 
world— certainly twice as 
expensive as our major Euro- 
pean competitors and prob- 
ably three or four times more 
expensive than America.” 

Mr Angus said that al- 
though the cost of space was 
a small proportion of tbe 
total money a company spent 
on exhibiting, it was unfortu- 
nately the emotive figure on 
which crucial decisions were 
frequently taken. 

He estimated that tbe 
exhibition industry was 
worth wdl over £500m an- 
nually , including the amount 
spent by visitors; and he was 
convinced that the NEC had 
teen a shot in the arm. He 
was convinced the 
Birmingham based centre 


was the best in Europe, with 
tbe possible exception of 
Dusseldorf and, the only true 
international centre in Brit- 
ain apart from the smaller 
Earl’s Court and Olympia. 

According to the Associ- 
ation of Exhibition Or- 
ganizers, over 700 exhibitions 
are held annually in tbe UK 
The number of mil and part- 
time jobs created by ex- 
. hibitions in the UK is 

Direct competition 
with marketing 

estimated at about 16 , 000 , 
although many more ait 
indirectly supported. 

Tbe organization estimates 
that for every £1 spent in 
connection with an ex- 
hibition. an additional £9 is 
spent in hotels, restaurants 
and on transport and other 
services 

Exhibition organizers are 
in direct competition with 
other forms of marketing, 
promotion and advertising. 

Executives at the NEC say 


that according to market 
research carried out by Ex- 
hibition Surveys, an exhibitor 
would have faced average 
costs of £26 for each useful 
contact at a trade show in 
Britain in 1984— taking 
acount of all direct costs such 
as staff salaries, hotel and 
travel bills 

That compared favourably. 

■ said, with the estimated 
cost of individual indus- 
trial sales calls. 

According to Mr Angus 
and his association, ex- 
hibitions were increasingly 
becoming recognized as a 
vital and successful form of 
marketing and promotion. 

That was the importance of 1 
success stories such as that at f 
the NEC He said: “There is! 
no one to compete with tbe l 
centre in Britain in terms of I 
major international shows. It. 
has enabled this country to 
run exhibitons of size and to 
compete with our European 
competitors.*’ 1 


Filling gaps in the calendar 


Derek Lyons is in show 
business. For, as director of 
the tbe exhibition and events 
division of the National 
Exhibition Centre, he heads a 
25-strong team which has the 
job of pioneering new shows 
to help fill gaps in the NEC 
business calendar. 

Mr Lyons said: “The NEC 
derided that it would be 
sensible to fill some of the 
voids which occur in our 
calendar rather than be en- 
tirely dependent on indepen- 
dent promoters and. ! must 
say, with 10 new exhibitions 
on our desks, we have made 
rapid and substantia] 




is team talks to potential 
exhibitors and authoritative 
bodies in the trade or 
industry concerned, checks 
with the trade press and 
researches potential cus- 
tomers to see if there is a gap 


in tbe market that can be 
filled at the NEC. 

He said:” A new idea is 
either going to be a total 
disaster or take tool We 
realty do not expea to reap a 
great reward the first time, 
but some of our exhibitions 
are coming around for the 
second or third time. I think 
the breakthrough has been 
achieved." 

Before tbe formation of the 
division in 1983 — when Mr 
Lyons joined the NEC — 
there bad been an events 
department largely respon- 
sible for servicing the needs 
of independent promotors for 
events such as concerts, 
conventions, industrial the- 
atre and sporting occasions — 
vital elements id the NECs 
success but not entrepreneur- 
ial in the sense that new 
business was conceived. 

Mr Lyons said that many 


important exhibitions that 
had been successfully placed 
in the NEC calendar. The 
International Safety Ex- 
hibition. sponsored by the 
RSPCA. had become the 
definitive show for the UK. 
Its next presentation was 
likely to be 120 per cent 
larger than the last event in 
1985. 

Autotech, an international 
automotive technology ex- 
hibition staged in October, 
had been created out of an 
approach to the NEC by the 
automobile division of the 
Institution of Mechanical En- 
gineers. which held a con- 
gress at the same time. That 
exhibition would now be 
alternated with the Motor 
Show, staged every other 
year. 

A marketing and promo- 
tion services exhibition had 
also been held, a Midlands 


manufacturer's clothing and 
fashion fair would start next 
February and an August fair 
for collectors of antiques and 
memorabilia starts this year. 
But. Mr Lyons said: “We do 
not necessarily seek shows 
which will be enormous on 
their first outing. We also 
bold small specialist events. 
It is a popular misconception 
that you can hold only large 
exhibitions at the NEC. We 
have had successful ex- 
hibitions of only 1.500 
square metres compared with 
something like Imerbuild, 
which occupies about 
55,000 square metres. ” 

The NEC is also following 
a European trend and an 
increasing number of ex- 
hibitions are now associated 
with conferences and semi- 
nars that are part of tire 
overall programme. 



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26 


SPORT 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1986 


. , f * f ! 

? » •• i » ' 


FOOTBALL 


Reforms being 

planned in 

West German 
league 


Bonn (Reuter) - Plans for a 
major reform of the West 
German League, including a 
cut from 18 to 16 teams, were 
announced yesterday by Her- 
mann Neuberger. the presi- 
dent of the West German 
Football Federation (DFB). 

Neuberger gave details of 
the plans in Vietri sul Mare, 
where the national team is 
training for the friendly 
international with Italy in 
Avellino tomorrow. 

Neuberger’s reforms also 
include an extension of the 
mid-winter break from six 
weeks to three months, more 
summer soccer and a na- 
tional indoor championship. 

He said the fust division 
could be reduced to 16 clubs 
by the 1987-88 season and 
the second division cut from 
20 teams, also to 16. at the 
same time. 

• He said the eight present 
regional leagues, mostly of 1 $ 
clubs, would be reduced to 
four leagues each of 
teams. 

The reforms have to 
approved by the clubs 
their annual congress 
Bremen in October. 

■ In the past, clubs have 
voted against any attempt to 
cut the number of teams in 
the league.but Neuberger ex- 
pressed his determination to 
get reforms through this time. 

“If the professional clubs 
remain unreasonable, we 
must take counter-action if 
need be." he said- 

Attendances in the league 
have been falling steadily for 
several years, dropping from 
a peak of 7.900.000 in 1977- 
78 to 5.800.000 last season. 

* Last month, trainers of 
first division clubs called for 
a winter breakfrom the end 
Of November to the begin- 
ning of March and more 


football in the summer 
months, arguing that wintry 
weather was a major factor in 
low attendances. 

The season usually ends 
early in June and resumes in 
mid-August. Neuberger said 
he still favoured a summer 
break because many fans 
were on holiday but thought 
it should be a much shorter 
pause. 

Neuberger’s reported plans 
were immediately welcomed 
by the country’s "two biggest 
clubs. Bayern Munich and 
Hamburg. But the first di- 
vision side Bochum ex- 
pressed disquiet, saying they 
would lose revenue from two 
home matches if the league 
was cut. 


16 


be 

at 

in 


The league leaders Werder 
Bremen underlined their title 
potential when they broke a 
long jinx to dispose of 
northern rivals Hamburg 1-0 
on Sunday. 

It was the first time for 10 
years they had beaten Ham- 
burg whose defeat has al- 
most certainly ended their 
championship hopes this sea- 
son. 

Veteran Manfred 
Burgsmueller clinched the 
points for the visitors to stun 
the 55.000 crowd in the 56th 
minute. 

Bayern Munich stay in 
second place, four points 
behind the leaders, after 
winning 5-0 at Hanover in 
front of 60.000 people. 

•FRANKFURT (Reuter) - 
Hungary may step in to 
replace Brazil in a friendly 
international with West Ger- 
many in Frankfurt on March 
12. the national soccer 
federation announced yes- 
terdav. 



BOXING 


CRICKET 


Hope and 
Conteh 
plead with 
Bruno 


England look better after 
Thomas toes the line 


Nigel Spink: under treatment 


Cup success is the 
key for Ipswich 


Francis at Birmingham 


Trevor Francis, a former 
favourite with the Bir- 
mingham City crowd, is set 
to return to St Andrew’s at 
(he end of the season. 

Britain’s first £1 million 
transfer player plans to play- 
in a testimonial game for 
Birmingham's injured former 
captain. Kevan Broadhurst. 
early in May. 

The news comes a week 
after Birmingham's new- man- 
ager, John Bond, made it 
clear that he wanted to sign 
Francis from the Italian dub. 
Sampdoria, to ease his side's 
relegation worries. 

Francis is expected to line 
up alongside other former 
Birmingham favourites, such 
as Colin Todd and Frank 
Worthington, in the game, 
which is scheduled for May 

- • Manchester United con- 
firmed yesterday that Nor- 
man Whiteside is to serve a 


suspension for the first time 
in his playing career. 

Whiteside's booking in the 
2-i defeat at West Ham 
United on Sunday took him 
past 2! penalty points and 
brought him an automatic 
two-match ban. The suspen- 
sion will start after United's 
FA Cup fifth round lie. at 
Ipswich or West Ham. on 
February 15. 

Whiteside, the 20-year-old 
Northern Ireland inter- 
national. said: "I’m glad the 
waiting is over. Some people 
have been waiting for me to 
be suspended, but 1 am not a 
dirty player. I have never 
deliberately Lried to injure 
anyone." 


There was good news for 
United yesterday when Paul 
McGrath, their Republic of 
Ireland central defender, 
agreed to sign a new four- 
year contracL 


Ipswich, conquerors of 
Liverpool last Saturday, take 
on West Ham in an FA Cup 
fourth round replay at 
Portman Road tonight 
spurred on by the knowledge 
that victory will earn them a 
lucrative fifth round tie 
against Manchester United, 
the holders. 

Bobby Ferguson, the Ips- 
wich manager, said: “The 
players have done tremen- 
dously well and have given 
the club a shot in the arm. 
but it is still going to be a a 
battle against West Ham that 
may go into extra-time. 

“I am confident we can 
win as long as the players 
apply themselves in the same 
way as they did against West 
Ham in the first match at 
Upton Park 10 days ago." 

From a financial point of 
view, tonights game is vital 
for the Suffolk club. Ipswich 
expect a crowd of 25.000 for 
the visit of West Ham and 
victory would set up a 30.000 
turn-out for a meeting with 
Manchester United. 

Ipswich will select from 13 
players.Michael Cole, a teen- 
aged forward, impressed 
when he came on tor the 
final 39 minutes in place of 


Frank YaJlop against Liver- 
pool. Injury doubts concern- 
ing Ian Cranson (knee) and 
Mark Brennan (ankle) have 
cleared up as Ipswich prepare 
for their biggest gate since 
last April, when 24.484 
watched the goalless league 
game against Liverpool. 

Aston Villa have injury 
problems for tonight’s Milk 
Cup quarter-final replay 
against Arsenal at Highbury. 
Villa's goalkeeper. Nigel 
Spink, who missed Saturday's , 
game with Southampton at 
Villa Park, is receiving treat- 
ment for a damaged shoulder 
and the midfield player 
Darren Bradley is also doubt- 
ful. 

Dean Glover is expected to 1 
play but will need strapping] 
to protect a broken bone in 
his hand. Paul Birch and 
Mark Walters, however, are) 
both fighting to overcome | 
injuries. 

Graham Tumer.the Villa 
manager, will delay selection 
of his team until later today, 
but may be forced to risk 
playing the full back Gary 
Williams, who is to see a 
specialist about a trouble- 
some foot injury. 


John Conteh and Maurice 
Hope, both former world 
boxing champions, have ap- 
pealed to Frank Bruno to call 
off his proposed fight wiLh 
Gerrie Coetzee. the South 
African heavyweight, at 
Wembley Arena on March 4. 

In a joint telemessage to 
Bruno. Conteh and Hope say: 
“As two black Britons who 
have held World Boxing 
Championship titles, we 
make an earnest appeal to 
you to call off the fight with 
Gerrie Coetzee of apartheid 
South Africa. The only bene- 
factor in this fight will be 
apartheid. 

“There are other ways to 
get to the top and these are 
very noble ways without the 
scar of apartheid being at- 
tached to you. Please con- 
sider these. 

“We would like to meet 
with you personally to ex- 
plain our position. We hope 
you would accept. Your 
brothers. John Conteh, Mau- 
rice Hope." 

Bruno is also being be- 
sieged from another quarter. 
Mr Richard Tracey, the 
Minister for Sport, has re- 
ceived a letter from the Black 
British Conference Against 
Apartheid Sport asking him 
to use his influence to get 
Bruno to call off the fighL 
The letter, from Paul 
Stephenson, the BBC.AAS 
chairman, points out that 
“the United Kingdom has 
now become South Africa's 
single most important sports 
collaborator." 

The letter continues: “Fur- 
ther sports exchanges with 
South Africa will certainly 
influence the voting pattern 
for the choice of the site of 
the 1992 Summer Olympic 
Games, for which Bir- 
mingham is a candiate.” 


GOLF 


Zoeller in 
command 


Entering the third day of 
their match here against the 
Windward Islands, England 
had bowled and fielded better 
than they had batted. This 
had enabled them to gain a 
first innings lead of 18. which 
they had increased to 64 by 
lunchtime yesterday for the 
loss of Gooch. Robinson and 
Lamb. 

Edmonds. Thomas, Willey 
and Foster shared the wickets 
in the Islanders' first innings, 
and of these Thomas de- 
serves a special mention-He 
had trouble with his run-up 
during the practices in Bar- 
bados, and of the 25 no-balls 
England bowled on Sunday 
he was responsible for 20. 
That was bad; but he 
appeared not to let ii upset 
him, which was gratifying. In 
fact, after an unsettling first 
over, in which he was called 
three times and deserved a 
wicket, he bowled rather well. 
Fast bowlers who pick up 
even one wicket on a pitch as 
slow as this one have 
something to be thankful for, 
and Thomas took 3. 

Willis, so often plagued 
with the same no-balling 
problem, has been working 
on Thomas, trying to gel his 
run-up right, and there is still 
a lot to be done. But Thomas 
may take heart from John 
Snow’s experience on the 
Australian tour of 1970-71 
when in the first match he 
bowled no ball after no ball 
Having made the necessary 
adjustments. Snow had a 
good tour. It is a matter, to 
some extent, of reaching an 
understanding with the um- 
pires, whose interpretation of 
the no-ball varies from coun- 
try to country. By the end of 
the Windwards' first innings 
winks and nods were passing 
between Thomas and the 
umpire, which suggested that 
things were being sorted oul 
Nothing needs to be made 
of a slight tiff towards the 
end of the Windwards in- 
nings on Sunday between 
Thomas and Sebastien. an 
engaging cocksparrow from 
Dominico. which finished 
with each telling the other to 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, St Vincent 

mind his own business. If ii refusal Uj ilei wrong d, ono ns 
mattered at all it was because knock the stuffing out 


it revealed a flash of Welsh 
fire. The Iasi time we saw any 
of that out here was 18 years 
ago when Jeff Jones bowled 
so well. Thomas has a long 
way to go to become as good 
as Jones, but he has made a 
stan. The return catch, taken 
as he followed through, 
which gave him his third 
wicket of the tour was a 
snorter. 

There were two other 
brilliant catches by the 
Englishmen - one at first slip 
bv Craning. the other by 
Lamb, running back at mid- 
wicket. Of the 81 overs in the 
Windwards first innings, the 
spinners, Edmonds and 
Willey, bowled 51. The ball 
turned so slowly (bat they 
had to sweat for thetr 
wickets, but they shared six. 
When the time comes, these 
two may well be contesting 
the same Test place. The idea 
at the moment seems to be 
for Emburey to play any- 
where. with Edmonds or 
Willey as his partner in spin. 

Because they bowl effec- 
tively as a pair in the last 
vear they have done so for 
England " against India and 
Australia, as well as for 
Middlesex - and provide a 
contrast, if would be a pity to 
split them up; but Willey's 
batting will count in his 
favour. With a catch and a 
couple of neat stumpings, all 
off Edmonds. Down ion has 
made a nice start. 

There is no sign of the bad 
stutter that developed last 
winter in Edmond's approach 
to the wicket, and that must 
be a great relief to him. In a 
strange way, though, he may 
have been more accurate 
when he had it. 

It has not taken long for 
the umpiring to look a little 
shaky, though one of those 
standing here - Barker that is 
- is likely to get a Test match 
or two. Such an early 
reminder of the problems 
there may be in this direction 
will be no bad thing if it 
reminds the players that the 
philosophical approach, the 


them, is the best one. 

Thomas’s fortunes on Sun- 
day levelled out in the end. 
Having been denied an ob- 
vious wicket in his first over 
he was lucky to have an 
appeal upheld in his fifth. In 
a sense it is a lottery, but it 
helps not to become cynical 
about it. 

Having played on at the 
start of England's first in- 
nings. Robinson was soon 
himself the victim of an 
umpire's whim at the start of 
the second yesterday morn- 
ing. being given out leg- 
before to Collymore. bowling 
left-arm over the wicket. 
Robinson was aiming to play 
a leg-side ball to leg. When 
Gooch was caught and 
bowled off a tall that 
stopped. England were 23 for 
two and able to enjoy neither 
the sunshine nor the spar- 
iding view. By lunch, taken at 
46 for three. Lamb had also 
gone, leg-before, lo the off 
spinner Hinds, and Smith 
had made 13 in 75 minutes, 
taking an 2nxious halt-hour 
to avoid the disappointment 
of a pair. 


ENGLAND: Rret mmgs 


136 JMW Gaffing, 77; D J CoUyrnore. 


I or 


Second mngs 

G A Gooch i and & CoUymore _ 10 
R T Robmson Cw Coflymote 7 


D M Smith b Hinds — 

A J Lamb kn» c Hinds 

M W Gamng 0 Etame 

P Wfuey b fcnds 

P R Downtcn c art b Etienne 

P H Edmonds 

N A Foster c Laws b Hinas ... 

J G Thomas 

Extras 


Total fB wrts) 73 

FALL OF WtCKETS: 1-2T. 2-23. 3-42. 4- 
61. 663. 6-65. 7-67. 8-73 
WINDWARD ISLANDS: First tonnes 

L D JCtin Ibw b Foster !5 

L A Lmws c Oownton b Edmonds 3 
L C Sebastian c Robinson b WdUy 28 

R Marsftan c Lamb 0 watay t 

w Thomas c ana b Thomas 9 

J T EtKxme st Oownton b Edmonds a 
i Cadette st Oownton o Edmonds 17 
J O Charles C Gatting D Thomas 30 

S L Mahon lew b Thomas 0 

D J CoHvmore not out 31 

S J Hmds c Tayior b Edmoncs _. J 
Extras (02. MM. nb25J 31 


Total 


. — 168 


FALL OF WtCKETS: 128. 2-39. Mfl. a. 
T05. 5-108. 6-114. 7-131. 8-138. 9-143. 
BOWLING: Thomas. 16-4-54-3: Foster, 
7-3-11-1; Edmonds. 25-5-38-4. Taylor. 7- 
1-17-0: WBey. 26-8-42-2. 


Pebble Beacb (AP) — Fuzzy 
Zoeller of the United States 
has a five-shot lead and a 
game-plan in mind going into 
the day-late finish of the 
AT&T Pebble Beach national 
pro-am. 

“I whipped Pebble Beach 
once [a 66 in Saturday’s 


Suspensions unlikely 
to hit ICC Trophy 


Prize fund 
increased 


By Richard Streeton 


round], and I'll go out there 
the 


with the idea of whipping it 
again." he said. 

Payne Stewart was alone in 
second going into Monday's 
final round for a $108,Ci00 
first prize. 

Tom Watson, three strokes 
behind Zoeller when the 
third round began, returned 
an erratic 73 at Pebble Beach 
and fell six off the pace at 
211 . 

LEADING SCORES: 205: F Zoofler. 
69-66-70. 210: P Stewart. 71-69- 
70. 211: M Wietoe. 70*9-72. T 
Site. 72-68-71. T Watson. 71-67- 
73. 


Star winger nurses a World 
Cup dream, despite injury 


Britfchplayera: 218: S Lyle. 76- 
. 222: P Oosteftiuis. 74-73- 


73-69 


New £ 3 /4m | Wales exempt 

package 


Will England be facing 
Fernando Chaiana. in 
Moutenrey, when they meet 
Portugal in the World Cop? 
For the umpteenth time, the 
Utile Portuguese left winger — 
or better, left sider — a 
rfefalgent star of the 1984 
European championship 
finals, is trying to come back, 
with Bordeaux. 

; He has discussed his pros- 
pects with Jose Torres, man- 
ager of (he Portuguese team. 
“He has assured me," said 
Chaiana. “if I play again at a 
high level for Bordeaux, he 
Would count on me for 
Mexico. It’s a great incentive. 
He is waiting for me." 

Chaiana, who has been 
recuperating in Lisbon for six 
months, hart himself on 
ifagast 16 in a French league 
match against Rennes: “It 
vjjas a tear in a thigh muscle 
which hadn't been properly 
hjealed, and, ondoobtedly. the 
secondary effects of an injec- 
tion that went wrong." 

Chaiana feels calmer now, 
hot he was terribly upset 
when be heard that Bordeaux 
were pursuing the Yugoslav 
international attacker 
Vjnjoric, of Hajdnk. In fact 
they still are- Vujovic will be 
free to move at the end of this 
season, bat will not do so 
anless whatever dub he signs 
for also takes his twin, a 
fellow interna tionaL Bor- 
deaux would seem ready to do 
both, which would push ont 
Chaiana as an extra for- 
eigner. 

; Understandably. Chaiana 
( b'as been deeply npset by 
suggestions that he does not 
- want to play, and none too 
pleased by others, that he 
‘does not get on with the 
* president, manager and play- 
, ere of Bordeaux. He will not. 


WORLD 

FOOTBALL 

Brian Glanville 


wi annutflu-v lie niu huu luiui a^oiu dltci ilia 

c be says, even think about not start to the season 
j going to Mexico: “That would petered ont a little. In hi 


be one frustration more.' 

Tomorrow In Avellino. It- 
aly play a friendly against 


last year, in his first season 
for Milan, not least thanks to 
injuries. But a fine perfor- 
mance - oddly enough, on 
Avellino's ground — nine days 
ago led his Swedish manager. 
Nils Liedholm (scorer of the 
first goal in the 1958 World 
Cnp final), to say that be 
thought Rossi would repeat 
his Spanish success in Mex- 
ico. 

There are no surprises in 
Enzo Bearzot's choice for 
Italy, but Franz Beckenbauer 
is having a difficult time 
picking his German team. He 
knows he will be without his 
talented young midfielder 
Uwe Rah u. badly injured in 
training and donbtful even for 
Mexico, while Rudi Voeller, 
Werder Bremen's prolific 
striker, injured by the Bayern 
Munich and West German 
sweeper Augenthaler. re- 
mains out of action. 

Beckenbauer is hoping to 
have his two distinguished 
Italian “exiles", Hans-Peier 
Briege! and Karl-Heinz 
Rummenigge. Briege 1 has just 
announced that . he will be 
leaving Verona If the end of 
this season, bis second with 
the dnb. Richer Italian teams 
are already queuing up for 
him. 

Thanks to the inter- 
national. the Italian 
championship had a day off 
yesterday, but when it re- 
sumes, Bobby Robson should 
really take a good look at 
Bari's young centre-forward 
Paul Rideout, running into 
form again after his splendid 
had 
his last 

game at Como. Rideout was 
most impressive, scoring the 
goal that gave a depleted Bari 


Bergamo, must appear before 
the referees' disciplinary 
committee. accused of failing 
to report a case of attempted 
bribery. The case, that is to 
say, of Senator Dino Viola, 
president of Roma, who 
admitted giving 100 million 
lire to an intermediary' to 
bribe the French referee 
Vautrot, before the second leg 
of the European Cup semi 
final against Dundee United 
in 1984. 


for Spurs 


To the scandalized outrage 
of the Italian sporting press, 
the disciplinary committee of 
the Italian FA (FIGC) did not 
punish either Viola or the 
intermediary, former inter- 
national stopper Spartaco 
Land in L though both were 
found guilty. The reason 
given was that (hey were 
protected by the FIGCs 
statute of limitations, 
whereby a case must be 
brought before the end or the 
year which follows any given 
season. 


« inruun Hgaiust uuil pre a tuepigiw 

i west Germany. One of its their unexpected point, 
p most interesting aspects will _ With Hateley waning. 


j-,be the performance of Paolo 
Rossi, now a Milan forward. 


fjwho looks as if he may rise 

^phoenix-like again, for the 
fronting World Cap. 
n Rossi had a poor time of it 


Rideout's claims become the 
stronger. And unlike Hateley. 
be has been playing in a 
beleaguered team. 

Next Saturday. Italy's 
international referee, Paolo 


Things are looking up a 
little for Tele Santana, who 
has jnst began his third stint 
as Brazil's team manager. 
Both Zico and Socrates have 
jnst begnn to play again for 
Fla men go after four months' 
absence: and they look good. 
Last week, Flamengo tad a 
match in Florence against 
Frarentioa: part of the deal 
for Socrates' transfer back to 
BraziL Zico did not come: he 
Still has tanging over him in 
Italy a sentence for alleged 
tax evasion. 

Falcao. another member of 
that marvellous midfield, did 
briefly return to Rome and 
went to a match at tbe 
Olympic Stadium played by 
his old club. Roma. There, he 
was promptly presented with 
a writ, alleging paternity of a 
fonr-and-a- half-year-old boy, 
whose presumptive father. 
Franco Cesarini, has dis- 
owned him. 

His former wife has taken 
Falcao to court, tat the 
player has returned to BraziL 
instructing his Roman law- 
yers. 

• Brian Glanville is Football 
Correspondent of the Sunday 
Times. 


Tottenham unveiled a new 
£750,000 sponsorship pack- 
age yesterday when Holsten 
agreed a new- three-year 
deal.But Tottenham's delight 
at the continuing support of 
the German lager brewers 
was tempered by the ban on 
alcohol in executive boxes. 

Mr Justice Popplewell 
recommended in a recent 
report that restrictions should 
be reviewed. But Paul 
BobrolT, a Spurs director, 
said yesterday: “We are 
disturbed to find that the 
Home Office has not yet 
received sufficient informa- 
tion from the Football 
League for the Home Sec- 
retary to decide on the issue.’* 
Mr Bobroff has contacted 
the League and has been told 
that “certain clubs" are 
dragging their heels. 

“It seems astonishing that 
when such a large part of our 
market is at stake, some elute 
or the League should be so 
dilatory in providing the 
information." he said- 
“There is at least £4 
million involved and the 
effect will be nothing short of 
catastrophic if the ban is not 
relaxed. Ground improve- 
ment will cease and new 
stand building will stop." he 
added. 

