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TIMES 


THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


THEtiBtellMEgi 

Tomorrow 



An actress in 
her prime 

Long after Miss 
Brodie, but still very 
definitely in her 
prime. Maggie Smith 
talks of her starring 
role m a lavish film 
version of E M 
Forster's^ Room With 
A View, which is 
opening here soon. 

Gatwick boom 
Jobs galore, 
but no-one 
to fill them 


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Pound lifts 

Sterling steadied against the 
dollar to close higher at 
S 13910, but weak North Sea 
oil prices pushed it to a new 
closing io w • ?4 

DM3.3! 75 && 17 

Irish zeal 

Barry McGuigan. the Insh- 
man «ho defends his wond 
featherweight title in Dubbn 
next week, is a man stm 
charged with ambition ■ 
pro file, page 23 

The new breed 

A new breed of empfoyew is 

needed in Britain’s espamhdg 

supermarket diaitun ^ in- 
troduction to today s six-page 
General Appointm^w 
section p8SfS 

ija6en {» 
Utters ™ 

OWnao . *1 

parU 8 Sf!L 4 

Pr«n Bwrfs 32 
Sale Room » 

Cnnrt 22-24 

TVA Radio 31 
Tbeams 

Walter » 

WUh u 


Home N*« 

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■ App» *419 

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£ isE* .4 

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■ J? 1 Law Report M 



regret over 
Westland 

By Rkhard Evans, Lobby Reporter 
Sir Robert Armstrong, said Miss Colette Bowe had 
Obinet Secretaiy spoke yes- wanted to seek the advice of 
today of the /“discourtesy. .Sir Brian Hayes, permanent 
impropriety and unwisdom’’ secretary at the DTI, but he 
surrounding the Westland was out of London. Mr Bem- 
leak letter saga and the ard Ingham, press secretary 
intense regret of those in- to the Prime Minister, had 
volved. not attempted to consult Sir 

During a tough cross- Robert about the matter, 
examination by the Com- 


Strong 
plea for 
5 civil 
servants 


By Riel 
Lobby 


Richard Evans 
Reporter 


^ Afte r confirming that Mr 
Brittan had given the author- 
ity for the leak because he felt 
the letter had to be- brought 


The Times Portfolio 
competition prize of J 
was shared yesterday between 
Mrs B Newcomb of Col- 
chester, Essex, and Mr C D 
Alien of Eastleigh, Hants. 
Portfolio list, page 20; how to 
play, information service, 
back page. 

Leak puts 
Sellafield 
on alert 

The nuclear waste plant at 
Sellafield, in Cambria, was 
put on “amber ^alert” yes- 
terday, indicating that- . a 
radiation leak bad occurred. 

British Nuclear Fuels said 
later the incident was re- 
stricted to One bufltfing- 
T races of plutonium had 
escaped Jh>m a section of the 
chemical^ reprocessing plant 


mons Defence Select 

Committee which layi^d 236 
hours. Sir Robot, without 

ever referring to the “famous . . ... - ■*,. 

five” civil servants by name; i? t ?* e pubhc domain. Sir 
revealed the reservations felt f ob< ^ How for 

by top officials at the hun ^ » .** 

Department of Trade and Jet thm this v«s the Solicitor 
Industry — but not at ^eneraTs letter and to the 
Downing Street - at having *scourtesy, impropnety or 
to disclose parts of the ^ 

Solicitor GeneraFs fetter to~ closed ’ 1 don’t know, 
the press association. But with a crucial Wesi- 

land meeting due to take 

Leading article 


13 place three hours after the 
_.. . “ rrr Solicitor GcneraTs letter 

With Mrs Thatcher’s pn- reached the DTI, officials 
vate parliamentary secretary were working under pressure^- 

Faced with this pressure, 
Mr Leon Brittan's private 
secretaiy ifooned the then 
Secretary of State, who was at 
a lunch. Mr Brittan derided 
the letter's contents should be 
made public but said that 
Downing Street must be 
consulted. It was then that 
the difference of understand- 
ing occurred, between 


and government whips listen- 
ing to the evidence session. 
Sir Robert said: “It would 
have been much better not to 
have disclosed the informa- 
tion that way. - 
“There is a dear rule that 
one does not disdose advice 
of the law officers and 
therefore it was very regret- 
table that was done. It should 
not have been done. 


if Street and the DTI 

.j^sssAn s 

ofSedrifsonOTtstaTOlTCd Downing Street and Miss 
iffiSSSTTM £S. Bo « to Mr 

proper act, Sir Robert said, “I c 

|''wisb they ited consuferatiou But Downing Street of 
* in their minds. Borne of them finals had not understood or 
T think did; some of them I believed that they were being 
think did* not” . asked to give authority for 

Without naming ter, he the leak, he said. 


Sir Robert Armstrong. 
Cabinet Secretaiy and head 
«f the Chi! Service, made an 
unusually strong pfea to the 
Commons Defence Select 
Committee yesterday not to 
be unfair and demand ev- 
idence from five cm) servants 
involved in the Westland 
leaked letter aflkir. 

After being questioned by 
10 of the committee's Conser- 
vative and Labom MPs, he 
said it would be “rough 
justice” if the cml servants 
were made to testify^ as they 
had already submitted to 
detailed questioning daring 
his own inquiry into the teak. 

“I have done my best to 
share with you my nnden- 
standing of the matter as 
derived from that,” he told 
MPs. 

Sir Robert said the careers, 
reputations and lives of the 
five were Involved. 

By last night Sir Robert’s 
appeal on behalf of the 
“famous five”, as one MP 
referred to them, appeared to 
have been at least partly 
successful. 

Dr John Gilbert, the senior 
Labour MP on the commit- 
tee, said after the Cabinet 
Secretary’s appearance, “1 
think h is less likely I would 
want to see them. I think it is 
very unlikely I will want to 
see aB five.” 

Another committee member 
sad they had milked' the 
subject for all it was worth, 
and believed his colleagues 
would now want to move 
quickly to preparing the 
report. 

But at least oat MP 
believes Mr Bernard Ingham, 
press secretaiy to the Prime 
Minister, has modi to answer 
for, and should be made to 
give evidence. 



Sir Robot Armstrong, who faced tough cross-examination. 


r- •<***«-. 





Tass lash 

The Soviet news agency Tass 
launched its strongest attack 
on President Reagan since 
last November’s summit, 
accusing him of delivering a 1 
militaristic Stale of- the 
Union message which ig- 
nored the K rpmtin’ s latest 
arms initiatives and ext~. 
couraged big . business at the 
expense of social 
programmes Rage 8 

Stamp saving 

The lp reduction in the price 
of second class stamps made 
in November is to continue 
until the beginning of July, 
the Post Office announced 
yesterday. 





>if«4. -r 



i Correspondent 

' Mr Pmd Chanbon, Sec-, 
retary ..for. Trade' and. In- 
dusoy. Jast night promised an 
ratty end to the Foid and 
Austin talks. ’ • - “ ■ 

In. a -rowdy three-hour 
Commons debate, he said it 
was ridiculous to suggest that 

British Leylaad not look at 
all the options to keep it 
afloat. 

“What I want to do is to 
talk about real jobs and real 
people and the prospects for 
the -company in. a hard 
commensal world. 

“The board are well aware 
that the businesses, if left to 
go their own ways, win. be 
small fishes in a pond foil of 
piranhas.” 

Mr Channon said that even 
on current trading levels, 
Austin Rover would require 
continued taxpayer support 
to keep afloat 

But knowing the Conser- 
vative back-bench disquiet 
that any details leaked on 
Ford-Auslin Rover talks 
could cause uncertainty, Mr 


Channon said both parties 
should recognise the need for 
an early settlement 
' He said negotiations be- 
tween the parties may suggest 
the need for a merger — but a 
joint venture was also an 
option. 

Mr Channon said the Land 
Rover-teyland-Bedford parts 
of British Leyland ted lost 
£120 million in both 1983 
and 1984. 

“That cannot continue — 
Capacity has already been cut 
and plant dosed but some 
other strategy surely has to be 
followed”. 

Opening the Opposition 
debate, Mr John South, the 
shadow spokesman, de- 
manded to know why the 
Government did not leant to 
compete rather than surren- 
der. ■ 

Mr Anthony Beaumont- 
Dark, Conservative MP for 
Birmingham SelW Oak, 
pointed out that Ford was 
cutting back the British 
content of its cars from 68 to 
63 per cent while the British 
content of Leyland cars 


remained at. 90 per cent 


• Mf Edward Heath, the 
former Tory prime minister, 
last night hunched a blister- 
ing attack on the plan to sell 
the remaining parts of British 
Leyland to American 
competitors • 

Intervening in the Com- 
mons debate he called on the 
Go vernment to abandon the 
project making it dear he 
would not support it if it did 
not 

He said the Government 
had injected £ 2.6 billion into 
British Leyland and on any 
ordinary business judgement 
that amount of money pro- 
vided every justification for 
keeping it. 

Ha advised Mr Channon 
not to talk about guarantees 
— “we know they wont be 
kept They have not been 
kept in the past”. 

Mr Heath suggested there 
should be an attempt to 
develop a European arrange- 
ment which would allow 
Britain to maintain some 
control over the industry. 


Helicopters collide in air 


By Colin Hughes 
. Five people escaped seri- 
ous injury in acccidents 
involving three civilian heli- 
copters yesterday- 
The pilots and a passenger 
, on board two helicopters 
I survived a mid-air collision 
1,500 feel over Kent yes- 
today. They only suffered 

■shock. . • . 

In the other incident, two 
people escaped imhurt after 
their helicopter crashed into 
a field at Rushyford. war the 
A689 in Durham, after an 
engine failure. 

The Department of 
Transport’s Accident In- 


vestigation Brandi sent two 
inspectors to investigate the 
Kent mrideuL One of the 
helicopters, a Bell 47 owned 
by Bnstow and flown by a 
lone student pilot cm naviga- 
tion exercise out of Redhill 
Aerodrome, Surrey, clipped a 
rotor blade. 

-Bristow's operation direc- 
tor, Captain Alistair Gordon, 
said the student “succeeded 
in putting- down safely in a 
field without much difficulty 
controlling if*. 

The controls of the other, a 
Hughes 500 four-seater flying 
from Wadhurst, Surrey, to 


Wycombe Air Park in 
Buckinghamshire, were seri- 
ously affected by the col- 
lision. But Captain Paul 
Moran, the pilot, and Mr 
Richard Town, the passenger, , 
escaped unscathed by ditch- 
ing m a hop field one and a 
ban miles away, at Park 
Farm, Tudeley, Kent 

A fireman said the Hughes 
500, run by Skyline Heli- 
copters. of Wycombe, came 
down in an orchard, plough- 
ing through hop poles, and 
narrowly missing farm hands 
who were grubbing the fruit 
trees. 


Hammond blames 
printing unions 


By Michael HorsneU 


Mr Eric Hammond, the 
electricians' leader, last night 
blamed the print unions for 
their “bad judgement and 
incompetence” in putting 
5,000 print workers on the 
dole.... 

He was taring his accusers 
at tbe TUC, who are seeking 
the suspension and ultimate 
xstxto&L of fr is.3« U3Q0 
rnemfets.-of the EETPU. 

~ Sogar ; 82, the National 
Graphical Association, the 
Amalgamated Union of En- 
gineering Workers, and the 
National Union of Journal- 
ists claim that the EETPU 
conspired with Mr Rupert 
Murdoch to take over the 
jobs, of printers and produce 
News International’s four 
titles in Wapping and Glas- 
gow. 

They accuse the EETPU of 
taking the jobs traditionally 
done by print workeraBut 
Mr Hammond put on a 
determined show when he 
addressed the 50-strong gen- 
eral council, the TUCs inner 
cabinet In a conciliatory 
gesture, however, as talks 
went on late into the night, 
Mr Hammond went on to 
promise that if the charges 
against the electricians were 
dropped the union would do 
all m its power to secure the 
re-iustatement of the dis- 
missed print workers. 

Mr Hammond said: “It 


would be foolish to pretend 
to any optimism, but I would 
be witling to try, with or 
without the presence of the 
other prim unions, but cer- 
tainly with Mr Norman 
Willis.” 

Mr Hammond presented a 
60-page document to the 
TUC in which he said that if 
.the . . TUC— was. really, ccn-- 
cemed about activities detri- 
mental to the trade union 
movement then it was the 
print unions who should 
stand accused. 

He said the strike called by 
the NGA and Sogat at News 
International ted “imperilled 
the jobs and conditions of 
employment of their own 
members”. 

Mr Hammond added that 
there had been 25 years of 
bad industrial relations in 
Fleet Street, which he de- 
scribed as a jungle. The print 
unions had always been at 
each others' throats. 

Mr Hammond avoided a 
demonstration of about 50 
vociferous pickets by arriving 
two hours early at Congress 
House. 

He went on the offensive 
as he fought to keep his 
union in the TUGMr Ham- 
mond told his attentive 
audience that the electricians 
had not poached the jobs of 
print workers and he said the 
Continued on page 2, col 7 


Mr nammuuu suu. u I nnhnnffl on page 2 , COl i 

Runcie praises church 
report on inner cities 

By Clifford Longley, Religjoas Affairs Correspondent 


The Church of England's 
controversial report on 
Britain's inner cities was the 
most “prophetic survey of a 
major social issue” for a 
generation, the Archbishop of 
Canterbury, Dr Robert 
Runcie, told the General 
Synod yesterday.. 

“The commission's field- 
work has been wide-ranging 
and highly professional; its 
findings well-informed and 
authoritative; and its recom- 
mendations comprehensive 
and unanimous,” be said. 

It was “a great challenge to 
our church and our nation”. 
It presented powerfully the 
Church's duty both to act 
and cry aloud for Stale action 


in situations in which there 
was a “concentration of 
poverty and deprivation”. 

On the first day of the two- 
day debate on the report, 
Fatih in the City, speaker 
after speaker added details 
and endorsed the 
archbishop's approval. The 
report appeared m December 
accompanied by strong criti- 
cisms from Conservative 
Party sources, and these were 
echoed in the debate yes- 
terday by Mr John Stokes, 
Conservative MP for 
Halesowen and Stourbridge. 

Mr Stokes said he was 
dismayed by the exaggera- 
tions in the report. 

Synod report, page 2 


Poisoned bats in rafters create legal history. 


By peter Davenport 

The demise of a co lony iff 
Bare roosting in the rafters of 

yesterday in a piece of legal 

b *Mr y ’Ma* Edmonson the 
owner of a timber treattynt 
company, 

person fa Engfand to.be 
j Rosecnted for intentionally 
kilting a bat , ... 

A special sitting iff Ac 
magistrates court at Bfecjalein 
North Yorksfare, 

Mr Edmonson. *8** 32, had 
only intended to destroy 

but that the spay - hts 
workmen' used, abo prorol 
i fatal to a colony of BrandtV 

^Tbcy plummeted from their 


roosting places into the 
watertank In. the loft and 
their remains eventually 
trickled out through the 
hatches tap. 

Mr Edmonson, who denied 
foe charge was forad guilty 
and fined £508 with £200 
costs. • 

' The charges were brought 
after foe owner of foe cottage 
at Breary Bank, Healey near 
Mashaa fa Ninth Yorkshire, 
Mr Brian White, complained 
to police about the stream of 
particles emerging with his 
tap water. 

.Mr Edmonson was ques- 
tioned niae months after 
workmen employed by his 
Yorkshire Damp Core Com- 
pany-had' ^treated the 
TMfbraing for woodwoxm in 
October 1984. 

.Mr /Edmonson of 


Pemtyhotoe, Craig Hall, near 
Bedafe was charged far North 
Yorkshire police with in- 
tentionally kflting bats, a 
protected specks, mder die 
1981 mbfiffe and comtryside 
act ...... 

Mr David Pedley, prosecut- 
ing, said that Mr Edmonson 
had authorised the use of a 
long lasting poisonous 
spray, Tisdale' on foe roof 
timbers when guddmes layed 
down by -foe Nature Conser- 
vative Cornual advised the use 
of a more expensive but 
harmless alternative in areas 
used by bats. 

Dr Robert Stebbing of foe 
Institute of Terrestrial Ecol- 
ogy, and an authority on bats, 
totd the court that the entire 
cofany of between 30 and 50 
bats may have been wiped rat 
by foe fimes. He estimated 


that they could have been in 
the cottage roof feu 28 years 
and may have been the only 
ime m an area of 100 square 
antes. 

Dr Stebbfag, who was 
caBed in to examine the site 
after Mr White’s complaint 
said it should have been 
obvious from dropping s that 
the roof wax a but nursery. 

However, Mr Rodney 
Place, defending, said his 
diefit wasn't an expat and 
couldn't differentiate between 
the drops of bats, rats or 
pigeons. 

And Mr Edmrason added 
”f would only know if hats 
were there if I had seen them 
hanging from the roof like 
yon see in pictures”. 

The court was told that foe 
spray used could remain 
lethal to bats for up to 29 


years after first applied and 
although it was fa widespread 
use throughout the country, 
contractors were required to 
contact the nature 
craservafity council before 
using it if they detected Signs 
iff bats fa the vicinity. 

After the court, Mr. 
Edmonson, a timber treat- 
ment specialist for 15 years 
added: “I am extremely 
disappointed. Those bats 
have given me nightmares for 
months. From now on I will 
inspect every attic on my 
tends and knees so I donit 
mis any sign of bats”. 

A spokesman for foe nature 
cMZservsfity council said foe 
decision of the magistrate was 
a wanting to all workman to 
take care fa buildings which 
could hold bats or other 
rfwHning a pwjff of animals. 


Tories plan to 
raise £7bn in 
water sell-off 

By Philip Webster, Political Reporter 


The Government yesterday 
unveiled plans for selling the 
water industry to the private 
sector, expected to be its 
biggest act of privatization 
since it was elected in 1979. 

The ten water authorities 
of England and Wales, whose 
assets are valued at £27 
billion, are to be transferred 
to private ownership under 
legislation to be introduced 

Initially they will become 
public limited companies, 
and then floated off individ- 
ually at what the Govern- 
ment considers the most 
appropriate time. It hopes 
that at least three, including 
the Thames Water Authority, 
will be disposed of during 
1987 and before ibe next 
general election. 

The total gain for the 
Treasury could be about £7 
billion, topping the proceeds 
from the British Telecom 
floatation and similar to that 
expected for British Gas. 

Mr Kenneth Baker, Sec- 
retary of Slate for the 
Environment, told the House 
of Commons that the 
authorities were now fit and 
ready to join the private 
sector. Their privatization 
would bring benefits to the 
customers, to the industry 
and to the nation in im- 
proved quality, more efficient 
service, greater commitment 
of the staff and more aware- 
ness of customer preference. 
“With the disciplines of the 
private sector, I expect the 
industry to move from 
strength to strength”, he said. 

But the proposals were 
condemned by the Labour 
Party, whose chief spokes- 
man on the environment. Mr 
John Cu nningham , pledged 
that a Labour government 
would return them to the 
public sector, adding to the 
party's already long list of 
commitments to re- 
nationalization. 

He accused the Govern- 
ment of gambling with the 
nation's health and well- 
being. Most Conservative 
MPs welcomed the plans 
loudly... al&High^ ..handful 
expressed -reservations. • 


A key feature of the 
change, which will face bitter 
opposition, will be the in- 
troduction of compulsory 
water metering in several 
large trial areas, initially 
expected to be in three or 
four cities. Every new house 
built in those areas will be 
obliged to have water meters. 

Mr Baker made clear to 
MPs that the present authori- 
ties would be privatized with 
all lheir responsibilities apart 
from land drainage and flood 
protection, which would re- 
main a public-sector 
responsibility. 


Price controls 
Kenneth Fleet 


2 

17 


He accepted that authori- 
ties were “large natural 
monopolies” and promised a 
firm regulatory framework 
through the appointment of a 
director general of water 
services, who would control 
the authorities by issuing 
operating licences setting 
stria conditions for pricing 
and service standards. 

Throughout the exchanges 
Mr Baker emphasized that 
present standards iff public 
health and water purity 
would be maintained and 
strengthened. 

But Mr Cunningham said 
that the plans were “appall- 
ing proposals from a des- 
perate Government”. They 
were another example of the 
“pawnshop politics of the 
Prime Minister” and their 
motivation was a crude and 
desperate grab for cash to buy 
votes. 

Mr John Cartwright, the 
Social Democratic Party’s 
environment spokesman, 
questioned the legality of the 
proposals. It was not dear 
that the Government had any 
right to sell foe authorities* 
assets; when they were estab- 
lished in 1974 their assets 
were simply transferred from 
their previous owners, the 
local authorities. 

“If they are to be disposed 
of, the local authorities may 
well &ve_» claim «Lat least 
part of "the- proceeds.” 


Italy ‘expels Russians’ 


From John 

The Italian Government is 
believed to have expelled a 
Soviet diplomat and the 
Rome station manager of the 
Soviet airline, Aeroflot, for 
spying. 

Mr Viktor Kopytin, first 
secretary in the admin- 
istrative department of the 
Soviet Embassy since 
September 1984, left Rome 
yesterday. 

It was also revealed yes- 
terday that Mr Andrei 
Chelukhin. aged 40. who 
besides being station manager 
was described as assistant to 


Earle, Rome 

Aeroflot’s general repre- 
sentative for Italy, ted al- 
ready flown to Moscow. An 
Aeroflot representative main- 
tained he ted been with- 
drawn because his term of 
duty had expired. 

In accordance with its 
practice, the Foreign Ministry 
declined to confirm or deny 
that foe two ted been asked 
to leave. The news leaked out 
through local news agencies. 

Eleven Soviet citizens have 
been expelled from Italy 
since 1970. Last year a 
correspondent of Izvestia left 
suddenly without publicity. 


LL 

The service was 
so professional 
that I felt if I had 
left my shoes 
outside the door 
they would have 
been cleaned?^ 


TRAVEL EXPERT 


Extract from just omnfinauy unsolicited 
letters received bv us recetith: 





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WUlVJjfc iNfcWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


Teachers in 
call to TUC 


?rt 


over union 
‘meddling’ 


By Lucy Hodges Education Correspondent 


The biggest teachers' union lies", he said, including the 
; was reported to the TUC claim that the new negotiat- 
yesterday for interfering in ing structure on pay and 
; the ballot being conducted by conditions being established 
. the National Association of by Acts was unacceptable 
‘ Schoolmasters/Union of The NUT which has 
Women Teachers on whether 216.000 members, called a 
, or not to accept the pro- meeting of its regional offi- 
l visional settlement drawn up CCT5 , jq days ago and given ■ 
by the Advisory Conciliation them a mandate to persuade , 



Print onion faces W 11 '! [ 


High Court 
contempt charge 




; and Arbitration Service. NAS/UWT members to vote 
; The ballot being held by against a settlement, Mr de 
- the second biggest union is Gruchy said. "We have no 
cruciai to a settlement of the doubt that the NUT is 
• vear-old teachers' pay dispute producing scurrilous material 
‘ and the National Union of locally to push round 
.. Teachers is keen that a vote schools", he added. Ballot 


By John Young 

The print union Sogal 82 points out that the E3ETPU 
has been summoned to ap- has do formal agreement with 
pear in the High Court next News International at 
Monday to answer a charge Wapping, east London, or in 
of contempt of court in Glasgow, 
disobeying a jud ge's order to Workers had been re- 
withdraw instructions to ns for 1 ^. 

members employed by news- national through the union's 
paper wholesalers not to branch offices in Souifaamp- 
hancfle News International ton and in MotfaerweB. bid 

. , without die knowledge of its 

Mr Bfll Mfles, die union’s London bead office/ 
national officer for the mws- Th«r most striking feature 
Mper industry, sud yesterday of the document, however, is 

a forthright attack on past 
sweated as a result. of Fleet S*reel working practices 
High Court moves, the muon and cm the activities of the 

WOUld Continue to function, nrint imirwt 

"There is no way we’re «»_ ^ . 


wuuiu wuuiiuc w luncuuu. UniOOS. 

IToOG- plus members who *** &&-&& ** of 

SSL 


A demonstrator being led away afte r he ha d been arrested yesterday outside Congress House, the TUC headquarters in con }P an y " i>ress trade union movement as 


central London, where an EETPU delegation was meeting onion leaders (Photograph: Tim Bishop). 




- should go against a settle- papers went out to members 


of the NAS/UWT on Mon- 


Yesierdav Mr Fred Smith- day and Tuesday, and are 
ies. general secretary of the due to reach the Electoral 


; NAS/UWT. complained to Reform Society by February 
Mr Norman Willis, the TUC 2L They are accompanied by 


« general secretary, that the a statement from the union's _ 

: NUT was intervening in the executive urging acceptance. The Archbishop of Canter- showed that the report bad peUecf The “fill pigs” “It is this strike which has 

internal affairs of another Members are told that if Bv Nicholas Timmins bury. Or Robert Runrie, "touched a nerve” among a senior obstetrician who which Mr Rupert Murdoch, imperilled the jots and con- 
. union. they vote "no”, they will be Soda! Services yesterday gave his fill] back- people. "The feeling that we - compiled a dustier of com- ch airman of News Inter- ditions of employment of the 

The NAS/UWT. which has voting for industrial action to Correspondent mg to the controversial the church - are right to care plaints which led to the national, was trying to Printing Industry Committee 

. 127.000 members, is claiming continue. Such a vote would Church of England report on has been palpable, and suspension of the obstetrician spread, was totally untrue. union members at Gray's Inn 

that NUT members are being mean no pay award for 1985 Family doctors should be inner city problems. overwhelming." Mrs Wendy Savage denied He challenged Mr Road and Booverie Street. 

, urged to put pressure on its and a delay to negotiations allowed to charge their Na- Opening a debate on the He hoped the synod would th at be had tried to get rid of Murdoch’s assertion that he “The Fleet Street industrial 

: own members to vote against on reform of salary scales, tional Health Service patients report in the General Synod, move quickly to set up the her since he took up his had been trying to negotiate relations ‘jungle' has enjoyed 

• the Acas deal. The NUT has The NUT . boycotted the up to £20 a ume for routine the church's parliament, he Church Urban Fund pro- appointment. with the print unions on new a notoriety over the last 25 


BMAcaii Inner cities report 
for £20 backed by Runcie 

nhAAlr imo V 


. internal affairs of another 
’ union. 


Members are told that if 
they vote "no”, they will be 


check-ups 


Savage 
plot is 
denied 


in many ways the dispute ™ tj 

ouM esralate in areas Where w even m respwt of 


could escalate in areas where XT 

not seeking to have a ££,S£f^itlldk 

iHSs' important that the 
image of the industry put 

forward by newspaper ansult of the strike m Fleet 

managements should be dis- aaceu 

peUed. The "fill pigs” wn«F, “It is this strike which has 




The NAS/UWT.which has voting for industrial action to 
, 127.000 members, is claiming continue. Such a vote would 


By Nicholas Timmins 
Social Services 
Correspondent 


that NUT members are being mean no pay award for 1985 


‘ put out literature saving that Acas talks and is not a party I medical check-ups which I said it was a prophetic survey pored by the report. 

1 _ <•*' . _ r / ft’ qlllm.i.h all I CnJ An.l.i nf I P - V . - . . Tn J.L... 


Professor 


Jnrgis | technology since 1979. 


years which cannot have 


the Acas offer of 6-9 per cent, to the settlement, although all 1 could find early signs of I 0 f an important social issue The debate is taking place I Grndrinskas also denied a I The daim was in the escaped the attention of any 


- rising to 8.5 per cent by the its members will receive the j serious diseases, the British land had generated national over two days and 150 retain from a leading rfiM j course of a 32-page document members of the General 


: end of March, erodes pay award 


teachers' living standards. •The 
Mr Nigel de Gruchy, dep- union 


' j Medical Association's family I debate. 


The smallest teachers’ doctor committee said yes- 1 ■ _ ... their names to speak, 

lion, the _ Professional terday. I f _ 7 5 e . 4 9S:? a ® e „ , 5??3 The Bishop of 


members have put down I health specialist (hat a sfaai- j submitted to the TUC in Council, however unfamiliar 


lar dossier could be compiled j answer to charges of breach- they may be with the 


, i vi i i«ig £7 uc ui uui;. ucp- *“» * •» .™«j. . , i mv u»uu(i ui BlT- fl pahljtf most COBSal tantS . lug |AJuvjr, mug uuuiuiEui iwmmm uhwhj. 

* my general secretary of the Association of Teachers, has The check-ups - basic tests commission wars rnin S h ^’ the Rt Rev Hugh Mrs Savage, aged 42, was 

NAS/UWT. said this was "a put m am claim of 7 per on eves< hear j^ and Wood Dr^Sci^ came Montefiore, in whose diocese suspended foe London 

; downright lie . because the cent for 1986 and says that if tests to dis- JSer ^fire fora oranmem 18551 Hai * dsworth nots Hospital's Mile End wing H CllTITYlfYTKl I) 1 21 111 PS 

. rate of inflation for the past tiiere is no settlement by May £ ver diabetes ^ some “L 1 “L™ ZJg^g “S *«* place, said the report last April alter allegations of X JLllllIlllUllU UIAIUV^ 
. year has been exactly £9 per ifoere should be immediate other conditions, and a check Sed St Knter had “stirred the conscience of professional incompetence m J # • 

* cent. Moreover the NUT had arbitration. on reflexes, swollen elands **-riL the nation and gave hope to MwaSring five pregnancies. uuaaiv«^ii«#v nvll art Ylsn 


ing policy. The document national newspaper industry. 


year has been exactly 6.9 per 
cent. Moreover the NUT had 
put out further “scurrilous 


ui ran on. on reflexes, swollen glands The Archbishoo insisted t® nat,0 ° & ve Hope to involving Ore pregnancies. HI*1VlTl 

Leading article, page 13 and any lumps and bumps - t h« ‘*converat?on?^«M , At an inquiry otdwed by f/llflll 

— would be rather like a car mnnin" with eovemment Mr John Stokes, Conser- Tower Hamlets Health ^ 

a service" Dr Michael Wilson, departments had 8 been the vative MP for Hallesowen, Authority, Professor Continued from page 1 


printing unions 


X y f -ww j «i service , Ur Michael Wilson, denariments had been the vauve 10r HaJiesowen, Authority. rroiessor Continued fmm none 1 he knew redundanries 

Vauvhall cin \z O chairman of the General onterof die dav and oointed *■“* ^ report emphasized Gr nd o nsk a s was questioned . . , imminent. Normally snch 

v auxnau siriKe mlw/SS sarss%5ss ^ rfOa 


«•- l I 'if* * if 


over open window 


At present rules in family retary of 5 
doctors’ contracts prevent Environment. 


Mr Kenneth Baker foe Sec- Dy 1116 aiatc a™ ice neea ror itonaia laywr, a Kamng .T Xt dhv^t to the raernttnumt 

re^r/^f SraT’S- ^ welfare aid rather than for paediatridaiL, of St Hnmas's Jts members mside the News tact » nxxmttomt 

retary of btate tor the ~ individuaJ action ^ ^ London. Interoauonai printing plants a&xw, but tor an imex- 


Vauxhai, wcrlerealLuton * rf, pro^. The M ^ ' ■ ' 


Professor Taylor had said I 3t .9 


V auxnau woreers ai i.uion aner earner protests. I tie Mr Baker’s announcement 

sssvrSii; aaeft^ eaS as'.'sssti zoo vet threw 

as 


even if the EETPU were to adtes insteaL 
told him his Gist task was to issue tostruenon to strike, The union disapproved of 
change his senior lecturer, ^ suggested that it that, but it rejects any 

v^owas Mrs Savage. could face a court action suggestion that he was 

P .fessor Gn lzioskas de- seelriog an injunction to lift attempting to disguise his 


tapping. plained reason the 
said that ask£ d him to use h 


in-! TV f rT 


who was Mrs Savage. 
Professor Grndzinskas de- 


Uniop members voied for a WiS Serday', «rike, the I d0 ™ r by the ^ cnt - I I ^ I E I ^ 


one-day protest over the way loss in production will cost The proposal was put 
management treated a shop the company an estimated forward as part of the BMA’s 
steward after he argued with £1.5 million. "alternative" green paper on 

a foreman about opening a Union officials were meet- the future of family doctor 


proposal was pm up the commission's vmmomy summofor D»t to™**- 

ssffnof ftcBM A-s rc Xropon - which called. . In D« 


ges. Mr O' Hanlon was unhappy - 

December, the EETPU f 2 


me repon - wmen cauea suspended from the register ^ ^ rrr^-' T7_TlLlJi it allowed him to at in on 

among other things, for for two months by the hi ™ job interviews, 

increased job ^ creation m Veterinary, Disciplinary J 5*ST 225^ “He says that some of 


* window during a night shift ing management later to try services. The Government : nCT cities, and a review of rnmmW viZ bd**** she did not cany out that he had been a«rigtino a - . say ^ 501116 

; last week. to resoIv?5te dispute. WoS- Has been planning such a S^etfef ^ m L ° Dd ° n ^ her duties cempeteiitly”. MTcP^sonmi^^ng ^ intennewed were marh 

* Mr Charlie McKinnon was ers on the night shift were Green Paper since early 1984. °!^^ S than «r A statement fr«m Professor workers. On head office bere ofother unions and, m 

; dismissed for disobeying an told lo, mpoa^o work. but publSion of it is sOU ^ eThoS i SS? Wes?^” J»-V SSon be, ^ ceSS V**a**. ,***■’ : 

l instruction not to open the • Bnlish fleet orders worth some weeks off. p paediatriaan, was. read out, further recruitment. R>rh»Tiipr> nN <ifMM( 

* window but after a disci- more than £25 million for the i> Wilson said that foe “And last vear new and saying complaints against 

* nlinarv hearine. foal was new rovenirw-huilt' Fmomt , >. 11S0 r 511 . 11131 “ ie . 0 "P 1 year, new ana disgraceml proicssioaal con- ivirs Sav«w> hk>hiv Mr OTianlon bad been canami *2.7 r csmart« p*» ito 

: changed w a foreeS 309 ck- > 3sk value of such routine screen- trape mitbresfos of vmlena duct. He had denied two StociaL approached last October by m aim 

s B . 1 uucc-uay ju? car, were annoiuicea m p was still a matter of in Handswonh. Bnxton and rhanm: nn^thaihothnwiin enue^ snower ua *ym- r* . M . is«i ceniHiw dm sjw caww «k 


inner recruitment. Bayfav He laws ovctMn 

. . , _ . . . _ Austria Scti 39v BUtton B fr» BO. 

Mr OTianlOO bad been Canada SZ. 7 B : caaaiua Ptt lrn 


: Son H wpv,rs ZZJSZtEtL annoiuicea i„g was still a matter of in Handswonh, Brixton and dteiges, one that he taw an "g"* JTT Mr Stmoulo tefol 

■ unim claims mLagcmem XSS^ichSSpfe mSJS” mLS“? ^not MTS •£ “* ■? 

• *Z£F " UP sMSVbeTWS ^cr*^ a a 5 ^ 1 “ “ 8 <,B, “ 


his union credentials 


YwZauwZ' Goifrey Da v fa. Tfat 3°9is°n "it could provide reassurance our major rities is stretched which he was acqitittedT that w 11 

Yesterdays acuon came sale to the publtc from today, and peaS of miod to and suiined to the Umh.” r«i3 Ta «S ^ 

" " ~ - - ■ patients.” Dr Runcie said his postbag excessive force: — - 


tnomc workers, a quite com- 
The inquiry continues to- m 9? in tte area. 


tO find 150: Hofland'cfjS* hwi 

1 aImv. RfttHibllc 4Qp: Italy 1 2500; 

1 Cl °0 - Laxanboam UTaS; Mifelra Esc ITO 


Malta 36c Morocco Dir IQ.OO: 
Norwap Kr 9.00: PakHttn Rw IK 
Portugal Esc 170: Singapore StUSa 


i Psychiatrist cleared of 
i all bomb plot charges 


patients. 


„ .. . Spain pa 200c Star 9XSX 

He sent application forms 

to several loSl firms where SS* ^ *** YW “‘" rt * “* 


Studies repeatedly showed 
lai conditions such as high 


Dr Maire O’Shea, a retired further hour before acquitting 
psychiatrist, aged 66, was Patrick Brazil, aged 35, of 


that conditions such as high 
blood pressure - which 
increases the risk of heart 
attacks and stroke — fre- 
quently go undetected and 
conditions such as diabetes 


Writing machine for 
the blind is launched 


Fears over Ford takeover 


By Qaig Seton 

Austin Rover betaes that the range of models from the Siena’s bold in the vital fleet 
jt222TSi2S2"H-SE jmau M«ros and F.eaas to mark*. Austin Rover, how- 


iSST Ch " n Co " | Jury trial is 


y The iuiy, which on Tues- adm,l,e ? conspiring to cause for ^ ^ Hours of concentrated Honda engines and gear- no direct Fo 

day acquitted her of conspir- ?"J5 p, f S 0n ’ wJ1 ^ sen_ dUaUUU1Ii;U Moon, a system of tan- He said. boxes; foe new Rover 800 the two comp 

ing to cause an explosion, ,oday - A trial at foe Central guage using embossed letter- Mrfou« said that HralDe executive car-duc for launch side byskie. 

cleared her of failing to Peier Lynch, aged 46, of Criminal Court costing thou- ™g (example below}, was was diffiCTlt to leant for Hind ^ foe swnmer— would have a The Ford 

disclose information about an Balsa 1 1 Heath, Birmingham, sands of pounds was aban- invented by Dr William people wfiose tosefe was Honda o vo engine in the marginally j 

act of terrorism. who at foe start of the trial doned yesterday when it was Moon of Brighton in 1847. Hecoeilsig less sensitive, usu- ;°P o* foe range version Metro in s 

The costs of Dr O'Shea’s admitted failing to disclose found that one of the jurors. Before the machine was ^ ^ l !S atl kS f 4a ^ lro ’ “ ,ln 


was difficult to learn for Mind m foe suramer-wouid have a The' Ford Fiesta is only mi£J5 er of 

people whose tench was Honda 2.5 V6 engine in the marginally ahead of foe ^S, nC R n S. d i 1 J , ?^f y: 
becoiing less sensitive, mm- l0 P of foe ran©! version Metro in sales while the ^ *** a lf ran 8B 

ally through age. intended for the lucrative Maestro, introduced in J983 J&? ie ls n s ^ Iln ® weU ^ 

The Moonwriter will cost Amencan market; and foe has 3.1 per cent of the market one . to 


defence will be paid out of information about an act of an Asian woman, could not developed, Moon was pro- 
central funds. terrorism, will also be sen- understand English properly, dneed only at foe Royal 

The jury then retired for a tenced today. She had sat through foe National Institute for the 


an Asian woman, coma not devekmaL Mimm me nm- . l,re wawwinw qkh — ■ ■«* «»■ i«u> oi me mantel Th«,, „n r- .1 

understand English property, dneed only at foe Royal SSL to Hut the due 10 ^lis far short of foe top- 20 ^est idling 

She had sat through foe Snal Lstitate for foe RNIB ^ wAsHBm it for [°JJ 0W the Maestio range seUing Escort II S 

lhmMlRv rtinl nf a man nn mini roristered blind peoule so i I before the end of foe decade. The murire* because if 


:: Boy’s killers get life 

; • _ . ,,w o ^ its verdict foal foe woman s 

The killers of Wayne 20. of Gainsford Crescent, difficulty came to light. 

J » Keeton, aged 10, were both Bestwood. to life custody. . 

; jailed for life at Nottingham The men had pleaded not l/IITllinwr ill 
i • Crown Court yesterday. guilty to murdering the boy IU 

; . Mr Justice Pain sentenced last year after be had gone Ur Edmund Rubbra, aged 
; : Philip Atherton, a labourer, out to play on his BMX the composer was yes- 

f itAAfl Tl .-»P D J * " re i. ■ r- ■ fAwImi m I/I «#> fvt im b ir w>a A i 


SSSMB-SU: Tf— l^tatheendoffoede^ fight is fierce 

gun charges. It was not until S«5Sy. 1 ««8aie, ^ ^ diem A09. Mr “ 1 *S SSL deveIo * ,ed ™ saloon cm R^rer wSiM 

rhx nirv har I Ivon enneirforina I Jm Brace enrohasized that ti»> I with foe Japanese companv. UmtMn mof I'oycr tney would not appear 


Now blind people can use development did not signal Collaboration between 
foe machine, about the size of any lessening of commitment Austin Rover and Honda has 
a portable typewriter, to write by the RNIB to braille, which become an increasingly un- 
til the language themselves, would remain the tan- portant part of the BL 
Mr Ian Bruce, director guage for foe blind. subsidiary's plans, but exec- 


Brace emphasized dud foe w * 1 h foe Japanese company. Momeco ,Y i er *H®y would not appear 


W - aged 2Z of Church Road, machine His body was found terday said to be very poorly 

i ; Bestwood. near Nottingham, under a bridge on foe River Hi Chalfonts and Gerrard 

| ; to life imprisonment, and Leen at Bestwood on Easter Cross hospital Buckingham- 

; ’ Mark Deary, a cleaner, aged Sunday. shire, after a stroke. 


shire, after a stroke. 


MOONWRI TER 

i©©s^n\ a =>r\ 


Baker plans price controls to prevent abuse of power Garage m$in 

Individual float for water authorities docked wages 


subsidiary's plans, but exec- 
utives say foe baby Rover, 
the Rover 800 ana the YY 
series would probably dis- 
appear under a Ford take- 
over. 

One said: “We have cot 
dealers in the States queuing 
up for the 800 series and we 
would expect sales of be- 
tween 15,000 and 20,000 in 


AUSTIN ROVER 


ft r !: l- 


M1M '(introduced 1959) 


1 8,599 sales (1 2. per cent 
of UK market} 

Price range £3,447-84.075 
1 Htre, 2 door 


No 

comparable 

model 




wins case over 

HArlrPfl wqonc The biggest single question 



METRO (1980) 


at Austin Rover is “what do 


J ‘ .By Hugh Clayton The authorities, which will aries, based on water caich- would not immediatelv be ^ compan / want”. Austin Rover 

i - Environment Correspondent be turned into “water supply ment areas, will be preserved, obvious if it was set too^hwh d £ du 5 te ^. a you ”S *? reco “ t c P ren ^5f I** 

: Mr Kf.nn.Mh HnL-pr n.ihHe limited comuanies" -The attendant’s wages for foe share of fo UK market and 


1 18.81 7saies (6.5 per cent) 

£3,999- .£6.569 
.1 Btre-Uturbo. 3-5door 


FIESTA (1977) 


124,143 sales (6.8 per cent} 
£4,201- £6,507 
9S0cc-1.6XR2,3door 


Mr Kenneth Baker, Sec public .limited, com.panies” -The monopoly power of because manag^fw^d S? Sff % ^ ™£“ 

retary of Slate for foe after privatization, will have the United Kingdom water be tern Died to use the ext™ of ^ ceDt - A takeover 

Environ men l wifl become to. accept yet-to-be-deter- authorities win require com- proceeds genera led for “em- Sj USrion r ^S5 VC 

Britain's biggest tycoon when mined price controls to prehensive and permanent pi re buiidine" and hivhpr *" ourl y este T^ a y unportantly, 

the 10 authorities prevent abuse of their Fegulaiion". Professor Stari«. ^ ^ ^ employees a J^ice h«ivy marketing 



: \ which supply 75 per cent of monopoly powers. 

, i the water used in England Mr Baker published 


Littleehild said Thw had t n -l. . system of “punishment costs, but executives are now 

be a balance between nSotL? privatized dressed up as compensation", carefully examining product 

Krssssw **>*•**•„?*»« i™***^™* 


MAESTRO (1983) 

?7 sates (3.1 per cent) 


57,527 sales (3.f per ct 
£4.998- £7.696 
1^- 2.0 EH, 3- 5 door 


ESCORT (1^0) 

1 .1-1 .6 turbo custom, 3 - 5 
door 


\‘ orderly transfer 


of the Birmingham University, who nominated'^'nikgrfi^ire’ ^ ollier losses m^els being phased out 

**-? ^“T^c -RPI minus X- x. sh ouU. b?3S SSfi-S' " CmP,0y,X S ^ * JfiSLf 1 .-. 


!- authorities to the 


i; sector means that, at first, formula used to control the new water companies. 

ih«u urill all rioi. nnth th. rhflro« imrvwrf hv thp If , 


. thev will all stav with the charges imposed by foe -P<*riodir n>vrcinn« r>f v -.»rn~i7« uutu JMSU «: wouuas ana «w»w uuium saw: wc nave 

«: Government. privlUzed British Telecom. It bas^on foe Sidsrick of to? Mr Justira Nolan dismissed achieved miracks over foe 

l; All 10 will be turned into means prices cannot be pertarance in foe whofo SteT of an app«al by Thamamead last five years. At least Ford 

a n on u, r^« ssssa^jcsw 


) check suppply abuses. 
The director-general will 


One di^zuntled Austin 


Justice Watkins and I Rover official said: “We have 


ROVER 200 SERIES (1984) 

43,669 sates (2L3 percent) 

£fi.199-£8 t 098 

1 .3 - 1 .6 Vitesse, 4 door 


OWOH( 198 a) 

i^-W 6pwca 

1;3- 1.6 GhiaH,4 door 


j; to be floated separately. The nominated percentage. 


, While Paper on water, re- Professor Littleehild pro- resulting benefits are largely companies, 
leased yesterday, said: “Ini- poses a similar system for passed on to customers.” --- 


Motor Centre, of Harrow are paying us a compliment 
Manor Way, Abbey Wood, by saying they want us, but 
south-east London, against a dearly the Government does 
conviction for unlawfully not believe what Ford be- 
im posing “fines” on Mr lieves— that we are a success. 



’Hi? if.,. 




clearly tne uovemment does 
not believe what Ford be- 


lieves— that we are a success. 


Mitvu wu aval t “v * m cuv a auu.'Qq. 

The present -8 statutory I Anthony Barra tL aged 18, in I We are ahead in manufac- 


MONTEQO (19841 

§^-?l?^ perce,, 

1 5 - 2.0 hBbo, 4 door 


SIERRA (1982) 


a , i^SSlt 5p0^cen,, 

1.3 - 2^ FL 5 door 


top-selling 

nartcet are 


- them individually, as rapidly ing financial position of foe of th^ RP -X fomu^ It Tyne wiU also be tin^d into .JSS-SS' a lzw ™ eoa or wc u top*e 

L- as market conditions and the 10 authorities. The Govern- would be obvious iT X was ouhlic * e COmpany.and an ortitsr to cars in foe UK market 

circumstances of the rndivid- meat has made it d«r SS ItSTtaSi taS dSF&mT ^ ^ Justin Rover and 

r ^" !pan,es ■ - * W bound- would be madTKe^ lZ mm B LST*" ™ SSLJ’LS SSS“ 


compete fiercely throughout 


ROVER SD1 (1976) 

U^w& M,W0Bn '> 

2-0 -3-5 Vanden Pfaa, 5 door 



GRANADA (1985) 

SSS.'SS ^ per< 

1.B-2.8H r 5door 




(J^J Jt Cj° liSjD 







'v -.ii : V - .V- • - • •* •~ri; >o *ie >■ 

v* •;••;. -*<•**« 





|y •' -A . . ' v< ■ ■. . 


*****«^!.k&&* v' ■ « 




<> * 


1^7 



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industry £1 ,000m 

a year in lost output’ 

» . . . By Nicholas Timmins 

least £L000 C0B ? tr ? 41 ^eatmeot received. The main 

industrial oatortSid ^ worry was that doctors simply did not 

^ eoongb .boot tow to it 

I 6 ” ^ S®®* 9 the Consnmers 1 s. S nr pris»ngiy few had tried 

Awomation yesterday »lteniative w treatments, given the 

Yet a decade after a Department of f^ wrt ® d popnianty of complementary 
Healt? working group said research thera P l€S * Jnst 6 per cent had visited 
into the problem should be a hinh “ n^^P^th and less than 3 per cent 


. «, - ,. r . w»wuw uc a mpn 

primi^P, nttle headway has been made 
IM findin g effective treatments for the 
Majority of sufferers. 

I® a _snrvey of 2,000 members. 


a chiropractor. 

Which? argues that teaching on 
prevention must start in schools, as a 
quarter of sufferers said the pain 


Whirh? fomu J TT W “® nl,eis » quarter of sufferers said the pain 

torf ^ ^ beg»» in «»* teens or e«iier,^d 

sunereo DHCk pain in the nast oml « mon 


^Tered back pam in the past and a 
tfcsrd said they either suffered from it 
®®w _or m the previous 12 months. 
Sli ghtly more t ha n one in ten «a»d they 
suffered from it all or most of the faw 
Sncty per cent of those who had suf- 
fered bade pain had sought treatment 
fro m , th e health service but nearly a 
quarter of those were dissatisfied with 


more emphasis must be put on 
prevention at work. Thirty per cent of 
men said their back pain started after 
an accident, 26 per cent saying it was 
due to the nature of their work, and 23 
per cent b laming lifting and carrying. 
Among women, 28 per cent blamed the 
start of their trouble on pregnancy or 
gynaecological problems. 


Food poisoning up by 45% 


Th e number of reported 
cases of food poisoning rose 
by 45 per cent between 1982 
and 1984, Dr Donald Acb- 
eson, the Government's chief 
medical officer, says today in 
Ms annual report on the state 
of the public health. 

The increase from 13,576 
cases in 1982 to 19,744 m 
1984 may be due in part to 
^ increased ' laboratory in- 
vestigations and to better 
reporting. Eh- Acbeson said. 
But the rise in laboratory 
reports matches the rise in 
fonnal notifications suggest- 
ing that at least pan of the in- 
crease was real. 

The report period covers 
the Stanley Royd hospital 
outbreak ai Wakefield in 
which 19 patients died and 
more than 460 patients and 
staff became ill But there 


was a decrease of more than 
half in the number of 
hospital outbreaks between 
1979 and 1983. 

The report says that the 
need to cut smoking among 
teenagers is one of the most 
urgent problems that health 
ministers face. 

Smoking among adults is 
continuing to decline, al- 
though at a slower rate than 
in previous years. But “fig- 
ures show that about a third 
of young people are smoking 
regularly when they are 19. 
Studies to throw light on the 
influences that start young 
people smoking, and to find 
effective ways to discourage 
them, must continue. 

“I have highfighted smok- 
ing because rt is the largest 
avoidable hazard in Britain 
today and causes about 


100,000 deaths a year”, be 
says. 

The report records that the 
number of people dying from 
heart disease in England and 
Wales is the third highest in 
the EEC and Scandinavian 
countries. 

• The Consumers' Associ- 
ation yesterday joined the 
campaign to end Crown 
Immunity for hospital kitch- 
ens. It is supporting the 
private member's Bill tabled 
by Mr Richard Shepherd, 
Conservative MP for 
Aldridge-Brownhfils, which 
would allow Grown property 
to be inspected and pros- 
ecuted for breaches of hy- 
giene regulations. 

On the State of the Public 
Health 1984 (Stationery Office; 
£7.30). 



on 

car import deals 

By Clifford Webb Motoring Correspondent 


An increasing, number of 
motorists trying to bay cheap 
.new cars on the Continent 
'are being “ripped off* by 
import agents and. some have, 
paid thousands ofpounds for 
a car they ' rieva- jpL the 
- Consumers Association said - 

yesterday^ ,..V7 - 

It called oq impart .compa- 
nies to. foirm ii .trade associ- 
ation wnhpowere-topolkea 
code of cohduct drawrt up 
with the guidance .of the. 
Office of Fair Tradmgr 

The association has been 
one of the most outspoken 
advocates of so-called "grey 
imports"’ to' force car manu- 
facturers to reduce , unjustifi- 
ably high car prices in 
Britain. Since 1980. an es- 
timated 200.000 cars have 
been imported in that way. 

But the association's 
Which? magazine repotted 
yesterday that 39 motorists 
had written recently 
complaining of the methods 
used by import companies. 

They include a motorist 
who was asked to pay an 
extra £315 for a 
manufacturer's nonexistent 
price increase and. a woman 
who paid £4.393 and then 
lost every penny when the 
company went into voluntary 
liquidation. In alL its cus- 
tomers had paid £200.000 for 
cars they never received. 

Another motorist paid 
£4.000 and waited in vain for 
14 months for an MG Metro. 
Finally, he received a de- 
mand for an additional. £290 


because of a change in the 
manufacturer's specification. 

Among companies named 
were Trans-Car International 
; of. Perthshire, which went 
into liquidation last February 
Wth- 50 customers waiting for 
cars for which : they bad. paid 
•fUXMXW. and Wejco, of 
. XiverpQot which was forced 
close after a Department 
of .Trade , and- Industry in- 
vestigation into why 200 
customers had paid deposits 
and not received cars. 

‘ Anqther problem spot- 
lighted was the diffidence in 
trim and specifications be- 
tween British and continental 
models of the same make. 

_• The . magazine reported: 
“Besides being illegal this 
can also be dangerous. Don't 
accept a car if you are not 
convinced .that -it meets 
British specification. You'll 
be buying a Jot of trouble.” 

It questioned 51 companies 
involved in car importing. 
- Only 26 replied with details 
of their methods of doing 
business. Between them they 
handle £80 million of 
motorists' money. Which? 
lists them without guidance 
or recommendation. Readers 
are left to make up their own. 
minds from the information 
published. 

Despite the - dangers. 
Which? says ' there are still 
considerable savings to be 
made by ...importing. Most 
import firms have not left 
their customers “high and 
dry”- but choosing a reliable 
one was still not easy. 


‘Torso in the tank’ 
killer loses appeal 


Ernest Clarke, who _ was 
sentenced to life imprison- 
ment for the “torso m a 
tank” murder which was 
highlighted by BBC 
television's Rough Justice 
programme, must stay in jail, 
the Court of Appeal ruled 
yesterday. 

‘ After two days reconsider- 
ing the 'evidence. Lord Justice 
Lawton said it was inconceiv- 
able that the murder could 
hare been committed by 
anyone else. 

Clarice, aged 5a. from Hull, 
and formerly rfAndw®; 
Street. South Shields, was 
convicted - at . Newcastle 
Crown Court in 1 980 for the 
murder of Eikrcn McDou^^ 
aecd 16. whose distncmoCTea 
bc3v was found in a fuel 


storage tank where Clarke 
worked. - 

He has always denied the 
murder and challenged his 
conviction - on the ground 
that the circurnsianiial ev- 
idence involved; made k 
unsafe and unsatisfactory.. 

But the judge said it was 
obvious from ihe un- 
contested foci ibat the killer 
must have known the girL He 
must also have been fit and 
active with a knowledge of 
the site. 

“There can be just one 
conclusion. Nobody else but 
this appellant could have 
committed the murder.” 

Mr Justice Mars-Joncs and 
Mr Justice Michael Davies 
agreed and the appeal was 
dismissed. 


Woman’s 

£26,000 

damages 

A woman who accused the 
police of assaulting her won 
£26.000 damages in the High 
Court , in London yesterday. 

Mrs Loma Lucas, aged 46, 
claimed she was assaulted 
wben police arrested her after 
an incident' in a builder's 
office where she had gone to 
complain- about repair work. 

Mrs Lucas, of Upland 
Road. East Dulwich, south 
London, had sued Sir. 
Kenneth Newman, the 
Metropolitan Police Commis- 
sioner. 

The jury awarded her 
£10.000 for the assault in 
Camberwell in August 1981. 
and £1.000 . for ..false 
imprisonment. 

She was also awarded 
£15.000 exemplary damages 
after the jury found that the 
police lied in court when they 
prosecuted her for assault. 

Art witchhunt 
is alleged 

One of Britain's leading art 
experts yesterday accused the 
National Museum of Wales 
of conducting a “witchhunt” 
after hearing that Dr Peter 
Cannon-Brookes. its keeper 
of aru has been suspended 
while an inquiry is held into 
his department. 

The controversy stems 
from the purchase by the 
museum of four tapestry 
cartoons. The History of 
Aeneas, said to be by Rubens 
but variously described as 
rubbish or a major discovery. 
The “witchhunt" allegation 
was made by Professor Mi- 
chael Jasse. director of the 
FiizWilliam Museum. Cam- 
bridge. and a Rubens author- 
ity. 

Complaint by 
Gillick upheld 

The Broadcasting Com- 
plaints Commission has up- 
held pan of a complaint 
against the BBC programme 
Taking Sides by Mrs Victoria 
Gillick. who campaigned un- 
successfully to make illegal 
without parental consent the 
prescription of contraceptives 
to' girls aged under 16. 

The commission consid- 
ered that -the description of 
the programme given to Mrs 
Gillick before the broadcast 
on November 29. 1984, did 
not adequately describe its 
aim. 


Legislation sought oil wine 


The Government sMfM 
legislate on how 

voluntary 5 

the trade 

working* 2C?* 

Association says today. 

After 

grr sTr 

Which? magazu* *®3«- 
The code recOTjnen** 
Hat quantities. sb«**J* 

gjron with prices, that glasses 


should conform to sizes listed 
in the Weights and Measures 
Act, and that no establish- 
ment should sell wine hy the 
glass in more titan two 
measures. , 

A survey conducted sbimy 
after the code was mtrodneed 
showed “only a tiny Propo^ 
tion of premises followipg. fts 
ipatn provisions, and the vast 
gj^ority of bar and res- 
. tgnrant staff unaware even of 
its provisions". 

jhe expected considerable 
improvement.- has not 
Joa tmialised and a second 


survey late last year showed 
only a tiny improvement the 
magazine said. 

4 Fewer than one in seven 
premises compfied with the 
code, fewer than one in six 
displayed both quantity and 
price, and in almost half the 
premises staff were still not 
aware of (he code. 

Taxation is strangling the 
.fortified wine trade in Britain 
and sales slumped hy almost 
a fifth last year, equivalent to 
30 million bottles, the in- 
dustry says. 


J . 



The Princess of Wales and Miss Sarah Ferguson, a friend of Prince Andrew, paying an unexpected visit to the Prince's 
ship, HMS Brazen, in the Pool of London yesterday. The frigate docked on Tuesday for a four-day stay, 


Man tells 
of finding 
stab victim 

A student who tried to help 
Mrs Carol Martin after she 
was fatally stabbed more than 
50 times told yesterday of his 
horror when he found her. 

Stuart Hopkins, aged 19. 
said there was nothing he 
could do medically to assist 
Mrs Martin, aged 38 and the 
mother of two children. 

Mr Hopkins, of Rush 
Lane. Churchill. Redditch. 
Hereford and Worcester, said 
he cradled Mrs Martin's head 
and tried to comfort her as 
she tried unsuccessfully to 
tell him something. 

He found Mrs Martin, an 
accountant's wife, dying on 
tiie eighth floor of a car park 
on Monday in Redditch. 

Mr Hopkins said: “1 felt 
sickened to see the way she 
was. 


Two police bitten 
by ‘Aids’ man 


Two police officers were 
ordered off duty yesterday 
after being bitten by a man 
dahning to have Aids. 

Greater Manchester Police 
said the officers, one aged 30 
and the other aged 26, and 
both with two children, were 
i n volved in a disturbance in 
the dty last night. 

Tests on the mm who bit 
them were being carried out 
yesterday. 

The police said appropriate 
treatment would be organized 
for the officers, who lave not 

narntnl 

A police spokesman said 
the officers, both from north 
Manchester, went to Whitley 
Road, CoDyhnrst, at just 
before midnight when they 
woe involved in a struggle 
with one of two men. 

Both men were arrested 


and one told them he had 
Aids. 

The spokesman added that 
a man lad been charged with 
being drunk and disorderly 
and two counts of assault and 
had appeared before Man- 
chester City magistrates ear- 
lier yesterday. 

• Britain's first main con- 
ference on Aids wiD be haM 
in Newcastle upon Tyne next 

Up to 450 delegates, 
representing doctors, muses, 
dentists and social workers, 
will attend the three-day 
event at Newcastle Civic 
Centre from Tuesday. 

The conference has been 
organized by Dr Peter Jones, 
director of the Northern 
Region Haemophilia Service 
based at Newcastle's Royal 
Victoria Infirmary. 


Girl hit by 
ruler fails 
in claim 


A schoolgirl who suffered 
permanent damage to an eye 
when a boy in her class 
struck her with a ruler was 
not entitled to damages 
against the education author- 
ity. a judge held in the High 
Court yesterday. 

But Deputy Judge 
Tiiheridge.QC. said that he 
would have awarded Kelly 
Bonneu, aged 12. of Bury St 
Edmunds. Suffolk. £15.000 if 
negligence had been proven. 
He said the girl, a pupil at 
Hardwick Middle School, 
was sitting on a cupboard 
swinging her legs when a boy. 
aged nine, ran into the room, 
tripped over her legs and fell. 
He then picked up a ruler 
and struck her. 


Sugar men 
take a 
sour line 
on apples 

By Thomson Prentice 

Saence Correspondent 

Ad apple a day won't keep 
tire dentist away and may do 
more barm to teeth than a 
bar of chocolate, acc ordin g to 
a new message being aimed at 
schoolchildren by the sugar 
industry. 

But the advice was s tron gly 
attacked by the Health 
Education Council as a 
“deliberate attempt to 
mislead" yesterday, with 
leading dentists joining the 
criticisms. 

A video film which is being 
sent to 2 00 health education- 
alists and being advertised in 
more than 6,000 secondary 
schools claims that sugar is 
not the main cause of tooth 
decay. 

The film has been pro d uc e d 
by the Sugar Bureau, which 
represents the indust r y in 
Britain, and features a 
consultant denial surgeon at 
Bristol University, Mr Mar- 
shall Mid da. 

Mr Midda believes that 
giving up sugar is an un- 
realistic measure in avoiding 
tooth decay as it is only one 
of a range of foods which 
feeds bacteria. Potato crisps, 
water biscuits, and even 
apples can do as much if not 
more barm, he says. 

The film has been produced 
to counter some of the 
nressages from campaigning 
groups such as the Health 
Edncation CouncB. 

The British Dental Associ- 
ation said yesterday it would 
be writing to local health and 
education authorities advising 
them not to show the film to 

schoolchildren. 

Mr Tom Dowell, chairman 
of its denial health and 
science committee, said: “The 
film is grossly £jhJ 

a deliberate attempt to 
minimis e the dangers done to 
teeth by sugar. 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


More privatization 


Foreign affairs 


Housing 


Authorities to go private 


WATER 


Proposals Tor ihc 
pmaiiuiion of the ion water 
authorities in England and 
Wales were announced in the 
Commons b> Mr Kenneth 
Baker. Sccrciar> of Stale for 
En v iron men l. following 
puhlicationof the White Paper 
f’nrjti.wr/oii hi tin- ll'tiftT 
. Inihunius i/i Mig/utieJ tind 
IVuUs by the DOE. the Welsh 
Office and the Ministry of 
Agriculture. Fisheries and 
Food. The While Paper sci oul 
the reasons for the 
government's decision to 
privatise the industry and the 
basis for its proposed legisla- 
tion. 

In his statement to MPs. Mr 
Baker said: On February 7. 

1 5. Mr lan Gow. then 

Minister for Housing and 
Construction at the DOE. 
announced that the govern- 
ment would examine the pros- 
pects for privatisation in ihc 
water industry. A discussion 
paper followed last April. 

In the lighi of the responses, 
and of professional advice 
nnthc financial issues, the 
government has now decided 
to transfer the ten water 
authorities in England and 
Wales to private ownership. 
Already 25 per cent of water is 
supplied by private sector 
water companies. 

We have also today 
(Wednesday 1 presented to Par- 
liament a White Paper setting 
out our proposals. Legislation 
will be necessary, and we shall 


into account a report published 
today (Wednesday! From 
Professor Litilechild of Bir- 
mingham University. Under 
the Director General, there will 
also be a strong machinery for 
representing consumer interests 
and investigating complaints. 

Water authorities are respon- 
sible in England and Wales for 
iniplemeniing national policy 
on the water environment. 
Necessary existing safeguards, 
including appeals against water 
authority divisions on dis- 
charges and government con- 
trols on the authorities' own 
discharges, will continue. 

We shall strengthen the 
system of pollution control in 
two main ways. First, we shall 
legislate to make their river 
quality objectives subject to 
ministerial approval. 

Second, we shall provide for 
any new requirements lo be 
laid down through a par- 
liamentary procedure. 

In this way the wem on) wc 
will use the opportunity of 
privatisation to improve 
environmental standards on a 
continuing basis. 

He said that over the past 
seven years considerable 
progress had been made in 
improv ing the management 
efficiency of water authorities. 
Their operating costs had been 
reduced in real terms, even 
while the demand for their 
services had been growing. 
Manpower had been reduced 


denis to the Government's 
consultation paper were in 
favour of selling off the water 
authorities. The proposals 
could lead to a massive 
increase in chaises, or denial of 
access altogether, for anglers, 
water sports enthusiasts and 
others engaged in leisure pur- 
suits. 

Will they haw the right to 

disconnect people from the 
water supply? And hew can 
privatisation guarantee the 
hundreds of millions of pounds 
or urgent and essential invest- 
ment that is required? 

Mr Baker replied that he 
understood the Labour Party 
was now adding water to its 
long list of facilities they would 
return to public ownership. 
Other countries already had 
substantial pans of the water 
supply owned privately. For 
instance in France. 65 per cent 
of the population received 
water from private companies 
and in the United States 40 per 
cent of utilities were publicly 
owned. 

He said the level of invest- 
ment was rising and would 
exceed £1 billion for the first 
lime in 1986/7. The high 


id mind that these were not 
nationalised resources but in 
many cases ones paid for by 

local ratepayers. What 
compensation would local rate- ! 
payers receive for the 
nationalisation and then the j 
de-nationalisation of resources 
for which they paid not ihe 
Slate? 

Mr Baker; the assets of 
predecessor bodies were vested 


Direct stake for 
water workers 
and consumers 


Israel of airliner 
is condemned 


<’"yjl»U 


U* 1 




WALES 


Privatisation of tbe Welsh 


in the water authorities by tbe j water Authority would enable 
Water Art 1973. Water amhon- h. 


waters tv /a. water amnw- CTpk>yecs ^ customers hi 
aes are public bodies whose to have a direct stake in 

members are aPPomted by the industry for the fim time. 


Govern mem. For that reason 


Nicholas Edwards, See- 


the proceeds Win be paid to tbe of StaM for wales, said 


Exchequer. 


Commons 


in the public sector and 
democratically controBed. 

Private water companies do 
exist, strictly regulated and 
controlled, but tbe fact is that 
water should not be snlyeci to 
tbe vagaries of tbe marketplace 
which these proposals envisage- 

Tbe Welsh Water Authority 
and its chairman are opposed 
to privatisation. They befieve it 
would be cumbersomely 


MIDDLE EAST 


Mr Rabat Brown (Newcastle j announcing the privatisation of administered. Rural areas will 


upon Tyne North, Lab) said 
that after spending something 


tike £400 million the River 
Tyne was now almost dean 


the Welsh Water Authority. 

He said during consultations 
the Welsh Water Authority had 
urged that tbe present inte- 


could the minister give tbe rivCT baan management 

should continue if the industry 


quality and purity of drinking 
water would be maintained- In 
no way would the present 
regime of water standards be 
weakened, he added. Indeed in 
several respects it would be 
strengthened, ic. for standards 
of effluence. Privatisation 


b> 20 per cent. The number of would not effect the powers to 
board appointments had been cut off water supplies. 



were to be privatised. The 
Government bad agreed with 
this and the authority would be 
privatised with its existing 
boundaries and functions in- 
tact, with the exception of the 
and finana 


coordination and 


certainly suffer because the 
Welsh Water Authority pro- 
vides jobs in these areas, many 
of them heavily blighted as a 
result of economic conditions. 

Charges could certainly es- 
calate in rural areas as a result 
of these proposals. The trade . 
unions in the water industry : 
are opposed. They are not 
seduced by promises of 
shareholding as they a p pr ec ia te 


The interception of an exec- 
utive jet from Tripoli by Israeli 
aircraft was condemned in the 
Commons by Sir Geoflrey 
Howe. Secretary of Stare for 
Foreign and Commonwealih 
Affairs. There was no evidence 
that terrorists were on board 
the jet or that any threat was 
posed to Israeli security. Tbe 
interception was without jus- 
tification and appeared to 
contravene international law. 
Such acts could only endanger 
the lives of innocent people. 


He was replying to Mr David 
Heatbcoat-Amary (Wells, C) 
who said although Libya had a 
gangster regime that did not 



r timrinpHam; Gan 

mth nation’s 


put the water authorities on the 
market as soon as possible 
thereafter. 

Our privatisation pro- 
gramme already covers a wide 
range of businesses. But 
transfern ng water to the pri- 
vate sector will offer unique 
opportunities and challenges. 
The water authorities arc not 
merely suppliers of goods and 
sen ices. They arc managers of 
natural resources. They safe- 

f uard the quality of our rivers. 

hey control water pollution. 
They have important 
responsibilities for fisheries, 
conservation, recreation and 
navigation. These functions are 
interdependent and insepa- 
rable. 

We will maintain the prin- 
ciple of integrated river basin 
management and wc will main- 
tain existing boundaries. The 
water authorities will be 
privatised with all their existing 
responsibilities but for the one 
exception of man drainage and 
flood protection. Financing and 
coordination of that function 
will remain a public sector 
responsibility. 

The authorities arc largely 
natural monopolies. The public 
will, rightly, expect us to set up 
a firm regulatory framework. 
Wc will appoint a Director 
General for Water Services. He 
will control the authorities 
through an operating licence. 
This will lay down strict 
conditions on pricing and on 
service standards. 

Thc system of promoting the 
interests of consumers will take 


reduced even more dramati- 
cally - from 313 to 123. 

In 1979 their investment was 
falling: in real terms it was now 
aboic its 1979 level and was 
rising. In the last six years the 
government had made the 
water authorities fit and ready 
to join the private sector, and 
as reported to the Public 
Accounts Committee of the 
Commons, the quality of water 
services has been improving in 
almost all regions. 

He declared: privatisation is 
the next logical step. It will 
bring benefits lo customers, to 
the industry itself and to the 
nation as a whole in improved 
quality, more efficient service, 
greater commitment of the staff 
to the work they are doing and 
greater awareness of customer 
preference. 

With (he disciplines and 
freedom of the private sector I 
expect the industry' to move 
from strength to strength. I 
know these proposals will be 
welcomed. 

DrJohn Cunningham, chief 
Opposition spokesman on 
environment said the Govern- 
ment was gambling with the 
nation's health and well being. 

These arc appalling proposals 
the said) from a desperate 
government. They are another 
example of the pawn shop 
politics of the Prime Minister. 

In common with the. British 
people wc believe that water 
resources are national assets 
which should be in public 
ownership and control and a 
Labour government would act 
accordingly. 

He asked how there could be 
any justification for the govern- 
ment selling o(T what was the 
nation '5 most fundamental na- 
tional resource on which 
people's very existence de- 
pended? There was already 
concern about ihc purity of the 
water supply with 25 per cent 
of water exempt from the 
purification standards set out 
by the EEC. 

These proposals cannot do 
other (he said) than create 
private monopolies. How can 
the government plan to sell off 
the £27 billion of assets that 
they do not own and for which 
they have never compensated 
local authorities or the rate- 
payers? 

He said only seven respon- 


MrCharles Morrison (Devizes, 
O said the statement was very 
welcome not least because U 
would release the provision 
and organisation of water from 
the restrictions imposed by the 
public service borrowing 
requirement. Mr Baker was 
also to be congratulated on 
deciding to maintain tbe inte- 
grated river basin management 
Taking account of the met that 
each river authority had dif- 
ferent needs would tbe pricing 
control be organised on a 
regional rather than a national 
basis? 

Mr Baker said that on the 
last point Mr Morrison should 
look at the report from 
Professor UukchikL 1 agree 
completely (he continued) and 
so do the various representa- 
tions that we have received 
that the water authorities 
should be privatised on a river 
basin authority leveL The 
authorities have worked and 
operated very well on a river 
basin basis since 1973. It would 
be our intention to do that. It 
will most certainly improve 
customer services. 

Mr Eik Heifer (Liverpool, 
Walton, Lab) said Mr Baker 
had not put up a case for water 
privatisation. It was dear that 
the government was prepared 
to put profits before the 
interests of the British people. 

Is it not time (he went on) 
that they stopped this 
privatisation of everything they 
see because the way they are 
going on we shall end up in 
this country by having to pay 
for the air that we breathe. 

Mr Baker said that one of 
the main advantages of seeking 
private capital was that in 
future water authorities would 
not have to compete with all 
the other demands on the 
public purse for capitaL That 
was the trade-off which went 
on. There was no reason why 
the capital requirements of 
water authorities should not go 
in future to the public sector. 
The most important invest- 
ment programme in Mr 
Heffer’s area was the Mersey 
Basin initiative. It was going to 
come to something over £4 
billion over the next twenty 
years and that programme 
would continue to go ahead. 

Mr Robin MaxweB-Hyslop 
(Tiverton, Q asked him to bear 


Morrison: Restrictions 
wiD be removed 
people of Northumbria any 
guarantee that water prices 
would not shoot up? On all the 
evidence of past privatisation it 
pushed up prices. 

Mr Baker said that on the 
level of water prices after 
privatisation it was clear that 
there would have to be a 
regulatory regime. Some water 
authority chairmen believe that 
following privatisation there 
would be a reduction in prices. 

Mr Richard Alexander i 
(Newark, C) expressed the hope 
that the dead hand of the 
Treasury would be out of 
taxpayers* bills in future. 

Mr Balter said that discuss- 
ing five yens ago the advan- 
tages of privatising Cable & 
Wireless he said it would 
relieve pressure on public 
resources by going to the 
private sector. 

Mr Simon Hughes (South- 
wark and Bermondsey, Lib) 
said that instead of putting 
water authorities back where 
they belonged, under demo- 
cratic control this would be 


floods defence and land drain- 
age. 

The privatised Welsh water 
company would operate under 
a licence from the new director 
general of waxer services who 
would lay down strict con- 
ditions on pricing and service 
standards The director general 
would appoint a regional con- 
sumer committee representing 
all consumer interests and in 
Wales this committee would be 
assisted by divisional commit- 
tees. 

The regulatory regime would 
provide general powers for tbe 
; supply of water in bulk 
between undertakings. The 
right of appeal would remain 
when water undertakers were 
unable to agree terms for such 
transfers, but this would be to 
the director general, rather than 
to the Secretary of State. 

In determining appeals be 
would apply the same general 
principles as applied to other 
aspects of charging policy in 
that charges should be cost 
related and should not be 
discriminatory. 

Considerable progress has 
been made since the authority 
was reorganised in 1982, be 
said. Services and Hfiriency 


ing of tbe puny percentage that went 


justify Israel's air piracy and 
fighting terror with terror 
would only escalate lawlessness 
in the area and encourage 
extremists on both sides. 

Dr David Owen, Leader of 
the SDP: What the Foreign 
Secretary bas said is in strong 
contrast with the support of the 
British government for tbe 
American action over the 
Egyptian airliner. 

If international law is to be 
upheld, and freedom of tbe 
airways, h is not for member 
stales to determine whether or 
not aircraft has terrorists on 
board and there has to be no 
intervention. He should apply 
even-handedly his view of 
upholding international law. 

Sfr Geoffrey Howe: There 
was a distinction between the 
two cases. Regarding the action 
against the Egyptian jet. it was 
relevant to take account of the 
international convention on 


to employees of British 
Telecom. They have concent 
too about the pension rights. 
They bear in mind the experi- 
ence of busmen recently as a 
result of transport legislation. 
They appreciate the difficulties 
which are affecting workers in 
tbe gas industry on this very 
same issue. 

The Welsh Water Authority 
has also experienced many 
turbulence and expensive re- 
organisation schemes. The gov- 
ernment has changed the 
method of accounting for the 
water industry. It has forced 
charges up yet restricted 
borrowing and in vestment All 
these measures have sent prices 
rocketing. It is the consumers 
who have to pay. The govern- i 
mem has prepared the ground- ; 
work for privatisation. These 
proposals are yet another 
example of selling the assets of 
tbe nation to fill the coffers of 
tbe Treasury in order to try to 
bribe the electorate to secure a 
Tory victory at the next 
General Election. 

It is estimated that the safe 
of water assets throughout the 
country could raise b etw e en £3 
and 5 billion. This is more 
than flotation of BT. The 


hijacking ami hostage taking. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe answering 
a later question said: The visit 
of the Israeli prime minister 
last month as the guest of the 
government demonstrated the 
dose links between the United 
Kingdom and Israel. 

Gur talks with him were 
friendly and constructive. The 
Prime Munster, accepted an 
invitation to visit land later 
this year. 

Mr Timothy Yeo (Suffolk 
South, CY Israel couki do more 
to help tbe peace making 
process if it refrained from 
forcing down aircraft and 
abandoned its policy of 
establishing settlements in tbe 
Arab-dom mated territory on 
the west bank. 

Sir Geoffrey Hem: I agree 
with both points. It is essential 
that both sides should refrain 
from action of violence or 
threat of violence. We have 
repeatedly made it dear to 
Israel that their resettlement 
policy is illegal and is an 
obstacle to peace. 

Mr Ian Mikardo (Bow and 
Poplar. Lab): Everybody who 
met Mr Shimon Peres and 
listened to him during his visit 
was deeply impressed by bis 
manifestly passionate desire to 
further the peace process at 
whatever cost, including the 
fact that he bas put a stop to 
any further settlements on the 
west bank. 

Will the government exercise 
whatever influence they can to 


help in that objective? 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: It is clear 
from tbe nature of the dis- 
cussions we have had that Mr 
Peres is anxious to promote the 
peace process. 


II i 


Government cash for 


urban regeneration 


bad been greatly improved and Secretary of Slate for Wales is 


■■■■■■■■■HMmwHBmmaBm under the right to buy pro- 

visions would not encourage 
HOUSING people to buy flats because they 

did not want to live in flats. 

The Housing and Planning Mr-MctaiJ Un< * r 

ill which aim* to tackle the Secretary of State for the 


„-,rt ru*)) i 
3 kil 

.,1'fjxf 1 i w 


seen as yet another example of | 
government syphoning off na- 


govemraent syphoning off na- 
tional assets in order to keep 
themselves and their wretched 
economic policies afloat. What 
advantages would there be in 
efficiency, in competition or to 
the consumer? 

Mr Baker said there would 
be no damage to the environ- 
ment and on tbe question of 
consumer protection the gov- 
ernment envisage statutory 
consumer committees. 


undertaken. 

I believe that privatisation 
(be added) will enable them to 
get on with their job with 
greater freedom and without 
the constraints on **^*"*^"8 
which public ownership im- 
poses. Customers will benefit 
from tbe improving service 
that will result. 

Mr Roy Hughes, an oppo- 
sition spokesman on Wales: I 
am profoundly concerned 
about tbe proposals you have 


exercise. Once again be is 
selling Wales short. On this 
side of tbe House we shall 


oppose these proposals through 
all the avenues open to us. 


Bill, which aims to tackle the 
problems of inner cities and to 
give government money for the 
regeneration of urban areas. 


EnvjronmcnL winding up the 
debate, said that since 1979 
over 900.000 council houses 


was read a second time without 5®* *»d been sold under 


all the avenues open to us. 

Mr Edwards: 1 am sure he 
will oppose these proposals just 
as he has opposed almost every 
constructive proposal in tbe 
House in my time. He said tbe 
proper place was in the public • 
sector but he didn't substan- > 
tiale that statement He admit- ; 
ted a large number of water I 


a division in the Commons on 
Tuesday night. 

This followed the refection 
by 290 votes to 213 - a 


the right to buy scheme and 
similar provisions, mostly to 
silting tenants. But the Bill did 
not mean that the Government 


Government majority"of 77. of ■* neglecting tenants who 
an Opposition amendment 5 °uld no1 or d,d no1 w,sh 10 


put forward in respect of authorities worked perfectly 
Wales. Water is a basic well in the private sector and 


amenity and one does not need 
to be a political extremist to 
believe that its proper place is 


exist in a strict regime of 
regulation and control, and the 
same is true in other countries 


Welcome for Botha speech 


declining to give the Bill a 
second reading on the grounds 
that it encouraged the eviction 
of council tenants so that their 
homes could be redeveloped 
and sold. 

Labour MPs said private 
developers would benefit at the 
expense of tenants. 

The amendment also staled 


buy. 

In the Bill the Government 
w as taking the opportunity to 
mobilize the private sector 
further in the attack on urban 
dereliction. • ■ 

Earlier. Mrjvllan Roberts 
(Bootle. Lab) said the Bill did 
nothing to deal with the real 
problem, of a massive shortage 


that the Bill foiled to provide of resources to build 
any hew resources to deal with moder nise and improve 
the massive problems of urban houses, especially m the inne- 
dccay. ciucs. 

Mr tnhn fw«. Mr.John Heddle .(Mid 

an „ 0p ff > : Staffordshire) said the Gov- 


SOUTH AFRICA 


welcomed tbe positive aspects 
of tbe President’s speech. 


Mr Nicholas Wlnterton, 
While the British Government (Macclesfield O said that in 


welcomed the commitment the light of the speech the 
identified by President Botha Council of Ministers of the 
of South Africa in his recent EEC should now rive full 


in his recent 


now give 


speech, the important thing encouragement to a govern- 
was to ensure that the mea- mem pledged to remove apart- 


sures were being implemented heid from South Africa, 
and earned forward at a pace particularly in the fight of the 


which carried conviction in refrains announced by Presi- 
South Africa, Sir Geoffrey dent Botha in respect of 


Howe, Secretary of State for education and property rights 
Foreign and Commonwealth and the government's 


rorogn ana commonwealth and the governments 
Affairs, told the Commons determination to involve 


during questions. 


population groups in tbe gov- 


He said the Government eminent of the Republic. 


Sir Geoffrey Howe, also 
stressed the importance of 
doing everything possible to 
open the way to dialogue 
between the South African 
government and repre- 
sentatives of the African people 
there. 

Mr Denis Healey, Chief 
Opposition spokesman for For- 
eign and Commonwealth Af- 
fairs We on this side of the 
House share the disappoint- i 
ment of the Foreign Secretary 
at tbe failure of Mr Botha in 
his recent speech to offer any 
increase in political power to 
the great Mock majority in 
South Africa. 


spokesman 


A a;n cm men i should require local 

authorities lO give FCOSOnS Whv 

with >S thr houscs in »hcir areas remained 

cities and in housing after a * L ® 


™ of rini on ^ siting lists Should 

mUrder - WUh be given a rent free period in 


streets ablaze. 

The greatest affliction was a 


those empty properties in 
mum for doing them up at 


shortage of rented accommoda- their own expense. 


tion so there should be com- 
mon agreement about right to 


Mr-Eric HefTer (Liverpool 
Walton -Lab) said Liverpool 


rent There should be some- councillors had begun to tackle 
thing m the Bill on repair and the problems of housing and 


improvement grants which 
could contribute so greatly to 
preserving inner city terraces. 


had built homes to rent. This 
helped people get out of 
terrible accommodation and 


The proposal to increase gave youngsters a chance to 
discount on flats by 10 per cent move into new homes. 


Crisis in residential care 


Cuts affect aged and disabled 


By Nicholas Timmins 
Social Services 
Correspondent 


Residential care For 
Britain's 120,000 elderly and 
disabled people who live in 
private and voluntary homes 
has been plunged into a crisis 
that threatens to get worse, 
the National Council for 
Voluntary Organizations said 
yesterday. 

Cuts in the maximum 
supplementary benefit system 
to pay for care in a home, in- 
troduced last April have led 
to homes closing, standards 
of care falling, some people 
feeing eviction and to "gross 
anomalies” in the system that 
unfairly discriminate against 
many people who are least 
able to help themselves. 

The changes, the report 
says, have brought chaos to 
the private and voluntary 
homes sector. The council 
said the findings of its study, 
launched when criticism over 
the changes in funding was 
beginning to mount, "exceed 
our worst fears”. 

The new limits set a 
maximum of £120 a week for 
residential care for tbe el- 


derly. But many homes need 
between £130 and £180 a 
week to provide decent care 
for each residenL 

The result has been some 
residents accumulating large 
debts to homes leaving rel- 
atives. often themselves 
poorly off, having to find up 
to £20 a week to help to meet 
the fees- 

Not only the frail and 
elderly are feeling the impact 
of the changes, the report 
says. Younger people with 
disabilities are also affected, 
and people with mental 
illness or mental handicap 
are finding it more difficult 
to get the residential care 
they need. 

The effects are, therefore, 
running counter to the 
Government's policy of care 
in tiie community. 

The cuts in the maximum 


benefit payable came after a 
steep rise from £39 million in 
1982 to nearly £200 million 


in 1984 in the amount paid in 
supplementary benefit for 
places in private and vol- 
untary homes. That increase 
came when local DHSS 
offices set local ceilings to the 
level of fees they would meet 


based on the highest reason- 
able charge in the areas for 
(hat type of home. 

That policy gave a green 
light to people wishing to run 
private homes whose num- 
bers practically doubled be- 
tween 1979 and 1984. Some 
home owners realized they 
could push the charges up to 
the (oral limit and still have 
them met. Individuals and 
their relatives began to re- 
alize that the social security 
system would pay and both 
local authorities and health 
authorities, hard pressed for 
funds, began encouraging 
people to go to private and 
voluntary homes as it trans- 
ferred spending from their 
budgets to the serial security 
system. 

“The benefit system 
opened the door to residen- 
tial care for lens of thousands 
of people. But since last 
April when the changes were 
introduced, that door has 
been slammed shut in their 
feces”, tbe national council 
said. 

The new system has pro- 
duced “major anomalies” the 
report rays. People in homes 
who develop disabilities after 


retirement age are getting less 
money than young people 
suffering the same handicaps. 
Younger people with mul- 
tiple handicaps often find 
their extra allowance inad- 
equate. 

The report recommends 
that in the long run the 
present system should be 
scrapped. Tbe level of fees 
should be set by local 
authorities to reflect the care 
and facilities each individual 
home provides, and the 
social security system should 
then meet that bill in full 


In tbe short term benefit 
limits should be raised, 
regional variations in- 
troduced, some of the main 
anomalies should be ironed 
out and “topping up” of the 
existing fees by’ local authori- 
ties should be made man- 
datory. Health authorities. 



Religion 
‘mistaken 
for mania 9 


Mr John Haray and Mrs NoeUe Derritt, of the British Museum, handling one of the 20 
sculptures m the Hainan Touch Exhibition, opening today (Photograph: Peter Trievaor). 


too, should have to top up 
the supplementary benefit 
payments when necessary if 
they place an individual in a 
nursing home. 


Peace man loses tax appeal 


Without such steps, the 
report says, “the crisis will 
deepen unless the Govern- 
ment acts now” 


Mr Edward Stanton, a 
peace campaigner, yesterday 
lost the latest round in his 
legal fight to stop his taxes 
being spent on nuclear weap- 
ons. 


A Court of Appeal judge 
refused to grant Mr Stanton 


leave to appeal against a 
ruling last November by a 
judge at Kendal Comity 
Court, Cambria, that be most 
pay a £490 tax bflL 
Mr Stanto n , aged 48, a 
contract gardener, of Smithy 
Cottage, Wrtbersiack, Cum- 


bria, who presented Us own 
case, argued that tbe county 
court ted dismissed tus 
arguments without consid- 
ering what be ted to say. 

Bat Lord Justice Nkholls 
told turn Us appeal would not 
succeed . 


More black people than 
whites are wrongly diagnosed 
as mentally ill according to 
MIND, the mental health 
charity. 

Often, their deep religion 
or “cheeky attitude” towards 
authority is mistaken by 
psychiatrists as mental ill- 
ness, Mr Larry Ward, the 
charity’s development officer, 
said. 

Tbe chairman of a team 
looking into problems faced 
by ethnic minorities was 
committed as mentally ill 
after being arrested because 
be said he talked to God. 

“There is a strong feeling 
that Afro-Garibbean people 
are misdiagnosed”, Mr Ward 
said. 

“They are mostly seen by 
very middle-class, white En- 
glish psychiatrists who do not 
understand that many Afro- 
Caribbean people, particu- 
larly Rastafarians, are deeply 
religious people.” 

In a policy paper. Mental 
Health Services in a Multi- 
Racial Society : MIND calls 
on the Government to pay 
more attention to the mental 
health needs of ethnic minor- 
ities. 


--Hon 






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THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


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Election campaign: The Philippines 


ttV.-Vvr- 


¥\r-i • - v 




u you want violence, 
violence it is,’ 
Marcos warns voters 


Prajdent Marcos rounded 
off hrs campaign for re- 
elect ion with a rally in a 
downpour, as the bead of the 
Roman Catholic Church in 
Manila appealed to him for a 
clean election. 

Thousands streamed into 


. . — * ™wujtu lUlU 

die city centre during the 
afternoon for the President’s 


- From David Watts, Manila 

. Mrs Aquino had none of 
the organizational or finan- 
cial resources available to 
President Marcos to attract 
her supporters, nor has she 
been able to hand out 
“appearance money”. The 


outpouring of spontaneous 
support for her has been 
impressive. 

Hours before the President 
made his final appeal to the 
people Cardinal Jaime Sin, 
the Archbishop of Manila, 
said that h was in Mr 
Marcos’s hands whether the 
most crucial election in the 
country’s history would leave 
the Philippines “to gnrpe in 
the darkness of a long night” 
or herald a new day. “It will 
be c l e an , Mr President, if yon 
want it to be dean.” 

His statement was the first 
from any Church leader u> 
name President Marcos as 
the most likely to be respon- 
sible for election abuses. 

In their statement last 
week, the bishops of the 
Philippines were careful to 
name neither side, saying 
only that they had not heard 


c , «*»• •IC3H1CIIIS 

final appearance but. al- 
though the Tuling New Soci- 
ety Movement (KBL) 
brought in supporters from 
all over the city and the 
surrounding provinces, there 
was a much smaller turnout 
than that for Mrs Corazon 
Aquino, _ the opposition 
presidential candidate, the 
previous night. 

Hundreds were leaving the 
gathering in Rizal Park even 
before the President began 
speaking. 

After detailing several mi- 
nor incidents be said were 
directed against the KBL, Mr 
Marcos gave the toughest 
warning yet of violence to 
come. “I have asked you to 
join me in the development 
of the country, but if you 
want violence, violence it is.” 

He said the Opposition 
would “reap the KBL 
whirlwind”. 


of any abases by the Aquino 
camp. They added: “It is 
impossible fc 


impossible for that to be the 
case because they have no 


money’, no power and no 
facilities.” 

The Gtizens’ Movement 
for Free Elections has now 
reached agreement with the 
Government on the conduct 
of its independent count of 
the balloting on election day. 
The body has assumed even 
more importance than it did 
in the 1984 legislative elec- 
tions, with President Reagan 

saying that the overall assess* 
ment of the conduct of the 
elections must rest on its 
reports. 

But the citizen's movement 
has been forced into a series 
of compromises which will 
considerably lessen its effec- 
tiveness. 

Mr Joe Concepcion, its 
chairman, has appealed to 
foreign cor r e sp ondents to sta- 
tion themselves in critical 
polling areas so as to assess 
the situation on the spot. In 
Manila alone there are 116 
polling stations where the 
movement considers there is 
a high ride of abuses on 
election day on Friday. 

Meanwhile, the Govern- 
ment has given the armed 
forces virtually unlimited 
powers on election day. 

Ladies* battle, page 12 



Election campaign: France 


Right reels under Barre’s 
refusal to close ranks 


From Diana Geddes 
Paris 


The ext ra ord ina ry body 
Mows being dealt by M 
Raymond Baire to his own 
side at the bright of the 
French election campaign 
have left his fellow opposition 
leaders reeling in amazement 
and anger, while the de- 
lighted Socialists look on, 
hardly daring to believe in 
their good fortune. 



\ 


* 


ing names, of operating a 
“microcosm ic totalitarian ism, 
that is to say a onion where 
everyone has to march in 
step.” 

M Barre's comments have 
prompted President 
Mitterrand to express his 


While continuing to insist 
that he has no intention of 
dividing the right, M Barre, 
Conner Prime Minister under 
President Giscard (TEstaing, 
has Batty turned down the 
latter's invitation to attend a 
public reunion of opposition 
leaders as a demonstration of 
their unify. 



M Raymond Barre: despair 

of the right 


“extreme gratitude” to his 
most dangerous political ri- 
val. while M Laurent Fabius, 
the Prime Minister, talks 
with delight as be goes round 
the country rallying Socialist 
votes, about the impossibility 
of the three waning oppo- 
sition leaders ever forming a 
stable government together. 


my position is not the same 
on other questions which 
appear to me fundamental for 
Onr country. 


His reason is their radical 
diff e rences over the desirabil- 
ity of forming a right-wing 
government under President 
Mitterrand in the event of an 
opposition victory. 


ft*!* 


la a letter to M Giscard 
d'Estaing on Tuesday, M 
Barre explained: “No one is 
more attached to the union of 
foe opposition than L and I 
believe that 1 have never 
failed in that respect. 


“Most of the leaders of the 
opposition parties are pre- 
pared to govern tomorrow 
with Mitterrand in foe event 
of a victory in the elections. I, 
for my part, believe that such 
a cohabitation would be a 
trap. 


Cardinal Sin »«w*wmrmg in Manila yesterday ***** he had 
rejected a request by President Marcos to pray with him. 


“ But in my opinion, sneb a 
union most be based on dear 
and common ground. I have 
marked my overall approval 
for foe John electoral pro- 
gramme of foe opposition, but 


“The same leaders recom- 
mend. from March 1986. a 
reading of the constitution 
which would seriously under- 
mine the presidential function 
and would threaten to bring 
back party rule. 1 am opposed 
to that.” 


Earlier, M Barre caused a 
furore when be accused oppo- 
sition leaders, without nam- 


Meanwhile, the opposition 
leaders themselves, other 
than M Barre, are des- 
perately trying to play down 
the extremely damaging di- 
visions. while at the same 
time refraining From directly 
attacking M Barre, who 
remains foe darling of the 
public opinion polls. 

M Jacques Chirac, foe 
normally pugnacious leader of 
the Ganliist RPR party, said 
simply that he “regretted”, 
Mr Beree's decision not to 
participate in a reunion of 
opposition leaders, but that it 
was not an event of national 
importance. 

Earlier, he tried a gentle 
rebuff when be commented 
that “the people understand a 
diversity which enriches, but 
reject a divisiveness which 
weakens.” 


Talks in Lusaka 
open new front 
against Pretoria 


From Jan Raath, Harare 


The last of the EEC foreign 
ministers who attended talks 
here with their counterparts 
from the southern African 
front-line states were leaving 
Ijgeaka yesterday after a 
distinctly mild outcome to two 
days of intense discussions. 

The representatives of the 
12 EEC countries and of 
Angola. Botswana, Mozam- 
bique, Tanzania, Zambia and 
Zimbabwe issued a joint 
communique at . foe end of 
Tuesday's meeting — foe first 
such- talks, between delega- 
tions from foe two groups — 
which called on South Africa 
to dismantle its apartheid 
system, and urged further 
International pressure, mt the 
Government there. 

A list of five demands was 
contained 1 to the conunaniqiife 
an end to foe stated of 


emergency in ^Sonfo Africa; 
foe retease of Mr* Nelson 
Mandela; -foe recognition rtf 
banned political parties; _foe 
freeing of political prisoners; 
and for Pretoria to open 
negotiations with " the 
country’s Wads: leaders. 

No mention was made in 
the commmnqite of com- 
prehensive economic sanc- 
tions - or support for foe 
organizations fighting the 
Sooth African 'Government 
foe African National Con- 
gress and the Pun African 
Congress. 

Observers agree, however, 
that tin unprecedented meet- 
ing, which was held at foe 
initiative of foe front-line 
states, establishes a new 
forum for international pres- 
sure on South Africa, and 
more open Knes of commu- 
nication for foe front-fine 


states to pnt their views. 

• LONDON: In spite of 
some strong language in foe 
final commnniqnt, British 
were pleased ***** it 
contained agreement on two 
key points — that change in 
Sorth Africa sbonid be 
achieved through dialogue if 
possible rather than armed 
straggle, and that foe 
Commonwealth Group of 
•“Eminent Persons, which is 
doe to embark on its peace 
. missio n later this {north, 
should be supported (Nicho- 
las Ashford writes). 

: Tha mani .concession Brit- 
ain had to make was to agree 
that ft and the European 
Commnmty would consider 
further “restrictive measures” 
against South Africa jf the 
current limited European 
sanctions do. jpt have their 
desired effect . 

Some observers also re- 
garded Britain's decision to 
fare official contact with foe 
ANC for the first time as an 
imjortart gestve- to Hack 
African opinion. However, 
British 1 sources mid the 
importance of the . meeting 


the AN£ was that ft 
ed Britain to explain 



enabled Britain to explain 
why it . wanted a peaceful 
solution of foe South African 
problem and was opposed to 
the armed straggle. 

On his retail to London 
yesterday. Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, die Foreign Secretary, 
defended the meeting with the 
ANC, saying: “This was foe 
right time to take the 
opportunity to get across to 
than foe case against vi- 
olence and of unde rlining to 
them die importance of foe 
Commonwealth initiative 



















Pollution 

theme 


in Prague 


62 nations 
review fate 
of forests 


From Richard Bassett 
Vienna 


From Diana Geddes 


The West German Foreign 
Minister, Herr Hans-Dietnch 
Genscber, began two days ot 
talks yesterday with n» 
Czechoslovak counterpart, 
Mr Bohuslav Chnoupek, 
aimed at increasing coopera- 
tion between the two coun- 
tries in the fig** ag^mst 
pollution. . 

The two ministers are 
meeting at the celebrated 
Czechoslovak spa town or 
Karlovy-Vary, 

Carlsbad, where acid nun has 
destroyed hundreds of trees 

in the last six months. 

Acid rain and other forms 
of pollution have devastated 
forests in West Germany s 
Bavaria and Czechoslovakia s 

"oSfc i«* 

.ES^JSSSjgjg 

m .of 

.ftohmer Wald which hes 

west Gennany nnd 
f^M^sIovakia. A I together 

States beBeve that more 
l flOD hectares of 

S 5 *S?ff •■«,»- 
■«*grs *n 

-saaitsa 


Ten heads of state or 


government, including Herr 
Helmut Kohl the West 
German ' .Chancellor, were 
among representatives of 62. 
countries at the opening by 
President Mitterrand in Paris 
yesterday of a three-day 
conference on trees - and 
forests. 

Countries represented at 
the most senior level were 
Belgium, Buikina Faso, Dji- 
bouti France, Gennany, Hol- 
land. the Irish Republic. 
Niger, Senegal and Somalia. 

■ Britain is represented by 
Mr Timothy Raison, Min- 
ister for Overseas Develop- 
ment. 


How BP 
scotched 
a drink 
problem. 


