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Welsh tap ties '- 



Conservative backbenchers increased 
the pressure on Mr Uon .ftittas to resign 
last fright, accusing tub of patting the 
Prime Minister in an Impossible position . 

. The .Government .was^ shaken Jhy 1 the. ; 
news that the Prime Minister had not been- 
told Mr Brittan had authorized a. critical - 
WestiantMeak ■ - ■' 


• Westland's share price soared as two 
mystery buyers in the stock market were 
prepared to pay more thap 150p. Two days 
ago the shares were 90p • 

•_ Mr Neil Kinnock compared the contro- 
versy to die start of the Watergate scandal 
which' brought about 'President Nixon’s 
downfall.' . \ Page 2 


Kins 


\* !>■ iit 

\ at 


Four readers shared the £2,000 
Tbncf'v PortMie competition 
yesterday. Miss . EHzabefo 
Potter of Worcester; Mr P 
Bagga ofLoDdon; Mr George 
Hart off Ipswich; and Mrs Jane 
=* Perry of Bktchley, Bucks, each 
woo i860. ftortfoBe list, page 
16; how to play, Information 

Service, hade page ' 

Militant to 
face assault 
allegations 

Allegations' of assault and 
intimidation , against-. Labour 
R: Party . tnembeis opposed to 
Militant tendency have been 
i made to the party sinquiry into 
* the Liverpool / branch, with 
t evidence that Militant - op- 
ponents .have been prevented 
from contesting council scats 
and candidates have bees 
ferced.io lake a “loyalty oath,” 
P*go2 

Ship sinks 

Two nn identified crew mem- 
bers died and. another is missing 
after the British-registered 
freighter Stanley Bay. sank off 
Spam's north coast in Jtmbrm. 

VA 


. By Philip Webster, Political Reporter •• 

Pressure on Mr Leon Brittan doubt it had not been the right Mr Ivor Sianbrook. Con- 

io resign became even more thing to .say. Some MPs even servative MP for Orpington, 

intense last night as Corise rva- . announced that they would not and a loyalist indicated that he 
live backbenchers accused him .be supporting the: Government would not be- supporting: the 
of letting- the party down and in Monday !s debate m 'protest at Government on Monday and 
putting the .Prime Minister into his conduct. • * said there had been dishonesty 
an impossible position. ... Mr Barry Porter, Conserva- Outside the .meeting another 

The renewed clamour for his ' MP for Wirral South, was- veteran. Sir .Peter Mills. MP for 
resignation came after Mrs ' reported to -frtve boen ' s peak i ng Devon'. West and Torridge, 
Thatcher had earlier. revealed in . ■ or the. majoniy of those who - stated: “I consider the Prime 

the. Commons that a critical contributed to the : debate when-’ Minister has been put in an 

leak during the Westland affair hc .^ kcd: Monday am J intolerable position. Ixon Brit- 

had been personally authorized - f**®? to TIPP® 1 ' 1 . „ '* nm ^ - tan must consider his position 

by Mr Brittan. • Minister, which. I shall, or am 1 very carefully. He should 

' . ‘ - .being asked to support Leon- «*sien ” 

. P |[ IVa , 1 S- 1 i r ee ^ 1 ® °^- Brittan; Which: LwillnOL” . Th» hvernihglminq view nf 

backbench 1922 Committee - ._ h _ p___ MP • The overwhelming view of 

well over half the 20 speakers hSow J WcsT.^ho hw ? bin backbencher* was that they 

SlTi behind* ^ 

or Trade and Industry to stand during the Westland dispute, hit K _ ' ' ■ 

10 «sethe crisis mto : out at Mr Brittan: saying that he ' -Mr Norman St John-Stevas. 
which the Government had had put the Prime Minister in [ ormcr m,msicr 

been plunged. . • • - an impossible situation"*. - b ; as * smaH parliamentary 

The party meeting, packed Mr Robin Maxwell-Hyslop. ntajoniy. u said to have won 
and tense; rallied behind 4hfe MP for- TivcrloD. angriJy poin- considerable support from his 


putting the .Prime Minister into 
an impossible position. 

The renewed clamour for his 
resignation came after Mrs 
Thatcher had earlier revealed in 
the. Commons that a critical 
leak. during the Westland affair 
had been personally authorized 
by Mr Brittan.' . 

At a private meeting of the 
backbench .' 1922 Committee 
well over half the 20 speakers 
called for the Secretary of.Stale 
for Trade' and Industry to stand 
down and to ease the crisis into 
which the Government had 
been plunged: 

■ The party meeting, packed 
and tense: rallied behind the 
Prime- Minister, some of them 
praising her performance in the 
Commons House. 

But there was ' negligible 
support for Mr Brittan. and any 
member who dared to sound a 
sympathetic tiote was left in no 



MP for- Tiverton.- angrily poin- considerable support from His 
ted out that iif -his statement on colleagues when . he • called on 
January 13 Mr Brittan 1 had MPs to rally behind the Prime 
omitted io mention that he had Minister.. . . 
authorized the leak. “The party - Text of latter, and Ingham 
is entitled to expect a higher profile, page 2 

standard of conduct.” he is • Parliament, page 4 

reported to have said. Leading article, page 13 


Mrs Thatcher leaving the Commons after making her statement yesterday and Mr 
Brittan arriving earlier at the Department of Trade and Industry 

Confrontation looms Peres steps 
at Murdoch papers u i ) n p . r , es ^ e 

An ii on Husam 

after talks collapse By Nicholas Ashford 

By Donald Mncdntyre and David Felton dJlLi?".3!*J22“ e ..5S 


Thatcher not told for 16 days 
that Brittan authorized leak 


. /L 


iUHi 




*5 W i 


Libya warned 

The US, .in what appeared, to be 
a warning IO Libya, notified 
Civilian "air traffic officials that 
US Navy .. fighters will be 
Conducting operations off the 
Ljbyan-cpast neat week. 

« - p 

r ■ ; V ■ . . 

< Irish jockeys 


The Go veftiteiait ■ irtfs - -TSt 
night shaken- by. the news that 
no one had r u>ld_ the Prime 
Minister that' A critical West- 
land -Irak -had been personally 
authorized by .Mr Leon -Brittan, 
Secretary- of State for Trade and 
Industry, And that in spite of 
unrelenting pressure Mr Brittan 
was adamantly resisting resig- 
nation. - ; • 

Mrs Margaret. Thatcher yes- 
terday refused to tell the House 
of Commons that she had not 
been told for 16 days that Mr 
Brittan had authorized the leak 
of;a. “confidential” letter- from 
Sir Patrick. Mayfrew, the Solici- 
tor General* U> Mr : Michael 
Heseltine, then Secretary- of 
State for Defence, on January 6. 
She told MPs that 10 Downing 
Street had been consulted. 

In spite of the fact that she 


■' had heed id Downing Street on 
• Jant&ry 6, ; in spite of phone 
caDj from DTI to Mr Charles 
Powell. - 'one of -her ^ivate 
' secretaries,- and . to Mr Bernard 
Ingham, tier Press- secretary, 
iand in spite drthe^feft that An 
official leaks inquiry was, set up 
. eight days later, on January 14, 
Mrs; Thatcher' did- not ; know 
. what had -happened -until she 
received the leaks report on- 
Wednesday night- 
Ttie mood of Conservative 
MPs . fist night - was one ' of 
dismay and dejnes^pn that the 
Prime Minister.; the, Cfovera- 
njent and the party should be so 
publicly humiliated, and. anger 
that 'Mr Brittan had; ■foiled' his 
colleagues by nor offering a' 
prompt and protective resig- 
nation in spite of Cabinet-level ' 
pressure. . 


: retire to race 

Bbt jodreys tiare been reported 
to . the ! Irish -National Hunt 
steeplechase ..committee after 
refusing to ride in t novice 
chase at 'Limerick. They had 
complained aboot the dange- 
rous nature of the track, bat 
their ol^ection was rejected.. 

Merger off 

The. Ladbroke and Granada 
groups ^ have Called off merger 
talks. 'Ttie diainnan of Grana- 
da, Mr Alex -Bernstein, said: 
“We simply couldn’t - agree 
terms”. - ' . Ptage 17 

Aids rebuke 

Some patients infected with 
Aids rare being shunned by 
doctors, dentists and nurses 
through fear and ignorance of 
the disease, a leading-'spccialist 
says Page 3 


Mystery buyers push up 
Westland share price 

• By Patience Wheatcroft *■ 

The price of Westland shares proposed deal; -with Sikorsky’ 
leapt . in the stock market although ttie deal failed to get 
yesterday as Another mystery "the necessary 75 per cent vote.it 


buyer appeared, prepared 10 pay 
more than 150p- for shares 
which two days ago were 9 Op. 


needed’ to succeed. The new 
buyers of the Prudential bolding 
are also beDeved to support the 


The Westland board and the Westland board. 

European cona^um which is However, the alienee of 
opposing the planned .tinkuR ^ i }V ^y er w jj 0 was snawfing up 
with Sikorsky- FI at said they did , vefuerdav is unknown 


not know the new buyer’s 
identity. 


slock yesteiday is unknown 
since the shares were not being 
purchased through Westland’s 


On Wednesd^evoteg^n- *ZZTa S-l 

anonymous buyer pruchased Scrimgeouir Vickers.' the broker 

the 4 A was believed to be prepared to 

owned by the Pru^nO^rd a j 52p a of 

“ Sc unnamed bnyer for a block 
have been owned by Provincial of j Westland shares. 

Insurance. The pnerwas more The , rcsil j t D f this share buying 
ihan J SOp a share and according t J^ markcl 

was to send 


to Mr Ron Amis of. the Wes^d^ha^sup to 135p 
Pi^clenuaL It was aoc ' .8°°dto ^ cy back to'dose 

refuse. The Prudential had at |23p, up 28p on the day. 

built up most- of its bolding last ■ ” . , • • 

autumn for between 60p ^pd Suggestions that Sue 
OAn might launch an. all-out b; 

'OP* . — - . : " ■ i ' -e wirZt j ___ r 


Suggestions that Sikorsky 
might launch an. all-put bid for 


At last Friday’s meeting , of Westland are seen by the City as 
Westland shareholders at ihe -unlikely, but without a bid, the 
Royal Albert Hall the Prudea- share price is .alroostimposaWe 
tial voted in favour of the to justify. - 


' That resignation is expected 
before' . Monday’s -emergency 
Chmmons . debate, granted at 
, Mr Neil Kiimoclds request -after 
- Mis Thatcher's statement yes- 
terday; : 

-.TKe party expects him to do 
. bis duty: 1 

■ Birt..even : if Mir Brinan does 
resign the Prime- Minister will 
; come -tinder the most intense 
attack in' the' Commons on 
. Monday. ■ One minister said 
after her statement yesterday. 

. “She is digging a grave for 
htrielC” ’ 

-The most common and mosi 
damaging all-pany criticism of 
ihe Prime' Minister yesterday 
was thal.she 'bad- lost control of 
.the Government. . 

Even - Lord- Whitelaw, • Mrs 
Thatcher’s closest colleague, 
told the Lords that Mr Hesel- 
tine had taken his Westland 
campaign to the point at which 
it had been “extremely difficult 
for good Cabinet government, 
confidentiality and joint Cabi- 
net responsibility to be pre- 
served.” '- 

Other Conservatives felt that 
Mrs- Thatcher, should have put 
an immediate end to the open' 
warfare between Mr Heseltine 
and Mr Brittan. ■ 

Yesterday’s statement illus- 
trated the results of the Cabinet 
feud, with Mrs' Thatcher saying 
openly that the problems over 
the leak' could have been 
avoided if only Mr Hesehine 
had cleared his own -correspon-. 
dence before publishing it 

In the- event, Mr Hesehine 
had. sent a tetter on Friday, 
January 3, to the European 
consortium which was bidding 
-for a stake in. Westland. 

. Because it was fell that -the 
letter Contained “material inac- 
curacies” on the basis of 
available documents Sir Patrick 
had written his tetter to Mr 
Hesehine on Monday, January 
6 . 

Mi - Brittan received a copy of 
ihe' letter at .1.30 pm and 
because he. thought the infor- 
mation “should be brought into 
the public domain as soon as 
. . Continued an page 2, col 4 


. .The prospect of industrial 
confrontation between News 
International and print workers 
at' its four' newspapers was 
looming' .over this weekend, 
after the breakdown of the talks 
between Mr Rupert Murdoch, 
the company chairman, and 
union leaders yesterday.. ‘ 

Mr Murdoch roade/it clear, 
after tile collapse of the talks 
that the company would seek to 
bring out all four newspapers in 
ihe increasingly likely event of 
industrial action by the two 
main -unions, Sogat ’82 and the 
National Graphical Associaton 
fNGA). after their failure to 
secure recognition at the Wap- 
ping plant in east London. - 
’The company has contin- 
gency plans to produce at least 
limited editions of its papers at 
the new high-technology plant 
at the centre of the dispute. Mr 
Murdoch said that his message 
to readers: was: “Just hang in 
there: Well get to you. If we 
miss for a day- or two, we’ll be 
b^ck." 

Mr' Murdoch, during two 
hours of talks at the Park Lane 
Hotel in central London, 
proposed new five-year con- 
tracts for “some hundreds” of 
the print workforce at each , of 
the existing, sites in Gray’s Inn 
Road and Bouverie Street, 
while rejecting claims for 


guarantees of no compulsory 
redundancy, indexation of pay 
rates and an assurance of no job 
losses as a result of production 
being transferred to Wap ping. 

The company- declined to 
confirm a claim by Mr Tony 
Dubbins, general secretary of 
the.NGA, that this would. mean 
up to 5,000 jobs Would go at the 
existing sites. But it is. acknow- 
ledged that the proposals 
“would indeed mean die loss of 
several thousands of jobs,” 
under • the new agreements, 
which would replace arrange- 
ments due to run out at the end , 
of June. 

Mr Murdoch also proposed 
legally binding contracts similar 
to those Already rejected by the 
prim unions for foe Wapping 
site. 

The union's next move 
depends in foe first instance on 
a meeting of all five of foe 
industry’s unions at foe- TUC > 
today, which will be attended by 
Mr Eric Ham mond , general 
secretary of foe EETPU. 

Mr Hammond is under 
pressure from TUC leaders to 
swing behind a common' ap- 
proach to negotiations, instead 
of pursuing separate talks for an 
agreement covering the Wap- 
ping plant 

In a gesture towards foe TUC 
- Contained on page 2, col 4 


up pressure 
on Husain 

By Nicholas Ashford 

The pace of Middle East 
diplomacy quickened appre- 
ciably yesterday as Mr Shimon 
Peres, the visiting Israeli Prime 
Minister, held two further 
rounds of secret talks with Mr 
Richard Morphy, US Assistant 
Seoutap* of State, on ways to 
bring King Wiwain of Jordan 
and moderate Palestinians into 
direct talks with Israel. 

There was a. growing convic- 
tion among Israeli' officials 
accompanying Mr Peres on his 
official visit to Britain that King 
Husain may abandon efforts to 
persuade Mr' Yasser Arafat, 
leader of the Palestine Liber- 
ation -Organization to join him 
in foe - talks and will Invite 
moderate Palestinians from foe 
occupied West Bank and Gaza 
to join him instead. 

However, they recalled that 
King Husain has been on the 
verge of talking peace with 
Israel in the past but has polled 
back because of Arab pressure. 
“It is not too difficult to get him 
80 per ant of the way. It is the 
last 20 per cent which can be 
problematical" 

The talks Mr Peres has been 
holding with Mr Murphy - he 
has met President Reagan's top 
Middle East expert three times 
since his arrival in London on 
Tuesday - have eclipsed the 
official part of his visit to 
London. 

Continued on back page, col 6 


Sterling 
hit by 
$15 oil 
warning 

By David Smith 
and Teresa Poole 

The Bank of England stepped 
in yesterday to prevent bank 
base rates, and thus mortgage 
rates, from rising. The move 
came as the pound was again 
filling, hit by a forecast from 
Saudi Arabia's oil minister. 
Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Yamani. 
that oil prices could plunge to 
less than $ 1 5 a barrel. 

The sterling index fell one 
point to 74.3, its lowest for 10 
months. This week the pound 
has lost nearly 5 per ant of its 
value. Against the dollar yester- 
day it fell by 1.2' ants to 
Si. 3837. ' 

Despite -the pound's setback, 
the Chancellor ' refused to 
sanction a base rate rise. The 
Treasury issued a statement 
saying that lower oil prices 
could be beneficial to the 
British economy. 

North Sea oil prices collapsed 
after the warning from Sheikh 
Yamani. Unless producers, 
both inside and outside foe 
Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries, collabo- 
rate on reducing output, oil 
prices could fall to less than £15 
a barrel, he said. 

The warning, directed at 
Britain, sent oil markets into a 
panic. Cargoes of Brent, the 
main North Sea crude, for 
delivery in March, were sold for 
SI 7 a barrel at one point, over 
$2 down on Wednesday’s 
closing levels. Prices later 
steadied, closing at Si 8.25 

World oil prices have crashed 
by a third over the past two 
months. 

The high street banks are now 
waiting for a signal from the 
Bank of England before making 
any move in their rates. Money 
market interest rates still point 
to a rise in base rates from 1 2.5 
t 13.5 per cent. But some 
foreign exchange dealers believe 
that the Treasury is willing to 
let foe pound run down 
temporarily, putting the blame 
on oil prices and the uncer- 
tainties caused by the Westland 
affair, rather than allowing a 
politically damaging mortgage 
rate increase. 

. Kenneth Flat, page 17 

New pay offer 
lifts strike 
threat at Ford 

The threat of a strike at Ford 
was lifted last night when union 
leaders agreed to recommend to 
the 37.000 manual workforce an 
improved two-year pay offer 
which will lead to rises of 
between 16 and 18 per ant. 
(Our Labour Correspondent 
writes). 

Increases over the period of 
the agreement will take a top 
production worker's weekly pay 
from the present £178.55 to 
£217.29. The rises are linked to 
a wide-ranging programme of 
changes in working practices 
which should redua the num- 
ber of job descriptions from the 
present 500 to 58. 


Direct cash offer to 
rebuild inner cities 

• By Richard Evans, Lobby Reporter 


A radical two-pronged plan 
aimed . at . cricouraging the 
regeneration of Britain's derelict . 
inner cities will be outlined by 
the Government today. 

. It will include giving White- 
hall , grants”' .direct to private 
sector : developers wishing to . 
-improve rundown areas, and so 
cut. JMit the time- wasting and 
political ' obstruction encoun- 
tered , from . Some MocAI" auth- 
orities. ■ 

.A’ system .of simplified 
planned' zones, fra from all but 
foe - most- basic planning re-' 
straints. will also be introduad. 

The" new prdposals. to be 
contained in -the. -Housing and 
Planning Bin. come in advana . 
of the Prime Minister's own 
recommendations for the inner' 
cities after Sait years riots, and 
have her blessing . 

At .the moment private 


developers wishing to regener- 
ate the worst inner city areas 
can apply for government cash 
through local authorities. But 
there have- ban complaints of 
undue bureaucracy, political 
opposition and delays.- particu- 
larly involving Labour-con- 
trolled councils. 

Mr Kenneth Baker. Secretary 
of Stale -for the Environment, 
has decided to speed the process 
by making urban regeneration 
grants available directly to 
developers. 

In multi-million pound 
schemes,- which often cover 
several acres.- the Government 
would provide about £1 in grant 
for every £5 spent by builders. 

The simplified planning 
zones, which will remove much 
towp-hall red tape, will not be 
introduced until next year. 






e* 


Costly jobs Evacuees turn Britannia into polyglot shantytown 


Fourteen jobs have been bought 
at .a new -Coo-Cola canning 
factory in. Northern Ireland at a 
cost to the taxpayer of ‘more 
than £60,000 each, a govern- 
ment report reveals Page 2 

Posgatesues 

Mr . Ian. Posgatc is suing foe 
board of his. former agency ^at 
Lloyd’s of London, foe in- 
surance market, for defamation 
after his 'dismissal two weeks 
ago. . . Pag* I 7 


From Richard Dowden, Rdyal Yacht Britannia, off the coast of Aden 


Home News 2-4 
Oiosos M 
'Appts UJ9 
.Arts 9 

•Basina* 16-21 
*Co«rt - . 14 

IGnsswwds ML2S 

l Dhxy . 12 

■Team 16-1? 
'JLnrStpflrt 24 
‘LeaOigaiilde.. 

• and Letters 13 


* * . * * 


Motoring » 

Obituary 14 
ParBanmN . 4 
Science 14 
Soow reports 28- 
Sport . 21-24 
TV & Radio 27 
Ttoai»*i®te ?? 
Weaker 28 
wo* 14 


The moon hung astern arer , 
the fluttering White Ensign, 
turning the ship’s wake, to 
silver, while on the packed 
quarter deck foe band in khaki 
shirts and shorts played their 
hearts oat. When the appkuise 
died down; foe band leader 
bowed, tnrned to thecrowj. iiid 
said: “Now I know what Band 

Aid felt Hke.” 

JJeJow, in the Qneen’s private 
quarters; beneath gHE-framed 
pain tings, -Indian, and fttfahn 
families, foe Women .dressed w 
colourful saris, were stretched 
oat on foe floor, some af their 
children curled up -asleep 
among their lew-bags. - 

In the.' Qtaen’s dining .ropm. 

next door, where heads of state 
bare . . dined H-fo. "■ spteodomv 
hmpble citizens . locked into 
plates ofrice,:beans and stew- • 

Every state, cabin was- fined: 
Pakistanis, Japanese. Suda- 
nese. Greeks, Bangladeshis, 


Filipinos, I nd ians, 'Britons, 
Chinese. Engineers, doctors, 
shopkeepers, waitresses, con- 
struction workers, all crammed 
in together. A polyglot shanty- 
town has moved into foie palace. 
Even foe Queen’s bedroom has 
stores init. -. 

The British tend -to do 
disasters and' defeats well, but 
this operation, which has been 
carried out with nonchalance 
- and harbour, bordered on foe 
magical. Among Britannia’s 
'bewildered passengers there 
was a universal feeling 'of 
ii wnw iw relief/- mixed, .with, 
blank astonishment at finding 
themselves on foe must exclus- 
ive crips* in foe world. 

•One unusual feature of the 
rescue, disclosed by foe Minis- 
try of Defence yesterday; wits 
that for about three'; days- A 


providing liaison with ' Russian 
Ships and people ashore. 

: Returning ‘ to -Djiboatr last 
night, Britannia bad 442 - 
evacuees on board, 22 of them 
British, which .puts Britannia's 
rescue totpl at 1,082 from 50 
different countries. 

They thought these were the 
last, but as Britannia palled 
away from Aden another Briton 
was discovered on foe jetty, and 
she turned back to pick him up. 

- He was Saleh Ali from Aden, 
a London Transport engineer 
on holiday visiting his family. 
“I will never ‘ believe foe ship 
ramp back for me,” he said. 

Then yesterday afternoon 
800 more Indians were found 
whom the diplomatic . com- 
munity did not know about, and 
last night - negotiations were 
coo tin mug to .evacuate them. It 
is unlikely that the Britannia 


Pncaian jrawler officer had ■ = wiU return to pick them np as 
been ..-.on - board' Britannia, these are other ships in the 


area to do the task, and 
Britannia is doe in Auckland 
for a Royal tour starting in late 
February. 

A group of British journal- 
ists were brought from Djibouti 
to -meet foe Britannia by HMS 
Jupiter, taken by helicopter, 
and winched on to Britannia's 
decks. ' 

The tales- they heard from 
foe evacuees were in terrible 
contrast to the cahn splendour 
of the escape.. 

- Mr Gerainc Parry, aged 32, 
from Epsom, Surrey, had spent 
much of last week lying, in a slit 
tzendiat the Boris construction 
camp at Bir Nasir, about 18 
miles from foe capital, while a 
tank and rocket battle raged. 
Rebels had ringed foe camp 
wifo artillery, ami Government 
troops poured lire onto it. 

Three other Britons, Mr 
John Coffey, from Be r- 
khamsted, Hertfordshire, Mr 


Martin Price, from Wilmslow, 
Cheshire, and Mr Colin Hop-, 
kins from Bournemouth, 
Hampshire, spent a week in a 
hotel restaurant in the Tawahi 
district of' Aden, while tanks 
duelled in the streets around 
them, firing at each other at 
point-blank range. They said 
they saw IS tanks destroyed in 
the streets, which were littered 
with the bodies of soldiers. 

They walked round foe 
mountain last Saturday with 
white flags to the Abyana 
beach to foe cast of Aden, bat 
fame under sniper fire. 

They then took -refuge in foe 
Russian Trade Mission, where 
they were looked after for three 
days. Finally, they made it in 
the convoy round to Little 
Aden. They said that whenever 
they met rebel or government 
troops, they found them cour- 
teous and friendly . 


BELLS 

Sjl-uiB.a-wfSj 

I. 

t U-Ehs n.- SCO? 1 Jb 


As OiN e ,Xv^. 

Up 

r.s 4- 


m 

w 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 24 1986 


Militant Tendency accused 
of physical attacks on 
Labour opponents 


By Philip Webster, Political Reporter 

Allegations of physical and outside party meetings. It attacks, the evidence stated that 
at tacks on labour Party mem- states that party members Mr Ben !-»«««, 'chairman of 
b? 15 who opposed Militant invited others to “go outside” Liverpool University Labour 
Tendency and of open intizni- to settle their differences. Such a Club, was allegedly assaulted by 
dauon and threats have been threat was made to Mr Ian two leading Militant youth 
submitted to the inquiry into Williams, a prominent member activists, who were named, 
toe Liverpool District Labour of the Liverpool Labour Left. The extracts from the evi- 

A meeting of he Dingle Ward dence described in detail how 
The left-wing but anti-Mili- was told by a union convener the process of selecting candi- 
tont Merseyside Labour Co- and Militant ally that his dates for the local government 
ordi na l i n g Committee, in evi- political critics would be panel was used as a “political 
dense made public yesterday in “visited”, the evidence stated. filter” to exclude opponents of 
the Tribune newspaper, alleges Members of the council’s Mflitant and their allies, 
mat leading members of the static security forces, which First, candidates had to 
district party unconstitutionally have been re fared to as “Derek answer three “loyalty oath” 
prevented opponents of Mill- Hatton’s private army", were questions and were in practice 
taut from contesting winnable said to to attend district party asked to choose district party 
city council seats. It added how meetings to “police” them. policy over national policies in 


candidates 


ordered 


It was said that one member crucial areas. 


submit to “loyalty oaths" before of the force; who frequently Candidates 


routinely 


they were considered fit to seek accompanied Mr Hatton and questioned about their specific 
election. . other prominent Militant court- ideological beliefs, and answers 

The committee alleges that cillors, stood at the end of a row deemed to be outside the 
even before the electoral party’s of party members who were dominant political line of the 
suspension there had been no critics of Militant and persist- district party led to exclusion, 
proper meeting since Septemb- ently directed threats and The Merseyside Labour Co- j 
er. Instead, there have been obscenities at them. ordinal! ng Committee said the 



s” meetings, mixing His policing was said in the campaign over 


councils 


delegates and members, and evidence to have reached its budget had left the Party with a 

k.. Mik M l « a.a rat ■ r? r rmi~T iTlljlfi r (Mn tutfk fk* IrtAel 


often attended by “visitors” peak when he pbyscally ejected credibility gap with the local 
from outside the city who a party member, Mr Lew electorate.' 
almost always turned out to be Baxter, who had a legitimate “Internally local party morale 
Militant sympathizers. right to be present is very low. The abuse and 

. But the allegations of physical 


The Prince of Wales being given a guided tour of die World of Watercolours and Drawings Exhibition at the Park Lane 
Hotel in London yesterday by the Royal Academy artist, Mr John Ward. Later .Mr Ward said that die Prince, as an 
amateHr artist, “finds painting amarveUous refuge from the press ores of work.” 


Confrontation looms at Murdoch papers 


ectorate.' Continued from page 1 

“Internally local party morale position last night, the EETPU 
is very low. The abuse and postponed its meeting with 


At a district party meeting in v il i fi c at ion of party members i News International, which was 


violence against the critics of November four local authority who had proposed compromise due to take place on Wednes- 
Mihtant, to be published in union leaders, united in their budgets, or opposed certain day the day after a special 
Tribune next week, are likely to opposition to Militant policies, tactics, combined with the general council meeting con- 
have a crucial influence on the were named as targets for cynical manipulation of the sideis an investigation under 
outcome of the inquiry. It is not removal by prominent council- majority of the councillors the TUCs Rule 13 into the 
expected to report in full until lore. The four were Mr Peter ... has undermined party unity union's dealings with the 
next month. Cresswell, Miss Judy Cotter, Mr and severely affected its ca- company. 

^The^Mereeyade Labour Co- Jim Ferguson and Mr Neville parity to mobilize for the But ^ EETPU is sending 


ordi n a fi ng Committee evidence Bann. 
alleges physical threats inride Turning 


a ultima ^ ^ physical added. Press branch instructing raem- 

1 bers at the four papers to report 

1 orv MPs want curb - 

w with the company. 

Mr Tom Rice, the union's 

on Spanish cars 

„ , ... ...... _ , permission to visit the Wapping 

By Clifford Webb, Motoring Correspondent £i a nt l0 ^ the full extent of 

A private meeting of game according to the rules EETPU and other union mem- 
Conservative MPs told Mr Paul while other countries ignore bership there. 

Channon. Minister of Trade, to them whenever it suits them? Mr Murdoch said after 

use whatever methods are most Mr Channon urged the yesterday's meeting, punctuated 
effective to restrict Spanish car predominantly West Midland by two adjournments sought by 
imports “short of an actual MPs to take a more moderate the union side, that the print 
blockade” until Spain increases line publicly and “not to rock workers' leaders had said they 
the quota of British car imports the boat at this time”. would now consider the alterna- 
tor 1986 to a more realistic He said that Austin Rover live plan pul forward by Mr 
level. had known for many months 

Mr Iain Mills. MP for that there was little likelihood 
Meriden, said yesterday: “I am of Spain agreeing to its request 
all in favour of doing a French for its 1986 quota to be 
on them and insisting that all increased by 3.000 cars 
Spanish cars arriving in this He conceded that this seemed 


municipal elections in May” it officia j advice to the London 


Voters beat ITory MPs want curb 


on Spanish cars 


Spanish-made Fiestas. Novas lastnighf 


the snow 
in Ulster 

By Richard Ford 
First results from Northern 
Ireland's 15 parliamentary by- 
elections will be known early 
this afternoon after voters 
braved a day of scattered snow 
showers and freezing weather 
to vote on the Anglo-Irish 
agreement. 

All the results are expected 
to be know by this ev ening, 
although recounts may be 
needed in at least two border 
marginal constituencies which 
were hit by the worst of 
yesterday’s weather. 

Polling was described as 
“brisk” and in strongly Prot- 
estant areas the turnout in 
favour of Official Unionist 
Democratic Unionist candi- 
dates at die end of their “Ulster 
Says No” campaign was 
described as unprecedented. 

several hours of darkness Former Labour MPs 

during which voting took place 

total turnout. ^ ** on Alliance poll list 

Among the first to vote were * 

Mr James Molyneanx, OUP By Our Political Staff 

S)lflPfea£ f * RCT P “ S,ey ’ Two forTncr Lab0 V r columnist, Polly Toynbee, and 
Xl. , ^ . among seven prominent SDP Elizabeth Smith, an executive 

fa SJf-M-* short-listed to fight member of the all-party 300 

national election that raters the forthcoming parliamentary group, are included on the 
have had to present official be-election m Fulham for the short-list, 
identi fication. T he aim is to end Alliance. Th,: otim « Mr Wiliiim. 

vote “stealing. The former MPs are Mr Evan Goodhart QC, chairman of the 

• The Irish Republic’s Luard, a former junior minister SDP council arrangements 
Fionas Fail opposition party at toe Foreign and Common- committee, Mr Roger Liddlc, 
suffered a blow when its front ]£®®lfo Office who represented leader of the Alliance on 
bench environment spokesman, Oxford, and Dr Colin Phipps, Lambeth council, and Mr Will 
Mr Bobby Malloy, defected to w b° 531 for Dudley West. Both Unwin, a lecturer and accounl- 
the new Prosressive Demo- men lost their seals in 1 979. ant and former Fulham -mrnirii. 


The Prime Minister de- 
fended Air Rupert Murdoch, 
chairman of News Inter- 
national, when he was criticized 
during Commons questions by 
Mr David Neffist, Labour MP 
for Coventry South East 
Mr Neffist asked Mrs 
Thatcher; “Before she loses 
another member of her Cabinet 
in the Brittangate scandal, will 
she send a message to Mr 
Murdoch, one of the million- 
aire owners of Britain's un- 
democratic Press, that he is not 
a First World War general, 
filling in the trenches outside 


breathed new life into them,” he 
his Wapping plant with rolls of said- 


barbed wire, and that industrial 
serfdom, where the workers 
became the property of the 
masters, should have gone out 
of this country centuries ago?” 

Mrs Thatcher: “Mr Mur- 
doch is trying to get rid of 
restrictive practices which 
should have been got rid of 
years ago, and to protect the 
future of some of Britain's most 
distinguished newspapers.” 

Mr Tony Banks, Labour MP 
for Newham North West: “The 
Sun distinguished!” 


Norman Willis, TUC general have been begging the unions to 
secretary, on maximizing pro- come to an agreement at 
duciion at Wapping as a basis Wapping for six years now. 
for agreements at Gray's Inn Earlier on we would have given 
Road and Bouverie Street. But them all sorts of things. 


they have made it clear it would 
have to extend to Wapping. 


“They seem determined to 
take me on. I'm amazed. They 


effective to restrict Spanish car 
imports “short of an actual 
blockade” until Spain increases 
the quota of British car imports 
for 1986 to a more realistic 
level. 

Mr Iain Mills. MP for 
Meriden, said yesterday: "I am 
all in favour of doing a French 
on them and insisting that all 
Spanish cars arriving in this 
country will be accepted only 
through somewhere nice and 
convenient like the Shetlands”. 

Mr Anthony Beaumont Dark, 
MP for Birmingham. Seliy Oak, 
asked the Minister “Why is it 
we always seem to be cast in the 
role of gentlemen playing the 


“We pointed out that the seem to roll over and play dead 
horse had bolted and that we for Mr (Robert) Maxwell, and 


had other people there now." 
Mr Murdoch said. 

“It is tragic that they've 
missed this opportunity. We 


we. on the other band, have 
created thousands of jobs in this 
country. We've picked up 
ailing, dying newspapers and 


Print meeting ‘under duress 9 


Mr Murdoch made it dear 
that the company had contin- 
gency plans for distribution, 
which had worked “pretty well 
last Saturday”. 

TNT, a commercial transport 
firm in which News Inter- 
national has an estimated six 
per cent stake, ensured supplies 
to London retailers of a 24-page 
supplement to The Sunday 
Times but that would need to be 
“tested and proven” in the 
event of a strike. 

Miss Brenda Dean, general 
secretary of Sogat '82. said that 
the outlook now appeared “very 
bleak”. i 

“We are extremely disap- 
pointed. more for our members' 
families than for the bureauc- 
racy of the union because they 
are the people Mr Murdoch has 
turned his back on. I'm 
absolutely amazed the company 
has not been prepared to have 
constructive discussions with 
us.” 

Miss Dean said that the 
alternative proposals put for- 
ward by Mr Willis would be 
widely rccogn ized as “ very 
progressive”. 

Last night print union 
leaders, who arc armed with a 5 


Coca-Cola 
given aid of 


villlALLLLL 


for 14 jobs 

By Stephen Goodwin 

Fourteen jobs in a new Coca- 
Cola canning factory in North- 
ern Ireland have been bought at 
a cost to the taxpayer of more 
than £60,000 for each job. . 

The story of how £900.000 
was offered to set up a plant at, 
Lam beg, Co Antrim, is dis- 
closed in the latest report on 
government spending in Ulster. 
The system for authorizing 
selective assistance over a limit 
of £8.500 a job emerges as little 
more than a rubberstamp. 

Compiled by Mr Louis 
Calvert, Comptroller and Audi- 
tor-General for Northern Ire- 
land, the report questions the 
evaluation of state aid. 

The Leventis Group, parent 
company of Coca-Cola Bottlers 
(Ulster), applied for assistance 
towards the £2-27 million 
canning project in October 
1983. It was to be built 
alongside its bottling factory, 
already employing 276 full-time 
workers, and in March 1984 the 
Department of Economic De- 
velopment offered Leventis a 
grant amounting to 40 per cent 
of the capital cost. 

Although only 14 new jobs 
were to be created, the Depart- 
ment of Economic Develop- 
ment told Mr Calvert that a 
further 55 jobs at the bottling 
plant would be “renewed” if the 
canningyUrojeci went ahead. 
WithouKt, the officials argued, 1 
these jobs would be at risk. 

Mr Calvert notes that this has 
the effect of reducing the 
subsidy for each job to £13,000 
but clearly he doubts whether 
any bottling jobs were seriously 
threatened. At one stage his 
officers suggested that the 
department had added the 55 
renewals to bring down Lhc cost 
perjob. 

The department maintained 
that as demand for canned 
drinks was increasing, that for 
single portion bottles was 
falling. However, Mr Calvert 
found that Coca-Cola's own 
business plan forecast increas- 
ing sales of 1 litre, 1.5 and 2 litre' 
bottles and “a large increase” in 
the total volume of Coca-Cola 
to be sold in bottles. 

This assessment was re- '. 
in forced by an external consult-' ' 
ant who. the report says, “had 1 
not considered that any jobs in 
the bottling plant would be 
seriously at risk if the canning 


The following statement was and Mr Murdoch to meet and it He said the whole purpose of to 1 ballot majority in favour of I plant was not built at Lambeg. 


unfair in the face of unrestricted issued by News International was obvious we were in an the exercise would be to achieve 


explosive atmosphere and not a competitive efficiency 


and Seats coming into Britain at We met today under duress suitable ■ one . for careful and other newspaper organizations 
the rale of 12,000 a month, but because we have a strike threa considered negotiations. who are currently involved in 

the quota had been agreed to answer - based on a demand -Mr Murdoch said, when discussions with the unions. j 1 

according to the conditions of from unions for jobs for life at Pressed by Miss Dean, that he company said- that foil 

Spanish membership of the Gray’s Inn Road and Bouverie “E deuti£ TffcoTd oriyte 

EEC. Mr h- Nation with a minimum period , . , 


industrial action, met transport 
union leaders in an attempt to 
secure support for disrupting 
distribution of papers which 
they expect to be produced at 
Wapping. and the Kinning Park 
plant at Glasgow, in the event 


djtion Zt ft? details of the but £id 


time which is why we had said 

July to allow an orderly period that the unions were seeking an 
for discussions. urgent meeting of the TUCs 

?".<* The Sunday Times who Correction 

all he had done .to rescue ailing belong to die Institute of The Office of Fair Trading has not ■ 
papers that they were tumingon. - Journalists yestenday gave their yet seen nor commented on Law •; 
himin this forceful fashion. . support to Mr Murdoch in his Society draft proposals to end ! 
him m this lorcenu lasmon. . over new technology at restrictive practices in ihe legal 

The union response to this Wapping. in a joint letter from profession as implied on January 
was to sav that their members Patrick Davis, convenor of The jj°, w f v 5 r ' l we, °? ni “ the 


r __ j __j ■»uiy w auow an oraerty period 

dgn£ the future of both Stn^anJ^e ££ for discussions. 

We had riven six months* If 8 * 11 * binding. Mr Murdoch said he thought 

notire of tfr^StatiJn of ^ Mr Murdoch was further the unions would be unwise to 
existing house agreements for some tdea of the strike and he was surprised after 

JSlSh^««nt that conditions of aH he had done -to rescue ailing 


Mr Murdoch said he thought 


Canning was due to begin ar 
Lambeg in September I9S5 but* 
full production cannot begin 
until 1988 when the franchise 
held by Batchelors of Dublin 
ends, the report says. 

• Three hundred jobs will be< 
lost in a reorganization of 
Southern Electricity Board of- • 
fices at Lyndburst in Hamp-> 
shire, Reading, the Isle of 
Wight. Swindon and Yeovil. 


_ , £ xvi W IVAVw UV ■ Ml in Jim in o i 

which meant that corKutious or without any definition of how 


employment r°uld uc operation ^ carried 

honoured until next July. out. he said jobs would be 

. The unions did not wait for available for some hundreds of 
negotiations. They took a strike people at both plants. He 


ballot. ’ 

This morning provided the 
first opportunity for the unions 


referred specifically to those 


The union response to this 
was to say that their members 
were concerned with- security 


people employed directly in the and M voted over whelming ly Godfrey Smith, convenor 


chanter and I auTtrU debate between the Bar and 
cnapier. ana | i . 


punting operation. 


to take action. 


The Sunday Times. 


_ y. Law Society in helping to further the • 
OI public interest in the provision of 
legal services to the community. 


The Westland affair 


Mr Bobby Malloy, defected to 
the new Progressive Demo- 
crats. . 


Two women, the Guardian for. 


ant and former Fulham -council- 


Pay on merit urged for teachers 


Kinnock compares leak controversy to Watergate 


By Lucy Hodges, Education Correspondent 


Teachers should be paid leave through early retirement, 
according to merit because he said. 


By Richard Evans 
Lobby Reporter 
Mr NeO Kinnock fast night 
compared the Westland leaked 


“safe mediocrity” was not good Mr Ban ham. who has become 
enough to equip children for the the scourge of education man- 
challenge of the 1 990s. Mr John agers.. said that schools should 
Banham. Controller of Audit, have more say in the way in 
said yesterday. which teachers were managed 


“How many local education letter controversy to the start of 
authorities have a marketing the Watergate scandal, and 


Mr Banham. who has become director?", he asked. “If we de m a nde d chat Mrs Thatcher 
r scourge of education man- devoted a fraction of the talent provide answers to bey qoes- 
ers. said that schools should and expense that Heinz devote tions in the affair, 
ve more say in the way in to selling and marketing their The Labour leader told 
uch teachers were managed spaghetti to marketing edu- journalists at Westminster 
d rewarded. Teachers should cation locally and to the “T7»e inference of what the 


their The Labour leader told 
edu- journalists at Westminster 
the “The inference of what the 


said yesterday. which teachers were managed spaghetti to marketing edu- journalists at V 

Thousands of teachers should and rewarded. Teachers should cation locally and to the “T?* inference o 

lose their jobs, and their schools have 10 days off-ihe-job train- national level, many of today’s Prime Minister said today was 

should be closed or merged in ing a year, and the Burnham problems might simply dis- that there was a bit of 

line with falling pupil numbers, system for negotiating teachers’ appear.” deception, but it vras in the 

Mr Banham. who heads the 15- pay should be abolished. m n a ti o n a l interest. That was 

member Audit Commission, The pupil to teacher ratio r Y, ^ precisely the excuse that was 
told the Society of Education should be replaced with j VT° up offered at the vary start of the 

Officers in a wide-ranging activity-led staffing. Mr Ban- £S drEn ' Watergate scandaL 

speech. ham, who was a director of ycsterday -M*”* In "The whole de= 


liable; when she knew precisely 
about the “contrivances” which 
people in the Department of 
Trade and Industry and Down- 
ing Street set in hand, and the 
use of the letter written by Sir 
Patrick Mayhew, the Solicitor 
GeneraL 

And in die most da mnin g 
reference to Mr Britten, he 
challenged tire Prime Minis- 
ter's .assertion that the Sec- 
retary of State alone had 
authorized Sir Patrick's letter 


to be leaked to .the Press. 
Association. 

“There most have been times 
in the fast few years when as a 
government minister he 
wondered whether he could 
Mow his nose without per- 
mission. 

“While there are strident 
personalities in the Govern- 
ment who may take such a 
decision on their own, if you 
had to draw np a list of the 
people likely to do it, at the 


~ bottom wonld be Leon Britten. 

“It is very difficult to believe 
that he wonld gulp and take 
responsibility entirely on. his 
own." 

Mr Kin nock said that leak- 
ing was part of the currency of 
government, and always bad 
been. “Brit the different level at 
which this leaking was con- 
trived and operated poses 
different questions about the 
use of the machinery of 
gOTermenL” 


Bulldog loyalty with Yorkshire grit 


speech. 

Failure to undertake “aggres- McKinsey and Co management le ff tlCTS ,- pay events is incredible. They are 

si vc rationalization” of second- consultants, said. The education lacking in credulity as far as I 

ary schools would mean that service should market itself to a ^2,1? wn ^51^ concerned and l a ck i ng in 
£250 million of public money parents, employers and the ^ credibility as far as tire 

would be wasted every year, media, not to mention, siu- t ininn^fTj 7 ^:.^ me rNauonai Government is concerned,” he 


yesterday lobbied 


“The whole description of 


By Stephen Goodwin 
Political Staff 

Mr Bernard In gham , 


Thatcher’s statement MPs ration. I have great confidence 
sought to place the blame at the in him”. Mr Ingham smiled, 
door of 10 Downing Street In the words of Mr John 
where the Yorkshireman has Biffen, Leader of the Commons, 
exercised considerable if ano- Mr Ingham is seen by his 
mymous power since 1979. political opponents as “some 

But Mr Ingham's bulldog tf* ^rough^poken Yorkshire 

loyalty to his tradm* is matched ^““meAt g 

by her respect for him. “Mr sovemment and Press. 

Ingham" she rounded on one Mr Ingham, aged 53. lives in 
MP," has served successive Parley. He is married with one 
governments with great de- son 


Teachers should be forced to dents, he said. 

Higher education in peril, 
vice-chancellors say 

By Our Education Correspondent 
University vice-chancellors in a way that no other public 
said yesterday that Britain's service was. 
higher education system was Universities had suffered a 
“in jeopardy" as a result of 10 per cent cut in real income 
government policy and that since 2980, “far greater than 
14,000 fewer graduates than any other part of the pubic 
now would be produced by tire sector”, he said. On present 
end of the next decade. planning, that cut would be 

In a 50-page report on the doubled during the next five 
future of the universities, they years. Mr Shock added, 
say that this will impede the The result was disaffected 
country's economic and social academics, rising emigration of 
recovery and pot Britain even the most able and financial 
further behind Its competitors. trouble for a number of 
Mr Maurice Shock, chair- universities, 
roan of the Committee of Vice- ~ If tbe Government acts 
Chancellors and Principals and according to demographic pro- 
Vice-Chancellor of Leicester jections. the rate of decline mav 
University, said universities continue to rise and to acceler- 
irere being singled out for cuts a[e when we ^ ^ 19903 “ 


Union of Teachers. 

Many classrooms were empty 
while the demonstrations took 
place, and last night the "Labour 
Party tabled a Commons 
motion calling on the Govern- 
ment to provide more money to 
settle the dispute and to 
improve educational standard. 

Today the two sides in the 
dispute meet again at the 
conciliation service, Acas, to try 
to hammer out a settlement at 


said. 

Mr Kinnock said that Mrs 
Thatcher had to explain where 
she was on January 6 when she 
was apparently so unobtai- 

Thatcher not 
told Brittan 
authorized leak 

Continued from page I 


m y Tn °us power since 1979. 

pies in the Commons press But Mr Ingham’s bulldog 
gallery, as the finger of sus- loyalty to his leader is matched 
picion in the Westland leaks by her respect for him. “Mr 
saga turned irresistibly in his Ingham" she rounded on one 
dirretion. MP,” has served successive 

Time and gain during Mrs governments with great de- 


The Latest events were , 
evidence of what people fad 
always suspected about Mrs ' 
Thatcher’s government: that it , 
conducted matters with such i 
arrogance and disregard for the 
normal requirements of demo- 
cratic government as to be . - 
basically antagonistic to the 
system. 

Asked if there should be ' 
resignations. Mr Kinnock said: ' 
“It is voy difficult to see how •• 
people other than those with 
heads even thicker than their - 
hides could possibly stay in - 
their positions. “Bnt I have no 
intention of assisting in saving 
careers by calling for resig- 
nations.” 

Tbe Opposition's motion ' 
wonld not be one of no 
confidence in the Government 
for Monday's emergency de- *; 
bate because it wonld mobilize 
the loyalty of the Tory party for 
Mrs Thatcher “even thoug h 
she plainly does not deserve it 
and does not enjoy a great deal 
of loyalty at this tune.” 


Full text of leaked letter from Solicitor General 


onsite fiS 3 Saturday the text of a letter you NH90 projects have given this 

c?? D f J5 are reported to have sent to the indication to HMG. 

M* Jl!Si£ Managing _ D irector of Lloyds -n, B fNo 440 of 17 

Heseletine at 2.S3pm on 


what has beeu^discribed.as.a I possible”, before a west! an a 


'make or tweak” meeting. 


press conference at 4 pm, he 


• Two or three polytechnic, or had ask^ his offiriab to getin 

perhaps five or six leading touch with 10 Downing Street stalement ^ ^ Hesekme - on 

colleges, may avc to be d«ed £ discuss, disclosures of the WestU ”f 

. proposals .. Mr John Mote, his principal ac y" but it did not quote an 

Ad“^BoSv foMo^l atS Private caSSi K bnportPpt qualification in the 

Aovisoiy Body tor local autn- Minister’s private office, same sentence. 

diSibutS ftmdin? !l0rU and Miss Colenc bis A report in The Times on 

distributes funding. head of information, phone Mr January 7 quoted three more 

• Severe damage has been i ng ham Mr Ingham heard that selectively leaked sentences, 

caused lo the Scottish examin- Mr Britten had authorized * n response to the leak via the 
aiion system by the dispute disclosure and he did not PA , Mr Hcseltine issued at 
over a demand by teachers for dissent. Neither did he approve, about 8pm on January 6 a 
an independent pay review, the Thatcher yesterday de- corroborated denial that his 

Scottish Secondary Teachers scribed that as a “cover from statement misled Westland 

Association said yesterday. It my office for proceeding". shareholders. 


Mayhew. QC, to Mr Michael Mwchunt BankLrrT ihe ™Tf 1116 tde 9 ams (No 440 of 17 
Heseletine at 2.53pm on December from the Hague and 

January 6. “ liu: third Nos 1037 ^ 10g3 of 5 

That leak quoted two words December from Rome) and the 

from the letter referring to a record of your meeting with the 

statement by Mr HodSe- on West German Defence Minister 

Westland - “material inaccur- overnments and com- ^ Novem ber which were 

acy” but it dM^t q^T^ ^ixfkSrowS^lTnbe ™ bbte 1 

important qualification in the iHSJLj advice on 31 December to the F 

sW sentence. Priroe on the text of incomplete or inaccurate fa 

. A report in The Time, on pl M=T5£J2t , S£. hor reply to Sir John Otclmny. 


and MBB are additionally 
involved in the projects). 

It is foreseeable that your 
letter will be relied upon by the 
Westland Board and its share- 
holders. Consistently with the 
advice I gave to the Prime 
Minister on 31 December the 
Government In such circum- 
stances Is under a duty not to 
give information which fa 


Promote your money to 

5 STAR INTEREST 

See the ABBEY NATIONAL advertisement 
on Page 19 


also announced one-day strikes 
in February and March. 


Thatcher 


om statement misled Westland 
shareholders. 

. Sir Patrick, he said, had not 
, seen ail the relevant documents 


posals are accepted you state her ^ t0 Sir John Oickney. 

do not seem to me to support a 
» HMG from both the slatemcnt lhat ^ ^ Govern- 
oiher Governments and the mcnls ^ ^ ^ companies 

wSS^d 5 li^ n ^?, Cd «; iSSk v a h#vc indicated that a WtSfalid 

Hnk Sikorsky/Fiat would 



■ | mav* iwwinuL SiWU mgy in 

Commons: “They did not seek before writing the letter, and 
my agreement. She also said .h*-*. f„n„ 


helicopter and NH90 projects”. Netherlands’ Defence Secretary, 
This sentence, when read toe German Defence Minister 
with the rest of the paragraph and the Chairman of Agusta 
[in which the Defence Ministers have commented to the know- 
of four Governments apart ledge of HMG in various ways 
from the UK are referred to), on adverse consequences which 
Necessarily implies that aH the may flow from a decision to 
Governments and all the com- accept the Sikorsky offer. (In 
pasies involved in the collabozit- addition to Agusta, the docu- 


I that if she had been asked she foaj siatemenL 

Tbe paragraphs leaked to The of fotir Governments apart 
T im & arc Printed in bold type from the UK. are referred to). 

^^^Jiw h «id h ths h t « ^ C , faUowin S foil text Of Sir Necessarily implies that aH the 

shoufohaYcsatd mat a different Patrick Mayhew's fatten Governments and all the com- 

wy must be found of making Dear Michael, ponies involved in the colfabora- 

xhc relevant facts known. I saw in “The Times” 09 live battlefield helicopter and 


these fully supported his orig- with the rest of the paragraph 
inal siatemenL (in which the Defence Ministers 

The paragraphs leaked to The of four Governments apart 


| s*r v.OO: MMuTd *m 

I DB< ubasi^S y^MSmaSOQ 


iddmon to Agusta, the docu- Yours ever, 
mcnls disclose that Aerospatiale Patrick. 


material particular. 

On the basis of the infor- 
mation contained in the docu- ", 
meats to which I have referred, 
which I emphasize are all that I 
have seen, the sentence in your "" 
letter to Mr Home doees in my 
opinion contain material inac- “ 
curacies in the respects I have " 
mentioned, and I therefore must 
advise that yon should write 
again to Mr Horne correcting”,.* 
the inaccuracies. • ■ 

I am copying this letter to the ' 
Prime Minister and to Uie-n 
Secrttory of State for Trade and 
Industrv and the Chief Sec - 
retary of the Treasury. ■ " 




i 








. 7 -5 ....... 

w - . By Thomson Prentice. Science Correspondent . - 

- Somc.pdtienis infected ^th dentists' willing to tratpeople km<»' they wre set up with 
^ iwTTtv ^ hose ^lood tests ;fertf_ shown govern^nenfe-fboding hist April; 

them to have heen^x^osed to and dassec;arcT!bOokrd until 
medical profession because of the virus.. It- was, “not uncom- - not JoJv ‘ 

rcar eSySSSnt Cad “ 8 monV for- male homosexuals 'to -We h^-Jound in some 

: vi?P£? a ^ s ' yesterday. . be sent away, .from . medical hospitals -that the degree of 

^3 doctors, dentists and nurses departments when they ' sought coi pnasn dn' avid concern for 

■■V turnmgaway people seekmg appointments, he said: ‘ - Aids- radenisls exemplary ” Mr 

, ; treatme nt o r ad^ce became Such discrimination occurs ■ MiHcxsaid. * P V^ 

o f exagg^t^.^fears about because many members of the *' : ^But^ wt -need- to. raise the 

^ v* > Acquired Immune peficiency medical^ profession maunder- awareness of- 1 general prac- 

the^natu m cfc fo cT Aids taiemers, some of whom are 

■•■-'V c £ n overestimate. -, -its ikQingforccdgnLze clinical signs 
* the chief counselling adviser of lnfectiaiRnKs 1 ho ■ a *® > 


V. the chief counselling adviser of mfectiousness, he said. -...-it . of infection irTtheir patiratsl 
- ^ , What. we. neod urgendy is,--. ■^S3? .are. refering..sus- 

Traimng ^Val St Mary s ^ ^ap dcon^ma>aisiv&pPblic;: pectedcases .for, blood, idsts 
-Tft- education on _ tbe Ti&hs associ- ^without, adequate. counselling or 
. • 'y ,dl . ttisepse.-' and proper follow-up, and this is 

\fa nagemera of A ids Patients, a adequate* counseftmg for every-; cabsing us. extreme concern.- 
book to be published next one who i s infected or . at ,rist' '. - '. Leading specialists at 1 St 


■^1, 


"■5s 


■-M* 


- X . - , 

■^treated -in ‘ an off-hand, if better.” 

.y.^noi irresponsible manner, by Mr Miller and a small group 
v A' medical personnel through fear . of colleagues have been bolding 
... and ignorance* and. this is not workshops throughout Britain 
. * acceptable" , he said. “If doctors at which doctors and other 
LJ| V respond to people wiih the Aids health professionals are briefed 

virus. in. this Wav. how On earth on AiHc t - _r_t. 


' i 


zrrr ■ . . . : . . . . w .««■ ,na. .Leading specialists at 1 at 

Rnd^ -am?oa- at professional^ The sooner ^ '<Hjvbmment ^. Mary's Hospital,^ one of 'the 
... , . ; launches a - health .education''-; main. centres' for-.treating Aids' 

“Some patients are hqng campaign - of .’this ‘ type;'" die ’ patients,'" have . contributed to 

The Management of Aids 
Patients,. . 

The book is edited by Mr 
Miller, Dr Jonathan Weber and 
Dr John Green, also of St 
Mary's.; . 


•v uvoiui pi ujcssionais are DTieicQ 

: virus in .this way, bow on earth oh Aids, infection control,' risk • ■ -- • 

~'k[- can we export society to behave reduction andthe counsdlinc of The Management of Aids Patients, 
otherwise?” patients, .families andfilends edited b y .^ fr -David Miller. Dr 

was About 850 such professionals 
find have attended the workshops 


m- ' ' 

• - ' ri. 


Barristers’ threat 
sanctions 



i£lL 

■ ^ i 

[5 

‘ -'■'ic: 


- By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 

The Government was warned increased the pay of barristers 
last night', that, unless it the front line” . . 
increases, pay levels for bams- But the high earnings at . the 
lcrs doing criminal legal aid, the top of the Bar were criticized in 
profession will have to cons i der , the same progr a mme by the law 
“sanctions.” • lord Lord Tem pieman. He 

Mr Robert Alexander. QC, expressed doubts that the free 
chairman of the Bar, said that 


the profession had submitted a 
' C- responsible report to- the 
; £• Government and would expect 
’-3: . “a responsible reaction”. 

He sakt^^This is something 
which it. is not. easy for a 
J'.. 25 professional to talk about, the 
:::: Impossibility, of sanctions. But 


market was sufficient protection 
against' overcharging by some 
barristers. 

• The Government is warned 
in the strongest terms in two 
reports published yesterday that 
its rigid cash limits on die legal 
aid scheme are causing serioius 


“ n0W a dtdays and threateni^ a grave 


between accepting that the rates 
of remuneration have got to go 
■ up, or suffering the decline of 
this profession in the public- 
• .- funded area.” ' 

r -; Mr . Alexander was speaking 
A - in the first of a new Radio 4 
senes called Pillars of Society. 
Talks on a 30-40 per cent pay 
. fZ claim by the Bar. have now 

• .7 reached a crucial stage, with the 

Govenwnem poised to an- 
nounce its intentions. The Bar 
has already said that. • it . will 
consider refusing to undertake 
prosecution work if its claim is 
• not met. * 

- Mr Alexander said, earlier this 

:.r; jfcefc that the Government's 

• restatement of . intention to 
'if ' improve the prosecution of 

. fraud would be "empty words'” 
unless, as recommended in the 
recent Roskjff report on fraud, it 


■irt 


deterioration in the £320 mil- 
lion a year service. 

At the same time the reports, 
by the Lord Chancellor’s own 
Legal Aid Advisory Committee 
and by the Law Society, which 
runs ~the legal aid scheme, are 
critical of the Government’s 
refusal to secure the future of 
the country’s 54 law. centres. 

The Legal Aid Advisory 
Committee, says that backlogs 
wfll mean delayed payment for 
lawyers doing civil- and criminal 
legal aid. This could result in 
deterring solicitors from doing 
the work. 

Another danger is that reduced 
spending on administration 
increased costs. 

Legal Aid: 35th annual reports 
of the Law Society and the Lord 
Chancellor’s Advisory Committee 
(Stationery Office). • - 


. and £10.95 paperback). 

Motorists 
join chase 
for bandits 

A bus driver and a motorist 
tried to foil a £100,000 armed 
robbery yesterday m ' which a 
Post. Office van was hyacked 
and- shots, .were, fired by the 
escaping raiders. 

Mr John Raine. aged 31. 
drove his . bus, with nine 
passengers, on board including 
schoolchildren, alongside the 
hijacked van. blocking its path 
until he was threatened by a 
man with a gun. 

The motorist also rammed 
the raiders' getaway car and 
continued the chase after being 
fired at twice. 

The two armed men took 
oyer the Post Office van as it 
pulled up outside a sub-post 
office in Charminster Road, 
Bournemouth. 

After Mr. Raine was threat- 
ened with a gun. -the van: was 
driven to a road near by where 
the stolen money was trans- 
ferred to a car driven by a third 
man . ' : 

The car. sped off chased by a 
man. aged 40: and his son aged 
1 8. The man, who refused to be. 
named, said: "At a junction I 
dedded to hit him up the back 
to set what would happen. They 
sped off and we followed and 
then" they leaned out of the 
passenger, side of the- car and 
started firing the gun.” 

The police set up road blocks 
but ‘ the vehicle was found 
abandoned . . 



; * v ■ 

tazel Hawarden, the Wigan museum organizer, and the completed £3-5 million Wigan Pier project, which is t 
attract more than 250,000 visitors a year to a once badly depressed area. ( Photographs: Mike Arron). 

The Queen takes road to Wigan Pier 


expected to 


George Orwell wrote about' it, 
although he never 'found it, and 
generations of comedians dating back 
to George Formby Senior have made 
jokes about it. Now Wigan Pier is to 
receive its greatest accolade with an 
official visit from the Qneen (Peter 
Davenport writes). 

After three years, a £3.5 million 
renovation has transformed the dis- 
used site of the original pier into a 
smart complex of museums, exhibition 
centres, a public house and restaurant. 


Wigan Pier began life in the 1700s 
as a small wooden jetty jutting out 
• three feet into the Leeds-Liverpool 
canal. It was at its busiest loading die 
coal barges that produced much of 
Wigan's tum-of-the-century pros- 
perity. 

But the pier remained unheralded 
outside the locality until George 
Formby Senior, who lived In Wigan, 
turned it into a music hall joke. 

When Orwell arrived in 1937 to 
write “The Road to Wigan Pier”, the. 


structure had been dismantled for 
eight years and he used the decay Into 
which the area had fallen as a symbol 
of the ills that were then blighting the 
industrial North. 

The local technical college has built 
a replica of the original pier, and 
renovations have also been carried out 
on a large cotton mill and dfcnspH 
Victorian and Georgian warehouses. 

The Queen will officially open the 
project on March 21. 


Hospital dangers for elderly 


By 

Disabled elderly people 
admitted - to hospital to give 
relatives caring for them a break 
run a high risk of dying shortly 
after admission, according to a 
study : published in the British 
Medical Journal today. 

