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No 62,383 


THE TIMES 

Tomorrow 


Not-so-great 

dictators 

Ex-Emperor 
Bokassa is no longer 
feeding his enemies 
to the crocodiles; 
“Baby Doc’ Duvalier 
has lacked the 
staying power of his 
Papa. Has the 
permanence gone 
out. of dictatorship? 

Broadway melody 

Me and My Girl 
rocks the 
Great White Way 

Victorian recipe 
Traditional taste 
of brown bread 
ice cream 

One-day cricket 
England opens 
against the 
West Indies 


The Times Portfolio dally 
* competition prize of £2^)00 

L was shared yesterday between 

Mr Mark Killengray of Wal- 
thamstow, London and Mr 
Mark Dnffree of Harlow, 
i Essex. Portfolio list, page 22; 

t bow to play, information ser- 

I rice, back page. 

| Tory MP 

attacked 
| at poly 

T. Michael Fallon, the Conserva- 

fc live MP for Darlington was 

% punched in the face during a 

\ visit to Sunderland Polytech- 

5 nic. Fifteen minutes after the 

1 attack he had to jump out of 

' the way of a car which was 

driven towards him. 

Tunnel talks 

Counter-terrorism measures 
for the Channel Tunnel are 
expected w be discussed today 
when Mr Douglas Hurd meets 
the French minister for the 
interior in Paris Page 2 

T^IT 


i S*uo\ guys’/ 

4 Am a p 

Shuttle search 

A US mini-submarine has 
photographed what Nasa offi- 
cials believe to be pan of the 
shuttle Challenger's right- 
hand solid rocket booster, the 
prime suspect in the world's 
worst space disaster Page 5 

Troops lost 

Two Israeli soldiers are miss- 
ing after an ambush in south 
Lebanon in which two mem- 
bers of the Israeli-backed 
South Lebanon Army militia 
were killed and a third Israeli 
soldier was wounded. 

Chad bombing 

France confirmed the bomb- 
ing, of the airport at 
Ndjamcna. the capital of 
Chad, by what was believed 10 
be a Libyan fighter aircraft 
approaching from the rebel- 
held north Page 7 

Botham doubt 

The England cricket team's 
plans for today's one-day in- 
ternational against West In- 
dies are clouded by doubts 
concerning Ian Botham, the 
man who hates to miss 
matches P»*e 24 

Hone News 2-4 Laden 13 
0*ersas 5,74 Utws |3 
dnjjts 1428 OUrnry M 
im 15 Partiament 4 

kr "?< issu* g 

gSUuuJj |S 3 » 

nupr 12 TV & Radio 31 
M 32 Univenidess 14 
10-12 Wodier 32 
Igtr Report M_Wgb » 


THE 



TIMES 


TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 


MPs try to keep 
Leyland British 
after rival bids 


By Philip Webster.Fofitica] Reporter 


The Government was under 
renewed pressure from Con- 
servative as well as Labour 
MPs last night to prevent the 
sale of British Upland's truck 


sale of British Leylantf struck cent and dismay that the 
division to General Motors of Government appeared to be . *- on *? 1 
the United States, and particu- presiding over an auction of ,ntensi y 
larly. to ensure that Land some of the best of British P ersua “ e 
Rover remains in British industry. hL if 

* ian ^ s " He asked Mr Chanson to Sweeten 

Conservative MPs repre- take the matter to. the Cabinet Vehicles 
sen ling Midlands seats were on Thursday so that “this 
linrine Mr Paul Chanson, dishonourable sellout” might Mr 


Conservative MPs repre- 
senting Midlands seats were 
urging Mr Paul Channon. 
Secretary of State for Trade 
and Industry, to rethink the 
Government's attitude to the 
General Motors deal after he 
disclosed in the Commons 
that other British companies 
have expressed an interest in 
acquiring Land Rover. 

In addition to Lonrho. 
whose negotiations with Brit- 
ish Leyland were disclosed at 
the weekend, Mr Channon 
told MPs that Aveling 
Barford, the Midlands engi- 
neering company dealing in 
heavy earth-moving vehicles, 
were interested in Land Rover 
asd the Leyland Bus. Talks 
are already taking place with 
the Laird group about the bus 
division. 

Mr Channon said that 
Volvo were also interested in 
Leyland Bus. Proposals for a 
management buy-out are also 
expected to come before the 
BL board. 

The minister made dear 
that he was naming only those 
companies that were willing to 
have their interest in the 
businesses made public, 
prompting the belief among 
MPs that several other compa- 
nies must be involved. 


Inquiry to 
endorse 
Hatton’s 
expulsion 

By Philip Webster 
Political Reporter 

Mr Derek Hatton, deputy 
leader of Liverpool City 
Council, and other leading 
supporters in the dty of the 
Militant Tendency, are facing 
expulsion from the Labour 
Party after the inquiry into the 
affairs of the district party. 

The inquiry team, headed 
by Mr Larry Whilty. the 
parly's general secretary, fin- 
ished taking evidence on Sun- 
day and began work on its 
report yesterday at the Labour 
headquarters in Walworth 
Road, south London. 

No decisions have been I 
reached, but party' sources i 
believe it likely that Mr 
Hatton. Mr Tony Mulheam. 
president of the district party, 
and other local parly members 
who are shown to have links 
with Militant will be expelled. , 
and that the district party will ; 
be dissolved. 

It would then be run by! 
party officials until a new ; 
party is established. The in- 1 
quiry members hope to have 
their report ready for the 
meeting of Labour's national 
executive tomorrow week. 

The almost certain moves 
to expel leading Militant sup- 
porters will provoke a fierce 
reaction from Labour's left. ■ 
which is already planning a I 


be brought to an end. It was 
after a Cabinet discussion a 
week last Thursday that the 
Government halted a propos- 
al to sell the Austin Rover car 
division to Fords. 

Mr Smith also referred to 
reports about General Motors 
buying Jaguar shares with a 


Benn says police 
back Murdoch 

By Anthony Bevins and Michael HorsneU 
Mr Tony Bonn, the Labour ferred yesterday by the print - 


MP, yesterday accused the 
police of launching an unpro- 
voked attack on “peaceful 
demonstrators” outside the 
News International plant at 
Wapping. east London. 

He told the Commons: 
“The police, instead of stand- 
ing aside, have been instructed 


to give 100 per cent support to awaited. 


Mr Murdoch and to use 
violent methods to deny the 
print workers their right to go 
to work.” 

But Mr Bernard WeatherilL 
the Speaker of the House, 
refused a request for an emer- 
gency debate on what Mr 
Benn called “the shameful 
conduct of Mr Murdoch, min- 
isters. the police and courts 
who are supporting him”. 

Mr Benn. whose submission 
for a debate was punctuated 
with cries of “cuckoo” from 
Mr Douglas Hogg. Conserva- 
tive MP for Grantham, said 
that Mr Rupert Murdoch had 
summarily dismissed more 
than 5.000 print workers and 
had moved his papers to a 
“fortified establishment in 
Wapping. surrounded by 
barbed wire”. 

Picketing and demonstra- 
tions had been provoked by 
“this brutality of action”. 

Mr Benn, MP for Chester- 
field. said that Sir Kenneth 
Newman, the Commissioner 
for the Metropolitan Police, 
had decided to bring in the 
riot police and operate a 
procedure “under which I 


The NGA said that after 
taking legal advice it would 
not announce the results until 
all votes were in. 

This has deferred the possi- 
bility of legal action by News 
International against the NGA 

Parliament 4 

which was fined £25.000 in the 
High Court last week for 
breaching an order banning 
the blacking of the supple- 
ments. 

Meanwhile the NGA said it 
will go ahead with attempts to 
disrupt distribution of the four 
national newspapers owned 
by News Iniernauonal. 

Miss Brenda Dean, general 
secretary of Sogat ’82, said she 
wanted to negotiate a new 
agreement with News Interna- 
tional based on the present 
needs of the industry. 

• Claims of unfair dismissal 
by 103 printers from the Kent 
Messenger newspaper group 
were rejected by an industrial 
tribunal at Ashford. Kent, 
yesterday. 


which is already planning a x 17 . v . 

sMWrsS" 10 Wine alert 

ngm me wucn-nunL Kr.ii, Main? u/m r. 


Mr Hatton said yesterday 
that there would be a “mass 
outcry” if there were moves to 
expel him and others. He 
described the inquiry as a 
“kangaroo court" and accused 
it of reaching its verdict before 
hearing the evidence. 

In an interview on BBC 
radio Mr Hatton said: “My 
concern is to ensure that the 
NEC understands that if they 
go for expulsions, if they go for 
dissolving the party in Liver- 
pool there will be a mass 
outcry not only from the 
Labour movement in Liver- 
pool but from the movement 
nationally.” 


ocation both by mounted and 
fool police, and disabled by 
the use of truncheons.” 

The threat of resumed 
blacking of The Times three 
supplements by the National 
Graphical Association was de- 


Mainz. West Germany 
(Reuter) — Traces of a poten- 
tially lethal chemical used in 
anti-freeze have been found in 
36 West German and foreign 
wines, the Rhineland Palati- 
nate Health Ministry said. 


End of Burke’s line 


A High Court judge yester- 
day ordered the final chapter 
on 160 years of hisioty when 
he ordered the top people's 


by Bath Press Limited and the 
Daily Telegraph. 


tie ordered the top people's Burke's Peerage was found- 
guide. Burke’s Baronetage ed in 1826 and became more 
Peerage, to be wound up with than 300 pages of small prim 
debts of more than £8,000. recording the geneologicafand 

Mr Justice Hannan granted heraldic history of Britain’s 
the order on a petition brought top families. 


Mr John Smith. Labour’s the negotiations would be 
chief trade and industry brought to a conclusion “very 
spokesman, said that there soon” in the interests of 
was growing puzzdment, con- ending damaging uncertainty. 


Conservative MPs are to 
intensify their campaign to 
persuade the Government to 
keep .Land Rover British, 
rather than to allow it to be the 
“sweetener” in the Leyland 
Vehicles sale. 


Mr David Gilroy 
Bevan.Conservative MP for 
Birmingham Yardley,will 
press for alternative solutions 
in a Commons adjournment 
debate lonighuand other MPs 
are expected to see Mr 
Channon. 

A majority of the Conserva- 
tive MPs who spoke in the 





.. /. 

fi ;v,» V - r.V.- : • - 

- 

*§j| 

■0 X 


view to acquiring that compa- Commons yesterday voiced 
ny. If that happened General misgivings about the Ameri- 
— - — - can deal. Mr Robert 

Parliament 4 Adley.MP for 

• Chnsicburch.asked that 
• , , , Lonrho be -treated “even- 

Motors would, more or less in handledly.' 
one operation, acquire a whole ' 

clutch of vital British inter- •Of the companies 
ests. named by Mr C hann on as 

Mr Channon assured MPs 
ihal the Government and the °L® n 4S. 

BL board would consider all SL.kJ J tw^S 
bids on their commercial mer- ^ ^ r ' 2? m 
its. but it is felt by MPs that 

because General Motors has ™ (J ° h " 

been in ihe tunning for nine Ycmns wntts) - 
months it has an overwhelm- The company is engaged 
ing advantage over its compel- principally in the manufacture 
itors. of heavy earth moving vehi- 

c -„ ■ ■ cles and employs just under 

VI1 ^ r n ' 0 / £' 1000 people at its works in 

r™ Granlhanu Lincolnshire. A 

\ senior official said yesterday 

m ^ kel that he did not want to make 
prospects U will offer. any comment on its interest in 

Mr Channon said he hoped Land Rover at this stage. 




Saudis 

sign 

£5, 000m 
deal 

By Edward Townsend 
Industrial Correspondent 

Britain's biggest arms ex- 
port contract weapons, spares 
and technical support ordered 
by Saadi Arabia and worth 
£5,000 tnilliomwas signed in 


By Nicholas Ashford, Diplomatic Correspondent 

In a conciliatory gesture to Argentine parliamentarians 
Argentina, the Government since the 1 982 Falklands war. 
agreed yesterday to meet a ”1 am surprised and delight- 
visiting delegation of Argen- . ed that a minister has agreed 

" «i v» ■ ■ > :i 


tine parliamentarians, two of to see them,” said Mr Cyril 
whom are dose political asso- Townsend, MP, chairman of 


union. 

This is to allow time for the 
balloting -of NGA members 
working on them on whether 
to black production. 

Two of three groups of 
printers have so far voted but 
a third ballot — of men 
working in London — is still 




Children presenting garlands to the Qneen on her arrival at Kathmandu airport yesterday. 

Colourful First olive branch 

for Qu“n toward Argentina 

•* TkT 1 By Nicholas Ashford, Diplomatic Correspondent 

ID 1^1 CD <11 In a conciliatory gesture to Argentine parliamentarians 

i u i™ Argentina, the Government since the 1982 Falklands war. 

* rom Michael IHamlyn agreed yesterday to meet a ”1 am surprised and delight- 

KammmWB visiting delegation of Argen- ed that a minister has agreed 

More than a quarter of a tine parliamentarians, two of to see them,” said Mr Cyril 
million people lined the oar- whom are dose political asso- Townsend, MP, chairman of 
row streets of Kathmandu’s dates of President AHonsin. the South Atlantic Council 

old town, ami the broad are- After weeks of heart-search- which invited the delegation 
ones of the official section of mg and protracted discussions to London, 
the city, to greet the Qneen between the Foreign Office He noied that a British 
and the Duke of Edinburgh as and (0 Downing Street, it was parliamentary delegation 
they were escorted m open decided that Mr Timothy which visited Argentina last 
carriages from the Durbar Eggar, a junior Foreign Office year was not received by 
Square to the royal palace. minister, should invite the members of the Argentine 
Thousands of schooIcbD-- four-member delegation for Government 
dren waving Union Jacks and talksat his office in the House The Argentine partiamen- 

the Nepalese flag with its two of -Commons. Mr Eggar is tartans are hoping that their 
poists, representing the moon- responsible for parliamentary visit this week will pave the 
of foekagdoa, and the matters. wav for an early resumption of 

san ami moon, representing However, it was immediate- diplomatic relations. Thai is 
bravery and peace, made. fy. made dear time Mr Eggar seen by the Argentines as a 
Modes of colour with their will use the meeting simply to necessary first step towards 
Mazers and gymslips. restate British policy on the opening negotiations on the 

Tribal dancers from the Falkland Islands and Britain's future of the Falklands. 
hills and the Tarai P lain*- attitude towards a resumption Britain wants to restore 
Buddhist priests with planted of diplomatic relations with more normal relations, but 
helmet-tike headgear, govern- Argentina. insists that cannot take place 

ment servants in formal black British officials made clear until President Aifonsin's 
jackets and stove-pipe iron- that the Government would Government formally ends 
sers, athletes in tracksuits and not use the meeting, which is the state iof hostility, 
karate champions were among likely to take place on Friday, The British view is that only 
the crowds smiling, welcom- to convey diplomatic mes- after there' has been an lin- 
ing, and curious to see the sages to Argentina or to press provement in areas such as 
royal visitors. for a resumption of secret commerce, communications 

A scarlet-jacketed mounted .bilateral talks, similar to the and fishing can there be any 


dates of President Alfonsin. 

After weeks of heart-search- 
ing and protracted discussions 
between the Foreign Office 
and 10 Downing Street, it was 


the South Atlantic Council 
which invited the delegation 
to London. 

He noted that a British 
parliamentary delegation 


decided that Mr Timothy which visited Argentina last 
Eggar, a junior Foreign Office year was not received by 
minister, should invite the members of the Argentine 
four-member delegation for Government 


talks at his office in the House 
of .Commons. Mr Eggar is 
responsible ‘for parliamentary 
matters, • 

However, it was immediate- 
ly made dear that Mr Eggar 
will use the meeting simply to 
Testate British policy on the 
Falkland Islands and Britain's 
attitude towards a resumption 
of diplomatic relations with 
Argentina. 

British officials made clear 
that the Government would 
not use the meeting, which is 
likely to take place on Friday, 
to convey diplomatic mes- 
sages to Argentina or to press 
for a resumption of secret 
bilateral talks, similar to the 


escort went before and behind 'abortive negotiations which 
the royal carriages, and pant- l0 °L place in Berne in 1984. 


ing footmen ran alongside, 
bearing horse-tail fly-whisks. 

The Qneen and the Duke 
were welcomed to Kathmanda 
airport by King Birendra and 
bis Qseefl, in a formal ceremo- 
ny with the Nepalese Army 


Although the Foreign Office 
sought to play down toe 
significance of its decision to 
talk to toe Argentine delega- 
tion, the feet that toe meeting 
is to take place at ministerial 


The Argentine parliamen- 
tarians are hoping that their 
visit this week will pave toe 
wav for an early resumption of 
diplomatic relations. Thai is 
seen by toe Argentines as a 
necessary first step towards 
opening negotiations on the 
future of the Falklands. 

Britain wants to restore 
more normal relations, but 
insists that cannot take place 
until President Aifonsin's 
Government formally ends 
toe stateiof hostility. 

The British view is that only 
after there has been an im- 
provement in areas such as 
commerce, communications 
and fishing can there be any 
question of .discussing toe 
islands. But the question of 
sovereignty is not for discus- 
sion. 

While in London the four 
Argentines — Senator Adolfo 
Gass, Senator Julio Amoedo, 
Senor Federico Storant and 


hind , and a guard of honour of seen as a significant gesture 
Garkhas from the First Rifle towards Buenos Aires. 
Regiment It wU be the first meeting 

King Birendra wore toe between a British minister and 

uniform of toe Supreme Com- — — — - — • 

mander of the Nepalese .O'") CUn 
Armed Forces, and Qoeeo dtZajDQ Did 
Aisfawariya wore a pink sari _ 

with a grey flannel jacket iV\|i 

The Qneen wore a hotter- -1D1. 

cop-yellow coal trimmed with t • -a 

white ribbon, and toe Duke JlfinpriQ I 

was in a field marshal’s uni- AM1 pvi MU 

r °™\ - ... . ... Takeover fever in toe City 

a T Th f. l | BnllS ?i Am bassador. 0 f London intensified yester- 

day with yet another recond- 
brewing bid, this time by 
foil ambasradonal ng of cot- Urutoi Biscuits, which is o£ 
array sw^w-tailed jacket, fering £2.5 billion for Imperial 

*e Courage beer to 
^ * ohn Player cigarette con- 

complete with ostrich feathera. glomerate. 

Mr Harrell was beard wish- H _ ncrtT1 . . ... 

mg his mother could see him , . Hanson Trust almost simul- 
^temade teneously.rmsed .ts bid 
since be was not a career for Im PenaI to £2.28 billion, 
diplomat hot a home civil United Biscuits, the 
servant, posted to the overseas McVitie’s to Wimpy ham- 
development agency burger group, had previously 

The iMm we lcoming one- agreed to be taken over by 
monies were held m Durbar ImperM -but those plans were 
Square, with its ancient royal spoiled by a reference last 
pakr<» twi historic pagndat Wee ' : 10 the Monopolies 2nd 
«mi A red carpet was Mergers Commission, 

hid across the flagstones and United Biscuits, which 
toe Qoeeo was led to the owns KP Foods, will be 
Kacrtta Mandap, toe wooden allowed to take over Imperial 
boose made from one teak only if it sells off Imperial's 
tree, from which Kathmandu Golden Wonder crisps, snacks 
gets its name. and nuts division. 

Continued page 2, col 4 Details, page 17 


rather thaQ official level is Seftor Julio Bortkm — will 
seen as a significant gesture meet leaders of toe three 


opposition parties and mem- 
bers from both Houses of 
Parliament 




The Sand! agreement to boy 
132 fighters, bombers and 
trainers in an anosuai oB-for- 
arms deal win give several 
years' work and secure the 
jobs of about 18,000 British 
Aerospace workers, mostly in 
Lancashire. 

Hondreds of UK specialist 
suppliers will also be involved, 
and it was estimated yesterday 
that np to 50,000 British 
aerospace industry workers 
would benefit. Eventually, the 
contract could be worth as 
much as £10,000 million. 

The order is for 48 of the 
strike version of the Tornado, 
built by toe Anglo-West Ger- 
man-Kalian Panavia consor- 
tium, 24 of the air defence 
variant, 30 all-British Hawk 
advanced trainees, and 30 of 
the Swiss-built Pflatns PC9 
trainers, the aircraft that the 
RAF discarded in favour of the 
Belfast-assembled Tncano as' 
Its next basic trainer. 

The original outline agree- 
ment with the Saadi authori- 
ties was concluded last autumn 
between Prince Saltan bin 
Abdul Aziz, foe Saadi defence 
minister, and Mr Michael 
Hesettine, the then Secretary 
of State for Defence. 

Since then, detailed discus- 
sions have been taking place 
behind the scenes to establish 
bow Sandi oil can be osed in 
the payment arrangements. 

It emerged yesterday that 
the British Government, 
which is sopplyiiig training 
and some ground 'support for 
the Saadis, and BAe will be 
paid in cash. The Saadis will 
raise the money by selling oil 
under an arrangement with 
Shell, British Petrotenm and 
tbe Aramco consortium which 
will refine the crude 

The recent coffitpse of worid 
oil prices will mean that the 
Saadis will have to lift consid- 
erably more oil to pay for toe 
aircraft. ■, 

After yesterday's signing. 1, 
by Prmce Sultan and Mr Cofin 
Chandler, head of defence 
export services at tbe Ministry 
of Defence, abort 12 detailed 
contracts covering the supply 
of the aircraft and spares wOl 
be drawn op. They will also 
cover so far undisclosed types 
of weapons. 

Abort £2,000 million of the 
contract covers toe cost of the 
132 aircraft, with the Torna- 
dos custom between . £18 mil- 
lion and £22 million each. Tim 
Germans have a 42^ per emit 
stake in the Tornado airframe, 
and tbe Italians 15 per cent, 
and both countries will take 
appropriate shares m the Sau- 
di order. 

Marconi cuts 

Marconi Defence Systems - 
is to make 120 workers redun- 
dant at its P orts worth factory. 


Don't stand for less 
than the latest in 
softness and comfort 



Five injured as storms 
batter British ferry 

Five passengers from the French cargo ship Fori Royal 
British feny Black Prince were was also 1 reared for concus- 
taken to hospital yesterday sion in Vigo after being in- 
after being injured in storms jured in the siorms.#Another 
off north-eastern Spain during cold week stretches ahead for 
a crossing from Madeira to Britain with bitter easterly 


Libraries shake-up likely 


By Richard Evans, Lobby Reporter 


London. 


winds continuing to hold tem- 


The feny. with 259 passen- peratures at little above free 2 - 
gers on board, made an emer- ing point, 
gettcy stop at the pon of Vigo Unlike weathermen in other 

A British pensioner aged SO countries, who use formulae 
suffered concussion, and a for calculating wind-chill fac- 
Wesl German couple were lors. the Met Office refuses to 
badly bruised as huge waves evaluate the effect of the wind 


and 60mph winds battered toe 
vessel during the night 
One crew member of 


in figures. 

The outlook is continuing 
cokL Forecast page 32 


Radical changes to the pub- 
lic library service, including 
toe closure of branches that 
are mder-used and expensive 
to ran. was foreshadowed yes- 
terday by Mr Richard Lace, 
Minister for tbe Arts. 

In a report to Parliament 
which could have far-reaching 
im pli ca t ions for the nation's 
3,900 library outlets. Mr Lace 
said he had identified two 
areas of concern; spending 
priorities and tbe ability of 
libraries to meet public de- 
mand. 

Mr Luce said he received 
more letters from tbe public 


about dedming book funds 
than abort any other aspect of 
tbe library service. That re- 
flected foe fell in expenditure 
during the past five years. 

“So it may be timely to raise 
some questions.” ' 

He suggested that all public 
library activities should be 
subjected to stringent testing 
to see what objective they 
served, what they were prodoc- 


loca! government reorganiza- 
tion. in recent years. “In par- 
tkrtar, are branch networks 
designed to meet tbe demands 
made of them? Are library 
authorities respo ndi ng to de- 
mographic and social 


Why stand Jbr less than the Columbine Suite? Its soft, 
contemporary looks, interchangeable am pillows and 
gentle head roll promise a new standard of luxury. Yet it’s 
easy to get out of and provides excellent support 

The suite comprises two armchairs, a two or three- 
seater settee, is available in selected fabrics, and represents 
just a part of Parker Knoll’s range of fine furniture. 

For the Parker Knoll Book of Comjort, whidi sfows 
w hat else we can offer, why not post the coupon? 

r? mr B$ornuOo*mdwr Bock tjConfarl, ptrasnaij the catpon to Sue Black, j 

, Dept TW. Parirr JOwfi fiffsitui* bnttMl. PO Box 2, Ht^ WjCOrnb*. Bs»tkHpn siy 1 


He said it was not sensible 
to keep open libraries that 
were tittle used or unduly 


ing, what they were costing, expensive to operate, 
and what priority they de- 'Mr Lace, whose main respon- 
served. ability is for Cite British 

It was open to question Library, said be had made it 
whether library authorities dear be cortd not guarantee 
had reacted sufficiently to its futnre level of finding- 


Parker Knoll 

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llUMt NhWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 


Fewer eligible 
for legal aid 
after Hailsham 


Top-level 
moves on 
tunnel 
security 


orders cuts 


By Peter Evans 
Home Affairs 


By Frances Gibb. Legal Affairs Correspondent 


Fewer people are likely 10 
obtain legal aid after the Lord 
Chancellor's announcement 
•yesterday of what appears lo 
be ihe firei cut in the scope of 
the scheme since ii was intro- 
duced 40 years ago . 

In a parliamenlray written 
answer Lord Hailsham of Si 
Marylebone said that, against 
a background of increasing, 
legal aid costs, the Govern- 
ment has decided 10 reduce 
the allowances which can be 
set against income when a 
person's eligibility for legal aid 
is being assessed. He said that 
since fa 70 spending on legal 
aid has doubled in real terms. 

The decision will affect 
people seeking legal aid for 
advice and assistance in civil 
or criminal mailers. 

The Government is to re- 
duce the levels of allowance 
for dependants from the 
present 50 per cent above 
those applicable for supple- 
mentary benefit to 25 percent. 
Regulations will soon be laid 
before Parliament. 

The decision was accompa- 
nied by a "sweetener" in the 
form of some reforms to the 
legal aid scheme, notably a 
dccison to relax the rules 
governing the operation of the 
controversial ''statutory 
charge", the clawback claimed 
by the Government for legal 
aid costs in divorce proceed- 
ings in the form or a charge on 
ihe matrimonial home. 

When funds permit. Lord 
Hailsham said, ihe claiming of 
this charge will be postponed 
and instead interest on the 
charge will be payable by the 
parly involved. 

. Capital eligibility limits, the 
levels determining how much 
capital a person may have 
before he becomes ineligible 
for legal aid. are also to be 
raised, from £500 to £800. for 
certain forms of legal aid 
known as "assistance by way 
of representation". 

A third proposal is to 
chance the rules so that law- 
yers may be paid for w-ork 
done before the granting of the 
legal aid certificate in certain 
criminal proceedings. 

The announcement brought 


an angry reaction from the 
Law Society. A spokesman 
said: "We are dismayed at 
what is the first cut in legal aid 
eligibility since its inception. 
It will affect families wih 
children who arc the victims 
of injustice and need legal 
help." 

Summons attempt 
is rejected 

A former barrister. Richard 
Mawcr. of Thurlestone. 
fvingsbridge. Devon, failed 
yesterday in his second High 
Court auempt to have a 
summons issued against Lord 
Hailsham for alleged conspir- 
acy to pervert the course of 
justice. 

Lord Justice Watkins, sit- 
ting with Sir Roger Ormrod. 
dismissing his challenge to a 
London magistrate's refusal to 
issue a summons, advised Mr 
Mawer "to get on with his life" 
instead of pursuing "this 
hopeless" application. 

Mr Mawer. of Court Park, 
who practised from chambers 
in Bristol until 1979. had 
claimed, among other matters, 
that there was a cover-up of 
value-added tax irregularities 
on the part of a circuit judge 
and offences of criminal dis- 
honesty involving other mem- 
bers of the judiciary. 

• The legal action being taken 
by banisters' leaders against 
Lord Hailsham over his refus- , 
al to negotiate on their claim 1 
for big increases in criminal 1 
legal aid fees will begin in the [ 
High Court in London today, j 

The Bar leaders will be 
seeking leave to bring judicial 
review' proceedings. 

At this preliminary hearing, 
before Lord Justice Watkins 
and Mr Justice Macpherson. 
the Lord Chancellor is not 
expected to be represented. 

Barristers claim that they 
have been underpaid for pub- 
lic-funded defence work for 
years and are seeking rises of 
tip to 40 per cent. The 
Government decided on a 5 
per cent increases from April. 

The Law Society is to take 
similar court action on behalf 
of solicitors. 


, Savage case report 
‘not exaggerated’ 


A senior consultant at the 
London Hospital was yester- 
day accused of exaggerating 
his report on reactions of 
junior doctors to a controver- 
sial maternity case involving 
Mrs Wendy Savage, the con- 
sultant obstetrician suspended 
for alleged professional mis- 
conduct. 

Mr Trevor Beedham told 


Mr Beedham told the inqui- 
ry thatjunior staff were so 
distressed about the AU case 
that they made phone calls 
asking for advice to the head 
of department and other con- 
sultants while Mrs Savage was 
supervising the labour. 


the Islington inquiry that he 
had not been misleading in his 


had not been misleading in his 
report on Mrs Savage's man- 
agement of the case of Mrs 
AU. whose baby died eight 
days after birth with brain 
damage. 

The mother had tried a 
period of labour although it 
was not physically possible for 
her to deliver normally. 


Mr Gordon Bourne, retired 
consultant in obstetrics and 
gynaecology and formerly of 
St Bartholomew’s Hospital, 
yesterday supported a claim 
last week by a maternity 
expen. Professor John Den- 
nis. that Mrs Savage’s treat- 
ment of the AU case was 
incomprehensible. 


The inquiry continues to- 
day. 


Correspondent 

Counter-terrorism measures 
in the Channel tunnel are 
expected to be discussed by 
Mr Douglas Hard, the Home 
Secretary, and his French 
opposite number, M Pierre 
Joxe, the Interior Minister, in 
Paris today. 

One of Britain's leading 
academic experts on terror- 
ism, Professor Paid Wilkin- 
son, of Aberdeen University, 
said yesterday there bad been 
representations by police to 
have adequate security in the 
tunnel. 

He said there would hare to 
be checkpoints for people and 
vehicles entering the tunnel 
and contingency plans for all 
kinds of terrorism, including 
the threat of bombing or an 
attempt to take hostages. 

Maximum vigilance would 
be called for during the con- 
struction of the tunnel, so that 
a terrorist group was not 
tempted to lit a time-delayed 
weapon. 

There could no absolute 
certainty that a person would 
not try to do something, but 
modern devices, including 
monitoring video cameras, 1 
could help to make sure it was j 
immediately noticed. I 

General fire risk would have 
to be taken into account and 1 
there must be ways of ensuring 
, that emergency services could 
get in. 

Plans for train services de- 
scribed by the British Rail- j 
ways Board yesterday indicate 
that security checks will have 
to be installed at Waterloo, 
one of the termini envisaged, 
and at Ashford, rather on the 
lines of monitoring at airports. 

The problem will be multi- 
plied if proposals are carried t 
out to run through services 
from cities. Trains from Wa- 
terloo, each expected to carry a 
maximum of 770 passengers, 
are planned to reach Brussels 
in three hours and Paris in . 
three and a quarter. 

The British Railways Board 
said yesterday it was talking to 
the Government on a Customs i 
service and security would be 
part of the discuss Lons. ! 

The Channel Tunnel Group 
said that when it had to submit 
its proposals to the Govern- 
ment, separate highly confi- 
dential measures on seemity 
had to be included. 

As well as the two main 
running tunnels, there would 
in between be a service tunnel 
4.5 metres in diameter, provid- 
ing a road for electric mainte- 
nance vehicles. Fire engines 
will probably have to be 
specially designed. 

The evacuation time 
planned for the entire system 
is expected to be 90 minutes at 
an expected peak load of 4,000 
people. The service road would 
connect with the main running j 
tunnels by a series of cross ! 
passages every 375 metres. j 

Mr Hurd and IVUoxe will 
also discuss terrorism in the , 
light of attacks at Rome and 
Vienna airports, the recent 
series of bombings in Paris 
and the arrest in The Nether- 
lands of two terrorists who bad 
escaped from the Maze Prison 
I in Northern Ireland. 



Our supporters 
prefer to use apair of 


The RSFC.A believes that abuse of all kinds is 

£9 on the increase. Last vear we 


the way to secure lasting 
improvements in animal welfare lies within 
the law, not outside it. 

Cutting the coupon and sending 
donation achieves far more in the end than 


utting wire fences. 

Since our foundation in 1824, we've seen 


countless new laws successfully onto the 
statute book by tireless Parliamentary 
lobbying. And that's how we intend 


to continue. 


But this is only part of our work. 


RSPCA 


k_Fon the increase. Last year we 
took over a million calls, and complaints 
investigated by our Inspectors soared by 
over 36% to 64,678. We secured a record 


2,112 convictions os a result. 


How much we achieve this year depends, 

as it always has, on our supporters being 
prepared to dig into their pockets. 

One thing is certain however; all 
our fighting for the welfare 
of animals will be done, 
with the law on our side. ( , 


lh) A ' 
ore > 

Ra f 
Su - 


Charity in Action 


r7 


I fully support ihe RSPCA in its fi^ht against cruelty by legal nitons. 


PiisicuJ 


i meins,' a ilnriatain »l 
| nr clurge my /VccwBuritiycaril N*> 

\_ Rvtuni c*»upun with ymir donation to RSPCA. f RLE POST. Horsham. VtatSutociRHC IZA. 




Private 
prisons 
are out, 
MPs told 


By Rickard Evans 
Lobby Reporter 


iV- 


. i-svfis.s. 

.•% V*.;' ■ : 


Four new faces at Westmin- 
ster will be leading players in a 
series of political imfrignes and 
scandal, in Granada TVs 
First Among Equals, based on 
Jeffrey Archer’s best-selling 
novel, which is due to start in 
October. 

The actors, (from left) Si- 


mon Kerslake, Andrew Fraser, 
Raymond Gould and Charles 
Seymour, star in the £3 million 
production which focuses on 
the lives of four MPS, two 
Conservatives and two La- 
bour, from 1964 to 1990- 
Filming for the 10-part se- 
ries has begun, but yesterday 


the actors visited Parliament 
to experience the atmosphere 
They have been given assis- 
tance by MPs from all parties 
and Mrs Margaret Thatcher 
allowed the filming of some 
scenes outside 10 Downing 
Street. 

(Photograph: John Voos) 


Minister’s insurance deal 


MP urges Lloyd’s inquiry 


By Anthony Bevins. Political Correspondent. 


The Council of Lloyd's, the 
London insurance market is 
being asked to investigate an 
arrangement under which a 
minister was allowed to cut his 
pay-out on a loss-making syn- 
dicate. 

The Times disclosed last 
month that Mr Richard Need- 
ham. Parliamentary Under- 
secretary at the Northern 
Ireland Office, had refused to 
pay his share of an estimated 
£3 million losses on syndicate 
244. which was managed by 
the agents; Laurence Philipps. 

Mr Needham refused to pay 
his share of the losses, which 
amounted to about £21,000, 
because he had been promised 
that he would be placed on 
“safe and sound" syndicates 
by Laurence Philipps when he 
joined Lloyd's in 1979. 


Mr Brian Sedgemore, La- 
bour MP for Hackney South 
and Shoreditch, yesterday ta- 
bled a Commons motion call- 
ing on the Lloyd's governing 
council to “institute disciplin- 
ary proceedings into the con- 
duct of the honourable 
member and Laurence 
Philipps”. 

Mr Sedgemore alleged that 
Mr Needham struck a deal “in 
which only £12,000 out ol 
£21.000 losses were paid by 
way of ( I ) a cheque for £3.500 
(2) a proposed set-off of losses 
against tax and (3) a profits 
set-off**. 

Mr Needham told The 
Times last month that his 
agreement with the agents had 
been based on the notional 
losses and profits of a syndi- 
cate “which Laurence Philipps 


had originally told me they’ 
would put me in, and didn't". 

Another member of syndi- 
cate 244 has written to Lloyd's 
complaining that he had paid 
his losses although he had also 
received assurances about the 
soundness of the syndicates. 


Mr Sedgemore'5 motion 
noted that while Lloyd's has 
said that it had no knowledge 
of Lhe agreement struck be- 
tween Mr Needham and 
Laurence Philipps, it had 
“suggested that legal action 
might be taken against 
Laurence Philipps". 


Mr Sedgemore called on 
Laurence Philipps, to explain 
why they had not mentioned 
Mr Needham's agreement in 
any accounts or reports. 


Hattersley 
plans for 
spending 


Star Wars 
poaching 
denied 


UDR soldiers in 
‘callous murder’ 


From Richard Ford, Belfast 


By Philip Webster 

Public authorities were ad- 
vised yesterday to draw up 
detailed capital investment 
and repair programmes well 
before the next general elec- 
tion for immediate implemen- 
tation in the event of a Labour 
Party victory. 

Local, health and water 
authorities will qualify for 
central government funding 
for schemes lhat create jobs, 
have been carefully costed and 
arc capable of speedy execu- 
tion. 

Bui ihe money will not be 
limitless and will applied on a 
first -co me-first -served basis lo 
authorities that show they are 
ready. Mr Roy Haltersley. 
Labour’s shadow Chancellor, 
yesterday gave further details 
of the Labour plan: first 
disclosed in September. 

He told a rail unions' con- 
ference in London thatthe 
scheme ».ill be funded by the 
immediate release of the £5 
billion of local authorities' 
accumulated capital receipts 
from the sales of council 
houses and other assets, sup- 
plemented by an unspecified 
amount of further central 
government finance. 

Initially the jobs are expect- 
ed to be in the construction 
industry, supporting services 
and suppliers. But. Mr 
Hattersley said, the additional 
demand the new investment 
stimulated would work its way 
into other sectors. 

He said that funds would lx 
provided by either low interest 
rate loans or capital grants. 
Areas of greatest need would 
have the full cost of the project 
financed by central govern- 
ment. 

“We will not guarantee 
investment for schemes which 
exist on paper without any 
certainty about the date on 
which the work will start. So 
prudent authorities will pre- 
pare more than plans. TTiey 
will need to know thai land is 
available, that management 
learns are ready, that the raw 
materials are to hand, that 
training requirements arc 
clearly spelt out. - * 


By Pearce Wright 
Science Editor 


General James 

Abrahamson, director of the 
American Star Wars pro- 
gramme. tried yesterday to 
allay fears that the project 
would cause a brain drain from 
Europe to the United States. 

He gave his assurances hi 
London to a conference ol 
industrialists and scientists 
who were meeting to hear ol 
opportunities for British busi- 
nesses as sub-contractors to 
the enterprise. 

General Abrahamson said: 
“We are not here lo pick the 
cherries from your own techni- 
cal genius by creating a brain 
drain. It is just the opposite. 
By providing money for work 
here we want to nourish your 
own technology." 

The conference, which was 
arranged by the Bow Group, 
was told of the potential for 
collaboration in tbe research 
and development effort, which 
will cost $20 billion over the 
next decade. 

Yesterday was the first time 
that British industrialists and 
scientists had been able to 
discuss tbe contract possibili- 
ties with representatives of the 
United States Department of 
Defence since the British Gov- 
ernment signed an agreement 
with tbe Americans in Decem- 
ber. 

Few contracts have been 
signed. The first was with 
Professor Desmond Smith's 
research group at Heriot-Watl 
University, which is a world 
leader in the development of 

manufacture of computers in 

which electronic circuits are 
replaced by optical ones. 

In theory they should oper- 
ate 10 times more quickly than 
electronic versions and be less 
vulnerable to radio jamming. 

General Abrahamson re- 
peated the assurance that 
British and European patents 
would be protected. 

He outlined several areas 
where European research 
could contribute, including 
work on particle beam weap- 
ons. 


Serving soldiers in the Ul- 
ster Defence Regiment plotted 
and carried out the callous and 
premeditated murder of a 
Roman Catholic while on 
duty hoping that their military 
tasks would provide an alibi 
for the killing. Belfast Crown 
Court was told yesterday. 

The victim was stalked by 
one of the soldiers who had 
changed from uniform into 
civilian clothes before shoot- 
ing him three times as he 
walked home from work, Mr 
Liam McCollum, QC, for the 
prosecution, told the court. 

He added that after the 
shooting the alleged killer 
returned to a UDR Land 
Rover where two colleagues 
gave cover as he changed back 
into uniform before driving to 
the local RUC station. 

Five members of the over- 
j whelmingly Protestant UDR 
are accused of murdering 
Adrian CarrolL aged 24, who 
was shot in Armagh City in 
November 1983. and of pos- 
sessing fire arms with imenL 
A sixth solider is accused of 
failing to give information. All 
six. based at Drum add Bar- 
racks in the city, denied the 
charges when their trial 
opened yesterday. 

The dead man was the 


brother of Roddy Carroll, an 
Irish National Liberation 


Army terrorist shot dead by 
the RUC in 1982 and another 
brother is a Provisional Sinn 
Fein councillor in Armagh 
City. i 

Mr McCollum said three 
shots were fired at the victim 
in a “callous, premeditated 
murder. The most disturbing 
aspect of tbe case is that 
according to the evidenoe the 
murder was planned orga- 
nized and perpetrated by a 
number of serving members 
of the UDR while they were 
actually on duty". 

Accused of murder and 
possessing a firearm with in- 
tent are: Lance Corporal 
James Hegan, aged 25, from 
Newry, Private Neil Latimer, 
aged 23, from Armagh City, 
Private Noel Bell, aged 22. 
from Armagh City, Private 
Colin Worton, aged 34. from 
MaikethfiL Co Armagh, and 
Private Alfred Allen, aged 25, 


from Loughall, Co Armagh. 
Private David McMullan, 


Private David McMullan, 
aged 24, of Drumadd Bar- 
racks. is accused of failing to 
give information. Ail six re- 
main members of the regi- 
ment. The trial continues 
today. 


King denounces ‘wild’ 
talk of Unionist MPs 


Mr Tom King. Secretary of 
State for Notbern Ireland, 
yesterday denounced Official 
Unionist MPs for “wild and 
ludicrous" talk lhat hinted at 
using the Assembly as some 
form of provisional govern- 
ment and suggested a cam- 
paign of civil disobedience. 

With Dr Garret FitzGerald, 
the Irish Republic’s Prime 
Minister, due to see Mrs 
Margaret Thatcher in London 
tomorrow for talks on the 
Anglo-Irish agreement and 
Unionist leaders meeting Mrs 
Thatcher on February 25, the 
MPs were attempting to raise 
the political temperature in 
the province. 


Mr Harold McCusker, dep- 
uty leader of the Official 
Unionist Party, said they 
would deny all revenue in- 
cluding rates and car tax, to 
the Government but insisted 
dial he and his colleague. Mr 
Ken Maginnis, Official 
Unionist MP for Fermanagh 
and South Tyrone, were 
speaking as individuals. 


Mr Maginnis went further 
by hinting at a possible 
Unionist seizure of power. 


The comments of both men 
were dismissed by Mr King as 
hysterical “ It is ludicrous talk 
only days before they meet the 
Prime Minister" 


Colourful welcome for Queen in Kathmandu 


Continued From page l 

Small girls in red brocade 
greeted her, and the Queen 
signed a visitors' boob, before 
mounting her carriage. 

After I pitch at tbe more 
modern royal palace, the 
Queen received calls from the 
Nepalese Prime Minister, Mr 
Lokeodra Bahadur Chand, 
and tbe Foreign Minister, Mr 
Ranadbir Subba. Last night 
tbe Duke of Edinburgh attend- 


ed a reception given by the 
Nepal-Brltain Society, before 
he and the Queen attended a 
state banquet. 

At the banquet the Queen 
spoke of the “legendary 
exploits” of the Gurkhas, who 
had woo “a special place in 
military history. I am glad to 
reiterate our thanks for the 
selfless comradeship in arms 
which we have shared with 
them for so long". 


The Queen, who is being 
accompanied by Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, the Foreign Secretary, 
also indicated that Britain's 
aid to Nepal is likely to be 
increased this year. 

The Queen's visit is wel- 
comed in Nepal's official and 
governmental circles, where it 
is felt H reinforces ties which 
have existed since 1816, when 
the British and the Nepalese 
fought each other to a stand- 


still and each ended respecting 
the other's endurance and 
fortitude. 

“The British help many 
aspects of our economy,*' ex- 
plained Mr Pnshpati 
Shamsher Rana. the Minister 
for Communications and Wa- 
ter Resources. “The Gurkhas 
are the most dramatic expres- 
sion of that." 


Leading article, page 13, 




Vouchers 
6 will put 
£20 on 
glasses’ 


Lobby Reporter 

The Horae Office last night 
ruled out American-style pri- 
vatization of Britain's prisons 
and insisted its prison build- 
ing programme is on course to 
cope with record overcrowd- 

m |ir Brian Cubbon, perma- 
nent secretary at the depart- 
ment gave an assurance to Mr. 
Dale CampbellSavours; La- 
bour MP for Workington, that 
no work was being done and 
there were no proposals with- 
in the Home Office for privati- 
zation. 

Earlier be told the all-party 
Commons public accounts 
committee that its prison 
building programme, aimed at 
matching the number of avail- 
able places with the expected 
prison population by the end 
of the decade was still a 
practical objective. 

He rejected as pessimistic a 
conclusion by Sir Gordon 
Downey, Comptroller and 
Auditor General, that unless 
the Home Office took special 
measures the building pro- 
gramme was unlikely to meet 
its taiget 

But he accepted that even if 
the Home Office meets its 
objective there will almost 
certainly remain a problem of 
overcrowding in some prisons 
and under-occupation in oth- 
ers. 

In Lhe next five years an 
extra 4.000 to 5,000 new 
places would become avail- 
able together with 3,000 to 
4.000 extra places as a result of 
redevelopment and refurbish- 
ment of existing prisons. 

Sir Brian, questioned close- 
ly by MPs on whether over- 
crowding was affecting 
sentencing policies of courts, 
said:“lt is very difficult to read 
into the psychology of sen- 
tencing but I suspect that tbe 
real choice that is made in the 
circumstances is between cus- 
tody and noncustody." 

Overcrowding was more 
likely to lip the balance from a 
prison sentence to one of non- 
custody he said. 

• Prison officers at Thorp 
Arch and Hull jails have voted 
for industrial action over 
moves to ease difficulties in 
the most overcrowded prison 
in the country. 

The moves are part of 
changes to cut numbers in 
Leeds by putting prisoners 
from there and elsewhere in 
Thorp Arch, West Yorkshire, 
a remand centre. 


By Nicholas Timmins 
Social Services 
Correspondent 


Partially sighted people who 
need complex spectacles could 
find themselves paying four 
times as much as a year ago for 
a pair when the Government 
scraps National Health Ser- 
vice glasses completely and 
brings in vouchers in July, the 
Royal National Institute . for 
the Blind said yesterday. 

From July vouchers will be 
given to people on low income 
still entitled to help with 
buying spectacles and the 
health service will no longer 

supply them. 

But the institute said that a 
survey of a particular complex 
prescription needed by pa- 
tients after a cataract opera- 
tion showed the average cost 
of such a pair of glasses from 
private opticians was more 
than £50, much the same price 
as a year ago. 

But in January 1985 pa- 
tients had paid only £1 1.75 for 
such a pair of glasses on the 
health service That figure had 
j risen to £31.05 with the in- 
crease in NHS chaises. 

“If ministers provide a 
voucher worth only £30 or so 
for such people in July they 
will not only have to pay £20 
i more than now, but over four 
times as much as they- were 
paying a year ago" the insti- 
tute said. " 


Fare hearing 


London taxi driver yester- 
day had their High Court 
challenge to the 50p levy for 
cabs using Heathrow Airport 
postponed when lhe judge. Mr 
Justice Webster, stood down 
because he had frequently 
advised the British Airports 
Authority. 


Coins treasure 

A hoard of Roman coins 
found buried in a ctiffal Seisey 
Bid. West Sussex, by Mr 
Richard Ellis, a metal detenor 
enthusiast of Harlow, Essex, 
has been estimated to be 
worth between £13,000 and 
£17.000. 


Case delayed 


A test case claim that 
whooping cough caused brain 
damage to Johnnie Kinnear, 
now aged 17. of west London, 
was adjourned in the High 
Court id London yesterday 
until March 17 because of 
legal aid difficulties. Two 
hundred cases await the out- 
come. 


TV gear theft 


BBC recording equipment 
valued at £1,500 has been 
stolen from the maternity unit 
at St Mary’s Hospital, Ports- 
mouth. where the television 
programme Hospital Watch is 
being broadcast over the next 
three months. 


Family ordeal 

Two hooded raiders, wield- 
ing a sawn -off shotgun and a 
pickaxe handle, yesterday sub- 
jected a family to a 90-minute 
ordeal during which they 
threatened to kill three chil- 
dren. before escaping with 
several thousand pounds in 
takings from the Billingham 
Constitutional Club in 
Wolviston Road, Dillingham, 
Cleveland. 


Killing charge 

Leslie Jones, an aircraft 
engineer, appeared in Luton 
Magistrates' Court yesterday 
charged with the murder of his 
wife. Rose Jones, the mara- 
thon runner, aged 26. at their 
home in Layham Drive. Lu- 
ton. on Si Valentine's Day. He 
was remanded in custody until 
next Tuesday. 


Votes for fund 


Two small unions, the 
Rossendale Union of Boot. 
Shoe and Slipper Operatives 
and the General Union of 
Associations of Loom Over- 
lookers. yesterday voted to 
retain their political 
funds. Thirty-two unions have 
now made that decision. 


Fish disaster 


About 10.000 fish were 
destroyed when a ruptured 
effluent tank poured 50.000 
gallons of pig slurry into the 
River Perry, Shrewsbury mag- 
istrates were told yesterday. 
Gary Slater, who caused the 
discharge, was fined £1.650. 


Soldier hurt 


A soldier was recovering in 
hospital last night after bang 
injured in a Provisional IRA 
land mine explosion near 
Crossmaglen, South Armagh. 
He was airlifted to the 
Musgrave Park Hospital, in 
Belfast, with a suspected bro- 
ken jaw and facial injuries. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY IS IQSfi 


HOME NEWS 


into 

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Cliveden awaits the new guest ‘set’ 


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save man from Satan’ 

of a ruS^s^aSa^iJSSl S? ^ otHaihed volvcd in die black arts, 

of tided and weaSdw neonte . A, ■ v Corke *y said Mr 

were tricked by a SxnfimS *5* ^ f > ni & hl painting and decorat- 

trickster into a schema wSE5 J?* 1 <r ° ne ^ ^ COTV ?? ni ^ fog business was not success- 


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Jitter ‘PI 0 a scheme which 

■rwHVvi bim more than 
yesterday WUn w **** the regalia of a satanic organ* £6,000 of bis alleged debts 

*8 ss,tss? ^r-fc'ssss 

the Rev John Baker of East EmS? hS 0 *^ 1 ? 01 ^ Hc ronfidw* to the rector he 
Sussex, into helping him aileg- debB be was 

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members to the naih nfrioK. !^.° l ? ail,zat,0 1 n 'jftfn 11 to help him. 

Jeousness, Mr Michael &!V^ was Knight's . MrKjiight told the rector he 

Corkery, QC. for the prosecu- tiu. „<■ ^.P^Parcd togivehislife to 

^ at Mudstone Cro wn °*A1gGl£ ^ 

Bui Mr or * became concerned and to the rector, he m kZ 


the zector that he would use 
the money to buy articles and 


fid and a couple in the village. 
Mr and Mis Wagstaff, paid off 


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n_ , mibuaci nan 

Corkery, QC, for the prosecu- E 
bon, sard at Maidstone Crown Chii 
Conn .. rr* 

Coitey aid that step 
instead the money was spent noli, 
.~5 hvmg, prostitutes and in 
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Mr Knight s alleged victims noli 
JPdwkji Lord Hampden, the !3fo 
^ari of March, and Mrs Susan offei 
bainsbury, wife of the Causer- Bi 
vative MP for Hove. rectc 

■ The plot had begun in 1983 inter 
when Mr Knight moved into day 
Jhe parish of Newick. He Knic 
ingratiated himself with the said, 
rector and the local communi- Si? 
ty by tending oat religious ■ into 
leal lets from door to door and wife, 
brgBmsmg prayer meetings. volvt 
From small be ginnings by Th 
. getting a couple in the village prayc 
P®y bis afleged debts of Knigl 
to, (XX) he moved on to bigger told ! 
fish by convincing the rector meat 


But later Mr Knight alleged- 
ly set bis sights on the rector. 
He confided 10 the rector he 
bad heavy debts and he was 
being hounded by vicious debt 
collectors. The rector agreed 
to help him. 


stepped in to inform the 
police. 

In March last year Mr 
Knight was interviewed by 
police and be was charged 
with a serious of deception 
offences in May. 

But so convinced was the 
rector of Mr Knight's good 
intentions that even to this 


to the rector, he to be 

possessed by spirits. 

Mr Knight claimed Ainu g 
his trance that he belonged 10 
Lucifer, had been i n itia le d 
into satanism by sacrifice ax 
the age of eight, was a master 
of the occult and held high 
office in a satanic order 

Later when he came out of j 
the trance he admitted to the 






. . .. _ , . — , —rr 11c ouuunca 10 me 

SjjLS: beIl ® v ? d m «*at Mr rector that he had been fiight- 
Knight was dotng, Mr Corkery ened to mention his satanic 


One of Cliveden’s butlers, Mr Michael Holliday, standing next to a painting of Lady Astor in the Great" HalL 

By John Young 


al communi- Six months after moving 
>ut refigious into the village. Mr Knight’s 
‘ to door and wife, Gwendoline, was in- 
meetings. volved in a car crash, 
eginnings by The rector -helped with 
a the village prayer and counselling and Mr 
ed debts of Knight went to see him and 
on to bigger told him about his past Hfe, 
S the rector mentioning that his maternal 


connections before because 
alter moving the organisation had a deep 
, Mr Knight s hold on him, but since 1 980 he 
aie ' ^ hr- had been trying to break free. 


ri.- uk raw mentioning mar ms maternal 

ot his campaign against Satan- grandmother ted been in- 




i«>ins 




'■ .i'cdelsi 


i V start 




■ • . 


.... -k 




v, 


i.tf 
«* r : * 


The Rev John Raker, “a 
- kind man withoin gnile". ' 

Rape law 
changes j 
: opposed 

■*. By Frances Gibb 
’ Legaf AfJairs - • • 
Correspoudent ' 

Home Office plans .to end 
defendants* right to anonymity 
in rape cases were strongly 
attacked by Opposition MPs 
yesterday, 

Mr Robin Corbett shadow 
-Home Office minister, said he 
hoped the Opposition would, 
resist any more by the Govern- 
ment to repeal the law. 

“I think what is suggested is 
very wrong, because it would 
scrap the equality of treatment 
which both the complainant 
woman and the defendant 
would have in a rape triaL" 

He also gave a warning that 
.such a move would at least 
-“put a question mark over the 
.anonymity of the woman, and 
-that woulka be winding the 
clock totally backwards 1 ". . 

But the move would be 

• widely welcomed by the judi- 
..tiary-.One senior judge said. 

yesterday that the rule, which 
.had come about without much 
.thought and consideration, 
was “full of anomalies" and 
conferred a privilege on defen- 
dants in rape cases which was 
not justified in the context of 
other serious sexual crimes. 

• The Government's determi- 
nation to press ahead with the 1 
changing the rale, contained ha j 
the Sexual Offences (Amend- 

■ ment) Act, 1976. was under- j 
lined by Mr David MeDori 1 
Home Office Minister of 
State. 1 

He said: “I think many 
people think there is no real 
equality between the victim 
and the offender, and 1 think if 
was a mistake in 1976 to put 
. them on the same basis. 

“Secondly. It is arbitrary 
that someone cannot be named 
who has been accused of rape, fi 
-but they can be named if they I 
, had been accused of a more E 
serious offence like murder." ■ tl 
Mr Mellor was speaking on u 
BBC Radio 4 after the disclo- tl 
sure in The Times that the 
Government intended to end ^ 
anonymity for defendants. g 
No' final decision has been ■„ 
made, but the Cabinet is being Q 
urged to change the -law after ^ 
■ widespread criticism. 

In particular, police In Wilt- 
shire felt angry after a recent a] 
’case when tfeey felt unable to L 
release the name or publish a re 
■photograph of a man wanted Lb 
for rape. He subsequently <3 
raped another wonup. u 

Mr Mellor made dear that st 
no change is to be mad etot he sc 
anonymity rule for wo ™ e p 
-com plaining of rape, wmeu M 
-was tte prfane purpose of the ~ 

1976 Act % 

Yesterday the Guild of Bril- ^ 
ish Newspaper Editors 1 wd- 
■ 'corned the proposal tt> change 
the law. Mr David Newell tie 

guilds parliamentary secre- ^ 
(ary, said: “Our view is a ex| 
: relatively simplistic one: n* *“ res 
‘criminal cases the public has en( 
the right to know who a 
defendant iss and just because 
the victim has anonymity « ^ 
’.does not mean the iefendam ^ 
-must have it." the 

Leading article, page ^ 1 


Loud Hampden, one of those 
who gave money. 


Mr Corkery said that from 
October J983 until March 
1984 the rector approached 
wealthy, practising and com- 
mitted Christians he knew. 

The rector raised money 
from a private charitable trust 
and among his parishioners 
after he sent out a letter asking 
them for asafctanrft in helping 
Mr Knight to break his satanic 
ties. 

The letter was accompanied 
by a note from the Bishop of 
Lewes who said the rector's 
activities were “very 
necessary” and a genuine 
work in dealing with an 
amazing case. 

Mr Knight, aged 46. of 
Noble s Cottage, Mill Lane, 
Dormans Land, Surrey, has 
denied 1 9 <±arges of deception 
which allege that he obtained a 
total of £203,850 from the 
rector and series of top figures 
in the community. 

The trial continues today. 



The rear view of Cliveden from the garden. 
(Photographs: Peter Trievnor). 


City fraud 

plot men The man said to have saved 

_ Chelsea Football Gub sued It 
CAtlTATIPoH f° r £48.475 damages in the 
SCI1 tcinetl High Court yesterday. 

A group of plotters almost ncer ’ a char ‘ 

cfaeated the City firm of S3? *£? .S 1, r ? p011 " 
stockbrokers, James CapeL jSStnSil. ^ if 

out of £1.8 million, using a it ^ c l? s 

.u-rt- finances m 1980 as its then 


A hotel already internation- 
ally famous nearly three weeks 
before it is due to welcome its 
first guests, yesterday opened 
its doors to the world. 

Cliveden, one of the great 
booses of England, the former 
home of the Astor family and a 
centre of high society and later 
notoriety, wQl from March 6 
be taking in paying lodgers at 
up to £300 a night. 

Its owners, the National 
Trust, have spent nearly 
£750,000 ou repairs to the 
roof, windows and exterior 
rendering and has leased 
Cliveden for 45 years to 
Blakeuey Hotels, who in turn 
have spent £2300,000 on fur- 
niture, central heating, electri- 
cal work and bathrooms. 

Mr Robin Evans, the 
Trust's land agent responsible 


for the restoration, said yester- 
day that be ted feared an 
adverse reaction from mem- 
bers but in fact most of the 
comment had been extremely 
favourable. 

The public will continue to 
have access to the gardens 
and, on two days a week, to the 
downstairs rooms. Guests* ho- 
tel bills will include a £2 entry 
fee which will be passed on to 
the trust. 

In the past week alone, 
thanks to free media publicity, ; 
there have been 173 bookings. 
The most remarkable thing is 
that almost all the bookings so 
Car have come from within 
Britain, when ft was expected 
that the main appeal would be 
to Americans ate other over- 
seas visitors. 


Cases of cruelty 
to animals soar 

AzrnnaTcraetyrases invest donation “which achieves for 
tigated bythe RSPCA last year . more in the end than cutting’ 
mciMste by more than a third wire fences," is aimed at 
to 64.678, the toghesr cruelty distancing the RSPCA from 
ta ^ y o^r e Chanty ^ s ’ militant ahimal'rights groups. 

RSTCA inspectors received Mr Dixon Ward added, 
more than a million, telephone ‘ Complaints investigated by 
calls about cruelty, and neglect foe RSPCA’s 229 inspectors 


Chelsea sued for damages 


week, was basically a dispute 
between two individuals, Mr 
Spencer and Mr Ken Bates, 
Chelsea chairman, Mr Philip 
Vallance, counsel for Mr 


EEC cash 
blow to 
cancer 
research 

By Thomson Prentice 
Science Correspondent 

Cancer research that could 
lead to many thousands of 
lives being saved every year 
throughout Europe is being 
threatened by lack of funding 
and bureaucratic delays with- 
in foe foe EEC. 

Collaboration among more 
than 3,000 cancer specialists 
at 250 hospitals and research 
units in ! I countries is at risk 
because of growing financial 
uncertainty and inadequate 
support from politicians with- 
in the Community. 

The European Organization 
for Research on Treatment of 
Cancer, set up by research 
workers 24 years ago. has 
almost 150 studies in progress 
and more than 26.000 patients 
registered at its data centre in 
Brussels. 

But staff at the centre were 
not paid last month because of 
delays, and none of the 22 
employees has ever been given 
more than a six-month guar- 
antee of work. 

The research organization 
has been responsible for bring- 
ing large numbers of new 
cancer drugs into clinical use 
and believes that the annual 
death toll in Europe from the 
most common forms of foe 
disease could be reduced by up 
to 15 per cent in foe next 10 
years through co-ordinated 
action. 

The work is now funded 
with an annual income of 
S952.000. two thirds of which 
is provided by individual 
countries. Most of the remain- 
der, $232,000, comes from the 
National Cancer Institute in 
foe United States, but that 
money is being gradually re- 
duced because foe institute 
feels that foe organization 
should be wholly supported 
within Europe. 

Professor Derek Crowther. 
the Cancer Research 


stockbrokers, Janies CapeL 
out of £1.8 million, nsing a 
single forged cheque, the Cen- 
tral Criminal Court was told 
yesterday. 

They were foiled just in 
time when a clerk at Capei's 
became suspicions. 

. Judge Lipfnend .imposed 
£5,000 fines and suspended 


— - ■ ■ 4 IV lllUtAJULlAI ]V1I DdlCa LU 

Spencers company, Canel- a* dub in 1982 knowing he 


chief executive and financial 
adviser. 

He claims that his service 
contract was unlawfully termi- 
nated for no good reason. 

But the dub has responded 
with its own claim for dam- 


last year, resulting in a post- 
war record number of animal 


Mr Dixon Ward added. conspiracy la use foe counter- 

Compfeints investigated by fo* 1 cheque.- 
foe RSPCA’s 229 inspectors . Bame Liss, aged 42, a 
increased by more than 36 per jeweller of Wembley Park, 


^»vuv uuwj ouu dUSjJUJUGU I niiM ' 

jail sentences on three north | ^5. j ...... 

London men who admitted The action, likely to last a 


temp, said. 

Mr Vallance told Mr Justice 
Hodgson that a five-year 
agreement for Mr Spencer to 
act as financial adviser from 
March 1980 was "wrongfully 
terminated" in April 1983. 

He said Mr Spencer was 
brought into foe dub in May 
1976 after it had been relegat- 
ed and was in finandal diffi- 
culties. 


1 . ■ j thc Cancer Research 

He said: “Wind and tide Campaign's professor of med- 
went together and Mr Spencer ical oncology at foe Christie 
reduced costs and introduced Hospital, Manchester Univer- 
financial stability.” sity, and a member of the 

He introduced Mr Bates to organization's board, said 
: club in 1982 knowing he ye$tertiay:“I am concerned 
is wealthy and interested in that the funding we need will 
nbaJJ and looking for a club not be forthcoming from the 
the south. EEC. 

The club claimed he was in ~ T1 “ it mean that 

:ach of the agreement and 50 m 5 ,n *Poitant studies would 
led to carry out his duties as P 01 he started, that others will 
ancial adviser. Mr Spencer »* support, and inevitably 
nies foe charge and claims ne J\ can , cer treatments 
; £48,475 is due under the wiU be delayed, 
ms of foe agreement. Britain contributes $150,000 

„ frbotoi £100.000) to foe 

rhe case resumes today. organization’s current income 


was wealthy and interested in 
football and looking for a club 
in the south. 

The club claimed he was in 
breach of foe agreement and 
failed 10 carry out his duties as 
financial adviser. Mr Spencer 
denies foe charge and claims 
foe £48.475 is due under foe 
terms of foe agreement. 

The case resumes today. 


cent last year to 64.678. The 


cruelty convictions, Mr number of a ni m al cruelty 
Anetay Hart, chairman of foe convictions reached a record 


RSPCA council, said in Lon- 2,1 12 : 
don yesterday. were dr 

Speaking at the launching of Conv 

a campaign by foe charity to elty to 
raise £500,000 to fight animal com par 
neglect in England and Wales, cruelty 
Mr Hart said last year’s figures with r 
showed an increasingly vio- donkey 
lent society, pared 

Britain, once a nation of cattle, s 
animal lovers, now ranked ) and 
fifth intbe world’s animal care Wildlife 
league, Mr Frank Dixon wild bin 
Wand, foe RSPCA’s executive 468 in 1984. 
director, said. Altos 


2,112 and 'the main victims 
were domestic dogs and cats. 

Convictions involving cru- 
elty to dogs rose to 992 
compared with 880 in 1984; 
enmity to cats, 229 compared 
with .171; cruelty to horses, 
donkeys and ponies. 145 com- 
pared with 78; cruelty to 
cattle, sheep and pigs, 103 (90 
) and offences under the 


west London, was given a 14- 
raonth sentence. David 
Osteriey, aged 45, an enter- 
tainment company director, 
of Howcroft Crescent. Finch- 
ley, north London, and a City 
coffee bar proprietor, Jean- 
Pierre IrtdiL aged 41, of 
Holden Road, Finchley, were 
given 12 months each. 
Aifthree sentences were sus- 
pended for two years. 

Mr David Cal vert-Smith 
said for the prosecution that a 


Wildlife and Countryside Act; **^ r inside , the stockbro- 

wild birds, 328 compared with J cers ' w h° bad not been prose- 

Ac.o inm nnwf 1w*».a u.i- ~r 


“The majority of cases in- ceived 1,008,124 telephone 
vorve general neglect We calls, an increase of more than 


need .a stronger animal educa- 
tion programme to produce 
more caring owners," Mr 
Dixon Ward said. 


)8 in 1984. cured because of lack of 

Altogether foe RSPCA re-* evidence, had taken a cheque 
ived 1,008,124 telephone frw? ft*® firm’s offices to be 
Us, an increase of more than copied- 
300. It was filled in to foe sum of 


fatSS&to- 

5s*S8Sf' 


Mr Charles Ma rshall , chief million, and flown to 
officer of foe RSPCA’s inspec- Luxembourg to be paid into a 


to rate. 


gross- 


groups did not help the overall 
animal welfare cause. 

To show its condemnation 
of violent methods, the 
RSPCA yesterday launched an 
advertising campaign promot- 
ing animal we Imre within the 
law. 

The campaign, which in- 
vites foe public to send a 

Peer cleared 
of link with 
body in sea 

A police investigation has 
found no connection between 
Lord O’ Hagen, Conservative . 


responsible owners to look 
after them". 

The RSPCA is launching a 
tougher campaign against bad- 


wtthin the aisoseeki 
the Aiiini 


in Cumbria and Wales. It is 
also seeking ammendments to 
the Animal Scientific Proce- 
dure BOL which is now before 
PariiamenL 

Detective is 
accused over 
Derby killing 

Det Sgt Robert MDes joined 
a concerted ate fiftal attach on 
a postal worker during an 


European MP for Devon, and alcoholic Derby Day 'outing, 
the. death of a youra drugs the Central Criminal Court 
user whose body was found in was told yesterday, 
the sea at Exeter two years ago; Blows were rained on Mr 

The investigation was or- W* ^ * fter ' 1 ^. 

dered after counsel for a police twsmtohed in an .argument 
sergeant, who was appearing i- ^ 

in court on an umSated gjjdj” ^ ” « !"» rad, 
matter, suggested there had ffEfS??! 7 » 
been a covSSpT ? 

- the prosecution, said. 

The police found a car hire He said Mr Albrny was set 


sergeant, who was appearing 
in court on an unrelated 
matter,; suggested there hte 
been a cover-up. 

The police found a car hire 


a u%» |nnivw ivwuw iuvhij nao ovi 

agreement in foe name of on by Det Sgt MQes, aged 26, 
Lord O’Hagen in the dead of .Fairmile Park Rote; Mr 
man’s pocket But yesterday Raymond Hudson, aged 44, of 
foe police said there was “I Richards Road, ate Mr Mi- 
can further say that equally cteel Clothier, aged 47, iff 
there is “no- evidence to- Seven HiUs Rote, all of 


sujgest any connection what- Cobbam, Suirey.They deny 

cnniwlwnwm I rtrrl O'Hawn nuratlaaoMw 


soever between Lord O’H 
ate the death of Geo: 
Malpass". 


nMBKbnghtw . 

The hearing coutinoes to- 
day-' 


numbered account 

“The cheque was sent by 
special courier to NatWesl in 
London, where it was exam- ; 
reed, passed as genuine and 
stamped as paid", Mr Cal vert- 
Smith said. 

fort foe clerk became suspi- 
cious when he saw foe firm 
was overdrawn on its daily 
statement and foe plot was 
uncovered. 

A former bank manager, 
Walter Bennett, aged 45, from 
Haslemere, Surrey, had given 
evidence for the prosecution 
last week before two other 
men were cleared of involve- 
ment in the plot. He admitted 
conspiracy and was sentenced 
to 18 months* imprisonment, 
with all but fotrr-and-a- hatf 

months suspended, and fined 
£5,000, 

Allen brother 
death verdict 

. An open verdict was record- 
ed at Westminster Coroner’s 
Court yesterday on John 
Tynan-O'Mahoney, aged 52, 
the stage manager brother of 
[ Dave Allen, foe comedian. 

Mr Allen, of York Build- 
ings, Adelphi, Holbora, cen- 
tral London, told the court his 
brother had been receiving 
psychiatric treatment, but did 
not know he had cancer. His 
brother died after falling from 
a fourth floor window at St 
Mungo's Hostel. Earl's Conn, 
west London, where be lived, 
on January 14. 








Scania have never been lempled 10 compete on And instead of maintaining 24-hour international 
t i- , . . cost alone. Lifeline cover, we d be forced lo trim our support 

Trying lo equal some of todays truck prices would services to more ordinary levels 
mean sacrificing loo many of our principles and True, wed tie able lo offer you a cheaper truck But 
„ *9° much oJy°“ r cost-efficiency, i! would probably cosl you more to run. It certainly 
instead of investing over / % of sales turnover in wouldn't Iasi as long. And when the time comes to 
research and development we might have to cut sell, the return on your initial investment wouldn't 
a few corners. Which could mean risking our be so healthy. 


hard-won reputation for absolute reliability and for 

fuel economy. 

Instead of manufacturing our own engines, 
gearboxes, axles and cabs, we might have to 
make do with bolting together bits and pieces 
made by someone less dedicated lo precision 


Scania promise you years of low-cost operation. 
And that more than equals 3 short-term saving in 
thebargainbasemeni 


Science research given t l /im boost 

ByBill Johnsti»oe,TechBo](^y Correspoteent 


The Natural Environment Re- 
search Council is to give an 
extra £550,000 to' university 


additional.poo! granted 10 the 
council at foe end oflast year. 
All British research councils 


research in environmental so- were given an extra £15mil- 


ence and relaled projects. \ 
The decision, announced 
yesterday; is ah: unexpected 
boost as university; fending 
has been seriously curtailed in 
the past five-years; 

The funds. wp- pan of an 


lion for this year. The Natural 
Environment Research Coun- 
cil .received' £1.9 million. 


otherwise not attract invest- 
ment. The council spends 
about £4 million a year on 
university research from- a 
budget of about £70 million. 

The new funding would be 
expected to be maintained i 



which allowed it to boost foe oyer the next three years since 

- 1 nor : ■ . ■ ■ <• n , J ... 


1986/87 university resirarch. 

The extra money will sup- 
port projects which would 


the council funds will be 
boosted by £ 1 3 million in foe - 
next two years. • 


SCANIA ii 

Scania (Great Bntamj Limned, TongwelL 
Milton Keynes MK15 BHB. Buckinghamshire^^ 

Tel: 0908614040. Tetex;82537S. ______ 

Scania. Building trucks, building reputations. 


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RtiAMENT FEBRUARY 17 1986 


Future of BL • Help with heating • Wapping clash 



Mover bids to 
on merit 


Attack on weather payments 


SOCIAL SERVICES 


INDUSTRY 


Mr Paul Channon. Secretary 
of Stale for Trade and Industry, 
yave an undertaking in the 
Commons that all bids for Land 
Roxer would be considered on 
[]>eir merits. During the ex- 
changes he said (hat great 
progress had been made in Land 
Rover and other pans of British 
Lev land, but the House would 
be deluding itself if ^imagined 
i ha i problems were over, that 
harsh decisions could be 
avoided and that there was 
some magic road down which 
ihcv could go without making 
dillicuh choices. 

Mr C'hannon explained that 
discussions were at an advanced 
stage between BL and General 
Motors in respect of Leyland 
Trucks. Land Rover. Freight 
Rover and certain related over- 
seas operations. Discussions 
were also taking place with the 
Laird Group about the future of 
Lev land Bus. 

Of the companies willing to 
have their interests in the busi- 
nesses made public. Lonrho was 
m contact with BL concerning 
Land Rover and Freight Rover. 
A, cling. Barford had expressed 
an interest in Land Rover and 
Lcvland Bus. and Volvo had 
expressed an interest also in 
Lcvland Bus. Proposals for a 
management buy-out were also 
expected to come before the 
board. 

The gov ernment and the BL 
board would consider other 
proposals on their commercial 
merits in relation to the future of 
BL as a whole. 

Mr John Smith, chief Oppo- 
sition spokesman on trade and 
industry, called for a statement 
of Government policy on the 
future of Bn lish Ley land subsid- 
iary companies, and in reply Mr 
Channon said the aim of the 
Government and British Ley- 
land board was to secure an 


internationally competitive 


mm 


■* 




Camp bell -Savours: Volvo 
visit blocked by board 


6. 

Ear 

nur. 


7. 

fnd 

con 

.tun 

hax 


United Kingdom commercial 
vehicle industry and to improve 
the long term prospects for 
Bniish Lev land's constituent 
businesses. 

Mr Smith asked if he was 
aware of the growing puzzle- 
ment. concern and dismay in 
this country that the Govern- 
ment appeared to be presiding 
over the auction of some of the 
best of British industry. Could 
Mr Ouinnon say clearly why 
this was happening and why it 
was necessary? 

Why when it seemed to make 
sense to General Motors to 
acquire Leyland Vehicles and 
Land Rover and sense to 
Lonrho to bid for Land Rover 
could ii not make sense for 
British Leyland to retain and 
develop the valuable assets in 
the British interest? 

Does Mr Channon not think 
the continued! that he should 
raise this question later in the 
week in Cabinet in the hope that 
the political results of his folly 
• might be borne in upon his 
colleagues and this 
dishonourable sell-out brought 
to an end? 

Mr Channon said this was 
typical of the Opposition’s ir- 
responsible and vindictive atti- 
tude. Instead of considering the 
“V commercial future of those in- 


dustries and the people who 
worked in them they were try ing 
to make the maximum political 
capital. 

Mr Alex Fletcher (Edinburgh 
Central. C) said Mr Channon 
was to be congratulated on the 
very skillful way in which he 
had attracted British bids for 
British Leyland and its subsid- 
iaries. He asked for an undertak- 
ing that these bids would be 
considered entirely on their own 
mem*. 

Mr Channon: Yes. Naturally 
we will consider them. 

Mr David Steel. Leader of the 
Liberal Party, said a clear 
distinction should be drawn 
between foreign ownership of 
the Bniish car industry or parts 
ofit on the one hand and foreign 
participation such as already 
existed, for example, between 
British Leyland and Honda. 

Will he register our surprise 
(he went on) that the board of 
the Land Rover company did 
not themselves know of the 
General Motors deal being 
stitched up before it became 
public? Will he give an assur- 
ance that the Government will 
give a (air wind if determined to 
go ahead with privatisation - 
and we assume they are - that 
priority will be given to bids 
from British concerns and co- 
operative ventures from foreign 
concerns that do not involve 
foreign takeover of the com- 
pany. 

Mr Channon: The BL Board 
have always been in favour of 
the GM proposal provided 
assurances can be obtained 
which I outlined to the House 
last week in order to get the best 
results for the British Leyland 
subsidiaries that can be ob- 
tained. What I am trying to do is 
to get the best solutions for all 
these questions. We shall natu- 
rally consider these other bids 
that come forward. 

Mr l>avfd Madel (South West 
Bedfordshire. C) asked whether 
General Motors had indicated 
how long the negotiations were 
likely to go on. 

Mr Chaonoit said it was m the 
interests of all concerned that 
the negotiations should come to 
an end as soon as they con- 
ceivably could. It was in the 
interests of all in the industry- to 
remove damaging uncertainty 
and worries. 

Mr Michael Foot (Blaenau 
Gwent. Lab) said that British 
Leyland under public ownership 
had a fine record of ordering 
components from British firms. 
Thai could be jeopardised if 
either of the sell-offs went 
ahead. What guarantees could 
Mr Channon give that such 
purchases of components would 
continue if BL was sold off? 

Mr Channon said saiisfactory- 
arrangements would have to be 
arranged. In spite of progress. 
Leyland lost £61 million in 
1984. on top of £70 million in 
1983- Land Rover was only just 
in profiL There were serious 
commercial problems here 
which the House should ad- 
dress. 

Mr Terry Davis (Birminham. 
Hodge Hill. Lab) asked how the 
Government would consult the 
BL workforce. 

Mr Channon: There will be 
talks through the usual consulta- 
tion machinery'- (Loud Labour 
protests). 

Mr Channon agreed with Mr 
Nicholas Soames (Crawley. C) 
who said Land Rover already 
had a satisfactory market in the 
Middle East and Africa. They 
needed better access to markets 
in the United States, which was 
exactly what one of the options 
Mr Channon was considering 
would give them. 

Mr Dale Campbell-Savonrs 
(Workington. Lab) said a visit to 
enable Volvo to see British 
Leyland had been blocked by 
the BL board. Would Mr 


Volvo had expressed interest in 
Leyland Bus which would be 

carefully considered. 

A minister would be meeting 
Mr Campbell-Savours later this 
week... 

Mr CampbeU-Saroars: It has 
been blocked. It has been 
blocked. 

Mr Cbannon: Well in that 
case we have unblocked il 

A representative from Volvo 
would be meeting with BL later 
this week. 

Mr Anthony Beaumont-Dark 
(Birmingham. Seliy Oak. Q said 
both Land Rover and Freight 
Rover were different from the 
rest of the areas being discussed- 

It would be a good idea to 
separate them in view of the 
interest shown in them. There 
was no need to offer them as a 
sweetener. 

Mr Channon said be was 
particularly anxious to make 
sure of the' best future not only 
for (he freight business but for 
Land Rover itself. 

Mr John Taylor (Solihull. O 
said Land Rover had taken vital 
steps to put it on a prosperous 
route. If that continued, might 
Britain not have a promising 
flotation like Jaguar? 

Mr Channon said that was 
possible. But Land Rover had a 
lot of progress still to make. On 
a turnover of £490 million, 
profits had been only £2 million 
following a loss of £14 million 
the star before. 



An attack on the Government 
over fuel payments in the recent 
cold snap came from Mr Mi- 
chael Meacfeer. chief Oppo- 
sition spokesman on Health and 
Social Security, in the Com- 
mons. 

Mr Antony Newton. Minister 
for Social Security, had said that 
last winter decisions on pay- 
ments used trigger points based 
on meteorological office 
information. The system was 
widely criticized and ruled 
invalid by the Social Security 
Commissioners last autumn, so 
the Chief Adjudication Officer 
issued further guidance on the 
handling of claims. 

It was for the independent 
adjudication officers in each 
locality to decide whether there 
had been exceptionally severe 
weather and to determine sub- 
sequent claims. 

The help included the heating 
additions for householders over 
65 and families with a child 
under five. 

Expenditure on these addi- 
tions was £400 million in 1984- 
85, £140 million more in real 
terms than in 1978-79. 

Mr Meadter accused the 
Government of abdicating 
responsibility and passing the 
buck to local officers to make 
the decisions. 

The Government was wash- 
ing its hands of the matter with 
the issue of a circular which did 
not define the words “period", 
“exceptionally severe weather” 
and other criteria. 

The temperature bad reached 
as low as -1 1"C in Scotland and 
the North East and -1 7*C 
around Cambridge. 

The availability of these pay- 
ments should be advertised 
locally because of the recent 
freezing weather. 

Mr Newton said the decision 
on payments had always been 
for the local adjudication offi- 
cer. The difference was that last 


winter these officers were given 
guidance by the Chief Adjudica- 
tion Officer setting out general 
national standards for the 
scheme. This officer had then 
responded to the declaration 
that the system was invalid. 

Wfmi would Mr Meachcr 
have said had the finding by the 
Social Security Commissioners 
had been ignored. 

The Government was aware 
of designations of areas of a 
period of exceptionally severe 
weather in Northampton. Peter- 
borough, Hertford. Cambridge, 
the Great London area as a 
whole. Mansfield and Sutton in 
Ashfield. He understood 
ttions were being consul- 
in some other areas. 

Mr Andrew Rowe (Mid-Kent, 
Cl will he confirm that not only 
has the scale of payments in- 
creased in real terms since 1979 
but also the spread? 

Mr Norton: It is the case we 
are spending very substantially 
more on regular weekly addi- 
tional payments than was the 
case when the government came 
to office - a total of £400 million 
which is £140 million more in 
real terms than 1978-79. 

These regular weekly addi- 
tions are now given to all 
supplementary benefits pen- 
sioner householders over 65 and 
a number of other groups and 
they are a much more important 


i n to account by the social 
security commissioners in look- 
ing at the operation of the 
regulations. 

Mr Douglas Hogg 
(Grantham. C]: A system of 
payments which does not pro- 
vide for a prompt indication of 
whether payments are going to 
be made and does not make 


Mr Newton: in areas where a 
period of exceptionally severe 

weather is declared I will cer- 
tainly undertake we will take 
steps’ to bang that to the 
attention of daimanis- 
Mr Patrick Cormack (South 
Staffordshire. O: It seems to 
many of us the government's 
entirely honourable and very 


Walker 
happy to 
meet new 
union 


dear how much is going to be good intentions are being fros- 
made is not a particularly trated by the arbitary and often 


COALMINING 


helpful one. Would be 
that the present system is 
ficiem in both respects? 

Mr Newton: Yes. I accept that 
point Last year I described the 
system as weird and wonderfuL 



NewtomDecisfop for 
local officers 


source of support for heaung 


payments than this system 
single payments which last year 
resulted in the payment of only 
about £1.7 million in benefits at 
an administration cost of £1 
million and that is plainly not a 
very satisfactory system. 

Mr Gordon Wilson (Dundee 
East SNP): One quarter of all 
deaths from hypothermia occur 
in Scotland. How much more do 
we have to take before we get 
adequate payments? 

Mr Newton: We are examin- 
ing the information available 
about hypothermia at the mo- 
ment The dissatisfaction ex- 
pressed in Scotland last year was 
no doubt one of the things taken 


8 


We have considered what would 
be the appropriate action in the 
light of the social security 
commissioners' findings. 

Mr Norman Ho 
(Cumbernauld and Kilsy 
Lab): Just how cold does it have 
to be before my constituents 
qualify for these allowances? 

Mr Newton: The only person 
who can answer that is the local 
adjudication officer in his area. 

Mr Frank Field (Birkenhead, 
Lab): Hundreds of thousands jof 
our constituents are suffering 
misery from the cold and some 
will die. Will he give an under- 
taking to seek radio and tele- 
vision time to tell people what 
help is available and how they 
should claim? 


insensitive local adjudication 
officer. Could not we have 
temperature guidelines laid 
down so we don't have the 
ridiculous situation where when 
it is minus 11 degrees people are 
not gening any benefit at all? 

Mr Newton: The attempt to 
lay down clear national guide- 
lines last winter by the chief 
adjudication officer was pre- 
cisely what was attacked in the 
House at the time and sub- 
sequently found to be invalid by 
the social security commis- 
sioners. 

Mr Gordon Brown (Dunferm- 
line East. Lab): How does he 
justify' refusing benefits w-hen 
the temperature is as low as -I ! 
degrees in Scotland and the 
North East? 

Mr Newton: The 

Government’s concern with the 
needs of poorer pensioners is 
precisely why regular, substan- 
tial weekly 'beating additions 
have been greatly increased. 

Mr Richard Holt 

(Langbaurgh. Ck The Treasury- 
bench has not got a very good 
record on locating Cleveland. 
Once again it will be very 
difficult to explain why Greater 
London rather than North East 
England is getting this extra 
money. 

Mr Newton: It is a matter for 
local decision. 

Mr Bruce Mill an (Glasgow, 
Govan. Lab): The effect is 
absolutely the same as last 
winter. The colder it is normally 
the colder it has to become 
before payment can be made. 
There is a sense of outrage and 
injustice in Scotland and else- 
where about this regulation. 


Foot: Fine record of 
baying British parts 


Mr Tony Benn (Chesterfield. 
Lab) said the assurances given 
to a Conservative Government 
20 years ago over Chryslers were 
not worth the paper they were 
written on- Would there be a 
ballot of workers to decide BL’s 
future? 


Labour 
protest at 
guillotine 


GAS BILL 


Mr Channon said the declara- 
tion given over the Chrysler deal 
was very much in his mind. The 
usual consultations would take 
place with the workforce. 

Mr Nicholas Lyell (Mid 
Bedfordshire. C) said in the 
Luton area people could see real 
advantage from the General 
Motors proposal. 

Mr Gerald Howarth 

(Cannock and Burnt wood. O 
said it made sense to sell to a 
British bidder rather than a 
foreigner. 

Mr Channon: What I am 
trying to do is to get (he best 
ilc deal for British Ley- 


possit 

land. 


Channon ensure that manage- 
ment proposals fora buy-out for 


Leyland Bus was given the 
fullest possible consideration by 
the Leyland board. 

Mr Channon said any such 
proposals would carefully 
considered on their merits. 


Mr Ian Wrigglesworlh 

(Stockton. SDP): Why does Mr 
Channon continue to talk down 
the achievements of Land 
Rover? h made a profit in every 
year except 1983 and there are 
forecasts of greater profits and 
record sales of their products. 
Wc are not asking for a magic 
solution. 

He suggested treating it the 
same as Jaguar had been in the 
past. 

Mr Channon: 1 am not in the 
least talking it down. The Land 
Rover products are excellent 
and have a worldwide reputa- 
tion of which all those involved 
can be proud. What 1 must do is 
give the House the figures. 

Mr Patrick Cormack (South 
Staffordshire. C) asked, if the 
products had done so well, why 
the hurry to flog them off? 

Mr Channon said there were 
serious commercial problems 
for the fuiure. 


It was adding insult to injury to 
deny MPs the opportunity of a 
full consideration of the' Gas 
Bill, which privatized the British 
Gas Corporation, Mr Peter 
Shore, chief Opposition spokes- 
man on Commons affairs, said 
when speaking against the 
Government's guillotine mo- 
tion on the Bill. 

But Mr John Biffen. Lord 
Privy Seal and Leader of the 
House, said the Government 
wanted the Bill to be enacted in 
the current Parliamentary ses- 
sion. He moved the guillotine 
motion which would limit the 
standing committee’s consid- 
eration of the Bill to a further 1 2 
sittings. 

This Bill typifies (he said) the 
Government’s positive attitude 
to industry. Industry should be 
free from unnecessary con- 
straints imposed on it by poli- 
ticians and should be fire for 
people to participate in its 
success. 

Mr Shore said the Bill had 
nothing (o do with the hallowed 
Conservative objectives of 
privatization and everything to 
do with the pressing require- 
ments of the Budget The Gov- 
ernment expected to raise £6 
billion to £8 billion by this sale 
in the autumn. The 
Government's strategy had col- 
lapsed through the rail in oil 
prices and so the greater pen of 
the proceeds of this sale would 
be absorbed by making good the 
falling oil revenue. 

Parliament today 

Commons (2.30): Drug Traffick- 
ing Offences Bill, remaining 
stages; private Bills. Lords 
(2.30): Local Government Bill, 
committee, first day. Marriage 
(Wales) Bill, second reading 


Benn fails to get 
debate on clash 


WAPPING 


Mr Tony Benn (Chesterfield. 
Lab) failed in an attempt to get 
an emergency Commons debate 
on recent incidents involving 
the police at Wapping 

He said there could be no 
doubt about the specific nature 
of the incidents directly follow- 
ing from the fact that over 5.000 
pnn i workers were summarily 
dismissed after working for The 
Times. Sunday Times. Sun and 
News of the World and the 
decision of Mr Murdoch to 
move the printing of those 
papers to a fortified establish- 
ment at Wapping surrounded by 
barbed wire. 

This brutality of action under- 
standably led to picketing and 
protests by those affected who 
had lost everything and their 
families and friends, who saw 
this as a direct attack upon the 
right of working people to band 


themselves together. 

Sir Kenneth Newman, 
Commissioner of Police for the 
Metropolis, directly and person- 
ally answerable to the Home 
Secretary and through him to 
the House, decided to bring in 
the riot police. Under the 
instructions laid down in the 
Police Operations Manual 
peaceful demonstrator might 
be attacked without any 
provocation both by mounted 
and foot police and disabled by 
the use of truncheons. As a 
result of this police action a 
number of people had been 
injured and a number of arrests 
had been made. 

The public importance of 
what was happening in the heart 
of London was very obvious. 
First, a foreign national. Mr 
Murdoch, had unjustly deprived 
several thousands of employees 
of their work and pay. Secondly, 
these workers had contributed 
directly to the making of mil- 
lions of pounds by Mr Murdoch 


Independent 
taxation of 
women urged 


HOUSE OF LOROS 


A system of transferable tax-; 
aiion allowances was rejected by 
a House of Lords committee i 
which considered a report of the ] 
EEC on income taxation and 
equal treatment for men and 
women. Lady Scrota (Lab) said j 
in opening a debate in the House | 
of Lords. 


Mr Peter Walker. Secretary 
of State for Energy, told the 
Commons that he had not yet 
met the leaders of the Union of 
Democratic Mineworkers but 
w ould be happy to do so if they 
requested a meeting. 

Mr Peter Brmn-rels (Leicester 
East. O said there was some 
concern among his constituents 
that Leicestershire mineworkers 
had not left the National Union 
of Mineworkers to join the 
UDM. It was in order for any 
individual mineworfcer to join 
the UDM to support Mr Roy 
Lynk. the leader, and to give ah 
alternative voice which the Na- 
tional Coal Board would listen 
to. 

Mr Walker That is a matter 
of decision by the individual 
miner. 

Mr Ian Wriegles»orth 
(Stockton South. SDP) said he 
welcomed that statement. He 
asked Mr Walker to condemn 
the unwillingness of the Labour 
Party's energy spokesman to 
meet the UDM who represented 
ordinary noticing people in the 
Midlands. 

Mr Walker It has always 
been our view that any leader of 
an officially recognised trade 
union should have the right to 
meet ministers so that would 
apply to shadow ministers, too. 

Mis Edirina Currie (Derby- 
shire South. C) said the South 
Derbyshire men were united 
gainst Mr Arthur Scargill and 
II his works. But it behoved the 
coal board to be completely 
even handed between the 
unions. The men should also 
work together for the future of 
the industry. 

Mr Walker said the coal 
board were pursuing the policy 
which any correct employer 
should lbUow and recognised 
those in the majority in any 
particular location. 

■Mr G rev [He J inner (Leicester 
West. Lab) said Leicestershire 
coal miners stayed within the 
NUM because they bad a ballot 
and had a substantial majority 
to stay in. 

Most of the Leicestershire 
miners are behind Jack Jones's 
leadership and so am I (he said). 

Mr Walker I am interested to 
hear if Mr Janner and his 
colleagues are also behind Ar- 
thur ScareilL 


The committee had come to 
its conclusion, she said, because 
of the many anomalies which 
could still mean substantial 
indirect discrimination against 
women and because of the 
complexity of introducing such 
a system. 

There was a tendency to think 
in terms of the traditional 
rami I y. That was no longer the 
norm. The role of married 
women in society and their 
financial status had changed 
rapidly in recent years. 


NCB mines tc 
stay in the 
state sector 


Minister will not be drawn 


OIL PRICES 


:rgy questions in 
5 he said that UK 


Mr ABck Bo cha n anS mitfa. Min- 
ister of State for Eneigy. refused 
to be drawn into saying whether 
the Government would step in if 
the price of North Sea oil fell 
any further. 

During enei 
the Commons 
oil production in 1985 had 
reached an estimated 127.4 
million tonnes. This year it was 
expected to be between 1 10 and 
130 million tonnes. 

He was replying to Mr Mal- 
colm Brace (Gordon!) who 
said this was substantially more 
than the self sufficiency level 
which was the Government's 


original objective. Some foil in 
oil price might be beneficial as a 
collapse was in nobody’s in- 
terest. he added. The time had 
come for the Government to 
think about reducing the level of 
oil production. 

Mr Bndunajt-Suritii said Mr 
Bruce was advocating joining a 
producer cartel but forgetting 
that Britain was a major con- 
sumer of oiL The character of 
North Sea production was also 
different from most of the other 
Opec producing countries. 

Mr Kenneth Carlisle 
(Ltncoln,C) said despite the 
current confusion in the oil 
industry, exploration and 
development would not decline 
because Britain needed oiL 

Mr BachanaaSmitit: It 


significant that the oil compa- 
nies tend to take a much longer 
term view of prospects than 
some opposition MPs. 

Mr Stanley Orme, chief 1 
Opposition spokesman on en- 
ergy. called for a statement from 
the Secretary of State for Energy 

What would happen (he 
asked) if the mice was to foil by 
another $5 a barrel? Would the 
Government still not take any 
action? Win be ask Mr Walker 
vo make a statement at the 
earliest possible opportunity? 

Mr B nfhanan Smith asked Mr- 
Orme what he would expect to 
come out of such a statement 
and what action was he asking 
for? Mr Orme was full of 
questions without understand- 
ing the background. 


The Government repeated its 
assertion that it has no plans for 
privatising the National Coal 
Board's mining activities. 

During questions in the Com- 
mons, Mr Darid Hunt, Under 
Secretary of State for Energy, 
reiterated that no discussions 
had taken place between the 
Government and the Coal 
Board on the subject. 

Earlier. Mr Hunt said Mr 
Antony Marlow (Northampton 
North. C) was right to pay 
tribute to workers at the Na- 
tional Freight Corporation who 
had bought shares in the 
organisation and found these 
were now worth 22 times the 
original investment 
Will Mr Hum write to Mr 
Roy Lynk (Leader of the Union 
of Democratic Mine Workers) 
and ask whether Nottingham- 
shire miners might like to set up 
a similar deal? 

Mr Hunt said the Govern- 
ment had always looked pos- ‘ 
itively at any plan by miners to 
take a more direct stake in their 
industry- 




7m extra to 



By Anthony Bevins, Political Correspondent 


The Inland Revenue is 
spending £17.5 million on 
overtime and employing casu- 
al staff in an attempt” to Teduce 
(he backlog of work in local 
tax offices. 

The Treasury has approved 
a plan to increase overtime 
and casual employment by 90 
per cent up to the end of the fi- 
nancial year on March 31. 