BP 's Liquid Petroleum Gas is used by a lot of 
distilleries in Scotland because of its cleanliness 
and controllability. However, until recently, all 
transportation of LPG was carried out by road. 


were 
sms 
ling 
spy 1 

Mr ! 
Na- ] 
ad- 

ent r. 

°f £ 

w 9i 

Jen- e , 

and ( 
«*■ 

of 311 

°* JVI 

verc |i 

™ m 
«sre ~ 

rauc i 
ame n in 


IS 


3 be 

rein I* 
J be « 
and Sue 
ence rebi 
itra- J s 
a tit 
used the 
3te’s n pj 
for soul 
ithes of! 
tiers 
the 

x deg 
bca Pl) 

? olA 31 ?" 
tote.' 1 ? 1C ‘ 

h5 0,ve 

ksecr 
ibjy won 


uh3e 


?8 «org 
utecjiif 


And as parts of the route (from Grangemouth 
to Inverness) were almost impassable in winter, 
deliveries of LPG were sometimes held up. So 
the distilleries were given some anxious moments. 
That's why we decided to build a new railhead 
terminal at Inverness. 


Other countries repre- 
sented were Algeria, Austria, 
Benin, Cana da, Cape Verde, 
the Central African Republic, 
Chad, Denmark, Egypt, 
Ethiopia, Finland, Gambia, 
Greece, Guinea, Guinea, Bis-v 
sau, Italy. Ivory Const, -Japan, 
Kenya, Libya, Luxembourg. 
Matu Morocco, Mauritania. 
Norway, Portugal. Siena Le- 
one; Sudan, Spain, Sweden, 
Switzerland, Togo, Tunisia 
and the United Stans. 


discus ^Sfolbhenria 

the safe- 

a*°°8. *L!25*vl in West 


atotg ^fmSwed in West 
guards ^gfoenscher is 

Germany. Here__ r^cho- 
expected to fion in 

Slovakia such as 

SS'S**"*" 


International organizations 
include: the Organization of 
African Unity; the EEC. 
represented by the President 
of the Commission, M .Jac- 
ques Delors; the UN Food 
and Agriculture organization; 
the Inter-state Committee for 
the Fight against Drought in 
the Sahel; and the Inter- 
governmental Authority on 
Drought and Development 


Now up to five railcar tankers, each holding 
17 tonnes of LPG can be off-loaded at any one 
time without any problems. This means that not 
just distillers but also farmers and householders 
are provided with a much better service (and 
should have no more worries about getting 
their whisky on time). At BP, we like to think we 
can get rid of the hard stuff. 


Britain at its best. 



Apr 







Mi 




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J <1? w 


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...•Vi . • 


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Did you know that companies which lag 
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companies which have readily adopted IT? 

That was one of the key findings of a survey 
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For example, we Implemented a financial 
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conducted by A. T. Kearney Ltd. ht 1064, was sponsored by The Institute of Administrative 
Management and The Department of Trade and Industry 


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Papal blessing 
for 20,000 
on hilltop site 
of saint’s death 

Thefts FroBI MWwrf Hamlyn, Madras 
■*** spot on J !^S a 3h» , ^i?? Jwrc as it mates item much 


< W»JH *> liS * P 


THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY d I Oi w 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


^JIvS 


-'f 


¥ . 


Uganda’s torture legacy 

Death shifts down 
the hotel corridor 


wild 


XrfJ«W 


first brought Christianhy 

jolncta «a* doneVS! 

K1 ™^ 

g^urfiood. S? John'de 

: Ihe day he also 

man 2« e d to declare toa 
phdiut "leaders of non- 


gss dependent upon the 
“TOpean conquerors for ihe 
source of thnr re!tgion.Bui 
were is no concrete docu- 
mentary evidence to prove 
cither that St Thomas came, 
or that he was martyred. 

There is, however, what 
Vatican experts are pleased to 
cal! a “pious tradition", and 


M UK Ul leader* rtf ___ T “ UOUJUUI1 . dJIU 

Otiistiap religions the ?* nre » virtually nolh- 
. desirability of that “snim nf ,ns aboul Wdia’s history that 
tolerance, which has^Kaw ^ '™ en - dowtf at 
been pan 0 f th^ t . ,rae ' there is no reason to 

heritage"’/ Indian doubt that h was true either. 


Tlw contradiction passed 
in the course ofhis 
^jwria. dunng which he 
noted L wrth great satisfaction 


doubt that it was true either. 

The first documentary ev- 
idence was said to have come 
in the second century AD 
when Epistles from various i 



* + \Af?' 

; 7‘ ^*1 



From Richard Dowden, Kampala 

Torture and murder permanently in 
continued at the Nile Man- the next floor. C 
sons Hotel after the coup in hear a scream fr 
July last year, according to in that room, 
the staff there. “There was no In the filing 
difference after July.” said reports from i 
Mr Edward Katamba, the going back to IS 
manager, “it was the same a detailed repor 






We preamble to IndSS cSS? 168 we [ e rcfe I red to in a 
Constitution assures frcednm Synac . work, and included 
of thought. eSS,iTbe?S ** i udas J n,on, as 

fanh anH . from Indl^L Bv Ihp oAvf 


WjW and worship, although 
religious intolerance has been 


from India. By the next 
century an apochryphal work 


Castro attacks Cuban bottlenecks 


■ intolerance hac Ivon J . “M"*-" 1 **"*** wur* 

the cause of vast^mteretf P VC k dwa,,ed description of 
intercommuna! deaths in r£ 5?" * e a . me *P senl to In- 
cent years. <*“ after drawing lots among 


■iATTMas 

practise and propaSre Sy J? a ? Church *S I™ 1 ** 
religion", no douta mind fill ? nd - 11 ***«*& joined ihej 

Bf.k.— . ... uiiiiuim Laun mmmiin nn 


of the extreme hostility of the 
Hindu community to Chris- 
tian conversions, and the 
expulsions of Christian 
missionaries who have been 
working in India for many 
years. 

As the Pope arrived in 


Latin . communion. 

As the Pope stepped down 
from the bullet-proofed ve- 
hicle at the summit of St 
Thomas's Mount, he was 
greeted by 12 tiny orphan 
children, ranging in age from 
two to ten. who played a 


me rope arrived in k—jw * 

Madras, he was drivmin • •? lnT,ng “«? on musical 
specially-built Indian Pooc- m thie^porch of 

mobile - the on* h#» .white-painted church the 


specially-built Indian Pope- 
. mobile - the one he used in 
Calcutta was an adapted 
Land-Rover, this was built 
on a Madras-made standard 
20. and was prepared in five 
days - to the hill rising 
abruptly from the- coastal 
plain close to the airport, 
called St Thomas Mount. 
Here Si Thomas the Apostle, 
doubting Thomas who would 
not believe i ij the resurrec- 
tion until he saw for himselfi 
was said to have been 
martyred in 72AD. 

The tradition that India 
was one of the earliest 
countries to be converted to 
Christianity is important to 
the Christian community. 


Portuguese built on the 
plateau. The Pope kissed- 
them, and was conducted to 
a baroque vririte-amf-gilt altar', 
where he paused solemnly. 

The Pope then moved 
outside lo an open space with 
a cenotaph- and a view o 

the entire city of Mad 

where 20.000 people were 
standing on the. slopes to 
receive his blessing. 

Later in the day, he 
celebrated Mass in the open, 
air at the edge of the sea 
overlooking the Bay of Ben- 
gal and visited the Cathedral 
of St Thomas, where the 
body of the martyr is said to 
be buried. 


Havana (Reuter) - Presi- 
dent Castro of Cuba has 
called for a more diversified 
and efficient economy and 
blamed the United States for 
most of the world's big 
problems, including the Third 
World debt crisis: 

In a keynote speech on 
Tuesday at the start of a four- 
day Communist Party con- 
gress, Dr Castro listed 
Cuba's advances in the 
production of everything from 
sugar ami steel to ice cream 
and yoghurt since the last 
party congress in December 

ly&tjL 

Then he launched into a 
strong attack on the in- 
efficiency which still plagues 
the economy. Party sources 
said the six-hour address was 
“very critical". 

“We still have much to 


leani as for as efficiency is 
concerned," Dr Castro said, 
announcing that a new watch- 
dog ministry would be set up 
to examine ways of improving 
the way Cuba’s centralized 
economy is run. 

Dressed in his familiar 
olive-green uniform. Dr Cas- 
tro complained of barean- 
c ratic bottlenecks and 
mcflfcfency in many sectors 
of the econo my JVf ore sac- 
rifices were needed, he said, 
and the average Cuban's 
austere. life-style wonfaf not 
change overnight. 

"W e cannot sacrifice the 
future for consumer wants," 
he said, referring to the need 
■ to save hard currency by 
cutting imports from the 
West. 

He said 1985 was a year of 
great savings and economic 


results “but that was jest the 
beginning." 

The Cuban leader spoke 
for three hours. While most 
of the address centred on the 
economy, a few minutes were 
given over to c riticising the 
United Stales. “Our country is 
not intimidated by the most 
powerful imperialist power on 
earth and we have created the 
conditions to enable ns to 
inflict a shaming defeat on it 
if ever we are attacked," be 
said to wild applause. 

Bat he said he wanted a 
political settlement with 
Washington and the 
establishment of diplomatic 
relations on the basis of 
“equality, reciprocity and the 
fullest mutual respect". This 
would imply strict non-inter- 
ference by the US in Cuba's 
internal affairs. 


He repeated Cuba's estab- 
lished position on most world 
issues but offered a special 
olive branch to the newly- 
elected Government in Guate- 
mala, which faces continuing 
insurgency by left-wing 
guerrillas. 

He welcomed the coming to 
power of President Vinirio 
Cerezo and remarked that 
Christian Democrat govern-; 
meats in Latin America were 
not necessarily as negative in 
outlook as their European 
counterparts. 

The President also praised 
the Indian Prime Minister, 
Mr Rajiv Gandhi, for master- 
ing a difficult situation after 
the death of his mother. 

He reiterated his call for 
non-payment of Latin 
America's $368 million (£261 
million) foreign debt. 


■people. They simply moved 
from room 326 to room 305, 
that's alL" 

He showed us the two" 
rooms. In 305 among the 
refuse strewn around the 
room were two pgp gps 2ft 
long, a large mallei, two car 
springs and a collection of 
electrical equipment and 
wires which could have been 
used for torture. There were 
huge blood stains on the 
green carpet and a revolting 
smell in the room. 

Mr Katamba said that at 
times about 50 people were 
kepi in the sitting room of 
the suite and everyone in the 
hotel could bear their 
screams when they were 
being tortured. 

The prisoners were brought 
in at night and the bodies 
taken away at night 
The hotel staff said the 
most common form of tor- 
ture was beating people with 
the soles of shoes in which 
were embedded 2in nails, and 
I found a packet of nails on 
the floor. 

The room had been booked 
for many months in the 
name of Major Eric Odwa 
but Mr Katamba said tbe 
man who began the torture 
operation at Nile Mansions 
was Captain Odango Oduka, 
a close aide of President 
Obote. 

“There is no way tha t ( 
Obote and Muwanga (the 
Vice President) did not know i 
what was going on in the 1 
hotel," he said. Tbe former 1 
President lived almost 1 


r permanently in room 217 on 
- the next floor. One can easily 
t hear a scream from room 305 

> in that room. 

> In the filing cabinet were 
l reports from secret agents 
: going back to 1981, including 
: a detailed report from a spy 
! close to the entourage of Mr 

Yoweri Museveni, the Na- 
tional Resistance Army lead- 
er who is now the President. 
There were also lists of 
names and D f 

suspects to' be arrested, iden- 
tity cards, photographs and 
copies of orders to agents. 

It appears that after the 
coup the entire files of 
Obote's secret police were 
transferred to room 305. even 
though the secret police were 
officially abolished. Mr Paul 
Ssemogerere, the Democratic 
Party leader, who became 
Minister of Internal Affairs in 
the OkeDo regime, said last 
August that there were to be 
no more political prisoners in 
Uganda and there would be 
no more torture and 
disappearances.The evidence 
from Nile Mansions contra- 
dicts this statement. 

Room 326, the suite used 
for torture during Obote's 
rule, was empty except foi 
some women's underclothes 
and piles of personal tetters 
and other belongings on the 
floor. One read; “If you dc 
not reach me soon I will be a 
skeleton." 

The walls were bare o! 
paper and one of the hole 
staff said the prisoners had 
been forced to eat il Is 
another room, inexplicably, 
were the wigs of Uganda': 
eight High Cburt judges. 

Commander Kaka, chief o: 
security in Kampala, said the 
NRA was still compiling i 
list of those who committee 
the atrocities. 


ans 
ora 
re- 
* cf 

■py- 

and 

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tie 

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r irst 

Em. 

983. 

cllo. 

the 

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ars. 

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FIVE STAR INTEREST 


Secret police held i 
Guatemala swoop 

. (Refer) - Investigations (DIT), have 

A crock raptor? mut yi*-. : been -linked by some dip- 

tmiav rautoH Hu> . k«>J- » .. r 


terday ... raided the - head- 
quarters of Gnatemaia's 
; feared secret - police and 
arrested dozens of agents, 
police sonnies and witnesses 
said. 

The swoop came ns police 
reported tire discovery of tire 
mu ti lated bodies of foar men. 


lomats, human rights troops 
and politicians to tire, dis- 
appearance and omrder id 
thousands of Guatemalans. 

Witnesses and . police 
sources said anflormed troops 
with assault rifles disarmed 
the secret pofice and put. them 


. i I > .i — y''* 



. 


wuuuini inwics ui war men, . , r r . „ 

the latest victims in a Wave of “f® waiting vehicles. A police 
death., squad-style killings — said the agents too 

. under inv estigation, bat the 
Interior Ministry denied that 
- and said they woe being 
escorted by the military to a 
police training course. 

At a news conference last 
week. President Cerezo ; 
Rested the police could 
behind tire, recent violence in 
Guatemala, where tire mili- 
tary has dominated the gov- 
ernment for 30 years. 

The four latest victims were 
found by police on Taesday. 
Two, wearing only their 
underwear, were found in a 

„ . . . _ . . neighbourhood north of the 

President Cerezo: cracking capitaL They had plastic hags 
down on rights violations over their beads and showed 

since President Viaicio s ** ns 

Cerezo. a civilian, took office The ballet-riddled bodies of 
m January 14. The raid was the rtro others were on a 
>een as his first crackdown on beach at Puerto San Jose, 75 
inman rights violations. mites sooth of the capitaL 
Tbe secret police, called They too had been tortured, 
he Department of Technical police said. 



* - - • 







' 

, 


President Cerezo: cracking 
down on rights violations 

- since President Viaicio 
. Cerezo. a civilian, took office 
on January 14. The raid was 
. seen as his first crackdown on 
human rights violations. 

Tbe secret police, called 
the Department o f Technical 

Key witness 
in fraud 
case jailed 

Singapore (Reuter) - The 
key witness in a criminal case 
against a Malaysian poli- 
tician. Mr Tan Koop Swan, 
was jailed for 1 5 months 
yesterday on two counts of 
criminal breach of trust 
involving 54.600 Singapore 
dollars (£17.800). 

Tan Kok Liang had admit- 
ted dishonestly disposing of 
funds of Pan-Electric In- 
dustries Lid. which collapsed 
with debts .of 390 million 
Singapore dollars 

Mr Tan Koon Swan, head 
of Malaysia's , largest ethnic 

Chinese political party, owns 
a major slake in. Ran-EIectnc.- 
He is due to appear in a 
Singapore court on May 5. 


Globe-trotter 
watches TV 
on the run 

San Ffencisco (Reuter) - A 
Briton carrying a toy panda 
has left San Francisco mi the 
penultimate leg of a 16.000- 
mile round-the-world run to 
raise money for the. World 
Wildlife Fund.- 
Mr Henry Weston, . a se- 
curity consultant, began bis 
28-country mission in Lon? 
don on April 1. 1984. 

Averaging about 30 miles a 
day, he hopes to reach the 
east coast in 100 days. 

Having slopped reading on 
the run after colliding with an 
elephant in Indian Mr Weston 
is testing out- a hand-held 
miniature television. He has 
so far raised $20,000 
(£14.285). 



R 




0 - 00 * 

W netpa 



/ 

* 


Candors must fly free 

From Ivor Davis, Los Angeles 



•is 

i 

1 



1 



The five remaining Califor- 
nian condors not in captivity 
should be allowed to roam m 
the wiki -and must not be 
captured by sdermsts tnrmg 
to save the big birds from 
extinction, federal judge has 

^Irfa Washington roling. he 
forbade the US Fish and 
Wildlife Service to resu ™® 

-controversial plan » 

up the condors. The five 

birds live 10 *2 

mountains, and some 20 are 


in zoos in Los Angeles and 
San Diega- 

The - National Audubon 
Society, which brought the 
suit to prevent the capture of 
the birds, said die decision 
would, enable, scientists and 
environmentalists to hedge 
their bets by leaving some 
condors in the remote moun- 
tains.. white others are kept, 
under dose scrutiny in zoos, 
where they are being bred, to 
try to save the species. 





pliflipiifl# 1 

k 

ftsaiSp 


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8 


OVERSEAS news 


THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


State of the Union: economic boom, welfare reform, defence growth 

Budget cuts seen as 
key to Reagan’s 
dream of greatness 


FTom Michael Binyon, Washington 


President Reagan bas 
called on Republicans and 
Democrats to unite in forcing 
the US Government to live 
within its means and reduce 
the federal budget. At the 
same time he insisted that 
defence spending would con- 
tinue to rise, diat he would 
not raise taxes, and that the 
space programme would con- 
tinue. 

In his annual State of the 
Union address to Congress 
on Tuesday. Mr Reagan 
offered a glowing vision of 
America's future, saying the 
country could reach the 
destiny of its dreams. 

‘•Tonight we look out on a 
rising America - firm of 
heart, united in spirit, power- 
ful in pride and patriotism. 
America is on the move!" 

His nationally televised 
speech dwelt at length on the 
American family, which he 
called the “moral core" of a 
restoration of the nation's 
confidence in the future. It 
was lime, he said, “we 


reduced the federal budget 
and left the family budget 
alone". 

On the eve of his presenta- 
tion of the contentious 1987 
budget, Mr Reagan gave few 
figures or details in his 
speech, which was shorter 
than usual and offered few 
legislative proposals. 

But. turning to Mr Thomas 
“Tip" O’Neill, the retiring 


Expressing optimism in the 
country's economy, however, 
he celebrated what he called 
“a great American 
comeback”, and insisted that 
his tax reform must be 
implemented as an “engine 
of productivity and growth”. 
But be would not accept any 
disguised tax rise, or protec- 
tionist legislation. 

His main domestic pro- 


Speaker, he said: “Now, Mr posals included a review of 
Speaker, you know, 1 know the nation's welfare system, 
and the American people “In the welfare culture, the 
know the federal budget is breakdown of the family, the 
broken: it doesn't work, most basic support system. 
Before we leave this city, let's has reached crisis proportions 
you and I work together so in female and child poverty, 
that we can finally give the child abandonment, horrible 
American people a balanced crimes and deteriorating 
budget” schools.” 

He said the Gramm- Saying this “terrible truth” 
Rudman-HoDings balanced could no longer be ignored, 
budget law gave the US “an he called for a strategy for 
historic opportunity to “immediate action” to meet 
achieve what has eluded our poor families' financial, 
national leadership for de~ educational, social and safety 
cades — forcing the Federal needs. 


Government to live wi thin 
its means.” 


Bitter attack by 
Kremlin on arms 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


Tass yesterday launched its 
i strongest attack on President 
Reagan since last year's 
•summit, accusing him of 
delivering a militaristic State 
,of the Union message which 
completely ignored the 
Kremlin's recent initiative on 
, nuclear arms control. 

In the first reaction from 
Moscow, the agency said that 
’the President's speech boiled 
down 10 a promise to 
icominue the old policy of 
militarization: escalation of 
v thc arms race and its spread 
into outer space: slate terror- 
ism abroad: and encourage- 
’ment of “big business" and 
curtailment of social pro- 
grammes at home. 

The biller tone of the 
.Soviet response, understood 
*to have been sanctioned at a 
high level inside the Kremlin 
hierarchy, was reminiscent of 
*thc daily diatribes against the 
Reagan Administration 
launched in the run-up to last 
November s summit in Ge- 
neva. 

Tass said that the Wash- 
ington Administration's ap- 
proach to questions of war 
nand peace was defined in the 


strategic defence initiative, 
with the help of which the 
US would like to make its 
nuclear arms arsenals in- 
vulnerable and to get a free 
hand for the first nuclear 
strike." 

Western diplomats here 
described the Reagan speech 
and the tough Soviet re- 
sponse as indicative of the 
serious difficulties which will 
confront the two superpower 
leaders at their second sum- 
mit in Washington later this 
year. 

Tass acknowledged that 
President Reagan had re- build _ up 
ferrcd to the resumption of 
summit contacts as possibly 
leading to “a more stable 
relationship". But then it 
added sourly: "He did not 
respond to the latest Soviet 
initiatives for the reduction 
and eventual complete 
elimination of nuclear ar- 
maments or the prevention 
of the militarization of space: 
moreover, he did not even 
mention them.” 

Switching to regional pol- 
icy. another major element in 
the renewed superpower di- 
alogue. the agency accused 


“We must revise or replace 
programmes enacted in the 
name of compassion that 
degrade the moral worth of 
work, encourage family 
break-ups and drive entire 
communities into a bleak and 
heartless dependency.” 

His speech, postponed for 
a week because of the shuttle 
disaster, insisted that the 
shuttle flights would con- 
tinue. “We are going forward 
to build our space station, 
and we are going forward 
with research on a new 
‘Orient Express* that could, 
by the end of the next 
decade, lake off from Dulles 
Airport (in Washington) and 
accelerate up to 25 times the 
speed of sound, attaining low 
earth orbit or flying to Tokyo 
within two hours.” 

On defence Mr Reagan 
repeated his insistence on 
realizing his Strategic De- 
fence Initiative, and on 
maintaining the defence 



Prospective Aden 
ruler blames 
US for civil war 


The man likely to rule 
South Yemen after the Marx- 
ist country's Politburo meets 
later this week yesterday 
blamed the US for starting 
the civil war here three weeks 
a go and said he had already 
received assurances from 
Moscow that the Soviet 
Union would defend the new 
regime “from any foreign 
cssion". 

.1c appearance before for- 
eign journalists of Mr Salem 
Saleh Muhammad, the most 
powerful of the three Polit- 
buro members opposed to 
former President AJi Nasser 
Muhammad to escape with 
his life last month, was an 
interesting performance. 

In the sitting room of a 
villa high on a volcanic 
promontory above the Red 
Sea. he revealed how his own 
representatives bad fumed 
down a Soviet attempt to 
mediate a ceasefire in the 
January battles in Aden. 

But he remained in- 
triguingly vague about the 
whereabouts — indeed the 
fate — of Mr Abdul Fatah 
Ismael, the Politburo mem- 
ber whose portrait still 
adorns the cars and- trucks of 
hundreds of government 
militiamen but who has not 
been seen since his own 


From Robert Fisk, Aden 

we also ha'C information 
that America is supplying Ali 
Nasser and hb clique for 
sub'ersi'e activities. They 
(the Americans! don't want 
to have stability in demo- 
cratic Yemen." 

By far the most intriguing 
comments from Mr Salem 
Saleh, however, concerned 
the Russians. While repealing 
Moscow's assertion that the 
Russians considered the war 
•■a domestic affair that be- 
longs to the Yemen Socialist 
Partv". he revealed how 
Soviet Embassy officials tried 
- and failed - to obtain a 
ceasefire between the two 
sides. 

“There was a joint 
committee sent to tbc Soviet 
Embassy." he saicL“They 
tried to convene a ceasefire 
in the early days. 

“In the joint committee, 
there were two from our 
group, two from the Ali 
Nasser group, a Palestinian 
official and the Soviet side. 
But the decision belonged to 
our group — we could not 
allow armed elements to 
occupy Aden, elements who 
were responsible for creating 
divisions among the party 
and the people. 

“So we implemented mili- 
tary orders at dusk to 


escape from SUSo. « liquidate (stfsuch subver- 
January 13. ave elements. 

Mr Salem Salah. a plump 


man with a black beard in a 
tightly fitting brown jacket, 
said that the Politburo and 
Central Committee “are go- 


Mr Salem Saleh praised 
Soviet assistance to South 
Yemen. “The first aircraft to 
arrive in Aden (after the war) 
was a Soviet aircraft bringing 


ing to announce his destiny doctors and medical cquip- 
and fate”. Without explaining mcnl. The first ship to enter 


his own apparent ignorance 
of Abdul Fatah Ismael's 


Pjrendeut Reagan being applauded by Vice-President George Bosh, left, and die Speaker, I whereabouts, he added with a 
Mr Thomas “Tip ’ OTVeill, before m aki n g his State of the Union address to Congress, j smile: “We hope that he is 

75 today, but no fanfares 


From Our Own Correspondent, Washington 


nmg 

i. “The Soviets must 
know that if America reduces 
her defences it will be 
because of a reduced threat, 
not a reduced resolve.” 

But the relationship with 
the Soviet Union had to be 
guided by realism, “rock 
hard, dear-eyed, steady and 
sure. If the Soviet Govern- 
ment wants an agreement 
that truly reduces nuclear 
arms, there will be an 
agreement” 

To the delight of conser- 
vative Republicans he in- 
sisted that the US would 
continue to aid anti-Com- 


President Reagan is 75 
today and is being showered 
with good wishes from friends 
and statesmen at home and 
abroad. 

The nation’s grandfather — 
he is already die oldest 
American President to bold 
office — is older than all his 
three sur vi ving predecessors, 
and was born six years before 
President Kennedy. Indeed, 
he is now one of the oldest 
heads of government in the 
world. 

His birthday (alls after a 
week of exhausting presiden- 
tial duties. Not only has be 
delivered his annual State of 
the Union message to Con- 
gress and prerented his 
contentions budget for 1987, 
but he has also ted the 


occasions in the Soviet 
Union, there will be no 
medals, no fanfare, no state 
recognition of his three quar- 
ters of a century. The same 
four wealthy Californian cou- 
ples who threw a party in 
1971 on Mr Reagan's seven- 
tieth birthday will do so again 
tomorrow: the Waiter 
Annenhergs, the Annand 
Deutsches, Earle Jorgensens 
and William Wilsons. 


Mr Reagan of that vaunted 
yoothfdlness of looks, 
penally since his cancer j 
operation last year. As tefe- 
viSMm has shown in the past 
week, his lace is lined, his 
neck has spread, and his 
hair, though thick, b no 
longer Mack. He wears con- 
tact lenses and a hearing aid 
in each ear. 

But vigorous optimism stiB 

marks Ms manner and out- 
look. Administration officials 


alive. 

It was probably inevitable 
that South Yemen's putative 
leader should blame Wash- 
ington for ihe violence here. 
He claimed that he had been 
told by former followers of 
Mf Ali Nasser that “they 
received huge quantities of 
money from the Americans — 


Aden seaport was a Soviet 
ship. But about ali we 
received from Western coun- 
tries were journalists." 

Mr Salem Saleh made a 
number of pointed references 
to the desire of North Yemen 
and Saudi Arabia for peace, 
claiming that North Yemeni 
officials had confiscated 
heavy weapons from Ali 
Nasser’s militiamen when 
they tried to cross the border 
from the north. 


address with a formula which President Reagan of jiggling mun i«rt “Wdmn fiohim” in 
was old and simplistic, but wi.h the r my.h~ of a M 

bodia and Nicaragua. 

Bndget reaction, page 17 


odangerous for all. “Namely, military threat and of pursu- _ _ An * olfl ’ Cam 


.that America must arm itself 
and go ahead full tilt with its 


mg a policy of 
around the globe. 


'diktat' 


Egyptians 
ram yacht 
near Taba 

From Onr Own 
Correspondent 
Jerusalem 

An Egyptian naval patrol 
boat has rammed an Israeli 
pleasure yacht just off the 
Sinai coast near Taba, 
slightly injuring two of nine 
Britons among the 18 tourists 
on board. 

loved ones. higher than that of President pu er ' what Egypt calls the Gulf of 

In contrast, his birthday Carter at his peak. Reagan and Reagairism Aqaba and Israel calls the 

celebration will be a private Bat the demands of five still dominate Washington Gulf of Eilat It underlines 

years in office have robbed and the country. 


The White House is not _ 

issuing a guest list and it has complain that his 'attention 
bee® left to the gossip span is short, and that he 
columnists to speculate that prefers government by an- 
ti* guests wfll include Frank ecdote to policy dfecusskm. 
Sinatra and Mrs Betsy ^ 

BtoomtanlaJe. Brt as he faces a difficult 

The President’s birthday J***' bnnsin 8 *«*- 

comes when polls show that ^ Congress over the 

he is still one of the most JUjf* ** 

mourning for the Challenger popular presidents of this ol>s ?™f rs “J* warning 
astronauts and shouldered century. His popularity rating QMerestimati ^ his 


family affair. Unlike similar 


Gonzalez warns of Nato trauma 


• Pulling out of the Atlantic 
[Alliance would have “irau- 
Jmatic consequences'* for 
jSpain's relations with its EEC 
partners, in terms of invest- 
ment. trade and high technol- 
pgy. Scfior Felipe Gonzalez, 
•the Prime Minister, warned 
nh is countrymen in a par- 
liamentary debate due to end 
cuoday. 

; He played the “Europe 
■card" strongly in a debate 
^required before the Govem- 
«mcnt holds a referendum on 
.March 12 to decide whether 


From Richard Wigg, Madrid 
Spain remains in Nato. 


best for Spain is to remain”. 

He was answering Seiior 
Leopoldo Calvo Sotelo,a for- 
mer Prime Minister, who 
said that by not joining 
Nato's military structures 
Spain had seriously damaged 
its claim to sovereignty over 
Gibraltar. 

The Government's con- 
ScfioT Gonzalez told Span- dilions are that Spain should 
iards yesterday that if a nsmain outside Nato's mili- 


Thc debate so far has 
confirmed that the Govern- 
ment will be fighting alone to 
wring a "yes" from the 27 
million Spaniards eligible to 
vote, and so endorse an 
about-turn of the Socialists' 
policy in opposition. 


majority voted no. they must 
understand that “I will de- 
nounce the Washington 
treaty though 1 believe the 


tary structures: keep its non- 
nuclear status; and that the 
US carry out a progressive 
reduction of its forces here 



...and the next step forward 
in microelectronics 


Flavour compounds may be developed into non-metallic conductors 
that electronic engineers have been searching for. 

Another link you may have missed between the purely academic 
and the sternly economic. 

If you haven't been reading New Scientist, you won't have 
made the connection. 

Who said purely academic? 

newscientist 

Today and every Thursday 


Geldof to 
receive 
doctorate 

Ghent, Belgium (AP) - Bob 
Geldof, the Irish pop singer, 
is to be awarded an honorary 
doctorate for his contribution 
to the fight against hunger in 
Africa. 

The founder Of Band Aid 
and Live Aid. which brought 
many of the world's leading 
pop singers together for 
benefit performances, will 
accept the degree in person 
from the University of Ghent 
in September. 

Killer claims 
16 th victim 

Paris (AFP) - The French 
capital's killer of elderly 
women has struck again, this 
time just for a few francs. 
Mme Viiginie Labrette, 
widow, aged 76, was found 
suffocated overnight in her 
home. 

Six others, all living alone, 
have been murdered in the 
last six weeks. Nine were 
killed in similar circum- 
stances at the end of 1984. 

Drugs in body 

Washington (AP) 
Substantial amounts of co- 
caine were found in the body 
of the singer Ricky Nelson, 
but experts say the find does 
not link drag use and the 
plane crash which killed Mr 
Nelson and six others on 
New Year’s Eve. 

MEP freed 

Brussels (AP) - Two 
Bclgians.including an MEP. 
arrested five days ago for 
trying to take home three 
children of a Belgian woman 
granted custody in a divorce 
ruling against her Algerian 
husband, were released. 

Quins born 

Philadelphia (Reuter) - 
Quintuplets weighing less 
titan 3ib each were born here 
yesterday, but one, a boy, 
died several hours later. 

Peace rejected 

Peking (AFP) - China has 
rejected a proposal by Viet- 
nam for a Lunar New Year 
ceasefire along their border. 


Bomb number three 
hits Paris bookshop 


Paris (Reuter) - Police 
yesterday were trying to find 
a link between three bombs 
placed in different parts of 
Paris in 24 hours, two of 
which went off injuring 12 
people. 

One exploded in a 
Champs- Ely s£es shopping ar- 
cade, injuring eight people . 
and another went off in a 


the strong Egyptian feeling 
about territorial rights just as 
negotiations are starting in 
Cairo to try to resolve the 
difficult question of sov- 
ereignty in the area. 

Last summer there were at 
least 20 different occasions 
Left Bank bookshop on when Egyptian patrol brats 
Tuesday night A third was dashed with Israeli yachts, 
defused on the Eiffel Tower. The latest dash came on 
Polioe said they were still Tuesday as a yacht called the 
puzzled by the claim of Gadan was sailing bade to 
responsibility for the EilaUn Eilat an official 
Champs-Elysfies bomb re- 
ceived by an international 
news organization from a 
group calling itself the 
Committee for Solidarity 
with Arab Political Prisoners. 


complaint was made to the 
Egyptian consul and the 
report was sent to the joint 
Isradi-Egyptian Commission 
which is meant to resolve 
disputes » 


Tontons 
back on 
the streets 

Port-au-Prince (UPI) - The 
Government of President 
Jean-Claude Duvalier yes- 
terday sent its feared Tontons 
Macoutes secret police into 
the streets and ordered 
businessmen to reopen their 
factories and stores. 

In spite of the order, the 
city centre remained largely 
locked and shuttered after the 
normal 8.30am opening time. 
Businessmen said on Tues- 
day that they had received 
anonymous phone calls 
threatening violence if they 
opened. 

As the order was issued, 
truckloads of blue-uniformed 
members of the Tontons 
Macoutes . — whose title 
means “bogeymen” — par 
trolled the city of one million 
people, together with Jeeps 
full of soldiers. 

The feared Tontons 
Macoutes bad previously 
been restrained out of con- 
cern over Haiti’s human 
rights image. They have been 
accused of having a licence to 
kill. 

_ There is no official es- 
timate of rhe number of 
people who have died in the 
crackdown on a wave of 
opposition to President Du- 
valier that started in the 
provinces on January 26. The 
unrest spread to Part-au- 
Prince on Friday, when 
several stores were looted in 
the city centre following 
rumours that President Du- 
valier had filed the country. A 
foreign diplomat said that 
industries employing at least 
60.000 people were closed on 
Tuesday afternoon. 



Israelis on 
alert for 
retaliation 

From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

Israeli representatives over- 
seas have been warned to be 
on their guard against retali- 
ation attacks sponsored by 
Syria and Libya after the 
forcing down of a Damascus- 
bound Libyan executive jet to 
an airfield In Israel. 

Although there is no sign 
of remorse In Israel about 
farcing the civilian aircraft to 
land in a search for wanted 
Palestinian leaders, there is 
real concern here that Colo- 
nel Gadaffi, the Libyan lead- 
er, may try to stage a 
showpiece reprisal. 

The Syrian chief of staff 
Hihhmat ai-Shibabi, is also 
quoted as saying that his 
country “wfll take revenge 
and wfll choose the appro- 
priate time and place”. 

Mr Yitzak Raimi, the 
Israeli Defence Minister, who 
took the decision to intercept 
the aircraft; said yesterday: 
“Israel must be daring and 
take unexpected actions, even 
if its aims are not always 
accomplished." 

He strongly criticized West 
European countries such as 
Britain' which have attacked 
the Israeli action. Mr Rabin 
said these countries seemed 
to be trying to make a 
disti nction between good and 
bad terrorists. 

Israel has also begun a 
counter-offensive against the 
UN, where it has only been 
saved by an American veto 
twice recently. 

• CAIRO: Egypt yesterday 
condemned Israel's intercep- 
tion of the jet as Egyptian 
and Israeli negotiators began 
a fresh round of talks on 
owne rship off tire dfcpnted 
Red Sea coastal enclave of 
Tata (Renter reports). 

LONDON: Britain yes- 
terday condemned Israel's 
interception of tire jet in 
international airspace, saying 
ttatj the action was without 
justification (Onr Diplomatic 
Correspondent writes). The 
17 — : gn Office said that the 
u move set “a 
precedent” which appeared to 
have been m contravention off 
international law. 


M- 


Manson stays in jail 


Charles Manson (above) ha* statement described as 
been refused his freedom for zarre and rambfine. 

bythe Gaiifbr- The board had received 
ma Board of Prison Terms, letters off testimony from 
Sentenced to We for biffing Governor George Deokmejum 
ttess Sharon Tate and of California, state? 
2" Man “ attorney general and a Los 

board a 20-page handwritten not to free him. 


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TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


SPECTRUM 


The driest eye in the 


THE TIMES 


PROFI LE 


KENNETH BAKER 


lain Madeod never presented a 
budget, and made only one 
speech in the House or Commons 
is Chancellor of the Exchequer. 
He was already sick, and he died 
i few days later. In the course of 
iis speech, however, he did (not 
ust said) something remarkable, 
ind it was noticed at the time as 
■emarkable. He expressed his 
ieep regret that young Kenneth 
iaker had lost his Acton seat in 
he 1970 general election in 
vhich the Tories had been 
riumphant. He stated his hope 
hat Baker would shortly be back 
n the House. 

He did so knowing that Baker 
tad put in (along with 437 other 
andidates) for the constituency 
>f St Marylebone, vacated by 
3u>ntin Hogg's elevation to the 
.ord Chancellorship. Macleod's 
oice was heard, and Baker 
ucceeded Hogg in September 
970. 

Since then, as we know, he has 
one from strength to strength, 
nd will doubtless apply his usual 
csl and style to the difficult task 
ow facing' him. that of privatiz- 
ig the water industry. The 
pposition within as well as 
.-iihoui his own party threatens 
y be more intense (because of 
ic argument that water is a 
cccssarv national commodity, 
kc defence), than in the case of 
nv of the earlier privatizing 
icasures. 

“Iain’s mantle", said a coniem- 
orary of both men. "was passed 
> Kenneth”. To this day 
lacleod occupies a particularly 
onoured place in the Pantheon 
f those we have become 
rcustomed to thinking of as 
orv “wets". How has it come 
doul therefore, that Baker finds 
imself in a Thatcherite front 
ne facing such opposition not 
nly over the water industry but 
so over cutting the rate support 
ant. and abolishing the rating 
'stem? 

In the vote on the rate support 
ant. for example. Ian Gitmour. 
rands Pym. James Prior and SO 
(her conservatives voted 
;ainst the recommendations of 
e Secretary of State for the 
fivironmenL "They looked 
imT. said a senior minister. 
4c had a smile on his face and. 
think, a song in his heart". 
Nobody has ever seen Baker 
her than cheerful 
’ He’s affable", said a school 
i Paul’s) contemporary who has 
•pt in touch with him ever 
•ice. "He's always affable, whal- 
er the pressures and whatever 
** circumstances.” 

•That judgement was amply 
ime out when Baker succeeded 
c unfortunate Patrick Jenkin as 


Secretary of Slate for the 
Environment in Mrs Thatcher's 
last major reshuffle. The resis- 
tance of the metropolitan coun- 
cils to their own abolition and 
the seemingly intractable finances 
of Liverpool ail seemed to gel 
Jenkin down. He plied his 
arguments doggedly, but without 
brio.“Hc even”, said one senior 
member of the Prime Minister's 
Private Office . “made Ken 
Livingstone into some kind of 
folk hero." 

Given the same brief as Jenkin 
(a thoroughly inadequate one. 
according to many critics). Baker 
look an entirely different ap- 
proach. He joked' with as well as 
against Livingstone. His "oh. 
come of iL Ken. you know that's 
not true” line heartened disheart- 
ened Tories, but he showed sled 
in refusing absolutely to meet 
delegations from Liverpool An 
affable man of steel, then, is not 
perhaps a bad description of him: 
it is summarized in the fact that, 
like few of his colleagues. Baker 
thrives on pressure. 


His enemies are highly 
suspicious 
of his transition 


But - and we have to return to 
the question - what of the legacy 
of Madeod. what of the famed 
social conscience? To begin with, 
the legacy is not as simple or 
dear-cut as it looks. John Biffen 
once threatened to devote a 
Conservative Political Centre 
lecture at a party conference to 
proving the proposition that Iain 
Madeod was a monetarist: and 
there is a great deal in the 
writings he left behind to suggest 
that he was a maverick as much 
as anything else. 

Even accepting his devotion 
(in a broaa way) to policies 
favouring the disadvantaged as 
against the advantaged. Baker 
could (and does) argue that he 
was bang in line with the 
tradition when he forced his new 
rate support grant through the 
House against many extremely 
reluctant Tories last month. 
These proposals (concerned 
essentially with the subvention 
central government ofTers an- 
nually to local government, there 
being at least outline agreement 
on how the cash is to be spent), 
significantly benefited the inner 
cities, and significantly hurt the 
Tory shires. 

“Isn't it strange", said one of 
his friends "that Conservatives 
like Pym and Gilmour and Prior, 
who are always going on about 




BIOGRAP 



iff 


;■* p 


1934: Bom November 3 in 
Newport-Educated at St Paul's 
School and Magdalen College, 
Oxford. 

19631: Married Mary Elizabeth 
Gray- Muir. One son and two 
daughters- 

1964k Contested Poplar 
unsuccessfully. 

1966: Contested Acton 
unsuccessfully in the General 
Election. 


1968: Won Acton in a by-election. 
1970: Won St Marylebone tea by- 
election. After redistribution, 
contested and won Mote VaBey m 
1983. 

1 Ml: Minister for Information 
Technology. 

1984: Minister of State for Local 
Government 

1985: Secretary of Slate tor the 
Environment 





end of the life of the Heath 
Government Parliamentary Pri- 
vate Secretary to the Prime 
Minister. 

These last two appointments 
had an importance greater iban 
appears on the surface. Heath 
was passionately interested in' the 
machinery of government and 
much time had been devoted to 
devising proposals for its reform 
during the years of opposition 
from I96S to 1970. BaJcer was at 
No. 10 not merely as the eyes and 
ears of his boss, but to devise a 
crusade for the creation of a full 
Prime Ministerial Department 
able to compete or its own terms 
with- other great departments: 

It is at least arguable that had 
Baker won this battle. Mrs 
Thatcher would not be in ibe fix 
she is in today, that Michael 
Heseltine would have been 
brought to heel much earlier, and 


remarked one of his critics m 
disgust as though a position with 
a cosmetics firm somehow- dis- 
qualified Baker from being 
considered seriously. "What's 
more", observed the same critic, 
"he even got the family in”. That 
was a reference to the foci that 
Mrs Baker (who was Mary Gray- 
Muir when they married in 1963) 
is herself a director of Avon. But 
she has also had senior positions 
with the London Tourist Board. 
Thames TV. and Barclays Bank 
as wen. 


Like few of his 
colleagues, he 
thrives on pressure 


that the lamentable shifts to 
which an overworked and under- 
staffed No. 10 has resorted would 
never have been required. 

Baker's critics dislike what they 
call his "Flash Hairy” manner, 
the sleek and slicked-back hair, 
the heavy glasses, the ever-read y 
smile, and the constant bon- 


homie. They are also highly 
suspicious of the ease with which ; 


* -* ' ‘ 


suspicious of the ease with which 
he made the transition from the 
Heath to the Thatcher era. But he 
did. after all.* stick by Heath to 
the bitter end. and was a member 
of the team campaigning to 
preserve his leadership in 1974 
and 1975. 


Man of all parts: Kenneth Baker, rare book expert, fine bridge player, devoted politician 


the h canless ness of this govern- 
ment objected to that move. But 
then, of course, they are shire 


men themselves." 

But there is also a more all- 
embracing aspect of his attitude 
to political life. It is an almost to- 
tal fascination with how govern- 
ment works, and how it can be 
made to work better. This was 
insufficiently appreciated when 
he was Mrs Thatcher's Minister 
for Information Technology from 
1981 to 1983. when his mission- 
ary zeal for every kind of hi-tech 


excited as much ribaldry as 
respect. Bui a preoccupation with 
technique, if you like, runs right 
through his political career. 

He was first elected to the 
House at a by-election in Acton 
in March 1968. having foiled to 
win the seat in the General 
Election of 1966. In April he 
began a crusade for tax reform, 
and in February 1970 he in- 
troduced a private member's Bill 
to cut taxation by 5 per cenL 
Meanwhile, he had also in- 
troduced (in March 1969) a Bill 


on data privacy, and he had been 
a member of Macleod's team 
fighting the 1969 Labour Budget 
When he renewed- bis - par- 
liamentary career in 1970. he 
undertook a bewildering number 
of responsibilities. He was a 
member of the Select Committee 
on the Treasury, and that on 
Parliamentary Procedure. He sat 
on many outside bodies, but 
notably on the Computer Ad- 
visory Council He became Par- 
liamentary Secretary to the Civil 
Service Department and, at the 


Once Heath had gone, how- 
ever. and the dust had to some 
extent settled, it was dear that 
Baker and the new leader had a 
good deal in common. The Prime 
Minister is not herself markedly 
interested in the machinery of- 
government : but she is fas- 
cinated. almost to the point of 
obsession, with modern technol- 
ogy. In Baker she found someone 
with similar predilections, and by 
this time, moreover. Baker was 
gaining formidable experience 
with the business world, in 
textiles with Cefestion. and in 
computers with Wordplex and 
Logica (a software company). 

"Bui he was also with Avon". 


As a pair, the Bakers outstrip 
in energy and achievement most 
other political couples on the 
scene. The truth is that Baker, in 
all the many areas of his 
professional life, has found him- 
self in constant demand for the 
dedication he brings to his work. 

If all that makes him sound a 
dull dog despite the deliberately 
winning ways, then? are other 
aspects which have to be added 
to any rounded picture of his 
personality. He is a tine and 
devoted bridge player: he was in 
the 1980-81 House of Commons 
team. Indeed, bridge was an 
important link with Madeod 
who. in the years before be was 
elected to the Commons, used to 
double and sometimes triple bis 
income from the Conservative 
Research Deportment through 
afternoon bridge sessions at 
Crockfords. and who inscribed 
on his book How To tt'in .4/ 
Bridge in the Downing Street 
library. "Perhaps this is the only 
book in this library' which win 
bring true profit to hs readers" 

Baker also collects books, and 
is highly respected among the 
professionals in that complex 
field. He has published a volume 
of adequately witty verse, / have 
no gun. inti / cim spit, and edited 
an anthology of poetry. London 
Lines. 


It is easy to mock (and many 
do) one or more of the sides of 
- Kenneth Baker. But there are few 
indeed of. hi&- contemporaries 
who have enjoyed (and enjoyed 
is the right word) so varied a life, 
and performed with such distinc- 
tion in every department of il 


Patrick Cosgrave 


QTkm Newspapers Lid 1386 


McGuigan: portrait of 
a champion PAGE-23 


CONCISE CROSSWORD (No 868) 

i Substantial foods i— 

(6) 14 Devoted student (8) 18 Sicrn(6) 

1 Secondary action 15 Dry wine (3) 20 Sickness (6) 

(6) 16 Sinw(6) 21 Lives (6) 

: By way of (3) 17 Dull (6) 23 Neal (4) 

3LUT10N TO No 867 

CROSS: 1 Kowtow 4 Thwack 7 Rail 8 Optional 9 Dripping 13 Egg 
4 House . magazine 17 Pod 19 Spectrum 24 Shanghai 25 Veto 
at Anyhow 27 Fennel 

OWN: 1 Kirk 2 Whipround 3 Whoop 4 Titan 5 Wood 6 Clang 
J Press II Irate 12 Graft 13 Epicurean 14 Gad IS Chip 18 Ashen 
J Pshaw 21 Chief 22 Inch 23 Coot 


The ghosts of war disturbing the Far East’s peace 


The souls of Japan's 
war dead are posing 
a tricky diplomatic 
problem, reports 
David Watts 


Insiston 


ReaUv DrvGin 


Second World War leaders 
have come back to haunt the 
Japanese government in a 
peculiarly ticklish and intan- 
gible religious problem which 
may have far-reaching con- 
sequences for China's new 
domestic liberalization poli- 
cies. 

Whatever Mr Yasuhiro 
Nakasone. Japan's un- 
ashamedly nationalist Prime 
Minister, does from now on 
to exorcise these ghosts of 
history will alienate either the 
right wing of his Liberal- 
Democratic party or threaten 
Japan's most important re- 
gional relationship. 

The tension centres on 
YasuknnL an imposing shrine 
in Tokyo which was the 
centre of state Shinto, or 
Emperor worship, in the 
period leading np to the 
Second World War. It also 
houses the souls of some 2.6 
million of Japan's military 
war dead. All those who died 
in the service of their country 
are enshrined regardless of 
their religion. 

The fact that they ind ode 
notorious militarists, such as 
General Hideki To jo, who 
were found guilty of war 
crimes went almost un- 


remarked — until recently. 
Then China's leaders discov- 
ered that vicious pillagers of 
their country were deified in 
one of Japan's most im- 
portant shrines. They decided 
to make use of it in a modest 
way to help overcome a 
worrying dedine in morals 
and the authority of the 
Communist Party as Deng's 
reforms have taken bold. 

In May the authorities, in 
Peking began drawing atten- 
tion to Japanese atrocities 
and marking war anniver- 
saries with great ceremony to 
show students and other 
back-sliders that they had 
□ever had it so good. 

Meanwhile Mr Nakasone, 
for his own domestic political 
reasons, was planning to pnt 
another brick in the rebuilt 
wall of Japanese self-respect 
and finally "dose the ac- 
counts of the war". That is 
his code phrase for the" 
restoration of a more 
nationalistic Japan which 
pays more attention to its 
traditions, including the 
strengthening of the 
Emperor's role. 

Concomitant with that is 
the revival of Yasuknni as the 
national shrine. But any 
notion of a key role for 
Yasuknni is controversial 
within Japan itself because it 
hints at the restoration of 
Shinto as the national re- 
ligion when the post-war 
constitution indisputably pro- 
vides for freedom of worship. 

The issue came to a head in 
the summer when Mr 




concerned at infringements 
of, and attempts to' revise, the 
constitution. 

The Chinese government 
has no objections to a 
militarily reborn Japan as a 
counter-balance to the Soviet 
Union, and makes that dear 
in private, but it has been 
quite willing to use the shrine 
issue for its own domestic 
purposes. 


arguments will be used by 
Deng’s opponents is not yet 
certain. 


The Japanese Liberal- 
Democratic party has sought 
to slip ont of the crisis by try- 
ing to persuade the religions 
authorities at Yasnluini to 
transfer the troublesome 
souls of war criminals to 
another, smaller shrine 
within the grounds. 



The issue is taking 
on a life of its own 



Prime Minister Nakasone at the Yasukuni, shrine last year 


Nakasone made an official 
visit to the shrine as Prime 
Minister and representative 
of the nation as a whole. In 
the past be has visited as 
"Yasuhiro Nakasone. Prime 
Minister", deliberately leav- 
ing vague the question of 
whether or not he was there 
in his official capacity. Last 


August be left no doubt.about 

that 

The response, both at home 
and in China, was immediate. 
To left-wing critics in Japan 
it was an indication that Mr 
Nakasone, a former Imperial 
Navy officer, is intent upon 
rebuilding Japan into a mili- 
tary power. Others are more 


Mr Nakasone and the 
establishment daim wide- 
spread support for the 
Yasukuni visits, based on 
what they say are increas- 
ingly favourable ratings in 
the opinion polls. Many of 
those polls, however, are 
carried out by the Prime 
Minister’s office and do not 
address : the problem of 
Yasukuni directly. 

One recent poll question 
merely asked if the individual 
supported the showing or 
respect for Japan's war dead 
— an unexceptionable idea 
that has tittle to do with the 
real issue. 

Deng's problems in China 
and the growing use of the 
"Japanese economic imperi- 
alism militarism" argument 
to oppose economic liberaliza- 
tion cannot be overcome so 
..easily. There have been signs 
recently that the issue is now 
out of the hands of Peking 
and taking on a life of hs 
own. How effectively these 


Quite apart from the fact 
that the concept of "dis- 
enshrining" someone is diffi- 
cult for. theologians to 
contemplate, the shrine's el- 
ders were strongly opposed to 
the idea. 


T hrough the confusion of 
what is. after all, a purely 
theoretical problem - there 
are no actual remains in the 
shrine - it is dear that the 
hitherto separate strands of 
domestic _ policies In Japan 
and China are now in- 
extricably intertwined to the 
embarrassment of both. 

. When Mr Nakasone next 
visits Yasukuni shrine, later* 
this year, be cannot contem- 
plate reverting to the status of 
private citizen, whatever the 
resulting fall-out for the 
Chinese: the right wing of his 
own party would make four 
more formidable critics. 

On the other hami, if he 
does go ahead with it the 
gloss will be irrevocably off 
one of Japan's less trouble- 
some and more promising 
economic relationships. 


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BOOKS 


Irish bard head and 


begins a major 
scholarly undertak- 
ing that promises 
to bring us over the 

2S!r« C ^ C ?!f **“ eorepJete 

letters, in a dozen volumes or 
so< of the man himselt 
complete means over 7.000 
or them; but, unfortunately 
tor the purposes of this 
volume, it does not mean 
Yeats s letters to Maud 
Gonne. which were destroyed 
in the Civil War. And as 
always on these occasions 
there is a story of a bonfire. 

I ne literary executrix of Miss 
A. E. G. Homiman set light 
to letters from Shaw. Synm. 
Lady Gregory, and Yeats. 
Presumably she thought 
thais what an executrix is 
supposed to do. Somebody 
should have given her a 
dictionary when the will was 
read. 

And somebody should 
have given Yeats a dictionary 
as well. His spelling has to be 
read to be believed: and it is 
pan of the charm of this 
edition that no attempt has 
been made to interfere with 
it- (I shall be obliged to 
interfere, however, as I am 
dispatching this review from 
Manila, where the expected 
standard of spelling is ex- 
tremely high.) John Kelly has 
given the first volume 
compendious same-page 
notes, a chronology, and a 
biographical appendix. If you 
knew nothing at all of Yeats's 
life, you would have to resort 
to the appendix to find out 
about the passionate relation- 
ship with Miss Gonne. There 
is no evidence for it in the 
main test 

What you do get however, 
is a dear picture of Yeats's 
professional - and artistic life 
up to the age of thirty. With 
the emphasis perhaps on the 
professional side of thing* 
Yeats, like Pound (who will 
feature in later volumes) was 
an enthusiast and a publicist, 
both of his own work and of 
anything he considered truly 


James Fenton 
reviews the 
letters of 
a young poet 
and mystic of 
a dim kingdom 

THE COLLECTED 
LETTERS OF 
W.B. YEATS, 1865-1895 
Edited by John Kefly 

Oxford. £22 JO 


Irish. The definition of what 
was truly Irish tends to be 
beftily folkloric. and there is 
a marked prejudice against 
the Eighteenth Century and 
its rationalist legacy in the 
Nineteenth. 


T ruth is to be -found 
not by the intellect 
but by the imagina- 
tion. it is to be 
sought in cottages and hov- 
els, among mad beggars and 
dotty old crones. It is to be 
found in Madame 
Blavatsky's circle, where, 
however, some irony is 
allowable. 

A sad accident happened 
at Madame Blavatsky 
lately I hear. A big 
materialist sat on the 
astral double qf a poor 
young Indian. It was 
sitting oh a sofa and he 
uro too materia to be able 
to see it. Certainly a sad 
accident. 

Quite bow seriously Yeats 
took, or intended us to take, 
his investigations into ma gic 
is something that the reader 
will continually ask himself. 
When challenged he win 
always defend it and some- 
times il will seem that what 
he is talking about is a 
philosophical tradition that 


seeks to avoid on the one 
hand the Darwin-Huxley- 
Tyndall cast of mind, some- 
thing that today might be 
dubbed reductionist and on 
the other the historical- 
fimdamenialist approach to 
religion, the Bishop Usshcr 
approach to Bible studies. 
Eve's apple, Yeats would tell 
us. was not of the kind that 
could be bought in a 
greengrocer's. 

So when he talks of Celtic 
legends, we see at limes a 
man who apparently knows 
what myth is. and is quite 
happy about it Myths are 
stories you make up. You 
hear a bit of a story that 
strikes you as beautiful, and 
you're quite at liberty to 
make up tbc rest as it suits 
you. The imagination is 
sovereign. 

This is an understandable, 
even defensible, position, but 
it is by no means consistently 
held. The other side of Yeats 
— the side that makes you 
want to throw this volume 
straight out of the window 
into the faecal waters of 
Manila Bay. and to telegraph 
Mr Kelly to the effect that a 
decade or so of one's life is 
far too much to devote to 
this junk — is the side that af- 
fects to have discovered 
scientific proof of second 
sight, to have investigated 
claims of the paranormal and 
so forth. This appeal to 
reliable witnesses — an 
empirical appeal invoked 
only when it suits the 
appellant - is quite 
contradictory in character to 
the supposedly seriously held 
philosophy. 

1 went to a great fairy 
locality — cave by the 
Rosses Sands — with an 
unde and a cousin who is 
believed by the neighbours 
and herself to have nar- 
rowly escaped capture by 
that dim kingdom once. I 
made a magic circle and 
invoked the fairies. My 
unde, a hard-headed man 



of about 47 — heard 
presently voices like those 
of boys shouting and 
distant music, but saw 
nothing My cousin how- 
ever, saw a bright light 
and multitudes of little 
forms clad in crimson . as 
well as hearing music and 
. then the .far voices. Once 
there nos a great sound as 
of little people cheering 
and stamping with their 
feet away in the heart of 
the rock. The queen of th e 
troop came then — l could 
see her — and held a long 
conversation with us and 
finally wrote in the sand, 
"be careful and do not 


seek to know too much 
about us. " 

She tells them this after 
divulging "a great deal about 
the economy of the dim 
kingdom". It appears to be 
fruitarian — the creatures 
carry “Quicken Berries” in 
their hands. 

Well, the turn of the 
century was a tough time for 
all concerned. Yeats tells us 
that he began spending the 
nights in caves during his 
adolescence, when he was 
troubled by desires of the 
flesh. Christina Rossetti's 
“The Goblin Market” seems 
to have had a similar origin 
in painful sexual experience. 


But there is ail the difference 
in the world between her 
poem and the passage quoted 
above. It is the difference 
between self-discovery and 
self-deception. 

OiT-putung too is the sense 
one gins of Yeats's parallel 
personality - his hard- 
headedness. It's not that he 
gets up to anything particu- 
larly discreditable — he had 
every right to his twelve-ond- 
a-half per cent, and he is 
good at dealing with his 
publishers. He had every 
justification in attempting to 
promote his conception of 
true Irish Literature by what- 
ever means available. Bui 
still, when * we catch him' 
making a calculation, we 
Cannot forget that this is the 
man who would prefer 
numerology to mathematics. : 
Yeats was not as other- 
worldly as he makes out. 

D uring these first 
thirty years hie re- 
ceived a bare mini- 
mum of formal 
education, divided his time 
between remote Sligo and 
Bedford Park, a garden sub- 
urb in Chiswick much asso- 
ciated with the aesthetic 
movement, and worked him- 
self to the point of exhaus- 
tion. The poems he wrote 
include some of his most 
popular — “fnnisfree'*. 
“When You Are Old”. 
‘■Down by the Salley 
Gardens” — some promising 
items like “The Madness of 
King Goir and some horrors 
like “The Wanderings of 
Oisin". He began writing 
plays. He edited and col- 
lected Irish poems, folklore, 
and stories: and set about 
transforming the reading hab- 
its of a nation. 

Eventually I believe the 
hard-headedness came to 
help him. He hated realism 
and was dismayed at mod- 
ernism. but he could see 
when one aesthetic had 
become exhausted and an- 
other had to take its place. Or 
he could see what the 
challenges were to his way of 
thinking and writing. He was 
determined not to be left 
behind, and that is why I 
have no doubt that the 
interest of these volumes will 
progressively increase. 

They have certainly got off 
to a flying start. 


We loved, sir- 
used to meet 


Browning liked women. He ■ T “I 

wrote about them and for X/\f P I (lVj 
them, some of the shrewdest ’ * ' 

and most passionate love « 

poems in the language, as ' T< 

wefl as dramatic explorations . LAOVvl L' 

of . the : darker aspects -of ' 

sexual failure and pain which movements of thought in his 
Victorian pnidertf hr this time, was avery great poet 
country, prevented now indeed. Thdt has never been 
from ocploring. fully recognized, perhaps be* 

The - feminists. Who • are cause his grittiness and quid- 
now greatly involved in " dity and pursuit of fine 
«— «. „ •- distinctions and recondite 


restoring Elizabeth. Barrett’s 


reputation, tend to be tin-.’ facts put him, outside the 
charitable to Robert. They mainstream of great British 


like to see her admiration for 
his work as female self- 
abasement before, male' 
“genius", and tend to ignore 
the feci that in her lifetime 
she was both more famous 
and more loved than he — ft 
was Elizabeth who was 
thought of as a possible 
Laureate. Browning in fact 
admired her as much as she 
did him. 

The truth is surely that 
Browning in his intellectual 
range and complexity of 
subject matter, in his scien- 
tific examination of human 
greatness and evil, in his 
idiosyncratic grasp of the 


poetry. And then Eh - Lea vis 
and Lytton Strachey came 
along and tokf us. m quite 
different ways, that the 
Victorians were moral hum- : 
bugs and naive thinkers; and 
we have not really got over 
that U is . time for a 
reassessment • 

Henry James knew Brown- 
ing was great and was 
puzzled by the disparity 
between the subtle poet and 
the hearty diner-out of the 
widowed years. In The Pri- 
vate Life he invented a great 
writer who led two. simulta- 
neous lives: the “loud. liberal 
and cheerful" public talker. 



g 

X 

'w 


X 


Celebrations of friendship and childhood 

A Late Beginner 

Priscilla Napier 

Tftire joy* Sunday Express 
An evocative memoir, of an Edwardian 
childhood spent in the shadow of the 
pyramids 

8pp of illustrations £5 S3 


God’s Apology 

A Chronicle of Three Friends: 

Hugh Kingsmiilf Malcolm Muggeridge 
and Hesketh Pearson. 

Richard Ingrams 

The editor oi Private Eye celebrates 
them as an embodiment of anri- 
intellectualism, common-sense and 
English decency’ Observer 
4pp of illustrations pS3 


. / A.S- Byatt 

MORE THAN FRIEND 
The Letters of Robert 
Browning to Katharine 
de Kay Bronson 
Edited by Michael Meredith 
Armstrong Browning Library A 
Wcdgestone Press. £12.95 


and the real writer, secretly 
and perpetually moving his 
pen. even in the dark. Henry 
James also planned a novel 
about Mrs Katharine 
Bronson, a rich American 
lady who entertained Brown- 
ing m bis last years in her pa- 
lazzo in Venice. Browning's 
letters to her have now been 
edited by Michael Meredith, 
who argues that the feelings 
of the seventy-year old poet 
for his hostess deepened into 
something more than friend- 
ship. 

Browning's most recent 
biographers sum up Mrs 
Bronson as a plump person 
surrounded by Chinese lap- 
dogs and peppermmled choc- 
olates. Mr Meredith treats 
her with more respect; she 
wrote poor poems, he tells us. 
but a definitive unpublished 
book on Venetian naval 
architecture. He adduces a 
poem in Fcrish tab's Fancies 
pleading for Sense as well as 
Soul in love, and the 


capitalization of the word 
Friend in the dedication to 
. Mis Bronson of Asolando. as 
evidence of Browning's stron- 
ger feelings. Bui the letters as 
a whole don’t bear out his 
case. They are all courteous 
chatter and expression of 
warm, gratitude. 

Mr Meredith has the habit 
of saying “perhaps Browning 
might have fell—” in one 
paragraph, and assuming H as 
historical feci that he did' so 
feel in the next. This might 
have amused Browning him- 
self. one of whose major 
contributions to literature 
was the dramatic proirayal of 
partiality and bias in the 
selection of evidence in 
argument. The Ring and the 
Book examines one murder 
through twelve different sets j 
of assumptions, prejudices, 
and passions. His great casu- 
ists. Bishop Btougram. Sludge 
the Medium, Caliban, can 
make the world appear as 
they desire or fear it to be. 

Some of his best poems 
bear directly on the problem 
of historical evidence that 
underlay the whole question- 
ing of Biblical authority in 
his time. He believed be was 
an objective, not a subjective 
poet — the speakers of his 
love lyrics are less likely to be 
the poet himself than in most 
cases. Mr Meredith's case is. 

I think, not proven: and the 
letters to Mrs Bronson are 
the work of James’s smiling 
public man. not of the secret 
and private poet. But they are 
good to have in another sense 
— they bring to life a 
vanished world of courtesy, 
leisure, and culture. 


A rubbish dump 
world, with love 


! Here’s a hero we're likely to 
| read more_about. In a dulled, 

; post-apocalyptic rubbish 
dump of a world the rakebell 
i musician Greg Rivas glitters 
with long-forgouen attributes 
such as integrity and loyalty, 
qualities that are used against 
him when he’s persuaded to 
seek the girl who was once 
his love. 

She’s been absorbed imo 
the Jaybush religious cult, 
whose devotees surrender 
their personalities — and 
more — to some grotesque 
omniscience. Intending to be 
his girl's redeemer, and 
armed only with a tune from 
Prokofiev's Peter and the 
Wolf. Rivas infiltrates the 
whole nasty business. 

Tim Powers’s method is to 
lake the drug-culture sins of 
this generation and project 
them into an nth-degree 
future. It may seems a bit 
preachy, but he tells a first 
rate tale and Rivas is a hero 
of real-cool potential, very 
identifiable, very sequel- and 
movie-orientated Pity Paul 
Newman is just that bit too 
old 

• 1 Hope 1 Shall Arrive 
Soon, by Philip K. Dick 
(G of lanes. £8.95 J. Short sto- 
ries from the late, great 
master of the irrational- 
made-reaL stunning fictional 
hallucinations which are, 
nevertheless, secondary in 


^ SCIENCE ^ 
* FICTION a 


Tom Hutchinson 

DINNER AT 
DEVIANTS PALACE 
By Tim Powers 

Chat to A Windus, £9.95 


interest to his alarming in- 
troduction. This, containing 
his Biblical reasons for writ- 
ing. is filled with anecdotes 
about the Koestierian co- 
incidences that have filled his 
life and made sense of it: as 
an artistic self-revelation it is 
absolutely fascinating. , 


• Science Fiction: The 100 
Best Novels. by 
David. Pringle ( Xanadu . 
£9.95). The author begins 
with Nineteen Eighty- Four in 
1949 and ends with 
Neuroma neer in 1984, a 
setting of parameters which - 
even after his explanation — 1 
didn't understand because it 
does mean that H.G. Wells is 
excluded. Still, if you're a 
believer in a hundred-besi- 
anythings this is as good as 
any, and enthusiasm tran- 
scends the rather measly i 
story-outlines. 


Horrors under the 
respectability 


When asked how she wanted 
her hair done. Cecil 
WoodhanvSmhh used to tell 
the hairdresser :'*in perfect 
silence". There can be noth- 
ing more English than this 
fear of intrusion into private 
thoughts, this love of 
comfortable 

isolation.Christopher Leach 
is a very English writer and 
these familiar loves and fears 
are at the heart of his 
excellent volume of stories. 

Take "The Hockey- 
Plavcr". A commuter breaks 
down one cold night driving 
home. Catching a train he 
finds a warm and empty 
compartment. As the black 
countryside streams by. a 
young man enters with a 
hockey-stick. Immediately 
the hot air charges with 
tension. “Good evening”, the 
young man says provoc- 
atively. and with these two 
hairdresser words we arc off 
into the havoc caused by 
contacL Edging closer with 
his stick — “it's a weapon" — 
he presses the poor 
commuter's arm. “I'm gay. 
Did you guess that?” He 
slides his address imo the 
poor man's jacket pock cl 
S melling of Parma violets it 
is inevitably discovered by 
the commuter's wife. 

Tracing the unfamiliar 
routes that are travelled to 
reach cliched situations, 
Leach shares much with 
William Trevor. Like Trevor 
his spare, ortiinaTy-seeming 
dialogue embraces what is 
sinister, mysterious, and 
painful in our lives. Like 
Trevor he exposes the horror 
that lurks beneath 
respectability. 

There is not a single 
hairdreser in The Nudists’, but 
Guy Bellamy's novel seems 
infested with this Porsche- 
driving class who holiday 
round Spanish swimming 
pools and return to stone- 
clad homes in Wimbledon. 
Bellamy's world is irredeem- 
ably chauvinist in its concern 
with flashy ad-men. Page 
Three girls, and money. 

. Bellamy is best when he 
-'laughs at the stone-cladding. 

Stefan Themerson is a 
Polish philosopher, com- 
poser. and experimental film- 
maker whose Europa was 
greeted by a Warsaw critic in 
1930 as “the outlook of a 
young madman" He brings 
this same vision to his ninth 
novel which begins in- 
triguingly enough when the 


FICTION 


Nicholas 

Shakespeare 

ENEMIES AND 
OTHER STRANGERS 
By Christopher Leach 

Dent. £9.50 

THE MYSTERY OF 

THE SARDINE 
By Stefan Themerson 

Falvr. £9.95 

THE NUDISTS 

By Guy Bellamy 

Seeker & narbitrg, iv.50 

TEFUGA 

By Peter Dickinson 

The Bodlrr Head. £9 95 


death of a famous poet 
precipitates a lesbian affair 
between the man's wife and 
his secretary. Fluently writ- 
ten. quick, and confident in 
its direction, it promises to 
do something original with 
the dollops of elliptical, 
chiastic philosophy informing 
e\cr\ page. Unfortunately the 
lesbian affair in the ball- 
rooms of Mallorca is just the 
start to a scries of tenuously 
related narratives featuring a 
child genius, a dotty aris- 
tocrat. and a black poodle 
which blows the legs off a 
professor of logic. 

Under a charitable light the 
resulting collage could be 
seen as a prose equivalent of 
Kurt Schwitters on whom 
Themerson has also written^ 
Less charitably it might b£ 
judged as a shoal of red 
herrings, each one pursued as 
soon as ii is spawned: and all 
of them, in the end. pulled 
together in one net and 
presented as inexorably 
linked. For this reviewer 
what began as genuinely 
problematical concluded as 
highly articulate balderdash.. 

There is similarly little; 
centre of gravity to Peter 
Dickinson's Tefuga which is 
set in Nigeria and sets out. 
ambitiously, to examine the- 
nature of authority — whether, 
colonial, military, or tribal. 
Alternating between the diary 
of a colonial housewife and a: 
modern attempt to film her 
life by her director son. « 
fells between two rickety 
stools and reads in patches, 
like A Passage to India as 
Misinterpreted by Enid 
Blyton. 



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definitive 

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subscription today and we wilt give you a copy of the 
hardback New Collins Concise English Dictionary 
(worth £&50) containing over 96,000 references. 

Simply fill in the coupon and send it to the address 
shown with your cheque for £33.00 (made payable to 
Times Newspapers Limited). 


Spotlights on Silence and the State itehmes Higher Education 


aas 
om 
re- 
* of 

ipVa 

and 

Jay. 

toe 

pior 

r irsi 

Em- 

5'83, 

ello. 

tbs 

'DUp 

ars. 

>viff 

the 

ex 

mat 

Ii 

nioi 

liplo 


1 — 


David Caute is the kind of 
writer you would expect to 
turn up at a PEN conference 
booing a .SebmiY of Stale, 
exchanging scatology (of the 
most literary kind) with a 
Norman Mailer, or mingling 
with the ethnically-dressed at 
some Unesco do. He wears 
his vocation as intellectual 
aggressively. He holds _ his 
mirror up to politicians, 
governments, and the secret 
policemen who do their dirty 
work, his twin spotlights 
Truth" and Art. and we. are 
shown the result 
These essays are. in no 
small measure, about their 
author.' The reader is re- 
quired to be interested in his 


David Walker 

THE ESPIONAGE OF 
THE SAINTS 

By David Cante 

Hamish Hamilton. £12.95 


recording (in order to pay off 
some old scores) the opinion 
of him written in a Senega- 
lese student’s thesis, and in 
his masochistic reproduction 
of the judgement of David 
Caute written by the editor of 
The Guardian during the 
affair of the non-publication 
there of a Caute essay. 

The Guardian turns out to 


be a leitmotif in what, though 
billed as two essays is, in feet, 
a single major piece on the 
relationship of art and poli- 
tics in Black Africa, to which 
has been added a previously 
published Caute diatribe on 
foe inquiry of Mr Peter 
Presion, the editor of afore- 
said Guardian, plus random 
jottings on the Ponting affair. 
The Guardian is one of the 
few — the only? - news- 
papers (Mr Caute implies) 
progressive enough to have 
recognized at an early stage 
the merit of foe Zimbabwean 
writer, Dambudzo 

Marcchera* who was later 
imprisoned by Robert 
Mugabe's secret police. But 


The Guardian . Mr Caute 
says, shopped Sarah Tisdall. 
and for foal crime Mr 
Preston is subjected to page 
upon page of vituperation. 

He draws his cartoons with 
verve. Eventually, though, 
they dissatisfy' him as well as 
us. He begins to probe Clive 
Poming's motives, doubts Ms 
Tisdall and her youthful 
purity, and suspends final 
judgement on foe new Zim- 
babwe despite its traducing 
the anti -colonial revolution. 
His mirror clouds, and foe 
emergent picture of govern- 
ments. their servants, and 
their policemen — and Mr 
Caute — takes on subtler, j 
more intriguing lines. I 


I endow my chequehosttl Oder for J3100 made papble to Times Newspapers 
LinttefL 


Signed Date 

Plate swd this coupon, together wilh your cheque; to Linda Batten, The Times 
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Pleaw no* this offer is open to new subscriber in the UK only and closes on 
Fdmary 25 I95& 







- / / s 


12 


It 


THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


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an 


One of’ the Lamhetr. Labour 
comviilor> v.jii'ji: r'.»r the High 
Court's judj.-siieni or. their rc- 
’usjl to set a -at; las; has de- 
fected to rite >DP. tin.,' Lei in. 
whose o r oi!'..T U«v d => "ia>or of 
Lambeth, resigned ir>n; the 
Labour group .rj-i before the end 
oi'Jjsi ueel-'s conn hearing. Like 
the other .’I counulfr-rs lasing 
disquah'icaU'T; and surcharge for 
rheir starve o\er r.n.e-eappine. 
Leon pleads not gusli.-* unlike 
them, he ha« n. •; .tapeared 
jvrsotval*; in c-tir*.. "Thi> is no 
sadden •Jecijion." he iss.s." 1 
h„v. e been ih.'d ;r: .tS-U ;t over 
the last n’nc snorin'. I am sick of 
the uj> :l«e pa-;.- n.i- exploited 
blacks m L.’.rr. K c:h r political 
purposes " Lev t. claims ihat 
asc uranic- ; o Cihnie minorities 
on fi.-uurg haxe h-.st ignored 
and that oirer La. v-ur councillors 
are unhjpp;. under ;!k hard left 
leadersil'P of Ted knight: 
“tVatcii . ,- J! :' r n*o>et in tile next 
few vices.'.” t'e warn' i.irUc. 


.cw- - 2 




Princes;- 


of Ke 

:ii max be 

amused 

b> cart 

tvns of 

rersei:' in 

the .Wit. 

>• ■*.* 

■ 

iche even 

ruy< she 

n’i bu: 

1 emne 

a imagine 

Norman 

Tebbi 

: sendi 

r.c off a 

cheque i 

for !/v: 

engifu 

1 of Jjfc's 

cartoon 

in T. 

:esda>': 

London 

Sur.iiari, 

It ih 

:C'.v > Tc 

bbii ban- 


daged head ip toe. and the 
caption does not bear repetition. 
Neil Kin nod. is am eng those 
who have sent off k- iters of 
discus:. Ediior Lou Kiriv- refuses 
to comment. 


Geld handclap 

Constituents in 'Vest Bromwich 
recently gave j party for local 
MPs Belly Boo throve and Feier 
Snape in appreciation of ihcir 
efforts to secure compensation 
for housing fault 5 . Each, to 
rapturous applause from a crowd 
of ?00. was presented wuh a gold 
pen. “Rapturous applausef" a 
colleague remarked when Snape 

IaIjI hirr -if mriiun: “HiH 


No doubt, like every industrial 
dispute, the teachers’ strike will 
be resolved in due course. But 
the real questions will remain: 
how was schooling in this 
country turned into an 
"industry" in which workers 
"strike for their rights" rather 
than a profession in which 
teachers follow a vocation? 

The answer is not far 10 seek. 
Since the 1944 Education Act. 
the 'ast majority of our schools 
have been — in effect — 
nationalized. True, they arc run 
by local authorities rather than 
directly b> the Department of 
Education: but then, the steel 
industry is run by its board 
rather than directly by the 
Department of Trade and In- 
dustry. True. too. the schools get 
a good deal of their money from 
rates instead of national taxes: 
but then, the steel industry gets a 
good deal of its money from sales 
instead of taxation. Ail in all. 
schools are just about as much a 
nationalized industry as the 
steelworks arc. 

And. being a nationalized 
industry, they behave like one. 
Nobody knows who spends how 
much on what. And nobody 
knows how- to make the staff 
believe they are pan of the 
organization rather than down- 
trodden serfs subject to hostile 
masters. It is all reminiscent of 
British Ley land before Michael 
Edwardes. 

The difficult question is: how- 
to turn schools back into schools? 
The usual answer — throwing 
more money at them — clearly 
will not work: all the evidence 
shows that when a nationalized 
industry gets a bigger subsidy it 
behaves even more like a 
nationalized industry. 

What, then? A new pay 
structure for teachers? Proper 
assessment of performance for 
both teachers 3nd pupils? Better 
teacher-training? A more sen- 
sible. down-to-earth curriculum? 
The government is trying all ot 
these, and no doubt they will all 
help. But will they really crack 
the problem? Won't we just have, 
temporarily, a better nationalized 
industry, likely to relapse into its 
old ways? 

There is a different, more 
fundamental solution at hand. 
Imagine a set of schools which 


More assisted places in a greatly expanded 
independent sector: Oliver Letwin 
offers an answer to the education crisis 


Good schools 
for all at 
minimum cost 



run themselves, entirely free 
from interference by all public 
officials except Her Majesty's 
Inspectorate. Imagine that, in 
these schools, the best teachers 
are paid well above the amount 
they could earn in our present 
maintained schools. Imagine that 
these schools have no strikes, no 
disruption of classes, and con- 
stant communication between 
staff' and managers on the spoL 
imagine that pupils from the 
poorest families receive a good, 
entirely free education. Imagine 
these things — and then rejoice, 
because they have already come 
true. 

In 1981. when Marie Carlisle 
was Education Secretary, the 
government set up an “Assisted 


Places Scheme". It enables the 
children of poor parents, and 
parents with middling incomes, 
to go to excellent independent 
schools. A child on the scheme 
whose parents earn less than 
£6.576 a year pays nothing at all. 
The schools involved are man- 
aged just as ihey were before the 
public binding was available: no 
need to deal with a local 
education authority: no interfer- 
ence except the Inspectorate's 
insistence on standards: a budget 
of their own: the managers on the 
spot: the best staff, paid over the 
odds. So far as can be as- 
certained. not one of these 
schools has been disrupted dur- 
ing the present dispute. 

If the contrast between the 


schools on the Assisted Places 
Scheme and the ordinary main- 
tained schools is so startu why 
doesn't the government build on 
the experience, and expand the 
scheme — or replicate its prin- 
ciples inside the nationalized 
sector? The argument usually put 
forward against doing so is that 
pupils with well-off parents have 
to pay high fees in Assisted 
Places schools, whereas every- 
body goes “free" ( i.e. at the 
taxpayers' and ratepayers* ex- 
pense) to nationalized schools. 

Of course, in theory it is 
absolute nonsense for the tax- 
payer and ratepayer to be 
providing “free" schools for the 
children of the well-off and rich. 
Everyone from every pan of the 
political spectrum knows that 
But this does not prevent people 
using “free schooling for all" as a 
political shibboleth. 

That is the political problem 
Sir Keith Joseph needs to solve. 
It is not as difficult as it looks — 
because the basic principles of 
the Assisted Places Scheme can 
be applied to the nationalized 
sector without abandoning “free 
schooling" for ail who want it. 

Schools that are at present 
nationalized can remain free of 
charge to all those who enter 
them. The self-management 
which is enjoyed by our present 
independent schools can grad- 
ually be replicated in the 
nationalized sector by providing 
each child with a “fully assisted 
place** - a sum paid to the school 
by the taxpayer and ratepayer for 
each pupil there. That way the 
school can become a financially 
independent entity, with a capac- 
ity to raise funds automatically 
by attracting more pupils. 

Cambridgeshire is already 
moving towards this goal by 
providing its schools with their 
own budgets: other areas could 
follow. There is a real chance, 
now. of turning our maintained 
schools gradually into indepen- 
dent professional institutions 
whose clients' fees are fully paid 
by the state, instead of fragments 
of a vast nationalized industry, 
woefully mismanaged, strike- 
bound and desolate. 

The author nay until recently a 
member of the Prime Minister's 
no/iev unit. 


Ronald Butt 

Why Lawson 
must listen 


■> 


told him of 
you resign? 


Bvngoi 


Kenneth Baker, the Environment 
Secretary. seems ;o n.v.c sud- 
denly developed j health;, regard 
for Pollers Bar vino. He has 
overruled an attempt by the local 
Hammers: council to build on a 
town-centre jliotmem - where 
the local wine knew, as Chateau 
By fig is produced. < Allotment 
grower C»c*' lire;. Rose lues, in 
B\ng Dmc.j -Six thousand locals 
signed on the dotted line, and 
Baker nas duly mot ;d. A 
happier late than that of the 
grand vru's namesake Admiral 
Btnu. who wus shot at Ports- 
mouth harbour in i?5” iGr losing 
Minorca to the French. 


Barry fantom 



u & \b y^cr. 

« . j©| jq 



(61 
*1 By 
fOLU 
KRt 

. .Ho 

J i An 

low 
1 1 Prc 
J Pit 


•Petrol price curs are great. 
I’ve just dri'-en 50 ciilvs 
looking for the cheapest brand' 


Old Glorv 


Some members of the Federation 
ol Conscrxav.j. Students base a 
childish surnme in More for 
Michael Hev i[irn.* ji iftjj week's 
Vnir.g Csir.sn.rx.Kise vA.ni'erencc 
m Bias' 1 pool. The notorious 
nghi-u ingers. v 'no have a reputa- 
tion lor iin.iiigenMii. plan lu 
wave Star*, nnd t: .ripcs flags 
daubed with MkorsM during his 
speech. 1 iiiiscrx Jiive Central Of- 
fice- v‘hiv!i 'v. :s uuTjged iu HnJ 
the Vi's ha.i invited Hescliine 
trier h resignation, is especially 
dreading 1 he Sif.i-rsl 1 j.iv in the 
light *>1 tin 1 American bid to take 
over Lev land. 


When Anatoli Sheharansky was 
imprisoned eight years ago. he 
was a pnme candidate for the 
son of bargaining now in 
progress. His case had everything 
the Soviet state usually likes to 
avoid, h was bound to attract 
international attention. It called 
into question once again the 
quality of Soviet justice, and it 
stood to damage Soviet foreign 
policy. Yet reports of plans to 
exchange Sheharansky for a 
number of East-bloc agents 
imprisoned in the West only- 
months after he was convicted 
came to nothing. 

Now. eight years through a 13- 
year sentence for alleied es- 
pionage. Sheharansky looks more 
likely to be released than at any- 
time since he was convicted. 
February NS6 is very different 
from July 1978. when 
Sheharansky was tried and sen- 
tenced. 

For the best pan of eight years, 
he has been supported by two of 
the world’s most powerful lob- 
bies. the international press and 
the Jewish community world- 
wide. The cumulative effect of 
their campaign should not be 
underestimated. 

The attention the press gave 
him resulted largely from his pre- 
trial role as liaison officer 
between the Soviet human-rights 
movement and Western journal- 
ists. There was a measure of 
guilty conscience among the 
journalists who had so eagerly 
seized on the stories of human- 
rights abuses that Sheharansky 
made public. 

Sheharansky himself had made 
no secret of his connections with 
the foreign press - declaring that 
they were not illegal under Soviet 
law. But the very openness of his 
contacts was a factor in the 
bringing of a charge of treason 
instead of the more usual charge 
against dissidents of anti-Soviet 
agitation and propaganda. 

What kept his name in the 
headlines, however, was the 
international Jewish commu- 
nity - who saw in his plight the 
plight of Jews throughout the 
Soviet Union. With time, his 
name became" synonymous with 
their campaign for the right of all 
Soviet Jews 10 emigrate to Israel. 
Shcharansky's imprisonment sig- 
nalled the end of Moscow's 


Mary Dejevsky explains what has Srougnt 
a change of mind after eight years 


Moscow finds 
freedom is best 
for Sheharansky 


benign but highly selective atti- 
tude to Jewish emigration (which 
had begun as a gesture to detente 
in the 1960s). and the beginning 
of what many Jews in the Soviet 
Union saw as a stale of siege - 
life in a country they fell to be 
increasingly alien. 

Shcharansky's case also at- 
tracted support by virtue of the 
human — or romantic — factor. 
He was married, after his release 
from an earlier period of deten- 
tion. to Natasha Stiglitz. On the 
day after the marriage the Soviet 
authorities cruelly gave her an 
exit visa to go to Israel. It was a 
question of leaving then, or 
never. Permission to leave the 
country may not be repeated. She 
chose to go. 

.And thereafter, using her Jew- 
ish name. Avital. and her 
married name. Sheharansky. she 
has campaigned tirelessly for her 
husband's release, appealing to 
statesmen and to international 
forums. She has become a 
familiar figure the world over, 
and a symbol. 

But it is unlikely 10 be the 
corrosive effect of the eight-year 
publicity campaign alone that has 
persuaded the Russians to con- 
sider releasing Sheharansky. They 
lake a perverse pride in 
withstanding even this degree of 
pressure. They must have come 
to the conclusion that holding 
Sheharansky any longer was 
counterproductive — to its policy 
aims as well as to its image 
abroad. 

Within the Soviet Union. 
Sheharansky has been a big factor 
in the revival of Jewish national 
and religious sentiment — a re- 
vival that had alreadv been 



Sheharansky: a symbol at home, 
a symbol abroad 


stimulated by the Six Day War of 
1967. Deprived of the possibility 
of leaving, the Jewish community 
turned in on itself. It became 
increasingly preoccupied xvjlh 
Judaism; young Jews became 
interested in learning Hebrew, 
even though the Soviet authori- 
ties insist that the language of 
Soviet Jews is Y'iddish: they 
started to celebrate Jewish festi- 
vals. 

Sheharansky became a focus 
for all those sentiments. His 
singlemindedness and fortitude 
under persecution became a 
powerful force that encouraged 
hundreds, perhaps thousands of 
Soviet Jews to profess their faith 
and their national identity pub- 
licly. and to persist in their desire 
to emigrate. This strengthening of 
the Jewish community has lx«n 
the direct opposite of the Soviet 
leadership's main objective in 
removing Sheharansky from So- 
viet society. 

For Soviet foreign policy, the 


case has proved equally counter- 
productive. Shcharansky’s 
continued imprisonment has be- 
come a serious irritant in East- 
West relations. In 1978. that was 
less important than now. 

The way the Soviet leadership 
looks at the world appears to 
have undergone a change. That 
has been evident in recent 
months in overtures to China. 
Japan and south-east Asia; in 
renewed interest in improved 
relations with conservative Arab 
countries: and in approaches — 
clandestine, but well authenti- 
cated — to Israel. 

It is above all in relations with 
the United States and with Israel 
that the Sheharansky factor 
comes in. His name is the one 
most frequently mentioned, along 
with that of Andrei Sakkharov. 
when there is talk of a gesture the 
Russians could make. The Soviet 
authorities have repeatedly in- 
sisted that they will not release 
Dr Sakharov. They have never 
been so categorical about 
Sheharansky. 

Releasing him at this point 
would bring the Soviet Union a 
number of advantages. Not only 
would it improve the prospects 
for the next Reagan-Gorbachov 
summit; it would also open the 
possibility of resumed diplomatic 
relations with Israel and thus the 
possibility of Soviet involvement 
in the Middle East peace process. 

For the United States and 
Israel, too, an exchange involving 
Sheharansky would have bene- 
fits. It would make President 
Reagan's less hostile attitude to 
the Russians look more justifi- 
able and gratiiy America's power- 
ful Jewish lobby. In Israel, it 
would be highly popular and help 
soften opposition to a resump- 
tion of diplomatic relations. 

The Soviet authorities must be 
hoping that Shcharansky’s release 
will set in train forces as powerful 
as those generated by his sentenc- 
ing. But they may be dis- 
appointed. Sheharansky has 
become a symbol for the Soviet 
human-rights movement as a 
whole. Unless his release is 
followed by an extension of the 
right to emigrate to those who 
have not had the bitter privilege 
of imprisonment, they may find 
that expectations have been 
aroused that cannot be met. 


If Mrs Thatcher puts off the 
election until the last possible 

moment, the government has at 
most two and a quarter years 
before it faces the electors. The 
Conservatives, therefore, have no 
time to lose in trying to win back 
lost public confidence. 

So long as the political world 
remains preoccupied with doubts 
about the Westland affair, the 
Tory party's chances of starting 
that recovery remain slight. But 
let us assume that these doubts 
are resolved in such a way as to 
leave no cause for reasonable 
anxiety among the government's 
own supporters. How then is the 
government to set about its own 
rehabilitation? 

Unemployment remains its 
overriding handicap, closely link- 
ed with anxieties about con-> 
dirions of life in the inner cities. 
The earlier assumption that 
unemployment would fell with 
the reduction of inflation and 
resumed growth have not been 
fulfilled. There are more jobs but 
unemployment nevertheless re- 
mains obstinately high, and is 
now rising again, as a result of in- 
creased demand for work arising 
from demographic changes and 
because more women are seeking 
work for the first time. 

The government rightly resists 
calls for more state spending to 
stimulate demand in the hope of 
creating more jobs, which would 
be both infiationary and. in 
employment terms, ultimately 
ineffective. It still believes that 
the right way forward is through 
the growth in small businesses, 
training (especially the Youth 
Training Scheme), the removal of 
restraints that inhibit the creation 
of new jobs at affordable wages, 
and eventually by increasing the 
differential between living on 
social security and the return for 
lower paid work to make such 
work more worth taking. 

The government’s creed is that 
businesses exist to create, not 
employment as such, but wealth 
from which employment oppor- 
tunities then come. All this is 
rational in theory but the 
government cannot be content to 
wait dogggcdly for the theory to 
work without taking any further 
action. If it does nothing more, it 
will be ousted from power as 
hard-hearted and dogmatically 
indifferent to the plight of those 
who seek work but cannot find it. 

Nor is it a help to say. although 
it is true enough, that the real 
level of unemployment is much 
much lower than the official 
figure on account of the untaxed 
black economy in parts of the 
country. Everybody knows about 
it. but the facts of the black 
economy are by their nature 
unprovablc. In any case, it is the 
trend that matters, and the 
official figures (which have just 
risen for two successive months 
to a record level) at least indicate 
the trend correctly. 

Some possible solutions plainly 
will nol be used because they are 
out of social fashion. In my 
opinion the government ought to 
use tax and social incentives to 
encourage more women with 
young families to stay at home in 
a sensible division of labour 
within the family. Thai would 


of 


have the social benefit 
improving the upbringing of their 

children as well as an economic 
advantage. But with the feminist 
lobby breathing down its neck, 
the government will shy away 
from thaL 

It could also be strongly argued 
that our employment figures are 
misleading compared with those 
of similar countries for reasons 
we could change. If we had 
national service and a longer 
period in full-time education our 
unemployment figures would 
compare belter with the German. 
.Again, our percentage unemploy- 
ment figures overstate the reality 
since the total workforce, of 
which the unemployed are ex- 
pressed as a percentage, excludes 
the rising number of self- 
employed. Were they included, 
the unemployed would not be 
put at 14.1 per cent, as they arc. 
but 12.5 per cent- 
Even so. urgent action is 
needed. Both the Organization 
for Economic Cooperation and 
Development and the European 
Community haxe recently an- 
alysed the employment outlook 
for Britain pessimistically, as a 
result of wage-push inflation and 
high labour costs. To try to 
retread the dangerous path of 
incomes policy would be a 
grievous error. The principal 
immediate remedy should be to 
make lower-paid work more 
worthwhile. This cannot be done 
by reducing social benefits, which 
have provided the safety valve 
that makes possible the shake-out 
of unproductive employment 
The threshold at which the 
low-paid enter tax should be 
raised sharply. But it is out of the 
question to allow this to reduce 
tax all the wax up the scale. It 
would haxe to be complemented 
by compensating changes in the 
higher bands, making eacb of 
them come into operation at a 
lower point. The Chancellor is 
thought to favour reducing the 
standard rate instead (if he does 
anything) because raising the 
threshold would still keep an 
unfairly sharp jump from no tax 
straight into the full standard 
rate. (Introducing 3 new- lower 
rate band would cause cosily 
difficulties in dealing with tax 
deduction from dividends, in- 
terest payments etc). 

But the political implications 
of this Budget arc too serious to 
be left for the Chancellor's 
decision alone after he has 
entered the annual “purdah” 
with his Treasury' officials. Of 
course, the overall Budget judg- 
ment is for him. but the Cabinet 
as a whole should discuss the 
political implications of detailed 
changes within that decision. 

A pre-Budget Chequers week- 
end would help. The Cabinet 
should look at the next phase of 
economic strategy , including the 
relationship between interest 
rates and exchange rates, (includ- 
ing the argument about joining 
the European Monetary System), 
and industrial regeneration. But 
in particular it should discuss at 
length the implications of the 
Budget for jobs. The Cabinet is 
entitled to have its say about the 
criteria which should guide the 
Chancellor. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Y e’ll tak’ the 
Wry road 


iG^My IBA 


!K 


Try putting tr.i* on >our car 
windscreen, h comes fr.im a 
publicity puff’ put out by she First 
Bank of Pinellas County, which 
is somewhere in America, in ihis 
case it standi for Individual 
Retirement Account. Questions 
posed and answered in the leaflet 
include "What is a Roi lover 
IRA?'’ and "Can nv. spouse have 
IRA?'" 


an 


House training 


Islington council reckoned wuh- 
| out its own workforce when it 
! ordered that pax omen is shouid 
tv? emblazoned xvih > el low 

[stencils of a dog. arrowed 
towards 1 he gutter, in an elTun to 
kc(.p the republic’*, si reels clean. 
Workmen installing a lamppost 
in Gillespie P.oaJ managed to 
reverse a pa*. mg M rt ne - so that 
the emblem n<«w points directly 
ii., an unsuspecting resident's 
cardcn. 


PHS 


Manila 

The startling good looks that won 
Mrs Imclda Marcos the title of 
"Miss Manila 1 9 53" have not 
altogether feded. and her con- 
summate statecraft makes the 
first lady of the Philippines a 
box-office draw in the current 
presidential election. 

"FL“. as she is known to the 
headline writers, has been cam- 
paigning just as hard as her 
husband Ferdinand in the run-up 
to the poll tomorrow that will 
decide whether his 20-ycar presi- 
dency is to be extended for a 
further six. years. 

She sings 10 the voters, in 
native Filipino. English, and 
sometimes local dialects: she 
delivers persuasive sales talks for 
the regime: and behind the 
scenes, she organizes. Marcos 
publicly acknowledges his debt to 
her. Not for nothing do they call 
her "the other president". ' 

There could scarcely be a more 
profound contrast between her 
stylish, almost regal presence and 
the discreet, modest charm of 
Mrs Cora/on Aquino, the left- 
wing politician's widow in whom 
the opposition has vested its 
hopes of dislodging Marcos. 

They arc almost the same age 
— Mrs Marcos 55 and Mrs 
Aquino 52. But there the likeness 
ends. Imelda is passionate where 
"Cor." is reticent. 

1 he first lady has been a 
powerful politician in her own 
right ox er three decades: the 


Philippine poll: will 
meek beat chic? 


self- 


opposition hopeful is a 
confessed political novice. 

The one represents the tough, 
wheeler-dealing world of Filipino 
public life, the other is a deeply 
religious, private person, thrust 
on to the hustings simply because 
she was the wife of* Benigno 
Aquino, slain at Manila airport 
on his return from political exile 
two years ago. 

The difference shows, particu- 
larly in their ceaseless public 
appearances. Mrs Marcos is 
dignified but alluring, her hair 
swept back, diamonds gjitiering 
in her cars. She picks up the 
microphone like a pop singer and 
paces the stage while defending 
her "number one top-notcher". 

Her speech is an expert blend 
of hard-nosed political invective 
— “Is she (Mrs Aquino) an 
oligarch or a communist? I say 
she is both" — and an almost 
mystic incantation of the virtue 
of beauty, love, and God. There 
is also a rather more mundane 
reference to "order". 


"They say 1 am a dreamer, but 
I dream during the day", she 
says. "I don’t just dream and 
plan. I do it. 1 am an activist" — 
which is all to the good, since 
apart from being the president's 


special envoy, head of the 
Philippine delegation to the UN 
general assembly, governor of 
metropolitan Manila and min- 
ister of human settlements, she is 
also chairman of two dozen 
business organizations and cul- 
tural bodies. 

The urban poor who wait 
hours to see and hear their 
“Cory", and the peasants who 
line her campaign trail, waving 
and wearing anything yellow (the 
colours of Mrs Aquino's parry), 
do not get such a performance. 

Mrs Aquino, petite like most 
Filipinos, -wearing glasses, and 
very little make-up. and always 
in a demure yellow dress (once 
w-iih its hem coming undone), 
looks like a schoolgirl by 
comparison. 

When she speaks, usually after 
hours of ranting denunciation of 
the “twenty years of Marcos mis- 
rule" by other opposition figures, 
it is quietly. She speaks chiefly of 
the anguish she suffered while 
her husband wras a martial law 
prisoner, and the trauma of his 
murder. It is a harrowing story, 
and the audience listens in 
silence.There is applause when 
she declares that she owes it to 
“Ninoy" to restore democracy, 
even if it should cost her life too. 


Her speeches are long on 
emotion and short on policy. She 
will retire the generals who have 
stayed loo long: she will usher in 
clean government; she will 
renegotiate the country's foreign 
debt: she will open the presiden- 
tial palace to the people and will 
create a better environment for 
businessmen, so generating badly 
needed jobs. It is a charcoal 
sketch of an Aquino administra- 
tion rather than a detailed 
engineering drawing. 