A study of 69 patients; with 
an average ag£ of 82, admitted 
to the Whittington Hospital, in 
north London, not because they 
were ill but to give those caring 
for them a rest, showed that 
nine of them, or 13 per cent, 
died shortly afterwards from 
pneumonia. : . 

That is a death rale half as 
high again as that for patients 
aged over 85. admitted . to the 


Our Social Services Correspondent 
geriatric wards at the hospital 
because they are acutely ill. 

The figures became even 
worse when they included 
.elderly people taken in as 
“social admissions” because 
they, or their relatives, could no 
longer cope at home, but who, 
again, were not actually ilL Of 
43 patients admitted with an 
average age of 85, fifteen, .or 
more than a third, died shortly 
afterwards, again mainly from 
pneumonia. 

Doctors at the hospital eard 
the figures showed clearly that 
“even a temporary move for a 
short period is not without risk 
for the elderly”. They said ways 
had to be found to provide 


prolonged periods of care at 
home to relieve relatives, rather 
than take elderly people into 
hospital. Admission as -a solu- 
tion to a social problem, which 
was still readily accepted by 
doctors, relatives and com- 
munity workers, “must be 
discouraged”, the doctors ad- 
ded. 

Dr Gurcharan Rai, consult- 
ant physician at the hospital, 
and his colleagues said there 
was no obvious explanation for 
the figures. They may have been 
due to disability, the treatment 
received or simply the move 
from the familiar home setting 
to hospital surroundings. 


GLC tries to keep art collection intact 

By Colin Hughes, Local Government Correspondent 

sented a gallery of riches 
Shortly before Christmas, Mr 
Tony Banks, the council's 
chairman, ordered all the 
valuables to be gathered for 
cataloguing before deciding how 
they should be disposed when 
the council • is- abolished on 
March 31. 


The Greater London Council 
is hoping ; to keep its large . 
coDection of valuable art, silver ‘ 
and furntiure intact in a single 
museum ‘ collection, officials 
said yesterday. 

Since the London County. 
Council was created in 1 889 the 
successive chairmen have been 


painted for portraits which line 
County Hall's members’ lob- 
bies, often by eminent Royal 
Academy artists. 

Until recently the council 
also maintained a tradition of 
chairmen donating silver at the 
end of their year of office and 
visiting dignitaries have pre- 


‘Spiritualist’ 
jailed for 
killing baby 

A self-claimed spiritualist 
and faith healer was jailed for 
life yesterday for the macabre 
murder of his lover's baby 
The child's mother, who 
claimed her spirit guide, an 
imaginary Tibetan monk in 
yellow robes, told hen “Your 
baby has to die”, was held in 
custody for medical reports. 

Glasgow High Court was told 
Kether Boleskin. aged three 
months. was strangled on 
the banks of Loch Lomond. 
Nine months later her mother; 
Sheena McLaughlan. aged 23. 
returned to the loch side with a 
guitar and sang a lament for her 
Alan Porter, aged 28. said he 
saw McLaughlin trying to 
strangle the baby and told 
police: “I look the baby from 
her and strangled her with my 
own hands to put her out of her 
suffering.” 

McLaughlan. denied murder 
but changed her plea to guilty to 
the lesser charge of culpable 
homicide. Porter had denied 
killing the child at Balloch 
Country Park in 1983. 


Health care 
group to 
offer family 
GP cover 

By Nicholas Timmins 
Social Services Correspondent 

A California-based health 
can: company is planning to 
launch the first health mainten- 
ance organization (HMO) in 
Britain next year. 

Health maintenance organi- 
zations are the fosiesi-growing 
sector of health care in the 
United States. Unlike private 
health insurance in Britain, they 
offer cover for family doctor 
services, as well as hospital care. 

Because they often contract 
with private hospitals to pro- 
vide beds, rather than run them 
themselves, more emphasis is 
placed on keeping people 
healthy and out of hospital, 
rather than just paying their 
bills when they go in. As a result 
they have helped reduce lhc 
sleep increase in the cost of 
health care in the United Slates. 

Dr Michael Goldsmith, who 
launched the Harrow Health 
Centre, a prepayment private 
family doctor service which met 
with mixed success before being 
taken over by American Medi- 
cal International, has been 
appointed executive director of 
a newly-formed United King- 
dom branch of Family Health 
Programme Inc. 

The company is spending 
£250,000 on a HMO feasibility 
study of England and plans to 
invest £5 million in four to six 
private family health centres in 
the London area next year. 

These would form the basis 
of a HMO which would offer 
companies and individuals 
health insurance 

Man sought in 
hotel killing 

Police have described a man 
they want to interview in 
connection with the murder of a 
Lake District hotel owner, Mrs 
Bronwen Nixon. 

He was seen near the Rothay 
Manor Hotel at Amblesidc late 
on Sunday evening at about the 
time Mrs Dixon, aged 66. was 
strangled in her cottage next 
door. The man is white, aged 30 
to 40, 6ft tall and well-biulL He 
has a medium length, dark, full 
beard and dark hair, either 
collar-length or shorter. He has 
staring eyes and was wearing 
dark clothing, with fawn trous- 
ers with a large check. 

Drink case police 
chief to retire 

Bert Sheldon, aged. 44. a 
chief superintendent in Dorset 
police traffic division who was 
given a suspended jail sentence 
for driving while over the limit, 
is to be retired early on grounds 
of ill health. 

Sheldon, who was also 
banned for two years and is 
appealing against the 28 day 
sentence, will not have to face a 
diciplinary hearing as a result of 
the police sub-committee 
decision. 


ate 


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Libyan ‘not 
involved 
in murder’ 

By Peter Evans ■ 
and Pat Healy 
A Libyan who was expelled 
with others from Britain after 
the murder of WPC Yvonne. 
Fletcher has been:, allowed to 
return because Mr Mark Patcy, 
the chief adjudicator of immi- 
gration appeals, was satisfied he 
h ad nnttiTug to do with it. . . . . 

A cqpy of Mr Patey’s 
determination of the case last 
September showed he was in no 
doubt that Saleh Abdessalem 
Ben Rabfaa. who had' been 
besieged m the Libyan People’s 
Bureau, should be allowed to 
rejoin his wife and five children. 
The case was heard in camera. 

Mr Patey > wbo has been chief 
adjudicator since July 1984, 
said that had there been any 
substantive' evidence to indicate 
that Mr Rabha. a film tech- 
nician. was involved directly or 
indirectly . with “the barbaric 
outrage on April 17, 1984. 
outside the Libyan People’s 
Bureau .in St James's Square”, 
he would' have, considered the 
decision to refose him a visa 
wholly justified, regardless of 
the strong compassionate cir- 
cumstances, 

No $uch evidence had been 
produced. “Indeed, -it would be 
inconopivable that the appellant 
would seek to return to this 
county to jace the likelihood of 
life imprisonment , if he was, in 
fact, so; involved,” Mr Patey 
said. 

“In these circumstances, and 
in spite of certain inconsist- 
encies in the. evidence for 
.example whether the appellant 



Mrs Kathleen Rahba, whose Libyan husband was deported 
after the siege at the People's Bureau in. 1984 and has been 
re-admitted .to Britain, leaving their Wiltshire home 
yesterday with three of their five children. 

was in an annexe at the time of relating to Mr Rabba’s wife and 
the shooting or in a room on the five children were very strong. . 
top floor. I am satisfied, 
certainly, on the balance of 
probabilities, that the appellant 
had no direct or indirect 
connection with the shooting. 

Mr Patey -said that he 
recognized it -would be generally 
desirable that persons employed 
in the former Libyan, People’s 
Bureau at the time of the 
outrage should be excluded 
from the United Kingdom. 

Nevertheless; each- case- had 
to be treated on its merits and 
balanced against any com- 
passionate features. As had been 
conceded on the Government’s 


Mr David Waddington, 
Minister of State at the Home 
Office, yesterday held out tittle 
hope of any action to MPs 
protesting aginst the decision. 
Speaking;, on . the BBC Ractio 
programme. Today, he said: 
“We did not want him back, but 
people have this right of appeal. 

Yesterday, Mr Ben Rabba, 
who fives near Pewsey, Wilt- 
shire. .. was m hiding. The 
cfesision to allow him to return 
was' defended by Mr Charles 
Morrison, Conservative MP for 
Devizes, who had been ap- 
proached by the family for 


side, the compassionate aspects . assistance over his return. 


Life ban on 
fishy tale 
anglers 

By Tim Jones 

The . tall tales of four 
' fishermen have led to them 
being banned for life from 
British sea angling compe- 
titions. It is alleged that foar 
operated a ring using .'each 
other’s names as witnesses to 
send off false claims to angling 
magazines in order to win 
prizes. 

The Welsh Sea Angling 
Federation imposed the baa 
after an ivestigation by the. 
Porthcawi Club in Mid 
Glamorgan. The men's alleged 
activities were discovered after 
doubts were cast on 
submitted from all the club’s 
140 members. 

One of the men is said to 
have filled in a form using the 
name of his daughter, aged five; 
while another claimed his catch 
had been witnessed by a top 
Welsh rugby international 
forward. 

Mr Pedro Birch, club vice- 
president, said: “I bet the 
player wouldn't know a macke- 
rel from a herring. One of the 
men genuinely won a rod in a 
competition, and they realized 
they could do quite well if they 
made op stories about big 
catches.” 

Last night of the banned 
anglers Mr : Jeff Prosser, 
denied for the four had 
operated a' ring. He said: “I 
think other members are 
jealous because, being - unem- 
ployed. we can spend more thm> 
at sea and catch more fish.” 


Orchestra wins damages for Private Eye libels 


The London Symphony 
Orchestra mid Mr Anthony 
Camden, its chairman, were 
awarded, “substantial” dam-, 
ages beleived to run into five 
figures ■ gain** thi* magazine. 
Private Eye yesterday for a 
series of articles alleging that 
orchestra members were drunk 
an unruly and that Mr Camden 
was incompetent. 


After the. case. Mr .Clive 
Gtifinson, the ISO's managing 
director, said that the articles, 

carried between September 

1983 and April last year, had 
damaged the company’s repu- 
tation at a when the future 

of all four London orchestras 
was in question. They , cost the 


By David Hewson, 
group money in lost sponsor- 
ship. . 

Mr Richard Ingrams, editor 
of private Eye , and the 
publishers, IVessram Ltd, 
conceded that all the aile- - 
gations were totally false. They 
did norattempt to justify them. - 

They recognized that they' 
were libels of the utmost 
gravity, which cansed- great' 

distress and damage to foe 

orchestra . and to Mr Camden -. 
and that they should never have, 
been puMBhed, 77*© defendants 
offered their apotigies and 
agreed to pay aU the . legal 
costs. ' 

Mr Gillinsoh said that, the 
articles did not cause iuiy 
internai - dissension. -He said;-: 


Arts Correspondent 

“Bot they were damaging. 1 
woo Id go to see. people and, 
while they never asked about - 
Private Eye outright, they were 
asking questions based upon 
what was in Private Eye. We do 
know, of one sponsor who did 
not hack us because of the 
stories.” 

In court it was said that the 
magazine alleged or suggested 
that the orchestra’s members 
were drunk and dissolute and 
unruly and otherwise irrespon- 
sible, both in rehearsal and on 
foreign tours'. ' 

The management was inef- 
ficient and incompetent, the 
magazine said, and the com- 
pany bankrupt. It also churned 
that the management f was 


dishonest in its dealings with 
members of foe public, chari- 
ties and sponsors 

The main allegations against 
Mr Camden were that, as 
chairman, he was inefficient 
■nd incompetent and disho- 
nestly concealed from' members 
of foe orchestra foe correct 
details of its financial affairs. 

He had dishonestly con- 
cealed from the Arts Connicl 
the financial position of foe 
orchestra, the magazine 
claimed. 

It claim ed also that he had 
behaved dicta to rially and was 
hated by members of the 
orchestra, that he was devious, 
evasive, tyrannical and not to 
be trusted. 




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HOME NEWS 


PARLJAM^lfJANUARY 23 1986 


No prosecutions: true 
facts had to be known 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 24 1 986 


Kinnock gets emergency debate on l eaked letter 

Opposition presses for Cabinet resignations 



There is to be an emergency debate in the 
Commons on Monday on the Westland affair 
and the Prime Minister's statement on the 
inquiry into the leak of the letter from the 
Solicitor General to Mr Michael Heseltine, then 
Secretary of State for Defence. Mr Neil Kinnock. 
Leader of the Opposition, sought the emergency 
debate after more than 45 mjDutes of questioning 
of the Prime Minister. 

Mr Kinnock. told the Speaker (Mr Bernard 
Weatberill) that the debate would concent the 
circumstances surrounding the publishing of 
classified information relevant to the future of 
Westland ole. 

It uouid be about the furtive and future 
activities of ministers, and the Prime Minister's 
counterfeit inquiry into the leaking of the 
Solicitor General's letter of January 6. 


Mrs Thatcher said that corrections to material 
inaccuracies in a letter from Mr Heseltine to Sir 
John Cuckney, chief executive of Westland, had 
to be brought into the public domain before Sir 
John held a press conference at 4 pm on January 
6. Commercial judgements would be made on 
information supplied by the Government. 

She had not been personally consulted about 
the leak bar would have approved it. In reply to 
questions, she said that she thought that 
although the information had to be brought into 
•‘he public domain, it should have been done in 
rome other way. 

Prior to Mr Kinnock being granted the 
emergency debate. Mr David Steel, Leader of the 
Liberal Party, bad said the Liberals had chosen 
The subject for debate on Wednesday. 


consider that in six months she \riit 

Mr Kinnock: After persistent efforts from farther damage? If be had not Mr JVieriyn Sees (Leeds. South and information, i i .was 1 LU have the same team, and will she be 

have managed 10 pull a fal Riled that duty he would have Modey, Lab): As l listened to and correct infommion captain of the team? 

statement from her. It had a detail been failing in his duty as Secretary watched this tawdry saga, while I no domain. It «US togcine w Thatcher: Yes. 

produced, not by frankness, but by of State. longer care about relationships tn ihe public domain I gave my .vm t nxreuen jk. 

guilt and uncrasable guilt. The stain M« Thatcher. His analysts is between trade and industry mim* {E asineioD. Labi: Y^J. wST 

will remain wTihbrr for as long « conta . 7 * Government had a and mdusinaltsis or whether Mb ^Jadc Dorjag (Eaa W. t w „ WbL Lab^ When Jja Ifa 

she endures in office. duty to sec that no misleading the machinery of government is The mme Minuter » o 

Her excuses are completely statements were made and that any being run property. I know that if as open decision taken by ihcir involvement :in agreeing to 

implausible. She cannot justify or such inaccuracy had to come into Home Secretary I had set up an MOTcrieff 3 (chief sSfSljei^^fetier^ ° f 

excuse her Govcramentin any one the public domain at the relevant mquny and thay had come back and see Mr Ons Mon t Solicitor General s letter? 

respect in this squalid story. We ,i mc P because commercial judge- said, “But, sir. you authorized it , I polmcal cmsondaMi “JJJ, ^ Mr* Thatcher: .Avast number of the 
have been told that the leaking or menu were about to be taken would have resigned- ? n ™ L°k iuitafwi not &cfc wnT no1 t0 “til 

SiWcSSSlSE » ™ ^ ^ m of .he Mr, Thatcben I ha ve given [he facte £J SgVSjM Si % Stt EfSfiL' 

offiS Liberal Party: Her Whole staiemenv indicaUng that! was not consulted. 1 reveal where it came from, who it {SmuasnoT * 

^ reveals ** <*apter of hope he will have the decency to came from, or any details of it? ,, . 

endorse, en shabby and asttmishiog behaviour accept that statement. There is no more honourable Mr 

'MireifJcS ^lnd“a«SSiMd Svde 5 in ** h, ^ her nachcs ** hfr Michael Heseltine (Henley. C): member of the Press Gallery than The whole epuodevrasoi^^ated 

aa lh£^ rff- JJ? Government Sbe owes this House If what I said in the letter which was Mancrieff. Why would he say io gel nd of 2 


rjESKiWS KWi—U?* ^r^SWSf - 


would have resigned- on ** vociock . facts were not known to me until 

„ last night, who said there was noi _j av f Wednesday). I airi ng, «. 
Mrs Thatcben I have given the facts wy ; n which he was gains to ■ . . ' ^ 


SJST WE S . 


contacted on a matter as basic and 
central as this? 

Vi'hai was authorized was a 
conspiracy by people in the 
Department of Trade and Industry 
and her office to disclose certain 


She has allowed nine days of a 


charade of an inquiry. She could No 10 and the DTI on the Friday . n . „. T 

have cleared up the whole matter, afternoon and there was no protest * I rin not believe there Mrs Thatcher: Perhaps Mr Ashton 

j, by calling in the Secretary of State from colleagues about its contents. ■ ire ,~r"T. '- . have set ©ul the has forgotten that Mr Hcsducc took 
Si Tor Trade and Industry and her own and as the fim i heard of conrero agS5?SSS5Sl ISMS?? SSoJfdcasion. 


ovpc nc will nave ure uwcuv, aR1c trom. or any oeiaus w A shlnn (Bassellaw LahV 

accept dial statement. There is no more honourable Mr JSJJ5S5J2 

Mr Michael Heseltine (Henley. O: member of the Press Gallery than The wh °. le 
If what 1 said in the letter which was Mancrieff. Why would he say io gel nd 7^. r 

apparently so difficult caused such these words in contradiction of what State for Defence jb dutj 
concern, as it r^Jn the hands^f Prime Minister, has told the 


House this afternoon? 


Ttiatcher says Brittan was right 


'Irs Thatcher, ip her Maicmcni. said: ihc House 

l nows. Sir John Cue Way. chairman of Westland, 
-‘roir io me on December .'0. l*iS5. asking whether 
V, esiland would no looser be considered a European 
•.ompany b;. the Government if a minority 
'-harchoidine ir ihc com pan v were held b> a major 
international group from a Nato country outside 
Europe. 

This question was of fundamental importance to ihc 
company, in making us decision as io what course u 
was best io follow in the best inicrcsis of the company 
and its employees. 

Ii was therefore essential to be sure that my reply 
should be in no way misleading to anyone "•ho might 
rely on it m making commercial judgments and 
decisions. 

The reply was accordingly considered among the 
departments concerned, and the icM of m> letter ol 
January i, 1&S6, was agreed in detail by Mr Leon 
Sriltan. Seer? tar- of State tor Trade and Industry. Mr 
Michael Heseltine. Secretary of Stale for Defence. Mr 
John MacGregor. Chief Secretary io the Treasury, and 
finally by Sir Patrick May hew. Solicitor General. My 
idler was made public. 

Two da>;. laicr. in January 3. Mr Hcsciimc replied 10 
a letter of ihe same date from Mr Home of Llo>ds 
Merchant Bank asking him a number of questions, 
covering some of the same ground as my own reply io 
Sir John Cuckney. The lexis of the leuers became 
public that same day. 

Mr Hesdtrnc's reply was not cleared or even 
discussed wiih the relevant Cabinet colleagues. 

Moreover, although the reply was also material to 
Ihc commercial judgments and decisions lhat would 
have to be made, the Solicitor General was not invited 
io scrutinize the letter before it was issued. 

On the morning of January 6 the Solicitor General 
v. rote to the then Secretary of Stale for Defence. 

He said: “It is foreseeable lhat your letter will be 
relied upon by 2 hc Westland Board and ils 
shareholders. Consistently with the advice ! gave to the 
Pnmc Minister on December 31. the Government in 
such circumstances is under a duty not to gi%c 
information which is imcompicic or inaccurate in any 
material particular. 

“On the basis of the information contained in the 
documents to which i have referred, which 1 emphasise 
arc all that 1 have seen, the sentence in your letter to 
Mr Home does in my opinion contain material 
inacuracics in the respects 1 have mentioned, and 1 
therefore must advise that you should write again to 
Mr Home correcting the inaccuracies." 

I ha\ c quoted extensively from the letter which was 
published a week ago. As I have already indicated, it 
was especially important in this situation for 
statements made on behalf or the Government, on 
which commercial judgements might be based, to be 
.-•ecu rate and m no way misleading. 

That being so. it was a matter or duty that it should 
be made known publicly that there were thought to be 
material inaccuracies which needed to be corrected in 
Mr Headline's letter of January 3. which as the House 
will recall had already been made public. 

Moreover, it was urgent that it should become 
public know ledge before 4pm that afternoon. January 
b. when Sir John Cuckney w-as due to hold a press 
conference to announce the Westland Board's 
recommendation to shareholders or a revised proposal 
from the United Technologies Corporation/Fiat 
consortium. 

These considerations were '‘cry much in the mind of 
Mr Brittan when the copy of the Solicitor General's 
Idler was brought io his attention at 1.30pm that 
afternoon of January 6. 


He took ihc view ihaT the feci that ihe Solicitor 
General had written to the then Secre ta ry of State for 
Defence and the opinion he had expressed should be 
brought into the public domain as soon as possible. 

He asked his officials to discuss with my office 
whether the disclosure should be made, and if so 
whether it should be made from 10 Downing Street as 
he said he would prefer. He made ii clar that, subject to 
the agreement of my Office, he was giving authority for 
the disclosure to be made from the Department of 
Trade and Industry, if it was not made from 10 
Downing Street. 

He expressed no view as to the form in which the 
disclosure should be made, though it was clear to all 
concerned lhat in the circumstances it was not possible 
to proceed by way of an agreed statement. 

My office’ were accordingly approached. Tney did 
not seek my agreement they considered - and they 
were nght - that 1 should agree with Mr Brittan that 
the Tact lhat the then Defence Secretary's letter of 
January 3 was thought by the Solicitor General to 
contain material inaccuracies which needed to be 
corrected, should become public knowledge as soon as 
possible, and before Sir John Cuckney's press 
conference. 

It was accepted that ihe Department of Trade and 
Industry should disclose that fact; and that in view of 
the urgency of the matter the disclosure should be 
made by means of a telephone communication to the 
Press Association. 1 should have said that a different 
way must be found of making the relevant facts 
known. 

The report finds, in the light of the evidence that the 
DTI acted in good faith in the knowledge that they had 
the authority of their Secretary of State and cover from 
my office for proceeding. 

An official of the department accordingly told a 
representative of the PA of the Solicitor General's 
letter and material elements of what it said. The 
company was also informed. The information was on 
the Press Association tapes at 3.30pm. 

Mr Briuan was in my judgement right in thinking 
that it was important ih3i the possible existence oi 
material inaccuracies in the then Secretary of State for 
Defence's letter of January 3 should become a matter 
of public knowledge, if possible before Sir John 
Cucknr-'s press conference at 4pm that day. Insofar as 
what m’v office said to the Department ofTradc and 
Industry w 3 s based on the belief that 1 should have 
taken that v jew. had 1 been consulted, they were right. 

The Attorney General has authorized me to inform 
the House that, having considered the report by the 
Head of the Civil Service, and on the material before 
him. he has decided, after consultation with, and wiih 
the full agreement of. the Director of Public 
Prosecutions, and Senior Treasury Counsel, that there 
is no justification for the institution of proceedings 
under the Official Secrets Act in respect of any of the 
persons concerned in this matter. (Loud laugh ten. 

In order that there should be no impediment to co- 
operation in the inquiry, the Attorney General had 
authorized the Head of the Civil Service to tell one of 
the officials concerned, whose testimony would be 
' itaJ to the inquirv. that he had the Attorney General's 
authority to say that, provided that he received full co- 
operation in his inquiry, the official concerned would 
not be prosecuted in respect of anything said during the 
course of the inquiry. 

The Head of the Civil Service did indeed receive full 
co-operation, not only from that official, but from all 
concerned. 

The Attorney General tells me that he is satisfied 
that that in no wav interfered with the course of justice: 
on the facts disclosed in the inquiry, there would have 
been no question of proceeding against the official in 
question. (Labour shouts of “Resign”). 


business. 

That was their way of putting it in 
the public domain, not by open 
means bui by subterfuge and 
dishonest means. 

We have been told dial there was 
an inquiry. There have been 
answers in this House from 
ministers, including the Prime 
Minister that on inquiry was being 
undertaken in the normal fashion. 

Why was ihere an inquiry when 
everybody knew? (Labour cheers). 
Why was there an inquiry when 
cverbody knew there would be no 
prosecution because a dispensation 
had been given. 

The only comparable precedent 
for this act of contrived insincerity 
is the way Macbeth so fiercly looked 
around for the murderers of 
Duncan. 

We hear from the Prime Minister 
lhat immunity was offered. Why 
was that the case when tt was plain 
that there was to be no prosecution? 

We have heard a shabby story, 
offered to divert the public. The feet 
is that the Prime Minister, the 
Secretary of State for Trade and 
Industry, and everybody else 
involved would have got away with 
it, were it not for the feci that in this 
democracy ihe Prime Minister had 
ultimately ltd make'a statemcnL 


of State for Defence not told that the Colleagues to have considered and sam _ g _.TT Ic .,.r_. 1 v 

letter would be made public? discussed, and perhaps even agreed, expressing there- 

Why, if it was so important to any withdrawal of anything in my Mr Roy Jenkins (Glasgow HiJ- 
make it public, was there not a clear letter that was misleading? Ihcad, SDP): As ^ she ana per 

Government statement of policy 


comer method? If she were living in 



corner mchod: If S h e were livin, m h„ to* jubtotai would Urn* 


Heseltine: My every word 
stands uncorrected 

the real world outside and 
conducted this inquiry she would 
now be on a charge of wasting police 
time. 

Mrs Thatcher: The inquiry was set 


fall facts as a result of the inquiry. I his own decision. 

£ when faaVe ^ ^ cm odC extremely ,\( r John Stokes (HaJesowit and 

carefully and accurately and I hope Stourbridge- O said «n hi s 
iTiraribiTfOT that he will consider them with the constituency nobody had meiy 
same care as I have given to ,j 0n cd Wcsilands and he had n« 
expressing them. received any letters about u. ; 

aytiting rnmy Mr Roy Jenkins (Glasgow, Hil- Mr David Winnick (Walsall North, 
ding? Ihcad, SDP): As she and her Lab): Instead of the robust hghinig 

m «h» eniintnr Government sink deeper into the statement promised today by herto a 
hkbwr bog of deceit and chicanery, almost lh c Press, what we have is a shoddy. ^ 
wnuid it not her onl y remaining memorable pathetic statement that «i|| con. 
**trfmv «Dlv words will be: there were commcr- v incc nobody about the deceitful 
welP Will the cial decisions involved. Previous the Government goes about hs 
j hs . every governments prior to her own have business. , . 

ai r sent to the been activated by higher consider- Whilst wc are all pleased that no 
a ttends unoar- atioas. Civil ServaiU has been uwd as a 

ement by the Mr* Thatcben When commercial scapegoat. iT Mr Brittan had the 
decisions of different recons true- lean idea what honour meant he 
problem would lions are made on the basis of a would have resigned by now. 
d he cleared his prospectus, legal obligations follow Mrs Thatcher said she had 
I id tor General that the information shall not be deliberate! v set up the inquiry in 
s of that letter misleading. I would have hoped chat establish the facts. 

:nt would have he might have accepted that _ „ , ' , 

otdoso. Mr Patric Coronet (South Stafford- Dr Kcttfc 

eli that I had shire. O: When the Secretary or W «L O sard Mr Hesoltme s i reply 
tf mine because state for Trade and Industry to tite Solicitor-General should also 
it it might be addressed this House at length last have been made public, m 
^ pectus or be WC ek. did he know he had the most damaging part of the 
he cleared his. authorized this leak? Sohcilor-GcncraTs Icncr lo Mr 

Id never have , vtSLK Heseltine. so that the shareholders 

Mre Thatcher: The inquiry was w make a pr operjudgemem. 
under way. The inquiry has now ^ 

der of the SDP: reported. Mrs Thatcher said it was essential 

x tell her that Mr Tom Daly ell (Linlithgow, Lab): to make public the fact that tittre 
cover to the When did the Prime Minister's were possible inaccuracies which 


now be right for the text of my reply SS 

si zzfi: s^ssysss 0^“ 

JSto of toelSer S I £m to thS activawd by CODsider - 

European consortium stands unoor- _ ons „ . . , 

reeled bv any statement by the Mr* Thatcben When commercial 
GovernmenL decisions of different reeqnsiruc- 


European consortium stands uncor- a ^ ons l_ , , 

reeled bv any statement by the Mr* Thatcben When commercial 
GovernmenL decisions of different recons truc- 

Mrs Thatcher: The problem would tions are made on the basis of a 
never have arisen had he cleared his prospectus, legal obligations follow 
letter with the Solicitor General that the information shall not be 
because on The basis of that letter misleading. I would have hoped chat 
commercial judgement would have he might have accepted tbaL 
been made. He did not do so. Mr Patiic Carmack (South Stafford- 


been made. He did not do so. Mr Patric Carmack (South Stafford- 

He knew full well that I had shire. Ck When the Secretary of 
cleared every word or mine because state for Trade and Industry 
it was thought that it might be addressed this House at length last 
included in the prospectus or be week, did he know he had 
material to it. Had be cleared his. authorized this leak? 
this problem would never have Thatcher: The inquiry was 
arisen. under way. The inquiry has now 

Dr Da rid Owen, Leader of the SDP: reported. 

When did her office tell her that Mr Tom Daly ell (Linlithgow, Lab); 
they had given cover to the When did the Prime Minister's 
Secretary of State's office to reveal press office first tell her what they 


this letter? Was it January 6? had done? 


ThrTKdT re d^Twith the .«P » ■ estebUsh the feels. Had I 
former' member of the Cabinet, and * demand foran inquiry 

Secretary of State of Defence, not by he would have enttetzed me. The 
the means available to the Prime «nqjwy established many fens 
w: jf -l,. K-iirvrd he was wfticfi were not known to me. He 

MlCig contiliw te\be national said he would have done it without 
interest - to sack him - but trying an , “ q . u,ry ' V)* 1 ,s not wblt hc 
dishonest!*’ and covertly to subvert would have said, 
him. Mr Akx Fletcher (Edinburgh 

For the Government to leak to Central, O: There are Conservative 
inform and influence public opinion MPs whose chief consideration in 


January 7? Which date? 

Why did sbe not come and tell 
this House since she knew that her 
office been involved in this 
leak? How can sbe continue to hold 
the high office that she does when 
she constituted a leak inqury in the 
fall knowledge that her office, and 
by implication herself was fully 
involved in this whole sordid affair? 
Mrs Thatcher: He has not taken 
fully into account every angle thing 
in my statement. The inquiry was 
set up to establish the facts. An 


Mrs Thatcben I have given a full 
account of the inquiry I established 


is normal For a Governemtn to this matter is ihe integrity of cn 0 miou 5 number of facts were not 
leak to discredit anyone is sbamefuL government Is she satisfied that her tnown to me until yesterday Mien 1 
For a Government to leak to statement this afternoon has got ^ ^ 0 f inquiry - 


subvert a member of that Govern- enhanced the integrity of her 
ment is the action of a Government Government? 

which is rotten, not just rotten to the _\j n Thatcben Yes. I have tried, 
core, but rotten from the core. They having set up an inquiry and having 
should go. ( Labour cheers l seen the fall report yesterday, to 

Mrs Thatcher: In reply to what Mr gj ve as full an account as I possibly 
Kinnock says, much of which I can because the House deserved to 
totally reject, '’he has seen from the have it. 


Solicitor General's 


---- - . Mr Michael Foot { Blaenau GwenL 

Government had a duD io give ufl D(XS sbg na]l ^ , week 

accurate mibmwmn and I not . to when , asked the question she 
give any mntading. nfornmnon ^ ^ inquify ^ go lofi ahead. 
I Labour protests and interruptions) but [ ( nol the custom to make a 


because lhat information could be 
used to make commercial judge- 


report to the House and she was not 


Moves to allay fears 
over lenient sentences 


The Government was still consider- 
ing how to allay public fears about 
ico lenient sentences, particularly 
for ifolcnt crimes. Mr Douglas 
Hurd, the Home Secretary, dis- 
closed during questions in the 
Commons. 

He said the Government had tried 
last session to include in the 
Prosecution of offences BUL a 
pro' ision to allay public concern, but 
unfortunately, it was thrown out by 
t..c House of Lords. The Govern- 
ment was still considering how to 
roire that sanction. 

This was a reference to the 
rejection in the Lords of a danse in 
the Ptosectuion or Offences Bill to 
allow the Attorney General to refer 
lenient sentences to the Court of 
Appeal. Under ihc clause ihe court 
would not have been able to change 
the sentence, bat could issue 
guidelines on the recommended level 
of sentences for such offences. 

Hc was replying to Sir .Anthony 
Grant iSouth West Cambridgeshire. 
C) wiu> that in the minds of the 


public some of the sentences for the 
most bestial crimes of violences, by 
comparison with those for burglary, 
seemed to bear no relation. Some of 
the courts seemed to be totally out of 
loach «ith reality. 

Mr Hurd said he noted with those 
remarks had a certain amount of 
support from other Conservative 
backbenchers. It was not up to 
Parliament to lay down what the 
courts should do but provide them 
with adequate sentencing powers. 


Interest rates 

Mrs Thatcher, the Pnmc Minister, 
replying to Mr Neil Kinnock. the 
Leader of the Opposition, said she 
had no change to announce in 
interest rates. 

Interest rate rises were unwel- 
come. Markets had been unsettled 
this w-ek as the oil price had fallen 
but (he Bank of England had 
maintained its current dealing rates. 


Speaker sticks 
to ruling 

The Speaker (Mr Bernard Weathe- 
rill) declared in the Commons that 
he would not change his ruling 
vesterday that Mr Leon Bniian. 
Secretary' of State for Trade and 
Industry, was not quoting from a 
Cabinet document in bis speech on 
the Westland controversy- 

He said he had looked at the 
papers handed to him by Mr Dale 
Campbell-Savours (Workinton. 
Labi. 

There were only minor differ- 
ences between the extract and the 
words read out by Mr Campbell- 
Savours when he raised hi s point ot 
order. But this did not affect his (Mr 
U'eathcrilFsi earlier ruling that 
passage in Mr Brittan's speech 
complained of was not a quotation. 

I am not responsible (he 
continued) for looking behind 
words said in the House or to cheek 
if words used by ministers arc also 
be be found in official document, it 
would be putting an impossible 
burden on any Speaker io ask him 
to do that. 


used to maxe commercial , lo do when sbe gave That 

mcnis. Because rfjj answer she must have known all the 

inaccuracy it was important to i get w shf concealed them from 

accurate information -nro the public ^ Housc and CQ When will 
domain in time for the meeting at 4 shc apologi2e for 

C I agree, as I have indicated, that N ^ ; 

there would be a more correct I did nor know all the facts. That is 
method. The fact is that I was not inquiry was set up- It « nol 

consulted, as 1 have indicated. >he usual tradition or custom to give 

I instituted an inquiry and Mr the outcome of these inquires. 
Kinnock would have been the first There have been rare exceptions 
to castigate me if I had noL when that has been the case, 

i instituted an inquiry, starting on . w ? en * * ot ' he **** 1 *: 

January 14, to find out the full bets inquiry l knew there would have to 
because the full facts were not be another cxcepuaa when a fall 
known. The inquiry reported on statement would have to be made. 
January 22 and I have made a fall Mr Michael Colrin (Romsey and 


January22. 

Mr Crude? Onslow (Woking. CY 
Many MPs opposite like Dr Owen, 
are not really interested in listening 
to the facts of the fall account. What 
view m ight this House have taken of 
any minister in any government 
placed in such an invidious 
situation by the action or a 
colleague, who had failed in his duty 
to ensure- that correct information 
was made public's* soon- as 
possible? , 

Mrs Thatcher: It would have been 
much cadre, as the facts were 
commercially sensitive, . if the 
relevant tetters had been cleared, as 
was mine, with the Solicitor 
General. It is because we knew lhat 
judgements may be founded upon 
them and The Government could be 
liable if wrong judgements were 
made as a result of misleading 


office to reveal press office first tell her what they were rctevanL She accepted at once 
" had done? it would have been better that a 

Mrs Thatcben I have given a fall statement wsa made or information 
account of the inquiry I established released to a different way. 

Mr Dale Campbell-Savours (Wor- 
kington, Lab): When the people (rf 
this country in the future examine 
these days, they wjfl say that die 
Prime Minister did not tell the 
truth. (Conservative protests). 

In 1963 Mr Profamo bad 
admitted his contempt in dehber- 
atcly misleading the House. This 
matter would be best dealt with hy J 
matters of privilege to find out the a 
nature of the contempL 
Mrs Thatcben Na I totally reject 
and reseat Mr Campbdl-Savoura 
assertions. 

Mr Norman St John-Stevas (Chel- 
msford. Ck Whatever the faults of 
the Government in handling this 
. „ . . . situation - and there have been 

Jenkins: Bog of deceit grave faults - nothing justifies the 

and chicaner}' farrago of hypocrisy and cant we 

30 lhat they could cslabllsh the frets- g™ jjg, “> “ d “ re rn,m 

I have indicated that l was not * ' ,0 , , . 

consulted at the time Mrs Thatcher said throughout she 

consulted at ne time. had lhought u vital ^ al Wrstlat ids ; 

Mr George Gardiner (Reigate, O made a choice on the basis o( 
said he was a political corrcspon- correct and not misleading infor- 
dent for 13 years and the events in matron. 

Mr Nigel Spearing (Newham South, 
from what were regular practices. IF [^1 asked to whom was Mr 
there anger andmucrai on tiro In&ham . hcr ^ 5 *. 

Conservative benches a retarv. accountable and who* 

relatively minor matter should have decided bis standing enters? ' * 

been blown up in such a spectacular ... __ . . * ,_ c 

fashion. Mrs Thatcher: Mr Ingham , has 

served successi ve govern meats wirb 
Mr Jack Ashley (Stoke-on-Trent great devotion and dedication. I 
South, Labi: Does Mrs Thatcher have great confidence in him. 



Jenkins: Bog of deceit 
and chicaner}' 

so lhat they could establish the facts. 
I have indicated lhat I was not 
consulted at the time. 


Whitelaw attacks Heseltine 


statement today, January 23. Waterside, C>: If wc need a lesson in ^ r rei>eatinR the statement in the 

Sir Edward Gardner (Fylde, C>: If. leaking we have only to remember of Lords. 


Waterside, C>: If we need a lesson in 


viscount Whitelaw, Lord President 
of the Conncfl and Leader of the 
House of Lords, made a personal 
attack on Mr HeseWne’s conduct. 


co (leagues than was exhibited 
daring this period by Mr Heseltine. 


we are entitled to say lL If Z feri iM 
shall certainly say it. 

1 am sorry. I hear Mr Hesritioe 


as is suggested was the case, the the Crossman and Castle diaries 
Secretary of State for Trade and from which wc have learned that 
Industry had been aware or had previous Labour governments 
been made aware, of what he leaJcrd like a sieve, 
believed 10 have been the mislead- Mrs Thatcher: A different way 
ing information which could have would have occurred had there been 
damaged seriously the future of time. The House should 

Westland would he not have been remember that there was a time 
under an overriding and imperative COQS irainL It was urgent because o! 


House of Lords. 

1 am sot in the business of 
seeking deliberately Io ran down my 
colleagues (he said) .or to be 
unpleasant about other people in 
other parties. Sat I am bound to any. 
having observed what went on at 
dose quarters. I have never in my 
time in the Cabinet seen more 


If yon look at many of the things no personal U! iriD hot I cannot fid I 
that have happened, that was one of was well treated. As a JeQa* 
the reasons why it was so difficult to colleague in Cabinet, I cannot ltd 
cany on Cabimrt Government in this that. 

period. ] did not see in what the then I still feel that if one members! 
Secretary of State for Defence did, the Cabinet decides to conduct a 
anything which made joint Cabinet campaign such as the then Secretary 
responsibility at all possible. of State for Defence decided, to 

conduct against the policy of the n» 
Because of what happened, 1 feel of the Cabinet, it is ext read? 
deeply and Utterly at the way 1 difficult for good Cabinet Comm- £ 


duty 10 correct that misleading ^at meeting at four o'clock lhat extraordinary behaviour to his 
impression and to protect Westland a fr ern »> 3 n. Prime Minister and indeed to all his 


personally, as a Cabinet minister, roent confidentiality and • jttfit. 
was treated over that period of time Cabinet responsibifify to' ■ • * 
and so indeed do my colleagues and preserved- 


Why Libyan was admitted visit to Israel Rate support in Scotland 


The case of Salab Abdessalem Ben 
Raiiba. a member of the Libyan 
People's Bureau in London who was 
expelled after the murder of WPC 
Yvonne Fletcher, was unique, the 
Prime Minister told the Commons 
when she explained bow he came to 
be allowed to re rani to Britain. 

Mr Dennis Walters: (Westburv. C) 
said during Commons questions that 
WpC Fletcher’s parents, who lived 
in his consti fluency, were under- 
standably upset at the decision to 
allow the return of a member of the 
bureau to England and to VVlltshire. 


Will tbe Prime Minister (he 
asked] assure us that this will not be 
looked upon as a precedent for other 
members of the bnreau? 

Mrs Tbatcben I believe the case was 
unique. Mr Ben Rata ha applied for a 
iisa to reenter tbe United Kingdom 
to rejoin bis English wife and 
children. 

The application w as rejected by 
the Home Office because of his 
presence in the bureau during the 
shooting. He exercised his right or 
appeal and the adjudicator found ia 
his favour. (Some cries of “Shame".) 


Mrs Thatcher, the Prime Minister, 
hopes to visit Israel later this year, 
sbe indicated during Commons 
questions when commenting on her 
talks with Mr Shimon Peres, the 
Israeli Prime Minister, which she 
described as enjoyable, interesting 
and constructive. 


Parliament today 

Commons (9.30): Obscene Publi- 
cations (Protection of Children, Etc) 
(Amendment) Bill, second reading. 


Channel rail link reaction 


;R to build four platforms at W aterloo 


By Hugh Clayton 
Environment Correspondent 

British Rail yesterday dis- 
closed plans for four extra 
platforms 21 Waterloo siation 10 
take Channel tunnel trains. 
They *il! follow a modified 
route ihal -will differ from both 
the existing 77-mtie lines from 

London to Dover. 

The platforms would be built 
io the nonh of platforms used 
bv trains to Richmond. Reading 
and Windsor. Tracks would be 
modified so trains could turn 
left on a new spur jusi before 
Oyecnsiown Road station in 
Baitersea. Thai would lake 
(hem on 10 rhe Victoria 10 Kern 
line throurh Pecfcham. 

But the lunnel trains would 
{cave iha: route on existing 
imcks in south-east London to 
join the line from Charing Cross 
10 Dover through Ashford. 

BR said lhat ihe new 
platforms and track at Waterloo 
could be buili mainly on 
railway land. Bui the plan to 
make Waterloo the sole tunnel 
pil terminal was opposed by 
the Labour-controlled Lambeth 
council and by the Waterloo 
Community Development 
Group- which is financed by the 
Greater London Council. 

Lambeih whose area includes 


The Channel tunnel is likely 
to foe unpopular with the public, 
according to a survey published 
yesterday. 

Assuming that there is no 
difference in price. 46 per cent 
of those canvassed would not 
use it at all if they could go by 
ferry' or hovercraft, the survey 
conducted by BJM Research 
Partners found. That figure 
would rise to 56 per cent if 
people were travelling by car. 

The survey also showed that 
43 per cent of those asked 

Waterloo station, is to hold a 
pubiic inquir. into the scheme 
beca use ihc Go vernen 1 has 
refused to do so. A spokesman 
said thai BR should consider 
lunnel terminal facilities at 
more than one London station. 

The council also wanted 
customs checks for tunnel 
passengers 10 be carried out on 
trains to avoid bottlenecks at 
stations. Mr Steve Barran. co- 
ordinator of the development 
group, said: "There is extreme 
concern That it will bring 
development pressures of the 
type thai ihe people of Waterloo 
have been fighting for years.” 

© W'iihin a day of the Channel 


would prefer a road link, 
whether they intended to use it 
or not, and only 31 per cent 
favoured a rail tunnel. 

Women were markedly more 
nervous of travelling in the 
tunnel than men. Sixty-five per 
cent of women in the survey 
said they would be "concerned” 
about using it. compared with 
40 per cent Of men. Fifty-eight 
per cent of women and only 33 
per cent of men said they would 
not go through the tunnel if 
given another way of making 
the crossing. 

lunnel rati link announcement 
on Monday, a representative of 
vVimpcy. one of the country's 
largest building firms, arrived in 
the Folkestone area looking for 
plots of land to buy /Our 
Property Correspondent writes). 

He was the first of many 
builders expected in the area 
around Chcriton. the site of the 
terminals, heralding a period of 
intense activity in the residen- 
tial and commercial property 
markets. Substantial price rises 
are expected during the next few 
year. 

Some agents have plans 10 
increase staff to cope with the 
demand. Although the year nas 


started well for the property 
market in the area, there was 
iitte anticipation of the decision 
because of false alarms m the 
past. 

Now, however, "industrial- 
ists and potential investors in 
Kent and Sussex need to take 
up their options quickly or be 
left behind in the rush to 
acquire land and leases in the 
South-east," Mr John Bishop, 
chairman of Geering and 
Coker, part of the Lloyds Bank- 
owned Black Horse agencies, 
said. 

Hc said the decision signalled 
a rise in rents for offices, 
factories, warehousing and rc- 
lail space, and an increase in 
housc prices beyond the pro- 
jected growth figure of 10 per 
ceni for 198b. 

Mr Bishop, whose f-.?m has 
more than 20 offices in Kent 
and Sussex, believed the cast 
Kent would benefit first, with a 
ripple effect moving from the 
consi ruction site across lhc 
counties. 

Mr Roddy Lodcr-Symonds. a 
partner al S trull and Parker's 
Canterbury office, said that 
people were concerned zboul 
the environmental impact of 
the tunnel, but added, "we have 
to accept it w ill come, and must 



An artist's impression of British Rail Engineering's 
planned 110 mph Class 87/2 locomotive which coaid puli 
Channel tunnel trains. They will incorporate the latest 
electronic technology and will require less maintenance 
than existing engines. 


think positively in order to gel 
it on the best terms lor county". 

• Plans for a new- high-speed 
locomotive which could pull 
Channel tunnel trains were 
disclosed yesterday as British 
Rail announced a £25 million 
order for 29 of them (Patricia 
Clough writes). 

The Class 87/2 locomotives, 
to be built by British Rail 
Engineering at Derby and 
Crewe could become a front 
runner for the Paris- London rail 
shuttle and the company has 
already submitted plans to the 
Channel Tunnel group which is 
building the project. 


The company, which is run 
on private lines although owned 
by British Rail, is planning to 
export similar engines as part of 
its policy to develop inter- 
national markets. 

• Townsend Thoresen, the 
ferry operators, yesterday an- 
nounced further cuts in fares 
and the introduction of free 
travel for members of its 
•"junior sailors club". Last 
month the company published 
fares which showed many 
reductions or minimal increases 
on 1985 prices (The Press 
A&sociaiion.rcpons>. 


Aggregate exchequer grant for 
1986-8? would be £2,008 .65m, Mr 
Malcolm Rificiod, Secretary of State 
for Scotland, said in moving the 
Scottish rate support grant order In 
the Commons late on Wednesday 
night It was 56.1 per cent of 
relevant expenditure, a reduction on 
the grant percentage in tbe current 
year. 

This was to pot farther pressure 
on authorities to bring their 
spending into line. Final out-turns 
were above pro visional Bottoms for 
many authorities, 90 grant penalties. 


‘Defence of 
Irish’ plea 
by doctor 

Maire O’Shea, a consonant 
psychiatrist, told a jury yester- 
day of the political organization 
she had joined after coming to 
Britain from the Irish Republic 

Dr O'Shea, aged 66, denies a 
charge at Manchester Crown 
Coart that she conspired to 
cause a bomb explosion aimed 
at a retires-. Strategic Air 
Service Regiment colonel. 

Dr O'Shea, of Solihull Road, 
SparkhilJ, Birmingham, said 
that at various times she had 
been a member of the Commu- 
nist Part)-, the Labour Party, 
Civil Rights, the Connolly 
Association, the anti-intern- 
ment committee and tbe Troops 
Out Movement. 

One of two men accused with 
her on the bomb conspiracy 
charge changed his plea to 
guilty yesterday. He was 
William Grimes, aged 43, 
unemployed, of Dublin. He also 
admitted a further charge of 
Possessing 2.45 kg of gelignite 
and a detonator. He will be 
sentenced after the trial. 

The third accused who 
denies conspiracy is Patrick 
Brazil, aged 34, able seaman, of 
Dublin. 

The trial continues today. 


such as Lothian. Region, *o® 
showing farther reduction*' ‘ m 
expenditure and tints also redad»» 
In penalties. • : ' - 

U local authorities spent 
there was eruy reason why mp n» 
increases should be low. If 
spent io flue with gnMeUnes, 
would be no grant 1"^“* ■“IS! 
overall level of rates would 
down. 

The order was carried b? J** 
votes to ISO - Gorerameol mV***’ 
41. 


College wins 
cruelty 
appeal : 

The- Royal College of^ 

gcons was . cleared at the..H»“ 
Court yesterday of -cans 1 ® 
unnecessary suffering W ■ 
monkey at one of its reseafy 1 
establishments. .... 

After a private prosccuW" 
by the British Union 
.Abolition of Vivisecuop. * 
Bromley Magistrates' Court: 
February last year the RyS*": 
fined £250 for an offence unj® 
the Protection of Animals ^ 
1911. - - '>)*. 

The action was brought 
the female Macaque 
was found in -a sate of cdfcP 
during a protest raid 
South East Animal. 

League on the BucktonrBro^r 
farm research estabbshmeoL 
Downe. near Orpington. 

The RCS appealed 
crown court, which uphcfa^ 
conviction but found *jj 
dehydration was due 
domination of • the . 
monkey by a male. This 
caused her 10 stop drinkiop- 

Yesterday Lord Ju*g 
Lloyd, sitting with Mr 
Skinner, said the RCS haftffi 
no opportunity at the 
the appeal of defending 
allegation .and ihe conyi^r 
could not stand. : ; 




i r y\ ^ 

t~* J A O «t 1 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 2d i OR* 


HOME/OVERSEAS NEWS 


v- -SS... 1 d 


Geoffrey 

Smith 


Uncertainties 

remain 

That is what most Conserva- 
tive MPs will be hoping. Their 
instinct to draw together in 
times of trouble should never be 
underestimated. I think this is 
now the dominant wish of most 
of them. 

But I doubt if the present 
controversy will be so quickly- 
set to rest. Frank as she was 
about some things. Mrs 
Thatcher did not manage to 
clear up all uncertainties 
yesterday. 

In particular, she was unwill- 
ing to provide a direct and 
unequivocal answer as to when 
she knew that her office had 
authorized the leak of the 
Solicitor General's letter. 

This means that the pursuit 
will continue, and thatartentioo 
will non focus more directly on 
her conduct. Whatever may be 
thought of Mr Leon Brittan's 
actions. I do not see that he 
should be expected to carry sole 
responsibility for an artion 
authorized by the Prime Minis- 
ter's office. 

There is nothing the Govern- 
ment and the Conservative 
party would like more than to 
draw & line under this whole 
sorry business. But it is hard to 
do that with selective frank- 
ness. 


Presidential campaign 


Portugal’s tense election 
pits united right against 
three left-wing contenders 


It would take a long time to 
find a precedent for the 
proceedings in the House of 
Commons yesterday. The 
Prime Minister was acknowl- 
edging that an official inquiry 
had been set np to discover the 
facts of a leak of information 
which had been authorized by 
her own office. 

As always. Mrs IVIargaret 
Thatcher's nerve was breath- 
taking. But she was unable to 
remove the impression that the 
inquiry had been a charade, 
designed to conceal the truth if 
(hat bad been possible, and 
that yesterda's disclosure was 
being made simply because it 
had been forced upon her. The 
dangerous suspicion that the 
Government had been per- 
petrating a trick was not 
dissolved by her statement or l 
by her answers to questions. 

For much of (lie time, the 
expression on the faces of 
Conservative backbenchers 
varied between stoicism and 
anguish. As time went on. with 
questions and answers on Mrs 
Thatcher's statement. the 
Conservatives began to recover 
their voices and to shout back 
• at the jubilant Opposition 
bcucttcs- 

it is the considered reaction 
' of the Conservative Party in the 
Ct-inmuus that will be the 
Cf.terRQient'K immediate con- 
cern. if their ranks do not hold, 
Mrs 1 hatcher and other 
, ministers will be in very serious 
trouble. No doubt with that 
consideration in mind, a delib- 
erate attempt to rally Con- 
servative spirits, was made in 
particular by Mr Cranieigh 
! Onslow, the chairman of the 
1922 Committee. 

The principal argument used 
by Mrs Thatcher's defenders 
was that the uncertain position 
of the Westland company make 
ii necessary for accurate infor- 
mation to be pobiiciy available 
before Sir John Cuckney, the 
chairman of the chairman of 
company, held a press confer- 
ence on the afternoon of 
January 6. 

Unpleasant 

taste 

in other words, the alleged 
, inaccuracies in a letter from Mr 
Michael Heseltine three days 
before had to be publicly 
; correcled as a matter of 
urgency. 

Even if it were accepted that 
Mr Heseltine's lerter did 
contain inaccuracies, which is 
hotly disputed, that would not 
explain why pans of the 
Solicitor General's letter were 
disclosed in such a damaging 
’ fashion without either his 
upprovaL or Mr Heseltine's. 

, The prime minister expressed 
her regret at the manner of 
disclosure - her one concession 
to her critics - but that does nor 

• dispose of all questions. 

Governments and journalists 

* live fay leaks, and it would be 
; wrong to be sanctimonious 

about indirect disclosures of 
official information not, the 
process of government w ould be 
even more secretive than it is. 

Yet it still leaves an un- 
pleasant taste in the mouth that 
ministers should leak such 
information in a way that was 
calculated to inflict the greatest 
personal damage on the very 
colleague whom they have been 
criticizing for failing to accept 
the discipline of collective 
cabinet responsibility. 

None the less, unpleasant as 
it has been, extraordinary 
though the Prime Minister's 
statement was, will all the 
furore prove to be more than a 
nine-day wonder? May it even 
turn out to be one of those 
political excitements which 
raise the temperature more at 
Westminster than in the 
country? 


Portugal's presidential elec- 
tions on Sunday have turned 
! into a tense tug-of-war over 
| different views of society. 

The break-up last summer of 
a centrist coalition Government 
made up of Socialists and Social 
Democrats already threatened 
such a polorization between 
right and led. and last October's 
inconclusive general election 
made it unavoidable. A min- 
ority Social Democrat govern- 
ment. led by Senhor Anibal 
Cavaco Silva emerged, with the 
support of only 30 per cent of 
the voters. 

This explains why Professor 
Diogo Freitas do Amaral, the 
candidate of a united Portu- 
guese right, will face a second 
round run-off in mid-February. 
After yesterday's withdrawal by 
the Communist candidate, he 
still faces three well-known 
opponents on the left. 

President Antonio Eanes, 
who cannot constitutionally 
have a third term, won his two 
five-year spells in office with 
outright majorities the first time 
of asking. 

The campaign has resembled 
a primary between Dr Mario 
Soares, the former Socialist 
Prime Minister, and two rivals. 
One is Dr Francisco Salgado 
Zenha. once his number two in 


From Richard Wigg, Lisbon 

the Socialist Party and now 
engaged in a contest which is 
bound to worsen the parly's 
post-electoral fortunes. 

The other is Senhora Maria 
de Lourdes Pintasilgo. a doughty 
Catholic professional woman 
who was briefly Prime Minister 
in 1979. She has lent a "Third 
World" flavour to the cam- 
paign. rarher as Lieutenant- 
Colonel Otelo Saraiva. the 1974 
revolutionary hero who is now 
on trial as a terrorist, did in a 
previous presidential contest. 

Having lost the October 
elections. Portugal's left is 
striving hand for the presidency. 
It is an influential post. as 
President Eanes has shown, but 
it can also be a frequent source 
of conflict with the Govern- 
ment. 

Dr Soares was out campaign- 
ing yesterday on centra! Lisbon 
streets. He avoided working- 
class districts, however, perhaps 
after being physically assaulted 
earlier in the campaign in 
central Portugal by factory 
workers who were protesting 
that their salaries had not been 
paid for months. 

His basic strategy is still to 
seek the middle-of-road- vote, 
especially among those Social 
Democrats who regard Pro- 


fessor Freitas as too right wing. 
The former Prime Minister has 
gone down well in the conserva- 
tive north. 

Dr Soares, whose spirits have 
revived since the severe rebuff 
given him last Ocotober. is 
evidently still hoping to crown 
his career with the presidency, 
assisted perhaps by a “conso- 
lation vote" from the Portu- 
guese who do not much care for 
politics buL like his personal 
image of bonhomie, stability 
and shunning of extremes. 

Dr Zenha. his rival, is the 
candidate publicly favoured by 
President Eanes. whose wife. 
Manuela, has campaigned for 
the 62-> car-old lawyer. 

The Communists have also 
contributed to the polarization 
by telling their supporters to 
hack Dr Zenha. This explained 
the successful day he had in 
Lisbon's industrial belt south of 
the River Tagus. 

Both the Communits and the 
Democratic renewal Parti 
which President Eanes will soon 
be leading after stepping down 
are exploiting the decline in ; 
Socialist fortunes. 

Whoever wins. Portugal will 
have a President who is not 
drawn from the armed forces 
for the first lime in more than 
50 vears. 


Bonn gives 
Japanese 
respite from 
trade issue 

From Frank Johnson 
Bonn 

Mr Shimon Abe. the Japa- 
nese Foreign Minister, who is 
louring European _ capitals, 
seems to have been given some 
respite here from what for him 
is the usual topic: his country's 
alleged in hospitality towards 
non-Japanese goods (Frank 
Johnson writes). 

Yesterday, Mr Abe had talks 
with the West German Chancel- 
lor. Herr Helmut Kohl, and the 
Foreign Minister. Herr Hans- 
Dietrich Genscher. On Tuesday 
bis two-day visit had begun 
with a meeting with Herr 
Genscher. 

.Alleged Japanese protection- 
ism apparently was raised by 
the West Germans, but not with 
the same passion as in other 
capitals, including London, 
where Mr Abe apparently was 
addressed vigorously on the 
subject by Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher. 

Although West Germany has 
a trade deficit with Japan, it is 
not so large as that of other 
European countries 

The talks also covered the 
United States' Strategic Defence 
Initiative (SDI) since Japan is 
shortly to follow' West Germany 
in sending a delegation to 
Washington to see what con- 
tracts it can win from the SDI. 
Mr Abe also breifed his hosts on 
the recent improvements in 
Soviei-Japanese relations after 
the first visit to Japan by a 
Soviet Foreign Minister for 10 
years. 



Mr Shintaro Abe. the Japanese Foreign Minister, greeting 
Chancellor Kohl of West Germany before their talks in 
Bonn yesterday. 


The Indian government has 
launched an international archi- 
tectural competition for an arts 
complex in Delhi commemorat- 
ing Indira Gandhi (Charles 
Knexitl writes i. 

The winner is to receive the 
equivalent of £5‘\000 and the 


commission. The buildings are 
expected to cost at least £50 
million. 

The National Arts Centre will 
be built on a 25-aere site on two 
Jvcs of Sir Edwin Lutyens's 
master-plan for Delhi. 


From M. G. G. Pillai 
Kuala Lumpur 

Mr Daim Zainuddin and Mr 
Richard Hu. the Malaysian and 
Singapore Finance Ministers, 
held talks in Singapore \ ester- 
day as Mr Tan Koon Swan, the 
prominent Malaysian business- 
man and politician, pleaded not 
guilty to six charges or criminal 
breach of trust totalling 5.5 
million Singapore dollars i£i.8 
million). 

The charges relate to the 
collapse of Pan Electric Indus- 
tries. a Singapore-based con- 
glomerate with about 90 sub- 
sidiaries and offices in 60 
countries, last December. Mr 
Tan was arrested on Tuesdav. 
while he was attempting 'a 
rescue operation of the 
company. 

Mr Tan was released on 20 
million Singapore dollars bail, 
i the highest ever set by a 
Singapore court, but he cannot 
leave Singapore because his 
passport was impounded. The 
hearing is seL for January 50. 

No details of the talks are 
available but Mr Daim said in a 
statement after meeting Mr Hu 
and Mr Tan that he would 
report to Datuk Seri Mahathir 
Mohamed. the Malaysian 
Prime Minister. 

Mr Tan is President of the 
Malaysian Chinese Association, 
a senior partner of the ruling 
coalition, and the arrest has 
embarrassed Malaysia and 
appears to have’ strained 
relations between the two 
countries. 


Rambo-styleijHE action bank • the action bank • the action bank ■ the action bank • the action bank 


mission to 
Laos failed 

Paris (API - Three .American 
Vietnam war veterans tried 
unsuccessfully last September to 
free an American believed to be 
held in a Laotian labour camp, 
the Paris daily Lc Figaro 
reported yesterday in an inter- 
view with a Frenchman who 
said he took pan in the mission. 

It quoted M Pierre O'Reilly, 
identified as a French business- 
man. aged 43. now living in 
California, as saving he contrib- 
uted $23,000 (£16.000) to the 
private effort. codcnamed 
"Snatch." 

Interviewed during a visit to 
Paris. M O'Reilly told Le 
Figaro the mission was planned 
after the American veterans 
received information from 
unspecified contacts in Thai- 
; land and Laos that a Laotian 
J Army captain would trade an 
American Vic(nam-War era 
prisoner for a sum of money 
and guarantees of safe passage 
out of Laos for himself and his 
family. The informants claimed 
the American was seriously ill. 

But when the three Ameri- 
cans slipped into Laos secretly 
on September 24. the Laotian 
officer demanded $40,000 in- 
stead of the 530,000 the team 
had brought and the deal fell 
throughi. 

M O'Reilly, who said he 
accompanied the team as far as 
Bangkok, added that the Ameri- 
cans relumed to the US where 
they were trying to raise 
additional money for a second 
mission. 

“1 put S23.000 into this affair 
strictly for humanitarian rea- 
sons." the newspaper quoted 
him as saying. "These Vietnam 
veterans are very convinced 
that their comrades are still 
alive and they are wailing to get 
them out of there." 

He identified the ihrec-man 
team as former Marine Sergeant 
Vinnie Amone. aged 39. and 
two other veterans. K.en O’Cou- 
nel and Kevin Hannaford. 

On September 17. the three 
flew from Boston to Paris, 
where M O'Reilly was waiting. 

The four then travelled to 
Bangkok, from where the three- 
man team slipped into Laos by 
boat across the Mekong river 
and made their way with a 
Laotian guide to a village in 
central Laos. 

