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j 1 

- *'x 




No 62,388 



MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


TIMES 


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•* - .' : '-v> 


■- ■ • ■**•■ & 

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Kjjnr:? 


Tomorrow 




Secrets of 
JJjepast 

TJe recent discovery 
01 a rich Egyp tian 
tomb has given fresh 
encouragement to 
other academics 
who are searching 
sites around the 
world. They believe 
fhat they have only 
just begun to scratch 
the surface of the 
ancient world What 1 
great finds arc still , 
to be made? 


£20,000 earners 
may pay £3 bn 
more in taxes 








‘ sc. 


People’s power 
breaks siege by 
Marcos troops 


By Anthony Bevnas, Political Corres pon dent 


A Labour gover nm ent win "■ said that in this fioanripi year 
impose an extra £3.000 mil- the top 5 per cent of texpayere. 


Sfe 




boo in taxes on toe richest those on a taxable income of 
rofluon taxpayers, Mr Neil more than f 16,200. conmbm- 



Kinnock said yesterday. 

An Intend Revenue source 
said last night that the plan 
would affect those earning 
between £20,000 and £25,000 
■a year and upwards. 

The Labour leader also said 


ed about£l ^00 ntdlum on the 
higher rate bands, which were 
reduced from a limit of 83 per 
cent to 60 per cent in the 1 979 


replacing it with "a framework 
of positive lights'". 

He said: "What wen see 
constructed in jplace of an 
industrial relations system 
that provokes conflict is one 
that allocates lights and re- 
sponsibilities and can safely 
be put in the hands of reason- 
able people instead of the 
ratUess and the self-interested 







From DavidWalls, Manila 

Ptiipino people's power tri- ate his way out of the most 
gr aphed for a moment over crucial blow yet to his regime, 
the might _ of President Mr Marcos the belligerent is 
Marcos's military machine as the more honest: to a man the 
darkness fell last night. Marines arriving yesterday af- 


Tfae pride of the Philippines teruoon admitted that they 


Marines in US-built armoured 
troop carriers and British 
Scorpion tanks milled out of 


had orders to fire on civilians 
if necessary. 

The reality is that the 


the siege of the Manila police civilians called Mr Marcos's 
headquarters, prevented from bluff There was no particular 


■a^ranaupwaita, But Mr Kinnock also said aWe . People instead of the 

. ™ Labour teader also said that, while he had no intention ratl xless and the sdf-mterested 
m an interview on tte: Tyne of raising the standard rate of and the matronal, which is the 
Tees Television Face the Press tax,be would hope to reduce Propose that the Conservative 
progpunme fom he would the tax burden on those legislation now serves". 
ictSbmf m n j7*»« sl E f m « ara “g less than £6,500 a That meant that balloting 

^ssiSSLSASm «■* ^ 

KM? ofth£miart ‘ 

Asked how be planned to 


Mass 


taking any action against the 
rebellions Defence Minister 
and Chief of Police by bun- 


love for Mr Enrile in the past 
— he ran the Marcos martial 
law apparatus and put hun- 


dreds of thousands ofdviiuuas dreds of political prisoners 
who surrounded the Marines away in the very camp where 


AH change 
A new smooth look 
from 

a fashion radical 


He sadd:“Therc is a case for 


finance his investment pro- waling down the tax-paying 
gramme, Mr Kinnock said process in such a way as to 


Indoor games 
Britain meets the 
USSR at Cosford 


(that the money would come relieve people on lower in- 
from borrowing, by reducing comes. So rm not saying we 
unemployment and - by a don’t want to change standard 
rampositon of “the tax EabD-' rate, Tm saying we don’t want 
ity escaped in the test six to increase standard rate." 
years, to the tune of about The Labour leader said he 
£3,000 miffion a year, by the did not want to make any 
top 3 or 5 per cent of promises or sign any cheques 
taxpayers". at the moment, but if it could 

, Mr Kinnock said: “It is a be done he would tike to 
question of starting to collect introduce discriminatory bdp 
die effective level rtf tax again for those on less than £ 6,500 a 
are very rich year. 

mean people Mr Kinnock also reaffirmed 


Kinnock said: “Insofar as it 
encourages rank and file ire 
volvemcnt in the decision 
making and the elections of 
trade unionism, then it’s to be 
accepted". 


with barricades ofbuses. sand- 
bags, logs and piles of rubble, 
Rewed-up engines belched 
clouds of oO smoke as the 
great camouflaged war ma- 
chines moved off in the 
direction of their barracks, 
and some of their crews 


he took refuge this weekend — 
but the people, called out by 
Cardinal Sin to help hire, 
risked their lives in confront- 
ing the military. They found 
they could free down the 
75mm cannon and heavy 
rachine guns on the Marines* 


surreptitiously gave the oppo- APCs, knowing that the small 


sruon sign. 


number of Marines in Manila 


Asked about the dispute 
involving News International 
and Wapping, Mr Kinnock 
said that a Labour govern- 
ment would ensure " that for 
the period of a strike you 
could not terminate peoples’ 
employment because of that 
strike, or during that strike. 


President Marcos, mean- appeared to be all the military 
while, was claiming quite the men riiat Mr Marcos could be 


reverse. The militar y had the ® ure yesterday. 


rebels cut off and were pre- 
venting the passage of troops 
either in or out of police 
headquarters, where Mr Juan 


While he spoke of tough 
military action against the 
rebels, it was dear that other 
units were refusing to attack 


Ponce Enrile, Mr Marcos’s their own. One report said 
Defence Minister for i 7 years, there had been several unsuc- 




compe ti tina was shared by 
force readers, Mrs Rath 
Scarratt, of Parlay, Surrey, 
Mr L P Henuglufa, of Wey- 
mouth, Dorset, and Mr ten 
WSsoMBaadll^Qifead, 
Herts. The rfafly prize at, 
£2,000 wax swed by Mr E 
Lefgb-Hmrtrd, of 'Kafabto- 


“It’s a system oftaw which . 
operates with effectiveness 


••i"'"™ from those who are very rich year. “It’s a system oftaw which 

Saturday’s £20,000 weekly in our society— I mean people Mr Kinnock alro reaffirmed operates with effectiveness 

prize hi The Than FMlbBo in the top 3 to 5 per cent as I Labour’s plans to “dear the elsewhere; there’s no reason 

compe ti tina was shared by have raid". deck" of all Conservative why it couldn’t effectively and 

force leadent' Mrs Bath The Inland Revenue source _ industrial relations legislation, justly operate in this country."’ 


‘dear the elsewhere; there's no reason 


and the Chief of Police, Gen- 
eral Hdd Ramos, were hold- 
ing out, after finding the 
courage to declare what the 
rest of the country has known 
for some time: that Mr Marcos 
is no longer a legitimate 
President. 


cessful attempts to get strike 
forces together. The Air Force 
wasconspicious by fts absence 
from the sky until one helicop- 
ter joined the Marines in fate 
afternoon. 


Union role in BL takeover 


PreridemT "•**“““* Both Mr Enrile and General 

Ramos have pledged never to 

In reality the Marines were surrender, and indeed they 
halfa mile from Camp frame, now have no choice: their 


Ned Bow 
Yorkshire. 


Keighley, 


lE By Oar Political Correspondent 

Ms- Mr Neil Kinnock yesterday sale, but a buy-out would be 
Mr revealed that the workforce of 1 the “least worst" option, 
fay, Land. Rover and of Freight With a Sunday Tunes 
Rover would be involved in MORI oofl showing vestexdav 


whicb was surrounded by a criticisms of Mr Marcos over 
vast wall of protective citizen- the weekend would never be 


Portfolio tistpage 18; rales! management buy-out plans 
and how to play, information! for British LeyfandL 
service, page 32- _ li The Labour leader said on 


Land. Kover and of Freight With a Sunday Times Mr Bififcn is a member of 
Rover would be involved in MORI poll showing yesterday, the special cabinet committee 
manogmnent buy-out plans jhat as many as 90 per cent setup to oversee any possible 
for British Leyiand. want Land Rover to stay m British Leytend sale. But it is j 

• The Labour leader said on British hands, while 77 per thought that two of his com- 
•tbe Tyne Tees television pro- cenl believe that the Govern- mittee colleagues, Mr Peter 
<grxmme,Face The Press: “The ment should insist that it Walker, Secretary of State for 
management who are pattimt remain British, the political Energy, and Mr Norman 


mind, is absurd, and I say this \ 

■as a nationalist* 1 . '■ 

Mr Bifen is a member of Mr Joan Ptmce Emile, the rebellions Philippines Defence 
the special cabinet committee Minister, outside his headquarters yesterday. 


management who are putting 


dogether the teams se^ig the pressure against a General 
/buy-outs want the dfrw ? in- Motors takeover is creating 


climbdown 


volvement from 
the trade umons 
in foasepifants. 


one of forinidaMedifficultksfin'Mrs 
workers Tteldier. ■ 


Walker, Secretary of Stale for 
Energy, and Mr Norman 
Fowler, Secretary of State for | 
Social Services, both repre- 
senting Midlands constituen- 
cies, are more sensitive to the 


Economy 
is given 
twin boost 


Paper run 
beats the 
pickets 


ry, but then Mr Marcos ap- forgiven. 

• pears more and more out of ,, _ 

touch with both reality and TV ~, n I^ po ^ - M .C Marcos 
troth with each pa ri n g day. J*®?™** 1 1W 5 #1 “ £?“ Bht ™ 
On television heroSantiy his second or thud assassi- 

reiterated his desire that thesis 

’should be no bloodshed, that m ®^-skmnod men who 
;no civilians should get hurt. 

■but alternating this with *r cre were ^pmessjons from 
■threats to use mortars and lhree 7°^ Army men at the 
artillery as he tried to negoti- Continued on page 2, col 7 


Mr John Biffen, Leader-bf. peditical pre ssur e s. 


Mr. v Winsfoa -Onm*fl[ has. 
abandone d bis “fannd y Jisf^ 
of activities debased, as ol^ 
scene and . not smtahte rfor 
broadcasting or. ptib&afom 
and replaced it with more 
general gmddmes in hfa Bill 
designed to extend Ao scope 
of the Obscene Publications 
Act Fage32 


“That was nude ycry Cicw « 


Those pressu re s were yes- 
terday reinforced •» a speech 


By Onr City Staff 


By Patricia Ctoagb 


• -- 1T.J? T OtlOHSW VII IW. UWV- nuuaj IUIHUIUU a 

^ iv‘ Mr 

- B'hek, Next Week, that the former- prime minister, 1 who 


nfanageniait, for-m- ‘bosfifify aroused by.tiie 


:stanct 

“rm not going to quote 
them directly becanse l don’t 
want to break, any confi- 
(fenoes, but .» they want, from 
day onfe some fedHty in 


ritkm created a “conaderaKc 
problem"; but that did not 
mean the idea was mistaken. 


He sakfc The Government, 


told a Coventry conference of 1 
the Conservative Group for 
Europe that there was no 
electoral mandate for the pos- 
sible sale to General Motors, : 


Flanging o3 prices *04 foe | 

pecsd-hsTr-^Tiu 

ahage boast to faitotey -2n the SS?bv 

UK, and foe Omfederafon of « 

British ladasby predicts font 
wtjnt Skrau rbe simply Su mhy T, ma 
over the next Irarmontiks. 

. The CBrsroryeynf month- 


i print run of raore'thah fj ' 

Issair million '(CPUS’ of foe . 

&fthe World sad. nearly L'rLii 
jl.4 million copies of The paodcre 
Sunday Times left Wapping .gtv 
on Saturday night deqnte Troemon 
delays caused by a demonstra- 


Rebels say President’s 
I elite force is deserting 


FremMichad BSnyen, Washington 


T3 regional army com- ^8 to 99 per cent of the 
Sers in tire Philippines military." He also emphasized 
giving support to the that he would not step down 
ion against President from office, 
os, Lieutenant-General Mr Juan Ponce Enrile, the 


^ vwmks jasay 


4 hm U. pressured. I believe that it is 

wJS sound industrial sense for this 
mroteed. m that- buy-out to ^ jnteniatioiial 


Missile offer 


President Reagan has pro- 
posed removal, of intermedi- 


process ’. . _ settings for many ofhsactivi- 

, Iromcafly, Mr Kinnock has ties. To rale these out wi pure 

li.* : uCLm. TJ ■ ■ . . i n _a_ _ 


also said that he would 


mSMTmSSS j gpy kind rfftitish Ley] 


-grousers mat only British own- 
ership is acceptable, in my— 


fied and naive. 

“The Government wifl pay 
deariy if it insists, against foe 
wishes of the British people, in 
steam-rollering this through”, 
be said. 


iy trends fur February shows | nSJ t 

that over foe next fbnr months Ipnnyworkqs and ympathiZH 


KN? International said 


Fidel Ramos, chief of the Defence Minister, also said a 
national police, told American large group of seemingly loyal 


-ortpol to rise and raly 11 per *nrl at 

knri expect it to dedfae. The I Hve pohcemoi and at least 


television ye sterd ay. soldiers were obeying orders 

_ Scores of young offi« 


cent expect it to dedfae. The I ' ' 11 

survey also indicates that l?°* .demonstrator were in- 




England in Tories give school 


na and Japan 


Page 7 


Militant fight 


JSSfiU- vouchers priority 


5E1. 

] Reflecting this optimism, 
theM^Bnsine^Si 
has ra ised its forecast of “ 
Brkaia’s ecmtoinK growth “SF”)* 


jured as missiles were thrown 
[in dashes at the gates of the 
News Internationa] plant 
where the print workers were 
joined by engineers, electri- 
cians and, for the first time. 


from Mr Marcos's elite guard 
were deserting him, because 


not attack anti-Marcos dem- 
onstrators. 

Mr Enrife and General Ra- 


they could uot stomach orders »,- • 

Sites, fellowrftora.^ mos.speajang from the Mnus- 


SbhSSSrKi S in Ma nila. 


cos to leave offios pooofuUy. 
remove Mr Marcos from pow- He cookl leave the Philippines 

and live anywhere he wanted. 

President Marcos, also ap- If be refused to go, the two 
pearing on television, scoffed men would continue using 
at the rebellion, saying the “people power" to get him 
leader had only 400 troops, out 
“We are probably in control of Hit list, pane 9 


Britain's 


England faced, the prospect 
of losing the first Test to the 
West Indies inside three days. 


Fony-teyen, people wm 

Z9 per cent foUowine the bV a T resto r ot . 3 r WCT ® 

itaffllv^TwnLinllii. charged with a variety of 


Tire leadership trf’tiie Labour! when their batting coQsqpsed 
Partv is pr eo arin g forcorrfron- 1 again at Sabina Phrk, Kmgs- 




m 


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r#PTT 



| Graham Gooch arid Tim 
[Robinson were- both dra- 
i missed for 'dudes after En- 


, By Anthony Berios, Political Correspondent 

TTm Conservative Party is frontiers <» the state system of 
planning to go into the next edneatira as effectively as the 
election with a radical new Government has rolled back 
pfan for education, including a the state sector of industry, 
voucher system which would The voucher scheme, which 
enable parents to switch Their is now being called the credit 

or access system, was last 


jin ofl pricevmd expects inlla- “ 

^tion to fall below 4 per cent by 
the middle of this year. 


gland had started then second I children from state to private 
maims 148 behind, so undo- 1 


Mwuumleef foisyear. ™uaai damage.lhreatening 

^Tm LBS, whose forecast Wg™ 1 - 

***&L'£l£r£ SSRESnsa^JS 

saS.The rest wore cautioned. 
The demonstration started 


Hit list, page 9 


removed afl scope for tax cuts I"- SSKTSSw nB 
in foe Budget on March 18. L® 




The CBI survey k the last to 


iters, led by a brass band, 
i Fleet Street to Wapping. 


mg afl foe . good work of Vouchers, which would 
medium pace bowler Richard roughly nmA the cost of a 
EQison, cif Kent state education, could be spent 

The West Indies ‘had been instead afprivate schools. 
bowled> out for 307, with R is even bong suggested 
I EQison taking five for 78, but that the scheme could be given 
at lunch, England were 18 for 2ts initial trials in the educa- 
fwo. David Gower, the cap- tionally deprived imw cities. 


tain, trying to find his form, j where the vouchers could be 


was on eigntana raer wmey, 

sent in at No 4 bepans e David ffirea grant primary schools. 
Smith was su fC aiug .from - Because the proposals win 
sunstroke, ot seven. be foc^bt by the so-calfed 

■John Woo dc ock; page 24 conservative “wets” and by 
nfkoll enlif the Whitehall establishment, 
UlKISftll spill, the Prime Minister will need 
land wm have a new aD the backing of loyalist 
al football league next mmistersandMfttftbepfan 
following a deciskm to is to be driven throurfi into 
iway from the^ Scottish the next etection_mamfesta 
! by nmc leading dubs..) Nevertheless, it is expected 
consistoftwo cr three That foe wffl pet herway on an 
os, and a premier divi- issue whk* arcgaidedas the 
[10 dribs, with promo- high e st priority. Senior Con- 
‘ one-up and one-down, servatives are confident that 
b agreed the next “radical Conservative 

HtefoT«ior,prae26 posh" will drive bock foe 


Secretary of State for Educa- 
tion and Science, at foe Con- 
servative Party conference in 
1982. 

He tinkled his proposal with 
open enrolment, the scheme 
under which parents are able 
to switch their children to 
popular state schools, which 


be published by foe om iiza- 

SnWfaredte BadgeL^ The departure of the News 

Internationa] lorries was de- 
Terence Beckett, foe fayed for a couple of hours, 


CBI director gro end. sa id: “U W eventually all left and as 
fa vital that radustry takes jfar as is known reached their 


advantage rtf this tranendous | destinat ion, the company 
appartauity in export fsajd. 


spent in a new network of are given funds to expand by 


Football split 




Scotland will have a new 
national football league next 
season following a decision to 
break away from the Scottish 
l«awpe by nmc leading 'dubs.. 
It will consist of two or three 


sion of 10 dubs, with promp- 
tion of onc-up said one-down, 
has been agreed 

HaghTaylor, page 26 


up to rare extra class of entry 
each year. 

That plan was effectively 
sabotaged by official hostility 
within the Department m 
Education and Science, but it 
fa intended that the new 
proposals win be driven 
through fry a determined Sec- 
retary of State with foe foil 
backing of a manifesto man- 
date: 

It is thought, therefore, that 
Mr Christopher Pattern, Sr 
Keith’s current deputy and 
leading C on serv a t i ve “wet," 

Ctotfinaed «u page 2, col 4 




Mr Beckett: “Tranefl- 
doos opp ort u nity” 


The company however lost 
17 271,000 copies of the News of 
the Wortdzt its Glasgow plant 
because of mechanical trou- 
ble. It printed 927,000 copies. 

Mr Neil Kinnock, the La- 
bour Party leader, defended 
his decision to boycott News 
International papers in an 
article in the Jvaws of the 
World. 

He said it was "nonsense" 
to claim that it undermined 
his commitment to more open 
government. NI journalists 
would continue to see 
Labour’s press releases and 
attend public addresses by 
. Labour potitiaans. 

It was also "rubbish" to 
contraaed on page 2, col 2 




US TO HELP 
THE ELDERLY 
IN NEED 


i rT'^M ♦ i > •>; 


Merger talk 


Morgan Grenfell, the . mer- 
chant bank, fa in metier tails 
with Exco, the financial con- 
glomerate, which could lead to 
the creation of a fl isSitm 
group E>lM7 


Ifrom Christopher Walker 
Moscow^ 


Guns proposal 


New tactics m tte use of 
fireanns by the pobcc-footdd 
be ccm^kfenri, a confidential 


The 27fo <x L 9 ess of foe 
2 ^| Soviet CnieixwiiTtPra- 
tyh^hto igttMiww.m der as 

dats aod foe media -critirism 
a dfoera^y earomiribyMr 
Goetaich©?- 1 • 

Yesfratfay, os scores ; of 
high-levd representatives 
from gnfau rrmmndst nd 


“sefflessoess, perabteoce, a 
fearless rejection -«£ mwtil 
-Inertia, of cMpfaceBcyaad of 


to deliver the goods 


foue”. 

Uafo Mr Gorhadtor con- 


foemsefaesHndnot foearcooB- 
tiy* 

1b myday cMmsafous 
with Mflsoovttes, there is no 
mwfikfng their expectatfass 


whkh have been flooding into 
its offices foroughovt the 
coatry. 

Mr B. Akxeyev, a Mnsco- 
viteand veteran party member 


toBMnTevr, it mB not he knows 


have tees aroosed by the pre- who joined its rules two years 
confess p^ +idty and sweep- after foe 1917 rendtefeo. 


elite, saefa as special budgets, 
hospitals and dosed stefs 
which offer access to moeb- 
prized Western goods; mass 
bribe-taking and oils for more 


I Help is a large word in our vocabulary. 

More than ever we depend on voluntary giving to 

I house our growing family of elderly people in MHA 
residential Homes and Sheltered Housing. Our target 
is for 2000 old people to be incur care by 1990. This 

I means a busier-tharvever building programme to 
provide all the extra places. And that costs money. 

I To put it in a nutshell we need £1 every 15 seconds , 

-some £2 million a year. « / 

B Will you help please? ft Jg,- / 

I . It's urgent! JkHfaC 


frig attacks on currant and 
inefficient officials. As am 


repOTttotheHttoteSeamiyjstte 




Sovfetfoaya Rm 
congress w wfet 


nrties arrived 
offiriafdatiy 
mn said foe 
nfacaas foe 


:coiigrero debate wu foetoric.' retired Moscow 
and how many of foe radical , aid — ■ reflect! 
soggedmos wffi be ordered . frankness wifo a 
iotopracikebyfoelSBiffian erasro froatede 
« so party members. of Mr Gofoadw 


wrote “As an old Bdslwrik, I 
think we mast estoWish n 


driver party rate to kdd periodic 


ae new 

— w~ 


pages” But Miss Tstyraa 
SaraoSs, foe papers fa^wn- 


ero are treated at foe Mdcfoig tfal letters cranspeadenf; ro- 
of Mr Gorbachov- ft fa more jetted foe sojarestion by sarins 


One senior Soviet sum 
told The Tiroes font foe 


than rime that we sott to foe party was already carrying 
peasiags all those fanaacrais out an enormous task tsdud- 
whosR at foeir desks , emim tag foe demsiug ef Its own 


all areas «f Soviet fife, 

A fre«-puge efiterfal pre- 
dScted fota dnrtanfonnareiiiv 
— CTpe ttetf to~£e -foe' meat 
■aqwatmtf' W, here since 
1961 —foe. Soviet people 
would be caBed npm to show 


foe new Soviet Unfrm and 

everyone was otpeettog it to 

lead to wfrtwf M (fra^BSta 

foe way fire comriry was ran. 


ranks. boots 

rtaaiwtM * dk- 


fehmeitfs meted out to the ■ 
gnflty. | 

The pond was taken np 
again this week by I 
Sovietskaya Rossiya, wfakh I 
cmried a series rf angry pie- I 
congress letters from ordinary m 
dtaens demanding the right tc I 
know wind deefekms were I 
being, taken behind dosed _ 
doms at party and trade maon m 


f^MHA 


METHODIST HOMES IW THE AGED 


TO: MHA, Dept t FREEPOST. DndQfl> 

I enclose my donation 
Please send me money 


ton about MHA 


The new mood was reflected 


He sod foe people - were lost week by Pravda, wfafdt 
InckJag MrGorbacbov m hfa pobtished a fans article trader 


bid to rid the Soviet Union, of " foe h*edff«n* “deanstag” cov- 
foase who tad bees-'finog-for retag foe calls for party refora 


The letters — whose publica- 
tion in itself indicated some, 
official backing for their often 
radical fomnnA* _ tarioded 


The paper concluded: 
“Unfortanatfey ... we know 
more about foe news in any 
African cuaaty thoa we do 
abottf onr own home". 


paper 


[Address. 


EClY lDR Reg Ctonty No 218504 . 


ing perks etyoyed by foe party i 


Stage set, page B 


■ /OncwiT warn? no a 

■Epwm House. 25 CrtyW' m g^ tog ^ 









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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY24 1986 


Labour is 
steeled 
to expel 
Militant 


By Anthony Bovins 
Political Correspondent 

The Labour leadership is 
prefaring itself for outright 
confrontation with the Trots- 


Secret report 
calls for 
revised police 
gun tactics 


kyite Militant Tendency on 
Wednesday when the party's 


Wednesday when the party's 
national executive considers 
disciplinary action a gainst 
Liverpool hardliners. 

A report from a nine-strong , 


inquiry team is thought to 
identify more than ten key 


identify more than ten key 
figures in the Liverpool Mili- 
tant hierarchy, including Mr 
Derek Hatton, deputy leader 
of the council, Mr Tony 
Mulhearne, president of the 
district party, and Mr Terry 
Harrison, deputy president 
and one of the Tendency's 
founders. 

Mr Neil Kinnock, the La- 
bour leader, said on Face the 
Press yesterday: “Where we I 
can establish firm evidence for 1 
people being part of the Mili- 
tant Tendency, they will be 
pnt out of the party. That's 
what I’ve said for a long time; 
that's what we’ll stick to. 

“The inquiry has been very 
thorough, the consideration 
win be very thorough, and the 
action taken will be very 
thorough.” 


By Peter Enos, Home Affairs Corrrespondeat 
Consideration of new tac- review of police firearms pro- 
tics in the use of guns by the cedure. The intention should 
police is proposed by the be to tighten the rules for the 
Police Complaints Authority planning and control of armed 
in a confidential report to the operations. 

Home Secretary, Mr Douglas The authority expresses 
Hurd. concern that than is lnsuffi- 

It may be that the time has dent planning and reconnais- 
come to set up an inquiry into sauce, before many armed 
the advantages and disadvan- operations and not enough 


tages of setting up medal consideration given to alterna- 
firearms teams, possibly re- tive action before arms are 


firearms teams, possibly re- tive a< 
gicmaJ ones, to undertake issued, 
armed operations, the report Tbei 
says. guideli 



Gaming 
chief 
killed 
in fall 


There should be a review of 
guidelines for the authoriza- 


The authority is concerned lion of the use of firearms, 
about the present practice, with particular reference to 


which calls police officers with raids on family homes. 


firearms training from normal A checklist should be avail- 


duties to take part in armed able for senior officers on the 


operations. 


planning, command and con- 



That caused the authority to trol of armed operations. It 
consider whether it was fair should be issued as Home 


and reasonable to expea a Office guidance. 


policeman to be an ordinary The minimal trigger pres- 


He was doe to have been the 
guest of honour, as President 
of the Alpine Cub. at a 
climbers' dinner Uanberis on 
Saturday night. 

Ofafcnry, page 14 


beat officer at one moment sures on all handguns should 
and then within a few hours to be standardized and there 


The man identified as Captajn W illiam Sutton, whose ship allegedly had a cargo of military equipment, with police at Brad I 


Sightseers 

stranded 


be a member of a team in a should be a thorough look at 
potentially dangerous fire- the type of bullet now used. 


But the inquiry report is 
understood to contain a dis- 
senting section from Miss 
Margaret Beckett and Mrs 
Audrey Wise. Mr Tony Berm 
and Mr Eric H offer have given 
notice that they will oppose 
expulsions on Wednesday. 

The meeting will be lobbied 
by Militant supporters, a pro- 
test which may provide graph- 
ic evidence of the scale of 
Trotskyist infiltration into the 
party. 

Although Mr Kinnock be- 
lieves that a public show of 
strength is necessary to reas- 
sure traditional Labour voters 
that Liverpool is not an 
example of Labour in office, 
any expulsions win be met 
with a tough, concerted and 
protracted counterattack. 

Those charged with Mili- 
tant membership are expected 
to be asked to attend a further 
national executive meeting 
next month, to answer the 
charges, and if there are any 
expulsions there will be a final 
right of appeal to this year’s 
party conference. 


arms operation. Arguably, too 
much was befog asked of such 
an officer. 

But Mr Hurd is strongly 


bly, too Baflastic experts are worried 
of such that it tends to fragment on 
impact, causing extra damage, 
strongly Thou should be betterplan- 


French hold skipper with arms cargo 


By Hugh Clayton 


resisting the idea of setting up rung of operations, with infor- 
elite groups of police officers mation on the layout of 


ent firearms duty premises and whether, inno- 
arzned incidents, cent parties are present 
These are known as Swat AD authorized firearms offi- 


(Sperial Weapons and Tac- cers, the report adds, should 
tics) squads in the United be subject to regular fitness 


States. 


medical 


The authority has said that amount of initial and refresher 
there should be a fundamental training should be increased. 


Paper run Maxwell’s 


beats the 
pickets 


closure 

threat 


Continued from page I Mr Robert Maxwell, the 

_ t publisher, threatened to shut 


The British captain of a ship 
alleged to be involved in an 
attempt to overthrow an Afri- 
can government, thought to be 
Sierra Leone, was bents ques- 
tioned yesterday after his crew 
of 12 had been released. 

French and British authori- 
ties were trying to piece to- 
gether details of the voyage of 
foe Panama-registered coaster 
Silver Sea. Reports conflicted 
about the type of mflitaiy 
equipment on board and the 
purpose of the voyage. 

Sources in Paris andToa- 
don suggested a fink between 
the voyage of the Silver Sea 
and opponents of President 
Joseph Momoh, who came to 


power last November. 

The presklent said jm his 
inaugural address to die peo- 
ple of Sierra Leone three 
weeks ago that the ce unt r y 
suffered from high rates of 
inflation and foreign debt He 
promised a fight against “eco- 
nomic saboteurs” i n volved in 
smuggling, customs evasion 
and “'other bnsiness 
malpractices”. 

In spite of its economic 
poverty the country is rich m 
natural resources, especially 
diamonds of exceptionally fine 
quality. The most detailed 
statement abont the SO ver Sea 
came yesterday from M Jac- 
ques Coulomb, deputy public 
prosecutor in Brest, where the 
crew were first questioned. 


He said that the 12 released But « i«i M* » »g h the Cost re- 
man had British passports, ports over tie weapons on 
and did not seem to know board had been exa gg er ate d, it 


where their ship was going, would be wrong to naderesti- 
They had not been charged mate the sign i fic ance of the 


because even if they were affair. 

mercenaries that was not in The 156-foot Sflver Sea, 


itself an offence. 


bnSt oa the Clyde mere than 


M Coulomb rejected reports 25 years ago, set fro m 
that the ship had been S out hampton , bnt after three 


S ights ee r s admiring the 
snow on Dartmoor were 
stranded yesterday and forced, 
to abandon their cars after tip 
to seven indies of snow fen in 
the West Country. 

The motoring organizations 
reported “treacherous” condi- 
tions yesterday and the Lon- 
don Weather Centre said box 
night that it would stay cold 
with snow showers mafoty in 
the South-west. 

Forecast, page 32 


pammed with heavy weapons, days it was forced to make for 
bat mid th at the skipper, the French coast in sto rmy 


Base break-in 


named as Mr Wflfiam Sutton, weather M Monday. Coast- 
might face charges of import- gmrii nffi rw n who o ghtwi rtu» 


mg undeclared cargo and of vessel in a sensitive area near 
breaking laws abont concern- the Brest naval military com- 


Dg the handling of B fl itei j 

equipment. 


pkx reported lata that there 
were jeeps, uniforms and elec- 


On Saturday, he was flown triwrfr b oar d, 

to Pans from best far ques- Seven! daggers and small 


timing 


intelligence agents. 


French counter aims belonging to the crew 


have bees seized. 


Four women peace protest- 
ers broke into the US air force 
base at Laken heath. Suffolk, 
yesterday after cutting 
through its security fences. 
They, were detained by an 
American patrol who handed 
them over to Ministry of 
Defence police. 


mem would talk only to 
newspapers which supported 


Northern Ireland 


peis aid axe 1.050 jobs yester- 
day unless staff accepted up to 


the Labour Party. It was not y SB 

true that the Leader of Her ^Operant job cuts and work 

Majesty’s opposition had a fco 


constitutional duty to talk to 
all newspapers. Government 


He said he would then 
restart the Daily Record and 


IRA gunman shot in attack 


Sundav ^ * smaller 
ministers often excluded - . 


U1IU19IC1J UUI.il CAUUU6U I, f." - mmwmU 


wish to brief or "leak" lo. /g. °TT l , _ T°-7 

”1^ feet is that I would ft* 811 ? ^^ ^“sumvmr 


A masked gunman shot 
dead by troops in Londonder- 
ry on Saturday night, seconds 
after a gun attack on a joint 
Army and police post, was 
named by the Provisional IRA 


According to the security car suffered severe shock but 
tees, Bradley was shot dead only minor injuries. 


forces. Bradley was shot dead 
collecting weapons from a 
hideaway, foil that was disput- 
ed by the Provisional IRA 
who said he was not a member 


executive connwtttee to an- 
swer any so-called allegations. 


have the same 


tiat I would . / big 0 Deration yesterday as a member of one and no weapons were hidden 

attitude to- , of its active service units. there. 


“So far, all the inquiry has 
done is spend 60 hours talking 
little tattle'. There has been 
no suggestion of any evidence 
ai all against any single mem- 
ber of the party in UverpooL 
The party in Liverpool cer- 
tainly opposes any single ex- 
pulsion that might come out” 


of its active service units.. 
Tony Gough, aged 24, from 


there. 

An RUC constable 


the W 'orld's employer behaved 

- whatever their politics.” The L . 

Leader of the Opposition had . j* 

thp rintv m unhn w tho riohtc tetter to aU staff and published 


the ShantaHow area of thedty,' treated for eye injuries yester- 
was one of two men who fired day after his patrol car was 


only minor injuries. - ! 

Mr Tom King. Secretary of 
State for Northern Ireland, 
yesterday dismissed as “en- 
tirely speculation” reports at 
the weekend that another 
battalion of regular troops is 
about to be ftown io Ulster. 


Marcos is 
forced to 
lift siege 


Dudley writ 


Continued from page I 


Lord Dudley is daftmog 
libel damages over a book. 
Princess Michael of Kent, 
against Peter Line, the author, 
and publishers Robert Hale. 
InaHqfo Coast writ he asks 
that references to his femfiy be 
re move d iramcdiaidy from 
future editions. - 


second Marcos press confer- HOfilC frildll p 

-ence in 24 hours. . , . . , 

TT,r nnrrTnKnnr «v«w - A boom in foe demand for 

.■S35SW mssssstz 


about - thirty • high-velocity wrecked in a bomb explosion 
shots at the Fort George in Armagh. The bomb was 
security post.* ' detonated by command as the 

As the pair drove away in a ^pnoured Cortina entered a 


the duty to uphold the rights 
of aB citizens, he said. 

The News of the World 


in yesterday's Sunday Mail, 
Mr Maxwell said that in- 


IM ■ (K ww VI m ■ ■ a » 

replied in its leader column: n^ntar askmgtersdlmSan 
“We disagree aim inn rw-r redundancies and changes a 


Bnt he told a BBC inter- 
viewer that if more regulars 


Lieutenant-Colonel 
Marcetino Malahacan, com- 


51 Shires beag exp ortedra the 
oast four rom ifte The main 
buyers are the United States, 


in Armagh. The bomb was wcre posted to Northern Ire- 
detonated by command as the tt would be to combat. 


Branding officer of the 16th SSL cE5 
Infantry Battalion, was car 

tainN convincing enough, as Newteids and Australia. 


Concorde trip 
to Mexico 


“We disagree almost 100 per “ 

cent with Mr Kinnock but we " or k j p g P rac ° ce ^ he had afj 
uphold his right to put his teredalOpa rent pay nse and , 
views. That is what Press »«nanurtee of no compulsory 


freedom is all about, but the ( k sn “ ssa * s ‘ 

Opposition leader pays only “The inevitable conse- 

1 - 1 A * — g- */aL 2 . 


Concorde is to fry to Mexico 
for the first time, taking 100 
people for a three-night holi- 
day in Las Brisas, Acapulco. 

Ninety-nine passengers will 
pay £3,475, get tickets for the 
soccer World Cup final, and 
be accompanied by a celebrity 
host. 


lip service to it by his continu- quences of the rejection of this 
ing refusal to speak to our generous offer are that in order 


journalists, those of The Sun, to safeguard the survival of 
The Sunday Times and The this company we have no 




Times” alternative bnt to notify the 

Mr Arthur Brittenden, Department of Employment 
News International's Director that we will need to declare' 


of Corporate Affairs, said of redundant between 300 and 
Mr Kmnock's stance: “We 400 of our 1,050 workforce.” 

rfmlnrp anv Irinr) nf micnrchin U. n i l Opcyiai 


deplore any kind of censorship 
and that's what it is.” 


Alcohol 

problems 

are 

family 

problems. 


Mr Maxwefl, who also pub- 
lishes The Minor, Sunday 
Mirror, and Sunday People, 
recently negotiated job cots 
and changes in his London and 
Manchester operations after 
similar dosrne threats. 

The publisher said there 
woe obvious examples of un- 
necessary staffing costs 

He dted the newspapers' 
Edinbargb office which had 15 
journalists and cost abont 
£500,000 a year to nm. “This 
scandalous overmanning will 
no longer be allowed to 
continue.” 

The Sun had only six joer- 
nalists to serve the whole of 
Scotland, be said . 

Unless agreement was 
reached quickly the company's 
s tr uc t ure would be radically 
changed. Prod action of the 
newspapers would be trans- 
ferred to a new firm, the 
British Newspaper Printing 
Corporation (Scotland), and 
the publishing would be under- 
taken by the Daily Record and 
Sunday Mall (1986) limited. 

The printing side would 
operate at Anderston Quay as 
a contract operation printing 


car registered in the republic, Lainoiic estate a 

which had been hijacked earli- 3bout 2am . 
er in ShantalltWTaTAnny Two other policemen in the 

foot patrol emerged from a 
side road. 

The patrol commander is 
believed to have fired a single 
shot which killed the passen- 
ger. The car stopped outside a 
busy petrol filling station and 
the driver immediately sur- 
rendered to police at a vehicle 
checkpoint near by. He suf- 
fered superficial cuts and 
shock and yesterday was in 
custody being questioned by 
Special Branch detectives. 

Gough was found dead in 
the car, his fece still masked. A 
rifle was recovered. 

He was the second man lo 
be shot dead by the Army in 
five days: Francis Bradley, 
aged 20, was killed on Toes- Mr Tom King, who dis- 


armoured Cortina entered a terrorism and improve secun- 
Roman Catholic estate at ty rather than to counter 


“loyalist” protests against the 
Anglo-Irish agreement. 


be told of his apparently Offpr ficlr 
rather minor part in a plot to 

take over the palace. A £M,000 investigation into 


The young cofood said the why otters have died in Nor- 
pfot was hatched by a group of folk has been launched by 


to save the republic from a contaminated 
bloody confrontation. If we chemicals, 
have to die in the effort it DP 
would be better that way, JTv- OOH 
rather than our peo^e dying PoBce Con 


PC honoured 

Police Constable Brian 


g*. g? fe j S5? PoB “ Brim 

named after him in 


day night near Castledawson, missed troop rdoforcraieiit 


. “U m ne i V m y young officers “in our belief naturalists after two of the 

“U roviuc ^ that this is the only option left animals proved to have been 
npt on routine po gting s and ^ save the repifolic from a contaminated with form 
bttn sent bloody confrontation. If we chemicals. 

after Christmas to increase have to die in the effort it nn 1 j 

securoy at P<tiice stgjcms would be better that way, PC fiOHOIlTCd 
thought vulnerable to Prtm- MthM- our neonfe dvina ' » n ** , , _ . 

sional IRA mcmar attacks. P( * ce ConstaWe Brian 

MumumnmuiuuAiMbu. in the streets. Our intentioil Dobson, seed 4^ i«: m haw a 

Army strength in Northern only was to. capture the Presi- him in 

behind is 1030 uoops. Some dent and talk to him, force wStnash Warwickshire 
increase might be expected him to resign or send him into which h^hs* 
before the threatened loyalist exile andfovrte some people ^ 12 

strike next Monday as part of whom we fed are credible to V* 
the; continuing campaign the Filipino people to lead the Pfl V, Pllt rtlftirp 
against the Hillsborough pact country bade to democracy”. wixi viiUiLv 

But less than 1,000 people Mr Marcos went on tdevi- Five hundred aaff and fee- 
attended a planned mass rally son late last night visibly workers at the Smart 
in the Ulster Hall in Bel&st on angered by tbe day’s humilia- Crystal glass-making compa- 
Saturday night, organized fay lions and denounced Mr Stourbridge, Hereford 

the Orapge Order and intend- Emile's “grab for power”. an d Worcester, have taken a 
cd to mobilize loyalist cam- . “They are i nsistin g that I 10 per cent pay cut to avoid 


T_ t tt-' . saeei namea aner nun u 

hStoVM»«inrwi^hni.^m Whitnash » Warwickshire. 

wbich he has policed for 12 


exile and invite some people years. 
whom we fed are credible to V*. 


Co Londonderry. 


reports. 


in the Ulster Hall in fld&st on 
Saturday night, oiganoed by 
the Orapge Order and intend- 
ed to mobilize loyalist-cam- 
paigners against the 
agreement 


and Worcester, have taken a 
10 per cent pay cut to avoid 


Priority for school vouchers 


step down and a junta or redundancy, 
council will take over. And 

who is the drairman of the OUTIIS glTl Ul6S 


srSKassss s 


Conthraed from page 1 moos reply on February 13: in spite of the humiliating 

will not succeed to the top job We shall continue to seek retreat forced on Sir Keith m a 
when Sir Keith leaves the ways of improving the educa- Conservative backbench re- 
department, possibly later this bon system through the exten- volt in December 1984. 
year. sion of parental choice and The right-wina backlash 


™ irom oums at the 

FrcncI ?y ho^oi, Bristi, 


department, possibly later this 


Favourites for the post in- through tbe improvement of a gains t the 
u ' DL - a “ — standards in the system.” — :B — — 


volt in December 1984. 

The right-wing . backlash 


was to take place on Sunday yestoxiay aft^a foe atto 
morning. They want to coerce home in Exeter which lrtHwi 

fffiSSSHiSS 


dude Mr Rhoctes Boyson, 
Minister of State at tbe North- 


was illustrated 


's “wet” wing 
ist week when 


miiuaicr ui auiic »l me One informed party source the 92 Oub, a secretive croup, 

ero Ireland Office, Mr John said last night that the credit met to discuss its hostility to 
Moore, Financial Secretary to system would work as a kind the influence of the “wets” 
the Treasury, and Mr Peter of “Access card to education” particularly in the Govern^ 

Unrricnn Minietw nf Clato at and hi> nid ,)nt i4 ^..IJ L. . -rv 


Morrison. Minister of State at and he said that ft would be a ment Whips’ office. 


the Daily Record and- Sunday 
MaO and foe Irish edition of 


MaB and foe Irish edition of 
The Mirror. 

After two additional presses 
were installed the new compa- 
ny would be seeking work from 
other newspaper publishers. 


the Department of Trade and 
Industry, all on the right wing 
of the party. 

The Prime Minister's deter- 
mination to act on education 
was recently signalled in an 
unnoticed Commons reply 
when she said on February 4: 
“I deeply regret that there are 


political leap forward. 


Mr Tristan Garel-Jones, a 


Education as well as law senior whip and a long-stand- 
and order are seen as issues mg liberal target for the right. 


which will swing votes to the was picked out for particular 
Conservative Fifty, because criticism. _• 


)ple are living on the front ' Mr John Biffen, Leader of 
‘ of the teachers' dispute, foe Commons, said in an 
ing standards in the interview on the BBC tdevi- 
ools and the rising rate of sion This Week , Next Week 
ire programme yesterday:“Do 


not so many direct grant crime. 

schools as there were, and I It is also being said, in 


.. — you «ally suppose that the 

believe that we must further Whitehall as well as at West- British Government proceeds 
consider the question of mi ns t e r, that the idea of on tbe basis of Mr Garel-Jones 
education.” _ student loans could be revived recommending and securing 


that Enrile can take over.” Mr — 

Enrile has merely said he does 
not intend to stave in an 
Aquino Gove rnment 
• Hijack thwarted: Soldiers in 
the southern Philippines com- 
mandeered a Philippine Air- 
hncs plane yesterday in an 
attempt to join the rebel forces 
but were arrested immediately 
on arrival at Manila airport, g~^ , 

an airlihe source said <AP Vjf3DQlD2Ster 
reports). - * 

leads at new 
chess venue 

miles south-east of Manila By Hany GoiomMk 

General Rodrigo Gutang, the Chess Correspondent 

local Constabulary command- tha a™ v 

er. informed the pilot that his Young Makers 

troops were takinn ftwr _, 0ur ? am . en t. which has 


education.” 


She said in another Com- in advance of the next election die appointment of ministers 


troops were taking over the — — 

plane and demanded they te a valuable role in 

flown to Manila the source meetings between 

raid. ^ tefdreg grandmaster and 




i TlU* r4 

!Uf c 


A post mortem examina- 
tion is to be he» OB Sir 
Anthony Rawliwwt. tted 59, 
the chainnaa « v#Gmu% 
Board, who «» » a 

I,0fl0ft plongeonSoowfom. 
The nsountaiDccr and; for* 

nm topCivUSersant stiMJI 

on snow-covered Cnb Goca, 

one of tbe peaks oa foe 3460 
ft mooBtaio. He «o foe foe 

second person to dkro a IflQQ 

ft fey within a fcwd ays. . 

Sir Anthony of Contngham 
Road, north-west London, 
bad a disti nguished career as a 
Whitehall Civil Servant and 
before becomir® chsirroan of 
tbe Gamine Board was joint 
permanent secretary to the 
Deoarunent of Trade and . 


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*4 


ignored in 
breast cancer, 
professor says 


Funds ‘too 
low to aid 
mentally 
sick’ 


By Nicholas Timmins 
Joint finance, foe -system 


Breast cancer, which claims 
the lives of 14,000 British 
women every year, is statisti- 
cally Lmfced to stressed events 
tn life and the inttividuaTs 
a bility to cope with them, 
fording to Professor Cary 
Looper, head of organization- 
al psychology of the Universi- 


strcss at work, believes that 
women who are prone to 
stress can help themselves by 
finding ways of getting It 6m 
of their system. 


If yon cry, do not cry 
alone", he advises. "Do it 
when other people are around 
ty of Manchester Institute of 50 that someone wm me that 
Science and Technology. 5™ a*- upset and will listen to 
He accuses the medical ^ oa * ^ ^bat is difficult, seek 


profession of being "extreme- 
ly slow” at recogniziiig the 
impact of psycho-social fee- 
tors on health and well-being. 

“When a woman loses her 
husband her doctor gives her 
Vafiom. Maybe he should be 


other help: counselling will do 
you much more rood , than 
Valium.” 

The study of 2,163 women 
reporting for breast screraupg 


was conducted at the Univer- 
sity Hospital of.Sbuth Man- 
the - St Luke's 
Huddersfield, and- 


griring her some land of 

support mechanism instead, w .. . - - . 

such as Cf mn«ynfnpr" J*«5 UPA MedlCal m 

sor Cooper aysT^ London.. 


Together with his wife, Dr 
Rachel Cooper, and Mr Brian 
Faragher, head statistician at 
the University Hospital of 
South Manchester, Professor 
Cooper has just completed a 
four-year study of more than 
2,000 women being screened 
for breast cancer, the largest 
investigation of its kin d . 

It shows that women who 
are reluctant to show their 
emotions are more likely to 
develop ' breast «iiww than 
those better able to cope with 
stress, because the extra effort 
they put into coping lowers 
the effectiveness of the body’s 
immune system. 

As a result, adverse life 
events, such as widowhood, 
can accelerate if not trigger 
breast cancer. Professor Coo- 
per says. 

The study also shows that 
the women most likely to 
develop breast cancer are less 
competitive and aggressive 
than most, and-' mare with- 
drawn. When they cxy, they 
tend to cry alone. 

Professor Cooper, who 
presents Channel Four's How 


Birth control 
vaccine tested 


The first trial of a new buth 
control vaccine that could 
prevent pregnancy for be- 
tween one and two years has 
started in Australia (our Social 
Services Correspondent 
writes). 

Thirty women who have 
been sterilized have volun- 
teered to have the vaccine in a 
nine-month study to assess its 
safety and side effects. 

At prerent , the only other 
vaccine in widespread use 
lasts for three to six months 
and produces unpleasant side 
effects in some women. The 
new vaccine, which has been 
successfully tested on animals, 
Modes a hormone which is 
essential to allow the fertilized 
egg to implant in the womb. . 

The Worid Health Organi- 
zation says the vaccine could 
be available for general use by 
tiie mid-1990s, and officials 
chum its development could 
be as important as the intro- 


io Survive the 9 to 5 television duction of the contraceptive 
programme, which looks at pflL 


Research close to gene 
clue for cystic fibrosis 


Scientists seeking a cure fin* 
qrstic fibrosis are very dose to 
finding the faulty genes which 
cause tiie disease, a conference 
was told yesterday. ■ . 

Mrs Barbara Bentley, direc- 
tor of the Cystic Fibrosis 
Research Trust, told its bien- 
nial conference . in 
Scarborough:“We are now ex- 
citingly dose to tracing the 
genes responsible, and this 
wiU lead to us being able to 
treat them." 


dergo several hours of physio- 
therapy every day. 

Mrs Bentley said two mil- 
lion people were earners of 
cystic, fibrosis, and if they had 
children there was a on&in- 
four chance that they-would 
develop the disease. 

“The exciting discovery of 
the actual chromosome on 
which the faulty gene lies 


opens up the hope that in only 
a few years it will be possible 
to identify cystic fibrosis carri- 
ers and, much earlier, pie-; 
Mrs Bentley said: "Twenty" natal diagnosis will be’ 
years ago, when tire trust was available” Mrs Bentley said. . 


started, it was rare for anyone 
to survive into adulthood. 
Now it is commonplace.*' 

Victims of tire disease, 
which affects the lungs and 
digestive system, have to on- 


Delegates from the trust’s 
82 branches weretold a record 
£750,000 had been raised in 
the past year for research jnto 
the disease, which 
6,000 people. 


being used by the Government 
to help to fund the transfer of 
rare for schizophrenics and 
the mentally 31 9n| t handi- 
capped to the community, is 
proving inadequate for the 

task, a study by the National 

Association of Health Au- 
thorities has condoded. 

Instead, extra forms of 
bridging finance are needed if 
the community care policy is to 
be imptemenfed effect' 
the study, undertaken j< 
frith the Centre for Research 
n Social Policy at Looghbor- 
Mtgfc Univ er si ty, Leicester- 
shire, said. 

Mr Norman Fowler, Secre- 
tary of State for Social Ser- 
vices, is to disenss the issue of 
Migiffig finance wftfa the 
chairmen of the 14 regional 
health authorities next month. 

In an interview with The 
Tows last wed; Mr Fowler 
nBjw iro aM reconsider the 

insist that is necessary to 
make community care work. 

Planners claim it is neces- 
sary because health and local 
authorities are being required 
to develop the new co mm u n ity- 
based services at the same 
time as m a j n ta ini i ig the old 
JouE-stay mortal hospitals 
while they are beragnm down. 1 

Mr Gerald Wistow, of 
Loughborough University, 
who undertook tire joint fi- 
nance survey, said: “It is dear 
that joint finance has only a 
very Hnrited rale to play in 
easing patient tranfers from 
hospital to community care.” 

While about £20 mflBon a 
year had been available in the 
past two years through joint 
finance, It re presented an aver- 
age of only about £2004)00 a 
year for each local authority to 
fund new m mui mfr y care 
schemes. 

The study found that more 
local authorities woe willing 
to enter into oommkments to 
provide community care 
schemes in 3984 thin they had 
been in 198L This waste spite 
of the fact that their take-up of 
joint finance had folten steadi- 
ly from more than 90 per cent 
In the five years to 1981, to 
only 73 per cent in 1984-85. 

The report says there is. 
now, “general agreement that 
joint ptat.;ung (between health 
and local authorities and vti- 
mrtary groups) has achieved 
less over the last decade than 
had been hoped”. 

• The Banking Insnance and 
Finance Union (Bib) has 
hunched a survey on foe 
employment of disabled staff 
in banks, holding societies 
and Insurance companies. 

The union claims that few of 
the - industry's 750,000 
workforce are disabled, and 
where they are employed, as 
telephonists for example, ca- 
reer opportmities are Banted. 

“We want to hnprove tire 
amber and raw of finance 
industry jobs available to peo- 
ple who have disabilities," Ms 
Ann Rae, who chairs tiie 
union's di s ablem e nt advisory 
committee, said. 





Marisa Robles and bra daughter. Grama H 
Putney, south-west Lem ~ 
first London 


aged 15, rehearsing at bwn^ in 
iy, for a Festival Hall concert tonight It will be their 
performance together (Photograph: John Voos). 


Law suit 
threat to 
tobacco 
lobby 


By Onr Soda! Services 
Correspondent 


Forest, the tobacco industry 
financed pressure group which 
combats the anti-smoking 
message from government- 
funded bodies such as the 
Health Education Council, 
has been threatened with legal 
action by the World Health 
Organization. 

Forest has been claimi 
that the WHO has describ 
the evidence that non-smok- 
ers may be harmed by the 
smoke from other people's 
cigarettes as marginal or inad- 
equate. 

But the World Health Orga- 
nization has written a strongly 
worded letter to Forest accus- 
ing it of distortion, demanding 
a retraction, and stating:“We 
do not know on what you base 
your assertion that WHO has 
described the evidence of 
harm from passive smoking as 
‘marginal’ or ‘inadequate"'. 

WHO says its view is that 
"the available evidence leads 
to the conclusion that passive 
smoking gives rise to some 
risk ofcanoer”, adding that the 


organization did not panici- 
ference 


pate in a Geneva conference 
which Forest has referred to as 
the source for hs remarks. 


In a letter from the coordi- 
nator of its smoking and 
health programme, copied to 
WHO's legal counsel. Forest 
has been told to desist from 
repeating its "misleading 
statements”. If it fails to do so, 
the letter says, “WHO will 
have to envisage appropriate 
measures'*. 


Underground flooding 
swamps city centre 


Underground flooding is tours of the cave network 
deluging low lying areas of beneath the city have been 
Nottingham city centre after a cancelled 
build-up of water over the past A crisis meeting between 
six months. the council and the Severn 

Parts of the basement at Trent Water Authority is to be 
Marks and Spencer’s main held this week, 
store have been condoned off Council officials believe 
and WH Smith and Bools are that because there are no easy 
reporting similar problems. escape routes for the water, an 

Houses converted to offices elaborate underground system 
in the Castle Boulevard area will have to be constructed to 
have had flooded cellars and cope with the build-up. 


Board to cut water 
to 3,000 bad payers 


An glian Water, the largest 
of the 10 regional water au- 
thorities in England and 
Wales, is to disconnect sup- 
plies to 3,000 bad payers this 
week. 

The get-tough action comes 
as part of its “pay up or else” 
campaign after the authority’s 
accountants reported that h 
was owed £4 million. 

Anglian Water has 1.7 mil- 
lion customers between the 


Humber and the Thames and 
the mounting debts from bad 
payers has been causing severe 
financial problems. Warning 
notices were sent out to the 
60,000 customers owing mon- 
ey and most paid. 

Anglian Water said that 
after trying all the usual 
warning procedures it had 
instructed engineers to start 
disconnecting supplies this 
week. 


Blood key to deafness 


Blood tests conM be ased to 
to detect and care deaf- 
ness after the discovery by 
scientists that the thickness of 
blood may cause loss erf hear- 
fog* 

Two studies of patients at- 

bearing deaoillers showed that 
they were more likely to have 
particularly rigid red cells in 
their Mood than people with 
normal hearing. That could 
make it more, difficult for tire 
cells to pass through very 
narrow blood vessels to feed a 
vital part of the ear. 

Mr George Brownteg, of the 

Medial Research ComtoTs 


Institute of Hearing Research 
out-station at Glasgow Royal 
Infirmary, said further studies 
were under way. 


He smd tint about one 
person in eight saffians percep- 
tible loss of hearing and for 
many there was no knows 
cause. Older people were mote 
likely to saffer, but whether 
that was dae to ageing or an 
amimufatiou of the effects of 
fflness and hazards, such. as 
noise, for a huger period, ms 

nniwiaiiL 


Browning added: “It raises the 
exciting possibility of 
ways of diagnosing loss of 
hearteg at rae es 
and treating it by treating 
Mood disorder.” 

Professor Mark 
(Erector of the Institate of 
Hearing Research, Notting- 
ham, raid a national surrey, 
analysed by his colleague. Dr 
Adrian ‘Davis, had indicated 
that about sevea million peo- 
ple in Ragland and Wales 
suffered from a 25 decibel 


But it bad now been found 
that Med viscosity couH be 
an important factor. Mr 


could not hear a 
whisper, but would hear some- 
thing louder. 


Specialist 
shops hold 
their own 


A survey in foe London area 
Thames Television, report- 
is The Grocer, finds that in 
a four-week period, 57 per cent 
iff shoppers visited a specialist 
gr e e ng rocer, 51 per cent a 
butcher, and 47 per cent a 
baker. 

But only 12 per cent went to 
a fishmonger, and more than 
half of all fish bought was 
from general grocery stores. . 

Hie increasing power" of 
supermarket chains fat shown. 
During the survey period, 60 
per cent TOfted * 
store, more than a. third 
bought from Tesce, and a 
quarter went to a Co-op. - 


New technique to aid 
claims for asbestosis 


,. A simple test by doctors at physician at the hospital, said 
the London Chest Hospital is the technique involved pass- 
offering new hope to people ingatube down the throat into 
who air denied compensation the affected part of the longs 
after exposure to asbestos. which are then washed in a 
One in 10 peopfcdaiming salty solution, 
industrial disablement bene- The fluid is then socked out 
fits are fumed downat present and the ceils gxaminwt mair- 
becaose of doubts about ing it possible to “confirm 
whether they have asbestosis beyond donbt” whether asbes- 
or some other hnq* disease. tos is present and whether it 
The lest is helping doctors had caused asbestosis. 
to confirm asbestosis in cases “We do this test in cases 
"where- X-rays and otter meth- where there is real doubt as to 
ods of diagnosis have proved diagnosis. It helps os to man- 
inconclusive. It was recently age foe patient's treatment 
recognized by the Medical and, as a spin-off; the evidence 


Appeal. Tribunal in awarding may also be used to support 
disablement benefits. their compensation - claims” 

Dr .Cohn Rudd, consultant Dr Rudd said. 



y be jet lag cure 


A possible core for jet, lag 
has been discovered by scien- 
tists researching difficulties 
experienced by air crews m; 
obtaining proper sleep be- 
tween international flights. 

They recommend that crew 
members .deliberately keep 
themselves awake at. foe end 
of a long flight, especially 


tional Aeronautic and Space 
Administration (Nasa) Ames 
Research Centre, and. in- 
volved organizations includ- 
ing British Airways, the Civil 
Aviation Authority (CAA) 
anti scientists from foe RAF 
Institute of Aviation Medicine 
atFaraboriwgh, Rent. 

A total of - 56, volunteer 


most "volunteers— wired op to 
dectrodes— obtained sleep, 
there was dear evidence that 
crew members experienced 
better quality sleep after west- 
bound 


The research is continuing. 
A CAA spokesman said: “We 
don’t claim to have found a 

w _ cure for jet lag. This research 

^^fl teg eas^rards, to help to pilots and flight engineers, has been aimed at helping 
insure a long night's sleep took part--, in . a seines of pilots mid crew memb ers to 
la tyr instead or dozing for two experiments in steep labbrato- obtain a good, sleep between 
or three shorter periods. • ‘ lies in’ London. Tokyo, San flights, but obviously it is a tip 
The international research Francisco and fiankftnt. ' which could prove helpful to 
was co-ordinated by foe Na- / The C£A reports foal while 


ir 


Parents 
rule on 
television 


viewing 

By Patricia Clough 


As Parliament is being 
asked to approve television 
censorship to protect children, . 
a survey published today indi- 
cates that the viewing of nine 

out of ten children is in feet- 
controlled by their parents. 

Out of a sample of. more 
than 350 children questioned 
by Miss Dee Norfolk, an arts 
graduate who conducts pro-, 
teen opinion polls, only 12 per ■ 
cent said they were allowed to . 
watch anything they liked. - 
Eighty-eight per cent said they 
were not. 

The survey comes in the 
midst of the controversy over 
Mr Winston Churchiirs pri- 
vate member’s Bill, now before 
Parliament, which would 
make pornography and vio- 
lence in the theatre, films and ' 
television punishable. The 
Bill’s proponents argue, . 
among other things, font it is 
necessary to protect children 
who might be watching televi- 
sion programmes not suitable ; 
for them. 

The survey also showed Hint 
children’s favourite pro- 
grammes are not the ones ' 
designed fra than, but popular 
adult-oriented series. Top of 
the list came The A-Team (18 
per cent), followed by . 
EasiEaders (15 per cent). 
Minder (12 per amt), amir 
Dynasty (10 per cent). 

Top of the list of least 
favourite programmes was 
Wogan (22 per cent), followed 
by foe mind-stretching quiz 
games. Blockbusters (18 pear 
cent) and Mastermind (12 per 
cent). 

Not one of the children 
questioned mentioned Blue 
Peter, the long-running 
children's programme. 

Spokesmen for the BBC and 
the Independent Broadcasting 
Authority said last night that 
foe preferred programmes 
were regarded as family view- 
ing material 

The BBC emphasized that * 
although its own research has 
also found that children tend 
to prefer grown-up pro- 
grammes, the viewing figures 
of children's programmes are 
extremely high and the re- 
sponse is always 
“tremendous”. 

Bill changed, page 32 


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26 

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HOME NEWS/LAW 


THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


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Treasury faces 
opposition 
over ‘too small’ 
benefit rises 

By Nicholas Timmins, Social Services Correspondent 


Increases in social security 
benefits from July are expect- 
ed to be announced today with 
a rise of between 40p and 45p 
a week in the single old age 
pension and of between 65p 
and 70p for a couple. 

The increases come after the 
publication last week of fig- 
ures showing a rise in the retail 
price index of 1.1 per cent 
between last May— the base- 
line for the previous rise paid 
in November— and January’s 
inflation figure. 

The upraiing is to take effect 
this July because ministers are 
moving the annual upraiing 
date from the traditional No- 
vember increase to April as 
pan of the Government's 
social security reforms. This 
July's increase will be fol- 
lowed by another in April next 
year. 

Conventionally, increases 
are rounded to the nearest 5p 
which would give an increase 
of only 40p on the single 
person's pension of £38.30, 
and of 65p on a couple's 
pension of £61.30. although 
both figures almost reach the 


threshold where they would be 
rounded up by another 5p. 

Treasury ministers have 
been arguing, however, that 
the figures should be rounded 
down because last November 
benefits rose by 7 per cent at a 
time when inflation was run- 
ning at only 5 percent. 

With another increase due 
only eight months after the 
July rise, the Treasury be- 
lieves that the formula should 
be followed precisely. 

The small rises— at a time 
when inflation is running at 
5.5 per cent— are likely to 
provoke criticism from Oppo- 
sition MPs, 

Social security ministers are 
also feeing opposition from 
their own back benches over 
any attempt to freeze child 
benefit which is due to rise by 
only 5p from its present level 
of £7 a week. 

Seventeen Conservatives 
MPs have signed an early-day 
motion calling for it to be 
uprated in line with inflation 
after the decision last Novem- 
ber to cut its value in real 
terms by 35p. 


Remands by courts 
‘unfair lottery’ 

By Oar Home Affairs Correspondent 


Unfair and capricious dif- 
ferences between courts in the 
granting of bail are cited in a 
report published today by the 
Prison Reform Trust. 

Calling the system a lottery, 
the report says "that defendants 
in Dorset are 12 times more 
likely to be remanded in 
custody than their counter- 
parts in Bedfordshire. Yet the 
Bait Act 1971 was supposed to 
lead to greater consistency and 
a drastic reduction in remands 
in custody. 

Great differences exist even 
between neighbouring areas. 
Uxbridge magistrates remand 
in custody 19 per cent of those 
whose cases cannot go ahead 
immediately while at Harrow 


ihe figure is 4 per cent, the 
trust says. 

Magistrates in Bedford- 
shire. Hertfordshire, 
Merseyside, South Wales. Es- 
sex. Nottinghamshire. Cam- 
bridgeshire. Warwickshire 
and Lincolnshire all remain] 
less than one in ten in custody 
with no apparent ill-effect. 

But areas which remand 
particularly high numbers in 
custody include Dorset. 
Cheshire. Devon and Corn- 
wall Humberside. Norfolk. 
Sussex, and Leicestershire. 

The Bail Lottery (Tram the 
Prison Reform Trust, Nuffield 
Lodge. Regent's Park. London 
NWi 4RS; 50p>. 


Hunt to 
trace fake 
art deco 
ceramics 

By Geraldine Norman 
Sale Room Correspondent 

Phillips auctioneers have 
supplied the police with a kit 
for recognizing lake Clarice 
Cliff ceramics which have 
flooded the market over the 
post few weeks. 

The vases, plates and other 
wares, naively painted in 
bright colours, which made 
the artist popular in the 1930s 
have become worth hundreds 
and sometimes thousands of 
pounds since American collec- 
tors became interested a few 
years ago. 

Phillips's 18 salerooms 
around the country have been 
issued with a “fake 
recognition" kit It comprises 
colour photographs of three 
views of a false vase and the 
same pictures of a genuine 
item for comparison. Five sets 
of the kit have been passed to 
police for circulation to home 
county forces. 

It was the sudden appear- 
ance of large numbers of 
Clarice Cliff pots on the 
market which led experts to 
realize that a large-scale fraud 
was taking place. 

Three dealers in art deco 
pottery rumbled what was 
going on. Mr Michael 
Playford bought a hitherto 
unknown type of vase at an 
auction in December for £460. 
Shortly afterwards, he found 
that a second dealer had a 
si milar piece. They assumed 
both were good early exam- 
ples. It was when the second 
dealer was offered an identical 
vase to the first that their 
suspicions were aroused. 

A third dealer. Miss Bever- 
ley Adams, saw some pieces at 
Phillips which made her suspi- 
cious. She visited Christies, in 
South Kensington, and found 
more. The dealers contacted 
the auction rooms and the 
Department of Fair Trading. 

Miss Adams said: "To see 
seven fakes in one day makes 
me shudder to think how 
much there is still to come up. 
The marks are absolutely spot- 
on and could fool a lot of 
collectors.” 

According to Mr Playford, 
the inside of the fake vases 
have a coffee-coloured shad- 
ing rather than the normal 
honey-coloured glaze. 


When police make things worse 

By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


A judge has issued a warn- 
ing about the dangers that can 
follow the intervention of 
over-assertive police officers 
in public house brawls and 
similar incidents. 

Writing in the current issue 
of SASPO News, the magazine 
of the National Association of 
Senior Probation Officers. 
Judge Pickles writes that the 


common man has come into 
his inheritance and is asserting 
himself. 

He adds: “Let those who 
stand in his way beware. This 
new assertiveness leads to 
violence: a sudden confronta- 
tion between two or more 
people, in a pub or dub, over 
something silly." Drink may 
play a part. 


The modern tendency for a 
man who feels thwarted was 
for him not to think twice and 
back down but rather to lash 
OUL 

“When the police come, 
things may get worse”, the 
judge writes. “In my experi- 
ence. most officers are tactful 
and pacifying. But some assert, 
themselves too much" 




■■ '■*» ■ ) e • ft- r*. \ ^ 




Miss Lynn Hatton watching Mr Alan Cot-bridge working on a Queen Street Mill loom. 

Mill town, 
has room 
for jobs 

By Charles Kaevitt 
Architecture Correspondent 

Burnley In Lancashire was 
mice a booming mannfartnriiig 
town, the world’s largest ex- 
porter of cotton goods. The 
wealth it created supported six 
theatres Hd 16 and 

during the Second World War 
it hosted visits from both the 
Old Vic and Sadler's Weils. 

But, as with many of its 
neighbouring towns, it fell 
prey to the 27 per cent drop in 
manufacturing employment in 
Britain between 1960 and 
1978. The hundreds of cotton 
mills which dosed have found 
new uses for other types of 
mdnstry, warehousing and 
mafl order, and small industri- 
al and workspace units. 

As Dr Nicholas Falk of 
Urban and Economic Develop- 
ment told the Royal Society of 
Arts in 1984: “The real prob- 
lem is not that of making the 
physical conversion to new 
uses and rides, but of making 
the mental changes needed to 
manage decline in ways that 
are acceptable to all con- 
cerned. 

“This is largely doe to the 
inertia and conservatism of the 
institutions that control foe 
bnUt of the resources, and their 
unwillingness to recognize the 
significance of foe post-indus- 
trial age we are entering." 

Two short-listed entries for 
The TimcsfBJJiX Community 
Enterprise Scheme, visited by 
assessors last week, demon- 
strate the part that partner- 





The Burnley Mechanics' Institute, refurbished to lure jobs. 


tary or ganizati on, in partner- 
ship vnth Burnley Borough 
Council, using funds from a 
number of different sources. 

The aim is to create 100 jobs 
through its new lease of life 
and a working museum, small 
workshop units, and local 
tourist attraction point Work 
started in 1984 and foe work- 
ships between voluntary 
organizations and local coun- 
cils, with government and 
private sector assistance, can 
lead to foe regeneration of 
such places. 

Queen Street Mill, Harie 
Sykes, is foe Last remaining 
steam-powered cotton weaving 
mill m the country. It has 
recently been refurbished as 
part of an ambitions industrial 
heritage scheme by Pennine 
Heritage, a charitable voitm- 


shops and . visitor iarilltres 
should be completed soon. 
About 250 Lancashire looms 
wifi be situated in foe wearing 
shed, and a re-creation of the 
traditional “union" shirt is 
already in production. 

Another project supported 
by foe council is foe £1.9 
milli on restoration of foe 
grade n-star listed Burnley 
Mechanics* Institute budding 
as an arts and entertainment 
centre, with special facilities 
for foe disabled. 

Professional facilities win 
be available to a wide range Of 
local cultural and dramatic 
societies, as well as advice. A 
programme of events and ac- 
tivities is being developed by, 
for, and with young people. 
Initially It will be open for 100 
hours, seven days a week. 


Vickers sale 


Sealed bids herald 
a new tomorrow 


In the first of two articles. Rodney Cowton, Defence 
Correspondent, sets the scene for the submission 
tomorrow of bids to acquire Britain's only nuclear sub- 
marine-building company. 


The days of foe traditional; 
majestic, launching of ships 
are almost over at foe Vickers 
shipyard at Barrow-in-Fur- 
ness, Cumbria. 

When a £230 million invest- 
ment programme has been 
completed ships and sjbnra- 
riztes will enter foe water, or be 

raised out of it, with ? 

minimum of splash or wave 
by 108 winches, each capable 
of lifting 225 tonnes and 
together able to handle vessels 
ofup to about 24,000 tonnes, 
b is claimed that it will be foe 
most powerful shiphfting sys- 
tem in the world. 

That is one of many changes 
that are occurring at Vickers 


a company which includes not 
only the Barrow shipyard but 
also Cammeli Laird at Birken- 
head on Merseyside. 

The most important change 
is planned to occur at the end 
of next month when the 
company win cease to be part 
of foe nationalized British 
Shipbuilders and be taken into 
private ownership. 

An important step in foal 
process will be taken tomor- 
row when sealed bids by 
would-be owners of the com- 
pany will be submitted . to 
Lazaxd Brothers, the mer- 
chant bank acting for British 
Shipbuilders. There are ex- 
pected to be only two bids, one 
from Trafalgar House and the 
other from a Vidtm manage- 
ment consortium. 

The two prospective bid- 
ders have adopted very differ- 
ent strategies. Trafalgar House 
has remained quiet about its 
intentions, to the extent of 
saying that h wfil not deride 
whether to bid until late today. 

The management-fed con- 
sortium, on the other hand, is 
publicly seeking to encourage, 
employees and other local 
residents to take a stake in the 
company if foe consortium's 
bid is successful 

The yards at Barrow and 
Birkenhead hold or have in 
prospect foe orders for ail the 
submarines, nuclear and non- 
nuclear, that are going to be 
buih between now and foe end 
of the decade for foe Royal 
Navy. 

However, although the 
company's order bode is. 
worth about £3,000 million, if 
present government policy is 
maintained the company’s ac- 
tivities over the next 10 years 
will be dominated by one 
project* the construction at a 
cost of about £400 million 
each of four 16,000-ton subma- 
rines to carry the new strategic 
nudear deterrent Trident 

There has been some con- 


cern in foe Mitti«ry of De- 
fence about the risks of placing 
a company so central to 
Britain's defence activities in 
private hands. - 

The consortium has sought 
to meet those concerns by 
proposing that foe Govern- 
ment should have a so-cailed 
“golden share” which for rou- 
tine purposes would not cany 
any voting rights. Inn which 
would give the Government a 
veto m certain rircumsunces. 

The consortium intends 
that there should be no 
shareholding of more than 15 
per cent, and the 
Government's veto could be 
applied to prevent that hap- 
pening. 

The consortium hopes that 
employees and the local com- 
munity will take op at least 20 
per cent of the shares, with a 
handful of financial institu- 
tions taking the rest' 

Employees who subscribe 
for 500 shares are being 
offered an extra ISO free, and 
those who take up 200 will 
receive an extra 50. 

Suggestions that foe take-up 
of shares by employees and 
foe local community could fell 
far short. of foe consortium's 
hopes are denied by Mr 
Richard Fortin, a director of 
Lloyds Merchant Bank, advis- 
ing the consortium. 

Negotiations on foe con- 
tract for the first of foe Trident 
submarines are still continu- 
ing. Vickers recognizes that ~ 
the project is vulnerable to 
caxKtellation if the Tories fell 
to win the next general elec- 
tion and foe company, there- 
fore, has been pressing for 
tight provisions for compensa- 
tion in foe event of a cancella- 
tion. 

The q>mpany wants to be 
fully covered for payment for 
.wort done up to the time of a 
cancellation, compensation 
for loss of profits, and provi- 
sion for what could be a 
prolonged transitional period 
while alternative work was 
being sought. 

The Labour Party is com- 
mitted to provide alternative 
orders giving an equivalent 
number of man-hours of work * 
if it is returned to power and ' ‘ 
cancels Trident 
. Thai offer may be less 
attraoqre than it looks for it 
would almost certainly in- 
volve the ordering of nuclear- 
powered . hunter-killer 
submarines and much of the 
work would probably consti- 
tute merely foe bringing for- 
ward of work that would have 
gone to Vickers anyway. 

Tomorrow: Work on Tri- 
deal begins. 


f/M 

m; 




PROPERTY 

l^ll CENTRE 


01-9356 



Visit property in 12 towns 
across the country from the comfort 

of your ’phone. 


The problem about re-locating or expand- 
ing your business is having to sift through long 
lists of candidate sites and properties. 

Itfe the same problem if you're looking for 
investment or development opportunities. 

The new CNT Property Centre near 
Londorfe Piccadilly simplifies the whole process 
by offering information on twelve New Towns 
in one location. We match your needs to our 
resources, resulting in a short-list that meets 
your brief exactly. 

A single phone call is all it takes to start the 
ball rolling Our choice of industrial and com- 
mercial space and development land in prime 


positions is second to none. Much of the pro- 
perty we have on offer is located within inter- 
mediate and development areas or enterprise 
zones which open the door to a wide range of 
financial incentives. 

Our advice is absolutely free so use the 
benefit of our local knowledge and experience. 

Call James Graftorfs office on 01-935 6100 . 
After all, why waste valuable time 'phoning 
around when one call is all it takes? 

The Commission for the New Tbwns, 

58 SL Jamesfe Street London SWIA ILD. 

Telex 262334. Facsimile: 01-491 0412. 


IS^^o^-Ceniiai Lancashire -Carby-Crawley--Hariaw-H3C5eld- Heme! Hwpstead-Nmt^^ 

Stevenage -Welwyn Garden City. 


Law Report February 24 1968 


No liability for trespassers 9 damages 


King v Liverpool City Council 
Before Lord Justice Purchaa, 
Lord Justice Nicbolls and Mr 
Justice Caulfield 
[Judgment given February 18] 

An occupier of vacant 
premises did not owe a duty of 
care to residents of other 
premises to take steps io prevent 
trespa ss ers from entering the 
vacant premises and damaging 
water pipes therein, and be 
therefore would not be liable in 
negligence to a resident of 
premises which had been 
flooded as a result of water 
escaping from such damaged 
pipes. 

The Court of Appeal so held, 
dismissing an appeal by the 
plaintiff Mrs Mary King, 
against the dismissal by the 
Liverpool County Court (Judge 
Sachs) on January 8, 1 985 of her 
claim for damages in nuisance 
and negligence against the 
defendant, Liverpool City 
Council, which owned the flat in 
which the plaintiff had lived and 
the flat immediately above it, in 
respect of flooding in the flat 
occupied by the plaintiff caused 
by water escaping from pipes in 
the vacant flat which had ■ 
been damaged by vandals. 

Mr David Marshal! Evans, 
QC and Mr Graham Wood for 
the plaintiff; Mr John Kay. QC 
and Mr William Braithwaile For 
the defendant. 


LORD JUSTICE PURCHAS 
said that the plaintiff bad in- 
formed the defendant that the 
upstairs flat was vacant and bad 
asked for it to be secured against 
■ trespassers. 

The trial judge had found that 
that had not been done, or if it 
had it had not prevented van- 
dals entering foe vacant flat on 
three occasions and damaging 
foe rising main, that rt would 
-not Ik vc been possible for foe 
rising main to have been dis- 
connected without affecting foe 
water supply to other flats, and 
that it would not have been 
possible for the defendant to 
take any effective steps which 
would have prevented the 
vandalism. 

The plaintiff had conceded 
that, on foe facts of this case, the 
nuisance claim could only suc- 
ceed if she could establish that 
foe defendant bad been neg- 
ligent, but had argued that foe 
judge had been wrong to dismiss 
the negligence claim on the basis 
that be was bound to do so by 
P.Peri (Exporters) Ltd v Camden 
London Borough Council 
([1984] QB 342), since that case 
was to be distinguished on the 
basis that the there 

[burglars gaining access to 
plaintiff's premises through un- 
secured vacant premises] had 
been held to be not reasonably 


forseeable. whereas, on the 
judge's findings, it was plainly 
foreseeable hoc that vandals 
would break in and cause this 
kind of damage if foe Sat were 
not secured. 

In essence foe plaintiffs 
contention was that the circum- 
stances of the flat being left 
vacant caused the defendant to 
owe a duty to the occupiers of 
neighbouring premisesto take 
reasonable care to prevent foe 
potential hazard in the flat, 
constituted by the pipes and foe 
water system, from 
materialising in a reasonably 
foerseeabJe way. 

The court had been referred to 
a number of cases where a 
defendant bad been held liable 
for foe acts of third parties, 
including Dorset Yatch Co Ltd v 
Home Office ([1970] AC 1004). 
Harris v Birkenhead Corpora- 
tion ([1976] 1 WLR 279.288), 
Warav Cannock Chase District 
Council ([1985] 3 All ER 537), 
Ames v Liverpool Corporation 
([1949] 2 All ER 175), Newby v 
General Lighterage Co Ltd mo 
(t 1955 1 l Lloyd's Rep 273) and 
Haynes v Harwood d Son 
([1 935] 1 KB 146). from which it 
was dear that it was necessary to 
assess the scope of foe duty of 
care in each case by reference to 
foe circumstances in which H 
arose. 


His Lordship considered in 
detail foe judgments in Perl's 
case and that of Lord Justice 
Robert Goff in Paterson 
Zochonis Ltd v Merfarken 
Packaging Ltd ([1983] FSR 273. 

Applying the principles there 
enunciated to the facts found by 
the judge, foe judge’s finding 
that there was no effective step 
which foe defendant could have 
taken which would have de- 
feated foe vandals was deter- 
minative of the appeal 

The defendant's duty of care 
10 the plaintiff in the circum- 
stances of this case was limited, 
and the judge had been right to 
hold that it owed no such duty 
to prevent the acts of vandalism 
which had caused the 
defendant's damage. 

LORD JUSTICE 

NfCHOLLS, concurring, said 
that he could see no distinction 
in principle between this case 
and PcrL There was no greater 
liability on an occupier because 
vandals had entered and caused 
damage by releasing water than 
if they had lit a fire, or had taken 
lead off the roof, permitting foe 
entry of rain water. . 

Mr Justice Caulfield agreed. 

Solicitors: Mr Charles R. 
Frais. Liverpool; Mr W.L Mur- 
ray, Liverpool 


Invalid can never claim aid from ex-wife 


Seaton v Seaton 
Before Lord Justice Dillon and 
Sir Roualeyn Cumrmng-Bruce 
[Judgment given February IS] 

A former wife with secure 
professional employment was 
not to be ordered to make any 
financial provision under foe 
amended section 25 of the 
Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 
for her unemployable husband, 
a severe and permanent invalid. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
in dismissing an appeal by Mr 
Terence Seaton from foe refusal 
of Judge Best at Yeovil County 
Court to accede to his applica- 
tion in ancillary proceedings 
that his wife. Mrs Jacquelyn 
Seaton, make periodical pay- 
ments to him. 

The court further went on to 
uphold the judge's decision to 
apply foe “dean-break” pro- 
visions introduced by the Matri- 
monial and Family Proceedings 
Act 1984 ordering that foe 
husband never be entitled to 
make any further application for 
financial assistance against his 
former wife. 

Mr Richard Tyson for foe 
husband: Mr Philip Gillibrand 
for the wife. 

SIR ROUALEYN CUM- 
MJNG-BRUCE said that the 
panics married in 1969. The 


husband was now 42 and the 
wife 36. 

In 1979 the husband lost his 
job as a result of criminal 
proceedings being taken against 
him. In 1983 he suffered a heart 
attack that had probably been 
contributed to by his propensity 
for alcohol. 

The wife who had been 
bearing the financial burdens of 
their lives together, then left 
him. Thereafter she had lived 
with foe co-respondent in a 
house that she had acquired 
with a 100 per cent mortgage. 

In 1984, following decree ab- 
solute. the husband suffered a 
major stroke which left him 
severely incapacitated. He could 
barely speak, had limited pow- 
ers of concentration and his 
comprehension was restricted. 
Although incapable of looking 
after himself or earning his 
living, he had enough intelli- 
gence to watch television and to 
go out with friends. 

He now lived with and was 
cared for by his parents and was 
in receipt of a weekly disability 
pension of £43. There was no 
prospect of his recovery. His 
future care lay either with his 
parents or the stale. 

For the husband it was said 
that foe judge by refusing a 


periodical payments order went 
wrong in failing to take account 
of his financial needs, bearing in 
mind he had no earning capac- 
ity. 

Further, it was said foal a 
clean-break order was only 
appropriate in cases where an 
applicant had either capital or 
an earning capacity. The hus- 
band bad neither, and as his 
former wife had an earning 
capacity and job security the 
judge was wrong to exercise the 
power given to him by section 
25A(3) of the 1973 Aci (in- 
troduced by section 3 of foe 1984 
Act) and to order a clean break. 

Additionally Mr Tyson asked 
foe coun to give general guid- 
ance to the legal profession by 
formulating a test as to the 
applicability of the clean-break 
provisions in section 25A(3). 
The facts of the present case 
were very unusual and foe 
invitation to formulate such a 
test, was refused. 

So far as foe husband's 
application for periodical pay- 
ments was concerned, it was the 
duty of foe court to lave regard 
to all foe matters set out in the 
■new section 25 and in particular 
those m subsection ( 2 ). 

The judge had found it diffi- 
cult to envisage any assistance 
from foe wife that would have 




any material effect on enhanci 
the life of the husband becau 
his limited opportunities I 
pleasure were reasonably s. 
isfied. given the dramatic qit 
ny ol his disability. 

That had led foe judge to ho 
that it would not be jusi 
impose on ihe-wjfca continui 
obligation to contribute to t 
needs. Similar consideraiio 
led foe judge to the view th 
there was no foreseeable situ 
non which w ould make it just 
impose on her an obligation 
give such financial support. 

The judge was right m holdi 
that it would be unjust to subjt 
the wife to supporting t 
husband out of her incon 
which, after paying h 
outgoings, enabled her to do i 
more than lead a reasonable li 
as a professional teacher. - 

Further, on foe special fat 
and as a matter of justice, i 
continuing obligation should I 
imposed on her. The judge h; 
clearly been correct to disentii 
ihe husband under sectic 
-5A(3l from making a forth 
application. ' 

Lord Justice Dillon ddivert 
a concurring judgment. 

Solicitors; Watts. Moore 
Bradford, Yeovil; Bait. Sandc 
« k Bennett. Yeovil. 







'lick* 




e d bid s . 

i*h * 11 


THE TIMES MONDAY 


LY24J9J 


■RSEAi 


% 


f -v7> 

‘ .1 


aama; 


rael forced to end its 
search in Lebanon 
Dr kidnapped troops 


Israel has ended its search 
for two kidnapped soldiers in 
swith Lebanon and is instead 
relyiQK on political pressure 
an d intelligence to secure their 
release. 

After a pessi misti c briefing 
on the chances of finding the 
nu&ang soldiers, Mr Yitzhak 
Rabm, the Defence Minist er, 
decided oh Saturday after- 

nnnn In «msl «tu j 


From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 

diers used sledge hammers to 
smash open lo«s and ransack 
cupboards, the Amal Shta 
militia began mobtlxzing men 
prepared to carry out suicide: 
raids to force the invaders to 
leave. j . . 

Israeli intdb&oce also dis- 
covered that hundreds of gun- 
men from the HezboQah 
fundamentalist group, which 


piles were found because 
yesterday’s rockets were fired 
from somewhere south of 
Tyre and drew ah a ns werin g 
barrage from Israel and the 
South Lebanon Army, which 
it backed. 

CX the thousands interrogat- 
ed during the search, several 
dozen have been detained for 
further questioning about 



, 



Tehran mourns its 
martyrs with 
cries for revenge 




■ X. -X 

v *^tJW 


From Robert Fisk, Tehran 


-'M?' 


- v *'. ' m i wt ■ ■■ 
f - -;f . 


the search area But deqnte 
combing the countryside and 
sconring every budding it 
found no trace. 

Moreover, Israeli methods 
of rounding np thousands of 
villagers and interrogating 
them for hours was seen to be ‘ 
causing deep and dangerous 
resentment. While Israeli sol- 


conceraed for the 
soldier. ‘ 

If it found no trace of the 
kidnappers, the search dk) 
discover huge quantities of 
arms , amm u n ition and rock- 
ets, winch were more than 
likely to have been stodqnled 
for future use in raids into 
Israel But not' all the stock- 


Tempers high in Alexandra ; ■ ■ 


Funeral threatens 
more violence 

- From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 

The threat of renewed vio- A black policeman, identi-' 
lence hangs over Alexandra as fied as Constable M.J. 
the black ghetto in northern Lehutso,:was found dead on 
Johannesburg plans . a mass Saturday in Sbshanguve, near 
funeral for at feast 23 people Pretoria. Police said he had 
killed in riots and dashes with been stoned and beaten to 
police in the past week. death. * 

Passions run high on such Tbe angry, mood in Alexan- 
occasionsandtheyfrcquently dra was evident on Friday 
end in violence, bloody dash- ’ wfaen Bishop Desmond Tutu 
es with police and more was booed and heckled by a 


funerals. 


crowd of-about 40,000 as he 


Meanwhile, an explosion in told them of the ta lks he and 


a telephone booth 


destroyed a Pretoria post 


i yesterday 
ia post of- 


other churchmen had had the 
previous day with Mr Adiiaan 


free and badly- damaged a Ylok, the Deputy Minister of 
neighbouring- dwwwt shop Defence and Law and Order, 
and greengrocery. Police said “ Cape Town. _ 
no one was injured In what • A moo of 500 blacks yester- 
they believed was thework of day lefta trail of destruction in 
insurgents of the outlawed the Transvaal - township of 
African National Congress. Ndsprmt, 120 : miles east 1 of 
Senior police officials are Pretoria, 
increa sin gly concecoed by the Thfc eastern-- -Trans vaal 
growing number of f » r p a rnne province has until now been 
and explosives finding their I>arely touched by the unrest, 
way into black townships, fudkd by grie vances _oyer 
Until recently, the use of apartheid race laws, m which 
landmines by the ANC was more . lhaD 1J0O people have 
confined to border areas bnt a died in the past two years, 
guerrilla lolled near East Lon- Three members of the 
don last month had five Commonwealth’s “eminent 
landmines in his possession persons” mission, set up to 


and last week one blew the- promote dialogue between 
rear wheel off a police South African blacks and 
armoured vehicle patrolling whites, were, questioned by 
the outskirts of the Mamdodi police on Friday when they 
township near Pretoria. tried to enter Alexandra. 

Police sources say security- 'Mr Malc ol m Fraser, former 
forceTarTnot oidy feeing Australian Prime Minister, 
stones and petrol bombs, fesb- General; Olusegun Otmanjo, 
toned from bottles and old former Nigerian head of state, 
rags, but are now comma Dame Nrta Barrow, prcsi- 
under gunfire wben they enter dent of the World Council of 
strife-torn townships. They Churdtes, were taken to a 
believe many of the firearms PoGoe station and asked if 
are stolen from private homes -ttey bad permits to enter the 
or seized from murdered po- townships. 


licemen. 

Fraser trip 
to whites 
only beach 

J ohannesb urg — Two' mem- 
bers of the Commonwealth 
“Eminent Pers o ns Group”, 
approaching the end ®f a 
week-long and hitherto low- 
profile visit to South Africa to 
monitor the pace of reform, 
went for a stroll on the beach 
in Ptat Elizabeth at the week- 
end They took photographs of 
the “whites only” signs as 
heavily-armed troops and riot 
police looked on (Michael 
Hornsby writes). 

Asked to comment on what 
they had seen, the former 
Australian Prime Minister, 
Mr Makoim Fraser: and the 
former Nigerian Head of 
State, General Olnsegmi 
Ohasanjo, held their peace. 
MFFraser waved his pqie and , 
General Ofansaq{o Jnstrariled. i 

King’s Beach, die stretch of 
sandraey toured, bur been hi 
the news recently becanse of a 
precedent-setting offer by the 

local snbsfcBary of the US 
General Motors company to 
support “legally and 
financially” any df itS-30^00 
Mask employees presented. 


Spectrum, page 10 

Seoul ends 
arrest of 
dissident 

Seoul (AFP) — The leading 
dissident, Mr Kim Young 
Sam, has been freed from, 
house arrest,- but another 
prominent opposition figure, 
Mr Kim DaeJnng, was still 
confined to his home, oppoa- . 
tion sources said. 

Mr Kim’s aides said that 
200 police had left their 
positions around his house. 

Police also lifted ..their 
blockade of the opposition 
New Korea Democratic Party 
headquarters, where a meeting 
is due to take place today to 
discuss stepping op the 
NKDPV campaign for direct 
presidential elections. . 

Drugs charge 

Middlebuiy, Vermont 
(AFP) — Mr John Zaccara, 
aged 22, the student, son of 
Mrs Gerakline Fenuro, Dem- 
ocratic vice-presidential can- 
didate in .1984, has been 
charged with drug trafficking 
after being -caught- selling co- 
caine: - • 

Dog saved 


It is the first tfcre a foreign 
firm has nne beyond verbal 
condemnation of apart hrid 
and actively encouraged dvfl 

disobedience by its employees. 

The issue of whether to open- 
Port Elizabeth’s beaches to afl 
races has been fiercely debat- 
ed in the city counrfL 

So tor file' views of the 
conservative (action have pre- 
vailed. A recent dedaou of the 
cosadTs ceanmnuty services 
committee, empowering nut- 
ffjejp al ffWMafa tO J»**Wadc»' 
removed from “wWc" bcach- 


Colnmbus, Ohio (UPI) — A 
mongrel deg called Oden, 
which ruined its '-kidneys by 
drinking anti-freeze, is home 
again with its owner, Martha 
Johnson, after receiving a inew 
kidney from a Irttennate in an 
experimental operation which 

cost$12,p00(£8^00X 

Fifteen drown 

Delhi (Reuter);— .-Twelve 
schoolgirls and three leaders 
drowned when a boat capsized 
during a school pienkr on the 
Meshva. River hear Shamlaji 
in western Indra, toe Press 
Trust ofIndia 7 repcfftsd. 



Israeli snhfiecs loading weapons and equipment yesterday as they prepared to break camp in 
southern Lebanon after calling off the search for their two mknng colleagues. 

UN draft blames Iraq for war 


From Zoriana Pysariwsky, New York 


doubt whether all win remain 
qmet on the northern front. By 
maintaining its buffer zo ne, 
Israel has kept open the border 
to its troops and the search 
operation has shown the local 
population that no Israeli 
government, whatever its po- 
litical leadership, win hesitate 
to use the zone as its own 
backyard 


The UN Security Council, 
alarmed by the success of 
Iran’s offensive against Iraq, 
has drafted a resolution which* 
in effect Monies Iraq for the 
start of the Golf war, and 
begins to meet Iran’s most 
emotive and central demand 
for ending the conflict. 

The draft, spearheaded by 
Britain, Denmark and Austra- 
lia, and refined by the non- 
permanent members of the 
coancO, is meant to entice Iran . 


into a ceasefire and negotiated 
settlement. It is expected to be 
adopted today after a four-day 
council debate on the latest 
escalation hi the Golf War. 

Although the language is 
diplomatic and veiled, the 
proposed resolution censures 
Iraq, even though Iranian 
troops are in Iraqi territory. It 
is not expected to please Iran 
entirely, but diplomats regard 
the initiative as a first step in a 
more explicit declaration at a - 


later stage in the coundTs 
deliberations. 

As a primary condition fa- 
ending the war, Iran has called 
for international condemna- 
tion of Iraq as the aggressor. 
The draft, however, after in- 
tense Iraqi and Arab pressure, 
“deplores the initial act which 
gave rise to the conflict". It 
marks a dramatic undertaking 
by the council which before the 
latest Iranian offensive 
seemed politically impossible. 


The pall-bearers held the 
coffins over their beads at 
amis length. Each of the 
wooden boxes covered with 
the red. white and green flag of 
Iran seemed to float in the air 
above the crowd. There was. 
after all, little left of the 46 
passengers of the Iranian Fok- 
fcer Friendship blasted from 
the skies by the bmps last 
week. 