If this shortcoming outrages 
her critics, it does not appear to 
worry unduly the huge crowds 
she has during her barnstorming 
touts. To them, she embodies the 
spirit of the slogan seen every- 
where in the city streets: So bra 
Na. Tama Na. Palitan Na. which 
roughly translate as “enough is 
enough, change it". 

Being ait astute politician, the 
first lady detects the widespread 
desire for change (something of 
an admission in itself)- "Every- 
body wants change, but it should 
be change for the better." she 
says. “We want change too, 
towards a better life." That gets 
them going, but not everyone 
daps. Some of those attending 
rallies of the ruling KBL (New 
Society) have no option but to 
attend, having been bussed there. 
Others go for the 20-peso hand- 
out, a free T-shirt, and the 
snacks. 


In the reception hall of BBC 
Glasgow, where I was for a short 
while last weekend, there hangs a 
press-cutting praising Scotch and 
**>>•. This is a TV programme, a 
bumper edition of which went 
out last Hogmanay, and said to 
be so good that the anonymous 
journalist wrote: “It is the only 
programme funny enough to get 
the menfolk home from the pub 
unblooiered before midnight" 
This worried me on two 
counts. One. I had never seen or 
heard of Scotch and »’ ry- Two. I 
didn’t know what unblooiered 
meant. I always feel culturally 
inadequate when I go north of 
the border, overcome by the 
feeling that the Scots have the 
whole of English culture at their 
disposal plus the whole of their 
own, whereas we have only our 
own. So I turned, as I usually do 
on these occasions, to my cousin 
Laurence, who lives near Blair- 
gowrie and with whom I was 
spending the rest of the weekend. 


Paul Routledge 


“Yes, Scotch and Wry is a very 
funny programme. Do you not 
get it down south? Dear. dear. It 
stars RikJki Fulton as, among 
other things, a church minister by 
the name of I.M. Jolly who does 
a hilarious parody of late-night 
epilogues by TV ministers. Of 
course, the church being stronger 
up here than it is down south. I 
suppose we can get more fun out 
of it than you can.” 

Not only do we nol get Scotch 
and W7t. we never see Rikki 
Fulton either. Not only that, but 
we don’t get ministers down here 
either, or at least only the rather 
etiolated kind, the political min- 
ister whose chief function is to 
queue up for Mrs Thatcher’s job. 
If there was a programme in 
Scotland called Yes. Minister it 
would be about clergymen, prob- 
ably of a more complex nature 
than Brittan or Heseltine. And of 
course we don't have "unbloo 
tered” either. 

“Ah yes. unblooiered. Well, 
blooiered means drunk, so I 
suppose unblooiered means so- 
ber. Come to think of it, it's 
interesting that a Scottish word 
for sober can mean: not yet 


drunk. Is there any word in 
English like that?" 

By now suffering badly from 
cultural inadequacy. I side- 
stepped the conversation into a 
talk about other TV comedy. We 
filled our glasses with Scotch (a 
product the English are incapable 
of making) and ranged far and 
wide over cultural map ref- 
erences. Laurence and I are in 
foil agreement over the main 
figures in Western civilization — 
Brunei. Fats Waller. William 
McGonagall — so it came as 
something of a shock when, 
quarter past the fourth glass, we 
encountered a total disagreement. 

He thought Fawlty Towers was 
an undoubted classic. I thought it 
was, at best, mildly amusing. He 
was shocked. He threw another 
three logs on the fire. He got out 
his two best video recordings of 
Fawlty Towers and. while the 
sleet swirled round the chimney 
and the Highland cattle settled 
down to sleep in the east field, we 
sat late into the night with a fifth 
and sixth elass of Famous Grouse 
and Fawlty Towers. 

Way after midnight we came to 
agreement. Laurence thought 
Fawlty Towers was a classic and I 
thought it was mildly amusing. 
We also came to a more 
philosophical agreement. There is 
no comedy programme which 
everyone has thought funny. 
Sergeant Bilko gets near, but 
some people hate Bilko. Mon tv 
Python gets nearer, but some 
people froth at the name. Chaplin 
has his enemies; some of these 
ike Busier Keaton: but Keaton 
I^. V f . 01hers C0|<L There is 

whSS ll ! y E5 ing , or nobody 
which everybody thinks funny. 

The next day. as ! left. 1 looked 
round for my coat, Laurence said 

!Li?hL R lhe 1 didn ’ 1 know 
.?Vc£ ^ laJk,r, S a bo“t- “Press 
is a Scottish wond for cupboard." 

^ a ni k S ly h Xome ®^n. 

When Ll ch -y° u some more. 

when the weathw's )«* sne „ « 

* ,e |* Scotland still feelinE 
L u !^ y ,T tad equate. 1 think J’M 
. soori - Al ffus rate. I’ll end 

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THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 3986 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


„ SIR ROBERT REGRETS 

The secretary of the Cabinet 
put up a better performance 
before the House of Com- 


Voluntary services at risk 


moos select committee on 
defence than did his prede- 
cessors as witnesses, Mr Leon 
Bnttan and Sir Brian Hayes. 
It was doubtless not the 
smoothest presentation of Sir 
Robert Armstrong’s mandarin 
career but he did at least 
speak in precise, meaningful 
sentences. He even told a 
joke. 


cash fa , 
oration 


It is fer from clear, how- 
ever, if he has satisfied the 
committee that there is no 
need to call the civil servants 
whose actions are at the heart 
of the events of January 6th. 
Sir Robert revealed that 
before Miss Colette Bowe 
leaked the Solicitor General's 
letter to the Press Association 
she tried to contact Sir Brian, 
her Permanent Secretary. Sir 
. Robert, himself, however, was 
not the object of an y such 
attempted consultation by Mr 
Bernard Ingham, the Prime 
Minister’s press secretary. It 
is possible that the committee 
may now feel that Miss Bowe 
need not appear before them. 
It must be much less likely 
that Sir Humphrey Atkins 
and his colleagues will feel the 
same way about Mr In gham 

The government is continu- 
ing to fight its war of attrition 
with the committee in the 
hope that it will win over just 
enough Conservative mem- 
bers for a weary truce to be 
called. It has still not grasped 
that this is a foolish war, a 
war against its own self 
interest. Until every con- 
ceivable question - and even 
some inconceivable questions 
- are answered the Govern- 
ment is hamstrung by the 
doubts and fears of its own- 
supporters. 

On yesterday's evidence, 
moreover, it is still an ill- 
fought war. Questions of 
tactics may seem somewhat 
beside the point at this 
juncture but, for the sake of 


the administration of which 
Mrs Thatcher is the bead and 
the civil service of which Sir 
Robert is the head, they are 
not without importance. Bet- 
ter rules for the relations 
between civil servants and 
parliament will be needed 
long after today’s key players 
are consigned to the footnotes 
and chapter headings of 
history. 

Sir Robert could have 
argued yesterday that the very 
idea of an official appearing 
before a select co mmitte e in 
any other . role than as a 
ministerial mouthpiece would 
be a mockery of good 
government. If advice to 
ministers were to be regularly 
published, if discretionary 
actions were to be subject to 
the constant glare of hind- 
sight, both the advice and the 
actions would become defen- 
sive, cautious and utterly 
antithetical to the cause of 
better management of Britain. 
He could have argued that the 
appearance of Miss Bowe and 
Messrs In gham^ Mogg and 
Powell in the current hot- 
house atmosphere of commit- 
tee room 15 would be a 
precedent with revolutionary 
consequences for the future. 

He did not however found 
his argument upon this sure 
base. He relied on the 
suggestion that to bring civil 
servants who had already 
.appeared before his own 
inquiry before a further in- 
quiry fay the select committee 
would be an act of unfairness. 
His joke was the old one 
about the pig and the hen 
being offered bacon and eggs 
in a motorway cafe. To the 
hen it was only a contribu- 
tion. To the pig it was a total 
commitment. • 


The concept of fairness is 
hot, of .course, one to be 
lightly cast adrift. But when 
set beside the threat to the 
country's confidence in its 
government it seems a lesser 
consideration. And indeed 


just how unfair would it 
really be to these experienced 
and highly paid officials? Sir 
Robert may have been careful 
not to mention any of them- 
by name hot their names 
have hardly remained un- 
sullied by this affair. If Mr 
Powell for example, merely 
misunderstood a request or 
on one occasion misused the 
discretionary powers that he 
is paid to use very day of his 
working life, should he not 
have the opportunity to 
delimit precisely his error? 

It is hard - even -for many 
friendly Conservative MPs - 
to resist the conclusion that 
unfairness to officials is not at 
the heart of the Government’s 
fears and that, i n s t ead, there 
is the knowledge that on the 
afternoon of January 6th the 
usual discretion of Downing 
Street officials included the 
unusual discretion to dis- 
credit Mr Heseltine. And that, 
moreover, when the unusual 
slipped into the illegitimate, a 
cover-up was organised to 
protect the Prime Minister 
from the consequences. 

If the above interpretation 
is the worst that the Prime 
Minister has to fear from the 
cross-examination of bar of- 
ficials by MPs, she ought not 
to be held bade from letting 
them appear. There is every 
reason to think that this is 
indeed the worst that she has 
to fear. Even if Sir Robert has 
succeeded in getting the select 
committee off the 
government’s back, the ques- 
tions will remain. 

Without frill investigation 
there is the risk that bad 
rumours will drive out the 
good for as long as she 
remains in office. Without 
full investigation it will be 
harder still to give strong 
government. And without 
strong government, the 
requirement to reconsider the 
role and responsibilities of 
dvil servants will not be the 
only .task that, remains un- 
done; 


YET MORE DAMAGE TO THE CHILDREN 


The ' teachers’ . union repre- 
sentatives like fo see theirs as 
a caring profession, to use the 
vogue phrase. Ur has riot, 
however, been easy to take 
that description at face value 
during the protracted .dispute 
over their pay, during which 
some teachers have not scru- 
pled, to use their pupils is 


.te&chers.y are ... ridyir/ mean? Is the intention simply 


more; 

. The National- Union of 
Teachers and the National ■ 
Association of Schoolmasters 
and Union of Women Teach- 
ers have, decided to boycott 
training courses for teachers 
in preparation for the new 
General Certificate of Second- 


hostages, to get their way. • ary Education examination 
Although Sir Keith Joseph’s ' which replaces both Ordinary 


handling of the dispute has 
fallen well short of befog a 
political masterpiece, that 
does not excuse the teachers 
unions’ tactics. 

They have penalized chil- 
dren. Their lightning guerilla 
strikes have caused chaos in 
schools and anxiety to many 
parents (not least to working 
mothers) who haye not 
known until the last moment 
whether they could safely 
leave their children at school 
Children have been sent 
home. Although head teach- 
ers have tried to protect 
examination pupils, . some 
have suffered. Withdrawal of 
mid-day supervision has led 
to children being sent outside 
regardless of the weather.. 

In some places it is over 
two years since parents had 
access to teachers for guid- 
ance about the schools .to 
which their children might 
move after the primary stage, 
or about the subject choices 
available at 13 or 16. To the 
caused, the 


levels and the Certificate of 
Secondary Education in 1988. 
Parents of children due to 
begpn their preparation for 
this examination this Septem- 
ber wifr inevitably be worried. 
Is the new examination (for 
which the teachers’ unions 
have 1 pressed hard) off after 
an?. : 

In feet, that cannot happen 
and the teachers’ unions 
know it Preparation for the 
new examination has gone 
far, and in many areas there 
has. already been a consid- 
erable attendance at teachers’ 
courses. Moreover, since 
examinations have to be 
prepared well in advance, the 
examining bodies are already 
standing -down working 
committees on the old 
exa mina tions. The switch to 
GCSE has gone past the point 
of no return, and no purpose 
is served by the teachers' 
ultimatum except to try to 
frighten parents with a bogus 
threat , 

What does “boycott’ 


to boycott training courses, 
which are normally provided 
for heads of departments who 
then take back what they 
have learned to their staff? 
Since written training mar 
terial has already been sent to 
schools, that would hardly 
bring the GCSE to a halt, and 
in any case teachers can 
hardly teach in an examina- 
tion vaccuum. Perhaps the 
idea is to teach for the 
examination badly, as a result 
of inadequate training. 


anxiety thus 

MILITANCY IN THE PUNJAB 


The NAS/UWT are refus- 
ing to take part in training 
until the 1985 pay dispute is 
conclusively settled. Since 
that union is now balloting its 
members in the hope of their 
agreement to the Acas pro- 
posals, it is hard to see what 
purpose is served by its threat 
- except to persuade its 
members that it is as tough as 
the NUT. The purpose of the 
NUT (which intends to take 
the Acas award but keep up 
the dispute) is plainer. It 
refuses both to train for the 
examination and to design 
and develop GCSE courses 
for children. But what else 
can be taught at this stage? 
The unions are spreading 
gloom and worry for no 
purpose. Whatever the merits 
Of their cause, their latest 
action deserves only con- 
tempt 


After four months of relative 
calm the troubles of India s 
Punjab state appear to^be 
reasserting themselves. Two 
separate but not necessarily 
unrelated events have trig- 
gered tension. They could put 
at risk the survival of last 
July's peace accord which is 
still the single most signifi- 
cant achievement of Rajiv 

Gandhi's tenure of office 


By making concessions to 
sikh moderates and isolating 
the militants Delhi was able 
to secure an elected govern- 
ment for the state. Its 
undoing would undermine 
not only the tenuous har- 
mony of Punjab but the 
standing of Mr , Gandhis 
administration. 


accord . Haryana. Punjab’s 
neighbour, which has shared 
Chandigarh as joint capital 
was to be compensated by the 
transfer of Punjabi territory. 
A commission to determine 
the areas lo be handed over 
was set up. But its verdict was 
inconclusive. As a result the 
twin exchanges of capital and 
territory were postponed; and 
now talks between Delhi, and 
the governments of the- two 


On their own neither of 
these two problems should 
cause concern. Together they 
do. The community of sikhs 
is fractured. Although the 
September elections in Pun- 
jab restored to power a 
majority moderate govern- 
ment it has been prey to 
terrorism and factionalism. 
As a result despite its 
popularity, it has been depen- 
dent on support from Mr 


states have also failed to .find Gandhi's . government in 

• • _ Ttf- ■ TVlhf rnm/^rcAlv Inf* Cilfh 


Problems arose when Delhi 
was unable to 

promised transfer of Chan- 
digarh to Punjab as the siate 
sole capital The ptedf JoA 


so was a central anicJe of the 


July accord l0 exche - the. .rer^pus. 


a solution. This leaves sikh 
moderates feeling badly let 

down. „ , , . . ‘ - 

A second problem is poten- 
tially more threatening. The 
Golden Temple complex has 
been taken over by sikh 
militants, many of them 
armed supporters of -seces- 
sion.. As a first step they 
apparently dismissed the tem- 
ple priests, accusing them Of 
collaborating with ; Mr 
Gandhi's government. . Now 
thev have virtual -control of 
the* Golden. Tcmpleand.from 
this vantage they; look to’ be 


end 

of -India's sikhs over tissue 
Under the terms of the 


fears and 
sikhs: . 


anxieties of; the 


Delhi. Conversely, the sikh 
militants who were drubbed 
at the polls have far from 
accepted their humiliation. 

The answer therefore is for 
Mr. Gandhi to transfer Chan- 
digarh to Punjab immedi- 
ately. even if that means 
uncoupling and delaying the 
handover of territory to 
Haryana. It would ensure 
moderate sikhs the support 
they need to take on the 
militants in the temple. It 
might also later on allow Mr 
Gandhi to send in his army to 
flush out the militants should 
he need to. without incurring j 
the sikh wrath which similar 
action provoked in 1984. 



■X. \\ i "X • * ■' - . - 

ife- Sg&i&siig 



From the Chairman of (he 
Katiomd Council for Voluntary 
Organisations ana others 
Sir, During the passage through 
Parliament of the Bill which 
abolishes the GLC and other 
metropolitan authorities vol- 
untary organisations asked for, 
and received, repeated assurances 
from Government ministers that 
worthwhile voluntary activity 
would not be pm at risk in the 
political crossfire surrounding 
abolition. 

However, as the date for 
abolition approaches, we are 
increasingly concerned feat vol- 
untary organisations face a very 
uncertain future with the succes- 
sor funding schemes. 

With transitional funding, the 
total of the first round of bids 
was 50 per cent higher than was 
expected when the scheme was 
first announced. We were very 
concerned that the scheme was 
discriminatory in that bids from 
Conservative authorities seemed 
to be treated much more 
favourably than comparable bids 
from Labour authorities. How- 
ever, we welcome the assurances 
that Lord Eton has given to the 
London Voluntary Service Coun- 
cil that this is not fee case; 

In the metropolitan counties 
none of the preparations is 
sufficiently advanced to enable a 
collective scheme, giving grants 
to voluntary organisations, to 
begin operations on April I this 
year. There is widespread confu- 
sion about bow fee collective 
scheme will work. One authority 
has decided, on what we believe 
to be incorrect legal advice, not 
to set up a scheme. 


There is also the current 
inability of fee London Boroughs 
Grams Committee to recommem 
a figure for its budget for 
London-wide organisations for 
the next financial year, which 


Curbs on power 
of Ombudsman 


From Mr H- J. Shields 
Sir, May L through fee courtesy 
of your pages, point out the 
danger of our ombudsman sys- 


needs to be supported bv the two- lem l*j n 8 rendered impotent by 
thirds of the boroughs 'necessary a .minomy of authorities? 
to enable fee scheme to begin to From bitter ex pen race, 1 have 


operate. 

Finally, voluntary 

organisations in London have 
been extremely worried by the 
decisioa of Westminster City 
Council to fund, either wholly or 
in part, only nine of the 41 
voluntary bodies in the borough 
which are currently funded by the 
GLC We hope that this wifi not 
set a precedent which other 
London boroughs will wish to 
follow. 

These and other factors com- 
bine to make it imperative for 
central Government to take 
urgent action to make good its 
repeated assurances that vol- 
untary activity in our great cities 
wifi not be damaged by the 
abolition of the metropolitan 
authorities. 

Yours faithfully, 

PETER JAY, Chairman. 
National Council for Voluntary 
Organisations. 

PETER W. SUTCLIFFE, Chair- 
man, 

London Voluntary Service Coun- 
cil, 

ALAN G. POWELL, Chairman, 
Greater Manchester Council for 
Voluntary Service, 
c/o National Council for Vol- 
untary Organisations. 

26 Bedford Square, WC1. 
January 22. 


Uganda’s future 

From Dr D. N. McM aster 
Sir, The tone of today's leader 
(January 31) on Uganda is most 
welcome. A new opportunity 
exists at lasL Yet it may again be 
lost unless it is acted upon 
simultaneously by the new lead- 
ers within fee country and by 
Britain. 

Delay was, I feel, part of the 
tragedy of the failure of Professor 
Lute’s provisional government of 
reconstruction after the fell of 
Amin. While outsiders waited for 
evidence of success before giving 
aid, many within the country 
vainly awaited manifestations of 
such support. Thus mutual fail- 
ure was half-anticipated. 

One would hope now for more 
positive responses, both within 
Uganda and from Britain. The 
.northern parts of Uganda have 
suffered, grievously in the pro- 
tracted conflicts, chiefly through 
aitenral strife, fee disruption -of 
society, and severe rural food 
dorages, chiefly occasioned by 
these problems and adverse 
weather. What outsiders can. or 
should, do here is surely limited. 


Presently, fee support for 
President Museveni is perceived 
as being chiefly derived from 
southern Uganda. It will be a 
severe test for the new govern- 
ment to be seen to be actively en- 
gaged in northern reconciliation. 
This is an internal matter. 

In southern Uganda, however, 
any visitor to the country in 
recent years has quickly become 
aware of fee terrible scale of 
physical destruction; in fee cap- 
ital in large towns, such as 
Masaka ana Mbarara, in fac- 
tories, on plantations and farms 
of perennial food crops. More- 
over, the main institutions of 
hujber education, including 
Makerere University, and of 
research are also in fee south of 
fee country. 

Outside assistance in these 
sectors could be both apt and 
effective and, not least, would be 
seen to be so now by an incoming 
government which will stand in 
immediate need of support. 
Yours faithfully, 

DAVID McMASTER, 

110 Contiston Drive, 

Edinburgh. 

January 31. 


Help for Forces 

From Field Marshal Lend Carver 
Sir, The interesting proposal 
made by Sir Philip Goodhart in 
his letter (February 3) could well 
be applied in other fields of 
defence as a means of making 
better use of civilian resources to 
improve the conventional 
capability of the Armed Forces. 
The mom-ent one tries to 
formalize such arrangements into 
a military organization, such as 
the existing Territorial Army, one 
runs into difficulties. The op- 
erators do not wish to undertake 
tire commitments involved in 
belonging to a military unit and 
the Ministry of Defence does not 
wish to spend fee money. 


All that is needed is the 
maintenance of a register of fee 
equipment and of fee personnel 
on which the Ministry of Defence 
would have the right to call in an 
emergency. It would be no more 
than fee application to other 
fields of fee arrangements which 
the Admiralty, and now fee 
Ministry of Defence, has had for 
a tong time in regard to merchant 
shipping. 

The old Army Emergency 
Reserve, which was swallowed up 
into fee T & AVR, when the two 
were merged, went a long way 
towards this as far as personnel 
were concerned. 

Yours truly, 

CARVER 
House of Lords. 


After Concorde 

From Mr Robert McCrindle, MP 
for Brentwood and Ongar 
(Conservative) 


Sir, T quite agree with Mr. N.A. 
de Berry, (January 21) that we 
should now be seriously consid- 
ering a successor to Concorde. 
Much of fee early criticism of 
this aircraft has started to recede 
and it is now evident that British 
Airways’ Concorde services are 
being run profitably and, in the 
process, through charters being 
brought doser to ordinary peo- 
ple. I fear, however, that the 
capital investment required for a 
purely Franco-British successor 
to Concorde is such that it is 
almost inevitable that we shall 
have to proceed in partnership 
with one of the large American 
aircraft manufacturers. 


Although this may seem at first 
sight to be regrettable, it does 
give a better guarantee of 
purchases of Concorde mark 11 
by American airlines, without 
whose orders h would be difficult 
lo justify the considerable ex- 
pense. 

h has long been my contention 
that, having marched a genera- 
tion up to the top of the 
supersonic hiH it is simply 
unacceptable that we should be 
prepared to march them down 
again as we approach the 21st 
centurv. U is not too early to take 
initiatives and 1 hope the new 
Secretary of State for Trade and 
Industry, Mr Paul Channon, MP, 
can be persuaded to do so. 
Yours faithfully, 

ROBERT McCRINDLE. 

House of Commons. 

January 30. 


Cathedral charges 

From the Subdean of Lincoln 
Sir, It is not surprising that fee 
decision of Ely’s chapter to 
introduce a charge for entry has 
again set off a discussion on 
support for cathedrals. The 
Bishop of Rochester's letter 
(January 24) raises a particular 
problem related to State aid: the 
na g gin g question of accountabil- 
ity. 

My hope would be to see a 
start made by a group of 
cathedral chapters to establish a 
■National Trust for the Care of 
Cathedrals as soon as possible. 
This should represent not only 
the cathedral administrators and 
the Cathedrals Advisory 
Commission but also conservar 
tionists, architects and business 
pie able to make a hard- 
ded effort to raise a real 
endowment for this work and to 
act as a lobby to enlist realistic 
State contributions in fee long 
run. 

Such a trust should also set up 
fee mechanism to receive project 
applications submitted by cathe- 


dral bodies for work on the 
fabric; to fund them on a shared 
basis and to monitor the needs 
for the future. 

It is surely for fee cathedral 
authorities themselves to get this 
structure set up and running. 
Then the campaign for real State 
aid can begin. 

Yours faithfully, 

REX DAVIS. 

The Subdeanery. Lincoln. 
January 28. 


The Times regrets that ft is 
temporarily unable to notify 
correspondents whose letters are 
not selected for publication. 


Worlds apart 

Fmm Mr IV.II.C.Finluw 
Sir.My surprise must have even 
surpassed Mrs Gofiton's {January 
16) at the country of origin of her 
USA postcards when my neigh- 
bour. last summer, sent me a 
beautiful composite-views one of 
Pearl Harbour. Hawaii. 

Most shots were aerial ones of 
the sunken battleship Arizona, 
now preserved os a permanent 
memorial and shrine. Another 
was the approach line of the 
Japanese attack. 

The postcard was printed in 
Japan. 

Yours lailhfullj. 
W.H.CFINBOW. 

Dene Cottage. 6 Gaywood Road. 
Ashicad. 

Surrey. 


> 


learnt that a council can reject 
wife impunity fee clearest 
arbitration of the local ombuds- 
man - even without any serious 
inquiry into fee actual grievance. 

The Commission for Local 
Administration has long been 
concerned feat councils criticised 
in a report can arbitrarily reject 
its recotnmcnda 1 ion 5 .I 1 says, “So 
far as possible, local authorities 
should be seen not to be judges 
in their own cause." 

It has repeatedly asked coun- 
cils io set up special committees 
to consider the ombudsman's 
findings whenever he upholds a 
verdict of maladministration 
involving injustice and stales 
that, where this has been done, 
fee system has worked well and 
most grievances have been re- 
solved. 

As 6 per cent of complaints 
involving injustice still remain 
wholly unresolved, the commis- 
sion last year urged the secretary 
of state to introduce legislation 
compelling authorities to provide 
a remedy in all such cases, as al- 
ready occurs in Northern Ireland. 
In reply, Kenneth Baker agreed 
that steps should be taken to 
ensure compliance with the 
ombudsman's report, but he 
considered that legal sanctions 
are not yet appropriate. 

A parliamentary select 
committee is at present consid- 
ering ways of giving the commis- 
sion more authority. May I 
suggest that if government is not 
prepared to grant enforcement 
powers, then the secretary of 
state should at least be required 
to use his existing prerogative to 
"call in fee papers" and feus 
confirm, or reject, the 
ombudsman's arbitration from 
his own investigation? 

Yours sincerely. 

JAMES SHIELDS. 

West Town Cottage, 

Sibford Ferris, 

Banbury, 

Oxfordshire. 

February 3. 


Outside the law 

From Mr John V. Eibner and Mr 
Lawrence Klippenstein 
Sir, You have done a good 
service by publishing (January 
29) Richard Bassett's report from 
Budapest, “Prisoners the West 
must not neglect”. There is 
always a danger that Western 
observers will be blinded to 
human-rights problems in Hun- 
gary on account of its remarkable 
prosperity and growing freedom 
by Soviet-bloc standards. It must 
not be forgotten feat prisoners of 
conscience still exist in Hungary. 
. Your correspondent gave fee 
impression that there are 160 
Catholic conscientious objectors 
lo armed military service in one 
Hungarian prison. Keston Col- 
lege estimates that there are 15 to 
20 Catholics among 150 to 200 
imprisoned conscientious objec- 
tors throughout fee whole coun- 
try. There are reportedly more 
Jehovah's Witnesses than Catho- 
lics among them. Only a few tiny 
religious groups qualify as 
conscientious objectors under 
Hungarian law. 

As Richard Bassett rightly 
points out, fee Catholic hierarchy 
has become “an extension of fee 
State’s authority". The bishops 
use their power to limit the 
influence of the pacifist element 
within fee Church, using such 
means as the suspension and 
transfer of priests. They also 
refuse to ask fee Government to 
allow Catholic conscientious 
objectors the option of unarmed 
alternative military service, as is 
the case in Poland and the GDR. 
Bishop Jozsef Cserhaii only this 
month stated, on behalf of the 
hierarchy, that it would be 
tantamount to “hara-kiri” for fee 
bishops to make a request 

Both the State and the Catholic 
Church have a real interest in 
improving Hungary's European 
credentials. To follow the exam- 
ple of the GDR, Poland and 
most other European countries 
by allowing unarmed military 
service for all religious conscien- 
tious objectors could only help 
this process. 

Yours sincerely. 

JOHN V. EIBNER. 

LAWRENCE KLIPPENSTEIN, 
Keston College, 

Heafefieid Road, 

Keston, Kent 
January 29. 


All mixed up 

From Mr John Stuart Law 
Sir, Whilst in a traffic jam in 
Wanington, Cheshire, fee other 
day I saw two young boys 
proceed to an area of parkland by 
fee side of the road and begin to 
play wife a rugby baiL As this 
area has connections with both 
branches of rugby, I was fas- 
cinated and curious to see which 
method would be adopted by 
them, be ft Union or League. 

My speculation was shortlived 
when the first of the boys threw 
the ball between his legs to be 
caught by fee other, who then 
proceeded to throw it forward. It 
would appear that he had fallen 
under fee influence of fee local 
American Air Force base. 

Is this really progress? 

Yours in disillusionment 
J. S. LAW. 

56 Radnor Drive, 

Wallasey. 

Merseyside. 

January 3t. 


ON THIS DAY 


February 6 1889 


Crou-n Prince Rudolph of Austria 
uxis found dead on January 30 at 
a shooting lodge at the oiiloge of 
Mayerling. First accounts stated 
that he had suffered a heart attack 
but shortly afterwards it was 
reported he had committed 
suicide. It was, however, several 
years later that it became known 
that with him had died his 
mistress Baroness Marie Vetstra 
and that her Indy had been 
smuggled out of the lodge. There 
will probably always be an element 
Of mystery 1 about the affair ■ it is 
only three years ago that it was 
claimed the pair had been 
murdered - victims of apolitical 

plot 


MAYERLING 

TRAGEDY 


FUNERAL OF 
ARCHDUKE 


VIENNA Feb 5. 
The funeral of the late Archduke 
Rudolph, Crown Prince of Austria - 
Hungary, was solemnized at 4 pm 
today at the Capuchin's Church on the 
New Market, in presence of the 
Emperor, the Archdukes, the King of 
the Brigmns. Prince Bandouin of 
Flanders, and the principal members of 
the Diplomatic Body. 

I made the church the sight was one 
of gloom. The Capuchins Church, in 
the vault of which 11 Emperors are 
buried, is a small, unpretending edifice, 
into which not much fight penetrates 
even at noon- The Crown Prince's 
coffin was set on a catafalque 
surrounded by large taper,, and these 
candles rather punctuated the darkness 
than gave light. In the deep shadows of 
the chancel one could perceive from 
the organ gallery several tiers of seats 
crowded with officers and ladies in 
mourning. Conspicuous in this assem- 
blage was the Emperor of Austria, in 
the Mack uniform of an infantry 
coloneL 

Beside His Majesty stood the King 
and Queen of the Be&ans, and aO the 
other places on the « trade were 
occupied by Archdukes and 
hnurhriiHf i The empress, the 
Crown Prince Stephanie, and the 
Archduchess Marie Valeria were ab- 
sent. 

Cardinal GangUxiuer. Ar chbishop of 
Vienna, performed the short funeral 
service. The organ was silent, and the 
choristers chanted their responses 
without aceompaniament. During the 
service the Emperor stood perfectly 
calm, looking about him with quick 
movements of the head, as his custom 
is. After the chanting of the Libera, 
however. His Majesty stepped out from 
his place, walked up along to his son's 
coffin, knelt down beside it, and with 
clasped hands remained for a moment 
or two in prayer. This was a minute of 
poignant emotion for aO pres en t- Not a 
sound was heard. Nobody coughed, not 
a dress rustled , not a sword scabba r d 
clanked on. the flagstones. An entire 
Btffinesa prevailed till the Emperor rose 
from his knees and walked back calmly 
to his place. 

The vaults are under the care of 
Capuchin monks of the brown-robed 
Franciscan Order, and they may be 
visited by anybody ; but if there be any 
ladies in a tourist party it will be 
noticed that the conducting monk 
shrinks when addressed by on of 
them, for the rules of the order forbid 
any intercourse, even by word, with 
women. All these Capuchins are 
gentlemen belo n g in g to the highest 
Austrian families, scholars tired of the 
world, men disappointed in love, or 
sufferers in mind and body who have 
found the paths of our modern life too 
stony for them. Crown Prince Rudd 
will lie henceforth in the crowd of 
illustrious departed H'wiiii, and from 
to-day one of these brown Capuchin 
friars will be trying daily to evade 
giving direct answers to the question 
as to how he died. 

M Jokai, the distinguished Hungar- 
ian author, publishes to-day in the 
Budapest Nunuet the following letter, 
addressed by the late Crown Prince to 
M. de Szogyenyi, Assistant Minister 
for Foreign Affairsu- 

My dear Szogyenyi, - Enclosed 1 
send you a codicil Please act in 
accordance with its instructions, and 
my will, executed two years ago, with 
my wife's consent. There is a small 
table near the sola in my study in the 
Hofbuig. Open the drawer with the 
enclosed golden key. and you will find 
there my papers . the perusal of which 
I confide to you, leaving it to your 
discretion to decide which or whether 
any ought to be published. 

“I must depart this life. Give my 
kind regards to all my good friends and 
acquaintances. 1 wish you every 
happiness. God bless our beloved 
Fatherland. “Yours’' 

-RUDOLPH” 

The official admission of the suicide 
has had this result - that in some 
places the ecclesiastical authorities, in 
accordance with the rules of the 
Roman Catholic Church, refuse to hold 
Divine services for the late Crown 
Prince. On receiving the first news, 
ascribing the sudden death of his 
Imperial Highness to apoplexy, the 
Franciscan Monastery of Linz hoisted 
a black flag which, however, was at 
once removed when the truth became 
known. At Meran, the well-known 
Tryolese winter resort, the Canon 
absolutley refused to celebrate mass in 
the parish church without special 
licence from h» bishop, and the 
authorities had to content themselves 
with a military service, conducted in 
t-lw open air. On other Iwwl, the 
Archbishop of Prague has instructed 
the Bohemian clergy to pray for the 
soul of the Emperor's son. who, 
according to indisputable medical 
evidence, was in a state of unsound 
mind when be laid hands upon himself; 
and there is no doubt that the entire 
Austrian and Hungarian clergy will 
receive instructions from Rome to 
assume the same altitude. 


21 




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From Mr R. G. Oliver 
Sir, At one time my company 
made certain articles which had 
to be used under wet conditions 
and ultimately the material 
would rot and so fee articles 
came to fee end of feeir lives. 
When I remarked that fee term 
rotting did not help sales my late 
father suggested calling it bacteri- 
ological decomposition. Our cus- 
tomers were most impressed. 
Yours faithfully. 

R. G. OLIVER. 

Park Moor Collage, 

Moorside Lane. 

Port Shriglej. 

Nr Macclesfield, 

Cheshire. 

January 31. 


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COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
February 5: The Prince of 
Wales ’arrived at Hewonh 
Station. Gateshead, in the 
Royal Train this morning to 
visit Tyne and Wear 
His Royal Highness visited the 
Hcbburn Training Centre. 
Association of Maritime and 
Related Charities. Ellison 
Street. Hcbburn. 

Afterwards. The Prince of 
Wales. President. Business in 
the Community, opened the 
TEDCo Business Enterprise 
Centre. Elden Street. South 
Shields. 

The Prince of Wales, on behalf 
of The Queen. invested Miss 
Catherine Cookson wilh_ the 
Insignia of an Officer of the 
Most Excellent Order of the 
British Empire. 

This afternoon His Royal 
Highness visited the Horton 
and Wcstoe Colliery Welfare 
Scheme. Boldon Lane. Honon. 
South Shields. 

His Royal Highness the visited 
The Pnncc of Wales" Commu- 
nity Venture (Sunderland) Cen- 
tre at St Thomas Street. 
Sunderland. 


The Prince of Wales later 
returned to Royal Air Force 
Nonholt in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight. 

Sir John Riddell. Bl. was in 
attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
February 5: The Duke of Kent 
returned to Heathrow AiTpon. 
London, today after attending 
the Army Alpine Ski 
Championships in Austria. 
The Duchess of Kent returned 
to Heathrow Airport. London, 
t oday from Hong Kong. 

Today is the thirty -founh 
anniversary of the accession of 
the Queen. 

The President of the United 
Stales is 75 today. 



The Queen, accompanied by - ■ - 

Birthdays today 


The bead of the Delphic Sibyl in the Sistine Chapel after its restoratkmfleft) and 
, beforefright). Work on Michaetangelo’s frescoed ceiling began in 1984 and wOi be 

completed in 1988 


open the new council chamber. 

The Duke of Kent has accepted 
an invitation to be Patron of 
Trinity College of Music 

A memorial service for John 
Barstow will be held at St 
Botolph without Bishopsgatc. 
London. ECI on Friday. Feb- 
ruary 7. at noon. 


Forthcoming 

marriages 

Viscount Chew ton 
and Miss M.A.A. Furness 
The engagement is announced 
between James Sherbrooke, 
elder son of Earl and Countess 
Waidcgravc. or Chcwton Mcn- 
dip. Somerset, and Mary Ali- 
son Anthca. daughter of the 
late Sir Robert Furness and 
Lady Furness, of Little 
She! ford. Cambridge. 

Mr JJ. Leary 
and Mikk Y.D. Cawley 
The engagement is announced 
between Jerome, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs H. Leary, of 
Waricy. West Midlands, and 
Yotancl. only daughter of the 
Hon Stephen and Mrs Cawley, 
of Hindhead. Surrey. 

Mr J.M. Boer 
and Miss A-M. Abling-Smifb 
The engagement is announced 
between John Miehacl. only 
son of the talc Mr W.C. Biycr 
and Mrs Brycr. of Sidcup. 
Kent, and Anne-Marie ElisabcL 
eldest daughter of Major and 
Mrs N.E. Smith, of High 
Wycombe. Buckinghamshire. 

Mr M. Gatehouse 
and Miss DJ- Wiggin 
The engagement is announced 
between Miehacl. younger son 
of Captain R. Gatehouse. DSC. 
RN (retd), and Mrs Gatehouse, 
of Easton Farm House. 
Newbury, and Davina Jane, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs G- 
Wiggin. of Whitehall House. 

, Ashford Hill. Newbury. . 


Mr J.P. Fenton 
and MKs S.W, Carnegie 
The engagement is announced 
between John, son of Mr and 
Mrs M.P. Fenton, of Somerset 
West. Cape Town. South Af- 
rica. and Sophie daughter of 
the late Mr J.M. Carnegie and 
Mrs Carnegie, of Polcfidds. 
Cowden. Kent. 

Mr PJ. Ainsworth 
and Miss S-A. Fotan 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter John, only son 
of Mr and Mts EJ. Ainsworth, 
of Sunbury. Middlesex, and 
Sheila Ann. daughter of Mr L 
Fotan and the fate Mrs Foian. 
of Cricklewood. London. 

Or K.A. Nilsson 
and Miss VJ. Read 
The engagement is announced 
between Anders, only son of 
the talc Hr Goto Nilsson and 
Fni Itignd Nilsson, of Orebro. 
Sweden, and Victoria, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Peter 
Read. of Stonehousc. 
Gloucestershire. 

Mr GJ.F. Sparkes 
and Miss KJ. Ward 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan, son of Mr 
and Mrs G.M. Sparkes. of East 
Knoxte. Wiltshire, and Kerry, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs SJ. 
Ward, of Kirkcaldy. Fife. 

Mr J.DAV. Starling 
and Miss LMS. Beris 
The engagement Is announced 
between Jonathan, eider son of 
Mr and Mrs David Starling, of 
Shcringham. Norfolk, and Lu- 
cinda. fourth daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Richard Bevis. or 
BsmeL Hertfordshire. 


Mr Claudio Arrau. 83; Sir 
Denys Buckley. 80: Mr Peter 
Cadbury. 68: Sir Robert Ef* 
skinc-Hill. 69: Air Marshal Sir 
Victor Goddard. 89: Mr Louis 
Horen. 67: Dr J.E.C. Hill. 74: 
Mr Nc»il Johnson. 57: Mr 
Patrick Macncc. 64: Chancellor 
E C'ianh Moore. 80: Mr Denis 
Nofdcn. 64: Mr Manuel 
Orontes. 37; Lord Roskiii. 75: 
Mr Jimmy Tarbuck. 46: Mr 
Fred Trueman. 55: Mr Keith 
Waterhouse. 57; Lord Woolley. 
81: Mr Billy Wright. 62. 

Appointments 

Mr James Anthony Hammond 
is appointed to be a circuit 
judge on the Northern Circuit 

Mr Justice Scott and Mr 
Justice Tucker are to be judges 
of the Employment Appeal 
Tribunal. 

Mr Robert M Ain scow is to be 
Deputy Secretary in the Over- 
seas Development Administra- 
tion. 

Moderator chosen 

The new Moderator of the 
Presbyterian Church in Ireland 
is to be Professor John 
Thompson.of the Presbyterian 
Theological College in Belfast 
He was nominated by 13 of the 
22 presbyteries. Professor 
Thompson will be installed at a 
meeting of the General Assem- 
bly next June, when he takes 
over from Dr Robert Dickin- 
son. 


Luncheons 

Lord Foot 

The President of the Law 
Society, Mr Alan Leslie, as- 
sisted by Mr John Wickerson, 
vice-president and Mr John 
Bowron. secretary-general gave 
a luncheon for the members of 
the Solicitors' All Party Par- 
liamentary Group at the House 
of. Lords, sponsored by Lord 
Foot yesterday. Among those 
present were: 

Viscount nvntford. Lard CMwyn of 
Pmrtios. CH. Lord OoieratM. Lord 
Evans of Cteu^non. Lord Hacking. 

Baroness Hoops-. Lord MUhwn. Lord 

Noel Buxton. Lord Pm-Daytes. Lord 
I RattK-reedan. Sir Wafiw 090. MP. 

i 

, Leo AbM. MP Mr Richard Alexander. 

I MP. Mr Spencer Balls*. MP. Mr 
Win Lam Cash. MP. Mr Tony FaveU. 
MP. Mr Cedi Franks. MP. Mr Gerry 


MP. and Mis Banks. Mr Alexander 
QC. W>, and Mrs Carttle. Mr 
~ MP. and Mrs 


MP. 


Profe 


Neale. MP. Mr Patrick NJcTroiiv. _ 
Mr Richard Odaway. MP. Mr Barry 
Porter. MP. Mr John M. Taylor. MP. 
Mr Peter viggers. MP. Mr John 
Whitfield. MP. and senior me m ber s of 
the council and stair or the society. 
U Diversity College London 
A luncheon was held at the 
School of Medicine. University 
College London, yesterday. Mr 
Barney Hayhoe. MP. was the 
principal guest and Sir James 
Ugh thill, provost presided. 

D.v.i. FainwutKr. vtce-prov . 

Don of the Middlesex Monk Lai 
Medical School. Dr PJ. vemu. 
Professor AP Mamma. Professor 
ER Huefcra. Dr and Mis A 
Whireson. Mr and Mrs B. Lewis. Mr L. 
Cohen. Mr J. Coral. Mrs Jack Hr am* 
and Major ‘General LH. Baker. 

Dinners 

The Speaker 

The Speaker and Mrs 
Weatherill gave a dinner yes- 
terday evening in Speaker's 

Lady Haver*. Mr Patnefc JenJdn- MP. 
and Mrs Jen kin. Mr Nicholae Baker. 
MP. and Mm Baker. Mr Tony Banks. 


and Lady CoodharL Mr tan Cow. MP. 
and Mrs Cow. Mr Richard HoO. MP. 
and Mrs Holt. Mr Ivan Lawrence. QC. 
MP. and Mrs Lawroice. Mr John Lee. 
MP. and Mrs Lee. Mr Hun 
Manns. MP. and Ms Mailt**. . _ 
Martin cmeflj. MP. and MTS CTNelU. 
Mr Barry Porter. MP. and Mrs Porter. 
Mr Jonathan Sayeed. MP. aoxl Ms 
Sayeed. Mr Keith Speed. MP. and Mis 
Speed. Mr Lewis Sevens, mp. and 
Mrs Stevens. UffOtenanr-GoEoaet and 

1 ^ a s ! I sa 

R o se anu e O -Relily 

Fletchers* Company 
The Lord Mayor and Lady 
Mayoress and ihc Sheriffs and 
their ladies attended a ladies' 
dinner of the Fletchers* Com- 
pany at Drapers* Hail Iasi 
night. The speakers were the 
Lord Mayor, the Upper War- 
den. Mr BJ. Brown. Mr R.C.L. 
Charvct and the Master. ‘Mr 
DJ. EkJridgc- 

Lecture 

Company of Stationers and 
Newspaper Makers 
The annual livery lecture was 
delivered lo the Company of 
Stationers and Newspaper 
Makers at Stationers' Hall last 
night by Mr Bernard Ingham. 
Chief Press Secretary to the 
Prime Minister. His lecture was 
entitled “The reporter - an 
endangered species'". The Mas- 
ter, hlr Ray Tindle. presided. 


Spring Ball 

The Spring Ball, in aid of the 
Jinja Groups Trust and of 
PHAB (Physically Handi- 
capped and Able Bodied) will 
take place on Wednesday. 
March 12. at the Inter-Conti- 
nental Hotel. I Hamilton 
Place. London.' W]. 


Batterbury. Judge Abdda. 

Mrs AtxJrta. Judea* Upfrfefi 

Uwaohn. Judge Graham Halt. Judg* 


.. and 
Judge 


Richard _ ... 

underiiUL ,V S$X Sd*Mr* Q &»«jerl3S! 

Judge Canman. J 

— >le. 


Latest wills 


Mr Robert Donovan Alec De 
La Mare, of Ciunnor. Oxford- 
shire: company director. left 
estate valued at £2,771.427 net 
After personal bequests of 
£64,000 and three quarters of 
the residue be left a quarter of 
the residue to charities to be 
chosen by his trustees. 

Mrs Patricia Lukis Peake, of 
Bury. Manchester, Left 
£195.104 net. She left her entire 
estate equally between the 
RNLI and the Guide Dogs for 
the Blind Association. 

Sir Harold George Sanders, 
of Wotton under Edge, 
Gloucestershire, Chief Scien- 
tific Adviser (Agriculture) to, 
the Ministry of Agriculture and' 
Fisheries, 1955-64, left £1 13,406 

Other estates include (net. 
before tax paid): 

GlUard. Mr Wyndham, of 
Woking — £277.733 

Hayward, Mr Thomas Paul 
i* me * Gale.of Marl- 
borough — £271,258 


Stamps mark 
Victorian age 

Stamps commemorating Sii 
Isaac Newton and Queen 
Victoria are included in the 
Post Office's programme ofj 
special stamps for 1987. 

Flora, the first special issue 
of the year, will be followed by 
a set marking Newton's work. 
The annual Europa stamps will 
focus on modem arts, with 
special emphasis on architec- 
ture. 

Victorian Britain wll be 
featured on another set which 
commemorates the 150th 
anniversary of Queen 
Victoria’s accession to the 
throne and the centenary of her 
golden jubilee. 

The provisional programme 
also includes the 300th 
anniversary of the revival of 
the Order of the Thistle, the 
centenary of the Si John 
Ambulance Brigade. 


Memorial service 

Judge CJL HHJjard cumciL qc’ judgt Damson. QC. 

TItffl I nrJ Judge Michael coombe. Judge Owen, 

loe Lord inanceuor was QC, judge PMre. Judge Mason. QC 

represented by Sir Derek 

Oulton at a service of thanks- gc <me counoi of Hcr^uaestvs 
riving for tte life °f Judge « Stf Ju ** 

Christopher Richard Hilliard ySnour dbvw ptc*. 
held at Si Scpulchre-wiihout- ESST* UrMTy - ~ ^ ** **" 
Newgate on Wednesday. The 
Lord Mayor, accompanied by 
the Sheriffs, were presenL 
The Rev Arthur Brown offici- 
ated and the prayers were led 
by the Rev T.E.F. Coulson. Mr 
Nicholas Hilliard, son, read the 
first lesson and Mr Stephen 
Mitchell read the second les- 
son. Judge Thomas Pjgot, QC o> 

Common Serjeant in the City w 
of London, gave an address. 

Judge Murcfiie read a reflection 
by Canon Henry Scott Holland 
and the choir of Queen Anne's 
School. Caversham. sang "God 
be in my Head’* by Walford 
Davies. Among those present 
were: 

Mrs raniart rwrtdowj. Mr and Mrs 
Ceoftrey Carter hxmirvUw and 
daughter). Mi*. Gwen Hilliard 


Mr William D t ny on. MP. and Mrs 
Benyon. Mrs s Oates KMnm. 
Reading Mafltatratesl and Mr P G 
Oates, the Master and Clerk of me 
Wax Chandlers' C ompany . Dr teen v# 
taKcUr B George. Deputy Cnmnus- 
staner. Metrapotnan Police. Mr Otrb 
Porteus rsoiidtorj- D aw tmml. Scot- 
land Yard! with Mr Peter StennUn: 
Mr peter Badge. Mr R w Gath 
(BettnlUre. Buckiagbamshlre and 
Oxfordshire Law Society). Mr Roy 
Am lot. Mr D H Barton (chairman. 
West Berkshire Bench) and Mrs 
Barton. Mbs Audrey scou (Head- 
mistress. Queen Anne* School. 
Caversham). Mr* P Jes&et (Crown 
Court. Reading). Mr L C Reynolds 
(Berkshire Magistrates’ Court’s 
r Barnr 


Committee). Mr 


PaUMer (Chief 


Clerk. Reading Crown court). Mr P 
Begem (Heraldry society}. Mr Hobert 
QsesUiyre. Mr Ian Jordan (Berttshlre 
Magtstrales* AModadon and Reading 
JustleeM. Mr AUen Green (Central 
dnaiCoigt Bar M ess and Criminal 
Aesoc ia oawL Mr Daidet Homs. 
..Alderman and Mis Chrtstopher 
WaKord. Mr Lewis Moss (Comer 

(mothwi Mr and Mm George PUriw FSB* W^gSSS; 

Mr Robert, pitman, mao oavw Row^ttam. Mr Mark 
Millard naucom intRTBUonaO wUh 
Mrs Millard. Mr Dennis Parker (East 
Berkshire Gideons). 

Professor Raymond Hide. Ueidea- 
anr-Commander C E CSson. Mr 
Richard GroWer. CM 


Mr J R F Hilliard. Mr and Mrs A 
Cooke. Mr and Mrs T w Hall. 

The. Lord for Berkshire 

with (he High Sheriff and Mrs SteeL 
Sonia. Utay F airfax orcameron. Mr 
Jonn Moim, Qc. MP. Mr Mark 
Gjlble. QC. MP Lord JustK* 
GlIdeweiL Lord Justice and Lady 
Woolf. Mr Justice Kenneth Jones and 
Lady Jones. Judge Sir David West 
Riaeen . » ponxeweu. The 

Recorder of London and Lady Mlstdn. 
Lady McOjIlough. Lady OultDn. sir 
.Lj4y ivugenL Lady AlUotL 
Mr JtBtice Fanjuharson. Lady Leon- 
artMrJuaice Simon Brown. Mr 
Justice French. 

Judge and Mrs Faulks. Judge 
Michael Kennedy. QC. Judge 


Whltehcuae QC« 

CourU. Commander and Mr* C .. 
Stephen. Mt» Ann Cornow. QC. 
Major md Mrs J H H York. Mr 
Hubert Dunn. QC. Mr WUllam Hud- 
son. qc. MrMJchael Betrta for d-wesL 
QC. Mrs Thomas Pigot and MBs 
Dima Pfgot . Lieutenant -CommanT ~ * 
N Green. RN. Mr juUan Jeffc. 
Captain P H Frazer. RN. and 


Calls to the Bar 

The following calls to the Bar 
arc announced: 

Inner Temple 

Polytechnic of Central 

London- DJ Bryan.HA. UnUersItV 

SII: jSESSmS '•2 n GSK: 
K l 'S“'SS"“SS 1 ‘5& M KSS;: 

O' ^ ecu' 

Duwm. 

Gray'S Ida 

aEzz- ■p^ B p % t s, ss 5 ; 

Science and Tcctray. Wales. LLB. 
London tun : SJ Dyson: nj 
L ocd:Dtane j Parkins; Julia A Han- 
km. Ellen M Samurt: MP Fireman. 

• M-B- Lrhetitiy Coll. LonoomSSL 
Lam. B Soc Set. Hong Kong Untv, 
J-LB. London llntv:NK Walsan. ui , 
Leicester Unis; l3 

t]TSf o rS-fh aK,n « , . CoU - LoadonT 
Utergopt Poly. Llm. Hull 
Ll« Mary B McKeonc. LLB. Man- 
chester Inn . MJ Taylor. BA. NE 
London Poly- CC Love. LLBTBrta<5 
Lnn: TV Tan. BA. WaFS&uSS! 


Double honour 

Dame Cecily Saunders, pioneer 
of the British hospice move- 
ment. is to receive an honorary 
degree from Cambridge 
University, becoming the first 
person in recent times to be 
awarded the honour by Oxford 
and Cambridge universities in 
the same year. Dame Cecily, 
aged 66. helped to found the St 
Christopher Hospice 
Cambridge's other honorary 
doctorates this year include Mr 
Ted Hughes, who became the 
first of the university’s gradu- 
^ i a,cs since Wordsworth in 1843 

Rev John Watson and Mr^Rohcrt 1 tO hold . the position of Poet 

Harman, qc. .1 Laureate: 


Saleroom 


Goya 


Sinister 
sets 
a record 
sale price 

B>- Geraldine Norman 

Sale Room Correspondent 

. Goya in dark and sinister 
mood set a record auction 
price at a Sotheby’s sale in 
Madrid on Tuesday night. 
The . painting. “Vaelo de 
Brnjas” or “‘Flight of 
Witches'*, mid for 78.4 mil- 
lion pesetas, or £373333 
Three witches hover in Che 
night sky socking the blood 
from a corpse, tike vampires, 
as another figure flees In 
terror. 

It Is one of a set of . six 
small paintings (43.5cm by 
30.5cm) on similar themes, 
commissioned by the Duchess 
of Osuna for her country 
home. La Alameda de Osuna. 
in about I79f7. Her grandson 
went bankrupt at the end of 
the nineteenth century and 
the family collection was sold. 
The Goyas were dispersed at 
this time, and one is now in 
the National Gallery. Lon- 
don. 

Sotheby's painting was re- 
turned to Spain in the 1920s, 
and had been declared an 
item of cultural interest, 
Spain's top heritage 
classification, by the Ministry 
of Culture, which rides out 
any possibility of exporting 
the work. It was bought by 
Agnew's. the London dealers, 
fora Swiss collector who fives 
in Spain. 

The sale of Old Master, 
Impressionist and Modern 
paintings brought a total of 
£958535. with 17 lots left 
unsold. 

Sotheby's sale of doUs, toys 
and teddy bears in London 
yesterday returned £K0J68, 
with 6 per cent unsold. Teddy 
bears were booming although 
there were no exceptional 
rarities hi the sale. A Steffi 
blonde plush bear of about 
1902. one of the very earliest, 
sold for £2550 (estimate 
£800-£L500), although it was 
in need of stitching and had 
new pads. 

A rinnamon coloured Steffi 
bear of 1907 secured £1210 
(estimate £800-£L200) and a 
rare 1912 half teddy, half doU 

— teddy body with doll's face 

— made £L320 (estimate 
£400-£600). A wax doD of 
about 1885, with blond hair 
and a bright bine silk dress, 
made £2J00 (estimate £600- 
£800), a reoeord auction price 
for a wax dolL The top price 
in the sale was £0,000 
(estimate £7,000-£9,000) for a 
Casirah- Bru bisque dull of 
about 1875. 

A pair of English rococo 
brass ormolu candlesticks, 
offered for sale by 
Boardman's in the town hafi 
at Clare, Suffolk, woe an 
exceptional rarity, the style 
never having seriously caught 
on in England. Mr 
Jorgeson. of the United 
States, paid £11000 to secure 
them, a top price for brass 
candlesticks. 

Presented to the Worship- 
fill Company of Armourers 
and Braziers by the retiring 
master. Mr Jim White, in 
1757. they are engraved with 
the coat of arms of the City ofj 
London and of the Armourers 


OBITUARY 

PROFESSOR H.W. PARKE. 
Authority on Greek oracles 

Professor Herbert William be en Via - too yg. 1952.73, 
Parice, the eminent ancient Libianm. 1949-o5, and Cu- 
historian who made the ra tor, 196 y3. _ 

subject of orades in Greece During t he w ar years he 
especially his own, died at his was a temporanr ftinctpal nj 
home in Redcar. Cleveland, the Board of Trade, 
on Jmuaiy 2a He was 82. Parke s books included 
Barii in County London- Greek Soldiers 

deny on September 7, 1903, (1933); Mphk CMt (1939. 
the son of a civil servant, he 2nd 

was educated, at Coleraine D.E.W. wotpa&n Oracles <£. 
Academical Insitulion and Zeus (1967); Greek Orades- 



where he was awarded firsts 
in Classical Moderations and 
Greats. 

A-M.p. Read scholar in 
1927 and Craven Fellow in 
1928, Parke also won in the 


appeared only a 'few weeks 
before his d e a th . 

His old age was hardy and 
green until heart trouble set 
m two or three years ago. He 
moved north from his retire- 
ment home in the sooth after 


, . 7 .; ... c» 3 v mem ouiuc m uk wiiui aticr 

JKJfeSPELES? the death of hS wife in 1980 


Prize of ihe British Academy. 
His old tutor, H. T. Wade- 


to live with his daughter. 


Pr«fp«or of His Jectures to school and 
^ 1 ^ 53 ) other audiences in the North 

Snfl 5 S-hii ”*2 ^ J?- 

r for re- aud ddizht. aad^ms support 


of Greek subjects for re- 
search. 

In 1929 Parke became a 
Fellow of Trinity College, 
Dublin, and in 1934, at the 
early, age of 31, he was 


of the Cleveland branch of 
the Classical Association was 
highly appreciated. 

His modest, friendly 
character and wry humour 
along with his profound 


promoted to the chair of learning, gained him affection 
Ancient History, from which and respect wherever he 
he retired in 1973, having -weni 

MR JOHN GREIG 

Mr John Greig, who was Q f Europe combined re- 
fer a number of years editor -sources. He was panindariy 
of Special Reports in The successful in riding the two 
77mes.ditdon Jrauaryjm D f editorial and 

the age of 51. He had been ill advertising despite . their 
for some time. natural antipathies, presov* 

Bora on October II, 1934, 

at Liversedge. Yorkshire, he a ? 1 . roan ?S .*?. .a^ettemg 


was educated at Uf 
School and St 
College, Cambridge, where he 
read English. 

He joined The Times as a 
graduate trainee in 1958, 


side, who trusted him. 

He was Assistant i 
Editor of- The Times 
1981 to 1982 when be left die 
paper, and after a period of 
freelance work won to fc^. 
Head of the Foreign Affaire 


starting off in Special Re- Section of the Conservative 
ports, which had then re- Research DepartmeniDtxring 
cently been set up to attract his final fifoess he displayed 
advertising by detailed and great courage, and was at his 
extensive surveys of particu- desk until a few days before 
lar industries and countries, his death. 

After a brief spell as a Greig was a kindly man 
reporter, during which he and a wdHiked colleague. To 
showed an unrotstakabie flare the common sense of his 
for journalistic management, native Yorkshire he added, 
he returned jn 1967, to an almost Gafiic zest for life, 
become editor of Special enhanced no doubt by his 
Reports. very happy marriage to 

He was largely responsible Mane-CTaude Marthe. the 
for their astonishing growth daughter of Marcel 
in the Thomson era, mdud- FoucaultShe, with their two 
ing the founding of Europa in sons and a daughter, survives 
which the leading. newspapers him. 

MR RAY MARSHALL 


Inner Temple 

Sir David West-Russefl, Miss 
Rostna Haze, QC, and Mr 
Brian Walsh. QC, have been 
elected Masters of the Bench of 
the Inner Temple. 


European Law Report 


Court of Justice of the European Communities 


Restriction of competition in franchise agreements 


Proturptia de Pare GmbH, 
Frankfurt am Mara ▼ 
Schillgalis 
Case 161/84 

Before Lord Mackenzie Stuart. 
President and Judges U 
Everting. K Bahtmann, R 
Joliet T Koopmans. O Due 
and Y Galmot 
Advocate General P VerLoren 
van Themaat 

[Judgment given January 281 

Clauses in distribution fran- 
chise agreements whose pur- 
pose was to protea the 
franchisor’s know-how. or the 
identity and reputation of the 
distribution network were not 
contrary to article 85(1) of the 
EEC Treaty, however, clauses 
which resulted in a division of 
markets between franchisor 
and franchisees or between 
franchisees constituted restric- 
tions of competition within the 
meaning of article 85(1). 

The parent company of the 
plaintiff, Pronupiia de Paris 
SA. .based in MontreuiL 
Fiance, traded in wedding 
dresses and other products in 
connection with weddings un- 
der the trade-mark "Pronupiia 
de Paris". 

The defendant was one of 


In return for the advantages 
derived by the franchisee from 
the right lo use the Pronupiia 
trade-mark the defendant was 
lo pay a licence fee of 10 per 
cent of her entire turnover, 
including (he goods not sup- 
plied by Pronupiia de Paris, for 
the duration of the contract 
"Hie plaintiff brought an 
action for the recovery of the 
licence fees on turnover for the 
years 1978. 1979 and 1980. The 
Landgericht [regional court] 
ordered the defendant to pay 


The court would deal only 
with that third type of agree- 
ment to which the national 
court's questions expressly re- 
ferred. 

It was further necessary to 
observe that the compatibility 
of franchise distribution agree- 
ments with article 85(1) could 
noi be assessed in the abstract 
but was a function of the 
clauses contained in those 
agreements. 

Franchise distribution agree- 
ments might be distinguished 


the prior agreement of the 
franchisor. 

Second, the franchisee had to 
be able to take the measures 
necessary to safeguard the 
identity and reputation of the 
distribution network which was 
symbolized by the brand name. 
It followed that clauses which 
provided the necessary control 
for that purpose did not 
constitute restrictions of com- 
petition within the meaning of 
article 85(1). 

That applied first to the 


contributed towards the public 
image of the brand name which 
symbolised the distribution 
network, a clause which ren- 
dered any publicity of the 
franchisee subject to the ap- 
proval of the franchisor was 
equally indispensable to the 
preservation of the identity of 
the network, provided that h 
related only to the nature of the 
publicity. 

On the other hand, it was 
necessary to emphasise that far 
from being necessary for the 


per cent. 

The Oberlandesgericht 
[Higher Regional Court] 
quashed that judgment on the 
ground that the contracts were 
void under article 85(1) of the 
EEC Treaty because they con- 
tained restrictions of com- 
petition which were not 
sanctioned by article 85(3) of 
that Treaty or by regulation 
67/67 of the Commission. 

The plaintiff lodged an 
appeal against that judgment to 
the Bundesgericfatsnof (Federal 
Court of Justice] claiming that 
the judgment at first instance 
should be restored. The 
Bundeserichtshof considered 
that the judgment of the 
the franchisees of the plaintiff Oberlandesgericht raised ques- 
and its parent company. In tions of Community law and it 
Deluded 


DM 158,502, plus interest at 13 from other distribution systems franchisee’s obligation to apply protection of transferred know- 


Jaouary 1980 she co 
three similarly wonted con- 
tracts with those companies. 

Under those ■ contracts the 
plaintiff renewed the 
defendant's exclusive right to 
use the Pronupiia de Paris 
trade-mark for the marketing of 
her goods and services in the 
districts of Hamburg, Olden- 
burg and Hanover, and the 
right to advertise in the 
contract territory subject to 
Pronuplia's prior approval of 
such advertising. 

The franchisors undertook 
not to open up any other 


therefore referred a number of 
questions on the interpretation 
of article 83 and of regulation 
67/67 to the Court of Juslioe of 
the European Communities for 
a preliminary ruling. 

In its judgment the European 
Court of Justice held as 
follows: 

It was first to be noted that 
there was a great diversity of 
types of franchise contract, the 
legality of which had not 
hitherto been examined by the 
Court, ft was necessary to 
distinguish different types of 
franchise agreements, in 


which required neither the use 
of the same trade name, nor 
the application of standard 
commercial methods nor pay- 
ment of fees in exchange for 
the advantages which were 
granted. 

Such a system, which al- 
lowed the franchisor to profit 
from his success, was not, in 
itself detrimental to com- 
petition. 

In order that such a system 
might function two conditions 
had to be fulfilled. 

First, the franchisor had to 
be able to impart his know-how 
to franchisees and to give them 
the necessary assistance to 
enable them to apply his 
methods, without the nsk of 
that know-how and that assis- 


the commercial methods devel- 
oped by the franchisor and to 
use the know-how provided. 

It also applied to the 
franchisee's obligation only to 
sell the goods covered by the 
contract in premises laid out 
and decorated according to the 
franchisor's instructions, and to 
the location of the shop the 
choice of which might also 
affect the reputation of the 
network. 

The prohibition on the part 
of the franchisee from transfer- 
ring the rights and obligations 
under the contract without the 
agreement of the franchisor, 
safeguarded the latter's right 
freely to choose franchisees 
whose qualifications were a 
condition for the establishment 


tence benefiting his compel- and preservation of the reputa- 


Pronuptia shops or to provide particular, service franchise 
goods or services covered by agreements, production ffan- 
thc contract to third parties in chise agreements and distribu- 
tee districts mentioned. tion franchise agreements. 


Mors, even indirectly, it 
followed that clauses which 
were essential for the preven- 
tion of that risk did not 
amount to restrictions of com- 
petition within the meaning of 
article 85(1). 

That applied to the pro- 
hibition imposed on the 
franchisee from opening, dur- 
ing the period of validity of the 
contract or within a reasonable 
time after its expiry, a shop 
with the same or similar 
purpose in an area in which he 
might enter into competition 
with another franchisee. It also 
applied to the obligation im- 
posed on the franchisee not to 
transfer his business without 


tion of the network. 

As a result of the control 
exercised by the franchisor 
over the range offered by the 
franchisee the public might 
obtain goods of the same 
quality from every franchisee. 

The clause prohibiting the 
franchisee from selling prod- 
ucts other than those supplied 
by the franchisor or by suppli- 
ers selected by him had 
therefore to be regarded as 
necessary for the protection of 
the reputation of the distribu- 
tion network, ft might not 
however prevent the franchisee 
from obtaining those products 
from other franchisees. 

Finally, since publicity 


bow or for safeguarding the 
reputation of the distribution 
network, certain clauses re- 
stricted competition be tween 
the members of that network. 

Such was the case of clauses 
which resulted in a division of 
markets between franchisor 
and franchisees or between 
franchisees or which prevented 
the latter from entering into 
price competition among them- 
selves. 

In that respect it was 
necessary to draw the attention 
of the national court to the 
clause requiring the franchisee 
only to sell the goods covered 
by the contract in premises 
specified therein. 

That clause prohibited the 
franchisee from opening a 
second shop, its real . effect 
appeared if it were compared 
with the undertaking by the 
franchisor to ensure that, 
within a certain area, the 
franchisee enjoyed the exclu- 
sive use of the brand name 
concerned. The juxtaposition 
of such dauses resulted in a 
certain partitioning of markets 
between the franchisor and 
franchisees or b e tween franchi- 
sees and thereby restricted 
competition, within the net- 
work. 

Notification of recom- 
mended prices by the franchi- 
sor to franchisees did not 
amount to a restriction on 
competition provided, how- 
ever. that between. die franchr- 

T 


sor and franchisees or among 
franchisees there was no con- 
certed practice with a view to 
the effective application of 
those prices. 

On those grounds, the Euro- 

r n Court ruled: 

(a) The compatibility of 
distribution franchise agree- 
ments. with article 85(1) de- 
pended upon the dauses 
contained Jn such agreements 
and on their economic context, 
(b) Clauses which were essen- 
tial for preventing the know- 
how transferred and the 
assistance provided by foe 
franchisor from benefiting 
competitors, did not constitute 
restrictions of competition 
within article 85(1). 

(c) Clauses which provided the 
control necessary for the 
preservation of foe identity and 
reputation of the distribution 
network which was symbolized 
by the brand name did not 
constitute restrictions of com- 
petition within article 85(1). 
(d) Clauses which resulted in a 
partitioning, of markets be- 
tween franchisor and franchi- 
sees or among franchisees 
constituted restrictions of com- 
petition within article 85(1). 

(e) The notification by 
franchisor to a. franchisee of] 
recommended prices was not ai 
restriction of competition pro- 
vided that there was not a 
concerted practice between the' 
francisor and franchtseesorj 
among franchisees with a view, 
to those prices being applied 1 
inpractice. 

(0 Distribution franchise agree- 
ments containing clauses 
resulting in a division off 
markets between franchisor 
and franchisee oramonej 
franchisees were capable of 
affecting trade between Mem- 
ber States. 

2 Regulation 67/67 was not. 
applicable to distribution fran- 
chise agreements such as those 
concerned in foe present 
proceedings. 


1 


Mr Ray Marshall, who 
died on January 27. aged 72. 
after a long illness, was a 
highly gifted potter of the 
postwar years. 

- Bora in Alberta, he served 
in the Canadian Army Medi- 
cal Corps, and later studied 
ceramics at the Royal College . 
of Art under Helen 
Pineombe. In 1952 he estab- 
lished a studio workshop at 
Stedham. and was quickly 
recognised as a distinctive 
and talented craftsman. 

His major influences had 
been Staile M array, and the 
Jomon. early Japanese, poi- 


beauiifu! stoneware bottles 
and delicate bowls. 

He had several exhibitions 
in London and Southern 
England. Examples of his 
work axe to be found nr the 
Tate Gallery and Coventry 
Cathedral .and were bought 
by cofleciors in Great Britain. 
Canada. Australia. Scandina- 
via and Holland. 

Marshall appeared to have 
inexhaustible creative energy. 
When handicapped by illness 
in ; 1979 he successfolly 
turned to glass engraving, 
macrame And quilting, bat it 
is undoubtedly as a potter. 
~ a u’. r .v and for his fine throwing and 

ter f‘ a . n V * ,1 ®5 ne throwing n ch stoneware dazes, that he 
was vividly reflected in his will be remembered. 

SIR HENRY TUCKER 

served on the Wartime S 


The Hon Sir Henry 
Tucker, KBE, first Govern- 
ment Leader of Bermuda, 
died on January 9, aged 82. 
He was widely regarded as 


Sup- 
plies Commission from 1943- 
46. 

„• By now he had become an 
influential figure in the 


the architect of the modern island's business and polittcai 
Bermuda. life. He played a leading part 

A descendant of a family in hdpuig to eliminate racial 
t in Bermudan at- discrimination, and he was 
since the 1 7th century, fearless in his fight against 
Henry James Tucker was reaction. 

bora in Flat ts, Bermuda, on „ . _ 

March 14, 1903* and edu- - *>«ame Government 
cated at Saftus Grammar *- e ?“ er m 1968 until . his 
School before entering the end of 1971, 

Sherborne, England. 


during Which time he helped 
to advance his country to- 
wards social and political 
maturity. 

, H* was created CBE in 
1946, knighted in 1961, and 


After eight years, learning 
banking in New York he 
returned to Bermuda in 1934 
and became general manager 
of foe Bank of Bermuda in 

1938 until his retirement in J972°^ 

, . He married in 1925 Gath-* 

Dunng «r be was erine Newbold Barstow; tiSe 

sons and a daughter 

Health from 1940-43 and of foe marriage. 


Bridge score error 
affects results 

A scoring error by ihc Surrey 
icam ai ihc Croydon Bridge 
Congress, which was not 
discovered until the following 
day. resulted in a change of the 
ptacings in (he championship 
icams-of-four cvcnLThe results 
were: 

I. D Cancr. Mrs L Jenkins. 
Mrs D Fairall. Mrs G Mollart 
(Surrey) 150:2. R Robinson. A 
M G Thompson. N VaiL N 
Solway (Middlesex) 145:3 A D 
Price. B M Lippand. T P 
Goldsmith. G B Soper (Kctii) 
144. 

Robinson and A M G 
Thompson found some 
consolation on ihc next day by 
winning rhe ■■ two-session 
championship pairs event 
while T.P.GoIdsmith and 
G.B.Sopcr were again one place 
behind them as runners-up. 


Pop star for 
stage role 

The pop star Suzy Quairo 
makes her sage acting debut 
fate this year in foe Chichester 
Festivai s silver jubilee season. 
S&J2! appear, with Edmond 
Hockndge m Irving Berlin's 
Annie Get Your Gun. 

A Chichester Festival spokes- 
man said that to mark die 
jubilee there would be five \ 
productions ibis year of ■- 7 
row; wifo a gala first night on 


ons are 


S/acst 

Jane Eyre, wifo Keifo 
Michdl as Mr Rochester and 
4£f u S Thing Happened On 
The Way 7o the Forum, 
stamng Frankie HowenL 


D/MD MORRIS IS OFFERING 

50 % DISCOUNT 

ON SELECTED WATCH MODELS 
UNTIL 28 * FEBRUARY 
IN THEIR BOUTIQUE AT 

THE CHURCHILL HOTEL 


morris 




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omen Beware Women, by the Jacobean playwright 
omas Middleton (right), opens tonight at the Royal 
Court. The tragedy has been substantially rewritten 
by Howard Barker. According to Barker the two 
dramatists have been in debate about the changes 

he has made ... 

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The redemptive power 

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Bianca, an upper-class Venetian girt, elopes to Florence with Leantio, a clerk. Sh ? is 
seen by the Duke of Florence a n d, through the mfehilfoDS of Livia, a inMinMgMl 
widow; she Is seduced by the Poke. Lhia herself falls In love with the vnimgT^mtiA. 


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Middleton: You are an irrespon- 
sible optimist . You have deprived 
the audience of its right to moral 
satisfaction. Admittedly you hax e 
provided a violent conclusion, hut 
with only one murder, when I wrote 
fire or six. / do think this is an en- 
couragement to had morals. 

~ Barker What I have done is to in- 
sist. on the redemptive power of 
desire, opposing your view on the 
inherent corruptibility of all sex. 
Livia is a much greater character 
than you allowed her to be. In any 
case, it is simply unrealistic to 
inflict slaughter on all the partici- 
pants in the interests of morality. 
It was quite obvious to me you did 
not believe in that yourself but 
were fulfilling a convention. 

M: / wrote for an authoritarian 
Christian society. Authoritarian hut 
not philistine. The king had just 
authorised a translation of the 
Bible . You inhabit an authoritarian 
society, hut a philistine one. James 
the First did not think it sillr to be 
an intellectual. He liked univer- 
sities. I understand your govern- 
ment is closing them down. But 
yes, the ending is conventional. / 
had the censor to think of. Yet lb* 
lieve the characters got what they 
deserved. 

B: What attracted me to your play 
when Max Stafford-Clark. Admin- 
istrator of the Royal Court, offered 
it 10 me was its obsessive linkage 
between money, power and sex. i 
saw the Florentine rulers as a 
rapacious class, vulgar and not 
very patrician. The Duke is 
characterized by cupidity. 


M: l knew very little of Florence. 
But h*» had to situate our politics at 
a distance. Otherwise you- could 
end up in prison. How do they 
punish you now? By taking the 
theatres away? It is much simpler. 

B: England in this era is a money 
and squalor society, also. The 
connections were obvious. And 
money in your text corrups 
everyone, though it appears to be 
sex that does it. F think you were 
‘ only half-aware of this. Bianca is 
obviously seduced by tbe Duke's 
wealth, not his body or bis mind. 
And yet she immediately fells in 
love with him, the sex uali ty 
catching up with the acquisitive- 
ness. The psychology of this is 
brilliant It made me wonder what 
Bianca's sexuality consisted in. So 
I made her ask those questions, 
too. at a moment of terrible crisis. 
It launched my entire version. 
People start to ask. what is desire? 
'What does it make me do?- 

M: Your misfortune is that you 
have no notion of sin. Look how 
you have vandalized the Cardinal. 
You effectively remove the moral 
spokesman from my play and 
replace him with a voyeur, a' roveur - 
notwithstanding his mteHectuahsm. 

B: His speeches were conventional 
homilies for which a modem 
audience could have no sympathy. 
We still have writers who lecture 
the audience. Arguably a play is a 
lecture, but it must come at them 
obliquely, they are trained in 
suspicion. For us the question of 


the private morality of princes, or 
bankers, is not of the first 
importance, though it is hard to 
resist exposing it. The question for 
us is whether we should tolerate 
the deforming social effects of 
bankerdom itself The sin of the 
false god. So 1 made Livia see that 
her life, most of which is behind 
her. had been rendered futile by 
ho- class affiliations. I always insist 
people can be saved. 

M: And / insist they are lost, that 
they have nothing but their instinct 
for survival. Leantio is my greatest 
character, a type new in mv time, 
commonplace in yours. A middle- 
man fir merchants, he puts his love 
of his career even before passion. 
While he’s absent on business, he 
loses his wife. Then he tries to lock 
her up like a piece af silver. That is 
a man! But. when he is robbed, he 
knows how to take the next 
opportunity. Money comes with a 
lecherous old woman, and he’s 
bought ! 

B: You call Livia lecherous. She 
conceived an appalling desire, 
perhaps. 

M: It kills her. anyway. 

B: The solution to so much 
corruption can only be mass- 
murder. people felling down trap- 
doors and so on. It is as if you 
threw up your hands on human 
beings and wished them to hell. 

M: That is where they are bound 
for. And in case you condemn me 
as a cynic, remember it was I who 
wrote' Lcantio’s "Const thou forget/ 



The dear pains my love took, how 
it has watched/ Whole nights 
together in all weathers fir 
thee... T\ 

B: But it cannot endure. There is 
always perdition at the end of it. 

M: .-Is night follows day. 

B: Contemporary reactionary eth- 
ics would make such a viewpoint 
welcome. They are reviving a 
medieval social theology in which 
human nature is deemed incurably 
corrupt in order to reconcile the 
poor with poverty, the sick with 
sickness, and the whole race to 
extermination. Now also money is 
violent, but the torturer is the 
accountant. We require a different 
form of tragedy in which the 
audience is encouraged, not by 
facile optimism or useless 
reconciliation, but by the spectacle 
of extreme struggle and the 
affirmation of human creativity. 
Failure is unimportant, tbe at- 
tempt is alL 

■M: This would explain your ■ 
redemption of the low-life charac- 
ters. Sordido in your version is a 
yob with a mission, and the Ward 
a study in pain. I think you are 
even more Christian than Shake- 
speare dared to be. 

B: I did no more than lend them a- 
status you suggested yourself. 

M: How? 


B: By giving them so much wit. 
You could not resist giving them 
the gift of sarcasm. They are both 
wonderfully bitter at the expense 
of posturing women, and Sordido 
is the obvious ideal opponent for 
the Duke. 1 pushed the nouveau 
riche flavour of your Florence, its 
vulgarity and accompanying pov- 
erty. into a cultural match for 
England now. Sordido is a model 
of modem youth, culturally embit- 
tered. a redundant genius who 
lives the life of the gutter. I 
massively extended the social 
range of your original by this one 
development. 

M: .1 final remark How do you 
iustify your continuing use of my 
title? What it means is my version 
is dear enough, but in yours? 

B: In yours, a woman engineers the 
fell of a woman, for a man. That is 
the role of women in your time. In 
mine, a woman engineers the fell 
of a woman, but for her own 
enlightenment. But the pain is 
terrible. So the title finds an irony 
it never had in your play. 

M: May I congratulate you on 
assembling such a distinguished 
company of actors to perform this 
monstrous assault on the canon of 
English literature? h suggests to me 
that now. as in my time, the more 
ferocious the imagination, the more 
loyalty it commands. 


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SinfomettaA . 

Masson - * v : 
Elizabeth Halt : > • r 

You could never accuse the 
London Sinfonietta of mean 
spiriiedness. but sometimes 
their concerts seem almost 
too generous; the listener's 
appetite gets glutted and the 
players switch to a kind of 
supercharged afterburner. 
This pro g ra m me, however, 
was a deft bit of planning; a 
hatful of Stravinsky's smaller 
pieces flanking two new 
works. 

George Benjamin’s Three 
Studies for solo piano were 
expertly played by the com- 
poser himself in their first 


, , Qmcert 

complete performance, pro- 
. vidhig further evidence that. 

-fer from , buckling under the 
.weighi of expectation: he has 
to carry, Benjamin appears to 
‘ /relish it. - Nice for him, and 
;'very nice Tor us. Th e- Fantasy 
. on lambic Rhvthm. much the 
longest piece, ramified bril- 
liantly from its opening two- 
note cell (B flat - D flat, 
short-long), its lucid dis- 
course nicely balancing argu- 
ment and caprice and. pro- 
pelled on a' torrent of blues- 
like rhyihms. Meditation on 
Haydn’s Name took an un- 
changing chord in the. piano's 
middle register and floated 
evanescent sonorities around 
■ it — a -simple idea perfectly 
realized — while Relativity 
Rag cross-hatched its ma- 


terial ' to the point of zany 
disintegration. - .. 

Mark- Anthony Turn age's 
On Ail Fours for ensemble (a 
world 'premifire) confidently 
held its own in such com- 
pany, interweaving its four 
suite-like dance- forms with 
four Refrains and Chorale 
into a concise single move- 
ment. The range of moods is 
wide (from fractured, strident 
Gigue to plangent Sarabande. 
ending with an arresting final 
gesture), and the idiom very 
assured it to my ears, 
harmonically a bit colourless. 
Turnage's purposeful attitude 
to structure is in desperately 
welcome contrast to that of 
most his contemporaries — a 
major asset. 

In a way Benjamin's Stud- 


ies relate back . to the 
colourful- world of Stra- 
vinsky's Ragtime and Ren- 
ard. where Diego Masson 
drew . some, crisply syn- 
chronized Sinfonietta playing 
— too obviously punchy for 
the Stravinsky of this period. 
I think, but exhilarataing just 
die same. The curious scoring 
of the enchanting little “chips 
from the bench” of Stra- 
vinsky's years in Switzerland 
necessitated a bevy of clari- 
nets (and clarinettists) of 
different shapes and sizes: 
Linda Hirst vividly projected 
the angular poise of the vocal 
lines in Pribaoutki, the Ber- 
ceuses du chat and the later, 
more austere Elegy for JFK. 

Malcolm Hayes 


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Country 

music 

Ricky Skaggs 

Albert Hall 

It is interesting that Ricky 
Skaggs is not among the 
artists included in the 
impending “Discover New 
' Country” campaign, a con- 
certed publicity drive by 
major record companies to 
raise the sagging profile of 
country music m Britain. His 
exclusion is presumably 
made on the assumption that 
he has already been discov- 
ered as probably the most 
significant country talent of 
the Eighties, and yet despite 
his prodigious collection of 
awards and country chart- 
topping records, there were 
many vacant seats in ev- 
idence at the miserably cold 
Albert Hall for his one 
London appearance. 

The scope of Skaggss 
talent is impressive indeed. 
As well as singing throughout 
in a dear. high. yodeHing 
tenor, he demonstrated . nis 
advanced proficiency on the 
mandolin, violin and electric 
guitar and turned w an 



Skaggs: most significant coentry talent of tbe Eighties 


acoustic guitar version of the 
breakneck-pace “Country 
Boy" which was better than 
the author Albert Lee’s own 
performance at the recent 
Everiy Brothers . concert: 

The seven-piece band ac- 
companying Skaggs were no 
less impressive as they rattled 


through the long set of songs, 
executing cleverly arranged 
parts with precise, relaxed 
assurance, the traditional 
country instrumentation of 
fiddle.' banjo and swelling 
pedal steel well to the fore. 

Bul better yet, and perhaps 
the key to Skaggs's success, is 


his authenticity as a per- 
former in a genre where the 
right roots can be almost as 
important as the right notes. 
Bom in Kentucky, perform- 
ing in local churches since 
the age of five, resident in 
Nashville, and inducted in 
1 982 as the Grand Ole Opry’s 
sixty-first and youngest mem- 
ber. he personifies a length of 
country tradition better than 
some contenders twice his 
age. 

Very few of the songs were 
his own compositions, and 
even the “new” ones 
(“You’re Running Wild”, for 
example) were old. but his 
interpretative skills were suf- 
ficient to stamp his own 
mark of authority on num- 
bers ranging from the hoe- 
down showdown of Bill 
Munroe’s “Uncle Pen” to the 
•mawkish sentemenfelity of 
Peter Rowan’s “You Make 
Me Feel Like a Man” (yes. a 
“lurve song"). By the dosing 
“Highway 40 Blues”, toes 
were tapping and limbs 
unfreezing: perhaps it is the 
British climate that makes 
country music seem so un- 
equivocaJIy the product of an 
alien society. 


Television 


Scarcely credible 


When is a diary columnist 
not a columnist? Answer 
when he is Peter Bowles 
playing Neville Lyuon, epon- 
ymous hero of Lytton's Diary 
(Thames). This is a drama 
series which really does try to 
have hs cake and eat it to 
■present us with a hero who is 
a dirt-digger and. at the same 
■time, have us believe- that he 
iis a man of higher qualities. 
Does it work? 

On the eveidence of last 
night's National Hero it does 
not. It was scarcely credible 
that Lyuon in Peter Bowles's 
interpretation could in all 
cold blood destroy the 
reputation of a retiring na- 
tional hero and yet remain 
the genial fellow he is 
supposed to be. But the 
object of the exercise is not 
the portrayal of the ami-hero. 
This is entertainment, not 
social critid5m. and punches 
are pulled in favour of 
reaching a nice wide audi- 
ence. 

The less savoury aspects of 
the Press could do with a 
little scrutiny. Lytton’s Diary 
throws in a few eye-opening 
examples (for those outside 
the business) of journalistic 
practice and malpractice, but 
it is a gentle assault. And 
perhaps that is better than 
nothing at alL 


Coronation Street (Gra- 
nada) runs and runs and 
keeps on running. The secret 
is no longer a secret: keep 
things simple, develop strong 
characters and do not start 
including a shopping-list of 
social problems in the vain 
hope of achieving relevance. 
The same ground-rules can 
be applied to most soaps on 
either side of the Atlantic. 
Yesterday's episode. A Man 
of Property, was the usual 
combination of a few jokes 
and a painful situation or 
two. It all added up to a 
portrait of life north of the 
Trent that was plausible 
enough. 

Finally Duty Free {York- 
shire). now in its third series 
(God help us!). British 
chauvinism, jokes about bi- 
dets (that oldest and deadest 
of ducks) and weakly con- 
structed farce made up the 
stuff of last night's episode. 
Costa del Crime. Here is the 
nadir of British televsion and 
the point at which it begins 
to resemble the East Euro- 
pean variety: there is an 
acute feeling of powers be- 
hind the screen narrow- 
minded. rigid and un- 
imaginative. A fourth series 
is not required. 

Carlo Gebler 


David Sinclair 










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xr 

N/fflONAL 

THEATRE 

Box Office & 
Credit Cards 

01-928 2252 

Standby: any unsold 
scats at low prices from 
2 hours before 

performance. 


OPENING PERFORMANCES 


British premiere of NEIL SIMON'S 



A smash hit in New York and hailed there as 

“THE BEST PLSY OF THE SULSON” 

■ Qmtf JwX TzSff) 


Lvttelton LOW PRICE PREVIEWS; Tomaht, Tomorrow, S=t at 7.4 

then Feb <0, U. 12 . 21, 22(m&e), 24, 
and Press Opening Feb 25 at ?pm 



ACADEMY CINEMA ONE 

Oxford Street * 437 2981 
Presents 

RICHARD DEM BO’S 

DANGEROUS MOVES. 

AN ARTHUR GOHN PRODUCTION RELEASED BY ENTBtPfUSE 
Starring 

MICHEL PKXDL1 • UVULLMANN 
LESLIE CARON • ALEXANDRE ARBATT 
Award* Best Foreign Fibn 



|tf I wish there was something I 
conld do to help, Sir M 

((It’s not your fault Max— 

I wish it was V 


Lend Me 

^[Tenor 


A comedy 


PREVIEWS FROM 
FEBRUARY 21 
OPENS MARCH 6 


GLOBE THEATRE 

Shaftcsbuiy Amnae, London W1 
BOX OFFICE 0M37LS92 


Theatre 


Beckett trilogy 

Riverside 

No other playwright exercises 
such nice control over the 
performance of his work as 
Samuel Beckon. Not even he. 
however, can control the 
work of lime, that implacably 
mechanical bad joke which 
his characters strive to refute. 
This April he will be 80 and 
ue will applaud him as 
though he had hit a six over 
‘the pavilion rather than 
suffered a statistical accident, 
the sort of thing that could 
happen to anyone. 

As an early birthday salute, 
the Riverside has been stag- 
ing a mini-festival of his 
plays and poetry. The biggest 
candles on the cake are the 
three sbon pieces with which 
Billie Whitelaw made such a 
splash in New York two 
years ago. the third of which 
Mr Beckett wrote for his 75th 
birthday celebrations. Com- 
prising a prose reading and 
two plays, the evening pa- 
rades the virtues of com- 
pression and minimalism 
that, as in the later fictions of 
that other great miniaturist 
Borges, consciously flirt with 
self-parody while creating 
something fresh, precise, 
unique. 

Enough, the introductory 
companion piece, presents a 
familiar conceptual landscape 
through which the female 
narrator is journeying, in- 
finitely slowly, infinitely 
pointlessly. with a bizarrely 
stooped man (“He gave me 
his hand like a tired old 
ape”). The musicality of the 
rigorously plain vocabulary. 


Don Carlos 

Bridge Lane 


After a praised production of 
'Mary Stuart last year, the 
enterprising company P.L.C. 
has turned its attention to an 
earlier Schiller play. Again 
affairs of the heart are 
:entangled with political plots, 
ithis time at the court of 
Philip II of Spain. Carlos, son 
of Philip's first queen, has 
'fallen in love with Elizabeth 
of Valois, his father's second 
jqueen. This Oedipal triangle 
;is turned into a square by tbe 
•presence of Princess Eboli, 
‘who loves the young prince 
jthough she is loved by the 
.king. Furthermore, the prince 
|is hot for liberty and idenii- 
-fies with his father's rebel- 
iliousNetherianders.- 

. . Most of this is historically 
absurd but can be made 
dramatically fruitful, as Verdi 
was to acknowledge. This 
highly accomplished produc- 
tion by Malcolm Edwards is 
played against a brick wall, 
with the shapes of blocked 
arched windows repeated on 
the brick floor. The cast are 
in modem dress — formal 
suits for the Spanish court, 
elegant black outfits for the 
queen. There is not a sword 
on view, so Carlos fights the 
Duke of Alba with his fists. 
But if one allows for the fact 
that heretics are not actually 
burned in the squares of 
modem Madrid, the trans- 
position works extraor- 
dinarily well. Care has been 


with its rhetorical devices of 
repetition and contradiction 
comes alive in Miss 
Whiiclaw's dear, authori- 
tative voice, although I do 
not quite know what the 
piece gains from her inter- 
mittent manual emphases or 
slow pacings round the lec- 
tern. Originally directed by 
the late Alan Schneider, it 
has been restaged by Robert 
Hendry. 

In Footfalls, first directed 
by the author and again 
restaged by Robert Hendry. 
Miss Whitelaw - paradoxi- 
cally looking much younger 
in dull make-up and mothy 
hair - trails the train of her 
ragged dress (“a feint tangle 
ofpale grey tatters”) back 
and forth across a meticu- 
lously measured rectangle of 
light, conversing with her 
unseen bedridden mother in 
a kind of piaincham. Chained 
to anoiher's debility, she is so 
bereft of ideniiiy that even 
her name is subject to 
anagram matical whim. 

Rockaby. restaged by 
Rocky Greenberg after 
Schneider, is an ineffably 
beautiful prose-poem recited 
by an old widow lulling 
herself ever closer to death in 
a rocking chair — rather, the 
chair is rocking her. and 
when it stops she demands 
"More!” from her own taped 
voice, which soothes her with 
gentle reminiscence. More is 
exactly what we want from 
playwright and player alike: 
the show closes on Sunday, 
and if you cannot queue for 
returns you will have to 
follow the trilogy to Austra- 
lia. 

Martin Cropper 


taken over such details as the 
Spanish shadow on the 
cheeks of the older courtiers 
and the just-perceptible 
French accent of the queen. 

Duologues played scarcely 
moving from the far wall 
contrast with larger scenes 
that exploit ail the acting 
area, moving from shadows 
into the pools of brilliant 
light beating down on 
Philip's chamber. 

This is a king not yet cruel 
but who becomes so through 
his son's treachery. Nick 
Kemp's watchful even poi- 
gnant performance convinces 
us of the truth of this, 
although his readiness to 
show emotion early on de- 
tracts from the shock of the 
later scene when he is found 
weeping by astounded court- 
iers. Significantly, this epi- 
sode. -is heavily cut. 

-Christopher Hollis has the 
youthful good looks, the 
burning stare and the volatil- 
ity for Carlos but could allow 
the part in some later scenes 
more anguish. I should also 
like Patrick Wilde to have 
conveyed more of the liberal 
Posa's fiery passion for free- 
dom. There is a capably 
crafty priest by Steven Caro, 
and good playing by Naomi 
Capron and Clare O’Donnell. 
There is not a real joke: no 
gravedigger, and the reform- 
ers are naive to a fault: bul 
the intelligence and skill of 
the performances make this 
ill-known play worth a trip to 
Battersea. 

Jeremy Kingston 


The Royal Opera 



RICHARD STRAUSS after OSCAR WILDE 


GWYNETH JONES 
JOSE VAN DAM 
HELGA DERNESCH 
ROBERT TEAR 

Conductor: 

ANDREW DAVIS 
Tickets from £7.00 



FEB 10, 14, 18, 22, 
25, 27 at 8.00pm. 


01-240 1066/1911 -Access/Visa/Diners Club 






A vicious, sodded comedy exposins tbe power games 

that bubble under the surface of modern coatmjnei thing. 

EAMON ROLAND PERRY FENWICK MIKE GWJIYM 
DIANA QUICK STRUAN RODGER DANIEL WEBB 
PETER WIGHT MICHELE VriNStANLEY 
Directed by DAVID HAYMAN Designed by GEOFF ROSE 

From 8 February 

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THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986_ 


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O BETTER 
ONE. 




The drinks world is currently ruled by 
international giants. 

It’s a sobering thought that two thirds of 
the whisky sold around the world is not Scotch 
whisky. 

It is Canadian whisky. American whiskey. 
Even Japanese whisky. 

So if Britain is to compete in the future, 
strong measures are called for now. 

At Guinness, we believe the merger with 
Distillers will give Britain the strength it needs 
in the international arena. 

Char new group will manage an arsenal of 
world famous brands. 

And our combined strength will put us 
into the big league with the likes of Seagram 
and Suntory. 

But this merger is not just about muscle. 

It has a great deal to do with the special 
skills required to persuade new whisky drinkers 
in America, Japan and Europe to switch to 
Scotch whisky. 

At Guinness, we have proven flair for 
advertising and brand development. 

We will commit this talent to increasing 
sales worldwide. 

And increased sales mean new jobs. 

Together, Distillers and Guinness will be 
good tor exports. 

Good for jobs. And good for Britain. 

We urge you to support our bid. 

GUINNESS PLC 

Guinness and Distillers. A stroke of genius. 




This advertisement is published by Morgan Grenfell ic C. ■ Limited and The British Linen Bank on behalf nf Guinnv* FLC. The Directors of Guinness PLC are the persons responsible for the information contained in this advertisement To the best of their knowledge and 
belief (having taken all reasonable care to ensure such is the cue) the information contained in this advertisement is in accordance with the facts. The Directors of Guinness PLC accept responsibility accordingly SOURCE: International Wine and Spirit Record 



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THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


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Executiv e Editor Kenneth Fleet 

Bankers take a wary 
view of the future 


Reagan ready to concede 
tax increase for first time 


If bankers are good judges of their 
own business, the next decade will 
prove a grim time for the industiy In 
an attempt to foresee the way banking 
will develop in these rapidly chanSng 
times Arthur Andersen, the accoun- 
tant, decided to go straight to the 

horses mouth. Yesterday it published 
the fruits of a comprehensive survey 
- the first of its type - which 
canvassed the opinions of 600 senior 
bankers, their competitors and as- 
sorted experts in the United King- 
dom and other European countries. 

The overwhelming message is that 
the days of easy business and fet 
profit margins are gone. Indeed, the 
pressure of competition is already 
forcing banks into policies thqt will 
erode their profitability. An astonish- 
ing 77 per cent of there questioned 
do not believe that securities trading 
after the big bang will produce returns 
high enough to justify the large 
capital investments put into it by 
many banks. 

Deregulation is causing other 
qualms. There is a strong belief that 
the Securities and Investment Board, 
the centrepiece of the new sys tem, 
will prove an ineffective regulatory 
body in a world where securities 
markets become truly 
intemationaLThis conviction should, 
if nothing else, give added weight to 
the Bank of England's call for an 
international agreement on securities 
regulation. 

To cope with growing inter- 
nationalization, the banks themselves 
will also have to throw even more re- 
sources into new information and 
communications technology. 


These developments will favour 
sheer size. Small banks, particularly 
those with assets of less than $150 
million (£107 million), will shrink 
rapidly in number as they are forced 
out of business or taken over by big- 
ger rivals. The survivors will be those 
wbo can find a profitable special 
niche and those big and diverse 
enough to take losses in areas such as 
'traditional commercial banking and 
new-style securities trading while 
looking for more profitable business 
elsewhere. Profits will come increas- 
ingly from fees and co mmissio n^ less 
from interest , income. 

The. search for profits will force 
banks increasingly into retail opera- 
tions, though here they: will face 
strong competition from insurance 
companies and, above all, building 
societies — some of which will 
become indistinguishable from banks. 

The lack of relish for deregulated 
securities markets, however, stands 
out most clearly from this survey. 
The respondents believe the markets 
will become increasingly price un- 
stable. The "culture clash* 4 between 
bankers and stockbrokers and jobbers 
yoked together is expected to cause 
continuing problems. The conflict of 
interest between investment and 
trading functions in the same 
institution will cause real difficulties 
in the minds of corporate customers. 
Added to which, there is no 
confidence that overall trading vol- 
ume in securities will increase much 
after the big bang. 

On this evidence,the City cannot be 
accused of naive optimism .Surely it 
cannot be quite as bad as that 


From Bailey Moms, W ashington 

President Reagan, has in- Mr John Heinz, chairman 
dicared, for the first time in of the Republican Senatorial 
the US deficit reduction Campaign Committee, said 
battle, that h e may anept a he hoped Mr Reagan's appeal 
tax increase, an oil import was "an invitation to a bi- 
fee, to raise new revenues, partisan budget summit'*. 

He will insist, however, without such a dramatic 
that any new revenues be effort, Mr Heinz said he did 
used to offset changes result- not see how the United States 
tog from tax reform, not to would reach the deficit reduc- 
reduce the record federal ijon goals specified in the 
deficit of more than $200 new balanced budget law. 


billion. 