Reagan’s 
pledge on 
abortion 

From Michael Bin von 
Washington 

President Reagan told the 
annual rally here on Wednesday 
of the anti-abortion "pro-life" 
lobbyists that an alternative to 
abortion had to be found and 
renewed his pledge that no 
government funds would be 
used for abortions in the United 
Stales of abroad. 

Speaking by a radio fink from 
the While House to several 
thousand demonstrators gath- 
ered outside Mr Reagan said he 
was proud to be associate with 
the march. He echoed Mother 
Teresa, who visited him re- 
cently in the White House by 
saying that, abortion was the 
greatest destroyer of peace. To 
cheers and applause he called 
for respect for "the most basic 
of civil rights - the right to life". 
He met the rally's leaders later * 
in the day. ( 

Abortion opponents have : 
been marching and lobbying for I 
1 3 years to end legal abortion in ( 
the’ US, but the Reagan ( 
Administration, though sym- 
pathetic. has carefully avoided ( 
any commitment to seek a ■ 

constitutional amendment - 
overturning the 1973 Supreme J 
Court decision on abortion. His 
message was essentially the 
same as that to a similar rally 
here last year. I 




S . P «ECZ AL 











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i, ■ ■ j-c ACTION BANK 



OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 24 1986 


Zulu-Pondo feud erupts 
again as 30 die 
in Natal tribal battles 


From Michael Hornsby. Johannesburg 


M least 30 deaths »crc 
reponsd in renewed dashes 
>C5lcrday and Wednesday 
between Zulus and Xhosa- 
speaking Pondos in the Um- 
buirrbuln coastal area souih of 
Durban, where more than 60 
people were killed in fighting 
over Christmas. Police expect 
even more bodies will be found. 

Reporters who went to the 
scene said about 500 Pondos 
and l .000 Zulus "ere involved 
in running bailies vriih spears, 
knives, slicks, hatchets, knob- 
kcrrics and primitive home- 
mode guns. 

a police ami-riot squad came 
under attack from Pondo mobs 
"hen it tried to separate the 
warring factions and had to use 
guns and tear gas to control the 
situation. A police spokesman 
said 484 Pondos were arrested 
and would be charged with 
public violence. 

The trouble began on Wed- 
nesday afternoon when a parly 
of Zulus attacked Pondos 
returning home from work in 
Durban as they got oil' the train 
at Isipingo station. One Pondo 
wjs set alight and later died 
from his burns :n hospital. 

Early yesterday, about 500 
Pondos made a retaliatory raid 
into Zulu territory ai Kwamak- 
hutha. but the Zulus were 
expecting them and drove them 
back towards the shanty settle- 
ments at Malagazi and'Umbo- 
Siniwjni. 


As they retreated, the Pondos 
attacked a shop and liquor store 
owned by Mr Roy Mbongwe. a 
member of the legislative 
assembly of the KwaZulu tribal 
homeland, but were driven off 
by Mr Mbongwe's son who 
opened fire on the mob with a 
shotgun. 

The pursuing Zulus eventu- 
ally caught their prey and the 
fighting raged for several hours 
until brought to a slop by 
police. Many Pondos" shacks 
were set on fire - some by 
Pondos themselves be Tore they 
were taken away by police. 

With most of the country 
reserved for the use and 
occupation of the white min- 
ority. there is intense compe- 
tition among blacks for land 
and squatter sites, particularly 
close to industrial areas where 
jobs can be found which arc not 
"available in the poverty-stricken 
tribal homelands. 

In recent years. Pondos. who 
come from the Transkei home- 
land. have migrated northwards 
in large numbers to the 
Umbumbulu area, which lies in 
traditional Zulu territory on the 
edge of new industrial develop- 
ment south of Durban. Zulus 
resent the Pondos as inter- 
lopers. 

Meanwhile. Trans sail police 
nre investigating reports that 
black miners who killed two 
white policemen when thay 
tried to break up a union 


meeting on Tuesday had been 
treated by a sangoma (witch 
doctor) and believed they had 
been given immunity to police 
bullets. 

Small cuts were made on the 
necks, foreheads and other pans 
of the miners' bodies and these 
were then smeared with some 
kind of mini, an African 
medicinal potion, according to 
a spokesman for the mine west 
of Johannesburg where the 
incident occurred. This is said 
to explain why the miners were 
not deterred by shots from the 
two policemen's pistols. 

A total of 250 people have 
been arrested as a result of the 
clash, and 1 1 miners have been 
charged with murder. The two 
policemen, the first white police 
to die in the unrest, will be 
buried with full military 
honours today. 

• CAPE TOWN: A postal 
worker was injured yesterday 
when a suspected letter bomb 
exploded in a mailbag at a 
railway station sorting office 
here (Reuter reports k 

The mailbag was labelled for 
Luanda, capital of neighbouring 
Angola. The station’s chief 
postal inspector told the South 
\frican Press Association that 
after the explosion there were 
thousands of papers floating in 
the air in the postal sorting 
section. The postal worker was 
injured in the leg and taken to 
hospital. 



Zulu warriors standing at the roadside near Kwa Makhuta sooth of Durban during a toll 
in the tribal faction fighting with rival Pondos which has claimed 30 lives. 

Refugees face move from Lesotho 


New York (AFP) - Lesotho's 
new military ruler, Major- 
General Justin Lekhanya. has 
informed the United Nations 
that he plans to send all Sooth 
African refugees in his country 
to "second countries of asy- 
lum”. 

Major-General Lekhanya, in 
a letter to the UN Secretary- 


General. Sehor Javier P6rez de 
Cuellar, said, however, that his 
government would not turn the 
refugees over to South Africa. 

• Minister detained: A former 
Lesotho Cabinet Minister is in 
detention and others are under 
tarying degrees of house arrest, 
according to diplomatic sources 


in Maseru (Michael Hornsby 
writes). 

Otherwise there is little hard 
information about the fate of 
members of the former Govern- 
ment and its Prime Minister, 
Chief Leabua Jonathan. 

The arrested minister is said 
to be Mr Francis Mathokume. 


YOU’ 


GOT UNTIL 


RENAULT 9 AND 11 BROADWAY 


tS*&i 


before February 2nd at prices that 
have more than a hint of 

must come to an end. And on 
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| ABC to go 
ahead with 
‘Amerika’ 
TV series 

From Trevor Fishloclc 
New York 

The US television network 
which shelved its plans to make 
a drama series about America 
under the Russian heel has now 
decided to go itfiead with the 
programme after complaints 
that the network had caved is 
to Russian pressure. 

The series, written but as yet 
unfilmed, will depict a drab 
America ten Y® ars „?J" r , . a 
bloodless coup by the KGB. It is 
called Amerika and is intended 
'as a major ratings-booster for 
the ABC network, which is 
ranked third of the three m. 
terms of viewing figures. 

Amerika was in a list of films, 
with Rambo. Rocky IV and Red 
Da* n. recently criticized by the 
Russians as likely to encourage 
hatred. In the United States,! 
too. the project was described as 
a hinderance to better relations; 
with the Soviet Union. 

Earlier this month ABC said | 
it was postponing the series, | 
chiefly for budgetary reasons. 
But another consideration was a 
warning from the Soviet 
Foreign Minisny that it would 
be ‘'unfortunate" if the relation- 
ship between ABC News in 
Moscow and Russian officials 
were to suffer because of the 
series. 

Although some US news- 
pa pers and other commentators 
expressed relief at the shelving 
or what they thought a foolish 
idea- conservative commen- 
tators were affronted that an 
American network had bowed 
to Russian pressure. 

Thus, the question became 
one not only of budget, but also 
of M standing tali'*. The 12-part 
series will be broadcast next 
year and, says ABC will be 
about freedom and the Ameri- 
can character. 


Marx and 
Party turn 
off China 4 
readers 

From Mary Lee 

Peking 

The mouthpiece of the . 
Chinese Communist Party, the 
People's Daily, is losing ns voice 
through falling simulation, 
according to a newspaper 
survey published in ihe China 
Daih vcsierday. The report said + 
the People's Daily's 19S6 ctreu- * 
; lation (established through 
1 subscriptions registered Iasi 
i December with the Postal 
Bureau, which distributes all 
i publications) stands at 3.6S 
1 million, representing a S.6 per 
icent drop in circulation in a. 

y Car 

3 In fact, the People's Daily has 
lost considerably more readers 
since 1983. when it sold six 
million copies. Diplomats attri- 
bute its declining circulation to 
several factors, including the 
loss of public interest in party 
pronouncements. 

One Chinese intellectual ^ 
commented: "Few individuals, 
buv the Pct'pfc's Daily. Nearly 
all' the subscriptions are taken 
out by work units who must 
have a copy of it in the office. 
Even then, few people read it 
with any interest. No one cares 
about the internal -arty debates 
about Marxism any more.” 

Officially, however, the cause 
of the decline is seen as the 
proliferation of local tabloids 
and other specialist publi- 
cations. Forty such newspapers 
now command a total circu- 
lation of more than seven jfc 
million. The other three 
national party newspapers - the 
Economic Daily, Guangming 
Daily and the Liberation Army 
Dally - have also suffered fall- 
offs. 

Chinese magazines which use 
foreign pin-ups on their covets 
and which deal with lifestyle, 
fashion, furniture, films and 
sports have apparently taken 
away millions of readers from' 
party newspapers. 


Uranus moons clue 
to mystery of rings 


Pasadena, California (AFP) 
- Nasa. technicians were flash- 
ing final .radio instructions, 
which take three hours to 
arrive, to the US space probe 
Voyager 2 yesterday as it 
neared a historic rendezvous 
with Uranus today. 

But Voyager, nearly eight 
years after being launched and 
now nearly two billion miles 
from Earth, was already un- 
locking some of the planet's 
secrets, having reported two 
farther moons; wind and cloud. 

It was the first time an 
atmosphere had been detected 
around Uranus, the seventh 
planet in the solar system and 
third-biggest after Jnpiter and 
Saturn. 

Voyager’s photographs 
showed Uranos like a huge 
blue-green striped billiard balL 
technicians said at NasaVJet 
Propulsion Laboratory. 

Their aim was to manoeuvre 
Voyager into the best position 
to observe Uranos as it slips 
past at more than 40,000 miles 
an hour today, a mere 50,625 
miles away. 

The two new smalt mdons 


Cruise missile 
goes astray 
by 35 miles 

From John Best 
Ottawa 

American and Canadian 
experts yesterday were seeking 
to find the cause of a malfunc- 
tion on a US cruise missile at 
the end of a test flight over 
north-western Canada on 
Wednesday. 

The air-launched missile 
came down 35 miles from 
where it was supposed to land 
after a four-hour flight from 
high over the Canadian Arctic 
to the Canadian forces base at 
Cold Lake. Alberta. ' 

Yesterday, a Canadian-Amc- 
riean team set out to recover it 

It was spotted by a-belicopter 
crew shortly before dusk on 
Wednesday, hours after the 
missile’s^ unplanned landing. 

Captain Yves Genereux. a 
Canadian military spokesman, 
said: “We have no idea of ihe 
extent of the damage."' 

The missile came down five 
minutes earlier than planned as 
it was making a series of 
programmed loops around the 
instrument range to bum off 
excess fuel. Some reports said a 
parachute that was supposed la 
open in the final moments 
faded to deploy, causing the 
unarmed cruise to crash. 


already located by Voyager 
brought its number of discerned 
moons to 14. Five Had already 
been observed by telescope 
from Earth and seven others 
were photographed by Voyager 
in the past few weeks. 

The two “new" ones ap- 
peared to be the first detracted 
or the 18 which astronomers 
suspect operate in pairs, "es- 
corting" and stabilizing by 
gravity Uranus’s nine sur- 
rounding Tings. Uranus may ' 
have op to 30 moons. 1 

But many mysteries re- 
mained to be solved, inlcuding 
what the rings themselves f 
consist of. and what "climate'* 
and atmosphere lie under a i 
heavy enveloping gassy cloud. ' 
it is also unclear if Uranus has 
a magnetic field. 

• Photographs transmitted by 
Voyager 2 hare revealed a 
brownish haze at Its south pole. 
Scientists also reported that 
the pictures showed the fire 
largest moons were distinctly 
different from one another in 
appearance and brightness 
(NYT reports). 

Leading article, page 13 


Anger over free ■ 
Concorde trip ; 
by UN envoys ’ 

From Zoriana Pysariwsky * 
New York 

A group of ambassadors from 
countries serving on the United,) 
Nations Security Council has; 
accepted an invitation for a trip.- 
to Paris and a wine tasting u>ur[ 
in the heart of Burgundy that 
has struck many diplomatic 
observers as a journey too. 
enjoyable to be appropriate. 

M Claude de Keraoularia.ilie 
French Ambassdor to the UN. 
arranged the trip for his. 
colleagues on the Council 
despite the prevailing climate of 
austerity at the UN and the 
ongoing struggle by the Security 
Council for it to be taken 
seriously. 

The permanent represent*- . 
lives of Britain, the US.. 
Trinidad and Tobago, Vene- 
zuela and die Soviet Union 
have declined the invitation: 
but for those willing .M...dc 
Kemoularia has arranged 'tb*‘ 
free flight to Paris, compliments 

of Air France, to commemorate 
the tenth anniversary of Coo* 
cordc, , 

The Security Council da 
Wednesday adjourned debate 
until Monday on a complaint 
by Islamic countries tliat 
Israelis had profaned the Al* . 
Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem. 


Four EEC nations reject 
Danish reform objection 

By Oor Foreign Staff 

rejected *l ave scher - «« reporters after ttib 

X ?f nU 4! d 10 with Mr EUecnan-Jensen tbs* *’ 

7 aft? ssssaa 
35-3? -ftr 9 — hi 

Rotating™ qUaUon «f WjBrip.vaw. v,i 
xr« l. t- * V* . Finally, Greece gave - • 

PariLnSr^K-JJ? Danish ^thumb^down”. MrTbeodtfos 
rauaments objections were Pangalos. the deputy Tor»P t ' 

t ^ se Problems and Minister, told an Athens pfr® 

. inference 

Gc ™ an foreign Minis- achieved important 6bjectt>*S- 
ter, Herr Hans-Dietrich Gen- during - the - negotiates* * 











I 




•ay, Jerusalem 

Ministry officials claim that the 
cuts are endangering- ngtTrmni 
security and that an extra $500 
million is needed just to 
confront present right 

Pensions .and soda] security 
payments take about; -18 per 
'cent,-' with .only 20‘ par' cent- left 
for non-military spending »wvt 7 
per cent earmarked for. invest- 
ment, 

. Cuts imposed include $43 
million from education,' with 


Mrs Corazon Aquino, opposition candidate in die Philippines presidential 
to vice-presidential running mate, Mr Salvador Laurel, with a placard 
nickname, atan election rally in Bataan, Mindanao Island. 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY M 1956 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


/- fv 

' '-t. 

.: 3,r f i 

-2>- 

. 

■i) r 
/■•'£. . 

" frk 
' -.■»«■ * 

i. 


on tough new 


From ton Murray, 


"'.■-* 1 ; 
** ' It* 


!*ri 


Reluctantly but . dutifully 
most Labour members of the 
Knesset have voted for. a first 
reading of another very tough 
budget - for IsraeL It will cut 
government spending m almost 
every' department and win 
almost certainly increase unem- 
ployment. 

Mrs Ora Namir admitted she 
had to grit hcr teeth in order to 
vote for the budget, and me* of 
her colleagues in the House felt 
thdsame.' 

But members generally 
accepted the. argument of Mr 
Yitzak Modal, the Finance 
Minister, that ' continued, aus- 
terity was crucial for the Israeli 
economy.. He said that the 
tough' measures aready in force 
were beginning to create stab- 
ility, but more effort was 
needed before Israelis would 
“be able to live honourably and 
comfortably from their own 
work**. 

One of the few to abstain was 
the Secretary General of- the 
Histadrm Labour Federation, 
Mr Yisrael Kessar, who must 
soon lead national wage nego- 
tiations on -behalf of his 
members. He said 40 per cent of 
the unemployed were in the .18- 
24 age group and the clear 
message of the budget to young 
people ' seeking work after 
finishing national service was: 
“We are healing the economy. 
Dont count on ns to find your a 
job”. 

The lion's share (40 per cent) 
of the $21,600 million budget 
will be needed to pay interest 
and debts incurred before the 
government's austerity pro- 
gramme began IS months ago. 

Defence will continue to lake 
a quarter, though extensive 
pruning in military spending 
has been carried out Defence 


cuts 


parents being mack to- pay $60 
in an annual Tevyfor each of the 
first two schoolchildren in a 
family. Another $65 mfliinn is 
being slashed from, the national 
insurance budget, $23 million 
from health services and $8 
million in other welfare depart- 
ments. 

Some sayings win come from 
making anbther 4,000 'public 
servants redundant, in -addition 
to the 14,000 laid off over the 
past 18 months. . 

The Finance Ministry esti- 
mates that with this budget foe 
economy should grow by a 
modest 2.4 per cent this year 
after declining 5 per cent last 
year. This small growth will not 
stop a further increase in 
unemployment, -which averaged 
6-5 per cent last year, to about 
7.4 percent 

Israel’s total revenue wfil still 
fan well short of needed 
spending. Only substantial 
American aid can make foe 
books balance. 

Since American economic aid 
worldwide is now being cut by 
4.3 per cent Israel has just had 
to hand bade $51 million of foe 
$1,200 million it received last 
October, or 43 per cent of its 
receipts from foe US. On its 
own Israel receives one-third of 
all American economic aid. 
lradingartide^ page 13 


nioonsck 

1 r v of ripe Italy asks the world to 
8 help catch Abu Nidal 


, - : = 0«b 
• X1‘ 

. i- 


The public prosecutor here 
issued an international arrest 
warrant yesterday for Abu 
Nidal, . leader . of. Palestine 
Liberation Organization splin- 
ter group, on a charge of causing 
a massacre, is foe Rome airport 
attack of December 27 in which 
14 people died (John Earle. 
wriies)L. . ... . ‘ .. .. ... . r. 

The warrant was signed by 
Signor Domenico Sica, the 
investigating magistrate, who 
has interrogated the sole sur- 
vivor of the four Palestinian 
gunmen.' 

Palestinian guerrilla acts and 
Libya's suspected support for 
them were, discussed at a 
meeting of foe inner Cabinet. 


Signor, Bettino Craxi, foe Prime 
Minister, reported on talks he 
had in Palermo- on Tuesday 
with the Maltese Prime Minis- 
ter, Dr Cannelo .Mifsud Bonni- 
ci, who had recently seen foe 
Libyan leader. Colonel Gadaffi, 
in Tripoli. 

Mifsud Bonnici is said to have 
put foward a three-point Mal- 
tese proposal for reducing 
tension in foe Mediterranean. 
States would pledge not to give 
any support or cover to terrorist 

S oups; would not use military 
rce against other states in foe 
region; and would not allow 
existing military bases to be 
used against other states in the 
region. 




All-out war 
threat 
in Uganda 

From Charles Harrison 
Nairobi . 

The sound of gunfir e again 
echoed in Kampala yesterday as 
fighting - continued between 
units of foe Uganda Army and 
guerrillas of the National 
Resistance Army (NRA). 

The two sides signed a peace 
agreement here more than a 
month ago, but no effective 
moves have been made to 
implement it, and the Ugandan 
Foreign Minister, Mr Ohtra 
Otunnu, told a press conference 
here yesterday that foe NRA 
leaders , were talking of aH-oul 
war. 

Mr Otunnu -said fighting had 
been going bn south and south- 
west of Kampala since January 
17, and was still continuing. 
There had been casualties on 
both sides. 

The Army in Kampala has 
been trying to control hundreds 
of troops who rampaged 
through' the city looting and 
stealing cars, apparently out of 
control, after being withdrawn 
from defensive positions a few 
miles away. 

The surge of troops caused 
panic; and Kampala was vir- 
tually deserted on Wednesday. 
Later, military police toured foe 
city rounding up troops . 

The Ugandan, head of state,-] 
General • Tito OkeBo. also 
toured Kampala, and addressed 
a rally yesterday. Idling people 
to remain calm. -. . 

The British high com- 
missioner, Mr Colin McLean, 
said no Britons had been hart in 
foe fighting. Brrt there were 
some Ugandan civilian casu- 
alties. 

The NRA says, its attacks are 
intended to bring under control 
foe Government troops who 
have been killing - and harassing 
civilians. But Mr Otunnu said 
this was no reason for foiling to 
implement foe peace agree- 
ment. 


Hong Kong 
rounds 
on Renton 

From David Bona via 
Hong Kong 

Mr Timothy Renton, Minis- 
ter of State at the Foreign 
Office, with responsibility for 
Hong Kong, arrived here 
yesterday to face the threat of a 
motion of erasure against the 
British Government over 
nationality questions. . 

He has also been criticized 
for his recent statement, in 
Peking rhat Britain and China 
must seek a form of “conver- 
gence” over the institution of 
new political means of govern- 
ing the territory. . 

Unofficial members of the 
legislative council said they 
would “denounce” Britain’s 
refusal to grant special 
nationality papers to about 
10,000 numbers of ethnic 
minorities and framer pris- 
oners-of-war who fear their 
descendants may become state- 
less after sovereignty reverts to 
China in 1997. 

It is .widely felt here that Mr 
Renton's comments in Peking 
left the British-dominated 
Hong Kong Government in foe 
position of a lame duck. 

It is not yet known whether 
the elections to a regional 
council in Hong Kong will be 
cancelled because of P eking 's 
strong opposition to farther 
democratization of the legis- 
lature- 

china wants Britain to stop 
allowing Hong Kong to draw up 
its own internal organs of self- 
government for Sts future status 
as a “special ad minis trative 
region” of foe People's Repub- 
lic, with its own economic and 
legal systems.. 

Peking is- in foe process of 
drafting a "basic law” or mini- 
co institution, whose provisions 
could dash with the new, quasi- 
democratic st ructure . being 
p ushed by foe local govern- 
ment, until now with Britain’s 
support. 


Prices strike hits Bolivia 


La Poz (Reuter) - Bolivian 

workers staged a general strike 
yesterday against foe Govern- 
ment’s economic policies only 
hours after President Paz 
Estenssoro bad swam in a new 
Cabinet committed to control- 
ling inflation. 

The 24-hour strike dosed 
factories and 'mines and dis- 
rupted rail services,' but'shops 
in La Paz remained open and 
public transport in the city was 
largely 


The protest . came after a 
sharp rise in prices over foe past 
two months, ending a period of] 
relative price stability after 
tough austerity measures intro- 
duced last August. 

President Paz reshuffled his 
Cabinet to breathe new life into 
his anti-inflation drive, appoint- 
ing foe Seriate President, Scalar 
Gonzalo Sflnchez de Lazada to 
the post of JPtoming- Minister, 
■head of the . Government’s 
economic t«un.-- 


election. and 
bearing her 


Marcos defends his war record 


Manila (Reuter) - President 
Marcos, commenting on foreign 
press reports that hsi Second 
World War military record 
claims are false, yesterday 
invited war veterans to answer 
for him. 

Mr Marcos, campaigning in 
foe Manila shanty town district 
of Tondo, told a crowd 
estimated by reporters at' 


40.000: “Our opponents said 
that Marcos was not a true 
guerrilla, that he was not in the 
thick of ‘the fight. The (war) 
veterans should answer that 
accusation.” 

Teh New York Times re- 
ported yesterday that US Army 
records discovered last year say 
there is no basis for Mr 
Marcos's claims that he was a 


guerrilla leader during foe 
Japanese occupation of the 
Philippines. 

President Marcos, who is 68. 
has emphasized his war record 
in almost every rally he has held 
in campaigning for re-election 
on February 7. 

President Marcos has 27 
Second World War medals. 


Tamils urged to free 
British woman 
suspected of spying 


From Vyitha Yapa, Colombo 


The British High Com- 
mission in Colombo has ap- 
pealed to a Tamil guerrilla 
group to release foe kidnapped 
Briton Mrs Penelope Willis, 
aged 64. She was seized by the 
Eelam Revolutionary Organiza- 
tion 0 f Students (Eros) last 
Friday from Mulialtivu in 
north-eastern Sri anka. 

. The guerrillas, in a statement 
issued from the South Indian 
Ctiy of Madras!) a ve claimed 
they, are holding her on 
suspicion that she was a spy. 

Independent sources said that 
foe guerrillas became suspicious 
after sne arrived in Muflattivu 
in a hired self-drive car. Foreign 
journalists are not allowed to 
visit the northern and eastern 
provinces and are turned back 
at security checkpoints. Mrs 
Willis, however, is said to have 
carried a written authority from 
a military officer which enabled 
her to move freely. 

This is foe third visit to Sri 
Lanka by Mrs Willis, who was 
in Jaffna in northern Sri Lanka 
last October. She is said to have 
written articles in journals 
covering international affairs 
under the pen name of Tre- 
nt ayne. 

A British spokesman said: 
“her interest in visiting the 
north of Sri Lanka was to 
ensure that she obtained a 
balanced picture of the inter- 
com mu nal problem including 
the views of the separatist 
[groups, in order to give 
authenticity to articles that she 
hoped to write on Sri Lanka.” 


He said Mrs Willis was 
unharmed. 

• Family fears: Members of 
Mrs Willis's family in Cornwall 
are waiting anxiously for news 
of her. Mrs Wtilis is from a well- 
known Cornish family. Her 
father was the late Air Marshal 
Sir John Tremayne. 

She lives with her husband 
Harold in the small village of 
Sladcsbridge, near Wadebridge 
in north Cornwall. They have a 
grown-up son and daughter. 

Her sisLer, Miss Damari sk 
T remayne, said yesterday: 
“Naturally we are very con- 
cerned. She's not strong and 
she's on some medication or 
other.’’ 

Meanwhile, Mr Willis is 
staving in London with friends 
while he waits for news from 
the Foreign Office. 

• Aircraft hit: An Army 
aircraft carrying troops return- 
ing from leave and a helicopter 
involved in an attack against 
Tamil guerrillas were fired at 
yesterday in the Jaffna district. 
One passenger in foe plane and 
a soldier in the helicopter were 
injured. 

Meanwhile, in Colombo, foe 
Sri Lanka Parliament voted by 
125 to I to extend the state of 
emergency on the island. The 
Communist Party's Moscow 
wing voted against while, Mrs 
Sirima Bandaranaike's Sri 
Lanka Freedom Party and foe 
socialist Mahajana Eksafo Pera- 
muna abstained 


Fiat may 
face action 
over press 
monopoly 

From John Earle 
Rome 

The AgaeEDe family's Fiat 
group faces possible legal 
action for allegedly violating 
Italy's anti-monopoly press law 
which prohibits ownership of 
newspapers with more than 20 
per cent of national circulation. 

For years Fiat has owned La 
Stampa of Turin, the second 
widest read newspaper after 
Convert: delta Sara of Milan. 
Signor Mario Sinopoli, a 
university professor who is an 
independent watchdog of the 
anti-monopoly law, has told a 
parliamentary commission th«f 
in recent weeks Fiat has built 
up a position of effective 
control over the Rizzo li pub- 
lishing house, which owns the 
Corriere. He has therefore 
submitted the matter to the 
Milan court fra- investigation. 

Rizzo li, which used to be 
under the influence of foe P2 
secret masonic lodge, was 
rescued by Gemma, a bolding 
company in which Fiat is foe 
dominant shareholder with 32 
per cent of the equity. Gemma 
used to have a minority holding 
in Rizzole but, Professor 
Sinopoli said, it increased it 
last December to 52 per cent. 
Hence bis allegation ttiar Fiat, 
in fact, controls foe Corriere. 

He backed his argument by 
pointing to certain management 
changes. Signor Cesare RomitL, 
foe managing-director of Fiat, 
has also become chairman of 
Gemma. 


t’s not 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 



A stormy election 
in earnest this week’ with the 
reium of Congress and the 
beginning of arguments over the 
budget, defence and foreign 
policy which will grow more 
heated as the mid-term con- 
gressional elections loom. 

The intractable budget u-ill be 
the focus for the sharpest 
conflicts between parties and 
between Congress and the 
White House. President Rea- 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 
car starts Congress adjourned on Dccem- Republican Party for a tax rise 
amid a flurry of 


ber 30 amid a 
compromises which enabled the 
tax legislation to pass ihc House 
of Representatives. 

Ycsierday the President 
began a series of small breakfast 
meetings with Republican sena- 
tors. Mr Caspar Weinberger, the 
Defence Secretary. look part to 
bolster the White House 
attempt to protect defence from 
budget cuts. To achieve the S6Q 


up the revenue 


pan's determination to increase -million cut this year in overall 
the defence budget by 3 per cent spending. Congress wants to cut 


in real terms will come under 
mounting pressure, as Congress 


grapples "with the need to slash 
federal spending before the 
automatic cuts mandated by the 
Gramm-Rudman legislation 
come into effect. 

Congress, however, will insist 
ihat the Pentagon accept its 
share of the massive reductions 
in domestic spending needed to 
balance the budget bj l 00 1. 
Battle lines have been drawn, 
with Mr Les Aspin. chairman of 
the House armed services 
committee, predicting that de- 
fence spending will decline by 
20 per cent in J9S7 and the 
President refusing to accept any 
reductions in funds for his 
controversial Strategic Defence 
Initiative. 

Mr Reagan will also insit that 
a reluctant Senate take up as a 
priority his_ cherished tax 
reform bill. 1 o press the point, 
he met Republican leaders on 


£30 million each from defence 
and domestic spending and 
raise taxes by £30 million, but 
Mr Reagan strongly opposes the 
plan. 

Senate hearings on the Bill will 
begin next Wednesday and 
Senator Robert Dole, the 
Republican majority leader, 
predicted a long, hot summer 
unless there was bipartisan 
support for the measure. 

Relations between the W hite 
House and congressional Re- 
publicans are poor and not 
likely to improve. About 32 
Republican senators arc up for 
election in November and 
many will try to distance 
themselves from Mr Reagan's 
increasingly unpopular policies 
on domestic cuts, agriculture 
and the defence build-up. 

As the devastating impact of 
cuts in those domestic pro- 
grammes not protected becomes 
clearer, calls arc increasingly 


‘uesday for the first time since going to be heard within the 


to make 
shortfall. 

Foreign policy also promises 
sharp controversy. Mr Reagan 
will * try again to persuade 
Congress to vote military aid, 
possibly as much as SlOQ 
million (£70 million), to the 
Nicaraguan Contras, but faces 
strong opposition. Congress 
seems equally opposed 10 the 
proposed arms sale to Saudi 
Arabia and Jordan, which the 
Administration sees as vital to 
retain King Husain's support 
for its Middle East peace 
initiative. 

There will be lively debates 
on whether and how the US 
should aid Unila guerrillas in 
Angola, on what further sanc- 
tions might be invoked against 
South Africa and on the 
gathering economic and politi- 
cal crisis in the Philippines. 
w ith the budget axe falling 
heavily on foreign aid. there will 
also be controversy on the 
reduction of US peacekeeping 
farces and contributions to 
international agencies. 

The White House is likely to 
find more support for its 
policies to fight terrorism and in 
the search for an arms agree- 
ment at Geneva. The adminis- 
iralion. how e' er, will probably 
urge Congress to repeal a ban on 
anti-satellite weapons testing. 

Scepticism about the Presi- 
dent's SD1 may harden into 
concerted opposition. 





Explosion 
in airline 
office at 
Peshawar 


* 




r. A 




Haryana farmers protesting against the loss or the state capital* Chandigarh, to neighbouring Punjab 

Three die as Chandigarh protests hit Haryana 


Delhi - Police had to open 
fire in at least three places 
yesterday to disperse mobs as 
they built barricades and 
disrupted traffic in the Hindi- 
speaking state of Haryana in 


protest against Delhi’s decision 
to transfer the city of Chandi- 
garh to Punjab (Our Corres- 
pondent writes). 

The city, joint capital of 
Punjab and Haryana, will be 


handed over to Punjab on 
Sunday. 

The agitation in Haryana is 
being led by all the opposition 
parties. 

Latest reports indicate that 




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three people were killed and at] 
least 14 injured in yesterday's 
violence in Haryana. A police 
van and six railway carriages 
were set on fire during the 
agitation. 


Bangladeshi 
puts faith 
in blood test 


By Peter Evans 
Home Affairs Correspondent 


Bangladesh has rejected a 
British proposal for blood tests 
known as DNA finger-printing, 
to be used on dependants of, 
immigrants in Britain of Ban- 
gladesh origin who apply for 
entry certificates. 

But the father of a 10-year- 
old girl in Bangladesh said 
yesterday that he thought the 
test would help to get her into 
Britain to join him. his wife and 
three sons. 

Mr Faruq Choudbury, the 
Bangladesh Foreign Minister, 
said on Tuesday that the test, 
which is based on the matching 
of genetic numbers between 
parents and their children, is 
“unreliable and humiliating.” 
He said the test was an invasion 
of privacy. 

But Mr Abdul Saiam, of 
Forest Gate. London, said 
yesterday that he did not think 
such a test on • his daughter 
would be an invasion of 
privacy. “I don’t want to waste 
any more time; that is why I 
would like the blood test" 

His daughter, Shefe Begum, 
was refused entiy to Britain in 
Dhaka in November 1984. The 
appeal hearing has been fixed 
for February 19. 

Mr Saiam, who has been in 
Britain since 1966, said that 
some people might, however, be 
angry about the test because 
they would feel their word was 
being doubted. 

The British High Com- 
mission in Dhaka had planned 
to introduce the test on a 
voluntary basis from April. The 
Foreign Office said yesterday 
that it would be talking to the 
Bangladeshi Government in an 
attempt to persuade it that the 
whole idea was to speed up 
entry clearance. Immigrant 
groups in Britain had wanted 
the Foreign Office to look at the 
idea. 

British immigration officials 
said that the test would speed 
up the processing of about 
12,000 pending applications 
because authenticity could be 
quickly verified. 


Peshawar / Reuter) 
powerful bomb at a Pakistan 
International Airlines office 
here killed at least three people^, 
including a senior government, 
official, and wounded 29 others. " 
police said. , , 

The aiiack was the latest m a..,* 
bombing campaign which has.; 
hit Pakistan’s North-West Fron-.y 
tier Province bordering Afghan-: - 
istan in the past few weeks. ,5 


$o c 

si# 




Deadlock over 
Albanian family: 


Rome - Negotiations hay£ ’ 
run into deadlock over the 
future of six .Albanian brothers 
and sisters who eluded security, 
guards and entered the Italian 
Embassy in Tirana on Decern- 
ber 12 to seek political asylum! 
(John Earle writes). . j 

The father of the Four men .' ' 
and two women, aged between/. 
44 and 60. was a chemist fronfr. 
Durazzo who collaborated wirin'; ' 
the Nazis and Fascists during- ' 
the Second World War. The su 
said they will commit suicide if'" 
handed back. 


Journalist fined 


Kuala Lumpur (AFP) - A " 
Malaysian journalist on the' .' 
;Vew Straits Times. Sabry/ • 
SharifL was sentenced to pay a - d, 
7,000 Malaysian dollar (£2.070)7* 
fine or spend one year in jail for ' •• 
violating the Official Secrets 1 ' 
Act He had received a secret' 
military document on the' 
purchase of airborne warning*- . 1 ' 
planes. 


Drugs swoop 


Verona (Reuter) - Sixty-six 
people have been arrested and* • 
charged with selling large- 
amounts of cocaine and heroin 
in Italy’s northern Veneio-. 
region. The round-up came, 
after the discovery of a ring’. , 
smuggling drugs from Colombia-., 
via London and Paris. 


Quito raid 


t.' 


Quito (AFP) - A previously" 
unknown left-wing guerilla- - 
group took over briefly the ■- 
Ecuador independence monu- 
ment in a night raid near here, ’’ 
disarmed four guards and. made 
off with nineteenth century'- ■ 
weapons from a museum. 


Modena blast 

Modi 
people 
explosii 


Modena (Reuter) - Seven-- 
were killed when an 
explosion ripped through a 
three-storey apartment building 
on the outskirts of this north-) 
Italian city of Modena. First" f 
reports blamed the blast on aD .« 
liquid gas container. 


Ship disaster 


Zamboanga, Philippines 
(Reuter) - Fifty people were*" 
reported missing after a cargo 
ship carrying 69 passengers and ; * 
crew sank in heavy seas off * 1 
Sibutu island in the Southern' 
Philippines. The survivors were - " ^ 
picked up by two fishing boats. ' “ 


Border incident 


Lira, Austria (Reuter) - An.. . 
Austrian former was detained,. , 
by Czechoslovak border guards - . 
while feeding deer near the..,/ 
frontier, taken to Czechoslovak r . 
territory and held for nearly - 
seven hours before being re--,.... 
leased. n- 


fev 

mi:: 


4_- 


Rained off 


Nuremburg (AP) - Rain arid^- 
mud have forced Nato to 1 end *“2 
the Alliance’s h inter,. » 
manoeuvres today, a w vck?4 
ahead of schedule, the US Aimy/J 
said it did not want to damage - 
the countryside. ' 

— — - ■ — — 

' 4 



Germans intrigued by 
jet-set banker’s trial : 






From Frank Johnson 
Bonn 

The career of Ferdinand 
Graf von Galen — who may.be 
unknown to the rest of the 
world, but whom the West 
German newspaper and maga- 
zine public know to be their 
country's only colourful banker 
- reached a climax yesterday. 

He went on trial in Frankfurt 
accused of a hugely conipli- . .„... ., 
rated fraud. How he came by & *■ 

his money has aroused hardly . 

any interest What he did with 
it is vrhat has made him a 
celebrity in a nation with few 
celebrities and whose gossip 
columns are dependent on 
foreign imports from Britain, 

France and the United States. 

Bankers in the Federal 
Repub lic enjoy the some 
prestige as field marshals, 
historians and composers in 
previous Germanies. The Deut- 
sche Bank is popularly as- 
sumed to run the country. But, 
in their horned -rimmed spec- 
tacles and dark suits, they are 
men of relentless discretion. 

Graf von Galen, aged 50, set 
oat ti) attract the attention paid 
to rich men the world over. 

This he achieved by the usual 
means: marrying a “glamorous 

heiress*, having Dr Henry 
Kcsslnger to dinner and charg- 
ing about in a private j«. 

“Let's saddle up the bird”, 
he apparently used to savwhen 
he felt like having a ride' In the 
jet. In alt tiuvGrnf vou Galen 
was helped by being 6ft 6in and 
always described as elegant 





Graf von Galen: colourful 
and elegant aristocrat 


He was quoted as saying that® 
the problem with the Gena* 0 * 
economy was that is was not 
jolly enough. His efforts to 
remedy that ended In December 
1984 when police stopped hi® 
in the street In Frankfurt a nu-i 
handcuffed him. , . A 

Graf von Galen was head ® . 
Schroeder. Mnewhmeyff’ . 
Hengst and Company. Sod* * j 
bank sounds imposing enow *- : 
In 1982, the Graf was head «[ ■ 
Frankfurt stock exchange. Bov 
his bank kept' on teadmg 
money to. a dubious bdUiflU-L 
company which later coUapaw* 3 
This allegedly hroke ge*. 
German law against lendings- 
much to- a single client yBPjU 
the law, a defendant . 
required to . plead. Bat. G*Nr-$5 
Galen will be denying • 
charges. 
















p esL at r 


Cinema 


, J0,r 'ck ( 

:i ^an fi 


§ shadow 

■ ~ $ "'i one of the striking facts about 
• the lastcentury iSthe. apparent 
StVf. - unconcern, with, which our 

f '<v . ^m ediate ancestors ignored — 

• •H-.jiSitnost literally stepped over - 
‘c*; -*5w poor and the starving who 

• cluttered the streets-of London. 
That was perhaps why Red 

lf .j. Herrings (BBC2) began with 
ftviL. some suitably bleak : pictures 
•in r ^ fro m House before 

411 [qh-j concentrating 1 upon more con- 
‘4Q| temporary." scenes - scenes 
' ' which contained a poverty and 
• H . a squalor which we ignore just 
-‘-jV*. as easily as the mid-Victorians. 

•- -;.d. T^ e docume n tary was sub- 
• • Another Country, and in a 

' . A serise that is ; quite appropriate: 
it 'was .concerned with the 

• *'k homelesy young, some of them 
. v oot much. older than Dickens's 

;,/^atcas«i -and most of them 
7-L' - living ip conditions which 
• - ms* 4 * those of Dickens's 

hovels. It is 'almost as if the 
: ■i'; 1 / poor labour under a curse, an 
\ urban horror .which continues 
^ from generation to generation. 
Certain things have 
however the new outcasts are 


i., nuwcvGj- usw wica&is are 

‘* i Hyljct- , more articulate and perhaps 
31 UfljJ more . aggrieved, since , the 
combination of economic de- 
. .. tr] ■ riine andfeiled “welfarism" has 
: ^ ;: f created a discontented client 
•• % class. 

“Jjfc -.vTbe fact that the problems of 
'^'liverty 'admit of no easy 
Ki solution generally m eans that 
* sa they are considered to be 
~7 J 1 3- somehow “permanent”, which 
-.1 ? in turn means that they can be 

: ^ forgotten or ignored. The point 
of programmes such, as Red 
Herrings is that it makes it 
•: Li> \Uftfin necessary to look at the despair 
-'U}) which is being bred on the 

- . streets; we can only understand 
. our society by looking at the 

* shadow which it casts. - 

• Forty Minutes (BBC2) also 

- - began witha Victorian scene, as 

' . - 1 something 'frightful happened to 

a white bride,. but Stop the 

- - --w Wedding! 1 soon reverted to the 
. : : ^ronlemparary world with 

,.lccounts of broken or discarded 
. t weddings. They were presented 
ralil 88 novdeltisih tales, and would 
no doubt have' appealed to 

• ' t ; those who like their gossip 

spiced with suspense. None of 
the women involved seemed to 
■; mind talking about wbat must 
:r: have been, at the time, horrible 
or at least embarrassing situ- 
■■ c ations: so perhaps the television 
viewer, in turn, should not 
mind being entertained by 
them. 

, r Dias Peter Ackrbytf 


Dre^child(PG) 

Ctirzon -V. 

Rocky TV(PG) 

Leicester Square Theatre ; - 

Teen: Wolf (PG) i 

Plaza; Carmon Oxford Street 

Death in a French Garden 
( 18 ) • 

Chelsea Cinema T -;' ~. 

Pte mi e hM revives . belief in the 
mirage-like British film renascence. 
Hereis a film that does' not attempt to 
compete with America iii scale or 
subject, but puts its trust in originality, 
imagination, skill and inventive exploi- 
tation of its limited financial resources. - 
Dennis. Potter’s screenplay £s a series of 
inventions around a true incident: In 
1 932- Mrs Alice Hargreaves, an 80-year- -■ 
old Eng l i sh widow, visited America to 
receive an honorary' degree in com- 
memoration of Lewis Carroll's centen- 
ary and in homage to her own curious 
contribution to En glish literature. 
Seventy years before, as 10-year-old 
Alice Liddell, she had been the 
inspiration for Cairo iTs Alice. 

Mis Hargreaves (Coral Browne) is a 
dragon of an uniquely English breed, 
bullying her put-upon young com- 
panion (Nicola Cowperj, charitably 
rescued from .an orphanage, and giving 
die uppity Yankees a few sharp lessons 
in good manners. Another sure mark of 
English gentility, nicely observed by 
Potter's script, is her confidence that it 
is ill-bred to - scorn hard cash: Mrs 
Hargreaves (justas her real-life original 
appears to have done) enters with a will 
into the commercial exploitation of her 
celebrity. In this she is assisted by a 
charming, mercenary yonng reporter' 
(Peter Gallagher); and this character... 
and his romantic involvement with the 
companion, though the structural 
utility is evident, is the least convincing 
and satisfying part of the scenario. 

Any demerits are heavily and 
happily outweighed. The centre of the 
film is the portrait of the real, 
vulnerable old lady hidden behind the 
defences of. veil, stiff back and sharp 
tongue. Conscious that death is not &r 
away (the real Mrs Hargreaves died a. 
few months after the visit), she is' 
obliged to take stock, to look back over 
a lifetime, past a war and its 
bereavements, to events she had tried 
to expunge from her memory. Gavin 
Millar's film moves smoothly from 
New York in the -Thirties to the Oxford 
summers of the 1 860$; and the ghosts 


heavily and happily outweighed 


Dance 


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sr -v 7fc ’ 

V . • r/ „ 

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C-'Xw ■><■&#**?*' 


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Passion, peril, innocence: Ian Holm and Amelia Shankley in Dreamchitd 


of the Revd Dodgson, the March Hare, 
the Mad Hatter and the Dormouse 
invade Alice's suite in the Waldorf- 
Astoria as easily as they did the 
imagination of the Dean’s little 
daughter. 

.Mrs Hargreaves is not unaware of 
sexual realities (“Arc you a homo- 
sexual?" she forthrightly askes the 
young reporter suspiciously) and it is 
with awareness as well as a mixture of 
anxiety and regret that she recalls 
Dodgson' s .attachment to her. The 
scenes between Dodgson and the child 
Alice are acutely played by Ian Holm 
and Amelia Shankley to. intimate all the 
passion, the peril and the touching 
innocence of the relationship. 

Coral Browne’s realization of Mrs 
Hargreaves is a formidable tragi -comic 
performace, touching moments of real 
nightmare in the aged Alice's confron- 
tation with a mouldy and malevolent 
Hatter's tea party, and rising, to: a 
triumphant resolution of self-know- 
ledge in her final acceptance speed. 

This extraordinarily satisfying film, 
was made with .resources that did not 
permit location filming in the United 
States. Liverpool stood in for the New 
York docks, and the city was re-created 
in various-otbeirr^jiiaLaOMtions. Y et 
even the handicaps are- turned to 


advantage: somehow; this slightly 
patched and makeshift New York 
seems to approximate to the image of a 
stern old lady of half a century ago far 
better than anything contemporary. 
America could provide. 

How different from the home life of 
Sylvester Stallone. He has created not 
one -but two of the most potent folk- 
heroes of the age. Rocky and Ram bo. 
No doubt if he wished he could be the 
next President of the United States. 
Indeed, given Ram bo’s worldwide 
following, why stop at that? Such 
thinking seems to be behind Stallone’s 
reflections on international relations in 
Rocky IV. 

Essentially the plot of Stallone’s own 
screenplay is the same as in Rocky L H, 
and 1IL viz., there is this big, nasty guy, 
but Rocky whops him just the same. 
Here there is the added sophistication 
of politics and patriotism. The op- 
ponent is Russian; and the honour of 
America itself is at stake. As in Rambo 
First Blood Part II, Stallone loyally 
confirms the general mass of ignorant 
fear and prejudice: the Soviet fighter 
has the advantage of the most costly 
and advanced technological training, as 
well as steroids and' plain cheating. 
Honest Americans are up against 
Machiavellian Commie politicking. 


Concerts 


Theatre 


. ; philharmonic/ / 

7 Tombard 

Festival Hall/Radio 3 

The music of “Les Grands 
. _ Maitres Francais” is on the 
_ . “menu of five Royal Philhar- 
v ;monic Society concerts this 
• 7'7- spring. That, at least, is what 
• -“ they tell us. In 'fact, the main 
v "_work in this opening concert 
■■".was the Symphony. in D minor 
' " y by Cesar Franck, whose claims 
to greatness and, indeed, 
Frenchness .have been 'wetl 
. j j debated by posterity. 
r mCiUCh The symphony is worth an 
occasional airing, if only to 
j: confirm the worst fears of those 
. ' . ^repulsed by rampant chroma ti- 
. ' 7 - cism, lurid instrumental colour- 
ing. interminable chains of 
' ! sequences and earnest but all- 
^ to-obvious “cyclic form”. For 
' Franck at his best, when he 
sends half the orchestra, chasing 
the other half in extravagantly 
jV prolonged canon, or piles up. a 


weighty climax with ponderous 
but impressive calculation, still 
makes any- half-sympathetic 
spine tingle. 

But grand old Romantic 
warhorses need careful groom- 
ing. In this performance Alain 
Lombard seemed content withTT 
rather casual ensemble and the 
addition of one or two extra 
garnishes of sentimentality to a 
score that has enough already. 
His recumbent attitude to the 
opening Lento, where nearly 
every barline signalled an 
immense rubato and every 
crotchet rest became a prayerful 
pause, was a case in point. 
Matters were not helped here by 
some indecision in the' lower 
strings about whether the 
Lenio’s reprise should be in F 
major or minor. 

The Allegro was better paced 
and the recapitulation, where 
Franck gives his main theme a 
thunderous bass echo, was 
properly ablaze with passion; 
but both here and in the finale 
Lomb ar d sbould surely have 


kept a tighter rein on those 
ubiquitous iambic rhythms. 
More successful was the middle 
movement where Jane 'Marshall 
brought a full-bodied tone to 
the cor anglais solo, and the 
strings were suitably silky in the 
curling scherzo passages. 

It was a busy -evening for 
Miss Marshall because the 
opening work, Berlioz’s over- 
ture Le Camaval remain, also 
displayed her soloistic prowess. 
Here Lombard was far happier, 
coaxing the Philharmonia 
strings to play with wiry 
brilliance, whittling away the 
middle textures, and letting the 
percussion department and 
Beriioz's pungent, rhythmic 
verve do the rest 

Ravel’s suite Xc Tom beau de 
Couperin fluttered - along .in 
relaxed and fairly winsome 
manner too, but it was Pou- 
lenc's Concerto for Two Pianos 
and Orchestra which' claimed 
most attention . among - this 
motley Gallic crew. Given 
idiomatic, punchy -and well. 


Netriono* Op« ra 


^ EngU** 1 *3-7^7 wro 


v ,AGNER'*"p!l!!!^^^a 


G*tindi>des 
:■ -:;**£**« 
Guardian 


Of 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

.Major' . 

DISPOSAL AUCTION 

of several hundred exceptionally 
fine and meefium quality, handmade 

PERSIAN CARPETS 

rugs and runners... 

and ethers from the inhere important weaving centres of line East, included are many 
antiques, silks, kefims. nomadtes and other unusual hams, not generally to be 
foundpn the home market 

This merchaicfiae istf»e property of a number of princ^Mfdrect importers in the U.IC, 
which has been cleared from H.M. Custams&Exrisebond, to be efisposed cfat nominal or 
ro reserve for immedate cash reafisafion. 

Every iten guaranteed euthertic. Expert advice auaiteble at time of^ viewing. 

To be transferred from bonded warehouseeand offered at the: 

HILTON INTERNATIONAL HOTEL, KENSINGTON, 
HOLLAND PARK AVENUE, LONDON W11, 

ON SUNDAY, 26th JANUARY at 3pm. 

Viewing from noon same day. - 

Payfnent cash, chequeoraB nig^cretSt cards. 

AuaorwwsAVfefcstey Brecoe & Pbitnerslld;, t44fl461Mew Bond Street London W.l. Tel- 014S34S7a^ 


synchronized treatment by 
Jean-Philippe Collard and Fran- 
cois- Rene Dnchable the work 
emerged as an ebullient . if 
slightly quixotic kaleidoscope of 
disparate inspirations. 

Richard Morrison 

LMP/GIover i 

Queen Elizabeth Hall 

The BBC, so the programme 
informed us, was recording this 
concert for future transmission. 
I anticipate tfyat only the early 
birds among ns will catch it on 
the radio, for the sole feature 
uniting the works which the 
strings of the London Mozart 
Players gave us was that all were 
eminently undemanding, if 
attractive. Just the sort of 
material deemed acceptable on 
the air before breakfast, in fact 
. A curious mixture it. was, too, 
though everything was per- 
formed confidently and compe- 
tently. The articulation was 
neat, the sound good and firm, 
while the occasional purple 
passage hinted that, perhaps 
more rehearsal time than, usual 
had been devoted to the music, 
hone of which was as straight- 
forward to play as to listen to, of 
course. 

The most immediately entic- 
ing prospects were two neo- 
classical works, Stravinsky's 
bare-textuxed postwar Concerto 
in D and Albert RousseFs 
Smfonietta. Op 52, of 1934. 
Stylistically they -share quite a 
Ion a considerable debt to the 
diatonic system,' for one thing, 
and in their outer movements a 
rhythmic impetus set in motion 
by the conflict -of regular pulse 
■ with . irregular - stress, .for an- 
other. But the Roussel seemed 
to me the stronger piece here. 

Where. Stravinsky concerns 
himself perhapstoo much, with 
-artifices like the blatant perfect 
cadences in the central Arioso 
and, indeed, the wilful remote- 
ness of that" whole movement. 
Roussel's writing is disarmingly 
direct as well as appealingly 
original. 

Jane Glover conducted both 
pieces with her usual unfussi- 
ness. and it was pleasant to hear 
her warm so readily,, loo, to 
Vaughan Williams's Oboe 
Concerto. Malcolm Messiter 
was the superb soloist in this 
expansive (too expansive?), 
pastoral -flavoured work. He 
made a rich, smooth sound 
throughout the register, drawing 
out his longer phrases with 
marvellous control- But that 
ended the evening's unhack- 
neyed music, for Mozart’s 
Divertimento in D, K1 36, crops 
up incessantly . these days, 
though here, its articnlative 
crispness was admirable. And 
Tchaikovsky’s Serenade, Op 48, 
is, I admit, a pet hate, for no 
better, reason than I have heard 
it too often. Still, three out of 
five is not too bad. 


Aptly welcome wit 


The Light Rough 

Hampstead 

If The Jewel in the Crown is to 
be believed, it was the struggle 
between the grammar school 
boy and the public schools that 
rotted British rule in India. 
Brian* Thompson's new play 
(director Michael Atten- 
borough) shows the same 
neurosis at work in a dealer of 
second-hand books in Clapbam. 
Paul (Alfred Lynch) does not 
end up bloodily dismembered 
on an Indian bed. Psychically 
dismembered he is. His wife 
walks out on him; the hated 
rival (public school) massacres 
him at golfi and his partner, a 
plasterer (working class), will 
not play with him any more. 
The bookselling business 
sounds in poor shape too. 

Should that last remark be 
thought to trivialize a story, of 
pain and lost directions, it is 
also the general response of 
Paul to his lot in life. But. very 
surprisingly for an author of 
Thompson's experience, we are 
not led towards the causes of 
the troubles. Paul is cheesed off 
by the sociological blah of his 
hatchet-faced rival - “I teach 
literature at Kent" - though he 
does not go as far as the vexed 
bus driver next door, who 
throws a garden gnome through 
the conservatory roof. 


What he does is provoke a 
crisis on the domestic front, but 
here his failure is that of his 
golf: no follow-through. What 
are we to make of this decline 
and fall as the one and only 
story of a play? 

What can be done is enjoy 
the dry wit that pops out at the 
most unexpected and welcome 
times, usually as one-liners apt 
to the character, which is by no 
means always the case when 
authors make their characters 
tell jokes. Surrounding these 
pleasures, however, there is 
chin-to-chin confrontation 
among a group of individuals of 
only intermittent plausibility. 

In his tirades. Alfred Lynch; 
■makes use of almost Shakespea- 
rian timbres, too large in scale 
for this stage. Heather Canning 
made increasing good sense of 
the wife. But it is the family 
friend, a biscuit-tin collector, 
who has the best lines, and 
Oliver Ford Davies makes him 
into the most credible male 
character. Splendidly behind 
the times (“What's My Line - 
now there’s a show that's 
lasted") as well as public school, 
his delicacy and decency are the 
manly qualities the author may 
well, in the circumstances, be 
holding up for recognition. 

Jeremy Kingston 


Stephen Pettitt 


Charlie and the 
Chocolate Factory 

Sadler’s Wells 

Roald Dahl's famous and 
much-loved children's story has 
been adapted for the stage by 
Jeremy Raison, which seems a 
fair idea, and set to music by 
Christopher Reason, which 
simply does not work. It would 
perhaps be unwise to suggest 
that a musical play could never 
be fashioned from the raw 
material available, but the salad 
of Broadway clich6s which Mr 
Reason dishes up is bewilder- 
ingly extraneous to the tone of 
the piece. What has doo-wop to 
do with bedtime stories? 

That grouse apart, Kim 
Grant's production appears to 
capture the imagination, or. at 
least the attention, of its target 
audience. Since the major 
interest in Mr Dahl's narrative 
is the lure of chocolate - 
variously the embodiment of 
sensual bliss or a sticky, 

addictive substance which pro- 
vokes migraine - this may not 
be a remarkable feet, although 
Lhe thing is certainly well 
plotted and just about the right 
length for its theme. 

A. plutocrat confectioner 
named Willy Wonka resolves in 
a fit of magnanimity to insert 
golden tickets into five out of 


his countless products, the 
lucky recipients to be invited on 
a tour of his nirvanic factory. 
The first four winners could 
have been invented by Richmal 
Crompton: a spheroid glutton 
named Augustus Gloop; Veruca 
Salt, a spoilt brat in a 
lampshade dress: a gum -chew- 
ing horror called Violet Beaure- 
gardc; and Mike Teavee, a cap- 
gun toting television addicL 

These monsters are to meet 
sticky ends appropriate to their 
cupidity: Augustus lost in a 
river of chocolate, Veruca deep- 
sixed down a rubbish chute by a 
squirrel she tries to appropriate, 
Violet turned into a bluebeny 
by a very special stick of gum, 
Mike reduced to matchbox size 
by Mr Wonka’s teleporting 
machine. Only the fifth child, 
the sickeningly good Charlie 
Bucket, comes unscathed 
through the tour of the factory, 
where he and his four grand- 
parents are rewarded with a 

cushy billet for life. 

Hugh Sullivan’s Mr Wonka 
carries the evening with aplomb 
and no little charm (although 
his jokes will definitely have to 
be rethought), and Michelle 
Archer makes an acutely grue- 
some fist of the lisping- Veruca. 
The fantastical machinery gives 
Marty' Flood an opportunity to 
indulge her fancy for strident 

colours ‘ Martin Cropper 


Mystery surrounding 
North’s departure 


Teen Wolf is a sad case of someone 
having a bright idea but not the least 
idea what to do with it. Michael J. Fox 
— the volatile young hero of Back to the 
Future - plays a shy college boy who 
develops an hereditary characteristic of 
turning into a werewolf from time to 
time. Contrary to his initial fears, this 
makes him the star of the basketball 
team and the idol of the girls who had 
previously ignored him. The story's 
potential is sacrificed to a witless script 
and direction, by Rod Daniel, to suit 
Under its original title. Peril en le 
demeure. Death in a French Garden, 
the twenty-second film of the prolific 
Michel Devil] e. has proved a major 
French box-office hit, though - like 
many successes with the French 
audience - it is hard to say why. It is 
technically crisp and efficient, with the 
kind of flashy scene transitions that 
pass for style, and has some .effective 
erotic passages. As a thriller however it 
is an extraordinary collection of 
borrowings from Chandler, Chabrol, 
Hitchcock et aL, all pieced together into 
a labyrinthine and frustratingly non seq. 
tale of intrigue and deception. The 
players include Christopher Malavoy, 
Nicole Garcia. Michel Piccoli and the 
somewhat eerie Anemone. 

David Robinson 


The 10 dancers of Ballet 
Rambert who are showing 
pieces in the company's cho- 
reographic workshop at River- 
side Studios this week could 
hardly be expected to produce 
anything as dramatic as the 
abrupt and entirely unforeseen 
departure of their artistic 
director, Robert North. Dis- 
agreement on artistic policy is 
the bland reason given: dis- 
agreement with whom is not yet 
revealed. 

One immediate effect of 
North's going is that the 
Manchester premiere of his new 
ballet Fabrications, with designs 
by the Emanuels, announced for 
February 7, has had to be 
cancelled. North himself has 
gone abroad and is not available 
lor comment 

North’s choreographic influ- 
ence could perhaps be detected 
in some of the apprentice pieces 
given at Riverside on Wednes- 
day. Curiously, the influence of 
Rambert’s resident choreogra- 
pher (and now acting director) 
Richard Alston was not appar- 
ent except in his lighter mood 
(Java style) which perhaps lay 
behind Mark Baldwin's cheerful 
Pussj^Footing for three kitten- 
ish girls and himself as the cat 
that got the cream. 

Only Frances Carty among 
the would-be choreographers 
had taken as her model 
Rambert's third associate chor- 
eographer. Christopher Bruce. 
His interest in folk music and 
dance, equally with his deep 
social concern, were reflected in 


Opera 

E trovatore 

Royal Glasgow 


Scottish Opera's new Trovatore 
is credited to Graham Vick as 
producer, but the movement 
and the groupings are con- 
ditioned very much by the 
engine-shed setting that Michael 
Yeargan designed for Andrei 
Serban’s 1983 Opera North 
production. Nor is there, in this 
of all operas, much room for 
two opinions about motivation. 
We are, therefore, back in 
Serban's Spanish Civil War 
staging, which provokes the 
question of why Verdi in 
Glasgow should survive trans- 
lation into the twentieth century' 
much better than does Rossini 
in London. 

Partly it is an effect of the 
Scottish lighting, by John 
Waterhouse, which effectively 
creates a gloom that prevents 
the updating from imposing 
itself too blatantly, at least until 
the final acL Partly it is the 
simple feci that 1 1 trovatore is so 
much more familiar than 
Moses: it creates its own place 
independent of the scenic 
apparatus, and thereby allows 
dislocation and irony more 
willingly. 

But perhaps the most signifi- 
cant difference is the change in 
musical style, whereby 1853 
seems very much closer to us 
than does 1827. The machinery 
of modem war is plausibly 
evoked by Verdi's rhythms and 
his rude scoring: one half 
expects the Anvil Chorus, done 
very percussively here, to be 
answered by the clatter of a 
locomotive coming across the 
stage's stretch of railway track. 

By no means, though, is ail 
noisiness in the musical pari of 
this revival. Graeme Jenkins 
proves himself a Vercii conduc- 
tor of the first rank, capable of 
communicating a sense of 
importance and detailed care to 
both chorus and orchestra, and 
of showing the score always at 
its finest, whether that is a 


Carty’s Songs of the Ghetto, set 
to three Yiddish songs passion- 
ately performed on stage by 
Hilary Western, ft would have 
been helpful to know what they 
were about, so as to follow 
better the fierce emotions 
expressed by Paul Melis, Bruce 
Michelson and especially Diane 
Walker, but the short work, 
visually inspired by Kathe 
K oil witz’s paintings, gripped 
the interest. 