Yesterday’s sponsorship re- 
newal represents a significant 
increase on the previous 
figure of just under £500.000. 

But .Alan Bridget!, deputy 
chairman and managing 
director of Holsten. said: 
“The decision to renew has 
been ‘beaten out’ in the face 
of all the difficulties which 
have pressed themselves on 
football, 

“We believe it is our duty 
to assist football and 
encourage a responsible atti- 
tude at grounds. We want 
good British social behaviour 
irrespective of the sport. 
Racing, in which we arc also 
heavily involved, has been 
quick to spot the possible 
dangers.” Mr Bridget! said. 

“I'm sure Tottenham will 
try as hard as possible to 
make our relationship a 
success." 


Wales have earned exempt 
status alongside England and 
Scotland for the second 
Dunhill Cup golf tournament 
to be played on the Old 
Course at St Andrews on 
September 25-28- Last year| 
Wales won the European 
qualifying zone final and 
went on to beat Spain at St 
Andrews before being elimi- 
nated in the semi-finals 


YACHTING 


Any threat to cricket's “little 
world cup" in the Midlands 
next summer, arising from 
the possible absence of 
Bangladesh and Zimbabwe, 
has finally disappeared. The 
International Cricket Con- 
ference (ICC) have received 
no motion proposing the 
suspension of either country, 
following the political inter- 
ference which prevented 
England's B team from visit- 
ing them. 

The ICC have called for 
reports, however, from 
Bangladesh, Zimbabwe and 
England, on the events lead- 
ing to the matches being 
cancelled. These reports will 
be discussed at the ICCs 
annual meeting on July 9 and 
10, which means that the ICC 
trophy competition on Mid- 
lands club grounds in June, is 
unaffected. 

“By the time of the ICCs 
meeting, some of the heat 
will have gone from the 
situation and everyone will 
be able to reflea and analyse 
calmly what is the appro- 
priate action to lake,” Jack 
Bailey, the ICC secretary, 
said. 

England's rejection of any 


tii-tbr-tat action is recog- 
nition that a country's cricket 
authorities cannot be held 
responsible for the action of 
their government. 


Two days before the ICC 
meeting, the delegates, by an 
ironic twist might be watch- 
ing Bangladesh and Zim- 
babwe contesting the ICC 
trophy final, which, on July 
7, is being played at Lord’s 
for the first time. Zimbabwe, 
the 1982 winners, are 
favourites to retain the tro- 
phy and qualify to join the 
seven Test match playing 
countries in the 1987 World 
Cup in India and Pakistan. 


Bangladesh lost to Zim- 
babwe in the 1982 semi-final 
round and are again expected 
to be among the leading 
contenders. The two sides 
meet in a group match at 
Moseley on June H, the 
opening day. Argentina, who 
were absent four years ago 
because of the Falkland 
Islands crisis, and Denmark. 


Prize money for England's 
longest-running sponsored 
cricket event, the John Player 
Special League, has been 
increased once more as the 
competition approaches its 
eighteenth season. 

From a total fund of 
£73,450. the winners will 
receive a record £19,000. 
£2,000 more than was won 
by last season’s champions. 
Essex. 

The runners-up will win 
£9,500, against £8.500 last 
season, with the third placed 
county receiving £4.250 and 
the fourth team £2.500. 
Winners of each of the 136 
matches will receive £275. 

Since the John Player 
Special League began in 
1969, cricket as a whole has 
benefined by more than £3 
million from the sponsorship. 

The Test and County 
Cricket Board have decided 
that matches will revert to a 
2 pm stan. except for those 
being televised by tbe BBC, 
in which case the first ball 
will be bowled at 1.30 pm. 

John Player Special League 
Prize Money: 


* Sponsorship fee. £400.536; wtn- 

who had financial problems, ner, £19.000; runner-up, £9,500; 
are tack among the IS third, £4,250; fourth; £1500; wtn- 


among 

associate members of the ICC 
taking part. 


ners each match (136 x E275J, 
237.400: most sixes, £400; most 
four wickets, £400. 


BOWLS 


First three are 

disqualified | Former champion off to strong start 


Penh CAP) - The first three 
boats across the finishing line 
in Sunday's final warm-up 
race for this week's world 12- 
meter championships were 
disqualified by the race 
organizers vesterdav. 

The New York Yacht 
Club's America II. and also 
Australia II and Australia III 
all were ruled guilty of 
transgressions by the Royal 
Penh Yacht Club. The Italian 
entry. Italia, was declared the 
winner despite finishing 
fourth. 

In Sunday's race, the 
American skipper John 
Kolius finished brilliantly to 
edge out Australia II 


By Gordon Allan 


Bob Sutherland of Scot- 
land. the 1983 winner, beat 
Mike Pike 21-13 in the first 
round of the Embassy world 
indoor championships at 
Coatbridge yesterday. His 
next match is with one of the 
seeded players. Jim Baker of 
Ireland, the 1984 champion, 
tomorrow morning. 

Sutherland and Baker have 
met six times in the past and 
Sutherland leads 4-2 in their 
private series. Inconsistency 
has been the weakness of 
Sutherland's game this sea- 
son. as he himself said, and it 
was the main reason he was 


not seeded for this evenL 
Pike, a Southampton man 
who now lives in Guernsey, 
lacked the experience to stop 
Sutherland. The early heads 
were closely packed — 
surprisingly so, perhaps, for 
the opening round of the 
championship — but it was 
noticeable that Pike was 
having trouble with one of 
the tastes of the game, 
length, and Sutherland estab- 
lished a 10-6 lead after 10 
ends. 


The man from the Channel 
Islands cut the lead to 11-8 


but from that point on 
Sutherland played with 
increasing confidence and 
accuracy. 

Ken Williams from 
Australia.who lost in the first 
round to Baker in 1984, was 
beaten 21-10 in an hour and 
20 minutes by Roy Cutis 
from Ipswich. This match 
was won and lost in the first 
nine ends, during which 
Cutis went 16-2 ahead with 
some flawless drawing shots. 

Rrsl Round — R Suther- 
land (Scotland^ 21, Pike (Chan- 


nel Islands) 


21. K 

TODAY’S FIXTURES 


FIXTURES AND FORECASTS ■ . • Parjl New man 


Saturday February 8 un- 
less staled 


ROST DIVISION 


2 Aston Vliu * w Ham 
1 Birmingham v WBA 
1 Chelsea v Oxford 
1 ids wen v Arsenal 
V Liverpool v Man U 
(Playing Sunday) 

1 Man C v OPR 
i Nottm F « Newcastle 

1 Shelf W v Leicester 
X Soton v Luton 

2 Tottenham v Coventry 
2 Watford v Everton 


THIRD DIVISION 
1 Bristol FT v Doncaster 
X Bury v Blackpool 
X cnesterUd v Notts Co 
1 G*ngtram v Bounwnth 
1 Newport v Brantford 
1 Pfymth » Rotherham 
1 Beading v Lincoln 

1 Wigan v Cardiff 

2 York v Darby 

Not on coupons. Darkng- 
ton V Bristol Citv t Sun- 
day): Swansea v Bottom 
Walsall v Wolves (Sun- 
day) 


Tramnare 

day). 


v Hauax (Fn- 


SCOTT1SH PREMIER 
1 Aberdeen v Clydebank 
1 Celtic v Si Mirren 
i Dundee u v Hibernian 

1 Hearts v Dundee 

2 MotnsrwaU * Rangers 


SECOND DIVISION 


FOURTH DTVH30N 

1 Bumley v Crewe 

2 Exeter v Mansfield 
2 Hereford v Hartlepool 
1 Nthampton v Torquay 

1 Orient v Cambridge U 

2 Peterboro v Stockport 
X Preston * Rochdale 
1 Scunmorpe * Col- 
chester 

1 SwmcJari v Chester 
1 Wrexham v Aldershot 
Net on coupons: Soulh- 
ert v Port Vale (Fnoay): 
TREBLE CHANCE (home teams) 

Southampton. Barnsley. Grimsby. 
h udder shew. Oldham. Shrewsbury. 

Bury. Chesterfield. Preston. K&mamod. 

PiirtKk. Albion 

BEST DRAWS- Southampton. Barnsley. 

Preston. Partrek. 

AWAYS Coventry. Derby. Mansfield. 

Rangers. Falkirk. 


X Bam-** « Shelf U 

1 Bradford v MiddtesbfD 

2 C Palace v Portsmth 
X Gnmsby v Lews 

X Huddersftd * HuD 
1 MiHwaii v Wimbledon 
X Oldham v Bteckbum 
X Stuewsbry v Norwich 
1 Stone v Fulham 
1 Sunoenand v Carlisle 
Not on coupons: Chariton 
v Brighton 


SCOTTISH FIRST 

1 Bredis* v Montrose 

2 Clyde v FallUf* 

1 Dumbarton » Ayr 
1 Forfar v A* one 
1 Hamdton v Alloa 
X KUmamock v Monon 
X Pa rock v East Fife 


BCOTTSH SECOND 
X Atkon <r Dunfameme 
1 Cowdenbtti v Stranraer 
1 Q of Sth v Meadowbtik 
Not on coupons: Queen s 
Park » ArtHtMth: Raitn v 
Easr Stirling; St 
Johnstone v 

Slonhon&eoHnr Suiting v 
Berwick. 

HOMES: Chelsea. Bradford. Wigan. 
Burnley. Northampton. Orient. Aberdeen. 
Come. Dundee l/nino. Hearts. Dum- 
barton. Hamilton. 


FA Cup fourth round replay 

Ipswich Town w West Ham Utd 


FIXED GODS: Ho mos . Chelsea, wafcwtt, 
Burnley. Aberdeen. Dundee Urwed. 


Away*: Coventry. Derby. MansftetdL 
~i! Southampton. Barnsley. Preston. 


Draws: 


Milk Cup fifth round replay 

Arsenal v Aston Villa 

Second division 

Charlton v Brighton 

Third division 
Blackpool v Chesterfield 
Bolton Wandrs v Bristol Rovers 
Bournemouth v York Crty 
Brentford v Walsan 
Bristol City vBury 
Cardiff City v Darlington 
Doncaster Rvrs v Swansea City 
Notts County v Wigan Ath 
Rotherham Utd v Newport County 
Wolverhampton v Reading 

Fourth division 

Aldershot v Orient 
Cambridge Utd v Wrexham 
Colchester Utd v Southend Utd 
Crewe Alex V Peterborough 
Halifax Town v Exeter City 
Rochdale v Hereford Utd 
Torquay utd v Burnley 

Scottish tint division 
Afloa Athletic v Dumbarton 
Scottish second division 
Raitfi Rovers v ABxon Rovers 


Scottish Cup 
Third round replay 
St Mirren v East Rfe 


iS&L. Goapo °- M »"» ■ « 


9f*£** L J-EAOUfc Rrs* OrtSton: 
Uffi i HuddersfieW 1701 Second 
d| Y? to,l = Bumtey v Preston (7.01; Cov- 
entry v Bradford (7.0) 


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^temouth V Teuton hanun (7oy. 


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LCr ,0nM 

<«aStw3S ssy ,nacx,r “*“* 
iS'soT 88 ” Wom,,nq « 


FA Vase draw 


Wa ™S ran w HudCWH 
or Havsn} v Wisbech: 
South* * Stevenage: Halesowen v 
Cambene)^ Matches to be piayed on 


February ZL 






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Scots unlikely 
to ring the 
changes against 
England 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 

and e irSd ra ^U 0f pS°S mJoiII r? n °lJ er I L, . b J enn ^ 
heads togeiher today after NoCall i London Irish), who 

seeina ihdr ” may - & l seriou * consid- 

the five naS rfc^ m « all0n -. The 'nsh scrummag- 
shiD at the weetitu^^Tv' ,n S against France was poor 
r ™ 1 t._ f Jhe and Anderson's place at lock 

2™SL l h de!,ber a»ons may be in ‘jeopaidv McCall 

Endifd h Z e KS 3H! V usefol p^^f’the S,m 

lively on Febraa™ °[ lhe hpwRil and no slouch 

lively on February la will be about the field and if changes 


known tomorrow. Whereas 
Scotland may derive consid- 
erable comfort from defeat 
against Wales, the Irish must 
be seriously concerned about 
their tight forwards. 

The Scots left Cardiff to 
prepare for iheir next game in 
the belief that they could 
have beaten the Welsh. That 
they accepted the referee's 
decision not to award David 
Sole a try was very much to 
their credit, but it did not 
lessen the feeling that they 
should have scored and that 
the game, from that point, 
could have been theirs. 

I suspect they will make 
few, if any. changes even 
though their half-backs have 
received criticism. England 
would not mind seeing the 
back of Rutherford and 
Laidlaw, two players of 
immense craft and experi- 
ence, when they arrive at 
Murrayfield; they were also 
impressed with Jeffery, the 
Kelso flanker. 

This is obviously the sea- 
son. given the new ruck-maul 
law, of the big back row man 
who can stay on his feet: 
Jeffery would blend very well 
with the current French back- 
row squad of Champ, Erbani 
and Joinel, and it would be 
nice to think that England's 
Hall will come into his own 
as a ball handler as the 
season progresses. 

Ireland will doubtless re- 
store Matthews to their back 
row against Wales. He has 
recovered from his elbow 
injury, but it is probably too 


are to be made, in what was. 
hitherto, a settled area of the 
team, a home game is the 
place to make them. 

The scrummaging of the 
front row may also be called 
into question. Des Fitzgerald, 
the Leinster light-head prop, 
may be considered, though 
McCoy is a good performer 
in the loose. Orr, after 49 
caps, cannot go on forever, 
sentiment may keep him 
there for a fiftieth but it is 
hard to imagine him still 
being in circulation for next 
year's world tournament, and 
if he is to receive his farewell 
handshake, this may be the 
time. 


Wales will announce their 
side to play Ireland on Friday 
happy with their backs. less 
than happy perhaps with 
their back row. Interestingly 
England, who trained at 
Twickenham over the week- 
end, have confirmed the 
quality of the defence of the 
Welsh backs with film of the 
England/Wales game last 
month taken from the south 
stand, which reveals dearly 
how much the Welsh mid- 
field did to draw the sting 
from England's attacks. 


England are happy that 
Underwood will be fit by 
February IS. though he did 
not train on Sunday because 
of a damaged Achilles ten- 
don. Smith, the Wasps wing, 
did not complete training 
because of a bruised heel but 
otherwise the English camp 


am IV vv-vij vww UUIWI >T| JV LllV. W«uup 

early for Carr to return as the has a comparatively dean bill 
other flanker. He is much of health. Davies, despite 
more confident about his turning an ankle while train- 
fitness, having played two ing with Wasps, took part 
junior and two senior games and the match squad was 
recently, but he may uot yet reinforced by Peter Williams 
be ready for international (Orrell) and Harrison (Wake- 
nigby. field). 


Yorkshire have, six 
in England squad 


SNOOKER 



Three times a winner; the triumphant Cliff Tborbnrn holds his Masters trophy aloft 

Masters’ winner Thorburn 
takes aim at the world title 


By David Hands 


Six of the Yorkshire play- 
ers who helped beat Kent m 
the final of the county colts 
championship have been 
named in the England squad 
of 28 which meets for 
training in Birmingham this 
weekend. They will play 
Warwickshire under-21s at 
Rugby on Sunday after which 
a squad of 21 will be chosen 
to prepare for the Colts 
international season which 
begins against Italy in Rome 
on March 22. 

Yorkshire success, by 14-3 
in Dover, was their third win 
in a championship now 
sponsored by the national 
Westminster Bank. They won 
in 1980 and in 1982, a proud 
record for their coach of such, 
long standing. Allan Roache, 


who now hopes to turn his 
mind to club coaching. 

The win over Kent repre- 
sented a triumph for the 
Yorkshire backs who took 
their chances wel L They 
scored an excellent try 
through their right wing. 
Walker (north Ribblesdale) to 
go with another by Garnett 
(ioninas) the flanker. Irving, 
their captain and centre from 
Cleckhealon, kicked two pen- 
alties in a game sympatheti- 
cally handled by Tony Trigg, 
the international referee. 

After their brief visit to 
Rome, the Colts face an away 
game against Wales at 
Whiiland on April S and 
their representative season 
concludes against France at 
London Welsh on April 18. 


SKIING 


Mueller takes his first 
win of the season 


Crans-Montana, Switzer- 
land (AP) - Peter Mueller, the 
Swiss downhill specialist, was 
the surprising winner in the 
men's BASF World Cup 
super-giant slalom race held 
here yesterday. He led a 
strong showing by the Swiss 
team, including second place 
for Pirmin Zurbriggen. 

Mueller, aged 28 and in his 
tenth season on the World 
Cup circuit, skied aggres- 
sively down the 2,200 metre 
Piste Nalionale to record his 
fim victory of ibe *■»“ 
after several second places m 

downhill events. . • 

Zurbriggen. the detendn^ 


His victory allowed 
Mueller to take the lead in 
the overall World Cup stand- 
ings. jumping from fifth place 
to overtake last year’s win- 
ner, Marc Gimrdelli of 
Luxembourg, who finished 
outside the first 15 yesterday. 

RESULTS: 1. P MueRer 


ter (Switz). 

imin 39-32sec; 2. P Zurbriggen 


worid'ctetnpion.has^t^to 


win this season. 

Wasmaier, of W«l Germany; 

finished third, ahead of two 
more Swiss. Franz Heinzer 
and Karl Alpiger. 


(Switz), 1:39.72; 3. M Wesmaier 
(WG), 1:38.95: 4. F Heinzer (Switz), 
1:40.02; 5. K Alpiger fewftzi 
1:40.12; 6. M Mbit (It), 1:40.37; 7, L 
Stock (Austria). 1:40.62; 6. J 
Schick (WG). 1:40.64; 9. H Strotz 
(Austria). 1:40.74; 10, M Hand 
(Switz). 1:40.89; IT. J 

PfaffenbicNer (Austria), MOM: 
12, S WUdgruber (WG), 1:40.99; 13. 
S Niederseer (Austria) and F 
Piccard (FrJ. 1:4.1.03: 15. K Walk 
(Austria), 1:41.15. 

Ovoafi standings: 1, Mueaar, 149 
M GirardSn (Lux).. 142; 3. P 


pts; 2, M GirardaW (Lux). _. .. 
wimsberger (Ausbto). 137: 4. I 


Wimscwyw* ■-'■7- . ■ 

Stenmark (Swe). 127; 5. R Petrowc 
(YUS) 125. 


LACROSSE 

Midlands shock North 

By Peter Tattow 


By Peter Tatfow 
, . A scored the winner. 

Midlands caused *e ** ^ ihe other Iwo games 

«. i»f*sr»-r a,n - 

_ 1 «r»inns.h)T7S at 


weekend OI me ry ~ 

Territorial championships at 

Harrogate- . came on 

Sa"^" 
holders, could qnJy jjmw 
with Midlands. The next 
Midlands went mio a 

shoS more deurmjnation 

7 f“ d y 

Sondenon making d 7 ■ 

EEffSSSMi— 


a i /-u — ----- 

bined Universities, and I Di 
SSm. of St Mary’s Colleg 
Twickenham, also scored 
four times to lead 5outb to a 
9-2 victory over EasL 
South’s close 7-5 victory 
over North on Saturday 
Seems to have se«l«i the 
championships which are 
concluded at Newbury m two 
weeks time. 

BFSULTS: North 15. Combined 
tJr 5 Ses 5 : south 8. MBiands 6; 
SS^fWest ft Norm 5. South 7; 
Aambtfiad Umvereites 0. West 17; 
eSlTsouth 9: North B. MxJtends 

7. 


Cliff Thorburn left London 
by air yesterday morning to 
rejoin his family in Toronto 
after retaining the Benson & 
Hedges Masters snooker title 
at Wembley on Sunday nighL 
His main ambition when he 
returns is to regain the world 
title, which he won in 1980. 

Jimmy White, whom 
Thorburn defeated 9-5 in 
Sunday's finaL includes him- 


self a/noo^ a list of lOplayers 


capable of winning the world 
championship at Sheffield 
(April 19-May 5) but he 
firmly believes that Thorburn 
will be the hardest man to 
beau despite the fact that 
Steve Davis will be the 
favourite. 

Thorburn said in an inter- 
view on Sunday that he 
would spend a week in 
Canada and return to Derby 
in time for the Dulux British 
open championship, which 
starts on February 16. He 
also announced his intention 
to live permanently in Britain 
with his family after the 
world Championship, but bad 


By Sydney Friskln 
not yet decided where he 
would slay. 

The first prize of £45.000 
look Tborbum's earnings for 
the season to z total of 
£157.800. which is about 
£16,000 more than Davies 
has so far accumulated. 
When this was brought to his 
notice, he said: "Fine, but 
I'm not going to go out and 
spend it" He was the first 
player to win the Masters 
title three times, his previous 
successes having been 
achieved in 1983 and 1985. 


On three occasions a lead of 
more than 50 points was not 
enough for him to win ihe 
frame, as he himself admit- 
ted. “1 didn't nick any frames 
off him. He nicked a few- off 
me. I should have cut the 
lead to 7-6." The reference 
was to the thirteenth frame, 
in which While terminated a 
break of 59 by losing the cue 
ball, Thorburn eventually 
clearing the table with a 
break of 61. 


Paying a rich tribute to 
White, Thorburn said: “I can 
never outpot him, he is 
dangerous all the time." 

White decribed the final as 
a good tactical game and 
added : "Cliff punished me 
for the errors I made. It is fa- 
tal to make a mistake against 
him because he gels stronger 
and stronger once he finds 
his rhythm." 

In a match played at a 
steady pace, the left-handed 
White had no place to hide. 


While Thorburn relaxes in 
Canada, there is no respite 
for White, who plays Neal 
Foulds in the Tolly Cobbotd 
English professional 
championship at the Corn 
Exchange. Ipswich on Friday. 
He had actually forgotten 
about this event, which starts 
on Thursday with a match 
between Tony Meo and Dean 
Reynolds. 


FINAL: C. Thorburn (Can) bt J 
White 9-5. Frame scores: 
(Thorburn first)- 35-68. 75-22, 68- 
25. 70-27, 21-90. 69-14. 61^ -52. 9- 
65. 63-53. 56-69, 12-76, 73-16. 65- 
60 and 68-33. 


Brilliant loser White plays 
with style of a champion 


Alex Higgins, with his 
dash and lunatic brilliance, 
did more than any other 
player to create the snooker 


He showed ns all that 
snooker need not be a game 
for sordid old men who 
trundle the cue hall back into 
baulk with expressions of 
idiot satisfaction on then- 
faces. He demonstrated that 
smoker can be a game of 
cracked, demented adventure, 
and so won himself the 
nickname of “the people’s 
champion". 

It seems that he has passed 
the torch mi in Jimmy White. 
To be at Wembley this 
weekend, where the Con- 
ference Centre was turned 
into a bear garden by 2500 
beery and boisterous spec- 
tators (“Gooorn Jimmy!"), 
was to attend a riot meeting 
of the Jimmy White Glee 
Club, hot I have a fancy that 
White does not want to be the 
people’s champion. He wants 
to be the world champion. 
The real thing. 

He has everything the 
people could wish for: a great 
crashing adventurousness 
with the balls, staggering 
skills, awesome power — afl 
this and a loser too. What 
more could yon want? He 
makes snooker seem a gay, 
chivalrous thing , mm in which 
a young man could happily 
toss his life away with a 
smile: if Harry Hotspur had 
been a snooker player, be 
wonld have been like Jimmy 
White of Tooting. 

Cliff Tbortom, victor in 
the weekend’s final of the 
Benson & Hedges Masters 
tournament, was splendidly 
cast as White’s opponent 
Thorburn makes potting a 
red and lying np safe look 
like an epic brow furrowed in 
violent concentration. Dll' 
mense deliberation, unhurried 
delivery: one point 

He beat White 9-5 despite 
playing poorisb snooker. His 
smoker mechanism seemed 
to be m fcring on one cylinder, 

but hi$ snooker brain was 


never oat of gear. 

Where Thorburn rolls balls 
into the pocket, White tries to 
crack the brass fillet behind 
them. Traditionally, when 
White misses, the ball goes 
up and down the table half a 
dozen times and opens the 
game up for any method man 
opposing him. But when he 
gets into a rhythm, be is 
devastation itself: once he 
starts smacking the balls 
about, you have had H. 

Tborborn worked his hard- 
est to stop that happening: 
and it worked. In fact be 
made White work for every- 
thing. 

Whit 


..Jite is a little like Ian 
Botham, in that be prides 
himself most on things that 
go against his native. Botham 
regards his Headingjey 149 
as “hilarious", but is proud, 
in an almost shocked kind of 
way, of some of his defensive 
innings. And White, the 
gladdest potter in the game, 
summed Bp his tournament 
by saying happily: “My 
safety game was as good as 
anything." 

He was also pleased with 
the cautions, clever, canny 
way he trapped Thorburn 
with a pair of snookers in the 
last frame. “It’s coming, you 
know, it’s coming," he said. 
For a long time. White has 
been able to play the most 
brilliant frames in snooker 
for a long time, be has also 
been able to play brilliant 
matches. But now he is 
bullying himself to play 
successful tournaments. 

One of Thorbern’s great 
assets as a tournament player 
— one who has a long-term 
object always in mind - is 
the knowledge of when the 
time is right to go against his 
nature and attack. White is 
learning about going against 
his own nature: not bow to 
play sale, but when. 

Yet he remains the most 
infuriating of men. Twice in 
the final, he missed straight- 
forward chances from the 
rest 

But White, fresh from his 


recent win in the Mercantile 
tournament was clearly try- 
ing to play like a champion 
rather than like Jimmy 
White pure and simple. 

Certainly, apart from one 
or two stirring moments, his 
game was inhibited. “Fnnny 
— I murdered Cliff twice in 
the world championships 
when I was inexperienced," 
he said. Bnt in those days, he 
would have beaten a great 
player triumphantly and then 
crashed out in the next round. 
He is beginning to look (ike a 
tournament winner these 
days, even if he missed this 
one. He is becoming less like 
Harry Hotspur. 

But not at the expense of 
chivalry. He called his own 
foul at one stage, when 
nobody bad noticed anything 
wrong. That is bis way. 

Thorn bum said: “Before 
our match. I heard him say in 
an interview that there wonld 
1 m no gamesmanship in our 
finaL, and that we wonld just 
go out and enjoy our snooker. 
1 tike thaL He’s a good boy. 
No, he’s a good man these 
days, I guess." 

Yes, and one determined to 
mature into a champion: to 
mix the less attractive, less 
gi&morons parts of snooker to 
his game, at the expense of 
his own luscious pursuit of 
impossible pots. Tbe man 
with a reputation for being 
the fastest gun in snooker 
now says things like “111 
keep plodding on." 