Democrats 


Mr Reagan also submitted Republicans criticized Mr 
his controversial new budget Reagan yesterday far refusing 
to Congress yesterday and to lake any blame for the 
gave his State of the Union huge deficits, 
message in which he The President shifted most 



Robert 


House and Congress are at I recent 


Sterling 

steadies 

The pound steadied yes- 
tbe terday after the sharp Ms of 


odds over priorities. 


and gained 


nearly 1.5 cents to $1.3910. 


If Mr Ropn opens the ^ 

door to ox inSaseshom oil ““ of Nonh 0,1 P nces 


ugui uj ula inuauo uum uu _ , ■ t< ^ _ 

fees, for example, Mr Dole JJSH£ 
said a majority of Repub- 

licans think he should use the m ® rk - T J* e sleri,n | mde .^ 
revenues to reduce deficits. . 

..... . against the dollar, rose 0.1 to 

The President's directive to 73 ^ 

Mr James Baker, his Trea- Prospects of a reduction in 
sury Secretary, to determine ^ us federal budget deficit, 
whether industrial nations a consequent easing of 
should meet to d iscuss rarer- interest rate pressures, 
national currency reforms pushed the dollar down 


David Stockman: provoked 


was applauded widely. 

The oil import fee under 


which 


bunched a new effort to of the blame to Congress and 
achieve international cur- unnamed government 


anger at the White House consideration by the Admm- 
The controversy yesterday lstI ®5°j was 


against most currencies. 

ITC offer 


rcney reforms. 

Congressional leaders, 
reacting with scepticism to 


bureaucrats in his State of the 
leaders. Union message. ■ 
irism to Earlier, the White House 


the President's appeal for a reacted angrily 10 statements 
bi-partisan effort to attack the by Mr David Stockman, the 
huge deficits, repeated their former director of the 
call yesterday for a national President's budget office, that 
summit to resolve the prob- Mr Reagan and Congress 


1 proposal of Mr 
’s new fiscal plans. 


shared the blame. 


over Mr Reagan's fiscal guided proposal of Mr The International Tin 
blueprint for 1987Tin which Reagan’s new fiscal plans. Council's producer and con- 
be asked for a 40 per cent in- An oil study, prepared by sumCT groups are understood 
crease in military spending Mr Beryl SprinkeL, chairman to. have offered! to pay £30 
o'er the next five years, of the Council of Economic million each towards resol v- 
resulting in an S per cent rise Advisers, concluded that a $5 JPE die tin crisis, now in its 
after inflation, gave an early dollar a barrel tax on oil fourth month. But this is far 
indication of the stormy imports would raise $8 bil- short of the £200 million ITC 
debate likely to dominate this lion dollars a year in new cmitributionproposed by the 
election year. revenues, officials said. banks and brokers. The ITC 


election year. 


Distillers 
sued over 
deal with 
Guinness 


Minister calls off Norway 
trip to avoid Opec contact 


By David Y, 


The Government's 
By Jeremy Warner determination to avoid bring 

tn., 1 ?.. n. n seen lo make any public 

Business Cbrrespoudent contact with the Organization 

The Department of Trade of Petroleum Exporting 
and Industry confirmed last Countries during the present 
night that it is looking into upheaval in world oil prices 
allegations that Guinness and has resulted in the Energy 
Distillers may have breached Minister, Mr Alick Bu- 

.1 . _ r_ _ - _ c i-t- j 



revenues, officials said. banks and brokers. The ITC 

has gross debts of £900 

__ _ million. 

Norway Bank debut 

a a The Hongkong and Shang- 

> pA||fQ hai Banking Corporation’s 

’ UiV I subsidiary, Hongkong Bank 

. _ m _ _ _ _ of Australia, opened for 

the weekend with the Norwe- business in Melbourne and 
nan oil m ini s t er, Mr Karre Sydney today after receiving 
Kristiansen, and other formal confirmation yes- 
Scandinavian government terday of the granting by the 
ministers whose portfolios Australian Government of a 


the Companies Acl 
Mr Michael Howard, Mrn- 


chanan-Smith, abandoning 
plans to meet his Scandina- 


istor for CtoponUeand Con- ™ a^unterparts t^week; 
sumer Affairs, said in a ^ 

Commons written answer he represrated. 




involve the energy industries. 

Mr Buchanan-Smith has 
now told the Norwegians that 
he is unable to attend 
because fie is involved in the 
all-night sittings in Par- 
liament to push through the 
legislation to privatize British 
Gas. 


full licence. 


Allianz buy 


In paT Allianz, the German insur- 
l-night sittings in Par- group, has bought a 

controSng interest in Affili- 
pslauon to privatize British aled ^ of 

ic crywn.iatinn Bristol for £2.4 million. The 

■ P S2 I “ , .£ h ™ new subsidiary, which will 


Alick Bnchanan-Smith: 
“all-night s tan ds '* 


ever, that the trip was 
cancelled because an official 
from Opec's economic 
department in Vienna is to 


Speed-up in water sell-off 


Sr tite dependent had f However unofficial con- ^ Bnchanan^mith: S oS ecc 

received two reprobations “aB-oight sittings'' department Vienn 

brintST “ Sfoi^ fr^^uSt^ is dependent on its natural be among the guests. 

^wT* , Arab Emirates has met Mr gas revenue, and gas prices j jv=. Britain Nn™ 

This “waged after Mr peter Walker, the Secretary of are linked to oil prices. consistently said that 

I®™” Gulhver’s Argyll State for Energy, at his Opec ministers regularly nol moDeiifi with ( 


■TT x . r r T:3i offer cover for legal expenses, 
wn change its name to 
Allianz Legal Protection. 


Roy Watts, chairman of the 
Thames Water Authority and the 
keenest and longest standing advocate 
of privatization of the water 
industry, must be a satisfied man. 
Yesterday's White Paper 
on privatization of the 10 water 
authorities in England and Wales has 
promised him virtually everything for 
which he could have dared to hope. 

The authorities are to be privatized ,, 
individually: while- ma in ta inin g the 
principle of integrated river-basin 
management — a single body controV 
ling water and sewerage in eadi river 
catchment — that has worked well 
since the present structure was 
established in 1974. 

Responsibility for management of 
the rivers, control of pollution, 
fisheries, environmental conserva- 
tion, levels of abstraction, recreation 
and navigation win remain with the 
authorities. On the other, band, the 
Government has agreed to shoulder 
the financial burden of land drainage 
and flood protection. This has been 
the biggest non-revenue earning part 
of the authorities' operations, taking 
£58 milli on or 7 per cent of total cap- 
ital expenditure in 1984-85. 

As a sop to those who c l ai m that 
the environment will inevitably suffer 
when the more hard-headed commer- 
cial approach of a privatized author- 
ity is brought to bear on other non- 
revenue earning services, the 
Government has decided to use the 
opportunity of privatization to in- 
troduce a clearer strategic framework 
for the protection of the 
environment Levels of service will 
also be more adequately defined than 
they are now. 

Legislation will be introduced — 
probably in the next session of 
Parliament — to turn each authority 
into a government- owned private 
limited company ready to be sold to 
the public. The first of these is most 
likely to be Thames, the Iarg«t and 
most prosperous, and that could be m 


private hands by early 1988 provided 
the Government runs its lull term of 
office. 

Privatization of the authorities with 
their £27 billion of assets and 51,000 
employees will represent a massive 
extension of the Government's de- 
nationalization programme. It also 
offers enormous opportunities for 
furthering the Government's aim of 
wider share ownership, with employ- 
ees and customers of the authorities 
likely to be targeted as the most likely 
and attractive purchasers of foe 
shares. Customers would become 
natural regional regulators of the new 
companies if they were persuaded to 
participate in the privatizations on a 
large scale. Such an ideal solution, if 
it emerged, would almost remove the 
need for the statutory regulatory 
authority to control prices and 
services that the While Paper 
envisages. 

There is stiff plenty of thinking to 
be done. The White Paper is notably 
vague on precisely how the authori- 
ties should be controlled. A new 
regulatory authority along the lines of 
Oftel and Gfgas (already nicknamed 
Ofwal) is to be set up, but there is no 
serious discussion on how water 
charges should be controlled other 
- than through an RPl-related formula. 
. Despite these caveats, the White 
Paper is a brave first attempt to come 
to grips with some of the more 
intractable privatization problems the 
Government has yet feced. In one 
K sense the Government has.no option 
but to privatize these huge natural 
monopolies. The authorities could 
not meet heavy infrastructure spend- 
ing demands for the remainder of this 
century within the current constraints 
of public spending without further 
.swingeing increases in water charges. 
Paradoxically, the effect of privatiza- 
tion is therefore likely to be a far less 
dr ama tic increase in charges than 
would have been the case bad the 
authorities remamed in the public 
sector. 


James Gulliver’s Argyll 
Group filed a writ alleging 
that Distillers had behaved 
illegally in agreeing to pay the 
costs of Guinness's agreed 
takeover bid for the com- 
pany. 

Argyll has been advised by 
the leading counsel, Mr 


Arab Emirates has met Mr gas revenue, and gas prices 
Peter Walker, the Secretary of are linked to oil prices. 


Berlei revival 


Like Britain Norway has 

consistently said that it can- Berlei, the foundation wear 


fo r Energy ^ at his Opec ministers regularly nol cooperate with Opec to manufacturer rescued from 

Mrllbank office to discuss the call in on Mr Walker when in ^q W down ^ North Sea the receiver by Courtaulds. 

situation in the world oil London on personal or busi- production, but in the past has begun manufac- 

tnarkeL ness visits, but such meetings three days that position has taring and expects to have a 

. The Algerian trade min- are seldom admitted officially softened as North Sea oil turnover of £9 million this 

ister has also mterupted talks by the Department of Energy, tumbled. year. Orders worth £800,000 

in London with Mr Paul Mr Buchanan-Smith was The Norwegian position is have been received. 

Cbannon. the Secretary of due to leave for the Norwe- that it would now accept 

State for Trade and Industry, gian ski resort of involvement in a meeting Racf wnml if Ai»l 


Richard Sykes, QC that the to go to Mr Walker's office to Sanderstolen later today with Opec but would not 
agreement is in breach of discuss the oil crisis. Algeria where he planned to spend initiate one. 


Bestwood deal 


section 151 of the Companies 
Act This makes it illegal for 
a company to give financial 
assistance to somebody that 
is attempting to acquire its 
shares. * - 


The Egyptian financier. Dr 


where he planned to spend initiate one. Bestwood has acquired 

, ■■■ ■■■■■■ three property services busi- 

Marwan raises Extel stoke to 11% !TfiE£rS 

Demerger Corporation Demieiger, says that Dr for aboul f 300 ' 000 - 


Ashraf Marwan, yesterday Demerger met Dr Marwan to Marwan had been unaware of 1 


P&O buyout 




Power from oil 
as prices fall 


ever, -which has a rival £1.9 
billion bid for Distillers on 
the table, is pursuing its 
action through the civil 
courts. The writ is against the 
two companies and not its 
directors. 

Guinness has indenmifed 
Distillers’ directors against 
legal action over the agree- 
ment which makes Distillers 
liable for costs of up to £25 
million. 

Distillers said that it also 
had consulted leading counsel 
on the agreement and was in 
no doubt that it was legal and 
proper. 

“This is yet another at- 
tempt by Argyll to divert 
attention from the real issue 
which is the merits of the 
proper merger with Guinness 
as opposed to Argyll's inad- 
equate and illogical bid,” the 
company said. 

Guinness believes the 
agreement is covered by Sec 
Pod 153 of the Companies 
Act which makes the pro- 
vision of financial assistance 
legal if given in good faith in 
the interests of the company. 

Mr Howard said in his 
written reply that interpreta- 
tion of the relevant sections 
of the Companies Act was a 
matter for the courts. 


•li 


The communications com- 
any is fighting off a bid 
■om the newly-formed 


Although be is a director ot Dr Marwan s mam concern 

Ifincorp SA, a Luxemburg is there should be some The management of Anglo 
company which helped set up kind of cash alternative to Overseas Transport Co has 
Ifincorp Earl, the British the current paper bid, and it bought the company from the 
finance bouse behind the bid, seems that the bidders are Peninsular and Oriental 


finance bouse behind the bid, 
Mr Peter EarL a director of 


Oriental 


Mr Peter Earl, a director of now trying to organize one. I Steam Navigation Co. 


THE ACTION BANK - THE ACTION BANK ■ THE ACTION BANK ■ THE ACTION BANK • THE ACTION BANK 


GM takeover will 
cut discounts 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


The large, oil-fired power 
stations which played an 
important part in kec £J°S 
power supplies unmterupted 
during the year-long miners 
strike are likely to 
operation as the Centta] 
Electricity Generating Board 
takes advantage of raffing 
world oil prices to accelerate 
is coal restocking pro- 

^Heavy fuel oil on _the 
Rotterdam spot mariert * 
trading at around 5W a 

S^AtbelowSlO^atOTne 

it becomes competitive with 
coal from tbe totjotral Cwd 
Board, although during me 
1984 strike suppb« w* 1 ® 
bought at nearer $iw a 

t0 Tbe CEGB has been ac- 
ting its oil burn steadily over 

Ihlfiasi 10 years “L 0 ?* ?Sg? 
moved upwards, and lm 1983- 
84 only 5 per cent of power 
produced came from ou. 

sffPWa*. 

process to P«>duce42 pff 
ant of its 

oil, with the large Thameside 



power 'station at Kingsnorth 
supplying no less than 25 per 
cent of the entire nation’s 
electricity from ofl for long 
periods during tbe dispute. 

The CEGB is now mon- 
itoring the oil price situation 
daffy, but because h is such a 
potentially large purchaser on 
the Rotterdam market it is 
keeping its buying intentions 
a closely granted sareL 

A spokesman said: During 
the miners’ strike our pur- 
chases were so large that they 
moved the.. market u pward s 
so- we have to be careful 
when and how we enter the 
market” 

By burning oil at economic 
rates at its T®S£ oil-fired 
stations on the Thames, at 
Southampton, Pembroke and 
at the South of tod-md 
Electricity Board s off-fired 
station at Inveriqp .on foe 
Hyde, the power romistry 
will able morequicHy to 
rebuild its stocks at the 
power stations to the level of 
over 30 million tonnes which 
the Government reels .a 
necessary to combat -.the. 
threat -of any future disrup- 
tion' in the mines. 


The takeover of Ley- 
land Vehicles by General 
Motors of the United 
States should pot an end 
to “over tbe top” 
discounting by - British 
truck makers in the 
oversnppHed British 
market, one of tbe lead- 
ing European producers 


Mr Alan Fox, chief 
executive of Iveco UK, 
the British arm of Fiat’s 
commercial vehicle 
subsidiary, said that fu- 
ture product development 
was being hampered by 
low prices and lack of 
profitability throughout 
Europe. Leyhmd Ve- 
hicles dearly had been 
selling, some of its mod- 
els. at a substantial loss. 

The GM takeover 
made sense by bringing 
together the product 
ranges of Leyland mid 
Bedford and would give 
the two companies the 
benefit of the economies 
•of scale. Despite price 


Increases of between 5 
and 10 per cent for most 
commercial vehicles last 
year, British manufac- 
turers made losses or at 
best broke even. 

Mr Fox said: “Econo- 
mies of development 
most be found in the 
form of joint ventures ; 
within the industry to j 
ensure a healthy future 
for all participants in the 
truck business”. 

Although discounting 
has been a feature of the 
lorry and van market for 
some years, reflecting an 
estimated overcapacity 
among manufacturers of 
40 per cent, the industry 
has been particularly in- 
censed at the discount 
Leyland has 
been offering on its new 
73-tonne Road Runner 
truck. This year,, said 
Iveco, price increases of 
at least 8 per cent had to 
be imposed if the in- 
dustry was to become 
viable. 




z Hiatis why NatWest are extending their- And you can get immediate handling of jjj 
m network of International Banking Centres documentary credit and other foreign business, >, 
g throughout Britain. Staffed with specialists to help secure prompt payment 3. 

£ in foreign business problems, they offer fast. For more information, contact your o 
^ financial advice to local businesses of all sizes, local NatWest branch or any of the NatWest ^ 
w Face to face, not just over the phone International Banking Centres listed below. > 

i ^ 

h- taimnghjm-Bngol. Edinburgh. Ltr&.Liv«poc»Uaadon iQwe iw Br^hlMjiKht^cr.NtoiUr^hiiTtRedhilLRoml'ord.ShHfifld.Stough.jnd now Wjrfqfd- 

THE ACTION BANK • THE ACTION BANK A NatWest THE ACTION BANK • THE ACTION BANK 

?—■ r-» a • i 


; 

rid j 




18 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


h 


THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


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( TEMPUS ) 


Oil doubts cut short 
frolics of the bulls 


Jiiteiy markets on both sides 
of the Atlantic yesterday 
hardly gave the bulls much 
scope for celebration after 
Tuesday's monetary fiesta. 
Gilts opened I/S point 
down, and then stopped 
dead until the charming 
fable of mid-moming — 
notably that Opec and Brit- 
ain were to meet in secret 
conclave, along with Norway 
- boosted quotes by perhaps 
point. 

Traders assumed that the 
tale represented pan of the 
Bank of England's bag of 
tricks designed to keep the 
market guessing and shifting 
upwards. They were not 
surprised subsequently to 
find that the story had been 
exploded and that sterling 
was resuming its downward 
trek. 

A change in money mar- 
ket tactics by the Bank may- 
or may not’ have had the 
same objective — keeping 
sterling firm by allowing 
period rates to remain high. 
On Tuesday, just ahead of 
the £M3 figures, the authori- 
ties took out the day's 
shortage of £300 million 
immediately and over- 
supplied the markets with 
crediL 

Yesterday, the interven- 
tion tactics were far more 
circumspect. The bulk of a 
£2S0 million shortage was 
not relieved until late in the 
day. and even so. some 40 
per cent of the shortage was 
taken out via late assistance. 

But US bonds opened in 
poor shape. The bad news 
that investor demand for the 
first leg of this week's 
mammoth Treasury- 
re financing package was 
poor was followed by more 
unsettling data, notably that 
the President's growth tar- 
gets for 1986 require a rise 
m short-term interest rates 
and a rise in inflation. 

This is bad news for 
Mexico which needs a 3/4 
percentage point fail in rates 
to compensate for every SI 
fall in oil prices- Since even 


posted Mexican prices have 
fallen by £3. while rales have 
not dropped, that leaves the 
Mexicans about S3 billion 
adrift. Shades of a world 
debt crisis loom. No wonder 
the long bond eased. 

Motors 

The fate of what remains of 
our motor industry lies in 
the balance. On the one 
hand the sale of some of BL 
to General Motors or Ford 
could be a loss to British 
component suppliers, es- 
pecially if the Americans 
continue to buy the bulk of 
their requirements for ve- 
hicle parts outside the 
United Kingdom. 

On the other hand, 
sterling's weakness against 
the mark is a major plus 
point for an industry which 
sells to and competes inter- 
nationally with German 
companies. 

With sterling down against 
the mark by less than a tenth 
in the past few weeks the 
motors sector should have 
benefited strongly on the 
stock market 
But investors have been 
uneven in their appreciation, 
with shares in Armstrong 
Equipment rising by 25 per 
cent and others almost 
untouched. Admittedly 
.Armstrong has been sup- 
ported by bid speculation. 

Shares in Guest. Keen & 
NetUefolds and AE, how- 
ever. have risen by only 
about 7 per cent in the past 
month, even though the 
German market is important 
to both companies. 

Lucas Industries has been 
least affected of all the 
component companies, with 
its shares rising by only 2.S 
per cent in the past month. 

While there has been 
some downgrading of cur- 
rent year forecasts recently, 
Mr Paul Burgess of Albert E. 
Sharp believes the long-term 
prospects are good. On that 


basis he says Lucas is one of 
the cheapest stocks in the 
sector. 

Davenports 

The poor of Birmingham 
will be taking a keen interest 
this week in events at the 
Baron Davenport's Charity 
Trust, which channels the 
income from its 20 per cent 
shareholding in the local 
brewery. Davenports, to the 
needy of the city. 

The trustees have asked 
for until tomorrow to decide 
whether to accept an offer 
for the trust's shares from 
the Wolverhampton & Dud- 
ley Brewery, whose £34.5 
million .takeover bid can 
only proceed if the trust 
agrees to sell. The board of 
Davenports has rejected the 
terms. 

Nearly three years ago the 
trust declined an offer for its 
holding which then stood at 
almost 30 per cent. Had it 
accepted the cash offd the 
charity's income would have 
been ’ about double the 
£600.000 it received between 
April 1983 and Iasi month. 

Wolverhampton & 
Dudley's renewed attempt to 
acquire Davenports would 
enable the trust to pick up a 
cheque in the region of £6.5 
million for its holding. That 
should comfortably produce 
an income about four times 
that which can be expected if 
the brewery pays an un- 
changed dividend this year. 

Since 1982-83 

Davenports's profits have 
fallen from £2.7 million to 
£1.8 million, and - excluding 
the rise caused by the bid — 
the shares have not exceeded 
300p. 

The arguments in favour 
of the trust accepting the 
latest cash offer of 415p a 
share appear overwhelming 
unless the trustees consider 
they have a higher obligation 
to preserving the indepen- 
dence of the brewery. That 
should not be so. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• PARKFIELD GROUP; The 
company has entered into 
conditional contract to acquire 
William Lee and. Durham Tube 
from Tarmac for £3.75 million. 
These acquisitions will help 

develop Parkfidd’s foundry 
and engineering interests. 

• ENGLISH TRUST 

GROUP: For the six months to 
Dec 31. 1985 an interim 

dividend of Ip is being paid on 
April 8 on increased capital 
(0.9ip adjusted last time). 

Group pretax profit was 
£l.l7million (£931,500). Earn- 
ings per share, adjusted. 3.65p 
(2.86p). The directors view the 
prospects for the remainder of 
the year with confidence. 

• ELECTKA INVESTMENT 
TRUST: The net asset value 
per ordinary share at Dec 31 
1985, was I69.46p (149.54p). 

• INDUSTRIAL PRECISION 
CASTINGS: An interim divi- 
dend of L23p (0.62p) is being 
paid on March I. Turnover for 
the six months ended Nov 2. 
1985 was £2.63 million (£I.S5 
million). Pretax was £353.000 
(£157.000). Earnings per share 
were 4.60p (2.1 Ip). 

BULLOUGH: A final divi- 
dend of S.5p (4.57p adjusted) is 
being paid for the year to Od 
31, 1985, making a total of 8-2p 
(7. Ip adjusted). Turnover was 
million (£88.56 mil 
lion). Pretax profit was £12.36 
million (against £10.12 millon). 
Earnings per share reached 
21.08p 08p adjusted). 

HARRISONS MALAY- 
SIAN PLANTATIONS: The 
company will buy 955.96 acres 
of land from Bedford Bertaad 
for $5.S million. The sale is 
subject to the approval of the 
foreign investment committee 
of Malaysia. Permodalan Na- 
tional bought 130.000 ordinary 
shares in the company for 
$391,654, bringing its holding 
per 


to 89.755,414 shares (21. 
cent). 

DANAE INVESTMENT 
TRUST: The unaudited net 
asset value per capital share at 
January 31 was I9-68p. 

JOVE INVESTMENT 
TRUST: The unaudited net 
asset value per capital share at 
January 31 was 34.69p. 

• KEPPEL SHIPYARD: Kep- 
pd Shipyard's industrial en- 
gineering division has been 
awarded projects worth S26 
million (£19 million) by 
Westinghouse Brake and Signal 
Company. 

MEZZANINE CAPITAL 
CORPORATION: The divi- 
dend for the half year to 
November 30 is S0.4808 
($0.4854), payable today. Net 
investment income was 
$4^36.987 ($4,805.3581 Cap- 
ital gains of $836,000 were 
earned and distributed to 
shareholders in October. 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Shares slip from peak 
on oil price worries 


Shares scaled fresh peaks on 
the London stock market 
yesterday, encouraged by this 
week's unexpectedly good 
money supply figures. How- 
ever, continuing concern over 
the prospect for oil prices 
dampened the hopeful mood 
and shares finished below 
their best levels. 

Dealers feel trading con- 
ditions will continue to be 
nervous and prices erratic 
until the present uncertainties 
over Britain's oil revenues 
are resolved. 

The pound's recovery 
against the dollar took some 
of the shine off the inter- 
national stocks which have 
benefited this week on 
anticipation of increased 
overseas earnings. 

ICI was down 7p at S27p 
while Jaguar — which yes- 
terday touched a record 431p 
- slid back to 4l8p. 

Some dealers were still 


By Cliff Felthsm 

concerned about sterling; 
however, on fears that any 
serious weakening could trig- 
ger a round of interest cate 
rises. As a result many shares 
in the stores sector suffered 
losses of between 5p and Sp. 
Burton fell 13p to 530p. 

Some shares shrugged off 
the uncertain mood to march 

The FT-30 index dosed down 
0.8 at 1,163.1 

to new highs. Amstrad 
touched 272p, a jump of 22p. 
on prospects of a boost to 
profits from its new compact 
discs. Others to break new 
ground included Spear and 
Jackson, 360p, Athroods. 
I46p, and Delta Group, 199p. 

Bid talk spurred advances 
at Bassett Foods, lOp better at 
161p. Smiths Industries 253p, 
up 7p. and Davy Corporation, 
5p ahead at 98p on specula- 
tion that Trafalgar House 


might be in a predatory 
moocL 

Poliy Peck recovered some 
ground after the previous 
day's shake-out. The com- 
pany says it knows of no 
reason for the foil in the price 
and says that trading contin- 
ues to be satisfactory. The 
shares responded with a Sp 
rise at 143p. 

A broker's circular 
prompted buying in Reed 
International, lifting the 
shares to 699p, a lOp 
improvement. 

Distillers went L5p ahead 
to 578p on hopes of a higher 
bid from Argyll. 

Speculative demand cre- 
ated action among the textile 
and engineering sectors. 
Among the best was Baker 
Perkins, lOp up at 253p, 
James NeiU JOp up at I84p, 
Vaniona 8p up at 450p, and 
Illingworth Munis, 7p to the 
good at 103p. 


EXCHANGES 


The pound rebounded sharply 
after rnowms* later denied, 
that oil monsters from Brit- 
ain and Norway would meet 
one or mure Opec ministers 
in Norway this weekend for 
secret talks. Sterling, which 
was languishing around over- 
night levels before the re- 
ports, jumped 1.45 cents 
against the dollar to 13930. 

It also improved well 
against the mark, with a 4JQ7 
pfennig rise at 33680. This 
pushed the effective index up 
to a high of 74.0 from a tow 
of 73-2, although die rate fell 
slightly later. 


MONEY 


The cost of overnight 
money moved higher in early 
dealings yesterday. 

The shortage, though sot 
great, appeared to lie outside 
the discount houses, which 
appeared to be long on 
money, hence their apparent 
lack of interest in tendering 
for assistance- The Bank of 
England was able to buy only 
£29 motion of bills ad the end 
ef the morning. 

Although period rates 
eased a lime, the mood of the 
market remained imeasy. 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


1985 

H#fl 


Company 


P"c» 


Gross 
On YU 

Cnga pence % PIE 


tOi 87 
698 580 
155 IIS 
302 345 
I5« 123 
120 SO 
105 83 

194 15? 
57 47. 

33 . 25 
374 312 
84 W 
89 72 

685 525 
178 '19 
115 “7 

127 95 
330 264 
148 112 
480 348 
528 363 
199 ISO 
118 88 
125 103 

302 254 

142 114 
79 65 

119 91 
12G 85 

97 76 

160 122 
248 lB6 

295 342 

185 80 

590 415 

303 235 

296 233 

109 70 

113 100 
560 405 
132 IDG 
134 100 
163 130 
343 268 

T4>, SB 
121 91 
IBS 115 
145 97 

289 230 
125 -IDS'* 
311 251 
148 M0 


A430 

AMncs 
4 mar Tnmt 
Ang Amor Sac 
Asnaovm 
MVK Assets 
Batten 
Bom, 

Br Aram 
Br Empre Sec 
Braun Inv 
Brunner 
CMner Aqency 
Ccnmraai 
Crmcem Japan 
Derb, tec 
DoCao 
Drama 1 Com 
Drayton For EaM 
Drawn Jaotn 
Drayton Prerraar 
DuOT* LOT 
EOT NW AIM! 
EtortMOT 
Etectic Gen 
EiOTsn hn 
Engksn Scot 
Enrj'rsn NY 
Ensign 
Fat a 
F« C 
Fin** 

Fks) Scot Amor 
Fust Un Gen 
Homing American 
Hexing Owsr 
Raima Emetjxwe 
Hemng Far EBB 


Bomng Japan 
Rensng Meccano# 
Ftemng Ova rmi 
FJerong Tech 


For 0# 

Q8C CaortN 
QT Japan 
General Puntu 
General Coxa 
Glasgow Stott 
QtoBfl 

Gown Aume 


98 

585 

136 

293 

194 

110 

105 
163 
57 
32’. 

372 

94 
88 

W6 

162 

112 

H5 

315 

144'„ 

478 

514 

ISO 

106 

124 

295 

08 

78 

118 

* 

190 

238 

290 
120 
525 

291 
267 

95 
<12 
340 

125 
131 
149 
343 

7* 1 1 
95 
US 

144 

278 

115 

309 

133 


♦ 1 
■ -5 


Jih 32300 
28. in 38 326 

43 32340 

81 28 52 B 

44 2.9 486 

08 07 . 

39h 3 7 393 
15 09 . 

2.7 4.7 318 
07 22445 

20 3h 58 228 
3.1 h 3 7 382 
ajfc 38 379 
30 Oh 45 317 
05 03 
120 <07 13* 


• -2 
-1 


14 3 
16 
30k 

102 
• 77 
09 

4 86 

5 an 
50 
1.9 
30 
20 
25 
10 # 

113b 
129 a 

8.7 
75 

M3 

129 

15 
36 

5.7 
43 
39 
33 
7lh 
20h 


4 5 310 
1 1 95.1 

05 

35 4Q1 
4J 320 
03 763 
37 41 8 
19 67 0 

36 406 
24 557 
11 437 
1.8 69 4 
27 520 
1.1 359 
4.7 34 4 
44420 
73 10.1 
14 84.7 
50 280 
45 351 
16 94.1 
32 431 
1.1 

34 406 
30 434 
22 634 
21 419 
U 573 


20IS 1.4 052 
27 13 852 
14 Jh 51 292 
29k 25 SOD 
145 47 296 


1985 

HOT low Cancan* 


151 '.-127 

195 152 
•270 202 
,275 220 

172 138 
382 226 
550 4*8 
258 acts 
62 41 

196 162 

06 90 

09 98 

106 88 
174 133 
138 108 
144 112 
236 IBS 
333 258 
m 3m 

77 61 

178 153 
54 37 

243 167 

324 746 
1# 74 

296 227 
149 125 
101 52 

<3 31 

46 32 

367 292 
151 125 

244 198 
ZO 168 

197 150 
290 228 

12 1 10 
119 96 

310 235 
385 211 
94 73 

424 345 
250 204 
410 354V 
500 
143 108 
78 61 

36 ‘ 32 
100 76 

7 03 76 

168 137 
255 187'. 


Gown Onextal 154 -« 

Gowra Soapy 195 

Graentnar 

Gresham House 235 *5 

Hnmtoos 171 • 

H£ (P) 273 a . 

mwesMX Success 550 

BN Cao 250 *1 

JOTan Assam 48'; 

LOT DeMraura tea 

lot iMcnm Sec 63 #-i 

Lon Trust 88 

107 

171 #*1 

132 +•.- 

142 
234 
324 

393 • . 

61 
156 

SO • . 
208 -3 

3CS #+0 
76 
295 

147 • 

75 -I 

35 

40 -I 

343 m . 
161 
225 

233 *8 

197 

268 -1 

£ 12 '/ 

119 -1 

308 • .. 

275 
92 

422 -2 

258 #+l 

*18 • 

583 *1 

142 
69 
SB 

... — 91 # . 

TH CO* Q1 Lot DM 98 ••! 


Grass 
cn via 

Pipe ponce % PIE 


Monks 
Uteri* Inc ome 
Murray mu 
mots* Sow 
Murray Venn 
Now Conn 
Maw Oaren Od 
928 

U-ttrog Inc 83 
Ne- "T»*o 
Wi Aaantc Sec 
w n Sea Assam 
NWn Amer 
Outmcn 
Pacdic Assets 
Do Minds 
Rerwnai Assets 
Raeoum 
River 6 were 
flner Hot 
H ooaco 
Roknco 

flor omo 
AnOetrs 


24 

63 
61 
138 
7 a 
66 
01 
B£k 
32 
0.1B 
54k 
3.4 h 
7J 
64n 
39n 
79 
204 
05 
67 
42k 
1 1 
4 a 

07 

77 

44 


1J) . 
2.7 290 
35 399 

51 280 
1.4 058 

gJ 635 

4 4 230 

5.1 162 
9X123.1 
SO 359 
20 783 
60 258 
U 31.6 
17 .. 
2*931 

52 27 J 
08 

40X2 
83 160 

05 

16850 
09 884 
28 53.9 
30*26 


5* Andre 
Scomsn 


American 
Scm Easwro 
Scot Mroa 
Scot Net 
Scot Mm A' 
Second AHanca 
Sac Of Scotland 
Smaller COS 
SRwi ErOBO 
IR Atmran 


TR ma S Gen 
TH Natural Res 


187 

214 


03 08 
150 44 348 

79h 52 300 
107 .'8 313 


68k 25862 

41 24 403 
65 2.0 531 
0 4 3 1 483 
29Pi 32 489 
10 7h 25 520 
69 27 48 3 
250 60 210 

232 -40340 
69k 4 9 33.7 
1.7k 25 399 
06 1.6 . 
31 3.4 320 

56k 5 7 775 
54b 32 443 
107 50 272 


1985 

OT LOT Conp j n y 


Rg Oigt pjkce 


YU 

% P/E 


III 79 
1*8.111 
152 129 
101 79 

152 1Z* 
145 111 
264 211 
333 2*0 
167 137 
120 103 

82 . 72. 

^ Bi- 
as 61 

HO 8* 
172 139 
290 ZS0 


tr Nam A.*wea 97 
rs PXXK BSMi 130 
TH P*OOW!Y 144 

tr Teen 98 

TR T manes :*3 

Temple Ba* MO 

T hr ogmotax 256 
Tkrog Seamed Cap 303 
-nans Oaac tss 
Txaune 116 

Tnctevasr uc 01 

US DetaenbOT 225 
Ittmo Resouroes ST. 
wasfoooi er 

Wfltennmi Enr«r 88 
MMan :09 

Yeoman 289 


26k 27 *82 

IU If 

53 37 3S8 
25 25 536 
G3k 44 33* 
7 lb 51 284 
157b 42 379 

55 3*«9 
33 28 386 
14 7 16.1 8 7 
93» 4.7 526 
17 29 *72 

22 33 4*2 

3 6 4.1 37* 
42 2560* 
I3LG* 47 334 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


5^5 260 
57'. 28‘- 
«3 19 

95 36 
155 Bfl 

15.860 
l* -850 
142 113 
(Oi 73 
348 ITS 
85 60 

426 350 

96 58 
US 44 

10-578 
186 163 
*05 300 
875 368 
369 217 
113 75 
41 15 

211 93 


AMoetf 8 Srnnkm 555 
American EaprHS £4t'< 


• -TO 250 45 135 




6 ntanraa Anew 
□any Ma* 

Do A 
E«acn 
Eng Trust 
Eacc 

Exofflraxon 
Framfcngun 
Fran Oc 
Goode OIUI 


35. 

36 

135 

£i5r- 

£«■. 

135 

97 

209 

70 

385 

87 

96 


Henderson Aamn CIO 


CM 


173 

325 

790 


VIS 
UwcaOTe House 2C4 
Pac*c Irte Tst 86 
Do Warr a n ts 
Smffll frcOiers 


14 

•2 80 

1*- B»3 
».'■ 5S3 
S-1 54 

-2 40 

45 
30 

» 57 

18 

I 257b 

-2 

229k 
-10 214 


IS 1 

165 


189 

05 


39 189 
97 3 

44 153 
*i no 
*7 103 

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18 179 
66 120 

19 16 7 
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70 85 
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Cfer Cmg Yu 


ABBEY UMTT TRUST MANAGERS 
60. HttMnkuxH Ha Bournemouth 
0345 717373 UmUrwg 
G*t 8 FKec 
MOT Inc Erawv 
Woriovind e Bona 
Amercan G>owOt 
Asan Paofc 
Assets 8 Earns 
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BQu*as rtogrea* 

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1072 

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07LT 810366 8 0793 282B1 
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American Income 
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Exempt Sm&Mr Co's 19ZD 203 5 
USA Ekmiot Tran 3153 3339 


1932 2058 -0 B 372 

1166 1242 -0,4 3 70 

20*3 2178 -1 0 382 

3102 33M -13 363 

4759 5068 -1 7 332 

296 315« +0.5 4 1J 
2117 2258 -05 5.13 

1136 1210 -08 547 

1227 1307 -07 63* 

278 208 -01 1007 

081 728B -rOfl 138 

72.9 770B *07 001 
1293 137 .7 B +18 130 
630 67.1 +1.0 122 

194* 2070 +4 3 087 

(895 201.8 -0 6 356 

-Si 343 -02 329 

1022 100 Bb -03 282 
1362 1451 -06 270 

a: no -oi 293 

83* 888 -02 223 

1828 1732B -02 342 
680 937 +12 123 

1052 1115 +01 638 

308 
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ARWmWOT SECURITIES 
131. Fmstwy Raremem. lomwi EC2A 1AY 
01-628 9876 01-280 8540(1,2/3 
CapPM Gnsmtn Wc *98 532 -02 198 

556 59* -03 196 

HMD m2 +4.9 1 79 
57 3 512 +27 179 

_ ... 522 ssa -02 260 

GM A Fowl income 427 449 b -0 1 9b* 

DC Accum 70 6 7*3a -04 964 

in Income mcome 626 65 9S -04 807 

tt *COm 1*52 1552* -10 fiffl 

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6«3 567 

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DO Accum 1172 125 3 -03 35? 

dorvl Penny Share 87 93 1 St 

HbfOTO Tst UK 65 7 60 0 -08 1 87 

RonttW Tst japan 71 0 73 5 +6 6 0 1C 

PteHOAo Tw us 730 756 +35 107 

Ponfoko Tst Europe 87 7 90S +19 010 

Ponl'tto Tst UK 4 JO 44 5 +19 DID 


BAIUJE (BFFOflD 

3. denlmas St EttWurgn EH3 0YY 
031-225 2S8i (Dealers 031 226 6066 1 


XXI E> (221 
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BG ErVnjy 
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BALTIC TRUST MANAGEBS 

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01 534 5544 


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9*2 895 +18 23* 

141 3 1503 -2 7 16S 

1009 1073 -20 165 

59 9 637c -02 30 
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67.0 659 61* 

2000 2127 -05 362 

2227 2K9 -OI 365 


119 9 1275 
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1212 '289 
122 4 1302 
196 T 1665 


-03 J» 
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B Tsi m. Fund ACC 2OT7 2669 
Da tnc 1760 1800 


279 2 297 OS -04 4 12 
706 7S3S +0J 101 
1205 1381 -10 3 80 

1598 169 7 -07 301 

92.0 VJBB -03 342 
493 524 +09 059 

49 0 531 -00 059 

135 5 144 IB -3 3 1 16 

— -0 7 3.07 

-06 387 


, BARING FUND MANAQERS 
l PO Bo 1 158 Bettextum. Nn BF13 4XQ 
{ 01-658 9002 


1 Eastern 
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5l London E62P 209 



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124 7 

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630 

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BR!TA*NIA UNIT TRUST 
•*•79 Fjciaury Pmremem London EC2A 1JD 
01-500 2777 deoteig.01 -638 0*78i9 MoneyGtacM 
0800-010-333 


Droenti G41 
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Wi Gtowin 
Japan Perl 
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55 A 562 -01 111 

913 974 230 

1220 1301 . 162 

336 358 -05 2220 

52 1 55 6B -01 8.17 


184 7 

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Orwm 

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55 6 59 8 
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56 7 60 6 
29 8 320 
135 7 1451 
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-07 020 
331 
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BUtaUdASTER MANAGEHEWT 

UWW ' EC *' 151 


General inc 1*1 
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281 7 296 7 
85 0 092 
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9*3-51009 3 


404 
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550 
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253 


CSFUMJ MANAGERS 
125. kign MotCom. London WCIV 6PY 
0'-2o2 I1*B 

CS Jattefl Fited 55 5 59 QB +0* 036 
CANNON FUND MANAGERS 
0i «£l?76 a ' We ” t * W MW10MB 

GniwlP 3*30 7565 .10 354 

mam, 277 3 395 0 -0 4 5 09 

Far East '354 1*35 +43 0.72 

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CAfEU JAMES) MANAGEMENT 

*■ Ltxwri ecsN ibo 

01421 0011 

L'enral fS 303 9 3199 137 

wccmie m 2337 3*0 0 541 

Noon AmentOT 13) 2*3.4 2562 TS5 

gtARmeS OFT1CIAL MVESTMENT FUND 
^ «» 

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*” 931 6 +149 . 

CLERICAL MEDICAL UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

N+rtOT Pi»n Bnsu BS2 OJK 
0272 277719 


Geneiai Eraatv 
“OTty Mot kneome 
■41 A Fnal tet GtP 


320 34 1 
34 4 366 

ZS* 271 
230 245 


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16' C1W5OT London ECfV 6EU 

Ot-’M i?99 

Caour Accum 2*24 257 B 

EnxrcK Tnm 41 6 *J2c 

Erlta teepme 138 3 147 1 

FmaraMI 137 5 1366* 

G*< strategy 54 1 55 7 

Gnj*!" uivewtrera ?a 1 0 256 3s 
Income & G'<w»m 3£. O 37 2* 

**WM i Pactec 989 1052 
NlH Amer Grpateti 95 7 IQI 8 
Inti Hecounv 990 10S3B 

SnOTer Co 3 tTHS i89fl 

G»0*>e4 tec T* 51 5 sj.7 


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CATER ALLEN 

I Kmc Will 14m Si £C*N 7 am 
01-813 8314 

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CENTRAL BOARO OF FDUNCE OP 

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CROWN UNIT TRUST SERVICES 

Crwm tecnivt VVoiung GU3I IXW 


464 
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Amaneen Tiu^ 


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AmteKan Fund *55 TOO 
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tetuf natural Fund 1*9 5 1813 

"noutft Fotta 20* 22J 

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Tt»ytfF|Bia 1 l&T 1270 

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(£•> FwH f*l 207 7 315 S 

l&n Smawe jjb 1*1 154 0 1590 
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Bd OfTttr Chng Via 


Bd Ofler Ckofl 


EAGLE STAR UNtr TRUST MANAGERS 
Bam Hoad CuMermam. OaanYr GL53 7LQ 
0242 52131I 


GOVETT (JOHN) UNIT MANAGEMENT 
wncnnite me. 77. lotoox «m Lotnon EC2N 
IDA 


U*r Bounced Inc 
Dp Accum 
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F4> Eastern Accum 
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563 

503 

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566 

610 

579 

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601 
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UK Specs* Sits 


989 

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697 

517 


892 +60 128 

•OS -12 <52 
745B +13 291 
553B -02 25* 


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SB* 824 

51® 693 

1832 174 5 
455 *86 
1070 1144 
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157-2 168.1 -0.3 X*2 

2788 2969 -05 342 

455 490c -03 344 
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200 

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15. Fountain SL MatOToster 
001-236 5685 
Emntaote Pttcan 
HOT InCOTB Trusi 
G*1 6 Fi«ed Mt 
Tel 01 Km. Trust* 

Sptcal Sits Tiust 
WO Amer TiuM 
Fat Eastern Trust 

EQUITY A LAW 

me cotporwen Si Contrary CV1 

0203 553231 
UK Grown Accutl 
Do intone 
Hamer inc Accutl 
DO lucerne 
GOT/ Fixed Accum 
Do income 

ran Amar Ts Accum 13IJ 1395 
Far EM Til Accun 107 7 1143 
Etao Ts Accum 1296 JJ70 
Genwai Trust 20Z6 2i5J5 


GREUNtTMAHAOEW 
Hoyal Eackanoe. EC3P 3DN 
01-666 9903 
G4t 6 F+etj Ini 
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kaoftc 

Properly Skua 
Straw Companies 
Euopeui Trust 


1111 1155 
1KJ* »920 
26 2S 2720 
13*2 1428 
1555 165 S 
1993 212 i* 
1772 1886 
1895 201.7 


969 
+24 232 
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1263 13*9 
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OUMNeSS HAMON UMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

PO Ben *42. 32 Si Mary* nee. London EC3P 
3AJ 

01-023 9333 


hot tecome 
N Ante Trust 

Recowry 
0*1 Trust 
£l Vncara tec 
Si Vncam US OW 


Tampa Bat Sm Do s 141 7 1495 


*65 433S -07 634 
1I3B 1212 +3 0 081 

161 I 1714 -05 291 

349 362B >01 1035 
72.7 750 -05 62S 

737 783 +13 0 79 


LLOYDSBANR UMT TRUST NANAGBIS 
H*9itrai» DpL Ganon-^See. WorWteo 
Sussex 
0*44 *59144 
BflOTcad 
Da Accum 
Enuijtr me 
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&ar a tecome 1326 1*18 -03 5.94 

Oo Accum 2345 2507 -O* 534 

German Q81 Me 572 81.1 +05 034 

Do Acaan 57 2 01 1 +05 03* 

Wane 2280 2*44 . . 434 

Do Accum 4433 4743 494 

MB T*ek 1750 187.1 +30 059 

Do Accum 1825 195.1 +3.1 059 

■Moan Qroran 532 508 +23 002 

Do Accun 532 503 +23 0.02 

N Amer t Gen b?b iM.7b +2B 098 
Oo Accum 1054 1127 +30 056 

PacWc Basm 947 ioi2a +13 0*2 

Do Accum 98 9 105.7 b +15 0.42 

Snraaet Cos 4 Roc 1512 ifll.T -03 221 

Do Accum 168* 1001 -10 221 

WCTiOiai Grown 1639 1752 +28 130 

Do Accum 2285 2*5.4 +33 128 

LLOYDS LM UWT TRUST 
20. CMRm SL London EC2A044X 
01-320 0311 


335 


F 1 C UNIT MANAGEMENT 
1 Laurence Romney Ha. Lonaon EC*R OBA 
01-623 *680 


HAWROS BANK UNH- TRUST MANAGERS 
fremjw UT Aamn, S. Ra 74*91 Bo. 9>enlwoad 

0777*217916 


Gouty Dm 
Do Accun 
Gfl Tiusj 
D o Accun 
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Do Accun 
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943 100.4 
1316 140.1 
472 430 
498 530 
7 52 60.1 B 
00 3 91 SB 
533 573 
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- 0.1 

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1.77 

1.77 

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memnuitf 
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Dc Accum 
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<77 507 
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103 E 110 2 
1005 1132 
2084 3227 
337 1 3585 
77 5 782 
8* 9 85 7 
685 728 
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1070 1133# +0.1 


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156* 1645 -02 290 

1654 1753 -02 236 

1953 201341 +07 310 
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Va 


Mmi AND BA NS GROUP UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Cpumnod Haa. 54«ar 5 l Haad. SMIHate St »C 

0742 79842 

99 5 741* -fl* 283 
933 100 10 -0.4 263 
1123 1204 -18 330 

1504 1668 -26 230 

51.3 5630 m3 859 
587 826* -01 859 
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78 T 815 -0.4 1020 

1285 1370 -02 63* 

213 1 SB7 3 -0.4 634 

1453 1543# -06 *18 
2303 2521# -13 *18 
1881 2006 +17 022 


fewnunonat 
Japan Grown 
Japan Smaer Cos 
MaMsrWJ 
New Teenrotajy 
SE Asia Grown 
Scoots 
Scotsnores 
ScotvwfcK 
Sated intemnnanM' 
Sm#ie+ Cos Inc 
Special Situations 
UK Equiy 

us Grown 
Uonarsal Grown 


SCHRODER UNIT TRUST 
Enterprise ttowM. P crom outn 
0705 B27733 


11)5 3 

1120 


104 

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640 

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955 

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743 

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942 

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147R 

1537 



M30 

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653 

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518 

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1536 

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*55 

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-06 220 
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TARGETTRUST MANAGERS 
Tggn^How*. Gne ua a Htt Aytefpury Butts 

14 


American Fund 
Capital Fund 
tecome Fund 
Fat Eastern Funa 
Overseas income 
Fixed keenest 
Natural Res Fund 
European tecome 


719 770 
983 1055 
66 8 713 
60 & 951 
626 070 
524 555 
487 521 


+25 028 
-26 045 
-08 550 
+2A 0*2 
+22 4 07 
-03 907 
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Hambros Sm» Cos 101 1 1075# -01 


500 621# +1 1 337 


FIDELITY MTERNAYKHiAL 
River Walk. Ton&nona, TVY9 ipY 
0732 362222 


Macros N Amer 
Ham tow Jap 0 F E 
Hamoras Scandvn 
Hamcrofi Euopeen 
Hamuras Canadian 
HamtoW Equey me 
Hamotns hot UK 
Mw*m» Res Assw 


850 

BBS 

878 

073 

425 

705 

508 

500 


89.1 
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713 
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750 

537 +02 635 

532# .. 33* 


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172 
525 


LONDON A MANCHESTER 

WPStodB P»fk. Exeter EXS IDS 
0392 52155 


General Trun 
tecune TruM 
tet un a nu ui Trial 


369 395 
305 330 

28* aa« 


-0.1 350 
050 
♦0.7 1.00 


Amencan 

Ame» Equly tecome 
Amer Snecrai So 
Far Era Inc 
0*i 6 F««o tel 
Growth A income 
Jaw" Special Sns 
Japan Trust 
Managed m Ta 
Mar tecome Emmy 
PnoteWjnai Gm 
Sown Era am Ta 
ScecuH Sis 


922 
306 
*7 8 
282 
277 
826 
299 
87 6 


1149 1229 
63 5 683 
290 309 
27 5 29 3 
1202 1300 


98 7 +20 092 

325# +03 521 
S97 +00 045 

JO I +08 349 
269 -01 9.90 

884 -07 438 

31 9# +1 1 
935 +3.0 

+09 034 
+00 580 
-01 2S» 
+02 018 
♦ 15 131 


HENDERSON ADamKnMTION 
Pramer UT aammsmon 5. Raytewi Ra Hraun 
Breravrodo Essex 


152 

152 


■ •OSEOMmES 

Ton* MS EC3R 680 


0277-21 7238 




Soeoai S*** tec 

1108 

1183 

*09 

Do Accum 

1540 

1657 

+13 

Recovery Tara 
Caonai Growte tec 

838 

488 

895 

520 

-00 

-03 

Da Accum 

556 

595 

-0J 

teeomo Asset 

925 

995 


Fvotcwi Trust 

1109 

1108 

-07 

Income S Growte Inc 

1200 

1290 

-01 

Do Accun 

2303 

7*76 

-07 

HOT tecome Trust 

1*80 

1562# 

-04 

Extra fneome 

1359 

14fll 

-0.4 


142 

142 

438 


FLEMWG (ROBERT) 

8 Cl cutty Sd London EC3A BAN 
01 638 Sfej 

American Exempi [3332 3*02 1 86 

Japan Enempi £27 1 2 7795 154 

Am Property Tst SU427 0 7 75 

Property Trusl [20870 6 10 

4MUNCTTON MANAGEMENT 
London waa Bags. London Wav London 
ECSM 5 NQ 
01.028 5181 
Amer A Gen Me 
Do Accun 
Amer Tumerod tec 
Do Accum 
Ghxgii Ta Inc 
Do ACCum 
Cm 8 G# tee 
Do Accun 
Exsra me T« inc 
Oo Accun 
Income Trust 
Do Accum 

tel Drfrwtn Fd inc 
Do Accum 
Japan 4 Gen Me 
IX' Accum 
Moranftr Income Fd 
Recovery 
Do Accun 


2166 2304 
2212 2352 
2060 2190 
212.4 2265 
1730 18*0 
206 6 2196 


+38 057 
♦3 7 0 57 
+39 120 
+*1 120 
+0 7 321 
MC 321 


I Smalm Cos Du 
Prai A Get 
GUI Ttusl 

Fi«ed bneresi Tnai 
GOT* Heanncare 
Gotui Tapi 
Odd 

1 (nrerrranonai 
Oil A Nat Res 
VKM&rata 151 
Ausn-awn 
European 
Euro Smaller Cos 
japan Trust 
japan Speci* 5« 

: 5m»lar Cm 


525 

«. 537 

SO 3* - 597 

*80 • 1038 

48*S -O-l 10 i» 
55.0 -0.) 1007 


70 4 B32B -01 623 
102 2 1088# -0 4 623 
1296 131 BB -02 y.‘j 
1378 1464# -03 525 
980 1042 -02 49Z 


Pacifc 

Smgaptoe 6 Moav 
Norm American 
«tew Smaber Co-. 

Amer Recovery Til . 

Wflk Income Eienstr 1034 lOBB 
SmaBe* Cos E>em« 101 4 106.7 
Eu>4 Exempt 96 1 1012 

Japan Exempt (5) 1009 sfiS2c -08 

N Amer 84 1 885 +1 7 


944 
449 
400 
514 

59 7 033 
1056 1119 
*62 *9 T 
145 9 1569 
659 70 AB -1 1 
3093 3202 . _ . 

689 718 -17 G91 

1992 2097 +4 4 ora 

728 766 +07 009 

1018 1100# +ZI 047 
1045 1108 +20 001 

58 9 624 
254 272a 
1364 147 3« 

517 55.6 
1193 1208 


01-026 
Am «t 8 Gen Inc 
Do Accun 

Amer R e c o very 

Do Accum 
Am S maser CM 
DO Accum 
Ausl * Gen Inc 
DP Accum 
Comm 8 Gm Inc 
Dc Accum 
Comtjouid Grow 
Crawerson Gtttvtn 
DP me 

Dmdand Fund Inc 
Dp Accum 


2H 5 2342B +33 1.73 
2*52 2593# +4.7 1.72 
2383 2505 +3.1 

2561 2715 +33 

56 7 601# +05 

57 7 61 2b +0.7 

741 793c -19 

80 5 8G1c -2.1 

1»S 1664# -01 

2030 2172* -01 23? 
3503 374 8 -13 352 

2854 3025c +13 290 
If 7 171.4c -00 009 
3389 3593 -2.3 53* 

979110070 -85 53* 


>58 

150 

101 

101 

1.04 

104 

292 


+13 aoi 

-25 032 
-11 1 12 
+1 7 027 
150 
3*9 


European 6 oaneral 1592 1887# +35 129 
- ‘ lg-5 2009 +42 138 

1832 1942 -13 E2D 

3859 *091 -37 620 

1132 120.1 +15 224 

1355 145.1 +IB 224 

2067 219 1 +05 301 

321 1 3404 +1.1 3J31 


1018 108 2 
1498 1592 
166* 1770 
64 * 68 4 
6*8 888 
630 67 0# 


-02 *92 
*22 000 
+35 000 
-0* 018 
+06 018 
02 560 


Gtosai Teen Ei tsi 
POT: Eranot i5j 


8* 8 89 r 
1538 1808 


+05 092 
-05 278 
+31 061 
+13 001 
+2 -A 137 
-0* 567 
-06 168 
+09 126 
1 17 
122 
+10 007 
+3 2 *51 


Do Accun 
Eura Y mw me 
Do Accun 
Fat Eraem me 
Do Accum 
Fund CH tey tec 
Of Ac c 

Qttierai Medina 
Do Accun 
G* & Fond mt 
Do Accum 
Goto tecome 
Dp Accum 


5302 5732 
578 5 8143 
715 its 
*562 *838 

til 19 1156 

293 6 300.6# -1.9 
3535 3053 -24 


HILL SAMUEL UW7 TRUST MANAGERS 

*5 Beecti 51 EC2P 2LX 
01-828 80H 


ma USB# +io 2u 
I20B 129 4# -10 214 

FRIENDS AROVtDENT MANAGEBS 

Pwnatri End. Domna. Surrey 
0306 865056 

FP Eontv Dat 174? 18*3 -15 305 

Do *ccun 2075 30*2 -2 5 305 

FP A red ter Dot 101+ 100* -0 8 663 

Dc Accun 1129 ISO? -09 

Stewarasrao Del i*J T 1520 -08 2*2 

Da Accun 1478 1563 -08 2*2 

FINOS W COURT 
Puu+c Flush* wngway. WC2 
-*05 +300 

5*0441 Ml 0 31! J 307 

Gtcss me 127 9 I3i ? IN 

Hot >+« 1830 1892 6 70 

CT UMT MANAGERS 

801 Floor 8 DewteStvre Sd London EC2M *YJ 
Ot-293 2576 Dnamg 01-626 9*31 


Bnutn Tram um 
Caooai Trust Unm 
Ckxur Trust Unas 
Eu>ooean Trust 
Far East Trust 
Firancui Trust 
C*1 Fu«d int tec 

Do Growtn 

Mipn Yield Trum 

teeome Tiuw 
tetamanonal 
Japan Teck Tm 
NJ rural Resautces 
Secuoy Trun 
Simmer Cos. 

Special Sits 


*®i *991 -4.5 3*? 

88 5 9* 2m +2 J 2B3 
176J 1876 +5 0 3 14 

99 8 l(K 0# +02 093 
1002 108 7# -0 7 222 
3i«b 33*7 +38 2.75 

270 28 1 ' 

37 9 4021 
551 587 
68 8 732 
108 4 115*4 
31 7 339 
308 328 
1561 1961 
673 71 7 
83-2 888 


104? 
+01 348 
-04 5 89 
-1 I 53* 
-20 ao< 

-0* 044 
-OB 23? 
-18 351 
.14 »B3 
+2J 275 


Accum 

Ins Growth tec 
Do Accum 
Inc Inc 

Japan A Gan me 
Do Accum 
Japan Sraaaer Acc 
MiOUnO A Gen tec 
Do Accun 
Recovery Fund Inc 
Do Accun 
Seewa C*n me 
Do Accun 
Smaser Cos tec 
Do Accun 
Trustee Fund tec 
Do «ccun 
Cherajond Inc (31 
_ Do * ccum (3i 
Crtartfund tec l2l 

Do Accum czj 

FteneOT Enentpl ft) 387 5 *050 
NAACIF tee CS 3*0 


508 0 5385# -25 423 
£1063 1127# -005 423 
595 503 c -03 10 18 
61J 85 4 -04 1010 

*2 ■> *52* -412 253 

45 0 481 -02 253 

3605 2701 -19 521 

690.7 7321 -4 8 GBl 

657.0 703 0# +62 267 
£10*7 II 21# +0 10 267 
536 56l8 +04 S47 


+27 0.10 
+30 016 
+0.7 0.® 
-05 458 
-OJH 458 
138 

ass 


Do Accum | 


5782 6129# -1 0 ___ 

Eijja 11.95# -on aaa 

583 8 603 3 6 *?4 288 
0705 9314e +3.7 280 
379 3 4059 -20 457 

£10 71 1l.«8 -005 *57 

106 4 # .. 1-05 

310 7 # 12.05 

317 3 3905# +0.1 038 
8179 8261# +124 038 

481 

038 


387.1 


838 


MtMUMTT TRUST MAMAOERS 
11 Devonskn So. London EC2M AYR 
01-623 *373 


ffilFUKO MANAGERS 

32 Queen Ames Gam. London swim sab 
01-222 1000 


IBi Bui A Owe 
is mot moome 
IBI Security Get 
investment TSI Fno 


120.7 1285 
51 3 54 0 

540 5*9 
H>> 833 


ISO 

950 

200 

350 


UK Cod Fed tec 

816 

67 3# 

+02 

260 

Da team 

1162 

124 3# 

+03 

2 M 

income Fund 

703 

752 

-01 

7 00 

Pennon E+empi 

>368 

1433# 

+0 7 

2*0 

inim tunoral 

13*4 

143 B 

-04 

■ 00 

US 3 Cenei# 

560 

599 

+18 

1*0 

Teen A Growtn 

672 

719 

-21 

too 

Jatun S General 

160 4 

1716 

-I 4 

030 

F*t East A On 

76 6 

si e 

-10 

100 

European F u r*j 

301? 

217 4 

-02 

070 

Geraiany Fund 

609 

65? 


100 


KUMMoar benson 

30- Ptjnttuc" 51. London H53 
01-623 8000 


Equty Erarrax 
Do Accun 
UK Mamet Rsatures 
Do Accun 
Jaoui Far don iu ice 
DC Acorn 
US Spepai Factual 
Do Accun 
GotS 8 Freoous Met 
Do Accun 
US Soeoai me 
Dc Accun 
European Perl bra 
Da Accum 


34*2 369 J 
4311 

571 609 
58 2 621 
91 3 972 
916 977 
817 656 
622 664 

424 *84 

43 3 *7 1 
58 1 60 Q 
697 
667 


-1.4 2B5 
-1.7 286 
-02 2 15 
-02 215 
*u ais 
♦ 1* 0.15 
-02 090 
-03 OS-3 
-01 217 
-03 2 17 
+20 583 
83 7# +20 583 
709 *09 


86 7 70 8 +09 09 


1 13 
27i 


GARTKORE FUM7 MANAGERS 
2 Marv A Mt London EC3* 88F 
01-623 1212 Drama 01-623 5766 Oeabng 01 -823 
5806 


611 8*8# +1 7 

825 66 3# +18 
»7 5 108 *01 

219 23 3* -Oi 
1076 II* 1 -06 630 


170 


American Trust 
Auvrakart Trum 
Brmsn T» Accun 
07 DiSI 

CorarwtKV Skore 
Euroman T>usl 
£,na inoswe Tru# 
Fm EaawraTnnt 
ed in re rasl And 

'in Trial 

uiopai Fund Actum 
Op C*V 

Gun Snate Trim 
HecgtM amenr^n 
Mtgn tneorne 1'u^l 
Here] lu.v«; Trust 
lrarc«ne Fyna 


905 
203 
*87 
*27 
57 9 
*29 
41 1 
60S 
2*5 
»s 
136 7 1*5 5 
1»J 1307 
■ c 4 IS* 

0 M9 
115 < 12X5# 
27 9 29 8 
602 6**# 


988 *1 5 

II 5 -0 7 

Ml -03 
45 7# -03 
61 £■ -0 
459 
•1*0 
987 
76 1# 

156 


rnronee Agmcm £3925 *2 32 
Japan Trust 951 1012 

r/anacna E+emcii ?205 2*02 


On S Energy T (1 «t 
Sbeo» S4S Tran 
UK Snw G i flee 


329 

7S5 


35 04 
DS 
64 7 


238 
124 
+0* 07 1 
-01 S70 
+16 0 4* 
10*1 
10 35 
+ 1 J 027 
+ 13 0 27 
162 

-06 0 10 
-02 532 

•08 084 

-03 406 
-01? 2 75 
-29 OOO 
-03 35] 
1 02 
153 
*0 3 109 


Amer Grown tec 
Do Accum 
Fun* in, t„ me 
DO Accum 
Yrau me 
- J Accun 
Mt Recovery inc 
DC Accun 
Japan an+ > tec 
Op Accun 
5ma#er Cos In: 

Do Accum 
lia 6; Grown me 
Od Accun 
HkOTwot Teek me 
Dc Accum 


L A C UNIT TRUST MANAGEMENT 
F«C* House Qmtnal Ave. ECSH 7BE 
01-588 290G 

income Fund 380 5 367 J# 

■nteinapanai a Got 213.0 2174# 

LEGAL 8 GENERAL UNIT TRUST 
MANAGOtS 

Wg^Swl Hrenfwrood Essev 



MLAUWfT TRUST MANAQ taiew T 

W^OO^SOTtbiia Bd UHsim. Kent mei* iiot 

MLA General 26* 30 1 -01 246 

MLA ime-ramara* *6 1 *88 -1 B 1.06 

MLA Grt Ural 215 227# -0.11145 

MLA tecaiw 33 4 JS3# -01 558 

MLA European 2943 3098 -20 


MANUUFE MANAGEMENT 

Mw*5Sfpi w *’' SIMna *’ 


Growm Una 
Oat 8 Fund Ini 
HOT income Umta 
hot Yield On Lint 
ten Growtn item 
N Anencte IJrvi- 

For East Urva 
£nuuer Cos Fuid 


63 6 676 
981 1016 
958 1016 
510 5? 8# 
999 106? 
63 9 879 
696 7*0 
57 0 606 


572 

09i 


0277 1 
Eauay 1 
Do Accum 
Do teGome 

European 

F jr Eauorn 
Gw Trust 


2351 2514 -38 2*3 

363 * 3890 -IS 2*3 
523 564# -01 5 57 
59 7 538# +06 235 
60 1 6*2 -08 070 

6802 7702 -0 02 851 


MEMCAP UNIT TRUST 

Ll’ve 0+ Hw 25? RorrXc+d Ra 67 

01-23* 55+4 

Wotcso Tla.3 122.5 


ACHCURY FUND MAMAOERS LTD 
33.JLA^WMhen Si £C*R 9AS 


3J6 
650 
637 
11 51 
04? 
0 57 
050 
13* 


-Ol 469 


Amer Groom 
Do Aaun 


907 

939 


96* 

998 


1.73 

193 


Accun 
CommwKy 8 Gen 
Do Accun 
Etura hot tec 
Da Accun 
Git 8 Fixed Inc 
Do Accun 

T Y+rtJ 
Accun 
income 
Do Accum 
J3BOT 8 PacAc 
Do Accun 
N American inc 
Oo Accum 
Overseas Growtfi 
Do Accum 
Smaier Cos ine 
Do Accum 


1070 210 1 
902 10*7 
117.1 12*9 
95 6 102.0 
114 5 132 1 
877 
92.7 


*\S 023 
+15 1.1* 
*17 1.14 
+1 Q 1 13 
+10 113 
935# -a? 277 
968# -08 2.77 


MURRAY JOHNSTONE UNIT TRUST 
MANAGSWENT 

183. Hope SitaeL GUsgon 02 2UH 
0*1 221 9252 


American tec 
Do Accun 
Auodatan me 
Do Accun 
Eurooean tec 
Do Accum 
G# A Fuad tec 
Do Accum 
Goto Fund tec 
Do Accun 
tecome 

Do Accun 
teO tecome 
DO Accun 
JAP Smflr Co's Ac 
Sinwora a u«ay 

Do Accum 

Smaller Cos tec 
Do Accum 
Special Sd tec 
Do Accun 
Tokyo Funa tec 
Dc Accun 
US Smsber Cos Ac 
UK Ecuty tec 
Do Accum 
BOTOvery 
Special ExOTTOt 
Pensons S Cturay 


1187 1269 
12t0 1294 
61 T 663# 
66? 71 1# 
910 974 
93 4 994 
500 
74 6 
348 
363 


+'2 159 
+14 149 
IBS 
T86 
104 
14* 


-IS 
-41 
♦ 19 

♦2.1 _ 
507# +04 1025 
784# +03 1025 
374 +01 449 

308 +01 3*9 

M43 1545 -08 537 

317 2 3395 -1.7 547 

9*5 1010 *2-1 07B 

1304 1394 +24 078 

974 1041# *43 010 
*74 514 +40 147 

409 524 +41 137 


1114 119.1 
1164 12*4 
694 SOI 

son 994 

1528 103* 

1540 1046 
545 90S 
BE* 945 
1353 1444 
678 0 725 1# 

1014 1004a +02 
*83^ 5174# +20* 


+21 
-01 105 
-01 165 
+04 1.43 
+04 145 
+03 027 
*65 027 
+2* 044 
-04 Z.I3 
-06 342 
2.76 
145 
341 


Anwnc*i 
Euopxot 
S maller Cos 


10*4 1114# +24 
1764 1603 +17 

1690 1804 -0* 


400 

132 

157 


NATIONAL PROVIDENT INVESTMENT 
MANAGERS 

*6 Gracectniroii a. EC3P 3HH 
01-823 4200 En 289 


SCOTTISH EQUTT ABLE 
20 Sj Anaens So Edrtxxflh 
031-556 9101 


ten tecome Urws 
Da Accun 


1296 138.1 
1912 203.4 


NP1 UK 
Iki Accum 
NP1 Oimrsaas 
Do accum 
Far East Acc 
Do Dot 
American Acc 
Do Dm 


1734 1845 
277 1 29*8 
5185 5516 
8303 6700 
563 62 1# +0.8 
583 821# +08 
5* 4 57.9 +1.1 

534 57* 


-04 100 
-15 300 
+75 120 
+9.0 140 
040 
040 
140 
140 


scorrsM ure Mvursmn 
If. S'jVSH’” ^ EtfrtwrOT 
031 225 2211 


UK&M, 

American 

Pacific 

European 


►10 


1900 101.1 
1*74 1525 
iai 1381 
1853 1904 


NORWICH UNION 
w Box (LNoraOT NR] 3NG 
0603 022200 
Groui Trust 
rmt Tntsi 


SCOTTISH MUTUAL. D4VB8TMEHT 
MANAGERS 

109. Vtecem SL Gtes^ow 02 5HN 


na?4 10 78 
1108 1251 


-003 4.12 
+20 148 


OfFCNMEMEH TRUST MAMAGEMEMT 
66 Cannon Street London EC4N 6AE 
WOTOT 01-236 3085(677/8/9.0 
teMmaaxnai Growte 1227 


0*1-248 0100 
UK Equty 
G4t S Fued 
UK Sm* Cos Eq 
European 
N American 
Patafe 


1*3.0 1521 
1027 7 OBJ 
120.7 1204 
1524 1620 
105.1 111.8 
1100 123 A 


tecome 6 Growtn 
Special Sis 
Amman drown 
Japan Grown 
Euroooan Growth 
UK Growte 
Pa Otic Growth 

Hot inenma 

Pi.icrcill tecrana 
Do Accum 


*69 

692 

318 

396 

518 

*50 

3*4 

292 

*54 

813 


1312a 
*99 
74 0 
338 
*20 


+10 TOO 

-05 2.90 
-0 6 2.10 
+0 7 310 
+04 


SCOTTISH UNIT TRUST 
26. Durante 5a Eunpwgn 
031-226 4373 


554# *02 29fl 

*84 -0? 1.30 

+08 070 
-01 810 
-01 2 70 
+04 2.70 


366 

313 

*81 

805 


Paofic 

Worn Growte 
N Amencen 
tecome Fund 


404 
31 0 
338 
380 


*3.1 

334 

302 

4020 


+24 343 
+34 137 


*04 218 
+48 135 
+13 0 07 
+44 073 


-03 269 
-04 885 
-04 229 
+11 103 
+20 2.10 
+04 049 


+03 
.. 041 

+03 077 
.. 504 


Amer Eagfe 

AiHfiatan 

Commaaty 

l!SSP 

Equity 

European Sore Sis 
End tecome 


GM tecome 
Gold tecome 
Dp Accun 


Japan 

Mau r i s Singapore 

Dd RemvcsJ 
Prat State Fd 
UK Cental 
SpeoaiSB 

TettenoJooy 

wrong Boo m a 
HWteflt fl a paal 
&W E» (3J 
DO Accun (31 


73.6. 704 
24.7 20L3* 
77 1 628 
35 4 37S 
1094 117.1 
414 464 
10(6 1007 
2271 2*24 
854 1005 
620 65.1 
1I3A (210 
598 748 


, 644 

-12 aio 

-14 212 
-14 1.43 
-01 312 
+1.4 028 
-04 035 
-1.1 207 
-04 068 
-14 1.80 
-25 148 
-04 016 

T4 

+04 009 
+05 009 
.. 18.31 
-01 227 
BOOM -04 096 
480# +07 0(0 
5*0 +04 700 

1214 1300 +04 143 

053 097 +10 221 

1223 1305 +14 221 


019 
190 
714 
07.7 
10 1 
5*7 
702 
4*0 
SOB 


601 

20J 

707 

SIS 

170 

504a 


SWOT TRUST MANAGERS 
L *»*• LUYWl H3A 88F 

or ■■ 


Soab#- Cos 


87.7 720 +07 OW 


TOUDfE REMNANT 

MeaiM HOUML 2. Fudda Dock. London EG*V 
01-2*8 1250 


Anancan Own 
General Growtn 
Gfcssd Tech 
teeme Grown 
tecome MnnnVy 
Japan Grown 
Gaeas Growte 
SinMNN Cos 
Special Opps 


336 3SB +05 043 
4*3 474 -OI 293 
363 349 +0 4 010 

51.1 54 « -02 522 

4(5 44.4# -OJ 720 

S O 308 +03 0.18 

9 41.7 +06 1.40 

SOI 533 -OI 140 
534 57.1* -02 125 


TRA NSATLA NTIC A GENERAL 
SECURITIES 

91-99. Nn London Ad. CnabaMonl 
0245 51651 


Cotemco tec (9 
Do Accun (5) 
Ftettng Fund Ml 
Do rXcun (*} 
Rdng An a Gen 
Da Accun M) 


3907 4165 
100.* 6793 
20S2 219? 
2246 3405 
W 2100 23*0 
2402 2529 


IncFuraiW 1443 1562 
S A JY Amer £0 mu 1500 
SOW SnAr Sea W01 111.7 


415 

4.15 

355 

355 

132 

132 

540 

154 

D-B 


PEARL TRUST 

252 HOT Hotecm WC1V 7ES 
01-405 8441 


Grown Fund tec 
Dc Accum 
income Fund 
W Gouty tnc 
Oo Acoun 
UW Tran inc 
Do Accum 


73 3 801 
1113 1 184 
100 7 107 I 
1090 M80 
109.0 1160 
1067 1135 
1827 194 4 


284 

• . . 28* 
-02 4 65 
+ 17 1.72 
+1.7 1.72 
-01 367 
-01 367 


PERPETUAL UNTT TRUST 
*8. Hbr Street Hartley On Tkanes 
0*91 576864 
mtf Growet 


worawWa flee 
Amer Growte 
HI Email) Coe 
Far East GflOT 


2305 2474 +8.1 1.32 

158 B 1694 .10 531 

128 4 137 0# -t)» zoo 
« 8 70 7# *25 1 Oi 
694 74 5 +|J 046 

571 SI 3 *23 111 


SCOTTISH WIDOWS 
PO Box 902. EdnbuOT EH 16 58U 
031-655 6000 

1959 2002 -78 313 

0 2204 237.5 -12 313 

SCTtTINAL FUNDS MANAGEMENT 
30. Oy Bo. London EClv 2 ay 
01-638 6011 1 

Amer Teen 6 Gen 
Pacrhc 

See tecome Fna 
Soeoai SiuMOTn 
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THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1 986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


19 


Ccommercial property) 


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Hammerson short of time MFI b “y s 

former 
airfield for 
£3 million 


for City office schemes 

By 

Jodith Himtley 


Hammerson Group is 
planning a large-scale 
redevelopment of Dominant 

Hgwe-to Clt * of London 

offia budding it bought for 
z-ii-j million last year. 

Talks are under way with 
the City Corporation over 


Corpor 
Id SOper, 
100,00(5 sc 


plans to add >u per cent to its 


casting 100,000 sq ft. But 
there is a possibility that 
Hammerson could build a 
bridge across ihe road to its 
riverside site. Brooks Wharf 
develop both sites with 
sq « of new offices. 
The developer has already 
applied to the City for 
Dominant House, but moves 
have yet to be made on 
Brooks Wharf Hammerson 
does not expect to start work 
on Dominant House until 
1988. It is occupied by 
Lloyds Bank, British Telecom 
and Burroughs Machines, 
among others. Some of the 
tenants have long leases 
which will have to be bought 
out before redevelopment 
Fur traders still occupy the 
Brooks Wharf building. If 
Hammerson opts for the 
large-scale development of 
both its key sites it will end 
up with a laige scheme in the 
Square Mile. But ti ming will 
be all. The big bang, which is 
resulting in booming demand 
for large Gty buildings, could 
well have petered out by the 
time Hammerson, and others 
late off the mark, get their 
buildings on stream. 

The LEP Group, which has 
a riverside site next door to . 
Brooks Wharf has finalized 
an agreement with the Gty 
Corporation to take a new 
1 50-year ground lease on its 
land and build 185,000 sq A 
of offices. 

St Quintin and James 
Andrews & Partners, the 
letting agents, are ex| 



Windmill sales ... 


St Martins Property Corporation fans sold a site for 20<MMM> 
sq ft of space on its 80-acre Windmill EGO development hi 
Swindon, Wiltshire, to America’s largest fleet management 
company, PHH International. PHH. which is pa ying 
£230,000 an aero, wfll make Windmill HID its 
headquarters. St Martins has also let all the 45£00 sq ft 
first phase of the scheme. The newest tenant is Image Prrat- 
hra, which has a 25-year lease with fire-year reviews at 
£6.75 a sq ft. The letting agents are Kingfat Frank & Rnfiey, 
Hartnell Taylor Cook aid Peter Barefoot of Swindon. 


rents of £30 a sq ft 
space. Hammerson 


the 

has 


brought in Baker Harris 
Saunders and Donaldsons to 
let Brooks Wharf with the 
addition of Richard PHis at 
Dominant House. City rents 
are expected to edge nearer 
£40 a sq ft this year for spoce 
in the core near the Bank of 
England, and it, is anybody’s 
guess to what level they will 
reach in two years. 

While the debate continues 
about- the City's ability to 
cope with the demands of 
financial conglomerates for 
large buildings with dear 
dealing floors, St Martins 
Property Corporation has 


confirmed that Price 
Waterhouse, the firm of 
accountants, is taking 83,000 
sq ft at London Bridge City, 
its £120 million develop- 
ment, south of the river, 
stretching from London 
Bridge to Tower Bridge. 

The accountants are be- 
lieved to be paying just under 
£20 a sq ft for the space in 
No 1 London Bridge. Mean- 
while Citibank, believed to be 
the key tenant at London 
Bridge City, has yet to sign a 
lease. 

The Gty Corporation i« 
putting the finishing touches 


to its new draft development 
plan, ft is due to go to the 
planning committee at the 
end of this month and to be 
approved by the corporation 
on March 13. Meanwhile, the 
City is doing its utmost to 
convince developers that up 
to 15 million sq A of space 
can be accommodated in the 
Square Mile. 

The Chy itself soon shortly 
begin marketing one of the 
few remaining development 
opportunities in the Square 
Mile. The Pilgrim Street site 
at Ludgatc (till, for which 
Savills, the estate agent, is the 
adviser, may go out to 
tender. 

The corporation has yet to 
decide how to sell this 
valuable asset. But it is 
believed that a development 
brief has been prepared for 
the site, which takes account 
of its sensitive location on 
the thoroughfare to St Paul’s 
CathdeiaL 

The availability of the site 
and others scattered around 
the edges of the City brings 
into question the need for the 
10 million sq A of offices 
planned at Canary Wharf in 
London’s Docklands. Savills, 
advising the banking con- 
sortium behind the ambitious 
plan, argues that the number 
of large tenants in the market 
for banking space will not 
find their needs satisfied by 
what will come on stream in 
the near future. 

Opponents of that view, 
and there are many, argue 
that demand will drop in 
1987 or 1988, leaving a big 
question mark over the 
Docklands scheme. However, 
leasing companies, looking to 
shelter an estimated £1.8 
billion, may well find Canary 
Wharf an a ttrac ti ve prospect 
because of its enterprise zone. 

It has yet to find tenants to 
sign on the dotted fine but, if 
they are of the standing of 
Credit Suisse First Boston, 
the scheme’s promoter, there 
is tittle doubt that funding 
would be provided. 


• MFI, the furniture re- 
tailer now merged with Asda. 
has bought 567 acres of 
land at Lutterworth . 
Leicestershire, for just 
over£3 million to build 
jislargcsi distribution centre. 


MFI envisages developing 
the site over the next de- 
cade and it may be used for 
distribution by Asda and 
Allied Carpets, its sister com- 
pany. 


The former airfield has 
been sold on the condition 
that MFI does not use it 
for retail development. The 
company will have more 
than 1 million sq ft of space at 
Lutterworth in the long 
term. 


• Booth bourne Properties 
has won planning permission 
to develop theformer ABC 
cinema at Maidenhead, Berk- 
shire. The site on the cor- 
ner of the High Street will be 
redeveloped with 24,500 
sq ft of offices and 84 parking 
spaces. 


This planning consent 
takes the Royal Borough of 
Windsor and Maidenhead 
to the limit of its office space 
allocation by Berkshire 
Count)’ Council which has re- 
duced allocations in the 
town as well as at Reading , 
Newbury and Bracknell. 


Boothboume Properties 
bought the cinema site from 
Thom EMI which lost an 
appeal to redevelop it in 1984. 
Edwin Hill & Partners and 


Goldstein Leigh Miles are the 
ntsfor 


letting agents 
Booth bo ume.The scheme wfll 
be completed by late next 
year. 



The much-publicized fight 
against software piracy has 
largely foiled because die 
copying of progra ms is virtu- 
ally impossible to prevent 
• Elaborate devices. _to stop 
copying ofcompnter software 
are often annoying for ges u- 
tne purchasers as they cannot 
take security copies of the 
software which they have 
paid for and, as an additional 
cost to the manufacturer, 
must either be absorbed or 
passed on to the buyer. 

Software protection against 
piracy can also mean that 
some programs will work on 
only one machine, limiting 
the software’s use in a mnlti- 
machine office. - - 

The software companies 
have argued that removing 
software protection from 
their discs will allow large 
companies to copy software 
and distribute large numbers 
of illegal copies throughout 


the firm without paying an 
additional foe fra doing so. 

In practice, however, most 
users know so tittle about 
computers that they are lost 
without the documentation. 
manuals and support that 
come with, each official copy 
of the software, and it can 
actually save them money to 
ensure that each employee is 
equipped with all the 
information needed to run a 
program. - - 

.. The word-processing leader 
Micropro recently declared 
an amnesty for users of illegal 
copies of its successful (and 
unprotected) Wordstar pro- 
gram -by offering them full 
documentation, registration 
and software support fra £40 
- a saving of more than £200 
on the recommended retail 
price of the software. 

In two or three years time, 
however, such an- offer might 
not mean anything as there is 


every indication software 
prices are felling dramati- 
cally. Many predict this will 
further curb piracy problems. 

If software costs less than 
£100 - and much of the new 
business software Ira low-cost 
business com pu ters such as 
AmstrafTs PCW 8256 and 
Atari’s 520 ST foils into this 
category - then there is not 
much of a saving in buying 
your own floppy discs and 
photocopying pages of the 
manual. 

Even new software for the 
IBM-PC and true IBM- 
compatible computers (which 
can bought for as tittle as 
£800) is becoming less expen- 
sive:. Last year Mr Adam 
Osborne, founder of the 31- 
foted Osborne Computer 
company, launched Paper- 
back Software - a company 
which offered a wide range of 
business applicatio n s each 
juiced at Iks than £100. 


But the business software 
market has not been the only 
sector affected by copy- 
protection schemes. Manu- 
facturers of games software 
for home computers have, for 
the past six months, been 
trying to prevent school- 
children from copying one 
another's programs. 


The most controversial 
plan has been a system called 
Lenslock, which causes the 
computer to display a coded 
sequence of numbers and 
letters on-screen as you load 
your game. The numbers and 
letters can only be viewed 
through a spatial viewing 
device that accompanies the 
game cassette. 


To use the game you must 
type in the tetters and 
numbers yon see on-screen 
within a few seconds or the 
screen will go Wank and the 
will be erased 


program 


• The Prudential Assurance 
Company has sold its free- 
hold interest in Park House, a 
new 1 3.000 sq ft office build- 
ing at 4 Park Place, in St 
James’s, London, for more 
than £6 million. Pension fund 
diems of King & Co have 
bought the investment at a 
yield oftess than five percent. 


The offices are let to Canada 
Permanent at a rent of more 
than £26 a sq ft Five Oaks 
Investments developed the 
scheme with the Prudential. 
Conway Rdf Stanton acted 
for the vendor. 


• The office market in 
central London saw a take-up 
peak last year with avail- 
able space dropping from 9 
million sq ft in the middle 
of 1 984 to only 4.9 million sq 
ft at the end ofl 985, 
according to Debenham 
Tewson & Chinn odes. 


The company's latest 
survey reveals that 1985 was 
the most active year for 
occupancy since 1 978. In con- 
trast to the letting and 
sales market, the amount of 
space craning on to the 
market has stayed constant 
over the last two years at 
about 1 1.4 million sq ft 


N Sea pioneers drill on 
despite market risks 


Seismic sunc\s show ihai 
oil exists under the far 
northern waters of the North 
Sea. 

The high-technology 
needed to bring it from the 
dangerous depths has been 
developed and the men 
willing to take the physical 
and financial risks involved 
are already working. 

What are lacking are the 
customers. With oil swilling 
round the world market and 
existing producers offering 
substantial discounts, the bar- 
rel from the North Sea which 
may cost more than $20 to 
produce is hardly saleable or 
attractive to the investor 
asked to finance new 
projects. 

However, the North Sea oil 
industry has produced its 
own breed of optimist who 
base their decisions on sound 
scicnufic data and who are 
now looking at the new- 
frontier areas — the deep 
waters north and west of the 
Shetland* — to provide Brit- 
ain with the oil it will need in 
the next century when the 
large oil fields in the compar- 
ativcly shallow waters run 
dry-. 

It is these companies that 
the Department of Energy 
expects to keep the oil and 
tax flowing in. although 
accepting that revenues will 
probably never reach their 
1984-85 peak of £12 billion. 

Leading the search in the 
waters 750 miles north of 
London is Sovereign Oil and 
Gas. a British company 
which is in the unique 
position among the indepen- 
dents of owning its own 
semi-submersible drilling rig. 
the Sovereign Explorer. 

The rig is one of only a 
handful capable of drilling in 
waters deeper than 2.000 feet 
and has a unique mooring 
system which saves time and 
money. 

Sovereign is now using its 
income from the large Brae 
field operated by Marathon 
UK. — ii also has oil flowing 
from shares in the BP Forties 
Field and the Occidental 
Claymore Field — to finance 
the most ambitious drilling 
programme being undertaken 
in British waters. 


UK GOVERNMENT! 
TAX TAKE £ btfjon 
12 


Treasury official 
estimate 


Current analysts' 
estimate 



North of Shetland, where 
ihe winds are as cold and 
fierce as those now blowing 
from the spot oil markets, the 
crew of the Sovereign Ex- 
plorer is close to completing 
a well on block 219/27 in 
water 1.700 feet deep — three 
tunes deeper than in the big 
oil fields such as Magnus and 
Brae — in an area where 
Sovereign has already found 
high-pressure natural gas. 

Mr David Biggins. 
Sovereign’s chief executive. 
saidrWc can’t ignore the 
world oil price, but wc can’t 
be constantly looking over 
our shoulder at it. We have 
got to be prepared to take the 
risks involved and the lesson 
from the past is that those 
who go into the frontier areas 
first are the ones who will 
reap the rewards. We have 
got to back our own hunches 
and use the invesicmem we 
have made in the most 
modem equipment to go and 
find oil in likely areas.” 

However, there are others 
in the industry who lake a 
more pessimistic view- and 
are reviewing some of the 
projects planned for the next 
decade. Luckily, they are in 
the minority and so far no 
major project has been can- 
celled. 

The key is the production 
costs of every North Sea 
barrel compared to the 
prevailing spot market price, 
and several companies have 
admitted that, with the 
present favourable taxation 


regime in the North Sea. the 
price would have to drop 
nearer S5 a barrel before 
some production would have 
to be turned off. 

Mr David Morrison, the 
North Sea specialist at the 
broker Wood Mackenzie. 
said:**From our findings it is 
readily apparent that even at 
a price as low as S5 a barrel 
there would be no compul- 
sion for the bulk of L'K 
producers to cut production. 

•’However, before the 
prices got anywhere near that 
level some companies might 
reduce output if they felt 
short-term reductions in cash 
flow could be more than 
made up at a later date when 
prices were better. 

“In any event the question 
of the impact of oil priced at 
55 a barrel is somewhat 
academic in ihai it is highly 
unlikely to fall that far. 
World-wide switching from 
other fuels, principally coal, 
would preclude such a price 
collapse.” 

Mr Humphrey Harrison, 
the oil analysi with the 
broker Fielding. Ncwson- 
Smith. said:"Wc believe that 
crude prices could fall well 
below even Si 5 a barrel. We 
do not discount the possibil- 
ity that this may only tic a 
temporary plunge and that 
prices could afterwards re- 
bound to stabilize at around 
Si 7. but equally, we cannot 
argue with much conviction 
that they will. 

’’The scourge of the market 
now is perhaps not so much 
Ihe basic supply-demand im- 
balance. but * the wishful 
thinking that has so in- 
fluenced the policies and 
forecasts of the industry 
recently and. ultimately, led 
to the current malaise.** 

Mr Mehdi Varzi. the world 
oil price specialist at the 
broker Grievcson Grant. 
said:“Wc believe that there is 
technical support for spot 
prices between SI8-S22 a 
barrel over the next few 
weeks. The big question is 
whether the political support 
for prices also exists at 
current levels. 


David Young 

Energy' Correspondent 


IMF chief calls for 
initiative on debt 


The Fleming Technology! 
Investment Trust pic 


INTERIM RESULTS 



At 30fli November 1985 

At 31st May 1985 | 

Thtal Assets 

£73,076,556 

£72,355,565 

(Geographical distribution: UK -44%, USA-34%, Japan & Europe- 22%) 


Net Asset Value per ordinary share 

184.0p 

182-2p 

Share price 

140p 

137p Ii 


By comparison, for the saroeperiodffieFT-Actuaries Electronics Indexfeflby 10%, and tbs 
Hambredit & QuistTfeduiology Index (USA.) fetiby 7% adjusted frathefefl in the dollan 


“It is the Board’s belief that the period of consolidation of net asset values, in the face of 
fallin g technology share prices generally; is now behind us. News from the USA. is 
morecheering and continued steady growth in the UK. and mja^se^mpr^pect” 


r« 


If vou would like a copy of the Annual Repost and details of our recently araiounced dividend 
reinvestment and saving scheme please send the coupon below to the Secretary Robert 


Real progress 
made in managing the debt 
problem over the past three 
years. Mr Jacques de 
Larosiere. managing director 
of the International Monetary 
Fund, told members of the 
Overseas Bankers Gub in 
London this week. “Bui we 
must now move from 
containment to 

consolidation.” he said. 

“Financial discipline must 
be strengthened and long 
overdue structural reforms 
must be pul in place so that 
adjustment can be combined 
with durable growth. Im- 
plementation of the right 
policies will require political 
courage by governments in 
debtor and creditor countries 
alike. It will also require 
financial support and under- 


By Onr City Staff 
had been standing 


the inter- 
financial 


from 

national 
community.” 

Mr de Larosiere said that 
the sharp decline in oil prices 
confronted oil exporting 
countries with “new 
challenges.” The responsibil- 
ities of each of the major 
parties were heavy — but they 
were not greater than the 
slakes involved in the debt 
problem. 

“We live in a difficult and 
interdependent world. The 
debt initiative offers a 
constructive framework for 
harnessing that interdepen- 
dence towards sustainable 
growth in the developing and 
developed world. It is now 
time to make that initiative 
work and to take concrete 
action. 


WHATSSOINTEXESTING 


ABOUT LEAMINGTON SM? 


SRI BOND 


(fart 


10 - 50 % = 15 * 00 % 


hun MIW iiiiMnaT 
GUARANTEED fOK ONE YEAK 



BASE 


LENDING 

RATES 


ARN 

.1216% 

Adam A On many 

.12%% 

srrt 

„12K% 

Qrihmfc JMngtf 

.12%% 

ComoMacd Ctds 

.12VA 

.1216% 

GtMpoaiFK Bnk 

CHran. * r-n 

.im 

.I2Mfc 


.1216% 

Nat Werimmcfcr 

.1216% 

Royal Bank Scotland 

TO 

. 1255% 
.12%% 

GthankNA 

.12%% 

f MBtppteRfe 


APPOINTMENTS 


Woolwich Equitable Build- 
ing Society: Mr David Small 
b&s been Tnarift genera] man- 
ager for bousing. Mr Stanley 
Cammmgs has beco m e assis- 
tant general manager of 
finance. Other new appoint- 
ments at assistant general 
manager level are: Mr How 
Alderman (marketing), Mr 


Frank Bartlett (lending pol- 
icy), Mr David Blake (cor- 
porate a ff ai rs), Mrs Jadtie 
Key (corporate planning), 
and Mr Michael Skinner 
(members accounts). 

Heflertnann Deutsch: Mr 
David J Burt is now joint 
managing director of the 
Bowtborpe Holdings connec- 
tor subsidiary. 

Inbucon: R E Putter, a 
member of the board of 
Inbucon Management 
Consultants, has been named 
as marketing director for 
international and special 
projects. Mr J W Boynton, 
Midlands regional director, 
has been appointed to the 
board as marketing director 
for UK regions. 

Moben Kitchens: Mr Bob 
HoDkk has become manag- 
ing director. 

Jean Sorefle: Mr Keith Fox 
has become operations direc- 
tor and deputy managing 
director. 


Clarke Construction (South 
Western): Mr M J Egerton 
becomes managing director 
of the new subsidiary of 
Clarke Construction. Mr A C 
J Coulter is appointed 
surveying director and Mr J 
W Short becomes estimating 
director. 

ANZ Holdings (UK): Mr 
Andrew Hugh Smith, chair- 
man of Capel-Cure Myers, 
the stockbroker, and a direc- 
tor of Grindlays Bank, was 
elected a director of ANZ 
Holdings (UK) (formerly 
Grindlays Holdings), 

Grindley’s Bank: David 
Poole, chief executive of 
ANZ Merchant Bank and of 
Capel-Cure Myers,has be- 
come a director of Grindlays 
Bank. 

Hill Samnel Shipping 
Holdings: Mr John Sproyt 
has joined the board. 

Good Relations Technol- 
ogy: Mr Malcolm Gaffe is 
now an account director. 

Thomas Cook Group: Mr 
BR Norman has been named 
as chief executive. Mr M W 
Brocksom has been ap- 
pointed chairman and chief 
executive of Thomas Cook 
Financial Services. He has 
also been appointed non- 
executive deputy chairman of 
the group. 


George Wimpey PLC: Mr 
Payne and Mr David 
have joined the exec- 
utive board. Mr Payne has 
been a director and general 
manager of George Wimpey 
International since 1983.Mr 
HepeU is currently deputy 
chairman of Wimpey Mer- 
chants, chairman of Wimpey- 
Dubilier and managing 
director of WimpoL 
Northern Engineering In- 
dustries: Mr Tarty Harrison 
is to be executive chairman 
on Sr Duncan’s McDonald’s 
retirement in May. Mr 
Graeme Anderson and Mr 
Larry Tmdale are to become 
deputy chairmen. Sir Donald 
Maitland has been made a 
non-executive director. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• NORTHGATE EXPLORA- 
TION: The company has 
agreed to sell its 10 per cent 
stake in Tara Exploration and 
Development, owner of 
Europe's largest zinc-lead mine, 
for GanSl2.57 million (£6.28 
million) to Outokumpu Oy, the 
mining group controlled by the 
Finnish government. 
Outokumpu intends to make a 
cash offer “as soon as 
practical" to purchase Tara’S 
outstanding shares at 
Can$ 19-00 per share. Noohgate 
owns 661,741 (J0 per cent) and 
Noranda owns 3.21 million (48 
per cent) of the total outstand- 
ing shares. Both companies 
have agreed to accept 
Outokumpu’s offer. 

• TADDALE INVEST- 
MENTS: Turnover for six 
months ended Oct 31 1985 was 
£9.31 million (£18.13 million 
for the year ended April 30, 
1985). Operating profit 
£635,571 (loss. £332.091) after 
deducting costs from discontin- 
ued activities £222.833 (£1.44 
million). Interest £! million, 
making loss £364,807 (loss 
£2.09 million). Tax nil (nil). 
Minority interests, loss £18.573 
(loss, £5.786) and extraordinary 
charges. £213.564 (£3.2) mil- 
lion), making a loss for the 
period of £596,944 (loss £5.47 
million). 

• TEXTURED JERSEY: For 
the half-year to Oct 31, 1985, 
an interim dividend of 2.25p 
(I.75p) is being paid on April 
1. Turnover was £8,71 million 
(£8.05 million). Pretax profit 
was £533,000 (£31 7,000). Earn- 
ings per share were 8-27p 
(5. 14p). Textured Jersey: Div 
pay April I. 

• THOMSON T-L1NE: The 
Diamond company has waived 
the condition relating to the 
value of Thomson T-Line 
stocks as at Nov 30.1985. The 
acquisition by Diamond of 
991.195 Thomson shares (61.5 
per cent) is unconditional 

• FLEMING ENTERPRISE: 
An interim dividend of 3p is to 
be paid on March 4. 


• MAYPOLE • 

Borough High Street 


• HOUSE • 

London Bridge SE1 



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.From your ponfoho card check vour 
eight share price movements. Add them 
up to give >ou your overall total Check 
this against the daily dividend figure 
published on this page, ir it matches you 
nave »on outright or a share of the tool 
daily pnze money staled. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
hack of sour card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 


1 

Cotupaui 

Voar 
min or 
loss 


INDUSTRIALS A-D 


(j 1 

bo>: 


E - 

Booker McConnell 


i 3 

DqHicii 


1 •* 

Ash & Lacey 


f 5 

Coo Lion 


1 h 

Armour 


H ' 

Brammer 


1 8 

Hr Meam 


I q 

Dan 


1 •!> 

Bulli inch 


a 

INDUSTRIALS Sr-Z 


|rr 

Sun’s Porienes 


n ■- 

Suodard Fironorks 


B 1.’ 

Scon Gircnium 


1 1* 

lAjieniwd ijlxss 


H (5 

Smith &. Nephew 


§ (0 

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Telfok 


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Trans pun De' 



DR.APERT A STORES 


f :1 

Cii’ldimilh Gp 


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Cantors ‘A’ 


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} 24 

PreoJi 1 Alfred' 


! 