That was much the mos* 
impressive work on show. 
Among the others, Lucy 
Beth une. in a jazzy dance for 
four men, and Cah trine Price, 
in a group dance that left its 
members vulnerably isolated, 
both found some interesting 
movement but did not sustain 
it. The women on the whole had 
the punchiest approach, ranging 
from an amusing, completely 
obscene fantasy on dental 
anaesthesia by Siobhan Stanley 
to a rough-up for two men by 
Amanda Britton. Most of the 
men's contributions by contrast 
were limply weL 

Chief heroes of the evening 
were the company's musical 
director. Nicholas Carr, and 
pianist, Christopher Swithin- 
bank, who between them 
composed, transcribed or ar- 
ranged the scores for six of the 
works, using sources as diverse 
as Dave Brubeck, Shostakovich 
and Philip Glass, all capably 
played by those two musicians 
and a small ensemble. 

John Percival 



Constant pleasure: Janice 
Cairns as Leonora 

matter of superb melodic 
phrasing, of exquisite chordings 
(in the introduction to the 
closing scene, for instance) or of 
an exact control of gesture. 
There is scarcely a crude 
moment. Where the piccolo 
might normally shriek, it is 
brought into the texture as a 
fifing on the breeze. High hopes 
are raised for Mr Jenkins's 
Verdi work at Glyndebourne. 

The cast may not be quite on 
the same level of excellence, but 
there are worthy and well-con- 
sidered performances through- 
out. Janice Cairns as Leonora 
gets an admirable quantity of 
the English text across, even 
when this causes problems of 
phrasing: her candid tone, too, 
is a constant pleasure, as is her 
flexibility in ornament. Patricia 
Payne is a plangent mother- 
figure as Azucena. Jack Slrauch 
a nicely grim-toned yet lyrical 
Di Luna and Geoffrey Moses a 
strong Fcrrando, again making 
much of the words. 

.Angelo Marenzi as Manrico 
is not well placed to do the 
same, and on Wednesday he 
was affected by an illness that 
threatened to stifle him in the 
third act. But, perhaps drawing 
strength from the committed 
seriousness of this production, 
he soldiered on magnificently. 

Paul Griffiths 


Dex/ Mummjj-* Eadif? 

/*. U*id 
au* ** l *** 

i 

aW, 

buJ- j'w .3 VS*, aupw' T^* 

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r r t Contemporary 
N e t v °rk 


STEVE REICH 

in Britain with his own mnadans 

Sieve Rrit±, Gloi Velez. Garry Kvisud. Mott Silver. 

NumTilte. Edmund Niemann. Bob Becker. Tm Ferdien 

Clapping Mnsk; Vermont Connlerpoinu 
Dramming Part £□: 

New York Counterpoint (British premiere) 

Sextet (British premiere) 

Wed 29 Jmn 7 JApm LO NDON. Domuaon Thane 01-5W 9Stf 

'Tku J0Ju7J0p> SHEFFIELD. Ons®* Centre 0743-79&! 

W 3i.ln7.Mpn MANCHESTER. Rayal Nonbcm QrfJcgt oTMiwc 061-373 J30* 
S* lFeb'J.Mfcn LIV ERPOOL , Philharmonic HaC 051-703 3789 

Sen 2Fe»7Japn LEICESTER, Haymartra Theatre OS33-S39797 

Mon JFehSJMpm COVENTRY. Waiwiek Umveisiw Am Centre 0203-117417 

Wed 5Fek7.3apn BIRMINGHAM, Great R*n, Aston Umvcraty 021-359 3979 

Ttw 6 Feb 7.39pm BRISTOL. Victoria Rooms 0272-299191 

Frl 7Fcb7J0pa CARDIFF. S> David's Hell 0222371^34 

Set SFcbSJMpm OXFORD. Shrkiochn Theatre 0K546405* 

So 9Fcb&Mm LEEDS, Gvk Thorne 0532-462453 

Further aeons from the Contemporary Mode Nerwory. JK& Sg&ff 1 ** Qreat 
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10 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 24 1986 


SPECTRUM 






outs of life in Britain 





COMING-IN • ; . FOR THE FREEDOM AND STABILITY 


Neither the numbers of foreign- 
ers coming into Britain nor the 
reasons for their doing so have 
altered in the last decade - but 
where they come from has. In 
1985. fewer were from Australia 
and die African Common- 
wealth. and more than ever 
before from Europe. In 1984. 
20.000 people came from North 
America. 15.000 from the EEC 
and 6.000 from other parts of 
Europe. How many foreigners 
have actually made their homes 
here is harder to say. 

Why are they here? Many are 
drawn first as students and 
having studied choose to stay 
on: some come on short-term 
business contracts and when 
iheir job is done cannot bear lo 
leave. Others come to pursue 
private dreams, like the solitary 
yachtsman Shigeo Kitano who 
set sail from Japan in 1970 to 
prove himself and is now on a 
prolonged pause in Britain. 

Once the decision to settle is 
made, justifications abound: 
after Bogota. Tokyo or New 
York the tempo is agreeable, 
and the pressures light: after 
Rome the traffic is delightfully 
unaggressive: after S3o Paolo 
the escape from traditionally 

P edro de Alcan taro (Bra- 
zilian: newly married) is 
the son of two doctors 
and left Sio Paolo for 
the United States at the age of 
19 to study raosic. He arrived in 
England at the beginning of the 
19805 to follow the Alexander 
Technique (a method of study- 
ing and viewing human behav- 
iour) and to play the cello. 

“At first 1 didn't like London. 

I thought it wasn't very' 
beautiful or very friendly. But 
there are so many masters in 
London - of singing and music 
and psychology - that you feel 
you're closely in touch with 
centuries of knowledge. 

“I'm not sore I know what 
home means; and in my mind 1 
wonder whether settling and 
growing up aren't incompatible 
areas of conflict.'’ 

P IERO di Monzi (Italian: 
bachelor), opened his 
first shop in the Fulham 
Road in 1968 having 
observed that in London “there 
was nobody selling good, 
decent-looking clothes to men". 

He spoke five languages, 
having trained as an interpreter, 
and had worked as a language 
teacher, a waiter and a recep- 
tionist. The boutique, introduc- 
ing new foreign designers into 
this country, was an instant 
triumph, and today sells to the 
Princess of Wales and clients 
faithful from mother to daugh- 
ter and father to son. 

Eight months a year arc spent 
in Chelsea: the other four in a 
family house at Spoleto in 
Umbria. “.As a child in Rome, 
in the fifties, i admired clothes: 
by the age of eight i could tell 
who was well dressed and who 
wasn't. Why do 1 live here? 
You're going to laugh. It’s the 
weather. 1 love the cold, the 
green. I feel more energetic. 

“This is such a civilized 
country: there’s no hooting of 
cars all day long. England made 
me welcome. I owe u a lot- It's 
made me famous. .And for me 
it's gening bener and better and 
belter.” 


intense family relationships is 
exhilarating. 

The affluent and more 
internationally minded say that 
England is the best base for 
Europe: they can spend week- 
ends looking at paintings in 
Paris or Madrid, the Easier 
holidays on the Grand Canai in 
Venice and the New Year skiing 
in Zerman. All speak of 
freedom: lo live as they will, 
without fear, uncoerced by 
social or political pressure. 

For their children loo. they 
say. there are really nothing but 
advantages: an excellent edua- 
tion. international friends and 
an accentless English voice. 
Parents add that they sec iheir 
families growing up without the 
national ties that formed their 
own generation, and that with 
air travel having diminished 
distance, why should children 
todav not be citizens of the 
world? 

Not all who come, of course, 
find it easy, espeeiaiij at first 
when jobs - particularly for 
women - prove elusive, foreign 
qualifications untransferable 
and a reliable plumber almost 
impossible to find. 

Three years ago five expatri- 


ate American women opened a 
telephone information service 
called Focus, specifically to help 
those who. as Ginger Irvine, a 
founder member, puts it, “were 
discovering that their expec- 
tations had been too high and 
that having given themselves 
sis weeks in which to adapt 
were now finding six months 
too little.’* 

Major problems for new 
arrivals, says Mrs Irvine, 
remain homesickness, inef- 
ficiency of all services and the 
children who fail to settle. 

That elusive concept of 
“home”, surprisingly, is rarely 
raised by expatriates. Migrants 
from Europe and North 
.America do not appear to waste 
their time tormenting them- 
selves about their roots. On the 
contrary* the rootlessness is 
precisely what appeals. 

For some home was a 
moveable feast from childhood 
and England will now do as well 
as anywhere else: for Shigeo 
Kitano, it remains a philosophi- 
cal concept, belonging more 
properly to past or future, while 
others say that “home” is 
carried with them, like a snail, 
with their other belongings. 


W hat makes thousands of Britons desert 
these shores each year for a new life 


abro ad while foreigners can’t wait to 
get in? Caroline Moorehead reports 

9 Ask any foreigner living in England why he is here and 
the answer will be the same: friendliness, subdued pace of 
life, freedom in all its forms and culture. 

9 The weather may not be that of San Francisco, nor the 
restaurants as good as in Marseilles, but as a place to bny a 
house, form a business, study a musical instrument or 
educate a child, it's hard to beat In 1984, 106,000 non- 
British dtizens migrated here (the Office of Population 
Censuses and Surveys defines a “migrant" ay someone who 
intends to stay in the UK a year or more). 

9 While foreigners are coming in. the British, with much 
the same vigour, enthusiasm and sense of adventure, are 
going out - to the Commonwealth countries, to Europe and 
to the Middle East 

9 Jn 3984 some 100.000 people in Britain put in a formal 
application to emigrate to Australia - another 150,000 made, 
inquiries at the Canadian High Commission. Only the 
smallest fraction of these will actually complete the 
extraordinarily complicated and demanding set of criteria, 
points and sponsorship that can yield a visa for the chosen 
few (12,000 annually into Australia. 4,000 into Canada). 

9 The fact that overall migration numbers are down - 
103,000 in 1984, 199,000 in 1974 - reflects quotas and jobs, 
not the current British desire to be on the move. 


Who, today, migrates from 
Britain? Apart from the spouses 
and elderly parents who now 
make up 80 per cent of 
immigrants into Australia they 
are. say’s Norman Hoffman of 
the Australian High Com- 
mission, either those with 
enough capital to set up a 
business, or they belong to 
certain specified occupations. 

Nurses, ai the moment, are 
much in demand 1 1,000 are in 
the process of seeking entry to 
Australia. Migrants today are 
seen as people with clear minds 
and strong drives and liable to 
return if not satisfied. 

“It’s so easy today to wander 
around the world”, points out 
. Mr Hn ffman. “Governments 
have to recognize that it's no 
longer right to expect individ- 
uals to make a commitment for 
life.” Wiili-. jet travel and 
package tours;', gone is the 
spectre of the migrant ship, 
severing families for ever. 

This adventurousness is 
mirrored in -those looking to 
North Africa and the Middle 
East for a more prosperous 
working future, it has been 
estimated that of all Western 
countries, Britain has by far the 


-gest contingent of workers m 
Jie Middle East. According to a 
bulletin published by the 
Committee for Middle 
Trade last September, there are 
now .sortie 100.000 Bntisn 
subjects living in the area, 
arriving .there at the rate 
about 20,000 a year (though. o» 
course, many are also leaving, 
as their contracts expire). 

On the subject of would-be 
migrants in general, immi- 
gration officers tend to be 
enthusiastic. “We really see the 
sort of people on their way up 
anyway. The unemployed don't 
migrate", says Mr Hoffman. 
“It’s people who are ambitious 
and thriving and who know 
they’re going to have to work 
very- hard and take risks if 
they're going to succeed." 

His words arc borne out. 
sometimes rather depressingly. 
by the figures. Foremost among 
the professions now heading 
overseas are designers, possibly 
educated better in Britain than 
anvwherc in the world- but who 
find that to prosper and have a 
chance to use their skills there is 
no alternative to emigration. 

Wives, ‘in particular, are 


Pedro de Alcan taro: In touch 


Piero dl Monzi: In business 


Round the world yachtsman Shigeo Kitano: T feel free here* 


S higeo Kitano (Japanese: bachelor) had 
reached Australia on a round the world 
trip in a specially built yacht in 1970 when 
his crew mutinied. 

An employee of Nippon Steel with a BSc in 
Industrial Management from the University of 
Southern California, be sooght legal redress in a 
suit against the Australian government in 
Loudon and has stayed in Britain ever since. He 
now works as a television and public relations 


consultant for Deatsu Incorporated while 
building a new ferroconcrete 53ft yacht which, he 
hopes, will one day permit him to accomplish 
solo the second half of his world voyage. 

“I see a quiet revolution taking place here as 
the country reaches the end of the road of the 
existing social system. 

“I still feel Japanese, very mnch so, but while 
In Japan I would have no freedom, either socially 
or politically, here I feel free.” 


The fuckey family; *If we don't make a better living in Canada* then something's wrong' 

,v — i — 

r- 


Clare (left) and Esther Duggan: ‘Australia bound for better pay'. Francesca Roberts: Off to Paris 


E sther Duggan is 25. the daughter of a 
former executive with a sugar company 
and one of a family of seven children. 
She has a twin sister Clare, who like 
herself qualified as a state registered 
nurse. Both girls have decided to emigrate to 
Western Australia, to join an elder sister already 
nursing in a private hospital and who is holding 
places for them. 

Working nights, leaving the flat she shares in 


Croydon at 7 in the evening and seldom 
returning home before 10 next morning, Esther 
Duggan earns £138 a week. In Australia, she has 
been told: it will be at least half as much again. 

“It's a challenge: a new life”, she says. 
“Australia is a totally unknown quantity. I like it 
that way. In any case, l can't see any future here 
at ail. It's a straggle. I can’t even think of buying 
a flat or a car. I work harder and harder just to 
stay in the same place”. 


known to face confusion when 
they migrate solely as append, 
ages tc> their husbands. Brigitte A 
Vandenabeele. of the Centre for 
International Briefing, mentally 
divides than into those happy 
to sit around a pool (and these, 
she says, survive) and those 
who resent having no work, 
hate playing bridge in the 
afternoon and are terrified of 
servants. “We try- to give them 
the information and incentives 
to fight culture shock”, she says 
Even so. expatriate life can be. 
lough. Dr Peter Dally, of the 
department of psychological 
medicine at the Westminster' 
Hospital, has made a study of 
the high number of expatriates 
who come home with problems; ■*' 
Of the 50 he interviewed, he 
found that marital troubles had 
caused SS per cent of tht* 
breakdown in wives - boredom,, 
alienation, loneliness and ihen 
much argument - and that 
family tensions often lead to 

anorexia in adolescent girls. 

Talk to would-be migrant, 
howe' er. and the feeling is all of 
good times ahead, greater 
prosperity and. above all, the- 
realization that at last some- 
thing new is about lo happen. . 

C indy and Ed Turkey 

their three children have 
been part of wandering 
army life ever since Ed 
joined as a Warrant Officer ia 
the 1960s. 

Last year, at the age of 48, Ed. 
was forced to retire. In the 
following months, he applied far 
35 jobs. The Tnckeys have min 
been accepted as immigrants 
into Canada where they hate 
bought a post office-curo-petrol 
station -cum-general store in * 
small village near Edmonton- , 
“Ed’s really over the hill 
here”, says Cindy. He is fit, 
young, but there’s nothing for 
him. If we don't make a better - 
living than here, then some- £ 
thing's wrong. 

“Here when the kids go out 
I’m always thinking: how long 
will they be? Where have they 
gone? Canada offers a better 
wav of life for the young. 

“We plan to stay for ever. \ 
don't like England any more, 
Unless you’re young and quali- 
fied, you've had it I*m very 
English when it conies to the 
Queen, but it's getting to the 
point when I'm ashamed ro spy 
I'm British.'’ 1 

F rancesca Roberts was 
working as a fioor man- 
ager in current affairs for 
the BBC when she met . 
and married her architect# : 
husband last summer. He has 
been living in Paris for the last 
10 years. Francesca speaks no 
French. After much deliberation 
- should they commute or 
should he move over here? - 
she decided to throw up her job 
and join him. 

“1 feel as if I've jumped off 
the edge of a cliff when there 
was a perfectly good path going 
round the coastline and 1 
haven’t landed yeL The hardest 
part was making the decision 
and I had to do that entirely on 
my own. For my age group it’s a 
very unfashionable thing to do 
- lea ve a good job for a man. ■’ 
“What I suppose 1 like best is 
the feeling that 1 have been 
thrown out onto ray sixth sense. * 
It's refreshing, if frightening.” 


When 


you stop 


buying 


\ 


Each year, millions of And all to satisfy the 

wild animals suffer agonising deaths demand for fur products we could 

in traps like this. Millions 50 eaj dy do without, 

more are subjected to the 

misery of intensive farming. VflJiiim iljy Sa yNOtofitf 


Charity in Action 


| j syppor: die R5PCA campaign against the lolling of Kir anitmU T enclose a donation of £- 
J nr Aarae mv Access/Barckreard Nn _ 


Name. 


Addreu- 


-Postcode. 


Please send me Qearsricto D'poggr 


| Return coupon with vour dnna non to RSPCA, FREEPOST Causeway. Horsham. Sussex K H12 t.ZA S3 3 


Dynasty II, or how soap gets in your eyes 


The launching of The 
Colbys, a Dynasty 
spin-off which starts 
tonight, was a 
drama in itself 

Dynasty's place at the top of the 
American television ratings was 
beginning to fid ter. Apart from 
anything else, its share in the 
annual billion dollar advertising 
revenue was threatened. So was 
another S200 million of mer- 
chandising. it was a year ago 
and Esther and Richard Shapiro 
convened a crisis meeting at 
their Beverly HiUs office. The 
agenda was headed: “Lust, 
power, intrigue and other fine 
things”. 

What was being planned was 
not so much a spin-off as a 
rocket launch. Using Blake 


Esther Shapiro: hit formula 

Carrington and his Colorado 
empire as the pad, a kind of 
“Son of Dynasty” would be 
fired straight into the upper 
atmosphere of television folk- 
lore. 

No one understood the rules 
bener than the Shapiros. Mar- 
ried for 30 years, it had been her 
ideas and his craftsmanship at 


CONCISE CROSSWORD (No 857) 

ACROSS 
] Meal (6) 

S Cherry brandy (6) 

8 Regret (31 

9 Gaseous alkane (6) 

10 Scientist (6) 

11 Breeding stable (4) 

12 Russian headscarf 
18) 

14 Opportunity 16) 

17 Invisible (6) 

19 Wave threateningly 
(81 

22 Shove [4) 

24 Dull (6) 

25 Wail tablet to) 

26 Sever from tree (3) 

27 Aiishoofft) 

28 Small former (6) 

DOWN 

2 Rejoice (5) 

3 Give up ( 7} _ , . /T . 

4 Shake (7) 13 Vase (3) 18 Boy’s voire (7) 

5 Skewer dish l5> IS Whale spear (7) 20 Din (5) 

6 Splits (5) W Cow mouth fill (3) 2i Fireplace (5) 

7 Wrinkle CD 17 Sad (7) 23 Steam bath (S) 

SOLUTION TO No 856 . „ . 

ACROSS: 8 Grappling iron 9 Nil 10 Imprecise 11 Yearn 13 evident 
. . _ ■ .. . .. , -n « B... 'IC CirhlM tackle 

, r ._ S Ogre 6 Praise 
... 17 Depose^ 18 Ddugc 

20 Rclmke^Sj* Hangerv^S-Pail-'' ,T.‘ f 5 : :-aW ■ 


the. typewriter which had 
created' •‘Oil”- the concept of 
super-soap which hit the screen 
as Dynasty in 1981. Along the 
way. the elegantly dressed and 
matronly built Esther Shapiro 
had become the most powerful 
and independent woman on 'the 
American networks. 

At that Beverly Hills meeting 
was casting director Mark 
Schwartz. “What we need”, he 
said, “are plenty of hot and sexy 
youthful roles". It was not, 
perhaps, the most innovative 
notion, but it was a contri- 
bution gladly accepted by the 
Shapiros. 

Blake Carrington and his clan 
would continue to work out all 
of our fantasies in Colorado 
while, interwoven into a double 
bill for soap addicts, a new and 
equally extravagant family lifes- 
tyle would be spawned by the 
sun and sea of the Pacific coast 
Like the splitting of an amoeba. 
Dynasty II, the Colbys of 
California will take its bow on 
BBCl tonight In subsequent 
weeks ii will be shown on 
Wednesdays with Dynasty I in 
its usual Friday slot 

It was the beleagured giant 
ABC trailing a poor third in the 
American network audience 
war. who first approached 
Esther Shapiro. Was there any 
chance of Dynasty reproducing 
itself? The idea had, after alL 
worked in the cinema with 
Roman numerals pursuing such 
titles as Mad Max znd Rocky. 

ABC got an unenthusiastic 
yes from the creator-writer duo 
who had amassed a personal 
fortune as co-producers and 
holders of the merchandising 
rights ot Dynasty -but -with 
certain iron conditions. It 
would be done the Shapiro way. 

The new soap would use the 
character of Jeff Colby, already 
established in Dynasty, as the 
essential link. California would 
be the new family’s lotus-land. 
Chariton Heston, seduced by 
the suggestion that the Colbys 
were really an updated version 
ofJ-Claudiusr would be the star 


The Colbys: Jeff (John James), Constance (Barbara Stanwyck?. 
Monica (Tracy Scoggins), and Jason (Charlton Heston) 


with a $2.1 million contract. 
That was where the spending 
would begin. 

Each Colbys episode costs 
around $1.35 million although 
it -is. filmed mostly in a studio. 
Designer Nolan Miller has been 
allowed to spend $100,000 on 
the first two introductory 
episodes. But the most import- 
ant and cunning proviso was 
that a full six episodes of 
Dynasty would be used to 
introduce the new characters 
among the old. 

With Dynasty II Esther 
Shapiro has, quite literally, 
programmed a hit Her plans to 
dovetail predecessor- into suc- 
cessor have been given full 
approval by the ABC hierarchy. 
Cleavage has-been cloned with 
cleavage, bitch with bitch, 
silver-haired smoothie with 
silver-haired smoothie. The 
result will unquestionably be a 
conflict-packed family with her 
favoured “power and control, 
sex, love and greed” formula. 

Now it seems the only cloud 
on the horizon for the Shapiros, 
Heston arid co-star Barbara 


Stanwyck - she gets $75,000 an 
episode and a guaranteed short 
working week - is the suspected 
emergence in America of a 
hitherto unimagined aihsc 01 * 
soap fatigue. 

The symptoms were recog- 
nized by Mr Donald 
president of CBS Entertain® 6 * 11 
and the man who gave l ° 
the world eight years ago. “*t * 
my hunch, instinctively, W 
this particular cycle is over” « “? 
said. Two of his reasons ^ 
pronouncing the unthinfc® 1 * 
were that Dynasty, number on* 
last year, had slumped " 
number 18 in last wee*? 
American TV rating? sad “r 
Colbys were at number 69. . 

ABC are undismayed.; Tws 
have.just given their new &n®y 
a 12-month guaranteed run.** jr 
unprecedented vote of 
dence in the history of theJM* 
American Soap Opera. The 
few Wednesdays and Fntkr 
will reveal which way ® . 
British vote goes. • 

Douglas Thompso? 

© Timsi Ne*ip«pen Unhid, • 











THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 24 1 Q ftfi 

FRIDAY PAGE 




t A sy 


• - r ;&u 


In Molly Keane’s genteel Irish dfole, a girl with a 
hint of bine in the stocking was thoughtafreak. So for 
l . SQySars she wrote under a pseudonym. She tells 
.« Russell Harty about her eccentric upbringing 


!i jwvixg ouw rriyiv UJULUV 

T. Russell Harty about h 

Molly Keane appears to be surprised. 

*' ftsiiL HXInkAffu' limnlv Ylrtlwl I r «« 


; J a 


her daughter shone" and a dress was 


Nobody, simply, nobody, can possibly commissioned from a 'Paris couturier. 


Be interested in an old bag from the bogs 
like me. r It is a statement propelled 
partly -by modesty and partly by- a 
confidence that this is quite untrue. . 

. * Her personal history reads like a 

synopsis' for a- novel from Mills and 
■'*:* ^ Boon: the house which paid Mrs Keane 
- • a^hahdsome £50 for her first manuscript ■ 
• ^ L ih the . 1920s. The plot focused upon a 
' pit hot ferociously attractive, not 

' ; 1: iig* expert in the hunting field, but who. 
' ’ eventually captured the prize gentleman 
by other cunning methods. 

--V She wrote this first nbvel secretly, at 
ci^‘5 ; ^U>me. in southern Ireland, ln her famiiy 
tf circle to have declared herself a writer 
/: rp ^ would have been to invite ridicule. You 
^ Os. were glamorous and attractive if you 
^ ebuid clear fences in the field, sit well on 
the hunter and spin half the night away 
• ■*?. £ Ai/lhe dance floor. If there was a hint of 
~ •tea*, 1 Blue . in ' the • stocking, you were 
: . ^ 1, considered a freak. 


expert in the hunting field, but who .with her happily ever after. Nobody 
eventually captured the prize gentleman noticed. Nobody, that is, except Molly, 
by other cunning methods. The wretched girl, a sweating sacrifice to 


The awkward girl was trimmed rather 
like a Christmas tree, taken to a secret 
bedroom and put into a huge Cellophane 
box. She was- then placed in a prominent 
position in. the great halL Her mother 
confidently assumed that as the young 
men arrived and caught sight of her, 
they would -rip open the wrapping in 
gallant frenzy, release her baby from her 
hot cell, and one of them would live 


’ - : Art. fe. 

■ -Hb. 

* » a** 
- ' ■*'? ib( 


v Her parents were prosperous in that 
Anglo-Irish way just before the cracks 
began to: appear, just before the hedges 
in the far fields were left untended. Her 
mother wrote poetry in her study and 
arranged menus and flowers. Her father 
ithnted and fished and preferred his 
tfher children. 


ts . . 

r • 

■"Srb. « 


•:-i r : 
-•i: -s ft* 


** • * i*ij i centred upon the fete and fortunes of 

. AS H crnia SHC .. her circle, full of betrayals, misfortunes 

,i t , -1 in and peccadilloes. 

.! ■ ■ tHOHStlt nersell One of them. Devoted Ladies. 

a - A ° -| j published 50 years ago, dealt sensitively 

' ratner UnlOVCO. * with lesbianism. Mrs Keane once 
* received ih her house a lady visitor 

whose luggage consisted simply of 1 ,000 
i Molly was sent away to school. She cork-tipped cigarettes and a safety razor. • 
lasted for a year and then this “rather Her presence was noted and instantly 
unloved, and unlovely child" (her entered into her impish computer. • 
words) came home to be tutored by Two events, one professional, one 
governesses. One of them, in a moment personal, smashed the happy structure 
of uncharacteristic panic, tokl Molly of Molly Keane's life. She had shifted 
where babies came from,; and. even from novels to plays and from the early 
more shockingly, how . they got there. • 1 950s ‘was writing pieces of a fashion- 
Molly. who relishes chatter and gossip, able nature for the West End stage, 
was quite unable to keep this cosmic Some, like.' Dazzling Prospect . . were 
secret to herself. At leaiime. she told her -collaborations with John Petjy, directed 
ip other and her mother sacked the by John Gielgud. That play opehedin 


noticed. Nobody, that is, except Molly. 
The wretched girl, a sweating sacrifice to 
her mother’s ambitions, eventually had 
to tear her way oul 

Mrs Keane met her own . man in less 
distressing circumstances. It wasn’t love 
at first uncellophaned sight, but they 
became good friends. He was handsome 
and dc bon air. They married. She their 
had her own house: she consulted the 
cooks and. instructed the maids; they 
hunted, played bridge, and* then,- she 
became confident enough to declare 
herself a writer. 

She was not.' however, confident 
enough of the reactions of her family 
and friends and she hid under the 
pseudonym of M. J. Farrell, a name she- 
collected from a sign over an Irish bar 
while out hunting one day. Ten hovels 
between 1928 and 1952, their beams 
centred upon the fete and fortunes of 
. her circle, fell of betrayals, misfortunes 
and peccadilloes. 

One of them. Devoted Ladies. 
published 50 years ago, dealt sensitively 
with lesbianism. Mrs Keane once 
received in . her house a lady visitor 
whose luggage consisted simply of 1,000 
cork-lipped cigarettes and a safety razor. 
Her presence was noted and instantly 
entered into her impish computer. - 

Two events, one professional, one 
personal smashed the happy structure 
of Molly Keane's life. She had shifted 
from novels to plays and from the early 
•1950s ‘was writing pieces of a fashion- 
able nature for the West End stage. 



,, v* : 


- / • ••' if 

iff/ 

r ■ -tsaS** ' 


.*/ * <v; '3 

■ ? 


& 




ar*> 



. governess. 

- Mrs Keane’s memories are selective, 

- entertaining, and dramatic. “We never 
.. hjad any trouble with the Sinn Feiners, 

... -L unless, of course, you count. the day 
' . when they came to burn down our 
. ’ bouse. That was a bit of a to-do", she 
- says.- . 

. .7, 1 One: day a message arrived to say that 
the house would be fired that evening. 
. - ‘The burning, which she describes as a 


1961 and was ripped into pieces by 
critics who' had tasted the rawer flesh of 
Mr John Osborne 

And Mrs Keane’s husband died, 
suddenly. He bad undergone uncompli- 
cated surgery and then developed a 
blood clou She was Unaware, of the fetal 
complication when she went to see him 
at the hospital. A matron- who clearly 
believed in swift surgery took her to a 
■ waiting room. It was 40 years ago. but 


son of ritual was watched by the family- Mrs Keane still remembers the pictures 
and their servants from a fer field. Her of admirals and generals on the brown 
father, with a shotgun under his arm walls. Mrs Keane, take a .seat . the 
said, simply, that he preferred to live in matron said. Your husband is dead. 
Ireland than die in England, so they London, the busy and glamorous 
moved -into a smaller house. . • . world of the theatre, were no longer pan 

1 She has recorded the drama of less of her life. She went back to the big and 
incendiary though equally heated now empty house near Code. There were 
circumstances. There was a dance at two children to bring up. Unforeseen 
another big house - the highlight of the circumstances like those in any self- 
season. One ambitious' mother had respecting . novel now dictated a 
determined that this would be the nijfet different way of life. 


Russell Harty and Molly Keane, creator of stylish, sad and funny stories 

. The servants went, the children : 

“a tFJS. Her nom de plume 

Something - that would please her. -crrcic Trrtm a cion 

Something she knew about, nothing to Wda 11 Ulll a. 0I5II 
do with feshfon. everything to do with on TricVl Vinr 

that bright circle of her young Over d.11 Ulhll U<Ll 

womanhood.- ■■ - ■■■ 

■She had kept her friends. Her letters country manor, all of mature years, each 
are- hoops -of binding steel and her with some singular deformity, indepen- 
-hbspitality and a small house on the dent in their day-to-day activities, but 
southern coast. of Ireland guaranteed a very much dependent when odd and 
regular drift of visitors. shaming secrets of their long lives are 

1 : Dame Peggy Ashcroft went to stay cunningly revealed, 
there in 1 980. She took to her bed with Sir John Gielgud. Trevor Howard and 

influenza and begged Molly to let her Googie Withers are some of the stylish 
read anything- she didn’t already know characlers in ihissad and funnyjjiece. 
of hers in print. Mrs Keane gave her the At a showing 'of the ‘ film at- the 
• manuscript of Good Behaviour and by a London Film Festival at the end of last 
rspeedy process .. it "was acquired,, pub- year, Mrs Keane slipped into the cinema 
lished and shortlisted for the Booker to watch it on a big screen and to listen 
Prize in 1981. , to questions putto the producer. 

She was persuaded that she was in After the first 1 1 . seconds of 
.there with a chance, because everyone embarrassed silence, a women with a 
told her how good it was. Now, she tweedy voice and a feel for the drama 
thinks they were trying to soften the asked, “How did you gel the dpg to react 
blow when Salman Rushdie's name was so amorously to the bitch?" and some of 
announced. . - the- mysteries of film-making were 

But the best thing of all was that she revealed. Another asked if the play was 
had. for the first time, used her real autobiographical and the answer was 
name, and the postman at Ardmore, the . “yes" and “no", which usually means 
■tiny village where she lives, asked her “yes" but we’re pretending it isn't, 
for an autograph and a kiss. The last questioner asked if there was 

Money, but not a lot of it, you another novel about to arrive. “Not that 
understand, started to arrive. She wc know ° r - re P ,ied gentleman in 
celebrated her success by buying two charge. , . 

new tyres for the car. The BBC bought *- however, have it on the highest 
•the rights to the book and made a series possible authority that Mrs Kiane now 
of plays from it, and it was serialized on needs two new tyres, for the front 
Woman’s Hour. wheels, and she knows exactly how to 

Now she is 81 and the BBC have gel them, 
made another film, of her novel Time Time After Time is on BBC2 on Sunday 
After Time. It is the story of three sisters at 1 0. 1 (3pm. 
and a brother who share a crumbling © riowa Ne»sp*jwni uak«j. i9g*. 


Testing time for earlier 
pregnancy checks 



Chorionic villus . sampling 
(CVS) is a new technique for 
antenatal diagnosis for foetal 
abnormalities. Last year the 
Medical Research Conndl 
(MRC) announced a trial of its 
pse - to be conducted at centres 
m the UK and Europe - which 
should involve more than 4,000 
women. 

It shows the seriousness with 
which CVS is being considered 
as a possible alternative to the 
now established technique of 
amniocentesis (sampling of the 
Quid around the foetus by 
injection of a hollow needle), 
with which It will be compared. 
But behind it also lies ’ an 
attempt to asses the risks and 
benefits of CVS clearly before 
its use becomes widespread. 

CVS involves snipping out a 
tiny portion of the chorionic 
vQii — the finger-like projec- 
tions of the placenta which 
form the foetus’s interface with 
the mother's blood supply. The 
tissue carries the same genetic 
configuration as the foetus and 
can therefore be used to 
diagnose genetic diseases. The 
most common method is to 
insult a hollow needle via the 
cervix. 


Living near a 
power pylon 

Since the beg- 
inning of the 
decade, people 
living in the 
shadows of 
pylons or near 
electricity sub- 
stations have 
become increasingly worried 
that they are more likely to 
suffer from cancer - particu- 
larly from leukaemia - 'than the 
rest of the population. Their 
fear has been fuelled by studies 
from many pans of the world 
although some of have been 
controversial 

The common hypothesis is 
that cables, which carry mass- 
ive electrical power, create 
electromagnetic fields which 
radiate over the local popu- 
lation and lead to the develop- 
ment ofedneers. 

But better news comes from 
a major study to be published 
in next month's issue of the 
British Journal of Cancer. 

More than 7.600 people 
living near sources of eleciro- 
ra."gnciic radiation in East 
Anglia were identified from the 
197! census. It was found that 
by the end of 1983 more than 
800 of the group had died. 
Close analysis of the figures 
showed that the overall death 
rate of the power line people 
was lower than the rest of the 
region, mainly because there 
were far fewer deaths from 
heart complaints and circulat- 
ory diseases than expected. 

Overall there was no excessr 
ivc risk from cancer in the 
study group. However, there 
was an unexpected peak in the 
number of women dying from 
lung cancer - not one of the 
cancers normally linked to 
exposure 10 electromagnetic 
radiation. (Unfortunately, fig- 
ures for smoking pat terns in 
the region were not available.) 

There was a marginal in- 
crease in the expected number 
of people dying from cancers or 
the lymphatic system and 


MEDICAL 

BRIEFING 


The great advantage over 
amniocentesis is that CVS can 
be performed earlier in preg- 
nancy - at around 9-11 weeks 
as opposed to 16 - and the 
results of the test are available 
almost immediately. This 
means that should a pregnancy 
be affected the mother can be 
offered a termination at a stage 
when it is much less traumatic. 

Even in the best haqds, 
transcervical CVS carries three 
to six times the risk of 
precipitating an unwanted 
abortion as does amniocentesis 
(where abortion is a side effect 
in ronghly one in 200 cases). 
Some of the unwanted abor- 
tions occur almost immediately 
and are the result of physical 
trauma but some occur days or 
weeks later and are thought to 
be due to infection introduced 
from the genital tract. 

Now, in the latest issue of 
the Lancet, Professor Richard 
Lilford, Professor of Obstetrics 
and Gynaecology at Leeds 


leukaemias, but only if they 
lived very close 10 sub-stations, 
and the increase was not 
statistically significant. 

However. Lhe author of the 
study does point out that the 
majority of people in the study 
were living near sub-stations 
which supply a relatively low 
current. If environmental elec- 
tromagnetic radiation from 
power lines docs turn out to be 
a health hazard the rcults of lhe 
East Anglian study may be 
because the group were only 
exposed to diluted doses. 

New guide to 
heart risks 


H V A doctor in 

19 J S' Lancashire has 

W ' 9111 discovered a new 

W 9G9 due as to who is 
9 Vj most likely to 

B k M suffer heart at- 

taefo. Maurice 
Stone, Director 
of the Royal College of General 
Practitioner's Clinical Research 
Unit in Leigh, has found that 
the blood dotting protein 
known as fibrinogen can help 
predict who will be most at risk 
from, heart attacks. 

In a papi-r recently published 
in the Journal of the Royal 
College of General Prac- 
titioners. Dr Stone describes 
how a high fibrinogen level in a 
middle-aged man who already 
has high blood pressure could 
increase his chances of having a 
heart attack 12 times. 

Blood fibrinogen levels also 
go up with rheumatoid ar- 
thritis. chronic chest com- 
plaints. cancer and infections, 
for example, and these other 
causes have to !*c taken into 
account. 

Dr Stone believes, however, 
that where there is no other 
obvious explanation, a high 
fibrinogen level is a sign of 
trouble in the circulatory 

system. 

The real value of the test, he 
says, is that it helps to spot 
those who need medical help 
the most. 


University, and coUeagaes from 
University College Hospital 
and St Mary's Hospital in 
London, argue that research and 
experience has shown that the 
risks of infection with CVS 
could be minimized if samples 
-were taken by passing the 
needle through the abdominal 
wall into the uterus rather than 
via the cervix. 

Professor Lilford told The 
Times that it was slightly more 
difficult to get chorionic villi 
samples transabdominally but 
the technique was easier to 
teach and could be used up to 
week 14 In a pregnancy. 

Dr Iain CliaJmers. Director 
of the National Perinatal 
Epidemiology Unit in Oxford, 
and one of the organizers of the 
MRC trial says that it would 
provide some data on the 
relative safety of transcervical 
and transabdominal CVS. 

He stressed that there was 
no scientific proof that either 
abdominal or transcervical 
CVS was better than amniocen- 
tesis or that one route had 
advantages over the other. The 
vital thing is that the facts be 
established before C'VS goes 
into general use, be says. 


No smoke 
without fire 

31 A large survey 

Jpg # in America has 

I shown that 

\ smoking as few 

r *Y*l 1\ as four cigars or 

-Tj four pipe bowls 

Of of lobacco a day 

is the toxic equi- 
valent of 10 cigarettes. 

Doctors at Minnesota Uni- 
versity's School of Public 
Health measured the levels of 
thiocyanate (a chemical marker 
of the amount of smoke which 
has been inhaled, they claim) 
in the blood of over 9.000 men. 

Their advice, published in 
the Journal of the American 
Medical Association is that 
even those who have only ever 
smoked a pipe or cigars should 
avoid them. 

Short-sighted 

prescriptions 

.1 study in the 
British Journal 
of Ophthal- 
mology suggests 
that 20 per cent 
of 10 year-olds 
given glasses 
have perfect 
vision and a further 15 per cent 
have only slight problems. 

The study nos based on a 
group of children born in 1970. 
In 1980 parents were inter- 
viewed about their children's 
sight and school doctors asked 
to examine them. Of a total oj 
13.756 children 11.7 per cent 
(1.610) had been given spec- 
tacles. Over 560 of these did not 
need them. 

II ‘her. a child complains of a 
headache he may be given an 
eye test and then glasses. The 
headaches may go away, but 
that might have nothing to do 
with the glasses. Your GP’s 
surgery is the best place for a 
child with a headache, not the 
local optician's. 

Olivia Timbs and 
Lorraine Fraser 


[THE 





SATURDAY 

The weekend starts here 


Thirst for love loses its fizz 






> Window on the world 

£ Television is set to become the cinema in yomr *ft tin&-room-Far 

from a programme being; samply ^mi the box", evexythfe^ i*®*® 
wfldlife to the weatherman will appear almost life-size on a 50- 
; inch screen hang on the walL The technology for this T. 250-line 

fid] colour window on the world exists now - Mt there ere 
problems, both physical and political, before yon can hang op 
yonr TV -screen. - 

First film in Russia witha 


First film in - — — 

five years different Prospekt 

Karel Reisz reveals A^progresave” 
his Sweet Dreams ■ trip to Moscow 

£22,000 

to be won 

; Can you always get your c opy of The TSmes? . 

7 Dear Newsagent, please deliver/save me a copy ofThe T aaes 

■ NATtfF •• •• ~ • -_i i_' 

Anrraras •' -i — 


From Douglas Lowndes. 

Colville Court . Great 
Missenden, Buckinghamshire 

Following Dr Dagmar O’Con- 
nor’s advice, (Weslaesday Plage. 
January 15), my wife-and I took 
each other to ■ bed yesterday 
afternoon, with two -sandwiches 
(one smoked salmon, one rare 
roast beef) and a bottle of 
Laurent Perrier N/V. We 
decided also to take plates, 
glasses and paper napkins, 
though Doctor D seems not to 
have heard of this variation. 

After about seven minutes, 
the bed became uninhabitable 
because of the breadcrumbs, and 
my wife knocked, over her glass 
of champagne while trying to 
brush the crumbs off. Altogether, 
it was a thoroughly sordid 
experience, and we would be 1 
much obliged if you could ask 
Doctor D to reconsider this 
particular technique, - or to- 
ad vise ns where we west wrong. 

From Jan EtheringtonrPetrie. 
Maple Road. Surbiton. Surrey. 

Keen to act Immediately -on your 
.feature remedy for revitalizing 
romance in maniage, I playfully 
improvised on the recipe of wine' 
and 1 sandwiches - beneath the 
-duvet and suggested to my 
spouse that we could launch the 
■wanting with Bodes Fizz, bacon 
butties and a bit of a fie-ln. ' 

He claimed that he would 
miss his. train. X' asked . what 
relevance that could ‘possibly 
have compared with nurturing, 
our relationship. He implied 
that I wioold jolly well find 'out 
when he was out of a job. 

. He grewled that he was all in. 
fevour of spontaneity, as long as 
he knew when toexyeet it, 

We are notspeakmg. • 

From a reader. 

name and address received . 

Having read the article by 
Penny Perrick on -“Lives 
Coloured by Depression" (Mon- 
day page, January 13) may I put 
the other side? I getvery fired of 
befog told bow dreadful it is to 
suffer from depression, how one 
must strive to underirtand and 


TALKBACK 


forgive the sufferers for their 
affliction. 

Consider what it is like to 
have . set up a pleasant birthday 
party for 70 friends at the 
request of the afflicted - because 
when the sunny side is up they 
are the most sociable of mortals 
- only to find that on the night 
the fog has descended and life is 
not worth living again, and 
certainly not worth the effort of 
appearing even rivfl to one’s 


I am tired of papering over 
the cracks . and pretending to 
friends and relatives that life is 
wonderful It is the nearest and 
dearest who come in for the bulk 
of the barrage. 

As one kind friend said to me: 
“It’s your, privilege to see his 
gloomy side as well". It is a 


privilege 1 would give my eye 
teeth to be able to walk away 
from, but that won’t do. 

I have to be there, for to go 
away would push him further 
into the mire. It won’t do for him 
to go away either as he then 
feels rejected. 

It is the Jekyll and Hyde 
syndrome. 1 never know which 
is going to walk in through the 
door, and the unpredictability is 
most unnerving. It is like Irving 
on a knife-edge. Yon can never 
relax or take anything for 
granted and any thought of 
lapsing into “placid serenity" is 
completely ont of the question. 
He seems totally unable to 
understand that he affects 
everyone fo the bouse. 

Perhaps this malady only 
affects the totally self-centred? 
Ms Perrick, a sufferer herself, 
looks at it only from her side of 
the wall try living on my side! 



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THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 24 1986 


THE TIME S 
DIARY 


Alfonsin’s 
taskforce 

For the first time since the Falklands 
c onflic t, a delegation, of senior 
Argentine politicians is to visit the 
Commons next month. The four 
men. two Peronists and two 
Radicals, will be guests- of the South' 
Atlantic Council, set up to promote 
■Anglo- Argentine reconciliation, and 
the ' Inter- Parliamentary Union. 
David Steel, David .Owen, Denis 
Healey and, probably, Neil Kinnock 
will meet them. With Buenos Aires 
now willing to talk about reconcili- 
ation, and with the trip being 
supported by senior Tory back- 
bencher David Crouch, the Govern- 
ment alone is standing outside the 
rapprochement process. Now Baron- 
ess Young, for the Foreign Office, is 
to be pressed to meet the delegation. 
George Foulkes, the Labour foreign 
affairs spokesman, says: “With 
Fortress Falklands costing tht* 
country £50. million 1 a year, the 
opposition partis and many Con- 
servatives see the need to normalize 
relations. It seems 1 as if only ‘Mifc 
Thatcher is now bolding 6 uL” 

Glowing report 

1 don’t give much for the chances of 
bigwigs in South Glamorgan in. the 
event of nuclear war. The county 
council’s public protection com- 
mittee was last night considering the 
laughable results of a Home Offic'e 
inspection of the Coryton “emer- 
gency centre" (ie nuclear bunker) in 
Cardiff. “It was found that the 
existing asphalt roof covering (which 
was 30 years old) had cracked and 
blistered in numerous places. This 
was allowing rain water to seep 
through the concrete roof", says the 
report of the council's chief execu- 
tive. These leaks “are affecting the 
electric cabling and will ultimately 
cause damage to the communi- 
cations equipment and lead to 
deterioration of the fabric of the 
structure”. Coryton would be proof 
against radiation - “subject to the 
roof being repaired". 


BARRY FANTON1 



“Cheer up, Nigel, some girls 
might And a car made 
by Vauxhail really off-beat* 

Oh, Mr Porter 

Embarrassment looms for the sedate 
East India Club in St James's. It is 
being taken to an industrial tribunal 
by an ex-hall porter, as I have 
reported, and the case will be heard 
on February 3. The management of 
that august institution dearly does 
not relish the prospect. The porter. 
Samuel Parks, who is claiming 
unfair dismissal, was offered' first a 
small sum of money, to withdraw, 
then a much larger sum, but he has 
refused Yesterday Parks’s adviser 
Michael Dickson, told me: “Mr 
Parks is not going to be bought off. 
A principle is at stake." The club 
secretary. John Stoy. and the club's 
solicitors declined to comment. 

Frisson 

Reg Frceson. Labour MP for Brent 
East, teeters on the brink. Will he or 
won't he defy his party and stand as 
an independent at the next election 
against Ken Livingstone? He cer- 
tainly makes no bones of his 
contempt for the man who has 
seized the parliamentary nomi- 
nation from him. The .Brent East 
party is “in serious crisis - an 
unsurprising outcome of years of 
factionalism, conspiratorial politics 
and manipulation associated with 
Mr Livingstone”, writes Freeson to 
his parly secretary. “I oppose 
narrow ideologues, adventurists and 
carpet-baggers. . . the abuse of local 
government for personal aggrandise- 
ment. . . the manipulation of the 
party and idealistic followers by 
ambitious populists. . . the abuse of 
anti-racism.” The time is near 
■•when orie'has to stand one’s ground 
and risk defeat", he hints tantali- 
singly. “Something must be done to 
stop the rot. . . I am seriously 
considering wbat that should be. To 
paraphrase Thoreau. inaction would 
be imp licit consent" 

Lebor report 

Reg Freeson is not the only Labour 
politician unhappy, it seems, about 
Ken Livingstone's parliamentary 
candidacy in Brent EasL The 
opinions of former Brent council 
leader. John Lebor, were canvassed 
last summer by Labour and his lack 
of enthusiasm for Livingstone did 
not go unnoticed. Weeks later the 
chairman of the local Labour party, 
Pwma Tail, wrote sternly asking 
him to “clarify his position" by 
“actively campaigning on behalf of 
the official Labour party candidate" 
in the next general election. Lebor 
wrote bade Are you really asking for 
an undertaking of active campaign- 
ing for two years in advance? If you 
are. perhaps you could let me know 
under which party rule you are 
demanding this undertaking and 
who else you have asked?" 

PHS 


The Nimrod airborne early warping 
project looks set to stage the most 
spectacular crash of any British 
defence scheme for nearly 20 years.. 
After nine years’ work and- commit-' 
men is of £ I. QQO million, the project 
is running at lea&.fbur years behind 
schedule. The aircraft’s performance ' 
still falls far short not only of the 
standards which the RAF originally 

demanded but. in important - res- 
pects. the much lower interim 
standards which, as a desperation 
measure,' «(ere set tqsff summer. 

The project began in 1977 after 
intensive lobbying by industry and 
other - interests. The RAF really 
wanted tbe American Awacs, 18 of 
which have since come into service 
.with Nato. But at the time it was 
proving difficult to obtain agree- 
ment on a Nato programme and for 
Britain alone to buy Awacs, for 
about £450 million, was considered 
too expensive. 

So Britain decided to develop its 
own radar and other electronic 
systems to- be installed in the 
adapted fuselage of existing Nim- 
rods - developed from the world’s 
first civil jet airliner, the Comet. 
This was expected to cost about 
£300 million at 1977 prices and all 
- 1 ] aircraft should have been 
operational by 1984 at the latest. 

However, as things now stand, the 
aircraft will not be in RAF service 
before 1987 or 1988 at the earliest, 
and even on the most optimistic 
assumptions the performance would 
be below what the RAF 

Originally sought. 

The whole of the originally 
estimated cosL which translates into 
£850 million at today's prices, has 
‘been spent. Probably another £100 
million has been committed but not 
ac tually disbursed, and perhaps £375 
million would be require to bring 
the project up to a minimum 
standard. Beyond that several years' 
more work at great cost would be 
required to bring it up to the 
originally specified performance. 

One of- the problems with early 
warning aircraft is that many 
yardsticks exist for assessing per- 
formance. On some, Nimrod is said 
to be as good as. or better than. 
Awacs. But on several important 
measures it fails by a a wide margin 
to meet the minimum initial 
operating standard. 

There appears to have been little 
advance over tbe last year, indeed it 
is rumoured that the performance of 
one aircraft carrying out trial sorties 
has fallen in that time. 

The problem is not with the 
aircraft itself but with the radars, 
computers and other equipment 
which track enemy aircraft. The 
prime contractor for this equipment 
is GEC Avionics. 

For at least a year the Ministry of 
Defence has doubted whether GEC 
could bring these systems up to even 
a minimum standard, and the RAF 
despaired of the project months ago. 

It has been kept alive partly out of 
hope that, miraculously, things 
would come right, but chiefly 
because it was thought politically 
unacceptable to write off a project 
on which so much had been spent 


Rodney Cowton on the uncertain 
future of the Nimrod spy plane 

Will Younger 
strike down the 
mighty hunter? 


Unless GEC comes 'forward with 
radically improved proposals for 
achieving p e rfor m ance targets it 
appears that George Younger, the 
new Defence Secretary, may be 
about to summon up the courage to 
grasp this thistle and snap it off. 

The political price may not be too 
great The project was. begun by a 
Labour • government, with Fred 
Multey as Defence Secretary, and no 
doubt Michael Heseltme would be 
made to carry - most of the 
opprobrium for not having cancelled 
it during his three years at Defence. 

Cancellation, although causing 
acrimony, would probably be in the 
best interests of GEC itself. Even 
those most critical of its perform- 
ance over Nimrod acknowledge that 
GEC Avionics does excellent wort; 
in other fields and regret that it is 
being tainted by this one failure. 

One thing which has - not been 
challenged throughout Nimrod's 
long and laborious gestation is the 
need for something to fulfil this role. 
The (JK. air defence region extends 
for to the north of the Faroe Islands, 
east to Norway and almost to 
Denmark, and well to the west of 
Ireland. The region is covered at 
high altitude out to a distance of 200 
miles or more from the UK by land- 
based radars. At medium height 
there is good cover -to about 100 
miles, but at low level there are huge 
gaps in the radar cover, particularly 
to the north and west, through 
which enemy bombers could attack. 
It is the job of airborne radar to fill 
these gaps. 


AWtaddBr 
rwl*r cswnga 

Man 

MSfluai_*u 

Low ii I 



Defending Britain: Nimrod’s role in 
bridging the radar gaps 

Britain has had early warning 
coverage of a sort for years. Since 
the 1950s it has been provided by 
Shackleton aircraft carrying 1940s 
vintage radar. These aircraft are 
regarded with admiration and 
affection but they were regarded 
only as a stop-gap when they were 
introduced. 

The six remaining in service are 
being given a four-month refit to 
keep them going until 1988, and 
perhaps until 1 990 if there is nothing 
to replace them. The RAF has 


COUNTDOWN TO CRISIS 


January 

1975 

March 

1977 


1979 

1982 

1984 


Agreement to replace 
1950s Shackleions. 

Labour government November 

approves project for 1984 

1 1 N unrods in prefer- 
ence to American End 1984 

Awacs at estimated 
cost of £250-£300 
million for service by 1985 
end of 1982. 

New Conservative 
government decides 
to proceed. 

Defence white paper 
says Nimrod Mark 3 
should enter service 
following year. 

Defence white paper 
refers to Nimrod's 
"introduction into 


service later this 
year”. 

First Nimrod handed 
over to RAF Wad- 
dington for validation 
£710 million already 
spent, a farther £106 
million committed. 
Negotiations between 
MoD and GEC to 
agree mmimnni oper- 
ational capability, 
date and cost for 
achieving it. GEC 
indicates four years 
and np to £400 
million or more. At 
least £900 million 
already spent or 
committed. 


scoured tbe world far sparepans to 
keep thewt operational. 

Even at its present . level of 
performance Nimrod' is a great 
advance on the Shacldetons-' If it 
met the original performance speci- 
fication. one aircraft could provide 
surveillance over perhaps 10 times 
the area covered by a Shackleton. 

While a Shackleton working flatf 

out ought be able to report by radio 
perhaps 30-40 trades of aircraft per 
minute, the elecronics of Nimrod 
the “mighty hunter" of the ] -Boofc of 
Genesis - should be able to-monztor 
and transmit information on at least 
10 times that number of tracks per 
second, instantly, disseminating the 
information to Nato and British air 
defence systems and controlling 
squadrons of allied fighters. But, ax 
present, in some repeats, it cannot 
do it. 

Although intended primarily for 
use over the sea. Nimrod is also 
supposed to have some capability 
over land. However, it has difficulty 
in rfiafi ngu i siting between slow- 
moving helicopters and fost-moving 
ground vehicles. When carrying out 
surveillance over the sea, bux 
looking towards the land, radar 
signals from the sea area may be 
obscured by false responses from the 
land. 

It should be: able to trade 
hundreds of aircraft simultaneously, 
but its computer can handle only a 
fraction of that number. Mainten- 
ance and reliability are said to be 
major problems, with insufficient 
fault identification equipment, 

GEC accuses the RAF of “moving 
the goal posts". To this the RAF 
replies that the original specification 
has not been greatly changed and 
that what chang e there has been is 10 
be expected when a project is 
running four years late and the 
threat which it is supposed to 
counter is advancing the whole time. 

GEC increasingly complains of 
the problems of trying to cram its 
systems into a cramped fuselage. 
The RAF replies that tbe Nimrod 
fuselage would have been adequate 
if the systems had worked as they 
were supposed -to; the problem has 
arisen from the need to add extra 
equipment to remedy deficiencies in 
performance. 

There are three possible replace- 
ments the Boeing Awacs, already in 
service with Nato; the E-2C 
Hawkeye operated by the US Navy, 
and the Orion P-3C. which Lock- 
heed is seeking to market. 

The Hawkeye does not have the 
necessary range and the Orion, 
although a well proven aircraft, 
would be new in tbe early warning 
role. The cabinet is under strong 
pressure now to cancel Nimrod and 
order the necessary number of 
Awacs - probably about six. 

That would add an additional 
£800 million to the already over- 
stretched defence budget over the 
next three years. But at least the 
money would be spent on a proven 
system and would dispose of the 
most unsatisfactory defence project 
of the decade. 

The author is defence correspondent 
o/The Times. 


Tito’s widow has been claiming 
(unsuccessfully) her inheritance: he 
had got rid of her a few years before 
his dead), no doubt to instal 
something more agreeable and up- 
to-date in her place, and they dearly 
parted very non-speaks indeed - so 
much so that she seems to have 
lived under conditions not far 
removed from house arrest ever 
since. 

The marital , relations of Tito do 
not concern me: what caused me to 
twitch an. eyebrow when I read of 
the dispute over his property was the 
list of the said property. It induded 
cars, motorboats, horses, yachts, 
jewellry. paintings, a score of villas, 
orchards, a . safari park and 
vineyards, and the value amounted 
to millions of pounds. 

You see the point immediately, 
no doubt. What was this noble, 
selfless, upright, honourable, caring, 
moral, austere, heroic, truly socialist 
figure (he Stafford Cripps of the 
Balkans, the Keir Hardie of the non- 
aligned. the Nye Bevan of small 
nations - what was he doing with 
millions of pounds worth of luxury’ 
goods, disappointed widow or no 
disappointed widow? 

Not everybody can answer that 
question, and some who can answer 
it will be reluctant to do so. Yet the 
answer, however distasteful it may 
be thought, is surely a very 
straightforward one: it is that mass 
murderers arc very unlikely indeed 
to jib at theft. Moreover, when the 
mass murderer -in question is not 
part of the private sector, but the 
unchallenged and unchallengeable 
despotic ruler of on entire stale, he 
can loot the public purse with 
impunity, for none of the mice will 
be willing to bell the cat or even to 
admit that there is a cat to be belled. 

It is easy to see .this in. the case of 
Ccauscscu, who is nothing but a 
thieving scoundrel, or in that of the 
Emperor Bokassa. Giscard d’Es- 
taing's chcr ami. Bui it is hardly 
more difficult to see it in the case of 
some rulers who have committed 
few. if any, murders, but have 
concentrated entirely on providing 
for their old age or overthrow. There 
mnsL for instance, be banks in 
Zurich desperate for space in which 
to accommodate the savings of 
President Mobutu of Zaire: it seems 
that Washington estate agents have 
been buying whole neighbourhoods 
on behalf of President Marcos of the 
Philippines: and one of the few good 
laughs the people of Poland had 
when Jaruzelski took power was the 
sight of those he had supplanted 
being accused of widespread pecu- 
lation.. 

But Tito was supposed (though 
not by me) to be above all that. Mass 
murder, yes: the dead ’u ns were 
obstructing progress towards social- 
ism. and you can't make a real 
Yugoslav omelette without breaking 
a bottle of s/ivovirzi But a taste for 
luxury, and robbing the public in 
order to indulge it? Even unre- 
constructed Stalinists, willing 10 
believe anything bad about the man 
who defied their hero, will surely be 
astonished to learn that Tito 
collected jewellry, country houses 
and vineyards. 

Lord Acton did not say “All 
power corrupts”, and he would have 
been a prize fool if he had. Did 
power corrupt Gandhi? Or Clement 
Aulee? Or Pope John? Or his 
present successor? Or Florence 
Nightingale? Or Vespasian? Or. 
ahem, Hannibal? What Acton said 
was “Power tends 10 corrupt"; 


Bernard Levin: the way we live now 

Power that 
enriches while 
it corrupts 


Ph4b YoMna 



inevitability was brought into it only 
in Lhe form, “Absolute power 
corrupts absolutely. ~ 

And so it does, and always will. 
Nor. as my roll-call suggests, is the 
corruption of power limited to one 
end of the political spectrum. It is 
true that supporters of left-wing 
regimes, and of left-wing insurgents 
against right-wing regimes, in- 
variably claim that the defeated or 
beleaguered forces of the right are 
financially corrupt, and those 
making the claims proudly contrast 
their own side's scrupulous purity in 
money matters, to such an extent 
that it sometimes seems as though 
Marxism is not an ideology but an 
antibiotic, with the miraculous 
property of cleansing the patient's 
blood of avarice, dishonesty and a 
taste for grands crus and caviar. 

But apart from the fact that it 
almost always turns out, even if only 
after some years, that the Marxist 
power-brokers were not in tbe least 
averse to sleeping on feather-beds, 
dining off gold plate and exercising 
every Variety of droit de seigneur. 
there is no evidence- at all that a 
belief in communism, even if it is 
genuine rather than cynically pro- 
fessed. is in any way a guarantee of 
financial probity and moral upright- 
ness. 

How could ii be? Tbe potential 


corruption of power is wi thin us, not 
external; the reason most of ns never 
succumb to it is that we have no 
power, and the wiser among us take 
good care never to acquire any, 
precisely because we are not cer tain 
that we could resist its heady fumes. 
But even jf we have power, or seek it 
most assiduously, it can never, in 
societies like ours, be absolute, or 
even very substantial It is otherwise 
with the Titos and Bokassas. 

.As it happens. I knew that Tito 
was a crook as long ago as 1977, 
when, on a stole visit to France, he 
stopped at Michel Gurnard's place at 
Eug£nie-Ies- Bains (to judge by that 
waistline I bet he didn’t go for the 
cuisine minceur j and skedaddled 
without paying the bill: Gutrard 
complained loudly, and the French 
Foreign Office turned as pink as 
mine host's roast lamb and forked 
out for what Tito had forked in. 

I remember remarking at the time 
that Tito had been so accustomed to 
bilking restaurateurs and shop- 
keepers in his own. country without 
being -challenged (because none, 
back home, would dare to challenge 
him) that he had altogether forgotten 
that elsewhere. a bit of give is 
expected to accompany the 

“We brought nothing into this 
world, says the- Prayer Book, “and 
it is certain that we shall carry 


nothing out rof iL” No. but; in 
between, ifweare ina position to do 
so. we can collect quite a lot, and 
enjoy it for quite a long time. And 
when we have the power of life and 
death over our subjects, how easy it 
must be to believe that if their lives 
are ours to command, to regulate 
and even to destroy, then their 
property is as nothing, and can be 
diverted to our use without any 
feeling of unease, let alone guilt. 

.And in time, such tyrants come to 
believe that not only- their subjects 
but the very soil of their country 
belongs to them (literally - among 
Tito's inventory was an entire island 
in the Adriatic). . and may be 
gathered in to make their lives still 
more comfortable. 

Here I pause to make a prophecy. 
The Widow Mao was accused, when 
after Mao's death his faction was 
overthrown, of countless crimes; 
among these was a taste for luxury, 
indulged at the expense of the toiling 
masses. The most bizarre of the 
charges was that she used to eat hot 
melon; well, tastes differ, and I 
certainly prefer mine frappe, but that 
is not the point. The point is that the 
new rulers of China fingered her as 
corrupt, diverting to her own use 
that which was the property of all. 