His task is to plod np to 
championship level in defi- 
ance of his own quixotic 
nature. As a lover of quixotry, 
there is one way in which 1 
hope that be never makes it, 
that he will leave ns all 
shouting “Gooorn Jimmy r in 
vain forever. But I won’t bet 
on it. 

He could become more 
than a mere people's cham- 
pion. This year, perhaps. He 
certainly wants the world 
championship more than any- 
thing now. 


Simon Barnes 


BOBSLEIGHING 


Phipps poised for final challenge 


Fran Chris Moore, Lake Placid 


Nick Phipps, near the end 
of a season that has promised 
so much for British 
bobsleighing, goes into this 
week's final round of the 
World Cup in Lake Placid 
with more medals still within 
his grasp. , 

Despite beinf edged out of 
the top three in the overall 
two-man competition, his 
seventh place in St Moritz on 
Sunday was sufficient to 
retain third spot in the 
combined standings for ihe 
four-man evenLAnd as the 
World Cup circus loaded up 
for yesterday’s tians-Albnnc 
departure from Munich, the 
British champion, aged 33. 
also had the incentive of a 
top three finish in the 
combination at which to aim. 

His two and four-man 


points total is 111, putting 
him in third place behind the 
1983 world champion 
Ekkerhard Passer of Switzer- 
land (127) and Maris Pojkans 
(l25).of the Soviet Union.But 
the big danger to Phipps and 
his Allied Steel crew of Keith 
Power, Bob Thorne and Alan 
Cearns. would appear to be 
the up and coming new 
American No 1 Matt Roy. 

Roy pipped him by one 
place in Si Moritz and is now 
joint third with Phipps in the 
four-man standings. Both 
have 60 points. Walter 
Dellekanh, of Austria, is out 
in front with 81, nine more 
than Fasser. 

With "home" advantage at 
Lake Placid. Roy will be 
favourite to deny Phipps the 
bronze in the combined 


standings. But with the Rus- 
sians missing, the way is 
open for the pair of them to 
overtake Pojkans for the 
silver medal in the combina- 
tion. 


Much, however, is going to 


depend on fate and fortune. 
Placid demands the ultimate 
in driving skill and daring. It 
is longer and faster than all 
the other World Cup venues, 
measuring 1-557 metres from 
top to bottom, with an 
awesome vertical drop of 148 
metres. But as he savs. 


anything can happen to 
anyone at Placid. “That's 
wh> I still feel in with a shout 
of finishing in the top three 
of the two-man standings 
providing, of course, we stay 
out of trouble ourselves." 


ICE HOCKEY 


A leading 
Hand 
in Racers’ 
victory 


By a Correspondent 

Tne premier division of the 
Heine ken League had an 
unusual weekend m that 
there was no change of 
position among the top six 
clubs- There were, however, 
several notable individual 
needs with 18-year-old Tony 
Hand leading the way. 

The young Scot had eight 
goals and four assists in 
Murrayfield Racer's 13-4 win 
at Cleveland: a personal best 
On Sunday, it was Rick Fera 
who took the honours with 
six goals and one assist, the 
Racers scoring 13 and 
restricting the normally high- 
scoring Ayr Bruins to a mere 
half-dozen. Inevitably the 
league's leading scorers. Tim 
Salmon and Kevin Conway, 
shared four of them. 

Streatham Redskins con- 
tinue to travel to Scotland 
more in hope than expecta- 
tion and suffered two more 
defeats ai Fite and Dundeen. 
The NHL experience of Tod 
Bidner and Garry Unger 
proved Redskins' undoing as 
each scored three goals. 

John Ciotti had a tally of 
seven goals and five assists in 
Durham Wasps' two wins, 
while Jim Earle managed 
seven goals and four assists 
in only one game, 
Cleveland's win at Peter- 
borough. The Pirates still 
await their first premier 
division win. 

The most dramatic finish 
came at Willey Bay on 
Sunday when Nottingham 
Panthers, trailing 4-3. went 
on the power-play, removed 
their goaltender to ice an 
extra forward and had 
defensemen. Robin Andrew, 
to thank for scoring the 
equalizer only 23 seconds 
from the final buzzer. 


HOCKEY 


N Zealand 
are first 
opponents 


By Sydney Frisian 

To mark the centenary of 
the Hockey Association, tbe 
sixth World Cup will be held 
at the Willesden Stadium in 
London from April 4-10. 
England begin iheir challenge 
on the opening day with a 
match against New Zealand 
and in order to qualify for 
the semi-finals on October 18 
they will need to finish first 
or second in their group. 
They face further opposition 
from the Soviet Lin ion. the 
Netherlands. Pakistan (the 
holders) and Argentina. 

Australia. Canada. West 
Germany India, Poland and 
Spain make up the other 
group. There will be three 
matches a day during the 
round-robin series. 

WORLD CUP FIXTURES: Oct 4: 


BASKETBALL 


US star is accused 
of getting lenient 


n. 


deal from referees r 


Team Polvcell Kingston go 
to Portsmouth tomorrow for 


Soviet Union v Nethertanos; Argen- 
v New 


tina v Pakistan: England v 
Zealand. Oct 5: Australia v Can- 
ada: India v Poland: Spain v west 
Germany. Oct 6: England v 
Argentina: Soviet Union v New 
Zealand: Netherlands v Pakistan. 
Oct 7: Inaia v Spam: Australia v 
West Germany: Canada v Poland. 
Oct 8: Pakistan v New Zealand: 
England V Soviet Umon; Nether- 
lands V Argentina. Oct 10: Poland v 
West Germany. Australia v Spain; 
Canada v India. Oct 11: England v 
Pakistan: Netherlands v New Zea- 
land: Argentina v Soviet Urson. Oct 
12: Spain v Poland; Canada v West 
Germany: Argentina v India. Oct 
13: New Zealand v Argentina; 
England v Netherlands: Soviet 
Union v Pakistan. Oct 14: India v 
West Germany: Canada v Spain; 
Australia v Poland. 

Slough completed a 
successful weekend in the 
Pizza Express London League 
by defeating St Albans 2-1 at 
home on Sunday to move 
into second place in the 
premier division. At half- 
time the score was 1-1. Si. 
Albans having scored first. 


torou^h Ashby. Barber equal- 


ized from a short corner and 
the winning goal was scored 
by Dak in the second-half. 
On Saturday Slough had 
defeated Spencer 4-0. 
HOCKEY ASSOCIATION CUP: 
First round: Old Becce hernia ns 0, 
Soutngate Adelaide 2: Nortoik 
Wanderers 1, Fora 2, PeHcans 0, 
West Herts 1: Whitehaven 1. 
Dumam University 4; Young Mus- 
lims 2. Disley S; Stourport 2, 
Northampton Saints 1; Khaisa 
(Leamington) 1. Redd itch 0. Rug By 
Town 0. South Notongham 7; 


Nottingham 2. Derby 1 
r LEAGUE. 


SUNLlFE west 
division: Exeter Cnckets 0. Fire- 
brands 2: Hereford 0. Isca ft 
Marlborough 2. Plymouth 1; Swin- 
don 1. Brean 3: West Gloucester 1, 
E«erer University 0 
SOUTH WALES LEAGUE: Premier 
division: Cardiff 4. Oystermouth ft 
Uarushen 1, Penartn 2, Swansea 3. 
Newport 1: Whitchurcn 13, 
Cwmbran 0 


Harris back in 
Welsh squad 


Wales have announced 
their players for 1986. Unlike 
England they have named the 
full squad of 16. five of 
hom will join the B squad 
_f 11 and play in the 
international B team’s tour- 
nament in Manchester on 
February 21-22 (Joyce White- 
head writes). In the A squad 
Wendy Davies, aged 17. a 
schoolgirl from Swansea, 
white Linda Harris has 
returned to the side after a 
year out due to a knee injury. 
Mama Williams has been 
recalled. A captain has not 
yet been appointed. 


a match that is certain to 
have a vital beating on the 
Carisberg National League 
Championship with their star 
American guard. Steve 
Bontrager. accused of gening 
-preferemia] treatment" from 
referees. 

Allen Loonin. the Ameri- 
can coach of Walkers Crisps 
Leicester, made the accusa- 
tion on Saturday after his 
side’s 137-121 defeat at 
Tolworth. Bontrager having 
scored 43 points for the 
winners. 

“If more calls had been 
made on Bontrager it would 
have been a lot closer," 
Loonin said. "Steve 
Bontrager gets preferential 
treatment more than any 
other player in the League." 
Loonin's view is that 
Bontrager has perfected the 
art of drawing fouls when he 
is the real offender, having 
deceived opponents — and 
referees too - by charging 
into players lining up to stop 
him. 

“1 would offer any film to 
any referee," Loonin said. 
“He's palming and pushing 
off all the time. He gets away 
with it but it's illegal and it's 
never called. .As soon as he 
objects to a calL he doesn't 
get a call against him for the 
next four minutes." 

Bontrager replied: “So 
many people complain about 
me getting preferential treat- 
ment that referees, in trying 
to make it fair, end up by go- 
ing against me." 

For the first 10 minutes of 
an engrossing game, it 
seemed that Loonin would 
have more cause to praise his 
own players than criticize 
officials. With Vaughan and 
Meagher prominent Leices- 
ter led 16-4 before Bontrager. 
Clark and Davis inspired the 
inevitable Kingston rally to 
take them into the lead by 
68-53 at half-time. 

Eight points by Innell. his 
first of the match, in the first 
two minutes of the second 
half put the match out of 


By Nicholas Hading 

Leicester's reach, although 
they nexer surrendered. 

Portsmouth and Sharp 
Manchester United, the other 
contenders, both had easy 
wins — Portsmouth by 84-66 
against struggling Home 
Spare Bolton. United with a 
90-82 success against 
Hemel/Watford. whose place 
in (he national championship 
play-offs is now in jeopardy. 

United's neighbours, Man- 
chester Giants, were the 
latest victims of the revival 
by Brunei Ducks Uxbridge 
and Camden. The most 
impressive promoted team 
for five years. Uxbridge 
followed iheir victories 
against Leicester Iasi week 
and at Hemel in midweek by 
winning 87-78 at Altrincham 
with the help of 31 points 
from Politi. 

QRS Sunderland, who 
were beaten 129-113 at 
Happy Eater Bracknell, have 
released one of their Ameri- 
cans. Victor Alexander, who 
has joined a Venezuelan first 
division club. “He's had an 
unfortunate time what with 
injuries and trying to get into 
shape but he's done a good 
job for us in some games." 
Dave Elderkin. the Sunder- 
land coach said. Dykstra's 44 
points for Sunderland made 
him the week's top scorer but 
to no avail. 

Nissan Bears Worthing, 
still w ith hopes of making the 
p[a>-offs. almost suffered a 
shock defeat at McEwan 
Tyneside, who were 14 points 
up with four minutes to go, 
Tyneside then made the 
mistake of holding on to 
what they had. enabling 
Shackleford to inspire a 
Worthing recovery in over- 
time by 91-81. 

The other first divison 
match, at Crystal Palace; 

started half an hour late as 

visiting Birmingham broke 
down enroute, which left 
them in no state to suppress 
Jennings, the scorer of 41 
points in Palace's 1 1 7-92 

victory. Palace now look 
certain to qualify 1 for lhq 

pby-offs. 


TENNIS 


Youth have chance to 
claim a place at top 

By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


The retirement of Susan 
Barker and Virginia Wade in 
turn has left room at the lop 
for the young women of 
British tennis. The past and 
present national champions. 
Joanna Dune, aged 25, and 
Anne Hobbs, aged 26. are the 
only widely experienced play- 
ers available for this year's 
most important team events, 
the world championship for 
the Federation Cup and the 
annual contest with the 
United States for the 
Wjghtman Cup. 

Susan Mappin. the na- 
tional team manager, said 
yesterday that Joanne Louis. 
Jane and Clare Wood, and 
Belinda Borneo, were among 
a group of younger players 
who “should be looking at 
the fifth place in the 
Wjghtman Cup team". 
Whereas Federation Cup ties 
consist of only two singles 
and one doubles, the 
Wjghtman Cup demands 
three singles players and two 
doubles teams. Amanda 
Brown looks the most vulner- 
able of the five obvious 
candidates. 

Annabel Croft, Miss Durie. 
and Miss Hobbs are Britain's 
leading singles players, with 
Sara Gomer challenging for a 
place on the faster surfaces. 
Miss Durie and Miss Hobbs 
remain the outstanding dou- 
bles team but Miss Croft and 
Miss Comer formed an 
encouraging partnership dur- 


ing last month's qualifying 
competition for the inaugeraL 
European Cup, and indoor 
team championship. Mis£ 
Brown, too. must be consid-* 
ered for a doubles place. 

Britain won their group in- 
the European Cup, which hai 
the same formal as the 
Federation Cup. and could* 
become the inaugural chants 
pions when the six nation! 
who have qualified for the 
first di\ ision. contest the title: 
from November 27-30 at a* 
venue that has yet to be 
decided. Much depends on 
the quality of the players 
available for the other 
competing teams. 

Last month, at Loano 
(Italy). Miss Croft and Miss 
Comer shouldered the bur- 
den. “They had some valu-, 
able experience*'. Miss 
Mappin said yesterday^. 
“Annabel played number 
one, without being accus-' 
tomed to that, and bad to get 
used to the pressure. As" 
number two. Sara had to start 
the ties off and did it very 
adequately. As they won the 
qualifying rounds I would 
like to give those two the 
same experience again, in 
November, if they are 
available." 

The Wightman Cup event 
will be played four weeks L 
earlier, at the Albert Hall 
and there could be a vacancy, 
for one of a host of presently 
obscure teenagers. 



Cup chance: Brown (left) and Gomer 


Mrs Lloyd wins again 


Key Bisfcayne, Florida (AP) 
- Chris Lloyd, of the United 
States, used her recently 
developed strength to take 
the sting out of Steffi Grafs 
power strokes and claim a 6- 
3. 6-1. victory in the final of 
the $250,000 (£178,000) 
Virginia Slims tournament 
on Sunday. 

Mrs Lloyd, the top seed 
here and ranked No 2 in the 
world, also displayed her 
psychological toughness and 
took advantage of Mtss 
Grafs fragile psyche at the 
end of each set. She won 12 
of the final 14 points in the 
first set and 13 of 14 at the 
end of the i 15-minute match 
on the cement conns at the 
Sheraton Royal Biscayne re- 
sort. She earned 540,000 for 


the victory, while Miss Graf 
the second seed and No 6 in 
the world, picked up $20,000 
for her runner-up finish in 
front of 4.912 spectators. 

After Miss Graf broke Mrs . 
Lloyd's service to get even ai , 
3-3 in the first set the 31 j 
year-old former Wimbledon! 
champion wore down her- 
opponent and won 12 of the. 
next 14 points to win the seC 

Miss Graf regained her 
composure long enough to 
break MrsUoyd s serve in the 
first game of the second seL, 
but the 1 6-vear-old West! 
German fell apart when a bad_ 
line call cost her the next. 


game. 

She won only four more 
points the rest of the way, ■ 
losing two games to love. 


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RACING 


Royscar should 
make most 
of favourable 


conditions 

By Mandar in (Michael Phillips) 


; With Mr Snugfit declared 
for the Stanwix Handicap 
Chase at Carlisle this after- 
noon and Corbiere under 
orders for the George Coney 
Challenge Cup at Warwick, 
this year's Grand National 
will be upper most in the 
minds of many again today. 

The two finished second 
a'nd third respectively behind 
Last Suspect in last year's 
Aintree spectacular. And of 
course Corbiere also finished 
third the year before having 
won the big race in 1983. 
While his trainer. Jenny 
Pitman, clearly resents the 
handicapper's decision to 
give her horse as much as 
list 41b to carry around 
Liverpool this spring she can 
have no qualms about his 
weight for the feature race at 
Warwick this afternoon. 

However, well though 1 
expect her pride and joy to go 
with only 10 si 12 lb. more 
especially as be showed a 
glimmer of sparkle at 
Cheltenham last month when 
he finished fourth behind 
Knock Hill over four miles I 
still prefer Royscar in this 
instance. 

The eventual winner will 
have to be a horse who stays 
really well and revels in 
muddy conditions underfoot 
Also he must be in form. To 
my way of thinking Royscar 
fits that bill and he is my 
idea of a sporting nap. Not to 
be confused with Royscript 
who also runs in the same 
race. Royscar seems to be 
better now than at any time 
in his life and that is 
something that appeals to me 
about a horse with only 10 st 
to carry. 

The first sign of that 


improvement was to be 
gleaned at Newton Abbot on 
Boxing Day when he finished 
second to Broadheath. who 
had himself won three of his 
four previous races. In third 
place that day was the hot 
favourite. Ballinacurra Lad. 
whose subsequent form reads 
so well. Then Roscar went to 
Wincanton 12 days ago 
where he finished in grand 
style at the end of three miles 
and a furlong to beat 
Macoliver who had won his 
two previous races. 

To me all that says that 
Royscar will prove lim’d to 
beat this afternoon, even 
though, with his penalty, he 
still has 2 lb more to carry 
than his official rating. Apart 
from Corbiere. Sam Wrekin. 
Little Polveir. Flaxen Tina. 
Royscript and Leckie will 
provide tough opposition 

If Corbiere is beaten his 
trainer should derive some 
consolation by at least win- 
ning the Malden Timber 
(EBF) Novices Hurdle 
(Qualifier) with Lafosse. 

Otherwise it could easily 
pay to pin one's faith on two 
horses who fell last time out 
quite uncharacteristically. 
Rainbow Lady (2.00) got no 
further than the second flight 
at Wincanton last time ouL 
Before that she made most of 
the running to win here at 
Warwick and now 1 expect 
her to go well again in the 
Burton Hill Handicap Hur- 
dle. 

Fudge Delight, my selec- 
tion Tor the Princethorpe 
Novices' Chase, also came a 
cropper last time out at 
Kempton. But before that he 
had run Berlin to four lengths 
at Lingfield. 



My Dominion, carrying the 
colours of Terry Ramsden for 
the first time, and also a 
substantial pile of off-course 
money, took his winning 
sequence to five in the bet 
With The Tote Novices 
Hurdle. Jonathan Lower ^ged 
17, scoring his 17tb success 
of the season, was riding at 
Fontwdl for the first time 
and had a battle to settle My 
Dominion in the early stages, 
especially with Christo (airing 
him on, but My Dominion 
never faltered and stormed 
home four lengths clear of 
San Carlos. 

My Dominion wifi be one 
of Rarasden's three runners 
in the Triumph at Chelten- 


ham, bat his main hope must 
be Bnmko, who runs next at 
Kempton. 

Pipe watched another of his 
Eonr-year-olds,Gniiidy Lane, 
beaten into second place in 
the opening division of the 
Bishop's Wood Novice Hur- 
dle at Wolverhampton -De- 
spite hating the ground, Dan 
Raise beat the 11-8 favourite 
a length, with Vubtwy’s 
Clown a farther three lengths 
away third. 

Martin Brennan set out to 
lead all the way on Vnlrory’s 
Clown and the combination 
was still at the head of affairs 
jumping the last flight, but he 
was soon overhauled by the 
winner and then the favourite. 


Mark Pitman, who rode 
Dan Raise for his mother, 
Jenny, described the ground 
as -bottomless.' 1 He brought 
Dan Raise on the outside, 
attempting to pick the better 
ground and although bis 
mount was hanging towards 
the other horses the move 
paid dividends. 

Jenny Pitman reported that 
Boirough Hill Lad came out 
of Saturday's Sundown Park 
victory well and there were no 
problems following his 
magnificent comeback. 

Mrs Pitman completed a 
doable when she saddled 
even-money favourite 
Stearsby to lead all the way 
under Peter Scudamore for a 


WARWICK 


Going: soft 


1.30 RYTON NOVICE HURDLE (£1.518: 2m) (25 runners) 

1 110t CLEARLY BUST (D) (C Hotaws) C Holmes 811-13 D Hood (7) 

4 1RJ004 WHAT WILL i WEAR (□} (Lady Anne Banted.) 

J Gtover 8-1 1-13 D McKeown (7) 

5 ARTK WONG (T MWqtey) K Morgan 8-11-6 S Jamwon 

8 00 CAREEN ( j MdokmeeM M Pipe Vn-6- P Laacn 

13 00 CVM (Wefls Paper Co UcJ) S Manor 5-11-6.. M Harrington 

U 0 WAKES LAO IK Hogg) P Burgoyne 3-11-6 — 

15 ELVERS GREEN (fl Lambert) JCosgravs 0-11-0 M Csseett 

16 00 FATHER MAC (O Frww et) Mrs M ReneH 5-11-0 - — 

17 04 FLEET BAY IMns J WonnacoB) 

Mrs JWotwcotl 6-11-0 OWpnnaooW (7) 

20 42408-4 HOUSE OF LORDS (J GWow) J Fitzgerald 7-11-6 — 

24 0 MEAUME (O Anal) 6 A no) 6-11-6 G McCourt 

28 MV SON WV SON (W Hannon) S Meaor 5-M -0G Oiadetgones 

30 QUICK FUNG (C WHtems) C Wafems 5-11-6 — 

33 P SANDHELD (Mrs H Knott) M Ecklay B-11-6 A O Hagen 

30 WATER PISTOL (0 Powell) 0 Wintta 6-11-0 A Carroll 

38 000 JACKIE'S LASS (Mis J Brawn) W Wharton 5-1 1-1. M Brennan 

39 LADY REEHFI (H Peactev) H Peachey 5-11-1 P Dover 

40 004 MARY KATE O'BRIEN (Mrs B Curiey) B Curley 5-11-1 DMurpfty(4) 

«4 0- TOM’S NAP HAND (T StMOon) W R WBems 5-11 -1C Brown 

45 0 TRW BLOSSOM (N Robans) J Webber 5-11-1 _...G Memagh 

47 OF CLAUDES MEN (B Incarnate) L Ugntbrown 4-10-10 K Sims (7) 

51 0044 MAORI WARRIOR (N2) (C Coombs) A Borrow 4-10-10 B Powefl 

57 0440 WALMER SANDS (USA) (Mrs C Welch) 

J Spearing 4 10 10P Warner 

ta 00 CHAISE LONGUE (C Wright) H O Ne» 4-10-S — 

69 0 EVE FLASHER (H Maddenr) R Carter 4-10-5 P Benon 

6-4 Oeady Bust. 4-1 My Son My Son. 5-1 House Ol Lord*. 7-1 Father Mac. 6-1 
Mery Kate O Brian, 12-1 Ctaeffi. 16-1 others. Otters: 4. 0. 


28 

32 

34 

37 

38 

39 
41 
45 


0 

000/000- 


MAGWA MZ) (G Luggj T Pars 
PINK PANTHER (T PaJnmg) R I 
POLLEN BEE (Mrs L Dresher) 


Forster 5-11-0 H Dawes 

Ho n a head 6-11-OP Scudamore 

O Sherwood 5-11-0 .C Cdx(4) 

0 ROSS TYCOON <M Walker) J Spearing 5-11-0 P Warner 

P ROVING GLEN (Mrs L Dresher) R Armytaga 5-11-0- B Ppwel- 

004 ROYAL CEDAR (J Curts) Mrs M Rene* 5-11-0. — 

SHOOT TO WIN (T Hammings) S Motor 5-11-OG Oiarta*Jones 
004 THE CAPO FAMtGUA (Mrs 8 



want 

Plea* 

does 
]m>sk 
ers of 
bfesa; 


on 
Tot 

& p 
West 

most 
be lib 


who 1 
phoen 


Warwick selections 

By Mandarin 

1.30 Clearly Busl 2.0 Rainbow Lady. 2.30 ROYSCAJR (nap). 3.0 
Lafosse. 3.30 Fudge Delight. 4.0 Siobhan's Joy. 4.30 All Intern. 

2.0 BURTON HILL HANDICAP HURDLE (2,267: 2m) (25) 

1 3-EP3F4 FRENCH CAPTAM (LavWa Duchess of Norte*) 

Lady Hemes 10-11-1 OR Rowe 

3 4303-1F RAINBOW LADY (GO) (B WheeOe# , 

4 401-04 AMMAN MU. (FR)0< PtntoWJ fl Judres^-ll-^ 

5 3F11F4- THE WBJDBI foi (R Yates) C Jackson 8-11-2 J Bryan 

6 YBMO B OLD ILL USION fc-D) (H Thws Date) M Eddey 8-11-2 C Cc* (4) 

0 0/OOOP4- PATRICK'S FAIR (D) (W Stater) R E Peacock 10-11-0 — - 

11 .000034 LULAV mjLJ Horn) D Nfchotaon 8-10-10 P Scudamore 

IS 000-04F LITTLE LONDON (D) (T Morion) T Morton 7-10-7R Dunwoody 

10 01P0-0P WALHAN (D> (Mrs H Knod) M Eddey 6-10-5 A Huteurdrf 

17 000100 ORBITAL MANOEUVERS (0) (G CNpman) 

B McMahon 5-10-4 TWU 

19 4MM>00 BROCK HU (GO) Mss S LOW) C F Jackson 1 0-1 0-3 E Murphy<4) 

20 140300' WOODWAX (GO) (K But) O VWntte 5-10-3 A Cam* 

21 MOOOO-O MABCELUNO (Mrs T Pfflimgton) A J WHson 10-10-3J Suthem 

22 P20P/U0 YORK COTTAGE (C HfcdWro) C Htetangs 9-10-3 R NyWI 

21P-QF3 Aims (P Oregon} Mra A Fmch 5-10-1 S Earie(4) 

27 424800 TW8AHJB Stevens) B Stevens 6-10-0 J H Dawes 

01-0000 APPALACHIAN (D) ft Sorter) C Vernon MBer 7-1 0-0 D Browne 

30 DO-POOQ ROYAL BAIZE (R Redding) J Baker 8-10-0 C Brawn 

32 OOOOPI BURLEY ML LASS (D) (C Ptwton) E Wheeler 6-10-0 M Bowteyf7) 

35 to/4-OOF BLOW MY TOP JR BroomheAJ R HoUer 7-10-0 P Murphy 

36 000-0 SHAKtRA GROVE (M Ufley) J Speemg 5-10-0 R Ottta 

38 OP/PP-PO BtOOKS LAW (GD) (D Mownfleld) 

DBloomUeWI 1-10-0 LBkJomBeld (4) 

39 flP204» OINAOAN (P Moms) A P James 5-10-0 - G Jones 

40 O3PO-F0 RECORD RED (E AUsopm J Speanng 5-10-0 P Warner 

41 DP-00 DISCOVER GOLD (Ashley Hamson Co Ud) fl Juckes 5-10-0 — 
3-1 Rainbow Lady. 4-1 Bold Wusmn. 5-1 Petncks Par. 8-1 Aiece. 