Combined English 


1 -0 

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i 

G<Her iAJi 


1 » 

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y 2^ 

Lee CoopcT 


1 -V 

D'sons GP 



BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


1 -1 

Wilson iCdnnolM 


H 3- 

Bawxndce Brick 


4 5-’ 

All woods 


a - u 

Redland 


G .55 

Persimmon 


3 ir 

Gleeson (Ml) 


A 5’ 

Block (ess 


*3 36 

Neujrihill 


3 vj 

W impel tGc.irpM 


i -h i 

Aberdeen I'onw 

mi 

S »' Tima Newipapen Ltd. Da3) Total | 

i_j 


l * » v- a A. tVox/A x 1 


KJ 4.0^ 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £o0.000 in 
newspaper. ’ 


won 


at 

wso 

mu 

Fffl 

SS 

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Tool 








BREWERIES 


306 l$3 
6K *n 
«• * 
U» 68 
st 250 

KB I >9 

sac -ur 

'80 *i? 
590 370 
198 759 
354 t4d 

12a 33 
439 334 
85 59 

17? 734 
190 1» 
93 57 
239 179 
338 108 
194 125 
40 - H-. 
410 258 
280 184 
>78 18S 
136 M2 
36 270 
45 135 


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.05 

645 

43 

88 

375 

757 

415 

455 

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186 

183 

293 


0-2 

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GuanP'-S 
H.*ov« S HanSJH 423 
Hijnune CVsit 73 

fi'-itjivaar Disfl 160 
lns.1 D-sl 185 

MarSCn Thompson 70 


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• -1 1006 56 121 

■r. 4i i i j 
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-3 103 4 3 122 

10 2 12 124 

99 SO 295 
122 29 15 2 

• 94 4 7 160 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


Zl 


203 90 Ailed ;«?n 195 

es 46 inina-mer iHenryi 67 
121 194 Au-, Mr* 2 773 

19 8 £3 

J7S 225 Ban. 01 beiano J05 
IS 8 Bank tfvji Israel £8 . 
290 215 Ban, Uftirm Ilk 240 

444 351 Em/» 01 Sec Hand 372 

479 >32 BjrrLa,- 444 

445 -ISO Bl'JlW Slknev 410 


90 46 
n 40 4 

• -2 ISO 65 

• - . 

• 170 4 7 

-10 160 87 112 

IB Oh 4 B 9 0 
-a 240 54 63 

13.2 32 17 7 



JIGGER 



SUNDAY 


To advertise your ear. holiday 
home or property for sale in 
The Sunday Times Classified, 
nil'm vour advertisement in 
the space below, i Lonuer 
messages can be attached 
separately 1. 

Rates'are: £9.50 per line 
i approximately 4 words, 
minimum 3 lines). 

£3#».00 per s.c.c. full display. 
Plus 13% VAT. 

Prior to your advertisement 
appearing we will contact you 
with the cost and confirm the 
date of insen ion. 

PAY NO POSTAGE. Send lo 
The Sunday Times. Classified 
Dept.. Freepost. London 
WC14BR. 


Advertisement. 


Name- 


Address: 


Daytime Telephone: 


l ACCESS L 


1 VISA! 

To pay by Access or Barclaycard. 
please quote your number. 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Lower at close 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings Began Jan 27. Dealings End Feb 7.§ Contango Day Feb 10. Settlement Day Feb 17. 

§ Forward Bargains are permitted on two previous days. 



g) TnaNnqiapmliaM 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£ 2,000 

Claims required for 
+29 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


Dw vw _ 
Di> pro S PfB 


l«K 
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548 423 
41 23 


a? r 


104 


57 
107 
2W 
1 79 74 

JV 249 
80 55 

225 




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37 - 23 

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£35 - 1 306 

59 . 

370 



41 • 13 




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6 0 130 

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26 4 2 2 169 

10 29 3 1 
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240 1'2 
280 213 
60 29 

146 B2 
363 208 
333 204 
136 64 

34 19 

151 ill 
70 60 

87 51 

925 US 
608 466 

253 igu 

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155 145 
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Birran De«s iifl 
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CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


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383 273 
250 160 
117 78 

87 51 

120 100 
13* 10* 
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107 79 

275 224 
1&9 13> 
168 112 
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436 335 
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625 KF 

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200 49 

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165 *3 

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308 104 
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263 156 Emekv LOem 23r 

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353 2*3 M Sana* 8 Ccnro'HO 
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215 85 hoot 100 

341 218 Lee FfcUngoranori 2*5 

368- 98 Looks 137 

326 220 A4K Btct 301 

385 233 MemiC 370 

235 34 Mod aS 73 

970 100 UOD Focus 100 

98 33 humcne EMC 38 

94 59 Mwiav EUa *0 

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283 170 Newmerk (Lous) 760 

90 76' NO 87 

173 23 OC0CTV.1, 45 

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155 95 . Ptrfcos Fui S' *. £155 

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ISO 111 Do A Ltd Voting ISO 
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20 13'- Do ADA 25 £17 

166 65 Piossac IJC 

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208 120 Racal EJea 174 

196 142 PoUSet 165 

503 382 ScnoWs (GHl 475 

88 71 SnoROCH 77 

140 21 Sound pttMn 39 

289 72 STC 102 

197 137 Slone InS IBS 

119 74 SvsJem Deugnen 92 

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400 89 Tetanem* 1 19 

4*4 301 Thom 041 384 

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385 168 Tunsair TMecom 250 

230 158 UB 230 

306 173 Umecfi 223 

350 236 Utd Laapng 240 

270 150 Utd SOKDMC 185 

350 244 VG Instruments 326 

258 123 Voiev 238 

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102 40 11B 

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325 220 wholesale Fong 2*8 


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£7 08282 

114 4 8 99 

39 71 129 

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334 21 0 AOnwortfi 243 

191 >28 Aaian Hum 169 

330 200 Amoboasia 330 

151 70 Berkley Tddt 120 

26 17 - CwhM £24'. 

218 1‘9 Camwwjr 205 

36 10 CcnMwn 20 

20'. 16'. Equsy 8 Gen 17*. 

250 120 h ditto 245 

193 91 Wary 6 Sens '63 

173 114 Mew ke 161 

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40'. 38 Do 8V £42 


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107 06 

29 1 4 60 8 

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13 74 78 

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61 37204 

8 9 55 23 1 
600 190 i 


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l£6 128 aSCA-MFI 138 

7? 18 AWe Drrtts 21 

375 253 Aims 348 

770 19a A0 Food 238 

■28 68 Assoc Fisheries 116 

679 559 Avans 589 

260 <95 Bams (Smney Cl 240 
13 6 Barker 0 OoKon II'. 

30i 183 Ban |*G1 301 

206 133 Bassett Foods 181 
l?8 85 Badeys 101 

■99 *40 Bayam *64 

83 60 Bkjeuro C-mf 73 

67 37' Br Venang (BVD 62 

177 131 0*x.rr Schweppes 16Z 


180 108 CAns MdvM 
175 130 ONoros Domes 
162 11b Qo A 
315 119 Cvdens 
205 149 Dm 
171 9« Frsner (Alban) 

272 193 F«h Loves 
313 220 Glass Gtov*’ 


173 

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162 

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226 160 Hderds 100 

203 143 HesoownHdge 195 
05 52 Home Farm 79 

81? 369 Iceland Fifteen 504 
244 170 he* Sam 224 

98 47'. Lees (Jam J) 96 

60 47 Lome IGF) SO 

638 *98 Low (With 540 

560 254 Mjimewi (Bernard) 525 
1 13 76'. MMI Trade Su*p 95 
168 94 Momson (W) 16O 

1® 34 Neadsn 163 

270 19? Nichcis gN) (Vmtol 22S 


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30 30 120 

54 3J 198 
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304 204 Nrm Fftjda 


75 

268 


170 130 Nwdm 8 Peacock 16a 


137 105 Part Foods 
107 122 HHM 

447 340 Rownbee Mae 


145 117 
190 20 

591 410 
303 219 
240 1*0 


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173 

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SsrtMxay U) 
SHOT (Qisrtl 

352 

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232 

175 

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132 

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174 

130 

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314 

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189 102 Cobras Go 
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28 9 <35 Cope Altman 
70 22 COOSOn (H 

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385 210 CowmeyPooe 
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138 80 CrtSI Mcncrton 

170 126 Crown Hone 
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76 44 Tews 

150 60 Ter Woes 

9» 65 Thed Ure 

1 36 35 Thomson T-Lme 

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248 137 wwn (FHl 
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142 61 Turner 8 Newell 

144 94 Lf*0 

124 20 (rrugroup 

14 .908 Unmnrer 

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235 164 Valor 
3*0 210 MOM 
140 78 moot Products 
206 101 wnan 
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305 142 Vdipar 
86 30 WSL 

174 110 »ace PonaoM 
191 96 WCdhan 

163 125 Wagon M 
88 3*'.- we mtoia Glass 
195 153 wefshams 
268 81 wttsaa rR Karvuu 266 
264 twv Wedgwood 262 


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285 185 Whatman Rears 
112 84 Wesce 
198 138 MIMeoMt 
22* 128 Mm uvneai 
44S 166 wsams HMga 


395 263 Eastern Prod 
171 108 Ectra 
2* 0 148 EIS 
36 27'. Ettef 
119 65 Baco 


300 

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230 

32 

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97 51 QKJR <B) 55 • . 

29 . 16' E reran £23'. •* 

306 Z76 Enrtrsh Chne CCBy 7B1 * 

30 10'. Encsson ILMI B £23u< *' 

150 78 Erskvw House 150 • . 

1S3M15 Eimpeen Femes UT 

163 1DI DoSNPlI 11» 

27D 139 Ewved 192 

140 10« Evose 110 

148 90 Eajoni* mi 140 

403 272 Enel 333 

42 23 Falcon 29 

37 36 Feeder Agnc « 30 

ISO 1O6 Fanner (JH) HO 

185 60 Frte moral 65 

4*6 2«3 FttOPS 463 

47 32 f , trwrton 37 

112 86 Ftoreao CAW 104 »*2 

46 20 Foom 33V • .. 

115 95 Fogarty ids d-3 

30 20 FdCes Group N/V 29V 

172 136 Fcmergd t hpvev 185 

89 43 French IThtmam 51 • . 

1 12 04 Gei jm 39 • 

300 108 GhK £9i -2 

rao TOO GR 260 • . 

74 SS Garten Eng 68 • . . 

i2i 99 Gestroei 114 • . 

124 64 Oaves 121 »-1 

16* >633'. Clave 690 *7 

278 IS* Oynwcfl 273 -2 

85 30 Gomme 05 

$40 433 Goretg Kerr 445 

193 85 Grampian HMus 193 >4 

242 146 Graruoa 290 -2 

16 7- GnawoeN 9 * . 

70' 3B Hafri Precaon GO 

loO 114 Hal Eng 156 • . 

*88 U0 Hi* iw 140 «-2 

230 143 Haute 195 

243 155 Hatma 230 • . 

3 a 10'. Hampton bid Z7‘. • . 

62 35 Hammer 45 -1 

191 133 Hanson 147 •-? 

190 .135 Do0«. Cm £149 *3 

110 . 90V Do 5'.% 100 *1 

142 32 Hargreaves 14? -I 

190 127 Hams iPneol 105 

a79 359 Hawker Srodatoy 479 *6 

114 60 Hawley 103 .1 

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129 66 135 

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79 60 74 

113 &o mo 

94 94 IZl 
100 23 224 

114 7.7 424 

126 27 130 
SO 89 43 
14 54 99 

29 42 Z75 

21 29 16 7 

2001 3.6 120 
39 2.7 140 


INSURANCE 


251 105 ahsv L4e 
28*. i8‘. Am 0 Am 
29'. 19'- Am Gen 
236 190 BradPOCk 
B37 593 B man w c 
261 IT* Com Umon 
233 20B Eouny & Law 
350 ltM FAI 
758 503 Gen Aceeent 
788 6>8 GRE 
723 540 Heart c E 
313 217 Hoag Rconson 
777 545 legal 4 Gen 
3* 19 L4> Lite SA HI 

872 642 London A Man 
320 2*2 ban Old bv. 

70 AS'- Mean 8 MCLSH 
30B 161 Aknei 
S65 210 PWS 
1* 917 Peart 
819 «■» Prudeon* 

435 276 Refuge 
828 STS ROyJ 
410 332 Sedgtnc* Go 
7B4 51O Stewart Wr son 
*50 320 Sfcuce Htogs 
583 391 Sun mance 
904 TO Sun L ie 
365 220 Trade bxtemmy 
*99 269 Wflrs Faber 


206 

£26 

£27 

235 

629 

2*3 

25B 

346 

730 

763 

609 

313 

714 

£19 

819 

310 

£70 

288 

270 

£ 12 - 

789 

416 

788 

403 

78* 

415 

588 

B44 

365 

*52 


-3 
*6 
• -2 
• *3 
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94 45 .. 
100 30 .. 
89 0 33 

79 34 162 

375 48 .. 
189 70.. 

80 31 • - 

280 35 183 
379 5 0 22 1 

314 46 104 

134 43 149 

321 40 . 


310 39 32.4 
*4 men 00 11.9 
a *11 220 3.1 

99 3 7 17 7 

• 125 40 34 7 

.. 50.4 4 0 . 

-3 343 *3 52.1 

-2 169 40 

>2 348 4 4 108 

-15 14 6 30 10 1 

*12 20? 

• B 5 

-3 221 

.. 303 


-2 


37212 
21 270 
30 525 
__ 36 
120 3 SI33 
10A 23 


LEISURE 


146 86 Barr « WA A 

188 133 Bcfliey 6 Hi 

130 98 Brent WftWrt 

52 22 Campan 

235 170 Chrysalis 
433 231 Far Lrtsure 
69' SI'. GHA 


HenOurger B/CC*5 
Monj on Travel 


11B 

138 

98 

*2 

210 

413 

57. 


590 

107 

8.6 

07 

16 


1*8 114 Jourdwi (Thomas) 144 
36 22 Kalamazoo 24 

29V 22 V Karon 28V 

233 IBS Kelsey rtd 188 
<25 78 Kennedy Smeto 12b 

36S 230 KeromrIM 248 
208 155 Krtchen (Rt* Teyionree 


-1 

•-V 


<48 80 lUean-E-Ze 


148 ■ 


50 120 
. 0 8*1.0 

8.6 30 162 

280 59 139 
07 05 19 0 

. 120 
ia4 43 152 

41 59 09 

90 00 11 1 

29 121 80 

1.7 04 189 

114 61 47 

2DB 1.6 219 
214 86 129 

157 70 92 
71 40 310 


75 35 

146 76 

140 93 

231 66 JlArtil s Higgs 
205 124 Mednvnslcr 
3*0 IB* neauvam* 

63 32 n*t LMSure 

214 >47 Seal HMeys 

30* 20'. Samueucn & 
ao 53 Toneimjm Hwsair 53 
135 92 Zeaars I3S 


66 

101 

HO 

100 

150 

313 

ST 

214 

283 


100 85 87 
n 207 

79 01 63 
14 33 112 

80 30136 

10.7 26 1S8 

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444 

63 02 196 
05 50 67 
30 30 <S6 
76 51 10 0 
8L9 28 109 
n . . SO 
61 29 232 

34 12 

57 108 96 
&1 40 110 


MINING 


L - R 


31 13 LOH 

?» ’85 Lap 
239 1*0 Land 
!?* 68 Limoni 
5* 


Lawrex 
Let (Arthur) 
Lrffcsr* 
Ldeshaii 
Lmreao 
Uoyd (FH) 


20'. locker (T1 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


413 £75 Grand Mei 385 

3*6 186 Kennedy &tx*as 23S 

332 ?*■ Lacnidke 320 

465 3*8 Lon Para Hotels 447 

96 77 Mount Chartarte 94 

112 67 Pmoe 01 W Hotels 7S 

68 48 Queens Moat 66 

41b 353 Savoy notate '* 378 

78 29 Sam 86 

169 119 irusrtoiM Forte ISS 


♦2'r 

*3 


143 37 110 
1.7 07 1J« 

150 *7 193 
11 Oh 20 51 1 
10 19174 

2l 26135 
33k 3 3 18 3 
36 10 '96 
17 26 163 

70 50 15.4 


INDUSTRIALS 


A - D 


AAH 

AGS Research 

AIM 

APV 

Aansmon 

Acweji 

Arevsmka «V«Ur 
Amow MIC 
Aoe»edore 
Aienson 

AltlQ/ 

»a- 4 Lacey 


191 

197 

96 

281 

82 

160 

770 

130 

33* 

M 

30 

358 


197 1*6 
257 182 
128 93 
301 216 
1 12 71 
272 1*8 
270 136 
i*5 85 

370 86 

*: 7* 

30 IS 
425 375 

307 165 Eng 9». 

*06 303 assoc Heat 
*5 IS Aurora 
345 318 Avon Rupee* 

73 75 Arrvwa Meal 
159 52 BBa 

393 278 BET 0*0 
87 59 3ETEC 

378 2*8 BCC 
*05 196 BTP 
197 ! tfl Babcsbk 
30 13 Baity ICH) 

«3 335 Banc .Wm| 

313 160 Baler Petkers 
*50 54 Banro me 

144 lit Bamam 
496 180 Bariovr Hane 
. 38 3Wrt>. Heooum 
?'0 130 Barton Transport 
SI 23 Baynes iCnanesl 
164 1J8 Beaucr Clerk* 

97 6S Beau'o'O 
391 77S O eecn a m 

B o i a r Cosnvfe* 

45 19 Baooi 

’SO 133 Brnsforo 1S4W1 
73 D e ulkj n l s 
K~ 1 DO Besca* 

3*5 20* Besnwa 
438 129 Bniwoofl 
J2 IS Bevan IDF) 

285 320 Boov UI 
'S3 13s Bern 
>03 61 BOarr (J) 

96 B) B<«d QuMcasi 
128 102 Srnkrtcyiam Mail 
172 :s Black Arrow 
3*3 190 Blacjr iPmi 

BMowpoo Hodge 
IS* 79 tohear 
308 723 Boeva* UcCome* 299 


*15 


276 

70 

198 

368 

69 
305 
*00 
182 
33 

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353 

1*8 

138 

369 
4?' 
180 
31 
160 
95 

359 

70 
144 
91 
109 

229 
170 

76 

230 
1*8 
78 
96' 
178 
ITT 
2*6 

36' 

’94 


*3 

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97 

86 


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'0 5 BouAcn fWtmt 

358 2i4 Bowater 

SowaW* me 
138 75 9-aaTw*ta Op 

Ai? 2?7 a rammer 
72 JO Bras* a* 

30 Penyeen 
76 B>«)Qan0 Gp 

97 Boon 
99' BnauartAkevSy 


336 

9 

395 

£19 

93 

333 

66 

36 


97 51 152 

96 49 212 

82 04UO 

16 1 S7 372 

60 73 93 

111 62H5 

26 20 8 
75 94 
26 18 4 
69 
10 1 55 
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n **3 
114 A 1 
16 7 44 180 

1 in 2? 119 

61 29 99 

21 30 US 

79n 15 200 

-2 218 5 9 150 

■ 21 30 89 

• *2 124 44 110 

-5 105 26 329 

-1 119 85 102 

24 5 

• *6 Man 60 102 

• HO 102 40 107 

-7 70 5J 17 1 

-1 29 21 203 

-3 

34 80 130 

25 7 14 3 55 

• *1 32 71 620 

• -I0 94 59 ?6 

• *1 6 6 71 6 7 

-3 161 40 14 8 


16 00 U0 

150 104 44 
75 82 87 

81 5661 

n . 120 

86k 73*65 
ZDn 77 S3 
95 34 171 

14 3 9 7 7 4 
40 51 50 

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86 67 131 
64 37 140 

24 7 1 203 

IS 9 

86 44 97 

16 4 50 *24 

9J 33 16* 


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ISS US 
176 114 
1*5 TT 
2'3 153 
383 227 
46 24 


Br Bipg & Eng Art* '2D 


Br Son 
Si Synncn 
Br v«e 
Broken vfii 
B-orasgrove net 
Breru Eng 
&trri*n lea 
Brown A Tewse 
Brown ujohnj 
Brurans iUci 
_ Buaoucn 

173 no Burgns 
71 36 Btras- Andersen 

63 2B Cannara Ena 
25 bwo mo 
33 Cape ind 
295 s«9 Caron Eng 
53 39 Caskngs 

S3 2S Cwesian 

Central 1 Snew 
T 7 10 Cwwyway lod 
*" “ Clnj 

OumbeHpn Pn 
Cn e mpwkri 0 Her 
220 i«0 Owner Cots 
W 8 401 Cnwwra 
325 2C8 Cmwn 
*3 31 CWtSly Hunt 

<85 73 Clarke rOemenn 


32 22 

173 121 
38 21 

78 SO 
230 184 


H3 -2 
SS e-5 
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1$. *'/ 


173 

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258 

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313 

569 

291 

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125 12 109 

13 On 14 0 
l?9 54 170 

12 *7 99 

31 00 114 

61 40 103 

71 4 4 126 

PB 09 63? 
98 SSH9 

38 30283 
90 44 80 

18 3 5 t0‘l 
0? 40 

16 64 46 

96 50 II 5 

4 3 7.3 13 J 

11.7 4 5 122 

22 1 9 U 1 

39 &2 135 

25 43 as 
24 97 H2 

n 44 
■7 9h 68 53 
38 63 91 
I* 5J 13* 

. n i20 
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31 66 113 

5 5 7.7 92 

50 62 66 

15.7 74 *23 
19 3 3 4 124 

7.9 28 14 6 

110 

65 35 286 


31 
288 
238 
148 
51 
47 
31 

71 
84 
61 
27 

IBS 
10* 

67' 

174 

156 • . 

390 -7 

336 

72 •-2 
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289 144 Macartfrys Riarm 28a .6 

MaUanany 123 -5 

MJCkHUn fPawi as « 

193 -2 

„ . 78 

586 206 Manomigr Slap 500 -10 

* “ Manganese Bronze 5* 


• ♦1 


*1 

• -'. 


00m 1 6 18.7 
68 24265 

80 34 10? 
34 130 

4.1 S3 
64 67 
..*3 
20 41 110 
29h 30 
36 50 177 

19 70 80 

142 76 120 


51 

21 

30 


33 Z' Ang Amer Cee* 
1 1 '■ 570 Ann Am 
79 28 AmGoM 
47'- 38'. AAIT 

3 :! “ST' 

295 158 Ayer H4am 
787 250 Bfyvoom 
187 71 Bracken 

37 72-. Bunas 

392 238 CRA 
'DO S? Carr BorC 
$64 397 Care Gau&eleK 
450 257 De Beers 
Dee^jl 
Doomtontem 
Onetonten 
Dictwn 


230 « 

l«. 5 
23- 8 
12 3 

318 143 

7W 275 

160 ia El Oro 
W8 80 EHbicg 




150 

47 


214 11? Mcxecwi* 
88 45 Magnolia 


J73 285 Uarunar 
630 376 MrU Bo. 
l?C 106 Metal Closures 
71 50 Mdrtrtt 

as 55 Mfcnee Coda 
64 50 M'fcnel Sonvs 

168 i?6 Means 
248 197 Morgan Cructte 
130 69 Moss iRoOUrt) 

- Heepsend 


230 

sa 

405 

14 

94 

382 

335 

850 

350 

60 

665 

250 

256 

1Z* 

71'. 

9T 

138'' 

128 

487 

1» 


74 110 60 
59 314 

4 3 2 7 20.6 
129h 33 110 
11 lb 33 180 

07 10 103 

10 30*85 
136 47 178 

32 20 304 
26 58 100 
11 i 59 >36 

39 50112 

79n I 6 323 
*3 B0 83 
♦ ' 54 40 138 

♦3 23 20 100 

43 52 123 

4J SJ 126 
29 40 J61 
*3 15 7 42 133 

*5 2*6 30 9$ 

-1 98 71 85 

*1 341i Si 120 

61 87 71 

5 0 7.1 130 

-2 113 60 103 

12 in 50 1*2 
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0 IP 04 11 7 
*10 100 54 70 

-1 79 60 IQ2 

.. 14 20629 

126 6.7 9* 
.. 114 50 114 

.. 136 52 96 


-2 

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70 Menev 112’. 

SI' Uartng B2 

<5 Marsha* iloutyj 83 

37 Do A 81 

53 Marshalls Unr 65 

373 
830 
’35 
87 
70 
70 
163 
S*2 

. ... . 107 

24 9 fueepsend 22'. 

184 119 Nee iji >84 

144 74 Newman TonW 132 

59 20 Honor . 56 

217 147 Norcrps 187 

253 148 OThce Elect Mach 70S 

738 165 Parker kno4 A 283 

238 123 Part Pace 

565 365 Pa'ian JT 

«35 388 Pearson 

3i 11 Peek 
97 73 Peufittu 

36* 258 Pegtw-Haiwrsiey 

360 99 Penaervi mo 

650 4 Pncno-Me 

358 246 Pfnngwn 
69 <8 PUSK Consb 

065 *90 Pgfttt. 

300 103 Ports' CnadDum 

314 730 Pd—xj CVfryn 

137 39 Pretlwvcn Hugs 

99 56 Prectiard Sen 

103 79 RFC 

137 76 RHP 

133 72 Rmort Metal IZ8 • . 36 20 

504 288 Ram Org 487 -10 21 4 4 4 14 8 

133 65 Ramome Sens 1» 61 40 to 1 

145 100 Ratdrtts (Gl Bndge) 123 60 4 1 4 4 

653 475 Ftockfl S Coman 650 4 hi U 170 

148 $6 RMKarn Glass 136 •-£ 29 21 81 

ns ire Reec Eiecum 200 •. . 5D 25 166 

74? SA Reeo tm 809 +10 270 39 120 

160 83 Retyon 136 64 4 7 105 

88. 45 RendM at TO 17 86 

170 B6 Resmvjr 94 • . . 57 81 140 

*00 770 Reusers 386 ..39 1.0 354 

18 Reunwe 23 • . . 1th 11 91 

123 J? RrcanJo Eng 122 39 32 13 3 

85 3$ RovarO (Lees) 81 .. 14 20 50 

26 '8 Renin son worn igv n . 89 

159 105 Robertson Ret 124 • . 3l 25 193 

195 3» Roomaon [Thomas) 190 +2 . a . . 195 

08 30 Rac k w ai u 38 30 

192 126 Rconer 134 .,83 89 70 

1<» 126 Do a 132 9 3 7.0 7B 

9 3 Raanmt 5 ?* 

IT 1 105 Rdrprv 117 .. eg 59 93 

118 83 Fkruee [A) 118 20 17 638 


488 233 E Reno Goto 
730 2 . E Rano Pro 

213 64 Free Stale De* 

25 12 F5 GreoW 

2*8 *3 Otr.ee Tm 
IT *' Cental 
12' 4 . Gen Mnrtg 

14'. 5. QF5A 
608 348 GM Kalgootb 
175 58 Gooeng 

850 230 GroonAi 
218 113' Hampton Areas 
IT- a Harmony 
525 190 Harms 
87 40 Jonws 

18- 8 - Keros 
a - 3’- wool 
276 8? (AM 

2D- 7' Loanon 
423 193 Lorane 
196 HO MtM 
56 21 Malaypan Mrang 

17$ 70 H HH I l 
36 16 - MetaH Eipwaaon 

17 7 Mnangiea 

10V 4', MMOte WKS 
793 450 Meiorco 
v- ?'• New wes 
IBS 99 Nth Broken HM 
54 '.' 28 - Nrt Katgiek 
375 155 Normgm 
280 *08 PWttro Trt 
3TS 2D5 Peko WaSsend 
25'* 9 . Free Brand 
27'. to Pees Steyn 

33 '. 14 Rand Mines Ltd 

BOO 27$ Rend Meat Prop *35 


III-. 

E»- 

£51 

£*3 

£39 

£39 

163 

381 

1*0 

276 

85 

474 

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180 
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£12 . 
£6- 
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1*3 

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355 

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£8’- 

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£8V 

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540 SS 
446 87 
»1 63 
1*2 36 
1*2 30 
475 291 
790 207 
260 18.6 
262 Ml 


360 7 4 116 
1&0 43 
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S20 109 
126 99 


120 22 
60 42 120 

1*0 60 
260 79 


162 97 
17 la?90 23 
60 0 7 4 
870 99 
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200 3*0 
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54 40 389 
620 68 
170 50 
345 40 
690 80 
40.0 6 9 
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17 D 170 


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230 


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9 On 96 127 
214 $9 107 

15 0*313 

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179 51 00 
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+10 279 4 2 136 
15r 06 
*2 217 8 S 13 7 

-2 06 06360 

54 76 63 

.. Si 57 120 
6 1 4S100 


95 16 Randfemeki c»7 

306 23 1 B e ne m 263 

687 507 R17 564 

O'- 4'- RuoMntug CSV 

26’. 6 - Si Helena 19'. 

279 78 SA Land 153 

731 '- 15V Soutnvaa £28 

8’- 319 Stfformwi 500 

200 *23 Sungei Bas i23 

275 125 Tjrypmj 125 

MV 8 T«ra -£9', 

310 106 Tronoh 100 

665 335 Unktt 495 

* • Veal Reefs £56*. 

8*4 3>5 varesrepos 495 

1T0 55 VU+ternan 95 

115 50 Vogais os 

15 10 WaMH Coder* 1Q‘| 

737 340 Wedom 473 

«re 1*3 Western Areas 203 

39 16;. Western Deep 07 V 

38 I3>- Western Hoongs tiBV 

?46 14? Western Ung lTD 

*70 1*0 wen Banc Core 235 
182 114 When Creek 11* 

31 8- Wmkeis n*-- 

>07 30 yvu Nigel 44 

u 2 ^222 Coppar »s 

08 32 Zandpan 5 2 


-10 230 

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160 120 .. 
207 151 .. 

120 20 110 
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293 52 70 
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175 120 
1 1 20 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


S - Z 


16 St 18'. 

765 131 Srti Tirwy 223 

08 55 Smew'S 50 

.51 13 §**•* Gotiot UI 54 

303 366 Scape 415 

<’$ 06 Scon Oreenftam IQ6 

130 60 Scon HerrlaM 126 

”5 » Scot * Rooeroon 99 

104 109' Secuneor 164 

15* 110 Do A 154 

165 1'6 Seointv Sorv 164 

£ if f ena E ™3 x 

» 38 Sruon 8* 

'02 i?3 $«e* 136 

25 *'9 S-eoe 713 

*3 70 Seanwgw j? 

260 rod Senon Eng <M 

S3 5.1 Hieiared 92 

*'8 JM SAarctuer 400 

3> 16 SAF B t30 

2’9 164 Smitti A fte n n e w 211 

26 Smrn Kknvxin 31 

-54 161 Smuns ma 253 

84 30 SoArrcvv 1CW1 77 

.2 y«" an 

?■$ 130 Soear 8 Jacwcm 270 

'*0 35 SDenc-v Caart 140 

'» ’22 StwaiSarec 150 

'02 59 S raHs Poner.es 'S 

<03 50 Stag FumTur.1 91 

2 Starvsa>d F>mm KM 

w 78 5iar Comp 53 

jw r^T' Si 

swetw, 303 

’M 53 5>*rvng mo 98 

’M '» Sloog*a 196 

i70 9? Sipnenk 9i 

10 ’12 Slemart A P-n in 

143 176 5ununm S**i ISB . 

« 24 SMcMe S Deal man 37 

”5P 1 12 Suim IB0 

303 0J7 5»»* Pjcrhe A 796 

SZ 4 Srcamore 2b 

’60 Svkone 201 

2C6 Tl J95 

« 81 TNT ,46 

ff 1 * J 9 - Thewna. 233 

S3’ G31 Tide 43j 

J. n ertpm £37 


23ni2 4 39 
7fi 34 14 1 

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4 I 1*8 
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36 132 
12 262 
1 23*6 
33 20229 
33 75 126 
32 38 56 

>2 9 95 6* 
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■ 6 83 
96 166 


40 
36 
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0* 39 Ameyarfl 

91 32 Armstrong 

*96 55 Auto Products 
27 22 B5G 

Bund Bros 
220 l?8 Bramae ICOi 
*03 293 Br Aer.JSWca 
Br Car Auouns 

- AA a - 

•?6 120 CaOyre 
93 *1 Cow* iTj 

If « OiM lOodlteyl 
X.~ 16* Dewrry 

*6 32 ERF 

342 2*2 FR Grow 
233 1*0 Fora Afetor 

92 50 Gates (Fraiw Ql 
110 226 OwyiJI Motor 

60 43 Granhdd Lawrence 

129 69 Group locus 

HArtwees 
5*9 35* HctkB Moov 
* 3> 237 jaguar 
83 62 Jesuos 

■60 97 Kenning umr 

60 28 Kwl.F* 

323 1 a Ler 
10* « Lookers 

515 233 Lucas 
85 Perry go 


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25 19 7 

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28 18 4 
32 117 

29 79 
4 5 121 
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17 9 4 9 11 6 

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86 90 95 
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4 5 152 
4 1 13 7 
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250 100 

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3 8 4 6 106 
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57 69 63 

9J 60 2*1 
28 48 171 

15 1 52 6 4 

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63 52 13 5 

64 77 113 

17 6 5 
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01 00 90 


NEWSPAPERS 

PUBLISHERS 


AND 


203 IBS Asscc Book 205 

i™ Newsoaoer M0 
3M 355 Black (AACI 305 

u00 388 Btisiq, 530 

435 333 Codre iWrmi 490 

300 263 Do A 325 

*65 95 Errao A ,50 

380 280 Haynes FuMug 380 

’■ 1 83 Home Ccumss 1 13 

285 >30 VvMMndnw 285 

622 422 mi Tnomson 42? 

050 505 News kn e m auo nal 850 

585 *23 'Dcraow. 510 

14. 1 1H Pprnmourt Simd 128 

2- ■ 220 Time* inn ??5 

2j0 260 Uh Newspajwb 318 


75 

1-15 2* 3 
-5 139 

I . 329 

98 


-3 

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-S 120 
-9 14 0 

*25 IS I 

-a 82 

1*2 5 7 

174 
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37 118 
26 125 
AS 169 
0 2 205 
20 S5.1 
90 30 107 
47 30234 

2D0 $6 188 
59 48 
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33 126 

16 292 
*5 126 
77 7$ 
72 1 23 


me* on* 1 


OIL 


129 91 Miami ’.22 

52 18 A ran Eneryy 23 

78 20 Adame Resource! ?: 

610 420 Br Pwr cPtuT' S» 

3? ? BrrtSir O- 1 10 

]» 2£ Bi Bcmeo 325 

243 181 Brim *SS 

320 200 8OT-W1 300 

176 71) Caneu Cac« ‘3 

91 65 Cenhrry 85 

57 22 Cwema- 2* 

112 6e Cnanertrcuse Pel m 

208 OO Enle»cnse '3* 

71 28 Gertie' Energy 3? 

356 230 G>X*> N Res 32 3 

99 34 Go*' Pel 52 

310 56 G* Western Res *5 


-0 45? S3 SS 


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26a Bi 120 
106 '00 51 
15 4 51113 

39 53 06 
5’ 6" 41 g 

09 38 35 

1 0H 1 9 12 2 
12 1 90 4 5 


361 

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256 *-13 27 1 

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23 

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RUGBY UNION 


FOOTBALL 


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Ireland’s veteran prop 
forward just 
misses his 50 th cap 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


Philip Orr. Ireland's loose' 
head prop, who has won 49 
caps, has been dropped from 
the side that will play Wales 
in Dublin on February 15. 
His place goes to Paul 
Kennedy, the London Irish- 
man, who is the only new cap 
in a side showing three, and 
possibly four, changes from 
that beaten 29-9 by France 
last weekend- 

Responsibility for the de- 
feat can be seen to lie heavily 
on the shoulders of the light 
forwards. Both props have 
been dropped, as has Ander- 
son from the second row. and 
there may be a further ebange 
at flank " forward: the open- 
side berth has been left 
vacant and the Irish selectors 
will watch Nigel Carr playing 
for .Ards against Ballymena 
on Saturday before complet- 
ing their line-up. 

In contrast, the Scottish 
selectors, who watched their 
side lose to W'ales last 
Saturday, have made no 
changes’ in the team to play 
England at Murrayfield on 
Saturday week, a pan from a 
technical adjustment among 
the replacements. 

If Carr can indicate his 
fitness. Ireland will have 
three more of the men in the 
team, though a fourth. Mc- 
Coy. has been dropped from 
tight-head prop in favour of 
Des Fitzgerald. the 
Lansdowne and Leinster 
player. McCall, the London 
Irish lock, who was capped as 
a replacement against France 
last season, takes over from 
Anderson and will probably 
jump at the front of the line 
with Lenihan moving back to 


the middle. 

Though Ireland’s backs did 
not make the most of the few 
chances they were given, no 
change was expected among 
their ranks. Crossan. the first- 
choice left wing, only begins 
his return after a broken jaw 
this Saturday when he plays 
in one of Instonians* junior 
sides. 

Matthews, the Ards 
flanker, continues to be ruled 
out on medical grounds, 
which allows Kearney to 
switch to the blind-side flank 
position. Out of the side goes 
Morrow, of Bangor, who won 
his first cap in Paris but the 
Irish back row that day could 
make little impression on the 
match because the tight 
forwards were struggling to 
stand their ground. 

Ironically for Orr. now 
aged 35. if Ireland had 
awarded caps for their game 
against Fiji this season, as 
Wales did. he would have 
reached 50 and thus equalled 
the world record for the 
position, held by Sandy 
Carmichael, of Scotland. His 
place goes to Kennedy, who 
celebrated his 29th birthday 
last week and whose selec- 
tion, along with McCall, 
gives the London exiles three 
players in the side. 

Kennedy. 16 stone and 5ft 
lO'/rin. was bom in Belfast 
and played for Collegians and 
the University of Ulster, but 
he spent much of his rugby 
career in England with Exeter 
before joining London Irish 
in 198] as a tight-head prop. 
He and Fitzgerald, capped 
twice in I9S4. are introduced 
for their scrummaging, as is 


McCsIL the 26-year-old lock. 
Ireland are aware that the 
Welsh front row will try to 
exert considerable influence 
on a match to be refereed by 
Fred Howard (England). 

Kennedy's place on the 
bench goes to McCoy, and 
Holland, the Wanderers lock, 
lakes over as a replacement 
from McCall. 

Scotland restore Rowan to 
their replacements instead of 
Brewster (Stewart's Melville 
FP). a position he would 
have occupied against Wales 
but for business reasons. 

IRELAND (v WALES): H P MacNefl 
(London Irish); T M Rfagtand 
(BaUymsnaj. M J Ktaman (Dolphin). 
B J Muttn rpufafin University). U C 
Finn (Cork Constitution); P M Dean 
(St Mary's CoBege), M T Bradtoy 
(Cork Constitution); A P Kennedy 
(London Irish), C F Fitzgerald (St 
Mary's College, captain). D C 
Fitzgerald (Lansdowne), A K Kear- 
ney (Wanderers). B W McCafl 
(London Irish). D G LenOtan (Cork 
Constitution}. A N Other, B J 
Spillane (Bohemians). Replace- 
ments: J J McCoy (Bangori, H T 
Harbtson (Bective Rangers), J J 
Holland (Wanderers), R C Brady 
(Ballymena). R P Keyes (Cork 
“ Rainey 


Constitution). P 


(Ballymena) 
Referee: r A 


Howard (ErxjtarKl)^ 


SCOTLAND (v ENGLAf 
Hastings (London Scottish); M D F 
Duncan (Western Scotland). D I 
Johnston (Watsonians). S Hastings 
(Watsonians), G R T Baird (Kelso); 
J Y Rutherford (Selkirk), R J 
Lakttaw (Jed-Forestk 0MB Sole 
(Bath). C T Deans (Hawick, 
captain). I G Mtoe (Harlequins). J 
Jeffrey (Kelso). A J Campbel 
(Hawick). I A M Paxton (Selkirk). F 
Odder (Stewart s MetvHJe FP). j R 
Beattie (Sasgow Acadenvcais). 
Replacements: N A Rowan 
(Boroughmuir). G J Caftander 
jKetsow), D B White (Gala), $ G 
Johnston (Watsonians), D S Wythe 
(Stewart's MefvOJe FP). P W Dods 

Zealand). 



Richards rests as 
England try 
to iron out faults 

From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent. Antigua 


Viv Richards, foe West 
Indies captain, will miss the 
second match of England's 
tour, against the Leeward 
Islands starting here tomorrow. 
Richards, the island's un- 
crowned king, is talcing a rest, 
laving just played himself into 
form with a century againg 
Trinidad. 

It was here. 12 years ago, 
that English cricketers got their 
first sight of him. In what 
developed into a bouncing 
match, with Roberts overdoing 
it on one side and Willis on the 
other. Richards made a daz- 
zling 42 and 52 not out No- 
one was more delighted by that 
than the English bookmaker 
who had just signed him up for 
Somerset His home here m St 
John's has become something 
of a shrine (for visiting cricket- 
ers. 

Although today’s practice 
was voluntary — the team had 
had a Sam call to catch then- 
flight from St Vincent — no- 
one was intending to miss it, 
nor should have done. Time is 
getting shore before the first 


-Test match and there is still a 
lot of work to be got through. 

Thomas's 28 no-balls j n $i 
Vincent are the cause of same 
concern. WiUis is advising him 
to concentrate on finding a 
rhythm, saying that this will be 
best done if he can avoid 
looking down at any guiding 
mark as ire comes in to bowl. 

It is a problem which the 
best of the West Indian fast 
bowlers seldom experience. 
Like all the great “naturals’* 
their feet land instinctively in 
the right place, usually well 
behind the line. Keith Miller 
was another who could run 
from anywhere, usually on an 
impulse; and get it right. So can 
Botham, -who very rarely bowls 
a no-baH, despite often varying 
the length and force of his run- 
up. Such cricketers are die 
envy of the Thomases of the 
world, whose repeating night- 
mare is an IS- ball over. 

LEEWARD tSLMOS (fro* R Otto 
ttaptamj. R Reftanaoa L Lawrence. L 
tatty. E Lews. K Artfiurton. M Sonon. S 
WUEams. E Procter. W Benjamto, G 
Ferns. N Gusfcani, D Thompson. 


Gower’s armada 
gets blind eye 

From Richard Evans, Antigua 
The captain^ was in magnani- case, tbe easy-going Antiguans 

tend to be more relaxed 


minutes of play 


R C Francis (New 


Brennan the only Matthaeus 
Ipswich doubt 


Coach who turns teenagers 
into sailing world-beaters 


The only area of competitive 
sailing where Britain can truly 
be sud to be the best m the 
would at present is at nndCT-19 
years leveL Britain's youths 
have won world championships 
for the past three seasons and 
must start favourites to con- 
tinue the sequence in 1986. 

In recognition of their efforts, 
tbe youth squad and their 
coach, Jim SaitonstaU, were 
elected Yachtsmen of the Year 
in 1985 and past youth cham- 
pions are now making their 
mark at national adult level. 

Why this sudden ran of 
success, when adult dinghy 
racing is going through a lean 
patch? It cannot be bom 
following their elders' example 
and it is unlikely that the 
nation on its own has suddenly 
produced a crop of wonderkids- 
Tbe most likely reason is the 
influence of SaltonstalL 

One has to see him in action 
to appreciate the qualities of 
the man, though hts sincerity 
and unfailing courtesy are 
noticeable from a casual meet- 
ing. What attracts his young 
followers, however, seems to be 
his unusual combination of 
humour and discipline. “A 
laugh a minute,** is how one 16- 
year-old girl described his 
coaching. 

Sugaring the discipline with 
humour dearly works. How 
else could be persuade the 
teenage girls to abandon boy- 
friends, pop and fashion in 
favour of training on a wet and 
cheerless weekend in tbe mid- 
dle of January? The boys 
possibly take their training 


more seriously. They have their preparation for racing were at a 
sights set on the Olympic higher level." 

Carnes and the America's Caps 
of tbe future. 

Not that the girls are not 
competitive, hot their ambitions 
are generally more modest. 

Salto nstail is' also in charge of 
the Royal Yachting 
Association's women's coaching 
programme and be combines 
the women and youths in joint 
training sessions. 

Women's sailing has grown 
apace dming die past few 
seasons and Britain's women, 
tike the youths, have had much 
success. So the girls in his 
youth sqaad are progressing 
towards women’s world 
championships and for selec- 
tion in their own separate class 
for the first time in the next 
Olympic Games. 

Cathy Foster. Britain's most 
successful woman sailor, is 
generous in her praise of 
Saltonstali: “He's a super gny 
and was always there when we 
needed him." She joined his 
training sessions after finishing 
second in the women's world 
championship in 1977. 

SalfonstalTs bask approach 
to each new intake is first toget 
the physical side of the boat 
handling right before moving 
on to tactics, rales and ad- 
vanced techniques. 

It was the concentration on 
boat handling that helped 
things fall into place for Miss 
Foster. “From then on we 
improved substantially, we shot 
upwards in a huge learning 
jump. Our mental side and 


She and her crew, Wendy 
HiWer, won two women's world 
championships in succession 
before she felt the need to 
spread her wings. In 1984 Miss 
Foster (with a male crew) was 
the only female skipper at the 
Los Angeles Olympic Games 
and tiie only one of seven 
British skippers to win a race 
in their class. 

A new season of training for 
another crop of youths and 
women has begun. There will 
be five weekend meetings at 
different venues before the 
middle of March. 

A typical training day will 
start with an early run along 
the beach, where the 
Saltonstali powers of persua- 
sion are seen at their best. 
Then come sessions on the 
water, combining set exercises 
with short races, all the time 
sharpening reflexes 

Now aged 38, Saltonstali 
became RYA National Raring 
Coach in 1977, following two 
years as sailing coach in the 
Royal Navy- His service train- 
ing stands him in good stead 
for dealing with the inevitable 
bureaucracy of the RYA. 

He admits to occasional 
frustration when dealing with 
well-meaning, bat amateur 
committee members. He seems 
to get his own way much of tbe 
time, however, and presumably 
will as long as results continue 
to be good. 

John Nicholls 


Ipswich Town win choose 
fro m the same 13-strong squad 
for tonight's FA Cup fourth 
round second replay against 
j West Ham at Porunan Road, 
j The only doubt concents the 
| midfield player Mark Brennan, 
who jarred a knee in Tuesday’s 
1-1 draw and was under 
1 treatment yesterday. 

The England defender Terry 
Butcher, who played with a 
heavy cold, was much im- 
proved yesterday as the players 
reported for hot baths to help 
ease the stiffness after 
Tuesday's 120 minutes of 
strength-sapping football. De- 
spite the bad weather forecast. 
Ipswich are confident the tie 
will go ahead after their 
manager. Bobby Ferguson, won 
the toss to decide the venue, 
and they have taken tbe 
precaution of covering both 
penalty areas with plastic 
sheeting. 

After 210 minutes the two 
teams are still in deadlock, 
with the winners awaiting a 
home fifth round tie against the 
holders, Manchester United, on 
Saturday week. A 94th minute 
goal from 18-year-old Jason 
Dozzell gave Ipswich the long- 
awaited impetus but West Ham 
equalized in the first minute of 
the second period of extra time 
through their second leading 
scorer, Tony Cortee. Ferguson 
said: “I was disappointed it 
wasn't a better game. Both 
teams suffered from their 
efforts at the weekend-” 

Ferguson accepted that the 
draw was a fair result while the 
West Ham captain, Alvin 
Martin, said: “We started 
slowly but we got stronger as 
the game went on." Parkes 
made a crucial save in the 22nd 
minute to deny Dozzell but 
West Ham retaliated after the 
interval to force Cooper to 
make an equally fine save from 
Walford. Putney and 


Zondervan both had chances to 
settle the issue in Ipswich's 
favour in normal time before 
Dozzell scored the first goal in 
184 minutes of play. 

Ipswich had their biggest 
crowd of the season by for, 
25 J84, and will be hoping for a 
similarly profitable figure to- 
nighL 

The Aston Villa manager, 
Graham Turner, who less than 
a week ago was contemplating 
resignation, is now looking 
forward to a Milk Cup semi- 
final. Villa's unexpected 2-1 
victory in Tuesday's quarter 
final replay at Arsenal was in 
stark contrast to the Utter 
disappointment of their FA 
Cup exit at Millwaff seven days 
earlier. 

Evans, the Villa captain, the 
only survivor from their 1982 
European Cup-winning side, 
said yesterday: "Graham 
Turner has handled himself 
admirably through all Hik Last 
night coukl have been the end 
of our season, but the result 
will really lift us." Evans 
beaded Villa’s second goal after 
Bitch had opened the scoring, 
and Mariner’s 78th minute 
reply was insufficient to revive 
a lacklustre AraenaL “That was 
our worst performance for two 
months,” the Arsenal manager, 
Don Howe, admitted. “We 
simply didn't play and did not 
pose Villa any problems.” 

While Villa look forward to a 
semi-final against Oxford — the 
first leg is at Villa Park next 
week — Howe’s immediate 
worry is the fitness of his 
England World Cup hopeful, 
Stewart Robson, who was due 
to have an X-ray yesterday to 
try and dear up the cause of 
bis niggling groin injury. Howe 
said: “If there is a problem he 
will have to have a long rest or 
even an operation." 


Italy 

West Germany, 


— 2 


BOWLS 

Sutherland’s 
law rules 
over Baker 

By Gordon Allan 

The heavyweights, that is the 
seeded players, entered the 
arena in the second round of 
the Embassy world indoor 
championship at Coatbridge 
yesterday — and one of them 
was promptly knocked ouL Jim 
Baker of Ireland, the champion 
two years ago. was beaten 21- 
17 by Scotland's Bob Suther- 
land. who won the title in 1983 
but was unseeded this time. 

Baker, 0-6 then 5-11 down, 
was never in front. The best he 
could manage was levelling the 
scores 13-13 on the eighteenth 
end. But events at the nine- 
teenth had far reaching effects. 
Baker, having won control of 
the jack, rolled it into the ditch 
for the second time in the 
match. Sutherland gratefully 
changed the length and picked 
up three shots. 

Baker recovered to 17-18 but 
either dropped short or went 
too for through on the next end 
and Sutherland was left with an 
mien draw for the winning shot 
with bis last bowL Sutherland 
is now the only recognized full 
time professional bowler in 
Scotland; victory has greater 
significance than it used to. 
“The pressure is on me out 
there now." he said, “but that 
is meat and drink to me. Jim is 
always marvellous to play 
against but I thought he was a 
wee bit scrappy today.” 

Sutherland’s opponent in the 
first of the quarter final round 
matches tomorrow will be Roy 
Cults from Ipswich who de- 
feated another seed. John 
Watson of Scotland. 21-15. 
Watson, who beat Baker in the 
1982 final, now wears glasses 
similar to those of the snooker 
champion Dennis Taylor, but 
it was Cutis who had his eye in 
to a more powerful degree in a 
skilful contest. 

fiESULTa FW ranac (Tuesctayk R 
Corate (Scot} 81. A Ross (Era) 9: G 
Souza (HK) 2i. r Ream ftat is. 
fcKQndroualtyeaantoy R SutWriand 


BADMINTON 


A Nordic version of 
the Dutch masters 


Top seed is defeated 


By a Correspondent 

blessing looked 1, Morten Frost, in the final of 
the British Airways Masters in 
October. Against the fleet- 
footed 20-year-ofel Darren Hall 
last night, a final full of 
youthful whirlwind rallies was 
guaranteed. 


One major 

likely to emerge from all foe 
turmoil and tension of the 
English national champion- 
ships. sponsored by Carlsbeig 
— a finals night ideal for 
television. 

It was this that principally 
persuaded the two top seeds, 
Steve Baddeiey and Helen 
Troke. to change their minds 
and risk the agonies of defeat 
in unfavourable circumstances. 
Those agonies certainly mani- 
fested themselves yesterday at 
Woking. 

Baddeiey foiled to overcome 
the effects of jet lag or the 
irrepressible energy of his 21- 
year-old colleague Steve Butler, 
whose style of play made such 
good viewing when he came 
close to upsetting the worfd No 


Troke, by contrast, suc- 
ceeded, but only just in 
overcoming the jitters that 
seem continually to afflict her 
in front of a big home crowd. 

Overcoming Fiona Elliott, 
who beat her in Denmark 
recently and who has won the 
English national title for foe 
past two years, was always 
likely to prove another nerve- 
ridden business. Sometimes, 
however, it is precisely this that 
provides the atmosphere with 
foe crackle of human electricity 
it needs. 


FOR THE RECORD 


BASKETBALL 


CYCLING 


UNITED STATES: HWtonH Ara oc tefl cn 
(NBA): Atlanta Hawks 105. Ctowtand 
Cavaiters 104; tntibana Pacers 117, New 
jersey Nets 101: Ostrat Platons m. 
Chicago Buis 115: Boston C&Vca 112. 
Milwaukee Bucks 93; San Antnrra Spurs 
124. Seattle Supersedes 118 (OT): 
Denver Nuggets 119. Porta raJ Tras- 
Otazera lift Phoenix Suns 127. Gotten 
State Warriors 1 1& Los Angelas Lakers 
110. DaBas Mavericks 102. 
CARLSBEBQ NATIONAL LEAGUE Dl- 
VTSJON 1; Sharp Manchester Orated % 
(Jones 25). Worthing Bears 80 
(Hungracker 3BL 


DOMAHe-OE-ROURET (France* Grand 
Pnx d'Ouverture of the mnual 
Besseges sertes (122km): 1. E 
Planckaen (Bel). 22252; 2. V Barteau 

t 3. J Brugmarm (SwnzL 4. N Segera 
5. J Lieckens (Befh 5. F Casting 
7. A Massard (Switzt & F Vjvar 
3. P Casaoo {Ft* ifc, Y Chaubet 

fW. 


TENNIS 


GOLF 


MEMPHIS: US Moor d— pla n ga 
First round: L Duncan (US) trt T fttyssan 
(Nath). 8-2. 7-6. (7-3): M Westatal (WG) 
HI L Pvrw* (Czech). 8-4. 6-4 Second 
round: M P emt u iS (Swe) W T Tuiasm 


PROFESSIONAL GOLFERS ASSOCI- 
ATION; Top 20 money winders (US 
laifass stated): 1. H Sutton. $141,960; 2. 
C Prate. S13L294; 3. F Zoeitar. 
$115,875. 4. D Hammond. S113JD70; 5. P 
Stewart. $86,700; & A S«s. S76.484: 7. J 
Cook. S72JOO-, 0. M O'Meara. SS5.450: 
9. B Langer (WGV $64,092: 10, J 
Mahaffejr. £42.722 It. J Mudd. $41,949: 
12 Mara Wltooe. $41,500: 13. P 
Bteckntar. 540-909: 14. J Thome, 
539 300: 15. D Foreman. $34,716: 1R T 
Watson. 531^00: 17. A Bean. 529.042 
18. C Stadter. $28.990: 19. S 
527.449: 20. T Simpson. 


(Fral. 2-0. 94. B-ll D 
Ostoja 


(US) U M 
is (US) bt J 


,j (Yugo). S*2 6-3: M Daws 
Anas (USL 4-6, 6-3. 7-5; K Curren (US) » 
M Pieces (US). 6-4. 0-7 (60). 9-1; J 
Connors (US» bt R Knstaian (Ind). 1-6. 6- 
1. 7-6 (7-3); Q Homes (US) » S Denton 
tug. 6-4. M. 7-6 (7-1). 

TOffoNTO: Norte American 
chsmpronsMps: Rraf ro u nd: J 
(G8) Dt S Bonnaau (Can), 6-2, 6-2 R 
Green (US) bt C teyn (SA|. 6-2. 7-6 (8-6£ 
R Ostertiun (WG) * D Saitz (US). 64. 6- 
4: C Out* (US) U R Senpson (NZ). 64. 
62 J Nysbom (Swe) bt A Mansdort (tor). 
64. 4-6: 7-5; L SrwasJUS) bt W Rba* 


ICE HOCKEY 


NORTH AMERICA: National league AO- 
Star Game: Wittes Conference 4. 
campbe* Conference 3 (overtone). 


(Pol). 6-3, 7-6 (166); P Fleming (US) bt M 
Wotemihokm (Can), 2-S, &3. 6-4. 
BRAMHALL: LTA man's indoor sauflte 
tournament O Delates (Fr) tn A Castle 
(GB). 2-6. 7-6. 6-2 F Sauer (Netel bt C 
Falk i Swe) (Fa* retired after first set wffli 
an mured artOe); C B e r gstr om ISwe) bt 
N Kroon (Swe): J Lodotv (Neth) tr R 
Vigmosad (US). 


New York (AP) - Preben 
Elkjaer Larsen, the Danish 
forward, believes that his 
country will field one of the 
most exciting teams in the 
World Cup in Mexico.“High 
technical level, speed and full 
of fight” is how he describes 
a Danish team whom experts 
rate as among the world 's 
top contenders. Elkjaer, who 
plays for Verona, the Italian 
champions, shares most of 
the scoring with Michael 
Laudrup. of Juventus. Frank 
Arnessen, of PSV Eindhoven, 
is one of several fine midfield 
players who bolster the from 
line. 

Known for their excellent 
physical conditioning, tbe 
Danes play at full speed, 
continually roving all over 
the field, attacking in mass 
and marking tightly when 
defending. 

Elkjaer said in a recent 
interview that Denmark 
“play by memory, in full 
control, with football mixed 
like a cocktaiL" He himself 
plays like a tank in the area, 
brraking through defensive 
walls with astonishing ease 
and taking full advantage of 
foe superb skills of Laudrup 
to form a dangerous one-two 
punch. 

The forward, nicknamed 
“Golkjaer” by the Verona 
supporters for his ability to 
score, rejects comparisons 
made in Europe between foe 
Danes and the footed Dutch 
national team of the 1970s. 

Elkjaer does not believe 
that Denmark afford a 
comparison with foe Dutch 
masters of foe past. “Jt would 
be an exaggeration.” be said. 

“ 1116 Dutch team of foe 
1970s played the most beauti- 
ful soccer that we may have 
seen. I don't believe that we 
can reach that level They 
established their total 
footballbut we have the 
intention of offering a Nordic 


top 

link 


version of the counter-attack 
at full speed in Mexico.” 

Denmark qualified for the 
World Cup by finishing 
runners-up to the Soviet 
Union in a qualifying group 
that included Ireland, 
Switzerland and Norway. Tbe 
Danes beat the strong Soviet 
team 4-2. with two goals each 
by Laudrup and Elkjaer, and 
demolished the Irish 4-1 and 
foe Norwegians 5-1 in away 
matches. 

The attacking power of 
Denmark relies not only on 
Elkjaer and Laudrup but also 
on a group of young mid- 
fielders who play for 
European clubs. Tbe 
between the midfield and the 
two forwards is Jesper Olsen, 
of Manchester United. Be- 
hind him are Arnessen, 
Molby, of Liverpool and 
Derby, of Bayern Munich. 

Danish football reached the 
front rank in Europe after the 
West German manager, Sepp 
Piontek, took charge of the 
national squad in July, 1979. 
He convinced the Danish 
Football Federation to give 
generous financial incentives 
to the "foreign legionnaires” 
who play for clubs all over 
Europe so that they would be 
willing to join the Danish 
squad. Then Piontek instilled 
an all-out attacking mentality 
in bis players, discarding the 
defensive tactics prevailing in 
Italy, Spain and other coun- 
tries. 

Denmark have been drawn 
into foe strongest group for 
the first round of the World 
Cup. alongside West Ger- 
many, Scotland and Uruguay. 
Many experts believe that the 
Danes will not only survive 
the first round but also 
advance as one of the four 
finalists. Franz Beckenbauer, 
foe West German manager, 
agrees with this, saying that 
Denmark are the team that 
his country fear most 


Avellino, Italy (AP) — West 
Germany defeated Italy in an 
friendly match in front of 
36.000 fons here yesterday, the 
winning goal coming in tbe 
7Sth minute when the Bayern 
Munich midfield player 
Matthaeus sent the I talian 
substitute goalkeeper. Tancredi, 
the wrong way from the 
penalty spoL The defeat was 
the world Cup holders’ third 
in succession and brought to an 
end West Germany's sequence 
of six games without a win. 

Italy took the lead in the 21st 
minute with a welt-constructed 
move. Altobelli, the Italian 
league’s leading scorer last year, 
picked up a pass 30 yards out, 
raced into tbe area and 
stylishly flicked it over the 
advancing Schumacher towards 
tbe for post. This year's top 
marksman. Serena of Juventus, 
outran tbe German defence to 
slab the ball home. 

Serena had the bail in the net 
10 minutes later, but die 
referee ruled a colleague off- 
side. In the tbe 38th minute 
Herget drew West Germany 
level with a free kick. With 
other German players seem- 
ingly ready to shoot, Herget 
surprised the Italian defence by 
curling the ball over the wall 
and beyond the stationary 
Galii. tbe first-half goalkeeper. 

Missing the injured Antonio 
di Gennaro of Verona, Italy 
lacked direction in midfield 
and foiled to carve out an 
equalizer following Matthaeus's 
goal. After tbe interval, Italian 
coach Enzo Bearzot brought on 
Sampdoria’s winger, Vialu, and 
Fiorentina’s Massaro. but nei- 
ther could make much head- 
way 

Better days 

Colchester United, after 
making a loss of almost 
£50,000 in 1983-84, have 
announced a profit of 
£1 1,742 for last season. Ray- 
ing staff costs fell by £26,000 
and administrative overheads ! 
were cut by almost £24,000. 
Turnstile receipts for the 23 
League games were up by 
over £7,000. Tbe dub sec- 
retary Martin Bennett said it 
was fortunate the dub bad 
embarked on an economy 
drive as more than £ 1 00,000 
had been spent on safety 

Tuesday’s results 

MLK CUP: FHtn round i g pte y . Arsenal 1. 
Aston Villa 2 

np ‘ ar * pswch »• 

west Hem 1 (sen 

SECOND DIVISION: CtBrtKm Z Breton 

THIRD DIVISION: Btertcpooi 0. Crests r- 

_1- Baton 0, Bristol Rovers 2 
2., Yortt 0; Brentford 1 . 

3. Brraot c«ty 4 . Bur* 1 ; Cardiff 
0. Dorflrtgron 1 . Doncaster 0. Swansea O, 
Jtotts County 1 . Wigan 1; Rotherham 0. 
TOjEtu °-l "‘fog? * Rratfng postponed 


rag are 

new borne in St John's, careful 
not to aggravate a 
strain, Viv Richards 
on the England team’s pom 
start to their tour in St Vincent. 
"These things happen at tbe 
start of a tour,” be said. "It 
takes time to get acclimatized.” 

But losing to the Windwards 
by. seven wjckets? “Well, they 
are not that bad, you know. I 
think they finished second in 
the SbeQ Shield last year. They 
can play.” 

Unfortunately for his 
supporters here in Antigua, 
Richards cannot — not at the 
moment. anyway.“l have been 
doing a lot of bowling recently 
in our Shell Shield games in 
Barbados and Trinidad and 
I'm feeling the hammy a bit. so 
I decided to give it a rest.” He 
did not bother to mention that 
he had mopped up Trinidad’s 
lower order in Port of Spain to 
give bis Leeward Islands team 
an unexpected victory. 

On tbe political front, Rich- 
ards was even more reticent. “I 
think the Antiguan people warn 
the tour to go on. It’s hard to 
say for sure until they arrive, 
but I have found no real 
opposition amongst tbe people 
1 have spoken to.” 

Obviously Richards does not 
hang out -with a group 
itself Committee of C 01 
Youth Against Apartheid, 
whose letter to the weekly 
Antigua Herald was headed 
“No place fix’ mercenaries”. 

As the Herald is one of only 
two papers printed on the 
island, neither of them daily, it 
is difficult to stir up any great 
opposition to anything through 
a Press campaign and. in any 


. than 
their Trinidadian cousins. 

Cenainly foe atmosphere at 
tbe St John's Recreation 
Ground the day before Fn g lan d 
arrived was almost rural, a 
saturated and uncovered pitch 
lay steaming under cloudy 
skies while just outside a cow, 
haring sprung itself loose from 
its moorings on a nearby patch 
of grass, was ambling across the 
street in tbe direction of the 
fire station. 

Neither cows nor England 
cricketers are sacred in Anti- 
gua, but it remains to be seen 
whether the Leeward Islands 
bowlers show as much concern 
for Gower's batsmen. 

In foe meantime. Richards 
will be enjoying tbe luxury of a 
few days at home, visiting his 
father, who stiU lives in the 
family house on what is now 
called Vivian Richards Street, 
and maybe playing a gentle 
game of tennis if the hamstring 
loosens up. 

It was all rather ominous, 
this attitude of lofty unconcern, 
Richards contemplating tennis 
as Gower’s armada hove into 
view reminding one un- 
comfortably of Drake playing 
bowk. Perhaps it is time 10 
remem ber that it was the 
Spaniards who discovered this 
island. A quick role reversal 
may be the only way to 
counteract Richards' cunning 
psychological warfare. 

• Pretoria (Reuter) - A 
chanceless 115 from the opener 
John Dyson, who hit a six off 
the first ball he received, 
helped the Australian rebel 
cricketers to 272 for six in the 
sixth and final one-day match 
against South Africa yesterday. 


BOXING 


Cowdell looks ahead 
to a fruitful year 


put 

European junior 
champion, makes his 
appearance in the ring tonight 
since his shattering fust-round 
knockout by Azumah Nelson, 
of Ghana, four months ago. 
Cowdell meets the Finchley 
lightweight. Stephen Griffiths, 
at foe Adwick Leisure Centre, 
near Doncaster. 

The 32-year-old veteran from 
Wariey, perhaps the most 
experienced boxer in Great 
Britain today, claims that it 
makes little difference that 
Griffiths is a lightweight. 
Cowdell has put on a few extra 
pounds to take on the Finchley 
boxer. 

Despite his years. Cowdell is 
looking ahead to a fruitful year. 
After disposing of Griffiths, the 
framer champion plans to 
regain foe European junior 
lightweight title be was stripped 
of by the “ 


DIVISION: Aldershot 1. Orient 
a Wrwh wn 5: Cotctwster 

a Soutee’jdft Owe 1 . Fateroorouah 1 ; 
Harta* 1. Exeter ft Rochdale 7. Hereford 

M eren 3 . £231 Rte 1 

SCOTTISH FIRST DtVtStON: AB 03 2 

Dumbarton 4 

SCOTTISH SECOND DfVISON: RtUte 
Rowre 1 . Albert Rovers 0 
SCOTTISH PREMIER DIVI8KMfcDunSM 
□. Hearts i 

northern prober league CUP: 

Witton 2 Mosstey 1 

AC OELCO CUP: Harrow 3. Sutton 

United S: Epsom & Ewell 1. Uxbridge 1 

(sen: Haves v F. — — - 

FOOTBALL I 


COM8HA1 

1. Tottenham A. Bristol Rovers 4. 
SartBaiTnKin 3: West Ham 4. OPR 1 
LEAGUE: FMt dMatom 
Leeds 2 Huodersflete 0. Second 
dnrtsiop: Sumley ft Preston 1: Coventry 
3. Bradford City 2 1 

*“"d mpter Lame 3. 

Bangor f taen 

RUGBY UNION 
CLUB MATCH: Bndgend 16. Newport 20 

TODAY’S FIXTURES 

FOOTBALL 

FteWflorar Trophy: Peterborough v 
Aiosrsnor 

OTHER SPORT 

BOWLS: Bttttessy world indoor etogtee 
M CaatDndge) 

SNOOKER: To*y Cota*) 
cttampiofBfttp (at Com 

*"Ch) 

BAskETBAU; Cartetwig National 
w« cSvtetttx Manchester Grants 
are Bolton (7.30); QRS 
w — ■— - V Walkers Crisps Leicester 
(6 01: Naaen Bears Worthing v London 


By Sriknmar Sen, Boxing Correspondent 

Cowdell. the former one he won as a featherweight. 

and then go for tbe third belt at 
lightweighL 

Griffiths, however, claims 
that he is not going to 
Doncaster to be just another 
opponent for Cowdell. Fresh 
from a good win over Ray 
Newbury, of Nottingham. Grif- 
fiths aims to make a name 
Cowdeil’s manager, Pat 
Lynch, is sure his man will win 
comfortably. “Pat has com- 
pletely recovered from the 
defeat by Nelson. It did not 
take anything away from him. 
He is boxing very well and is 
full of enthusiasm. His age is 
not significant because he 
never took any beatings and his 
style makes for longevity. 
Griffiths is a good young boxer 
but he has not got the 
experience to beat PaL” 
Lynch said that Cowddl's 

r next contest would be on 

the European Boxing March 13 for foe British and 
Union, then add the junior junior lightweight title held by 
lightweight Lonsdale belt to the John Doherty. 

Tapping the reservoirs 
with private enterprise 

By Conrad Voss Bark 

Stock e d front fishing st most 

of the big public water sappfy 
reservoirs is likely to be offered 
on a leasehold basis to private 
enterprise in foe next few 
years. Tea res er v oir fisheries 
have already gone private, 
ioctading foe 400-acre Queen 
Mother r e serv oir at Datfoet. 

Bat foe Hnest shack to 
reservoir fishermen is the news 
that Ansfian Water Aathority 
want to hrve off their fishing at 

foe famous 3,000-acre Rutland 
Water, foe bi gg e s t stocked 
treat fishery in Europe, as trefl 
as at the 1,700-ao-e Graiham, 
which has bees described as 
one of foe best, if not the best, 
reservoir fishing a England. 

The Midland Fly Fishers' 

Club and foe Salmon and Trent 
Association have beea seaaded 
out whether they woald be 
interested in running either one 
or both of these fi s h e r ies. No 
official decision has beea fafcfn 
by foe Salmon and Trent 
Association bat (hey are re- 
garded as hot favourites for 
Tanning Rutland Water, where 
the world fly fishing champion- 
ships, which they are sponsor- 
ing. are to be held n«t year. 

Book opinion in foe SATA 
feels that the cost nay be 
prohibitive bat others are 
enthusiastic. Mach will itrprnd 
on the form and extent of foe 
lease. 

Stocking both Rofomd and 
G raiham irosld n wn ^ m . 



m»al ooday of tbe order of 
OWWW, but with about 
50,000 anglers vis it ing them 
daring foe season it would not 
be all that to break 

even and still keep up the 
present high standards of foe 
fishing. If foe SATA do decide 
sg iiH t it a commercial op- 
erator might step in. 

Top of the list of potential 
operators would be Bensoa and 
Hedges, who are spending 
many thousands of pounds on 
dob fishing competitions. How- 
ever, first choice would be the 
Salmon and Treat Association, 
who would benefit indirectly by 
extending what is at present 
their limited appeal among 
reservoir fishermen. 

The terms of tbe lease rid be 
cradaL Leases granted so far 
nave been strongly criticized by 
foe chairman of the Association 
of Stfflwster Fishery Man- 
agers, Mr DJ.Parltmafl. 
Speaking at tbe Two Lakes 
fishery conference, organized 
by foe NFU, Mr Parkman sad 
foe leases . offered by water 
authorities were for far too 
sfa»t a period and contained 
what be called an “enonnoas” 
■umber of restrictive danses. 


£ 









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Tf* ‘ 


TXe&l > ilioT 


yachting 


THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1 QRfi 


3 



t*fckt*f tirri 
fc'ttt T — 






'■ .;3, 






•n- 




Espionage is 

the game 
as syndicates 
set sail 


Sports profile: boxer who hunts down rabbits and opponents with ease 


SPORT 


23 


No hiding place from McGuigan 


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before 

America’s Cup is decided and 

SSSt ‘f 6 12 metre de *W* 

expected lo compete in the 

ehmmatjon trial Waning™ 
October have stiH tS® te 

bunched. Yet visitors to 
Fremantle this week to watch 

*?5 ■ * nietr e world 
championship starting tomor- 
row could be forgiven for 
thinking they had strayed 
into some secret multi-na- 

il ? k wea P° n s-tesiing 
establishment for all the 
“V* ^ seamty there is about 

Each syndicate's com- 
pound has been fortified with 
chain-link fencing, padlocked 
gates and security screens, 
and the corps of private 
guards almost outnumbers 
everyone else in town. Crew- 
men are not encouraged to 
fraternize with opposing 
teams for fear that alcohol 
could loosen their tongues. 

When they do mix it is 
usually for a rough and 
tumble affair such as the final 
of ihe world arm-wrestling 
championship on Tuesday 
night, when a New Zealand 
crewman dismissed his South 
Australian opponent from 
both this contest and the 12 
metre world championship 
by breaking his arm. 

Newport was a playground 


K 

: ^ 


r r- 
rial 






: bjv. 


• • tC 


l.: 


by comparison. The 
controversial shrouds used by 
Alan Bond to hide Australia^ 
• 7>; t radical winged keel from 
‘--*3 1 PDing Amen can eyes during 
v ; . dial last historic cup summer 
’ in 1983 are now common to 
all but the New Zealand and 
Courageous syndicates, while 
the True North group from 
Canada has taken the idea 


tent that totally envelopes its 
new 12 metre 
One of the groups to have 
taken the threat of sporting 
espionage most seriously is 
the New Yoric Yacht Oub. 
who held the Cup for 132 
years before It was finally 
snatched away fey Bond, the 
Australian property tycoon, 
na ms team. Visitors to this 
syndicate's expansive com- 
pound in the centre of 
Fremantle's fishing harbour 
must pass through two sets of 
security gates before reaching 
the inner sanctum where 
canvas screens hide all activ- 
nyaround the dock and boat 

Out at sea, chase boats take 
up station around the 
syndicate's two 12 metres to 
herd away photographic craft, 
official or otherwise, and 
whenever a helicopter ap- 
pears overhead, skipper John 
Kohus and his crew stop 
sailing immediately to ensure 
their keel remains hidden 
from view. Andrea Bertrand, 
the wife of tactician John 
Bertrand and spokeswoman 
for the syndicate; defends this 
degree of secrecy, saying: 
“We’re merely protecting our 
SI2 million investment.** 
Others put ft aO down to 
paranoia. The present early 
results certainly make all this 
secrecy rather superfluous, 
for none of the new designs 
appears to hold any roe 
advantage over the tnn 
year-old Australia IL Unless, 
of course, the security screens 
are there to hide the sandbag s 
as they are carried ashore 
each night This next week 
should telL 


Ask the rabbits of KnockbeHamor, 
the big hill a couple of miles from 
- Barry McGuigan’s bungalow jn 
Clones. Co. Monaghan, and they 
wilt idl you that when the little 
Irishman sets out to catch them, 
they can run but they cannot hide. 
When the rabbits see ihe young man 
with the sharp eyes coming across 
the lumpy fields on an April 
afternoon, they disappear down their 
holes. The man sends his muzzled 
ferrets down after them and they are 
caught in the nets as they run out. 
Bui at the end of the day. all but one 
or two of them are allowed to go 
free. These Fivers and Hazels will 
tell you that the Irishman is quicker 
even than the quick brown fox. 


An instinctive 
response 


This is also confirmed by Jim 
Sheridan. 1 , a Dubliner working 
New York and McGuigan's of 
biographer, who says in his excellent 
book Leave the Fighting to 
McGuigan: “All the holes are 
covered. The ferret goes down. 
There is a nimble underground. 
Barry's eyes are flashing in all 
directions. The rabbits are 1 running 
into the traps. Close to Barry one of 
the rabbits conics flying out and 
jumps straight through a hole m the 
net. Quick as a flash Barry reaches 
his hand out and grabs the rabbit in 
mid-air. A totally instinctive 
response.** 

This ferret-like quickness makes 
McGuigan the most feared man in 
the ring. Once he goes after his 
quarry there is no escape. Only one 
man ever got away. In 1981, Peter 
Eubanks, of Brighton, out-pointed 
McGuigan to pm the only blemish 
on the Irishman's record of 29 
contests. But four months later 
Eubanks was stopped in eight 
rounds in Belfast Altogether 24 of 
McGuigan's opponents have failed 
to last the distance. 



sparring and gently taper 
down to nine stone with 
boxing and skipping 


himself 

shadow 


As far as training is concerned, he 
has ’’tunnel vision”, his lather says. 
In his gym in Clones a slogan across 
the wall in large letters says: "Work 
hard, think fast, and you will last”. 


In spite of his high earnings these 
days. McGuigan is still very much 
that old stay-at-home who docs not 
even go to’ a boxing match. His 
lifestyle has changed in only one 
way. He has exchanged his bangers 
for fast new cars. When he retires in 
two years’ time he hopes to take up 
Formula One racing. "His ambition 
is to drive round Brands Hatch." his 
lather says. McGuigan has already- 
been offered contracts by a leading 
car company to take up motor 
rallying when he gives up the ring 


Motor-racing 

ambitions 


He bought a Lotus after winning 
the world title last June but that 
proved "too light”. He now has 
something a liulc more substantial — 
a Mercedes with a racing Cosworth 
engine that frightens the life out his 
parents and manager. They remem- 
ber too well what happened to the 
great Salvador Sanchez of Mexico, 
another world featherweight cham- 
pion. He was killed when his 
Porsche went into a cement lorry at 
16Gmph. The third of eight children. 
McGuigan is a devout Catholic and 
his wife. Sandra, the girl from across 
the way. is a Protestant. W'hilc their 
son. Biain. was baptized a Catholic, 
their two-week-old daughter Danika 
Kathryn will be allowed to follow 
the faith of her choice when she 
grows up. 


SKIING 




Walliser’s 
victory 
is fruitful 


BOXING 

fell looks ahe; 
l fruitful year 

SeaulVt.; 





Valzoldana (AP) — Maria 
Walhscr. of Switzerland, tri- 
umphed in a World Cup giant 
slalom yesterday and regained 
the overall lead. Miss Wailiscr, 
aged 22. recorded the -fastest 
lime in bodhr heats down the 
Foppc track, in lmin I5.5sec 
and 1:18.05 -for a winning - 
aggregate time, of £34.00. ;• 

Maicja Sveu a rising. Yugo- 
slav competitor, finished in 
second place in 2:34.97. Olga 
Charvaiova. of Czechoslovakia, 
a surprise winner of a special 
slalom in Piancavallo on Tues- 
day. came thind in. 2:35.89. 
Traudl Hacchcr was the top 
West German finisher, placing 
fourth in 2:36.00. 

Carole Meric, of France, was 
a surprising fifth ahead of the 
defending World Cup cham-. 
pion. Michcla Figini. of 
Switzerland, who dropped one 
place from the first ‘ heat to 
finish sixth. 

Miss Walliscr's second vic- 
tory this season gave the 
downhill and super-giant 
specialist a commanding total 
of 209 points in the overall 
standings. Her team colleague. 
Erika Hess, who had taken 
over leadership after Tuesday's 
slalom, dropped to second 
place. 

RESULTS: 1. M Wajteer fBgrfW. &I*t 
34 OOsac Z M SmsTM*). 234.97: 3,0 

£ Hass (Swttz). 237.44; 16. K Detter 


(WGL 237.46: 11. M Klahl (WGQ, 237.52; 
12. C Outlet iFrt. 237 72 ^ S WoH 
(Austria) 237.73: 14. M G®0 !WG). 


i37.BR T5. Z Haas 
OVERALL. ST, 


1. M WaSsar 


St. 



(SwitzL 209pts: 2. E Hess (Svwtz). 1W. 3. 
V Schneider (SwmzL £24 M FJin 
rswtz). 183. 5. B Oerti(S*rttt). 136: ftK 
Gurensohn (Austro). 129; 7. M ogtq 
(WGL 127: sTm KiaW 1WQ. ''4. 9. 0 


i{CzL HO; 10 L Graham (Can) 

gWf i. v 


(YuQ) 

O Charvaiova (Ca). 35. 


CRICKET 


Australia in 
dramatic 
one-day win 


And at the end of the day in Dub- 
lin on February 15. in the first world 
championship to be held there since 
Mike McTigue brat Battling Siki. 
the Singular Senegalese, in 20 
rounds in 1923, it is almost certain 
that Daneilo Cabrera, of the 
Dominican Republic, ranked sixth 
in the world, will feel the weight of 
the Irishman's fast hands. This will 
be the WBA featherweight 
champion's second defence. 


McGtHgan: in spite of his high earnings, he is still a stay-at-home 


After laking his Intermediate 
Certificate at 16 he achieved the 
distinction of being the only Irish 
amateur boxer to win the juvenile, 
youth and senior titles in one year. 
"That means he was fighting guys of 
26”. his father says. 


go on Mastermind." Together the 
brothers analyse styles of boxers 
they admire and prospective oppo- 
nents. 


Sydney CAP) — Australia beat 
India, the world one-day cham- 
iions.J>y 1 1 runs in tm exciting 


irst. World Scries Cup 
yesterday. The. Australians; af- 
ter being resinned to 170 for 
eight in a game reduced to 44 
ovcis a side because of rain, 
bowled magnificently to dis- 
miss the Indians for 159. 

The fast bowler Davis and 
the spinners Matthews and 
Border each took three wickets. 
The Indians started badly when 
they Tost their openers. Shasiri 
and Srikkanth. with only 11 
runs oh the board. Vengsarkar 
was . their top scorer with 45 

Boon, with 50, was 
Australia's most accomplished 
performer, and he figured in a 
69-run opening partnership 
whh'Marsh. " 


Finbarr McGuigan (he was called 
Finbarr after his mother was told at 
the christening that there was no 
such saint as Barry) was always good 
with his hands. After leaving St 
Tiemach’s primary school he went 
. to St Patrick's, a vocational school, 
where he learned woodwork and 
light engineering as something to fall 
back on. But it soon became evident 
that his hands would be put to other 
use. He .first showed that he had 
fighting in his blood when, accord- 
ing to Sheridan, he put a neck lock 
on a chimp at the chimpanzees tea 
party in Dublin Zoo and claimed 
afterwards that the chimp had 
started it! 


Strong beyond 
his years 


McGuigan inherits determination 
from his mother. Katie. She opened 
a store in Cones to help support 
her family of eight. Today that store 
is a supermarket covering 1.500 sq 
ft.“She is a very determined 
woman” her husband Pat says. 
“She takes no nonsense from the 
reps who come to see her.” The 
fighter’s stamina and power, which 
make him. pound for pound, one of 
the hardest hitters in the world, 
comes from his father, who as a 
young man loved to play Gaelic 
football, a game as hard as the 
Australian Rules version. 


McGuigan does not let his world 
champion status stand in the way of 
calling in experts when faced with a 
big fight. For his three most 
important contests, against Juan 
LaPorte. Eusebio Pedroza, and 
Bernard Taylor, he sent for Gerald 
Hayes, an American who had met 
all three. Hayes showed him the 
ropes. For his forthcoming defence 
bis manager. B J Eastwood, has 
brought in two Mexicans and a 
Panamanian “These Panamanians 
know so much”. McGuigan says. 
"You never know what they are 
going to do next. There is always so 


They say the third-bom is a saint 
or a hero, but even McGuigan's 
proud parents could not have 
guessed when he was bom on 
February 28. 1961 that he would one 
day unite north and south Ireland 
under one flag That whenever he 
appeared in the ring under the 
United Nations flag of peace Ireland 
would hold its breath as one nation. 
That on lifting the world title at 
Queen's Park Rangers football 
ground last June the Irish Sports 
Minister. Donal Creed, would de- 
clare: “If there was a vacancy. Barry 
could become president of Ireland 
today if he wanted to” That 
Muhammad Ali would telephone his 
congratulations: "You were great, 
but 1 am still the greatest,” he said. 
That Clones would be on the world 
map and instead of asking the 
Dundalk operator for the number of 
the general store in Clones, vou 
would be able to dial direct from 
anywhere in the world. 


much to learn.' 


AUSTRALIA 
D C Boon G Maflxjtni b Shastrl _ 50 
G R Marsh cSharma b Azhnuddn 36 

D M Wetiham b A mar ri a m 6 

A R Border e Azhamddu b Shashi 12 

D M JOf»s not out — 30 

5 R-Waurti b Azharaddta 1 

G R Matmaws run out -7 

T Zoefwer b Kapi Dev 11 

C J -McQemwx.ron out — 0 

B R Ram not out' — 4 

Extras (b-1. M. nb-4. w-2} 13 


Total (Bight wickets. 44 overs) 170 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-69. 2-66. 3-110, 4- 
118. 5-122. 6-135. 7-164. 8-164. 
BOWLING: Kapil Dov. 9-2-21 -1; ftnny, 7- 
O-StMfcStianna. 5-0-34-0; Amamatti. SO- 
21-1: ShestrL 9-0-31-2: Aznanrddn. 90- 
26-2. 


INDIA 

R J Shastri c Zoehrer b OwAa — 8 

K Srikkanth b Dans 0 

M Amamatt c Marsh b Matthews 13 
D B Vengsarkar c Jones b Waugh 45 

M Azharuddm b Matthews i 

S M Gavaskar c Jonas b Border 32 

Kapi Dev b Matthews 0 

A MaMotra c&b Border — : 12 

c Shams not out 19 

R M H Beaty b Border 16 

K More b Davis 2 

Extras (b2.kb6.w2. nbl) 11 


Total (as out 43.4 overs) 159 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-4. 2-11. 3-40. 4- 
52. 5-82, 962. 7-112, 8-128. 9-149. 
BOWUNG: McDamtotL 54-264: Davis. 
7 4-3-10-3; Raid. 9-2-34-0: Matthews. 9- 
0-27-3; Waugh. 8-1-31-1; Border. 5-0-23- 
3. 


OLYMPIC GAMES 


US TV fears boycott 


FISH!* 6 ’ 




*5* 
r » 




New York (Reuter) - “Boy- 
cott insurance" hw emerged as 
an issue in contract Wilts 
between negotiators for foe 
South Korean _ Olympic 
Organizing Committee and me 

National Broadcasting Com- 
p»n£ the American TV net- 

W An NBC spokesman raid 
yesterday that though « had 
wonihe rights .^October m 
televise the 1988 Summer 
Olympics, a contract has not 

yet been signed. 

One of the delays « NBCs 
request that financial dkw- 
ances be made in e*em ihata 
number of Eastern or Western 
Woe nations boycott Seoul 
Prior to the 1984 Summer 


Olympics in Los Angeles, the 
American Broadcasting Com- 
pany, which had television 
rights to the Games, sought to 
renegotiate its agreement be- 
cause of a boycott by Eastern 
bloc countries. ' , 

However, the Los Angeles 
Games drew, large television 
ratings and ABC paid the lfce — 
approximately $225 million — 
that had been negotiated before 
the Games. 

• Havana — President Fidd 
Castro made dear for the first 
time yesterday that- Cuba 
would not take part in the 1988 
Olympics Games if they are 
held in South Korea alone, 
instead of both North and 
South Korea. 






*■».* '• 




COMMONWEALTH GAMES 

Boycott threat lifted 





■ "* Ml £ 


J 








Games in Edinbmgb 

ssassssw 

the games. , 

Tan y«r *vrral Africa? 


to go to the Games m protest 

‘ - nri — It IvtT 1 KllMtf 


against participation by ‘New 


and Britain, whose 
rugby and cricket .teams 
planned. to tour South. Afndi: 

Several African delegates 
attending the closed-door meet- 
ing rebuffed questions about 
their country’s stand - on the 
boycott. “Talk about positive, 
not negative, things - "boycoas 
Are negative." Abraham Ordia. 
the former head of the Su- 
nreme Council for Sports in. 
Africa, who is a Nigerian, said. 


At the age of eight he used to cycle 
to Waulebridge to box at the club 
there, but after two bodies were 
found in rubbish bags on the road 
back from the club his parents 
moved him to the Smithboro Oub, 
six miles from Cones, where he beat 
off all-comers. 


McGuigan’s greatest asset is his 
ability to learn. He will spend hours 
poring over boxing magazines with 
his brother. DermoL who is so 
knowledgeable about the sport that 
“he can tell you all about the old 
fighters and is even good enough to 


There is no boxer in Britain more 
dedicated to training than 
McGuigan. Five weeks before a big 
fight he goes to his Bangor retreat, 
where he stays alone at the 
Beresford Guest House by the sea. 
He runs eight to 10 miles a day. 
starting at 8.30 in the morning, then 
goes to his Castle Street gym in 
Belfast to spar with his imported 
boxers. 


Every day McGuigan receives 50 


Visitors and the Press are 
not allowed to watch him work oul 
A fter three hours he returns to 
Bangor. Next Tuesday he will slop 


world, some even from prisons in 
America. He and his wife Sandra sit 
down in the evening and meticu- 
lously reply to them. One letter that 
reached him was addressed to 
“Barry McGuigan. World Cham- 
pion, Ireland”. That proved he was 
a star. Another letter from an 
admirer in England made him a 
superstar. The address on that letter 
simply said ’’Barry McGuigan”. 


Sri kumar Sen 

Boxing Correspondent 


SQUASH 


Top target 
is in 

range for 
Cannons 


By Colin McQuillan 


RESULTS: Cannons Quo 4. Manchester 
Nonnem i. Cnapel Anenon i. Squa&n 
Leicester 4. Dunnmgs MiU 2 EOQMStOfl 
Pnoty 3. Redwooa Lome 3. Armey 2. 
League positions: I, Artfeign Han. 63: 2. 
Cannons Qua. S5 3. Cnapei AUenon. 5*. 
4. Eogoasion Pnory. 48. 5. Mancneser 
Nonnem. 47. 6. Nocwtgnsm. c7: 7. 
Dunnings Mil). 4?. 8. Squash Leicester, 
an. g. Armey. 36. 10. Redwood Lodge. 
23. 


GYMNASTICS 


Russians are 
on their way 


Three world gymnastics 
champions confirmed yes- 
terday their paniciption in The 
Mirror Soviet Displays at 
Wembley on March 8 and 9. 

Oksana Omeliawthik and 
Elena Shushunova. joint hold- 
ers of the world title, will be in 
the line-up. Shushunova is also 
the European women's cham- 
pion. 

Yuri Korolev,! he men’s 
world champion, will also be in 
the team. This displayof Soviet 
gymnastics, now in its thir- 
teenth year at Wembley, will 
feature competitors who be- 
tween them hold more than 40 
Olympic and world champion- 
ship medals. 


This year only two disj 
will take place because of the 
Soviet commitments in other 
parts of the world, anda 
maximum of 16,000 seats will 
be available. 


First onting of a low-line, high-speed design hoping to capture grand prix glory 


New-look 
Brabham 
could start 
revolution 






A new era in Formula One 
design may be heralded by the 
appearance of the strikingly 
attractive “tow-line” 1986 
Brabban-BMW grand prix 
car. which made its public 
debat ' last weekend in a test 
session at .the Estoril circuit in 
Portugal. 

Riccardo Patrese, who »3I be 
one of die team's driven, 
certainly thinks so. At Estoril, 
he remarked ts an Italian 
reporter? “A month ago, last 
year's car seemed competitive. 
Now,- after these tests, I’d say 
that it’s already a museum 
piece.” 

There is no better time for 
soaring optimistic, of course, 
than during the raa-op to a new 
season. Nevertheless, by the 
apparently simple act of creat- 
ing a dramatically lower car, 
Gordon Murray, the Brabham 
team's chief designer, will be 
hotting to achieve the ldnd of 
leap in performance that takes 
the competition an entire sea- 
son fe match. 

Called , the BT-55, and devel- 
oped it a cost of £&8 million, 

the new car has dearly been 

packaged with the primary 
intention of exploiting the 
potential of its BMW engine — 
which, although it began die 
fear years ago as a turbo- 
charged development of fee 
company's humble f oar-cyl- 
inder formula Two motor, has 
consistently proved itself su- 
perior in toms of sheer power 
to its chief rivals from Renault, 
Ferrari, Honda and TAG- 
Porsche. 

Every element of Manny’s 
typicaUy elegant design is 
geared towards the dean lines 
and tiny frontal area that 
provide minimum wind resis- 
tance, giving fee drivers an 
immediate advantage in sheer 
straight-fine speed. Such a 
margin would in turn allow the 
team to improve fee car's 
cornering grip by ad jotting Its 
wings to provide extra down’ 
force. 

The BT-S^s drivers will 
adopt a setnt-reclimng position 
more reminiscent of Jim Clark 
amt fee first monocoqae 
times in the early Sixties 
’than- of fee comparatively 
nprighi posture of recent fash- 
ion. The diagram also shows 



124 PTS £632 85 

23PTS £80-94 

22V2PTS £3-54 

22 PTS £1-77 

21V2PTS £408 

21 PTS £0-45 

|TnM» Ckuee dkri4w4> la nits b( Yip. 


w 

s 

0 

ts 


Manchester Northern, last 
season’s aggressiic uinners of 
the American Express Premier 
squash league, appear 10 have 
abandoned hopes of repeating 
1 heir success this season after 
fielding an injurs -a fleeted 
squad against a full-strength 
Cannons Club leam. led b> the 
world No 2. Ross Norman. 

The New Zealander has 
calculated that the London club 
can win the ink* if all potential 
wins are secured. Norman’s 
opponent, the Australian Ricki 
Hill, is increastnglv worried by 
a suspected hip bone crack. He 
lost in three hard games. 

. The rerurn of GeofT Williams 
to the Manchester line-up after 
two knee operations was labori- 
ous. Plainly lacking cither 
match fitness or physical con- 
fidence. the former British 
champion lost to Cannons' 
second string. Jamie Hickox. 

Most spectacular among the 
Manchester sufferers was 
Adrian Davies. Against Har- 
vey. the Cannons' fourth string, 
Davies ran himself 10 the point 
of nausea, m losing ihe first 
two games K-lfl and 8-9, then 
was effectively disqualified 
when he tefi the court for 19 
seconds at 0-5 in the third 10 be 
sick. The rules demand that 
play must he continuous and 
sell-induced vomiting is not a 
valid reason for significant 
interruption. 

The Cannons' third siring, 
Danny Lee. went on for the 
dead rubber against Robert 
Forde vowing to give his 
evening’s earnings 10 chanty if 
he lost. Lee also won in straight 
games. Only the resurgent 
Robert Ow-cn managed a point 
for Manchester, beating Nigel 
Stiles in straight games. 

The win moves Cannons to 
second place behind the league 
leaders. Ardlcigh Hall. 


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Above: Riccardo Patrese piloting the sleek BT-55 dm 
Below: bow the new silhouette compares with the li 


its tests at the Estoril circuit 
car's higher outline (shaded) 



dearly how Murray, atone 
among Formula One designers, 
has managed to keep fee 
driver's feet behind the front 
axle fine, an important safety 


The driver's seal is located 
immediately ahead of fee fuel 
tank, reduced by tins season's 
regulations to 195 litres. 
BMW's engineers have an- 
nounced that there wfll be mare 
than 1,000 brake horsepower 
available daring qraUfyiag ses- 
sions from their redeveloped 
engine, which is how tilted at 
an angle of 72 degrees from the 
vertical, permitting much lower 
rear bodywork and thereby a 
“dean” flow of air to fee rear 
wing. 

While the McLaren team, 
holders of fee constructors' 
championship tide, are fitting 
their first six-speed gearbox, 
fee BT-55 offers its (hirers a 
choice of seven ratios. In a new 
transversdy-momted an it. At 
Estoril, in feet the gearbox was 
the only mechanical part of the 
car to give trouble, fee cars of 
both Patrese and his coUeagne, 
Etio De Angefis, suffering 
failures. 

These are fee dry facts of tiie 
design, bnt to many spectators 


the appeal of Murray's latest 
creation may have more of u 
aesthetic duneosJon.In its 
radically different looks (“IPs 
even tower in real fifo than in 
fee photographs,” Giorgio 
Ptote wrote in L*Etpripe\ the 
car hints at a return to the 
variety of spectacle offered in 
the middle Fifties, when 
streamlined Mercedes ran 
cheek by jowl with lean 
Maseratis, bulbous Ferrari 
Sqoatos and dainty Gordius. 

Such is tiie way of things, 
though, that if the BT-55 
falfllls its promise — and the 
times set in poor conditions at 
Estoril ware extremely en- 
— then the other 
quickly set their 
draughtsmen to work producing 
copies. Ferrari have already 
a nnounced their intention to 
install their new four-cylinder 
engine in a chassis consid- 
erably tower even than (he 
Brabham: an almost unimagin- 
able 70cm. from ground to 
rollover bar, compared to fee 
English car's 82cm. 

Mnrray, aged 38, works to 
the sound of Bob Dylan on his 
Walkman and is known - for his 
innovations. Some, ssch as the 
surface radiators of the original 


BT-46 in 1978, are stiU-born; 
others, like the extractor fan 
that socked Niki Landa to 
victory hi the 1978 Swedish 
Grand Prix, are so effective 
feat they have to be legislated 
out of existence. In 1983 
Murray used camouflage paint 
on the prototype BT-52 to keep 
his rivals to ignorance of its 
dart-shaped aerodynamic 
csofignrarioa; later feat season 
he dreamt up fee mid-race 
refuelling stop, a brilliant piece 
of lateral thinking feat soon 
attracted the attention of fee 
law-givers. 

A (though be probably regrets 
the absence of fee brilliant and 
technically perceptive Nelson 
Piquet, who drove bis creations 
to the world championship in 
1981 and *83 but has now 
defected to the Wilfiams-Honda 
team, Murray knows that, wife 
what L'Equipe calls "la FI 
chaise-longue" he has already 
provided fee first talking point 
of the new season, which opens 
on March 23 to Brazil. And to 
Olivetti, the team's main spon- 
sor. feat alone is probably 
worth a sizeable percentage of 

t6S million. 



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GOLF 


RACING 


TH£ TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


WINCANTON 


Big smiles and 
surprise 
pay day for the 
Europeans 


Aherlow 
to hold 




upper 

hand 


By Mandarin 

(Michael Phillips) 


From John RaHanfine. La Jolla, California 
Bernhard Lauger. Ken ?rs. particularly 


_ _ _ Peter 

Brown, Nick FaldcTand Peter Jacobsen, Ray Floyd and Hal 
Oosterhuis, compete in the Sutton, who all argued that 
San Diego Open which be- many amateurs were due 
gins here on the Toney Pines back at their desks fust thing 
public North and South on Tuesday morning and, 
courses today still reeling a anyway, they said, the fore- 
little from the extraordinary cast was for more rain. 


happenings 400 miles north 
at Pebble Beach last weekend. 

Sandy Lyle began his long 
flight home on Monday just 
after Wade Cagle, a PGA 
official, acceded to the bitter 
protests of several top Ameri- 
can players and brought the 
first AT&T national pro-am 
to a finish after rain had 
washed out play at 11.10am. 

The other two Europeans 
had smiles all over their feces 
as a result of the foreshorten- 
ing. Brown, who had been 
felling awav in the final 
round, got SI 9.425 (£14,000) 
for finishing in sixth place 
after 54 holes while Linger 
received $11,250 and in 
addition moved to the top of 
the new S2m (£l.4m) Van- 
tage Cup competition with 
615 points. 

The day was fraught with a 
mass of decision and counter- 
decision. The last four- ball 
had already played seven 
holes so that Cfcgle, after 
touring the course on a caddy 
cart, announced that the links 
were unplayable and that the 
last round would be replayed 
on Tuesday. 


The end product 
volution" 


luct of this 
‘palace revolution" was, that 
the organizers overruled 
Cagle and announced not 
only that the tournament 
would be declared “official" 
at 54 holes but that the total 
purse of $660,000 would be 
fully raid, a most lucratively 
satisfying outcome for the 
three Europeans. 