Last year’s estimates pro- 
posed overtime and casual 
staff employment of 1.7! i 
man-years, but that figure :. j% 
now been increased to 3.151 
man-years in supplementary' 
estimates just published by the 
Treasury. 

The Inland Revenue has 
made considerable cuts in 
staff levels in recent years: 
with a reduction of more than 
3.000 in I9S3-84 after the 
introduction of mortgage in- 
terest relief lakcn at source. 

But subsequent annual cuts 
hav e reduced staff levels from 


72.862 in April I9S3 to a 
target 69.274 at the end of next 
month. 

Because of the cutbacks, the 
Inland Revenue staff union 
introduced an overtime ban. 
which was lifted last Novem- 
ber after it had been agreed 
that long-term staff targets 
should be 65.000 rather than 
62.000 by 1 988. 

Overtime is generally paid 
a! a rate of time and a half and 
the Inland Revenue said yes- 
>-’rdj> that the massed man- 
power would be mainly used 
on manual recoding work in 
offices which had not yet been 
computerized. 

The latest supplementary' 
estimates also provide for an 
extra £4.4 million to be spent 
on computer equipment, 
bringing this year’s computer 
budget up to £64.6 million. 
The total salary and adminis- 
trative budget for Ihc Inland 
Revenue this year is £8419 
million. 


Drugs worth up to £ 1 50.000 

■ have been stolen from prose- 
cution offices in Glasgow and 

■ five trials in which the drugs 
were to have been evidence 

l may have to be put off. 

7 ; The drugs are said to have 

■ vanished on January 2 with 
, some cash from the offices of 
■; the city's procurator fiscal. 

who. under Scottish law. han- 


drug theft 


dies criminal prosecutions. 

The building. Montrose 
House, contains the offices of 
the 65 prosecution staff and 
Ministry of Defence and Prop- 
erty Services Agency workers. 

Mr Leonard Higson, Assis- 
tant Procurator- Fiscal, said on 
Sunday: “There was an appar- 
ent break-in at Montrose 
House on January 2. “ 


Job creation 

N CB (Enterprises) Ltd were 
creating job opportunities at the 
rate of 500 a month. Mr Darid 
Hunt. Under Secretary of State 
for Energy, said. 


Drunken 
driver ‘like 


a mugger’ 


Drunken drivers could be 
likened to muggers and should 
receive mandatory jail sen- 
tences. Mr Peter Bottomley. a 
junior transport minister, sug- 
gested yesterday. 


There were cases in which 
offenders aged over 2 1 should 
go to a day jail or attendance 
centre, he said during an LBC 
radio interview on road safety. 


Everyone needed ..to be 
made more conscious of road 
safety, although the past 10 
years had seen an improve- 
ment in attitudes. Many more 
people were being offered soft 
drinks, especially at ponies. 
Once it had been thought 
“cissy" to lake an orange juice. 

"What wc need to do is to 
keep the same kind of social 
disgust for people who are 
drunk in charge of a vehicle as 
we have for someone involved 
in fraud, or someone who goes 
up behind someone else on the 
pavement and hits him over 
the head. 

“Because ifdrink diminish- 
es your ability to drive safely, 
and it docs, you are actually 
being just as wanton as going 
out and mugging someone in 
the street-" 

He thought there was much 
to be said for mandatory jail 
sentences for people convicted 
of drinking and driving. 

He was not making policy, 
he said, but added: “I don't 
understand why iT you are 
over 21 you cannot go in effect 
to day jail, to attendance 
centres, and that is something 
I would want to consult other 
colleagues in government 
over”. 


Encourage 
visitors, 
Ulster told 




Pill and the under- 1 6s 


Doctor’s ‘question of contract’ 

•Us Timmins n.- i r 


By Nicholas Timmins 
Social Services 
Correspondent 

The Law Lords ruling in the 
Cillick judgement, which drew 
a fundamental distinction be- 
tween under-age girls who 
were able to consent to contra- 
ceptive treatment and those 
who were not mature enough to 
do so, led to the General 
Medical Council's controver- 
sial advice on the pill and girls 
aged under 16. Professor lag 
Kennedy, professor of medical 
law and ethics at King's 
College. London, said yester- 
day. 


The Law Lords judgement 
while permitting the supply of 
contraceptives where the girt 
was sufficiently mature to 
understand the issues involved 
and could not be persuaded to 
tell her parents, also empha- 
sized the importance of the 
family. 

Confidentiality presumes an 
agreement which can only be 
made between two parties 
sufficiently mature to under- 
stand wfcal was involved. Pro- 
fessor Kennedy said. Where 
girt was not sufficiently' 
mature the Law Lords judge- 
ment implied that the parents 


ordinarily had a right to havea 
say in what happened to their 
children. 

The balance that had been 
struck between the interests of 
the family and the right of 
some girts aged under 16 to be 
prescribed the pill without 
their parents' knowledge 
meant that “some girls, some 
times, will be judged so imma- 
ture that the doctor ought to 
tell someone about the consul- 
tation, though not necessarily 
the parent”. 



Any girl who went to her 
doctor and said at the start of 


the consultation that she was 
patting ha- trust In the doctor 
wonld put him under consider- 
able notice that be should not 
impair that trust. Professor 
Kennedy said. 

He argued that where a girt 
was not competent to enter 
into a contract of confidence 
“there would be no obligation’ 
of confidence toward the I 
chad". 

The GMC therefore could! 
not legally advise doctors al- 
ways to maintain the confi- 
dence where the doctor 
decided the child was not 
competent so to do. 


Mr Rhodes Boyson. Minis- 
ter of State for Northern 
Ireland, yesterday urged peo- 
ple in Ulster not to take 
actions or make speeches 
which were likely to frighten 
away visitors. 

Announcing a revised 
grants scheme to help to 
provide better holiday accom- 
modation. he said: “The over- 
all objective will be to attract 
over one million staying visi- 
tors a year by 1989. 

“If this target is met. 300 
permanent jobs could be cre- 
ated within the industry and a 
further 300 construction jobs 
provided. 

“The province needs this 
extra employment and it is up 
to everyone to do all they can, 
not just to welcome visitors 
but to ensure that their actions 
and speeches are likely to 
encourage people to visit Ul- 
ster and not frighten them 
away.” 

Government grams to the 
holiday industry were to be 
increased by £414.000 to £5.9 
million in l'98££7. 

The number of visitors had 
increased from 710,000 la- 
1980 to 908.000 in 1984-.- 
very encouraging 

developments'', Mr Boyson, 
who is minister responsible.' 
For tourism in the province^ 
said. 


40 jobs to go 


Neariy 40 jobs wilibe.lost 
wheu Tnang Toys drees its. 
factory, at Merthyr Tydfil,. 
South Wales, next month. 
Manufacturing will be trans- 
ferred to Manchester. ■ . 


1 



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Shuttle search 


sub may have 
located rogue 
rocket booster 


From Mohsin AH, Washington 
A mini-submarine lias tak- House search for a new per- 


„l " , — uuux ; 

SrSiu < w? phs of Nasa manrai administrator, 
omnais believe to be pan of Mr C 


the wreckage of~the shuttle 
Challenger’s right-hand solid 
rocket booster, the prime sus- 
pect m.the. world’s worst space 
disaster. . 

The photographs were tak- 
en at about 1200 ft by the crew 
of the small submersible 
searching the Atlantic Ocean 
bottom about 40 miles north- 
east of Gape .Canaveral. 

Nasa officials said the find- 
ing could not be confirmed 
until photographs, and video 
tapes taken by divers from the 
submarine, Johnson Sealink 
2, were analysed by engineers 
familiar with the 149-ft4ong 
solid rocket booster before the 
disastrous launch on January 
28. 

'.Manned and robot 
submersibles will continue to 
map the ocean floor in the 
area before salvage crews at- 
tempt to raise the otyects. 

-Meanwhile, Mr William 


Graham said that the 
position of general 

Mr Culbertson had 

two mouths had “not proved 
effective**. Mr Graham said he 
would now take sole responsi- 
bility for all daily and bug- 
range decisions. 

Kennedy. Space Centre offi- 
cials said that several mem- 
bers of Nasa's own inquiry 
board might be eliminated 
from the Challenger inquiry 
by Saturday’s decision of a 
Presidential investigation 
commission to exclude per- 
sonnel who helped to decide 
to launch the shuttle. 

MrWifliam Rogers, com- 
mission chairman, said on 
Saturday that the decision to 
launch the shuttle may have 
been flawed. The Presidential 
commission has been focusing 
on evidence of a flawed 
righthand booster rocket. 

Experts have suggested that 
a seal between segments of the 


Graham, acting Nasa admin- right booster may have foiled, 
istrator, is reported to have spewing flaine on the thin skin 
relieved Mr Philip Culbertson of the riant fuel t»nfc and 
of duties as general manager of setting off a catastrophic rhmin 
the space agency, apparently reaction, 
in an effort to consolidate his The undersea search for 
hold over the agency during Challenger’s wreckSwffl in- 
the inquiry into the Challeng- tensity this week with the 
er expJoaon. arriva , of two more 

Mr Culbertson has been submersibles^a seven-man US 
handling daytoday operations. Navy craft and a camera- 
of Nasa during the White carrying robot submarine. 


Vanishing 
Russians 
set puzzle 
for Greeks 


From Mario Modfeno 
Athens 


The simultaneous disap- 
pearances of a Soviet trade 
mission official, his young 
son, and a woman readier at 
the Soviet Embassy school has 
intrigued Greek security ser- 
vices who are not certain 
whether they are dealing with 
defections, an elopement, or 
both. 

Police sources have identi- 
fied the missing Russians as 
Mr Viktor Gudarcv, aged 30, 
head of the maritime section 
of the Soviet trade mission in 
Athens, his son Maxim, aged 
eight, ami Miss G alina 
Gromova, aged 30, who teach- 
es at the Soviet Embassy 
school for children of its staff 
The Greek Government 
said yesterday that neither the 
Ministry of Foreign Affaire 
nor the Ministry of public 
Order-had- any knowledge of 
Soviet defections. 

The US Embassy here, re- 
cently a magnet for East 
European defectors, declined 
to comment, in keeping with 
standard practice. Important 
defectors usually surface 
again m Washington after 
debriefing, as in the case of Mr 
Sergei Bokhan, who served in 
the Athens Embassy a ml de- 
fected last May to make 
revelations about Soviet intel- 
ligence in Greece. 

The latest disappearances 
could explain the bizarre epi- 
sode near the US Embassy 
early on Saturday when Greek 
-itioe chased two identical 
iviet Embassy cars circling 
with lights out 



Militant Sikhs vowing to defend the sanctity of the Akal Takht, the holiest Sikh shrine, at a 
rally in Amritsar at which they started rebuilding the shrine razed by colleagues last year. 


Hindu leader shot dead by Sikhs 


Delhi (Renter) — Sikh ex- 
tremists shot dead a Hinds 
leader near the Sikh holy city 
of Amritsar, police said. 

Two gunmen killed Chaman 
Lai president of the local 
branch of Shiv Sena, a right- 
wing Hindu group in Punjab 
state, which has a Sikh major- 
ity- 

The attack on Sunday night 
was the worst incident of 


rioldtce in a day marked by 
rival shows of force by Sikh 
hardliners and moderates bat- 
tling for die Golden Temple, 
their religion's holiest shrine. 

More than 100,000 moder- 
ates vowed at a rally in the 
historic village of Anandpnr 
Sahib to wrest control of the 
Temple from student-led mili- 
tants who occupied it on 
January 26. 


At a rival gathering 100 
miles away in Amritsar, the 
militants pledged not to give 
op the Temple complex with- 
out a fight. 

BHOPAL: Police were yes- 
terday ordered to shoot trou- 
blemakers on sight at Sehore 
where Hindu-Mnsflm violence 
left at least fora dead on 
Sunday, the area police chief 
said (AFP reports). 


The Francophone summit 


Mitterrand leads 
last stand against 
English invasion 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 


Opening the first Franco- 
phone Summit at the Chateau 
of Versailles, outside Paris. 
President Mitterrand yester- 
day called on the representa- 
tives of 39 French-speaking 
countries to work together to 
defend their common lan- 
guage and culture. 

M Mitterrand said that the 
identity of the 120 million 
members of the French-speak- 
ing community in the world 
was threatened. It must rise up 
against the ‘Tata! abolition oi 
differences” or else run the 
risk of seeing itself“Very often 
condemned to the role of sub- 
contractor. translator or 
interpreter". 

The three-day summit has 
been seen as an attempt to 
create a British-style Com- 
monwealth of French-speak- 
ing countries. However. M 
Mitterrand went out of his 
way to emphasize that -free- 
dom from all allegiance and 
nostalgia” was the “best ram- 
part against the threat to the 
francophone community's 
cultural identify” 

Developments in Chad and 
Haiti are expected to be key- 
topics among delegates, al- 
though neither is on the 
official agenda for (he plenary 
sessions, which are due to be 
devoted to more general issues 
such as the adaptation of the 
French language for use in 
computers; Third World prob- 
lems; strengthening cultural 
and political co-operation be- 
tween francophone countries; 


and foreign policy and de- 
fence. 

In his recent book on 
French foreign policy', M 
Mitterrand spoke of his con- 
cern at the retreat of the 
French language in the face of 
the rapid spread or English, 
and complained of the “irri- 
tating habit of certain of our 


The participating 

countries 


Belgium. Benia, Burkina 
Faso. Burundi, Cameroon. 
Canada, Central African Re- 
public, Chad, Comoro Islands, 
Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, 
Egypt, France, Gabon. Guin- 
ea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti. Ivo- 
ry Coast, Lebanon, 
Luxembourg. Madagascar,. 
Mali, Mauritius, Mauritania, 
'Monaco. Morocco. Niger, Ru- 
anda, Si Lucia, Senegal, Sey- 
chelles, Switzerland, Togo, 
Tunisia, Vanuatu, Vietnam, 
Zaire. 


diplomats, civil servants, and 
even politicians to speak in a 
language other than their 
own” when abroad. 

French was supposed to be 
one of the official languages of 
the United Nations and all its 
subsidiaries, the EEC. and 
most other international insti- 
tutions. yet many of them 
ignored that rule, he said. The 
same was true of many inter- 
national scientific congresses. 


Township rioting 
as observers talk 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Three members of the Com- 
monwealth -“eminent persons 
group” had a working lunch In 
Cape Town yesterday with the 
South African Foreign Minis- 
ter, Mr R F “PUt” Botha, 
according to government 
sources. 

The “eminent persons” , Mr 
Malcolm Fraser, former Aus- 
tralian Prime Minister, Gen- 
eral OfnsegHn Obasanjo, 
former Nigerian military rid- 
er, and Dame Nita Barrow, • 
president of The World Coun- 
cil of Churches, have refused, 
since their, arrival oh Sunday-, 
to say anything about then 
visit ‘ ■ 


but it is not likely to have been 
timed defibirately to coincide 
with it The most spectacular 
riots have been in Alexandra, 
a black shanty town on the 
northern ootskirts of 
Johannestargwhidi is near 
well-to-do white suburbs. 

The fronbfe in Alexandra 


According to government 
sources, they met Mr Chris 
Heunis, the Minister of Con- 
stitutional Development and 
Planning, before their -touch 
with Mir Botha. They are 
, expected to be in South Africa 
for a week. 

It is thought likely that the 
group will have asked Mr 
Botha if they can visit Mr 
Nelson Mandela, foe jailed 
leader of the outlawed African 
National . . Congress 
(ANC)-There has been an 
upsurge of violence in Mack 
townships in foe past few days, 
in which at least nine people 
died, an embarrassment for 
the Government daring foe 
Commonwealth group's riant; 


began on Saturday when the 
police had running battles 
with monrners after two funer- 
als for unrest victims. Police 
vehicles were stoned and pet- 
rol-bombed, and the police 
replied with gun shots and 
teaigas* The. area was still 
sealed off by police and troops 
yesterday, . with journalists 
barred: 

Two po&cemen were wound- 
ed and two black insurgents, 
believed to be members of the 
ANC, were killed in armed 
skirmishes in Mack townships 
near Port Elizabeth yesterday. 
The police said that a hand- 
grenade was thrown at them, 
and that they came under fire 
from an AK-47 rifle. 

The police are also investi- 
gating what appears to be the 
first use (f t landmine in the 
18 months of 
fence when an expi 
ripped off the back wheel of a 
police armoured personnel 
carrier on a dirt road in 
Manielodi outside Pretoria. 
Seven policemen escaped inju- 
ry. 


VK>- 


Italian police 
check sinking 
of hydrofoils 


From John Earle 
Rome 


Italian police are investigat- 
ing the sinking of two 2fVyear- 
okl hydrofoils in Sicily’s 
Messina Harbour on January 
30. 

One ram our circulating in 
Messina is ilhat the Israeli 


Secret Service sank the Cy 
rout 


prus-regisfored but apparently 
Arab-owned vessels because 
they were used by the Pales- 
tine liberation Organization. 

The vessels were built in 
1963 and 196 6 and each was 
capable of carrying 125 pas- 
sengers. They were anchored 
awaiting engine overhauls and 
repairs when sunk by explo- 
sives. The changes were seem- 
ingly set by experts 


80 feared lost 
as bus 

falls into river 


From Ahmed FazI 
Dhaka 


At least 80 people were 
feared drowned when a bus 
carrying more than 100 pas- 
sengers rolled into a river 
while trying to board a ferry 
near Dhaka. Officials said that 
25 bodies, including those of 
six children, were recovered. 

The bus was travelling from 
Dhiaka to Faridpur in south- 
ern Bangladesh . on Sunday 
evening , when the accident 
happened about 12 miles out 
of the capitaL 

Meanwhile, more than 170 
people are missing after two 
ferry boats collided head-on in 
early morning fog bn Sunday 
about 74 miles from the 
southern Bangladesh port of 
Khulna. 


Husak drops hint of 
economic reforms 


. From Richard Bassett, Vienna 
Mr Gastav Husak, the centralized state of the 
r 7 pchrwlavak leader, has giv- • country’s management. _ 
CT?surprise lint of economic Since ftemtenrennOT of 
SfmrnV while speaking to Warsaw Pact troops in 1968, 
^digna«>ricsS week- inertia and infkaefiy Save 
end He questioned the over- been the hallmarks of 
ena n 4 Czechoslovakia s economy. 



Mr Hnsak: prompted by 
Budapest’s luxuries 


Fears that this state of affairs 
is increasingly irritating Mos- 
cow under Mr Gorbachov's 
leadership may have prompt 1 
ed Mr Husak’s-tentanve hint 
of reform.-. 

The Czechoslovak leader, 
observed that the party would 
have to allow more : decision 
makingxo take placeat afowet 
leveL 

- In a.tftinly-vriled'refcrenoe 
to the higher ^standards of 
‘living . of Hungary, . whose 
economy has bee^deyefoping 
along more flexible lines, Mr 
• Husak. : $aid Czech osbVakia 
was watching .-carefully the 
measures introduced... by .so- 
cialist countries^- • :* 



Should you choose to put your money into life insurance? Or should you put it into a plan that gives you a cash 
return? Today with Lloyd’s Life Linkplan, you don’t need to split your maney-because Linkplan gives you both. 


Wd.i* plan. Lloyd’s Life have 
r much of The confusion 


cleared away 
surrounding Insurance and investment 
plans. 

Designed for people who don’t want 
to pick through complicated schemes. 
Linkplan combines the two most- 
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Flrsr. Linkplan gives you straight- 
forward life insurance. Bluntly put. if 


you die. we pav out to your dependants, 
ethe secuuty of knowing 


So they have it 

?yTI be looked after financially 


tbeyll 

But what about you? Many didinary 
life insurance policies simply take your' 
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That's, where Linkplan scares 

wd to provide 
lan does 

acquire a cash value. This starts to build up af ter a 
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and you can cash It in . . . totally tax free afier 



TAKE A MAN AGED 30* . . 

Wants protection kx his vnfe. but 
also wants to see some cash from his 
policy He puts £20 a month into 
Linkplan. He’s instantly insured for 
124.434 ^guaranteed for 13 years'. 
Aha the guarantee period, bis life 
cover increases while bis premium 
stays the samel In fact at £j 5. bis life 
cover is £57887 

In the meantime, bis policy is 
growing m value. He could cash it in 
at 45 and receive £4.647. . .and at 65. 
it's worth £27381 ... aD tax free. 


-tfenmM*lpaMua» «h» *Wu 


... . i Mx-wkkik.Tliri' biMpctrt* WCwpr i.'»- wr 


■huun^inxlij pwrllVr 


THE MONEY MANAGER 1 CALCULATOR 

IN A SUMLINE 

PERSONALISED LEATHER WALLET. 

When we receive your completed application, 
well send you vour free Linkplan information pack 
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Then, when you pay your first full premium 
we’ll send you. ABSOLUTELY FREE, this superb 
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Irwill bold your cheque-book credit cards, 
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and withdrawals so you always know Just bow- 
much Is in your account - something your Bank 
Manager would thoroughly approve ol? 


Because, although primarily designed to provide money We'll be putting it to good use After an 
a lifetime of high-level life cover, your plan does initial period, a nigh proportion of your monthly 

acquire a cash value. This starts to build up after a premiums goes into the Lloyds Life Multiple 


10 years! Naturally like any such plan, the longer you 
reater the val 


leave your money m. the greater the value. In ft 
early years, values will not be very high - but after a 
reasonable period you'll hod you have a growing 
asset The tables below show you how it works. But 
for full inf orman an. return tire coupon. 

We'll send you a Personal Illustration showing 
you bow much you're covered for if you die ... and 
now much you could be worth if you want to cash in 
your policy -• 

But more than that - we'll offer yon up to one 
month's free cover as well as your FREE "Money 
Manager'- no matter how much you choose to pay. 


premiums goes into the Lloyd's Life Multiple 
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After the 'guarantee!! period.' your life cover 
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And provided the Fund performs as well as 
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Result? 

Your premiums bring you a guaranteed amount 
of bfe cover ta the earl|ryears. .and the prospect of 


expect from bank deposit accounts or building 
society accounts 

We've shown in the table below, how much you'd 
be worth assuming the Fund were to grow at 8%'and 
HF.- net pa. In fact, over tbe past 10 years, the actual 
growth rare has generally been in excess of these tlgures. 

These growth rates have been used foi illustration 
purposes only, and you should not regard them as 
estimates at future fund performaixe. 

In fact, if tbe fund goes on performing as well as it 
has in the past, your future benefits will be worth 
much more than we've shown. » 



questions. Provided all these details 
are satisfactory your acceptance is guaranteed 
without a medical. 

Remember, in returning the coupon today you'ie 


under no obligation at all. No salesman will call on you 
ealdin 


youll deal direct with Lloyd's Life confidentially by 
post And youll have plenty of time to consider your 
plan before you need to do a thing. 

APPLY WITHIN 10 DAYS 


HOW THE PLAN WORKS 

Linkplan st a rts off as stra ightf orwa rd life insu ranee 
Your Tifeis immediately covered for' a substan- 
tial amount, wbth is guaranteed for a number ol 


years, depending cm your preseni age. In other 
words, should you die wirnin weeks. t 


well pay your 
dependants tire amount shown against the 
premium j'ou choose - eren if you veonlj- paid one ' 
or two premiums' -• 

Then, after this 'guaranteed period: something 
very much to your advantage could happen. 

You carry on paying the same premiums. But 
your life insurance cover should start to nsel 
How? Yous». wederit just hang tm to your 


an increasing amount later, because yoube-eiit 
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Not only that, but your plans cash value should 
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down as well as up. you'll see from the table that 
your casb-tn values over the medium to bug term 
can be high. Thousands of pounds, m fact. 

What would you dp withyour cash? Home 
improvements’ A new cat? A Boat or the holiday of a 
lifetime? Or just added comfort for your retirement > 
The choice is yours. 

GO FOR GROWTH 

The Lloyd's Life Multiple Growth Fund is worth 
over £30 000.000 The fund buys crocks and shares 
around the world ..some high performers, some 
■gUr-edged’ government securities, and also invests 
in property 

So ycmr money is put to work hard always aiming 
to achieve a bena return than you would normally 


EASY TO FIND OUT MORE 

To start couldn't be simpler. )ust tick tbe amount 


If you act quickly and reply to us within 10 days 
you'll also be entitled - upon acc 


on the coupon below that you wish to contribute each 
month, ftlh 


■ upon acceptance - to 
two extra benefits First, you'll be eligible for up to 
ONE MONTH'S COVER FREE which could be worth 


in your name, address and tire other details 
requested. Then post the coupon to us as soon as you 
can to ensure you beat the deadline. Remember, it's 
FREEPOST so your envelope doesn't need a stamp 
We'll then "prepare your own Personal Illustration, 
and send it ro you together with full details of 
LINKPLAN. 

And don't worry about a medical Well send you a 


upto£30toyou Full dei ails will accompany your 
free Personal Illustration. 


Second, youll also be eligible for your free 
PERSONALISED MONEY MANAGER' WALLET Embossed 
wnb up ro three initials of your choice, your 
Money Manager will be sent to you entirely FREE 
when you make your first full payment - but only if 


simple application requesting derails of your height 
and weight, and asking you three straightforward 


the coupon beknv is received within 10 davs. 

"tnebenefi 


So act today to make sure you get all 
that Linkplan can otter you- 


its 


p_ _ _ _ _ _ PERSONAL ILLUSTRATION REQUEST 
| NO OBLIG ATTON - NO SIGNATURE - SEND NO MONET 



1 Monthly Male 

1 Coranbuwin Age 

Guaranteed 
Luc Com 

Lite com age 65 

a% m 

XioMh frowtfi 

£10 

18 

£19.652 

£38.460 £68.274 

30 

£11.849 

£18703 £28 049 


49 

Cd.702 

£4 973 £5.74? 

.£15 

18 

L30.105 

£58.902 EI05 691 

30 

£18.161 

£28652 £42968 


jq 

C7.Z03 

£7.618 £8 793 

*20 

18 

£a0%7 

£79.353 1140 905 

30 


£38600 £57.867 


*19 

rq ?04 

£ 10 763 £11852 

.£25 

18 

LST t-10 

£99806 CV 7?.:v> 


£ Vib 
£12.?05 

£48548 £72,085' 
£12908 f 14 907 

£30 

18 

Lfc-I 

£120257 L2 13.517 

30 

£ 37.0& 9 

£58.49/ £87.724 



£14706 

C 1 5 553 £17.^61 


YOUR CASH VALUE 


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£53219 

30 

£13.499 

£20.323 

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£2245 

£2.617 

£20 

10 

£40 201 

171.693 

30 

£13 136 

£27.381 


49 

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£3 525 

£25 

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mairfi jr vJ$nih ngMr • 


yPJ^ Please send me full details of Linkplan 1 have 


ticked tire amount 1 would like to amtnbute 
each mouth. and I understand that you will now prepare 

for me a free personal illustration showing 
what I could be wrath 1 understand that this plates me 
trader no obligation whatsoever: that no salesmen will 
call on me and that I should send ao money now. As l am 
applying wfthni 10 days please send me details oo how I 
couM qualify for up to one mouth's cover Free, phis my 
F?£E 'Money Manager 1 
I would hk* L 0 contribute each month; 


/*". Send within 10 days - 
to qualify for up to one 
month sfreeLinkpIan cover 
and vour FREE Pcrsonalised 
. \M on e\\Manager ’ 


£10 □ £15 □ £20 □ £25 □ £30 □ 


Name tldr'Mn-'Mlssj'Ms 


FustttraeUV 



COVER VOUCHER 


Address, 



if wt RECEIVE vour 
COUPON WITHIN 
10 DAYS VOITLLBE 
ELIGIBLE FOR UP 
TOOSE MONTH'S 
Fit EECOVEF* WORTH 
AS MUCH AS 
LW TO VOL* 




Jbsoode- 


POST TODAY, WITHOUT A STWAP.TO: Lloyd’s Life 
I FMEPKLfelcdtwitMlilL 


Date ol 3mh, 




J. 


Om mOnIh lint 


QMakQFWMfe 



IJNKPLAN 


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1. 




The temperature rises in Chad 

Rebels hit back at 
French raiders by 
bombing airport 


From Diana Ceddes 
Paris 

France confirmed yesterday 
that the airport in the Chad 
capital, Ndjamena, had been 
bombed, probably by a Libyan 
fighter plane from (he rebel- 
held north. Damage was 
slight, it said, and the runway 
could still be used by military 
aircraft. 

At the same time, the Paris 
Defence Ministry announced 
the immediate deployment at 
the airport, "for deterrent 
purposes", of 200 French 
commandos. Jaguar fighter 
aircraft and anti-aircraft mis- 
siles. 

. France seems to have ruled 
out, for the time being, any 
question of a second French 
attack on rebel positions. 

The dawn raid on 
Ndjamena yesterday came less 
than 24 hours after the French 
bombardment of the Ouadi 
Doum airfield in the north, 
which the French claimed was 



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M Qoites yesterday 

being used to support Libyan- 
backed incursions across the 
I6ib parallel dividing the 
rebel-held north from the 
south. 

The French and the Libyans 
agreed to that ad hoc demarca- 
tion line in 1984. 

M Paul Quilgs, the French 
Defence Minister, dismissed 
as a "bad joke" the Libyan 
claim that the French had 
bombed a purely civil airport 
used for sending medicines, 
food and other relief to famine 
victims in the north of Chad. 

It was pointed out that civil 
airports are rarely protected 
by anti-aircraft artillery and 
ground-to-air missiles. 

The French decision to take 
a tough line with the Libyans 
by benching its surprise at- 
tack on Ouadi Doum has been 
met with virtually unanimous 
approval here, the only criti- 
cism — from the right — being 


that it should have come 
sooner. 

Far from damaging the 
Socialist Party's chances in 
next month's general election, 
the raid is expected to win 
them extra points. 

The Defence Ministry said 
that yesterday's bombardment 
of Ndjamena airport was car- 
ried out by a Russian-made 
Tupolev 22 fighter, almost cer- 
tainly belonging to the Liby- 
ans and based in the Libyan- 
occupied Aouzou strip along 
the Libyan border with Chad. 

Three bombs are under- 
stood to have been dropped 
from 5,00Q-6,000fL but M 
Quilcs said that only one had 
hit the runway. Repairs had 
begun, and the airport is 
expected to be fully operation- 
al again, even for long-dis- 
tance civil aircraft, by 
tomorrow. 

"What happened this morn- 
ing looks very much like a 
bluff,” M Quiles said. “It will 
not undermine our determina- 
tion to continue to assist the 
Government of Chad." 

He insisted, however, that 
France had “no bellicose 
intentions" toward Libya, and 
denied that the latest 
“defensive" disposition of 
French forces in Ndjamena 
was to be a second operation 
of the type bunched in i 983 to 
defend the Chad regime from 
Libyan-backed rebel attacks. 


Europe looks to the future 


Nine poised to 
speed decisions 

From a Correspondent, Luxembourg 


Britain and eight other Eu- 
ropean Community nations 
last night signed a controver- 
sial “European Act", designed 
to speed up EEC decision 
making, although the Act is 
still the subject of a referen- 
dum to be held in Denmark 
next weeek. 

But the ceremony was 
marred by the refusal of 
Greece and Italy to -sign in 
advance of the Danes. 

The Act calls for the remov- 
al of all barriers to internal 
EEC trade by 1992, and 
promises to restrict the use of 
national vetoes by individual 
countries. But it offers scope 
for nations to dissent on 
matters of health, safely.anti 
terrorism measures and immi- 
gration controL 

Mrs Lynda Chalker, the 
. Minister of Stale at the For- 
■etgn Office who signed for 


Britain in Luxembourg last 
night welcomed the Act's po- 
tential for developing freer 
trade and the greater scope it 
offered for European co-oper- 
ation. 

The Italian Government 
has said it will not sign the 
Act, which it believes does not 
go far enough towards the 
achievement of the European 
ideal, until the Danish Gov- 
ernment has had the support 
of the people in next week's 
referendum 

The Greek Deputy Foreign 
Minister in charge of Europe- 
an affairs, Mr Theodores 
Pangalos, explained that his 
Government would not sign 
out of solidarity with Den- 
mark, one of the few countries 
to show complete support for 
the Greek resistance during 
the dictatorship of the Colo- 
nels. 


Danes back reforms 

From Christopher Follett, Copenhagen 


Opinion polls about this 
month's Danish referendum 
on European Community re- 
forms indicate a convincing 
majority in favour of the 
package. 

One poll published yester- 
day in JyUands-Postch , the 
influential Conservative daily 
newspaper, showed 52 per 
cent of Danes supporting the 
reforms, with 33 per cent 
against and a large 15 percent 
undecided. Other leading 


newspaper polls at the week- 
end showed the same predom- 
inantly positive attitude, 
predicting more than 50 per 
cent support. 

A national referendum on 
reforms to the workings of the 
European Community has 
been called for February 27 by 
the centre-right minority Gov- 
ernment after the leftist parlia- 
mentary majority last month 
rejected the so-cailcd Luxem- 
bourg package. 


EEC ends 
boycott 
of Turkey 

By Nicholas Ashford 

Diplomatic Correspondent 

As Mr Turgut OzaL the 
Turkish Prime Minister, be- 
gan his official visit to Britain 
yesterday, he received news 
that one of the main aims of 
his visit - the improvement of 
Turkey's relations with the 
European Community - had 
been given a big boost by 
European foreign ministers 
meeting in Luxembourg. 

The ministers derided to 
end what had been a virtual 
boycott of Turkey by agreeing 
to call a special meeting later 
this year under Turkey’s 1963 
association agreement with 
the Community. 

Greece had been blocking 
such a move since official 
contacts had been severed 
after the military coup in 
Turkey in 1980. 

Yesterday's Luxembourg 
derision was an important 
breakthrough for MrOzal who 
had been trying to normalize 
his country's relations with 
Western Europe since his 
election two years ago. 

Britain had favoured 
reactivating Turkey's associa- 
tion with the EEC but, apart 
from Greece which opposed it 
over the Cyprus issue, several 
other European countries had 
been wary because of contin- 
ued human rights abuses in 
that country. 

Leading article, page 13 


Doubts 
linger 
on liner 
sinking 

From Richard Long 
Wellington 

An inqniry will open in New 
Zealand today into the sinking 
of the Soviet anise liner 
Mikhail Lermontov after the 
Prime Minister, Mr David 
Lange, talked yesterday of 

disquieting aspects. 

He was referring to the 

delay In calling assistance 
when the stricken 20,000- 
tonne liner began to drift 
without power alter striking 
recks and taking water. 

Mr Lange said the rescue 
operation, which saved all the 
740 passengers and crew ex- 
cept for one Russian seaman, 
believed to have gone down 
with the ship, was a remark- 
able achievement. But there 
were conflicting assessments, 
be said, over tbe need for an 
early warning and early assis- 
tance for the liner, and that 
needed investigation. 

The two-man preliminary 
inquiry by tbe Marine Divi- 
sion of the New Zealand 
Ministry of Transport will 
recommend whether- a frill 
marine inquiry should be set 
np. 

The British High Commis- 
sion in Wellington said the 
passengers included 53 British 
passport holders, bnt most 
were Australian residents. 

Passengers, many of them 
elderly Australians ou a’ 14- 
day Pacific cruise, told report- 
ers after landing in Wellington 
yesterday that the ship's band 
continued to play and they 
were urged to continue a 
Russian wine-tasting even af- 
ter tbe ship's engines stopped 
and it began to list. 

When the list increased, 
they bad to use ropes to cross 
the tilting deck and reach tbe 
lifeboats. 

Earlier, passengers recalled 
expressing surprise that the 
big finer should travel so dose 
to the Cape Jackson headland. 
Mr Peter Evans, on deck at 
the time of the impact, said he 
was surprised that the finer 
passed on the landward side of 
a fight beacon, which he 
thought would have been a 
warning to ships. Mr Stan 
Smith, aged 65, i rf Sydney, 
said he saw a reef so large and 
so dose to the ship that it 
resembled a partly submerged 
submarine. 

Neither New Zealand an- 





A rescued passenger arriving at Sydney airport Is welcomed by a young relative. 


thorities hot the Soviet Em- 
bassy would say whether the 
ship was under the guidance of 
the New Zealand pilot. Cap- 
tain Don Jamieson, or the 
Russian master. Captain 
Vladislav Vorobyov, at the 
time it struck rocks off the 
northern tip of New Zealand's 
South Island. 

Bnt some passengers said 
that Captain Jamieson, who 
had been giving a running 
commentary bom tbe bridge 
when he guided the ship out of 
Queen Charlotte Sound, said 
be would be leaving the bridge 
in control of the captain and 
would take over again when 
the ship entered Milford 
Sound. 

After this the ship changed 
direction to head inside the 
beacon and near the headland, 
they claimed. 

Rescue centre staff in Wel- 
lington yesterday gave details 
of bow a 6.03 pm "Mayday" 
signal from the Mikhail Ler- 
montov was cancelled on Sun- 
day night This left rescuers 
unsure of whether to go to tbe 
.ship's assistance as the. liner 


drifted ost of control in fading 
tight. 

At 6.45 pm the liner sent out 
specific instru c tions th«t no 
further assistance was needed. 
However, Captain John 
Reedman of the balk carrier 
Tarihike, con tinned towards 
the liner, as did a number of 
small craft. They were able to 
be of immediate assistance 
when the passengers began 
abandoning ship. 

• MOSCOW: Tass, in its 
report on the sinking, praised 
the liner's crew for their skill 
in saving passengers and 
pointed out that a New Zea- 
land pilot was on board. 

Yesterday's Tass report was 
the first mention in the Soviet 
media of die shipwreck. The 
agency said tbe Mikhail Ler- 
montov struck a reef "In the 
conditions of a difficult pas- 
sage tbrongh the fjords of New 
Zealand". 

It went on: “After five boors 
nphOl struggle to save the 
ship, the liner sank at a depth 
of 33 metres (100 ft). Attempts 
to ground the vessel failed. 


Rapidly rising water flooded 
tbe engine room. 

“The faultless training and 
sang firoid of the crew allowed 
the evacuation of the passen- 
gers in the shortest time on to 
New Zealand ships which had 
sped to the place of the 
shipwreck.” 

• LONDON: British staff 
rescued from the Soviet liner 
were recovering yesterday at a 
hotel in Sydney (the Press 
Association reports). 

CTC lines, the London- 
based charter operators of the 
liner, said its 13 employees 
were "severely shaken" 

CTC said its staff inclnded 
crnise director Peter Warren 
from Hull, his assistant Joy 
Sherlock from Oxford, and a 
four-piece band called Mag- 
nus. 

The band consists of drum- 
mer Bob Wadkin from Shef- 
field, bass guitarist Tom 
Williams from south London, 
guitarist Ken Tweddle from 
Cramlington, co Durham, and 
pianist Lawrence Webster 
from Blackpool. . 


Savimbi 
boasts of 
US arms 

Jamba," Angola (AP) — The 
leader of the Unita guerrilla 
movement in Angola. Dr Jo- 
nas Savimbi, hopes his forces 
will be using US anti-tank and 
anti-aircraft missiles by April 
to meet an expected govern- 
ment offensive. 

He told about 20 Western 
and South African reporters at 
his bush headquarters here at 
the weekend that he had a 
“firm commitment" for mili- 
tary aid from the Reagan 
Administration, but was not 
certain when the aid would 
arrive or what it would be. 

He rejected speculation in 
South African newspapers 
that Unita was considering 
freeing Cuban prisoners as 
part of possible agreements to 
release Nelson Mandela, the 
black leader jailed in South 
Africa. 


Dissident 
plea over 
jail terms 

From Roger Bayes 
Warsaw 

Defence lawyers yesterday 
appealed for the quashing of 
jail sentences against three of 
Poland's leading dissidents, 
arguing that the original trial 
had been badly conducted and 
that the evidence was too thin 
to warrant conviction. 

The dissidents — the histori- 
an Mr Adam Michnik and 
Solidarity underground orga- 
nizers Mr Wladyslaw 
Fraysniuk and Mr Bogdan Lis 
- had been jailed for between 
. 2ft and 3V: years last year after 
a police raid on a Gdansk 
apartment. The police said 
that the three and others 
present, including the Solidar- 
ity leader Mr Lech Walesa, 
had been planning protest 
■ strikes against price rises. 

None of ihe defendants was 
present. Mr Michnik had ap- 
plied for permission — deter- 
mined to make a speech that 
was repeatedly muffled al tbe 
trial - but was refused. No 
reporters were allowed into 
the courtroom and only four 
relatives were present. How- 
ever. defence lawyers said that 
the presiding judge, though 
strict, was fair, giving counsel 
time to expound on the ineq- 
uities of the trial held in June. 

The lawyers yesterday pre- 
sented a * catalogue of 25 
procedural abuses in the trial 
The prosecution when it puts 
its case may argue for stiffcr 
jail sentences.lt had originally 
demanded five and four-year 
jail terms. 


Tin- w hfoasu*. riifed 




Iranian troops celebrate their capture of the Iraqi port of Fao, with the smoke of Iraqi oil 
tanks billowing in the background. Tbe photograph was released by Iran, 

Iran claims air strike HQ seized 


Bahrain (Reuter) - Iran said 
yesterday that it had captured 
a control centre used to direct 
Iraqi air strikes on tankers in 
the Guff and reported downing 
seven Iraqi planes, making 36 
destroyed since its “Dawn 8" 
offensive began more than a 
week ago. 

Iraq said that its Air Force 
knocked out six bridges in the 
Iranian cities of Abadan and 
Khorramsfcahr, used by Irani- 
an reinforcements on their way 
to territory Iran has occupied 
in the Fao peninsula of south- 
ern Iraq. 

Earlier, Iraq said most of 
the Iranians oho fought their 
across the Shan a 3- Arab wa- 
terway to reach Fao had been 
killed. i 


On tiie diplomatic front, the 
foreign ministers of Kuwait 
and Saudi Arabia, supporters 
oflraq. arrived iu Baghdad for 
talks with President Saddam 
Hussein. They had previously 
been in Damascus, apparently 
trying to persuade Syria, an 
ally of Iran, to join moves to 
end the fighting, which has 
taken Iranian troops to the 
Iraqi border with Kuwait. 

Iu Vienna, meanwhile, an 
Austrian doctor who examined 
eight Iranian soldiers flown 
from Tehran for hospital 
treatment said that they were 
suffering from severe respira- 
tory problems caused by poi- 
son gas. "We will be lucky if 
four of the eight survive," Dr 
Gerhard Freilinger said. 


Tehran radio said that the 
control post was used direct 
Iraqi air strikes a gains, ank- 
ers serving Iran's Kharg Is- 
land oil terminal 
The post, containing sophis- 
ticated European radar and 
listening devices, was captured 
intact, the radio said. Iran says 
it has taken more than 320 
square miles of the Fao penin- 
sula in ihe offensive. 
Yesterday's communique 
daimedthat 530 Iraqi tanks 
and personnel carriers had 
been destroyed and several 
others captured and turned 
g ains t the Iraqis. But an Iraqi 
commander said his troops 
had retaken several positions 
from tbe Iranians, most or 
whom- had been killed. 


West Germany shaken by two scandal stories 

Kohl fights perjury charge 


Public prosecutors in the 
Rhineland-Palatinate. where 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl was 
formerly Land Prime Minis- 
ter. yesterday made known 
that they intended to start 
"investigation proceedings" 
against Herr Kohl for alleged 
false testimony. 

The allegation relates to 
evidence he gave in the Land 
capita] of Mainz last summer 
before a committee of the 
Land Parliament. 

The committee was looking 
into payments which Herr 
Kohl was said to have re- 
ceived. on behalf of Christian 
Democratic Party funds, from 
business interests when he was 


From Frank Johnson, Bonn 

Land Prime Minister. 

The suggestion was that the 
payments were not properly 
declared under law. Hen - Kohl 
denied the allegations. 

Yesterday two lawyers in 
the regional public pros- 
ecutor’s office at Koblenz, 
Herr Heribert Braun and Herr 
Hans Seeliger, said that they 
would begin the investigating 
proceedings after Herr Otto 
Schily. a radical lawyer and 
Green MP in Boon, had taken 
out a private summons 
against Herr Kohl for alleged 
false testimony. 

The hearings in Mainz were 
part of the “Flick Affair” — 
illegal payments to political 


parties by Flick, the industrial 
concern, in connection with 
which two former Bonn min- 
isters are at present on trial. 

‘‘Investigation pro- 
ceedings" against Hot Kohl 
are a long way from constitut- 
ing a charge against him. Herr 
Schily, a brilliant tactician, hit 
upon the idea of a private 
summons as a political and 
publicity device. 

None the less, the an- 
nouncement by the two Ko- 
blenz prosecutors — who were 
answering questions from re- 
porters about the fate of Herr 
Schily’s application — means 
that he has got farther with it 
than was expected. 


Taint of corruption in Berlin 

From Our Own Correspondent, Bonn 


Corruption among politi- 
cians in West Berlin, or the 
suspicion of iL seems to have 
achieved al 1-pany status. 

The Christian Democrats 
ICDU) won the mayoralty and 
became the biggest party in the 
city senate at the turn of the 
decade partly by promising to 
put an end to the periodic 
corruption which had marked 
the previous 30 years of Social 
Democratic (SPD) rule in the 
city. 

But recently two CDU offi- 
cials were indicted for alleged- 
ly taking bribes from a 
building contractor. 

Shortly after suspending 
one of them from duly, pend- 
ing charges, the Mayor of 
West Berlin, Herr Eberhard 
Diep&en. announced in ad- 
vance — since it was bound to 
become known — that he, too, 
had accepted DM50,000 


(about £ 1 5,000) from the same 
contractor. Hen- Diepgen said 
it was when the CDU was in 
opposition, and all the money 
had gone into party funds. 

Now Herr Horst Vetter, a 
city senator from the Free 
Democrats (FDP), the CDU's 
coalition partner m West Ber- 
lin. is accused of accepting 
DM10.000 (about £3.000) 
from the same contractor. 

So all three West Berlin 
parties are tainted with cor- 
ruption: one reason why the 
worldly Berliners are not tak- 
ing seriously the present SPD 
protests is that the party has 
failed to make them forget its 
own past in the city. 

The scandal has reached the 
stage of worrying the CDU 
leaders in Bonn, including 
Chancellor Kohl, The word 
reaching them is that the FDP 
in West Berlin is not prepared 


to let Herr Vetter be sacrificed 
unless an important CDU 
figure is sacrificed as welL 

For the first lime, the 
possibility of Herr Diepgen's 
resignation is being talked 
about here, although there is 
still no decisive evidence of 
illegality on his part If he is 
forced out, it will end the 
career of one of the rising men 
of the CDU — he is only 44 — 
and one who has been dis- 
cussed as a future Chancellor. 

As to the reasons for West 
Berlin's corruption, various 
theories are advanced. These 
include the city's rather unreal 
status, deep in communist 
East Germany, as well as the 
immense West German subsi- 
dies disbursed by local politi- 
cians, currying favour with 
whom is therefore important 
to local businessmen. 


T* 

JL 


Moscow 
extends 
visa 
Bonner 

Moscow ( AP) — Mre Yelena | 
Bonner, wife of the Soviet 
dissident. Dr Andrei Sakha- j 
rov, has been given a three- ■ 
month visa extension to stay I 
in the West for medical ireal- 
mem. the Soviet journalist, | 
Mr Victor Louis, said yester- j 
day. , i 

Mr Louis, who has close lies I 
with the Kremlin leadership. \ 
described Mrs Bonner s vi>g ; 
extension as a formality and : 
said that it did not pose 
problems. 

Mrs Bonner, aged 65, left 
Moscow' in November on a 
visa that was to expire on 
February 25. She had bean , 
bypass surgery at Massachu- j 
setts General Hospital in Bos- 
ton in January, and has been j 
recovering at the home in i 
Newton, Massachusetts, of 
her daughter, Mrs Tatiana ; 
Yankelevich. 

Dwarf protest 
stops contest f 

Bonn (Reuter) - An inter- 
national dwarf-throwing com- 
petition in West Germany 
next month involving a Brit- 
isb group, tbe Oddballs with a j; 
4ft 4in man called Lenny the 3 
Giant, has been cancelled after l 
protests from small people. 3 
The organizer said he had [ 
called it off after receiving) 
complaints from people oft 
restricted growth in West Ger- { 
many. Britain and The Neth-; 
erlands. . 

Ship towed in j 

Dubai (Reuter) - The; 
Greek oil tanker Avocet. hit 
by an Iranian missile off Qatar! 
on February 6, was being 
towed to Dubai with thej 
bodies of two Indian seamen | 
killed in the attack. Another, 
two seamen are missing, be- 
lieved drowned. 

Bathers flee 

Tokyo (Reuter) — Twenty-, 
five naked bathers fied to the! 
cold streets holding only tradi-| 
lional Japanese washcloths; 
after fire broke out in a public^ 
bath-house in central Tokyo. : 

Death fall j 

New York (Reuter) - Jo-j 
soph Duell. aged 30. a princi-| 
pal dancer with the New Yorkj- 
City Ballet Company, fell tov 
his acath from his Manhattan* 
flat. 

Pit disaster 

Saarbriicken (Reuter) -j 
Seven coalminers were killed 
and one was injured in anl 
explosion at a pit outside thi4 
south-western German town! 
The Saarbergwerke company! 
spokesman said Sunday, 
night's explosion had beerfl 
caused by fire-damp. [1 

Oil slick seen | 

Taipei (AP) - Searchers 
have spotted a large oil slick ir.j 
rough seas near where a China 
Airlines Boeing 737. carrying! 
13 people, disappeared aficS 
failing to land on an island 
about 155 miles from here, j 

Family killed j 

Pfaffenhofen. West Germa J . 
ny (AFP) — A 36-ycar-old 
locksmith here strangled hi? 
wife, aged 32, and their si:-| 
children, aged from six to I2j 
before cutting his wrists. \ 

Mafia swoop [ 

Catania, Sicily (AFP) -A 
Signor Giuseppe Alleruzzo. arj 
alleged Mafia godfather, wa« 
arrested when 300 police 1 
swooped on his Mount Ein,^ 
hideouL jj 

Asylum row p 

Tokyo (AP) — Mr Valery’ i 
Vacheslavovich Polyanin, s* 
Soviet seaman seeking asylum; 
in the US after rowing s' 
rubber raft into Japanese wal 
tere, is in the custody o~~ 
Japanese Immigration Bureau 
authorities after having beer!'.-, 
interviewed by Soviet offif , 
rials. 

Author dies 

Ojai. California (AP) 

Jiddu Krishnarr.urti, the Indir 
an philosopher, author ant; 
educationist, who founder'* : 
schools in Britain, the US anri 
India, died yesierday. aged 90r ■ 


West Nile leaders 
urged to give up 

From Richard Dowden, Kampala 
A delegation from the new The delegation which left 


Ugandan Government yester- 
day met political and military 
leaders of the West Nile 
District, including Colonel 
Gad Wilson Toko, the former 
Defence Minister, in Arua, to 
persuade them to surrender. 

According to a reliable 
source who visited West Nile 
via Zaire at the weekend, there 
is widespread civilian pressure 
for capitulation among West 
Nile people. 

Colonel Toko, who is from 
West Nile, is reported to travel 
frequently by helicopter be- 
tween Arua and Gulu. where 
Brigadier Basiiio Okello. the 
former chief of staff. »as his 
headquarters. But the colonel 
is reported to be undecided 
whether or not to carry on 
fighting. 





Kampala at the weekend is 
made up of officers of the 
Former Uganda National 
Army (FUNA) and of ihe 
Uganda National Rescue 
Front (UNRF) who have al- 
ready surrendered to the gov- 
erning National Resistance 
Army (NRAl 

Most of the troops from 
FUNA and the UNRF who 
were brought back to Uganda 
from exile and armed by the 
Okello regime List August, 
were former soldiers from his 
home district of West Nile. 

Their defection would mean 
that only the AcholiS, the tribe 
of the Okello leadership, 
would con 1 . i r.ue to stand 
against the new comment. 

All banks, shops, schools 
and offices in Arua are report- 
.ed closed p 


Sfecharansky denies j 
religious pressures j 


Tel Aviv (AP) — The re- 
leased Soviet dissident, Mr 
Anatoly Sbcharansky, has de- 
fended his wife and her friends 
against charges that they were 
trying to turn him into a 
religious penitent 

In an interview published in 
the daily newspaper Yidiqt 
Ahronot he said: “Nobody is 
trying to influence me. Finally 
I am in a democratic state and 
also in a democratic family." 

He said he would observe 
the Jewish religious laws he 
liked and would not observe 
(hose he did not. He said that 
his wife's religions friends 
“devoted years of their lives to 
help us, and they help now to 
prevent journalists from 
smothering me with love. They 
are considerate and don't push 
me." 

Mr Shcharansky's religions 
and political beliefs have come 

R. 


under intense scrutiny by isj 
raeli liberal* who believe hi; 
has the moral authority t% 
influence Israeli opinion or! 

such matters as Jewish settle; 
ment in the occupied territo 
ries and religions coercion. , 
Liberal Israeli journalist^ 
have said he appeared to b- 
undcr pressure by ultra-naj 
tionalist and religions Jewiss 
settlers to change his nn» 
obstrvanf ways and adepj 
their religious attitudes am 
hardline policies toward 1 
Israel's occupied territories. 6 
His wife A vital who becams .. 
a religions penitent short!? ' 
after she arrived here in 197>| i 
uttered a public prayer at big 
Shcharansky's arrival cerenua 
ny on Tuesday, that temtorS 
ia the land ol Israel not 
given up. She also pressed 
skullcap on her husband 
head. 




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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 


Portuguese presidential election 


Dissident I The Philippines crisis 


© 


[-distance runner 


From Richard 'Vies 
Lisbon 

One of Dr Mario Soares’s 
campaign posters in the presi- 
dential election showed Carlos 
lopes. Portugal's Olympic 
gold medallist, endorsing his 
candidacy as “a fellow long- 
distance runner". 

The €»!-> ear-old former So- 
cialist Prime Minister's vic- 
tory on Sunday capturing 51.2 
per cent of the vote was a 
triumph of political stamina. 

He fought back From the 
rom of his own party in last 
October’s genera! election to 
edge out his right-wing oppo- 
nent. Professor Diogo Freitas 
do Amaral, who so nearly won 
in the first round and reached 
over4S percent in the run-off. 

Clearly savouring his per- 
sonal victory . Dr Soares 
delivered a midnight speech to 
his celebrating supporters in a 
Lisbon square, urging magna- 
nimity in victory, promising 
to ensure respect Tor the rights 
of all Portuguese, and asking 
the whole nation to concen- 
trate its energies now on 
meeting "the European 
challenge" after joining the 
Community. 

The victory was well-de- 
served. but Dr Soares's five- 
year mandate may not prove 
an easy one. Only 1 50.000 
voics separated him from 
Professor Freitas, who deptart- 
ed with a de Gaulle-like touch, 
promising his “availability” to 
the nation in the future. 

Two deeply contrasting 
sides of Portuguese society 






- 



Anibai Cavaco Silva, the man 
who broke up the coalition of 
Socialists and Social Demo- 
crats that Dr Soares led until 
last summer. 

Senhor Cavaco told a press 
conference after Dr Soares's 
victory became dear that he 
saw no consequences for bis 
Government and emphasized 
his good relations with the 
outgoing President. 

The remarks were cooL 
Senhor Cavaco backed Profes- 
sor Freitas for much of the 
second round of the cam- 
paign, repeatedly attacking Dr 


campaign 
plan upset 


Listening role for 
Reagan’s envoy 


The two men could hardly 
be more different. Dr Soares, a 
poor administrator although 
three times Prime Minister, 


fought for democracy since his 
student days and suffered 
imprisonment and exile under 
the Salazar regime. He found- 
ed the Socialist Party in exile 
in 1973, rushed home as the 
April Revolution broke and 
then led the struggle to pre- 
vent a Communist takeover in 
1975. He communicates easi- 
ly, as demonstrated by the 
innumerable handshakes, 
kisses and embraces received 
from the populace during the 
presidential campaign. 

Professor Freitas’s young 
and dynamic personality and 
well-oiled American style 
campaign did not conceal the 
right-wing forces backing him. 
Portugal has judged them as 
seeking too brazenly a return 
to the values of an undemo- 
cratic past 


The victorious Dr Mario Soares acknowledges the cheers of his supporters. 


laced each other in the cam- 
paign. and only the people's 
remarkable ability to live 
peacefully with these differ- 
ences prevents an explosive 
confrontation. 

Dr Soares's victory, howev- 
er. is crucial in this respect, ft 
shows a majority of Portu- 
guese opt for the tolerance and 
openness to dialogue he per- 
sonifies instead of the polar- 
ization underlying Professor 
Freitas's campaign. Many or- 


dinary citizens have evidently 
still not forgotten what life was 
like during the Salazar years. 

Dr Soares, w hose father was 
a Cabinet minister during 
Portugal’s First Republic, will 
enter the pink 18th century 
Palace of Belem early next 
month, succeeding an army 
general. President .Antonio 
Eanes. as the country’s first 
civilian head of state in almost 
60 >cars. 

His ambition is clearly to 


play the role of influential 
leader, even though he must 
realize the powers of the 
president were considerably 
reduced, ironically at his bid- 
ding. during President Eanes’s 
second term. Avoiding parlia- 
mentary instability will be one 
of his main tasks. 

First of all.he will have to 
keep his election promise to 
respect the present minority 
Social Democrat Govern- 
ment. headed by Senbor 


Seoul (Renter) - Mr Kim 
Young Sam, South Korea's 
leading dissident, has been 
released from the' boose arrest 
imposed to prevent him at- 
tending a meeting of opposi- 
tion politicians. 

However, Mr Kim Dae 
Jong, the country's best- 
known dissident, remains sn- 
der police guard. 

Mr Kim Yoeng Sam was to 
have chaired a meeting at the 
office of the Council for Pro- 
motion of Democracy (CPD) j 
on how to coaster a govern- 1 
went crackdown os a cam- 
paign to gather 10 million i 
signatures calling for direct 


in Manila mission 


From David Watts, Manila 


he was confined to his house 
for about 11 hoars. 


Police have arrested about 
100 opposition politicians and 
dissidents 

Hundreds of riot police still 
ringed Mr Kim Dae Jong's 
house and people were not 
allowed in or out. 


The two Kims signed a 
petition, with abont 200 other 
opposition figures, last week 
calling for election reforms 
despite a government warning 
that they laced up to seven 
years’ jail for doing so. 

The US has condemned the 
government crackdown and 
called for the lifting of restric- 
tions against Mr Kim Dae 
Jung. 



President Reagan's special 
envoy. Mr Philip Habib, visit- 
ed President Marcos yesterday 
to begin the task of trying to 
find a way out of 
Washington’s extraordinary 
dilemma after Mr Marcos's 
disputed victory in the dirtiest 
elections in Philippine histo- 
ry. 

The meeting lasted twice 
the planned one hour before 
Mr Habib went on to meet 
Mrs Corazon Aquino, who 
seems to grow stronger in her 
conviction that she is the real 
choice of the Filipino people. 
Mr Habib was accompanied 
by the head of the Philippines 
desk at the US State Depart- 
ment Mr John Maisto, and 
the US Ambassador in Ma- 
nila. Mr Stephen Bosworth. 

Mrs Aquino and her run- 
ning mate. Mr Salvador Lau- 
rel. left Mr Habib in no doubt 
that the crisis can be resolved 
only by an orderly transfer of 
power to an Aquino presiden- 
cy. “Mrs Aquino sounded 
very presidential, she con- 
ducted herself in a very presi- 
dential manner." said a 
briefing officer. 

Mrs Aquino did most of the 
talking, telling Mr Habib that 
she was the overwhelming 
choice of the people and that 
she intended to apply increas- 
ing pressure “until the popular 
will expressed last February 7 
is vindicated and respected at 
the earliest possible time". 

Mr Habib appears to have 
played little part in the meet- 
ing. being content to listen to 
Mrs Aquino and some of her 
advisers. The two sides parted 
on the understanding that 
another meeting could be 
arranged if needed. 

Mr Habib finds the US 
faced with a president deter- 


mined to discount the opin- 
ions of foreign election 
observers, the Catholic bish- 
ops. the foreign media. Presi- 
dent Reagan and an equally 
determined Mrs Aquino. 

It appears foal American 
options are now limited io 
uving to find some modus 
rfrendi between the two par- 
ties. Presidem Marcos has 
publicly rejected the notion 
that he follow the example of 
President Duvalier. the for- 
mer Haitian leader, and go 
into exile. Even if the Ameri- 
cans were to make that sugges- 
tion it would most likely make 
Mr Marcos more determined 
to retain power. 

After Mrs Aquino's call for 
a boycott of banks owned by 
friends of Mr Marcos, several 
had beaw withdrawals. But it 
was difficult to ascertain 
whether this was as a result of 
Mrs Aquino’s demand or 
whether it was an indication 
that more Marcos supporters 
were leaving the country. 

The share price of San 
Miguel Corporation fell three 
centavos on the Makati stock 
exchange after Mrs Aquino 
called for a boycott of the 
firm’s products. Although she 
also told people not to buy 
newspapers which supported 
foe Presidenuhey have al- 
ready suffered because of their 
rabidly partisan coverage of 
foe election. 

Mr Marcos, meanwhile, be- 
gan to make good on his 
promise to pursue investiga- 
tions of some of the 
campaign's worst crimes when 
the entire military command 
in the province of Antique was 
relieved following the murder 
there Iasi week of a former 
governor. Mr Evelio Javier. 


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Sydney (Reuter) — Mrs 
Lindy Chamberlain, who was 
convicted of killing her nine- 
week-old daughter Azaria. 
said that her fight for justice 
was just beginning. She was 
speaking in public Tor the first j 
lime since her release from 
jail. 

Mrs Chamberlain, aged 37, 
who has maintained that the 
child was dragged away by a 
dingo, told a church meeting 
of 1,000 Seventh Day Advent- 
ists: “This is not just for our 
freedom; it is for you as well 
. . . We do not ever wish to see 
what has happened to be 
repeated in Australia." 

Beside her at the service at 
Cooranbong 90 miles north of 
Sydney were her husband. 
Michael a former priest of the 
church. 

She was freed from Darwin 
Jail after serving three years of 
a life sentence for murder. Her 
release on bond followed foe 
discovery of a tattered cardi- 
gan. which she identified as 
Azaria’s. near the remote 
Ayers Rock camp site in 
central Australia where the 
child disappeared in August 
1980. 

Authorities in the Northern 
Territory have said that her 
conviction stands pending a 
new inquiry into foe case. 

Late last week, she negotiat- 
ed exclusive interview rights 
with a media group owned by 
Mr Kerry Packer, and is 
expected to appear soon on his 
television station and in his 
magazine. Australian 
Women's Weekly. Local spec- 
ulation is that the rights cost 
Mr Packer more than 
$Aus250.000 (£125.000). 


Czeslaw 

Bielecki 


By Caroline Moo rehead 








f professionalism 
m work 


China attacks 
Dalai Lama’s 
view on Tibet 


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Peking (AFP) - China has 
again insisted that Tibet is 
Chinese territory and that 
“this historic reality is recog- 
nized by all who know its 
history." 

Mr Ma Mingqing . spokes- , 
man for foe State National- I 
ities Affairs Commission, 
replying to a statement by foe 
Dalai Lama that foe territory" 
had become a Chinese colony, 
said: 'All hostile attacks are 
useless". 

He added: “After many 
years of struggling, Tibet’s 
economy has developed great- 
ly. people's lives have im- 
proved and the freedom of 
religious belief is protected by 
law.” 

The Dalai Lama said in an 
article published last week by 
the Hindustan Times that 
Tibetans do not wish to live 
under Chinese domination. 


On Saturday. April Ll 
1985, a ant! of Security Police 
entered a house in Warsaw 
and emerged leading a man. 
his head covered with a blood- 
stained towel. As be was being 
put into a waiting police car. 
the man called oat: “My name 
is Bieiecki-Poleski. Tell every- 
one that they bare arrested 
me.” 

Czeslaw Bielecki is an ar- 
chitect. a graphic designer, a 
playwright and. under the pen 
name of Maciej Poleski. a 
political columnist. Before his 
arrest, he had been editor of 
one of Poland's three largest 
independent publishing 
houses, CDN, an acronym for 
“to be continued". During 
martial law. he was a regular 
contributor to the Paris-based 
emigre journal Kultura. 

In the 1970s, Mr Bielecki 
who is 38. worked as an 
architect both in France and 
Saudi Arabia. With the birth 
of Solidarity In 1980. he 
became a founder member of 
the group DIM — House and 
Town — the first independent 
circle of architects. 

Early in 1983 Mr Bielecki 
was arrested, then released in 
the July amnesty. He combi- 
ned working as an architect, at 
the same time publishing a 
series of political articles wi- 
der his pen name, in which be 
argued that even under hope- 
less conditions much could be 
achieved. 

Mr Bielecki is now awaiting 
trial before a military court. 
On October 13 he began a 
banger strike for the right to 
see bis two sons, aged seven 
and 10, and to be able to 
receive books and be granted 
the status of political prisoner. 
He is now being force-fed. 

In Poland, force-feeding Is 
done with some brutality and it 
has been going on for five 
months, so -friends are now 
worried about his health. 



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Mr Bielecki: force-fed while 
on hunger strike 




Gum flies to Crete 


■> 1 

t * 3 



WH SMITH rn 


Suhjsci iojcu Utahn. Pnc«rorr?ct a time pTgoingiopfA). Olkf wink M archil h 


Soma -^Mrnert avaiLiWe 41 Ui^er branches anjjMrtte Sod* Us. 


Kathmandu (Reuter) — 
Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, foe 
rich man's, guru, apparently 
left Nepal over foe weekend, 
saying his disciples in Europe 
needed him. 

“He is now in Crete, we 
have just heard from our 
headquarters in Geneva.”. 
Swami Anand Arun, co-ordi-' 
nator of the Kathmandu 
Rajneesh Centre, said. 


lese capital were angry at their 
gunt s abrupt departure from 
a luxury hotel here. 

Swami Arun denied that the 
departure of Rajneesh had 


VS* YV. 


anything to do with the arrival 
wday of the Queen and foe 
Edi ? bur & h on a five- 






daystaie visit. 
The euni ai 


jtH O* 



„ left the 

in? November after plead- 
t0 imini 6* alion 




- • ’—t 4 ! ~i -■ At 




lj* IsS£> 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY IK IQM 


Only one British airline flips 

'Stop to Saudi Arabia. 




(The service is non-stop, too.) 





Mote coffee, sir I" 


“Thefihnsoundtracks on Channel 2.” 




“Would you like a blanker as well? 



jjg-r 



u Thelccdtime?Justafier9, sk” 


*Don\forgty<nahandbaggage, sk " 



“ Hopeyouenjityed the flight, sir. " 


If you want to fly non-stop to Dhahran, Jeddah or Riyadh, 
there!; only one way you can fly British. 

And that’s with British Caledonian. 

YCfe fly 5 times a week to Dhahran, 5 times a week to Jeddah, 
and twice a week to Riyadh. 

(No other airline, British or otherwise, flies non-stop fiom 
London to all these destinations.) 

Naturally, a non-stop flight on British Caledonian means 
non-stop attention from our Caledonian Girls. 

Whether you go First Class, Super Executive or Economy, 
they’re at your service fiom check-in to touch-down. ■ 

In First Class or Super Executive, you get a choice of meals 
(served on real china) and unlimited flee drinks (served in real 
glass). You also get dedicatetichecking-in facilities and priority 
baggage clearance. 


urv«Kju£.' r 


All British Caledonian passengers enjoy the benefits of 
flying from London-Gatwick. Bor one thing, it’s only half-an-hour 
fiom Victoria Station by the Gatwick Express. 

We even have a check-in desk at the station, so you can 
check your baggage and get your boarding pass even before you 
board the train. 

(If you live out of town, the new M25 makes the airport easily 
accessible by road.) 

For more details of British Caledonian’s services to the 
Middle East, ring your Travel Agent. 

Or call our Passenger Information service on 01-668 4222. 
They can give you details of flight times, seat availability, 

even tell you what film’s showing on the flight. 

With British Caledonian, it’s all part of the service. 

We never forget you have 3 cboice, 

edanian * . , . ■ 














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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 1 8 1986 


SPECTRUM 


A 


N ot long ago, perhaps 
as late as last week, 
it was enough to 
own a portable vid- 
- eo Super-8 Camcorder and 
' Celinet telephone to fed at the 
- forefront of while-hot technol- 
7 ogy. Not any more. For the 
- status-conscious, a parabolic 
' television amenta is what 
- now piques the neighbours. It 
is a big white dishcgenerally 
between 1.5 and 1.8 metres 
across, on a tall tripod moored 
in concrete. Whether squatted 
toadlike in the shrubbery, or 
perched unblinking on the 
root it cannot be ignored. 

Possession of a satellite dish 
distinguishes someone as an 
“early adopter*’, the kind of 
person market research de- 
fines as the first to acquire 
anything newfangled. A fash- 
ionable arcane vocabulary ac- 
companies it. One must 
always speak of the “backyard 
dish”. The satellite at whidi it 
is pointed is the “bird”. Quite 
soon one is casually dropping 
jargon like “footprints” (the 
; ground area covered by satel- 
lite beams) and “TVROs" 
(Television Reoeive Only: 
dishes which can reoeive but 
not transmit signals). 

In Britain, the number of 
owners is in the hundreds, not 
thousands. They are an exclu- 
sive bunch of electronics en- 
thusiasts. media folk and rich 
businessmen, especially Euro- 
pean expatriates wishing to 
watch television in their own 
language. For less than £4,000, 
including VAT and installa- 
tion costs, they can receive up , 
to 21 TV channels from 
Britain and abroad. 

A “working tool” is how 
television personality and pro- 
gramme archivist Bob 
Monkhouse regards his £3,000 
Hfah, " an ugly bastard” con- 
demned to one of the darker 
comers of his garden near 
Woburn. “When I come to 
argue it out with the taxman, 
any claim that it’s ptndy for 
amusement win be met with 
the fret that I need to watch 
any accessible programme 
that will provide me with 
comedy material”, he says. 

Forty years before he 


Satellite television is the latest craze among 
gadget-lovers. It may turn your back garden 
into Jodrell Bank, but how else do you watch 
Norwegian religion or Lassie in German? 





SKY CHAfOSEL: Owned by 


CHILDRBCS CHANNEL: 


MUmORVlSfON: Robert 
Maxwell's feature film service 
whose output ranges from 


Rupert Murdoch. Offers general Programmes for yourapters 
entertainment dommataa by I 7am until 3pm. Ownaaby 


old American series Eke TheLucyx Thoro-EML Starts off the day 


Show end The Untouchables. 


with Tm Tm. 


Function to/ Married A 
Centrefold, What s Up Nurse and 
Dribble. 




SCREEN SPORT: From 
American ABC network. Sport is 
shown alongside less 
orthodox activities — roSer derby, 
arm wresting and blue marirt 
fishing. Today features rock 
climbing and stock car racing. 


THE ARTS CHANNEL 
THE ARTS CHANNEL: WJf. 
Smith's culture vulture channel 


MUSK BOX: Also owned by 
Thom-aW. Shows 18 hours of 
pop videos, 15 every hour. 


which today features modem 
sculpture and the playwright 
Jutfes Feiffar. 




TV5: French ente rt a inment 
channel with progr a mmes from 
Europe and French-speaking 
Canada. Today showing an old 
Fernanda* film and a variety 
show. 


TELECLUB: German-Swiss 
company showing mostly 
Engtish-fanguage Hms with 
subtitles. On oner tonight are 
Gandhi and Blame ft on Rio. 


SAT 1: German-language 
news, sport and fim network. 
Tonight offers Lassie. Taxi and 
flfe LBute von derSfdoh Ranch. 


FiimMet 


FtLMNET: Dutch feature Am 


service. English ffms with Dutch 
subtitles. Tonight offers An 


subtitles. Ton 
Officer and A 
Grease 2. 


(offers An 
Ttieman, and 


IHEMOIMOHEC M— . 
PREMIERE: Owned by Thom- 
EM1 and shows mainly feature 
films, inducing tonignrs Snow 
White and Tha Seven Dwarfs, 
Children of The Com and 
Great Expectations. 


news in French or German 
every night. Indeed, many of 
the early British systems were 
bought by the RAF and Army 
for reaching recruits Russian. 

However, the best case for 
satellite TV is made by the live 
24-hour Cable News Network,' 
relayed to Europe from Atlan- 
ta by the mighty Ted Turner, 
an interloper both admired 
and mistrusted by European 
broadcasters. The BBC and 
ITV covered the recent shuttle 
disaster using his pictures. 
CNN, a “window on the 
USA” now constitutes die 
biggest sales pitch for the 
consumer satellite market 

Of course, manufacturers 
and distributors of satellite 
TV equipment stand to bene- 
fit greatly from deregulation. ! 
Northampton-based Sat-TeL . 
Britain’s largest marmfiir trimr ! 
selling to ' the professional 
telecommunication industry, 
now maif«-y a domestic dish 
costing £1,000. The leading 
distributor, Megasat, was sim- 
ply “ hang in g m” until last 

May, as Graham Lawson, its 
managing director, cheerfully 
confesses. Bui he expects a £1 
million turnover this year. 

The dishes he sells, made of 
al uminium or fibre-glass, 
come in kits like DIY furni- 
ture, together with a low-noise 
block converter for processing 
the satellite si gnal*, the 
receiver, a box placed next to 
the TV set Suppliers will carry 
out installation for a fee winch 
can be several bundled 
pounds, according to the de- 
gree of difficulty and distance 
travelled. A dear line of sight 
is necessary from the premises 
to the two European satellites 
available, Intelsat V and ECS 
F-I (European Communica- 
tions Satellite). 




vSJl v 





i'/ 

/ 




/ * 

$ 

I* 




JUr* 


LIFESTYLE W.H. Smith's 
channel aimed at housewives. 
Broadcasts advice about sex, 
cookery and (fivorce plus a 
weekly spat from Dr Miriam 
Stoppard. 9am-1 2.30pm. 


Other foreign channels are RTL- 
Plus(German), NRK TV Norge 
and its Norwegian fellow 
countryman New World 
Channel, which offers rakjtous 
progr a mmes. Two Russian 
channels, Programma 1 and 2, 
can be received wkh special 
equipment Most Russian 
programmes are*'cuttural M , but 
there Is soccer and ica hockey. 


M egasat’s four do- 
mestic systems 
range from £1,030 
to the £2,850, 
which has a motor for point- 
ing the dish towards the 
satellites and a computer tun- 
ing in each channel. Without 
the motor you must pul on 
wellies and turn the dish by 



bought his dish, Arthur G available to local operators. Joint Industry Committee for interest” from customers rv^ked - with morcDOwerful 

Clara the science fcnon The technology was picked up Cable Audience Research, since starting before Christ- grT brSSdom 

author of 2001, A Space by ordinary Americans want- Disturbed by the slow growth mas. It has sold 1 1, costing mno a* »k» 

Odyssey, was inventing ns ing to see television from of subscription, the cable pro- £2,100 ea± (pin* YAT), <Hsh may end up being tittle 


concept. The satellite comma- around the workL Now it is gramme-makers, together mainly to Europeans living in 

nications industry is the prod- estimated that 45,000 back- with satellite dish manufactur- southern England, 

uct of his discovery that yard dishes are sold there ere, persuaded the Govern- More significantly for the 

satellites travelling in synchro- every month. ment last May to relax its rules average consumer, the high 


nous orbit with the earth, 
22,400 miles above the equa- 
tor, will appear stationary and 
so be able to transmit to 
designated parts of the globe. 


T 


street TV rental chain DER 
has successfully experimented 


on ownership of riishre street TV rental chain DER 

he British Govern- They can feel reasonably has successfully experimented 
ment ignored the do-, pleased The Department of for two months in 25 shops in 
mestic possibilities of Trade and Industry has since the Home Counties with rcnt- 
satefliie dishes when it granted 900 one-off licences, ing systems for £50 a month. 


direct broadcast satellites 
(DBS) due far launching, the 
dish may end up being tittle 
bigger than a dinner-plate 
sitting on top of the telly. 
Then, say expats, prices could 
tumble to £500. 


Wine and song tat no women: Lanrie Lee In his attic, strictly m work area 


Although the importance of 
technology and retailing costs 


But not until ^ recently have authorized cable TV firan- Dishes have begun to colonize 
inch viduals, at least m Britain, chises in 1983. Only cable the roofs of hotels, such as the 
wrested the technology from operators, research establish- Dorchester in Mayfair, and 
governments and telecom- ments and British Telecom London pubs like the 
mimuatioQs giants. were legally allowed to own Vulture’s Perch, run by foe 

Historically, satellites have satellite television equipment Virgin leisure group, which is 
been . < T UC 1 t f?« - ■ for receiving foe kind of also equipping its Oxford 

r!® 0 ™ cable television. Sato- programmes in which Britain Street Megastore, 
me rv plucks pictures from now leads Europe: pop videos By 1987, most of Britain's 
foe sky, cable sends than from Music Box (cost £15 a 10,000 betting shops could be 
down a landline into the year), films (Premiere and televising live racing by satd- 
bome. But cable programme- Mirror Vision), women’s fea- life on one or several banks of 
, sate !f tes toreky lures (Lifestyle), a children’s screens, if foe Betting Office 
sgtiaK both locally and inter- channel and general enter- Licensees Association 
nationally, to the cable opera- tamment (Sky). (BOLA) has its way. 

tors, who the n tran smit than The Government miscalai- There are no figures for 
to their subscribers. The feted. The national cable TV individuals taking up the B- 
Amencan (able Tvboom of audience has remained stub- cences, but Hatreds, the first 
the fete 1970s began only bornly small: still only department store to sell dish- 
wben satellites were made 26,000, according to the es^ reports ’’enormous 


foe Home Counties with rent- cannot be overlooked, the 
ing systems for £50 a month, quality and quantity of the 


cider man 


plus a 12-programme charge 
which is passed on to the 


es will deride foe 
satellite television. 


programme-providers. The Sly, with its seven million 
deposit of £744, a year’s viewers across Europe, is well 


It is three years since Lanrie 
Lee invited anyone to his 


rental has not deterred its 34 placed for foe battle looming 
customers. DER is employing between foe progra m mo -pn>- 


attic hideaway in Chelsea, a 
place full of locked rooms 


extra staff to meet foe de- . "riders. But foe specialist En-d 


mand. 


P 


glish-language channels, 
dependent on small . cable 

eople less committed 

to foe satellite «...«■ aiverosing, face difficulties, 
who include profes- u L^ ct ’ is . a fr ca ^y 

sonal TV critics, won- being sold off 
y anyone wou ld ever The programmers are 


der why anyone would ever t he programmers are 
watch cable prog rammes , threate n ed, ironically, by foe 
from Britain or Europe, when “open skies” philosophy im- 


this counry already four pfrcit in satelli te televirion. At 
perfectly good channels as well present anyone with the 


when satellites were made 


reports ’’enormous 


as plenty of films to rent or equipment can pick up their 
buy on video cassette. The programmes without actual 


usual response to this j$ the payment- So they are almost 
wider choice satellite TV of- certain to follow Sky’s exaro- 


fers: foe variety of pie and scramble foe satellite 

available on a rainy S unda y signal. A dish owner would 


when regular then have to spend up to £200 
shows the likes a decoder. 

Praise, and the But even among foe big 
sal to fans of guns there is i uncertainty and 


ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS 
IN MEDICAL RESEARCH 


of Songs of Praise, and the 
specific appeal to fans of 
continuous pop music, fihra 
and sport on the American- 
owned Screen Sport channel. 

Our screen guardians are 


tic activity. ITV has an- 1 hatches . . . 


place full of locked rooms 
containing rqected manu- 
scripts and other men’s mad 
wives. Or so he says. He also 
ays be doesn't own a tele- 
phone, so when one suddenly 
Weep as we are matily 
clinking glasses to toast the 
forthcoming BBC television 
film of his classic, As / 
Walked Out One Midsummer 
Morning , I tactfully disregard 
it- ■■ 

Lee ignores it too. He gazes 
evasively through the win- 
dow, foe cracks of which are 
ineptly sealed with shrivelled 
brown sticky tape, and be 
enthuses about foe view. “I 
watch Concorde go over, a 
beautiful sight, and Prince 
Andrew dipping his helicop- 
ter over foe palace to wave to 
Ma'am, and the seagulls, a 
sign to batten down foe 


In Laurie Lee’s 
Chelsea attic, 
Val Hennessy finds 
a new volume is 
quietly stirring 


nounced a Su per C hannel to 
carry the best ofTTV and BBC 
programmes, though the BBC 


Lee, poet, essayist. OBE 
and author of one oftbemosr 


surely correct to criticize the may yet move separately, 
cheap progamming, tiro re- Sky’s owners, News Interna- 


YES* NO 


peats of ancient American tionaJ and Virgin, a sharefaold- 
series like The Lucy Show, er in Music Box, are part ofa 


they are also concerned that conglomerate with plans for a 
viewers wifi lose the “shared system in which anyone can 


Tve depended on 

women as ; 

voluptuous refuges 9 


experience” of good national bid to supply programmes, 
television, a topic for discus- And next year Robot Max- 


rion at work the next morning. 

Yet there is a sneaking 
enjoyment in flitting around 


the global village, from seedy DBS satellite. 


well owner of Mirror Vision, 
hopes to launch a second 
channel from a new French 


WbuMyou beat a child suffering feonr 
feukaema? 


Italian cabaret on station RAL With so much money on die 


jo.foe Good Sex show on table, satellite television looks 
Lifestyle, and, that Screen a goodbet to happen, as turf 


Sport s World Tiger Fish accountants will soon con- 
Champi onsfups from Zxmba- firm. But many questions 
bwe. Much ofit is rubbish, but remain, the most vital being: I 


WbuHyou retain Sodetfs band won 
control over poSo, diphth e ria, TB and 
smallpox? 


Would you a^eewe must have 
medicines ana vaccines which have 
been tested far safety? 



it holds foe fasc i n ati on of will national television be 
being someone rise’s rubbish, drained of money to fond 


And there are more defenri- even f i tf ap w cable shows? Or 
ble arguments, one of them fe]i gj] just pie in the sky? 


educational. How useful this 
>goes, for your child doing O- 
level languages to watch the 


yrical autobiographies in the 
English language. Cider with 
Rosie, is a bit ofan old 'rateaL 
The literary world tells tafes 
of his partiality for tho hard 
stuff how he foil off foe 
podium at a poetry-reacting, 
bow he smugdes drink into 
readings in ink bottles- 
He tells tales about bimseff 
tike the one about the day be . 
was sitting outside tire pub in 
" his native Cotswold village, 
Siad, when a party of giggling ' 
schoolgirls asked: Excuse 
roe, sir, can you tell us where 
Laurie Lee is buried?” In the 


young man taking my part is 
much better looking than I 
was, the music's tty Julian 
Bream ...” But what he 
really wants to discuss is his 
appearance on Wogan and 
how he got up Wogan's nose. 

“I soon realized that foe 
twinkle in Wogan's eye turns 
to ice if you pull his leg”, he 
grumbles, his own astute eyes 
glowering through smeared 
bi-focals. “When I told him 
not to interrupt me, he drew 
back looking coldly dis- 
pleased. Td taken along my 
tittle flute to surprise him 
with an impromptu Irish air. 
In case the excitement of 
talking to Wogan drove my 
fingering from my mind, I 
carried a card with instruct- 
ions to myself saying: Three 
fingers down, two fingers up'. 
When 1 asked him to hold it 
he looked cross and suddenly 
tore it in half and the credits 
rolled up. We didhT hit it off 
atalL. 


appears not to hear. When I 
inquire whether he's slightly 
deaf he replies: “My dear 
daughter Hesse, who gives 
me kisses in exchange for 
pound notes, describes me to 
people saying, ‘he stumbles 
and he’s a bit deaf but he’s 
ever so young ...’ One nev- 
er says one's deaf you know, 
as one never says one’s an 
alcoholic. Incidentally, my 
GP recently asked me what 
Td drunk that day and I 
replied *two beers and a short’ 
which is alcoholic code, as all 
GPs know, for 15 beers and 
half a bottle of whisky. 


“I began telling him how 
Tve always depended on 
women as voluptuous ref- 
uges. How I often live alone 
because unlike certain more 
august writers, like Blake and 
Dickens. I can’t work with 
women in the room, 

_ “This is the reason I don’t 
live at home all foe timg with 
my dear wife. I Jove visiting 
her, then returning . to my 
London fortress where I 
work. The pleasure of wd- 


At this point the post 
arrives. Lee nips into foe hall, 
wildly slitting open envelopes 
until like a sniffer-dog 
pouncing on dings, he finds a 
cheque. While 1 ask a feeble 
question about bis work in 
progress he waves the cheque 
gleefully like a flag. “That’s 
foe question I always shy 
away from", he replies, top- 
ping up the glasses. “Further- 
more, I don't even think of 
myself as a writer now. More 
a communicator and 
intepreter of something 
whidi I still think of as being 
magically unique, that is this 
world and this life which, in 
spite of shadows and occa- 
sion^ pain, has been a per - 
petnal excitement and joy. I 
never intended to be a writer. 
I left the village school at 14. 1 
just scribbled for my family 
and girlfriends. When I was 
in my 20s a rather grand 


*1 don’t even think 
of myself 
as a writer now* 


Michael Watts 

kNMMwMIW 


polite version he replies (and . «ome is only exceeded by the 
here you must imagine his . pleasure of saying 
Gloucestershire burr): “Lao- farewell ...” J 


23 Go*« shelter (4) 

24 Showy clothing (6) 


done-this work must continue. 


DOWN 

2 Shack (S) 

3 Goods vehicle (3) 

4 Straight-through 
fcnyMJL 4.2) 

5 Rshbitftir(4} 

6 Toterani(7) 

7 Sudden idev(lO) 
10 Stncbxw(JO) 

12 London 


rie Lee is usually buried with 
his nose in a pint of bitter if 
you'd care to join me in foe 
public bar”. In foe saucy 
version he replies: “Ooh ar, 
come up foe wood, girls, and 
Laurie Lee will soon show 
you where be wants to be 
buried”. 

You can forgive bawdiness 
from the man who wrote: 
“Such a morning it is when 
love/leans through geranium 
windows/ and calls with a 
cockerefs tongue. . . " Arid 
you can countenance a cer- 
tain amount of intemperate 


rambling from foe man who, 
at 19, fen his mother's cottage 


■ So what is Laurie Lee 
writing these days? 
“Cheques" he replies with a 
wistful sniff “gas bills, VAT 
returns. I spend a lot of time 
answering letters from people 
wanting their poems pub- 
lished. Schoolchildren doing 
Cider with Rosie for O level 
write to trie. My serious 
objection to being on the 
syllabus is the daft exam 
questions they set But I 
won’t say more on that topic 
[soowls sheepishly] in case 
•they take me off foe syllabus 
and my royalties dry up.“ 
Obviously “the royalties” 
keep foe wolf from foe door 


girlfriend found my poems 
on foe floor and persuaded 
Cyril Connolly to get them 
published.” 

Bemoaning the fact that be 

writes very slowly, he sud- 
denly lets slip that foe sequel 

k* s balf-a-milbon 

benseller. As l Walked Out, is 
?eanng completion. , “It’s a 
book of defeat, pain and 
disaster. About a winter when 
the anti-Franco side were in 
tstreat, Franco was winning 

and ourskfc had no arms. Tm 

«so_ writing my Deathbed 
forue ssionS'bm that’s all Tm 
prepared to say.No one wants 
to hear an old poet rambling 
gompously on about his next 



■* *■«•* 
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19 PusOrt |{5J 

14 Frozen sea mast (4) 20 Domed mess (4) 


to wafle to London arid then ’ . not to mention the scotch on 
through Spain, from Vigo to foe rocks, foe book having 

Aiufsliuia nlurinv a ..M __rur . . 


And that’s it Heinvites 


SttTwi? * 5 cap a tettos » 

lists, bills and poems in a 


. ! s this *1 




cuenahmieDt axes (4) 16 Small sally fish (7) 22 Wallop (3) 


Safeguard your future 


SOLUTION TO No S77 

ACROSS: I Crumb 4 Macftw SArtOn STonme 10 Salaried II Fail 
I3 Hippo aaia 17 Alps IS Funereal 21 Detract 22 Olive 23 Mystery 
« bucuC 

DOWN: I Chaise 2 Until 3 Bookropo 4 Mother country 5 Core 
32Rw«enou» Mlmpens IS Random; lfiFIccce 
19 Ehte 20 Safe _ ^ V 


Andalusia, pfeying a violin 
for money as be wenL - 
Not that the man will 
discuss either his poehy or 
the BBC film of thatcde&rai- 
ed trek. “It’s fairly trite to my 


sold two million in paDer- 
back. Loe confesses it a a 
mystery to him font a book 
about rural life before it was 
“raped by foe combustion 
engine - stilt attracts readers. 


eh**, 

<fowBstadre and 


°ut into foe 


- - ^ 
-■-■j ' 


» foe gloomy street, 
fove a definitely not- 


fewithcoci^" 








of snowdrops thrust- 















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Hvi'V 

fiz-.ir* 


' 


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. ^ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 


FASHION by Suzy Menkes 



Shaping up for a spring clean 


ci 








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lean is the mes- 
sage and shape is 
the story for 
spring. Simple 
clothes make their 
impact with sharp 
cut rather than fancy detail 
The spring suit is bade at 
centre stage and takes over 
from all those cunningly mis- 
matched separates. The curvy 
all-woman suits have short 
tight skins and scornfully turn 
a shapely derriire to mannish 
looks, androgyny and over- 
size. 


■h 


This tender tailoring gives 
us fashion on the curve. 
Although there is a hint of the 
sharp-angled 1960s, the new 
clothes are drawn with a 
compass rather than a set- 
square. 

Shoulders are still padded 
but bust, waist and hips are all 
rounded. The new silhouette 
comes much closer to the 
body line, with twin seams 
gathering in the folds of fabric 
to make jackets fit for spring. 

king of the curves, and the 
alchemist of this fashion 
change, is Paris designer 
Azzedine Alaia. He moulds 
corsets of wool jersey and 
stretch viscose to the female 
body. Those who dismiss his 
outline as extreme forget that 
the first statements about 
changing fashion are always 
dramatic. 

Alaia’s new collection is 
based on an all-in-one gar- 
ment which he calls, appropri- 
ately enough, “the body". The 
Tunisian-born designer, who 
stands waist-high to his 
favourite muse, Grace Jones, 


once designed costumes for 
the Crazy Horse strip show. 

He has a cartoon-strip view 
of women and one that flouts 
the feminist fashion creed. But 
Alaia has worked for 20 years 
as a couturier . for private 
clients and his ready-to-wear 
clothes, made in artfully 
seamed soft fabrics that fit and 
ding, are more wearable t han 
might first appear. 

Alaia has also acted as a 
catalyst for other designers 
who have now thrown off 
layers and shrouds and 
brought the body back into 
focus in their own way. 

French designers, who arc 
always strong on tailoring, 
have been quick to develop 
the style. The young Parisian 
designer Myrene de 
Premonville is in the new 
mood, and so are young 
British names like John Rocha 
and Jasper Conran. 

The curvy jacket and slim 
skin are the linchpins of the 
new spring style. The skirt 
comes mostly in just one 
shape: tubular and on-tbe- 
knee. It is worn with flat 
pumps and crepe tights or high 
heels and glossy legs. Hem- 
lines come both longer and 
shorter, but the skirts are 
always reed-slim and need to 
be seen in proportion to the 
jacket (and your hip-size). 

The newest skin of all is the 
sarong, which has all the 
appropriate curviness and 
comes in light jersey and fine 
gaberdine, as well as the more 
traditional summer cottons. 

Flat materials, both man 
and silky and especially wool 



Room, Tunbridge Wells” Kent, 
atnir 


gaberdine, make the fabric worn over a slim short skirt 
story of the season. This was a significant shape in 

The jacket is the key pur- *^6 Paris couture collections 
chase, buttoned high and al- 


ways moulded with seaming 
from bust to waist and hips. 
There are some curvy jackets 
among the oversize in the 
chain stores, but this is mostly 
a look that is coming from the 


and is already on sale from the 
forward-looking ready-to- 
wear designers. 


designers and will only later 
work thro 


through high streets and 
wardrobes at the lower prices. 

The newest shape of jacket 
is the riding coat — a three- 
quarter-length jacket follow- 
ing the body to mid-thigh and 


ngcoa 

body gracefully, shapes a less- 
Ihan-perfect body, and makes 
an oufit that expresses 
fashion's new soph is ic3 lion 
after a decade of sporty sepa- 
rates. 


There is more than a hint of 
the 1960s about some of the 
jackets, which are round- 
necked, collar! ess and high 


buttoned. A confetti sprin- 
kling of buttons down the 
front is the only detail to break 
up the uncluttered line. Keep- 
ing it simple is also the 
message for hair and accesso- 
ries which all need to be sharp 
and clean. 

Under the jacket goes the 
simplest sweater, a ribbed 
polo neck or cut-away top 
(also redolent of the 1960s). 

The shapely jacket is often 
worn over nothing at all. For 
the suit has come back not just 
to the body-line, but in a way 
that makes it sexy, young and 
fun. 


Right Rajah jacket in canary 
yellow wool gaberdine, fitted 


© The romance of the bride is 
ihe theme of store displays 
this month. The young make- 
up ranges are also in the 
wedding tradition for they 
have borrowed grand old 
names, come up with new 
textures and shadowed it all 
with something blue. 

© The dressing-up look of 
winter beauty has freshened — 
but there is still a feint feel of 
decadence in the moody 
mauves. slate blues and poi- 
son pinks that make up the 
cosmetic colour schemes. 

& Miss Havisham is the bnde 
who springs to mind for Way- 
in's dramatic new beauty 
range launched last week. A 
hah! touch of post-punk, a 
gloss of Sixties style, all on a 
hgve of supcr-Sloane. makes 
up this striking collection. 


O Eyes are in focus with duo 
sets of strong shadow (£2.95) 
using mixes of pink and 
mauve or lime and apricot, 
with cheeky names like Buck- 
ingham Royals and Camden 
Look. There are also strong lip 
colours suggesting Bad Girls, 
who wear bright Piccadilly 
Pink or Soho Orange. 


• Young accessories to light 
up a teenage make-up corner 
are fat blusher brushes in 
vivid Day-glo colours. 

• Lips are In the news with 
the Nouvelle Kissine range 
from Miss Selfridge’s Kiss and 
Make-up cosmetic collection. 
Refreshing colours for spring 
honeymooners are tangerine, 
pomegranate and tequila 
among a cocktail of equally 
delicious shades. 


thigh-length and collarless with 
slender skirt Suit by 
Pr6monvtIle et Dewavrin, £395, 
also in white or black from 
Whistles, 12-14 St 
Christopher's Place, W1 and 
branches. Zip-up matt bla 
swimsuit, £65, by Kathari 
Hamnett from 50 South Morton 
Street, W! and 124B Kings 
Road, SW3 from March; 
Comiche, Edinburgh; Review, 
Cheltenham; Square, Bath. 

Belt, Alaia. 






Is this the only 
kind of bird your 
children watch? 


If so, then you should give them 
a gift of a year’s membership to 
The Young Ornithologists’ Qub. 

lr’s the junior section of the RSPB, 
and ir will make them look at the 
birtfs and wildlife around them with 
iresh, eager eyes. Not square eyes. 


RSPB 


Ftic imho mfiniBaaoB »itse la 
YOC Dcpu ISM. The LmJec, 
SOt* JEH. 

Td-Dw* Ob lOftr, grist. 


Heels as well as skirts are 
going op in the world. The 
slim-line silhouette and its 
short and sassy hemline de- 
mand a change of pace fin 1 
shoes. 