There could be no mistak- 
ing the message given to the 
thousands of mourners — 
young men in parka jackets 
and jeans. Mullahs and Revo- 
lutionary Guards — “The 
blood of these martyrs wffl 
turn into bullets and lodge in 
the beans of the enemy”. 

Rhythmically, they ham- 
mered their fists on their 
chests and the whole street 
outside the parliament build- 
ing vibrated with a singular 
giant heart-beaL “Revenge, 
revenge," they shouted. 

But bow is that revenge to 
be taken when the news from 
the war front suggested the 
downing of the plane was in 
retaliation for the Iranian 
capture of the Fao Peninsula 
la si week where they advanced 
on the ruined oil refinery town 
from three directions. 

The Iranians have admitted 
they have been feeing four 
separate Iraqi oounter-anacks 
amid the wreckage of Fao, 
buoying up their own spirits 


with a claim that they have 
killed 1,000 Iraqis 
Ayatollah Khomeini spoke 
of the downing of the Iranian 
passenger aircraft over Ahvaz 
by telling the victims’ families 
— who included not only MPs 
but also Sayad Hassan Shah- 
Cberaghi, chief editor of the 
Iranian daily newspaper 
Kayhan — that they bad 
received them rewards in 
death. “A nation which 
launched a revolution for the 
satisfaction of divine, spiritual 
and humane values,” be said, 
“has nothing to fear form the 
martyrdom of its dear ones.” 

The funeral itself prompted 
thousands of mourners to 
wear red headbands, symbol- 
izing their readiness for mar- 
tyrdom, and push aside the 
military guard of honour and 
even the cadet school’s brass 
band and run alongside the 
coffins in a near-hysterical 
stampede. 

• BAGHDAD: Iraqi forces 
fighting to retake the southern 
tip of the Fao peninsula 
recaptured an important com- 
munications junction yester- 
day, according to the official 
Iraqi News Agency (Reuter 
reports). 

The Iraqi agency said the 
central column launched 
seized the junction after fierce 
fighting that left Iranian 
corpses ’‘filling the 
battleground.” 


esi 

ut S 
op 
in- 
is -os 

is- s • 
or de 
tc >ie 
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Is nd 


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British Airways -Super Club is 
rather popular these days. 

. It could be the six abreast seating, 
the award winning service, or even 
the fact that we fly to fifteen dries in 
the. US and three in Canada. 

Whatever the reason, you may 
find all the sears have been taken. 


Don’t worry. 

Unlike other airlines we won’t 
send you away disappointed. 

We’ll send you away First Class 
instead at absolutely no extra cost 
(to you, that is). 

Or we might even send you on 
Concorde if you’ve booked a Super 


Club flight to New York, Miami, or 
Washington D.C. 

British Airways would like to 
apologise to its passengers for any 
inconvenience this may cause. 

British airways 

The uorkfi favourin' airline, 








26 


THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


CF ] 

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U COULD TEST-DRIVE IT 
■FOLD, WOULD YOU 

WHAT CAR IT WAS? 




We wouldn’t recommend this experi- 
ment for real, but it’s an interesting hypothesis 
nevertheless. Imagine it 

The salesman guides you into the 
driver’s seat It feels reassuringly firm, yet so 
comfortable it could have been made 
specially for you. 

(In fact it has an adjustable lumbar 
support and a 12-position height and rake 
adjustment) 

The door closes with an effortless clunk. 

“IT'S A MSKEDES.” 

Good guess, but the wrong one. 

Somehow, you can sense the feeling of 
spaciousness inside the car. 

Your hands fall naturally onto the steering 
wheel, and your feet onto the pedals. 

YouswitchontheignitionTheenginefires 

instantaneously dying to a barely audible purr. 

44 A RkARfiAn 


steel construction, and the 9 coats ofpaint and 
primer that protect the bodywork. 

He mentions the 13-outlet heating and 
ventilation system, the 17.2 cubic foot boot, 
the central locking. 

You can feel the power-assisted brakes 
for yourself 

“A JAGUAR?” 



Perhaps, yes. But actually, no. 

As you pull away from the kerb (don’t 
worry, the salesman gives you directions) you 
notice the lightness and precision of the 
powersteering. 

You accelerate briskly through the gears, 
enjoying the smooth power of the engine. 

This car is no slouch. 



f9 


No it isn’t. 

The salesman, fedingrather pleased with 
himself helps you with a few clues. 

He tells you about the car’s welded box- 


Against your better judgement, you start 
to lower your sights a biL You did, after all, 

mention a price limit of£l 1 , 000 . 

But what car of that sort of price could 
give you this sort of ride? 

Unable to contain your curiosity any 
longer, you pull into the kerb and pull off 
the blindfold. 

"A VOLVO! I KNEW I COULDN’T AFFORD IT.” 

Yes, it’s a Volvo. The 740 GL, to be precise. 
And yes, you can afford it 
Amazingly the car you thought could 
have been a Mercedes costs only £1Q271. 

You turn to the salesman sitting beside 
you. In one hand, he has an order form for a 
brand new Volvo 740GL 

In the other, a pen. 

_ Despitehis presumptuousness, you sign. 

Mo: Kajro, SpringWd House, Princess StreeUSrtJd BS3 4FF~1 
ft! a brochure, phone (0272) 217082 or poa the coupon. 

Mr/Mrs/Miss 

Address 

— Postcode. 


74/S8-O4-F-09 




I . 


lV- 




ly 


li $£> 


£j» ijiSjO 








;X i,? **• 


Reagan wants 
INF weapons 


THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


three years 


Gorbachov, the Soviet leader, 
welcoming his proposal for a 

ban on intermediate-range nu- 
clear missiles in Europe, but 
calling also for the elimination 
of Soviet weapons targeted on 
China and Japan. 

. His letter,, sud to be posi- 
tive and optimistic in tone, is 
a formal reply to a Soviet 
proposal of January IS, winch 
outlined a plan for the gradual 
elimination of all nuclear 
weapons by the end of the 
century. The White House is 
to issue a statement within the 
next day or two. 

While welcoming a nuclear 
ban by . the year 2000; Mr 
Reagan concentrated in his 
letter on an INF agr e ement, an 
area where - progress looks 
most promising. 

He called for removal of 
intermediate-range weapons 
in Europe within three years. 
But to alleviate concern ex- 
pressed to MrEdward Rowny, 
a US amis control adviser 
who recently discussed - the' 
plan with Asian countries, Mr' 
Reagan insisted SS20 missiles 
must be scrapped in Asia. 

As one option, the President - 
suggested limiting SS20 de- 
ployment “to Soviet Central 
Asia and allowing .the US to 
keep an equal number of 
intermediate wiisrifes m the 
US. But after three years both 
sides would have to get rid of 
these missiles as weH 

Mr Reagan, who also sent 
Mr Paid Nhze, his senior arms 
control adviser, to Europe to 
sound out allied opinion, im- 
posed a reduction of interme- 
diate weapons to Europe to 
140 within a year, with pro- 
portional reductions to Asia. 
The number would then be 
halved and dropped to zero. 

Another option wooki be to 
reduce die numbers straight 
down to zero in three yearn on 
a global basis. 

On the British and French 
nuclear weapons, which Mr 
Gorbachov says should not be 
modernized, the US position 
is that it is up to those two 
countries to negotiate sepa- 
rately with Moscow. He reject- 


UkJ ottUtUU J 


missiles to its allies. 

Accor ding to Administra- 
tion officials, Mr Reagan told 
the Soviet leader that his plan 
to make the world nuclear-free 
was an positive gesture but 
nuclear weaponry must be 
reduced one step at a time. 

• Nato fears: President Rea- 
gan, to his reply to Mr 
- Gorbachov, is firmly rejecting 
the Soviet proposal to freeze 
British and French nuclear 
forces at existing levels and 
ban the transfer of US Trident 
missiles to Britain to exchange 
for an agreement on scrapping 
all Soviet and American Euro- 
missiles (Nicholas Ashford 
writes). ... 

The US’s Nato allies are 
waiting anxiously to hear die 
precise form of the American 
response. In particular, they 
want to know what level of 
reduction to the number of 
medium-range m warily Mr 
Reagan will propose to- re- 
sponse to the challenge made 
by Mr Gorbachov that they 
should all be scrapped. 

The Soviet offer has raised 
fears among the US’s allies — 
which - Washington ti»* been 
unable to lay to rest complete- 
ly — that the US could be[ 
tempted into reaching — 
agreement which would lea 


Some European countries 
feh that the removal of all 
Pershing 2 and cruse missiles 
from Europe would not only 
leave Nato vulnerable to the 
conventional superiority of 
Warsaw Pact countries but* 
would weaken the transfamtic 
link between the US and its 
European allies. - 
Britain and France were 
concerned that they would feel 
very exposed if the question of I 
their nuclear forces appear 
to be the only thing blockii _ 
an agreement on medium- 
range missiles- - 
Both countries have plans 
to modernize their .nuclear 
deterrents. In Britain’s case 
the purchase of Trident would 
increase by eight .times the 
number of its nuclear war- 
heads. 


Spaniards inarch 
against alliance 

Fn>m Richard Wigg, Madrid 


Hundreds of thousands of 
Spaniards took to toe streets 
of Madrid yesterday to dem- 
onstrate against remaining to 
Nato, as die Government of 
SeAor Felipe Gonzdlez pre- 
pared to hunch its ca mpaign 
for a “yes" verdict on member- 
ship to the March 12 referen- 


The de mons trators have the 
wind to their sails, with two 
puMic opinion polls released 
at the weekend showing ma- 
jorities to favour of leaving 
Nato, especially among young 
people. 

In an obvious bid to prevent 
foe anti-Nato demonstration 
dominating the headlines, four 
ministers addressed rallies a f 
Socialists yesterday to work- 
ing-class suburbs of the capi- 
tal. They were not well 
attended. 

Sefror Francisco Fernandez 
Ordddez, the Foreign Minis- 


ter, insisted that peace is best 
defended toside the alliance. 

Speaking at the rally. Pro- 
fessor EJP. Thompson, the 
British historian, told Span- 
iards that they would be doing 
a service by withdrawing from 
Nato. 

Sefror Gonz&ez is seeking 
to persuade Spaniards that by 

saying “yes" to slaying to the 
affiance they would reinforce 
the “European pillar", whfle 
quitting Nato wpokl leave 
Spain alone in its bilateral 
relations hip with foe US. 

The most discouraging poll 
result for foe Government 
came from the organization it 
customarily uses. A fortnight 
ago its poll gave a small 
majority to favour of staying in 
Nato, but foe latest survey 
draws 31 per cent against and 
only . 27 per cent for remaining 
fa the alliance. 


Dead spy Bhutto 
left letter ‘tortured 
for wife to death’ 


Washington — Mr Larry 
Wu-tai Chin, the former Cen- 
tral Intelligence Agency ana- 
lyst convicted of spying -for 
China for 30 years, lolled 
himself in his prison cell on 
Friday by tying a plastic bag 
over his bead, a post-mortem 
examination confirmed (Mi- 
chael Binyon writes). 

Medical examiners found 
that Chin, aged 63, died of 
asphyxiation. A sealed letter 
to his wife that be posted in 
prison wfll be translated and 
screened for possible security 
information. The authorities 
are also investigating why he 
was left unsupervized. 

Chin bad been convicted 
and was due to be sentenced 
on March 17. 

Reagan pi cks 
new White 
House counsel 

Washington (UPI) — Mr 
Peter J. Waflison, aged 44, a 
Washington lawyer and for- 
mer counsel to Vice-President 
Nelson Rockefeller, wfll suc- 
ceed Mr Red FieMingas the 
White House counsel. Presi- 
dent Reagan announced on 

Friday. 

In another announcement, 
president Reagan said he was 
nommafing Mr Ronald Lau- 
der, former chairman of Estes 
Lauder International, to be 

ambassador to Austria. 


From Hasan Akhtar 
Islamabad 

Mr Tikka Khan, a framer 
army chief and secretary gen- 
eral of the Pakistan People’s 
Party, is trying to gather, 
evidence to prove that 
Zuffikar AH Bhutto, the for- 
mer Prime Minister, was actu- 
ally tortured to death. . 

He said yesterday be was 
convinced that Bhutto, who 
was sentenced to hang, was 
carried to the scaffold at 
Rawalpindi jail already dead. 
But be bdieved.it would be 
very difficult to collect evi- 
dence which could stand the 
fpyt of judicial reliability after 

a lapse of so many years. 

He added that it had been 
the consistent demand of the. 
Pakistan People’s Party lead- 
ership that facts relating to 
Bhutto’s detention and death 
should be verified. Bhutto was 
in jail for a year and a half 
during- his trial on a political 
murder charge. 

Meanwhile, President ZSa 
has raid he had no intention of 

joining, the ruling . Pakistan 
Muslim League party. 

'- General 2a made the state- 
ment in Shi, Baluchistan, on 
Saturday. 

■' The: opposition iii the Na- 
tional Assembly has. said that 
under the constitution Gener- 
al 2a amid not hold the 
offices rif President and army 
"chief simultaneously. 


y-.-**j«*'** 


a ed Mr GojbachovVproposal 



Inquiry explodes Nasa’s credibility 


The inquiry into the cause 
of the shuttle Challenger disa^ 
ter has shocked America al- 
most as profoundly as the 
explosion itsdf 
Almost daily during the past 


From Ota- Own Correspondent, Washington 
from the very men who were for each launch was reversed. 


the agency’s raison d'etre — 
the astronauts. 

Statements made by Nasa 
officials shortly after the ex- 
plosion portrayed the pre- 


Bui the main accusation to 
come from the testimonies is 
that Nasa’s information flow 


tance of Nasa to come clean. 
Nearly all the damaging infor- 
mation on who knew what 
and when has been leaked 



was so dogged tha t senior anonymously. 


week, the inquiry has ember- launch discussions as normal 
rassingly and incriminatingly suggesting there had been little 
revealed not simply a failure concern about the cold wsath- 
of technology but a massive er. But the commission has 


failure of the entire organiza- 
tion. 

The once vaunted National 
Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration (Nasa) now -vir- 
tually stands accused of 
culpable negligence. 

Far from stemming a 
haemorrhage of confidence, 
the Rogers Commissi on has 
opened wounds through 
which the credibility of Nasa 
drains rapidly. Its revelations 
are far more damaging than 
any trouble with the O-ring 
sews of the booster rockets. 
They have not only under- 
mined public and political 
support but, more seriously, 
have led to public questions 


found that fierce arguments 
raged on the eve of the launch 
as engineers from Morton 
ThiokoL the booster rocket 
manufacturers, tried in vain to 
abort the launch, warning 
Nasa of the danger to the seals 
from the cold. Nasa officials 
cajoled the engineers to go 
against their better judgement 
and the long-standing rule that 
a safety case had to be made 


management was not in- 
formed of those safety worries 
— worries that had been 
nagging for three years — why 
were the rocket seals burning? 

The commission, apparent- 
ly shocked by testimony heard 
in dosed sessions, has already 
concluded that the decision 
making process “may have 
been flawed”. It has also 
barred all those involved in 
the launch from taking part in 
the investigation. 

The senate investigating 
panel has been equally 
shocked by foe apparent reluc- 


Ariane goes into perfect orbit 

Konron, French Guiana space rhrafc programme in 
(AP) - The European Space temporary su s pen s ion after 
Agency reported that two sat- foe explosion of ChaBesger, 
effites lau n ched by foe Ariane Ariane's success can only 
booster ware to perfect north- increase its share of the huge 
south orbit. With foe US satellite branch market. 


Ozal arrives home to union protest 









The American entertainer, Danny Kaye, proudly displaying 
his Legion d’Honneur after receiving the decoration in Paris 


Mr Tmgut Ozal, the Turk- 
ish Prime Minster, who 
boasted of dazzling economic 
successes and a restoration of 
democracy during his official 
vial to Britain last week, came 
home to a strong protest by 
workers who denounced their 
“ruthless exploitation” and 
heavy curtailment of union 
rights. 

Some 30,000 people turned 
out in Izmir for a “bread, 
peace, freedom rally” on Sat- 


Fnun Rash GurdSek, Ankara 
unlay in the first such mass 
demonstration since the 1980 
military coup. It was orga- 
nized by the oncehdocileTurk- 
ish Trade Unions 
Confederation, the country's 
biggest labour confederation, 
with about a million mem- 
bers. 

Falling living standards due 
to high inflation, to which 
workers feel they are particu- 
larly exposed in view of 
restrictive labour legislation. 


was the main theme of speech- 
es at the rally , which was 
dosety watched by police. 

The head of foe union 
confederation, Mr Sevket 
Yilmaz, mocked government 
claims foal workers were more 
prosperous. 

The militancy of foe confed- 
eration, which advocates non- 
political “supra-party 
unionism”, is in sharp con- 
trast to its low profile under 
foe military regtmeJ 


There is no doubt heads wfll 
roll beginning at the top. Mr 
James Bates, the administra- 
tor, is on leave facing accusa- 
tions of fraud from his 

S irevious job with a big de- 
race contractor. But be is 
trying to ensure that if he goes. 
Dr William Graham, bis act- 
ing deputy, wfll not replace 
him. The Reagan Administra- 
tion bristles at any attempt to 
dictate terms, but probably 
warns both men ouL Mr Jesse 
Moore, bead of foe shuttle 
programme, was transferred 
before the ill-fated launch. 

What is not questioned is 
that the American space pro- 
gramme will re main on the 
launch pad until foe astro- 
nauts themselves are assured 
that those sending them into 
space know what they are 
doing. 


Brazil grants 
Haiti police 
chief asylum 

Port-au-Prince (AFP) — The 
former head of Haiti’s notori- 
ous political police, Colonel 
Albert Pierre, has been given 
political asylum in Brazil after 
hiding in its embassy here. 

A reliable source said asy- 
lum was also given to his wife. 
Mr Gener Cotin, a former 
colleague, and Mr Edner 
Pageotte Andre, a former par- 
liamentary deputy. 





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Royal visit to New Zealand 


Protests greet the Queen 


(I i H pi'f • t Er- « M ■ ; : r V- Hi i t'k ■ 


fresh from drama and adven- 
ture in the Middle East, 
berthed in Auckland harbour 
yesterday - a day late for the 
arrival in New Zealand of the 
Queen and the Duke of Edin- 
burgh. 

The Royal entourage em- 
barked in die afternoon, hav- 
ing spent the first night of this 
seventh visit by the Queen to 
New Zealand at Government 
House, residence of Sir Paul 
Reeves, the Governor- Gener- 
al 

The most distant of her 


realms, and also one of the 
most enthusiastically loyalist, 
New Zealand offered an un- 
usually low-key welcome for 
the Queen on Saturday. The 
crowd at the airport to greet . 
her arrival from Nepal looked 
no more than about 300.. 

The welcoming party in- 
cluded Sir Paul and Lady 
Reeves and an ebullient Mr 
David Lange, the Prime Min- 
ister, who in a relaxed ceremo- 
ny was as ready as ever to 
laugh and joke. 

The Queen looked fresh and 
crisply dressed in blue and 
white, despite the 19-hour 
flight from Kathmandu, but 


with the arrival formalities 
quickly out of the way she and 
Prince Philip were whisked off 
to Government House to rest 
The official programme gets 
under way today with a walk- 
about in Auckland city centre. 
Driving from the airport, the 
royal cars passed a small 
protest demonstration of 
aboui25 people representing a 
number of groups opposing 
the visit, including Republi- 
cans, Maori activists and Irish 
nationalists. 


A recent opinion poll indi- 
cates that the strength of 
royalist sentiment in New 
Zealand is waning among die 


young but there is still 2 broad 
range of support for the visit 

The suivty found' that more 
than 40 per cent welcomed the 
idea, about 40 per cent were 
indifferent, while 9 per cent 
were opposed. 

Throughout yesterday a 
stream o? visitors made their 
way down to the quay where 
Britannia is moored- 

The main features of the 
visit indude the national 
Maori reception in Hastings 
tomorrow and the state open- 
ing of Parliament in Welling- 
ton on Wednesday. The Royal 
couple depart for Australia on 



From Christopher Walker 
MOSCOW ‘ 


■**> : 

r ; > 


.. . 

• ik.. ... ‘ . > • - '?> 

■ t ' y- v - • • 


When the 27th . congress of 
the rating Communist Party 
opens ' tomorrow ' in the 
Kremlin's imposing Palace of 
Congresses, it wffl4»30 years 
to the day smoe.thelate Nikita 
Khrushchev delivered Iffs re- 
markabteanti-Statin speech to 
a. closed session iff L500 
delegates attending the 20th 


/*► pSrnr 

iACONORESSAi 

Parti 


Speech angers Nepal opposition 




From Michael Hamlyn 
Kathmandu 


Opposition leaders in Nepal 
are angered by the Queen's 
: apparent endorsement of the 
royal overthrow of parliamen- 
tary democracy 25 years ago. 

During her state visit last 
week, the Queen praised the 
partyle$s Panchayat system, 
developing in Nepal since the 
multi-party parliament was 
brought to an end by King 
Mahendra, which is set to hold 
' its second election on May 12. 

The leaders of the banned 
Nepali Congress Party (NCP) 

■ have questioned why the 
Queen paid tribute to what it 
sees as a slow, if not 
negligable, progression to- 
wards democracy. 


The NCP is considering 
contesting the elections ifjasit 
demands, they are held under 
a neutral interim government 
and candidates are allowed to 
compete under a common 
manifesto using a common 
electoral symbol 

There will almost certainly 
be an interim government 
because the term of the 
present one will have expired 
before the election and there 
will be few problems with 
common manifestos because 
they are not covered by the 
constitution and symbols are 
being allotted to candidates by 
lottery. 

But Mr Krishna Prasad 
Bhattarai the NCP leader and 
former Speaker of Parliament, 


said he would not let the party 
go into elections “unless and 
until I am sure we can get an 
absolute majority”. 




Although some aspects -of 
Soviet life have changed dra- 
matically in the meantime, the 

congress — which now involves 

about. 5,000 delegates — re- 
mains the ultimate authority 
within the party, and because 


Still, If parties do not con- 
test the election, factions will, 
ft will be clear to voters which 
candidates support the gov- 
ernment of Mr Lokendra 
Bahadur Chand and which, 
support the tougher, more 
experienced former Prime 
Minister Mr Surya Bahadur 
Thapa, who fen from power in 
1983 when a group of Paneha- 
yat members opposed to his 
authoritarian style, suddenly 
found an ally in the palace. 


Mr Thapa accuses Mr 
Chand of having no grip on 
politics. “The economy is 


completely out of control- He 
is not capable of leadership". 

In return, Mr ChancTs sup- 
porters accuse Mr Thapa of 
“Walpolean" behaviour while 
others speak daddy of the 
amount of disposable fluids be 
amassed during his three years 
in power. 

The management of the 
economy will be an issue 
because: the recent, devalua- 
tion has had a marked effect 
on pices; an annual income of 
around $160 (about £114)per 
capita leaves Nepal the fourth 
or fifth least developed coun- 
try in the world; and. the 
population growth rate has 
risen from 2.7 per cent to , - 

almost 3 per cent because of A small boy helping to prepare for the Communist Party 
immigrants from India | congress by sweeping up snow in Red Square, Moscow. 


•.of the afi-perasfve finks be- teastfreyegs- 


tween party and government, 
the ultimate authority is foe 
political system. 

Despite this ' theoretical 
power, votes are traditionally 
mammons and much of the 
procedure (most of which 
takes place behind closed 


^rs)titttemmytfaanroh^- ft requires 

stamping of deamons taken m obticatiois-siicbasttenaed 


f*., . 


stamping « aeastom eamsn m obligations -sncli as foe need 
even more secretive surround- ^ seen adhering strictly to 
iqgs. Primarily;, the meeting Mr GorhedwvV new anti- 


1*. • 


wilL provide a showcase for the 
domestic and foreign policies 
of Mikhail Gorbachov, who 
will outline them ina fonr-and- 
a-half-htmr address: 


PROBABLY THE MOST 


ENJOYABLE INVESTMENT 


YOU’LL EVER MAKE 


Since 1956, congresses have 
been convened in the capital 
every five years* the date 
coinoding with the start of the 
new five-year plan, foe lynch- 
pin of the party's control of an 
economy spanning over 279 
nffUton people. Tiffs year, 
delegates will also be present- 
ed with an amended set of 
party rules and a new 15-year 
programme notably more real- 
istic than the previous blue- 
print presented : by 
MrKhrushcbev in 1961. 

According to that pro- 
gramme, which was to prove of 
increasing embarrassment to 
subsequent Soviet leaders, 
Russia wmB today -have be- 
come a greater industrial pow- 
er than .foe US, travel and 
accommodation would be free 
and most countries in foe 
world. Including Britain, 
would have gone Communist. 
The 1986 model is mach more : 


akobal campaign. 

In the heady pre-congress 
period, there have been un- 
precedented co captain ts in the 
.official press: about foe unfoir- 


More pleas to join 
spouses inUS 

Moscow (ReuterV— Ten Sovi- 
et citizens married to 'Ameri- 
cans appealed to the 
forthcoming party congress 
yesterday to let themiohriheir 
spouses in the US. The group 
said; . in' a telegram: 
~We, . . put onr hopes m you 
for the reunification of our 
families." ... After last 
November’s Soviet-US sum- 
mit at least nine other Soviet 
citizens -with spouses or rela- 
tives in the US were told they 
coidd leave. 


National Savings Income Bonds 
giveyou a tegular monthly income 
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The difference a tegular income makes. Income Bends 
ndv pay 12 %'d^. gross. The rate paid may be changed fiom time 



■ . . v - > - ( .«r- „ ' . 

1 : ■: 

p. m 1 1 ■ 


currently pay 12% p.a. gross. The rate paid may be changed fiom time 
to time to keep it competitive. 

Interest is calculated on a day to day baas and sent direct to 
your home or your bank oh the 5th of each month. It is paid in full 
and is subject to tax if you are a taxpayer; 

This is what 12%‘p a earns you every month: 


In foe costly pre-congress 
publicity bafid-ap, attention 
has been turned on the individ- 
ual delegates from the 
country's 15 republics. All 
hare , been selected at- local 
level often because of out- 
Standing achievements i# their 


ness of these perks — which 
are expected to come under 
Rowing attack — and about 
foe difficulty many citizens 
find in joining. Two brothers 
from Sharov wrote angrily to 
IVoMfrc ** In some institutions 
there is a waiting list for years 
to jom the . patty. What are 
those who strive to get into 
such a strange queue' thirsting 
for? Perhaps for those privi- 
leges which we ore now deci- 
sively renouncing? A queue for 
the party, is absurd. Tie party 


IvSSWMt frther than # . 

any particnlar political acn- 


£2,000 

Anagc 

MtantUrbwaoie 

£20 

fnWNtWMlt 

£ 8,000 

M|Wif||[ylqq)fpe 

£80 

luvmiiuKor 

£18,000 

M«N|r Income 

£180 

£5,000 

£50 

£10,000 

£100 

£20,000 

£200 

£6,000 

£60 

£13,000 

£130 

£25,000 

£250 

£7,000 

£70 

£15,000 

£150 

£50,000 

£500 


Among them wffl he a 
Siberian lannhand who pro- 
duced a record mffkyield from 
his herd, a shipyard worker 
from Archangel who suggested 
an incentive scheme for boost- 
ing productivity and foe party 
secretary from Polyclinic 
Number 22 in Minsk, who is 


running of foe country is 
symbolized by the importance 
being attached to the congress, 
which although not a policy- 
making occasion in foe West- 
ern sense, will provide a 
unique pointer to the direction 
in which the Soviet Union wffl 
be guided during foe early, 
formative years of the 
Gorbachov era. 



(EvduAfid ona l fl jOOOinwegeJprodgcqmawg^gcoIXlOamoBib-azOayBc MaHiaiiiii hohBmfSOJOOJ 
^ in te r est rate correct at time of going to press. 


Ershad on defensive 

lhaka —Army units around ing to meet a new wave of 


notice to have any Bond repaid And there will be no loss c 
if youVe held your Bond for a year or more. (For details 
repayment, see paragraph 6 of the prospectus below.) 


Dhaka -Army units around 
Dhaka were put on alert and 
extra police brought into the 
city yesterday. Interior Minis- 
try sources said (Ahmed Fazl 
writes). 

The military government of 
President Ershad was prepar- 


protest from the opposition. 

Sheik Basina Wazed, chief 
of the 15-party alliance, has 
called for a grand rally today 
in the capitars northern Sher- 
e-Bangla Nagar District in a 
fresh challenge to martial law. 


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• 1 .1 5 *1 * .1 • ■ _ . 


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lfl a j 

liquid 


credited irititsecuring a 13 per 
cent cot in diseases at focal 
kindergartens. 

What aO delegates have in 
cbmriMW » membership of the 
party, a distinctHm enjoyed by 
rou^tly 1$ million Soviet citi- 
zens, or aboat 10. per cent of 
.foe adult popolatfon. Member- 
ship, open jfrma the age of IS 
np wards, ts tightly controlled 
and depends on jrecommenda- 
tkm from three party veterans, 
who nrast each have served for 


V if -» „ 

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" »■ ' : usts jp| 


THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Philippines crisis: 9 3,000 attests planned 0 Washington takes sides # Men behind challenge 

Marcos is accused of " ' ^ ^ n.„ n»— 

making hit list to 
liquidate opposition 


The Times learnt on Friday 
afternoon that the Gorenh 
was planning the arrest 
of some 3,000 opposition sup- 
porters. 

There was strong circum- 
stantial evidence: President 
Marcos had been stenaifos 
Us moves with some of the 
same measures which preced- 
ed the introduction of wrtfai 
law in 1972 . At least one 
opposition newspaper 
was searched, first by people 
m uniform and later i>y men m 
plain clothes on the pretext 
that the bafidiag m igh t be 
threatened by a bomb attack. 

Mr Marcos was continually 
warning against at tempts to 
disrupt the country at the time 
of his inauguration t om orrow. 
But for the Opposition, too, 
this weekend was the last 
opportunity to stop Mr Mar- 
cos anointing himself as Presi- 
dent. 

In the middle of Saturd ay 


From David Watts, Manila 

btry of Defence -at Guap During the press conference 
Agmnaldo here after hearing a helicopter landed with arms 
tnstf ttey were about to be and supplies for the men holed 

up in the ministr y, 

Boftrepndiated Mr Marcos «I have fought for my 
■nd pledged themselves to dk, country. I don’t have plenty of 
ajnttessaiy,ma]^tstaiidm medals but the hour of reckon- 
defence of the will of the fog is here and now for me,” 

**?!?**• . . ' ‘ General Ramos stated. “When 

'Gltwe to tears, General Bar yon serve yonr country you 
mos told a press conference: “I have to take risks. Anyway, if 
T m " ■ I d» tonight or tomorrow Mr 
Son oppucmV Marcos wffl also die some day. 

, accusea HehasmiHuamfoity.Bntat 

Aruel Salvanerra, aged 17, is least my hearts dean." 
expected to be arrested and . In condasioa be on - 
charged today with the mur- all members of the armed 
der of his tether, Mr Oscar forces to disobey all illegal 
Salvatierra — a top executive orders, 
of an anti-Marcos Filipino Mr Earite told the press 
American newspaper (Ivor conference: “I am a sfrfag my 

(Mvie wrifu- I r>.L* . - . - . . 



Manila citizens surrounding tanks that bad been heading under orders for the military complex held by anti-Marcos rebels, 
bers of the Cabinet to heed the chain of command, “in a very of the public to go to camps befog party to a nfot to attack 


Davis 


feOow Cabinet mfniy feya who 


afternoon, bourn after tte 

maw fa this land. There fa 


Angeles). Police said he tried are decent to get out of tile 
to make the shooting look like Government and not support 
a political assasination. an iBegftiinate regime.” 

“ ~ He said a secret bit fist for 

am calling on the people of the the arrest and Liquidation of 
world to hefe us restore deceit- the opposition had beat drawn 


Presi dent Reagan’s special en- 
voy, Mr Joan Ponce Enrite, 
the Defence Minister, and 
Genentl Fidel Ramos, chief of 
the Ptutippines national police 
force, took refnge m the Min- 


im justice, no decency, no reai 
freedom, mndi less democracy 
in this hel p less land. Nobody 
has indicated any help to us. 


an illegitimate regime.” 

He said a secret hit fist for 
the arrest and liquidation of 
the opposition had been drawn 
up at Mr Marcos's 
Ma la can a ng Palace during the 
past two weeks. 

“As of now, I gwiMt fo my 
confidence recognize the Fres- 

Hwit aS the t anma..<< PT-in- 


bers of the Cabinet to heed the 
will of the people expressed 
daring the last election be- 
cause In ray own region I know 
that we cheated the election to 
the extent of 350,000votes. 


chain of command, “in a very 
clandestine manner, for the 


uc to go to camps 
and Cruse, which 


purpose of his vested interest are separated by a big higb- 


aid his political objectives”. 

Mr Enrile added that he had 
informed the American ami 


General Ramos safe! promt* Japanese ambassadors of 
oeat people, mdndmg Mr their predicament so that they 

n ■ - — - u — al- a __ -l. s_r_ j. • 


we are 
even w 


to help ourselves Chief of the armed forces and I 


Benjamin RomauMez, the Am- 
bassador to the United States, 
and Mr Eduardo Cojoangn, 
one of Mr Marcos's friends 
who controls the sagar indus- 
try among others, Info received 
a lot of firearms. 

It was without tiie knowt- 


might inform their govern- 
ments. * 

No sooner had the two men 
finished their press conference 
than Cardinal Sin gad Mr 
Blitz Aquino, Mrs Corazon 
Aquino’s brother-in-law, ap- 
pealed over the Roman Catho- 


oor bare hands'*. am appealing to ether mem- edge of those in the military lie Radio Veritas to members 


way, to protect the minister 
and the chief of police from 
other military men loyal to Mr 
Marcos. 

The President swiftly retali- 
ated with the daira that be had 
both Mr Emile’s Camp Agni- 
naldo and Camp Crame, head- 
quarters of General Ramos's 
police, surrounded. 

At a press conference fo 
Malacanang Palace he pro- 
duced a young captain who, he 
efanwiwi, had confessed to 


An unlikely duo driven to desperate measures 


befog party to a plot to attack 

tlw poiant arf aiswurinatp him 

By 3 am on Sunday, the road 
outride the camps — five bums 
going either way - was 
blocked with cars and thou- 
sands of ManOans, giving the 
lie to Mr Marcos's Haim that 
be had both camps surround- 
ed. 

At 5 am, 16 gunmen at- 
tacked the main transmitters 
of Radio Veritas, potting out of 
action its 50 kilowatt transmit- 
ter, da ma ging a new 250 
kilowatt one not yet fo use and 
injuring an engineer. 


np® The Pope 
prays for 
^ bloodless 

1 solution 

Rome (AP) — The Pope 
yesterday prayed for a just and 
bloodless solution to the crisis 
_ About 1,000 Filipinos — 
MK>Ir many of them carrying yellow 
banners, the colour of apposi- 
tion leader Mrs Corazon 
Aquino — heard the Pope pray 
from his window on St Peter's 
Square. “My thought is always 
with the Philippines and to its 
*2 dear people who are going 
* through such a difficult time. 
“I pray that the Lord will 
inspire all towards a peaceful 
and just solution, without 
violence and without blood- 
shed, keeping alone in mind 

2 the supreme welfare of the 
nation.” 

nc n>tv»ic The Filipinos arrived in St 
Peter’s Square after a short 
to attack march carrying banners that 
irate him read: “We are with our bish- 
, the road ops and our people,” and 
five lanes “Liberty and peace for the 
- ms Philippines”, 
nd thou- A week after the disputed 
jjving the election on February 7, the 
laim that Catholic bishops conference 
mntnmdr fo Manila issued a statement 
which said that (he amount of 
wiMii at- v ote fraud was unparalleled 
as nutters and urged Filipinos to begin a 
fog out of non-violent struggle for jus- 
traosmit- tice. 

lew 250 The next day, the Vatican 
lose and expessed “confidence” in the 
bishops of the Philippines. 


Manila — Mr Juan Ponce 
Enrile, the Philippines "'De- 
fence Minister, and Lieuten- 
ant-General Fidel Ramos, 
chief of the national police, 
were isolated yesterday in 
Manila's police headquarters 
with relatively few loyal, 
troops to protect them (Our 
Own Correspondent writes). 

Mr Enrile is a flamboyant. 
Harvard-trained lawyer, who 
was President Marcos's mar- 
tial law administrator. A 
good-looking, articulate man 
of 62, he is the antithesis of the 
deeply religions General Ra- 
mos. But both now find 



Mrs Corazon Aquino and Senator Salvador Laurel greeting 20,000 supporters in Cebu City. 


' Philippines, he has been part 

of the system for the power 
of desperation wife the opr- thot h oe TO n « for 


ruption and mendacity of a 


that it eng 
the contn 


ders as well as for 
lion that be may 


told friends at the Defence the ste 
Ministry last week: “I have of the 
served the man long enough, heavy 


jy slide in the quality 
military, now so top- 
with relatives and 


But under a government in 


Now is the time to serve my friends of the Marcos family 


country. 


and so riven with factionalism 


* which someone who witnesses 
minister as a common felon. a theft that wouM embarrass 

Mr Enrile is no angeL Like, the efite simply disappears, 
every other politician in the Mr Enrife had had cnougkHe, 


But under a government in General Ramos, like Mr and corruption that the cam- 
which someone who witnesses Enrile, is a founder member of paign against the communist 
a theft that would embarrass 1 the Military Reform Mow- New People's Army is being 
the efite simply disappears, - meat, which has been trying to- hampered. The reform move- 
Mr Enrile had had enough. He, . persuade Mr Marcos to stop meat was founded in March. - 


Mr Marcos has even rein- 
stated General Fabian Ver, his 
cousin, as chief of the armed 
forces, in spite of haying 
announced his retirement just 
over a week ago. 

On the face of it, the contest 
between Mr Marcos and his 
Defence Minister and General 
Ramos isan uneven one, with 
Mr Marcos able to count on 
the loyalty not only of General 
Ver but also of General Jose- 
phus Ramas, commander of 
the Army; Rear-Admiral 
Briliame Ochoco, commander 
Of the Navy, the co mmander 
of the marines. General 
Artemio Tadiar; and General 
Vicente Pichio, head of the Air 
Force. 

But even Mr Marcos knows 
that his opponents can com- 
mand respect, something that 


White House gives open 
backing to the rebels 

From Michael Binyoa, Washington 

The White House gave open ruling party, so extreme as to the country if Mr Marcos tries 
pport to the Philippines undermine the credibility and to arrest her. Mr Stephen 


support to the Philippines 
Defence Minister and the 
acting Chief of Staff in their 
rebellion against President 
Marcos, moving closer than 
ever before to calling directly 
on him to resign. 

With Mr Philip Habib, the 
US special envoy to the 
Philippines, who returned 
here on Saturday, President 
Reagan approved a statement 
endorsing the opposition dec- 
laration that “the mandate of 
the people does not belong to 
the regime”. 

The White House said: 
“These statements strongly 
reinforce our concern that the 


he no longer inspires among recent presidential elections 
many, members of the ser- were marred by fraud, perpe- 
. vices. - trated overwhelmingly by the 


legitimacy of the election and 
impair the capacity of the 
Government of the Philip- 
pines to cope with a growing 
insurgency and a troubled 
economy.” 

The US supported “resolu- 
tion of the issues involved by 
all the people of the Philip- 
pines as quickly as possible” 
and expected this to be done 
.without violence, the state- 
ment added. It ignored 
charaes by Mr Marcos that 
Washington was plotting his 
assassination. 

. Meanwhile, the Pentagon 
has agreed to take Mrs 
Corazon Aquino, the opposi- 
tion leader; on board a US 
Navy ship to enable her to flee 


to arrest her. Mr Stephen 
Sotaiz, chairman of the House 
sub-committee on Asian and 
Pacific affairs and a leading 
congressional opponent of Mr 
Marcos, criticized the White 
House statement as being too 
vague. He said Washington 
should say clearly that Mr 
Marcos should go. 

“This is the only way to 
avoid massive bloodshed and 
even civil war.” He urged the 
Administration to oner Mr 
Marcos asylum in the US if he 
stepped down peacefully. 

In another development, 
the Philippines Consul Gener- 
al and six consular officers in 
Honolulu said they no longer 
considered Mr Marcos the 
president 


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<§> 

AIR CANADA 


AIR 
CANADA 
HAVE JUST 
WON THE 
PRESTIGIOUS 
AIRTRANSPORT 
WORLD PASSENGER 
SERVICE AWARD FOR 1985. 

IN THE PROCESS THEY HAVE 
BEATEN THE FOLLOWING AIRLINES. 

AERONAVES DEL CENTRO • AERONICA - AEROPEUCAN 
AIR SERVICES ■ AEROPERLAS ■ AEROPERU ■ AERO VIRGIN 
ISLANDS • AISLE AZUR • AIR AFRJQUE - AIR ALBATROSS - AIR 
ALGERIE-AIR ALMA- AIR ANDORRA-AIR ATLANTA -AIR ATONABEE 
AIR &C. • AIRBORNE EXPRESS - AIRBORNE OF SWEDEN - AIR BOT- 
SWANA - AIR BRIDGE CARRIERS • AIR BURKINA - AIR BURUNDI - AIR- 
BUSINESS APS/AUCAIR ■ AIR BVI - AIR CAL ■ AIR CALEDONIE - AIR CALE- 
DONIE INTERNATIONAL - AIR CAPE - AIR CARIBE INTERNATIONAL • AIR 
COMORES- AIR CORTEZ INTERNATIONAL- AIR CREEBEC - AIR DJIBOUTI -AIR ECO S5E 
AIR EUROPE -AIR EXPRESS INTERNATIONAL AIRLINES ■ AIR FRANCE ■ AIR GABON -AIR 
GUADELOUPE • AIR GUINEE - AIR HAWAII - AW HUDIK • AIR INDIA • AIR INTER • AIR IVOIRE 
AIR JAMAICA - AIR JET - AIR KENTUCKY AIRLINES ■ AIR LA. ■ AIR LANKA - AIR LIBERIA - AIR 
LIMOUSIN ■ AIRLINES OF NORTHERN AUSTRALIA ■ AIRLINES OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA ■ AIRLINES 
OF TASMANIA ■ AIR UNK - AIR LITTORAL • AIR MADAGASCAR • AIR MALAWI ■ AIR MALI ■ AIR MALTA 
AIR MARTINIQUE • AIR MAURTTANIE - AIR MAURITIUS - AIR MELANESIE - AIR MICRONESIA ■ AIR MID- 
WEST . AIR MOLOKAI — TROPIC AIRUNES - AIR MONGOL - MILT • MR NAURU - MR NEVADA - MR'NEW 
ORLEANS - AIR NEW SOUTH WALES • AIR NEW ZEALAND - AIR NIAGARA - AIR NIGER • AIR NIUGINI - AIR NORTH 
AIR ONTARIO- AIRPAC AIRUNES -AIR PACIFIC- AIR PANAMA I NTERNACIONAL- AIR POLYNE5IE -AIR QUEENSLAND 
AIR RAROTONGA ■ AIR ST. PIERRE • AIR SEDONA ■ AIR SENEGAL ■ AIR SEYCHELLES ■ AIR SINAI -AIR SOUTH • AIR 
SUNSHINE • AIR TAHITI • AIR TANZANIA CORPORATION ■ AIR TCHAD - AIR TODAY ■ AIR TOGO ■ AIR TUNGAHU • AIR UK ■ MR 
VANAUTU • AIR VIRGINIA - AIRWAY EXPRESS - AIR WEST AIRUNES - AIRWEST INTERNATIONAL - AIR WHITSUNDAY • AIR 
WISCONSIN - AIR ZAIRE - AIR ZIMBABWE - ALASKA AIRLINES • ALASKA ISLAND AIR - ALIA - AU GIULIA - All SARD A 
ALITAUA • ALLEGHENY AIRUNES ■ ALM ■ ALOHA AIRLINES • ALPHA AIR ■ ALPINE AVIATION - ALTUS AIRLINES - ALYEMDA DEMO- 
CRATIC YEMEN -AIRUNES • AMA AIR EXPRESS - AMERICAN AIRUNES - AMERICAN CENTRAL AIRUNES - AMERICA WEST MRUNES 
ANDES AIRUNES - ANSETT AIRUNES OF AUSTRALIA - ANSETT WJL - APOLLO AIRWAYS • AQUATIC AIRWAYS • AQUILA AIR • ARCTIC 
CIRCLE AIR - ARIANA AFGHAN AIRUNES - ARKU ISRAEU AIRUNES • ARMSTRONG AIR SERVICE - ARROW AIR - A/S NORVING - ASPEN AIR- 
WAYS ■ ATI-AERO TRASPORTI ITALIAN I • ATLANTIC GULF AIRUNES - ATLANTIC SOUTHEAST AIRLINES ■ ATLANTIS AIRLINES ■ AUDI AIR ■ AUGUSTA 
AIRWAYS • AURIGNY AIR SERVICES - AUSTIN AIRWAYS - AUSTRAL (LINEAS AEREASI - AUSTRIAN AIRLINES - AUSTRIAN AIR SERVICES ■ AVENSA 
AVIACO - AVIA MCA - AVIATECA - AVIATION SERVICES - AVTOR - BAHAMASAIR - BAKHTAR AFGHAN AIRUNES - BALKAN BULGARIAN AIRUNES - BANKAIR 
BAR HARBOR AIRUNES - BJL5. AIRUNES - BEARSKIN LAKE MR SERVICE - BELL- AIR ■ BEMIDJI MRUNES - BEST AIRLINES • BIG SKY AIRUNES - BIMAN 
BANGLADESH AIRLINES - BIRMINGHAM EXECUTIVE AIRWAYS • BDUGMR - BRAATHENS S.A.F.E. AIRTRANSPORT - BRANIFF - BRENNAN AND HARGREAVES 
BRIT AIR • BRITANNIA AIRWAYS - BRITISH AIR FERRIES • BRITISH AIRWAYS - BRITISH CALEDONIAN AIRWAYS • BRITISH CARIBBEAN AIRWAYS - BRITISH MIDLAND 
MRWAYS • BRITT AIRWAYS - BROCKWAY AIR - BROWN AIR SERVICES - BRYMON AIRWAYS - BURMA AIRWAYS CORPORATION - BURRARD AIR - BUSINESS EXPRESS 
BWIA INTERNATIONAL TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO MRWAYS CDRP - CAAC - CALIFORNIA SEABOARD MRUNES - CALM MR INTERNATIONAL - CAMEROON AIRLINES - CAPE 
SMYTHE MR SERVICE - CAPITOL MR SERVICE - CARIBBEAN AIRWAYS - CASCADE MRWAYS - CATHAY PACIFIC AIRWAYS - CATS KILL MRWAYS • CAYMAN AIRWAYS 
CENTENNIAL AIRUNES - CHALK'S INTERNATIONAL A! RUNE - CHALLENGE MR TRANSPORT - CHANNEL EXPRESS (MR SERVICES) - CHAPARRAL MRUNES - CHAUTAUQUA 
AIRUNES • CHINA MRUNES < CHtSUM FLYING SERVICE OF ALASKA - CHRISTMAN AIR SYSTEM • CIMBER AIR - CITY EXPRESS - CLEARWATER FLYING SERVICE - COASTAL AIR 
TRANSPORT • CGLGAH AIRWAYS • COMAIR ■ COMMAND AIRWAYS - COMMERCIAL MRWAYS - COMMODORE AVIATION - COMMUTER EXPRESS - COMPAGNSE AERIENNE DU 
LANGUEDOC - COM PAN I A DE AVIACtON FAUCETT • CONN EOT AIR - CONTINENTAL AIRLINES - COOK ISLANDAIR • COPA - CORAL AIR ■ CP AIR - CRESCENT HELICOPTERS • CROSSAIR 
CROWN MR/DORADO WINGS - CROWN MRWAYS - CRUZEIRO DO SUL - CSA - CUBAN A - CUMBERLAND AIRLINES - CYPRUS AIRWAYS • CYPRUS TURKISH AIRUNES - DANA1R - DAN-AIR 
SERVICES - DELTA AIR - DELTA MR LINES - DESERT SUN MRUNES - DIRECT MR - OIRECTAIR - DLT— DEUTSCHE LV. - DOMINMR • DOMINICANA DE AVIACION - DOMINICANA (NTERNACIONAL 
AIRUNES ■ DOUGLAS AIRWAYS • EAGLE AIR - EAGLE MRUNES • EAGLE AIRWAYS - EAST COAST AIRLINES • EASTERN MR LINES - EASTERN PROVINCIAL AIRWAYS - EAST HAMPTON MR 
EAST- WEST AIRUNES - ECUATORIANA - EGYPTA1R - EL AL ISRAEL AIRUNES * ELLIS AIR TAX • EMPIRE AIRUNE5 • EMPIRE MRWAYS • ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES - EURO MR HEUKOPTERSERVICE 
EURO FLUE - EUROPE AERO-SERVICE ■ EVERGREEN INTERNATIONAL MRUNES - EXEC EXPRESS ■ FAR EASTERN MR TRANSPORT CORPORATION • FAST AIR CARRIER - FLU MR SERVICES - FINN AIR 
FINNAVIATION - FIRST AIR - FISCHER BROS. AVIATION . FLIGHT LINE • FLORIDA EXPRESS • FLUGDIENST PEGASUS - FLUGFELAG AUSTUH LANDS - FLUGFEWG NORDUR LANDS - FLYING TIGER UNE - FORT 
WORTH MRUNES -40-MILE MR - FREEDOM MR - FRONTIER MRUNES - GALAZY AIRLINES - GARUDA INDONESIAN AIRWAYS ■ GB AIR ■ GEMINI AIRUNES • GEORGIAN BAY AIRWAYS - GHANA AIRWAYS CORP- 
ORATION • GOLDEN AIR • GOLDEN PACIFIC MRUNES • GRAND CANYON MRLINES - GREAT LAKES AVIATION - GREEN HILLS AVIATION - GRON LANDSFLY • GUERNSEY MRUNES • GULF MR - GULL AIR - GUYANA 
AIRWAYS CORPORATION > HAITI MR - HANG KHONG VIETNAM - HARBOR AIRUNES - HAROLD'S AIR SERVICE - HARVEST AVIATION - HAVASU AIRUNES - HAWAIIAN MRUNES • HAZELTON MR SERVICES - HEU MR 
MONACO - HEL> FRANCE - HENEBERY AWATlpN - HENSON AVIATION - HERMANS MR - HOLIDAY AIRUNES • HOLIDAY EXPRESS - HOLLAND AERO UNES • HORIZON AIRUNES • IBERIA • ICELANDER • IMPERIAL MRLINES 
INDIAN MRUNES - INDIAN WELLS AIRLINE - IN EX ADRM MRWAYS - INTERFLU 6 • l PEC AVIATION • IRAMAIR • IRAQI AIRWAYS - JAL - JAMAHIRYA UBYAN ARAS AIRLINES • JAPAN ASIA MRWAYS • JAT • JERSEY EUROPEAN 
MRWAYS - JETAIRE AIRLINES - JET AMERICA AIRUNES - JETSTREAM INTERNATIONAL AIRUNES • JET 24 INTERNATIONAL MRWAYS • KARMR > KENDELL MRL(NES - KENN BOREK MR - KENYA MRWAYS - KEYSTONE AIR SERVICE 
KITTY HAWK AIRWAYS.- KOREAN MR - KUWAIT AIRWAYS CORPORATION - LA. EL FLYING SERVICE - LAS - UC-UNEAS AEREAS DEL CARIBE • LACSA - LADE - LADECQ - LAKE UNION AIR SERVICE - UM-UNKAS AEREAS DE 
MOCAMBIQUE - LANCE AVIATION - LAN -CHILE • LAO AVIATION • LAP ■ LAS VEGAS AIRLINES • LAV • LESOTHO AIRWAYS • LETABA AIRWAYS - UAT . UBYAN ARAB MRUNES - LINA CONGO - LINHAS AEREAS DA GUINE-BISSAU - UNJEFLYG 
LOGANAIR - LONDON EUROPEAN MRWAYS - LONG ISLAND MRUNES -LOT— POUSH MRUNES - LUFTHANSA GERMAN MRLINES - MACKNKJHT MRUNES - MAERSK MR • MAGNUM MRUNES • MALAYSIA MR CHARTER - MALAYSIAN 
AIRLINE SYSTEM BERHAD- MALDIVES AIRWAYS - MALEV - MALL MRWAYS ■ M AND ALA MRUNES - MAMMOTH MR SHUTTLE - MANX AIRUNES - MARGATE MR - MARKAJR • MAUI MRUNES - MAYA MRWAYS - MEA • MERPA71 NU5ANTARA 
- AIRUNES - MESA AIR SHUTTLE - MESA0A AIRLINES • METRO MRLINES • METRO AIRWAYS BOHNSTE0T PETERSEN & DYRBERG - METROFLIGHT MRUNES - METROPOLITAN MRWAYS - MEXICANA - MICHIGAN MRWAYS • MID PACIFIC 
AIRUNES - MIDSTATE MRUNES - MIDWAY EXPRESS - MIDWAY METRO UNK - MIDWEST AVIATION - MIDWEST EXPRESS MRLINES • MMABATHO MR SERVICES - MO NT AUK CARIBBEAN MRWAYS - MOUNT COOK MRUNES • MUK MR • MURRAY 
VALLEY MRUNES - MUSE A|R CORPORATION - NAMAKWALAND LUGDIENS - NAM1B MR - NETHERLANDS - NEW ENGLAND MRUNES - NEWMANS MRWAYS - NEW YORK MR • NEW YORK HELICOPTER CORPORATION • NIGERIA MRWAYS • NIHON 
KlNKYORI MRWAYS • NIPPON CARGO AIRUNES • NLM — DUTCH MRUNES • N0RCANMR • NORDMR • NORFOLK MRUNES * NORONTMR • NORSK FLYTJENESTE • NORTHEASTERN INTERNATIONAL AIRWAYS • NORTHERN AIRWAYS • NORTH PACIFIC 
MRLINES - NORTHWEST ORIENT AIRUNES - NORTHWEST TERRITORIAL AIRWAYS • NUERN BERGER FLUGDIENST INTRO - NYGE-AERO - OLT — OSTFRIESISCHE LUFTRANSPORT - OLYMPIC MRWAYS - OMAN AVIATION SERVICES COMPANY - OPAL AIR 
QREBRO AIR- OXLEY MRUNES - OZARK MR UNES - PACIFIC MR EXPRES5 - PACIFIC COAST MRUNES - PACIFIC SOUTHWEST MRLINES - PACIFIC WESTERN MRUNES - PAKISTAN INTERNATIONAL MRUNES • PAN AMERICAN WORLD MRWAYS - PANORAMA 
AIR • PBA-PROWNCETOWN BOSTON MRUNE - PEM-AIR - PENINSULA AIRWAYS - PENNSYLVANIA MRUNES - PEOPLE EXPRES5 MRUNES - PERIMETER MRUNES - PHILIPPINE MRUNES - PIEDMONT AVIATION • PIEDMONT REGIONAL MRUNES - PILGRIM 
AIRLINES • PIONEER AIRUNES • PLUMA - POCONO AIRUNES • POLYNESIAN AMUNES - PRECISION MRUNES - PRIDE MR • PRIME MR - PRJNA1R • PRfNCEVILLE MRWAYS - PRO MR SERVICES - P.T. MANDALA MRUNES - QANTAS MRWAYS • QUEBECAJR • RANSOME 
AIRUNES -REEVE ALEUTIAN MRWAVS r REEVES AIR -REGENT MR -REPUBLIC MRUNES -RESORT MR -REUNION MR SERVICE - RFS-REGIONALFUJG -RIA- RIO MRWAYS -RIO-SUL- ROCKY MOUNTMN MRWAYS -ROUND MR -ROSSMR- ROYAL MR INTER -ROYAL AIR 
UAROc . ROYAL BRUNEI MRUNES - ROYALE AIRUNES - ROYAL HAWAIIAN MR SERVICE • ROYAL NEPAL MRUNES CORPORATION - ROYAL SWAZI NATIONAL MRWAYS CORPORATION - RYAN MR - SASENA- SABER AVIATION - SAETA-SQCIEDAD ECUATORIANA DE TRANS- 
POOTES AEREOS - SAFE AIR - SAHSA - SAM - SAMOA JURUKES - SAM • SAN JUAN AIRUNES - SANSA - SAS - SATA - SAUWA • SCENIC AIRLINES ■ SCIBE-A1KUFT • SEAIR ALASKA AIRUNES • SEAPLANE SHUTTLE TRANSPORT - SHANNON EXECUTIVE AVIATION - SIERRA LEONE 
AKLJHES - SIERRA VISTA AVIATION - SIMMONS AIRUNES - SINGAPORE AIRLINES - SINGLETON MR SERVICE - SKYWAY COMMUTER - SKYWAYS OF SCANDINAVIA - SKYWEST AIRUNES - SKY WEST AVIATION . SMB-SEDAUA MARSHALL BOONVILU STAGE UNE - SOLOMON 
KLAMQS AIRWAYS ■ SO MALI MRUNES • SOUTH AFRICAN MRWAYS -SOUTH BURNETT AVIATION - SOUTH CENTRAL MR - SOUTHERN MR • SOUTHERN EXPRESS • SOUTHERN JERSEY MRWAYS - SOUTH PACIFIC ISLAND MRWAY5 ■ SOUTHWEST AIRUNES - SPACEGRAND • SUBURBAN 
AIRUNES - SUDAN AIRWAYS - 5UDAVU FLUGGESEIASCHAFT - SUMMIT MRUNES ■ SUNMRE - SUN AIRE UNES - 5UNBIRD MRUNES • SUN BIRD AVIATION - SUNBIRD ■ SUNFLOWER MRUNES - SUNSTATE MRUNES • SUNWORLD INTERNATIONAL AIRWAYS ■ SURINAM MRWAYS 
S^DM^SWISSAIR ■ SYDAEBO BE-GE - SYRIAN ARAB MRUNES -TAAG- ANGOLA MRUNES - TACA INTERNATIONAL MRUNES • TALAIR- TAME -TAMPA AIRUNES- TAN -TAP MR PORTUGAL- TAROM • TAT-EXPORT-TAT-TRANSPORT AERIEN TRANSREGiONAL • TEMSCO AIRLINES - TENNESSEE 








-21 


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THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


SPECTRUM 


- 1 ^ 1 1 

Curtain up on 


POLITICIANS AND PARTIES IN THE FIGHT FOR POWER 


a new French 




revolution 




The next general election mill 
probably be one of the most 
important in France for more 
than a quarter of a century. 
March 16, polling day, will 
almost certainly be a turning 
point in modem French histo- 
ry. For the first time under the 
fifth Republic, France is like- 
ly to have a government 
whose political hue is opposed 
to that of its President Some 
fear that this will cause a 
constitutional crisis. Yet rare- 
ly has an election campaign 
(carried on unofficially for the 
past couple of months) been 
so lacklustre. 

One reason for the lack of 
excitement is the dearth of 
new ideas among the main 
political parties, combined 


France’s election 
campaign starts 
today — and for 
the first time in 
recent history, a 
president may 
have to share 
power with his 
political enemies 


Another reason for the lack 
of excitement lies in the new 
system of proportional repre- 
sentation, to be used for the 
first time in the election. 
Instead of a straight fight 
between individual candi- 
dates in single constituencies, 
French voters will now be 
asked to choose between dif- 
ferent lists of candidates put 










V -fT< 


Aged 53. 
Giallist 


Jacques Chirac ' Raynwarii Barre 

dayor of Paris. Leader of the Aged 61. Prime minister under Gis- between a right-wing go venimentand 
(PR Party. Prime minister card (TEstaing. Deputy for the Rhone, a left-wing president He insists that 


— — i — in each of the 105 departments 

have to share fgj™?* 585 teiTitories °f ^ 

n^o-p- nAfU Hie The deputies win be elected 
POWCT Wltn PIS f 0 accordance with the propor- 

”■ tion of votes obtained by their 
Political enemies list, their position on that list, 

aiJ d the number of seats 
... _ . . allocated to their department 

possible. It has apparently 711115, a candidate in third 


forward by the various parties, under Giscard d’Estaing. Flamboyant, affiliated to the UDF group in. the 
in each of the 105 departments dynamic, a product of the Ecole National Assembly. Considered one of 


dynamic, a product of the Ecole 
Nationale d’Administration (ENA), 
but someone who often gives the 
impression . of speaking before, he 
thinks. Has a large and loyal personal 
following, but is not a good television 
performer. Most likely candidate as 
next prime minister. Has an interest in 
making “cohabitation” with 
Mitterrand work if only to do down 


1981. 1 
since l 


with the general public's wide- dropped plans to expel unem- p i^> Q n a list in a four-scat . his major rival, Raymond Barre. 
spread scepticism that any ployed immigrants and to stop 'department knows that his list 
party will find a solution for supplementary family benefits ^ to about 75 per 
the problem that concerns for non-French fa m ilies- cent of the vote, 

them most — unemployment. 


affiliated to the UDF group in . the the President should be forced to . since 1984- Sts with UDF group in 
National Assembly. Considered one of resign by thenewright-wing partial paj^anreDLbuthasno rcaipartvofbis 
the three main .opposition ' leaders,' menL Otherwise he feds there will be _ own: No Tonger has nmcfa influerice 
although he has consistently refused to constitutional chaos. He has said be either with UDF or the country. Is 
take, over the leadership of any party will support a censure motionagainst nevertheless considered one of the 
and has declined to form his own. any right-wing government whiehtries three main opposition leaders and still 
Aloof, ironic, and highly intelligent, to govern with President Mitterrand, listened to with respect. Rem ains a 
tins rotund former professor of eco- - However, it is not dear bow many of posable candMute for tbe presi dential 
nomics has managed to leap from the his supporters, expected to number as elections m 1988, though his chances 
very bottom of the popularity stakes in :inany as 100 in thenew parliament, .are thought sfim. Ah ascetic, cold, 
the opinion polls 10 the very top. He would follow suiL A certain presides- brifliani manwix) has never managed 
refuses to contemplate “cohabitation” tial candidate. to touch the hearts Of the peorde. 


are thought slim. Ari ascetic, chid; 
brilliant man who has never managed 
to touch the hearts of the people. 


for non-French families. 

Both sides seem to coucen- 


RPR-UDF MANIFESTO 


Almost 2.4 million people are trale on criticizing one anotb- 


now unemployed, 600,000 
more than in 1981 when the 


er and speculating on political 
life after March 16. The most 


Socialists came to power likely outcome is considered 
promising to reduce their to be one in which Jacques 


number. 


Chirac, as leader of the RPR, 


Under the new system, 
results can be predicted with 
much greater accuracy than in 
the past. Not only can it 
already be guaranteed — bar- 
ring some major cataclysm — 


The party manifestos form a coalition with the National Assembly, but the- 
arp vprv cimilnr UDF. But the President would names ofas many as 448 of the 

^ be under no obligation to 577 deputies m the new 

choose Chirac. He may prefer assembly can already be given. 

The most striking thing a right-wing moderate, or a Some critics had feared that 
about the manifestos of tbe Socialist, but whoever it was - the new voting system would 
two major nolitical forma-, must be able to win a majority- lead to a proliferation of small 
tions — the Socialists on the in the national assembly. . parties, but in feci tire oppo- 
Jeft and the Alliance of the' Even if the two main oppo- site is likely to happen. More 


the biggest party in the new. that the Socialists will lose 
parliament, is called upon to their present majority in the 


Created by Jacques Chirac in 1976 out 
of the former flanlBu Union des 
Dfeaocrates poor la Repnfcliqpe. A 
right-wing populist party representing 
a broad cross-section of society. The 
hugest, mast dferipftned, and best 
organized of the opposition parties. 
Has 62 seats in the National Assem- 
bly, bails expected to share up 10 309 
seats with the UDF. President: 
Jacques Chirac. General Secretary: 
Jacques Tonboo. . 


Lift all re m ai n i n g price controls wealth tax and reduce top income-tax 
immediately, and lift other- restrictive rate from to per cent to 50 per cent. 


economic controls as soon as possible. 
Denationalize progressively over tbe 


rate tram 65 per cent to. 50 per cent 
No automatic right to Frehch atzzen- 


*5? for born 

mmnanies and lane industrial mums m France On reaching the age of 1.& bt 


companies and large industrial groups 
nationalized by the Socialists. In the J^L*” 1 ** SSEt 
long term, denationalize all competi- JS 

tive public companies. Privatize two an “ conventional aimed forces, 
of tbe three state television channels. 


Support' the American Star Wars 


Cut taxes and levies by 40 billion initiative. Promote construction of 
francs (£4 billion), a year. Abolish Europe and European defence. 


■Jeft and the Alliance of the' 


Gaullist Rassemblement Pour si tion parties won an absolute 
La Repubtique (RPR) and the majority and M Chirac was 


Union Pour La Democratic 
Francaise (UDF) on the right 
— is their similarity. 

There is no doubt that the 
Socialists have shifted to the 
right since they came to 
power, but the right has also 
shifted to the centre, largely in 
reaction to the emergence of 
the National Front on the 


appointed prime minister, it is 
by no means clear what would 
happen. Supporters of Ray- 
mond Barre may refuse to 
back the government, in 
which case new elections 
would have to be called. Or 
tbe new government may 
dash with tbe President mi 
some vital issue, bringing 


parties, but in feci tire oppo- 
site is likely to happen. More 
than half the departments 
have four or fewer seats, 
which means that a party most 
get at least 25 per cent of the 
vote in order to get a single 
candidate elected in those 
departments. That is more 
than twice tbe predicted na- 
tional score of either the 
National Front or the Com- 
munist Party. 


‘ v 

V>. 3 • 

... ivV. - ^ 

** ‘V ?'.* -- 
* • ■ 

\ f -y 

V '* U. .+*■ Jr 



% share 
of votes 
40r m 


Result 

1981 


(43-46.5% ) 


Total mariber 


UXv 4 lanuimi j| min LUv 3 . « — 

extreme right. Of course there ftoumilnmaa lo » nintfafl 

are differences. The right 


wants to denationalize tbe. 
banks, insurance companies, 
and huge industrial groups 
nationalized by the Socialists. 
It wants to cut taxes, particu- 
larly for business and the 
highest-paid, by some 40 bil- 
lion fiancs (£4 billion) a year, 
abolish the wealth tax im- 


Tbanks to proportional repre- 
sentation. this could result in a 
parliament of similar com- 
plexion and political stale- 
mate. 

The president could, of 
course, resign. Burt he has no 
desire to go down in history as 
the first president to be forced 


posed by the Sodatistsandto outofoffic^Onrachasa The link 1 parties ime Uk 
more fester than the left in “ leres S “ _ be virtually annihilated. 


liberalizing the economy. . 

~ . , . - . use the office of prune muus- 

On the other hand, it has ter to build up his prestige for 
undertaken to keep the the 1988 presidential election 


with Mitterrand be wants to it ha s been es timate d th»t a 


undertaken to keep the 
Socialists' main social re- 
forms, which it initially vehe- 
mently opposed: the fifth paid 
week’s holiday, retirement at 
60, and improvements in 
family benefits, social security 
payments, and pensions. It 


tCT to build up jus prestofor about 43 percent of the total 


and the fight against his most 
dangerous rival, Raymond 
Barre. 

The campaign posters hare 
echoed the dearth of real 
issues. Immigration was ex- 
pected to be one but the 


munist Party. • Georges Marduis 

~ ~ ~ , 7 Aged 65. He has been secretary of the 

Small parties could French Communist Party since 1972 

be nearly wiped out £ii d S ptt K 1 ,S >r 5 a ^S'J^ rBC **“* 

mmm ^ l97 ^ 1x1 1974 ^ he was an 

unsuccessful presidential candidate. 
In only two departments. In behind-the-scenes-battles he has' 
the Nord and Paris, are there a beaten off several attempts by the 
sufficient number of seals (20 rank-and-file to remove him as party 
or more) for a party with only_ leader and replace him with someone 
5 percent of the vote to stand younger, brighter, more modern and 
a chance of winning a seat, attractive. Knows how to work tbe. 
The little parties are likely to party machine and play moderates off' 
be virtually annihila ted. . against hard-liners. He is a survivor 

It has been estimated that a a ada^h ffir hutlmtostmiid'oflhe 

apsgeaffx 

election campaign. 



(273*31%) 


Forecast 

1986 * 

- ’Based on 
opinion poSs 


Total nu mber 
ofaeafs. FM 


Loose fedostioa of parties formed hi 
1978, Eangfeg from thec«trete the far 
right, mcfai&ig flie^ Ceatre des 
jDemocrates Sorianx (CDS) and the 
dscanfian Parti R^mUfcam (PR). 
Hq^y idBl3Ci.tirided h its alle- 
gfance, and witiwot any dear leader. 
Most o utg oin g CDS deputies and a 
masher of PR deputies rapport Ray. 
mood Bane, hot he has coaristeatiy 
rriused to tabe leadmfalp of a party. 
Former President Giscard (TEmung, 
once the leadmg figjht in tike UDF, ao 
longer carries ranch weight. The 
President of the UDF, Jean Lecamxt^ 
atthmgh a fiamer minister, has had 
little impact er htflmtnce. Francois 
LtaCard, the yodog general secretary 
of PR, fa emerg i ng as a national figure. 


no-11% ) 

EEES — ( 5.5-7% ) 

■ (2-3%) 

ffil '.f3 






A 




In only two departments, 
the Nord and Paris, are there a 
sufficient number of seals (20 



.i* * *•,. / 


a chance of winning a seat. 
Die little parties are likely to 



I' 

v - ' 




>• 5. . fg: 


Z.-.r'T - '--.-* » ; 


Irav agreal to keep the guaran- debate his somehow never, 
teed minim um wage. It has no quite got off the ground. The 


plans to reintroduce the death 
penalty, abolished’ by the So- 


National Front, which has 
made immigration its top 


oalists, and it approves of campaign issue, appears to 
Socialist attempts to find as 'have been losing support re- 


national vote to win tbe 289 
seats needed to form an 
absolute majority in the new 
parliament. The UDF-RPR 
alliance currently scores be- 
tween 43 and 46 per cent in ’ 
tbe opinion polls. It has ruled 
out any question ofa pact with . 
the National Front, and has 
said it will not form a govern- 
ment unless it wins an abso- 
lute majority.. 


COMMUNIST 


many alternatives to prison as" oently. 


fWT- 
ta -"ftp 


Disable* 


mean 

helpless 




It’s astonishing, 
how quite a simple 
aid can often free 



The Socialists, who know 
they have no chance of in- 
creasing their present score of 
28-31 per cent to win an 
absolute majority, say they are 
prepared to form a minority 
government Some, indeed, 
say it should be their right to 
do so if they remain the largest 
single party in Parliament, 
which is possible. The Social- 
ists have not totally ruled oat 
a future alliance with the 
Communists, but say it is out 
ofthe question at present The 
Communists agree. So the 
Socialists are blithely talking 
of attracting a sufficient num- 
ber of individual moderates to 
give them the support they 
need to form a viable govern- 
ment. Quite where there indi- 
viduals will come from, no ’ 
one knows. 

Diana Geddes 


Founded In 1920. Bdgrim as the 
hugest left-wing party la France for 
more than 40 years, conristratiy 
getting between 20 and 25 per cent of 
the rate. They are now credited with 
only about 11 per cent of rating 
inten tions. An attempt by members 
with Enro-Commamst sympathies to 
reform and modernize tbe party after 
its severe set-back in the European 
Parliament elections in 1984 h»N , 
First Secretary Georges Marchais and 
the pro-Moscow hardliners stiU bold 
sway, although they have learnt to 
moderate their tone over (be years.Tbe 
party is vehemently opposed to 
“flexible” work patterns. Wants re- 
daction in working week and time off 
for vocational retraining without loss 
of pay. Increase Income tax for the 
wealthiest, and doable wealth tax. 
Progressive reduction of retirement 
age jrith priority ferMne-collar work- 
era. Increase all state benefits, with a 
guaranteed mi nimum of 2£00 francs 
(£250) a month for ad unemployed. 
Stop inflnx ofinunagrants, but Im prove 
conditions of those already here. 
Possible vote for imm igra n ts In local 
elections. Fight crime by fighting 
poverty. Retain French nuclear force, 
but promote p r ogressive world disar- 
mament. No to “Star Wars”. No to 
European defence. No to military 
integration into Nato. 


. . * 

W' 'V 

y?sv - 

%v; . 




Aged 57. President of ; foe National 
Front A former paratrooper, son ofa 
‘ Breton fisherman. Has degrees in law 


and political- science. .Long career on 
the far-right margins of politics. His 
deathcut good looks, sense ofhumour, 
and . energy attract a' cross-section of 
conservative French society. He de- 
nies be is a racist and has won every li- 
bel case against those who made that 
chare. National Front presidential 
ca ndidat e in 1974, winning 0.74 per 
cent of the vote. Elected to the 
European parliament in 1984. He 
confide ntly predicts a National Front 
poO of around 15 percent with 50 to 
.100 seats. The party has no seats at the 
moment 




NATIONAL FRONT 


Francois Mitterrand 


Agod 69. President of France smee directly elected by the people and 
C - v£ or *?5 r firat secretary of the means to serve his foil seven-year 
Soaaust Party. As President, he term. He gives no hint of how he wffl 
®° kmger belongs to any behave . if confronted by a right- wing 
( ^ a P ai S^g}iBTd government only that he will not 
P™"* 1 “■ remain “inert”. His popularity, which 


S^ C0Uld ' h h0W * V ^ !“ Wtarer^towfeaSS&S 

insists, however, that he has been his 


ion for being dangerous when 
is up against a waU. 


SOCIALIST 


«» A 5252[ l S l, - S0C ^ a ? s:t P a ^ fie,, ii iS* llce «ti» of modernizing FV»»r» r ^ 


|r^ntSoaalist Party wasfwioed iu taxes and levies. A gnarant^Tmin^ 

S mam .^ BC * m ^ fiw ' 411 < tb<ye « social 

Sf RmreeX Oppose denatioa- 


h*s suc c eed ed in slizatiio, but 
nmmg its dmereaces during the ‘‘flexibility” in nm 
preeri canpagn and to unite itself cawiMaiw Shwm 
- «hind its femer le^er and fmmd®, tion. provide grant 
Francois Mitterrand. Manifesto to return borne!; 


Mniaip fl. 


Founded in 1972 by Jesa-Marie Le 
Fra, now party prerident Obtained 
less than 2 percent of the vote until tile 
rise m rarism hi France at the time of 
ti»e 1983 economic crisis. In tbe 1984 

. European elections got 10J1 per cent of 

the vote, almost level with the Comma- 
res ts. Ma nifesto promises to abolish 
all' restraints on the economy, reduce 
muon power and promote individual 
contra^ between employer and em- 
ployee^ Progressively replace income 
tax by indirect taxation. Replace state 
soqal security system as for as 
passible by private insaraitoe schemes. 
WTO priority of fobs to French 
ranonals. Expel immigrants who lose 
tranr jobs or who are found guilty of 
otoks. No family and social security 
totems for mimigrants. No automatic 
grach ttetionalrty for those from 
PTOnoe s former North African colo- 
Bring bade death penalty. Strfet- 
er ^aphne in prisons. No remission 


to continue. along tbe present force. Condemns Star 


itfaa nuclear 
ars initiative. 


a disabled person from dependence on others and 
allow them to lead an active, independent, fuller life. 

Dressing with one hand (even lying a shoelace) can 
be made quite easy. People with impaired speech 
and movement can communicate readily, or 
summon help, without making a sound. Countless 
aids, some simple, some hi-tech, are helping 
disabled people to move, hear, see, cook, work and 
play - living a normal life - in ways they had never 
dreamed possible. And all because the Disabled 
Living Foundation is seeking out ways to help them 
and is passing this information on. 


on nalioittl and dvfl 
conscr ip tion. 


Still life in the old Dog 


Please help to keep this vital service going. Your 
donation, or your legacy, will mean a fuller life for 
so many people. 

And if you are disabled, or know someone else who 
is, it could be worth getting in touch with the 
Foundation to see what aids may be available. It 
could be a new beginning! 


Disabled 1 pawq 1 
Living Foundation 


Practical help in daily living for aB disabled people 

Rxxnu 150, 380/384 Hamm- Road, London W9 2 HU. 
TeL 01-289 6111. ■ 


Tin now a tourist in life as 
well as in London — 1 can 
enjoy myself again", Vivian 
StansbaD says as be demol- 
ishes a generous plateful of 
Viennas and salt beef in a 
North London restaurant. The 
former ringleader of tbe 
Bonzo Dog Band and one- 
time purveyor of “an with a 
capital F" is in London on a 
rare visit from Bristol Docks, 
where he lives on an old 
Sunderland coaster, the 
Thekla, which has been turned 
intoa rockandjazz venue, the 
Old Profanity Showboat 
is almost a year since he 

would have been a terminal 
addiction to tranquillizers. 
Now he is evangelical in his 
loathing and distrust of the 
pills, and the appalling medi- 
cal ignorance of the cost of 
withdrawal The man who 
wrote such comic dareics as 
“Intro and Outre", "Can Blue 
Men Sing the Whites?" and 
“My Pink Half of the 
I Drainpipe" sounds now like a 
walking pharmacopoeia as he 
describes the effects of 14 
years' reliance on 
tranquillizers. 

JTve alway s been an exrit- 


Emerging from a pill 
strewn lost weekend 
of 14 years* duration, 
the pop humorist 
Vivian Stanshall 
(right) is getting 
back to abnormal 


: 




msmv 



able ami anxious workaholic, 
and one day in 1971 I coll- 
apsed on the floor and woke 
up to find Td been prescribed 
pills tocalm me down. At first 
it was 30 milligrams a day, but 
within a short time I found I 
could not function without 
them. At the time I wholly 
believed in doctors and by 
1976 1 was taking between 200 
and 300 milligrams of Valium 
and Librium a day. Then Td 
have the booze to accelerate 
the effect ofthe pill s. 

In the early 1 980s, Stanshall 
was living on a boat in 
Chertsey with his second wife, 
Pamela Longfellow, a tough 
part-lroquois Californian, 
who had some success in 
getting him to work again. But 


in 1984 Stanshall was on his 
own, Uving in one room in his 
decaying submarine-chaser, 
suffering increasingly severe 
anxiety attacks and acute ago- 
rapfaobaa. Friends eventually 
got him to try various cures, 
and at Broadway Lodge near 
Weston-super-Mare he was 
eventually weaned. 

“But withdrawal was, ami 


still is. a terrifying experience. 
There’s a wond of difference 
between withdrawal, from 
heavy drugs or alcohol and 
from tranquillizers. I saw 
people get off heroin In 10 
days and then that's that 
There are all sorts of miracu- 
lous cures for junkies and 
alcoholics and terrific follow- 
ups available. With 


benzodiazepam. all the | 
tranquillizers, there’s virtually 
noth ing . Stanshall is active in 
a . local Pills Anonymous 
group, where he gives m valu- 
able advice to others (mainly 
■young housewives) who are 
trying to give up these pais." 

At Christmas, Stanshall 
demonstrated Ms recovery 
with a remarkable musical he 
wrote and directed at the Old 
Profanity Showboat; called 
Stinkfoot A bizarre comic 
opera on tbe rbenMofregexier. 
atiou, it included characters 
which ranged from an oracu- 
larvemri] oquist’s dummy and 
a giant squid to a partly 
cooked shnmp and a feisty 
tomcat. It proved that the 
creator. -.of that saga of 
artistocratic lunacy Rawlinson 
End (where the family crest is 
Omnes blotto and dinner is 
followed by billiards onhorse- 
back) is back on fora. 

His next project is to record 
Stinkfoot and then write a 
series of children^ -books. 
After that? He. might do- a 
book about somethu%'fie.is 
well qualified to write about— 
the dangers nf traaq mllacpi. 

Richard Gilbert 


ACROSS 
I Fen (5) 

4 Can vass (7) ■ 

8 Fictitious story (S) 

9 Padded scat (7) 

10 Rnadtanier(8) 

11 Bor&(4) 

13 Rougb(H) ' 

17 Bound (4) 

U Badoa^s dozen (8) 

2] Strict moralist (7) 

22 Maggot (5) 

23 Not active (7) 

24 Tom aside (2) 

down 

1 Tmy{6) 

2 Nomad (5) 

3 Chopper anport (8) 

4 Securities market 

- <5.8) 

$ Gnat deal (4) 

6 Dense (7) 



1 

rk 


8 






■ 




>0 

L, 





i 

i 



Hi 

14 



IS 

■ 




17 

3 r 

■ 

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6 Dense (7) 14 f • ’ ■ 

7 TWBtconfosuig|y{Q B '2’X W,d ® 

12 Ram canopy (8) !6 {ggS (<a ^feedfeca»<4) 

B mm 


r 


m 







if -v> ; fr 

' . ••, i-fT' 

(><■ ■■■ r. r: 


Val^jyGfscard (TEstaing 

ff 60. Pineadeht of France 1974- 
I. Deputy for the Pay du Ddme 
e 1984. Sis with UDF era an in 


since 1984. Sts with UDF group is. 

o^*?to?on»er has mucfrSluenoe 
eftber with UDF or t fie country. Is 
nevertheless considered one of the 
three mainopposrrion leaders and still 
listened to with respect Remains a 


foo 


20 




-■ 


- .i-'V*r 


V<‘j • 

« , ( | > 11 ■ «, .• , 





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‘n .'Ki-. - 
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"V-jTrl'l -■ V 






* 

3 ! a * 


THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 I QSfi 

MONDAY PAGE 


Parallel voices amid Africa 


lie mWrf!? ?cly apartheid. 

BSSSESSfc; 


A«~. WeU ;? eami, 8 whi le South 
Africans. Her struggle has been 
ju*. and honesTXiy of ^ 
views are shared by all of us. Fora 
««g time she was a lone voice in 
white South Africa, in the white 
Parliament, one of the few voices 
tnai expressed to some extent our 
view^ I remember particularly 
that she visited my husband and 

S5T '"‘■““•^Pnsonera on 
Robben Island CD during those 
early years when conditions were 
extremely difficult for them in 
pnson. Together with the Red 
Ctoss, she played a major role in 
gemng then- conditions improved. 

.She has really been the con- 
Kience of white South Africa. Her 
fight against apartheid has been a 
very just fight and a very honour- 
able one. Within the limits set by 
ihe South African racist regime 
she has played a very valuable 
role, and 1 don’t think she has now 
reached the limits of what she as a 
white South African can do to 
“ght apartheid from within the 
system. 

is. of course, up to her to 
decide whether the time has come 
to leave Parliament She must be 
free to choose to own political 
path. But, personally, I cann ot see 
any room any more for a purely 
white opposition to racist Pre- 
toria. The Botha ® . regime has 

successfully destroyed the role of a - 

Ajkit. ft :u n — 


MP, and WmiUe Mandela, the wife of the 
Med African National Congress (ANQ 
leader. Nelson Mandela. 

In exclusive interviews with Michael 
Hornsby, they Calk about each other, their 
political differences, and a future in which 

they might even belong to the same party. 


ashing them to join Umkbonto 
We Sizwe ® or the African 
National Congress while it is still 
banned. But they could join the 
United Democratic Front ® . In 
the end, all the democratic forces 
of the country will have to finite to 
bring down the racist regime in 
Pretoria— 

I have always disagreed with 
Helen's opposition to economic 
sanctions. But she is not in the 
dog-house (loud laugh}. Our dis- 
agreements do not affect our 
relationship at alL I understand 
that she is speaking from a white 
perspective. But we are rather sick 
and tired of hearing from whites 
that we are the ones who would 
suffer (from sanctions) as if we are 
not already suffering. We are 
sayimg that .we want to suffer once 
and for all and shorten our 
and sanctions are the only peace s 
fid course that is open to us to 


South Africa itself has shown by 
its treatment of Lesotho, its 
strangling of poor little Lesotho, 
what sanctions can da They 


f You know, ifsvny difficult 
'to remember when I first 
Hdft met Winnie. I think I proba- 
bjy made contact with her 
the first time I visited to 
husband. Nelson, on Robben Is- 
land, and that would have been 
back in 1967. She is a woman of 
neat personal charm and vivacity. 
She's very articulate, and extreme- 
ly $ood-Loofcmg. As a politician, 
she s damned shrewd. She plays 
her cards very well, and knows 
how to handle the media. She 
always gives them their money's 
worth either in Quotable quotes or 
just by looking ravishing. And of 
course, the government has played 
right into her Hand s by its ludi- 
crous harassment of her. 

■ I think the way die has weath- 
ered the very hard life of having 
her husband locked up all these - 
years shows a lot of guts. She has 
also retained a remarkable sense 
of humour. There is no trace of 
selfpity or anti-white racism in 
her. She takes people as people 
and either likes them or not, 
regardless of race. She’s a formida- 


« iin.i.nria uw uu. iney , , — — — — ■ 

brought down Leabua ® in a weeL “** A 7? 1 * 

We are asking the international • “? shrinking violet, 

community to do exactlvth« *n.w* and even if Nelson were to be 


white (liberal) opposition. That 
has been confirmed by the resigna- fln 
tion of Van Zyl Slabbert ® . He tri 

was quite right in believing that be a i 

was getting nowhere. 

Helen may not like to admit it 
publicly, but the feet is that there K 1 
is only one opposition to a racist Js*l 
South Africa and that is the 
African National Congress. Pre-. ■ _ 
toria is still talking about reform- ' 1101 
ing apartheid. We have never 
fought for a reformed, apartheid * 
regime. We are not fighting for a " 
Notified apartheid regime. Our 
fight is for the total abolition of. J 01 
apartheid. We no longer see any * 
role for gradualism, because Pre- 
toria has told os in so many words wiM 
that it is not prepared to end flan 
apartheid even by gradual, negoti- 
a ted change. Pretoriadoesn’t “P* 
speak that kind of langnager of H 
\ --...not . 

That doesn’t mean there is no are ' 
role for liberal whites opposed to ■ struj 
the government We still believe will 
we can play a very meaningful role own 
together. Our doors have always cons 
been open to people like Helen me. 
Suzman and Slabbert. No one is heyc 


community to do exactly the same 
' thing to South Africa^ as South 
Africa did to Lesotho. . 

- ft is nonsensical speculation to 
say that my husband’s views have 
changed in prison or that be has 
become a communist He remains 
a nationalist, and he . remains 
committed to the oppre ss ed peo- 
pie of his country. His views are 
identical with those he expressed 
and expounded in his speech at his 
trial in 1964®. I don’t know what 
a Communist is in South Africa. 
The government calls ah its 
opponents communists. Mandela 
is totally committed to the views 
expressed in the Freedom Charter 
® . He believes in a future South 
. Africa which is for ah, a constitu- 
tion that embodies everyone irre- 
spective of colour. 

Helen says she does not know 
whether Mandda would still have 
the support of the radicalizied 
.young bracks of today. The answer 

to that lies in the feet that to this 

.day children who were not born 
when he went into prison sing his 
name and eulogize the man. His 
name is synonomous with the 
liberation of the oppressed people 
of this country ^ -Fftrsonally, I am ■ 
.not Interested in political office: I 
are just part and parcel of the 
struggle of the people] and I 
win continue to play my 
own little role which 
consider is an honour for - 
me. I have no ambitions M 
beyond that. ^ . 


freed, I don’t think she'd be 
content to play the little woman, if 
I have judged her correcttyL. 

On one occasion when I visited 
Winnie in Brandfort the ywa| 
branch descended on us. We sat 
and chatted while these big, burly 
fellows went round co nfiscating 
papers and taking books off the - 
shelves. They ended up by taking a 

-black, green and yellow bedspread 
off the bed in to room. I said: 
“What cm earth are you taking that 
for?*’ The police just looked at me. 
Then I said, “Ah, I see now, ANC 
(African National .Congress) col- 
. ours, this is a subversive 
bedspread”. Winnie and I had a 
good laugh over that_. 

That was two or three years ago. 
Since then 1 have only been in 
contact with to by phone and 
tetter, or through her lawyer. She 
hasn't confirmed it to me person- 
ally, but 2 think I may be in the 
dog-house because I haven’t taken 
the line of calling for internatio nal 
economic sanctions. Sanctions 
would hurt ail of us, black and 
white, as weU as neighbouring 
countries. It is easy for Winnie to 
say bfecfcs are prcpared tb suffer 
for liberation because she hasn't 
got a job that would be threatened 
by sanctions. She’s also deluded in 
thinking that sanctions would be a 
short, stop campaign, leading to 
the collapse of the government It 
wouldn't be Hke ithaL It would be a 
long war of attrition during which 



BIOGRAPHIES 


Mandela 

Nomzamo “she who strives” 
Winnie Mandela was bom in 1934 
at Bizana in Poncloland, part of 
the Xhosa-speaidng Transkel, the 
daughter of a teacher. 

She married Nelson Mandela in 
1958. Her elder by 16 years, he 
was already a member of the 
national executive of the African 
National Congress (ANC). She 
herself was active in the 
organization until it was banned 
In1960. 

In 1964 her husband was 
convicted of sabotage and 
sentenced to kfe Imprisonment 
With her husband in fail, she has 
worked tirelessly, despite 
constant police harassment, to 
keep his name alive. 

Since 1976 she has been a 
“banned" person, subject to 
restrictions on her movements. 
She was held in solitary 
confinement for 17 months in 
1969-70. 

Suzman 

Helen Suzman has been a 
member of the South African 
Parliament for 32 years, 
representing the Johannesburg 
constituency of Houghton. For 
1 3 years she was the only anti- 
apartheid voice in Parliament 
Bom on November 7. 1917, Just 


OP 
Jrr 
S os 
5- s ; 
u- de 


s nd 


Over the colour ban Helen Suzman (left) and Winnie Mandela with a bedspread in African National 
kSF 1655 S 0 /® 1 ?? which was given to Mrs Mandda by American congressmen soon after a similar 
bedspread had been confiscated by Brandfort prison officers. The two women have not met since 


toe government would withdraw 
into its laager and its resistance to 
change would be stiffened, not 
weakened. Economic sanctions 
imposed from within the country 
by toe growing power of Mack 
trade unions make much more 
sense to me. But the unions 
to braid up their strength and 
organization first— 

Winnie says I should follow 
Slabbert' s example and leave Par- 
liament I can’t agree. It would be 
tragic if the opposition in Parlia- 
ment consisted only of right-wing 
elements who would do their best 
to stop the government’s already 
faltering racial reforms in their 
tracks. like it or not, ’political 
power m this country is stiD In 
white hands and Parliament is at 
present the only place where 
changes can be turned into legisla- 
tion and toe government ques- 
tioned and held to account. The 
rote of the extra-parliamentary 
opposition is very important, and . 


I see it as complimentary to, and 
not in conflict with, what I am 
doing. Our objectives may not be 
identical in every respect, but they 
are certainly identical in wanting 
to get rid of apartheid- 
I have little doubt that the ANC 
has toe support of toe majority of 
Macks. The government has got to 
take the plunge and release 
Mandela and the other political 
prisoners and unban the ANC and 
negotiate with it I don't pretend it 
wouldn't be a gamble. A lot would 
depend on whether the ANC, 
given freedom to operate legally, 
would go for non-violent meth- 
ods. The government would als» 
have to make big concessions, 
dismantle apartheid and be pre- 
pared to discuss toe transfer of 
political power. That’s not going 
to be easy-. 

Personally, 1 would have no 
problems in sitting round a negoti- 
ating table with people like Win- 
nie and Nelson. Obviously, 


whether we could work in the 
same party would depend on 
whether we could agree on the 
. same policies. It is hard to tell 
what sort of press freedom and 
free association, what degree of 
economic free enterprise, and so 
on, would be alloired under an 
ANC government The present 
leaders, like Oliver Tarnbo @ and, 
as lar as I know, Mandela, say they 
want these things, but whether toe 
oldtime black nationalists would 
still be calling toe shots then is 
another matter. One doesn't know 
how far the realty radical elements 
have gone beyond Mack national- 
ism, and want a black marxist 
government, with no element of a 
free society. I don’t believe that 
either Winnie or Nelson favour 
that kind of extremism.They 
mjght have to in order to 
retain leadership, but l don't M 
think that would be their 
natural instinct. We shall M 
have to see. er • 


Jewish immigrants from 
Lithuania. Sira was first returned to 
Parliament in April, 1953, as a 
member of the United Party. 
Suzman and a small group of 
other United Party MPs broke 
away to form the Progressive 
, Party, which became the official 
opposition.She has been a 
relentless critic of the 
government’s security 
legislation, conditions in its prisons 
and abuses of human rights. 

FOOTNOTES 

,® . The Alcatraz-style prison 
on an island in Tabto Bay. 

■ 0 President P. W. Botha, 

Head of State. 

® Dr Frederik Van Zyt 
Sabbert, Leader of the Progressive 
Federal Party, the main 
Opposition in the House of 
Assembly, from 1979 until 
February 7 of this year, when he 


© Umkhonto We Sizwe 
(Zulu for "Spear of the Nation") is 
the military arm of the African 
National Congress. 

. 9 The United Democra tic 
Rant, launched in 1963. a loose 
coaRHon of more than 600 anti- 
apartheid groups. 
w Chief Leabua Jonathan, 
former prime minister of Lesotho, 

0 At las trial Mandela said 
ha regarded himself "in the first 
place as an African patriot". He 
<ras not a communist 
O The Freedom Charter 

was approved by a Congress of the 
People m 1955 and adopted by 
.the ANC as to manifesto. 

0 Oliver Tambo is the 
acting President of the ANC 


Too good to be true 


“You finish this book feeling 
belter... You believe yon can 
do h too”, reads a review in 
Punch of Lee Iacocca’s autobi- 
ography. Speak for yourself, 
Punch. I know perfectly wdl 
that I would only have to get 
three pages into Mr Iacocca’s 
book before I began to feel 
very much worse. Far from 
being convinced that I, Hke 
Mr L could save an ailing 
motor company and be in toe 
running for President of the 
United States, I would get that 
horrible conviction that I am 
toe sort of inadequate who 
couldn't find her way out of a 
paper bag. 