The question remains as to 
whether the players should 
have had any part in the final 
say and there will be much 
discussion here over that 
point An interesting sideline 
at Pebble Beach was the 
remarks of Nathaniel Crosby 
over the future of the 
tournament “Before I go to 
Europe for my second tour I 
hope to talk to my mother 
Katherine and persuade her 
to allow my dad's name to be 
back in the title." the young 
professional said. This may 
be difficult however, as Mrs 
Crosby is initiating a new 
"Bing Crosby Pro-Am" in 
North Carolina in June. 
Everyone at Pebble Beach 
was terrified to mention the 


This produced a furor of dreaded name, presumably in 
criticism from leading play- case she sued someone. 


Getting rid of the 
bad and the ugly 


One of the great injustices in 
the game in recent years, in the 
opiuJou of Tom Mitchell, has 
been that dabs, which usually 
means dob directors, have had 
to pay fines imposed by the 
League on brawling players. 
The injustice has bitten deep 
into the son! of one of the 
game's most colourful and 
outspoken characters, the 
bearded sage of Cambria and 
council member for Workington 
Town. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 
DIARY 

Keith MackBn 



earned cash by digging deeply 
into tbeir own pockets, they! 
would think twice, and think 


again, before rushing m with 
whirling fists in defence of a\ 


As always, Mitcbdl is firing 
on all bands. A former 
Australasian tour manag er and 
long-term member of the Rngby 
League council, he is not known 
for reticence when fighting a 
cause, and he has decided to 
lanch a campaign not merely 
against brawling, but against 

" “baal" 


the use of the word “brawl 
He beUeres that there is no 
place in the vocabulary of a 
self-respecting sport for such a 
word. He wants it to be deleted 
from the rale book, believing 
that It is an ngly-soanding word 
and taints the image of the 
sport. That is one aspect of a 
campaign which be will take as 
for as die rale-changing annual 
meeting in the summer. 


colleague, or in settlement* of a 
personal score or vendetta. 

It wifi be necessary fori 
Mitchell to get a large majority 
of dob representatives behind 
him at the annual meeting, and 
be believes be will do so 
because he has right on his 
side. He has been campaigning 
for years behind the scenes to 
win people over to what be 
believes is a self-evident truth. 


“The Marne should be placed 
where it lies, with the players. 
Now, more often than not, 
responsibility foils on the dab 
directors, but the directors are 
not on the field of play 
swapping punches. They, as 
innocent bystanders, are 
blamed and penalized by fines 
for someone else's punch- op.” 


The other edge to his 
campaign concerns the players 
who take part in what Tom 
Mitchell prefers to call an 
"affray". When referees report 
teams, and the cfobs are 
brought before die disciplinary 
committee, fines are imposed 
on the dobs. The players, 
particularly those who have 
taken part in the fracas but 
have not been identified, get off 
scot free. Mitchell wants ref- 
erees to identify in then- reports 
the instigators of incidents, for 
those players to be hauled 
before the disciplinary commit- 
tee, and for the fines to be 
imposed on the players con- 
cerned. 


On die question of brawls 
and their causes. Mitchell 
outlines his reasons for wanting 
the word deleted. “Brawls have 
no place in the philosophy of 
the game, and they also 
damage the performances of the 
offending clnbs. Brawling 
teams never get anywhere in 
the long run. Referees and 
touch judges talk among them- 
selves and name the teams who 
seem to be constantly involved 
in such situations." 


As be points out, if the 
culprits on the field of play bad 
to fbrit not their own hard- 


MitcbeU, who always gave 
and demanded loyalty to the 
team cause as a tour manager, 
clearly draws the line at 

tearing into a fight, 

are no ifs and bats 

about allegedly going in to | 

protect a team mate. There is 
no justification for snch 
action." 


Those who have backed 
Chrysaor to win this year's 
Schweppes Gold Trophy at 
Newbury on Saturday will 
derive encouragement if his 
talented stable companion 
Aherlow wins the valuable 
Sidney Banks Memorial 
Novices' Hurdle at Hunting- 
don today. 

I find it significant that 
Simon Christian, his trainer, 
decided to bypass two 
pjausabie alternative engage- 
ments at Sandown last Friday 
and Ascot yesterday and wait 
for this opportunity which has 
been foremost in his mind 
since Aherlow won his last race 
at Kemp ton Park by 12 
lengths. 

With Ibn Mqjed also stand- 
ing his ground, Aheriow's task 
is anything but easy. Neverthe- 
less. he is still my nap. At 
Kempion the two who trailed 
in his wake were Kildimo and 
Bronslri. Between them they 
had already won seven races 
this season so the form is rock 
solid. 

Having made afl the running 
over 2*6 miles at Utroxeur, 
Doncaster and Ascot, Ibn 
Majed will certainly take some 
catching because he stays 
extremely well for one by the 
sprinter Godswalk. However, 
the feet remains that both Troy 
Fair and Christo, the two who 
finished immediately behind 
him at Ascot, have both been 
beaten in the meantime and I 
remain convinced that be could 
prove vulnerable when chal- 
lenged by a horse of 
AHERLOW’S cfass- 
Celtic Slave, a winner for 
Richard Dun woody and Tim 
Forster at the last meeting, 
returns for a crack at the 
Whiulesey Handicap Chase. In 
this instance though 1 just 
prefer Northern Bay even 
though the distance is a bit on 
the short side for him. His last 
two efforts at Cheltenham and 
Warwick had a genuine ring 
about them and Celtic Slave 
will really know that she has 
been in a battle at a difference 
of only 61b. 

. However. Forster and his 
jockey can win the Bet with (he 
Tote Novices Chase (qualifier) 
with Polar Sunset. I have been 
waiting for this brother to both 
Western Sunset and Hazy 
Sunset to reappear ever since 
he finished fourih b ehind The 
Catchpoo), Braunston Brook 
and Brass Change in his first 
steeple chase at Lingfieid in 
December. The longer distance 
of today's race should suit him 
ideally. Furthermore, he also 
has a pull of 71b in the weights 
for only half a length with 
Brass Change. 

At W incanton the successful 
Lam bo urn trainer Nicky 
Henderson is not without a 
chance of pulling off a family 
double with Into Song (2.15) 
and Charlies Cottage (2.45L 
Owned by his sister-in-law, 
Jane Sloan. Into Song can win 
the EBF Han Hill and Pin 
Farm Studs Novices Hurdle 
following that commendable 
front running performance at 
Taunton that month. Half an 
hour later Charlies Cottage, 
carrying the colours of 
Henderson's mother-in-law, 
Wendy Thome, will be hard to 
beat in the Wincanton Chal- 
lenge Cup for novice chasers if 
he is as good over fences as he 
was over hurdles. 

The Dick Woodhouse 
Hunters’ Chase features an- 
other intriguing clash between 
Village Mark and Tawny Myth. 

At Newbury fast March. Tawny 
Myth's long unbeaten run in 
hunter chases, which by then 
stretched to 14, was finally 
brought to an end by Village 
Mark. Now following that good 
run behind Dart Over at 
Stratford last Saturday, the 
advantage again appears to lie 
with the latter. 



JSfSflSfl JOCKEYS HAMfCfP 


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Wincanton selections i* 

By Mandarin 

t 45 Strath Leader. 2.15 Into Song. 2.45 CharficsCoiugc. 3.15 
Village Mark, 3-45 Kuwait Mutar. 4.15 ftmto Prince. 


2.15 EBF HART HILL & PUT FARM STUDS NOVICE HURDLE 
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2AS WINCANTON CHALLENGE CUP (NOVICE 
CHASEX£2,1452mX20) 

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Charcoal WaUv. and Brendan Powell, dear over the last in the Sapling Novice 
Chase at Ascot yesterday (Photograph: Ian Stewart). 


15 004040 CHARLIES COTTAGE (Mm 


Branton Park bravely 
answers Bradley’s call 


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Branton Park, the least 
fended of three northern 
challengers, scattered Gold 
Cup and Grand National 
hopes like spent betting 
tickets in the wind when he 
took yesterday's featured 
Charterhouse Chase at Ascot. 

Under another masterful 
ride from Graham Bradley, 
who climbed out of his sick 
bed to give an object lesson 
in timing, style and con- 
trolled strength in a finish, 
Brunion Park came to chal- 
lenge Cybrandian, who had 
taken over the lead from 
Drumadowney after the 
third, between the last two 
fences. 

Cybrandian battled back 
on the fiat, but Branton Park 
was always holding him. 
Although the winner is far 
removed from Gold Cup 
standard, Cybrandian could 
be said to have done his 
prospects in the Cheltenham 
race no harm, particularly as 
he was considered in need of 
the race. 

Door Latch, who ran a fine 
race, only tiring in the 
straight, will not tackle the 
Gold Cup and with the 
Grand National in mind, is 
likely to miss Cheltenham 
altogether in favour of a 
small preparatory race else- 
where. Leading bookmakers 
reduced Door Latch to 16-1 
for Ain tree where he must 
surely have an outstanding 
chance. 

Very Promising’s lack lus- 


By John Barter 

After a severe overnight 
frost, racing was given the go- 
ahead only after four inspec- 
tions of the course; the final 
one at 12 o'clock when the 
stewards decided to put the 
programme back by half an 
hour. 

Backers, who braved the 
first overtures of the prom- 
ised Siberian weather, got 
away to the best possible start 
when one of the afternoon’s 
banker bets, Riva Rose, took 
the opening Datchet Novices* 
Hurdle. 

Mind you, supporters of 
the hot favourite must have 
been wishing they had stayed 
in bed when Riva Rose, who 
appeared to meet with inter- 
ference at the start, turned 
into the straight some way 
behind the pacemaking Wag- 
oner. who was not faltering 
and River Ceiriog, who also 
appeared to have plenty left 
in the tank. 

However, this potentially 
top-class young performer 
then showed exceptional 
tenacity and acceleration to 
close on the two leaders 
under pressure from his 
young rider Wayne 
O’Callaghan, and drew level 


Jenny Hunan, as ever 
playing her role as the 
loquacious lady of I 
Lam bourn, not unnaturally 
looked highly relieved and 
after joking that O’Callaghan 
would have been walking 
home if he had lost, praised 
her rider for his fine efforts in 
the most difficult of circum- 
stances. 

Billy Gaff, the owner, wifi 
obviously be keen to run 
Riva Rose at Cheltenham, 
Mrs Pitman said, but if it 
were left to her she would by- 
pass the Festival meeting m 
favour of Aintree 

Charcoal Wally gave a 
magnificant exhibition ofj 
quick, fluent jumping to 
make all the running in the 
Sapling Novices’ Chase. Ore- 
gon Trail tried to dose 
between the last two fences as 
did the strongly-fancied Deep 
Impression under strong 
driving from Peter; 
Scudamore. 

However, Brendan Powell 
had something in reserve on 
Charcoal Wally, who 
comfortably held Oregon 
Trail to earn a place in 
Cheltenham's Arkle Trophy, 
end 


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tre display was explained by 


the fact that he broke a blood 
vessel. However, that equine 
prima donna, Drumadowney, 
once again declined to per- 
form halfway through the 
race and it will take a brave 
man to risk a penny on him 
in the near future. 


obstacle flat-footed and 
O'Callaghan, who rode his 
first winner on Tuesday, lost 
an iron. 

The fresh-faced apprentice 
then showed the icy calm of 
Bjorn Borg at match point 
down and, aided by the 
courage of his mount who 
stuck his neck out when it 
mattered most, drove for 
home and edged out Wag- 
oner on the line. 


The Schweppes Gold Tro- 
phy. abandoned three limes in 
ihc past five seasons because of 
bad weather, is likely to be lost 
this Saturday, according (o the 
bookmakers William Hill. 

The weather forecast is 
snow^nd to tempt punters 
Hills offer ihe odds of 5-1 
against the meeting taking 
placc.A spokesman Graham 
Sharpc.said: “Humberside 
Lady is ti-l favourite for the 
race, bui the real favourite is 


94 Cctonai James, 4-1 Home Countv.82 Storm House. BSakecx: 15. 

4.15 GILLINGHAM HANDICAP HURDLE (£1.786^1X14) 

1 122-110 HYPNOSIS (USA)(t>DXBF) (Maf G Snefl) 

2 13/0800- AWMAL-S RUiSI (D) (W Paaor&S 3 **^ 7 ^ 1 ^ 303 ^ 

3 10001/0 EASTERN LINE (D) (John 

4 014-122 INDIAN MAJOR (C-OXBF) (Miss 

5 10WW DREAM «M)) (D 


8 


32IW11 PANTO PHMCE (C-P) (Ms L Warran) 

FltfM ROOB, NICHOLAS pi pn 

gsg ggawgrjalSiia^^^Ss 

. ■MW’’ SAUUNEO SO«G'(rp5S«? DpSSI-Im”^ M 

3-1 Panto Pi inert, 4-1 **■ ‘ 


11 

12 

16 

17 

18 
19 


G Jones 


M Richards 


Wggrod (chase co-Be^ood 

IJORm tide) 1. WVA R0QE&6 W* 
2. Wagoner ID Browne. 5-2): 3. r 


SSfiF 


(2m txSe) 1. riva 

r (D Browne. 5-2): 3 
Smith Ecdes. 10-1). ALSO 
Agta Special. 14 Graceiut 


Kicker. Ifithx'te Make Mne Mefiha. 33 
Arrow — 


■W-i i . _ I Bngm «nrow (otrrj. Netson Lad. I 

Ford tested at Salford 


Sieve Ford, the Cardiff 
winger who mtis banned for life 
from Rugby Union for playing 
trials wiih Leeds, may get 
mother chance in the Rugby 
League game (Keith Macklih 
yrites). He is playing in trials 
or Salford, and has impressed 
heir coach. Kevin Ashcroft. 
The banning of Ford caused 
storm when ihc Welsh Rugbv 
.Inion imposed iL with Ford 
ircaicning to name up to 
Oothcr players who had had 
ials with Rugby League clubs. 
Amateur sides have had an 
icouraging boost with ihc 


news that in next season's Silk 
Cul Challenge Cup there will 
be 38 clubs in the opening | 
round, four of whom will be 
amateur dubs. 


Price is back 


London Welsh recall Colvn 
Price at stand-off and Glvn 
Llewellyn in the pack for; 
Saturday's John Player Special 
Cup Rugby Union match 
against Camborne at Old Deer 
Park. It will he Price's first 
appearance since he faced the 
Fijians early in the season 


SNOOKER 


Davis set to 
] play Virgo 


his 


Cstcve Davis will defend 
Cc in the Tolly Cobbold 
eglish professional snooker 
impionship. the final siagcs 
t which start today at the 
a-n Exchange. Ipswich, with a 
jich between Tony Mco and 
1 an Reynolds (Sydney 
t Ain writes). Davis makes 
first appearance on Sunday, 
p -R he plays against John 
d !0 ih the quarter-final 

u id. 


ony Knowles, who was 
icr-up last year to Davis, 
beaten in an earlier round 
Mike Hailcii. and Willie 
me was eliminated by 
■tolds. 


\I 1 matches are over 
ames and the final will be 
?d on February 12. 


TER-HNAL DRAW; T Mac « O 

'ids. J Wtirtfl v N FouMs: J Johnson 
IfalML S Daws a J Virgo. 


HOCKEY 


Slough move 
into third 


Bright Arrow (5th). Nelson Lad. LMv 
Oocoian {4ttiJ. Quefty Castings (pu). 10 

ST&.S ftSPJBf 1 £, - 2a 

20 (2m ch) 1. CHARCOAL WALLY (B 
Oreg on TraB (K Mooney, 
fXmFF 0 * ( p Scudamow. 

5-2 tuvl ALSO RAN: 4 Pnariyman (4th). 
Nassau Royate (fl. 9 Duntark (6th). 66 
AnvuBNi (5m). 7 ran. 3L «. 0. 41. 20L H 
J53IMW L fS3 fK S t *280. 

£220 DF: £2810. CSF: £278a 
MO On hdte) 1. KThKTS COLLEGE 
BOY <D Browne. S-lfc Z, tow n The 

lav). ALSO RAN: 12 
Ml. lit 301. 1V«L N 
_ « Lantaum. TOTE: £620. DF: 
.00. CSF: £2*33. 

38 On eh) 1. BRUNTON PARK (G 
14-1): 2. Cyfirarasan (A 0mm. 
3. Ooor Latch (R Rowe. 7-2). 
.. ^ M*4 By The Way 11-2 

Very Promarw. 10 Dnenadowney (pu), 
20 Everett (6tML Caste Warden (SmTa 
ran. 4 1. 51. 81. 71. 151. Mrs M ttetason at 
Harewood. TOTE: £1030: £18a 81.7a 
£160. DF: £19 60. CSR £42.81. 

340 (3m ctl) 1. BOLANDS CROSS (P 
' ' “ ‘ ■* ~tream (K 

_ . Browns, 



ALSO 


Although Southgate are top 
of the Pizza Express London 
League with 15 points, they 
can be overhauled by Houns- 
low, who have 10 points and 
have three matches in band 
(Sydney Friskin writes). 
There are three points for a 
win in this league. 

Slough, who won two 
matches Iasi weekend, have 
moved into third place. St 
Albans are bottom, having 
lost all three marches, but are 
top of the Truman indoor 
;ue. 

am bridge City have taken 
over the leadership of the 
premier division of the Nor- 
wich Union East League with 
31 points from 11 matches 
followed by Old 
Loughtonians with 28 from 
the same number of games. 


OF: £8.40. CSF: £1224. 

4.10 an « MM 1. MISTER PITT (J 

Si! 

GMWralQjryspn. 9 Chemist Broker (fl. 
lOjnteno (SOU Poftsn. 12 PnnceS 
owe. Tow De ftree. if HeHo KBney. 

»rj 

«rv Annestay (pu). 25 ran. Nffi Down 
rittht V. W. 41. 41. i»,L M Pipe at 
WeOngwn. Tote: £21.00. £3.10. S-80, 
niid £1.60. DF: £107.00. CSF^ 
£13622. Tnease £3^01.40. 


Inspections 


There will be a 7.30am 
inspection at Huntingdon 10 
decide whether racing is pos- 
sible but the chances of going 
ahead are “not high", accord- 
ing 10 the clerk of the course. 
Hugo Bevan. He said: "We 
have had three hours of snow 
which has now turned to sleet 
and the weather forecast is for 
more snow and frost." There is 

also a precautionary 7am 
inspection at Wincanton 


W8- 

nra- 

.25- 


Ludlow 

GOING: soft 

1.1S0T1 hdto)1. HARVEST 

Bams.l4-l)ZX3«ip Coach 

arte. 14-1)3. Cartel s 
1LALSO RAW5-2 fav Tlmsafi 
C3wln 01 ReSoiteg . 10-1 
Jkreny Bor 6th. Stag To Me P/OP.12-1 
Wee Wfflam ,14-1 Qty Link Exprau . My 
Snp .16-1 Do Or die . 25-1 Another 
Generation , Vai OmOar. Onttab . The 
Rusk JEyeioM . Tree Imp . 19 
RenW.&A Hop. Neck. 1SL 2feUt»UJ3L 
0.0 NeS at CtWttwtf»n.T0tt: £13J0. 
£2.80 £2.30 £7.90 £2.80. DF:: 
E228.40.C.S.F. £190.13 Trtcast; 
£4^55. 


that the meeting will be off.' 



145( am_4fch)1, CURA JRO WTAW ( 

Repm 


OunwooOyfvene fayt 2 Auart Rat 

wnite.1 1-4):3, CeucbMier( 
.12-1). ALSO RAN: 8-1 


Memagh.12-1) 
esters lid P/l 


Q 

For- 


P/UP.11-1 Relmore Gtfl.16-1 

Sammy Lux F. 25-1 A 


i Autumn Show P, 33* 


1 Ben s Way 5m, Coc^w 4tth Dunvegm 


Lad F. Lumnfcn 


Mohfle U- 


RTemptarwtey P/UP. Saj^MopPflJfi 


Wayward Kate F. 15 raaNf 

tan. nd. 20 i, . 


II. T Forster 
Wantage-Tota: £2.16 £1.40. £1.70, 
£1.60- DF«30.CSF £446. 
aiHanJI. METMAN ( M Pttman.4-5 
KastowiSne (J FrosLB-1): 2. 

iWny > rimii o n .r 

Cawnaro.12-1 VSguefy Artistic Bth.16-1 

ExptativQ. 20-1 Cookalarem , 33-1 Celtic 


Quest, Mcarac, Cetac Mare Dl's Wag, 

5th. Cosile ftjor. 


KaUakra . Casta n tefro . . 

Smlffi Bear 4th, Little Oimpie.lfi 
ran.NR.Hive Od.Raaens Boy. 4 
I.K.125.6. Mrs J Pitman at Upper 
Lam bourn. Totafl^O. £1.10X1.40, 
£4X0 DF; £3.00. CSF E789 
2A5( 3m cft)1, CITY BOY ( Mr T 
Thomson Jones .11-10 tav)2. Id 

Bosun < Mrs J Utson.12-1)J. B oota inQ 

Bockt Mr J GrtttimeX3-1LALSO RAN: £ 
1 Herr Capilan firh. 8-1 Cheatao Ora 
P/up.10-1 Prince _ Rowan Mh. 16-1 


Seaetary GcnerN 5th. 20-1 teaoc^up, 


33-1 Lonesome Park . Bmehom _ . 
Cooterm Boy^ BNIy Task P/up. 


R. Wtngsottmtnomlng 
15 ran. in L7.sft-haa.nk. Mrs A 


to. Tote win 
DF-. £11.50. 


(noerwood at 
£1.60X1X0 £1.70 
CSF £14X2. 

315(2in ch)UTSGOTTABEALJUGHT( p 

Warner .4-1 it taatf . OeoMe Aitam(C 
Cowley .15-2)3. Bkteaigh Bridoe ( Mr L 
Harvey A-1LALSO RAN: 4-1 jtPav Pee- 
Cock-Ada S«h. 5-1 Smtaook .7-1 
lernse F. 8-1 Rraral Mere 4th. 16-1 
3BHO 6m, Marina Star . 20-1 Fare Love 
25-1 Teftfiano . Be My Luck P(U. 
Haroour Bazaar 13 

ran. NR “ “ 


4. nk 


Tota 


DFXS9.10. CSF £3480. Tncatt £214.12. 
345( 2m hdta)1J BIN ZABOON (M 
PtenarvB-ll fWfStjBaaia Dram ( J White. 

tonw 25-1 Naggrra . 33-1 Lady Liza 
4Bi. PadOysWwn .T^enSyne a Pnde . 50-1 
tote Orchard . Chelsea Mon £arty 
Promotion . Roddy rTOr .Saraon r 
Tern Sauce . RB Tin ^Satires 


atwd Dawi . 18 Ran. 3 L 3. 4. H. 6. 
Mrs j. Pitman ai Upper Lamtnwn.TotB ; 
£1 60. £130. £290. £130. OF; £6.40. 
CSF. £8.76. 

PLACEPOT±1930 


HUNTINGDON 


M BET WITH THE TOTE NOVICE CHASE (Qualifier: £1 ,935: 3m 
100ydX18) 


Going; good to soft (chase course): soft (hurdles) 


3-31103 GOLDEN MINSTREL gHSaJe) 4 GttfcW 7-11-10 


— R.Rom 
..P Baron 


1.30 GLATTON SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,181^11 4f) 
(18 runners) 

1 0-10004 FINALE SEPT (W Eason) H Fleming 6-11-10 M Pepper 

2 300103 FLORJ WONDER (C Wtedon) J D /Oavnes 6-11-9 G HtwartT) 

5 P-00000 MIAMI HOLIDAY (tadustnal Glove Co Udl 

M Caste* 5-11-5 K Traylor ( 

P00-040 ROBANO (Mrs J Perrte) w Pemn 6-11-5 — Mr S Woods 


6 

7 

10 

11 

12 

13 

15 

16 
17 


1132 AIRLANKA’ (CXBF) (R Joactum} J Jenlorts 4-10-12 Mr M i v . 

I (R PedOns) B PBriuns 6-10-9 —*......Qai WUkams 


P-FSBOO ALJAZAAR 


5 

8 

13 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 


000 VENETIAN PRINCESS (Mrs J Pent) A Moon 5-10-9 G 

Jham) L Ntorduvpiam 5-10-8 ..J Barlow 


OP-PI 34 TAVARGOS (L Wording 
300030- ARNAB (L WT 
000000 SEXTON ASH 


Moore 


300030- ARNAB (L Wordn^sm) L Wordmqharii 6-10-6 

" (R D'SuAvan) R 0'Suftvan 4-10-4 R Rowe 


23 

24 

25 


200000 INSPIRED (K Wjngrove) K Wmgrovo 6-10-3 R Battourff) 

000 PATRALAN (Commander R " * 


18 

19 

21 

22 

23 

25 


Maddox) 

W Musson 4-10-3 Gina Hensmanf7) 

OF40 FOREVER MO (R Northetee) G Baktng 4-10-2 

0404 LADY GRIM M Davies) W Wharton 4-10-1 M Brennan 

OP20-40 PRINCE BUBBLY (J Bennett) M Avison 5-10-0 — 

004/000 SOLAR TEMPTRESS (O Baxter) J D J Dawes 6-10-0 


0-03P13 BRASS CHANGE (N GoodkH) I Dudgeon 8-11-3 
21U0-31 CHURCH WARDEN (J Moreton) 

P41P00 JtSBS KING (Mrs M 5°^^ 7_t ^ 

tflW SUNY ME IR Scholey) R Scfloley 8-11-3 r Peniott 

*** AS HLONE (S TtadSy^ Melto^10-in_.T~G^totes^J^ 
4F/F4-F0 CAPPING (Mrs H Hams) P W Hams 11-10-10 R Stroroe 
WMW22 COUNTRY AGENT (J WMcmson) J Webber B-lO-io G Mertth 
P-4F DUN ROLFE (Mra J Pnwpa) N Gas^ee6-10-l0 V iS 
Mtterl M Tompkins 8-10-10 _ J Bartow 
20-442F KEVIN EVANS (BF) (B Curton & B Shepherd Ltd) 

«F4I00 MV MAJOR (Mrs H Harris) P W*'lSi?7?HM0 0 "^ n° SkSmSi 
R Annytage 8-10-10 Mss G Armytage(7) 


Wsnn 


my 


31 4-04FF2 WISE WORDS (Mrs K Peytph) P 8-10-10 _ _ — 


OO/FP-FO GALE BOY (fl HaB) P AButgnam 5-10-0 M Hammond 

(C Rstmnson) J BlundeU 6-10-0 D Dutton 


ROP-OPP BURGH MILL GIRL 
7-2 Airlanka. 4-1 Tavargos. 11-2 Rnale Sept 6-1 Ron Wonder. 8-1 Miamt 
HoMay. 10-1 Pnnc© Bubbly. 12-1 Patralan. 16-1 others. Banker* 12. 15. 10. 21. 


MEMORIAL hunter 


Huntingdon selections 

By Mandarin 

1 JO Airlanka. 2.00 Northern Bay, 2.30 Aheriow^uap) 3.00 Po- 
lar Sunset 3.30 Beam warn, 4.00 Motivator. 


^3So2 M ^ OR ^ CH ^5.y ES TOWNSEND 
CHASE (Amateurs:£651:2m 4f){16) 

1 244/014- 8EAMWAM (D) (D Naylte-lejtoid) 

3 0220P3 GAMBLING PRINCE <D) GE^SS"® ° Nayto ’ Wylan,5(71 

4 F4I32P. POYNTZ PASS (0) (B Munro^^f 13_12 ' 8M JOOW{n 


B 

9 

11 

12 


0/324 41- ABLE 


LEXAOOR 

1/4000P- ABBW AW .... 
3310/ CERTAIN LIGHT (Mra 


«W« (J 


2.0 WHITTLESEY HANDICAP CHASE <£1.797:3m 100yd) (11) 

1-243F2 CERIMAU (Mrs E BW) J Edwards 8-11-7 P Baron 

310-403 FRED PIUJMER (N Johnson) M Scudamore 9-11-6 H Dawes 


FI-0023 NORTHERN BAY (TWycross Frozen Food Centre LW) 

T Btfi 10-11-6 R Crank 


PI 020-0 ARABIAN MUSK (Lady Roans) J Gittord 11-11-2 - R Rowe 

T-D) IB I - - ‘ 


13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 
21 
24 


14FU0Q) COUNTRY HOME, 
0/ ELLIOTTS WOOD 
0024F/3- HIGH POPPA 


R Perkins 8-12-0 
Campbell) 

Mrs AC 


..G Wragg (7J 


sgsvsrg juan T jE« ■— j m 

aySSSSt LGUUNAN (S 1 


3*0?: MAFTTBI EAU (Mra"*' A — - -0 - 


13 

14 

15 


312/031 CELTIC SLAVE IC-D) (B Heityer) T Foratar 9-1D-J3* R Ounwoody 
00/P300 LODGE'S FORTUNE (Mrs O Lodge) 

Mrs S Davenport 1 1-10-11 A Sharpe 
00-0100 KILLEGAR KIM (Mis M Grant) J WetW 7-10-2 ... G Meme^ 

024224 SEA SPLASH (J Hardy) O Brennan 10-10-1 M Brennan 

U -00401 PRINCE CARLTON (Mrs J Bloom) 

Mrs J Bloom 1 1-1D-1 C Saundera 


0U4-30U PflYDEL | Major E O F 


Wteo n :-s Co»*m 

DORAMBA (B Upchurch} B R l gS^it^ T " n «^^ 

5-2 Beamwam. 7-2 Ga- — ~ — - - - ' 

Mamneau. 14-1 Loans rj. 


26 


Pas8, 70 *** Sa * or - 


PUOFPO ARTIMARVAL (D) (R Beeson) J BlundeU 13 - 18-1 — □ Dutton 
34PP-0F KNIGHT OP LOVE (P " _ 


Freamanj B Stevens 11-10-0 J H Denes 
11-4 Cemc Steve. 4-i Nonhem Bay. 11-2 Cerunau. 7-1 free Piteier. 8-1 Pnnee 
Cart ton. 10-1 Sea Stuash. Araoan Muse. 1 2-1 KiNegar Km, 16-1 others. 


4.0 LONG STAINTON HANDICAP HURDLE (E1.452^m 200yd) 


2-30 SIDNEY BANKS MEMORIAL NOVICE HURDLE (£5, 722; 2m 

4f) (13) 

01 AHERLOW (Di (P Fahey) S Christian 6 - 1 1-4 R Boggart 

220-410 JAMES MY BOV (D) (Mrs R OcKiirson) M Diddnsan 6-11-4 P Tuck 

231021 KOUROS (F Stern O Brennan 7-11-4 _.M Bterman 

040-324 MSStNG MAN (Mrs L Stmpson) J Stand 6-11-4 R Rowe 

00 saints ALIVE (l wrikems) K Stay 6 - 11-4 --—- A Jonra 

2 WAGONER (A OWey) P Watwyn 6^-11-4 NONflUNNER 

003 ALDO KING (FR) (Mrs V Langford) D Oughton 5-11-2 P Double 
000*3 ANOTHER NORFOLK (N Smith) B SfcMahOn 5-11-2 ..-T Wafl 
00-032 CELTIC FLEET |R BftSwicJi) J Speanng 5-11-2. ..... P Warner 
110 COOL STRIKE JT Knowles) D Moorhead S-n-2 -M Harmnond 
0033 HALMAJOR IBR (G SchjeJdarupj G Bwang 5-11-2 C Bractey 
022223 SAMT ACTON (FfUBF) (EWwnsten) A Jarvis 5-11-2 K Bwte 
Fill IBN UAJED (0) IP O'Dorawf) C Spares *-10-6 J MeLautfUm 
. 5-2 1 tin Majed. 3-t Aherww. n-2 Wagoner. 7-1 Hakneior. 10-1 Cetac FleeL SWnt 

J Acton. 12-t howiis. 16-1 others. Banker*: S. 


1 

2 

5 

6 
7 
9 

10 

II 


33-a»3 ARBITRAGE (M fitBom"G"7hSnw?ifli 1-8 S Ji 

900301 MOTIVATOR (T toted*,) . -■ -.P.toton 


OOdPPI APPLE WINE (T OGrarm D ClSSIUn o V. 1 McCourt 

O/UPOO-0 ANiECE (CJ ip 9lld(5«0S toahitev 


D/UPOO-O ANIECE (CJ (P Be&wA] Mr s K *S h 

2130-22 TIN BOY |J — I Swhem 

Mirrm aamu iaV-r <-10-12 . s mhu<wi 


240330 BATON MATCH” 


12 
15 
18 
18 • 


(5 ex) S KfcgMtey 
"* J Swhem 
S McNeW 

Ctepmane-io-n RBaHourr 


2i 


4-0010 MEHDON monarch (j Siwhl n aSS2 an 7‘ , ?r l l. RBa * ,our I 7 > 
0 321041 BROBORY (T B fitoJn, R Gu«st(7) 

0-30330 BATTL&1ELD BAND (B Dunwoody 

F301M NICE ONE ANDvJe^^^ &3*SSEF Dua ° rt 

014KM BUCKMINSTER BOY (C-D| (p G Hotter S-10-6J Bartow 

S “ZSSKS; SUMMERCOVE (K Hinson) A 'USES '' OJtew 

26 002AOO BLACKWELL BOY fuGSTWiJS's^ 0 ^ " G MWQ 

27 F-0003 HEAR NO EVIL (Mrs a „ „ A jamas 7-10-0 G Jones 

7-2 Motivator 4.1 Apple ° 8-l«M) Mra L Gftbon 

Nee One Andy. BucWsrer Boy ifl-l 7 J 


others QSnkura: ta 









r 


, frJJ* o* * 



THE 



TIMES 


25 


2vju. m 


£K£U 



GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


February 6, 1986 



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-s*. 

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• y* 

'•■■ S£S? cs » By *»«. 

+*0U -r 

B'.- »I £■*.. . 


2 ywfiAwo* 

$2$; U». . ?•«•*;••■: 

ft 4c-a ^K9 : 


(twr^.n 


SR 


IM* dfcfti « ..... . 

v ■ y ■- *.lh 

<W «Ca 




JTC=‘ -^*as a»Tf.4 

***3 fcww •*»«- 
Site* JKww*»- ,**■- 

a*ssr/-r ■•• 

Sf-aSSS'v •• :. 

MV# wtbs**m 

1 <jkJ**= j.ter£ 




ift^r feus • 

9. tin 


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fSWL ,M‘ . 
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m. fiMw? aa ' 

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T hree of the largest '*0 
com^nics in the United 
Kingdom, in terms or 

rriaiUr* rl kct pp'^lisation. are 
retailers. Three have annual tum- 

° v iL!" c,xccs ? of £3 billion, and 
several more m excess of £2 bil- 
lion. It ,s one area of our economy 
where many businesses have seen 
continuing success, even duriS 
the recent recession, and where 
future prospects continue bright! 
given good and increasinglv pro- 
fessional management 
Many of the stores we build 
today will employ 400 people, 
irade for nearly 70 houVT^r 
week, and may need night shift 
operations. They will have a turn- 
over m the region of £25 million a 
year, sell more than 8.0Q0 
commodities, and serve well over 
lu.UUD customers each week 
Complex operations of ihis kind 
call for intelligent, resulis-ori- 
entated management, 

organ isauon and career struc- 
tures. and the use of professional 
management skills. Extensive use 
of information technology, 
sophisticated ordering, stock con- 
trol and distribution systems 
bring into practice a complex of 
acquired technical skills. 

But above all. what is peculiar 


■to retailing is management in a 
goldfish bowl. This .demands its 
own skills. Vour customers arc 
there with you. all the lime you 
trade. Your success in managing 
the operation — the right goods at 
the right time - is tested contin- 
ually in from of your very eyes. 

Vet it is not only to manage- 
ment that the industry offers ca- 
reer development. The 
acquisition of skills through train- 
mg provides opportunities to all 
staff working for large retailers. 
The staff practise these skills in 
direct contact with customers. 
They must understand the prin- 
ciples on which the business 
stands: they must become even 
belter at relating to ever more 
demanding customers; they must 
know- something of the products, 
and they should know how the 
business is doing and how they 
are contributing to its perfor- 
mance. 


The big stores 


are expanding 


and need a 


new breed of 


employee, says 


Angus Gark 



in but i on and data processing 
Retailing, to a greater extent 
than most industries, has consid- 
erable experience in the realities 
of competition, not just in the 
market place but in the career 
market too. Each year it needs 
more people with an increasingly 
wide range of management skills. 


:v. 


This adds up to a demanding 
specification not always meu The 
low level of understanding many 
staff may have received of these 
factors, cither in other work or in 
education, places a bigger task 
upon the employer than would be 
the case if our society more 


readily understood the need and 
the responsibility for everyone to 
earn the standard and quality of 
life we are seeking. 

Beyond the stores, modern 
large-scale retailing is a business 
employing a wide range of pro- 
fessional and management skills. 
To an ever-increasing extent the 
products the public w-ant are 
made available through buying 
and marketing initiatives where 
the retailer takes a lead in identi- 
fying the needs of the customer. 
Cone are the days when the re- 
tailer sold merely wh2t was in the 
market or what the manufacturer 


chose to produce. The initiative 
has shifted, with all the manage- 
ment implications this suggests. 

The biggest area of capital 
investment for large retailers is 
property - the development of 
new facilities on which future 
trading success is dependent. 
Anticipating customers' require- 
ments. not only for shopping by 
car. but for range, choice, and 
general ambience, make such 
investment a complex and 
challenging management activity 
embracing other support services 
such as research and develop- 
ment. finance, personnel, dis- 


B ut it 2lso has to ensure 
that it can attract and 
hold these skills. So retail- 
ing must and does offer 
competitive salaries and good 
benefits. Failure to do so would 
allow it to wither. It needs the 
best, from university, polytechnic 
and sixth form, as well as from 
other job experiences. It offers 
responsibility, careers, career 
development and extensive train- 
ing. The more it needs first-class 
staff trained in a variety of skills, 
so the more it must offer good pay 
and conditions, and promotional 
opportunities for all levels of staff 
not only those pursuing a manage- 
ment career. 

Today's customers rightly ex- 
pect shops to be open when they 
want to use them, and for staff to 
be available in the numbers nec- 
essary to sene them well. Cus- 
tomers increasingly want to shop 


after their own work is done, or 
when the family is together in the 
evenings and at the weekend. For 
the same reasons, our our full- 
time staff want some of their 
leisure to be at these times, and 
they too want to share in shorter 
working weeks and longer holi- 
days. The effective way for us to 
contribute to these social changes 
is by offering pan-time work to 
those whose personal lifestyle de- 
mands this flexibility. 


Finally, a brief comment on the 
subject of unemployment. 4 cen- 
tury or more ago, manufacturing 
pulled workers away from agri- 
culture and consequently agri- 
culture became more productive. 
To survive today manufacturing 
must always be more efficient and 
strive to fbrcc down its unit la- 
bour costs. More can be produced 
with fewer working hours. 

This allows the opportunity for 
shoner hours and more vaned 
living patterns. But much of that 
labour surplus has to move into 
the scrv icc sector. 

Within service industries the 
yardsticks are not identical to 
manufacturing and do not put the 
same pressure on job opportu- 
nities — quite the reverse. Yes. 


service industries have to be ef- 
ficient. > cs. they have to offer a 
product pcopic want, and will pay 
for. But this does not necessarily 
mean unit labour costs arc driven 

down. 

Retailing, like many service in- 
dustries. is a balance between 
service, quality and efficiency. 
Store bakeries may be more la- 
bour intensive titan manufac- 
turing plant bakeries, but 
customers may prefer the super- 
market-baked product. Many pre- 
fer service at a delicatessen to 
buying pre-packaged goods. Some 
may dislike packing their own 
purchases at a supermarket, and 
want assistance. Giving customers 
the choice and service they want 
creates more jobs. 


Change is inevitable. Effective 
use of information technology will 
remove inefficicnces and certain 
kinds of jobs. In doing so cost 
opportunities arise to introduce 
different and better ways for staff 
to serve customers. In our sophis- 
ticated society we are all looking 
for better scrv ice and that means 
jobs. 


Angus dark is Director of 
Persnniiri and Data Processing at 
Samsbury's 


— Appointments Phone: 01-278 9161/5 


Appointments Phone: 01-278 9161/5 — 



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New jobs in developing success for the arts in Britain. 


The Arts Council is creating four new senior posts as 
part of Hs announced intention to restructure its 
management team and make its support for the arts even 
• more effective. 


Director of 
Arts Co-ordination 


£22,000-£27,000 

_ The Mrertor wffimana^ and co-ordinate the full range of the Council's 
specialist art-form work in Dance, Drama, Ktm, Video and Broadcasting, 
literature. Music, Tboxmg and Visual Arts. 

A key task will be settinf up and managing new aystems to evaluate the 
work of organisations funded by the Arts Council. TTie Director will co-ordinate 
recommendationa for the aDocatian of grants, oversee the Council's arte 
development8trat^yaiid be responabie for the early transition, toother bodies, 
ofactivities currently directly provided by the CotmriL 

The Director, who wiD be a member of the senior management team 
reporting to the Secretary'-GeDeral, wiD represent the Council externally stall 
levels, eocoipaging Iheait-fonn departments to ptrreueacentral role in their 
own professions. 


Controllerof 
Marketing 
and Resources 


£15 JQOO -£19,000 

la this challenging new role, which will report to the Deputy Secretary- 
General, responsibility ia wide ranging and covers three main areas of activity: 
marketing, public relations and information services — including library 
fatalities. High calibre experts head np these specialist activities, hence a key- 
personal attribute will be the ability to co-ordinate and motivate tbeir skills to 
further develop the Goundlb range of external influencing and advisory 
activities. 

In addition to managing the affairs of public relations and information 
services, a direct positive con&ibotkm to the development of marketing services 
is sought, hence marketing experience is an important requirement. 

Early emphasis will be placed on enhancing the marketing input to client 
evaluation procedures and ensuring the effective exploitation of automation in 
handling the department’s activities. 


Controller of Iburing 


up to £25,000 

Reporting to the Director of Arts Co-ordination, the Controller will be 
responsible for two key areas of the Council’s work; the positive development and 
co-ordination of touring companies funded by the Council: and the production 
and implementation of a new scheme to r aise investment capital for touring 
productions in the performing arts. 

This will include responsibility for imtia ting new funding from both 
commercial aod public sources, negotiating with all potential sourees of touring 
productions, and evaluating the artistic, marketing and managerial 
performance of Arts Council funded companies. 

This is a demanding entrepreneurial role and the aucnaarfril candida te 
must be able to offer a positive, assertive and highly capable contribution, 
having bad considerable practical experience as a senior manags- in this 5eld of 
activity 


Controller of Planning 


£15fi00-£19fi00 

Reporting to the Deputy Secretary-General, the Controller of Planning 
will manage two main responsibilities: 

• the development of the Council’s relationships with Regional Arts 
Associations. local authorities. Government departments and other public 
agencies concerned with leisure, social and economic pohoes, and 

• the management and co-ordination ofkey development priorities of the 
Coimtil currently in the areas of disability ethnic minority arts, education and 
tr aining 

The Controller of Planning wiD also be responsible for the Council's 
research and statistics unit. Applicants must have first class managerial , 
investigative and administrative experience with a broad knowledge and 
understanding of the arts. 


Fbr the respective job description 
and an application farm, to be 
returned by Monday 17 February, 
please contact the Personnel 
Department, Arts Council, 105 
Piccadilly LONDON W1 V0AU. 
Telephone 01-6299495 ext. 266- 

Applications from employees of the GLC 
and MCC’s with relevant experience will be 
welcome- 


eg 


A 


&A 


An Equal Opportunities Employer 


Planning Statistician 


Akey element in BUPA’s strategic t hinking 
and a chance 

to develop your analytical skills 


c £12,500 


Central London 


BUPA's expansion in the field ofprivate 
medical insurance, our consistent search 


of the market overall . . . from all of these 

^ors arises our need for sophisbated 

research resources and expert statistical 
analysis. 

For a young graduate with some 

business research/analysis experience, a 
commercial 


lateral mind and a stroDg comm 

awareness, the post of SALKa 


PLANNING SMTSTICIAN offers the 

contribution to Management Planning 
within our Sales Planning area. 

:Hbe 


As 


abase 


and reports on auaro^iA^-r---- 

and performance- But be as siuedd^ 

nom^-numbercru^^^You'fl 

SSEKSSSSStSBSSgij— ; 

^-sESkSST 


monitoring and analysis, in which you'll 
be assisted by a Data Clerk, will all play 
their part in the process of corporate 

decisionmaking. 

By nowitshouid be clear why well insist 
on a sharp analytical mind^ with a distinct 

commercial edge. This is no place for an 

ivory-towered academic. 

If you have these qualities together with 

a numerate degree, good communicatkHi 

ability and experience with APL 
computing techniques, here’s a chance to 

work on your strengths, develop new 

skills and prepare forafuture which could 

hold interesting options such as product 

management. 

An attractive package of big company 
benefits which indudee free BlIPAatd a 
mortgage subsidy wfl] be attached to the 
competitive salary. Please write with 

foil evto: Sue Jones, Personnel Officer, 

BUPA, RoweD House, Essex Street 
London WC2R3AX. Tel: 01-3535212. 



BUPA 


Britain feels betterfor it 


BOB appointments 


SUB-EDITOR 

REPORTER 

‘ARIEL’ 


Central London 
£11,164 — £14,170* 


Ariel is the BBC's saaff newspaper with a 
weddy arodaSon of 35,000. 

You must be an experienced journalist 
with a good news sense, vwda experience 
of reporting and a capable sub. 

An Interest in broadcastrig and a 
knowledge ol the BBC would Be hetphl 

(Ref. 9170/0) 


REGIONAL 

JOURNALIST 

Mancnester 
E&916 — £14*024* 
Pfasdtoswai>fESG9pjL 


Now required to join the newsroom team 

producing the nighty regional new 
ma gaz i ne progr amm e North ttfesr fonigtit 
In addtton id prepamg regional news 
buBetms as required, mdawtmSM to 
nawok television and radio news buferins. 

you w3 also write commentaries tor news 

ferns, research and evaluate progranme 

mrilfinai, onginale topical toms and assist 

oenaragy in prog ram me production. Worit 

is on a shift pattern, which tndudes 


Ws look tor sound edtorial judgement 
wihiouniafistlcfflcpedBnceinnewspBpera 
ortKoadcasong.akeeniueresiffinews 

and current affairs, and the abifty to woric 

quk^ard accurately urdefprossufB for 

We programmes. Knowledge of Sw North 
West is also desirabte. (fief.TWTj 


For the Newcastle based vacancy, you wd 


be joining the newsroom team woriong 
primarily on me preparation of the stsnon'i 

news and eurait affairs programmes, 


; programmes. 

indwtog newsreading, IrfiBtviewkig and 

reponrig. m addition, you may produce 

feature p rog r amm e s and take part in 
amounting duties. (Ref.9T53/T) 


NEWS PRODUCERS 

Ftacfio Newcastle 
Based Newcastte&AftwIcfc 
£9£09- C13*42Q 
PtnsfiOMncaoftSTfpa. 


Fonhe opponunBy Aar Atomic* 
t wB be based ri me heart of 


stuck), youi 

north Northumberland. 

Woddngmyourawn.youwibeccwe^ 
ing an area strairiting from Berwick in the 
north lo Morpeth « tne south, primarily for 

raws bufetina and the breakfast p rog ra mm e, 

btriatsoawgttiutgigtocaherpregrairOTas. 
vouwfflaisobe expected to represent 

the Satan in the community and you wfl 

have an imp ort a ^ otofep&y in the image 

bdtfng and pubic relations at Radio 
Newcastle in the county. (Frequent ewrtng 
and weekend work.) fRef.9tt8/T) 

Fbr al posts, you wl need to be an 
experienced joumateL (sub-actor or 

raportarjwlh agt^ntotsphoravok* 

and a current dnvrigBcenca. 


We are an equal 

o pp ort uni ties employer 


• SrtMy from 1 autarch 1B68; 

Retention exp«MttcaraidMed far 

pennuntpaite. 

Gortwa u« Immed ia tely torappjc W fen tea 
(quote asmTOpristemLendentMeeuM.) 
BSC Appotefewda, London WfAIAA. 


THAMESMEAD 


A unique opportunity for 
enterprising and innovative managers. 


The Thamesmead Trust, a private company whose board 
will be elected by the local people, will take over the 
management and development responsibilities of the GLC, 
following abolition of that authority. Plans which embrace 
housing, industrial, commercial, community, leisure and 
other exciting projects will be carried through over the 
next decade by an enterprising management team now to 
be appointed and led by Clive Thornton. Applications are 
now sought for the following positions: 


Chief Executive 


Successful applicants should have wide managerial ex- 
perience and be capable of providing sound and energetic 
leadership to an enthusiastic team. A proven ability to get 
things done is an essential requirement. Professional back- 
ground. although not essential, would be a distinct advantage. 
The successful applicant will become an Executive Director 
of the Board of the Trust. 

The terms and conditions of employment are negotiable 
but the salary is not expected to be less than £30,000 pa. 


Financial Director 
and Secretary 


For this position, applicants must possess appropriate 
financial qualifications and be skilled in all aspects of 
financial management, planning and control. Initially, the 
successful candidate will be expected to establish a new 
Finance Department to provide the Trust with a full range 
of financial services. The Trust will be wholly financed from 
the private sector and will complete the town's develop- 
ment programme of about £50 million entirely without 
subsidy. The successful applicant will become an Executive 
Director of the Board of the Trust. 

The terms and conditions of employment are negotiable 
but the salary is not expected to be less than £28,000 pa. 


Mr 
rsi*- 
aces 
the 
the 
en u 
iiz* 
bote 
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H 

vgei 


'A 
in 
0 I 


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t 5 
idu 


Housing and 
Estate Manager 


The position carries responsibilities for managing and 
maintaining an estate comprising approximately 5,500 
rented properties of all types and substantial areas of 
parklands. open spaces, leisure and amenity areas. The 
staff complement is expected to exceed 200 and a wide 
range of skills both professional and otherwise is involved. 
The successful candidate must have sound experience in 
housing management and a sympathetic outlook and a 
caring attitude towards residents. Formal qualifications are 
not essential but would be an advantage. 

The terms and conditions of employment are negotiable 
but the salary is not expected to be less than £25,000 pa. 


I 


rt-i 

Pi 
'ob 
ji 
yt 
01 
i &. 
I 


Development Director 


The development programme for Thamesmead which is to 
be completed over the next 10 years includes the recla- 
mation of about 500 acres of derelict land, a substantial 
proportion of which has river frontage and embraces two 
industrial estates as well as a commercial and shopping 
complex. Additionally, there are ongoing projects which 
concern leisure and amenity areas, parks, lakes, canals and 
open spaces and a number of these are unique to the area. 
The successful candidate must have an appropriate pro- 
fessional qualification, a proven and relevant track record 
and possess a lively mind and have qualities of leadership 
normally attributable to such a position. 

The terms and conditions of employment are negotiable 
but the salary is not expected to be less than £25,000 pa. 
Please write with full CV to Clive Thornton. 14 Greville 
Street, Hatton Garden. London EC1. by 21st February. 


.hi 

hi 

in 

r 

a> 

n 


nal “ 


3 


er- 

ns. 


Thamesmead 


els 

•re. 

s 

ext 



of 

rs 

'•rid 


INCORPORATED SOCIETY 

of 

VALUERS AND AUCTIONEERS 


ASSISTANT SECRETARY & ADMINISTRATOF 


Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for this important 
appointment by the Society which is a leading body within the profession r 
the land. 


The successful candidate will be responsible to the Secretary for the efficiei 
administration of Headquarters accomodation and services, including stafi 
management- Knowledge of statutory requirements under the Companies 
Acts and the servicing of Council and Committee structures will be 
particularly relevant. Experience in financial services including budgetary 
control and forecasting would be desirable. 


This is a senior appointment and the salary will be commensurate with 
experience and suitability of the successful applicant 


Applications are invited in writing detailing previous experience to the 
Secretary at 3 Cadogan Gate, London SWIX OAS, to be received not late: 
than Friday 2Sth February. 


I 



















■= lio I 


K wn 

S' 


is s 
cas 
— Re 
po* 
inc 
IR, 
an 


THE 


>D AY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


Can you bring 


JIT to MRP? 


A.T. Kearney is one of the senior international management consultancies. 
We give practical -assistance to top management seeking to select new 
markets, boost customer service performance, cut out inessential costs and 
secure superior competitive advantage. 

We take pride in working at the leading edge of manufacturing and 
distribudon systems. We are looking for exceptional young managers with a 
successful record of implementing MRP systems in complex manufacturing 


environments. 


You will be in your late 20's or early 30V with a good degree, a first class 
understanding of business and a flair for effective communication. Your 
background could be in manufacturing management, production 
engineering, materials management or management services. You will 
understand current developments in low-inventory’ manufacturing and 
supply. In shocLyou will be a porenrial leader in logisdcs systems. 

We offer a challenge, excellent career prospects and a salary’ and benefits 
package in line with the importance of the job. 

A.T. Kearney intends to enhance further its leadership position. If you meet 
our requirements and would like to join us, please contact:- 


Glye Hodson, Director 

A.T. Kearney Limited, 134 Piccadilly, London W1V 9FJ. 


a mmr 


HONOURS GRADUATES 


Seeing 


is believing? 


If you look directly at the grid, you will see a 
Jries of erev dots between the squares. They 


series of grey dots between the squares. The) 1 
don’t exist. Your eyes are being deceived by art 
optical illusion. 

Dealing with things that are not always as 
the>’ seem on the surface is an everyday part of 
the Tax Inspectors' work. In assessing the tax 
liabilities of businesses of all types and sizes 
they must apply their powers ot analysis and 
perception - sometimes intuition — in reaching 
a fair conclusion. All part of a distinctive career 
of exceptional challenge and variety, which 
offers a structured and progressive path for the 
ambitious. 

Through intensive training, you will develop 
the skills of a lawyer, advocate, accountant, 
investigator, negotiator and manager. Within a 
few months you can expect to be handling your 
own casework. After 3 years you will be 
managing a sizeable team of statf. and in due 
course, you should be running your ow n lax 
district.' 

Qualifications: Under 3ft and a First or 
Second class honours degree in any subject or 


an acceptable equivalent qualification. Final 
Year Si udents may apply. 

Starting salary according to qualifications 
and experience irom £ to £$»15 for those 
aged under 2n and from £95*5 to £1tl,«15 for 
those 2n and over. >ou .should be earning at 
least after 2 years and, 3 years later, you 
should be on a scale rising from £l4.5fR to* 
£1S.3 ni. If you fulfil your promise, you should 
later be on a scale rising to £22.*C5. Beyond this 
there are opportunities for further promotion to 
the most senior ejades in the Civil Service. 
SALARIES HIGHER IN LONDON i£1>5. £7n5 
or £545 according to location). Training can usually 
begin a ban offictrin the area of your choice. 

To find out more and for an application form 
w rite to Civil Service Commission, Alencon Link, 
Basingstoke. Hants RG21 1JB. or telephone 
Basingstoke (025*) 44*551 (answering service 
operates outside office hours). 


Please quote ref: A7 86/320/131. 


The Civil Service is an equal opportunity 
employer 


Director 
of Laboratory 


Are you earning over £20K and seeking a 
new job? 


Far East 


Our client, a multinational company 
known world-wide in the field of 
services is looking for a Director to 
head one of its laboratories in the 
FAR EAST. 


The Connaught Services have helped 
more executives to find new appoint- 
ments than any other organisation — 
mainly in the unadvertised vacancy area. 

Contact us for a free confidential 
meeting. If you are currently abroad, 
enquire about our EXPAT EXECUTIVE 
SERVICE. 


The person appointed will direct the 
activities of a multipurpose labora- 
tory where consumer products and 
raw materials (textiles, chemical 
products, food products, etc.) will be 
analysed and tested. The challenge 
is to manage a profit centre in full 
expansion within an important and 
dynamic company. 

The ideal candidate, in his mid- 
thirties, will hold a degree in 
chemistry and have several years’ 
experience in laboratory activities. 
An excellent command of the 
English language is essential. 

The conditions of employment are 
competitive and compare favourably 
with those offered to expatriates in 
the region. 

Confidential Reply Service: Please 
write with full CV quoting reference 
2008/JE on your envelope, listing 
separately any companies to whom 
you do not wish your details to be 
sent CVs will be forwarded directly 
to our client, who wiil conduct the 
interviews. Charles Barker 
Recruitment Limited, 30 Farringdon 
! Street, London EC4A 4EA. 


1 32 Sa vile Row 
London, W1 


Connaught 


01*7343879 
(24 hours) 


i The Executive Job Search Professionals ■ 


A Support Role 
in Executive Recruitment 


Gain involvement in executive re crui t m ent at fee most senior 
levels and in a wide variety of disciplines by providing a 
comprehensive s u pp o rt service to an extremely busy and 
highly successful Executive Director We provide advertising, 
selection and executive search services to an established and 


in London, Aberdeen and Reading. 


Working in a compact team and assis ting fee PirecttH. 
wherever appropriate, on a diverse range of recrmt rnenx 
activities, you will enjoy a demanding and snromamg 
e n v ironm ent and have fee. opportunity to cg ntnon te 
significantly to fee successful completion of challen ging 
a s aim imentB . 


Professional 


Directors PA 


You will be closely involved in recruitment advertising and 
executive search and will prepare comprehensive reports 
following meetings wife clients and candidates. 


Your work scope will include a diversity of tasks, suc h as 
producing a high volume of varied r eport s, co-ordinating 
advertising, meetings, dealing wife correspondence 

etc. Providing full sp crff M rfr d administrative support to fee 
Director; who is also responsible for a large, busy tea m of 


Thorough and conscientious, you are self disciplined and 
persevering with accomplished verbal and written 
communication skills. Of graduate calibre, your experience 
may have been gained in a commercial environment or m a 
secretarial capacity and you are keen to give your career a 
fresh, new start where potential for development, both personal 
and professional, is available. 


skills to fee 1 


High in initiative, you are probably a graduate wife accurate 
audio and word processing experience. Professiona l an d 
enthusiastic, you have a good sense of humour and fee ability to 
work well under pr es sure and co mmu ni c a t e both verbally and 
in writing with people at all levels. 


Based at our London headquarters, you wEB enjoy a c om pet i ti v e and cc 
In complete confidence please write with cv to JohnDiack, Director; Cr 
Personnel Management Consultants, 88/89 High Holbazn, London 


ps. Sears & Associates Limited, 

CIV 6LH. Tel: 01-404 5701. 


Cripps, Sears 


The Institute, with over 13,000 mem- 
Institale of bers worldwide, serves the needs of the 

Metals metals and materials community both 

by its learned society activities and by 
acting as the professional body for metallurgists and materials 
technologists. 


Its Registry and Membership Department has the following im- 
mediate vacancies: 


DEPUTY REGISTRAR: A new position, the Deputy Registrar 
will be responsible to the Registrar for the day-to-day manage- 
ment of the Registry, the processing of membership applications 
and the registration of Chartered Engineers, Technician Engineers 
and Engineering Technicians. Duties include deputising for the 
Registrar, liaising with The Engineering Council and members of 
the Institute. 


Applicants should be graduates with at least 3 years experience in 
the work of a professional institution, or in office administration. 
Knowledge of computer systems and/or supervisory experience is 
desirable. 


MEMBERSHIP ASSISTANT: To maintain and update the 
computerised membership records and to handle members' 
enquiries. 


Applicants should have worked with computer-based systems. 
Experience with VDU’s, typewriting and/or word processing 
skills would be an advantage. 


Salaries according to qualifications and experience, five weeks 
annua] holiday, attractive central location. 


Applications together with a brief CV to B D Gibson, Deputy 
Secretary, The Institute of Metals, 1 Carlton Home Terrace, Lon- 
don SW1Y SDB. 


Unit General 



Non-Acute Services 
Salary £19, 150-£25, 150 

Staff 800 Budget £10.5m 

We are seeking an innovative, high calibre manager to direct the 
implementation of plans and programmes of our new management 
structure in the Authority^ Non-Acute Unit 

Non-Acute Services are based on several sites throughout the 
Authority and comprise a range of Comm un ity. Mental III ness. 

Mental Handicap and Geriatric facilities. There is particular, 
responsibi lily for the further development of an established policy of 
co mm unity- based care, including two Community Hospitals in 
outlying areas. New provisions for Mental Illness will be a feature of 
this UniL 

This is a demanding role requiring proven management 
expertise and leadership qua! ities together wi th a genuine desire and 
ability to initiate change in a dynamic, multi -disciplinary 
environment 

Major objectives will be the maintenance of thehighest 
standards of patient care and the efficient management of the Unit 
within prescribed budgetary limits. 

Initially this appointment is fora fixed term of four years 
(renewable). Salary will be assessed according to backgro und and 
experience and Clinicians will be remunerated in accordance with 
HC (85) 9. 

To discuss these points informally please contact Dc Neil 
Hampson, District General Manager on (0483) 57 1122 ext. 1206. 

Further details are available from Peter Murphy. Director of 
Personnel. District Headquarters, Pam ham Road Hospital, 

Guildford. Telephone (0483) 571122 ext- 1227 or 213. 

Closing date: 2nd March J9S6 


iScuth WestSurreyA 
zHealth Authority— 


TERRITORIAL ARMY 


Marlowe , 

II Q^rlic 

I 1. The first year was k 

I I tough, but now this is 


Vacancy for 


SECRETARY 


Ito theltecritofial. AndBaty and Volunteer Roane 
Association for the North Wert of England and flic 
isle of Man 


the most satisfying 
career I could nave* 


2. "Helping my dients 
make money has 
trebled my income 
over the past 2 years." 


^ M V * 

£ H v; ^ * 


' ; n /! n 


Applications are imbed tor die Sc u rt a q uM p of die 
TemtDtial, Auxx&ai? and Vbfamseer Reserve Association tor Uk 
N orth West of England and the laie of Man, baaed at L iverpool 
and covering die counties erf Curate ie. Lancashne. Greats- 
Manchester, Merseyside. Cheshire and the trie of M«n. The post 
will become vacant on 3 April 1987 and the succesafal applicant 
will be required to u nders tu dy *e present Secretary Cor one 
DKBilh before taking over 

Applicants should, preferably, Service Staff experience 
of at least Grade 1 lewd for cqahalentj and have readied the age 
of 43, but not have reached the age of 36, as « 3 April 1987. 
Present salary is £UMX)6 per annum sod is subject to periodic 


3. Can you say the same? 


4. Marlowe Sachs are intermediaries in the field of Unit Trusts. 
Pensions, investments (onshore and offshore), and Insurance. 
We are expanding our operations and require intelligent 
energetic individuals aged 25-40 for our Head Office in the City. 


CHARLES BARKER 

ADVERTISING -SELECTION- SEARCH 


5. Join the Professionals 

I Marlowe afiKBSs £« 

^ „ London EC1N8SU 


The appBeantiaaat rerida within the counties of Lancashire; 
Greater Manchester. Mcreeyride or Cheshire within 45 minutes 
commuting distance of tteHadqunnt'OfficeinLiueipooi. An 
Association house it available if required. 

The appointment la forapcobationaiypaiod of lBnooths in 
the Gist instance, afire which it ray be comfirtned to die age of 60. 

I with te ther gtrenaOP* of one year up to >fae age of 65. tablet tn 

satisfactory annual reports. The successful ca nd i date will be' 
required topnwaiaetBcrteitBnrtnarinnandtoconitiburetothe 
Superannuation Rand. 


Application forms may be obtained from the Setaratary. 
NW of England & IOM TAVR Ass o c ia tio n . Alexandra Court. 
27 Alexandra Drive, Liverpool L17SYE. Completed forms must 
reach the Association by not later than 7 Match 1M&. 


Sachs 


Teh 01-242 2420. 


No testimonials or similar documents should be sent until 
asked for. AH applications received will be adenewtetiged. Any 
tem erf can iwaaiiigiiHlI lead roWMMwf^Mdiwpiiiailieirfiww 




ASSISTANT MANAGER 


INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS DEPARTMENT 


The National association of British and Irish Millers (NABIM) 
is the trade and . employers* association of the UK flour milling 
■industry. It occupies pleasant offices in St James on the edge of 
Green Park. 


The Association seeks an assistant manager for its Industrial 
Relations Department which covers a wide range of subjects for 
both NABIM and The National Joint Industrial Council for the 
Flour Milling Industry. 


His or her main responsibility will be to administer and develop 
the industry's voluntary training arrangements, including 
correspondence courses leading to City & Guilds (CGLI) 
examinations in floor milling; liaison with the Manpower 
Services Commission, CGLI and course tutors forms an 
important part of this work. A major task over the next 2/3 
years will be the revision and up dating of the course text boofcs. 
Other responsibilities of the post include the formulation of 
policy on health and safety matters, the provision of advice to 
members on these matters and on employment law and practise, 
and committee work. 


Essential requirements are readiness to work on a variety of 
subjects, administrative ability and skill m drafting. A trade 
association background, together with experience of training, 
health and safety or Industrial Relations, are- desirable. 


The successful candidate is unlikely to be under 26 years of age 
and will probably be a graduate. Starting salary will be 
negotiable around £12,000, depending on experience. There is a 
good contributory pension scheme, and a luncheon allowance is 
payable. 


Letters of application, together with CV, should be sent to the 
Administration Director, NABIM, 21 Arlington 
Street, London, SW1A 1RN, not later than 2lst 
February 1986. 


FINANCE 


DIRECTOR 


PUBLIC TRANSPORT Up to £22,000 


Under the Transport Act 198E, Southampton 
City is creating a new public transport company to 
operate under the provisions of the Companies Acts 
on a full commercial basis at 'arms length' from the 
Council, taking overfrom the current Council-operated 
bus undertaking. 

The recruitment of a Managing Director is 
undenway and the Board now wish to appoint a Finance 

Director to take full responsibility for the finance and 
commercial activities of the Company. 

You will be a senior executive currently achieving 
optimum commercial performance through good 
accounting practice and the most beneficial use and 
deployment of the financial resource. Drive, 
commitment, determination and technical ability are 
the key factors as are a good working knowledge of 
company law. 

For this key position we will negotiate a salary 
wrtb'm the range £20 - £22,000 per annum, together 
with generous relocation expenses if applicable. 

Application forms and further details available 
from: Warwick Temple, Personnel Department, 
CivfcCentre, Southampton. S09 4ZF. Telephone: 
Southampton (0703) 832832. ( Answerphone out of 
office hours quoting ref. no. LA 02). 

Closing date: 24th February 1986. 


Southampton 

Your appfegBon will be judged solely on fra O I VV 
marits irrespective of raca, marital status, sex, %#A A M 

■awl oriantatlon. agg, reSgfon or disability. 


A change of direction 


If your career is at a dead end and von are 
considering a change of direction this couldbe 
the opportunity you are looking for 
Opportunities exist for self assuretLpeonle with 

S? and UK propel of i 


Without^ obligation, find out otau. our 
Please pkmelUh Punt on 01-734 5660. 

ALLIED DUNBAR 

THE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT GROUP 





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THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 



Tomorrows 

Top 

Management 


£ 17 - 35,000 


manufacturing information 
technology 

.MR^Wn.0 PT. Comius. OA, 

JTECIM.CAP CAM. mainframe/oiini/ 
FMS. robotics micro, manufacturing. 


DISTRIBUTION/ 
LOGISTICS 
Strategy, compoter- 
cootrolled systems, 
warehousing, stock 
control, hi-tech 
materials handling, 
transportation. 


We have been briefed by a range of highly 
prestigious management consultancy clients to 
help them search for the best young talent in the 
country. 

They can equip “fast track* meq and women for 
tomorrow's top management positions by 
broadening and deepening technical and 
interpersonal skills through a wide variety of 
assignments. 

The significance of management consultancy is 
reflected m frequent advertisements for 
consultants in the national media, bur which ones 
should you consider? Our experience can help 
you choose. 

We would like to meet high calibre, numerate 
graduates in their late 30s Or early 30s who have 
planned and/or implemented radical changes in 
strategies and computer-based systems in either 
line or support management rotes. 

Your experience will have been gained in 
recognisable blue chip companies who operate 
advanced systems and who are genuinely 
"forward thinking about change. 

To disci&s your next career step, please 
telephone: 

Ooire ffpsiap AkmBrotn 

0905 612261 office 062875956 

0905354509 borne 0753883288 


or send us your CV to the address betovr quoting 
your daytime telephone number. 


FINANCIAL CONTROLLER 

c£ 29 , 000 + Car + Benefits 


Lee^ Valley Bone of the largest statutay water companies, suppfyinga population of 
ewer one million in an area of 860 square miles from the North London Boroughs to 
rural Essex, Hertfordshire and BedfordshiraAnnualincome isju^ million. 

TheCompany is seekinga forward kxAir^quafified accountanttobe responsible 
for the entire finance function with a staff of over 50. As a member of a small 
management teamyou will be inthe top finance position developing new initiatives 
and medSngthe needs of fine management and the non-executive Board for high 
quality financial information. You will be joining the Company at a time of 
considerable change and therefore new challenges will emerge. 

Proven experience of financial management atasenior level, together with a high 
degree of comnunicatiue skills are essential. Financial planning and the 
development of infarm&ion technology are high priorities of the post 
Age ramge 3045. Location Hatfield, Hertfordshire. Assistance with both 
rekxationexpensesandnTOrtga^wiilbegiveni^reapproprate 
Applicants should send a detailed curriculum vitae in confidence to J.F. McGown, 
General Manager, Lee \&ley Water Company, R0. Box 48, Bishops Rise, Hatfield, 
Herts ALIO 9HL The closing date is 21st February 1986. 


MKA SEARCH INTERNATIONAL LTD 
Berkshire House, Queen Street 
Maidenhead, Berks SL6 INF 
Telephone: 0628 75956 



LEE VALLEY WATER COMPANY 


ASSISTANT MANAGER 

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS DEPARTMENT 


‘ K- r Eo£ 
'!.r*d I; £ 
;•;> t» ». 


The National association of British and Irish Millets (NABIM) 
is the trade and employers’ association of the UK flour milling 
industry. It occupies pleasant offices in St James on the edge of 
Green Park. 


-•••• FUt- 


" l.* 

- ^ 

• J-"? JE 


1 j-'.’.tt 


..j •• -i: 


• • i: •*, 
. in ' 


The Association seeks an assistant manager for its Industrial 
Relations Department which covers a wide range of subjects for 
both NABIM and The National Joint Industrial Council for the 
Bout Milling Industry. 


His or her main responsibility will be to adminis ter and develop 
the industry's voluntary training arrangements, indading 
correspondence courses leading to CSty & Guilds (CGU) 
examinations in flour milling; liaison with the Manpower 
Services Commission, CGU and course tutors forms an 
important pan of this work. A major task over the next 2/3 
years win be die revision and up dating of the course text books. 
Other responsibilities of the post include the formulation of 
policy on health and safety, matters, the provision of advice to 
members on these matters and on employment law and practise, 
and committee work. 


Essential requirements are readiness to work on a variety of 
subjects, . admini strative, ability and ilriD in. drafting- A trade 
association background, together with experience of training, 
health and safety or Industrial Relations, are desirable. 


The successful candidate is unHkdy to be under 26 years of age 
and will probably be a graduate. Starring salary will be 
negotiable around £12,000, depending on experience. There is a 
good contributory pension scheme, and a luncheon allowance is 
payable. 


Letters of application, together with CV, should be sent to the 

Administration Director, NABIM, 21 Arlington 
Street, London, SW1A 1RN, not later than 21st 
February 1986. 


MATRON i ran ^ 


S*M1' mu LIZ XXX M 
im mtulil* anrbMU, 
.VimrKXlullOn r. jiMUhir if 

inimtnt 

Xiv* goal alim<|uuniv 
OVPU Ilium la Jn ^■pUi.nil 
iiHnr-Jrri in irw prenintn. 
Mto fH ■Vv’.-.i r rjif cf I hr 
Mill* ll NnfliUr rstriKirr 
vidumi hr Ai jni ouiaqr hid is 
nal rssmtMl. 

T hr null on wtfl to rrsoanv 
lj)r Ml Mr rj|. MM .rll«r 
of Ihr i rsaamls >n SB nniisol 
shMlrirfl vniniMliiKu ui 
Ihr ri*tnr M Hnlnmun 
riiHltiiU mo nrnsioihr pkm 
innq sulliiri aim <*ni'pnM*H 
M Mi Em rn Cm. h<,iKi Is nr 
ni»H on mr umr «ilr 


-tMUmuioin should nr mrdr 
Ui *i riiiJj iwHh fUii^ulum 
tUM Ana mr lunn or imo 
irlrirr, .ml vnl to Tin 1 
t.lrfl ui Ihr Tiuslrr,. I HU Ml 
W*wimur4/i Alim Houva. 
Bp Rnmin Row. La.Mii 
SU IP JBL lion. i.nnm a 
■»+> ih-sriiDlion v ,i> nr 
bbtamnl 

Utom^drfir for «ntajtian 

]sl Mairh l-Wfc 


ANTIQUE 
PRINTS & MAPS 


Outgoing >oung man 
or woman required to 
sell in our gallcrs. 
Graduate preferred; an 
inierest in ihe subjecl a 
definite adianuge. 


Please apph in wrinng. 
with C.V„ io> 


WBorr DMimu 
runs 1 MAPS LTD 
« taarMU Strut, 


wear km 


SPECIALIST MEDICAL OFFICER 

(FORENSIC PATHOLOGIST) 


THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF 
THE REPUBLIC OF TRINIDAD & 
TOBAGO 


Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for appointment 
to a vacant post of Specialist Medical Officer (Forensic Pathologist) in the 
Trinidad and Tobago Forensic Science Centre of the Ministry of National 
Security. 


Particulars relating to the post are as follows: 

SALARY 


Range 64: 56.397 (TAT dollars) per month 
(1983) 


MINIMUM 
EXPERIENCE 
AND TRAINING 


Experience in the field of Forensic Pathology and 
training as evidenced by the possession of a 
Medical Degree from a recognised school of 
medicine supplemented school of medicine 


supplemented by the possession of post- 
graduate qualification in 
Forensic Pathology. . . 


ADDITIONAL 

SPECIAL 

REQUIREMENT 


Registration by the Medical Board oFTrinidad 
and Tobago as a medical Practitioner and as a 
Specialist in the field of Forensic Pathology. 


Application forms, further particulars relating to die post and the terms 
and conditions of employment can be obtained from the: 


TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO HIGH COMMISSION, 
42 BEL CRAVE SQUARE, 

LONDON SW1X 8NT. 

(T«fcOX-245 9351) 


To whom all applications should be submitted not later than February 
14.1986. 


»*-■— i *tj irf t imrf i m 

Assistant 


Planning 

Officer 


GaAatm n • nmarsta dso- 
ptM w«» waft experience ml 
c e w p M UD n me app fari on 
et WMtK al metnaas and the 
uu at mocroconputera ra- 
qind ter recanfly eaabfahtt 


pteroig un d n the central ad- 
maw abort 


FanManty mtn the 
tectMquaa of ptatnng and S- 
n anew aualuatan « aesmUa. 
Abity to pmaant ntamatxvi 
dMrty. both csaiy and n wnt- 
kq. wmal 

Salary range C13A30 - £T6^t9 
(wider reMBw taut cdudng at- 
teem 4 per oant enhancement 
«S London Aaowwic 

Further pardcu- 
teaand 

Atfw rea trawa 
Secratary, 
perW Coiego, 
London &W7 
2AZ Til; mm HU Xtaaax. 

aoratwe. 




CONTRACTS 

MANAGER 


.■*. u i . 
t n'i.v..- 


I 


rdtri % 


MANAGEMENT 

OPPORTUNITY 

An exciting career 
is open to 
individuate (22+) 
who are angle 
minded and 
interested m their 
own future This is 
an opportunity to 
earn over £20.000 
pa and earn 
shares in a 
nationwide group. 

Please cal! 


Mr PtekecagiU 
01-439 8431 


Ina 


NDPS is a rapidly expanding arm 
of British Telecom Enterprises - 
the division of BT which is 
competing successfully In the field 
of Network Communications and 
Value Added Systems. Our 
reputation has been won through 
innovative computer development 
and consultancy services to the 
international freight industry and 
we are now broadening quickfy 
into new markets. 

The experienced Contracts 
Manager we're now seeking will 
act in dose liaison with our 
Account and General Managers-' 
on aJI aspects of Contract work - 
from initial draft to complete 
negotiations with suppliers and 
customers' legal representatives. 
You'll also be seen as a source of 
legal advice on a wide range of 
issues (including data protection) 
for ail NDPS staff. 

A highly visible role such as this 
demands not only formal legal 
training and considerable practical 
experience, but also a strong 
awareness of commercial needs 


and a genuine ability to 
communicate with all levels of 
staff and management 
The post will be located in Central 
London but will involve travelling 
to our offices in West Drayton and 
Egham. 

If you have the expertise and the 
business acumen we're looking 
for, you can look forward to a 
starting salary up to 17k, a 
performance-related bonus and 
relocation expenses where 
appropriate and, of course, a wide 
car eer hori zon within the BT 
org a nisation.' 

For further In fo r m ation please 
phone Miriam Barber, on 01-759 
2644 ext 400 or write with cv to 
Lesley Stevens, British Telecom 
Enterprises, Recruitment VASS, 
Wellington House, 

6-9 Upper St Martins Lane, 
London, WC2H9DL. 

Please quote ref: TM91. 


British 

TELECOM 


*jr 

i/+ 

■Aj 







he rec- 
ite ent^ 


PERSONNEL OFFICER 

(Central London) 


5 fishih* 



A major Multinational Group of Com- 
panies in food production, trading, retailing, 
shipping and other industries, seeks a high 
calibre person to join foe small central Loiv 
don Group Personnel Department 

The department monitors and advises on 
employment conditions, policy and practice 
worldwide, providing services and support 
for Group company Managers and Person- 
nel Managers. ... , , 

The successful applicant will be involved, 
in both staff and non-staff work, in IR, salary 
admin, training, policy making, administra- 
tion, etc. In particular he/she will recruit 
specialised and professional staff and will 
recruit and manage graduate trainees. 

Applicants must have solid industrial and 
IR experience at plant level, plus recruitment 
and general experience with senior staff, 
preferably in a large company or Group 
headquarters. Sound technical/Iega! know- 
ledge is essential. -• „ . 

The ideal applicant will be well educated, 
IPM qualified, aged about 30, a self starter 
with integrity and personality capable or fit- 
ting into a Headquarters environment and 
communicating effectively at all levels. 
There are medium and long term career 
prospects. The salary is negotiable but itis 
unlikely foatthose earning less than £l 2 , wo 
will have the necessary experience. Re- 
location help available if needed. 
Appl ica tions ut writing to Box No- NR 105. 
The Extef Consultancy Ltd., 4 Bouvene 
Street, London EC4Y 8AB. 


Director of 
Nursing Policy 
And Practice 


The Counci of the RCN invites appications for this 
key appo i ntment. The Department of Nursmg Pofcy 
and Pract»ca is concerned with the provision of 
professional leadership and poficy analysis on issuas 
connected with patient care from both a general and 
aMdafist viewpoint. The Director is responsaile for 
the management of the de pa rtment for co- 
orcfovjting its activities as a professional think-tank 
and through its staff for providing a professionai 
advisory sarvice to the membership of this College. 


This post cafis for l eade rsh ip qualities of a high ordar 
and wide professionai knowledge. The successful 
appRcant wB be a nurse with proven managerial 
skits who has foflowed a recognised course of 
further education, probably leaefing to a degree. 


Accountable ta the General Secretary, the Director 
wtf be a Chief Officer of the C ofcge and as such w» 
contribute to the^ general management of the 
organisation. Commencing salary wH be within the 
stale £20^64^25533 and a London Weighting 
allowance of £1,365 appfias to this app ointment 
which is based in central London. 


Further detafe ft sbpfkteioii 
from the Principal Personnel 


College of Wurainfl. 2PCeve n d hh 
London W1MOA&.BBBI 


Officer, The Royel 


Tat 01-409 

date for return of forms: Friday 21 at Fafe 1 



Tbr B£W diwnngn aaoioe: in al « pnrnsK 


ROYAL COLLEGE 
OF NURSING 



Home Famishing 
Design Director 

Laura Ashley is seeking a Home 
Furnishing Design Director, who will 
report to the Group Design Director 
The successful candidate will lead a 
'design team based in Fulham. The 
Post requires extensive consultation 
with retail divisions on market needs, 
and with product division on the 
development of existing and new 
design concepts. 

The successful candidate win have a 
minimum of five years Interior Design 
experience, including historical 
research. Key characteristics sought 
are creative flair and management 
ability to direct a complex process. 
The rewards in both personal and 
financial terms are substantial 
Please send a written C. V. to> 
Nick Ashley, Group Design Director; 
Laura Ashley Limited 
49 Tempedey Road, CJapham, 
London SW12 8QEL 


TRANSPORTED HELGUERA SA 
(SPAIN) 


Well-known transport company, in existence for 
more than 50 >ears. with direct links with princi- 
pal Spanish towns, seeks ACTIVE & WELL 
INTRODUCED PERSON with knowledge of 
the transport sector, to take over the representa- 
tion of this company in London. Genuine 
references required. Excellent prospects. Written 
applications to: 


Transporter Hetgoera SA, APDO 1012. 
BILBAO, Spain. 


TELEPHONIST/RECEPTIONIST 


Have you the charm and poise wc are seeking to 
greet our clients graciously? Have you good tele- 
phonist experience and the ability to operate our 
busy monarch board - sometimes underpressure 
whilst still maintaining a smiling face and cheer- 
ful attitude? If so. why not send me your CV 
with a vtcw to joining us in our prestigious 
May fair offices. We offer an excellent salary, 
fringe benefits and a happy working atmosphere. 


S)ll> Clair. 
HunM A Parlrrrv 
B B^ltour Piafr. 
London wj 


RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANTS 


LONDON AND THE HOME COUNTIES 


Accountancy Personnel is the market leader in 
the specialist recruitment of Accountants and 
their staff at all levels in commerce, industry and 
public practice. Committed to sustained growth, 
wc offer sound training leading rapidly into an 
exceptionally progressive career structure with 
all promotion from within, providing stimulat- 
ing and rewarding responsibilities. To join one 
of our successful professional teams you should 
be 21-30. self motivated and well educated, ide- 
ally (but not essentially) with some accountancy 
knowledge. 


Contact the Personnel Manager on: 
01-828 6004. 


Accountancy Personnel, 
1 Glen House, 

Stag Place, 
London SWlE SAD 


SENIOR EXPORT EXECUTIVE 

TO ASSIST MARKETING DIRECTOR 


Lradinq umoon ronltmara 1X*W. pari o! intmidlnnal croup, 
to. Iirntotloir. lourw pinuiur to win i Sr MorkMinc Iron! 

k> thr using Dirrclor Hr HsouW riralb- na\r 
f nnimnnp f-spor! rspmriirr. to tviuinp id iraicl mnv® or- 
C.WOIUIH- diwt will piawnv to in SM -SOi Good oooorlunum 
Itn ..luKpmmi ^ppli Hi ulriing wiin lull C V and OMoiU of 
pinriH wUrt IP Prplv lo BOX A^8 


SPEAK WELL 


Do you need £400-£800+ per week? Are you aged 
25-55. able to start work in our NW2 offices soon, 
determined and reasonably imelligcnt/educated? 
If so telephone us soon, no evening or weekend 
work and you don’t need your own car or own 
phone. Telephone C. Simpson or J. Masters 01- 
450 93:2 




Marketing Manager 

China Trade 


appointment of- 


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A well established 
and successful Europe- 
an company in the 
field of Hair/Body 
Care Products invites 

applications for the po- 
sition of Marketing 
Manager to further de- 
velop their activities in 
P.R. China. Basic 
training in Europe will 
be provided for the 
successful applicant. 


This is a challenging 
position for candidates 
with the following 
qualifications: 

- Chinese male, age 30- 
40 

- University degree in 

- Economics/Business 
Affairs 

- practical marketing 
; experience, and of 

dealing with Chinese 


government offices of 
various degrees of 
importance 
Preferably experience 
in compensation 
trade with China 
Excellent command 
in both spoken and 
written English. 


Hamburg 
Mtilheim/Ruhr 
Frankfurt _ 

; Stuttgart 

Munchen . 



This app 
fers excellent prospects 
for future advance- 
ment. Salary package 
is negotiable. Please 
apply in strictest confi- 
dence enclosing curric- 
ulum vitae and recent 
photo to SCS Personal- 
beratung GmbH. 
Johnsallee 13, Dr. 
Manfred Schulze, 2000 
Hamburg 13, West 
Germany. 


Personal beratung GmbH 


— 

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28 


THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


C HORIZONS^ 


A guide 
to career development 


The executive vacancy enigma 


In 1983 the HAY-MSL Index of 
advertised executive vacancies reached 
its highest level since it was started in 
1 959-. the number of vacancies flowing 
through Jobcentres was the greatest 
since 1979; and employer competition 
for newly qualified graduates was the 
most intense for many years. 

This high level of" recruitment 
activity was totally unexpected. 

For 30 years the recruitment market 
has followed a pattern of alternating 
boom and recession. So. in recent 
years, recruitment specialists have 
been able to predict accurately the 
timing of each upturn and downturn. 
The forecasters were expecting the 
market to enter a new recession at the 
,siart of last year. This did not come - 
and nobody is sure why. 

Historians studying the 20th-century 
. labour market are likely 10 find the 
1980s. and 1985 in particular, of 
special interest. Until the last reces- 
sion. as the number of job vacancies 
increased or decreased, so the numbers 
of unemployed fell or rose. 

But in the early summer of 1981 va- 
cancies started to increase as we drew 
out of the recession, but unemploy- 
ment also continued to rise. 

The trend both for vacancies and for 
unemployment has been upward ever 
since. This apparent paradox has 

The present boom has 
been most marked 
in the service industries 

arisen because we are now at the 
centre of a new industrial revolution 
involving a massive restructuring of 
our economy. 

Many of the unemployed have 
limited’ skills or talents which are no 
longer required, while employers are 
starved of a wide variety of skills 
which are in short supply. 

Furthermore, employers are 
structuring their workforces in new 
wavs which provide them with greater 
flexibility. This includes having a 
smaller core of permanent employees 
and making greater use of temporary 
part-time and self-employed workers. 

Thus many of the vacancies now 
arising are for posts which those 
seeking full-time permanent employ- 
ment find unattractive. 

Though the rise in unemployment at 
a time of increasing job vacancies can 
be fairlv simply explained, we do not 
yet know why the cyclic pattern of the 
past has changed and so allowed 1985 
to be a year of recruitment boom. 

The number of vacancies flowing 
into Jobcentres in 1985 was just under 
four per cent higher than in 1984. As 
these are claimed by the Department 
of Employment to represent about a 
third of all the vacancies in the 
economy. UK employers last year had 
more than V/* million vacancies to fill. 

Even this may be an under-estimate 
because some evidence suggests that 


Usually, as the number 
of jobs advertised 
rise, numbers of 
jobless decrease. But 
in 1985 this changed. 
What does it mean? 
Philip Schofield offers 
some suggestions 

Jobccmres handle a lower proportion 
of vacancies, perhaps no more than a 
quarter, at limes when the recruitment 
market is buoyant and skills in short 
supply. 

Thus in I9S5 there may have been 
as many as 10 million vacancies, 
approaching the boom levels of the 
mid-1970s. 

The present boom has been most 
marked in the service industries and 
those sectors of manufacturing which 
use high technology to make high- 
value-added goods. Those with tech- 
nical. professional and management 
skills and experience have been most 
in demand. 

This is apparent from the pattern of 
recruitment advertising appearing in 
the national newspapers. In 1985 the 
growth in job advertising volume in a 
sample of 12 national newspapers plus 
The London Standard was 14.3 per 
cent up on 1984. 

However, the growth in .the popular 
dailies was only 1.3 per cent while that 
in the quality newspapers was 16.9 per 
cent. Reflecting the buovancy of the 
overall jobs market in London. The 
London Standard showed a growth of 
10.1 per cent. 

Within the overall pattern of jobs 
advertising, there are intriguing vari- 
ations. Thus the quality dailies showed 
a growth of just over "l 9 per cent but 
their Sunday equivalents gained less 
than seven per cent. The latter was ac- 
counted for solely by The Sunday 
Times' growth of* 13 per cent. The 
Sunday Telegraph and The Observer 
both fell sharply. 

Among the dailies. The Daily 
Telegraph showed a fall ofl 1 per cent, 
leaving The Guardian to cany the 
largest volume of recruitment advertis- 
ing of any national newspaper. 

Even so. the largest gains were made 
by The Times with a volume increase 
of more than 73 per cent between 1984 
and 1985. The middle-market papers. 
The Daily Express and The Daily 
Mail, showed a joint growth of just 
over one per cent, little more than the 
remaining popuiars with a joint growth 
of just under one per cent- 
Execuiive Post, the weekly jobs 
newspaper published by the Manpower 
Service Commission's PER. showed a 
6.3 growth in the number of vacancies 
advertised. Though it claims to have 


advertised 232120 vacancies in i9S5. 
this is almost certainly a significant 
under-estimate in that* it appears to 
undcr-count multiple vacancies. 

The index shows that in the last 
quarter there was a 26 per cent fall in 
demand for research, development and 
design people over the same period in 
1984. There was also a 14 per cent 
drop in demand for production 
management and a seven per cent fall 
for marketing and sales. 

The largest sector of growth was 
accounting and finance. This pattern, 
in the past, has tended to herald a drop 
in the recruitment market. 

The Manpower Survey of Employ- 
ment Prospects, normally a reliable 
indicator, similarly indicates a slowing- 
down of the jobs market. The survey- 
or 1.629 employers found that 20 per 
cent expect to increase staffing in the 
first quarter of this year and 14 per 
cent expect staff cuts. 

The report notes: "This is the first 
time in five years that prospects for the 
first quarter have failed to show 
improvement over the first quarter of 
the prior year." 

Vacancies flowing into Jobcentres 
reached a peak last October and are 
now. on a seasonally adjusted basis, 
declining. 

The outlook for newly-qualified 


The newly-qualified 
can now look ahead 
with greater optimism 


graduates in 1986 looks more promis- 
ing. A joint survey by the Standing 
Conference of Employers and Gradu- 
ates. the Central Services Unit and the 
Association of Graduate Careers Ad- 
visory Services predicts that employer 
demand will be up by four per cent on 
1985 although graduate supply will be 
down. 

However this increase is likely to be 
centred on non-manufacturing recruit- 
ers with big increases in transport and 
communications (32 per cent) and in 
the public sector (13 per cent). 
Manufacturing vacancies are predicted 
to fall by nine per cent. 

It is too soon to know whether we 
have returned to the old cycle and to 
dismiss 1985 as an aberrant year. Bu: 
even if we are now entering a jobs 
recession, it seems most unlikely that 
it will be as severe as the lasL 

The HAY-MSL Index, which has 
been monitoring selected executive 
vacancies advertised in five national 
newspapers and The Economist since 
1959. reached its all-time peak in the 
second quarter of 1985. 

The index's moving annual total, 
which smooths out seasonal variations, 
has changed liule through 1985. 
moving through the four quarters from 
174, through 176 and 175 and back to 
174. However, in the final quarter 
there were signs that the market may 
now be moving from a high plateau to- 
wards a decline. 



A Commission 
in the Women’s Royal 
Army Corps. 

The Army is currently looking tor 
applicants to compete tor Commissions 
in the XXTTAC Training for officers at the 
Royal Milt ran- Academy, Sandhurst starts 
in January and September each year. 

The Corps is looking for young 
women who want a more unusual and 
challenging career, which could take rhem 
anywhere in the UK, or abroad serving 
alongside their male colleagues. 

Successful applicants will initially be 
offered a 3 year Short Service Commission, 
with the possibility of extending to a Regular 
Commission at a later date. 

If you are between 17-2S years old 
and have, ideally, 2 A! levels, or a degree, 
please write for further details to Lieutenant 
Colonel Joan Johnstone MBE, WRAC, 
Corps Recruiting and Liaison Officer, 
Department K603, The Keep, Stoughton 
Road, Guildford, Surrey GU2 6PN. 


I if 

(N.B. Tell her your date of birth and the 
qualihcarions you have or expect.) 

EALING 

-* it! 


FAMILY 

- — 


AN OUTSTANDING 

omwrunn 

For a well-educated Individual (preferably 
graduate! to train as a Financial Planning Ad- 
viser with a leading city-based brokerage. The 
successful applicant will be til aged 21-30, (21 
self-motivated and hard-working, (3) a good 
communicator. (-1 1 looking for an exciting ca- 
reer. In return, the position offers (11 full 
training and support. l2l an exciting working 
environment. (3) a stable career with a profes- 
sional organisation. (4! an attractive 
remuneration package. (51 a wide range of 
long-term opportunities with one of the most 
innovative and dynamic companies in the Fi- 
nancial Services sector. 

Tel: Robin Bloor on 01-404-5766 
or write to him at 
Chase de Vere (Investments Ltd) 

63 Lincoln’s Inn Fields 
London WC2A 3JX 


Already active world wide in various 
commodities arc arc looking for further expertise 
as part of our structured expansion program. 

WANTED: TRADER IN ESSENTIAL OILS 

Wc arc a progressive and vouthful company - as will be 
ihc successful applicant. Deiailed knowledge ofboih the 
suppK and demand markets is essential, ambition and 
commitment are cv peeled, cMi-nsric iraiel would be 
encouraged. 

Wc can offer evcellenl remuneration and working 
environment - what can you offer us? 

Please contact, in strict confidence, Erifc Thofbek, H ft 
T Walker Ltd, Walker House. London Road, 
Riverhead, Sevenoaks, Kent TN13 20 N (0732) 450712. 


FINANCIAL CONTROLLER 

c£18,500 

ThH ts an opportunity to loin a group of rapidly expanding 
West London Housing Associations which provide railed 
and shared ownership housing (or the homeless and Inade- 
quately housed. We currently manage almost 2.000 
pr op erties. 

The Financial Controller heads the Finance Department 
and is ■ member of an active and forward looking manage- 
ment team. 

we are looking for a man or woman who; 

. ts professionally qualified 

. has vision and can Innovate 

. can man age substantial financial resources. 

. b sympathetic in solving London's housing problems. 

Benefits include car allowance and purchase scheme, pen- 
sion and health scheme, help with reasonable relocation 
costs. 

For an Manual d b o uu rm comat Mm Pobnrr fDtnerori. on /Oil 379 'IM 
Ftr MomOUm package and appiwaum form, eomae G«ni Shrwrmr t? 
tdepkine or ante ut 


1H/1U 

m __ 

A DeglMTad aunty 
An Equal Opportunities 
Employer 


NATIONAL RIFLE 
ASSOCIATION 
ASSISTANT 
SECRETARY 
SMOOTOK 
Tne National Rin<- Avtonahon 
w*-k, appliranu. un tms vnior 
«**' al BiMry Camp 
Brcnh wood. Burn-i 
The Aimumm Secrelarv a re. 
HWnMlile (or the coordination 
at all mailers related lo ihr rnr 
ulalxon ot rompeimon 
uvooitnq with iuiumtp n»r and 
t rniri-firr mud. and in (MrtK 
ular. urn- roorniiuiiion tf nd 
manewmMil nf ihr isr Vs an 
nual Mrs-nnu al Bidm. (or all 
mailers rr-Urtinq | D r.inor .ir.mii 
■"id « 1 ei ewpmenl liaison wild 
im- MmiMn o( Drfnnm and inr 
*a» isirni affiliated 

'im.iunalians nn sorh mailers 
■or the nmrun-nirnl -and sale 01 
small arms ammunition and (or 
lerhniral adiKe ,-ialinq lo 
(irejfim 

The sixrr-Mul appuranl will 
ornnaoii tjo 55 vears ol av nr 
under, had managerial erprri 
- al senior Irsei. praniral 
p\ucrienri> ol me #o*» r.saied 
arm, lies and personal esprn 
eiH-e of rompeiiiion slKSUinq al 
County level or abnie 
The anoliranl should Op as ail 
aoir lo undersiudv Ihr DOM as 
>»Mn a* po-MWe and nol Lilrr 
Ihaji Isi Mai 1080 lo De in 
nosl on 111 SrptmUMT 1986 
Appliralions will, cv should 
niaor under Personal cover 
lo 

BriswRer P.fcA. hn «Mt MC. 
National RMia A— claim 


WeUes, Surra*. CUM ORB. 


THE WORLD 
WILDLIFE FUND 

remures all Appeals Exrru 
live in assist inr .Slanaorr ol 
me Appr.ih Division lo ear 
i i«|e .in .iniiual proqramnu* 
01 lund raiwno .ipproarlirs 
lo nr-nidr admnuMralive and 
rrsrertn support lor ihn pro 
or.imme and lo undertalr 
rlKHl sen irnm 

Based in CndaJiranq Ssirn-v 
■vppji.;.iiiis r-'siune education 
lo 'Teorea HhD siandard 
s.iih al Iran 2 sr *rs pc.-, vow, 
■ol. rspc-ri enre lo demon 
sir.il.’ an apnludr lor 
drsriolmed and detailed 
wnefc. Hand iii ia of admirus 
xr.iftvi- sv stems and should 
IU- e deal! aim people al all 
levels Tsaurv m-d around 
tllOOOpa Inten-dPd appli 
earns should forward a lull 
cv io .Mrs V C Rurbnrioe. 
Panda House Codalminp. 
tiurre, GL 7 lOL 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


OXON 


M0X( 

JUOL 


PHIN 


Recruitment Advertising 
Executive Search 
I/CDDV Management Selection 

<X I\Jl1i\Lj Y I Tn International Recruitment 


178-202 ^ rea ‘^^n^'441! 

London WIN 5TB. TJ.C ^ ^ ^ 

8 Mathew Street. Lr.'crpoc. 

Tel: 051-236 1724 


Instructors 


& Software 


expansion programme iha is constantly being 
exceeded - a dLrea reflection of tile quality of 
our products as wefl as the quality of our 


of working 
Youll enjoy 


■vesJ'fir'PriihcrgAarfs 

extent 
ocnerti 


including rei«ai:o_n cusser-ds* 

nrttaniSJtion cr, . c-a l =e 


_ r now were looking for Instructors - 
Hardware & Software wittitei our Educational 
Services department whuch trams Software fi 
Hardware tngsneeix. Candidates will probably 
be aged between 25 - 35. technically 
motivated and of graduate calibre. You should 
also have a good technical background and a 
desire to communicate this technical service or 
software experience to motivated Hardware & 
Software Engineers. 


on (0734] 8p8p-'° Of’ ^ &gf4rk 

Edit 





Solicitor 


Enhance vonr legal skills 
with management expertise 


c£ 18 , 000 + car and 
full banking benefits 


Citibank Savings, part erf" the world's Largest 
bank, is looking for an experienced solicitor to 
join our legal department 

This is rather an unusual opportunity for 
someone with drive and ambition who would 
likelc utifise Iheir legal background in maktnaa 
move into project management and beyond 
within a major intemahonal company 

You will spend much of your nme handling 
new business and other prqects for our 
Mortgage Banking Division, but can also ( 
to work with, anoon occasion stand in foe I 
Company Soliafor on a wide range of 
demanding legal work. 