The shape of the heel can 
vary from a teetering stiletto to 
a krais heel with less height 
hut the same feminine curve. 
Cuban heels are sharply an- 
gled, ending on fine spindly 
points. If heels are low they 
are still pointed, but triangu- 
lar, so low-heeled pomps are 
now low-heeled court shoes. 

As a half-way measure, the 
wedge heel is a strong story 
this season. The ©80s’ wedges 
are not the dumpy oversized 
soles of the 1970s, but more 


Sling-it 


made by Marilyn Anselm for 
Hobbs. She has recreated this 


A Whits leather peep-toe 
w wedge, £45.S». also in green! 
from Russell and Bromley, 

24 New Bond Street, Wl 

O Bronze metallic leather 
sandal on a plastic wedge. 
£59.50, from Charles 
Jourdan. 33-43 Brompton 
Road, SW1 


■“i: ?■'>':* “* cAr&fr* - . ' ^3%b> 







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S- 


Centre: Azzedine AJaia's 
dramatic S-line, cut to cling in 
Shiny stretch viscose. Body- 
moulding bronze dress wife 
polo collar. 072, wide and 
shaped tan leather bell, three- 
quarter length fitted cardigan 
coat with padded shoulders, 
£215. AH by Azzedine Alaia 
from Joseph Pour La Maison, 
Sloane Street, SW1. Glossy 
tights by Aristoc 




Far left Hourglass three- 
quarter feted riding coat in 
herringbone s8k with gilt 
buttons. By John Rocha £215 
from Gallery 28, Brook Street, 
Wl; Whistles, 12-14 St 
Christopher's Place, Wl and 
branches; The Changing 



Chinatown Clothing Company, 
Dublin. Striped cotton sweater, 
£90, slim gaberdine skirt, £107, 
both by Edina Ronay, 141 
Kings Road, SW3; Ubertys. 
Regent Street Wl. Gilded twist 
earrings and brooch 




<*■ 




Top right Gently feted double- 
breasted jacket, £165, and slim 
skirt E/2, by Nicole Farhl in 
rose pink wool gaberdine, also 
navy and jade. Soft while 
blouse. £59.95, by Joseph 
Jannard, all from Fenwicks, 
New Bond Street 


All jewellery from Cobra and Bellamy, 149 Sloane Street, SW1 
Hair by Lawrence at John Frieda 


Photographs by David Bailey 


A NEW DESIGN BY EDWIN BELCHAMBER 


EHRMAN TAPESTRY 


Last year Edwin Belchamber designed a lovely tapestry 

forus inspired by tire gardenatSissinghuretmKent.lt was 

such a success that he hasnow prod uced a pair for it. The 
Lily Pond and surrounding garden are in soft blues and 
greens with the wall and bench in tones of brown and 
beige. The picture is enclosed by a border of pale blue 
flowers on a bottle green background. Designed as a 
picture it would also make a charming cushion . 



glamorous sandals with deli- 
cately cut-out sides and peep- 

toes. The Hollywood feel chic French style with a light- g \ Hoflvwood stvle wedae- 
bnngs brighter metallic col- weight co-respondent Xg- ® heeled sandal, Ejgjgff, 
oeis. Charles Jourdan stitch back in smooth white leather Hobbs, 47 South Morton 


from 


The design measures I454"x 14 % " and is worked in simple half-cross 
slitch. It is printed in the full ten colours: Grass green, bottle green, 
powdcrblue, (dive, haze in ut, royal blue, fawn, French navy, a very deep 
green and beige. The canvas is 12 holes to the inch and thekitcomes 
complete with all the required yams from the Appleton Lapestry range, 
AU for £1925 including postage and packing 
Use FREEPOST- No stamp needed. 


rich bronze leather to a strong 
plastic wedge, and Russell and 
Bromley have a more light- 
weight look with ent-oot 
Shapes and a hint of glitter. 

Shoes echo the Chanel in- 
flame on spring suits. The 
elegant sling-back is a classic 
made incomparably by Cha- 
nel. The sling-hack 


and a shiny toe-cap in red or 
navy bine. 

Pied a Terre have also 
followed suit with a sq oared- 
off toe which gives a city-smart 
look to a soft leather sling- 
back, shoe tied at the heel with 
a chic leather bow. 


£ Rebecca Tyrrel 


Street, Wl 

Chic leather sling-back, 

** £39.99, from Hobbs, 

47 South Morton Street. Wl 
£} Classic sling-back with 
bow detail, £59, from Pied a 
Terre, 14 Sloane Street, SWl 
|S| Lace-patterned sling-back, 
£99, from Pled a Terre 
Rouge, 44 Old Bond Street, Wl 
Diawngt toy Mew DswcIsot 


r m 


Ehrtpafl £| Vinragr Gair. London. W* 4 A A. PSrtn*n 11 AR Ehnun. 

reutf allow .18 days (iif delivery Money back if If it n*i urnrd unwed wiUun 14 dayv 


Tb: EHRMAN, FREEPOST, LONDON, WS4BR. 

Please send me tapestry kits at £19.25 each. 

| I enclose cheque/F.O. made out 10 Ehnuan TorS (Tbtal) 

Name 


Address, 


j TK38C j 




J 










12 


1 he TIMES IUESDaY FEBRUARY 18 1986 


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THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Party 


tricks 


Deadlock 


One of the Worthing brothers who 
vowed to starve until the local 
council reversed its decision to 
dose the town's Connaught The* 
a ire was said yesterday to be near 
death. Michael Wilson is now 
bedridden and semi-comatose as 
the two approached their 44th day 
of gating. His brother Roy. whose 
idea il was. himself weighs just 
over seven stone. “I feel rather bad 
about the affair now" said Roy. “1 
recently announced the end of our 
fast on local radio, but Michael 
would have none of it." If the fast 
continues, both could die before 
the Connaught curtain twitches: 
the coundi has delayed any de- 
dsion on its future until March 6. 
“It's a tricky situation, but a 
democratic decison has been 
taken, and we cannot act under a 
threat of this kind," a coundi 
spokesman said. 


But no shells 


The day the petrol pumps ran with 
water will not soon be forgotten at 
the Hawes Landing Service Sta- 
tion in Edinburgh- No sooner had 
a customer filled up and driven 
away than his car broke down. 
When station manager Brian 
Clark towed the car in. he found 
the petrol tank full of sea water. By 
then six other enraged motorists 
had broken down, all within a mile 
of filling up. “It cost me a lot of 
time and effort overhauling the 
engines.” said Clark, “but most of 
the customers were happy when I 
g&ve them some bonus petrol.’ 
Petrol suppliers Unipart, who had 
pumped 1 30,000 gallons of ballast 
sea water into the station's under- 
ground tanks, yesterday declined 
to comment 


BARRY FANTONI 



‘It’s MPs trying to understand 
the new Animals 
(Scientific Procedures) B3J 
that I feel sorry for' 


Age no bar 


I would take with a hefty block of 
rock salt the notion that Lord 
Hailsham and the Law Society are 
at daggers drawn over rights of 
audience and legal aid fees. On 
Saturday night, only 24 hours after 
the Society said it was considering 
taking the Lord Chancellor to 
coun over the legal aid dispute, its 
West London branch wined and 
dined him at a lavish banquet. Far 
from laying into the man who has 
confessed devotion to bis own 
branch of the profession, the Bar, 
the Law Society president. Alan 
Leslie, went to great lengths to 
emphasize that their disagree- 
ments were “nothing personal” In 
a wine-curdling show of affection, 
the Society actually handed 
Hailsham a Valentine cant 


Why I could not fight on 


Eleventh-hour Tory protests 
brought Channel 4's Sunday night 
documentary My Britain — David 
Steel within a whisker of being 
pulled off the air. The hour-long 
programme in which the Liberal 
leader paraded bis personal vision 
of Britain, at one stage button- 
holing Derek Haitonovas made by 
independent producer Justin Cart- 
wright, a former producer of 
Liberal parry political broadcasts. 
The prospect was too much for 
one Tory supporter who contacted 
the IBA after reading a paragraph 
in Liberal News enthusing that foe 
programme was foe “ best party 
political" ever made. After an 
emergency viewing and dis- 
cussions with Channel 4 boss 
Jeremy Isaacs, foe IBA narrowly 
decided that foe programme 
should be shown. Tory Central 
Office said yesterday it too had 
contacted foe IBA — to discover, 
before making a formal com- 
plaint. which Tory politician 
would be given a similar platform. 

I hope it won't be too upset when l 
give the answer. Jim Prior. 


Foreign parts 


Scottish geography is not Denis 
Thatcher’s strong suit. Not long 
ago, on a trip north of foe border 
with his wife, he startled his 
Scottish hosts by mistaking Aber- 
deen for Dundee. Worse was to 
come. “I can't understand all the 
fuss about this place Carldike,” 
mused Denis to all and sundry at 
the height of the Gancosh affair. 


Here’s a tip 

Guidance at last for diners at Just 
Around foe Comer, that embarr- 
assing new restaurant on the 
Finchley Road in London where 
payment is left to your discretion. 
Four months after it opened, 
owner Peter Hie tells me foe most 
he has received for his six-course 
meal is £80 and the least £8. left by 
two girls. “If anything, customers 
are leaving more than I expected.” 
he says happily. 


PHS 


President Botha said at the recent 
opening of Parliament that South 
Africa had “outgrown the out- 
dated concept of apartheid." Oli- 
ver Tarabo. head of the banned 
African National Congress, is on 
record as saying that if apartheid 
disappears completely, foe ANC 
would reconsider its commitment 
to armed struggle and violence as 
a way to bring about change and 
would operate peacefully and 
legally inside South Africa. 

Chief Bufoelezi. president of 
Inkatha, has said that if the 
government clearly commits itself 
to abandon apartheid he would 
work enthusiastically for an alter- 
native. He also urges the legaliza- 
tion of foe ANC and the release of 
ail political prisoners so that all 
organizations could compete 
openly and legally for support. 

So what is the problem? Surely 
the germ of a solution to foe 
conflict in South Africa should be 
possible if foe major antagonists 
bold such attitudes? 

It all depends what is meant by 
apartheid. I have come across 
considerable confusion outside 
South Africa when asking people. 
“What do you mean when you say 
apartheid must go?” Some mean 
white domination, to which foe 
South African government re- 
sponds by pointing out that black 
majority rule would mean exploit- 
ation, of which examples can 
easily be found elsewhere. Others 
mean racism; foe point is easily 
made that racism is a pervasive 
phenomenon. 

But foe outstanding characteris- 
tic of apartheid is that it is not 
subject to ambiguity or con- 
troversy about whether it is 
domination, exploitation or rac- 


Frederik van Zyl Slabbert explains his 
decision to resign as leader of 
South Africa's official opposition party 


ism. compared to other situations 
where these problems exist Apart- 
heid is concrete, demonstrable 
and unique to South Africa. 
Apartheid is law. There is a law, 
the Population Registration Act 
that classifies every South African 
at birth into a particular racial or 
ethnic group. Another law. the 
Group Areas Act allocates 
residential and other land accord- 
ing to racial and ethnic defi- 
nitions. In short apartheid is foe 
most comprehensive system of 
legalized racial domination, 
exploitation and racism devised 
by any government since the war. 

Apartheid was the Afrikaner 
nationalist's attempt to cope with 
the challenge of postwar de- 
colonial izaiion, while maintaining 
his position of dominance. This 
dominance is called “self- 
determination” for foe Afrikaners 
as a group. Afrikaner nationalists 
have u.*- :d the bedrock of legalized 
aparthi d as the basis of “self- 
determination” of other “groups” 
which they have one-sidedly 
identified and classified. 

By opposing apartheid one is 
not denying the reality of racial or 
ethnic groups or the fact that it 
may be difficult to find a demo- 
cratic solution for them to live 
together in the same society. By 
opposing apartheid one is oppos- 
ing the right that one racial/ethnic 
group claims for itself (o manipu- 
late racial and ethnic groups to its 
own advantage, and to the ob- 
vious disadvantage of others. 


As leader of the official oppo- 
sition Progressive Federal Parry in 
the South African parliament, 1 set 
myself two objectives: to persuade 
as many whites as possible that 
apartheid must go. and to nego- 
tiate with the government to bring 
that about After six years I 
concluded that although my party 
had made some headway on the 
first. I was wasting tny lime on foe 
second. 

The implementation of foe new 
three-chamber parliament (for 
whites, Indians and “coloureds”) 
was a retrogressive step which 
entrenched foe Population Regis- 
tration Act Nevertheless. I was 
willing to explore whether the 
government would use it to gel ad 
of okl apartheid structures or 
whether it would use h to extend 
its logic to new ones. My dis- 
illusionment became final when 
President Botha defined foe so- 
called guidelines within which foe 
excluded black majority could be 
constitutionally accommodated. 

The government has not the 
slightest intention of abandoning 
compulsory racial and ethnic 
group membership as a basis for 
further constitutional develop- 
ment; on the contrary, that is its 
fundamental precondition for any 
reform. Botha did not say that 
apartheid is dead or is to be 
abandoned. He said South Africa 
“has outgrown the outdated con- 
cept of apartheid”, but not a new 
modernized concept of apartheid. 

The “self-determination of 


whites” is still to be preserved by 
extending and using apartheid as 
entrenched in foe three-chamber 
parliament. Botha should be taken 
at his word; concerned people 
should not read into his reform 
initiatives that are not there. 

Last year I had at least five 
personal interviews with the presi- 
dent, spoke to several cabinet 
ministers, and gave evidence to 
cabinet committees. 1 explored 
one question: is foe government 
prepared to restore freedom of 
choice by repealing segregated 
residential, educanonai and politi- 
cal structures? 

I had one last hope: perhaps the 
traumatic events of 1985 would 
somehow bring change. An indica- 
tion of this would come in foe 
president's speech opening the 
1986 session of parliament, and 
foe no-confidence debate which 
followed, i told a few of my 
colleagues confidentially that if 
Botha really shifted on foe ques- 
tion of freedom of choice. 1 saw 
some reason for continuing in my 
present role. If not, I had no 
further initiatives which I could 
offer my supporters and was 
wasting their and my time by 
continuing. 

1 want to explore other ways of 
getting rid of apartheid. Die 
leaders of foe ANC, Inkatha. 
United Democratic Front, foe 
Azamao People’s Organization 
and other extra-parliamentary 
opposition groups are absolutely 
correct There can no negotia- 
tions. no stability, no cooperation, 
as long as the South African 
government continues with apart- 
heid Apartheid must go, in every 
legal sense of the word 

© Tim— Na wi p ^— ,tses 


Iain Carson looks East, not West, for a tie-up that makes sense 


BL’s best bet for prosperity 


Six years after it decided to forget 
its principles and bail out British 
Leyiand Mrs Thatcher’s govern- 
ment is now haunted by foe very 
success of that policy. 

After the bail-out, ministers by 
and large left BL's bosses to get on 
with the job. Subsidies have all but 
been eliminated and the 1985 
figures might even show a tiny net 
profiL This improvement in foe 
company's fortunes (from losses 
of nearly £400 m five years ago) 
has encouraged thoughts of 
privatization. 

Profits will never be big enough 
for a wholesale privatization; but 
neither are the constituent parts, 
now figuring in the arguments at 
Westminster, in such bad shape 
that they have to be remaindered 
to foreign multi-nationals in- 
terested only in buying brand 
names or market shares. Govern- 
ment ministers seem to have lost 
their nerve and to be unaware of 
foe value of the state-owned 
group. 

The fracas over Austin Rover 
furnishes a classic example of the 
muddle between myth and reality: 
there are options other than sale to 
a foreign buyer and still more 
subsidies. Austin Rover is a 
midget in European markets, trail- 
ing well behind the big six — 
Volkswagen and Fiat (12.9 and 
112 per cent respectively), fol- 
lowed by Ford Europe, Peugeot 
and General Motors (each with a 
market share of between 1 1 and 12 
per cent) and Renault (10.7 per 
cent). Austin Rover’s production 
of just over 450.000 cars a year is 
barely a third of that of foe big 
companies, with, it would appear, 
a consequent loss of economy of 
scale. 

Moreover, even the big six are 
having a hard time, since capacity 
exceeds demand by some 2.5 
million vehicles, taking into ac- 
count European exports and im- 
ports from, notably, Japan. 

Austin Rover is the only Euro- 
pean locally-owned volume car- 
maker to have less than a quarter 
of its home market. That makes it 
harder to penetrate other Euro- 
pean markets where marketing 
and distribution is a cut-throat 
and expensive business. Worse, 
Austin Rover has failed consis- 
tently to hit foe 20 per cent share 
of the British market which foe 
company has long seen as critical 
to its survival Even with a full 
tfi of new models that are 
nothing to be ashamed of, Austin 



Land Rover's production line. The firm could again be a winner if 
Panl ChannOD steers it in the right direction 


Rover is still fighting GM 
Vauxhall for second place. Its 17.9 
per cent — against GM's rising 
share of 16.17 per cent — is far 
behind Ford, foe leader, with 26.5 
percent 

Despite its bright new models, 
its newly automated factories at 
Longbridge and Cowley and its 
improved labour productivity. 
Austin Rover has fallen short 
because its recovery coincided 
with a tougher British car market 
A few years ago GM derided to 
take on Ford in Europe, where foe 
latter bad long been much strong- 
er. Backed by reviving profits in 
foe United States, these two 
powerful forces started slugging it 
out — most intensively in Britain 
— with big discounts to win and 
defend market shares. Austin 
Rover was ground between these 
two international giants. 

No one is making money in this 
bailie: in 1984 Ford in Britain 
incurred an operating loss of 
£14 million and Vauxhall lost 
£9.4 million; foe latest figure for 
Austin Rover shows an operating 
profit of only £600,000 in foe first 
half of 1985. 

The future looks even tougher. 
Nissan, loaded with government 
grants to start car production at 
Washington, County Durham — 
on the principle, as a minister told 
me, that ”If you can’t beat them, 
join them” — will produce its first 
vehicles this summer. If aJI goes 
well, it intends to increase produc- 


tion from 300,000 vehicles to 
100.000. The immediate target is 
the fleet market, in which Nissan 
cars can qualify as British. (In- 
deed, with 80 per cent local 
content they will be more British 
than Ford Fiestas or Sierras (62 
per cent and 75 per cent local 
content). Next it hopes to export 
from Britain to other EEC coun- 
tries. 


Changes on the broader Euro- 
pean scene favouring an Austin 
Rover renaissance are unlikely. 
France’s stare-owned Renault 
company, having shed 25,000 jobs 
in the face of a £ J billion loss last 
year, will outlive the Eiffel Tower. 
Despite losses, or at best a pitiful 
return on capital, none of foe 
other producers is likely to go out 
of business. 

Against this bleak landscape, 
however, there are two develop- 
ments which suggest that Austin 
Rover need not be a lost cause. 
First, foe conventional wisdom on 
foe economies of car production is 
being revised. Not long ago 
Giovanni Agnelli, head of foe Fiat 
group, said that only car makers 
producing two million vehicles a 
year could survive. Now he says 
the critical figure is about one 
million. Why the revision? 

Agnelli's two million figure was 
predicated on a continued cus- 
tomer swing towards small, light 
and economical cars in which 
price would be a significant factor. 


This, it was thought, would favour 
the intemanuonal giants making 
similar cars worldwide. That fore- 
cast has turned out to be false. The 
variety of models seen on any road 
in the mid-1980s, even in down- 
at-heel Britain, shows that motor- 
ists want more from a car than 
basics — different permutations of 
comfort style and speed. Exit the 
world car. 

Another factor is the fun- 
damental change in car produc- 
tion. Henry Ford’s assembly lines 
were the epitome of contemporary 
manufacturing techniques — mass 
production of a few models by an 
extreme division of labour. Today 
we are witnessing another revolu- 
tion: smaller runs of different 
models without loss of mass 
production economies. Micro- 
electronics now make it possible 
to programme machines to make 
model A in the morning - and 
model B in the afternoon. This 
flexible manufacturing system 
mitigates Austin Rover’s puny 
scale. 

Austin Rover could also benefit 
from joint development and shar- 
ing of components with other 
producers. It already uses Volks- 
wagen gearboxes in some of its 
models. But while sharing compo- 
nents means a lesser risk than 
developing your own, the rewards 
are also reduced. 

Austin Rover could best reduce 
the risks and capital investment 
without sacrificing too much 
profit by further joint develop- 
ment of whole cars with Honda. 
Smaller than the mighty Toyota 
and Nissan. Honda desperately 
needs, help to increase its share of 
foe European market Its cars, 
more than those of any other 
Japanese manufacturer, have 
tended towards European styling: 
its latest Accord models rival the 
bottom end of the BMW range. 

That is precisely where Austin 
Rover should be headed — not 
into outright luxury cars but into 
fewer models, each of high quality 
and styling within its category of 
size — giving up pretensions to 
compete head-on with foe giants 
in basic volume cars. Paul 
Chan non. the new Industry Sec- 
retary. should get on a plane to 
Tokyo and mend fences, fast 
After all, the Japanese today can 
teach us more about making cars 
than foe Americans. 

The author is a reporter and 
presenter on Channel 4‘s The 
Business Programme. 


Disbv Anderson 

MayThatcher 
stay outside 


During the Westland 
journalist wrote that the country 
was awaiting with “bated breath ’ 
the outcome of foe following day's 
Cabinet meeting. So l took 
particular care to inspect the chaps 
in the bar at the Royal Albion. 

You couldn’t actually see from 
their chests if they were holding 
their breath because they were so 
wrapped up. but none was going 
any redder in the face than usual 
there were no sudden exhilara- 
tions, or other signs of bating. One 
group was talking about tele- 
vision. another, slightly younger, 
predictably about each other. It 
was foe same story at foe Newport 
Arms. Oblivious to the crisis, they 
carried on playing an imported 
variation of snooker, their tjrea th- 
ing totally unaffected. 

Trade, which might have been 
boosted by alcoholic relief of 
helicopter neurosis, or threatened 
as homes deserted the pub to 
huddle round their home tele- 
vision sets awaiting new “dev- 
elopments”, remained as usuaL In 
the butcher, baker and bank, 
respiration was stoically regular, if 
subject to a little seasonal wheeze. 

A few remarks were overheard 
expressing joy foal foe primers 
had at last got their deserts. 
Someone wondered why only 
foreigners — Messrs Murdoch, 
MacGregor and Edwardes — were 
tough enough to do what so 
obviously needed to be done, but 
no one mentioned Westland- 

Meanwhile journalists con- 
trasted the shoddy behaviour by 
ministers, “indeed all concerned”, 
with foe high standards “we” 
expect from government. The 
contrast is purely rtvetoricaL No 
one that I know, except academics 
and journalists bewitched by their 
own writing, expects high stan- 
dards from politicians, indeed 
expects much at all from poli- 
ticians. Most subscribe to foe Yes. 
Prime Minister view of politicians 
and their bureaucrats. 

While not knowing foe precise 
relationship between the Prime 
Minister and foe Foreign Office 
portrayed in last week’s episode, 
they are not at all surprised by the 
general picture of selfseeking, 
muddle, popularity consciousness 
and deviousness which emerges 
from foe series. Nor do they doubt 
that it is close to reality. The feet 
that they enjoy watching it while 
being bored by the real life events 
it mirrors is not explained by any 
illusion but foe skills of foe 
scriptwriters and, unlike West- 
land, the brevity of each episode. 

A crucial part of Mrs Thatcher 
grasps and shares this widespread 
boredom with politics and disillu- 
sion with politicians and their 
bureaucratic servants. Among the 
ideas which Thatcherism has 
drawn on, this is a constant theme. 
Hayek insists that politicians are, 
and always will be. essentially 
ignorant of the increasing number 
of things they seek to controL- the 
most modest greengrocer knows 
more about his customers' wishes 
and his suppliers’ merits than the 
bureaucrats and politicians who 
control Europe's largest employer, 
the NHS. 

Economists of foe “public 
choice” school point out in detail 
if less elegantly, the Yes. Prime 
Minister message that politicians 
and public “servants’* are driven 


that 


by the same self-seeking 
operates in the private sector. 
Neo-conservatives such as Glazer 
and Krisiol show that the peraer- 
siiv of policy decisions, the way 
foev fail to benefit their apparently 
intended customer-beneficiancs 
but enrich their producers, is not 
just Jim Hacker's problem but one 
of politicized, bureaucratized de- 
cision-making. Why eh* would 


foe TV series sell to 46 countries 


with different political systems? 

Thatcherism is noi just for 
freely contracted exchanges be- 
tween individuals (foe markei): it 
is against public bureaucracies, 
foe politicization oflife, inevitably 
against politicians. For some, the 
most attractive thing about Mrs 
Thatcher has been the way foe has 
remained an outsider, deeply anti- 
pathetic to politicians, their sys- 
tem and ambitions, while herself 
in foe supreme political office. 
Given the pressures- it is remark- 
able how she has not been 
corrupted and become another 
politician, an insider. 

Many politicians and journal- 
ists have offered her advice, on 
how to recover from the Westland 
setback- Much of it is about 
presentation. Some suggest she 
should rest on her considerable 
achievements of reducing infla- 
tion and trade union reform' and 
coast to the next election. Others, 
notably Michael Hesehine. want 
new policies, more intervention. 

Heseltine apparently shares the 
delusion popular with many of 
Mrs Thatcher's critics, including 
the authors of the Archbishop’s 
report on the inner cities, foal 
contemporary {Britain, in which 
more titan half the population 
receive their income from the 
state as wages or hand-outs, is 
some sort of extreme laissez-faire 
society beset with individualism. 
One wonders what level of collec- 
tivization would satisfy them. 

Before taking any of that advice, 
she should weigh not only the 
economic and immediate political 
consequences but what it would 
make of her. No doubt she could 
appear more compassionate, reas- 
onable, or moderate, but what if 
the price were that she became 
another politician, an insider? 
Then she would lose that constit- 
uency which is bored with politics 
and distrustful of politicians, 
which snookered and so un- 
aba tedly breathed its way through 
foe Westland “crisis” Maybe it's a 
small group and dispensable: foe 
Yes. Prime Minister viewing fig- 
ures suggest otherwise. 

• Thanks to the many readers 
who, after my column of January 
7, “Give compassion real 
conflict”, wrote suggesting titles 
for a TV programme m which 
welfare lobbies compete against 
each other for limited public funds 
2 nd sympathy. I can only list some 
of the suggestions and hope a 
television producer is among the 
readers. I particularly like Tragic 
Choices. Tragic Options. Com- 
passion Cake. Beggar mv Neigh- 
bour. Money for Me or Money for 
You?. Sow's Ear. Opportunity 
Crocks. Unlucky Dip. Tough-love 
Debates. Pot Calls the Kettle 
Black, My Friend WiU Pay and 
Soak the Which. 


The author is director of the Social 
Affairs Unit. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Bonhomie is 
the name 


The image sunk with the Lermontov 


Three weeks ago. Western tele- 
vision viewers watched in horror 
as the American space shuttle 
Challenger exploded wifo foe loss 
of its crew of seven. The pictures 
were transmitted live, courtesy of 
American television. In a matter 
of hours, those same pictures were 
made available to the people of the 
Soviet Union on their main 
evening news bulletin. 

Now the Soviet Union has 
suffered a comparable disaster 
with foe loss of its flagship cruise 
liner, the Mikhail Lermontov, 
after hitting a reef off New 
Zealand. Pictures of the sinking 
ship were as instantly accessible to 
television viewers as were those of 
foe Challenger — except in the 
country which had suffered the 
loss. 

It was more than 36 hours 
before foe Soviet media reported 
the disaster at all. When it did. it 
was on the wires of its inter- 
national news agency, Tass. for 
foreign consumption only. The 
tale told was not of disaster but of 
foe crew’s heroism and “faultless 
training” 

The disparity in foe way disas- 
ters are reported in West and East 
is nothing new. But foe sinking of 
the Mikhail Lermontov set Mos- 
cow a particular challenge. 

Since Mikhail Gorbachov took 
office nearly a year ago, Soviet 


officials have made repeated calls 
for foe country's media to show 
more openness in reporting bad 
news. Thai these calls had official 
endorsement was evident from 
clauses in the new edition of foe 
Communist Party programme — 
foe document foal sets out official 
party policy for the long term — 
which exhorted foe media lo be 
frank is raising problems. 

There were many reasons why 
the new Soviet leadership should 
have wanted to advocate more 
prompt and open reporting of foe 
negative as well as the positive 
aspects of Soviet life. 

The new generation of Soviet 
leaders has been concerned to 
present a more modern and a 
more plausible image to their own 
people and to foe outside world; 
Soviet news reporting has often 
been discredited, at borne as well 
as abroad by its insistence on 
empasizing success rather than 
failure. Its deafening silence on 
accidents within foe Soviet Union 
has allowed Western agencies to 
score propaganda points by being 
the first to inform the Soviet 
public of accidents in their own 
country. Often foe first intimation 
of a fatal air or rail disaster is the 
receipt by a bereaved relauve of a 
telegram with the news and an 
offer of compensation. 

The Soviet leadership also has a 
domestic political interest is 


improving standards of reporting. 
Frank (and selective) reporting of 
problems allows a new leadership 
to expose in detail some of the 
more blatant failures of its prede- 
cessor and so ease out figures 
associated wifo it. Recently, foe 
Soviet press has published a spate 
of reports cataloguing official 
incompetence and corruption all 
over foe country. These are di- 
rected as much at ousting un- 
wanted officials as they are at 
exposing crime and maladmin- 
istration. 


The call for more open ad- 
mission of problems, encouraged 
by the new leadership, seemed to 
herald a more profound change in 
Soviet official attitudes as welL It 
looked as though the Soviet Linton 
might at last be preparing to throw 
off ns age-old sense of inferiority 
and with it some of its - hyper- 
sensitivity towards problems. 


In the past, the Soviet authori- 
ties were inclined to the view that 
a single accident or natural disas- 
ter reflected poorly on Soviet 
society as a whole, and provided 
foe West wifo evidence that foe 
entire system was defective. For 
reasons which are not entirely 
clear, the same rationale was 
applied to accidents such as air 
crashes, in which the machinery or 
the pilot could be blamed, and to 
natural disasters such as floods or 


earthquakes. AU went unreported, 
lest they detract from Soviet 
prestige. 

The sinking of foe Mikhail 
Lermontov presents foe Soviet 
authorities with a difficult prob- 
lem. The ship was foe pride of foe 
Soviet cruise fleet- It had recently 
been refitted, and it was at the 
cen tre of an attempt by the Soviet 
Union to present its goods and 
services as in no way inferior to 
those of the WesL 

The reputation of the Soviet 
cruise line. CTC, to which the ship 
belonged, had been damaged a 
year ago by a disastrous Christmas 
Mediterranean cruise by a sister 
ship of foe Lermontov which 
brought complaints about how it 
was run. Only recently. CTC had 
launched a new advertising cam- 
paign designed to counter the 
image of Soviet cruise ships as 
cheap but noi necessarily pleasant. 

The sinking of foe Lermontov 
dashes these hopes, it also resur- 
rects fears that some have bad 
about the safety of Soviet ships. 
Four years ago a Soviet cargo ship 
sank off foe coast of Canada amid 
reports that its crew had refused 
all offers of help, possibly for fear 
of what would happen t6 them 
when they returned home — 
possibly for fear of having their 
cargo discovered. 

Mary Dejevsky 


There is a new offshoot of Friends 
of foe Earth called The Arts for 
The Earth (Tale) which aims to 
raise funds for ecology by staging 
artistic events. What kind of 
events? Well, auctioning a lot of 
specially donated cartoons, that 
sort of thing. 

That's what they did at 
Bonham’s auction rooms in 
Knightsbridge the other evening, 
so 1 went along to say hello to old 
cartoonist friends, stare at the old 
cartoons, and maybe make foe 
odd bid or iwo, though at foe few 
auctions l have ever been to i have 
always found it impossible to 
attract the auctioneer’s attention. 

Well, of course, when they hold 
up cartoons at auctions you don't 
see very much (that's what view- 
ing days are for), so my attention 
wandered to foe whispering of the 
cartoonists round me; not ail of it 
very respectful. One drawing 
showed a nuclear cooling tower 
with tulips growing out of foe lop 
as if it were a vase. 

“Very East European,” said 
Chic Jacob. “Flower in the gun 
barrel.” 

“Daffodil growing in concrete,’’ 
said Ian Heath. “You name it, we 
put a flower in it.” 

Another drawing showed a 
hedgehog making advances to a 
hairbrush ."There’s a novel idea," 
said Nick Baker. “When was foe 
first hedgehog-hairbrush cartoon. 
Chicr 
“1890T 

"Late as that, was it?” 

But most of the cartoons got 
their approval. Indeed, a Peanuts 
strip by Charles Schulz got a bid of 
£230 from Ian Heath. It was the 
winning bid. He looked shaken. 

“These Schulz originals are 
extremely rare.” said auctioneer 
Nicholas Bonham strictly. “Tha; 
one went very cheap. I hope to get 
3 lot more for foe next one.” 

I think it was Bonham who 
presented foe best value of foe 
evening “Only £60 for this 
wonderful drawing?" he said in 
mid-lot “You're out of V our 
minds. Td like this myself; in feet 
I'm going to bid £80 for this ««« 
drawing. £80 I bid, £80 with the 


auctioneer ... My God, isn't any- 
one going to get me out of this, 
plrase. somebody bid more than 
£80, don't let me end up with 
this ...” 


He also believed in establishing 
relations with characters in the 
audience, variously known as The 
Man At The Back. Whose Name J 
Can't Remember. The Woman At 
The Front Who Bids For Every- 
thing, and My Wife. 

“Do you realty mean that bid?” 
be said to the latter, then to the 
resn of us, “It's my wife, you see. 
It's not coming our of foe house- 
keeping. you know." 


Wife: “You don't give me aoy- 
housekeeping." 


The only person who fazed him 
at all was The Woman At The 
Front Who Bid For Everything, 
who went to £500 for a liny 
drawing of a pink hippopotamus, 
tven Nicholas Bonham fell this 
might be loo high.'"My God, that's 
about £ 1 00 a square inch. Are you 
l“!, e J 0U Z££ - ■ ? Vou're really 

that 5 all right then. She needs it to 
complete a pair," he explained. 

I suddenly realized that 

*“5“ was very like 

that of foe black gospel preacher, 
setting foe audience excited, 
hypnotized even, insistently 
repeating numbers with religious 
*™“ r ■■■-». Ml IwmtuE 


•: ii “ 


•ift 


ii 

V * 


you. 100. iOO, give me 1 20, Irt me 




you can say 120.. 

He was wonderful. He cot the 
nc J Caries Schulz up to £700 
and the last one of all to £1800. af- 
ter he had barked down a tele- 
phone at a transatlantic bidder, 
though even Bonham looked 
vaguely surprised at someone 

f ° r a drawn 5tri P- 
fen H«,h H UrpnSed - Ul0u 8 h - » 

I did make one or two bids 
b *l *** auctioneer never 
2® 1 '? 5 *"«• not even Nicholas 

** f ? his next 
w^r i. ha L?°. ** one of foe best 

tats of theatre in foe West End 


W 


k[\c 




i 


*iS£> 


•> uid vrs , \ 


That 


1 HE fiM £S TUESDAY FEBRUARY IS 1936 


naic he, 


GUky 1 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


1 Petmington Street, London EL Tetepbone 01 481 4100 


RAPE LAW 


Taking care of inner cities 


It is not simply an impression 

u m * sensa UonaJ headlines 
mat the cnme of rape is on the 
increase. It has also become 
more brutal. The incidence of 
rape began to rise in the early 
sixties after a long period in 
which it had increased 
comparatively little, and in the 
last few years that rise has 
steepened. 


anomalies and inequitable 
situations. 

Thus a man accused, say. of 
rape, and also of sexually 
assaulting a child in other 
wa>-s. and who is aquitlcd of 
rape but found guilty of the 
second charge, remains pro- 
tected by the anonymity role. 
He cannot be named in news- 
papers for the crime of which 
he is guilty. The same would 
also apply where a man acquit- 
ted of rape was found guilty of 
other, non-sexual. serious of- 
fences. 

This kind of absurdity has 
been criticized by the Criminal 
Law Revision Committee, and 
was also described as 
“extraordinary" by Mr David 
Mellor. the Home Office Par- 
liamentary Secretary, when he 
spoke in a Commons debate 
on rape in November. What is 
more, if the concern is to 
protect the reputation of a man 
accused of rape who is 
eventually found not guilty, 
the same argument could be 
used in respect of other hardly 
less heinous crimes of violence 
in respect of which the accused 
has to face the full glare of 
publicity before a verdict is 
reached. The only case in logic 
lor the rule has been that 
anonymity for the victim (who 
is also the accuser) should be 
matched with anonymity for 
the man charged, not least 
because a number of rape cases 
arise from encoumersbetween 
people known to each other, in 
which the facts may be highly 
doubtful. 

The dominant case for a 
change in the rule, however, 
does not hang on the unfair- 
ness with which particular 
accused persons are dealt with 
in terms of publicity. It rests 
on the growing belief that as a 
result of the anonymity rule, 
the police do. on occasions, 
feel inhibited in their search 
for and apprehension of sus- 
pected rapists. In a recent case. 


, - - A 

; i C 


• U 


The sharp increase m re- 
ported rape cases in the past 
few years may have something 
to do w ith a greater willingness 
on the pan of victims to report 
rape in the light of greater 
police sensitivity towards vic- 
tims. But that does not alter 
the general picture of a crime 
that is increasing and that is 
also one that is “getting 
nastier" as Detective Chief 
Superintendent Thelma 
WaggsiafTe of the Metropoli- 
tan Police put it recently. In a 
graphic address to the Howard 
League she described how rape 
is now frequently accompanied 
by acts of deliberate cruelty 
and defilement, arisingfrom a 
determination to submit the 
victim to maximum humili- 
ation. 


The public is becoming 
increasingly anxious both that 
such crimes should carry their 
due penalty and that nothing 
should stand in the way of the 
detection and apprehension of 
rapists by the police. After a 
number of especially horrific 
cases recently. Home Office 
Ministers now contemplate 
abolishing the rule of anonym- 
iiy which prohibits the public 
identification of men accused 
of rape until, and unless, they 
are found guilty. This was 
added to the Sexual Offences 
(Amendment) Act of 1976, 
which provides for the 
anonymity of rape victims, 
while the Bill was before 
Parliament, and has un- 
doubtedly led to absurd 


the Wiltshire police felt con- 
strained from publishing the 
photograph of a suspect rapist 
or from naming him. during 
the search because he was 
already suspected of another 
earlier rape. In fact, since no 
charge had been preferred with 
regard to the first crime, it 
appears that the the police 
would, according to the letter 
of the law have been entitled to 
publish the photograph of the 
wanted man. and give his 
name, in connection with the 
second. But it is also a ques- 
tion of the spirit of the law. 

In searching for any sus- 
pected criminal, the police 
have to be careful not to 
prejudice trial by publishing 
photographs and giving 
names. They only resort to 
both when the public interest 
warrants it, which means when 
all other methods have failed 
or when there is a danger to the 
public. In theory, they are as 
free to pursue this course with 
rapists as with other criminals, 
however strange it may seem 
that a suspected rapist can be 
named (usually as wanted for 
questioning about a “serious 
offence") while the search is on 
but cannot be named in the 
court. The fact remains that 
they are often confused by the 
anonymity rule, and fear to 
take any step which may be 
said later to have prejudiced a 
fair trial. Their fear is ev- 
idenced by cases in which they 
feel able to say that a suspect is 
wanted fora murder, suppress- 
ing the foci that he is also 
wanted for rape, h is no doubt 
true that the removal of the 
anonymity rule would lead to 
some hard cases. But the 
general truth that hard cases 
tend to make for bad law 
clearly seems to operate in 
regard to the anonymity rule 
for suspected rapists. The 
Home Office ministers are 
right to have begun the process 
of changing it 


From Mr Laurence Trackman 
Sir, For the last two years I have 
been involved in establishing a 
small business centre in St Paul's. 
Bristol, specifically for the benefit 
of local young people. Our 
organisation, recognised by cen- 
tral Government as a local enter- 
prise agency, has now virtually 
completed the development of the 
£300.000 business centre without 
any specific central Government 
support, relying instead on the two 
local authorities and the far- 
sightedness of the local private 
sector. 

With a Manpower Services 
Commission community pro- 
gramme we have employed 25 
local long-term unemployed 
young people to undertake most of 
the building wort and have put 
just under £100.000 of earned 
income back into St Paul's. 

My experience in working on 
this project has led me to realise 
that many inner-city young people 
are consumed with bitterness 
towards a system that has stripped 
them of self-esteem and hope, and 
for them the worst of that system 
is represented on a day-to-day 
basis by the police. 

On Fnday in St Paul's I 
conducted a business-counselling 
session with two young black 
women who hope to start a 
restaurant in the area. With the 
right support they are perfectly 
capable of succeeding As we 
talked a rank of police vehicles 
formed outside my window. In the 
“serious incident" which followed 
. (report. February 8) a police car 
was destroyed and two policemen 


were hospitalised as a result of the 
attempted arrest of a car thief. 

We must hope that, with the 
announcement (report. February 
7 ) of the inner-city task forces, the 
Home Office recognises the cru- 
cial pari ti plays in influencing the 
way inner-city young people re- 
gard the world 'around them. If 
police are seen as representing a 
system that has clearly failed, then 
they must also be seen to be 
involved in the regeneration of 
those inner-city economies. 

My repeated requests to local 
police chiefs and to the Home 
Office for their constructive 
involvement in initiatives of 
socio-economic development 
such as ours ha\e so far met with 
tilde interest, yet a policy, for 
example, of using their consid- 
erable purchasing power to sup- 
port and develop up-and-coming 
inner-city small businesses could 
have far-reaching effects both 
economically and in terms of 
human relations. 

It is clear that the situation in 
the inner cities has now reached a 
watershed. Policing methods in 
the inner city are also at a 
watershed. Law and order in 
Britain is something more sophis- 
ticated than simply a state of not 
burning police cars. 

Yours Faithfullv. 

LAURENCE TRACKMAN. 
Director and General Manager. 
The Coach House Small Business 
Centre. 

2 Upper York Street, 

St Paul's. Bristol. 

Avon. 

Februarv 10. 


No decline in 
Tory position 


MR OZAL AND THE CYPRUS TEST 


Turkey's prime minister Mr 
Turgui Ozal will call on Mrs 
Thatcher at Downing Street 
today less than two weeks 
before United Nations of- 
ficials are due to start the next 
round of exploratory low-level 
talks on Cyprus. It is to be 
hoped that Mrs Thatcher will 
use the opportunity to impress 
upon her visitor the need for 
rapid progress on this issue. 

It is now more than a year 
since the meeting between 
Greek and Turkish Cypriot 
leaders, with the UN Sec- 
retary-General Senor Javier 
Perez de Cuellar acting as 
referee, broke up in New York 
in disarray, li is ten months 
since the Secretary-General 
completed his revised set of 
proposals - designed to get the 
show back on the road. Elec- 
tions in both parts of Cyprus 
last year inevitably held up the 
resumption. But now the UN 
is trying to get things moving 
once more and Britain is well 
placed to put a shoulder 
behind the wheel. 

So too is Mr Ozal. However 
one apportions responsibility 
for the breakdown of the 
January 1985 meeting, it was 
Mr Raiif Denktas the leader of 
the so-called Turkish Republic 
of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) 
who walked out - and it is Mr 
Denktas who is now likely to 


please. Time after all is on his . Jtuman rights. In recognition 
side - as he consolidates his of ks progress on this issue the 


position in the North of that 
divided island. He can afford 
to sit back and thumb his nose 
at his opposite number Presi- 
dent Spyros Kyprianou on the 
other side of the thin blue line 
in Nicosia - or to prevaricate 
when approached by an anx- 
ious Perez de Cuellar. The one 
person he cannot afford to 
treat too lightly is Mr Ozal. 

The TRNC depends on 
Ankara for around 60 per cent 
of its annual budget. More 
than 20,000 Turkish troops 
remain on the island, and their 
continuing presence is one of 
the central issues which stand 
in the way of a Cyprus 
solution. Economically, mili- 
tarily and politically too. Mr 
Denktas must always look to 
Ankara for support. It follows 
that Mr Ozal is well placed to 
apply the pressure which 
might be needed before a 
settlement over Cyprus can be 
reached. 

Will he agree to do so? He 
will almost certainly not agree 
to help buy peace on Cyprus at 
any price. But Turkey as a 
member of Nato and a would- 
be partner in the European 
Community must perceive the 
inherent instability in a di- 
vided Cyprus 

Turkey has already fallen 
foul of the Community over 


EEC has unblocked over £!7m 
worth of aid to Ankara and a 
much bigger package is now tc 
be negotiated. Turkey 
recognises that any application 
by her to join the Community 
at this stage would almost 
certainly be rebuffed- But 
member countries are 
committed in principle to 
opening the door one day^ 

There are two ways in which 
Mr Ozal could put pressure on 
Mr Denktas and his 
colieagues.One would be in 
persuading the Turks at least 
to drop the forceful rhetoric 
which flows from time to lime 
from the TRNC and which 
hardly encourages the right 
kind of climate for progress. 
The second involves persuad- 
ing them to be more positive 
in negotiations. The next com- 
promise worked out by Perez 
de Cuellar and his staff will be 
the subject of the low-level 
talks (which means Mr 
Denktas himself will not be 
there) in Geneva,, next week. 


Clinical research 

From the Director of the Clinical 
Research Centre 

Sir. Sir Michael Stoker’s commit- 
tee on the Clinical Research 
Centre has made recommenda- 
tions to the Medical Research 
Council (report, February 5) 
which are far-reaching, imagi- 
native and in the best interests of 
clinical research in this country. 
His proposals that the centre 
. should be merged with the Royal 
Postgraduate Medical School and 
that basic science and clinical 
research should be brought to- 
gether by moving the National 
Institute for Medical Research to 
the same site are warmly wel- 
comed by the centre’s staff. 

When the centre was founded in 
1970 the MRC deliberately chose 
to site it alongside a district 
general hospital, since thev envis- 
aged not -only that, the centre; 
would fulfil a national- role but 
also that the research workers 
would be brought into direct touch 
with the everyday problems of 
disease as manifest in the commu- 
nity. The research workers and 
clinicians have had very consid- 
erable success in applying the 
scientific method to disorders 
such as schizophrenia, obesity, 
alcohol abuse, the biology ofblood 
vessels, infectious diseases, 
dianhoeal illnesses and to allergy 
and disorders as banal as the 
common cold, for the Common 
Cold Unit at Salisbury is an 
important omsiation of the centre. 

It is not true to say that the beds 


at Nonhwick Park Hospital des- 
ignated for research have not been 
fully used. The reason whv re- 


fully used. The reason why re- 
search workers have used these 
beds in caring for patients from 
the local community has been to 
ensure that our clinical research 
staff should be brought into direct 
contact with the everyday prob- 
lems of medicine, so that they 
keep their investigative feet firmly 
on the ground. 

The Royal Postgraduate Medi- 
cal School at Hammersmith Hos- 
pital. on the other hand, has 
evolved an approach to medicine 
that is entirely different but totally 
complementary to that of the 
Clinical Research Centre at 
Norlhwick Park. It has built up a 
formidable reputation for work in 
highly specialised areas of medi- 
cine. for example open-heart sur- 
gery, transplantation, the 
treatment ofleukaemia, and imag- 
ing techniques. 

Jn bringing together the ex- 
cellence of the Ginical Research 
Centre's work in studies of im- 
portant problems in the commu- 
nity and the high technology 
approach of Hammersmith the 
council will be creating a national 
centre for clinical research which 
will be unrivalled in western 
Europe. 

Your faithfully. 

CHRISTOPHER BOOTH, 
Director. 

Clinical Research Centre. 

Watford Road. 

Harrow. 

Middlesex. 

February 7. 


From Sir Alan PercivaL QC. \tP 
for Southport (Conservative) 

Sir. "Informed sources" have been 
chattering away for weeks about a 
supposed decline in Conservative 
popularity and their explanations 
of this presumed event. Have they 
perhaps spent more time listening 
to one another than looking at the 
facts? 

A Gallup Poll last week showed 
no change in (he Conservative 
share of the poll between January 
and February, and the MORJ Doll 
published in The Sunday Times 
today (February 16) confirmed 
this and showed a remarkable 
consistency. 

In the last MORE poll before Mr 
Hesdtinc resigned the Conser- 
vative share was 33 per cent: one 
taken in between the resignations 
of Mr Heseltine and Mr Bnttan 
gave our share as 33 per cent, and 
the latest one. completed on 
February 12, gave us the same 33 
per cent. 

Surely it must now be clear to all 
that the public are more interested 
in good government than in 
Westland. And all credit to them 
for that, for withstanding the 
barrage to which they have been 
subjected, and for showing that 
the suggestion of a precipitous fail 
in the popularity of the Govern- 
ment or of the Prime Minister is 
something in the minds of the 
commentators and the wishful 
thinking of her enemies, not fact. 

The remarkable fact is how 
steady support for both has re- 
mained despite all recent on- 
slaughts. 

Yours etc.. 

IAN PERCIVAL 
House of Commons. 

Februarv 1 6. 


Green belt pressures 

From Mr Arnold Whit tick 
Sir. There is one simple solution 
to the problems of the pressure of 
population at Crawley and the 
shortage of houses mentioned by 
William Greaves in his article on 
“The green and pleasant boom 
town" (February 7). The solution 
is. build another new town in the 
region. That mentioned by Sir 
Peter Hordern, although in the 
right direction, does not go far 
enough. 


Traitors in 1940 

From Brigadier B. Chichester- 


By pointing out all this to 
her guest Mrs Thatcher will 
not be taking sides. Sir Geof- 
frey Howe as Foreign Sec- 
retary is due to visit Athens 
next month and it is to be 
hoped that he will not lose the 
opportunity there either. 


prove the more difficult to foul of the Community over opportunity there eur 

MURMURINGS IN THE HIMALAYAS 

Eight months ago a series of quo and in the long run may money they bring back 1 
bombs in Kathmandu exposed lum out to be more important feed the country's s 
the political strains lying than the head-line grabbing exchequer, is somethin 
underneath the surface of acts of terrorism. would find it hard 

Nepal's Shangri-La image. In I960 the then monarch without. 

More recently ihe Liberal MP dissolved the country s par- Religious inloieran 
Mr David Alton described in liament and replaced it with a harder to identify th£ 
The Times the persecution of body called the “panchayet - country’s economic pro 
at least some Christians - in a a non-pany assembly. The Officially the Hindu ant 
countrv hitherto renowned for reason was said to be the dhist people of Nepa 
rclinious tolerance, undue influence exerted on together without any str 

Ycsicrtav iwcntv-Jlvc years Nepal's parties from outside too, officially, do the coi 
after her last state visit to influences, particularly in In- 35,000 Christian minor* 
Neoal the Queen began a dia. Bui the system has been religious conversion is fc 
rriurnirin to that country at a under increasing criticism as - with up to six years in . 
time which the Nepalese might an instrument for perpetuating transgressor;. While this 
hink of as unfortunate. the power of the king - despite not cause dtfficulties i 

It Jould indeed seem to be a referendum six years ago relatively sophisti 

• rrMPrtihle that things which would seem to have environment of the t 

-iro nm nnite what they used to endorsed iL Last years civil itself. Hindu fundamer 
for ih Hi^alaSn king- disobedience .reflected more have used ihe law i 
L w ;,h its Old Etonian recent unhappiness. against Christian wron; 

. r - h l if .he terrorist One request the Nepalese with excessive zeal in sc 
^ t«, l„ne were the will make of Sir Geoffrey the more outlying » 

h®"! 5 * ? L/clafmed of left- Howe who. as Foreign Sec- notably in the EasL 
uork '^ S l a i ls dedicated to relary is travelling with the authorities have been at 
\ S " J of King Queen, is for reassurances over of lumtnga blind e] 

L hc ? e . hi . . ine t he plot the future of the Gurkhas thisThe Queen and Sir 
Birendra a whose five battalions in the frey will see none of it e 

was a fed ureJ l f or British army face an uncertain But the two countries 

hav e consolidated r future when Hong Kong a long history of relation 

the 4lV> car-old of {w here three of them are while the glitter of a slat 

a u "u in Nepal, based) is handed over to China to a friendly country s 

lhc Hindu maj . hedience, in T997. The Nepalese do not not be dimmed, the. 
But the cjxtI i^mhines. like 10 ialk too much about the should also not be left un 
whtch preceded the bomo. g* Gur khas whose mercenary sta- of Britain’s concern 
reflected tne middle tus is something .of an Nepal's communities of' 

embarrassment, But .he dans. 


money they bring back to help 
feed the country's starved 
exchequer, is something they 
would find it hard 10 do 
without. 

Religious intolerance is 
harder to -identity than the 
country’s economic problems. 
Officially the Hindu and Bud- 
dhist people of Nepal live 
together without any strife. So 
too, officially, do ihe country ’s 
35,000 Christian minority. But 
religious conversion is banned 
- with up to six years in jail for 
transgressors. While this might 
not cause difficulties in the 
relatively sophisticated 
environment of the capital 
itself. Hindu fundamentalists 
have used the law 10 act 
against Christian wrongdoers 
with excessive zeal in some of 
the more outlying areas - 
notably in the EasL The 
authorities have been accused 
of turnings blind eye to 
.lhis.The Queen and Sir Geof- 
frey will see none of it either. 

But the two countries share 
a long history of relations and. 
while the glitter of a state visit 
to a friendly country should 
not be dimmed, the. hosts 
should also not be left unaware 
of Britain's concern for 
Nepal's communities of Chris- 
tians. 


From Brigadier B- Chichester- 
Cooke 

Sir. It would be sad if your report 
today (February 11) lent credence 
to the idea that Kent was traitor- 
ridden in 1940. If memory serves 
me right. Gaude Liardet did not 
command Kent, but the 56th 
(London TA) Division, which was 
quartered at that lime in East 
KenL 

He was one of a small group of 
senior officers who were con- 
vinced that Germany had, over 
the years, built up in Britain a 
highly trained organization of 
traitors, saboteurs, and ill-dis- 
posed persons who. on the word, 
would shoot up the air defence 
personnel and disable their equip- 
ment and immobilise and contain 
ithe ground defences, to allow the 
unopposed landing of fleets of 
tanks at Folkestone to romp up 
Ihe A2 to London in two hours, 
instead of a wasteful frontal 
attack. 

At the time I was commanding a 
fair slice of the AA defences in 
Biggin Hill sector with detach- 
ments all over Kent and I well 
remember Gaude sending the late 
Brigadier Guy Portman 10 per- 
suade me to join in the hunt for 
“ihese vermin". 

It was my contrary view that at 


that moment every able-bodied 
person in Kent had embraced the 
newly formed Local Defence 
Volunteers and. with enormous 
zeal, armed with an armband and 
a 1 2-bore and whipped up by all 
this “traitor" talk, was making 
movement, especially at night 
almost impossible. 

! never discovered who it was 
that Gaude wanted to lock up. but 
I suspect it included some of the 
fanners and landowners who at- 
tacked him strongly because his 
troops entered their lands and 
buildings searching for ilirit ren- 
dezvous or arms caches, trampling 
down crops and letting out live- 
stock. 

If there were any pro-enemy 
incidents. I cannot find anyone 
who has heard about them. In 
contrast, ihe sheep farmers of 
Kent and the Romney Marsh 
readily allowed millions of sheep 
to be removed to deny an invading 
force a meat supply. It broke their 
hearts and ruined their flocks as 
well as many of themselves. But 
they did iL 
Yours faithfully. 

B. CHICHESTER-COOKE, 
Hammond Place. 

Upnor. 

Rochester. 

Kent 

Februarv 1 1. 


Another new town with a 
maximum population of about 
50.000. either at Billingshurst or 
Pul boro ugh. both served by Brit- 
ish Rail is. in my view, the 
solution. There may be opposition 
among the residents of these 
towns, but then there is always 
opposition among some residents 
to such proposals. 

The opportunity to do this was 
missed when the Government was 
considering the expansion of 
Crawley in 1966 in response to 
representations of industry. I 
asked Lord Greenwood, who was 
then Minister of Housing and 
Local Government, why the min- 
istry' did not designate another 
new town in the region and he 
replied that it was less costly to 
expand Crawley than to build 
another new town. 

The result was the addition to 
Crawley of two more large 
neighbourhoods. Broadfteid and 
Bewbush. both of which spread 
across the originally planned green 
belt. This was contrary to the 
original concepL which was to 
limit the size of the town in the 
interests of its inhabitants and. 
when nearing completion, to des- 
ignate another town in the region. 
It is not too late to do this. 

Yours faithfully. 

ARNOLD WHITTICK 
4 Netherwood. 

Gossops Green, 

Crawley', 

West Sussex. 

February 12. 


ON THIS DAY 


FEBRUARY 18 1905 


The year 1905 sou 1 Russia beset on 
tuo fronts: at home by uvrkers in , 
open revolt agauut oppression j 
and autocracy ; abroad by its fo&ses | 
in the Russo-Japanese u-ar In 
January about l, M0 people had 
been killed in front of the Winter 
Palace u-hen troops fired nn a 
\ defenceless crowd. In retaliation - 
the Czar's unde the Grand Duke 
Serge was assassinated. 


GRAND DUKE 
SERGE 

ILLEDBYABOMB. 
ARREST OF THE 
MURDERERS. 

ST. PETERSBURG, FEB. 17. 


GCSE examination 

From Mr Steven Bending 
Sir, You have reported (February 
7) that the new GCSE examina- 
tion which will replace the CSE 
and O level systems is to go ahead 
despite the boycott by the two 
main teaching unions. I would 
suggest that the success or failure 
of the GCSE will have little to do 
with the teachers’ dispute. 


So far the training programme, 
at a cost of £8 million, has 
proceeded without most final 
draft syllabuses being made avail- 
able because they nave not yet 
been agreed upon. Furthermore, 
the proposed syllabuses for the 
colleges are not to be published 
until May, 1987, we are told. 


For geography, as an 
example, the Midlands examining 
group is proposing to offer five 
different syllabuses, of which four 
are not available. 

The question arises as to how 
teachers are supposed to train tor 
syllabuses they have not yet seen 
and prepare the necessary materi- 
als and in many cases buy new text 
books. This process alone will take 


more time than has been made 
available. 

Grade-related criteria marking, 
which is a key component, is not 
to be introduced until 1990 and it 
is highly questionable as to 
whether the GCSE will put less 
emphasis on the acquisition of 
knowledge. The system wiU still 
maintain three pass grades and no 
doubt pupils, parents and employ- 
ers will not understand that grades 
D to G will be acceptable results. 

It seems that Sir Keith Joseph's 
undue haste in pushing forward 
the GCSE will result in a certain 
amount of muddling through 
which is hardly conducive to 
improving educational standards, 
and the exam is becoming just 
another abbreviation to add to 
CSEs. O levels. CPVE. B/TEC, 
YT5. to name but a few, that 
teachers, parents and employers 
are supposed to understand. 

Yours faithfullv. 

STEVEN BENDING. 

5 Yamingdale. 

Ha-wood Grove. 

Shirley. 

Solihull. 

West Midlands. 

February 7. 


"Positive’ scoring 

From Mr .4. J. D. Ferguson 
Sir. The evidence of the rugby 
internationals played so far this 
season underlines the need to 
review the scoring system. In 
Saturday's ScotJand/Wales match, 
for example. Scotland scored three 
tries to one yet lost because of the 
five penally goals scored by Wales 
- admittedly superbly kicked. 

In effect the efforts of 28 players 
on the field could be discarded for 
ten-minute “kick-out" between 
the two full-backs. 

I would suggest that one way of 
restoring the importance of 
"positive" scoring through tries 
and dropped goals would be to 
introduce a distinction between 
penalties for deliberate physical 
fouls and those for accidental or 
technical infringements. 

The penally for a deliberate 
physical foul would, as at present 
allow for a direct goal attempt and 
attract three points, whereas an 
accidental or technical foul would 
result in an indirect free kick, with 
no direct kick at goal permitted. 
Yours faithfullv. 

A. J. D. FERGUSON. 

Mundy’s Hill. 

Sherc Road, 

Ewhursu 

Surrey. 

February 5. 


4.10pm 1 

At Moscow to-day, af- the Grand 
Duke Serge was driving in the 
direction of the Kremlin Palace 
from the Historical Museum, he 
was assassinated... 

5 30pm 

Further details have been re- 
ceived regarding the assassination 
of the Grand Duke Serge in 
Moscow. 

His Imperial Highness was driv- 
ing from the Nicholas Palace 
through the Senate Square at 3. 
o'clock this afternoon. Behind hts- 
camage camp two cabs. At the Law 
Courts a s l edge in which two men 
were seated, one of them dressed 
like a workman, shot out ahead of 
the Grand Duke’s carriage, it then 
slowed up and allowed the latter to 
pass. At this moment a bomb was 
thrown beneath the carriage. The 
explosion was so great that all the 
windows in the Law Courts were 
smashed, and the report was beard 
outside the city. 

The carriage was blown to 
pieces, nothing but the four wheels 
remaining. The horses were un- 
hurt. and bolted. 

The Grand Duke Serge was 
killed instantaneously, his head 
and limbs being tom from the 
body. The driver was so seriously 
burned and otherwise injured that 
be died on the way to the hospital 
The murderers were at once 
arrested. Their names are not yet 
known. One of them coolly re- 
marked. “I don't care. I have done 
my job"— . 

10 30pm 

At the moment of the explosion 
the Grand Duchess Serge was at. 
the Kremlin, engaged in superin- 
tending work for the wounded in 
the war. She was about to proceed 
to the bouse of the Governor- 
General, where she intended to join 
her husband, and her carriage was 
waiting outside the Kremlin. 

After the explosion a policeman 
observed a man running from the 
scene of the murder, and. in spite of 
the fact that the man carried 8 
revolver, succeeded in overtaking 
and arresting him. The man did 
not attempt to deny that he was 
the assassin, and explained that 
the revolver was intended to hinder . 
his arresL_ 

WOMEN’S APPEAL TO 
THE TSARITSA. 
ST.PETERSBURG, FEB.17 

The women of Moscow have 
forwarded the following address, 
bearing a large number of signa- 
tures. to the Express Alexandra:- 
tVe Russian women - mothers, wives, 
and sisters of the warriors who are 
shedding their blood in the Far East for 
ihe beloved fatherland - address our- 
selves to you. O Sovereign, believing 
that, with your mother's heart you feel 
all the horrors of war as we do. You will ' 
understand that a woman ardently • 
desires peace. Peace is being violated. ; 
not only beyond the frontiers of our 
country, but even in the heart of the ‘ 
fatherland. We see with terror in the .. 
recent troubles the beginning of calami- 
ties that may crush all Russia if the 
Emperor does not seek, in unity with his 
people, to avert them. All the bases of - 
life are shaken and all moral found*- 1 
tions are trembling. Mothers, these who 
have to bring up the young generation, 
are saddened and their task is made 
impossible. It is beyond their power, 
beyond all possibility, to train children 
up on bases of unshakable truth and love 
of duty when the social life of the 
country does not rest on these for its 
foundation. The youth of the country on 
entering life constantly meet contradie- , 
tions to what was taught them in their - 
families- They thus lose all faith in the _ , 
principles taught them, seek new faiths. - 
and fall into extremes. Our best forces 
are perishing. Mothers' hearts are 
breaking. They cannot remain silent. . 
They feel that many more lives wiU yet I 
be sacrificed: for what is happening b 
not spasmodic, but the result of earlier - 
calamities. The Emperor can still save 
Russia by his puissant will. Be our 
pleader and pray the Emperor that he 
may listen to the voice of the country 
and the cry of its mothers. If the 
Emperor leads the country into the 
paths of greatness, its women will help 
in the work of its organization by 1 ' 
guiding their brothers and children into 
the new way and a life of lighL 

THE RUSSIAN UNREST. ■ 
ST. PETERSBURG. FEB. 17 
The strike is now rapidly extend- * 
ing. At 4 o’clock this afternoon the " 
men employed at the Neva Thread •* 
Works, numbering 2,400, joined 
the movement. 


Meaningful terms 

From Dr Janet Welch 
Sir. “Egress" was once a crowd 
puller. In the 1840s Bamum’s 
museum was so popular that 
people would not leave. He solved 
the problem by posting signs 
advertising a star attraction. 

They read to the Egress”. 
Yours faithfully. 

JANET WELCH. 

61 Narbonne Avenue. SW4. 
February 8. 


Winter’s tale 

From the Reverend John H\ 
Latham 

Sir. Some of the coldest tem- 
peratures recorded in England 
recently have noi been in Kent, as - 
reported by you on February II, ■ 
bui here in Flore, where, at 7.45 
am on February 10. the tem- 
perature in a garden protected by a . 


hedge in a tree-protected low-lying • 
area was 4'F. On January 17, . 


area was 4'F. On January 17, . 
1985. the temperature was 2‘F. - 
again lower than anything re- . 
ported elsewhere. 

This is a very climatically 
favoured area but when we go to 
extremes, we go to extremes'. 

Yours faithfullv. ” . 

J. W. LATHAM, 

The Vicaraac. 

Flore. Northampton. 




14 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 


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COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 

February 17; The Princess 
Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips. Presi- 
dent of the Save the Children 
Fund, this afternoon visited the 
Patmore Children's Centre. Pat- 
more Estate. London. SW8, 
where Her Royal Highness was 
received by the Mayor of 
Wandsworth (Councillor Mau- 
rice Heaster). and aftei'wards the 

St Peter’s Children’s Centre, 
London, SW 1 1, where The Prin- 
cess Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips, 


was received by the Principal 
Officer (Mrs Victoria Taylor). 

Her Royal Highness later 
attended (he Brownk/Guide 
Tea Challenge Party at the 
Savoy Hotel, London, where 
The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Ph ill i ps, wasjeceived by tire 

Coy) amM^e Director, Save the 
Children Fundraising (Miss 
Wendy Richest ’ 

Mrs Malcolm Wallace was in 
attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 

February 1 7: The Prince of 
Wales left Royal Air Force Brize 
.Norton this morning in a VC10 
aircraft of No 10 Squadron, 


Royal Ait Force, for the United 
Slates of America. 

Hh Royal Highness was re- 
ceived upon arrival, by Her 
Majesty's Lord Lieutenant for 
Oxfordshire (Sir - Ashley 
Ponsonby, BtV His Excellency 
the United States Ambassador 
(the Hon Charies Price; II) and 
the Station Commander (Group 
Captain Peter Beir, RAF). 

Sir John RiddeU, fit and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Jack 
S teahouse are in attendance 


A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of MrLajos Lederer will be 
held today at The Press Club, 
Shoe Lane; EC4, at noon. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr S. Bentinck-Bcdd 
and Miss O. Co ben 
He engagement is announced 
between Stephen, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs Edward C. Ben- 
linck-Budd. of Esher. Surrey., 
and Omer-li, eldest daughter of 
Professor and Mrs Percy S. 
Cohen, of Hampstead, London. 
Mr G-P-A. Brawn 
1 and Miss ELA- Drey 
The engagement is announced 
between Giles, only son of 
Professor R. Allen Brown, of 
Thelneatham, Suffolk, and Mrs 
P.E. Brown, of UggeshalL Suf- 
folk. and Elizabeth, only daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs R.EA. Drey, 
of Blackhead). London. SE3. 

Mr R.W.T. Buchanan 
and Miss D.T. Tanaka 
The engagement is announced 
■ between Robin, elder son of the 
J late Lain Buchanan and of Mrs 

- Martin Hudson, of Chailey, 
Sussex, and Diana, daughter of 
Dr and Mrs Thomas H. Tanaka, 
of New York. 

Mr C. Bnlman 
and Miss S. Shaw 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, son of 
_ Major Philip Bulman. of 
Glanton. Northumberland, and 
Mrs Claire Bulman. of Dane 
’ HilL Sussex, and Stephanie, 

. elder daughter of Dr and Mrs 

- J.H.T. Shaw, of Cowden, Kent. 
Mr J-A. Carbone 

and Miss VJF.M. Syborn 
The engagement is announced 
between James Albert, only son 
of Mr and Mrs Albert Carbone, 
of Matawan, New Jersey, 
United States, and Veronica 
Frances Margaret, only daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs Victor 
Syborn. of Newtown Park, 
Po run ore. Lymingion, Hamp- 
shire. 

Dr N.W3. Clowes 
and Miss J.C. Rich 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, second son of 
Mr and Mrs W.B. Clowes, of 
Wappenham. Northampton- 
shire. and Janet, elder daughter 
of Mr and Mis G.E Rich, of 

- Sal fords. Surrey. 

Mr CJ.M- Curry 

- and Miss AJ. Nightingale 

• The engagement is announced 

- between Christopher, eldest son 
of Mr and Mis Peter Curry, of 
Chobham. Surrey, and Amanda, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs David 
Nightingale, of Dartmouth, 
Devon. 


Mr G. Dererenx 
and Miss SJF. Skinner 
The engagement is announced 
between Graham, son of Mr and 
Mrs E. Devereux. of 
Wimboume. Dorset, and Susan 
Fiona, eldest daughter of the late 
Mr B.A. Skinner and Mrs C-F. 
Skinner, of Jersey, Channel 
Islands. 

Major D.S.P-M. Dickson 
and Miss ELA. White 
The engaumem is announced 
between David Dickson, The 
Royal Scots (The Royal Regi- 
ment ). elder son of Colonel and 
Mrs Seton Dickson, of Field 
House. Symington, Ayrshire, 
and Elizabeth, elder daughter of 
Mr and Mrs James White, of 
Mitonu Wadeford, Somerset 
Mr R.WJI. Evans 
and Miss KJV. Mitchell 
The engagement is announced 
between Roland, eldest son of 
Mr John Evans, of Powys, and 
Mrs Sylvia Evans, of London. 
SWI. and Kate, daughter of 
Colonel and Mis Peter Mitchell, 
of Hampshire. 

Mr DJJJVL Fraser 
and Miss FJEJP. Smith 
The engagement is announced 
between Donald, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs C.D. Fraser, of 
Banff Grampian, and FeneUa, 
twin daughter of Mr Peter 
Neville Smith, DFC, and Mrs 
Smith, of Hen bury, Maccles- 
field. Cheshire. 

Mr G-D. Jones 
and Miss L.C. Brettingfaam 
The engagement is announced 
between Griffith, son of Mr and 
Mrs D. Jones, of Montreal, 
Canada, and Lisa, eider daugh- 
ter of Mr B. Brettingham. of 
Maiden, Kent, and Mrs H. 
Brettingham, of Beamed, Kent, 
Mr M-A. Kalderon 
and Miss SJVML Wilson 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark Adam, son of Dr 
and Mrs David Kalderon. of 
Stratford-upon-Avon, and Su- 
san Mary Radford, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs John R. Wilson, of 
Bloomsbury, formerly of 
Poynton, Cheshire. 

Mr GJ. Kalnms 
and Miss J3L Gorst 
The engagement is announced 
between George Juris, youngest 
son of Mr and Mrs F. Kalnins, 
of Adelaide. Australia, and Ju- 
dith Mary, third daughter of Mr 
and Mrs P_B. Gorst, of 
Woodbridge. Suffolk. 


Mr J-A- Lofts 
and Miss AJFL Nowak 
The e ngage ment is announced 
between Tony, son of Mr and 
Mrs RJ. Lofts, of Thoriey. 
Bishop's StortfonL and Anne, 
eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs 
SJC Nowak, of Pinner, Middle- 
sex. 

Mr A J. McLonghEn 
and Miss W. Preston 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, only son of Mr 
and Mrs Alan McLoughlin, of 
Withnel! Fold. Lancashire, and 
Wendy, elder daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Robert Preston, of 
Choriey, Lancashire. 

Captain M. Maond 
and Miss D J. Redman, WKAC 
The engagement is announced 
between Martyn Maund, The 
22nd (Cheshire) Regiment, and 
Jane, second daughter of Major 
and Mrs P.B. Redman. HQ 
Northag, BFP040. 

Mr M.K. Mierzefewsiri 
and Miss AJVf. Roberts 
The engagement is announced 
between March, youngest son of 
the late Mr Jazef Mierzejewski 
and of Mrs Maria Mierzejewska, 
of Great Cbesterford. Essex, and 
Angela, elder daughter of 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs 
Gerald Roberts, of Wands- 
worth. London SWI 8. 

Mr AX- Stewart 
and Miss ILL. Dora rile 
The engagement is announced 
between Alexander, eldest son 
of Mr and Mrs Robert Stewart, 
of Amdean, Dollar, Kinross- 
shire. and Katherine, daughter 
of Mr and Mis Denys Domvile, 
of Brook House, Sutton 
Courtenay, Abingdon, Oxford- 
shire. 

Dr J. Stewart 
and Miss EJ. Forsyth 
The engagement is announced 
between Joseph, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs G.M. Stewart, of 
Lossiemouth. Grampian, and 
Jane, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
K.B. Forsyth, of Astley, 
Worcestershire. 

Mr H. Speller 
and Miss E. Lampard 
The engagement is announced 
between Hamid, eldest son of 
the late lan Speller and Mrs 
Loma Barker, of The HaiL 
Woodnorton. Norfolk, and 
Emily, second daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Marcus Lampard, of 
Mandinam. Uangadog, Dyfed. 



Appointments (OBITUARY 

MRRAINSFORD 

mowlem 

Leading wartime plastic 

■■''.'.'■surgeon- 

Tj-jncford Mowlem, Many of these patients bad 

IASS SttSSJB 


Pro fesso r Wilfred Sa unders , 
Professor Terence Ranger and 
Dr Horry, Koseveare to be 
members of the Advisory 
CoondT on Public Records. 


to be, deputy 
Royal 


The 

•fieotenants Gw the 
| County of Berkshire: . 

m PM— a IIW H ptaq. 

Si ££&, 4n MaStepaqr 
and Mr — 


Museum buys earliest 
City map copperplate 

The Museum of London has acquired the earliest 
(cl 560) surviving engraved copperplate for a map of. ,, 
the City of London (detail below) with the help of the 
National Heritage Memorial Fond. The northern end ‘ DuM °* 1 

of London Bridge Is shown at the bottom right edge of 
our photograph. On die reverse is an oil painting, held 
by Mrs Rosemary Weinstein, keeper of the museum's 
Tudor and Stnart department, of the Coronation of the 
Virgin, attributed to the dSrde of Frans Frankeh 
(d620). In the seventeenth century disused plates 
were considered a suitable painting medium (Photo- 
graphs: John Voos). 


Mr Kalb Alexander, head of 
music and. aits, for BBC 
Scotland, and Mr Ian 
HafflnttO, rlmtrman of Plae- 
form Music Societies, to be 
members of .the Scottish Aits 
Council -for force years. 

Mr Ronald:’ Garrick is ap- 
pointed a member of the 
Restrictive Practices Court. 
■Jlie Rev SLWDfiams, United' 
Reformed Church, to be Prin- 
cipal Chaplain, Church of Scot- 
land and Free Churches (Naval), 
in succession to the Rev 
LL Vincent,' Methodist Church, 
on September 9. ' 

Mr GWJFmce, Deputy Sec- 
retary at tire Department of 
Health and Social Security, to.be 
second permanent secretary in 
the department from April 30, 

in succession to Sir Geoffrey 
Otton, who is retiring. 

Mfas SbeBa Black to be 
fjiairrr^ an designate of the 
proposed Gas' Consumers* 
Council 

General Sr Hash Beach to be 
a Vice Lord-Lieutenant of 
Greater London. 

Mr Gjryffydd Haw Morgan 
Darnel to be a Grant Judge on 
the Wales and Chester dra m . 
Mr Derek Peter Hornby to be 
a part-time' Civil Service 
Commissioner for three years. 
The first 13 members of the 
board of trustees to administer 
national niiwwimf and galleries 
on Merseyside after abolition 
uadi are to be: 

Robert B«rry: 

gradshtw; Mr 

C corse Hole Profemor Mirtiarf 
Kauffman; Mr John Last; Mr 


Britain's leading plastic sur- 
geons, died at his home in 
Southern Spain on February 6. 
He was SI 

Mowlem was m that line of 
eminent plastic surgeons from 
New Zealand - which included 
Sir Hajold CiUks,. and his 
pupa. Sir Archibald Mclndoe 
- who made such a fundamen- 
tal contribution to the treat- 
mens of war wounds. 

Bom on December 12, 
1902, be was educated at 
Auckland Grammar School 
and the University of New 
Zealand. . He qualified MB, 
ChB before coming to En- 
gland for training. in surgery.. 
He derided to stay what 
offered a place on the surgical 
staff of the Middlesex Hospi- 
tal. 

Is London be came under 
the wifliw»ni»» of Sir Harold 
(Hires, and in 193 9 be joined 
services with the orthopaedic 
staff in she treatment of 
patients with war wounds, at 
HiD End 


skills of orthopaedic and plas- 
tic surgeons. Ratosford 
Mowlem baft up this new* 
exciting branch of plastic sur 
eery which attracted vaawrs 
from home and abroad 

He was a brilliant surgeon 
with flair for teaching which 
was widely acriai tned. His 
ebrity of vision was (rftenome- 
naJ and his operative tech- 
nique superb. He was 
ackowtedged as o tie of the 

great wartime surgeons. 

He demanded a high degree 
of care for his patients and wa s 
intolerant of - inefficiency. 
Nothing was allowed to inter- 
fere with a steadily improving 
service and bis unit became 
known as. a cSnic ctf excel- 
fence. 

On his retirement he'wa^i 
made Emeritus Consulting 
Plastic Surgeon at tbe Middle- 
sex Hospital. 

Ramsford Mowlem mar- 
ried in -1933, Margaret West 
Harvey. They bad two daugh- 
ters. 


End, St Albans. 

MAJOR SIR WILLIAM 
PENNLNGTON-RAMSDEN 

Educated at Eton and Cam- 
bridge; be joined the Life 
Guards, and fought in Burma 
in the Second World War. He 
was Master of tbe Grafton 
Hounds from 1955-60, and 
served as High Sheriff of 
Osraberiand 1962-1 



University news 


Science report 


Value of the money spider 


Scientists are considering 
way of enlisting the money 
spider as a check on the aphid, 
which is a major pest in 
cereals and other crops. 

Money spiders (linyphiidae) 
already have a remarkable 
although unwitting ability to 
aid the fanner by airlifting 
themselves into fields on anti- 
cydonic summer and autumn 
days in a phenomenon known 
as “ballooning". 

Huge numbers launch them- 
selves by raising their abdo- 
mens and exuding a fine sBk 
thread. Borne aloft by wind or 
thermal currents they can waft 
for many miles before de- 
scending into fields over which 
they swiftly construct a net- 
work of webs. 

Studies carried out in fields 
of winter wheat in West 
Sussex and East Anglia where 
no insecticides were applied 
show that linyphiidae, which 
is dominant among foe 1 51 
species of spiders found in 
arable crops in the UK, are 
potentially valuable in the 
control of cereal aphids 
(sitobkm avenae). ■ 

Another recent detailed 
study on a single field in the 
South Downs showed that 
linyphiidae could reduce peak 
n ambers of aphids by a quar- 
ter. These spiders also eat pest 
aphids in sugar beet, potato 
and grass crops. 


By Gareth Hnw Davies 

Bat information on spider 
predation is fimlted. Despite 
their great numbers little is 
known of the bask ecology, or 
life cycle. Scientists believe 
many agricultural practises 
have considerable effect on 
their populations and feel 
there is much scope for in- 
creasing their effectiveness 
through countryside manage- 
ment techniques and less in- 
discriminate use of agri- 
chemicals. 

The spiders colonize the 
field from foe air either by 
ballooning or by walking in 
over foe sofl surface. Once in a 
field many linyphiidae are 
able to survive the plough and 
last through the whiter. They 
make horizontal hammock 
webs where much of their food 
is taken. They can s u rviv e 
months without food and then 
exploit prey when it becomes 
abundant, rapidly -doabling 
their weight 

Dr Keith Sunderland, of foe 
Glasshouse Crops Research 
Institute at Littlehamptoo, 
West Sussex, and researchers 
from foe University of East 
Anglia looked at foe rate at 
which aphids fell off plants 
into webs, foe area of ground - 
covered by webs and tbe 
effkkncy of spiders in bolding 
on to their prey. 

.For. instance, small aphids, 
are unlikely to escape entan- 


glement in foe webs, while 
about 70 per cent of tbe biggest 
aphids escape. Bat the spider 
compensates by attacking foe 
largest of a number of simulta- 
neous arrivals first and collect- 
ing them up for later 
consumption rather than allow 
foe subsequent arrivals to 
escape. 

Dr Sander land concludes 
foal it wonht make a signifi- 
cant contribution to aphid 
control if web cover could be 
increased in tbe spring when 
there is a peat amount of 
aphid movement but when 
predation is limited by the 
incidence of webs. 

Even in early spring; when 
webs covered less than one per 
cent of the ground, 16 per cent 
of aphids were estimated to 
encounter webs. By late sum- 
mer web coverage had risen to 
60 per cent of the fields' area. 

Many of fire spiders which 
balloon in the autumn are 
believed to take off again or 
suffer high mortality. Re- 
searchers want to know if 
any thing can be done to per- 
suade more of them to stay in 
crop fields. Other possible 
ways of encooTaging 
tinyphudae into crops indade 
increasing the reservoir of 
suitable habitat sack as 
hedges and nncnltivated grass- 
land. • 


Aberdeen 

Dr Ian Hyslop Munro. of foe 
Science and Engineering Re- 
search Council laboratory at 
Daresbury. has been appointed 
an honorary professor in the 
department or natural philos- 
ophy (physics). 

Other appointments 

Senior lect ur er. Anri P Ambler 
(computing science): lecturer; Unua 
Thomson (accountancy). 

Bath 

Honorary degrees will be con- 
ferred on the following: 

DSc Sir William Barlow, chair- 
man of Thorn EM! Engineering 
Group and BICC; Mr John 
Bolton, chairman arid managing 
director of Growth Capital; 
Professor Sir James Baddiley. 
FRS, emeritus professor of 
chemical microbiology at New- 
castle University: Professor Da- 
vid Kendall. FRS, formerly 
professor of mathematical 
statistics at Cambridge Univer- 
sity; Sir Henry Chi] vers, FRS, 
vice-chancellor of Craniield In- 
stitute of Technology; Mr Nor- 
man Foster, architect; and Mrs 
Heather Angel nature photog- 
rapher. 

DJLitt Miss June Mendoza, 
portrait painter; and Miss 
Maggie Smith, actress. 

MA: Mrs Pat Bishop, organizer 
of drama and visual arts at the 
university. 

Appointments 

L*ctur«rv Dr Moa M D( 

S2SSS? Rw 

(wancai fnfiuwtn©- 

Grants 

gnnea: CSZjJens'nr B? Baterand 
Dr rw Swnn for audio on o» 
(unction control rad cMMstry or 

MQi. 

EfQoorrric and SocfcU Research Coon, 
ot K> Or HM 


Birthdays today 

Mr H.L Beales, 97; Major Sir 
Harold Bibby, 97; Miss Phyllis 
Calvert, 71; MissJean E. Cooke, 
59; Miss Sinead Cusack, 38; 
Lord Dazwen, 71; Mr Lea 
Deighton, 57; Lieutenant-Gen- 
eral Sir Donald Dunstan, 63; 
Professor EG. Edwards, 72; Sir 
Charles Frossard, 64; Sir Eric 
Gairy. 64; Mr Graeme Garden, 
43; Miss Phyllis George, 61: Dr 
J.C. Houston. 69; Sir Peter 
Laurence, 63;.- Sir Basil 
McFarland. 88; Professor Wil- 
liam Me Kane, 65; Sir Arthur 
Norman, 69; Mr Ned Sherri n, 
55; Viscount Waverfey. 75; Sir 
Max Williams, 60. 

Giggles wick 
School 

The first Douglas Glover me- 
morial lecture at Gisleswicfc 
School will be riven by Mr Peter 
Walker, MP. Secretary of State 
for Energy, on Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 26, at 7pm. The title of the 
lecture -is “Our Future 
Chalk: ages”. The lecture , has 
been instituted as an annual 
event at the school in memory 
of Sir Douglas Glover, who was 
Chairman of foe National | 
Union of Conservative Associ- 
ations. 1961/62. Sir Douglas 
studied at Giggleswick in the 
1920$, became a governor in 
1970 and was chairman of the 
governors between 1975 and 
1977. 


Major Sir William 
Pennington- Ramsden, Be. 
who died on January 13, vnU 
be remembered by steeple^ 
chasing enthusiasts as Bobby 
Pennington, the owner of 
Bovril, the one-eyed horse 
which, in spite of serious 
illness, he rode into second 
place behind Sprig in the 1927 
Grand National. 

During the 1920s he rode a 
number of winners, notably 
Prince Regent . and West 
Countryman, while after the 
last war be bought Loyal Fort 
with which 'he won the Fred 
Wrthington Handicap Chase 
at Sandown in 1962. 


He succeeded his father as 
seventh Barooet ia 1958, higt 
elder brother having been 
killed by guerrillas in Malaya. 

In 1927 he married Veroni- 
ca Marfey, by whom he had 
three daughters. He is suc- 
ceeded by a cousin, Caryl 
Ramsden CMG, CVO. 


MR CALVIN HOFFMAN 

Mr Calvin Hoffman, who pictured Wafeiirgham, ever 
has died at his home in lynx-eyed for inadvertent be- 
Sarasota, Florida, at the age of .trayab of their author's true 
SO. was a tireless proponent of identity, discharging his task 


Luncheon 


honorary degrees . on Sultan 
Azlan Shah, Sultan of Perak and 
Deputy King of Malaysia. 

Professor Sluan Kind.' forensic 
- scientist, and Sir David Wilson, 
director of the British Museum. 

Stirling 

Tbe university is to award 
honorary degrees to the follow- 
ing 

DUnfcSir David Bates, FRS, 
theoretical physicist; Mr David 
Njckson, president-elect of the 
CBL Professor Dr Haji Omar 
Bin Abdul Rahman, veterinary > 
pathologist; Mr A.Ronald I rUIOngnt 

Holdings; Mr James Morrison, 
arusi; Lord SiefT of Brimptoo, 
president of Marks and Spencer; 
and Professor Ninian Smart 
professor of religious studies at 
the University of California, 

Santa Barbara. ' - 
MA: Mr Jack Cunningham, 
formerly university head porter 
and mace bearer and Mr 
A-Norman Walker, formerly 
university estates and buildings 
officer. 

Grants _ _ 

ssa &*&£&8 , B32Sr , 3 

a study of software design meth- 
odology based on MaKot. 

EEC Cl 36,600 to Professor RJ 
Roberts for a fundamental study on 
intensive prawn culture for tropical 


English-Speaking Union 
Mr Roy Jenkins. MP„ was the 
st speaker at the English- 
speaking Union literary lun- 
cheon held yesterday at 
Dartmouth House. Mr Alan Lee 
Williams, director-general, was 
in the chair and Mr Bernard 
Levin also spoke. 


the Fuibright Commission, the 
bi-national United States-. 
United Kingdom Educational 
Commission, has announced 
the following new commission 
members: 

American: Mr Kingman Brew- 
ster, Mn Polly Brown, Profes- 
sor Charlotte Erickson. Mr 
Charles G Lubar and Dr 
Robert McGeehan. 

British: Mrs Carol Chattaway, 
Lady Meihven. Dr John Rob- 
erts. Mr Nicholas A H Stacey. 
Professor Peter Stein. Professor 
James Trainer and Mr Aubrey 
Wilson. 


the landfill but highly enter- 
taining theory that foe worts 
of Shakespeare were in' fact 
written fry Marlowe. 

In bis book The Man Who 
Was Shakespeare rich was 
published in 1955, He argued 
that Marlowe V murder ' had 
been simulated, an unknown 
sailor having been killed in his 
place, while the pia 
whom the Privy* 
wanted . to question about 
some subversive pamphlets, 
jumped bail and made, good 
his escape to Italy. • - 

From there for the next 
twenty years, Hoffman main- 
tained. he. sent back to En- 
gland a steady stream of those 
fascinating manuscripts com- 
monly misattributed to 
Shakespeare.These were han- 
dled by his patron, Thomas 
Walsingfram, who, to save his 
homosexual friend from trial 
for blasphemy and treason 
had originally organised the 
sailor’s murder. 

Huffman's ingenious theory 


of gettingthe plays copied and 
finally co&ecting them for the 
First Folio of 1623, thereby 
rendering a priceless sendee to 
literature. 

In 1956 Hoffman was per- 
mitted to open tb#' 
Wahragham tomb at Chisle- 
hurst, Kent, where he hoped 
to find documentary evidence 
to 'sqpport bis theories^ but 
nothing came to lighL 
-Nevertheless he pursued his 
theory over the yean, devot- 
ing his life to research and 
lecturing widely era the sub- 
ject 

He had an abiding love of 
England, to which, latterly, he 
was a frequent visitor, making 
an annual pilgrimage to the 
birthplace and school of Mar- 
lowe - Canterbury and the 
King's School. 

Under his will a trust is to 
be formed for further research 
into the problem of Shake- 
spearian authorship, with an 
annual prize to be adminisv 
tened by the King’s School. * 


MR LAZARE KAPLAN 


Lazare Kaplan, who died on 
February 12 at foe age of 102, 
was the founder, of tbe New 
York diamond inn bearing 
his name, and the man who 
cm the 726-carai looker dia- 
mond. ■ 

Kaplan, who became a leg- 
endary figure in. world dia- 
mond centres, undertook the 
difficult and highly' risky task 
of cutting the huge J tinker 
diamond, which had been 
found on a ferin near Pretoria, 
South Africa. 

The operation resulted in 12 


diamonds, the largest of 
which, a 126.65-carat stone, 
was later sold to King Farouk 
of Egypt fora price reported to 
be a million dollars. 

One of 13 children, Kaplan 
was born July 17, 18&3, in 
Russia. He emigrated to the 
United States from Belgium in 

The First World War broke 
out while he was visiting 
relatives in New York and he 
stayed on and later founded 
t he d iamond merchants 
Lazare Kaplan and Sons. 


research into peer review and 
stractire of sdencr in - 

£122,j 

evaluation __ ... 

of loom diameter wind turbino 


aiion of wood fnrtnaira for U»e 


Computer Board: £80.000 to South 
West University Regional Computer 
Centre for a cocroutteii ia£ to 
support uie board's inffiattve la the 
use of computer factiaies. for teaching. 

Nottingham 
The university 


is to confer 


Newcastle 
Grants _ 

North or Enetantf Cancer Research 
emtmete.- SX9XKO to Dr RF Sean* io 
•nxty Immune rurpnaer to oncofetal 

Muscular Dystrophy Group of Croat 
Britain: £308.963 . to Profe ss or JB 
Harri s for re search tmo u e ur or m n- . 

science and Engineering Res ear ch 
Council: ££2 jB8i lo Professor RH 
Pain and Dr R . Virtfen to study 

ebendem and kinetic charartes tsafltora 

Of me active sit* of Denicaun ocytase: 
£58.560 to Professor AK Covington to 
rese ar ch etectrocneodcai and etieml- 
hertnnwnl sensors: £6 0 00 0 to Mr 
ge Hearn end Professor OE Cakfwea 
to study ocean thermal conversion - a 
coOthocaave programme, 

Natural Environment Research Coun- 
cfl XI 56,990 to PTOfe teor R a Q«t 
for rocky snores Motogic a U smell- 

MtoMry of Defence: £98.327 to 
~ - p Ranortl to study security 
for distributed systems. 


Army 

commissions 

The following have been 
granted short -service . limited 
commissions in the regiments, 
corps shown, having success- 
fully completed course Np 17' 
at the Royal Military Academy 
SandhursL* 

ajPP CouQhtor- lOGR. Cslerttam: 
TC N Dairy, ra. si 8m S.PJ Fry. 
Rt_ Canford: E J Omrneo. •“ 

Groy.cs. HA 

^orUord C. JA HowtHL 17 21L. ... 
Klnv i S. Worcntjr: J l Huohrs. RA. 
Manrtmirr S: N S KraoK*. Orm Cds. 
RairUUr CCJ Krtly. RE.- Worth S: T 
A Krtiyone aanc y. Crvn GO*. Eton; D - 
J KiUKrltr. RCT. St Baurs. Barnes.- D 
A Jtimrr. RE. Oundto: MCJ Uoyo. 
D O. Cttwroote senior: C o E 
MOtl. RE. Winchester: M C Slat), RCT. 
Zptotn C; M R Suthrt-Uno. RA. 
LnUOWy CoUS: D M Trlckoy. RE. 
NiaoMan- CSj o J, Turner. RCT. k 
E dward VIE Lylham: P ic 
Wrddcrtmrn. BW. oiinov MS- 


MR EMANOEL LEE 

Mr Emanoel Lee, FRCS, em Art as a member of council 
Cnairman ot the Oxford Re- and was an accomplished 

g 0D *l . Medical Advisory - historian, with special knowL 
ommittee, died on January edge of the Boer War. 

25. aged 52. He made valuable 
contributions to bis profession 
as surgeon, research worker 
and teacher he also had 
several outside interests. 

He was a gifted artist in. oils 
or in watercolours; exhibitions 
of his «A>rk were shown in 
Oxford and elsewhere; and 
one of bis portraits hangs hr St 
Cross College, of which college 
he was a Fellow. 

. He gave expert assistance to 
the Oxford Museum of Mod- 


His first book on that 
subject. To the Bitter End 
contains a unique collection of 
photographs, many previously 
• unpublished, linked by a 
scholarly text Other books 
were planned. 

With all this Lee was patient 
and compassionate to every- 
one, and had a great sense of 
run. 

He was married with two 
sons. 


CHRISTIE’S WEEK IN VIEW 

A selection from our 19 sales in London this week* 

Chinese Ceramics, Jades and Snuff-Bottles: 
Wednesday 19 February at 10.30 ajn. and 2.30 p.m^ 
King Street: An attractive sale comprising a variety of 
decorative wares from late Archaic to the Qing Dynasty. 

18th Century famille rose is well represented; of particular 
interest among the larger pieces is an ormolu-mounted 
tureen, stand and cover which should fetch £3,000 to 
£4,000. An interesting selection of jade and numerous 
decorated snuff bottles round up the sale. 

Old Master Paintings: Thursday 20 February at 
10 JO ajn.. King Street: A large and varied sale with 
much of interest tor the discerning collector. Notable 
among the 270 lots are works by Hubert Robert, Ruisdael 
and Theobald Michau. A bizarre item is die head of a man 


formed from grotesque dwarfs — almost s foreshadowing of 
Dali. 

Postage Scamps of* India: Tuesday, 25 February at 
10.30 a.m- and 230 p.m.. King Street; This is one of the 
most exciting collections of India which has been fittingly 
called the ‘Koh- in-Nor’. It is studded with great rarities 
spectacular blocks. Since the be ginnin g of serious philately 
the postage stamps of India have continued to capture the 
interest and imagination of collectors. This is a rare 
opportunity to acquire some of the finest items in existence. 
Viewing: King Street: Weekdays 9 a.m.-4.45 pan. 
Enquiries (01) 839 9060 
South Kensington: 

Mondays 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. 

Tnesday to Friday 9 a.m.- 4.45 p jri- 
Enquiries: (01) 582 7611 



Christie’s have 25 offices throughout the UK. If yon would Uke to know the name of your nearest representative please 
telephone Caroline Ixefigame on (01) 588 4424. 


Latest wills 


Baroness Sheffield, of Chelsea, England opening bowler, left 
wife of the former Ambassador estate valued at £70.522 net. 
to Washington and daughter of Sir Herbert John Todd, of 
Mr Dwight Davis, the donor of Blairgowrie, prime minister 
the Davis Cup. left estate in mid vice-president, Jaipur 


d and Wales valued at 
1,0S1,932 neL 

Mrs Joan Ryder Scarfe, of 
JeviMton, East Sussex, daugh- 
ter of Mr Sam Ryder, donor of 
the Ryder Cup, left estate valued 
at £568,468 net. 