2 -30 GEORGE CONEY CHALLENGE CUP (Handicap chase: 
J3.967: 3m 4f 180yd) (13) 

1 1/4 0204) HUP6RTIN0 ILotJ Kenyon) E Owan km 11-11-7 ....R Strange 

2 W-3F22 SAM WREKiN (BP) (R Thomson) J FinaeralO 8-10-12 

3 13-0004 CORMBtE (B Burrough) Mrs J Prtman?l-10-12.... B de Haan 

4 2/11F11 GOLDEN KNOLL (Mrs J McKechme) 

5 103-PP2 LITTLE POLVEIR (U Shone) J tdvwxis 9^^G-10 .!^P*bSw 

l S dee) J Werner B-tO-6 G Memagh 

9 22-OOPO GRg NBANK PARK (O (R Budge) R Periqns 9-10-1 Q Witbare 

10 K-3313 ROYSCRIPT (G Hwsby) J 9-10-0 PlteW 

11 133(QF22 LECKIE (W WhttKead) R Armytage 11-10-0 ■. B PoweO 

II t r^ D ~ (Mrs . F . OunwSSS 

13 4-03321 ROYSCAR (J Chsnvi) J Chantn 9-10-0 (6 ex) R IVtoman 

14 omiMF COLONEL CHRISTY (H ONeO) H ONeA 11-10-0 __!!!_!!—. 

10 F2P13-P BAY FOREST (Mrs D Cnestare) Mrs E Kennart B-10-0 S McNeil 

_ 7-2 Sam WVekin. 9-2 Little Polveir. 5-1 Royscar. 6-1 Cortxere. Flaxen Tea. 8-1 
Golden KnoR. Lecue. io-i Bashful Lad. 12-1 Greanoantc Park. 

3.0 MALDEN TIMBER (EBF) NOVICE HURDLE (QUALIFIER) 
(£3,158 2m) (25) 

£ n.mnjft Mr £ J Pwnafl 5-11-10 — M Pitman 

6 POKE'S CASTLE (K Durmj K W Ourm 6-11-5 R Svonga 

8 00341 ONE FOR MAMMY (C RobcW C Roach 5-T1-5 a Wrr^ri 

9 10 TENZING (D) (R Boo Wigmore St Lrol 

O Sherwood 6-11 -5 S Sherwood 

10 0 ADMIRAL IRONSIDE (J Btam P O Haynes 5-11-0 „_.A Webb 

21 OOFPUF HK3HWOOO (J Clarice) 0 McMahon 6-11-0 T WM 

24 20322P INVtSBLE RING (C Smrthi R Holder 5-11-0 P Murarry 

26 00 JMSINT1ME (kitime Eng Ltd) R Brarington 5-11-0 . . .C Jones 

27 0 JOCKSER (S Lawther) J Webber 5-11-0 G Memagh 

FnnflVpIl TPClllfo (ri. ao Charteswn George (**m) Court 

rum wen results Jme. Move Aim IPUl. 33 John Star. 

Utamuud (5th). Worn Be Told (P U.K 
Going Soft Kham Hawk (6m). Maiden Balder (P U) 

1 Jb (2m 2f ch): 1. FEARLESS IMP 20 RAN15I. S. 1SL * $'■ MPw 
(pWeSs 3-1)2. Breven |M Bosley 9-4 Wefcmon. Torn: QUO; C2 00 £2820 
rav): 3. PtashfR.GuesnO-l): Also ran: 7- E3 40 D/F (Winner » 2nd wan any other) 
2 Paddy O'MaBey tF). 0 Southdown Sport Et.0O. CSF _ E124E8. 

(4(h). 18 Tqpon (5th). 20 Henry Geary 
Steels (R. OWer Hardy (6WL 

25 Bold Argumffit (fl(. 9 ran. 12 ... . . 

LdtaLtSl.lG. R Sneonerd, Devom fa»): Also ran: lO Royal GernM |F).12 

Tote m E4.70; £1 JOEi.lOJaEaDF Harlow Mi« (P/U). Jvrnano (F). MaHredee 
£500£SF ES 88. (P/Ul Nemo «yOo|P/UI- Soeerg SotB (F) 

slo pm 41 hole): i. MY DOMINION (J 16 Garaamei (Fl. 20 Morion The Hattar 
Low Evena Favy. 2. 5an Carlos (R H»n). 25 Loiiys Patch m. Wesum Border 

Rowe 7-1); 3, Accuracy (H Davies 51) 3. (F)- 33 Grants Casoa 1P£U]. Pnnce Sane 

Ano ran- 4 Christo (Stfi) 12 5yMn (P/U). TB ran. 7 L. 2W. not ta*en. R 

JOhar. 14 Man 0 Mage (4*1. 10 Mr AnnytagajEast BsWy. Tow: UJO-tiiO. 

Avenger (PUL 20 Mss Magnestom (F). £4.70 n.80 Dual Forecasc E2i 00 CSF: 

50 F*n Service (P Ul. Hopeful Kyoo (5th) £29.89 

10 Ran. 41. ii. iiHjfa. M Pipe. 4J0 (Zm 4f ndtak 1. INLANDER U 
WaKmnon. Tata £2.40. Ei 4fl. ei 10 Lovejoy 100-30); 2 LkfG Moore 18-1) 3.- 
£2.90 dF: £4 40. CSF: £9 43. HaTs Pnneo (P Rowe 14-1). 4. 

2.30 1 2m 21 1 10yd ch): 1. RhoHunosa ia WeDO 8 -ic Atso ran. ll-« 

GRAKtoENAMANAGH (R RoweO 10-»L Fan Come On Grade ffimj. w an 

2,'Cwim (R Dunwoody *-l) 3. Bright Graan (PUL 10 Mrgmv Steel, 14 High 

teprison (j AAerwrer i4-ij Also ran. Heaven. 5th. 18 Bn»ti Crown. 20 Wwr 

Evens Fav Capta*> Dawn (U R) fl and Peace. 25 Corona. Cfcme Tratn. 

Patatmaw (F) <0 ZeMa s Fancy (P ui. 16 umon (R). 33 it m For Gaia. 9p Up (to. 

OonT Touch |4tti). 20 Downgaymem (5ihl Here s Hie DOC 16 ran. 61. II. *L l Hd. 121. 

8 ran. si, 6). Mae L Bower Aaeslord. J 0 Davwa Etwom Tw: ^20; EZiO. 

Tote £720. £1 30 E2 00 £2.30 DF £15 50 EL30. £1 60. £2.90 DF E66.ID. CSF: 

&0 (2m a ncsai: i. kilcha Gnu. g £57 93. Tncasc £839 50. 

Lower 7-2 FAV): 2 Goldan June (C Gray " ■ — 

Q3-1) 3. Par Savvy (H Jerwins TO- if. OFFICIAL SCAaTCHINGS: All 

Also ran- 11-2 Tro)an Goo 7 in engagementStdead): Ross Morgan. 

Amazing >5-2 Mling. 0 Happy Cash. i0 Royal Barm, Ripyttara, Safe Pnda El 

Aicazaea. Edwm's Ponoess. id Song at Ceownno Dawn. Oonaghs Fancy, meet 

Cnnotw. Terra ffl Sena. 16 Breakfast Car Laay. Oelwea Ftom 


CurtMt 

B Curtoy 8-1 1-0 D Mwphy (4) 
0004 TROUT ANGLER (P Tram) Mtas P O Conrw 5-11-0 C Warren (7) 
4 WAtKDU (BF) (Greermees Securities Ud) M Pipe 5-11-OP Leach 
403 WHAHRY BUM (Mrs G McFerrfln) I Dudgeon 5-11-014 Richards 
00 WOODLAND SHADOW (J Mountfort) Mrs M RMI 0-11-0- — 

0 H AND K HATTRICK IE Klrfland) D GarxUho 5-10-9 — 

P004-00 IVY ROYAL (Mrs P Bomterd) P Somterd 7-10-9..R Dunwoody 

800 UTTLE MYM) (T Pearson) Q H Jones 7-10-9 G Jones 

302-400 NETHERDAfl (R MaXiethwart) W Wnarion 6-18-9— M Brennan 
114 Tenzing. 7-2 Lafosse. 4-1 one For Mammy, 81 The Capo Famgha. 81 
WaMo. 181 Foxes Castle. 12-1 Magwa. 14 othera. Blnhere: 57. 

3.30 PRINCETHORPE NOVICE CHASE (£2.496 2m 4f) (16) 

2 FF2P-41 DUNCOMBE PRINCE (D)(J McDonough) J MJeftarson 7-11-8 — 

3 8 2321 F FUDGE DELIGHT (M Dorey) O Sherwood 7-11-8 S Sherwood 

203144 MORKE (B Hartwyt M C Pipe 8-11-8 P Leach 

P CASTS. GANDOLFO (K Dunn) K W Own 9-11-12 R Strange 

O/OOW EASTER NiGHT (M Wittes) T A Forster 8-11-2 H Davies 

P/OOPPP FIRST QUADRANT (USA) (Mrs E Humana) H O Ne* 8-11-2 — 
FO GENERAL CHERRY (A Sydenham) B Stevens 12-11-2 J H Davies 

300(484 JOHN WELLBORN (T CM) W Whamn 7-11-2 M Bremwi 

0S2FD2 MAYANNCOR (G Wrago) R A Periuns 8-11-2 Dai Wafers 

8800 VALIANT WOOO (Mrs R Fitch) S Metier 6-11-2-M Harrington 
BRIDGETOWN GIRL (Miss L Wood) J Webber 8-10-1 1G Menngh 
OF0800 RUE-THE-OAY (Cherry Tree Stabtas) S T Hants 7-10-1 1J Frost 
000/2041 SPACE SPEAKER [Mrs M Bndgwater) 

_ KSBridguetar 7-10-1 1W Worthington 

OOPO YOUNG JCL (Mrs H Dowson) Mrs H Dowson 7-10-1 1J Suihem 

048830 NON8MOKER (D Hodges) M C Pipe 5-10-7 J Loweif7) 

PROVIDE (M Kingsley) S Motor S-10-7 G CharlevJones 

64 Fudge DeftghL 3-1 Mayanncor. 4-1 Dunoombe Pnnce. 6-1 Morice. 181 Jofm 
Wetoum. 12-1 Vafiant Wood. 14-1 others. 

4.0 AIR WEDDING HUNTERS TROPHY 

amateurs: £1.030: 2m 4fi (14) 


46 

48 

49 

50 
53 
5* 

56 

57 


12 

21 

22 

23 

28 

31 

47 

49 
56 

50 

59 

00 

61 


(Hunter chase: 


233128 RUGY (D) (R Weaving) R Weaving 1812-8. J 

ARTIC PUSH (B Lay) B Lay 7-12-2 L Lay 

300/08P CELTIC TUDOR (J HaMdnson) J Hartdnsan I812-2J Henl d n s on 
COLpEN CAa Ni?(M Barthorpe) M Bantwrpe 812-2S Andrewsjaj 
LONE SOLD1CT (Mis j Docker) Mrs J Docker 14-12-2H HanuD 


TOP, 


. MA XED F IST (Mra P Multan) Mra P Mullen 11-12-2G H 

41FF-00 ROBBERY ROAD (N B Jones) N B Jones 812-2-N ... 

ggg. JMra P Jowto) Mrs P Jones 1812-2 

P/32038 StOBHANS JOY (Mrs C Janeurajrt 

"r aasB»4S^a»»vs3Br ,2_tM p 

W Coptart H I Copley 811-11. 

310/Q3F- WISE LADY (O) (Mrs C Jane StttanJJN OftvwM) . 

Mrs C Jane Staltard 1811-11 

J*?. Ru! ?l3' 1 ' Ms S La °y- < " 1 G«**Bn Casino. 81 Upper Tan. 81 Rock Candy, 
18? Lone Sokfcsr. 12-1 others. Bflnkenc 7. 11. 14. 

4.30 EBF NH FLAT RACE (£1.578: 2m) (28) 


CARLISLE 


GoingJieavy 


1.15 KlNGMOOfl HANDICAP CHASE ( £1,1 922m) (8 runners) 

t 2033-PP SNOW BLE9SED (C Atanoder) 


2 

3 

4 

7 

8 
9 

12 


212832 IVAGOP 
134282 RAM 


3/3F403 SLASHB1 (Mrs 
‘ TOWER ( 


C Alexander 811 -10 □ Dolton 


JP (Lord MecAndrew) Denys Smith 7-11-4— S Chariton 
DC THOR (G-DXBF) < “ 


(Mra F Waken). 


402132- PARK _ 
341 PI 0 SAUCSPOT 
1-S300U TAILORED 


F Walton 1 1 -1 1 -3 Mr J Wakon 

G FaVtwm) G Falruaim l2-ll-0 ..T G Dun 

ER (0) (Lt-Col W Momedh) P MonmOi 810-6D Notsi 

(C-D) rw Gcib) G Rtchards 810-6 N Dougmy 

TO TASTE (DJ (Mrs M GreenshMds) 

M Naughton 7-10-0 M Hammond 

OS20UO MASTER CROFT (HMchens for Kitchens Ud) D McCasi 

8l0-0K0ootar4 

9-4 Ram The Thor, -10830 taac c p. 4-1 StaM ie r . 11-2 Saucapot 81 Parktmur.' 
Tatored To Tasta. 181 Mhera.- 

1A5 WETHERAL SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE( £74£2m 330 

ydX19) 


3 

5 

6 
8 
9 

10 

11 

12 

14 


P* NO MYSTEKYI 
H GOLDEN NOU' 


(Dwtam 
Y (H Wc 


_ _ Inns Ltd) R 
Wood) Mra G ‘ 


000180 ALE X CH OICE (Mrs H Bawl) Mra M Sevan 7-11-4Mr C Smith 
310800 PERFECT MAGE (Miss D Stock) Mra E ! 

Mbchw) J I 


10-11-6 S Chariton 
0-11-6 P Niven 7 


. Stack 811-4R Ca rn a h a n 


i Gray 1 
R o v nfey 


810-13. 

wade 81811 


J Goukfing 
.Mr C Storey 


F00840 JARALL fJ Mkchefl) J Mitchea 811-3 
003044/ EELA0OUT (J StoreyV J Storey 
OOP/OM SON OF MANADO (J Wade) J < 

ALBANY VICTOR (R TXytor) J Rowlands 181810 Mr G Heriwr 4 
300340 NfTE OF SPRING (D Green) Mas Z Green 


SAUCY TARTAN (G 1 
HECKLEV MMKY " 
>300 GO USSAVA (B 
HEAVENLY 


8189Jayne Thomp so r 
0 Mra G Revetoy 8180 N Ooutfity 

F Wetan 8187 Mr J Wafer 

810-6 D Dutton 


1 810-GSharon James (7) 

SOCKS) (M Bowfcer) M Bowker 8186 E Conroy 7 

ASCOT AOAM (Mrs D Ferrell) J P SnWh 18106- P A Farrell 
0UEENS8UHY UZ (J BaB R Jeffrey 810-6 P Tuck 


19 028000 SOCMai 

20 030-033 

21 020-PflQ OUEPfSa UHY U Z (J BxS) R Jeffrey 

23 U00008 IRSS KRUGERRAND (R Jeffrey) R Jeffrey 810-8. J Brough 7 

24 08040 UTTLE WWWOTON (M Pound) N B«ro& 8186M Rfctwnte 7 

25 00000/ MAY SKM (fl Evens) A Brtaooume 7-10-6 M Bneboume 

9-2 Golden Holly. 81 Asc« Agacn.11-2 San of Manado. 81 Nto of Spring. 81 No 

Atax Choioe. 181 Perfect image., Socher. 181 Saucy Tanan. 14-1 
14. 17, 1ft 20. 


3 

5 

6 
21 
25 
27 
29 
36 
36 

43 

4fl 

53 

56 

58 

61 

63 

67 

70 

71 
73 
70 

BO 

82 

84 

a? 


AS YOU LIKE IT (M T/usler) M Truster 811-6'Mcs S 

BASRULLAH (Mra PWH " 

SAYMOUNT U Needham) 


BASRULLAH (Mrs P_W Harris) P W Hama 811-0 P Skyme 
‘ J Needham 811-8 -..A Hutourt 


NOT ARC ADIAN (R Fry) J OW 811-0: .Mr C Uewe8yn(7) 

PRINCE METTERNKH |R England] S Avery 811-6 

HAGENS BOY (D Edwards) OCTNeta 811-8 T 

ROSE HUSSAR (Maj F PtHfips) Mrs M RmeU 811-0MT M PncefT) 
THAMES TRADER (H Booty) P Haynes 8I1-6__P Comovij] 
THATS FOR SURE (Bng C Harvey) ^ 1 

_ DNxmolson8ll-6Mr AI0ng(7) 

IWANCE HILL CTRL (J Owen) J Jefreraon 811-1 J— 

NEOCENE (Mrs E Wi*ams) J 0‘Donoghue 811-1 Mr D Tosdavtn 
mPPUNG FLAME (J Mahon) J Mahon 811-1 .....Mr J Waeton 
ALL INTENT (USA) (G Harwood) 

. _ _ . G Harwood 4-i8lOMias A Harwood(7) 

ARCTIC CAVALIER (Segray Properties Ltd) 

Mra J Prnnan 4-1810S Setey(7) 

ROmNG LAD (P Narat-Bames) W Kemp 4-18I0G 

FREE SKY (W Price) W Pnce 4- 

KING 


SKY (W Ph 
N1MR00 W 


.. -1810 

Oamon) N Gesetee 4-1810-. 


ONE TRACK MIND (Miss J Eaton) Mns J Eaton 4-1810... — 
“ J OlhvanO D Elsworth 4-1810 


P1KEMAN (Mrs 
RUSH THE BANK 
THE A TRAIN (M 


Camte) W Kackie 4-1810. 


.0 Hoaey(7) 


J Pifrnan 4-1810M OT^to|gli nP 7 


THE GREY FERGY (A Dickmsan) M Dtetansem 4-1810 
B&£ ANGEL IN Connop) R Hoftrshral 4-185- D Carearyf7) 

ETHELS COURSE (U-Cof D Pam) D Mottan 4-10-5 

HtOIER S TILL (W BfendJ W Ken» 4-1 0-5 Mr D Benneywort}i(7) 
LIZZY LONGSTOCKMG (Miss L WortnacoOJD Wormaett 

„ Mrs JWormacort 4-10-5 DWomgcoB 

2? MIS8 PO T1CAL (J cotaton) J Colston 4-10-6 W Hayes(7) 

94 ROVING SEAL (D Sflrt) C Popham 4-185 Mbs S LswrencefT) 

7-2 Arctic Cev alter. 4-i Thames Trader. 81 Thaw For Sure. 81 Rose Hussar. 8 
1 AU (mem, 181 PAeman. The A Tram. 12.1 Bate Angel. 14-1 mnera. 

• Peter Scudamore's successful weekend was rounded off 
yesterday with the news that he has been voted A T Cross Jockey 
of the Month for the second consecutive month. 

• Robert Byme^ged 19. brother of the former Irish Champion. 
Joe Byrne, is the A T Cross Conditional Jockey of the Month, 
following whai David Wimie described as the riding performance 
of the season when steering ChaJkie's Pei lo victory at 
Wolverhampton in the Chadsmoor Handicap Hurdle on Jan uar y 
2JL 


Wolverhampton 


GOING: Chase Coursa, good to soft; 
Hunflas. soft 

1-45 (2m hdte) 1. DAN RAISE (M 
Pitman 3- It Z Grundy Lana (P 
Leach. 11 -8 fav): 3 . Vtemyre Qom (V 
Brennan. 81) . ALSO RAN: 81 lady 
Woodpecker 4th, 12-1 Staging Boy. 14-1 
Golden name fltfi. 281 Homatey. 33-1 
Mrs Fotey. OkMcSr, 581 Brawn Beau. 
Hariey Street Man 5d>. Rosa Tycoon. 
Lady Chou. Uahr Vanture), Badlngham 
Boy. Red Baroness, Coded Love .17 
Ran. H 3L ia 251. 7t Mrs J Pitman at 
Upper Lamboum. Tola : £3.70. CiBD 
Ef.lO £180 OF: S7M. CSF: £7.76 
2.15 (3m ch) 1. STEARSBY (P 
Scudamore. Evans lav); 2.Poplar 
[Mr M Price. 33-1): ft PttcnrtvW 
4-1) ALSO RAN ; 70-1 
hare (FV 181 Haven Air 
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Roadman (P-U ) Scotch Princess (U-fl), 
281 Gorno (P-UL281 SomMang Spe- 
cial (RBI. 33-1 Barney (P-ULCone On 
sonny (SIM. Scafctara paDuressa (F) 14 
Ran 10 lO. 5. dm. Mrs J Purnan at 
Upper Lambown. Tom : £130; DJO. 
£4.40. £2- DO. OF: £53.40. CSF: £40.79 
Z46 (3m II ch) 1. KING 8A BA (P 
Scudamore. 2-1 lav]: 2. Cottage 
RbyrtoMP G & rigani 3 SkegftytM Bren- 
nan. 7-2) ALSO hAN' 4-1 Dabter (F). 81 
Charles Duke (P-U). 20-1 Pampas 
MewdyffMJ) .6 raaftftMaatei- Tercel. 25 
1. 1SI. R Gdw ai DorfcngToce: S2.10; 


Banor.S-TL Z Lewis Estates (J 
8ryan.l3-2L 3. C ddrata w n (Q CoaMey J- 
2) . ALSO RAN: 11-4 lav Back n Action 
5th. 7-2 Johns Present 0. 12-1 Hazy 
Day. 181 Handyteo. 20-t &ux 6tti, 38 

I Backlog 4m. 581 Paperacer (F). 

Hanac hpw (fMJ) . 11 Ran. 2ML 1st 4L 
1C*. Hd. J Edwards at Ross on Wye. To» 
: E3A0: £150, El 50. £2.10. DF: 

£16 JO. CSF: E4323 TRICAST: £145.13 

3A5 (2m WM 1. ROARK (P LMOh.18 

II fav): Z tnflotty Rutea (M 


lon.i 141: 3. _ . 

Bryan .14-1) . ALSO RAN-. 8i Cram 
Guerre 6A.181 Croonaig Berry 5W33-1 


Btakaney 4th. 
Parch (P.U^. 


£130. EZ JO. OF £8 50. CSF £1022 
3-15 (2m 41 ch) 1. MANNA REEF (P 


Aatfnme. 581 Bngactar 

River Trout (P-U.). Free 
Sudden Data (P.U.). Utea Danpta . .. 
Mwab. Perfltyne’a Pride, Plumbers Mata. 
Lady Oryx tS ren.NR:Golden 
Redeemer .Cheteae Man. lOL 6L sh nd. 
1L 41. MPBj at Wwingui. Tola : £160. 
£1.40. £2.00. £1.60 Oft EEJXL CSF. 
ESS7 

4.15 (2m 4f hdle) 1. THE 

UOUHJATOR(P Leach. 7 2t Z LmtJ 
TutJR Crenh. 281): 2. CcMc TknefP 
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N Dougmy. 14-1) . ALSO RAN. 82 (av 
Vartago. 5-1 Mtaiar Boot 5th. 81 Maoc 
Mink. 181 MteJM. county Player. Sen 
and Stnpes 6m. 20-1 H Arte K GantelW. 
James My Boy. Sr>ou«out &r Lucky 
ff»U). 2M Gun-Carnage (PJJ L 381 
Eamara Ovren. Ruetul Lady. Johnston's 
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pnnce. 71 3L ll. 15L *1 M Pipe at 
WSfrjhn. Torn. £550. £2.40. &20. 
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403301 WALLSH36 HARBOUR (T Jeffrey) T Jeffrey 8)1-5 


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SPARTAN FLASHBACK (N Jetted R Ftter 7-11-0. 


Law Report February 4 1986 

Damages awarded ^ 
to train driver 

after accident 


Graiguenamanagh takes the last behind Cresim before winning Footwell's Bog nor Regis Chase (Photo: lan Stewart) 

My Dominion boosts Festival claim 


convincing victory in the EBF 
Novices* Chase. “Peter has 
ridden four winners for me, 
and finished third on 
Corbiere ia the Grand Na- 
tional on his only other 
mount for me," said the 
Lam bourn trainer. 

Stearsby jumped to the 
right, just as he did when 
scoring on the course fast 
month, ontil the last fence, 
which be took perfectly. 

Scudamore completed a 5-1 
double on King Ba Bo, 2-1 
w inning fovOfirite in tile 
Barnhill Handicap Chase, to 
go to die top of the jockeys’ 
table with 52 whiners - one 
more than Simon Sherwood. 


Ill VALE OF SECRECY (Mb 0 MOST) R Ftener 5-11-0.. 


00 WATBI WAGTAIL (W A Btaphanson) W A Stephe ns o n 

- 8ll-0RLamb 

400260 CHEENVS BWG (A Mactaggstf B Maeteggarf 

8188PTock 

OUMBSTRUCK (D Bflngsby) A BRSbaume 810-9 M Brisbatm 
0 HENNY PENNY (Mra PShrubsote) P Mantarth 

81890 Nolan 

15-fl Vata Of Sacrecy. 3-1 Magwood. 9-2 Rinus. 81 Wafeds. 81 Amato. 1M 
Anotnm Gear, 12-1 oteara. 


18 


20 

21 


Wigg y British Railways 
_ , 

Before Mr Justice Tucker 
[Judgment given January 31] 
A uain driver was entitled lo 
succeed in his claim for 
damages for shock and trauma 
suffered when he came upon 
the body of a person very soon 
after it had been struck down 
bv a door on the train he was 
driving as ii pulled away from 
a station and thew driver had 
descended from nis cab to 
search for the victim. 

h was reasonably foreseeable 
by the defendants that the 
driver would behave as be did, 
that there was a risk be might 
suffer nervous shock as a 
consequence, and that they 
were in breach of the duty of 
care they owed him. 

Mr Justice Tucker so held in 
the Queen’s Bench Division 
when he found that (he 
plaintiff suffered nervous shoe* 
as a consequence of his 
experience immediately after 
the accident, and awarded him 
damages of £4,000 plus interest 
and agreed special damages, 
and costs, against his employ- 
ers. the British Railways Board, 
after an accident on the 
evening of December 16, 1981, 
at Thorpe Bay Station, Essex, 
in which the victim had died. 

Mr Allan Gore for the 
plaintiff; Mr FJ.M. Marr- 
Johnson for the board. 