I deafly aged between 25-35. youH need 
specific strength in land law and conveyancing, 


responsibilities of tfusrste- LS-vuiko ofcing a 
generous salary with :uii 
subsidised rr.ongage. 
contributory pensor. schemes an- prrrare 

""S^y career ar.d ocwr-aldencbla 
Nigel Rogers, Pen*?ry.^ : <a rfge. 

Citibank Savings O 


Credit Risk 
Manager 

Analysing Credit Risk 
Performance 


J business means the worid-femous 

DinereQuborgarasaion -jTart.jfCitSiank- 
needs to appoint another Credit Risk Manager. 
Based in Famborough. the role involves the 


need considerable analytical and report 
presentation sfcilis. A relevant oegrec. -- > 


development of new PC t 
systems des 

day-to-day decision making The 
development forecasting and monitoring of 
departmental budgets, espaaty plans, 
productivity and portfolio analysis are other 
important areas of responsibflitY While 
experience erf credit scoring procedures wouki 
be an advantage, of more importance is the 
abitey to analyse and interpret data, and to 
present conclusions and recommendations in 
a logical manner 

The successful candidate will accordingly 


is highly desirablc._ 

This position oners an exotrsg ocponuniv 
lor career development plus a sanmg salary of 
between £ 10 . 006 -£! 5 . 00 C jr.c gefcaale 
according to experience J and a generous 
benefits package 

Apply in writing with fuE £• -o ™ 

Personnel Manager. Diners Guo IrvemaconaJ. 
DtnereOub House. Kngsnwad FkTjbKQstfL 
Hants GUM 7SP-TeL (C252) 5I62t>i. 


«> 


DINERS CLUB 
INTERNATIONAL' 


Gateway for 
Success as 
Field 

Marketing 

Manager 


Chartham Paper Mills, manufacture a range of 

papers Tor the Drawing Office Industry under 
the brand name “Gateway". To continue our 
success tn this field, we now need to appoint a 
UJC Held Marketing Manager 

Reporting to the Sales Manager; you'll 
become a member of a small marketing team 
virithrespcmsibtoftttheirn^ 
market in particular, we have recently 

task' 
mark 


range of paper and your first 
ana the promotion and 
trketmg of these products. 

Vie k looking for someone with a degree 
and an intimate knowledge of the UK Piper 
industry and a good track record in a relevant 


senior role. 

UfeU offer you an attractive salary, quality 
company car and relocation expenses to the 
beauafuj Kent counL-yside m the Canterbury 
area. 

For an application form please telephone 
the Personnel Deoartmem >022.7) 733771. 
extension 222. of wme to the 

Personnel Department. 

Chanham Paper Mills. 

Canterbury, Kent Ciq 7JA. 



WIGGINS 

TEAPE 


RETAILING PROFESSIONALS 

Preach what you’ve always practised from 
the Chair in Retailing 


ASDA-MFI Group pic are 
sponsoring the very first Chair in 
Retailing at Manchester Polytechnic. 
We therefore wish to appoint a 
Professor, someone with proven 
intellectual distinction and 
demonstrable practical retailing 
experience, to support 
the BA (Hons) Degree 
in Retail Marketing 
within the 
Department of 
Business 
Studies. 


All applications will be dealt with 
in the strictest confidence. 

For further information 
about this position, please 
write or telephone 
The Secretary, Manchester 
Polytechnic, All Saints, 
Manchester. 

MANCHESTER Telephone: 

POLYTECHNIC -oJSSSSi 

for applications 
® is 4th April, 

1986. 






NEGOTIATOR 

(hquiiwl B*mtrd Mumn* 
pvpjtkI mo lurnmwd fnimti 
depdrlrwiil EvBWKiKf lire 
lotted Dui cnlhuMMii And 
■nuHive ate more uaporUni. 
Car owner. 

Applv Pimlico Office. 
01-S34 7316. 


Stowe School 



Appointment of 

BURSAR 

Tbe Governors wish to appoint a Bwsarto 
succeed Commander M.K. Burley who is 
retiring on 31st August, 1986. 

Fuflpartkularsoftheapprantinentanda 
fonn of application may be obtained from the 
Secretaiy to the Governors, do The AIBed 
Schools, 42 South Bar Street, Bahbuiy, Oxon 
0X16 9XL (Telephone Banbury 56441). 
Closing date for applications, Friday, 21st 
February, 1986. 


Redundant? Just looking? 


Our Job seardi and career counselling 
services are mdfvidually tailored to meet the needs 
of senior executives (men and women) in mki-caieex; 
and get results -guaranteed. "Phone— 

London (01)4990321 Bristol (0272) 2 11987 

GaUdfcm! (0463) 575090 Banhury (0295) 59885 
Hong Hong (5J 257957 

Search aid Assessment Services Ltd 
Head Office 23 ftigb 5L BanbmyOX168EG 


Mc a rr u nusumc 

Wraim Auinnmv Dinv-iw m 
I dH’ililirv SiUu U(ilnCl'»000 
drorniliiwi Btrvicuv r^ppii 
me * viyri-Mdil Gcnoful 
nviinrnl tnr nuv un 
mudi and (tenMiulinti ml Tii>- 
rujni appHt jnl Mill nr miiru 
lur ereaU' e ana ennorut anti 
Morii^iiHinni, dtjUman ol 
II** I*-** Diviricl Cvnruior v-iin 
lull prr-oiwl rpvoenvtiililk lor 
nn* nuuMfmnu ol it*- r- 
•ctnrm under Kiv nrr rouuoi 
TIH* On- -rim r.inliim will pro 
vide non<lunr«l >uCM *1 

srr, nn irg rlvjunma. LruJnliv 

rjirru*) nwiiifiMUnre clf< lo 
ll>r tnuuirpnwnlv ol ini* 1 . nil 
OnorJI Maiijoors rr>DOi*sioh- 
loi vr-.ilr ooin^rv Tno llirrr 
lor t. 4lvo ipsooimiOI.' lot 
(woIosmoi*«t osiaip iruiM<|Pt*pni 
Jisl raui.il pumniiMi Miner ’o 
inr Drurn-I Cmrral VUmJgrr 
For «n miornui divusunn inr 
pnor»- Ron Krrr cmi ■»!«•* i'STOl 
PXl 363 Fuiihrr mlornuiKm is 
Ol dibble (ram llw Prrvcmjl Ol 

lire on pvt 3o** 5 Aocoinlmpnl 

Mil hr »n» a inrrp inr livd 
Wm Ml in an omian (or I rises., II 
bt inuiiMI 

Mimi m ii ipplriiicrs in inr 
canauLMn own Mvir IK orrwn 
latum la ineludr 2 irtrim. 
vlvauW rx* spill lo R krrr Om 
I/K 1 General UiUMrr. Mortti 
Hpriianmnirr Hrum Auinoniv. 
Mmodm House Br.li.jra 

ROMl Hilrtiui Herts SC5 2HF 
Thr r loving dolr n 2dlli Friuu 
arv IWId 

COUNTIIY UUS NrgmMl oe 
AnolicanU should br aoeC O'er 
30 hoi r pips ions rsrwnrtKr in 
proppiiy uK IMS r ansr ind 
ahihlv lo Jllrad V*|ps and hr 
ahtr lo Mork on Iheir own Tnr 
Murk ins dvrs Itop guiriuv 
soln «nd Ipllmq of rrsidrnluil 
•ud agru-ullurjl piocnty but 
tnr whoip osunirv Anwv wuh 
r ' fo M » rvrswion ARICS. 

FiWmt Hooarm. OO. Hxm 
Siren VLlrkn Horborougii. 
Lnenlmhirc LEU. 7NX. 


FINANCIAL AND ACCOUNTANO’ 


COURIERS / REPRESENT ATIV ES 

Prtruir*H|»vv viuill Tidiri CcrniNli) irom end April |«i 

L*ru*«t 1^80 m Wri- K'llowinq piarrs 

>pa«i 4 Mi nor M«rtr IliM 
P|h|MAf< M ■ liflTCr 
MdiMTaiMA • "e*l ■ f lain 
\iMru Srfala%« 

ApplMT.inl% muM lu\r "O ►ifl EnqllMl. Dr m or 25 ol uon 

.uni hdw 1 IliH'iil rnhinisn C**rniegn. or Turkish an 

,hJi givil jior* Pul iuxl .^wwfiiui \in|n or XTTvoitr 

r mtcicr Hi'lnlaw. 

-I The W hilchuusc. 

Bs'aviin Kund. 
i r..M(xuouph 
F. Susm-i T“sh IAB. 

Td. ( ro»hi 'rough lUXuZnl 


T0f> LONDON BROtUERACE 

A idranry hav driven (or a 
If juice hroker The vuc- 
cissful applicant vw||| no 
wd 2d- and of a sirurl 
appear j nrc ho pres to US 
i*vnrririvr av full iraimnq 
•sill hr- given 

For a confidnnlial inter 
now rino Enr W Smith 
on Ol M3 93JB 


GRADUATE RE SEARCH ASMS* 
TAUT Milh 'lundson' 
ronipulrr evumenre and qnd 
■spun, u ill be ir.inus] Salary 
r MOW Call Ol «3 BS24 
Judv >'arduh.ir<oti Lid. iRnr. 
Tons 147 (SOW Bond SI. London 
W 1 


OXFORD ST FASHION CROUD 

Urnnirps assniani lo Everulisr 
Dn prior able in i*orl under 
I4i-*.iirr Cofnwilri work 
w.iTrhnnsf dunes, mod promo 
imn pr-sspprl* 21 irs 27 its "O' 
irsrts nirl nulhs Good salary. 
Trl Aiiik* Ol 437 0133 


rsrcHouxajT Milh ps perse nrr 
oi Jan. .» uin Prmi.il Therapv 
need nd wilh knoi. led or ol 
I irucn and Gemuiti escseriessre 
nr Ipsiiiur al 

nsrarih ev alualmn methods 
nniwsriaiii Salaii nmoiuMe 
l«l 2ti7 401 D 

GRADUATES three Ir.niMT ever 
iilivrs nurd 21 - risiuirpii lor 
.-.taWishrtJ Lnnoon I'onUilUn 
r< Ai.iiripaind firu vrar 
e-irnnwis ( tlj OOC Irt Ol- 


SMALL MUSIC COMFAHY re- 

auirrs mlmsalional cry 
ordinaior wilh knowledge of 
ihr Amrriran and Japanese 
miisjr btunru Al k-asl 5 vrar*. 
evpmener ui Uv is rmord In 
duHrs required Japanese 
spratinq amillv essrnlml 
Please reply in wrlimq wilh CV 
lo 30 Bndsiaw Ptare. London 
WZ b-\E 


recruit mem 
bawd in bsrsl Did Consul lari l 
required aqe 36 36 wilh bach- 
qround in mini lab. D a p or 
marketinq 10 Min vounq ex 
pandinq hsrm Sellsl.il ler with 
rne ai whli lo rommunn ale swell 
esweniul Salari neq Phoiie Mr 
Hanshurv 014J9 IRZI 


HC3LATHHfla Trainee I 
Arrounl rveruiiie nroerilly [ 
needed hv -mall, expandiin, Hi 
Tern pn aoenry. lusiti in Wew | 
London Salary neqoilaMe 
Srrm C\ lo BiH Penn. Penn I 
Commiinir.-rhons. n 12 The] 
Green. London W5 sda Tel 
Ol 840 7200 

A SOCIETY MAGAZINE Requires I 
a pan lime m house I 

munviiea Photoorapher Rel.l 
RW Ol aJf I 6067. 


Young Accountant 

Corporate Media Communications 

c £12,000 + benefits London based 

Btackrod is a young and highly successful TV company with a blue- 
chip client list and a range of services that include: corporate film/ 
video production co m m un ic a tion; TV and media training, tbe design 
and m a na g e ment of live events such as prrvtufT bnnHu^ and pr r - sm - 

tations to employees, interactive video design and production, video 

marketing and distrilxition, cable and broadcast televistoo, consul- 
tancy, audience research and other TV related services. 


accountant ro Join our finance department as Deputy Financial Con- 
troller. Your role will be to assist in carrying out the day-to-day 
accounting requirements and ro cake respoosibiiity for various man- 
agement accounting functions. 

You will be over 25 years of age, a graduate and be either a qualified 
acco unt ant or be part-qualified with relevant industrial experience. 
Salary in the region of A 1 2,000 will reflect your experience and qual- 
ifications. A range of benefit s is also offered. 

Please write-in confidence -with CV to; Tun Robinson, Company 

Secretary /Financial Controller, Blackrod Ltd, Threeways House, 40- 
44 Clipstone Street. London W1P TEA. 


BLACKROD 


i Leader in fhefietd of corporate media communicafions 


3M Laboratories (Europe) GmbH 

SECURE THE FUTURE THROUGH INNOVATION 


In ow European Technology Laboratories In Neuss and Hamburg highly quafifted scientists aid engineers are working on projects and solving 
todBYa^tomorrow’aprobtema.WltheouraBe.creatlvttyandpoi^ofJudBemert they SBCure the tong term tapeta of 3MCoa^anY8¥iorid- 
wMe operations. 

Tbe Candidates: 

- should be open and receptive io learning and instructing; 

- should be skilled in effective presentations and interpersonal 
communications; 

- should have the ability io work independently whh contacts 
all over Europe and contribute ideas io a highly professional 
team; 

- should be willing to relocate to Hamburg and travel with in 
Europe. 

3M is prepared to offer liberal relocation assistance. 

Please send your resume io: 

3M Laboratories (Europe) GmbH 
Georg-Wilhelm-Str. 183-185, 2102 Hamburg 93 /Germany 
Attention Mrs. A Strait 


C13.000 

£14.000 


3M 

Technical Service Engineers (Female or Male) 

for a fan growing department providing system solutions for prob- 
lems caused by static electricity with the emphasis on the electronic 
industry. Duties will iadude support to European subsidiaries in- 
eluding direct customer contact, organization and performance of 
™” nm on a 1 training, translation of identified market needs to 
product proposals ami related marketing strategies. 

Qualification*. 

Applicant should: 

- hold a utnveriny degree with good coverage of electronics and 
economics. 

- haw : experience in the sales and marketing sector or in the 
technical service within a multinational company. 

- fluent English and French is expected. 


Soillhanuflon 

w- . . A*®* 1 WARAOEH DCSCMATE 

AC-\ 3 y«var« POE 

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT, NORFOLK 

Profirmnrv in DRinnn.il praclm- paramount CIMOQ 

ACA Arp you nuiuymmi maici-ialT 
CA’» Cornwall ci jjooo 

VAX MANAOCR - SOUTHAMPTON 
P^rwonal Garporair. Trial Eapprimcn nanMtal Cl 0.000 


Accord i 




AppH Ui Narfwa 


(MSS 814014 


JKCcSC NTA«V eW ?C2aSSf 

LlDnirwwrl a Irainpp | ar a 
Moll PU Jlilr-Jwl rmhulJAnc, 

wcm-wilPrino in puhdi- arartne. 
lOmmotn- ana Cilv marlnv 
hh-ain joti 24'». AnrulalP and 

Milh a briqM griuiiulilv Ax 

'WU'UikT tMPhqround or 
rnrnnlmpni PHUmnurr an ad 
' a Minor full Ir.uumq ipirn if 
»<-Uuirrd. Gontivi Brian Inuram 
liHtram Rm-uiimmi 70 71 
B«hi swwt London W] 
Tel oi b?q 35SS 


SALES & MARKETING 


SALES MANAGER 

An onoorfumlv for Thr irro 
*atrw WMVIHi.r fq mn up- 

niowl prMrrwiw- romrari 
rk-amna rompanv in Lon 
don. A prow rn IrarL rrrorfl 
anddnrmniuiion loxirrond 

twowonlial Thr romium ol 

ler Ihn lull iurl.ua Ot ihr 
("Vim amdua of work and 
nuiuqnnrnl -\ lop uUn 
will fir oatd lo Ihr wKTrvdul 
APCrtaram. Appi> In wtiIiihi : 

INmcter 


(72 Ho Itoot 
UNw C17 





AMO ARTICULATE 

train lo wit adtrrlmiKi -pa r 
ram immiwp CIHO LB2d d u 
L onVwns rail Jar w Drfhm on 
01 831 1131 


. . - - -•“S' 





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NEGOTIATOR 



SSS? 



LA CREME DE LA CREME 




crrY based — - - - EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES 

r. to £13,500 + mortgage subsidy 

Our client a MAHKETS SUBSIDIARY OF MAJOR INTERNATIONAL BANK 

Bilingua] „ 


(Senior) 

Central London 


Director’s Secretary! 


Director, become involved 


your own. You wffl work closely with a Managing 


ce is offered 
Applications 




CMwm-JMwtMiiaM)nMMrj wtiLm i Wi UM iiLii ,35iBtgaaiiasmgT.uMMiEcaiiiB. 


SECRETARY 


PUBLIC RELATIONS 


PjlF internal promotion, wc require an 
enthusiastic and intelligent secretary to work 
"8 onc P f «*» City’s latest Sd S 
public relations consultancies. 


Wc arc looking for an individual who would 
enjoy the responsibility and commitment of 
being, a member of a rapidly expanding 
consultancy within a major publicly quoted 
corporate communications group. 


TTic work IS hectic, absorbing and requires 
calmness under pressure. Experience of word 
processing. is essential and audio typing prefera- 
ble. The salary will reflect ability and cxnerien/'p 


CVs to Julian Hansoo-Smitfi 
Financial Strategy Ltd 
X Balt Court, London EC4A 3DQ 


PASECSW1 


£lt l 0d0/£ie i 500 




ADMDflSTBATlOM ASSISTANT C £10,5M ++ PA 


Young wm i. i a > ui dty co. are loaUn ter a ■ 

ra> tbcaonun. TIwagpBcnotatiouUlMman 
bo J B H iM law ttM na W M I U Id coi 


SEC TO CLIENT SERVICES MKCTOR SWI £M*f 

~* w ~ * r — — — in rtii » i i til Migimg i nn im im mi 

■vitontor me noon rtantfng of om mu on ■ dv« day 


to do mm rmiiirli 


<Na.ni^i 


IS SiGHTSBRlDGT? 
i\ SECRETARIES JZ 


SECRETARY/P.A, 


£9.185 +- benefits 


This is a responsible job reporting to thegroap 
eoji&ulistnl of ifrfiajor inter^iasal cbiripaay. 


You. need lo gd bb wcU with top people, be 
unflappable." and since your boss, is away a 
great deal you need to have initiative and he 
well organised. Good secretarial skills are 
essential. 


Please apply with CV to Catherine Scott Ca- 
reer Plan Ltd. Chichester House;- Chichester 
Rents. Chancery Lane. London WC2A 1EG. 
Tel: 01-242 5775. 


ORGANISER PAR EXCELLENCE 


The newly appointed director of a nationwide 
federation acting as advisor to. its me mber s 
needs an organised secretary to lake on this var- 
ied and extremely interesting role which will 
involve some overseas traveL One of the major 
tasks will be the arrangement of the annual con- 
ference which calls for a well ordered mind and 
an empathy for people 


DIRECTORS’ SECRETARIES 


01-629 9323 


HECTIC DIRECTOR NEEDS SECRETARY 


in medium sfcw property agency In Wi mainly audio 
vrtih some shorthand - speedwriHne as secondary means 
of dictation: Usual range of secretarial duties, much of 
winch s confidential. 


Age 30 plus. Salary JMJSOO 


For further details please fall: 


Mn Di Carpenter. Lesley Liniott A Associates 
. Tel: 935 6856 e\l 221 


No Agencies Please. 


manager 

. secretarial DIVISION - ^ 
ESTABLISHED RECRUITMENT AGENCY. 


ckalU.att'tMlb 


Cuab&vhed rnrmrV Pmoanenl awl lemperarv 
Htgftru uandartb waw 

Abntiraliom in w ruing jEJLTJlJES, 

Busums mr.no l m srparaieti chmto io w *» m vrmf appucanon 
should mi bo lortoarrted 


Douglas Sic wart Associates 
Suite 50a Chcsham Howe. 

15D Regent StreeL London wiR ar*. 


wo w a —'— I f-ra growing firm K Mrt wor» and arrWIocts 


and notv roqwre an _ 

audio secretary 

to work in our prestigious Mayfe^omc^Good 
audio tvping speeds required Wiher ' 
flexibility to integrate and 
departments. Wc offer an excellent salarf. W 
andoihcr benefits, if >ou think ?°“ JJP A 
person for the job. please send your CV to. 


twiv Clary 

Hunter & Parfnon. 
8 Bailout Plan* 
London. »l 


EXECUTIVE P.A. 
c£1 3,000 


■me Smtof Powof « 

Accountants m w 

i PA sssS tt 3225 {MST* 

to deal 




UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 


For Enthusiastic pa/secretary to assist 
Managing Director of fast developing furniture 
company based in South East London 


HIGH SPIRITS 

£9,000 + Bimflte 


You will be responsible for administrating our 
American Export Programme and must have 
good secretarial skills and more importantly 
the sd {-confidence and ability to work on vour 
own initiative. 


work far 2 yoana a&vtrOa- 


Davy McKee (London) Ltd, a major British engineering 
contractor, wishes to appoint a secretary with senior 
experience, at its ultra modem headquarters in Euston 
Road. 

This position will attract applicants who have good skills 
and who have gained sound administrative experience 
during the course of a proven record of employment at 
senior management level. 

Applicants are likely to be 30+, with a good education 
and the ability to handle challenging situations as they 
arise. 

We offer a competitive salary, 5 weeks holiday, 
flexitime and a season ticket loan scheme. Our other 
facilities include a leisure centre. 

Interested applicants should send a C.V. or phone or 
write for. an application for to: 

Sarah McConnell 

Per so nnel Department, 

Davy McKee (London) Ltd, ■ T& ll2ltfU 
250 Euston Road, London LJ 1 awdVy 

NW1 2PG l“fji 

Telephone: 01-380 4012 


Serendipity in Advertising 


£ 12,000 


A sutXtKsful and expanding advmising agency 
jf\tu»c> ib |?owih on a njenculou&lv' 
protnsioiul approach and a solid track word tor 
creatuc quality whh [our- standing major climu. 
Ii> Chid Ltcxunvr depend, on bn PA to help 
him 'hold the centre" and create a stable, friendly 
and crdmice axmo»phcre amidst a team oi cramc 
high periornierv 

The half repertoire of a senior PA (including 
speed* of 100/60) will be complemented bv a 
calm, naturalle orpimscd Temperament, and the 
poise and presentation to handle ciicffl contact ai 
the hij^ira fee el. 

The successful applicant will hast a proven senior 
secretarial record m a nurkciinR or media-related 
environment and the wish to coranbute further m 
a top support function. Arc range is from 25-35. 
[rut a l solars' is to£12,Xw * uh benefits mdudmR 
BUPA and a profit share scheme. 

Tdephooe437 1564 or write in compkee 
confidence quoting reference MBNDS 2033. 


•ju.ci« 1 ua. TUa super feb 
wWdi tondny of Us- 


MacHain 


pert (skflto 60/60 WP) m 


Ai iraezi ve salary offered in line with age. expe- 
rience and aptitude. , 


In the first instance please send a 
comprehensive CV to> 


TOP CAP 
£10,000 
+ MTG 


SWEET SMELL 
OF SUCCESS 


£ll-£!2,000 


£!l*£l 2.000 


BIG BANK 


& Associate* Lid 
31-437 1S64 

Recruitment Consultants I3C Recent St rert. 
London WlR 51 E 


Mr 1 Freedman 
Tim Family Tree Ltd 
Neale Street London SES OKU. 


Crone Coririll 


louden bw, inks t m. 
wor aeaetary to join 


HOUSE OF COMMONS 

Requires a 


Yob ton he *ed »»■. 
have a resident charac- 
ter, rod w® enjoy 
«ortm« wiili a kosc of 


btoWMBB Halaaemt- j I «fi 


PERSONAL SECRETARY 
to the 

DEPUTY SERJEANT AT ARMS 


PERSONAL ASSISTANT 




Royal Institute of British Ardriftects. 


This titieresungjob. working in the Professional 
Conduct Office, offers plenty of scope to use 
your initiative particularly if you have any legal 
experience. 


No m o mmy! is nceda a 
to wot for tne dynamic 
Heed of tbo Aircraft 
Marfcottng Dtvtoton ot 


I nqmir i wffl beaefei. 

H)d aviefrial 

UtiHa (10CV6Q) are 


CITY OFRCC 
726 8491 


City 377 8600 
VUes End 4397001 


City 377 8600 
West End 4397001 


imrrrMinq^itf toHnuHr poU far rctoait. «toe*a6 k* and rr-Hl 
irm pr r wn Good mndilom and granoin hoktfay* 

Minimum aiuiifraiiam 3 OCX .'O' Inm urrlMni CngasA 
LantMltom dnd Shorthand Tnwq IOO 3Srn«fflHH, Salary 
v jar C7 03B pa rising bt four annual inrinMie is C4.30O 
pa Hownn. a -Jarlinq saUrv oi LB.09B pa may Dr gad 
drprndam upon tor rantodatr's pm ious rvpmrnrr Praliorn- 
rv AUmavis el up lo Cl. 170 pa. ran Dr pnnna The DOW i» 
prrmanml arw> prmiCMUr. 


-Educated to' 'A* level standard, you must have 
secretarial skills, including accurate audio, and 
good administrative ability. 


lag company. You win 
be involved in an amccta 
or BiBkattaa tutor ser- 
vice* to dfaitt. 


■ ■ — .. » I— I ■— I lj 

A5SdL539SffiSR Secretaries P his Secretaries P lus 


ret limner utoiK and appfiralJOti form apply lo 
CvatUiUnnmlftOfllrr Houw-ol Cooimon^ London SWI A OAA. 
THtoww: Ol 714 5544 lamux-nog vnrfi Quoting rrfarmra 
71 ITS T 

Clounp dtv I or rrmpt of appiaraiiom 14 Frbruarv. 1986 
Thr Hour Of Co mm ons Smirr n an biual Oopotlumbn 
EaflnR. 


Commencing salary £7309 (under review). 
Benefits include 21 days' hoUday + I week at 
Christinas and £1.50 per day LVs. 


PTOVkUno mala rial 
I aupport Good audio typ- 
1 he (SO) and wj». 
Mcamaiy O iatoin e etv- 
anX Lmd amerian 
Mjllt AH iwa 


For further information phone:- 
Vivika Monensen on 01-580 5533 ext 4I26 l 
R oyal Institute of British Architects. 

66 Portland Place. 

London Wl. 


AUDIO SECRETARY 

SALARY NEG UP TO £10,000 


SEE THE SPECIALISTS 


434 4512 


Crone Coririll 


we art a DuHltog add trtmOy CNy ttrro or dwVM arro u n- 
lanH wtin a noo audio poMBon lo ffii. Von wiH tv must mg 
two dtnim with an m p u dl n g and lanrd cmkh portfolio 
Vou should br Sot- well niwanu and «Uc to «M on >our 
own intliMnr. 


Burnt WL 


Please phone 01-353 9581 eun 213- 


PUBLICITY CO-ORDINATOR 

C. £13,000 + car 


HARVEY NICKS 


PRIVATE MEDICAL PRACTICE 

IN KNIGHTSBRIDGE 


-A well established expanding company situat- 
ed in the centre of Slough require a publicity 
coHTrdinSlor with extensive writing abilily.and 
numerous media contacts. You wll use your 
creative ideas and persuasive powers to 


publicise the company image. This is a key role 
for a smart presentable person who has a flair 


for dealing with people. 

For a confidential discussion. 


Mach !■ win im ■! and 
caastaot : jKtblty aft the 
udcraftheitfuftcK- 
tuj » aa Execatht; in a 
tel tom u to utt 
aim. TV people 
miff la tfafa Job iimr 


SMTPldn- far wntor mnmr. Pmioul mrchral imrUnd fid, 
nmtp draimblr but not mmdtbL sum tBJOOO. To Mart rad 
oi February orgiraungof burnt. Long Horn* but inrtidly aJmo- 
vbrrr..Wor*-iairTMtiag ana tm.olvrd. Cnwrotn tutu* off. 


A nnghl irirty ppramabiy 
AW4 hMwiyn TSitObl, 
mured as um> pa SrcrrUrv 
lo in, udv md of a rapidly 
rxpandmg «t\bt maunry 
rompany Thr duttoar, \ar- 
ird ad mcltadr wop, tar 
ronuonabir Imotirmral m 
in, running of in, nxnpany 
anwru KUvuuialiKiFUn 
a* vkilh Aho th, ability lo 
won. undrr wraurr and 
jorum houn witpn nirnwy 
n pwnilal starting aaiaiy 
CB .500 

pwwu* snid CV and fall dt^ 
Uto lo BOX A49 . Tit, Time* 
Ntwindpts. PD Box 4B4. 
Virginia bum. London E.1. 


PA/SEC -Fashion PR & Design. Marvel- 
lous Opportunity. - £S,500 neg 
PR SEC -Ambitious & Creative. Fast- 

moving Consultancy - £8,000+ 
SEC (No sh) -Young, buzzy Design Co 
„„ -£8,000 
FA -Account Handling move. Cre- 
ative Team - £10,000 

SH SEC -2nd Jobber. Major Adv Agy. Re- 
search Training - £7,500 m« 


Apply in own handwriting Wtui c V. lo. 

3 Bam Strerd 
London. SW3 


SECRETARY/ 
SH TYPIST 


TEMPS- LONG & SHORT ASSIGNMENTS 
IN ADVERTISING. PR & DESIGN AVAIL- 
ABLE NOW 

M-EASE CALL ^GISELLE BACHE or - 
ANNA ROBERTSON ON 01-493 6456 


ADMINISTRATOR - £8S00pa - SW9 


Required for Classical 
Music & ballet 


a B to MMBn abac 
London wi 


adpower 


RING CAROL NEWMAN 
. (0628) -72834 


B 8 B Personnel, SL Ives House, 
SL hres Read, Maidenhead, Berks. 


NG? 

£9,000-£ 10,000 



Thn raptdly grow in g rompany o rrko JiMMr rtfJctrni adimmatra- 
lor. Vou Wtu Or part cd a unaD tram and win work mrrrtly tar 
lb, nurf ramim , vour dutm win or tamd and ctialirnging 
and a background knpwiragr of cumptirm would b, an adv an - 
lagr Vouihotdd br otcr ai. have good wcrannai nulls, ibm io 
war Jung on your own udltain e and M drafiag wnn propl, at all 
irtm. 


organ isauon. 

Write with C.V. to: 


Telephone: 01-733 7697. 


Vinor Hochhauser. 
4 Oak Hill Way. 
Undon NW3 7LR. 


RECEPTIONIST /DESIGN 


Ow cUcnl provldm UnancUt ad«k» to a variety of cmnpB- 
BKs Blto Deeds an jmMwI wun excellenl admlnlstrsttve 
ibOitla. uototkerplng (o trial balance, and secretarial 
weeds of 100/60. You win be In constant teleshone con- 
tact with dfenta. and the nature of the work means that 
cmUdenUaMy is vital. You should have «"« knowledge 
of records lua rntenenc e and statutory rwjutremetits. a con- 
fident personality and en»V worfdng with, as opposed to. 
for your doss. Age 22-30. Please catt> 


Crone Corkill 


AD AGENCY 


SECRETARY /PA 


Senior partner m in* 
young fast growing «m- 
ry Twaufm a ternary ■ 
PA. Experience In 
advertising and working 
at director tevrt essential. 
Salary ncoouaue aap. 


Plow lef Debbie Bavs 


FLOAT IN 


c£9,500 

tows a+e. PVS MPA. 


Cxr prof young w s l lo 
aura all 4 everyone and 
Jrarn lateM W P. Vou win Ul 
ft wlllf into vour own ikM 

one, you've mown mm' 


AiMrv SpnUM APPts 
Andrra Hroni 
SB3 0706 


GIRL FRIDAY 
to assist 
SHOW BIZ 
MANAGER 


Good shorthand, fvpmg. 
boot- K*W»9 no-van AhO 
rat mmn IfiinNiin »ar 
■rd poMiion lor rrau Bovwi. 
Mini imioteaM,. 


Ring 602 2500 


GRADUATE 


ASSISTANT 


Mira ivpp and lake dinanon 
liilfmw n pollUrt. good 
wrrrlanal «hdh. ISM m 
Liaopnan languagr. aht, to 
ir.-n,!. uk, inponstbilllv 
Srnd C V lo. 


A leading international furniture design 
company with stylish Mayfair showrooms need 
a well presented, competent receptionist with a 
natural and responsive attitude towards people 
If you feel relaxed in a creative, friendly but 
often busy environment, are flexible enough to 
han dl e a variety of tasks, plus have good typing 
(minimum 50wpmX call us to dineuys this inter- 
esting opportunity. Age 19+ Salary £7,500 neg. 


M.E.P. Research • 
Services 

23 Golden Square 
London. WIR 3PA. 


01-499 6S66 
IJU 01-493 8383 


SLUJZVJ acr#TT 


Bumiu, 


IS CMm Street. EC2 


A CAREER IN ADVERTISING? 


Ponon Advertising art looking Jer a gradual, wrrrtory to 
work w their rartna deponmeM wdh me »wn ot beroramg a 
media executive. The llkefy raodMaie will be noromde. have 
a degree or ecRdtaieni and good typing speeds. Salary 
e C7.SOO Seng details « C v.ia 




K ' ' E 


HARLEY 

STREET. 


Organised and expe- 
rienced Medical 
Secretary to run 
busy orthopaedic 
surgeon's private 
practice. Please send 
CV asap to 73 Har- 
ley StreeL London 
wl. No agencies 
please. 


PA/SEC 


£13,000+ 


Property detrtaprr moving 
OitM-e* to enotTddrh n-mirev 
fuper efnnrm PA Sec to 
keep Ibm and hn of Ik, In- 
order. AdlMnMr alien Of 
bum and perwmai mat 
le»^ teguirev ewrneiH 

vhorthand ivwng vkue> - in- 

lethgepre and mrtulrvr M 
work on orrational proferts 
and mearrti Marrh uart. 




SECRETARY 

SHORTHAND/ 

TYPIST 



Se n ior Se c re ta ries 

to UAMO Wka, SM. W> 


| TMer of our bfggMl rtentt*. a 
We arthumural pfarllre 
■mO Iwo trading Iniernafion 
al Act oununlv at, rinrenlly 
K-rruilinQ expeneureo high 
rabbre vercunm for a von 
rtv of now torn ai partner 
tovrt So rt you art tookmo 
lot a HaBliorui vrr PA role 
or would now Hke a greater 
admmsfraliv, roMeni. we 
ni.iv hrti nav e vernrthJiw tar 
von for lun k 4> voenfira. 
lioov rau Lk me or EUlna on 


Tito WAT TO p p owe m o n If 

1-00 lekHe h-rtl lo people, would 
hke to vn invohrd in managp- 
mral tripfinn and in hffpmq lo 
run Iraunng ■ ourvev. Ifm open- 
ing wnn a wrff known 
ewnjM/iy would provMe a real 
rhallrnae Previoas P.vg have 
ah-avv been vomolni lo ad- 
nuiHslialois so me vopr , 
Ihei, Skill, oo 50 wpm 31 ♦ 
CU 500 Oomacl Audrpv Dirlef 
Ol 585 1054 MCfMilh Stoll 
■Rigrurtinrali 


01457 Boat- 


RMUL SGCltoTAI TT miutred to 
run a small Cvlnl, and rarm Ol 
fir, m Korin Las l Hampshire. 
Knovvfpiiu, of Book keeping. 
VAT and PAVE procedures 
msufMrkul not esMmlial Ar 
rim u nodanon a'ackuor. H 
rewired S-iarv arrording K> 
our and rxnennx r Apptv- in 
willing with a luH C \ . lo John 
P Mewing. fRICS. 16 AOr 
talk Road DkibniM. 
Birmingham BIS Serfs. 


Required for clas- 
sical music & ballet 
organisation. ■ 
Applications to be 
senl with c.v . lo; 


LEGAL LA CREME 



P/A SECRETARY 


Dimtor of small Mercfiam 
Bank rcqulTTS PA Seen- 
I ary. InlrtlipenL 

Dcreonabte srif-siartpr. 


PA SEC SH 
PROFESSIONAL 
BODY 




Good typing and audio 
skills essential, shorthand 
preferable. txccikm 
rmunwrallon aimg wilh 
afliuui bofluk- 


Combi nr tour tmraar srr 
vkllh wilh vour org. fLur W 
•wMiiigtMM bnMorPRani 
OiMkiiv of i (us ptoasam in«a. 
"Beanulul Cromun otiuns 

willi «r I new benefits. 


Adiler borewUKl .\pgis 


nmt eealoet Kama IMacn 


01 242 0599 



mount vnu bkr lo nrlp mir 
umpan wruie imiliartv 

tar attar interiors and btnM- 

ing ptooiirtsv Watkinuiiam 
our knwililsbridae oil ire 
tour task w»W be to .iseisi oui 
DrieUis in negotiations 

wun irgiCnmoames and wo 

frssHHkil rtrstoneiv 1MIMII 
lie um oft nd wph nkilkel re 
snairli. nnert nuduiq some 

lefeptioue srtLmq owl irnrral 
vam nromouan sal You 
emnl hr well ofgaiirrd. m.i 
lie, in outlook and enwv 
work in* r .is a i m ii w r ea a 
null leant Thr iohuioih' is 
a sdbwdMiv of a knur piMir 
group *salaii negotiable. 
Pirgerred age 3SJf» 


A Poll hi I IW msunre lo 
UL MBULL LTD, H6 Floor, 


CXCCLUDfr CAREDt MOVE. 

Lt-admg mum national reguirrv 

snuor serrefaries lor Iheir mar- 
keting deMKlmenl SU i 
Lduraird lo -.v leirl siamuort 
with shorthand and or audio 

IvrmMj i speeds 100 30* WP 
hrmua mougn wiH train Hrv* 
5 pm n »ievs paxt hoUdei 
STL Non rpntrib pension, 
t i 'sol Cl en dav Loveh of 
Ikiw sievftal ponIkbiv with 

salaries from C7.A60 lo C&fiOO 
pa Tel. \ at Ol -454 581 1 . Jans 
People LM. 10 OxfMd Gurus 
•vvr. 231 Oxford 61. to IR I AD. 
Re. Cons 


UTCRARV ASPIRATIONS? Am 

ntiiuis sowieiurv regd who 
isnuW ram vaned admin. 
la-4' ■ ouphil with gnuial 
shorthand smtwanal dunes and 
a i just oponnumlv of pro 
messing viiltnn lb*’ rlepl to 
LiUlotial Assislanl Cduranonal 
si.mdard. *.V level LngbsJi or 

■graduate sun us Own ofllrr 

* "lira y T.ooo* kVn' rev irw 

I radarl UikU Hultolon 01 9M5 
0055 Com I Assor tales 

* R« ■ u4mm|>. 


SCMfm AOMmantATlOH arr 

i Mars with shamvaiwl Ivpmg 
skips iron in well known oil 

■ p Chillnniiig position offer 
irui Dlenir of v .in etr with a hwH 
ad i nm lonlenl Modem of la r 
a* rongnodalKHi. nirk UODOO 
rmtarl Lmda Hingdon Ol 6fu 
0066 Court Asvor uiev 

■ Rniirimrnli, 


H-aleV Strnef surgeon re 
(limes Olkdriled medmn. 
si* i Hal » im a fid time basis. 
Amarine eniptovtaem pack 
.are and itoort ■ - salarv 
at I mduuHo rsperteiK e Pro 
posed slat. I mg ifale.apnrbv 1 
. month Trfepfyxie Me- fur 
IfM-t delaiK 


Required for UovfK L.nder 
unlers-CilT nfiHiv Musi 
ikimpraven smotoual •J.'uis 
.mil Dteasam k h idhua"* man 
ner. Katon - Ov ariamrmnnl 
nitu. C5DOO. . 


Exacting Bond Street art dealer, 
wide ranging interests, seeks 


SECRETARY/PA 


cdKM-cat«M 


Organisational skills, some book-keeping, no 
Saturdays. Good salary. 


01-933 5715. 


Apply With CV to: Box No AM. 


Experienced Legal 
Secretanr 


Regwred to wort, m thr 
Gooiikim fummeiihii Oe 
parlmml ol .1 snuD. vminci. 
Iliendh film m (3un*riv 
Lane TvieOefU Ivpimi and 
vrrietrfTidl skills rssrnlxd. In 

pel her wah an nfiPimiig 
omontodv and imliabie 
Aged 25 Phis sn. it'vf 
weeks Itotxtavs 


Salary £9,000 

Hraw uB LUCU NEW 


PAfrrTHHESECSETMnr C5O0O 
Im 5 dai- week lo bHp run 
liienfttY olllrr oil kemmqlon 
High «* Wide saiirlv M unrk. 
Iiom monel it- ilev ewomeni lo 

annuals. owmmiujuiv iniiamon 
wp (Rmd telephone manias rs 
smii.il Gall u Taunton Ol 9)7 
IM 


scc-omcc AOmmSTRATOR 

i« 77 1 KU -tinna an Mjiumi' 
mini CteisuHanls based hi to t 
lvpnw 55* H-pm. fruirn 
dial u (jnnun ierv useful 
hjLuv C8.MO Please |r|e 
Phone Mart Baiunis 

Rag ■ launcgd 754 0771. 


OOfOl CHARM iUW our 
elienl has a gemlv humourous 
stole As Mi. perwmai sm iou 

will enwi staMilv a ronn*i en 
viionmenl and kh.ii imotie- 
mein He divides lus life 
between his off ire <of 15 proplei 
and tus represnuiuve tote with, 
in the ronsnixiion indusnv 
Working wnh mm on both .is 

peels vou will need uool skills 
iOO 50 * and wmie wp egp Age 
IH is Please ret 01 409 1234 
The Week sum. 

DON'T PARK This herlir exnto 
lotions department needs a 
ir* iv wll mom atetl and lle-u 
■de sen elan- who WHI rnmv a 
vnuno and bust OH rompanv 
Good Iswna idO*i toP . and 
a mill i k> iMiMilrsr evwiuiai 
Telex, shorthand useful, good 
IrJephoitr manner Super of 
IKes in SW.I. Age 20 26 
V8 SOO Telephone Ol 454 
4512 Clone uaUl Set run 
mem Cansuiianiv. 

FLUENT FRCHCH A Italian lo 
OI SOO A large filler national 
manMarluitin nmwiv m 
Hammersmith seeks a in-ini 
goal set I rial \ to two setuoi 
everutltrs HO 50 skiHs and 
Vs. i no word nn nvanu evperi 
■•m e essa-nliai Please Irtnmoiie 
01 240 5551 ILIIVI Ol 01 240 
531 ill i torsi LwJi. tli/anelh 
Hunt Rerijnlment Coiivull.inls 
p ACH ACT ftfHQfi aa im. 

V dung go ahead design rp 

win smart, sitlivn and Him 
migl'to bnght all I mu ton Im 
oi ’leant invodvigimit' Oiuune 
wripe Ior prownuaon Vou will 
need nous, ipitialiie ana llevi 
■unit in addilmii to (xmmi Iv ping 
teO wpm i Age 32 * Please lei 
Ol 409 1232 rib- to oik hhop 
CONSULTANT CMNMOLOCttT 
leduii PS expel i end'd .IIHI adapt 
aide meoual serretaiv I nr mp.v 
and inteeerfing Wl Plane e 
i rgiunenring vpnl Mav liwi 
prleiue in rlr.ililla U ilh gsilieiiK 
,mnI hmtolntar of shartlsuxl 
impm l uni Please i epli Ionov 
U«0 Hit t inks PO Box 
4H4.V ngnisi si | j 
Sun Dvaldgra Trawgl igckUilsmg 
a i onlei m eamn.nl + « low ILU 
sm w illi neinbis. limning 
nilHe and aclrng as Pt lo Ihe 
I hi is tat matol liaire bndv 
RiHi MKxlIwitiii ill siiimr 
cioooo* run 4507001 . 

nl.nilT-IRfl w PI ( S. The 

hecreunal Uonsullants 


WTEIHM OCSfDN IO C9000 A 
lop Inn M designers based in 
.uiu/iimwi otliressreksa mu 

lessonial vnuno veriefary 10 a 
pnueet nsiiuurf II vou wmim 
eniov a nusv . 1 train r airno 
vphne and pienlv of elirnl 
ronlarl mists for iou n-sanew 
posilton and good prosoerlv are 
nil isaged Csf elienl nrnrfu 
IkKkage oOvsrpm ivpuei afnliiv 
and lues unis w«fd processing 
evpeimiri' needed Please lelc 
Phone Ol 240 3B&1 1 C 1 IM h 
01 240 5531 3511 iWesl Endi 
Lliralirth Hunt Renuilmenl 
Cotisullaiils. 

HOME TO NAMMERMim* 

(.10.000 neg Whv rommule 
toiien sou fan work lorailVi' 
Join ihe. min nalional manulur 
Iihiikj rnmpaiil' os sentar 
serretarv 10 iwo ierv wuswi 
exei ufn rs This is a new posi 
■mn to lib meal sropr tor 
des r lo pm enl is re ben I benefit 
parkage oflised 90 50 Skills 
and ptpviaus to'anu worn mo 

■ essmg exnenrwe needed 
Please telephone Ol 240 3&5I 
it'JIt ns 01 240331 311 atom 
f.aidi. LH/abein Hunt HistuU 
meiii consrdiaHh 

Fibnury Ftailiid CBfiOO neg A 
lamdit expanding rompMiv 
•amtlieTs 01 smart Italian ladi es 
fdshioits seeks a rarm nwided 
se< r<-tarv in I hen managing di 
impr Hein rootdmalr regular 
i.rsnion slioiiw and onrini 
tom own areas of rrsponsibil 
■ti Benetilv nk Hide generous 

rkxninu uHouanre 90 SO 
skilh needed Please letephone 
01 240 3551 icavi or Ol 240 
S53I 3SI I itonsl Finn. EDM 
hem Himl Remnlmenl 

Lhiisiiikinls 

KMCSTON 1 Cl 1.000 Why ran 
mini' when vou ran utxk 

lot .ills lor a lop rampam hi 
tolled «l maahrtiiHi of 
• mnpufrr sollware vou will He 
OTirldri tu a semor ex endue 
and should he a good 
annniiisiiiiioi lommuniraloi. 
able In liaise al all leveto 90 00 
•skilh. ami previous toonn pro 

usunn ngpenenre needed. 
Pkvisi- lelephone Ol 240 3552 
■CUV 1 or 01240 3651 351 1 

■ torsi l ikIi. Lli/abefh Hunt Be 
irmlmenl Consultants 


T«p min ihK vaned position a 
vnu wish tsilh a Maifau prop 
eni (Aoipam If vou air eniiv 
M'*, and naie .1 in Hi- person 
■ililv and sound shorthand 
l\ Plug skilK CB.50O+- tree 
fiMirli fall 459 7001. SCCRC 
1 IRIt is PI l M. The beer run ml 
fmisiiiianis. 

Lf 0,000 ear tv 20's* rnifUn 
In eun nos Irani m uiun fail io| 
i-xuandmg hank in WC2 UP 
i-xp fasevsaiv. shhflhamt ira* 
lid ('.ill 577 HbOO iCHvi 459 
7001 itoesl Lndl 

hl.CRI.T ABtLSPU B. The sex 
lHaiial fonsiuianh 


err our and amkit j. U om 

noi all imtiidri posilton Wilh 
im lushed telling depi of friend 
■1 swi Prnpeili (b rU5DO 
p*<w* Ionian Linda nvLeod 
Ol 4» 3064 I ailhlOM 

Pl-I «IHi|M>| 

ARCHfHCTS In nlv regiMte ein 
<■■111 utip. hv«"i» Mvrrfafv lot 2 

n-iilnefs kiK m admin dealing 
Hi Ihe iHfipnlt world 100 60 
W * 01.500. TeiOl 370 15M 

Miiiiiin- Rep Cnns 
H awn j iMi yds admin, .rs 
andm PA lo seiiriim in nun 
i.Hi.p.i*. last rrpinq. wane 
mihIifI m»ri . cq.OOq C59U AW 
7"0| Klou 2-.1 RICH PlLSk 
I he s«x 1 rtanal fOnMiltams 


¥ no* 
a bind 

w? The 

lgress. 

. udent 
™° "din 
^ three 
iet 

seveni 
an J ga. Dr 
^ L as 
rople’s 
he * week 
nth lamed 
im- >Ie for 
day com- 
aalt Oboie 
was as not 
nit- 

alse nisiers 
m Mr 
| 3 y, Resis- 
— places 
►r ihe 
id th^ 
mrent, 
;aaizt 
Oboie 
bigger 
. The 

and rmy «s j 
or lemlla I 


aliens 
from 
21 re- 
icn of 

r -P>- 
arid 
»day. 

«Uie 
jJgnor 
First 
i Em- 
1963, 
anello. 

i the 
group 
yeais. 
So vie 
1 ifaf 
So vie 
e ex 
fomat 
ay. ii 
Unioi 
diplo 
v. 


Sudz 
rebel 
2 d St 
ratio 
ihej 
m pa 
sout 
1 off 


aty [fnister fSjjf 
the iibi. a jjie 
oat «"«<* ) del 
bed oscow, ,inut 
before rn w 

ign, 31 ® 51 ? 1 Mac 
per^uons 
be 

.nal ded to 
di will 

iiD y until jwe 
k„ Terence her 


,l£.-ciions. "nip 


out mtryis / a 
av .of ihe oun 
a 2, and Sta 
outems to -* o 
• allow 
_ enable 
get to 
'P™* Ja 


f former x J 


nal “ 




























30 


THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


2 ( 


In 

ac 

it 

l< 

th 

si 

fc 

m 

a< 

h: 

b 

y 

b 

ti 

T 

n 

I s ' 

a 

fc 

1 

s 

s 

t! 

a 

c 

c 

r- 

L 

s 


3 
t 
C 

fc 
n 

H 

o: 

l 

fa 

or 

r 

X 

or 

X> 

im 
ne 
nl> 
so 
an 
sic 
In 
an 
ran 
the 
!airt| 
e 
nvi 
um 
■ic 
Ihiil 
No| 
her 
"H 
t Pa 

•pi 

nee. 
er i 
■’ ci 
Thi 

ime 
e ur 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


■WTH. MMRUCn, MHTM 

■Ml M ttfMORUM CCOO . 

bf ♦ 15V VAT. 

a Minimum 3 llnntl 

AnnotnKciWnlf. authentl 
OHed By the name and 
permanent adorn of me 

■WKT. may 6c VPI id 


ro tUi 414 

Vh«MaMrMl 

L— Mil Cl 
or men t ioned lb} telephone 
automben onU-i la 01 4>x 
MM. 

Announcement can pe re- 
(*« ay MMpiwrr wtem 
V.OOun and 8 JOBffl. Mon 
day in Friday, on Saivritav 
(Bwrm 9 0aun 

I Moon i481 4000 Only' Fur 
puaocauan the larikh-ina 
day. phone By 1 34om 
nMTIILUMHM MUnMO, 
DBMSS, tic on Court ana 
Social Poor. Main. 19V 
VAT. 

Court and Social Paw* an 
nouncmwnu can not Bp 
accepted to Mtohmr En 
Qumo io. 01 «U 4100 
Mt* other damned adver 
taaements ran Bp aerppipa b> 
Te leph one. Tup deadline as 
S OCbfn 2 day v oner to pvUMi 
canon <Le eOOpm Monday 
lor WMimoavi Should you 
wM lo renal an adirrtlw- 
men! in «rmno please 
Include your daytime phone 
nufliBer 

T OMER KMIca 
TMJCWT. II you lute am 
queneat or proBlrms relating 
lo your advirtiremeni once n 
ha* appeared draw .-onlJet 
aur Cuelorner Service* Or 
partmrM by telephone on ®1- 
441 MW 


DEATHS 


MAdimiK. i.iihuii i join 
• '•null n. Sip-vrx Llirnhclh 
lliiu-i -H« II. * M.ermiii i.il. 
'■I l H <’ >l>e kilim im ilkillt 
l-.vl.i. >■ ( ami » nwilix' (Jetvllv 
.mil iit.m ■ luili .■■iii a uni 
iIIih-m. Pil'.il- liinef.il -tl her 

i--i|ijf-xT \u ihiMii. Nil lei. 

mn 'in ••ill'- Lhiimlmin r«i 

I R,~ 

MARTIN m. I •■■•I naif dill |nnc 
ximilt'iili MU |y'.H eJiUlt 
fcaliiraiiii II. if i hMh'H 

a Imre li.muuou xturliii. 

■■■ MIIIMII-I' M..U.H Inn- 

■* Mis 

t.i Ill'll! id 'srreii Rule 

Hu* slim I fa'll- Pin ale 

» I I lllelHT'll 

I .•■■Ills Tl.il* ■ | s MUl, ||VlMlH>|to 

II lll-'ll"1 ■ •■! IIV fell I UllHlO* 
\>Md i.iiiou I i a ii i«*i '•■■■■ o 

llh Iiisr-IHII £<■ Jfivp-111 


flf- 


. ■“%!■■ 


Mm 


I Ml 


>■!•■■<■ |e| IH* ill I In III I M all 

MITCHELL • -full \ j| hmiii nn 

^rlnriLix lvi | ■•nr ii.ii 

vMiiii'ii .mhM M mm iieilivi 

I ■ ■ rn. m 1 1 »— mi* nnmiiT I ■■ 


mu 

I i lliM-ii 


7 ■ lisl llillHi 


Ll.fl l 
Puhlit 
l .K.ihMl 


Um«n iCori> r.illm iii. 
■Ilvo Hi*4il*«il .»|in Hhniu | 
lilioil lltrni lif >ilvo ■ilnmif'd 
Rooi-mv K 1 


BIRTHS 


■AMEN On Frn 3rd In Paine 
■ nee Pavrr-.imi tlirh.ul 

rV.MII .1 III ..[TII’I ms 

ami Tu-lau 

■mens - mi ?J«ii IjHiLLur v In 

\.inr«vi iihv Wmiiniie 
Hmiv .1 tLiu-jMi*! \lm a ii 
CMIPfiCU-NAinm on >. mi 
JOin hi vnrfc it« \|jhi«ii 
utrr F mur % * and umiv 
ij^tiim 

CARVER- O i» Unuoiii M*l 

•\mlor-i -inct Ijun*- .■ Min iwil 
fMfni J Brother ior Belinda .>UJ 
•Uirr 

CLANHE-MAU. nn 4m I-nruar 
10 CTare mee liuaii' .in.1 
R it hal d M Chiatiurvi Mall'll 
near PelcrWietd. a daughter 
iHenrtefla tyiyam 
lUNIP Ct - On list Jarman a* 
lhe Royal Free Hospital lo Alex 
andra and Mark- a daughter. 
Catherine Lilian A teller for 
Chariot le and CUrabelti 
FARGHER - on February 5rd al 
The Middlesex Hmrttal. lo Elir 
abetn mee Smarn and Tim 
ion. Edmund Junes Timothy 
Brother lo Zot. Matthew and 
Anna. 

S An n u m On 3rd FAnurt 
1966. to Tou mOe Jardine 
Pllnims. will of Jonathan 
Gauman. a daugttler. 
atmenUnp 
MALL - to onihia and An then j . 
a daughter Eleanor Alice 
Man-, on Januan the JOIh 
1966 at Queen CJvaikmr't 
HaxpiiaJ. London 
Joom On January iTIh 1984 ai 
the roup Maiemily Hospital. 
Camorfdgr. To Stan inpp Da 
t tn) and Hum. a daughipr Cirri 
Am piarad 

KADOOMIE ■ on Fporuary 3rd. at 
St Thomae' Hoipllal. SE1. Id 
Betty "nee TolTWuo’ and 
MIchaeL a gin of a beauutul 
daughter. 

•CUIOSLEV on -ian 28. 1936 lo 
CaUtenne mee Witmrrv and 
Oaha m a daughter Hnuier. 
EWTTH ■ cm 2Tth January 
Ntcota and George, a ton. Hen 
rv. hrother fhr Thoma« and 
Em ilt 

MEHMAN • On JTh .iaiiu.ii \ .it 

Quern CnailulteS In Mauoi 
.nee F.-iwreln and turn 
dataihlpr MnluHa Beaiiur 
truet ioi Hkamier 
MNGM On Janiurx ?Jtd in Pi 
Ion lo VMIntui .nee M.nkriam 
and X imi ■ a snu .\n.uui JiiIiij. 
SMITH on 2«h lun.urt in Lisa 
■nee BoMan and ChMsiapher 
son. Robrtl a hi fh nn i nr hale 
WMJBERS SEE KINCSLEV 


DEATHS 


Allen «• F«« U jn im xagp 
wwrfum al Vs rum. no 
Kenneth Hetuam Hemerl 4i 
Jrn. TO 111 agetl 85 s mix 
Oe.uH lined nuscsind ai var 
•Ml et httsm-l ot r.trlMi tathet 
Ot Celia and lolm and a mur n 
loved ur.iiidialhn rornu-r 
aiasier oi lhe ironmoiKier 
Lompanv Sen nr Inaav 

Thmvlai reiiruarv gin. 
vniiirunn Cienvalouuiti. ? •*> 
Pin lamitv liciver- amt hut 
Uonaliuie. U rtevurd lo The 
Arlhniis aiui Rheumalisni 
(.onnril r O H D Trilie Lid. 
61 Lvndhursl R<«d Unrinuna 
B 1 AXLAHP . on am velmurv 
l a «6. pearelullt adit a sud 
iten illness ixuiiain Gieoorv 
L4r The Bulls ot Low 
Heppingion. C^nlrimnx . aoed 
ot Much loved husBami. (aihet 
and qraitvltathii Fmai.il al 
Lntsei Handies ratiui'h no rri 
dav Tin retuu.li! al U noon 
rannlv flasers unlv Onn.tlmns 
if tinned to l.cnsei H.irdrm i\ 
rWrckirMHoi. at r o rh.' Rn 
Rif hard Lave The Reriotx. 
Pelham Cauiierhun 
DOASC On lauikiiv Jin Irmur 
.'oseiiti CMC. O B r rues 
dued M Ur.irlv loved husband 
ot -Wire, and i.ilher •« lit., sous 
and lor dauohii-is H I I 
CAME on Iambi rv pain 1916 At 
home Bntbidiei Ki-niieih 
Cjiaiim t ame O 0 E Lair 
P-1B1 Hon t < ’lour l 4 P \» \ 
Hiisibtnd 01 Peniue lalhcr ot 
BeUlld.1 Jennie .mil Plje 
neral Ibis l.ia.s. place 
COCK MG - On Janibirv P8lh al 
Can Ujr blue inrni .XLniin. 
Ioi merlv Proli-wioi al Trenrh 
Lanuuaw and Lileratui 

l lilt r l silt ul Lou. Inn King's 

CoHeor Loiiiki and greatly 
Imed nushand 04 berk! laihtT 
of Roiuiiiv lalhcr ii. law o 
thee and uran. Il.il hei q| 
■tlexandia iTemanaii nr 11 arc 
Xlrnroi ial sniire lo or 
■uinoiinred laier FamUi 
lint, ns onlv donaliom u 
•tished io nu- Profassgr Havhar 
Rrsearrn l Ml al Iddrfdvcokrs 
Hosmial. Camhudoe o 
Mim ell TheLeiAaeima Lull al 
Trrliske H osin L ai. Truro 

CUDDON Brirbidier Philip 
Cud. km CBt ML. h t> G . 
(leal tri.-im oi Lili.inr (tells, gj 
Pi ai ion Gairiletis sVv IO 
CUODON nn FrhnbNx 1st .vgerl 
88 HntbMlier Philip t'lioifen 
<Br MC. KSG mnen 
l.n.sl i.uher nf Ch-irir-. anil 
.nandlalhen Inbalah Kale aial 
Ben Reanieni mass Ham Fell 
i nan lOih StV.uv's Cartngai. 
sti.-ei. SVs i Pi ii ale i.unai al 
Gnnnpishurv TIohiss io SJ 
Mary' s 

cunts. on rehniall lhe 4lh 
1 980 Riribird On i Miles peare 
lulls aged 7b Dead! loved 
hiistbind of Cvnlhia. latla-r of 
Diana and jnlmt and aiaiirifa 
llirt oi IXniri Simon Susannah. 
Ben and Rulh No iloisers 

plr.ive Donalvons. i| n ishrvt. Io 
Thr baietv m si Infm The 
1 v .miielel *4 l.dvs.ird's Hnuse 
Gi'-al i nUnp- Slier.i London 
st* 1 Memunai venue lo he 
aniisnin. .si laiet 

COOFREY-FAUSSETT c. am 

l ("In nai v pea. .amis .ii 
HimlslaiMl Hisiva- ri.ii.i. « 

t»'vll stlr'lla much lev i-il .nolh 
•T *d David aim Nnphlp .llht 
ui.iinlmmii... ol Kale aim 
I.imps fuuri.il service nn 
T initial' I Illi I etirii.iiv 

P »wil al SI Icrnirv (Tlin.h 
cmuhoriii- I Icm. iv m ri.inns 
Clh.iqiell a Sons Glar'd Pn 
i .ale. High si f.I.niK'l susses 
GREW John iVflnKk |..i\k sud 
fh'UlX ••II foil Jiff iMUfj 

iM'lmnl r>iiv|M|Ml nl Maiiir 

CLUMP -ii»d Lilhrr of Hillmm 
alKl i ithm Rrom 
9-vll M.rvs Jl ?.r>\f Dll I IK > 

i ruin Ii liwt-xjrr PLkb 
ini \ton>iiii rrii mn ,ti ipfn 
I ,iimK KctwAH v mi|\ Dmi«i 
IlUirs If ilrxirftl lo 1Hf Lmr.u, 

■\rf Hriiilni runil « r» P^alio 

ItM'l.lfM Drfll Vvov|timn|pr 
»lov|if|.J SU1 


I li|vJ..,| H r «•■ lfi a lF|ii>, |.HIii*| ol 
\lu list*'! .|iu| Mu li«uHlu I unfi.il 

|«HlHl«v ■ ■■ ITIlIlM lllltl XCMfl 
Mill ii.ii I .11 hfvi h.' rl-i'vri 
1 tllllaill'lfll* v| JlRMUh'-X 
M.ile. M | r.lnh'ii LM 

MORGAN- JCMNE5 mi \ rtriLir\ 

>1.1 IOHD .|| 9 P 

l*f ■■• ■ i ■ lilt i.R ■I’.li-i Mi 

•k>ii liHit- IP Ml I (' 

H* Im ii| rin«h.iiuii ■!« ► .ilfaliv 

|i«\HMi P.illu-i m| .\l»i h.iH t'hi 
Ti«|ifn i .iiul Nn ri.1 id x mK-O 

i *i .null vi Wt'ihfi k.tlhiwi 
Mill 0,11 ■ 1 > It" .11 .1 1 lr.'*l»*n 

Mi-lri ami limnirn 

Min n .il mi'ii*- Jl si inrirrxvv 

I Rl1»lMt iZlIillfl lileVk 

u.iii'r kil I irainoni nn. m 
7m -Mf.it l I II* f rtii ik.hi .i! 
.■ J Stun l siuull fln.iriv only 
I h>rij|iii||x rn.it In- wnl lo Ihr* 
I r.m.-r.HJ •vmimr.iMh prunn 
(••ill f im-r t n liivliiiilr .ii 
I Jlell l« t |i*l >1 r.HlMldlirv 

M'Hinigili* pi.k Lmirtiin LG?. 

•■I Riffivn FJ-.ul I mmiloIiLii. 

• *1 Ml I h soil > Rdvtvlrx 
R«r f.raiKHin 1 

PARKCR. nnr S.iilllx Im nxi-l 40 
I ■ .us 1 1.1 riif IJiim-ii ramiU. nn 

I i-fi | ' Disiri'iiill 

I • iiiiiuiitm Hiwpil.il fun °!in 
i .’ail Mmlt imitllu Ppgrn FV 
in fi’hii i in* iiili 1 rotn Cirmi 
.■mi -til trifii 1 1 rfiidv .tnd I **Li 
iinjv- I mil r.m rual.ii -ih I Hi 
.il 11 -1^ .if >nulh.impion tip 
n«.|f m unit no**nv in Houv & 

« it -n* I fXttlll.t^ MltPtl 

I t (tiiiiulnii hi IO OO.i in 

I llllall 

PMULUFS hhnlei H r.<vfaiul 
slic.iih.im. .Invl r.-n Ahi 
I ■iti.'i.tl senile ^ iJCgnt left 
1 Illi siie.iih.un • en-'lert 

RIDLET TAYLOR l- elm 
-it— t*. i'll Pe.ic.nill! on r.-btu 

in 5lh .11 si„,i.ii iron Nursing 
turn. k irklrrllliuvli-l uidim 
■i 1 i ne- 1 Riiiiis Taunt Ini 

1— I Is .4 sminu Urine 

l.fii.iliv Vs.-llv ..i 1. 1 samlfi'irsl 
SANDS >hi si l.ii.uats 1 4Mb al 
Piun.ss si.n naret HnvpiLil. 
sn iiid.iu .iii.-i a ..nci illness 
I ililh M.tlv.n. ■ IK -u i r Sums 

...esl 7a sn ne a I 111 

i in.'.r. iunii.igi' al I ? nurrn cm 
I iiakil " I H'lu.in inluuieil Hi 
|.| ii .lie i ifit..i!lHli Sn llcivseis 
lull ileluili.itis |I .lulled Id SI 
t eu. ...... i .ndi.ic Hi-'Miili 

I nisi ■ ..11 ninnu. Husptlal. 

I niidiili si | 71 M 
SMITH. TREVOR nn XI 
■<e,H elullt .cun » i Slum lined 
Lil.bii* Pi 111 ali.l l.llllilv 

HblVi.m 's.»s nn Vs 1st 3 VI 

•l.k*l Vlisl I ol"|.S' 1 7l ■■lil.tln 

Mair.vvs Ro.10 No 

llcsiT' fioiialioiis u fj.-v.i cd 
in'lds Lve Hospital OU 
If mid 1 « I 
SPITTLE - ..11 Will lannars 
1<>H6 al ^1 T 1 iniTPirvif mi RdilO 
4 anilu nH»' Hitat-i lu.vrt autvl 
04 oidi.vs m Ties or spillle 
.leant Int.'il mnihei nr and 
in.illv. and ureal uraiidumlh-'c 
klcllbllicni .Pr 11 ali-i lolloued 
Is a serine .11 Tmnipfnglon 
p.irisli LJinrrn CanilMiage. 

I 4MI.it "In F. -hr ism al 
linnn No ir.ii.of V plr.tse Bill 
•l•■ll.lllr■l|. d .-fi-sji.st 
1 'atilt— wbe-. Im e I as* U111 
Cilhfes V 0,1c .1 ,1 Limits 

Rank X sirtui-s Nlrrei 
f'.ltnlMliKie r.BZ 3FKJ ■ 

STOKES Vorian I dward narluig 
iu1vn.1i nl 01 Vi.diefLi FS-rfi'eiiillv 
al home nn Ally V eni ibsrs 1 
ilh hiv i.inuls .iinuiid him 

1 cilia I in ii.iio No (lose.' 

IIS Iisili.-sl Memnri.il bon n e 
l«l all ineinh 10 rw announrni 
TCEMAN fnliii I ensue aunt 48 

seaiv ai t anihnilH’ I'niiiu.ill. 

oml al SI KLilV' Hospil.il 
Pi .led slrifl LiHHlhii Vv?. ihr 
Mill laiiu.ui |9Mo .ic-jalc 

mnrfs ar npih the 

fiilin- Muuital .Hid riilensn e 
lore luut. Bonn 'sith miinfle 
c "1 11.030 ami patience Adon-d 
hi all his dev .cJalivl lamilv 
Funeral nili.Ho Nn nom" 1 
Dle.csa' lull donaiionv 11 wished 
lo I He Irml'-niir Siuuirgl Lull 
•inui ' ai 1 eve At th at live 
alKlle Jinvoiial 


A N.NO I'NCE.M ENTS 


ThcSIoanc Qub-’Vbur London Address 



M«beTstapB»«iUikiot»tJiI»j«3ind* 


Kfcww. ndnal dina duliefcpUna. 
> BkcUdu mahmoiirpinettel drome itm 

- Orcha Roan aiatablc for pMxUBfi *ad 
pn*>ic iBccpdora. 

- Atafaucd^mo- 60 prtw mcodicn' 

cUNtoRMtodc. 

•Oki 


■nmJ the Oub. 


Tbe5ccw*y. 

TbeStoMaOub. 

53 Low Staanc Sum. 5W1 
TdeptaM: 91.738 * 13! Telex 264010 





LEGAL NOTICES 


EXPANDING PUBLISH ERS 

"Ol ID L IK F TO 

tpum si rnoR» iiiouiui 

•Milieu a Im) II, al itesc 
IKilHn-.ilinM Vs nle m Qep| THE 
V4VHVK tLn LTD ?4 Hhu 
siiivA.lev.es Si lives RN7 PLi- 

CERMAHV Sminei icm A ho 
1 1 .■■■■ e .net St.il/rilaiul v-'n.l 
laigi- s Si re vul a Pni 
Lull slifel Osrerd 
ROBERT W BEARD ■'cna -trills 
itinx nn • ■'iupM-ling 4C* 

v«iih Uiinrxmr ft Cmi 

Ihiiik on ihr 1-4 I i'hi 1 iaii \ I afto 


MARRIAGES 


HOMfCECO riTZSsILLIAM 

H MJUELsEV On lenriHrv 
im I'vHo nl ch.-hen Fhrpi 
li.uiMjei son .4 sir 
Himirsji. and rin- kite Mrs Es 
Hflbgctio nl H.-hllev Ssood 
He, is 10 Jnlbf Anne rilrsvillianr 
Haditchev vminurt dnutinirr 
or ihr lore \tr Lmnct Fi!/m ilium 
HAddetses Ami Mrs 
FiI/h ilium Hadrtetvcv 
I .ii enham Sun oik 


MLSICAL 

INSTRIMENTS 


1923 CROCRIAN 3TCINWAT 

ipaibl malic 711 4 lonq EV .900 
Tri Ol 874 I 146 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP 

I uiiilnn'v leading -per .nltvl tn 
re v. .nai fevinn-d pi.siKh foe lhe 
L.iuesi genuine velerri.Mi avail 
•till!' JOa Hejhibdo Rn NW 
(It 767 7o.T J Flee calalngur 
BROADWOOO BABY GRAND 
same lamilv SO leers Tuned 
aim maminmed Cl IO0 Ring 

Hauls i02ovj t.j, 3^0 

PIANOS: HXANE A SONS. New 

and 1 nrnndilioiie.1 QuAiilv 
rC'.emnaNe pi ire* 576 Briqhlon 
Rd . SCrovdon Ol 68MJ!6I 5 
K-rolt- 2 Manual solid stare vs v 
1 Cl n rnurrn organ* V GC 050 

MUV IWU *11.! 


WANTED 


TWO YOtma Creaave anna n- 
utore txrmfortau e nu 
nrodtxl prior in S.W. London 
HUGO 7404444 EXL 386 
ttfoyfc TOBY 9*7-6318 Cm] 


FOR SALE 


RESIST A. CARPETS 
SALE NOW ON 


.\[.isv.' c.rncl- ol wool hfend 
.6 Berners rrom EX 95 * 
X ir Plus main haraainx m 
room tir.v In all uualiries 


2SS Net* Nap Road 
ParaM Green SWS 

Tel: 01-73 1 2588 

r 11* r-.li male Expert filling 


! TROWER - on T^th J.tnuarv 
|9Ro v erv suddenly Jon,, 
Phinv aged 49 or HmhiiHd 
ItOiW Cli.-rtn.il. hie.hainf ill 
Maribirei and i.tlhm 
<7nisinphri j.inies and 
thistair F uner.il .11 si 
Andrew ’» CJmrrli Cheddar n«i 
Thin stiav. gill Febiuai 1 atJ.V) 
pm Family ■ lowers on 11 
please •ml iloibinonx if rt.wired 
lit Nl MichapIN Cheshire 
Hume AxBndge mav 

•ir.led lo Gear ic Williams 
I uncial Direrinr IhNin Farm 
Rertrtilli* Nlrib'l. ChethLir 'Tel 
0934 7470581 

URQUHART (Jam on rchluarv 
ilw 7ii«l in hi* 7Mn vejr .urer .1 
slmrl illlii-ss Ui.siilv mournert 
111 hei Insntg uirnAs and lam 
rulier.ll M.e. held 
tarrtiasddi Srh Fehcibtri 

VANDCRMIN. On thr 2nd Tchrii 
1 9MO |H .- mull III Fhhpil.,1 
GvvenrtuKm Man Hie heloxivt 
wile or in- Kile flrrirv Fiai-rns 
.111.1 iM iii.iincl nl Peict ami 
Pam I uln'i.il Nei nce.if Osluiil 
i.il.irriini nu rnrt.iv ine 7in 
l.-hnbiiv al ? nn pm laimfv 
nnweisnuls hill dcin.Hiuns ,1 ac 
sued 10 Nl Lllkr's Nurstnu 
Home. L.iiini'-r Road. 
H-aiiuigl'Ti Uxl.Nrt 

VICTOR V. DUPPA-WHYTC 

WHlileulv nil ^9|n Ian lid rv 
1 9*46 III Columbia v»ilh Amei 
«a acbsl 51' rtl-i plv lllivscst hi 
ne wile Gfenv valid ins rhildin, 
Lam del anil Tal-lh.i 

WALLER on 2’lfh l.muarv . I Ofg 
Lililh I, ■■■•' Wallei ul 
Widiv onUM Nursing Hume L11 
Ion a. net 94 tears Fomieiiy of 
He\|oii Rood. Barlou. BrtlJutd 
shoe Private iTernalPm 
Luton No novsecs rn risjnesi 
hfil UonalKUTv may ne venl 10 Ihr 
Patlanvoiis Disejw society . r 

Nei u|e 1 um-f.il he, y ire. 31 j 

Marsh RojiI Lilian 

MIT - on ?rd Fetirib'irv Frank 
Wr-.| xi Phil xi it. 1 n 
Ninifi r lotmrrPr XIM. or 
t.ourl. Viinihlc.cn \nv 
loualioiis lo Trimly Hospirr 

WWELER-BENMETT on Sin 

■I'libuv 1— ■— er uni ar Tf-' 
■mi mg cross Hcopnal atler a 
a.| I —pit * Jemivil I ."Ai 1 1 a. id 
2fi. .Tisirn tiehn d son ol Rn h 
.t — 1 loan ami .Hlnreri 
MMNn in Kunibi and Ennlv 
ni. unison m Li ir and Ellen 
Havek-k Funeral [a n air Me 
lIMVIial set 1 HI- lull ■ pc held ,xi si 
Man 's Palish Onutn. Barnes. 
niHloii sk» 1 3 al nann on S.11 
day 15tli f.-nenan 
l.-MbUions wclinined lo Ch-m 
'■ul Wi-.'lci FU-tiliiMI Mian.il mi 
I unci J»4 ntucaiisiHTi Sunaic 
' nnii-ai. WU V 7PI. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


riNESsT uuallll wool ■ arpefs A, 
Hade prno. and uudis. dho 
ai.tllahle lOCTs rxlia Large 
inoiii wee rrnwuiils nnoir hall 
unriTi.il prn'e Chancery Carpets 
Ot 406 0453 
CATS. STARLH3MT EXPRESS 
We hat e tickets (or ItvesrandaU 
im-atie and spoils Tel 6JI 
3719 657 171 5 All moon 
rre dil card s 

THE TIMES Original issues. 1 845 
1«M6 other lilies avail Hand 
hound readi lor P.cvniUllou 
also "bundavx" 03 SO uwl 
R-memner W hen Ol 688 632S 
OLD YORK FLAGSTONES, roe 

I4r sells etc Nai Km wide 
deliveries Tel 10500' 850039 
'Wills' 

SEATF1NOERS Anv event inr 
Llals Cat phi Gdn Slaclbjhl Evp 
O: 828 J67R Marar credit 
.aids 

COLLECTION OF over I OOO 
Penginn Isi edilion hooks 
Otters Tel Ol 09 3 7385 


ANTIQUES & 
COLLECTABLES 


■RIGHTS OF NETTLE BED. LTV tv 

0. IRIh i.'ennnx replica turn, 
line madr lo clients 
■abni.r aliens Home approval 
sen lie Neniened. Oxnn 0491 
o4til5. Bournemouth 0202 
J9J680 Totnham 03R287 
7445 Berkeley . Glos 0493 
810952 


SHORT LETS 


SERVICED APARTMENTS in 

Kensington Col 1 1 74hr m. no 
llx t allingnam Apis 01 373 
fkW) 

ST JAMES'S PLACE NW 1 Xerv 
small 2 lied s r apt next lo 
PhiL MM ukI 373a30oiT' 


, 2 «P 1 in 


• c O Isn't 11 heave.. 

1 lo lhe liifrnlle One 
uiiuiiiv- lirfaved one 


SUMMER JOB direr lorm 
tla.h— , c— Riilamaf W'Hbmlin 
■4. al 1.4 95 ca t. or learn Vac 
W.i.k a P.i.k End N. 0x1 010 
KLEC ALLEN Snn of William of 

Saiiais.il Inrtbtot ramirs . ulravf 
photic 0273 454ol4 

JUSTIN l_t 200 a tear man aged 


SERVICES 


FIND NEW PARTNERS thru- 
HrDI FISHER INTHOOLC 
TlUiXn ME 14 Braurhamp 
PI hW 3 Ol 267 0006 Metl 35 
55 111 ilrlnaikl 

CAJJBHC CVS prof ■'•atonal hr 
wriiirn and produced 
rur.iriiliini vitae doeumeiils 
DrfaiK 01 580 2959 
FRIENDSHIP, Love or Marriage 
All ages, areas Dalenne. Dept 
>7ST > 23 -U-ugrtcm Road. Lon 
rlon WN Tel Ol 938 toil. 


FLATS HA RE 


GREENWICH Pcottwsaonal person 
In shall e 3 bed house Own 
loom C40pwexii Tri. 01439 
8953 iWdik. HS3 4737 lEvel 


HARROW. I niiiet person lo Glare 
Hnetv romlnrlahke house in 
trey HUM ,u>d nVeavaJil resJdm 
lull ai -a Own large 
ramlorlafife room and lull use 
or house inrlurhng garden 
n«0 per moiilh. Trlepnone 
90“ SWJ 

MAIDA VALE 2 11 x prof F 
share Ige rn, in yerv mrr flat 
all mod roils, clow robe Cl 52 
pn prm ext 1 » I mJhs return 
able depdstl Avail I Mar 
Phone Jovre 289 9098 after 6 

pm 

KEMMNGTON 2nd rtoor Inlerior 
•h-s-uierf | hid llal. Full mod 
lux krl it halhrm. gox C H 
Comm Garden Lv 67 yr*. 
LSSOOO Tel OL 602 8975. 


IN THI XI ITT! IF QT 
CTIMPAMrs Al. I 1985 
AND 

Pieros Lixtm n 

Miim is in m kt uixin 
PIIISU.UI, ID snlimi 5HH nl lhe 
t mnik lines lit I WHS lh.it ■! 

xti c 1 iko n, ne- chi rn runs m 

the af-tve ibuned Com nan 1 will 
he hrkl .if ll-> otfa i» ol SIIKiia A 
I jnnjsam . tsrrv Ho.nl htien 
House 55 Nets' Rro.ul slreH 
r emtio 11 LC2 no 2Dth renriKifv 

1 9H6 al 2 30 P IM rm lhe 
pnnKtses inixUinnesi III sn no. IS 
589 and 590 gr Ihr haul VI I 
HATED IMIS VSh rtav of 

Jambll v 1986 

BX ODDER Ul THL BO IHD 

rum l'tor 


Pl'BUr APPOINTMENTS 


COL USES 


EASTER REVISION 
LONDON 

ASHBOURIK TUTORS 

O 1 A L***t 
SPECIALISTS 


tm rt-iails 

Tllr Pimripal Ashlvniuive 
Fumes 59 01 keirariaion 
Hnih hiieel. London WB 
SF.O 

Tel Ol 9J7 3858 I 


6 wk lull lime. C2YHh 
\ rsiiai Arts course starts 3Uti 
April ApMv Pi 1 nr 1 pal d 584 
0667 


UNIVERSITY 

APPOINTMENTS 


PARK a 


NWS, DARTMOUTH 

nun. lube, studious prof Fim 
oner I up CH bed 91. own rooK 
fats wc 4 vJiwr 10 gum 
C52 nur uid Tel Ol 485 6001. 
SOMEONE 28- ta share rornforf 
anie nouse in swl* <vnn 
owiiet. nose io rube 
EarlMirfd main Nnr 
Cl 75 PCM Ol 946 4076 
BATTERSEA 2nd person to mar* 
aluaiiive 2 Bedroom flat. o r. 
L45 pw ♦ tall* 01 637 3670 
BEAUTIFUL BELGRAVIA am 
R are main- for prof female. 
CMO pw Tel: OI-23S 464B 

CHISWICK. Lux nun nr lug* 
Pmf m 1 o r CI 95 prm ml. 
All mod ram 01 994 
CLAPHAM prof m f. lo Ntare 
rnml llal with 1 other 3 uhm 
tune. Ciasorm 01 677 0803 
FULHAM Room ay amble m pr*l 
Il garden (lot C45owlPCt Rtng 
Ol 7X6 485S 

KENSINGTON flat prof M. Mn 

1 His m 5 a R. C 145 pern nui. 
Ol 370 2262 

■ 1 profewonal mid 30» vlvarr 
llal. I Oliver, o rm. lAOpw Ex- 
clusive 341 9651 oner 6pm. 
NWS Female o r in private flat 
monte laciiillex C60 pw mctu 
sue Atler a pm 014354627 
NW2 Jntnlee line. O R. C H C40 
pw lire K A 8. shore with prof 
gem. sun k h F. 01 aso S777. 
etMLJCO 1WI Own room Prof 
rn I Lux house C2DO prm 
exc| Tel. Ol B2L W337 
PUTNEY. Lrgertt Prof F 27* 
5 O R E30pw Nr Tube 
Ot 486 7661 before 5.30 
PUTNEY HILL Prof M luxury 
llal 0 r ns C48pw 01-235 
2006 ext 5244. 788 0079 eve. 
3RD COIL. Lug flai m Battersea 
o looking Ph o rm All ament 
lies ESO pw cwl Ol 789 9036 
SWtB Lively prof 2S«. Own dM 
oom l ux house nr tube £160 
Del" 94o 0667 Jllrr 7pm 
SWS dhle rm in atlr. newly com 
grrtn Hal clone 10 lube CH £80 
pw Ol 588 6464. f-xlm 2060 
SW7 Clou rest er Rd Female Non 
smoker Shore Urge room. 
Ct23 prm Exr Ol 370 6828 
SWS Innate, n s. own room. 
Urge nai. C220 prm Inc Tel 
rfa* 836 4962 eves. 736 1398 
W14 PROF F. Lair 2CCs with 2 
outers o r Lao pw rxfi Ot 
603 8344 Bn 630 IO pm 
WIMBLEDON NrBfl4 lube Gdn 
II. O R. ch. C35 pw e*tl Ol 
940 8138 01623 3144 x323. 
STROUD GREEN 1X4 Large guW 
■Audi- nedroam in luxurious 
idiriilv name £340 pw mrl Drib 
272 9748 

CLAPHAM. Young prof F rvgj ro 
lux house own dblr 
earn L55 pw t shr Bills Refs 
reg Call 228 7026 all 6 .20 pm 
FLATMATES 5ete>l|yr Shdniig 
Well 1-slHb Milrndunoci service 
Pise ret ioi appl Ol S89 5491. 
313 Brainplnu Road, swii 
'■1 Accor. St Johns Wood 
small IksJmI oierfonking gar 
gen. nvvn enlranre sepkilfanl. 
C40 p w Ol 6 24 8726 
ONE CBtL own room, large rial, 
retinal nraling. rlose ro luhr 
140 P w evrludmg Call Jane 
Adam on Ol 4 37 4311 iday. 

W2 lus HOI 2 mrv £62 A Cafipw 
.UlaiireiMlies N s prof person. 
Refs Ot 402 1704 262 3806 


ROYAL FREE 
HOSPITAL SCHOOL 
OF MEDICINE 

iL m versify of London) 

.Ass i Siam Accountant 

irviuired tor Intrrrxlina an 
poinlmeiu rvnrrmra wur> 
Iribnirraf aspens Of sLaflmd 
and super annua I >on mailers, 
rtealinu wilh rrwarh oronl 
monies and superxMNHi m 
small arroums offirp 
Applrrants shoula lurid or be 
studying for a professional 
uiMkiliralian and experieiKe 
M L nitetsilies' Superannua 
lien Scheme an advanloop 
ingeiher with knowledge nt 
and mleiesl in rommileriserl 
acinnnlmg systerm Salarv 
0,1 a-alr I A £6.865 £12 635 

plus Ct 297 Lonmi 

'UMwanns 

rnrlher particulars- are avail 
atrip from lhe hrttoof Ofriee. 
BFHSM. Rowland Hill 
Stlrel. London. Nh'J 2PF 
IOI 794 0600 Eitn 42621 IO 
Which aPPhcauon Bv lull cui 
i- uinm vitae mrluaing ine 
names and address of two ret 
rrres shoiifd Be suomulert bv 
21 Felpuarv 1986 Quoting 
relerenrr 441 


NEWCASTLE HEALTH AUTHORITY 

HEAD OF CORPORATE 

PLANNING 

Salary scale 32. Circa £21,000 


o>r petal- PLtnmng tn ixewrostre is Mom reconrrtmg ine 

Ihibimism and OIIOIUV of three rear rung ngapuats- mnpv a 
Ine tkmnnunitv and Mental Health herstces mum a lmUM 
liusptiar with dimmisnuig resoi-rev iTTre post libs', no! 
■i-lnde resf-mm-tiiv for ropual ptorert ptdlllinHIJ 

Vke seek iaiimiw fughh- mdlvjlrd wiin sironv aruawnrai 
skills, a sv-mnoihv lot the mtmriav Muten corporate pun- 
ning amt operauonal management and an inaependcrx 
ms social i is Your pees iaus mner pa Hem or professional 
drsriplm,- IS less iranorram ifwn lhe personal work 


To luirt cmr more lefepnone CAnrs Sorv .DKfrirl General 
Manaurt • oi present Dost holder. Martin Gocham I re I 
TviNs-f- C9| 281 301 1 1 or wnio to Krflh Ccxwetv. ontrm 
PersotHbi Ofliret Mniruvu- Health Authority Scottish 
Lite Hens— 2 IO Arrlthold Terrore. Newcastle LpOti 
Tv-ne NL2 ILr 

The rlswiu dale lor lhe remp* of oppliraaions rs 2416 
yc-hnunv. 1986 Inlet views win he hrM on !7Ih 18th 
Vac in 


NEWCASTLE HEALTH 
AUTHORITY 

HEAD OF CORPORATE PLANNING 
Salary Scale 32: Circa: £21.000 

Corporate Planning in Newcastle is about rsciinciling the 
dynaiDtsin and quality of three tearhing hospiuls. innovate 
O immunity and Menu] Health services and a Denial Hos- 
pital. with diminishing resources. (The post dues not 
include responsibility fur capital pruject plaurmy). 

We seek someone highly motivated- with strong- analytical 
skills, a sympjtlty for the interplay be tween corporate pian- 
mnp and uperauonal manaxmeat and an independent 
pemuulily. Your previous career psttem or pn>ressionaI 
doripline » teas important rhan the pennoal work 
attribinen that you would contribute to our management 
team. 

The pint carries membership nf the District Management 
BoartL 

Tu find out more telephone Chm Spry (District General 
Manager) ur present post-holder Martin Gorham (teh U9J- 
2M1 aOUl vir write uv. 

Keith Gikiden. District Personnel Officer. 

Newcastle Health Authority. 2-10 Archbnld Terrace. 
-lexDMind. Netvcasile upon Tyne MSI 1EF. 

Thr dii sine date fur receipt nf applicatiiiru i\ 2 1 th February 
ISbti. Inten ieu » iriU be held an f 7th; 18th March 


COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 


SUMMER COURSES 


inq Sr hoof esamFnrr rraurrS 
nmtl SinuMt a— x rtl avl,. 
bthrd 4 wr-fi mfdmual cmrw 
near Newbury Mali* from 
vomreut tiiudie i fmt-iu 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


MONOmn a no 


mvEsnCATiON or tmc 
pout orncc-s 

PHOCLKMENT 

Acrtvmcs 

CM 31 Drmwrr |988 the 
Srrtriorv of Sim# tar Trade 
and I n diadry referred ta the- 


IM SYSTEMS PROGRAMMERS c £2» 

Several powunitv available xrorklag an the dexeMomrai and 
luninq of xv x] mix vafiware Muh have proven trark record ax 
a svxlnto Programmer 

SYSTEMS DEVELOFMENT ANALYSTS c X1SK 

Three yearv pud. expertenre af unaottanl devetoamenl axuqn- 

mentx Mamirarae and ar mutt computer rvtx-nenre 
preferred 

SCRUM COBOL mOBRAMMERS c C1SK 

Knowlrdae of ururtured pragra 


) lerfuuoiiex pluv ihor- 
endi commernal exoerietwe of Cobpl lo work on raaior on 
hne vmhim IMF advantageous 

DA T ABASE ABMMSTRATDR c tlM 

Five veor» mperrenre regmred to torn Hie DataBase support 
lean at Pfotrei leader level. SaHd DP background essential 
wdh IMF or iXrianat 


We ofoo hold numerous vacancies for programming and oper- 
anon* Man m Ml nunr iroroware tJhcipKnrs For deutlk 
contort Tanv Win on Oi 938 3696 


NON-SECRETA RIAL 


Comi-iMiun for gneeiigMfon 
and report xwstam rrWiig 
IO the efflorno and roil, of 
Nle Rail On ire m 
ProeiMe n ietil arhviue* 

A copy Of the rod terms Of 
refer mee «x nmantaBF irom. 
and anyone wtuung lo xabmil 
evideare vhouM wrrie M. 

The Serrefary 
MmuHhrvA Mergixx 
Cammnwm 
New Court 
48 Caret' Street 
London WC2A ZXT 


TEMPTING TIMES 


TELEVISION Temporary assign 
rnenlx runhtlly availaMe tar 
xerrefariex looking for mvolve 
menl For 1. other mfomniion 
iiimarr riu DaHv or Pnrr 
JaimeMm A pi nr* irer ronsi ot 
631 1541. 


PART TIME VACANCIES 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANT 
c. £15,000 + 

(Basic £8,000 - £10,000 a^.c.) 

Applirirlion* are knviled from turrenful ronutttanix. with m 
‘T f 13 moirlfr*' rMpenrnre. who are seeking a rhoiienging 
poxriion- rmpormtritity and a lenutr working emtroninenf U 
vou arc a xdi mauvatra. prafemkanal pun raaabie ol miaBibn 
ingond mocniaining a porifouo of chenls. please ronton: JCUE 
SMITH, tn xUKtevl runfrdence. on - 

Monday - Friday 0I-28J 6691 
Eves & Weekends 01-444 3559 

SELECTIVE APPOINTMENTS 


MHT-THK retnanre typM 
IrtephOfini SH’IO. Hours 2 
efrm. Salary neg acrording lo 
aw A exponenre Cxreiiml 
wrillen A spoken Enqlrxh nerex 
xarv Edurabon lo -A' level 
xiandard. Knowledge of Ger 
man an advantage But 
neriwvarv Pkvnc lelephone 
OI 3S1 7361 


£13,000 no*. • Persontirf Offtrer 
with a voum personnel man- 
ogemevtt and legal harkground 
to handle reenairng and ad mm 
for large City firm. Typing re- 
oured inr own rornwnondence. 
Call 377 8600 iCilyl Or 43» 
TOOl tWnt Endl. 

SECRET ARIES PLUS- TKe Sec- 
retarial CDBMIlantv 


DOMESTIC & CATERING , 
SITUATIONS 


INTERNATIONAL 
TURAL CONSERVATION Pan | 

lime exp xrrrrtarv regurred 
Apply bv |4lh beb wvmg de , 
laih. lo ICOMOS 34 36 Bedford | 
S9 London WC1 


CHALET GWL WANTED for . 

small group m Guodd. muxi be ' 
•fpnd rook. 2 week* starting 81 h 
March Please nng Mrs 
fUFOdale Ol 229 6449 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


A THANKSGIVING SERVICE Ioi 

Arthur Xwiiiillex I r-rsui r Ldjmi 
1 Iiiarirxvl Times, r. ki hi- 
iici'l -It *a Brule X CTinri h Fieri 
*ilie.-1 < niirtnu I.F4 al uonri on 
Xlllflil.iv lOlh fl.lnn.iiv | 096 


IN MEMORIA.M 
- PRIVATE 


GOYDCR Raman Henulin mn 
(<iHa awl Mark vn lux sleep 
2l|il f eh, ll.li v 1 "Hf’ illln f mi 
Ini nannihx Udnaf-inx in hr. 
meiimi i in I » mi.-ail Pei is h 
(liunll XhiIhhjIm.iii ne a Cl rile 
Xu a, 

HOPE thnniax 6 Oia 3lrt Fetifia 
al v 1“9o aunt 7oi)l H.iurtlow 
Hrgiw. Uiinf h-vni -irarl lalilv ,4 
taHlworriii BarrrHi tvxnu h.Hi 
art Illi* tale Vi rHalearoaa til l la-ve 
Muff -iimI Mn l.alniain,! Hope 
f.ilhei ir, VlTaatl .anal an .uadfarhe. 
of fUirlix .mat * ate. MeJ rir.i. 
fv hefm.xl meJianil of Lexlu- 
anal xirpiainer ot Roliaa. 
i. iMiu-% and an "1 Maihev. Tn 
lier.12 ,U Chula noil! (Xr 

lAiwnm. rrirtai Till frtnii 
Ul 4 lllatVitav Familv IIiiaix 
rtnrrtH.nx lo Th.' luniinf Joak 

el x Fund 

JOHNSON On 3<3rh .lailuarv al 

laailiU- al Hi4a«lh«nr VXV 
Jnhll I Ilf halm eii liiixlkuad or 
rx.ioatn . lllMI l.ilhef ,H P.HTTeU, 
.mat Hilar v .vul w .nirta.lira,- of 
1 7l.lt lavlle and Xlexamh-r 


Pi ii all- 


r.al 


U-OYO THOMAS <hi Vil renin 
.11 V I9M6. IH-we .lull! al let 
imme in ha-vv. suiim Aha e 
Va~4a an Ih'T Beth inn xaxniirt 
H.imOal.-j ,M lhe Cue Mi l J M A. 
VIh.- Ltoiat rlwuilax nearlv 
h.vixl .Vlllil al llell A cxwul 
I iem.alii»ir "II Xy.rll.ikr ,vu r uex 

iiav 1 ilh ItiMvcHv ai ? 30 n tn 

Flnueix A laicjina hx | n l H 
XxHH»erx h Sons 1 in 28 A SO 
hevt Rood Rnlimund vi,.. 

Ol 948 


BARNES - -Vue Man t>lh 
Irtniunv 14H4 2t4h Fehraa.u i 
|9o9 f.„ niwllH-i on her 

milhaiav <i jih ioi.- 
FLOOD Jim Remn nhered uuh 
k" InaLav .hart .veil alar 
IVLlla Joa-V .llirt l.imiliex 
FORBES v menmiiai veivirr inr 
•ai H.aaila , Ul Iw-X. m III re herd nil 
I a-fir ia,if V 24 1 h ar temple 
r. Inn ih n 4 al 4 43 pm 
KHAAY - COUN MACK CNN AL 
nreil 27111 laimarv |4ffi> 
vvlide uiitrtx are while lime 
p. PrvHI 

SCOTT Irtirijarv Slh 1<>’^ 
k" mg ninii.iiv ih Mailer, 
L ix.iiai rt w ijixinne w, nil atiixi 
84 ria-lnvaxt hlhdaiul rvl loan 
. -fill lattu-r tn Cluvilex Inhil 
.UI.I Xielievv 

TO BIT Xkiarn I will ih* loinig 
v mi a-lei ii. ilh | aia 


Secretary 

Marketing Department 

Consumers' Association, publishers of 
Which? magazine, are looking (or an 
experienced Secretary lo pin their small 
marketing research team. 

The job primanly involves preparing reports, 
questionnaires, and correspondence on an 
IBM PC, for which [raining will be given. The 
Secretary will also heip admmislraiive and 
basic research tasks. 

A good standard of education and first class 
typing skills essential. 

Starling salary around £7.000. and excellent 
benefits include 28 days annual holiday. LV’s. 
pension and free fife assurance schemes, 
and interest-free season ticket loan. 

Please apply m writing with full CV. to The 
Personnel Officer. Consumers' Association. 
14 Buckingham Street London. WC2 60S. 


MM** 


LEGAL SERVICES 



IrxiCRIXXI SVXTCVIS 

>1 Vi HIT! 

l v i i.ivipi t vw v rcii 

X"ll"‘ IX IH-l,-h« Ml, ail la.iixll.llir lo 
-xeih.iai 5HU hi 11 k- Ineiimiae. 