Mr John Fallon, of Brighousc. 
West Yorkshire; former York- 
shire golfer and captain of the 
Ryder Cop team in 1963, left 
estate valued at £93,1 19 net 
Mr Godfrey French NeaL of 
East Grinstead. West Sussex, 
building and civil engineering 
contractor, left estate valued at 
£1.674.861 net. 

Viscountess Leathers, vof 
Kirdford. West Sussex, left 
estate valued at £128,188 net 
Mr Joseph Keith Presto n, of 
Greasby, Merseyside, left est a t e 
valued at £1.126.604 net * 

Mr. Richard Pollard^ of 
Westhoushton, Greater. Man- 
chester, former Lancashire and 


ice-pr 

Council of Stott, 1939. left 
. £376.4« net . 

'Mr Roderick Eustace 
Eathoven, of Kensington, Lon- 
don, president of the Architec- 
tural Asso ci ation, 1948-49, left 
£437,917. neL 

Mr Ahdd Gudil Abou Ztid 
Fayed, of B . Zanalek, Egypt, 
who died intestate, left estate in 
England and Wales valued at 
&2LQ53 net 

: Other estates include (net, 
before tax paid)r 
BoOeaa, Major Etienne Henry 
Tudor, of Dorchester £475,8 52 
Davits, Mrs , Pearl, -of 
Broadstone. Dorset _ £285,196 
Elders, ' Stanley - Cofling, of] 
Derby -L.J37l.8Q3 . 

.Ric*£ards,Vera-. Josephine... ofj 
South Godstone —— £273.559 
Stajnra^Mr .Reginald Wafter. 
George Fitzgerald. J 

ton • *- -V £237.226 


The Dean of Winchester, the 
Very Rev Michael Siancliffe. is 
to retire on October 1. He has 
.-bden dean since 1969. 

Appointments 

TJ*n*v JE SanMI. teMUifiMury 

ssssssshi jSzsrzi 

Tram vicar. &JSr<? u . 2 j 

ana. Farrrv. nm oiorm. ■ "* 


Church news 


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C»j»o n_ C D BWtWi. vicar Si 

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ISESfZZ!? Virarsi - 4*®S5»or toMBn"*** 1 * wtm*. 

fsmtvsssp 


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Payor 


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m LaMAh =* ..amt- .rink.- 


■atoeene ai Lanaoh 
pri4> . s . F rest. 


vicar. TTWull. same eu£ 5 £? T * ai ? 




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THE ARTS 












Television 

Memory 

matters 




-f 






■'t >. 








Horizon (BBC2) devoted 
to an examination of scientific 
“truth**, by substantially sd~ 

entiric methods. The aim was 
to demonstrate that science is 
not so much a natter of 
discovering absolute truths 
about onr universe as of 
placing the results of experi- 
ments in the context of the 
conventional wisdom ef oar 
time. 

The producer, Hilary Law- 
son, began by demonstrating 
that human visual perception 

is a process of relating the data 

transmitted by the optic nerve 
to existing concepts in oar 
memory. The BmI proof of 
this theory was a retired 
company director who had 
suffered brain damage during 
a rontine hospital ope ration 
His sight was perfect; the 
mental faculty which he 
lacked was the store of con- 
cepts with which to make 
sense of -what he saw. As a 
result he could get tost within 
10 yards of hxs home, and 
could make no sense at all of a 
..." u picture of a Christmas tree. 

L Leaving this noble victim 
' y-'t. behind, the programme then 
'•■ w went on to look at the circ om - 
stances surrounding two das- 
■" ;■ sic scientific discoveries. 

- Galileo's proof of the rotation 
-.of the earth was swiftly dem- 

i ‘ i r i t Iim*: ‘ f Hastra, *d to hare been mean- 
■ v • J vaj]| ingless to his contemporaries, 

.. .- 7; " who simply chose to believe 
information which accorded 
"f with their own consensus of 
. opinion. 

* Einstein’s theory of relativ- 
' - it) was also named as an idea 
; ^ . which appealed to the spirit of 
■ . its age, and which was adopted 
in the face of conflicting 

- evidence. We that passed 
some time with two frame of 
scientists who were hunting 
the quark, with varying de- 
grees of success and increasing 
mutual distrust Scientific ex- 
periment it was snggested. 
could often be amply a way of 
rm^ing the evidence. 

These were en thralling ar- 
guments which could generate 
a stimulating sixth-form de- 
bate and tax more mature 
intellects with their implica- 
tions. Their presentation, 
however, was so prosaic that 
the programme would have 
wiped the floor with Marcel 
Marceau at that hypothetical 
contest devised by The Good- 
ies, The Montreox Festival of 
Boring. Instead of demanding ' 
“vhitbeT knowledge?** or 
“whither society? 1 ", the viewer 
was unfairly tempted to wish it 
would all just wither away. 


Galleries 


English simplicity 
bom of diversity 




Julian Trevelyan 

Watermans Art Centre, 
Brentford 


Reg Gammon ■ 
New Grafton Gallery 


Joseph Wright of 
Derby: Mr and Mrs 
C oltman 
National Gallery 


Prints and Drawings: 
Five Years of 

Collecting 

British Museum . 


February is the cruellest month for 
artists. Short and dark, it effectively 
ensures that their month-long gallery 
shows last in practice a bare three 
weeks, and the work that is on show 
seldom if ever gets seen by natural 


light As against that the prevailing 
gloon ' 


i >1 


iiiS 


k treas : 






iik-ar!* 


Celia Brayfield 


Joom does tend to favour bright 
colourful art and there is already a 
faint feeling, after the psychological 
hiatus of the Christmas/New Year 
holidays, that something is again 
beginning to stir. Thus, while Julian 
Trevelyan could quite possibly have 
asked for a better time to have his 
first retrospective, at the Watermans 
Art Centre, Brentford, until the end of 
the week (after which it tours), he 
could certainly have had a worse one 
for the advantageous display of his 
particular gifts. 

The first impression of Trevelyan, 
based on his most recent work, is that 
he is a rather cosy, easy-to-take, 
parochial artist, painting away, most- 
ly around west London, at his - 
dmzUngly simple, sophisticated- 


primitive landscapes. The big thing 
this retrospective demonstrates is 
that the apparent simplicity has not 
come easily. Nor has the very local, 
English quality arrivedthrougb igno- 
rance or lack of interest in what has 
been going on artistically elsewhere in 
the world. 

Indeed, he began wearing his 
cosmopolitanism on his sleeve; the 
abstracts of the Thirties proclaim him 
Klee's most enthusiastic English dis- 
ciple, with their knowing scribbles of 
circles and stars and triangles, as 
though speaking to us in pictograras 
we can almost but not quite under- 
stand. With the onset of the Forbes he 
did not like others of his generation 
(he was boro in 1910) turn his back 
completely on modernism, though he 
was inevitably influenced by the Neo- 
Romantic melancholy of the Zeit- 
geist : the anguish of paintings like 
Premonitions of the Blitz is stiffened 


by an acute awareness of German 
Expressionism, of Continental Surre- 
alist practice, and probably of the 
Picasso of Guernica. 

So many and diverse influences 
might well produce stylistic chaos, 
and it is not easy to explain why they 
do not — or not quite. Perhaps the key 
work here is Seagull (1945), which 
amazingly combines delight in the 
English landscape with a surrealist 
eye for bizarre detail, present in Nco- 
Romantic profusion, and the sheer 
hard dunking required to keep such a 
composition from felling to pieces 
before our eyes. Trevelyan is dearly 
an intensely intelligent artist: his 
questing mind may take him off in 
what ought to be a confusing number 
of different directions, but it also 
provides him with the confidence to 
assume that whatever style he decides 
to try is bound to relate to some 
unseen hub in his work — the same 
person is, after all. always there 
wielding the brush. Maybe he is not a 
major artist of his generation, but. 
engagingly, he does not claim to be. 
Unmistakably he just enjoys being an 
artist, exploring the manifold possi- 
bilities of paint, and a naturally sunny 
disposition illuminates alL 
Reg Gammon has bad u> wait a lot 
longer, not fora retrospective but just 
for a one-man London show. Still, 
now he has made it, at the age of 92, 
with a really exciting introduction 
(until the end of the week) at the New 
Grafton Gallery, late of Bond Street, 
now of Church Road. Barnes. He ts 
not entirely an unknown quantity; be 
has been a professional artist since be 
was apprenticed to the black-and- 
white illustrator Frank Patterson in • 
1911, and has exhibited widely in 
Wales and the West; by a curious 
coincidence he was brought to the 
attention of his London gallery by 
Julian Trevelyan’s painter wife Mary 
Feddon. 

For all his beg innin g in black-and- 
white,- Gammon is a very painterly 
painter, as well as a prolific one: all 
the oils and watercolours in this show 
have been ‘painted in his nineties. 



Theatre 


Sisterhood at last 
finds its Orton 


The Rag of 

Identity 
Oval House 


QmntessenfiaUy English, hot attractive across the Channel nevertheless: 
Joseph Wright of Derby’s Mr and Mrs Coltman at the National Gallery 


With few exceptions they are land- 
i fil 


scapes, usually with figures and 
sometimes dominated by figures. The 
watercolours are proficient but some- 
how ordinary. Not so the oils, which 
have an extraordinary and not entire- 


ly explicable smouldering intensity, 
farming or crofting scenes in the 


His 


west of Ireland. Normany or Brittany 
are transfigured by a breathtaking 
)f colot 


intensity of colour, with a particular 
delight in burning reds and acid 
greens which have not been applied to 
such subjects with such enthusiasm 
since Gauguin and Die Brucke. 

' It is perhaps late to make our first 
acquaintance with such a distinctive 
talent but, if the sheer energy with 
which he tackles the canvas is 
anything to go by, we should have 
plenty of time for more detailed 


knowledge. To any suggestion that 
this show might be merely a flash in 
the pan, one can with confidence 
counter that it will be really fascinat- 
ing to see what be is painting in 
twenty years. 

The current crop of new museum 
shows brings a number of unexpected 
and in the main unpretentious de- 
lights. At the National Gallery the 
latest “Acquisition in Focus** show 
(until April 27) concentrates on 
Joseph Wright of Derby’s Mr and 
Mrs Coltman. a quintessential^ En- 
glish composition of two figures, she 
on horse tack, he standing beside her. 
in a landscape with a vaguely 
indicated country house, modest 
rather than stately, in the back- 
ground. It is not the sort of painting 
Wright is best remembered for, 
though it seems likely that the same 
couple, friends of the painter, also 
figure in one of those. An Experiment 
on a Bird in the Air Pump, which is at 
present in the Tate Gallery but will 
return to the National (to which it 
was originally bequeathed) this au- 
tumn. 


would like in Paris to follow the 
Gainsborough. Turner and Reynolds 
exhibitions received the unanimous 
and enthusiastic answer — Joseph 
Wright of Derby . . . 

Meanwhile the British Museum's 


Department of Prints and Drawings 

ith the 


That, of course, is one of Wright's 
virtuoso plays with dramatic illumi- 
nation in a darkened room. Mr and 
Mrs Coltman, acquired in 1 984. is in 
much the same tradition as 
Gainsborough’s Mr and Mrs An- 
drews , and stirs British sensibilities in 
the same sort of way. But not British 
alone, it would appear 1 am told that 
recent enquiries as to what the French 


has, as is its wont, produced with 
utmost nonchalance a staggering cull 
from its acquisitions of the last five 
years (on show until May 4). headed 
in public feme no doubt by the 
Palmer watercolour A Cornfield by 
Moonlight with the Evening Star — 
just the sort of thing, surely, that 
concern for the National Heritage can 
legitimately be about, and well worth 
all the concern and money lavished 
on its retention for the nation. But 
there are also wonderful Pre-Raphael- 
ite drawings, a complete sketchbook 
by the recently rediscovered 18th- 
century Welsh landscapist Thomas 
Jones, one of the earliest known 
monotypes (by Casiiglione) and some 
superb 20th-century German draw- 
ings and prints, ranging from Paula 
Modersohn-Becker to Anselm Kiefer. 

It is also notable that a handful of 
the more remarkable exhibits — the 
Casiiglione monotype, a Rembrandt 
drawing — come from the Chatsworth 
sale: a salutary reminder that, what- 
ever opportunities the national col- 
lections may be able to grasp, like the 
Palmer, there arc still all too many 
chances which are just beyond then- 
resources and have to be let slip. 


Theatre should ever be thus: 
the first night delayed for 20 
minutes to allow a crucial 
prop (a lavatory pedestal) to 
be mended; an exotic audi- 
ence pulling their feet through 
disconcerting gaps in the 
tiered flooring; a programme 
which invites the reader to 
describe a sex-change opera- 
tion in three words or less; a 
junk stage-set with loopy 
sightlines; all this, and one of 
the most sublimely ludicrous 
plays I have ever sat still for. 

Jill W. Fleming’s preposter- 
ous lesbian romp concerns a 
problematical cat's-cradle of a 
set-up between two young 
women and their outrageous 
mothers. These columns are 
not the place to spell out the 
finer wrinkles of Miss Fle- 
ming's plot, nor to retail her 
funnier one-liners: suffice it to 
say that she has written a 
brilliant entertainment for 
some of the family. 

Joanna, an earnestly har- 
rowed writer of paperback 
nasties, visits her smart, soi- 
gnee mother in the con- 
demned cell (where, naturally, 
she has been conducting an 
affair with the wardress), only 
to be told the awful truth of 
her parentage: “Your father 
was a lavatory seat". Joanna 
suffers a further shock when 
her mother reveals that the 


homicide for which she is 
about to swing was merely the 
last in a considerable series 
which, in the guise of recycled 
bedtime stories, provided her 
daughter with the plots of her 
books. 

We now move to a rackety 
flat shared by Laurie, a dress- 
designer. and her tailor* s dum- 
my. Enter her walking 
nightmare of a mother. Mrs 
Proctor, a tubby bottle-blonde 
in a man's suit who has been 
thrown out by her son (she 
arranged for his fiancee to be 
murdered) and now plans to 
impose on Laurie. Arriving in 
distress after being mugged. 
Joanna vomits into Mrs 
Procior's hat; the latter at- 
tempts to throttle the dummy 
before swanking out on the 
town. 

All this is achieved with 
gloriously filthy dead-pan 
jokes with innocent-sounding 
snippets of “normal" conver- 
sation. Parts of the script 
urgently need tidying up. 
which may become more ob- 
vious when Jude Alderson's 
production gels into its stride, 
but it already sizzles with wit 
and panache. 

The Hard Corps company- 
are Heather Gilmore, Debby 
Klein. Sarah McNair. Cathy 
Kilcoyne and Karen Parker. A 
few weeks ago I roundly 
declared that the sisterhood 
were “still waiting for their 
own Joe Orton to mater- 
ialize". I was not then aware of 
Jill W. Fleming. 

Martin Cropper 


Goat 

Croydon Warehouse 


The most deleterious aspect of 
life in the shadow of the Bomb 
not the angst supposedly 
attendant on the threat of 
global immolation but the 
poverty of comment to which 
this predicament gives rise. It 
is almost as if tbe fictional 
treatment of the theme held 
some spatial magnetic allure 
for our duller playwrights. 
This effort by Louise Page 
with which Paines Plough 
(The Writers’ Company) has 


been touring is prolix, miscon- 
onfused an 


and confus- 


John Russell Taylor 


Concerts 


Right to the Russian heart 




LSO/ 

Rozhdestvensky 

Barbican 




With the cantata Alexander 
Sevsky, Gennadi Rozhdest- 
vensky reached the Russian 
heart of his four-concert series 
with the London Symphony 
Orchestra. A compatriot like 
Yevgeny Svetlanov may well, 
judging from his last memora- 
ble London performance, 
have transported his audience 
back to the Mosfilm Studios 
where Prokofiev first worked 
on his film score with Elsen- 
siein: setting the score’s Mack 
against its white, emphasizing 
its savage cross-cutting of 
rhythmic blocks and the merg- 
ing of its instrumental mon- 
tage. Rozhdestvensky chose to 
do otherwise. 

This performance glorified 
in Prokofiev’s rearrangement 
and accommodation of the 
score for the concert halL 
Taking full account of tbe 
even broader spread of sound 
created by the orchestra's 
• necessarily wide, shallow posi- 
* , tioning on the Barbican plal- 
’ form, the conductor chose 
and sturdy 


than a diifling performance, 
apart, that is, from Alfreda 
Hodgson's tenderly phrased 
solo in “The Field of tbe 
Dead". 

Tbe first half of the evening 
was dominated, literally, by 
Viktoria Posmikova’s hugely 
grandiloquent performance of 
Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concer- 
to No 1. In its ponderous, 
striding chords and octaves 
and its lurching, heavily lan- 
guid nibato, it was very much 
the pianistic equivalent of tbe 
grand operatic style of a 
Dimitrova or an Arkhipova: 
But tuning a more- effete 
western ear to its scale was not 
the whole story, nor tbe entire, 
solution. 

' ‘ For, as the slow movement 
so telling revealed, it was the 
narcissism of the perfor- 
mance, its obsession with an 
entirely solo-orientated acous- 
tic fantasy, which weakened 
its superficial 'strength, 
forcing the orchestra to mat 
its inflated proportioning, it 
was a performance which 
accused the work itself of self- 
indulgence. 

Hilary Finch 


tion of “conductor/pianist". 
Twenty years on, the partner- 
ship between orchestra and 
pianist is still rather special, as 
these performances of Beet- 
hoven’s First and Second 
Concertos demonstrated. 


£ 


The key to their long-lasting 
concord must lie in the ECO’s 
fine-tuned response to Baren- 
boim’s varied, ever-probing 
musicianship. His majestic 
fluency in the allegros of both 
concertos, and his perfect 
judgement of the weight that 
each passing sforzando of No 
2’s finale needs in its context, 
all attested to his undimmed 
virtuosity. The preservation 
of this technical quality is all 
the more remarkable because 
Barenboim now surely has 
little time in his crowded* 
schedule for the daily digital 
drudgery which many concert 
pianists consider a necessary 
chore. 



Nash Ensemble 

Wigmore Hall 


Daniel Barenb oim: special 
relationship with the ECO 


U 




. -.*;i 


rather than incisive massing of ECO/BarenbOim 
his forces in the big choral ppcriv-,! fx«ii 
numbere (valiantly sung by festival nail 
the London Symphony Cho- 
rus). He concentrated, loo. on 
the spread of. resonance from 
horn and trombone rather 
than the searing collisions 

with which Prokofiev had 
staged-managed his ice battle. 

It made for a thrilling rather 


With the English Chamber 
Orchestra, in the early 1960s, 
Daniel Barenboim not only 
laid the foundations of his 
own dazzling dual career but 
in the process pioneered the 
(now well subscribed) oceupa- 


More extraordinary still is 
bis instinct for coaxing half- 
hidden meanings from the 
music The sparky thrust of 
his passagework was. time and 
again, onset by subdued, even 
slightly sad, touches; a marked 
si owing-down m No 2*s first 
movement so that the mystery 
of the remote D flat and G flat 
excursions could be savoured, 
for instance. His cadenzas 
were complex kaleidoscopes 
of fleeting moods, but perhaps 
the afternoon’s most magical 
moment was its simplest: the 
ending of No 2’s slow move- 
ment where the poignancy of 
Barenboim's phrasing (and his 
exactly measured pedalling) in 

tbe unaccompanied right- 


hand “recitative” created a 
perceptible tension through- 
out the packed halL 

The orchestra, alert and 
sympathetic but understand- 
ably taking a supporting role 
in the concertos, had earlier 
offered a spacious account of 
Mozart’s “Haffner" Sympho- 
ny. No 35. Rather than beat- 
ing time conventionally Bar- 
enboim conducted the whole 
work, by indicating the stress- 
points and required shading of 
phrases: a sophisticated ap- 
proach which indirectly com- 
plimented the ECO’s un- 
sbakeable rapport, but which 
did produce the occasional 
dynamic extravagance. 


Richard Morrison 


Each time I hear Webern's 
arrangement for the Pierrot 
Lunaire ensemble of flute, 
clarinet, violin, cello and pi- 
ano of Schoenberg's Chamber 
Symphony. Op 9. 1 become 
more convinced that the result 
is an improvement even upon 
the marvellous original. The 
reason lies not simply in the 
greater clarity offered by the 
reduced forces, nor in the 
urgency given to ihe score 
through the increased demand 
upon each player, but simply 
through the presence of the 
piano. For, where Schoen- 
berg's 10 wind and five string 
instruments tend to fuse the 
music's complexities into a 
rather luscious whole, the 
piano's percussiveoess lends 
bite as well as transparency io 
the work; the rest of the 
ensemble's contributions also 
emerge with greater force. 

Such, anyway, was the im- 
pression given by the Nash 
Ensemble's magnificent read- 
ing in the latest concert ol 
their “Austro-German Rom- 
antic" series. If Webem’s ver- 
sion does have a fault, it is that 
the work can sound messy 
simply through being so tech- 
nically demanding. Yet there 
was never the slightest suspi- 
cion here that each performer 
had done anything less than 
wholly master his or her part- 


But the climax of the con- 
cert — which began with 
Henze's rather slight Violin 
Sonatina — was undoubtedly a 
mellow account of Brahms's 
Clarinet Quintet. Though it 
seems invidious to single out 
players in a piece that requires 
so much of each contributor, it 
has to be said that Michael 
Collins's immaculately con- 
trolled. impeccably shaped 
and sensitively coloured dan- 
net playing was something 
only to be marvelled aL 

S.P. 


ceived, coni 
ing. 

We find ourselves in a 
biochemistry laboratory' in a 
high-security installation 
where Alice, a research scien- 
tist specializing in the decay of 
the alimentary canal after 
irradiation, has been sum- 
moned to conduct a controlled 
experiment over the course of 
a weekend. The ostensible 
subject of her inquiry icapra 
hircus. the ruminant quadru- 
ped of the title) is tethered, 
conceptually, in the audience, 
enabling Alice to address her 
80-minute monologue to us as 
if we ourselves were dumb 
scalpel-fodder. 

This improbable set-up is 
rendered well-nigh incredible 
by the author's failure to 
characterize her single protag- 
onist Raised on a council 
estate, the daughter of a 
butcher (nudge-nudge). Alice 


has a niece named Tracey and 
calls the lavatory “the toilet" 
— accurate enough as far as it 
goes, but she is also given to 
quoting William Blake and 
frequently descends (or per- 
haps rises) to pamphletese in 
her sporadic attempts to see 
the world in a grain of cliche. 

The script's tin-eared ca- 
dences are complemented by a 
form of imaginative tunnel- 
vision which reaches its nadir 
when the idealistic researcher, 
recalling her ambition to dis- 
cover a cure for radiation 
sickness, describes a nuclear- 
winter dream in which she 
addresses an audience of 
corpses: “Because they were 
all skulls, they couldn't even 
smile". Unhappy skulls, inca- 
pable even of rictus. 

One presumes that Miss 
Page’s purpose in writing this 
panoptic jumble was to stimu- 
late debate on “the issues", to 
raise questions. Well, here are 
some questions. What are the 
external forces that keep Alice 
penned to her laboratory for 
the course of the weekend 
which (apparently) witnesses a 
nuclear explosion? What pre- 
vents her communicating with 
the outside world? Is her 
attendance for this experiment 
to be seen (God forbid) as a 
metaphor for women's subser- 
vience? 

And, lastly, what are Carole 
Harrison, a perfectly compe- 
tent actress, and Pip Brough- 
ton. one of our more capable 
directors, doing here? 

M.C. 


BBCSO/ 

Pritchard 

Barbican 


i\T 


PETER SHAFFER’S NHW PLAY 


i4 



‘The huge imagination of 


NATIONAL 

THEATRE 


Shaffer is one of the 


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t from. 2 houre before performance.^^ 



It is difficult fora performance 
of Mahler's Second Sympho- 
ny to fail; surely nothing could 
Vial ends with such a positive, 
uplifting affirmation. Never- 
theless it takes something 
special to help it transcend its 
vast proportions. Sir John 
Pritchard, directing the BBC 
Symphony Orchestra and 
Chorus and the London Phil- 
harmonic Choir, managed it 
on Sunday, however, and 
those who wish to confirm or 
deny that view can listen to his 
results tonight on Radio 3. 

The secret of Sir John's 
performance lay in his paring, 
most crucially perhaps in the 
stormy funeral inarch of the 
first movement 11 did not 
matter that .here the players 
were not always unanimous in 
those rushing C minor flumes; 
nor even that the tempo 
sometimes erred marginally 
on the careful side, for the 
argument remained intense 
throughout, and death was 
absolute. 

. Bul in the pastures of the 


second movement Sir John’s 
pristine control of rhythm and 
speed was such that the pizzi- 
cato repeal of the first section 
came dose to being a parody 
of itself. If that was the 
intention, it would have to be 
counted a mistake, for there is 
nothing about ihe atmosphere 
there or in the Scherzo to 
make anyone believe that 
Mahler was being other than 
perfectly straightforward, de- 
spite the burlesques and the 
screaming E flat clarinets in 
the latter movement. How 
else to approach the agonizing 
spiritual purity of the succeed- 
ing “Uriicht"? There Felicity 
Palmer and. ihe trumpets and 
horns were in firm emotional 
and technical controL 
And then came that won- 
drous finale, in which Miss 
Palmer. Felicity Lott and the 
two splendid choirs really did 
transport us to other worlds, 
aided by orchestral playing of 
impressive warmth and nobil- 
ity, The brass section never 
raftered; the woodwind and 
strings were nearly as perfect; 
and Sir John was masterful in 
his expansive treatment of this 
glorious music. 

Stephen Pettitt 



QMmu&Mup>u 

Kt&ViMtg. 


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With rising interest rates we could not continue this offer into February 
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2.0 LASER 


APR 


114% 


114% 


Cash Price* 

Initial Payment (minimum 20%) 
Amount of Credit 
36 Monthly Instalments of 
Charge for Credit 
Total Credit Price 


420108 

84022 

3360.86 

109.88 

59422 

4795.90 


7253.38 

1450.68 

5802.70 

189.72 

102722 

8280.60 


7328.44 

1465.69 

5862.75 

19L68 

1037.73 

836617 


’Maximum retail price as at February 7th 1986 excluding delivery number plates and road fund licence. 


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FEBRUARY 18 1986 



FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 

1220.7 (+1,9) 

FT-SE 100 

1477.9 (+4.4) 


USMfDatesfream) 

114.33 (+0.37) 


the pound 


US dollar 

1.4207 (+0.003) 


W German mark 

3.3213 


Trade-weighted 

73.6 (u/c> 


Rodamco 
offer out 


UB offers £2.5bn for Imps 
as Hanson raises bid 


The banle for 
Group took off 


Hanson Trust raising its 


Rodamco Property, the 
Dutch company bidding £179 
million for Haslemere Estates, 
sent out its offer document 
last night. It argues that 
Haslemere has under- 
performed the nest of the 
property sectorand that 
Rodamco's offer of 600p per 
share cash is a fair price, a" 
sentiment with which the 
market seems to agree. 

Rodamco now has just over 
24 per cent of Haskmere, 
having picked up another 12 
per cent from institutional 
shareholders on the day the 
unwelcome bid was an- 
nounced last week. And the 
institutions have been selling 
to other buyers, including 
American arbitrageurs who 
were in the market at prices up 
to 624p a share. 


with 

. ingrtsbidto 

- £228 billion and United Bis- 
cuits. whose agreed merger 
with Imperial was referred last 
week to the Monopolies Com- 
mission, stealing the initiative 
from Imperial and lopping the 
Hanson offer with a record 
breaking £Z5 billion bid. 


By Alison Eadie 

Imperial man and chief executive of the 
combined group straight 
away, instead of waiting for 
Mr Geoffrey Kent, chairman 
oflmperial, to retire in March 
next year. Mr Kent would 
become a non-executive direc- 
tor. 


Imperial put out a bolding 
statement to hs s ha reholders, 
but last night it was locked in 
meetings with United Biscuits 
and is expected to recommend 
the UB offer. Both companies 
have emphasized throughout 
their merger campaign the 
industrial logic of their pro- 
posals and the lack of industri- 
al logic of the Hanson offer. 
Sir Hector Laing. chair man of 
UB, is particularly keen lo 
create a British food group 
capable of competing with' the 
American giants in the world ' 
market to provide food for the 
Third World. 


United Biscuits has prom- 
ised the Office of Fair Trading 
that it will sell off Golden 
Wonder. Imperial's slacks, 
crisps and nuts business, in 
order to avoid a competition 
reference. UB and Imperial 
together have over 40 percent 
of the British shacks market, 
which triggered the reference 
to the Monopolies Commis- 
sion. UB's snacks division, 
KP Foods, is larger than 
Golden Wonder, which had a 
turnover in 1984 of £117.2 
million and pretax profits of 
£8.1 million. 



million, an increase of 34 per 
cent. 

United Biscuits is offering 
five of its shares and five 
convertible preferred shares 
plus 275p cash for six Imperial 
shares. At yesterday's dosing 
price its offer values each 
imperial share at 529p 3gainsi 
a dosing price in the mark 
320p. up 29p. UB shares 
closed down Up at 231p. UB 
is also offering 775p gash 
instead of the cash and pre- 
ferred dement of the main 
offer, which is worth 32I.7p 
share. 


„ keen to 
compete with the Americans 


Sir Hector, under UB's bid 
terms, would become chair- 


UB said that after the sale of 
Golden Wonder, for which 
there are reported to be sever- 
al interested parties, group 
gearing would be a 
able 35 per cent. Althot 


shareholders do end up with 
less of the combined group 
under the new terms the 
difference is 31 .4 per cent after 
conversion or 40 per cent 
before conversion as against 
40 per cent under the old 
terras. 

Hanson Trust also forecast 
pretax profits this year of £340 


Hanson has offered for each 
Imperial share one of 
shares plus I53p cash worth 
301 p per share at Hanson' 
closing price yesterday 
148p. down 3p. Alternatively 
it has offered one Hanson and 
I53p of 10 per cent convert- 
ible stock or one Hanson and 
153p of!2 per cent loan notes. 
The full cash alternative 
worth 293p a share. Both 
Hasson and UB are allowing 
Imperial shareholders to keep 
Imperial's recommended final 
dividend of 6.6p. 


CTG chief 


Lord Pennock is to be the next 
chairman of the Channel Tun- 
nel Group. He takes up the 
appointment next month. 



Posgate fight 
to carry on 


Mr las Posgate (above) is to 
appeal against last week's 
derision by the Council of 
LLoyd's not to readmit him to 
the market because he was not 
a “fit and proper" person to 
underwrite. His six-month 
suspension, imposed for re- 
ceiving a Pissarro painting as 
an inducement to place busi- 
ness, ended on January 8. 

Mr Posgate will be repre- 
sented by Mr Robert Alexan- 
der QC head of the Bar 
Council, who also successfully 
represented him in his appeal 
against expulsion from 
Lloyd's. 


Beazer offer 


Beazer has received sufficient 
acceptances under its offer for 
French Kier to acquire com- 
pulsorily any outstanding 
French Keir shares. 


Hunter buys 


Hunter has agreed to ac- 
quire wood and board distrib' 
utors Christie and Vesey for 
£1.6 miffion in cash. 


71.4% accept 

)igan Crucible has accep- 
s for 71 .4 per cent of First 


Mo: 

tatices... — . 

Castle Electronics shares and 
its offer has been declared 
unconditional. 


Oil options 

The New York Mercantile 
Exchange expects to trade 
options on its erode ofl futures 
contract (his year, Mr Michel 
Marks, chairman of the ex- 
change. said yesterday. 


Coffee switch 


Soaring coffee prices have 
forced the International Cofj 
fee Organization to suspend 
coffee export quotas. With 
prices at least 40 cents above 
the maximum of 140 cents a 

pound set by the International 
Coffee Agreement, the ICO 
announced yesterday that 
members would be allowed to 
export as much as they want- 
ed. 


Holmes a Court raises bid 
for BHP to £1.71 billion 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 
Mr Robert Holmes 4 Court more than Aus$2 billion, in 


yesterday sent out the clearest 
signal yet that his move on the 
Broken HOI Proprietary Com- 
pany (BHP) is not, as many 
commentators have suggst- 
ed, a share-boosting manoeu- 
vre, but a genuine attempt to 
take over Australia's biggest 
corporate enterprise. 

Unveiling bis latest bid, 
worth up to Aus$3 .5 billion 
(£1.71 billion) in Melbourne 
yesterday. Mr -Holmes a 
Court, head of the BeD Group, 
said it retained many of the 
features of the Bell offer made 
on February I. He declined to 
give a commitment that if he 
gained control of “the big 
Australian” he would not 


break it up. 
offer 


The offer is to buy 50 per 
cent of each shareholder’s 
stake, at Aus$7.70. The alter- 
native offer is a Bell share pins 
AusJZSO for each BHP share, 
also up to half of a holding. 

There are three new condi- 
tions in the bid: that a 
minimum of 250 million BHP 
shares must be acquired; that 
BeO not be required to lay out 


cash; and that Bell should not 
have to issue more than 
Aus$250 million of its shares. 

Mr Holmes k Court conced- 
ed that these conditions meant 
that the bid could run into 
trouble if it resulted in accep- 
tances requiring Beil to issue 
more than the stipulated quo- 
ta of shares or put up more 
than A us$2 billion m cash. 

Mr Holmes k Court also 
disclosed details of the finan- 
cial arrangements behind the 
bid. 

The Standard Chartered 
Bank in Britain has extended 
an Aus$2 billion line of credit 
to Bell Resources, which will 
be syndicated to Australian 
and international banks. 

Mr Brian Loton, managing 
director of BHP, acknowl- 
edged the offer as “a 
serious bid” but said it su 
fered from the same defect as 
the last one. He said it was a 


BHP would go about prevent- 
ing the takeover. In answer to 
a question, he said Mr Holmes 
a Court would not be invited 
to join the BHP board. 


Mr Holmes & Court denied 
suggestions that he bad bowed 
to political pressure in chang- 
ing from a pro-rata to 
proportional bid. 


He confirmed that success 
of the offer would give Bell 
Group the ability to influence 
the composition of the beard, 
but said any new directors 
would be obliged to act in the 
interests of shareholders rath- 
er than Bell. 


Mr Holmes k Court criti- 
cized BHFs recent acquisition 
of two American interests and 
its commitment to develop a 
copper mine in Chile. 

But he added: “Bell Re- 


sources Holdings and Bell 
Resources do not propose any 
totally inadequate consider- change to the redeployment of 
ation for passing the company the fixed assets of BHP and, in 
into what would, in effect, be particular, do not propose any 
the control of one man. change to the location of the 

He would not detail bow BHP head office. 


NatWest to 


reorganize 
its services 


By Richard Thomson 
Banking Correspondent 

National Westminster, the 
clearing bank with the largest 
branch network, yesterday an- 
nounced plans for an impor- 
tant reorganization of ' its 
customer services designed to 
provide a more competitive 
service to corporate and per- 
sonal clients. 

Over a three-year period 
NatWest will set up more than 
100 coporate banking centres 
in busy commercial areas to 
provide service direct to large 
corporate customers, ft will 
also develop groupings of 
smaller brandies in about 450 
areas to cater, for personal 
customers and small business- 
es. 

The groupings will be linked 
to a lead branch in each area 
which will co-ordinate the 
smaller branches and handle 
the Imger business accounts. 
About Z000 of the bank’s 
3.000 branches will be affected 

The local command struc- 
ture within the bank will be 
simplified by replacing the 
two-tier system of eight re- 
gional and 45 area offices with 
a single tier of 25 strengthened 
area offices. 

The bank is reducing its 
branch network by some 50 
offices, and the latest plans 
will mean shedding a further. 
50 by 1 99a 
The new corporate banking 
centres will complement a 
system of 18. international 
banking centres 


Laing and Bechtel 
launch oil venture 


By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 
The British subsidiary of about 1 1 big North Sea devel- 


the American Bechtel group 
and the construction firm 
John Laing have established a 
new joint company which 
could lead toan increase in the 
use of American technology in 
British offshore ofl and gas 
engineering projects. 

The new company, Laing 
Bechtel Petroleum Develop- 
ment, will undertake concep- 
tual design and engineering 
work for projects on the UK’s 
Continental Shelf and in over- 
seas markets. The company, 
of which Laing holds 51 per 
cent, said the association “will 
assist the development and 
expedite the transfer of tech- 
nology within the British off- 
shore industry". - 

Bechtel was involved in 


opment projects up to 1983, 
but since then the Department 
of Energy has frowned on the 
use of American technology 
and urged that offshore exper- 
tise should be anchored in the 
UK. 

The department's Offshore 
Supplies Office, recognizing 
Bechtel's world reputation, 
has been working behind the 
scenes to try to find a suitable 
British partner to establish a 
joint venture company, and 
Laing’s involvement is the 
result of 10 months of discus- 
sions. 

The move was welcomed 
yesterday by Mr Alick- 
Buchana n-Smi th , Minister of 
State for Energy, as “a power- 
r -’ partnership". 


ful 


Campari in £1.8m deal 


Mr Ake Nordin, a Swedish 
businessman, yesterday an- 
nounced a £1.8 million deal to 
buy large family shareholdings 
in Chmpari, the sports equip- 
ment firm. 

He has agreed to buy the 
holdings of Mr Harry Lipton, 
chairman, and Mrs Roberta 
Benscber and their family 
trust, paying 49p a share. 

Announcing the deal, which 
gives him 47.76 per cent of the 
north ■ London company's 
shares, he said he would offer 
to make a full-scale takeover 
bid for the company at 49p a 
share. 


At the same time he cau- 
tioned that shareholders 
should wait to see what he says 
in his formal offer document. 


A statement said he intend- 
ed to develop the business and 
wanted to keep a listing on the 
Stock Exchange for Campari 
shares. He is understood to 
want to achieve a total holding 
ofbetween 50 per cent and 75 
percent. 

Mr Nordin is a director and 
30 per cent shareholder of a 
Swedish sports and camping 
gear company, Fjailraven 
Sport equipment 


Indonesia 
‘may raise 
oil output 9 

By Teresa Poole 


Indonesia yesterday fell into 


step with several of its part- 
ners in the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
tries and said it might raise oil 
production and adopt 
“flexible" pricing structure to 
meet revenue targets. 

Dr Subroio. the country's 
mines and energy minister, 
told the pariiamant in Jakarta 
that Indonesia would produce 
ofl at the level necessary to 
secure planned export income, 
but would stay in line with 
Opec policies. 

Indonesia is producing 
about 1.3 million barrels of Ofl 
a day and has a maximum 
daily output of 1.7 million 
barrels. _ 



Dr Subrotuc fighting for 
a “fair" market share 


Until the beginning of ibis 
year. Indonesia had been one 
of Opec's more disciplined 
members, observing quota 
and price decisions. Most of 
its oil is sold to the Far East, 
but in January its biggest 
customer, Japan, started to 
buy heavily in the European 
market 

Oil and natural gas are 
expected to earn 70 per cent of 
Indonesia's foreign exchange 
revenue of $18.9 billion for 
the year starting April 1. 

Earlier this month, at a 
special committee meeting in 
Vienna attended by Dr 
Subroto, Opec confirmed its 
free-for-all policy of increasing 
production to gain a larger 
share of the world market. 

Dr Subroto told the Indone- 
sian parliament that the com- 
mittee — Indonesia, 
Venezuela, Iraq, Kuwait, and 
the United Arab Emirates — 
wanted increases in produc- 
tion in order to obtain a “fair" 
share of the market. It would 
recommend at next month's 
full Opec meeting that the 
cartel's oil production be ad- 
justable to the market situa- 
tion, he added. 

“In principle, the market 
share will be larger than the 
production ceiling of 16 mil- 
lion barrels a day officially 
adopted by Opec at present," 
The price which Opec 
should charge for its oils was a 
tool which the group would 
use in confronting non-Opec 
producers to fight for its 
market share. Dr 
said. 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


Britain’s £70 billion 
North Sea legacy 


It is a sign that the market is in high 
ground when the law of equal and 
opposite reasoning comes into opera- 
tion. The best current example is the 
impact of oil prices on the United 
Kingdom. When North Sea oil 
fetched more than S30 a barrel, 
Britain exulted in its petrodollar 
status. North Sea induced economic 
activity raised the growth level; the 
balance of payments was in hand- 
some surplus; oil tax revenue flowed 
into the Exchequer. 

On its way down, the oil price 
became a portent of economic disas- 
ter. not least because diminishing oil 
revenues robbed the Chancellor of 
most of the wherewithal for 
eleciorially popular, and economi- 
cally desirable, tax cuts. With crude 
oil now down to half its former leveL. 
the mood has changed. Cheap energy 
is now deemed to be of equal value to 
high price North Sea oil. The 
arguments can be disputed; but not 
the sentiment. 

While the consequences of an oil- 
inflated pound were a steeper reces- 
sion and higher unemployment than 
might otherwise have occurred in the 
early 1980s, the other side of the coin 
looks very pleasing. Britain accu- 
mulated huge assets overseas, which 
now total some £70 billion. These 
assets are easily capable of yielding an 
income of $5 billion, and maybe as 
much as £7 billion a year. The legacy 
of oil at $30 a barrel is one of the high- 
est ratios of external assets to gross 
national product of any leading 
industrial country. 

In 1985, Britain's net return on the 
oil trading account was £8.2 billion. 
The income from external assets built 
up during the oil-rich years is thus 
already not far short of the surplus 
from actually trading in oil last year. 
It may. in feet, very soon exceed it 
since the fell in oil prices will erode 
the £3 billion despatched abroad to 
foreign companies with investments 
in the North Sea. 

The good news does not stop there. 
As Dr David Lomax, group eco- 
nomic adviser to National West- 
minster Bank, puts it: 

“The effect of the fell in the oil 
price has pushed sterling to a level 
where British products should be 
much more competitive as against 
European and worldwide com- 
petition. The movement in the 
sterling exchange rate is all the 
Confederation of British Industry 
could have wished for.” 


which confined business to call 
options. That was sorted out in 1981. 
Since then, new stocks, particularly 
British Telecom plus the index 
contract from 1984, have produced 
accelerating growth in the heady 
atmosphere of boom. By 1984, con- 
tracts lopped the million mark and 
volume doubled again last year to 
2.28 million. 

The index contract has been some- 
thing of a disappointment for the 
marketxnakers. There are problems 
for institutional managers who need 
separate permissions under their 
trust deeds for trading in an index, 
rather than in individual stocks 
where there is real stock to be 
delivered at the end of the paper 
contracts. 

Even so, the FT-SE contract, 
despite related competition from the 
rival market Liffe. accounts for about 
12 per cent of the contracts, with 
contracts totalling about £175 million 
open at the last count. By contrast, 
stock contracts open now total about 
£700 million. 

In the United States, however, 
contracts on the equivalent Standard 
& Poor's index dominate not merely 
option business but sometimes eq- 
uity turnover as a whole 


Gilts wait on GB 


Options open 


The current bout of takeover fever is 
wonderful business for the Stock 
Exchange's traded options market, 
never mind that it is speculative 
rather than answering those more 
worthy aims normally claimed for 
options and futures. 

Last month. Distillers joined the 
list of individual stocks traded, along 
with Boots and Gable & Wireless. 
The three together accounted for 
some 12 per cent of the recorded 
volume achieved, with rumours 
about Boots adding to the more 
obvious appeal of trading in Distill- 
ers. 

Yesterday, the exchange an- 
nounced that Blue Circle will join the 
ist from Thursday. It will be the 36th 
company option traded along with 
three gilt-edged stocks and the con- 
tract on the FT-SE 100 share index. 


The policy of increasing the nura- 
)f contn 


bers of contracts steadily month by 
month has undoubtedly helped build 
up the market, which has grown by 
leaps and bounds after a slow start in 
978-79. 

There were tax problems then 


Gilts dutifully went for their life 
yesterday after traders had spent a 
restful weekend brooding about the 
disinflationary environment prevail- 
ing in New York and other points 
east 

Longs opened about 5/8 point up, 
eased back a fraction on mid- 
morning profit-taking, and then 
pushed ahead again as fresh demand 
materialized to underpin the market; 
Treasury 2003/07 put on about a 
point in this way. Both mediums and 
shorts improved by some 3/8 point. 

A trifle gratuitously, the Govern- 
ment Broker announced that he had 
exhausted supplies of his most recent 
new issue. Treasury 10 per cent 1993. 

But the price at which he exhausted 
the tap was eye-catching — £20afe per 
cent, or a fully paid up price of £94*6. 
This is clearly comfortably above the 
allotment price, and serves to empha- 
size just what a bargain Government 
stocks now are. Perhaps the moral of 
the announcement is that more stock 
sales are on the way. 

Plenty of traders yesterday were 
prepared to bet on a fleeting appear- 
ance of the Government Broker 
today at 3.30. January borrowing 
figures for the public sector will be 
published at 2.30, and the median 
forecast is for a net repayment of debt 
to the tune of some £2.3 billion, 
whether or not the authorities are still 
sitting on a heap of unpresented 
cheques. 

The market ought to like that 
figure. It would add up to a 
cumulative borrowing figure for 
1985-86 of about £5‘A billion, putting 
the Chancellor well on target for his 
total projected figure for the year of 
£8 billion. Judging by the way that 
recent Government data has tended 
to outperform expectations, it must 
be a reasonable bet that the published 
figure will be better than market 
hopes. 

Judging by the performance yes- 
terday of the US long bond futures, 
the American market, closed for the 
President's Day, has retained its 
bullish edge. The combination of a 
strong market in New York and good 
UK economic data could add up to 
an irresistible background for extra 
funding moves. Last night the bal- 
ance of market views favoured an 
early 21st century stock. 


Subroto 


Shop sales fall after Christmas record 


BASE 

lending 

RATES 

ABN 1Zh%. 

Mam & Company — 

BCC1 .... - -“-32# 

Citibank Savings! — 

Consolidated Grds 12£» 

Continental Trust 

Co-operative Bank ~12k* 

C. Haare & Co 

LLoyds Bank 

Nat Westminster izwjp 
Royal Bank of Scottand-..J0*J 

jsg — I?™ 

Citibank N/L. 

| Mor tgage Bne Ifartc. 


By Derek Harris and Edward Townsend 


After the record Christmas 
Britain's shops saw trade fen 
away b st month as the Now 


by stock tasting and fee start 
pf the arctic weather. Bat 
dottung sales are flourishing, 
to aw figures re- 
leased today fry ^Confedera- 
tion of British Industry. 

Retail sales last mouth were 

down 1.1 per crat 


of aatoe volume readied a 
record 1173 (1988- 100X 
having the January index at 
116, according to th e Depar fe- 


Tbe value Of sales in Janu- 
ary was op 7 per cent on the 
same month bst year white m 

December the increase on 


annual comparison was 8 per 
cent. 

Sales in the three-month 
period November to January 
wens op 3.S per cent compared 
with the same period a year 
ago. 

The score of department 
stores of fee John Lewis 
Partnership reported doing 
weH during January but by the 
middle of fee month sales were 
easing, wife an increase m the 
week ended January 25 of only 
8.7 per cent which is an 
increase in real terms, allow- 
ing for inflation, of abort 5 per 
cent. 

In fee . last week of fee 
month bad weather struck and 
the sales increase was 53 per 
cent ia fee week to February l. 
Jn real terms .this put sates 


little above last year's levels. 

There have been reports to 
fee Retail Consortium, the 
trade body for most retailers, 
that stores have been hit by 
bad weather this month . 

The Jobs Lewis department 
stores, on the other band, 
showed a sharp improvement 
despite fee weather in fee first 
week of February wife improv- 
ing 149 per cent A factor 
appears to be that snow made 
travelling difficult only in 
some parts of fee country and 
then had only a United effect 
after fee first few days. 

Meanwhile, the British are 
buying more dofees than ever 
which is helping a 

high level of sales in fee 
street, according to fee C 
latest distributive trades sur- 


vey, covering 600 companies. 
Sales in shops and stores 
continue to flourish, according 
tofeeCBL 


Last month, clothing shops 
reported fee largest rise in 
sates of any sector and are also 
fee most optimistic about 
prospects for this month wife 

71 per cent predicting another 
increase in turnover. Only the 
confectionery, tobacco ami 
newsagents' sectors expect 
lower sales this month com- 
pared wife a year ago. 

Sales by wholesalers are 
said to be stowing down after 
fee December boom, but fee 
CBI stresses feat higher-than- 
expected sales over the New 
Year period have left 
with depleted stocks. . 


Changes 
at Great 
Portland 


By Judith Huntley 
Commercial Property 

Correspondent 

Mr Basil Samuel’s switch 
from chairman of Great Port- 
land Estates to its life presi- 
dent is seen as the forerunner 
of changes in the property 
company’s operation. 

The market is looking to Mr 
Richard Peskin, the new man- 
aging director and chairman, 
to set a foster pace. 

Great Portland is seen as a 
prime takeover candidate is 
the sector although Mr 
Samuel’s stake - 6J2 per cent 
of beneficial beddings and 3 
per cent of non-benefiriaJ 
shares — makes such a move 
unlikely. There are no indica- 
tions that the former chair- 
man intends to sell 

Great Portland has gradual- 
ly been changing hs portfolio 
to give a more attractive asset 


base. It has a high exposure to 


the City of London office 
market and recently let its 
development at 80 
Bishopsgate to a foreign bank 
at a healthy rent. 

It has been selling part of its 
Great Portland Street portfo- 
lio but if changes in planning 
law come through, it could 
benefit by transforming indus- 
trial property into offices. 



Highland Express pfc offer for 
subscription of up to 5.000.000 ordmafy 
shares of 10p each at SOp per share. 


BnMms pro p o s e d new transatlantic 
«riirx using a Boeing 747 atro-dfl 
serving New Ybrk and Tbranto from 
iuneStRj 


led by Randolph Fields who co- 
founded Virgin Adamic Airways. 
BES ux relief may be auaiUHe 
Travel pnwto,ses far certain founder 

investors 


Only tmnsaiiantie scheduled services 
bom London sSrmstedaupon and 
Bnrnmghiim InJwnatinnal 


Onfy Brush airline prov i ding dr a ft 
Scotnsh iransatiantic services. 


Proven expierienciHl lejkm of dstetorr. 


Tht Subscription lot will dose a 
anytime on or before 5 00 pm. Match 
3rd. 1986 

If you would Wee a copy of ihc 
Prospectus, on the tasK. erf which any 
application of chaw- is made, please 
return the coupon bdow or phone 
Parsons & Co. Ud 041 33JB79I 


• To. Susan Ambrose, PareonsS Co LtcL 100 Vfcsi Nile Street. Glasgow G12QU 

• Pleasewnd me a copy oflhe Holland Express pic Prospectus Q 

I Please send me deurb of semmars Q 


Marne- 


Address , 


j 1 understand tha any appbcatioft 
I for shares is solely on the hosts of 
| the prospectus. 


Highland Express ^ 


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FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 


WALL STREET 


New York (AP-DJVTrad- month fell a greater-tftan* 
era and analysts said a power- expected 0.7 per cent 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


COMMODITIES 




hi rally in the bond tnar fent 
helped the stock market over- 
come repeated small poU- 


The Dow Jones iodasttfal 
average dose was 1664.45 op 
1938- There were 1 158 issues 


backs. The Treasury** 

bellwether 9 1-4 per cent long declining and 

bond was op abort ] 1-2 points i«cooniwi 


late in the day 
Both markets received a 
boost at the opening of trad- 
ing. participants said, on news 
that producer prices last 


Volume totaled 155 590000 
shares compared with 136 490 
000 shares yesterday. 

The New YOrk Stock Ex- 
change composite index ms 
126.65, op 1.24. 


Fed Fed 
14 13 


FAb Fob 
14 13 


li llli 

WKPZ?- 1H 


[:~~t : ■ 


isiisiiMis 



[ MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 




HeanHj. 

Hercules 


Bee* Rates % 

Clearing Banks 12% 

France House 12 

Discount Market Loaim % 
OwmttrtHMft: 12 Lour 9 
Weehfeed:l2% 

Tressory BSIe (Dtscoum %) 

Buying Seftng 

2 mntn 12% Znstth iz** 

3 mntti i2*m 3 mntti 12'* 

Prim Bank 88a (Discount %) 

1 mntti l2”»-12*a 2 mntti 12*xr12% 

3 mntn J2'»-T2“tt 6 mntti 11»w.1l«J,a 
TTede BBs (Discount %) 

1 mntn lZ> r K 2 mntti 12»» 

3 mmh 12”» B mntti 12*n 

Overnight open 1» ciosa 11 
1 week 12%-1Z% 6 mntti 12*-12% 

1 mntti I2fc.12"n 9 mntti 12%-12% 
3mntti 12 ,J »-12% 12mttl 12 *m-12’m 

Local Authority Deposits «4 

2 days 12% 7 day* 12% 

1 mntti 12% 3 mntti 12% 

8 omen 12% 12nrtti 12% 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 60-7»i 
3 mcnttttR.&-T« 



UWDON COMMODITY 
EXCHANGE 
Rubber In p per kdo: 
Soyabean meal, coffee and 
cocoa in E per tame; 
Ott-M end ttogw mUSS 
per tonne. 

GWJeyMoa and Co report 


SUGAR 

(Raw) 

No 6 « 18.40 

Mar 

May 

Aug ..... 

Oct 

Dec 

March 

VW. 


.. 7KLA-I53 

1602-160 

167A46& 

. ... 171-17H2 

unquoted 

imquoted 

_T53a 


7 days 4»«4>,. 
3mpntt»4»w-4li« 
Franck Franc 
7 days 9%-9% 

3 months 14K-14H 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 1-V1% 
3months3<Si^au« 
Van 

7 days 6'w«"w 
3 months 6 s w-6 1 * 


cal Rn 
1 montti 60-7 7 * 

6 morrthsB.a-7 1 * 
cat 5-4 

i north 4»ie4 , w 
8inonttl84>i»4'iB 
caB 10-9 
1 month 12%-12 
B months 13 VI 3 s * 
cal 2K-1* 

1 month 3’^3% 
6mcnhs4 
cafl 6-5 
1 month 
SraontneB 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


1.2835-1.2855 

2.1400-2.1420 

2.45802.4800 

B. 701 5-0.7025 

13040-13960 

7.4300- 74400 

7.3300-7.3400 

&680M8900 

23466-2-3480 

13500-13520 

23H0-26530 

7. 1950-73050 

10130-1 82.00 

1596.0-1599.0 

40. OS-48. 70 

73030-7.8050 

153-154 

147.7-1400 

1850-1652 


Auatratia ~ 

Canada 

Sweden 

Norway 

Danmafc 

West Germany 

Switzerland 

Nether la nds 


Hong Kong 
Portugrt_^ 

Spill 

Austria 


COCOA 
Mart*! 

May 

Jrty 

Sap - - 

Dec 

March 

May 

Vbt 

COFFER 

March 

May 

July 

Sep 

Nov ... 

Jan 

March 

** 

SOYABEAN 

Feb — 

Aprtl 

June 

Aug — — - 

Oct 

Dec 

Fab 

VoL 

GASOfL 

March 

Apnl 

“■V- — 

Jura 

Jwv - 

Aug 

Sep — 


1832-37 

1634-33 

16EB45 

1S97-B6 

— 1729-25 

1757-55 

- 1800-65 

3692 

.... 2265-2255 

2320-2315 

. 2385-2380 
_.. 24502440 

— 2507-2505 
... 2550-2500 
.... 2620-2520 
6139 

— 137.9-29-0 

1354450 

... 1323-31.8 
... 1303-300 

— 131-0-300 
... 1330-320 
_ 136 032-5 

809 

17225-172-0 

15725-157,0 

1520-15125 

1495-146.75 

1493-147.00 

1510-15000 

155-0-15000 


Od ISO 0-1 5000 

Nov j 1 653-1 5030 

Voi 3103 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
Unofficial prices 
Offioaf Turnover fig»a« 

Pike tat per wafcic tome 
Silver is pence per bay ova 
RudMWbtt A Cpl Ltd. report 

COPPER WGHGBADE. 

v«h fflMMBT.M 

Three months .. 101400- 

101450 

VOi 0400 

Tone — — . Steadier 

3TAWWWD CATHODES 

Cosh 57500-97800 

Three Months 1005.00- 
100600 

VOI . NB 

Tone - Mfe 


Suspended 


TIN 

Cash 

Three Months . 

VCR 

Tone « — 


LEAD 

Cash . ; 25790-258.00 

Three Months. 2673038750 

Vet 1250 

Tone Steady 

25nc SXaqdsnl 

Cash .. 40730-41230 

Three Months — 

voi m 

Tone — — Me 

Zinc Wgh Grade . 

Cash . 42230-42300 

Three Mcrths. 431.5043230 

VW 4400 

Tone Steady 








Cash 4160041350 

Three Months ... 425.0425-50 

Voi I 5 

Tone 1 0»set 


LQMX2M GUAM FUTURES J 
• SpwAmdtt 

Wheat tericy 

worm Ctaw Cme 
w*=n US 40 11325 

H*v 1 T 67 S U «*5 

Jmy 113 15 

sS 9620 9*00 

■tew lffi-25 KM 25 

Jan 105 75 wage 

V3J1* ~ 

yv«oar ....... — — 329 

S LONOON MEATFUTUtes' 2 
EXCHANGE 
linPipSeasnct .- 

Mpner ^^Open .Oose 
March . 104 $ . 1035 * 

April t(B9 1034 

Hay HS .5 1020 

Jura <02$ HP 9 

July 101 5 102 1 

*og 1008 700 1 

V »53 

LONDON 

potato futures 

£ par Wine 

Month Open Oose 
ASM 8890 9030 

May 9750 9790 

Ssv 7630 7550 

Fes 8*10 8*.M> 

Aprt - 9550 

■ .V» 752 


SALnCFAeOHY INDEX 
GAU. FMgM Fntures Ltd 
•sport 510 per index point 

4prt86 8K^^0 C So 
Jmy86 777 0- 7700 mo 
acres 8790-876 a 57 a a 
Jen 87 — 87?5 ■ 

Apnf87 — 977 jj 0 

J&87 — 8350 

Oa 87 — 937g 

JV 188 — 9325 

Sack 7800 
Voi 125 lots 




INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


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752 Ol TO TUM HI 

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14k 1.1 .. 

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U USJ 
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7.1h 49 2fiL4 
115 47 au 

U 33 419 
u zaras 
mj tae &7 
ut u su 

22k 42 417 
22 1441 
U 29374 
42 DPI 
WJt 49305 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS! 


*5 250 4J14I 


4 u 

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*1 64 

40- 
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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


19 


_ C TEMPUS^) 

Dealers may take fright 


Singapore faces 
short, sharp 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Shares break record 


^ ^ Ultcup V* A VWJLU 

when bid fever passes economic shock despite profit- taking 

JS-SLTSW®*™* the comnanv snfimng (mm t^nn — j o- .u_ By Our Financial Staff — _ MT o 


The Hanson Trust-imperial 
Group-United Biscuits trian- 
gle pushed the market to yet 
higher peaks yesterday morn- 
ing. But by the afternoon 
much of the excitement had 
vanished. It seems that deal- 
ers are uncertain whether 
these record bids herald yet 
more of the same or whether 
Hanson has once again called 
1 the tune. 

Optimism is not unique to 
London. Last week both Wall 
Street and the Japanese equi- 
ty markets hit new highs and 
the smaller markets of Hong 
| Kong, West Germany and 
j Australia, though less buoy- 
ant, are still not far off their 
best 

Baldly, confidence in Ja- 
pan can be explained in terms 
of lower oil prices, while Wall 
Street is benefiting from in- 
ternational flows of capital, 
principally from Japan, and a 
series of good economic num- 
bers. The reasons for 
London's startling perfor- 
mance are, however, more 
difficult to find because oil is 
dearly a. mixed blessing, giv- 
en that the recent fall-out 
reduces the Chancellor’s 
room for manoeuvre. 

Mr Jack Defries of Greene 
& Co, the stockbroker, says 
the market is ripe for a 
downward correction. He 
points out that the main 
index is now 18.6 per cent 
above its 240-day moving 
average, which he describes 
as “a magnetic force that 
drags its meandering subject 
back to reality whenever it 
strays too far away". He says 
that the market has been 
rising on the back of a limited 
number of shares and that the 
surge of activity cannot be 
sustained for long. 

However, dealers are 
known for their pragmatic 
view of the market. While 
takeover fever remains in- 
tense, and there is foreign 
money to feed it, the market 
is likely to remain buoyant. 
But in the long ran there must 
be a limit to the number of 
bid targets that can be found. 
When the market starts to see 
the source of its strength 
drying up, dealers could take 
fright quite suddenly. 


Dalgety 


The stock market did not like 
DaJgety’s acquisition of Gill 
& Duffus when it was first 
announced last year. Events 
since have only gone to 
confirm those doubts, with : 


the company suffering from 
both the tin crisis and a fall in 
the price of cocoa. Although 
the company claim c any tin- 
related loss will not be mate- 
rial, the saga simply 
underimes Gill & Duffus *s 
vulnerability to the drama of 
commodity markets. 

Despite those problems 
GO] & Duffus contributed 
£7.9 million to DaJgety’s 
pretax profit of £35.4 milion 
in the six months to Decem- 
ber 31. As Gill & Duffus did 
not formally produce any 
interim figures, either for 
internal consumption or for 
publication, it is difficult to 
say bow that result compares 
with last year, although it 
probably indicates a si milar 
underlying rate of profit. 

On the face of h profits 
from the rest of Dalgety are 
down but deconsolidation of 
Dalgety Farmers of Australia, 
together with movements in 
exchange rates, more than 
covers the sho rtfall But 
among the spread of busi- 
nesses there was a huge 
variation. 

Most worrying was the 
performance at Martin- 
B rower, an American distrib- 
utor of McDonald's products, 
where profits stood still de- 
spite an increase in turnover. 
The disappointment is attrib- 
uted to the costs of introduc- 
ing new McDonaId T $ 
products, so profits growth 
should resume in the second 
half But there is now a risk 
that profits will be held back 
every time McDonald's 
changes its range. 

Pet food, however, did well 
and the conmany is dearly 
confident of future growth as 
the market is growing at 3 per 
cent a year. And after the 
acquisition of Romix Foods, 
Dalgety has become the larg- 
est cake mix producer in the 
country. 

These consumer related 
businesses do not disguise the 
presence of the more cyclical 
operations, such as egg pro- 
duction and fanarimn lum- 
ber. These and the 
commodity trading business- 
es are likely to prevent a 
further rerating of Dalgety’s 
shares. At 240p they are 
trading on less than 10 times 
earnings, but the yield of 7 
per cent could be attractive to 
income seekers. 


Mann and Company, the 
publicly qnoied estate agen- 
cy, which has found itself 
swept up in a wave of 
enthusiasm for the sector. 
Rising house prices and no 
shortage of hinds for would- 
be buyers have apparently 
alerted likely predators to the 
attractions of i nstalling “For 
Sale" signs throughout subur- 
bia. 

But yesterday Mann's 
shares raced a day of reckon- 
ing, felling I2p to 273p, 
although stiQ trading at a 
healthy premium to last 
year’s tender price of 145p. 

Ostensibly, the fell reflect- 
ed first-half figures which 
showed an advance from £L8 
million to £12 million in 


pretax profits. Sales were up 
from £5.6 million 


to £63 

million. The number of 
houses sold during the period 
was 6.100 compared with 
5,600. The value of pr op er ti es 
passing through its books was 
£290 million, up from £230 
million, while insurance ser- 
vices arranged by Mann to- 
talled £70 million, an 
increase of£25 million. There 
is an interim dividend of L6p 
for the six months ended 
November 30. 

The chairman, Mr Jeremy 
Agaoe, and his team now 


operate a chain of (63 outlets, 


to the recent acquisa- 
: of the 


Mann and O) 


Bid speculation has been 
kind to ; the share -price of 


tion of Abbotts, one 

largest agencies in East An- 
glia. They plan to open 
another nine or so branches 
this year. 

Looked at on strictly oper- 
ating grounds, Mann's per- 
formance has been steady if 
unspectacular and there are 
reasons for thinking that this 
is likely to be the pattern for 
some time to come. House 
prices for the coming year are 
set to go up between 7 and 12 
per cent, a few points below 
- last year’s rate, while the 
current spell of cold weather 
is likely to keep prospective 
buyers indoors. 

Until there are more posi- 
tive indications that Mann is 
likely to be on the receiving 
end of an approach the 
market will adopt a cooler 
attitude towards its trading 
prospects. With Abbotts set 
to contribute about £200,000 
this year Mann will probably 
finish making around £4.1 
million. The shares remain 
pitched at a flattering level 
although the strength of the 
paper will help Mann to 
achieve its ambitious plans. 


By Oar Financial Staff 

The economic programme 
aimed at shocking Singapore's 
economy out of its sudden 
trough of stagnation will be 
given a sharp boost of urgency 
today, when Brigadier-Gener- 
al lie Hsien Loong steps up 
from a junior government 
post to the Cabinet as acting 
minister for trade and indus- 
try. 

Brigadier-General Lee is the 
heir-apparent son of the Prime 
Minister, Mr Lee Kuan Yew, 
and has been chairman of the 
comm ittee charged with draw- 
ing up ibe reform package. 
The full report of the commit- 
tee is about to be submitted 
and publication in Singapore 
is expected in the next few 
days. 

Meanwhile, summaries of 
the report's recommendations 
have been dribbling out, and 
those, added to recent utter- 
ances of Brigadier-General 
Lee, suggest that the report 
may not be the fundamental 
long-term document some 
had been expecting. By con- 
trast. short-term measures are 
likely to be drastic. 

The immediate plan is to 
reduce employment costs by a 
combination of freezes — if 
not actual cuts — in nominal 
wages, combined with tax 
changes to reduce the cost of 
labour to employers. In partic- 
ular, employers’ contributions 
to the Central Provident Fund 
(equivalent to national insur- 
ance contributions in Britain) 
are likely to be cut heavily, 
though temporarily, from 25 
per cent to 10 per cent Taxes 
on company profits are likely 
to be cut less drastically, but 
with an additional allowance 
for capital investment in {riant 
and machinery. 

As expectedjthere is to be 
more emphasis on services 
and on locally grown business- 
es than before. But Brigadier- 
General Lee, speaking at a 
recent London conference on 



Lee: 

emphasis on old virtues 
Singapore Futures at the Com- 
monwealth Institute, insisted 
that the island's economy 
would continue io rely on 
investment from overseas 
multinationals. 

Indeed, the first priority — 
reducing wage costs — is 
aimed squarely at reversing 
the mistimed government-in- 
spired drive to price the island 
out of cheap-labour indus- 
tries. To cushion the impact 
on lake-home pay. the Gov- 
ernment wants the strain to be 
taken by reducing the propor- 
tion of pay going in compul- 
sory saving via the state 
central provident fond. The 
basic features of the fund, 
perhaps surprisingly, are likely 
to remain intact. 

Most of the emphasis, how- 
ever. is to be placed on 
recovering the old vimies. 
Brigadier-General Lee "If we 
are prepared to work 44 hours 
a week where others work only 
38; if we are willing to do third 
shift duties, and keep plants 
open 24 hours a day; if we will 
accept postings by multina- 
tional companies to strange 
overseas lands, to do hardship 
tours away from creature com- 
forts; then Singapore has 
something to offer an investor 
Life under Brigadier-Gen- 
eral LeeJt seems, is unlikely to 
be an easy ride. 


The stock market extended 
last week's record advance, 
despite profit-taking during 
the day. The FT 30-share 
index dosed at 1220.7, up 1.9 
and the FT-SE index of 100 
shares gained 4.4 to 1477.9 
Takeover activity contin- 
ued io dominate, with Imperi- 
al Group back in the limelight 
following the counter bid from 
United Biscuits and the in- 
creased offer from Hanson 
Trust 

Imperial finished 29p high- 
er at 320p. but United Biscuits 
slipped I Ip to 23 Ip. Hanson, 
where there is talk that the 
group may switch their atten- 
tion to Bo water if they fail to 
snare Imperial, lost 3p at 
145p. Bowater jumped J3p to 
308 p. 


Gilts had a good day on 
hopes of lower US interest 
rates, scoring gains of up to to. 
Last week's T reasury tap stock 
10 per cent 1993 was exha used 
at £20 tow 

The go-ahead for the 
Hawk/Tornado order gave a 
boost to British Aerospace up 
ISp at 468p, but among 
motors Jaguar provided a dun 
spot, shedding 15p at 7ip on 
profit-taking, in contrast BL 
reacted to truck sale talks 9p 
higher at 58p. 

Stores lost ground on the 
felling retail safes, but one to 
go against the trend was 
Austin Reed Up higher at 
146p on speculative demand. 

Dalgety expressed disap- 
pointment with interim fig- 
ures Sp lower at 238p, while 


profit-taking after the trading 
results lowered Mann and Co 
12p at 273p. 

Bid speculation prompted a 
sharp 53p jump in Miss 
World at 218p. Others wanted 
for this reason included Gra- 
nada 8p up at 236p. Wordplex 
15p higher at 91 p, and 
Maxiprint 7p better at 32p. 

WCI put on J2p at !18p, 
after the agreed Tilbury bid 
while Manchester Ship, excit- 
ed by the Hjgharas bid added 
ISp at 530p. 

A “take profits*' advice 
trimmed West Bromwich 
Spring I6pal 34p. but acquisi- 
tion news was good for Row- 
land Martin I6p higher at 
I50p. 


RECENT ISSUES 


Abbott M. 231 dn 2 
Ashley (LJ 199 dn 3 
Cable & Wire. 320 dn 3 
Control Tech 158 
u-Datron 1m S3 
Davidson Pearce 1 58 up 7 
u-Elec.Daia 71 dn 2 
Ferguson J 22 dn 4 
u-Hampden 60 up I 
Inoco 51 

u-Kiark-Tnk. 103 dn 5 
Lexicon Inc. 1 1 8 up 3 
Macro 4 new 126 up I 
Men vale 125 
Really Useful 368 up 5 
SPP 155 

Safeway UK £41 1-4 up 0 3-4 
u-Shandwick 210 up 2 


u-Sberwood 212 up 12 
u-Sigmex 101 
Shorrock 78 
Tiphook 174 
Underwoods 1 89 
Wellcome new J 67 up 7 


Rights Issues 
BTP 1 18 

Barham f/p 146 dn 3 
Cray Elec np 43 
Goal. Pel. f/p 46 dn 2 
Hogg Rob.f/p 318 dn 2 
Peel Hdgs.fp 485 dn 5 
Siormgard fp 18 
Speyhawk new 295 
Unigroup fp Il8dn 2 
Waishams n/p 34 


Option market: Moderate 
activity was reported for the 
new account which opened 
yesterday. 

Calls were produced in 
GUS, Amber Day, Apricot 
Computers, G F Lovell, STC, 
Five Oaks Investments, Bula 
Resources. Riley Leisure. Ab- 
erdeen Steak Houses, Cadbury 
Schweppes. Worthington AJ. 
Grovebell. Wclkom Gold 
Mining, Widney, Amstrad. 
Chloride, Cowan de Groot, 
Aden, Rainers, United Bis- 
cuits warrants, Sound Diffu- 
sion, Tranwood. Harris 
Queensway, Leisure Time, 
Baca. Thomas French. Com- 
bined Technologies, Carless 
Cape! and International Lei- 
sure. 


RHP plans £24m buyouts 


RHP Group has condition- 
ally agreed to buy two fire and 
explosion control companies 
from Allegheny International 

The £24.25 million price for 
Graviner and Deugra will be 
met with 18.49 million new 
RHP ordinary shares, all of 
which have been conditionally 
placed. About 53 pier cent of 


the new shares will be offered 
to RHP shareholders. 

In addition, RHP has 
agreed to pay the Allegheny 
subsidiary Wilkinson Finance 
£5.75 million of inter-group 
indebtedness outstanding 
from Graviner and Deugra. 

Graviner and Deugra de- 
sign. manufacture, supply and 


service a range of products for 
detection and suppression of 
fires and explosions 

Graviner's facilities are at 
Coin brook where the compa- 
ny owns a 10-acre site near 
Heathrow airport. 

Deugra operates from 
Ratigan, near Dusseldorf air- 
port, West Germany. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• JAMEX RESOURCES: The 
Can ad i an explorer has begun an. 
80-hole drilling programme. to 
test the 50 sq mile gold prospect 
it has farmed into at County 
Tyrone, Northern Ireland. The 
company raised CanS200,000 
by a private placement- daring 
December to finance the 
exploration. 

• GOODHEAD PRINT 
GROUP: Results for the half 
year to November 30: Interim 


• ST HELENA GOLD capital expenditure. Bank 
MlNESeAs a result bfa series of borrowings have been reduced 
abnormally severe seismic to £8.8m at January 31, but the 


events on February 10. several 
working places have been af- 
fected in the area served by no. 2 
shaft. No workers were injured 
but a 10 per cent loss in gold 
production is expected for this 
quarter. 

• GLASGOW STOCK- 
HOLDERS TRUST: Final 

ErSa emeses i 

a&lS new NOK ™- 

pn.fi. 524 (402). 4 ^Ka^INV^STMENT 

minorities ml tone), extraor- trust- Net asset value per 


board considers this is still too 
high. 

• CRANBROOE ELEC- 
TRONIC HOLDINGS: Divi- 
dend (LSp (nil) for year to 
September 30. With figures in 
£000. turnover was 6, IT 
(6,291), gross profit 2^221' 
(1,864) after cost of sates 3,94V 
(4,427), pretax profit 475 (298). 



dinary debit nti (21), earnings 
per share 4.3p (3.8p). Dividend 
payable April 8. 

• PROTIMETER: Results for 
the six months to December 31. 
Interim dividend 0.5p (nil). 
Figures in £000: Turnover 808 
<630},pretax profit 279 (206), tax 
109 (93). earnings per share 
2.25p (Up). Some profit in- 
crease was due to the wet 
harvest in the United Kingdom 
which resulted in increased sales 
of grain-moisture meters to 
farmers. 


• A NG LO-I NDONESI AN 
CORP: The directors of Planta- 
tion and General Investments 
say the offer document in 
connection with the proposed 
merger with Angjo-Indonesian 
is being posted to shareholders. 
It includes their estimate that 
the consolidated pretax profits 
of Plantation and General for 
the year to December 31 were 
about £1.7 million. They have 
declared a second interim divi- 
dend (in lieu ofa final dividend) 
in respect of the year to Decem- 
ber 31 of 3p net per ordinarc 
share, giving total net dividends 
for the year of 5_2p net per 
ordinary share An glo-I Indo- 
nesian directors estimate that 
consolidated pretax profits of 
Anglo- Indonesian for the year to 
December 31 were about £1.9 
million before provision for 
Brazilian monetaiy 
capital adjustment of £0J5 
lion. 


capital share at January 31 was 
205.6p. 

• ARCHIMEDES INVEST- 
MENT TRUST: Unaudited net 
asset value at January 31 was 
294.37 per capita] share 

• EQUITY CONSORT 
INVESTMENT TRUST: 
Unaudited net asset values per 
share- at January 31 were 422p 
per £1 ordinary share and 644p 
per SOp deferred share 

• HEALTH CARE SER- 
VICES: Company has entered 
into a conditional agreement to 
provide advisory and manage- 
ment services to Bright Walton 
Homes, which will own and 
operate between three and ten 
residential and nursing homes, 
concentrating initially on the 
south and south-east 

• RILEY LEISURE: Company 
has conditionally agreed to dis- 
pose of the issued share capita] 
of Power Soft International and 
Athletic Equipment Manufac- 
turing. The consideration wiD be 
£4nuBion in cash, payable on 
completion by Compaastyle, 
the purchaser, a subsidiary of 
Jonas Oglaend. a .company 
incorporated m Norway. The 
disposal “ is subject to 
shareholders' approval. Riley 
and its subsidiaries had high 
bank borrowings at the end of 
1984 (£12.8m) and .reduction 

-was one of the- board's prime 
objectives. The positive trading 
cash flow- in 1985 has been 
ilemented by £950,000 from 
of surplus fixed assets less 


ERN: Interim 0-5p (0.5p). With 
figures in £000, turnover was 79 
(1 65) for the half year to October 
31. Pretax profit was 39 (39). 
Earnings per share l.OIp (Ip). 

• GREENBANK GROUP: The 
company has bought the equip- 
ment, stock and technology of 


decade 


dark Inudustries from Peeler 

> 0,000 


Haztersley for about £250, 
cash provided from the 
company's own resources. 
Remaining net assets of Clark 
are being retained by Pegler. 
dark’s main products are small 
to medium-sized desalination 
plants of reverse osmosis and 
heat using types. 

• SECOND ALLIANCE 
TRUST: Interim dividend 6p 
(5p). With figures in £000. gross 
income before interest and ex- 
penses was 2,994 (2.672) for the 
half year to January 31. Rev- 
enue before tax was 2,856 
(2.498). tax 1,002 (947), net 


asset vahre 782.4p (677_0p) and 
9.59p(8.0 


THE RIGHT HOME 
FOR YOUR PROPERTY 


To advertise your properly for sale iil The Times 
Classified. fill m your ath*?n Lsemeni in ihcspace tetow. ' 

iU»n«erniessajsscanbe!dUcliedsfpuraielyl. 

Raws arc: S4.IX) per line fupprmimaldy {cun' words, 
minimum ihnw lines) tlUXl per ic.c. fallcfisplay Plus. 

ChvaiKS lo be made payable to Times Newspanets Ltd. 
Should you wish to pay hy Accessor Burdyjiraid. please 
quote your number hefow. 


Send toSWrtey MamoKs, Group CWB cti Advertise 

£»«srjsKsn=s 

E19DD. 


Advertisement:. 


Name: — 
Address. 


Daytime Telephone: 
I Access,) 


.iBarclaycurdi 


earnings per share 9.59p (8.0 lp). 
Earnings per ordinary stock 
.units for the year to July 31, 
1986 are expected to exceed 
19-5p (I7_|4p). 

• UNITED - COMPUTER 
AND TECHNOLOGY: The 
directors of Harvard announce 
an increase in the cash alter- 
native offer to acquire tire 
ordinary sharesJt will be in- 
creased to It Op cash for each 
United share, in all other re- 
spects the. offers to acquire the 
United shares and the outstand- 
ing warrants are unchanged, 
except that the closing date for 
both the offers will be extended 
to the 14th day after posting of j 
tire document containing the 
increased offer. Harvard already 

owns 747,500 United shares. 

• MCCORQUODALE: The 
company has acquired the free- 
hold property, numfaenmug 
plant, inventories and trade of 
H W Chapman, a specialist 
packaging business, for a cash 
consideration of £6.5million. In 
the year to December 31 Chap- 
man recorded a trading profit 
before interest and tax of about 
£1.6 million on sales of £14 
million. 


MAJOR SHARE 
CHANGES 


Maxiprint 34 + 9 
Miss World 220 + 55 
PWgkalen 200 + 50 
Aidcom Ini 57+13 
H and J Quick 71 + 13 
TanjongTin 150 + 25 
Wordplex 91 + 15 
Amber Day 26.75 + 4 
BL 58 + 9 
Falls 

Bohbn Textile 17-2 
CPS Computer 30 -3 
Lyle Shipping 1 1 - 1 
Sunleigh Electrical 20.- 1.50 


The last ten years has been the most 
successful in our history. 

With growth both rapid and consistent 

(Conades for instance, that dividends 
have grown by over 20% p.a. compound) 

And that in an industry thatfc as tough 
and competitive as any in Britain. 

Today we’re one of the leading 
companies in the fest-growing financial 
services secton 

We’ve a dear business strategy based 
on innovation and service that will guide 
our success through the eighties and 
nineties. 

And better products, organisation and 
marketing skills than ever before. 

Our future looks bright Wed like you 
tobepartofit 



Sun Life: our record ten years 


GnoupJimdsupJim£595m3Imto 
£3267 million 


£415 mitim 

Expansion in pensions, unit-linked, unit trust and 
investment mana^maitsavuxs 

Nolmthe'Mana^mentToday\CityGwo;th 
League l 985* 

(Based on latest audited results) 


t> - 
td ir. 
b’9 tc 
i riu 
s col- 
icirih- 
aL 

ted a 
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epc.“ 
70. A 
not :c 
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mili- 

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other 

track 

«iou. 

C-s- 

ciries 

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other 

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route 


M.IJ, 

said 
tuck 
* had 


said 

jpar- 


* August, 1985. 


For more information on one ofBritain's 
most successful Kfe and pensions offices, contact: 
Sun Life Assurance Society pic, 
on Factline, 01-606 7788 or write io 
107, Cheapside. London EC2V 6DU. 


A major force in British Life for 175 years JM 


»WOCI«l|P% C>l 








I ^Sig-gr .C3S?^E??c , 'S=?E's , sgi!§iSB-B'r ■rbs-b^.s- ss'es-aae-asnus- 


1 xi>irUSv>L ru >i7 Ii IVl/ju. «>i 


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* _ i u>V • 


COMMODITIES REVIEW 


ITC delays put a 
spanner in the 
Newco works 


It is now so long since the 
dynamic duo of Mr Ralph 
Kestenbaum, managing di- 
rector of Gerald Metals, and 
Mr Peter Graham, senior 
deputy chairman of Standard 
Chartered Bank, tumbled 
down the chimney with their 
Christinas present of a solu- 
tion to the tut crisis that their 
offering might betxer be called 
“Oldco". 

Indeed, if the vpace of 
events does not pick up 
perceptibly. Newco might fall 
apart as bankers and brokers, 
lose patience with the bureau- 
cratic ways of the Interna- 
tional Tin Council. 

The problem is simply that 
with every week that this 
extraordinary affair drags on, 
the economics of Newco look 
more fragile. The disturbing 
question that arises now is: 
can Newco perform its allot- 
ted task of taking on and 
disposing of the ITCs huge 
obligations in an orderly 
fashion? 

Let us start at tire begin- 
ning. The original proposal, 
longbcards may recall, was 
for Newco to be capitalized, 
with £270 million in equity 
and £50 million of loan 
capital. The ITC was to put 
up £200 million and the 
banks and London Metal 
Exchange brokers £70 million 
of the equity, with British 
taxpayers stumping up the 
loan capital. 

That was the idea. The 
execution (not a reference to 
bankers' and brokers* views 
on the ITC) has been rather 
different. By delaying and 
cheese-paring, the ITC has 
cut its stake to £100 million, 
with a chance of raising it to 
£120 million. With the help 
of contributions from other 
metal dealers, the banks and' 
London Metal Exchange bro- 
kers will scrape together £100 
million. Also, the Govern- 
ment's loan has been translat- 
ed into cash up front. 

This means that Newco's 
I capital structure has been 
weakened on two important 
fronts: it is short of working 
capital and there is no guar- 
antee from ITC members to 
cover any cash outgoings 
caused by tin prices being 
lower than expected or by 
more time than expected 
being needed to eliminate 
Newco's stocks and hence the 
company. 

Even as conceived. Newco 


would have “flown" — Mr 
Kcstenbnum's favourite met- 
aphor — on a wing and a 
prayer. At last week's hearing 
before the Select Committee 
on Trade and Industry, Mr 
Kestenbaum said he expected 
tin to reopen at £7,500 a 
tonne because of back- 
wardation in the market, and 
then average £6,000 over the 
three years of Newco’s life. 

Nobody seems sure how 
these prices were calculated — 
one banker closely involved 
in the crisis said that it was 
the fust time he had heard 
them. But it is obvious that 
Newco could look very un- 
steady if tin prices average 
less than has been assumed. It 
is surprising but true that the 
plan includes no specific 
exchange rate, interest rate or, 
even detailed cash flow esti- 
mates. 

There is a good reason for 
this. Any such assumptions' 
would immediately become 
targets for speculators. Some 
people involved with Newco 
already fear that Mr 
Kestenbaum ’s generous tin 
price estimates will encour- 
age the ITC to argue that it is 
being asked for too much. 

But one thing is certain: 
without lower tin production 
and exports, Newco will be 
with us for much longer than 
three years. If it takes on 
about 85,000 tonnes of ITC 
obligations, there might be 

50.000 tonnes of physical 
metal to place in the market. 
With the present export con- 
trols of about 30,000 tonnes, 
the market is barely in bal- 
ance when consumption is 

165.000 tonnes. 

So it is hardly surprising 
that one analyst advised 
Newco to plan disposals over 
10 years. Unloading 1S.000 
tonnes of tin a year on to the 
market in its' likely state 
seems bound to depress the 
price below the vague as- 
sumptions on which Newco 
is constructed. 

The longer the crisis lasts, 
the weaker the tin price will 
be. Even today it is barely 
above £5.000 a tonne, a for 
cry from the £8.140 at which 
LME dealings were suspend- 
ed. If the ITC does not 
improve its offer quickly, 
Newco could become 
“Pastco". and quite a few 
other companies could join 

lL Michael Prest 



More breweries face 
threat of closure 


Law Report February 18 1986 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 

Overcapacity among “This problem might only be * 
Britain's brewers could mean solved if one or two of the c 
further closures on top of the major brewers were to dose fc 


further closures on top of the 
14 breweries which have been 
shut down since 1 980. 


barrels by the end of this 
decade. But since 1980 14 1 
brewery locations have been ! 


who prefer 
their own bid 


down all their breweries or if dosed down and there could 
consumption were to rise by be more to come as sales 


Malic Cliffe: chief 
economist at ANZ 


New chief 
for bank 
subsidiary 


^The "brewing hgusjy * 
dustry's capacity is unused contested Buckmaster 
a time when beer produc- ant * Moore estimates on ex- 
>n is languishing with not ? ss ^C^dty. partly because 

uch prospector improve- b ; ew “? u tecl ? nl< E* ha I* 
ent in theimmediate fbture. changed but also because the 

industry always, needs some 
Total brewing capacity in spare capacity to meet peak 


that more than a quarter of the 
industry's capacity is unused 
at a time when hirer produc- 
tion is languishing with not 
much prospect of improve- 
ment in the immediate future. 


Bank of America: Mr Ger- 
ald Doherty has been made 
managing director of the Lon- 
don-based merchant banking 
subsidiary. Bank of America 
Internationa! Limited (BAIL). 

John Lewis Partnership: Mr 
David Young is to become the 
partnership’s deputy finance 
director on June 30. 

ANZ Merchant Bank: Mr 
Mark Cliffe has been named 
chief economist 
Crow Companies: Mr Keith. 
Gee becomes managing direc- 
tor. 

Pegler Sunvic: Mr Alan 
Newton is made director and 
general manager. 

Thew Engineering Group: 
Mr Hugh Cameron becomes 
group financial director. 

Felton Fluid Handling: Mr 
John Boyd joins the board. 

ARC: Mt Humphrey Wood 
has been named executive 
chairman with Mr C. Spence 
as chief executive and deputy 
chairman. Mr B. W. Deller, 
Mr C. Glynn. Mr E. H. Hope, 
Mr G. Mortimer, Mr K. 
Orrell-Jones, Mr D. S. Single- 
ton and Mr P. T. Terry have 
become executive 

directors.The non-executive 
directors are Mr B. L J. 
Agnew, Mr R. G. Bartlett, Mr 
S. Eilon, Mr P. D. Fells, Mr 
G. R. J. Guise. Mr A. P. 
Hichens and Mr H. P. Parry. 

Heublein Inc Mr Jeremy 
Collis has become vice-presi- 
dent for the Europe. Middle 
East and Africa region. 

H E Moss: Mr Robert Ross 
will become managing direc- 
tor from April 1. 

Continental Trust: Mr Mi- 
chael Hobson has been ap- 
pointed managing director 
and Mr PfaQip Rem an assis- 
tant director. 

Heron Power. Mr Colin 
Phttison has been made mar- 
keting services manager. 


Britain exceeds 50 million 
bulk barrels, according to 
Buckmaster and Moore, one 
of the leading drinks trade 
analysts. But last year, the 
Brewers Society says, beer 
production was 36.45 million 
bulk barrels, a decrease of 0.7 
per cent on 1984. 


Future takeovers and merg- 
ers are unlikely to do much to 
reduce the excess capacity, the 
analysts contend. They add: 


summer demand. 

But only the degree of 
excess is in dispute because 
the new generation of brewer- 
ies was planned Largely in foe 
yeare before 1979 when beer 
sales consistently showed a 2 
per cent annual rise. 

Had that pattern of growth 


patients change. . 

The only countervailing 
trend has been the growth in 
mini-breweries, usually at- 
tached to a single pub. In 
1984, there were 128 farrar- 
scale breweries but since 1971 
about 90 small brewers have 
appeared on the scene. 

It is the ales, especially > 
mild, which have been hit 
most as beer sales have drifted i 
into foe doldrums since 1979. 

Premium bitters have hdd j 
their own and lager sales , 
continue to grow, . and now 
account for 42 per cent of the 
market in Britain. Its. market 


Inre a Company «.«*»* 

-amsMSs 




rwsseo a monoa io auuc vui *» r 

petition in which foe petitioner rase for rebef 

that foe directors tad 


Sliced (bat (be direeto* had 

acteoin a manner prejudicial to imdeTsjcgon^offoeCompa- 

their interests by favouring a °^ Act ,,^^1 tta . 

tower bid for (be company’s Mr - ***** contended tint 


tower DIO lor me " -- - -r 

shares from a company pro- i^nS^Svebeeii 

moted by the directors m-pref- 


moral BY UK gitAWii ■■ nMilinnin' 

ereucc to a higher bid from a 

trade competitor. SfflSSSSSf 'JSrtS 


iSlr RobmPotU and Mr John. HjSESjjfi- 1 * ** 
Cone for foe directors Mr ■ - 


Ralph Instone for the petition- 
ers. 

MR JUSTICE HOFFMANN 


His Lordship found that to.be 
a . distinction without a dif- 
ference: one of tire interests of a 
shareholder was in being able to 


said foal foe case concerned foe sell his sbares at foe best pnee. 


duties of the directors of a Mr Potts at&o contended tint 


not been upset by foe effects of share appears to be higher in 
recession, the industry would foe South-east and inScotland 


private company to its general uoiesa the petitioners could 
body of shareholders w hen th ere shoe/ some infringement of 
were two competing offers for rightsofoer than those conferred 


probably have needed a capac- where it has been a traditional 
ity of around 50 million bulk drink for much longer. 


(heir shares: one from a com- by section 459 itself, they could 
pany promoted by foe directors not cfafrri to have been ■ prej- 


Micro memory 
prices plunge 


By Geof Wheelwright 

The days of foe empty can make proper use of it— bat 
personal computer are tram- there seems to be do danger of 


‘Prospects 
good’ for 
N Sea oil 


themselves and foe other, at a 
substantially higher figure, ft om 
a trade competitor. 

The petitioners, holding 29 
per cent of foe issued share 
capital alleged unfairly prej u- 


udiced. 

His Lordship thought that too 
restrictive an interpretation of 
foe section. The concept of 

onfeirness cut across foie distinc- 
tion between acts which did or 


dicial conduct by foe directors did not infringe eights attaching 


bered. In recent months foe rtmt happening. In (act, quite a 
cost of adding to the innards of number of pieces of computer 

■ ” 1 ■ - ■. lx. „>A» W 


microcomputers has plummet- software have been “waiting” 
ed, making it ranch easier for for this drop in prices. Pack- 


agers to make more of their ages sach as Lotas 
business systems. “Symphony” and Ashton- 

There are acres of space Tate's “Framework”, both of 
inside foe nation's business which include a word-proces- 


busiuess systems. 


“Symphony’' 


computers — just waiting to be sor, a spreadsheet electronic 
occupied by some tide plug-in ledger system and a database 


“goodie” that will make foe 
machine easier, fester or more 
sensible to use. The most basic 
of these is the RAM (random 
access memory) card — a 
derice which pings into slots 
inside a computer and vastly 


computer filing system, have 
had firafted success because 
they both require extra com- 
puter memory cards to be 
purchased before they can be 
used extensively. 

The software flavour-of-the- 


increases the amount of infor- month, graptnes-based bnsi- 


mation it can handle wifooet 
haring to retrieve more infor- 
mation from foe computer disc 
drive. 

The dramatic drop in prices 
of RAM cards — the best of 
which cost almost £1,000 a 
year ago and which can now be 
found for between £200 and 
£500 — is taroely attributable 
to the worldwide drop is 
demand for the computer 
RAM microchips which make 
op the cards. The development 
of chips which are more 
powerful but cost little more to 
produce has also led to foe 
price dedine. 

Of course, extra RAM win 
do do good unless computers 


ness software which can be 
controlled using pictures in- 
stead of word commands, is 
very hungry °° computer 
memory. Microsoft’s windows 
and Digital Research's “Gem” 
for foe IBM PC both require 
at least 640K (storage for 
about 640,000 characters) of 
RAM to be used effectively. 

Tbe fact that RAM for 
computers such as the IBM 
PC is measured in the thou- 
sands, rather than the hun- 
dreds, means that very large 
tasks — which previously 
would have been very time- 
consuming or plain impossible 
on a micro — can now be done 
with tittle difficslty. 


By David Young 
Energy Correspondent 

World oil price uncertainty 
will have only a marginal 
effect on the pace of future 
North Sea oil developmen ts , 
according to Gaffney Cline, 
the international energy advis- 
er. 

. Total ofl drilling, explore- : 
don. appraisal and develop- 
ment m the North Sea readied 
a record levd last year, al- 
though exploration drilling 
was marginally down on the 
previous year. 

Mr Geoffrey Cull, Gaffney 
Cline’s managing director for 
European operations, said: 
“The current oil {nice instabil- 


in favouring their own bid. 

Tbe directors wished to have 
foe petition struck out as 
disclosing no reasonable cause 
of action or as being frivolous, 
vexatious or an abuse of pro- 
cess. 

The offer front foe company 
i promoted by foe directors, 
which was subject to foe 
satisfaction of various . coo- 
I di lions, was for £L40 a share: 
foe offer from a publicly quoted 


to share*. 

His Lordship referred lain re 
Carrington India pic (on- 
reported. February 3. 1983) and 
to In re Bird Precision Bellow 


Lrrffl»ft*)2WUUSSk 
“Unfairness” was a familiar 


concept often employed in or- 
dinary speec h, often by way of 
contrast to infringement of a 
legal right. 

It was at least arguable that 
the chairman’s fetter bad de- 


company canying.on » si votes -pnved foe petitioners of foe 
business, was for £3 a Share; £2 rfaare of sefllnji titer shares to a 
in cash and £1 in short-dated IO higher btdderTor reduced Uter 


in cash and D in short-dated K> 
per cent loan notes. That offer 
could be declared unconditional 
by foe offeror on acceptance in 
respect of more than 50 percent 
of foe shares by December 12, 
1985. 

Both offers were rece iv ed 
before foe holding of an extraor- 
dinary general meeting, on 
November 18. 198S. 

Tbe petition alleged that 
when foe meeti ng was hdd foe 


ity has created uncertainty | chairman, . realising from foe 
and pessimism in some cir- 1 proxies received that special 


des. but the long lead time resolutions would be needed for 
from discovery to develop- foe success of foe offer from foe 
ment offshore — sometimes as directors’ company, secured foe 
much as 10 years— acts to our passing of a proposal for an 
advantage. adjoynnatM. ttq t amn on ly a 

-WeSieveamoUprico 

wtU recover in the short to ing more than 25 per cent of foe 


medium term once Opec has (.shares. The meeting was not 
resolved its problems. Conse-| reconvened, ami foe offer 


quently, developments I lapsed. . 

planned now will eventually J Ott the same date as the 


come on stream after the oil 
price recovery. 

“While some delay may be 
expected in planning some 


meeting, the chairman sent a 
circular letter to sharefaoidexs, 
expressing foe view that the 
rival offer could not succeed 
because foe holders of 232,939 


future marginal prospects, I (shares had given irrevocable 
see no reason why discoveries I undertakings which would pre- 



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of larger accumulations 
should not be planned and 
implemented.’* 

, _ Mr Cull added: “Of peat 
significance is the steadily 
increasing development in- 
dex, which shows that more 
reserves are being developed 
to replace those already pro- 
duced. 