That is the trouble with 
autobiographies — everyone 
who writes one seems to have 
blessings showered upon them 
from the cradle to the grave. 
Even if they grow up in slums, 
their parents are wildly sup- 
portive and take in washing so 
that their baby can finish high 
school They either many 
their childhood sweetheart 
and live happily ever after, or 
have one of those mutually 
regretful divorces where both 
sides agree that ifs for the best 
and vow to remain friends for 
ever. People in autobiogra- 
phies never admit to having 
rows over who is to retain 
custody of the best dinner- 
service or wishing that their 
ex-husband would lose all his 
hair - both of which are 
common practice in real life. 

When auto biographers get 
in, their sickness is of a 
lhrilling ly dramatic nature 


- •.**** 




„ T,. lonsoiaaiea Amaigamatea 

PENIS 1 \ deal”, when their eyes fed on a 

DIJDD T< r ' r L r ) n °te informing them that 

rCIUUviV y Honey has run off to New 

r. ^ Mexico with her hairdresser. 

position where he is today In foci, I shouldn’t be 
without a certain amount of . surprised if their lives do have 
skulduggery and. back-slab- a few tittle hiccups here and 
bring. But autobiograpfcers there but to learn about them. 


that my family photograph 
album is a lengthy record of 
yelling babies, slipping bra- 
straps, uncombed hair and 
honeymoon couples who have 
quite obviously not been cm 

- speaking terms fin- a consider- 
able length of time. 

I think my attitude towards 
the seffconfessedty successful 
is perfectly normal. Like ev- 
eryone else, I just want them 

- to pay the price of feme. I 
should like them to come 
home one evening shouting, 
“Honey, I just made a million, 
sqoilhon smackeroos on the 
Consoldated Amalgamated 
deal”, when their eyes fed on a 
note informing them that 
Honey .has run off to New 
Mexico' with her hairdresser. 

In foci, I shouldn’t be 
surprised if their lives do have 


never have to. learn how to 
make enemies and destroy 
people. Generous-minded cot- 
leagues who know a great 
talent when they see ft dear a 
path so that Our Hero can take 
over the role of Hamlet at and 
five minutes notice/take com- 
mand of a secret military 
operation/take over the chair- 
manship of International 
United Combined Trading 
Limited. 

The number one problem 
with autobiographies is that 
toe authors of them mana^ to 
have everything: wonderful 
heart-warming relationships 
with their parents* spouses 
and chidren. the friendly co- 


we usually have to wait for a 
hiogmphy - the unauthorized 
version. 

• My hotel room in Paris had 
no tetevisipn, shoe-cleaning kit 
or coffee-making equipment 
Instead ii had a brass bedstead 
on a bed that encouraged 
,, friendly relations to break out 
Every available surface was 
covered in den-of- iniquity red 
plush and swagged, draped 
and gilded within an inch of its 
life. The only view was qf 
pigeons on the rooftop across 
the street getting up to no good. 
This also seemed to add to the 
romance. It would be difficult 
to find suck a room in a 
London hotel Luxury there is 


providing umpteen cliff-bang- operation of their coDeagnes Y 1 *™. 

ere: “The doctors said! would , and a dose rirde of friends,' to be-ajang-size. 


never recover but I knew that I 
had to or Td be letting Margie 
and toe kids down”, so that 
they become resulting in them 
becoming fer, for belief people 
than they were, before. Com- 
mon ailments tike corns, indi- 
gestion and prostate trouble 
seem to pass them by. 

Their children are always 


fectionaie with maybe a touch 
of youthful high-spirits during 
adolescence: “We still laugh at 
the r™» Junior backed his car 
into a hamburger joint right 
after toe Senior rrom but 
Betty Sue and I talked it over 
and decided to bay the kid a 
Rolls Royce for ■ his 17fo 
birthday and were fori'fled to 
see that being held responsible 
for bs own possessions made 
him much more, carefuL" 
Outside of autobiographies, 
I don’t know cine successful 
person who has reached toe 


some of whom go back to toe 
time when they all did a paper- 
round toother as skinny fonr- 
y ear-olds 

The questions one wants 
answered is how, if they stay 
up every night planning take- 
over bids and spend every day 
zooming around the country 
m their private jet, do they 
have all toe wonderful, heart? 
warming, jetatfonsbips. 

In toe middle of most 
autobiographies j$ a thick 
wodge of . photographs in 
which no one ever bas toe sun 
In todr eyes, a ladder in their 
stocking or a frown on todr 
face. How is'" this? ' Do 
autoMographefs hire Lord 
Snowdon at an early stags in 
their careers to take fife ramity 
snapshots? . There 'are two 
reasons why.. I could never 
write my autobiography: the 


bed a television with remote 
control to watch while you are 
in it and masses of gleaming 
storage-space painted In anti- 
septic-looking white. To spot 
die : difference between the 
English and the French you 
need look no fitrther than to 
what each nation considers to 


TALKBACK 


From: Mrs Barbar a Petm, 

St Peter Port, 

Guernsey 

I read Carofine Mmnfoad’j 
article (“When life begins an 
■W • 12 February) with inter- 
est, some amusement and 
profenad relief that I did not 
read it some 21 years ago. It 
was then, at the age of 41, 1 
gave birth to my first child 
after five years of marriage. 
My pregnancy was perfectly 
normal, with no sickness, 
morning or otherwise. 

Perhaps the successful re- 
sult can be attributed to the 
following: a doctor who was 
sensible enough to assure me 

that I was as fit as the average 

girl of 20; no radical change m 
habits; a grandmother who 
had her first child at 41 and a 
mother who had my youngest 
sister just before her 42nd 
birthday. 

I have no rloubt that there 
are many women whose expe- 
rience of pregnancy in their 
mature years has been equal- 
ly uneventful and perhaps if 
the experts stopped treating 
■s as goiatric problems, pro- i 
riding the mother is healthy, 
it would be a great deal better. 

Older parents tend to be 
more stable, patient and, 
bang fer enough away from 
their own childhood to be 
objective, more understand- 
ing of the tramoas of growing 
up. Our daughter, a bright 
healthy 21-year-old at Uni- 
versity borrows her fethert 
and ray clothes, my make-wp 
and jewellery ami does not 
consider that, m their 60s, her 
parents Are beyond redump- 
tion. 

From: Lene Orchard, 

Burkes Road, 

Buckinghamshire 

Although foil of sympathy 
with wanes who want to have 




^ each nation considers tt> 
jttaf sleeping, mange- ^ 


ments ‘ . phB. I feel some reservation 

• I cannot toink how I could about this option, 
have^ mistaken Nod Coward’s When you are '40, yon 
Nina from Amentum, for ocfoaBy feel yomxg, so the 
somebody completely differ- thought of a first baby may 
art called LMa, as Idid in Iaa seem entirety reasonable, 
week’s cotamiL But I did and However, 10-15 years later on 
several readers have pat me the picture looks different 


right and taken the trouble to 
write out toe complete lyric in 


Copi ng with sdKwkhildren 
tenting teo teenagers at an 


wme /^ autobiography: the that it really was 
first is that Lcowdnl afford was at it again, befon 
the tibel MBs and toe. second is _ any more concisions. 


its various verions, which 1 age when foe mother may fed 
amnow committing to mono- less than 100% herself, may 
ty. I am also going back to toe not be the best tonic in the 
Master’s song-book to died; world. Net to speak of toe 
that it' realty 'was.il/foe who financial strains of patting 
was at it agam, before I cause children through university 
any more confbsdons. , when yon are about to retire! 


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THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


,;v *■••• 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Untrue 
to type 


Thatcher’s new tax tactics 

liter's favourite new Qo-foVi T-Tri0XX a cut in the basic rate c 

the nurse who pays too *-/j ualqii AaU&p from an increase in a 


Labour inquisitors looking into 
Tony Muftieam's future in the 
party may be interested, to learn 
that his solidarity with the far left 
is only skin deep. Mulheam's 
paymaster is none other than 
Rupert Murdoch. Liverpool's 
controversial council leader works 
for printers Eric Bemrose, a 
wholly owned subsidiary of 
Murdoch's News International. 
“Tony is a compositor, and works 
on the News of the World colour 
supplement" said a colleague. “So 
what?" said Mulheant "You've 


Mrs Thatcher's favourite new 
example of the nurse who pays too 
much tax is the clearest indication 
yet of a change of income tax 
policy in next month's Budget, 
The big clue lies in the wage 
quoted by the Prime Minister — 
£140 a week. At this level, Mrs 
Thatcher’s tax-burdened nurse 
would benefit less from the 
government's usual method of 
cutting income tax — raising the 
threshold - than from a straight- 
forward cut in the 30 per cent 
basic rate. 

After slicing 3p off the base rate 
of income tax in 1979, the 
government has since spent all its 
free cash on increases in personal 
allowances. These have risen 15 
per cent more than inflation since 
this government came to power. 
The same money could have been 
spent cutting the basic tax rate to 
26.5 per cent But for years 


wnatr said Mufoeara. "You ve ministers preached the virtues of 
got to work for someone. Anyway 2 ugh er allowances, as a way of 
I m not speaking to The Times, helping the poor by "taking them 
and 1 suggest you put the phone ou t of tax". Backbenchers were 
down befo re t hi ngs get rrmvinced. Now Mrs Thatcher is 


unpleasant." Meanwhile Liver- 
pool council, at Mulfaearn's be- 
hest. has ordered its 31,000 
workers not to speak to the 
Liverpool Post and Echo news- 
papers because S3 of their printers 
were recently made redundant. 
Solidarity — or could it have 
something to do with Mulheam’s 
analysis of the Echo s leaders? 
Between October and November 
last year only two out of 37 
acknowledged the city's "need" 
for more government cash. 


Brittanalysis 


A reader has unearthed an article 
of Leon Brittan’s, How the Tories 
Can Win, in a dusty copy of The 
Illustrated London News of Janu- 
ary 18, 1969 (when H. Wilson was 
at No 10). Talk about plus < a 
change! Brirtan expounds: "As 
governments approach the end of 
their term of office there seems to 
be a tendency, irrespective of 
party, for administrative bungles 
to occur with increasing fre- 
quency. If the opposition can spot 
these at an early stage and coolly 
but ruthlessly expose them in the 
House of Commons, this can have 
a devastating effect on the morale 
of a tired government and its 
supporters." He also says: "The 
one thing that puts the electorate I 
off a political party more than any 
other is the spectacle of it being 
tom by internal strife... This 
danger now feces the Tories." 


Open book 


Talking about plus ca change. 
another reader thinks that this 
H. E. Chapman novel, which he 
has just come across, must be 



essential reading for all Westland 
addicts: unlike the real thing, it 
carries the disclaimer “This story, 
its plot, incidents, characters and 
dialogue is FICTION from begin- 
ning to end." 


Shown the door 


A spot of spice this morning for 
the crusty colonels at the East 
India Gub in St James's (whose 
members include- one 
D. Thatcher): Michael Dickson, 
who has been a regular guest at the 
club for the past 10 years, has been 
banned by its chairman. Com- 
mander whajley. Yesterday Dick- 
son told me of his felony: he was 
recently named as adviser to the 
dub's ex-potter, Samuel Parks, 
who today lodges a claim for 
unfair dismissal. When Parks 
refused a small sum of money to 
withdraw, then a much larger sum, 
Dickson stuck his neck out and 
announced that the porter would 
not be "bought off." 


BARRY FANTONI 



‘Evening, Norman. Large 
take-over and soda' 


Hit parade 

Elton John took Watford to 
Wembley. Now Rick Wakeman, 
star of a thousand meaningful 
songs, is striving to do the same 
for Camberiey Town of the 
Vauxhall-Opel League (division 
two south), of which he is chair- 
man. Camberiey are due to 
play Halesowen Town of the West 
Midlands League in the quarter- 
final of the FA Vase — the first 
time they have got so far in the. 
competition. Wakeman has al- 
ready gone one better than Elton 
John - he has actually played at 
Wembley, io a charity warm-up to 
the final of the Freight Rover 
Trophy last season. 


helping the poor by "taking them 
out of tax". Backbenchers were 
convinced. Now Mrs Thatcher is 
having difficulty persuading them 
of the virtues of lower rates. 

An increase in tax allowances is 
the easiest tax cut. It can be done 
in conveniently small slices. The 
basic rate cannot sensibly be 
reduced by less than Ip at a time, 
and this costs £1.2 billion a year in 
lost revenue. Bui personal allow- 
ances can be raised m £10 steps — 
each costing only £74 million a 
year in lost revenue. Allowances 
have to be increased every year, in 
any case, if their real value is not 
to be eroded by inflation; the 
necessary increase this year is 
£1 30 for a single person, £200 fora 


married man. Quite a small real 
increase on top of that looks 
misleadingly generous. 

An increase in allowances at- 
tracts political support mainly 
because it is supposed to give most 
benefit to the poorest taxpayers. In 
fact, it actually gives most to the 
best -off An increase in the basic 
allowance shunts up each higher- 
rate threshold too: so a taxpayer 
feeing a 60 per cent marginal rate 
gains exactly twice as much as a 
basic-rate taxpayer. 

This certainly is not in tone with 
Mrs Thatcher’s latest theme: that 
it is the bottom half of taxpayers 
who need help, but it is a problem 
rather easily dealt with. If the 
width of the basic-rate tax band is 
shortened by the same amount 
that allowances are increased, 
every taxpayer gains the same cash 
benefit -which means that the 
poorest taxpayers get the- largest 
percentage cut in their total tax 

bills. 

A raising of allowances is com- 
monly supposed to lessen the 
“poverty trap" In feet, that too is 
a misconception. The “poverty 
trap" catches those low-paid fam- 
ily men who find that any increase 
in earnings is virtually wiped out 
by the consequent loss of means- 
tested benefits, combined with an 
increase in their income tax bills. 
In other words, they face "mar- 
ginal tax rates" that are sometimes 
over 100 percent 

The trouble is that most of these 
family breadwinners are clustered 
at income levels above the point 
to which the Chancellor could 


hope to raise thresholds. So those 
"taken out of tax" by a general 
increase in allowances tend to be 
part-time working wives and 
pensioners. 

These absurd "marginal tax 
rates" are in part the product of 
Britain's exceptionally high start- 
ing rate of tax. Most other tax 
systems begin well below 30 per 
cent; hence the growing support 
for a cut in the basic rale- The. 
trouble; again, is that the kind of 
reductions the Chancellor could 
afford would not make much 
difference to the depth of the 
poverty trap. It still might be the 
Chancellor’s best bet 

Catting the basic rate is an even 
more expensive way of helping the 
very poorest than raising allow- 
ances, because it gives more cash 
to the better-paid. Compare, for 
example, the effects of a penny cut 
in the basic rate with a 5 per cent 
increase in allowances, as cal- 
culated by the Institute for Fiscal 
Studies. These would cost the 
Chancellor roughly the same. 

If allowances were increased, all 
those still in the basic-rate tax net 
would gain the same: dose on £1 a 
week for married men, 65p for a 
single person or married woman. 
If the rate were cut. those at the 
bottom of the tax scale would gain 
hardly anything. At £20,000 a year 
or more, taxpayers would receive 
the maximum benefit: oyer. £3 a 
week. 

The due to Mrs Thatcher's 
strategy, however, is that tax- 
payers on quite modest levels of 
income would still do better from 


a cut in the basic rate of tax than 
from an increase in allowances. 
For single people, the balance of 
advantage • shifts away from 
thresholds at about £106 a week; 
even for a married man, basic-rate 
cuts are better if his income 
reaches £166 a week. And these 
middle-of-tbe-tax-road groups be- 
gin to look very much like Mis 
Thatcher’s new priority. 

There is one final due. The 
paradoxof the income tax system 
is that the more allowances are 
increased, the fewer people pay tax 
— and so less is then lost by 
reducing the rate at which they pay 
it Equally; the moire the rate of 
income tax is reduced, foe less the 
government receives on every 


Anne Sofer 

Centre forward 




The Labour Party, as William 
Rodgers remarked at a private 
meeting last week, is trying to 
become the $DP Mark 2. 

For those of us who nave some 
acquaintance with .the Labour 
Party on the ground, this is 

laughable. Take as ah example the 


mamifecturing economy" (Wal- 
den described that ns a "’complete 
and very dear answer”). ' 

In foe real world (and the "real 
world’, like foe “middle ground", 
is a current cliche .for where the 
action is) this just will not do. 
There are real conflicts to be 
resolved between freedom and 




toc^e^fewroaSerav rax teSand thriving Lab** Party in resolved 

mcraseo, me rewer people pay rax (one of equality and between production 

income lax is reduced, the less the dep oring the witch-hunt fci^hote conversation was 

paund of taxable income — and so geo|udcfenoeo fB, ™draKrFann ™ -ffi UKST ELS 
the loss from making it tax-free is <££***&*■•* ffiSrc it was SXfinding 


proportionately lower. 

Now the Chancellor wants, 
eventually, to make a huge in- 
crease in the tax allowances of one 
group: those married men with 
non-working wives. He can do tirisr 
by introducing "transferable al- 
lowances" for husbands and 
wives, so that a sole breadwinner 
would get, in. effect, two allow- 
ances. Such a change, to be 
outlined in foe Chancellor’s green 
paper on tax, win have to wait for 
the Inland Revenue's new com- 
puters. 

In the meantime, the Chan- 
cellor can cut its eventual cost by 
reducing the basic rate of tax. If he 
were to achieve that old govern- 
ment aim of a 25 per cent basic 
rate, any Increase in allowances 
would cost 15 per cent less than it 
does today. 

The author is Economics Editor cf 
The Times. 


Lawrence Freedman on Western Europe’s nuclear missile dilemmas 


If there is one thing that worries 
West European governments 
more than US-Soviet confronta- 
tion, it is US-Soviet co-operation. 
After years of pleading with the 
Reagan administration for a more 
positive stance on arms control as 
an excellent means of improving 
East- West relations and reassuring 
public opinion, they are now 
having to think through the 
implications of possible agree- 
ments. 

The main European concern 
stems from the feet foal Mikhail , 
Gorbachov has been so mis- 
chievous as to embrace a concept 
long associated with President 
Reagan — the “zero option". 

It was proposed by Reagan in 
November 1981 as the opening 
American bid in the talks on 
Intermediate-range Nuclear 
Forces (INF), then about to start 
in Geneva. The proposal was 
simple. Nat o would not deploy 
cruise and Pershing missiles in 
Europe if the Soviet Union re- 
moved all its missiles of com- 
parable range — of which the most 
notorious was the triple-warhead 
SS-20. 

The virtue of the proposal was 
its papular appeaL It {ticked up the 
slogan of the then ascendant anti- 
nuclear movement (no cruise; no 
SS-20). The West European gov- 
ernments endorsed foe zero op- 
tion, and some even claimed 
credit for it. Nevertheless, they 
were also aware of two important 
problems. 

The first was foal the zero 
option actually contradicted foe 
original rationale for Nato’s mis- 
sile programme. According to the 
doctrine of flexible response, foe 
US nuclear arsenal must be dosely 
coupled to the defence of Western 
Europe, and the Soviet Union will 
be deterred from agression so long 
as there is a substantial risk of 
conventional war leading to nu- 
clear strikes. The American 
commitment would be reinforced 
by missiles of the necessary range 
actually based in Europe. 

The second problem was that 
foe zero option was clearly one- 
sided, given the balance of forces 
at the tune. Hundreds of deployed 
Soviet warheads would be re- 
moved in return for abandoning 
Nato plans that might not even be 
implemented because of a lack of 
popular support 
The evident non-negotiability 
of foe zero option undermined its 
credibility as an exercise in arms 
control. This did, however, have 
the advantage of reducing foe risk 
posed to Nato doctrine. The 
integrity of “flexible response” 
was therefore dependent on foe 
Soviet Union rejecting Reagan’s 
offer. This it duly did. 

The Soviet view was foal there 




aaopqpf i 

ITS IN MONK 


ITSHMOMNa" 

SQWLJBSa® 



What options 
when Gorbachov 
zeros in? 


was already a nuclear balance in 
Europe which would be disrupted 
by any new Nato missiles. When 
the fust US missiles arrived late in 
1983, it claimed that there was no 
longer any basis for negotiation 
and left tire talks. 

When negotiations resumed in 
1985 it seemed clear foe any 
agreement would now require the 
Soviet Union to sanction some 
Nato missiles. This was conformed 
in foe burst of arms-controJ 
activity in the tead-up to last 
November’s Reagan -Gorbachov 
summit Both agreed that US 
numbers would be kept to 140 
missile-launchers (foe number for 
cruise and Pershing in place at the 
end of December). 

The question was, how: many 
SS-20s? The Soviet Union argued 
that it was necessary to take 
British and French missiles into 
account But then on January 15 
Gorbachov announced to foe 
surprise of the Wesg European 
governments that foe Soviet 
Union now favoured the 
“elimination” of Intermediate 
Nuclear Forces in the "European 
zone" He also no longer expected 


compensation for foe British and 
French forces — only that those 
forces be frozen at current levels 
and not (referring to Britain) 
replenished by missiles from the 
United States. 

It appears that Soviet calcula- 
tions have been transformed by 
the very success of the Nato 
programme. Nalo's missile build- 
up is now as substantial as that of 
the Soviet Union. If, as Nato 
doctrine would have us believe, 
cruise and Pershing matter more 
to the alliance than do SS-20s to 
the Soviet Union, then the zero 
option has become rather attrac- 
tive to Moscow. 

So the West European govern- 
ments suddenly found themselves 
in an embarrassing position. 
Washington remained wedded to 
the zero option. Having proposed 
it in the first place, it could not 
reject it simply because of Soviet 
acceptance. This acceptance could 
be taken as a vindication of 
Reagan's strategy of bunding 
weapons now to disarm later. 

West European concern, con- 
veyed to Ambassador Paul Nitze 
during recent consultations, ir- 


on vered in foe original American 
zero option. T bet US will insist on 
at leak a 50 per cent cut The 
Germans have drawn attention to 
foe Soviet short-range missiles 
brought forward into East Ger- 
many and Czechoslovakia in re- 
sponse to Pershing. - 
The main question is whether 
the Reagan administration will 
accept the "elimination of inter- 
mediate nuclear forces in foe 
European zone” The alternative 
will be to accept global ceilings 
which would allow the US to keep 


missiles io Europe so long as the 
Soviet Union left them in Asia. If 
the zero option is re-embraced by 
the Reagan administration, foe 
West European governments will 
have no choice but to applaud — 
and then to torn again to foe 
strategic problem that cruise and 
Pershing missiles were supposed 
to solve. 

' The author is professor of war 
studies. Xing’s College. London. 


The capitalist plague comes to Russia 


PHS 


Moscow 

When delegates to foe 27th Com- 
munist Party congress gather this 
week to approve Mikhail Gor- 
bachov’s sweeping plans to mod- 
ernize the Soviet economy, the 
nation will be faced with the 
spectre of unemployment - albeit 
by another name — for foe fist 
time since the official declaration 
in October 1930 that the problem 
had been eliminated. 

The prospect was raised pub- 
licly in January when Professor 
Vladimir Kostajtov, a leading 
Soviet economist and deputy 
director of the research institute 
run by the State Planning 
Committee, predicted _ that the 
blueprint for streamlining the 
economy could make between 13 
and 1 9 million workers in industry 
temporarily out of work by the 
year 2.000. 

In an article which caused 
considerable concern to the party 
establishment, the professor 
doubted whether jobs could be 
found in foe service industries for 
all those laid off “Some of those 
who are discharged wifi find 
employment in modernized shop 
floors ... but only some", he 
wrote. "Judging by the results of 
his work, one worker will indeed 
replace several of today's ones. 
Therefore, inevitable redundancy 
lies ahead." 


Sensationalist treatment of the 
article in the western media 
(particularly in France) prompted 
an angry response from the official 
news agency. Tass, which talked of 
slander and "an anti-Soviet cam- 
paign intended to make the 
French doubt the undoubted 
achievements of real socialism." 

Because western dole queues are 
foe stock-in-trade of Kremlin 
propagandists, who emphasize 
that the Soviet constitution guar- 
antees full employment as a 
fundamental right, foe debate 
touched one of the rawest nerves 
in foe new Soviet leadership. 
Eyebrows were also raised over 
foe professor's disclosure that 
thousands of agricultural officials, 
made redundant by a rerent 
ministerial reorganization, had 
been offered full pay for three 
months if usable to find new jobs. 

"Whatever the official explana- 
tion might be, that sounds to me 
very much like foe unemployment 
pay that you receive in the West", 
remarked one office worker who 
had visited Loudon as a student. 

A second article by Professor 
Kostakov. apparently intended to 
allay foe fears raised by the first, 
appeared soon after in Sovietskaya 
Kuleura. 

This time, foe professor argued 
that redundancies might not be 
necessary if certain conditions 


were mmet These included earlier " give comfort to a sacked, middle- 
retirement, more full-time as op- aged clerk with few skills. 


posed to part-time students, 
longer paid maternity leave and 

S on of the leisure and 
sectors of the economy. 

Showing signs ofa man who had 
been given a talking-to by bis 
superiors, Professor Kostakov 
concluded in reference to redun- 
dancy: “The psychology of an 
unemployed person who win 
gladly take any job for foe sake of a 
crumb of bread will always be 
deeply alien in the Soviet Union." 

However, the topic has refused 
to tie down. It seems likety to 
dominate every analysis of 
Gorbachov's chances of mod- 
ernizing a society which in some 
respects (but not armaments) is so 
technologically backward that the 
wooden abacus remains the main 
means of calculation in most 
Soviet shops. 

One weekly Moscow paper 
called on Alexander Davydov of 
foe Central Council of Trade 
Unions to explain bow the several 
thousand officials made redun- 
dant in the agricultural shake-up 
were befog found other jobs. “The 
country stiff lacks the necessary 
number of agronomists, vet- 
erinary surgeons, civil engineers 
and economists. In short, no one 
will be left on the street," he wrote. 
But that explanation is unlikely to 


Another leading trade unionist, 
Vitaly Provctorov, was ques- 
tioned at a press conference about 
the consequences of Gorbachov’s 
modernization plans. He replied 
that on foe basis of existing 
legislation, workers made redun- 
dant could learn new skills free of 
charge, receiving their previous 
average monthly wage throughout 
the training period. 

Although western experts do 
not believe that the Kremlin's new 
blueprint will lead to anything Hke 
western levels of unemployment 
(unofficial estimates put invol- 
untary unemployment in foe 
USSR at less than 3 percent), they 
note that drastic changes in weak 
habits and expectations will be 
required if the plans are to have 
any chance of success. 

In a country where the right to 
work is treated as second only to 
the right to life, changes in attitude 
will not necessarily come easily. < 
As Professor Kostakov notes: “We 
regard it as natural and necessary 
that if. for objective reasons, a job 
position is eliminated, the worker 
must immediately be given an- 
other job. Now, however, one will 
have to get used to the thought 
that to find a job will require a 
certain period of time." 

Christopher Walker 


defiance of the law over rate* 
flapping. There seems a limited 
desire here, at any rare, to court 
the middle ground. 

No so Neil Kinnock. Watching 
him talking to Brian Walden on 
Weekend World earlier this 
month, and subsequently reading 
foe. transcript of the interview. I 
am bound to agree 1 with Bill 
Rodgers. 

It was an extraordinarily easy 
and indulgent interview, particu- 
larly from such a grand master of 
the game as Walden. It was almost 
as if he had taken a deliberate 
decision not to ask difficult ques- 
tions, not to harry or pin down, 
but to give someone learning a 
new language plenty of time to 
find foe words, to stumble and 
correct himself; to bufld up his 
confidence in a new role: The 
politicians who left Labour five 
years ago to found the Social 
Democratic Party would have 
been gtad of sucb an easy ride — to 
be allowed to generalize about 
freedom and equality without 
being interrogated about private 
medicine or the independent 
schools or foe closed shop; to 
propound the primacy of produc- 
tion without being challenged on 
nationalization or attitudes to the 
market. 

- So because it was on this level of 
unchallenged generality, it was a 
little difficult to undezstand .what 
Kinnock Was saying; Indeed, Wal- 
den seemed to suffer from this 
diffi culty as twe H, mueh tfmn gh hk . 

words of bland encouragement 
were meant to deny it “Very dear, 
very dear ” he kept saying; “now 
we're getting along swimmingly P 
Then he would go on to sum up 
what Kinnock had said, only to be 
instantly contradicted. 


ritated American officials. After 
years of being berated by allies for 
not taking anus control seriously, 
the Reagan administration was 
being accused of taking it too 
seriously. 

When foe US response to 
Gorbachov's . proposal is . an- 
nounced this week some allied 
concerns will be taken into ac- 
count. The British and French 
reluctance to compromise the 
modernization of their nuclear 
forces will be reflected in a 
rejection of the idea that they be 
frozen. The Japanese object to the 
Soviet refusal to reduce missiles 
feeing the Far East, which were 


Kinnock’s main-achievement in 
this interview was to claim firmly 
that the Labour Party put individ- 
ual freedom before equality, and 
production before redistribu- 
tion — and that is what he woo 
headlines for- in the press the 
following day — but in foe ver- 
biage that followed bo reversed 
those priorities to defend his back 
against his own party. Thus: “foe 
pursuit . of equality . . . is foe 
meanS'of turoing individual free- 
dom from a slogan, an adornment, 
into a real living thing . . ." Simi- 
larly, on the second issue: “So the 
process of redistribution, yes goes 
on, but it is as a complement, not - 
just, ft doesn't just have a merit of 
its own, though it does. It's also as 
a complement to the whole busi- 
ness of rebuilding the basis of our 


argument: it was all about finding 
a new vocabulariy for the Labour 
Party, a vocabufaty which gives 
some words a consi derab le prom- 
inence — words tike fairness, mer- 
it. efficiency — and demotes oth- 
ers. There were some conjuring 
tricks here as wdL "Soli darity 1 (a 
slightly dodgy word) was s anitiz ed 
by being used only in the context 
of Japan- "Equality" was pre- 
seated at one stage as befog a <j 
combination of the concepts of 
“equity" and “quality" “ a syn- 
thesis which has a certain , aural 
plausibility but no logical or 
etymological basis. 

For Kinnock the most difficult 
word of all is “socialist" Here a 
new subliminal message has been 
meticulously and imaginatively 
worked out. Ax several points in 
the interview be was at pains to 
point out that what he wanted to 
do was not in any way peculiarly 
socialist People with other politi- 
cal bdiefc thought the same; it was 
only common sense. “Look, l 
happen to be a socialist," he 
seemed to be saying; (the approach 
was very endearing, just as if he 
were saying “I happen to have red 
bah- and freckles"). “But don't 
bold it against me. I can talk sense * 
as well as foe next man, hist as if I 
weren't a socialist at all . . ." He 
actually used, in this mood, words 
I never again expected to hear 
from a Labour leader ; “We have 
to buikl a consensus, yes, a co- 
operative attitude . . " 

. Do we clasp our bands piously 
and thanfc God for a sinner that 
repentefo? Do we believe even 
that he means it? Whether he does 
or not, be has certainly not 
thought out foe implications. For 
if he nafly. does regard socialism 
as merely _one among a number of 
valid political philosophies, if he 
really does “celebrate the dif- 
ferences in society" as be daims, 
why is be so adamantly opposed to 
any . form, of coalition or propor- 
tional representation? 

In truth the whole new image is 
the usual cynical attempt to edge 
the Labour vote up those extra 
percentage points in order to get 
total power. That disarmingly 
frank politician Ken Livingstone 
puts the matter succinctly in this 
week's issue of my local paper 
"We could get quite a surprising 
win with 38 per cent of the vote. 

The feet that the electoral system 
is a feme doesn't mean you don't 
lake the power when you are 
offered ft.” That is what demo- 
cratic socialism is all about 
The author is SDP member of the 
GLC/ILEA for St Pancras North. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

All my own 
works 


. Ignore the AigyU bid for Distillers. 
Pay no attention to Rank's take- 
over of Granada. Don’t take a 
blind bit of notice of General 
Motors’ attempt to grab Austin 
Rover. Why not ? Because More- 
over Enterprises are making a bold 
bid for foe whole lot. that’s why:- If 
you follow our advice, there will 
soon be a massive global company 
called Moreover-Rank-Argyll- 
Drstillers-Generai-Rover-and- 
tonic (Jemon-and-ice-please). 

For foe last few weeks there 
have been fuff-page ads in foe 
papers. They have been written in 
vety simple English. They have 
pointed out that Guinness (or 
Distillers) are the only people you 
can trust Or foal Argyll ‘(or 
Guinness) are the people to follow. 
They have presented you with 
short sentences. So that you can 
understand what is going on. And 
the upshot has been. That you 
haven’t foe faintest idea who is in 
the righL Or in the wrtng. It’s all 
very confusing. Isn’t it? 

Now. lhank goodness, all that is 
over because Moreover, the big- 
gest company in the world, has at 
last moved Into foe open and 
declared its intention of taking 
over foe whole damn lot of them. 


They're real tough cookies at 
Friends of the Earth, and we had a 
humdinger of a battle before we 
took them over. After what the 
French did to the Greenpeace boat 
in New Zealand, we knew they 
were battle-hardened. Go on. sink 
a Russian cruise vessel, we said. 
And they did. You have to respect 
people like that. 


to understand what on earth is 
going on. because Moreover is 
going to run everything, and you 
can go back to reading the sports 
pages again. 

Moreover already controls most 
of ihe .Amazon basin, foe gun- 
; running trade in foe Middle East, 
foe drug market at Heathrow, foe 
concession on sticky plaster for 
foe English Test team in foe West 
Indies, the cloakroom at the Press 
Council, the reserve guest list for 
the Terry Wogan show and Bob 
GekJofs Irish elocution lessons. 
We handle the tank accounts of 
Baby Doc Chevalier. President 
Marcos and whoever won the last 
snooker championship. We also 
have foe catering rights for foe 
next Geneva talks and foe crois- 
sant franchise for foe Channel 
Tunnel. 

In other words, we are big and 
tough.' 

That’s the kind of company you 
need to take over Rank and 
Granada and General Motors and 
Friends of the Earth. Yeah, you 
heard right. Friends of foe Earth 


Where were we? Oh. yeah. 
Moreover now intends to take 
overall the companies now boring 
- the public silly with takeover bids. 
Especially American companies. 
Especially those American compa- 
nies controlled by foe Mafia. You 
may have read about foe 600 
Mafia men being held in cages in 
Sicily, and you may have won- 
dered who was big enough to bring 
foe Mafia to book. Moreover, 
foai’s who. Say no more. 

We also, and this is where we 
think tou will .finaffv pav atten- 
uqn. intend to regularize the 
British football scene. For far too 
long w haye been bedevilled by 
ttungs like the Canon League, and 
foe Gola League, and the Milk 
tup. and you keep adding your- 
selves questions like: What do 
Canon make, and what is Milk, 
and who dnnks Gola-Coia? Weil 
for the next season ail will be 
plain. We will have foe Moreover 
League and foe Moreover Cup and 

-■sreasraea 

fflESBr* 

But first of all. we need your 

lhe com « T1 On 
shareholder, the bastion ofdemoc- 
racV' we cannot do without vou. 
wen. that is not quite true. "Our 
plans are so well laid that we can 
get by without you quite well Bm 
it always looks better if ' 

foaS Pl h? h* >?U ' And how taler 
than by buying space in the 

Moreover column, just one of the 
Unv outposts of our vast empire’ 

So just remember this. B?fo, : s 

llmt> nml luul . ... ,ul * 


hall be in 


control of all Q f v 0 u At foe 
moment, we represen ( the carina 
side of capitalism. Bv StlSf 

Sts:*!?*** lhe SB? 

you warn l0 

iST * «■ 


* ? . 


• 4 . 


S, 


(J&jJi £j* liS£) 


’l fo % 

wrji'Lr.. \ 



Street London El. Ta top ho t* 01 401 4100 


THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


13 . 


ON THIS DAY 


MR CHI JRCTTTT T ’SI RATYMTT T Charity concession only limited 

1 1 J i a i O DfXU DlijjL From the Director of the Charities at £500 millkm ner vear si 


The most damping thing that 

ton be said about Mr Winston 
Churchill’s obscenity bin is 
that it could have been in- 
troduced at ^ time during 

tne^st quarter-century. It is 
indifferent to debate about the 
<»ntrol of broadcasting and 
.die future of the BBC To it, 
direct broadcasting by satelhe 
and the “new media” of mass 
communication are irrelevant. 
Worse, Mr Churchill and his 
supporters behave as if there 
had been no change of govern- 
ment seven years ago, and the 
.Thatcher era had seen no effort 
to re-educate Britain in the 
dependence of economic suc- 
cess on personal freedom and 
enterprise. 

Behind Mr ChuzchiU is Mrs 
Mary Whitehouse. She, it has 
long been plain, has little time 
for markets, especially in mat- 
ters of culture and taste. She is 
not much of an individ ualist 


when and in what way the 
young are to be protected. And 
the implicit message ‘ goes 
wider. The rise of the H cultural 
industries” is a facet of eco- 
nomic change. Jobs for actors, 
actresses, producers and all the 
ancillary functionaries sub- 
stitute in the medium run for 
older, decayed manufacturing 
industries. Here is an area of 
economic specialization where 
Britain does well. Is that to be 
choked, crimped and sub- 
jected to the penetrating gaze 
of Mrs Grundy?. No minister 
with tiie government’s broad 
objectives in mind can with a 
clear conscience walk through 
the lobbies in support of this 
bflL ■ 

Mr Ch urchin's bill is bad, 
and no amount of last minute 
refurbishment in committee 
will salvage it. It is un- 
necessary. Where are the le- 


ather, if that entails leaving to gions of parents so enslaved by 
individuals in their homes and television and video that they, 

i • .i __ : 1 i_, _ _ r- . . . .V 


families and in their commer- 
cial dealings the freedom to 
make their own choice about 
the cultural material they buy 
and view and allow their 
dependents to buy and watch. 
But what is disconcerting is to 
see Mrs Whitehouse joined in 
her campaign by Conser- 
vatives - including the Prime 
Minister herself -apparently 
unaware of the discrepancy 
between their espousal of mar- 
ket individualism and their 
enthusiasm for heavy-handed 
policemen, agents of the State, 

. interposing themselves be- 
tween individual consumers 
and broadcast material. 

What a .signal to give the 
nation. To brim; the State with 
its apparatus of censorshipmio 
stage, screen, gallery, even the 
daily newspaper, because it 
knows better than parents 


incapabable of turning sets off 
at home, have to have the state 
bludgeon producers of pro- 
grammes? There, are parents 
anxious about the effects of 
television, bat their concerns 
are about random fictional 
violence rather than sex. The 
remedy is better dialogue be- 
tween consumers, television 
executives, importers of detec- 
tive fiction and eventually 
producers - not government 
intervention. 

No sound case has been put 
for extending the ambit of the 
Obscene Publications Act to 
television. Repeated citations 
of the showing of a single film 
(a serious film, its theme taken 
from the early church) late at 
night, on a minority channel 
advance that case not one jot 
The Act has settled into a 
comfortable middle age, rising 


on the moving tide of public 
standards. Now, in realization 
of a persistent lobbying 
group's wish list, the Act is to 
be yanked into a new lease of 
active life, to be used against ; 
.all and sundry. Under Mr 
Churchill's scheme everyone 
from gallery manager to film 
exhibitor win stand to be 
arraigned. Here is a recipe for 
overloading the courts, stifling 
cultural creation and depriv- 
ing the public of entire cate- 
gories of programme and 
picture. 

The progress of Mr 
ChunchilTs bill has shown the 
House of Commons at its 
worst. Cranks on all fronts 
have been attracted to its 
blanket bands and its univer- 
sal condemnations. On one 
side an M? has proposed 
extending the bflTs hit list of 
forbidden imag es to the 
printed word. On the other an 
MP is trying to extend its 
censorship to communication 
by telephone. A regulatory 
Christmas tree is constructed 
, with minimal thought. 

The sources of television 
progr amming multiply. Meth- 
ods -of broadcasting diversify, 
with the growth now in Europe 
of satellite transmissions and 
the boom in video cassettes. 
New regularity frameworks 
will be needed, and much care 
will need to be expendedon 
their shape and intrusiveness. 
There will be hard work for 
parliament to do, sooner or 
later. On this c o mn umicatin iis 
future however, Mr 
Churehiirs. bin is mpte. It 
offers a mere reflex. Its spirit is 
that of the censor. Its methods 
those of the authoritarian 
state’s policeman. It is a bill 
that should proceed no further. 


Firm the Director cf the Charities at £500 millkm per year, should 
. • double within five years of the 

Sir, The publicity you have given introduction of an encouraging tax 

(repot, February 19) to the regimen. We seek only to allay 
possibility of new tax incentives in fears until or to avoid too much 

the Budget to encourage more disappointment on, March 18 
erring is in danger of creating false Yours faithfully, 

hopes on the one hand and MICHAEL BROPHY, Director, 
u nne c es s ar y anxiety on the other. Charities Aid Foundation, 

May I therefore make a number of 14 Bloomsbury Square, WCl. 
points: February 20. 

L h is likely that the new 

Axnerican-styie incentives will be From Mr N. V. Holliday 

compunesonly in Sir. It is ironic that in your 
tins Budget. An incentive for interesting leader today (February 
indiv^aafe may be announc ed as 20) on the tax status of charities 
tte ofawfflicn^ party (»■ to ^ should choose the word 
be unto con siderati on for a “theological” to describe the de- 
** e ** mpk ’-l ^ bate as to whether tax revenue 

2. Ibe covenant s ystem wil l not be diverted to charities is “public 
ammshed; new incentives will be money” Your implication is that 

i r of ^ 9 ^ion is arcane, academic 
enrvenants. People should realise and of no practical relevance, 
that an incentive given now can be 
removed later, wtereas the right to This is a n sm which 

abrogate mcome on which tax has currency (rather inappropriately. I 
fettPag a chant yxs no w thought) during the recent debates 
in a henah te- Besides, the churches, about the Labour Party’s constitu- 
many membership chanties and tion, debates which journalists in 
many project appeals survive particular intended to describe as 
absolutely because of covenants. “theological”. 

3. The company concession will 

not lead to a “bonanza". Compa- The iws gp reflects, however 
tries give £70 nzHtioo per yean the only a secularist misapprehe n sio n .’ 
top 200 companies give half of tins Theology, the knowledge of God, 
arid have excellent tax provisions is nothing if not directly practical 
already, whilst the local company - and this is seen nowhere more 
can already give to local charities clearly than in the British charities 
as a business expense. Also dose of which you write. For it was 
and private companies will not be precisely their understanding of 
I n clud e d until indryktaals are. what God is like, and therefore 
Therefore the immediate effect of wfaat man is worth, which moti- 
this likely company concession vated many of the pioneers of 
should be several millions rather British charitable institutions in 
than tens of millions of new the last century. With a different 
money per year. theology they might never have 

None of these points is intended started, 
to play down the excitement of the 
immediate or medhan-tenn pros- Yours faithfully, - 
pects. We would forecast a dra- NIGEL VAUX HAL 
marie increase in private support 108 Gloucester Cour 
for dimity given effective in- Kew Road, 
centives for individuals when it Kew Gardens, 
does ha p p en. Voluntary h Surrey, 
contributions, running presently' FdxrmuylOL 

Benefits for the cold and old 


Yours faithfully, ■ 

NIGEL VAUX HAI.I ID AY, 


NIGEL VAUX HALL 
108 Gloucester Court, 
Kew Road, 

Kew Gardens, 

Surrey. 

February 20. 


Some errors in 
Thinking big’ 

From Mr Philip R. Lowe 
Sir, In his letter on merger issues 
(February 19) Sir Michael 
Edwardes misses the real point 
behind the reservations held by so 
many who are opposed to the 
Leyland/Bedford merger, amongst 
others. 

Rightly or wrongly, the public at 
large tend to see three results from 
most mergers firstly, a large 
financial windfall for the 
shareholders of the “larger com- 
pany (with accompanying 
opportunities for speculators to 
make a “lolling”); secondly, fur- 
ther limitation of choice and 
availability of product for the 
customer (be he consumer or 
otherwise); and thirdly, yet an- 
other redundancy programme 
(usually in the guise of 
“rationalisation”) to further swell 
the dole queue. 

Such fears may or may not be 
unfounded. However, the exam- 
ples of Leyiand itself -(whose 
manifest difficulties only occurred 
after a series of disastrous mergers 
in the 1 960s) and Chrysler UK, 
formerly Rootes Group (whose 
decline did not seriusly set in until 
tiie takeover by Chrysler US, again 
in the 1960s) give such fears much 
credence. Either way such feelings 
are most understandable and wor- 
thy of greater respect than to be 
dismissed as “doctrinaire and 
parochial” or “little Englander”. 

To trade in a heavyweight world 
Britain must, as Sir Michael says, 
“think big”. However, to imply 
that the act of allowing our sole 
remaining volume vehicle manu- 
facturer to fell under the control of 
a foreign-owned competitor ac- 
cords with the desorption of 
“thinking big” seems, with re- 
spect, to be illogicaL 


From Mr T. G. C Knight 
Sir, Your leader writer on “Winter 
filer (February 19) may have 
fallen into the trap of thinking 
there are simple formulae for 


WAITING FOR HONECKER 


; M 


■v 0\V 


* rO 


& When will the East German 
"" leader, Erich Honecker, visit 
West Germany? This question 
threatens to become one of the 
- hardy perennials of 6ezman 
~ politics,, raised each year but 
never finally answered. 

The historic visit was sched- 
uled for autumn 1984, but 
cancelled at the eleventh hour 
in an unprecedented finny of 
public controversy between 
(and within) the regimes of the 
.Soviet bloc. It was nnnoured 
to be imminen t i g j in at the 
^ end of last year, but Honecker 
" came there none. And now we 
are told that last week’s visit to 
^ Bonn by Herr Horst 
Si ndermann, the second man 
, 1 in the East German state, was a 
prelude and a dress rehearsal 

* for his leader’s visit We will 
believe it when we see it 

Formally speaking. Hen 
Sindermann was in Bonn in 
his capacity as President of the 

- Volkskammer of the German 
, Democratic Republic, on the 

invitation of the Social Demo- 
crats in the. West German . 
. Bundestag. But his visit was 
. dramatically upgraded by the 

• feet that he was receival by 
Chancellor Kohl and by the 
President of the Bundestag, 

' Heir Philipp Jenninger. Some 
Christian Democrats objected 
to the latter meeting on the 
grounds that the West German 
b Bundestag is a real parliament 
> and the East German 
. Volkskammer is not. They 

- have a point. ■ The 

• Volkskammer is not a par- 
liament It is a rubberstamp. 
When asked why votes in the 
Volkskammer are always 
unanimous, Herr Sindermann 
averred “Of course there are 
differences of opinion, but 
th at ’s all cleared up in commit- 

. tee ahead of tune, before the 
vote in the chamber.” 

Cricket safety 

From Mr H. J. Stockwdl 
■ Sir. May I point out to the Rev 
James Funnel] (Fehniary 21) that 
batsmen use “the other kind of 

• protector” to protect themselves 
against the ball which is bowled 

• legitimately with the intention of 
inning the stumps, whereas the 

type of ball which is bowled with 

the intention of softening up the 

• batsman - not that any _ bowler 
could soften op Mike Gatting — or 

i - making the batsman give a catch 

* white defending his person and 
not foe wicket is fflegitiniate, is not 
cricket, and should be so called rjy 
any urn fare who can read trie 
Diws. 

The game so many of us used to 

love as an art and a motfcl for a 
way of life has been Puckered to 
, suit our present-day violent soci- 
ety. 

Yours faithfully, 

* RJ.STOCKWELL, 

Cymru, 

EppingRoad, - 
Roydon, ; 

Essex. 

February 21. 


Yet these Christian Demo- 
crats were perhaps as much 
worried by the feet that, this 


, With these various moves the 
SPD has appeared to take the 
initiative in Ostpolitik, a 


visit was organised by the • remarkable achievement . for a 
Social' Democrats. Over the ; party" out of office;' and ah 


last year the SPD has been 
quietly unfolding what has 
been called its “second 
Ostpolitik.” This involved 
building up anetwoik of party^ 
to-party negotiations and 
relationships with the ruling 
Communist parties of Eastern 
Europe. 

. SPD delegates are meant to 
be . discussing environmental 
problems with the Czecho- 
slovak Communist parly, eco- 
nomic issues with the 
Hungarian comrades, “con- 
fidence-building” with the Pol-, 
ish United Workers’ Party 
. (whose confidence in whom?), 
and, of all things, defence 
spending cuts with the Com- 
munist Party of the Soviet 
Union. With East Germany’s 
ruling communist party, tiie 
SED, they have already pro- 
duced a joint “draft treaty” for 
a chemical weapon-free zone 
in Centra] Europe (defined as 
the two " Germanics and 
Czechoslovakia), and ate 
working on a joint commit- 
ment to a nuclear-free zone. 

There are major obj ection s 
of substance to - the SPD’s 
‘second Ostpolitik.’ It lends to 
obscure the fundamental ideo- 
logical differences between 
communism and social 
democracy, which the SPD has 
traditionally been the first to 
point up- More serious still, it 
seems to accept the. linkage 
between intra-German refer 
lions (Dentschlandpolitik) and 
security policy which Soviet 
leaders have always tried to 
impose, and which the Kohl 
government, to its credit, has 
resolutely ignored. 

But there is also a domestic 
political side to this debate. 

From MrJ. E. Harper 
Sue, After the horrendous accident 
to Mike Ganing (report, February 
20 j I tried out something like the 
fan protective equipment- your 
cricket photograph displayed in 
today's Times (February 21). I 
could still see the ball, even when 
bowled fast. The trouble was,.! 
found it hard to move and 
wellnigh impossible to nth. 

Will the “quick single” die, as 
has the “quick two”? 

Yours sincerely, 

J.E. HARPER, 


Essex. . 

February 2L . . . 

A total blank 

From Mr A. B. M. Campbell 
Sir, Many of your readers most 
have, seen the . recent BBC tele- 
virion commercial, .fronted by 
John Deesc, in which, he lists what 
he gets for his £SS. licence. 

.wliat lie doesn’t get is any TV 
coverage, ..five or dead, of tfae- 
Eng ton d ream playing the national 


doctoral plus. Ifj however. 
Chancellor Kohl can bring off 
a Honecker visit before next 
year’s general election, the 
balance will be more than 
righted. 

Herr Honecker himself in a 
recent interview with the West 
German newspaper Die Zeit, 
made cautiously positive ref- 
erence to the Kohl 
government’s stance on intra- 
German relations, and said he 
would pay his long-awaited 
call at a time convenient to 
both sides. Herr Sindermann 
in Bohn brought further hints 
of progress, himself raising the 
(to West Germany) all-im- 
portant subject of improving 
human contacts between the 
Germans in the two states. He 
also set a couple of useful little 
precedents in those points of 
protocol which so egregiously 
complicate German-Ge rman 
diplomacy. 

At the same time, 
however,another senior East 
German Politburo member 
was guardedly presenting East- 
West German relations, in the 
pages of Pravda, as a contribu- 
tion to the Soviet-led struggle 
for peace. And there’s the rub. 
For Moscow still holds the 
key. This time round, Herr 
Honedcer will surely not com- I 
mit himself until he is ab- I 
sohitdy confident that he has a 
clear green light from the 
Soviet leader. That will almost 
certainly mean waiting until 
after the Soviet party congress; 
and probably until after his 
own party congress, which is 
scheduled for April. So Bonn 
may settle back to at least a few 
more enjoyable weeks of “will 
he, won’t he?” 

game in a Test natch a gain*! the 
West Indies. 

Shut op, Wogan! 

Yours sincerely, 

ALASDAIR CAMPBELL, 

Cockles House, 


East Susses. 


Seen along the line 

From Mr Jonathan Bates 
Sir, I am pleased to be able to tell 
Dr Fuxsdon (February 12) that 
scarecrows have not disappeared; 
they have merely developed, in 
much the same way that art is 
supposed to have developed. 

Many of today’s scarecrows 
consist of a pole surm ounted fay a 
bin liner or similar plastic sheet -a 
punk scarecrow, perhaps - whilst 
others are vaguely mechanical in 
appearance. I have even spotted 
cubist scarecrows during recent 
wafts m the countryside. How- 
ever, Eke Dr; Fursdon I much 
prefer the traditional variety. 
Yours faithfully, 

JONATHAN BATES, 

8 Buck&one Rise, .. 

Edinburgh. 


should be made: He says “severe 
weather payments hinge on out- 
of-thooramary conditions.” We 
know that “normal” is only a 
mean between extremes, but at 
< what point does anything become 
'out-owhe-ondmary? It is not so 
•easy for those who have tp decide. 

In referring to loan 'arrange- 
ments your writer alto mentions 
the wrads “sufficient” (in referring 
to baric rates) and “reasonable” 
(in referring to provision far. 
winter fod). These are not easy 
words to define. In practice what 
may prove adequate for A may be 


r Court sped, to be illogicaL 

Sir Michael asks how many of 
our businesses will be effective fo 
10 years’ time if views do not 
change. If the proposed series of 

mergers goes ahead, to be followed 

_ - presumably by yet more, then 1 

q]q imagine the customers, employ- 

ees, unions and management of 
have been excluded had Ley land, plus anyone else with an 
powers been more, interest m seeing that Britain 
Me and whose real maintains some vestige of mano- 
/ery obvious. The factming industry under its con- 
sn of the system has trol, will be asking themselves tbe 
its most distressing same question. 

Yours faithfully, 

iat without dearly PHILIP R. LOWE, 
foes, there was, and 14 Woodland Close, 
te risk of certain Albrighton, 
areas, bring more Wolverhampton, 
j severe than others. West Midlands. 

’ (also, admittedly, February 19. 


be reasonable forB may' not be so 
for A. Individual circumstances 
are so often a mayor factor. 

In the pest 20_years the Supple- 
mentary Benefits Commission 
and its successors have sought 
legislation which might establish 
absolute precision m decision- 
making. toe flaw has been that 
new fews paved the way for 
payments to many who may not 
have been in real need while 
debarring many others who might 

The missing matron 

From the General Secretary of the 
Royal College of Nursing 
Sir, Mr R. M. NrchoUs, the 
'General Manager of Soulhmead 
District Health Authority (Feb- 
ruary 17), completely misses the 
point about the Royal College of 
Nursing campaign. The issue is 
not about how many nurses have 
been appointed as general man- 
agers. Even if 50 per cent' of 
general managers were former 
nurses they, as individuals, would 
still require an a d e quate nursing 
structure because 50 per cent of 
their staff would be nurses and 
probably over 40 per cent of their 
budget would be spent on nursing. 

Too many general _ managers 
think they can run nursing in their 
district with advice from nurses 
rather than properly ted and 
managed muring teams. To talk 
about ward sisters becoming gen- 
eral managers indicates the shift 
taking place away from pro- 
fessional care. It will bring more 
administration into tbe wards, not 
more influence in management 

The Royal College of Nursing 
has been careful to say that it 
foresees serious problems fo about 
70 health authorities in England 
where the nursing structure has 
been emasculated. We believe this 
is a ferae enough minority to merit 
central Government action. 

Mr Nkholls reflects upon the 
impact of the campaign on nursing 
morale and public confidence. Far 
from undermining morale, the 
advertisements have given nurses 
confidence to speak out locally 
about what they see happening 
around them. Public confidence 
will indeed be shaken if the 
h umanity atid compassion in the 
NHS is submerged in a welter of 
so-called efficiency savings and 
greater productivity ami through- 
put 

Finally, the Griffiths 
reorganization is not, in most 
cases, about devolving more 
power to the ward sister and 
charge nurse. It is they who have 
been most vocal about the dis- 
mantling of the professional sup- 
port s t ru ct u re they require. 
Hollow promises will impress no 
one, least of all ward sisters. 

Yours faithfully, 

TREVOR CLAY, 

General Secretary, 

Royal College of Nursing of die 
United Kingdom. 

20 Cavendish Square, Wl. 
February 18. 


readily available and whose real 
needs were very obvious. The 
dehumanization of the system has 
been one of its most distressing 
features. 

It is true that, without dearly 
defined guidelines, there was, and 
is, always the risk of 
officials, or areas, bring more 
' lenient or more severe than others. 
But, if “need” (also, admittedly, 
difficult to define) is to be the 
criterion, as it ought always to be, 
there'is much to be said for tbe 
exercise of discretion, rather thaw 
voluminous regulations which are 
unintelligible to the public at large 
and to many officials, themselves, 
even if it does mean apparent 
discrepancies at times. 

Tbe 1966 Supplementary Bene- 
fit Act was not as tad, in 
retrospect, as its critics suggested. 
And there was, and still is, much 
to be said for the A Code (the 
DHSS internal guide) and its 
confidentiality. 

Yours faithfully, 

T. G. G KNIGHT, 

Wildwood, 

Rriden Lane, 

Crowborough, 

Sussex. 

February 19. 

From the President of The In- 
stitute of Health Services Manage- 
ment 

Sir, The Royal College of Nursing 
have a good point in their simple 
message that the NHS needs 
nursing management and advice. 
Most general managers accept and 
endorse that message. The college 
have, however, made a number of 
claims which will not stand up to 
examination. 

It may suit the college's purpose 
to conjure up armies of pinstriped 
executives, but h is simply not 
true. Of the 605 general managers 
so for appointed, only 46 are from 
tbe private sector and 46 are 
nurses! 

The RCN advertisements give 
the impression that long-standing 
NHS problems have been caused 
by general management Staffing 
levels at night have been a 
problem throughout the time 
“when nursing was managed by 
nurses” and remain so today. 

The RCN urges us to “pul the 
"patient not the balance sheet 
first”. These are false alternatives. 
Putting the patient first is some- 
thing we an need to team to da ft 
is quite wrong to suggest that 
sound financial manage ment is in 
opposition to “patients first”. Vast 
resources are spent on nursing 
services and it is in the patient's as 
well as the taxpayer's interest that 
managers shook! view nursing in 
terms of cost as well as care. 

Roy Griffiths produced a 
powerful critique ofNHS manage- 
ment. The RCN campaign is no 
answer to that critique or to the 
problems of managing a complex 
modern health service. 

Yours smeerefy, 

KEN JARROLD, President, 

The Institute of Health Services 
Management, 

75 Portland Place, Wl. 

Tory position 

From Dr L. Rose 
Sir, What is so reassuring (Sir Ian 
Percival, yesterday) about retain- 
ing the “steady support” of 33 par 
cent of the popular vote?Would it 
not be wise to pay attention to 
what the other 6o per cent want? 
Yours faithfully, 

Ll ROSE 
7 View dose. 

View Road, 

Highgate, N6. 

February 18. 


Birth of a motor . 

From Bishop W. Warren Hunt 
Sr, Mr Pearson Phillips (Spec- 
trum, February 1 3) gives a version 
of how the Land Rover was 
conceived and bom. The account I 
have came from Maurice Wilks 
himself as we were on holiday to 
Anglesey. 

He had taken his young sons 
down to tbe beach at Red Wharf 
Bay and as he sat there dreamed of 
something that would take Him 
and the boys across tbe vast 
stretch of sand and sea to wher- 
ever they wanted to go. Then it 
would take them up the steep, 
rough stony track, through the 
trees back to the hotel 

Dreams turned to ideas which 
he jotted down on that day's page 
of his diary. As the first Land 
Rover stood fo the factory yard he 
looked back fo his diary — it was 
nine months to the day since be 
had first made his notes. 

To be a passenger fo a Land 
Rov*r when he drove h over 
seemingly impossible land and 
through the sea was an experience 
never to be forgotten. 

Yours faithfully, 
fW. WARREN HUNT, 

15 Lynch Down, 

'Funungton, 

Nr Chichester, 

West Sussex. 

February 15. 


Sunday trading 

From the Chairman cf the 
Consumers ' Association 
Sir, Mr David Crouch, MP*s 
innocent letter (February 20) is 
disarming. Like the Canterbury 
Christian Council Consumers’ 
Association coukl hold a public 
meeting in Caterbury. An audi- 
ence of 200, including church- 
goers, would vote in favour of 
sweeping away the laws about 
shopping hours. Our problem is 
that unlike, for example, the Keep 
Sunday Special campaign, we 
could not use hundreds of thou- 
sands of pounds to organise 
petitions, arrange a “write-in” and 
pack meetings with supporters. 
Neither would I want to. 

The voices that are shouting 
loud and long are not the voices of 
tbe electorate. Poll after poll of 
statistically representative sam- 
ples of the public shows the 
majority of people to be in favour 
of deregulation. In countries 
where thoe is legal Sunday trading 
— Scotland and Sweden — there is 
no question that Sunday is still 
special It could not be “like any 
other day of the week” when most 
shops and places of work will still 
be shut 

Sweeping away the Shops Act 
protecting the hours of 
sbopworkers, attending church 
and having Sunday as a different 
day are not irreconcilable. To 
claim tha t the campaign against 
deregulation is a spontaneous 
expression of widely held views is 
a distortion of the acts. 

Yours faithfully, 

RACHEL WATERHOUSE, 

Chairman, 

Consumers’ Association, 

14 Buckingham Street, WC2. 
February 20. 


FEBRUARY 24 1874 

The capture by the Ashantee tribe 
in West Africa of members of the 
BasLe Mission took place in June 
1869. War between that tribe and 
the Fanti tribe delayed the 
prisoners' release, which was not 
effected until January 1874, when 
Sir Garnet Walseley's troops 
marched into Coomassie. Our 
Special Correspondent was 
Winwood Reads ( 1835 - 75). 


IN CAPTIVITY 
AT COOMASSIE 

| Prahsu, Jan 18 

In this letter Z shall offer to your 
leaders a connected narrative of 
Mr Kuhne’s capture and captivity 
as related to me by hir n t HI fi 
preceding his story with a few 
remarks on tbe Mission to which 
he belongs, and the country m 
which it carries on its work. That 
country forms part of the Gold 
Coast 

The stations of the Basle Mis- 
sion are partly in the forest region, 
partly in the open land . . . 

It was my fortune a few years ago 
to pass much time among these 

m iHS pj Q T Tfl rjp ff , nnri I have had myn y 

a conversation with them in rela- 
tion to the captives at Coomassie. 
The Church Missionary Society 
did great things in the early days at 
Sierra Leone, when shiploads of 
naked savages taken on board slave 
Bhips were disembarked every 
month in that settlement. But as 
regards missionary labours nmnn g 
independent savage tribes in West- 
ern Africa it is certain that the 
Basle Mission should receive the 
palm. Tbe principles upon which it 
is conducted make it resemble 
those industrious communities of 
Tnnnlra which hewed clearings in 
the great German forests and 
regarded labour as a kind of prayer. 
With reaped to missionaries trad- 
ing with the natives (for the benefit 
of the Society), a difference of 
opinion may prevail; but no ratio- 
nal man will deny that it » good for 
mkrionaiiw to famrli tlirir con- 
verts useful horttBcrwfta and the 
discipline of industry . . . 

They have posted their stations 
a considerable distance into the 
interior, and one of the most inland 
was at the town of Anum, in the 
Kreepee country, on the other side 
of the Volta . . . 

Presently the Ashantees were 
reported to be near Anum. Every 
one left the town; the missionaries 
sent their clerk and catechist and 
servants away, and remained quite 
alone in the house. They were three 
in number — Mr Kuhne, Mr 
Ramseyer, and Mrs Ramaeyer who 
find an infant ten months oM 
... It was on the 12th of June 
1869, Mix Ramseyer was in the 
galleiy spr eading out clothes to dry 
when she saw the barrels of 
muskets above tbe high grass. 
About 20 armed men appeared and 
pointed their guns at the house. 
She wished them good morning 
and went inside. The two mission- 
aries went out and asked the men if 
they were Ashantees, and on 
receiving their reply said they were 
friends to the Ashantees as well as 
to all other people, and had nothing 
to do with the war. They then 
shook hands, and the leader of the 
men said they must all go down to 
Anum and sahite the General .. . 

The next day they were made to 
march off again: Mis Ramseyer 
lost one of her shoes in a swamp, 
but was not allowed to wait for a 
moment Mr Kuhne lagged, and 
was threatened with the 
whip ... It was dark before they 
reached the Ashantee camp. They 
were taken before what they at first 
supposed to be a tent, but it was a 
huge umbrella. Beneath it sat a 
man covered with a white doth. 
They were told that this was Adoo 
Buff oo. The soldiers of the escort 
knelt down and presented the 
captives. Some men rushed up to 
Mrs Ramseyer and tore off the 
skirt of her gown. A man with a 
long knife came up and separated 
the captives. Mr Kuhne was taken 
to a but in which Bat a chief, 
bleeding from five wounds, which 
were being washed with hot water. 
He ordered Kuhne to sit down, and 
mark signs that he would cut off 
his arms. The chief then inquired if 
he had been fighting. Kuhne 
replied that be was a priest The 
chief made a sign, ami he was put 
into irons. He felt sure that he 
would be killed . . . 

However, though kept in irons 
and robbed, they were not other- 
wise ill-treated, and Adoo Buffbo 
informed tl>pwi with much 
politeness . . . they must go to a 
quiet town . . . and sent them off 
They walked for some distance 
until they came to a hill whence 
they could Bee the Volta. Then they 
knew that the quiet town to which 
they were going was Coomas- 
aie — 

Mrs Ramseyer bad some desic- 
cated milk in a bottle, and with this 
she kept the child alive for a time. 
When the milk was finished she 
made it food with eggs and boiled 
com, and when they entered a 
village the missionaries used to go 
begging from bouse to house for an 
egg. They were not always success- 
ful, but the natives were sometimes 
very kind and brought them food of 
their own accord The child be- 
came thinner and paler every day, 
and died before tbe end of July. It 
had just been buried, when they 
received a present from tbe King 
and a message telling them not to 
be afraid . . . 

Worlds apart 

From Dr W. J. Trowell 
Sir, When I had my eyes tested by 
my optician he used an apparatus 
bated on a principle discovered by 
Isaac Newton and manufactured 
by the East Yorkshire Optical 
Company of Japan. 

Yours etc, 

JOHN TROWELL, 

Lister House, 

Staple Tye, 

Great Parndon, 

Harlow, 

Essex. 




THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


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COURT 
AND 
SOCIAL 


Clifford Longley 


Church’s grumbling appendix 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
February 23;The Princess Anne. 
Mrs Mark Phillips, President of 
the Save the Children Fund, this 
evening attended a performance 
of the Messiah at the Royal 
Albert Halt London. 

Miss Victoria Lege Bourke 
was in attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
February 23: The Prince of 


Wales arrived at Royal Air 
Force Brize Norton this evening 
in a VCJO aircraft of No 10 
Squadron. Royal Air Force from 
the United Slates of America. 

Sir John Riddell, Bt was in 
attendance. 

A memorial service for Sir Hugh 
Forbes will be held ai the 
Temple Church, EC4, at 4.45pm 
today. 

A memorial service for Robert 
Fraser will be held on March 5 at 
St Mary's on Paddington Green 
at noon. 


Forthcoming marriages 

Mr CJLR. Joly 
and Lady Rose Scott 
The engagement is announced 
between Diaries, youngest son 
of Lieutenant-Commander and 
Mrs James Joly. of Chevington, 

Gloucestershire, and Rose, 
daughter of the late Earl and 
Countess of Eldon. 


MtDjG. Kidd 
and Miss VJVL Hall 
The engagement is announced 
between David, son of Mr and 
Mis Graeme S- Kidd, of 
Gosmore. Hitchin, Hertford- 
shire, and Virginia, elder daugh- 
ter of the late Mrs Gillian M. 
Hall and Mr Peter D. Hall, of 
Crandall, Faraham, Surrey. 


Captain T J. Gregson 
and Miss CM . Altink 
The engagement is announced 
between Timothv John 

Grcgson, The Light Infantry. f Jud ^ ^ MnfJohn 

elder son of the Jate Lieutenant- jfewy, Q f Seveioaks, Kent, and 


MrMXLNewey 
and Miss Cl. Hern 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael Dive, youn- 


Colonel K_ Gregson and Mrs 
A.V. Barker, and stepson .of the 
Right Rev C.C. Barker, of York, 
and Catherine Murdina. elder 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J.D. 
Altink. of Eaton Square, Lon- 
don, and Gex, France. 

Mr AJ. Blnrfou 
and Miss LA. Perks 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, younger son 
of Mr and Mrs T.R. Blurt on. of 
Cob ham, Surrey, and Louise 
Andrea, only daughter of Dr 
G.T. Perks and the late Mis 
Perks, of Marton-m-Cleveland. 


Mr P.L Bostock 
and Miss DA. Clayton 
The engagement is announced 
between Piers, only son of Mr 
and Mrs C.L Bostock. of 
Charterhouse, London, and 
Debra, only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs G. Clayton, of Stourport- 
on-Sevem. Worcestershire. 


lewey, 

Catherine Louise, only daughter 
of Mr and Mis David Hera, of 
Roth ley, Leicestershire. 

Mr N. Ptaskett 
and Miss N. Bacon 
The engagement is announced 
between Nigel, son of Dr and 
Mrs J.S. Plaskett. of Horam, 
East Sussex, and Nicola, youn- 
ger daughter ofMr and Mis D.E. 
Bacon, of East Grinstead, West 
Sussex. 

Mr S.T. Rhind-Tatt 
and Mbs F.CS. Mtnsfidd 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon Thomas, only 
son of Mr and Mrs G.T. Rhintt- 
Tutt, of Wood cote, Epsom, 
Surrey, and Fiona Caroline 
Swift, youngest daughter of the 
’ Aansfield and of 


late Mr L.CS. Mans 
Mrs SjA. Mansfield, of Epsom, 
Surrey. 

Mr JJ). Simmons 
and Miss C. Read , 

The engagement is announced 
between James Daniel 
Simmons, of USAF Hdienicon, 
Athens, elder son of George and 
Margaret Simmons, of Cleve- 
land. Ohio. United States, and 
Catherine Read, of Higbgate 
Village, London, younger 
daughter of Trevor and Chns- 

York. and Caroline, daughter of of ^ WinaL 

Mr and Mrs C.F. Milnes, of Mmeyside. 


Government reaction lo the Church 
of England report on the inner cities last 
December is described as “partly 
hysterical" and "entirely confused" in a 
comment in the 1986 edition of The 
Church of England Year Book, pub- 
lished yesterday . 

The preface to the year book, which is 
from an unnamed source dose to the 
Secretary General of the General Synod, 
Mr Derek Pattinson, also doubts subse- 
quent government denials that it was 
responsible for breaching confidential- 
ity by leaking the report in advance of 
publication. "There was a strong rumour 
of an official hand in it," it states. 

The chairman of the Conservative 
Party, Mr Norman Tebbit, and his 
deputy. Mr Geoffrey Archer, raised the 
level of “vituperation” even higher by 
trying to discredit the chairman of the 
commission which wrote the report, Sir 
Richard O'Brien. 

The report, which was critical of 
government policy in inner city areas, 
appeared amid charges of Marxism 
from anonymous government sources, a 
charge which was subsequently contra- 
dicted by Mr Kenneth Baker, Secretary 
of State for the Environment The year 
book preface is so far the strongest 
comment to come from the church on 
iastyear's controversy. 

The preface also comments at length 
on the less dramatic but more enduring 
(and possibly related) debate about 
what the Church of England stands for, 
and whether there is an identifiable 
entity called Anglican belief 
It takes seriously the argument of a 
leading article in The Times last 
November that the church’s 
“comprehensiveness" could become a 
harmful indulgence, "where it seems to 
stand for nothing at all or nothing in 
particular." The preface- writer com- 
ments that there is an undoubted 
problem about comprehensiveness, 
while reporting the answer of the 
Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Robert 
Runcie. to such criticisms. 

This is that “the ordered structure of 
the church in the ordained ministry** 
makes for a shared life, a common 
Christian life, in which the elements 
embraced in the term comprehensive- 
ness - catholic, evangelical and liberal - 


are free to enjoy their differences. 

The bedrock of Anglicanism's 
“shared life”. Dr Runcie says, is the 
sharing of the Gospel, the sharing of the 
creeds, and the sharing of the sacra- 
ments. That it is not more precisely 
defined is a virtue; the function of 
authority in Anglicanism is to maintain 
the basic common life of the church 
which "makes possible authentic Chris- 
tian freedom”, to use Dr R unde's 
words. 

They came from his inaugural presi- 
dential address to the general synod last 
autumn, and they represent a significant 
development in the search for a 
definition of Anglicanism. This search 
has become like a grumbling appendix 
both in inter-church theological discus- 
sions and in the church’s occasional 
tangles with secular power, where in 
both cases the Church of England has 
had some difficulty answering the 
question:"Who is speaking, please?" 

It is also relevant to the current grass- 
roots ecumenical programme in which 
local groups, aided by local radio 
stations, are studying throughout Lent 
the two questions “What is the 
church?", and “What is the church for?” 
It is a search for Anglican identity. 

Dr Runcie does not speak out of the 
blue. His presidential address to the 
synod was an Anglican presentation of 
the concept of Jcoinonia (Greek) or 
comrmtmo (Latin) which is emerging as 
the idea whose time has come through- 
out the Christian churches. 

It was the key word in last autumn's 
Extraordinary Synod in Rome, where 
the Roman Catholic Church was steered 
away from a course of conservative 
retrenchment in the name of that idea. 
It was also the central unifying principle 
to emerge when the Anglican-Roman 
Catholic International Commission 
(Aide I) produced its report in 1982, 
which first gave it wide currency. 

It is a concept whose provenance is 
neither Roman nor Anglican nor Prot- 
estant but Orthodox, though it seems to 
be equally acceptable wherever h ap- 
pears. (In its usual pronunciation, the 
Greek rhymes with “joy holier”). 

It is, nevertheless, hard to define. 
Cardinal Basil Hume, trying to do so at 
a press conference last year, was reduced 


to clicking his fingers. Koinonia has no 
exact English equivalent It is a stronger 
word than “fellowship”, being less 
sentimental and more structured. 

Those held in a relationship of 
koinonia have a bond between them 
that is not wholly dependent on how 
they feel about it like the bond between 
husband and wife or members of the 
same army platoon. There is an 
implication of shared property andjoint 
responsibility; and in a sense different 
from superficial emotion, love. 

Koinonia is the web of subliminal 
connections between people in a partic- 
ular kind of society; and applied to the 
church, participation in that web is 
achieved through baptism. It is hard to 
speak of precisely, therefore, without 
sacramentid and metaphysical language; 
otherwise it has no objective character, 
and means whatever the user wants it to 
mean. 

The importance as incorporating it 
into a definition of Anglicanism is 
it is an ecumenically powerful theologi- 
cal tool. Dr Runcie's implicit use of it m 
his presidential address last year point- 
ed a way round the problem of Anglican 
diversity, a kind of interna! ecumenism. 

And if all the churches understand 
themselves in terms of koinonia, some 
of the difficulties of uniting them start 
to look less intractable, if the unity being 
sought is also conceived that way. It 
suggests a more helpful way of stating 
the key problem of authority in the 
church, which is critical in Anglicanism 
and no less so ecumenically. Human 
authority in the church becomes a 
servant of koinonia, not its master. Acts 
of authority are for building it up, not 
dictating to it 

The outstanding issue raised by this 
concept in the Church of England is that 
a church so described must to some 
minimum degree be organic and visible, 
with a “basic common life” that is 
something else than En glish citizenship 
with a “C of E” labeL 

It is that familiar An glican assump- 
tion which makes comprehensiveness 
so incomprehensible, for it gives any 
random group of Tory MPs no better or 
worse right to speak for the church on 
urban priority areas, say, titan an 
archbishop’s hand-picked commission. 


OBITUARY 

SIR ANTHONY 
RAWLINSON 

Civil Service and 
mountaineering 

Sir Anthony Rawlinson, Stock Exchange's agreement 
KCB. a former Joint Perma- to end fixed commissions and 
nent Secretary at the Depart- combine the roles ofsiockbro- 1 • 
mem of Trade, was killed in a kers and stockjobbers, setting 
fall from Snowdon on Febru- in train “City revolution that 
ary 22. He was 59. will reach its climax later this 

Bom on March 5, 1926, he year. , 

was educated at Eton and After his retirement from 
Christ Church, Oxford, and the Department of Trade and 
served in the Grenadier Induswyhe became chairman 
Guards from 1944 to 1947. of the Gaming Board. 

His dvfl service career was Ever since his schooldays 
concentrated mainly in the Rawlinson had maintained a : 
Treasury, from which he went lifelong interest in mountain- ■ 
to Washington in 1972-75 as eering and had climbed exten- 
Britain’s executive director of sively and regularly in this 
the International Monetary country and in the Alps. 

Fund at the World Bank, a job in this field, as in the Civil 

which is combined with that Service, he was one of the . 
of economic minister m (be outstanding men ofhisgener- ■■ 
British Embassy in Washing- a tion. In 1949-1950 he was 
ton. # president of the Oxford Uni- - 

After a brief spell in the versify Mountaineering Cub '* 
Department of Industry, he and in 1970-1971 was chair- ; 

man of the Mount Everest 
Foundation, a charity set up 
by the .Alpine Club and the ; 
Royal Geographical Society to - 


returned to the Treasury as 
one of three second perma- 
nent secretaries. There he had 
responsibility for public ex- 
penditure during a period of control the distribution of 
rapid change in the m a n ag e - funds, arising initially from 


ment of public programmes, 
and oversaw the switch to 
cash planning and budgeting, 
begun the Callaghan 

government but accelerated 
under the first of Mis 
Thatcher's administrations. 

In 1983, he moved to 
become permanent secretary 
at the Department of Trade, 
which was fused with the 
/under 
Mr Cecil Parkinson after the 
1983 election, though still 
retaining two permanent sec- 
retaries. 

At Trade, Rawlinson had 
responsibility for issues of 
competition policy, and was 


the successful British Expedi- 
tion to Everest in 1953, and 
used to encourage and support _ J 
mountain exploration - 
throughout the world. 

Rawlinson himself had 
been one of the four reserves " 
for that expedition, and nar- 
rowly missed being chosen by 7 
Colonel Hum, as he then was. 
as a travelling member of the 
party. 

Having served as honorary 
secretary of the Alpine Cub ; 
from 1963-1966, Rawlinson 
had just begun his term as 
president of the club, and in 
that office had already done - 
enough to demonstrate the 


Mr P.C. Cronson 
and Miss C JVL. Millies 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul, son of Mr D. 
Cronson. of Geneva, and Mrs 
Mary Sharp Cronson. of New 


Christchurch, Dorset 

Mr IULM. Evans 
and Miss MA. Hiscock 
The engagement is announced 
between Kim Anthony, son of 


Marriage 

Mr J-PJLJ*. O'Seflly-Ckcooi 
and Mrs M.K. Cpen 
The marriage took place quietly 
on February 22 of Mr John Pius 
Lambert© Patrick O’ReiDy- 


the late Mervyn Evans and of Cicconi.onlysonof Mr and Mrs 
Mrs Hairy Ball and stepson of Lambenon Cicconi, of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Haiyy Ball. Macerate, Italy, and Mrs Manly 


of Charing, Kent, and Maria 
Anne, daughter of Mr an£ Mrs 
John Hiscock, of Cambericy. 
Surrey. 


Rosa Cyffeis, elder daughter of 
Mr Peter Burke, of Auberies, 
Sudbury, Suffolk, and the late 
Mis Heather Burke: 


Birthdays today 

Mrs N.H. Alexander, 71; Profes- 
sor E. Boyland, 81; Dr Lionel 
Dakerc, 62; Mr Reginald: 
Frceson, MP, 60: Mr Richard 
Hamilton. 64; Mr Paul Jones, 
44; Mr David Langdon, 72; Mr 
Charles McCall 79; Lord 
Mekfaett, 38: Admiral Sir Wil- 
liam Pillar. 62: Mr Frank 


ere, 66; Sir Edgar Vaughan, 7 
Mr Dennis Waterman, 38; Sir 
Harold Wilkinson, 83. 


Francis Holland 
School 

The biennia] old girls’ party for 
the school birthday will be held 
at Francis Holland School, Gra- 
ham Terrace, on Thursday, 
February 27, at 6.30pm. Miss 
Bowden and Miss Colvile are 
planning to attend. The head- 
mistress would be delighted to 
see as many old girls as can 
01-730 2’ 


attend. Telephone 1 


2971. 


King of Spain 
for London 

The King and Queen of Spain 
will pay a state visit to Britain 
starting on April 22. the Spanish 
Foreign Ministry has an- 
nounced. It will be the first such 
visit by a reigning Spanish king 
for 80 years. 


Dinner 


League of Friends 
The Italian Ambassador was 
present at the annual dinner 
held by the League of Friends on 
Saturday ai Grosvenor House in 
aid of the Italian HospitaL The 
guest of honour was Signor 
Ono revolt Giovanni Goria, and 
Lady 
the I 

chair. The guests 
Signora Goria, Lord 
Thorn ey croft, CH. Viscountess 
Hambleden. Lord and Lady 
Forte and Signor and Signora 
Umberto VattanL 



Appointments in 
the Forces 

Royal Navy 

1 CAPTAJNSJ 


much involved in the negotia- grave loss suffered by the club 
lions that culminated in the in his untimely dcain 

PROFESSOR AGNES 
HEADLAM-MORLEY 


Cunningham. MOO 

tBalhl. 14J«& JAP Furry. MOO 
4Balhl. IB 6.86; C A HoofcUaoA. 
POST. 11.4.86: J Perryman. 
.-SACLANT. .50.7-86: □ L 

1 Portsmouth NB. 9 5.86 

i 24 3.06. _ 

. COMMANDCRSJ O Bass. MOO 
(London l. 16-6-36: R O Bryan. MOD 
(BaQil. 6.6.86: DAP Carter. MOD 
.(London), 273.86: M J Matthews. 
MOD (Latvian). 26.3 86; CSC 
Moraan. CAMBRIDGE, tn and. 
9.9.86: C L L Quarrto. (3NCFLEET. 
16.4.B6’. C M Has*. RNH PLYM- 
OUTH. 1.7.86: P J A Wyatt. MOD 
•London). 163.86: D H N Yale*. 
HERON. 27.6.86. 

CHAPLAINS L wmunts. MOD 
(LondooX 9.9.86. 


CAPTABMJ J MUctwB. 2,4.86. 
The Army 

MAJOR-GENERAL: D B H Colley, to 
be DGTM LEX A! 1 3 86. 

BRJGADIER&M A OcnbMr. to br 
DAQ MOD. IS, 86: J WeKUfce. to be 

Team Dome SANQOOM. 24.3-86 

COLONELSJ S Bremen lo MOD. 

28.2S6: M R Cooper, to HQ 1 Arrod 

Dtv. 28-2 36: C GcaL to 

28 2 86 

LlEUTENANT-GOLONEL&T c p 
B rooke. R Irtoitt to MOD. 24H86; M J 

H Harry RRW. to be CO 4 rrw. 

24 2.86: C J F Jarwl* RE. to 12 RSME 

RM. 24.2.B6: TAB Milford RAOC. 

lo LElA). 24 2 36; D M Roberts RRW , 
U D INF. 26.2 36: R C Smith RCT. to 
MOO. 24.286. B A Cartoon Queens, 
to RMAS. 24.2 86: R M W Drake 
RAPC. to 4 AltOd Dtv. 24-2 36: A D 
Hfatcks PWO. to UKLF. 24.236. 

Royal Air Fort* 

AlRCOMMOOOR£d3G Harrington, 
to be Director of Signal* (Alt). 

WINQ COMMANDERS: □ R OrtCU. 
to HQ AFCENT. 28 2-36: J R A 
WMtney. to RAJF OdiliaDl. 28 .236: W 
B Kane, to RAF Wittering. 24.286. 

Stonyhnrst College 

Music awards 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Mr Stephen Egerton to be 
Ambassador to Saudi Arabia in 
succession to Sir Patrick Wright, 
who will be returning to London 
later this year to become Perma- 
nent Under Secretary of State at 
the Foreign and Commonweath 
Office and Head of the Dip- 
lomatic Corps. 

Mr Michael Tait to be Ambas- 
sador to the United Arab Emir- 
ates in succession to Mr 
H.B. Walker, who will be taking 
up a further Diplomatic Service 
appointment 

Mr Wuhan AJdoas, QC, to be 
the Chairman of the Performing 
Rights Tribunal. 


The future of the Henry Moore altar commissioned for St Stephen Walbrook, one of Wren's 
finest and most complex churches, is in doubt after the consistory court of the diocese of 
London refused permission for its installation. The court ruled that Moore's work was not a 
table as defined under canon (aw, but the Rev Chad Varah, the rector, said he would appeal 

(Photograph: Peter Trievnor). 

Sale room 

English coup in Monaco 

By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 


THINKING OF A 

NEW 

KITCHEN 


Then why not visit one of our local 
displays? We have over 100 nationally, 
open 7 days a week. You can choose 
from oak, laminate, mahogany and 
painted finishes and we may be able to 
offer you a discount of up to 

40 % 

OFF OUR LIST PRICE 
For details of where you can view our 
kitchens, complete the coupon or 
phone now on 

London 

01-541 4711 

Sheffield 

0742 430413 

Newcastle 

091-285 7370 

Bristol 

0272 20305 

Manchester 

061-796 6441 

ARISTOCAST KITCHENS. 

FREEPOST. BOLD STREET. 

SHEFFIELD S9 3TW 


■ I j Please send me a' 

1 LJ FREE brochure. ‘ ■ 


□ 


Please ted me where I 
can view your kitchens 

Name i 


% 




Address 


Post Code 


Tel; 

Den. Iiligu 


An English dealer carried 
off the star lot in Sotheby's 
sale of Old Master paintings in 
Monaco on Saturday, paying 
“109,000 francs (estimate 1 
million to 1.4 million francs) 
or £202.788 for a charming 
little street scene, busy with 
passers-by, painted by Boilly 
in 1806. 

The other big price of the 
sale was also for a French 
picture, a gay vase of flowers 
on a table, by Anne Vallayer- 
Coster, which made 1.776,000 
francs (estimate 700,000 to 
900.000 francs) or £170.769. 

The French Musees 
Nationaux were represented 
at the sale and pre-empted the 
purchase of two portraits of 
distinguished rulers. They 
spent 1 66.500 francs (estimate 


150.000 to 200.000 francs) or 
£61.010 on a full-length por- 
trait of Jerome Napoleon in 
his royal robes as King of 
Westphalia. The Ministry of 
Culture intends it for the 
drawing room of the Palais- 
RoyaL 

A portrait of Marie de 
Medicis in the mythological 
garb of Minerva cost them 
277,500 francs (estimate 

200.000 lo 300,000) or 
£26,683 and is to go to 
Fomainbleau. The sale to- 
talled £2.2 million with 13 per 
cent left unsold. 

The Monaco sale of Old 
Master drawings contained an 
album of sketches made by 
David in Rome between 1775 
and 1780. 80 of them in all, 
which sold for 1,720.500 


francs or £165,865. His so- 
journ in Rome set David on 
bis career as a classicist and 
was thus a particularly inter- 
esting period. 

It made 288.600 francs 
(£27,750) against an estimate 
of only 10,000 to 15.000 
francs, the purchaser dearly 
having bigger ideas about the 
attribution. It went to an 
American bidding over the 
telephone. 

The sale of Old Master 
drawings made a total of 
£649,807 with four per cent 
left unsold. 

Sotheby's sale of jewellery 
and precious objects in St 
Moritz made £4.3 million 
with 38 per cent unsold. As 
usual in this venue there were 
plenty of private collectors - 


(Westminster Cathedral Q*otr Scttoolr 
mtoor scttotorthlpsr PA C 
.(Westminster Cathedral Cbalr I.. 

AX. Latham (St Mary's Hall. 
Stony hurst): exhibition; J.E. Radford 
’(Westminster Cathedral Chair School). 

Air League 

The Andrew Humphrey me- 
morial lecture was given by Sir 
Adam Thomson, chairman of | 
the Caledonian Aviation Group, 
at 4 Hamilton Place on Feb- 
ruary 19. Dr J.E. Henderson, 
Chairman of the Air. lea gue, 
was in the chair. 

Lord Dainton 

The life barony conferred on Sir 
Frederick Dai n ion has been 
ga zoned by the name, style and 
title of Baron Dainton. of Hal- 
lam Moors in South Yorkshire. 

Parliament 
this week 

_ La rtK Toda y - Loca l Government 
BUL commute* stage: Incast and 
Retoted Offences (Scotland; BUL re- 
port stage: Marriage BUL report stage. 

To morro w- Shops BUI and Salman 
BUL Ditrd readings. 

"Wednesday; Debates on 

crime in London and on relaooastiio 
at Government and Parliament with 
Civil S endee. Debatable guestton on 
Seme /Carlisle railway line. 

Thursday: Gaming (Amendment; 

' ” Dtscrinunattem 


Professor Agnes Headlam- 
Moriey, who died on February 
21 at the age of 83, was the 
first wo man to hold a chair at 
Oxford University when she 
was elected Montague Burton 
Professor of International Re- 
lations in 1948. 

She was born on December 
1 0, 1 902, the only daughter of 
Sir James Wycline Headlam- 
Mortey, who was Historical 
Adviser to the Foreign Office 
and whose Studies in Diplo- 
matic History she edited with 
her only brother Kenneth, in 
.1930. 

She retained throughout her 
I life a great respect for the work 
|of- her father and in 1972 
■produced an edition of his 
Memoir of the Peace Confer- 
ence of Paris, 

Agnes Headlam-Morley 
went to Wimbledon High 
School and Somerville Col- 
lege, Oxford. In 1932 she was 
elected a fellow and tutor of St 
Hugh's College and taught and 
lectured with great vigour in 
Modern History and Politics. 
She was an excellent tutor and 
was much in demand as a 
teacher. 

She insisted on high stan- 
dards; she was friendly, enthu- 
siastic and provocative, and 
she took endless trouble with 
good and bad pupils alike. 

Throughout the war she 
took a heavy burden of exam- 
ining to fill the gap left by the 
absence of so many of her 
colleagues. It was perhaps 
partly the strain of these years 
to which may be attributed the 
origins of the ill-health which 
overtook her comparatively 
soon after her election to tire 
professorship. Her tenure of 
the chair was interrupted by 
treatment for tuberculosis and 
her capacity for sustained 
work was never to be what it 
had been in the years before 
the war. 

Nonetheless she retained 
her formidable spirit and en- 
thusiasm for her subject She 
took great time and trouble in 


She was a conservative in 
politics (she had been adopted 
as prospective Conservative 
candidate for Barnard Castle 
in 1936) and in academic 
affairs she resisted change, 
particularly where plans for 
the reform of the syllabus of 
her own subject were con- 
cerned. 

After the Second World 
War she was much involved 
in discussionsabout the future 
of Germany, a country with 
which she had close ties as her 
mother, a gifted musician, was 
German. She was A founder 
member of the Anglo-German 
Association and served for 
several years as a member of 
the academic council of Wil- 
ton Park. 

During a period of illness 
she made translations of Ger- 
man poetry and published a 
remarkable short novel Last 
Days (I960), an imaginiuve 
account of life in and around 
Berlin in the closing months of 
the war. 

She refused to accept that 
National Socialism was any- 
thing more than a temporary 
aberration in the course of 
German history and also al- 
ways denied that Germany 
had been responsible for the 
outbreak of the First World 
War. 

After her retirement in 1971 
she continued to read widely 
in German history and inter- 
national affairs and retained 
in old age her intellectual 
curiosity and capacity for 
vigorous discussion. 

In addition to the editions 
of her father's work, a valuable 
study of the constitution- 
making after the First World 
War, New Democratic 
Constulions of Europe ap- 
peared in 1929 and in 1970 an 
interesting essay in The Histo- 
ry Makers , edited by Sir John 
Wheeler-Bennet and Lord - 
Longford, on Gustav 
Streseman. a figure whom she 
much admired. She comribut- 


BUL mjrui 


.1 nadtaK Sex I 

BUL second reading. D 

Don on relations with Uneseo. 
Co w a ns. Today - Debate on children 
to care British Railways GSUnSnO 
BIIL second reading. 

Tomorrow: Local gownment rate 
limitation order and toed government 
reorganization pensions order. 

. Wednesday: Debate On RAF: Educa- 

ijoi and Libraries (Northern Ireland) 


__ Thursday: Debate on procedure. 
Housing (Scotland) BUL remaining , 

Backbench motion on tn 
ness sponsorship a I the arts. 


preparing her lectures and was ed to the Longford Report on 
a devoted supervisor of a large pornography in 1 976. 
number of research students. She was an unforgettable 
Her inaugural lecture was teacher and was held in affec- 
delivered before a large audi- tion by her colleagues who 
ence and made a deep impres- admired her gallant spirit, 
sion, not least for its fearless personal distinction, indepen- 
assertion of her moral and dence and integrity 
religious beliefe (she had been She was elected' an Hon 
received into the Roman Fellow of Somerville in 1948 
Catholic Church in 1948). and of St Hugh's in 1970. 

GENERAL JACQUES 
de BOLLARDIERE 


Science report 

Nine-month trial of birth control vaccine 


By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 


The world's first human 
trial of a birth control raceme 
begins in Adelaide, Australia, 
this month on a group of 30 
already sterilized women vol- 
unteers. The trial Is scheduled 
to last for nine mouths and 
aims to determine the safety 
and side-effects of the vaccine. 

After the successful comple- 
tion of this phase, the vaccine 
vrill then be tested on fertile 
women to assess its efficacy as 
a method of birth control The 
trials are part of a World 
Health Organization pro- 
gramme which could result in 
the vaccine becoming available 
in the mid-1990s. 

The vaccine is based on a 
hormone, human chorionic go- 
nadotrophin (hCGL which is 


produced soon after 
fertflirarion and is necessary 
for the establishment and 
maintenance of early pregnan- 
cy. When injected, die vaccine 
triggers an immune response 
that neutralizes the hormone, 
thus interrupting the repro- 
ductive process before the 
fertilized egg hM implanted 
successfully in the womb. 

2t has been developed by 
Ohio State University in the 
United States in collaboration 
with other academic centres, 
the drug industry and the 
WHO over the past ten years, 
and has already been shown to 
be safe in several animal 
species, and to prevent preg- 
nancy in baboons. 

The infertility rate In inject- 


ed baboons has been reported 
as 95 per emit compared with 
30 per cent for a control group 
on placebo. Both groups were 
mated with male baboons of 
proven fertility through three 
menstrual cycles or until they 
became pregnant 

Two of the 15 vaccinated 
females were pregnant after 44 
matings, whereas 14 of the 15 
control females were pregnant 
after 20 matings. 