Vii «9H5 rn-J .a xiLi rrixv: fa 
■ IMIMa. .-.| IIH- .aha >v *• ■■.iineil 

all Ih- hrfal .11 IIH- nr 

IHf-x ..I LI IT-. VHP II R I IS A 

'll xuiMlaxI .11 30 F -VST 

Hkji HM 1LRRXCT .CTxU 
HOUR' LOkJXJS H? ell . JM 

Me.llHxal.lv. !!„. I3IJ, ,M» m I Pl> 
111.111 I'JHo .4 1 2 .»'. k.v nlaalf1.iv 
im f ih lauvrNcaxrx- hanvidni ich an 
•v.laonx MO .md B9rj 

fulfil hie Ptflli dav of l.iiaihirv 

19146 

i g mf if urn 

l>ie.rot 



BUSY CCWOTGASOGN BASED 
PTVAWSmSWGAQBYCY 
nqure 

SEUOR 

EA7SECRETARY 

nmfcftrMD.nl fflOrean: 

. SwihBri hniinSfuiTiannl 
mtyknwKannninBBBReaaA 

AtBCbuafafybfnfUina. 
Cartct VttySNNi raJB-3M«W2 
NOAGENCES 


°r^9 5M. P V LnolWh 

*4l2Mx I .MPJiuatH- hlofl 

Vaiv Ol J5S 89?2 
FoNtaMac iota Ire ,au on mit 
i-*''' nl M.Hii^ii Bmraii 
I In-f 7^3 

SPANISH ENGLISH PV r™Jej, 

Ot ^5 n ^U nU,U ^ -*** 1 


FA SEC for adverlnmg nromn 

IKMVX Co li> elv person with 
good xkdK * milialne for rwil 
nig pmironmem 23 - C8.500 
Lrgnvt. Trt Ok 370 1B63 Mon 
roe Rer Con* 

EXPERIENCED N E C R UITIHENT 
ConxuUanl (<w small onvalrtv 
ova nasi xerTeunal agenry Spa 
noux quirt MCI Of Urn. 
« Cll OOO OI 406 2143 
PJL SECRETARY CO OOO * 
weeks tvofx + honurt with x 
for lauxv Da-rKHVnrl dnurtmnit 
Trt. 01 24H 6656 Crtilre Ctrl 
dWr lark 
■A SECRETARY £9 TOO wlh 
x n lo won, lor raanagmuTK 
i-MHaufionK Lola ol admin Trt 
01 248 5656 Ohln- Ctrl l- mo 
Am 


NEEDED 

YOUNG 
GOVERNESS/ 
COMPANION 

For our |2 vastr cHd daughter 
who lun some learning 
druhtlriirs and artmOv vrhaol 
an Ihr mariiuraa 

Pieave amrtv if rm are wpu 
edurami. aged 18 24 with 
ouMoar mtermts and 
rixpaiMW nature you wvH 
iMssl idrmvn A grnerous 
xalarv n affrtra 
Live in. Genlrof London, 
work aUrtnoam pi 
xomriimn living in. 

Tot news. raH Mrs Fraw. 
office noun. Ot 730 2298. 


■ Scv* for 
media adteniNim and Piilriir 
Relations Cm cm Garden Bu 
mmii I IO Flrrt Siren EC4 Ol 
S53 7696 

SH SEC with piomoiiaii pros 
orris lot Puidixhuui 1:0 SL1 
•lue 19* L7 CUO eartv review. 

SuBsidwed rexLniram 5FL 

Belie Lme Am Ol 404 465S 

TV CO. need huhirtv ig market 
p A Sir who ran oigaruse two 
sales direr lots fun job l_oTs ot 
w°t*e To C9. 500 Trt Ol 437 

0328 pot oue Personnel Agv 

YOUNG MF is looking lor P A 
-**« 'hand lv pang tots OJ rortlaa r 
wilh 1 IP's Aqe 18 32 
CIO OOO. TM Irriaarualranjd Rer 
°e "w Trt Ol 581 1805 


FNENCH SncAKmo Bdinoaut 

^ffelaiv IVM? C neg Fasmon 
«o 01 404 4854 Corraafour 
■Xgv 

GERMAN FRENCH xoealung per 
soil Trovefteis Cheviues rjepa 
j* Ifjiy GY OOO Pa* lunrnrs 
Ol 404 4854 Carrevgur Am 

KNfOMTSBNRMK fori lime vr 

"ioi* H» small proh-sxforul 
IH .art|se Flex due worlaiag 

hours Ring Ol 235 4540 iNo 
.IgeiMirwi 


re- 

mured (or pm ale home. 
Dnv er. rounlrv and animal lav 
exaerrual Furnished 
unfurnished rial ronaoe avail- 
4«e Apply III wrilura IO The | 
Coumevs ol Halifax . Garrowhy 
1«L Yt>4 lOD 

ASSISTANT WH( BAR 
MANAGER/ css An cxreflenl 
i aim opp evens lor an Jro 
ram manager cm in prrsiigrom ! 
wine har hurrexsiut aPDtlrani 
will be m h» im 20*. anrrulate 
and afrie lo rwwnumrair al ad 
lev arts Full training will be 
pmvided Please apply In 
willin g with C\ lo BOX 425 
YOUNG PERSON required lo hrlp 
wlin gmeaai IrmnenoM duties 1 
■II Barxv hoppi- home. 25 miles | 
nmlh ot Oxford. Cor driver m- 
sennal. Good salary and 
aa rotnntodalran Please lele- 
ohoaae 0280 703238 
GENERAL ASSISTANT regirtred 
in >ie pan of lamilv running I 

small hulet Oil lhe Dr.u ■ F tf ■ il n 

Lmrt ol Mull Marrti lo Otioher 
Pw Irteunonr 06882044 
QUALNYED esprrie m ed nanny 
JO* lor iiexarhoni Snir charge 
Home. London anil Pal as Sau 

cioonw * oi 499 side 

Caislle ,Vgv 
WORLDS LARGEST All Parr Bu- 
I oilers M hrlo Drms or 
in vloil. IK A overseas Au , 
PV*r -Vsnirv' Ltd 8T Regents Si. 1 
London 01 4 59 6534 
BELGIUM, NANNY req up ta 
C160 BW nei. Trt Ol 579 2040 ] 
a lu Paw a DomexUr 
■\ poo.nl men lx 1 

PAMS cion wev-xrv Nanny re- 
uuirevi im l <mui. Irrixajf Travel 
involved rn- trt.ni ConxulMnls 
-VUHlsnal Trt 02 52 3I&969. 
TRABWD NANNIES, lor reniral 
I rvfidon overseas iravrt Tel 
01 579 2040 'Au Pair A Do 
meslir -Ippoanimnilxi 

GENERAL 


Penlhoarse luDv fur 
n is heal. lav nag duiing room. | 
Ilrawvuvg Bedroom. kjlrhen. L 
luUi wr. large lermer. pan 
orgmar views Immediate lei 
C230 pw Inc. Contort No Ol 
638 5933 

NR1 LMiirrustiM modem pur 
pose huill Work. 2 dlrie beds, 
rerep. fit kiL hath. I yr Mm I 
£150 pw evrlienr Co M 

onlv. Drum*. 482 23 77 


NWS rumHbfd nai. large 
■ erep dhle hen. kil and hath ! 
vr (Hus £150 pw inriusive 
Dillons Ol 482 2277 
OUKEMSCATE SW7. pnull single 
studio flal. mil hiismess nerxem. 
CH. .inxwerpnoiie. till .uid par 
ler iiH-lnsave C70 pw Max 6 
nuMilh lei Trt Ol 722 1532 
WB- Coint 3rd n nai. 2 twin. Kre 
rerepi. ,| hilrnen. gas i h. rot lv . 
Bwh w star dr Nr shops and 
lithe C I oq p.w. Co Irt only Trf ' 
Ol 370 US’* 

MELSEA svdarro. lirxun. newly 
drt mailed one double liedrooni 
Hal on Ctievme Ivalk LlbOow 
Ol 352 8458 

DARK LAME Lux Sir llal o look 

H>iJr Pk <1 rwri liniir fmn rUn- 
« C450 P w lrJ Ol 0^3 0453 


east of England 


— Saerx lor Me 
<!» “i'll PXavjH- RrLuaonx 
Ltuenf Garden Burrxni. J 
Fieri 61. EL4 353 769a 


FOR 4RCHI 

lH-Tk .Hid designers 

Penn Irmn posihoux AM3A 
SPerialNI laaenav Ol 734 0532 


t sneaking see 


aeiarv wilh naiod orgarmalKinal 
.UhIiIv - .Maario or snornurift lor 
Uie «:niel Lxerurivr nr a Olv 
mgvk III .OOO liril 3778600. 
-« alv i or 439 7001 ■ Wesl Crvdi 
SCCtRCI IRILSPLI 5. The 
irVnii.il Consniuarilx 


CXKBKNCSR NEGOTIATOR 

hesaderilial votes negotiator 
lareflrci io nelp mn small 
w.H esLaurshen lu m m es. 

take igmu ul mi Satarv 
pins inmnBwxion negotiatrie. 

HuMWgtm7274HK 
Idagal or 

7R» SIS* Uttar 7pm) 


BURST ALL 

Sutltrik- 3 mix from Ipxwirn 
rlosa- -vi 7 imrrsra lion lex- 
romniuliiia lo Leielon 
Midlands Nooaxous roraiiv 
hxe. xtamling iu dWav 
Orte in aitrarlive rural rt 
ling Cnairpregug 3 large 
Ihxn. 2 holhs. hMinge '-Hh 
16" pano elnrtox . Ins td. 
dmamirm. rlkrm * uul.n rm. 
Wrie ola2. eavnv mxiriiMian 
witl> lull UM. Also nnvemeiH 
IS x 24. atnle wr 

Oflns in lhe reomn ot 

£95.000. 

0473 87435 


lenrrv xpeokaiK] vat-re 

Iaii 26- w iltv fluenl English 

rm liiiern.alionaf Co tn rounlrv 
K?i™** ,, . a * < ' Ca* parking 
L9 000 081439 7001 fȣCW. 

T IRIE3 PL1 S The secretarial 
I aihMirl.mlx 

ESTATE AGENTS 

Kniutllslllfika.- aie limkiiig tin I 
-II- eilllillsMsIn six 10 uptk 
I hell r lien, Hi oifFi- Agp 21 • I 
V.9CW neg xl iUx ao 55 vnnr I 
V-u-kiiH-x -R IT ftani Ol 4031 
3907 Ol 499 0092 


ART GALLERIES 


FINE ANT SOCIETY ,48 New 

Hnrd sr Vs | 01629 511*. 

MARY ELLEN BCn\ 


SPECIAL INTEREST 


VIENNA- Spanish Rlihiig Sr bool 
b iHvsigiaiii ■ aufliH led lOtiM-m 

ilmle lull dvw. pn ImimuiMe 8 1 
private vivl la, I ilnsr.inn Slud 
Jl Mrilea FlUl da-lails pmilm Nt 

•nun a I aiv el Ta-I 0404 44191 

\HT \ 


PROPERTY WANTED 


UNtVCRSITV mnstOR Irom 

Vuxlr.uaa single Irnuale seeks 
runawhmt , near rug VS.VP in, 
Ur" 2711a Innuarx 1*961 witHin 

walking flnlaihr trnm Rirwefl 
hn I aridiin toCI Tel Oi u37 

TplM 


CAR ACCESSORIES Si 
SERVICES 


■ICtUEY. L-rmvlfl Cadrh House 
ffhuperh rixetw. 4 5 beds Hid 
s pool dhle oar. 20 Hint- V IT 
forta L 189.050 01 460 2477. 


RENTALS 


AROUND TOWN 

120 NoBood tan Are. wu 

QL.'EENSCLUB WI4 

Ground III ILH wiin uve of letiiNx ruuilv and grtfi Ltf 

unlli luainslierl 3 laealmw. xparfoart rerep. eel di kil. 
pierli UoUMin.laiuHiri-ini. ovaUHantnx U> Vax L|dOm« 

NORTH KENSINGTON WIO 

lmnwuwr idtPriv name, lolrtrv rraertM died and lur 
naslwxi to vert fugtr xlapaHud. xttartQVta Bnoril ruvi'us. 
modern lixtnrex. .nil Irilmgx. 3 Bedrind. 2 ihtVWU fntv. 2 
ruilvinrs laior vikMi. paved ado. Ivf* Co Irt L2T5 DM 

Ol 229 9900 


FARLEY & CO 


qumdakTc 
5W7. LruxouI ground ad 
1st iiamv uxaixonrtle vnvll 
Line lei rare, newlli dero 
raiaxi and alli.m«vrtv 
fnrnixheH Lotatred in ete 
ganl pn khi house RmW 
I. A 11. 2 Beds Avail 
immen faivq co let £275 
P» 

mCLD RO, CHELSEA. 
SMflO. Naiper nueenelle 

<n> 3 ffws. w.ih ndii 
wnden. 4 S hedx . 2 

lullts. rer eta ryvnteiv 
Avail 1 maned long let 
V323 p w 

CONTACT 
SU&AN METCALFE 

01-584 6491 


BUCKINGHAM 
MEWS SW1 - 

lii. mni* hnvew tm xerimtrn T' 

tllr',* IM m l*»« Imaiin. 

kit a lmrt Win. «p u-r 

Aaml p>tw o monUrv mm 

I n trf USO (Ha nto 

SOUTH EATON 
PLACE 

•anprrti hxr area™* amtgrraxl 

In (anatw, slaaUM 4 cm. w# 

Bed 3 art an. fed, utatdv real 3 
rxiffr odn l l taB I r rergg, 

me aad»a VLCIOO tax. 

MAJEKME A CO 
01-225 0433 


CADOBAN 1AJE 


CASOCANIANC ] 

Smart 3 4 bnboarmnl house 

_ 

•await 3 4 li.nroanmihgtor 1 

warn garage CS50 pw 


wilh wu are CS50gw f 

COMWALL BARDENS 


GOdlWMi GARDENS 1 

Lev any 2 bed apart, dec. M 


lex m 2 ben apart M til 

tuoh •tandord Shari ML 


m 

s 

j 

j 

1 



*275 lit. 

HME m 


3U1ANE SQ 



linaalwepnxa jnrremfeiv 

noma n™*l cieo pm. 


IiimI ura-ea. CISC pw 

t 

l 


CMtattanbUrta 

| 01-888 *223 


■1-889 922S 


FLATS and houses 
avoiLahte and urgenm 
■1 lured lor tong nr snarl teix m 
Di nnr Genual London areas 
rr can CTOG pw Ouranhr Con 
xtanline 270 Carls Court Road. 
SVv 5 Tel OL 244 7353 Trtexi 

918986 


| WEST KENSINGTON Charming 
modern idltv lamnjred tartar 
nedroomen town hoove wnh- 
narking and garden C34S pw 
iih CHL HVx Avodahte 
tong rornpanv let Trt Ol 675 
IH96 


ViurtoiH wrtl lur 
nnlved. imulv dag xludio 
- ioi rtni not m lamilv house 
CCH rlose lo rube CIOS p ~ 
iiH-lusrve exretri Irtepnone Tel 
01 8T4 1 146 


SOUTH KEHSM6TOM Thurtoe 
huiuie. W7 Lux mod limy 
turn x r tlat Own rttiranre 
Nuil couple single Co let onlk 
Mm 6 monllrx CI 30 pw T IH 
01 584 3373 


5W19 Prof M F 28 35 NS 
Owe cm snare large lux r.h 
house Close BR tuba' C200 
tarn inr 01 540 5351 Ml 7pm. 


CENTRAL LONDON Apartments, 
l argest rhotre Lang snort klx 
From CloOpw Trt 935 4456 


HAMKTEADb Newlv dec 2 Bed 
llal * private grge Cl 80 pw. 
Nathan Vvimmi a On Tea : ioi 


NEGOTIATOR RFOTL 
General Atgrotnfinems 


H1MILCDON. Srtrrtton 

nauvex (lota no fee lo tenants 
Williams A Son 01 947 3130 

ST JOHN'S WOOD NWB Luxury 
fiat vet on au, nr of njndxome 
p b blfe Eorlr viewing rrrom 
mended 3 rerep. Lit 3 dhle 
bedrooms. 2 rum. drevontg 
room utility room parking. 
CT50 pw. neg. Can Lari KeiUv 
Cardofe Crovex on 01 629 
6604. 

CAOOGAN SQUARE. SWt Gar 
dm Ih 3 Ord roomed mews lur 
Interior designed througnout 
Rerrp. ku. 3 Oedroonvi. 2 hath 
C3PQ d.w neg Conlort K<uh 
Cardofe Grosm on 01 629 
6604 

FASHIONABLE 

K NIGKriiBRIOGE LuxourtavK 
A xaanouv. 3 BW. 2 t erect . 2 
Oath TIM in lhe heart ol 
London's prime rexadenliol dn 
ir*rl Long rn Irt C650 a w 
Bur ha nai is Qi 351 7767 

OLD BJMUWrraN ROAD SWS 

Pro! M F lor 4 Beds. 2 IMilfi IUI. 
tv me. a washer TV video, 
etr sang CSO. ante C7Q. dbfe 
with Bartrrjn rmurte ego pw 
■nr 01 373 -»488 alter 6am and 
H mk 



Buchanans 

Lainaagd BpMpBt n l 

0l-2>J7767 


hAr Im Dot 
me in ws in 2 owe Brsts ru 

kil a 04!h nu wash mar 

dish wash rot tv USO aw 
Ol Ha I 1401. ei 01607 5,06 

| BE HR A tUTHCMOF lor inxlav 
Niyniinin.si JMum Wood Be 
ornlx Prffk «*-a» Vote JWIII 
'-'dn A Kanapsltvad Ol 906 7961 

[CLAPHAM S«*I1 Partly 2 Ben 
nwMmnr wm> talroov Vn 3 
xlHBrtx al CdO Ills eartl 
(kn harwas Ol 351 7767 

KENSINGTON WJk Fnrn 2 pea 
ttouv 2 hams 2 ter r as c H 
UEO 0*. Trt CV 957 S»65 
KINGS RD SWA. demon CtA 
SVs :0. Maun stand date Draft 
OaK CteOpw Hereark A Ca 
OI 584 0863. 


Trt 


CHELSEA. Top Door manonrire 
wilh 'roof inrare 7 hedx win 
in nil nr w.vrdronex. Ige rrr 2011 

X 1911 MaMeni ul. an appta I N.VVZ1 Afrranive wrtl smarted 

^V9SPW wnrelULSUg, loZnr 

Ol 4 93 9 941 I u Aim. udnv 060D w 

HAMPSTEAD PLAT. Newly ron 4SS 6873 

erird. Ale hrarm. toauoe kA | NWd. I Ben Pan, Lvov 4 Beg drt 
me. 2 halhx 2 mrc. oen I urea 
Ial < h mV a. gge. £400 pw. 
Paiev torts Ol >56 9537 
LWJl Sporaovx 2nd Or IU, 2 
laeafs 2 rerv 3 bonax. Lge LH CH 
r- H W Co irt 6 (Mhs * C37S 
p is M 1 Uuru ta itteh 7 Jo 3435 


rum m. 04. dishwasher wash 
rng marhure. limn 
Lvervuitna brand new ct55 
raw Trt 435 5376 

3id fir flat in 
romerxaon 2 double 
Irtim. rerep rm. If kil. 
houirra -V \ ail ran, LongOoM 
UWini Samuel 6 Co Ol 736 
5000 

SOUTH KENSINGTON Ige BngM 
new tt lufri dndileror 1 Bed (lot. 
FHIrd fed all marnurt pm 
gdarv dew underground and 

husex Co Irt part CJSOOpa* . Tel 
Ol 373 8046 1 lam 9.30pm 
T JOHNS WOOD Iranian 
1 rumor itnut 3 hedx >2 dbfe. I 

ui mie, hu*n in ta 4, drones, (kalh 
rtfcrm. 28(1 KH h fast rm 2 ai 
leerora recot 3511 v l«n. cm 
pork C300DW Ol H702S76tH 

DIED . OF SEARaaMG? 

HameioralaTx has ever thOO 

lonwmmwd leriingy. 4 
branrtvrg ami 25 rijH to Mp 
Mm Fim nvto ran the exoevix 
027 2610 7 tali 
Mfl vervallrariivefumtshedlUi 
■mnurulale rondibon rerennv 
drxroraled ? double beds, rerep 
Iron, filled kil A both. Gas C H 
USO pw HUiuatno r waives 
Tel. 01 ajs 2781 Jtaylmie <Ti 
BATTERSEA Furnished Isi donr 
hi! 3 lo share X'ewly 
inpdrtiiivd 2 beds. rrrpL rut. 
■uinmi. <Kh Cl 35 pw w 01 
622 1268 

COLVILLE TERR. VII 1st fir 
llal 2 Beds, lull dtaUV kil A 
both Avail «x oi Teh L 1 
L 1 45o w Ring Mask ells Ol 681 
2216 

KENSINGTON WJO Strrpprd 
Sine and spotlkarah MitarM- 
room mini krl . L.vgr humgr. 
rari TV k*ui executive coa- 
Ble C96 pw Ol 960 1222 
HGHTSBRRME Nuorrbfv 
ref mb 2 bed rm ILM Ige 
raw ro limes. 2 ImIIh 1 rnxiulr. 
lil kiL IHI. lo lel umurn. C300 
pw Ol 581 5828 
NEED HELP! Horaeforaiors rental 
arotnm pathfishers over IO 
years exp with houses flats 
nedsdx. snares AD array 627 
2610 7 Dan 

SW1 1 m F itiixhum stred roam, 
eirunle shower, newts' aerorof 
rd 2 lard Hal CSS mr Trt Ol 
247 4366 idayi Ol 622 7582 

■evesl 

PIMUCO Elegoiri rerep. double 
ued/nr. small single bixlrm k A 
a. Gas CH. ro! TV. Cl 40 pw 
OKO 

*1 SUPERB 2 lard maatonellr. 

newly der A fnrn 1 rerep. mlly 
III krl. 1* • baths. HU. porter, g* 
A,lra 4 


MWir J muished saxnebave 
■IWIUILU dllle nedrra. For rern 
h A B. Cl 50 pw. Ol 584 1225 
Tt . I iB iu Wirt Fuats flat m overt 

ul 3hedrrnv. hvmg rovnew pn 
diner baltarm. shown Cloak, 
r H WMpw 0454 414329 
ST JOHNS WOOD Nr lime. 3 feed 
Mai. hie rrp. If ML bath and vep 
nr per [pi. rfioftw C300pw 
two Trt Ol 584 4903 ,9-51 
nvtO v sjunous. sr.gr boor 
ilk nr dot bed. lounge. kU. 
r n run v pngpe. Irtrvnagn 
CITOpw Trt OJ 3S2 4416 

SWISS COTTAGE. Snort loot 
let Superb rossn toe 3 feed 2 
both Garage Can Uoa g w, 
Ol 485 a»6 

U.5. COMPANY seeks fan w 
rt lies in next London are . 

( ABB as a GASELEE tEwL'e 
■lien Ixi Ol 589 5481 

WANTED OOMP AMY (XT Twr k 

1 armsv 5 4 nefl oceans Lang krl 
Hni Pk. (lwfere Kemmgwn 
TH Ol 589 9612 U 13 Feb 

CHELSEA rurnasimj brdM X B 
LIOODW Tel 01 499 2106 or 01 
352 3961 aim bom 
EALING TVS C3ov to tube luxury 
3 laedruona liar 10 leL AH ament 
Hex. C250 pw 840 448). 
FULHAM tux 1 bed. raareiM. * n 
im t.no pw b c Boland Ot 
221 2615 

KNICtrrsSRIDCE Newly- refur 

haxthxl one Bedrnomed fla 

£200 pw Tel Ol 2252839 
LANCASTER CATE super lux 
bewfKUl Pnarv k A a From 
LI 14 pw Ol 382 6486 
Mayfair , Ryda park- Unary 1. 

2 3 4 oed (Lota * tom Long 
tahrnl lets 935 9512 

OVAL Second prof 23* la Huge 
llal. o 1 £160 MM um 582 
7897 atler 7 00pm 


Place Magmfiretri Mn (urn y . 
foe Mutko. 9dw C160pw pn 
935 9055 


dtrie • bed fWr C120 pw 
Nevrorfc A Co 984 6863. 

W2 LlrxiH v 2 bed. fully turn fTJi 
CM. (Tfta mr C2WJ p w. TP' I 
Ol 446 2025 

««. Stylish 2 bed fbM rlove 
Brook Green Long to C160 
pw Bnrnoiaam Ol 301 7767 
wn.TS.GL05 BOR. Charming 
xrsludra turn CMxwdidrafUar 
Stos 5 inno trt 09*0 620962 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


THEATRES 


PU BLfgHfN B/ ADVPmSMG 

Company reg. a tap gg. IBM 1 
Dnauv wnrer report park * 
Trxl 4 exp rtenlut 23 ♦ i 
C8JK10 Immed -JUU-I lef. 01-370 I 
1562 Monroe Rep Com. 
FRENCH 1 preterit and German I 
speaker Exerutive Language 
centre In Bona Street. Mm age 
30. 01-493 1177 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


CHARTERED SECRETARY aged 
46 year*, lam 14 years Marvoo- I 
tng Cferenor of prevannrl | 
compaiiv ui Southern 4lnr> 
Previously 13 sears in l.Kl 
banking Ekperletrred in Ifurd I 
world rounlnes. Management, f 

prevonrirtA Imanrr Seeks poyr- 

non carrying j rlMItorge To I 
the advertnre PO Box loillf 
Jotvanesburg 2000. Rrputuir ol 
South aUrua 

FROFEBSfONAL EXECUTIVE I 

PA SECRETARY with top I 
fhtdil experience seeks inirrrei 
tng part lime post I ron or 

after nail' rty lo work (rami 
home 1 south roast 1 Trt. 0273 1 
559022 after 6 pen. 
professional cnaufreur with j 
own exerutn e ear seeks I 
ort! are rttniK ReaMUiatriel 
rates. Tetfli 609 8783 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


w — W WW CWIO Conventenlf 
In* DUMir irangporl Tins sen 
rouuined ground floor flat is 
nrs»|y decora led wilh nnght) 
and a. rev rooms 1 atnubte bed 
rnnm rer rm ton tilled kitchen | 
and bathroom. Mui I rear kg 
1.120 pw 947 1 763 from 9am ■ 
1pm and after 6.30pm 


DARIAII< 


Neva York £i98J7mrg £46o 

1 Los ABO £329 Nairobi £339 

Sydney £659 Banltek £339 

Aukland £7BOToromo £239 

DART AIR 

19D JMrayu AtreaL HVI 

Ptaw uan 7X44 - 


LOWEST FARES 
WORLDWIDE 

Pam L 69 Cairo C205 
; Milan C 88 Thurg C4-35 
Athens C109 HKong £495 
I Ceil 2ur £79 LA SF . C34B 
F*o C 89 A York C275 
Vienna C129 Sin MHC699 
’ DeOll L34S TAvtv C169 

SUN & SAND 
TRAVEL LTD 

21 SWALLOW ST. 
LONDON W.i. 

01-437 0837. 734 9503 


MW* VRUUST 


Sidnah- a w 

£395 

Rrttirii 

CMS 

Auckland o w 

C420 

Return 

C774 

Jo Tiurg a it 

£264 

Hnurn 

£470 

Lox Angrtes 

£171 

Rrturn 

USB 


London Fltgtil Centre 
131 Earls Cl Rd. SVV 5 

01-370 6332 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

single return 
.tn'buio Har OOO C46S 

Naaroht £220 C32S 

Cano £130 L2O0 

l.nws C235 £335 

Del Bom £230 £340 

Bangkok C195 £330 

Douaki C420 

Afro Asian Travel 

162 IBB Regent 9 Wl. 

TEL: 01-437 8Z55/«i7j 8 
AMEX VISA DtNERS 


AMERICA 

AUSTRALIA 

NZ 

For I Olv cost matrix. Dftn ho- 
hx* uarture. Imuranre and 
torn arramamenls. phone 

01-930 2556 

HermB Travel 
36 urhareholl SVs 1 
.VBTV 3483X 


GENERAL 


PRIVATE VILLAS wdh pooh ... 
Scud 1 1 o| Frame from CASo wk 
in Mav Id £2.000 «6 m Aimni 
Palmer 4 Rarkei rOX9 oat 
5413 


OVERLANDERS 


expedition as «a wax** 
r 1 lance 01 4 Hlrtime. leaving 
Loaklon an Mm 1 1 rro—u kj Sh 
I fcira nrxcTt to Fihodlua. Kenva 
anal rrturn 10 Loudon. Cost 
CI 820 including all food. 

mart ac a*, and lares tor Mate and 
reiTtaile Must tie lit Limned 
iiiHnfxxr g, pirteex. pegtr*! xe 
• aired To man. write prrxonof 
deUaaK lo Exnaxlalioii leader. I 
t.nrie Street. Howarth. Kngh 
lev. taexf Yorkshire 


SELF-CATERING 


Fihiv egulpbed 
iHvhdav collage xduated in qur 
V* '*ri»ev 2 dmihie bnvnnnx. 
I.ain- kaunae. tullv filled kilm 
•m. mm- femrativ healed, irom 
Mrttli rmnaidta from CIOO 
P •* Trt 0623 553281 


SELF-CATERING 

Balearic* 


MAHON HARBOUR MENORCA. 

“■nul. m Motn^p lux vlU«t 

>*iiti maw im*. x.ini»aid sn 
itaxh VM-Vita Hips a .tkiHl Horn 
l-Wb-l Tag Ol 730 6972 


GENEVA return ftoapil 818 Febru 
I Travel Genlrr 


arv C40 Trt 
0603 401000 


URBEBT AIN 

Burkinnnam Traiei 

OI 836 8o22 


FARES. 
08TA 


USA AFRICA EUROPE Genuine . 
discount farm OPC Ol 602 I 
3236. 


USA irom £99 Moior travel. Ol 
48S 9237. IATA 


Tenerife Greek lx 
land* Algarve, ill Lav apis 
penMotn. invenux. hoHdavy 
fetid llrgbtx Summer wavier 
Brochure hooking! only direrl 
from me sneoalntx. \enlura 
Hobdays Tel 0742 351100 
ATOL 2034. 

SKI BONNE NEJGC. Catered 
rtaaleix m MeriBel a, Courchevel 
Ir £165 b n lark inr Iravrt. 
Great food, onbd wine a. exien 
use guiding 01 733 2333 1737 
3861 ai as* phone 1 
TAME TORE OFF lo Pares. Am 
xlecdam. Brussels. Brugex 
Geneva. Lausanne The Hague 
Dublin. Rouen. A Dieppe Time 
OH. 2a. Chester Clove. London 
SW1\ 7BO 01 235 8070 
LATIN AMERICAN TRAVEL. 
Conlacl the m Berts 10 Laun 
America. Club A Isi Clad. Ca- 
ribbean. L.SA A Mexico 
Sunair. Ol 639 1130 
LATIN AMERICA. Low rou 
UtajWs p.g. Rvo £504 Um» 
C473 nn AMO. Small Group 
Hofxiay Joumns. JLA OI 747 
3108 

LATW AMERICA. Smart group 
holiday tourneys and low rovl 
tUghls for mdegenr ta n) nave), 
fore JLA. 16 Devonshire Rd . 
London W4. 01-747 3108. 
MMAn. JAMAICA, JLYOHK, F 

EAST. rtr Guaranteed 

cheapasd raws Rwiunond 
Travel. 1 Dukes at. Richmond. 
Surrey 01-940 4073 
COS I CUI ILH* ON niqbls hofs 
la Cm ope. I SA A maxi devil hd 
Until DIPLOMAT TRAVEL Ol - 
730 2201 ABTA IATA ATOL. , 
BSCOUNTS 1st Economy hrk 
etv. T rv us frrxi 
FLKjHTBOOKERS Ol 387 I 

9100 

«* COST FLIGHTS- Most 
European rfoxImalioiK 

Valexander 01402! 

4262 0052 ABTA 

61004 ATOL i960 


COTTOLOC ■4' 928 2752 CC 
•National Theatre's small au* 
forium- tout. Tomar 73a 
Thur 2 30 * 7 30 isoMoaddav 
jeafx DhHtYHE CHERRY 08- 
CHARD rn Chekhov OnemFeb 
1 5 al 7 00. Then Frt, 14 A ISA 
Ujjrrnig A HOT ABOUT 
WROES. Tout bom Lactam 
Tha Cherry OrrtaanL 45 roan 
pLatlrwm perl an Hits C20Q 

CUIIULOC -S' 938 2252 CC 
'XManrUH Theatre's small aunt _ 
inr mm I Today 2 30 A 7 JO 
>*oM aul dav seals only I THI 
CMURY ORCHARD by Qae 
khov Tumor 7 30. sal 230 A 
730 men Feb 17 to 20 TMC 
ROAD TO MECCA. Opens Feb 
I3al 700 Then Feb I4A I5A 
Alarm 19 A 20 HOT ABOUT 


DLCHEbta taC2 836 8043 CC 
240 7200 ,34 WS. 7 Has si FROM 
TOMORROW Ei ex 80. WedF U 
30 

klh 50 A 830 

GEORGE COLE 

■■-Via exhalaratmq display Of rotor 
tuning'' Gdn all 

A MONTH OF SUHMYB 

to Boh Larpey 

a Vullmr m - A Vine Rgnumce"' 
“SHOULD NOT I 


•WHS* HEAD Ol 226 1916 AT 
•JUFT IT* MMC ELLIOTT 
■'tajid and Crare Coanars- Dnr 
7 pm bbnw 8 pm. Bodk Npw 

OLD VK 928 7616 OC 261 1821 
Warm 11 10 April 19 

•AN NJCH ABD 
«»*«*»«• BAN- FIT W 
GEMMA JONES 

MALCOLM MW 

LYON 


AFTER AIDA 

A new play Bv 
wiin rauMr bv 


OLD Vic 928 7616. CC HI 1821 
Gap Safe-, 9306)23 LvaoYSO 
Med Mats 2 JO Sals 4 00 A 745. 

PRIDE & PREJUDICE 

A pt.iv adapted from JW 
Ar IX ten's novel bv David f»«d 


WARWICK 


YATE5 .... 

TES SA 3 

PEAJUWHBHfo' 


TUNISIA For that perferi howay 
wilh suimv dan A raretree 
nMMx ideal for Feb Marm. 
Tumwau Travel 013734411. 

TUSCANY, runv egutp lam 
house blpx 6 and xludio Hal sips 
2. From C75 pw 01 249 
0806 Ol 940 3250 eves 

ROT 7tIRKEY. 12 berth rrude 
moiw vorhl Iroan £1.000 p w. 
Mviih Ml! ale nrarh hotel 


CHEAP FUGHTS taortdwide 
Ha i' marvel Travel TeieDtKMrr 
OI 9*3 1 Seo 


SUTCLIFFE 

D uenna bv BB FlsN 

“DOS 15 THE MOST EHW>- 
ABLE NOVEL ADAPTATION I 
NAVE SEEM SWCC NICHOLAS 
„ .WCKIEBY-Tmx 
*9 LOVED IT" Observer 


CINEMAS 


LEICESTER SQUARE THEATRE 

930 5252 lEngi 839 1759 .24 
^ ^ Rookuitoi 
ROCKY nr 1PG1 in 70mm Sen 
nrngx Dah- 12 55 3 30 6 10 
8 SO L. Ue hkghl Show NighUv 
11 45pm All Proto BookoMe In 
■vdv .mre 


prtrnre 01 me Rnalni 1PG1 3pm. 
H"!- TBra. 9pm Tirkrtv ] 
Boariaame 


Olivn 928 2282 re t iNMCn 

al rival res oprn stage) Today 
2 00 itm- prare null t 714 
then rm 1O6 11 AcbtatoH 
dtaopb f x«fl bv AIM 

Avrkhoum Tomor 7 15. Thor 
2 00 How price mall a 7 15. 
Ureti Feh 18 to 20 TONADAB. 

OMV1ER 938 2252 CC *N* 

lineal TivAire'x oixv gto 

Inalav 2 00 iK>w price mall 4 
7 IS. men Frti 18 IP 20 
YONADAB to Peter SiriTW 
Tuatma 7 15. Sat 2 OOalowPhre 
in.nr A 7 15. men March 17 4 
IM THE REAL IWrtC™ 
HOUND will, THE CRITIC-. 


PHOENIX 836 2294 rr 240 Obit 
et 741 9900E.vrx.8mol Thu354 
5 A 8 .VO Fiixl tall 24 hr 7 tMVCT 
24 IT 7200 

BEST MltSICAL OF 1985 

taiMim Drama Award* 

MARTIN SHAW 

e Eiinv Prexlox _ 
is JUST MHZHn, THE Sf 
F O WM AHCE IS A UUfDMAM* 

ARE YOU LONESOME 



TONIGHT? • 

ALAN BLEASOALT 
r NtOtT OUT-ACE TW 


CONCERTS 


UUMWAJI HAUx 658 8891 628 
8796 Toni 7 30 Cl eveland Or 
rhrrtrj Prog inr MEftOELASOI 
MOEART. TCHKBlbVSKY 


FCmVAL HALL Ol 928 
g l ?J C C. ‘WU MOO Tnngfel 
Z^gggi On* .alia A 
prow*. — - - - 


DMmtoyL KaMta MrttBu. 


. x- Uo * > 

>i •Mirvavor irom 

Warsaw Itoare on Earth Bg*- 
tbO*«n Sl'mchw!' Nag. 

LtWalll 


ROYAL FESTIVAL NALL Ol 928 
1191 ITT' 938 8800 Torugnl 
730™ RPO YartTmtaiaw, 


K'liov JnvVnm.i, I 
Pune haa erto I 

No) Tt ba flagmfclB hvmntrmi! 

kill 


BY ALAN 1 

A GREAT I 

“TPS MAGNmcENTroMrtvrt 


ROYAL OPERA MOUSE. Covert 
<*aitii-n. WCSOl 2401066 
Ct 6 M.vmlhv tmoOl 831 
Mon bat loam Ppm 95 
xMk.n.»l Iravan icwni on mere* 
Taakeix Opera noau C7.oa Bre 
irom £4 50 

, THE ROYAL OPERA' 

Tbrr'i. t n (General Standby O? 
lhi laeiore peril 7 00 raau 
8 00 salonie 

THE ROYAL BALLET 

Tain tor 7 30. Sal 2 30 A 7 »U 
1 aHe rM taortre Thiar 1? 

Moiann Battel Casting mm 01 2°“ 

9«1S 


STRATFORD UPON AVON Ro** 
xauketapaxire ThaxMte 
2^Sn23 nt Taa kelittao-o-lei Ol I 

0413 “ 

ROYAL SHAKESPEARC 

COMPANY hi 

Filial navi m 

NICHOLAS MCKLEBY 

"Yam will t tevej I or art 
■'VIH'lleme ' S Tima-, f oi Ml"*? 

meal IlM'alir ahxaK anal hotodOB 

••vei airfai 0789 O 72o2 









ahcgham 

WS SWl 



1 


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I tifc I IMkh 

iHUKSUAY ttLttlOJAJO 6 1 V2so 





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■ *■'• ■ m k Secombg 10.30 Ceefax 

I 1240 News After Noon, wfth 
n, : R*cnard Whitmore and 

< Moira Stuart, includes 

1 i news headlines with 

■' «-* j suttfaes 1245 Regional 

ww l ' news. The weather details 

come from Bill Giles 

% , 1-00 Pebble MHI at One with 

; -- Bob Langley. Pam Coia 
and Josephine Buchan. 

V, fc The pros and cons of 

- . , o! ■ video display units and the 

damage they are alleged 
•".■“*7 to do to the health of the 

■ ->■- - ? n user are debated this 

afternoon between Tony 

- Webb of the VDU Workers 

rw Rights Campaign and Dr 

Colin Mackay of the Health 

• - u and Safety Executive. 

. Plus, Jifl Crawshaw 

examines activity holidays 
1 r^r 145 Hokey Cokey. A&»- 

' Saw programme for the 

“ , very young presented by 

. kB CWoa Spencer and Don 

Spencer (r) 2.00 Ceefax 
a - ' - . ^ 3.52 Regional news 

- • '• »'h .irtC Vf, 3-55 T.T.V. Tea Time Television 

-i" V. !V " tor the young 440 

. SuperTed and the 

... ^ Lumberjacks (r) 4.15 

"7 • Jackanwy. Jane Asher 

aes Snijii iof^ reads part four of The 

■ Railway Children 440 

' Ulysses 31. Science 

* . • •• H.fp prcj fiction cartoon series 

■ f 445 John Craven's 

' ^ $ Newsround 5.05 Blue 

«>*«▼ ini«, Peter includes a renWnder 

about the York Minster 
■ 'sn Bosses Competition 

k * (Ceefax) 

w ^ First class. The second 

quarterfinal of inter-schoot 

•’ video competition pits a 

team from Hustler School 
■- * m Middlesbrough, against 

one from Brias High. 

. ''. ‘V Z Colwyn Bay. Presented by 

• Debbie Greenwood 

" t *' T „ .Ti.« 6.00 News with Sue Lawtey and 
.. —*• Nicholas WHehefl. Weather - 

f«ik i ; 6.35 London Plus 

" - £<■« 7.oo Top of the Pops 
'.***• presented by Simon Bates 

• ,J,: and Paul Jordan 

Vas* 7 JO EastEnders. Dr Legg tells 

• Ruth the truth; there are 

.... m--*- * some surprises for the 

■ nwr -j— , «- Fowler farntfy. and Mary 

*i't >■ receives a nasty shock 

(Ceefax) 

' . ,V- £. ;;830 Tomorrow’s World 

• " includes news of a unisex . 

• ' contraceptive pill a device 

'■ -V to detect moisture in a 

; aim roof; a raw printing ink ■. 

/.IT-: *'- which stays on the 

— ^ — ; — newspaper, an instant u . •_ 

— telephone-scrambler; an 

■.:>\TUr> advance in mining . J 

— — • technology; aid a hangmg 

basket wnh a ratchet that 

*- makes watering simple 

• J’ &30 A Question of %«rt. Bit 

.--‘citfin * Beaumont and Emlyn 

Hughes are joined by 
' ^iao Sebastian Coe, Tim 

... , u**. Robinson. Gary Lineker 

, •> and Co«n Deans. David - 

■ — 1 ^ Coleman is the 

_ . . « :r= f question master (Ceefax) 

- ■ -;-??» 9JW News with Julia Somerville 
. .** and John Humphrys, 

.*rt Weather 

. r*« 930 Blackadder H. Edmund. 

, . experiencing a cash-flow 

*' Zn iF problem, has to flee the 

... Bishop of Bath and Wfiiis, 

- who has a particularly 

U painful method of debt 

*.«*■-* 1 collecting 

* 10.00 Question Time. Sir Robin 

• Day's panel consists of 

• • * Edwina Currie, William 

of **** Rodgers. Tom Sawyer 

m U, and Andrew Neffl 

oi «*io '11.00 Great ExperSnenta. The 

1885 experiment in which 

. U Heinrich Hertz produced 
?.■. '■’> •’f-T bright blue sparks (r) 

11 J5 Late ffight in Concert 

The group I NXS in 

' ,f ^. concert 
'*£&> 11-5S Weather 


made and soma of its uses 

Mc&s.’ssri"*’ 

keep feet fteaWiy 10,11 a 

COtonyof 100,000 baas 
10.28 Tradition and 
religion in Asian famSes 

ena the conflict they can 
rausel1JJ3 Adaymthe 
life of a physically 
handicapped child 1U!0 
Science: aareraft flight 

11J37 How we used to five: 

motor hflFcfimbing 

12J0 pw Giddy Game Show. 
Gus. Gonfla and Giddy 1 
cause chaos in the kitchen 
12.10 Pudcfie Lane. 

Puppet show tor the 

young. With Ned kmes 
1230 The SutEwis. 

Drama serial about an 
Australian fantiy during 
the Forties 

1-00 News at One 1J20 Thames 
news with Robin Houston 
1-30 Falcon Crest Jane 

Wyman stars m this drama 
serial about the vmyard 
owrtng folk of C^fontia 
23SltoaneCoc 


i i~l I H Wi 1 > I 1 wB LW ( t 

" u^TiV / j i r ^ 1 j i 4- 1 til 


CHANNEL 4 


230 FfcteWn c e of Foxes” 


23S mme Cookery dub. 
The recipe tor Savoury 
Pancake 

230 Daytime. Sarah Kennedy 
chairs a stutfio cfiscussion 
on a matter of topics 
lmportance. 3 . 0 0 O a mi . 
Episode 10 of the drama 
seriri set to the Covent 
Garden workshops of a 
fashion design company 
335 Ttame* news 
heatffines 330 Sons and 


430 The 


Game Shown A 




. '.li 

• . "V 

a da iv* 

...■tin 

..-AS’ 


. . .«.■<>»•* 

T-S • 


shown at noon 4.10 The 
Tetobuos. Cartoon series 
4.15 Rndo&y Anna. Tales 
of a weeing, talking doS. 
With Pat Coombs 435 
Brtamyte Bugto. David 
Bellamy's nature watch 
440 The Sooty Show wBh 
Matthew Corbett (r)530 
Alias the Jester 
5.15 TtaamesSpoit Brian 
Moore meets the t ee nager 
who was brought out ora 
coma by a recording made 
by the Arsenal footbafl 
teamrand, has Jimmy 
White's defeat in the 
Benson and Hedges 
tournament dented hs 
hopes for the Wodd 
* Championship? 

5.45 News 630 Thames news 
6JS H^TFurther news of the 
Kidscape national 


,’ V 


635 Cro ss roads. Kath decides 
to cde&rate tor no reason, 
whatsoever; aneMborrasie 
shatters Mickey by . 
"something she says. 

730 Bnmsrdde Farm. WHI 
_ Matt be slowed bail after 
hfe appearance at the 
Magfetrates Court? 

730 Kirightllldar. Michael s 
displays his skflLas a . 
driver, ixiaware mat there 
is aptotto kfflfwn and to 
destroy KITT 

.630 Minder. Dead Men DoTel 
Tales. Arthur tears the 
undeedwhenheisaskBd - 
to store a corpse in las 
lock-up premises (r) 


Britten, tafia about the 
meeting of two cultures 
1145 racier education - 
undergraduates 1235 
Lesson 15 of the ttafian 
conver sa tion course tor 
beginners 1230 Lesson 
five of the German . 
conversation course 1245 
Part four of David 
Beflamy's series on tiie 
botanical histonr of 
America (Ceefax) 130 The 
customs of Rady 138 
Behind the scenes a! 
Glasgow Airport 230 For 
four- and five-year olds 
2.15 Music contrasts 240 
The Arabs' relationships 
with the Israelis since 
1947 

330 Wbrid Bowls. The final 
second round games in 
the Embassy World indoor 
Bowls Championship. 

535 News staamary with 
subtitles. Weather 
530 Red Herrings. Berlin is the 

subject of a two- 
programma profBe.ThiS 
edition includes interviews 
with Mark Reeder, an 
Englishman who came to 
the ctty on holiday six 
years ago and has stayed 
ever since^nd British 
soldiers who are guardng 
fire infamous Wall 
630 Star Trek. The Enterprise 
(fiscovers the deserted 
hufic of another starship, 
orbiting the planet Omega 
IV. (r) 

6L5D Discovering Animals. The 
fifth programme In the 
series mid Tony Soper 
examines the vsIcxjs 
types of deer to be seen in 
me British Isles. 

7.15 Far FtatePteddbe. This . . 
’’ 'week's edition examines 
the environmental damage 
caused py the, now, very 
mecha ni se d eternal 
husbandry industry 
8.10 Tlmcwatch, introduced by 
PeterFrance from the 
Mary Rose Ship Halt, 
Portsmouth. Two ftims 
ilustraflng the Bte and 
times of Hway VII 
330 Yes, Prims Minister, a 
financial crisis looms just 
- at the time when MPs and 
top dvft servants are due 
for a pay increase. WB Sir 


930 TV Eye Learning flie Hart 
- - Way. How the year-old 
teachers’ dispute has hit a 
1,500 pupil comprehensive 
In Richmond, Yorkshire. 
The reporter is Peter Glfr 
1030 News at Ten 
1030 A Sense of toe Past 

Graeme Garden searches 
for old working 
communities' estates 
1130 Kojak. The New York 
policeman is concerned 
about a colleague's 

irrational behaviour 

12.00 ThatfsHa4rwood.A 
tribute to Gregory Peck 
1235 tkght Thoughts 


succead?(Ceefax) 

930 40 Mteutes; Emerg e ncy - 
Bkmawtaury 3. How two 
new recasts to one of the 
country's busiest 
ambulance stations 
survived the* first week. 
(Ceefax) . . 

10.10 Pot Black 86. Tony Meo 
plays Kirk Stevens 
1035 Nawsnight 1130 Weather 
1135 World Bowls. Highlights of 
the day's play in tiie 
Embassy world Indoor 
Championship. Ends at 
12.15 


Power, Orson Wefies and 
Wanda Hendrix. Period 
adventure wan Wetes 
pbying the part of Cesve 
Borgia, ptoteg to conquer 
the whole of Italy with the 
htep of his cohort Oread 
(Power). Borgia sands 
Orsifii lo spy on a pro v ince 
ruled by an elderfy duke. 
There Orsmi falls far tje 
duke's young wife and 
changes his afi eg a nce. 

Dir acted by Henry King. 

430 Cou nt down. Yesterday's 
winner ts chaBenged by 
radio officer, Michael John 
Punfie, from Scarborough. 

530 Badrtert g ^The^&^sh 

from the Woking Leisure 
Centre. 

630 From the bttade-The 
itetons. Part five of the 
series on trade uraonism 
at grassroots level looks 
at me efforts made a by a 
group of Tyne and Wear 
county councfi workers m 
the nationwide campaign 
to prevent the demise of 
the GLC and the 
Metropolitan Comities 

730 Channei four news 

730 Comment With her views 
on a matter of topical 
importance is AUsa- 
Margaret Oidroyd, a 
housewife and mother. 
Weather 

o-w uptmonsxmmm 

Brftannia. The penultimate 
progra m m e of the series 
a law 

lecturer at New Coflege. 
Oxford, examines the case 
of the Bill of Rights at a 
time when a lot of people 
befieve that individual and 
coflective rights have been 
eroded. Lacey argues that 
British socialist opposition 
to a BUI of Rights is 
indefensible, and puts 
forward her own version 
erf a workable BUI of Rights 

830 Treasure Hunt Anthony 
Davis and Jonathan . 
Street both from 
Leicester, send Armeka 
Rice skimming over the 
Devon countryside 
searching for hidden 
^treasure. (Oracle) _ „ 

930 FHm on Four -Taka 2: 
Accou nt s (1983) starring 
Bspeth Chariton, Robert 
- Smeaton and Michael 
McNally. The. story of Mary 
Mawson, who is suddenly 
widowed, and her two 
teenaged sons, who 
decide to leave their 
tenanted Northumberland 
farm and sink their money 
in their own farm in the 
Scottish border country 
near Kelso. Directed by 
Michael Dartow (Oracle) 

1135 Starting OuL The fifth 
drama m a series of eight 
set in an inner city youth 
dub, tackling 
contemporary issues of 
concern to young people. 
Tonight it is the story of a 
young Asian girt who 
defies the wishes of her 
guradians and continues 
her friendship with a white 
boy. 

1135 My Bremer's Keeper. The 
work of a centra for 
alcoholics in London run 


Radio 4 


Mai 


i d 




1148 Tradesman's Entrance. 
PWSmrtti offers an 
■nsigtit into the pains and 
precious few pleasures 
nvohed m setting up your 
own business. 

1230 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice with 
John Howard. 

1237 Transatlantic Quiz, bene 
Thomas and John JuUus 
Norwich challenge Shana 
Alexander and critic 
Brendan Gil 1235 Weather. 

130 The World AtOne: News. 

140 The Archers 135 


8*0^535 Weather. 

I !We*s; financial Report 
i My Word! Panel game 
vcfttD'.ysFDweSano 
Frank Mxrdiaflengmg Joan 
Bakewefi and Dens 
Narsen. 

News. 

Tne Archers. 

> Arry Answers? Listeners 
a? their views on some 
cf me subesss raised m last 
ween s Am# Questions? 
P-ic-nage Frank Delaney, 
WitH M3 friends, takes a 
beer to Skejjg. habest of afl 
holy Irish slares. 

P.Lars of Soceiy. Nick 
Carke examines the 
iterk^g of tne inland 
Revenue, in the throes ot 
a b>3 Kgarezationai change. 
Gtyn Worship &nks 
recordings from the BBC 
Sound Archives. 
Kaleidoscope. 

A Book at Bedtime; ‘But 
for Sorter bv David 




1130-1230 For Schools: 
1130 Nctiseboard (s) 1135 
hi the News 1130 
Waveiengtn (s) 135-330 pm 
For Schools: 135 
Listening Comer 235 The 
Song Tree (s) 230 Living 
Language (s) 2.40 Newscast 


200 News: Woman's Hour. 
Racial prejutfice among 
the young. 

330 News; The Afternoon 
Play. ‘Old Affiances' by 
Trevor Floyie. With Michael 
Elder. Benny Young and 
SJobhan Redmond. 

430 News. 

435 Bookshelf, with Hunter 
Davies, Jonathan Raban, 
and Anne Catchpole. 

435 K al eid o scope. 

530 PM: News magazine 530 


doth Wales S3S pot-630 
==ii Wales Today. £35-730 
The Happiest Days?. 1135- 
1230 Wales Heacffines and 
weather. Scotland 1030 am- 
1030 Dotamaa 6^-730 Report- 
ing Scotland. 830-830 Ceree 
for Concetn. Norttiem Maud 535 
pm-540 Today's Sport. 540- 
630 Inside Ulster . 835-730 Fxst 
Class. 830-930 SpOtiighL 
1136-1230 News Heedfines and 
weather. England 1230 pm-1 
230 A Whacker's World (North- 
West onty). 635-730 Regional 
newsmagazines. 

CHANNEL 

130 Home Cookery 135-230 
Falcon Oast 330-430 That’s My 
Dog 5.15-545 Blockbusters 
630-535 Channei Report 1030 
Prisoner: Ceil Block H 1130 
Mysteries of Edgar Wafiace* 


530-535 dm (continued) 
1230-1.10 am Schools 
Night-Time 

Broadcasting; Radio History 


Radio 3 


635 Weather. 730 News. 

7.05 Morranq Concert 
Copland (An Outdoor 
Overture: LSO); Barlok 
(Dance Suite); Haydn 
(CMvertimento in Eftet H 1W5: 
Warren- 

Green . vioSn;Thocr)pson ,hom; 
Scftiiman. ceflo): Puccini 
(Capricdo sinfOnico: Batin 


RSOtPucdni ( Che 
pence orfanw. La Boheme 
(Bergonzi, Fischer- 
bteskau). 830 New& 

835 MommgConeereeontd. 

Handel (Concerto 
Grosso m D. Op 3 No 6 
fngishConctet): 

Branms (Horn TnomE flat 
Op 40-Periraan.Tuckweli- 
4shkcmzy): uahier (Ueder 
ernes faftrenden 
Geseterr Fscher- 
Dte5kau3300 News 
935 This Week s Composer 
Frescobakfa. Devotional 
Chamber Music. Endy van 
Evers (soprano), Nigel 

Rogers (tenor)- 
945 BerimPhtlharnionte 
Orchestra: Mahler 
(Symphony No 1) 

1030 Engfish Clarinet Music 
Gerafctae ABen (daraiet). 
Gavin Mole (piano). Edward 
German (Song without 
words); Aiwyn (Sonata); 
Easterarook (Out of tne 
_ purple), 

1130 Scottish National 
Orchestra: part 
one. Haydn (Symphony No 

48) 

1135 Six Contine n ts: foreign 
radio broadcasts, 
montored by the BBC. 

1215 Concert pan two. 


Spring). Prokofiev (Summer 
Day suae). 130 News. 

135 Bxrmngham Lunchtime 
Concert: Alexander 
BaAe (ceffi^. Piers Lane 
(piano J. B e e thoven 
(Variations tn E fiat on Bet 
Mannem, from The 
Magic Flutek Faure 
(Romance xi A. Op 69; 
Papillon. Op 77); 

Shostakovich (Sonata. 

Op 40k«nd other works. 

230 Paradise and the Pen: 
Schumann setting of an 
episode from Thomas 
Moore's oriental epic 
LaflaRookh. Edinburgh 
Festival Chorus. 

Orchestre de ropera de 
Lyon, and sokxsts 
mduftro Pamela Cobum 
and NefJerSuns. 

330 Beethoven and Ravel 
Gordon Fergus- 
Thomp so n foimo). 

Beethoven (Sonata in A, 

Op 101; Ravel (Moon). 435 : 
News. 

530 Mairrfy for Pleasure: 

Natalie Wheen with a 
selection of recorded music. 

630 Bandstand: Murray 
International Whitburn 
Brass Band. Hubert Bath 
(Freedom), Adrian Cruft 
(A diversion for band), Arnold 
(Fantasy for brass band). 

730 Schubert and Leslie 
Waiters songs: Ian 
Partridge (tenor), Jennifer 
Partridge (piano). 

Walters's Frolic, Winter, a 
Hard Soioum;Sctiubert 
(Herbst; ttir Grab, 
SehnsuchbDer Bnsame. 

730 Royal Philharmonic 
Orchestra: with Dmitri 
Alexeevtpiano). Part one. 
Mussorgsky (the prelude 
Khovanshcfuna); 

Rachmaninov (Piano 
Concerto No 3). 

835 One Pair of Ears: the 
week on ratio, surveyed 
by Roger Savage. 

' 845 Concert part two- 
Tchaikovsky 
(Symphony No 4). 

930 Tne Mirror in the 
Roadway: poems by 


sd by Peter Dear 
Peter Davalle 


Qaries Tomtinson. read by 
ton. 

1030 Music m our Tune: 

Ranard Rodney Bennett 
(Commeda 2): Enka Fox 
(Quasi una cadenza'r. 

Judah Weir (Several 
Concertos). Performed 


by Lomano. 

1045 Where Old Men May 

Spend the Heat of tne 
Davy: LoffiSusi reads Ame 
Aytor's short story . 

1139 Mcrtos Quartet of 
Stuttgart. Schumann 
(Quartet m F. Op 41 No 


Bagarefles. Op9): 
Beethoven (Quartet in F. 
Op 135) 

1 137 News. 1200 Closedown. 

( Radio 2 

News on the hour HeacBtnes 
530 am, 630, 730, 8L30 Sports 


REGIONAL-TELEVISION VARIATIONS 



TYNE TiEES,^^ 

News 130-230 Man In A Sut- 
case 5-15-5.45 Survival Of The Fit- 
test E3CF645 Northern Life 
730-830 Falcon Crest 1032 The 
works 11.10 Sense Of The Past 
1140 Bedtime Book. Closedown, 
ear* Uffipm Countdown 1-30 
=2= Afice 230 Fenestri 230 
Ffalabaton 235 Hyn O Fyd 235 
Interval 3.10 Take Six Cooks 340 
Ten Mflfion 420 Sense Of Place 
430 Hamer Awr Fwy 530 As Good 
As New 630 Brookside B30 


Spare On Earth 730 Newyddion 
Saidi 730 Bnor Ac Efall 835 
Dinas 931 Y Cleciwr 9-35 HB1 Street 
■ Blues 1030 Film: The Hatter's 
ax>st 1245am Closedown. 

GRAMPIAN 

News 130-230 The Baron 
5.15-545 Blockbusters 630435 
North Tonigm 730 Random 
Choice 730-630 Falcon Crest 
1130 Barney Mfitor 1130 About 
Gaelic 1230 News. Closedown. 

SCOTTISH As London ax- 
---- 1 1 capt 120pm News 
130 Bodyfine 135-230 Riptide 
330-430 Mr Smith 5.15-545 
Blockbusters 630-635 News 
And Scotland Today 730 Now You 
See It 730430 Falcon Crest 
T030 Crime Desk 1035 Sense Of 
The Past 11.05 Late Call 11.10 
The Sweeney 1210am Closedown. 

. CENTRAL Asuxidonex- ^ _ 


Contact 120 News 130-230 
Man In A Suitcase 5.15-545 Canttid 
Camera 630 Crossroads 625- 
730 News 730-830 Falcon Crest 
1030 Central Lobby 1130 
Sense Of The Past 113Q Fight 
Night 1230am Closedown. 

GRANADA 

nada Reports 130-225 


Country Practice 330-430 Young 
Doctors 5.15-545 Survival Of 
The Fittest 630 Granada Reports 

630-635 This Is Your Right 
730-830Falcon Crest 1130Shei- 
tey 1130 Fight Night 1230am 
Closedown. 

TCUf As London except 

120pm News 130-230 
Carson's Law S15^45 Cross- 
roads 630 Today South West 630 
Emmerdaie Farm 730 Knfaht 
Rider 630-630 Busman's Hofiday 
1032 Phoenix And The Levia- 
than 1130 Sense Of The Past 
1130 Marlowe - Private Eye 
1230am postscript. Closedown. 

border 

130-230 Man in A Suitcase 
5.15-545 Candid Camera 630-635 
Lookarourtd 1130 The Master 
1200 News, Closedown. 

YORKSHIRE 

1230pm-1.00 Calendar Lunch- 
time Live 130 News 130-230 
Carson's Law 5.15-545 Sur- 
vival Of The Fittest 630-635 Cal- 
endar 1130 John Briggs Music 
Show 1130 Fight Nignt 1230am 
Closedown. 

TVS As London except 
-L2S 130pm News 130 Home 


Desks 135 pm, 202, 332 432, 
535. 832 645 fmf) only. 935. 430 
w» Charles Nova (s) 630 Ray 
Moore (s) 8.05 Ken Bruce (e) 1030 
Jffnmy young. Food information 
from Tony De Angefi (s) 135 pm 
David Jacobs fs) 230 Gtoria 
Hunrnford fs) 330 Muse AH The 
Way (s)4.00 David Hamilton (s) 

630 Bob Hoiness (M830 Wady 
Whyton introduces Country 
Oub (s) 935 Sports Desk 1030 
Ken Dodd's Palace of Laugnter. 

Ken Dodd with Marlene Sideway, 
Gary Anderson, Simmons 
Brothers and Sytxe Jones 1030 
Star Sound extra. (Nick 
Jackson) 1130 Brian Matthew 
Presents Round MKMght 
(stereo from mkfcughtj 130 am 
Peter Dickson presents 
Nightride (s) 330-430 A Little Night 
Musc(S). T 

C Radiol ) 

News on tin half hour from 
630 am until 630 pm and at 12 
mkinigu. 630 am Adrian John 
730 Mite Read 930 Sanon Bates 
1230pm Newsbeat (tan 
Parkinson) 1245 Gary Davies 200 
Steve Wnght 530 Newsbeat 
(Ian Parkinson) 5.45 Bruno Brookes 
730 Jance Long 1030-1230 
Andy Kershaw (s) VHF Radios 1 6 2 
430 am as Radio 2 1030 pm as 
Racfiol 1200-430 am as Raetia 2 

WORLD SERVICE 

630 Newsdesh 730 News 738 Twenty-' 
four Hours 730 Son Gospel 745 
Network UK 630 Nem lLOB Reflections 
B.15 Country Style 630 John Peel 930 
News 939 Review at ttw British Press 

8.15 The worm Today 930 Financial 
News 940 Look Ahead 945 Monoor 
1030 News 1031 Kings Of Swmg 1030 
Two Cheers for January 1130 News 
1139 News About Braem 11.15 New 
ideas 1135 A Lenar from England 1230 

; Redo Newsreel 1215 Top Twenty 1245 
Sports Romdup 130 News 139 Twenty- 
tour Hours 130 Network UK 145 Short 
Takes 230 News 201 Outlook 245 Juka 
Box Duy (rpt) 330 Racko Newsreel 215 
The Pfeasureas Yours 430 News 439 
Conrnwntary 4.15 Assrovnent 445 The 
wodd Today 530 News 539 A Letter 
From England 5.15 Mend ia n 630 News 
639 hwenty-For Hours 9.15 A Joly 
Good Show 1030 News 1200 The Wodd 
Today 1039 The World Today 1035 A 
Lenar From England 1030 Financial 
News 1040 Reflections 1045 Sports 
Raumtop 1130 News 1139 Commentary 

11.15 Merchant Navy Prognanm e 1130 
Nature Nonbook 1140 The Fannng 
Wodd 1230 News 1209 News About 
Britain 1215 Redo Newsreel 1230 
Music Now 130 News 131 Outlook 130 
Short Takes 145 Book Chocs 130 In 
The Meantime 200 News 209 Revtow of 
the British Prase 215 Devatopmenr 230 
Talking About Music 330 News 209 
News About Britan 215 The World 
Today 338 Business Mature 430 
Newadeak 430 Country Style 545 The 
fltorid Today 


Cookery 135-230 Falcon Crest 
230-460 That's My Dog 5.15-545 
Blockbusters 6J10-6J5 Coast 
To Coast 1QJ10 Prisoner: Cell Block 
H 11 JO Mysteries Of Edgar 
Wafiace* 12308m Company, 
Closedown. 

ANGLIA As London except 
— 1-2Qpm-1.30 News 
5.15545 Blockbusters 6.00- 
6J5 About Anglia 74)0-7 JO Mind 
Your Language 1230 Fofio 
1130 Sense Of The Past 1140 The 
Master 1230am Child Of Cov- 
enant. Closedown. 

mstwEsrs^^- 

News 145-230 Country Prac- 
tioB 5.15545 Diff rent Strokes 
630-645 News 745540 Mag- 
num 1040 Winter Outlook 1045 
West This Week 1130 Sense 
OfThe Past 1140 Marlowe - Pri- 
vate Eye 1240am Closedown. 

HTVWALESff 9 g^ 

940am-1039 Schools lail- 
1046 Looking Forward 6.00pm- 
645 Wales W Six 1040-1130 
Wales This Week. 

140-230 Man (n A Suitcase 
345430 Spire Of Ufa 5.15545 
Diff rent Strokes 630 Good 
Evening Ulster 645545 Poire Six 
740-840 Tuckers Witch 1040 
Counterpoint 1130 Sense Of The 
Past 1140 Yeflow Rose 
1245am News, Closedown. 




engineering 


GRADUATE 




East Africa 


Financial Managers 
Operations Managers 
Mechanical/ 
Electrical Engineers 
Water Engineers 

For assignment in East Africa, a variety of 
opportunities have arisen requiring individuals 
experienced in the above areas. 

Typical dudes of the posts include the operarkm and/ 
or commercial performance of utilities according to 
agreed standards; therefore candidates shmftd have ^ 
reached a high Wd of competency within their field, 
and have worked either within a Water and Sewerage 

Authority or in a Public Utilities environmenL 

( Wcpac experience although desirable is nor 
essential. 

Contracts fora duration of 24-36 months, salaries in 
the region of £23,000 - £25.000 per annum, plus 

generous benefits. 

Full C V. and references should be sent to Tracy 
Millwood: 



Crown Agents 

■‘g&SSSgfa 





SCHOLARSHIPS 




• Do you have, or do you expect to obtain in 1986. a good honours 
degree (upper second or above) in a scientific dsapfinemrwhich there 
is bmit&d demand among employers? 

Would you B«e to be retrained m Computer Science or Operational 
Research with subsetpiert employment as a Srienhstinthe Minisby of 
Defence? 

tf a^eBK^^mce Group) iseffering: 

2. Paymatt of tiation fees 

a An assigned senior MOD Scientist as personal tutor. 

Retraining wffl be accompfehed using suitable MSc or Dip^rama levd 
coiases avatafate at Universities, PtAfechros etc commencing m the 
Autumn of 1986 and successful students will be expected to lake up 
their appointment with the MOD Science Group as soon asme course^ 
is completed. / v 

i^furth& dwarfs and appSc^ionfOTis please write to: / . i 
OT{S)la2T Room 8H4, a Ofristopher House, f 1 

Southwark Street London SEl DID. \ 


A residential, co-educirtional college with an international 
atmosphere, 275 students 16 plus 

SIXTH FORM SCHOLARSHIPS 

for the 

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE 

a two year, six-subject course leading to university entry in Britain and 
world-wide. Ideal for the academic student who wishes to maintain a 
broad range of subjects. 

The scholarship examination will be held at the college on Saturday, 
1st March. 

Further details available from: 

The Principal, St Clare's, Oxford 139 Banbury Road, 

0X2 7AL 

.Tel: Oxford (0865) 52031 


2K 



WINTER SPORTS 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


StimUNOY /AWEBG#«; 


TUSCANY- Bi MHliWfll 

H.1HS . 


SKI WHIZZ 

. * * * 

UWM CIUHM PorlNH 

_n» dm the tuires a 

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Fab 8 £159 
. Feb 15 £189 

top rmvn a swua nmortt 
Ring 0I-37G-0W9 

ATOL I tOO 


MacG 


FEBRUARY 
SKI BARGAINS 

S FEBRUARY 


Priori • 

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t T69 

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GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE 

BOARD OF EXTRA-MURAL 
STUDIES 

FINANCE OFFICER 

A graduate, preferably a qualified or part-qualified 
accountant, is sought to supervise the keeping and 
presentation of the Board's accounts; to advise on 
and to implement a new system of financial 
management and record-keeping; and to advise 
: the Director and officers on the financial 
! implications of new policies and activities. Two 
; assistant staff are attached to the Finance Office. 
This post offers considerable scope for initiative 
i and for innovatory analysis of a complex 
operation. Three year contract in the first 
! instance. Salary scale £9,766 -0 £>2,636- Closing 
date: 18 February 1986. 

For application forms and farther details: The 
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Studies. Madingley Hall, Madfngley. Cambridge 
CB3 8AQ- Tetphone: Madingley (0954) 210636 


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32 


THE TIMES THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 1986 


THE TIMES 


First Published 1785 


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Victims tell of 
torture by 
Marcos regime 

From Alan McGregor. Geneva 
Details of more than SU through the training of mili- 
cases of human rights viola- tary personnel in US military 
-i— Philippines, schools." it adds. A senior 




lions in the 
including torture — described 
as “pan of a systematic 
scheme of suppressing 
dissent" — disappearances 
and summary executions, are 
set out in the latest “black 
book" issued by the World 
Council of Churches. 

It has been submitted to 
the 43-nation UN Human 


Filipino officer informed the 
US Attorney General at the 
time. Mr Ramsey Clark, that 
he had learnt the techniques 
at Fort Bragg and other 
training establishments. 

Typical among lonure vic- 
tims is Mr Wenifredo 
Villareal, arrested for failing 
to present a residence certifi- 


Righis Commission meeting cate to soldiers at a military 
here. checkpoint, and suspected of 

Testimonies from those being a member of the New 


victims who survived were 
collected over a six-month 
period by Philippines 
organizations working in 
collaboration with the 
churches^ there^^ie^Vorjd 

Filipino soldiers yesterday 
attacked a motorcade carry- 


people’s Army communist 
guerrillas: "1 was boxed and 
kicked in the stomach, my 
nape struck with a rifle butt, 
my face submerged in a toilet 
bowl many times. ...My penis 
was tied with live electrical 
wire, my heart seemed to 
_ . burst every time the current 

ing supporters of the pppo- flowed trough ray bodv. 
sition presidential candidate. -They put hot pepper on 
Mrs Corazon Aquino, smash- mv penis. One of the top- 
ing car windows and thrwten- , orere found Vick's 

ing them with death. There Vaporub ointment 


were no serious injuries in the 
incident near Mrs Aquino's 
home town of Concepcion. 
She had not joined the 
procession when the violence 
erupted. 


m my 
pocket and emptied it into 
my eyes, nose and mouth....! 
was forced to drink two litres 
of muddy water after which I 
was boxed in the stomach so 
that Lite water spurted out of 
my mouth." 

According to testimony 
from women detainees, sex- 
ual molestation and rape 
were routine. 


Council said yesterday that 
information arriving too late 
for inclusion in the book 
included the case of a 
campaign worker for Mrs 
Corazon Aquino, the oppo- 
sition presidential candidate, 
whose body was found with 

the fingers cut off. . . , . . , — — - 

“The depths of degradation marl,a J. J,. y. 63 ” a ®°’ I days touring India ap- 


• MANILA: The Manila 
Times, closed down when 
President Marcos declared I The effects of five busy 



£435m to 
be spent 
on ethnic 
culture 

By David Henson 

Arts Correspondent 

The Arts Council is to 
spend 4 pa* cent of its budget, 
£435 million, on Afro-CarEb- 
bean and Asian arts over the 
next two years to help to 
rectify the neglect of ethnic 
culture in the past 
Arts groups which receive 
money from the councS will 
be asked to fill out a checklist 
on whether they are generally 
aware of Che cultural tra- 
ditions and art forms of Asia, 
Africa and the Caribbean, if 
there is scope within their 
work for the promotion of 
arts of other than European 
cultures, and if they operate a 
policy of integrated casting 


io which ihe regime has 
fallen reflect its desperation." 
the council says. “The 
(Benigno) Aquino assassina- 
tion was not an isolated 
event It is pan of a pattern. 
Normally there are no in- 
quiries and no 
investigations." 

The book describes tonure 
techniques io the Philippines 
as “strikingly similar" 


resumed publication yea- — t0 be "taking their 
terday under the same family fTf ‘ JlL 
nwnmhin lAP rervnmv toll OD the Pope as he 


ownership (AP reports). 

The Manila Times is the 
second daily claiming an 
independent editorial policy 
to begin publication since 
President Marcos called the 
election. The Philippine Daily 
Inquirer . published by 


yawns during a Mass 
attended by more than 
500,000 people at Ma- 
rina Beach in Madras 
yesterday. 

The Pope apparently 
I told a Vatican official 


to 

those practised and taught by several weeks ago. 

US soldiers during the Viet- The restored newspaper is 


Maximo Soliven. changed, the Roman Catholic 
from a weekly to a daily- c i ergy m ^ 


nam war and used by “other 
repressive states in .Asia and 
Latin America". 

"There are indications that 
torture technology is im- 
ported and channelled 


Today's events 


Royal engagements 

Princess Anne. Chancellor of 
ihe University of London, 
visits Lillian Penson Hall of 
Residence. W2. 2.30. 

The Duke of Kent, as 
Honorary Fellow of the Institu- 
tion of Electrical Engineers, 
attends the Faraday lecture at 
Logan Hall. London Unixersity 
of Education. WCL 5.55. 

New exhibitions 

Finnish Graphics: M or lev 
Gallery . t>l Westminster Bridge 
Road. SEI: Mon io Fn 10 to 0 
( ends Feb 28). 

Russian paintings: Vital v 
Komar. Alexander Molamid"; 
Arts Council Gallery. Bedford 
St. Belfast: Tucs to Sal 10 to 6. 

Designer Knitwear: Frame 
Museum Gallery. North Pa- 
rade. Somerset: Mon to Sat 10 
to 4 { ends* Feb 28). 


published by Mr Ramon 
Roces. who has been running 
a successful printing and 
magazine publishing busi- 
ness. 

Electron campaign, page 5 


Last chance to see 

Recent paintings by Anne 
Gingell: Wo I I son College. 

Linton Rd. Oxford; 10 to 
lends ioda>). 

Music 

Concert by the Halle Choin 
Manchester Free Trade Hail 
7.30. 

Concert by ihc Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra: Colston 
Hall. BristoL 7.30. 

Ekx'iric Phoenix celebrity 
recital: Royal Institute of Brit- 
ish Architects. 7.30. 

Concert by .Aranjucz Guitar 
Trio: Churchill Hall. Worksop 
College. Notts. 7.45. 

Piano recital by Liora Ziv 
Li; The King's School. Otter? 
St Mary. Devon. 7.30. 

Concert by ihc Allegri Quar- 
tet: Grosvenor Suite. Grand 
Hold. Colmorc Row. Bir- 
mingham. 7.30. 

The Fairer Sax recital: St 
George s. Brandon Hill. Bris- 
tol. I. 


! wrong either to try to 
become as much like 
Hindus as possible, or to 
concentrate on social and 
[educational work to the 
neglect of preaching. 
Papal blessing, page 7 


Greece rejects asylum 
appeal from Duvalier 

From Mario Modiano, Athens 
Greece said yesterday it residence". Mr Papaioannou 
had rejected a request for said* “The answer was ‘No'." 
political asylum from Presi- The original report asserted 
dent Jean-Claude Duvalier of that Argentina, Spain. Italy 
T, “ ' : and Switzerland had already 


Haiti. 

Mr Miltiadis Papaioannou. 
chief spokesman for the 
Government, confirmed a 
local press report that the 
Greek .Ambassador to Ven- 
ezuela. Mr Constantine 
Dimadis. had been officially 
asked if Greece was prepared 
to give President Duvalier 
asylum and a permanent 


turned down similar requests 
from the Haitian President 
There is no record here of 
any previous connection be- 
tween President Duvalier and 
Greece. 

The two countries have 
diplomatic relations. 

Ton tens back, page 8 


Id a letter to arts grou p s, 
the cotmtiFs secretary-gen- 
eral. Mr Lake Khmer, says 
that organizations funded by 
the council will be expected to 
adopt plans matching the new 
policy for their own opera- 
tions. 

The council’s plan says the 
Afiro-Caribbean and Asian 
communities are populous 
and face particularly grave 
social and cultural problems. 
The council believed it had 
vital responsibility to 
encourage their artistic activ- 
ities and to promote their 
employment opportunities 
“There are many fine Afro- 
Caribbean and Asian artists 
working in this conn try' and 
their valuable contribution to 
the creativity and vitality of 
the nation's cultural life is 
neither folly appreciated nor 
exploited," Sir William Rees- 
Mogg, the connoTs chair- 
man, said. 

The plan calls for a 
minimum of 4 per cent of 
Arts Council expenditure to 
be committed to the develop- 
ment of ethnic arts by the end 
of two years. 

It also urges the develop- 
ment. implementation and 
monitoring of equal opportu- 
nities in employment policies, 
the appointment of a foil time 
senior arts officer responsible 
for ethnic minority arts, the 
training of Arts Council staff 
to advise and support ethnic 
artists and arts, and the 
appointment of specialist 
advisers and a monitoring 
group. 


Letter from Berlin 


On the trail of the 
spy-swap lawyer 


AU talk here about the 
looming East-West prisoner 
exchange comes back to the 
two traditional participants 
in such transactions: 
Glienicke, the mysterious 
Berlin bridge, and VogeL the 
mysterious Berlin lawyer. 

Both were involved in the 
first of these exchanges to 
become part of popular 
memory. This was ra 1962 
when, from opposite direc- 
tions, the U2 pilot. Francis 
Gary Powers, and the Soviet 
"masierspy". Rudolf Abel, 
walked across the bridge, 
after a lot of preparatory 
work by the lawyer. 

Since then, bridge and 
lawyer seem to have entered 
the myth and legend of East- 
West relations. But in this 
city for these last two days, 
while the bridge has been 
visible, the lawyer has not 

As to who Wolfgang 
VogeL aged 6!, actually is, 
some of what we read and 
bear makes him appear to be 


green stucco, detached house 
with a polished brass plate 

A brisk woman opened 
the door and invited me in 
immediately, without asking 
. my business, which sug- 
gested that this was a house 
of many callers. 

She was one of four 
secretaries working in two 
ground floor rooms. Type- 
writers rattled. The ’sec- 
retaries moved between die 
rooms carrying documents. 
Files were’ slacked every, 
where. 

A bearded man. perhaps 
the communist equivalent of 
the solicitor's clerk, said 
“Excuse me" as he pushed 
past with a bulky folder. It 
was the busiest office this 
correspondent has so fer 
seen in a communist coun- 
try. 

The secretary was polite - 
charming, even — bur firm. 
No, Herr Vogel was not 
available. No. he was not in 
Berlin. He might be back in 


a kind of Lord Goodman of a few days. Perhaps he could 
East Berlin: ibe counsellor of help then. No, he could not 


his co u try's ruling class 
(Herr Honnecker, the party 
leader is a personal friend, it 
seems), but also a dispenser 
of humanitarian aid to 
needy Utile people who 
could not normally afford 
his fees. 

But his principle activity 
has no Goodman esqne 
about it. Herr 
Vogel fixes bow much the 
West German Government 
has lo pay to get East 
German political prisoners, 
and others, out of East 
Germany. 


say where he was. 

Back to the bridge. It is a 
sturdy, iron structure span- 
ning a lake and linking the 
south-western tip of West 
Berlin with Potsdam on East 
German territory. It is an 
appropriate place for a 
legend to be situated. 

Over the bridge come and 
go each day the patrols 
which the Russians and the 
Western allies are allowed to 
carry out on each other's 
territory’. 

The American Major 


/ 


-vt 



. f . Nicholson, who met his - 

The East German's main death on one such patrol last Y 
interest in such transactions year when he peered too 
is to get rid of trouble closelv at a Soviet barracks, 
makers, but above all to knew this bridge welL 
earn West German marks. Now the only signs of 
That aim is disguised by the anything unusual were 
East Germans explaining the successive arrivals of the 
cash as compensation for the world’s camera crews and 

news agency reporters, work- 
ing in shirts to keep an eye 
on the place, huddled 
against the cold in their cars. 

None of us know when or 
whether the bridge will make 
a further contribution to its 
legend, although Herr VogeL 
where ever he is. un- 
doubtedly does. 


investment" their state has 
made in a particular citizens' 
education and welfare. 

The search for Herr Vogel 
took me across the Wall at 
Checkpoint Charlie and, visa 
and currency formalities 
completed, on a drive 
through East Berlin lo the 
suburb of Friederichsfelde. 

There, at number four, 
Reilerstrasse. stood a fijne- 


Frank Johnson 


. . ■ t : 




-:.V< 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 16,962 



ACROSS 

1 This plant is a nuisance, you 
and 1 would say {8>. 

9 Sloth, perhaps - a blissful 
state to an art benefactor (S>. 

10 What a surprise, finding the 
orderly officer in one <4J. 

11 Singer opposed to the gen- 
eral trend (7-5) 

13 Read carefully through a 
form of service (6). 

14 Outline of film on race is 
distorted (8). 

15 The book of the law (7). 

16 Normally young Brunei's 
territory 171. 

20 Scotsman in van taking 
England's opener for a drink 
( 8 ). 

22 Beer for the concierge (6). 

23 A student of world-shaking 
events (12). 

25 In the same passage one's 
identified as a wader (4). 

20 They should like a 
nobleman's statements (8). 

27 Members of REME unit, 
one insubordinate to Cap- 
lain Bligh (8), 

DOWN 

2 Trendy former spouse, 
presumptous though lacking 

skill <8). 

3 Eccentric is so crude - out to 
be uncivil (12). 

4 It ran be eaten cold - use 
after cooking fast (8). 


5 Operator who looks down in 
the mouth? (7) 

6 Tiny pan in revolution 
taken by teacher (6). 

7 Secure new grain store (4k 

8 Possessive feminine weaver 
accepted one such bequest 
( 8 ). 

12 The report of Mark Twain's 
death, for example? ( 12). 

15 Second displaced alien is 
from central Europe (8). 

I? Liule devil not forbidden, 
it's understood. 

18 Showing loo much 
discrimination in French 
airspace (4-4). 

19 Courageous conduct of a 
priestess of Venus? (7). 

21 Full value of a cavalry 
charger (6). 

24 Old Peruvian emperor 
imprisoned in Josselin Cas- 
tle (4). 

Solution of Puzzle No 1&96I 




Recital by Wissam Boustany 
t flute) and Russell Lomas "{ 
piano); The Royal Exchange 
Theatre. Manchester, I. 

Recital by Delta Saxophone 
Quarter. St James's Church. 
Piccadilly, t.10. 

Recital by Sarah 
Con nollx( mezzo-soprano); St 
George's Church. 

Square. Wl. 1 . 10. 


Books — paperback 


Talks. lectures 
Impact of television on 
public life I Inside Media sc- 
ries): 1C.A Gallerv. The Mall. 
7.30. 

Dr Paul Coates on “The Veil 
of Perception": Queen's Build- 
ing. Exeter University. 4.30. 

“From Hemlock io Heroin." 
h> Dr J.R Malpass: Chemistry 
Lecture Room B. Leicester 
Unixcrsitx. 4.15. 

The Achievements of the 
Law Commission, by Sir Ralph 
Gibson: Gustave Tuck Lecture 
Theatre. University College. 
London. 5. 1 5. 

The origin and evolution of 
the Universe ( the 1 3th 
Harland Lecture), by Prof LS 
Longair: Newman Building. 
Exeter University. 5.15. 

The Golden Age of Anglo- 
Saxon Art: The British Library. 
II. 

John Constable by James 
Malpas: Tate Gallery, I. 

Highlight: Lacc in the Textile 
Study Room, by Alyson Mor- 
ris. 12: and ceramics’ and glass, 
by JVG Mallet. 1.15: Victoria 
& Albert Museum. 

General 

Sale of Brooklyn Public 
Library collection: Bloomsbury 
Book Auctions. 3 and 4. 
Hardwick St. ECI. II and 2.30. 

"It’s Your BBC!": discussion: 
Civic Hall, the Boulevard. 
Crawley. W Sussex. 


The Literary Editor's selection of interesting books published this 
week: 

FICTION 

Dust Tracks on a Road, by Zora Neale Hurston (Virago. £4.95) 
Funny Monea. by Mark Singer (Picador, £3.50) 

Sleepless Nights, by Elizabeth Hardwick (Virago. £3.50) 

Hanov^ | JoN-RCrioN 8 ' 11 * L> "" C Rci<1 £2 - 95 > 

A Curious life for a Lady, the story of Isabella Bird, by Pat Ban- 
(Penguin. £3.951 

Collins Road Allas of Europe (Collins. £4.95) 

Europe Without Baedeker, by Edmund Wilson (Hogarth Press. 
£4.05) 

Feminism In France from May '68 to Mirterand. by Claire 
Duchen (Routlcdgc A Kegan PauL £6.95) 

The Economic Decline of Modern Britain. The Debate Between 
Lefi and Right, by David Coates & John Hillard (Wheatsheaf. 
£6.95) 

The Fortress. A Diary of Anzio and After, by Raleigh Trevelyan 
(Buchan & Enright. £5.95) 

PH 


Weather 

forecast 


Anniversaries 


Births: Anne, reigned 1702- 
14. London. IbbS; Ugo 
Foscolo, poet and dramatist. 
Zakinthos. Greece. 1778: Sir 
Charles Wheatstone, physicist. 
Gloucester. 1802: Sir Henry 
In-ing. Keinton Mandevillc. 
Somerset. 1838: William Mur- 
phy. physician. Nobel laureate 
1934. Stoughton. Wisconsin. 
1892: “Babe” Ruth, baseball 
player. Baltimore. 1895. 

Deaths: Charles II. reigned 
1660-85. London. 1685: Lan- 
celot (“Capability") Broun, 
garden designer. 1783: Carlo 
Goldoni, dramatist. Paris. 1793: 
Joseph Priestley, clergyman, 
educator, and scientist. 
Northumbncrland. Pennsylva- 
nia. 1804: Gustav Klimt, 
painter, founder of the Vienna 
Sczcssion school. Vienna. 1918. 


£250,000 bond 


Navigators contest 


The winning number of this 
month’s £250.000 Premium 
Bond pri/c is 7AW 525386. 
The winner lives in 
Dunbartonshire. 


Parliament today 


Commons (2.30): Debate on 
the Royal Navy- 
Lords (3.00k Third reading 
of the Agricultural Holdings 
Bill: First day of the report 
stage of the Shops Bill: Gaming 
(Amendment) Bill (committee 

stage). 


Details and entry forms for 
| the Royal Institute of 
Navigation's 1986 Navigators 
Competition are available from 
The Royal Institute of Naviga- 
I lion, I Kensington Gore, Lon- 
don. SW7 2AT; tel: 01-589 
5021. Competitors, aged 8 lo 
1 23. are asked to wnte about 
[getting from one place to 
| another a journey, or invent a 
I new navigational technique, or 
■ write a history of some son of 
navigation. The closing dale for 
entries is October 1 . 1986. The 
prize giving will be held in 
London in early January 1987. 


Roads 


The Midlands: M5: Major 
roadworks between junctions 4 
and 5 (A38 

Bromsgro vc/ Birmingham 
SW/A38 Droilwich); 

contraflow: 50 mph speed 
restrictions. MS: Contraflow 
from junctions 2 to 3 IA4123 
Dudley/ Birmingham W and 
A456 Halesowen/Birmingham 
W). A 49: Roadworks at three 
separate locations between 
Shrewsbury and Ludlow, each 
with temporary lights. 

Wales and West M4: Out- 
side lane dosed westbound 
between junctions 22 and 23 
(A446 Chepstow and B4245 
Magor): hard shoulder only 
open casibound. A39: Tem- 
porary lights (24 hours) on 
Stratton bypass. Bude. Corn- 
wall. A38 : Middle lanes of i 
both carriageways on the 
Buck fast to Plymouth road, 
closed at Ivy Bridge bypass. 

The North Ml 80: 
Contraflow between junction 3 
(M 180/181) and junction 4 
(Ermine Street interchange). 
Scunthorpe. A49: Bypass 
construcuoin N and S of 
Tarporley. Cheshire. A688: 
Pcdcstrinisaiion scheme in 
Bishop Auckland market place. 

Scotland: A93: Single line 
traffic and temporary lights 
between M90 junction II 
tkior) and Perth city boundary. 
A74: Outside lanes dosed on 
both carriageways at Crawford 
bypass (Lanarkshire). A94: By- 
pass construction S of Forfar. 
Angus: care required. 
Information suppled by tbe AA 


cold unstable E aft-stream wffl 
ha across the oounuy 

B am to midnight 

London, MMamte, N Wales, 
NW, central N England, Lake 
District, Me of Man, SW Scotland: 

Cloudy with soma clearer intervals 

and scattered snow showers; 
winds E moderate or fresh; max 
tamp 2C (36 F). 

St, central S, SW England, 
Channel Islands, S Wales: Snow 
aring slowly, cloudy with dearer 
intervals and Isolated snow show- 

era later winds NE or E moderate; 

max temp 4C (39F). 

East Anglia, E, NE England, 
Borders, EcBnurgh, Dundee, Aber- 
deen: Cloudy, snow showers; 
winds E fresh, locally strong; max 
- » 2C (36f). 

aasgow. Central Highlands, 
Northern Ireland: Cloudy, a few 

breaks in sheltered areas, occa- 

sional snow showers; winds E 
moderate or fresh; max temp 2C 

(38P)- 

Moray Firth, NE, NW Scotland, 

Argyt, Orkney, Shetland: Cloudy, 

some sunny periods, isolated snow 

showera; winds E moderate; max 

temp 3C (47F). 

Outlook lor tomorrow and Sat- 
urday: Snow, showers, mainly In 
the E; remaining cold. 


Swi Rises: Sun Sets: 
7.31 am <59 pm 




High Tides 



Mean rises 
6.32 nn 1.19 pm 
Now Moon : February 9 

Lighting-up time 

London 5.29 pm to 7.00 am 

Bristol 5.39 pm io 7 .09 am 
Cd totourgh 5-26 pm to 726 am 
‘ lor 5.31 pm to 7.14 am 

‘ 5.54 pm to 7.17 am 


b-blur sky; be -blur sky and doud: c- 

rtoutty. o-oinrad: f-foq: d-drtste: h- 

b.ni: misrmtsl: r raln. *-anow: ui. 
tiiundrrslorm. 

Arrows -show wind direct Ion. wind 

spred imphi ctrch’d. Tenwratare refill- 

made 



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Around Britain 


TMe measured in metros: l«= 12606 Jt 

K 


“Ui; 


Hil U‘ 


Yesterday 


EAST COAST 
Scactnro 
BridSnatan 
Cromer 


Temperatures « mttday yeswoey c. 
daud: I. lair; r. ram; s. sun. 

C F 

c 2 36 Guernsey 

c 1 3< Inverness 1 

c 2 36 Jenny c 

t 3 37 London t 

s 3 37 M'ncfcster 

l 3 37 Newcastle c 

4 39 R'ntdBway c 


Ctoefon 
Mauasto 
sSmtCOAST 


Sun Rain 
hrS in 

.12 
.09 
.10 
-05 

.13 
Jtt 



The pound 


Snow Reports 



Bank 


Australia 5 

Austria Sch 
BetgkwiFr 
CenadaS 
Denmark Kr 
FiWandMkk 
France Pr 
any Dm 
Greece Dr 
Hong Kong S 
Ireland Pt 
Italy Um 
Japan Yen 
Netherlands GM 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
South Africa Rd 
Sputa Pte 
Sweden Kr 
Switzerland Fr 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Dnr 


24J5 

TIM 

24)75 

1277 

7.78 

1058 

3.46 

254.00 
11.10 

1.15 

2385.00 

277.00 


10.78 

22300 

25B 

21000 

1068 

233 

1.45 

56000 


Bank 
Sens 
1-875 
23.05 
67.60 
1385 
1207 
7.38 
1003 
028 
224 M 
10S9 
1.09 
2265X0 

263J» 

3.705 

1023 

21200 

3-25 

2044)0 

1033 

278 

1.48 

500-00 


varied worn sun 
varied good fine 


Rama tar small denomination bank notes 
only as aupsfted by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Different rates apply lo travellers' 
ar lore 


closed 


RetaH Price Index: 3729 

London: The FT Index 
down 0.8 at 1163.1 


Depth Conditions 

(cm) Off 

L U Piste Piste 

AUSTRIA 

Jgis 25 75 good 

Axamer Liz urn good 
Seefeld SO 130 good 

Good skiing 
FRANCE 

Megeve 90 180 good varied 

Excellent piste conditions 
Morzme 70 190 good 

Excellent skiing 
SWITZERLAND 

Andermatt 100 220 good 
Excellent piste skiing 
Davos 105 185 good 

Good skiing all pistes 
Grindelwald 70 120 good 
Good above 1300 metres 
Murren 100 150 good 

Excellent ski conditions 

Italy 

Courmayeur 200 350 good 
Excellent skiing 


Runs to 
resort 


Weather 

(5pm) 

°C 


varied 


varied 

varied 

varied 

varied 


good 

good 

good 

good 

good 

good 


fine 

fine 


fine 

tine 

fine 

fine 


-2 


-2 


powder good doud 


PortMHo - Item to pta* 
Mondav Saturday rriwtl your dally 
Pdi Iloilo total 

Arid ititv loqrtlyr lo determine 
lour wwl.lv Portfolio total. 

II vour total malrhf*! I hr puhttwrd 

wrUV dlthlcud tiwirr you hatr won 

I out i u, til or a Uiiirc of llu* pri» monry 

I -.laird (or rn.il and mi&i claim 

prise as instructed Mow 

„ How to data) 

No Oawii can bo acotwod ootaMo thM* 
hour*. 

Vnu mint nose your card wlUi you 
when vou irk-ohonc 

If you a rr unafcJi- to fpuuhorip 
someone rhr ran claim on vour behalf 

hul Ihev mud hate vour card and call 

rhe Time*. Poet folia clams lino 
between llir stipulated limes. 

No rcsoon-ahiiiiv can he accented 
lor r allure 10 ronlarl the claims office 
(pc anv reason wilhui the stated 
hones 

Tne aiynp instructions are as- 
Dlirsrtifp lo both dally and weekly 
dtSKlend Claims 

•Momo Tunes Portfolio cards include 

minor misprints in I he instructions on 

th* - rp\ prse side These cards ore not 

invauctalPd 

•The wordtiM or Rides 2 and 3 has 

been PMMnrim Irom earlier ( pistons 

lor clanfir.iiiofi purposes. The Came 

Il'ril h no* aliened and will continue 

lo he placed r|i esactls Ihe same way 

as before 


.14 

.08 

JOT 

SB 

-07 

SB 

-06 

-07 

.15 

.13 

.IB 

.11 

.11 

in 

JM 

.09 

.19 

-05 

A5 


tamw - M 

WEST COAST 
Sc*y Mm - .01 

Nawpay - - 


Mdx 
C F 

3 37 drtCEfc 
S 37 (UI 

1 34 cloudy 

2 38 duR 

3 37 doudy 
3 37 cloudy 

3 37 cloudy 

3 37 duR 

4 3S did 

2 36 dufl 
4 38 du8 

3 37 rtgufly 

4 39 drfzzpm 
4 39 doutfy 

4 39 duB 

5 41 cloudy 

3 37 cktzrte 
5 41 tirtnte 

4 39 drizzle 
3 37 duB 

a 37 dull 

3 37 dufl 

5 41 duu 

5 41 cfcxady 

4 39 dul 

5 41 duff 

6 43 Si pm 

4 39 ckxidy 

6 43 duff 


g fr a co nt b e 
Tate 
Cotaryn Bay 


Sun Rain 
hre m 
Ai 

-..04 

_ _ - .05 

OautfHi - .05 

ENGLAND AND WALES 

.10 
.07 
.06 
.04 
.03 


.01 

.18 

.12 

01 


London 
BfamMipt 
Bristol ( 
CanSfll 


NotHnjjham 

N’ca-n-iyne 


1.8 


SCOTLAND 
Frird tae mub - 
Prestwick 

rireo 

Stornoway 
Lsnrick 
WiC* 

ftfcw 

8L Andrews 
Edktinngb 

NORTHERN mELAND 
- .02 


.02 

A4 

.02 

.11 

.11 

.11 


Max 
C F 
4 39 dril 
4 39 cloudy 
4 39 drizaoi 

4 39 ran pm 

5 41 ran pm 

3 37 driztoe 

2 36 snow pm 

3 37 dnzpm 
2 36 dowdy 

4 39 ram 
4 39 ran. 

4 39 dnzzfe 

2 36 dpffl 

3 37 

3 37 drizzle 

1 34 snow 

4 39 doudy 

3 37 ram f 

4 39 ranpm 

5 41 ram am 
4 39 bright 

4 39 shown 
3 37 dam 

2 36 snow 

3 37 dam 

3 37 dpm 

4 38 rain pm 


These are Tuesday's figures 


Abroad 




Algtare 


MKMM'K e. cloud; d. drizzle; t. tain IgL log: r. ralm a. sun; so, snow: t thunder 

C F C F C* 

e -1 30 Hn c 9 48 Rome c 9 <8 

c . ^ a 14 57 Sahtwig a 1 V 

1 TO » terita l 14 57 3 Panto 
3 3 37 Meto’mc f24 75 SPito«» 
r 8 43 MotaooC 

S 13 55 MM 
f 7 46 BSton f 2 38 
a -1 30 Montreal 
c 14 57 Meacav an -11 12 

c -T 30 Munich s 2 ; 

s 12 64 Nairobi I 28 82 Tm 

s-JO 14 Naptas l 10 SO TfflL.. 

1 ’5 JtefMW S 18 64 Tanerffe 


C F 

r 948 Ootogno 
1 14 57 C^^jon 
t IB 64 Cortu 
c 7 45 DuhBn 
a -2 23 Duhrtwofli 
c 6 43 Pm 
s 19 66 Hurew ra 


, m the above reports, supplied by representatives of foe Ski Club 
of Great Britain, l refers to lower slopes and U to upper, and art 
I to artificial. Tuesday's report . 




■* TIME* XLWNPAPEBS . 

iaue> Punh-d .itul pttlMHhetl L 

hii-w^iwpers Lin inert, t PennlnolOft 
’Jlreel- LfHidon. El Telephone Ol 481 
4iOQ TtinrydUx. February fc. I9to. 

RMii^tereq «\ J new^naper at Ihe PM 

Olfire 




1 34 N Yoifc 

C 4 38 Me* 
s 31 88 Oslo 

_ Paris 
s 23 ?3Mttaa 
1 17 63 Perth 

;!£?■*■ 

Sri -3 27 



Tokyo 

r E 43 Tonne 
s -8 18 Tunis 
e -1 30 Valencia 
S -2 58 Vane ‘vac 
s 29 84 Venice 
3-3 2? Vienna 
1 4 39 Warsaw 
> 13 55 WaehTon 
S 23 73 
C2S 77 



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