“This trend is continuing 
and the recent announcement 
of the approval for the devel- 
opment of tbe Ivanhoe and 
Rob Roy Adds is an example 
of this.” 

The pace of oil develop- 
ment in Norway is also likely 
to continue despite oil price 
problems. 


dude their accepting it. and that 
the articles of association could 
not be amended so as to admit 
the offeror to membership. 

Mr Instone contended that 
that, circular was misleading, 
and foal the undertakings re- 
ferred to would lapse with the 
offer from foe directors’ cont- 
pany, -and foal foe power to 
admit an outrider to member- 
ship under . article 8. was a 
fiduciary power which the board 


chance of so doing. 

Whether or not theboard ofa 
company freed with competing 
bids m trader a duty to advise 
shareholders to accept the 
higher offer, fairness required, if 
the board chose to give advice, 
that rl should be tactually ac- 
curate and given with a view to 
enabling tbe shareholders, who 
ex hyptxhesi were being advised 
to sdL to sell at foe best price. 

There was force in Mr 
InstooeV critic is m tint the 
board could not have advised 
shareholders to accept- forir 
company's offer in such positive 
terms if they had placed their 
fiduciary duty to shareholders 
before their own interest 

Tbe feet that directors ac- 
cepted personal responsibility 
for statements, was not inconsis- 
tent with their being made on 
behalf of foe company, and thus 
in the conduct of its affaire. 

His Lordship found it difficult 
io accept that foe board must 
inevitably be under a positive 
duty to recommend and take all 
steps in their power to facilitate 
whichever was the higher offer, 
particularly if they proposed to 
exercise their undoubted right to 
accept foe tower offer io respect 
of their own shares. ‘ 

The mere omission to recom- 
mend tbe higher offer bad not 
deprived shareholders of foe 
opportunity to accept iL 

Mr Potts contended that since 
foe only matters alleged to 
constitute unfairness actually 
alleged in the petition were foe 
friinrc to recommend the higher 
bid. and the failure to inform 


had to nfertnse in foe interests of shareholders that foe offeror 


| sta * ehoWe ? » a «* would be admitted to member- 


SS^JS^^ a Li^ vGradr ship, the petition must sand or 


Eurobond 
dealers 
fear Bill 


([I983J BCLC244, 265). 

- In short, it was said that the 
chairman's letter was unfair to 
foe petitioners, who wished foe 
rival offerto succeed. 

It was also contended that 
i since foe rival offer was more 
than twice tbe value of foe 
directors’ offer, it was the 
board’s duty to recommend 
acceptance and to inform 
shareholders that the articles 
would be amended so as to 
admit foe offeror. In foiling to 


foil by them. , 

. But foe primary function of 
foe petition was to allege the 
feels upon which the dam to 
the exercise of the court’s juris- 
diction was based: provided that 
facts were piarded which could 
arguably found sudt a dafm it 
was not fatal that foe petition 
did not specifically ; -identify 
them as such. Here an arguable 
case existed 

Solicitors: Dtbb LuptOn & Co, 
Leeds; .Broombeads, Sheffield. 


By Clare Dobie 


Unfair dismissal claim 


Concern is growing that the 
Eurobond market will be driv- 
en out of London Ity the 
Financial Services Bill. 

Dealers are worried that the 
detailed regulatory clauses of 
the Bill are unsuited to the 
fast-moving and international 
nature of the bond market. 

“There is a real fear that the 
new issue market will go to 
Luxemburg”, said Mr Ian 


over retiring age 


Swaise v Health and -Safety 
Executive 

Before Mr Justice PoppleweU,- 
Mr W Sirs and Miss A P Vale 1 : 
(Judgment given February J 3] 

A civil servant aged 63 at foe 
date of his dismissal was held to 
be entitled to bring a oorapfehit 
of unfair dismissal on the 
ground that, a purported reduc- 
tion in tbe normal retiring age 


Steers, chairman of the pro- 1 from 65 to a band ofbetween 62 
posed International Securities I was insufficiently defi- 


Reguialory Organization, tbe 
body set up to regulate the 
Eurobond market. 

The problem is that most 


arte- to constitute- a normal 
retiring age. so foal the statutory 
alternative of 65 applied. 

Hie Employment Appeal Tri- 
bunal allowed an appeal by Mr.' 


new issues on the Eurobond I Jade Svfeine from a decision ofa 
market are sold via telexes but f Leeds industrial tribunal in 


the Bill would require these to 1 April _ J 984 that they had .no 


contractual retiring age. but that 
it might be displaced by- ev- 
idence that it was regularly 
departed from in practice. 

Lord' Fraser of TuUybelton 
said, at p 662: “—the evidence 
may show that foe contractual 
retirement age has been . super- 
seded by some definite higher 
age, and if so. that win nave 
become foe normal retiring age. 
Or the evidence may. show 
merely that foe contractual retir- 
ingnge has been abandoned and 
that employees retire af a variety 
of higher ages, in that case there 
' will be no normal retiring age 
and foe statutory alternative of 
65 . . . will apply” 

In the present case tbe govern- 
ment policy about retirement 


be vetted at length The delay I jurisdiction io hear his daini of changed and there was a move 
m each is«! lf .cn..iH tk« I unfair dismissal against - his to reduce foe normal retiring age 


don is competing for buoness 


with Continental centres. 

The Confederation of Brit- 


naa attained foe normal retiring 
age within foe meaning of 
section 64(l)(b) of foe'Employf 


ish Industry, which is looking K ment Protection (Consolida- 
at several aspects of the Bill is J ton* Act 1 978. 


particularly anxious about its f c Section 64. provides 


effects on foe Eurobond mar- 1 sec- 


than 65: ■ 

Mr Bendy argued that even if 
there had been a change of 
policy so that foe understanding 
that foe normal retiring age 
would be 65 bad been varied, it 
was necessary, hi foe fight of 
Lord Fraser’s speech, that it bad 
to be. superseded by a definite 

figure. 

; . In the present case. Mr Hetidy 
contended, the industrial m- 


; •' *■ f< 


non 54 [the right not to be to be. superseded by a definite 
Mr unfairly dismissed] does not figure. 

- _ tannery, me head apply to foe dismissal of an '. In the present case. MrHendy 
company law at tbe CB1, employee from any employ- contended, the industrial tt> 
satd: Any extra cost or delay mem if the employee ... (b) on buna) had found that 62 to 63 
automatically feeds- through in <w -before foe effective date of ' years, a band of normal retiring 
higher costs for companies termination attained foe ago - age which covered a span of a 
wishing to raise money on the wh ! cl1 ' m die undertaking m .year was the appropriate figure. 
Eurobond marker Which he was employed, was foe- He contended that that was not 

It is understood that the PO fT ? al T t F T W ? for .. an at^finitefi^ireand iffoerew® 


i : -. ri v 
* t ; 


^ ? M i -- 


nlZr^r “*.1 employee holdmg the position 
Department ^ of Trade and (which he held,. or if a man. 


industry is already looking at | attained the ^e of 65 . - 

the problem and considering^ Mr jobn_ Hendy for Mr 


relaxing the requirements. 


Mr jonn Hendy tor Mr 
Swaine: Mr David Blunt for foe 
employers. 


Harvard Securities 

pT p LntocdDnlai 

1 is Secant ■« 


Wellcome Pic 


Buy or Sell Shares 
Ftee of coomixssioa 


lodes! ring 

01-9284003/9282237 


MR JUSTICE POPPLE- 
WELL said that foe industrial 
tribunal found that the 
employee's contractual retire- 
ment date was 60 and foe 


He contended that that was not 
a definite figure and if there was 
do definite figure there could be 
no normal retiring age and the 
statutory alternative of .65 ap- 
plied. 

in the absence of other 
authority the appeal .tribunal 
would be guided -by foe speech 
of Lord Fraser in WaUe’s case. 
On ; foe. industrial tribunal's 
findings there was no definite 
age and a band of 62 to 63 
encompassed a variety of dif- 


s v >f 


i N JV 

* • i 


normal retiring age was 65 at the - -ferent figures. As it was innws- 
ume he entered . the Alkali si We to point to a figure and 


Inspectorate in March 1958. 

It was argued that whereas the 

contractual age of 60 did- not 
alter, the normal retiring age 
did. In Waite v Government 
Communications Headquarters 


({1983J ICR 653). foe House of- be considered. 


specify what. was the normal 
retiring age the statutory alter- . 
nativeof 65 applied. . 

The appeal would be allowed 
and the case remitted for 1 foe. 
question of -unfair dismissal to 




Lords held that the normal 
retiring age was primq jbcie/iiiz 


Sofieiiozx -pasters:'. Treasury 
' Solicitor- . ‘ ' 






21 


7 




* *? 0 Pref e ; 

ieir nuJ? 


.t-u ■e*s\u. . _ 


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of five continents. 


for themselves. 

Primitive though they are, most of the 


their last meal came from. 

Which is something that can’t be said of 
the people of the more advanced countries of 
the world. 

In the States they think Baskin-Robbins, 
one of the world’s biggest ice-cream chains, is 
as American as Apple Pie. Which is hardly 
surprising as it’s run entirely by Americans. 

But it’s owned by Allied-Lyons. A British 
company. 

Clogs, windmills, tulips, advocaat, what 
could be more Dutch? 


it’s part of Allied-Lyons. 

All over the world people have got into 


>' v 
kv vv. 




«i\v‘ 







after a meal. Hardly the thing to do, eh what? there in Antarctica. 


But we don’t mind. The chances are they’re 
drinking Harveys, the world’s biggest selling 
sherry once again from Allied-Lyons. 

It’s much the same with port. 

In over 50 countries they don’t know, or 
care, which way to pass the port. But they do 
know which port to pass. It’s Cockbums. 

We could go on. 

Allied-Lyons have over 200 brands, many 
of which are household names in countries the 
world over. But we’re not just sitting back count- 
ing the profits, considerable though they are. 

This financial year alone, we plan to invest 
a massive £190 million in the business and in 
1985 we launched well over 100 new products 
worldwide. 

Last year we made record pre-tax profits 
of £219 million and achieved £945 million worth 
of business overseas, without any help from our 
flippered friends down o 1 T 
there in Antarctica. AUied-LvatlS 

^GROWING 


GOING ON 




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FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 


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STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


From vour portfolio card check vow- 
eight share price movements. Add item 
UP 10 five sou your overall total. Check 
this against the daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If it matches you 
have won outright or a share of die total 
daily prize money stated. If you arc a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of >our card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 



ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings Began Feb.lO. Dealings End Feb 2I.§ Contango Day Feb 24. Settlement Day, March 3 

§ Forward Bargains are permitted on two previous days. 


©hibsw#»«o<» 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£ 2,000 

Claims required for 
+41 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


5*1 419 saw cm 

MB GG3 Umor 
14? 56 tt«QOT 

*>'- Vkwt Fargo 
280 Kt> rarerusi 


O* -2 (it 53 7 1 

sa • asesz 

tat *s so 16 tea 

£SS'. 

240 71 jm» 


BREWERIES 


ELECTRICALS 


Cray Ekd 



306 

153 

A**H.*OTS 

» 

• .. 

110 

41 168 

682 

471 

Bass 

058 

*3 

210 

32 14 0 

01 

36 

Dwtoiwn 

a 


1 1 

Z4 23* 

100 

573 

66 

250 

Srajongran* 

Brawn (Mmnewt 

93 

«0Q 

-7 

*5 

42 

70.0 

•S 105 

50 14.7 

'» 

>19 

Burner |H Pi 

IS? 

• .. 

70 

4J >3 > 

530 

*05 

Burtonwooo Braw 

410 

• .. 

143 

30 95 

05 

225 

Clrt (Uatmen) 

(85 


10 7 

22 106 

van 

*17 

Dmnsn \J A| 

775 

-sa 

166 

24 227 

62a 

270 

Dwtners 

620 

-1 

229 

37 171 

19# 

<59 

Ornenel IM) 

>70 

*3 

79b 

4fi 12 1 

75* 

MS 

Amo 

133 

-2 

72 

3 7 117 

SS 

22S 

GumoM 

285 

• 4 

>03 

XB 100 

02 

324 

Hrafn £ Hanujns 459 

• -5 

241 

S3 It 7 

65 

X 

H'Shtand Dnd 

73 


ZB 

37 >50 

177 

124 

Wueraaroon DWI 
wntira 

160 


81 

30 II 7 

208 

IX 

206 

*3 

60 

29 

SO 

57 

Unw Thompson 

K 


29 

34 14.7 

238 

179 

uotoid 

227 


91 

40 126 

338 

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5* Drew ones 

732 

ti 



104 

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Sen 1 Now 

160 

• .. 

toon 59 123 1 

a% 27% Sascram 

OB’. 

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41 1 

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410 

258 

Vain 

330 

-5 

150 

4.1 iso 

2aa 

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wnacraed 'A' 

2J0 

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270 

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Do B ■ 

243 

-3 

102 

42 12* 

238 

152 

WMbraad bn 

200 


90 

50X0 

4*0 

3*5 

770 

m 

Wotwnmpra 0 D 
Young jp 

440 

20a 

-2 

172 

94 

20 16 1 

4 7 180 


Brawn BenranKam 88 

W"* 

CUM S WMm 610 

CarOnSM Dec 2 m 

CAP So 213 

CWorWa 47 

Do 7',Ai CPF 1B3 

Comcap 225 

Cray Bed 2S8 

enmotw in 

Dm Em 72 

PWMn 170 

Mint -A- 34 

Domno SR 

DftwOmn K Mb 41 

DMO 4>*r 106 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 



BRITISH FUNDS 


99>. aa .Trtas 

96 92 Tnwa 

100 S3 1 ! E**h 
101*4 M* TIMS 
904 92’. Tnwa 
96 07'; E*C 

105% 96 
1W% KVEwai 
80. S2'<Ti0B3 
MV WV Em* 

U» v 94V Em* 

8SV 68 Fart 
99V 92V Tims 
92V 83V Trass 
10B>. M Tibbs 
96 ttVTnsa* 

100 OTyExch 

98', SOVTiBM C9V% 

87V 79VTrans 3% 

97V 88VTre» 9':% 1988 
102% 93V Trans H',-% 1989 
»V 90'»Tras*S 1989 


81V 7SV 
93V 86V 
101 91 ’■ 


!'.-%> 1990 
3*. 1990 
!'■% 1987-90 
10%. 1990 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 



215 

*2 

90 

42 


58 


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410 

233 


■so 

64 


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377 


16 Oh 

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407 

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31 

186 

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114 

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23 

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129 

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205 

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189 

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226 





674 

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550 

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215 

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202 


157 

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26a 

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<0 

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34 


Aberdeen Const 2*2 

mw 232 

AncWa 58 

Amman <50 

BPS Iroutnes 39i 
Baqqmge Brck 31' 
Biiran IJ6 

BaAfviBenl Constr 23 

BuBway 152 

Bentom Concrete 71 
Ben 8ms 68 

Brouey* 890 

BW Cacra 573 

BnWUnACDm H* 2SJ 
BraMUiM PlKSey 89 
B» Dr-ccmg 69 

On w 5 JUKUon 23 
BrCr«T*M 70 

BraSH S* 

Burner & HuBam 


105 *3 151 
157 68 92 

0 In 02 89 
57 38 13? 

<16 10 156 
aa ii 119 
10 9 80 .. 

04 1.7 4 0 

too 66 171 
54 76774 

*4 65 IS 2 

32 9 3 7 12 7 

786 50 79 

138 5 4 30 5 
4 0 5 5 151 

36 5J 15 2 

1S9 

4J 83 78 
47 50 119 

571 . 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £20,000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 


155 

>45 

CeaMreas Robey 

ISO 


4d 

29 »a 

KH) 

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Cewm-Po+ESone 

100 

•2 

40 

40 

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42 

Carter Grp 

58 


21 

31 381 

Mfl 

336 


04 

♦6 

221 

J6 '02 

325 



304 

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82 

2 7 82 

IM 

94 


IM 


7B 

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116 

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90 


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96 8* 

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£5 158 

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113 

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42 

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116 

103 

Grtcn i Dandy OrtJ 106 


23 

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290 

204 

Guravyi ,mji 

254 

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119 

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69 

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SCJ 

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Higgs 6 h*j 

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100 

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100 

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140 


67 

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JH 

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>65 


109 

59 11 7 

ID# 

110 

Marsrnto iHaUaxi 

156 


7 1 

O 122 


235 34 

970 108 
98 33 
M 59 
45 16 

283 170 
93 rev 
178 22 

429 238 
58 43 

44 24 

182V 95V 
17V 10 
205 115 

iao iiiv 

214 114 
20V 13V 
IBB BS 
80 23 

288 120 
198 M2 
503 382 
86 71 

140 21 

703 72 
197 137 
119 74 

21V Iff* 
230 188 
-«a 09 

494 301 
185 1*9 
385 168 
2S6 158 
308 173 
350 236 
770 ISO 
350 244 
250 123 
65 *0 

103 SB 
325 220 


Bumdc Rands *5 

Baaee uonwn 2*2 

ElFOCwrm 3*5 

FalTMl Beet 206 

Ferrara 132 

Fast Cbm Else 188 

Fbnranl Tedl as 

G8C 198 

ann 95 

saw) 0*a 97 

I tt 150 

In SM C ConuUSZO 
Jama Stroud 182 

Hods 95 

Lac n ano wi mi a® 
Lodes 147 

uxaect 3i8 

Mediae 388 

(•era BS 70 

utmftxoL ire 
Murtfcme Bsc 50 
Uurrm v Bed U 

Neuman 32 

WMnaiti (VoukA 2» 
NB S3 

Ocsomes 43 

OrfonJ Mnmni 426 
Peuxm 48 

Piucom 29 

Pines Rn E162V 

Phase Lamps N/V £17% 
MCO 190 

DO 'A* U0 Itobng 150 
Ptawmr 200 

DO ADR 25 mv 
Prassac 145 

Quest AukuMUon 33 
Rscd Bad 188 

fkxetoc 170 

Sowtes (OH) 485 
Shomxk 78 

Sould OfluUOn 45V 

SIC 98 

5m M 170 

Sgjwra DeMfrara ^98^ 

Tataptans Rands ISb 
Tttanam no 

Than EMI 434 

Tharps (FW) 175 
TuraM T ab e a m tto 
us 255 

Untoch 253 

UW LOWrtn 246 

Urt Scent*: 165 

va kammentt 3*4 
Vote* 230 

Vfeswm SdoCSan 5* 
WhOMOIth EHrc 85 
WlMHSBla Fttng 243 


IB «2115 
19 14.1 31.4 

19 15 85 
185 22 205 
102 35 114 
21 15 . . 
.. .. 110 

i> aa its 

45 1.6 £4 

8.1 33 ?s 

84 8 9 25.1 

15 05 .. 
15 4.4 75 

25 06 25.1 

20 49 111 

45 22 135 

79 2B 25-1 
15 1.6 863 

4£ 192 17.7 
79 35 255 
&0 25 175 

29 lj* 237 

23 1.7 1&2 

355 15 102 
. n .. 177 
58 29 135 

82 86 75 

39 3.7 124 

17 1.1 188 

19 03 .. 

10.7 19 86 

7.1 75 81 

ns 72 6.9 

14 15 159 
145 48 104 

36 09 JBJ 

25 13 125 

4 OB 85 370 
0.1 02 .. 

1.1 3.4 93 
191 69 128 
75 B 1 155 
It 25 87 

20 0.5 235 

15 33176 
15 65 81 

575 95 .. 

75 89 104 

75 55 S2 

83 32 160 

3.1 £1 211 

. . .155 

43 23 120 

6.7 39 105 
288 59 10.9 

21 27 169 

05 1 3 88 

. . a . 45 

85 18 I O b- 
oe 05 353 

105 54 13 4 

25 23 63 
250 59 155 

55 32 87 

24 09 188 

75 29 229 

85 34 115 
13 22 79 
81 49 14.1 

2.7 08 299 

114 48 104 

39 72 126 

22 29 110 
99 45 >2.4 


443 230': common 
209 135 Capa A*n«n 
70 2? COpMB fri 
7S': 19 COM# 


139 80 cram WcMbon 138 +1 

177 126 Qmm Hon ITT *1 

207V I48'j Cummns 3*% 093 V 

43 22 DSC 39 

483 350 DPCE 4*8 +3 

203V196V Dragety 55 ■* 

26V 15V W» E22* *'• 

sa 33 Damn 9 M« 'A' 58 

220 133 Dsyws 6 raawman 2ip 

127 Si Davy 97 

9*0 715 0a L nua 8» -5 

203 105V Dana »i 

208 106 DaraanU Sameang 203 •+3 

215 132 DaMuttm 21' -2 

19V 10V DaMa Had 18'. 

313 ISB CbptdM 313 +3 

9ri OB Drtaon Prt 9Z •*■! 

115 73 Dorn HO • .. 

119 7* Dommiao n UW -1 

7* so Dupan 72 t'r 

48 12 DMt 40 -2 

% S W S M 


*2 

90 

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110 

t2 

100 

37 

12-4 

+11 

2.1 

&0 

300 


»H 

5.7 

107 


121 

30 

110 

-1 

30 

40 

3X7 

+1 

50 

40 

110 



83 

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375 

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376 

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170 

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211 >2 

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313 +3 

92 9*1 

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88 •->-£ 
79 mt2 


92 55 . 

.. 114 64 87 

55 55 95 
-5 425 50 TI4 

72 89 109 

->3 95 45 115 


400 308 T raMgar Howaa 

196 lOS'i Tivapan Da* 
19V 7** TranwoM 
SO 38 TrafM 
99V 29V TnpkM 
1*8 81 Dm* a Nb«8 
ITS 9* UH0 
104 20 uragmio 
14 V 998 U4w 
83V 44* umi4r(M4 

235 164 Vakir 

360 210 WsSsia 


322 

212 • 
152 

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80 


140 7B tt*rB 
206 101 Mean 
166V 52V Vtttb 
3(6 14? vojjoar 

92 45 115 I 174 110 Wrt) PI 
9.7 49 85 | 2iO 98 Ubdon 


141 -t 

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117 -2 

£14 

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345 ~e 

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.1 41 25 05 

-10 7.1 49 72 

^ 19n 1.4 28.1 

.. 505 35 111 

-1 57 ill 114 

4 157 40 129 

-2 85 12 115 

•4 45b 25 305 


9> 65 Canary _ ® "09 ifl ll 

200 U0 EntarpnM IS •* «' « 45 

ti zb Carom Esmpw 3* 

^ ‘IS STp£ ^ -? i - 35 

St, m On SO *-6 *1 62 

J3v 4 1 ,- ICC W • 

4 19 5c?0rtns E j 4* IS3 

379 MS 14SMO ^ 

52023® Do UMI 0® .. U4.»5 

175 35 NW UMM Ol » .. 

310 111 POCOCOP 115 74 69 

58 a'rPMMl 2^-- -!«_ -• 

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207 64 5 wamgo M -a 

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SS % JS2JT* S ^ no 72 


09 48175 

75 24 194 

74 m 132 

71 85 122 

75 75 78 
25 35 185 

57 65 214 
52 72 192 


335 14? Vojjoar in .. ( .. 72 

174 no Wadn Rubral 140 42 11 M2 

2W 96 Waomi 2>D 2-1 ID - • 

107 T25 WMoiM 187 113 62127 

98 34V WaSrtM GMt 98 4-1 19 12 . . 
185 ie Mntmms 173 • .. Hh 22 M.7 


395 263 Eastern Prod 300 

175 100 Eotao >75 

a« 1*8 EIS 235 

37 2Tj BM 34 

119 85 Been 109 

3i“- 12- Beardux iaEJ TF £23 

87 51 Ebon IB1 55 

29V 18‘ Enwl C£5 

310 218 Ed** Dm Ctay 308 

30 Encs son iLMI B £23 

1 56 78 Erw* Ho us* 156 

163 US Eurapam Fame* 161 

163 101 Do 9*« Prt II* 
270 139 Everaa IM 

1*0 TO* ErtXM 118 

IM SO Ejrasrot hit tSl 

*06 27? EiM 290 

43 23 Fdcon 34 


ii* -3 

IM -3 

118 -I 

1S> *1 

290 -0 

34 

37 26 PeetJM Aonc HO 30 

ISO 105 Feme* IJH) HI -3 

IBS 60 FiW indnaf 65 

*83 260 Foots *Bi -3 

47 32 Fitr»-IKXI 38 

112 E6 Fbneito CSW 10* S-2 

*6 rn Rkm 37 -2 

n5 55 Fogarty HO -i 

JOV ?Q i Fofcn GtOUD Hiv 29'. 

172 1 35 Fofrwrga S H4nwy 161 

85 *3 Franco iThomas) S3 «*2 

n2 8* GEI bl 98 

308 IBS GKN 307 -1 

280 300 GB 380 

75 55 COTOK Eng 75 

121 M GoMamor 117 •** 

>2* W Gems >24 

16 -533 V Gbco 897 +S 

282 164 Glynweo 282 *6 

85 30 Comma BS 

640 *33 Gonna Krr *35 

20' 85 Gfomrwn Hugs 198 *3 


242 146 Granada 
10'- T- &owje« 9'- 

70 '• 39 Habi Praccnan 6* 

160 114 Hal Eng 154 

168 <36 Han iMi i*0 

230 1*3 H*fc» 193 

2*3 155 Hama 2*i 

34 19V HanOMXi hid 28 

6? 35 Hamm*. *4 

19l 133*.- Hansen 1*6 

iW- 135 On 8% Cnv EiS6 

110V 90V Do 5‘**« 103 

152 92 HandMTOS 151 

195 127 Hmns l««*OI I9S 

50 353 HAwbi* Soodey 5H 

iu 68 Hamby 110 

121 73 Hay (Ibjnnanl IQS 

172 120 Hepworb Ceramc 155 

120 55 Hrnna 126 

92 M Hamm rJI 73 

140 58 Higngab & Job US 

83 62 Haas Bras u 

M 67 non Lloyd 70 

170 IDO Hoafcrcons 170 

19 7 HOmaro Maclmry 

104 07 Homden 91 

14V av Hudson Bay [13 

268 165 nuwe Assoc 2*2 

106 m Hunting Grom 68 

389'; 3(n hincnsn wnamooa 253 

1*0 88 IM 1*0 

295 190 isooon 2*2 

310 205 jar* sons Baum* 393 
133 , 93 J4HMM Mam 116 

*90 *23 jonnson Cbaners *90 
170 63 JOTnson Mannm 160 

a 11'. jonnsem * FB 28 

?7o iso jot ran on 270 

79 *i jatm S Sraoman 75 

160 11* JOuraarr (Thomas) 158 

36 23 KJumaxtra 2S 

29V 23'. Midi 25'. 

235 165 hdsev hrt 191 

125 78 KaobOy S"a» 131 

365 330 horyvtaiAi 260 
208 155 KiictMfi |R» Tay«O308 
140 90 waavEZa 1*3 


FINANCE AND LAND 


McMdm 1*41*01 328 

Meyflf Id 198 

vi«e (Sianbyi 23 

M-JOk (4) 122 

Momvm iJoran 354 

ihemann*i 900 

•wrangnam BrcX 191 

Pmsunnion 13S 

Pnoenm T*nae> <0* 

Pocrans 380 

RMC 5>* 

PMUnd 389 

Roberts Adam <56 

RuaeiOd 236 

RugOv Camara is* 

SG6 is* 

Snonw * Fane/ 96 

5mm Ut TS 

Tarmac 388 

Taynx Wocrt'd* 52* 

Tilbury Gimp 155 

Trams 6 Amort W 


T-era 92 

Tum« 165 

vrarcpiam 243 

ward 268 

Warrmraw (TJ 63 

wan* Bum iw 

wenem Bras 78 

W«»n» *6 

WITsot iCo*mo»V) 320 

Wmpey (Gengai 148 


5*s 51 

-1 161 40 111 

-3 77 19 109 

07 30 . 
+1 9 3 7 6 16 4 

-2 10 6 5 5 239 

.. 157 18 162 

93 *3143 
*1 68 50 99 

43 II 49 
-S 18 4 4 8 9* 

~* 109 37 115 

-5 155 4.0 14 3 

■2 06 SS'31 

11 t 49 t2 1 

-4 99 68 113 

• . 107 4 3 97 

.. 32 33 150 

62 66 153 

*? 11 7 30 162 

,3 214 4 1 1* 1 

*3 70 45 i3« 

.. >13 33 123 

>6 >7110 

.. 10 0 0 1 304 

I . U4 55 106 

*4 96 34 14.7 

-2 S7n 90 72 
60 A3140 

i*n 18152 

4 5 14 IE'i 

*i *6 3 1 140 


334 210 AMmerm 
193 128 Aittan HUM 
345 200 AmolagaM 
>5> 70 BiranTm 

XV >7v Camaba 
210 159 Candomm 
36 10 Caonoimv 

20>. 16V Equhy & Gen 
253 IX Hambra 
193 91 hory « 5hne 
173 IM Ms ysas 


47 37 Nat Hems Loans *1 
48V 38 Da rt £*1 


2X .. 1J 08 .. 

172 -2 11.0 64 73 

345 .. 200 58 58 

13 iO .. ..... 

£25 157 M .. 

198 tl ZB 15 588 

23 . . . . « . 

18V .. 13 70 83 

253 • . . la* 4 1 302 

170 .. 61 3^297 

16* -Z 09 64 23£ 


-X 09 6* 235 

♦I 

-1 800 1915 .. 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


44' 

73- 

AUTO N/V Bern* 

£43% 

+'- 

*00 

91 .. 

256 

121 

AJMd Cotods 

165 

• .. 

33 

30 170 

303 

2’3 

Amaranam 

325 

-3 

89 

37 ISB 

MO 

160 

Armor Chancra 

220 

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61 

20 01 

H9 

78 

BTP 

11# 


S 7 

4 8 17.1 

89 

5i 

Barer DM50 

£89 

ti - 

700 

■* 

120 

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BJagcen 

119 


103 

07 89 

13* 

104 

Brant Ownra 

127 


51 

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75 

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. 750 

UT 

79 

Canning iVR 

87 

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59 >29 

2>S 

224 

Comm 

2S2 

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95 

3 0 131 

199 

131 

Come* Bids 

143 


66 

48 86 

168 

III 

Do A 

112 


66 

59 68 

» 

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Cray (Horace) 

15' 


07 

*2 56 

151 

116 

C'cxu 

134 

-V 

100 

70 13 9 

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82 

Do DM 

105 



. 109 

227 

158 

EAn & Ewrva 

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80 

4 7 IBS 

358 

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Fpjooo-Mnsao 

244 

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11 9 

49 96 

137 

66 

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IK 

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57 

4 4 101 

488 

318 

Hrtfcson 

*05 


214 

5 3 92 

67 

51 

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£86 

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884 

630 

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52 04 

368 

778 

Laoone 

353 


105 

30 179 

Ul 

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107 


4 r 

4 A 109 

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100 36 77 

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1-4 21 1 8 109 

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29 34 59 
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185 MS NMm 
288 81 Watma (R 
272 180V INdgmood 
84 40 War 

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118 45 wtatbnd 


US 84 Wtwttoa 
198 136 HMacmft 
224 120 wo«s (Jamas) 
478 MS Mann wags 


475 137 MdrabyUtfba 475 128 

ST 48 Wood (Ant») SO 80 

a 18 Wood few) X .. 1.4 

7b 15 Woorawna t As 73V -4 29 


603 370 Yarrow 

150 88 Young (HJ 


.. 23 09 309 

-1 107 40 12-5 

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!1 49 57 200 

+12 79 07 103 

31 13 221 

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OVERSEAS TRADERS 



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INSURANCE 


XI IBB AbDtv LOS 204 -3 8* 40 .. 

20>. 18V Ate a AIR £2SV +V 100 29 .. 

28V 19V Am Got E38V 3+V 800 3.1 • . 

253 190 Braaandi 250 -a 79 12 173 

837 393 Bntnc 829 -3 379 4.6 .. 

772 174 Com umoo 250 -5 MS 03 .. 

293 200 Equay 3 Law 255 -3 U 11 - 

350 104 FM 300 -» .... .. 

768 503 Got Aceuw 753 -6 203 39 WS 

798 818 ORE 783 -6 37.9 4-B 22 7 

723 540 Ham C E 898 .. 313 43 10 7 

! 321 217 Hogg nrawwcn 317 4-2 13* *2 1&.1 

777 5*5 Lagal 6 Gen 742 -£ 321 43 . . 

34 19 JjD Lde 34 R1 134 - . 

072 642 London 6 Mn 017 -6 31.8 39 324 

336 242 L0n Uar few 328 ., 106 67 128 

70 48V Mann 0 UcLen £80% +% 23) 33 . . 

308 161 MMel 270 -1 99 33 179 

585 318 PW5 2B3 +W 129 44 313 

14 0T7 pean nn 904 * A .. 

019 493 prudendsl 807 -5 3*3 <3 533 

435 278 Refuge 403 -2 188 *2 . 

aa SIS Royal 810 -7 346 42 125 

413 332 Sadgmck Gp 388 -8 149 39 179 

7M 255 SMwan Wr-aon 387 -6 1*4 39 219 

*50 220 Suras MOSS 42S 9*3 00 20 290 

018 391 Sun Atom 598 -7 221 27 539 

904 Sun Ub 882 -7 X0 05. 

305 220 Trade mnaonty 365 . . 129 35 139 

489 289 Wtts F*b*r 424 -13 10.4 29 220 


PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERTG 


289 39 189 

370 49 22.7 

314 45 10 7 

134 42 15.1 
321 49 . . 


-6 319 39 324 

109 67 129 
+% 220 39 .. 

-1 95 37 179 

+W 129 49 353 
.. 904 44 .. 

-5 30 43 933 

-Z 189 42 . 

-7 346 *2 105 

-8 149 39 179 

S 144 39 219 

*3 86 20 290 

-7 221 27 538 

-7 30.5 35 . 

.. 129 35 133 


34 70 
86 25 225 
51 *8 187 
49 49 102 
O 29 164 


LEISURE 


1*6 K Ban 6 WA A' 121 

IBS 133 Botsbt a Hmkat 1*3 

130 m Brant walker 102 

5* 22 Camera 52 

235 178 craysras 210 

*33 231 Rna Iwn 413 

IS9V 51V GM 58V 

75 35 Homumar 0Kb 68 

148 78 H dWj r Trams UN 

la B3 M Loom 138 

231 66 Johan s Hbgs 96 

as 124 uedmasr ms 

3TO 184 PbasvOTd 320 

6* 32 AOrlaan 82 

222 147 Saga Hotdan 222 

304 213V Saamram fip 283 

80 52 Tonenhara Ham 5? 

140 92 Zsttnra 1*0 


TOO 03 89 
.. a .. 214 
79 7.7 89 
14 27 139 
00 39139 
KL7 28 159 
.. .. 713 

.. .. 444 

83 50206 
09 50 S3 

30 11 ISO 
79 52 97 
89 22199 
S4 

6.1 27 241 

34 12 .. 

57 110 0 A 
81 44 120 


PROPERTY 


MINING 


*6 187 39 


31 13 L£M 

303 IBS Up ■ 

269 140 Lwd 
174 88 Lament 

81 25V La*noi 

56 24’; Lee (ATOWJ 
44 29 UKaa 

83 82 LiMSIbl 

88 27 Larraad 

72 32 nova IFH) 
31 MV LoCtusr (TJ 


31 +1 

203 V. 

207 -2 

>47 

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56 «+1 

30 

72 

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+1 0511 19 1BJ 

+3 89 22 279 

-2 8.0 3B120 

5 1 35 13.0 

21 34 84 

>♦1 30 04 HO 

25 A 

.. 29 4D11J 

2911 35 .. 
-1 39 03 107 

19 69 96 

-I 142 79 119 


CINEMAS AND TV 


413 775 Grand Mai 386 

2*8 IBB Kannedy Braohaa 238 

333 241 LadP ' - -<* 325 

«> W Ion Prt HOMb *50 

96 77 Mourn CharUos 9* 

112 67 Pram Of W Houh 73 

68V 40V QiMna Most 68V 

*15 353 Samiy Hoad* W 988 

78 29 Sous 72 

169 119 Truranoun Fane >63 


-2 145 3-7 11 8 

+4 21 09 140 

*3 15.0 45 18.6 

.. 1100 24 515 

+'r >9 19 174 

21 29 132 

22b 32 190 
38 09 19 1 

+2 1.7 24 178 

>*2 79 49 162 


198 IX anghj TV A' 
6* 23 Grampian 

t8S "8 MTV N.'V 
301 71# LWT Hrtge 
232 '78 Swi TV A 
IM 110 TVS N/V 
34 73 TSW 


*3 

129 

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-2 

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70 72 

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81 02 

-3 

208 

72116 

+3 

127 

55 94 


II 4 

66 83 , 

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7.1 8J 


INDUSTRIALS 
A - D 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


79 50 

100 51 
161 60 
5? 9 

66 48 

*38 235 
S6S 270 
317 20* 
III 63 
5* 36 

3S5 224 
166 67 

136 95 

93 67' 

10 5T« 
396 27' 
91 96 

650 380 
ITT 92 
229 >30 
98 27 
>39 72 

BO 25 . 
196 14J 
382 162 
110 76 

<5* 60 

105 *3 
2J7 153 
3M 152 
13 68* 
90* 67* 
5»0 306 
289 168 
?9- a 
39 21 

368 7*0 
IX S3 
90 TJ' 
38 Si 
13* 93 

235 100 
8*5 370 
190 1*2 
193 M> 
336 ?18 
195 115 
615 300 
lSD 9* 
154 
36a 313 
6*0 33 1 
71 33 

07 56 

"9 » 
Ul *6 
38*. 23 
W5 155 
103 98 
38 16 
185 110 
9? 7? 

127 ?9 

335 300 
£0 l GO 
M 31 
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t'5 58 

as % 

SOI 373 

r; a 

51' 27 
156 180 
M63 267 
231 i*0 
3 28 363 
1*8 98 
6t0 Z77' 


Vpascutum * 77v 

Beams tJemri) A 90 ♦: 

Bernaes 147 -* 

BWCKS Lad IS .- 

Bieranar 56 

B' Home Moras 326 -* 

Bujwn IN) 5*5 

Burton* 2*2 -6 

Camora V 99 

CJtAirt {Sh *5 

Oaaen 350 

Comaneo Engnsn IS3 -3 

Crmra (Fran A 1 17 

Domras HJ) 07 -2 

Oman* Grp £10'- • 

Dunn* 379 -J 

ESA 4 GadSMi 74 e . 

ElyS iWnuMOOTI 630 

Fir pi ra Srares 1*8 

Er*m E2£> -2 

E»«UWr CrtOb* 70 -S 

Fme «n Do* IX -i 

Fora iMarrmi 70 -I 

FranwHbr 185 • 

Fieemrts 3*4 -2 

Getter [AJI KM 

Gem SR TO 

GoldDerg (*> 103 9-1 

Gddrtrtvs Gc 198 -2 

Grattan 360 -8 

GU5 £13' « .. 

Do A 9*6 •-! 

Hawm Mowaraara **4 •-> 

Ortensmay AM 
Hraefb 01 Ldnooi 25 . 

HMss 38 #-l 

Homa Charm 282 -1 

House » wrase 1 1* 

Jones lEraasU 06 

Ladea Praia X 

LCP M9 «2 

Lee Conner 159 -5 

Ubrty HO 

L*Kr?« KSgoiP 178 

MuA» 6 Spencer 1» -2 

Menses lJooti 398 -2 

MdmtS LmuTS 190 

Moss Bros 5M 

MSS Newsagent 135 -2 

N#»i 236 -4 

Okw «3) 339 

Our Pn ce 535 -10 

Pemos 70 

R9ii*S SKUB 00 

piomh (Aitredi lOB -2 

Raiftars (Jnwt*eral l22 0-C 

Raneeck 35' 

(bed fAufcbn) 385 -S 

Do A >** +11 

51U Srtras 32 

Samue* iHl 153 

Do A 73 

Saar* 122 -2 

Sanpeon iSI A 3l5 

Smin Ffitf] A 266 • -J 

Oo 0 53 •-! 

5W"*y iAQt 7* 

S««wg 112 -3 

Sumne gumes 40 

Suwanr; Siores *10 

le»n.daiM*aw *2 -2 

Time Products flfl 

Undenjnxos 109 

Vernons VytAi 43* -2 

ww Grauo 130 *3 

waia wnne 2K -3 

wgw ion -3 

Woomtonn 48$ -5 


2 3 4 3 39 2 
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-4 31 2 1 299 

14" 20 4*18 
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139 26 27 0 
-5 6 3 2 6 IS 7 

32 32 25* 

31 87 86 

.. 30 7 59 118 

-3 7 7 *2 X9 

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-2 >4 1620E 

1 . 9i 0 9 393 

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* . 3 3 * 5 10 1 

.. 129 21311 

38 24 fflj 

-2 * 6 2 1 237 

-8 . . a 110 

-1 4 7 3 9 21 4 


86 46 95 

83 1*202 

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29 4 1 d2J 

21 2 1 75 I 

'07 57 132 

57 1 5 23) 

fB0 3 I 204 
26 9 30 13 8 

155 35218 

59 39 185 

23 90 04 

30 79 159 

*2 15206 

114 100 107 

58 67 105 

21 75X7 

80 50X3 

53 32 79 

100 12370 

100 55 92 

51 28259 

51 17174 

79 15509 

7 4 13 417 

$1 30M2 

54 2*361 
117 33 255 

79 1 5 336 

05 07365 
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5 5 $1 193 
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r » 31 

7' 25 32 9 

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90 3 7 41 0 

GO 82 IB 7 

44 35 10 1 

62 2$ 122 
76 29 102 
1 $ 28 192 

36 41WT 

3$ 3 f 162 
6* 15210 

29n 59 93 
25 < 1 136 
2* I J 33 5 

T7 !h 39 10 4 
113 57 74 

95 30 164 
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119 z.?joe 


ELECTRICALS 



aw ns 

2S7 182 
>28 S3 
XI 216 
112 71 

222 148 
280 136 
1*5 as 

370 Of, 

42 24 

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*35 325 Asn 
*7 1* Asm 

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*OS 303 
45 15V 

345 210 
75 25 

211 52 

393 770 
87 58 

328 240 
429 296 
197 |10 
XV 13V 
481 3» 

2S3 150 
150 M 
15' 112 
495 180 
48 X 
210 T3Q 
01 23 

184 138 
97 06 

391 275 

45 IB 
1® IX 
116 73 

327 100 
3*5 204 
438 IX 

32 15 
305 220 
183 1» 

103 61 

109 BO 
12B 10ZV 
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2*3 in 

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214 79 

300 223 
Z74 100 
10V 5V 
388 214 
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7? 38 
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150 97 

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155 iu 

176 U* 

148 77 

227 153 
383 2T7\ 

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3a 208 

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145 62 

530 380 

182 rn 

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204 

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298 

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31 XV Locher fri 29 10 M > 

232 175 Lot Mttold 1SS -1 U2 TS 11 

138 63 On Old 100 

85 56 Lon & MM QV . . 74 100 U 

IM «9 Lanina IM ♦! U 10205 

165 86 LOTgton md IBS • .. 40 20 210 

390 IS) Low 8 Bonw 388 . . 129b S3 120 

360 Z!\ ML Hag* 3M • n ib 32 183 

04 35 MS 9H 03 07 00 110 

41V 22V MY Deri XV 10 3.1 440 . 

291 144 Macarow Pharai 291 .. 1300 4.7 142 

150 07V MaebraoM >23 .. 32 zo a* 

47 3* MacMhm IPBW) a 20 50 mo 

231 112 MtfrtmM 220 -2 120b 59 165 

98 45 Magnaaa 08 30 40 120 

ses as Manomar Sr*j ho 435 86 1.0 t&s 

68 51 Manganese Bronze 55 42 70 04 

122 TOV Mortar 111 54 401X7 

107 51V Mating 03 20 20 10.1 

85 45 (toman (Labor) 00 40 si 125 

85 37 Dp 'A- 85 +2 40 0.1 1X2 

77 S3 Mamma unw re .. 29 41 773 

3B3 285 uanonar 393 .. 157 4.1 137 

TOO 370 Meat Box 590 -5 2* 6 3 6 10.4 

>72 IBS Motel CfeHuaa 132 -3 90 70 00 

72 50 Heart* 71 -1 04b 40 127 

85 55 Mtcne* Com 70 0.1 74 79 

M 58 M4CM9 Sams 77 59 65 1* 3 

in 126 Mofins 103 (10 00 103 

251 197 Morgan CrueMi Si +1 121 n 40 14.7 

130 09 Mon iRobert) 103 .. 44 40 710 

9 M o ras e no S'; +V 0.1 ■ 0.4 tzs 

an 119 niiTifl 197 -2 100 bi B 0 

144 74 Newman Tonka IX • . . 71 U 9.7 

66 X Noton S3 -a 14 22 708 

217 147 Noraros 202 .. 120 0J2 100 

253 1*8 Office Bed Mach 213 .. 114 54119 

298 IK Prtor Km* 'A' 277 .. 13.0 40 10 1 

238 123 Prt Piece 233 . . 89 00 117 

623 285 Parian JT 023 +0 

*35 288 Paancn *23 139 3314.8 

11 Peak 10V -1 ,. . 093 

97 73 Paene5a 90 • .. 9.0n a* 130 

«6 J5a Pegto-HararabT MO .. 21.4 54 110 

375 99 Penttanatnd 375 19 a* 35.1 

Jl'l 4'« PhattM** £11 V 70 07 290 

396 2*0 P»«ig*on 390 *5 ITS 40 09 

72 48 RasOc Com 98 +1 40 50 11.4 

255 480 Portal* 700 +5 279 40 M0 

300 103 Rater Chattum 243 1 0n 0.6 . . 

3, J Ptoa* MAW 272 2l 7 00 14.0 

140 33 Prasndcn Hbga >26 -A 00 0.6 27 7 

99 MV Prachard Sara 75 M 72 17 

'MV rev RHI 90 • . . 55 50 12.1 

149 70 f0* 148 • . . 6.1 4 1 109 

IX 72 Radbnl Mew IX 00 00 .. 

5*4 296 flank Org 5*4 21.4 39 1X0 

I4f K Ranaone Sana ia *10 01 4.1 119 

14$ 100 Retctttt (Gf Bndgei 130 00 30 47 

7id *75 flacant 0 Ccfcimn 690 -4 2\.i 11 100 

140 58 flmfeem Glam 131 • . . 20 20 70 

215 120 Reed E*eomue 205 50 2* 170 

7*4 528 Reed In 737 -2 270 27 13.1 


22 0% And Amor Coal £10% 

11V 570 And Am 975 *12 540 £0 .. 

79 20V Am Gnu ZS2 4a 00 .. 

47V 26V AAlT £43'.- *h 271 02 .. 

XV 21 Angkxaal £3S 142 30 .. 

XV ZT So -A- £39 142 30 .. 

295 ISB Amrttom 173 *5 470 270 .. 

7*7 2SS aiymora 30B *10 790 m-s .. 

107 71 Bradum 13S .. 260 1fL3 .. 

37 12% Buftto £17% 292 162 .. 

399 238 CHA JTO 

100 52 Carr Bgyfl .68 -2 

589 377 Gone GoMBWa 482 -2 »0 70 112 

*50 257 De Dnn 429 +18 W o 42 .. 

280 85 Deaftr m 170 46 40 24 .. 

lft% S% OoOTf ml gil £7% av 920 12.0 .. 

23% 0V D n e t ontoi £12% +% 128 9L7 .. 

12V y* Dwoen EV* .. .. a .. .. 

3TB 143 E Dnggu WE 

760 275 481 *0 120 20 . . 

160 126 B Oro 143 80 *2 120 

3« 00 Batwrg IM .. 1*0 UO .. 

406 233 E Rend Odd 348 +10 280 80 .. 

730 2% E Rend Pip £3V +% 

Zta 64 Flee Sana Dev 170 ■- .. .. 

» 12 FS £W% +'. 182 17 . . 

248 43 Gaemr m 02 -I 17.1*276 24 

11 «V Gortal £7V -% 000 CO .. 

4% Gen Mining OH +V 07.0 100 .. 

*4% 5>4 GfHA 0% .. 400 90 .. 

008 348 eu atoms 393 .. . .. 

175 S3 Gapang 63 .. 30® S7.7 .. 

050 230 Qroatto 83 -12 5*.' 17 J .. 

210 113V Hampton Araea >23 a -2 04 44 374 

ITt 4% Hannpay OTV .. «28 7J .. 

S2B 1W Hatha* 310 -3 170 50 .. 

07 « junto £75 VJ » « .. 

1P» 6% Khraes nov -% 090 09 .. 

8>. 3% Wort £5% a .. 400 74 .. 

278 87 Lola 140 +6 29-0 20.7 .. 

20% 7% Ubanoa £12% 115- 04 .. 

423 T93 Utona 338 

108 110 MM 123 -12 

60 21 M to y U OT Mortg 24 

17S 70 Marbvab 110 +0 170 150 .. 

S 16V Matos Expartm iB'i +V 

7 Mhragrai 14 +1 .. a .. .. 

10V 4V WttaSWb £0% 

792 <S® lAwraa 390 +10 1B0 17 .. 

5% 2V New Vfc WV .. 200 01 .. 

105 99 NB Man M IX +1 

8*V »V Mh Kabul *2 •-! .* .. .. 

sg 195 Nprthgrt 220 +0 

283 106 Pebinfl Tin 113 +S 

318,205 (%fio WaSaend 255 +2 .. .. .. 

» • BVPraaBrrad £19 +% 160 129 .. 

27% 10 nasStayn £13% +% 207 101 .. 

X% 14 Read Una LhJ £30 -I 

000 275 Rand Mnea Prop 435 .. 12® 20 110 

95 16 RantfloMam £62% +% 561 09 .. 

3m 231 Reman 255 -3 ...... 

887 S07 RTZ 582 -7 29.8 32 ?0 

8% 4H. RuataMWg XV .. 260 40 400 

26’» 6% a H ab ra E»% -% 125 120 .. 


S’- 2V New was 

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+0 170 150 .. 

+v 

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J% 100 129 II 


279 78 SA Land 
731% 15% Sorabnaf 

0'eiw SMamrn 

280 123 Suemtd Beal 
275 H» Tw^ora 
14% 0 Tara 

310 i«a Tionob 
BBS 336 (Meal 
07 32% vnei Reefs 

044 315 . Ma n rai p ow 
170 59 VtortonitM 

<15 50 Vogm 
IS 10V rtoUe Coflmy 


100 120 .. 
110 49 .. 


ISO *S£ 

BB'r 
118 

BBS 336 Unuf 401 -7 4S0 06 .. 

B7 32% to fleets E63-- *'/ BS6 100 .. 

044 315 . wanarapow 481 -7 540 110 .. 

170 50 V tokm ifaw IDO +0 150 150 . . 

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■,s^sa 

for «* likesof 

Sgasar-^ 

,!f» gfc ofirftf that 

sJSirv.sa. 

S“fte tf A £ e iffe 

*?aVing money again, there is 
® wry smile On the faces of the 
T«*as aatwes at Compaq who 

SS?i y “HST* 1 ®* «cord fi- 
nancial results. 

®Ht Compaq is not the only 

5*. ff kfeatin g. A quick tour 

software shops should 

£L?hS5? oa the face of 
mifash home computer soft- 
ware houses as the games- 
^vei US market welcomes 
UK classics such as the 1 
Hobbit and Elite with open ' 




Theseare mixed with a few 
“OW us titles such as Jet 
(successor to the hncefv snc- 
jessfnl flight siiwktor) and 
Mmdscape’s Deja Vo. Bat the 
styje and tone- of the British 
software really stands out 
against most other US offer- 


■i * 

* ■** '51 

■> -■ 


ft* of the recent UK 
success in the US 
stems from a growing move by 
US software houses not to 
" r| ® for what they see as oM 
“«ne computers such as the 
Commodore 64 and Apple IL 
concentrating instead on 
newer mad more - expensive 
machines. 


coverage in the 

. - S computer press these days 

if ?® the machines were released 
3 *p the US relatively recently - 
respite being announced in 
or Europe almost a year ago. In 
, - Britain the company has made 
£ aaBounoements of a series of 
t new machines mrirefing two 
J rersimis of its 520$T 
Z ^Potar expeded to am less 
? than £500. 

g Both IBM and Compaq are 
expected to branch some fon 

of portable computer. Apple is 

. sme to announce yet more new 
Macintoshes and Apple II 
computers. 

r j Tw weeks ago the presi- 
I SS? Apple InternationaL 
r SpindJer, promised that 
me company would announce 

£ “open Macintosh" with 
£*M^4yte expansion rf<*rfgn , 

unvoted this year - along with 
a more high-powered Apple IL 
The company is. not, hewew- ] 
or, expected to make any 
mom in the home market as , 
Mr Spmdler says he believes i 
that proper support cannot be i 

given to machines that sell for e 

much less than $1,000. J 

But the real waiting is still 
on IBM’s laptop portable *> 
computer, the non-appearance ti 
of which is causing jitters h 
Bmong many competitors who d 
have timed launches of so p 
cafled compatible products to L 
come just after the announce- °1 
“ent they- had expected ia 
January. They may now feel a W 
rntie nervous abort entering yc 
tins market; - • I vi 


Edited by Matthew May 

All the Sir Clive is back 

with new launch 

m Ctr\ By Matthew May Sinclair's new machine, the 

(AAA Sir Oiup Cim4«i>v i Spectrum 128. has a hnvr 


Scoring points in fantasy land 

T? n _ 


A new fontasy game is giving 
! American adults a chance to 
; indulge in Actional forays into 
deep space while zapping c?ch 
other with toy ray guns. 

^ Thj; tete 20th century 

Dad^s Array” is playing Pho- 
ton.- The game uses a six- 
minute dock with space-age 
trimmings. 

People who fidget while 
watching science- Action mov- 
ies and want to grab their own 
laser weapons and stalk inter- 
galactic bad guys And it a big 
attraction. 

“It can be exciting. It can be 
frustrating," said Mike Has- 
! f 1 "? 8 * 33, an air traffic control- 
ler in the US Air Force and, off 
duty, a regular player at the 
Photon Amusement Centre in 
Denver, one of five now 
operating. 

Working out siragegy for 
photon is a challenge. “Itgives i 
you a good workout If you’re I 
vigorous and really try to : 


Peggy Anderson in Chicago 

^SSSSSS^SS?^ 

The game’s computerized laOQOsqfo twoSSS nlavine 
scoring system. keyed to the 

JSSft. STiJFK “o «**■ 

gets high marks from . _ , 

Mr Hastings. A central column emits 

“When you're a kid and s ™ ok y “ raa ttiaii mist" music , 
play army or cowbovs and £5^ S CU if d be S? s of . li B bt 
Indians, you never had the ^ *“?*■, ,s 20 

opportunity to tell whether °* Kervall0T1 d®* for oniook- 
yon zapped (shot) somebody." , 
he recalled. “This provides an “I've heard some people say 

environment to play in and *“®y think it’s a way to get 
lets you know...how vou did.” >’ our an 8 e1, out but that’s iun 
Photon isn’t child’s play. 


your anger out but that’s just 
not true,’’ said the electronic 


Superchip could cut cost of storage 

Dawson the new hieh caoaritv memnn/ ... ® 


ruuiun isn i cmw s piav uuc, saia me electronic 
Players are decked out in I51bs equipment repairman. Ronnie 
of gear — a computerized chest Lesseraux, 20, who plavs regu- 
plate, helmets with stereo- ,ari y as captain ofa league 
phonic headphones, a battery leam in Housion.“To me. it's 
belt and a pistol beaming J“» scoring points. It’s not like 
infra-red light shooting a gun." 

In addition to the five Scores are kept for teams 
operating centres in Dallas, and individuals in each six- 
Denver, Houston, Toronto minute game, which costs St 
and a New Jersey suburb, 94 S3.50 a player. 


instant 

At test the British information 
providers are taking the fast 
cohesive steps towards estab- 
lishing themselves as a credi- 
ble industry. Three companies 
from diverse parts of that 
embryonic Indus by made sig- 
nificant moves test week to 
market and package informa- 
tion as a product. 

They are the BBC, Mead 
***to Central International 
(US owned) and British 
Telecom. 

Such a positive response has 
been well overdue. It was 
warlS'three years ago when 
the Information Technotow 
Advisory Panel (ITAP), at- 
tached to the Cabinet, recom- 
mended that information be 
developed as an industry and 
that the information providers 
— those with access to data 
which coaid be sold - should 
«aro to package and sell it. 

The ITAP gurus Had called 
for a lead from government 
smee it was in (he position to 
mspire, being one of the ■ 
I principal sources of statistical 
data in the UK. 

Within months of the ITAP 
report the Government re- i 
s ponded, producing much ■ 
rhetoric hot no policy and the j 
same amount of inspiration, j 
British information providers \ 
thought they wohM go it alone c 
and form a new Industry. j 


By Matthew May 

Sir Give Sinclair's launch last 
wek of a £180 version of the 
popular Spectrum home com- 
puter was accompanied by a 
barrage of surveys as the 
company tried to prove that 
the death of the home compute 
er market has been greatly 
exaggerated. 

Perhaps they had a point — 
of home computers in 
the UK. last year topped one 
| million units. Though de- 
mand in Britain is expected to 
decline by more than 20 per 
cent this year, it is predicted 
that overall European demand 
will remain steadv over the 
next few years as 'the rest of 
Europe expands. 

More than 400,000 of UK 
sales in 1985 have been credit- 
ed to Sinclair machines and, 
says the company, sales last 
November and December ex- 
ceeded _ those for the same 


Sinclair’s new machine, the 
Spectrum 1 28, has a larger 
memory of 128K, improved 
sound and better animation. It 
was originally launched only 
m Spain last November as the 
company did not want to 
jeopardize the Christmas sales 
of its £130 Spectrum Plus, 
which had accumulated in 
embarrassing quantities in 
warehouses during the early 
pan of last year. 

The Spectrum 128 is a 
relatively safe option building, 
on the established success of 
earlier Spectrums. Sinclair is 
hoping that owners of the 
current model will upgrade, 
quoting a Gallup survey that 
30 per cent of home computer 
sales are to households that 
already have a computer. 

But the price of £180 is 
considered high at only £20 
less than Amstrad’s CPC 464 


By Ian Dawson 


dripsT n JjSntoJ?* appCBr ceF ~ 
daims the new chips will be v * ^ ■ 

more reliable and foster than A «j!£“ ,s wf ^T e , Citizen’s 

magnetic storage units. Since ^u? 051 i skeiy . 10 com ~ 
chips have no moving parts to EflE; J!? i e tiiat 




Developments in Japan could !oE£!h, *u* JZ£n ' J 
revolutionize the Sftf SKSES 

ESS* » 5 


hoWjinore than 30 times as tions ring true? ' ' " ’ . 

nmch mformauon;asanIBM Whether the storage capad- M ? n “ f ^2 r€ { S 

^L fl ?Ef^^ d ? v / andwin ** of ettpsu toSted ' had difficulties 

retain lire stored information enough to give them the T" 
even when switched off Such competitive edge over disc J 1 * cost of 

non-volatile chips already drives remains to be seen. Bv dnves fitted to 

MKt but have so for beei 1990, PC is between £100 

i ?K5 no S? ***■ to ‘ appear on . market, S^S°V Even the J rend for 
compete with disc (in ves. - • - floppy disc drives may be able °f °omputer hardware 

If the company working on - "to match the chip's canadtv lEoSS to its perfor- 

— ^ wiiwuny. mance continues, it is hard to 


chips have no moving parts to EfSl • , e that 

wear out, go oat ofa^ustinm ^ dlfi L c “ l1 10 

or slow down, the electronic fh^^» t ^E2 mpany 
^ new computer chip is aspects of transferrine infiir- S c ™ commercially 
being developed which will mation. the comrnn y \ »wr- avaiJa ble chips will sdl for 

hold 1 more than in tions ring true. “m T 

Whether the storage capaci- 

ty of the chips is boosted had difficulties 
enough to give them the X,’,? f7n . . 

.J. ... SDOUt ±70. Thf* tvnm nw. 


' envisage disc drives with the 
drip capacity selling for as 
little as £70. 

By the time the memory 
chip is available, the disc drive 
industry is likely to be in a 
greater state of disarray than it 
is now. Matters came toa head 
among manufacturers in 1984 
when big name players includ- 
ing Dysan encountered prob- 
lems. Difficulties have 
continued, with one notable 
dnve manufacturer, Tandon, 
turning to the production ofa 
low cost IBM PC done as a 
mrans of turning its fortunes. 

The appearance of devices 
such as Citizen's Is certain to 
pose a continuing challenge .. 


Boost in 
profits for 
IBM UK 

IBM UK has announced a 

Sr RPLSS? 1 A*® in pre-tax prof- 
its to £308 minion for 19851 
a year in which IBM’s total op- 
erations throughout the 
world were hard pressed to 
even equal 1984’s profit 
Turnover increased by 30 per 
cent to £3.04 billion, consid- 
erably higher than IBM's other 

European operations which 
increased by 17 per cent in 

West Germany and Italy 
and 13 per cent in France. 

IBM UK is Ihe only Euro- 
pean subsidiary to manufac- 
ture its personal computer 
range which contributed 
heavily to the increase in 
turnover. IBM UK cited the 
careful management of 
costs and expenses as a factor 

in tha nmfit nni, I.. ^ - 


The moves being made bv 
the BBC and BTwtil have ter 
more impact on that new 
industry than Mead, which is 
increasing the marketing of its 
service in Europe and informa- 
tion in the UK; which has 
successfully been sold in other 
parts of Europe, the US and 
Japan. 

The BBC Intends to Hse the 
spare lines not used by the 
teletext service Cerfax to send 
information on the airwaves. 
The Ceefax service itself nses 
those spare from the 625 
which axe not seeded to com- 
pose a television picture with 
sound. The Ceefax (and On- 


period in 1 984. Tlie key factor 
for Sinclair is whether the 
company can produce at a 
pnoe that ensures a healthy 
profit, yet competitiveness. 

Sinclair largely produces his 
product in the UK unlike 
Amstrad, for example, which 
is shipping its £460 word 
processor from South Korea at 
a rate of 50.000 per month. 

Last week Amstrad an- 
nounced pre-tax profits for the 
second half of 1985 of £27.5 
million. £7 million more than 
for tbe whole of the previous 
year Computer sales were 
cited as the prime reason for 
its success. “We never stay in 
business where the margins 
aren't good enough,” says 
.Alan Sugar, chairman and 
managing director of - 
Amstrad. 

With its word processor, ! 
Amstrad have taken over 

Sinclair's earlier role ofbeing a ] 

pacesetter and forcing the ! 
price of computers down. ; 


less than Amstrad 's CPC 464 
. a° d Sinclair's QL micro, re- 
’ Aecung perhaps the need for 
, healthy profit margins to pay 
: principal creditors. So for. 
i says Sir Give, £10 million ol 
the £15 million debt has been 
paid. 

He also stressed that the 
new machine would be in the 
shops this week and that over 
70 new or redesigned pro- 
grams will be available. Pro- 
grams for the current 
S^ctrum will also run on the 

When the QL was originally 
launched there was consider- 
able criticism at the months of 
delay before deliveries began, 
even though Sinclair was ini- 
tially accepting money with 
orders. Software was also very 
slow to appear. 

.. Sir Give’s return to more 
revolutionary products will 
come later this year with the 
launch, of the Pandora porta- 
ble which, he says, will feature 
a flat screen design that gives 
the same quality as televi- 
sions. 


Banks caught In Swift 
software snarl-up 


in the profit rise but was 
ateoable to increase staff by 
1.300 to 18^00 at a time 
when many other computer 
companies made redun- 
dancies. 


[( THE WEEK 1 


By Bill Johnstone 

Technology Correspondent 

de on li V) information is 
tra n s m i tt ed at the same tiwn» 
as the picture. { 


We’ve taken Ameriea by storm. 




Electric ABC 

Parents who want to in- 
troduce their offspring to new 
technology as soon as pos- 
sible can now buy a £34 word 
processing program which 


cnudrea Features include a 
computerized dictionary 
that will work by groups of 
words, as weil as alphabeti- 
cally, large type and the abiity 
to write straight away with- 
out needing to open files or 
work through menu 
screens. 

Further information from 
Logotron (01-352 1088). 


computer! 

BRIEFING 


Code revenge 

The financial analyst Alvin 
Frost believed he was on the 
way out with Washington 
City Hall and found a novel way 
to get revenge. He changed 
die computer access code for 
the city's major accounts 
and now says he cannot 
remember rt, so the ac- 
counts are blocked. He said 
the new code had some- 
thing to do with the Declaration 
of Independence but he 
does not remember what 

City Hallis to appeal to the 
computer manufacturer to see 
if there is a suoercoda that 


1 *V ; 

V" -t ; .**: 


r . * -' p 


FACT: In 5 years PFS became Ameriagjjst selling personal computer software. FACT: No other software matched PFS* s ability m 
make more American buanessmen^^^cienVia^ FACT: Afl PFS business soffware^^ SSjSS^JS? 
graph) has afrived in the UK; FACT. 3 F?ES ■spyware is available for IBM and IBM compatible! Annie ti rYi» amW c _ ' * 

other personal computers. FACT: Caiiing 01-2QO 0200 (24 houra) guarantees you a convincing demonstration,' ^ 

Tlie best selling business sofh^^v^iere software cant be second best. FllV • 




stders from breaking into 
company computer systems. 

The unit. Response, can 

handle up to 1,200 users and 
takes calls to the computer, 

checks the password and then 
cuts the connection, ft will, 
then automatically call back 
only on the authorized tele- 
phone number for that pass- 
word. 

"Password systems have 
been shown to be 
inadequate.” says Roger 
Walton, marketing manager of 
Motorola Information Sys- 
tems which wifl sell Response 


y I Prelect b 5DC- 

I cessful it could make it oue of 
I the most important informa- 
| tion providers in the UK. The 
I corporation, usually staid and 
I conservative in its approach to 
J many things, is breaking new 
w J ground. High street retailers 
I and even betting shops could 
ti I be the first clients of the BBC 
. I of this novel service. 

13 I The corporation would take 
I the information provided by I 
I the client — racing news or I 
I changes in shop prices - and I 
j broadcast them at specific I 
y I times in the day cm tbe spare I 
I Ceefax lines. I 

I British Telecom is aicn I 
j breaking new ground by offer- 1 
I ing a database service. Doubt- 1 
I less the corporation, now free I 
[ from the bondage of being a I 
j public utility, has been in- 1 
j spired by the success of Ren- 1 
I ters, whose financial services 1 1 
j have transformed the group I 
I into a multi-million dollar I 
I company. I 

J British Telecom intends to ( I 
I unveil the service at the end of 1 1 
the spring. The electronic II 
J information service, to be 1 1 
I called Hotline, could mitp it 1 1 
I the principal information ser- 1 1 
/ I vice operator in the UK. 1 1 
I And what of Mead Data 1 1 
I Central International? AJ- 1 1 
j thosgh an American company, 1 1 
I it could give tbe British infos- 1 [ 
j try the inspiration that it| f 
J needs. The group’s computer 1 1 
I dat aba s e has 30 null km arti-ll 
des, with a further 65,000 II 
I articles added each week. I ( 

I His electronic library con- 1 f 
tens information on legal, 1 1 
| Irasmess and general and spe-l ; 

I enlist news. || 

j Similarly, the Thora-EMI 1 1 
J computer group Datasolre ha^ 1 1 
bera compiling such a library 1 1 
I t ^ ,e “fonqation from 1 1 
I The limes, Financial Times, 1 1 
I Economist, The Guard tan, 1 1 
World Service and 1 1 
Pravda. 1 1 

The^ newspaper indnstry, II 
which Is now at the be ginning 1 1 
of a pa irifol electronic revolo- 1 *™ 
tioij, is sitting on a goldmine. I 
The “old” words printed I 
years, if not decades, ago, still I 
feave value. They can become I 
the core of the new databases I 
of tomorrow and produce a I 
valuable source of secondary I 
income, which one day might I 
become primary income, fori 
quality newspapers. I 


By Eamonn Qumn 

Nearly 1300 users of a com- 
puterized message carrying 
network around the world 
were told last month that their 
revamped network would be 
delayed by up to one year. It 
had fallen foul ofa “resched- 
uled delivery*’ date for the 
software needed to run the 
network. 

The users in question are 
the banks, including 36 UK- 
owned institutions which 
■have, in the past, built com- 
puter-driven systems such as 
the familiar high street cash 
machines that are linked to 
centralized mainframes. 

They have received unwel- 
come publicity as the pro- 
grams running them have 
crashed, leaving the machines 
unable to operate. 

Banks use a network called 
Swift - the Society for World- 


wide Interbank Telecom- 
munications. The types of 
messages carried can range 
from inter-bank payment in- 
structions to warnings of an 
impending staff strike at any 
tank in the many countries 
that the network serves. 

The present network was 
due to become the much larger 
and faster Swift If from the 
middle of this year but has 
been put off to March next 
year as key parts of the 
software will not be avaiJable 

Attention is switching to 
putting into place contingency 
plans that allow the present 
network to handle tbe growing 
volume of transactions. Ger- 
man banks are likely to be the 
most seriously affected - they 
had relied on the early avail- 
ability of the new network, 
whereas UK banks were not 
due to switch to it until later. 



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- fiFyoupcoD^uI^poQm 

agag m =s 


BIRMINGHAM 
BRISTOL • 

■ GLASGOW 
'■'LEEDS. 
'LONDON 
NEWCASTLE 
: WOKINGHAM 


A business computer sales executive 
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24 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 


\ 


CRICKET: INJURY MAY KEEP BOTHAM OUT OF HR ST ONE-DAY INTERNA TIONAL AGAINST WEST INDIES 

Fast men 
have yet 
to hit the 
stumps 

From Simon WiMe, Colombo 


Imprest here yesterday 
centred on how England's three 
fast bowlers would fare on a 
pilch which, it was thought, 
would benefit them more than 
most others they have met in Sri 
Lanka. Through a combination 
of factors, not all of them the 
fault of the bowlers, they had a 
frustrating day and took only 
one wicket between them. The 
Sri Lankans scored 161 for one 
in response to England B's 364 
for eight declared on the second 
day of the fourth four-day 
international. 

The one wicket that fell came 
in Lawrence's first over. 
Wamakulasuriya fending a ball 
limply into the hands of gully. 
Samantsekera and Madugaflc 
never looked like giving in so 
easily, although Samarasekera 
was dropped when 31 and again 
whcn91. The first of these 
misses was by Nicholas at slip 
off Cowans. who had struck the 
batsman a painful blow in the 
groin the previous ball. At the 
close Samarasekera was 103 not 
out. Madugaflc was 43 and they 
had added 1S3 runs together. 

Lawrence' and Cowans have 
had little success on this tour 
and if there were an injury 
among the opening bowlers in 
West Indies neither could seri- 
ously come into the reckoning as 
a replacement. Cowans has 
taken only five wickets for 222 
runs in 66 overs and Lawrence 
six for 427 in 107 overs. They 
have not hit the stumps in a 
match since they got here. 

In his first six overs yesterday 
Cowans looked hostile and 
caused problems to the bats- 
men. apart from having 
Samarasekera dropped. By his 
third spell, though, he was a 
spent force and went for 1 7 runs 
in the first over. 

Lawrence, too. produced awk- 
ward deliveries but was more 
erratic. In his second over he 
was warned Tor running down 
the line of the stumps and 
reminded of this again in his 
seventh, after which he went 
round the wickcl. He then began 
to bowl no-balls but would have 
had Madugalle caught off one of 
these if it had been a legitimate 
ball. 

Samarasekera rode his luck 
and. after moving from 34 to 40 
with a hook for six off Cowans, 
began to produce a succession of 
majestic boundary strokes. 
There were 16 fours and one six 
in his centunr. which came ofT 
130 balls and was reached with 
two consecutive fours off 
Trcmlett. It was a display of 
great authority for a player of 
such limited experience. 

England, who had been put in 
on Sunday, went on to their 
highest score of the tour before 
declaring. Smith batted as 
soundly as ever and reached his 
third successive half century. 
SCORES: England B 369 for 8 dec (□ W 
RandaH 92, W N Slack 85V: Sri Lanka 161 
for t (A Samarasekera 103 not out) 



, ... 4l !w w t • 

Delight fur Embarey as be Haims his only wicket, bowling the Jamaican tail-finder Daley 

England need a man Friday 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Jamaica 


England's preparations for 
today's one-day international 
against West Indies, the first 
of four scheduled for the tour, 
were clouded yesterday by 
doubts about the availability 
of Ian Botham, who had to 
leave the field on Sunday with 
a slight groin strain. 

Had there been a game 
yesterday, England's physio- 
therapist said that Botham 
would "have struggled to 
play". 

It is m Botham's nature to 
rise from sick beds and to play 
through pain. He hates miss- 
ing matches that matter. But 
he is going to have so much 
work to do in the next couple 
of months, all being well, that 
no-one will want to take a 
chance with him. 

There is a Test match on 
Friday, and that is much more 
important than today's game.' 
Consideration could be given 
to playing Botham only as a 
batsman, and leaving him to 
field at slip, but yesterday at 
any rate that was considered 
unlikely, mainly because it 
would mean Gooch or 
Gatling, or both, having to 
bowl. 

Assuming the worst — that 
is, that Botham Sails to make it 
— the last two bowling places 
would go. presumably, to 
either Edmonds or Emburey 
and Foster or Thomas. Al- 
though Edmonds was excel- 
lent on Sunday, when he took 
four for 44, he may be thought 
rather easier to get at than 
Emburey, aiming at the 


batsmen's legs, would be. The 
straight boundaries at Sabina 
Park are still short enough to 
swing the vote Emburey's 
way. 

Whether Botham plays or 
not, it is hardly conceivable 
that it will be anything other 
than a very difficult match for 

Scoreboard 

ENGLAND: H rat tansies 371 (M W 
Gatnng 80. A J lamb 78) 

Second Innings 177 for 5 doe (A J Land) 
60 not out) 

JAMAICA: First Imtaga 222 (M C Naita 
66) 


F Cunmngham tow b T: 
G Powel c Dowmon b 
MCNMabTaytor 


.. 7 
19 
40 


tP J Dupn c Taylor b EOnonds 31 

C A Damson c Emtwuy b Erftnonds 40 
LCisminghanic Rooinson b ERson _ 9 


JC Adams cQowrb Edmonds 

DC pawn b E dmond s 

A G Daley b Eniburay 

C A Walsh not out. 


M A Hoktmg absent injured . 
Extras (6 5. lb 2. nb 5) _ 


Total 


168 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-28. 2-9S. 3-104, 4- 
112. 5-146, 6-154. 7-165. 8-168, 9-168 
BOWUNG: Botham 6-1-13-0; Taylor 13-3- 
28-2: BUson 17-436-2: Emburey 8-2-16- 
1: Gooch 7-3-240: Edmonds 194-44-4 

England. On the evidence of 
the game against Jamaica, it is 
hard to think of any pitch in 
the world on which the West 
Indian fast bowlers might be 
more formidable. Barbados 
with the grass left on might 
come nearest to matching it. 
Perth in Western Australia 
was faster than either in its 
heyday, but it had such a 
beautifully even bounce. Un- 
less the groundsman has done 
wonders since Sunday and 
levelled it out, this one could 


be more like Lord's in the days 
of the ridge- 

For England's batsmen, 
therefore, of whom only 
Gatting and Lamb have so tar 
looked the part, today's match 
and Friday’s first Test are 
likely to provide a singular 
examination. 

This will be the 1 9th one- 
day international between the 
two countries* Of the first 18, 
the West Indies won 14 and 
England four. Out of the 1 10 
one-day internationals they 
have played since their first in 
England in 1973, the West 
indies have won 85, 

To beat them has always 
been a great feather in the 
winners' cap. Pakistan did it 
twice in November, in fact, 
when they took the West 
Indies to the last match of a 
five-match series. But that was 
in Pakistan on pitches quite 
unsuited to the main West 
Indian bowlers. In the last 
one-day series out here, this 
time last year. New Zealand 
lost all five matches. 

“In the unlikely event that 
the English cricketers surprise 
us and come out on top, it is 
not likely that it will be 
possible to complete the 
tour,” wrote a leading colum- 
nist in Jamaica's Daily Glean- 
er yesterday morning. But that 
is a hazard ofa different kind, 
and one that England need to 
keep well out of mind. 

Their recent one-day record 
is dreadful. Of their last nine 
such matches they have won 
only two, and one of those was 


m a game reduced to IS overs 
against India at Chandigarh. 

The weather in Jamaica is 
perfect, there being a breeze to 
temper the sun and only the 
remotest chance of rain. There 
are rather too many alsatians 
guarding the entrances and 
exits at Sabina Park for my 
liking, but only in Australia 
and New Zealand are England 
teams on tour allowed to look 
after themselves these days. 

If this aspect of things has 
worried anyone so far, it is 
obviously Gooch. More than 
once he has got out through a 
lapse of concentration, and his 
timing is proving elusive. 
Because be was captain of the 
disapproved side to South 
Africa in 1982, his name is 
invariably the one on to which 
the protestors have latched. 

“The presence of Gooch 
and company merely sharpens 
those feelings (of resentment 
towards the British 
government's interests in 
South Africa) by providing a 
tangible target on which to 
articulate these feelings,” the 
Daily Gleaner columnist said. 

Gooch has become a kind of 
fbiL If be can live with that 
and yet make the runs that 
England so badly need of him, 
it will be a personal triumph. 
As it will for Gower if he can 
overcome the battering he 
took here from Walsh on 
Saturday afternoon. For those 
who played against Jamaica 
yesterday's practice was op- 
tional But Gower took part 


Northern 
Districts 
press on 

Hamilton, New Zealand (AP) 
— Northern Districts were bat- 
tling to survive at the close of 
play on the second day of a 
three-day match against 
theAustrauans yesterday. Begin- 
ning the day at 83 for one. 
Northern Districts moved to 
167 before declaring with two 
wickets taken. 

The Australians responded 
with a brisk 153 for one de- 
clared, and by the dose bad 
Northern Districts in trouble at 
131 for seven. The Australian 
left-arm spinner, Ray Bright, 
took five second innings wickets 
for 42 runs in 18 overs. 


NORTHERN US T RI CTS: First IreWiga 

LCrocker b Gdben 30 

R Mawhinney not out 28 

D While c Zoeiwer b Davla 53 

B Blair not out 81 

Extras (to 3. nb 4) 7 

Total (2 wkts dad) 187 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-56,2-110. 
BOWLING: RflM 10-2-22-0: Daft 133- 
38-1; Gftwrt 10-1-39-1; Bright 11 .2-6-23 
0; Matthews 11-1-42-0. 


RMawMrmeybBuM 

O 

23 


8 


46 

G Howarth at SoehfBr'b Bright _ 
CKuggetejnc Dawta baighi — 

6 

5 

18 

M CMac Matthews b Bright 

0 

12 

Extras (lb 7. nb 6) 

13 

Total [7 wkts) — 

—IsT 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-0. 2-23,364.4-84, 
5-95. 8-100, 7-100. 

AUSTRALIA: First tarings 

G Marsh not out 

WPHRpsc and b Scott 44 

G Matthews not Out 57 

Extras (b 4. 8) 4) 8 


ToWflwktdact. 


153 

FALL OF WICKET: 1-78. 

BOWUNG; Carrington 6-1-18-0; Trailer 
62-7-0; soon 11-345-1: Kuw o tefri 7-1- 
41-0; ChM 5-2-25-0; BWr UHftL 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


FOOTBALL 
730 unless stated 

• FA Cup 

Fifth round replays 
Arsenal v Luton Town P 
Liverpool v York City 
MiBwaH v Southampton 

Second division 
Middlesbrough v Grimsby Town 
Stoke City v Fulham 

Scottish Cup 
Fourth round 

Alloa Athletic v Motherwell P 
Hamilton v Hearts 
St Mirren v Falkirk 

Scottish second division 

Raith Rovers v Berwick 

FREIGHT ROVER TROPHY: Southern 
section: Southend United » Nonnampwt 
Town (7 45) , _ 

GOLA 1FATHF" Altrincham v Barrow. 
Bam V Weymouth: Dantard v Dagenham, 
Enfield v Bamer. THtard v Cnettennam. 
VAUXNALL-OPEL LEAGUE: Premier re- 
vision: Barking v Walthamstow: BdJencay 
v Duhncfi. Slough v Hnchm; Sutton Untied 
v Bognor Wohmgtiam v Hayes, find 
dhnsMiK Bromley v Titoury. Grays v Si 
Albans. Leyton- Wmgate v Leytonstone 
and Word. Mamertreaflv Lewes Uxondge 
v Starnes: lYembtey v Chesnam. Second 
ritvmon north: Cupton v Heybndge. 
Second division south: Motesey v 
Dorking. Whyte leafs v Camtwriev (7 45) 
SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Premier cJMstan: 
Aylesbury v RS Sou t h am pt o n Midland 
division: Banbury v Leamington. 
Bnognorth v Sutton CotdftekL Grantham v 
Leicester united. Merthyr Tydld v 
Redthtch. Southern division: Andover v 
% Pooie, Conn than v Chatham: Dover v 

* Hastings. Ruts&p v Canterbury. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: First tftftlOK Man- 
Chester City v Liverpool 1 6 451 Second 
dWtston: Blackpool v Stoke (7 0). Bradford 
v Wolverhampton- Burnley v Sunderland 
(701. Middiesbiougn v Doncaster (7.0): 
Oldham v Preston (70): Rotherham v 
Gnmsbv (7.01. York v Coventry (7 01 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Ipswich v 
Bristol Rovere 12.0V Portsmouth v Swan- 
sea (7 Ov Swawton * Ftflham (2.01. 
Postponed: Oxford v Crystal Palace 
LONDON SENIOR CUP: Second round: 
Fmcfliey v Cotter Row. Staines v 
Bnmsdown 

ESSEX SENIOR TROPHY: Semi- final: 
Wftttam v Wood lord 

BUUfNG SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Braintree v Tfltree. Great Yarmouth v 
Bit rv Town. 

GREAT MILLS WESTERN LEAGUE: Pre- 
mier ttansmo: Chard v Bristol Manor 
Farm. Clan down v Pauhon 
NENE GROUP UNITED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Cup. second round: Bataock v 
Woo Ron. 

. BERKS AND BUCKS SENIOR CUP: Send- 
\ final: Wycombe v Fiachwe* Heath. 

SURREY SENIOR CUP Second round: 
Leamertiaaa v Walton and Her sham. 
MIDDLESEX SENIOR CUP: Sermons* 
Harrow * Hendon; Swthat v Hayes. 
MIDDLESEX CHARITY CUP: First round: 
Feftham V Kingsbury. 

FA YOUTH CUP Fourth round: Brea* 
Rovers v Tottenham Hotspur 

RUGBY UNION 

CLUB MATCHES: &»«er v Weston-super- 
Mare (245). Conceited; Cambridge 
University v Trimly COteO© Dublin 
LOMBARD SHIPPING SEVEN COUNTIES 
MERIT TABLE: Thurrock v Suleup 
RUGBY LEAGUE 
SILK CUT CHALLENGE CUP: Rrtt round: 
Postponed: Bradford Northern v Wake- 
t had Tnhrtv 

s OTHER SPORT 

HOCKEY: Cancelled: Cambndge Urwvw- 
sny v Tna Army 

SNOOKER: Dulux Brash open Mur 
ngineru (at Derby Assembly RoomsL 
TENNIS: LTA tournament (at Queens 
Out) 

Monday's results 

FA CUP: Firm roust P ostp one d: Derby 
County V Sheffield Wednesday. 

FREIGHT ROVER TROPHY: S outhern 
Section; postponed: Hwang y_ Orie nt: 
Southend United v Northampton Town. 

I] FA TROPHY: 1 hW round Worthing 0. 
Kettering 0. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Pr e m ier dWstan: 

Postponed: 
LEAGUE CUP: 



SLALOM LAGER CHAWKWSHIPi Post- 
pound Hun Kingston Rovers v Swnton 


TENNIS: RETURN OF THE BECKER PROTOTYPE AND AR RIVAL OF THE LAVER CLONE 


Connors is 
left to 
lift morale 

From Richard -Evans 
Boca Raton 

American tennis continues to 
be a source of some embarrass- 
ment to a nation used to success. 
Although the courts here are 
unusually slow, cement is sup- 
posed lo be the surface on which 
American players thrive but 
only four of them reached the 
last 16 of the Lipton Inter- 
national men's championship. 

Last year, on slightly faster 
courts, two Americans. Tim 
Mayotte and Scon Davis, 
reached the final. Only the 
ageing veteran. Jimmy Connors, 
seems to have a real chance of 
progressing further in a field 
which has seen nine Europeans 
through to the fourth round. 

Jimmy Arias would appear to 
have little chance against Ivan 
Lcndi.the No I seed, 
andanotiicr American. Marty 
Davis, also faces a difficult 
match against Stefan Edbeig. 
the fifth seed, The fourth Ameri- 
can, David Pate, has already 
gone out to the Czechoslovak. 
Milan Srejber. Connors, on 
present form, should beat 
Thierry Tulasne. the French- 
man who put out Brad Gilbert, 
the only .American to have made 
any real progress this year. 

The Wimbeldon referee. Alan 
Mills, who is in charge here also, 
was faced with one of those 
decisions all referees dread 
Intermittent rain kept interrupt- 
ing the evening play, sending 
players scurrying off court three 
times in half an hour. “We had 
to make a decision.” Vittorio 
Selmi, the Association ofTennis 
Professionals road manager, ex- 
plained. “You cannot go mess- 
ing players around" 

The problem was that Mills 
and Selmi made their decision 



Cash flows back eager 
to deliver the goods 

By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


■ -Kl : • * • 




Helena Sokova returns a backhand on her way to beating 
Catarina Lmdqvist 

s 


about five minutes too early. 
Almost at the same moment as 
they decided lo cancel play for 
the night the rain slopped, the 
clouds cleared and a few hun- 
dred spectators were left sitting 
under a brilliant Florida moon 
wondering why they were being 
denied the tennis they had come 
tosce. 

MEN’S SINGLES: TMrd rant I Lendl 

(Cz) bt G Hobries JUS), 84. 7-6. Fomtb 

round: M Sraber (Cz) 

7 -B. 64 ; M Wander 
{EcL 7-S. 6-4 


KBTS DOUBLES: Succnd round: 

WBwfSSS FowtA round: C 

Uoyd (USlbt K Jordan (US). 7-5, 6-2; K 

Rraldt (US) bt A hran (US). 6-3. 64: C 
Bassett (Can) M K GOfflperrQJS), 8-3, 8-1; 
B POHDT (US) M M Maleeva ' wA 6-3, 2-6, 
7-5; Z Garrison (US). btSGdes (Yog). 6-1. 
7-6; H Suhova (CMbtCLindqvtstSweL 6- 
1, M; S Graf fWG) M A Motton (US). 8-1. 
64 

OUEENS CLUB: LT» «rt Mur stWMM 

tomwnent Hrit rom± J Uiodorptadi] bt A 


Fat CaA, who has been lost in 
a wOdeniess of seiMoabt since 
he reached the Wimbledon and 
United Scales semi-finals in 
1984, has been challenged to 
prove that be can still produce 
the goods. Cash, aged 20, will be 
included la Australia's team for 
the Davis Cop tie with New 
7<?aland from March 7 to 9, 
subject to the cooditioa that first 
be competes in the grand prix 
tournament at La Quinta, 
California, from February 24 to 
March 2. 

In many ways the beefy, 
powerful Cash was the Boris 
Bcdter of 1984 and at the end of 
that year he ranked eighth In the 
world. Then there was back 
trouble and a gradual erosion of 
confidence. Cash bad set himself 
an exceptionally high standard 
bat as the months of inaction 
slipped by be became less and 
less sure of himself. His last 
tonnmnent was Wimbledon, 
where he was beaten in the 
second rood by Rkardo Acuna. 
That was almost eight months 
ago. Since the n Cash ha s backed 
away from competitive commit- 
ments. 

Better news from Australia is 
the sadden emergence of a Rod 
Laver done called Mark 
Woodforde, a red-haired, freck- 
led left-hander from Adelaide. 
Woodforde made do impact as a 
junior and had 20 birtMs^s 
behind him when Ray Raffels, 
the national coach, realized that 
Woodforde was a promising late 
developer. So Woodforde ■ was 
given a wild card mto die 
Melbourne indoor tournament 
last October and did wefi enough 
to attract the attention of Nettle 
Fraser, Australia's Davis Cop 
captain. 

Fraser reckons Woodforde 1 ? 
service is not yet as good as a 


left-hander's shook! be. On the 
other hand, Woodforde is a 
gifted volley er, reads the rallies 
well and has a sound tempera- 
ment- He has leapt oat of the 
Mae to move abend of a si mil a r 
player, Mark Kratzmana, who 
had a dazzling junior career trat 
has yet to make the most of his 
wealth of shots. 

Woodforde was given a wfM 
card into the Australian 
championships but November 
and beat the sixteenth seed, 
Greg Holmes, to reach the third 
round. Last month be wen a 
grand prix toarnament at Auck- 
land. It was only bis fifth 
appearance is a grand prix event 
aim Ids first finaL Paid 
McNamee and Cash are now the 
only Australians ranked above 
him and mdess both are fit 
Woodforde most be a ca ndida te 
to play for his country in the 
World Team Cep compkition at 
Dttssddorf from May 19 to 25. 

In this eight-team champion- 
ship of the Association of Tennis 
Professionals invitations go lo a 
national two moot highly ranked 
players, assuming they are fit 
and willing. Australia played h 
all trine p r e vious champtonshipo 
and have been more c on si st ently 
successful than any other nation 
except the United States. This 
year Australia failed to qualify 
but were offered the wild card 
place became - in the words of 
the toarnament director, Horst 
Klosterkemper - “they have 
always made such a positive 
contribution fat every way". 

Australia's choice wfll depend 
on the players' - rankings six 
weeks before Dtesddnl At 
present Woodforde is wefl in the 
running, though be is still so 

modi df an unknown quantity 
that for the time being Fraser is 
unlikely to risk him 


From Barry PicktbalL Perth 


YACHTING: CUDMORE AND CREW PLEASED WITH THEIR AMERICA’S CUP APPROACH 

Meeting the technological challenge 

moves to front 

Peter Blake and his crew 
aboard the Holland-designed 
76fl maxi Lion New Zealand 
moved up from sixth to first in a 
dramatic about-turn yesterday 
in the Whitbread round-the- 
world race as the leaders began 
to foci the effect of the Roaring 
Forties on the long run towards 
Cape Horn (Barry Pickthall 
■writes). 

Lion set an average of 13 
knots for 21 hours between 
satellite passes yesterday while 
Cote d'Qr. the earlier leader, 
could manage no more than 
sevon-and-a-harf knots and 
slipped back to sixth. 

LEADING POSITIONS: 1. Uon Now Zea- 
land: i NZI Enterprise; a. UBS Switzer- 
land: 4. Atfantic Prwateer: 5. Dnjm. 
Leading on jwxftap: 1. bon New 
Zealand; 2. VEspnt d Equip-. 3. Rueanor 
Tnsiar: 4. Equny and Law; 5. Ruhps 
innov a to r 


ATHLETICS 


V" 


Crew members from ihe Brit- 
ish America's Cup challenge, led 
b> Harold Cudmorc w ho joined 
forces with the French to race . 
the threes car-old conventional 
Loxcen-designed 1 2-mcirc Chal- 
lenge 12 in last week's world 
championship off Frcmanilc. 
returned home yesterday con- 
vinced that their technological 
approach to winning back the 
cup this lime next year has been 
correct. 

"I'm very pleased with what 
I’ve seen here." skipper 
Cudmorc said before leaving. 
"None of the new designs have 
shown any marked improve- 
ment over Australia IF' (Alan 
Bond's wing-keeled cup winner 
in 1983 which might well have 
finished second to its larger 
successor Australia III had the 
winds experienced during the 
Iasi race been lighter). 

« 


The British are mounting a 
strong two-pronged attack. 
Their first new boat. Crusader, 
which Cudmore and his team 
intend lo have sailing off Fre- 
mamlc by April I. is a wing- 
keeled development of the Ian 
Howleti-dcsigncd Victory 83. 
now in Italian hands, which won 
last year's 12-mctrc champion- 
ship off Sardinia. 

Their second boat, which is 
expected to be sailing a month 
laicr. is a more radical design, 
incorporating a concept devel- 
oped initially for Peter de 
Savory's challenge in 1983 bv 
(he model yacht designer David 
Holiom. 

Cudmore and his design 
director. Phil Crebbin. arc con- 
xinccd hv the tank test results 
earned out under the guidance 
of Sir Hubert Pierey at the 


National Maritime Institute 
facilities at Fcltham. But the 
extensive research and develop- 
ment that have gone into 
translating Hollom's ideas into a 
match race winner will give 
them the edge. 

The British syndicate arc not 
alone in keeping their powder 
dry during this championship. 
Four of the six American syn- 
dicates decided against entering 
at ail and ofihc nine challenging 
syndicates represented, eight arc 
known to be building new 
designs. 

One team showing much 
promise during this series has 
been the French Kiss syndicate, 
whose Briand design won two of 
the heavy weather races but 
lacked sail area in the lighter 
going. Another has been the 
BN2 challenge from New Zea- 
land. Chris Dickson and > his 
i 


crew sailing the glass fibre- 
moulded New Zealand H won 
second place overall despite 
having only a thrcc-wcck 
apprenticeship in this class prior 
to the series. 

For Cudmore and his crew, 
the lessons learned have been of 
a practical nature. Weather con- 
ditions can vary considerably 
requiring a design that will 
perform well in heavy weather 
yet still hang in on the occa- 
sional days when winds arc 
light. 

With five man-overboard in- 
cidents there is obviously a need 
to devise a system lo keep the 
bowman from being washed 
overboard when seas arc rough. 
There is also a necessity to 
shroud all deck openings to 
avoid them filling up with water 
- as Challenge 12 did during 
Sunday's bst race. 

..SL 



Budding talent may 
be lost to England 

By Pat Botcher, Athletics Correspondent 


f i 


It looks as if an attempt by the 
South African junior cross-cosm- 
try champion Terry Thornton to 

fellow in Zola Badri's footsteps 
to an England team place and a 
tDt at a world cross-country title 
will foil, despite Thornton hav- 
ing a British passport. 

Thornton, aged 18, who ar- 
rived in England two weeks ago 
from Fort Elizabeth and joined 
Aldershot, Famham and Dis- 
trict; the same dob as Badd, was 

a runaway winner in a Surrey 
League cross-comtry match at 
Conlsdon on Saturday. He was 
one minute and 20 seconds 
ahead of the second finisher, 
Mel Page, who was sixth in the 
southern senior championships 
the previous week. 

John Lofts, secretary of the 
Aldershot dab. is trying to get 
Thornton into the English junior 
cres»< 0 Biitry charapkmklps at 
Newcastle on March 1, bat the 
championship secretary, Barry 
Wallman, aid yesterday that 
entries had dosed, and Thorn- 
ton could not compete. 

Lofts said: “It would be a bit 
of a blow if he couldn't run, 
because I think Terry would win 
the national championship. His 
situation isn't the same as Zola 
Bndd’s, because he already has a 
British passport The prolbn is 
that he has had offers from 
American universities, and if he 


can't m in the national 
championships, be has an air 
ticket to the United States for 
March I. It would bean absolute 
tragedy if this phenomenal tal- 
ent foils through oar hands." 

Thornton was on his way 
yesterday to visit his grand- 
mother in Preston, where be was 
born 18 years ago. He emigrated 
with his parents to Sooth Africa 
when be was six, and has won 
both the South African under- 17 
and under- 19 cross-country ti- 
tles. 