MR JUSTICE TUCKER 
said that the plaintiff bad been 
employed by the defendants for 
32 years. 20 as a train driver. 
On the day of the accident be 
started die train from the 
platform after he had received 
ibe signal from his guard that h 
was safe to move oft 
The train was brought to a 
halt by the emergency brakes 
after ii had travelled about 2'fc 
, carriage lengths- The victim 
! was attempting to .board the 
| train as a moved off. the 
carriage door was open and, 
since he held on to the door 
handle, he was dragged along 
the platform until he fell 
between it and the train. 

The plaintiff searched the 
r track and found the victim 
I whom he unwittingly believed 
was alive; he began to speak to 
him to comfort turn until help 
arrived. He remained at the 
edge of the platform for at least 
10 minutes and, according to a 


witness, began » tremble from 
shock. 

The guard should have seen 
-the open carriage door, was 
negligent in causing the train to 
start and his negligence caused 
die accident for which . the 
defendants were vicariously 
liable. 

His Lordship derived from 
AfcLoughlin v O' Brian ( ] 983J | 
AC 410) the principles, inter 
aha, that a claim for nervous 
shock caused by negligence 
could succeed if the plaintiff 
satisfied the strict test of 
proximi ty by sight or hearing: 
that cases should not be judged 
by policy considerations but on 
their own merits: that the 
fundamental' Question in each 
case was one of reasonable 
foreseeability: where the plain- 
tiff came upon a serious 
accident involving numerous 
people and acted as a rescuer of 
those involved; that the plain- 
tiff was assumed lo be a person 
of normal disposition and 
phdgrn (see per Lord Bridge of 
Harwich at pp 441 D-F and 443 
A-E). 

The defendants conceded it 
was foreseeable a driver would 
get out of his cab. would , help 
to search for the body, might 
come across it, and, in- 4he 
present case, might come upon 
the consequences of the ac- 
cident very soon. 

But they chained it was sot 
foreseeable that tram drivers of 
reasonable firmness would 
have suffered nervous shock, 
and added that tire plaintiff 
had bad two previous experi- 
ences of death on tire track in 
1979 and 1980. 

His Lordship found that the 
plaintiff had done more than 
the ordinary disinterested by- 
stander would doi he searched 
for and found the victim, be 
remained near him and offered 
words of comfort; if he had 
remained alive, as ibe plaintiff 
believed he was. his presence 
would have been of great 
support to him. 

The plaintiff could be de- 
scribed as a rescuer in the 
circumstances but in any event 
that was unnecessary since the 
nervous shock suffered was 
reasonably foreseeable. 

Solicitors: Robin Thompson 
& Partners. Ilford; Mr Michael 
G. BaJcCT-Sl Pancras. 


Defence should have 
been left to jury 


Renouf 

ere a defendant was 
charged with reckless driving, 
and the acts alleged by ibe 
prosecution to amount to 
recklessness also amounted to 
reasonable . force for the pur- 
pose of assisting in the arrest of 
an offender, be might avail 
himself of the defence afforded 
by section 30) of the Criminal 
Law Ad 1967. 

The Court of Appeal (Crim- 
inal Division) (Lord Justice 
Lawton, Mr Justice Hollings 
and Mr Justice Michael Da- 
vies) so held on January 31, 
allowing an appeal by John 
William Renouf against his 
convictioQ at Winchester 
Crown Court (Mr Justice 
Bristow and a jury) of reckless 
driving. 

LORD JUSTICE LAWTON 
said that the appellant was 
driving his car in pursuit of a 
Volvo motor car containing 
persons who had committed an 
arrestable offence. The police 
had been called. 

The appellant carried out a 
manoeuvre which made the 
Volvo go on to the grass verge 


and stop. He said he had done 
that to make sure that the car 
and its occupants were still 
there when the police arrived. 

The evidence relating to 
edging the Volvo off the road 
was what the prosecution said 
was the reckless driving as 
charged. 

Hie appellant submined that 
in so doing he was “using such 
force as (was] reasonable in the 
circumstances in . . , assisting 
in the lawful arrest of off- 
enders”, thus putting forward a 
defence which should have 
been left to the jury. 

The case had to fee consid- 
ered in the light of the evidence 
which bad two feats: the acts 
of recklessness alleged by the 
prosecution: and that those 
same acts amounted to the use 
of reasonable force for the 
purpose of assisting in the 
lawful arrest of offenders. 

Only alien evidence had 
those two fecets could section 
3(1) of the Act apply. On the 
unusual facts of die case, the 
judge should have left the 
appellant's defence to the jury. 


Justices can override 


counsel’s wishes 


Regina 


v Highbury 
Magistrates Court, 


Corner 
. Ex parte 

McGinley 

Same v Same, Ex parte Spiro 
Same v Same, Ex parte 
Lynch 

Where both the prosecution 
and the defence made rep- 
resentations for separate trials, 
magistrates stiff had a dis- 
cretion to order a joint triaL 
The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court (Lord Justice 
Uoyd and Mr Justice Skinner) 
so held on January 29, dismiss' 
ing the applications for judicial 
review by way of certiorari by 
three defendants who bad been 
convicted under section S of 
the Public Order Act 1936. 
They claimed that justice had 
not been done because, truer 
alia, insufficient weight had 


been given to the feet that both 
the prosecution and the defen- 
dants wanted separate trials. 

LORD JUSTICE LLOYD 
said .that the circumstances in 
which separate trials should be 
ordered was considered by the 
House of Lords in Clayton r 
Chief Constable of A ’otiolk and 
Others ([1983] 2 AC 473X 

Although it was assumed in 
that case that the prosecution 
would always be in fevour of a 
joint trial, it was conceded by 
counsel for the defendants that 
the same rules applied in the 
present case. 

The feels were sufficiently 
connected to make a joint trial 
appropriate and his Lordship 
could see no greater risk lo the 
defendants than if all had been 
tried successively by the same 
magistrate on the same day. 


Attempts to buy time 


3.15 STANWIX HANDICAP CHASE (E2.14&3m) (10) 

1H2-PP MR SNUOHT (C-D) (A Greenwood) M W Faster by 

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1 

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13 

14 
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2Q 


Ex parte Karim 
Applications for leave to 
move for judicial review in 
immigration cases which were 
renewed before the Court of 
Appeal would be looked at 
immediately to see whether 
they were merely attempts to 
buy time or whether there was 
a chance of success. If there 
was no chance of success. 


administrative measures would 
be taken to list them at the 
earliest possible opportunity. 
t V* Court of Appeal (Sir 
fohn Donaldson. Master of the 
Rolls. Lord Justice Stephen 
Brown and Mr Justice Woolf) 
so Slated on January 27 when 
dismissing an application for 
■**ye to move for judicial 
review. 


Jacfcaon) J Afctar. 


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UNKLATER 8 S, PAINES 


Commercial 


Lawy 


Linklaters & Paines are looking for lawyersto specialise in commercial 

property law. 

^ ro P er ty Department undertakes a wide range of property work, 
with an emphasis on institutional investment and property develop- 
mrat in the Umted.Kingdom and overseas. The work is challenging 
and requires solicitors of ability with drive, initiative and a willingness 
to undertake considerable responsibility in a progressive, modem, 
environment. 

Salary and benefits will be competitive and c omm ensurate with age 
and experience. 

Please apply with full c.v. to: 

Mrs A. J. Dickinson, ■ 

Linklaters & Paines, 

Barrington House, 59-67 Gresham Street, London EC2 V 7JA. 


LINKLATERS S. PAINES 


INDUSTRIAL LAWYER 

NORTHERN ENGLAND 


A commercially minded solicitor with a varied legal 
background is sought lo work dosely with the 
Company Secretary tor a leading national company. 
Part of a major industrial group, the company has a 
UK turnover exceeding £400 million largely in nation- 
ally known consumer products, many of them house- 
hold names. 

As Car as possible aD legal work is carried out by the 
company’s own small legal team and the lawyers are 
dosely involved in a wide variety Of projects and 


activities across all areas of the business. Key require- 
ments therefore are versatility and the ability to work 
successfully with young, dynamic and highly pro- 
fessional managers from many different disciplines. 
The appointment offers, an unusually challenging and 
satisfying work load and an opportunity to contribute 
significantly to company business. Salary is competi- 
tive and a comprehensive benefits package includes 
assistance with relocation and house purchase. 


If you wish to discu s s this opportunity telephone Toby Wilkinson on 01-405 6852 quoting Ref: TW/C2Q5 or 
apply to him in writing to Reuter Simkin Ltd. , 26-28 Bedford Row. London WCl R 4 HE. 


Na- 


REUTER 

SIMKIN 


RECRUITMENT 


BADENOCH & CLARK 


SOLICITORS 


COMPANY/COMMERCIAL to £18, 000 

Our client, a medium, sized City firm, is keen to 
engage SoUdtora with up to three years pqe in a 
variety of demanding commercial work si this 
expanding department. The positions available have 
a strong financial bias and . would suit ambitious 
graduate lawyers with proven experience. 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 
LAWYER-CITY to£17.000 

For a newly admitted SoBdlof orarnHtioiis cancfidate 
seeking to move to a medium steed practice toAouang 
2-3 years in a large Gty firm environment, - an 
excellent opportunity exists- with our efient ..This, 
expanding Cay firm is looking for amficanis with 
good academic backgrounds who will work weD. 
under pressure on a wide range of property matters. 


CAPITAL MARKETS - to £25.000 
We halve been retained by a number of leading 
Merchant, Investment and International Banks to 
provide high calibre Sabckois from leading Qty firms 
tor a variety of legal advisory and documentation 
positions, whkh oner exciting prospects of moving 
into front-line banking posmons. 

CORPORATE FINANCE to £30,000 

On behalf of two of ov dlents, a Mediant Bank and 
a targe Stockbroker, we are recruiting young 
Soficflors In their mid to late 20's who have served 
articles with a substantial Cuy fam. Successful 
camfidates wfil become involved in mergers/ 
aenutettions and general corporate advisory work 
with the bank and, for the Stockbroker, the work will 
include U.S.M- tiaings. . 


Have a vacancy for a ten- 
ant of at least S years 
call. Opportunity to de- 
velop a ciicmt common 
law practice, particularly 
in personal injury 
litigation. 

Apply to Head of Cham- 
bers. 3rd Float Pearl 
Chambers. 72 East Pa- 
rade. Leeds LSa 5BU. 



underpressure on a wide range of propertyraattos. include U.S.M. Bshrtgs. 

For details of these and other positions, please contact JohwC uBew or Jwjthf 


Legal andFinartcial Recruitment Specialists . 
.16-18 New Bridge St, London EC4V 6AU 
Telephone: 01-583 0073. 


Recently qualified so- 
licitor required by 
friendly 7 patner firm 
at their head office for 
General Litigator 
Advocacy.' 

SATES Ml CO. 


LAWYER 

p Was sca«t law 

Its Attorney for * 


E^iuMj±s1 


practice wan focus on M*r- 
iumuI Duma and 

Reply to BOX A63. 



DONCASTER MAGISTRATES’ COURT COMMITTEE 
... , ,COURX* CLERK UNDER TRAINING!. , ^ 
Sa^ £6,753 - £9,594 

This post provides an exedteat-t^partanity for those wishing to 
train for a proffeaonal career in the Magistrates' Courts Service. 
Doncaster is a busy Magistrates’ court with over 65 court sittings/, 
each week and offers a wide variety of\voik; induding family law, 
^ince Doncaster has a particulary flourishing civil jurisdiction. 

Doncaster is a two court division, with toort houses at Doncaster 
and Thome. All the staff are based at Doocasterin modem, 
purpose-built law courts which provide a pleasant working envi- 
ronment. The successful applicant will join a -young enthusiastic 
Tea m of court clerks many of whom are profiesfonally qualified. 

Applicants should be qualified as. Banisters or Solicitors or have 
passed aQ heads of the Finals examination. Articles ~of clerkship 
will be available in the appropriate case. Applications will be 
considered from persons proposing to sit a final examination in 
Summer 1986. The succesfiu candidate will receive a training 
programme and emphasis will be- placed ;on encouraging that 
person to act as clerk in court without supervision at the earhest 
opportunity. After the initial period of training /of sx months, the 
candidate who demonstrates ability to act satisfactorily in. court 
on his or her own can expect to receive a salary not less than 
£8,178. Further reviews of salary will take place at periodic inter- 
vals. Good prospects for advancement to higher salary levels up 
to £13,764 for court clerks and £16,311 for more senior posts. 

Applications stating age, qualifications and any previous experi- 
ence, together with the names and addresses of two referees, 
should be sent to me a soon as possible. For further information, • 
telephone Mr. J. Wilford, Deputy Cteric to the Justices, Doncaster 
(0302) 66711. Prospective candidates are welcome to visit the 
Law Courts, and meet court staff by prior arrangement 

A.T. Draycott, 

Clerk to the' Magistrates’ Courts Committee 


Wtrwwfi ■wimlSXlp 
liar in our uagaoeti 
Prp j rew m to deni prknnrlty 
wMA cnmnal and m UTi mo- 
ntai wore. Thr mMXnl 
aPOUcnnl muM tm a wiHnp 
and competent atisnu Wt 
■re a tnmUy forward look- 
in* and enanding 7 partner 
nnn in an attract tv* trvdoi 
in* CMhrdrM City. 

Apply wTOi CV tm 
aj. cure. MA.. 

K u r i val A Son 
. 37 Pnrstoau 
Peter* onugh PEI US 


P.O.Box 49, 

The Law Courts, 
College Road, 
Doncaster. 

DN1 3HT. 


£ Negotiable phis car 

. Tbe London Brandi of Auatordam-RoOerdiin 
Baak-NVIs seeking a qualified sobcilofdr barrister to 
(31 the position of Legal Advisee Ideally the raecessfnl 
candidate will have five yams post-quaKScnlioa * 
experience, a sjRniScwi I part of which wit} h»vcbo©rnn 
the field of banking few and have entailed the drafting 
ofa wide variety efftannetajSoiTn I tainn ndliied in 
ibecoa fort of commercial banking operations. Hr or she 
should also be prepared to advise on, and Hnise 
with external counsel concer ni ng a wide variety of 
legal issues affecting ibe Bank's 
activities, and sbotdd be both commer- . 
ciaDy inn and be responsive to working 
Hpartof a leant. 

A* wall at an exceflenf salary time tf 
a fxistdass range of benefits as one would 
expect from a major international bank. 

If yon wish to bo considered for the 
position, please write with foil details lo 
John Pother. Head of P ers onn el. 

Amsterdam- Rotterdam Bank N.Y, 
lOlMoorgata, L ondon EC2M 8SB. 

Amro Bank® 

Amsterdam-Rottezdsm Bonk 


Senior Legal 
Assistant 

Salary £12^67 - E1L921 M- 
inclusive 

We are looking .for an experienced Legal Exec- 
utive or newly qualified SoSdtor for a 
demanding post which involves County Court 
and .High Court Btigatton, particularly debt 
recovery and possession actions; handling a 
variety of associated legal matters, including 
advocacy in the County Court; supervising and 
training junior staff. 

This post is subject to the LMGSC ring fence 
procedure. Applications are welcomed from 
any candidates. GLC and London Boroughs' 
staff wiH be- considered first 


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11/2/86. . 



CLIFFORD-TURNER 


Litigation Lawyers 


Clifford-Tumer wish to recruit lawyers for their Litigation 
Depanmen t to handle a wide range of substantial commercial 
work both in the High Court and in English and international 
arbitrations. The range of work includes shipping, insurance, 
commercial and trading contracts, acquisitions and mergers, 
securities, banking, property, construction projects, joint 
venture and partnership matters. There is a largp international 
element and a willingness to travel is essential. 

Solicitors and Barristers with up to 3 years experience and those 
about to qualify with good experience during articles, are invited 
to apply. The successful applicants will assume, after a short 
rime, a heavy but varied work load, whilst working within a 
team environment. 


Please apply, with a c.v. to; 
Leon Boshoff 
Clifford-Tumer 
Blackfriars House 
19 New Bridge Street 
London EC4V6BY 


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CLIFFORD-TURNER 
London, Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam, 
Singapore, Riyadh, Tokyo and Madrid 


^pncatkxi forms from London Borough of 
HanmersmKhFuJham (Personnel). Town HaH 

Extension, King Street, Hammersmith W6 9JU, 
telephone 01-741 0904 (24 hour answering 


fltw. Non cMimns On* 
£15X00 WaNX CBwfoillH 
(O9301 20185- 

WATPtMB A St Afon. Vow, 
Mwn iw l w ne uo ra i ro fi wt 
Camanoaoi <M ooa eenm- 
OOUS Sfona IO CIZ^OO. 
W«smy Can*ultana 0935- 
251S3. 

YOUNG roc *Mb> aoBUtM *aud- 
■or or nuiw rcaulrva tor lOOfo 
crefonM aw prattle*. Prmoua 
CTtannN ngmavr mmeo 
Ufy Tawwta 5 CO. 260 
Brtston HML laidai SWZ 
CO WPANY/ C OrefoCT O t AL FM- 

ner mo r 30-40. Cxy oxptr mw t 

iwu trt Bv nwaram NMd aty 
Pracnc* KZOjOOO* are T«L- 
0962 750026 

CO MP A NY LU8I— Oil Soact- 
lor adiWOtO 85 84 for yomg 


Nrwiy to 3 yitri gwWM.or 
L we. Well raginM pracBc*. 
£10X00 - £14.000 Coun Amo 
amt 01-583 0065. 

■M Cte— mwtnr far 2 or 
IKt W MMMUO firm lo amr«Mp 

Ufoaiwn cood p ro ap c c a 
£16X00 V'i«h Oo o o nlt a BN 
109561 25183. 

IIMO cmr NgM aid a op ouu - 
nret* for 5 Mm 2M young 
lolKHdre Eat and South ton- 


Senior Conveyancing 
Solicitor 


telephone 01-741 0904 (24 hour answering 
service) quoting ref; LHS.17. 
dosing date: fifth February 1986. 


An Eawnl OpporMy 


iner«uw«p ■ nmw ro remnrcs an adcbnooal 


Solteor for to ^ of. ver; 




numeracy *** 3 . . . .. . 


wsa,eaqf M he w, wW late 20 ‘s widiwoer dm* year’s qualified 
Applicants sb ^^ j ^ rc J^ usir y or pnvaie practice. The salary Tange is 

figurt'wai reOecr the abiUQr«[id 

the to»3 

Other artracove ^ a m C.V. quotiug currem salary to 

W E Hedley, PelWlted , *taMP , ».TlteFrto■^■ , 









COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL 
CONVEYANCERS LITIGATION 


Our efieto. a powoU CSty- 
practioe seats to augmaot 
dsComeyancng 
Oeporarant with Ughh - 
capsule tewyvs wtio am 
adept Is Board IsmL 


SgnSicsnt M M u naraiion rad 
sxcetant prospects. 


we an tastaxsedbr a Ml 
raraent London pradicdio 
Meet and nroQuees . 
competant togsAor (up ta 4 
yea* pest qusMcawa). Al 
corad expanence stoudag 
Bbtong WO* rad Hquaeoan- 
• essennL 

krenrani psftnentep 
p r o i p eca. HffOfy 
co mp eaws ntery 


£wTerscmiel& 


nswigsi 

.96ABfom.IraoonWC2B4jK«m-»OBl 2 « !ar 

teoi-mvm 


25185 

■ fo«i cASMCR CrailwhlQt 90 


cHiOOOO Court Awn mm Oi- 
5G3 0065 

LEGAL EXSStmVC KNM 

prMtiep word wdli bu» 
Trunin valley firm. £11X00. 
Wren . Owu lt a a b tQMM 
26183 

UTIGATIOH Hucnw nwr 
35 tor Wan County nrm. On M- 
»«• mw ePace dccatlml 
KUMCts £16X00. Man 
OanruwaT.il. (00351 25183 

MATIM CONVEY AMCOt for 
Berks lowti nnn *Mr la work 
wWwid (Upmifon. £10.000 
W«saeH Cenauiunk 0*36 
25183 

»o— ra w vnrr Sorciai for 
New rarest attmtM UHohho 

M8 Good preatwcB £17 000. 
toren Conaumna 0935 
25183 

YOUNG UTMATMt good araa- 
pem All r6Und mbUtty tor wM 
rtiHafeH Sum Sanction 
£14X00. w tmac Cnnu Ota n t t 
0935 26183 

YOUNG UTKATON for ntd, 
UM Saatn London Otto. 
OeaMdi ra wwwra 
£11X00. Wan Q o iHWI a ntt 
iDWfii 25153- 


coniryanccr atlmwcd 82. 63 
£16X00 wmb Conaumna 
10933) 25183. 

C— Wt toe Nw rewi i- 
& Boris. Han*. Somarjet. 
tfotora A W MHtiand*. wnren 
OomJUM 109361 35183 

annum, mnn aaueMr 

for Souinamnon City Ohio* 
tirre Cl 1.000 W«h» Cotmd- 
lam* (09361 36183 
LCCaL EXKCtmvr mouuy mal- 
rtmOBuL Norm London. 

£ 12 . 000 . Wcaare ConauGanH 

0936-25183. 

LEGAL CXCCOT1VE IwaNTOfotM 
and m* Rpnanoum £i2xoa 
Vnsex Consultant* <09353 
26183 

NEWLY QUAUnO tallQMlon. 

■mu. B'lnman. Tl m dins. Too 
orarOfM r £9.000 CDort Afoe- 
CWfl 01483 0055 


This challenging oppor- 
tunity is with Mobil Oil Company 
Limited, the UK manufacturing 
and marketing affiliate of Mobil 
Corporation, one of the largest 
corporations in the world. 

The Company wishes to 
appoint a solicitor to manage the 
Conveyancing Section of its Legal 
Department in London, handling 
.a variety of work connected with 
the Company’s marketing activi- 
ties in the UK. 

Applications are invited 
from solicitors with at least six 
years’ post qualification ex- 
perience of conveyancing, prefer- 
ably with a law degree and 
industrial experience. The 
successful applicant must also 


have managerial experience 
combined with business acumen, 
drive and initiative. 

Salary will fully reflect the 
responsibilities of this important 
position. A full range of benefits 
applies, including contributory 
pension and executive car 
scheme. Relocation assistance 
will be provided if applicable. 

Please send details of 
age, qualifications, experience 
and present salary to:- Stephen 
Huard, Manager Employment & 
Development Mobil Oil Co. Ltd., 
Mobil House, 54-60 Victoria 
Street London SW1E 6QB. 


©bil 


COMPANY MANAGEMENT 

Yobbo nrnfMrtimM tnttM mw req u ired for cany » 
pomi m rintiy BfoafMBnawrdcon u ioi iy . Mra — r**m too- 
r XI 2X00 BA. awm m ran apply) pub or. Apply to 
ctmnamrc wnn fun C.V. 10 

Tb* Company Se cr et ary 
Select Co rp or ate Services LM. 
Homeric House, 3 Mount Pleasant 
Doaglas. Isle of Man 


BARKING 

Solicitor required for 
matrimonial work and 
to assist with general 
advocacy. 

Compenve Salary ac- 
cording to experience- 

Apply with C.V. to: 
s. Rogers 

Hatten Asptln Channer 
St Glenny. 

Radial House. 

3-6. Ripple Road. 
Barking, 


CASMtn/TlltlSr cinfi fur raid 
H Moore HMKiiore Dtpenrared 
a toMHOn ocrountt moo TruS 
worn mreual. Wfoe rcaponft- 
HUOh oup w tr w ra nw 

£12- £15 Wntr witp G.V. Bn 
T265. fowl A Son Lid. 2- 
Suora Road, jjpmq. EAn 
CMoO 


(for 55 tor reUnWUrd 
Mddnn firm. £16X00 W**. 
ra CdMUtanM 0935 28)83 
CONVEYANCE* N wen London 
Finn, commrr e lfll £12300 
Wt*n e*d— P lOKUU 
25)83 


HERTFORDSHIRE 

CONVEYANCER 

Required tor mamly do- 
meslic work n area of 
potential and opporturu 
nes by a firm seeking lo 
exploit those opportuni- 
ties We need someone 
with drn»e and energy 
who enjoys hard work and 
contact with people 
Above average salary (to 
mckxte firm s car tf pre- 
ferred) For further details 
please telephone (09921 


MONTH DEVON Mlirnon MM BMHTLT ADMITTED Solicitor. 
ravivixM rotnnranrer » BjMinfl to rawwdw » nU- 
c 10,000 WMtv comfounis N“n fo LIOOOO Vvrw 
KWnaBIta. COnraHralK 0935 25183 






































tstm. aUMUGKS. BKATH5 
•«* M W H O M AM EAJOO a 
•« * 15% VAT. 

•minimuRi 5 tines! 
Announcemrntv autnenll. 
t J,w #V fli* lump And 
IWWiiHtt aUtm of iffr 

sctwpt. may be sew lo. 