Now for my prophecy: within five . 
years of where we sit, Mao will have 
been condemned by his successors 
for precisely the same crimes, only 
to a for greater extent We shall learn 
that be had a vast collection of 
precious jade, golden armour, silk 
underwear, whores, crocodile-skin 
shoes, jewelled cigarette-holders, 
Faberge knick-knacks and a dozen 
more varieties of extremely unprole- 
tarian comforts; with any luck it will 
be revealed that he went on the Long 
March in a Rolls-Royce, with a 
Fortnums hamper in the boot. 

That will be disconcerting to Mr 
Neville Maxwell (Felix Greene has 
died), but it will not surprise me in 
the least. Absolute power corrupts 
absolutely, and when a man is 
worshipped as a living god (I never 
tire of pointing out that when Mao 
died there were seven hundred 
million extant pictures of him in 
China) he would have to be of a 
nonpareil diffidence and modesty to 
insist that be was only - er - primus 
inter pares. 

Mankind is not yet perfect, and it 
is my sad _ task to announce that 
perfection is most unlikely to be 
achieved by the week after next, and 
that meanwhile greedy swine like 
Tito will take what they can get, and 
none shall Say them nay. The 
solution lies not in trying to hurry 
the perfection, but in devising a 
system that takes the imperfection 
into account. And these is only one 
way to achieve that: a form of 
government which prevents any 
man from having great power, let 
alone absolute power, over the 
governed. 

There are, of course, better 
reasons for democracy than that it 
prevents its leaders amassing yachts, 
villas, safari-parks, paintings and 
vineyards, but that is a very good 
reason none tbe less. I don't know 
whether Tito ever read Montaigne, 
but if he did I wonder what he 
thought when he got to the bit which 
says, “Sit we upon never so high a 
stool yet sit we but upon our own 
tails". I dare say that .all he did was 
to rearrange , the silk cushions and 
call for some more Bollinger. And 
woe betide any serf who brought 
him the non-vimage. 

Nwww L lM . a aw 


David Watt 



heart and head 


The words that have cr o p p ed up 
moss often in the Westland affair 
(apart, perhaps, from “domineer- 
ing") have been “anti-American” 
and “anti-European". As Geoffrey 
Smith pointed 'out the other day, it 
is, strictly speaking, unfoir to drag 
these adjectives into the argument. 

It is not anti-American to claim, 
as Michael Heseltine has done, that 
the Atlantic alliance would actually 
be strengthened if the Europeans 
be cam e less dependent on American 
arms and if the Americans allowed 
the Europeans more than a derisory 
share of the US defence market. 

It may be mistaken, but it is not 
necessarily anti-European to say. as 
the government has said, that the 
best way of making sure that the 
- taxpayer does not have to fork out in 
the future is to allow Westland to 
grab the surest lifeline Immediately 
available even if it happens to be 
American. 

“This will do as an explanation and 
an apology for the moment. 
Nevertheless, there is a real problem 
of national psychology here. There 
really are strong, shifting and often 
contradictory currents of opinion 
about the US and Europe at work 
which cannot foil to have a powerful 
influence on the way British 
interests are seen. 

There is. in focL an emotional 
element underpinning Heseltine's 
logical arguments, which is that the 
Americans are getting too powerful 
and contemptuous of us. If a lot of 
people -did not feel this, he would 
not have made nearly as much 
headway as he has. On the other 
hand, if the prospect of European 
cooperation did not immediately 
arouse all sorts of atavistic doubts 
and suspicions, he would have made 
even more headway. 

Trying to chart these waters is not 
easy, but perhaps the best starting 
point is Churchill's famous postwar 
image. This was of the three 
overlapping circles at the juncture of 
which Britain stands - the Ameri- 
can. the European and the Com- 
monwealth. The Commonwealth 
probably never appealed much to 
the British public, except when it 
still looked a bit like' the Empire. It 
has subsequently disappointed pol- 
icy makers of all political stripes 
becatise.it has- provided .a less and 
less secure basis for British influ- 
ence. Ii is now regarded as being of 
marginal importance even by the 
Labour Pam’, for whom it briefly 
seemed to offer a sublimated form of 
imperial benevolence. This is a pity, 
but it is a fact. 

The American circle has had a 
chequered career. It was sustained at 
the popular level for 25 years by the 
simple idea that the Americans arc 
“nice people" who speak our 
language, and that anyway, wc need 
them ’ to defend us -against the 
Russians. This view was given a new 
impetus by the glamour of John 
Kennedy, but was undermined by 
the Vietnam war. by the appearance 
of presidents from Johnson to 
Reagan to whom the British found it 
hard to relate, and by nearly 1 5 years 
of economic difficulties which have 
exacerbated conflicts of interest 
between ourselves and tbe US. 

At the point we have now 
reached, the opinion polls show that 
while we still like Americans as 
people, we rather distrust them as a 
stole and are worried about the 
competence and views of the present 
administration. For instance, the 


addition of the words "Aroencan- 
comroUed” to questions about 
cruise missiles adds 10 pervert tog* 
points to opposition to them. *ne 
British would not have elected 
Ronald Reagan in 1984. Their view 
of him as a president is now the 
reverse of the American: 30 per cent ^ 
arc satisfied, 70 per cent are not. 

The political and bureaucratic 
worlds have taken a more compli- 
cated view. There have always been 
quite pronounced strands of anti- 
Americanism in the Conservative as 
well as the Labour Party. The tury of 
many Tories at tbe vulgar American 
usurpation of the Britain's imperial 
role has been matched by the left's 
eager adoption of the idea that the 
chief capitalist stale must also, by 
definition, be an imperialist one. 
and therefore the legitimate heir 10 
all the moral opprobrium they once 
heaped on the British Empire. 

But mainstreams bipartisan opi- 
. nion since the war has been that the * 
“special relationship” with 
Washington, was the most comfort- 
able. as well as the most effective 
instrument of British foreign policy. 

Is this sentiment changing? Yes. 
but slowly. Many senior politicians 
and civil servants are much more 
sceptical than formerly about claims 
that American policies and British 
interests coincide, particularly in the 
economic field. And they tend to 
share the general sense of worry and 
irritation about the Reagan adminis- 
tration. 

But old habits die hard, and most . 
policy-makers instinctively prefer toi** 
make a bilateral accommodation 
with Washington rather than try to 
improve their negotiating hand by 
combining with other Europeans. 

The feet that this may often be the 
less effective strategy - given that 
the Americans themselves, c\ccpi 
on a very narrow range of defence 
questions, no longer give Britain 
special rights - does not alter our 
menial furniture. The Iasi two 
British governments haw usually 
ended up with policies based on the 
conviction that “the moral is. keep 
hold of nurse, for fear of finding 
something worse". 

If. in the American case, the 
British still allow sentiment to 
override some substantial doubts, in jft- 
' the European circle the opposite 
applies. We are only now. after 15 
years in the EEC. and 25 in pursuit 
of membership, beginning to allow a 
powerful historic aversion to be 
overcome by the realization titat 
self-interest Forces us to make 
Europe the main foundation of our 
foreign stance. 

Many recent decisions, of which 
the Channel tunnel is the most 
spectacular (and probably, in us 
present form, the Icasi useful), attest 
to the change. 

Because there is link feeling 
outside the thin ranks of European 
enthusiasts in the bureaucracy, 
.however, the acknowledged logic of 
British interest is seldom followed 
out properly in practice. ^ 

The picture I have painted here 
does not imply that conflict between 
European and American interests is 
inevitable; for the most pan they arc 
still congruenL l am not even 
portraying a titanic struggle for the 
soul of Britain. Bui we arc in a 
muddle which will take time to clear 
up. Meanwhile perhaps we would be 
wise to follow our heads a little more 
often and our confused hearts a little 
less. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Wearing a heart 
on his stripes 


As you' must be aware by now. 
Moreover Enterprises has its very 
own publishing house. Mills and 
Bang, which produces nothing but 
romantic • military fiction. The 
romance appeals to the girls, the 
violence appeals to the men - and 
it's all in the same novels! That’s 
why Mills and Bang fiction, as 
delicate as a spray of apple blossom, 
yet as tough as a kick in the shins, is 
always up there in the best-seller list 
and we confidently feel that this new 
crop of macho yet maidenly yams 
will get you in the guts. 

Sally of Salisbury Plain, by Letitia 
Knapsack. 

When her mother and father had 
died unexpectedly, Sally had in- 
herited their place on the edge of 
Salisbury Plain. After paying her 
death duties, she had only 50,000 
acres and a stately home left, but she 
felt it was her duty to the nation to 
keep it going. Accordingly, she 
opened it to the public one day a 
year and the rest of the lime had 
wild parties there for her friends 
from London. 

One morning, she looked out of 
her bedroom window to see that the 
ancestral lawn had been turned into 
a crater 40 feet deep. She uied to 
remember what her weekend guests 
had been up to the night before, then 
suddenly realized that it was 
Wednesday and she was alone in the 
house. As she did so. she realized 
there was a man in the room with 
her. 

"Are you the new butler?” she 
asked. 

“No ma’am. T am Captain 
Roberts of the Yeomanshire Regi- 
ment. I wish to apologize for my 
men's direct hit on your lawn, it was 
a stray shell and will not happen 
again.". 

During the weeks that were to 
ensue.' Sally was to foil deeply in 
love with Captain Roberts's simple 
way of life, his almost mystic 
contact with earth, khaki and bare 
metal. At the same time. Captain 
Roberts was' to fell deeply in love 
with Sally’s endless round of parties 
and wild orgies. But which one of 
them was to win? The answer is 
revealed on one passionate night, 
when the two young people come to 
a compromise, and Sally’s stately 
home is destroyed by yet another 
stray shell. 


The Gentle Spider's Web. by Trudi 
Greensleeves. 

It was not until he joined the 
Parachute Regimem that Ralph 
realized he had an unconquerable 
fear of heights. 

"Oh, Judy," he wept into his 
girlfriend's denim shoulder-padding. 
”1 do my first drop tomorrow, and l 
would do anything to get out of it." 

Judy's heart softened at this first 
sign of humanity in Ralph. 

"Don't worry,” she said. "I will 
do the jump instead of you." 

"But — you have no moustache. 
No tattoos. They will notice." 

Twenty-four hours later, equipped 
with a false moustache and hastilv 
stencilled tattoo, Judy did her first 
jump. She loved iL Parachute 
Sergeant Ivor Thomas noticed her 
style and fell in love with her on the 
spot But he thought she was a man 
called Ralph. Never mind - 
everything was finally settled in a 
dramatic three- person jump over 
Brudershaufen. 

Souffle of Hearts, by Germaine 
Mod. 

"Four hundred baked beans on toast 
and one smoked mackerel quiche" 
said Major “Bob” Devizes. 

“Sorry, baked beans is off", said 
Shirley of the Catering Corps.Then 
she looked into Bob's eyes and 
gasped. He was really quite dishy. 

“Then make it smoked mackerel 
quiche for two", he said, reaching 
over and grasping her oven glove 
The battalion later starved to death 
but for Shirley and Bob it was never- 
ending love, plus lasagne on 
Sundays. 

Love Beyond Question, by Camille 
Philofax- 

"I just warn to ask vou a few 
questions", said Sergeant Sam Quin 
of Her Majesty's Interrogation 
Corps, flicking his electronic trun- 
cheon. 

“And l want to ask vou a 
question", said brave Bertha O’ Bra- 
rugan. “How on earth can you bear 
to wear that ghastly combat jacket 
with that terrible beret?" J 

Sam gasped. Nobody had ever 

,*? ^ lSwcr h . im back before. 
Several torture sessions later and £ 
would do everything she asked, even 
turn up in a smart DJ and red 
carnanon. But by then. *,ho ^ 

SfK. h ^ 1 sr tions7 A 






i 



• % : v? r ^ ^ r •* 


s * atr 


; ^ t 
la heaJ 15 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY l/t i oac 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Xi* 


PA.vjffl ?> ffl> Gray 1 ^ Inn; Road,. ' London ■ WC1 X 8EZ. Telephone: 01-837 1234 

EXCESSES OF LOYALTY 

The Pnnio Minister's statement political consequences.. She- has . puted accounts of meetings". 
. to thje House of _ Colnmqiis no choice . now but. to- protect And since the BAe chief felt able 
, yesterday TfcmJorced. her well them. Nor would her inclination - for reasons of improved 
deserved reputation for loyalty., be to do anything else. But she memory or future commercial 
j to her colleagues. Thao is _ still must ask herself whether those prospects - to brine his account 
. unfinished business; however, if who took, such decisions are the closer to that of his sponsoring 
, she is to regam the reputation for right people, in the right placer minister, the Lygo letter affair 
/ strong government that is her with the right powers if she is to can be set aside for the moment, 
owir best political asset and the overcome problems ’ like this in It did not, however, - leave Mr 
■ best available source-, of -good the future. ; /■ Brittan with an unassailed repu- 

’ government for Britain. Mr Leon Brittain now has "the tati on for candour. 

■In the days after Mr Heseltine cover*’ to which -he felt entitled. The case of the Mayhew letter 

a resigned from the Cabinet Mrs He would have -'preferred' the • was never open to the excuse of 
Thatcher was castigated - for Prime Minister’s office to have "misunderstanding’'. In bis do- 
. b«ng dogmatic, dommeenng publicized -the Solicitor Gen- fensive speech in the Commons 
-and dictatorial .This was newer a eral’s letter in some form. The on the 15th January Mr Brittan 
: sen y_ sustainable charge al- decision went against him and he asked MPs to believe that 
r, ? / ,ts uses ni Mr . was left to do it hims elf through although he had "consulted the 
Heseltine s campaign for the his . own detjartmeni. The fact Law Officer” about Mr Hesel- 


> support of grumbling Tory back 
■bemchers. Since then .it has 
become -. hard to resist the 
conclusion that the Government 
wpuld be in a much better state if 
' she had been as tough in her 
dealings with certain ministers 
land ..advisers as Mr Heseltine 
.'said that she was. After yester- 
^ day's statement that conclusion 
• is absolutely clear. 

Mrs Thatcher told the House 
that she "regretted the maimer” 
... in whit. b the Solicitor General’s 
( letter had been selectively pub- 
Slished via a telephone call to the 
i Press Association. She also 
: regretted' the fact that the 
Solicitor General had not been 
consulted about the leak of his 
confidential letter m which he 
'accused Mr Heseltine of “mat- 
erial inaccuracy” in his advice to 
, the bankers for the European 
consortium. She may yet have 
cause to regret much more. 

Officials in her office are said 
to have acted without her 
= knowledge to leak a document in 
a way that had damaging 


political consequences.. She. has 
no choice . how but. to protect 
them. Nor would her inclination 
be to do anything else. But she 
must ask herself whether those 
who took, such decisions are the 
right people, in the right placer 
with the right. -powers if she is to 
overcome problems like this in 
the future. : ■ '7 

Mr Leon Brittan how has "the 
cover*’ to which -he felt entitled. 
He would have -preferred the 
Prime Minister’s office to have 
publicized 'the Solicitor Gen- 
eral’s letter- in some form’ The 
decision went against him and he 
was left to do it hims elf through 
his. own department. The fact 
remains, however,, that Mr 
Brittan .was - the senior respon- 
sible minister to have knowledge 
of the' : unorthodox events that 
were taking place. It is easy to 
see the logic '.of those loyalist 
Tory MPs who' argued yesterday 
that this sort of leaking is' the 
daily stuff of government, which- 
ever party is in power. It is easy 
to agree that the Government’s 
handling of the Westland affair 
has grown out of context and out 
of all proportion. But .logic is a 
poor friend in politics. -Context 
and proportion matter much 
more. - Mr Brittan, a sound 
logician has shown himself an 
unsound politician. 

For more than a week poten- 
tially deadly issues have been 
hovering like vultures over the 
battered body of the Trade and 
Industry Secretary. Some of 
. them he has frightened away. Sir 
Raymond Lygo’s letter is not the 
lethal threat it once threatened to 
be. It can be classified by 
students of the Westland affair in 
their bulging files marked “dis- 


’ : fa ' 


TRIBALISM VERSUS MARXISM 




- ■; ;VAlt 

.i 


>1 i i -'w« 


• Through all the clouds of 
i uncertainty which have hung 
‘above South Yemen this week, 
' one conclusion has dearly 
■emerged. Soviet strategic plan- 
1 ning m the Middle East has been 
complicated by a turn of events 
, which the Russians could hardly 
have expected, and for which 
: they could still less have wished. 
Their grand diplomatic design to 
; re-enter the Middle East peace 
process has suffered something 
of a reverse. If a pro-Soviet 
■.- faction wins power in a Third 
'World country, it can be sup- 
. ported and if this is later 
’overthrown and replaced then 
the new regime can be reviled as 
: a reactionary force, embodying 
iall that is worst in the West. But 
if one pro-Soviet party fells out 
-with another, over arguments 
which are personal or tribal, then 
the Kremlin is lost for an 
‘answer. 

This is not the first time that 
- ‘ tribal divisions have proved too 
much for Russian ambitions in 
the Third World. They were only 
too clearly evident during the 
early days of the crisis in 
Afghanistan. But their impact 
upon South Yemen (containing 
• as it does the port of Aden, a 
strategically vital base for Soviet 
operations in the Indian Ocean) 
can hardly have come at a less 


propitious moment for the new 
men in the Kremlin. 

In the Middle East as else- 
where in : the world, they bad 
thought they were starting to 
reap the benefits of the fresh 
diplomatic style which had 
emerged in the post-Brezhnev 
era, with its lighter touch, greater 
flexibility and less dogmatic 
pursuit of long-term Marxist 
ideals. In recent months the 
Soviet Union has resumed 
diplomatic relations with the 
Gulf states of Oman and the 
United Arab Emirates, and there 
has been talk of overtures to 
Saudi Arabia. There have even 
been rumours of links being 
restored between the Soviet 
.Union and Israel; it is also worth 
noting that the resumption of 
diplomatic relations between 
Israel and Spain did not come in 
for the condemnation it might 
have earned from Moscow 
twelve months ago, however 
unpopular Spain’s political lead- 
ers made themselves in the Arab 
world. Gradually the Russians 
have been able to implant the 
notion that # in any overall 
settlement of the Middle East 
issues, the Russians would have 
to be involved. But is it true? 

As Soviet interests have 
spread round the world so its 
leadership has also come to 


AT HEAVEN’S GATE 


Today, about an hour after the 
Greenwich segment of the west- 
ern hemisphere enters full dark- 
ness, the space probe Voyager 2 
will be gin its passage through tbe 
planetary system of Uranus. The 
transit will take mere hours 
before the craft takes off for its 
possible rendezvous with. Nep- 
tune in three years. The data 
about Uranus are a bonus; 
Voyagers 1 and 2 paid their way 
with their transmissions from 
the. systems of Jupiter and 
Saturn. But if new astronomical 
information about the further 
solar system comes cheap, it is 
held dear. 

That anthropomorphic, femily 
feeling we extend to the planets 
of the Earth's star system makes 
the data precious to layman as 
well as space scientist. Voyager's 
discoveries - Uranus’ "extra” 
moons, clues to its formation, 
the content of its atmosphere, 
inference about the planet's core 
- do more than add to. the stock 


Decline in research 

From DtL~ R. WcatheHey 

Sir, I refer to the views expressed by 
Sir Christophor Laidlaw (January 8) 
concerning research and academia 
and feel that it is worth pointing out 
prat many members of the engineer - 
ing- community within academia 
have already gone si long way to 
embrace the approach which, be 

proposes."'. • 

The motivation and will to 
develop ideas into useful, products 
and processes, I believe, is stronger 
than Sir Christophor suggests. In my 
own discipline of chemical engineer-. 
iit 7 . we have ' seen within • the. 
university community, a- remark ab le 
iicubility to respond to the needs of. 
industry’ with new programmes of 


of local astronomical knowledge. 
They populate the familiar skies 
and bring their contents, rock, 
debris, mere gas, within the 
compass of human endeavour. 

Voyager 2 demonstrates, yet 
again, the co-operative nature of 
the scientific project- It helps 
make comprehensible that 
yearning for international shar- 
ing that so often makes of 
scientists such naive politicians 
and vulnerable custodians of the 
West’s freedoms. The probe is 
American, ditto the analysis of 
its transmissions at the Jet 
Propulsion Laboratory in Pasa- 
dena. But Uranus was the 
discovery of that eminent Briton 
William Herschel. 170 years ago. 
and Australians are only ode of 
the several .groups of physicists 
and mathematicians who will 
piece together the rich fragments 
from Voyager; Some have es- 
sayed predictions (about the 
planet's atmosphere, about, the 
mass , of its satellites) that will be 


development activity in areas like 
biotechnology, ; speciality moduct 
development, process intensification 
and energy network analysis, to 
name but r a -few; 

I agree wholeheartedly with the 
view that a greater emphasis should 
be placed, on. development, and 

exploitation. Unfortunately those of 

us In academia who take this view 
are, more .than ever, frustrated by. 
the lack of pump-pruning fending 
from public . sources -which is 
necessary to demonstrate the poten- 
tial of an'idea to would-be industrial 
sponsors. . This', is .reflected in the 
• great difficulty hi recruiting staff of 
the appropriate .calibre ' to carry out 
‘jdevani development work 

Mean while- wc see hogp amounts 
of public fending continually poured 


pul to the lest. Others will build 
from the data even further 
insights into the process by 
which the Universe came into | 
being. ! 

The project also shows how 
false is the common antithesis 
between science (meaning theo- 
retical knowledge) and tech- 
nology. The apparatus for receiv- 
ing transmissions from the probe 
and for directing its course is 
both a precondition and an 
intimate of astrophysical know- 
ledge of the highest abstraction. 
And in that marriage lies the 
cause for celebration today about 
a tiny event billions of miles 
away. Assimilating the signals 
from Uranus requires an act of 
imagination, and they feed it. As 
they slake they excite a thirst for 
new knowledge, pure and ap- 
plied. Today’s extra-terrestrial 
action is a spur to mental effort 
on Earth-: good for science, good 
for its innovative application, 
good, loo, for our sense of 
ourselves! 


into the prestigious pure science 
projects which are seldom likely to 
see a financial return. Generation of 
wealth by the development of better 
processes, better products and more 
effective marketing ought to be the 
major priority. Then we may be able 
to justify generous spending on 
esoteric scientific research. 

Unfortunately it appears to be a 
deeply rooted part of the British 
culture to measure scientific excel- 
lence in terms of pure knowledge 
rather than in- terms of the 
marketability and commercial ex- 
ploitation of ideas; 

Yours faithfully, 

LAWRENCE WEATHERLEY. 

6 Frirways, * . 

Dunfermline, 

Fife. 

January '13.,’ 


Keeping hospitals free from disease 


puted accounts of meetings". 
And since the BAe chief felt able 
- for reasons of improved 
memory or future commercial 
prospects - to bring; his account 
closer to that of his sponsoring 
minister, the Lygo letter affair 
can be set aside for the moment. 
It did not, however, leave Mr 
Brittan with an unassailed repu- 
tation for candour. .. 

The case of the Mayhew letter 
was never open to the excuse of 
"misunderstanding”.. In bis do- 
fensive speech in the Commons 
on tbe 1 5th January Mr Brittan 
asked MPs to believe that 
although he had "consulted the 
Law Officer” about Mr Head- 
line's letter, he had not asked the 
Law Officer to- write his sub- 
sequent letter to Mr Heseltine. 
There were not a few who found 
this hard to believe even then. 
But we now know that, while he 
was making that statement, he 
withheld the feet that he had 
himself authorized the leaking of 
that letter. 

The House deserves more 
candour than it has this week 
received from Mr Brittan. The 
prime cause of the Govern- 
ment's damage in this affair is 
the behaviour of Mr Michael 
Heseltine. Mis Thatcher must 
regret that she did not remove 
him from her Government well 
before he resigned. But in the . 
dirty fight that Mr Heseltiue 
precipitated Mr Brittan has 
allowed himself to be dragged ' 
down too dose to his adversary’s ; 
level Since be has Mrs j 
Thatcher’s “cover" she can 
hardly dismiss him. It would be 
better now for his government 
and his party if he were to give 
her his resignation. i 


From Dr R. Eban 

Sir, I fear the correct lesson will not 
be drawn from the enquiry into the 
Stanley Royd Hospital outbreak 
(report. January 22). Just as war is 
too important to be left to the 
generals, hygiene is loo important to 
be left to the catering officers. The 
only safeguard In institutional 
catering is a weekly, if not daily 
inspection of the kitchens by a 
senior administrator independent of 
the caterers. 

A twice-yearly inspection by an 
environmental health officer is quite 
useless in preventing an outbreak 
such as occurred at Stanley Royd 
and has occurred more recently 
(though with fortunately less disas- 
trous results) at another large 
hospital. 1 was taught this lesson as a 
National Service regimental medical 
officer in the Far East, where the 
daily round of kilchens and latrines 
with the orderly sergeant was by far 
the most important part of my 
function. 

The price of freedom - from 
infection is eternal vigilance (not 
twice-yearly inspections). Who will 
assume this responsibility, and what 
is more, discharge it? In the past, 
administrators have been reluctant 
to leave their desks and their 
financial statements to do the 
frequent regular inspections of 
kitchens, toilets and washing facili- 
ties, tire essential factor in maintain- 
ing elementary hygiene. Let us hope 
that our new managers do better. 
Yours etc, 

RAPHAEL EBAN. 

Ealing Health District, 

Ealing Hospital, 

Genera] Wing, 

Uxbridge Road, 

Southall, 

Middlesex. 

January 22. 


From Mr Christopher Siorrs 
Sir, Mr Norman Fowler's replies in 
the Commons yesterday (January' 
21) on the subject of hygiene in 
hospitals show great disingenuous- 
ness. He cannot seriously believe his 
own distinction between manage- 


realize the attendant risks of : 
foreign involvement. To take 
recent developments alone, the 
drought in Africa has indirectly 
concentrated criticism on Mos- 
cow because of its meagre aid to 
the starving in Ethiopia. In 
Lebanon it has become involved 
in a hostage crisis, a fete usually 
associated more with Western 
countries. In Afghanistan the 
Red Army has come under fire - 
literally and metaphorically. The 
Kremlin is being made to realize 
that in the eyes of the Third 
World one superpower looks 
much like another, except when 
its help is needed, and then it 
tends to be the United States 
which responds the more readily. 

But what South Yemen has 
most graphically demonstrated is 
the uncertain grip which the 
Russians now have on events 
outside their heartland. Their 
talent for crisis management 
would win them few prizes in 
any Western training school. At 
one time it looked as if no 
satisfactory settlement could be 
achieved in the Middle East 
without at some stage winning 
Moscow's blessing. This cer- 
tainly can be regarded as a pre- 
requisite no longer. Indeed as yet 
another trouble-spot is added to 
the growing list, and Moscow 
struggles to regain control, the 
reverse may well be true. 


Independence of BBC 

From Sir Robert Lusty 
Sir. It may not be loo late to hope 
that one paramount consideration 
will dominate the thinking of the 
Peacock committee as it ponders its 
conclusions on the BBC. 

. It was flagrantly wrong in the 
fifties, and it remains so today, that 
it should have been an "Indepen- 
dent” Television Authority set up to 
establish commercial channels in 
competition with the BBC. Indepen- 
dent of what? The implication is of 
some kind of freedom denied to the 
BBC. 

Protests were made at the time 
and ignored. That these are relevant 
still in no way detracts from the 
splendid achievements of the 
commercial companies or their, 
programmes. 

Nonetheless the supreme inspi- 
ration of public service broadcast- 
ing, as embedded within the deepest 
foundations of the BBC, is that 
essential “independence" of motive, 
constrained only by law and 
constitution, which gave the BBC a 
world leadership and a world 


Spanish Civil War 

From Mr Peter Kemp 
Sir, In his article on the aftermath of 
the Spanish Civil War (January IS) 
Antony Beevor tells a story, which is 
in fact quite untrue, about the Count 
of Alba de Yelies shooting six of his 
labourers on the outbreak of that 
war. 

h is based on misinterpretation of 
a passage in my own book on that 
war. Mine Were of Trouble, 
published here in 1957. I recognize 
now ihat the passage, taken out of its 
context, is open to misinterpreta- 
tion, and so I ask you to let me put 
the record straight. 

In feci, the count who. I 
explained, had a black sense of 
humour, invented the story himself 
to shock a naive British visitor, of 
whose opinions he disapproved. 
Unfortunately, as I realised later. I 
failed to make this vital point clear, 
and although I sought to amend the 
passage in page proof my altera- 
tions, For reasons unclear to me, 
were ignored. My publishers and I 
subsequently apologized to the 
count for this unintentional slur 
upon him. 

I should add that the count, 
whom I knew well, was in feet very 
popular with his workers, and he 
would never have contemplated 
such a crime. Anyone who had 
committed it would have faced trial 
from the Nationalist authorities. 
Yours faithfully. 

PETER KEMP, 

24 Radnor Walk, SW3, 

January 20. 


Born to blush unseen 

From Mr Christopher Wade 
Sir. Further to your correspondent’s 
list of disappearing forenames 
(January 3). I have been unearthing 
some choice 1 8th and 19th-century 
specimens in our survey of Hamp- 
stead parish churchyard. 

Among the men, we have: Armine 
SnoxeU, Fountain El win. Blanchard 
Coward, Alured Popple, Paramour 
Ashenden and Hercules Robinson. 

But the women are more colour- 
ful; B landin ah Kestcvcn, Rejoyce 
Foot. Idonea Punon. Zephretie 
Hyndman, Onyxia S win burn and 
Philadelphia Hancock; the latter was 
Jane Austen’s aunt. 

I have found much more joie de 
vivre in the graveyard than in 
your annual list of contemporary 
Christian names. 

Yours truly, 

CHRISTOPHER WADE 

(Vice-President, Camden History 
■Society). 

-28 Willoughby Road, NW3. 

January 14T 


ment issues and that of Crown 
immunity. 

difficult to believe that 
anything but the immunity from 
prosecution has undermined effec- 
tive hygiene and management, and 
will continue to do so until it is 
removed. It i s also difficult to 
believe that a Government which is 
keen to make authorities (local 
government, trade unions) more 
accountable, should be so tardy in 
this respect where Crown imm uni ty 
is involved. 

The most glaring aspect of the 
issue is Mr Fowler’s failure to justify 
the persistence of immunity 
Clearly, this is because there is no 
argument for it. While Mr Fowler 
has his inquiry and decides, can we 
have his assurance of his own 
resignation in the event of more 
fatalities like that at Stanley Royd 
hospital? 

Yours sincerely. 

CHRISTOPHER STORRS. 

31 Seaton Point. 

Downs Road, E5. 

January 22. 

Mental disorders 

From Dr Francis J. M. Farley. FRS 
Sir. Positron emission tomography 
(PET), which you say today 
("Cracking the mind's secrets”. 
January 20) gives insights into 
mental disease, is a direct product of 
research in particle physics. The 
techniques used are identical to 
those involved in unravelling 
complex nuclear events. 

Once again research in esoteric 
subjects unexpectedly throws up 
devices useful in everyday life. If we 
opt out of basic science, we will miss 
out on the inventions, too. Only one 
PET scanner in Britain, and that not 
working, is a natural result of our 
failure to pursue particle physics 
more vigorously. 

Yours faithfully, 

FRANCIS J. M. FARLEY, 

Carswell Barn, 

Faringdon. 

Oxfordshire. 

January 20. 


authority only lately under threat. It 
is precisely this which will be 
sacrificed if commercial advertising 
becomes any port of any programme 
to emanate from the BBC. 

The governors of the BBC, 
appointed by the Privy Council, 
should have this main consideration 
always in the forefront of their 
minds. No such responsibility rests, 
or ever has, upon the members of 
the IT A. Their functions arc quite 
different. 

Boards at any one lime may be 
good or they may be bad. All such 
have their peaks and their troughs;- 
so too boards of management. It 
may matter for a time, but cannot be 
allowed to be of consequence in the 
sweep of years. 

The true “independence" of the 
BBC is a priceless asset not only to 
this country but to the world. It 
should not be put at risk by the 
whim of Government or the 
requirements of financial “logic". 
Yours faithfully, 

ROBERT LUSTY. 

Broad Dose, 

Blockley, 

More ton -in-Marsh, Gloucestershire. 


Stability at Defence 

From Dr Bruce Collins 
Sir, Mr Michael Glover (January 1 8) 
plays fast and loose with history. To 
discredit Admiral of the Fleet Sir 
Henry Leach's view (January 15) 
that frequent ministerial changes 
hurt defence policy, he reports that 
the Admiralty had no fewer than 
four political heads in the five years 
before Trafalgar. 

Indeed- But Lord Spencer had 
enjoyed a long spell as a reforming 
administrator ( 1 794-1 801 ). His three 
successors all knew a good deal 
about their job. Two were full 
admirals of high standing who had 
also been MPs; one had served as 
controller of the Navy for 12 years, 
and Lord St Vincent had com- 
manded both the Mediterranean and 
Channel fleets in wartime. Lord 
Melville helped conduct the war 
during the 1790s as one of Pitt’s 
closest senior colleagues. 

Although administrative contro- 
versies bedevilled the Admiralty 
during 1801-5, the prelude to 
Trafalgar and that engagement itself 
conformed to tested policies and 
practices, and confirmed a British 
naval superiority already established 
in five major battles from 1794 to 
1801. 

To compare that situation with 
the bureaucratic cauldron of the 
modem three - Service department of 
Defence is surely far-fetched. Per- 
haps Mr Glover's analogy arose 
from Mr Heseltine’s turning a 
Nelsonian blind eye to signals from 
his superior and proceeding to 
grapple at close quarters with his 
adversary. But then Nelson always 
sank more than one of his chosen 
targets. 

Yours faithfully. 

BRUCE COLLINS, 

University of Glasgow. 

Department of Modern History, 
Glasgow. 

Which chestnut? 

From Wing Commander B. G. 
Burman 

Sir, Your correspondent, Lawrence 
Hills (January 3), raises an old 
chestnut in his quest for information 
on the resistance to insect attack of 
chestnut timber. My cherished 1934 
edition of A. L Howard's The 
Timbers of the World quotes 
correspondence in your pages of 
over 90 years ago on the very same 
subject from the then architect to the 
London County Council, Thomas 
Blashill. 

Sweet chestnut (Castanea vulgaris 
- 281b lOoz per cubic ft) limber was 
extensively used for constructional 
work because of its resistance to 


Paying a price for 
cathedral entry 

From the Bishop of Rochester 
Sir. In his letter about cathedrals 
(January 18) Dr John Maddison is. 2 
fear, misleading about State aid for 
historic churches that are still in use. 

Whilst for a while it may have 
been true that outstanding parish 
churches who made application, 
with their archdeacons' support, 
together with historic church build- 
ings belonging to other denomi- 
nations, could, if their case was 
proved, rely upon a grant of up to 50 
per cent, this is no longer the case. 

Under the new arrangement, by 
which responsibility has been 
delegated by the Secretary of Slate to 
English Heritage, the plain fact is 
that that new body, acting as the 
Historic Buildings and Monuments 
Commission, does not have suffi- 
cient funds available to make grants 
of more than 40 per cent. Moreover, 
only a proportion of the outstanding 
parish churches that are now making 
application are receiving State aid. 
Many equally deserving cases are 
receiving no help at all. 

So far as the Church of England is 
concerned, the prime need is for the 
commission to have sufficient funds 
to meet the known needs of historic 
parish churches, which arc account- 
able under the long-established 
Faculty Jurisdiction procedure. The 
reason why cathedrals have never 
been eligible for Stale aid is that, as 
yet, they arc not so accountable. 

H is surely premature to ask for 
State aid to be extended to 
cathedrals until the needs of parish 
churches are being met more 
adequately, for cathedrals have such 
a much wider catchment area from 
which to raise funds. 

Most cathedrals have indicated 
their readiness to become account- 
able in some such way. as has been 
suggested in the General Synod's 
report on Faculty Jurisdiction. This 
report was prepared to fulfil an 
undertaking given by the Church of 
England to the Government of the 
day when State aid was introduced 
in 1977. 

It was debated by the Synod in 
1984, when the Synod also agreed on 
a considered reply to the consulta- 
tive document issued by the 
Department of the Environment in 
1983. 

Further consultation on these 
matters has been proceeding slowly 
ever since with successive ministers 
of state. 

Yours sincerely, 
fDAVID ROFFEN:. 

Bishopscourt, 

Rochester, Kent. 

Fears for library 

From the Chief Executive of the 
Library Association 
Sir, Colin Hughes's article, "Carving 
up the County Hall cake" (January 
8) draws attention to the problems 
involved in satisfactorily devolving 
the functions of the GLC to a variety 
of other bodies by April 1. 

The Library Association is par- 
ticularly concerned about the future 
of the GLC Research Library, which 
is a part of the Research and 
Intelligence Unit. To dale the 
London , boroughs have failed to 
reach agreement on the future of the 
unit. 

The research library is the only 
mtyor library in the country 
specialising in urban and local 
government affairs and its services 
are used by a wide range of 
organisations (both in the UK and 
overseas) including local govern- 
ment. private firms, academics and 
Go veramen 1 depanmen is. 

Its databases, the only English- 
language databases in the world 
specialising in urban affairs and 
local government, are used in over 
20 countries worldwide. 

If the boroughs cannot agree to 
support the research library it will 
pass to the London Residuary Body, 
where its fete will be determined. 

Unfortunately the London 
Residuary Body has indicated that it 
is not prepared to take over GLC 
functions without funding from 
either the Government or the 
boroughs. Since Lhe Government is 
unlikely to provide fends, and the 
boroughs cannot agree, the future of 
the research library is far from dear. 
Yours sincerely, 

GEORGE CUNNINGHAM, 

Chief Executive, 

The Library Association. 

7 Ridgmount Street, WC1. 

Sleepers awake 

Front Dr V. P. Geoghegan 
Sir. Why all this fuss about sleepers 
on the railway? When l could afford 
it I used to travel overnight 
occasionally to Aberdeen and 
Inverness, but I did not contemplate 
wasting good railway time in sleep. 

Miss the Newcastle High Level, 
the Forth and Tay bridges in the 
dawn, and that amazing kink in the 
middle of the Kinghom tunnel? 

Sleep, whether athwartships or 
otherwise, has no place in the real 
enjoyment of railway travel. 

Yours truly. 

V. P. GEOGHEGAN. 

3 Somersiown, 

Chichester. 

West Sussex- 
January 16. 

attack by insects, boring beetles and 
fungus. Howard notes 
ihaL before lhe sixteenth century, an the 
Continent, the craftsmen in wood were 
already aware or lhe manner in which the 
use of chestnut mixed with oak formed a 
preservative to the oak — 

The author gives examples of this 
practice of mixing the timbers to be 
seen in the carved stalls in tbe choir 
of Amiens cathedral and in the 
woodwork of the church of St Ouen 
at Rouen. He cites the beam in the 
common room of Peierhouse as an 
example of the use of chestnut in 
England. 

Yours faithfully. 

B. G. BURMAN, 

HO Afcent, 

BFP028. ' 


ON THIS DAY 


JANUARY 24 1809 

. An episode in the Peninsular War 
1 (1608-14). General Sir John Moore, his 
retreat into Portugal cut off, withdrew 
to Corunna. There he found that the 
British Fleet had not arrived In the 
ensuing battle Moore was wounded 
and died on January 16. He was buried 
in the eitadeL “ With his martial cloak 
around him". 


[BATTLE OF CORUNNA] 

LONDON. 

TUESDA Y, JANUARY 24.1809 

It was but in a part of our edition of 
yesterday that we. were enabled to 
communicate to our readers a brief 
notice of Borne of the chief circum- 
stances attending the battle of 
Corunna, and the final embarkation of 
our troops at that place: we 
resume the narration of these 
important events. The grief that we 
before expressed, in a public point of 
view, that the British army was leaving 
Spain, with hardly a sight of the enemy 
before whom they were retreating, now 
gives way to sentiments of private 
condolence with the friends of tbe 
heroes who have fallen in battle. 

It appears, that on the evening of the 
14th, that is three days after our troops 
reached Corunna, a hundred sail of 
transports arrived in that bay, and were 
followed by the remainder on the day 
following, that is, on Sunday the 15th. 
The whole of this day was passed in 
incessant Bkirmishcg under the walls of 
Corunna, the enemy declining a general 
engagement and seeming only intent 
upon occupying our army, so as to 
prevent proceedings in the work of 
embarkation, till the arrival of fresh 
forces by which they might think 
themselves to overwhelm us. These 
having accordingly arrived in great 
numbers by the morning of the 16th, 
under the command (it is said) of 
Junot, and a considerable portion of 
our cavalry having already embarked, 
the enemy were seen to assemble 
around ub, but particularly on our right 
wing between 10 and 11 o'clock of that 
day; and tbe British Generals prepared 
with courage and prudence to sustain 
an engagement, which it was clear had 
now become unavoidable. 

... It was obviously the intention of 
the enemy to turn our right wing, and 
thus to interpose themselves between 
the main body of oar army and the 
place of embarkation; but in all their 
endeavours to obtain this end, they 
were most completely defeated. 
Although tbe whole of our line, or 
nearly so, was engaged, yet the brigade 
that was chiefly opposed to them was 
that under Lord W. Renting K, 
comprising the 4th, 4 2d, and 60th 
regiments. After repeated attacks upon 
this point, in each of which the enemy 
was repelled with great slaughter, the 
English, in their turn, became the 
assailants. Observing an opportunity 
when their antagonists were thrown 
into confusion, the Guards advanced to 
complete their route and charged with 
tbe bayonet. This charge, which is 
generally irresistible when made by 
British troops, was in the present 
instance conclusive of the fate of the 
day, the enemy absolutely flying with 
the greatest precipitation, and not 
daring for tbe space of fourteen hours 
during which our forces were embark- 
ing. to renew the attack. . . . 

Our toss in the battle is stated to be 
less than might have been apprehen- 
ded, not much exceeding in killed and 
wounded six hundred men; among 
these are several Officers. It was in the 
beginning of the engagement that 
General Moore received a musket-shot 
in the breast, which the Surgeon 
immediately pronounced mortal, and 
which he only survived till about twelve 
o'clock at night. . . . 

It is unnecessary to say, that the 
whole of our troops displayed the 
greatest valour: frequent opportunities 
indeed of evincing their superior 
prowess occurred, not only in tbe final 
engagement, but during tbe whole of 
the retreat. The regiments which 
suffered most, were tbe 4 2d, 50th, 26th, 

. and 3d Royals. ... 

After Generals Moore and Baird 
were rendered incapable by their 
wounds of maintaining their post, the 
chief command, and of course the care 
of tbe embarkation, would devolve 
upon General Hope. The toss of the 
above two Generals we do most 
sincerely regret, not only on account of 
their professional merit, but because 
information which they must have 
possessed, seems to us to be necessary 
to elucidate the views of the 
Administration in this singular 
campaign, and their own merits in the 
execution of them. We shall stand firm 
in the maintenance of the opinions 
which we yesterday advanced: and 
whatever sympathy we may possess for 
individual sufferings or private grief, 
we do most sincerely rejoice that the 
British army has not been suffered to 
quit Spain without giving their enemies 
a bitter Lasie of their valour. .. . 


Staying power 

From MrAlden Todd 
Sir. Mr Arnold Butler's testimony 
(January 16) to the staying power of 
Britisb ex -Service material echoes 
what I have thought since 1944. The 
British-made woollen undershirt 
that was issued to me that summer, 
through what we American service- 
men called “reverse Lend-Lease", 
stiff warms me when I go skiing. 
And I occasionally wear a pair of 
British Army wool socks that I 
picked up in 1944 at Chilton Foliat, 
Hungerford. where someone had 
dropped or discarded them. 

Yours faithfully. 

ALDEN TODD, 

13B Heath Drive, NV/3. 

January 17. 

Front Mr Dcs Fov 

Sir. In his letter (January 16) Mr 
Butler refers to the longevity of 
Service materials. Early m * 
was issued with a complete set oi 
RAF false teeth. . , 

These have now been in daily use 
for nearly 44 years, have undoub- 
tedly put in many more hours ot 
active use than the dressing gown 
referred to. and are still as good as 
when they were first issued. 

Yours faithfully, 

DES FOY. 

Womack. „ 

1 7 Bolters Road South, 

Horley, 

Surrey. 

January i 7. 


I 


14 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 24 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


. COT TP T Stopsley. to meet people connected 

*■ with the work of Luton Women’s 

U IjAR The Princess of Wales, attended 
KENSINGTON PALACE by Miss Anne Bcdkwfth-Smith and 

January 23: The Priori- of w-i— Lieutenant-Commander Richard 
Prcsidcm. Business^ Aylard. RN, travelled in an aircraft 

oSLdte of The Queen's FlithL 
.^est Norfolk Busi™S» BneiLiS YORK HOUSE, 

( T ™SL King's Lynn Norfolk ST JAMES’S PALACE 

£ N'S Roya) Highness later trav- January 23: The Duchess of Kent, 
F'fcd to London in an aircraft of The Patron, today opened the new 

Wen’s Right reran mine ^ at ^ NuffieW 

The Prince of Wales this Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford, 
afternoon visited the World of Mrs Alan Henderson was in 
"£ lc IFoU> u re and Drawings Fair alUrndancc - 

a ,5 lhe Pa"* Lane THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 
T& ^ ad,tty r\^\- January 23: Princess Alexandra this 

rhllr °\ W a Jes - Cofanel-in- morning presented the Awards of 
T **f. Parachute Regiment, this the Worldwide Bed and Breakfast 
^ening dined with the Officers of Association at Kensington and 
inc Queens Guard. 2nd Battalion. Chelsea Town Hall. W8. 

r a £“ hu,e Regiment at St Lady Angela Whiidey was in 
James s Palace. attendance. 





Mr Rupert Murdoch (left), chairman of News International, and Mr Charles Wilson (centre), editor of The Times , 
diking to Mr Shimon Peres, the Israeli Prime Minister, before a luncheon in his honour at Gray’s Inn Road yesterday. 
Mr Peres is on an official visit to Britain (Photograph: Warren Harrison) 


Lieutenant-Colonel Jack Sten- — 

house was in attendance. t»; 

The Princess of Wales this 
morning visited the Hospice of Our Mr 

-Udy and St lahn Thr Pnnr. rv.i 


Birthdays today 

Mr Neil Diamond. 41: 


Marriage 

Major B. E. Camp 


Goulandris Collection’s new home 


2 e s^S^v a sss 3 , 000 bc nude pride of museum 


Her Royal Highness Morris. 58; Earl Spencer, 62: Air Brian Edward Camp of Thursley 
attended a luncheon at Stopsley Commodore Sir Archie WinsJrilL and Mra Lynda Metcalf Mitchell, of 
.sports Centre. St Thomas’s Road. 69. Guildford. 


Forthcoming marriages 


A remarkable marble statue of an 
almost life-size female nude, 
fashioned with abstract simplicity to 


From Mario Modiauo, Athens 

in the National Archaeological 
Museum in Athens, hut experts 


the third millenium BC on one of artistic meriL 


maintain it cannot be compared for artists, these early sculptors tran- 


Mr C. J. A. Mead 

and Miss C. A. M. O’Donnell 


the Aegean Islands, is the pride of a 
new museum in Athens bousing the 
Goulandris Collection, which in- 


'MrC. G. A. Younger DrA.N fi Hi.. . i. Mr r* J A Mead new museum in Athens bousing the 

,QdMksS.E.F^i« m Ju£ Mta CAM. O’DonneU 

bctwee^cSJS^nd^J’SfmS “W 6 " 1 ,** * nnounoed Theenwenieiil Js announce! ofSy CycSSnkuS 

Hon George and Mrs „ der 1 j on - of 71,6 f o UMtore y marble and glass 

Easter Leckie. Ganninnock. Stiriine. ,^ ra _ H - Harris, of and Mrs John Mead, of Havant, museum whose exhibits span more 

and Sallv q % Westminster, and Ann, younger Hampshire, and Clare, younger h,-- 3 «jq of artistic 

SRffhSSSSa daughter -of Mr. and ItaVf daughterof the late Dr Raymond w^enrd this^k 

V.CMK. S«un.<,fWeBmnmer. ?SSS?CTl^.dl by Miss Melin. Memuri. the G™k 

shire. uoungnam- , Kathleen O’Donnell. Minister of Culture, and dedicated 


V " mmvmmmmmm w. "" . , — ' ~ ’ niUMTUIIl WUUSC CUUDILS bLHUJ U1U1U 

Westminster, and Ann, younger Hampshire and Clare younger ^ 3J00 oflrtistic 

daughter of Mr and Mrs W. F. daughter of the late Dr Raymond acfaicvcrncQt , wlsopened this week 

Swain, of Westminster. ODonndl and the late Mrs by Miss Melina Mercouri. the Greek 

— - - Kathleen O’DonneU. Minister of Culture, and dedicated 


MrA.SwE.AOeo 

and Mbs J. A. Hartley Martin 


Mr J. Jones 

and Mbs M-L. Buckley 


of the collection”, said Dr Colin 
Renfrew, professor of archaeology at 
Cambridge University, who is an 


Mr R. C. Perry 


The engagement is announced *“* Mbs P. C Sayers 


Goulandris. the late shipowner and 
well-known Maecenas. 

Mrs Dolly Goulandris, his widow 


Nikola os authority an early Cydadie art. 


ine engagement » announced Canu„ am 'i™* bw ra m between Richard, son of the late Mr mrauouy uouiannns, niswiaow 
between Simon, son of Mr and Mrs Jonts ’ R N* fRetd) . q™!*. h- „r Hove, and president of the Goulandris 

Mark Allen, of Cirencester, Glou- n. d mn ^.^ “**• . .° r . Waraash, s Priscilla, daughter of Foundation, said the collection had 

ccsrershire, and Jane, daughter of .J2* Mane-Ludocre sES CBE wdMra been the fruit or 25 years of efforts 

Mr and Mrs R. Hartley Martin, of Liu! ^* n,ie Savers, of ChrsweiL Holbelon. to kee P tiiese outstanding antiqui- 

Wllmslow, Cheshire. SSE Mr J*®« XS tJ * rsw «L MOIDelOQ ’ |jM Grcecc and lo 


Mr A. J. E. Berger 
and Miss M. S- Walker 
The engagement is 


announced 


Buckley, of Burridge, Hampshire. 
MrM. J. Hennessy 
and Miss T. A. Crane 
The engagement is announced 


MrS. N. Pritchard 

and Miss HL S. Jameson 

The engagement is announced 


Andrewson of Mr and iSLeSTEIkJmSk hEES betvreen S^phen only son of Mr EiT ' " ~ 

twLhi™. 8 , , S ii ^ r8eT i j f T t yfbr i. son of Mr and Mre?JL Hennessy David Pritchaid. of Abboas Ann, The museum’s centrepiece, the 
EtT n er c ’ of LaJce Forest Illinois, U^d Hampshire and Mra Daphne “large female figurine”, made of 

Vim-nil? Walker ' of States, and Tracey Anne Crane, of E"l ehard ’ of R J e ‘ ga ^ Su 7S‘ "5 while raarbIe ^ P alches of *** 


C uuiita. anu iiaccy AUDC i. 

Virginia Water. Surrey. London, daughter of Phili 

tapL A. j.Brear and the late Mrs Joan W 

and Miss J. S. Matthews also or Lake Forest. Illinois 

The engagement is announced Slates, 
between Andrew Brear. The Duke m, n j Wrmj 
of Wellington's Regiment, eider son aiM i miJL c r u-iunw 
or Mr and Mra A. Brear. of Hy, “f 1 & C. Hardie-BIck 

Cambridgeshire and Jenny, da ugh- * ne engagement is announced 
ter of the late Mr K. Matthews and bct , w “ n Nick, younger son of Mr 


London, daughter of Philip Crane Hebe, younger daughter of Mr and and brown, stands 1.40 metres high, 
and the late Mra Joan W. Crane. GeoRrey Jammeson, of it is one of the two largest Cydadie 

also of Lake Forest. Illinois! United North Yorkshire idols ever found. The other. 


Its been the fruit or 25 years of efforts Goulandris. 
m to keep these outstanding antiqui- Most of the museum's exhibits 
ties in Greece and eventually to were acquired in the same way. 
make them accessible to the public. There are 220 important objects 
”1 have always felt that cultural dating from 3200 lo 2000 BC in the 
treasures should not be the personal Cydadie collection, ranging from 
ed property of private collectors.*' she the violin-shaped torsos of the 
dr said. earliest phase to the impressive 

re The museum's centrepiece, the figurines of the third millenium BC. 
ne “large female figurine”, made of the vessels of marble, pottery and 
nd white marble with palches of grey metalwork. 

ad and brown, stands 1.40 metres high. Professor Renfrew speaks of the 
of It is one of the two largest Cydadie “breathtaking simplicity of line” in 


of Mrs A. Smyth, of Limavady. Co ££i Mrs .£’ J ’ Wood, of Ecclestone 


Londonderry. ” Fari*- Merseyside, and Susie. 

MrPACnln^ daughter of Mr and Mrs P. Hardie- 

Bide, orBickJey, Kent. 

The engagement is announced Mr T. Q. Leigh 
between Edward Allan Sedge field, and Miss J. E. Nyman 
only son of the late Mr EJ S Donner The engagement is 
and Mrs M G Donner. of Sireatley, between Trevor, son o 


Gargrave, North Yorkshire idols ever found. The other, 

MrJ.Raldlfle discovered on Amorgos Island, is 

ami Mbs S. J. Foster . ” 

The engagement is announced L 11110x16005 

between John, only son of the late Management Consultants 

Mr Tom Ratdiffe and of Mrs Jean Association 

Ratdlffe. of Buxton. Derbyshire jtf r j D hn Lids tone, chairman, and 

and Sarah Jane, eider daughter of rounci | members of the Manage- 


these Cydadie figurines “which 
avoids crudeness” and are so 

10 Downing Street yesterday 
evening in honour of the National 
Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelly to Children. The guests 
were i 


announced 


Mr and Mra John Foster, of Putney, 
London. SW IS. 

Mr P. Roberts 

and Miss S. A. Will cocks 

The engagement is announced 


between Trevor, son of Mr and Mra ? elwe *!!? P 1 * 1 '* *°" of Mr and [ Mrs 


menl Consultants Association were 
hosts at a luncheon given for Lord 
Boardman at the Cavalry and 
Guards Cub yesterday. 

Institnte of Freight 
Forwarders 



Berkshire and Judy Margaret, elder Philip Leigh, of Highgate. London. Roberts, of St Fillians. The Institute of Freight Forwarders 

daughter of Mr and Mra PA Conn, and Juliet, daughter of Mr and Mra Ydvenon. Devon, and Sarah Ann, held its annual luncheon at the 

of Zimbabwe. Michael Nyman, of London, and younger daughter of Mr and Mrs Institute of Directors yesterday. Mr 

- Mr M N J Donkin- Hindhead. Surrey. Derek Wificocks. or Sevenoaks, J. G. Davis, president, proposed the 

anA MtKinrtKiiMi... u - „ Kent. health of the guests, which was 

an MtssADO’Callagluui ■— « Mr F.W. Roche responded to by the Earl of 

pie engagement is announced and Mbs J. A. Harrington and Mbs H.J. Pont Limerick, President of the Institute 


Mr M N J Duukley 

and Miss A DOX-aUaghan 

The engagement is announced 

between Marcus Norman James. 


Hindhead, hurrey. 

Mr J.H. Lovett 

and Mbs J. A. Harrington 


Pattenmakets' Company 


uciwccn Marcus ivorman James. I ne engagement is announced . , 

elder son of Lieutenant-Colonel and between John, son of Mra Jane Jfe engagem ent is announced 

Mra N J Dunkley, of Hythe. Kent, Lovett and the late Mr Hadden nEbrnT'S 

and Anne Denise, elder daughter of Lovett, of Chaiton, North umber- SL.wL. o n iv^nn<,h?Ir nfrv r 

Mr and Mra Scnan O Callaghan, of land, and Jane Armstrong, daughter ?? ly RZi- - H " 

Boston, Massachusetts, tJniled ofMrand Mra GeoifrSHirrinpoS ^ n k ° f Mtt “ on 

States. orPapplewick. Noninghamshire/ Hospital, Tank, Pakistan. 


of Export on behalf of a number of. 7 J ie Lord May or “d Lady 
representatives of government Mayoress, accompaned by the 
departments, trade associations and ShCT 1 “ s “ ie,r , J? d,es> .. WBrc 

institutions associated with inter- « lhc anneal livery dinner 


Boston, 

States. 


Mr JR Dunkley 
and Mbs M J Larder 


Mr D. W. R. Marsh 
and Mbs J. C Chisholm 


Hospital, Tank, Pakistan.- 

Mr R. F. Syjnondson 
and Mbs A. J. Gad die 


Thce wmeg^is^'io un^ Tte is 

inru£S&2E srB«™ h " n o? f « 

N J Dunkley, of Hythe, Kent, and Bramshou. Hampshire and Julia, da lSH“S' Mra'jSin 

Melanie Jane, only daughter of Mr younger daughtT of Professor Gaddifof Brede Rre Su^S. 
and Mrs James Larder, of Mcl- Michael Chisholip and Mra Edith Q addie - ot ^ ^ussex. 
boume. Victoria, Australia. Chisholm, of Cambridge. Mi- p. j. w. Symonds 

Mr N E Haloes Mr D. Wmfauns and Dottoressa A. E. Magglonl 

and Mbs S E Littlewpod and Mbs A. Hesketh The engagement is annoi 

The engagement is announced, and The engagement is announced between Peter, younger son ( 


announced 


and Mrs James Larder, of Mel- 
bourne. Victoria, Australia. 


Mr N E Haines Mr D.V 

and Mbs S E Littlevrood and Mb 

The engagement is announced, and The er 
the marriage will take place on May between 


Mr P.J.W. Symonds 
and Dottoressa A. E. Magglonl 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter, younger son of Mr 


national transport. of **» Pattenmakere’ Company held 

at the Mansion House last night. 
British-Soviet Chamber of Cora- The Master. Mr A N. Eskenzi. 
men* Eari Jellicoe. Chairman of the presided, assisted by the Renter 
British Overseas Trade Board, was Warden, the Rev J. E. Scott, and the 
the guest speaker at the members’ Warden to the Trade, Mr G. W. 
luncheon of the British-Soviet MarehalL Judge Sir James Mishin. 
Chamber of Commerce held at the QC. Recorder of London, and Mr C. 
Connaught Rooms yesterday. Sir A. Prendeigast also spoke. 

John Ma y be w-Sanders presided and Society of Ecacadon Officers 
those present included Lord Wilson Mr Cliff Morgan, head of BBC 
of Ricvaulx. Mr G. G. Gveiusadzc, Outside Brodcastingl -was . the 
and Mr M. J. Llewellyn -Smith. principal guest at the ynnuy i dinner 

of the Society of Education Officers ; 
Vnronlinn held nt the Royal Over-Seas League j 

KtXCpUUU last night. Mr J. Beale, chief 



Reception 


iel, son or Mr and Mra and Mra W. de W. W. Symons, of yh? B«SJ«lmt Fund e JS caU ®l?, ffic f r ' V ? st t f ,ani0f ^’ 

rv.ut.iii Bovingdon. Hertfordshire. | The a vi I Service Benevolent Fund and president of the society 


10. between Nicholas Esmond, elder K- Williams, of QakbilL Somerset, Bovingdon. Hertfordshire and 
son of Dr and Mra A J Haines, of and Anne, younger daughter of Mr Sandra, younger daughter of Dott 
London. N8, and Susan Elizabeth, and Mra H. R- Hesketh. of Nairobi, Ing and Signora F. Maggioni, of 
eldest daughter of Dr and Mrs J M Kenya. Milan, Italy. 


eldest daughter of Dr and Mra J M 
Lilllewood, of Bardsey, West 
Yorkshire. 

Mr D.T. Hawker 
and Miss A. J. Foster 
The engagement is announced 
between David, son of Mr and Mra 
K. Howker, of Blackpool Lanca- 
shire. and Alison only daughter of 
Mr and Mrs G. Foster, of Abbotts 
Langley. Hertfordshire. 

Memorial service 

Mrs J. Finlay 

A memorial service for Mrs John 
iShcena) Finlay was held at the 
Temple Church on Wednesday. The 
Master of the Temple officiated and 
prayers were said by Canon D. E 
Nineham. Sir John Donaldson. 
Master of the Rolls and Treasurer of 
ihe Middle Temple, and Baroness 
Plan of Writtle, Chairman of the 
Equal Opportunities Commission, 
read the lessons. Lady Howe gave 
an address. Among those present 


Kenya. Milan, Italy. 

MrS. J. Merritt Mr M. T. Vernon 

and Mbs S. CM. Carr and Mbs H. L. Worsley 

The engagement is announced The engagement is announced 

between Simon John, son ofMrand between Mark, only son of Mr W. 


Archbishop Luigi Barbarito, 
who has been appointed Apos- 
tolic Pro nun do at the Court of 
St James's. He succeeds 
.Archbishop Bruno Heim, who 
left last August 


The Civil Service Benevolent Fund and president of the society St James's. 1 
held a reception last night at the presided. Arch bis ho n Bran 

Whitehai Banqueting House to ■ , .'vrcnnisnop ^ujri 

bunch its centenary year appeaL Company of Chartered Accountants * e «* **st A 

The chairman. Sir Brian Cubbon. Mr Alderman. David Rowe- Ham, 

Permanent Undcr-Secretary at the of the Company’ of T atouct willc 

Homoe Office, launched the appeal Chartered Accountants in England Latest nuia 
and the guests included permanent and Wales, accompanied by Mr D. Mr Hugh Barroogb 
under-secretaries from other G. Richards, Senior Warden, and Buckinghamshire, < 
government departments, and Sir John G re aside. Junior Warden, founders of the C 
representatives from civil service presided at_ a dinner held 8t Company in 1917, 
trades unions, welfare officers and Fishmongers' Hall last night. Judge 101, left estate valt 
staff of die fund. John Owen and Mr David Williams neu 

also spoke. Among those present Mr Thomas Mich 


under-secretaries from other 

Between aimon jonn, son tn nor anu between Mart, only son ot Mr w. MV emmem derailments. and 

Mra Band Mmilt, rfSigttamioe M. Vmioa, of Fyfield, Hampshire, ^resentatives service 

House, near Bury St Edmunds, and Mra Rosheen Vernon, or Jdes unions, welfare officers and 

Suffolk, and Sylvia Caroline Mary, Montpelier Walk, London, and S^r^ Cd 

daughter of Major and Mrs Rex Harriet, eldest daughter of Mr and 

Carr, of Beech Cottage. Hawsuad, Mrs J. Worelry, of Furlong House. 