Europeans 
under fire 

Mike Turner, the British 
teadt manager for this 
weekend's European indoor 
athletics championships in Ma- 
drid. has hit out at the fixture 
organizers. Three days after 
competing in Ihe top indoor 
meeting in Europe, many ath- 
letes will be expected to repre- 
sent Britain against the Soviet 
Union at Cosford. 

“At the European Fixture 
Congress in October delegates 
seemed to grab at fixtures in 
case someone else filled the dale. 
Decisions were made under odd 
conditions and 1 hope it will not 
happen again," be said. 


Bubka wins 


Rosemont, Illinois (AP) — 
Sergei Bubka cleared 5.81 me- 
tres on Sunday to win the pole 
vault at the Bally invitation 
meeting but failed in three 
attempts to beat the world 
indoor best. He was the only one 
of three va lifters who have 
broken the world indoor best in 
the past six weeks to compete in 
the event. 

Bubka, who holds the outdoor 
record of 6.00 metres, said that 
be missed because he was not 
accustomed to the wodden sur- 
face. “The runway was too short 
for me and it prevented me from 
setting the world record," be 
said. 

Billy Olson, of the United 


States, holder of the indoor best 
at 5.93 metres, was reported to 
be too tired to compete. Joe 
DiaL of the United States, did 
not compete because his poles 
had not arrived from New York. 

“I think Billy Olson as a 
sportsman leaves much to be 
desired." Bubka said. “My phys- 
ical shape is much better than 
his. He will have to improve his 
.qualities to become a worthy 
rival of mine." 

HEN: Pole matt: 1. S Butta (USSR). 
5.81m: 2. V BuDka (USSR). 5.81: 3. D Votz 
(US). 5.61. Long jump: 1. M Contey lUS). 
8 aim: 2, L Spicks (US). 8X18; 3. K 
Harmon (USV 7.96. Hgh hmpc 1. P 
Stobera (Sue), 230m: & J Howard (US). 
2.30: 37 M CWey (US). 2X96. 

WOMEN: I^EOObc 1. M Pwca (Rom). 
4:14.73; 2. SAddtson (US), 4:14*7; 3. M 
Kescag (Rom), 4:1600. 


SNOOKER 

Parrott is a 
talking 
point again 

John Parrott, aged 21, from 
Liverpool, who had been out of 
the limelight in recent months, 
moved into the fifth round of 
the Dulux British open 
championship at Derby yes- 
terday with a smooth 5-0 victory 
over Patsy Fagan, the London- 
based Irishman. 

Fagan, who was the winner of 
the fust UK championship in 
1977 and who had beaten Willie 
Thome 10-6 last year in the first 
round of the Embassy world 
championship, was out of touch 
and showed only brief glimpses 
of his true capabilities. 

Parrott, without making any 
sizable breaks, built solidly bn 
his advantages: his highest 
break, 32, came in the third 
frame. Fagan offered some resis- 
tance in the fifth frame with a 
break of 26 but was unable to 
sustain his effort. 

Thome underlined his break- 
building potential on the adjoin- 
ing table against Perrie Mans, of 
South Africa. Mans looked as if 
he would give Thome some 
trouble with his accuracy and 
shrewd tactics but Thome 
nipped in to take the first frame 
by clearing the last three bolls on 
the table. After that be made a 
break of 73 in the second frame, 
64 in the third and 57 in the 
fourth to go 4-1 ahead. 

Steve Davis, the world's num- 
ber one, drew attention on 
Sunday night not merely be- 
cause of his convincing 5-1 
victory over Dave Martin in the 
fourth round. What be said 
afterwards was more significant. 
In an open condemnation of his 
own performances this season, 
be- said that he had won two 
tournaments, the Rothmans 
grand prix and the Coral UK 
championship despite playing 
badly. Recent defeats by Jimmy 
White and Tony Meo had 
woken him up. He said: “It's no 
use other people telling me what 
I should do. 1 am my own best 
critic." 

After, watching video record- 
ings with his father of the 
matches he had played over the 
last two years, Davis said that he 
had discovered a technical fault 
in his play on which be was not 
prepared to elaborate. He has 
apparently pul the matter 
straight, judging by the author- 
ity of bus performance on 
Sunday. 

“I played well enough, but 
there is no- guarantee that 1 will 
play as well again next lime," be 
said. “You can never master this 
game; that's what makes it so 
frustrating and yet so fascinat- 
ing. You are always learning." 
His aim is to recapture the form 
he acquired in 1983 when he 
won the Jamieson title at New- 
castle and went on to retain the 
world championship at Shef- 
field. He was at his best then but 
he now intends to be “better 
than ever before". 

Terry Griffiths, who defeated 
Neal Foulds 5-1, seems also to 
have entered a period of resur- 
gence. After winning the Belgian 
Masters at Ostend he retained 
his Welsh title at Abertillcry 
where he defeated Doug 
Mountfoy 9-3. These successes 
apparently wound him up for 
fluent break-building against 
Foulds. 

Griffiths made a clearance 
break of 69 in the third frame 
and a 104 clearance in the sixth 
before Foulds fought back to cut 
the lead to 4-3. But Griffiths 
took command again and 
emerged a decisive winner. He 
and Davis approach the corning 
work! championship at Shef- 
field from April 19 to May 5 
with renewed confidence. 

SCORE& Fourth round: J Par rott bt P 
Fagan H) (trams scores: 6328. 88-18. 
7644. 75-2, 62-41); W Thome MP Mm 
7346, 102-23, 4384, 85- 


SQUASH RACKETS 

Ambitions 
burning 
for Britons 

By Colin McQuillan 

The world's leading players 
arc gathering in England this 
month as the international tour- 
nament circuit moves into its 
European phase. The estab- 
lished order may not arrive. 
intact at the culminating British 
Open championships in April. 
During the past few days two of 
England's young professionals. 
Marlin Bodimcadc and Danny 
Lee. have made their ambitions 
all ioo obvious in high quality 
cvcms. Bodimcadc defeated Ga- 
wain Briars, newly promoted to 
world no. 4. at East Grinslead 
on Friday. Lee thoroughly un- 
settled Greg Pollard, the world 
no. 6. before losing courageously 
on Sunday at Welwyn Garden 
City. 

Bodimcadc is ranked 25th in 
the world and Lee is six places 
behind. Later this week they 
travel to the Thomaby Pavilion 
in Cleveland to join an inter- 
national field gathering for the 
first 1CI Open championships. 
Bodimcadc is scheduled to meet 
Pollard in the second round of 
the ICI event, and Lee could 
meet Briars in the quarter-finals. 

The top seeds at Thomaby arc 
ihe world champion. Jahangir 
Khan, and his constant chal- 
lenger. Ross Norman, of New 
Zealand. Their presence must 
impose limitations upon the 
progress of Bodimcadc. Lee and 
company. But the ability of 
Bodimcadc to outplay Briars, a 
player allegedly beyond his 
scope, and Lee's obvious lack of 
reverence for the Australian 
even forthcr ahead of his own 
world position must suggest that 
they might be thinking ofmirror 
image results next time around. 


FOR THE RECORD 


BASKETBALL 


UNTIED STATES: H H owt AtMCtalkn 
(NBA* Oates Mmaricte 120. Chicago Buis 
114; Son Antonio Son 113. Sacramento 
Kings 94: Boston ColKs 106. LA Laters 99; 
Mam Hs mb no. Portland Tran ansra 
101 . 

CARLSBERO NATIONAL LEAGUE: M Mat* 
■ion: Tom Potyoe* Kingston 95. Sharp 
Manchosur Unfed 102: Tam Pottoefl Klrns- 
ton 148. Happy Ejtnr Bradman Prates ill; 
Spontngs Sotert Stan 95. Wafcore Crisps 
Lmemar 106: Portsmouttl 103. Homa sp ar e 

BoKn 87: Manchester Gants 95. Portsmouth 

94; Brutal Ducks Urtriaae 104. Honwspara 
Bohon 84: QBS Sundar&M 1Q2. Hemal 8 
Watford RoyNS 99; Bimunrtiam Bute's 98. 
Noun Bears Worthing 97; McEwan Tynomte 
lit. London DoOdan* C Pataca 148. 


FOOTBALL 


AUCKLAND: M a m— 1 match: New Zea- 
tradO-SowatUmon 1. 


ICE HOCKEY 


NORTH AMSttCA: Hartn r u l Imm (NHLk 
New York Rangers 3. Damn Red wti»s fj 
New Jersey Dem 6. Pittsburgh Rename & 
Quebec mnSquw 8 Calgary Rentes 3; 
Edmonton (Mara 7. Buffalo Sanies $; Vancou- 
ver Canucks a Taranto Maple Leets 4: 
Oticago Bbck Hawks 4. St Louis Bfens 2; 
, Boston Brums 5. Mmesota North Stars 3 


LUGE 


LAKE PLACID: World CXra Men** aMes: 1, 
N Hutxr (RL 2mm (fijiStoac: 2. M waiter 
(EG), 2MM3: 3. U Zalonc (US). 2*9211. 

1. SMarftihEG). 155810: 
2, U OberttotfnorfECa, 1*6.194; 3. CSChna 
(EG). 1:56348. Metfe dowMar 1. H-J Ratfl 
and N Huoar (It), 1:17 498:2. Sttsankw and G 
HttcN (WG). U7«7: 3. T Scnwab am W 
StautfihflMjWGL 


ORIENTEERING 


BOLTON: 

event Mart Bn 1, R Bmt (Lmradol 
UnM . BBrnin 3Saec 2. H Jonas (Durham 
7226; 3. D waters (Dwhm). 723£ 
Woman’* 7km; 1. J Lochead (tnoepenOenn. 


ROAD RUNNING 


WUt8LJP:>*Bngtfna J ea me r ued mem 1. E 
London tash, 40: & Camtmge H. 46 


RUGBY UNION 


HAMKMRE CUP; Seetflnab: Hawn U. 
Atari US PonsoMuat 6, Fururttmth 3. 


SKIING 


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RUGBY UNION 


How England missed 
an opportunity 
for a vital conversion 


BOXING 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


One of the sadder aspects of 
Saturday s Calcutta Cup 
game, in which England pre- 
sented such a sorry face, was 
that it will do nothing to 
attract those youngsters in 
England who may be turning 
to other pursuits, in conversa- 
tion on the eve of tBe mme 
Martin Green, England’s coa- 
ch, agreed with the suggestion 
that the shop window present- 
ed by the international cham- 
pionship must be m ade as 
attractive as possible to help 
slop a drift away from the 
game. 

The potency of television as 
an advertising medium is' not 
in doubt In recent years It has 
given basketball and Ameri- 
can football a massive lift, 
while rugby league has benefit- 
ed from the televised presence 
of the Australians and some 
outstanding Challenge Cup 
finals. 

Rugby Union, with the 
exception of last season’s Aus- 
tralians, has not had much of a 
product to offer, though Scot- 
land, after destroying England 
33-6, may be some way down 
the road to improving that 
situation. 

Wales have an exciting back 
division to offer while Ireland, 
even in defeat, cut a decent 
dash at the weekend England, 
on Saturday’s evidence, offer 
little more than raw courage. 
They can play better, and they 
will, but it is no use expecting 
the selectors to start swinging 
axes because the other trees in 
their wood are no more fruit- 
ful. 

The team to play Ireland at 
Twickenham on March 1 will 
be known after the weekend 
and there must be many 
crossed fingers that the weath- 
er will relent and allow club 
games to be played One man 


at least. Had will not be 
chosen: a broken thumb has 
ruled him out and if Bath are 
in the fortunate position of 
having Simpson, another in- 
ternational, to replace him in 
the back row, England may 
look elsewhere. 

Two obvious names come 
to mind: Philip Moss, the 
Onrell and England B blind- 
side flanker, and Peter Cook, 
the Nottingham player who 
had such a good divisional 
championship. 

Welsh defeat 

Wales's march towards the 
Miller Buckley universities 
championship was baited by 
Ireland at the weekend. Hav- 
ing won their first two games, 
against England and Scotland, 
the Welsh universities wait 
down 20-7 at Trinity College, 
Dublin in what was the first 
game of the cham pionshi p for 
the Irish students. Scotland’s 
game with England at Rae- 
burn Place was frozen off by 
the weather and it is hoped to 
play the game on March 3, 
three days after En gland uni- 
versities play Ireland at the 
Stoop Memorial Ground. 

Alternatively, there remains 
the possibility of playing 
flankers left and right as the 
French are doing this season, 
rather than open and blind. 
This would leave the way dear 
for the return of Rees, the 
other Nottingham flanker, al- 
though there are many noted 
exponents of back-row play 
who do not flavour the at- 
tempted conversion of an 
acknowledged open-side to 
the other side of toe scrum. 

There must be a prospect of 
Richards, the Leicester No. &. 


stepping up instead of the 
other Midlander, Robbins, 
and if the back row is to be 
altered en masse, a home 
international against a team 
which has already lost twice 
may be the place to do 
England will know Ireland's 
selection tomorrow; the Welsh 
team to play France at Cardiff 
on the same day will be 
announced on Friday. 

The triumphant Scots can 
rest, temporarily, from their 
labours. Their selectors meet 
today to choose a B team to 
play France at Viiiefhmche- 
sur-Saone on March 2 but 
their remaining five nations 
match is against Ireland in 
Dublin on March 1 5, by which 
lime they will know whether a 
shared championship . is the 
best they can hope for. 

The other noteworthy fea- 
ture of the game at 
Murrayfield was the pressing 
necessity for a meeting of 
international referees to dis- 
cuss a common approach to 
next year’s world tournament. 
Interpretations have fluctuat- 
ed so wildly this season that 
players must know where they 
stand {or fall) by early summer 
so that the proper prepara- 
tions can be made by both 
nonhem and southern hemi- 
sphere countries. 

The set piece has seldom 
dominated southern hemi- 
sphere thinking and if.like the 
French, officials from that 
part of the world can ignore it, 
they wilL But players in 
Australia and New Zealand 
next year are going to be 
playing a minimum three 
internationals m 1 1 days and 
if they play one way on 
Saturday, but are not allowed 
the same practices on 
Wednesday, we are in for a 
sour world tournament. 



The winner; Livingstone Bramble salutes victory with his son, Alnjah 


Bramble 

buckles 

Crawley 


Coetzee speaks out 
against apartheid 

By Sriknmar Sen, Boxing Correspondent 


Irish eyes on A N Other 


It is a near certainty that the 
ubiquitous A_N. Other will ap- 
pear at left wing in the Ireland 
side to meet England at Twick- 
enham on Saturday week when 
the line-up is announced in 
Dublin tomorrow. 

Whether or not Keith 
Crossan. who will be watched by 
the selectors on Saturday, sat-, 
isfies them as to his fitness to re- 
sume international rugby after a 
jaw fracture in early December, 
Moss Firm may not be retained. 
The Constitution wing was re- 
called when Crossan was ruled 
out; but pace and zest are no 
longer apparent in Finn's make- 
up and if Crossan *s fitness rules 
him out the London Irish and 
Ulster wing, Roger Anderson, 
may win a first cap. 

Crossan, who returned to 
rugby at the weekend with an 
Insionians junior side, said 
yesterday. “I feelgood but it was 
difficult for me on Saturday. 


By George Ace 

“The 101b I lost during the 
period when my jaws were wired 
together and I was on a liquid 
diet are back and I will be 
training every night this week. I 
am honestly not certain about a 
return against England; every- 
thing is happening . rather 
quickly. Next Saturday should 

E jvidea sterner task.and I will 
ow a lot more when that game 
is over than I know now." 

The other position that will be 
debated at length is at lock, 
where Holland pfayed in place 
of -McCall, who injured a calf 
muscle at Irish squad training. 
McCall expects to be fit to play 
for London Irish at the weekend 
but Holland's 'performance 
against the Welsh was such that 
he may win his fourth cap. 

That would be a bitier pill for 
McCall, who is a fine forward 
bat is at a height disadvantage 
compared to Holland, as he was 
against Willie Anderson, who 


was on the substitutes* bench on 
Saturday. McCall's only cap to 
date was as a substitute against 
France last season when 
Spillane was injured, Anderson I 
switching to No 8. * 

Mobbs men 

Four members of the Scotland 
team which beat England on 
Saturday have been selected by 
the Barbarians for the Mobbs 
memorial match against East 
Midlands at Northampton on 
March 5. They are: Matt Dun- 
can. Colin Deans, Iain Milne 
and Tain Paxton. 

i Irish* MF 
lADMcmm 
, K G Stamm 
t D May 

. ... J; D N B Sola 
C T Daana (Haw**). I Q Una 
t W A Dooley (Preston (frare- 
"j Hoaand (wanderers). D B 
I), 1 A M Paxton (SaSdriO, N J 

Carr (Ards). 




ROWING 


Everything, even 
the kitchen sink 


Cambridge, who were made 
Boat Race favourites last week 
by Ladbrokes, the sponsors, 
have since been frustrated by 
Lhe weather, forced to find a 
substitute, changed their order, 
experimented with equipment 
and nearly sunk without trace. 

They rapidly abandoned their 
outing on the Tideway on 
Saturday when they hit a partly 
submerged kitchen sink unit 
near Barn Elms. The obstacle 
cut through the skin of the bull, 
scoring their yeOow plastic re- 
inforced shell over a three-foot 
area and writing off their fin. 
Don Rowlands, the boatman of 
lhe host club. Barclays Bank, 
went to iheir help. 

Cambridge had gone to die 
Tideway to escape floating ice 
on the River Ouse at Ely. . 

This is always a paternal 
danger on Britain's exposed 
eastern flank; but it was prob- 
ably considered mild weather by 
Neil Campbell, the Canadian 
Olympic gold medal coacb, who 
flew in from Ontario last week 
for a three-week stint with 
Cambridge. Campbell s first 
move was to revamp the rowing 
order just when most people 
thought it was all settled around 
the solid bedrock of the stem 
four. 

Pew. an American, was pro- 
moted to the stroke seat 
Broughton went from stroke to 
six: and Pritchard, twice an 
Olympic silver medal winner, 
was placed in the bows at four. 

So the Light Blues have not 
onlv been shaken up by a 
kitchen cabinet but also bjMje 
aulhoriianan Canadian coacb. 
Sieve Peel, the Bntkk inter- 
national. was not in the boat on 
Saturday. CambTdgebrou&^m 
their lead substitute, Jeffrey 

^Cambridge are experimenting 
with new oara They ate trying 


By Jim Railton 


out American blades con- 
structed from graphite and glass 
fibre, which are extremely stiff 
and, to retain ' their physical 
properties, are cured at a tem- 
perature of 350T 7 . They are a 
mere £170 each and can be 
lough on the back muscles. 

On Sunday Cambridge took 
-on Vesta on the Tideway. They 
reeled bade the London chib in 
the first set-piece from three 
quarters of a length to win by 
about three lengths over eight 
minutes. Carol Burton, the cox- 
swain. received a lesson in the 
second set-piece when she was 
discourteously shoved out of the 
tide: Cambridge finished three 
lengths in arrears. 

After a dash and a restart in 
the final encounter Cambridge 
just had a length. To escape the 
pack ice at Ely the crew may 
seek refuge w the* London 
Docks this week and, kitchen 
units apart, the Tideway this 
weekend. 

Bycontrast, Oxford. spent a 
sedate weekend licking their 

wounds in more hospitable 
Marlcrw after their encounters 
with the British lightweight 
eigjht- 

OXFOflft M n DoMteQ (St Otoe'S. 

gSS&TAT^i&i G «3 

Acadamy and ManstMdk i M PMb 
dwk (CJfitoniis imanuty sno iCTVvnflty 

srsvsesfi&zi^ 

chaster and tesrowj, strong A S 
Gnu (Katwrdashara' Asms and Ovist 

CAUBtaX^ I B Cti 
aid FtawWamL bow; U 
UntvwstW and TrMM; M 
^Bedford Modem and Downing): 
Wtchwd (St cwrom Dane’s and Roan- 
P L ZeMtor fHaflayCwy and 
-P H D b m #hi M Cot- 




RUGBY LEAGUE 


Surgery for Cronin 

Sv**, <«5 : ■»— ■*' ' 


fouc?\~ { prewseason frieticDy’ 

one of Austral 13 s tweca his Panamatta dub and 

ere, may be forowl a Manly. Doctore'said that his eye 

suffering an eye ‘“J"? f was too swollen to;estaWish 

weekend match. Croon* ageo w beiher bchad suffered retina 
34, underwent suigeo^ , or optic serve-damage. A' - hos- 
n »whu> 7 piialspqkeamairiaWrt would be 
later in ihe -week before doctors 
would be able. to tell' whether 
Cronin's -eye was pennaoenjly 
damage* - * - a r 


Sydnev hospital on Sunday 3 ™ 
is scheduled for another opera 
lion tomorrow- 


IN BRIEF 

Cram runs 
ahead of 
schedule 

Steve Cram has confirmed 
tint be wifi run in the national 
cross country championship at 
Newcastle's Town Moor on 
Saturday, March 1. The double 
world record holder, who re- 
turned to action two weeks ago 
after a knee injury, that he 
wanted a couple of races before 
making, up his mind.bui after 
recording the fastest time in a 
iroad relay race at Gateshead on 
Saturday, he announced ahead 
of schedule that be would be 
taking part 

However; he is anxious to 
play down expectations of what 
he might do on the day. "It'll 
simply be a case of having a 
good workout. I've been around 
the course a couple of times and 
it is really tough." 

CYCLING: Bernard Hinault, of 
France, was an easy winner of 
the Luis Puig trophy race in 
Denia, Spain, yesterday. He 
completed the 175km circuit m 
4hr 3 3 min 4sec, 41 seconds 
ahead of a Spaniard, Inalri 
Gaston. 


Reno, Nevada (Reuter) - 
Livingstone Bramble, the World 
ring Association lightweight 
champion, pommelled the lead- 
ing contender, Tyrone Crawley, 
on Sunday before being awarded 
the onesided boot on a technical 
knockout late in the 1 3th round. 

The end did not come sud- 
denly. Crawley was a gamp but 
thoroughly beaten opponent 
when Bramble a left- 

right combination, snapping 
book Crawley’s head nnd moving 
him towards bis own comer. 
Seconds later Crawley's knees 
buckled and he went down. The 
dazed challenger was up by the 
count of six, and the referee, 
Joey Curtis, allowed Bramble a 
few more Mows before be ended 
the boat 

Bramble, aged 25, showed no 
in effects from a one-year lay-off 
taa the convincing victory. At the 
9s* 91b limit, he was relentless, 
always moving forward, 
concentrating OB the body for the 
first fear rounds. When 
Crawley's hands came down to 
protect his ribs, he moved up, 
landing rights to the bead. 

The win gives Bramble a 
record of 24 wins, one draw and 
one defeat, with 15 knockouts. 
He said later: "I'm the true 
lightweight champion of 1 the 
world. I fought a great fight. I 
was in the best shape of my life. I 
do not look pretty, hot I get the 
job dime." 


Genie Coetzee, the World 
Boxing Association heavy- 
weight no. 1 from South Africa, 
hit out at apartheid yesterday. 
Coetzee, who is in London for 
his world title eliminator against 
Frank Bruno at Wembley on 
March 4, told a press conference 
that black, white and coloured 
meant nothing to him. 

"People should join hands to 
live together, walk together and 
fight together," he said. He 
hoped that anti-apartheid 
groups would not protest against 
his visit. 

"That would leave a sour 
taste.” he said. “If you stop 
people competing against each 
other you are making apartheid 
permanent.” 

Coetzee, who is accompanied 
by a black sparring partner, 
James Dixon, from Chicago, 
and his black protege, Benny 
Kaais, a 2 1 -year-old South Af- 
rican lightweight, said: “1 can- 
not say what it feels like to be 
black. 1 never knew anything 
about apartheid until I was 19.” 
Coetzee had imagined that black 
and white people lived sepa- 
rately everywhere in the world. 
"Travelling opened lots of doors 
for me," be said. “It was only 
when 1 went to New York and 
saw blade and white people 
walking about the streets to- 
gether that I realized how crazy 
it all was.” 

The promoter of tire Wem- 


bley show, Mike Barrett, clearly 
aware of the protest that bad 
already been launched by three 
leading British anti-apartheid 
groups, said that Coeoee "was a 
very brave man. As a white man 
in South Africa be had stood up 
publicly and declared his views 
on apartheid and that «afc*« 
guts.” 

Barrett said that Co« 2 ee 
would be training at the Lons- 
dale gym in Carnaby Street 
every day. While it was possible 
for the press to see him working 
oui there, all interviews would 
have to be by appointment. “He 
doesn't warn to give interviews, 
that would distract him." Bar- 
rett said. 

Coetzee dismissed asl 
“rubbish” reports in The Sun - 1 
day People that he had not 
trained, was overweight and had 
no motivation left- According to , 
Coetzee. the South African 
informant of The Sunday People j 
had never once been to see him 
in his gym in South Africa. The 
former world champion main- 
tained that be bad trained for | 
this contest as for any other but 
said that be would come in as 
heavv as possible “so ft won't be 
easy For him to push me around. 
Promoters have seen me as a 
shortcut to the world tide. If he 
beats me I want you people to 
give him crediL If be beats me. 
Bruno wiQ take the world tide." 


ICE HOCKEY 


Scots give Redskins no respite 


GOLF 


Skill in awkward 
positions helps 
Langer’s progress 

From John BaHantmeJionoInln 


Bernhard Langer. the Euro- 
pean no. I, who is earning by far 
the greatest share of the foreign 
limelight here in lhe regrettable 
absence of that other lion of 
Europe, Severiano Ballesteros, 
had another strong finish in the 
Hawaiian Open on Sunday. 
This resulted in pan from his 
marvellous long game and in 
pan from his skill, which he 
Shares with the Spaniard, in 
conjuring the ball near the flag 
sticks from awkward positions. 

In the end at Waialae his 
challenge, which had looked 
serious at the turn, faded rather 
despite bis making another cou- 
ple of birdies and ending with a 
very sound 68. 

The SOT sunshine, tempered 
by cool trade winds, un- 
doubtedly helped the German to 
overcome the disadvantage of a 
muscle strain which he first felt 
on Monday but which he 
thought was caused by the long 
air journey from the mainland 
followed by the carrying of 
heavy suitcases from the airport 
One's immediate feeling was 
that a man who has won more 
than Si 30.000 from six events 
should be able to afford porter- 
age on these occasions. 

Nick Faldo was also in 
comention at one point for a 
huge prize, bat the bole where a 
iwo-siroke swing occurred, and 
which somehow typified the 
difference between Faldo and 
Langer. was the S08-yard thir- 
teenth. a dogleg with a stand of 
palm trees and a bunker at the 
elbow. Faldo drove into the 
sand trying to cut the corner and 


could only pipy safe out of a bat* 
he. His third shoi ran just off iht 
green and from 10 yards he too Id 
three more, finally missing froirf 
four Teel to take a’ six. 

Langer look the longer routes 
driving faraway from theccimeij 
and hitting the front of the greerj 
with a long iron. From about 3C 
yards he laid up to 3 feci and goi 
his birdie four. 

Borh players know well how 
valuable strokes are at this latt- 
nage. often being worth thou-, 
sands of dollars. The difference 
between the two. in car terms, r 
that Faldo's swing is like a Roll: 
Roscc's giant cylinders effort- 
lessly grinding out the mile? 
while Langer's has a quicker 
Porsche- Like action which r 
capable oE quick bursts o 
acceleration. 

However, what a marvellau 
season Langer has had so far 
Fifth on the money list befon 
Hawaii, he was denied victor 
in a play-off in San Diego b; 
inspired play from the new 
comer. Bob Tway. Surely i 
cannot be very long before h- 
wins a third title. After a week it 
Australia he restarts at Doral u 
Miami on March 6. followed b; 
a week at his American home ii 
Florida. 

FINAL SCORES I US unless Statort 27: 
CPmn.e7.G7. 72.66 274 P Annas. 7{ 
65. 69. 70 276: T Watson. 68. 69. 66. 73. 1 
Langer (W Gar). 67. 74. 67. 68 277 I 
Groan. 71. 68. 68. 70: D Ocrm. 66. 70. 7 / 

67, A Omani. 69. 71. 69. 6& 278- J Mu a 
71 , 69. 66. 72. 279: 1 Aoki (Japanl. 72 6-< 

70, 68, C SuKfler. 67. 72. 67. 73: W Lev 
67. 70, 70. 72: J Haas. 6B. 72, 72. 67. 1 
WadMns. 6& 70, 71. 7Ch 3 TWay. 70. 6 1 

68. 73: D Himwnefls. 68. 68. 72, 71. Britn 
•cams: 281: N F&RJo. 70. 71. 67. 73. 2St 
P OOSiamuO. 73, 69. 89, 75. 


Second win for Player 


Florida (AP) - Gary Player 
scored a par 72 to bold off the 
challenge of Lee Elder, of the 
United Slates, and record a two- 
stroke victory in the final round 
of the S250.000 If 1 68.9001 PGA 
Seniors championship at Palm 
Beach Gardens. 

It was Player’s second victory 
in bis first three tournaments on 
the PGA Senior circuitHe fin- 
ished with a seven- under-par 
total of 281, having held a 
seven-stroke lead in the first two 
rounds and then played one 


over par in lhe last two days. 

Elder trailed by five strokes r 
the turn but made it dose b 
having four birdies in the Giu 
nine holes. A 30ft-birdie at th 
1 7th brought Elder as close as h 
could get however, as he an 
Player recorded pars at the tint 
hole. 

FINAL SCORES (US unless stmeeft 28 
G Player ISA), 88^8.73.72. 283: L 6 Oa 
70.73,69.71 290: C Owens . 72.72.74.72: 
King , 74,73,70,73. 291: P RttfclQUS2 ( 
RioolJ3,76^9.73;B Caspar, 75.7072.7- 


282: 6 Brewer , 76.74 .71 ,7ft B M&xwt 
7470.75.73. 294: O Moody 74,72.73,7. 
295: o Sanders 74.74.72.75. 


HOCKEY 


For many months SOtadttm 
Redskins have been travelling 
to Scotland more in hope ihan 
expectation. Two weeks ago. 
although without their leading 
defence man, Darrin Zinger, 
they at least gained two respect- 
able defeats. This weekend, their 
home rink afforded them no 
solace as they suffered two 
embarrassing evenings against 
Scottish opposition. 

On Saturday it was the un- 
doubted class of Garry Unger, 
whose three goals helped Dun- 
dee Rockets toa 1 0-5 win. this in 
spite of the home side taking a 
three-goal lead in the first II 
minutes. On Sunday. Ron 
Plumb brilliantly marshalled 
the Fife defence and 
ibegoai tender. Andy Donald, 
was outstanding. 

Dundee Rockets returned 
home for Sunday's game with 
the league-leaders, Durham, and 
showed no ill-effects from their 


By a Special Correspondent 

arduous weekend during which 
they spent some 13 hours on 
trains. Six players shared the 
scoring and the clinching goal in 
a thriller came in the final 
minute as Unger shot into an 
empty net 

Durham fared better at home 
to Cleveland. John Ciotli scor- 
ing six goals in an 1 8-4 rout: but 
the individual honours once 
again went to Ayr's dynamic 
scoring duo of Tim Salmon and 
Kevin Conway. Salmon's nine 
goals and three assists took him 
to 186 points, a Heineken 
League record with 12 games 
still to play. 

The scoring race is closer in 
division one. A productive 
weekend for Sdibdrs Brad 
Schnurr brought him five goals 
and seven assists and took him 
above Telford's Mark Budz. 
Only one point now separates 
their respective teams. Telford 
beat Glasgow. Solihull had wins 


over Blackpool and Cnmtree. 
Telford have JO points with five 
gomes to play and Solihull 29 
points with six to play. 

In even the highest class of ice 
hockey, for a goaltender to hold 
the opposition scoreless is an 
achievement. In the British 
game, where goals are plentiful, 
it is a rarity. In their 1 0-0 defeat 
at Crowtree, Sheffield Sabres 
managed only 14 shots on goal 
but Chris Salem stopped them 
an 

RESULTS: Pramtor MiIm Durham 

WAsps 18 . Cleveland Bombers 4; Nodmg- 

ham Panthers 2. Fife Byers 8; Streatham 

ReOsKsre 5. Ounoee Rodiets 10: Ayr 

Bfum 20. WtoMy Warnor * “ 

Rockets 9. Diatom Wasps 7: 

Racers 11. Oeveiand Bombers 
borau^fi Pratts 3. Nnningham P a roi e r s 
8: Sfteadiam Redskins 1. Fite Fhws 

7Aat dMston: Blackpool Sesails 8, 

SottuJ Barons 15: Cromnree Cnwfs ID. 

SlwttieW Sams D; Telford Tlgws 14. 

Glasgow Dynamos ft Boumemomh S 

18. msdmool Seagulls 7: Oxford 

Sam 6 . ARjmctom Aces It; Hwtvr 
Flyers 4, Southampton Vtonos 3: SoShufl 
Barons 12. Crewtree Chiefs 5. 


Hounslow 
back in 
cup hunt 

Hounslow qualified for the 
third round of the Hockey 
Association Cup with a 5-1 
victory bn Sunday over Chich- 
ester and will now meet the 
winners of the twice-postponed 
second-round match between 
Southgate, the holders, and Old 
Kingsionians. Another effort 
unplete i 
match on Sunday. Southgate 
will be without five of their 
internationals, who have been 
called to a Great Britain training 
weekend at LilleshaJU but they 
have so much talent on hand 
that they are still expected to 
beat Old Kingstooians. 

Hounslow were the first win- 
ners of this tournament in 1 972, 
when they defeated Norwich 
Grasshoppers 3-0 in the final at 
Crystal Palace. This match was 
dominated by Mike Corby, who 
later moved to Southgate. 
Hounslow won again in 1973 
but lost 2-1 to Nottingham in 
the final of 1976. That was 
Hounslow's last appearance in 
the final. 

Southgate won the title for the 
first time in 1974 and retained it 
the following year. It was not 
until 1 982 that they won it 
again. Last year they defeated 
Blackheaih 2-1 in the final at 
Willesden. Slough, who have 
appeared in the final seven 
times, winning it on four occa- 
sions. were hoping to regain lost 
laurels but were beaten 2-1 after 
extra time by East Grinstead. 
who won it in 1984 and are re- 
entering the scene with renewed 
hope. 

SECOND ROUND; City of Oxford 0. 
Beckenham 4; RAPC 2, Southgate M- 
etexte 1; Hawks 2, Boqnor 4 (a«J; 
TecKJingcon 3, Sevenoalcs 2; East 
Grinstaad 2. Slough 1 la eft Richmond 5. 
Old EowanSans a Chichester 1. Hounv 

Hafestone 

University 2: 


Swindon 2. Exeter Unhersay 
3. Chippenham 0. 




: Plymouth 


RIFLE SHOOTING 


LONDON: IMvarstty . . . . _ . 

HMfeip Cap: Mm Reams Of aqmtl Cnm- 
D»Aw 1-558 (N D Piter 197J: 2. Ozttfd 150 * 

it> FTtapatnek laia. Wow* fleams ol towt 
1. tartvdoa 750 (CM Parves 195J; l Oxtort 
734 iAP Hotter i$2) 


Sport to be enjoyed not seen as a crisis 


■This s the slack time of year 
for the sports book publishing 
trade. There are bo new lan 
Botham books this month. True, 
there will be three later in the 
year to make ap for tins shock- 
ing lapse, so the trade has no call 
to panic, and there is a new book 
oat abort a man with an even 
more noticeable haircut. 

m E*m on the fiefaL be allowed 
the team to rebel, and that i s 
why we were soceessfoL” one 
man quoted hi the book says. 
The book's subject says: **Rngby 
is a means to an end, a way to 
happiness. It is a war of lire to 
express yourself bat is never as 
important as Ufa. For me, to bets 
to da; yon have to find yomsett, 
to be creative. Bat also, yon 
learn to share *ritb people; share 
experiences, share things. Low- 
• what yon do, and s h aring 
with people yon love. That is 
greaL- the heart is swefling. 

Ron Atkinson? No, the words 
are from Jeatt-Pterre Rims A 
Modem Corinthian, a biography 
(none of your ghosted stuff) by 
Pieter Bills. I have a great deal ttf 
time for M Rives (Indeed, after 
last Saturday's horror-show by 
ftehwt f am thmldag of 
etafem&ig to France for the rest 

of the nsgby season). Rives Is a 
man for whom team spirit meant 



nothing lew (baa self-sacrifice: 
if Rives did not look like eoter-a- 
MeedfBghsergeaiif( M what bloody 
man is that? 5 *) by the end of the 
be felt he had not truly 
tit. 

1 do like Hives's attitude to 
sjwt- “Yob ran be serious in the 
spirit bar you should not allow 
the game to make you too 
scrioaa," be said. “It is eqfoy- 
ment, it Is trying to improve your 
body and yoor mental attitude, it 
b not murk, not a crisis." 

Sometimes sport does look 
very like a crisis. Remember the 
last world snooker final? The 
one between Steve Davis and 
Dennis Taylor? It attracted a 
record aedienoe for a television 
sporting event in Britain: 18 
udfiioo.. Soookre’s transition 
from sordid gambling game to 
national obsession b charted In 
Snookered, by Donald TndfonL 
Trefford, who edits The Ob- 
server in his spare time, aches 


with love for the click-dick- 
djek, and can write a bit too. 
“Why, you're a regular 
snooker," a young army officer 
in India called Neville Chamber* 
fate jibed (a snooker being a raw 
recruit). The rest is history, 
fates. 

Remember when intefleetoate 
used to be obsessed by football 
instead aS snooker? A puzzling 
offering comes from the football 
referee, Keith Hackett, with 
Hackett's Lao. "When defend- 
ers and forwards rise together to 
bead the ball, watch carefhliy for 
offences. The defender might be 
"dim bug” placing an arm on 
the forward to prevent him from 
jumping, pasbrng in the haHr 
with the palm of his hand before 
the hafl has arrived, sticking Ms 
knee into an opponent from 
behind, or hoUtog his shirt. The 
striker, on the other hand, 
realizing he win not win tbe baU, 

could foil down, pretending he 
has been footed. Or he eonld 
back into or elbow a defender, or 
hold his shirt and spin off ft. The 
forward might also stoop below 
the centre of gravity of the 
defender end back Into him as if 
he ms abort to nm off with the 
ball - attempting to con the 
referee into teSieeifeg that the 
defend® was "dimbing" and 


should award the forward a free 
kick." Pete called football "the 

beautiful game". 

1 am sure everyone knows the 
Know The Game collection: the 
series of 82 How To pamphlets, 
fan of diagrams of boddha-faced 
sportsmen showing yon what’s 
what. The bools are not only 
immensely sound, they are also 
immensely cheap. The publish- 
ers have just brought out a new 
one. on short tennis, which is the 
back garden game to which kids 
play with bits of sponge can 
leant the real thing. 

They have also jazzed up - if 
that is the phrase I am looking 
for - three back titles, Ooqoet, 
Volleyball and Swimming. The 
Croquet book even radiates a 
picture of Stephen Mnlfiner, the 
Hurricane Higgins of Croquet, 
in bis shorts. 

Jean-Pierre Rim: A Modem 
Corinthian, by Peter Bills (Allen 
and Unwin. £9.95). 

Snookered, by Donald 
Tretford (Faber and Faber, 
£L95). 

Hackett' s Lam A Referee's 
Notebook, by Keith Hackett 
(Collins Willow, £8.95). 

Know The Game series, vari- 
ous authors (A&C Black, £1.25 
each). 

Other titles received include: 


Standing Off: My Life In 
Rugby, by Gareth Davies with 
Terry Godwin (Queen Anne 
Press, £8.95). "I'm grateful that 
I was lucky enough to have bad 
the chances that others have 
not." Davies says. Good for him. 

The fighting Arts: Choosing 
the Way, compiled by David 
Scott ami Mick Pappas (Rider, 
£5.95). A kind of Wh ich? guide 
to the martial arts. "When yon 
feel your wiD working oa yon 
(not on anyone else) then yon 
will have got to the root of yoor 
own worth.” Contact addresses 
in the hack: A sotmd piece of 
work. 

Sport Diving: The British 
Sob-Aqua Oub Diving Manual 
(Stanley Part, £11.95). “Do not 
swim or dive with a bleeding cut. 
It can mily attract on welcome 
visitors.” [see. This is a genuine 
ati-yoo-Deedhttkoow book. 

sporting Life Fiat Race Re- 
mits in Fail 1985 (Queen Anne 
Press, £11.95); Sporting Life 
Trainers Review, Flax Season 
I98S (£10.95). With all these 
spendid statistics al my finger 
tips, how can I foil to make my 
fortune next season? WiHhun 
Hill tram paler with every page 
I scan. 

Simon Barnes 


BASKETBALL 

Six clubs 
still eye 
play-offs 

By Nicholas Harling 

Sharp Manchester Unite 
may be champtons-dea aftt 
their stunning 102-95 win : 
Kingston on Saturday but si 
dubs are still in contention fc 
tbe three places yet to be fille 
for the national ebampionshi 
play-offs.- 

The tension got the belter c 
both Nissan Bears Worthin 
and Hemei/Watford Royal 1 
dubs whose chances of qualify 
ing bad been enhanced late i 
their respective Car h berg Nf 
lional League matches on Sa 1 
urday. Yet both lost, Worthin 
after leading rival contender 
Birmingham Bullets 97-9! wit 
90 seconds left, Hemd a fit 
being 97-90 up with less iha 
two minutes to go at QR 
Sunderland. 

Birmingham owed the. 
recovery to a basket and a fre 
throw by Shoulders and mor 
free throws by Donaldson an 
Bent before Bent, their youn 
guard, sank a jump-shot with I 
seconds left that gave Bit 
mingham a 98-97 win. Worthin 
having failed to score in the la: 
90 seconds. 

The story was much the sarr, 
at Sunderland where Dykstn 
who was twice fouled in the at 
of shooting in the last 11 
seconds, scored eight poim 
during that period to finish wit 
51 points against Heme). Fui 
ther baskets by Brown an 
MuIIings for the home side hav 
almost certainly consigne 
Hcmel, who could only repl 
with one late basket from Lloyi 
to an unavailing pursuit of 
play-off position. 

HemeL who lost 102-99. hav 
only one remaining leagu 
game, against Happy Eatt 
Bracknell, another club de: 
lined not to qualify;. They io: 
146-1 1 1 on Sunday in an enter 
mining game against Teat 
Polycell Kingston, who showe 

that they had recovered fror 
the previous night’s ups* 
tsi Manchester United wii 
k 153 points) maintain! n 
his outstanding forrr 
Bontrager. whose rwo misse 
free throws late in tbe game tit 
night before had proved s 
crucial, did not lei that distur 
his composure, and be scored 4 
points. 

Walkers Crisps Leicester ca 
probably afford to los 
tomonow’s home game wit 
Manchester United and sti 
qualify, following their 106*9 
success at Spellings Soler 
Stare, who are very muc 
outsiders now, bearing in rain- 
that their Iasi two games are £ 
Kingston tomorrow and Mar 
Chester United next Saturday. 

With games this week t 
home to Worthing and at Bii 
mingham, Brunei Ducks U» 
bridge and Camden have it i 
their own hands to become tfa 
surprise packet among the lat 
eight. Their sixth sucessive wii 
bv 104-84 came at the expens 
of HraneSpare Bolton, whos 
first division tenancy depend 
on them winning Thursday - 
home game against McEwa 
sloe, their fellow straggler 
Tyneside lost by 143-1 II 2 
home to Crystal Palace, fa 
whom Jennings contributed 4 
points. 

Two teams alredy assured c 
qualifying met aL Ahrinchar 
where Portsmouth defeate. 
Manchester Giants 94-85 wit 
Irish (34) back to somethin 
approaching, his best form. 


I 

II 

■rj - 
■ed tc 

(i(l IC 
1 rile 
s col- 
jorti;. 
aJ. 

led a 
. but 
eport 
70. A 
30! 1C 
: ifct 

eat is 

i an 
n a! 

taged 

eftivt 

mili- 

Piw>- 

;u. 

Rgfot 

other 

rrack 

W-.R. 

. *ras- 
cinV* 

: cel 
other 
•ndrt 
route 

aanv. 
said 
Hack 
> had 

said 

jpa:> 



lh> 

so 

an 

re; 

m; _ 

an 

hd 

La 

"li 

yo 

La 

Ac , 

* 6 

feia 

Mi 

ov 

iru 

La D 


• if 

las 


cai 

cir 

am i 
coi 0 


lilt uivu^> jocoj^Ai rcDRUai\i id iwo 


FOOTBALL: COUNTDOWN TO THE WORLD CUP FOR ENGLAND HOPEFULS 


Hateley gives his rivals a chance 


By Stuart Jones 


Within minutes of an- 
nouncing a party of 22 for the 
international match in Israel 
next Wednesday. England's 
manager was rewriting his 
cast. It is a tediousl) familiar 
laJe. Bobby Robson has been 
forced to amend so many of 
his scripts over the last three 
years that he should seek a 

sponsor for his pencil sharpen- 
er. 






W IfeM * 
M ■ 42&F *1 




At least the changes have so 
far been minimal. Yesterday 
he had merely to erase the 
name of one Italian exile. 
Hateley. of AC Milpn. and 
insert’ that of another. 
Cowans, of Bari. With a sense 
of liming that is more than 
unfortunate. Hateley will be in 
hospital, for an operation that' 
has been delayed, rather than 





■m- J 

jaws... -. y 


* \m* 


■ s .* 


England squad 


P SWtton (Southampton), C Bailey 
(Manchester United). C Woods 


(Norwichl. V Anderson (Arsenal). G 
Stevens (Everton), K Sanaom 






(Arsenan. T Butcher ilpswch 
Town), A Martin (West Ham United). 


M Wright (Southampton). T Fen- 
wick (Queen s Park Rangers) B 
Robson (Manchester U ruled), P 
Reid (Everton). T Steven (Everton). 
R Wilkins (AC Milan). G Hoddle 
(Tottenham Hotspur), G Lineker 
(Everton). M Hateley (AC Milan). K 
Dixon (Chelsea). A Woodcock 
(Arsenal). P Beardsley (Newcastle 
United), C Waddle (Tottenham 
Hotspur), J Barnes (Watford). 


§F" 






Bound for Israel; The Everton players. Steven, Stevens, Reid and Lineker celebrate their England call-op 


FA Cup draw 


Sixth round 

Derby or Sheffield Wednesday v 
West Ham or Manchester United 
Peterborough or Brighton v 
Southampton or WiUwaU 
York or Liverpool v Watford or Bury 
Luton or Arsenal v Tottenham 
Hotspur or Everton 
(Ties to be played on March 8) 


in Tel Aviv this weekend, 

In electing to have his 
tonsils ouL Hateley has let in 
not so much Cowans as those 
challenging for his position at 
the head of England's attack. 
Whoever is picked alongside 
Lineker, now considered to be 
a certain member of the line- 
up in Mexico this summer, 
will regard his selection as an 
unexpected opportunity. 

Woodcock, the most experi- 
enced candidate with 41 caps, 
is currently not even consid- 
ered a permanent fixture in his 
.own club side. Arsenal. .Al- 
though he featured in the 2-2 
.draw at Luton Town in the FA 
Cup fifth round tie on Satur- 
day. his recent absence is 
significant His manager. Don 
Howe, happens to be the 
England coach. 

Dixon, with four goals in his 


three full appearances so far. is 
more similar in style and 
method to Hateley but he has 
not been playing for his club 
either. He has been idle since 
ripping a stomach muscle 
early in Chelsea's home defeat 
by Liverpool in the F.A Cup 
fourth round three weeks ago. 

Beardsley, although playing 
regularly for Newcastle Unit- 
ed. will be pleasantly surprised 
even to be retained by his 
country. He is aged 25 but his 
international career is only- 
some 30 minutes old. It began 
when he came on for the 
injured Lineker and created 
England's fourth and final 
goal against Egypt last month. 

Wallace, the other debu- 
tante in Cairo, marked the 
occasion by claiming the third 
but is omitted to make way for 
Barnes, the youngest represen- 
tative in the squad, and Wad- 
dle. neither of whom were 
then available. Nor were 
Hodge and Stewart Robson 
who were originally included 
but are now excluded. Watson 
and Hill are also dropped. 

Anderson. Bailey. Butcher. 
Hoddlc, Reid and Bryan Rob- 
son arc recalled and four of 
them are expected to start 
against IsraeL Butcher, who 


has not been able to appear in 
any of England's four fixtures 
this season, should come in 
for the disturbingly erratic 
Wright to partner ihe more 
dependable Fenwick at the 
centre of the defence. 

Hoddle. as he confirmed 
during last summer's tour in 
Mexico City, could be 
England's most influential in- 
dividual during the World 
Cup finals. Reid, ruled out for 
five months with a damaged 
Achilles tendon, is a more 
positive anchor than Wilkins, 
who is certain to lose his role 
as captain to Bryan Robson. 

Hoddle. Reid and Bryan 
Robson formed the midfield 
in the 3-0 victory over the 
enfeebled West Germans in 
Mexico last June and in the 1- 
1 home draw against Romania 
in September. 

Only three more practice 
matches remain before the 
England parry leave early in 
May for their training camp in 
Colorado. It would thus make 
more sense for the genuine 
preparations to begin and to 
link the trio with Steven, who 
opened the scoring in Egypt to 
maintain his notable striking 
rate of a goal every other 
game. 


The formation must as usu- 
al be wrapped in a doak of 
speculation. Robson cannot 
begin to think about unveiling 
it until the 22 are ready to 
board the flight next Sunday. 
Before then almost all of them 
are scheduled to play two 
games but for once his squad 
may have spent a relatively 
restful week. 

The prospect of the FA Cup 
fifth round being completed 
within the next few days is 
buried beneath eight frozen 
pilches. Five of the ties in- 
volve members of the England 
party but the Football Associ- 
ation stated yesterday that, if 
any replays are required, they 
will not be staged before 
March 3. 

Club fixtures, which took 
priority during the trip to 
Egypt, are to be delayed if 
necessary because next week 
was originally reserved for 
international matches. Rob- 


son may have been spared that 
complication but. if the Cup 


or Canon League games are 
held, he must fear that his 
players may be injured, partic- 
ularly as the surfaces wifl be as 
hard as iron. 

Arsenal and Everton, re- 
sponsible for supplying more 


Burden of history 
weighs on Smith 


Bingham picks part-timer 


By George Ace 


Denis Smith fears history 
could repeat itself as he prepares 
\ork City for tonight's F\ Cup 
fi till round replay at Liverpool. 
Ii is not only ihe ’fear of a repeat 
if the 7-0 defeat they suffered at 
Anfield in an FA Cup fifth 
\>und replay last season but the 
ear of again finding his squad 
rut to shreds. 

Smith said: “Wo lost four 
Mayers at Anfield last year, and 
I dread it happening again. We 
ost Keith Walu-yn and Ricky 
^bragia for the rest of the 
•cason. and Keith Houchen and. 
Mike Astbury for a considerable 
ime which obviously had a 
treat effect on our bid for 
irromoiion.” 

Though not as well placed as 
ast year. York still entertain 
Jrcams of the second division. 
Thoughts of the FA Cup quar- 
cr-tinals. however, are now in 
.he realms of fantasy. 

■'Obviously we have to ihmk 
we can still "do something, but 
name me a team that is well* 
.■quipped to surivc at Anfield." 
Smith said. “Saturday was our 
nest chance and we came very 
.'lose. Now- w-c must aim to 
mprovc on last year’s perfor- 
-nanccai Anfield. I just hope it's 
lot seven again - maybe we can 
>eep them to six." That may 
aro'e to be an accurate asscss- 
neni. Liverpool, having es- 
;apcd from - the rock-hard 
Sootham Crescent pitch with a 
I -I draw on Saturday, will be 
■non: of a handful at lusher, 
.-cnirally-hcaied Anfield. 

“At (cast we'U have a better 
•urfacc for the replay." their 
-nanager. Kenny Dalglish, said. 
Liverpool should have Ronnie 
Whelan and Gary Gillespie 
tvatlable. 

The freezing weather is 
.■onnnuing to play havoc with 
ji her filth round tics. Watford's 
ami’ against Bury, due to have 
seen played last night, has been 
xmponed until tomorrow. 
A-hen it is hoped that the 
notches between Tottenham 
Hotspur and Everton. West 
Ham United and Manchester 


United, and Derby Count}' and 
Sheffield Wednesday will also 
lake place. Arsenal's replay 
against Luton Town, due to have 
been played tonighL will take 
place on Monday. March I. 

Brighton are keen to go ahead 
with their replay at home to 
Peterborough United tomorrow 
after escaping with a 2-2 draw 
on a snow-covered pitch on 
Saturday. “On a proper surface 
they will find us a different 
proposition." the Brighton man- 
ager. Chris Caulin. said. 

Southampton will not relish 
tonight's return trip to Millwall. 
should the match go ahead. 
There will be a pitch inspection 
this morning. The Southampton 
defender. Mark Dennis, is 
doubtful after injuring his check 
on Saturday. 

MtUwall will be unchanged. The 
all-ticket rulingon the match 
will cost Millwall about 1.000 
“ floating" fans. Tony Shaw, 
their chief executive, believes. 
•Simon Stamford. Aston Villa's 
leading scorer with 14 goals this 
season, was yesterday cleared to 
play in tomorrow's Milk Cup 
semi-final against Oxford 
United. 


rerfew threat Yugoslav decision imminent 


Mark Caughey. a big. strong- 
running winger who plays part- 
time football for Lmfidd, is 
unexpectedly included in the 
Northern Ireland squad for the 
game against France in Paris a 
week tomorrow, the first ot 
three World Cup warm-up fix- 
tures. Two who played in North- 
ern Ireland's last match against 
England. Ian Stewart, of New- 
castle United, and Nigel 
Worthington, of Sheffield 
Wednesday, are playing reserve 
team football after injuries and 
were not considered. 

Caughey. who has scored 1 3 
goals this season, his first with 
Linfield. is a 25-year-old police- 
man. He said yesterday: “I 
thought it was only paper talk 
when I read I was being watched 
by Billy Bingham, but it has ail 
happened: it is up to me now to 
prove I have what it takes and 
convince the manager that I 
should be a pan of the squad in 
Mexico.” 

Bingham said: “I watched 
Caughey against Canick Rang- 
ers recently and 1 -want to have 
another look at him. He is big 
and strong and is the type o? 
player 1 am looking for.” 

Bingham is almost certain to 
give Colin Clarke a run in Paris. 


Clarke, a forward with Bourne- 
mouth. has been in the squad on 
four previous occasions but has 
still to play a game. He is 
attracting the attention of Alan 
Ball, the manager of Ports- 
mouth. 

•Joey Jones, who needs one 
more cap to set a Welsh record 
for international appearances, 
has been left out of the squad for 
next week’s match in Saudi 
Arabia (the Press Association 
reports). The long-serving full 
back holds the joint record of 68 
caps with Ivor Alichurcfa 

The Welsh manager Mike 
England spoke to Jones, who 
plays for Huddersfield, before 
dropping him yesterday.“He 
took it very well.” England said. 
“He expected that when we are 
looking forward to the European 
Championship and preparing 
for the future we might have to 
make change*- He has enjoyed 
playing for Wales and has made 
a great contribution.” 

Alan Curtis, of Southampton, 
has also been left out by 
England, who has called up 
Watford’s 1 8-year-old forward 
Malcolm Allen and the Norwich 
defender David Williams. Both 
are uncapped 

Allen has made only three 


first-team appearances for Wat- 
ford but underlined his poten- 
tial by scoring three goals in bis 
dub’s 4-0 win in a friendly at 
Exeter on Saturday. Williams 
has played for Wales at school- 
boy, youth and junior level and 
has been a consistent performer 
for Norwich this season. 

Mark Hughes, the Manches- 
ter United forward is in the 
squad even though be is sus- 
pended from Wales's first three 
games in next season's Euro- i 
pean Championship qualifying 
competition. j 


NORTHERN IRELAND SQUAD (v Franca* 
P Jmrtnga (Tot — ham Hotspw). J PM 
ICoteranrt, A NteboB West BrwwAch 
attion). M Donagfcy (Luton Town) J 
MeCfctad (Wattort), A McDonald 
(Queer's Pat Rangers}. 4 OritaM 
Leicester CttyL 0 McCreary (Newcastle 
United). S Mcfcoy (MancMsar CrtyJ, N 


BrontwkSh Wbion), C Ctartce 


988). N Saner (Oxford), K Jacket! 
(Watford), K Rekfiffe (Everton), P Van 
dan Har are (Everton). L PMMpa (Mao- , 
Chester ay. L Jama (Queen's Park 


Bromwich AftonL M Hughes (Manches- 
ter Untied). C OUUtmoni (Manchester 
United). D Warns (Norwich), M Man 
(Wattanft G Davtea (Manchester Otfi. 


The first division clubs are set 
for 3 confromaiion wiih Foot- 
ball League leaders over plans to 
revolutionize the game in En- 
gland. In their most public 
warning to dale, they have 
threatened to break away from 
(he traditional set-up if they do 
not get their own way. 

At a meeting in Birmingham 
>csicrda> the 22 first division 
dubs voted unanimously to 
render sterile next month's 
extraordinary general meeting 
called 10 consider the League 
Management Committee's pro- 
posals lor the future shape of the 
league. 

They then plan to call their 
own EGM. probably early in 
April, to put forward their 10- 
poinl restructuring package. 


SPOOLS FORECAST by Paul Newman 


iaturday February 22 un- 
ess stated 

FIRST DIVISION 
( A VittS v Ipswich 
I Coventry v Sown 
I Leicester * Brmnghm 

1 Liverpool v Evanon 
> Man U v W0A 

t Oxford v Newcastle 

2 OPR v Luton 

I ShflH WvTOttfiflMffl 

< WaHOrd v Noam F 
I West Ham v Man C 
<4ot pn coupons; Arsenal v 
>w»sea 


X Boumemth v VMgan 
1 Brantford v Uncom 
1 Bnsrol C i Vor* 

1 Cardiff v Blackpool 

2 Ctavterfld « DertJy 
1 QHwgham * Bury 


2 Gravesend v Folkestone 
2 RS Soron v WeAvtg 
2 WManhsHv Fisher 


1 Notts Co v Damngton 
1 Waisafl v Bristol h 


1 Waisafl v Bristol H 
No) on co up ons: Don- 
caster v Rothemam i Sun- 
der) Swansea v Readmg: 
Wolvea v Plymouth. 


SCOTTISH PREISER 
X Ceffic v Hearts 
1 Oydetak v Mttterwrf 

1 Dundee U V Rangers 
X HitMrtuan v AOarpeeo 
1 S» Mirren v Dundee 


SECOND OIVtSKJN 
i Bradford v Leeds 
< Carlisle v HiA 
f Fulham v Bute* bum 


I Gum shy v Barnsley 
i Middiesbro v Shelf U 


* Middiesbro v Shelf U 
< Mjfluan , C Palace 
I Norwich v Huddetsffd 
I Ports mtfi v Oldham 
( SlOHe v Chariton 
f Sunoertnd v ShnraBnr 
i Wsnbiedon v Bngiuon 


FOURTH HVfSfON 

1 Aldershot v Traroner e 

2 Crewe « Chester 

1 HarttescxX v Torauay 
1 MansW v Scwdhorpa 

1 Pewtero v Hereford 

2 Preston v Swindon 
1 Rochdale v Burnley 
Not on ooupoaK Col- 
chester v Orient (Fnday); 
Evenr v Camondga Utd 
iFnaavK Halifax v Port 
Vale IFnoay) Stockport v 
Northampion (Friday). 
Wrexham v Soumena 


SCOTTISH FIRST 

1 Airdne v Pa rick 

2 Afloa v Dumbarton 
2 Ayr v Forfar 

2 6 File « Hamilton 
X Falkirk v Kftnamck 
1 Momrose v Clyde 
1 Monon v Brectvn 


England's strougest rivals in 
the qualifying tournament of the 
Earopean Nations Cap, Yugo- 
slavia. are srill without a team 
manager. The appointment is 
expected to be made neat Sat- 
urday, when the technical 
commission of the Yugoslav 
Football Federation meet. 
However.since Milos 

MHotinovIc resigned after his 
team's disappointing elimina- 
tion bora the World Cup, no 
name has been officially pot 
forward. 

There is talk that Mftjan 
MOjaaic. once wanted by Chel- 
sea and Arsenal, wilf return 
from the barren United Arab 
Emirates to be geoeral manager, 
assisted by one of two distin- 
guished former Yogostev for- 
wards, Osin or Jo-fcovie. 
Boskov and Ivic. both working fat 
Italy, are other possibilities 
although Ivic has already said 
he wants lo stay with Avelfino. 
Stankovk. manager of the Tork- 
isb international team, is an- 
other candidate. Sajber, the new 
president of the federation, says 
he wants a manager with 
Mftjaaic's charm. Stank oric’s 
authority and Osin's concept of 
football 

Whoever tabes over is likely 


to find that two of his players, 
the Vnjovic brothers, will hare 


THIRD DIVISION 
Z Bolton v NewDCM 


SOUTHERN PREMIER 
1 GotpOrt vCoiBy 


SCOTTISH SECOND 
2 Abort * Q of Sm 
f Arbroath v Condnbth 
Not on coupons Bern** 

v Stranraer Dwntermknu v 

St jonnaione: 

Meoaowbank v RMh: 
Ouaen's Pam v East Sw- 
ung; Stirling v 
StenhouHnw. 


the Vnjovic brothers, will have 
left for Bordeaux, with 
Sliskovic. their Hajdak 
dubmate and general of the 
Yugoslav midfield, eagerly 
awaiting his 28th birthday to 
follow Item abroad. 

The least expected choice in 
the party of Brazilian World 


whom some accuse of a kind of 
ancestor worship, is going back 
not just one World Cup, but two. 
It was. In fact, in 1978 in 
Argentina that Dircea's clever 
strategy and superb left-footed 
shooting did so much to gam 
Brazil third place. 

No fewer than seven members 
of the present Ste Prato team 
have been chosen in the party. 
This means a return to the 
international sqnad for Falcio. 
whose old midfield partner with 
Roma. Ceram, is also among 
those nominated- 

Though Cerezo is playing 
exceedingly well in a Roma team 
which put five goals past 
Avelliao on Sund ay, t hu s gain - 
ing a point on Juveotus, Cef CEO's 
relations with Roma are strained 

Moreover, though be had 
asked to take part in Brazil's 
spring tour of Europe, per- 
mission is most unlikely to be 
given since the two games in 
which he would like to play come 
on either side of Roma's vital 
Championship encounter 
wfthjpventns- 

Tfae Roma president. Senator 

Dino Viola, has refused to resign 
despite recently bang finmd 
guilty of trying to bribe (be 
referee of Roma v Dundee 
United in the European Cup 
semi-final of 1984. But although 
the Italian Federation's Statute 
of Limitations saved him from 
actual punishment, he » not yet 
out of did wood; neither is Ms 
dub. On February 26, at an 


official meeting of UEFA, the 
president of the Italian Football 
Federation, Federico SordQto, 
says be intends to present a foil 
report of the case. In Italy it is 
generally expected that Roma 
will receive a ban from Emopean 
competition. 

Bernd Schuster is full of 
negative intentions at the mo- 
ment Within a matter of days, 
he has announced first that be 
mill wants to leave Barcetooa at 
theendafthisseaseu because be 
is receiving insufficient stimu- 
lus: secondly, that he still has no 
intention of playing for West 
Germany in the Mexico World 
Cap. His relations with the 
co n troversial Barcelona presi- 
dent, SeflorNanes, remain as 
Weak as ever. They are not even 
speaking at the moment but 
Schuster's contract does not 
expire until 1988 and Barcetooa 


may still try to keep him. 

Consolation for them, and 
good news for Scotland, is that 
Steve Archibald, after yet an- 
other month's absence, has at 
last returned to the team ia 
splendid form. He was es- 
pecially effective when be made i 
hb fins appearance since that 1 
absence against Atietico Madrid | 
in tbe Spanish Cup. last week. I 
sco ri ng a goal and obliging Ac j 
Argentine inter nation al goal-] 
keeper FHhri to make uo fewer 
than three fine saves. 

Brian Glanrille Is Football \ 


id wood; neither *5 Ms Correspondent ofTht Sunday 
i February 26, at an Times. 

OVERSEAS LEAGUE RESULTS 


Weld has 
strong 
Triumph 
hand 


By Ow Irish Racm 
Correspondent, Dnbl 


of a victory in another major 
Cheltenham contest, the Sun 


than a third of his outfield 
choices, are supposed, for 
instance, to be taking on 
Luton and Tottenham 
Hotspur respectively in the 
Cup and then meeting oppo- 
nents on Saturday who can 
scarcely be considered gentle. 
They arc due to face Chelsea 
and Liverpool in derbys that 
are traditionally ferociously 
competitive. 

Arsenal and Everton could 
yet collide in the sixth round 
of the FA Cup at Highbury. 
Yesterday they were paired 
together in a draw that over- 
flowed with possibilities. Der- 
by County were given enough 
incentive to make the most of 
home advantage against Shef- 
field Wednesday. They will 
stay at the Baseball Ground to 
entertain either West Ham 
United or Manchester United. 

Liverpool, the favourites 
not only to dismiss York City 
in the replay at Anfield but 
also to win the trophy itself, 
will probably be visited by- 
Watford. Brighton, similarly 
expected to triumph in their 
retum match against Peter- 
borough, would entertain ei- 
ther Millwall or Southampton 
at the Goldstone Ground on 
March 8. I 


Leopardstown 

results 


Slava (H-i). Mount Parson 
ramirrVlra AdmiraL D Hugta 


AdMntDHughas. 
i txSe) 1. TuSor a 


, Cougtarts 
laxoLI Fan 


Run (5-1 (Wav). 


Saver BuSet (IM) S ran. D Hucgies. 


Penalty Kick p0-1) . 9 rannr - H ar ring to n 
SnmCDWML 

<30 (2m flat) 1.Bateb(MrTVMsii, *4 
to); Z May OlMtoy (8-1); & Bonne 
Sants (6-1). 19 ran. nr- Captain 
RoMn, Bronze PatLOn Dear.R Kevin. 

SO (dn Ml 1. Lartmaot (Mr P 
Oaegan . 5-2 tavk Z Clara GW (5-lfc 3. 
Kissane (8-1) . 20 mvrr. Raise Your 
Hand, Bavamour, Brave Rrn. Brendan 
Okvia. Paap Coton. Sir Oscar. Estrattne. 
MsaEPachafl. 


Vigors accepts 
Irish decision 


Nick Vigors will not lodge an 
appeal against tbe controversial 
disqualification of bis gelding 
Kesslin in Sunday's Wessel 
Cable Champion Hurdle at 
Leopardstown. Kesslin. ridden 
by John White, won the race by 
one and a half lengths, but was 
demoted to second place by the 
stewards for hampering the 
runner-up Herbert United at tbe 
final flight of hurdles. 

Vigors said yesterday:“lt was 
very disappointing. However, 
both Kesslin *s sporting owners. 
John Tudor and Francis John, 
have agreed there is no point in 
appealing against the 
verdict. Tbe chances of the Irish 
Turf Cub overruling tbe de- 
cision are virtually nil. irrespec- 
tive of everyone agreeing that 
Kesslin was a very impressive 
winner.Rules are rules, however 
you interpret them.*' 

Kesslin will now be aimed for 
ihe Champion Hurdle at 
Cheltenham, and gets a (0-1 
quote from Corals, the book- 
makers. 


RACING 


Choice mares visit 
Rainbow Quest 
in his first season 


By Michael Phillips 


Dermot Weld rates the 
American bred Son of Ivor as 
his No. I candidate for next 
month's Triumph Himdle at 
Cheltenham, although a minor 
training accident kept him from 
competing in Sunday's Wessel 
Cable Champion Hurdle. 

if by any chance there should 
be a rec u rrence of this injury 
Weld would have a very solid 
substitute in Dark Raven, who 
completed a treble in the 
Sullorgaa Four Year Okl Hur- 
dle at Leopardstown yesterday. 

This race was run at an 
absurdly slow pace and this 
simplified the task of the odds- 
on favourite, who on the flat fast 
season had easily the best record 
of any of tbe runners. 

Coining to the final flight 
Dark Raven moved up to join 
Abbey Glen and on the run-in 
quickened to go right away and 
win handsomely. 

Earlier in the day Irish hopes 


Cheltenham contest, the Sun 
Alliance Hurdle, slumped 
through the failure of another 
odds-on favourite Field Con- 
queror to take the Greenfield 
Novice Hurdle. 

For a winner of two starts 
under National Hunt rules Field 
Conqueror looked very well 
treated by the conditions of this 
event, but surprisingly made 
little impression on Caddy, who 
had not previously managed to 
win a race overjumps. 

After Canute Express bad 
won at Leopardstown on Sun- 
day Homer Scon had named 
him as a runner for a race at 
Chepstow, mentioning that he 
was not nearly os good in his 
book as Field Conqueror. 

Now he, too. must be having 
second thoughts for Canute 
Express scored in the style of a 
sui limproving horse whereas 
Field Conqueror, racing over a 
distance calculated to bring out 
the best in him. did not jump 
with the fluency one associates 
with a National Hunt Festival 


24) (2m note) 1. Catharina* M (T 


Morgan. 4-1); 2. HaynDad (10-1); 3. Rna 
Slave (14-1). Mount Parson (7-2 fav). 19 


230 (2m hde) 1. Tudor Sasaon (T 
McGhram. 7-1): 2. Pwvan Warrior (20-1k 
3. Covgtans Run (5-1 (Wav). 18 minrUr 


In a recent appraisal of some 

of the better young horses taking 

up stud duties for the firs! time 
this year l wrote that while no- 
one could be certain that either 
RoasOlon or Rainbow Qaest 
mold succeed in passing on 
their on excellence Co their 
offspring, although both are 
assured of tbe best possible 
start. 

Now, courtesy of Hyperion 
Promotions Ltd, the public rela- 
tions and news agency which 
specialises in the bloodstock 

ind us try. 1 am able to expand on 
tbe subject, particularly regard- 
ing Rainbow Quest. 

The company have seat me 
the complete fist of mares 
visiting Mm this season. And 
what excellent reading it m a k es. 

In all 4S have been booked w 
tbe horse, who among bis 
achie vements won last season' 5 
Prix de L'Are de Triomphe and 
Coronation Cop. 

That exceptional list includes 
no fewer than 18 group winners 
and 14 others that were either 
stakes winners or group 
pbced^srthennore. 14 of tbe 
mares are already the dams of 
group winners. 

Heading the list on merit are 
four classic winners - Aryenne 
(French 1,000 Guineas); Btreme 
(Oaks); Sarah Siddons (Irish 
1,000 Guineas) and Swiftfoot 
(Irish Oaks). 

Then conies Broadway 
Dancer. Circus Ring. MarweU 
and Shoot Clear who. although 
unable to boast a classic victory, 
were, nevertheless, high-class 
members of their 
generationa,Marwell particu- 
larly so. In ail she won ten of her 
13 races, including the King's 
Stand Stakes at Royal Ascot, 
the July Cup at Newmarket and 
the Prix de L'Abhaye at 
Loogcbarap. 

Although most of those visit- 
ing Rainbow Quest are still 
relatively young there are a 
number who have been at stud 
longer ami who have wasted 
little time in making an impact. 
They include the dans of such 
notable performers as Princess 
Pan and Seymour Hicks (Sarah 
Siddoos); Elegant Ait (Elegant 
Tern); Kate Dancer (Kalazero); 
Tender King (Cider Princess); 
Basseuthwaite (Splashing); 
Nomination (Rivers Mai db. 
Greenland Park and Red Sunset 
(Centre Piece); A1 Nasr 
(Caretta); Sing Softly (Melody 


Hoar): Supreme Leader (Prin 
cess Zena) *sd Satinenc (Silk 

Stocking)- t . 

The Queen, who » never one 
ro miss a good opportunity. *s 
sending Soprano who. besides 
winning at Chester, hempton 
and Sundown last year, also ran 
well against the best of hex ifie 
at Royal Ascot, Goodwood and 
Newbury. . 

In my opinion tbe entire took 
supports the overwhelming feej- 
ino Rainbow Quest s 

nomination fee of £25,000 has 
bees pitched at precise!? the 
right level when so many others 
■s tand at inflated prices. 

Apart from being a lop per- 
former from seven forloogj. to a 
mil f and a half Rainbow Quest 
has a most appealing pedigree. 

A descendant of Nearco. 
through NasrnHah and Red 
God. be is by the crack French 
two-year-old and mfler Blushing 
Groom, who has already got 
eleven individual Group one 
win ners is six countries from 
only bis first four craps. 

If speed and precoslty are to 
he found there M equal propor- 
tion of stamina running through 
tbe bottom half of Rainbow 
Quest's pedigree. For instance. 
Noblesse, his great grand-dam. 
was tbe r u naway winner of the 
Oaks in 1963. 

Tbe intervening years have 
seen both a daughter (Where 
You Lead) and a granddaughter 
(Slightly Dangerous) of No- 
blesse finish second in that same 
Epsom Classic. Rainbow Quest 
now stands on his owner Prince 
Khaled Abdulla's Jfnddmonte 
stud hi Berkshire. 

In alph a betical order the foil 
fist of m a res visiting him this 


year is as follows:- Allegedly 
Bloe. Aryenne. BJreme. Broad- 


Blue. .Aryenne. BJreme, Broad- 
way Dancer, Cmcca, Centre 
Piece; Cider Princess. Circm 
Ring. Cockade, Dancing Rocks, 
Dancing Shadow, Danger 
Abend, Elegant Tern. Embryo. 
Fairy Tern, fear .Naught, Fiesta 
Fun. Gypsy Rood. Good Lass. 
Hamada. Home On Tbe Range, 
Immense,- Infra Green, 
Kalazero, Knights Beauty. 
MarweU, Melody Hour. Modi 
Pleasure. Northern Walker. 
One Way Street Pampas Miss. 
Paper Moon. Practical. Prm- 
cesse Torn, Princess Zero. Riv- 
ers Maid. Roussalks. Royal 
Saint Sugar, Sarah Addons. 
Shoot Clear, Silk Stocking. 
Soprano, Splashing. Swiftfoot 


10 (an 6fbtfa) 1. Caddy ( Mr P Fenton. 
16-1 fc 2. RakJ Conqueror (1-2 tav): a 
Codde HU (9-2). 9 rwuicBaron BmH 
B unat a n . E O Graefy. 

330 (2m 41 rxte) 1. Sfeney Creak ( T 
Morgan. 6-4); 2. 8&raDOU«4-5 far); 3. 
Stw BuSet (10-iy 6 ran. 0 Hu^iaa. 


4J> f 2m Me) 1. Darit Ravan I T 
Carmocfy, 4-6 tav); Z. Abbey Glen (8-1): 3. 
Panaky Kick fi0-1) . 9 raanr . H ar rtnc 



S \ i ' ‘ 





Tbe Arc winner, Rainbow Quest, has been priced 
competitively for the launch of bis stud career. 


Racing kept on ice 


The weather coatinnes to hold 
racing in its icy grip. Today's 
meetings at Hontiiigdoa and 
Sed g t fl dd were-callaaoff due to 
frost and snow.Tomorrow's 
cards at Warwick and and 
Catterick Bridge have also been 
victims of tbe weather. 

Ireland has escaped the harsh 
conditions. Their next fixture 
scheduled to take place is at 


Downpatrick tomorrow, when 
tbe prospects ofTatiitg are good. 
It is hoped that tbe weather 
remains stable in Ireland to 
allow their programme at 
Puncbestown on Saturday to 
take place. Dawn Ron fa ex- 
pected to be in action at this 
meetiag, with John O'Neill 
riding her for the first time in 
public over fences. 


POINT-TO-POINT 


Miss Upstone 
looking for 
right break 


Flying Ace a credit to 
the Calder family 


Cop possibles announced by the 
reappointed manager. Tele 
Santana, is Direen, tbe inside 
left of Cono, who will be 34 
years eld in June. S urprising , 
that is. to followers in Brazil 
rather than in Italy, where 
Direen has been having an 
astonishingly successful season 
for a far from illustrious dab. 

In pkting Dirces, Santana. 


TREBLE CHANCE (name reams* Asmn 
Vffla. Ortora. Watford. Cartels. Mflwafl. 
Stake. VRmUeoon. BOumemoum. Cetbc. 
Faihim. nut bare cnasnr- 

twtd. 

gear draws: w«wm, unman. Sk*e. 
vWic. FaRiim. 

SSTJEii #*' Nem ow - a-*. 


HOMES: SnalMki wwnasdav. West 
Ham. Bradford. Norwich. Portsmouth, 
Brentford. Bristol Cay. GAngnam. Nans 

» . Hartlepool MansfiaU. Dundee 

TOED OODSc Homes Horendi. PortS- 
moua*. GAnatwi. Hariiepoai. Mansfield. 
Awm: W8A. Newport. Chester. Drews 
waiiora, saahe. Cette 


BAAZUAfe Ramengo A Rumtansa 1: 
America 1 . Campo Grands fc Botatogo 0. 
ow a Vasco 6. Qoyta caz ft Bangu 1. 
Portuguese (fc Afflencsno 0, Meaqute 0. 
FRENCH: Ctqj. McoBdraiM.Wrt leg: Le 
Havre 2. Rennes 1: LUe 1. Brett 1; 
Auaerre t.SoaiauxarttcsO.MuBiousel: 
Basuvae 1. Lens 2u laval 0. Angara 0; 
Bastia 4. Ctwumom 1; Pens Sant- 
Gsrmsn 2. MontpeOer 1; Lbs Cres a. 

08 Pans 4. Evry 0. Toura 0. 
PORTUGUESE: Portmonensa 0. Benfica 
3; Sporting 0. O a tenui B o a ft SfltuMl 4. 
Penates 0; ConBa Q. SaSguesros ft 


Boawsa A Aeaderwca ft Guimsaes 2.1 
AveaO. 

SPAteSH: Las Palmas 3. Bareatona 0. ! 
Laa rfn g prutaowr i. Real Maand; ft 
Barcelona: 3. ASUeOc BHbaa. 

TURJQStt: Besktzs 3 Artreragueu ft 
Gancierblrligl ft Fenarpanee 2; 
Gaiatasaray 5. Kaysarlspor 2; 
Sakaryaapor 0. Semsunapor 0; 
Tratsortspor 1. Sanyer 1; Orduepor 4. , 
Maiatyaspor 3; EStoetaepor 3. ARay 3; I 
ZonguSdaxapor 2, KoceeNspor 2; 
Rtzespor 1, Oandiapor ft Laden po- 
aSoiK 1. Gatoasarey; 2. Poirikiaa. ft 
Sameunspor. 


By Christopher Goolding 

Even in defeat. Elaine 
Upstone can be rewarded when 
she competes in poini-lo- 
poinULAs a trainee chiropractor 
Miss Upstone often treats 
horses and jockeys that she rides 
against 

Miss Upstone will become a 
folly qualified chiropractor in 
October.when she will be reg- 
istered to use her skills as a bone 
manipulator on horses and 
humans suffering from injury. 
But already she has helped 
riders and horses back lo fitness 
in the Oxford and Northampton 
area. where she rides in point-to- 
points. 

Now in her fourth season race 
riding. 21-year-old Miss 
Upstone has ridden four 
winner&and been placed in 20 
races from 30 mounts.Her suc- 
cess in competitive hum races 
has not been a question of 
getting on expensively bought, 
tailor-made racing machines. 
Her two horses. Apple Crumble 
and Great Man. collectively cost 
£IJZ5a 

Despite Apple Crumble's 
ironically named mother. 
Expensive Item, she has proved 
lo be a useful racehorse. winning 
two point-io-points and finish- 
ing second in a hunter chase at 
Huntingdon. 

Miss Upstone has no illusions 
of becoming champion lady 
rider.but*T would like to ride 
more winners and hopefully win 
a hunter chase.” she said. 

Despite Miss Upstone’ s busy 
schedule, fining in studies and 
attending classes at Oxford, she 
has herself and her horses fit for 
the new season. And if someone 
is unfortunate enough to return 
injured Miss Upstone's other 
skills can be relied upon. 


By Brian Bee! 


Flying Eye, who for the Calder 
family, had won two hunter 
chases and 13 point-io-points, 
gave birth to a May foal in 1 976. 
like his frill elder brother Flying 
Kit, he retained the 'Flying' in 
his name to which was added 
tbe suffix 'Ace'. Never has a 
horse been more aptly named. 

Broken as three-year-old by 
Doreen Calder, Flying Ace spent 
bis informative years in tbe 
show ring, in Pony Club events 
and in hunter trials. 

His racing career started on 
Feb 26. 1983 when he was 
favourite in a field of three and 
won the Members’ race at bis 
local point-to-point. 

He had to move up to 
restricted open class the follow- 
ing week at foe Percy and won 
from 16 other starters. So began 
a suing of successes - mainly in 
adjacent bunts' races, ridden 
with one exception, each time 


by Doreen Odder. The dimax 
or his first season came at 
Sedgefield in May when he won 
the Vaux Breweries Northern 


Champion Hunter Chase. 
In 1 984. after winning h 


In 1 984. after winning his first 
raeft Flying Ace then faced his 
stiirest task by Opposing 
Scotland’s top burner chaser. 
Queensbeny Lad, in the Audi 

Alldlifiiw R* D --« 1 ■ 


' . ' ■ nuyi 

qualifier at the Berwickshire. 
The two went awav from iVu. 


The two went away from 
other 14 runners and raced 
together until approaching the 
last where Doreen Calder kicked 
on and Flying Ace won. going 

wtuOM Uii r-ii. ® 


away, by six lengths. 
He then won se 


Me then won seven more 
races in a row - making 17 in 
succession - before meeting 
defeat at the Melton Hunt Club 
meeting for the Brit Ag Ladies 
Championship. 

The 1984 Chepstow RMC 



final is the one Doreen Colder 
wants to forget. She was about 
200 yards behind when she 
realised that the others, in the 
straight, -with five to jump, were 
beginning to race and there was 
not another circuit to go. Even 
Flying Ace could not make up 
that much ground. 

Normally foot perfect, when 
facing bis biggest challenge in 
the Horse and Hound Cup at 
Stratford. Flying Ace was in the 
lead when be hit the fourth fence 
from home, winded himself and 
never recovered. He had lost his 
last three races. 

No horse has beaten him 
since. He was first past the post 
in ail his eleven races last season 
but was unfortunately disquali- 
fied ou one occasion when, in a 
hunter chase a i Kelso, his weight 
cloth fell off on the run-in. 

The Chepstow final went his 
way but not without a struggle 
and then came his greatest 
triumph, in the Horse and 
Hound Cup on his second 
appearance, when he beat Miss 
Croatia. 

Frustrated by the weather on ■ 
Saturday at Bogside. Flying Ace 
will now start his 1986 cam- 
paign at the Berwickshire next' 
week, attempting to qualify for 
the Audi final at Sandown.. 
Cheltenham is not on the 
agenda, but returns to Chepstow 
and Stratford certainly are. 

The 1985 Brit. Ag fadies 
champion Foolish Hero has 
come second to Flying Ace on 
eight occasions. As the 1979-80 
torm book informs us that 
Burro ugh Hill Lad was a“ 
credtiabfe second to Foolish 
Hero at Southwell', perhaps it is 
no surprise that Flying Ace is 
such a racing phenomenon. 


rVwHLH o j 










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Potent 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 




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27 



LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


Commercial Manager 

International Contract Law £16 -£20,000 


As part of a highly successful, major industrial 
group, and with an international reputation for 
process plant technology my Oient has the volume 
of worldwide contracts to challenge a legally 
trained Commeraal Manager Drafting contracts 
and advistog all areas of the company this exacting 
post provides personal development and major 
commercial challenge. 

Responsible for drafting turnkey, FOB and OF 
contracts ensuring my Client's security in the face 
of international financial trends and events, you will 
also work dosety with our Sales team advising ihem 
of pertinent business and commercial practices. 
Similarly you will liaise with the Financial Director 
on export financing considerations, and with the 
Purch asing M anager regarding necessary legal 
documentation for sub-contract arrangement. 

meet the demands of the position it is likdy 

that you have legal training to degree standard 


and can demonstrate a thorough understanding 
of international contract law. A background with 
a chemical engineering or process contractor will 
prove an advantage. 

you wHI enjoy on exciting commercial existence 
with my Client, and good prospects in their parent 
organisation. Our rewards packoge con 
accommodate a professional education with 
a minimum level of experience up to o seasoned 
professional, and could warrant a company cor. 

\fou can pursue this offer by telephoning 
David VNfoaif for o confidential discussion, or send 
full career details to him at 
Juniper V\fc>off Consulting Partners, 

22 New Concordia Wharf, 

St Saviours Dock, 

Mill Street, 

London SE1 2BB. 

Tel: 01-231 7275. 



SEARCH & SELECTION • RECRUITMENT ADVERTISING 


Commercially -minded 



Delohxe Haskins + Sells are a leading internal tonal firm of 
Chartered Accountants who are expanding rapidly, especially p 
tbe Financial Services Seaoc 

W? need in our Technical Depar tm ent a conmxreialiy- 
minded lawyer who wants the variety and intellectual 
sumulrfon of advising partners and senior saff on diem and 
other matters, principally company law. 

The position will appeal to either a Barrister or Solicitor, 
who is articulate, responsible, good with people and who can 
write well He or die will probably be- in their mid ki> and na\t 
tbe knowledge and experience to command a <oLia of between 
£20,000 and £25.000. 

Please send cv in confidence . Flnlnifln 

UhManhew Patient UBtUsUB 

128 Queen Victoria Street Haskins+Sells 


LONDON EGiP-jJX 


CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS 


jsL licensing. Patents or Legal experience? 

*5jr ■ .V An opportunity to progress your career as a... 

Potent & Licensing Executive 

Beckenham, Kent 





Career 

Opportunities 

in Commercial 
Litigation 


We are a long established major 
City practice, with overseas offices 
in Hong Kong, Tokyo and Paris, 
which provides a comprehensive 
legal serv ice to a wide range of 
prestigious clients of whom the 
majority are based overseas. Our 
practice is expanding and we have 
a continuing requirement for 
lawyers with drive and enthusiasm 
to specialise in commercial 
litigation. The work is 
challenging and intellectually 
stimulating, and involves a wide 
variety of high quality High Court 
and arbitration matters, mostly of 
a shipping insurance nature, in 
England and foreign jurisdictions. 

We welcome applications 
from lawyers who are interested in 
specialising in the above- 
mentioned work; if you have 
experience in other areas of 
practice but lack experience 
of commercial 


litigation, or wish to pursue a new 
career path, we would like to hear 
from you. Applicants will have, 
ideally, good academic 
qualifications and sound 
commercial judgment combined 
with flair and imagination. A 
desire to travel and a knowledge of 
one or more foreign languages, 
particularly French, would be an 
advantage. We offer competitive 
remuneration, above average 
working conditions and excellent 
prospects. 



If you wish to apply for one of 
these appointments, or to discuss 
your suitability, please write to or 
telephone John Hamilton quoting 
JH/II6 at:— 

John Hamilton Associates, 
51/53 High Street, Guildford, 
Surrey GUI 3DY. 

Tel: (0483) 574814. 


BS 

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John Hamilton Associates 
.Legal Personnel fi i Management Consultants. 




The Wellcome Foundation Is the parent of an 
international group of pharmaceutical companies 
with headquarters in die United Kingdom and a 
current annual turnover In excess of £ 1000 m. 

The Patents &. Agreements Department is 
responsible for a patents service to the whole of 
the Wellcome Group, as well as the formulation 
and co-ordination of agreement and licence 
activities in the research and development area. 

As a result of an internal transfer a vacancy has 
arisen for an executive, probably aged 25-30. to 
work in a small team responsible for all patent, 
licence and agreement aspects In specific technical 
areas. 

of application, giving details of academic and employment achievements, 
piM^u ul Interests and career objectives should be addressed to Miss LM. J osset. 
Personnel Officer; The Wellcome Research Laboratories Langley Court, Beckenham, 
Kent BR3 3BS, quoting reference WRl/394> 


it is an excellent opportunity for those candidates 
with licensing patents or legal experience who are 
keen to train and qualify as a Chartered Patent 
Agent and European Patent Attorney. An enquiring 
mind, good written skills and the ability to 
communicate with scientific, legal and commercial 
staff are essential qualities. I n addition, a degree in a 
scientific discipline would be an advantage 

We offer an attractive salary dependent on 
qualifications and experience and our scales will 
be reviewed on 1st May 1986. Excellent company 
benefits include 5 weeks’ holiday pension scheme, 
subsidised restaurant and first class sports and 
social dub facilities. Assistance with relocation 
expenses will be considered where appropriate. 




Wellcome 


Senior 
Legal Officer 

Herts* c.£l6,000+ 

Generous Benefits 

We have been rerained by * well known and 
successful Ule office to seek a oualihed solicitor or 
barrister to fulfil a key role within their legal and 
technical department. 

Your responsibil ides, as pan of a small ream, 
will include advising the company on the 
implications ol newjegtsLirion and sou must have 
the ability to liaise efrecmeK wuh the marketing 
department on the launch of new produces. 
Experience of drafting mists, policies and unit nust 
deeds is necessary. 

You are probably aged around 50 with previous 
experience within me insurance sector. 

To apply, please Telephone or wrire in the 
strictest confidence ro Geoffrey Mather LLB- 
quoting reference 9920. Lloyd Chapman 
Associace&lOO New Bond Street, London 
WlY 0 HR. Telephone: 01-408 1670. 

Uo 



Associates 


International 
Search and Selection 


J 


Conveyancing 

Lawyer 

BERMUDA 

Tax-free salary + benefits 


. The leading partne r sh ip of 
Conyers, Dffl& Pearman requires 
2 Conveyancing Lawyer to under- 
take a substantial and interesting 
range of commercial and private 
wore for local and international 
dienrs. 

You must have at 
least five years’ relevant 


a sizeable, modem office. 

A very attractive, tax-free 
salary will be complemented by 
other benefits including Health 
and other insurances. 

Interviews wiU be held in 
London. " ’ . 




dent managerial ability 
to organise and control 

H\ Advertising 


Please send full ev 

which wiU be forwarded 
to our cKeot unopened. 
Ref:R20S9/T. 


LEGAL ADVISER FOR 
LIFE AND PENSIONS/ 
COMPANY SECRETARY 

Ttro right «w 4 c ont*M*l be w pttctegic: 

. L ftoquHadasartgcftDrarbamttor 
2. Ham exparionratatfttBte art pontoon tadwtry 


3. Be a ppointed Senary of IUS Ufa 

- - - - y • •- ■ ■ U|£ »i 1 — -- mif gnn.Jf,, 

LuuipiJry LVIlUU *OQ Moa rraoKfM JOG ra»UH| 

Company Lktoted 

Wb^napoastiStoiRJuidba drafting md vetting 
afi legal contract!, vatttag of pofaies and ten ur e , 
s ec retari al duties pradnd de w tep m ewt, brand! 
properties. The appfcant.wouid be expected to writ ta 
the Administraiise Office to CheknshnL 
Salary -accocdng to agaanc 
■xperiortce. 

• PtaanwritotoortefapteoK 

• fttrli nd D n - -* * 

fucnifa rvLoautnv* 

Managing Dktctor, 

MG Assurance GmoUnkad, 

-Three Quays, low ML 
London GC 3 R 6 BO. 

Ifefc 01-626 4588, ext. 250. 



MAG life 


COMMERCIAL SEC/PA £10.000+ 

An orgm posaon easts m tbs young art e rea rt ag Font ha w ing 
ConsHW/CofTmeoai work Tfus uu r mi m Pams seeks afl tx&sv 
steed Leg* Aum Secretary taotonp is M rna ana s Wort 
erecessag eweranca assenwl tu x -fraaong rtl be gwen. CaH Mem 
SENIOR PARTNER'S SEC £10,000 

Eswswd Cewrt lonoon practce are non setoong an e q ynran d 
leg* Seamary lo asset a Saw Panner on a tt bass Hespecotses 
«i comment* tor art non uraersrv mouses toe asssance m a ngm 
tonpeRnt art wefl eaucated Seoetary men a gooo legal ba*gn » w. 
X-tamg wd te pm oo the wort pncBisa. Cal Carmri. 

URGENT hne a demand to leg* Seersanes b hO te 
7. w.un 1 1 oor ptesnpo us ckems Umpnut Qmai London. 
TEMPS bcetu noes pbs nrtoay art Bank Hobby pay 

1. Lou iW Sees SMRtart art kuCB.ipwt&SQiXL 

2. Legal Agow/ShORbart Sees, up to EfcDO pft. 
Far nwe intannabon about these art taker ntensbng pasters 
please cab Carnal or Mexa on 01-242 078S. 

95 Abtwych. London. WC2& 4JR. 

Tet 01-242 0785 (24 br answer service). 


‘Versotmel 
Appointments 

OS AkSnych. London WC2&4JF. 181:01 -2«2078S 
{24 no ans-aanca}. 






UK Legal Advisers 

Hertfordshire Salary negotiable 

On behalf of our efient, a major US based multinational group with 
extensive investments throughout Europe, we are seeking a Lawyer 
with exceptional abilities to HI the position of UK Legal Adviser. 
Reporting to senior management of the UK subsidiary, the successfii 
candidate will be expected to provide legal advice and assistance on 
a very wide range ot matters connected with the group’s activities in 
the UK. He or she win also hold the position of Company Secretary 
and participate in the formulation of subsidiary policy. 

Idea&y this appointment will suit an ambitious Banister or Solictor 
who wishes to move into a stimulating environment, and who may be 
in private practice or a corporate legal role at present 

Essential qualifications are a good Law Degree, five to ten years' post 
qualification experience in English Company and Commercial Law, 
and a willingness to travel a reasonable amount in the UK and abroad. 

Applicants, probably aged late 20s -early 30s, should have a keen 
business sense and commercial outlook. They should be accus- 
tomed to dealing with people at senior levels, have good outgoing 
personalities and good communication Skills. They should be confi- 
dent and articulate with the ability to develop imaginative solutions to 
legal problems. Knowledge of other European tegad systems and abil- 
ity to speak other European languages, would be an advantage. 

Benefits include company car and assistance with relocation 
expenses, if necessary. 

Please write - in confidence - with fufl curriculum vitae and salary 
details to David Bennefl ref. A^3819. 

This appo&Vntvni e open to men and women. 

HAY-MSL Selection and Advertising Limited, 

52 Grosvenor Gardens, London SW1W 0AW. 

OITScas In Eu ro p e . Bw/Vnartcas. dusfratasia anti Asia Pa&Gc. 


rSi. 






LEGAL 



COMPANY COHMEKM 
UOTrt R«uht«w 
prartiCC- MW4H**"* oao< T- .- 
miv. cany MWgy 
ErtbrrtS. 2 year* 


y qiuLMD todflWf 

ino iwurN Mr 

London prtli*? °w»j Sg 

mMKTHM! TOOMMn'WW" 


?SirSo»«4e*.v«tan*s- 
London El 


compaitt 

W 

2SIS3. 


unmnwnoucnw imiwy 
mnniupd lor fAH And r rim uias 
SrtTwrth Dwanm Hjrer- 
Ikt tlO.CCC. 

0M8 2S185. 

BU Mt l Ul OUM. TWW 
,~r me m mandMff rom> 
—m law. miraiud an. 
T^Joftooc no. Ol JSS A680 
-imjmw nimi yoimfl ygai n- 
Mr «en««J Ui^UMn 
f yinn whhi CO nwflU nte. 
OUj 281 S3. 

wuc iO L IK 1 ' e xe cut iv e for 
^Ewyail imoaVon work. £9.000. 
mwi ComonanB 0939 
26IS3- 

MMVKVAmNLrin. VArwMlcs 

dgnMiK h«M 

Oantinnnt* CfiSB 25183, 

coitnr*™** S0Z22 

* — e lor woe*- 

“■ 0BU29US. ... 