The infertility rate should 
be higher in women, because 
the vaccine is based on human 
peptides, and two injections 
should protect a woman 
against pregnancy for at least 
a year, according to Professor 
Warren R. Jones, who is 
leading the trials in Adelaide. 


Professor Jones is research- 
ing whether the effects of the 
vaccine will normally be re- 
versed with time, and whether 
they can be artificially re- 
versed to allow an immunized 
woman to become pregnant 

Mr David Griffin, a WHO 
official involved in the devel- 
opment of the vaccine, says:*Tt 
may prove to be as important a 
development in birth control 
technology as the contracep- 
tive pill. It offers a masher of 
advantages over many current 
methods, and this should 
make it a valuable addition to 
the options available to the 
public.” 


Genera] Jacques Paris de 
BoUardiere. who died on Feb- 
ruary 21 altiieageof78,wasa 
hero of the French Resistance, 
who later became known for 
hi$ pacifist and anti-nuclear 
views. 

Bora in 1907, he served in 
the Foreign Legion from 1935 
lo 1939 and after the fall of 


overran the area in early 
September. 

He commanded French air- 
borne troops in Indochina 
between 1950 and 1953 before 
T be, K n | *5**° Algeria in 1956. 
In March 1957 he asked to be 

t°h hls command in 

protest at the use of torture on 
Algerian rebels. He was con- 


France escaped to England fined to "IZ \ u,l_ 

where he was trained by the before beinn HS rS r / or 
Special Operations ^ 

Executive’s Gaullist section, d of a umt m Camer- 

On April 1 1/12 be parachut- He heram* , 
ed into the Ardennes on a 1951 and St*?**™ 1 ? 1 m 
mission called Citronefle, his aeaim, s ? eaJc oul 

task being to arm and train the SS£o ns in^n t nd nucIeaf 

local maquis. On the night of 2525*" ^ ^ joined a 
the Normandy landings, more uon aeafo^t p2, Ies l ex P«li- 
agents.were dropped in, bring- testine?tb?.»f rench nuclear 
ine his missions's strength iit% a ururoa. 

A prime 


ing his missions's strength up 
to 12. A huge influx of recruits 
gave them plenty of work as 
well as danger. 

A week later a major Ger- 
man attack split his largest 
maquis, and a hundred pris- 
oners from it were shot. 

c- lTrTT ~ ^ , . He himself escaped and 

sources WHO, Geneva, and | went on with clandestine work d'YiZL n 1 ' ,uuin 8 Bat ai lie 

Medical World Hews, Hens- in the neighbourhood until the Sjofe ; Batfdle de r Homme 

United States First Army ^alllon de la 


for m a V non-viol^t 

alternative he was an unsur- 

candidate forSe 
Greens pacifi^i^ ^ 

?984 Europe9n 

W0 H r L^ a ^ thor O f several 
works includma BataiUe 





v. 


£j* i\S&> 



THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


15 


THE ARTS 


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:.:a. 


Eyre's superb new OntThe Insurance 

2 ffl ^2^^ e S d ^ ) ** yeSBSfa *6i pt by Alan 
Bennett in which Franz Kafka is a leafing 
secMBd^dnuacter. Already, the coiQim^oa 
**^ 8 ^ the amatenr fiterary 
ai&cs ont m force. We hare been told that The 
luumce Man is a tame reworking of The 
Trial that Bennett's Czech peasants talk tike 

YwlwhirelalHMHers, that the film is tmgid and 

In fact, tfae tiok. between the two writers is 
morea m a tter of atmosphere and mood **>*« 
grease literary influence. The Trial k the 
^msplracy-thfiorisfs recurring nkhtmare. ami 
Bennett is right, in a Radio Tima article, to 
compare it to 4fice or Wonderland, Both are 
dark, funny books where the central characters 
are the only sane people in a world which is int- 
pregnamy and mcoatrovartiblj ■«# Tke 
Insurance Man has no such licence. yd its 
comedy Is phflosphical rather dan fantastic. 

In ft, a dye worker contracts a mysterious 
skin di sease, tries to daim compensation and is 
frustrated at every torn, finally receiving help 
and sympathy from a kindly-digpnsed young 
claims assessor. The claims assessor is Kafka, 
and his well-intentioned «Mnp*< w fr w — m 
alternative Job in an asbestos factory — 
backfires. . The skin fim w, too, has no 
verifiable c on n e ctio n with work and «ifi«T 
away after 'Bennett’s central k 

rejected by his fianefee. Everyone at the 
Assessment office - rie»n»e,.«c clerks and 
docto rs — has some emotional stake in the 
bureaucracy of unhappiness, in the way *«t 
most of os invest some specfficftctaal foensfor 
a wider and more general misery. 

Ttasuftora at tte Court of Chancery did the 
same in Bleak Hoax, and The Insurance Man 
owes more to the angry, i ^iin p gf 

Dkkeos than Kafka’s snrreal whimsy. In one 
stunning scene an exandning doctor foscahk 
temper with the stated iitstfinthmaHad com- 
passion. They all dawn to have been happy 
mrtfl their a ccid e nt , he says, his voice coM with 
finy. They want paradise, not compensation. It 
k one of the finett things that Bennett hag writ- 
ten and, acted extraonfiMifiy wefi by Geoffrey 

Palmer, it gives as the bleak centre of thk mor- 
dant moral fable. Richard Eyre directs with a 
qnkt, unsentimental intelligence. mmfraid to 
Id fate camera look the text face on, recognizing 
film's capacity for psychological scrutiny and 
co nc e nt ration. The script has its moments of 
^overstatement and chmsiaess the framing 
scenes, set. Cm- the purposes of reminiscence, in 
1945, are a mere device — bat this k an acute .. 
and moving piece of work. 

The weekend saw two notable repeats. Gerry 
Anderson's breathtaking, high-tech poppet, 
adventure series Captain Scarlet retasas in the 
LWT region, proving once again that Ander- 
son was a dream-maker of mcondescewting 
genius. The dory of Tony Hancock, in 
Hancock’s Half- Hoar k that Mend of 

obsequiousness and beUjgerence, of toadying 
and boiling, which seems to snm np the 
national character. We see the same imqniet 
spirit dancing inside Alf Garnett and Basil 
Fawlty. — AJL 


Andrew Rissik reviews the weekend's television and, a year on from 
EastEnders, Mark Lawson assesses the impact of Michael Grade 

Shrewd aim at the toughest targets 


.On'BBCI, the channel c ontro lled 
by Mr Michael Grade, there has 
recently been a series called The 
Marriage. A young couple were 
followed by the cameras from first 
passion to first anniversary w hile 
everyone assessed the strength 
and likely length of their iminn 
Mr Grade is in a position to 
sympathize: the marriage between 
himself an aggressive scheduler 
with theories gleaned from years 
with ITV, and the august and 
crusty BBC has been subjected to 
the same curious scrutiny. 

This week sees the first anniver- 
sary of the revamp of the sched- 
ules — centred around EastEnders 
'and Wogan — which have mad * 
Grade the highest-profile pro- 
grammer in British television. It 
is time to lake up the invitation be 
made at the launch of those 
programmes last February: 
“Don't expect miracles. Give 
these changes a year and then see 
what difference they have made." 

If figures are significant, they 
■ hiss derision at his critics. 
EastEnders , the first new soap 
opera to challenge the Coronation 
Street monopoly, occupied places 
one to 10 in the British Audience ■ 
Research Board list of last 
month's most-watched pro- 
grammes. The BBC produced 17 
of the Christmas lop-20 shows 
and 57 of the top 100 for the first 
week of January, and have clawed . 
towards, and sometimes beyond, 
.a 50-50 split iff the total audience 
available to BBC and ITV. For 
the BBC these are figures which 
previously only happened to oth- 
er people. 

If your criterion is quality, the 
equation is more problematic. 
There have been accusations that 
Grade has brought to the BBC 
cheque-book television, a casb- 
for-trash mentality: that the BBC 
will overflow ■ with soap and 
shows in which Paul Daniels cuts 
Samantha Fox in half and rtiat 
Grade has a down on drama, arts 
and current affairs. Twelve 
months ago “How-Grade” was the 
fashionable tag for BBC1 but, of 
late, the Je remiahs have been 
silent 

Consider his two main innova- 
tions. Doubt has been cast on the 


figures for EastEnders fit has the 
advantage, unlike its ITV rivals, 
of a weekend repeat) but it is, for 
me. considerably better written 
and more obviously taflored to 
the Eighties than Coronation 
Street. It should be remembered 
that Grade, in seeking to create a 
popular twice-weekly soap opera, 
. chose the hardest target in the 
market. Granada Television's 
own attempts to find a stable- 
mate for Coronation Stiver— with 
the bi-weekly serials The Practice 
and Albion Market — hit a 
quicksand of indifference; the 
former will return as one-bour 
dramas on the General Hospital 
model and foe latter was switched 
from peak-time to teatime after 
felling ratings. 

The achievement of Wogan is 
more open to debate. Almost 
everything the show has proved is 
inadvertent and to its own disad- 
vantage:. how boring talk be- 
comes, how Wogan knocks 
conversations into monologues 
for himself and how slender is the 
set of genuinely interesting celeb- 
rities. Grade is staunch in his 
support of the show, hinting at 
Wogan Eve nights a week, but it 
bears signs of tiredness already 
and the best that can be said is 
that it has survived a year, 
probably longer than many felt 
likely, mid that an average audi- 
ence of nine million is respect- 
able. 

Many have attempted to 
present Grade as a cultural thug 
That is nonsence and his record at 
London Weekend Television dis- 
proves it sneer at the zany game- 
shows and the cop-anthdobber 
series if you tike, but remember 
The South Bank Show and Week- ' 
end World and, in d rama, an Alan 
Bennett sextet and a Dennis 
Potter trilogy. The cleverness of 
Grade's scheduling at LWT was 
its balance between pap to satisfy 
advertisers and higher-q ualit y 
products. 

But Wogan and EastEnders 
alone would represent a recovery 
as temporary and cosmetic as a 
topee. The real achievement of 
Grade's first year is that he; as a 
specialist scheduler, has broad- 
ened the audience for shows ’ 



Concert 

Music on the boil 


BBCSO/Edtvds 

BBC Maida Vale 


Musical enterprise from the 
BBC is not exactly news, but 
this season's crop of Invita- 
tion Concerts is proving some- 
thing special. On Saturday 
night the invitation was to foe 
Maida Vale studios, where the 
BBCSO were conducted by 
Peter Eotvos in three works, 
beginning with Michael 
Finnissy's Sea and Sky for 
large forces. 

No more than La Mer is it a 
picture drawn from nature; 
indeed its ferocity, its dam our 
of notes over a wide register, 
often boiling at foe top with 
trumpets, and its finally inde- 
pendent clarinet solo all seem 
purely musical phenomena, 
not requiring explanation. 

Christoph Dciz’s Piano 
Concerto, on the other hand. 


insists on bring interpreted. 
After a first movement nota- 
ble for grasping gestures from 
foe composer/soloist, low 
strings ami percussion, the 
second is a homage to Bufiud 
which could easily be imag- 
ined as an accompaniment to 
one of his films, involving, 
perhaps, a giant guitar with a 
hundred hands scrambling 
over it. a cellist playing from a 
minaret, a concert in an 
aircraft hangar and any num- 
ber of melting but still ticking 
watches. Delz is dearly an 
original. 

Hugues Dufourt's talent is 
less surprising, emerging al- 
most inevitably from foe mix 
of Xenakis and Messiaen, but 
it was worth hearing his flute 
concerto Antithesis when 
played with such a narrow, 
elegant pencil fine as it was 
here by Istvan Matuz. 

Paul Griffiths 


Opera 


Michael Grade: astonishing — if not miraculous — achievement 


which he was expected to jettison. 
Panorama, trimmed by 10 .min- 
utes and moved to after the main 
evening news, was seen as a 
victim of Grade's philistinism; in 
feet, its audience doubled. Grade 
claimed to have given ft “more 
money and more programmes” 
and its recent ran has been up to 
or above the quality of before: 

He points out, for those who 
sounded alarms about drama, 
that BBC1 wall this year transmit 
serials by Britain's two best 
tdevision playwrights: Dennis 
Potter's The Singing Detective 
and Alan Bleasdale's The Mono- 
ded Mutineer. 

But there are thorns in foe 
garden as welL Grade has faults 
which the BBC would do well to 
check. He is an unashamed 
salesman and American soap 
opera sells well, but you can have 


too much; to transmit, as be will 
from March 5, Dallas on Wednes- 
days with Dynasty and Dynasty 11 
on alternate Fridays, is to make 
Britain a soap-dish for foe Ameri- 
can network. 

The BBC still has many prob- 
lems. As ratings have scored, 
morale has fallen; foe Real Lives 
affair and foe suspension of two 
journalists from foe current-af- 
fairs series Rough Justice have 
apparently made the upper eche- 
lons tremulous about upsetting 
anyone. The very success of 
Grade's schedules has intensified 
uncertainty about foe BBGs role. 
Is programming now motivated 
by ratings-chasmg? If Mr Grade 
will fight ITV in foe schedules, 
then why not in foe market-place 
for advertising? Though back on 
course, the BBC needs careful 
steering -MX. 


Madam Butterfly 

Coliseum 

Graham Vick’s much-ad- 
mired production has a new 
_ Jtterfly for this revival: foe 
Polish soprano Magdalena 
Falewicz, making her En glish 
National Opera debut. She is 
above all a sophisticated ac- 
tress, not entirely credible as a 
naive 15-year-old perhaps but 
revealing great psychological 
insight in Act Q where the 
conflicting mills of sdf-delu- 
sion, love; despair and dignity 
are movingly conveyed. 

She is best, vocally, in a 
well-focused and vibrant mid- 
dle range. The felling phrases 
for “One Fine Day” expose a 
slightly underpowered low 
register, and her highest notes 
are variable. 

As Pinkerton, Roland 
Sidwell also had mixed for- 
tunes among the leger-tines 
(although both singers were in 
ardently lyrical voice for foe 
big Act I duet). Sidwell, how- 
ever, acts well and looks right 


— burly, crass and desperately 
short of moral fibre - and his 
direct, ingenuous vocal man- 
ner is potentially ideal for foe 
part. 

The other roles are also 
strongly sung. Anne-Marie 
Owens's gloomy, suspicious 
Suzuki is a characterization of 
considerable stature, a worthy 
oriental counterpart to Nor- 
man Bailey's opprobrious, sol- 
idly-sung Sharpless. As the 
Bonze, Richard Angas pro- 

{ 'ects a chilly physical presence 
Hit not enough of the text; 
Terry Jenkins, however, is 
suitably oily and odious as 
Go no — an excellent cameo. 

In foe pit the experienced 
James Lockhan concentrates 
on subtle, often delicate or- 
chestral textures, well-tailored 
phrasing and generally exem- 
plary rapport with bis singers. 
His approach perfectly com- 
plements Vick’s handsome 
staging, which — for all its 
dever touches — makes its 
final appeal straight to the 
heart, just as it should. 

Richard Morrison 


^ Simon Banner reports from Paris on 
,■ the National Theatre’s contribution to 
>v ‘ the Theatre de rEurope season 



calmly nervous 


honoured 


r i-L- Enter Tom Stoppard 

; : - right, stepping into the murky, 
-/ green light, and pacing foe 
• •• '*» stage carefully as if to measure 

. it. Staggering on and caught in 

. .. :? a wild embrace with an ugly- 
looking bearskin, a stage-hand 
. : :r. appears to be searching for 
somewhere to off-load his 
burden. The contraption 
which hovers above — a group 
of clouds, a trident and a 

• ; ' r ' shield decorated with the 
■ -■* Union Jack — begins lo rise 

: ^ ' .and descend creakily. Some- 
i L -Wbere “Rule Britannia” is 
. struck up. Meanwhile! picking 

his way between an industrial 
' .Jai vacuum deaner, a dead body 
-;’T JilUW and a wheelchair, Stoppard 
’ ' , » i exits stage left pursued by 
■ ,. J .< < stage-hand and bear. 

Not altogether surprisingly, 

• V.'- r Edward Petherbridge furrows 
- . his brow: “At this paint it 

always looks as if it win never 

come together, doesn't it?" 

, But he turns to Ian McKellen 
!* (who, along with Pctherbridge 
J himself, is co-director of one 
f : of the five distinct groups 
' which now make up foe 
National Theatre) and adds 
• f gloomily that “Perhaps it 
won’t come together this time 
- after all”. 

^ What should have been 
coming together was the 
Petherfaidge-McKeHen pro- 
; ‘ *. ’• ; duction of The Real Inspector 
"x ‘ Hound and The Critic, due to 
' - . !. open 24 hours later at the 
-I'-^'OdtoD in Paris. The actors 
. - J!'* : had only just flown in from 
' ■ London and were now, late in 

• the evening, due to see the 
^ Odten for the first time. 

Jwvrf * 1 “ No showers!” “What 
» pyll'** 1 " about the mirrors?” But each 
' “ ” f rtPfl observation had foe corollary 
. - „ J. that “at least it’s a better 
■* u riieatre than the Olivier”. And 

K 1 * more attractive too, richly 
^ decorated in red and 


-in 


- “<V 


^4 hung with chandeliers. It is! 

-' ,n . to Eleanor Bron unwittingly to 
"■make the most dramatic en- 
■„ : ' trance of bH Dressed in Mack, 
•-''.topped by a skyscraper of a 


hat, she advances elegantly 
across die stage to be met by 
foe objection that “r 
you look like a Russian 
“SssshT foe says, con s pi ra io- 
rially darting her eyes from 
side to side, “Do you want 
everybody to know?" 

Taking- change, Sheila Han- 
cock, foe director of. The 
Critic, offers some thoughts 
on the theatre and the task 
ahead of them. .There is foe 
problem of the differently 
shaped stage, of the sheer lack 
of time, the acoustics, and the 
mix of French and British 
technical staff they are work- 
ing with. Thelma Hob, the 
recently-appointed and 
strangdy-titled Head of Tour- 
ing and Exploitation, offers 
soothing advicb about how to 
protect valuables, and how to 
phone home. The ga t h eri ng 
begins to take on foe atmo- 
sphere of -a rather chichi 
scbooltripi 

Last year alone foe National 
Theatre made similar outings 
with She Stoops to Conqueno 
Aberdeen and Glasgow, with 
The Road to Mecca to Bath, 
with Coriolanus to Athens and 
Animal Farm to more places 
than one can mention. Al- 
ready this year there are trips 
planned to Aberdeen, Glas- 
gow, Edinburgh, Zurich, Balti- . 
more, Toronto, Washington 
and Chicago. Even so, this is 
the first outing .beyond the 
South Bank for foe Pether- 
bridge-McKellen company 
and it is also one of foe more 
dicti ngnished of die National 
Theatre's international en- 
gagements, for the period in- 
Parish. -is part ofGiorgio 
Strebkr's Theatre de F Europe 
season, which aims to give 
Parisians a chance to sample 
the best of European drama 
■and is how. in its thud year. 
Along with foe British Coun- 
cil, it is foe Theatre de 
rEurope which has financed 
the Petheibridge-McKellen 
visit . 



Tbtal panic — or maybe not: 
Ian McKellen as foe Hoand 


. s • 
1. ..>' 



The temperature 
in Cornwall 
is82°F 



Montego Bay is in Cornwall 
Jamaica And right now wanner 
than Cornwall England 
For foe Jamaica Information Pack, . 
/write to: JanafcaTburist Board; 
^50 St James's St, London 
SWiAiJT (01-4941707)- 




• Conscious of what is expect- 
ed of it, Ian McKellen believes 
the company to be “call 
nervous” “We have to recog- 
nize what a tremendous hon- 
our it is for us to be invited 
hoe at all, because, while 
Britain has been standing still 
.culturally over the last few 
years, the French have been 
busy malting Paris the cultural 
capitelofEmope. And here we 
are, invited to be at the very 
heart of things.” 

With juste few hours to go 
before curtain-up, there are 
more immediate worries than 
the decline of British theatre. 
In a. converted office, the 
company's wig mistress and 
her team are fretfully combing 
and teasing life back into the 
37 wigs they have brought 
over with them, at the same 
time as pondering, on the 
possibility of successful co- 
ordination of' the evening's 
many rapid costume and wig 
changes. “Trying to work it 
out is fike doing a cros s w or d 
and a jigsaw at foe same 
time.” ■ 

“They’re not going to be 
able to bear from np here”, 
shouts Sheila Hancock pre- 
tending to be an audience in 
one of the boxes. “Nor see", 
she adds cheerily. “There’s so 
Htlle tune left for a run- 
through”, says Stoppard, 
“we’re just- going to lave to 
put the lights on and do foe 
show.” *Tm afraid ‘Rule 
Britannia' has to be fester!” 
says Hancock. 

“If yon want my opinion”, 
as one of the critics in Hound 
puts it as the curtain is about 
to rise, “it’s total panic back 
there:” Or maybe not. Be- 
cause, as foe company hits its 
stride, particularly with the 
neatlycxecuted pantomime of 
The Critic, and apart from the 
occasional whispered enquiry 
heard among ihe.audience, the 
dgnificance of a language- 
barrier m the theatre is gener- 
ally exaggerated. This is^ borne 
out by the enthusiastic first 
night response. “This is what 
the ThgUre de rEnrope is all 
about — there's good and bad 
theatre, but really fine theatre 
works for’ any audience.” 
“They understood it didn’t 
they?”, says Tristram 
Wymark amazedly. Nation 
eaks to nation and Edward 
iherbridge claims to have a 
whole new perspective on the 
Channel TonneL All this from 
what a few hours ago looked 
fike the jaws of defeat 


>. * 


Dance 


Radiant Fonteyn 


The Sleeping 
Beauty 

Miami Beach, 
Florida 


Dame Margot Fonteyn’s fly- 
ing visit to Miami Beach 10 
appear with foe Sadler's Wells 
Royal Ballet in The Sleeping 
Beauty was no ordinary dance 
occasion. Her association with 
this particular ballet goes back 
some 47 years — when the 
Tchaikovsky/Petipa then al- 
most youthful classic was 
itself one year shy of its own 
balfcentury. And her Miami 
appearances came almost 40 
years to the day — February 
20, 1946 — after she helped 
reopen • the Royal Opera 
House at that epoch-starting 
Royal Gala, with foe historic 
Sleeping Beauty that embod- 
ied Obver Messd’s stylized 
visions of fairyland. 

Peter Wright's recent stag- 
ing of The Sleeping Beauty 
replaces Messd’s fantasy with 
the more sombre finery of 
Philip Prowse. Even more 
significantly, Dame Margot, 
the world's Aurora, who had 
danced the role more often 
than any other ballerina in 
history ever had or almost 
certainly ever will, was now, 
for the first time, foe Queen. 

Dame Margot’s appearance 
was not unnaturally taken as 
an event Her Majesty's Am- 
bassador came from Washing- 

Royal Ballet 

Covent Garden 


ton to attend her debut, and 
the Miami Herald noted the 
next day that Fonteyn was 
“looking radiant . . . acting 
with her legendary grace.” 

Her appearance did not 
seem surprising. After all she 
still remains listed officially as 
foe Royal Ballet's one and 
only prima ballerina assoluta 
and her nature was always 
modest rather than retiring. 
Also she is not a complete 
stranger to the quieter realm 
of mime role — a few years ago 
in New York she played Lady 
Capulet for foe Ballet of La 
Scala, Milan. But even that 
lacked the poignancy and 
charm of this new assump- 
tion. 

How was she? She was 
radiant What other word 
could there be? - after afl, ft 
once characterized the Aurora 
that woke up foe entire world 
of dance. So ft can well serve 
another turn. 

She was an Aurora’s mother 
who got more applause on 
entrance than some Auroras 
gel on exit She behaved 
impeccably. Her acting 
proved studiously unexagger- 
ated, completely attuned to, 
the suave authority of her' 
King — himself a long-time 
danang partner, Desmond 
Kelly. 

She accepted her roses with 
the moist eyes of pleasure. She 
still walked in beauty, foe way 
a star danced at her birth. 

Give Barnes 


Rock 


Feargal Sharkey 

Hamme rsmith 

Odeon 


Who would have predicted 
when young Feargal Sharkey 
was still singing with the 
evergreen Undertones that he 
would one day turn out to be 
such a suave musical sophisti- 
cate? For when his former 
coup threw in the towel, 
following a run of modest 
chart entries between 1978 
and 1981, ft was their sponta- 
neous. gauche approach, un- 
tainted by any hint of 
calculating music-business 
acumen, for which they were 
most fondly remembered. 

But times change. With foe 
confidence of a No 1 hit 
behind him, and the aura of a 
man who has tasted foe fruits 
of “crossover” appeal, Shar- 
key strode purposefully to the 


I can oever understand why a 
company as steeped in tradi- 
tion as the Royal Ballet lacks 
sense of occasion. Last week it 
marked the fortieth anniversa- 
ry of its move to Covem 
Garden, reopening the Opera 
House after foe war, with a 
nondescript triple bill that can 
hardly be claimed to make a 
coherent or satisfying whole 
since neither musically, the- 
matically nor stylistically do 
its parts have anything to do 
with one another. 

1 suppose it makes sense to 
get as much mileage as possi- 
ble out of Frankenstein before 
audiences, notice foal Wayne 
Eagling's flamboyant use of 
stage tricks thinly covers a 
lack of any attribute likely to 
give it staying power. His 
choreography limply recycles 
familiar stops. Neither Eagliug 
nor foe more glamorous Ash- 
ley Page can adequately sub- 
stitute for the dramatic flair 
which Stephen Jefferies (sadly 
now injured) previously gave 
foe title part Last season’s 
cheers are notably missing. 

By my applause meter (alias 
ears), Gloria is the evening's 
most popular part. It is easy to 
see why. since it combines 
three infallible themes: war, 
sex and religion. Poulenc's 
music provides the piety while 
Andy CTunder’s designs set the 
action in a sharply stylized but 
unmistakable evocation of 


First World War trenches 
where men stand or rest 
anxious and waiting for foe 
next attack. Kenneth MacMil- 
lan gives the pale ghosts and 
flayed corpses that make up 
foe cast some of his most 
erotic choreography as they 
recall lost pleasures. 

The partnering work is 
smoother and less strained 
than MacMillan sometimes 
imposes, whether in foe ada- 
gios for two or three dancers 
or foe allegro acrobatics for 
three men and a woman. 

Jennifer Penney, Julian 
Hosking and Wendy Ellis 
repeat their success in the 
roles made for them, and 
Fiona Chadwick made a good 
dfebut in Penney’ s pan. 
Eagling, in foe other main 
role, acts intensely but his 
solos have lost some of their 
energy. 

Separating these two dispa- 
rate works. David Bintley’s 
Consort Lessons offers some 
of his most assured adagio 
choreography (handsomely 
done by Lesley Collier and 
Fiona Chadwick on successive 
nights) and allegro dances that 
contain striking and felicitous 
passages. Bintley asks a fair 
turn of speed from his danc- 
ers, but there is nothing 
exorbitant in what he expects, 
and there seems no excuse for 
the sloppy footwork, lack of 
forcefulness and lack of finish- 
es which some of them 
showed 

John Perdval 



microphone, while his superb- 
ly drilled 10 -piece soul revue 
tend cracked down hard on 
foe Motown beat of his most 
recent hit. “You Little Thief”. 
. His voice, however, re- 
mains a constant factor in a 
career which now looks as well 
groomed as his gorgeous flow- 
ing locks. With its high, warm 
timbre be still struck a siren- 
note of brooding Angst over 
the supper-dub funk of“ Bitter 
Man” and the designer soul of 
“Don’t Leave it to Nature” 
while occasionally, as when be 
stalked the front row during 
“Ashes and Diamonds”, look- 
ing like a figure from Macbeth, 
foe awkward energy of his old 
Bash Street Kid persona reas- 
serted itself. 

His baud were strikingly 
good; essentially a cohesive 
backing unit, they stuck to 
crisp, tidy arrangements, 
Davey Payne’s brief saxo- 
phone solos and Graham 


Pointer’s rare guitar breaks 
remaining firmly bedded in a 
mix of compact-disc accuracy. 
With no one musician to the 
fore, attention was constantly 
drawn to the superlative drive 
and prediton of Jeff Dunn's 
drumming. 

The nagging singalong mel- 
ody of “A Good Heart” was 
delivered with an impressive 
clout, and, whatever reserva- 
tions may be felt about 
Sharkey's induction into the 
high-gloss echelons of produc- 
tion pop, there was no doubt- 
ing the conviction of this 
performance. Capable perfor- 
mances of Percy Sledge's 
“When a Man Loves a 
Woman” and Bob and Earf s 
“Harlem Shuffle", two of the 
most taxing soul classics for 
both singer and band, provid- 
ed an admirable and uplifting 
finale. 

David Sinclair 


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THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986- 











«> iiSJ> 




MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


THE 



TIMES 


y 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


in. 


US NOTEBOOK 

Dangers in 
Volcker 


policy 


Exco in £lbn merger talks 
with Morgan Grenfell 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


From Maxwell Newton,- 
NwYMi 


By Graham Searje*Bl Fmaociai Editor 


• • WI * . Morgan Grenfell, the most 

Mr Paul Volcker, chai rman important merchant bank re- 

niA Pnlli^n 1 1 1h. __ * •WAi.kl.- « ■ _ • 


Of the Federal Reserve Board, raining in private 
m his erfdeoce to Congress, having exploratpiy talk* with 


fcw made it dear rt»n t be Exco, the finanHgf 
rateads to protect the dollar. It ate* which “may or may not 


pic 


fed £rien fte enough, be said. lead to a mer^r" the bank 
Let ns be dear about this — confirmed last ni ght 


any move by a central bank to ' If approved fry shneh oidea 
protect the value of its curies-; and the Bank of Engfamt the 
cy most involve a restrictive merger would create a group 
monetary policy in the **^mfir. capitalized at about ffbuHon 
tic economy. There is no other with a strong position in 


means for a central bank to (banking and ! corporate 


“protect” its dBieacy. 


stockbroking. 



I have recently referred tq j edged dealing and money and 


the same of 
central hank ug frj a N tf , 
.when It Is their lot to prej 
ever a weak currency. . 

.. Becawe of the hot 


currency broking. 

- Talks have been taking 
place for a. few weeks and 
l ea ke d out overthe weekend. 
If they came to fruition, Exco 


lion cash since s elling its 
controlling stake in Telerate, 
the US financial information 
group, last year. 

Mr John Gunn, who built 
up the group, then left follow- 
ing arguments over his ambi- 
tious takeover plans and the 
group has been thought to be 
jn search of a future since last 
autumn. 

A merger with Morgan 
Grenfell would give the bank- 
ing group the capital it needs 
to expand its dealing badness 
after the Stock Exchange big 
bang this autumn. 

It has bought the gift-edged 
broker Pember & Boyle and 
the .jobber Pinchin Denny. Mr 



is is the interests of Exco 
shareholders,” he said. 

The Bank of Engla nd may, 
however, be the biggest stum- 
bling block. Under the so- 
called O'Brien letter. 


The election pattern 
set by oil and coal 


promulgated in the eariy sev- 
enties, the Bank insists that a 


Christopher Reeves: “Exco 
made the first move” 


endes, the Bank insists that a 
bank should not own more 
than K) per cent of a money 
broker. Money broking is 
Exco's biggest business al- 
though it also owns the WICO 
Far East stockbroking busi- 
ness. 

Preliminary talks have been 
held at the Bank of England 
but the Bank confirmed yes- 
terday that the separation 
doctrine still stands at the 
request of the market. . Mr 


weakness of the US economy; I WOoW take oyer the Morgan 



■ in the second half of 1984 the v® 
1 -.doffinr began to lose its end 

Strength in Febnatiy, 1985. e®* 3 
But, as a result of brtenwJ -E 
pressures from the conflktfug Excl 
• exporting and imp ortin g into? ti on 
esta, Mr James Baker, US __ 
\ TVeasary Secretary, pulled off -w 

■ the coup of tte first G5| I 
^meeting. Mr Volcker never * 

approved this policy, - 

September he has aft the rasd ■; 
of money growth iu half, and] 
has done roughly the same to , 
the adjusted monetary base. ' V I 
Mr Vehker has never fakeof 


Grenfell group, with each side 
ending up with about half the 
enlarged group. 

: Exco is valued on the Stock 
Exchanges at about £550 mil- 
lion ana has some £350 mil- 


Chnstopber Reeves, Morgan his colleague Mr Alan Ne are ?® cve yesterday that 
GreftiMTs chief executive, said in London for an b»i*» board’ Morgan did only 0.07 percent 


Grcnfeirs chief executive, said in London for a 
yesterday that the bank had meeting to disco 
originaDy been approached by MrNg said y 
E««x v - the concept of ti 

Exco’s biggest shareholder interesting but th 
Tan Sri Khoo Teck Puax, the ed the financial 


to discuss the deal. 


Mr Ng said yesterday that' 
e concept of the merger was! 


meager was, 
they await-’ 
letafls.“The 


Malaysian businessman, and- important thing is whether it 


of its business with Exco. 

If the Bank insist s on the 
separation, the deal may not 
go ahead. Mr Reeves insisted 
yesterday that other options 
were available. 


Efficiency! 

of BA 
criticized 


New deal could 
end tin crisis 


By Michael JPrest, Financial Correspondent 


SEC acts 
to end bid 
rumours 


been tofaDv preoccupied with! 
an imaginary inflationary^ 
threat, as his tes tim o ny toj 
Congress shewed. He had 
backed op this poHcy with W 
8 per cent federal foods poficy^ 
The qaestiou that springs ftv 
mind is: WB1 Mr Vokker’s, 
tight money policy protect thet 
dollar from farther major de- 


By Edward Townsend 
Industrial Correspondent 


It is possible that in at- 1 ratrtute says in it 

tempting to protect the dollar SSS&'SSSiaiSi^ii 
(«d ««« .he 


possibilities of a weakeafo 
dollar), Mr Voider wffl set h 
train forces which wffl haw 
the effect of devahmg tfe 
dollar still further. 

There are reasons for befiev 
fog this to be tte case: 

Mr Yakker's foaeasfogl] 
restrictive monetary potic] 
will weaken the US economy 
making it a much less attrac- 
tive place for fare^nera to 
invest He virfaafly said as 
such in his testimony when he 
declared that the Japanese 


__a ,.L. lrfuu , i. l | W »*l VU« OUUUCa, UUUU 

tte mm- o**** u 

jj-iuuLjjmru TK« -* ~ * — 'a h a n sa, Alitalia, Japan Ainu 

be the “locomotive” far*3 

rest of the world. 1 I *£***2221 


British Airway’ improved 
profitability may be financial- 
ly attractive to the Govern- 
ment in the ran-op to the 
airime's privatization, but it is 
not necessarily indicative of 
improved efficiency, accord- 
ing to the Institute for Fiscal 
Studies. - 

.The institute says in its 
quarterly journal that BA's 
improved performance is pri- 
marily based on the substan- 
tial reductions in its labour 
force, from 56,000 in 1980 to 
36,000 in 1984. 

“This does not necessarily 
imply an equally dramatic 
increase in productivity, be- 
cause of the possibility of : 
substituting other factors of, 
production for labour, of in- 
creasing the contracting out of 
work, and of changing the 
output mix." . 

Tte institute also stresses 
that in relation to BA’s perfor- 
mance, other airlines, notably ' 
British Chjcdoraan, Luft- 
hansa, Alitalia, Japan Airlines 
and Singapore Arrimes, have 


Agreement to rod tte tin 
crisis, which is about to enter 
jts fifth nMn«fc l could he 
reached this week after inten- 
sive discussions over the week- 
end produced an outline 
settlement which wffl be pift to 
hanks, brokers and Interna- 
tional Tin Carnal members 
today. ' 


Mr Graham and 1 
Keateabamn envisaged I 
nr contributing £200 arilli 
to Newco’s capita frration 
£270 ntiHion. Sources dose 


ITC and hank sources said 
that the proposed deal is very 
dose to foe original Newco 
plan pm fonvaidjBBt before 
Christmas by Mr Peter Gra- 
ham, senior deputy chairman 
of Standard Chartered Bank, 
and Mr Ralph Kestenbama, 

ma n ay iHg dfrCCtOT of foe bTO- 

ker Gerald Metals. 

If a deal is signed this week, 
tfo treating os foe Ioadou 
Metal should re- 

sume for foe middle of next 
month. March 17 is a possible ' 
date. 


that the final ITC contribution 
will be a fittie short of £120 
minion Thp hawk* and bro- 
kers wffl put up £100 nriffioa 
and foe British Govcramenf 
£50 million. l 

The ootime deal auggestoi 
that foe Newco board wffl havei 


a banker as chairman, with 
two bankers and two brokers) 
on the board. Another twoi, 


From Balky Morns, 

Washing ton 

The US Securities and Ex- 
change Commission, alarmed 
by the dramatic shift in tte 
share prices of large compa- 
nies, has launched- an investi- 
gation to prevent stock 
manipulators planting illegal 
rumours on Wall Street. 

Over the past year, when 
markets have been booming 
and corporate takeover activi- 
ty has risen sharply, company 
after company has fallen vie- j 
tim to a series of carefully | 
planted rumours which have 


directorships are reserved for | earned large p ro fi ts fora «naty 


ITC members, but they are 
divided on who wrote to sit - 
Bound representation is im- 
portant not only because of 
who runs Newco but also 


group of big investors, the 
SEC said. 

The case of Pennzoil, the oil 
firm involved in a mufti- 
million dollar legal dispute 


because _ of immunity from I with Texaco, was cited by the 


prosecution. Some TTC mem- I SEC in the first public hearing 


tike primary 


Mr Vocfcer increased the like- 
lihood of further reductions in 
US interest rates. Indeed, it is 
possible that by early 1987 the 
medium to long-term yield on 
US bonds will be 7 per cent 
This rate wffl certainly not 
contribute to a strong dollar. 

In other words, Mr 
Vokker's tight money policy ; 
and Ms 8 per cent federal 
fends policy are fikriy to have 
just foe opposite effect from 
that presumably fatpmieifj 
Ami this wffl not be tte firstj 
time that, by att e mp tin g to 
“fight the market" with an 
unrealistic federal fends rated 
tte central bank has produced! 
perverse results. 

Mr Vokker's “disinflation-, 
ary de termin a tio n'’ as part of 
his plan to protect tte curren- 
cy is likely to lead to an 
accelerated devaluation of foe 
dollar. 


British Airways has im- 
proved its relative position, 
although starting from well 
behind the c omp e titi on, the 
report says. • 

: “Its degree of improvement 
has been good, but not spec- 


| The outfiue deal was 
reac h e d a ttain on Saturday 
after 10 hours of negotiations 
between tte ITC and rep r esea- 
lathes of its creditor banks 
and brokers. ITC and bank 
sources admitted that minds 
had been concentrated for ferns 
that foe weak tm price could 
undermine foe economics of 
I Newcou 

Under foe plan a company, 
-at foe moment called Newco, 
wffl take over all foe ITC* 
obligations and tm stocks. 


bers fear that bated member- 1 on the problem. 


ship wffl leave them open to 


ITC aad tte banks and 


On January 7. following a 
news wire report that Texaco 
had offered to buy the compa- 


brokers had to agree to dfs-j ny for $100 a share, Pennzoil’s 
agree on an unmanly danse stock took of£ rising from 
wfoch rays that ITC memben $63.37 to $83 a share. Specula- 


mamtain they emoy sovereign 
i Him H flhy while ttefr creditors 


tors who had bought options 
on the stock, which jumped 


believe o therwise. There is a from $3730 to $1025, made a 
g en tleman 's agreement not to profit of almost 3000 per cent. 


succach oth er. _ But the next day, when both 

Tte other cnutl issue dnr-; companies denied the ru- 
ing foe negotiations was tte; m0 ur, Pcunzoil's price 
policy for disposing of dropped from a high of $91 to 


Newco’s tin. In principle the- [$74.50 at the dose and the 


tacular, ajid ft remains one oT amoimtsog to 85,000 tonnes of 
the poorer performers.” tm cwrentiy valued at £500 

* ' - r -- -- - mfflioii. In redan the ITC wffl 


the poorer perfbnners." - 

New chief for 
tax board 


outfiue agreement says that 
about 8 per cent of foe 


holdings should be sold each! (meted to $40. 


ion price for 100 Pennzoil 
res at $75 a share phnn- 


be relieved of its debts and its 
tin bnEfer stock operation win 


Kir- 1 mnvmv Atkms ♦LI COMTh gTOSS <febtS 

tiff Lawrence Airey, tte-1 »«> gonn nrfffln* . 


chairman of the Board of 
Inland Revenue, is to retire at 1 
the end of June after six years 
as Britain's top taxman. Sir; 
Lawrence- will be '60 next 


month over three yean. Bat The SEC is investig a t i n g the 

this timetable can be varied to incident to determine who 
allow for price movements. In started the rumour and who 
practice, Newco’s fife and profited 
disposal policy will be deter- t- PpT , n , rtl -| • 

Tniiiiwi hy tte hoard. “ ie Pennzoil episode is 

mmeanyraenaara. apparently not an isolated 

- - case. In One frantic fortnight 

ftl I mifnilt last year, 20 companies were 
Ull UUipiU fejsely rumoured to be take- 
in remarks quoted By the over targets, arco^g to Mr 
snian news agency, Irna, he < ^T y Lynch, the SECs chief 
id that if foere were no ... 

rinns mMQim in Imtil n»rt. But foe SEC WjH find it 


month. He will be succeeded foe ranks of foe Organization 
by Mr Anthony Ba t tishfll , of Exporting Countries over 


Iran plea on oil output 

In the first sign of a split in In remarks quoted By tl 


aged 48, who is a dq?u£y j foe fell in tte o2 


chairman. • 

Mr Battishffi, a graduate 
the London School of Ec 


Iranian news aaency, Irna, be) G y Lyn ch, the 
there 1 


oil minister, Mr Ghdamreza 
Aqazadeh. .has called for a 
temporary halt to oil produo 


said that if there were no 
serious measures to limit emt- 


By 1988 (election year, remember?) 
the Government may have cause to 
be grateful to not one, but two groups 
of energy producers. Between them, 
the miners and Opcc have reshaped 
the pattern of economic growth 
through Mis Thatcher's second term. 

What they have done between 
them, in effect, is to damp down the 
impact on Britain of America's 
fearful struggles to rebalance its trade 
position. This had threatened to be 
the dominant, depressive influence 
on the world economy between 1984 
and 1988. We have already seen the 
first consequences: as American 
growth was checked, the whole world 
slowed down. Hie growth of world 
output fell by half between 1984 and 
1985. 

In Britain, however, this slowdown 
was conveniently disguised by the 
economy's rebound from the miners' 
strike, to an extent that was finally 
revealed just last week. The output 
estimates for 1985 record growth of 
about 3’£ per cent, up half a point 
from 1984. Strip out the rebound 
from the miners' strike, however, and 
there was actually a fall in growth 
from 4 per cent in 1984 to a mere 2% 
percent in 1985. 

Had the miners not unwittingly 
concealed this slowdown, Mr Nigel 
Lawson's differences with — for 
example — the Confederation of 
British Industry might have been a 
good deal sharper- But with this 
convenient ScaxgiJJ effect now out of 
the statistics, he meed new difficulties 
in keeping the growth ball rolling. 
This year might have been just good 
enough; but not 1987. Then began 
“Opec Three". 

The pessimists (notably in the 
international financial institutions) 
still fear that the foiling oil price will 
not do enough to counterbalance 
American retrenchment. They are 
worried that the world will react to 
the huge shifts in purchasing power 
involved in “Opec Three” very much 
as it did in the opposite shifts in 
“Opecs One and Two” When the oil 
producers jacked up their prices, the 
losers were forced to cut other 
imports, while the winners pocketed 
their gains and increased their trade 
surpluses: a combination that pushed 
the world into recession. 

The most obvious winners from a 
foiling oil price are Japan and West 
Germany, America and France; and 
there is indeed some danger that the 
first two will simply run up even 
larger balance of payments surpluses, 
while the third will go on trying to cut 
its deficit. Meanwhile, some of the 
debt-ridden losers will be forced to 
make painful adjustments; in the 
usual fashion of economic fate, the 
good news is slower acting than the 
bad. But there are some rather 
important differences between the 
previous Opec crises and today's. 

First of ail, a felling, as opposed to 
a rising, oil price increases the real 
value of money balances worldwide 
and thus boosts world wealth and 
world demand overall. Second, as the 
price of energy foils, it automatically 
makes productive capacity that had 
to be mothballed as the oil price rose 
economic to use again: no sensible 
estimates exist of the extent of this 


pnee, Iran s serious measures to limit out-) “ u: ^ una . u 

GhoJamreza pul “an uncontrollable c risis I £ fr™ cu ft m slop fo® practice. 


nornics, fias divided his civil tion-- for two weeks or more 
service career between the — to be followed by a co- 

Ul«.j c .-a _ ' - f . . 


would be created.” For example, officials from 

• Spot crude oil prices fell JWb exchanges and from 
to SI3.50 a barrel on the New WaQ Street firms met m 
York Mercantile Exchange on Washington last week but 


spare capacity, but it would be absurd 
to suppose there will be no boost to 
supply. 

This is the secure foundation for 
optimism about Opec Three. The 
effects on Britain are a little more 
convoluted. They are usefully teased 
out in the latest forecasts of the 
London Business School, published 
today. 

Its ready reckoner suggested that 
every $5 off the oil price adds roughly 
half of l per cent to Britain's output 


Inland Revenue and the Trea-| ordinated cut in production Saturday, the lowest 1 n °t agree on the defini- 


by tte 13-member caneL 


lion of an illegal rumour. 


ORDINARY SHARES 


Why food stores are having a thin time 


in the first year, and more than 1 per 
cent in the second and third years, 
while paring a point off the inflation 
rate in the first year. The mechanism 
is a foil in the exchange rate, which 
boosts competitiveness and thus 
Britain's opportunity to take advan- 
tage of world trade. 

The LBS’s first caveat is that the 
advantage can easily be destroyed by 
government, if it raises interest rates 
to prevent the foil in the pound. That 
lesson certainly seems to have been 
absorbed by the British Treasury. 

The second caveat, however, is that 
industry can throw the advantage 
tiway with equal ease. 

During Opecs One and Two, it was 
industry that first felt the strain: costs 
rose, profits foil, before prices ad- 
justed. In the same way, it is now in- 
dustry that will get first bite at the 
Opec cherry. It is the immediate 
boost to company profits from a 
foiling oil price that provides the 
latest excuse for believing the stock 
market's present party can cany on. 
The economic question is whether 
companies eventually respond to the 
stimulus of higher profits by invest- 
ing and expanding, or whether the 
boost to the economy is dispersed 
through consumer purchases of still 
more imports. 

It is daft to suppose that there 
should be no deterioration in 
Britain's balance of payments after a 
foil in the oil price. What is im- 
portant, however, is that we should 
maintain our market share in manu- 
factured trade. 

The LBS is cheerfully optimistic 
about this: indeed it suggests that the 
tide of disaster has already turned, 
and that Britain's share of world 
trade has held up surprisingly well 
over the past five years. So its new 
forecast is a good deal more cheering 
than the projections it made last 
autumn; and would be brighter still at 
an oil price of $15, rather than the 
$20 cautiously assumed. What is 
even more interesting is that the 
shape of the forecast has changed 
dramatically. 

Last October, the LBS suggested 
modest growth in 1986 would fade 
further in 1987, from 2.4 per cent this 
year to 2.1 per cent next. Now, by 
contrast, it is suggesting a bounce. Its 
growth forecast for 1986 is un- 
changed, the benefit of lower oil 
prices is partly offset by the 
Chancellor's struggle to hold down 
public borrowing, and the LBS 
assumes he has no scope for tax cuts. 

The LBS's forecast for 1987, 
however, now shows a growth rate of 
nearly 3 per cent. Supposing this 
pattern to be roughly correct, the 
effect of Opec Three wul have been to 
reshape Mrs Thatcher's second term, 
from a steady decline in economic 
growth to a modest economic cycle in 
which a mild growth-recession is 
followed by a conveniently timed 
recovery. 

The same rearrangement can be 
seen in the LBS's inflation forecast 
Last October, it forecast 4.3 per cent 
inflation this year, increasing mod- 
estly but drearily to 4.6 per cent in 
1987. Now it is forecasting 3.8 per 
cent inflation in 1 986, dropping next 
year to 3.3 per cent. 

And unemployment? Well, that 
too is expected to fell; and a shift 
from capital-intensive oil production 
to relatively labour-intensive manu- 
facturing would certainly help. But 
the decline in the number of jobless is 
still slow. The LBS adds its influence 
to the growing pressure for under- 
standing of the problem of hard-core 
unemployment 


Sarah Hogg 

Economics Editor 


The food rctaffiug sector has 
significantly underperformed 


pad. 

retailers 


the rest ofthe market in recent are less highly geared to this 
weeks. This repeals foe pat- than foe non-food or “stores” 


tern in all but three years of 
the previous decade, as tte 


sector, spending levels are 
important -for sales of 


excitement of Christmas foes upmarket foods and rum-food 
down, and reflects a lack of prefects. 


company announcements to 
push the shares to even higher 
ratings. 

Hus year, however, the 


decline in the price of oflhas recovery (as 


aged <mly 1.6 per cent in 1985 tit 
after the bumper harvest of loi 
1984, but is showing some 


provided farther downward 
pressure. Consumer spending 


tte outlook for interest rates Faffing oil prices are expect- 


and possible tax cuts has. ed to stimulate the economy 


worsened. 


Food retailers’ profits are - though there is little to pash 
nearly ail from Britain, and ‘ the sector index higher in the 


i be deteriorating outlook for shortterm, r solid baseexists 
storting has sisoredneed. tte ■ for future earnings yowth. 


through 1986 and beyond. has been mainly the preserve 
Although the food retailers of independents, 
e less highly geared to this •• The. expansion-minded 
an foe non-food or “stores" groups are competing for tiles 
cfor, spending -levels are to bttild up their share before a 
nportant -for sales of saturation point is readied, 
nnarket foods and non-food With site costs rising dramati- 
tfects. caHy. most members of the 

Food price inflation aver- .rector, with tte notable excep- 
ledmily 1.6 per cent in 1985 tion of Kwflc Save, are no 
ter the bumper harvest of; longer cash generative. ■ 

184, but is showing some This has, however, contrib- 
covery (as measured by The med to an easing of pricing 
race ri, and this will be a pressures. With all available 
rtterooost females and prof- resources directed towards 
l . capital spending, no gronp is 

Faffing oil prices are expect- likely to initiate a price war 
i «&rrm\!rtF. the economy like that by Tesco in 1977. 
tte long term. Thus, al- The economies of scale arc 
otJglr there is little to posh als o leading to considerable 
e sector index higher in the takeover activity within tte 
ott te rm, a sohd base exists rector, as the groups attempt 
r future earnings growth, -to raise their sales through the 

Tte big is bea n ti fb l ada ge ag prisition of less powerful 


Morrisons, Milliards, William tor, although Guinness has 
Low and Normans. - identified this area as pro mis-' 

Other changes in market ing. Although such a store is 
share stem from -shifts in never likely to provide for the 
customer requirements. In- weekly shopping, and is forced 
creating real wealth among to charge significantly higher 
those in employment has led prices than the supermarket 


Japanese criticized over whisky 


The Scotch whisky industry er have it both ways. It is a 
will this week step up pressure major trading nation and if it 


opping, and is forced 
significantly higher 


on Japan to relax import wishes to have continued 
restrictions, which it believes, access to overseas markets ft 


to a - demand for broader groups, the right location can 
ranges of more attractively- lead to excellent turnover. 


sales to Japan 


must allow products such as 
Scotch whisky to compete on 

C..'. .-J ...„i . - ■- *i 


Mr Bin Bewsher, director- fair and equal terms. 


presented products, with com- 
parative prices becoming less 
of a factor. 


Market share for conve- 
nience stores is expected to 
rise, although they remain 


general of the Scorch Whisky A delegation from the asso- 


and this- will be a 
ost forales and prat 


Convenienc e is becoming more vulnerable than most 
even more unponant, particu- food retailers to any swings in 


Association, tdd a press con- » .cation, which is visiting Ja- 
ference in Edinburgh at foe pan Ibis week and is supported 
weekend: “Jaoan can no long- by foe EEC will urge Japan to 


jariy with tte increasmg num- consumer spending, 
ber of women at work, and . ±LI L ^ r , .. 1 _ L ' 


in the long term. Thus, al- 


share depends mainly on kxa- 


renew pnee 


availability of ear parking. Uj! 


Thus, despite manufieturers. Wtat seats 


sector's short-term earnings Tte big is beautifixl adage acquisition of less powerful 
, prospects compared with applies weB to food zetaifiiig. competitors, 
companies with major export- Tte bigger groups wddenorr . The big three - Sainsbniy. 
* J ing or oveiteasmterffits. mota power yverthg mana- Tcsco ^ ^ _ would 

jsss'S'sk gsSifS 

P Pfv PI iBSKW SS5ESKS siEESfiHs-K 


power and excellent rite port ran ^ coaomuaicu m 

folio should help to ensurea few hands ^ none w0 “ ld 
good rtcoveiym the longer to start a serious pace 


leung 

&Cniickskmk 



by 5.2 per cent since Jan: 
1, almost as. bad as tte 


sector, which . has makesit increasingly difficnH 


probably be prevented from 
acquiring smaller supermar- 
ket groups by the Monopolies 
and Meigeis Commission, but 


term.. 

Tte rapid growth in the 
frozen food market over the 
past 10 years owes much to 
this increasing emphasis on 


Instead, foe strong cash flow 
could be used to diversify 
away from the food retailing 
sector. Some groups have 


undCTpcrfonned by 6.6 per tate^powei&l operatora 

cent fo tte short-tam, oil to compete on pnee. .. rapidly incnasii^thdr buying 

price movements arc likely to The top four quoted sups'-, power through acquisition. 

i* °ld basmestt of 

The strengths of the sector ^ grocery maitetThe inde- ftis,™ 5 ’ 

Should OM bo fiHjsa®, how- Sfftaj*. loa BBBto 


gyn and Dee, have Seen 

ranirfhi inrrftoeiitff .ifiMF hmrina nOWCVef. tM ftOZeD food 


convenience, and has been' already done this, for instance 
given a significant lift by the Asda with MF1 and Sainsbury 
success of microwave ovens. With Homebase. And Argyll 


We are pleased to announce the opening 
of our Representative Office in Tokyo 


rapidly increasing thdr buying however, me nozen moa 

SSKfthiCESS 


to find it isaeasngty dimenff 
to justify a separate shopping 
trip, and the mtgor supennar- 


bas pursued Distillers. 

Tte food retailing groups to I 
back for the longer term are 
those which, while continuing 
to achieve good returns from 
their supermarkets, are likely 


gtf LJtlfSTi 


"v wo-.-- j j Hioen is mYC mat uwivll • L _ . .. . _ _ « _ j . » ; — — — — : . 1 , mvu 

ever. VWth increases m aver- chaze, and the trend is likely to M . heenahsoroedmto feet multiples could gam tig* to di verify successfully out- 
age earnings continuing to . ...... bs&r i*ams.andnr the kmger nificaut market share in this tide the sector. 

exceed thelevd df general coimnac ‘. . term, it will become increas- a^a. 

inflation, real growth in Brit- - L^&atibn to relax; shop, mgly h»ti for foe regional Tte rise of the convenience rTam QmAlHp 

idi'ammofr spending of bows this year would proba-: supennarket groups to remam store is part of this trend. ^ LMireJuremi; 

ioercent is bly reinforce these <*anges,es independent This explains Cullen's is the only quoted The cakor is food raaiiin& 
ZztZ-Zi tn be mainwnied eveniqg and Sunday trading ■. the high ratings enjoyed by. pure convenience store opera-, analyst at Hetbert Wagg.. 


£nM2and SvaoaA '* Wyremforce these dtaBges,as inde 
gSS tfte SScd and Sunday trading- .the 


arra. 

Tte rise of the convenience 
store is pert of this trend. 
Cullen’s is the only quoted 
pure convenience store opera*. 


Claire Smellie 

The author is food retailing 
analyst at Hetbert Wogg. 


For further information please contact 

R.L Crispin 

Chief Representative 

4th Root Shin Nbsekt Bldg. 

4-2, Mcsunouchl 3-<*om© 

Chiyodo-ku Tokyo 100 


Tet (03) 213-4011 
Fax (03) 213-4017 
The J33912 OPFIA1N G 


•op 
drr 
is K» 


dis- s . 
fort ide 


'Ihel jic 
the I w 


tion u ], 
nds nd 


ust- 
dis, 
ersej 

^1 el 


ver, 
lark 
am- 1 hq 

tof .*ci 
for* 
r- a 






tax and apply duty on aft 
spirits on tte basis of alcohol 
content. 

Despite the import con- 
straints, annnual exports of 
Scotch whisky to Japan are 
running at 15.3 million litres 
or 20 million bottles, and 
Japan remains the third larg- 
est export market for 
Scotch. 


ii iMnrMnmwiiwn 

Jgk MorauSe House Gma 

▼ TV tomhmiii niiirtniaoi T 















FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


tin 
Nk 
po' 
the 
Eu 
ev< i sf 
em 
of 

d 

the 
Hi: 

Be 
Cfe 
ear 
coi 
crc 
wh 
wa 


V 


From your portfolio card check your 
eight share price movements. Add them 
up to give you your overall loud. Check 
this against ihc daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If it matches you 
have won outright or a share of the total 
daily prize money sated. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of your card. You must always have 
your catd available when claiming. 


Cara pan; 


ELECTRICALS 


NEI 


Prase 


Schota (GH> 




Capitalization and week’s change 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings Begin today. Dealings End March 10. § Contango Day March 10. Settlement Day, Man* 17. 

§ Forward Bargains are permitted on two previous days 


•THE WBWfTTMES 


^TkraNmwaiw 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
. £ 2,000 
Claims required for 
>65 points 

Claimants should rine 0254-53272 


lilfilOUf 


uni 


Mag^saaMia 


lilKd 


!EC 


EHI 








Copwn (FI 


fmSmSm 

■ i—~i 


iifl 
fa I 


EtMEnaa 

u|pg 

nzT^q 


Wood (Arthur! 


lirrcqEi 

warn 
m 
m 


Transcontinental 


Sidtaw 


CThaai N amp ap tri Lid. Dafl, Total 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a noie of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £20.000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 


BRITISH FUNDS 



96AH WM 196 

Mfl ta vrankwm HUgi 20Z 
sjmxm Horn F«m 79 
799b icouna Fiona SS9 
3822b Km* Saw 3«0 

ziauxn um potin j] ids 

014000 Low* (BF) 8S 

738m Low (Vwrt) 366 

91.7b Mmthewa (BamaU) 575 
2*33.000 Moat Trada Supp 93 
1520 b Mormon (WJ IB* 
4S2» Merms git) (VknM 2*5 
27 An N»ib » 74 

6022» Nmn Fooas 284 
IIOlSb Nuncln 8 Peacock 195 
13-iB Park Foam 12B 

S203m RHU 184 

753ta> noxntTM Mac 453 
28408m tarataayjLB 378 
3SZA“ Saharan PM 142 
4816.000 Somporaw T72 

401 8m Tan 8 Lyta 583 
1860 tm Tram 333 

5558b Unu» 252 

9148m UkTENKMe 225 

i33ai naui a nrap mo 


4.1 28189 
28 118 .. 

11.1 n 38 188 
80 10 128 

4.6 38 368 

188 28 112 
14.8 89 78 

.. .. 202 

121 48 87 

97 82108 
- 38 11 118 
14 32 20.1 

78 39 230 

17 .25158 

14 4.9 II 4 

15 5.0 98 

sfe 92 118 
88 S3 118 

97 38 288 
32 .18 22.4 
148 5.1 218 

S8 28 188 
11/4 18 281 

4.4 28172 

58 25234 
48 58 11 

16 16 200 

88 29 17.7 
11 28 155 
43 68 47.1 

17.1 30 178 

11.1 18 27 2 

75 11 14.1 

1.7 18 14.7 

75 32 184 

20 15HL3 
104 17 152 
52 39148 
54 42 129 
78 4.1 125 

182 35 129 
85 18 948 

4.1 28 187 

314 54 118 
78 22 232 
124 48 188 
109 48 122 
85 58 175 


28 9m Mata TV W 
4538.000 Gmnpan 
315m KTV N/V 
48 Sm LWT iuga 
212m Scot TV *■ 
408 b TVS N/V 
7.885500 TSW 


200 +5 128 65 148 

33 +6 24 19 79 

180 -3 118 81 02 

a» -1 206 7.111* 

250 +21 127 51 102 

180 *-5 114 18 It 

38'i +3 24 88 100 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 




m 




SiO 

-3 

90 

40 .. 

67 

-1 


. 404 

240 

+7 

190 

63 .. 

El Ob 

+]•• 



400 




ab 




2*0 

• .. 

160 

97 111 

377 

+5 

10Or 

49 12 

474 

♦a 

248 

11 99 

44Q 

+15 

112 

10 190 

m 

+20 

411 

06 11.7 

45b 

♦7b 

20 

6.1 165 

£203k 

A a. 

394 

138 

CS5V 

-b 

206 

58 . 

40 


13 

13 70 

84 

• +5 

34 

13 98 

or 

-1'. 

68 

01 .. 

£229 

-3 

1200 

92 .. 

103 

• +22 

4.0 

Z2 11.1 

294 

+17 

1U 

94 17.1 

79 

• .. 

17 

14 128 

233 

-13 

98 

4.1 195 

COT 

-1 

957 

12 291 

371 

-6 

178 

48 98 

7H 

-2 



389 


174 

45 199 

144 

+4 

116 

12173 

880 

+40 

21.4 r 

11 128 

487 

+5 

369 

95 74 

34 


11 

92 130 


+45 

9jq 

28 138 

47* 

+7 

394 

7.7 78 

533 

+3 



ns 

+32 

378 

93 60 

non 


550 

55 215 


+17 

157 

44 14.9 

73 


10 

25 21.7 



65 

97138 

B«*i 

+** 


29* 

+12 

117 

4.7 05 



26A 



-i 


28 13 

aw 

•42 

421 

15 7.7 


• +» 

028 

02 6*8 

«*• 

-2b 

1A 

18 170 

2*0 


Tl 

38 152 




3* 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


3875 1m Grwfl Mat 398 +10 142 18 121 

3UM Karmady Brack** 258 +22 21 08 132 

7D4.CB Ladbrom 342 +20 134 44 207 

17.1m Lon Psk HgMl 430 142 r 32 195 

2S£L5m Mowa CJWrtOOO 94** +1 18 18 178 

8819.000 Prmoa (X W horn* 72 -1 21 20 110 

TIIAa Owens Mo« 68 -'i 22 r 12 185 

lOBta Savoy HoKU A' 383 +5 10 09 193 

16*8* States 72 +2 1.7 24179 

12562m Truaftouaa Ran* 181 • . . 78 48 188 


INDUSTRIALS 
A - D 


m 


m 


ELECTRICALS 



12 +14 

9.7 

48 100 

1 »+7 

98 

45 267 

6 • . 

92 

05 108 

n -10 

191 

58 310 

B +1 

90 

90 93 

B +22 

11 1 

53 133 

0 

7.1 

27 208 

D 

B.7 

75 94 

0 a +26 

88 

23 204 

3 -3 


.. 97 

7 

05 

1.1 118 

5 +5 

268 

T0 113 

4 +2 


-- 596 

3 +M 

11.4 

30 .. 

0 -3 

197 

45 170 

r, +5 

1 1 r 25 110 

5 +S 

91 

27 108 

7 +2 

11 

27 297 

I -1 

25R 15 2*8 

5 +29 

218 

93 160 

1 -2 

2.1 

10 a 1 

2 m+i 

134 

42 122 

i +13 

105 

24 291 

» +2 

118 

63 196 

2'. 


217 

1 +1 

28.0 r 58 108 

1 +a 


17 110 

5 +25 

78 

48 202 


28 

10 291 

) +23 




34 

99 150 


297 

143 95 

1 m-3 


70 .. 

-s 

It 

50 7.7 

l +13 

90 

ia aa 


191 

43 TS4 

-1' 

10 

73 123 

1 +4 

190 

90 48 

1 m+ii 

75 

90 ms 

! •- 1 . 

91 

91 10 

+»a 

.. 1 

.. 143 

1 +23 

8Jr 20 531 

1 +s 

20 1 91 90 

1 -s 

95 

12 163 

1 +5 

145 

85 75 


40 

45 96 

1 *3'‘ 

94 

50 05 

> -3 

96 

Bfl 120 


6* 

17 140 

-5 

24 

1.(200 



. 190 

+fi 

86 

19108 


1*4 

S3 120 

♦1 

93 

40 163 

1 +36 

125 

is 121 

+ 12 

110(111.0 

+10 

170 

90 191 

• +2 

12 

40 190 

b +4'z 

21 

92 120 




+1 

6.1 

47 too 

♦21 

71 

10 143 

+9 

0L9 

97 550 

♦e 

90 

54 123 

+4 

30 

10300 

+3 

93 

4.1 94 

-20 



-4 

10 

17 gjj 


97 

44 

b m-ib 

18 

99 93 

• .. 

98 

95110 

-1 



-1 

45 

70 124 

• +13 

117 

45110 


29 

20 14.1 

b -1 

38 


b -b 

25 

43 7.1 

+3 

24 

68 143 

+2 



m+7 

17.9 f 

64 97 


30 

63 90 


14 

16 194 

f 

. . n 

■ ■ ISO 


_ . a 

.. 308 

• +3 

11 

62 90 

1 +1 

66 

70 91 


58 

62 00 

-8 

15 7 

99«52 

-W 

103 

34 122 

+13 

70 

24 17.1 

-1 


. 10.7 

+10 

95 

37271 

+£ 

10.7 

95 98 

• .. 

+10 

194 

68 

it 166 

i -lb 





31 5m Emmm Plod 300 M2 48 3.1 

149b Eaton 178 +3 lOD IB 7.6 

452b BE 2*0 +0 88 17 148 

426*000 EMat 341 .. 25 72 14.8 

110b Bbco tos -1 52 48 117 

12211b Backohn (KS -W mb +A, 

8323400 am m 54 m-1 22 64 155 

7S1.3™ Enrt*a E25* +1 139 84 .. 

8485m Emu CM Day 320 +14 157 49 127 

7503m ErassacsJ (LM) It' Z22S 9.0 0.4 .. 

233m-&*ldn* r£Ss TOO +4 48 25 218 

3713b Buropwn Fork* IBP* +9b 11 16 118 


773* DoSVPrl 110 -1 7.1 81 .. 

0G2m Bumad 212 +18 48 22 185 

£1An Emoa 119 46 19 188 

347b Expmnat W 152 +2 78 5.0 1ELB 

171.4b Exm) 403 +3 98 24 23.7 

9519000 FBcon 22 -2 14 04 57 

3853800 Fairfax Mt M 30 14 47 538 

360m Fannar gfij 117 +4 7.1 6.1 184 

3834JB0 FM Mnr - 85 " 59r 77 87 

12197 b Run 50G +22 89 14 270 

8.TB4JM0 Reason 37 -1 18 27 .. 

1374900 Ftamfeo C8W 102 -4 54 98 78 

7037000 Fbbri 45 +6 OB 11 51 

20Bb Foamy 112 +1 57 91 411 

8010000 FaEa Oram N/v zb -lb 15 68 89 

20.0 b FMhmgfl iTtarwy 180 -1 110 74 144 

6.750.000 ftmdr (Thomas! 00 *+9 4.1 88 .. 


375m OB mt 105 +7 BA 10 158 

7830m GKN 330 +22 157 48 191 

9.020400 gr 275 -s 100 sis 7.6 

2JJO10G3 Qaw Big 76 +1 43 97 12 

667b GeatrtnaT . 138 B+23 21 15 122 

128m (Saws 138 +14 45r IT 180 

7.4363a, Gtao ‘ OO +1 141 14 270 

2408m Gtjnwml 237 +11 119 48 184 

lOta Oormno 84 -1 29 15 68 

270m Gomg K9rr . 486 +30 15.® 12 170 

27 Jm Omota HUgi 198 +3 70 40 259 

731.0m Qranadi - 2M 8+68 10.1 14 212 

6135.000 Growbal 91* -b 0.7 78. 50 

9514400 Hat* Piadekm 65 «+i 25 88 137 

218m Hal Em 154+2 119 72 1O0 

1141m Hal m 148 +8 B8n * 6 111 

59OB0OO Ksssa 190 *-3 129 98 135 

09ta Mtam 2*1 .. 22 asms 

70*6000 Haqxon M 29b B+2 17 r 54 100 

100m Hartman 41 -2 

3.0100m Hmaxi 158 +7 97 38141 

2744m DO 81b CM E134 -2 SOT 52 .. 

1534m OoSVk 1035 -1 12 75 .. 

590m lU m ra a aa 155 +3 70 40 17 7 

12*0000 i-C* (Ph8p) 106 .. 121 62187 

10140m Hawker SUrfUay 515 +2 174 14 112 

202.1m I la Way 104 -5 27 28 9.1 

4200000 nay (Somar* 105 94 91 148 

2598* Hepaarth CBBrtC 168 +11 OS 60 117 

310m HUM* 125 -1 91 -4152.7 

2734000 Haatt 18. 81 +0 34 42 107 

i..:u£.vOT Higtaam A Job 135 .. ..n.. 292 

514m Hcna Bros 73 -1 397 

372m Holt LkJyrf 82 B+5 54 98 120 

367m HopMnaons 180 +2 98 49118 

FfDBBrf MKWm I.. ... 

94ta Htmdan 91 -1 48 93 9.1 

3610m Hudson Bay 212*. -■* KSS 47 . . 

31 ta HliKkio Assoc 250 +21 107 41 94 

198m Hontkm Qraup 88 96 98 1U 

i7*2-im HuKhsn w nam poa ms -T2>> 

396.1b M 148 +8 67 45 138 

35.0m teesran 290 +91 10 09 538 

6726000 Jackson* Baum 233 88 29 184 

3*20 JadM Man ■ 110b. -*j 

530m Jotwaon ci im ma *» .. 200 97143 

224 Aa Jotaamn Mattiey 108 +■ 07 04 218 

3&1ra Jotmaon 4 FS 34. +8 .... 170 

27 Aa Johnston - ZHi . 104 19 179 

101m Jan* s Shuman is +9 4.1 49 110 

TOta Journal (Thaw) 165 +r 95 50 127 

4807000 Ktanm 25 23 118 14 

3RA« Kata 32b <M7 17 62 212 

5£mM Kairay M 191 • . . -114 00 99 


91 -1 48 93 9.1 

M 1 * -V B3M 47 .. 

25B +21 537 41 94 

« 96 98 1U 

®iS -t2’» 

140 +0 97 45138 

290 +91 10 OS 638 

233 - 08 29 104 

11B*» -b 

480 .. 290 97 143 

188 +« 97 04 215 

34. +0 .... 170 

Z70 . 104 30 179 

85 +9 4.1 4.8 110 

165 +7- 95 90 127 

. 25 23 110 04 

32b <M7 17 02 238 

191 • . . -114 60 91 


7809000 Kannady AMU 125 +2 20r 18210 

065b Kanhaw W 270 - +10 214 70 148 

9OB30OO (Otchan fRM Tt)U0a» . . 197 75 98 

*.111000 KtarvEia 143 7.1 90 307 








+2 

05 r 

10193 

-2 

90 

23 270 

+6 

60 

29124 

+11 

91 

35130 

-a 

21 

38 91 

•-4 

30 

99 75 

-4 


.. 220 


29 

40 11J 


23r 

38. .. 

-2b 

38 

64 192 

-4 

10 

70 83 

+1 

145 

70 121 

-b 

74 

WJ 91 

+2 

99 

50 205 

• -2 

43 

28 213 

-12 

129r 

34 125 

• +10 

11.1 r 

3.1 200 

• +e 

OJ 

08 120 

■e'l 

13 

21 493 

+47 

138(1 

43 158 

+5 

as 

25 212 


20 

58 100 

*5 

129 r 

97191 


19 

48123 

♦Too 

08 

14 21.0 

+1 

43 

7.7 60 

-a 

94 

90133 

-5 

23 

20 25 

+13 

45 

48 148 

+3 

45 

50 134 

+1 

20 

4.1 170 

+10 

19/ 

40140 

-20 

248 

1610.1 

-3 

98 

73 88 

+1 

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4J HI 

-b 

91 

70 70 

+7 

90 

90 168 

+2 

113 

63 104 

44 

121 

40 148 

41 



4b 

91n 

04 122 

-17 

100 

55 7.7 

•-1 

70 

63 9.7 

-6 

14 

24 663 

4 W 

126 

58 199 

-5 

114 

95 110 


110 

90 98 

-0 

60 

30 193 




13 62 7.9 

93 7.0 70 


99 52 110 

28 1.7 030 


m 


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70 

10 

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65 

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38 

40 

40 

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128 

92 

178 

24 

39O105 

114 

80 

70 

73 

£24 

S3' 

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94 

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97 

20 

9E 

91 ' 

43 

97 

97 

4.1 : 

43 

17 1 

39 

45 

55 

50 


m 



•^rrr 








INSURANCE 


5004m «Mr UM 
0725m Atal- Jta* 
28908m. An Cmi 
303m BrarfsloA 
171 0b Bnmntao 
1.12S8m Com Umon 
2591m ^uty 4 Lma 

Qan Acddai* 


m am c t 
Hogg Hubhoon 
LagS a Gan 
UbLMSARl 
London 4 btan 
UtoUkt few 
Marah 4 McUa 


Shags Mdgs 
San AHgnc* 
SwUa 
Trade Bdamnty 


203 4- 94 

CB*. * 3 ». 100. 
£20i. m+b 390 
253 78 . 

82» -3 378 

S3 +5 190 

2SS . -3 00 

299 ?12 

7H +23 21* 

810L +02 213 

703 . +5 0J4 

310 m-3 134. 

732 ’ SM 

22S +1 

019 . >0 318. 

333 +5 190 

cer. +!•* 220 
200 -« 99 

270 ..128 

BA .. S04 

OK- -TO 343 
310' -7 190 

848 +23 140 

383 -3 148 

402 ... .144. 

42B • . 08 . 

011 +6 22.1 

86* ~B :®ts 

900 -6 120 

4 T9 -70 104 


- ' 

107 

57 

39 

•*1 

OT ■ 

. 10 

«.! 

+14 

. 53 

S0 

53 

+9 

208 

51 

MSB 

-17 

+b 

Kl 

14 

73 

48 

V 

- *•! 

11.1 

64 

ms 


47 

75' 

71 

-if 

94 

38 

70 

-2 

64 

16 

76 

+6 

75 

47 

91 

“ 1 

-0 

223 

48 

95 

+a> 



177 

- -3 

90 

94' 

72 


PAPER. PRINTING, ADVERTG 


LBSURE 


PROPERTY 


538m Horizon Tlmt 
(5An felt LaUun 


-r- t> 


nib 

.+* 



nob 

+b 

540 

53 .. 

KSSb 

T 

- 440 

90 .. 

«5 

271 

-90 .. 



142 


£39 

+5 

142 

16 .. 

m 

475 275 „ 

400 

+27 

mo 

198 .. 

148 

+13 

2fid0 

170 .. 

E17b 

+b 

.202 

148 .. 

74 

+3 


74114 

407 

+3 

350 

450 

+43 

190 

S3 .. 

ISO 

+1S 

40 

22 .. 

£7b 

+* 

920 

117 .. 

na<< 

+b 

120 

53 ... 


+22 

120 

24 .. 

HHE* 

toO 

4.1 124 

+25 

140 


+3/ 

200 

75 .. 

+'* 



+3 



+4. 

1« 

9* .. 

-3 

17.1 n 205 23 


090 

70 .. 

+*» 

B/0 

98 .. 

♦b 

490 

47 .. 




+« 

03 

+2 

20 

, . 

ZB 

-0 

17 

+4 

171 

+4 

90 

«e 

191 


130 

+0 

- U 

+2 

74 

+2 

90 


26 

+3 

08 

♦IS 

157 

-10 

257 r 


BOI 

-ail 

50 


45 


25 


fRCtae Zanbii Copper 
7 jOS1JX» 


SHIPPING 


TOTAn Hr CanMnonaMHi 335 
307ta CUaaonU 318 

173m Ftsftsr {James] 73 

58*9000 Qrmg 570 

, , Jf 5a w 63 

1862800 Lata 10b 

7mm ibtnay Doe** as 
Zllta .Ocaan Thmapan 1B1 

T.17B£m P I O DM 400 

910803 FhHdmmi (WMmr) to* 
1880800 TurjtfxJ Scot: 375 


125 28 . 

93 15 as 
91 15 707 

47 94 98 
170 11 277 

6.0 r 70 265 

.. a .. >1 
. . . . 14 

14 44 141 

208 42147 

7.1 9B30J 

129 34 909 


kill 




MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


- . 158m n - 325 

17 «m oarav Saadi 10Q =g 

1470800 Ktattan Sms 35 +1 

Q-MGM® LaMwri Howmm 170 +10 

3.111800 NanbOd 6 Sum 74 

"10 An Pkard 8* 

" 178m Semg 0 Fsnar 122 

-316m Stylo 170 +3 


textiles 


19 17 1|7 
13-1 70 W 

am 88 u 

7.2 *.0 U 

44 99 ... 

58 99 01 
KL7 98 J8 
64 38 210 


NEWSPAPERS 

AND 

PUBLISHERS 




TOBACCOS 


9291 An BAT 
13745m Imomoi 
*W8m RoAmtra W 


+7 137 4 « 

•a 17.1 r M110JS 

+6 91 03 33 . 








































































































• ; \t> 






L w r .,; • ^ 




■-. 


iJpPjM Cj^ ii S.O 


* UVlilO dMUi^Un-l 1'fcPIVUfUS.l ji. T 1 300 


rilNrtl\^|i /V1NIV tlNL>UJMVl 


USM REVIEW 


COMPANY NEWS 


Note tbe recent strength in 
Uk share price of 
Bowers. Alter languishim? for 
months bdow ilsissne mice, 
the share has made the *£■ 
important psychological break 
above the 48p placing price 
and moved smartly to 64p. 

Hoggett Bowers is an execn- 
bve recruitment agency which 

has always looked like the 

market Cinderella compared 
with the more glamorous rat- 
ing accorded to Michael Page. 
This has partly reflected the 
market’s perception thai Mi- 
chael Page is better positioned 
in its marketplace but also the 
misfortunes that have dogged 
Hoggett Bowers since flota- 
tion. 

The company came tolbe 
USM in August 1984, but 
early de a lings were damaged 
by press comment on the large 
amount of convertible loan 
stock held by the directors. 
Worse c a m e when the found- 
ing chairman, Mr Brian 
Hoggett, died suddenly the 
following December. Tbe abil- 
ity of the company to weather 
this crisis is a tribute to the 
depth and quality of. tbe 
management below the level 
of the founders. 

Profits before tax rose 18 


for Hoggett 


per cent to £756,000 last year 
and the balance sheet showed 
a strong cash position. The 
buoyant background for exec- 
utive recruitment and a first- 
tone contribution from' new 
offices in Windsor and the 
City should ensure a further 
strong advance this year (end- 
ing August) to comfortably 
over £1 million. . 

Earnings per share of 6p 
leave the shares on a prospec- 
tive price/eammg ratio of 1 1, 
which looks very reasonable 
’ value against the other quoted 
ag e n cies, and the takeover 
rumours swirling around the 
company are in for free. Tbe 
annual meeting is today and a 
confident statement is expect- 
ed. . _• __ 

Another USM stock which 
broke above its issue price last 
week for the first time since its 
flotation a year ago. is Pepe. 
Founded by two- Kenyan 
Asians in 1973 on a clotlung 
store in the King's Road. it. 
imports a range of jeans and 
casual coordinates mainl y 
from India and the Fhr Ea-tf- 
The clothes are sold on to • 
leading retailers, and the com- 
pany is ex port in g in a small 
way to the United States and - 
Ireland. 


Growth over the past five 
years has been excellent, but 
the offer for sale of shares tut 
year went badly wrong. The 
issue was greatly oversub- 
scribed, hut too much stock 
eroded in the hands of stags 
and there was oo institutional 
support to hold the price firm 
in early dealings. The shares 
dropped from tbe lOOp issue 
twice to as low as 65p. 

The good news has contin- 
ued to flow from the compa- 
ny, however. Last month's 
interim results showed pretax 
profits up by 54 per cent. For 
the foil year to March, the 
market is looking for £3.8 
• millto n to £4 minion, com- 
pared with £216 million last 
year. 

Assuming a 40 per cent tax 
charge, this would leave share- 
holders with earnings per 
share of approximately I Op 
and tbe shares selling at a 
modest 10 times pro s p ect i ve 
earnings. . 

The progress has fed to 
increased interest in the com- 
pany from the City but, when- 
ever the share price has 
approached lOOp, disappoint- 
ed investors have recovered 
then-money. But now it can be 
assumed that -most of the 


srifers are out and the shares 
should benefit from a de- 
served re-rating. 

Successful marketing is the 
essence of another USM win- 
ner— Inn Leisure. Despite tbe 
feci that Guinness announced 
its new bid for Distillers on 
Thursday, top brewery ana- 
lysts turned out for the 
company’s presentation to ex- 
plain the rationale of the 
proposed merger with the 300- 
year-old brewery and pub 
group JjA Devenish. 

Inn Leisure was an early 
launch on the USM in Decem- 
ber 1982 and has enjoyed both 
strong profit and share price 
performance derived from its 
marketing skills in r unning 
fine houses along the M4 
corridor, mainly in town cen- 
tres. It made pretax profits of 
£1.6 million last year from 34 
pubs. 

Devenish has 150 pubs, 
mostly in Devon and Corn- 
wall, with one brewery, and 
made pretax profits last year 
of £1.9 minion. 

Isabel Unswortb 

The author is an an- 
alyst with the stockbroker 
Grieveson Grant. 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 




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78BOUOOO Brown 
7814.000 Brw* 


15 UU 
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410 410 

180 -8 

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470 426 

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IPf . 

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0.7 47 30 
82 34 122 
10 12200 
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43 42 102 
32 42 0.1 

82r 35 30 
32 13 522 

12 22314 
31 33 U2 

1.7 19125 
31r 17232 
19 12 87.1 

10.0 22 173 

1.1 r 32 472 
112 10 172 
112 17 139 
37 14252 


2.1 23 35 
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42 10 94 
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140 +2 

28 

1ft 207 

9J +*» 

Ur 3.1 2 OS 

21 -3 

Ur 

48 128 

123 -5 

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20 288 



43 43182 
17 00202 
34 r 15 132 


• LANCASHIRE & LON- 
DON INVESTMENT TRUST: 
Final dividend 5.J2p, making 
7-l2p (3.l2p) for 1985. Pretax 
profit £495,826 (£300,8221. 

• A SEA: Earnings, before 
allocations and tax, 2.367 mil- 
lion Swedish krona (about £224 
million), compared with 2,259 
million krona. Dividend, nine 
krona a share, against seven 
krona last time. 

• DOMINO PRINTING SCI- 
ENCES: In his annual state- 
ment. tbe chairman, Mr G. 
Minio. reports that tbe group 
balance sheet is strong, with 
shareholders' funds of more 
than £5 million, no long-term 
debt and the substantial cash 
balances raised by the flotation. 
But the opportunity to invest in 

new premises has not yet 
materialized. 

• WILLIAMS HOLDEVGS- 
SPENCER CLARK: The 
recommended offer by Williams 
Holdings for Spencer Clark 
Metal Industries has been ac- 
cepted for 4.86 million shares 
(93.7 peT cent). Williams in- 
tends to compulsorily acquire 
the remainder. 

• BANCO DE BILBAO: Profit 
before tax SI 87.1 million (about 
£128 million), compared with 
SI 38.1 million. Dividend per 
share. 9t cents (81 cents). The 
company’s shares were listed on 
the London Stock Exchange in 
Apr! 1985. 

• RENOWN: Dividend. 12.5 
yen (same) for 1985. Net sales 
reached 220,167 million yen 
(about £847 million), against 
212.494 million yen. Net profit 
5,721 million yen (5,708 million 
yen). 

• HIGH-POINT SERVICES: 
An interim dividend of ].75p 
n.5p) is being paid on April 14. 
Turnover for the half-year to 
Nov. 30, 1985, £3.77 minion 
(£2.59 million). Pretax profit 
£321.000 (£249.000). Earnings 
per share 5.S9p (5.21 p). 

• ENDENDERRY SHOES: 
An interim dividend of 2p 
(same) is being paid oil April 8. 
Turnover for the half-year to 
Jan. 3, 1986, Irish £3.02 million 
(Irish £2.45 million). Presax 
profit Irish £165.714 (Irish 
£103.150). Earnings per share 
3.9p (2.49p). 

• DON BROTHERS BUIST: 
Interim dividend Up (Ip). 
Turnover for tbe half-year to 
Nov. 24. 1985. £26.9 million 
(£25.24 minion). Pretax profit 
£1.65 million (£1.79 minion). 
Earnings per share, before 
extraordinary items, 7.6p(7.5p). 

• ANGLO-AMERICAN 
SECURITIES: The trust is 
reporting for the yen- to Dec. 3 1 . 
1985, compared with the pre- 
vious 50 weeks. Final dividend 
4.7p, making 6J2p (5.7pX Rev- 
enue before tax £5.67 million 
(£4.92 million). Earnings per 
share 6-53p (5_36p). 


GILT-EDGED 


Bonds fly in the face 
of dark possibilities 



Tbe global village gorged 
itself to near-satiety last week 
on a diet of rumour, supersti- 
tion and half-feet. It was rich, 
medieval and, above all. 
highly profitable. Bond prices 
flew upwards, seemingly 
without constraint. By the 
end of the week, long yields in 
New York had fallen to their 
-lowest level for more than six 
years. 

In tbe UK, long gilt yields 
finally fell below 10 per cent, 
after an amazing surge to- 
wards tbe end of the Friday 
trading session. The Govern- 
ment Broker's reluctance to 
appear in tbe market with 
Taps fuelled a baying surge 
which took prices ahead by 1 
point in less than an hour. 

On tbe face of it, the 
algebraic structure that un- 
derpins tbe market is still 
highly favourable for bonds. 
The market seems to have 
identified a kind of beneficial 
nexus involving Japan, the 
United States and the mem- 
bers of the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Cotm-_ 
tries. 

Japan, as a major benefi- 
ciary of felling oil prices, is 
keen to curb the correspond- 
ing surge m its current ac- 
count surplus. Hence rates 
should feu. Meanwhile, the 
United States remains a 
straight beneficiary of lower 
energy costs. 


Opec countries’ 
role remains 
ambiguous 

Whether or not the logic in 
this argument is too simplis- 
tic, the feet remains that both 
American and Japanese 
bonds have recently reacted 
as if it were correct Since 
January, for example, spreads 
in Tokyo have broadened 
from 6 to nearly 20. points, 
with mediums actually over- 
hauling shorts in the race to. 
penetrate the 6 per cent yield 


l;f.i lP 1 1 i j i#T73 »*ci :ik 


NIPPON: A dividend of 
0.45p is being paid by the 
company on April 25. Invest- 
ment income for the seven 
months to January 31 was 
£231,605 and pretax revenue 
£145^207. Earnings per share 
were 0.57p and diluted net 
assset value 63p- .r 


Buying enthusiasm has re- 
ed vednesh impetus from 
statements by both the Japa- 
nese and American equiva- 
lents of Chancellor of the 
Exchequer. Mr Takeshita, the 
Japanese Finance Minister,' 
suggested that his discount 
rale was poised to fefl. Mr 


James Baker, the US Trea- 
sury Secretary, said much the 
same thing last week. 

The role of the Opec 
countries in this nexus re- 
mains fairly ambiguous. On 
the one hand, felling oil 
prices rob them of revenue. 
But, m perhaps equal com- 
pensation, rising capital mar- 
kets provide Opec with 
massive portfolio gains. 
Hence Opec actually benefits 
from felling oil prices! 

Bat the counter to a scen- 
ario of perpetually felling 
bond yields remains the cen- 
tral bulking response. 

The Bank now 
appears to have 
switched tactics 

No sooner, for example, 
had Mr Takeshita opined last 
week than Mr Sumha, tbe 
Governor of the Bank of 
Japan, contradicted his call 
for a discount rate cut. West 
Germany's central bank last 
week opted pointedly to 
maintain its discount rate at 4 
percent. 

The Bank of England ap- 
pears to have switched tactics 
in its dealings in the money 
markets. Some weeks ago. 
when sterling was weak, the 
authorities pushed interest 
rates up, and jobbed against 
tbe gilts market to boost tbe 
currency by tempting the 
foreigner. 

Last week saw a succession 
of moves which fell money 
markets either over- or 
under-supplied with credit 
The resultant interest rate 
structure boosted or deflated 
the currency. But rates did 
not fefl. 

These cautious moves, 
which are at variance with 
pleas from politicians for 
lower rates, find their most 
natural expression in the 
testimony fay Mr Paul 
Volcker. chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, to the 
US Congress last week. 

It was a cautious speech, 
which stressed that an econo- 
my expanding at a reasonable 
clip, where broad money 
signals were difficult to read, 
required an expansion in the 
volume of allowable credit' 


growth but perhaps not a cut 
m its price. 

Mr Volcker’s caution is 
understandable. Tbe US dis- 
count rate could not fell, for 
the time being, because of tbe 
continuing erosion of the 
dollar on the foreign ex- 
change markets. Perhaps the 
spectre of rising inflation 
fears would provoke all kinds 
of dollar portfolio adjust- 
ments. notably by the Saudis, 
at a time when the adverse 
effect of lower oil prices, 
debtor country default, 
would start to rear its head 
again. 

The central banks are clear- 
ly aiming for stable curren- 
cies. If this was Mr Volcker’s 
line of thinking, then it was 
remarkably percipient. By the 
weekend, Mexico was 
rumoured to be in difficul- 
ties. 

Bond markets, however, 
are still ignoring these dark 
possibilities and are concen- 
trating on the brighter side of 
life. The gilts market, for 
example, looks set for* a 
further run this week. Z 

The gilts market 
looks set 
for further ran ; 


Notable in the past five 
trading sessions have been 
the huge build-up in trading 
volume, and the well-nigh 
unshakable underlying firm- 
ness, despite the jobbers' 
attempts to slam pnees. Ef- 
fectively, London has been 
transformed into a geared 
way into the New York 
market, with the lower oil 
price argument subtly tra- 
duced- 

Seiling these markets is 
unthinkable, when prices 
bound ahead. Equally, hold- ' 
ing stock carries a manifest 
risk when fire yield gap from 1 
money market rates is about 
250 basis points. And if 
markets do crack, then of 
course the authorities cannot 1 
be blamed, because they have 
very deliberately stood aside 
from the recent prices surge, 
leaving traders to their own 
devices. Naturam expelles 
fiirca, tamen usque recunet? 

Christopher Dunn 

, Orion Royal Bank 



INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


§ 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


laaao! 


THE “SHELL'’ TRANSPORT 
AND TRADING COMPANY. 

pj_a 

NOTICE is hereby GIVEN 
that a balance of the Register 
wft be struck on Monday, 3rd 
March, 1886 for the prepara- 
tion of ttie half-yearly dmdead 
pa y ub hi on tha FIRST PREF- 
ERENCE SHARES for the irix 
months ending 31st March, 
1966- The dividend w* be paid- 
on 1st April 1986 

For Transferees to receive this 
dividend, th*ir transfers must 
be lodged wftfi the Company’s 
Regtsnr, Lloyds Bank Ptc, 
Registrar's Department, got- 
ing-by-Sea, Worthing. West 
Sussex, BN12 60 A, not tner 
matt 34» dju. on Monday, 3rd 
March, 1966 

By Order of the BmrI 
Dl-W. Cfmstwmen 
Company Secretary 
Shed Centra 
London SE1 THA • 

21M February, 1385 




H i: Cel 


RATES 


ABN 

Adam & Company — 

BCG1 

Citibank Swingst-.-- 
Consolidated Crds — 

Continental Trust 

Co4jpwaJwe. Bank — : 
C. Hoare S 

Lloyds Bank. * 

Nat Westminster L. 
Bak of Scatiad. 


Citibank NA 


_12h% 

_12fc% 

.. 12 *% 

_t2K% 

_12fe% 

_12H% 

_12K% 

_12H% 


t Msnpge Bast Sate. 


4.1 38 
88 2J 
98 38 

42ft. 

548 

3U 

96 58 

105 *4 C 

tost Gfc s» .. ar 

toede© 4W 96 % - 25 

W.7r 24 

547 

m m i 

406 300 

BH 138 +5 128 E 

IM 380 +5 228 1 

258 CD 
»8o 4.1 
Ur 48 
17r 23 
Oft 1ft 
XI 38 
58 r 68 

208 

308 

342 

<U 

575 30 3 
an 217 
l« 75 P 
41 16 

n n ; 

ISO 750 • 214 

kraMl HOOM 342 «+3 158 

’•ate m T* 85 05 

COWawB 21 

MbBraon 205 +9 *? 4 

284 


C BOARD MEETINGS ) 


£41-9 million 
pre-tax profits 

Operating profit increased by 16.2% 

Interim dividend increased by 15.2% 
to 2.072p per share. 

Turnover per employee up by 12.9% 


1985-86 third quarter results 

An extract from The Plessey Company's unaudited consolidated accounts. 


Turnover 


13 weeks ended 
27 Dec 1985 
£m 


351.3 


13 weeks ended 39 weeks ended 

28 Dec 1984 27 Dec 1985 


352.2 


TODAY - Interims: Murray 
Income Trust Finals: S and W 
Bensford, . Martey, Sr Alfred 
McAJpine,Murray International 
Trust Vickers. 

TOMORROW - Interims: 
.DiaJene (amended). Finals: 
Bluebird Toys, Capital and 
Counties, Fret Scottish Ameri- 


Invastment Trust, Torchmark 
Corporation (quarterly divi- 
dend), UniseJ Gold Miles, 
Winkethaak Mines. Finals: 
Biomechanics International, 
Channel Islands and Inter- 
nationa] Investment Trust ICI. 
W and R Jacob, Jebsons 
Drtf&ng, Pacific Assets Trust 



’ vtt, MT i i ", i r -ra i "> r? nj-« i cy. ~ i : ■ ! ■ vTtra ; - t: 




Oza&d RarSus. 