PAtmsact. u you have aw 
tumn or orobtwns rrlalm 
10 vol* advertisement oner 11 
Ml appeared please contort 
our Customer ServtM* De- 
partment by tcWbhone on Ol- 
481 3024 


IVeSTT - Willunn. I RroOqMr 
Rival. Hinruev foTftwty 
Sfi'm Master M Mown Grace 
Hwh School Hwrtley and 
Direnor Of Bamoft Lid iMarkrt 
BPWLWin Antiques'. Tie 
Da4oind niMuixl ol Ptivlli* past 
prarHultv awav alier a WOO III- 

m-%s January 2«n I98n aged 

"! years, ho ontM Crmior 
Orru (Its emnf as III# sun. Ih# 
momuiq or» Pm air lunrrdl 
*m|rn. no Iwwm or MIMS OV 

rnqiH-n Donaltem in lieu nr 

nonon. a w dnirM. for SI 

Maw PlfrJy Guirah- 

Hinckley Pedoralicn Fund, 
r o of G Seller A Go Lid 
Funeral twedor 7S. L'PP« 

Bond Street. Hinrwry. Letts 
lennire Tel 0*55 U745T 
toACLEAR On Frtdav January 
31M suddenly Ml very peace- 
ful'! Ian. AKr-tl Druce m bn 
Mlb year Dearly k»ed bus- 

hand of Heather and of the laie 
nunj Father of Lowry and 

John Funeral Sen Ke al Si an- 
dri->.L Ouirm. Haute M Sum i 
on Wednesday February IJUi. 
Inllewed by private nrauiun. , 
Family lk»rn Only please, but ■ 
dMUIMm Inr KMI Enquire* 
lo B M.Whn.s Funeral Erlr.-e 
lors Southhampton 447 9*6 
MiCMLUU Hector tleun- 
art On February l si aurd 02. 
pear-iuily al Tie Cromwell 
Hospital Dearly used bv Ins 

y.U>' Palsy, bn oauqhim. 
Fiona. Alexandria and Sarah 
and lus granddaughter 
Cainona Funeral senire Fn 
day Tin February 2 30 pm al 
Leake Churm Knaylon Norm 
\ orksbire Farmlv flower*, only 
plnre Donaiioas il desired bo 
Cancer Research 
MILLER Harry. IMA CanpaOV 
writer aged BS peacefully al 
home In CofHqpcrs. 1*1 Febru- 
ary. Cremation Private 

PALM - On MOi January 1988 
alter a bmp Illness bravely bdrn 
at tlae Homoeopathic wmg of 
Bristol Eye Hospital. Anthony 
Guidon PaUn F R.CS. Cdln.- 
FJJ CS Ena . aped 78. dearly 
laved husband of Oabrtefie 
iBobblei and dear Mba of 
Jeremy and Mi ch a el , and 
grandfartlter lo KrtMlna. Usa 
and omia Funeral service at 
SI Mary's. Stake Bosteop. Bris- 
tol on Monday 3rd Febuary at 
1 40 pm Fallowed by nerv ate 
cremation Family Flowers 
only, out donations If so de- 
sired. lo Friends of Bristol Ese 
Hospital Lower Maudlin Street. 
Bristol 1. Enquiries lo Thomas - 
Davis Funeral Directors Lid. 1 
Brtsiol 663368 


THE TIMES TUESDAY HiBKUAKY 4 ivsb 


LEGAL APPCMN1MENTS 


rentals 




ASHFORD-RUSSELL. Sec 

Farmer 

BRADFORD on S4lh January Id 
Anne and Diet a .lauqhtrf. a 
sister for Jamr* and Posh- 
BURDEN to Refer and Didi <nee 
Per rev all a son. Edward Huoli 
CARHACIS on ?4ih January lo 
Amanda -nee McLure> And 
Philip, ai Roial Hampshire 
C-suniL Hospital winchester A 
son Benjamin James a Brother 
lor Sarah Louise 

FARMER on M j.m al me Pen I I 

'SL'SS? XSSSiXLJSl MEMORIAL services 


Jenny Ilsee Ashford BiuAttl 
and Tim. a daughter -Kate- 
FK.LERT On Januan 3lv lo 
S-ira iNee Akrovd' and Bnan. a 
son 'thonu Geoffrey i 
FLETCHER an January JEM lo 
Caroline mre Poiner> and Tun a 
dautmm Jessica 
FUENTES - OPR, On February 
2nd al S< Georges Toounq. to 

Paula and Luchc a dauohirr 
Joanria 

GRAY • on 29ih Januan lo Debo- 
ran mee LaiMOcn-Mudqei and 
Marlin a daughter. Chartotte 
Joan ia surer for Louise*. 
MEMM on ?2nd January at 
Wycombe General HosdtaL lo 
Hilary iNee pnee' and Stephen 
a son ChrtstoptMT Simon, a 
brother tor Jane. 

R UBBER - On Jan 30th al Si. 
Thomas' Hospital. London, to 
Emma nice Smith' and George. 
a daughter ■ Laura Reset 
MYNOTT ■ on January 29tn. to 
Anna inee Hetml and Ttm. a 
daughter. Sarah tw 
PARKER. On January join 1986 
lo John and Lesley’ mee Jen 
UtkI a Sbn. David John 
ROUACM - on |7th January 10 
Ruth met Marhovltf' and Al- 
bert. a daughter Oiarloae 
Rachel. 

GAMPSON - on 29th January, at 
Queen Charlottes Hospital, to 
Mariana ntee Brayi and Ricti- 
ard. a son. George Edward 
Richa rd. 

SCOTT BOLTON . on 1st Feb Id 
Pamela and Tim. a San. Julian, 
brothel to Emily. Potty and 
Chide Jubilate' 

THOMSON . on jnd re but a r v Id 
Penelope inee Uovdi and 
Adam, a son. Edward William 
Peter, h i 'Melbourne. Australia 
TURNER. On January JOth to 
Jearau mee Farauharsani and 
Tim. a daughter. Florence 
Lucy, a sister for Ttnah 
WILSON on 23rd Jan tn Canada, 
lo Anne and Rtehard c formerly 
Mark End. GodoJitungi a son 
MKturl 

YATES on January 36. to Jan# 
inee LLoyd Davlesi and David, 
a son Richard Hugn Douglas, 
brother lor William. 


DEATHS 


ADAMS on January 24. Artlne 
Maud aped 93. widow of Dr 
Bml Adams of W’dnon-imder- 
Edge. Clones 

BALCfJMBE - On February 3rd 
peacefully at home. Edwin k'ea- 
tmen iTedi. aged BA Beloved 
husband of me late Jane Will 
be sadly missed by his children. 
John and Jacqueline. Ann and 
David. Philip and Margaret, 
qrand.-hddrm great-orandcMk 
dnti. *4S»#r Lily and bnHher-in 
law Coleman Funeral Hoot 
Lane Crematorium. 12 noon 
Februarv din Proven 6 JOjxt. 
the same evening west London 
Sy nogopue. Upper Berkeley 
Sir eel. Ml. 

BRANDT on 3QUv January 1986 
alter a short illness. R.A Roir 
Brandt of West Hampstead En 
triune-, lo Levenon A Sons OI- 
387 6075. 

COX - on January 30m. 1988 
peacefully at Basingstoke Ok- 
Ulct Hospital. Barbara 
EJuabeM aged 74. dearly lot ed 
wife of Nigel and loving momer 
« Timoiny and Rosemary. Fu- 
neral service al SI Mary's. 
U nion Grey on Feoruary 7|h of 
2 30 H" lotlcw.nl by private 
cremation Family- (lowers 
only, bul donations If desired lo 
SI Alary 's Church Upton Grey 
Ri-slorauon Fund, e o Vicar- 
age. L’plon Grey 
DEUTSCH MAURICE - Aged 84. 
dearly Oetcved husband of 
Mathilda and tamer of Brian. 
Anthony. Arieitc and Renee. 
Peaceful!! al his heme on Fen 
ruary til oiler a ill# of great 
gr oct irmly and devolloti lo all 
ha close relatives and frtenda 
He w ill be deeply mourned 
DIXEY On January jin in her 
93rd year. Helen Margaret, 
mother of I> Roger Dixey. 
Funeral at Streailev Church. 
Monday February loth at 
11 CO am 

DtXON ROBMSON on January 
36. Klppy Peacefully at home 
Fum-rM has lakcti place. 
nUWR on January- 3ls( 1986 
al Boseombr Haspilal. Camilla 
whr of uve vale Maior T F Elu- 
nn M C Further end rimes lo 
Brian Wilton Funeral Directors. 
156 TucFlon Road. Bourne- 
mo uth T #t BmouUr 438 536. 
FAWCETT - Dr Frederick John 
Fa lv cell, peacefully an Febcu- 
ary IN Beloved husband of 
Ann father of Charles and Elb 
atwlh Prtvale funeral al 
East on -on- the- Hill. Family 

flowers only Donations If d»- 
Nred to hossltaf al honv. 
Midgale House. Peterborough 
A secure of Uianksqiv ing will 
be held on Suiurday isth 
March al 2 30pm in Peterbor- 
ough Ca tired raL 

GAUJMORC on 1st February 
1986 oesrefully al home with 
his lamlly Thurslon Orpe bn. 
loved husband of Mane Claire 
and lather of Ronald vs> trunk 
him lor evrrylhing. Funeral at 
Hinton SI George Church al 
3 OOpm on Friday 7th Febru- 
ary Flowers MAE Sloodley & 
Son. 31 Market Square. 
Crewkeme. 

HILDYARS on January sin alter 
a short illness. Henry, beloved 
husband of Jacks- and father of 
Caroline. Nicttolai and Vlrlona. 
Funeral at Holy Trinity 
Church. Cotenum Hatch. Sus- 
sex. on Wednesday February 
sih al 2 30pm. No memcinal 
service 

MILTON on January me Jim. 
1986 al Stamford Hospital 

Lincolnshire. Alan Howard, 
belated husband of the late 
Barbara and father of jane and 
John Funeral al SI Marys 
Bowdon. Cbevhnr. on Wednes- 
day February 6th. al 2 30 pm 
and afterwards al Atdrrley 
Edge Cemetery. DoiuW«" R 
preferred In cancer research. 
MODGKBKON - Non. late of 
Harpcnden Square. Ond#rhill. 
NOlUnqtum. suddenly. bul 
oeacefuiLv January 3lsf. aged 
82 rears, dearly betas ed wife of 
Fry and devoted mother to 


LAWRENCE - A memori a l sen ye 
will be neld for Mr Brian Law- 
rence Depuiy Managing 
Director of Times Newspapers. , 
al 51 Bride*. Fleet Street oo i 
Wednesday 36lh Febuarv At 
12 OO noon Cheques (or Can- 
cer Roseau h campaign, c o 
Red Lion Farm. The Green. I 
SarrrD. Herts 


SLPER SECRETARIES 


EARLS COURT £10.000 -e uB : 
market reudenlial letlnvg and 
progeny managing CO reguvre 
a iwpliontst secereiary with I 
basic skills and ability lo work 
on meir own tniialivr. Good 
leteptweve manner and outgoing 
penonalily- essential for rfienf 
liaison Trt 01244 7353 
LANCUAOC5 Ut KMOWffiU 
Mv ore uroenlJy yecfcmq 2 per- 
sonnel Secretaries Assists 1 
wiin fluent trench and l wtm 
fluent german mo S Hi (or Jrrt 
Ci's One ia £9.000 * exci 
perks Merrow Emp Aoy ‘The 
Language Specialists! 636 
1487 

Arch Mee t s Sec's Draw up plans 

for lies best rob vuCovenl Gar 
den Bureau. 1 to Fleet Si EC4 
353 7696 

MniMsi Sec’s We're me best 
media* Cmrru Garden Bureau. 

I IO Fleet SI EC4 363 7696 
PiMsMas Smi Are you on our I 
books' 1 Cei enl garden Bureau. 
Fleet St. EC4 3S3 7696 


NON-SECRETARIAL 


FRENCH i perfect I and Ofrmar 
speaker Execultve Language 
centre in Bond Strcof. Min apt 
30. 01-493 1177 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SmjATIONS 


WORLDS LARGEST Au Pair Bu- 
reau Offers M help. Don* or 
live In *I4». L'k’ A overseas Au 
Pair Agency Ltd 87 Regen la SL 
London 01439 6834 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


KENSMBTOR SWIB Cmv* enlent 
for public transport. This self 
contained around floor flat is 
newly decorated wtih brfcpu 
and airey rooms. 1 double bed- 
room. mention, fined klichen 
and bathroom Min. I year lei. 
£.130 pw. 947 1763 from 9am- 
1pm and after 630pm. 


** JUET FIWWHt 8 brand new 
Interior designed, a bedrooms, 
double reception. |v bams. 
American klichen. luxury 
house wflh parage. Palace 
Properties 01-086 8936. 

Ml IN IT JWL Newly dec a bed 
3rd nr nal Ch . n.w . elec, pas 
4 cleaning Inc Go M only. 
£1.300 pem far 6 nuhs + 
short lets by neg Avail mid Ftp. 
Tel Tracy or Rowena on oi- 
639 2791 Mon- FM lli NO 
AGENTS 

*EAL FOR VtHTORG. Souih 
kVnstngion. luxury flat for 2 
service, itn. Mephone. 

TV. CH. DC 01-684 
Or Ot 786 4381 

: fc'ensngton AF 
Itred mixed flat. 
hone 6 • 8pm 370 

LAME LUX Svr fW. O look 
Pfc a bed Large l rvln din- 
_ 150 p w tel 01 993 0463 


GENERAL 


MGB GT 

lsi registered June 
1 Q 84. Chocolate 
1 1000 miles. Full ser- 
vice history, one j 
grandmother owner. 
£6.250. 6202-210323. j 


MERCEDES 


NORFOLK POLICE AUTHORITY 

PROSECUTING 

SOLICITORS 

4 POSTS £12,168 -£13.308 

We have a unique opportunity to appoint 4 
additional Prosecuting Solicitors, to prepare 
and conduct prosecutions on behalf of the 
Norfolk Constabulary and advise the Police- 
Three posts will be based at Norwich and 
one post at King's Lynn. These Prosecuting 
Solicitors can expect to transfer to the new 
Crown Prosecution Service on 1st October. 
1986, when the maximum salary for their 
posts will rise to £15,000. 

Applications are invited from suitably quali- 
fied and enthusiastic Solicitors and Barristers 
with interest in criminal law and an aptitude 
for advocacy. Some experience of advocacy 
would be an advantage. 

For application forms and further particulars 
please write to the Chief Executive and Clerk, 
County Hall, Martineau Lane, Norwich, NRl 
2DH; or telephone Norwich (0603) 611122 
Ext: 5337. The dosing date for receipt of 
completed applications will be 21st Febru- 
ary, 1986. 


REYNOLDS PORTER CHAMBERLAIN 

CONVEYANCER 


Solicitor with at least 2 years' experience 
in Commercial and Private freehold and 
leasehold property matters to work in a 
responsible position in our Conveyancing 
DepartmenL 

The successful applicant will be 
personable, professionally ambitious and 
recognise the need to provide die efficient 
service clients expecL 

Applications should be submitted in 
writing (quoting reference JR1) with full 
curriculum vitae to: 

Colin P. Ellis 
Partnership Secretary 
Reynolds Porter Chamberlain 
Chichester House 
278/282 High Holborn 
London WC1V 7HA 


BROMLEY MAGISTRATES' COURT 
The Court House. South Street 
Bromley 

Kent BRi IRD 
01-466 6621 

APPLICATIONS ARE INVITED • 

1 1 ) From Barrfeirr*. SobcRon or penona otherwise quouned undrr 
Ow Justices' Clerks' iQuoltflCaUon of Assistants! Regulations 1979. 
for a Court Cirrfc who must be nwMi of taking courts at an 
dNCTWMk 

t2> From Barmiers. Solicitors, hokters of Law Degrees or other- 
wise sulfoMy e xp erienced persons, for jppofnfment os trainee 
Court Clerk Applicants must hove undemndlng or criminal law 
ono oe uncreated in die adraln u tr U on at matt hi the M en h ir el, «' 
Court. 

Commencement Mtd of the salary scale win depend upon the 
qualification* and experience of the sucorndul candtdatee and 
wiihln the range'- 
ll) Court dertr. ce PAD 1 - 12 £8178- £13072. (Experienced 
■tool lean Is may expect lo ni i n m c v u e M Point 61. Pka London 
Wetghtmp Allowance - 5667 per aaruii. 
at Trainee Court Clerk.- £3384 - £6783. PIUS Loadmi 
wrlehtme Allowance - £887 per annum. 

The usual Conditions of Service wtu apply and intere s ted per- 
sons should write lo ihe Clerk to the Jindces at the above sililnw 
or refephone Mrs King lor on agohcoMon form which shook] be 
re lumen by isth February 1986. 

These poms are exempt (cam the LMG6C ring fence proredvae bat 
apphcaLkms from employees of Uie GLCor MCCT ui aider London 
wan rrtevant experience wia be w e lcom e. 


INITIATIVE REWARDED 

COMPANY COMMERCIAL 
SOLICITORS 

If you have the initiative to reply to this 
advertisement instead of sitting back and 
waiting for a recruitment agency lo for- 
ward your CV to us. you will have 
demonstrated one quality for which we 
are looking in recruiting assistant solici- 
tors and potential partners in our firm. 
The other qualities we require are a 
sound academic and professional back- 
ground. an ambition to be an early 
partner in a smaller firm and a confi- 
dence that with you and people like you 
in that firm it will rapidly progress in size 
and reputation and take you with it 
We have a significant and impressive in- 
ternational commerical clientele which 
we need your help in servicing and ex- 
panding. We are not ungenerous in salary 
and admission to the partnership will be 
within two years for the right candidates. 

Reply in confidence to Box 
No. 1357 N. 


MERCEDES 280 

1986 Blur wim prey inletl- 
or. on* owner. 3.000 
mile*. Pioneer nerro. Of- 
*°VV fully taxed, xipnt 
condition. 

£18.750. 

Call 01-453 0957. 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


CITY 


A nancy had amen far a 
trainee 


SOO SXC 1983 (A Reg) Silver 
B tie Blue Velour inferior. 
Biaupunki Sierra. Cobra 
Alarm, wired for Cei loet ear- 
phone. 21.000 mite* Fall 
hHtery C28.495 Tet S. 
Pavlon on 01-637-8493 be 
I ween 10-6 Mon-Frl 


vary at tub. training given. 

For a confidential 
interview, ring 
Ian Jamieson on: 

01-283 2942 


NATURE PERSON, lo IheJn to 
»e*P wftfi young btoiy and large 
dog living m Kensington at 
PWN Min im um 6 mantle 
and mat be moored to re- 
locate if necamry. T«t 373 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


CREME DE LA CREME 


WEST EM> SECRETARY 

Fun tune secretary for huty 
wq» End Architectural me- 
tttu Shorthand req ui r e d. 
OpportunUtea for word ptd- 
ceestng. Responsible pontoon 


Telephone John Living 



rtoht applicant -who wMI 
hare an necessary skats. 


Salary £11 K drataUH 
4ti experience. 

TEL: 01-482-441 1. 


TAX LAWYERS 


We are looking for able and experienced 
lawyers to handle the increased workload in 
our Tax Department 

Applicants should have a first class academic 
record and a sound knowledge of the principles 
of corporate taxation. Consideration will also 
be given to applicants who are Chartered 
Accountants and now wish to pursue a legal 
career. 

The department engages in all aspects of 
corporate and individual tax and associated 
planning work, especially in the context of 
international business, and some experience 
of international tax planning would be useful. 
The rewards, professionally and financially, 
are very attractive. 

If you would like to find out more, 
please write sending a complete CV to 
Michael Charteris-Black, 

14 Dominion Street London EC2M 2RJ. 


SEMMONS & SIMMONS 



OuraisN Constantine I o 


St JOHNS WOOD NWS 

Elegant inoilliTrt g*i ■« 

AnwE k-an *a,. Drawing m*. 8in»niL anw tamay am Mo. 
4dNebedrm».3bBni««- ggB.Rvan*M*tercotat £SDP 

KINGSBURY KW9 

Substantial dtfcbd «e» 

rated carpeted- SBtangk2»BHw.<M*Wf aato. 

WC*. Branfl new ff ftK with aU m a ctun es- Paao. gda. gge, 

Aradlable for tons co let £300 pw 

Contact Rosemary MaoArtfanr 




QmBisftf 


YOUR HOME TU LET? 

WeteveuiKtedeSans 
nboaewgemlyxNfaog 
rwtais oi supemt pmpemes 
m tawBrtti lanttan dtnnas. 
A (afl tnanagroem sense 
isavadabte. 


inMngrmwMiMUBr 
tub# with an. porter A uoro 

entrv t Loop <6. In 

£158 pw 

WjnHMMIM 

Snnon 9 Md W m italic 
Large nc*o wn long bay ! 
wtndawa. kit w 8kr. bath. 

» Heo entry Phcrw 4, m par , 
ter ion n M £298 pw. 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY 

A young high calibre solicitor, qualified for one to two years, 
to join our residential conveyancing department dealing 
with ffie broadest range of properties. A high degree of 
client contact and a busy workload calls for applicants with 
an intelligent, enthusiastic and efficient approach. The suc- 
cessful candidate will be able to take the initiative and to give 
effective and practical advice on all aspects of buying and 
selling residential property as part of a busy team backed by 
the latest in computer technology a We are offering a highly 
competitive remuneration package to the right individual 
Please write in confidence with fuQ curriculum vitae to our 
staff partner, John Skelton. 


WITHERS 

20 Essex Street - Strand * London WC2R3AL 


GOING 

OVERSEAS? 

WEHMEWUTMG 

COMPANY TENANTS 
WANTING TO RENT 
YOUR HOME IN 

cerrRAUSw London 

Buchanans 

LangANraamte 

(R- 351 7767 


f milMWfE WALE, wu 1 
Donat Ttiumt ttwa_ 

HiWeMIMJWkOMMrtW 

Hon. double tacdnu.. fcBchan 

batom. AvoUoble uma col o ltl y 6- 
12 IMMIta 
£200 per «du 

.NaWnf HU Offlor 01-221 5600 




CA0OGMI 1 ft If 
Smart 3 >a Uwf i uuiuw l honae 
wtm garage £850 PW 
COGMVAU. SAR0CN5 
Lovely 2 bad opart doe. to 
Mgh staratanL Start let. 
£276 pw. 

HOME BQ 

AaaBW pp Mitanetota 
- Bom nratt CSSO pw. 


annBB putoHMv. Over to 
yews exp. »« fwnvrv Bats. 
—•» tad. anaraL totatad Boor “SSr S57* - "***■ aa7 

tod to pwMd boose. Raot> wsb . 

math tovtaxc o . dlMto j to; ff- *0*®"?°® ■ «» Bom tut 
to. Co M fi — e- £226 near Pnww tbs GagMs 
B.W. Quddtod ♦ totato ot-oao Pat*, a tad, rree p. ktL BOOL gas 
7SL CM Cta M £200 pw. Tel 01-722 

^ — — — . n* 4 hoBira ova a. 

* read, lor dtotomao. rwro- 
i»» Lcag 6 (tart lea to ad 
VMS- upfnwkcs. dBAtoe- 
ta USbWL Wt 03-499 8330 
WK. Fi mr sd pirdtu om. a 
beds, mcak ksetron * bam 
roam, gas cb. par lun g. or. 
■■MUD UDDOI wmb gto^nbe. aval Bmwx. 

Wa ******* ? msttonetie. 

far family. £250 pw Na- m i - i inm na wmrf r aa* 
Ban Wittto. A Co 01794 1161 rage. C?78B^ * 

Co. 499 1655 

BBLGI2Z VDJJbSE ttamae 2 bad 

XMaHTldXIDOr Treoiendoao flat. Dir tn tdras m g tones- tiao 
varn# M SSOOp.w. urorraopy pw Nathan WHsoa ft Co. Oi- 
£3900 w >. superb 1 bed 794 1181 

serviced fta L TV . Avtesforo ft HAJHFSTEAO RrtUMm Rd NW3 
Co. 01-361 2383. Furn FUL 2 dMe 1 egle betonn. 

— dMe iko cb. l yr mm Family 

tody £225 pw. 01-794-1015. 
OHamtoML 2 bed nal to taoommtttm wa. cnanmng 
P/BMock with lerraro. nr rube Town House, *375 pw. o r of- 

Res noaiLkeeper. Lotto eo let. fm tor otuck ml Tel OI 727 

£380 p.w. toe. Of. MW. God- 7BB7 - 

dord ft SaMh 01 930 732L P UtoO W EIIE .2bed.reep*. new- 
. b w. Md» wrtcom e. £127 

pw. uto eiL 01-627 2610 


CO/VB. £220 tod. 
Iffta town. 01-229 


vSmSZn rn SZZ STwm £?££ p “ • 

wa. ■» M bouse dose 

rtver ft mb* Aval now Ciso 
F~ BuMWX 383 T767 

omaKTra, ml aknng roofn. m* ««*« - w. 

fundsfied one. cuts ft dap. 

Co/Ctub*n> let only £360 pw Srw * iL5-*? St 

inc-CHftCHW Mr James. Of- .. JS*. 

flee 01-588 low Week into PW WHHton WBIrtt 7303438. 
0990682220. PPACIOUB 3 bed boaot. dt- new. 

ECCLUTOM ST SWL Super 

motaneae on 3 firs wtm own . 0 1-627 2610 

street etdrance. 2 Deanna. Pam. 

sta towr fra, 2 rrrep ran exe lElto ta' W— d Fton BM to outef 
PM wtth an aaw aonttoncs. new rd. 3 bednas. Hung fnuiew ku 
dmntmx * cuts, ryai pw. . diner. boormi- sfrower rtook. 

DouaaLyato ft Lyons. 01-238 CM. CZHnw. OW «l«j» 

7933 MJsBda Wsad* Stapeip fun hae 

■U W OW MEW1 SW7 soperti wtoi gdn nr Araertcn SCPool. 
newly decorated uMoiMtet 4, 5 tads. 3 recep. 2*: mux. 
roewi I ZZZZSn ru P ttetod s W.TP 938 9312. 

beds. 1/2 receps. 3 batun. Roof UU»- COMP AM Y m l u furn prop- 
Tffipce ft Garage, carpet*, cur- ernes to best London ant 
totosAMImacblnes. Aval now CABBAN ft GASCLEE l£slole 
tong Co let £800 pw. Sudan- norms'. 01-889 MSI. 
an 381 7767 W. NHKTEW Newly turn 1 

FULHAM BWC. BngM garden na bufenuaMunM Lge recep. 

In nai modern devefogmenL k ft P. S nw PiPr.-sbeps Co. 

WWf Pednoora. reoratton IeL £125 pw. Ol 586 2663 

rt tom. kO diop ft tamraom. WAffKS COMPANY UT EMC ft 
eiS** ***■ J!' £*■*•> 3 4 bed oecont Long M 

**®° Ji*- ■■total ft Oo. Hoi Pk. CPclMd. Kona up on - 

. 73fe a °° ° _ Tot. Ol 689 5812 id 13 Feb 

MAtoFCTAD WLLACE. Newty WELL F I S W B EP I bed fUL 
lead- CP. booty lube. £84 p w . 
P * m - * oiflrooni garden leva atlicn. 01-627 3610 

teL tor stogtetrorsgp £l 10 pw . 

THrobooe; 79« 3«B evmtoto- BATTERSEA Stadons 3 bed RM 
. . ***- . I . A** wdb at maduneo avail now 

£22? y. toy to «» BW aud aiM n s 351 7767 
FLAT, bntury 1 tad. «VPL cn W. 
t oTSSk £80 P.w.. oWera. 

SUM-iSff PW - w ** 

COUTH KEMSSfOTOH lge brtghl l 

news, fora and decor 1 bed S L 

Fitted k* afl maditnes. Prtv 01 ^ 1 . 7 ?°, 

qrinw- rtosr mu tertn ound mmi ■■WWATE N4» Attractive i beef 
Sum. co m Trt fan rut ch parking, gge. open 

01-373 BoStTl^SSSuT ™ ^ Of -340 0237 

MHL Light maelaas Owners luxury 2 

w«H Iurl Oaf o'Mking pan. w T p 

tatom.. I«e racep. k A b. i? . „ ..... . 

£1S0 pw. me CH and HW. OFT KMOt ROAD Sdfd Lnvrty 2 
Company m. Tel: 727 4680. tad Iwnr. Avon now loop let 
KMBItTUIUUU. Supeftdy £17S nw Buetaaaa 561 7767 
rafurb 2 bad no not. ige W®™ FARM Ponman . 
racep, diner, a WkL k ■nuuUr. taoce. Motoufleetu lux fum s-e 

fix «L ML to HI ttofUrn. £300 IgcshJdlo. gan. £160pw. Pb 
PW 01-681 5838 936 9058. 