Excctmvc um*. 
TWIL MBinmemal mas lor tan 
MWianOs mAniors £9000 
. W«MI CokuICMIi 0935 
. 2S1A3. 

ep. Mr N- Hens moicr. Litm. 
■ uon or noiHBa ml Coon 
Ausnolrv Ol G83 OOOS. 

UBMWMNT e» n p cN «n lot 

. - Buna town linn £iO 000 Wr, 
sex CBtwuHanw. 0938 28183 

unsATioM w. twM no to a 

yr» adm. Some mi or ary. Couri 
- Ascocules Ol £83 OOSfi 

MWOfTIN. CMVCVANCINO 

- tun. Legal Exec ar*t.- 
Coon AHonain oi 585 00S5. 

CONVEYANCn OF MSH raltbn- 
*nUi mdnuiil onMoomenl 
Md Dbcimns «ooe9l exnenenre 
for CH« or London uhnwn. 
’■ S B.SM. Vhon ■ Cam ulwm w 
099825183. 


BEXLEY MA6ISTRATES COUNT 

TRAINEE COURT CLERK 

.. £6,021 - £7,446 

(inciadhig London weightb^] 

AwllcauoBi an mviirt from Barrister*. SoUdter*. 
.Graduates or otter suitably Qualified persons who wish to 
Irate (or a professional career m tee Magistrates Courts 
Service. 

A surrmfoi candidate wtn has passed Law Sodety/ 
Qar finals would receive £7.o46 per anoum. 

Aithtnioh ine post is now exempt from LM GS.C. rinp- 
fence irsmcnons. appucauans from Greater London 
Council employees win be name many welcome under 
our present lr poling scheme, all previous trainees lav* 
made rapid process and poised promotion. 

runner aetaus and appitcaaon forms may be obtained 
from; 

The Clerk to the Justices 
’ Bexley Magistrates Court, 

AJbtoa Rood, 

Bexteyheatfi, 

Kent DAS 7NB 

01 304 5211 ext 24 

M W im tamo Vksm Be rrlurned by Monaw 3rd Ham 1986. 


PMtaAVX AOUCTTOK aanwipo 
■» » W HW-CM i™. 
. £ll.0OO. Wnen Comuliana 
-Q9M 28185. 


CAST te WO H aohnion nrra 
vounq taajauon waeaor liViaO 
. w, i«n«ah £1 1-000 Wn«rx 

CoikuJ L ulls 0035 2SIB5. . 


GEORGE GREEN & CO 

SOLICITORS : 


COMMERCIAL LITIGATIOM 


One of the most progressive law practices in the West 
Midlands urgently requires two additional solicitors of 
partnership calibre to join its fftkpuon team. 

ion 
Its 


TTwjwfll athtte corporate dioiK in con&aq Uti 


litigation prevention, they will represent 
ano thdr insures and. as occasion arises, i 
undertake claims andempkyne nt work toiedi 


These posts are important and. therefore, upwards of 
f20000ixa- is avafiahie infrfetfy to candidates Tor die 
senior position itawnqVSyearsgood post quaiiUcation 
experience anti £12300 to camtitiaies tor the junior 
position. A suitable car and Q.UPA. membership goes 
with each appofmmenL Candidates are invited to write 
with Ml ItTfe- 


Rdtard M. Cliff 
GEORGE GREETi fir CO. 
134/5 f%h Street Cradiev Heath, 
wartey. Vfest Midlands. B64 5HW. 


LONDON 

DISTRICTS 

Knigbtsbridge 

Corwyaroag sotator Ol 
imnui 3 years pod 
ouawaten eamnet 
teCBmsL ncnweaL «lh 
urn tnstt art moHft. Ddirts 
p 9K propeas. H^8y 
c o mppt ta i e stony. 

North West London 

LnqaMH Mlartr of aMwnm.3 
y ears post qurtcaaon 
PrmofHSy bnHonl art nnant 




of wry bgti patty. 
cX 15,000 + good prospWS 

South West London 

kswfy (patted sofacso or k&i 
eac uwe a dD Con wyaong 
and general tagnnn vi sirai. 
ficrtty macs AmcMsatey 
art goad prospects 
All saSanas to Die sum 
poscob m eotnly negunatfe. 

gavTcrsonnei 

# 


LONDON 

CITY 

Cmnae tmanx sotator ol 
son! City taA^oumL 2/3 
years gust QuaMietonn. sought 
by medun to Urge Cxy practice 
Satay saw swage 

CENTRAL 

LONDON 

Sokcsor. to mk msrtowed 
on cofrtany conrnrnto. sougnr 
by noun sum prac a c e 3/4 
yeas posl qnMawn Coy 
Borenix essenm EsceUen 
satoy and «aHy pttap- 

CITY 

toge qntty mart comeyanong 
workload. n amgerul 
sumustongs- Sotaflors to 3/4 
years retvart oast *atte»w 
sqienence reowed by medun 
sued pradee MradiK and 1 
oeuaM prospats. 

All salines or ms above 
Doihwk are ertnsty nagownte 

jgwHersonnef 


ffOUNO rwnlly OualrftM soUrt 
m km foulitl r#cuir«d lor lOOs, 
nimmai in nrartirr. Pmioui 
rnfflaul MpHnmr uiwirm- 
wry Touwtli i Os. StO 
Bumou Hill. Lonaon bW2. 

veuNSLlt%Mor Iw hu>v Sautft- 

Jinnsnn firm CIO OOP Wntn 
Coosunonli. OUS 23183 

ran LIST of faun try wMirs 
di uiarm from C7.DOO to 
C28.O0O Clumom « Pdrinm 

Ol e>06 9571. 

MSH STttEET Gram rvanilio- 
nrr ter Ww Londco MMirnon 
il ?&£ ConsolUJil* 

OBUZSIU. 


CHAMBERS 

Expanding Com- 
mon Law set in 
London with excel- 
lent premises need I 
or 2 ambitious ju- 
niors of 7 or more 
years call to join the 
team. 

top* lo MX BZZ. Thr 
ftm. M to> 404. Vtotau 


Out of London 

S Herts 

ftp caitoe sotator mtfi i 
iwwiun of 3-4 years post 
oainicaun eepacnce requred 
by tlw gp-ahead practce Ovd 
kbgaiwi Mrtaad. Salary htody 
atoadire. 

Surrey 

towfy qnbtied stoedor widi 
retevant arecto nporm to 
eom«ny art cnmmen aa i 
requed to tan iris Rsoeoal 
practice Salary hgtty toname. 

Central Norfolk 

Competent predmnx mo 
appnwmatohr 3 year; 
c omiey an onp erpenence 
ream hi by Ihs tugs ay 
araotcr Atoiost eutiswtoy 
resdermalwHUoad Salary im to 
f 15.000 

AH satires tor pie above 
puaons ate entnty negotiable. 

^tv^trsoniteT 


Uta NW 

&MM9W1 — 


Managing Clerk/ 
Legal Executive 

Required by Wl prac- 
tice to undertake large 
volume of residential 
conveyancing. Salary 
according to age and 
experience. 

Id 434 2694 (day- 
time) 958 SI 10 (eves). 












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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 1 8 1-986 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


-‘Aip. i 


*jr, 


INTELLECTUAL 
PROPERTY LAWYERS 


l i 


Lawyers for Insurance Careers 


Aged 26-28 


£15,000+ 


Our client is a small and dynamic division erf a prestigious City firm erf mutual insurance 
managers. It is involved in the insurance of world wide containeiftmit load operations- As 
part of its planned growth it now seeks legal professionals to take up a career in 
underwriting or liability claims. ... _._ i 

Candidates will be graduate lawyers with a grounding in insurance. Numeracy, commercial 
acumen, an eye for detail and a Feel for computers would be assets. Languages would be 
useful as international travel and client contact are frequent. This is a very real opportunity 
for a career within the lively and ambitious teams who mak e this company a world leader 
in its field. . ... . • a 


We are looking for able and experienced 
lawyers to handle the increased workload 
irvour Intellectual Property department. 
Applicants should have a first class academic 
record and ideally have a science degree 
with relevant experience. 

The variety of work is stimulating covering 
every area of intellectual property law, both 
contentious and non-contentious. The 
business is worldwide and knowledge of 
a foreign language would be useful. 

The rewards, professionally and financially, 
are very attractive. 

If you would like to find out more, please 
write sending a complete CV to Michael 
Charteris-Black, 14 Dominion Street, 
London EC2M 2RJ. 


U1 Its LLC1U. ... c j 

Please apply in writing, quoting reference 2126, giving details of your career and 
ambitions. Your application will be treated in- the strictest confidence. 

r l: n rimim A WaeEminctW Palarp ItAfYlPn!?. ArTlllCrV 


Mrs Indira Brown, Corporate Resourcing Group, 6 Westminster Palace Gardens, Artiliexy 
Row, London SW1P 1RL, or telephone: 01-222 5555 for an application form. 


Corporate Resourcing Group 


Management Consultants ■ Executive Search 
Fan of BemdLson International 

BRUSSELS - COPENHAGEN ■ FRANKFURT ■ GENEVA ■ LONDON * MADRID - NEW YORK - PARIS 


SIMMONS & SIMMONS 


CONSUMER LAWYERS 


Anderson, Squires 




■ If you have recently qualified in ervil law and are looking for a job which 
entails putting your knowledge 1 q practical use, you could be the ideal 
candidate lor one of two new posts within our young team of legal advisers. 
You should have an interest in consumer affairs, the patience to sort out 
problems and some office experience. 

Consumer Lawyers handle the Consumer cases submitted to us by members 
of our Which? Personal Service, and give advice on a variety of general 
consumer questions including those arising from the Association's work and 
publications. They work under pressure but the wide variety ot problems 
handled makes the job interesting. 

Salary will be on a scale rising from £10,407 to £13.724 with scope for further 
progression. Benefits include 28 days annual holiday, pension scheme, free 
life assurance and interest-free season ticket loan. 


Opportunity in major U.S. bank for young solicitor 


Please write for an Application Form to: Personnel Services Managed 
Consumers' Association, 14 Buckingham Street 
London WC2N 60S 


LEGAL ADVISOR 


Excellent salary & banking benefits 


Our client is the Chase Manhattan Bank, one of the largest and most 
prestigious of U.S. banks. It provides a wide range of banking 
services in the U.K. and has been consistently at the forefront of 
development in new products and markets. 


This position within the legal department, covers the complete range 
of legal matters and problems affecting the bank’s interests. It 
provides full involvement in the bank’s lending portfolio; working 
with marketing officers on negotiation of loan agreements and 
review of documentation as well as an advisory role in the structuring 
of the bank’s business. 


BIRCHAM &CO. 


Commercial 

Property 


Do you know where 
you are going? 


The ideal candidate is a relatively recently qualified solicitor; he/she 
should have some technical background in working with banks on 
their financial transactions, and excellent verbal and written 
communication skills. The exposure to virtually all areas of a major 
banking group should provide a strong stepping stone for future 
career development. Excellent banking benefits, including subsidised 
mortgage, bonus, and non-contributory pension apply to this 
position. 


We are looking for a young solicitor with a good academic 
background who seeks challenging work in a friendly atmosphere, 
to join an expanding team within our Commercial Property group. 
The work will primarily involve high quality development and 
retail property transactions which demand a thorough but positive 
approach. 


Please write with a full curriculum vitae to Ian McCulloch at I 
Dean Farrar Street, Warminster, London SWIH QDY. 


BIRCHAM & CO. 


“The future of the profession?" - "fusion 
with theBar?'*- "end of conveyancing 
monopoly". 

Headlines like these show that solicitors 
live in a time of change. 

But there will always be a need for the real 
experts whose ski Ils are vi tal to the 
international commercial community. 

Ourown expertise ism shipping, 
■insurance and trade world-wide; wehave 
an increasingly lively office in Hong Kong. 

While involving you in exciting and 
challenging work spanningtbe Continents, 
we can offer a secure and well-paid future. 

Ifycxfare an ambitious young solicitor with 
a practising sense ofhuraour, talk to us. 

Write to, or telephone our Consultant, 

Mrs. Indira Brown with details of your 
background, Corporate Resourcing Group, 
6 Westminster Palace Gardens, . * 

Artillery Row, London SW1P 1RL, quoting 
reference 2127. Telephone: 01-222 5555, or, 
if you prefer, at home be tween 7 pjn.and 
9 pm. 01-480 6666. . 


■^mercia 


Interested candidates should apply in confidence to 
Kevin Byrne, either sending a foil C.V. or phoning 
him on 01-588-6644 (until 7.30pm on 
Tuesday 18th February) 


MUSIC AND VIDEO LAWYER 


Anderson, Squires Ltd., 

Bank Recruitment Specialists 
127 Cheapside, London EC2 V 6BU 


IFPI (The International Federation of Phonogram and 1 | 

Videogram Producers) with members in ail parts of the workt. II I Jfl 

offers an interesting opportunity for a professional qualified HT 

lawyer to join its Secretariat in London. Candidates, who 

should have 5-10 years post qualification experience and 

practical knowledge of Intellectual Property and EEC law. must be fluent in English. 

French and German. Experience in the music, film or video industries would be an 

advantage. Some overseas travel will be involved. 



Co 


J 


Remuneration will be c£20.000 - £25.000. depending on age. qualifications and 
experience. 


Applications should be accompanied by a detailed curriculum vitae and a recent 
photograph and addressed to; 


D.J. FREEMAN & CO. 


The Director Gen eral 
IFPI SECRETARIAT 
54 Regent Street 
London W1R 5PJ 


Solicitors 


Company/Commercial Department 
Litigation Department 


TROWER, STILL 
& KEELING 


[ COMMERCIAL LAWYER 

Sooth West London 


■ Opportunity for young Solicitor or Barrister aged 26-28 years to be sole 
legal adviser to wdl-knovmpublic company. The work will include general 
cranmerdal few (contracts, intellectual property, employment law, 
iranchisirjg and company law) as well as some company secretarial work. Ir 
is essential that candidates arecommeidally-mmcled and enjoy working in 
a fast-moving environment. The position reports to die Board Attractive 
salary + company car. 

telephone us an 01-606 9371. ' 


CHAMBERS & PARTNERS 

PROFESSIONAL RECRUITMENT 


”°NO pf 


“Ol 


We are a substantial City firm but young enough and 
flexible enough to remain friendly and informal whilst 
offering outstanding career prospects to lawyers of high 
ability. That includes progress to partnership for people 
with the right qualities. 


and 

HAMLINS, GRAMMER & 
HAMLIN 


CORPORATE COUNCIL 


Corporal Itm-K-gta Attorney with 2 5 years experience wUh 


Have vacancies for the following positions in their 
London OfiBcest- 



Our company/com mercial department and our litigation 
department are each looking for two able young lawyers. 
Both departments have a wide range of high quality and 
interesting work. 


An able Assistant Solicitor for their ex- 
panding litigation department to undertake a wide 


CURREY & COMPANY 


and interesting variety of general cm! Stigatkxi 
work but with the opportunity to become involved 
in the larger commercial and construction litiga- 
tion. At least 2-3 years' litigation experience since 
qualification preferred. 


Are toofctne lor a Sonnier Wtu. w wn wf M 
Family Financial & Landed EMUH la 


If you have true professional commitment and can think 
creatively, we would like to tell you about the terms and 
career prospects we have to offer. 


An energetic Assistant Solicitor for their 
expanding commercial conveyancing department 
with at least 3 years' admitted experience since 
qualification. 


PVhhc wrllt h>. 

Mr PE.X). Dunning 

a». Bununoium CM*. 
London Stoic 6LS 


CITY LIFE LOSING 
ITS APPEAL ? 


Wc are a progressive firm 
ttiautafted in Uimtra Easl 
SerWilre who strive la 
fluiniain uie ntgbesl 
standards. 


We need an experienced 
Commercial Commercial 
Conyencmg SoHruor lo tom 
our exsistlDR warn Confi- 
dence and an ability lo gel 
on win, private and com 
nwrrlai clients are 
essential. 

We offer dennate career 
WMoecis an excellent sala- 
ry and a chance lo rnnprae 
One Quality of Ufe. 

Reply 10 BOX 850 . 


Even if you are newly qualified, without relevanr 
experience, but are confident of your potential to become 
a lawyer of high calibre, we w f ou!d still like to talk to you. 


Each position offers a competitive salary. BUPA, 
membership of firm's Pension Scheme, four 
weeks' holiday and other benefits. 

Please send full curriculum vitae, in confidence to: 


A Solicitor 

Required by 


PIconc v\ rue 10 Tony Leifer in our company/commerciaJ 
depur!* .irvd Colin Joseph in our litigation department 


Nicholas Hills 
Administration Partner 
5 New Square, 
Lincoln’s Inn, 
London WC2A 3RP 


Chapman & Wilson 






wif .s • : _ • 


D. j. -reciiua & Co., -i3 rater Lane, London EC4A 1NA. 


2 lo 4 years’ experience in litigation including • - - V 

rr advoracy and 

cxpanding P «-mSf Brighum ofhi6h caiibre in this 

Brighlon^Ni*' UJJ. K R Wil »" «*. >00 Ch urch S^L 


1 '*’*£??* 


I V* ’-“*«**. 









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(nvn biii 


■ 

• . T'^n* f ; 

: 

■ ’ • •>■ 

■ ■•>..” s 
- r^> 

■. 

. 


. ••'X I 

•- %*>, 
■■ ■ 




r,<<ai c»* 


Commercial Litigators 


*”*** to recr “ t .^8^ calibre young lawyers to join their expanding 
® *2? ^epartmMit. The work involves a wide range of commercial and financial 
masters for major corporations and insiitutionsbasedin theU JC. and around the world. 

We are loo king for people with the ability and energy to learn about and to deal with 
our de man din g and stimulating work, much of which is international 

anemic record is essential. If you have little or no experience of commercial 
P®*v?P but are attracted to it, we still want to hear from you. We offer a wide range 
n pn ^® mmes and opportunities to ensure young lawyers receive a broad 

practical education about litigation as well as acquiring specialist staTlc in 0 ne or more 
of our areas of practice. Early responsibility is given. 


_ — o ^ . iniin i. nMuo muucm mure 

of our areas of practice. Early responsibility is given. 

A willingness to travel abroad at short notice is desirable. Future opportunities exist 
for assignments to one of the firm’s overseas offices. 

We can offer you first class career prospects, a friendly working atmosphere in a mod- 
ern office together with a competitive salary. 

If you would like to develop a career as a litigator and want to find out more about the 
work, trai n i n g and opportunities, why not come and see us? Please apply with a full 
curriculum vitae, to: 

Mrs. Alison Dickinson, 

Linklaters & Paines, 

Barrington House, 59-67 Gresham Street, London EC2V 7JA. 


McKenna & Co 

CORPORATE 
FINANCE SOLICITOR 

We are looking for a solicitor of exceptional ability for our 
expanding Corporate Finance Department. 

. The work is varied and demanding with a strong 
emphasis on public company work. Stock Exrhaqg p transac- 
tions including circulars, admissions to Listing and the USM, 
securities issu e s, banking and general finanriai and co r por a te 
advice. 

You should have a good academic record, have been 
qualified for ar least two years and have gained relevant 
experience, preferably with a City firm. 

This position offers a fhallpnging opportunity to 
become actively involved in die further development of 
this tide of the practice. 

The prospects for the right candidate are excellent and 
a highly competitive salary and benefits are offered. 

Please apply with full Curriculum Vitae to:- 
Bernadette Willoughby 

..... McKcmia&Co ■ ... 

INVERESK HOUSE. - 
. . .. . 1ALDWYGH, 

London. 

WC2R0HF. 


Commercial Property Lawyers 

We areseeking two experienced practitioners (up to and 
including partnership level) to participate in and promote the 
development of our substantial commercial property 
department. 

Our work covers the full range of commercial property 
activities and includes dealing with material development 
funding, planning and financial transactions. 

Expansion, is rapid and the quality of both the transactions 
and required expertise is high with commensurate prospects 
and salary levels. 

Please write in confidence to: Roger Buck, Berwin Leighton, 
Adelaide House, London Bridge, London EC4R 9HA. 

BERWIN LEIGHTON 


BONDPEARCE 

PLYMOUTH 

We are looking for able and ambitious young solicitors to fiB 
positions in the following departments: . 

PROPERTY • 

We require a commercial conveyancer with business acumen 
and a positive approach as well as a good groundingin commercial 

property transactions; 

UTIGATION 

VCb seek an enthusiastic and committed litigator to join 
our team specialising in personal injury and related matters-here 
ability arid personality are more important than length of . 

experience. 

To arrange an interview in London or. Plymouth ring 
John Price on 0752 266633 or write to him at 1 The Crescent, 
Plymouth-PU 3AE. 


jssssSsss. 

Trainee Court Clerk . - 

Salary not **» «*" 

ApoftraiMna are wSy«Sw?OiH»t 

srs '^si'sssr^sa. - — «-»- 

sSSSSSsSSxssss 

MM ■“■SE?"* 

cam* W MH» ... niw 

n iKinonr HuaoerafleW mperteac «* J 0 *? 1 ™ 

■mi rater mao ****** cwrfr- 
- Appal nmenl TTI "T TSTm 

ajSi KW Writ to me 


COMPANY /COMMMERCIAL ASSISTANTS 
£ HIGHLY NEGOTIABLE 

Our rttefUs - ngti) from sroaS pmbcU taw firms id 
major Cliv m ai m - sttk wu yng / tf OT ta t lawyers 
at afl tovafc or experience M handle ■ wide mgr of mattan 
twsurttaf coeonte finance, aqabUans. mergers nd pem. 
toon general contpany/coronracaal wort. In some asm 
full training wu be given lo raamdatm and eftea Uiat* 4* 
Ok Qpsrartun&y of secondment uvadi offices abroad. v 
yon nave a good acaaantc Dackgmnd and wotdd like to 
know more atari Ok p os HKob atonL pun ea wt a rt - 

*■'' -- Gabriel Duffy Consultancy 
Gabriel Du fly House 
17 St SwiUian's Lane 
Cannon Si 
London EC4 N8AL 
Tel: 01-623 4295 


SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER 

(Ref. T/SDM) 

Allders* thirteen department stores, located thoughout the country, are a significant 
and growing part of the highly successful Hanson Trust Group, on the top ten UK 
Public Companies. AUders* Data Processing Department is located at Hackbridge, 

Surrey, but this central operation « linked via an interna! network to satellite 
operations at each store. The company is a major VAX user. If you wish to join this 
profitable and expanding organization, please consider our requirements and decide 
if you match our exacting standards:- 

This senior appointment coincides with a major new hardware and software 
development programme. The successful candidate will head a team of systems 
analysts and programmers and will be responsible for the specification, design and 
implementation of the company’s business systems, liaising when appropriate with 
software houses. 

The essential requirements of this senior appointment are proven management skids 
and previous experience of designing and implementing at least one major system. A 
knowledge of DEC equipment would be an advantage. Applicants, probably 28-35 
years of age, should ideally be educated to degree standard. 

A total remuneration package in excess of £20,000, including profit-related bonus, 
plus company car is offered for this important post The benefits package includes 
staff discounts and a subsidised staff restaurant Please send a detailed CV including 
salary progression, to:- 


J.G. HAWKINS 
FINANCIAL DIRECTOR 
ALLDERS DEPARTMENT STORES LTD 
PO BOX 143 LONDON HOUSE 
11/15 DINGWALL AVENUE 
CROYDON SURREY 


Communiccffions Analyst £14*500 

Do you hove an understanding of 
Communications and Computing based 
around tCL mainframes? This Transport related 
company whose 40 regional offices are all 
over the country possess one of the largest ICL 
installations in the UK. Mbu wfll be based near 
RICHMOND with benefits including o generous 
relocation pockoge and free family PPP. 




5 


DEPARTMENT STORES LTD 



Database Analysts to £19,000 + car 

Database designers are urgently required with 
BM Data DictionoiY. 4th Generation Language 
and/or ADABAS/ORACLE or similar experience 
for this International bank in the CITY. Six 
Financial Analysts and Project Leaders ore also 
required where salaries to £21x000 con be 
negotiated. Naturally, the perks are 
tremendous, but you must be good. 


Manufacturing Analyst to £14000 Insurance analysis £4L000to£t6jD00 


This is a major household named electrical 
manufacturer based in NORTH LONDON using 
IBM MVS computers. They require an Analyst 
with major implementation experience to work 
on new Stock Control and Production Control 
protects. Analysis with Distribution experience 
are also needed. Benefits Include 5 weeks 
hofiday^ relocation expenses end an 


insurance AnafyHcal experience at aB grades is 
needed now for diverse dienls based in HERTS. 
HANTS. SURREY and In the CITY Analysis/ 
Programmers wishing to progress to full 
ana lyrical work ore also required. Many of 
these excellent companies offer relocation 
expenses. mortgage assistance and 
subsidised BUR\ Why not telephone and 
cfiscuss these vacancies now? 


excerient training schema cfiscuss these vacanaes now? 

The Analyst Recruitment Specialists please telephone 

UNIVERSAL C0MPUTH? ASSOCIATES LTD “KSSSiw. 

tnWgar Hoorn GtwawBa Hoe*, London NW7 3SA after hours ond at 
Tilijjhn . BI-99» VWE/3611 weekends. 


Be a Manpower ‘Saver’ 


In one monlh. one of our temporaries saved £84 towards a new 
Hi-Fi, over £60 in Holiday Pay, and "the day" several times over for 
various clients. 

Manpower temporaries are used to going into crisis scenes, 
straightening things out. and moving on to the next task. They get 
rewarded fcrcfri financiafly (hduefing excellent Holiday Pay) did 
with jobs that challenge. 

In t w a tf ad in saving with Manpower? 

Caflusnow. 


wWER Tel: 225 0505 

SndT Specialists 24 hour answonng service 



DP.-Systems Specialists 

to£T8K Worthing 

Eurotherm international pic is a market leader in the 
field of instrumentation control equipment The company 
are committed to the support of individual excellence and- . 
have a history of entrepreneurial projects resulting in new 
and successful company start-ups. 

Eurotherm offers you a new and continuing challenge 
which will extend and develop your abilities to the fulLThe 
Croup Information Systems Department seeks to recruit 
two commercial Systems specialists who will develop 
packages for manufacturing and commercial installations 
in the UK, Europe and the USA. 

The Senior Manufacturing Analyst/Programmer must 
have a minimum of 6 years experience, ideally RPC II plus 
in-depth knowledge of manufacturing systems. 

The Senior Cobol programmer wilrhave a minimum of 4 




packages plus specification writing/design experience. 
Project leader experience and a knowledge of Wang VS 


> i-<) •■'/»] ' i 1 4 '> 1 - 4 1 » 1 1 f • J J «:•] i i|i;i iHUTClHl 



HERTFORDSHIRE 

CONVEYANCER 

Rtq irt red for irtM- do- 
mes* woe* In ferea of 
potential nd opportunities 
by a Arm seeUng te enploB 
Umar oppcRuaMea. We 
, n bed someone wffli drive 
, arid awv *mo oUnt 
; hard work and contact 
1 with people. Above aver- 
age salary (to Include 
firm's car if p referred). 
For further details ptaaae 

! LJ nlmne 

OnoyiwOc. 

0992 56949 


BARKING 

Sonow reeund for matn- 
monui work and la mam 
*«i general Advocacy. 
Cmanair salary arcord- 
tne u> wner k a te . 

Apply wW» C.v. » 

. ». man. 

NftTtSM MKM CVAMHOr A 


VIMMEIIMt, 
mme, rejXTf 
TDjMMH 


SECRETARY TO FILM 
PRODUCER/M.D. 

INDEPENDENT FILM PRODUCTION CO 
REQUIRE IMMEDIATLEY 

We are looking for a very experienced 
sh ort ha nd secretary, who has preferably had 
experience in the media world, aged 22-30. 

Candidates must have worked in a responsible 
position and be able to work flexible hours in 
this busy company, where Initiative, a confident 
manner aid plenty of energy are imperative. 

Essential skBs - 60/100 wpm, some 
bookkeeping. French an advantage. 

Reply to BOX B63 . 


SECRETARY /PA 

For young and progressive 
sobcilon office 
Just soittn of the river. 
Varied case load. 

Good orgaxitt&BonBi Skill 
and initiative required 
Salary up lo £9.000 

01-735 2466 


company offers a pension scheme, health scheme 
and 5 weeks holiday. 

Apply with full CV to Mr. A. Warren. Information Systems 
Department, Eurotherm International pic. Second Floor. 

93 Rowlands Road, Worthing, Sussex 3N11 3JX. 





University Appointments 


COMPUTER 

appointments 



c Universit/' 
of Reading 

Appointments 


PROFESSORSHIP OF ' 
FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING 

Applications are invited for the Professorship of 
Finance and Accounting in the Department of 
Economics. The appointment wiD be made from 
a date to be agreed with the socccssfhi candidate. 

The University is seeking to appoint a Professor 
mho has teaching and research abilities in ac- 
counting, and who, for preference, is 
professionally qualified. Other things being 
equal, candidates with i n t e res a in modern fi- 
nancial theory or financial accounting and 
mana ge m e n t will be p referred. 

Rather information may be obtained from the 
Registrar, Room 212. Whiteknights House. P.O. 
Box 217, The University. Whiufcmghts, Read- 
ing, RG6 2AH. The doting date for applications 
is 21 March 1986. - 


PROGRAMMERS FOR 
CAD SYSTEMS 

Ziegler instruments GMBH, a West Ger- 
man software house specialising in 
computer-aided design and related techni- 
cal applications, is seeking two high calibre 
programmers. 

The successful candidates will have a 
sound knowledge of computer science, a 
good understanding of mathematics and 
the ability to program in Pascal arid/or C. 
under MS/DOS or UNIX. 

Previous experience of solving CAD prob- 
lems would be an advantage, but is not 
essential. 

A minimum commitment of two years 
would be expected of applicants. German 
language is not an essential. 

Applicants should write, enclosing their 
CV to: 

Ziegler Instruments GMBH. 

POSTFACH 20 14 65, 

04050 MOENCHENGLADBACH 2, 
WEST GERMANY 


SOLICrroRS ■ COMMERCIAL LAWYERS ■ LEGAL 
OFFICERS ■ PRIVATE & PUBLIC PRACTICE 
K wide range of legdpsaiiomihmtqh'XB pmfasien 
appear ewty Tuesday. 

TUESDAY 

MAKE SURE YOU GET 
YOUR COPY OF 

THE*§^sTIMES 


•■H-T y ~ - ; ’ 



BIREECK COLLEGE 
(Lntrerslo of Loudon) 

COMPUTER 

SERVICES 

MANAGER 

Applicant, arc mtiied for ihc 
oculy created post of Com- 
puter Scrwcci Manat" u< to 
responsible for the 
orpmiMUon and manage- 
ment of the rotlqr'i 
compuiLf mukk equip- 
ment. campus network and 
staff within Ihc context of (he 
Uimvrwi? of London wr> 
'ice. on which ihc College 
alio rrlm. Applicants should . 

h»'C appropriate »pcne«e 
of computer service provi- 
sion either m a university or . 
other research oriented «'«• 
nntmem. A systems 

programming backyoufld 
would be an advantage. A P" 

pomimeru mil be ai a pant 
0 l> the scale for Grade 1H for 
Other Related Staff £I5.W7- 
IIV.7I2 pa (inrluiu' of 
London Allowance) under re- 
new. Brnefns include 31 
days holiday, foil pension 
an) ucineu beocfiis. and 
season irchti loan scheme. 
Further details from ihe As- 
usum Secretary (Personnel) 
iCSMi. Birtacrk Cnilegc. 
Malei Si rcet London WOE 
7HX (Tel 01-031 65291. to 
whom application including 
lull c.\. aod names of mo 
relents should be seni Ap> 
plicanis who arish to discuss 
tlw post may soman Profes- 
sor Pnn King till -MS 6J15V 


great second income potential 

Ittiemai tonal Mart-eimg l ompanv has a new product wtaeti has 
second income poreimal and could be operated Awn borne with 
family nanmpaiion Tins product, which k uvll sought after 
cspaiaU} by ihe healilt and fitness rounouL rs already located 
■n some of the largest depan mental gore chains m this counny 
no selling invufi.ctL mvesimcni secured by product that a cash 
producing, cwtftiul product has bent used for over bO ycatsl If 
you have vtic or limy days free per week and investment capital 
of £ I6.5W. then please apply for free colour brochure to 
r_M. Lid. II Mmfhornth Place. Brafaraa. East Sussex. 

Td (0273) 072226. Hk 87gttg, 


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30 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 


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Pfr. \llls jnj |,\ Mi.MO- 
RIWI fJ.linv-i |**« i it, 
irnimmurn p l Iiik.*>i 
tnni'untvnvnif. auihinii- 
uii'iJ hi Iftc nami- ami 
iSrmjniTl of 

VSjyT «,!• K' HUI 1.1 

THU 1 1VIES 
PO HOV 4S4 
\ iryuua Srrrrl 

IffllAw fcl 
i*r k-k-pfiiWAl f* Iricphonr 
NuSsTitvrv onKi lor 01-481 
3«:4. 

snmuinccniciii* ran hr rr- 
ui‘fd hi icfirphniw* between 

1 . 1 * Q m j ml j. jitpm. Mijmln 

to. FnJji on Siilurdai be- 
tween “rt'oin and IJnoort. 
1411 JfWO OnlvL For putrit- 
eatinn 1 tv iijlowinj da*, 
rtoime hi I Icpm. 
FORTHCOMING MtR- 
RUUKX. W CODINGS, «c 
on : turn and S-vtal Pap- £jn 
1 line * ISH V IT. 

I nun and Sooal Page an- 
nou.-.iVnu-r::* can not be 
□ic.TirtJ b\ telephone. En- 
quire 10 : 01-481 4100. 

M.»si nitvrr classt'ivd adicr- 
li-»-mi-nn van (X JCTVpU-d In 
tel.-pftnnc The deadline ri 
? mj*m 2 da>i pnor 10 puNi- 
eaiiun ii.c r ti.ipoi Morula* 
for Wednesday J. Should soil 
“i»*i i>j send an ad*«i4£- 
oiwni in writing (rii'Jk: 
iiKiudc your Jjinmc ptiune 
number 

n STOMER 5ERVICES 
DEPvRTMENT. If you 
haw rany qui-nrs or pruhfnra 
trial mg in >i>ur ad*cntv- 
ment (vut 11 has appeared 
please Ionian our t'uji wncr 
Senior* Lk-panmcni In. tele- 
phone nn 0 1-48 1 J0B6. 


Uww .lor inai nui wretch 
nvdurrtfi unlo evrrlaslina mr 
wturn 1 hr Son of nun shall air 
IU110 you 

SI John A- 77 


BIRTHS 


ARCHIBALD On February Lhe 
Jeire in Adelaide. South Aus- 
tralia lo.Shirtey I nee Savage' 
and Robert, formerly of 
Stabbing. Esses. a son. Oilier 
Linl.-v 

BAKER - On February UUi 10 
Lucy .nee Corkbum* and 
Tod. a second daughter 
BEER - On lSIh February at 
Ouecn Charlotte's Hospital. 
10 \niw him MacKayi and 
diaries, a daughter Helena 
Susan 

DANIELS - On February lOfh 
!?8e la Pal 1 nee Nison' and 
Peter, a daughter Hannah 
Elirabelh 

DAVENPORT On February 
loin, to Mary inee O'Brien' 
and Robert, a son. Thomas 
Dudley 

OURfE ■ On 9ih February lo 
Perm 'nee Mailin' and Tom. 
a daughter Cnarloile Kate a 
sisler (or Lunnoa 
ELLIOTT On !6ih February- 
1986. at lhe Mathilda Hospi 
Lai. Hong Kong 10 Charlene 
■ nee Oandsoni and Giles, a 
son. Dominic Angus 
McGregor, a brother tor Al- 
exandra Laura and Orlando. 
MEDLEY : On February I3ih 
10 Julia ■ nee Scorer) and 
Pwrs. a son. Richard. 
JEFFREYS - To Simon and 
Ann .nee Tavlon a daughter 
on February t-lih In 
Johannesburg. 

KETTLE On 1 4th February to 
Martin and Penelope, a 
daughter. Jemima Mary, a 
sifter for Roland Vincent 
LEWIS - On February IJih 
1 936. to Felicity (nee 
Nickson' and James, a 
daughter Sophie Louisa, a 
sister for Emily Rose 
MILLER - On ITtn February 
1986 ai \ecnii. somerset, lo 
Christine mee Chandler and 
Gareth, a son Beniamin John 
Gareth 

MOMCRE1FFE - On <9lh 
Feoruan ai Si George s 
Hospual London, to Mark 
and rsa mee Tebblti a 
daughter Laura Anne 
Katherine, a sisier lor 
Ed'-vard. 

MULHOLLAND - On February 
lSIh ai Mounl Alterma. 
Guildford, to Mary mee 
Whistler ■ and Bran, a son 
William Alexander a brother 
for Tara and Andrew 
FELLY • TO MichelH? and 
Richard on Fcbruaty s6th. a 
daughter Isabelle 
PRIOR - On Feo 13th at John 
Rjddiffe Hospital. Oxford. to 
Sarah nice Kennedy and 
Charles, a son Eduard 
Charles Loathes, a brother 
ior John and Andrew 
WYNNE DAVIES - On 15th 
February in Jersey 10 David 
and Susan inee Ebeiyi. a son 
John Geoffrey 


INMAN On FpIhtnwy I7fh. 
19Ho. I’camfuily and with 
on-ai courage- Sally 
Tti'ini,NnH -m-o MernsCovi 
rd v»iir 01 Doc id and 
ilc.irm friend and mWhor of 
Julia. K'.Hhmne Janu’s and 
Claire, and sister of Ann 
Hullct SenKc of Tnanfcs 
cue ma al Bl Marc and Alt 
Sami* Ctiurrli, DuilSfuld on 
rrid.i». 21-4 February ai 
2 3C D m Ko nov.»rs hy re 
quest hut donations lo 
BACLP. 1SI 

Charterhouse Sireci. London 
EC 1 vi 6AA 'Cancer In for 
matron Semrei 
KENNY - On 9th February m 
Monaco George Thomas 
AJtwn Kenny aged 73. Dear 
brother of Priscilla and 
P.iinna Reouicm Mass al 
Legltse Saree Coeur 
Monnoheiu. Monaco. Friday 
2isl February at 8 A5am 
MATHER Rachel Louise of Si 
Cues House. Kings Langley. 
a> NorthwicH Park Hospital, 
on February Uih. aged 20 
years Beloved daughter of 
John and Hilda Funeral ser 
lice to be held on Friday 21st 
February. 11 SCam. at All 
Sainis Church. Kings Lang- 
ley prior lo cremation si The 
Vvest Herts Crematorium. 
Carslon Flowers and enqui- 
ries nieam - 10 C Hall A Sons. 
He reel Hempstead 52395. 
MILLAR Peacefully on 14th 
February afier devoted care 
at Puitennam Htu Nursing 
Home Winifred Sarah Millar 
■ nee Kenlisbeen age 87. Be- 
loved wife of the Isle William 
Millar Much Wved mother or 
Jean ana Pam and grand- 
mol Her of Julia. Nigel. Alison 
and Kale Will be sadly 
mt» serf by alt her family and 
friends Funeral ar 
Leaihi-rtirad Par on Church. 
Friday 21 si February al 12 
noon 

MILNER - On February l-sth 
suddenly. His Honour Judge 
George Andrew Milner, 
Judge of lhe North Eastern 
Circuil since 1975. of 
Grnilham House. Croat ham. 
Hartlepool and Branscombe. 
Devon Trusty and well be- 
loied husband of Janet, and 
loving father of Matthew and 
Gut. Funeral ServKe ai 
Grealham Parish Church. 
Wednesday February 19th. 
al 1 30 pm. prior to commii- 
■al ai Hartlepool 
Crematorium. Donations in 
lieu of flowers. U so desired, 
lo The National Trust. 
Klllertcn House. Broadciysi. 
Exeler 

MURRAY On February !5ih 
1986. T P Douglas Murray 
MBE. TD. DL_ aged 64 years 
of -Tern pleiv odd' Brechin, 
dear husband of Sybil, father 
01 Amu- and Neil, grandfa- 
ther and great grandfather 
Funeral service al SI 
Andrevt's Episcopalian 
Church Brechin, on Wednes- 
day February 19th al 
I 45pm Private cremation 
later. Family flowrrs only 
ORR - On February S6lh 1986 
peacefully al home. The 
Sieps. Railey. Nr. Banbury. 

Ox on after a long illness 
bravely borne Lady Mariana 
Frances Lilian .Molly >- 
beloved wife of the Ri Hon 
Sir Alan Orr. much loved 
mother of Jane. Gavin. Mark 
and Gilev mol her in -law of 
Alison Phiiuaa and Patricia 
and beloved grandmother 
Funeral al Si. Peter ad 
\ inruU. Railey al 1 1 45 am 
on Thursday February 20th 
Family flowers only- please 
Donations, if desired lo The 
British Diabenr Association. 

10 Queen Anne's Street. 
London Vvim OBD. 

RACK - Kathleen on February 
I4iii I9B6 peacefully in 
hospilal. much (oved mother 
and granny Cremation 
pm ale Memorial Service al 
Regale. on Saturday 
February 22nd at 11 am. No 
flow err please by request 
Donations to Mann lyre 

Schools Ltd 2 Ridgeway 
Court. Crovebun Road. 
Leiqhion Buzzard. Beds LL7 
8SW 

RICHARDSON On 14th Febru 
arv 1986. William Alan 
FCA. aged 65 of Notiingham. 
Detoied husband 10 Brenda, 
much loved father, and 
friend of Nigel 

SITWELL . On lSIh February, 
peacefully al her home Bel- 
mont Co KWI ream. Clematis 
Denys 1 Betty 1 after a merci- 
fully short illness Funeral 
pm ale. Estate and family 
only 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


FLATSHARE 


expand me wsusmers 

V% Ur I. o tifcC TU HC.VH 
r»AI -VI THOBs l> %n.. hj.e 
v«iiflrn a fioov 1 n. 1 l iteveivov 
PuMir . 111.111 Wrilr l<r Drtll. THE 
HUON ijt II n I TD 26 mail 
9l"l. L.-v I-S Siim-< BN7 3LL 

HAVE YOU READ Ihr Frhruary 
Lh In r II v uutiityilte page 2o , 
h..i rf> vou win nani .1 niur 

sl^r-. -j.tr! lirviivnr Hum 
Lwitiodie Houv FM'inoriie. 
K> Ow rr Ki-lil. CTI3 dBt 
Tel 0304 84047J 
CAROLYN! I mOJI hr- M,|) .III] Al 

■hr Riu irum l7iti rm iur .1 
wees or Please rail Ot 493 
6IU1 Ln.uv ea vn.irnw d ride 
wun vvju. S Mina fvrw 1 ark 
Tel 317 t0IS» 33» 

BONHAMS Monlpetiee Modem 
Ait (.'craves See Uue.tlion 


S9J DnMr HMrnts linntv 
(H'liiiiiMive fiat 10 Share with re 
Urea gentleman Own nemonm 
riw om me Phone Ol M4 
r j“o4 


WS Prof F. far O Rut lux not AH 

.mu-nllm tog PH >Da>l Ol 

»D 9486 


MW WORLD HUES HHBEBWM 
MUm Bsmftaf 

rux tl te OcBD 

laSK lUntb 

Wnmi Stagaope 


cw« 


TUSCANY- Bv MnMV al kwi <X 
Barga m me beautiful 
Cariunnaiu V.ulrv r.nm 
hoiiwn vHlav. JiMth A 'Dimin' 
■MU eft jerr-iRi-S 01838 

81U 


MN 


Srfl'l . 

Hew T«rt 
M 

8XTUJHD TRW^f LTD 
ZAtmiM 5THBT tOlHJOH HI 
TH-- BI-OB XgUtUT 

JtmUJR BONOB) 


BsIhBM 


WINTER SPORTS 


SERVICES 


A NEW SERVICE Have vmi not a 
uei~in.il iiuviuf-n or vnrvvi 
pfflfHrm 7 We ran *91 ve l) ■ 
Write in ronfiaenre or lete- 
phone 4»*dn.ilr* I men ail tonal. 
Devem House 40. Rlnnqton 
rareei Lraidon EC2 Teiepnone 
oi 41ft. Your rail »m be 
re»erre.t lo a PnueiiMI ot me 
Comp-inv in ramulele 
(-onfidenrt- 

NU NCW PUTNIRS ihru- 
HEDI FISHER FNTROOLC 

TIOts*. s*£ i ; Beauihonip 

PI SW4 Ol 367 0066 Men is 
55 in demand 

CMLiBRC CVS profmionaiiy 
wi men ana nrod need 

rummium i uae dwuimu* 

Details Ol 680 3959 

FRIENDSHIP. Lave or MJITW 
411 ages, arrvrv Dunrline. Drp 
iTSTi 23 APimMOn Road. Lon- 
don WB Trt Ol 948 lOI 1. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US VBA MATTERS. E S Cud-on. 

l_S Uwvn IT Buhlrodr- 

London WI Ol 486 0814. 


WANTED 


BALDWIN ANTIQUES require 
roll lac 4 pedesui de*!.*. boot, 
raws. Lanles. rnairs leg 
uardrobei ehesls. pkinm eir 
01 589 0148 or 01 328 2716 
PROFESSIONAL ARTIST Wisned 
lo buv reasanaMv pn-~ed flat 
nun working living aerammo 
dalnMI Reply IO BOX 0 JO . 


FOR SALE 


RESIST.* CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 


MM Prof uerton 244 n v ware 

i Nurmn CH garden ilol wlin 

une other, own igedltl room, els 
IHIblrr Iroirunrl L48 pw E>d 

Phone 806 8092. oner 7pm 

ST jomrs wood Vm rarnmn 

anii< nrasuunq roam ra lady * 

fldl. use kao. near &tmn. irons. 

port Hr. Suue prafrxwpnal 
male CSO pw 28 9 9466 
MIL TWO UBUnEIK, lulls 

fin nnned. inr rooking I ar limes. 

8 mim Oaphom Junrticrt FuU 

vov rn C97 C62 pw. Refs es 

venllal Tel Ol 223 8901. 
WANTED NOW Ctrl 28* lo share 

large Ikn ■■■ Eaih Court. 5 mins 

from under vound CSSp w. es 

rlusive Please ronlarl Cainv on 

Ifciv 229 23*7 home 673 i 577 
■LACNMEATH nrof F. n s. re 

row grad mm own room. Hi. 

snared maisonneur Cl TO prm 

inn o> 868 6253 Oder 6pm 

FLATMATES Selrrllvr Sharing 

Well evlab iniroduelory vm ire 

Pne lef lor anp(- Ol 989 0491 ■ 

31 3 Brompton Dead. SW3 
SiffT CAR OWNER ige beam (or 

one m W2 wim garage, rh. 

own bain ana wr. use of kn. 

C75o» uw 01 363 9691. 
FWP -A -HAT IMPianmi agmor 
Arram mo9 niUK 34 hligi 
Rd .Ski Ol 984 8013 
MARIA VALE Female lo share 

rm N 5 UAnweirl Tel. 01 

920 264S I work i. 

SMS. Lux Mews hesne. I I IS 

suiie ha lhroo m. ci*9 prm ml 

Ol 706-0073 any lime 
SW6 Prof m l lo share I1M. own 

room, close lo lube snort in 

DO---. . CM u w Ol 727 0794 

W.lf m)|. rm m rial 4vaU mon- 

In nr. lube. UOp.w. 01986 

8316 alter 6 30. 

W-Z. M I o r lo snr m Igr m 

Close all Irons. £60 p w. inrf 

01 243 1785. 

Wimbledon p s zz + io sharr 

llal o r. Gw rh Clmr lo (uoe. 

tVj pn excl Ol 643 7570. 
SW6 Prm. m I lo share flat own 

room, rtose !o lube, short lef 

DOVS . CBS p w. oi 727 0734. 

WA I wo lo snare srJge room 

Lu* run £43p w . earn Tel 01 

S89 4588 day 603 7858 eves. 

W-2. M f o r lo shr In Igr 111 

Ctov all irons. C60 D w. met 

01 343 1786. 

WIMBLEDON n t S3 * lo share 

rial o r to rti CKW lo I uoe 

CVS p.w. exri 01-642 7370 
WIMBLEDON gjrl ro share 3 

henrro. C«e o r. ot, win XV 90 

Pne Ol 543 4671 after 6 pm. 

WIM PK area. r*r romp (urn 3 

bed Use gdn a. palio. mod kil. 

lu« nain Go Let men lo mju 

•set. £160 pw. 01-870 4 BAA. 


SKIING HOLIDAYS 



To Avoina I ram t9° H B 
Gafwn-k Mujurti 
flighl pnh- CfS. 
Goivvirk Turin £88 

Bmuinaham Mumrn CBS 
ManrnesteT Miuiu-h (fto 
HARDS WINTERS PORTS 


FULHAM ROAD, SW6 


3rd flr. Flat full of character. Open 
plan living rm. & kitchen with 
South Taring Roof Terrace. Dbkr 
hcd.. baih. Available now. £130 
per week. 


Chelsea Office: 01-589 5211 


• Wide range of quafrty iyrmshetf 

gml unfumiSTred CTCO&^y 

• Fua Manage men; Service 


1 






c 

HbS 

— R t S 

T 

1 D 

ERTC 

» t > T I A 1 

?NS 


■ Legain&n Advice. 

, Personalised Service mrougn 

7 computer finked offices. 


ALDERNEY STREET 


An attractive two bedroom Mai- 
sonette with two tBihrms.. axiTJ.. 
dming room, kilchvtw hreakrisi 
rm. Available on long u-rrrv 
Company k-l. £300 per week neg. 


PhafitA Office: 01-834 9998 


Teh 021 704 5222 


ATOL 162 ABTA 35771 


Tel 01-441-0122 24hr. 


FUUBMmi Worsdwtdr 
HavnsarhM Travn. Tolrphonr- 
Ol US 13*6 


unrunut Thr most nnwii. 
nil pUrr vou'ir win hrord of. 
01 -441 0122 1 24 lusi 


LOWEST AIR FARES. 

Burtungnam Travn ABTA. 

Ol 836 8M2. 


SKI WHIZZ 

* * * 


Cairrrd Chain par-tun 
FANTASTIC MMMH S 

Feb 22 £219 
Mar 1st £249 

Inrluwvi* fliotm. food * tun 
Has ai-27o om *4 m 
ATOL 1820 


BRITTON POOLE & 
BURNS 

KEMSmenw ms Charming 

mum ruilaqr 2 ante. 2 v6 

mv 2 rrrnn « study bra 2 
Igihv !M kil Long Co tel 
L375pw 

UOMD0N 1WX1. Soarsouv 
limy rut odd Ballrrsra park 
3 nr«v 2 nrrn ham 6 vnwr 
rni.iMUi Co tel. Ciaflpw. 
Ol m 2907 


AROUND TOWN 

tnihMhHiAii 
uw wu 
HOLLAND PARA 
A movi rtegan* and nirnw 
It tp-tnoirt Ilol in aunf 
mtomiHN rood Nntly drr 
& lumnnnL 2 IM> ImJimv 
dining non. mod ifwik 

hplhrm CMf -tlrrrt ptiq gdn 
Avail now e iMnt. Co v it 

tzaouw 

dt-zzt MW 


USA AFRICA EUROPE Gmunc , 
dra-mml Urn OTC 01-602 , 
3236 


KHJGHTSBRI06E 

Superb 2 -bedroom flat m fns- 
ijgioia Mask opp Harnxb. 
Fulty fined U tis bglnsi stan- 
dards. Mad service and 24hr. 
tmaiaqa. AwWde now fts 
Co. leL C325 pw. Contact; 
Ruenary Macarthur. 


Mossur stocks of wool 
UnvM Brrtyrs from £3 95 
* val Plus many bargains in 
mom sues in all auahtm 


TOFF tbuEvVAfty 


ROAD) 


548 Fulham Road 
Parsons Green SW6 
Tel; 01-736 7551 


Frrr ndnuir • Cxpm lining 


No Premium. 24 hr. i 
CHS. Prestige fum. 
carpel ed offices with 
phone plus Ux. from £70 
uw all incl. Short long 
lerm. Parking faculties. 


01-839 4808 


SOLID HARDWOOD: uun. 
main, beds mnlv shrives, 
desks, nr Phone lor Trrskes 
dNimivr roldloflue 0845 - 
H2770 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


EXQUISm lund moor broom 
lr.sv lOO 4 - Mis isampirvi 
CI50L5P0 Trtennorr Mrs 
Golliirs Ol 994 3352 


TRAILFINDERS 


DEATHS 


LFBMO.yBUSH nn Frtrujn 





N’i 


Ooox. jw-d 8J war'. 



Fi.irpull' -w Firlo .ind Evcrdon. 

6. 


and taitiM- ..4 Paul Fum-rai at 



Ej 


Frbru.irv 21*1 al 1 45 pm fcA- 


toiwiii bi on« Me ciimolvin. 

m 

- 

Fin -. it* t 0. 


1 

T8oiTilri.Ev.Ydon NorthonL* 


SMITH ALBANY See Smith 
DCA 

SMITH DENNIS CHARLES , 
ALBANY ■ On I5lh February 
IbAo. peacefully at home In 
Brmol. beloved husband of 
Anne and dear father ot Rob- 
in and daughier-ln law 
Norma. Funeral airange- 
mcnls private Family 
nowers only please. Oona- 
hons may be made to Bristol 
Old People's Welfare Care of 
Thomas Dawes Lid. 
Souinv ilte Lodge. Soulhville 
Rd. Brtslol BS 31 DJ. 


FINEST guoiily woof rarneis. Ai 
trade prirns and under Oho 
available ioo - s nan Large 
ream scr remnams under half 
normal orirr Chonrrrv Carpels 
Ol 405 0461 

CATS. STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Vs r have linvrh for move and JM 
menlre and sports Tel 631 
J7|n (937 i7J£ All motor 

rrrdn r.irds 

THE TIMES Ctemnai issues 1|M5 
I486 Ofnrr lilies avail Hand 
bound ready tor presrnuiion 
oso -Sundays - £12 50 >nn 
Remember When Ol 688 6323 
OLD YOU* FLAGSTONES, rob 
Me sells elc NoiKMtwide 
deiisenm. Tel t038Oi 850039 
■ H llfsl 

SEATTtNOERS An* even* Inc 
C.V» On mi Gdn. SUrligni Exp 
O! 828 >678 Motor credit 

fords 

TICICETS for any event Cals. 
SUrtiohi Exoress. 42na Sr AU 
1 heal re and sports 821 6616 
Jm A A E\ 

FRIDGES. FREEZERS. Cookers, 
eir can vou buy cheaper? 0 A 
SU« 01 229 1947 8468 


Worldwide tew real fltgivp. 
Tim besi and we ran prov e ii 
lo5 OOO c Items stnrr 1970 
AROUND THE WORLD 
FROM £765 


Of* 

SYDNEY £392 

PERTH £371 

AUCKLAND £409 
BANGKOK £1W 
SINGAPORE 
MlAMI/FLOfWDA £188 
HONG KONG £237 
DELHI/B0M8AY £250 

COLOMBO £241 

CAIRO £160 

NAIROBI £231 
JO'BURG £286 
LIMA £253 

LOS ANGELES £187 
NEW YORK £129 
GENEVA £ 75 
4M1 EMOJ COURT KUO 
UMOON M Mi 

EmPDX/U&A ngm 01-837 9400 
Long M ra^da Oi-can 191S 
fa/Buanvn Oma 01-938 3444 
OMmw Lrcrmad/BoadMl 
ABTA IATA ATOL 14» 


nn 

£641 

£582 

£770 

£383 

£462 

£309 

£474 

£398 

£420 

£270 

£385 

£473 

£484 

£321 

£255 

£89 


ANTIQUES 4 
COLLECTABLES 


BRIGHTS OF NETTLE BED. I7lh 
and 18tn Century replica furni- 
ture including me Broughton 
Manor Collection, made in our 
own West Country workshoo 
Neltieord. near Henley >0401 1 
64(115. Bournemouth iCvJCOi 
2*3680 Tonwam. Devon 
•0392871 7446. Berkeley. 

Gtoi >04631 810952. 


CROSS - Clara Dunbar, peaceful 
Is ai her hems- in 13U1 ol 
Frhruarv 1-^gr. .mea &£ Doc 
ini fiarj Crovs MD MRC? 
lormiTlv rgnsullanl posilidn oi 
51 .Martin's hnspilal. Baih Wile 
•H lhe late Roland Crow of lhe 
Cr.sv, Maiiufiiriuring Company 
and mo* her ie lhe Loir Gainer 
in.- Mi.- ridel and Rodrvv. 
.11 i r. I mo I her tjf Pefer Jane. 
Thomas. Rirnara. Cdwarn 
Jam»b. Daniel Hannan and 
Eli.-uPrLh Funeiui tenirr 
3 I 5pm. on Friday 21-4 ol Fell, 
ruan ai •>« Primp arid 
Si lames Odd Down. Both. I of 
•msMl by private rT renal Kin 
Pl.-ow no nower.. Donairuns Id 
The Friends pi si. Marlin. 
Mid tern Ra Both 
DARLEY - on February I5lh 
190b. Peacefully in his sleep. 
H Cyril T Darley. of 
PenenOen Healh. Maidslone: 
devoiea husband of iho late 
Edith, beloved father of 
Brenda and Henry, dearly 
loved fainerin-law' lo Gor- 
don and Ginny and 
grandfather lo Joanna. Caro- 
line. Sarah. Dominic. 
Chmdopner and Andrew 
Funeral S**rv ice. al S» Paul's 
Church. Bov ley Road. Maid 
sione. on Monday 2<Hti 
Fearuarv. al 2 IS pni fol 
knwed l>y cremauon al 


TU DOR-PRICE on February 
lilh TheHon Sir Oawd Wil- 
liam Tudor PrKe K.T. 
Beloved husband of Elspeth 
and laiher of Sfmon. Garem 
and k a Inna. Funeral sen ice 
al Si BmoJphs Church. 
Aspiey Guise on Wednesday 
February 19lh at 2 p.m. 
Family flowers only, dona 
lions for Red Crass lo H W. 
Mason and Sara. 9 High 
Street. Newport PagnelL 
Bucks Tel 0900 611 112 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


BABY GRAND FMM Very 
small Bv Beinhoil Rrguiarfy 
limed and pfavvd £1.000 Tri. 
Ol 948 1.346 


TYRtNGHAM. On 15th Of Feb 
ruarv. Humphrey Douglas, 
beloved husband of Mary 
and step-father of Susan. Fu- 
neral service. Si Andrews 
church, Buck land. 

Monochcrum. Friday 2Isi of 
February al 2.00pm. Fol- 
lowed by pm ale cremation 
ai Efford Crematorium. Fam- 
ily flowers only please. 


THE PIAHO WORKSHOP 

London's leading sperlalisJ in 
new and restored punos for me 
largm ornuine detection avail- 
ante 304 HigtKMlr Rd. NWS 
01-367 7671 Free nualogue. 
CRAMP PIANO 711 81 IW 

Kirkman 1862. rasewoocL nice 
lone \ O.C . regularly tuned 
£1 .9*30 Ox lord, |0865> 
881117 

PIANOS: K-LANE « SDKS. New 

and rrcondjuoned QuallU' al 
reasonable prunes 326 Bn onion 
Rd.. S. Croydon. 01-6803613 


• TRAILFINDERS 

worldwide low rou mgnts 
The best and we ran prove it 
lofi.OCO clients since 1970 
AROLND THE WORLD 
FROM £766 

0 /W Nn 
SYDNEY £392 £841 

PERTH £380 £582 

AUCKLAND £409 £770 
BANGKOK £198 £363 
SINGAPORE £225 £462 
MIAMI/FLORIDA £188 £309 
HONG KONG £237 £474 
DELHI/BOMBAY £250 £390 

COLOMBO £241 £420 

CAIRO £160 £270 

NAJHOBJ £231 £391 

JO'BURG £286 £473 

LIMA £253 £484 

LOS ANGELES £187 £321 
NEW YORK £120 £240 
GENEVA E 75 E 89 

41-48 EMU MOTT n» 
UMHM W8 «u 

EuraoenJSA FUgM 01-037 5400 
mga **4 F*0ht» 01-003 ISIB 
Isufhameas CM 01-838 3444 
Coyr n me ni UcPRandfBonded 
ABTA IATA ATOL 1458 


Algarve 

MrnornL Tenerife Villas. Apf 
PensKHW Tavenuv HeMays 
and FUgMs summer Winter 
Brochure*, bookings only direct 
tram. The SprooJnta. Ventura 
Holidays Tet Ol HO liSB 
HOT TURKEY. 12 berth rri-wed 
mol or yartii from Cl OOO p w 
Idyllir private burn hotel 
LHOW 12 week.*, me fin Free 
wdirrwra wufi boui. 01-326 
1005 1737 3861 omapnonCL 
ATOL 2091 

MORE KELAMO For 

Cronee New 88 programme. 
Hotel louring, ramping, iiebing 
A horse safari* Lroque Land of 
vatranoe*. glaciers a water- 
fall* Twicheraworkl ocoenure. 
C1-S92 7606 ■ 892 7851 
TAKE TBBE OFT le Para. Am 
Sferdam. Brtrssen. Bruges. 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. Dublin. Rouen. Bou- 
logne A Dieppe Time Off 2a. 
Chester Close. London SWIX 
TOO Ol 236 8CT70 
RKUE A VHUMO 
Irefaads braiMiful a rugged 
countryside. Highland safaris 
T— re *. ITS world summer Dro- 
ebure Ol 892 7606 <24 hr Ol 
892 7851 L 

UNIQUE Far Cast Tour la The 
■Three Osru-c kingdoms' 
Cl 985 Conlacl Limmal Travel 
Ol 530 1848 tor your tree bro- 
chure on Hong Kong. China 6 
Taiwan 

WORLD WISE flight* spreiot ato q 
m Ttrsl 5 Club Class a Econo- 
my lo Australia. Far East. S 
Aim. ISA. Lisbon and Gene- 
va Phone Travel Center Ol 
656 7025 ABTA 
LATIN AMERICAN TRAVEL. 
Conlacl lhe experts lo Latin 
America. Club A 1st Cla». Ca 
nboeon. L&A. A Mexico 
Sunar. 01-629 1 ISO 
LATIN AAKSfOL Low com 
dignn eg Rio cogfi Lima 
L47g rln Also Small Group 
Holiday Journeys. JLA ai 747 
sioe 

MAZARROH UNSPOILT man In 
S Spam Villa* opts Sal Fll 
Gal Murcia iNr La Manga I. 
Beach Bay Hols 0432 270105 
ATOL ACT 1517 
COS I'ClfT TDIS ON fltahtt nets 
lo Europe. USA A mod deslino- 
lion* DIPLOMAT TRAVEL 01 
7 JO 2201 ABTA IATA ATOL 
DISCOUNTS IN Economy urk- 
el* Try ua 

lost FLKSHTBOOkXRS Ol 307 
9100 

LOW COST FLIGHTS. Most 
European destination* 

Vah-vandrr 01 aOO 

4262 0052 ABTA 

61004 ATOL I960 
MBAMIL JAMAICA. N.VORK. 
Ainrca cheaprsi lores etc 
Rlrhmond Travel, 1 Oukr St 
Rvcnm ond ABTA Ol 940 4073 
PORTUGAL Pousada Ffy drive 
lours rirM Clou Detune Ho- 
tels Brochure. t» 4*6-4477 
Hart land Houaays 
TUNISIA For that perfect naboay 
wiih tunny day* 6 carefree 
nighls Weal for Feb March 
Tunisian Travel 01 573 4411 
USA. New van. L249 Lot Anar 
K“s £335. Florida £309 * other 
destinations Motor L .S comer* 

Ol 584 7371 ABTA. 

AUCANTE. Faro. Malaga nte 
Dvmond Travel ATOL 17B3 
Oi 581 4*41. Horsham 6854 
AUSSIE. M2 . SMi Africa. ISA. 
Hong Kong Best Farm- Ol -493 
7775 ABTA. 

AUSTRALIA. Sydney Metooume 
Ir 16 18 Penn Darwin- 
L56-3 01-584 7571. ABTA 
FAR EAST. Hong Kong £488 
Bangl. oft £325. Singapore 
£445. 01-684 7371 ABTA 
FLY Til £59 Spain. Purl. Can, 
te*. Milan Swict. Munich. 
Creere Sunwheel 01 -434 4326 
TURKEY Flights only from £176 
Inclusive Cbplamal Travel Ol 
730 2201 

SOUTH AFRICA Jo-burg fr £ 475 . 

Ol 584 7371 ABTA 


Besi run for your money 

VERBIER/MERIBEL 

suited Chotets 22 Feo I Mae 

1 wh Ir U09np Air Chalet 

2 wka fr C337pp Air Oiotel 
Dnim Inc of Ferry Crossing 

1 Wh lr £12900. a ids Ir 
£249pp 

3 deurwvn meets a day 6 free 

wine ol dinner 
Se* Catering Chalet* 
Available 

22 Feb i'vAi fr Cl25«p 
Ine m £69pp srtf drive 
■Inr Ferry Ccosnngi 

SKI BEACH VILLAS 

Ring 0223 311113 
ATOL 381b ABTA 1415X 
Access. Borrloyrard 


ST JOHNS WOOD. Per fen house 
1 pc rampany entmamihg. A 
vnnnou* town home on 4 
noon. Splendid dining rm. 
drawino rm. 4 a Mr bearoom* 2 
haUvrooms il rn svulri Games 
room Parra garage £500 pw 
244 7353 


KENSINGTON 

house gn 2 I 


S uperb I m en 
comanajig. 2 


PARSONS 
GREEN 

1 oich J bed Mtec with bond 
o.-» La n«v lu a tvgh vuad*nL 

Uhl p« 

SLOANE 
SQUARE 

Livveh Pmyg-iern -m qg<i yet 
hrcU vfitfl. 
tinipu. 

Contact: 
LUXURY LIVING 
01 -583 9225 



Services) 

Locited 


C8EYK SOW SVC. be»k 
ttbUy ium & ck. 1 2 HO 
Gts/rgun Pz. 2 3 tgCESa. 
MPJ pba j im rr> eze 

My fii W. rat W rest 
Atari cow. co K KCC?* 
WEST iCBfSBIGTDtt. w>3 
turn 2 bed te. rrcept. CL 
(mb. 0 x 3 d now. T15S Bw. 
ra W smf S?CE5 






Quralshi 

CfiflsMoe 


KIH6HTS8ftflJC£ 

P Soflrtb 2-fcedfoam fiat m («s. 
»g«3 text 0«L KNTHfc 
faC# JiTtail t« Hr tbjltel st®. 
iJnUl Mad wnwB aos 2-ito 
?- 3 gamy. AtaUUe caw tor 
Co in. £325 3BL CgrUCL 
ScsreoY Bbcarriw 




! REGENTS PARK SDRS, Suaerb 2 

beg rm well rviuMted apart 

MM bnvalr lerr Hign’r rec 

£170 p*> vKlun Uiwh e. Ca 
01 794 | 16 I 


(tedraann. 2 baltvdona. Amoce 
ran kilchrn. large double 
reernfran • seperate cloak*. 
Available now Palace Proper- 
ties DX 486 8926 


SLOANE AVENUE SW3 double | 
bedroom rial C1SO p w. 
Hey rock a Co. 5646B63 


Large 

farmn neuvr 6 Dedv. 3 tu.Ts. I 

wevi rgimpprd Lltmen *ir.lrri | 

£320 pw Butluucv DZ 331 
7767 


GOING 

OVERSEAS? 

WE HAVE WUTNJG 
COUMMY TENANTS 
’WONTING TO RENT 
TOUR HOME IN 
CENTRAL, 'SW LONDON 


Buchanans 

Urti"!* KavRhnnf 

ffl-$!7J67 


SWl. Lo>rly limly home. 2, 
rrreov 3 4 bed*, kn. dining rm 
wiin polio doon logon. 2 both*, 
fireplace*. Newly dee. £400 1 
DM COotes 01-828 B251. 


HOLLAND PK. DeUgmul Igr 1 
flat in route standing in own 
ground*. Sootkrb room* 
new decor furniture and ratap- 
tneni. 2 double neas. living rm. 
dining, nan. win. vii. cal u 
CH. HW. off si pkg. CO. Id only 
£275 Pw Trt Ol 603 7749. 


SKI*SKI*SKI* 


FIT I 

A CATWICK 
FDS SUnr-FREE SUM 
FROM ONLY CSS 


URGENTLY REQUBKO - Id 

now properties lor long comN 
n* lr< in cenirai London Lvual 
lee* Si urge. B. Sbhv Ol 244 
7441 


PURLEY 20 min* Waterloo or 
Land Brog and 290 yd* from 
sin Broad new family house In 
pfroMnt surrounding*. £ 
rerew a bedrm*. oailtetn. 
rtoayrm. and wen n ilea kit. gdn 
and garage toe at lor ramraul 
tng LlOO pw. Cl 244 7353 


URGENTLY REGUtREO. Tiru 
cUv- prti p eflte* tor tcro Cmntd 

iiv tel* in CcTKeai teiuni 

L-vuol lee* Uttgi 6 Sen 01 

244 7441 

UHERKAN Bank u.-genhy rr 

iliiirrt hrvury lion and imnn 

from C2O0 LI 090 Pw Rirg 
Butgevs Evlatr Attec.l* LBl 31 3b ! 


WL I in ? hrd iijt m on rune* 
L;yr?pw me £31. a<W. SCBu 
Lex! OS f2l I-CLS 
W14 Nfyltvfi -Uko- rase. 2 Nd rid 
rtv tofte C!SO PW Uuin .111 

dnv. 331 7767 


BARONS COUNT. >W ken. 1 M 

newry con.rrtcd touay flat. 2 

mm* lubr Cl 15 pw 

Sue 90S 9632 


WWWWY war 2 M. 14 W 4 

*4Wf CIH3 pw irony 
Fair 6 Vm*. hrr ^it,J| 


MNCSJUTY OF 4MMRRA. 


FREEDOM HOUDAVS 
Ol 741 4686 Obi 236 0019 
ATOL 432 IATA A1TO 


VISdlMG LONDON? Allen Bate! 
A Ca nave a large veieeuon of 
Hal* and Iwum aiaUable lor I 
wrci. ♦ from CIOOpw 499 
1665 


VAL «T BENE. Ttgne* & Lei 4m 
22 February. 7 niaMy from 
unu £199 0 o 14 mqnL* 

L2T9PP Inrtuuve rained 
chatef club holiday Limited 
aiOikibtlilV I March C4U Ski 
Val on OL 905 4444 or ill 200 
6000 1 JAltourt! ABTA 55031 
ATOL1 162. 


WCt.'WX Swcimb MUdto flat in 
Hr. stork. CH. CMW. Cot TV , 
clraner pgrler £1 10 pw- Tel 
Ol 580 0 S 0 I or 38 T 2S?9 


SOUTH HCNSMGYON S.W.7 

Lnfurrmned Ijrar mewy novae, 
clove Lvcer and lube 3 4 bed*. 
3 Haifa, vauru ana garage. To- 
tally refurbished 
immaculate Avail now long co 

Irl £475 pw Buchanan* Ol- 
351 T76? 


HYDE PARK SQUARE W2 2 

hrrt* luvurv lurniyhM flal 
Tefe phone 01-262 5550 


AMCRWAN Executives Seek 

lu* rial* hoti*r* up lo £500 
pw Ltuil fee* reg PMUto* 
hay 6 Lew**. South of Hie Park 
Chrf*ea office. Ol 542 81 :1 or 
Anrth of lhe Par* Regrnt'i 
Pork office. Ol 7 23 5135 


BELGRAVIA CHELSEA 

hMCHTSGUIDGE r.an Nuu* 

atartoDle naiw LlOO I .COO aw 

Bucge** Ol £81 Silo 

CHELSEA JUVENSIDC Beaudiui 

lux 1 due brdr flat ru-wly- or. 

Lev kilrfi nt eaklavt rm. CI6C 

pw 01 352 8458 

CORNWALL GARDENS IW7 

Soactou* 2 tmnoum run u*te 

fully dee Ail amcnii.ee r.v tel 

£^65 pw Tei. O: «rs 6>g: 2_ 

DON'T SEX IT ADVERTISED? 

1600 More*, lorruuw i:pm tot 

info 01 627 2610 Homefocaiocy 

Rente* Ac com Pyrncvhet* 


STM KEN EARLS CT. fit vvr 

hi » ■■!* 1 bed fin* iron tipg 

?Jteif>^i'ijni C:?o bhh-id. ei 


FANTASTIC SMI bargain* Cha 
leu haleH. apart menu, air 
steeper roach and *ell drtve 
Booking hoUtne with Accra 6 
Im Ski Wed 0373 864811 


QUALITY FURNIS HE D not* and 
rrauve* m au area* 10 let 
Hunter* 837 7365 


HOLLAND PARK beouhluL *6s- 
rrain and neuni tu floor floL 
recep With martite Irrepiare. 

dble bro wHh fufrony view* 
over and acre** lo gdn*. £160 
ow 01-749 2087 ill 


DRAYTON GARDENS SW 10 Ro- 

land Cardin* 5*7 siudto 
bed flats. 1 120 D w Hr* rack 6 
CO Tel Ol 584 6863 


ST PAUL'S CT *14 Ltegoni 3 
tern town n*r. gdn «r 5 nnn 
:ulie Cl 70 p.w nn h tyr 
tejw Cl 7 LSI Jiyg * 

SW7. 2 dole bed Hof m, 1-4 m 
“’in bale 6ny Ber lit. Cn let 
t sirup* • CIM5 pw wuium 
Witten 7 30 S4i3 

THE WEST SELECTION ef guoluy 

4hd noutev in Lomt.™. 
£Vwto-hi CQnUuvm- 

T« o: 244 !KJ 

U.S COSD>AMT leek 1 , fum pens- 
ri'»-* ir LainhMi area* 

CABBA.N « GASCXEC itunr 

■Abril's., o: Wi 5481 


CHALET PUmlt in perlecl 
im* Far our February 
March vaconoe* In lop re*orb 
rn France Switzerland or Holy 
Special offer Madrwmo ISO off 
<3 weef.ii £26 tl vvrefc 1 
Snvalfworld Tel- iQ342i 22222 
i24M beorhurevi or 27272 


SKI BONNE RMC Catered 
chalets In Merioel A Courrhevef 
lr £165. h. 0 Iwk inr teavei 
Crral food, unlld wtneAexlen 
*h-« guiding Ol 733 2S531737 
3861 ansaohane • ATOL 2091 


HOLLAm PAKK/KrtHlngtan 
High Si 5parraiB ■ amity flat 
fiullv turnnltedi 3 Pearoom* 
Urge *outn lacing recepban. 2 
bathroom* knrhrn break fan 
room L400 pw Superb 
torairanCaO Gratvom ueai 01 
2*7 3639 day OI 602 2652. 

CASTLENAU SWl 3 Do you hove 
a good head lor height* and ar 
Itklu- leaning*.'' this flat 1 * for 
you Armiten deugned and 
beautifully- furnished kip ftoor 
flai vpfil level living rm. fJ. kit. 
S dbte bed ran 2 Oath*. £170 
pw 244 7353 


KNJQHTS BR I DCE. In DrmUgVOun 
btock. close M Harrodl. dreorot 
ed 10 d htgn nandord. 2 

bedroom apt 24 hr porter One 
and mud white Long Co lei 
remmed. £325 pw 244 7353 


FULHAM IMS Preu* 3 beg 

house. DM 4 *narrr* wuh ro Irt 

tlHO pw Burtunom 01 351 
7767 


UHCENILT RCQUmiD luwury 
I'an .ted hnrn>'v hi O-uir J leiii 
den I*r lung carlo. im It-ly 
fklenurl 8 Cn Ol 730 5000 


HOLLAND PAJtK Soactou* wrC 

fum garden rial Dble bedrm 

•qr reeeot t J " rnmpdnv In 

LlOO pw Tel 01 777 4680. 


ST LOO CT. FLOOD ST BW3L 

•tewiy arc gng ft rial 1 able 
bed 1 |WJ 1 bed. 2 bald*, uiung 
rm. dnung rm. vu A* ail now. 4 
nubs. iJJO pw Ma&kclls Ol- 
581 W16 


KwarnanocE own mew* 

now Hyde Pork Large rec co- 

tton tfniing hail 2 . br«L f 
bam*. £330 pw Tef 584 1163 


GENERAL 


March aiaUabdrly 
Ski Jeannie Luxury holiday* of 1 
duty free pner* Catered S C | 
from Ci79uw riigiu* A text 
transfer Tel 01 221 7911 


ExecHotels 


FULHAM Superior eoartou* 2 Bed 
flat, ctow lube Recep. 
ku diner, washer dryer. Lgr 
com gdn. £145 pw. Co Lef Tel 
>l*!i 736.1076 or 361 5867 

MML1CO. Attractor newly «pn 
vened ground fir flat in uimar 
period house 2 bed* recep kit. 
twin CH £2O0cw Aiken 
Greene Assoc 01-551 5295 


KNIGHTS B R IDGE. Changing 
nnv m."*s house >2 min* 
Monody bull 1 2 pmo: 1225 
pw Tel Ol «9i Qp46 


MS A NIG. 2 

new rmrv eciinm 6 
V 1 and ? rev! Hah Fufiy turn 
CH Cn k-> only Fr ran CMSte* 
A3cr. Bate* A Co 499 1U*S 
9 BEDROOM MOUSE sun -Mim 
TV wa*f>n pai rang £140 pw 
627 2610 Hnmcka alor*. 

«N1RAL line: : Imnn. on ok 
Pd' "II to. "Wv* £90 pw CUl 
rr* n27 2610 Htofncturainn 
DISTRICT LML 1 Reno* 1 lietfrin. 
gafdrn flJl n.vr*ing. £95 pw 
62" 2610 Hotnriorafor* 


LITTLE VENICE ALTaruvr 1*1 nr 

flat, toe nvepr 2 bed* ! Mir. 

I single* fully turn et-c m* 

Ol 399 1666 ot Oi 930-IC30 


HAMMERSMITH: rum inn 2 hea 

r^Jt L I «() pm . o(hrrv loo hj? 

2613 HomrtoratoeT 


.SMC. Ldven- 

comforlable 3 bed flat close 10 

tune £200 per nrL Tv-te 
oho or Ol 9C9 S6A3 


NEWLY OCC aw bedim flat m 
t<»*ris- *a daw 0*41 Tube mo 
p *> Trt OI 736 *034 

REDEJITS FK Pnrtiand PI nrw 
tortiiiil r-rmbtiu 2m*J tfal All 
Otmj ooeiy £315 pw *15 nyjs, 


lr 


GENERAL 


SOTOCRANDE ■ near CWcallar 
choice private villa* and ann 
mem* m rural an. cxrencm 
golf, imnn and ndlng but 
Marorlla 40 mimiln. Pobner A 
Parker toil *93 5725 
SIMPLY ICELAND. MU Easter 
Break: Bargain Week* A Wee* 
end*. Panorama Tour 
Centre*. Vardan Travel 01 283 
662S. ABTA. IATA 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARIC'S 


FOR HIM 


s> 

v inlrr* Park Famii) flowers 

IV 

l ontv. Donaiiora, if desired, to 

. Tlw Wishing Wall Hospire. 

PT 

’ Maidstone, r 0 Sears Funer- 

al Service 2 . Thornhill 

9. 

Place. Maidstone. Keni 

Tf 

OEHT ■ On isih February al 
Hinrieias. afier a long illness. 

, Rosalind Hosier aged 62. 

Beloved daughter of 


VICK Canon Laurence John 
on Feo i«ih peacefully al 
fuwne aged 67 Much loved 
husband of Diana and father 
of Timothy. Anthony and 
Rosemary. Vicar of Fefeled 
1951 lo 1986. Funeral ai 
EHddenden on Feb : 9th ai 
5.30pm Memorial serf Ice al 
Felsied on Feb 281h al 2pm. 
No flowers Donations lo 
FeWed Quitch, c o D.l. 
Shaw. Korotevu. Chelmsford 
Road. Feist ed. 


OWNER 5Um 
wedding Morning mns 
Evening toil lutbv BLvrt, 
locket* & sinned irouser* 


SALE hm £30. 

UPMAN5 HIRE OEPT. 22 
CHARING CROSS ROAD, 
WC2 IN# LrkMter Sg Ste 
tkral 01-240 2310. 


Leonard, dear sister of Celia. 
Anita and Gerard and a 
much foied aunt ana friend. 
Funeral service al Burghfield 
Parish Church on 21*1 
February al 2 45pm 
DIXON On I4ih of February 
suddenly ai home w h tBiin 
darling husband of Margo, 
much loved tamer of ■wil- 
liam. Hugh. Mile* and 
tMkned grandfather Con- 
sulting engineer. Service of 
thanksgiving for his life at 
Holy Tnmij. Church. 
Cue k field Wesl Sussex Fn 
day 21 si of February at 12. 
30pm Flowers or memorial 
donation* lo Council for Pro- 
tection Of Rural England may 
be sent to J A R Matthews. 
Church SI.. Curkfteid. W«J 
Sussex. Tel. OJ<U 4 13055 . 

GAYLER On February l2tn. 
Robert John Fellow of fhe 
Library Association, beloved 
husband of Dorothy, dearest 
father of Mary and son in- 
law David a dear Grandpa 
of toe and Robert Crema- 
finn ai Enlield Crematorium 
al a oopm Thursday Febru- 
ary 20tn. 

BLUCKSTE1W On February 
Ulh al home afier a long ill 
wis bravely born. Guy. 
df.oled husband of Barbara, 
beloved laiher of Sally and 
Nigel and adored bv his 
grandchildren No flowers. 
Funeral strictly private 

HBUN85 - On Saturday 15 m 
February 198b 31 Horton 
Hospital, Epsom. Surrey 
peacefully afier a long cruel 
illness. Ron. adored husband 
ot Cnnsitne ih*s 'Mavsuj'l. 
and brother of Peter. Pam 
and Alan. Enquiries 10 
Messrs G-S Kearr* A Co.. C9 
High Slrccl. Hampton Hill. 
Middlesex 01-9T7 5127 

Flower* will be -welcomed 
bu: donation*, if preferred 
please. 10 tikf Alzheimer * 
Deveoxc fiocteiy. 3rd Floor. 
Ranh Gunning*. Fulham 
Broadway. London SW6 
ID* 


VRNME8 - On I3lh February, 
afier a long illness. Nina So- 
phia. beloved wife of Harry, 
mother of Jonathan and Si- 
mon. amt grandmother. 
Cremauon ar Gowers Green. 
2.30 pm. Friday 21*1 Febru 
arv. Donation* If desired to 
Saw lhe Children Fund. 

WOOTTEW - on February 16th 
peacefully of home. Florence 
■Glory 1 . devoled wife of the 
late Maior General RM 
**ooiicn Her loving friends 
will miss her areally 
Cremation 21 Ammluin. 
Friday February 2ist al 
epm. Cut flowers or 
donations lo Marie Curie 
Memorial Foundation. 28 
Beigrave Square. London 
SVviX 0OC 


DMCDUNTCD FARES 

single return 
io'iivaa Hat £300 £465 

NairOOi £220 £325 

Cairo £130 £200 

Logo* £235 £33S 

Orl Bom £2*0 £jaO 

BjJWkofc £196 £3 30 

Douala S.JSO 

Afro Asian Travel 


162 168 Bronl SW|, 

TELi 01-437 KtSS'6'7-B 
AMEX VISA DINERS 


Luxury apartment* 
pest ktcairan deuvl* and 
avatlaUUly Ot 262 OZ34. 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


UP UP & AWAY 


FINIS FDR MEN al maker* prtem 
021 236 9647. Bu&JiwsbI or 

0455632594 .Hamel n I 


NoiroW. Jo-Burg. Cairo. Du- 
bai hlaniMil. Singapore. KL 
Genu. Banqkok. Hong Kong. 
Sydney. Europe. A The 
Americas. FUmitvgo Travel. 
3 New Quebec SI Marble 
Arm London W1H Too. 

01-402 9217/18/19 

Open Saturday 10.0013 00 


ST, TMRZ REGION iCrmx 
\ aimer r BeovHilul romfortable 
family home emensli e grourwj* 
near sea. very large pom. Ueenv 
B 10 Mid June to rrad-6eptem 
Her. £1500 p w . help included 
Ol 221 8615 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


EUB O EA, Greece 2 vinot, sleep 6 
4 4. in K-iTBCed gardens over 
■ooUng sea AvjiLsOte May. 
June Orl £300 pw A £170 pw. 
Trt. 01-341 0268 (ami 


SHORT LETS 


SERVICED APARTMENTS In 

Kensington. Cot t v 24hr *wpd. 
Ux . GoUtnaham Apts. 01 373 
4506 

ST JAMES’S PLACE SWl. Verv 
vm.n -1 z rad. s r anl ne-ci to 
Park. Maid inn 373 6306 |T1 


ADWARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
a v. £395 nn £o48 Aurkiand 
a v* £420 rln £774 Jo’bvitg 
o W CJKA rln £470 Lo* Ange- 
te* 4 v* £171 rtn £335 Lonaan 
Flvgnt Center 01 370 6332. 


GREECE. (M Mauds) Villas opts 
A pensions Departures from 25 
Mon-tL low price* from l vvk 
Cl 6 9 3 w*s C1B9 .0923. 
T78344 Timwar Holidays 
ABTA ATOL HOT. 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


AUSTRALIA. W. Far CJnl In (art 
viomiiAidf. low com Jhqfm 
EurOrMVh 01-543 4^77. 


Cancer 


TUSCANY. Luvimoixly lur 
nejvrd house to Irt AuaiiSI 
Steen* 6. 3 Bathroom, terrace, 
toiall pool. Beauiiria rounlry. 
1 5 nun* Siena, I hour Florence 
C7SO put Ring 01370 6423. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


GEOFFREY N CAS SOM To all j 
Prirocians and other friends. , 
A memorial sen ice will Del 

herd at Si Mtrnaer* Church. 
Elude an Friday 2isi Febru- 1 
an 1986 ai 7.00pm. 


| Together we can beat it. 

W? fund over one •Jitid of 
■ill research imo the pneven- 
uon and cure of cancer in 
fh‘- UK. 

Help usb}- sendinpa dona- 
I tionor makea lejjcv to 


The more 
you help us, 
the more 
well find out 


ANDORRA 22 Feb Ski jranrw | 
Luxury holiday at duly free 
orvrv Catered and S C from 
£159 i wi of fhgm and uxi 

transfer 01-221 7913 
SKI ANDORRA /AUSTRIA. Hole* | 
or <eff catering opts Coacn or 
(b from £79. phone now for 
our brochure. Oeckers Travel 
OV STS 3591 
MU BARGAMS - FEB 22 Too ro 
sort*, besi snow, fully coterrd i 
chalob from £199. oMritnniis | 
from £89 by air Ski MacG OI- 
351 5446 ATOL 
MARCH STILL AVAIL. Andorra. 
Lux or ran next lo unties, 
catered A S C holidays. Ski 
Jeannie 01-221 7913 
SKI FLIGHTS daily Id Geneva. 
Zonch. Munich Mr tram EM | 
Ski. West 0373 86481 1 
MU PUT ST VINCENT from £69 
tor Hols Ol- 309-7070 Oil 1 C 
ATO L 1 772 
DU VTOWSJt Luxury, rm ueeix I 
6 Central location Available I 
Fra 16- Maim 8. 01-580 3445 | 
VEMBKR chalet on lhe Uu slope*. 
UM6. Id let. from £240pw. Tel: 
031 5573880. 


GENERAL 


COURSES 


THE GUIDE TO 
SELECTED HOTELS 
WITH CHARACTER IN 
BRITAIN 


CD— BMM.B WEST COAST 

ThorncuH Howl Mo*<gan 
North overlooking gold xands 
« rocky rtne*. GMrtous 
cUft 'country walks. AH bed- 
roonra mute cm TV. 
UBvMwrM Otnon £90- 
£1 25 e x VAT wfcly 1 06371 
860737. AfMey Courtney 
i ecbm w e fai e iL 

aXMTRV BREAKS ONLY 


TOYOTA CCUCA automatic XT 
LB 19840 15.000 mile*, 

ttrei blue. E.S R . ahoy*, stereo 
rassebe. cared for and nnmacu 
VM*. guaromeea m> 3V.7 86 
Pmaie sale £5.995. TeN- 
Phone. 0638668866. 


CHIROPODY AS A PROFESSION 


7ht d»MfU lgr gw ifMigc tear, at W3n*n a»r=oo6si 41 tra flnww woo* 6 
■nctoKras. v=nofiMBau-rt4>»«5*a,, w a'.awviw«dE4oiiurtcftei»ocv 
tnay up BWn ai hone Sf nr/ "secucsec ertcspcrcDneg WMonv tote-wed 
by hd pntcknf mm* 7ou aw n-wee ra <*nv lot iM frae aocuot tom 


Atmso per P4TBOI1 OoUy Shar- 
ing twa wMW bkBaroom. 
breakfooL diWMr. EUwite. 
taxing break hi lhe country 
wMh good food, log Iters 


VOLVO 7tt» OLE Auto. 10 
monim Old. nut under 
manufacturer's warranty. 
9.000 miles only Every con 
reliable extra uvrtudlng stereo. 
CIO.BBOOT offer. Home tel- Ol- 
670 9741 Bus: 01-761 4128 


7tm Socrtmy of me School of ChnopodT- 
THE SMAE IHSTfTUTB (oSUOkUlM 1»18) 
Uw Non Had (Osoonment Trt| 

Mb Bowl Mort ra h—d. BMhjtom 06 «Jt 
T«L HMetawM (DK81 3SI49 (21130 24 IK»>( 


UJL HOLIDAYS 


OAKTBSZ COTTAGES Sell Ca 
leruig acroniodalion. Brochure | 
104841 657522 Oakn MUM 
Oak*. Huddersfield -HD3 4BV 


LEGAL NOTICES 


RE J LEAVER A SONS LIMITED. ] 
BY ORDER OF THE HIGH 
COURT DATED THE 1ST NO- 
VEMBER 1985. 

NEVILLE ECVCLEY FCA. OF I 
332 BRIGHTON ROAD. SOUTH I 
CROVTXJN HAS BEEN AP 
POINTED UOUIOATOR OF THE i 
ABOVE-NAMED COMPANS' 
WITHOUT A COMMITTEE OF 
INSPECTION. 

DATED 1CTTM FEBRUARY ] 
1986 

NEVILLE ECKLTY 
LIQtllDATOB 


Southdowm Hotel ft Coun- 

try ncMaurant Troaon. nr. 
JV Iera f lel d . Hama 1073080) 

621. 

BBn VALUY Cumbria T«m- 

pie fiwertw Home Hotel nr. 

Penrith. Elegant Q 

house bi deNBMfld . _ 

garden. Good food and cosy 

hedrowm wtui private bath- 

rooms ta A pattern Short 
breaks ol year, m tending ho 

tettert 1093016 1 678 
GEORGIAN R07SL aa.TTTa 

ronwnen. Egon Ronav. Meal 

Mr YorV Dales. Moon. All 

Redraw entoue col. TV. ra- 
dio. phone. Wa, coffee 
faewnes. CbcmUpm o 
room oar. cor park. Bro- 
chure. Heather. The HiS 
HoteL 60 Yo rk Hd. A cuntae- 
York 10904) 790777 

j wi wn i WILTS. 

KU.MKL3*granwte 
ten* and Itatad btiHdmg adk 
Norman abbey Fine food, 
excefl win 


I RANGE ROVER 19B2 X rr.. 
blue, low mileage £7 500 ona. 
RAC or AA inspection wu- 
come. 01-223 1453. 


EASTER REVISION 
LONDON 


BALW. 


ASHBOURNE TUTORS 


MEW BMW’S - All models la or- 
der .3251 rarly deliver* Large 
docauiug Tel 0227 T93Q10 <Tl 


Oil Uvd 
SPECIALISTS 


Mathematic* Economic* amt 
the Sciences 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


Far details- 

The Pntmtul. Ashbourne 
Tutor*. 59 61 Kensiutnon 
High siren. London VvB 
SCO. 

Trt. 01-937 3858 1 


r 13UIC And au «M 
heatedn Bargain bnato 
1066621 2344/2SB8L 

MFLriXT MANOR Nr Wey- 

moulli. 40 ran. Most private 
hath Countryside by throes 
Family activity hotfctayx . 3 
sguash courix. kg. indoor 
pool gym. sauna, teonta. 
snooker. Cellar bar dob. 2 
moM brrak. DOB tra JMT7 tad 
BP <03061 7B6948 


■WOITI PARK. Haney Houv. 
lop floor, unf urn. view* of nark. 

4 bedims iJ dbte i a'* balhrm*. 
Ige US kn. 3 uuerran recep. 
Rem £1 IJVfiOpa. Lease. CiC 
kHrhen appliance* eir for sate. 
B7o 4703 Sunday . r> n. 493 i 
9941 weekdays. 


Tearfirr rrautrrd fo 
leach rim* or 6 year old*. Mart 
Ing in April APMv hi The 
Headmistress. Bruomwood Half 
School. Kyrle Road London 


Stall. Trt Ol 360 2988. 


RE B UMCOIN (FASHIONS) LIM 
ITED. B>' Oft DC H OF THE HIGH 
OOL-RT DATED THE 27TH NO- 
VEMBER 1985 

NEVILLE ECKLEY FCA OF 
332. BRIGHTON HOAD. SOUTH 
CROYDON. HAB BEEN AP 
POINTED UQLUDATOn OF THE 
ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY 
WITHOUT A COMMITTEE Of 
INSPECTION. 

DATED 10TH FEBRUARY 
1 986 

NEVILLE ECKLEY 

LIQUIDATOR 


Stoop* Enghtei Coonlry 
mansion brtwean Chester.- ■ 
Shrewsbury - a part or 
England you've never visaed 
h«of». 2 day break Iron 
E46. Arrange your own 
htooe party, bndge. cragurt. 
tarttwWctang etc. (0691711 
2736. 


KEHSUfOTOM WB AttracUvty 
rurnnhed family houv- garden, 
co tel L375P.W Trt 938 1368. 


i 6 wh. full lime C20th 
Visual Art* Course Mam 28ui 
April. Apply Principal 01-5BA 
0667. 


EDUCATION 

ASSISTANT 


For run*- pmfc-WMival irnll 
lute m-.r Osf.ird (VriH 
Mu*1 hov c eve tar dcLitl and 
fir jnie la acrurak-iv pt-f (mm 
routine a* well a* more inlrr 
estiipq ifuiie* undrr prwsurr 
SLuiinq Lb COO or in) lo 
C8 SOD tor rxrrpumuj r jrvti 
dJtr PJcoV wrile >jn log 
■IrloiK of eauraimn and m 
pMvmenf. including -uiarv 
marking em rhw fHrsonnrl 
PR" to Imulute af MedM-.V 
Lalraralory Scmncr*. 22 
Owen Aime SL London 
WIM OAL 


HUSBAND a WIFE learner team 
rrutnrrd k> lake o\ rr cst-di 
lived profnaiMr Engl an 

language srhool m CUndniilte. 
Margate 20 year trine, arram 
modaiiCHn high toe* No raplal 
mmirea Ring Geenng A 
Codlrr. Mai u Mono 63836. 