WEDNESDAY - Interims: 

Beco Holdings, English and 
Scottish Investors, Herrburger 
Brooks, Mainmet Holding, Vic- 
tor Products. Finale: British 
Vending Industries, Otives Pa- 
per Mat 

THURSDAY - Interims: AHI 
Holdings. Bracken Mines, 
Cope AHman International, fr 
( amended), Kinross Mines, 
LssHb GokJ Mines: The Scottish 


General Investment 
Trust, Royal Insurance, 
SKFfAB), woodhouse & Rbcson 


FRIDAY - interim* Artwthnot 
Government Securities Trust, 
Crusts, Goodwin, Intereurope 
Technology Services, Poly- 
technic Sectronics, SetecTV, 
Stothert & Pitt (amended). 
Finals: Ault & Wiborg, WWam 
Bedford. Derek Crouch, Uoyds 
Bank, Somportex Holdings, 

-Yelverton Investments. 


Operating profit 


Profit before taxation 


Earnings per share 


Shareholders are reminded that enquiries should be directed to our 
Investor Relations Office based atMiUbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, 
London SW1P4QP, telephone 01-834 3855. 


The Plessey Company pic 
Vicarage Lane, Ilford, Essex IGI 4AQ. 

PLESSEY and plessey symbol art trade ita/fes ofTkePletsey Company pic 


r 


PLESSEY 


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THE 



TIMES 




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La utp 
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po' In 
flgi id 
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pol idc 
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February 24, 1986 


FOCUS 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON 

PENSIONS/1 



time 


for people’s 



Joyce MacDonald 




s 0 



wealth $ 


For the first time in 
anyone's memory pensions 
are a sexy subject Although 
the general opinion of the 
Government's proposals on 
personal pensions is that 
they have, once again, made 
a dog's dinn er of thing s. In 
terms of making the average 
employee aware of how 
much of his cash is tied up 
in a pension scheme, the 
exercise has to be judged a 
resounding success. 

The nation's greed has 
been aroused and many 
people believe, rightly or 
wrongly, that personal pen- 
sions are the way to get their 
hands on the money locked 
up in -occupational pension 
schemes. 

Though it is a major 
achievement to have got the 
general public interested in 
a subject which has hitherto 
produced terminal bore- 
dom there is no ignoring the 
fact that the whole pension 
scene is an absolute mess. 

Since the DHSS appar- 
ently does not talk to the 
Inland Revenue or Super- 
annuation Funds Office, the 
fundamental problem asso- 
ciated with personal porta- 
ble pensions remains, not 
only unresolved, but even 
more of a muddle than it 
was before. 

The Government’s objec- 
tives are three-fold. First, to 
offload some of the expense 
of providing for people in 
retirement; second, to en- 
courage job mobility by 
making it easier for people 
to take their pensions with 
them when they change 
employment; and third, to 
give working people a real 
interest in what is probably 
their biggest investment 
But instead of starting i 


Department of Health and 

Social Security were asked 


contract out of the State 
scheme, they do not tackle 


to look at the ways of some of the fundamental 
cutting the cost of Serps (the problems associated with 
State Earnings Related Pen- pensions, 
sion Scheme) and devise a The vast majority of 
scheme which would en- workers have inadequate 
courage people to take out pensions and need to make 
personal pension plans, extra provision for their 
with no reference to the retirmenL Yet nothing has 
overall tax structure of pen- been done to enable those 
sions — fundamental to who are in an inadequate 
solving the pensions conun- occupational scheme, or 
drum. those job changers who 

Until the Government have much reduced pen- 
tackles the tax problems, sions, to obtain tax relief on 
there can be no real porta- contributions to a top-up 
bility of pensions. The new personal pension, 
proposals leave a host of The Government would 
unanswered questions say its proposals are de- 
which must be dealt with. signed to encourage people 
At the moment an em- to make extra voluntary 
ployer can push as much contributions to their exist- 
cash as he likes into an ing occupational pension 
— scheme. But nothing has 

< The nation’s greed been , done *° 
has been aroused any real fi “ dom 

find many believe If his company has an 
personal pensions AVC scheme (Additional 
flrpflu* wav tn Voluntary Contributions) 
are me way 10 which ^ of tfae main 

get tneir nands on pension scheme, and that 
locked-np money 9 > scheme is under-funded, 

then it is madness to en- 

occupational pension 










courage anyone to pay extra 
occupational _ pension contributions into such a 
scheme and obtain tax relief scheme, since it will inevita- 
on these contributions, be- bly be poor value for mon- 


cause the limitation is on 
the amount of eventual 
pension paid to members at 
retirement age. 

With a personal pension 
policy the restrictions are on 
tax relief on contributions 
to the plan — and the 
pension can be any amount 
or proportion of previous 
earnings. How then can 
there be any harmony be- 
tween the two? 

Though the new propos- 
als give limited rights to job 


from scratch and deriding changers in terms of up- 
how best to achieve these rating of deferred pension 
objectives, officials at the benefits, and the right to 


The employee could get a 
better deal elsewhere — 
except that he can't because 
the new pension regulations 
have done nothing to solve, 
this problem. As a member 
of an occupational scheme 
— however bad — he still 
cannot get tax relief on 
contributions to a personal 
pension plan. 

Similarly, it’s all very well 
ruling that deferred pension 
benefits, from January 


ais give limited rights to job benefits, from January 
changers in terms of up- 1986, must be uprated by 
rating ot deferred pension the lesser of 3 per cent a 
benefits, and the right to' year, or the rate of inflation. 


But prhat if the pension 
scheme rules give no right 
to deferred pension at all if 
the employee leaves wi thin 
a certain number of years? 

It is still possible for an 
employee to be a member of 
a company pension scheme 
and leave that employment 
without any pension rights 
at all. 

There are other lesser 
nonsenses, such as the fact \ 
that the Government wants I 
financial institutions such 
as building societies and 
banks to offer personal pen- 
sion plans — but under 
current legislation annuities 
must still be bought from 
insurance companies. 

The Government cannot 
complain that it has been 
short of advice. The weight 
of paper written on solu- 
tions to the pensions puzzle 
is enough to smother even 
the civil servants. 

But the trouble is the 
DHSS does not understand 
taxation and has no brief In 
any case to tinker with the 
tax angles of pensions, while 
the Inland Revenue is not 
interested in pensions be- 
yond the taxation of them. : 

Loraa Bonrke 



INSIDE: The Serps U-turn, page 22 • Getting the best advice, page 23 # Making sure of your rights, page 23 

ITS BECAUSE WE VALUE 
OUR INDEPENDENCE 

THAT OUR CLIENTS 
VALUE OUR ADVICE 




It’s increasingly difficult these days to find completely 
independent pension fund management. 

And when your advisers are part of a large financial 
conglomerate, it's sometimes hard to be certain that 
investment management has priority among their many and 
diverse activities. With the best will in the world, other 
influences may dissipate their energy or cloud their 
judgement. 

Not so with GT pension fund management. GTisa totally 
independent group, whose abilities and Lalem are wholly 
focused on achieving investment performance. And our 
steady and continuing expansion - we manage some £3 
billion worldwide - proves we give our diems not only 
unbiased, but effective advice. 

Our investment strategy is based on identifying well- 
managed companies growing fast in growing markets. In the 
UK this approach has led us to develop concentrated, rather 
than balanced or indexed portfolios. 

We a PPly lh 5 same philosophy world wide through our 
principal offices in Tokyo. Hong 
Kong, San Francisco and Sydney. 

The result is sophisticated and 
successful management, with j 

investment derisions based entirely Mmg ■ ■ ■ 

on objective considerations. ||gj|| 

If you'd like to know more IBB ■BBBBn 

about truly independent pension EBB 

fund management, please talk to | 

Peter O'Connor on 01-283 2575. 

Or write to GT Management Ltd., || §1 

8th Floor. 8 Devonshire Square, "■* ■ 9 9 

London EC2M 4YJ. ' B ■ | 


GT MANAGEMENT LIMITED 


Minister Incharge: NormanFowter, 
who proposed the abofithm of Serps, then 
retreated in the face of wholesale criticism 
and produced a compromise solution 

The snag about 
switching jobs 


J /- 

:s- • •’ . , ■ • -'P-/. 

'-VZ 

- ; l). 


\V 



One of the most oqbiibob areas 
of dissatisfaction among em- 
ployees who have an- occupa- 
tional pension scheme is what 
happens to. thefr accmnafation 
pension rights if they switch 
jobs. Early leavers, as they are 
known, often complain 
the options available to them 
when they change jobs are too 
narrow, and that the valne of 
their accrued rights is far less 
than they had expected. 

Certainly recent legislation 
has to an extent addressed 
both of these granules. The 
Social Security Act 1985; 
which hugely came into force 
on January 1 ftk year, im- 
proved tike available dunces 
for early leavers as weH as 
fayiag down, certain rales 
which, while not necessarily 
going to produce the valuation 
that the early leaver would 
want or expect, win neverthe- 
less ensure that some sort of 
fair valuation is arrived at 


Under the dd law an em- 
ployee most have worked at 
least five years for a company 
and be at least 26 years old 
before becoming entitled to a 
deforced or fazen pension. la 
other words, unless both these 
requirements had been satis- 
fied^ an employee did not have 
the right to keep his or her 
pension in die company's 
scheme when moving to anoth- 
er fob. 

The new act changes the 
position slightly in that the 
age re q nfr em em is scrapped, 
(earing five years pensionable 
service as the sole qualifying 
condition for a iefesmi or 
frozen pensi on . 

Another improvement intro- 
duced by tiie Social Security 
Ad 1985 is to require compa- 
nies to increase the valne of 
deferred pensions annually. 
While many companies had' 

Continued oa page 22 




Schraders 



Investment 

Management 


When experience is essential 

Schraders was one ofthe first to recognise the need for specialist 
management services for pension funds. 

Today, after more than 30 successful years, we offer one ofthe 
most experienced teams available, backed by full-time research 
staff in London and overseas; our own investment operations 
in New York, Zurich, Sydney, Singapore, Hong Kong and Tokyo; 
and a property management and investment facility active in the 
UK and USA 

Schraders' unsurpassed experience is atyour disposal. 

Just write or telephone; 



I. P. Sedgwick, Chief Executive, 

Schroder Investment Management Limited, 

36 Old Jewry, London EC2R 8BS.Tei: 01-382 6000. 












# -V --I-' If; 


" • -fT iv 


5^.*« 
~. v ' 1 l if 

--=■*“ -• i ? 

i i . ■> ? «■ 


Few people would dilute the 
need to supplement the State 
pension arrangements. 

And, obviously, the sooner they 
start a pension plan, the better off 
they’ll be. 

But, who they go to could have 
a very great bearing on how well 
off they are, ultimately. 

The Prudential is not only one 


of the most secure financial 
institutions, but it’s also one with 
an enviable investment reputation. 

We manage many of the leading 
companies’ schemes. 

We handle more personal 
pension plans than anyone else. 

And our with-profits retirement 
pension plan is consistently among 
the best performers in its field. 


It all helps to make us No. 1 in 
personal pensions. 

Before starting - or getting 
your clients to put more into - a 
pension plan, consider what we can 
offer. Just contact Jonathan Hyde, 
The Prudential Assurance 
Company Ltd., 54 Lime Street, 
London EC3M 7BR, or telephone 
01-623 8765 Ext 209. 



* 5L 


lURl 


1 in personal pension plans 



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A sensible compromise 
on the Serps U-turn 


The Government tried last 
year to put through one of the 
most radical changes it has 
proposed since Mrs Thatcher 
came to office. It attempted to 
get agreement for plans to 
overturn the state pensions 
system established in the 
1970s. a system which affects 
virtually the whole popula- 
tion. And it failed. 

“The compromise now 
achieved produces a sensibly 
balanced pensions framework, 
keeping much in the state 
sector and transferring those 
who can afford it to the 
private sector.” says Tony 
Doggarv of Save & Prosper, 
the unit-linked life and pen- 
sions group. 

The Social Security Bill 
embodying this compromise 
is now on its way through 
Parliament and the new pen- 
sions system will come into 
force in 1988. 

What Norman Fowler, the 
Social Services Secretary, first 
proposed was the total aboli- 
tion of the State Earnings 
Related Pension Scheme 
(Serps) and the transfer of all 
pensions to the private sector 
over a period of years. 


Serps now gives an infla- 
tion-proof pension related, to 
final salary on top of the basic 
state pension. This was a 
mixture of pragmatic planning 
and ideology. 

On one hand Mr Fowler 
was looking ahead into the 
next century and seeing that 
Serps would become prohibi- 
tively expensive — costing the 
Government about £25 billion 
a year by 2030. On the other 
hand, the Government be- 
lieves that if individuals have 
to administer and invest their 
own pensions the property 
owning, capitalist minded de- 
mocracy so dear to Tory 
hearts will receive an enor- 
mous boost 

The plan to abolish Serps 
foundered on a reef of criti- 
cism which the Government 
had dearly not expected. 
Trade unions objected believ- 
ing their members would be 
worse off. while employers 
objected believing the new 
system would cost them much 
more. 

Most surprising of all, the 
pensions industry itself object- 
ed. Far from seeing the trans- 
fer of pensions to the private 


sector as a gift, life companies 
saw enormous complications 
and expenses in implementa- 
tion and correctly objected 
that many of the lower paid 
would be big losers. 

Mr Fowler took the sensible 
course and retreated. The 
compromise now achieved 
still makes savings in the 
future cost of Serps — by about 
the year 2030 h will be costing 
roughly £13 biDion a year. It 
will still transfer many 
people’s pensions to the pri- 
vate sector but, in theory, at 

Widows will be 
badly hit 

least, for only those who can 
afford it. 

The new system will be 
phased in over 10 years, with a 
promise from Mr Fowler that 
“the changes will not affect 
anyone retiring this century, 
□or anyone widowed this 
century . The fundamental 
change is that the new slim- 
line Serps will be based on 20 
per cent of average earnings 
over a lifetime rather than 23 
per cent averaged over the 



PENSION SCHEME S 198 4 

Em p lo y — ala urottaZI nsHBoo 


9.75 mflSon empKr 
In a company pens 
andcanfractedoot 
OfSERPS * I 


ss 10 mffioB empfoyees^ntifled 
scheme to a SWe Jwnfogs Related 
Pension (SERPS) but a n not 
• ' ' i ~ iria company pension 
■" H — scheme 


r - > 1 

ul 

* * 
. , he St 

1 ... 


1-25ntHton^ — 
(approx) seif employ) 
wftnouta pension 
schema other than 
basic State Pension 


1.25 mUfor (appro] 
seKerapfoysd hi 
a pension scheme 


^1J25m8Bon 
■In SERPS plus 

-a' company 
pension 
' scheme 


best 20 years. Clearly the new 
system win pay less for most 
people. 

Particularly badly hit will be 
widows who will no longer 
receive the whole of their 
spouses pension. Temporary 
workers, sudh as married 
women," who leave employ- 
ment for a time and then 
rejoin it, will also suffer. 

The reason for the relief 
within the pensions industry 
when Mr Fowler modified his 
plans was partly that it stands 
far more chance than the first 
idea of achieving political 
concensus, thus avoiding fur- 
ther tampering. 

But it was also because the a 
industry knew it could not 
provide economical pension 
schemes to lower paid people 


who could only make small 
monthly contributions. Only 
the Government can operate 
on a big enough scale to cut 
administration costs enough 
to give Iowa* paid contribu- 
tors value for money. 

The . other plank of Mr 
Fowler’s pensions platform, is 
the introduction of personal 
portable pensions that will 
cater mainly to the better paid. 

People can now opt out of 
Serps, but usually only to join 
a “contracted out” company 
scheme. Under the newrules 
contracting-out schemes will 
get a rebate of 2 per cent of 
earnings, paid in by the Gov- 
ernment for the first five 
years, as an incentive. The 
minimum contribution to 
company schemes, split be- 


tween employer and- employ- 
ee, win be at the fidT National 
Insurance eontractedrout rate 
- likely to be set at 5.75 per 
cent. ‘ ■-' . 

But individuals wiff aEso be 


for investment. 

allowed to contract out into 
their own personal scheme 
which, unlike-. , a : company 
scheme, they tan cany with 
them when they change jobs 
without losing .any of the 
benefits. These will be “mon- 
ey purchase" schemes worth 
no mpre than the value of the 
investments in ah individuaTs 
fund rather than jbe more 
secure company, 'schemes 
based on a proportion of final 
salary. 


- To avoid conihsion in ad- 
: ninistering these schemes, tin 
new - system allows- for a 
central ' pensions clearing 
-fronsepaid for and run by the 
Deportment of Health and 
Social Security which; will 
: receive the contributions of 

- the individual and employer 
and pass them on to the 
relevant pension company. 

- The individual will be able 
to invest the contributions in a 
wide range of vehicles, from . 
ordinary hank accounts to 
stocks and shares. New laws 
are being introduced to pre- 
vent him being ctishduestiy 
advised on his investments^ 

New laws are /also bong 
introduced to •* allow more 
institutions to offer pension 
schemes, such as amt trust 


companies, building societies 
ami banks. A similar system in 
theUSwas introduced in 1980 
which indicates the waypeo- 
pie in Britain may behave 
with personal pensions. 

But recently, as the market 
has begun to mature, pension 
contributions have begun w 
be invested in more sophisti- 
cated and risky investments. 

If that is the pattern fol- 
lowed in Britain, for the rest of 
this century Mr Fowler will 
have gone further than jnst 
changing the pensions system. 

. He wifi have done" more to 
encoiix&e a property and 
share owning society than the 
whole of the Government's 
pri vat i z a tion policy is ever 
likely to do. 

. Richard Thomson 


W 




* -it*' * 


Personal Pensions: 



Some pension plans penalize you if you retire earlier dun 
yon originally intended; some, if you don't want cocommn yourself 
to paying identical premiums every year. 

With The Equitable's “with profits" plans you'll encounter 
no such traps. 

Retire early, for instance, and well pay you the full value of 
your fund accumulated to date. 

Whatever your special requirements are, you need nor 
sacrifice superlative performance for flexibility. 

Arranging your own pension? If you're a partner, self- 
employed or simply not in a company pension scheme. The 
Equitable’s results might surprise you. The latest Planned Savings 
survey (November 1985) of regular premium with profits policies 
shows that if you *d chosen our 20 year plan and had reared aged 65 
on 1st September 1 985 your fund would have been worth over 49% 
more than it would have been with the worst performer. 

Over the last 9 years this magazine has compiled 18 tables 
surveying 10 and 20 year regularpremium with profits plans. 

TheEquicable has been top in nine and second in four more. 
No ocher company has even approached this remarkable record. 

In vour company's pension scheme? If your company 
pension will be less than two thirds of your final salary you may be 
able to top up your pension. And ^gain our results arc just as 
impressive. For instance, tf you had retired aged 65 on 1st May 198 S 
with an Equitable 10 year “with profits" top-up plan your fund 
would have been worth 82% more than with the lowest 
performer,* 

Over the years, in Tlanned Savings' surveys ot 10 year 
regular premium with profits pension plans for executives and 
other cmployees,The Equitable has come top more often than any 
odier company. 

Of course the pan cannot guarantee the future, but for 
outstanding results without any of the hidden traps, cut our the 
coupon or speak to us direct on 01-606 661 1. 

-TUnned Sittings. SuTury July 19851 ot rcguLir premium wirii prcrfia pohem. 

*** ^ mD ‘“tmtt pension jmnpnnero. the whom ire nor gcnnjllv 
itaiubkn Civil Scram* or employee* at taal gucn tt ocm or imioiuhsni gxfamrf. 


To: The Equitable Life. FREE POST 4 CoJeman Street. London EG2B 2JT. 
To welcome further details on The Equitable’s retirement plans. □ I am 
self-employed: □ I am an employee not in a company pension scheme: 

□ I want to top up benefits from my compani V pension scheme: 

□ 1 would also welcome details on retirement plans linked in up to ten 

investment hinds. lUKimJrnaonHi 


Namr'Mr.Mri Mwi 
Addrev 


ftwende 
Damt Bgrh 



SH- .OttKf 
M; 'Hnmr 


mis ■ - i*m»i«i rw I 

- j The Equitable Life I 

|7! I— — - You gain because we’re different - — . — 1 




Free thinkers have always influenced die important 
changes in the world's history. Battles have been 
fought for the right to independent thought and ideas. 

Touche Remnant pension managers have a 
reputation for having an independent line of thought 
and action. • /- 

We have years of experience and wisdom and 
a clear view of future pension fund strategy. 

Give it some drought- 



ToudieRemnont 

IbnsimFimdMma^mM 

Mermaid House 2 Puddle Dock London EC4V 3AT 
Telephone 01-236 6565 Dealing 01-248 1250 Cables Tremnanr London EC4 Telex 885703 


PENSIONS MARKETING MANAGER 




•m 


pensions bi 


The Eagle Star success story in the pensions 
business market is well Illustrated by the faetthat the 
company currently manages pension funds in excess 
of £1.3 billion. 

ft is however an environment in the throes of 
major change and from which will emerge new, 
untapped marketing opportunities. 

We now have an urgent need for someone who 
can identify these opportunities. And then maximise 
them, profitably. A top-calibre industry professional 
with a proven marketing record; a dynamic achiever, 
who can market a wide range of services from 
investmentto administration; and a person committed 
to career development in much the same vein as Eagle 
Star is committed to further strategic growth. 

This new appointment reports to the Assistant 
General Manager— Life Marketing & Development and 


h^fflfgeinthe 

^environment 

involves dose liaison with ourHead Office pensions 
and life sales staff, and with intermediaries. 

The job is based in the City of London, Involves 
considerable UK travel and commands a salary of 
c£25,000 plus a car, contributory pension, P.H.I., BUPA 
and house purchase schemes. Relocation assistance is 
also available if appropriate. 

Initially, your response should be directed to our 
selection advisers, who will treat your application in the 
strictest confidence. 

Full CV please to: John L Thompson (Ref 1 069A), 
Thompson Associates Ltd., 232 Portland Road, London 
SE254SL. 



Eagle Star Group 



Improvements for early leavers 



Cootinned from page 20 
already adop ted.* policy of 
voluntarily increased deferred 
pensions, muqr others simply 
left them un touch ed and flat. 

Moreover, according to a 
survey of .the company pension 
schemesby Money Mag/tajm. 
before the new law came Into 
force, co n ip a nfcs 'sachas Brit- 
ish Home Store*, Marks A 
Spencer and General Accident 
were among those who ap- 
peared to adopt the practice of 
not topping up deferred pen- 
sions. ...... 

There are arguments on 
both sides, it could be said 
that companies shoold look 
after the hrterests of employ- 
ees who have shown long- 
standing loyalty to the 
company h terms of long 
service, and that to Increase 
deferred-pensions would be at 
the expense of such people mid 
to the benefit of those early 
leaven, who necessarily had', 
not shown the sanwloyrity. 

Conversely, this might quite 
simply, not be relevant since 
tire existing members may be 
receiving toll benefits; so that 
any savings from not increase 
lag deferred pensions to Stan- - 
ply increasing a surplus on toe 
toad. Moreover, the reality of 
working life is that most 
people do not stay exclusively • 
working for me employer. 
And this reality should, there- 
fore, be recognized in terms of 
improving the position of early 
leavers. 

Hence the act prorides tor a 
statutory increase for deferred 
pensions of 5 per cent a year or 
the level of increase in the 
retail prices index, whichever . 
works out lower. So deferred 
pensions can no longer be 
allowed to remain static. Bat 
remember that the obligation 
to increase a deferred pension 
only applies to the pension 
benefits that an employee has 
accumulated since Jsmmuy L 
1985. 

If yon have a money pnr- 
cfaase pension scheme rather . 


than, a final -pay one, the new 
law — the Social Security Act 
1985 — wffl also apply to yon. 
In Instance it uti jpmhtef 
thafany preserved or deferred 
pension m a money purchase 
scheme mast receive the same 
treatment as; that handed out 
to active pensions renaming 
within thescheme. - 

Another change by toe new 
lepslatioB si toe requirement 
from the beginning of this year 
for -all company pension 
schemes to offer early havers 
a transfer, pension as an 
alternative to leaving toe pen- 
sion rights where they are. . 

In practice many companies 

— partioriarly toe larger ones 

— already offered the transfer 
payment fiadfity. The para- 
dox, perhaps, is tint the new 
law fe>es not stipulate that the 
company to which the early 
leaver is moving must accept 
the transfer payment into its. 


scheme to buy rights therein. 
Again, in practice, most com- 
parries are prepared to accept 
sneba oavmeot. 

The right to lmve a “transfer 
value” as it is known also 
extends to nsing k toparchase 
a “buy out” or H oectsui 32 
poficy", generally speaking a 
special pension plan - 
>• Either way there are provi- 
sions in the new legfadatin 
co n cer n ing the cakalafieis of 
transfer values, whether wed 
for purchasing rights in anoth- 
er scheme or a separate pen- 
sion policy. 

As for section 32 policies, 
.these vary eonsUeraMy and at 
the same tone offer the stan- 
dard range of with-profits, 
rmft-liaked, deposit adminis- 
tration and non-profits 
choices. The transfer value is 
kBvesftettitt the form ofa stogie 


Lawrence Lever 


^ * 




R WATSON & SONS 

CPNSULTING ACTUARIES 
provide .. 

1 impartial advice cm ail aspects of pension 
schemes whatever their size, including 

help in dealing with the requirements of 
thenewlegjslation. 

and Personal Pension inqdicarions for both 
“users” and “jauvidere” 



Whrson House, • 

London Road, 

Reigate, Surrey RH29PQ 
Telephone: 07372 41M4 


Asphalze House, 
Palace Street, 

London SW1E5HS 
TefcpboaerOl 828 6294 


MMSkrn 


266481 

2265060 

Eadiei. 




aHiSSSP ^ ,>EN ? ,0N «'N»(-Hhi*on« roi „v«tod) 


FUND SIZE 
XI 57^ MILLION -AT 
5 FEBRUARY 1886 


M&G offers you the strength of * individual attention for 

* consistent long-^erm eachfimd .. 

perfoimance ' * sound management controls 

* contanuityof management * efficient mmmK on 

* independence admimstrationUpiU" 

WiiLs.-rtsit.nl Mltluu-l liounxv M£(i ImwliiK-nt ftfaiKun-nk-m Limiti-d 

Tliriv(itBi > xT.mvrni!UJwhmE(TSRb1KLTofc(a-^d'aWi/ i ::^«^ r „^MliHB|| 


♦ .'•JLS/kVb 














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■c£pr- 
■ - -' J. * 



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-’ ■•'_•-• •.: i- 

i--XXi 
• :■* 


: ji’trgs 


THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 



PENSIONS/3 


Don’t leave it 
too late for 
tiie best results 


Where to go to get the advice that matters 




Most employees forget about 
pensions -natil they ate n^ 
fstiraneat age. As a result 
most are ignorant of their 
rights. A few enlightened cant- 
paoies go oat of their way to 
make up for this deficiency by 
“swing that their pension 
schemes make regular reports 
to members, but they are the 
exception. 

Last year's Social Security 
Ac* introduced general re- 
quirement; on providing infor- 
mation to pension scheme 
members bat the details were 
left to regulations which have 
yet to be drawn qp. It is 
already dear, however, that 


. a nd a sgmnpthms employed m 
arriving at the act uarial states 
merits as there are go many 
different approaches in cm- 
rent we. It even says the 


to most readers of accoun ts. 

The consultative paper sug- 
gested that trustees and em- 
ifefees would be responsible ! 
for bringing the repost aid . 
accounts to the attention of | 
members and feat displaying ; 
if ea a noticeboard would be 


Advice on pensions for the 
eleven and a half million 
people who are estimated to 
have an occupational or com- 
pany pension scheme is not 
always easy to find. The 
pension consultants and actu- 
aries advising on company 
pension schemes are usually 
concerned with giving advice 
to the company, rather than to 
individual beneficiaries of the 
company's pension scheme. 


% 

) Ox 


In theory you can seek their 
advice, if you consider it. 
necessary, out the practical 
realities arc such that the costs 
would generally make such an 
i approach prohibitive. 

! - Fortunately, there is a fair 
ammount of dear and reason- 
ably comprehensive literature 
aimed at getting the layman to 
understand what his or her 
pension is made up of what 
all the technical jargon means, 


O' 


Difficulty in 
giving details 


■ they will reqahre huge changes 
in practice to be made. 

The regulations are likely to 


. The reports wmU also have 
to be sent to representatives of 
recognized trade anions. The 
original plan for setting up a 
pension reports . registry has 
been dropped, though the 
derision will be reviewed in 
three years’ time. 

Other information which 
might be required fndades a 
record of past racreases in 


and what you can expect from- £35,000 a year. 


OPAS has been operational 
for more than two years and 
its Tunning costs are about 


your occupational pension. 
There are also a couple of 
. bodies prepared to help with 


It has 150 occupational 
pension scheme advisors 
spread throughout the coun- 


oocupational pension schemes’ try, all of whom work on a 


be based on recommendations 
made fat a consultative paper 

mhHchmi « in.. « information on fee trustees 


and individual benefit state- 
ments. A recant snrrey. has 


published as long ago as -J 

Go«t information 

funded or not aid which in Short Supply 

contain a set of audited ac- ■— ■■ ■ 

counts, an auditor's report and. found that these requirements 


Good information 
in short supply 


a summary description of the would necessitate a drastic 
scheme's assets. In addition it improvement in the level of 


‘VSltlJj 

■■ V st^ 

-j-jj 

’t ■> a- 


recommended that the report infwmatioB supplied. Of the 
include a statement on borrow- 414 schemes taking part, 39 


mgs* the names of the invest* per cot fid not publish an 
meat managers and 'an annual report for members, 78 


actuarial statement, renewed per cent did not provide one for 
every three years, on the level early leavers and 61 per cent 


of funding. dft) not supply tte inforinatta 

Bacon & Woodrow, the to people who has already 
consulting actuaries, say the retired. . 


actnrial sta t emen t sheukTbe 


divided in two parts dealing ^Greater Security for the 
separately with benefits ac- Rights and Expectations oj 


creed to date and the on-going Members of Occupational 
position: It argues that there is Pension Schemes. 
considerable difficulty about • Company Pension Schemes 


-giving details of the methods Survey, PPL, HIM. 


—it’s surprising 
how many questions... 


• Scheme design 

O C-fttnpnfifiiMfi arimhriqratlrtw 

• Urustceship 

• Srif -a dminisiCT ed directors* 
schemes 

• Personal Hoanaalp hn n ing . 


• Actuarial vobutloqs 

• Poislon implications of 
take-overs and mergers - 

• Investment performance 
, measurement 

OEnytoyecoomaai nic arioQS 


without charge. . 

i on bow trans- ^ Consumers’ Associa- 
rion, whose publications are 
trustees °^ en models °f clarity and 
hpnpfft ctete. thoroughness, has published a 
■t ^ book entitled: What will my 
S ^ y *** pension be? It costs £4.95 and 
irmarinn * avai{a bie from most large 
, n bookshops or from the assori- 
SUpply ation. For the beginner it 
* represents an excellent guide 
' regufr oneito through the complkatioiis of 
de a drastic pensions and pensionspeak. 

kj®* of The book is not specifically 
phed. Of the devoted to company pension 
king part, 39 schemes, although it does 
rt publish an cover the various types in 
r mem bers, 78 detaiL An alternative, or even 
nmdeoue for supplementary source ofwrit- 
161 per cent ten information (it is free) 
ic mronnat ion comes from an organization 
las already called the Company Pensions 
Information Centre. 

Clare Dopie The CPIC publishes a num- 
ity for the her of dear, amusing ly ihus- 
pectations of trated booklets, under titles 
Occupational such as. What Pension Terms 
c. Mean; How a Pension Fund 

r ion Schemes Works; Tensions for Women; 
\f. and How to Understand your 

- ^ 71 Pension Scheme. 

There are six booklets in all 
and are available from the 
CPIC You must send a 
L/ stamped addressed envelope, 
with £5.95 postage. 

If you have a problem with 
, ' or any confusion about your 

pension scheme then your first 
ions . port of call is your scheme 

fdansof authority — generally the 


voluntary basis and generally 
have a long-standing 
connection with the pensions 


have lost all the pension they 
were expecting, ” he says. 

On the whole, he says, most 
company pension schemes are 
wen run, although there are a 
number on the fringe where 
employees can get a rough 
ride. 

Then there are cases where 
people just cannot understand 


industry. So they will often be ' 9 ^ their pension is so low 
pension frmd managers, ra- compared to those of 


pension frmd managers, re- com pa red to .those of j 
tired or still working, or c^tompories in si mi lar jobs, j 


members of the Institute of 
Actuaries. 

“A lot of people approach 
us through the local Citizens 
Advice Bureaux," says Mr 
Teriy Brand, deputy chairman 
of OPAS. The chairman is 
Margaret Granger OBE 

“If people have not been 
satisfied after an approach to 
the scheme authority they can 
approach OPAS. A consider- 
able number of enquiries we 
receive can be answered im- 
mediately. If not then the 
enquiry or approach will be 
dealt with as a case," says Mr 
Brand. 

But this does not mean that 
OPAS will engage in protract- 
ed negotiations on your be- 
half "We are not the 
Ombudsman,” says Mr 


Another organization that 
provides a measure of assis- 
tance is the Company Pen- 
sions Information Centre, 
which was set up by a consor- 
tium of life offices 11 years 
ago. 

“We give information but 
not advice," says David Bar- 
rett, information manager at 
CPIC. “Individual members 
of the public do come in for 
advice. We are happy to help 
them to understand pension 
schemes generally, but we mil 
not delve into the rules of 
individual pension schemes. 
We don't cheek the figures but 
we help people to understand 
the process." 



The case for 
Flextole Pensions 


As well as providing infor- 
mation to individuals, CPIC 


or put forward our views as to 


what people's rights are under 
the terms of the rules of the 


l conferences, gatherings of 
Institute of Chartered 


SUN LIFE have been one of 
the first to recognise that, in 
recent years, increased job 
mobility has demanded that 
individual pension arrange- 
ments be designed to take 
seriously the position of those 
who have more than one occu- 
pation — perhaps many more 
than one — in a working life. 

That s why we’ve developed 
our Individual “Ponaole' 
Pensions package - Flexible 
Pension Plan, Flexible 
Executive Pension Plan and 
Flexible T-Plan. 


Some of the rnanv 
advantages of our “portable 11 
approach are: 

* Planholders can change 
jobs without loss of pension 
rights. 

* Any lump sum death- in- 
service benefits can, within 


SgfeSUN 

Pure 


Sl : N UFE Assurance Society pic 


certain limits, be retained on 
changing jobs. 

* Pension rights can be 
transferred from existing 
Schemes to member's own 
individual plan. 

It's one of the most 
“portable* pensions packages 
permitted by current 
legislation and can be easily' 
adapted to meet future 
changes in the Law. 

Fur further details of SL>N 
LIFE’S case for flexible 
pensions please complete and 
return the coupon. . y^r 


scheme axid JndS Accountants Tire booklets * 


.have precisely thesame answer 


DUNCAN C. FRASER & CO 


77. h. Consulting Actuaries wit!} the full pensions sen let 


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the law of trusts. 

"If we have ^permission 
from the person who has 
approached us we wifi talk to 
the employer and express our 
views. Then we leave it to the 
parties to finalize matters. 


produces also take up a lot of 
working time. 

LL 


' The Company Pensions In- 
formation Centre, 7 Old Park 
Lane, London WIY^LJ. 




TO. SUN UFE Assurance Society pic. FREEPOST. Bristol BS I 3YX NO STAMP REQUIRED 

Please send me FbULdeuibof SUN LIFERS INOMDUAL'PORTABLEr PENSIONS package. T 24/2 

Name ! Name and addrcs* of your financial adilier (jf any): 

Aririrt-M 


their agents. It is only, if you do* preaches from an employer 
not get sans&ction from this and employee but this does. 


House, 229 JKingsway, London 
WC2B6NN. 


approach that you can consid- 
er contacting the Occupation- 
al 1 Pensions Advisory Service 

v SpS is a registered charity 
which is funded by comribu- 
-tions mainly . from large insti- 
tutions such as the high street 
clearing banks, various insur- 
ance companies and compa- 


not happen often." 

One of the unfortunate 
aspects of the work that OPAS 
does is the number of times it 
witnesses what Mr Brand calls 
"tragedies”. 

“ We often have to tell. 
people,‘sony but you have a 
miserable pension*, and there 


nies such as Rank Zerox and have been the most ghastly 


British Petroleum. 


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An England nightmare returns 


From John Woodcock 
Cricket Correspondent 
Kingston, Jamaica 

England looked to be plung- 
ing headlong to defeat in the 
first Test match against West 
Indies here yesterday. By 
lunch on the third day they 
' were 18 for two, needing 148 
■i; to avoid being beaten by an 
- inning s. 

~ - Alter the Wes Indies had 
. been bowled out in their first 

■ innings for 307, England, bat- 
r ting again, lost Robinson to 

his fourth ball and Gooch to 
: ' his eighth, both for dneks. 

It was another scorching 
' day as Ellison and Thomas 
picked up the last three wick- 
ets in the West Indies’ first 

- innings. Ellison's five for 78 in 

■ 33 overs was his reward for the 
doughtiest bonding. Only 
Snow and Bailey have prevU 

; oasly taken five wickets in an 
! innings for England at Sabina 
Park. In the last five innings 

- for which England have beat 

- in the field, Ellison has taken 

■ 22 wickets at 12 a piece. 

Scoreboard 

■ ENGLAND: Fhst tarings 159 (Gooch 81, 

. - Ut 48; F a Ba u oB 4-30). 

WEST BUESc FM Nap 

. C Q Graooidgo fcw h OMow a 

□ LHaynoac Downkm b TVomsa 32 

a Qomorc Edmcnda b Batbtm 24 

-.SB Wcfaartwa few b Botti— 7 

H A Gom— few b BKooq M 

CABMttorbWBfav ... ■ a 
• *1 VAfflctMrtttorbHNofl . 23 

■ . IP JDidonc Gooch bTlmntt. 54. 

II D MantaS c Mb b Stood 6 

. "W A HokSng tor b Btoon 3 

- P B Patmon (no! OoQ ... 0 

► • £flra»(b4»B>2.nb3) .... . .— 2 

• . Total ; 387 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-95,2-1 12, 3-115, 4- . 
IBS, 5-222, 6-241, 7-247, A-29S, 9-303. < 

..BOWLING: Botfm 1*447-3 ; TbomM I 
' 2B5-S-82-2; EKmm 33-12-7** Ed- , 
' DKMMte2l-*£3-0;WHajr4-0-1S-lfOoocb 2 
.. 2-T-6-0. J 

UmpimsD Aicbarand JGayla. ] 


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liTWIS 


makes up for 
British setbacks 

From David M91er, Madrid 

Geoff Parsons’s bronzemedal disappointed not to get inside 
in the high jump and Yvonne her personal best of 9mm 
Murray** silver in die 3,000m Oipdsecwitb a time some four- 
compeosated for some of the tenths of a second dower. Yet 
carikr disappointments for Brit- die still was able to leave a 
ain in the European Champion- couple ofSoviet runners in third 
ships; with the hopes of Omstie, and fourth place. 

Kinch, McDermott. .Roberts \ With six. laps to go 
and Dee still to come. Chgtiafavaaoddenly seemed to 

It is 3$ years dace Alan' pause when lying sewnd, sllow- 
Paterson won . a high-jump ing Murray to move through 
medal for Br^aln with his gold behind BmeraeO. of East Gor- 
in foe outdoor European many, who was settings conve- 

Qianiptonships of 195a For niently fiat pace. The kmg- 
Parsons. still on Jl and several stric&ng Murray stayed with the 


Sports 
Commentary 



years short of fiis jumping German and opened a 20-yard 
maturity, this - was me first gap over the Russians. Coming 
success m such an event, and he ■ into the - last lap, BibernaJl 
exhibited a competitive moved army, and tfae Russians 


concentration which optimis- started to dost on Murray. The 

tically marked a new phase in gap became smaller and smaller 

his development. . Bat at the fin Mnna . line this 

He had an unblemished jiatii charming Scottish ^! still had a 
all the way to 228m (7ft 5kin) yard or two to spare. She hopes, 
but then foiled three times at she said a fter w a r d s in her 
23!, which was cleared by the modest way, that the Scottish 
two West Germans, selectors might see fit to pre- 
Moegentxng and TbraenhaFCh, seket her for Edinburgh, 
the torener oontimring to 234. Iftheae ia one aspect of the 
Parsons shared the bronze, wiih indoor athletics wtnch makes it 
Eddy Amu js, of Belgium. raore appealmg, it is the atten^ 

To maintain concentration tion which the crowd is abfo to 


David Miller 


Madrid 

A HHxti*dood appeared on 
the horimn oo Saturday which 
might just, ultimately, jeopar- 

dh» Barcelona’s bid for the 
1992 Olympic Games. If noth- 
ing else, it brought Denis 
Howell a wry smile at his 
Sunday breakfast table. 

Late oti Friday, the Spanish 
Athletics Federation received 
a note from the Socialist 
government of Felipe Gmaa- 
tez Marquez, ordering that the 
Gibraltar flam mast not be 
displayed at Saturday 5 * open- 


througbout a* fitidy com- 
petitkm de m anded the utmost 


veto fidd events. Eschement 
•flowed the whole duration of 




Mastering the master for once: Sidiards is trapped teg before by EDison, who took five West Indies wickets 


But the West Indian score 
1 was soon put into perspective. 
Robinson had his off stump 

- uprooted by a ball from 
.Gamer that never left the 
. ground — there is no playing 
-those at this pace — and 

Gooch received a real trimmer 

- from Marshall which dipped 
'his bails. 

_ Earlier, England had paid 
5 dearly for the risk that a side 
■ always lakes when it reduces 
. its bowling in an attempt to 
strengthen its batting. It is 

Partners 
unburden 
N Zealand 

Wellington (PA) — Jeremy 
Coney and Ken Rutherford 
shared A sixth-wickct partner- 
ship of 109 runs to guide New 
Zealand out of trouble on the 
third day of the first Test 
Australia yesterday. In reply to 
Australia’s total of 435 in their 
first innings. New Zealand, 
resuming at 70 for two, finished 
on 311 for six after being 138 for 
five. 

•. Rutherford, who scored 12 
runs in seven innings in the 
West Indies last year and had a 
previous highest Test score of 
seven, hit 65, including 1 1 fours. 
Coney weas unbeaten on 79 and 
Richard Hadlee was 27 not out 
at the dose of a day on which 89 
minutes were lost because of 
bed light Coney averaged a run 
a minute through most of his 

jnninp 

* Coney gave a chance at 28 
when Craig McDermott mis- 
judged a catch at deep mid-off 
and be survived to give New 
Zealand reasonable hope of 
saving the match. Rutherford 
and Coney's partnership, put 
together in 143 minutes, was the 
highest by a New Zealand sixth- 
wicket pair. in Test matches 
against Australia. Coney's in- 
nings was also marked his 
highest score in 10 Tests as New 
Zealand captain. 


easy to see now that if Gower, 
had had another fast bowler, 
say Foster, at his disposal in 
place of Willey, the West 
indies would almost certainly 
have made many fewer. 

As it was, on a pitch made 
for pace, England were obliged 
on Saturday to use Edmonds 
as a stock bowler. He did a 
worthy job, but it was in the 
West Indians’ interests that be 
should have had to. 

The other crucial factor was 
Botham's form. Bowling as he 
did in his middle twenties he 
would more likely have fin- 
ished with seven for 45 than 
two for 67. For one thing he 
would have pitched the ball up 
and made it swing, rather than ' 

Sri Lankan 
attack 
prospers 


try for ball after ball to knock 
the batsman’s head off 
. There were overs in which 
be bowled six attempted 
bouncers, and all that did was 
stir up further trouble for 
England's batsmen, especially 
with umpires who pay not the 
slightest attention to the law as 
it relates to short-pitched 
bowling. 

So, although they took sev- 
en wickets for 183 on Satur- 
day. and despite all the great 
efforts of Ellison and Thomas, 
England might so well have 
done better. 

For the West Indies Gomes 
played another invaluable in- 
nings, and Best, in his first 
Test match, was full of confi- 


dent touches. When last, I 
wonder, did a haKmaw as 
distinct from a slogger, get off 
the mark in Test cricket by 
hitting his third ball for six, let 
alone against a bowler with 
nearly 350 Test wickets to his 
credit? This was bow Best 
began against Bo tham, the 
stroke a hook to long fog. 

On balance England must 
be said to have had the best of 
the umpiring decisions. If 
Greenidge, when be came 
back on Saturday evening 
having retired hurt on Friday, 
seemed almost embarrassed 
not to be judged leg before to a 
shooter from Ellison, Best, 
Gomes, Holding and eventu- 
ally Greenidge may all have 


been unlucky to be given 
outThe one who looked most 
out of all, other than 
Greenidge on Saturday, was 
Richards, when he went to a 
shooter from FHw« 

When Holding ha«f his 
marching orders the world 
record of six Ibw decisions in a 
Test innings was equalled. It 
has happened twice before — 
here in England's second in- 
nings in 1959-60 and in their 

first inning s a gainst Sooth 

Africa at Headingley jut 1955. 
In five Test matches in India 
last winter, only two such 
decisions went England's way, 
while in the West Indies m 
1973-74 only four did so, abb 
in five Tests. 


singte-fnrndedpFss. for the ran- the triptejoinp, in which 
up was criss-crossing with that Bruzhiks, of the Soviet Union, 
of the tong-jumpers. Parsons set a world best of 17-54m and 
was also mtennitienfty required the jampen received almost 
to dodge runners lap pi n g the m ore of tbe.gallcsy’s attention 
track, from the ontakie of which than the rmmers. 
be started his curve towards the . Rob Harrison had a miserable 
bar. time in the 1,500m. heats, rega- 

He is studying at the Cdflege iariy getting in tfae wrong po- 
of Mines and until six months sitton as the pace suraed and 


Indoor Championships, in the 
presence of the King- Gibraltar 
has been an independent mem- 
ber of the International Ana- 
tom’ Athletic Federation 9»n<T 
1954, and had entered a* 890 
metres runner, Battaduno 
AveGno. . 

in a hasty compromise. Sir 
Arthur Gold, President of the 
European Athletic Union, 
agreed to exetade all flags, bat 
the IAAF are to tfisdptine the 


■(■■ 252 S 3222 X| 2 ij®!|S^E 3 E 2 Cj 2 Z 5223 


H5PS3S 










lifi'TInryfnifmirMi', 




Athey’s patience rewarded 


■ w ’ i TTi • 


V J 



; 4f id! . 

f J J r Jr i 

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ft . : ' ■ l'‘ < / Vi I *77 



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1 I- ■ i 1 1 1 _i | r i ] 





From Simon Wilde, Gaffe, Sri Lanka 


AUSTRALIA: Ffett Ma s 435 © R J 
Matthews 130, G M RndSa 92. 0 C Boon 

70). 

NEW ZEALAND: Fbvt SmMt 
T J Franktn c Bordar b McOwmod — 0 

BE Edgar cWWgibM flld i m 38 

J R BcSc PWBp» b Raid — 32 

SRGMKptacBHdw-bRakl 28 

M D Cram b Mautmrs 19 

K R Rutharfofd c sub (Bright) b ReU . 65 

"J V Coney nd out 1. 79 

R J HwSm not out 27 

Extras (b2.fc 8. wl.nbtd) 23 

Total (Tor 0M*ts) _____ 311 

I 0 S Sntith, G B Troup, E J ChMfletd to 
b8L 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-0, 2-57. 3-94, 4> 
115. S-13a 6-247. 

BOWLING: McDermott 22-4-86-1; Davis 
21 -4-51 -ft Reid 26-5-63-3; Matthews 32- 
*45-2; Border 4-3-1 -ft Waugh 3.1 -1-7^3. 


Bubka 
vaults to 
record 


- Inglewood, California (UP!) 

- Sergei Bubka, of the Soviet ; 
Union, cleared If~ 






Kandy, Sri Lanka (PA) — Sri 
Lanka, dismissed for 109, hit 
back with four Pakistani wickets 
before the dose of the first day 
of their first Test match yes- 
terday. On a day which saw 14 
wickets foil for 167 runs. Paki- 
stan were struggling at 58 for 
four off 27.2 overs when poor 
light ended play. 

The Sri Lankan captain, 
Duleep Mendis, won the toss 
and decided to bat first, but the 
decision rebounded on him 
when the front-line batsmen 
yielded wickets with an undisci- 
plined effort. After Imran Khan 
had made early inroads with 
three quick wickets, Abdul 
Qadir and Tauseef Ahmed, 
revelling on a taming pitch, got 
three wickets each to complete 
Sri Lanka's destruction. 

Asantha De Mel struck three 
fours in a top score of 23 to 
ensure that Sri Lanka surpassed 
their previous lowest Test score 
of 93 against New Zealand in 
Wellington. But h was a ht^e 
disappointment for the home 
crowd, who hoped their side 
would avenge the series defeat 
in Pakistan test year. 

Pakistan fell into trouble al- 
most as quickly as Sri Lanka 
had, Mohan Khan frflmi g leg 
before to De Md with the score 
on one. The other three Paki- 
stani wickets to fon were all also 
deemed leg before. Qasim Omar 
joined Mudassar Naszar and the 
pair lifted the total to 28 before 
Qasim was trapped by Rumesb 
Ratnayake for 1 1. 

Scoreboard 

STB LANKA: First Innings 
S WWttmcmy tov b Imran Khan . 0 

Amal Stoa c Zuqamatn b Akram 3 

Anwtndfl De S4va c Zuiqemain 

b Imran Khan 11 

R L Dias b Tauseef 11 

*L R O Mends c Mudassar 

btmranKhan 6 

A R a natun ga b Tauseef 18 

Raw Ratraraahe b Qatflr . 4 

A LF De Iw bTauaeef 23 

RumeshRatnayafcacSsieerBbQBdr . 4 

Asoka Da SKva not out — 10 

J Wemaweara e Imran Khan b QatSr _ 3 

Extras (b-7 nb-7 w-2} .... 16 

Total (efl out) 109 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-0, 2-14.3-25.4-37. 
5-44. &09, 7-69. S-78. 9-100. 

BOWLING: Imran Khan 9-0-20-3; Akram 
&3-21-1; Tauseef 13-4-32-3; Oadr 124- 
3-20-3. 

PAKISTAN: Ffrstbmtngs 

Mudassar Nazar not out : — : 34 

Matntn Khan Bw b Da Mel 1 

GastrnOnwRwbRmeshRatnswke 11 
Javad Uandad bm b Asoka Ds aha .. 4 

Ramaz RAa Ibw bWamamara 3 

Sataam Male not out 3 

Extras {*2} 

Total (for 4w*ts) 58 

Ttman Khan. Tauroof Aimed, Zutqamatn, 
Waseem Mrsm. AtxM Ok» «o tot 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-1 . 2-28. 348, 4-53. 


Nobody here is daring to say 
too much, but P.ngtanH B have a 
chance of winning this fifth and 
final international match of the 
series. A century of the hi gher 
quality by Bui Athey, un- 
defeated after 320 minutes for 
102 ont of a total of 159 for four, 
has placed them in a strong 
position. Sri Lanka's first in- 
nings bad earlier come to a rapid 
close for 231. If England are to 
win they must today produce 
some positive cricket. 

By mid-afternoon yesterday 
the touring team's problems 
were accumulating rapidly and 
their prospects looked bleak. 
Moxon, in his first first-class 
innings since January 28. Ran- 
dall and Nicholas, were all out 
tor the time the total had reached 
59 and the heat seemed to be 
having a strange effect on then- 
party. Smith was confined to his 
hotel with a fever (it is hoped he 
will play today) and Gifford, the 
assistant manager, was similarly 


indisposed. Agnew had gone to 
hospital with a badly blistered 
toe, which could yet be a 
problem, and it was necessary to 
press into service. Peter Lush,, 
the manager, as twelfth mm ft 
would not be inaccurate to say 
that England, after their success 
of the morning, were galled. 

As Athey and Rhodes set 
about retrieving the situation, 
the play was gripping . They 
tussled to keep the spinners at 
bay. Athey was dropped when 
17 and 61 but these proved 
minor blemishes; Rbodes occu- 
pied the crease in his imperturb- 
able fashion, just relishing being 
there. Anuta Siri wheeled away 
28 oven from 1 1.40 until 3.50. 
Subsequently, Abeysekera 
switched ends a number of 
times in search of the break- 
through, bat foiled to find ft. 

After 162 minutes and a 
partnership of 92 runs, the first 
over'of the new ball accounted 


for Rhodes. Athey reached bis 
hundred in the final over of the 
day with a sweet cover drive to 
the boundary. 

-The imposing ramparts of a 
seventeenth century Dutch fort 
looked down on the ground and 
the original purpose of this 
maidan was to expose any foe to 
easy assault. As Cowans ripped 
through the Sri Lankan tail 
yesterday morning, with three 
wickets in three overs, it was 
made to look once again like a 

killing Briri . 

Cowans finished with six for 
54, the best figures of the tour by 
any bowler and. for an- English 
fast bowler in a first-dais match 
in Sri Lanka, second only to E W 
Oaric’s six for 24 in 1933-34. ft 
all see ms ra ther ironic in view of 
his having previously taken only 
one fifst-dass wicket since arriv- 
ing, when he was heralded as 
standing between any local bats- 
man and success. 


A painful | England 


fight back 


for Meo 

Bjj Sydney Friskor " ' 

* Tony Med is to faa*e aji X-ray 
examination to find out the 
cause of the pain in his back 
which forced him to seek relief 




From 1 Correspondent 
. MnHteim 

England's, women managed V 
sarpasmg recovery to beat^ Den- 
mark, their old rivals, 3-2 and 
win the European zone of the 
Uber Gup World Team 


Series of defeats for Boycott fa ction 

Start of a healing process 


A new search for unity in 
Yorkshire cricket starts to- 
night when the committee 
meet with a mandate from 
members to concentrate on 
restoring playing success and 
to put aside politics. It follows 
a remarkable animal meeting 
on Saturday when the pro- 
Geoffrey Boycott faction met 
with a series of defeats by 
unexpectedly large margins. 

Viscount Mount Garret, the 
Yorkshire President, said af- 
ter the meeting m Sheffield 
City Hall: “Yorkshire 
cricket’s future most be con- 
siderably brighter with aH die 
brouhaha behind us. It is the 
chance for a new be ginning 
with political, divisive matters 
finished.” 

.. A new constitution, one part 
of which outlaws Boycott’s 
dual role as committee ram 
and player, was agreed by 
3,370 votes to 310. This 
represented a 92 per cent 
majority, fat in excess of the 
two-thirds required. Those 


By Richard Streeton 

who had threatened legal 
moves to have Saturday's 
meeting declared have now 
shelved their plans. 

“It would be Mally point- 
less- to proceed/* Boy 
Ickringfll said yesterday. He 
was tme of four c ommittee 
members who foul failed to get 
an alternative set of new rules 
put fto the agenda. Reg Kirk, 
another of the four, resigned 
on Saturday became of iH- 
bealth hot die others, Peter 
Quinn ami Peter Charles, Eke 
Mr IckringflL confirmed they 
would remain on the commit- 
tee. 

Pete* Briggs, who moved 
several amendments nasoc- 
cessfully mi behalf of the 
Boycott camp, said: “The 
president won overwhelming- 
ly. To take legal action now 
would be similar to renaing up 
Everest to WeflmgtoB boots." 

As amendments and counter 
resolutions, pot by Mr Briggs 
and ottos, toiled one by one, 
it was extraordinary to recall 


that Boycott and his support- 
ers swept to power only two 
years ago in the same halL 
Several times Boycott’s ■**«***» 
invoked groans am] jeers when 
it was su ggested be was being 
victimized. 

Boycott, who is currently in 
the West Indie s, will be 46 
next October when he win 
have to decide whether to 
continue playing or to stand 
for re-election to the commit- 
tee. He has declined rec ent ly 
to reveal hts future intentions 
even to dose friends. Boycott 
is an acknowledged and a 
consdentions committee work- 
er but bis dual role has long 
been felt to be tovidioas by 
members. 

Tonight's committee meet- 
ing is expected to br-fog wide- 
spread changes to Yorkshire's 
sab-committees, the most sig- 
nificant being the probable 
return of Brian Close and 
ether former players to the 
cricket sub-committee. They 
have declined to serve to recent 
months. 


TENNIS: THE STORM IN FLORIDA 




ifcl 


Connors a throwback to another age 



. . , ® t .™ e top, the ama- 

teansh British Board must get 
ds hopelessly disorientated act 
into proper professional 
snape. How about an indepen- 
dent coaches fund? 



a 


353 






tuacthb: 


From Richard Evans 

Boca Raton 

Chris Lloyd, who won the 
women's singles at the Upton 
International Players' 
Championships here with a 6-4, 
6-2 victory over I6-year-old 
Steffi Graf was once engaged to 
Jimmy Connors. So the ques- 
tion she was asked, after her 
victory, about Friday’s men's 
semi-final fiasco was loaded, to 


victory, about Friday’s men's 
semi-final fiasco was loaded, to 
say the least. 

In a fit of rape, Connors had 
caused himself to be defaulted 
in the fifth set of his match with 
Ivan Lendl when the last ,of 
several dubious line calls went 
a geing him. ,What .did Mis 
Lloyd think about it?. - 

Bring the diplomat she is, the 
game's most articulate spokes- 
woman managed 40 let it be 
known that she did not approve 
™ Connors's refusal to play on 


while never actually criticizing 
him for it She did however, 
come to the conclusion that the 
umpire was at foult, an opinion I 
would not contest. She also said, 
in commenting on the relation- 
ship between umpires and play- 
ers, that the situation is 
generally out of control: that last 
assessment 1 would contest very 
smmgiy. 

The Connors incident was no 
more, I think, than a sudden and 
basically irrelevant lurch back- 
wards into the game's recent 
past. Connors and John 
McEnroe, who is not even 
playing grand prix tennis at the 
moment, have become some- 
thing of an anachronism as for 
as their behavour is concerned. 
The Swedes and the French are 
setting the standards now and 
their behaviour is beyond re- 
proach. 


Basically, foe way players 
behave is dictated by peer 
pressure, to foe 60s and early 
70s. the Australians ruled the 
roost Now, because they have 
been so successful the quiet, 
polite Swedes and the less quiet 
but equally sportsmanlike 
French players sudi as Yannick* 
Noah and Henri Leconte, are 
making their contemporaries 
realize that you do not have to 
behave like an enraged baboon 
to win tennis matches. 

Noah, as well as " Mats 
Wilan der and his Swedish col- 
leagues, would much rather give 
an opponent a disputed point 
foan have an argument about ft. 
So Connors’s eruption most be 
put in perspective. The new 

codeoicondtictanda new breed 

of player have made widespread 
bad behaviour a lhiag of the 
past. 


The fact that Jeremy Sh»W 
did eventually get around to 
following the new rales, which 
resulted in Connors bring de- 
faulted when he refused to play 
on, should impress upon every- 
one that even ticket-selling 
superstars are not above foe law. 
I just wish Shales bad damped 
down an Connors «rfier in the 
match. Had he done so he might 
have saved the game from 
another unsavoury 

Friday 

•tart MngteteBMfeMlK 1 Ud« 

gw*}. W. 1-ft ntko l 

Saturday 


SQUASH RACKETS 




S52S3 






B Gfce it ml V ran Psttan (US) wa 6 
Stare and A JanydfiMe). aw. 






I was determined to t^b i 




wmauy months at East 


British under 23 


























iO't'V’srfi: 


Uv.-wb ' i-.eA 




'« t*- “W . 


Cork will celebrate selection of ' - *k| 
^ e yes as he wins his first can sifti 

BrDariflTtaiub MT 4i 


SPORT 


SKIING 


GOLF 


nbfrS. ¥?"»• 24-year- 

iSSStfTrs? 

SdSr U iL Iris ^ sefeS 

w *»en their squad 

ST out 81 

Key« takes the place of 

sS^* J s 

a^^s 

against Wales but for a 
grained calf muscle; the only 

Sf 3 rtL < S2P pe ? 1 is Moss fini 

S*s aSaSlBa 55 

the recall to the squad, as a 

gsg^sassa 
S^fwas: i 

clearly considered that Keyes i 
Pft °f the squad fer t 
the last two seasons — he t 
£”J W|U > ^fand to Japan J 


By David Hands, Rngby Correspondent 

nigby, woEkPSi ramn^h^ sqi^ P ^^? B filness dl ? ne may “** «*» view that so 
fevour. Moreover, under the NeverthnSt^SL* yesttr ? ay - "““y P*aym had a poor day 
scniuny of the selectors oS au t ^^^i?2LJ? USt % a againsl Scotland that ftcouM I 

WW5£ - possibly happen again. 

Monkstowu 4 ** 18 38311151 contender for the position was if change there is. it wi 

Keyewt 5ft 9in and 12 sl is mSTJUSF"!! 1 **“. *-““**» J?“ b, X * to th 

not the biggest of mm anriki. , “ «*»«'.. "*0* time will •*« Redman’s athlei 

be^ cert ? n,y rome - J. asm *«*« a Pressing dain 

limited by the Sthai AU®"* 1 the Exiles have the **■ . ? place m his correc 

Ward at? both satisfaction of seeing McCall POObon as lock and Chilcon* 

Vfunster. But it wf £» S' 5? “P for **“ second cap - he scrummaging ability migb 


Keyesjn 5ft 9in and 12 sl is 

not>iebi S e« 0 f I SaDdhg 
P^W *»* *»en 
hmiied by the fact that he and 

ward are both qualified for 


ifi"®?- But it may be re- 


gUed that when be played for 
Ireland against Scotland in the 
n international at Galway fast 

80 tofutonted 
Gavin Hastings, the Scottish 
JhU-hack, that day that 
Hastings drive towards a first 
cap was delayed until this 
year. 

Therefore. Ireland may see 
his selection as less of a 
gamble than that of Croasan, 
who may be somewhat appre- 
oeosive at resuming his inter- 
national career after only two 
junior matches in the last two 
^ a ha# months. Crossan, 
aged 26. the Instonians left- 
wmg, played against Fiji in 
October and would have been 


ir change mere is, it will 
probably be confined to the 
scrum where Redman’s athlet- 
icism makes a pressing claim 
for a place in his correct 
position as lock and Ch ikon’s 
scrummaging ability might 





Champion 
moves 
up behind 
leader 


l'r 



& «L 






From John Ballanunc 

Los Angeles 


in . 

% l fs 

rcW 
, he ,dfr 
rigs!** 

n .IS • 


step up tor tus second cap - he scrummaging ability might 
scored two tries on the day he ***** to 80 England light five 

was selected against Wales (his wfaich failed beyond measure 


last May - and that he would choice for the 

{* Pjf^S with Michael £&$- £t 
ley, his dub scrum-half. nfavmo bTS* *“* 

.Tberefore, his familiarity ESlr fan-ESL agauist 
with current members of the ^ , 

oiuad, including Michael weeke£d^S?h * njgby fast 
Doyle, their coach who had * - d h Ioslon,8nc 

not been appointed when 


' Em cap came as a replace- 
ment against France last sea- 
son) only to withdraw the 
following week after an injury 
in training. 

London Irish, therefore, 
ff YE three players in the side, 
McCall jornmg Kennedy and 
MacNeiU. The Irish forwards 
made a distinct impression in 
me loose against Wales and 
McCall, a mobile 26-year-old, 
will take nothing away in 

respect He has done well for 
tnsier at the from of the line- 
out and will m, doubt be 
interested to hear today' 
against whom he will have to 
jump. 

England^ selectors, de- 
prived of any meaningful 
rugby over the weekend, gath- 
ered in the north of England 
ycamhiy to deliberateon 
their team which will be 


to earn its corn against Scot- 
land. 


nELAMDtt P IflocHM) (London 


jghf iff's-s Csss 

(LansdownaL R K Kearnev 
(Ards), B J g pBano 

SHIsISas 

gss .V 0 , %•& 

SSS2S“i- p '• 



■■■ - 



bt be i2 u I?0 annon )t R C 
Tljff- tBallymanaJ, A j 
loday (Greystonss), p | 
tve to iBaSymana). 


ri r ra 

Quins lose Milne and game 


• Theotpan iz ers of the Schweppes 
Weteh C**> have asked those t*jbs 
who wars forced to postpone 
quarter final ties on Saturday iftfiey 

can play their matches on or before 
March 11. They are, however, keen 
that dubs should leave the coming 
week free so as not to interfere wltn 
preparations by Wales for the final 
c ham pions h ip match of their sea- 
son against France in Cardiff on 


Gatecrashing the put,. Znrbriggen's first World Cep slalom win since March 1985 

among the elite 


wrjTMrtchwonwbeSre new^uri S^ishSS u P m > confidence day by day 
They are, however, keen . of *_ Ma rt i «^T^r?~/ esor } now I m ready for anything, 
should leave the comma “I 11 confirmed If you survive a race HtrlhS 


■SftMSBSftS 

country is frostbound must 
continue to step warily. It is not 


gfif SeTSS Hi 

m«ham and on Saturday. Brooks th <- 1 


By David Hands 

back, who has been in such 
commanding goal-kiddng form 
uus season, made the difference 
by landing a conversion and 


SSSijSi* Sf^day. Brooks, the Park No 8, had a 
10 keep their more worthwhile outinT nTTh^ 


cun ^ «> keep their more worthwhile outing at ihe 

Si Pl^^?i.- Came ? cropper DnoO than if he had appeanxL 

e.sctedoled. tor thfSS 


Ma^us Magmisson - failed to 


“J^^Jhiough the reo- finShlgS 1 ’ bSl tte 

fn n . d *"■ ■» *ouring^^S?b3S,h^ 


international this coming week- 
end) and retreated somewhat 
disconsolate after the third of 
Buicber s penalties gave Albion 
a kind of revenge ior the one- 
point defeat they suffered 
against Harlequins In the John 
Player Cup two years ago. 

Kpssly* Park, in contrast, 
made the best possible use of 
their first visit to Neath in 20 
years. They won 23-20 against a 
warn contai nin g Thorbura, 
Rees and the Wales back row 
replacement. Made Jones, but . 
missing Jonathan Davies, who 
putt a twinkle in the eye of any 
team these days. 

Nor was the match short on 


ngweek- developed such straw links 
Mnewhat with Oxford, 
third, of There has been much heart 
e Albion searching at Oxford over 
the one- whether to field former pfayen 
suffered against touring sides, m the 
he John hope of maintaining fixtures 
P- against the major rngby playing 
■ontrafl^ countries. Thet wSSeSbSJi 
^nseof on Saturday about the condition 
a in 20 of the pitch: it was more as a 
E a gesture to Kobe than amithina 


tots, an example seldom 
followed by players in this 
country. I am not sure why: if 

this is supposed u> be a handling 

game then h is easier to catch 
and pass with fingers retaining 
an element of the warmth. The 
omy international match in 
Britain which lingers in the 
memory because some players 
wore mittens is the Wales v 
England game of 1963 - the last 
tune England won in Wales. 

Nevertheless it will have been 
a thoroughly cosmopolitan sea- 
son for Oxford. It began with a 
visit to North America, in- 
cluded these Japanese visitors 
and will conclude with a visit to 
France, where the university 
will play Cahors on March 29 
and Tervasson two days later. 


Llanelli 
pay for 
ambition 


g^^SaSSS "ou can’do'wdl evnrohj^" 5 

■H.b-sssasss*, 

K£§f| 5 ® SSFiyH 


By Gerald Da vies 


U> thirteenth in the season’s 
downhill standings, with two 
races lo go. the British skier, 
who is aged 21, has ensured that 
he is now being talked about as 
the most successful young 
.downhiUer of the season, edips- 
[ mg his contemporaries in the 
powerful Austrian and Swiss 
teams. 


Llanelli 

Aberavon ... 


That this game should have 

been staged at all was surprising 

enough, the other three] 
Schweppes Welsh Cup quarter- 


[ ..Are hopes to host the 1992 
[Winter Olympics, and armchair 
‘viewers will certainly be flock- 
:mg to support its candidacy, 
j.nie lelmsion cameras were 
(ideally positioned to capture the 


mem from 36th and 37ih places 
in the two Argentinian races 
with which the season began in 
August suggest that a race 
victory may not be far away. 

Most of the racers made 
mistakes during their runs, and 
Peter Mueller, of Switzerland, 
who won Friday's race by 
almost a full second, fell half- 


Switzerfand, the world downhill 
champion, achieved his first 
victory m a season which has 
been disrupted for him by injury 
when he won yesterday’s slalom 
at Are, ahead of Paul Frommeli. 
of Liechtenstein, and the world 
champion, Jonas Nilsson, of 
Sweden. 

. Several 0 f the favourites, 
including Role Petrovic, of 
Yugoslavia, and Ingemar 
Sienmark, of Sweden, fell on ihe 
demanding course. 


PpWMLL: 1. F Hetnzsr (Swntzl Imin 
55 -Mmc 2. M Gtanlea Qjjx). 1:5625; 3, 
A <. L Stock 

5, M Bel |GB). 1:5670; 


way down the course on Sat- 
urday. leaving himsdf with the 
task of winning both the remain- 
ing races — at Aspen in the 
United States on March 8 and 
Whistler Mountain in Canada a 


Sterner (Aiotria). 157 A; 15. M Wasmeier 

OVERALL (after 11 races]: 1 p 
wmafaeraer (Austria). iiSpts; i. P 

Mujmer 1 10: 3. M 82; 4. K 

AUur fawttzj. 75: 5, M Gki& (Luicj. 
7S 6. E Reach (Austria), 72. Oittah I 


'-vp qaaner- as tne course Offered a test of the 
fioak having been called off racers* skill and nerve t? iS 

Kittbuhel’s long-established 


team these days. ^ S2 iS? ,rOW ** 9“° 500 “ 

Nor was the match short on ^°“* lbr 

tnea. Neath scored fbnr^foem. nS.fi? fof !°^ i:id a 


BASKETBALL 

IMieD BTA1E& (MM 

BSffpmaSSSS 

nSrK2lS25*"S: M S2" Bn 111. 

Mmorjcka 104: QfcHo Buis jffl. * 
gM t jfc Sacnunonk) Kings- 
^gg^ ^ ll ft OoMBnaus wK 
rion 12S. Lw Angotascappan 123. 


two conversions. The Paik cof- 
lected three, of which two went 
to Offiah on the wing and the 
tluid to Out, who replaced 
Anderson. Graves. Paries full 


High are 
made 
to feel low 


poutt Brian ftpcler. the referee, 
called proceedings to a hah since 
P*ayers were clearly having diffi- 
culty keeping their feet 
Several of the Japanese play, 
ere took the field wearing mit- 


CRICKET 

fr Squtt *■«: 


but the decision to play was not 
half as unexpected as the tale 

that was to be told later on in the 
afternoon. Llanelli, who had lost 

only once before in a Clip tie on 

then- home ground, to Swansea, 
and have the remarkable record 
kjying on Jy 10 games in 
the 75 they have played in the 
14-year history of the com- 
petition, lost to a persistent and 
occasionally inventive 
Aneravon team by two tries and 
a penalty to a try and two 
penalties. 

As with all the best and 
entertaining teams, Llanelli try 
things which do not always 
sureeed; and in looking for the 
nsry shots there is always the 
Pea ter opportunity of failure. 


janassswrlS 
aa-te.® ss jsrtsn, 


6. E Reach (Austria). 72. 


Lanny Wadkins. ihc defend- 3 ajA. 
mg champion, scored 67 to £‘ 
move on to the shoulder of jds -, 
Doug TcweU, the third-round -r - ?*« 
leader, as ihe field closed up Su<.an-. 
with several well-known players l C\saic 
in contention in perfect con- la;[uul» 
“I 11 ®"* ® n Riviera course in -^and 
ihe tiOth Los Angeles Open. «■, . 

Both Wadkins and Tewell are 
aged 36. but whereas the un &l,U 
former's career has been loaded 
wiih honours In Walker Cup he ic • 

and Rvder Cup play and he has noise I 
won 1 5 dues in i 3 years on tour, ti piee 
ihe latter, who hails from Loui- iln , Q d 
siana. has but two victories io 
his crediL the Heriiage Qassic tT. k 
and the Philadelphia Classic. UL ‘ . - 
both scored in 1980. Tewell 1311 ’* 
opened his third round with six I or 
successive birdies to gei a lead ico 
he never relinquished. o vs a 

Ail the dire forecasts of more ii'-wr 
ram proved incorrect and fair- incr^T. 
ways and greens were in prime n -Jl * 
condition throughout the hot - '„ P 
sunshine of the Iasi three davs 1 l,,C£ 
Nick Faldo and Pei'er ' ,r ,c,c ’ 
Oosterhuis both failed by two &CaIJo 
strokes io qualify and Mac cccfcct 
° Grady took over the lead. ed a p 
O Grady is one or ihe most sclJfror 
curious characters ever to play eru 
championship golf and he has nr ,- 
taken umbrae both at the 1 £. rr 
media and at Deane Beman. the . Ce 
US commissioner. The Cal if or- - d at 
man. who once played in Eu- Of'lve 
rope a nd who won hjs LIS 'card’ in A th 
pnfy ai his 1 7th atterapL was !cli- 

fined $500 in 1 984, allegedly for lid. 

abusing a volunteer worker -at u .„ 
the New Orleans Open. ...iinr 

The money was deducted ’ ullEE 
Irom his winnings Iaier without 
his conseni and he is threatening nc 
a court action. Last year, he was P-* 
featured in an American maga- th- 
zi ne m a way which he also of 
considered derogatory, so he has 
since taken up the habit of ; n - 
contronting all reporters and 
phoiographers with a cheery but ' 
uninformative “have a nice 
dinner lonight gentiemen’* or ’' ll 
something equally vacuous. 

This is extremely painful and >da 
unhelpful to American “■■■ 
correspondents who tend to ask « 
players about their strokes a ' 
rather than watch them making 3 
them. 7] 


he ic • 
noise 1 
Tipiee 
uni op 
.'asenot 
go: thi 

Lair i: 

I or 
:id ien 
o ys a 
1 1 par 

•nsfae i 

prr.* op 
hv.Hcc 
'Ir icki 
he alio 
c ccleci 
ed a p 
scUfror 

erw 

prc lcIT 

Ce 


ocive 

mt lb 
Id r 
lid .. 

ulu 

lull Ed 


f 'Streif ooime. ° 

“When I first saw this piste I 
whs rraliy impressed and 1 

„ 2 1 »uld do so 

writ Bell said after achieving 
his fifth finish in the top 15 this 
season. But 1 was able to build 


injured an arm and a leg, 
Mueller said he was uncertain 
whether he would be able to race 
again this season. 

Mueller’s spectacular accident 
left victory to his team col- 
league. Franz Heinzer , 

• Pirmin Zurbriggen, of 


pMncEl3.MBea.37. 

SLALOM: 1 . P Zurtrio 




After opening his third round 
with a birdie, O’Grady fell away 
with 75. 


GakM(R). i^&io; TO, 
1:38.79; 11. G Benedfc 
A Bittner 


BOBSLEIGHING 


.79; 11. G Benedft (YibL 1:385- 

HOCKEY 


LEADING SCORES: 207: 0 Tewed 

k 71.70,67: W 

S tood S-S® 0 Tretlef. 66.71 ,71. 20ft C 
Rose 73,70.66. 210c T Kke. 71 ,69 7th B 
Jaecko) 73.70,67: F Cowries, 73 71 j 
CoMt ra«.71; A Cwfla74.67;69!*il: 
j M*W 89.73^0; M O'Grady. 68.68.75. 
Mbsh score: 217; K Hrown?70.75.w! 


^°£ P ®i aS A ^.? n E “S| a ?» d come first but 


a second 
to spare 


DcxNraafcJn go, "a' Zmra 
JjWM 21ft Now S(Uh WUm . 

(S Smafllia G Dyer 69. M Rtf MS). 


saws •srarz iair£sa>S? 


spot for 
Bowden 

By Sydney Friskin 


Irish take honours 


By Joyce Whitehead 


SI of at i Komngssa: yMto^yTfinishinR 

Siradey, which accounts for it • 1.09 sec aheld rfSfth wSS! 


Coventry rewarded for 
set-piece superiority 


oiraaey. which accounts for it • 1.09 sec ahead of to&vh Pfehfe? 
bang such a popular place to be jof SwitzeriandfChris Moore 
to watch a game. On Saturday, j writes). Moorc 

LnwLSw. . firm 
contimunjg to attack when lesser iSSSSS"? 6 - medal, the 
teams might have been morel 6,51 German and 


By Sydney Friskin na^nt °^ d C a,"^^ JgS 

Taunton Vale reached the third E ccke . nd . endcd with 

round of the Hockey Assort- d 8 winning by the 

at ion Cup yesterday with a 2-0 o***® 11 ® on goal 

victory over Brean. The scorers ™"«ence after finishing level 
were Matthew Beny and Mick P" 1,011,18 .Ireland. The 
Martin. tournament also included Can- 

*■ ’Swfta' B “ mofs “ Ul,rai 


goals against one, before Wot- 
ting their copybook against 
Ireland. 


By Michael Stevenson 


By Ian McLaDdhlan 


Fylde 

Coventry 19 


The efforts of snow-clearing 
volunteers who turned up at 
Inverleith on Saturday proved 
fruitless as the ground froze as 
soon as the cover was lifted. 
This left only one game in 
Edinburgh on Saturday, at 
Jock’s Lodge, where Ed®iwgh 
Wanderers defeated Royal High 
by 1 1 points to six. 


Conditions were perfect at 
Ansdell on Saturday where 
Fylde. on the crest of a mini- 
wave after early season disas- 
ters, entertained Coventry, onlv 


CMoanwa* G own. C 
A Tumar (Manet mi w Sodatfl. 

McMaster is 


satisfied with more mundane 
matters in using the boot, that 
cost them the match, when with 


&haJ£ kCman ’ DhTtmar 
achauerhanuner. were only in 
second place after the first lauf 


SThT aSrtss-ejw? = 


uuw miuuio io go me noroe I r-i«a 

teams ambitious attack broke! Hoppes 

down (nrHitoi ia a.. £ ml teOWd by .47 of a ffimnH 


down for Giles to rau in fiom~50 ^ ' 4 Z of L a secood 

metres for a magnificent match- Jf 49 on ^f p,00slup *** “ me 

winning try. s ? c ' 

No one, not even the most But the Swiss champion could 


tens, entertained Coventry, only 
to Jose a flowing and enjoyable 
contest by two goals, a uy and 
two penalties to a goal and a try. 

The non-arrival of Sron* 


The pitch, although covered 
by snow, was passed as playable 
by the referee John Logie, who 
had travelled down from Inver- 
ness. Royal High took advan- 
tage of their opponents' loose 
play up front 10 edge into a balf- 


Tbe non-arrival of Steve 
Bain bridge occasioned feverish 
to-ugs and fro-ings, and Fylde 
were relieved to enlist the 
services of a formidable replace- 
ment in Wade Dooley, whose 
match for Preston Grasshoppers 
had been cancelled; he helped to 
counter Coventry's vast 
superiority in weight and drilled 


McMaster is No one, not even the most! But the Swiss champion could 

• Partisan, would quibble with c f pnal, “ on *at early 

Il| cnaree Abemvon's victory. Llanelli ad 5 n ^ 8C ? nd ’ “odor slower 
nr ,l_ ®. _ faded disastrously in the second “ ,~2 n ?. “ snow yesterday, 

first ^nn rf Uk ^ T , Sen,0r * C, i. P whjUe Aberavon looked by ^ ^“8 an impossible 

SSri-SS? «^ ne £. wiu< ?* far *0 be the hungrier team. Hoppe stretched his 

ab ^ - t ? S® They have made sSypn^gress J^d *<> 0.94 sec before the final 
BE? SS® B 5S r ’ dvonghout the season and their wmn m8 time was 3 min 

ID S u,t 5 **« P®** arr something co be “*■ , , 

PJ™™ance from the No 8 reckoned with. The battle for the bronze was 

t T ie l &T5m But it is felt that it is the by T i5f° , 5? r German 


Of three Ulster Senior Cup 
first round games which, 


not capitalize on that early 
advantage and. under slower 
conditions in snow yesterday 
was left feeing an impossible 
task after Hoppe stretched his 


way to find that the pitch was tj, 
covered with snow for their «J12L, 5, ™ e ? n **» cricket 
match against Plymouth and 2L ,B 2“ splendid, despite 
had to go away disappointed. .IT iT“ z i n 8 temperature, but 
In the northern area Bowdon ihrtr in 

defeated Bradford 4-1 and quali- m^ ,nsl j£ e,and ^ 

®S.*° West Hens in the Sffii |E!?7 1,I, S- They nevcr 
tfard round. Phil Adams scored 906 Irela nd 

all four goals for Bowdon. daermunxlly attacking at 

i n every opportunity. 

South 'JEE^ divi5i0 “ of die Deirdre Deasy (Munster) 


S«w1 Round: CunSxidge ftornksT 
Bowdon 4. Bradford 1 . Bon Lite Wrat 


Morrow and two tries from the 
Internationa! right wing 
McMaster, which helped Ban- 

B f to defeat Portadown 24-0 at 
Pochard Park (George Ace 
writes . 


The battle for the bronze was 
won by the other East German 


return of Mike Lewis, at stand- 1 driver; Deilef Richter, who pre- 
off half that has marfp the! veole< * Ench Scharer bowing 


£”***,, 7 ;. l j» n F*wi 0: Cwmbran 1 . 

Sffil&SSS'”" 4 - '*** * 


difference. Last he oul with a medal in his fins 

parted for Italy as one of the! lw 2i"^ n , even * before retiring. 


woy iniunsier) cre- 
ated ihe goal which Maretie 
rarirtl (Munster) scored from a 
rebound at a penalty comer and 
then Deasy scored the second 
nerseir again at a penalty comer. 
Ireland can be justly proud of 

, A P 1 ** **»* Scotland 

1-0, Wales 1-0. England 2-0 and 
lost 1-0 to ranaflff 
England B started the tour- 
nament well, winning three 
matches with a total of nine 


casualties of the miners' strike.) a . 8 ”^’ 5 Nick Phipps and 


kicked two penalties. 


After the break Wanderers 
came more into the game when 
Campbell Gillies cut the deficit 
with a penalty. With 20 minutes 


Coventry's scrumtnaging was 
decisive. A rock-solid base gave 
the mobile scrum-half Steve 
Thomas, the opportunity to 
work the Mind and chip pre- 
cisely. Owen got the touchdown 


but came back a few months ago ( ^fa 11 Cairns had the worst of die 
to help transform Aberavon'sj yesterday and slipped back 


fortunes. He and Giles were the elev H?. tl,after dwd 

mam architects of this vietorv £ ur “? tweJfth - T*»y were fourth 

k.A ___ __ . ; J from inert tn an aa ,k. C-.i 


— l/I UU) VJLHJly f f « 

but it was nevertheless one ■ ? t 81 to go on the final run 
which was based firmly on the . w,Ul “* ,rack lowing all the 


time te*» ^ s ^ jeTTOnl 7 “ ^ight and drilled The minnows of the senior but came back a fewmcralhs ^ A 1311 Cairns had the worst oftix 

k3tadS»?£iSaJ“ en “ e ^2L! , J theaeIpiec 5 s - league. CTYMS and Academy, to bdp iraSfoim draw yKterfay and slipped bS 

two penalties. amSV was met at Hydepark. whereSe fortunes. He and Gileswmfoe f 0 ? d ™ ,tih after the ihirt 

After the break Wanderers fST U !^ijL- n>ck ' 50 “^ ^? se t , gave l * am ft*d a comfortable main architects of this victory !?!“'“? tweJftjL They were fourth 

came more into the game when • Sleve 8 ~ < Lr in - fly half Davis but it was nevertheless one last to go on the final run 

Campbell Gillies cut tb« deficit .°^ or ^ ,ty ,0 contributing 10 points with two which was based firmly on the ^ ^ ,rack lowing all the 

withS^^wS Mm SSi S&&iSlSl2ElE “d conversions, foundations laid X 

to go a clever kick from Haw- frSTvI^S?. 801 *“ touchdown Two tries in four minutes took an increasing share in the *” British champions were 

■ Sfra£hfa£S dSEniSE andCoventry were seven points ughnp through the first half, ISSl sSf SJ£? r ^ 

the corner and from the resul- . . °gF w “«* was converted, suprisangly controlled the pos- rf™ , s !“8 e "“T P*UPP® had 

lam lineout Gordon plunged ^cUvely put finish to wssion in a way that May and J*en.faM|jow dunng fast week's 

over fora try. 5L ®® a “* Cblmliie s Cup interest for Cornelius did not for the home Jf? uli,1 « ty a virus which forced 

y forward play, accounted for the another season. Collegians go- team. him to miss three of the eight 

Near the end of the earn? the imcr ^ 1 tead -. A _ «>llm8 maul ingon to win 13-4. Thrrv have the - practice runs. 


FOR THE RECORD 


Canada, over here for titiie 
dual purpose of playing England 
at Wembley next month and to 
prepare for the World Cup in 

Amsterdam in July, were third. 

ihey improved with each match 
and against Ireland on Saturday 
and Scotland yesterday they 
began to put their game together 
and looked more purposeful 
Scotland s best effort was 
against England on Saturday 
when Gillian Messenger gave 
them a 1-0 lead by half-time, but 
they could not keep up the pace. 

Wales are back in the dol- 
dmrns, always just that fraction 
of a second too slow, and with 
four losses, no goals scored and 
nine against, they can only 
improve m their next attempt. 

uus was the last Inter- 
national Home Countries tour- 
nament. It has taken place ai 
CMd Trafford for 18 years and in 
1 98 7 the event Is 10 c hange 

gsss 

LScodand i; Ireland 2. EngSUor*™ 8 


BOXING 

KUWAIT! WBC MOM ft,, 


on pts. § 


foundations laid by a pock who Ul 25; 0 . 

took an increasing share in the ‘ British champions were 


me comer ana nom me rcsui- Tam mma 1 .. 

Gurdoo plunged re ^ anl for niggSy 
over for a try. forward play, accounted for the 

„ Near the end of the game the STRLISiAiSSS ^ 
flanker Robertson made sure of SMZiSXf 1 ® ■ ‘H® 8 * 


wssion in a way that May and 
Cornell us did not for the home 


the result with another un- 
converted try. 

Cancellation of Saturday's 
futures leaves the league pro- 
gramme in tatters. With next 
weekend's B international in 
FraixxLand the Irish and Roma- 
nia internationals in March, this 
leaves only one weekend in 
which fixtures can be played 
before ApriL 


Weekend results 


The traditional bolder sevens 
which take place during that 
month mean that league fixtures 
will have to be completed 
midweek, which is totally 
unsuitable and devalues the 
competition. 


The border dmni must come 
under more pressure as commit- 
raeni to a league and cup 
structure in Scotland grow*. 


his second coming shortly after 
from a pushover. Steve Thomas 
converted both. 

Steve Thomas Iaier locked a 
second penalty and Fylde found 
consolation m providing the 
most thrilling incident of the 
match. The right wing, 
Hanavan. ran from his own line, 
chipped gently, caught his own 
kick, beat a couple of Goveniry 
coverers and kicked infield, 
where Hesketb and Paul Dooley 
(Wade’s brother) bustled the 
bail 10 the line fra- Paul Dooley 
to score and Tanner, who had 
kicked Fylde's penalty, to con- 
ven on t he final whistle. 

SK9RER& RMw llr P Doolmr. Fmsttf 
and comeafet Tamar. Cowrtnr Trtar 

cssiBBessiaas 


S2?SES.?S5L CW: “”n«. 

sgt iss“ 10. Alwwvwn 11. 

w^^aidDwraair 6; TQ^uay AmJwfcs 


team. 

They have the makings of a 
good team with a him or two, 
with the running of Griffiths 
from full-back, Matthews in 


been laid low during last week's 
training by a virus which forced 
him to miss three of the eight 
practice runs. 

Britain’s other driver here, 
Pete BrugnanL who was 0.03 of 
asecood fester than Phipps on 


CYCLING 

iiHfr-’SSSS 


SP ’■ 1 LanmaNr (W £24.12: 

i. d vaudw tm a. h Kmbt [ml 

A2a.m 


NORDIC SKIING 

LBrnORAIfc Worid da mi 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

Doncaster 
succumb to 
Leeds revival 

By Keith Macklin 


LOmORAO: Worid Cup monmfm 10km 

ot «« ewy , r> or i. a Ahum <Nof) 30 nan i nere were visions of yet 


FOOTBALL 


wawte i. JMmwo_ 96 pe: ion z m 
M aUamen (Fin) and B PMUrson (Nor) 69. 


JMWASION: Doncmr , Rodwf*, 


ROAD RUNNING 


wirwu, ivumaews in 

mid-field and Diplock on the 5^21^2* gE 6 " 1 !! 8 run L - 

wing, that they may warn to act “ ck - >”>“1 Jourteenth 

away from their hard image of ?fi h r fW ! y . 10 sixteemh of 


SSL T" TABUHfc 


CORNWALL IERIT TABLE& Cmbonw 
E£P ulh jan.7 SI Auatefl 3; 

iSWBBWJKT 




s Sfas?a 

i, D BMP BANK LEAOIE Marti. — «w. 


RowelTs unique win 

Sarah Rowell, who set a 
British women’s best in the 
London marathon last year, 
became the first woman to win a 
mixed marathon when she won 
the Seven Sisters race from 
2.000 competitors on Saturday. 
Untroubled by the leg injury 
wfaich has hampered her train- 
ing in recent months, Miss 
Rowell clocked an impressive 
2hr 49min over the cross- 
country course, beating the 
prominent ultra-distance run- 
ners Sam Lam bourne and Marie 
Pickard. 


New man , 14 Qbun, P FauBcnor M Coflsw 13. Mfafc -H 

Bsaaa , SMMsr* !a 

League plan is rejected 


Keptesematives ef EngfancTs 
leading rugby football wmpn 


to a leagne strnctane wfam they 
met at Mbsaiey yesterday to 
disetns the possible wrpaiuft m 
of the existiag John Sn^ 
merit tables (David. 
writes). • 

The 24 dabs who « 

fables A and B fatvT^S 
known their opposition to 
feagees before 


third national table to the exist- 
iag two (which have been given 
sponsorship for another two 
years at (east) and four di- 


former years. 

The home team had none 
ahead at the interval with a try 
by Hopkins after Aberavon had 
gone io the lead with a Lewis 
penalty in the efahth minute. In 
the second half Pearce, who did 
not appear to have his locking 
boots bn, having missed four 
penalty opportunities and been 
on- target with two attempts at 
drop goals, extended the lead 
with a penalty > 

Lewis had sem a long flighted 
ball, missing out a couple of 
players, to send Diplock in for 
the try to draw fevd. But when 
.v 8 ??? ®°? aa,Mhcr penalty fa 

the 31st minute that seems to be 

mat However, five minu te 
faier a move started by Phil 
Davies and continued by Grif- 
fiths was completed by Giles, 
*ho spnnted past the first line 
of defence and when confronted 
with the second, chipped ahwm 
and won the race for the try 

SCOflBtfe UMfc Tfigw P HopMna. 

E'5255- § 5“"* R AbWawMeran 


36. Considering Bnignani is in 
his first year as a driver, that was 
stilt a respectable performance. 


O MMOte K jwnhia (Norwich 

T*® DIVISIOffc C aanw (BaumamauiM 



TODArS FIXTURES pWAS 


7 J0 un toss stand 


FOOTBALL 

FA Cup 
Fifth round 

Derby v Shaft Wednesday 
Fourth cfivtekwi 
Port Vata v Burnley 
Southend v Halifax (7.451 
Stockport v Exetra 
Scottish Cup 
Fourth round 
St Mirren v Falkirk 
Hamilton v Hearts 
AHoa v MotherweS 


p»^w™) 17; C Madden (Bury) 17; T 
^^JPjwwrtisnijtTilMcParianiltNoits 


4M7: 1 Cartmdga UnrvflnsVy 45Ja. Fwfgi 
UfE S Vinal (Loughborough] KM4. 


SPEEDSKATING 


OTY (South African unless stand): 2M: 
MMdttiKy. 212i F Alan. 2«fc M vntdtn. 21* 



n^;TDot)Os. Other BAUinm 220:1 

5So.g«L Y 'ss^. , ‘!as:- ^ 


FREKUrr ROVER TROPHY: Southern 
socdorc Ctoerter-flnet QBSngnani w Cem- 


?9'; *® G Turner 
fig. T. c . H Longer [WQfc g 


TENNIS 

Qfr W* andnr-IB Winter Cm 
titaf Bnwi lean Frtana 34 (K ftSaoms 
An»o6-1.Mfc Meet Germany Ud Fhwwfr 


VOLLEYBALL 


vfctoml tables, an linked by uS^ l . H 2 l,0 *^2^“ti»ds. 
The dabs yesterday favoored g™g: * . Buchaan. k Towroey. L 


The dobs dfecassed a paper 
fit® their mo sab-canmittee 

reewn m en din g dw of A 


a, structure of three 
tables of 12 dabs each, and (he 
resalta of tteir dfscsssion wffl be 
forwarded a the Rugby Football 
Union whose Own competitioos 
committee has hem #»«) to 


Sysaarniarf 

USBUMkt J GnfiNte p jaim. G 
Matthews, M Thcvirm*. R DMeek; u 
Lmde. fl Gfce; P KHgm. B James, D 
Jpeep h. TReea. I Brown, j Jenkins. P 
Vwwey. T Feuvel. 

f®=EREE: Mr L J Raant (Casteton) 


W TROPHY: iWl ro und. Bishops 
Stanford v Cheflanhem: weakMono * 
South Bank: Leek Town v Wycombe. 
ftjrtraiiwJ reptar Kettering v Wbntwo 

0PH. LEAGUE Pnndw «- 
Bognor v Epsom & But 
JJfrUhSfflStow v Harrow; BUtericay * 
Dulwteh. 