Bury Si Edmunds. Hu r stpierpoint. Sussex. UlHH6rS 


Wood. Sir Dorn Dotoon. 


WMtHirton. Mr Jinan rad 
JuMIce rad Lady FaicoiwrSHPmi 
Ralph and Ladv Klliur Brown, Mr 





Prime Minister 

The Prime Minuter and Mr Denis 
Thatcher were hosts at a dinner at 

Latest appointments 
Woman ambassador 
for Panama 

Mrs Margaret Bryan, aged 56, head 
of chancery at the British Embassy 
at Havana, has been appointed 
Ambassador to Panama in suc- 
cession to MrT. H. Steggle. who will 
be taking op a further Diplomatic 
Service appointment. She will be the 
only woman ambassador in the 
Diplomatic Service. 

Other appointments include: 

Mr Marshall H. Field to be 



Mr Hugh Burroughs, of Burnham, 
Buckinghamshire, one of the two 
founders of the Glostcr Aircraft 
Company in 1917. who died aged 
1 01, left estate valued ai.£387,l4S 
net. 

Mr Thomas Michael Morgan, of 
Corbridge. Northumberland, left 
£502,673 net- He died intestate. 

Other estates include (net, before 
tax paid): 

Barnard, Professor Howard Clive, 
of Godalming, Surrey, formerly of 
Caversbam, Reading, professor of 
education at Reading University, 


_ . j i^vereoam, tvcuuui*. miuiowi ui 

abipwnehts Company education at Reading University, 

The following were elected officers l?* 7 '? 1 ^ 

of the Shipwrights' Company for the occfyn Fassett, of 

ra “ ti ” ,! teft . 
Prim* UTwralra. TN D L* £262.576 . 


ycsierday: 

Prime Warden, Mr D B Kimber, _ __ r,r 

Renter Warden. Rear-Admiral Sir BST 9 ' M Fredenck ’ ^ 

Motgan Morgan-Giles; Second ui , j ’ ' ~ T7; «' ' " ' ' T™ ' 

Warrim Mr n o Nmnign' Thml Holland. Miss Viplet Amy, of 


OBITUARY . 

MRG. C. LLOYD-ROBERTS 
Contributions to orthopaedics 


reminiscent of a Brancusi 1 or 
Modigliani. He says: “Like all great 


scendcd the limitations of time and 
The statue portrays a female space to produce works which speak 
figure, possiblv a goddess, her arras to us directly today”. 

fSSring «uili^!£ P £d s3 M« of .1* CyclwUc •« 

ears, slightly inclined to the right, a sno 

knees fiexed as if in motion, feel ,ve ^ **-500 years ago. But archaeol- 

slanung downwards as in a crucifix. p f I ^ nf 

-For me. this is the masterpiece ^ n ^L durmg the Ufetunc of 

*inra -ras j r«i;« their Owners. 


Mr George Charles Lloyd- 
Roberts, FRCS. who 'died on 
January 12 at the age of 67. 
made major contributions to 
children's orthopaedics, a 
speciality - in which he had a 
reputation both In this country 
and abroad. He was formerly 
Consultant Orthopaedic Sur- 
geon at The Hospital for Sick 
Children, Great Ormond Street, 
and St George's Hospital, 
London. 

He was educated at Eton and 
Magdalen College, Cambridge, 
before completing his clinical 
studies at St Thomas's Hospital, 
London. He qualified in 1942 
and joined the Royal Army 
Medical Corps serving for part 
of the war with the partisan 
forces both in Italy and 
Yugoslavia. 

After the war he completed 
his surgical training at St 
George's Hospital and specia- 
lized in orthopaedic surgery. He 
was appointed Consultant Or- 
thopaedic Surgeon at The 
Hospital for Sick Children in 
1955 and at St George's in 1956. 

Uoyd-Roberts had a dis- 
tinguished national and inter- 
national career in his chosen 
speciality. In 1953 he was 
awarded the Robert Jones Gold 
Medal and British Orthopaedic 
Association Prize for his essay 
on osteoarthritis of the hip 
joint. He was Civilian Consult- 
ant to both the Royal Air Force 
and the Royal Navy. 


He was President of the 
British Orthopaedic Association 
in 1977/7% smd Member of the 
Council of The Royal College of 
Surgeons from 1976 until 1984. 

He was appointed Member of 
the Pensions Appeal Tribunal 
by the Lead Chancellor in 1984. 

His contributions to chil- 
dren's orthopaedics included, in 
particular, the management of 
congenital dislocation of the 
hip. dub foot. Perthe's disease 
and bone and joint infection. . 

He was a prolific writer with 
a style and flair which made his . 
books and many papers a 
pleasure to read. These included 
Orthopaedics in Infancy ana 
Childhood (1972). The Hip 
Joint in Childhood (1977) and 
Orthopaedic Surgery ( 1 968) 
which he edited. 

He was a gifted and amusing 
speaker, who was in great 
demand as a lecturer and 
visiting speaker. As a result he 
travelled widely both in this 
country and abroad always 
reluming with new ideas and 
interests from what he had seen. 

Those who had the great 
good fortune to work with and 
to come under the influence of 
George Lloyd- Roberts will 
always remember the charming, 
witty character, who hid behind 
the mask of the gifted amateur 
English gentleman, a shrewd 
and penetrating intellect who 
was very much a professional at 
his chosen career. 


SIR WILLIAM RICHARDSON 


One of the most striking exhibits 
is the small seated figurine, its 
almond-shaped head tilling back- 

The statue had been sawn off in wards, holding out a wine cup as if 
three parts to make it easier to proposing a toast, 
smuggle oul But those who found ■ . .. I 

iL probably in Amorgos, were _ * r 1 

persuaded to sell it instead to Mrs ji™, *?. the - wori 4 to present early 
Goulandris- Cytladic art as a mqjor phase in 

Most or the museum’s exhibits worid ** °‘V ls °~ n ** 

were acquired in the same way. mone comprehettsive Goulandris 
There are 220 important objects collection of Ancient Greek an also 
dating from 3200 to 2000 BCiii the on d “[* , - u * here - ,s J ust “ 
Cydadie collection, ranging from romar * a ' ,le ' 
the violin-shaped torsos of the Its objects span 2.000 years from 
earliest phase to the impressive Minoan and Mycenaean pottery to 
figurines of the third millenium BC. hue Roman glass, and indudes 
the vessels of marble, pottery and important pieces of vases, sculpture, 
metalwork. gold jewelry and implements. 

Professor Renfrew speaks of the Several exhibits were repatriated 
“breathtaking simplicity of fine” in after being smuggled out of Greece 
these Cydadie figurines “which or Italy, some of them bought at 
avoids inideness” and are so London auctions. 


president 


Actuaries from July 1 in succession 
to Professor Peter G. Moore. 


n appointed Morgan Morgan-Giles; Second "j ‘ ’ ~ ‘ " ‘ ’ a™ ' 

ima in sue- Warden, Mr G R Newman; Third 5?™ 1=960 43? 

ggle, who will Warden, Mr F M Everaid; Fourth ' ' 'wYnrL m ' 4 1 

r Diplomatic Warden. Mr E C B Corleu. Fredentk 

the will be the The Prime Warden afterwards Liverpool - £943 ' 3!U I 

■dor in the presented certificates to seven sea 

cadets who have been awarded Tnrlnrc IrniohfoH 
include Shipwrights’ Company bursaries for ** AUlglllctl 

Field to be berths on TS Royalist, and the Knighthoods have been conferred 
Institute of Queen’s Stiver Medal to Mr David on Mr Justice AUiott and Mr Justice 




ftfrasNtBr 
6 m £*««■ 
£2/000 


A Oxford r 

WHY rr PAYS TO SELL 
FINE WINES AT PHILLIPS 

We recently edverthed tor items for inclusion m our sales at Fine Wines, 
many people replied, and as a result many are now happily 
better off. 

There are very good reasons for se l l ing your wines at Phillips; a fast 
valuation service for insurance, probate and sale, free collection (based 
on viable rjuantihesj, free storage prior to auction from rare single bottles 
to entire cellars, one of the lowest v e nd ors cotnmBgions in the UK 
and the absence of a bayers pre m i um . 

Wfe are currently accepting items for inclusion in our Fine Sale 
of IS March, as well as ether sales to be held later this yeae Should 
you have ClaKed Growth Claret Domaine-Bottled Burgundy. 
Vinfage Port and Champagne Rhones. Hocks and MoseDes. 
other Fine Wtnes and wine related artefacts that you wish tosefl. 
please contact the Head of our Wine Department Robert Churchward, 
on 054 46 633 . « Michael Wekh at the address Move. 



Burwood. who won the 1985 
Shipbuilding Apprentice Prize. 

Science report 


Ognall on their appointment as 
judges of the High Court 


Birds benefit by crying wolf 


Phillips Oxford. 39 Park End Street Oxford, OXl IIP, Td OS65 723524 
OXFORD * LONDON • PARIS • NEW YORK - GENEVA • BRUSSELS 

Fifttm brunches tbvBgbad fe United Kixsdatn. Members the Saciriy cf FmeArtAuctiatren. 


Chateau Lahur. 

JHMbHfe. 

£225 


Scientists have discovered an 
unusual case of deception in the 
animal world. Many birds the* live 
in flocks sound alarm calls warning 
their fellows of danger from 
predators. The research shows that 
some have learnt to exploit that 
arrangement by raising false 
alarms for personal gain. 

Charles Muon, who is based at 
the New York Zoological Society, 
made the discovery while studying 
mixed nocks of birds in the 
Amazon forest of Pern. In such 
flocks, members of one species 
often act as sentinels, giving a 
distinct alarm call whenever a hawk 
is in the neighbourhood. On 
hearing the caQ, oilier birds dive for 
cover. 

In return for their vigilance, 

Miltitlds receive a rich supply of 

bisects, which are dislodged from 

vegetation by other members of the 
flock. In short, an parties seem to 
profit from the assodotion. 


By Stephen Young 

Mr Mann studied two species of 
sentinels, which play «rimnar roles 
in different parts of the forest. One, 
a tanager, operates in the Ugh tree 
tops, while the other, an antshrike, 
prefers lower branches. 

A sentinel’s method of feeding 
often brings It into conflict with 
other members of the flock. Chases 
and scrambles for insects are 
commonplace. Mr Mmm was 
surprised to find that both sentinels 
tend to raise, the alarm daring those 
competitive tussles. Could that be a 
way of distracting the opposition? 

He realized that such w a r ni ngs 
were bogus, partly becaase no 
predators were in flu vicinity at the 
time and partly because the sentinel 

wn ■t t «w ni [ i» <ft liM* 

Howerer. other birds in the flock 
cannot distingmsh those sham 
alarms from real emergencies. Mr 
Mmm confirmed their gniHbfllty by 
playing them recordings of both 


types of call, while monitoring their 
responses. All calls were equally 
effective. 

Why do sentinels cry wolf? The 
obvious answer is that by cre atin g 
diversions they secure more food. 
Although the idea was difficult to 
prove, Mr Mann was able to 
support it with other evidence. 
Sentinels were more likely to resort 
to fraud, for example, when they 
needed extra food for a brood of 
youngsters. 

The boy who cried “Wolf, vroUT* 
in Aesop's fable was eve n tually 
ignored, so why do the birds persist 
in responding to false alarms? Mr 
Mam points to Che high costs of a 
failure m react daring a real crisis. 
As a result, natural selection has 
ensured that flocks respond to all 
alarm calls regardfeas of the 
veracity of their sentinels. 

Source Platan. voL 319, p. 143 


Sir William Richardson who 
died on January 16, aged 77. 
was for 25 years editor of 
Reynolds News which became 
the Sunday Citizen. He was its 
last editor, and was knighted the 
week before its closure in 1967. 

It was a radical newspaper, 
founded in 1S50 to support the 
People's Charter, and although 
its circulation was never large, it 
included many of the activists 
in the Co-operative. Labour and 
irade union movements, and 
had an influence out of 
proportion to its sales. 

William Robert Richardson 
was born in Newcastle-upon- 
Tyne. son of a shipyard 
electrician, and was educated at 
elementary schools. At 14 he 
joined the staff of the Co- 
operative News, starting a 
continuous association for more 
than 50 years with the Co-oper- 


ative movement In 1936 he 
joined Reynolds Ne*s as a sub- 
editor. and in 1942, at the age of 
33. became editor. 

He was involved in the major 
political controversies of the 
post-war years and. under his 
editorship, the paper was a 
undying force and a stabilising 
influence in the heated disputes 
of the 1950s which often 
threatened to split the Labour 
Party. 

In the sometimes bitter 
atmosphere of Fleet Street and 
Labour Party politics in his 
time Richardson was much 
respected for his integrity, lack 
of malice and his devotion to 
the Labour and Co-operative 
movement which he served all 
his life. 

In 1932 he married Gladys 
Gillians. who survives him with 
one son and two daughters. 


SIR WILTON LEE 


Sir Wilton Lee who died on 
January 15, aged 81 , was 
founder chairman of the British 
Independent Steel Producers' 
Association and president of the 
stainless-steel firm. Arthur Lee 
and Sons. 

George Wilton Lee was 
educated at Uppingham and 
Queen's College. Cambridge; 
his working life was devoted to 
the steel industry and lo the 
family business. Starting as an 
under foreman in 1925 he took 
over as chairman of the firm on 
the death of his lather in 1949. 

In 1948 half the Lee Group's 
business was nationalized, but 
six years later he completed a 
re-purchase and began to 
become closely, if reluctantly, 
involved with the politics of 
steel. 

When the possibility of 
renationalization returned in 
1965 he fought hard to keep the 
smaller companies out of state 
ownership. 

He became founder chairman 
of the Association, and on 
behalf of the private companies 
developed a productive working 
relationship with Lord Mel- 


chett. first chairman of the 
British Steel Corporation, a 
relationship (hat paved the way 
for a degree of sensible rational- 
ization between the public and 
private sectors. 

He took a lifelong interest in 
his native Sheffield. In the early 
1960s he chaired the appeal 
committee for the extension of 
Sheffield Cathedral, work which 
was completed in 1966. A few 
years later he agreed to join a 
similar committee for York 
Minster. 

He was chairman of the 
Sheffield Conservative Associ- 
ation for several years and a JP 
of the city. He was Master 
Cutler 1950-51. 

He had the satisfaction of 
seeing his busincsss recover 
from the years of recession and 
survive as an independent 
group with strong family par- 
ticipation. 

An enthusiastic sportsman, 
he spent his time after his 
retirement in 1976 on his farm 
and developing bis Trubriic 
herd of pedigec fricsians. He 
was knighted in 1964. 

He is survived, by his wife 
and three sons. 


MR FRED TEBBUTT 


H. C. writes: 

Fred Tebbutt, OBE. who has 
died aged 85, was one of the last 
representatives of that breed of 
outstanding amateur archaeol- 
ogist that is unique to this 
country. 

A Huntingdonshire man, he 
ran his family business in St 
Neots until his retirement, and 
was also active in County 
Council affairs. 

It was in this area that he first 
demonstrated his almost un- 
canny ability to interpret a 
landscape from The slight traces 
that often only his eyes could 
discern. Many of the leading 
professionals of la tier-day Brit- 
ish archaeology learned their 
craft from him while they were 
undergraduates. 

Tebbutt emigrated to Ash- 
down Forest when he retired in 
the early 1960s, when be 
brought bis remarkable talents 


to bear on the archaeology of 
the Sussex Weald; until his- 
painstaking fieldwork, was pub- 
lished the received view that 
that there was no prehistoric 
occupation in the Weald, but he 
demonstrated that the region 
had been widely settled before 
the Romans. 

Latterly, in addition to bis 
valuable work for the Sussex 
Archaeological Society, he be- 
came the moving spirit in (he 
Weal den Iron Research Group, 
which has made a significant 
contribution to scholarship 
since its foundation. 

Fred Tebbutt was a man of 
great charm and .modesty, 
whose enquiring mind and 
readiness to help and encourage 
young archaeologists made him 
one of the best loved and most 
greatly admired field workers of 
his day. 


MGR JOSEPH CALLANAN 


The Right Rev Monsignor 
Canon Joseph Callanan, Vicar 
General of the Roman Catholic 
Archdiocese of Southwark since 
1979, died on January 20, aged 
69. 

Bom on July 10. 1916, in 
County Kerry, be was the first 
Catholic to enter Dover Gram- 
mar School as a pupil. After 
seminary training he was 
ordained priest in June, 1941, 
and went to St Benet’s Hall, 
Oxford, where he read history. 

In 1944 he was appointed 
professor at St Joseph's College, 
the junior seminary at Mark 
Cross, where he taught until 
1956. 

MRE.C 

Mr Eric Conrad Peters, who 
died on December 28, aged 82, 
was the only British amateur 
tennis player to beat the 
American champion, W. T. 
Tilden. It happened at Cannes 
in 1930 at the Carlton CJub 
meeting. Shortly after TUden 
had his revenge but only after 
five hard sets. 

Peters woo the Belgian - 


The same year’ he became 
assistant to the Financial 
Secretary of the dioceses of 
Southwark, succeeding to the 
position in 1959. In 1979 he was 
appointed Chancellor and Vicar 
General. 

His administrative akill . fej r _ 
ness and sense of humour 
endeared him to many within 
the diocete and outside. 

He contributed to the work of 
many charitable societites and, 
having become a Chapter 

Prelate i? 60 ’ wa ? a Pp oin *ed a 

if Sf fJSS 0,ir * Popc John 

PETERS 

Doubles championship in 1930 
with H- K. Lester, and reached 
the final of the British Hard 
Cotute championship, beating 
H. W. Austin and f. S. Ofliff 
without loss of a set The same 
year he captained an. English 




l 


A -60 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 2d i Qg* 



,\0 

1 ->s‘ 


You have a manufacturing plant in 
Taiwan. And an Italian designer based 
in Tokyo. 

His English is very bad. 

Vbu have to exolain 1o him that the 


gimble pin on the spindle grommet 
should be facing the overhead 
bearing on the reverse transmission 
pin ana not the other way round. 

You have 15 minutes 


What do you do? 






x. 


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FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


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the *^3^ times 



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CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 


23". AjvSOHtVBesrar £*lV 


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Amsrsnani 
Ancnor Cnand 

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51V BaymDMM 
100 BUpdsn 

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CerranglWI 
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195 Bar*slStdnovO 
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143 HBsrkwm WOgs 
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389 teeUM Eroan 
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132 

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di 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 24 i Qg* 


17 


1HE 


TIMES 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 






waiting for 
Old Lady 


Ulysses tied himself to the mast and 
stuffed the ears .of his men with, wax to 
resisi the Sirens' songs. Likewise, the Bank 
of . England ploughed on steadfastly 
yesterday, resisting the blandishments of a 
market now clamouring for 14 per cent 
base rate at least. 

The chances are that the Bank will.be 
forced To yield today and accede to the 
market's demands. But nothing in current 
trading is certain. If the twitching hands of 
the Bank’s master mariners can stave off 
the seemingly, inevitable until the week- 
end. there is at least a sporting chance that 
the Batik’s original game plan of 12'/> per 
cent base rales and no more might just 
survive. Some of the players in the gilt 
market believe this. That is why gills 
yesterday were so remarkably resilient in 
the face of an almost overwhelmingly bear 
.charge on the foreign exchange markets. 
Sterling and oil prices were the cynosure 
of forex eyes yesterday. 

Despite steadying later in the day, oil 
prices were very weak, with trades at 
$17.40 for March, deliveries of Brent 
crude. Sheikh Yamani, the Saudi oil 
minister, gave a wanting that oil prices 
could collapse to $15 a barrel unless there 
is co-operation between Opec and non-. 
Opec members on production levels. Such 
an agreement, he said, should give Opec at 
least 16 million barrels a day of total 
■outpup. 

The impact on the pound was severe. It 
fell to $ 1 .3755 before steadying to record a 
1.2 cent drop to $1.3837. Sterling fell to 
DM3.39 against the . mark, down 2 
pfennigs, having been as low as DM3.36. 
The trade weighted index dropped a full 
point to 74.3. This week so far the pound’s 
average value has 4.6 per cent. 

Yet apart from a brief flurry in Band One 
bills, the Bank of England kept its dealing 
rates unchanged, signalling in this way 
that it drew a distinction beteen the 
turmoil of external events and the correct 
price for domestic credit. The two 
seemingly contradictory approaches meet 
in the perception that lower oil prices 
reduce inflation and we therefore ben- 
eficial. But at what point does the Bank, 
after due consultation of its computer 
runs, decide that enough is enough? 

Gilt traders have decided that such a 
moment is fast approaching. Hence on the 
one hand is ■ the resilience of the 
conventional markets, and on the other, 
the uninspired showing of index-linked 
slocks. 

The clearing banks are still waiting for a 
signal from the Rank and are unwilling to 
move until they get it. It could come today 
with a new gilt sale and repurchase 
agreement If the Bank sets this at middle 
market rates rather than a fixed, and 
lower, rate the banks would take this as a 
signal that they can raise base rates. 

NFC naorsels for 
the institutions 

The National Freight Consortium is still 
one of Mrs Thatcher’s bestadvertisemenis 
for privatization and employee .share 
ownership. But success breeds problems: 
how to provide a wider market for -the 
shares while retaining employee control of 
the company? The original £1 shares have 
a “determined” value of £16.50. 

Yesterday, after unveiling a 70 per cent 
increase in pretax profits to £28.8 million, 
the. chairman. Sir Peter Thompson, 
outlined proposals for “The Way Ahead”. 
These vail be put to NFCs 17,671 
shareholders next month. They do not 
include flotation “in the immediate 
future.” 

They do include the recommendation 
that, certain financial . institutions should 
be allowed to participate in the internal 
market on the four dealing days a year, if 
there is a shortage of buyers. If this 
happens the share price would come closer 
to a likely stock market value. 

Less popular with the City is a 
commitment the board would require 
from the institutions not to support a 
takeover against the directors’ recommen- 
dation. In preparation Tor a flotation at 
some future date (but not for at least two 
or three years) the articles of association 
would be amended to give employee 
shares twice the voting weight in the event 
o ’ a takeover bid. Sir Peter believes 
e nployee control is the “magic ingredient 
4 and dews not intend to let it slip away. 

3 o further strengthen employee owner- 
hd, he wants up to 15 per cent of pretax 
profits allocated to a profit-sharing scheme 
through which employees would receive 
shares according to length of service. 


STERLING 
INDEX 



D J FM AM J J ASONDJ 

DATASTREAM 


The success of NFC since privatization 
four years ago has not been unfailing. The 
1 984-85 accounts record an extraordinary 
provision of £17 million to cover the 
closure and reorganization costs in the 
parcels division, which last year made a 
trading loss of almost £9 million. The cost 
of last year's 1.500 redundancies was £2.3. 
million and there will be further job losses 
at Roadline. . 

When shareholders vote on Sir Peter’s 
package on February 16 they will 
implicitly be voting on the timescale of the 
inevitable flotation. The board has said it 
would take it as a signal for a quotation if 
institutional shareholders’ stake rose to 20 
per cent in two years. 

Robeco finds a 
lack of harmony 

Robeco. the renowned Dutch open-ended 
investment fund, has fallen foul of another 
of those embarrassing failures to co-ordi- 
nate the policies of different departments 
of state. The Department of Trade and 
Industry is keen to create a free market in 
financial services within the European 
Community. 

To that end, clause 78 of the Financial 
Services Bill makes it easier for invest- 
ment funds authorized in another member 
state of the EEC to market their wares in 
this country, with the minimum of 
bureaucracy and a little discretion. 

The Robeco group is a 50-year-old pillar 
of the ditch establishment. It consists of 
four funds worth more. than £4 billion 
including the original £2 billion Robeco 
fond, a pioneer of international invest- 
ment conducted on lines that combine 
features of a unit trust and an investment 
trust company.. It is the biggest such 
mutual" fund group in Europe.< jtist the 
sort of eminently respectable organization 
the Bill is designed to welcome. 

In another part of the wood, however, 
Robeco is cast in a different light. It has 
fallen foul of the Finance Act 1984 
regulations sponsored by the Inland 
Revenue to counteract tax avoidance 
through tawdry offshore funds that roll up 
their income in tax havens to avoid 
British tax- 

The law was not designed to catch 
Robeco which effectively distributes all its 
income, following Dutch rules tighter than 
those applied in Britain for investment 
trusts. But it foils subsidiary technical tests 
designed to close potential loopholes. For 
instance, it owns more than 10 per cent of 
several venture capital investments worth 
about 3 per cent of its total assets and 
management companies that also trade (as 
a savings bank to attract customers to save 
via the funds). As a result, it does not 
seem about to qualify for distributor 
status, which would free it from the rightly 
tough new rule that capital gains on 
(offshore roll-up funds are taxed asincome. 

This, says Robeco's President, Professor 
Theo Scbolten, would “hurt our English 
shareholders in a substantial way”. And 
there are between 10,000 and 20,000 of 
them (impossible to say because Robeco 
uses bearer shares) owning some £72 
million of Robeco and its sister fund 
Rolinco. Robeco is upset because it will 
effectively be debarred from marketing in 
Britain 

Robeco's pleas , were rebuffed by the 
Inland Revenue, which was too pleased 
that its non-discretionary rules had finally 
closed some important loopholes to start 
changing them. Application to the Chan- 
cellor has yielded no more than a regretful 
verbal shrug of the shoulders. 

The authorities ought to do' better than 
that. The problem is not simple. Robeco 
shares a little of the blame by running its 
own. admittedly linked, savings business. 
That is no ideal for a group seeking 
worldwide recognition as a pure invest- 
ment vehicle. Yet if the drive for a free 
EEC internal market in financial services 
is to mean anything, Robeco and the 
authorities should be able to sit round a 
table and sort this problem out. 


Coats Patons near takeover 
deal with mystery bidder 


By Patience Wheatcroft 


Coats Patons, one of Britain’s 
biggest textile companies, is on 
the brink of being taken overin 
a deal that would value the 
company at more than £600 
million. The most likely bidder 
is thought to be Vantona 
Vi ye 11a, although Courtholds is 
also a strong contender. 

Talks between Coats and the 
mystery bidder have been going 
on for several weeks, and Mr 
Peter Cadbury of Morgan 
Grenfell, advisers to Coats, said 
they' hope to be able to 
announce an agreed deal soon. 

Coats’ interests include the 
clothing label of Jaeger, and just 
before Christman the group 
bought a majority holding in 
the Jean Muir fashion business. 
It is also a world leader in the 
threads and knitting yams 
business. Some 80 per cent of its 
sales are outside Britain, and it 
is that which is thought to make 
the group attractive to Vaniona. 

Mr Davoud A llian ce, the 
architect of Vantona Viyeila, 
would not comment last night 
when it was suggested that he 
might be bidding for Coats. 
After his acquisition of Notting- 
ham Manufacturing last year - 


an agreed deal on lines similar 
to those now being discussed by 
Coats - Vantona is now 
capitalized at around £450 
million. Coats' market value 
was up to £534 million last 
night after a rapid rise in the 
shares, which now stand at 
193p, their highest for more 
than a year. 

Coats’ profits last year are 
estimated to have risen from 
almost £1 10 million to £140 
million. The company has 
undergone some restructuring 
in resent years, and although 
there are some divisions where 


profitability could still be 
improved, the main economies 
have already been made. There 
is one division which might be 
sold as outside the main 
business of the group, and that 
“ .the precision engineering 
division, which in 1984 made a 
trading profit of £17.2 million. 

The biggest contributor to 
profits in 1984 was Coats* 
leisure and crafts division, half 
of its turnover being in band 
knitting yarns. Home sewing 
products comes next, followed 
by industrial sewing produces. 
Retail and fashion wear made 


Imps steps up defence 


The war of words Intensified 
in Imperial’s defence against 
Hanson Trust’s £1.8 million 
bid yesterday when Mr Geof- 
frey Kent, the chairman of 
Imperial, wrote to shareholders 
telling them they would suffer 
significant asset dilation - 
materially more than under the 
United Biscuits merger - if 
they were to accept the Hanson 
offer. The first closing date is 
today. 


Mr Kent also said Imperial’s 
£616.5 million valuation sur- 
plus related mainly to freehold 
and long leasehold property, 
meaning additional de- 
preciation wonld be less than 
£500,000 a year. 

Mr Kent concluded that the 
continuing poor performance of 
Hanson shares meant that the 
doubts Imperial had expressed 
about Hanson's ability to grow, 
were increasingly widely held. 


profits of just £10 million in 
1984. 

It is thought that Vantona 
would appreciate the worldwide 
presence that Coats would give 
it, with operations in Portugal. 
Brazil, North .America and 

Australia. 

But there would also be clear 
advantages for Vantona in 
joining with Coats' fashion 
business. Apart from Jaeger. 
Coats has a chain of Country 
Casual 5 Lops and has made 
some inroads into the highly 
competitive business of dothing 
the working woman. The recent 
purchase of Jean Muir was seen 
as important for Coats, giving it 
a base to build a whole new 
design-oriented business that 
some said might develop along 
similar lines to Laura Ashley, 
with a strong home furnishings 
division. Vantona is already a 
leading supplier of home fur- 
nishings. 

The deal between i Vantona 
and Nottingham Manufacturing 
was put together by Mr Jacob 
Rothschild. He is believed to 
have a small holding in Coats, 
previously held by Hanson 
Trust. 


Posgate to 
sue over 
dismissal 

By Alison Eadie 

Mr Ian Posgate yesterday 
issued defamation proceedings 
in the High Court against the 
board of Posgate & Den by, his 
former' agency .at Lloyd's in- 
surance market, which sacked 
him from his service contract 
two weeks ago. 

Mr Posgate received his 
dismissal notice on January 7, 
hours before his suspension at 
Lloyd's was due to expire. Mr 
Posgate alleges that Posgate & 
Denby then wrote to Lloyd’s 
about the reasons for his 
dismissal, which he says were 
“utterly untrue'*. 

The letter arrived a few days 
before the ruling council of 
Lloyd's was due to debate the 
question of Mr Posgate's re- 
admission to Lloyd's as an 
active underwriter. The council 
has since told Mr Posgate that it 
was minded not to accept him 
and has given him until next 
Wednesday to appeal. 7 

Mr Posgate says he is suing 
Posgate &. Denby, because he 
claims the letter It sent to 
Lloyd's was incorrect. Posgate 
& Denby's managing director, 
Mr Michael Bassett, who is 
named in the writ with the 
chairman Mr Robert Brammell, 
refused to comment. Another 
employee of Posgate & Denby 
was sacked in connection with 
Mr Posgate's dismissal. 

Mr Posgate was suspended 
for six months from working at 
Lloyd's by Lord WDberforce, 
head of Lloyd's appeals tri- 
bunal, for his part in the 
Alexander Howden affair. He 
was found guilty of accepting a 
Pissarro painting as an induce- 
ment to place business with the 
Howden group and of not 
disclosing bis stake in the 
Banque du Rhone et <fe I* 
Tamise. 


Cockfield urges 
uniform VAT 
rules in EEC 

Harmonizing VAT systems 
in the European Community 
would simplify adminsiration 
and “eliminate the major 
incentive to fraud and evasion 
presented by the existing system 
of zero-rating exports”. Lord 
Cockfield, vice-president of the 
EEC Commission, said yester- 
day. 

Lord Cockfield told a confer- 
ence organized by the Confeder- 
ation of British Industry, that 
there was “virtually unani- 
mous” support in industry for 
the Commission's approach to 
harmonizing VAT systems as 
part of its plan to create a singe! 
“internal market” by 1992. 

The Commission’s proposals 
allowed for a “substantial 
measure of flexibility,” he said, 
and acknowledged that “there 
may be a need for derogations 
to meet particular cases of 
political and economic sensi- 
tivity”. 


roc 

rress in tin 1 

f - MARKET SUMMARY ^ 

crisis talks 

STOCK MARKETS 

MAIN PRICE CHANGES 

CURRENCIES 


•y 


JThe London Metal Exchange 
; .will today again postpone a 
decision on when to resume tin 
. trading. 

* It will do so because of 
: mounting evidence of progress 
ia negotiations for a financial 
settlement of the crisis. 

, Banks and brokers, led by 
Standard Chartered Bank, have 
held serious if informal dis- 
cussions with International Tin 
Council representatives over 

the past three days about the 
money required from the 
various parties to ensure a 
settlement. 

Modifications to the plan 
proposed . to the ITC before 
Christmas by Mr Peter Gra- 
ham. senior deputy chairman of 
Standard Chartered, and Mr 
.Ralph Kestenbaum, managing 
director of Gerald, Metals, have 
. been offered to thccpunril. 

Tim aotlook, page 21 


FTIndOrd — 

FT AH Share 

FT Govt Securities 


1120.4 (-33 

j ... 669.78 (-3.77) 

. curities — 80.451+0.07) 

FT-SE 1 00 — 1382^1-8.1} 

Bargains — ... 23,850 

Datastream USM — 107.50 (-0.21) 

New York . 

Dow Jones ..- — ...1502.88 (+0.69) 

NfrkfriDow — ....12888.94 (-34.38) 

Sycbiey:AO .......... 1059.9 (-9.1) 

Frankfurt: 

Commerzbank 1968.9 (-75.8) 

BnuMis: 

General — — .799.86 M7A7) 

Paris: CAC 271,3 (n/c) 

Zurich: 

SKA General .........439.1 0 (-11 2 0) 


GOLD 


London fixing: 

3Sw 4a ’ 5 ^S^.75(E254J30- 

254.50) 

Hew York: 

Comex (Latest) $350.05 


RISES: 

Newman-Toriks 135p +40p 

Coats Patons 200p+50p 

Westland 123p+28p 

Clive Discount — — ~43p +6p 

Acom Computer ._62p +8p 

Campari Inti ; — 47p +5p 

Lyon & Lyon - 113p+8p 

Whlttfngtn Eng 145p +I0p 

Beecham Group -368p +255p 

Cooper Inds .3d.5p+3p 

Slaters Food — —150p +I0p 

Somportex Hldgs 1 

Unigroup ..... — -95p +Bp 

Systems Design — _..9Bp +6p 

Sovereign OH "* 1 

MicrovHec 

Metal Closures 


.82p+5p 
...34p+2p 
136p+8p 
Frost J J.&D — 85p+6p 


J&J 


86p+5p 


SWtob - — - — 91p+5p 

SaviUe Gordon -55p +3p 


Bryant Derek 

Oceonfcs Group .. 

FALLS: 

TanjongTm ... — 
Bristol Oil Mri — 
Je bsene Prtffing ~ 
Feunnti 


125p -25p 

— 'P -Ip 

.23p -Ip 

,—...135p -3p 


London: 

£: $1.3837 (-0.01 23) 

SL DM 3-3906(— Q.Q2 - 
£: SwFr 2.8599(-0.( 

£: FFr10-3689(-0.1052) 
£: Yen 278.51 (-2.81) 

£ Index: 74.3(-1.0) 

New York: 

£: $1 .3830 
$: DM 2.4515 
$ Index: 125.8<+0.5) 
ECU £0.640721 
SDR £0.775926 


INTEREST RATES 


London: 

Bank Base: 12V54. 

3-fnonth Interbank 13V13 »i*% 
3-month eligible bills: 
buying rate 13V13% 

US: 

Prime Rats 9-50% , 

Federal Funds 7*1% 

3-montft Treasury 810s 6.99-6.98 B «> 
30-year bond price 1 04V1 


Ladbroke merger talks off 


By Ian Griffiths 

Ladbroke and Granada 
Group have called off their 
merger talks aimed at creating a 
£1.2 billion leisure conglomer- 
ate. The announcement took 
the City by surprise and came 
after failure to agree on the 
value of Granada's shares. 

Ladbroke's chairman, Mr 
Cyril Stein, denied that the 
company would now make a 
hostile bid for Granada and said 
it would look elsewhere for a 
fourth leg to add to its 
operations. 

City observers were surprised 
that the negotiations had 
broken down as all the indi- 
cations, since the companies 
admitted last week they were 
having talks, were that both 
sides wanted the merger and 
that it made sound commercial 
sense. 

Mr Alex Bernstein, the 



Cyril Stein: k no plans 
for a hostile bid' 

chairman of . Granada, said: 
“We simply couldn't agree 
terms. We differed on what the 
current value of Granada 
should be when going into a 
merger.” 


He denied that the failure of 
the talks now left the group 
exposed to a hostile bid from 
another direction. However, 
one stockbroker said last night 
that there was no doubt that the 
for sale sign is now up at 
Granada. 

Granada's merchant bank. S. 
G. Warburg, was also quick to 
talk down the suggestion that 
the company was for sale. A 
spokesman said: “Nothing 
could be farther from the troth. 
If the business was available 
then the deal with Ladbroke 
might have gone ahead." 

However, the attractions of 
Granada's strong cash flow 
generated from its television 
rentaL business has not escaped 
the City’s notice. It is also a 
member of the winning Chan- 
nel Tunnel consortium and will 
provide the catering facilities at 
the Kent terminal. 


Nakasone promises change 

From Bailey Morris, Washington 


C 


Japan has reacted to intense 
ressure from Europe and the 
niied States, with a promise to 
reshape its domestic economy 
to include fewer exports and 
more expansion at home. 

The Prime Minister, Mr 
Yasuhiro Nakasone. said in an 
interview with the Washington 
Post that the first of the new 
market measures would be 
announced in early spring. 


following publication in March 

Expressing renewed fear of 
coordinated . protectionist 
actions against Japan. Mr 
Nakasone said he was con- 
vinced his nation must act 
quickly 10 avoid “serious 
consequences”. 

At the same time, in a 
seperate interview in Washing- 
ton. Mr Nobour Takeshita, the 
finance minister, stated for the 


first time publicly that Japan 
did not intend to intervene 
further on foreign exchange 
markets to boost the value of 
the yen against the dollar. . 

The Japanese Government, 
faced wiih slowing growth this 
year, has been under strong 
domestic pressure from ex- 
porters to allow the yen to stay 
put at a ratio of about 200 to the 
dollar. 


IN BRIEF 


Mitel share 
suspension 

Dealings in the shares of 
Mile l, the troubled Canadian 
telecommunications manufac- 
turers, were suspended on the 
Toronto Stock Exchange yester- 
day after a report in The Times 
suggested that the Monopolies 
and Mergers commission were 
about to block a rescue takeover 
bid by British Telecom. 

British Telecom said it had 
had no indication of what was 
in the commissions report, nor 
had it any knowledge of what 
Mr Leon Britten, the Secretary 
of Slate for Trade and Industry, 
might decide. Mitel described 
the Times report as speculative. 

Mr Britten is under pressure 
from the Canadian Govern- 
ment to allow the takeover. 

Fitch Lovell up 

Fitch LovelL the food manu- 
facturer, lifted profits from 
£7.02 million to £9.04 million 
before tax in the six months to 
October 26. Turnover was 
down from £241 million to 
£232 million and the interim 
dividend raised from 3p to 3.5p. 

Tempos, page 19 


Bids for Payless, the do-it- 
yourself chain being sold by 
Marley. have to be deposited 
with the merchant bank. Hill 
Samuel today. Widespread 
Interest has been shown and 
offers of np to £100 million are 
likely for the business, Britain's 
third largest DIY retailer. 


Switch to BBC 

Mr Frank Fitzpatrick, aged 
46. the general manager of 
group finance with the Midland 
Bank, is joining the BBC as 
■director of finance. He succeeds 
Mr Geoff Buck who retires at 
the end of April after 27 years. 

Bid approach 

Campari International, the 
camping equipment group, said 
yesterday that an approach had 
been made which could lead 10 
an offer. The shares closed 5p 
ahead at 47p, valuing Campari 
at abbut £5 million. 

Greycoat deal 

The Greycoat Group has 
bough 1 Lutyens House at 
Finsbury Circus in the City of 
London from the National 
Water Council and British 
Telecom for £30.25 million. 

Frogmore chief 

The board of Frogmore 
Estates, the properly company, 
meets today 10 discuss a 
replacement chairman for Mr 
Kenneth Oliver, who died this 
week. Speculation is mounting 
that Frogmore may be open to a 
takeover bid with a price tag of 
around £72 million. 



A whirlwind love affair with New York is just 
thethingfor spring or eariy summer 

But make sure you go by TWA the 
official UMTS - airline. 

Your tour is organised by American 
Express, one of America's most experienced 
tour operators. 

You get special Hertz Car Hire discounts 
and New York hotel discounts too. 


&1! 




°rk 

re turT, 


Also, if you pay with your American Express 
Card before 14th March you get a further 
£40 discount on car hire and hotels. 

TWAs low fare of only £268* is available 
on Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays for 
travel commencing by 28th February 
Economy class, 7-day advance purchase. 
You'll love New York with TWA. Read the 

book now! “Subject to government approval 

1 


I Please send me the great love story of New York. 

I To: New York New York Tour Programme, 20th Floo( Portland House, StagPlace, London SW1E 5BZ 


NameL- 

Address. 


The official I#NY airline 












1 


\ . « ls ii > L/ L j i i\ i 



i tic, i iivina i-iviijAl JAiNUAKl 24 1986 




Jan ;an ( 

K 2* 


Jan Jon 

22 21 


Jan jan 
22 21 


Ava 

«SA 

*:'«<! s^nai 
As.ee 5 :c< 9- 
4 -:ra Chalmers 
4liC'£ 

Ana* Inc 
Amentia Hess 
At. Brands 

Am Broadcast 
Am Can 
Am Cvanamd 
J.n E»«? 5 *er 
Am -rprogg 
»m Heme 
am MclO's 
Am t&nZarl 
Am Teiephctvs 
Amoce 
Aimco Sieel 
Atatco 
Ashland Qa 
AHntie R^ntoia 
Avon Products 
Bankers 1st NY 
9ankamenc3 
Sank ol Boston 
Bank of NY 
Batter Tray 
Soatnce Poods 
Bethienem Steel 

606 <ng 

B04B Cascade 
Qcrden 
5org Warner 
Bnsiol Myers 
5? 

Burtmryonlnd 
Burlington Nthn 
Burroughs 
CamptM* Soup 
Canadian p#rfie 
CaiarplHar 
Celanese 
Central SW 
ChamD'S” 

Chase Vanh*{ 
Cnem Eank NY 
Chevron 
Cttr,-s1sr 
Cmcorp 
Oar* Equip 
Coca Cola 
Canals 
CQS 

Columbia Gas 
Combusson Eng 
Cnmwtth Edison 
Cons Edison 
Cons Nat Gas 
Cons Pottor 
Control Dau 
Comma Glass 
CPCIml 
Cran) 

Crown Zeller 
□an & Kraft 
Deere 
Delta Air 
CerroP Edison 
Digital Equip 
Cwney 
Dow Chemical 
Dresser Ind 
Duke Power 
Du Pont 
Eastern Air 
Eastman Kodak 
Eaton Corp 
Emerson Elect 
Emery AlrFrgi 


9 Er *v ■ AsUd c 


JS j 

■s&'r Z - « 
TO-, • ! ; 


I E> sor CO-T 4«« 

i Fee Deot : :c res P, 

Firestone 2?, 

-s:Cn-x'a 2T 

r~V mtr*' KhCD 52 
"st °«nr> Cera T- t 

F?rc W, 

GAP Corp SS‘, 

| GTE Corp 46', 

Gen Con 69”i 

Gen Dynarvea 5T, 

I Gen Eieeine erj 

I Gen Inst I*'. 

| Gen Mill* 57*1 

Jen Mo lots 70'* 

; Gen Put Util NY 19 


ti : 1 ■aeo.-y i Pacific 26 

55 Gme.-w ?0» a 

_£> Ocwntfi 33 

"J Gocnear 30^ 

*S-« Gcuio Inc 27 ' : 

S' Grace S2-, 

Gi AUc & Pacilfe 19', 

Greyhound 3V, 
it: ‘ Grumman Corp 2T, 

£»,* Cult S West 49 

5!!« Nernr h J. 29 : , 

12 ,» Hercules 59', 

fi’: Hewten-Ptud 39’. 

■*. HotteyweB 74’ B 

2,» iClrvia 36*4 

Ingerson 54', 

5°^ Inland Steel 22*, 

24-1 ISM 144’, 

S/ Art; Harvester 8-', 

Sl> INCO 13’, 

m: Paper 491 , 

TO, imTeiTet 3S 3 , 

"■ Irving Bank 41", 

J6 J jim Walter 42’, 

!?!* Johnson & John -igi, 

Kaiser AJumrn 16’j 

Kerr McGee 29h 

(‘Jmbeily Clark 70', 

h Mar. 25 : , 

Kroger 45', 

LTV Co»p 5’, 

urron 77', 

Lock need 44'. 

Lucky Stores 24^ 

Manuf Hanover 42', 

Man mile Cp 7 

A'aoco $7>, 

Marine Mitfarvi 29’, 

Mann Marwna X', 

Masco 4i', 

McDonnell 7C'- 

Mead 43 

Merck 136', 

Minnesota Mnc 89'. 

Moat Oil 2«. 

.Marrsanto j8 

Morgan J. P. 60 

Motorola 36 s * 

NCR Corp Jl's 

NL industries 14'> 

Nat Distillers 34 ’, 

Nat Med Em 21 

Nat Semicndctr t2’: 

Norfolk South 78 

MV Bancorp 2B’r 

Occidental Pet 27*» 

Ogeen 29’: 

Obn Corp jr. 

Owen?- Illinois So 

Pacific Gas Sec 19’ : 

Pan Am 7 1 , 

Penney J. C. 5J^ 

Pennroil 67 

°spsico 66 1 , 


moon h Eid k Marrtl closed n New t 


PUmr jr, 

Ptwfcs Cocge 25 ! 

Pniitpi Moms 90 < - 

PnuliDf Parrot 7 J V 

Potarctf 47’; 1 

PPG ina 4?.- * 

Ptwpi GamotB 66 * 

PuPSer 5& Gaa 3’S ] 

Raytheon 54 

RCA Corp 61 : i t 

Reynolds Ind 31 5 , ; 

Reynolds FAnUI 3B'a ; 

RoihweB hi 3a > 

Roval Dutch 61’* £ 

getaways 3**, * 

Sara Lee 49 * 

SPE Sopac j6 3 

SCM 73’. . 

Schlumoarger 32'; 

Scott Paper 50 s 

Seagram 42 V 4 

Sears Rcshuck 3£r» 3 

Shell Trans 25 : j ? 

Singer 33 3 

Smithfeuoe Beck 76’, 7 

Sony 30 1 

SB: Cal Edison 35*. 2 

Sperry Cotp 4B’. 4 

Sid Oil Ohio 45’. 4 

Sterling Orus 37 J . 3 

Stevens j P 38 2 

Sun Comp 4J 4 

Teiedyne 309 ? i 50 
Tenrwco J8’« 3 

TeuBCf ST 3 * 5 

Taras East Corp 35 r , 3 

Teuslnst 106"? 10 
Te.js UiAmes 30 5 

Tertron 49 ’, * 

Travelers Corp 46 4 

TRW Inc W 1 . ® 

UAL Inc 5 ?» S 

Unlever NV 14^, w 
Union Carbide 7? 1 

Un Faofic Corp 49’ : 5 

United Brands 2 4, i 2 

US Steel 23; 2 

Utd Tecnnoi 45 4 

Unocal 24', 3 

Warner Comms 39 3 

Warner Lamoert 46', a 

UVeDa Fargo 64’, 6 

Wesmghse Elec J2 3 . * 

VYevcmauser 30’. 3 

Wmnoooi 491 , 4 

Wootwonn 58% S 

Yetm Corp 56’, 5 

Zerwn 16 ’. 1 

CANADIAN PRICES 


Slump into 


Atvtibi 

Alcan Alurom 
Algoma Steel 
Beil Telephone 
Can Paafic 
Cominco 
Cons Bathurst 
Guh Oil 

Hawker /Sy Can 
Hudson Bay Min 
1 mo sco 
Imperii! 04 
Int Pipe 
Mass.-Fergsn 
Ro,ai Trusted 
Seaoram 
Steel Co 
Thomson N 'A 
Walker Hiram 
WCT 


1 Stock split t Traded 


l6r, 16 
4Vj 42’* 
20 20 

3P. 59’ t 

17’; 15’, 

12 4 . 13’i 

19’, 19-, 

20’; 20’. 

214 ri’i 

7", “'i 

26'. 26», 

46 47 

42', 43', 

2.96 3 CO 

32', 22\ 

62V 
23V 23V 

22'; 22», 

30’. 30«, 

16V 16', 


New York (Renter) - Wall 
Street's r.lump continued for a 
fourth day with stock prices 
moving lower in active early 
trading yesterday. 

Oil isiucs were lower as 
concerns about a sharp drop in 
crude prices worried investors. 
5 ank issues also continued 
lower on concern about energy 
leans. 

The Daw Jones industrial 
average was down three points 
to 1499. Declines led advances 
by a three-two margin. 

Merrill Lynch led the actives, 
down l 5 g to 41H. The stock had 
been rising on takeover specu- 
lation since early this month. 
Sources at Merrill Lynch said 
there did not appear to be any 
truth in the rumours. 

© Personal income is the 
US in December increased a 
seasonally adjusted 1.4 per cent 
from the previous month, the 
Commerce Department said. 

PersonaS income rose $46.6 
billion last month to an adjusted 
$3,394 billion annual rate after 
rising a revised 0.4 per cent, or 
Si 6.7 billion in the previous an 
adjusted S3 -34 7 billion. 

The Commerce Department 
previously reported a 0.6 per 
cent increase for November. 

The number of initial claims 
Tor unemployment insurance 
benefits rose to a seasonally 
adjusted 431.000 in the week 
ending January 11. from 
356,000, the Labour Depart- 
ment said. 


The failing pound and collaps- 
ing oil prices dominated the 
markets yesterday. Metals did 
not benefit from sterling's 
weakness as much as might 
have been expected, and con- 
tangos widened to the equiva- 


lent of a 15 per cent Interest 
rate as metal was dumped. 

Coffee was very strong again 
and cocoa was quite buoyant, 
partly because of the pound. 
Sugar also advanced. 

Cold dosed at exactly the 


same price as the day before. 

But the real action tvas in oil, 
where healthy volumes were 
seen, and In financials. Cur- 
rency and Interest rate con- 
tracts were heavily traded. 


LONDON COMMODITY 
EXCHANGE 
Rubber jo pMfkSo; 
Soyabean men!, coffee end 
cocoa in C per tonne; 
Gu-ofl end augur in US S 
perionne- 

G W Joymort end Co report 
RUBBER 

Afl norms unquoted. 

voi .-nil 

SUGAR 

(Raw) 

Mar 155.40-00 

May .163.40-00 

Aug 167 .00-bid 

OG ' .172.40-73.00 

Deo - - — -wvj 

VWl ~ - -S.S59 

SUGAR 

(wunei 

An months urquolMS 
Vot Hi. 

COCOA 

Mar 1.747-45 

rily 1 .745-47 

SW 1 .797 -95 

Dec 1.816-15 

Mar t .833-30 

May 1350-43 

VM 3.234 

COFFEE 

Jan .2.435 -TO 

Mar. -2.4K-90 

May 2.570-50 

jj 5.S2S-20 

Sep 7.705-00 

NOT - - - ..2760-70 

jan iBSO-29 

Vo I ....6.005 

SOYABEAN 

Fad 137.0-36.0 

Aw 138.0-37 B 

Jun T35.0-35.7 

Aug 133.5-32.6 

Oct - ...134.0-33.6 

D*c - —.135 0-34.0 

Fed 136 6- 34 6 

Vo 1 *,456 

GASOIL 

Feb 173 00-72.75 

Mar .170.50-70.00 

Ap. 168.00-87 00 

May 170.00 -69 25 

Jun. 170 00-69 50 

Uty 175.00-60 SO 


Aug .... 175.09-60.50 

S«1 180 00-70.00 

Ota 185 00-61 M 

Vat 4.584- 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
Unofficial price* 

Official turnover figure* 
Prices bi C per nMtrle tonne 
Savw In penco per troy ounca 

Rudolf WoHf A Co- Ltd. report 

COPPER HIGH GRADE 

Cash — - -1011.00 

Three mornne ...lQ43.0fr-UW.0p 

Vol 6325 

Tone. — — .. Steadier. 

STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash 990.WW95.00 

Thrre mourns .-.1031D0-1 033.00 

Vol - ri L 

Tore — Idto 

TIN STANDARD 
SUSPENDED. 

LEAD 

Cash 263 00264. 00 

Three trarflfis jztbss-ztqsq 

vol - "3525 

Tone Needy 

ZINC STANDARD 

Cash 430.00-440.00 

Tone id!®. 

ZINC HIGH GRADE 

Casn 459.KWO0.50 

Three months 477.5fr-47B.00 

Vo l _ 3300 

Tone steadier 

SILVER LARGE 

Cash 440.0-4410 

Three months _ 454 J>-4SS 5 

Vot n* 

Tone -Quiet 


SILVER SMALL 

Cash _44Q.0-*41.0 

Three months A54S-455.5 

Vet "4 

Tone —Wle 


ALUMINIUM 

Cash.. 790.50-791 .SO 

Three months S22.50-823JO 

VOI 8626 

Tone ... - firm 

NfCffEL 

Cash 2830-2840 

Three months 2910-2915 

Vol -.456 

Tons steady 

MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 
COMMISSION 
Average teteSoek prices at 
representative marfuRs on 
January 23 

GB; Cattle. 9S32p per kg Nr 
{-1561. 

GB: Sheep. 17Z.46P per kfl est 
dcw(-11.751. 

Oft Pigs, 74.5&J p*- *5 hr 
(+I.O 61 . 


England and Wales: 

Cattle nos. down 9.6 per cant, 
eve. prtw. 95 88p (- 1 SSI. 
Sheep nos. down 6.7 mr cent 
eve. price. ?72J4p{- 13.22). 

Pig nos. down 9.9 per cent, ava, 
pnoa.74Ji^j 1+1.1®. 


OmUantL 

Cattle nos. down 4.1 per cart, 
ave. price. 93 53p (-1.961- 
Sheep nos. down 13-3 per cent 
eve. price. 17248p (-6^0j. 

Pig nos. up 41 Jjur cam. aw. 
prfce. 75.51p(-2JH). 


LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 
£ per tonne 


LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Live Pig Connect 
p. pet kid 

mth Open qo 


The pound came under attack 
once P again yesterday as 
prices continued to Sdp on the 
Kotterdasn spot snarket- 

W ith March Brent crude as 
low as SI 7.40 a barrel by the 
dose, sterling ended just off the 
bottom at S1-3S37. against 
Si 3960 at the prenous CWfe. 

The pound's value against Jie 
mark declined dramatically to 

33905 (14111k while its »«£ 
weighted index lost a fall point 
to 743- 


The currency markets opened 
in nervous mood- 
But the rot really set in with a 
statement by Sheikh Yamani. 
the Saudi oil minister, that a 
price of SI 5 a barrel was likely 
if the Opec and non-Opcc 
producing countries did not co- 
operate 

This began to look tike a self- 
fulfilling prophecy, and the 
pound immediately slumped. 
It slipped further to a low of 
13755 before rallying a touch 


STEALING SFOT AND FORWARD RATES 


February VOL4 

ngmnt 

p.pcrkfto 

Ppfifl CiasB 

102.6 101.6 

102.8 102-1 

1013 100.6 

99J 99.0 

105.5 104.9 

106.4 106.2 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 
Epor tonne 





•*Lnnrl 










WhMt 

Bortoy 

Month 

Oos« 

Ctoso 

Mar 

£11785 

EI158C 

May 

f!21i5 

S1185C 

Jui 

£123.00 

— 


£101.00 

£99.31 

Nov 

£104.00 

£102.70 

Jsn expirad at 1? noon 


Vohrma: 
Wheat - 


..——348 

Bortov, 


1B3 


BALTIC FREIGHT INDEX 
G.NJ. Freight Fifiuma Ltd report 
SID per Index pobrt 
Hich/Low Ohm 
J an 889-0-889.0 689.5 

Apr P42 0-339.0 942.0 

Jut 817.0416.0 817.0 

Oct 913.0-913.0 9130 


Spot 892 
Vol: 13 tots. 


ArqaiUtna austral 

Austraio dtMar 

Ban ram Omar 

Braza cruzeiro 

Cyprus pound — 

Finland tnarka 

Greece drachma 

Hong Kong dollar ... . 

India rupee - 

Kuwait dnarfKD; — 

Malaysia Cottar 

Mexico peso 

New Zealand dollar - 

Saudi Arabia riyai 

Suv 3 apore dollar 

South Africa rend 

t/rVfsd Aran ErWrataa 


1.106A-1.1D86 

1 .9373- 1.94 17 

0J175-0A215 

16001 .00- 16095.00 

0.7400-0.7500 

..7^350-7.5750 

204.75-2OS.75 

10800-10.8130 

17.10-1730 

0-3320-0 4C20 

3.4172-3.422S 

588.41 -633 41 

2.6942 -5.7CS8 

5.0125-$ 0525 

_Z.9537-2.SiS7 

...3.1443-3.1610 

dtrhant....A0425-5 0625 


LVard 

S.tgapcre 

Maiayw . - . — 

Australia 

C=«S3 — 

5*«*1 

Ncrvrar/ 

Dermari. 

VJes: Germany . 
Sm-ae.'.and .... 
Naparia«s ... . 

France — 

Japan 

Italy — - 

Se^iiT.'Comtm 

HcngKong 

P'^aigal 

Scam _ — _ 

ajwj 


1 .2350-1 2395 

Z 1350-2 1370 

2.4700-2.4720 

0.7130-0.7140 

.1.4055-1 4065 

7 9375-7 5405 

.7.5900-7. 50SD 

9 0050-9 0100 

2.4508-2.45 IS 

2.0737-2.07S2 

2 ,'600-17615 

7 5150-7^250 

JOI.5(W02.00 

1669 00-1670 00 

5D.DD-50.D5 

.7 8110-7 8130 

15550-159 00 

153 75-15355 

17 20-17-22 


Rates supplied by Barclays Bank HOFEX and EatsL 






^ -JNVESXfvl ENTTRUSTS 


l!ond0N,;F)na n ci/^ii’Fu J ',u 


Three Month Starling 

Mar 86 

Jun 88 - 

Sen 86 — 

Dec 66 

Previous day s total opan Imprest 1 1087 
Three Month Eurodollar 

Mar 86 

Jun 86 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 ........ 

Previous day s total Ofian interest ?tO80 
US Treasury Bend 

Mar 86 

Iun86 

Sep 66 

Prevous day s total own interest 3812 
Shan GUI 

Jim W ...*.. 

■•?ep86 ... 

Prevous day’s total open inwrat*. 1296 
Long GDI 

war 66 

Jun 86 

Sep 86 

Previous day’s tctai open interest 7265 
FT-SE 100 

Mar 96 

Jun B6 

Fi e vious dav’s total open interest 2037 




Open 

High 

Low 

ClMB 

Est Vol 

86.3J 

66.57 

88.32 

06.46 

4866 

8 T .CO 

B7.15 

86 94 

87 10 

542 

57.63 

87.72 

88.00 

67.83 

87.72 

247 

87 93 

8780 

88.02 

16S 

?t 9? 

91.97 

91.90 

91.93 

5090 

91 77 

91. 50 

91.73 

91.75 

733 

91.54 

9158 

91.50 

9153 

810 

91 29 

91 J3 

91x8 

91.29 

36 

83-13 

NT 

NT 

63-24 

83-04 

83-17 

82-11 

7213 

0 

0 

94-lS 

NT 

NT 

94-35 

94-05 

94-06 

34-38 

7|2 

0 

0 

107-22 

NT 

NT 

108-05 

107-01 

107- 10 

108- 04 
108-03 

7418 

0 

0 

139 60 
tfT 

140 JO 

138.40 

139 JO 
14070 

S3T 

0 


Rates were again fully firm at 
the close yesterday at levels 
discounting at least 13 V: per 
cent base rates. 

Day-to-day money was 
around Ilf'a-I! per cent for 
much of the session, but fell 
away to 5 l z per cent in the 
afternoon before closing around 
6 per cent. 


Base Rates 
Clearing Banks 12': 
Finance House 12 

Discount Matltol Loans* 1 . 

Overnight. H»'M1 LtT" 5 


Local Authority Bonds (**) 

Imomn 13^-13*1 2 months 13 1 >13' I 

3 months T3*»- 13'^ 6 months 13V J 3’ i 
9 months l3V*-l34i 12 months la'via'A 
StertngCO»t%) 

imomn 13V13V, 3 months US- '3^ 
6 months J3Vl3’i 12 months !3^r 12% 

Doflar CDs {%! 

.1 month 8.00-7.95 3 months S.OO-7.9S 
6 months 8.05-8 00 12 months 8-20-8.15 

EURO-CURRENCY DEPOSITS % 


C5U ( Overnight . Hl'Th 11 
755 1 weei> lived. 12-11 


Treasury BiCe (Dtscount 
Buying Selling 

2 months 13-’„ 2 months 

3 months 13' „ 3 months 

Prime Senk B.Tis (Discount *,) 

1 morth 1 2- r 1 3 2 months 

Jmor.ms 13 Vi 3 6 months 

Trade SHIa (Dh'Xani *•> 

1 month U Smooths 

3 months 13' , 6 months 

interbank ('.1 

Overnight, open 1 1 ’ ,-1 1 doss 6 
1 week ir- 12 ’, 6 months 

I month 13 -13’ - , 9 months 

3months 1 JVl3’,i 12 months 

Local Authority Deposits (N> 

"days 11 -, T jays 

1 monin 13 3 months 

5 months 13 12 months 


13V 13’. , 

«V12"» 


I3ir-134ii 
131 tr'3' i* 
13'V13 4 ’i» 


Dollar 

7 days 8-7' 3 i, 

3 months S^k-S’m 
D eutschmark 
7 days 4’H’r 
3 months 4V 4 ’: 
French Franc 
7 days 9'rf> ? » _ 

3 months l2Vi2*is- 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 10 VI O’. 