GUESTACCOM 


JITHE HIGH COURT OF JUS- 
TTOE ^CHANCERY DIVISION NO 
0QB4OS OF 1985 IN TKE Manor 
Of Johnson A Firth B row n pic and 
in TheMalter of The Companies 
Art 1988 

NOTICE IS HERESY GIVEN ugu 
the Ordjr of lhe High Court or 

JusUre •Chancery CMvtsiani dtaed 

3rd Frbnuxy 1986 rainnrung 
Uw reduruoa af the capital of lhe 
above-named Carapany Iran 
£37.000000 la £1 T.4464MQ90 
*°d the Mmute approved by toe 
OWMBMWmW respect lo uw 
c WP dta of UX Cofnptaiy os a n ert vl 
twr ae vecal parunoon required 
by lhe ateo* e-men Honed Art were 
r. SPM -.cq tv tor Rcgtatrta- of 
*i 7fb 


DATEO Bite 18th 


Fraruory 

1986 

HERBERT SMITH A CO. 

taoubig Hour 

SB. 37 Cannon Siren 
London cum Win 


Sotavars far lhe 


Company. 


BIRTHDAYS 


TO DIANA DUNCAN on a verv 
Mv-c iiit binnoav Manv happy 
■ riurny. Laly of Io*c from Her 
njrd Mark. Kauierme and 
Manila ax*. 


Cancer, 

Research 

Campaign 


Britfch Heart Foundadm 
The heart research d&Egity 
iWtfeucester Pttce, 
tandem WM&M 


I J C-irKon Hs’iuYrTrrraf r. 
fLVpi LLonHiuiSVlir^ 


STRIKE AT STROKE Am 
OTHER DISABLING DiSEAS£S 
Our crusade is amifis; Stroke AND against 
Astana. Chronic Bitwctiitis. Angina, Emphysema 
and CcT-^nary ThrDmtxjsis. H you, or a loved one. 
are Buiteimg from any ol these flnessaa. pteasa 
gat Hi touch, We can help you. 

The CHSA is spemfing a miflion pounds 

a iear on research andother vital work. 

Isa VVayouheJpuswithaDort^ion.a 
Cownata or a Legacy? The tax wa can 
recover on aCovsnanl enhances your gift 

THB CHEST* HEART & STROKE ASSOCIATION 

Tkwinocfc House North. London VWC1H &i£. ^epf»r»Wr30l2 



Make 1986 the year 

you got the villa right 


THE GREEK ISLANDS • PORTUGAL 
F1ALY • SOUTH OF FRANCE. 


^sSSa 




THE FAMILY OF 
SMALL HOTELS 
AND QUALITY 
GUEST 

ACCOMODATION 
WITH GOOD ROOM 
AWARDS 


A MOLJB AT hi UMp h Bid VP 
tape of Osamn. Pnvoiety 
run iradluonai Laketond 
*A. RAC Blomi bow. Own 
vounos by Ri^ec Rotoxy. 
Cnrdop bleu nM». CM, 
Pm. (pennies. Gof TV Ml 
room*. Woravwmtli coudry 


OAKBANK 

nt ece. Cum brto <08031 217 

«*«H HOHHE HOTEL, 

uieMon. Torauay >oaa3i 
605446 Beautiful VlrturLuv 

houxenr CodUnomn vidwm 
AUracTtv* rmt mart rn sube. 
wonderful borne caaktna. 
ramson, persopta utenuai. 
Rxtlo xte tcwm bar Oop 
*y m w r ncduc 
Uoro OBB £18 


l 




wSSBaSS*- h 2=g™-‘- 

2? 2"^-. about fherfamrfy 

MU'wsuprtb tobdaycan affoni 

SS-H»~sr~ 


: >j ^ a ThespedafistsinviBahoBdaiys. 


”** Award wmmng coun- 
tay honor hotaL Beauorul 
w **ws tel*. Here. Pretty 
reams wHh col TV taum* 
•°9 fires. candtefH aiMng. 
J«l. ctasme. one wines. 
Hm ML Bruoi. Welts. Bw 
Breaks 1 003*8* ■ 3145 
cyjyc wpop h ouse. 

SS* 17 W*C OM 

holt in Peak National Park. 
CAtotort. log rbm acesre 
lood. AB roams M state. A 
iraeirn. Open ok year round. 
Dinner BAB from £17 60 . 
Mgrtiunt MRS MOFFETT. 

“ocm hal l. ncan*m. 

MARTI NGTON. BUXTON, 
DeRBPVS. 1020884) 461. 
KKOFVLlmmilMRnRH. 
■OLAMD Warm, friendly 
fkmtty nai MM. Log fires. 
™9h*y to food ieom 
Ronsat > Good Food) <teM Aie. 
Baigam Bredis now from 

£IB DB4B Central far httrt. 

coasi. taronr vw Arera 
Rroehure from ryeeroft 
«TEL wmder 1066* 


Fcr more tefarnunlan please 
""tart inc hotels cured or 
send £i for ham gttates to 
AMBLEWURE. 190 Church 
Rd. hove, Eaai fimn bn* 
201 . 



THE RIGHT PLACE TO BE 


Tb advertise holidays for sale in The Times Classified, fill in vour 
adwmsernem in the space below, (Longer messages can be attached 
separately). 

Rales are: £4.00 per line (approximaiefy four words, minimum three 
lines) £23.0 ij per s.c.c. full display. Plus 1?% VAT. 

Oreques to be made payable to Times Newspapers Lid. Should you 
wish to pay by Access or Barclaycard, please quote your number bdow. 


Sen® to Shirley Margofe, Gn»p Classified Advertisement Manager. 
Iwas Newspapers Ud, AdrertBement Department. P.O. Box&), 
Virgmia Street, London EI 9DD. nox m 


Advertisement-. 


Name:. 


Address:. 


Daytime Telephone: . 
(Access). 


.|Visal 


THE *SISS& TIMES 








BJghMan O Alkirfusi^ Eire ^£103^- 
iwextKbtopy. • Sjjybnlghe-lmorth. • SchtduWttniimeflifihs^ 
wsmtE!ji}f& ® IlailydqHffiiiBfiMnHeaifHnwa^ 

^ «W 5W2 1» lino). Birniinrfiam (Oil) Sti 1953. 
Manchester <Ubi/ -} 5 fi (h+j, Glaspw ^kjij 
-Ml mays gab ant jcoywl 


r.te ill i> 'i-‘ 



































iy> fx. SjD 



THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 



1 oday s television and radio programmes 


31 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


— 3 


f-gj £** ta *AM. 

630 aSfWgtrme with 

2®"? Scott ana m ike 

sSS 5 '"® 0 

sgSwa,.. 

SSM&nsr 

M^O ana 

£{™w^tovice line at S? 
by the adult .» 

E^K,°r a,e, v a " 

£=!?«■ 

&2P Ceefax 1030 Pfay 

1?J0 '&***!*»•' Noon with 
Richard Whitmore and 
Frances CoverdaJe, ' 
wwhJdea news headiinaB 

with subtitles 1SL55 
Regional news and 
weather 

1.00 Pebble Mai at One. Jane 
Lomas with the latest 
fashions for the mother-to- 

be and what trendy younq 

ffltc ora un^i^ui 9 


TV-AM 



Miibna ruutr. 

^^ SeSaf6,a,jneWS 

aUSSMT 

■Wo and 9.00; sport at 
®^5 and 7.34; regional 
report atT.IStS^'at 

£2«: pop video *7.56; 
Wntrewew at 8J4; Moya 

r ,fun«ns at 
8.45; June Brown 

mtfflvwwsPauiHardcastte 


itv/london 



In the Name of Charity, on 
nv.i0.40pm. is documentary 
film-maker Nigel Evans's 


CHOICE 


pessimistic updating of his 
optimistic 1984 film a be 


film about a 

remarkable woman. Jeanette 
Roberts. Mum to 22 ctkidren 
though Wood- mother to only one. 
When we last saw her, she 
was busy massaging nightmares 
out of their disorientated 
fives. Some took more erasing 
than others, and there was 
more than one tear-stained face 
that registered doubt when 


told by _ ”Mum" that every one of 
toemnad — 


tots are wearing this 
jrOr David Dafvm 




spring; Dr Davit 

continues his series on 
ante-natal care 1.45 

240 The Goode Kitchen. 
Sh'riey Goode prepares 

Paupers' Potage or, as it 

•s less politely known, 


*•£ 2*a?es news headlines. 
9-30 For Schools; memory - for 
the hearing impaired 9 JO 
The natural history of a 
valley 1049 The afferent 
ways animals move 1046 
German conversation for 
beginners 1048 Politics . 
local and rational 
decisions 11.10 
Computers in everyday bfe 

11.27 All about air 11.44 

Travellers talk about their 
way of life 

1240 Button Moon. Puppet 
adventures of the Spoon 
farnSy 12.10 Rainbow. 
Learning made fun with 

« 1230 The 


- .._J a rigmw feelings ot 
shame and mistrust ! remember 
this film vividly because it 
illustrated how the vast 
. . machinery of the social 

y. ‘ ' services can sometimes be 

- ■£. T rramaiunzea m the shape of a 

Louise Brooks: profiled in Arena. smgte.carmg.intfviduat such as 
BBC 1 9 JSdbi Jeanette Roberts and a 


disparate and dependen: brood. 
Alas, segued grown-ups 
had Still more wounds to ofiici on 
the Roberts family and 
tonight s film tells how Jeanette 
Roberts s plan fo build a 
bridge between her children and 
a group of elderly, cured 
leprosy victims. living near 
by.came to grief As an 
indictment of that sector cf 
society that claims rt is acting 
in the name of Cnrstian chant/ 
while ignoring the community ‘ 
Btluc that is me qumtessence cf 
a charitable roJe.the 
documental left me feeling 


who haven't the wit to find 
cut for ourselves that vegetables 
can be a mpai in tho>r ra,.*- 


can be a meal in their own 
right and not just an adjunct to 
meat or fish. To watch master 


Radio 3 


Chef Peter Krcmberg prepare his 

StradBi de legumes .for 


more angry than anythrng f 

sran for a very 


have seen on television 
long time. 


• Take Six Cooks (Channel 
4. 8.30pm Jremmd5 those of i 


example. or a broccoli and 
almond souffle, is to 
experience salivation on a scale 
that is almost embarrass ma 
to talk about. 

• Best on radio today: 

Mahler s massive Symphony No 
2. with the two Fsiiotys. Lott 
and Palmer (p^dio 
3.7.4 5pm J... Juliet Ace's 
Afternoon Play Embroideries 
‘.Radio 4. 3.00pm) is a 
castigation of smug virtue.To 

enjey ft fully, you wilt need to 

keep on reminding yourself that it 
is a fairy tale for our times. 


BBC 2 



635 Open University: Motion - 
Newton's Law. Ends at 
7.20 

9-00 Ceefax 

9-20 Daytime on Twee For 

moderately mentally 
handicapped young adults 


CHANNEL 4 


9-35 Spanish conversation 
Maths: Fibonacci 




Sartiage soup; makes 
s from poi 


i potato 


140 News si One with Leonard 
„ M Rajfcin 1-20 Thames news 
1-30 Shine On Harvey Moon. 
Comedy drama series 
about a serviceman 
coming to terms with 

civilian Bfe in London after 
the Second World War. 
Starring Kenneth 


*uuyaktu 

orarwes and a two-tier 

wedding i 


Cranham. (r) 

-KhaMAziz 


- * r i W^OIIRiW. 

Inexpensive ways of 
nefo 




keeping the under fives 
entertained^) Ceefax 
3-52 Regional news 
345 Postman Pat (r) 4.10 
Jonbo and the Jet Set 
Cartoon series 4.15 
Jackanory. Christopher 
Guard reads the second 


2L30 Daytime.! 

chairs a studio discussion 
on Britain's prison system. 
With David Manor. 


' «a.'. 


part of Stig of the Dump. 

440 The 


officers and former 
prisoners. 3JJ0 That's My 
Dog. Canine quiz 
presented by Derek 
Hobson 125 Thames 
news headlines 340 The 
Young Doctors. 

4.00 Button Moon. A repeat of 


1 * ■ 




4L25 Bananaman 440 >. 
Really WBd Show. Terry 
N utkins, Nick Davies and 
Chris Packham answer " 

. another selection of young 
vtewers’ nature questions 
5.00 John Craven's 

Newsround 5.10 Grange 
HBi. Episode 13. It is half 
term and Robbia and 


the programme shown at 
noon 4.10 f 


10 BiH the Mkidar 
mees a king on the run 


from his kingdom 420 The 
the Willows. 


Ziggy take in the sights of 
London/'^ * * ‘ 


j A PRCJT 


bn^Ceefax) 

5-35 Hospital Watch. More live, 
human dramas from 
Portsmouth's St Mary s 
end Queen Alexandra's 
hospitals 

6.00 News with Sue Lawiey and 
Nicholas Witched Weather 
645 London Phis 
740 Holiday. Sarah Kennedy 
reports from BenJdorm on 
the effect of stricter 
ppfleingof the place; John 
Carter takes a cruise 
along the Nile; and BUI 
Buckley takes a five-day 
^ gliding course to Yorkshire 
7.30 EastEndera. Den makes 
an important 
decision .(Ceefax) 

640 One by One. Episode. . 
three and the move to the 
Safari Park gathers 
momentum. (Ceefax) 

650 Points of View. 

940 A Party PoBtical 

Broadcast on behalf of the 


Wind in the 

Animated adventures 
based on the Kenneth 
Grahame tale (Oracle} 4.45 
Splash. News of a 
Supers! euth competition, 
the winner of which wUI be 
a VIP guest of the San 
Francisco police 

5.15 Blockbusters. Bob 
Hotoess with another 
round of the general 
knowledge quiz for 
teenagers 

645 News with Michael 
Nicholson 640 Thames 
news 

6J25 Reporting London. BiB . 
Wigmore investigates 
rumours of dubious 
dealings in the Docklands 
brought about by the 


942 

seauences 1615- Part six 
of The Boy From Space 
10-38 The development of 
London's docklands 1140 
A visit to Elvaston Castle 
Museum, Derbyshire 
11.17 Drawing and 
painting butterflies and 
colourful flowers 1149 
Science: electronics 12.00 
French conversation 1240 
Lesson 16 of a German for 
beginners course 124 
Ceefax 140 The French 
seaside town of Fecamp 

' 148 Using maps and 

compasses 240 For four- 
and five-year olds 2.15 
Working a remote farm in 
toe Highlands of Scotland 
2-40 Science: patterns of 
growth 

3.00 Ceefax 

540 News summary Mtoh 
subtitles. Weatoer 

545 Fast Forward. Video fun 
for the young presented 
by FloeBa Benjamin 

6.00 No Limits. Jenny Powelt 
and Tony Powell report on 
the pop music, video and 
film scenes of York. 

640 The Adventure Game. The 
final in the series of tests 
of ingenuity between the 
ruler of the planet Arg and 
Earthfings whoare 
represented by Heather 
Couper, Keith Chegwin 
and Adam Giibey. 

740 The Money Makers. The 
first of a new series of six 


240 Film; Seven Keys* (1962) 
starring Alan Dob* and 
Jeannie Carson. Thriller 
about an ex-convict who is 
left a set of keys in the wiD 
of a former cell-mate 
Directed by Pat Jackson 

3-35 Paul Tomkowicz - Street 
Railway Switchman. A 
Canadian made short 
profiling one of the unsung 
heroes of Winnipeg whose 
job it is to keep the street 
' railway switches free of 
ice and mud. 

3.45 Years Ahead. Magazine 
programme for the older 
viewer presented by 
Robert DougalL This 
week's edition focuses on 
‘care in the community' 
and includes a discussion 
on provision for carers, 
with Harriet Harman amt a 
representative of the 
government 

140 Countdown. Yesterday's 
contestants. Andy KeetXe 
and Sandie Simorus return 
for a second time. 

5.00 Bewftehecfc Samantha's 
simultaneous appearance 
in Chicago and New York 
almost costs Darrin his job 
5.30 As Good As New. The 
final programme of 
handyman Mike Smith's 
series and he puts the 
finishing touches to the 
furniture he has been 
working on through the 
series, (postponed from 
last week) 


I ( Radio 4 ) 


645 Weather. 740 News. 

7.05 Morning Concert J C 
Bach (Smlorua m D, Op 
18 No 4); Brahms (Ballade in 
G minor. Op 118 No 2: 
Lupu.pianoj; Diftersdorf 
(Oooe Concerto m Gc 
Schubert (Errtr acte No 3 and 
other music from 
Rosamunds). 840 News. 
845 Concert-pert two. 

Wagner (Forest 
Murmurs): Donizetti (Una 
furciva lagrmta- 
Geoda. tenon: Grieg (Piano 
Concerto. Solomon); Liszt 
(Rekoczy March). 9.00 News 
945 This Week's Composers: 
Delibes and Massenet. 
Massenet (symphonic poem 
Visionsi; Delibes ibailet 
_ mus« CoppeUa. Act i). 

1Q.CKD Danish Radio SO: 

Nielsen (rhapsodic 
Overture An imaginary 


11.00 Dvorak String Quartets: 
Lindsay Qua net play the 
No i in D Hat (Cypresses No 
i).3ndinE,OpBO. 

1145 Dans le gout theatral: an 
ensemble plays Francois 
Coy perm's Nouvaau Concert 
no 4 in G. 

11^7 News. 12.00 Closedown. 

VHF only: From 645 to 645. 

Open University. Modem Art 
Flatness 


1’ 


h 


(. Radio 2 ) 


News on me hour. Headlines 
5.30am, 640pm. 740 and 640. 


| Cricket: West indies v England. 

02.545,642, 


Jtns 

;bf> 

ned 
* an 
AD- 
nut 


1.05pm, 2.02, 342, 442, i 

E.45 |m( only). 842. 942. 945, 


1 11.02. 4.0Coni Cohn Berry (s). 840 
i Ken Bruce 


Ray Moore IS). 845 i * 

is). 1040 Jimmy Young. Medical 


[ Questions answered by Dr Mike 
IJaco 


545 Shipping 640 News Bnetnc: 
Weamer. 6.10 Fammg. 

645 Prayer for the Day. 

640 T0g^ mckgirg740. 

Business News. 645, 745 
Weather 7.00, 840 
News. 740 Letters 745, 

8.25 Sport. 7.45 Tnougnt 
for me Day. 845 Veste'day 
m Parliament 847 
Weather, Travel. 

9.00 News 

945 Tuesday Can- 01-580- 

1 1 . Lisienere can *0in a 
discussion e bout legislation 
. on pornography. 

1 1040 News: From Our Own 
Correspondeni. Life and 
oofabes abroad, reported by 
BBC foreign 
correspondents. 


1040 Morning Story: The 
World of Mr Price by 


Phyllis Anderson. Tne reader 
is Jams 


_ James Benson. 

10L45 Daily Sennce. (New 
Every Morning, pace 

89Xs). 

11.00 News; Travel: Thmy- 
Mmute Theatre 
Listening to Sean fcv Phiio 
Mamon. With Jamie 
Roberts and Joe 
McPartland. The story of 
a disruptive third party, (s'. 
1143 The Lnratg World.: News 
of wildlife and the 
countryside. 

1240 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice, with 
Pattie Cotdwen. 


1247 My Word/ Panel aame 
with Dilys Poweifand 
Frank Muir challenging 


640 Pop the Question. Pro 
iiz-The 


programmes in which 


aind Lomax talks to a 
number of the world's 
most successful 
businessmen, beginning 
with John Harvey-Jones. 
the man who turned ICI's 
million pound loss into 
more than a biUion pounds 


music nostalgia quiz. '.. 
regular team captains. 
Chris Tarrant and David 
Hamilton, are joined by 
Eve Ferret Gary Wilmot 
Stephanie Lawrence and 
Ken Bruce. 

640 Danger Man. British 

secret service agent John 


Drake, investigates toe 
of an Amer 


property boom: Angela 
Lambert! “ 


ambert profiles Lena 


Kennedy, the writer from 
the East! 


tEnd with a world- 
wide reputation. 

740 Emmer da le Farm. Amos 
Breartey falls foul of Seth 
Armstrong's home-made 
wine 

740 Busman’s Holiday. Jufian 

.a 


Pettifer presents another 
round ot the travel prize 


Labour Party 
9.10 News with Ju 


r.. m x 


TuHa Somerville 

and John Hixnphrys. 
Weatoer 

9.40 Htoeaway. Episode two of 
toe thriller and Ron Moody 
joins toe cast as a 


840 


detective making low-key 
enquiries into W right's 


sudden disappearance 
from the Camden Town 
area (Ceefax) 

1040 Hospital Watch. An up- 
date of the day's activities 
in the two Portsmouth 
hospitals 

1140 ram 86. Barry Norman 
reviews Commando, 
Agnes of God,.and Mr 
Love. In addition, Bette 
Davis talks about her life 
and career on toe eve of 
receiving the Life 
Achievement Award in 
Franca 

1140 Nothing But the Best A 
- parents' guide to 
secondary education 

1145 Weather 


jnum. The private 
detective's friend. TC. has 
an accident with a Ferrari 
which leaves TC to a 
position to repay a debt 
- incurred during the war in 
Vietnam. 

940 Boon. The freelance 
trouble-shooter gets 
mixed up in a local 
protection racket Starting 
Michael Bphick (Oracle) 
moo A Party Political 

Broadcast on behalf of toe 


Labour Party 
10.10 -News with Alastaii 


irBumet 

- and Pamela Armstrong. 
Weather folowed " 
Thames news hei — 
10.40 Viewpoint 86: In the 
Name of Charity (see 
Choice) 

11.45 International Darts. Elton 
Weisby introduces 
coverage of the 
Blackthorn Masters. From 
Oldham City Haft. 


12.40 Night Thoughts 


840 South East Reports. In 
this first of six 
programmes about 
matters concerning toe 
south-east reporter Steve 
Clarke examines the ~ 
hopes and fears of the 
population as toe Channel 
Tunnel begins to become 
a reality. 

840 Food and Dris*. Among the 
■ - . items this week are a 
decaffienated tea tas 
and a comparison of, 
foods with the frozen 
variety 

9.00 1, Claudius. Part six and 
John Hurt makes his 
appearance as Caligula, 
the son who was 
instrumental in toe 
. poisoning of his father. 
Germ an reus. 

945 Arena; Louisa Brooks. A 
profile of the HoBywood 
actress who died last year. 
In which she talks candidly 
about her life which had 
more than a passing 
resemblance to Lulu, 
perhaps her most 
celebrated role, toe 
pleasure-seeking heroine 
of Wedekind's Pandora's 
Box. 

1040. A Party Poetical 

Broadcast on behalf of the 
Labour Party. 

1140 NewsnigtiL 
5 Went 


11-45 Weather 
1140 Open Uni v ersity: Richard 
Hoggart - A Measured 
Life. End? m 19 on 


murder of an American 
serviceman in Germany. 

7.00 Channel Four News with 
Alastair Stewart and 
Nicholas Owen indudes a 
" special report on the new 
political party in the Irish 
Republic, the Progressive 
Democrats 

740 Comment With his views 
on a matter of topical 
importance Is. 
comprehensive school 
deputy headmaster, 
Jeremy Cunningham. 
Weather 

840 Brookside. Bifly prepares 
for his court appearance 
while Lucy turns up at 
James' house to confront 
his wife 

840 Take Six Cooks. The fifth 
course - vegetables - is 
prepared by Peter 
Kromberg, executive chef 
at Le Souffle in London's 
Inter-Continental Hotel 
(see Choice) (Oracle) 

940 Film: Android (1982) 
starring Klaus Kinski and 
Brie Howard- Science 
fiction adventure, set in 
the year 2036. about a 
scientist and his android 
creation who dream of 
returning to earth when 
their remote space station 
is invaded by three 
escaping convicts. 

Directed by Aaron Lipstadt 
1040 The TubeL A repeat of 
Friday's show that 
featured Simple Minds, 
Stephen Duffy, David 
Bowie and the Jazz 
Butcher. There is also a 
location report from the 
film Shanghai Express, 
starring Madonna. Ends at 
1145 


- challenging Libby 

Purves and Denis 
Norden (s). 1245 Weatfw; 
travel. 

140 The World at One: News 
145 A Party Pofrticat 

Broadcast by the Labour 
Party. 

1.40 The Archers. 145 
Shipping Forecast 
240 News, woman's Hour. 
Includes a feature on 
women who go into business 
partnerships. 

340 News; Trie Aftemooi 
Play: Embroideries by 
Juliet Ace. Wrth a cast 


inchJdmgStephan 
Thome, Hizabeth 1 


— 1 Proud and 

Julian Firth. (s)A morality 
tale about a smug family 
440 News. 

4,05 The Food Programme. 

Derek Cooper with the 


latest developments in the 
fish trace is). 

440 Kaleidoscope. With Paul 
Vaughan. Includes 

comment on Garrison 
Keillor s book Lake 
Wobegon Days (r) 

540 PM- News Magazine. 

540 Shipping Forecast 
545 Weather 

6.00 The Six O'QoO News; 
Financial Report. 

640 Oh. Yes It is! A seven 
pan history of 
pantormine. narrated by 
Richard Briers «) They 

7j» 5^ii au, ' ayCoupfe, « , ^> 

745 Tha Archers 

740 Fite On 4 Stuart Simon 
reports on maior issues 
and important events at 
home and abroad. 

840 Medicine Now. Geoff 
Watts on the neartn or 
medical care 

840 The Tuesday Feature: 

It's Our Blood They're 
After. Bob Fimgan on the 
British bloodstock 
industry. 

9.00 In Touch. News views 
and information for 
people with a visual 
handicap. 

940 Perscna Grata. Irene 
Thomas talks about three 
of her favourite characters 
from fiction (s). 

9.45 Kaleidoscope. Includes 
comment on the film 
Year of the Owet Sun. 

10.15 A Book At Bedtime: Lake 


tourney to the Faroe 
islands): I 


islands): Langgaard {Music 
□f tne Spheres). 

1040 Scarlatti and Soier Soter 
(Concerto No 1 m C 
major. for two organs); 
Scarlatti (Laetatus sum. 
with BBC Singers and 
soloists). 

11.15 Israel Piano Trio. Mozart 
(Tno m G. K 496). and 
Brahms (Tno in C minor. Oo 
101). H 
12.10 Midday Concert. BBC 
Scottish SO Pan 
one Elgar (Wand ot Youth): 
Stravinsky (Parses 
eoncertar.ies). 140 News. 
145 Midday Concert (comd): 
Delius (Intermezzo, 
Fenmmore and Gerda: On 
hearing the first cuckoo: 

La Ca linear, Haydn 
(SympnonyNo 104). 

2.00 Guitar music: Stepan 
Rak plays some of his 
own compositions. 

2-30 The Gentle Trumpet: 

Mahler (Wo die schonen 
Tromperrten bJasenj: 

Copland (Omet Crtyj: 
Samt-Saens (Septet m E Hat 
Op 65): Franz Schmidt 
(Symphony No 4). 

440 Qaabeth Gale and 
Martin I sepp, soprano 
and piano recital. Works by 


Smith. 145pm David Jacobs (si 
240 Gloria Hunmford (s). 340 
Mus«r All The Way (s). 4.00 David 
Harmnon (s). 6.00 John Dunn 
is). 8.00 Old Stagers. Jessie 
Matthews (sj.A profile written 
by Bnan Haines and Peter Cotes, 
Including contributions from 
Joan Milier.8.30 The Golden Years 
(Alan Keith) 9. DO BBC Radio 
Orchestra is). The star vocabst is 


tiad 
of 
ed- 
it is 
ind 
its 


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Ufi fc 

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. but 
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?cv 

the 

ip- 

iru 

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eni is 


Sandra Kino. With Nocturnal 
Triangle. 9.55 


-.-J Sports Desk. 1040 
On Cue (Tony Peers). Those 
taking part include Armeka Rice. 
1040 Tne Name's The Game. 

1 140 Bren Matthew (stereo from 


he 

er 


I (sTlblw .r -^ a - m ctiartes Nov ® 


IS). 


*40 A Little Night Music 


( Radio 1 ) 


News on the half-hour from 
630am until 9.30pm and at 1240 
midnight. 640am Adrian John. 

730 Mike Read. 930 Simon Bates. 
1230 Newsbe3t (Frank 


an 

on 

:te 

O' 

he 

ns 


Parmdget. 12.45 Gary Davies (this 
week's Top 40i. 340 Steve 


week's”Top40i 

Wright. 530 Newsbeat (Frank 
Patndge). 5.45 Bruno Brookes. 

7.30 Janice Long. 1040-1240 John 
Peel (s). VHF RADIOS 1 & 2. 

4.00am As Radio 2 1040 As Ratio 
1 12.00-4.QCam As Radio 2. 


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jpar- 


Sdiubert(Mignon songs. 

"c Wolf (settings of 


WORLD SERVICE 


Wobegon Days by 

;ejur]2). Read by 


Garrison K .. 

the author. 1029 
Weather. 


1030 The World Tonight 
al Worfd 


11.15 The Financial ' 

Tonight 
1130 Today in Parliament 
12.00 News; Weather. 1233 
Shipping Forecast. 

VHF (available in England and 
S. Wales only) as above except 
545-6.00am Weather; TraveL 
11.00-1240 For Schools: 1140 
Time and Tune (s) 1120 Time 
to Move 1140 Musicianship: Early 
Stages (s). 135- 340pm For 
Schools: 1-55 Listening Comer. 
245 History; Not So Long Ago. 
225 Contact 240 Picture in Your 
Mind (Stories). 530-535 PM 
(contmjed). 11 30-12.1 Own Open 
University. 1130 Students' 
Magazine. 1130 Science: Look 
Before You Leap. 


by Goethe): 

the same poems): and 
Debussy (Ariettas oubliees 
and other works). 435 
News. 

5.00 Mamiy for Pleasure: 

Andrew Keener witn a 
selection of recorded music 
630 Robert Johnson: Jakob 
Lindbert(liJte)plays works 
inducting Pavan. Aim an, and 
Carman s Whistle. 

740 British Pino Music: 

Kathryn Stott plays 
HDwete's Sonatina and 
works by Howard 
Farquson (Five Bagalefies). 

Scott and Tippett 
(Sonata No 2). 

7.45 Mahler Symphony No 2. 
BBC SO/London 
Philharmonic Choir/ BBC 
Symphony 

Chorus/Felicity Lott and 
Felicity Palmer. 

9.15 Alexander Goehr and 
Rupert Bawd err. 

Grosvenor Chamber Group. 
Goehr (Suite Opl 1], and 
Bewden (The Angel and the 
Ship of Souls). 

10.00 Jazz Today: Charles Fox 
presents John Stevens's 
Free bop. 


6 JX3 NevnOeik 7.00 Worfd News 7 J03 


e _ 


Twsniy-lour~Houn~736'My coiimry m 
Mmfl 7.45 Network UK &.D0 Wdrto News 


|49 Reflections 8.15 Boankcxxn Kings 


830 Talking About Mus*c 930 WcSa . 
News 949 Renew of tne Butin Press ■ 


9.15 The Worm Today 930" Firwncui 
4head 9A5 What's New 


News 9.40 Look Ahead : 


1040 News Summary 1041 Discovery 
tews 1149 


10.30 Chart* 1140 Wort News 
News About Britain 11.15 Wevegude 
1135 A Letter From Scotland 1240 Radio 
Newsreel 12.15 Journey Through Heaven 
1245 Sports Roundup 149 World ! 


■— .. U .J News 

149 Twenty, (our Hours 130 Network UK 
145 Recording 3 1 the Week 200 Outlook 
2A5 Engksn Song 3.00 Rad* Newsreel 
1 A Jcdy Good ah 


215 A Jo»y Good Show 440 World News 
449 Commentary 4.TS Omnibus 445 Hie 
world Today 540 world News 549 a 
L etter Prom Scotland 5.15 Mendon 940 


World News 8.09 Twentymo* Hours 215 
■tal 10.00 World News 


tmemationai Recital ^ „ WH 
1049 The World Today 1035 A Letter 
From Scotland 1030 Fvvanoal News 
1040 Reflections 1045 Sports Rounduo 
1140 World News 1149i Commenmry 


11.15 The Classic AXnjm 1130 Journey 
ws 1249 


ThreugliVhMiven 1240 World News 1 


Bntaml215 Rado Newsreel 

1230 Omnibus 140 News Sunmaiy 141 

rLrflnnU 4 *Mt r>— m ^ .. 


Outlook 130 ReporTon Reiigmn* 145 
i 240 World News 249 


WALES 535-6.00 
635- 


Coontry Siylt 

Rawew ol tne Bmafi Press 215 the 
Music Business 230 Chart* 340 World 
News 349 News About Bdtam 115 The 
World Today 330 Discovery 440 
Newsdesk 430 Waveguide 440 Book 
Cnoice 545 The World Today 


BBC1 

— — pm Wales Today 6- 

7JJ0 Hospital Watch 930-1IL15 
Weak In Week Out 10.15-1030 


.. — .Jeek Out 10.15-1030 100 
Greai Sporting Moments. 

(Torwfl and Dean 19B41 1135-1230 
News and weather SCOTLAND 
1020-1 030am Dotaman 635-730 
Reporting Scotland 1130-1135 
Wise Chcnce NORTHERN IRELAND 
535-530 Today's Sport 5.40- 
630 tnaide Ulster 635-730 Hospi- 
tal Watch 1135-1230 News 
and weather ENGLAND 1230- 


1230 pm East on Two (East 
only) 635-7.00 Regional news 


magazines 


_ CHANNEL SS*" . 

~ except starts 

925-930 For Openera120 
Channel News and Weather 130- 
230 A Country Practice 330* 

3.30 Questions 5.12 Puffin's 
Pia(i)ce 5.15-545 Sons and 


Daughters 6.00 Channel Report 
635-730 Crossroads 10.00 


■ -ww IV.UW 

The Mike Harris Band 1035 News 
1035 Viswpoim 1140 Black- 
thorn Masters Darts 1235 Weath- 
er, dose. 


ULSTER As London ex . 

— — S cept 925-930 The 
ly Ahead 1 20 Lunchtime 


I Indoor Gardening 345 

Ulster News 


Shocase 338 Ulster 
j*\J5-545 The Beverly HiBomes 


630 Good Evemng Ulster 625 

635-7.00 Crossroads 


“wyDWeS iMiri.iw unas 

8.00 On Stage Tonight 830- 

9.00 The Cceby Show 1235am 
News. 


REGION A L, TEL. E VIS) O N VARIATIONS^ 


TSW A8London except 

1230 Newhard 120 


TSW News 3.00 The Protectors 
3^ Sons and Daughters 337 
TSW News 3.15 Gus Honeybun's 
Magic Birthdays 520 Cross- 


roads 630 Today South West 625 
30Emmerdi 


Televiews 630 Emmerdale 
Farm 730 FBm: Butch and 
Sundance ■ The Early Days 
(1979) 1240 Postcript 1245 Weath- 
er, Close. 


Analia ^ London except 
1230 Gardens for AH 
130 Anglia News and Weather 325 
AngBa News 5.15 Emmerdale 
Farm 630 About Angtia 635 Cross- 
roads 7.00-730 Bygones 1240 
Tuesday Topic Close. 


BORDER A* London ex- 
s cept 


120 Border News 330 Sons 


and Daughters 5.15-5.45 DifTrent 
Strokes 630 Lookaround 


Lookaround Tues- 
day 638 Crossroads 8.00 Quincy 
12.40 am News Summary 1243 
Close. 


HTV WESTAs London ex- 
iLL - = - cept: 120-130 HTV 
News 325-330 HTV News 
5.15-5.45 Mr Smith 630 HTV News 
635-7.00 Crossroads 830-930 
Murder, She Wrote 1240am 
Weather. Close. 


J^ WALES i£^Ut 

630pm-635 Wales At Sot. 


_ GRANA D A ^ff°^ 

130 Granada Reports 325 
Granada Reports 3.30-4.00 Sons 


and Daughters 5.15-545 Small 
Wonder 630 G 


Granada Reports 630 

This Is Your Right 635-730 
Crossroads 1240am Close. 


YORKSHIRE ^ Ton- 

— - — — don except 

1230-1.00 Calendar Lunchtime 
Live 120-130 Calendar News 325 
Calendar News 330-4.00 A 
Country Practice 5.15-545 Tha 
Protectors 6.00 Calendar 635- 
730 Crossroads 1240am Close. 


bbampia n££S«s 


925-930 First Thing 1230-130 


mmg Time 120-130 North 
News 325-330 North Head- 
lines 5.15-545 Emmerdale Farm 
630 North Tonight and Weather 
635 Crossroads 7.00-730 Perth- 
shire: The Highland Heartland 
1240am News Headlines and 
Weather 1245 Close. 


T\#S London except 
S' 51^ 925-930 TVS Out- 
look 120 TVS News 130-230 


A Coun^^Practice 330 Questions 


327-330 TVS News 5.12-545 
TVS News Headbnes foflowed by 
Sons and Daughters 630 Coast 
to Coast 625 Pottce 5 635-730 
Crossroads 1240am Company, 
dose. 


SCOTTISH As London ex- 
cepe 


1230 Scottish News 330 Sons 
and Daughters 5.15 Emmerdale 
Farm 630 Scottish News and 
Scotland Today 635 Crossroads 
730 Funny You Should Say 
That 830 Hotel 1235 am Late Can 
1240 Close. 


car* I.OOCountwodn 130 Al- 
— ice 200 Hwnt AC Yma 220 
Ffalabaiam 235 Hyn O Fyd 255 
Sea War 325 My Brother's Keeper 
3.55 Make It Pay 4.25 Be- 
witched 435 Harwer Awr Fawr 530 
Unforgettable 630 Winston 
ChuncrtR: The Valent Years 630 
Crwydro'r Cledrau 6.45 Sioe 


Siarad 730 Newyddion Saith 730 
830 Treasure Hunt 


Cefn Gwtad 830 

930 Deryn 10.00 lesu Ddoe A 
Hedcfiw 1030 Howto Survive 
the Nine to Five 1120 Film: The 
Werewolf ol London ' (1935) 
1245 am Close 


CENTRAL 3-25-330 
- ■ ■ Central News 


5.15-5^45 Survival; Bay of Fun- 

625-730 Can- 


dy 6.00 Crossroads 

tral News 1240am Close. 


TYNE TEES As London 


except: starts 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


925-9.30 North East News 
120-130 North East News and 
Lookaround 325 North East 

6 ,1 5-5.45 Look Who's Taft- 
mg 630* Non hem Life 635- 
Preparing for Easter '86 Close. 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


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THE DRAGON’S TAIL 

“Funny A EntMUMnc.” Coi 


■mils A m>*» IMa* ** Dnuoki* 
Vt.llklllsOII Dir*fW b\ Mil line 
Rutlnian L* n- Mon in Fn 7 30 
Ipilts KIM 3 0. hdb 5.01. P 15 
Gi«iP s-'l'- BOX OUkt 01-930 
*123 LAST fi WEEKS 


APPOLO WTTORIA SC 828 
ar.-,s I'C *30 *2*2 GfwS.ll^s 030 
DliJ rxt* 7 46 Man lun A Sul 

h ° STAftLWKT EXPRESS 

“A MUSICAL THAT SURPASSES 
ANYTHING AROUND M EVERY 

DIMENSION” D EaP 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Ml ML B\ 

ANDRr.W LLONT3 WEBBER 
X RhCS !■* PtTJIARU fcTILtSOL 
On ivlrrt hv TRLIOR NLNN 

APPLY DAILY TO SOX WTICr 
FOR RETURNS 

(V-nrnuMh lor O A PS milil 
A pi it .il Tipj XLlI- 

BOOKINGS TO SEPTEMBER 


THEATRE Bon Off 


ASTORIA 

t.<: a Gi otip- Of TJ4 4387 
Of 437 8773 

BEST MUSICAL 1^5. 

Th.- TiiW-. 

LENNON 

rclmriiiiDi! of Itw tiN Jnnmyr 
Win I.MHIM* •■WOmpEMtWIMlHi ■ 


TlinE LE|li CNEkRillC WITH 
EVERYONE ELSE AT TNE END. 

AmilllOfMl M4I - 1 ’ , 0 : c ' ^ 

,ir, |o Sal 8.0 M41* S»1 A Son 


MR 8 FCAW HALL *« «*=■!. NfW 
ur-nk fmi'l 7 4S NO* Inin Silr 
IW.U 1114*4".* 

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AIR I'm /Ml 


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n ,| juu 373- CBM* BUniW 
u, n Unlit! Ill IVWlin Plrtll-l“' , 
DREAMCMILD -P*^- 1 ■? 00 

iSTtSlTTlO. OJO A N40 


COMEDY THEATRE Bnx Ol IK 
01-030 3S7B nrfl t'^11 34 hour 
*Lu> il h#n> Ol 340 7300 P 
Wn«l r«-h 3* Chair. Tliur rm 

GLENDA NKEL 
JACKSON HAWTHORNE 


27 


ACROSS FROM THE 
GARDEN OF ALLAH 
■ Hr CHARLES. WOOD 
Uim-lfd h\ RON DANIELS 
f.»«N Mon FlilOMlilDL 830 


COTTESLOC "S' 038 3353 UC 

iSlImul IlnvU r n s -unoll judl 

Miiiimi Tnn'l. 7 30 Tonka 
7 30 I hill M*irti 27 A M-urh 
24 A 31 THE CHERRY OR- 
CHARD fh Cfidiim Onorjr. 
FMI 1341700 Thru r<4» 14 A 
A Mdiflt IP A JO MOT 
ABOUT HEROES. 


IX R/Ok WLST LND Slul lifitm 
-Menu- W| 434 48bS Jnvur .1 
Laiw CO ' Karin,' w SWEET 

5" Tifni ,-n 3 00 -mu 
4 IO b 30- A B 40 Frrun 
XW.Ii 7 ku/o-ufl’s RAN >IE 
BOOK NOIL 


DOMINION THTATRL TII1K-. 
Hollirm Ol 580 RR4E- Box m 
IH- Ol b3b S&3R i oi Ol 58Q 
u Sc8 3 Filxr Can MHr 7 D,iv 
<£ 83b 242R Grp rwlr» 

8I3S 

OPENS A PR II 
DAXT. CJ ARK'S . 


THE Ml SIC.AI ' 

CUFF RfCMARD 
-V. "THL HOCK STAR 1 
TML PORTRAYAL Of 
IK ASH' in 

LAURENCE OLIVER 


OONMAR WAREHOUSE L'tO 
r i-h I7LUX 1R DRUID 
THEATRE CO from ni-lana 
mill kith Ihpir 1 Ali-0 -4iinnin>i 
siltin'. BAtLEGANGASK sui 
• u«t SWBMAM McKCNtUL 


DRURY LANE THEATRE ROYAL 

Ol (UR UlOfi Ol 200 40bt> 7 
Hsl i All 34 haul 7 tLn ■< hLu, 
WO 7200 

MvrHdk'i 

42ND STREET 

a show For au. the fahrly 

UfeMr rlNIMmi 
IHwIul Award! Hr IBM 

soft-O 

BEST MUSICAL 

SMMWM DRAMA AWARDS 

»Mixl 

BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE IMJVtEH AWARD 

• mini 

BEST MUSICAL 

PLAYS A PLATERS 
LONDON THEATRE CRITICS 
AWARD 

4- MOXUK LLnl 3 0 4 hC 5 0 ik 

• a so 

UnU)i Suit-, 0.30 Mp3 

NOW -BOOKING UNTIL 
. - JAN 1187 

Parly Rate! AvaUaM* 


NOfC S -HEA D Ql pp 0 jajt .* 
TASTEUF ORTON* i in-'i Uni 7 
fan «tm.v ftwit. Hook Non 


mm or york bvj size cc 
h 3b 4W37 T41 3rt»w> Gip S4lr3 
■(SO b!23 Fir-1 Coll 24 Hr 7 
UlV C C 340 7200 tv« B rhtl 

xu 3 sji. s a n M 
2 nd SLAB Or THL AWARD 
- WINNING COMEDY HIT 
STEPPING OUT 
“TRIl 1 IPH ON TAP 1- C»r SID 
Thn Ml rcmmi hr Rirhdiil 
H.mtx ninitd m jutu 
xlrNi-n/ii- 

CDMEDY OF THE TEAR 
Standard Drama at Un Tur 
Award 1904 

"LAIGH WK RSTLF SILLY" 
T oul "(i.id Hv undirnri- vt-niiMi 
I nr murr" D Mul -Mini miu-Ii 
Lflmihr Tnun Go NOW - D Trl 
"itui-nt ..pjimji" Tmm - Il s 
,-ooinfj lo Lip. lap lap loi««' 

Nov. 


ruRrLNLNLx: rue 22 SB ssy> 
731 I «|. H I n Sdl t> a. B 40 
COMEDY OF THE YEAR 
L-Airrnrr urn irr Award iwh 
UP AND UNDER 
Hi Amu God on 
a wOHoatriiL COMEDY" * 
T inw-. S4N r.NIND" D Td 
INn- of l hr lunnuxl ,nw lr*j mt- 
It'iifKnxN PLfi-i Aoni iffT ■ mag in 
■* TOTALLY HrSTEnCAL- 
On- “ T-V tlttnnil tin Hildnn 
Pi-isiMdimi I IV amuniri- lo (Up 
Aiuf i*m ■" s Tt-l • A JOV ‘ tXP 


cioer cc oi 437 iso? fitm 

LUII 24 Hi 7 Dai CC 240 7300 
Irnlim Lloyd Wmbri hnihiIi 
H u- 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

SoriPli m Wml tnd Thmu 
Atiain 83 

DAISY PULLS IY OFF 
Hi Onnt- On<Hli 
Dnitird m Dai M Gilmm 

tin H M-II-. iviYI 3 -Nl 4 C Of ID 
Nlli>. 030 ijl.M 

• IHh IS AN ABSOLL Tr HUOT 
AND A STPL AM" 
s Tinn 

LAST WLI h MLnT CND 
NATL RD \3 


HAYMARHCT THEATRE ROYAL. 
Boa mint- .mai it oi vxi 4H32 
Ltinup SAIn 930 bl?3 

SUSANNAH DENNIS 
YORK QUILL EY 


in 


fit QBE J JT 1 392 r lixl LAI 1 24 Ml 
Dill - rr 240 7200 Lirp Salt* 
*>30 0123 

ANDRCW ILUVn WLHBTR 
PRrsLNrs 

I Yin L,ita.sin. Jan f r aihi-. 

RtHUM Ifolu.ilr John Rarron 
LENO ME A TENOR 
•l f/otm-th bv h<Yr Ludwia birttl 

nn in D.t<ml GrirntMt- lip. HOO 
Mam Will 3 CD -so 4 00 Pin*. 
Itmu trh 21 Him NnOil Mann e- 


"On' nl Hip rnort- -r>phi*Ju jIi^ 

Mlminnitils ct rtn-ni limn . Jnr. 
inniifi '•■imii in rhjiOv 1 d Trl 

tERNARO SLADE'S 

fatal attraction 

Ln Prim III DAVID GILMORE 
Ek HUm 7 SO MMlm-n Wpdin 
link 2 30 NrilurtLn 3 O 

FINAL DAY 


HAYMARKET TltEATItC ROYAL. 

Bi>\ LMIpn tk CL" Ol 430 OftST 
Cl AW XJfn «» 6l?J Pm, 
*1 run rm IB upnn r*t> JO al 


al 7 QO 


OLOGEf-rai 4*7 1 5S2 F ipj Call 
■4 III 7 (Ml 
Tt 740 7MO 
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«MEDY OF THE YEAR 

it'll Ot Ut«l tint Thrall r 
\>*,tlTf l» 3 

DAISY PULL rr OFF 


Oi 0--HI- rYnirtt, 

rxtniixi i» n.ik*i niimijn- 

W-. B ShllN viort ? -5.il 4 

•linm Nall-. <» bI23 


Tllpj p- IN , ABSOLL TC HOOT 
IND tr.RLL.M- 
I unr-. 


ML St LXP 


LYRIC HAMMERSMITH Ol 741 

I'll I Prpt- f un't. Tnn-oi 7 45 
Iwrn IA»I 7 o 'Wlh Cm 7 49 

D0ue LUCIE'S 

PROGRESS 

Dnrtlni I>k Da ild Hannan 

Un.uiM bl C»H that 

KSEfiSP^ I'Mit fit SATIE 
DLV4MHT lik Adrian Mftthef! 
IiutrlPd m Rkftard WWLatna 
OrWRiiPil hi- Tan Mllllpt 
t-, pmi m-mpf 1 -I r-b ih ur 


‘Fit 


PETER O'TOOLE 

-kirn 

BERNARD BRADEH 
DOIU BRYAN 
MCNAEL DENISON 
MARIUS OORtMC 

GEOFFREY KEEN 

MOIRA LISTER 
BREWSTER MASON 
PAUL ROGERS 
DINAH SHERIDAN 
DAVID WALLER 
and 

SUSANNAH YORK 


111 


THE APPLE CART 

By BERNARD SHAW 

• tr, 7 3D M.iH land tk Sdl 
2 V) 


LONDON PALLADIUM. Of j,i 7 
737 1 t f. Hi-lliia- 437 2055 LkUk 
■ Xlalv Mon. Tun. tvrdtk >■« 
2*0 Patl* inf- ak.uLtlMP 
IiIIIIh lldiklioiittl Paulo • TTa 
Mur 

DES O'CONNOR 

"r, <Jn,r4dUlH|. ' Thr bldl 

in CINDERELLA 
PAUL NICHOLAS 

•I I«»>I1I4I|IV a lip. Ilk Ptiutr 
i Juuniimi " Da Uk Xluil 
‘rth* nmtirm pnOmtkm b 
•aduiMmnt,*' P Mail 

rx>llH llllu Nikkilt a„|, 

llimMIOtl- tpUdliu- 11 Daih 1>|> 

•p.iivi iiuitn im- antiMih p 
MP- fUnxniit « kkOtufi'rlul 

k iibiik i-f Imp. - l ow 

Apply Rm Office 01-437 7373 
«r«t<i Safes ei-RSO SIRS 
First can 24 Kaar. 7 -day 
CC Boshfaiic* U-M fZM 
Saab AeaUatala al Uw daor*. 


IOMVN PALL MTfl M 
THE KIT MUSICAL COMEDY 
DIRECT FROM BROADWAY - 
LA CAGE AUX FOLLIES 

Ptpkipk*-. ironi Ipru 32 Kiim 
inqni Mat 7 Tr* ptnnii - t.tf.i 
makitrir ir— prrrvirn oti Of 734 

Roj.x r .tit tjn Hi 7 Dak- lx 1 

Bruxinii-. 24 C' TOO Bo\ .rflH ■- 
lau tXkril tut prrv^kilrHlIrfklilll 
Shm-1 <JJCi bl 24 


HER MAJESTY'S >»3D aiK-5 4 Pk 

MAj Ct: hothltr 741 WW«. 24 til 
7 4 . 1 k r C !»■«•► HitA I its! C -ill 24D 
72r«j Ginup sjirs ojd b!2S "A 

teoaderful UMalrKably. MeaBy 
l a ff are d la Mir . . . third tar 
adrtnlara*- L> Mail 

DONALD UNOU In 

T hP xnu-rs nil f (oin Hit Ctia brsh-r 
Fi-.ltt.il Tftrjirp 


I T 


-A 


THE SCARLET 
PIMPERNEL 


aaaaiac al . . . thaatr* nuRr ti 
Trl *rtlM apa ct a cnf aify laaure In 
chic melodrama*- M O ■» Er* 
730. Mat*. Wad* A Sat* al 3.0. 


LYRIC THEATRE -dt.iflr—tain k 
Air \ll Ol 4 57 V* 7 Cl 414 
1IKO tr 4J4 ISSO Til 51 bo 7 
lii-l ■ Ml ■’J nnur 7 1L11 rr noni. 
iidyt 240 TJOO 

BERYL JEAN -PIERRE 

REID AUMCWtr 

SUUI CEOFFRfY 

PHILLIPS BUHRIDCC 
A AMANDA WARIMC IN 
LCRNER A LOCWrS MUSICAL 

G1GI 

DliPflrd Pi lulkii [Vxipi 

“Graafffi . *Mi laoMdlau* 
■ p p U wa** Luiii rxiupv. 

1 up ’ 30 Mh 9 n a *f :5 
With 'UiP- 3 ij ■ 

Cimp XiIp. r*! 410 bl21 


OLD Vie -f Sr. cc 2 bl I a? I 

Go S.UI- °W b !23 Cip 7 so 
hid XUT-. 2 IL -mis 4 0 4 7 45 

PRIDE L PREJI.'DICE 

* lll.ll .KM [Mp 4 from Jam- 
AliMPn - no t pi Pk runttl FYiunju 

PETER PAULINE 

SALLIS YATES 

JAMES TESSA 

WARWICK PEAME-JOKES 
IAN IRENE 

CELDER SUTCUFFE 

|j.i.-ri.4 lik IH Prrda 
■THIS IS TNE MOST ENJOY- 
ABLE NOVEL ADAPTATTOM 


HAVE SEEN SINCE NICHOLAS 
JHCKLEBY** Tim. 

“I LOVED IT- uv/nn 


LD VIC 7e-lo rr Pel 162: 
Li i- vk- »K bl2S 

XX-II'P :: Adi. I 10 

_ IAN IHC HARD 

CHARUSON GRIFFITHS 
GEMMA JONES 
DAVB3 MALCOLM 

LYON STORRY 


■II 


AFTER AIDA 

la-h am r.k Jufian MIMmR 
■ih inip.ii tn G liwappa Vardt 


LYTTLETOM X s.'d 7252 f.C 
•^dfwtMil ThPdlti- x pfukt-nlum 
xlatp-i Lnti blifp prnr^k 
Iiai l Tunrt 7 45 Turn iiip 
iiriik PliJI hi 24 Uvin tin 
:’5- .11 7 00 Turn f*-h jb a. 
Milirn J in 5 BRIGHTON 
BEACH MEMOIRS hi n.-,i 

Vnimii 


OLIVIER f a?h 2252 rr .Xjlion 

7 15 1 mm a 2 00 .In'- prrf--- 
niiii- A 7 : j iimn 21 u, 25 

A CHORUS OF WSAPfftOVAL 

bourn 




PHOENIX B3b 22«4 rr 240 Oebl 
m 741 OXPW Cm- H Mai Thn S 
Siil & A B 30 25 Hr 7 ddv Fin,i 
C.III r.- 240 7200 

W..NT Ml MCAL OF I W. 
Slaiidartl Oiam.l Akkdrd-, 
MARTIN SHAW 
\*. Llip. Pri-kA-i- 
II -ST 4M42ING THE PI R 
IORWXMJL- IS 1 LAn.Dft.IARk • 

ARC YOU I LOHESOME TOMCJfTT 

bt *lan blcasdale 

. ^T*S MACNIFTCE»fT"OV. 

H.11 I'-'nPI-WJIIPLlk LhlSplP-J.-! 
-H- Mo rum Cun Will 


PRDICC EDWARD. Trt Ol 437 
5>»-. S Tnn Rk'r A AiHli-u 
Lbnd In’nhrmi n 

, EVITA 

['ll rt |,-d tn HdJPnnrp i.tos 4 0 
ALU- I run*. A Sal al 3 0 
HUililp J3R B4»* 57<> oh.;' 741 
WKhi 24 hi 7 dav (7 Hvtkuur. 
i 11 nl nail 01 240 7200 

final day 

rnoxi tr iv i4 

CHESS 

nov orrrcL oi 734 hoei 

» IRST r-\n .-4 nr 7 dak 

'-*■ HUOhlMiX Ol K3i> Mb4 

Gip S.IW. Ol ViO 0123 


SADLERS la! I is :--n Hbm 

CHARLIE AND THE 
CHOCOLATE FACTORY 

In Ru.il-1 D.llil 

sp-k Mirar HinlnriiM. --t Hmj 
I -1 tnl t'Jllldl i-nV lnn| • 

L IIIHN.il Th Lit-. -.2 75 ■ H vain- 
• piitn -r.tin Ira r 11 , 1 , 1 , ,,■ 

JEANNE- 

5 Atdii 7 30|hu Pn-k-ik 1-riMidi: 
im rr 


S7C &43.S Ct p nabs 0313 


Ft &*2 

0123 

TKE MUSICAL SENSATION 
LES MtSERABLES 

•ir x 01 f :an t get a new n 

STI \l DNL- Mil 
I’" ' V- Mil- Thu A sal 2 30 
L,||>-| unarm IU« 4(1111111111 unlil Tim 
IMt-i ■ .11 

Nt \T THI. TtH TS HA LWA |R 
IXG TOR RFTIRNs IT THE 
LUTICI, MVk BOOKING 
W RIOD TO (JI T 4 NOW OPEN 


PMINf.r rDVk ARU Bnx Oil 11 
7K BUS I 1 1 mi l-d|| ?J Hr 7 Dutn 
r Riailmg Bin ILtsS Gro Salts 
RJO 0123 

CHESS 

THE MIMICAL 
MWH 14 May al 7pm 


MERMAID rc iihi nniAini 
Ol 2Jta iutafo* 741 OHM .-, 

24 hi ' n.ik 240 T20O i^rp 
sia-01 »*# 123 Plr.Knn AIL 
KIN leirnni Thin- Almi lt>Nu 
. Xliis rri a Sill SNIPS 
AWARD- WIMMfM 
PROOUCTIOH 

GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS 

Bk Uafnf XLkn.rl 

Dura Uni hi RiU Orvtlni 
ptiu-r M nnc— nrr- NaltoiMI 


Th 


Nl w 1 OlxnCHw nriui t.nio Wit? 
J|>‘. 0072 C* Ol 370 043.3 l -.ts 
7 3% Hu- A sal 3 00 A 7 45 THE 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
T.S. CLMY 
MUSICAL 
CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 
FOR RETURNS 

UKtup ikujijihin oj a?6 isn? „i 
OI aio 1175 Po-I.U jpuljkatuim 
tn-* *» 2 lra ,k> rpJrd until Ainusi 


FHEON1X «Je2204 tr 240 o«,: 

... - J : fu'li \iaii I hit 3 sj, 

■’i* *--• • 3 Hi 7 Da, rum Call it 
W0 TOO 

BEST MUSICAL OF 1985: 
standard Draraa Award. 
ARE YOU LONESOME 
TONIGHT? 

Bk -\1411 BH'd-n.ib* 

■IIS M.u,nl„ti,l"Mi> 

K.n lfki-i'-.killpfc,» I.I.raPMSHs 

PH MmuiHti i-Ii-h Crtiffc 


PHOENIX RR? 22<t4 tt MO Qbfel 

Cl 7is «"Mf imtniMi Inuixu 
5 4 u W Til n! ■ all 24 hi 7 d.t> rt 
ran 72iio 

BEST MUSICAL OF m> 

Nl.imUitl Dr . 111.4 I kdlOi 

MARTIN SHAW 

-f I '■ 1 - Prrnlrk 

*» JUST AMAZING. TNE PER- 
FORMANCE « e A LANDMARK’ 

ARE YOU LONESOME 
TONIGHT’ 

BY ALAN BLEASDLLC 
A GR EAT NffiHT OUT. .SEE THIS 
“ITS MACmrKEMrfXsrit.? 


PfiBNCC OF WALES Ol ■*» 

hoKI ? rr HOfluir Ol AMI 
S O Group Suits Ol *K1 
b!2S I,. Pioin-H' OI 741 «« 
1 imi r.iti jjih’dncr hunLintfk 
240 720OOI J7R WJ.H k<m 7 30 
XLil Thui A Sd' al 3 00 Onr t4 
•m- URLXT CRL4T Ml SIC-IUS' 
S 1 mas Thr Nalii-uiid Tht'alri- nl 
UBI-AT BttlTlAN AWARD 
W INNING 

GUYS AND DOLLS 

Mirtino 
LI.IL 

NORVlh. .MNF.T 

BUSSING TOS. UIULE.Y 

ANDRE W r W TDsU ORT 
THITh WILSON 
■wr.iNDLRI I L 
INTI ITT AISMI.NT s T«-l 
•% fl Inw. tn II-. fcitaf D Tt-l 
■ii\M«rrr.- n xi.ni 

l>Q" HtK>t.lllt| ullltl Apt II 2& 


RUV.1L CXH RT l PbTAIRs 7* 
2&M OURSELVES ALONE bl 
Ann- Drain. LAST THREE 
PEWS. TOUT 7 30 TOMOR 

3 X> A 7 30 


ROYAL OKRA HOUSE. Cwrnl 

L-*lll.-l> Ikl 201 240 lOuo l*»ll 
•F s si ,] lulls mmOl H3c,b»03 
MPIIS 4 I loan I Hptn bS arr. phi 
kf.ifn ,u .nl Him 1 041*1 on Ui, day 
fcrfn um.i Horn L7 CO Ua|la< 
lltilil C4 V‘ 

THE ROYAL OPERA 

11 T -<Jt lira nl sfaiKini lio im 
lu-ir.it- imt. Moh e OO SalntrK. 

THE ROYAL BALLET 

Trann. 7 SO Sll 7»A 730U 
I III. Jll.tl U.IMUT Tlllli 7 TO 


B.VIH Canting HIM Ol 240 «8Ifi 


SHAFTESBURY THEATRE OF 
COMEDY JT* !,■,« it. 74 i 

•»KW OlP Ntf.n --.Sr' M23 I 1.S 
F O S..I 5 V) a H 30 

theathe or COMEDY 
COMPANY 

JOHN DANIEL 

THAW MASSEY 

NERYS HUGHES 
and ALFRED MARKS 

TU0 INTO ONE 

Wtilin. .n»f tinrairai hk 

Ray Coo nay 

"HiHriuir ui-kIih lion 1 I 1 
-f.wnir iKviihihi ns riiHst * s 

MUST END SAT 


NATIONAL GALLERY Tl.ilakt .,1 
s.iii.ir. trawl. it WC7 Ol SJd 
!'21 n.' hi nra| mm OI dSO 

i&?-. vu.li’ |n» stilt-. P b .If 
Ml ISITIUX IK Flu.i s -Mi anil 
si. ' cr.iiiu.iii iik Vk 1 lonr .a Urrrn 

I Kill -Iptil ;-7 loni Fun- 


CINEMAS 


XII If 1 SR* PV STW 741 

I H-.l Call 2l Hi 7 link'.. 
JW 72lXi Gip N.IK-. nv* bl2J 
ROWAN ATKINSON 
THI Nl U R^^ l c 
OMI IS XI INCH 
Bril Pint. Piran 11 e M.tr.n 


YOUNG VIC A3H bJbJ Ct J'V 

I Hill Xlal 2P I IH 7 .1.1 
-Tmiinr 7PII.- Will r. fn M.i-.n 

2 nn ROMEO AMD JULIET 


YOUNG VIC STUDIO c«2it t,V>! 
I mil rrairuark .-2 Lms H |.m 
Lililt Prpdntltnaa in TTtAJ*. 

row THE ANTELOPE \ ih-% 

■mil w .il ill Ik 


OPERA & BALLET 


COLISEUM s hv. jibi tt 

2J0 625a 

ENGLISH NATIONAL 
OPERA 

Tiiii I TOO Haiti- I ran... 3 

■"* MaUrrrin ^ary of Nuranbarc 


ACADEMY I 47.7 .iqbi CANCER- 
OUS MOVES iPGl !>>«' Hi 
'n-a ->iiui 4 10 . a 20 

k 40 

ACADEMY II 4 17 MM THE 

EMPTY TABLE IPG) Film 41 
!• I .• 5 35 a :<Q 
ACADEMY III 437 aaib THE 
WANDERER IPGI Pi ov. 

4 rr. t . 10 . A 20 


CAMDEN PLAZA JH5 244 3 ..,p„ 

■ .itiMi.-n l-.i'ii ■ mu - 1 Prira 

(.■.rai.k.nn A ZED A TWO 
NOUGHTS .151 rum *| u S , 

J .-<• 6 20 H 4 5 ... 

CHELSEA CINEMA 351 374? 

hint- Pram - 1 u-. 1 r .-4 lulu- 

*•1'— !«■• *"i- v«m rx-i.ii--' 


DEATH IN A FRENCH CAROCN 

■Ik' I ■■■■• .il I ft) 3 00 500 

7 r.-> o iV. s,-.,i. iKH.Ialiir 1 14 

l.i*l t-n-nnai iwi Ininunrr 


LEICESTER SQUARE THEATRE 

<|V ' I lb|> RJft 1 ,Ty[ 

ni>iJl \i rrws. ipni HtfWiLiiitr>> 

ROCKY tv ..V7. 70tr.m S.U 
wap L>.iil< 12 55 3 30 oiO 

rt 50 Ini. X.iuiii srunv x nihil t 

ti ! 5yln Mil'iuun BriOlmidi- in 

-VII -l.u. 


LEICESTER SQUARE THEATRE 

0 50 52 52 -f ihii H jn | 7 5« .24 

II...H V,.-.. \ IS4 AntMklllii -,1 

Ittui-. Ik .Ini' III 70IIIIH nt-u 
onto CJ. 11 I 1 12 OS z 50 n Id 
H 60 All Ml Oun hwcihnint- in 

.to' -TlU 


-ART GALLERIES 


f* «T SOCIETY 1JK \... 

2* n ±.**J..!b > 01 ^ -» it 

MARY EI.1.EM BEST. 


MUSEUM OF MANKIND Jim 

illHdUn Cailili'lln l.tmlnu UI 
I LIST MIGlI. K INkjl rtjk |-n 
IN.U !il\ P-lPl.n MOOhs III 
.'Miiiniinn Ili.ilt-il t.k 
f UI IPUU PWI kJ.VI Mia. 
S.d 1(1 S Sim Jifln liim in.. 


MUSEUM OF MANKIND Hm’iiw 
l.-nGaliliir. I rti.i.Ki Ik I LOST 
MAGIC KINGDOMS AND SIX 
PAPER MOONS. ■In t* 1 riirnii.il. 
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32 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 18 1986 




First paMisted 178S 


k litany for unknowns left behind 



Edward Fox 


By Patricia Clough 
On and on it west from 


freezing dawn to icy dusk, the 
interminable litany of names, 
lifted by the bitter wind across 
the grey Thames to the grey 
city beyond. 

Unknown names of un- 
known Soviet Jews, spoken by 
British actors, writers, musi- 
cians. journalists, politicians 
and bishops in the hope that 
the very speaking might help 


to bring about their release 
from the country they long to 
ieave. 

for each name drama stu- 
dents strewed a red carnation 
oq gravel floor of the twisted 
stone circle on the Sooth Bank 
in front of the National The- 
atre w hich, to the delight of its 
sculptor, John Maine, was 
being used for the first time. 

Last week Anatoly 
Shcharansky. the most fara- 


U.-. ,'«Ev«k 
Twiggy 

oss refusenik, was released 
amid massive publicity after 
many years of hell. These 
people, said Tom Stoppard, 
the Czech-born playwright 
who organized the roll-call, 
are the unknowns without 
personal champions, the ones 
who were left behind. 


And by the time the roU-call 
ended at dusk after ten and a 
half hours only about 9,000 
names bad been spoken - not 


Timothy West 

even half of the 25,000 who 
have had the courage to apply 
for ent visas. These in torn are 
only a tiny fraction of the 
380.000 who taken the initial 
step of asking the Israeli 
Government, through rela- 
tives, for an invitation to go 
and live there. 

Only a handful of passers- 
by came to listen as wind-chill 
plunged the temperature to 
minus 21 degrees and a 


dusting of snow fell over the 
scene. But Mr Stoppard, bun- 
dled np against the cold in two 
coats, a sweater and a scarf, 
was not worried. 

For there were TV cameras 
and press photographers 
drawn, as be knew they would 
be, by the appearance, one 
after another, of 200 well- 
known personalities, most of 
them non-Jews, including Fe- 
licity Kendall (who began 


- '-•<:£SS3 kS£l. : 

Jeremy Irons 
coverting to Judaism 


four 

years ago), Jeremy Irons, 
Anthony Hopkins. John 
Mills, Susannah York. Twig- 
gy, and Andrew Lloyd Webber 
There were writers, tike 
Christopher Fry, John Braine 
and Kingsley Amis, leading 
newspaper editors, and clergy, 
among them the Bishop of 
London. 

Photographs by Tim Bishop 
and Chris Harris 


iSTHET^ES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today's events 


Royal engagements 

The Princess of Wales opens 
ihe new Maternity Unit. New- 
ham General Hospital. E 1 3, 
10.45. 

The Duke of Kent. Vice 
Chairman of the British Over- 
seas Trade Board, visits Logica 
Pic. Newman Street. WL 1 1.30. 


Music 

Concert by the City of Bir- 
mingham Svmphonv Orchestra. 
Birmingham Town Hall. 7.30. 

Concert by the Wren Or- 
chestra of London. Sl John s 
Smith 5q.SW 1.7.30. 

Recital b\ Trinity College of 
Music. Southwark Cathedral 
SE1. 1.10. 

Concert by Cambrian Brass, 
Sl David's Hall. Cardiff. 1.05. 


Recital by the Cathedral 
Choir. Chichester Cathedral, 
1 . 10 . 


Organ recital by Keitii 
HaJL Salford 


Elcombe. Maxwell 
UniveTsilv. Crescent House. 
12.35. 

Concert by the Northern 
Sinfonia. Spa 'Grand Hall. Scar- 
borough. 7.30. 

List Centenary Concert. Great 
HaJL Exeter University. 7.30. 

Concert of music and poetry 
by Colla Voce. Sl Anne's 
Church. Kew Green. 7.30. 

Mozart - a dramatic portrait 
in words and music Lauderdale 
House, Watcrlow Park, 
Highgate Hill N6. 8. 

Piano recital by Youri 
Egorov. Common Room. The 
Law Society, 1 1 3 Chancery 
Lane. WCL 6.30. 

Organ recital by John Belcher. 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 36,972 



ACROSS 

! Squeers and Son in panto- 
mime (9.3). 

8 Tar discoloration makes us 
hold back (7). 

9 Letter-writer may claim to 
be this afterwards, note (7). 

11 Mental disposition and a 
style of painting (7). 

12 Raise hockey side that’s in- 
complete without a team 
leader (7). 

13 Sweetest thing in the limits 
of confectionery? (5). 

14 Doctors visitor declaring 
himself intolerant of delay 
(9). 


16 Redesigning wrapper OK. as 
the clerk’s job? (5,41 


19 Cereal from a tropic isle (5>. 

21 Container of ale. or one of 
water by a roadside (7). 

23 Cancel entry if one’s not up 
to it? (7). 

24 Beautiful giri perhaps un- 
welcome in a china shop (7). 

25 Like Homung's cracksman 
or a cricket-playing gentle- 
man (7). 

26 Two very large forces on op- 
posite sides in N America 
(7,5). 


4 Bordering the street con- 
founded type of slippery 
path (5). 

5 Merciful hindrance holding 
up German veto (71. 

6 To be obliged to embrace a 
giri appears to be daunting 
(7). 

7 Shares in reconstruction ofa 
4 at 19^112). 

10 Favourite to hold the lead 
from its current form (8,4). 

15 Fish — with a rod, that’s 
plain (9V 

17 Paronomasia injection I 
heard in India (7). 

18 What a swine Mr Toad 
proved to be! (4,3). 

19 Dock — the end for a dirty 
dog? (7). 

20 Worn by Tommy, with 
place on the river (7). 

22 Say. arc you in debt? For 
this painter quite the con- 
trary (5). 


Solution of Puzzle No 16.971 


DOWN 

1 Job on the island for ode in 
public service (7). 

2 Pictures for instance turned 
up in the possession of one 
queen (7). 

3 Italian peasant has a racket 
in Portuguese money (9). 



Bristol Cathedral. College 
Green. 1.15. 

Concert by Guildhall School 
of Music Chamber Orchestra, 
Bishopsgate Hall. 230 
Bishopsgaie. 1.05. 

Piano recital by Bernard 
d* Ascoli. Lecture Theatre Block. 
Essex University. Colchester, 
7.45. 

Concert by the City Univer- 
sity Symphony Orchestra. SL 
Giles. Cripplcgate. EC2, 7.30. 

Organ recital by Catherine 
Ennis. Sl. Lawrence Jewry. 
Guildhall 1. 

Recital by Susan Milan (flute) 
and lan Brown (piano). Sam 
New son Music Centre. South 
Street Boston. Lines. 6.30. 

Talks, lectures 

People with a message for 
today - Jacob, by the Rev 
Neville Cryer, Si Margaret Pat- 
tens Church. 1.10. 

Elizabeth Siddall: Life and 
Legend. National Poetry Centre. 
21 Earls Court Sq« SW5. 7.30. 

Architects and their work, by 
John Thompson. RIBA. 66 
Portland PI. Wl. 6.15. 

Into the unconscious, by Nick 
Isbister. The London Institute. 
St Peter’s Church, Vcre Sl Wl, 
1 . 10 . 

Pieter Bruegel: mountains 
and men. by Prof J.E.C.T. 
White. Darwin Theatre, Univer- 
sity College London. Gower Sl 
WC l. 120. 

Domesday rebound 1985. by 
Dr Helen Fbrde. Royal Institu- 
tion. 21 Albemarle St, WI.6. 

George Stubbs by Richard 


Humphreys. GaJ!er^4. Tate 


Gallery. Millbauk. 

Tax avoidance:The English 
and American approach, by Mr 
PJ. Milieu. The New Gate 
Theatre, Strand Campus, 
Strand. WCl 5.30. 

Architects and their work, by 
John Thompson. RIBA, 66 
Portland PL Wl.6.15. 

Bridges, by Aubrey TuBey, 
Science Museum. SW7, 1. 

The London Survey, by Tony 
Hare. Friends’ Meeting House, 
Ravens bourne Rd. Bromley. 8. 

Animal Hunters, Natural His- 
tory Museum. 3. 

Sir Joshua Reynolds’ Collec- 
tion of paintings, by Francis 
Broun. Ans Faculty Lecture 
Theatre 1, Bristol University. 
5.15. 

Has public service broadcast- 
ing any future? by Gerard 
Mansell. Highgate Literary & 
Scientific Institution. 1 1 South 
Grove. Highgate. N6. 8.15. 

Revnolds and Costume, by 
Aileen Ribeiro. Goldsmiths* 
Theatre. London School of Hy- 
giene and Tropical Medicine. 
Keppel SL WCl. 6.1 S. 

Turkish carpets of the Otto- 
man period, by Eileen Graham. 
12: The Decorative Arts of 
China by Gillian Darby. 1.15, 
Victoria &. Albert Museum. 
Beginnings and 

cndingsiTumer’s watercolours, 
by Colin Wiggins. Lower Floor 
Theatre. The National Gallery, 
WCl I. 


General 


Booksellers Fairs Association. 
City Book Market Sl Olavc’s 
Parish Hall. Mark Lane. EC3. 
11 . 

Sale of an books. I i Chaucer 
Rd. Cambridge. 7.30. 


Parliament today 


Commons 1 2.30k Drug Traf- 
ficking Offences BilL remaining 
stages, private Bills. 

Lords 1 2.30k Local Govern- 
ment Bill committee, first day. 
Marriage (Wales) Bill, second 
reading. 


TV top ten 


National top ten MavWon programme* to 
the week ending February 9 : 


BSC 1 

1 EaslEndara (Thu/Sun) 23.05m 

2 Ea s tEndsrs (Toe/Sun) 21 90m 

3 Noel Edmond* Lata Late Brtds snow 
15.65m 

4 That's Life 14.30m 

5 Don't Walt Up 1396m 

6 HM3e*« 13.65m 

1 Every Second Counts 1225m 

8 News and Weather (Sun 21:10) 
13.00m 

9 Wogan (Frt) iZSSm 

10 Btankety Blank 1265m 


rrv 


1 Coronation Street (Mon) Granada 
1730m 

2 Coronation Street (Wed) Granada 
17.35m 

3 Wish You Were Hera (Mon/Wad) 
Thames 16.1(»n 

4 Surprise. Surprise LWT 1495m 

5 tXtfy Flee Yorkshire 14.80m 

6 Bufceye Central 13.35m 

7 The Bui Thames 1330m 

0 Crazy Like a Fox (TV 1325m 

9 Narer ihe Twam Thames 13 10m 

10 Alt in Good FaHh Thames l&OOm 

BBC 2 

1 Yes Prime Minister 7.00m 

2 Forty Manxes 6.70m 

3 MASH 5.35m 

4 Tom O'Connor 4.65m 

5 tnramaaonal Darts (Sun 17KB) 
4.65m 

6 Star Trek 4 .60m 

7 Food and Drmk4JBm 

8 Bob Monkhouse Show 4.10m 

9 Deetftaad 3.90m 

10 Discovering Animals 350m 

Charnel 4 

1 BrooksfcJe (TuefSat) tLS&n 

2 Brootetoe (Mon/Sal) 655m 

3 Treasure Hunt 3.60m 

4 AMte 530m 

5 Accounts 4.60m 

6 Sanrday Live 330n» 

7 Crises 350m 


8 CounldoiMi^O^d) 3.10m 


9 Boardwalk 

10 Comxtoum (Tue) 3.00m 


B reaktem tetovte ton: The swage 
weekly figures for audiences at pea* 
ames twn taxes m parenthesis 
showing cne reach - the number of peat* 
who wowed for at least frree minutes* 
B8C1: Snwttjsr fibre Men to Fn 
i «m (7 -5m) 

TV-anr. Good Meming Brito* Mon to Frt 
2.2m (10.3m) Sat 23m (62m) 

Sun 1 -3m 


Anniversaries 


Births: Mary L reigned 1553- 
58. Greenwich. 1516; 
ADrssaadro Volta, physicist and 
inventor of the electric 
battery .Como. Italy, 1 745; 
Ramakrisbna, teacher and 
preacher. Hooghly, Bengal 
1836; Erast Mach, physicist. 
Turas. Czechoslovakia. 1838 (be 
died on Feb 19, 1916 at Haar. W 
Germany). 

Deaths: Martin Lather, 
Eisleben. Germany, 1546; 
Michelangelo, Rome. 
1 564;Robert Oppeoheimer, 
physictsL Princeton, New Jer- 
sey. 1967. 


Roads 


The Midlnnds: MS: 
Contraflow between junction 4 
and 5 (Bromsgrove/'Droirwich); 
only one lane northbound; 
northbound entry at junction 5 
dosed. Ml: Roadworks south- 
bound between junctions 22 
(A50 Leicestershire and 
Coalville) and 23 (A5I2 Lough- 
borough and Shepshed); one 
lane dosed; delays. 

Wales and West: M5: Only 
one lane open on the north- 
bound carriageway at junction 
25 (Taunton). A4I9: Major 
reconstruction work on the 
Cirencester to Swindon road at 
South Ccrney; delays; avoid if 
possible. A39: Lanes restrictions 
and temporary signals between 
Street and Walton. Somerset. 

The North: MI 8: Doncaster 
to Sheffield (ink road dosed; 
diversion due to work on 
Mortben Hall Bridge. AJ9: 
Fencing work S or Murton 
flyover. Co Durham, and 
construction of a new shp road 
between A19 and BI432. A19: 

Resurfacing work with tem- 
porary lights at Sbipton (NW of 
York); delays. 

Scotiflod; M& Surface repairs, 
on east bound carriageway W of 
junction 5. M8: Repairs to slip 
roads on to the M8 at Newhouse 
interchange on the E and west- 
bound carriageways: delays. 


A93: Perth Cjty: 'Singe line 


traffic and lights on Glasgow 
Road and South Methren Street: 
road closed between High Street 
and South Street; diversions. 


The pound 


Austria Sc* 
Fr 
S 

Kr 

Finland Mkk 
France Fr 
Germany Dm 
Greece Dr 
Hoag KangS 
Ireland Pt 
Italy Ls* 


Bank 

w 


2.14 
2420 
71.40 
2455 
1290 
7.79 
1059 
245 
247-00 
11-35 

T.14S 

235550 


N on ray Kr 

Portugal Esc 

South Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
Sectiw Kr 
SeRzartendFr 
USAS 
Yu 


3-89 

10-76 

3.10 

21X50 

1030 

2.35 

1.483 


Bank 
Sets 
2 50 
23-OC 
67-80 
1.965 

1X10 

759 

1004 

X27 

222-00 

1086 

1.085 

222000 

2-54-00 

3.70 

10-71 

212.2S 

2JM 

201-50 

1035 

2.T0 

1.413 


Ratos tor smffl da nowtoeti o n bank nows 
only as suppled by Barclays Bank PLC. 


37X9 


London: The FrunOn dosed up IS at 
1220,71 


Snow Reports 


Depth 
(cm) 

L U Piste 

AUSTRIA 

St Anton 100 300 good varied fair 

Good sklng on most slopes 
FRANCE 

fSdaSOOO ISO 200 good 


Conditions Weather 

OH Runs to (5pm) 
resort 


fine 


Excellent all pistes 


powder good fine 

crust good snow 

heavy good 
varied good 


thaw 

fine 


varied good sun 


UP»gne 135 270 good 

Shallow new snow 

Meg eve 80 160 good 

Expected snow missed Magme 
Moraine 85 190 good 

ExceHem skting conditions 
ITALY 

Courrnayeur 110 250 good 

Pistes in good condition 
SWITZERLAND 

Andermatt 70 170 good 

Excellent piste skiing 
Davos 90 170 good 

Good sking on afl pistes 
Murren 70 150 good 

Excellent sluing everywhere 
Viters TOO 210 soft 

New snow but warm conditions 
in the above reports, supplied Dy representatives of toe Ski Club of Great 
Britain. L refers to lower slopes and U to upper, and art to artrficaL 
Weekend figures. . 


varied good 
crust good 


fine 
fine 

varied good fine 
powder fair 


fine 


Weather 

forecast 


6 am to midnight 


scattered mainly light start or snow 
i; wind E, moderate or fresh; 


Showers; 

max temp 2C (36 F|l 


W Midlands, Wales, NW En- 
gbnd. Lake District, feta at Man, 
SW Scotland, Glasgow, Northern 


tretand: Ooudy but wfth ctaar. 


sunny intervals, mainly dry; wind^ 


moderate or fresh; max tamp 
(39F). 

Aberdeen, Cental 
Firth, NE, NW 
(Mcney, Shetland: Sunny 
and many dry. wind E, light 
br moderate: max temp 5C (41 F). 

Outlook lor tomorrow «id Thurs- 
day: LitBe change. 


SwiRtoes Sun S«tK 
7-09 am 5-21 pm 


E Moon seta Moonrisas: 

324 am 1037 am 
Ful moorc Febniery 24. 


Lighting-up time 


London 5J51 pm to 6JJ7 am 
Bristol S.00 pm to 6.47 am 


Edtatwgh 553gm to 7.00 am 


5.55 pm to 6-50 ent 
6-15 pm to 6^6 am 


Yesterday 



PaitMOo - Mh |0 oMT 
Monday-Saturil»y record your dally 
Poniotw lotat 

Add Dime coonwr tn determine 
your we*Uy Portfolio wire. 


i! your imal msictiw Dk w a tthri 
dKIdpnd flourp you lan won 


ounotit or a «ibt# at Ihe prue money 
»iat«a (or Dial week, and must dan 
your prize as instructed below. 


■Httfiiw# TTuMnmre 1 

AM 0754-53272 P SI W SI IMP a 0 snO 


Wo ill— r can bs accspMO —MM» there 
Iwios.- 

You must have your care with you 
when you W e pnonc. 

W you are unable to , 

someone else can claim on youri 


but ussy must have yaw card and i 

The Times Portfolio oam line 


taeween ihe sdpulated limes 

No resoonsUriluy can be accept rd 
lor tenure lo contact me claim orQre 
Wt any reason wtBvm the stated 
hours 

Trie above instructions are are 
nmole to Doth dally and weekly 
siikKnd claims 

•Some Times Portfolio cards Include 
minor rnwrinb in the insUucrioM on 
Ihe nrierse side. These cards are not 
imatMalpd 

•The wordino or Rules 2 and 3 has 
been expanaed (rom earlier verdona 
Tor Lianhcabon purposes. The Game 
I wolf ts not affected and will conunue 
to br played in esacilv ihe same way 


CTIMES NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 
Itad. Primed and tiuWWwd by Ttnn 
Newspapers Limited, l Pennlnoton 
Street. London. El . TetaMu Ol 481 
4100. Tuesday. February 18. 1936 
RejUsWrod aaa newspaper ai me Pon 



f 1A 


ill 


YO 


\\££> 1 


Letter from Washiagtoa 

The gossips catch 
up with Reagan 


Black sheep in ihe While 
House are uncomfonab5> 
conspicuous. The hapless 
Carters had a flock lai?e 
enough to keep ihe gossip 
columnists busy for four 
rollicking yea** Billy we 
brother, with his Libyan con* 
nections; Gloria, the 
moiortjiking sister whose son 
languished in 3 Californian 
j 2 it son Chip, with his crum- 
bling marriage; and die 
irrespressible Miz Lillian. 

The Reagans, by conirasL 
seemed sedately proper, shar- 
ing with their predecessors 
only the habit of holding 
hands in public. 

But Washington gossip col- 
umnists, being what they are. 
soon found some items 10 
pick over. Wasn’t there a 
family feud between eldest 
son Michael and his step- 
mother Nancy? Why had the 
First Family refused to see 
their grand-daughter for her 
first IS months? And what 
about young Ron and his 
wish to" be a dancer? How 
would the Jofirey Ballet 
crowd go down with Betsy 
Bloomingdale. W'alter 
Annenberg and the rest of the 
Reagans’ conservative Cali- 
fornian set? 

The press has had fun with 
Ron’s marriage, in jeans and 
sneakers, his griping about 
exploitation in the ballet and 
his standing in line for unem- 
ployment benefit, saying that 
since all America was on the 
dole, he was too. 

Happily for the President, 
the supermarket tabloids 
have never found any real 
skeletons to rattle. And the 
Reagans, with years of Holly- 
wood experience, have 
shrugged off the showbiz 
prattle. 

But recent weeks most 
have stretched even the 
Gipper’s tolerance. Patty Da- 
vis, Nancy and Ronald’s 
actress daughter, has just 
written a tamalizingly auto- 
biographical “novel’' about 
growing up as an anti-war 
protester in a political family. 
And Ron has become a 
correspondent for Playboy . 
and appeared on network 
television in his underpants. 

His zany performance, in a 
hot-pink shirt and white 
briefs, guitar in hand and 


bd»jng out raucous pop. 
murucked the tilia RLsk\ 
Bunixctt. which tells of 3 
young mas left atone at home 
who sorts 3 prostitution nng. 

It was the talk of the town 
next day. Papa missed it, 
quickly go: a video tape and 
affected 10 be impressed. 

Pressed 10 evaluate Ron jnr's 
performance, he could say 
onlv: “i was very surprised.** 

Roc’s Playboy article on 
the Geneva summit (remem- 
ber Mr Caner’s notorious 
“adultery in the heart" inter- 
view?) got some inside infpr- 
matioif from bis presidential 
father, but the White House 
had to scrabbie to make up 
for some very undiplomatic 
details of life in (he US 
Embassy in Moscow. 

.And cow Patty, with her 
book Howe Front . has fol- 
lowed the trend of spilling the 
family beans set by the 
daughters of Joan Crawford 
and Bette Davis. The heroine 
is a young woman named 
Beth 'Canfield whose father 
becomes Governor of Cali- 
fornia and calls out the 
National Guard to hail cam- 
pus anti-war protests which, 
he is convinced are the work 
of communist agitators, while 
his daughter becomes an anti- 
war activist 

When her lather sets his 
sights on the presidency, 
family loyalties become 
strained. “You have no idea 
bow much you hurl your 
father when you participate 
in . . . demonstrations," her 
mother says. 

Patty’s book does not say 
what portions really did hap- 
pen and what is fiction. But 


certainly some sounds famil- 
iar. As the 


First Family enters 


uyei 

the White House after the 


inauguration, “my mother 
was carrying on conversation 
as she ducked in and out of 
rooms, inspecting furniture, 
drapes, walls". 

At one point, our heroine 
reveals that she fell complete- 
ly in love for the first time in 
the hayloft at an expensive 
private school. We do not 
know the conversation in the 
real White House when the 
First Parents read that chap- 
ter. 


Michael Binyon 


A cold E airstream will be 
maintained with a com- 
plex area of low pressme 
over France^moving away 


London, SE England, East An- 
gBn: Mainly doudy. wftri scattered 
snow showers; winds E trash or 
strong. JocaHy gate: max temp 1C 
(341). 

Central N, SW England, Channel 
Mends: Mainly cloudy, some iso- 
lated snow showers; winds E trash 
or str ong. toca»y gate; max temp 3C 
(37F). 

E Midlands, E, central N, NE 
England, Borders, Edinburgh, Dun- 
dee: Cloudy, some dear intervals. 




High Tides 


Mlw ito: DMA* sky am douft c- 
tfoudy: o^vercast: f log 


. fog: d -drizzle: fi- 
nal): mtsl-rast: r-raln: s-snow: tn- 

ttumdersionn: p^howars. 

Arrows show wind directum, wtod 
rated tmph) circled. Temperature 
centigrade. 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

London Bridge 

7^8 

56 

653 

5-5 

Aherdoan 

7.59 

ai 

857 

3.1 

Avoraaotfi 

1232 

93 

1.17 

95 

BeNeot 

546 

27 

629 

27 

Cenfiff 

12.17 

9.1 

152 

S3 

Oevonpart 

1150 

4.1 

ai9 

45 

Dover 

556 

5.1 

FAtoMUth 

11-20 

35 



Glasgow 

IlineJiih 

WWTcn 

633 

s sr 

42 

11 

759 

623 

44 

35 

sr - 

4-42 

4.1 

552 

1258 

4.1 

54 

toiacunbe 



12.08 

63 

Ledta 

9.07 

4.1 

953 

42 

Liverpool 

5.15 

68 

6.00 

63 

Lowestoft 

3.39 

20 

4.42 

19 

Margate 

sxn 

3.7 

652 

16 

«"■< ■ «« 

Pffnjoro now 



1259 

4.9 

Newquay 

1129 

5.0 

1.04 

23 

Oban 



Panaance 

1129 

4.1 



Portland 

1156 

1J 



Portsmoutti 

539 

3.6 

650 

3.4 

BLauaAgm 

Gumwwi 

5.09 

45 

559 

45 

SouttMrPpUJft 

5i» 

35 

550 

34 

Swansea 



1259 

69 


1035 

4.0 

1059 

4.0 

W'Bcn-cB'Nze 

533 

35 

6.11 

11 


Around Britain 


EAST COAST 

Seaborn 

Brt&ngton 


Sun Rain 
hrs in 


Max 
C F 


2 36 duR 
2 38 duff 


M n mjeib d 

Tnby 

CtfwynBiy 


Sun Bam 
hrs in 


0.7 


Temperatures a imddsy yesterday: c, 
dout f, tar. r. rain; s, sun. 

C F C F 

sn 337 G oawaay e 337 
sn -130 tone m ams c 337 
c 337 Jersey c 337 

sn 134 London 91 134 

Cardiff e 032 MMdteSer sn 236 

EdWwgh r 337 Nas ca sOa e 236 

GSasemr c 337 R'aKIsway t 337 


Meraate 
SOUTH C 


34 


COAST 
r eO realp qe 4 2 
Hastings 
E ra h w mn 
B righton 
Worsting 
U«alw»tn 
BognorR 
SouOisca 


32 dul 
34 dowdy 
dowdy 


Douglas 


0.7 


Max 
C F 
4 39 dufl 

2 38 dowdy 

3 3G dd 
3 37 dul 

2 38 dowdy 


33 
1 JO 
L9 
Z9 
1.0 


Sbanfctti 

Bo wme mOi 

Poole 

Swsnege 

Weymmitti 

Exmouth 

Tetgnmoufl) 

Torquay 

Fatnoush 

Peeaan cs 

taffy 

Cu ema ey 


03 

06 


34 bn^it 
36 brtgtn 
36 cloudy 

36 bright 

37 dowdy 

37 Cloudy 
37 brtem 

37 dandy 
32 log 

38 ctoudy 

37 cloudy 

39 doudy 
37 cloudy 
41 AM 


3 37 
3 
3 
0 
2 

3 

4 
3 

5 . . 

3 37 dufl 

4 39 dufl 

4 S3 AM 

6 43 ctoudy 

6 43 gala 

7 45 au 

7 45 doudy 


ENGLAND AND WALK 
London 

Btisn Ainit - - 

Bristol (COfl - - 

Cardiff (CtiQ - - 

Anglesoy 73 

fTpool Airpt 


N’otf-a-Tyno 


36 dowdy 
32 snort 
34 dtnsiy 
34 Cloudy 
34 dew 
38 cloudy 
38 snow 
32 snow 
38 9nort 

37 Ctoudy 


01 


SCOTLAND 
FnFifnhtniitr 
pTBSMck 
Gtasgoer 
Too* 

St o rnow ay 63 
Lerwick 2.8 
Wick -0J02 

KMm 

Aberdeen - 0 JOT 

SL Andrews - 8 01 


1 34 snow 

4 39 ctoudy 
3 37 Sleet 

5 41 doudy 
S 41 sumy 
3 37 bright 
3 37 bn 

2 38 doudy 

2 38 snow 

3 37 Wri 


These ore Sunday’s Bgwea 


Abroad 










Tide ammd in metres: 1«= 32808#. ffij ■ 



MtoOAY: c, ctoud; 0, drazte L frt; Ig, tog; r, rata; s. sun: an, snow: t thunder- 

r 11 52 + 


AkroM 

Mes^taa 

Algiers 

taa t ra 

Atbenss 

Bahrain- 

Bated) 


Bant 

Belgrade 

Bartin 

Bemuds 

Btanffz 

Borne 

Borns'* 

Brussels 

Sudapst 

B Aires 

Cam 

CapeTn 

CTriance 

CMesgo 

Ch'ehreh 


C F 

M3 S Cologne 
t 17 63 Cpbavi 
s 19 56 Carle 
c 17 63 SuHEa 
s 0 32 Oitorvrt 
17 83 Fora 
g 20 68 Boranee 
Ftarirtwt 
f 14 67 nrachar 
(tenewo 
t 2 38 Gtaffar 
5 -5 23 Hetstafd 
Hoag K 
I 13 S5 Mbncfe 
c 0 33 bteM 
t IS S5 Jeddsfi 
s 1 34 Ja-buro 
c 0 32 Karachi 
L Pataka 
S 21 70 LtetMO* 

S 29 84 Locarno 
Loswobg 
LAngeis 
Madrid- 


C F 

2 38 Majorca* 
-6 21 Malaga' 

tit E7 — ‘ 


S 
sn 

s 14 57 Mafea 
c 3 37 MeVme 
c 9 48 Mexico C 
f 14 57 _ 

C 5 41 
S -1 30 
S 19 66 
c 1 34 Munch 
f 15 58 Nffrotfl 
S -4 25 Naples 
r 16 61 NDoH 
t 1 34 NYrafc 
( 13 55 Wco 
s 27 81 09 to 
mhIs 

t 24 75 Mdng* 
c 20 68 Partfi 
r 13 56 Prague 
sl 1 34 teftrik 
I -1 30 Rbodss 


C 
f 16 
t 19 
f 13 
r 23 


F 
61 
66 : 

55 SI 
73 S FTisco 


I 1 34 


Ml 1 


Seoul 

“ISSS 

IB SkeebVg 
25 Sydney 


s -8 
C -4 
S 29 
C 12 54 Tel 
S 20 


84 Tanraer 
HMeiAviv 


C 4 33 
c 3t » 

t 'I 
c 

s 27 81 


c 12 $4 node J 


r 7 
c 4 
sn 1 
S 2 
3 27 
sn ■« 
r 3 
1 14 
a 21 
I 30 


c W £ 

sis 


s 23 
e 19 $ 


Tokyo 
45 Ti 
21 Tania 
S« . . 

36 Vane'Vor ^ 
81 Venice sl 2 * 
21 Vtona s -4 » 

37 Weran sn -5 23 
57 Wastitcx 




■fc . 

■ .. 


- domes Ogures are tetostsvaitrtto 


70 Weftwto 
BSZuritf