SOUTHERN L£AOUEt Piwnter dtviakMC 
grower » Besvwtroke. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: FM mHOK 
titoa w v Huddersfield (74)): West 
Btamvacl! * Demy (7.0). Second dMsiaK 


YAMOUSSOUKRO: hmy Ce —t O pe n (BraMi 
«tes swd) 273: a Brand Sr. 7^67.te. 69 . 
»Bc B itereMurA. 68. 67. 68. 72. 276: A 


***27-72. 67. 70. 67 279 W Ldngmulr, 72. 
67. 68. 72. 28ft GCtAen. 73. 68, 66, 7X201; J 


^.^^rrA’ar,' 

& ) S , W b 5^ S ^, 


JJfrjBan. 72, 71. 70. 08: S Bemea. 70. 70. SB, 
S P Cowon. 73. 7 1 , S7. 70: J Hfrnlns. 73. 74, 
Owwn(Fr). 66. TIL 74, 68:0 


YACHTING 


ftw. 71. 70. 74. 67; P Thornes. 68, 75. 68. 70. 
SUN cmr: SureNne ckcait (Sam African 


SUN OTY: Sutchtae cfendt (Soutti African 
tMeH steted): 279: M MOUiy. 73.68.71.69. 
gfc 73. 73 a«fc 0 Feneny 

(M. n. 70. 71, 72. 2V7: W Waetnar, 74. 7t . 

ST. 7lh M UMtshra. 73. 74, 68, 74, 268; W A 1 _ * v 

wsrassaKaattiss Audam mark 
K^saflaasHraa _ a«u«i (api - 

s Hotttty. 7 i. 75.7 4. 70; b &*n (GB). 74 Lommonwealth Gaines gold 
fie. 74. 7a, r Hartmann (us), to. 72. 73, 75 . medallist Anne Audain broke 


AUCKLAND: w«M OK dfa. 

J 5f U|lf».(NZ fc 4 dl 3 


PWe proposals for a com- Carotfl or Samor- 


RUGBY LEAGUE 
gtlS CUT CUP: Rnt found: Dewstxxy v 
StHtfensfetHudkigtay). 1 


prebeasbre dab siro c tu re op- 
erable by the 1987/8 season. 


SB^ASrviaBS 

Maichw to l* ptajBd on Mwai a 1 "* - 


OTHER SPORT 








■ Ate Commonwealth record for 

— riOCatEY the 10,000 metres yesterday in a 

bSm? S5? ■«» tiwao.'dml qualifying run for this year’s 

Games- Audam, who won the 
MaHscw 3.000 metres at Brisbane in 

^Kas. i asSaF s ot^ 


jj Doncaster when the lowly sec- 
ond division side led Leeds 10-4 
- > n Oie second round 

Silk Cut Challenge Cup game ai 
Headingley. 

The Dons, who beat Salford, 
of the first division, in the first 
round, showed remarkable 

■ spun. They tackled so well and 
ran so determinedly that they 

■ “irew the international-studded 

Leeds side completely out of 
their stride. Although Smith got 
an early try for Leeds. Jones and 
Parithouse went over for Don- 
ca ster a nd Noble kicked a goal. 

Perhaps the dream was too 
gocxl to Iasi, and in the second 
half Leeds asserted first division 
pedigree. Tries came from 
Rayne. Powell. Lyons and 
Crcasser. and Doncaster, fight- 
ing to the last, eventually suc- 
cumbed 28-10, 

Rochdale Hornets, another 
second division side, also fought 
bravely before going down 36- 
20 to YVidnes. Again, first 
division experience and class 
told in the end and the Widnes 
crowd gave an ovation to the 
Australian forward Noel CteaL 
who returns home today and 
who crowned a storming perfor- 
mance with the last Widnes try. 

Other home tries came from 
David Hulme (2). Paul Hulme: 
Ruanc and Fieldhouse. and 
John Myier kicked six goals. For 
Hornets. CariwnghL Kuili and 
wood scored ines. and Hornets 
had the last word by claiming 
the last try. * 

sasssg 

gggsss® 






6 Hatifa* s Second 

Run «Jfn H 24. ManstwdMg *™ Q0: 


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FOOTBALL 


Freeze-up adds insult 


to the injuries that 
spoil Robson’s choice 


By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 

Some World Cup finalkrs, pected to start against the sat for foe sixth time were less 


such as the hosts, Mexico, will 
have spent more than a year 
on their build-up to this 
summer’s tournament Others 
win have been practising for 
sa months. The preparations 
of England, the nation with by 
far the most demanding do- 
mestic programme, wm al- 
most certainly last little more 
than a fortnight 
Last month, for foe opening 
trial in Egypt, dub commit- 
ments forced Bobby Robson 
to redesign his plans. So many- 
of his representatives were 
ruled out that, even with the 
belated addition of four play- 
ers, he took a squad of only 17 
to Cairo. Now the disruption 
has been caused by an equally 

familiar problem, injuries. 

Yesterday Robson flew to 
Tel Aviv without three mem- 
bers of the side who probably 
.would have lined up against 
Israel on Wednesday. Haidey, 
who may be out for three 
weeks after having his tonsils 
removed, was joined on the 
casualty list by Lineker, suffer- 
ing from a back strain, and 
Reid, victim of a pulled groin 
muscle. 

The reluctant withdrawal of 
lifrefcer immediately after 
Saturday’s Merseyside derby 
ends his own sequence of six 
successive appearances, dur- 
ing which he scored five goals. 


to stan _ 

Israelis. Dixon has not played 
for a month, Woodcock has 
not been picked regularly by 
his club and Beardsley’s inter- 
national career is a mere 30 
minutes old. 


Although Harford had been 
placed on an unofficial stand- 
by list Robson considered 
that be has adeqnate cover in 


than riisfinffiifiheH 

Wright started promisingly. 
He put Southampton ahead at 
Coventry City during a first 
half that was described by his 
manager, Chris Nicbou, as 
“our best performance this 
season". But be and his defen- 
sive colleagues, including 
Shilton, conceded three goals 


inaine ras aoequare cover in during a second half diajlay 
attack. The only replacement NlchoO’s opinioavws 

to be summoned was Hill, his ^ 


Luton Town colleague, who 
came on as a substitute in 
Cairo two and a half years 
after winning his last cap. The 
squad has been cm to 20. 

Robson can foresee similar 
troubles ahead. The weight of 
fixture congestion is growing 
heavier by foe day and weath- 
er forecasts suggest that it win 
not be appreciably eased be- 
fore next week. Some sides, 
such as Everton, could be 
involved in at least two games 
a week for the rest of the 
-season. 


It also compiles the breakup 


ofEngfend’s strike force, 
bee, the winger chosen to 
make his debut in support of 
Lineker and Hateiey in Egypt, 
is not even in the party. 

England's manager is left 
with a limited choice of three 
centre forwards, none of 
whom would under normal 
circumstances have been ex- 


it would be 
optimistic to imagine that the 
squads assembled for the prac- 
tice matches, in the Soviet 
Union next month and against 
Scotland in April, will not be 
weakened, perhaps severely. 
The strongest side may not be 
gathered together until May 
16, against Guadalajara in LOs 
Angeles: 18 days, in other 
wends, before England's open- 
ing World Cup tie against 
Portugal. 

Robson’s men by then may 
be suffering from fatigue but 
half of those on yesterday’s 
passenger list were relatively 
fresh. Ten of them have been 
idle fora week or more. Some 
of those who were active on 
Saturday when the pools panql 


Coventry, who bad not lost 
to Southampton at home since 
1949, recovered from a two- 
goal deficit for the second 
successive week. Tottenham 
Hotspur, with Hoddie and 
Waddle, also came from be- 
hind to win at Sheffield 
Wednesday with their first 
Canon League goals of the 
year. Their winner was 
claimed by Howells, an 18- 
year-old pre fe rred to Clive 
Allen, valued at £700,000. 

Howells, the scorer of 31 
goals in 38 youth team appear- 
ances last season, has the 
advantage of having a younger 
brother for a goalkeeper who 
in the next few days wifl join 
Tottenham as an apprentice. 
He can have few finer exam- 
ples to follow than Gemence, 
who was responsible for pro- 
tecting their lead at 



JUDO 

McSorley 

shows 



form 


Gosney, Portsmouth’s goal- 
keeper, was equally responsi- 
ble for throwing away his 
team’s chances of closing the 
gap on Norwich Qty at the top 
of the second division. Dillon 
did not help their cause by 
missing a penalty bnt 
Gosney’s error, as embonass- 
as Grobbelaar’s at Anfiekl, 
Henry to complete 
Oldham Athletic’s unexpected 
victory on the south coast 


Changing of the old Palace guards: Luton’s Nicholas (right) crosses swords with QPR’s Fenwick (Photograph; Ian Stejrart) 

Carpet ad’s 
artificial 


of his six ’ opponents 
coukf fmd the answer to the 
b an age of uncompromising at- 
tacks that brought some 
spectacular results. His first 
three opponents were sum- 
marily bowled over by 
McSooey exploding put . ner- 
vous defences with Mistering. 
speedy while Ran Angus, the 


feu loan admirable 


Dalglish has to master the 
art of running for cover 


By Cibe White 


Liverpool. 


Everton. 


Olsen gives spring Breakaway 


< to United’s winter league is 


The trouble with awards is 
that by their nature they tend to 
apply to yesterday's wodc rather 
than today’s. Consequently, 
they have a nasty habit of being 
presented at ino ppor t u ne mo- 
ments, as was one by a Scottish 
distillery to Kenny Dalglish 


By Simon O'Hagan 


victory, if ever there was one, 
j laved « 


Manchester United.. 
West Bromwich 


played well within themselves. 
In the absence of the suspended 
Robson and Whiteside most of 
the attacking was left to 
Strachan, Olsen and Hughes, all 
low-centre-of-gravity Mayers 
whose skills on the bony surface 
were too much for Albion’s 
cumbersome defence. 

It was no surprise that pen- 


prior to the Merseyside 

1 _ j i a kick-off on Saturday for being 

born at last rama ® er of *■ 

Dalglish might well have been 
tempted to give bade the whisky 


Saturday’s match at Okl 
Trafford mirrored the current 
state of the game rather neatly, 
consisting as it did of sporadic 
outbursts of- football inter- 

St 7»E 


players sensed they were 
disobeying the law of nature, 
which decrees that, whether the 
Football League like it or not, 
there will be a mid-season break 
every winter. 

Come April, however, when 
the pressure on sides at the lop 
and the bottom increases with 
every rearranged match, Man- 
chester United win be glad they 
emerged from hibernation to 
stock up with another three 
points. As for West Bromwich 
Albion, they could be enduring a 
metaphorical winter until the 
end of the season and beyond. 

This was Albion's first match 
under the managership of Ron 
Saunders and by replacing his 
goalkeeper and three of his 
midfield men he managed to 
make more impact on it than 
any ofhis Mayers, new or old. As 
has been acknowledged all sea- 
son, Albion have the ability but 
lack anybody with the con- 
fidence to show it. Their best 
spcH was the opening quarter of 
an how, when the shockwaves 
of Saunders’s selection would 
have been most keenly fell, but 
thereafter they acquiesced. 
Afterwards Saunders spoke sol- 
emnly of lesson learnt, which is 
really all a mana£iy in his 
position can do. 

United, sensing a routine 


United's 2-0 lead at half-time, 
on both occasions Colin Gibson 
being brought down as he bunt 
into the area Olsen, with his 
curious, ambling approach, put 
the first penalty in the top left- 
hand corner and the second in 
the top right, a touch of im- 
pudence which Naylor, malting 
his debut in the Albion goal, 
afterwards seemed to have 
rather enjoyed. He had not 
come across such dass at Crewe, 
Peterborough or Lincoln City. 
With 20 minutes left and United 
coasting. Olsen scored his third, 
the first time be has achieved 
this feat at the dub. 

Not for the first time this 
season, though, injuries de- 
tracted from United's pleasure 
in victory. Hughes hobbled off 
at the end with a swollen ankle. 


but though he will miss Wales's 
visit to Saudi t 


Arabia this week, 
he could be fit by next Saturday. 
Gidman, the United right-back, 
has injured knee ligaments and 
will probably be absent lor a 
fortnight 

MANCHESTER UMTED: C Turner, J 
Gidman (sub; T Gtnon). A AUston. C 
EBadcmare. P McGrath. K Moran, G 
Strachan. C Gibson, M Hughes, F 


By Hugh Taylor 

The breakaway threatened for 
months- fry Scotland's 
dubs has at last become a reality 
and the country will have a new 
national football league next 
season. It will co mprise two or 
three divisions, depending on 
tiu volume. of applications to 
ir organization: * 
premier diridn of 10 dubs, 

with promotion and refegatfcn of 
one-up and one-down, has al- 
ready been agreed. 

The dedshm to spfit from the 
Scottish League was made at the 
weekend following a meeting of 
the nine dissident chibs, who are 
all fuD-thne me mb ers of the 
present premier division. The 
BCw organirariBn, to be known 
as foe Scottish National Leagae, 
will be run from the Scottish 
Football Association head- 
quarters in Glasgow, and is to be 
recogn iz ed by UEFA. 

A new constitutio n has been 
drafted and is to be fin ali z ed 
when the SFA Corardl meet on 
March 10. San cti on at fee 
level in football has been 
and the latest more by 
dabs known as “the rebel 
nallifies a new Mne pi hit 
being prepared by the manage- 
ment committee for dfrisfons of 
12, 14 and 14 to an effort to 
m,in»nw ftp traditional strno- 
tore. 


test of any aspiring manager, 
and perhaps give credence to the 
rumour that he may sign Daven- 
port from Nottingham FoTOSL 
So fin- he has spent just once, 
£300.000 on McMahon. ■ 

His remedy for the deficiency 
on Saturday was a further 
indication of his current in- 
decision, in this case with regard 
to MMby*s role in Liverpoolnie.- 
MMby has played behind foe 
bade four, in front of the back 
four, in midfield, and on Sat- 
urday just behind the attack 
which consisted of one lonely 
soul. Rush. 

No wonder the strolling Dane 
looked more confused than 


time, with his past convictions 
be could never be wholly ab- 
solved from any crime. 

So it proved in the 74th 
minute when, having his 
second commendaMe save of 
the game, one-handed and low 
to Stevens, be allowed a soft 
shot from, of all people; 
Ratdifie which took an even 
softer deflection to squir m un- 
der his body and cross ever so 
slowly over the goal-line. 

One could only guess ax 
Grobbelaar’s anguish, whoever 
has nightmares m daylight with 
45,00^ people sniggering at you? 
And, of course, the tdevuioa 
cameras were there just to 


impression 

ByDaridftnrell 


OPR. 


Luton Town. 


Sttptoton, J Otean. 
WEST BBC 


BROMWICH ALBION: S 
WOiofl, D StMham. M Forsyth, C I 
M Bennett G Robson. S Mackenzie, G 
RaSy, R Dennison (sub: I Varwf), G. 
Crook*. 

Retiree: G M Tyson (Sunderland). 


Wright lifts Aberdeen 


Many officials still oppose a 
breakaway and Jack Steedman, 
the foagae treasurer, whose part- 
timers Clydebank are the only 
premier dhisiefl dab not in- 
volved in the revolt, said: “The 
mere will pose many problems 
and we at Clydebank still befierc 
in the Scottish League and will 
not desert it” 


an boor and a half later. For 
while foe Scot, in his new off- 
field rote, has manoeuvred 
Liverpool into a challenging 
position for multiple honours 
this season, they seem to have 
been overtaken in recent weeks 
by indecision, as much as 
injuries, .winch stems directly 
from the top. 

, Most importantly,- the time 
has come for Dalglish to look 
into his wardrobe and decide: 
managers suit or playing left. 

For my own part I would 
rather see him attempt in g the 
more rewarding feat of 
intimidating opposing defend- 
ers than “opposing” journalists 
at pmss conferences. Despite 
professing to be a player-man- 
ager, he has shown almost a 
reluctance to take the fidd, 
regularly excusing himself from 
games because of injury as 
though be were finding the dual 
rote, not surprisingly, too 

While Walsh was fit and with 
Rush running defences giddy, 
Dalglish’s presence, as he cor- 
rectly acknowledged, was hanfty 
required. Walsh's absence for 
three matches has exposed 
Liverpool’s non-existent cover 
in attack 

Dalglish was unavailable with 
a groin strain this time, but it 
seems be must find the courage 
to enter the transfer market, a 


normal by a Merseyside derby. c ? sure ft becomes a recurring 

They tend to go straight to ha ■* rf “ «* 

- ~ haunted by enough of them 

already. 


head, like the first glass of 
Akvavit AH the bustle and 
bustle, without a moment’s 
peace, seems to agititale him 
and if be had not limped out of 
the gmne with a whin injury, a 
booking and bredsed ptrsde at 
halftime, one 'fears fie might 
have been ordered out offt. - 


Unlike Everton, 
Reid was 

no continuity or 
about UverpooTs 


for whom 
there is 


midfield. 


and McMahon re- 
turned having both missed , the 
last nine games. The confusion 
spread to defence, traditionally 
UverpooTs strength, and even 
Lawrenson -looked jittery, 
.thongh why the best central 
defender in Europe should be 
playing at right back (in place of 
the injured Nicol) without , a 
winger to mark I cannot under- 
stand. 

He stiP managed to get him- 
sdf into tire thick of dungs, 
however, almost conceding a 


penalty ortwo, notably when 
flanenm 


natfftimig Richards on while try- 
ing to bring relief to a comic 
misunde rstanding hir™- 

sdf and Grobbdaar. The goal- 
keeper played a minor part in 
this episode but, as someone 
said prophetically and not a 
little unsympa t he ti cally at half’ 


His future is something else 
about which Dalglish must de- 
ride. He will have to start totting 
up Grobbelaar’s debits and 
credits. Dropping Grobbdaar is 
unlikely to have any effect- on 
what Grobbelaar drops, since 
foe problem is one of personal- 
ity not form. How envious 
Dalglish must-be of Everton 
with the^feuMess . Southall and 

behind him M mim^ an Eh ghnj 
under-21 goalkeeper. It is a 
lesson in coyer which Dalglish 
has yet to leant. 

Everton’s second goal, about 
which there was a hint of off- 
side rather than the five-yard 
margin which Dalglish dairned, 
was inconsequential except to 
Lineker, far whom it was his 
30foof the season. . 

What might be of con- 
sequence is that UverpooTs 
defeat, their first at Anfiekl in 1 1 
months, is only the third at 
home to Everton in 16 years; 
After the other two, in 1970 and 
last year, Everton went on to 
win the Championship. 

LIVERPOOL- B GrobMun S Lot. J 
Begin, M Lawranaon, R W h et an . A 


Miami 
R ett T 


K RatcMe. P Van den Hamm. P 


Steven G Lineker. G Sharp. P 

■ tastoc A Haspw), K flktantaon. 

■ i n Uli n i ■! I . 

I el D worm (irara^jaw). 

Slipping into a trap of mediocrity 


By Nicholas Harfing 


Wimbledon. 


The Scottish League cham- 
pions,- Aber deen , have again 
been made favourites at the 
odds of 2-1 to win the title after 
their 2-0 victory ova- Hibernian 

at Easter Road, their first win 
away from borne since Septem- 
ber (Hugh Taylor writes). 

Although ft was a dourly won 
success, Aberdeen showed the 
determination of champions 
and their title hopes were bol- 
stered by the fine display of yet 
another talented te ena ger. Paul 

goal and was the "gamers 


returned to international form, 
the home attack failed to pro- 
duce enough ideas to upset the 
wefl-orgamzed Hearts defence 
and Robertson scored the equal- 
izer to stretch his dob's un- 
beaten record to 21. 


Heart of MtfotUaa still lead 
the premier division, and their 
1-1 draw. with. Celtic before a 
45,000 crowd at Pufcbad re- 
vealed that they are going to be 
difficult to topple. 

Although Johnston, who 
opened the scoring for Celtic, 


showed that they 
have no fear of the leading dubs 
when they drew 1-1 with Db- 
dee United at Taxmadice. They 
may have lacked the finesse of 
their opponents but they pack 
drive ami determination into 
their Mny and, despite losing an 
early goal to Dodds, they fought 
back gallantly and equalized 
when McCoist scored from close 


Two goals from Ray Stephen, 
Dundee's leading scorer, gave 
them a 2-1 victory over 
lustre St Mirren at Pa 
Speirs scored for the home : 


Bat the Scottish football pub- 
lic is likely to fed reBeL for they 
have long bdd the view that 
dare were too many small dabs 
with too much power and that 
the league set-up was com- 
pficated. 

The new organization say they 
have already had applications 
from 10 other Scottish dobs to 
Join them. The action, which wffl 
lead to the destruction of the 
present structure of 38 dubs, 
was takes because the smaller 
d obs h ad refused to concede 
overwhelming voting power and 
new proposal for promotion and 
relegation to the powerful rebel 
body. 

It was indicated yesterday 
that foe only factor which 
now stop the breakaway, a 
somersault by the first and 
second dhwM dubs at the 
league's special general meeting 
on March 12, was unlikely to 
happen. 


Brighton. 


lost their footing. Wimbledon,, 
with there, to put it politely 
“long ball game," probably suf- 
fered less m the circumstances 
than Brighton, whose designs 
. have always been more creative. 
But in the end Brighton were 
hoisting the ball as high and as 
far as the home safe. “When in 


A game which produced nei- 
ther a spectacle nor a result to 
encourage foe promotion am- 
bilious of either side was best 
summed up by a remark late on 

by a cynic. “Crime on, ref” he there manager offered by way of 


OfaO the players, Wilson had 
m ade the biggest effort to be 
constructive once be bad settled 
a personal vendetta wish. 
Winterbnm, fortunately for the 
Brighton player without a book- 
ing but even he found balance 
di ffic ul t , squandering iris side’s 
best chance near the. end. 


thw 


shouted. “Stop spoiling 
game - such as it is.” 

The hard Plough Lane ground 
which played havoc with what- 
ever attempts there wens to 
display skill was bad enough. 
What acce n tu a ted the medioc- 
rity were the offside traps sprung 


explanation. 

It was dearly not a policy that 


brought any great pleasure to 
Cattim. “We’re in the e n tgrtirio- 


both tides and foe tendency 


the referee, David Axcdl, to 
overlook the advantage rote. It 
all contributed to a match of 
increasing tedium which ended 
as inconclusively as the dis- 
cussion after ft relating to the 
pros and ams of Maying on sudi 
unyielding surfaces. 

The longer the game pro- 
gressed, the more the Mayers 


ment business”, he said, “and it 
does put a question mark 
against dte entertainment value 
to have to May on a Midi hks 
that.'* 

DaveTBaisctt, however; was 
not convinced, believing that 
hard pitches, him muddy ones 
and ideal ones, axe afi there to be 
mastered. “You have all the 
elements to contend with but 
obviously ft was difficult for the 
players to keep their feet at 

times,” the Wimbledon man- 

ager said. 


Wimbledon’s best spell had 
come early in the second half! En . 
the space of five minutes, Cork 
struck an upright, Fairweather 
had a header cleared off the line 

by Handlings and Winterbum 
was itemed by a deflection 
which helped ha vicious swerv- 
ing shot over foe bar. The name 
of Fairwealher was hardly ap- 
posite in the conditions, but ft . 
bad been through their lively left 
winger that Wimbledon 
made most of (heir progress, 
such as ft was. 

W WW I no w: D Sonant; K Gaga, N 
Wintarbum, S GaSsrs, M Manic. Mante, 
S Enna. A Co*. I Hoft>«r (pix D Wtaol. 

LSmtaz,CFttwMfttt 

■WOHTQIfc P Digwowt C Hutchings, S 
G*«ng. DWa^E Young. GtmiSy.D 
Saundara. S Panray. A Btay, T Comer, S 
Jacobs, 

RafacMkiD AxttKSouthamg. - 


WEEKEND RESULTS AND POOLS CHECK 


ntSTBMSKM: Coventry Cfey 3. 


Southampton at (Jwpool <L Evwibn 2; 
Msichasttr United 3. Waal Bromwich 


AMon ft Quoan'a Park Rangers 1. Luton 

Town. 1; Sheffield ttMnesdn 1. Totten* 

■ — Hotspur 2, — * 

W* Aston 


Arsenal v 

Ipswich Town; 


G8y v d n nl ngtisn i CUr. Osftrd 
safe OnUsd; WHtord v 


United v Newcsate .... 

HrtJtoBhnm great West HWi Ufiltod r 

Portsmouth 1. OB- 
hM AtMUc £ State C*r a Chariton 
ft Wtattedon 0, Brighton a 
tefc Bradford City v Lews Untett 
United vHdCfr Futoam s 
H«Mjurn Rover*; Grtoubv Town v 
Bamtera MdAttiraute v Sheffield 
United; itewal v GyatJfW* Horwteti 
Qty vHuOdereWd Town; Sunderind v 
StvmnburyTowri. 

tw» mot: Bolton Wanderers 4. 


(toted: Peterborough v Heratord United; 
Rochdale v Buntey; WAwcghem v South- 
und Unted 

SCOTTISH PROBER DfVTSKM: Qtoc 1. 

Hearts i; Dundw Untod 1. Rangers 1; 

Hbemtan ft Aberdeen t; St Reran 1, 

Dundee 2. P c tto aee it. Clydebank. v 

Mothww t 

SCOTTISH HRST omSKM: Airdrie ft 
Parade TNefe ft Morton 3, Brechin 2. 
n a m pona n Aloe Athteie v Dumbarton: 
Ayr v Forfar East Rfe v Huntton 
Aeedetufca*; Fate* v Ntaamocto Mte- 
trosa v Clyde, 

SCOTTISH SECOND OMfeOlfc Arfcvoatft 
0. Cowdenbeath 1; Queen s Park ft Ess T 
Stktngft Straw AUon 3, Stenhousamuir 
2. Postponed: Abton Rovers v Queen Of 


tte South; Bererich Rangers v Stranraer: 

» » J 


Dunfermline * Sf Johnstone; 
Meedowbank v Ralth Rovers. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Planter dMatoos 


EEBBBBBB jjaBSBg 


BtegpodftChaeMraslBl, Derby Coirtv 
ftegKteBolJfery ft Swanaea City ft 
Reedtog 3. Itoahinaad Brantford v Lh- 


1» 


wwwMjran ma nov era: WWMqite 

WWTH Crewe AtemnOi 2. 

gw«r Oy ft Preston North B to ft 
gwtoten Town 3. P netoened. AMenliot v 

Smwnem. Rwsra ; Hsraspod Unfed v 
Taquay: ManaSaH Town v Scuratwpn 


■HGmeaand v Fofcstone: Wtorftd 
v Raher. —dteail ffieteloas rw— »«ft tr 

vessA ssnunnE 

HOty ft Oorabaatar t. Bunmm md 


MULTHUn- LEAGUE: Caernarfon 2, 
Gaktewadft Rhyl ft Worksop 1; Working 

iis fflaajsRgsS 

ityde 2. 

CENTML LEAGUE Fhst dUetoa 
Bmnon ft Manchester Unfed ft 
FOOTBALL COHEMATON: Chelsea 1. 
wntoni v. Southampton 2. OPR ft Luton 
T, Oxford Unfe d ft 

GREAT MILLS WEST8W LEAGUE: Pra- 
nter dtefukn 8smstapte 9 Ma&eham ft 
Ctevedon 0 MengonaeU United 1: 
Danish 0 Taunton L&mouft 2 Bristol 
Cay ft Frame 2 Shepton MaM 1; 
Rymouth Arwts 6 Palm Rovers ft 
Tbntagn 3CWd ft Waston super Mara 

VAUXWULl 0HEL LEAGUE: Piaafer ffi- 
vteter Harrow ft HfeWn ft Tooteg and 
Mtehan ft Fsmborauah 2; WMSanstow 
ft Cnhteon ft FtefdhrtetoR Mtidon- 
head Unted 0, Hampton 1. Second 
dMaten aortte Hayferidga Swifts 1. 
Wotvenon i. Second omaton e oegt 
Marlow 1. SotshwkK 2; Motasey 1. 
T; Pet er ifl eM Unfed i. 


Unfed 

1. 


ney Comer S. ... 

CnonvRe ft Portadown ft I 
FA VASE: State rowoefc Warrington ft 
Huctowl CW 1;.SouM ft Stovmege 
BoraO . 

NORTH WEST COUNIEB LEAGUE: PWt 
dMaton: Buracowh 0, Cftherea ft neet- 
woed a Leak 2: FWot Cable ft Ptamte 
ft RsdcMIa Bora ft Boote T; at Hatam 2. 


Full back’s two goals 
eliminate Stevenage 


ByPudNewmaa 


Tt is more than mere co- 
incidence that Luton Town are. 
heading for their highest ever 
League position in their first 
season of Maying on an artificial 
pitch at Kenilworth Road. The 
ex p l anation , accordin g to David 
Pleat, Luton’s "wtngpr, is that 
his team's skills haver been 
improved bv the surface. So, 
since Queen s Itorlc Rangers are 
the only other League -team 
housing a synthetic mtefi.- 
Saturday’s game at Loftns Road 
should have been throbbing 
with quality. 

Ear from it As an advertise- 
ment for the game’s most 
controversial product.' it was 
like watching a trailer for Topttf 
the Pops ; with foe sound, turned 
dowrotix perfoiraerrwere lush- 
ing aroond Ml over the ptacebut 
were failing to. get through; to 
lhcxT- audience 
“You would be' stocked,” 
Pleat said, “at .foe number of 
dubs who have asked us about 
synthetic pilches.” Shocked in- 
deed. Any of those enquirers 
who were watching here' might 
now be thinking again. 

A good game can often be 
measured fry the ntntiber of 
saves foe goalkeeper* have to 
make and both Barron and 
Sealcy had finfe to do on that 
scare. Luton’s shooting was so 
w ayw ar d that; of their half- 
dozen a t te mpt s at goal in the 

tazgrtf^Even the stoT^from 
Harford, which Wicks splen- 
didly headed off the line, had to 
be deflected on course by 

NewetiVkoce: 

Clearly missing the injured 
Stein, who wfll be out for some 
time, Luton looked even less 
likely to score after die Interval 
but did so thanks to a moment’s 
inspiration from Harford. Ris- 
ing above McDonald, the Luton 
forward* j. header was goal- 
bound before Newell stole m to 
add the finishing tooeb. " 

In the industrious H3I, who 
looked worth his after-match 
call-up to tire England squad for 
WedtKsdayV game in fared, 
and the ubiquitous Thomas, 
who is probably second only to 
Sansom, of Arsenal, among-foe 
nation’s fail, backs,. Luton had 
the two best players on view. 

It came -as some surprise, 
therefore, when Rangers took a 
35th numite 

Byrne’s low shot after Wi 
had headed down. A mmnte 
later Sealey saved magnificently 
from Byrne’s header, but these 
two efforts were the only ones of 
note from Ranges. 

Luton had won on each of 
their three! previous visits to 
Rangers since the laying of 
Omnituif arid again looked the 
side mare likely to mhe maxi- 
mum points. Apart from Wicks 
and the occasional raid by 
Feneday down the wing, it was 
tiie sort of Rangers’ perfor- 
mance to give the dubs beneath 
them hope of first division 

survival. 

No wonder Jim Smith, their 
manager, when asfcfd to com- 
ment on the failure of Bobby 
Robson to keep his appoint- 
ment at foe match, replied: “He 
wasn’t a bad judge, was be?* 
OUB9TS PARR RANOBlte p Bmn. A 
mggk us**. » we*, s t 

ftferfcfc M Fteiy. M Aten. Q Bungte. J 
BwnftW Faraday. 


armlocfc mano euv re. Only two 
Austrians, Peter Reiter, the 
former E uro pe an silver medal 
winner, and Thomas Haasman 
in ttac final, were able to take 
McSorley to' full time, hut he 
-feBed them both with throws 
which , brought pert-scores. The 
two kadmg internati onal stars 
of the evenftFeter Seisembacher 
tAustmV the Olympic and 
world nuddlewcighi champion 
and Robert Van de WaUe, the 
Enropan' fight heavyweight 
champion, aimiably despatched 
all opposition 

RSSULTB: BtetMRNtaM fund* 60 tat 

Adstwad ^Enflfc ft W Suchamui 

fthtowr 

■ • 75 loot j. u 
2, r < %ssmwi 
nferOSkg): l.P. 

. -JrtStakl.RVtei 
ft B mdrihinan' 

essszss^ 95Kir . , - ,: 


CROSS-COUNTRY 


Fourth in 
a row 
for Jones 

^fiComqofldeiit 


- ' Steve Jones, Britain ’* leading 
marathon runner, gained his 
fourth consecutive wm when he 
retained his Welsh cross-coun- 
try title at Cardiff Jones, who 
also led Newport to a convinc- 
ing team win, finished more 
than half a minute dear, cover- 
ingihe 122 km 36 min. 43 sec. 

His victory brings his record 
of Welsh titles to nine and he 
was subsequently chosen to lead 
khe country’s team in the world 
(championships in Switzerland 
on March 23. 

Angela Tootsy of Cardiff 
her third victory when 
retained her women's title, 
.rever; this year she shared 
the honours with her twin sister 
Susan as they crossed the line 
■together at the end of the 
5,000m race in 17 min 58 sec. 

-j Competing over a firm 12 Ion 
(course at Irvine, Nat Muir of 
Shettlesura also retained his 
Scottish senior men’s title in 37 
■min 3sec- It was also Us fourth 
'successive victory and foe sev- 
enth Scottish title for Muir, who 
was selected but did not com- 
pete for Britain in last summer’s 
European Cup finaL Neil 
Tennant of Luton was second 
five seconds behind. 

WELSH CHARnONSMPSe (Cwififfc 
38^ min 43 mc; 

Su? VW JS? tor ^ £ D 9* ,r *l 87-ft ft N 

Atenwj (Swansea) 37.4 ST®wk 1. Now- 

* 'Js ywjwyJ vgutt ATooby 
and S Toofay (Carfeni7 nfe 68 
«C ft L MBddtaoi (doteyn Bay) 1US 
TM^grdHIWpftftaai T^ft 

SCOTTISH CHAHPK3NSHPS: (faMt 

ft ** Twwara JUfen) fo* ft c 
ran (Btetygh Sotteam} 37J8. 
Effintxagh Southern Hantora. 


LACROSSE 

England near 
to getting 
right balance 

By Peter Tatlow 


Philadelphia and June seem 
^ foray, tot the thought of the 
■ Cn P there drove 

LnglaiuTs women on to an all- 
weafoer pitch on Saturday. The 


the 


event It was foe 


EASTERN LEAGUE: 
WteHKh SJterMeh and P 1 . 

HALLS BREWERY IEUJEMC LEA8U& 

Skat Piaafer ffintalMeapcSacaari tank 
Pajpcus Juniors 0, Abradon unfed ft 
NEWS GROUP UMTED COmtffiS 
LEAGUE: Planter d hta tei i i BucMngtnro 
1. StotfoidtL 

NORTHERN COUNHES EAST UfeGUE: 
PraotardtafatoR: Boston ft Staton Town 


Southall are through to the tome victory over Hnekuall u m 

FA Vtott Cofifay^ Welfare (Notts Alii- R^^j^rth(Ufeeswa 
thanks to Knth James, a full ance). Both sides began cau-. «« 
back with an eye for goaL James tiously, but once Dolan had put WflPT! HO 11A1VC 

•ttnmlr twine cm Ratnrrlav tn sfv*> Wamiwlnn in • fmni «htSrtlu ’ ’ v AAw TT 9 


NQRTHBBt COUtfTIES EAST LEAGUE: 

SraKvteF f * *= * 




LEAGUE: Bate ft BoMon 0; 
Samar ft Itatorauu 

. 1 0: NoraiMCll 0, Wopnoutt 1; 

Runcorn 0. KkMamiremr ft 






BracknMI. 

RtflN LEAGUE: Banoor ft OWMri ft 
Newy 1. Unfloklft 

bASS RffiHCUP: Saeaari manft Arts 4, 
Qrusafera 1; SatedareCom l.Gterfeiwi 
1; Siuuutl ft Sanbrtdn Tam 0; 
Cerrick o. Dundaia Ct Cotarakw ft 
Balymena 1; pungnron Swita a Cten. 


SUSSEX SENIOR CUP: ftoorte raoate 
Bognor Raglaft ra abou m a ft 


ESSEX SENIOR LEAGUE: Santor a 

Pont IMtad 0. Wteam i. j 
LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE* ■ 
dtv rttoir Y aaJng4, riaarnniiftail 1 M 
gwrogqUQHS HOR THERH LEAGUE; 
|F*K dMatoce Spampnoor ft Bten^am 


1. 


1 1 J. 

n S S 


m 




B 


i 


a* 

ll 


mg 


struck twice on Saturday to give 

Southall a 24) victory over 
Stevenage Borough, one of the 
favourites to wm the com- 
petition, in front of a crowd of 
more than 1,000. 

Soothafl, from the VauxhaU- 
Opel League second division 
south, took the lead after 23 
minutes, when Stevenage failed 
to dear a comer and James shot 
home from 20 yards. After 84 
minutes Tyler handled the ball 
in the Stevenage penalty area 
and James scored from the spot 
to take his tally far the season to 
10. Tyler was sent off after the 
game for arguing with the 
referee on the way to. the 
dressing rooms. 

Warrington Town (North 
West Gounties League), watch-' 
ed by a crowd of more thaw 
1,200, had a comfortable 3-1 


front shortly 
tiie result was 
tardy in doubt. Price and 
Kinsey increased the lead in the 
second half before Hodman 
scored a consolation goal in the 
dosing minutes. 


is good news 


Aizlewood call 


Marie Aizlewood, tire 
Chariton Athletic captain, has 
been called into the Welsh 
-squad for their international 
much with Saudi- Arabia in. 
Jedda tomorrow. He is In line ' 
for -his' fim cap because Hughes, 
of Manchester United, and Yan 
Den Hauwe, of Everton, have, 
dropped, out. with -injuries. 
Aizlewootfs selection means 
that Chariton's sccond.dfvision 
match will! Wimbledon tomor-' 
row has been postponed. 


Billy Bin gham, The 

of Northern Ireland, \ 

blessed the weather which has 
left unscathed his plans for his 
side's first World Cup warm-op 
match against franc* in Paras 
on Wednesday. 

‘‘N? "£*** to be good 
news , amgnam said as the 
teleptone stayed sfient on the 

eve of foe first Irish game since 
they ^ confirmed titetrplace in 
Mexico agamst England last 
November. 


but the candidates, e$- 
front of the chairman of En- 

Tbenew Eo^and squad are 
“ defence with an 

SSSlJl? 0 ‘iff 6 ^ er awl more 
PMetianng foan the side who 

i^wSdcS” 81 ™' “ the 

Barbara Dootson, Claire 
JHSJl J ^ a Gwforide, Anne 

second WorldCup 

tlS. Sf JjSrttafl « me 


* 


rtl 


Run 

tiier 


f 

p :■ 


Cl 







. pyFhffipNicksia 

r wy s mStl the relative wcak- 
foethrowiag skills of 
Nefl Edwrsley, the Olymptc 
bantso nw ei ^ it bronze medal 
winner, was revealed as to was 

to to satisfied with a 
consolation bronze medal at the 
1^5 Scottish open chsmpion- 

ships at Meadowbank Stadium, 
Edinburgh, on Saturday. 

He set oat as he bad planned, 
by working hairi, to throw-ha 
exponents rather than rdying, 
as usual, on h» capable ground- 
woriqand he won his first two 
its p gRmrt Owen Lowry (En- 
id) and Jan Waagetin (Swe- 
) with a succession of good 
throws. 

Bui his expected advance 
towards the final was checked by 
tiie Josef Fidter, the Austrian, 

whom ironically Erimdcy had 
arm-focked so comfortably in 
the world championships last 
year. How different was the 
story of tiie Martin MdSoney. 
He bad two mod reasons for a 
subdued perform an ce: a recent 
knee injury and a five-day-old 
marriage: But the Scottish Ijght- 
middDeweigKift8ged2l, was an 






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RACING 


Puncbesiown suffered three 
losses over the weekend. Fu»- 
ly, Saturday's meeting was 
postponed until Monday and 
ujen abandoned, while yester- 
day the executive also had to 
cad off the Kildare Hunt 
point-to-point which would 
nave been run inside the wswn 
track. 

At first sight this would 
appear to rule out any pros- 
pect of Paddy Mu llins getting 
another preCbeltenham race 
into his Gold Cup mare Dawn 
Run. However, a Racing 
Board spokesman revealed 
yesterday that discussions 
were taking place to transfer 
two of the Punchestown fea- 
ture events, the Diners’ Cob 
Chase and the Ladhroke's 
National Trial, on to 
Wednesday's meeting at 
Leo par dst own or Tipperary 
on Thursday should racing be 
possible there. 

Faddy MulKns’ wife, Mau- 
reen, said yesterday “If the 
Diners* Club sponsorship is 
run anywhere in Ireland in the 
course of the next ten days, we 
would be happy to send Dawn 
Run there.** 

There is, however, still a 
serious doubt about the pros- 
pect of racing at 
Leopardstown where there 
was two heavy night hosts 
over the weekend and where it 
would not have been possible 
to race on Saturday. 

Maureen Mullins discount- 
ed the idea though that her 
husband would be unduly 
upset at not getting another 
piece of steeplechase experi- 
ence into Davm Run. She said, 

" You wifi remember when 


Correspondent, Dublin 

JJ*ddy was interviewed after 
Cheltenham last month that 
he then suggested he would 
not look for another preGold 
Cup outing for her. That of 
coarse was before her owner, 
Chamrian Hill, deckled to 
change jockeys and to replace 
Tony with Jonjo O’NdlL This 
was the factor that prompted 
Faddy to decide to send Dawn i 
Run for the Diners* Qub. 
Chase to give Jonjo an oppor- 
tunity of renewing acquaint- 
ance with Dawn Run**. 

According to Maureen 
M u llin s, Dawn Run has done 
particularly well in recent 
weeks and that thanfcg to their 
ail weather gallop it has been 
possible to keep her in steady 
work daring the freezeup. It is 
an indication, though, of how 
little rain Ireland has had' 
since the beginning of the 
month that tbe aftwsaiher 
gallop had to be watered ai the 

weekend. 

Mrs. Hill herself continues 
ip play a past in the prepara- 
tion for Cheltenham and last 
week paid one of her regular 
visits to the stable to ride her 
in work. At 65 years of age, 
Mrs. Hill must be one of the 
most redoubtable women 
owners in National Hunt rac- 
ing. 

She has had her share ofbad 
falls since becoming the first 
woman to ride against men 
under rotes both in Britain 
and Ireland. It is perhaps 
indicative of her approach to 
life that on the last occasion 
she had a holiday abroad, she 
and her doctor husband elect- 
ed fora two-week hiking tour 
in the Himalayas 


Raymond suspended 
until end of May 




iUrin; 

a row 

if JoRi 


Brace Raymond, the British 
jockey, has been suspended until 
the end of tbe seasoo by the 
Royal Hong Jockey Qnb folloiv- 
mg BnesbafisH by the In- 
dependent Coffl m gdw Against 
Corruption (ICAQ. Eight other 
jockeys have received a «nrii»r 
tan rati] May 31 and two more 
have been banned until March 6. 

Derek Kent, tbe former Sus- 
sex-bused trainer, has had Ms 
temporary suspension lifted bat 
Che top local tramer, Derek 
Cheng, has been barred until 
June 30. All those detained, by 
the JCAC last Thursday have 
now been released- da boil rue- 
tag from £<500 to £90,000. 

Michael Sandberg, the chair- * 
man of tbe jockey dub, wbo ftevr 
from Australia for yesterday** , 
emergency meeting, said that he 
welcomed the JCAC inquiry bat 
thought it would be difficult to 
eradicate tbe problem. 

"What has been happening is 
rather like a malignant growth— - 
a cancer — and cancers fre- 



Raymomt banned for rest of 
the Hong Kong season . 

qnentiy regnire ' surgery,*" he 
said. "Getting to tike roots wO) 
not be easy." : 


No respite in sight 


The arctic spell continues to 
cast its icy shadow over racing 
and the number of meetings lost 
to the weather this season seems 
sure to lop the 100 mark before 
the end of this week. Today*® 
cards at Doncaster and Leicester 
were both called off yesterday 
and tomorrow's meetings at 
Kelso and Nottingham both fell 
by the wayside yesterday, bring- 
ing the total lost to 92. 

David McHaig, the Kelso 
clerk of the course, who had 
been optimistic about staging 
tomorrow’s card at one time last 
week, said; "There is snow on 
the course and in view of tbe 
hopeless weather forecast we 


have decided to abandon the 
meeting." 

Stewards will’ inspect the 
course at Wetherby at 430 
today to decide the fate of 
Wednesday's meeting. 

• The European team of Les- 
ter Piggott, Pat Eddery, Willie 
Carson and Yves Saint-Martin 
finished test of three with 21 
points in the second round of 
the Ritz Club challenge trophy 
in Penang yesterday. The round 
was wan py the expatriate team, 
which incf cries Ernie Johnson, 
with 34 points. The third and 
final round will be staged in 
Hong Kong on Wednesday and 
Saturday. " . 


Johnson Houghton is 
hoping for better year 

By a Special Correspondent 


By his own high standards, 
Fuike Johnson Houghton, the 
trainer, had an extremely dis- 
. appointing season in 1985. His 
Woodway stables, nestling in 


reeks is Shanriyda, who 
is by Sir Ivor. “ She has grown 
into a lovely filly and l know she 
has a lot of ability," said her 
handler. 


wooaway susuics, ukwu'5 . “*■ 

the folds of the downs high A couple of the Agas colts 
above the Oxfordshire village of worth following are NOambar 
Blewbury, was ravaged by a and KadiaL NBamhar, a half; 
virus which at one stage forced brother to Naseem, was second 
him to dose down for two at York last season. He s a big 
months. sort and will get I Vi mite. He 

The yanTs total of 17 winners could tie a classic contender, 
was wd3 below normal, and the KadiaL a halfitirotber to Kafim, 
whole season was like a bad has shown Johnson Houghton- 
dream to the man who trained enough at home for him to say: 
champions like Ribocco. “He could be the best of my 
Ribera. Habitat, Ribofibo, Hot coJul He wD aofora one mfie 
Grove, Be De Bourbon and maiden and then go on tram 


Double Form. — _ . 

Now, Johnson -Houghton is Other promising uiree-ycar- 
anxions io wipe out the memory olds are Floral Charge, runner- 
of that nightmare with a team of op to Comtne LEtoue at 
65 horses free of any viruses. “ Doncaster on the final day of the 
I Last year was totally frustrating, season, Frangnlto, and 
* The vims hung around for so Satiapoar. 

long that there were a lot of Myth, a daughter ofTroy, was 


there." 

Other 


oumpuaua 1 1 

long that there were a wi or Myth* adaughterofTroy, was 

hones I just couldn't gel on the placed in each of her four l 
course. Tie said. , efforts, but threw away winning 


xkob. ine norees a straigm „ 

wmteredweUaadIe*KiMnoibe of the nnraced brigade, the 
more pleased with them,** be t rainer picked out Kahuubnya* ■ 
said. Good Natareri, Duncan Idaho, 

Bui don't expect any early and ibe Roscoe Blake filly. Eye 
fireworks fromthe Bfewbury Sight, as likely winners this 
framer. As l* explains: “1 tike 10 s atnm er, 

-give my bones plenty of time. The older horses are sprat; 
" and wc never ett going properly headed by KSnnaaa* now aged 
until May. I fike them to be five, who will reappear to ®J“et 
flying at around Royal Ascot" the Jockey Ctab Cu^ wbita be 
The 45-yearoM trainer ex- won 

sawstta: : 

a'aafirsrjB 

Gumms. Se is owned by tbe oldandMtlyaOT«»™itw«test 
Aga Khan, who also has high yw. Johnson Hougtonm^m 
• hope* of Stakmx-n* trainer SaMM* p 
-• “ Shatana had tbe virus tbou&bt she ^ PJ* 

. h badly «d J was only able to 

give hx one race. She did very and her trip i 

■ ^finishing second at Ascot, 

and 1 tlnfcae could be very ^S>-v ear-olds will take j 

■ aray&'RSSSs:! 

■ fiffic$ u> tsar; iu mind io the type* . y. 


MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1 986 


SPORT 


Dawn Run may get 
another crack at 
Diners’ Qub Chase 


LA CREME DE LA CR] 


ECCO 


EMPLOYMENT AGENCY LTD 

Dear Temp, 

Are you looking for peanuts instead of 
caviar? 

We pay the top rates and holiday pay for 
W.P. operators, secretaries and typists. 

Call Angela Buckley for West End 439 
831 1 or Rachael Block for City 920 0866. 

Olivetti 10/10, 20/10 W.P. OP’s especially 
welcome. 

Temping could even become enjoyable. 


INTERESTED IN 
PERSONNEL 
£9,500 


A LIFE OF 
LEISURE 
£10,000 


Join this wed known company, coteety Based in Covent Garden, our client, 
connected to the newspaper industry heavily involved in the leisure field 
as secretary to their assistant stair seeks a secretary to assist and 
relations manager. ITUs position is deputise for the office manager. Help 
60% administrative end wifi be an ex- organise conferences. PR functions 
ceflent springboard and teaming poet and administrative systems. This is a 
for a career in personnel and industrial new position with great scope for de- 

skills needed. 


for a career in personnel and industrial new position wr 
relations. An 'A' level education and velopmenL 100, 
100/50 skills needed. 


Oy 

01300359 


Elizabeth Hunt 

a amamantr/wfevOf 


Wag End 
01-2403531 


Get better with Manpower 

Temporaries who are already pretty good when they join, find 
they get even better with Manpower: 

Developing wider skills through our free training including 
W/Ps and personal computers. Even more interesting (and 
challenging) work. Even better pay and conditions. 

- •Senior Secretaries 
• W/P Secretaries • PA's 

^ Get an even better working Dfe by cqIBng Manpower now. 

O MANPOWER Tel: 225 0505 


Temporary StiffSc 


JMhour answering service 


- PROPERTY PARAGON W8 * £32,000 * 

Keep track of this busy man’s fife and ideas. A genuine 
opportunity for an intelligent personal assjsianL Car 
driver. Non-smoker. 

• PA/OmCE MANAGER - WI * ejaO.000 * 
Small, engineering company, part of a larger 
organisation, require experienced person with knowl- 
edge of bookkeeping, preferably on a com paler. 

• PA/SECRETARY TOR GREEK EXECUTIVE - 

SWI * £10.000 * ■ 

Confident with good skills and eoquiring mind you 
will find scope for future development with this mL ca 

• IBM DtSPLAYWRITER EXPERT? CAN YOU 
TEACH OTHERS? 

Merchant Bank EC2 seek fina class operator (75% of 
gfjU Reportpack and some shorthand. Salary to 


* FILM A VIDEO PRODUCTION * £KSW • 
Based in Covent Carden this super company needs 
help. You must be a skilled WP operator (IBM 
Displaywriter - we will cross-train) with shorthand or 
•audio. 

* INTEREST IN PROPERTY? - ECT * £8,000 * 
Partner .'who surveys buildings needs audio 
smwary/WP operator (IBM Displaywriter - we will 
crass- train) 

* WORD PROCESSING TRAINING * 

* IBM DISPLAYWRITER • IBM DtSPtAVWRITE 2 AND 3 • 

• wano * as • multimate • Wordstar • 

WORD ASSOCIATES 

RECRUITMENT AND TRAINING 
CONSULTANTS 

01-377 6433 


SENIOR SECRETARY 

£ 10,000 

Scvrvtatv nwUmi tor u* Snuor Partner w > wett-known ton* 
of idkib liwjm In Central London, anllnl wMlunt condi- 
tion* wUh own room, audio and word processor. Must Be wcil- 
oroantied and rfdcMM and at*)* to deal <Mr«coy wttn clients. 
PtcutM. pioa&e un« e.i. and luU detaUi to: 

Box 77 

The Tmw IHnnusKn 
P.O. Box «u 
vmnnia Street- London El 


LEISURE GROUP PA 
£9,000 - 

London's most prestigious Insure and 
restaurant group is offering the oppor- 
tunity to join one of their busy 
General Manager! Yout vand day of- 
fering total involvement, will suite a 
friendly and flexible personality. If you 
have some knowlegdge of French, with 
$h. and audio skills of 80/50, then con- 
.lact Melanie Laing. 

EXECUTIVE PA 

£ 11,000 

Full involvement to include 60% ad- 
ministration whilst assisting this 
dynamic lop level executive. A coordi- 
nating role with scope for 
development and substantial confiden- 
tial work re acquisitions for this highly 
successful promotions group. If you 
are 25-30 years with skills of 90/60 
wprfi and superb presentation contact 
Carol Daniels. 

FASHION PA 
£9,500 

Assist young and. dynamic MD of this 
small rasbion/giftware company (WI) 
and enjoy a varid and hectic day - 
meet and great clients, organise 
lunches/meeimgs, telephone liaison 
plus all ad hoc projects. If you are 23+ 
yrs with excellent sec skills (90/50) and 
a flexible and friendly personality con- 
tact Suzanne Rubens. 

01 631 t54t'Rec*Cons* " 

Price -Jam eson 


WHISKY MAC 
| French/Spanish 

Export Marketing Dept 
of well known spirit co 
requires 2 bihreuial sec- 
retaries t > with French & 
Spanish, the other with 
French*. Lots of travel 
arrangements & admin 
together with normal sec- 
retarial duties. Salaries to 
£8050. 

AUDIO P.A. 
£9,000 + Perks 

Senior Fanner of leading 
Mayfair Property Co 
seeks 1st class Audio PA 
to organise his hectic 
schedule. Variety of du- 
ties & involvement with 
administration. Age 25- 
33. 

BOND ST. BUREAU 
xa sm* hwm n. m 


1692 62? 5580 


629 3692 


EXECUTIVE 
SOUTH OF FRANCE 

Bond with me EflpttUi 
WMIWTI TlmusM cl mm uig 
iomtaouui«rFrtiK«? Fund- 
Mr pcnon ZM. good trim or 
numour. rramrni to Or com- 
panion to rnttnu M Yhr 
housr. Lienl luutehokl tfu- 
bM. Driving Keener, good 
French and ru«ly ijrnng 
necawy. 

Ptraw mw wan CV and 
Pl tol otraWi to: 


RESIDENTIAL 

NEGOTIATOR 

; Rroutmi rorwjw CMtanof- 
«r . AcfWang aho w di nave 
a mOiooM. hiimuhk 
ano amtnuwn totnudr Pgr- 
imu* Mprrwncc H rt Wrt. 
n npiiraiuinc ihniivi mrTnrir a 
C.V. 

ftratv » box con 


SECRETARY/ 

. PROPERTY 
NEGOTIATOR 

-For young success- 
ful firm of Fulham 
Esuue Agents. 

TeL- 73$ 9822 


PART TIME 
SECRETARY 

Smart and well spo- 
ken candidate 
required for inter- 
esting position in 
the City. 5 after- 
noons per week. 
Age: 25-40. Contact 
Anthea Symms. FT 
Partnership, 70 Old 
Broad Street, Lon- 
don EC2M IQS. 

01-623 1053 


PA /SEC 

£9,000 + 
FASHION 

Mature capable PA to 
work at Chairman level, 
for young expanding 
fash ion/i rumor design 
Co. Lois of scope, chal- 
lenge and variety, for an 
ambitious person. 

Call Louise Hammond 
on 

602 3012 

Staftpian Rec Cons. 


SMALL FRIENDLY 
WEST END 
QUANTITY 
SURVEYORS 

Rrotm&rcnUfywm, srtwr 
of numour and outoouM dot 
wrcrttw. Agra IMS me** 
witto riwujnng ful) CV ia 
Mtt* Boom. TWEEDS, a 
VllgnMn Am, London. 

wih gee 


2 SECRETARIES 

2 war*d wr QfgtmKmd 
Consuttanry onirr m Lanran- 
Wr Cto afi» Thr tmor 
US.000 Id C1OO0O9 should 
hh» IQ swan Mpmmcr 
ana tor waUni tefjOOO la 
£3000] S vrm. Both xbauld 
»•' **•» Ktmu typing. 
AMbrananff to- 


AMERICAN LA W FIRM 

Specialising in Trademarks and Copy- 
right seeks bright mature 
Secretary/Personal Assistant io help run 
small friendly office in the Hoibom area. 

Competitive salary according to age and 
experience. 

Call Mr Stevenson 01-404 0456 

i No Agcnnn) 


MEDICAL SECRETARY 

Required for Consultant of busy private Hiszo- 
paihologica! Laboratory. To work as a team 
with two other experienced secretaries. Accu- 
rate and fast audio. Good telephone manner. 
Shorthand an advantage. Must enjoy hard 
work, be conscientious and have a sense of 
humour. Good salary negotiable. Four weeks 
annual holiday. 01-723 1288 cxi 174 


RESIDENTIAL LETTING 

Character body with humour, patience and 
determination needed to join small team run- 
ning residential properties near Sloans 
Square. Secretarial skills are not of para- 
mount importance. Common sense Is. 
Everything negotiable. We want the right per- 
son to be happy. 

Telephone Mrs Maria Ripper 01-730 2144 


SHORTHAND SECRETARY 

Looking for a new challenge? Want to 
work in friendly and informal atmo- 
sphere with Chartered Acccountanis who, 
despite everything, have kept their sense 
of humour. 

Accurate typing essential. Olivetti elec- 
tronic typewriter. Salary £8.500+ 
Telephone Jeffrey Zinkin on 01-262 2641 


PA TO FASHION MD 

Dynamic MD of a young and fast moving interna- 
tional fash (on house needs a well spoken PA to 
track him up and stand in while he Is frequently 
abroad. The essentials are dedication, keeping 
your cool and dealing with a wide range of people 
and issues at shows and by telephone. A superb 
op perl unity for someone over 21 with drivers li- 
cence. Starling salary £8.000 4- attractive fashion 
allowance. Reviewed after 3 months to £8.500. 
Apply in writing with CV to Mtss Jones. Buzz 
Wear Ltd.. Blenheim House. 137 Blenheim cres- 
cent. London wxi 2EQ. 


ADMINISTRATOR/SENIOR SECRETARY 

To be key person In sman professional organisation near 
Baker Street. Fnencuy atmosphere in unpretentious mew* 
building. Adirilnutralive, organising experience essential. 
Age front about 28. Salary from £&300. For details and 
application form telephone: 

01-486 5786 

{No Agencies) 


LETTINGS NEGOTIATOR / MANAGER 

RMWM to ufce oner small ton growing Mllw depart- 
mow! in South W«M London. Prospective applicant wW 
toasBvneagraZ& .sOvnina a year, retmun experience 
and a broad knowledge of aU aspect! of miaeatial inline 

Basic salary LiO.Ooa pjc * gracraus caRinmton + car 
Wemnrr. 

CM W an t * Baanr an 81-7*5 T122 


♦♦PROMOTION SECRETARY** 

W. London Company dealing with advernsing/- 
en terrain merits seek organised secretary with 
excellent presentation to attend meetings etc. 
Must have 50/S0 skills. Mid 20's. £8.500 plus 
profit share. Please call Lucinda Cornell on: 
01-370 1562 Monroe Rec. Cons. 


SMATTERING OF LANGUAGES 
WITH WINE 


Rare opponunit* us join wtt know Wine CbIki rating 
secretary wnh*n> European languors- louse purl) coiloqui- 
ally. Eviensi'f travel nrzaatcmeius for VIP’s etc. Rusty 
Shorthand XL250 


583 1034 

MEREDITH SCOTT <n«* Omi 


BUSY ARCHITECT/DIRECTOR 

Of an expanding design company urgently requires a 
bright, enihusiaur PA secretary interesting and varied 
wwk_ normal secretarial skills and wp essential. Car driv- 
er. Salary negotiable. 

Please write with CV Ux 
Machin Designs Ltd. 

4 Avenue Studios. 

Sydney Close. London SW3 6HW. 


RECRUITMENT COUNCELLOR 

The success of our new West End office has neces- 
sitated an additional person to handle permanent 
business- The ideal applicant must have at least 6 
months agency experience and be aged in their 
early 20‘s. Salary negotiable. 

Please phone Derek Last on 
01 734 2921 

Kompass Ltd 

221-223 Oxford Street, WI. 


Solicitors 

Knightsbridge Top 
Rates 

We require an efficent and personable 
audio secretary for our busy commer- 
cial practice in modem, well equipped 
and well located offices. 

Applicants should be aged 20-40 and 
have good secretarial skills (not 
neccesarily shorthand) and be pre- 
pared to demonstrate iniatlve and 
enthusiasm. 

Consideration will be given lo appli- 
cants not previous experienced in 
legal work. 

Top rates of pay and conditions, com- 
parable to any in London. Reply to 
Mrs Sue Trewhella 01-236 0222 for 
interview. 



TOPS IN THE CITY 

INVESTMENT COMPANY £12,500 

EnMi Cwruinr wnn ■ wirknt *t>m* at numour pff-r, tun 
nr* imdirarM to * nigMfc hmmuni ntm toiwv. 
IMp run |4 rornpunurs MUiOtiN nmmnt from 
roiMutTTMliwi to titoftty ronfiomlui nwlim. from imito to 
rlami iianon BPOutilul oNirr MDorgot*. Agra WUan. 

AMERICAN BANK Package £12,000+ 

Vrrv touu f Nrw VnrL-r -.nh « lop rroonU Mvrnary lo 
hnp run pm mo ana in t<*r> imat Irrajurv <mtarfm>nl Lir 
your numour ana rttnrm lo m>m Ulk rlimts In men alfrn 
■war Mowwir SfcUH too 60 and Wang. Agr 26-55 


GERMAN USEFUL 


c£lO,50O 



Ml I 

I —it»a «2 


PERSONAL ASSISTANT £12,000 

Channing Director seeks an Assistant with fluent French. 

Toial involvement far those seeking a career. 60wpgi typing, 
aaz aw tout, i — i — . m. 


HtoWy papular Pirnamr Inimnouonal group MD n tor iturp 
pm nmh a partiur in mmr who win mu am noryming ■ 
niorrm. Mi-nt ar^nownu. mmiwniul auia pmorul 
Ihtoto- Poavwv tori- jour own nwnor snusmng orncrv to- 
rrrr my o*rr SO Mw wnn I IO oo tWrtncan. T tea I uni 11 
ana supra grain 

Love and Tate oi-2«3 om 


DIRECTORS* SECRETARIES 
TO £9,000 

Although IMs is an adtntnng ami PB agancy. not «ery- ' 
otto b rushing about bring ctcmiv*! We have two iscancm - 
for Directors' secretaries where rtrsi priority w|u be gi\rn 
to excellent shorthaful and word processing skills ' 
Addiuonaiy. one of ihe secretaries who win work tor the 
Chief Exeruuie and another director, win need an me 
discretion, diplomacy and commitlmeM Uiai go won a post , 
where highly con/idenaal and personal matters are part of ' 
Ihe day lo-day work. < 

The other vacancy K for a secretary lo two PR Directors ' 
They need your help as ihey cepe wnh enrol meetings, 
press conferences, news releases and Ihe 1.001 things Uiai . 
keep Iheir adrenalin flowing. 

Both secretaries win find that a in civ sense of humour will 
Ol in wnn [nose around mem and keep them pane during 
me more franiic moments' Ai irus let el of responsibtuy. 

5 30 will nol always be the last ttme you see on Ihe office 
dock. 

Please send your CV to Don Kenoady, SI laws* Corpp-- 
nrt* CaiMuHntfgas Lid, 4/7 Rad Um Coni, Flaat . 
Stmt, London EC4A 3EB. Tafophona. 01 M3 2S2S. 


IBM DISPLAYWRITER 
TRAINER 
£ 11,000 

This key appointment has arisen due to rapid 
growth within this professional organistaion. 
you will be based in Croxdon. Surrey. 

You will need sound expertise on the IBM 
Displaywriter with experience up to Report Pack 
standard. Excellent company to work for along 
with career progression. 

Please contact Paula Howe on 01-439 4001 
Office Systems Recruitment Services. 

115 Shaftesbury Avenue WC2 


LAUGHING ALL THE WAY 
TO THE BANK! 

SEC P. A is offered up la £.12.000 lor bkuh. education and 
Banking exp com mensural* with this salary <120 siu. Musi 
have seme of humour and hags of personality for this 
senior Oly Director Age 23-30tsh. 

PRESS AND PR ? 

YOUNG SECRETARY istt typj with excellent telephone 
manner for the wen-esteemed organisation involved in 
restoration and the environment. Good first Jobber round 
ered. Swi. 

W mi Mrs Of ianlhw 

NORMA SKEMP 

fw u —t Sarvteaa 

Ol 222 5091 * • 

moo Si James's Park Tubet 


RECEPTIONIST/TELEPHONIST 
£8,(X)0 pa 

Urgently required by City based firm of Solici- 
tors for general telephonist receptionist duties. 
Essential qualities: 

Smart and confident 
Well spoken 
Punctual and reliable 
Experienced on Monarch switchboard 
Knowledge of Italian useful 
Hours 9.20-6.00 pm 
Please call Mrs Newman 01-236 6000 

iNb 


THREE SENIOR 
SECRETARIES 

£9,000 pa plus fringe 

We are the European headquarters of an ex- 
panding. multinational computer software 
company and now require 3 lively, senior sec- 
retaries to join our team spirited office. You 
will be 25 + and have a good, working knowl- 
edge or office computer systems and word 
processing. Good secretarial (100/50) and 
administrative/organisational skills required. 
Knowledge of European languages, although 
not essential, would be an advantage. 

Call Ray Sheath on 01-785 0972. 

(No Dtari 


TRAVELLING 

SECRETARY/PA 

Top level executive Secreiary/P4 to work on 
an international basis with periods away, fre- 
quently extending up to four weeks. 
Candidates should be organised, adaptable and 
energetic with excellent skills (120/60) and 
education to at least A level standard. No lan- 
guages are required, but a good sense of 
humour, charm, and impeccable grooming are 
essential. Top remuneration to someone who 
is prepared to work hard. Age 25-30. 

Apply with CV to Box Cl 9. The Times. PO 
Box 484. Virginia Street. London E4. 


LIVELY AREA ORGANISER 
FOR R.N.L.L 

A lively Area Organiser and Secretary is urgently want- 
ed for the prestigious fund raising committee of this 
national charity in ii*s busy London headquarters. Ex- 
cellent administrative and secretarial skills are needed 
and there will be some out of hours work. The job 
includes co-ordinating fund raising events such as the 
annual London Ball. Must be able to work tinder pres- 
sure ai times and on awn initiative . Please ring Gina 
Majcndie on 01 928 5743. 


AMERICAN LAW OFFICE 

Seeks senior partners private secretary, f i J.00C. Mod- 
em offices, busy, brisk, efficient and friendly 
atmosphere in prime London West End location. Word 
processor knowledge desired or at least Willingness to 
learn. TV’s, 4 weeks holrda*. Current secretary retiring 
but willing to stay on and teach if desired. Large airy 
own room as work staikm. Preferred starring date May 
1st or earlier. 

Tmk 01-839 3226 Mrs. Dorothy Atkin 


FILMS. TV. 
VIDEO. MUSIC. 

03 

£ 10,000 . 

pa to help start ma- 
jor project. Very, 
'ery bright. 

60+ i J0+. 01-960 
6985 0516. 


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LACRJ 


CHELSEA DESIGNERS 

A cancer with a team of top Chelsea Designers 
awaits an organised secretary with drive and 
iniative who can cope with a demanding rote 
running an increasingly busy office. You must 
also be confident as tire job involves much client 
liaison. 


f Monday pay 
you don’t nave to 
pay foe 


Why should being a Temporary mean all 


work and no play when you can get full 
holidau oau with M acBkrin Hash? 


holiday pay with MacBlain Hash? 

Thai's right, full holiday pay. as if you 
were a full-lime employee. 

And utfufs more we wont ask you fora 
penny fou’anfc it. 

So if If pau you lo come in and see us soon. 
01-439 0601. TomrvTraTnr 


Recruitment CtnualUuiU. 3rd Floor Csrrtagtoa House. 
BO lUpgll Siw* Urajgl Wtg IFE. [Entrance in Renew PU 


INTERNATIONAL MODELS! 
ro £9.000 + 5 weeks hols. 


Prestigious, well-established Model Agency 
in Chelsea need experienced Sec to help 
run their office. You must be well present- 
ed yet down to earth with unflappable, 
adaptable personality. Skills 90/50. Age 21- 


We have excellent assignments 

with good rates of pay and paid holidays for: 


with shorthand and a 


Call Diane 
at Kelly Girl 
on 629 6821 


TBMKMMVHar 


COME OUT OF THE COLD 


Bask in the sunshine of our warm welcome, expert 
advice and the best Temporary Assignments in Town. 
We have a wide variety of super companies who wel- 
come our high cafibre Secretaries with or without WP. 
Top. top rates keep you glowing? 

~ 01-5B3 8807 dfe 


RBRumrar cokoltmtui tmitm ao*. rafrrhHii an 


IBM DISPLAY WRITER 
OPERATOR /SECRETARY 


Good knowledge of Displaywrfter essential 


Opportunity for dedicated secretary to work wtti a teren of 
consultants in a lively and stimulating firm of profession- 
als Salary £8.000 ■ £10.000 depending on age and 
werience plus profit sharing. STL. Life and Health 
Insurance. 


Tek Jenny Adams or JnKa Pearce 
01-430 11S1 (Hottsom Area) 


SENIOR 

SECRETARY 


InltnaMwm property dm* 
opmem com pany wuhofflra 
In Mayfair has a vacancy for 
a senior secretary lo 2 
Dtvttopmeni Ewrcinnes. 
Tins position is JvaDaow as 
front l«m Modi. Applicant 
imnl be experience d in UUS 
field and or settle agency 
■ and be able lo work on m n 
Ini damp. Own office. Write 
wttb CV ouoQng reference 
SPT/UD lo. 

21 Grafton StTM. 

London W1X -V n 


BANKING PA 

£9,000 + 
Mortgage 


Presuglaus CHy Bankers 
seek a brkdn profetManol 
S -hand Secretary to provide 
a run Sec A Admin support 
M 2 busy young Expcottvea. 
A mgh standard of presenta- 
tion is umxnant lo aaM me 

Col visitors a Chert*. 34, 
Mortgage. BUPA. ST1- Bo- 
nus *. Mrs May. Acme 
Anets. Ba Cannon SL EC*. 
Ol 633 BBSS. 


TRADE SHOWS 
£8000 


Promoaotuf adddes. reccn- 
uons. lots of people contact 
and organlemg to be done. 
Act as hou/an at various 
functions. ar r an ge a c co m mo- 
daUon for out of wm 
mectsoves Ben ex mu stems 
00/60. Pnsto si oi m pre s en - 
tatWB IM toe afatifty to deal 
won people M an mm abso- 
lutely necessa ry. 


£10,00 + BeBefits 


Working for sentar partner 
of small wen known 
OTftknisation handling 
International asstgnments. 
FlexfbUity and exnflent 
secretarial and 
Interpersonal skats ore 
essential. 


Contact jane Capon on 


Telephone 01 499 5406 


Susan Hamilton 
Personnel LTD. 


£ 10,500 


5*81. Georg? Street, wi. 


PWSec 29-30 (100/50) nth am- 
w« l»a RBtfH noenence m. 
tmtag mycr bams an adran- 
tage A pal deal tf jrttrtSfstai. 
(«y 3WM 20% sforona/ wpw- 
. tonal Cesnpem/Oly Ptoneffi-437 
BP6 a 01-734 3768, 133 (Wonl 
-Seat flee Ok 


MILLER 

MCNISH 


NOT SO MUCH 
A JOB, MORE 
A WAY OF LIFE 


FOW day week (Tuesday 
Friday! raquh-ed- 
Snutg. friendly 

•ramt/Hpon campB- 

ny. Salary negotiable. 
Shorttsana tmnda. 
Ww*** of French 
and Me* experience an 
Mwim - Own ofote 
la Georgian boa*. Bv<f _ 

f^dR^T-W’oneot. 


Opt business b aewtopmg 
Cast and we can offer, in a 
wefl educated (A level/ 
graduate). Wtfdy moUvat- 
cd. career oriented 
bKHvtfftial an opportunity 
as one of our consultants. 
If you und er s t a nd people 
and thrive on hard work 
wHim main ta in i n g your 
Mflse of humour and en> 
utusiaam you are an set for 
a career wm an aMMttful 


*a»ary package. 

Bernadette 
of Bond St. 

MofuviutuiCofvnftDiiti 
fcSU— ifHI iwuM 


THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


KNIGHTSBRIDGE £lZ00o 

The American Director of an exciting 
KnigniSbndge company needs an enlhusiastJc, 
efticienl secretary to support his work which 
involves the legal aspects of marketing in Eu- 
rope. Whilst good skills are essential, there is the 
opportunity to take on interesting projects. 
Friendly offices are a bonus for an ambitious 
individual. 


OKXIE IMG 


A CHANGE TO TRAIN 
£5,500+ 


A very special, young person is needed by this dynamic City 
bank to jeta their trading desk As the pslsr gofer you wH 
do erer/stwi tnom toe typing (40 *spn) and fftigto maUng 
(Ik odd cup of tea. A Mgplii persoraTity is esssn- 
tial to kaep up tfffh these m a dcap young chaps. 


A young up and coming computer company need a bdgtt, 
wwng ywng person with 9 good spwWng votes and plenty 
of common sense. They mfl ban you an e ve tythfcw: the 
swrtchboart cumputBr and WP. Accurate 1 35 wpm typing 
essentoL Excellent prospects otfored. 


Please Telephone: 01-499 8070 



Supercool PA 


aeor — the 
big plane for 


Do you bare the cool resilience of spirit that keeps you 
always on top? And can yon delegate effectively? 

Our client to ^ go-getting, robust entrepreneur — the 
C h ai r man of a major adv ei liau g group, with big plana for 
ag-renhe growth into new sectors. 

As his private HV you will look after both business and 
personal affelis, with the beb rifa secretary Skills 100/50. 
Age 244-. Salary £10,000. "MO 1-409 1232. 

R p iUl fl OWtM Fftewriahtentol 


Warm A^felcomes 


Excellent reception post for a well-spoken and smartly 
presented person with some typing (c40wpm). 


Handling front -desk duties for this prestigious senior 
level recruitment consultancy you wiO deal with clients 
and high grade professional candidates white looking 
after a small switchboard 


\bu should be well-educated ( min 5 CMevels) with some 
work e xp erience. Salary £9,000. Tel 01-409 1232. 


Rf U ' i lal t f nfinf f^ipff ij lyiVhi 


cnRounf wna 


FILMS 

c£8,500 

TJs smaB Rim Co based to Chebaa is lookaig for a mD- 


AMERICAN OIL COMPANY 
£1(1,500 


with audio and shorthand 

WP OPERATORS 

sspecially those with AES display write U or IBM . 

5520 experience : 


IT you mpy a last race and an international atmosahere, then 
ton the dynamo Orator MNa their super European Head 
Qu arters m WT. As Executive PA you wmarange numero us 
S* nns “5PS5*. VIP kmduons amt fodenswe atofael travel 
•raws. 100/60 sfofis e s senM . Age 2M5 years. 


Tetephone: 01-499 8070 


1 MrouwHiresasEnunw 


rGlHTSl 


JHy firm never looked back x- 
once we started to get ^ 

our temporaries j:J 

from ...9 y. ^ 


The first numbers to zing J V /I I /*-- 


PERSONNEL IN P.R. 
NO SHORTHAND 


Join this large international pubic relations consultancy 
in Wt as secretary to the Director at Hunan Re- 
sources. You Ml be involved in the running of the 
department, personnel admini s t ra t i on, assisting with 
training seminars, Baraon with all company staff and M 
secretarial support (auefio GO+wpm). Age late 30's. 
W.P. experience essential. Salary £10,000. Please cal: 

434 4512 


Crone Corkill 


RscnStn»nt Consuttants 

99 Regents Stmt Wl 


PROPERTY 


c£9,500 

Charming young part- 
ner needs an 
ambitious PA as his 
assistant. Masses of 
involvement, super 
offices and wonderful 
perks. Good sec skills! 
Call Anna Manners 


ALFRED JKARK5- 

IK 'mUBttoeffrftxu- 


MAYFAIR 


OUW ♦ to* * LV» 

Senior partner- rcoidres 
woll proomed secretary 
wtui nctOmi shorthand/. 
audto/typine skflta. 

For furthn- i nf or mat ion 
call Atmamre MacKIntosh 
or TVufty Meagher on Ol- 
493 1251. 


SECRETARY 


United Medical and Dental Schools of 
Giiy's and St -Thomas's' Hospitals , 

. SECRETARY l 


worn a CHy b*K4 PurcM atrvtcw company and re- 
4 uuy a srartny tpoMtdy a sradwto to worlc on arfeYtete 
Mela but pitndpaity tor three twtnibar a of start. W« are 
tooMns tor.sood typing and sfwfltwid. atdita tlOO/sn.to- 
Berber wtfl> an efOeteat tetephone .manner. A mature 
undmtaadinB of our working environment to eoaentiai. 
Modem ofilocsIdoK Liverpool Street station}. A fam jUar - 
Ity vrtth word processing systems would be an 'advantage. 


. Our Piafraor of AmceMW* a MMat.far a* eWKstmcvo 
M xvnun and be mbonsMte for Otber ill usrfmrnmi wore. 


,-ito.B a toyW'iwfftiw'ciwa dwW i* wtoeranw of a^ate. 
Own iifueiaak ottiCr, won BOW**! 


Age 32 plus. Salary and bonus wfl be cBU&OOO to reflect. 
Mgh level of competence and freooent demands to work 
under lime pressure. 


BTMf MSWMmUHinW bora Mn B Hortt-WWof <y- 

•O? WMnaoSBSl. townomoogfwMwutowndftiHCV 

and names <f iwo rrtnwt by; id Man. vw- te»*te ™ ■ 

Q AMCirKb 


^ jEWTOWAL 
: SEC •- 
To £8 r OOO . 

. L ifttee wtch famoas A xh 
more.--- Oct: involved 
with Fiction dr tfon- 
FtctHw ADA. Books., si 
■ good sec Job’ With S/H 
at toMBng PaUUicn. 


JUJ7&MARKS, 

: mtxUXBX&iyBU 


arve 


PUBU5iONG 

COMPANY 

£8,000 


i UMtrd i»n rrnns re tpanai- 
■ — goHtMD ' wo H d n g tor 


ei albiial tVBUHt. adnaMs- 
Hatton and UMn iWSs 
Foe nmner oifurreklgo (to 
ildrunT MicMBfasa Ok 
T nafy un«Mraimti>l 


Pleare seed Cv to: Unda Duds. National Leasing A Fi- 
nance Co- 4 London Wall DuflOngs. BtondleM Street. 
London EC2M GNT. 


No Agnews.' 


. PA TO 
DIRECTOR 
: £9,000 : 


TOP PA SEC 


US New 




CET INTO BANKRIO 


£ 9,000 


c£10300 

TMs senior ww MCi 
within malar consumer co.' 
is everything you could 
|wM for - dynamic tea ap- 
roroachaNe. hsnlworlting 
1 but understaodto*. hi 
man b real geiin He needs 
a super PA to organise Ufa 
1 busy setoeduie of travel 
Land mee tin gs along with/ 
■bolding the tort win* he) 
a away. If you are 30-45 
with at least 90 wpm 
shorthand men can Ol- 
388 5081. ; 


Busy Oau Processing DM- 
toon or ads we s ustoos 
i Mcwnani Bank ms» a 
kiny' secretary with good 
sherUMod and (yotny *« 
Candida ips should pc ore- . 
pared to work wtndn a team 
pmlmnowM and luncdr a- 
wine variety of usks<- wp 
and Sm«m «M HknM i 
would be advantageous to- ! 
Bnugh ' runner iraUUng to I 
offered. Age 33+. 


Ctdate Shortband Se 
l lots of common sense i 
fit by Director of leMttv 
Brokers. Ml involve 
Admin & PtrsotuKL fc 
tionto b fufl secretorti 
Wrt. .Luxurious office 
s Uv. SL Mrs Haye 
W . Appts.' 19 
opsoata. EC2. Ol 24 


senior tevef.Si 
nnoog itte& 


Cay Rank seek a 
! PA' wSh exp at 


. AUWO 
SECRETARY 
£8^500+ 


■ S/band &- HP ' sSris. 
-Subsidised Mortgage'* «s- 
^u»nL awrtj . offices. Ms 
Bofton Acme Appc. a 
MoodieUs. EC2. 01. 638 
AW. i 


PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT 


; for (uiJWtt ettar ofHcc. 


Property devekwment 
dcmtmeiUifwtii 
knownEsUSAgnti 
in the Bond Street _ 
area. For further 
- JnftumHttom fall ■■ 
Adrianne Mackintosh ■ 
or Trudy Meaghe r on 
4931251 

149«4ew QoM St Wl> 


NtCOUt«UAVR.AiWT 
OBSwrfmtoty ban areon for a 
-. ntMst isrooto cjl won km re 
- tntttoiKr to wpc* tn^maO. In 
tormre cmtobancy m WC2 A, 
tn. to tbr M O and bn R A 
yon i-flB uk yew 40di. sew- 
rate run. add good swep tem r 
manor to twin creontemr n« 
(nradty team- Apr 19*. 541. 
£ 7000 * Phase rug 437 
4is7 nnmimssK com. 


•?’ ^ 


nt w vow Imre km m pa to 


1 /emort uwfBl. good pro. 
too. Metal oonOMnoe-fer 


p 01 236 II 13 

R- PCMtnMK 

«• staumm 

9 * .semen 


rem u red for « Jsm— CM- ' 
Nry sgtrl silting: In 
- Nineteenth Cent u r y ofl 
■ palnUqgs. Enretencs . or 
sereng nebra and gaPcry 
rnsns g em e m required.' 


.orend. Can NKky on 630 7066 I 


Wl As.secretary 


tntreWMHAtf. QontMny, .You 
am 40* to — A fluent French 
m MW - WP' Stem * BOM 

tfumuoyi Qrafna Acremmxu- 
tton. car. tttftm. and £ 10 . 000 + 
salary. Can <n-577 etoc <aiy< 
«T 01499 7 ore (Wfll End) Mr. 
rr torr ei P»u* • Tbe SKretonal 


P»to UtoflW w*:*vq to-be- . 


Mots was cv ire 
BOX BTO. . ' 


Oe* matte tu- J 


s ntoto to te ntSw far the Pmt 
MVff.ludSM pobbe Bowes .Vow 


some ofnev uttn aad om an a 

'taPwtoS reSSSSf 


- MB MMMUto h SWI for 
' WWW pirn lOaOTtn. Some an. 
dtregoM tyotng. nun 3 mantbrn 
em> HeWngsmaH testa of toad- 
mg Mgmat Crenuamts d—Bng 
wnb all toyreti exacuttve sttec- 
OOR. cOjOOO. tatty Review. 


Cons. Pteew' rtag **r ai87,8» >flOT^SECRETARIAL 

IKM«4jg>WMwv ^H rei tomwWK ■ 

r Cnanmer of Conun-rn., Unitor second lob. Why cam 

wte tentag . no-e horthand. mure? Wo nt . f ew for BUS BALBS ABBBM fiSJWO +-*. Jam 
“ ■— ~.n By. OipiMfii» e we re; to* suecemhn cans- a reneu Co now reua, up m 
”w™»*w. J ^ 1 totto; luttr <un»uBttncy an secretary . Croydon ere- Tto sMito * good 


RA/Secrewry wttb a I 


HIGH-FLYER 
£13,000 + M/G 


SWEDISH 
OR DANISH? 


to be very Ouent. We aleo 


When not MarkeOnfl the 
services of Ms prestigious 
Merchant Beak in th« 
Stales, this livel y, charm - 
tog and de m a n di n g 
Director is busy orgsntotng 
roadshows In Eurom- 
Me needs a PA who cm 
keep w with trim, hdp . 
prioritise nis work and 
or— tet Mgr fuochons. 
Total uaiuuBtment . an to- 
chrive and wall educated 
mind and Immaculate 
■MBs and presentation are 
essential prrreqntottea for 
this unique postaon. 

Skins 100/6<kAge 26^56. , 


Tbe manapng dheetor.ot a 
west Cnd bank needs a Mp 
cMSMre PA wtm esceOnd 
ucnbriU ABL whopmM 
tti i hi dim. Age 30*. 


■ban a fun aecmartal tretailug. 
as jt win bivotve using * cere- 


Swe«a1wreJAOOOM.Td - to tutor mnyw director Bx- | admm todHty «ss. Sutrere new 
0 1407 9100 . were preepecto w*nm a I omen - o oanttua Rtag s* 

SIMQHUaiaMnmMMC.' • . nmaOU. M KWi wB l*rW l ; rah CHe. 436 0383 SUtodda 


Mamilimual Services iMcrua- I rMey PdmMimMr Arwrat I ■' .are as Of rmMMlw. I puc Cans. 

I medical pra cti ce In toe Oty of I TMt U a esnrer postaon po* I 


Salary KVjOOO acg. I Bon. SO wm TMs and. 


c£ 13 , 000 + 
taking hm B to 


A BanM> spraMny secretary 
wp sMtoaUd/ Qrptm 
meeds id 1 00/00 ip needed 
by a City bank. Early 20b 


Dee systems desig n company 638 3001. 
based M Swiss Cretsgnswkau ■— «— MOW £ 

aretetapi in die ndvenislag and iiimsmiiji l> nS 
pr oenoewns ■ - v ~' win - expaodtrig ras 

wwmls e to— Mie s. p n—s BOfli. pa to toe m D oie 


- dnk-too is aadbke.snd can -pNore-Oi-MO atoi <ca») or- • USiSSISsnSSonw 
Help to am running of ttuprac: oia« SBSi/BUi. Otcabeto .amSLSi* SS? 

tteu Salanr £01X30 ues- Te< Ol- Huaf fteerol b n ent Csosu Bmts^ mtoton « _i evw m aavrei. 

/ 638 30 01. . I BANK ONITt Dual ooportaMte to SS5 

> crant MOW mjaoo*- Tbe imp an aspens « -iMiLtMMH 

1 oommmr to smaP . rtto peopte) ,bmk «nga snre«Ttom»SK. totos 19 . 

39 Ubn ID Mr* EHUngfani. 
103411 fatal Stmt. London 
EC* . . . 


To £9,000. 


rei son ape d 22* wm good au- SnvPA became * Cwvctorf). 
dto meed s to eope otrtctdy wto» Qood shortoa ua ne eded Ategds 
rahrenal.-sec drdtoa. Some tele. PersooU *39 2777 ■ • - 


174 M*. Bust B. m. 


JC9J000. Please COMM Sue 
Kerstaaw ot^soa 4033 Ret 


£10000*, PA wfto good admin - 


■.pared feed. A Unwlcdgr re 
diHestraiin f ends and nosing 


CITY OFFICE 
* 726 8391 


P A/secretary wntr'an I n terest 
in £as<- West trade required for 
toe CRy. The Iota la varied and 
respoautda, md wredd besr sdt 
someon e in their ao-s. w m Im - 
Peccable' Cbigllsli. 


a reaSy 'Dodbte approach 


AM^&eS2K5tSPR 


SNATCH THIS UP 
TODAY! 

Wl MECEPTfOMST 
UP TO £10,000 pa. 


IWdibbldp renoe Cor iecre- 
-Mrv 1 Call -S77- DAM 

tow remiss 7001 (Wastes COLLSK LEAVERS, wfto S«c 
Secretaries Plus - jMBa for superb. ca. £6MO* 

T be^ecrefa rtol OaafteB KteBjauteneM^Wtsiy 

miganre ■ Se cre tar y wfm MLBMUAL. . nUDMCH/DM- 

BBC Ctty Bank. Cioooo * 
SKtobta CW SSfc Aie immea mort gaar * jtoto. Ftotr 
. rasBOO * S bbaktoad -gggP” 1 *» . __ . 

swngags ere. CM 377 8600 W*/!* m ter .J P*- 

lOly) nr 439 7001 (West End) 

Sccntein Phis • "•ffl**; riasr ftecruttanem 

The Secretariat coadteia . . a oj U lit- - 
BWawehnvei (rtendteco. who SS 

are looldna for a brwdit cofleoe re awnerb w i to «L800 Flair 
RtUL k iilUi l 409 1319 


■ eastwaaL Rtrvo 01r6e7 2770 
KMPU fl W g/WmB FrkUy 
to W. Be* XR ad to Staler 6cc 


PAST TIME VACANCIES 


Flair neendtaaeat 


PA/aacranry 06-38) wMrcn- 


RECEPTIONIST 


bitemodonal Property De- 
wetopmefit company wm 
offices to the heart of May- 
fair has a vacancy for the 
post ot RecaptlonlsL Post Hem 
avaoaote » from 28 th Feb- 
ruare- Candidates wa be of 
tint dam appearance and 
manner and be able to con- , 
verse wtth lead in g ; 
penonalUies of tbe property , 
world. A good admUon and i 
pereonalUy are rwndred and , 
relet-ant ea B tertence to work- 
ing at this lereL Write with 
CV quoting reference 
DAK/NRM to; 

21 Grafton Street. j 

London W1X3LD. 


We need an hnaeidatt.se- 
ntor rrcfptionht/ 

telephonist who wOl be 
able lo run a busy recep- 
tion area in these smart - 
new offices. The tebOHy to 
remain calm at an times Is 
es se nti al here! Please 
phone Sally Owens on Ol- 
236 8427. 4 Pont Street. 
London SWiX 9EL 


kmwMdM of SwedMior Nor- 
wegten. to aretst D UMt n wUh 


detatts tram: NhiHUtnpoid Ser- 


01436 3794/8. 


ieever-fET/fSOi. There Is nm ™ l 

mgoMMKy and a varied BBaiHBVnMdfiMOOi 
worti toad. Rlno Sstte Owens Partner to wed eSMMMNd firm- 
today- cm 01-236 8427. of Anchoret* In Wt needs mctv- 
KntghitDridse Sccretarits. • v toy to sestet him to vt ett id o u i 
PomSntMC. Loudon Swixsgl. ndevriooment svomcl you 

TEUCVmOHCO. Young Soiree y 

required for CKaandtng- WJ. **"** . "ttn*” * 
nev Cb to is— usutein jwrif iB fl 111 U—Nlinn Mm Arid -CNR 

- -"lamnww three wm be eMosPem iteMknt nvnlnp .inesci op 

- irnwrerti tor More and matmam yoar own renre 

SSSfc ssrjomfpiSnSS “ system, soem, 9o/6a + wp. 


NHL FMMV/BBC tor Itm <V 
nance company in Covent 
omn required for rventngs 
ALSO . 8PRU 01-836 0833. 


caunr wan - »jo to aja 

' the dam a work, secretary. 
Fan teatog me some snort- 
band. Friendly onto*, met 
people Salary c- £7300 For 
fUrtfior detads mease contact 

- Lucy Utyns on oi-sa- 

- 2977/2947 at Jan. 





^300^ 

CHARITY 

Nr Waterloo 


s—biiaw TRuaan vice 
Pre d oo n t of prasagtom Coy 
US. New York ocgantaattoa 
needs, a matte w a r 
PA/Secretaor with go/va 
- Wp/Wbnp: £10800 4 mart, 
freer & perks, pim nop Ctestte 
OMO 40 01-488 40U. 


ALFREDMAftKS 

— maoMiotgrfou 


PA SECRETARY 

£9.250 + bonus + LV*s 


A secretarial lob with ftwmenre 
variety Hid Interest to^a muf-t 
Iriendiy ofllce whree you w«bt 
Involved In ' tend raising. 
orsanMng an aumai ban And ad- 
. nutiucrachnr duUm- Good 
shorthand/ typing and the awnty 
to work on your own udUaUvels 
enonttoL. Tart and dtotorwaorto 
aHo imparunl asyou wut be deaf- 

ing wttn people at aB.tewta. Apr 


co un t : ucAvasts c. sojsoo. 
flnn toy/ Aau as d Fun. et- 
cBtag p ow h o n i «MUa young 
■ lively P u btiditng On. Sri 90. 

rest typj nu. 4 93 BS76 OP 0(1 7 
_*n 899477. Duke Street Per- 
sonnet. Rac Cons. ' 


htetts. C7JOOO. Pins two ;y«Msn v Sprem 9 o/ 6a. -f- WP. mdUnts LkL. 31 .Baaucharep 

reotews to 198 8. Alecls Person- ^Odottom J4mr_ Banams We- Ptare. London SWK. 

ms-439 2777 . orrepwem di-7 34 8771 . . wp opcflumnt (tetter tetepnomst 

ATTMACnw PA/TVPIPT pref. FULHAM - HMMCrlM/Pib ftp Barristers Cha m bers CC*. 

some co oimn er asp. (would motkma Agency ■ wonune as. Monday. Wednesday. Friday, 

train) tar M Cte wa Aadat at M/8er to hertaastrt young. Further detada Tetephone 

«xhlt>t(ionaabn>ad. aAn9S «se> . M-P..Cood ah/tyatog rwennal. 01383 7366 
run 1603. To £7.800 oottt w JA experience hctpfnL Iritnd- « want Secretaries - part 

review iluacar. Kenstnstan Bee te and tatornai but bevy one to to 
Cm 01438 2181 atmosphere to clvUlaed office* 

(Mary c. £aot». For iurtoM- 

detaus merer can Lwy idvra _ 

on Ol -8812977. 2947 at Jane , ___ " 

CriMUtwaHe fteenatnuoi Con- GENERAL 

.fgESJT**""**- APPOINTMENTS 

U WWP tMOO young : 

KNMHISMnMl PA UM*S. MgMy proftasto uM PA/CU-or- 

SsdUr aiwr M wSb-HM- "dlnatoP . sought by top ^ — ... , 

W repantetag rihuty requM dasfpo-mtventoM -cmnutcso OteSf Cte Go wef. 

by MDMor.er tote prate C». W*I«1» V> ague deHUas* pre tertabte 

otouacoapwi]. Mbfeaan skflb. In a Mgh-charved yrt Intonnaf ,C T thete bmy Owfcwap 

BOFSaCaO Modpeftoe ro ttreent atmorehre ^ wwiui handle re-. * *?■ Aw>f **** u ” 

.eo. Od-629 BBSS. - March, quotes, toea ol-'ottoae . . etodres ereiinni. m 382 4628. 

IBMBMr - two aeca needed for work and an-rouad tm.oh.e- ' — — 

■ pranerty - tenpuy. meat.. Oodd typing/ rusty OWUM TflCWM reqidred 

. ^ hoit h a nd / i iodto a n d out going Ntortoand revdred. Age 20-28. fer London. Cdberience > ouati- 

PtesreiaWty. £7-8800 * team IVaar W 01-409. 1282 The mttons not ’essential. Smart 

• Can Caraunr Wutwc on Ol work Shop. a pp e a rance, sersonatny. aorem 


i ' 




gtout company. Mtoknani skfUs. 
80/flacrei NodpeftonuBnwM 
eo. Od-629 BBSS. - 
Ltonnrr - umo sees needed (or 
■ property ' com pan y. 