3 months 4' .-4', 
Yen 

7 days 7' j-7 
3 months 6 ’ j it6 ,j m 


cat 

1 month 
6 months 
call 

1 month 
6 monms 
call 

1 month 

6 months 
call 

1 month 
6 months 
call 

1 month 
6 months 


8V7H 

B'rB 

8*>r8'« 

5-1 

4*1-4 ’s 

10-9 
^v-S', 
12V12Li 
2'— 1 L 

4'>, 

4'r4’, 

7-6 

7*,r7'i» 

S’rfl’r 


haiOerrand' (Per coin): 

535i .50353.00 IE255JJO-256.00I 
Sovereigns' tnewfc 
S84.5O-fc50 (SSI 25-62.251 
•E* dudes VAT 


Fixed Rare Swung Export Finance Scheme rv 
Average reference rale for interest period 4 
DecemDer. 1985 to 7 January. 1986. mdushre: 
11.838 per cenL 


1hB5 

High Lav, Stock 


101 97 

t» SW 

tss its 

302 24 

IK 123 

120 83 

IP S3 

114 162 

IX 153 

St 47V 
37. a 

374 312 

S3 64 

IB 72 

665 525 

179 116 

116 97 

127 » 

320 2M 

149 112 

450 349 

S2f 393 

m 16 Q 

111 89 

12 s*, in 

XS 35 4 

142 114 

79 66 

114 91 

124 BS 

97 78 

169 122 

248 IK 

296 2*2 

US W 

SW 415 

303 23$ 

296 2T3 

1C9 76 


113 1Q0 

SE0 406 

1J? I« 

134 IX 

181 13 

338 268 

74 69 

121 91 

IB ns 

144 37 

339 230 


AowrTiuH 
AngAme>9ec 
Ashdown 
MSfljmc ASMTa 

Bankers 

Berry 

BvoertSVtfn 

B» Assets 
BrEmpra See 
BntthkN 
aunjr 
Cnerw Agency 
ConTtnarm) 
Cmceni Jipan 
Dertiy he 
Do Cod 
Drayton Core 
Drayton Fer EeW 
Drayton Jeoen 
Drayton Prewer 
OieeMeLon 
Eret AmerAswl 

&4nowoh 

Been: Gen 
Engveh en 
Engnn Scot 
EngMiNT 
Eronn 
FSCAMnce 
FSCPaOte 
Fandy 

FMScoAmer 
FirMUnGen 
FwimAirerton 
Fleming Oarer 
Fteneng Btsrpriie 
Ftemtna Fer East 
Flaming Fledging 
Fleming -Upan 

Pornng M er can Me 
Fterrung Oreneea 
FVwmgTecn 
FWreig Unharsel 
For Co 
OBCCapW 
GT Japan 
General Fleets 
General Cora 
□Uiuow Stock 


UL Cross 
onti- Red. 1 986 

Price Ch’ge yld % yld °v High Lew Slot k 


•S3 -2 

134 «2 

287 
ISO 

IDS -1 

101 • >3 

(W 

in -i 

Sf • .7 

an • +i 

tO ■el’, 

93 

BAS * 

143 *2 

IIS 4-2 

110 -3 

314 -1 

136 

430 e2 

514 

178 -1 

105 

IX 

298 • 

138 • -1 

78 

112 -t 

733 • .. 

M • 

147 *1 

239 
289 
100 

*00 *2 

297 *1 

288 

BBS • ♦* 

110 

4n a .. 

73e 

m a *t 
IK 

338’ -3 

77 

92V a 
120 at 

142 

275 -3 

115 


lriL Cross 
only Red. 

Price Oi'ge Fld'a > Id 


LW5 

High Low Cwnpaiiv 


Olv Yld 
Pnte Ch’oe pence '* 



575 280 

57V 2SV 
43 19 

BS 37 

IS 9 

i r, n 

14V BV 
142 113 

1C! 73 

ZK 178 

95 90 
4J6V 350 

96 59 

ICS 44 

r-CV, STB 
156 166 


Akrsyd&SmnNre 
AMieaiEcmi 
ArgrW 
B ooMond 
hrortna Arrow 
OWyMef 
Co*' 

Deo* 

EngTno: 

Ereo 

Exc*vaK7 

F wrfnca o 

Frost Gp 

cmsaiotui 

HoeSanon Adnen 

ICR 

MAI 

u&G 

UaretKtoHaoa 

PeoflclmTc; 

OoVwraras 

amaaceres 


jtv"" • -Jc: .:/. 


-vC>. a- 






COM Cnrg 1W 


B-j Olfef Cinq 1« | 


flU C">r Orrvj (U 


Ed 0*v Cnrf m 


A3BEY UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
SO Howannxsr Rd. Bcumanmcn BHB SAL 
OHS 717373 lUnKimel 
GRtCFoerl 104 8 llOi 

HflhXKEquCy 769 l'8 

WwMvnce BPVI '99 6 '81. 

Amercui Growth 1«0S 1439 

AWnPiolt 43 9 47.1 

AsHUi Earn BOB *59 

CJRHai heserwe 604 607 

Comm SEn«Tiy 703 75 2 

Eurapasfl CapH 71.7 76 2 

Cnneral 11S4 1234# 

JCMK 523 55 9 , 

Uk Growth Ine 750 B0 1 

DeAcoxn 1673 1154 

USErnerarcCcs 98.1 604 

liwee:. Prcgresa 159 6 180 6 

■.■ASTrratAW »0 55 4 

4LUCO DUNBAR UMT TRUSTS 
4A<M DuntW Centre S««n4aiSNt 1EL 
0794 6103» A 07932829' 


G*Yl«kHnc 'OS 1 IB* > 

DoAccun 'B1 7 1663 

Man Ywidlnc S3 4 73 8# 

ajAoaen 135.4 143.6 

Jeoenimane ’559 1659 

Do AcCum 1565 lo63 

NXmencMiMC 423 457# 

Do Acajm 49.T 529# 

Pxrnc Ihottw 97 2 IKS 

DoAocv 10S3 1111 

Smaco’inc 61.7 657 a 

OoAoaim 725 772 e 

BRITANNIA UNIT T71UST 
74-78 riwm Pe«r-«n Lan-joo EC2A I JD 
01-5962777 DeiMcgi -536 0476/9 
MorreyGUM 090001 0-333 
OwrtfrOffr SS3 587 

MMecoe etv 86 n VLi 

SmoBer Co> 113.1 127 0 

UKOrowJi 32.0 34 1 

Emn me 4*2 52 s# 

ON 23 6 248 

IncKkOwBl 1656 1788 

NMMi^imr 162.1 1723 

PratS/ma 175 1A7 

Conencxfw 1303 1X0 

Rninual Sacs 383 402 

Gomsflen >96 213 

rniLnoura 143 153 ' 

Phro Snares 486 51.6 


F*«Tnal 165.1 197 1 

'Vowrn 4 income 1123 1199 

Cental That 197A 210.7 

BeiereM 2992 316 6# 

Vaam Trusl 4673 4*7 0 

Amencan menme 290 30.9 c 

MWltnoameTK 2952 2185 

Cowry Mcome 1102 117 4 

HiTh yie« 1192 IHJ 

lijy Sea Tiuet 27 3 29,4 

lirerruavrul 659 702# 

Japan F«id 67.1 it.5 

Ptonclrusl 1217 129 S 

AmerSptaso W< «3 

Cn Amef Tst 1924 1942 

AM Auer Value 162.6 194 £ 

Oy Grown J2.7 34 0 

'i-noBar Go's 99 0 1054# 

2nd Smeler Co'e 133 7 IU3 

Feorrery Trum 64 4 K.6 

Alii Mai 6 Cmdry 79* B0 

' zm Earning* 1565 1W7 

TeenoaogyTM 932 W.6 

income Enamor 1001 107 0 

Exempt Smolv Col 1845 ISJ.9 

USA E, Bin pt Tn* 293 9 3112 

arbuinnot secunmEs 
131 F«aoon Pawmem. Lwvpon EC2A I A r 
01-516 X78 01-3*0 8540/1 HP 
Tsixtal amn me *C t SI* 


EAQlE STAR UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
Ben Road cneiiermam. Osucevar GL54 7LQ 
C2J2 5213H 


UK Balanced « 54 1 67 r 

Do Ac^an 64.1 57 7 

ue Grtmen Accum 57 h *1 4 

i.n*Ni£imcine S45 58.1 

H American Acorn £73 6' 1 

Far Easwm Ajoi'i S3J 571 

ErAT4iean Accum 649 692 

UK G# • FI me 47 0 SO 1 

DoAccun 47 0 501 

EOU (TABLE UNITS ADMINISTRATION 
35. FowrannSl .Vanchuwr 
061-216 5865 


-03 147 
-0 3 347 
-04 104 
-03 6 02 
-01 18* 
-as 0 J» 
-ft* 128 
. 99* 

.. 93* 


GAS LW/T MANAGERS 
Royal Exchange. EC3P 3DN 
01 -6M 2020 

Gits Fried W IlOf JM-J • 

GnMOiEoity 1715 1B5LA "ii 255 

iSSri 249 5 258.6 -3 6 326 

NAmencen 125 4 133S -05 23 

1473 153 7 -03 056 

Pr-ooem Sre/a 184.1 rf«# . 

SmaHr Comoerre* 189' J7J8 -96 'TJ 

European TruM 1852 197.1 vl.l 0.76 

GUDKBSS MAHON WAT TRUM T MAW AOERS 
POBci e42. 32 Si Muy-eHa London EC3F3AJ 

4S.I *AJ# -01 JM 

Sff !£l *03 || 

SOUnceiCUSGdi . «r» , TM *05 OB 

TemPe Bar Sm Go a 1»*.i9 141 H .. IBS 

HAMBRPS BANK UWT TRUST MA NAGERS 
PiwMw UT »«n*i. S. Reyleigri Rlt Bramrewo Esae. 
0*77217916 

Hemoraa SnK Co a «« 'gD* *^ MJ 

Hanvxoe N Amer 613 K2 -dl V0l 

Kamaros JeOlFE 81.1 UJ -09 05* 

Hamcrat ScamSyn 6M 7ft, ♦05 1.10 

Hvrere, Em>pe» *3* *S* B -J| 

>S5iaC«SIn «.! 443 *6-1 J-J 

Handana EauaySK 67.9 ^2 -43 5.J8 

Hunrioa F*gn *K 485 575 • 

hranUfiM Rea Aata 4S2 513 a -02 149 

rdDEMSON APM UNRTlt ATlON _ 

(Hamer JT rwa . wu u nucn S. Ray«v Ro. huom 
BtemworiJ Esee* 

0377-:t72X __ . . 

*£££?* ikI l%i '-i{ | 

ft? SS! 35 J8 

JZ52. « 3s {i 

Fkw&aiTnat 10& I llfi-7 ~Q.r 

SSS»raS«,lne 1164 ^2 -02 17. 

Oo Accvari 2215 2*0J "0-5 3.74 

vegn Incame Thre 141.5 '4l 4 o -02 S.K 
Ejdra tncome 135 1M2 -OA 554 

sSScSon- 903 K5* -M ■» 

Prat 4 G4 *42 47 4 . . IBM 

MTW 40.9 *14 4 -0 1 9.91 

fried wrerasr Tow *0.7 6*3 

Giooil Meanneat* !83 SR-l *0* JJ 

GUMlTedl 893 '012 *0-0 ft25 

&K *42 492 -06 112 

Mamnnw 139 « 1499 *0.7 029 

049 Nal Res W3 7J» -03 1.47 

ISriMWOet*! »!' “J* •• Jff 

/unffabn (82 i*U ■ W® 

Eurc^n INI 7X62 -05 0.79 

Eras SmaAer Goa TOP tit *05 0^ 

jx-an Trua *49 1006e *13 057 

J^SrectfScs 945 1002 *15 0-01 

pSkMSic « » 3 -12 038 

SramoreS Malay 242 25. DW -02 190 

ScrpSrereuT 7 MSS 1X6# *0.8 OK 

AmarSmaee’Cea *83 61 8 *07 026 

AmerReajyery Truat 1112 i70.» *0* ' *T 

wen (t>=xna Editck 995 I0A7# -03 5 BP 

SniAMr Cos Exams'. 96 7 imJ *0 6 1.76 

EusEiemnSI 945 ®5 *03 123 

Japan eZSjHSI V* »72 ♦!.< 1^ 

NAna 79.1 03 *01 130 

GBd Taos £, 151 77 5 91 6 *0.7 0.07 

Paa&c EasncdS) '613 151.9 *3* 150 



Bar OTer Cnrg YK 



62ft 

80ft e 

rtoh Income Trust 

596 


48.6 

*?6# 


50* 

MO 

Soacril Sto Trust 

826 

66ft 

Nm Amrr Trus> 

WO 


Fat Eastern Tnu’ 
EQUITY A LAW 

5*8 

efionSLCt 

rvereryCt 


48 6 513 

445 475# 

40 2 425 

91 2 972 

55.9 595 

90 245 

693 7*.S 


64 4 68.6 

793 ISO 
1565 198.7 
832 68.6 

IMS 107 0 
184 4 1SS.9 
293 B 3112 


Unn, Enemy 
Wend Tedi 
AmerGrowP 
Amer income 
Amar Smiau Co 1 
AuBGrp-m 
EuroSmaler 


HomKwigPW 2*6 262# 

Infl Grown, 30 B 32.6 

Japan Red XI *17# 

Japan Smaller 106 M3 

Exempt 662 BfLS 

EiemplMvfcm 64.7 872 

BROWN SHPLET 

0-17. Penymoue Ro. Haywards Heetti 
Oi*. ajar a. 


0203563231 

UK Growth Accun l£7 1X4 

Epmeorae 1079 n*.7 

(•oner Inc Accun 19' 5 2017 

Do Income 1 X 6 1 MB 

0,8i/n«e« Acdm IS* mi 

Domcome 776 914 

N* AirerTC Acoim 1250 1325 

Fer East T« Aeaun. 99..’ 106 0 

Euro TP Accum 127.1 13S2 

OeneruTnaJ 1942 2055 

FAC UNIT MANAGEMENT 

i uuwee Penmen H". London EC*R0BA 

01423 4660 


4® t SI* 

Do Accun 53 7 57 4 

Ess:enifcln9 934 105 J 

Do i>*- Wi t h dra wa l 543 58 0 

Fnance S Properly » 9 54 3 

GmiFuedheom* «-7 *59e 

Cd Accum 705 74.1 c 

Hnn income mcoma 602 84 le 

Do Accum 1X2 1475 c 

Nf Iwkllnceoe 622 684 

DoAccun 158 3 199 8 

'rrrrre =4 Sda 

On Acc 53 6 S2 

DoS-bVAdaere 60 6 64.8 

Managed Fund S3 0 55 6 

Preference Income 25. J 2.8 

DoAccum 314 *6.6 

imaBofCotWomre 104.6 1118 

DoAccum 1'i7 IMS 

'.vxrU Penny Snare li 9 0 

PtadCfO 7* UK »«7 870 

PottkjBo Tar Japan KL3 6*5 

PorSriaa 7« US 88.9 714 

PrjnfONJTR Europe 654 9*6 

PcrtfOMTMMC 4J 8 443 

ATLANTA FUNDS MAJJAQEMEKT 
IS Vcogale. London ECin 6EL 
01-638 1/11 

inremaKBial (31 97 4 72.4 

Co a roan 01 07 o 434 

Hign mcomo (31 5J2 894 

v; orta Energy Ol ’36 14 6 

D0A<=um(3l 191 20 5 

in* Trust (3| 1«J J” ! 

DtrAmanOI ltt.6 164.1 

RAOJJ2 OSFfOBB 

3 gen^-Jaa h. Eantairgn EH3 67 Y 
4?, -225 3561 I Dealers OJ1 -27C6W9I 
inse*l22| J524 X9.0 


-0 J 204 
-04 204 
♦16 131 
*0.9 1 9l 
-02 268 
*02 9*3 
*03 ft4J 
-05 6.K 
.. 832 
-04 672 
-12 8.72 
*0.1 2L62 
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107.1 1151 
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BUCXMASTER MANAOEMENT 
The Swo E*mange London ECZP 2JT 
01 -588 286* 


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Do Accum 1*1 274 3 269 0 *1.6 448 

Incoma Fuel t3> 62.7 B8 8 . S.78 

Ol Accum Ch 1419 leftO *0 1 9.76 

Mkya 1026 <084 . 299 

DoAccumO 1»9 1416 .. 26B 

SnweerreiSl 6860 9272 .. ZU, 

Da Acoan (51 914 4 Bn4 .. £69 

C3FUN0 MANAGERS _ 

125. H«h Ho*om. London WC1V 9PT 
01-242 1146 

CS Japan Field 495 527 *02 0.41 

CANNON FUW MANAGERS 
i . Ohinpie Way. Wemetey. HA9 OF* 

01-902 8976 

Grotn 23 S3 2543 *23 385 

income 266 7 2B5S *15 525 

Far East 127.7 135 J +05 0 76 

Nom American 124 4 1JZJ *05 IJZ 

CAPELSJAMES1 MANAGEMENT 
too. C«o Broad St London EC2N 1 BO 
01-6210011 

CaOM(3> 237.0 3127 .. ;(D 

Income (3) C8J 2404 .. 655 

Norm Ameiar [3> 2407 253.4 . 157 


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1772 1*85 
3688 3682 
1612 1B5 
1423 151.4 
1064 1134 
1585 1997 
509.7 J16B 
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01-5991M 

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77. London Weft London 6C2N 108 

01-516 1615 

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CLERICAL MEDICAL UWt TRUST MANAGER6 
Narrow #am. Bnsiol BS2 OJH 
0372 277718 

General EtP«v 21 ? £2 “23’ 

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HMAtUNCTON MANAGEMENT 

3 London WaB Meg*. LoneolWa*. Ixnoon ECSMSMa 
01-6265161 

Am* S Gen mcome 2C6B 2208 +1 9 058 

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Am* Tumarcpno me 1972 20* 6 *'.0 '2! 

OoAecum 203* 2i62 +1 B 125 

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Da Aram OKS 013* -0J J3t 

Cony 8 GiMneome 774 820 -04 622 

DoAccum 100 S 1072 -0.4 622 

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Do Accum 1320 14128 ~CA 5 44 

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Rxccvery i«4 113 0# .. 12* 

DoAccum 1150 t34# -- 234 

FRia<B9 FWOVaeKT MANAOmS 
Wonam End. Donung. Surrey 
0306185055 

FREouKiDU >674 1763 

Oo accum 375.9 Z91S 

FP Fried WD» 103-2 

OlAAinr 112.7 1705 + 

Stew*d9mpD<cl 13*6 ' 57 2 

Do Accum 1435 1614 - 

FUNDS M COURT 
oubec Tnmee. *xngy**y. WCO 
O1-KJS4300 

Capon 7557 3044 

Oiyplnc 1243 125 6 

HUhl'iea 1814 1*65 

GTUWTMANA53IS , „ , 

801 Floor. 8. Dewnahmi Sft Lonoon ECSM 47 J 

01-793 375 Dpjlrg 01-628 9431 
UK Cap Fnd tnc 733 f4 9e - 


Inti Tech 193.1 174A 

Co Accum 170.1 1914 

Jepon Grown, *M 52.1 

OoAocrew <M 

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DoAccum 98.1 10*9 

PaatcSasn 6M 954 

DoACaao 617 99.1 

5*i**bi Coe 8 dec irea 156.4 

Do Accum lBI 1744 

WcridwWaOowni 1974 1*8.1 

Oo Acafn 02 04 2554 

ILOrDBUFeiMTTmKT 

20. C*Hor 91 London EC2A844X 

01-9200311 


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QoAceuw 127.1 1394 

GaTiu* *6* *0A 

Do Accum H.1 524 

(fgli Income OW 7Z4 • 774 

Da Acore 634 BBS 

US Growth W.4 B3.7 

DoAccun 564 64.1 

LONDON » NANCHtffTW 
tvmsride F*1L Eeei* EX5 IDS 
0392 921 S5 

General Trap 355 36.0 

Income Tnao 202 31.9 

Mw reeo nel Trial £62 28.7 

MMOseeuurEs 

Time Queye. Tow* HR EC3R 98Q 

01-6284586 

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DoAccun 232.5 248.5 C 

Am* W e co .*y 229.9 24 GJ 

DoAccun 2464 2644 

Am Sms** Coe 540 574# 

DoAccun 542 994# 

AuH & On Inc 7S.7 81 -D 

OoAcare 024 S&0 

Comm&OenkK I9ft3 19740 

DoAccun 203.0 218.1 • 

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ConventonGrowm 7162 292J 

Dome 1562 1674 

Dividend Fund »>C 328 5 8484 

Do Accum 9401 1,0002 

European & General '553 16A6# 


-0 4 128 
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HU. SAMUEL UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
*5. Beech SvECaPSLX 
01-628 001 1 


1014 103-2 
112.7 1205 


4405 489 7 
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1S7J 1780 

97.8 103.9# 

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30f 4 3£4 9 

274 2ftl 

38.9 41.0 c 

53.1 564 

964 705 

1034 110.8# 
290 302 

3£7 3£7 

1520 1614 
530 974 


139 6 1477 
1435 1514 


733 F49e 
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01-9234351 „ 

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UK FUW MANAGERS 

32. Open Aimes G«*. LPWi 3W1M9AB 

01-C221000 

earner***! 1157 Igi 

1 9i High morns Sl2 »9 

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KLEU4WOAT BENSON 

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lm Recorary ire rae 81 

DC Aram 62.1 870 

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0b tow* L23 82.4 

SraaarrCoiex: 1SS4 1 jS4 

DoAecur 1623 175 3 

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OoAsern J-’S 399s 

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OoAcam 38.3 *9 6 


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NPI UK 1698 1798 -'A 380 

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DoAccun 6017 6*02 +18 120 

F* Earn ACC 548 578 c +18 040 

DOOM 548 *78c +18 040 

American Acc SIT 558# -02 140 

DodK 51ft 545# -418 180 

NORWICH UNION 

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0803622200 

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HTnet 113ft 1195 -Oft 184 

ONgoaBI trust manaodhent 

66. Carronsceet London EC+N8AE 

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kaameeai* Growth 1218 «0£# -08 180 

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3pea*9Ke 69.1 73ft# +02 £10 

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UK Growth 4+.1 472 +02 120 

PeOScQrowm 332 35.7 +OJ 020 

Mipnmeoou air job# -os are 

PractfcaJmeoma 448 *3.8 + 0.1 £70 

DoAccun 79.1 84ft +0.1 £70 

PEARL TRUST 

25£ Wgh Hotnan, WClV 7EB 
51-4055441 

Grown Fuel me 71.7 768 ’ -42 £77 

OoAecum 136 D (i£8 -02 £77 

moaraeFlmd 96ft ®1 -05 483 

Vn! Et^wyme 1042 1108 +02 161 

OoAecum 10*2 1108 +02 181 

UnRTruMmc 10£4 1 B 86 -08 183 

DoAccun 1764 1668 -Oft 353 


PERPETUAL UWT TRUST 

*6. Hal SoweL Henley On Thames 

0*91576668 

Ini Growth 2150 £360 

Income '15.0 1380 

VYrnUhridedee 121* 13£8 o 

Amr-Growtn 80ft 658c 

ta Emm Co t 6S9 715 

FerEaMarwUi 538 £78 

PR0L89C UWT TRUSTS 
2Z7. B W opg g e. Lcridon EC2 

01-2*7 75*4/7 


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1349 14*8 

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23.4 258 

638 5ST# 
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10*.* 1118# 
1412 151.0 
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SU 667 

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—04 086 
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+61 11 JB 
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-0.1 315 
-02 455 
-05 483 
£64 
-01 540 
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-03 056 
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7MOE7 TRUST MANAGERS 

TenM Moure. GalenouM Rd. Ayleeouiy Bucks 

02666041 


+06 180 
-0.1 £90 
+02 £10 
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+02 120 
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*01 £70 
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-1.4 1.40 
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- 1.1 £10 
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(*gn trams 
CorwAQ# 

Fer Eastern 
Marti American 
ftoecmiSa 


904 972 

1444 153.1 
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117ft 1261 
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99-l0aS*nai«nLM6k»ro.hentMCt4 iXX 
0629674791 

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I4LA irsemitwrel 417 463 1.14 

NlAGtolAM 215 227 a -03 11 AS 

MLAtrconi ZL5 3+4c . 581 

MLA Ewcpeen 236 SO .. MO 

MANUmlUNAQEMEMT 
Sl George* Wsy. Stereneoe Hn 
0435356101 


L 6 C UNTT TRUST MANAGEMENT 
pterev HSuse. Ccwrm Aye. EtSft 7 BE 

wrartoFure 553.3 ftfOSe 

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TdAecum 3464 3716 -£6 £54 

Domeome 507 £*£• “92 5ft* 

EuPiieen 5S3 C4c +03 £J7 

F# Eastern 541 57J +0.7 QM 

GO Truss 67.9 71ft +0.1 6ft3 

wWaieged BO 89 5 ]TT 

mvNfrie <Tft 512 -Oft 4ftS 

NAmenunTnni 409 71ft# +fl.1 2.10 

us Sped* 343 <38 53ft .. £73 

LLOYDS BANK UWT TRUST MANAGERS . 

Betfinrs CV- ComiJS+ftej. WWWTJ. MSlsua 
0U443fl1** 

Bjuacri 1512 161 T -1ft 055 

»92 284 7 -17 4S8 

Enc—, mn 464 496 655 

Do Accum 33ft 34ft - <+» 

Eararc^pe 1778 1363 +0.* 9.15 

DoAcevm S58 2414 ~0> 616 

OcrWlCVi STJ 02 +12 0^ 

Do X-.- 7-1 572 31 2 *02 629 

H«1 234.3 -08 5 IT 

DaAccen *25 1 494.8 -1ft 417 


043535610' 

QrewBi IWB 61.4 03 

GAflFrieetot 96 S IDOJ 

n^fimeome unm 51.7 6T8 

HUinatdGtoum 567 52ft# 

rid Oc-th Unto 07ft 1039 

N Americen Ukke 61 ft Br4 

Far East LHJs W.4 70 9 

$ma9#CMFuto 64ft 57ft 

NBCARUMT TRUST 

LMoam HM. 25£ nomlerd U. E7 

01 >234 5544 

MPCU 1114 1169 -6 7 

MERCURY FUND MANAGERS LTD 
^WJjMiem St EC4R 9AS 

AiMrGreWi *68 92J -42 * 

DoAmen BLft 955 -42 ’ 

Airertasn* 4a2 *00 -0.1 ! 

DoAccum 403 4S2 -9.1 ■ 

Beopon Grown 102ft 108ft *42 ’ 

Oaeceum Toil iifi +4.1 ] 

Gener# 2002 212ft -12 

DcAcaen 3223 34£B -1ft i 


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krarras u r m 1B£6 SSO *$ft 15 

D? Accun 23611 2511 +« 'J* 

Ham 903 101ft# +06 Ofi 

ODACOa B7.1 1032* +09 9® 

RedMrv 1492 IS*- 7 -Oft £41 

Ddacobi 157ft »J -0* J 4 ! 

ErempiDta 1968 litfld J® 

EurrxaAwro 217.7 299ft 6 ■- £02 

0742 73642 

CapRsI krama 670 Tt 4# -45 2.73 

Dg Accum 905 Mft# -Oft £73 

CeimanSyftGon J«0 H0« "JS 

DuMcun 1538 164.1 +0.i 036 


PRUDENTIAL UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
5149. Bed HO. Mord Eseex. 1G1 2DL 
01-4783377 

HomomEguBy 337ft 3528 -11 385 

Hctooro Euopeao 67 7 728 *0.4 088 

Hotoomcor™ +68 518 .. 123 

hWorriHgnire 555 598# -01 682 

Motounrid 778 6£7# *0A 084 

Motoem JKseraM «U 64 1 *04 005 

HottoriiRAmancan MO S1.6 .. 103 

HefcomSpreSto soj 80 s -03 lm 

riotoam UK Grown 67.4 718 -65 380 

HotoomGKTrum 1598 183.6 *81 684 

GU0TO MANAGEMENT COWWY 
31-45 Orrehtm Si London EC2V7LH 
0l«04l77 

Quadrant Gareral 35£7 3703 .. 049 

OuaOem ricome 194 0 2004# .. 015 

OaorimWFa 334ft Sfflft .. ift* 

Qu»**ra Raeowry 2160 2298 .. 024 

WIIIWWCHLD ASSET «UfiMB#gNT 

NC Arena be 7*3.7 2582 +43 186 

Jfeteann 2S2.I Z7BJ +43 185 

WJgWSyAre !»j -08 102 

NCkran# 72ft 77A -0A 485 

. 1268 1346 +15 0.42 

W §"■*■&» U4.I 151ft -47 106 

NC|c*EinpCB 1 134ft 1403 +08 032 

MfEamKQR 11150 iron .. MO 

NCArmtPtop 51157 12.18 .. .. 

NCPrupony 1*68 1968 .. 

ROWAN iwr TRUST 

JiW WUn * nEOH ** 

*'"***' 1*1 1998 2035 +40 2.79 

jKUttna 5713 5600 .. 3.18 

WflRdWfti 1315 1»0 ..658 

Wrtn» 304.0 3110# .. 12S 

Fried Weraw 1328 1315 +65 £50 

tMlkrera* 1138 1KB# .. 1359 

f »E«a 1375 1415 ,. 020 

ROYAL ufe RTO MAMAGCUENT 
U»«1»al IB93H8 

061-227 4422 

^ffTnre 51.1 50 -03 3.13 

665 62.6 C +04 1J6 

».l S3 .. 9.00 
US Trust 288 fflj ,, 123 

P*McBa*7rt 27.7 204 403 OJU 

RQTALLOWON UWT TRUBT WUlAGERS 
^LajfcnNoaoedHIBSWCDI IRA 

AroereanGreiTOl 7eft 792# -08 037 

C*«ri(Aca«n 1402 TST.T -15 £57 

oakram 407 51ft *01 982 

Wghttxsme 61ft 64ft -02 079 

meeme 5 Grew# 74.7 r*5# -04 0M 

gjJanGrowm 604 608 +09 008 

^reariSN* 823 882 +07 L77 


BCMIDOCR UWT1RUST 

&ire prt«sNo cae-W3t«mjmh 

0705627733 

American Inc till 1209 . ] 8 I 

Oo Accun li&e ' 20 * +01 167 

Austraanlnc 66.7 664c +06 IJE! 

DoAccun rao 731 c +05 1 ^ 

European me 862 B*3 -06 126 

DoAccun 908 947 -08 125 

G9tfl Fried mo S 12 548 e . 7080 

Do Accum 737 77.7 e -01 10 00 

Gold Fix'd Inc 36.6 359 +08 3® 

DC Accun »0 37.4 -02 iS2 

(neon* 1395 1493 -07 §55 

DoAccum ■ 3054 327.7 -1.7 $55 

wnneoma 90S *4 *04 082 

DoAccum 12*8 1311 *0.5 08Z 

JepSmA- Co* Ac 57 JJ 948# *13 010 

Srigepora • M#ty *54 485 +02 1 *« 

DoAccun «aft 405 +03 >5* 

SraalwCo'sIno '078 ilea .. 172 

Do Accum 1118 1195 *01 172 

Special SRs Inc 976 338 .. 189 

Dri Accum 905 96ft 1.49 

TcAyoFurdUio 1385 1401 +1.9 030 

Dr> Accum 1 JS 8 1492 *15 020 

USSnatorCosAC 514 545 +08 028 

UKByriymc US* 91ft ■.♦00 054 

. DOACCUD ’ - - ’ 1308 1338 +13 IS* 

n scorer , . . . 6503 9978 c . . £93 

SpeeW&mnvt im.0 10S8» +0A 187 

P*reone 6 Cn*ny 40*8 4962# .. 3ftT 

SCOTTISH EOUTABLE 
20 6 l Andrews 5 *l Britou^h 
031-5869101 

lntftrrame unite !»5 132* 389 

DoAccun 183ft 1650 .. 389 

SCOTTISH UF# MUESTHGNTS 
15. St Andrews 30 Eratough 
031 2252211 

UK Equity 1419 1516 - 1 ft £31 

American 1378 1«7A *01 140 

Puente 1205 1209 +19 008 

europaan 1705 191ft +09 076 

SCOTTISH MUTUAL WVESTMENT MANAGERS 
109. vmesrt SL Gtoagow G 2 6 HN 
9*1-9*66100 

UXEqri* 1377 1465 - 0 ft SM 

GtotFlxid 1025 109 0 -01 023 

UKGnrirCoeEg 1105 1239 -94 £39 

Eunpean ISO 3 1598 *15 18* 

NAmaricai 974 '038 *03 227 

Padko 109.1 1101 +15 086 

SCOTTISH UNIT TRUST 
29. Cnorkitie Sq. Edkicugh 
091-2284373 

Pucfflc 374 401 *05 

Worid Growth 297 318 +0.1 0 77 

NAmaricaB 325 3*5 - 0 J C 90 

meonaPimd 372 3Bfto -02 589 

Scottish wnows 

PO Bee 90£ Eatwgh EH16 5BU 

0614650000 

Pag Ed Inc 1521 20*4 *19 377 

DoAccun 319ft 233-4 *£0 32! 

GO(rMS.nMO> MANAGEMENT 
30 CNy Hoed, London 8C1Y 3AV 
01-6366011 

Are# Tech 6 Gan 80 1010 -05 010 

Pacdlc 1S0.1 1235 +20 0 89 

SactKomaFnd 1*28 Ifiift# -II 41* 


AmrEagto 

AuNiaCan 259 

ComrredBy 7B7 

tnaray ^0 

EouM 1C37 1 

Ecrcpean Spec Ste 79ft 

Extra Income W.i . 

RnanOBl 319 7 . 

GB inccme 5*8 

G*1 Income 61 1 

Doncsun >10.9 

SS? SH 

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CoRarirear K » 

neiSnmPd '00 

UK Canal SI .7 

ScwadSae 75+ 

TBUmeogy *£a 

trieriOireoM +34 

Worioeace Cental IWft 

Edftre*(3i 

Co Accun 110ft 

31 UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
£ Si Mere AM.Landon EC3A OBP 
019280306 


TOft 

750 

£56 

27.4# 

75 7 

*25 

£69 

393 

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file 

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12738 


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Snraer Cos 67 6 71.9 +06 I 

TDUCMEREBHANT __ . _ 

Uarmaid Hcuae. 2, PukM Deck London EC4V 3AT 
01-2*61250 


Anreran Growth 
Genera) Grown 
aonalTech 
mcoms Grown 
income Uonddy 
Japan Grown 
Owes Grown 
S+HperCos 

se«o*icta» 


S 3ft 34? 
431 46 4 

345 309 

406 520 

*0.6 435 

267 205 

305 38ft 
465 51 6 

61 0 554 c 


TRANSATLANTIC A QSNERAL SECUHTES 
B1-9B. New London Rd-Otern d teed 
024661651 


CofemcamoiS) 

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TVMMU.MAAUS5R5 
10 Cenynga Ha BrritrA 
0272738241 


Do Accum 

Erenv 

Co Accum 
FuEue+m 
DoAccum 
FlaAProp 
DoAccum 
Gto Carnal 
DOACSUn 

Gfclmxns 
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3830 4008 
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3108 23* ft 
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1, LonjenWW Bte. Lsnson EC2M spt 

07-6883044 35# 

Special Sue (59 437 40a 

«nuwvu*7t« 

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tmreeUnlB 2C05 2215 

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STEWART, WORT UMT TRUST MANAGERS 

&'%£5Z Sq - Bc ** u *' 

D31-S632M ■ ■ ■ 


AreMlanfTM '965 298.7 

DoAccun, 2201 +314 

DeWHidrawM 1413 151 1 

AumanFM OU 177ft 

Do Accun >208 1207 

BraWiFuno #77.1 50&1 

DoAccum 6354 675ft 

EuopeanRrid 2318 3*64 

VoAcam 2*3.7 2S05 

Japan Fu# 2206 mo 

DoAccun 72X3 2357 

SaaoTTf 1 MM 161ft 

SUN ALLIANCE 

Bur A— M* Nfl0 HoraMBL StriCto 
0*03 SSS3 

BpAyTruttAcc 2288 ft*?.A 

NAoi Trua Acc S£0 56ft 

Fv&aTiuMAee 5as S0* 


+06 £29 
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-SJ 3M 
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American Growth 74ft 78J# -0ft 037 

gAPjWAcaen 1402 167.T -15 £57 

407 51ft +01 «2 
Wghkirome 618 64ft -02 079 

weome a Grew# 7*7 795 # -04 036 

£jWiGrow9l 30* 608 409 006 

^reoMSAe Eft 802 -0.7 f_77 

SAWS A PROSPER 
ffl. JjM#n Rd. Roofed RU] 3lft 
a- 73, Ow#« si EMn ea 4NX 
Ptawart] OnO€B96SQr (E»} 031-228 7351 
Arnyw caarowr SIT 674 +6.1 733 

87ft 53. C# -0.1 287 
Canmotfri «7.7 51 J .. ,57 

6*97 6 W Oft 61ft -Oft 100 

B«W"6ic*li 626 DU +0.4 075 

EtoRNHreBrid 07ft 71.4 61 2 

IklHUJi 533 507 .. 313 


TSB UWT TRUSTS 

SRio ire 

oas* 62168 Du# 6 MSBH 8*32 
Araericenric 101.1 1076 _n 

QoAccon 105ft 112.1 

ErdnMCOmOMe 90ft 907 +d. : 

DoAOun 10 *5 I ((ft 

BenanlUrfHre 132ft 141 ft# -yj 

_ DoAccun 2155 229.*# 

GRflRnjriinc 44ft ■ 46.4# -0 

. DoAccun 571 egem 


Mem 

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105ft 112.1 .. 1-4 

90ft 907 +0.1 0OD 

1045 I ((ft .. .080 

t32ft 141ft# -1.0 3.11 

2158 229.4# -16 31 a 

js;* - a - 1 9a 

5S SW +41 055 
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270.6 2678# -28 454 

114.7 12£1 +1ft 074 

1«M ]S3 +18 074 

5BJ 271 0 . *(LQ 1A4 

3 J?f Z S T Tift 1ft* 

405 52.7 -o.i £05 

SJft 572 40ft 285 

45/9 *03 77 aS 

«2 43ft -01 £21 


+12 074 
+18 074 
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DoAccun 

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SmaCei Cos Onreic 
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UR PROMCEMT UT MANAGERS 
UK KoriUi. Cun SL Sanauy SP1 CSr* 

onztts:*! 

UAEifcshr KK.4 1005 -06 

Poore satin nee 1005 +1 e 

NAmv 1066 H51 -05 

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0SHcJoornVoBu«.EC1A2EU 
01-339 3CS? 

Grow* Ira K20 155 le *11 

Do Accum 2W5 2302 +16 

HttlTIOM 112 ft 1026 e +lft 

Special 93 819 3=8# ♦Oft 

Tncta* 109.0 1168 

DoAuxuni 1525 1728 

AicarfiGen Si 9 SSft +0.1 

MasarPoraoWlii £5083 5183 

WARDLEY UNIT TRUST HANAC5RS 
n truer House. 7. DarontfereSo, uman ECS 
D1-8C91S3S 

Ameflcan Truer t>31 675 -C.l 

Far Sent A Gen 609 672 +OE 

iraurai Ftoouco* $1.7 5S.1 -02 

(rramaTroM 670 721 -0* 

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Techrotaoy 3* » *.* “0-1 

AuEjraBa . 44 ft 47.7# +08 

UK Trust 1002 1158 - 1.1 

Eumcean Growth - 30* 402 -01 

Hong Air'S 218 211 *02 

BAVEJUr ASaer MANMXUENT 
13. ChaAroa 9e_&£flfcugh 
03! ja 1551 

AuSnKHBGcM . 157 39ft c -02. 

Paafic Bean Eheroy 16 ft 17 B +02' 

CenpJjn 0el GJh 403 500 

UmUuFm $1004 104ft c 

WkrrnHCOAlft IPUT TRUST MAHAGCR? 
2Htm»L>SC3Sar 
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Sir Dtd Oft Fund 59S 60S 40V 


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j™ I- 7 4*T 41 rebruory cVrry. Auguat NmaHK PJ 


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JSI1 I-r day at February U»te AuML ttjwmwr g* 

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Tuet+MyoTmamn. 


i 
























THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY id i ora 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 




TEMPUS 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


as the pound 
comes under fire 


Sterling’s plight may be viewed 
as poison in some quarters but 
for the chemical companies 
i and for Id in particular, it is 
^ pure nectar. Every phennig off 
the sterling exchange rate adds 
be twee £5 million and £7JS 
million lo Id's profits, accord* 
ing to the. broker,. James Capel 
and Co. With, a fen of nearly 20 
pfennigs so for this week, that 
represents about -an extra £100 
million of profit for ICL 
-The steady decline in the 
sterling-mark exchange rate 
since 'the summer " has been 
reflected in a steady rise in the 
Id share price. While the 
value of the pound against the 
mark has fallen by more than 
16 per cent since the summer, 
'y, I CPs share price has improved 

r by .24 per cent from foe 
■September low of 632p. Yester- 
day Id added lip to dose at 
782p£ as foe pound dipped 
3 gym against foe mark. 

: Bayer --and Hoescbt; the 
German chamicaJ companies, 
also saw their share prices 
strengthen. So, too, did Hick- 
son International- and Laporte, 
which also benefit from foe 
strong mark. Id’s high pro- 
portion of mark-related sales is 
Tuglyrepresenting about 25 per 
cent of the total and well ahead 
^ of mark-linked costs. 

About £300 millioh has been 
noiionafiy added to IGI profits 
since July when there were four 
marks to the pound. There are 
currency swings as well as 
roundabouts: if foe pound 
begins to strengthen against foe 
mark profits fall. What Id 
would appreciate most is 
stability, and its would not 
j complain too much if sterling 
was locked into the European 
Monetary System at the cur- 
rent rate. 

pearly is is not Just ex- 
change rales which affect ICTs 

stock market rating. When the 

shares were at their January 
peak of 882p foe pound-mark 
■ ; i was 3,60. It is below that, but 
the share price is still only 
782p. This, in some measure, 
reflects the inevitable time lag 
between physical transactions 
and - their impact on - foe 
company's results. The view is 
that foe gains to Id will not 
bepn to appear until the 
second quarter this year. The 
shares should be held as the 
currency benefits will eventu- 
al aUy-flowrforough. - 

Fitch Lovell 

Now that food- is a fashion 
business, manufacturers are 
having to show- some nimble 
* , footwork. Fitch Lovell, In deals 

totalling £100 million in two 
■ * years, has withdrawn .from 
retailing and general whole* 
i sating, and invested heavily in 

specialist distribution,- con- 
venience products and white 
meats. While the main switch 
of emphasis in now complete, 

, * further acquisitions are likely. 

t \ ' The benefits of foe policy are 

apparent in foe interim results. 
Profits rose by 29 per cent to 
£9.04 milli on even though sales 
were slightly down, reflecting 
the disposal of the cash and 
cany business.. Earnings per 
share were 26 per cent higher. 

The company’s move away 
from fatty meats was given 
extra impetus in the half year 
by a scare about the content of 
pork products. Sales of sau- 
sages were down by 20 per cent 
at one point. The d a m ag e to 


profits however, was offset by 
a fortuitous drop, in foe cost of 
pork, which on its . -own . 
probably ^ added £750,000 to 
group profits. Given foe 
company’s- vulnerability to! 
both health fads and. volatile 
prices, further acquisitions 1 in 
this field are unlikely. 

Trent Meats, a producer of 
' cooked meats, - acquired • last 
-year, and other recent pur- 
chases contributed 'a further 
£750,000. But foe. sale of foe 
. cash and carry business cost 
£300,000. 

The second half will include 
maiden contributions from two 
specialist distributors and from 
Ashmount, a manufacturer of 
turkey and chicken products. 
Ashmount has just developed a 
process that will extend shelf 
life to three months but it is 
too early to say how successful 
this will be. , . - 

After this year’s purchases 
Fitch Lovell is likely to end the 
year with net debt of £10 
million. Thai still leaves scope 
for further expansion, though 
foe company is how anxious to 
avoid paying too much good- 
will 

At 265p the shares . are. 
-trading on 16 times prospective! 
earnings, a rating which- allows 
the company to continue 
malting acquisitions without 
dilution. 

Standard Chartered 

Standard Chartered has been 
one of foe dimmer stars in foe 
banking constellation since 
1981. Unfortunately its pros- 
pects, in near term, do not look 
significantly brighter. Yester- 
day the shares dropped 5p to 
434p, helped down by a report 
from the brokers W. Green- 
well, revising downwards 
earlier profit estimates for 1985 
and 1986. 

Out of seven m^jor geo- 
graphical areas of operation, at 
least five are showing a fell in 
profits or no gain. In South 
Africa, Stanbic (Standard Bank 
Investment Corporation) has 
admitted that deteriorating 
business conditions would not 
allow mare than modest 
growth at best during 1 985. 

Conditions in Hong Kong 
are difficult From zero profit 
in 1 983, the contribution leapt 
to a profit of HK5290 million 
the following year. The, figure^s 
expected to &fi bade to around' 
HKS23& million for the whole 
of 1985. 

-Standard Chartered also 
faces the problem of currency 
fluctuations. Its profits are 
earned in South African rands 
and US dollars. Since the bank 
reported an interim profit 
improvement of 40 per cent 
last year, both currencies have 
dropped in value - the dollar 
by around 20 cents. 

Taking these considerations 
into account. Green well’s ana- 
lysts have revised their 1985 
profit estimates from £276 
million to £254 million and 
their 1986 estimate from £320 
to £280 million. This could be 
a premature judgement. The 
Singapore businessman. Tan 
Koon Swan, who was probably 
the last hope of saving 
something from foe wreckage 
of -Pan Electric, has left foe 
scene. Standard is involved to 
the tune of £35 million around 
half of it secured against 
.property and business in 
Singapore. 


APPOINTMENTS 


Tootal Group: Mr Geoffrey 
MaddreD is to join foe board 
and become managing director. 

Conoco U.K.: Mr John 
Ogren succeeds Mr Harry 
Sager as chainnan-and manag- 
ing director. Mr Sager becomes 
vice-president. North American 
production. 

. Lloyds Bank? Mr Leon 
Wilkinson has been appointed 
chief financial officer. 

British Nuclear Fuels: Mr 
Christopher Harding is to be 
c hairman and Mr Neville 
Chamberlain chief executive. 

: The Institute of _ London 
Underwriters: Mr David Lowen 
6a& been, elected chairman and 
Mr John Ptirtou deputy chair- 
bran. 

; Trafalgar House: Mr Alan 
(Kennedy has been appointed a 
non-executive director. He will 
-become a full-time executive 
: director' on March 31- with 
responsibility for the group’s 
! shipping and hotel operations. 

Bowring Macalaste 1 - & 
! Senior Mr Leu Hughes be* 
: comes chairman. Mr Gordon 
' Sailor and Mr John _ Paul 
become joint deputy chairmen 
and Mr Alan MacKay and Mr 


Takeover talk helps to trim the losses 


By Derek Pain and Pam Spooner 


Takeover news and specu- 
lation kept the stock market out 
of trouble yesterday, helping to 
reduce what would otherwise 
have been heavy losses across . 
the lists. 

. The day began in poor style, 
with share prices felling steadily 
in . the morning. By lunchtime 
the FT-SE 100 share index had_ 
lost 21.9 points, and foe FT 30 
share index was down 18.1 
'points: 

Scrimgeour Vickers had Allied- 
Lyons in to loach at its City 
offices yesterday, and noises 
emerging from the meeting were . 
encouraging enough to put 7p on 
the shares, to 263p. Analysts at 
Scrimgeour, ho were-, were 
tight-lipped about the infor- 
mation they gleaned. 

Oil prices and interest rates 
were again foe cause of the 
problem. Around mid-morning 
dealers were dismayed to see 
the spot price of North Sea 
Brent. drop below S19 a barrel 
Warnings from Saudi Arabia 
that oil prices mil fell below SI 5 
a barrel if there is no co-oper- 
ation on production quotas 
added to the gloom and Brent 
was soon changing hands at 
little over Si 7 though foe price 
rallied later. 

Then came a spate of 
takeover news - and foe - reyitali- - 
‘ration of several " rumours. 
Coats Patous revealed that it 
has received an approach- which 
might lead to a bid, and the 
share price jumped to 200p, up 
50p on the day. 


Mike Adam joint managing 
directors. 

. Petrocon Group: Mr John* 
Carney has been appointed 
group financial director. 

The Guidehouse Group: Lord 
Derwent has joined foe board as 
a non-executive director. Mr 
Jonathan Davis becomes man- 
aging director of Guidehouse, 
Mr Michael Jackson managing 
director of Guidehouse Securi- 
ties and Mr Harold Bach 
manag in g director of Greyftiars 
Trust. 

Taylor Woodrow: Mr R. G. 
Smith becomes chairman of 
Taylor Woodrow Construction 
(Northern). Mr K. van der Lee 
becomes chairman of Taylor 
Woodrow Construction (Scot- 
land), and a director of Taylor 
Woodrow Construction (North- 
ern). Mr M. Layeock has joined 
the board of Taylor Woodrow 
Construction (Scotland). 

Turner & Newall: Mr Bill 
Barnes has been appointed a 
director of Storeys Decorative 
Products. 

Philips Radio Communi- 
cation Systems: Mr Ian McKen- 
zie has been named as manag- 
ing director. 


RECENT ISSUES 


Lending 


ABN Bank— 

Adam & Company 

BCd 1256% 

Citibank Savings — .. — I'. 12K% 

Consolidated Cri 12j6% 

Continental Trust- — — ,I2V5flfc 
Co-operative Bank— 

CHoare&Co— 12Jgb 

Lloyds Bartk - 12 

N« Westminster __ 12£% 
Royal Bank Scotland .- Iljtfb 

TSB, . 12149b 

Citibank NA ,—.12*% 

t Mortgage Base Rata. 





Frier 
218 
176-3 
N 289-2 

64 
f* 

r_ 

65 
96 

. 804-2 

133 
16+1 
60 
7* 
250-3 
118 
113 
86-1 
93+2 
338-2 
117 
150+1 
90— t 


48 DTun-' 
9 
44 


The news confirmed specu- 
lation which had fluttered 
around the market for some 
months, but market men still 
had plenty to guess about in 
finding the bidder. Courtaulds 
was upped os the most likely 
buyer, with a one-for-one share 
offer, and its share price rose 
lOp to 206p. 

Entrad, foe Australian group 
which failed last year in a 
takeover attempt on Tootal, 
was also reckoned to be sniffing 
at foe Coats Batons business 
and there were other market 
men unwilling to let go of foe 
idea that Bill will make an 
offe r for CP. Only on Wednes- 
day BTR announced the sale of 
ComhiH Insurance for £305 
million which is bound to be 
spent on acquisitions. 

McKechnle Brothers put in a 
bid for Newman Tonks, and 
sent foe latter’s price 40p higher 
to 135p. McKechnie fell 9p to 
204 p, partly reflecting market 
disappointment over the hoped- 
for bid for McKechnie itself. 
Wilbams Holdings, which has 
more than 6 per cent of 
McKechnie, was expected to 
make a move soon. 

Back among foe rumours, 
Beecham Group was again on 
foe move, the shares gaining 
25p to 366p. The latest sugges- 
tion from foe market was that 
l)nilqyer and IGI are ready lo 
launch-' a joint .offer for .the 
household goods and' drugs 
combine. BAT Industries is also 
reckoned to be about to pounce 
on. Beecham. 

Distillers gained lOp lo 570p 


in late trading as foe market 
suddenly became convinced 
that foe Guinness takeover bid 
would 'not be referred to foe 
Monopolies Commission. 
Meanwhile it seems that GEC is 
continuing to sefl Distillers 
shares. At one time it had more 
than 10 million. Now, it is 
reliably understood, foe GEC 
stake is about 2 million. 

With all these excitements. 


off early losses of around £'4 to 
close virtually unchanged. 

British Telecom fell 2p to 
180p on yesterday's report in 
The Times that foe Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission 
would block its bid for Mitel 
the Canadian electronics group. 
Mitel shares were suspended at 
430p. 

Rugby Port lane Cement re- 
covered from 3’4p fell to show a 


A & M Group, which hires antique furniture to film makers, hovers 
near its low at 13p after the breakdown of merger tuXkm - with 
Promotion House and lower profits. But foe company's recent 
acquisition, the television commercial group, is scheduled to make 
£300,000 profits in a full year compared with foe £371,000 the rest 
of the group achieved last year. An A & M's near 15 per cent 
shareholding in Promotion House could be up for sale. 


and a few more, foe market 
suddenly took a turn for foe 
better. Oil prices also recovered 
somewhat, and foe looked -for 
increase in base rales did not 
appear. 

By foe end of foe day foe FT- 
SE index was just 8.4 points 
down at 1 382.8, and the 30 
share index only 3.2 points 
lower at 1120.4. Prices of 
government stocks also ended 
foe day in better shape, shaking 


2K$J gain at 1 53p as talk of a bid 
continued to circulate. Lafarge, 
the Continental group, is named 
as foe most likely bidder. 

Westland surged to 123p up 
28p as foe Prudential Corpor- 
ation sold its 4.4 per cem 
interest. Ferranti, the electronic 
group, eased 3p to 135p on a 
profit downgrading by Hoare 
Govett the broker. Mr Basil de 
Ferranti, the chairman, dis- 
closed he had sold 800,000 


Traded option highlights 


Action flared on. the traded 
options pitches ahead of today's 
end of the main equity Account 
A total of 21,310 contracts were 
traded, with takeover favourites, 
oils and currencies leading the 


surge of business. Beecham saw 
2,594, BP 2,145 and the 
dollar/steriing option 1.226 
contracts traded. There were 
also high volumes in Imperial 
Lonrho, BTR and BATs. 


shares at prices up to I47p. His 
shareholding is now 1.2 per 
cent 

Marks and Spencer was 
unsettled by a broker’s sell 
recommendation. The' shares 
fell 3p to 1 65p. Pritchard 
Services gained 2vjp to 69p on 
suggestions of a bid. Hawley 
was again mentioned as a 
possible predator. 

Clive Discount sprang to life 
with takeover speculation again 
providing the spur. The shares 
rose 6p to 43p. 

Campari, foe camping and 
leisure group, rose Sp to 47p as 
the long- suspected presence of a 
bidder was confirmed. 

Klearfold, the packaging 
group, coaid not have chosen a 
worst day for its market debut 
It closed 116p against a 118p 
offer price. 

Breakmate continued to re- 
spond to the stan of takeover 
negotiations, rising a further 
20p to 1 85p. Stan el co improved 
5p to 43p as Mr Peter Beswick, 
with Henderson Croswaite, foe 
broker, and Mr David Landau, 
a solicitor, acquired Pavion 
International’s 60 per cent 
shareholding at just lOpa share. 
A lOp-a-share offer goes to 
other shareholders. 

Pavion, a cosmetics group, 
recently sold its controlling 
shareholding in Sangers Photo- 
graphic. 

There was a flurry of late 
business in Cooper Industries as 
the market geared itself for 
further action there. Kennedy 
Smale, which holds 21 per cent 
of Cooper, is expected to make 


an offer, but Rosedale Invest- 
ments. which is friendly to the 
Cooper board, continues to buy 
shares. 

Earlier this week Rosedale 
bought around 4 million shares, 
taking its stake to 13 per cent. 
Another 14 per cent holding in 
Cooper is believed to be 
controlled by one investor, 
though no one is sure which 
side such a holder will take. The 
Cooper price moved above 30p 

Profits of KLP Group, the sales 
promotion and direct marketing 
group, jumped from £962,000 to 
£1356 million in foe year to last 
September and should hit £13 
million this year. The company 
made seven acquisitions last 
year, and is expected to keep up 
foe takeover pace this year. The 
shares were unchanged at 31 5 p. 

in late trade, having opened foe 
day at 27 Pip. 

Home Charm Group fell 2p to 
242p. Wood Mackenzie & Co., 
foe broker, has returned the 
shares to its buy list. It has, 
however, lowered its profit 
forecast from £13.5 million to 
£12 million. In its previous year 
foe Texas Homecare group 
achieved profits of £10.8 mil- 
lion. HCG*5 shares have come 
down from 368p last year and 
Wood Mackenzie feels they are 
now very cheap for a stock 
trad it ion a Illy commanding a 
significant premium. 

The broker has also lowered 
its current year forecast from 
£19 million to £17 million. 


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20 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 24 1 986 


- YOUR OWN BUSINESS 


Another 

snip at the 
red tape 

By Teresa Poole 
A detailed programme for 
sun pli cation of the rules 
regulations governing & luau 
businesses has been drawn up by the 
Forum of Private Business - with a 
forecast that a million new jobs could 
be created. 

The package based on three years of 
research, claims to reduce the 
bureaucratic burden on small 
businesses without diluting the law 
itself. * 

The Forum is lobbying for some of 
its ideas to be incorporated into the 
White Paper on deregulation, due 
from the Department of Employment 
in May, and a demonstration was 
given last month to David Tripp ier, 
the minister for small business. 

The main thrust of the proposals is 
a three- tier system to cover all 
legislation. This covers detailed 
questionnaires, standardized notice- 
boards with booklets, and a free 
phone service available for both 
employers and employees. 

The Forum proposes a “fax 
amnesty” to flush out those who want 
to leave the black economy and go 
legitimate. Part of the reason for the 
black economy, the Forum believes, is 
a reluctance to deal with regulations. 

Because an. amnesty would increase 
competition for existing companies, 
the Forum suggests a new legal 
identity - the micro-company - for all 
small businesses which would confer 
qualification for a tax-deferral scheme 
and cheap forms of borrowing. The 
Forum also wants the VAT threshold 
increased to £100,000. 

The bulk of the jobs forecast would 
be created in existing businesses 
where employers cite the red-tape 
burden as a block to expansion. 


MR FRIDAY JWflyi*. 

£0311 ' 






“A man can dream, can’t he?” 


Fashioning a future: Marion Whiteiaw, left; Rebecca Myranq 
and Use Anne Dawes 

Drawing up a profit 

For the past three months, in a quiet detailed business plan, are equipped to 
corner of die Royal College of Art in start their own businesses - 
centra] London, 15 young designers Between them the 35 wonld-be 
have pot aside their sketches and entrepreneurs have a wide range of 
concentrated instead on the art of talents in textile, pottery, jewellery, 
drawing up cash-flow forecasts, writes clothing ami furnitu re design- Now 
Teresa Poole. that the coarse is fawhwi they have 

They were Inking part in a new aJJ been granted £1*000 under the 
Design Enterprise Programme started LEntA Loan Scheme and many are 
by the Loudon Enterprise Agency to ™ w applying to join the Enterprise 
give young art and design graduates a Allowance Scheme, 
grounding in the sldHs needed to run a Marion Whiteiaw, aged 25, from 
business. Glasgow, designs and prints scarves 

The graduates, chosen last year made of knitted and woven mile, 
from more than 250 applicants, are Between leaving college in 1984 and 
more used to grappling with the joining the Design Enterprise Pro- 
problems of perspective than the gramme she supported' herself by 
subtleties of praftt-and-loss accounts, freelance work, indodfeg some design 
But at an exhibition of their work last commissions for the i n t e rna tionally 
week to mark the end . of the first renowned Jean Mnirl A buyer from 
course, potters and textile designers New. York heard about Marion's work 
alike were happily chatting about and ordered 12 scarves, worth £900, 
their working capital requirements which this week were sent to the US. 
and bank loan proposals. Working from her own fiat, but 

The 34-week programme, funded by with access to printing facilities, she 
the Manpower Services Commission, now plans to approach London 
provides intensive classroom instruc- boutiques with her scarves, which 
tion in finance, tax, business sHFla retail for around £150. She has 
and marketing, followed by a period of persuaded the bank to lend £2,000 and 
market research for which there is a to provide a £2,000 overdraft and Is 
£500 grant. By the end of the coarse forecasting a £10,000 turnover in her 
the designers, each complete with a first year. 

Rebecca Mynun, also 25, from 
Kent, designs and makes f urniture in 


BRIEFING 


Catering courses 

f | The Hotel and Catering Industry 
raining Board (HCITB) is offering 

courses for smafl businesses in the 
catering and Deemed trade. About 350 a 


small batches aid to private com- 
missions. With the help of the RCA’s 
cabinet-maker, she has developed a 
technique for steam-bending ash and 
has designed a prize- winning chair . 

As part of a competition prize. Miss 
Mynun has a rent and rate free studio 


(Uiu HMIEKW UUUB. HUOUI jaua " T I. 

year have been taking them up. The latest Shoreditch, London. 


one-day, stage-one course, aimed at 
helping in a decision to take on a hotel 
pub or restaurant, will be held next Frida 1 


Not all of the designers intend to 
stay in London. Use Anne Dawes, 
aged 22, who designs and prints 


puw u* resin uram, wm do neia next hnaay agea zz, who designs ana prints 
at Ramsey House, Wembley. Cost is £40. materials for her own doth derio iw, is 

tookfog for premises in Manchester. 
• Contact HCITB, TeL (01) 902 5316. She says: “London is flooded with 

How to manaOA upmarket designers. “ 

now TO manage Miss Dawes needs a £5^00 loan 

■ Managing A SmaB Business In 1986, a from the bank and £2,000 working 
wMkly evening course for both potential capital overdraft facilities. Most of 

sla P s her work is in silk. 

Waltham Forest College, London, next 

2 ,u J? l !^'JJ??*! s£4 2 for # rtw « Bks - • Contact: London Enterprise Agencv, 
(TeLOUSH SmaB Susmess Unit 69^ Cannon Street. London EC4N 


LEG AL NOTICES 


„ .No. 008405 or 1985. 

In Bn HIGH court Of JUSTICE. 
Chancery Division. In me matiar on 
Joti men a Firth Brown tMc and In nut 
manor of: THE COMPANIES ACT 
1 9BS 

NOTICE b hereby given that a 

was on the loth. December 1 

prevented to Her Mak9ny*s High Court 
WJummAr the conflnnaUan:- 

or the reduction of me capital at 
Um above named Gocnoanv (ran 

££7.000.000 to CI7.44S»O§0 and 

ra> Dm canraBatton of the share 
°*w°y 

funner given mm uw 
“•JdPWUton l» directed to bo heard 
before me Honourable Mr. justice 
H anna n at the Royal Courts of Jinnee. 
Wfand^Longon WC2 on Monday 3rd 
reoroacy I Quo. 

ANY creditor oraharehaldcr at the said 
Cdnanny dotfrtna to aopaae tha 
■naktjip of an Order for me cxmijr- 
m«on Of the said reduction of capital 
and c aacctlaqgn of me share premium 
account .sh ould a ppear at the thne of 
hearing to aoreon or by Counsel for that 


furnbhed lo any surb person mnAIra 
8«e same by Dm undermentioned 
sotlcboj* on pea-mem of the regulated 
rharo r foe the same. 
iw? 7 ™ a,ta l9n ’ by of January 

K^Sb l ^^ TSMmi * 00 - 

hoitcmira for Dir said Company. 


DOMESTIC AND CATERING 
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Peraonnei OfSce. 