REYNOLDS PORTER CHAMBERLAIN 

Due to continued expansion, we have vacancies for 2 qualified 
solicitors with a good academic record, enthusiasm and a will' 
ingness to work hard. 

COMPANY/COMMERCIAL 

Solicitor with at least 3 years post admission experience to work 
in conjunction with a senior partner on a variety of mergers and 
acquisitions, principally for private companies. Knowledge of 
Stock Exchange listing requirements and involvement in USM 
public issues also desirable. This is a senior appointment with 
excellent long-term prospects. 

the successful applicant will have business acumen, excellent 
drafting ability, the competence to work unsupervised and the 
stature and presence to handle major clients. 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY LAWYER 

Solicitor with 1/2 years qualification to work as a member of a 
team. Good drafting ability and efficient work presentation will 
be key considerations coupled with experience in commercial 
property transactions for corporate clients and also in mortgage 
finance work. 

Applications should be submitted in writing (quoting reference 
JR2) with full curriculum vitae to: 

Colin P. Ellis 
Partnership Secretary 
Reynolds Porter Chamberlain 
Chichester House 
278/282 High Holborn 
London WC1V 7HA 


LEGAL LA CREME 


ntaftototo cuy tow practice 
urgently requirra a high cob- 


have sterling retratmeal a- 
ytXnc e om tablllty to kata 
at all tovta. A background in 


would be a strung advantage. 


APPOINTMENTS 

01 242 0785 


alrcfi rrq. £120 put. 01-229 
8091 oner loam. 

SOUTH KENSINGTON lge Might 


GENERAL 




COMPUTER 

APPOINTMENTS 


touou Of Quarterly man ardtr 


SELF-CATERING 


ASA LAW 

SPECIALISTS FOR 

LOCUM APPOINTMENTS 

FOR SOLICITORS A LEGAL EXECUTIVES 
A COUNTRYWIDE SERVICE 
I MMED IATE VACANCIES INCLUDE: 

• MAIDSTONE (MatnmonM - 9x 

ft BROMLEY (Catwyaidat - 2x months) 

ft LONDON SEI 1 iLiu gauon . Hoidtas - P. Time) 

- ALL FEES NEGOTIABLE^ 

01 248 1139 

ASA LAW LOCUM SERVICE 
6/7 LUDGATE SQ-. LUDCATE HILL. BC4M 7 AS 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 


MAHON HARBOUR Mn tOR C A. 

Graceful, wurodr tax villa 
win* idm cook, wifumra su- 
perb view* sips 6 ml from 
Coin THOI-73Q 6972. 


LEGAL LA 


ctutoccarr lark lesal tn- 
RKTARHES. TTMBG £880».n_ 
•PCRMANCNT& ttal to £10800. 
29. Ma d dox 6L. London. Wl. 
01-493 0048. 


get In touch, ws can help you. 

» TheCHSA is spending a miflion pounds 

ra a mar on research and ocher vital work. 
sa w« yw help us with a Donation, a 
Covenant ora Lsgacy? The ex we can 
(eoowr on a Cmenam enhances your 0fL 

THE CHEST, HEART& STROKE ASSOCIATION 

l&rifltodi House North. London WC1H9JE. Telephone 01-387 3012 


WINTER BREAKS 


VtRlI ft R luxury roierM sort 
Avtoioote Feb March Bmdry 
Travel. Trt trt 361 7967. 


ARE YOU A CLOCK WATCHER £10,000++ 



URGENT TEMPS 

We have a demand tor legal i m o brai to work tor our 
n r r i by i u id ettente ttoooghOMl central London. Fxrrttent 
rata Dtos holiday and bonk holiday pw. 

1. Legal wp wo. abortiond tad audio, up to COMO nh. 
_ 2. Ladto audio anorttrond we*, up lo £600 BP. 

Far otorg Infn r rnril o n about Pan and otter Ifdera xdtMf 
p n o tt o na ptoaa# can Cdim a l or AMdtta od OEM 0TSC 


'TfersonneC 4 

Appointments " 

TSMhrytdi London WC2B 4JF f» 01-»2 1281 

ons served 



ASHURST MORRIS 
CRISP & CO 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 

As a result of the continuing expansion of the 
Commercial Property Department we are 
recruiting: 

1. SOLICITOR 

(3 Years + post-admission) 

who has since qualification been 
dealing with substantial commercial 
property transactions with an em- 
phasis towards development/ 
funding work, and who wishes to 
make a career in this field. 

2. SOLICITOR 

(1 Year + post-admission) 

who has since qualification been 
dealing with all types of commercial 
property transactions, and wishes to 
build upon his/her experience. 

I hese ,Sf new appointments within a 
Department with heavy work- 
Y e ■?! seeinng outstanding 
Personality who wiU 
be able to work with a minimum of 
supervision The work will be chal- 
Ungwg and will demand flair and 
initiative. u 

Excellent salary negotiable 
according to age and experience. 

Please apply with full CV to: 

W DRUMMOND ESQ 
Ashurst Morris Crisp & Co 
Broadgate House 
7 Eldon Street 
London EC2M 7HD. 



dfJH Cj* fiS£> 






















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Hi! ifopfr »7.Vd aa :Vg» l?i:f»1 


EBI 


l-7*^T T >I^/rti T i 


international news at7JXL 


w&m * 


Mil 1 h i ] m 


to tld. -tij- 

iniBi 



’s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


**<rt > r 

*^fe 

„ .. .« JH 




Adrian EdmondsondEddie Monsoon 

(ITV,7-30 



r???. 1 ^ 1 ■ » !r. ' \ ; >> j P i 










SfiB| 

USiPlSwSt 

riiTii iiM 


1-00 News at One l 30 Thames 
„ news wift Robto Houston 
130 Shine on Harvey Moon. 
Comedy drama seriai 
about a serviceman 
coming to terms with 
dvifian fife after the 
Second World War. (i) 

230 Daytime. How to keep the 
spark aBve duing a long- 
term relationship is 
discussed by, among 
others. Dagmar O'Connor, 
Ctaire RaynerandMoHy 
Partcln 3.00 That’s My 

Dog. Canine quiz 335 
Thames news headlines 
3-30 The Young Doctors. 
430 Button Moon. A repeat of 
the proreamme shown at 











w» 


noon 4.10 The Tetobugs. 
Cartoon series 430 The 
Tatebnoa Cartoon series 
430 The Wind in toe 
WBfowa. Animated series 
based on the tale by 
Kenneth Grahame (Oracle) 
4.45 Splash. This week . 
there are Hems on dog 
breeding and the 
Slimbridge WSdtawi Trust 

5.15 Blockbusters. Bob 
Hotness 

635 News 6.00 Thames news 

635 Reporting London. 
Michael Wftson reports 
from Southall on the Sikh 
population’s fears of 
pofitical unrest and 
Lindsay Chariton 
examines London 
Transport's underground 

730 EaunenWe Farm. Matt 
has been charged with 
murder. is he roafly guitty? 

730 Busman’s Holiday. Quiz 
game for teams. 


635 Open University: Science 
-Hie Planet Earth. Ends at 
730 

930 Ceefax 

930 Daytime on Two: tor the 
moderately mentaBy 
handicapped young adUt 

935 Leisure time in Spain 
932 Maths 10l15 Chapter 
five of The Boy from 
Space 1038 A car factory 
in Hiroshima 1130 
Chinese New Year 
celebrations rn London 
and Manchester 11.17 
Walrus 1139 Is there a 
solution to the problem of 
famine? 1230 me year of 
the French episode about 
the Spa Doctor 1230 
Lesson 15 of a German 
conver sa ti o n course 12J55 
Ce e fax 130 leisure tone 
in France 138 Bridges that 
span the River Forth 230 
For four- and five-year 

olds 215 A dramatization 
of a true story, set at the 
time of the Reformation, 
i&jstniling the probtoms 
that arose with the 
chanaina erf the official 


1*223 


. 3 One by One. Part one of a 
repeat of the seriai based 
on the Zoo Vet books. 
(Ceefax) 

» Points of View includes 
the results of the good 


News with JuSa 
and Andrew Harvey. 


830 Magnum. The detective b 
persuaded bya young 
woman to look for her 



































CHANNEL 4 


230 Fin The Horemine 
Dagger rt935) starring 
Donald Woods. Murder 
mystery about a men 
obsessed wKh the nought 

that he has inherited the 
murderous tendencies of 
hfs Borgia ancestors. 
Directed by Robert Florey 

X45 10 ROBm. The fourth and 
final progr am me in the 
series for the older viewer. 
Today's edition examines 
the high cost of hearing 
aids; thedeefinein 
Natioinal Health Service 
convalescent home 
faculties; and the change 
of legislation mq&i&m 
optwans (Oracle) 

430 C ou nt d own. Yesterday’s 
winner is chaHenoed by 
Jeff Yates, a school 
caretaker from Partington, 
Cheshro 

530 Be wi t ch ed. Panic ensues 
when Tabatha brings to 
Efa aO the spooks in her 
lecture book. 

530 As Gkwd As New. Part five 
of handyman Mate Smith's 
series on repairing broken 
cx damaged furniture, and 
he rattans to the written 
desk he bought for £45in 
the first programme. 


fcMkbael ElphicIcBoon (ITV, 9.00pm) 


Radio 4 


tor smafl orchestra}; 

Poulenc (Saxtett Rimsky- 
Korsakov (The Snow 
Makten sun). 830 News- 
205 Debussy (string Quanat 
kiGmmor.OplO); 
ShostakowchiCeflo 
Concetto Not. with 
Rostropovich as soloist). 93 

NQW5. 

935 This Wears Composer: 
FrescobaW. Canzofi da 
Sonars. London BarOQua. 
9.45 Academy of St Martin-in- 
the-Ftetes. Mendelssohn 

S py N 0 12); Walton 

Choral Music. 

BBC Singere. Includes 
Three motets. Op 110. 

11.15 CeRo and piano: Raphael 
Sommer (MBojand 
Daniel ArWJpBno). 
Schumann (Three 
Romances. Op 94); Dvorak 
(Silent Wbods}; 
Rachmaninov (Sonata m G 
minor, Op 19} 

1210 Midday Concert BBC 
Scottish SO. With Teresa 
CaNI (soprano}- Haydn 

ratGeoroa Banjamm (A 
Mind Of Winter}. 130 
News 

135 Concert pari 
two.Mendetssohn 


Eyes: Peter Kavanagh 
reads Tom MacIntyre's short 
story. 

1030 Jazz Today Charles Fox 
presents the Roland 
Pemn Sextet 
1130 String Quartets of 
Dvorak: Quartet in E 

J^TwoWanzes. Op^; 
Andante Appassionato; 
Bagatelles, Op 47. 

1135 Songs ollnnocence end 
Experience: London 
Smfontetta. wnh Robyn 


1137 News. 1200 Oosee 

( Radio 2 

News on the 


BBSS! 


jjgpl 


Radio 1 




Pop the Question. Pop 
nostal{pa quiz. The two 


» 5 


:vJ0 The Variety Clito Awards, 
introduced tw Terry 

Wogan and Ray Moore . 

from the London Hffton. 

— ‘T 30 Film 86. Barry Norman, . 

•- reviews the latest Walt 
.*■ ^ Disney fHm, The Journal 
of Natty Gann, and The 
Quiet Earth; and 
«• speculates on the Oscar 
_ nominafioQS,duetobe 
’’I announced tomorrow 

• -« 130 The Sky at NighL Patrick 
Moore reports from 
mace headquartare In 
ftusadenaonthe 
Voyager 2 probe to 
.. . Uranus 

;^J30 Nothing But tha Bast. 
Part four of a parents 
- :'J guide to secondary 
education 
135 Weather 


930 feMoThe freelance 1 

troubleshooter finds a 
. distraught woman to an 
• ' • ■ overgrown garden. His 
offer o# help leads toWs 
discovering that it is not - 
just the garcton that Es gjrt 


U| UJUUUMV4IOMO/ 

1030 Maws atTan and weather 
- Thames news haaifines 

1030 First Tuesday J*®«ca 

piopte- The Dream That 
DM. The story, of why the 
Northern fir^nd peace 
• movement ended to 
recriminations afi round; ' 
Sugar Ditch Aley. A 
proffla of Tunica, 
Mis^ssippi, which st* 
qperatesan apartheid, ... 
system 

1130 FtoeT1»eE20300Kfea* 

(1962) starring Dawn - 
Addams and Michael 


reign of the next Pope but 
one 

630 Heroes. Eric Robson talks 
toJaneGrig8on,Ttie 
Observer's cookery 
correspondent, who 
includes EBzabeth David, 
Henry James and her lata 
husband, Geoffrey, among 
her heroes 

830 Food and Drink, 

presented by Chris Kety, 

. Mi c hae l Bary and JB1 
Godlden.There are terns 
on the government’s plana 
for nutnfional labeHng; 


Chris Tarrant and David 
Hamiton, are joined by 
fifick Owen, Gemma 
Craven, Lizzie Wlebb and 
Carl Wayne 

630 Danger Mon. British 
Intelligence agent. John 
Drake, is sent to North 
Africa to investigate the 
mystery stxroundlng an 
atomic energy plant where 
a large nunber of the staff 
have gone down with 
radiation sickness. 

730 Channel Four news 
730 Comment With his views 
one matter of topical 
importance is Harold Levy, 
a dental surgeon from 
Manchester. Weether 
630 BrooluMe. Barry pretends 
lobe Ms father when 
trying to raise a loan. 

830 Taka Six Cooks. The third 
course , fish, Is prepared 
bv Jovos Motvneux of the 



730 FBe on 4. The Legacy of 
Jasmine Beddord. A 
report by Hugh Prysor-Jones 
on the reaction of social 
workers to the Bksn Cooper 


Matread Cerrigm: en ITV, 1 


Wallace thrflter about a 
pair of Mackmaaers who 

try to get their hooks into a 
successtuHawyer teid . . 
poBtidan who has dreams 
of readiing Mgh office. 
Directed by John_Mowy 
1230 light Thoughts . 


for nutritional labeHng; 
eggs; vodka; and 
restaurant service charges 
030 I, Ctaudkss. Episode for* 
wid GermaMcus rattans to 
Romeln triumph after 
qualfing the German tribes 
SJSS Arena: Go-Go in 

Wash ing to n DC. A tour of 
Chocolate City, the name 
thatthe capital city has 
been christened bytoe _ 
_ black residents. 

IMS New amglrt .1130 
Weather 

1135 Worid Bowls. An 

Embassy Wbrid indoor 
Bowls Championship 
match between George ■ 
•. Soiiaof Hong Kong and 
Ireland’s Tom Reeves. 
Ends at 1215 


Dartmouth. She makes 
John Dory with orange 
and mushroom stuffing, 
mats of Dover sole with 
sorref and herbs, and 
salmon In pastry with 
ginger and currants 
(Grade) 

930 Ftec Bo ardwalk (1979) 

Ruth^mtorforana^ 
about an elderly Jewish 
couple who have to face 
mounting harrasa merit 
and terror in their decaying 
Coney Island home. 
Directed by Stephen 

Verona 

1030 The Comic Strip 


FREQUENCIES! Radio Is IOS3kHz/285m; 1089kHz^75m; Radio 2; 693kHz/433m; 909LJ^30m; Radio^ I ^ > 5 0 klW247m: VHF 
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don I458kHz/206nu VHF 94.9; Worid Service MF 648 kHz/463m. 


-AUferTony Bwbow 
interviews Eckfia 
Monsoon, alias Adrian 
Edmondson, the most 
abusive South African 
television star (r) 

TI3S Ghosts in fire MadiM A 
selection of comedy 
videos. Ends at 1220 


DftfH Wales 5-35-&JM 
HSy - Wales Today. 635-736 
The Chris Stuart cha ctw chat 
show. 1030-1050 Week in week 
out 11. 45-1 2.1 5am FHm 86. 
1215-1230 News and weather. 
Scottand 1030-1030 Doteman. 
635-730 Reporting Scotland. 
1030-1050 Sx Seaside . 

Towns. 1130-1130 The Skyat 1 

Night. 1130-1135 Weather. 
Northern bakmd 535-540Today*s 
sport 539-830 Inside Ulstar. 
B35-730Charies in charge. 1135- 
1130 News and weather.En- 
gtend 1200-1230 Eaat only East 
on twa 635-730 Regional 
news magazines. 

CHANNEL 

130pra News 1^230 Coun- 
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5.15-5-45 Sons and Daughters 
630 Charnel Report 635-730 
Crossroads 1130 The Cham- 
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Gardening Time 130-130 
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REGIONAL-TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


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1130 Ironside 1230am Closedown 

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1130 V 1230am Closedown 
TVQ As London except: 

-LX2 130pm News 130-230 
Country Practioe 330330 
Questions 515535 Sons end 
Daughters 630 Coast to Coast 
635PDHC0 5635-730 Crossroads 
1130 Champions 1230m 
Company, Closedown 

tor Al 130-130 News 5.15- 
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HIV WEST 

1220pm-130 News 515535 
Mr Smith 630 News 635-730 
Crossroads 830-930 Mtader, 

She Wrote 1130 Man in a Sutcase 
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HTV WALES 

930em-1230 Schools 630- 
pro-635 Wales at Six 

•MIlBSKSSKSg, 

time 330 Water Garden 335- 
430 Showcase 5.15535 Beverly 
haibiKes* 630 Good Evening 
Ulster 635 Diary Dates 635-730 
Crossroads 830 On Stage To- 
night 630-930 Cosby Show 1130 
The Sweeney 122Sam 
Closedown 

130 News 615535 Look 
Who's Talking 600 Northern Lite 
635-730 Crossroads 1130 
Barney Mfler 1230 Bedtime Book. 

Closedown 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


Legal and Joint 

Ventures Adviser 


Jbnathan\\ 7 i 


ren 


On behalf of Major City based Merchant and 
International Banks we seek the following:- 

1 Marketing - c.£25,000 Plus Full 

* Aid T3 M»gfag Benefits Package 


Hf UK PLG has been 
helping to provide the UK with 
up to one third of its gas require- 
ments from Rigg for 

a decade. We have extensive 
interests both offshore and 
onshote and the £1000 minion 
we are currently investing in the 

Alwyn North Reid is one of the 

[arr yvet single investments m 

the North Sea today In adtfltion 
to an active acquisition poucy 

we also expect to be involved 

in new development projects 
in the near future. 

We require an experi- 
enced oil and gas lawyer who ^ 
will be responsible for the legal 
and joint ventures services 
provided to the Company and 
will report directly totfie 
Corporate Affairs Diredoc 
TWs senior post Is 
suitable for sofiritors or 


barristers aged 30-40 
preferably with a university 
degree. The successful 
applicant should have a 
minimum of five years? oil 

industry experienca 

Vfe offer a competitive 

remuneration package 
including company cac 

Please write giving foil 
details of qualifications and 
experiencefo: 

Mrs. Hilary Jeanes, 
Personnel Controtiec 
SfUKPLG, 

Knightsbridge.Hoi»e, . 
WKhightsbridge, 

London SW71RZ. 




No X Marketing - c.£25,000 Plus FoU 

Sales Aid Benefits Package 

Sales Aid Markethig Specialist, aged 29-35 years, to establish a vendor 
programme operation. Associated technical and back-up skills are 
essential. 

ACA’s-UK Taxation Neg £18^25,000 

Graduate ACA’s aged 27-30 years, with experience of corporaie- 
taxation, who are keen to utilise their creative financial skills more 
fully, in an agressive banking environmeuL Vacancies exist within a 
Major US Investment Bank. ' 

Credit Manager £15-£20,000 + Benefits 

Proven experience of the medium ticket leasing market together with 
the ability to produce ' in-depth credit proposals and related 
recommendations. 

Operations/ Neg£14-£20,000 

Admin Manager 

Sound fearing knowledge is required to Oversee existing middle ticket 
portfolio and safes aid leasing administration. Experience to include 
systems, documentation, etc. 

fi fllpc Aid Leasing (l£15-£20,000 

Specialists 

First experience gained whhin a M^jor office equipment sates aid 

Company, and proven ability to establish and maintain supp tier- 
relationships are pre-requiste qualities fix 1 these two new positions. 


OVERSEAS TBAVEL 


omubcnibi' 


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HONGKONG 


swtoty “S'* 
IMW” 

Brtum 
jptmro ° ' w 
BKiirn 
f.W.AW ** 




' Recruitment Consultants w V 
170 Ksbopsfpwc, London EC 2 M 4 LX. Tdt 01 - 6-2 5 1266 


TUSCANY. Fully eootp Unrv 

- nomr.Sto* ami studio ftoUte vemMA ib-z2oH Fr* atom-™ 

8 Fraa C7G mu. 01 awo mm hum. pikm ai-auau*. 
. 0806.01 -MO 3250 na. afl room* wtti (MU 0223 

840920 <««> 

DU ATIItoA CTMWE CSraalO* «K1 FUOHTS daUy la Onoa. 
. dlucounl biwa QPC Ol-tOO Zurich. Mnnlrti « Urn EAO 
jOM. . «d Wrtt am 8223B7. 


Regional Solicitor 

POTTKSBAR c£22-5k 

Applications are invited for the post of 
Solicitor to be based at Regional 
Headquarters, Potters Bar, Herts. 

The successful candidate w3! be pmapaBy 
concerned with providing a legal service to 
Eastern Region and its constituent functions 
and departments. The Senator will manage 
and act as the profesriond Head of the Legal 
Department whose members comprise bath 
admitted and unadmitted staff. Generally, the 
work of the Department indudes common 
law matters and litigation, conveyancing, 
cammerrid, industrial and employment law 
Appropriate professional qualifications we 
ess^Uid together with several years' experi- 
ence in a large industrial or commercial 
organisation, a public or local authority, or in 
private practioe. 

Commenangsalary nattessthan£22 ( 400 per 
annum including Weighting Allowance. 
Excellent benefits package including 
refocafionassistarrevi^erea 
Detailed appCcntions should be sent within 
10 days of tne qppecFance of this advertise- 
ment to: Personnel Director British Gas 
Eastern, Star House, Mutton Lane, Potters 
Rat Herts EN6 2PD. 

British Gas^ 

Eastern 

mb equal opparfunifisa employer M 


INNER LONDON 
MAGISTRATES’ COURTS 
SERVICE 

Deputy Chief Clerks 

Applications are invited from BARRISTERS 
AND SOLICITORS called or admitted in En- 
gland. for employment as Deputy Chief Clerks 
in the Inner London Magistrates’ Courts 
Service. 

Previous experience in the Magistrates’ Courts 
Service will be taken into account but is not 
essential 

The starting salary will be £13.201 pa rising by 
nine annual increments to £18.943 pa. In addi- 
tion a London Weighting of £1.248 pa is 
payable, -{under review) 

For an application form and further particulars 
write to: 

The Principal Chief Clerk (DCC) 
Inner London Magistrates’ Courts 
Service 

Third Floor, North West Wing 
Bush House, Aktwycb WC2B 4PJ 

Completed application forms must be received 
by 28 February 1986. 


COURSES 


EASTER REVISION 
LONDON 

ASHBOURNE TUTORS 

ORA M 
SPECIALISTS 

Mjobenuim. ECMHnocs and 
Or Sommi 

For druUE 

The Printed. AihbouW 
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High sum. London wa 
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Tot OI-957 38SB- 1 


tOMMJWS 6 WH mu turn. C20tti 
vwid Am Coum< sura 28«h 
a orii. ADOty Principal 01 68* 
0067. i 


PUBLIC 

APPOINTMENTS 


NEEDED 

YOUNG 

GOVERNESS/ 

COMPANION 

For our 12 year old oauprix-r 
uno lus tomr train mq 
diMMiimjiMannidittnoM 
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rduralrd. aqrtl 18 24 win 

o ut doo r urinrds And , 

mwiMV nature Vou win 
nmt iwiwn A 9<wrou& 
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want ofiemoonc Hua 
wranlnn living tn 

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OHIO* hourv 01-730 2298 


used thei 


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32 THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4 1 QSfi 


THE TTMFS 


A carnival of protest in Haiti 


From Trevor Fis block 
St Marc, Haiti 
President-for-life Joan 
Claude Dnraiier, "Baby 
Doc*, changed the name of 
Haiti's brutal and sinister 
special police force. Bin 
Haitians still call it the 
Ton tons Macoutes, and its 
stock-in-trade is stiU terror 
and extortion. 

Here in the seaside town of 
St Marc we were shown the 
bodies of two citizens shot the 
night before by die Macootes. 

People churned that more 
had been killed ami one man 
said it was hard to be sure of 
n ambers after such shootings 
because bodies were some- 
times damped In the bills. 

It was a dramatic day at St 
Marc. Anger, exuberance, 
fear,confasion and the evident 
ache for change made it a 
microcosm of Haiti's turmoil. 

A large anti-Goveroment 
demonstration was being 
called, a bold act after years 
of repression and a sign of 
the way the tide is rnnmng. 

People were flocking m 
answer to the signal rang out 
on church beflk. ’Twenty- 
nine dead years with the 
Daraifers. Not enough work, 
not enough food. It is time for 
it to end" a man of 22said 
bitterly. He bad no English 
so he amid not read the 
slogan on his tourist T-shirt— 

" It’s better in Haiti". 

A woman of 30 said: "We 
don't care who takes 
Dnvalier’s place. We want a 
better life and we want him 
out** 

A schoolteacher, said:"We 
want the Americans to take 
over, and set np a 
democracy .“Indeed.this 
seemed a popular idea with 
many people, though one or 
two noted thoughtfully that 
tiie Americans had been 
supporting the dictatorship 
for years. 

There had been trouble in 
St Marc over the previous 
two days. People had bar- 
ricaded the streets and looted 
food and medicine from a 
warehouse on the quay. 

People said that on the 
first day of disturbances the 
local Ton tons had opened 
fire. Then a strange thing 
happened. Hie Arm; dis- 
armed the Macoutes and the 
soldiers were hailed as the 
people's protectors. 

Tie sullen Macoutes, then- 
fangs drawn, had shmk oft 
On Saturday, more Macoutes 
came in and started shooting. 
As well as the bodies shown 



North 
suffers 
in the 


Letter from Mexico City 


Iron bars do not 
a prison make... 


I 



snow 

By Michael Horsnefl 

now up t< 
it further 


here, there areseven people in 
hospital with bullet wounds. 

By now 2000 people had 
gathered for the demonstra- 
tion. A steel band banged out 
rhythm and the people 
danced and kicked up the 
dust, their faces filled with 
joy. 