- S horthand/lipttto an doreflreap 

paenmany. £7-8800 + bonus- 
• CM Caroline Wa ntage*, on Ol 
486 6981. SBtT totmdoctiopa. 
Pec Cons. ’ 


1U (KUU WWBti Co seek 
•' experienced and presentable 
staff tor their busy enrfeoa 
■bon. Appreciation Of good 
ctothaa ereentiaL Ol 382 462& 


Top Mayte Chartered 
Surveyois. ml use yow 
excvlBnt pa/shorthand 
secrea trial sMg lo the Ml in 
ttns vreiad and MB flng rote . 
Wortteig for senior punnet. 
For Itrthor Mofiwtem call 
Attaanne Mackintosh or 
Trudy Mushier on 
01-483 125J 

115 New Band Street Wl 


Bernadette 
of Bond St. 

naenjumant Consultant* 

SaSS.IsKdnrufsmuW . 


W.1SIBMB tWO Id) c- CKOOO 
Itecretary /A nte! a n t tor (Hand-, 
ly vttoUctty dept- WP *■ 
sdratnuttagan. Consider cat- 
.tege Havre. 490-8676 or after - 
7ttn 999 .4377. Dotee Street 
Peraonngl- Me Oons. 


-fhUMJBHBM PA required ftr Art 
Director: Hvaiy. aaid'lnteraalfrg 
pool Hon. Computer PBteiteni 
. . preL 8f- Ptea re rin g .tauter 
Coachman on 01-373 6070. «M 
218. 

nn-gvTiOMlT ; wan typta*. 


nammr pa msoao, asbm- 
tag to* Head of th UK ted Widal 

' Pruprety Dapt 'of. this land top 
toyfek eatafr a ge nt* , you wfli 
be involved to srittng some of 

- Dig moot prastigtona note and 
b oowe a to London.' You wm «- 

. aril events and wtu cany out a 

- varied ftm c t ton which Win gKr 
you the opp to make a real can 
trtbutton. SUM 100/86 wpm. 
9 y t»ctgy. Utr-re mo t u m m con- 
SUHancy. 01-697 9833/9 


noun nwwm required 
for London. Estbenmc* > ouait- 
. firettons not tjueini ai. Smart 
app ra ranco. presonaBty. aorenl 
rarer unportanL Trl Ol 437 
4873. 

AMBITIOUS THUMB KBMW 

- -eZ2 *i w ttn integrity requimL 
£7.000 Mf. rt9MN rarmnqs 
scheme. ExceUnii managmnit 
. pno au ec t s. Ring Ol 222 4181. 


■5» r i i. i- 

■ l - Wit. 


HKSI 



CENTRAL ..' 
HERTFORDSHIRE 

£9,000 net “ 

PA/BOOKKEEPING 

TMs smafl OraigB company ■ 
rrqteres an office manager 
who wta nr lotaay oeatote 
in ab«tte* , 'and MRiU*. 
You win need to be able so 
keep llie books, preprev 
rosUep. do PA VC- all on a 


Secretary/ Areteta n t tor Pin 
HsMng Director. Uatea wtm 
-authors.- Lots- of lu vu hn mwn*. 
-lOO/ea 493 8678 or aft Tpm 
,899-4377. OteULSttred Ptfson- 



fteuce to Mat taatoasre te 
essential prrrwaMy on a 
computer based system and 
ranuttanty wtm nunaoe- 
mren a ce wit a would be I 
IbctDftal. Thu amt ateo in- i 
voKcs office 




N. BnOwaUc Tl.Tieeul tributwn. - ns 100/90 wpm 

tanguagre an asset- et.ooo pa. Synergy. m»7reiwtoteid corv 

Pteaee ring EUzabem Steer on attlaney. 01697; 9S33/9 

sac^tre tin krenL ftobiM^ awo mTAWY - OCMeva sereb 
SynS yS' tary required tor toteraatlonal 
5" 5? ” 7^^ ■ achoot near 'Omega to com- 

of French prefrr a bte. London 

wrn SS ^SL’ 4 ” tnterwljwswfm Mr. Joton Rater- ! 

O, 10 taD9 *^ K ' p * r * Co,t ^ , . son KcM Februrey 27U>-Marai , 

FAMMOte HMCTDS reqy Mp. . u at-. PM House Hold. 

60<te SH aec. TKHt -dootoody-. i m throw. Fre detaito can 

Ltotee wttb designers a Mary Langtora on 01-438 8849 

Chab roan's uBtcc-WL £9000 fevesj or Mr. Patoson at Pool 

Wood houee Wee 0*00 404*6*6 Houm 01-759 2323 on above 

BFBSSAII- M-Hngual secretary PA. dates. 

V* ta we lf a n i secretarial — . 

/uunsreuan uade. ttooot. ™?*PBIAM u» £ 8800- J ow 
Ut* Language- Appotnbnante. "** known co mpa ny as 

01-846 9748 secreto ry to Hub- deiwty man 

ITALIAN M^ngute me: 90/ 50 tor 

Ml furriers JECd. BactUngtoet SaSL ETiJS: " ^“re 

moving fua Job- Salary iteb. 

Link. Language Appo to t nam te VotJ 

01646 9743 1 etwuki_b4 _ y’Od, adrofnlelriUor 


DOMESne A CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


Ul u 

•J X 1 » 


l ! !?.U 

>\R 


I I — throw.- nr detatts. can 
Maty LangtoM on 01-438 8849 
fevevO or Mr. raerean at Pom 
H ouse 01-789-2303 on above 


PA rule you sen help or panf— 
and co-ordinate fteoaun UK cx, 
hMIkma and co nf erences. You 


BMBM (ABU HUBI) 

<UM* pa Nartand / P C- / 
ChMtecn nanny 1 toddler. 1 
baby. 

tosses 4 WerW travel trained 
nanny for toddler 6 baby 
£80 4 

duetts an Mb ttvtng to 
Swiss ski resort travel to 
S-F ranee. USA 6 only. 
Norland Nanny re N n.E-B. 
to boy 3 tori 6 ndhs £100 
Farid MOO a tads not tar 
nanny, girt tB mum note 
charge. 


r t L* a 

-« i» f'i 


t|( ) v l 


io rn 

*.-vOR> 


tstaana Sal LkL 01-730 6148. 


Producdrei' Cer nmds brigtaL'. 
retiabfc mcsMtontel/wp- typist 
■ tar tw WM EM office. Phone 
Jam-Aim em 01-439 1831- 


wttti 100 , 60 nun*. Phase ute- 
pnohe- 01-3*0 3SS1 tCRy] or 
01-240 3811/3831 (WM CndL 
Btabeth. Hunt Recnduaenl 


There would be a minimal 
amount of secretarial work. 
Shorthand would be useful 
typing te a necess i ty. .-Ape . 


dobed Miorthaadtt aodioL Age 
. 2*4.. Salary £8780 p^ Per ha-- 


ter Eflttoclai AaetetaoL Son a*- 




toMtes-. £7 j 0004 good be naflts- 
AkBdl PereceineJ 01-439 27T7 


FUMTBM BMJUBS £8.000 . *. 

SM company in ihe world of 
. rents* stops and luxwy hotels 
"to itoimg pec to vice-Pnm- 
dam. lmb or cflant Hateon. 


SWIIUUHD ClOO weekly, 
toremy required ter one child. 
USA wttn um> (am- 

Uy Fry . Stt If Consul Kants. 
"AWlOL Tel: CaxFSt&M 


Bernadette 
of Bond St. 



10 .become tavotoed in Mpiiy 


.(Stoane So) LkL 01-730 8148. 


. flora. AMSA apa c un te flee. 

Cora. Ol 734 0892 
PIM Iftettfl SMJJOO Wit. Age 
2866. 100 /ea are/ Admtn Job. 
TOL 89*8931 or' 881 1808. 
TJf. tateenattoteal Ate. Cara 
JUNMN. MBINMS c £9.000 


admin tovonwracfiL You sttottd 
nave a a** mind and Bvety. 
"todglono approach. Good skffis 


- Bec - 190/801 an some work mp re- 

guested. Ape 214. Prime lei 01 . 
v Age 409 1282 The Wor* Shop. 


aarc ‘* "W** Ol- 


and be truly Involved. Good 
sb/typing. Oaitege leaver or * 


nstta Agency 01-493 9*93 
ton fltt / B M B H s yea rin g exp PA- 
NWia tort maned. £900a 


a real career opportunity to. Itos 
■Mfoh company . You wm an as 

PA/Sec to EMracur and trader 
to a Muon, hectic learn. H lgh 
adu nto 1 COMM, wtthtn a Ntoh- 
proftM pubttttong envtnornnoiit. 


115 New Bead Street 
Wl 


LINGUIST 
SECRETARIES 
IN BANKING 
TO £10,000 



skate and me afefhty la work 
wgD wbflst under pe maure . 
For further OaMte pteMN 


p 01 236 1113 

POKIMMf 
wornttmatT 
S ara vt ccf 


LET US 
TEMPT YOU 

Join our busy, young 
temporary team aid 
work to a variety ol 
interesting clients 
throughout London. You 
may well fold your ideal 

pamanent job and be 

S white looking ! 

S 80/100 sh or 
aWfo. 50+ typ. Age 19- 

ft • 




SUPERSONIC 
PA /SECRETARIES 


(Sloane SqS Ltd. 01-730 8148. 


deck (docume n t ad orn ri 1.000 
Language Staff- 01-408 *922 

i> 8Srem r a^L l £jB 5axw ^S- . 

Stair Ann Ol -MSB 8922. 




•OTtto migh a mwign, 

£ B**re*i tor unan atv 
jy 1 " Bre Restaurant. The tdr- 
a yi UKua nave mnn of 
ytouste sm won nab- and 
■■naglMlion to run Ihh new 
vgntore. Tel; C. Mack. OL-623 


MMiamM See PA for MD 

wan very friendly ra Very 


nwtttVttntr m usa Augim 

}** to June 1987 or law. 
Ln e4n help kj care for htfanL 
Satery Si 20 par week 4 room, 
board, use ot cat and ret ur n 
triwisaUanttc Right (SuHact to 
visaj. 01-609 1078. - 


m meet, when he n out and 


™«E AttStBTAMT ro 

Wed far e toantog and general 
JtoUtokremn, duties at 6wapa- 


h°urs per wee k , ' two t*,-' h 
B “? ton9 "BBS* HXSXL 


c£1 4,000++ 


An exeelent ctatanga for an 
teriMnus PA within *mi ccaofl- 
rate Oman ol Bus 
pesrtgeous Merchant Bank 
Become an ntegnd pert ol a 
Uyname team oqttnMng and 
attending raadrfwsei Eu- 
rope and the UK. 
Pnate ssi o n atom. poor* and 
top shds e ee en t tt (1BQ/60 
rrui) Age 3W5. W tenawB 
be pad 

Contact 

Rebecca Headtay 
on 283 1S5S 


£6,500 neg 


rtease img: 

437 4187/89 


M. Xtouww I 


PR SECRETARY 


Foe Atvoant Cwnm* to 
mm rt BHH d t ng company 


Previous e xy cr i e n ce of PK 
md markMtog re tma* 
Maid preferred. £7.780 pa 4 
two bonus** 4 BUPA. 


Write w«h cv re hi w idfi * 
Jway MrCrety- 
Cameron. Choat 6 Partners. 
196-128 Cronrwea fitoad. 
London «WT 4£T ' 


Tel: «Wn 4897. 


The newty appointed General 
MJus*gw kn Ms prcsUgfoea 
ttavei company in 
KAi£it»M4ge icyulres a vera 
regaoKod young secretary. 
Voo win need to relate ta peo- 
ple on an levety, take MtiaUve 
and be able Id handle an an- 
perti of gro u p and company 
baud. All your good Ideas wM 
be woredateti and in return 
you wm has# the opp ortun it y 
to travel oversea* You must 
be wefl spoken and wrtl pre- 
sntied wtm suns or ao/sfi 
wah me knowledge or wp. 
Generous travel benefits bv 
ctudlng free siding 


rwavwi 



BARRISTERS clerk 

ilinn a.«. 'e_ . . 


BA W UMQ TO £9.800 4 berks * 
mort g age- Prestigious merchant 
bank seeks upmarket PA/see to 
work fur • dynamic young Dt- 
rivtre. Plenty of Intoathe 6. 
pemreuutv -neceesacy. AMtttv 
ta cgp* under pressure and deal 
wuhaUtevstsef staff. CM ***** 
6 arotorct s 8 Wp iralntog. 
234. caa Kate pt, 690 7066. 

. Ktoestaod Per, cons. 


. 

tt-toc o-tt „ 

juniors). Terms negotiable a1ks » 


^easc write to; 

Eric Elliott 
51 Westgait Rd. 

mdos ‘"* > cunicul™ 


■s-? 

























"-."N 


-■Si 




\r 


-- * 


% 





THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1 986 


((HORIZONS^ 


A guide to 
career choice 


Carve out a furniture future 



29 


UNIVERSITY APPOINTMENTS 


WEBSTER UNIVERSITY 


IN ELROFF 


Furniture-making is fashionable. Con- 
sumer interest m design, new technol- 
ogy and an emphasis on wood man ship 
are combining to open career opportu- 
ne year Lord Snowdon's son, 
Lora Linley. opened his own furniture 
shop and helped to spark a spate of ar- 
ticles on trendy furniture- makers. His 
own master, John Makepeace, is soon 
to open a second schooL 

This spring the New Woodmanship 
Trust is being launched, and a new 
BSc furniture-production course is now 
open at Buckinghamshire College in 
High Wycombe. 

So. join a firm or start your own 
business; either way the route is 
surprisingly long. In the latter case, six 
years of being a student may end with 
a lucky break ai the college diploma 
show. Even then business skills can be 
lacking — as Mr Makepeaice knows. 
His private school on a magnificent 
Dorset estate, insists that pupils 
market their creations and learn bow 
to cope in the world before the course 
concludes. 

Management and business studies 
are also central to courses in fine 
craftsmanship and design at 
Ryecotewood College. Oxfordshire. 

For fellow students Peter Christian 
and Paul Chamberlain, the end-of- 
course show at the Royal College of . 
Art launched their firm, called Flux.. 
An elegant lounger had already won a 
prize and soon found a manufacturer. 
They are to be found now in a studio 
in Battersea with trains thundering 
past and. on view, an assortment of 
successful creations from a one-piece 
swivelling table and stool to the 
original lounger. 

The studio was set up in 1985 as 
both Peter and Paul gained an 
Enterprise Allowance (worth £40 each 
fora year). That is just ending, but the 
future looks promising with a dutch of ' 
commissions. How did they begin? 

Paul studied design, craft 'and 
technology at' school and joined the 
foundation course az Cardiff College of 
Art before taking a degree in- 
construction and design at Bristol. 
There he produced some novel waft- 
hanging chairs, which won an interna- 
tional competition in Belgium. The 
'’'lone" Brit beat 400. 


holiday. Grants and bursaries bad 
nearly paid for his education. 

Peter, who concentrated on furniture 
and lighting at Ravensboume College 
of Art, took a year out at Sheffield 
University, working as illustrator and 
designer in lire publications depart- 
ment and won an award for seating. 
That took him to the Netherlands and 
Italy, before the Royal College. 

The pair intended to set up in 
partnership to design for mass mar- 
kets. Despite the long academic course, 
Peter and Paul fdt inexperienced in 
business and, sensibly, began on a low 
budget, working at home in 1984. 

Are they making a living? Just, with 
much of their revenue going on 
producing samples on publicity and 
trade shows. 

In the future Flux hopes to have its a 
own shop, but for that the two want 
another business partner, leaving them 
to concentrate on design and presenta- 
tion. Maybe the new Independent 
Designers Federation win .be usefiiL It 


Ann Hills looks at 


new interest m an 


old skill and how 


to plan for success 


At the end of three years at the- Roy- 
al College (exclusively, post-graduate) - 
Paul had been a studept .for .seven- 
years, -having 'earned a few pounds . 
working with Crown -Supplies in ft 


aims to help members in building links 
with industry and manufacturers, in 
marketing and sales. 

"Are you sitting comfortably?" is a 
question Kanwal Sharma is asking 
pupils. at Richard Goudesley special 
school near the Barbican, where his 
seating system being -piloted. That 
uses an assessment rig with moveable 
parts to enable an ergonomically 
suitable prescription to be devised for. 
each youngster according to their size' 
and disability: The - ' computerized 
findings are then used to adapt 
component seating for a comfortable 
fiL 

The Richard Cloudesiey chair is 
KanwaTs first . substantial impact in 
furniture design. Having a real brief is 
a vital spur, says Mr Sharma. "Too of- 
ten students are asked to design for the 
distant future," He adds. 

Mr Sharma is optimistic But after 
six years of adademic education he 
regrets the lack -of solid links with 
.industry;, and „..the.„ neglect, of basic • 
buririess-managfement skills^ ; _ v 

■ Between Kingston 'Colle ge of ^Art - 


and the Royal College. Brenda 
Saunders took a year out and worked 
in Heals’ domestic furniture depart- 
ment. 

She says: "1 learnt what people want 
to buy . — at college you have a 
blinkered sense of commercialism." 
Being a high-flier, she gained a first at 
Kingston and "really blossomed at the 
RCA where 1 developed my own 
fabrics for my furniture". 

She finished there 10 years ago and 
went to Italy on a British Council 
Scholarship to study upholstery in 
Milan, before setting up business with 
Peter Busson. a fellow- RCA student of 
environmental design. 

These days, in a new studio in 
Hoxton. east London, Brenda 
Saunders exudes a confidence born of 
successful creations, such as a chair 
which sold by the score and — going 
into production this month — a space- 
saver bed for Sleepeezee. Made of steel 
aluminium, with plastic feet and 
wooden slats, it is intended for home 
and for contract use, as in hostels. 

She has benefilted directly from 
government cash invested in the 
Design Council for Industry, which has 
enabled manufacturers to experiment 
with new products. 

Brenda is grateful that the Govern- 
ment is backing design and is enjoying 
the chance to do her own thing - or 
rather, with Peter Busson. to produce 
commercially viable domestic furni- 
ture, from a work-station with a bed 
on top and cupboard to the side (ideal 
for the bedsit) to a larger desk with 
VDU on a swivel 
Now the Saunders partnership is 
branching out, taking on an architect 
and graphic artists. 

Where should you begin in 1986? 
Choosing a relevant course is the first 
priority. Settings range from universi- 
ties. polytechnics and other colleges of 
further education to manufacturers’ 
training schools, with courses homing 
in on areas from craft to industrial de- 
sign. The London College of Furniture, 
■which is .vocationally based, haying 
-good contacts with industry, lakes 
students from 16 to 60 full-time or 
part-time. 

Career advice is available from the 
British Furniture Manufacturers Feder- 
ation, the Design Council colleges, and 
-private schools. Send SAE. preferably 
self-sealing, for. a ' 0st to Special 
^Projects (furniture), The Times* 1. 
iPennington Street, Wapping, Loudon 
— ..." 


lAfehster UnrversSy of St Lxis, Missouri has estobMied fagHy-auttfisW 
Geneva, Vienna wd Leiden. They cfe Atnericcn BA, fAA, and MBA degree ir 
management, computer studies, international idafions and related fields, ifrrough 
daytime and evening courses for working and UKrae students of dl natronafifiei 


Classes wB dart at the new \Afebster branch ii London 
an October 27, 1986 and Vfebsfer is now recruiting to head this branch its 


DIRECTOR. LONDON 


The kfed candidate wi9 hove a dodortfe, be a higHy-mafivated seff-darter who 
wishes to bu3d into a major vtsftuiion a branch of an American umenSy abroad, has 
experiences] an America) iroveraty and experience in Brian, aid is or has been a 
mcncgec 

A highfy-compefifive compens a tion package wffl be offered to 
the successful candidate. Start date is about September 1986. 

Short resumes should be sent (ho cals) before March 15. 1986 to bath 


Dems Daggsn md Geage ad DcPeel 


Webster University 
470 East Lednmd 
Si Loris, Missouri 63119 


37 Avenue de Baft 
1202 Geneva, Smtzerirad 


AN EGUM OPPOfH/JJY/AfflEMATTVT ACDON EMPLOYS 


’ UNIVERSITY OF STIRLING 
CENTRE FOR SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH 


Senior Research Fellow 


Applications are invited from weU ouaHiled social 
-science vaduotes with substantial experience of ap- 
plied social research. The person appointed will play 
a motor role tn planning, managing and conducting 
research Into the effectiveness of social work. The 
Centre Is funded jointly by the Economic & Social 
Research Education Department. Professor Juliet 
Cheethaxn has recently taken up the Directorship of 
the Centre. 


The person appointed, who wtu be expected from 
ante to tinie la deputise for the Director, wti! hold a 
Senior Lectureship In Ute University (salary scale 
£14700 - £1 84 1 3). An appropriately experienced ap- 
plicant may be offered a Readership (salary scale 
£16817 -£184131: scales subject to review. The con 
tract will be for five years and may be renewable for 
a further fixed period. 


Further particulars can be obtained from (he Univer- 
sity Secretary University of Stirling. Stirling FK9 
4 LA. Scotland. Informal enquiries may be made to 
Professor Juliet CheeUiam. Director. Social Work 
Research Centre. University of Stirling. Stirling: Tel: 
0786. 73171. Ext 2134. 

Please quote reference (T). 
dosing date for applications 1 April 1986. 


SHIPLAKE COLLEGE 

BURSAR 

and 

CLERK TO THE 
GOVERNORS 


The above position wifi become Vacant on May 
1st 1986. The College, which has 342 boys, aged 
13-18. is a member of G.BA. and the current 
Bursar of L5.BA 


Applicants, who should be experienced financial 
managers, should write to: 

The Secretary . 

Shiplakc College 
Henley on Thames 
Oxon RG9 4BW 


from whom full particulars of the appointment 
may be obtained. 



ROSSALL SCHOOL 

HEAD 


The Headship will become vacant in September 
1987 with the retirement of Dr. J. Sharp, who, 
like his predecessors, has been a member of 
HMC. 


Rossall is a mainly boarding school for boys and 
girls from the age of II to 18- 

Full details of the post may be obtained from 
The Secretary to the Corporation of Rossall 
SchooL Fleetwood. LancsL, FY7 8JW. Applica- 
tions dose on UHh April 1986. 


Hum for school on PtmMra. 
MmuMi or eo uK - g g* tram- 
In ounwo April. PiMsrrtrv 
01-834 JL7I mornings only. 


COURSES 


nraiortO to take over Mate 
Usbed pro m u u or - EngUMi 
■ — IT— i— school iB.CMfionvHie. 
Margate- 30 imr teas*, accom- 
modation- Mgh fees. No capital 
mww 1 l»ng c w jna * 
CoUvrr. MMUMmr 63636. 


SIBFORD SCHOOL 

offer* • 

A SIXTH FORM WITH 
A DIFFERENCE 


One and two year courses are available for stu- 
dents who want a more career based course than 

‘A' Levels. We offer CPVE - the new post-16 
fi rniKfionl nn, a pre-Foundation Course in An or 
access to the local Technical College for Busi- 
ness Studies and other B.Tec Courses while 
living in school as a boarder. 


Pfeuft send ft prospecto* datate ot 
5Krf»H *86-T Sixth Form Cranes tfts 


Sand to fee Haadraftster'a 
SiMord SchooL sword Farrh, Hr, 
b or y, Oxon 0X15 SQL 



DAUNTSEY’S SCHOOL 

(Founded 1543) 

West- Lavington. Devizes, Wiltshire SNIO 4HE 


H.M.C; fully co-educational boarding and 
dayS30 pupils aged JI-18: 190 in Vlth form. 
Special link with Lavington * Comprehensive) 
School 


RMtavedfor 1st. September 1986 

SENIOR MISmSS 


A new post with particular 
welfare of the girls; approximately 
pits are pris. . ‘ . 


for the 
the pu- 


HEAD OF CRAFT, DESIGN, 
TECHNOLOGY 

. . (Scale III) 


A new pose new < 
ing in * 


MATHEMATICS TEACHER 


Fufi-timc graduate to teach at all levels, from 
1 1 + to Oxbridge entrance. Courses mainly SM P; 
high proportion of.VIih form work in a friendly 
and successful depart menu 


MODERN LINGUIST 


FuIMimc graduate to teach German and French 
from U+ to Oxbridge entrance. New courses 
being mtroducedr link yrilh Ecole des Acacias, 
Lc . Havre. ■ 


HEAD OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 


New Sports Hall 1980. Heated indoor swimming 
pool {25rri. S-Iane) opened 1985. Good facilities 
for all mgjor and many- other sports (boys and 
pits). Physical Education Js taught to all pupils. 


Ft*0 dMaBs oTorar of the above posts fOxHUscys School 
•cetoJs above Burnham: Government Teacha** Superan- 
nuation Scheme) obtainable . Aw . the Head Master 
(Christopher Evans). DaunBey-s School, Weal Lavington. 
Devises; WHMtkra. SNkO 4HE. Telephone: Lavtafftot) 
(0360 81) 2446. 


3 


CLAYESMORE 

SCHOOL 


Dorset 

HEADSHIP 


The Council or 
Clayesmore School 
invites applications 
for the position of 
Head following the 
appointment of Mr. 
M.P. Hawkins to Sl 
A nne's, Windermere. 
Candidates should 
apply by 8th March. 
1986. 


Further particulars 
and application forms 
may. be obtained from 
the Clerk to the 
Council Clayesmore 
School lweme Min- 
ster, • Blandford 
Forum. Dorset DTI I 
8LL 


NUFFIELD COLLEGE 

Oxford OXI INF 


POLITICS or SOCIOLOGY 


The College intends to proceed to the election of 
an Official Fellow in Politics or Sociology ten- 
able front I October 1986, or a later date to be 
arranged. Applications are invited from men 
and women whose interests lie within these sub- 
jects. The College does not define them 
narrowly, but is particularly interested in candi- 
dates able to link both. Official Fellows engage 
in research and supervise graduate students. Par- 
ticulars from the Warden, to whom applications, 
stating qualifications, research interests, and 
three referees should be sent by 15 March 1986. 


GIGGLES WICK 
SCHOOL 
Co-edncatioBal 
Boarding - HMC 
HEAD OF BOYS’ 
SPORT 
For 

September, 1 9 86 

Responsible for 
by &. Cricket, P.E. 
Sports. 


Applicants should be 
inaer 


under 33. experienced 
in playing at high lev- 
el &. suitably 
qualified. 

Further details and 
job specification from 
the Headmaster, 
Giggleswicfc School, 
Set be. North York- 
shire. BD24 ODE. 

(TeL 072 92 3545) 


' ~ UNIVERSITY 
OF OXFORD 
Research Officmhip 
in Nuclear Physics 

Tito Department ubii» owl 
research in nuclear and parti-' 
etc physics and baa 38 
academic Haft (including sl* 
fixed tom Research OMcersi. 
41 academic rtttM research 
support stall, and IS techni 
rlani. Tito Department has 
wMI-MUttpcd mechanic* 
irfcahoDi and 


Mctoienl computing Cartnur*. 
ADprePmUbMSonhfK 
adenttc start are involved to 
particle Physics rese ar ch pro- 
grammas ai OESY. Hamburg 
(TABSD-HE3UU. CEBN 
mELPHDand Mumetou <pro- 
lan decay*- The other «y»o 
air involved m nuclear struc- 
ture research which Includes 
a heavy ton research pro- 
pa i u iw at the NSF. 
O aieipur y. and a> Oxford a 
neutrino mass experiment 
and an ncueiuiiriil on rare de- 
cay modes of nuoei. wuun 
the department (here is also a 
solar neutrino experiment 
which is pan Of a cryogenic 
detector develop , ite m protect- 
Research Officers carry out 
research indeoendently or III 
■esociaUon wtth Unmuy 
Lecturer*. They wort rta&rty 
wub gradnue students and 
can be a pp oi nte d at research 
snpcrvtoon. They arc re 
gtareo to tmorrtalce three 
hours of laboratory learning 
per week 172 hours, year) as d 
are encouraged to pile gradu- 


Rewwrch OfOcsrs are appoint- 
ed on the UnK-erxHv Lcctune 
scale irr.BSO-Ci6.GAS. ac- 
cording to agei Tor a period of 
three years In me' rtrsi in- 
stance The appatnlment may 
be re ne wed for a further two 


Atouranta tomato write to 
Professor D.H. PcrUns. Nu- 
cl»*r Ptanto Laboratory. 
KAie Road- Oxford. OXt 
3RH. enclosing a comculuni 
iliac, a id d pubik-aiions. 
said i he names of two re f « re vs 
io roach Mm not tail er than IB 
June 1986. 



University 
delaRomande 


A private non-traditional 
Swiss Univttsiry pfes 
degrees to mid-career aduks 
over 25. entirely at home 
and tt-hh fhB cret&s Tor life/ 
career experience. 

tMChmtOwpw. 

Dept T. ft. Kkge 5u 

5edtmay. SdU. COIS 8£Ql 
Tdi lUfit 4M84 (M bomt 


UNIVERSITY OF 
LIVERPOOL 
Chair of Biochemistry 


AppMcaUons arc invited for a 
Chair of BjocnemBuy in the 
Department of BtocnetMstrv. 
The Ova, r wtu became vacant 
In October 1986 upon the ie 
uremeni of Professor J 
Clover- The other Chair m the 
Deport men, n currently held 
by Professor BED Maden. 


The Deparanenl B housed m 
a modem, purpose mult build- 
ing and nasa well cstamittied 
repuiaiton m ine fields of Up- 
Ids. nucleic acids and praicfn 
BtocttrmJstry. AooUrailon, 
are Rivhed Iron randtnates 
who have an ouistandmg 
record of achievement in any 
area of BtochcmMn’ 


The salary wNI be witnfn the 
range approved lor non-cxre 
cal pro fess o n to salaries, 
currently not less than 
£18.933 pee annum (under 
review l. 


APPhraUons, together wUh 
the names of three referees- 
UaniM be received no* later 
than Zpd April. 1986 by toe 
Registrar. The L'prverslly pO 
Boa 147. Lnrrpool L69 3BX. 
irom whom further nartiru- 
Urs may be ebtained. 


Quote Ref. RV 281 


UNIVERSITY OF 
READING 
SUB-WARDEN OF 
CHILDS HALL 

AMaUcalun-i are mv-two for 
thn resfami post w a Kan of 
RnUfiKr wun fufl rateniw 
(actnttos For 400 men and 
women sludents with confer- 
ences In vacations The Sup 
W arden a lespomiMr to the 
Warden lor I he day to day 
running of the Kail Initial sal- 
ary £10020 pa Hinder 
review) plus LTSS l ■SOP!. 
Benefit*. A mree bedimmed 
ecu contained IM h ermlM- 
The appaininieni is Irom June 
1966. Further particuiars and 
appuconon forms iZ cop«sl 
are avaname from the Person- 
nel Office. University of 
Reading. whiMuiltoii. PO. 
Box 217. Reading. RC6 2AH. 
telephone iO730i 8TB123 ext 
444 Pleafie onole Rei C2QA- 
Ctang die 21 March 1986. 


Univen 

Char 


f of Edinburgh 
Ecclesiastical 


Tnc Utocmh Ciui 
to ** Cmp v 


GERMAN HVTENSIVC 

COURSE. 


J feps n ts Ootlrge. -London 

Begtnnm. O tod A Level 

1-B AprO £99 
AccwnnotUHOn avadaue 
AOgfo-AuRrian Society 


46i 

LONDON SWIlf SAfl 

M0USMH- 



LU TEftM 
*Ai JLausdownr you Irani M 


r'Hb 


IflMlM* 


ium type sr Lansoown* Cof 

lege. 40 HsrrtnoHH Oantens. 

Luooon SWT 4JU 
Ttol 01-J73 7282.-3/4 '- 


M O W MTKMHVX Typewriting 

-HxthMual tuUop / Speed do- 

A’rtoeCMrtt DectrK/rlrcinailr. 

.« wu /uH-tlw Btoy. Begmnees 

. Mar 3/Aprtl T^TW Mn PMppx 

01-629 2904- Th» UhpMM 
.Centre, .is, vttonmm. 0L. 
I*VUW LONDQH x 1. 

w qucorc aemtariarCM- 

Omwertfl McretBttostoib 

wt«> cetera dtptooa w n e w 

f xom d i e n ps IB apk Wrhe or 


M Ndhonr ag-Jo^ Oo M TO to em' 


Place. London 





New from Pitman 


BOKUttw CBcratariN tfBkiiag plus tKHksiqMrteneB at eur 


VWmtMden CoBsgB. indutes tralrdra in «ord and data 
• i tor RSA uxam W ati ona. 


I oiMtggcfBtwIalakiUs 

[ artHabte. Faf prempKM, phase 



T 9k 01-948 1700 
Pr#4t*l *211212. 


EASTER REVISION 
LONDON 


ASWMIMK-IUIMS 


0 A AM 
SPECIALISTS 


' M at h e m a ti cs ^ c «ioni«a»M 

tboSrinacos 


r or deanp 

TV" PrtacipaL Aubbourne 
Tuwrt- ■ &9s63 K**atagu»n 
Hkh Street Londdn ws 

—tel: 01-9S7 SOS. 1 


A A M4MAM sccretartto Oouegr, 

iaDunravv««treeC Park Lane. 

London WtV HFE, please HTUe 
-.or telephone fbr jmspsetus. 

ToL OX-639 2B04.’. • - 
BONHAMS 6 nik. OM Unto. caOto 
. vuuai An* Opomewarta. £fith. 
April Apply Prm c UM I Ol-ESa 
0667 





DRAMA 


SanuMr Astttf 

■ CfWTMS 


..Oxford Drama 
Programmes 

8 Castle Mill House 
JuAon' Street 
Oxford (0865)51 1020 


LEAM TO PABfT on holiday hi 
Mult «td MHorca. RnadMUai 
OMimev JuH* vrwgnm. 
ARCA. AffWA. Imtomare 
Lodge- Canals Muu. pato 
' OHD. GcoUand. OCBI4 201. 


BLACKHEATH 
SCHOOL 
OF ARTS 


Invuet appUeatwni for 
OWE Yuur 

FOUNOATlOfi com IT 
Haiti —6 Tints I tor Start 


Details from 

21 LwHawL LaadeaHOWKL 
0MS2HH 


EcdesMcd Hmy 

•hdi «d lan va»n on tie cd B>e 

Rnoend Ptowar A C Cnwne on 
XDn Sepmnw 1986 
lot fjoAv oi EwHr PMmm sm 
dm s to Sir thqne d B D at anmair 
rut nonou* imrts mJ as in m-ba 
mb UA owes n me RdooK Swsk 
P to y a siW nahcfaf cnanuesaiBi 
OBtotomiS 'as oS*i Fatales 
to pemc a na n c. to esa aaal 
eomoonm S we tHmsej degrees m 
uo b noun IM. e. aar opuju on 

am n Mo m Siam m wi is 

tW J KB Mn n fcamoa a an lems an 
He Hetoy - Dfnsiticrti hmi we 

Urttortto TV FauP, feerrat* to 
nang tamuus to we Mreih o' 
n Chrtfl V ScoHnLcsitonia lor 
rte uoissf a om Outtwi be m 
a nry ve*h if 

tans *M fli Mutitots AMH Pe art 
6 remuind si w sums Hey 
farther pphCBUK ion Be OOtoCll 


'*"* l &%r*^**' 


tan- 


Ptnjxm o5 Sojb ftr 
lUCti EH1 1L$ to Mian , 

O mhbi me cow from bw- 

jxitoii itoa^a am rene mote 


SCHOLARSHIPS 


QUEEN’S GATE JUNIOR SCHOOL 
London S.W.7 

E ntr an ce examoMtons for September 1980. 
Entrance exammaOons for the 610 year ou wfa take 
place on March 11th and i2m. 

One acamnllc cchoianhlp Is offiereti artfte age of 8 yean: 
talue one Isms UlUJon fee annually roe 3 yean. 

The scholarship is open Co both Internal and externa! 
candidates. 

For funner details please apply » trie Registrar. 


WMKSOr COLLESC BOW curb 
13-18, For detotri tecnotorahto* 
Mci: m to ir— ir, worwop cm- 
kge. Wortaop. Nett* iOM9> 
: 473391 


”‘fr — — 




UNIVERSITY OF 
NEWCASTLE 
UPON TYNE 
Registrar's Office 


ASSISTANT 

REGISTRAR 


ABOUrauofis are Imlted ter 
an appointment as an ASSIS- 
TANT REGISTRAR. 

Candidates should be grado- 
un, and should have had 
previous admmmrain e expe- 
nencr. - prdmMv in 

inmersny. The sufrcssful 
canaidaie “HI be respomMu 
lor a range of didies con- 
rerned wrtth one of the 
Faruhies of I he UmverUty as 
wen as lor other duun of a 
general University nature. 


Saury win be at an jppropn- 
afe potm on the 
Admlmslratrve Grade It scale: 
EUJ67S - LW-KS DA. (Un- 
der rev uwl according to age. 
nuabficaoont. and expert- 
enre Appomcmeni win be 
made from as early a dale as 


Further parttrulars may 
obtained from the Senior As 
sntani Regstrar IF P i. The 
University. 6 Kensington Ter- 
race. Newcastle upon Tyne 
NEl 7RU, with whom aoph- 
ClUona (3 coMMI. rogether 
with I he names and addresses 
PL three r eferees, should be 
lodged net tour than lain 
March 1986. 


UNIVERSITY OF 
LIVERPOOL 
Chair of Pure 
Mathematics 

Appnralxme are invited for a 
Chau m i he Droaranem of 
Pree nut hematics. The other 
Chair m the Department tv 
hew by Professor CTtX 
WaR. F.RS- currently holder 
Of a SEBC senior Fellowship 
from 1983 to 1988. 

The Department has an ewei- 
KM International, reputation 
and attracts corisfderaMe re- 
search ■ undine II works 
rtosrfy with the Departments 
of Applied Mai hematics and 
Theoreueal Physics and Of 
Stanaues and Computational 
Mathematics. AppUcehont 
ore welcome from candidates 
who nave an outstanding re- 
search record and whose 
research haopooHMMes at in- 
teraction with 


dcpanmenul work. 

The salary will be wiuun the 
range appeoved for norvcii ru- 
ral professorial saunes. 
nprenlly not teas than 
£10.933 per annum (under 
review! 

Applications, together with 
the names of three re f erees. 
sh«Ad be received nM later 
than 30lh ApTU. 1986 to the 
Registrar. The ITmrrsily. 
PO. Box 147. Liverpool Log 
MX. from wnasn further par- 
Urulars may be obtained. 
Quote Ret: RV/977 


KING'S COLLEGE 
LONDON (KQO 


rtmnw of London) 


LECTirRESHlP IN THE 
vPARTMENT OF CNOIJSH 


DCPAR 

LANGUAGE AND 
UTERATVRE 


AppUratlom are tin lied for a 
Lectureship si English. 
Can did at es with a special 
interest m either nineteenth 
or Vwmku cmiuni 
Uieroture will be preferred. 
However, an ability 
paflJcIPMf m lutortals 
other amas ana ro emunbute 
lo courses such as Modern 
Lurawui ana. America 
Drama and The Novel win be 
3 distinct advantage. 

Salary «W pe wiuun the 
range £7J£2CKEI BS^O I 
annum plus £1.297 per 
annum London AUawaoce 
i under rev lew I . U rwenj lies' 

Superannuation Scheme 
benefits payable. 

AppHcalion forms and further 
particulars are as ailabie from 
the Personnel Office. King's 
College London. Strand. 
London, wcafl 2LS IICLOI- 
836 6464 CM 27601. 

A neutral ions should be 
Mjbmrned in duplicate, wun 
the names of not fewer man 
two referees, not later than 24 
March 1986. 


university of 

GLASGOW 
DEPARTMENT of 
ARCHAEOLOGY 
Research Assistant 


Aophrauant are muted for 
the above pom. lenaMe tar 18 
months from April 1996. The 
appointee win aacta In dtrert- 
mg l be excavation of the 
Roman fort and native settle- 
meni ai Llgtimaiigh. 
Appllranls should havr a 
good knowidetige of later pre- 
htfJorlr or Roman 

acrtVBMIogv. experience of 
armaeoiogirai evcavuiioa at 
supervisory level and the pre- 
paration of such work for 
puahcaUon A knowledge of 

campiiUrwed tula mamorea- 
flon would be an advantage. 
The pm ns supported by me 
ScotlUi Devefopmenl Deturl- 
mm wun salary within me 
Range I A B for Research and 
Analogous naif linlmm state 
C6R6409J7761. 

ADM teal mm. inrtudMg cv 
and ine namhs of iwo refer- 
ret. should be sehl to DR W S 
Hanson. Department of Ar- 
chaeology. L'ntverelly Of 
Clasgew. GUsgow. 02 BOO 
by 28 ut February 1986 


UNIVERSITY OF 
EDINBURGH 
KERR - FRY 
. AWARDS 
1986/87 


Ihe tamtwwg Bwd ei B» Ken 

are Annas Inane ton Oerter 

W86 

bo b P fiorato a bpM at iKMfcai 

HuftB CTfw utiul Mrt si an am 


M anoRtoce me wnc K to 

gmmL m hams Won w w Dl 

scobs# Mfe a flespaf. hi nu leas 

man hemp- top yeatotj emi-ito- 

m stiAlenn 4 h *23 bbr wars' 

Wntrcj at Gmje.lMHns Cbboe. 
IvOKp m ooauaK nl to um 
tflSri d EtMtacn CasasaMn 

nr we* H-9ht«ilA toPkhH 

Ml moA fsAMg ns* anHBAs 

ristte ivnr sed ifdawi tom 

mjb y ettasirtteni Di CarenneM 
UeMae. Seottor . W Btoatst Afl- 
lanstohQ BnH Itowoh .< 
fomnli Otf Were. Stuh &tk 
ESSSB# EHI STfL Id 031-kP 

«vt m a uKm unptoM 

# B m «" toss Be A ton e d . 

nr am tun me 


THE UNIVERSITY OF 
SHEFFIELD 



DEPARTMENT OF 
CONTROL ENGINEERING 


DEPARTMENT OF 
ELECTRONIC 
AND ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING 


As psn Dime Engmeermg ana Tecftnotogy Programme. ItieUGCtas 
suppoited a major evpanson ot Ihe Dejartmenl of Control Engineer- 
ing end me BepafTtnem oi Eteciromc and Dectncal Engmeoing at 
the Unveraty rt An aauitiona) HI uiKJagraduale places 
per arniun mil oe avaitaMe Uwn OciDbo 1888 on ihe B. Eng degree 
course ii tn/otmalion and Comroi Engmeering whch e jaoitty 
sdnunsteied by Ite \vu Depariments 


Sote/anlul resources aril be available lo sueport Hits ttevetopmem: 
aopnmnaie levels of aaonionai siaifmg wiR be provided logemet wrih 
funds kH new eauionum Ihe Umvefsdy has recently acquned 
fuiher modem accommodaiBm to use by the Oepartmenis con- 
cerned and by the Umwtsit/S newfy established bwttute far 
inftamalion Technology m addiimn tunds m excess ot El mfttm 
Have been allocated by the UGC lor a new budding. 


Tins development nil confirm ihe position at Sheffield Ureveratv as 
one ol the leading ceniies (of teaching and research m Infavmaiion 
Engmeennq The Department oi Control Engineering (Head ot De- 
parimeni Professor H. Ncrrofson) has partcufa wpeftee m sqnal 
and image processing, tmaoevocessor apohcaikms and rabofes 
Stall m me Department ol Etectiomc and Efcctncal Engmeenng 
(Head ol Deparmem. ftotesa* F A Eensoni are pronwenl m many 
heJOs of research mduding me design of new electronic systems 
using computers, sermconductoi innovation, cornmuncalion system 
dispiavs. real lime image processing, mpopocessor applcabons 
and maowave sensors. 


NEW LECTURESHIPS 


Apohulws are wmed (or tout posts of lechtra available torm 
August 1985 Suitable areas ol expertise mdude: 


Department of Control Engineering 


signal processing 
softvcie engineering 
real-lime cohlrd 


exped systems 
Automated marulaclure 
robot technology 


Department of Electronic and 
Electrical Engineering 


drgifal signal processng 

Circuit and aicMectwe design usmg VSU techrigues 
real lime image processing 

modern technujues tor sensmg. mstromerffabeii 
actuation and control 


Apphcariis should be able lo contnbme lo exstmg teaching ad 
research adwiues m these areas, and wd also be encoragaMo 
develop tneir own areas of imeresl Experience m industrial Bngmsff- 
«ng or wi academic research is essential Initial salaries wo bo at 
points between 1 and 12 an the nan -cluneal lecturers' scale (E702Q 
- £13.140 under review) according lo age. ouaJificalons and experi- 
ence kimmal enqumes should be addressed m Ihe last instance to 
Or. J. Taylor. Assistant Registrar. Faculties ol Engmeenng and 


Materials (Tel 0742 78555 exL 5361). Further parDcubre may^pe 


obtained tram the Personnel Department (Academe Starting). .« 
University. Sheffield. S10 2TN to whom appticdions (6 copies) 
including Ihe names ot three referees, should be relumed by Monday 
17 Match 1986. Please quote reference lumber R377/A 


UNIVERSITY OF KENT 


AT CANTERBURY 


FACULTY OF HUMANITIES 
Lecturer in English and American Literature 


AppWotitons art? tnvflrd for a riaif Urop Lectureship In En 
9ihh and American Literature Irom 1st October 1986. The 
successful rand Mate wHl be expected lo undertake some 
leaching in ihe field of African and Caribbean Literatim." 


Salary will be according lo auauricabons and experience 
on the scale £7.820 - £15.620 per annum Hinder review) 
but ihe Initial appointment will not be made above the 
seventh point of Ute scale. 


Further particulars and appUcatum forms are available 
from Mr. J. £ Reilly/ Secretary of Faculties and Deputy 
Reglsirar. The Registry. University of Kent at Canterbury; 
Kent CT2 7N z. Com pitied application forms (three copies) 
should be returned noi later than Monday 24th March 
1986. 


Please quale reference number A9/86/T. 


SEWOft RESEARCH 

ASSOCIATE 
ENVIRONMENTAL 
BSN ASSESSMENT 


App&caoons are invited 
irom Idcrate and numer- 
ate scientists lo worn with 
Professor LEJ Roberts. 
FRS. and other members 
of the School of Environ- 
mental Sciences an ihe 
ouanuncadon of the risks 
artsing from manmade en- 
vironmental changes. The 
post wtU be available from 
May 1986 to July 1990. 
Starting salary win be at 
an appropriate point with- 
in ihe range £7820 lo 
£9765 (under review) plus 
LSS benefits. 


Application including Ihe 
names of Ihree referees 
should be made by 10 
March 1 986 w the Dean of 
the School Ot Environmen- 
tal Sciences. University of 
Cast Anglia, Norwich NRd 
7TJ. uk. from whom fur- 
ther particuiars may be 
OM&lnea. 


UNIVERSITY OF 
NEWCASTLE UPON 
TYNE 

DIRECTOR OF 
CONTINUING 
EDUCATION 

Applications are Inviied for 
the newly established post of 
DWtior of Continuing Edu- 
cation which win be available 
irom Id October 1986: a 
new centre For Coniuiumg 
Education wHl be formed 
from the dame dale, inconxv 
rating toe e * 1*1 mo 
Department of MuU Educa- 
tion. The pou will be held at 
professorial level, and u is in- 
landed that H should be rilled 
by a person wuh both a 
[pjcning and an administra- 
tive background. who 
possesses managerial and en- 
trepreneurial skills as wed as 
a capacity lo prtv idr academ- 
ic leader dup. The Director 
will be nopecicd to undertake 
market research into toe re- 
gional demand for urns 
forms of continuing Educa- 
tion. and in coordinate toe 
provisions made in dMfcretU 
parts of Ihe LUiversIty for 
satisfying tool demand. The 
successful candidate will 
Show an ability to mutate toe 
provision of Short courses 
and lo encourage and ansa! 
other departments in expand- 
ing toelr masting 
contributUMs m Una field. 
kW expertmet to required, 
preferably including that of 
working with or wuhffl in- 
dustry. commerce or 
associated professions 
Salary will ee on ihe Profes- 
sorial range Membership of 
Uw L'mtersdies' Supcranmi- 
aiien Scheme win be 
mured. 


UNIVERSITY OF - 
DURHAM 
DEPARTMENT OF 
CHEMISTRY \ 

AppikailorM are Invited for 
an SEJIC funded RESCABClr 
A66ISTANTSHIP la Organjc 
ChoniKtry lenaMe ror UuVr 
yean lot work on toe syntoe- 
us of potentially riecmcauV 
comuciim noiymeio concanv- 
mg fluorine and involviiiW 
synthetic todkt to areas or 
hrierocyclir and aromaUc 
rnemnlry- n h suliablr for ap- 
M lean is homing or expecting 
a lirU or upper second class 
Honours degree Hi Chemistry. 
who win be expected to rrgn- 
ler lor a higher degree under 
tor supervision of Dr- C. M. 
Brmme irom whom fumw 
information may be nbuined 
by telephoning 03B»«49Za 
hi 407. 

Applirahons (3 nwM nam- 
ing Uirre referees. mmuU be 
sem by 30 April 1966- lo By 
RepHtrxr. Science LOborolg- 
nev South Road. Durham 
DHi 6LX. 


UNIVERSITY OF 
DURHAM 
CHAIR IN 
GEOLOGY 

Anpnrauans are bulled Idr 
Use CHAIR IN QCOLOQV 
Irom randxutes with re 
jeairti inu-rrsb in any oi toe 
main fieros nf Groiogy. The 
appanlinenl win dale irom 1 
Oriober 1986 or such later 
dale as may be arranged. 


The vacancy has arisen front 
Ihe appomimem of Professor 
J F Dewey. FRS to the Chan 
of Geology al Oxford 
L-itiv ersny. 


The anpmninieni will be 
made on use basic Professori- 
al salary scale together wnn 
toe normal pe ns i on 
arragemenle. 


AtucaioM (twehr ropirsL 
UK-ludiim toe name* of three 
refer nev rmrvl be subcmfled 
noi taler toon Wednesday. 2 
April 1986 to irv Regtstear 
ana Secretary. OU Shire HalL 
Durham DM1 SHP. Iiam 
whom fiirfher parucnlan 
may be Obtained. 


UNIVERSITY OF 
NEWCASTLE UPON 
TYNE 

DEPARTMENT OF 
MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING 
Lecturer 


post Of LKCTUREH In Me 


c— mom usosdd iur»r aacr. 

SB 


Further Mfrindan may be 
oMafncd from The Regturar, 
The L'nhemiy of Newcastle 
upon Tyne. 6 Kensington 
Terrace. Newcastle upon 
Tine NEI 7BU wim whom 
aptwcaDons iis copirei giv- 
ing the names and addresses 
of twee referees, must M 
lodoed noi later than 27th 
March 1986. 

iCandidMat from ouisida me 
BnUSh hies may submit one 
copy onlyi 


UNIVERSITY 
OF BRISTOL 


The Uilverwy proposrs to 
make an appwnunmi lo a 
Chair in Drama from ivi Jan- 
uary. 1987 or suetl taler dale 
as may be mutually agreed. 


SuttoMy auabfied appbronto 
are united lo sttemu appura 
Um by ifiUi March. 1986 
Further porunuars of Die » 
PMnmwni may be obtained 
'from ihe Regtaarar aad Secre- 
tory. Lnnemty Senate 
HbtMd. Bratal BS8 1TH 




p*ar reference to raboto and 
theft- apotKariofi m Dutnufae- 
Inrtofr The Lecfmr wfll be 
expMtad ig tote part to u» 
aerorbduate and poagroduato 
uocritng in the ratovant (Mas 
and to MbBabbi 




% 


B 




wflh inAncry. 


ca miwatM frieuu haw -a 

good Honours dig rte hi Me 
cria M ori Em Mcoiag or a 
retaied fMdL togetttor wuh re- 
aeorch and/or Ind u strial 


Sotory wm ne Mao appropri- 
ate potm on me Lecturers* 
HS lb i tajtOD - £14.906 per 
annum funder review), as- 
cording lo nge. anadfleaUoni 


obtai n ed from me Senior £»■ 


OFFL Trie 


UulmnUy- 6 Ksn o m s ta ll TfT- 


NEI VftO. with whom apdfe- 

redoBB 13 c o to os). togetngr 

wBh me aames and addr—s a 

of three ratorees sriooto A* 

lodged Mt later than 2» 

Moral >986. 




SUMMES COURSES 


M lor Aupux 1986. CouMtac- 
cmmmxMc up to sbay Mkng 

DMOto. An ncuiOH. Heated 


Bad auertng Mtaae. Ram hCt» 
(Of of £ 1.000 par week 
"g^ mnatere.,Ttl 
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Iht i IMhSi MONDAY frfctfKUAK* 24 iy«o 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


BIRTHS 


DEATHS 


CARR.'WCIFFEMBAEH - on 

February 17th in Bath to 
Camilla and Marcel. a son 

COOKE • On February 17m 
.1986 to Stephanie and 
Terem-e. a daughter 
AJeviuidra. 

.CfttMSLEY • On January Cfith 
at Toronto General Hospital, 
to Can! i nee Smith i and 
Gerald, a son. On e Edward. 

eUHOVSKT - on 2CHh 
February i9tte at Milton 
homes to Paur and Sue tnee 
Rennie. a ton Peter Renruc 
KfDlmtj. a brother (or Clare 
Jane. 

HUTLEY On Feoruarj 21 si to 
Jane mw Wollaston t and 
Nicholas, of Carttuckv Su- 
llen. Goondlwindl. NSW.. 
Australia, a son. a brother 
lor Ollier 

LLEWELLYN. On 2 1 si of 
February to Maria Theresa. 

. nee Barlow, and Martin A 
son. Thomas, a brother tor 
Harry. 

.MARK - On 20Ui February 
1986 to Susan and AJasiair. 
a daughter Alexandra 
Munro. a sister lor Susanna 
and Lucy. 

MILLER. On 2Isl of February, 
■o Richard and Karen of 
Back Forest Road. Far 
Meadow. Via Berry. 2636 
New South Wales. A son. 
Alexander James, a brother 
for So oh Ip 

NEWTON - On 168l February 
1986 to Karen inee HJcfcgj , 
and Anthony, a son Michael 
RoberL With thanks and all 
ben wishes lo the marvellous 
stall al U.C.H and much 
love lo Michael's I 
grandparents. 

SHAWCROSS ■ On 2 1 st 
February 1986 at The Royal 
Berkshire Hospital, to AJUson 
(nee Gunnell i and . 

Christopher - a son. Charles ,| 
Christopher Stuart, a brother 
for Harriet. 

T ALBOT -PONSONB V On 18th 
February at The Royal 

. Hampshire County Hospital. 
Winchester, to Robina inee 
Bruce) and NigeL a son. 


VALUER on I8in February af- 
ter a short illness Dons 
Maude Voider of Tunbridge 
Wells, aged 91. Cremation 
sen-ice at Tunbndor Wells 
Crematorium on Friday 28th 
February al 3.00 pm. 
cSke bequeathed her 
body for medical purposes. 
Memorial concert lo tie he"' 
later. Enquiries to her 
cousin, Margaret Webb, 40 
Slocks Road. Aldbury. Trine. 
Herts. 11 

YATES Peier Edmund, sud 
demy. Monday 17th 
February. Deeply missed by 
his family and many friends 
Requiem Mass to be held 
Thursday 27th February at 
10am. Holy Crass Church. 
Fulham. Flowere to Paines 
Ltd.. Funeral Directors High 
Street. New Malden. Dona- 
tions lo Save ihe Children 
Fund. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


WILLIAMS - A service will be 
held in memory al Morns 
williams on 18th March al 
1 2 noon al the Church of Si 
Peter Upon Comhitl. 

London. E.C.3. 


IN MEMORIAL 
■ PRIVATE 


ADAMS James Thomas Ward 
' Jim) died on 24ih February 
1985. Much loved and loving 
husband, remembered with 
pride by Rosemary. Daddy is 
greatly missed by Clare and 
Kainna. May Ught perpetual 
shine upon him. 
pAWSON -BOWUNG - Canon 
J O M. Former Vicar of Holy 
Tnnlly. Dinting Vale, and 
Rural Dean of GJossop Died 
24 th February 1980 

Remembered always with 
love 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


DEATHS 


BLACKWOOD. on Februar-- 
IBIh. peacefully al home. Kath 
►m Dorothi. mum loved 
mother erf Brun. grandmother 
of Ah-vander and vtsirr of Mar 
ion Funeral imm Wednesday 
2*m February al SI Peter's 
Churm. Pmlu Part. Brlohlcn 
al 2 30 pm. Flower* lo SC 
5* Inner A Son*. 140 t»n 
Ra Bnehinn 02 73-607440. 

de QUMCEY - On February 
IB tb 1986. Robert Gerald 
-■ Funeral Service al Salehurs! 
Church on Thursday 

February 27lh al 2.00pm. 
tallowed by private 
cremation. Family flowers 
only bui donations, it 
desired, to Salehurst Church 
‘ Restoration Fund, c o Mr & 

' Mrs Hugh Speers. 

' Twynham. K none Road. 

Rabertsbndge. Sussex. 
DONALDSON See 

Monypenny of Pitmilly. 

COCG1N On February 1 9th in 
' Ctieilenham General Hospi- 
' lal after a short illness aged 
' 82 years. Kathleen of 

* ChasUeian. Enouines to Al- 

* lend Son. Moreton-ln -Marsh 
Tel: 0608-50633 

. GRAHAM On February 201 h at 
. the Hampshire Clinic Maud 
. Elsie. Funeral at St. Mary’s 
. Church. Sullingfon. Nr 

Siomngion. West Sussex on 
. Tuesday. February 26th al 
. 2 30pm. If desired, donations 
. In lieu of (lowers, lo Asthma 
. Research Council. SI. 

- Thomas- Hospilal. Lambeth 
Palace Road. London SEl 
. 7EH. 

NEADLAM-MORLEY. On 

February 2lsi 1986. peace- 
lully in hospital after a brief 
Ulness. Agnes aged 85 yean. 
Formerly Montague Burton 
Professor of International 
Relations at Oxford Universi- 
ty. Much loved sisier-ln-law 
of Loma. aunt and greai- 
aunl. Requium Mass Sacred 
Heart Church. Edge Hill. 
Wimbledon. Monday 3rd of 
March at 1 00pm. Followed 
by cremation at Mordcn 
Crematorium. interment 
later in Whorlton Church- 
yard. Family dowers only, 
donations in lieu for S< 

Marys Church. Whorlton. 
c o Nat West Bank, Barnard 
Caslte. 

HICKS On February 19th. 

1986 in hospital. Agnes 

Hicks O.B E aged 91 years. 
Much loved aunt and great 
. aunt, she will be greatly 

missed by her wide circle of 
friends. Service at Mortlake 
Crematorium on Friday. 
28th February at 1.30 pm. 
Floral trlbules may be sent to 
James Goulborn. 61 Grey 
hound Road. Hammersmith. 
W6. Friday. 28lh by 12 
noon A service of Ihanksgiv- 
mg will be announced In due 
course. 

JOHNSON babel May -Tigger - 
< nee Scarborough! aged 50 
years of Cranes Park Ave- 
nue. Surbiion, Surrey 
20th February 1986. Funer- 


Cel v«hit mirv 
lorrrr, lor Ihe I6ih National 
Scrabble Championship now. 
Send stamped van lo NSC. 73 
Parsons Oxen Lane. London 
SI* 6 4J4 

HENRY m ROBERTA BOWMAN 

Congralulaliom on your Silver 
Wedding Anniversary Lou 
Debbie. Jason A all Uir family. 
KWMJUfS Monlpeller Modem 
An Courses. See Education 
PADOWCTON inn- ChoUl needs 
help. 


Cancer 


| Together we can beat it. 

Wt- Itiiid out line third ■.rf’ 
all ri'seunrh inli> ihe pi>-vei) 

I kin jrirJ 1 1 in- of vjnrrr in 
ihe UK 

Hr Ip iis hi sending j don j - 
| lion or make a IvgJv j |iiv 

Cancer 
Research 
Campaign 

•'■irdi'ii H.in-j- T^rrji i 
I il v - 1 >( il .■n*fi<*»*!\ttY9 i 



MARRIAGES 


BUCKLE-SHOm- The Mar 
nagr look place auieiiy on 
Friday Ihe 2lsl February, at 
Feering Church between 
Pamela Susan Short. Widow 
of Jeremy, and Kennedy 
Buckle. Widower of Mairrue. 
of Stamps and Close Laver 
Breton 


BIRTHDAYS 


JERVAULX May your heart be 
like a singing bird on your 
Birthday. Alblnom. 

HAETHC. Happy 22nd. Lov e goes 
on. enlv proole change Ales 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


TW 

London's imdinfl -wertalhl 
new dnd mlMTil pianos for the 
Lirqpsl genuine selection avail 
Able JOa HigMhHr BO NWS 
Ol »? 7b71 free catalogue 
HAROS: HJLAMC A SONS. New 
and rrrondinoncd OuaUiy at 

rrdvonable priers 376 Hnghloi 
Rd . S Croydon Ot <-883613 


bi.s v upriqni puns 
Victorian ClJMonO Bedford 
10214 1 57862 
bluthnek Babv' Grand tsrn 
km coiuliliafi. £2.000. Tel 
Crowihorne 772647 
GRAND HARO - Gerhard Adam 
Nr 22082 Tuned Hrmil.nrd 
CIOOO Lealherhead J76216 
NEIMETER rw wood OUT 
slruno uprtghl Musioan'S Pi' 
•ino £600 Ol gT> li>90 
PIANO Smalt upmmi good 

rcndlTlon ' lone Cd75 Trip. 
phone: Ol 937 7476 
SALE. Piano world secondhand 
new rrrnndmoned LnbeaLiHc 
pnees 01 -485 1 5SS 


FOOD & WINE 


LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, 

central London from £325 pw 
Plnq Town Hv Apis 37! 3433 
ST JAKVS PLACE SW| Very 
■mart 2 bed s t ant neyl lo 
Parh. Maid inti. 373 O30O iTi. 


FL4T5HARE 


SW7 Prof Male lor sell cot) lamed 
bedsit. own phone Clow 
Gloucener Rd lube £250 pem 
Tel. 01 373 1916 


SWX1 2nd Female lo share flat 
Own Room £140 pm. Tel. 01 
223 710b. 


(SLmOTQH Sun reciMc. Dbie Be 
all amenilm. close lo nubile 
Irarapocl. pal CH. n* pw. 
Short im povs Tel. 01-485 4161 
i Day I 236 0441 (Eiei. 
BARON'S COURT. W14 - Lae rm 
in soar newly mod 4 bed hat lor 
pro) n s 2 mins lube and shops 
£50 p w 381 afire 7. 

CHISWICK F to share line OK 
o r cicrw ID lube all amrti Uk 
days only preferred £2 20 pm 
Tel 01 994 5727 after 8 pm. 
FLATMATES Selenite Sharing. 
Weu esiab mlrodurlon service. 
PKe lei ror appl Ol 589 6491. 
313 BromMon Road. SW3 
OLDERS GREEN Room IO suit 2 
Inends in spacious flat £300 
per month. Tel Ol 209 0592 
'Evenings' 

FADDINCTOfL 5 nans lube A BR 
Mai are male lo snare fully (urn 
omd dr (lal O room. C5Cpw 
excl. 262 IbOliMcrnlngi 
SW1X Prof F lo share lux Me. 
o. reo.'balh Nr CUp June Sin. 
£1 TOpr.m. excl. Rhone 01 228 
5163 alter o 30 P m 
WJHAMP' M.VALE. Prof lo share 
he luv 2 bed hi o dbl rm. shwr 
en sir. n s close lube £75 p w. 
Al ail unm 01 025 6830 Cl ra. 
WANTED in N or W London 
■ Zones l A 2> Flat • use share (or 
prof re. £40 pw max wy 623 
8080 x 3888 eves 727 1478 
CLAPMAM. r lo shore room in lux 
nol ch. nr ammenllies £136 
pc ra 01673 8393 
CLA PHAM PROF F lo share romf 
ilai Own small mom Ci?4pm 
Tel 01 223 5104 eves 
FMD-A-FLAT nalshanno agency 
Arrom mini arras 36 Kings 
Rd SW3 01 5«4 8012 
FULHAM m n/' 10 shore large 
rial 5 mins rube £40 pw evrl 
Tom 681 7|fci bs731 6079 hm 
KENSJNCTON luv gdn (lal Prof 
male Own room £210 pem 

01 437 9928 all 6 00 
MAIDA VALE WV F o. r beaui i 
lul (lal £ 1 95 pem excl bills 
Ol 286 0270 -eves' 

PROF Male 25 wishes lo share 
ilai in ranc 1 or S Phone Ol- 
607 3603 afler 6 P.m 
PUTNEY Laroc room, c h spa- 
cious Ilai by Hi-alh £35 pw 
01 789 8627 eves 
PUTNEY prof male, own room.* 
share CH house NS Nr Sia- 
lic ns £45pw incl 01870 5791 
i. KEN female lo Share lovely 
large garden studio dal Amen. 
£82 50t>w Inc 01-373 7082. 
>W7. 2 prof Females la snare rm 
in CH (lal Cl&Spcm each * 
bills Tel 884 1181 art«r Apm. 
SW1 large dal. nr lube A shops 
v» nn nano. Female lo share 
room £15 pw 01-821 5494. 

W 30 2nd pmon lo share house 
£40 mus bills Tel 01 834.6432 
■ Offlcei 01-960 6199 ■ eves I 
WARPING Own room Ail mod 
cons CH £5Spw end. Mr 
Tortnfl Ol 831 2999. 


RENTALS 


SERVICES 


NEART to HEART. Todays way 
ol meeting. Confidential inlro- 
d unions IhrougnoiM UK lor 
Companionship. Fnendslup. 
Mam age Heart lo Heart. 32 
London Rd Twickenham. 
Middx 01 892 2051. 

CALIBRE CVS profeswonally 
mien and produced 
rumruturn vilae documents 
Deu.tr 01-560 2969 
FRIENDSHIP. Love or Marriage 
AU a aes. areas Dolelme. Deni 
|7ST' 23 Abingdon Road Lc«n- 
non wa Te». Ol 936 1011 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US VISA MATTERS. E 5 Coded n 
LS lawver. 17 Buhl rode St. 
London Wt 01-486 0813. 


WANTED 


V. 

rr 

i 

I 

at Sen ice will Lake place on 

t 

Friday 26th February at 3 
pm al Kingston Crematori- 


T 

um. Bonner Hill Road. 

tc 

.n 

5 

Kingston. No flowers please. 

a 

but donations lo Live Aid. 
Funner enquiries to W. 

. t 

— 

Hodges A Co. 37 Quakers 

aj 

X 

} 

Hall Lane. Sevenoaks. Kent 
' Tel. Sevenoate 454457. 
KREBS - Lottie loving wife of 

IT 

4 

Wolf and mother of Peter. 

IS 

T. 

1 

1 

9 

suddenly on 19th February 
- 1 986. Funeral serv ice Thurs- 
day 27ih February at 
Croydon Crematorium 1 30 


pm. Flowers lo Ebbull Fu- 
neral Services. Crovdon 
LAURENSON On 2C>lh Febru 
ary 1986. Janies Tail 
Laurenson F.R C.F aged 90 
of SuduFfe Meade. -Seal. 
Kent, greatly loved husband 
of ihe tale Vera Laurenson 
and much loved father and 
grandraiher. Funeral al Seal 
Parish Church on Wednes- 
day 26lh February al 
ll-OBam. followed by pri- 
vate cremation. No (lowers, 
but donations lo Doctor 
Bamados. Enquiries W 
Hodoev 6 Co. Sevenoaks 
454467 
MACKENZIE SMITH - on 19lh 
February Charles “Mac" 
Mackenzie Smith C A., aged 
80 loving and loved husband 
of the laie Ruth, father of 
David, falher-m-law of Janet 
and grandfather of Catnona 
and Margaret. Cremation 
pnvaie. enquiries to F W. 
Paine. Teddlngton 01977 
’ 15 a7 - 
MONYREKNY o( Plimilly. On 
201 h February 1986 in her 
BOIh year. Joan Cr an field. 

. wife of Rear Admiral Vemorr 
D airy Donaldson Funeral 
al Crogvcnor Chapel. South 
Audley Street. London W|. 
Tuesday 25lh February 
2.30pm. followed by 
interment at Kingsbamy, 
Fife Cui flowers only to J H. 
Kenyon Lid.. 49 Martces 
Road. London w? 
.NOWELL. On February 2CaH 
ol Bideford. Dorothy Mary in' 
her 90th year of Penhilt 
Nurseries. F remington. 

■ North Devon, widow of Wil- 
liam. bclov ed moiher of" 
' Edward and Elizabeth inc- 
reased v sister of Phyllis and 
a dear grandmother who will 
be missed by all. Funeral ser- 
lire at North Devon 
Crematorium. Barnstaple on 
Tuesday. February 25lh al 
• 4.06pm. 

PAUL suddenly al home on 
February wm. Susie, much 
, -loved daughter of Anthony 
Paul and Jean Wilson aged 
37 Funeral ai si John's 
** Beaumont. Old Windsor on 
Wednesday. February 261 h 
ai 1 2 00 

tWHMVER - On Wednesday 
19 th February Albert 
. Thomas Leslie Rimmer. Ma . 
Msc . and Barrister. 'Bertie - 
al King Edward vn Hospital 
Father of George and Roger. 
Funeral Service on Monday 
3rd March 1 1 00am ai Si. 
Andrew's Church. Orshon. 
Surrey Flowers lo Ihe 
church please. 

RUGBY TICKET* WANTED F.n- 
gf.ind vs Ireland. Cxcrllml 
pra-pspaid Tet- 01-836 677 1 4 
540 8104 

SMITH - “Mac", please see 
Mackenzie Smith. 


MODERN SCULPTURE London 
Oallm owner wnh- lo pur 
(luw laror pirrn rt liauranv r 
modern >r mature ■ vmgie items 
or llm ropvngm la l.mlim rdi 
lionv Please vnd ihiuom lo 
Derel Crowih«r. Svon Lodge 
London Road. hlewanh. 
Middx TW7 SSH 
FAMILY MAN 3 muoren wnhex 
IO Ml an nndBCIO-ed amount 
in r avb lor a S A Owl. 2 rw-p 
(Ul houv preferably in need of 
oeroreiion Cenlrol Lcndon Re 
plv lo BOX £03 RpplH-v irealed 
cenlidenUaly 

BALDWIN ANTIQUES require 
roll lop 4 pedevul devil * pool 

r«v Hl*i i-nairx irg 
wardrrtvm rtxwiv. ainure^ rf.- 
Ol 585 0148 « Ol 228 2716 
WANTED. Fair, herd bjr> ropv 
■lleirv -4 SHORT HISTORY 
OF RELIGIONS' Any reavon 
arte pore Reply lo BOX C25 
ARTIST* A MODELS RBC2 Wed. 
|9ih F f) vhs V idea Warned 

Trt 01 4J7 78e8 
BAYREUTH 1986 3 (or 

•tnv rvcie wameo iot 6* Tin 

mnhdai Ping oi gae, sia^. 


LITTLE VENICE 

Luxury maisonette. 3rd 
& ath floors. 4oo sq.ft.. 
newly converted, 

bright, unlum. flaL 4 5 
dble bdrooms. 2 baths, 
1 2 recepUons i25fl x 
POHi. b'fast 

rm kitchen. GCH. Roof 
terrace otooKinq 3 
aaes prlv. enclosed gar- 
dens. Close American 
School. Regents Canal, 
■village' Shopping and 
all a men 1 lies. Corporate 
Tenants and Embassies. 
LSOO per wk. 

Phone: (Oil 289 2485. 


Rentals 


Ealing W5 

Ideal fum family hse 
in quid cul-dc-»c, 4 
bods. Igc rcccpts. 2 
baihs. c.\c Puffy Hi 
kii/dincr plus all ap- 
pliances. gdn. gge. 
025 pw ncg. Wc re- 
quire properties in 
central south and 
we&i London areas, 
for wailing applicant 
01-221 8838. 





SW1. Scucioua Hal mth huge 
rt>»p iiXfns F F ktl. 4 beds. Z 
baths £4 Mpw 

SW1. Attractive and comfort. 
aWc maconstte Ftecfip wiih 
teeplace & baby Grand piano 
Lge lul/b'lasl rm 3 bods. 2 
bams, anal mol terrace 
C350pw 

SOUTH KEM. Large and vnJ 
dec studio with dbte bad Bat- 
coiTr l<ji/drr>q. bait) mth 
snowat £139pw'ndCHS HW 


Short lcts:in central areas - 
also'' avail LlOCr£t'iOOOi)w 
-. 0 1-828 3251 




Groves n 


Keith 
Cardale 
Groves 

BELGRVVIA SWI 
Lo*cty 4 Morvy period house 
with garden and GARAGE. J 
imps. Ll. 4 hedrms. 2 
ha 1 turns, elks + stall flai 
comprising nxvp. kiL dMc 
bednr. haih LbMpw ncg. 

HICHGATE N* 

3 slorey modern lowti hooac 
wiih rveep. dining area. kiL 
pL' room. 4 hedrms. baih. 



GOING 

OVERSEAS? 

WE HAVE WAITING 
COMPANY TENANTS 
WANTING TD RENT 
YOUR HOME IN 
CENTRAL/SW LONDON 

Buchanans 

Lctlmg & NanigrnMi 

01-3517767 


SOUTH 
KENSINGTON 

Superb unfurnished^ 

mews house. 3 beds. J 
rcerpis. 3 baths, saunaj 
Earagc and roof terrace.! 
Long lei toh 

com pames/em bossies 
janly. £475 pw. 

Buchanans 

Lnlinc A Monjccmmi 

01-351 7767 


UPFR1END 

HOLLAND RE. DWJWlul TT Oat 

10 Nam 1 - tamre > r» -mi. 

XUdw Lttr La. U fw 
L tmOILEl. BwMi W i-wt. tsar. 
iwm foMICCW 80041 Brfft'tf 
P.'Un tTM 

CUPfUMCM. mows 1 fflf BBFr 

4 X (Via Eh fats <45 S.-joo£1X 

01-499 5334 


OLD HAMFSTCAD. Dnrmung 
tenant sought lor rtegant pn 
van* timin' in wing 01 Quoth 
A nn*' noiw. Oar rrcrtr- rood 

kil. 2 Brdrms. prrtiy bdUi. 
washing marh. igr orrp Irrrn-. 
CH. Ov eriopkjnq and uM> of lg« 
pan C3C0DW Do L» Rrt* Ol 
493 2224. 2«a 


WANTED - CENTRAL LONDON 

Bnlrfi Owshm-b osecuInN MW. 
rolurmna Lk from Toro mo 
wNh lo row smon furnishM 
housr/ltef <>-» roomi lor 6 
months from Mav ImporeaOlP 
rrlniwn no Agmls pteoac. 
Rrpfv to BOX CM Th* Tirtwv 
PO Bos 434. Virginia SI. Lon- 
don El 


PENTHOUSE • Oly/Boriwan. 
roily furnished, living/ dim ba 
room, d revving/ golUii boo 
room, ktlclwn. Mh.'M. Urtr 
irmrr. panoramic m6m6 £210 

pw Inc. 01-628 6820 after 
e CD p m 


iWO lovely Ugm IN near rut. I 
dbl bedroom. 1 rccep. (iiwd 
knetM>n. IxaUiroom and roof In-, 
rare inclusive- of aos and 
eicct nelly. AvaiUMe until end 
April CIlOpw. Co Lei ftegrtF 
nr House Props 01-937 3710 


ADJACENT THE CHURCHILL Ho 

in. nmly decorated fUH 
Lounge, one bed. bath en sunc 
£150 per week Company let 
preferred. Avatlaotr now. Ol- 
935 1791. 


HAMPSTEAD VILLAGE. Luxury 
modern 2 bedroomed Mrwf 
House. Garage £280 p — Full 
CH Avaiiaole os irom Marrh. 
Company lei Pref Tet Ol 348 
0834 or 01-794 8294 


LOVELY BELGRAVIA home wUh 
prrtly English Style inferior de- 
sign. Superb order. 4 beds, 
intercom rerra. 2'. 1 baihs. kil 

wiih all nurtn £SOOpw. 

AyfcUord A Co 351 2383. 


PMMROSC HILL, well fum flaL 
I bed 1 reeeo . V * b g r ti . 
qdn CBS p w. Also s c studio 
flol wiih k + b. £60 D. w Mm 
year No sharers. Telephone, 
01-722 3019. 


ST JOHN'S WOOD Linrury fur 
nlshed home. 4 s dble bedr m a, 
2 3 reeepuons. 3 balhrms. fully 
equipped kjlcfien. garage, pjlao 
£550 per week or unfur 
lushed. 01-624 8704 


WESTMINSTER Fully rurrusned 
flat 2 beds, large living room 
(Hied kurtien. and baUiroom 
washing nwtiuir. dhh wash 
colour TV £180 pw Tel. 01 
630 7031 or 01607 SI 56 


HOLLAND PARK Charming lerr 
hse nr lube Completely return 
3 bedv 2 baihs. recep. dining, 
kil. patio, ige roof lerrace £350 
pw Ol 221 4893 


VtMTMG LONDON? Allen Bairs 
A Co nave a large selection 
dais and houses available for 
week v Irom ClSOpw. 499 
1665. 


HARLEY ST Wt Magnlfleenl 
level man. 4 able bens. Igr 
rerep. 3 baihs & tv / an bed 
FAOOpw.SC Boland 221 2615 


ST JOHNS WOOD. Tucked away 
in drttghlful So Charming 
bed Hal £145 pw Nathan wu 
son a. Co. 794. 1161 


Savoti Madron all Bad Props 


Frogn.il NW3 
Randolph W9 
HID SL W1 


£ 

225 

27B 

450 


Hoi. Pk. Ms Wll 
Upper Pk Rd NW3 
Warrington 

Cds W9 4 

01 722 5135 


320 

350 


FOR SALE 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 

Massive slacks al wool 
btended Berbers irom 13 95 
+ vat Plus mam bargains in 
room sizes In all uualiitev 

207 Havcrsiock Hill 
Hampstead NW3. 
01-794 0139 

FTecesumale ■ Expert tilling 


THE TUNES H8I4 ]ie5i i 

an c-rfainai ivviir. ddi ■ 
nf Ihriwv day llwy u nr bom 
£1S 50 Of 2 lor £22 00. plus 
free I BoO's Times & qreennm 
card Tel 01 486 6705 or 
0492 13145 

FINEST qualm- wool carpets Al 
trade pru'es and under. Mv 
ai-ulanie lOO'v esnra Large 
room sire remnants under heH 
normal pnre cnancerv Carpels 
01 406 04 S3 

WIMBLEDON Tickets wun ever 
uuve euM-rteinnmu -Aill 
jujoie fur names ni six cr 
more. From £130 per head 
Further mformaiion. ring Ol 
76 1 1340 it* (Mr hour*. i 

CATS. STARLIGHT EXPRESS 
l*e nave lu-krls (or iheve and all 
meal re and vporii Tel 63 1 
3719 637 1715 All maiur 

credit rardv 

THE TIMES Original mm 18 a& 
1986 Other HIM avail Hand 
bound ready for arevenlallon 
“■JundajV £12 50 uwl. 
Rememaer wnen Ol mm 6323 

TICKETS lor any evenl Cals, 
tuorligni Exp. Cnew. to Mis 
All Ihealre and iporh 821 
6616-828 0495 

A £x .' v isa* Diners 

OLD YORK PAVING STONES All 
rectangular Beauuful rondi 
1190 Cheaper IO buy now Tet 
0625 533721 

SCATTHfUCM Any evenl inr 
Cats. Covenl Gdn. Slaf lighl Lvp 
Ol 828 1 d 7U Maior crrdif 
vards 

ROLCX WATCH. Iflrl goM dai 
dale wdh IBci gold Mmeiei 
C20CO one* Tel OI-92<9 3829 


LNTIQLi 

jllect; 


collehables 


8MGHTS or NCTTLCBED. Some 
of England'* linenl 17lh and 
lBifl Century replica lumilure. 
9olid mahogeiiv, English Oak. 
walnut ana nurki-irv 
NeMtefed. 0*«n. i049Ii 
64111®. 


CABBAN & 
G.ASELEE 


HOLLAND RAM 

house 3 beds, dble recep. 
new K. B * loo GARAGE. 
£250 

VICTORIA SWI flai. 2 
hedx 2 rerepk. 2 MUD. 9d 
k Balcony £275 
SLOAN STREET SWI Su 
Perb Ilai 3 dble bedi - 2 Ige 
rrveps. Mg K wiih all 
mortis. 2 B * Cloaks. 
£650 

01 589 5481 


GEORGE KNIGHT 

The Leuing Agcnl 

As London's leading special- 
ist telling agents, we offer a 
professional and expen ser 
vire in both Ihe telling and 
renting of line homes To 
new our personally inspect, 
ed properties or if you 
require a quality tenant, 
please coniarl Elaine Moir. 
Julie Morgan or Katrina 
Evill 

01-589 2133. 


DRAYTON CARDENS. 
SWIO 

Hdtericsei fkil WUh good re 
repbon rooms. 4 beds 2 
hjlhs. 5 r«n». kil 'break. 
Liii and Porter 
£o5*lpw 

CHARLWOOD S 'l H E E T. 
ML 

Ground floor run. 3 beds 

recep baih. Vil 

£250ow 

ORtLCWOtG ASSOCIATES 
01-Mi 8025 


FIRST MAYFAIR 
PROPERTIES 

CABOCAH PLACE SHUSH 

rious i bra liar me rh rhw 

£Z50p* 

Mayfair 2 bed Hal £MOpw 
W2 Mews Hse 3 hdv2 Whs 

CAOOyw 

Pork Mfoef W 2 Several I Bed 
(Lus from ......... L171m 

01-499 8403 


PLAZA ESTATES 

ST. STEPHEN'S CLOSE. NWI 
Stum^iq W Des Ultra mod Hat 
n piesaqe ML 3 owe Beds. 2 
baihs. Ok. 2 Receps Huge 
Kn/BTa&inn Pnvaie Dkq. lift 
Dona Iw*} lei £750 00 pw 
UPPER MONTAGU ST, W1 
DekghKui warm and cosy Hat n 
Ihe heart ol the West End Bed. 
Baih. leceg. M. Long tet 
£17000 pn 

724 3100 


r LONDON. W 2 ^ 

C nrrtlmi rpfurtrtftrd ronv 
Fiji Ligni Mfilh irad fur ns . 
2 bMh . dbtr nYpp mod 
kiL tfailh mdctunn. bain 
AkuiUOff 6-24 monfln £210 
pnr WOP k 

Notling Hill Office 

01-221 ^snn 


CHEST^RTONS 


PALACE 

PROPERTIES 

We have a superb se let non of 
personally utspenrd lur 
nnned and unfurnished 
properties in many fine Prt. 
aenlwl damns. ranging 
from £1 SO pw ui £2£X» pw. 

Tel: 01-486 8926 


r KMCHTSBRIOGE 

I swi 

r fttfll dec + cmncmporanlv 
:Jum Ilai. i low Harrods. 
perukl umv. | rccep. ’| 
\ h.'ilrmv. i fcaihrm. f f kil 
£Tu'P«.. 225 1972. 

LT7TLE VENICE W9 

Evuuiviu brand nos Oaf in 
IXTHni hiHive. (Ttamunp 
iivcp I.' kinking huiar crimm 
50" .’ btfilrmv 1 haihrmv. t f 
kil t b'CLM Jrva. £35npw. 

722 7101. 

KENSINGTON W8 

Bcauiiiul huijv- m voughi af- 
ter HiHpic Villoyr Itnmac 
JiV & lum ihrrsigfiouL 3 
Ikslrms. ’ cn VUIK haihrmv, 
vpacmlK Wflip f fkil - k b't mj 
isirca £. 5 5Up*. ?27 7227, 



QUEENS6ATE GATE 
TERRACE SWI 

Spacious, newly decor a ted 
IW noor flat euh fouln 

■ aring lerrare double bed 
room. bJihromt. kuenrn. 
reception 

£185 pw 

Please roniaci Suxannr 

ConwAv al 

SAISHOCRS 

of Kenvmaon 
an 661 3623 


PLAZA ESTATES 

ST. STEPHEN'S CLOSE. NWS 
Stunnrifl W Des Uma mod !BI 
in Biestrge Uk. 3 dbte Beds. 2 
Darns. Cm 2 ftsfios. Huge 
M/Bherm Pnvaie d 4 Ml. 
oana. Long us. £750 00 e*. 

UPPER MONTAGU ST, WT 
DekgWd tom wt wsy na m 
the new ol the Wgsl enfl. Bed. 
Bam receo. ka. Long t 
£170 00 sw 

724 3100 


THE VERY BEST 

LandtonM and Tenanrt 
none to uv for BELCH -V 
VIA. HAMPSttvD. 
KEMSPvCTOK. WIMBLE 
OOK and wmur anus 
Phone now. 

BIRCH & CO 
01-734 7432 


FURNISHED QUALITY flats and 
nouaet in all areas. 

Hunter A Co 037 7365 


WAPPtNW CANAL FRONTAGE 

Superb new various 3/a nod 

house. living room. large 
Kill -Ren /dinmg area, study. 
ballM. seprikrm. an new (urn _ 
equip. GCH. landscaped court 
yard, close team., pm pkmg 
CfowT Pw- <03281 

5 MMS HARRODSl Spectacular 
fully furnished IN noor flat. I 
dble bedim. v. large 
rerep, diner balcony, brand 
new Ailed kitchen and bath 
room wlin shwr Full ch Long 
K« required £500pw Tel B46 
9164 / 995 7358 anytime 

ST JOHNS WOOD Modern Mock 
Unlum Ihrre aspeefed (lal 
bedims with buui-m ward 
robes. 2 balhrms. clfcrm. 2611 
12 klirnen with brklosi bar. 2 
intercom recep. 34 s 1 5n recep. 
CH. parking. Immaculate rondi 
tton. £340pw. 870 2576 

AMERICAN EXECUTIVES Sert. 

I UK flalv houses UP lo £600 
p w. Lsuai lees reg Phibipv 
Kay 4 Lewis. South ol Die Par* 
Chelsea office. 01-352 811 
North of ihe Park Regent's 
Park office. 01 72? 5135 

KENSINGTON with private SOfl 
south lacing garden 2 nearttn. 
SOtl recep. new lounge A dining 
furniture, modern kllctien 

anal trances, balhim. storage 
£165pw 493 2091 evenings 
870 a 703 

LET YOUR PROPERTY wiih 
qrealer nexibnin-. ObUUn your 
lumilure for short or long term 
teri on our unique hire service 
Ring Mr Michael Norburv 
JOtm Strand Contracts Lid Tel 
01 485 0615 

WEST KENSINGTON - dlptomall 
famuy hse. 3 dble bedrooms, 
dbte drawing room, large 
klirnen coming room, folly fur 
nished. maior anptlanm. gas 
ch £180 nw Tel 01 MS 4299 
mornings 6 evenings 

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 
Hamoslead NWJ adi heath 
rumisned Oil. newly refurb 
and arc Double bed. single bed 
recep. K £ B CH £150pw Tel, 
01 629 6102 iTi 

PARSONS MON suneunual 5 
bed. 3 bain house in great 
kKalion.Rrdrcoraled lo lughesl 
DOSSrtkr wandards. avail now 
unfurnished, long ro let. £450 
pw Buctunans 3SI -7T67. 

PUTNEY Superb IM In sought of 
ler area 2 dblr beds, recep din 

wi'h bole, lux lul Break and 
baih Gas CH HW £130 pw. 
COS. only Barnard Marcus. OL- 
602 2428 

SWISS COTTAGE NWJ. Modem 
family house in gulp! tocarmn. 
nul (lose lo lube Drawing 
room, dining room, a bed 
rooms. 2 baihs. garage and 
paUO £200 pw 01 244 7353. 
VKAJLAGE CATE WS. Newly dec 
comport Mil smart flat in Mock 
1 dble bed. recep. mod kil and 
bain Co tec. £190 pw me 
CH CHW. b mins plus. Kennctl 
Turner. Ol 584 2531. 

WALTON ON THAMES New lux 

urv sell contained I wo bedro o m 
opart men! Lease I year £125 
per week 25 manules Waterloo 
Available NOW. Tel 0932 
240997 


rurrenily seeking good guuuy 
rental jccommoaaocn in 
central London for wainng 
company tenants 01-937 9681. 
CLOSE HOLLAND PARK Nu-rly 
furnished flat. Ublng roam. 
kiKhen -dwer. double bedroom. 
baUiroom. Osdral Hvaung 
£1 25 pw 01-221 2247 
CONTACT us If you waM (be 
very bm selection of superior 
dais and house* In London. 
Our anti i Comunune. 

Tel: Ol 244 73B3 
COVENT GARDEN WC2. Super 
new siudio flat m heart of fash- 
mnAOte area Meal EMM-a-ierr* 
Co trt I yr mm. £150 gw. 
S-rtt Cowan Oi«i 6313 
FUUfAM. flow Kings Rd PirMy 
2 bed house wun off si parking 
and gdn. Avail now. long cc icl 
C l 80 pw 

Buchanans 361-7767 
FULHAM superior snecsous 2 bee 
fief. rfcHe tube Rerep. new 
kil 'diner, washer /dryer Lge 
com gdn EtaSpw Co. Lei Tef 
.1*1- 736 1076 or 381 58ST 
KEHSOeenrOH Luxury I bed flat. 
Lower ground floor wiih sunny 
garden. Souarr wiih lemus 

rourt* CI25PW oeg. TeL- Ol 
937 5606. 

MARSHALL ST vn. Fantadir 
views. LI tra mod 10m Rr 1 Bed 
Ilai wiih roof lerr Pkno avail 
Co lei 3 mnlM * £185 pw 
Sweby Cbwan. 01-631 5313 
WS. BeOuliluily pr—rtifed col 
■age. lum lo i high standard 2 
bed*. Hlrti recep. Igr Ml. super 

tsalhrm gdn close kj tube Long 
ITI £165 pw Tel 0: -381 4266 
WE LET FLATS AND HOUSES. 
We urgenllv require your prop- 
er lies m w.. Sk and nw 
L ondon Run Woonr & Co 
402T38L 

WCM PK AKA EWMM. rully 
lurii 2 bed ror. 65' gdn & paiio. 
mod krt luh bath, CH. Co Lei 
Cwnuai lo request debub 
1160 p w Ol 870 485S 

AMEJHCAH Bank urqefi||y rr 
uuirev lintury flats and Muses 
from £200 £l OCJO pw Rmg 
Burgess Estate Agents 581 5l Ah 
BELGRAVIA CHELSEA 

hlsnGHTSBRIDGC Rah (MUteg 
av jMPte now. tiocM.OOO pw 
Burge*, ot-581 5136 


the hrorl « ihe 
tillage. Atiroet 2 bedim flan. 
ClSOpw Ndiiwo wiuon a Co. 
794 not 

M K INCTON 'CH EL REA. SO 

knrly studios A i bed flat*, 
from £90 to Cl AO pw Co. H«i 
tet* Shield Ol 373 2387. 
KNMWTSBJHDGG opp Marred*. 
Good 1 bed nai in Mock Rerep. 
USB. £200pw. Alhcn Bates A Co 
499 1666 

Nud H last? Honsetoraters rmial 
arrom publtshrrs 1600 varan- 
nrs IO rtevwe irom. 627 2610 
nil 8pm. 

NWS DenoMfui «er 2 bed Ital. 

p b block, £300 nw Co. or Env 

bossy in TWO uetore 9 30 am Of 
alter 11 pm. 01 794 3084. 
PUTNEY snuimteM unique 2 bed 
Oeorgtao collage in charming 
qutei sum. Long let £225 pw. 
Buchanans 381 7767 

SOUTH KJHMGTON Luxury 1 
bed Mews flat “tOt g»bge 
Long ro tet. £226 nw. 
Buchanans 351-7767. 

ST JOHNS WOOD. Prrity siudio 
flat. suH 1 person. Fully 
equipped TV. MtiUn. CBBpw 
722 8476 

ST PAUL’S CT W14. EJegant 2 
bed town me. gd” Wte- 6 Trt * m 
lube. £170 p w mri r. n. lyr 
tease 01-748 2442. 

SW7 2 bed furmsfied rial Go or 
pnvaie imvst. £190 pw Avait 
mid Mairh Tef day 238 0301 
ofter 6. 373 7406. 

SWISS COTTAGE. £480 pw Mod 
3 bed. 2 baih town me Mr Hob- 
day inn. Co tef only. Outer* 
available LCD £ 5B6 881 1. 

987 S«St The number lormwm 
ber when seeking be* rental 
properties m central and prune 
London area* £ lS0/£2.000pw. 

URGENTLY REQUIRED in riam 

flai* 4 hsev in rtnlrsl London ' 
for long short Cn lets. Samuel 
A Co. 736 GOOD 
W. KEN SING TON 3 bed. Id floor 
balcony flat. 3 mins tube £180 
pwk I Day! 236 4040 EM 279 
■Eve) 306 8459. 

R. KEN. CHELSEA A selection of 
charming fuHy turn 14 bed 
appl* A t/house*. £140/ £400 
pw md 91-675 1096. 

Control! OMr bedul own kit. £58 
p w Others too 627-2610 
I tune 4 cm. a lor* . 

■rt End 1 3 be cu i n house sufl 
snarers. CBS pw Others log 
627 2610 HomeWcalors. 

Five bedrm house washer TV ga- 
rage sharers ok. £140 pw .627- 
2biO Homefocators. 

Handy Tnbn I Dole bedrm im 
washer recent C66 pw 627- 
26io Hometocators. 