They hoisted the Stars and 
Stripes alongside the pre- 
Dovalier Hainan flag. They 
sang and chanted at the tops 
of their voices, the songs 
echoing the Creole slogans on 
rough placards — ** Down with 


Duvafier"," Ddown with the 
dictator". 

There was a tremedous din 
as people blew conches and 
banged tins and rattled 
sticks. As they marched and 
swayed they held aloft a 
coffia painted with the slogan 
Jeaa-Oaude CochotL Little 
boys jumped into the coffin 
and made faces. 

It was a carnival of protest 
The people had the fever of 
freedom. Spectators slapped 
each other in glee and 
laughed to see sach fan. 


A couple of soldiers oa a 
motorcycle were spotted and 
mobbed as if they were pop 
stars. The crowd yelled "Vive 
)'Annee~. Once the pro- 
cession reached the end of 
town it tamed around and 
started back up ggam- 
But at last an Army patrol 
came along and told people to 
go home for their own safety. 
A soldier warned thw people 
that the Macoutes would be 
back in town. 

The crowd quickly dis- 
posed and the streets grew 


suddenly quiet After all the 
singing and the attention of 
the cameras the faces douded 
over. The town was pervaded 
by nervousness. 


Bade in Port-au-Prince, the 
capital, there was a crowd in 
the backstreets shouting and 
singing. It was not a 
demonstration, bat a prelude 
to the Mardi Gras festival. 

People were swinging to the 
noise of the band. On the 
crowd's fringe was 
Macoute. 


Britons hope to fly out today 


Britons trapped in trouble- 
tom Haiti believe they could 
be flown out to Jamaica 
today. 

The men - four from Kent 
the other from Sussex - are 

S s of the Haiti Rotary 
and were caught up in 
tbe riots. 

Speaking on BBC local 
radio. Mr Paul Downes, a 
dentist, said that "it's eerie 
during the day because it 


seems so normaT, but at 
night they can hear gunfire. 

A colleague, Mr Andrew 
Davis, a chartered accountant 
from Gillingham, said in a 
message to his family: "There 
is absolutely no need to 
worry whatsoever. We’re per- 
fectly safe." 


Mr Andrew Dagger, a person- 
nel officer from Ashford, and 
the leader of the group, Mr 
Ian Hesketh, of Eastbourne. 
Sussex, they hope to fry out 
to Jamaica today. 

The Foreign Office said 
there were about 60 British 
residents in Haiti' 


Although it was dusk be! 
wore dark glasses. He was a 

skinny m*n ami he 

the butt of bis rifle on the 
buckle of his belt, while 
rotating bis pelvis to the 
rhythm. He looked obscene 
and reptifian. 


deep brought limber misery 
to the North, Wales and 
Scotland yestenfey. 

The severe weather contin- 
ued to hit tbe Pennines and 
the Derbyshire Peak District 
hardest. Most major roads 
were dosed and police said 
the only safe route was the 
M62. 

In mid-Wales, high winds 
and snow drifts closed tbe 
A470 Merthyr to Brecon 
road at Storey Arms, and hi 
Scotland the A939 
Cockbridge to Tonintonol 
road and tbe A93 near Sprtzal 
of Gtenshee were closed. 

Freezing weather caused an 
underground explosion of 
methane gas and put two pits 
in south wales out of action. 
No one was hart but miners 
working a mile away from 
tbe Wait were knocked over. 
Electricity engineers usng 
helicopters where trying to 
restore power to isolated 
communities in tbe Buxton 
area after conditions wors- 
ened early yesterday, freezing 
lines and bringing down 
cables, affecting 600 house- 
holds. About 1,500 homes 
lost power in the Lodlow area 
of Shropshire- 
On the Continent, southern 
Europe began to return to 

normal 

But fresh snowfalls and 
avalanches continued to 
paralyse parts of south east 
France. Two firemen were 
caught in an avalanche in the 
Ardeche 
A soldier died and four 
were injured when an ava- 
lanche swept them away 
during a training exercise in 
tbe Al ps near 


A year ago this week a prisoners — who for the most 
Mexican drag gang kid- part idolize him — a n d, more 
napped an undercover important, among the prison 
American narcotics agent, guards. He pays three senior 
hammered an ice-pick into guards 50,000 pesos, or £78 a 
his skull and killed him. The day each to torn a blind eye 
drug boss accused of ordering to his more extravagant 
the lolling now languishes in indulgences. 

a Mexico City jail in what a Caro is not Mexico's onl-j 
fellow prisoner describes as prisoner VIP. The former 
“five-star luxury**. . head of the country's states 

The US-bound heroin and owned oil company, for 
marijuana trafficking of 35- example, was imprisoned 


year-old Rafael Caro Quin- nearly three years ago. 
tero, is said by sources in He too has frequent female 
Washington to have yielded a visits, a limousine that draws 
turn-over of one billion up to his prison gates with 
dollars during the IS months gourmet areals and a tennis 
before his capture. pro sent in to help turn 

Caro's cell is carpeted and sharpen up ids backhand, 
has its own bathroom. He “One would lave thought 
has a tdeviaon and a video- a Mexican prison would be a 
cassette player, a refrigerator, terrible place," said Mr Ran- 
a stove and a manservant gel, "but it isn’t if you have 
The manservant — whom money." 
he calls *mi nun o’, or ‘my Mr Rangel, however, is 
boy* — is a good cook, one of doing tbe Mexican prison 
whose duties is to prepare system an injustice. Some 
meals for the Zapala- 
moustadrioed druglord and 
his frequent guests. 

Caro's wire visits him 
inside his ceil once a fort- 
night but, as the prison 
guards enjoy telling you, an 






system an injustice, some* 

S kis are indeed a nightmare 9 
it as a rule the system is 


remarkably benign. 

Cases have been reported 
Of Ameri can and Canadian 
prisoners, repatriated to com- 
plete their sentences in their 


Together with the rest of 
the group, Mr Stephen El- 
liott, a Tonbridge policeman. 


Bui it also issued advice to 
them: *Sit tight and keep your 
heads down.” 


Although a symbol 
perpetrator of bullying, 
ery and extortion, hie was part 
of this happy crowd. He saw j 
me and suddenly his tips 
parted in a terrible smile. It j 
was as if a sknD had ground. , 


In Australia, a mas was 
lolled and a thousand homes 
destroyed when cyclone 
Winifred struck the north 
coastal areas; in 
Igeria, four chil- 
dren were killed when 
chimney collapsed in their 
classroom during a wind- 
storm; and in Peru, atl least 
twenty people died when tbe 
flooding Rrver Tambo swept 
away the village off 
Marancbari. 


assonment of elegant “lady own countries, who have 
friends" come on visits most then asked to be sent back to 
days of the week. their Mexican jails. 

Tbe plush prison existence All prisoners are allowed 
of Mexico's most famous intimate, undisturbed mo- 
Mafia boss has caused out- meats with the opposite sex 
among American of- In the courtyard of one 
finals. The head of an anti- Mexico City prison there is a 
drugs US congressional large block with curtained 
delegation which visited windows, outside which a 
Mexico recently, Mr Charles large notice reads^Visitas 
Rangel, said ire had been Intimas". 
informed that Caro was Other types of sport are 
allowed regularly out of also available to the inmates 
prison for nights out in of Mexico City prisons, 
expensive Mexico City res- Football is taken very 
taurants. seriously. Every year the 

Mr Rangel gave as an inter-prison football cup 
example a wild party Caro is arouses great excitement 
supposed to have attended among prisoners and prison 
recently in a luxury hotel to officials alike, 
celebrate bis birthday. One prison governor has 

The Mexican authorities an impressive display of 
have denied Mr Rangel's trophies on his sideboard, 
claim but — as one lawyer Proudly he explains his 



^ . . t ( 




here has remarked — in such 
a half-hearted manner as to 
leave room for doubt 
What is apparently certain 
is that at any given moment 
Caro will have several thou- 
sand dollars worth of c ash 
with him in his cell. 

This he used to dispense 
favours among his fellow- 


prisoners have consistently 
won the championship in 
recent years because the 
manager of the team is a 
Swiss long-term prisoner 
who, in the 1950s, was a 
member of his country’s 
national team. 


* * : 

. •» 

: J w* 


?rf 
:%■ * 


John Carlin 


e THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today's events 


loyal 

Trie ( 


engagements 
Queen and toe Duke of 
Ediabuigh visit HMS Brazen 
in toe POrt of London. 12 
noon. 

The Prince of Wales. Vice 
Patron, The British CounciL 
attends a meeting of the Board 
of the Council. 10 Spring 
Gardens, SW1, 10.05. 

Queen Elizabeth The Queen 
Mother visits HOTEL YMPIA 
1986. the international Hotel 
and Catering Exhibition. Olym- 
pia. 11.30. 

Talks, lectures 

Eighteenth-century up- 
holstery fabrics, by Imogen 
Stewart. 12; and Ceramics ft 
fay Gillian Darby, 1.15; Vic- 
toria & Albert Museum. 

Back to the Beginning: Dar- 
winism by Ernest Lucas. Lon- 
don Insitute for Contemporary 


Christianity. St Peter's Church. 
Vere Street. Wl. 1.1ft 
Life in the Dark, by Joyce 
Pope, Natural History Mu- 
seum. Cromwell Road. 3L 

Reynolds and Rembrandt, by 
Martin Postie. Goldsmiths' 
Theatre. London School of 
Hygience and Tropical Medi- 
cine, Keppel Street (off Gower 


Lon- 

Gower 


Street). 


6.15. 


The limitations of dentistry, 
by Dr. A Sheiham, University 
College London. Chemistry 
Auditorium. Christopher 
Ipgold Laboratories, Gordon 
St, WCI. 5.30. 


Millkent Fawcett: constitu- 
tional suffragist, by Joyce 
Ansell. City Temple, Holbom 


Viaduct, ECl, 

Charles Gitiins memorial 
lecture by David Hargreaves. 
Taliesin Centre for the Arts, 
University College of Swansea, 
7.3ft 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 16,960 



Neagu. University College 
don. Darwin Theatre, C 
St. WCI, 1.2ft 

French and English 1 3th 
century manuscripts, by Penel- 
ope Wallis. The British Li- 
brary. Seminar Room, Great 
Russell Street WCI. 12.30. 

German expressionism, by 
Anna Moszynska, Tale Gallery, 
Mil/bank, I. 

Computing, then and now, 
by John Stevenson, Science 
Museum, SW7, 1. 

Concert by the London 
Sinfonietta, Queen Elizabeth 
Hall. 7.45. 

Organ recital by Robert 
Jones. St Lawrence Jewry, I. 

Cello recital by Faye Clinton. 
Chichester Cathedral, LK). 

Concert by Chris Barber's 
Jazz Band. South Hill fink, 
Bracknell. 8. 

Concert by Salford College of 
Technology Brass Ensemble, 
Salford University ( 

1135. 

Concert by City of Bir- 
mingham Symphony Or- 
chestra. Birmingham Town 
Hall. 7 JO. 

Concert by Caroline Dale 


TV top ten 


H i amm>apfH Bie* l ai u iipro ij i a n wm 
toe week ending 26TH JAN & 




BBC 1 


(Thu/Sun) 21.80 
fTUeJSwi) 2050 


The TWo Ronnies 1345 
Las and Outfits Laughter Show 

taao 


£U 3 ’ 5 


The Good Ufa 13 IS 
Banket* Bank 1JL06 
New. Spoa Weather (Sat 2105) 
12S0 

That's Ufa 12J0 
Don't Up 12JS5 


ITV 


Coronation Street (Mon) Granada 
17-60 

CorgHiion Street (Wed) Granada 

WM You Were Hera (Mon/Wed) 
Thames 15.35 
Duty Free Yorkshire 14.20 
Sixprise, Suprise LWT 1170 
BUtseye Central 1355 
The Bw Thames 13^0 
This is Your Lite Themes 1120 


Crossroads 


SB 


Central 1265 


(cello) and Piers Lane ( piano), 
Sam Newsom Music Centre, 


across 

1 Old instrument taken to bits 
- hold one piece (10). 

9 Slick notice in this position 

( 6 ). 

10 Sound instruction from this 
dotty superior (8). 

11 Mount for man with polio, 
perhaps (S). 

12 Mountain of no morn for 
beast of burden (4). 

13 Frightful woman novelist 
gets put on the board (10). 

15 High structure is record in 
steel fabrication (7). 

17 Stiff, with legs extended (7). 

20 What Ractatraw, in spite of 
all temptations, remained 
U0). 

21 Fine island, jolly compact 

(4)- . . 

23 Cow is completely m the 

quagmire (8). 

25 Bored, we hear, with French 
silent pictures (8). 

26 Was this a factor in ancient 
tragedy too? (6). 

27 Striker kicks bent terminals 
(b-4>. 

DOWN 

2 Steady workers bolding tool 

( 6 ). 

3 Tap a growth area? (8k 

4 American city makes 
arrangement to sell one gas 
(3.7). 

5 Be responsible for burning 
high church taper (7). 


6 Peer inside the pearly gates 
(4). 

7 Use a chopper here - 
plane's too cumbersome (8). 

8 This letter may be 
it should be rememi 
( 10 ). 

12 Place where tbe natives are, 
in the main, cultivated <6- 
4). 

14 Pretended to be less in fasb- 
ion(10). 

16 One Provost of Elton's solu- 
tion was to make this device 
unnecessary (3-5). 

18 Kind of insurance ring sup- 
ports emergency flotation 
( 8 ). 

19 Hazel's hanger-on (7). 

22 Note - electrical safeguard is 

rejected as worthless (6). 

24 Rubbish can be shot here 
(4). 


Newsom Music 
Lines, 7.30. 

Concert by Cam! 
roque Soloists, Christ's College 
Chapel. Cambridge. 8.30. 

Organ recital by Mark Shep- 
herd, Bristol Cathedral. 1.15. 

Concert by Ian Gardiner, 
Andrew Thomson and the 
George W. Welch 
Ensemble. British Music 
Information Centre. 10, Strata 
ford Place. Wl. 7.3ft 
Concert by Chantal 
Haghesjnizabeth Robinson 
and Suat Cboo Yeoh (piano). 
King's Hall, Newcastle, Lift 
Concert by students from 
Royal College of Music, South- 
wark Cathedral, 1.1ft 
Concert by Nigel Cliffe( 
baritone) and James Vickers 
(piano), St Martin-in tbe- 
Firids. LOS. 

John and Kathryn Lenehan 
piano recital. Foyer, Royal 
Festival HalL 1230- 
Concert by the Pbilhanncmia 
O r c h est ra . Royal Festival Haft 
7.30. 

Concert by Tallis Chamber 
Choir and Philhannooia Or- 
chestra. Queen Elizabeth Haft 
7.30. 

Concert by London Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Barbican 
Concert Hall, 7.45. 

General 
The General Synod of the 
Church of England, Church 
House. Dean's Yard. West- 
minster. 10 to I: 230 to 7. 

Ambit (the Poetry 
Society Hreadings at tbe Na- 
tional Poetry Centre. 21. Ear is 
Court Square. SW5. 730. 


nc2 

Forty Mtortas 615 
That Touch of Mnfc 6.75 
Yea. Prime Mate* 6.70 


Grange HS 6. 15 
M-A.Sk 


1.555 
Food and Drink 5.15 
PW Stack 06 5.10 
Dead Head 4.95 
Time Alter Time 4.10 
The Bob MorMwuse / Star 
Ttek4J» 


j fTue/SaO 6.00 
i (Mon/SaO SAD 


BraokaUe 

Brooksde .... 

Conte Ship Presents- Duty Moria 

Tresswe Hunt 5 l 00 
Raggedy Man 4.10 
Swortxiwl XX &55 
In The Realm of Bw Shark 150 


Countdown (Wed) 3.40 
J Land 3^0 


19 Feres The . 

Countdown (Thu) 3J0 



MCI: 

13(7.1) 

TV-am: Good Uomng Britain Man to Fri 


Broadcasters- Audience Research Boenl 
Viewing figures in nWfiora 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be lifted 
today at approximately 
9.15am. 


Roads 


Wales and West: M4: Delays 
between junctions 22 and 23 
(Chepstow and Manor); east- 
bound hard shoulder dosed 
and outside lane westbound 
dosed. MS: Only outside lane 
in use northbound at junction 
25 (Taunton), reconstruction 
work. A381: Temporary traffic 
lights in Totnes, Devon, at 
junction with B38I Plymouth 
road. 

The North: M6I Blaoow 
Bridge (junction M61/M6): 
Construction of new motorway 
link on M67! at Walton 
summit; left hand lane closure 
cm both N and southbound 
carriageways. M18: Full closure 
of Doncaster to Sheffield link 
road, S Yorkshire; diversion 
due to work on Morthen Hall 
Bridge. 

Scotland: M74: Northbound 
carriageway closed. N of access 
to Blackwood; contraflow on 
southbound. A832: Road 
dosed at Little Gruinard, E of j 
Laide. off peak hours for 
improvements; lengthy di- 
versions. A73: Single line 
traffic and traffic hghts on 
Bellsidc Bridge, N of 
Newmains; various lane clo- 
sures. 


Weather 

forecast 


A very add E airstream 
will persist 


6 am to midnight 


London, SE, cental S, 
England, East An^te, V 


DfeMctWa of Mon, 8W Scotland, 
onagon: MaHy dry, a tow snow 
flurries; winds EorNE moderate 
or fresh; max temp 2C (38R. 

_ E, cental N, IE England, 
Bord«*. rtf n h iii uft Dundee. 
Abe r d een. Contra! ffitftands: 
Rather cloudy, occasional fight 
sieet or snow; wind E fresh; max 


Movar rffm, r 
Arm*. Orkney, £ 



• • j 

• * - ♦ 


Armffl, Orkney, Shetland, Northern 
IraSmfc Isolated steel or snow 
showers, some sunny intervals; 
wind E moderate ; max temp 3C 
07F). 

Oudoofc for tomorrow and 
Thursday: Staying very coM, per- 
haps snow in southern and contra! 
areas on Thursday. 


NOON TODAY 




7.35 aw 


*55 pm 


<06 am 
New moon : Rabnmy 9 


1126 an 


The pound 


Lighting-up time 


tatfMl 525 pm to 703 am 


Austria St* 
BMgtamFr 
Canada* 
DsomarkKr 


5.35 pm to 7.13 am 
Ednfcuegh S3Z pm to 7 JO am 


■Z2pm\ 

527 pm to 7.18am 
551 pm to 7.21 am 


t 


High Tides 


TODAY 

L ondon Bridge 


937 
■ 

HgM 


Lotto 


7-31 

336 

533 

1245 

1234 

954 

6.15 

<16 

R41 

1257 


Oban 


1246 


France Ft 
Q eratsfiyDM 
Gree ce 6r 

HoogKongS 
Maud PI 
Italy Lira 
Yen 


741 

KLD4 


Yesterday 


Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
Small Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
Sweden Kr 

Fr 

USAS 


TaiSMvn at midday yesterday; c. 
cfcud; 1, fair, r, rairc Csun. * 

C F C F 

S iS C 4 39 

d 233 (rararae as c 2 36 
J 3 37 Jersey C 4 38 

d 3 37 tendon e 3 37 

c 236 arncftster d 4 39 
[ 3 37 Newcas tle r 3 37 
r 3 37 R’nfctawaf c 4 39 


Q4*»«g akj n bcjM sky and Idmi c- 
rioudy: pj w rat aat f-tog n^rlzae; h- 
haU: mM-mM; r-ratn: hmw: Ba. 

nwirxJerfitorm: 

w ind dirgcfloii. vvtnd 
speto impnj uiiku. 
ctMigraiw. 


WBon-oa-Nza 


451248 

5.6 6138 
12.18 

A 2 am 

32 732 
45 6.10 
6.4 141 
72 1.14 
45 10-31 

7.6 653 
22 550 
A2 756 
55 157 

1257 
35 157 
12.05 
14 153 
4-0 7.14 
5.1 652 
4JQ 649 
75 1.47 
4,3 1156 
35 7,20 


Around Britain 


CaRfff 


EAST COAST 


Sun Rain 
hn in 


Sun Rato 
tvs hi 


Times world-wide 


Bridfagtoa 


Rates lor smaB denomtoabon bank notes 

cr+tas suopBed by Barclays Bank PLC. 


Ratal Price index: 3785 
London: The FT Index 
down 5.7 at 11553. 


ctesod 


Snow Reports 


Piste 


good 

good 


Anniversaries 


Solution of Puzzle No 1&959 



Births Tadeesz Kosdszko, 
Polish patriot. 

Mereczowszczyna. Poland 
(now in USSR). 1746; W illiam 
Harrison Ainsw or th, historical 
novelist. Manchester 18QS; 
Fernand L£ger. painter, Aigen- 
tan. France. 1881; Ugo Betti, 
- Camerino, Italy. 


Depth 

l‘% 

AUSTRIA 

Igls 25 75 

New snow needed 
StAnton 110 310 

Good skiing on all pistes' 
Seefekl 90 140 good 

Firm base, good skiing 
FRANCE 

Isoia 2000 155 200 good 

Excellent snow on aD runs 
LaPlagne 165 180 good 

Excefient Skiing 
Msgeve 110 190 

Powder on good basr 
Moraine 75 190 

Ex cellent conditions 
SWITZERLAND 
Artdermatt 100 220 

Good snow on all 
Grindeiwafd 80 130 

Good in aB areas 
Murren 100 150 


Conditions 
Off Runs to 
Piste resort 


Noon in London is: .7 am in 
New York; 4 am in San 
Frandsco, 9 pm in Tokyo; II 
pm in Canberra, 2 pm in 
Joha nne sburg ; 4 pm in Linked 
Arab Emnates; 3 pm in Kenya; 
I pm in Nigeria; 3 pm in 
Moscow; 8 pm in Hong Koag, 


SoKhc 


COAST 


3 37 drizzle 
3 37 rain 
3 37 drtzzfe 

3 37 Mom 

4 39 si pm 

5 41 ranp 


Tan fay 

C ata nia tew 


41 dowdy 
4i any 
41 duD 
39 c to udpm 


pm 


heavy worn sun 


varied good 
varied good 


fine -10 


Tatpmoufe 


- J>1 


fine 


- MMg tfar . _ _ Faksotfe . . 

> reeurd ww (Mr Pmbw 

to*®; r to dcwnMoe 12 .12 

Portfolio totaL Oiramwi r . .12 


good 

good 


powder good 
powder good 
powder good 
powder good 


doud 


PortfoBo tout. n iw nii ur 

sssftggfsg ^ssyssg S SS5T 0.1 

vour prtw ^ 


5 41 drtcpm 

5 41 drtzpm 

6 <3 drizpm 

4 39 dtf 

5 41 cloudy 
5 41 cloudy 
5 41 drtzzfa 
5 41 cloudy 
5 41 dm 

5 41 cloudy 

4 39 drizzle 

5 41 drizzle 
5 41 drizzle 
4 39 (64 

4 39 dul 
4 39 duS 

4 39 dUH 

5 41 cloudy 
B 43 dull 

6 43 cloudy 

7 45 Cloudy 


ENQUUD AMI WALES 
London . ,11 

gfr—AApt . 13 

SESgJ 

05 .10 




- .10 


rfatn-Tyira 


- .11 


4 38 drizzla 

2 36 slam 

3 37 drizzle 
3 37 cloudy 

5 41 min 

S 41 nrinpsn 
3 37 rain 
1 34 anoar 

3 37 ram 

4 39 deer am 


SCOTLAND 


- 51 


04 


sun 


WICK - m 

n*m - sn 

A faw dt mi - x H 

SL i ndra n e 

6 H d23 UO^niBlN IRELAND 
Panotes Sundave Baurae 


1 34 gnaw ? 
3 37 drzzpn 

3 37 cloudy 

5 47 cloudy 

6 43 cloudy 

4 39 cloudy 

5 41 showera 
4 39 drizzle 

3 37 snow 

4 39 snowea 

2 38 sleet 


- 3 37 etoet 


5 >.. . 

i v i 


Abroad 


fair 


S L - 

wiyn you 
g you i 


your card you 


good 

good 


varied good 
powder good 


fine 


-1 


Parliament today 


good 

Superb skiing, all runs open 
Villa rs 60 165 goo 


powder good fak 


-1 


crust good fine 


The solution to toe Collins Competition Qualifier Puzzle 16951 
will now appear tomorrow. 


Commons: Housing and 
Planning Bill, second reading. 

Lords: Prevention of Oil 
Pollution Bill, report stage; 
Local Government Bin. second 
reading; Outer Space Bill, 
second reading. 


doud 


good 

Pistes firm, off piste crust 
Zermatt 150 250 powder powder good 
All runs dosed due to too much snow 
ITALY 

Courmayew 100 150 good 
Good skiing on piste 

to the above reports, suppfied by representatives of the Ski 
Oub of Great Britain, L refers to lower slopes and U to 
upper, and art to artificial. These denote Sats figures. 


good good snow 


The cbevr h u t ru c Uum are «-■ 
“ Dd 

otraa “* no * 
•The wom mg-or HUa 2 and 9 ka 

ESSS 

to h cjgta ud W «— craft* aaSewg 


AW«« 


C 18 64 Cork* 
c 12 54 OnbAn 

0-1 35 Mm 
a 11 52 tea 
a 17 63 Ftarano 
*127 81 Frarricte 
121 54 FuocM 


C F 

UK 1 


B Aires* 


CapeTR 


aiQO T oeaiay. February 

BWcrcri aa a mrmatS S Sr all 


M6JOAY: c, doud; d, ctozzie; l, fatr. fg. fog; r, rain; a, sue an, snow; t, thundar. 
C F 

S 13 55 Crioaa 
s 18 64 CUW - _ __ 

f 13 55 

cioioitatec- 
•r 

Sii 

c 1 34 
1 13 55 

1-12 10 

c 17 63 NnDaU 
a 4 39 NYttor 
Eli 1 34 Mca 
a 28 82 Ora 
122 72 Itarta 
a 23 73 Pe king 
117 63 Prato 
e 11 52 - 
to 3 37 
6 1 34 

«14 5y__. 

C 5 41 Hods J 


Chicago* 

ctrdSSf 


c OSQftn te 
S 37 HataMd 

ws*-* 

e 1 34 
C 5 41 

e 1 34 
■n -2 28 -. 

f 28 82 L 

can usboc 

?as ast. 
m §s aar- 




's « To.ro 
c 11 52 Toronto* 
f -4 a Tmta 
C 4 39 Vatancta 
a 0 32 V ao c Vor* 
a 33 

C -1 _ 

S 43 Warsaw 




» IS 69 WaafiToo* a 19 88 
a 18 64 WrfDOB* 1 25 77 
c 038 


-7- rt