JUCUZZD4 bedrm house nr h£e 
washer parking. £160 pw. 627- 
2610 HameiacaWrL 
LUXURY SERVICED Apartments 
near Stoane Square. Reduced 
wuurr rales. 01881 BOOH IT) 
MATE AIR Slnqje bedrogm A bath 
ui luxury home. £98 pw Inc. 
Telephone 01491 1944. 

NW11 spacious. Is* fir do) 3 
beds, lounge. kK/dtnrt-. fgns 
C155 pw. CM let. 01-465 6073 
HW 2 bedrm flat recent. rit«d ok- 
£85 pw. Other* too- 627-2610 
HomeMealors. 

QUEENSGATX Destguert tin 
fum 1 bed paho flaL Co LeL 1 
year* £300 pw. 504 2251. 
RMOVATUK 2 bedrm flol. nr, 
lube CM. £02 pw. Other* loo, 
627-2610 Honsewcalon. 

S KEN Lux. fum. » C flat SUll 
couple smote. Own enlrance 
Co Lef. ClJOpw. 01 584 3373 

S. KEM. garden square, atlrarirve 

i r studio n«! from £70pw. 373 [ 
0667 

SW7 Attractive large furnished 3 
bed maoonefle. all machine*. 
Co let. £286 pw Tel. 684 7B64. 
SW7 BeauUfully ftesegned large 1 
bed n«l. bainrrn en-suite. pauo. 
Co tel £IB5mv. Tel . 584 7564. 
SW Dble bedrm. flat . rerrpt 
phone £80 pw Ollten loo 627 
2610 Homelocaiors. 

W 14 Fum. 2 beds, balcony. C H. 
£150 pwk. (Day 1 236 4040 Ekl 
279 lEvei 386 BA59 
Wl. Centrally located cheerful 2 
beds. 2 baih nal. roof lerr. £250 
pw. 586 984? 1 111 
Wl short let* 1 bed med a-terre 
Lin MOrti near BBCfRegents 
Pk £1 lBpw 01-794 1523 
Wgat End! Luxury I bedrm TV 
parking C9S pw Others loo 627- 
2610 Hometocalon. 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


PARTAIR 


Ihe 


n York Eiwr* JTwra £46'ia 

UH Ain £339 Nohow £3391 
Sydney £639 

Aurk £700 Toronto SSWfl 

130 Jeraqm Strwrt, 
SWI 

PImhic 01-838 7144 





return from £623 
SYD/NEL/6R1S ' £655 
AUCKLAND * £745 
SeawtatheNDBENDENT 
SPECIALIST on Offer! 

01-2425555 
REHO TRAVEL |IATA) 

S/17 Meat Orlortl St. London WC1 
B jacM ■ Stdtey & Udtsme . 


UP UP & AWAY 

hUurobi. JoDurg. Cano. Du- 
bu. Istanbul. Singapore. K L 
Demi. Bangkok. Hong Kong. 
Sydney. Europo. A The 
Americas Flamingo Travel. 
3 Now Quebec Si Morale 
Arm London wiH TOO. 

01-402 9217/18/19 

Open Saturday 10.00-13 00 


i mm — 

i«g»i 


WH LOW FARES 
WOAUHIflOf 


Cata 

KMl 



SKYLORD TRMtS” LTD 
Z DEN1UH BI Hfct l LONDON Ml 
ILL 01439 3521/ 


AIRFARE sncuum Sydney 
o w £395 rm £645. Auckland 
o w £420 rm £774. Jotting 
o w £264 rip £470. LOV Aoge- 
lr*o w £171 nn £335. London 
Flight Center Ol 370 6332. 


COS I CUI ItM ON nights hota 
lo Europe. LS*A A most dnlina- 
hom. nplonvM Travel- 01-730 
2201. AETTA IATA ATOL. 


MR FARES. 

Buckingham TraveL ABTA. 

Ol B36 8622. 


USA from £99. Major (ravel. 01 
485 9237. IATA 


ALICANTE. Fan* Malaga etc. 
Dtroond Travel ATOL 1783. 
01-501 4641. Horsham 60541 

AUSSK. N Z . sin Africa. I S.A. 
Hong Kong. Be*l Fares: 01493 
7776 ABTA. 

SYD/MEL £618 Perth £545 AD 
maior earners lo ACS. N2. Ol 

684 7371. ABTA 

H KOm CABS Bangkok UH Sin 
£425 Other Far un dertlna- 
lions 01884 7371 ABTA 
SOUTH AFRICA Jo'burg fr £465. 
□1-684 7371 ABTA. 


GENERAL 


Fine 

homes foe exchange in 30 covin- 
Dies Worldwide home 
Exchange. 1 3 KiugMsbndgr 
Green. London SWI. Tel Ol 
589 6056 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


SELF-CATERING 


♦ ♦SAVE £££♦♦ 

♦ ♦FIRST CLASSY 

♦ ♦CLUB CLASSY 
♦♦TOURIST CLASSY 

♦ BOOK NOW FOR &>♦ 


MALAGA. lUEtlW 

Travel woe oi 44 1 mi. 


MALDIVES, LANZAROTE 
hUtKH Ol 836 4383. 


« <>»e» 

* 

* 

UELSOUFWF * 

• PERTH 

* 


enstm * 

* HOBJfll 

» 

* 

MBM * 

• JO BUG 

* 

* 

Semen* 

* kJCKUM) 

* 

*• 

MUJWTOh * 

* FIJI 

* 

»PORT UORFST * 

+ 

* 

* 

10-CWJ * 

* wmK 

* 

* 

«w * 

* (MW 

* 


BHAW * 

* WO EAST 

♦ 

* 

WB * 

* l«JM 

* 

* 

MftflE * 

* lOftTHIO 

* 

4 

vAkCUMB A 

* l ahoiE 

* 

* 

MW* * 

* «»n(£ 

* 

* s RWkCECO * 


TUNISIA For ana rimer In or the 
Char a AndaJous Hole! ai Port 
Cl kaniaout. the holiday jewel 
in Tun rasa's crown, rail Paincu 
wiktblood Ud 0249 817023 
01668 6722. ABTA ATOL 
1276 


WINTER SPORTS 


FANTASTIC SKI bargains. On 
in*, hotel*, anarunenls. 
Necpor coarh and *11 drivr. 
Boohing hoibne wUh ACCM* 
Visa. Ski Wesi 0373 86481 


March avauauuity 

Ski jeanute. Luxury holiday* 
duty Iree giwn Catered 
(ram £179 inr Flight- 6 IM 
Inmlrr. Trt 01-221 7913. 
MARCH BARGAINS - TOP resort*, 
best snow fully cxiemd chalet* 
from £229. aaarUnml* (rt« 
£139. bv* air. Ski MacC 01-361 
5446 ATOL 
SKI ANDORRA 7 AUETRULHOief* 
or wH(«atenng apm Coach 
nv Irom £79. Phone now for 

our bromurv: Deckers Travel 
01 373 3391 
MARCH STILL AVAIL. Andorra 
Lux acram nrxr to dope* ca- 
tered * s e holiday*, su 
Jesomte. Ot 221 7913 
SKI TONES 815 Marrti WUD 
own untrurur Flight, twlct 
KB. teralrucJwn included. £259 
Tef. 0272 738317. 

SKI FLATS, vji Thor cm. 
France 8-15 tuar Aho Apr, 
£60 pp pw Tel: 01-948 2376. 
SJU FLIGHTS dally M Geneva 
Zurich. Mumrti ric from £69 
Ski Wes 0373 864011 
SKI UBS ALPSS lor luxury holi- 
day* m terser Ptewje id lor 
del ad*. Oi *02 3086. 

SKI PUT ST VINCENT from £59 
Inr Hoi* Ol 309 7070. CMUr. 
ATOL 1770 
VDMHER Feb March availAtMI- 
tly. BenUey Travel 01301 
7907 


UJL HOLIDAY’S 


COTTAGE FOR CONNOtSSCURS, 
SuHoik. on snap (arm. jteeoa 4- 
6 12 miln roan SoumwoUL 
CH. ante qlaztng. hard lerum 
court*, table tennis. £66 £150 
pw. Trt Mates worth (090671 
3418. 


WALES 


over, 

looking sea luxury 8 berth 
caravan stiwr/lw /flush wr 
cfr/lNuted spoof A country 
Club. Mar On 0272 502205 

Gage. 34 Rlngwood CT. 
MulNwM. Brand 


YORKSHIRE 


MORTH YORKS Moor* 4 miles 
Hrtimles. 20 miter. York. Del 
bed bungalow colour brochure 
no pel*. Trt Mason 0482 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OPPORTUNITIES 

For anyone lo start in 
business without 
capital. 

SAE Lyon Marketing. 
205. Aibyn Complex. 
Bourton Rd. Sheffield 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE MATTED OF 
HARLAKD SIMON LIMITED 
and • 

JV THE MATTER OF THE 
COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Ihal 
■hr Order of Ihe High Court oi 
juMirr (Chancery Oiv-moai doled 
i6(h December 1985 confirming 
me reduchon of Ihe capital of the 
above-named Company from 
£2.600.000 lo £2.125.000 and 
me Mmulr approved by Ihe Court 
showing with respect lo Ihe rapt 
ui or the Company as ottered ute 
several particulars required by 
the obsn iMneauoned Art were 
rrqt&iemi by Ute Registrar of 
Comparers on I31h January 
i486 

Dated I tin IBih day of February 
1986 

Rowe A Maw 
20 Black Friars Lane 
London EC4V 6HD 
Solicitors for Ihe 
above-named Company 


MATTER OF 
l FABRICS) 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


* USA ♦ USA * USA *USA * 
SUN* OR ID TRAVEL 
lEst'd fN>9| 

i° Vi Bill Epson SL Sonrv 
I0.172H ’7SM/JS>J0/;7I0«/ 
J|7»9/’4*.iy»0>l7 
Trio :4M? 


CAP FERRAT vtiu wild poof- lor 
14. 16 July 4 wk*. £1.720 
weekly Pamwr h Parker <049 
4811 6413 


5 /FRANCE near Cannes. Superb 
pm aiety owned villa steep* 6-7 
pool, panonuntr slew*. Tel: 
0705 40689. 


TRAILFIN DERS 

Worldwide low con nights 
Thr best ■ and we can proven 
170.000 Climb since 1970 
AROUND THE WORLD 
FROM £765 

0/W (Dl 
SYDNEY £392 £841 

PERTH £388 £582 

AUCKLAND £409 £770 
BANGKOK £198 £383 

SINGAPORE £225 E462 
MIAMI/FLORIDA £189 £292 
HONG KONG £237 £474 
DELHI/BOMBAY £250 £390 

COLOMBO £241 £420 

CAIRO £160 £270 

NAIROBI £231 £381 

JO'BURG £286 £473 

LIMA E2S3 £484 

LOS ANGELES £187 £325 
NEW YORK £120 £240 
GENEVA £ 75 £ 89 

(Ml EMU COURT ROAD 
UMMWW 

EenmNUSA Right, pi-937 S*00 
Long Hut FUgUa 01-603 ISIS 
IKDomua Qw 01-4 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


SPRING Dl CORFU. April /May 
special prices in our our active 
v ilia* from Heathrow Ring Pan 
World Holidayi 01 734 2562. 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


TUSCANY. By Medieval (own of 
Barga m Ihe bewmiul 
Carfugnana Valley. Farm 
house* villas, apart* A country 
hotel*. JETFAHES 01-828 
8383 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALOARVC ALTERNATIVE, villa 
Holiday* ot distinction tor Ihe 
very Ip* Tel- 01-491 0002. 73 
St. Janies'* Siren. SWI. 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


ABTA 


IATA 


ATOL USB 


VENTURA HOLIDAYS 

LAST MINUTE. ADVANCE 
BOOKING WINTER SUN 
BARGAINS. Algarve 1 wk 
I rom W. 2 wk* from £109. 
Tenerife lwk from £189 
2wfcs rnun £224 Departure* 
28 Feb. 2. 7. 9 March Also 
Departures April A through, 
out ihe year including 
Apartments or Hotel St 
Flights from Catwick & Man- 
chester (sum lo tuns A 
avatiaemtyt. Instant bookings 
A brochure only direct Irom. 
Trt London 01 260 1356 Tel 
Mane hosier 061 834 5033 
Tel Sheffield 0742 331100. 
ATOL 2034 


Pnvaie luxury 2 Bed apart 
nvenL swimming pool, lennis A 
beauIHul gardens. 0433 5170! 


COSTA BLANCA Moral ra villa 
own pool 3 bedroom* 2 Mb 
1 room* Sul 6. Trt: Ol 31 8 4255. 


WINTER SPORTS 


JolMira Hot 

Nairobi 

Cairo 


wrote return 
£300 £466 
£220 £325 
£130 £200 
£235 £335 
Del Bom £230 £300 

Bangkok £195 £330 

DeualA £4» 

Afro Asian Travel 

162 168 Regent St W.l 
TEL: 81-437 DHt/l’M 
AMEX. VISA. DINERS 


SKIING HOUDAYS 

To Austria 16/3 For one 
week Mayrhafrn £137 naif 
board. Sean only. 

Galwtrk (Munich £75 

Birmingham /Munich £85 
Manchester /Munich £89 
Calwirk/ Turin £85 

HARDS WDVTEHSPORTS 
Tel' 021 704 6222 
ATOL 162 ABTA 31771 


TUN I SIA For mat perfect not Idas- 
with sunny day* A carefree 
nights. Ideal lor FA March. 
Tunisian Travel. 01-373 4411 

USA. N - York C18W Miami C198 
LA 004 rtn Also Cheapest 
wheAul* m on maier US cam 
IT* 01-584 7571 ABTA 

TAKE TIME OFF W Pari*. Am 
Slrtdam. Brussel*. Bruges. ■ 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne The j 
Hogue. Dublin. Rouen. Bou- 
logne A Dieppe. Time OK 3a. 
Chewier thru- London SW Ik 
TWO Ol 335 8070 

RDJE A VIMM HORSE hi 
hr lands beamidd t rugged 
couniryteiir. Highiaml safari*. 

T wicker* world Suftitner bed- i 
churc 01892 7606 (24 nr Ol 
893 78511. 

SKI BONW MEHC. Calrrnl I 
rlutet* in Mmbel A Courchevel | 
Ir £190 h h lwk I pc travel 
Great food, unlld. wine a. rxicu 
uve guiding Ot 733 3333 1737- 
3661 anuHKae > 

LATIN AMERICAN TRAVEL 
Com art dir experts lo Latm ! 
4menra Club A itl GUM. Ca 
nboran. LS A 3 Mexiro 
Sunoir 01-624 1 ISO 

LATH AHKRWJL Low cost I 
Iteahls P a Rio £405 Lima 
£475 rtn. Ana Small Group 
Haddav Journey* JLAOl 747 
31CW 

BBCBWTO 1st Economy tick- 
Try ii« 

»«l ruCHTBOOKEHS Ol 387 | 
9100 

LOW COST FLIGHTS- Most 
Eurooran oesllnaiKicp. 

Votexamter. 01 402 I 

4262 0052. ABTA 

61004 ATOL I960. 

D. JAMAICA. N.YDNK. 
Airica rheaoe*! fore- elr | 
mrnreand Travel 1 Duke SR 
Htehmgud ABTA Ol 940 4073. , 


SKI* SKI* SKI* SKI 

FLV FROM MANCHESTER 
A CATWICK 
FOR DUTY FREE SKIING 
FROM ONLY C99 
IN THE AMAZING 
PfaNOPALITS' OF 
ANOORAA 

HOTELS A APARTMENTS 
FREEDOM HOLIDAYS 
Ol 741 4686 061 236 0019 
ATOL 432 IATA AITO 


Catered Chatet Partm 
_ SIM CM IIS SJIPESB! 
Ptetwc*. Barbeque* 
and Parties 


lor lush p Flights. 
Food and ww 
S-C-X145 
Ring 01-370 0999. 
AM 1830. 


SKI* SKI* SKI* 

FLY FROM MANCHESTER 
A BATWKH 


PROM ONLY EM 
HTKNUZMO 

PBMOPAUTY OF AMNMRA. 

FREEDOM HOLIDAYS 
01 74] *686.061 336 0019 
ATOL 432 IATA AITO 


sauncinsisi March. * persons 
MUdMM. roach travel Hum. 6 
day hfi pass. £iT3pp gr catered 
motel with mummeril and in- 
strurtMXi C196PP. Call S« Vat 
01 903 4444 or 01-300 6080 
04 hnu ABTA 5S431 ATOL 
1163 


IN THE 
ELLWOODS 
LIMITED 
AND IN THE MATTER OF THE 
COMPANIES ACT 19S5 
Creditors voluntary winding L'B 
Notice i* hereby given, pursuant 
to section* 596 and 64C(i I of the 
Companies Art 1985. mat Meet 
mgs of the Member s and 
CredHars of Ihe above company 
wilt be held at UXh Floor. York 
House. York Street. Manchester 
on Thursday 27 March 1986. at 
1 1 00 am. and 1130 am re- 
sprtlivrty. for Ihe purpose ol 
having an account laid before 
mem showing the manner 
which the winding us has been 
conducted ana Ute property of ihe 
company imposed of. and of 
hearing any expianallon Out 
migtu be given by the Uquidaior 
H A Buu 
Liquicator ta February 1986 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


Uni OFFICER (FfUKAV, 48. V 
UL seeks ponuon. No Ites. Reply 
lo BOX C1B. 

MALE 24 Experienced, enterpris- 
mg. seeks rhallenglng work 
from now till SrpL 01672 
4400. 


MERCEDES 


380 SEL 
1981 

Champagne Gold 34.000 
mites. Air cond S. roof. 
Exrrticnl condition 

£14,850 no offers 

Tet 789-2140 Ext 23 (Days| 
64S-2MB (EraO. 


GENERAL 


Take the 
profit... 

on your new car 
investment 

you lake the profit, 
we do the work 

Mycar 


north of THE 

THAMES 


THEATRES 


rjrn im n kitchen cnnvm a 

iSJTuttgr^ crtfgr. w 11 

IWM! SUitons 4 Wd " tetoruMy. 

1 1 78.000. Freehold TN Ol 
579 7127. MUSI W Vm. 


GRADUATE 


r.n a Mol S Sal 5 A 8 2® . 
24 tw 7 Day FirM Can « ?«.« 

‘ massjiA or iw 

SutuUrd Oranw Awaras 

ARE you LONESOME 
tonight? 

BY ALAN BkE-lSPJlF 
^,‘JiAaiwKorr oc^ 
Nay Jewel* 


w ul pw EN iv PrrWrv 
Evn only 


appointments 

^' 5 t 8 30 2 & Hr T dai *ma 


RUN TOUR OWN eOM<*flKY« 

you have (he moflvalion and 
raihuuaRn lo warn Us run y our 
own cwnpanv. lh» gpewng 


“bS^SSl of 

—jk tfcaar* 

li, Cut* PrrdCY 


wdn a young Witi ,n remrai amazing. THF W7 

Lrtvxm rauid punkte m ime JJcc- gTa LAWWAiik" 

HBlinal. VOU-ShOuMreMte htejl rOPMA>V-t. 


peart* -nd **** •> % 
nmusUJltve rote 24 30 
rcio.ooo 'ndiojlv Phone OI 
683 1034 MwoiU* scou 

RrmiRmeM 


PREP & PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS 


THE 1986 

DIRECTORY 
. OF PRIMARY 
education 

Lists £0400 «*w. pcttnHV 

acnoafe ba UK 1R44 pogas 

£28.00 CWO. Post free. 

THE 1986 
EDUCATION 
authorities 

DIRECTORY 

Gnat run defeats of tocni md- 
exMoa authorities and Ibrtr 
sriflr. an eecondary schools. 
Independent secondary Hvd 

acboois. further and Idgner 
edncalloB trottfutrs- P«b'- 
trcSmka. udwriWa. roeoal 
achoot*. sM mvteh more. 
1220 paces- Case bound. £33 
CWO. 

Available thro' book- 
sellers or from SGP 
Ltd. Dept ST, Darby 
House, BldchingJey 
Road, Redhifi, Surrey 

RH1 3DN. TeL 073 
74 2223. Telex. 

291084 SGP G. 


FSB*™*" 1 

on \TontU* Eve* 4nft 

I mindtim 836 fT 9661 

> 4 ] oqncvis BMHt Thu SNot 
“ £ 8 JoTd Hr 7 frn. r.rvt td. 
rr £40 7300 

BEST MLUC4L OF IW1 

, siaiwjri* Pf onw_4_w_ar-* 

spy TQU LONESOME TONIGHT? 
"“by” L^TBLEAhnALC 
-IT'S. MAGNIFICENT Ob' 
Hj* j run a* will Pki* U'-" Phwtey 
on Monday Fvm dttlV 

BCCUIU-Y TWUTK 637 
HollhK-. 3W.««! Jii JS? 

Z2Z2EZ 

DAVID ** FRANK 
ESSEX FINLAY 
MUTINY! 

-THEMENOOUS *»«TACL«- 
5.0 Mate Wad 3 B Sad S- 

FfBMCE EDWARD Btrv OffTe tit 
8951 First Call 24 Hr 7 Da vs <c 
Booking 836 3464 Grp hates 930 

CHE^ 

THE MUSICAL 
Osem 14 May ai Turn 


DURHAM 

SCHOOL 

HAS A 

SMALL NUMBER OF 
VACANCIES FOR 

GIRLS 

TO ENTER THE 

SIXTH 

FORM 

IN SEPTEMBER 1986 

. Far 6Mb write tK 

The Headmaster, 
Durham School 
Durham City. DH1 4SZ 
Tet Durham 
(0385) 47977 


Ol 950 

060! 2 rr HoUlne Ol 930 
0044. 5 6 Group hates Ol 930 
6! 23 k Prow** Ol 741 9*W 
First Con 24 hr 7 dak cc hookings 
240 720001 579 e433 Evgs 7 30 
NTji Thur 4 Sal at 3 OQ 'One 0» 
me CHEAT GREAT ML SIC A LS 
S Times The National Theatre or 
GREAT BHm AN AWARD 
WINNING- 

GUYS AND DOLLS 

surnng 
LLLU 

NORMAN JANTT 

ROSSI NG TON D«L£V 

ANDREW C WADSWORTH 
TMTCk' WILSON 
■WONDERFLL 
EVTE RT AIN MCNT S Trt 
-A CLASSIC of it* kind' D. Tel 
■DYNAMITE' □ Mail 
now Booking until April 20 


W WALES Ol 930 
0681 2 CC Holline Ot 930 
0844 5 6 Group Sale* Ol 930 
6125 K Pmwv Ot 741 9999 
First Can 24 nr 7 <Lu « bookin.is 
240 720001- 579 6AS3 Eves 7 30 
■Viols Thur 5 Sal al 5 O “On Ol 


& Time* The Notional Theatre of 
Cl Britain Award Winning 

GUYS & DOLLS 

Surrmq LULU 
NORMAN JANET 

ROSStNOTON OWLET 

ANDREW C WADSWAORTH 
THICK WILSON 

• ‘W sa d .i f.ll E ntartab—i W* S Tet 
“A a—lt ol its kind" D Tel 
Diuaib" D. Matt 
Nuw boakmg unM Aprd *86 

QUEDTS Ol 734 1166. 7S4 

1167. 734 0261 734 0120 4 39 

3840 439 4031 TirvCaaCC 24 
br 240 7200 Grp Sates 930 6123 
Eve* Bom. Wed A Sd Mai* 3pm 

MAGGIE EDWARD 

SMITH FOX 

“FIVE a 


SARDONIC. 

COMEDY." S Tnra 

INTERPRETERS 

A New Play by 


TUITION 


WLWMTUBonBATP’Ltehdl/ 

dridran. O/sro* riadenri 

■Wy. £6 p/h NOT HAH 
IT74, 

umnuncs A/or au 

PiUa— MOOD. Any tewai A 

llTl* I ~T ~ 

rian. 01-722 9999. 


CRUCIAL EXAMS 
IN 1986? 

GC£ "O' EtW level? Appfrtog 
UCCA or Poly? Grad wrfitrg? 
QnaHi m w m ? 

■QW IS THE HKIE H comah 
us lor expert asHsamof amt 
■uMaaw. Rw hroefewt; 

A M • CAREER ANALYSTS 
^ _ 90 Qoucoster Place. Wl 

•• • 01-935 5452 [24 dm) 

IIOBMBBi 


EASTER REVISION 
LONDON 

ASHBOURNE TUTORS 

O A A Lrt*l 
SPECIALISTS 

Malhenuriics. Erononur* and 
Ihe Sciences 

For details- 
The Principal. Ashbourne 
Tutors. 59 61 Kendngton 
High StreeL London W8 
5EO. 

Trt: 01-937 3058 I 


Directed by Pate r Tata. 

ROYAL COURT S CC 730 1 743. 
WOMEN BEWARE WOMAN by 

Thomas Middleton and Howard 
Barker Directed by William 
CbsmU Eves B.O Sal Mats 4 o 

ROYAL COURT THEATRE 
UPSTAIRS 01-730 2S94 Liver- 
pool Playhouse present 
SNORT CNAMOC by Terry 
Hraton From teed Eve* 7.30. 
Sol Mat 3-30 

ROYAL COLRT L-P5TAIR6. 730 
2564 OURSELVES ALONE by 
Anne Devlin LAST THREE 
PERI'S. TORT 7.30 TOMOR 
330 A 7 3Q 


ROYAL OKRA HOUSE, On ere 

Garden WC20t-240 1066 191 1 
OC S standby info Ol 836 6901 
Mon Sal Idore-apm. 65 orephi 
seats avail Iron, lOam on ihe day 
Ticket* Opera from £? Oo. Bauet 
from C4 50 

THE ROYAL OPERA 

Toni i General Standby £10 IN 
before peril. Mon 8 OO Salome 

THE ROYAL BALLET 

Tomor 7 30. So* 2 30 A 7.30 La 
Flllr mat garuee. Thur 7 SO 
Manon 

Balk* Casting Info Ol 240 9815. 
i ((ADLER'S WELLS 278 R916 

CHARLIE AND THE 
CHOCOLATE FACTORY 

by Roald Dahl 

New Musir Produmon of 'Best 
Loved Children's nook* 

Until Sal. Tie kefs £2 75 EB-Somr 
• • pnre seals for Children 

JEANNE -T*I4 Mnsicai, 22 Fete 
6 April. 7 30pra. Press A tsf Night 
'■ pnre 

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i 






— j — ^ l THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 

Today’s television and radio programmes 


Edited 

and 


by Peter Dear 
Peter Davalle 


TI£ 


St 


BBC1 


&00 Ceefax AM. 

RSO Breakfast Time with 
Safina Scotland Mike 
Smith. Weather at Bj 
. 7.25,7.55, *25 andL 
reQwal news, weather 
and traffic at 657, 7.27, 
757 and 827; national snd 

frrtgnational news at 7 JKL 
7.30,84)0,830 and 9.0a; 
sport at 720 and 820: a 

review of the montim 
newspapers at 8L37.1 
Lynn FauUs Wood's 


TV-AM 


6-15 Good 


?mond and Nick Owen. 

c^rdses at Sinews 
Gwaon Honeycomfce 

gwaST 

625 and 754; cartoon at 
J ? 4 *' 1 


teteriskwWgWi^rtsat 
624; the history of the 
PaKtijefla miniature horse 


consumer report; pop 
vs from Steve 


music newel 


at 8.45; Samantha Fox and 
i r father at 924; and 


herfai 

Babytalkat 9 , 12 . 


from RusseH Grant 
*•& gPSS 1 ® 1030 School. 

1250 Sews After Noon with 
Richard Whitmore and 
Frances Coverdale. 


I TV/LONDON 



with subtitles 1255 
Regionai news and 

W&3thOf 

1.00 Pebble MB! at One. In the 

last of his series of i 
from the Seychelles. 

Cote meets a couple from 

Preston who have crated 

b Seychelles garden at 

their home in Hesketh 
Bank. 155 Litte Misses 

mdtfaeMtetefMenfr) 

2.00 The Parent P roar en wie. 
How to cope wim 
youngsters' faddy eating 
is the subject this 
week2.15Play ItSafe! 
Jimmy SavBe with aocktent 
prevention tips for children 
225 See Heart The final 

tin the series 


955 Thames news heacflJnes. 

950 ForSchootetheHvesofa 
(amity of deer 9.47 Bricks 
and brickwork 959 No 
Hankey-Pankey. a story by 
Naomi Lewis 10.11 Uses 
of computers 1028 
Physics: measurement of 
the change on an electron 
1055 German 
conversation for beginners 
11-08 Maths; counting and 
sharing 1122 Maths: 
connections between - 
patterns and codes 1150 
Part two of Jean Anouilh’s 
La Belie Vie. 

1220 Tickle on the Turn. ' 



• ON YER BHCE (1TV, 850 
pm), an unsympathetic synthesis 
of Norman Tettwt's counsel 
to the Jobless who complained 
that insy could not find work 

wSfl5apwnSS^w^ >0rt °n 

_ i men when they 
viu wuawuy what Mr TebM 
Suggested. They got on their 
bikes (actually, me coach to 
London) ancf pedafled smack into 
a brick wan. Thera were jobs, 
of a sort. In the Smoke ah right 
but by the time the trio paid 
their Mis they were no better off 
than tney would have been If 

they haa stayed on the dole up 

North. Wbrkf in Action have 
asked me not to reveal the 
eventual fate of the men, and 
a I wont in any case, their 

"75S Taaam ~ 2SSdSSwSg’£ B nMorote .« 

y^jjupm) mood, so there cannot be a 


CHOICE 


neat Rots as a dosing titled 
would be rash to suggest that 
the experience of these three 

MidtJtesborough men is 

archetypel.Bui given the 
particular circumstances of 
their cases fcherchezla femme, 
cft&rchaz la fsnvBo. etc). there 
must a vast army of similar 

desperate cyclists who set oft 

with high hopes only to return 

with punctured tyres 

• THE CHILDREN OF EVE 
(BBC 2,8.10p m) advances the 

disorientating theory that we 
are all descended from Kalahari 
apes. The fact that the 
separation of Man from Monkey 
probebiy took place five 
miWon years ago. otfe 
l comfort, and 


theotogists w« have something 
to say about the proposition 
that in this oddly-located Garden 
of Eden, Eve had a mother. 

• TAGGART (ITV.g.OOpfn) 

scatters severed human limbs aU 

over Glasgow, and there is a 
nasty moment when it looks as if 
a bit of torso will end up 
complementing the animal fjfflng 
in the local black 
puddings. There is a plentiful 

supply of red herrings, too, in 
this above-average thriller serial. 

• TOO CLEVER TO BE 
GOOD (Radio 3. 9.30pm) is a new , 
assessment of G.B.S.His 

reputation as a man of the 

theatre emerges with far 
fewer bullet-hoies than his 
standing as socialist 
pulpiteer. 


Suburban Theatre}. BJJ 0 
News. 

8-05 Concert (contd): Sibelius 


j); Nielsen 
^S ymp hony Ncl). 920 

925 This Week's Composer: 
Stenhammar. Serenade 

for Orchestra, Op 31; Two 
Sentimental Romances. 

Op 28. with Tellafsen, vtofin). 
1020 Fane and Franck; 

Malcolm Bin ns 
(plano)piays the Faure 
Ballade, ends Franck's 

Prelude. Aria and Brute. 
1050 Montreal SO. Rodngo 

(Fantasia para un 

1120 Soprano and piano 
recital: Margaret Field 
and John York. Faure 


Peter Davalle 


BBC-2 


tales lor children ^ 12 - 


Lef a Pretend to the story 
of The S% Dressmaker. 
1250 Someone to TaBc To. The 
second programme in the 



series on the kind of htfp 
to find 


available to those who 1 


iff® 


r. (Ceefax) (r) 

325 Ceefax 352 Regional 
news. 

355 Paddington has Picture 
Trouble (r) 420 Heads and 
TaBs (r) 4.10 5mbo and 
the Jet Set Cartoon 
series, 4.15 Jecfcanory. 
Peter Davison reads part 
one of Dick K — 

Thei 


Cartoon space series, 
525 John Craven's 

Newsroom &Q5 Blue 
Peter. Biologist Brian 
Banks inspects the pond 
in the Bfaw Peter garden 
where the winter weather 
has already UHed off two 


[ aJcohofic who was 
admitted to Hartley House, 
oneoftmrahabmatlon 
units run by Turning Point 
120 News at One wfth Leonard 
Parkfci 120 Thames news 
150 FBck The Birthday 

Present* (1957) starring . 
Tony Britton and SyMa 
Sims. Drama a bout a Mr 
Everyman whose attempts 
to smuggle a watch 
through customs changes 
his whole wav of fife. 
Directed by Pat Jackson 
325 Thames news 
headlines 350 The Young 
Doctors. 

4,00 Tickle on the Turn. A 


655 Open Un ivers i ty: Maths - 
the Binomial System. Ends 
at 720 
1.920 Ceefax. 

9.15 Daytime on Item the 
impact on a family of the 

arrival of a baby 038 

Course options for the 

over-13s 1020 For the 

1 10.15 Musks 
I History; 
11120 

^ Jthe weather 
1122Thinkabout 1150 
Updating Shakespeare, 
with John Barton and 
Michael Bogdanov 1225 
Ceetex 1255 The tfetory 
of the cotton industry 125 
Lesson two of (he better 

tennis course 158 The 

development of the . 
Scottish Highlands 220 
Words and pictures 2.18 
Parts one and two of The 
r and the Victim 250 
i studies: holy 


with 


and, 


555 

6.00 News with Sue 
Andrew Harvey. 

655 London Pfen. 

720 Wogan. Terry celebrates 
his first year as a chat 
show host wfth a number 
of guests who were on his 
opening programme 


repeat of the programme 
an 4,10 BIB 


including ERon John, vfa 
satefflte from Phoenix, 
Arizona, and Wendy 


,and 

James Galway . 

755 If s Yow Move. American 
domestic comedy series 
about a precocious youth 
who makes Sfe .' 


disagreeable for aD those 
around him. 

8-00 Scott Free. Sefina Scott, in 
the second of her series 
onpebpie whoffave “ 
discovered their own Jdnd 
of fre ed o m, meets ~ 
Lawrence MacEwan, who 
farms oniheJste of Muck. 


850 


f series 


920 


xml Comedy sc 
abouta schoolteacher 
whose wife has left him 
but who pursues him for 
increased raaintenanoe 
payments. ICeeiasO. 

News with Julia SomervBe 
and John Humphrys. 
Weather. 

950 Panora ma : The TWnBtea 
Line. Would revised 
petidng methods 
combined with the use of 
bask: technological aids 
hrtp to stop the growing 
size of the crime fl 
10.10 Htn: Take a Hard 


(1975) starring Lee Van 
Cfeef, Jim Brow 


,Jrm Brown and Fred 
Wiffiamson. A 
western about the 
foreman of a ranch who 
promises his dying boss to 
detaveraiargesumof 
money back to Mexica 
But others have heard of 
the errand and static the 
hapless foreman on his 


journey from AMene. 
Directed 1 


Dawson. 
1150 Weather. 


by Anthony M 


shown at noon 4,1 
the Minder helps Ns Aunt 
Chloe 420 He-Man md 
Masters of the Unherae 


320 Ceefax. 

525 News 
subtitles. 

550 Were Uve. Ian McNaught- 
Davis investigates tire . 
chances of a computer 
having the facility to make 
judgements; there is a 
computer who has just 
pubtashed its first book of 
poetry; and Lesley Judd 
' tries to ted the (fifference 
between a man and a 

machine, (rt 

620 Ften: The Sky's the LindT 


4.45 Dodger, Bonzo and 
Rest Part i 


the Rest Part Dneof a 
new series of adventures 
set In a children's home. 

5.15 Btockbustere. Bob 
Holness with another 
round of the general 
knowledge game for 


555 News 820 Thames news 
- . wfth Andrew Gardner and 
Tina Jenkins. 

625 Hefei Vhf Taylor Gee with 
■ the first of three 
programmes on mobffity 
aids. This evening's 
programme offers advice 
on different types of 
- walking sticks. 

655 Cro ssr o ad s. Lorraine is 
__ .,^^g^pn9yedbyAdai!i .. 

720 _Wfeh You Were Here-? . 
Judith Chalmers takes a 
fly/drfve hoHday in the 
Camargoe; Anneka Rice 
continues her rail journey 
through Europe; and Chris 
Kelly Ski Waterford 
samptog farmhouse 
accommodation in the 
soutfrof Ireland. (Oracle)' 
750 Coronation Street Ken is 
• shown what an the conflict 
til the Barlow household is 
doing to young Tracy. 
(Oracle) 

Al at No 20. Comedy 
series starring Maureen 
Upman as the widow left 

wfthati 

of 

(Oracle) 

850 World in Action; On Yer 
88 <e— Postponed from last 
week, the story of two 
Jobless Northerters who 
took Mr T Bbb'if s advice 
and went looting for work 
elsewhere (see Choice) 

920 Taggart Episode one of a 
new drama serial (Oracle) 
(see Choice) - 
10.00 News at Ten. Weather, 
foKowed by Thames news 
beadfines. 

1050 Snooker. The Didux 
British Open. 

12-15 NjglHTliaaglits 


620 


and 


and Joan Lesha. 
Musical romance about a 
Second World War flying 
ace on leave in New York, 
incognito, who fails for the 
. charms of a magazine 
photographer. Directed by 
Edward H Griffith. 

725 Cartoon TWo. Sheila 
Graber’s fltms looking at 
the Rte and work of 
Leonardo da Vinci and 
Michelangelo. 

755 Open Space: Lest Link in 
the Cliten. A documentary 
foBowing the progress of 
the nine men who began 
an historic march at me 
beginning of January from 
the Gartcosh state mffl 
near Glasgow to 10 

- Downing Street to delivar 
a protest tetout the 
proposed closure of the . 
steet mU thte provides 
work tor 700 people. 

8.10 Horizon; The Children of 
Ev& A documentary 
investigating a new theory 
about the ancestry of 
human beings, based on 
what is described as a 
'molecular dock’, (see 
Choice) 

9.00 Comrade Dad The last 
programme of the comedy 
senes and Rm Dudgeon 
takes his fantify by car to 
the seaside. 

950 TheBobMonkhouse 
Show. The entertainer's 
guests are Lorraine Chase 
' and American comedian 
Pete Barbutti. 

10,10 Maestro. A new series 
begins with a profile of 
AustraHan distance runner 
Ron Clarke: 

1020 NawanlgM includes John 
Tusa reporting from 
Moscow on the eve of the 

. . .27th Soviet Parly 
Conference. 

1155 Weather. 

1120 Tele-Journal. Tonight's 
news as seen 
of Spain's first 

12.05 Open UnhereftyiAn 
Introduction to Econ 
2. Ends at 1255. 


CHANNEL 4 


250 Snooker. Further fifth 
round action in the Dulux 
British Open, introduced 
by Dickie Davies. 

4.00 A Phis 4. GDI Neville 
discusses the problem of 
stress pnd soda! workers. 

450 Countdown. The reigning 
champion. Paul White, is 
challenged by Oi Dennis. 
fromRiBsGp. 

520 Afice. Mona, the 
overbearing mother of 
Alice, arrives for a 
Thanksgiving party at 
Alice's and completely 
reorganises the efinnor. To, 
' make matters worse she 
tells Alice that she is 
sefiSng her house to come 
and live with her daughter. 

550 Food For Thought The 
' penultimate programme of 
the series exammes the 
rote that the government 
and the foodindustiy pla; 
in the nature of the Bmisr 
diatir) 

Worn of Animation, 
presented by Richard 
Evans 

650 Be Your Own Boss. The 
last programme of the 
series presented by Henry 
Cooper. Tonight's edition 
examines how much help 
is available for the small 
businessman at local and 
iment level (r) 


( Radio 4 *) 


555 


8.15 


uo 

News Briefing; weather. 

6.10 Farming weak. An 
interview with a leader of 
the agricultural industry. 
toftowed by a five-day 
weather forecast for 
fanners. 625 Prayer for 
the Day (s) 

650 Today, including 650, 
720,850 News. 1145 
Busmess News. 655, 755 
Weather. 720. 820 
News. 725", 825 Sport. 7.45 
Thought for the Day 

825 The Week on 4 with 
Charlotte Green 

8A3 John Ebdon. A further 
selector of recordings 
from the BBC Sound 
Archives 857 Weather; 

Travel 

9 DO Mawc 

925 Start of the Week with 
Richard Baker. From the 
Crucible Theatre, Sheffield 

Is) 

1020 News; Money Box. 

Financial advice 


Juggle 
1050 Momii 


01 


OyJl 

Ffeur 


720 Channel FOtv news with 
Peter Sissons includes a 
report from Nik Gowing in 
Moscow on how 
Gorbachov's reforms have 
made it easier for the 
ordinary man to criticise 
the Russian way of fife. 

750 Comment With her views 
on a matter of topical 
importance is youth 
councfflor. Carol Trill. 
Weather 

8.00 BroofcsideL Ralph and 
Harry decide to widen their 
social circle and advertise 
in the personal columns; 
Lucy, who has taken her 
ckcumstances 
receives no 
from Paul. 

850 Lou Grant The Trib's 
leading columnist writes a 
story about a k'rtter who 
has struck six times.' it is 

■ - feared that this publicity 
wfll lead the maniac to 
strike again. 

925 Kate ana Aflta. The 

second programme tat the 
American sitcom series 
about two old friends who 
d^^tospOT^tefr^ 

955~§eerand SJdttfea. The 
sixth and final programme 
In the animated series in 
praise of the British pub. 

1020 Survive. This programme 
in the series exploring the 
limits of human endurance 
features the experiences 
of those who have 
survived torture. Maria, a 
South American woman, 
tells of 10 days of horrific 
brutality; a Russian 
(SssJdent describes his 12 
years in various 
institutions; and an 
American prisoner oi war 
in Vietnam recalls his five 
years in a tiny wooden 

cagett 


k The Jar 
by 

Chandler 
10-45 Daily Service (New Every 

mo !S$Si3S 

Your Way. Brian 
Johnston visits Eastleigh in 
Hampshire (rite) 

11.48 Poetry Please! Poetry 
requested by Isteners. 

■’1220 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice with 

Paltie CotoweU 
1227 Oh. Yes It Is! A seven- 
part history of pantomine 
narrated by Richard Briers 
(5) Tricks. Traps and 
Tran s formation. Written by 
Gerald Frow (si 1255 

Weather 

120 The World at One: News 
1.40 The Archers 
155 Shipping Forecast 
220 News; Woman's 1-tour. 
Includes a feature on a 

new strte of nursvig care 
320 News; The Afternoon 
PteYMre Mornenstem'a 
BaoBargains oy David Bean 
with Sandra Clark as Mrs 
Biddy Morgenstem. The play 


is set during the 

tsuterwa 


PerwwiiarWar(rXs) 
450 Kaleidoscope. A second 
chance to hear last 

nigtil's edition (r) 
5,00 PM: News magazine. 

_ 550 Shipping Forecast. 
555 Weather 


620 The Six O'Ctock News; 

Financial Report 
650 Just a Minute. Panel 
game wkh Kenneth 
WBiams. Ctement Freud. 
William Franklyn and 
Peter Jones (iks) 

7.00 News 
7.05 The Archers 
7.20 On Your Farm (r) 

7-*5 Soence Now. Peter 
Evans reviews 
discoveries and 
developments 
8.15 The Monday Ptay. 
irtukshuk by Rachel 
Wyatt 

950 Teetotal Now. The story 
of Joe wason, the 
Vtotonan entertainer who 
became a campaigner tor 
temperance in the 1 9th 
Century 

9.45 Kaleidoscope, indudes 
comment on Out of Line 
at the Walker Art Gallery, and 
RiddJey walker at the 

Royal Exchange. 

Manchester. 1029 
Weather 


i (A Woman Yowig and 
OW). DeBaes (songs 
nducUng Bonjour. Suzon). 
1225 Concert of Engftsh 

Music: Northern Smtonia 
with soio Instrumentalists. 
Amm (Overture to B 
flat), Ireland (Minuet and 

Elegy-A Downland Suite). 

Rawsthome (Concertanta 
Pastorale for flute Jwm 

and strings), Vaughan 
WBams (Four hymns tor 
tenor.vtoia and strings), 
Avison (Concerto Grosso 
to D major. Op 9 No 12). 120 
News. 

125 BBC Lunchtime Concert 


1050 The World Tomght 
aal World 


iZertsatovaU-.. 
Beethoven (Sonata to C 

minor. Op 30 No 2), and 
Sonata to F. Op 24 (The 
Spring). 

220 Music Weekly: another 
chance to hear 
yesterday’s edition.h 
•ridudes a conversation 
with the singer Fefidty 
Palmer, ana Richard 
Osborne on Rossini, Moses 
and the Paris revisions 

(ri. 

255 New Records: Bach 


11.15 The Financial 1 

Tonight 

1150 Today in Parflament 

1220 am News: Weather 

1253 Shipotna Forecast 


(Partita in A minor. BWV 

827: P 


VHS 



in England and 

Wales only) as above 
except 555-6208111 Weather; 
Travel. 1120-1220 For 
Schools: 11.00 Muse Makers. 
1120 Let's Move. 11-40 
Johnny Ball's Maths Games 
(s). 1150 Poeny Comer. 
155-320pm For Schools; 

155 Listening Comer. 

225 Playtime. 220 
Introducing Science. 250 
Topic Songbook (s). 2.45 
Radio Club. 550-555 PM 

(continued). 1150-12.10ain 

Open University: 1 1.30 An 

Exercise in Constructive 

Criticism. 1150 Pope's 
'Essay on Man'. 125O-1.10 
Schools Night-Time 
Broadcasting: Choices 86 . 


; PtonockJtarpsktoord), 
Mozart (Horn Concerto 
No 2: Hermann Baumann, 
horn). Janacek (me 
cantata Amams.wrth sotoists 
Nemeckova, Vocficka. 

Zitak), Tubto (Vtofin Concerto 
No 1:Lubotsky, violin), 

Faure (Piano Quartet No 1 ). 
455 News. 

520 Music for Pleasure: 

Roger Nichols with 

another selection of 

recorded music. 

650 Music tor the Iron Voice: 
Frederick Rtovner on the 
organ at Bute Hail. University 
of Glasgow. Paavo 
HeMnen's Ocutus aquftae. 
720 Michael Hobson: Kate 
Elmitt and John Ratoon 

rSix South 

lean 


950 Too Clever to be Good: a 
new assessment of 
Bernard Shaw, by David 
Wheeler. 

10.15 Telemann and Bach: 
Telemann (Ouverture in 
G mtoor). Bach ( Concerto to 
0 minor, BWV 1052: 

English Concert under 
Pwnock, harpsichord) 

1120 Edith Vogel plays 

Beethoven. 32 variations 
in C minor, WoO 80; Andante 
favori. WOO 57: Sonata 
to C major. Op 53( 

Waidstein). 

1157 News. Until 1220. 

VHP only; Open University, 
from 655am to 655. Biotic 
and behaviour. 


0l 3a 


. Biology, brain 


C Radio 2 ) 


News on the hour. Headlines 
5.30am, 650, 750 and 85a Sports 
Desk 1.05pm, 222, 3.02, 422. 

5.05, 6.02. 6.45 (ml only). 955 
420am Colm Berry (s) 620 Ray 
Moore ( 5 ) 8.05 Ken Bruce (s) if 


:ii f 

.or in^ . 
al claii| e f! 

De r s 
. a r<?F 
im he ,drr 
mings P° s 
ut a •' 

?re gi^ lde 
3 unds.' oie 
iker. Pres 

si Susanc 
■WTJ 

o clairouli 

id atand 
offshry * 
y run Biiw 


Jimmy Young (s) 1.05pm David 

si 220 Gloria Hunniford (s) 


Jaatos(s)! 

3.30 Music All The Way (s) 350 
Music AH The Way (s) 420 David 
Hamilton (s) 620 John Dunn (s) 

820 National Big Band Competition 
All Winners' Concert. With 
Radio Leicester Big Band, and 
Midland Youth Jazz Orchestra 
(s) 920 Humphrey Lyttelton with 
the best of jazz on record fs) 

955 Sports Desk 1020 The 
Monday Movie Quiz with Ray 
Moore 1050 Star Sound. Nick 
Jackson plays a selection of 
film soundtrack requests 1120 
Bran Matthew presents Round 
Midnight (stereo from midnight) 
1.00am Peter Dickson present 
Nightrkte (s) 320-4.00 A Little Night 
Music (s) 


( Radiol ) 


News on the half hour from 
6.30am until 950pm and at 1220 
midnight 6.00am Adrian John 
750 Mike Read 950 Srmon Bates 
1250pm News beat (Frank 
Partridge) 12.45 Gary Davies 320 
Steve Wright 550 Newsbeat 
(Frank Partnoge) 5.45 Bruno 
Brookes 750 Janice Long 
1020-1220 John Peel (s) VHF 
Radios 182 420am As Radio 
2 1020pm As Radio 1 1220- 
420am As Radio 2 


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WORLD SERVICE 


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6-00 Newsoesk. 720 Haws. 729 Twenty- 


four Hours. 750 Sarah and Company. 

tons. 8.15 


1250 Choosmg Courses 
ubiects.fi 


and 

YTS, 


r 250 School, 
or Work? 


( Radio 3 ) 


555 Weather. 720 News- 
725 Morning Conceit: Haydn 
(Piano Concerto in C.H 
X111; with PhHppe 
Entremont. piano); Ibert 


9*. Jose van 
Dam. bass-baritone); Mozart 


(Rondo to C.K 373, with 
Suk,vio 


;vto 8 n) l - Marttou (suite: 
Act one of The 


750 Henze. Lutoslawski and 
the London Sintontetta; 
wtth Sarah Leonard 
(soprano). Marie Siorach 
(soprano), Michael CoUns 
(clarinet), London 
Sinfonwtta Chorus. Part one. 
Henze (the cantata Being 
beauteous: La miracie da la 
rose. 

850 Letter from Quamoy. A 
talc by Dennis 
Duncanson, who recently 
visited the Taiwanese 
i Island. 

820 Concert part two. 
Lutoslawski (Chain 1 : 
Seventeen Pofish Christmas 
Carols. 


820 World News. 829 Reflections. 
Foreign Affavs. 850 Anyttvng Goes. 920 
World News 929 Review oi the British 
Press. 9.15 Good Books. 930 Financial 
News. 9-40 Look Anead. 9.45 Peebles' 
Choice. 10.00 News. 1021 The Mind n 
Focus 1050 Hitswie USA. 1120 World 
News. 1129 -News About Britain. 11.15 
Boardroom Kings. 1220 Radio Newsraei. 
12.15 Transatlantic Quiz. 1225 Spoils 
Roundup 120 News. 129 Twenty-Four 
Hours 120 Kmgs of Swing. ZOO Outlook. 
245 Breakfast at Tiffanys. 320 Radio 
Newsreel 3.15 The Mind n Focus. 3.45 
WhaVs New. 420 News. 4.09 Coninwn- 


•uctior 
e pov 
ening 
e med 
ter. - 
sioda- 


taiy. 4.15 My Country m Mind. 430 The 
ss. 425 The Worid To 


Muse Business. 445 The World Today. 
5.00 News 529 Book Choice. 5.15 My 
Word! 820 News. 829 Twenty-Four 
Hours. 9.15 The Music Business. 930 
Rack Salad. 1020 News. 10u09 The World 
Today. 1025 Book Choice. 1020 Finan- 
cial News. 1040 Reflections. 10.45 Sports 
Roundup. 1120 News. 1129 Commen- 


tary il.is My Counfry in Mind, ii jo 
Transatlantic Quiz. 1220 News. 


— 1228 

News About Britain. 12.15 Radio News- 
reel. 1220 Sarah and Company. 120 


News. 121 Outlook. 120 Shan Sksy. 

9.2JN 


125 My Country mMind. 220 News 

Review of the British Press. 2.15 Network 
UK. 220 Spons international. 320 News. 
329 News About Britain. 3.15 The World 
Today. 330 John Peel. 420 Newsdesk. 

430 Engttsn Song. 545 The World Today. 
Afl Timn in GMT. 


WALES 555 Pro-620 

Wales Today. 625-720 
Time and Place. 1120-1220 

(London Walsh 


v Bath). 12JBM225 News and 
weather. SCOTLAND 1(110 1 


1&3Q Bzzz. 525 pm*620 

-7.00 Reporting 


Catchword. SJ35-7 
. Scotland. NORTHERN IRE- 
' LAND 525pm-5.40 Today's Sport 
540-620 Inside Ulster. 625- 
7.00 Channel One. 1120-1125 
News and weather. ENGLAND 
1220-1220 pm Secret Nature. 


(South-West only). 625-720 
Regional news mac 


newsmagazine. 

*ANNEL e ,™^ 

925420 For Openers. 120 
Channel news and weather. 120 
Home Cookery dub. 125 FUm: 
Who Goes There. 3.10-320 Indoor 
Gardening. 5.12 Puffin's 
Pia(i)ce. 5.15-&45 Sons and 
Daughters. 620 Channel Re- 
port followed by Report Sport 620 
Life With a Caprtal sea. 1020 
Questions. 1120 Snooker. 12.15 
Weather. Close. 


1120 The Eleventh Hoik 
W hat's Wrong with the 
Welfare State?. A 
discussion between a 
group of academics and 

pofiticians on the 

of the welfare 
at 1220 


TYNE TEES 

pt starts 
lews. 

120 North East News and 
Lookaround. 120 Fflm: The 
Weddh^ of UBi Marlene. 3,10 
Canon to the Kitchen. 325-320 
North EAst News. 5.15-525 Ani- 
mals to Action. 6.00 Northern 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


Life. 620-720 Mr 8 Mrs. 12.15 am 
Power. 1220 Close. 

GRANADA 


Reports. 120 Scramble! 220 
Film: To Ooruthy a Son. 325-320 
Granada Reports. 5.15-5.45 
Scramble! 6.00 Granada Reports. 
620-720 D iff rent 
Strokes. 12.15 am Cktee. 

YORKSHIRE 


-exrept starts 
r. 120 Calen- 


925-920 Weather, 
dar News. 125 Help Yourself. 120 
Film; Tiger fn The Smoke. 325 
Calendar News. 320-42DA Coun- 


try Practice. 5.15-5.45 Benson. 
6201 


Calendar. 620-720 Cleggs 
People 12.15 am Comedy To- 
night 12.45 Close. 

□ay Ahead. 120 Lunchtime. 

120 FVm: My Brother Jonathan. - 
320 Short Story Theatre. 328- 

4.00 Ulster News. 5.15-5.45 Surviv- 
al. 620 Good Evantog Ulster. 
620-720 Lifestyle. 1020 Lakeland 
Games: EmUskiSen v Derry. 

11.00 Snooker. 12.10 am News. 
ANGLIA ^ London except 


120 Anqtia news and 
cfheTlwty- 


wea trier. 120 Film: 

Nme Steps (1959). 3.15 Cartoon 
Time. 325-320 Anaha news. 


5.15-5.45 Emmerdale Form. 620 
About Anglia. 620-720 Surviv- 
al. 1020 Anglia Reports. 1120 
Snooker. 12.15 am Why Suffer- 
ing? Close. 

SCOTTISH 


News. 120 Action 


1 cert: 120 Scottish 
ion Line. 125 


Film: Doctor in Clover (19651. 320- 
‘ 15-5.45 


420 About Gaelic. 5.1 
Emmerdale Farm. 620 Scottish 
News and Scotland Today. 
620-7.00 Wrist s Your Problem? 
1020 Crime Desk. 1025 
Snooker. 12.15 am Late Call. 1220 
Close. 

S4C 1 - 00 Countdown. 

- - - 120 Face the Press. 220 


Ffenestri. 220 Moalwyn. 225 
Hwnt Ac Yma. 225 Snooker - 
Dulux British Open. 420 A Plus 
4. 420 The March of Time: The 


American Century. 5.00 

etri. 520 Pop the Ques- 


Ysgotariaetri. 

tion. 620 Darner Man. 620 
Gwaith Creu. 720 Newyddron 
Saitri. 720 Arolwg. 8.00 Lou 
Grant. News Headfines. 920 Aras. 


920 Y Byd Ar Bedwar. 1020 

s. 1020 26 Bathrooms. 1120 


Cheers 

Making Rye. 1120 Bert- A Per- 
sonal Memoir. 12.45am Close 
TSW A® London except 
-^2- 1 20 TSW News. 120 Film; 
Kina Crab (19801. 325 The 


Young Doctors. 327-4.00 TSW 
News. 5.12 Gus Honeybun's 


Magic Birthdays. 5.1S : 5.45 Biock- 
- — fod " 


busters. 8.00 Today South 
West. 620-720 Gardens tor AM. 
10.32 Interpub '86. 1120 
Snooker. 12.15am View From This 
Side. 1225 Postscript 1Z40 
Weather and Close. 


BORDER As Lorafe" «*- 

-- cept 120 Bonder 

News. 1 .30 Ftorv. The Password 


goes 

Mrs. 


12.15 News Summary. 
12.18 Close. 


. GRAMPIAN 

starts 925 First Thtog. 120 
North News. 120 Film: Wuthertog 
Heights (1939). 325-320 North 
Headlines. 5.15-5.45 Emmerdale 
Farm. 620-7.00 North Tonight 
and Weather. 12.15am News head- 
lines and weather. 1220 Close. 


UTV West As London ex- 

cept starts 925 HTV News. 

120 HTV News. 120 F0m: John 
and Juin. 3.00 Three uttie Words. 
325-320 HTV News. 5.15-545 
Candid Camera. 6.00-720 HTV 


Sit 


News. 1020 Along the Cots- 
120 Sn 


wold Way. 11 20 Snooker. 12.15 
Weather, dose. HTV wales As 
HTV West except 620-720 Wales 
at Six. 10.30-11. 00 About Far*. 


ie 



er 


THEATRES 


AMELWU a» 761 1 or 240 
7*JI 5 4 OC 7*1 ■»«.*» 

7 MS 379 6433 
Cm 930 6123 

CC BOOKING TO XMAS *S6 
cxcujSf\TEiv wnn rm Can an 
240 7200 24 Hr 7 Dai* 


__ su 

POLLARO 


TMC LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 

«m> fxamk Tum u now 


DimM by Mine orkrmi 
NlgMbr 41 7 30 Mats W«d al 2 30 
& Sal 4 30 6 8.00 

"TUT ONLY LIVE MUHML 
rve EVER ENiOVW 
SPMiaior 


A DELPHI 836 7611 or 240 
7913 4 OC 741 9999.836 

7356 379 6433 Grp Sato* 930 

6123 CC BOOKING TO XMAS 

*66 EXCLUSIVELY WITH EhnA 

GUI ON Z40 7200 34- Hr7 Daw 

uuntnes ouvm 

AWARD WMIIEM 
BEST MUMCALOF. THE. YEAR 

ENN SU 

REITEL POUAIID 

MC AND MY SHU 

THE. LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 

WHi FRANK THORNTON 


DJi-mim tw Ml to- Ockrrnl NtetiUy 
al 7 50 MJIs Wad al 9 30 A SU 
4 306 BOO 

“THE ONLY L/Ve MUSIC At 
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ALBCRY 01-836 3870 CC 379 
6S65 CC 379 6433. 741 «S9 
GTP Salas OSO 6123 83* 3968 
EiVl 7 15 Sals 2-0 A 7 30 

ACTOR OF THE YEAR 

otutor A Standard Awards "86 
ANTONY SHEA'S 
LAST WEEKS to 

TORCH SONG TRILOGY 

RuWt JMtoda 

rnnr ana GlnrtMr 


MMn K arhn ... 

"•muiantet nmr 


CKw. 




MTatUTNUreEBMOII into 
CC A Gro ups 01-734 *30t Ol- 
437 8778- 

BEST MUSICAL 196 5 

Tl» Times 

LENNON 

A ertobrauan 9T nw Wr am noiwr 
al John LmHa. 

-WOKOOtrUU, | HALLY 
LOVED IT* HteMa “JNKY 
COUUWTT NAVE DONE IT 


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:)n 


„ Wish sl wca 

01436 Mil CCOl-836 
1171. 741 9999. croup Sun OI 
930 6183 Mon nun M Swtw. Fn 
A SU M 6om A 8A6. 

OF 


WIFE BEGINS AT FORTY 

a drueMful comedy. 

Boomnu mrquQh June 1980. 

SM eves mm to end of March. 


APOLLO VKTOIBA 6S B28 8665 

OC 630 6268 Crp Stees 930 61 S3 

Eta 7 AS Mato Tut A SU 3.0. 


STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

TMEMME* 


r A W lti Ctt THAT! 

ANYTNMfi MKMINdH 

^■OMailOH" O Exp 


ST.ARLIGHT EXPRESS 


AW C W LLOYO r 

LVTKI U> RICHARD 

DncIM by TREVOR NUNN 
APPLY DAILY TO HU OTTKE 
FOR RETURN* 
Conct B aloM for O.A P> UniH 
ASM M Tun Mato 

irt wuw a a to samuamn 


CC 437 
36M .4 *34 3698/9 3* hr 7 day 


FTm 


MO 7800 

«Mum: KEITH 
■ARK KINBSTON 

THE DRAGON^S TAIL 

"runny 6 Erueruung" Ob' 

UTOtt, 

a Ne* pur by Oooglaj waihlns 
OtracMO By MJChaU Rudraan 
E'9 MairFh 7 -SO. mm Mu 3.0 
- saw so *8.13 
Group Sals 930 6193 

LAST. FOUR WEEKS 


«WU> VICTORIA SS 828 
866S CC 630 6263 Grp Sato* MO 
612S Eves 7.40 Mats fned, Sal 
30 


STARLHWT EXMEI* 

-A NtlClCM. THAT SURPASSES 


ANYTHMO AteOUKO M EVERY 

MMtW M Oi r 0 1a 
. staruqht ovaui:- 

MusicaY- 

ANOflCtot LlOYO WEBBER- • 
lyrics by RIOJA no smeot 
Dtrrrted by TREVOR MINN 

APPLY BA1LY TO MK WTIIX 


Conc e ssions tor oaj>5 
April al Tmb Mato ■ 
•OQKtHBft' TO 3CPTEMI 


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01-628 . 8796/638 

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SSmw&NY RI ' ARWtM ® 

BARBICAN THEATRE the 

MERRYW1VE8 OF WINDSOR 
■n'l. Minor 7 30. RSC/ROVAL 
n^JRWrlCE ARMCHAIR 

PROMS 

34 Marrti dan* «aato SA SO Irotn 
S-SQarn on iite day. 

THE PIT PHILISTINES BY Maxim 
Oorky too l 7 30. MELONS oy 
Bernard Pomarance ikta avail 6 

2eto 


BARBICAN HALL 638 8891 .- 628 

8796 TOO'l 7 46 NarUiern Stn- 

torta at Enatand. StopitMt 
BtolioiHiCov anifli read PUtna 


COMEOY S 930 8578 CC 839 

1438. KNUi PnwK 741 9999 

(840 7200. 7 day 24 art. Or» 

sale! 930 6123 Eve* SO Wed 

_Mat» so Sat* 8.0 ft 8-30 
ROYAL IMKZflTNK Gffl 

CAMILLE 

By Pam Gets*, nr. Ron Dantoi* 

“THEBI » mTHM TO BEAT 
OnL LAST Z WEEKS 


C PMa V THCATBE Box OTOre 
01-930 2578 PtrM CMI 84-nour 7 
day rc Mw OI 840 7800 
Prrv trw wm. Opm Thun at 7.0 


-JACKMM 


HAWTHORNE 

ACROSS FROM THE 
GARDEN OF .ALLAH 

tty CHARLES WOOD 
Directed by ROM DANIELS 
Evre Mon-FYI 8.0 SM 5 JO 6 B20 


COTTESLOE -S' 928 2260 CC 
■National Theatre'* small aucu- 
- Ionian] .Toni. 7.30. Tomoc 
7.30. Dim Marrti 27 ft March 
29 a 31 THE CHOKY OR- 
CHARD w> CheWm . Opoens 
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terimot V 928 2232 CC 
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7.30, Sat MO ft 7 jo lan petto 
HAMLET by Shateijsoswe. 
Pteviewn March 8 u> 15. Open* 
HPfli 1 7M7J 0. Then March 

IB FUTURISTS. 


CRmteHm. e 9» 3216 CC 5T9 

M06 379 . 6433 7/11 W». 

tWW B363962 EvtB 8.00L Thu 


nw *30. SM 530 ft &30 

'ICC AT ITS BEST** 


BARBI C AN 01-628 8796/638 re 
UHOn-Snn lOMnftwiij- 

ROYAL uouvnat 

COMPANY 

-BtCAM TWATRE . THE 

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(NSUKANCE " ARMCHAIR 
PROPS 3-8 Mwrti AiMto arid 

£4.00 from B 30>m on ih*. day 
THE PIT PHJESTINES byMaWm 
"Oorkv wnn-TjO MELOKS fty 
Bernard Pwwww ikta avajl_6. 
Marznm . "r • 1 - - 


“British race 
' O. Mafl 

The Theatr e pi Comtdy Company 
DRCjrnUft . • T H I R TY SCOTT 


MHMURY 


RUN F0R Y0UR WIFE! 

Wrmwi and ometed tiy 
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Rrsnnirle i rnaiti «r ordr xirals. 


geteON.- MAY FAIR CurZOn 
Mreu 499 3737 Coral Browne, 
jgg" Ctoonto Potwrto 

RREAMCMLO tPCl Film al 700 
(not aunl 4.10. ftao ft 8^40 


CURZON WEST END Sha/tanurv 
Avanue WI 439 4806 JnCO 
JEB Hama in SWEET 
“■RAMS IIS) nim al 2-00 mol 
«£U 4.KL 6J» ft 8.40 From 
fcgWjh ^UfBWrt RAN (IB) 


BOMBflON THEATRE 
Hoouim Oi 680 8840 Box Of- 
lire 01 636 8638 9 or OI 680 
966P.3 rim Call auHr 7 Day 
OC 836 2488 Grp Baton 930 
6123 

OPENS APRIL 

DAVE CLARK'S 


THE MUSICAL 
CUFF RMHABO 
__ AS THE ROCK STAR" 
THE PORTRAYAL OF 
-AKABH' by 

LAURENCE OUVCR 


PO R MOH THEATRE TIME* 
HOTLINES 01-636 8638 9 Boa 
omc or 01-880 9662 3 
Fra Can sdhr 7 oof cc . 
836 9428. Grp Sato* 930 6193 
DAVE CLARK** 

TIME 

THE MUSICAL 

CUFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK ST AW 
THE PORTRAYAL OF -AKASH* 

LAURENCEOUVIER 

Red Ptkt Prr%s from Mon 24 
March. Opens Wed 9 April at 7 
Mon Ffl 7 30 
Thu MM 3430 SM ftft a 


WAREHOUSE 240 
0230 Fen 17- Mar 18 BRWD 
THEATRE CO from Irrfand re- 
turn ltrfln uieer IM*H ■tanning 
8QCtfK IteULECAHOABte war- 
rma SWBHAN MrK PtW. 


PONMAR WnU THOUE C 240 

8330 CC 379 6666 6433. Unto 
March 15. Eve* T.SQ MtUD 
Theatre co from Ireland 
return with Uwtr tBWH Mon- 
mntr rocrem BAH fEIMBWE 
to. .Yarn Murfftqr, TUnrtng 


SHMMAN HOCIMU. UKnnv 
m only admmed a mwcvai. 


DUKE or YORKS 836 6122 CC 
896 9B37 741 9999 Ore Sam 
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CC S4Q 7200 Cm 8.0. 
-Thu MM 3. SM S ft 9 96 
Znd YEAR or THE AWARD 
WMMMQ CUMUIY HTT 

STEPPING OUT 

“TIHUMFH ON TAT** Eie SO 

The Hrt Corned} 
to Rinura Ham 
IHtoW tor JvH MrKmnr 

COMEDY-OFTHE YEAR 

Standard 'Drama A Warn 1984 
■ LAICH VOLTlStXF SU-LY“ 
Oul -Had me aumenre veiling 
far more’' *> Man "Moai surety 
lake ihe town. Qo NOW” Q Trt 
“Roar* of wroit" Tmn -«h 
moiD to lapJaojap Icfnir" Now. 


DUKE OF YORK 83& 6122 CC 
836 9837 741 9999 Crp Satos 
930 6123 Firs Con 24 Hr 7 
Day CC 240 7200 EMM 8 Thu 
MM 3 6M 6 ft 830 
2nd YEAR OF THE AWARD 
WIN NING C OMEDY wrr 

srovBia our 

■'TWL'MPH ON TAP- Eve Sid 
The hM comedy by mcnard 
Kmb Directed by Julia 
McKenzie 

COMEDY Or THE YEAR 
Standard Draw of tha Va 
Amrd 1884 

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lor more" D Mall -Mud surely 
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9648. Flrti Can OC 240 7200 
Oft (in 7 oayu 

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-An exhilarallno Mgilay of ramie 
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A MONTH OF SUNDAYS 
taft larttfi am puiy 

“CLOWS WITH HUMOUR. WfT 
AUTO COMPASSION- O. Mail 
“A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS- 


DURY LANE THEATRE ROYAL 

01-836 8108 Ol-RflO 9066 7 
Fro Can 24 hour 7 day cc Ht 
240 7200 


«ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL THE FAMILY 
WOMEN OF ALL THE BEST 
MUSICAL AWARDS FOR ISM 

Voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

STAMBMRD DHAMA AWARDS 
VMM 

BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE OUVKR AWARD 

VMM- 

BEST 

PLAYS ft HJt. 

LONDON THEATRE CRW l C ft 
AWARD 

E.19S 8.0. Mato Wed 30 
S»i 6 0 ft 8.0 
Group todes 01-930 6123 

NOW booking until 

JAN. 1987 

Pony Rain Available 


rORTLNE 9 CC 836 2238. 2239 
74 1 9*99 Eir 8 Fn SMI 6 ft 8 40 
C OMED Y OF TM( YEAR 
uanwe Cuvier Award 1984 
UP AND INCMlt 
. Bv John Godow 
-A WOHDCRTUL COMEDY- S 
Timm - splendid" D Tet ■■ 
One m Die funnies ana im are. 


towiw re pl an your nrrsHng ID 
ace. . TOTALLY HVSTEMLAL** 


Oh w Excitement and KUarny- 
Pmuadiiw Dw audience to eiae 
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MSDNnCH THEATRE OI 858 
77SS E\ nuagi 7 4£ nuu Sal 
2=0 or US toJROBIN 
CHAPMAN with ANTHONY 
ANDREWS, DAlnD 

TOTOJOTOL WN OMLVY and 
®*T QUATLE -a caotiai 
rasr D. Trl.-FacHUUnq ft 
iHld production- Guardian 
GARRICK. S OI 836 4601 C C 
3796433 ft CC. 24 hr 7 day 240 
7200 Cni SMm 930 61 23 EtesiS 
pm. Wm mat 3 0. Sol S Dana SO 

NO SEX. PLEASE- 
WFRE BRITISH 


GLOBE 437 1592 First Call 24 Hr 
Dam cc 2«0 7200 Cm B»e» 
930 6123 

- ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
PRESENTS 

Dene. Lawson. Jan France; 

Ronald Hotaatr John Barron 
LEND ME A TENOR 
A Comedy by Ken Ludwiq Olrm 
ed by DatM GUmcNre Em BOO 
MM& Wed 3 00 Sat aoO Fmt 
from Feb 21 Fra Nioni Mwiii 6 
at 700 


HAYMARHET THEATRE ROYAL 

too* Office ft cc 01 930 8932 FI rat 
Can 24 hr 7 d ay cc sue 240 7200 

PETER OTOOLE 

hllh 


■ DORA BRVAH H 
MKHAO. DENtaOH 


GEOFFREY KEEN 

MOmtA L ISTER 
BREWSTER MASON 
PAUL ROGERS 
MHAH SHOODAM 
DAVID WALLER 


SUSANNAH YOR K 


THE APPLE CART 

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Elys 7 30 Mats Wed 6 Sal ZJSO 


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Aadem Uayd WaUwr 
ta* Tha Baa ltir Uartal Unto 

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RONALD HOUUTE 


LEND ME A TENOR 

A Comedy by Km Ludwig 
Queried by tend GHmojr 

Eiec 8 Mats Wed 30 Sal to 
NOW PREVIEWING 
Firal N 19 M March 6 a 7 00 


GLOBE CC 01 037 1598 First 
Call 24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200 
Andrew Uayd Webber amenta 
Uu* 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Sbftoty M We* End Theatre 
Award 83 

MBV PULLS (TOFF 
By Denne Dergan 
DUycim hy Dar. W amgn 
Evn 8 Mato wed J sal a Grow 
SaiK 930 6123 

“THIS IS AN ABSOLUTE MOOT 
AND A SCREAM" 

S Tunes 

LAST WtCK - MUST END 
9ATLHDAV 


HER MAJESTY’S 950 9832 930 
6606 

cc Hotline 7Ai 9999 Firal Can 
24 mu- 7 day cc OooMim 
240 7200 


ta Wtarad to aww-Wrart tar 
adnotara'* D Mail 
DONALD WHICH in 

THE SCARLET 
PIMPERN& 

A«ta 


Em 7.30 M8U WM A Sal 41 3 O 


KIMS HEAD 01-296 1916 ‘A 
TASTE OF ORTON* Uoe>i Dar 
7pm. Show 80 m Book Now 


LYMC HAMMERSMITH OI 741 
231 1 Pmi Ton ‘I. Tomof 7 45 
Opera WM 7 0 Sub Eie» 7 45. 
POO* UMTS 

PROGRESS 


Directed by DnM Known 
df Ana 


. DeognM by C M f 

LYRIC STUDIO from Fn SATIE 
PAY4HOHT to A Art— Mtuhitl 
DbectM bV 


win 


_ Desmned by Tom PMSIpi 
Em 8pm Horapll (Feb IB al 
TOOi 


LONDON PUUKMI M 

THE HTT MUSKAL COMEDY 


LONDON PALLACHLM . 

THE HIT MUSICAL COMEDY 
DIRECT FROM BROADWAY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

Previews (ram Anna 22 
Firal Nwiti May 7 
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Sales 930 6123. 


LA CAOE AUX FOLLIES 
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DOUR LUGOT 

PROGRESS 

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bookings OJ-3MO 7200 

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ROD AUMOHT 

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RICHARD TODD 

ERIC LAMBER ANNETTE ANDRE 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

The fill thriller by Richard Harm 
"The best Uirtllrr for Vrara 'S Mir 
"An unabashed winner" 8 Ejrp 
■■A I hnller Uval achieve* « all" 
■■Sensallonal" Times "The mod 
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OVER 2,000 PERFORMANCES 


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AWARD- WINNOta 
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GLENGARRYGLEN ROSS 

By oavu Mamet 
Chrected by Bui Dry ocn 
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MERMAID cc 'ms booking |rfi 
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new LONDON Drury Lane WC2 
405 0072 OC 01 379 6433 Em 
7 45 Tue ft Sal 3 00 ft 7 45 THE 

ANDREW LLOYD 7.' 

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MUSICAL 
CATS 

APPLY DAIL Y TO BOX OFFICE 
FOR RETURNS 

Group boohing* OI 406 1567 Or 
OI 930 6123 Pmlal application* 
now neine acrepied unfit Aiiguel 
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OLD VIC 92U 7616 CC 261 1821 
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DM Mato 2 30. Sato 4 0 ft 7 46 

PRIDE & PREJUDICE 

A PUv udaWid Irotn Jane 
Aime n'i no te! By Dai id pownail 

PCTRR PAULINE 

LAUDS YATES 

JAMES TESSA 

WARWICK Pg AJtE-JO MES 
IAN ffiENE 

CCLDEB SUTCLIFFE 
Dtretied by M Pryda 
“TIBS B THE MOST ENJOY 
: jl NOVEL ADAPTATION L 
HAVE SEEM SINCE NICHOLAS 
MICKLECY” Tm* 

“1 LOVED IT* Clwnw 


OLD VIC 298 7616 CC 261 1831. 
Grp Sale* 930 6133 Marrti ll lo 
April 19 

IAN RIC HARD 
CHARLCSON tunFFITH* 


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PERIOD TO OCT 4 NOW OPEN 


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PRIDE & PREJUDICE 

A Play adapted Iron tone 

Austen's 

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PAULINE 
YATES 

TESSA 

WARWICK PCAKE-JOMES 
IAN IBCNE 
BELDER SUTCLIFFE 

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PALACE THEATRE 437 6834 CC 
437 8827 or 379 6433 Cn> SMC* 
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THE MUSICAL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLE 
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Cm 7.30 Mato Thu ft Sal 2.30 
Lain-oiwi no] aomiiM until the 
■nirrral 

■cat the Tovn by CNquiR- 
me FOR RETURNS AT THE BOX 
OFFICE NEW MMMUNQ& 
PERIOD TO OCT.4 NOW OPEN 


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THE MUSICAL 
•para 1ft May at 7pn 













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THE TIMES MONDAY FEBRUARY 24 1986 


THET1MES 


Prince 
calls for 
industry 
links 


The Prince of Wales yester- 
day raged Britam’s taisess- 
mea to develop closer finks 
between industry and the local 
community, “lie power for 
good of partnership, oa politi- 
cally aeirtral ground, between 
business leaders sad others in 
the conmmify, has been 
proved time and (ne again” 


The Prince, who is Presi- I 
dot of the Business in the 
Community project, suggests 
that “serioas consideration” 
should be given by companies 
to allocating a p er centage of 
pre-tax profits to com m un i ty 
projects. 

Writing in the BIOS news- 
tetter he says; “Soda! involve- 
ment is modi more than a 
matter d money, bat money is 
nevertheless the best single 
measare of commitment 

“Business in the Conang d- 

ty is, in effect, asking yon, and 
ewy board at directors in the 
country, to consider afresh 
what yonr enterprise is doing; 
to encourage participation fey 
yonr wo rkfo rce at all levels; 
and to search out the local 
people and organizations who 
can work with yon to create 
snccessfnl partnership 
initiatives”, he says. Tl 

New Zealand four, page S 



Village Voice 







: * •*, T 

‘i J. '* 


in the fBnsalayas,tells 








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The Prince of Wales with Mrs Barbara Sinatra, wife of the singer, who presented the trophy 
after a polo match in Indio, California, yesterday. 


Churchill bows to Bill protest 

Obscenity ‘laundry list 9 replaced 


The' Government doctor 
peremptorily refused to treat the 
patient, waving him off the porch. 
The young man walked away 
clutching bus stomach, doubled up 
with pain. “Serves him right, "the 
doctor said. “Maybe it will teach 
him a lesson.” 

. The Indian system of ayurvedic 
medicine in much he had been 
trained , he told me defensively, 
didn't provide quick cures. The 
villagers gave op the treatment at 
the first sign of any improvement, 
and blamed him when the disease . 
returned. He rounded on an old 
woman. “Why didn't you come 
last week?”. 

She cringed. “We tried our own 
herbs first but they didn't work,” 
she said guiltily. He turned away 
in disgust. “It’s always like that.” 

He had been posted to the 
village for a three-year term but 
managed to spend most of the 
time in towns with his family. The 
compounder, whose job was to 
make up prescriptions, not to 
treat patients, ran the dispensary 
in his absence. 


would fcaveihits own good 'time;'-; 

“Only three, patients today?” I', 
asked the doctor. “What can I d6. 
if they won’t come?” be answered. 
“They’re backward, dirty and 
lazy,-’ He would be happy when 
his new posting came, he con- 
fided. “It won’t be long now.” • 

. The viUagers, too, were gIad to 
see him go. Nor cfid they take to 

away. He*^wai^a. stiddS^Dri. 
hygiene. They found it irksome 
and difficult to understand. But 
■he - , didn’t treat them, with 
condescension. Instead of berat- 
ing them for relying on village 
remedies, he studied their herbs, 
and encouraged them to use those 
that were effective. 


delicious taum-tastmg cough 
mixture shared the medicine with 
his ^ friends, and children were 
soon fitting up. . outside the 
dispensary^ coughing their hearts 
out: The compoander solemnly 
' doled out the "• Unctios, _ entering 
each child’s name in the register. 


. For the grown-ups, there was a 
stomach powder with the taste of 
mango frmt, wfncfi was also much 
sought after. The attendance fig- 
ures were b^mning to look better, 
but they stiff didn't compare vdth 
the previous doctor’s. 


Names recurred with 
curious regularity 


The new compounder who had 
come 'with him, cheerful and 
chatty, quickly won the 'villagers* 
trust They didn’t mind when be 


Mr Winston Churchill, 
Conservative MP for 
Davyhulme, has made 
changes to his Bill designed to 
extend the scope of the Ob- 
scene Publications Act after 
criticism by broadcasting 
chiefs. 

The amendments tabled by 
Mr Churchill to his private 
member's Bin, now before the 
Commons, would replace the 
“laundry list” of items 
deemed obscene: 

The list included acts such 
as “cannibalism, bestiality, 
mutilation and vicious cruelty 
towards persons or animals,” 
which, under the Act, would 
automatically be deemed ob- 
scene and banned from being 
published or viewed in any 
place to which people under 
the age of 18 had access. 


The amendments come in 
the wake of claims that the 
effect of the “laundry list,” 
contained in Mr Churchill's 
Obscene Publications 
(Amendment) BilL would be 
that a performance of King 
Lear would not be permissible 
because of a scene in which 
Gloucester’s eyes are gouged 
out on stage- ■ 

Other broadcast items, such 
as nature films showing ani- 
mals devouring each other, 
would also have been not 
permissible. 

The alternative form of 
words he has tabled to replace 
the “laundry list” states: “In 
any proceedings in connection 
with a broadcast, a court or 
jury in determining whether 
the broadcast was obscene, 
would have to have regard in 


particular to the probability of 
it being viewed or heard by 
children and young persons. 

“Publishers of the more 
explicit brands of sex maga- 
zines, increasingly readily 
available at local newsagents 
and bookstalls, would no long- 
er be able to sell such maga- 
zines to young persons under 
18, and would be required to 
package than in sealed 
wrapping.” 

Mr Churchill said: “I recog- 
nize as a journalist and former 
radio presenter that the ’laun- 
dry fist' approach, including as 
it did the term ’vicious ' 
cruelty', would have caused 
difficulty to legitimate current 
affairs reprating as well as to 
certain drama productions 
“Although the term 'vicious 
cruelty* will no longer be in the 


Bill, nonetheless, the grosser 
forms of violence would be 
fully dealt with under the 
'tendency to deprave and ; 
corrupt' test contained wr thin 
the existing Act, which has 
already been most successful 
in prohibiting 'video nasties.* 

“The amended Bill will stiD 
fully achieve the two objec- 
tives with which I set out in 
the beginning, namely to bring 
broadcasting within the scope 
of the Act and to restrict the 
availability to children of the 
more explicit magazines.” 

Mr Michael Grade, control- 
ler of BBC 1, said he thought 
there would be more opposi- 
tion to Mr Churchill's amend- 
ments than there had been to 
his original proposils. 

Leading article, page 13 


Old herbal medicine 
failed to work 


The compounder was peering at 
the sores on the woman's head 
and was giving the doctor, who 


was sitting at the table, a running 
commentary on the progress of 
his examination. The doctor, 
scribbling busily, didn’t even 
glance at the patient His assistant 
wiped the sores with a piece of 
cotton wool, dropped it over the 
side of the porch where s imilar 
refuse littered the ground, and put 
ointment on the woman's head. 

There were flies everywhere — 
on the patient* s sores, on the 
coxnpouilder, on the table. One 
landed on the doctor’s nose. He 
didn’t even shake his bead. It 


to keep^.fheir dressings dean. 

When the doctor left to attend a 
course; the. compounder looked 
after them with a brisk effiriency 
which made them think he was a 
better physician than the doctor; , 

The compounder : was still in 
charge when the rumour reached 
the village: dispensaries which 
foiled to attain the attendance 
quote set by the Government 
would he dosed down. Hie com- 
pared die daily register kept by his 
predecessor with his own and 
found to his chagrin that fewer 
patients came now than in the 
past Yet no one in the village bad 
ever had a good word to say for 
the previous doctor. ‘ ■ 

At first, the explanation eluded 
him. If he was to save the. 
dispensary, for the villagers* sake; 
he must increase the attendance 
figures. He tried bribery. 

A boy whose cold the com- 
pounder was treating with a 


- The miswra 1 came to the com- 
pounder as he was poring over the 
. old register, kK>lringjOT a solution 
to the puzzle. Many of the names 
recurred with suspicious. regular- 
ity. The villagers confirmed his 
doubts The register had been 
forged, and tiomstfyai that. But 
the compounder was a good 
learner. Tram, now on his figures j 
too w^ higl^ th^ the 
Government's' quota. 

The 'next tun£tbe doctor Went 
to town, he attended* meeting at 
which other ayurvedic prac- 
titioners repented on the high 
levels of attendances at their 
dispensary. They were all 
comfortably above the quota, as 
hi$ were now, and, he soon- 
discovered,. theirs had been at- 
tained in exactly the same way. 

When I left the vxQage three 
years ago, the compounder was 
stiff working hard to hue the 
villagers to tike dispensary and 
was making good progress. When 
I returned recently, he and ■■the 
doctor had gone — but the 
dispensary has survived. - . 


Copyright ©Victor Zorza, 1986 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 


opens the Brit- 
ish Equestrian Trade Associ- 
ation Trade Fair at Sandown 
Park Racecourse, 10.30. 


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Music 

Redial by Brian Gallifonl 
(tenor). The American Church 
In London, 79 Tottenham Ct 
Rd, Wl, 1.05 - 1.50. 

Redial by Trio Sonneric, Sl 
George's Church, Bloomsbury 
Way, Wa. I. . 

Concert by the Holywell En- 
semble, The University Church 
of Si Mary the Virgin, High St, 
Oxford, 1.15. 

Recital by Vocem, Walter 


(piano), St. Martin-in-dxe 
Fields, 1.05. 

Rental by Starlight Trio 
authentic Palm Court Trio, with 
muse from the 30s, The Royal 
Festival Han, Sooth Bank, 12.30 
- 2 . 

Concert by the Scottish 
Chamber Orchestra, Barbican 
Hall, EC2, 7.45. 

Piano redial by David How- 
ells, Su Lawrence Jewry, EC2, 1. 

Organ redial by Christopher 
Enston, Sl Michael's, Comhill, 

Concert by harpist, Marisa 
Robles with the English Cham- i 


her Orchestra, Royal Festival 
Hall, South Bank, 7J0. 

Talks, lectures, films 

Service Issues and Gerontol- 
ogy by Professor Olive Steven- 
son and Mr Jef Smith, The 
Great Hall, King’s College Lon- 
don, Strand, 5 JO. 


Mob eri^ HaO, University of 


Keefe,8. 

Recital by Alison Hrghman- 
Bdl (soprano), Kelvin Grout 


The Tones Crossword Puzzle No 16,977 


Regency and early Victorian 
dress by Frances Musker, 12; 
Images of women in nineteenth- 
century British paintings by Gill 
Saunders. 1.15, Victoria and 
Albert Museum, South Kensit%- 
ton. 

Why are the Merchants of 
Death no longer immoral? by 
Professor Peter Wiles, LSE, 
Houghton Street, WC2. 5 JO. 

How the Stock Exchange 
Works by Miss Jacqueline Eta- 
vis, The Birmingham and Mid- 
land Institute, Margaret Street, 
6 JO. 

Romantic Travellers In Leba- 
non by Johu Julius Norwich, 
Leighton House, 12 Holland 
Park Rd, W14. 6.30. 

Invention and Discovery in 
the Study of Early English 
Names by Mr J. McN. Dodgson, 
Chemistry Auditorium, Chris- 
topher ingold Laboratories, 
Gordon St/WCI, 5 JO. 

Introduction to manuscript 


Nature notes 


ACROSS. 


1 Wishful thinking grips nov- 
elist right? Cherry-pie (10). 

6 Soil batter in a vessel (4k 
9 Shunning the fair sex he is 
into gyms for a change (10). 

10 Box, knocks being returned 

<4 \ 

12 Principal event in cock- 
fighting (4). 

13 Beloved by 12 perhaps, or a 
word of thanks (9). 

15 Competently consumed an 
irrational quantity in a 
ridiculous fashion (8). 

16 Resolved like Achilles to 
sulk here? (fi). 

18 One's country, if for in- 
stance a Cypriot (6). 

20 Change of fortune making 
no difference to Laval (8). 

23 "Harry is essentially attrac- 
tive (9). 

24 Dash across the Channel 
W* 

26 Bird makes writer Laurence 
lose his way (4). 

27 Obliteration of six notes in- 
tended to be heard (10). 

28 Spans one fra the driver-ex- 
haust, say? (4). 

29 Counsellor round central 
Perth who contributes to 
newspapers (10). 


3 Music-maker or bird 
(inducting what was left of 
the Cheshire Cal) (5-7). 

4 Learner Bruce in new form 
of hat worn by Mr. Lear (8). 

5 This type of order is after afl 
incomplete (6) 

7 Provide substitutes for 
carded and fancy fabrics (7). 

8 Trading vessel lit up in the 
lake(10). 

11 Scene of topping achieve- 
ment to herald the Corona- 


Seminar Room, British Library 
galleries, Gt Russel St WCI. 

Feeling and Form in Worship 
by Kevin Nichols, Exhibition 
HaO, Palace Green, Durham 
City, SjIS. 

La n g u ag e And Privacy by Dr 
PJ. Fitzpatrick, Room 203, 
ENet Riverside Lecture Rooms, 
(Stage II), New Elvet, Durham 
City, 5.15. 

Gifts of the Spirit: Wise 
speech by Gordon Bates, Liver- 
pool Parish Church, Pier Head, 
1.05. 

James 11 and the Revelation 
of 1688 by Prof WA Speck, 
Herbert Jarman Lecture The- 
atre, King Alfred's College, 
Winchester, 4J0. 

The European Community's 
Response; Future Priorities by 
Christopher Jackson and Mi- 
chael McGowan, Royal Institu- 
tion of Chartered Surveyors, 12 
Gt George St, SW1. 6-8. 

The Shock of the New (4) 
Trouble (60 Mins), Lower Floor 
Theatre, The National Gallery, 
TrafalgarSq. I. 


There have been some reports 
of mute swans frozen into the 
ice: In the Fens, stretches of 
flood water have been kept open 
by the Wildfowl Trust, who 
have been feeding the herds of 
Bewick's swans on unwanted 

K and potatoes given by 
farmers. 

As the frost has gone on, small 
birds hove found it increasingly 
hard to get food, and many have 
been largely sustained by human 
help. However, where a thaw in 
the daytime has softened the 
ground it has been easier lor 
them, and robins and hedge- 
sparrows have found time to 
keep singing. Hedge-sparrows 
might be mistaken at a glance 
for female house-sparrows, but 
they have fine hQls and soft grey 
heads, and live more like wrens, 
feeding on the ground and 
flitting low from bush to bush. 
At present the males are 
challenging each other with loud 
song from the tops of small 
trees. 



Weather 

forecast 


Pressure wiff remain low 
over France, ridge of high 
pressure over NW areas. 


6 am to midnight 



The pound 


In the woods, winter aconites 
opened their yellow petals be- 
fore the cold spell, bat they win 
not open again until it is much 
warmer. The stringy yellow 
flowers of the fragrant witch- 
hazel can survive a night well 
below freezing. DJM 


Births: Winslow Homer, 
painter, Boston, Massachusetts. 
1836; 

Deaths: Henry GmadBsh, 
physdst, London, 1810; Robert 
FuJton, pioneer of steamboats, 
New York, 1815/ 

Today is the Feast of Salat 
Matthias, the Apostle chosen to 
replace Judas Iscariot (Acts 1 
xxiii-xxvi). There is a tradition 
that he was martyred at Colchis. 



Yngcwama Dnr 

for amaU donemtoatfon bank nods' 
a* «s suppled by Barclays Bank PTC. 
Different rates apply to travellers' 
cheques and other foreign currency 


RelaB Price Mac 3787 

Maw Volte The Dow Jams tndustrW 
Arerege dosed up 2AJBB at IWOTon 


The week’s walks 


TodM insfcto Dickens' Ionian: Grays 
Inn tDDickflRs's House, meal Hdbom 
UndorgjrasaS. 2 . 


H Scene of topping achieve- 
ment to herald the corona- 
tion (5.7). 

14 Stipple a manuscript to 
form no original writing 
(10X 

17 Murphy will naturally lead a 
dull Life (8), 

19 He made a bit of gold in a 
ship (7). 

21 Support needed by those on 
board (3-4). 

22 Advertised as rapes may be 

( 6 ). 

25 USA’s standard state repre- 
sentative (4 )l 


Underground. 7aa 
WS&asd a y! Inns 0> Court England's. 
Legal heritage, meet Chancery Lens 
Undeqjrouno {ttcfcet office). 11. Legal 
London: inside the LawCbura, meet 

Bottom Underground. 2. 

TMredajR Tfo Charm of CMaa. meet 
Soana Square Underground, a Beat ot 
Brash pubs night, meet Bond Street 
Underground (lletaoffrM), 730. 

RteSy! Wm Shakespeare and Charles 

Dt dkwB rh nrade tour, meet Monument 
Underground. 11. An Nswrw pi* waft : 
owara' nraewas, meet St PauT s Under- 


ground. 750. 


be 

S Times PartfaBo He im iWiti . 


Saturday to The Times. 

6 Times Pcrtfa tto Hat end detaOs or 

omea* or The TtmST^ 


Swope Lis and tbnss ot Winston 
ChurejC meet St James Parte Under- 
grotfid, 11 . Attorney through Dickens' 
London, meat a Pairs Underground. 11- 


A Lond on Vfltt ga. HjghgMe. meet Areft- 
way U nderground. Z diaries Dfckorf 
Stray London, meet St PatTs Under- 
ground, 120 . An historic pub w«K 
OwteM. met Soane Square Under- 
ground. 7.30. 


Will AT 

1 grog used by Jack Ketch Will a J 

- 2 Awkward rascals, these east- DCXt o3.i 

ten sailors (7), 

CONCISE CROSSWORD PAGE 10 


The Solution 
of Saturday's 
Prize Puzzle 
No 16,976 
will appear 
next Saturday 




Parliament today 


Commons: Debate on chil- 
dren in care: British Railways 
(Stansted) Bill, second reading. 

Lords: Local Government 
BilL committee stage; Incest and 
Related Offences (Scotland) 
BilL report stage; Marriage Bin, 
report stage. 






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