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LEGAL NOTICES 


CLOBECOMMOUTTY 
CFUTURES) LTD 
Notice b hods given tost the creditors 
of me SOov-n ara ed Company, which h 
Mm voluntarily wound is. are re- 
quired. a a or before Dm 3M dw at 
March 1985. to mm hi Choir fun 
Christian and eornamv a . their 
addraaaa and doocrtpOonL Ml partcu- 
lara of thetr debta or etatma. and the 
names and addrosaea of their Soltciiore 
nr any I. ia dw Under si gned Michael 
EMot FCA erf d« Wetback Street 
Lawton WiM THE. tha Liquidator. ore. 
Personally or by melr Solicitor*. lo 
come In and prove melr debts or claims 

at such nnw and Place n shoe ba aped- 
Hed to well nonce, or In defanB Owner 
they be excluded from the benefit 
of any dbu-ibutton made before audh 
debt* ore proved. 

Dated Oita 1 7th day January 1086 

Michael EUM PCA 

I |q talf«T#M 


DOMESTIC AND CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


COUPLB WANTED for 
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aftacaM .-Melos. Doras. ou live-in starr. 
UK A Overseas. Au Pair Agency Lid. B7 
Regontst, London, OI -4596534. 
TRAINED NANNIES for pewuorn. 
Uddler. Central Lon don, overseas 
ttavoL Phone 01-579 3040. thin (tec 
com). 


NOTICE TO 
READERS 


Whilst we take ad possible precautions with 
regard to investment or franchise advertising, 
readers are strongly advised to take 
appropriate professional advice before enter- 
ing into any commitments. 

Box number replies to: 

THE TIMES, 

Box No. Dept, . 

200 Gray’s Inn Road, 
London, WC1X82Z. 


SUPPLIERS WANTED 
A EQUIPMENT 


URGENTLY REQUIRED 

Bulk new and seconcfoand catering equipment, food 
machinery end hardware etc. Wifl travel UK, Instant cash 
or bank draft settlement 

Send lists to Kentay C.E.S.. 143 Gray SL, Aberdeen, or 
phone: Mr Taylor, 0224 57175 (office) or 0224 575586 
(home). 


PORSCHE 

rrouirja tor X 986 catato aaa. write to 
WJ.te M Won EL. Hoddssdon 
ENI1 8ET. 


CASH FOR DfSTlOSSED & 
a tocfcs. Aboofuw dlscxoadte 
672BZ. TNex 32496 Kehluk G. 


DIRECT MAIL AND 
TELEX SERVICES 


DIRECT MAIL 

National Mail Order House shortly doing a Direct Mail-Shot to 
100.000 “Uve“ Accounts, willing to indude your enclosure al a 
ridiculously low price. 

CONTACT US WITHOUT DELAY ON: 0508 471216 
B. B. Adams Mail Order Lid 

Cavalier House, Ipswich Rd. Newton Flotmon, Norwich NR15 1 PN 


LEG AL NOTICES 


WALLACE BEDDING LIMITED 

T / A RESTWELL BEDDING LTD 
NOTICE tS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant 
to Section 588 of the Companies Act. 

1985. mat a m return of nw ow M tore or 

me above named Company wi n be ne w 

■I Die offices of LEONARD CURTIS 6 
Go- 30 ES H dhouroe Terr a ce (2nd. floori 
London W2 6LFon mday DioSisl dm' 
of January 1956 al 12.00 o'clock. 

midday, tor me puiuumj provided for 

tnSecttoiB 589 and 69a 

Doled DM 16th day of January 19B6 
W. A. WALLACE 


K THE MATTER O f 
BERG. SONS AND CO. UMTTED 
. order of the Chancery Otvinon 
companies Conn dated mo Ninm.day 
of October 1985. MaKoun Joftn 
London of Shdley House. 3 NOMe 
StrreL London ECZV TOO Had been 
aapewted Llauldator of the above- 
named Company with a Committee of 

Thirteenth day at January 




NORTH OF THAMES 


FULHAM 1st floor not bunt 1985. 
RscrtJ with Balcony 1 bad. Balh wun 
sh ower Puny m kuchen- Partonp 
spare. Residents own prtvue leisure 

centre wi m In door pool In tmdgnneo 

ujr de ns . 998 yrs tense XTT.OOO. Ol 
561 5188 OC 024342473 


COUNTRY PROPERTY 


N R RYE. EA8T SUSSEX Very de- 
tached thatched eoctooe hi a ta b w 
co o dW oti. 4 doabU bedrooms. 
Way , diner, fully lltted M tctien. 
uotru uom and larpe d o wi ma nv 
ckaknon. fun central bniim. L 
— gard en and drive I n rur al Mtrag 


JCTB.0 


Te|Nor«Uaii2TaL 


TOOR SALES 

expertly writbm — — 

moderate coot. 01-679 9576. 


NON-SECRET AWAL 
APPOINTMENTS 


RECEPTIONIST/TELEPHONIST 

dertcal assists ----- - 

autred tor wi 
croup Musi be lively 

19 lo 34 years. Porm/testv position. 

£95 p.w. Please phone Anne. 01-437 
0133- 

ADMimSTIIATlVE. RecepaonML 
required by oroup of tour C^kTuH 

notla Home. SmnlnodaJe. Berks. 

sreU-presented perron for 
uiy 
se/t 
■with diems « 


SUPER 

SECRETARIES 


SECRETARIES FOR ARCHITECTS 
Designers. Permanent/ 

sottions-AMSA Special - 

1-734 0532- 


O VERSE AS PROPERTY 
Waadu e« «de i» ad»»esi fc pre H seli 
advles b ef o re entaifciB tote amt 


BERMUDA. MopnlOpant Uncut-tons 
modern name nr the fames* Mb 
O cean Cod Oito. 3/5 bedrooms. Sh 
baths famal lounge, torrool — 

room, summer louage. den. 

breakfast pano. targe 
kitchen, utility room. cfc. .66 pern 

landscape garden, pool svular vtesv 

and rlgtiL One of tne test homes atraO; 

able tor t 


or 31446 


,“S5 L 


TRANSPORT 

SERVICES 

Next day delivery at 3 
day prices. 

01-645 9595 


SALES-LETmS 


WMCH SELL! 
Scribes Of Luton 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



FIRST CLASS 
USA INVESTMENTS 

Real Estate Investment in Syndication 
Missouri Income Properties Limited I, a Florida 
Limited Partnership, offers participation of 
US$26,000 - (or multiple) in the ownership of an 
office bmldmg rented as a distribution centre to 

FEDERAL EXPRESS CORPORATION 
a New York Stock Exchange company, nation leader 
in the courier service (1984 turnover 1.4 billion 
dollars). 

Triple Net Long Term Lease. 

Guaranteed Triple Net Yield: 7.5% average. 

ORION INVESTMENTS & TRUST LTD 
15, rue do Cendrier 
1201 GENEVA 
TeL (22) 32.48.05 
Telex: 23676 orion ch 
Fax: (22) 31.44.91 

This offer is not available to US citizens or residents 
THE ORION GROUP 
MIAMI (Headquarters), GENEVA, 
MONTREAL. 

Representative Offices; 
FRANKFURT, MUNCHEN, ESSEN, 
LONDON, LUGANO 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


ST. CHRISTOPHER’S ASSOCIATES 

service & now avafleUs for small to medium sized conv 
assistance. We deal witti creditors, court pmceed- 
advice and debt financing - hi fact aB aspects of 
company frnanctal requirements, dealt wftfi by puafifled profosskxmis. 

If you have a problem we wfl be pleased to advise. 

Phone 

01-935 5795/8931 


LIMITED COMPANIES 

from £99.50 tndnlw 

Same-Day Company Sendees Ud 
Bridge St, 181 Quasi Victoria St. Lomton, EC4 

Tel: 01-248 5616 

Also Company Soarchaa 


Nafiooai company wHh Mgh prafRa and subita n fla l extaflng market 

ihm Mflha to ecamMa 

AGENT AREA SALES FORCE 

tosafl nndrtnandpreetoat mateta into tha »s>i yowto itontal tnorkaL 

TtebphSwStoaa^oBtroiitoroidB ^ SornmtegtoniigbiTiataClOJXXHEIS^OOpA. 



Principal to boar mrtioad a^term w . managsmant, administration, dbtributkn. 
promodcin widonooinQ nbikig. 

w» are hWrfy a tla a iva. Only moss wKh datnr ml naaon and anttwatasm nood apply. 
ParUKMarewttoto 

THE GOLD VAULT LTD 

IS Union Street. Swans e a . SA1 3EH or tehmbone “ Fre e f one PMR AF 
toys” BJ0 ptn-eJO pm wee kd ay 


Old, wcO-estaUBShedl 
SAUBI ARABIAN 
ORGANISATION 

requires opportunities to market products and or services 
in the Middle East on joint venture or agency basis. No 
third parties. Please write to 

Box No. 3595 N,Tke Times 


REAL ESTATE COMPANY 
IN COSTA BLANCA, SPAIN 

is looking for an efficient partner witti experience In real estate 
business to create tt>a saloe organisation In England. Answer with 
curricubm vitae to 

Box 2596 N 
THE TIMES 


Ambitious Young Man 
Seeks Challenging New Career 

Investment at Home or Abroad 

Box 2599 N The Times 


EXPORT 


The Prestige Profession 

START YOUR OWN EXPORT/IMPORT AGENCY 

Operate tram home, part of MMtao. No capital nooeML BonafK bom our 
sxpMfenos advtabio dents to Iffl coutttea store 1946. 

BROCHURE. No oMgatlon. no risk- 
ANTHONY WADE (Conartants) Ud. 

Dept UKPl.P.O.Box9.8wbi(tan. WHtahlre. 


TELEX 

No subscription. London's lowest rates. 

01-2422320 


LION SECURITY 
SYSTEMS 

NLSXXUL approved a — 
btsfarienara now able to otter 
COUNTER SURV HLLANC E / 
ELECTROMC SWGEPMQ 
of boardrooms. otBcoa * private 


ML 

For appointment Phone Potters 
air fl>707)45701 


CONSULTANCY. 

har m in wirfiba u auppftmait 
y tro re l income on port-time total 
ettoatd contact st Chrtanwherel 
Associates Ol 435 5795. 


SURVEILLANCE 

MONITORING 

nd coudar amaOim «rtmnt hr 
totb tha nenr 4 pnlaaamL Rhg at- 
oatofarprioalM. 
flnVBJXTROMCSIID 
TteLnSriAnM 
IndoaCUHII 
01-SB4Z2S 


A MAYFAIR ADORERS at SSBpa A 
effldant m answering tetex. Ring 
Belh Mason 01-529 2931. 


CONSULTING ROOM lift Sin X 9ft 
6tn oveftooidno garden available Id 
roaarfnl Bufttaonl bufldlng 1 
minute South Kensington tube. 
Communal waHtoo ream. Appoint. 
am matte £30 per half day. Rs-| 
dactioin if au ner aT srestona reautred. 
Tet 01-881 8395. 


AJJrf. Meaty concre te far there who I 
want to mla real —— y con far I 
lu h a i u a lta si ajdl Anocutn oi- 
8785256 - 
MtCMWMUTBI, anion* wont pro-| 
OKtsor. (M new. £& 00 aao. Tut 01- 
541 3650 (aroaH. • 

TELEX and fbcsten fte aarvtce. 

maui ale. no adaontlon. 
01-3 IB 1235. 


CAN YOU NEGOTIATE? AMbMoos 
accountants, reaction, redundant 
executives, school teachers or rocenl 

graduates ore required to be 

proCearianaty trained In a rewarding 
coraor tn the BMnchl sector. In tar 
reted partes should contact London 
Ralph Downs Oh 01-387 8070. Man 
chasten Ray Fwmpont mi 061 872 
4015. 

COMPAMV NUTH ttaUBP to totarton 
of worVdng capital not excBedtng, 
CIOOJOOO and oraparsd to offer 

OCUPlayiiiant to tnveaura experienced 

rapraMnlattve Please apply Box 
2499 1_ The Times. 

.£900 WEBO.V. Spare tone tn 


Aston House. Hope 630 i 


lavaflablo 


Smmfhnfi 

March 21at-April 11th 
In me heart of Sussex. Steep) 70. 
O aa teoom a . computBr/aateOte cen- 
tre, oxtenahw fields, wood- 


tanda. tore* coistt 
rooms. Sawy. theatre. Wtah or anttv 
out own catreng. Esceteni rates. 

PortnA dataeo, 

TatephonacHorshreD (0403)52824 


SPANISH REAL ESTATE CO MP AWT 
have op ei i inu tor UK aefllng apenL no 
promUan. Mai sdUng experience and 
scene working canttaL 0689 62913 
BSiOa) 


A RARE OPPORTUNITY to become a 


i boon mtaBftttied I 


attuated near the sooth caret l Cn 
wishing to develop the i-sm*. 
further, buf owing to other business 
cotiuniimaits. we are looking tor a 
working partner who baa drive and 
experience In this fart r xpaiai in g 
SrfdT rare accommodation annOabte 
to aKBwrfui a pp lican t- h u a sio renl 
£16.000 nuntnmm. References re- 
qutred-BoxNoisrrdR. 


NEW MARKETS, ■ 

Hundreds of c w me td 


now prod n et* . 


i Sehrme Lbi 
I -953 6600k 


Lane. London. 


, owl 

NW7 : 


EXPORT AND IMPORT 


COMMERCIAL AND 
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY 


INVESTMENT PROPERTY 
NEAR CHESTER 

6 wK contained flats, new con- 
version and fufly moda ml sed. 
Car paildng, iaundretts Fadffty. 
Freehold income £15^00. 

Price £120.000 

18 salt contained flats, avatebla 
October 1988, Ail car parking 
area fofly modernised, lease 
available at 230,000 par annum 
for block or let separately to 
produce £40,000 focotne per 
annum, laundnstta faefflty free- 
hold. 

Price E25IMHNI 
Box No. 1273 RTbe Tinas 


for sale 

Subject to RAM. Ptennisolon 

COFFEE 

ESTATE 

Southern ImSa 
Apply Executors: 

Turner Kenneth Brown 
100 Fetter Lane 
London EC4 1DD 

riant 23 


YIELD 12.25% 

Manchester and Birm in gh am 
suburbs- Shoo investments let 
an FRI leases. 

Price £18,000 - £30.000. 

Mottzer & Company, 
Park Rd Finchley 
NS. 

Tek 01-348 4948 . 


SUPPLIERS WANTED 
& EQUIPMENT 


KEOUNDJUVT STOCKS 
cash. Gan cofloct. rang 


COMPUTERS 


OLIVETTI M24 

Authorised Distributor 

20mb Need 795 

256k complete system 
BUY, LEASE OR RENT 

CRESTMATT LTD 

01-402 1254/5 


Exceflent Opportunity to Inport 

LEAF SPRINGS 

for commercial veNdes 
GOCX) QUALITY at KEEN PRICES 
tor nether MonnaSon contact 
DELIGHT ENGINEERING, 

53 Nathans Road, North Wembtoy, Mddx HAO 3BZ 
Tek 01-904 5855 
Tatae 894315 DELENGG 


BUSINESSES FOR SALE 
ft WANTED 


PORTABLE PERSONAL 
COMPUTER IN A 
BRIEFCASE ONLY £1,1991 

2S6K Ram. 320K 3% "Disk Drive 
SUt" pack software Inctodsa NLO 


Rtag ILOS&8. on 0IM 733821 
Z7t Nbta Ha Ride, 

Wafeteflham,8aflta. 


FINANCE AND INVESTMENT 


EXPANSION 

CAPITAL 

Enquiries consderad from 
businaBBea seeking capital in 
excess of £175XX«for growth 
and/or acquisitions witlicut 
participation 

IKTHffUMJ FWANCIAL GROUP 
58 Graa St London W1Y3RH 
To* 01-829 047S/D1-491 0446 
Tolrec 22749 IFUND 


H OTEL S AND 
LICENSED PREMISES 


AUSTRIA 

untoua opporttarity to punefama 
Engtett remad Austrian company 
operating adramahr popirfsr Eng- 
Dafi pun In a top re yasir round re- 
■oft. Seats 200 parsons. E a c o l ani 
ovorasas Cuakiaas. Rx sale due to 
2160.000 


Tefc 01043 5212 2303 


- HOTELS AND 
LICENSED PREMISES 


ALTEA (Spain) Nr. Benidorm, 

business premises far sale In new marina, mezzanine possibilities 
65 sq metres. 

£38,500. 

Write to Apartado 154, Aitea Alicante or "telephone (010) 34- 
778738 (evenings). 


AMSTRAD 

PCW8256 



• NOVACARE , 


WORDPROCESSING CO. 

Based in City of London. Dealing with training 
recruitment, and bureau services. Fully equipped 
offices. Offers. 

Box 2598 N The Times 


Payroll on Micro 



>64.- 


tna BM & Cteptabtai H Ite 

Unfioft re tta ' ' 

to real & 
& brew ifcre 1979. 
Malpaidql 


FINANCE COMPANY 
IN SOUTHAMPTON 
FOR SALE 

Minimum turnover for 1986 £1,000,000. 
Audited accounts available. 

Price £90,000 

Telephone 04895 5547 
after 6pm 


DISTRIBUTORS 
AND AGENTS 


CORVUS OMMUflET network with a 

IBM C on i pa t iw waH aBSte— and 

46mb Ou n d d dw . Am new. Cost 


£10.246 5 months ago. Mast sen at 1 
£5.725 + vat or wfll rout- Ten 
045276405. 


COMMERCIAL PRINTERS 





WE HAVE SPENT 

a co n aldaraMa amount of nwnay In 
tea last 18 months darttaplng a 
unique product simad at ow new 
homes mskst Wo hare mat wHi 
mmandouB taktoi success and am 
now ready to market our product in 
th a aoulh east. Wb ha w ttaokte dy 
tto oompgUtlonl Witen Interested in 
making contact with a sates orgon- 
nwfion of proven abtty. 

Ft» more ta fismalkm . 
to Bon MSB L Tha 


SLASH YOUR 
PRINTING COSTS 

5,000 leaflets from £28. 
Booklet specialists. 
Phone Junta 
01-701 3858 


Tmaemw Trade , 
amlram. nwotecn. 
fast, reliable, accurate. 


off 

. _ JS 

- 01553 


■teals in new impress 
from 196. Mans ' 
Edmunds 032841 T 


National Distributors Required 
VERY HIGH QUALITY 
BLOCK TAPS 
DOOR AND CABINET 
FURNITURE 

Kofaly c on q jiflflhm prices, rate 


Box 1272 R Ttw Times. 


PROMOTION PUBL ICITY 
AND MARKETING 


SUMMER INCOMING ! 

Enterta in your tan d kah st. pnre 
batons, niram mm. superb, stynsn 

Country House coucerta- 

f\bt dam. hoasas. A prlres santort 
HOP. I. to. . C h a nb ury. OXFORD 

TeL- <06081 81 131 1 
Telex: 837883 


Established North London 
Garden Centre lor sate 
Good location, 3,000+ sq ft 
Shop, car parking, large 
grounds. 

Also avaBable within same 
grounds, substantial area 
suitable for aquatic centre. 

Contact Mr Foster 
01-340 7891 


ESTABLISHED BEAUTY SALOON 
tor nto In NW London am. Rrolr 
am 1364 Tha Tima*. 


DEVON MARKET TOWN HOTEL. 
Vary aaramitani for MG. The 
■tty cauuMtare Laanae Bor, - 
Bar. FtretauraiU/Funciton 
looetha- wim 6 


devotosnnant paiatM parttocaarly " 
tufas tswsssrfMtna* to rear of property. •. 
Me* £119.000 far tha HMnia, ' 
Ftoara. FHtinga and OendwUL 
FulfOffls. CnwU« 21 4015. 


THE MBODAB RESTRAUftANT 
■Quality ratmrant nMtedm tn 
TraHon and Preach c e Bteg operattng 
from Ma u r teH M pwretoro wim. 
irogniflcetil aea views in me South I 
■B^rotawn of^HteBtete 


sate doe to. 

Price; £13&000 tor tha freehold. 
Oxhnro. atonal and goodwill. 

HYDRAULIC CVUMDBI and pro- 
duett mawHfaiiiirmy co ippm y for 
rote. One mffison rotes per year — 
LaulUeUe. I . n ca ted In oeatafld. 
sunny, southern California. . write 
o wner who wtew. to retire. Bn 
1S9TO WydeoB. NJ 07481 . USA. 
ffTAUAH Reateurant/Wtne Bor cicaw 
to — ■*" ~ 


wee«y..'6 q Sto» 

*£SS» SBUBF'IS 


pram. LO 
Shorehom 


•l»l \K\ Of I III I IMI S 

CI.ASSIFIKI) 


Over 1-3 rnDIjan of tke most 
affinent peajde m tiie coaBby read 
the dassi&ed cofamms oTTheTimes. 
The foflowing c ote g uik s ^qwag 
ragohrty every week, and are g m- 
«aBy accrenpaiuedbyrderBri 

edStorfal articles. 

Use the coupon (ri^tX end find 

eat Ihjw easy, fast and economical 
ft is lo advertise m The Tines 


MONDAY Edncar kc: Univeisity 
Appobitments, ftep. & Public School 
Appointments. Educational Courses, 
Schdbfships A Fellowships. 

TUESDAY C o mpu ter Hor iz ens: a 
c on tpfrite ns ivc guide to. the 
computer market. 

Legal Appmuteuaris SoBdtots, 
Commercial Lawyers, Legal Officers, 
Private & Public practice. 


WEDNESDAY La Ctfme de la 
Criaae: Secretariai/PA appointmems 
over £7,500. GenaalsecretariaL . 
P roperty : ReaJh m lial.CdmmefciaL' 

Town & Counrry.pvwseas,Rer«als. 

THURSDAY GenisalAppfWd- 
mtate Chief Executives', -Managing 
Diredbois, Director Safer and ^Mptet- 
ing Executives, Puiriia, Jrnancfr and 
Overseas Appointments, faciudfog a 


Hew elaMifiralifift Brt^ Ptnonrfal 


FRIDAY. Metons: A complete car 

buyers' guide featuring, established . 

coalers and private sates. ' 


THE WO&LO FAMOUS PERSON AL COLUMN APPEARS EVERY DAY 
ANNOUNCEMENTS CAN APPEAR 'WITHIN 24 HOURS- 


SeUpig property, fianebiscs, 
eqiripmeatete, fip small and large 
■ compmiesor businesses. ‘ 

SATURDAY O ra sasliwifc 
Holidays abroad,' Lew cost Qigfais, 
Cruises. Car hire. UiC Travct Holds, 
Colons, Holiday Jets. 
Eatatdaiegb: 


Fill in (be coupon and attach iltojouradvertisemenL Prior toil appearing, 
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i;i 


NAME 

ADDRESS. 


TELEPHONE (Day Ume). 


ACCESSOR VISA A/C Na 


date op insertion . 

ffta u t rftan i te iira 


i 1 — i — i — i — i ( 17-1—!— 


tee 


\ : 








~L° r 8s 






on 


Z 


- -'. '■-’i&Nh., 


- f •■».,,[’ ^ 

‘^ICj, 


• .{■ ■»■ 

■ "ts 


By Clare Dobie ! 

Wellcome, .Britain’s second 

largest drug company. Is famed 
for its ability to bring together 
lateral flunking boffins and 
foot-in-thc-door . salesmen. 
When the company, is floated 
on, the stock market next month 
the City seems bound - to unroll 
a red carpet, inscribed with an 
eponymous but fairly . obvious 


a ’ sp Al|j 

- - 


■3 Man 
Career 


ON. ! 


' ’’ *saar 


:,,rs sanE^ 

w *'" ; 




3 


••• ’■ *. -J'i'law 

r> IT 

- *■* 


1 

■ •• '•■■m 

• -V -sc ~o 

t si* 

‘ ■•■tsa 
■ ■ 

"r-e 

a rsts 


J 752 




But the drags group has been 
even cleverer. In order to 
guarantee a good reception for 
the shares, it has arranged for 
tradiog to start on February 14. 
St Valentine's Day. It is hoping 
for love at first sight 
Even though the stock mar- 
ket has- fallen recently, 'there 
l seems little doubt that investors 
c will be : queuing up, cheque 
books; in hand, to subscribe for 
shares. 1 After the flotation the 
group will probably be valued at 
comfortably over £1 billion. 

A special poignancy attaches 
itself to the whole idea of a 
Wellcome flotation. Underlying 
its undoubted commercial suc- 
cess there, is a hand core of 
traditional philanthropy, not 

nnliVp . tlw -.rWinVor 


which are part and parcel of 
Rowntree Mackintosh. It is the 
commitment to human wdl- 
S being, as 'well as a keen eye for 
the market opportunity, which 
has led Wellcome to plough 
huge chunks of its research and 
development budget into work 
on treatments for hopes and 
Aids.. 

Until now WeDcome’s only 
shareholder has been a charity, 
the Welcome Trust. It' was the 
trust’s decision to sell some of 
its shares, so ft. could spread its 
investment portfolio, that has 
led to the flotation. 

According to Sir David Steel, 
chairman' of the trustees, there 
was concern about having “all 
our eggs in one basket, notwith- 
standing the excellence of that 
basket”, 

» The relationship between the 
trust and the company dates 
back to;1936, the year Sir Henry 
Wellcome died. Sir Henry, a 
pharmacist and collector, foun- 
ded Wellcome in. 1880, together 
with Mr Silas Burroughs, a 
fellow American and . a - keen 
salesman. 

From the start there was a 
tension between Sir Henry’s 
strong commercial instincts and 
his religious background. When 
he was 21 he wrote to his 
parents:- “4 have always had a 
desire for wealth and still 
have. . . but 1 want to live a life 
devoted to the true God and to 
mankind”. 

t. The trust was set up under 
j the terms of Sir Henry’s will. It 
k was to cram the company, then 
called WeHcome Foundation, so 
it could use the profits for 
medical res earch . In the. 50 
years of its existence the trust 
has received £150 million from 
Wellcome. It was able to spend 


W*Boom»’a main 
human h«ai 


Cough and cold 
preparations 
Systemic 
antibacterials 
Topical aritf-infectives 
Anti-gout preparations- 
Anti-vfrals 
Cardiovascular . 

treatments 

Muederetaxanta 

Analgesics - - 
Diagnostics 
Vacdnce • 

Other pharmaceuticals 

Other non- • 

pharmaceuticals 


1985 "- 
£m ' •h 

342 ■■ 17 

98 - '12 
83 .10 

80 10 
62 7 


17 . 2 

9 .1 

104-13 

103 - -12 



. ■■n-* J 


ToW 825 100 


£22 million last year, making it 
the: largest medical research 
charity, in Britain. 

Wellcome, the company, has 
an almost unrivalled reputation 
for.' -producing new drugs. 
Historically it has attracted 
some of the brightest and best 
researchers available and, until 

UAW Jf kn/f ZLa 


the scientific community re- 
garded as the best pharmaco- 
logical department in the 
country. 

It was led by Sir John Vane, a 
-Nobel prize winner*, and Sir 
James Blade, another world 
renowned scientist. Their time 
saw the development of both 
Septrin, an important anti-bac- 
terial, and Zyfaric, a treatment 
fbrgoutwbicb still accounts for 
10 per cent of Wellcome' s sales. 

But their main contribution 
to Wellcome was their work on 
anti-virals, : a field where Wel- 
lcome now has a commanding 
lead. Zovirax, a treatment for 
herpes, was font launched in 
1981, when many Americans 
feared an outbreak of epidemic 
prop ort i ons. ' 

Wellcome is currently carry- 
ing out clinical trials on a new 
anti-Aids drug: but, as the 
company is the first to admit, it 
could be years before the drug 
reaches the market. 

The time lapse between 
discovering a drug and launch- 
ing it on the market makes it 
difficult to assess -the contri- 
bution of individuals. It is dear, 
however, that the presence of 
Sir. John Vane and Sir James 
Black attracted other brilliant 
researchers, who seem to have 
been ^undeterred fry rivalry 
between the two great men. 

Whether or not it was as the 
result of a power struggle or on 
the advice of Arthur D. Little, 
the consultants brought in to 
report on the management of 
Wellcome’s research, both Sir 
James and -Sir John left the 
company last year. As one 
academic put it “Morals was 
shattered. The two big names 
had gone and, as if to add insult 
to injury, the Trust gave a vote 


of no confidence by announcing 
'itstieciskm to sell some of its 
shares.” - 

- Earlier this month Dr Pedro 
-Cuatrecasas, the head of Ameri- 
_ can research, announced plane 
to join Glaxo. Britain’s largest 
pharmaceutical company. We- 
lcome’s public relations team 
did its best to play down the 

- importance of the dep ar t ur e but 
its task was made by more 
difficult by subsequent events. 

With only two weeks to go 
before toe prospectus was (toe 
: out, Mr Bill Sullivan, the head 
of Burroughs WeHcame, the 
American subsidiary, resigned 

- very suddenly on January 13. 

Wellcome’s dp knmi a nd ' 
chief executive/ Mr -Alfred 
Shepperd denied there had been 
a dispute about who would be 
hier apparent, but Mr Sullivan’s 
unexpected loss nevertheless 
underlines the tension between , 
toe American and British ends 
of the operation.-. - 
. The United States has pow- 
ered WeQcome's growth in the 
past five years, when sales have 
doubled from £500 million to 
£1 billion and profits have risen 


iimnwn tv ibiM 

million 

The loss of four key figures m 
less than 12 months is particu- 
larly unfortunate in view of toe 
immin ent flotation. 

Wellcome is doing its best to 
dispel the cloud hanging.over it 
with roadshows and presen- 
tations to financial institutions. 
But there is no British Telecom 
style appeal to private investors. 

Great play is being made of 
the company’s ftitnre plans, in 
which the anti-Aids drug clearly 
plays an important part. Other 
new drugs mclude Wellbratm, 
an anti-depressant which will be 
launched in the US this year 
and a new antihistamine, and 
research continues on treat- 
ments for glandular fever and 
furhter uses of existing prod- 
ucts. Wellcome is also trying to 
break in to the Japanese market' 

These projects should keep 
Well come’s . profits moving 
firmly forward over the next' 
two or three years. This year, 
however, is proving more 
problematic, thanks to the 
vagaries of toe exchange .rates: 
The fall in toe dollar has hit 
Wellcome hard so that it is not 
expected to push up profits very 
for in the year to end August 
The flotation could have been 
better timed. 

The shares will not be finally 
priced until January 29, when 
the pro s pectus is published. 
Unlike toe Government, which 
has an interest in sponsoring 
people's capitalism, Wellcome 
Trust only has an interest in 
nusing as. much money for 
research as possibles This means 
toe margin for error is small. 
This time it is science and not 
the Treasury that benefits. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• RANKS HOV1S MCDOU- 
GALL: The chairman says in his 
annual report that current trading 
results remain encouraging. As 
stated on December 27 the bad 
wheat harvest of 1985 made it 
difficult to forecast the outcome far 
Ihe current year. Otherwise, he says, 
the company has made a good start 
and be e x pects to report another 
satisfactory year. 

• IMKY PROPERTY HOLD- 
INGS; An interim dividend of 1.8p 
(17p), parable on April 8, has been 
decried, with figures is £000, gross 
rents from investment properties 
totalled 3.053 (2,573) for the half 
year to September 30. 

• WILLIAM DAWSON (HOLD- 

INGS): A final dividend of 9.6p 
making l£4p (10p), payable next ' 
Monday, has been announced for 
the year to September 30. Turnover 
was £36.336,000 (£30304,000), 

pretax profit £3,620,000 ; 
(£3.004,000) and profit after tax 
£2.080,000 (£1,698,000). Earnings 
per share rose to 5739p (47.54p). 

• NATIONAL COMMERCIAL 
BANK OF SAUDI ARABIA: net 
profit available for distribution for 
1985 was down to Rial 99.6 mfiHon 
or £19.5 million foam 499.4 million. 
But net income totalled Rial 4.9 
billion. 

• CENTROVINCIAt ESTATES: 
The company has declared an 
interim dividend of 3p (3p), payable 
on April 7. for the six months to 
September 30. With figures in £000, 
gross rental income was 4.538 
(4,413)’ and' net income from 
properties before interest and tax 
2,723 (2,445), Eaminge per share 
were 5.44p (5.95). 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY / SPORT 21 


ATHLETICS; COMMONWEALTH GAMES RULING COULD LEAD TO NEW CONTROVERSY 


Budd’s Edinburgh entry at risk 


The imm ediate concern over 
Zola B odd's late arrival back in 
Britain to defend’ her national 
indoor 1.300 metres title this 
weekend will be nothing compared 
to the criticism of another long 
absence in South Africa if It causes 
her to miss this summer’s Common- 
wealth Games in Ed in burgh- 
inquiries yesterday drew no 
comment, but English team officials 
are known to be greatly concerned 
by the ambiguities in Article 34 (iii) 
of the Commonwealth Gaines 
Constitution (1985) which states 
that eligible competitors who wish 
to r e pr esent a country other than 
that of their birth must reside in 
their chosen country for at least six 
out of the 12 months preceding the 
opening date of the Games. 

Miss Budd, who arrived in 
London from South Africa yester- 
day morning, wishes to represent 


By Pat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent 


England at 1,500 metres in 
Edinburgh. But, with the Games 
opening on July 24, and individual 
entries due on July 6, she would not 
qualify even iT she stayed in England 
continuously from now. 

Of the other qualifying six 
months since July 24 last year. Miss 
Budd has only spent a handful of 
days in her Guildford digs. One 
factor which may help Miss Budcf s 
cose is a sub-clause relating to a 
residence in the new country of 
qualification. On a brief trip to 
London last November, to receive 
the women's award of the British 
Athletics Writers Association. Miss 
Budd did buy a house in Guildford. 

But. opinion among officials, who 
originally welcomed Miss Budd u> 
Britam with open arms is beginning 
to harden. Members of the British 
Amateur Athletic Board have made 
it dear to Miss Budd's South 


African coach, Pieter Labuschagnc, 
that he would not be welcome back 
in England. Compared to this latest 
political problem for Miss Budd and 
her backers, the defence of her 1500 
metres title at Cosford, which begins 
with this evening's beats, should be 
easy. 

In the two-day meeting sponsored 
by Pearl Assurance, there will be 
much more competitive interest, 
especially in the 3,000 metres and 
200 metres. David Lems is prepared 
to give Sebastian Coe a serious test 
over 3.000 metres in tomorrow’s 
final, if Coe decides to run the 
longer distance, as expected, instead 
of the 1.500 metres. 

Curiously for a man who has 
meed indoors, albeit irregularly, 
over the last 12 years, Coe has never 
competed in the senior 1,500 
metres, at which he has won two 


Olympic gold medals. But he has 
won the 3.000 metres twice, the 
latter in 1981 in 7 min SSJlsec, one 
of the fastest championship times. 
But Lewis, the title-holder, is 
looking to break the championship 
best of 7;50.0 by lan Stewart in 
1972. He said yesterday: “As soon 
as I beard Coe might be running, 
two and a half weeks ago. I modified 
my naming. 1 cut out hfil rumunjs 
and replaced it with track sessions!; 
hope Coe does run, because I'm 
feeling quite sharp. I realize that if 
he's still with me 400 metres to go. it 
wilt be goodbye. But I’m thinking 
more ofa fast last 1.000 metres. 

Two of the best races at Cosford 
last year were the 200 metres 
contested by Ade Mafe and Todd 
BenneiL They won one but 
since Mafe had beaten Bennett the 
previous year. Bennett is now 
seeking to redress the balance. 


FOOTBALL 


I (■*;(*;« a. 




Time running short for 
solution to tin crisis 


When the 22 members of toe 
board and committee of the 
London Metal Exchange gather 
today they wifi be painfully 
aware; that it is up to three 
months to the day since toe 
International Tin Council with- 
drew from toe market and the 
exchange was forced to suspend 
tin trading. 

Those three months have 
beep toe most extraordinary 
episode in the modem history 
of commodity markets. An 
international -body, set up 30 
years ago by treaty between 22 
member states, has squabbled 
within itself and with its 
creditors over gross debts of 
£900 milli on- .... 

So serious, convoluted and 
even acrimonious have toe 
divisions been during toe 
longest clos ure of any com- 
modity market since toe Second 
World War that it would be a 
brave metal broker or banker 
who said toe end was in sight. 

The issue, as Mr Jacques 
Lion, chairman of toe LME 
board has stressed from toe 
beginning, is the sanctity of 
contract. If 22 countries can 
collectively avoid all or part of 
their commercial debts, what 
security is there for traders? 

The ITC was much the 
biggest trader in toe, tin market. 
At least 13 LME brokers - half 
toe exchange's membership - 
have positions with the. ITC as 
sellers to it, buyers from it, or 
both. 

When the buffer stock ab- 


ruptly ceased ' operations no- 
body was sure of what ft had left 
behind. The ITC secretariat was 
forced to call in outside 
auditors. Peat Marwick Mit- 
cheH 

What the auditors found 
horrified toe most alarmed 
broker. The ITC had forward 
contracts to buy more than 

67.000 tonnes of tin before toe 
end of this month. It had stocks 
of almost 53,000 tonnes. 
Against this it ; had sales 
commitments of. snore than 

70.000 tonnes, of which 30.000 
were undated and unpriced 
contracts running to 19S7. On 
top of toe tin mountain, the 
ITC had borrowed £350 million 
from a group of 14 banks and 
brokers. 

These huge quantities mat- 
tered because toe ITCs with- 
drawal from toe market would 
have caused a collapse of the 
price had be LME not sus- 
pended trading. Therday before 
toe suspension, tin was trading 
at £8,500 a tonne. On toe 
morning of the suspension if 
was £8,140. Recent informal 
deals have been done at below 
£ 6 , 000 . ' 

But toe ITCs purchase 
contracts would have been 
priced at more. -.than £8,000. IF 
toe ITC therefore squared its 
position - sold and bought all 
its co mmitm ents - at an 
average price- of £6,000 it would 
lose £263 million. And that 
would not be toe end of toe 
story. . The ITC would be left 


with stocks of just under 50,000 
tonnes. 

Selling these stocks might 
reduce the shortfall to £160 
milli on- It would, however, 
cause chaos in a market already 
oversupplied with tin. Mines 
‘ would -close — 8,000 miners 
' have been laid off in Malaysia '— 
and several metal brokers with 
contracts with toe ITC could be 
bankrupted. 

For a month now toe ITC has 
been studying a plan out 
forward by Mr Peter Graham, 
senior deputy chairman of 
Standard Chartered Bank, and 
Mr Ralph Kestenbaum, manag- 
ing director of Gerald Metals. 
The plan is to set up a new 
company, capitalized with £200 
million of.equity from the ITC 
members, £70 mlffion from the 
banks and brokers, and a £50 
million loan from toe British 
Government. 

■ Newco, as it has become 
known, would take on all toe 
ITCs obligations. The buffer 
stock would be- wound up, 
although the ITYC migh t 
continue as a substantial body. 
Banks and brokers deeply resent 
being forced to pay part of toe 
ITCs debts, and toe ITC is still 
suggesting that its contribution 
should be lower. But as more 
and more contracts foU due and 
legal actions between broken to 
settle business accumulate, time 
is very short, 

Michael Prest 


final dividend of 3p making 4.5p 
(2.Sp) for the year to October 31 has 
been declared. With figures in £000, 
turnover was up to 23.1 14 (19,843), 
profit before tax to 5,062 (3318) 
and profit available to shareholders 
to 2,854 (1,081). Earnings per share 
before extraordinary hems were 
163p(8.9). 

• JOHN BEALES: Results for the 
year to November 30 include an 
in te rim dividend of 1.35p (1.2p). 
With fig ures in £000,. turnover was 
7,694 (TJO 27), gross profit 685 (537) 
and operating profit 3S7 (229). 
Earnings per shares fixlly dilated, 
were 8.1p(5.5p). 

• GEORGE DEW: The chairman 
states in his progress report that 
efforts are now concentrated on the 
reorganization, required to compete 
in tbe company’s “very challenging" 
market. The board has accepted by 
agreement tbe resignations of Mr B. 
Parry, and MrJ. M. Yates. 

• PARKDALE HOLDINGS: 
Results fin- the six months to 
October 31 show an interim 
dividend of Q375p (0JZ5p), payable 
on February 27. Gross rents totalled 
£281,609 (£261,145) with financial 
services income at £232386 
(£233,829). 

• HH.I. AND SMITH HOLD- 
INGS: The report for the year to 
September 30 includes a one-foMO 
capitalization plan. A dividend of 
2.6p (2.675p) making 3.85p (3,675p) 
is also included. With figures m 
£000 turnover rose to 27,408 
(22380) and pretax profit to 1.655 
(1,438). Earnings per share net basis 
were 1 1.16p (10.95p) and nil bans 
IM6p(M7p). 

• DERBY TRUST: A second 
; interim dividend of 4.6924p 

(3.953p), making 8368 lp (7.11 5p). 
payable on February 28, has been 
de cla red. With figures in £000, 
income from fixed assets, invest- 
ments, dividends and interest 
totalled 1,542 (1390). Net earnings 
per income share were 8. 368 Ip 
(7.1 15p) an assets attributable to 
capital shares £2.47% (£23316). 

• THOMAS FRENCH A SONS: 
A final dividend of 1.725p (1.725), 
making 2.875p (2.S75pX for the year 
to September .28 has been an- 
nounced. With figures m £000 sales 
totalled 26832 (25353). operating 
profit 905 (1562) and pretax profit 
947 (1613). Earnings per share were 
1.05p(4.43p). 

• ESTATES PROPERTY IN- 
VESTMENT CO: Results for the 
six months to October 31 include an 
interim dividend of 3p (2.75p). 
With figures in £000, rents 
receivable totalled 3,055 (2,697) less 
ground rents payable 563 (400). Net 
property income was 2335 (1,998) 
and ear n ings pewr share were 5.98p 
(4.83p). 

• BEVAN HOLDINGS: Results 
for the six months to September 30 
(figures in £000) show turnover of 
10,441 (8,941), operating profit of 
365 (290) mid pretax profit of 135 
(129). Earnings per ordinary share 
slipped to L21p(136p). An interim 
dividend of0.4p (035p), payable on 
April 10, has born announced. 

• UNION CARBIDE: A quarterly 
dividend of $1.25 or 89p per share 
($035). payable on March 1, has 
been announced. The board has 
authorized that the previously 
announced thxee-for-one stock spbt 
be effected in the form of a stock 
dividend on tbe corporation's 
issued shares. The new shares will 
be distributed on March 14. 

• DENMANS ELECTRICAL: A 
final dividend of 2.45p (2_25p) 
malting 3.7p (3.5p) has been 
d ec la red in tbe results for the year to 
August 30. With figures in £000, 
turnover was 18,669 (17,608) and 
pretax profit 1,002 (948). Earnings 
per share were 13.40p(13.38p). 

• LONDON AND NORTHERN 
GROUP: The northern companies 
in London and Northern Group 
have been awarded contracts worth 
£3.94 million in the north of 
England and southern Scotland. 

• EMESS LIGHTING: The 
company has acquired Abelscot for 
£400,000. Consideration is to be 
satisfied by the issue of 88.000 
Emess ordinary shares and £100,000 
floating rate unsecured loan stock 
1987-90 and £88, 800 in cash. 

• ABGENTEX RESOURCE 
EXPLORATION: The company 
has raised <3500,000 in a private 
placement with options for a funber 
C$150,000 by tbe end of May. The 
proposed public offering through 
the Vancouver Stock Exchange has 
been withdrawn. 





■h : m 


<4* i. \ 






Why gridiron scores over Rugby Union 

A game failing to 
realize its potential 


John Bond (right) with his assistant, Fred Davies, after 
taking over at Birmingham City yesterday 

Bond joins Birmingham 


John Bond has taken charge of 
another club that is in the deepest 
financial trouble (Stuart Jones 
Football Corre s pondent, writes). 
Sacked last month from Swansea 
City, who were and still are in 
danger of extinction, he was 
appointed yesterday as the new 
manager of Birmingham City, who 
are £2v, million in debt. 

“1 think everybody knows the 
situation at Birmingham,*' he said. 
“Somebody is going to have to keep 
them in the first division this season 
and the finances will start to 
improve from there. But I am used 
to this son of situation now. It was 
worse at Manchester City, for 
example. I accepted Birmingham’s 
offer principally because 1 was out 
ofa job but also because I wanted to 
return to tbe first division”. 

For the third time he has followed 
in the footsteps of Ron Saunders, 
who resigned from Birmingham last 
week. The trail started at Norwich 
City in 1973 when Saunders 
similarly walked out after a 
boardroom row. It continued at 


Manchester City, although Bond’s 
immediate predecessor in 1980 was 
Malcolm Allison. 

Manchester City at the time were 
anchored to the foot of the first 
division without a League victory. 
As well as keeping the afloat, be ted 
them to the FA Cup final. Three 
years later he resigned, saying that 
he was not prepared to “lake money 
under false pretences**. 

Bond stepped down Into the 
lower divisions, first with Burnley 
and then with Swansea. His ’new 
side have lost their last nine games 
at borne and have not under 
Saunders, they were humiliated by 
Altrincham In the FA Cup. 

Bond, who takes over without a 
contract, plans to select the first 
ream for a reserve match against 
Chelsea tomorrow (Bir m i n g h a m 
have no Canon League fixture). 
Fred Davies, a former colleague at 
Swansea, will be his assistant and 
Kevin Reeves, once of Norwich and . 
Manchester City, is to become ; 
Birmingham’s coach. 

More football, page 22 


It was a heart-* arming welcome 
borne accompanied with, to him. a 
death-defying leap frith arms 
outstretched, followed by an em- 
brace which all fathers lore from 
their sms. Tbe Twickenham match 
was over and dead. 

“Hey, dad . . . could you please 
get a video tape for the match?*' 

“But, the England- Wales game is 
now over 

“No, yon don't understand . . .** 
Not many parents do, I reflected, as 
tbe first signs of a generation gap 
yawned between me and my seven- 
year-old . . . “No. I want to tape the 
Soper BowL American football is on 
Sunday until 2.0 in the morning. 
Have we got a four- hoar tape so I 
can see h. Please ... Dad?” 

The momentary high spirits, 
occasioned by die embrace, plum- 
meted somewhat. A sinking feeling 
set in at the sacrilege that the 
memory of an England- Wales 
match, for goodness sake, should be 
so summarily dismissed. Twicken- 
ham. in recollection, hardly mat- 
teed to him, but tbe preparations 
were well in band for a game, so 
foreign to our sporting enti re, was 
now enthusiastically anticipated. 

But to the child's and 

munhlbhed imagination, it was not 
ranch of a memory. Not modi to 
savour for an old man's prejudice, 
either. Certainly not of the kind yon 
wish to carry round in your pocket 
beyond next week. 

The boy, being a pretty deter- 
mined follow, you understand, 
already bad his imitation Welsh 
jersey (with feathers) and the other 
paraphernalia. This Christinas, 
though, be wanted a grid-iron 
helmet The vest be already has and 
represents his favourite San Fran- 
cisco Forty-niners, so he tells me, 
amid the other, to me, unintelligible 
statistics. You gel the drift that be 
is, by courtesy of the flickering 
vision of an A-team culture in tbe 
corner, more than a little partial to 
this sweeping and addictive phenom- 
enon. 

In its edited form, it is a colourful 
pageant. It has style and seems to be 
a lot of fun. And there are lots of 
touch-downs. But, the spoil-sport 
might say, the real game is not like 
that. Telescopically, the lens zooms 
In on the highlights. Yes... qnite 
so. But bow much truer were last 
weekend's international matches in 
which 17 penalties were locked, to 
the real spirit of rugby football. And 
which one of them inspires a fertile 
imagination. 

And if that is my son in this 
random doable-handed survey, what 


of my paL the television executive, 
from the West (of F.nfltnmi t i hastily 
add) whose unbounded enthusiasm 
for rugby persuades me that he 
mi gh t put many a Welshman to 
shame. He said, wistfully, that 
international rngby is no longer 
coming up to expectation. Christmas 
over, he says. Is the sign that the 
international season Is here. He gets 
excited, he says. 

“But", he said - you knew that 
the awful ‘but' was coming - “these 
days it is like taking off the 
wrapping paper only to rad there Is 
no sparkling, glittering gift. Only 
something made out of plastic, 
instead." 

Tbe game must appeal to the 
boy's sense of wonder and to flatter 
the child's sense of wonder, almost 
forgotten, in the adult. 

The coach will tell you that one 
point ahead Is enough. And the 
players will insist that to win is tbe 
vital point. Of course, hot only so 
long the game encourages the 
swift and tbe brave as much as it 
nowadays does the whistle and the 
penalty kicker. If not, the game is no 
game stall. 

Seventeen penalties in the 
window-shopping glamour of the 
international set is absurd and lays 
the game open to ridicule. As, ia 
fact, it did momentarily at Twicken- 
ham where the occasional boos were 
not the expression of extreme 
partisanship for either tide, not 
against any transgressions or in- 
discipline. They were targeted at the 
silliness of some of tbe laws and the 
unfortunate m °" In eh* middle 
whose task it was In i n terpret them. 

How self-defeating these laws are 
could be seen in the way they 
blighted tiie coherent attitudes of 
both teams: Jonathan Davies's swift 
dropout, for instance, courageously 
taken in the opening minute, 
epitomized this, while Huw, his 
namesake, on the England side, 
though a touch nervous under the 
high balL was dangerously elusive in 
attack. Dooley waded ambitiously 
down the middle and Deverenx ran 
out of defence. 

These hints and gestures were of 
adventurous men. More of which 
would bare created the memories of 
a kind which penalties, apart from 
Andrew's first, can rarely inspire. 
But the laws, not necessarily the 
referee’s interpretation of them, 
contrive to blnnt tbe edge and stifle 
ambition. Tbe game's potential 
remains frnstratingly nnreaHzed. 


Gerald Davies 


RUGBY UNION: WEST LONDON INSTITUTE MAKE JOHN PLAYER DEBUT 


Thomas in 
move to 
alter laws 

By David Hands 
Rugby Correspondent 

Testyn Thomas, the Harlequins’ 
coach, has put into words what 
many players and administrators 
felt after a penalty-ridden inter- 
national weekend. He hopes his dub 
will press for an amendment to the 
present law relating to the ruck and 
maul with the intention of restoring 
greater eloquence to a game 
currently suffering from consti- 
pation. 

Thomas, reflecting some serious 
discussion among Harii quins 
officials, would like to see the ball- 
carrier go to ground without play 
being stopped if (a) tbe ball b 
released immediately; (b) the ruck is 
moving forward; and (c) if tbe 
referee can see the bafl. 

Colin Herridge, the Harlqeuin 
secretary, said: “The referee is now 
on a hiding to nothing. If he tries to 
let the game flow he may contravene 
what the law says. The danger is 
now that the games win be won by 
sides playing pressure rugby, that is 
sides who aim merely to play the 
game in the opposition half and wait 
for mistakes so thnt they can kick 
penalties.” 

CORRECTION 

In a photograph of toe rugby 
match between the English and 
Welsh universities published 
last Saturday, the player “hand- 
ing off* was Iain Hunter, not 
KoraL 


Students moving up 
on the blindside 


Rivalry among student rugby 
clubs is nothing new: the Hospitals 
Cup arouses powerful emotions 
among its adherents, as did the 
series between St Luke's College, 
Exeter and Loughborough Colleges, 
before both moved on to university 
status. There is, too. the annual 
fracas between Oxford and Cam- 
bridge - all of which leaves the 
supporters of the West London 
Institute of Higher Education 
virtually unmoved. 

The Institute, formerly known as 
Borough Road College, who trace 
their routes back to 1891 and who 
indude among their luminaries two 
of tbe Rugby Football Union's 
divisional technical directors, Ch al- 
kie White and Alan Black (there 
may be a pun there!), make their 
debut in the John Player Special 
Cup tomorrow when they travel to 
Lichfield in the third round. 

They are the first student body to 
be seeded direct to the third round, 
by virtue of being runners-up in Iasi 
season's Middlesex Cup Final when 
they lost 1 3-3 to the same Rosslyn 
Park team which has just disposed 
of London-Wrish and Bristol. It is a 
fact of which they are justifiably 
proud, even though they have 
subsequently been joined by 
Loughborough students who have 
fought their way from the first 
round past Nuneaton and Berry 
Hill. 

Yet no one could accuse West 
London of hogging the limelight. 
They take part in none of the 
student knock-out competitions 
which attract publicity; when they 
sustained their besi-ever season last 
year it went virtually unrecorded 


and there was a certain amount of 
ire in a letter from one of the 
institute's students which reached 
me last autumn, hinting that West 
London could stand comparison 
with the best that Loughborough, 
Exeter, Durham and the two senior 
universities could offer. 

It is a considered policy by the 
institute, however, to limit iheir 
fixture list to non-student rugby. 
John Hunter, bead of physical 
education at West London, said: “I 
have long centred the list round 
London first-class dub second XVs 
and tbp junior clubs, with our 
student connection now limited to 
the Hospital XV. I believe we have 
the right sort of list to devdop 
players for first-class rugby which, 
to me, is the real raison d'etre for 
them being here." (His side beat 
London Hospitals 56-0 this season.) 

A glance at some of the first team 
bears out Mr Hunter's words. Three 
players have appeared for Middle- 
sex in this season's county 
championship: Mark Peplow, Chris 
Mann and Neil GemmelL the 
captain. Paul Jo si in has played for 
Devon at No 8, ami Roger 
Anderson, the Ulster wing, played 
in Ireland's trial this season and is 
commonly regarded as a virtual 
certainty for a cap 

The quality of the Institute's 
products is not difficult to explain. 
Mr Hunter has the assistance of 
Ernie Price, formerly of Wasps and 
the Metropolitan Police, and Kerin 
Bowring, the London-Wdsb No 8. 
and a Barbarian, who is a part-time 
lecturer in PE at the 1 ostituie. 

David Hands 


Silky skills 
handled 
with gloves 

Schools rugby 
by Michael Stevenson 
Before tbe Australian Schools’ 
convincing win over _ London 
Schools in midweek iheir visit to the 
North was a disappointment. Wind, 
rain and mud at New Brighton 
made the handling game in which 
they revel hazardous: yet their best 
passing moves (facilitated by gloves 
which several players wore io 
counteract the hideous conditions) 
were a joy to behold. 

The Australians beat the North of 
England 1 8-3, scoring four tries and 
demonstrating the skills and tactics 
that have spectacularly thrust 
Australian rugby to the fore. They 
believe passionately in keeping the 
ball alive, knowing that physical 
contact will mean that the ball 
carrier is overrun by his support and 
the movement fatally slowed down. 

These young men employ 
basketball-style passing over the 
head of a defender, numerous loops, 
switches and moves in which 
players are missed out. They are not 
shy to employ lateral movements, 
which does not entirely please the 
purists, but. when a gap opens, it is 
exploited with lightning speed. In 
this context Kohl, at full back. 
O'Connell on the left wing and 
above all Stuart at stand-off half 
were briTlianL 

The North's coaches, Terry MtUs 
and Geoff Wappett. had done a 
good job of motivation and the 
side's defence was commendably 
brave but there was a great gulf 
between the teams in most 
departments. 









n - 


SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 24 1986 


TENNIS: BRITAIN EARN TWO-DAY RESPITE 


Bungert is in search of 
supporting cast 
for his leading actor 

By Rex Bellamy, Teams Correspondent 
_^ Un £ er1 ’ * e , West egation to the second division Club produced thrilling, highly 
k “P*" 11 : m only a remote possibility. skilled tennis in a stSly 


GOLF 


David Miller meets Alex Ferguson 


FOOTBALL 


? rapiain ? only a remote possibility. . skilled tennis in a sparsely 
^ 1 y!° won ^ er ^ Paul Hutchins. Britain’s cap- populated arena. Jan Gunnars- 
■ support- lain, was understandably more son and Peter Lundgren, ranked 

^ gratified than Bungen. It was 25th and 27th in the world, 
rvfi of “H?- European unfortunate, he said, that must find it frustrating that five 
t-up competition, at Queen's because of injuries to other other Swedes rank even higher. 
L.IUD, was not much help, players Fulwood had to make! Lundgren was given a tough 


S “ 0l . m uch help, players Fulwood had to make. Lundgren was given a tough 

Michael Westphal was out- his debut at this level in a match byPaolo Cane, aged 20, 
classed by Heremy Bates in the singles match, in which Oster- ^-,1 ■ 

singles and Tore Meinecke and thim ten him “I would have 

Ricki Osterthun were beaten liked Nick m have a doubles! SSi'bS^lwFr^S 
7-5, 6-1, by Bates and Nick first,” Hutchins said, "but we 

Fulwood in the deciding doub- will have learn eda great deal ceUottl m adehghtftU match. 

... ... _ from tost night's ordesl, &nd I Referring to the ostentatious 

Westphal is Becker’s second think that, having won the intrusioncJ two pigeons during 


Referring to the ostentatious 
intrusion of two pigeons- during 


siring on fast courts and doubles, he will be a better Wednesday’s play, the Queen'S 
Hansjorg Schwaier takes over player against Czechoslovakia.” Club management issued a 
on shale. Neither is ui Becker s Britain’s win over Germany tongue in cheek bulletin to the 
class but for the time being earned them a two-day respite effect that this sort of thing was 
Bungert must make do with from competition before they “frowned upon”. The bulletin 
them. They are young enough to take on Czechoslovakia tomor- went on; “These j 

improve. That does not apply to row. visitors, having no regard fop 

Hutchins has no Becker to the niceties of tennis, or the ! 


Andreas Maurer, who has been 


Backer s partner in doubles but call on, but has fewer Davis club rules are headline seekers 
was demoralized by the Swedes Cup problems than Bungert. who fail to pay admission 
in Munich last month and. The obvious choices are John charges, subscriptions or even 
consequently, may have blown Lloyd and Bates in singles and rentaland are a considerable 
his chances. j Lloyd and Colin Dowdeswell in distraction. The catering man- 

Meinecke, aged 18 and doubles. Stephen Shaw, Stuart ager wishes h to be known that 
Orterthun, aged 21 are candi- Bale (both injured) and Ful- fer plgonneauxfarri wffl shortly 
dates for the doubles vacancy, wood, may soon be considered be on the menu. The grounds 
indeed, not long ago, many for a singles place manager is currently engaged in 

regarded Meinecke as poten- The second day at Queen's shooting practice.” 


regarded Meinecke as poten- The second day at Queen's shooting practice 
tially a better singles player than 

K ktaJPEdteS EUROPEAN CUP RESU LTS 

looks vulnerable in doubles. 

iSSSnS.?™ 

cost him a service game at 5-5 first); n Fufwood tost to R Osterthun, Doyte beat J Van L 


Betgtum 3-0 (Irish names first): g 
Sorensen beat A Brichant, 6-3, 7-6; M 
Doyle beat J Van Langmd, 3-6. 6-4. 
6-3; Sorensen end uoyto beat Van , 
Langandock and Brictant, 6-a, 7-6. 1 


in the first set m which the 3-6, 4-6; J Bales beat M Weatohal, 6-4, 6-3; Sorensen and Doyle beat Van 
Germans led 5-2 and had a set 6-a Bales and Fufwood best Osterthun Langandock and Brichant 6-3. 7-6- 
ooinL The British mir took the 871(1 T Metoecken. 7-6, 6-4. Sweden Austria beat USSR 2-1. Netherlands 

level with Nahr 1-1 {Swedish names beat Belgium 3-0. ThM dhiMoic Spain 
set with a tun of five games and first): P Lundgren beat P Cane. 6-4, 6-7. boat Monaco 3-0. Fourth dhrfstorc 
kept their form well enough to 6-3; J Gurmaraon lost to F Canceltoni Poland beat Cyprus 3-0; Bidgarta beat 
clinch a win that made rel- 6-7. 5-7. Second dMshae Ireland beat Portugal 3-0. 



Salonen leads daring the Col de Brans stage of the Monte Carlo Rally yesterday 

Toivonen regains the initiative 


Manic Carlo (AP) - Henri 
Toivonen. of Finland, driving a 
Lancia Delta S4, held a 37-second 
lead over his compatriot. Timo 
Salonen, in a Peugeot 205. as the 
1986 Monte Carlo rally moved into 
its last day today. 

Salonen led the 84 surviving 
crews out from Monte Carlo's 
famous Casino Square yesterday 
morning and made a fine start to the 
day when he set the fastest time of 
13 minutes 33 seconds over the 
18km stage at the Col de la Madonc 
in the mountains just north of the 
principality. This extended his lead 
from 33 seconds to 4S seconds. 
However, over the famous Turini 
pass, lined by thousands of 


spectators. Toivonen stormed back 
into contention. 

He docked the fastest stage lime 
of 17 minutes 6 seconds over the 
22.4km run to reduce Salonen's 
overall lead to 24 seconds and then 
took the lead by racing up the 
Couillote stage in the scratch time of 
14 minutes 31 seconds. 

Despite the appeals of the 
organizers and of the Italian team 
manager, Cesare Fiorio, some of the 
spectators continued to pack snow 
on the roads and to stay too dose to 
oncoming cars. On the Turini pass, 
the leadig cars, with the notable 
exception of the Landis, were 
pelted with snowballs. Although the 
leaders came safdy through the run. 


some of the lower-placed competi- 
tors came off the road and several 
spectators suffered slight injuries in { 
a series of minor accidents. 

Lancia’s second works Delta, 
driven by Massimo Biasion, held 
third place at the ■ end of the 
penultimate day. just under two 
minutes behind Toivonen. 



FOR THE RECORD 


FOOTBALL 

FRENCH LEAGUE: Lflo 2. Para Sr Germain 0. 
LAS PALMAS: International match: Spain Z 
Soviet Union 0. 

WEST HERMAN CUP: OUanaMtiwh 
Kaaeretotnom 0. Bayern Munich 1 
SCHOOLS: Bractaya Bank U-19 Cup: fir* 
round: Oalwood Park, Mudstone I. A lawi'a. 
DuMAQ 

BEL ABBES: Algeria 0. PSV Bndtwven (Noth) 
a 

UBREVULE^Gabon 0, Senegal i. 

DAR ES SALAAM Em! and Central African 
CUb Ch e mpto na Mp : SemMlnals: Leopards 
(Kart 0. EJ<M*re*h (Sudan) i; Young Africans 
(Ten) 0. Wtfulra Wanderers (Z*m) 9 (Young 
Africans «on 4-2 on pens). 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: RetKSng Z 
Fulham 3; Samian 3. Watford 0. 

MAC8AR SOUTH-WEST COUNTIES IXAOUE: 
Bournemouth « Torquay, postponed. 

YACHTING 

PALM BEACH. Owon-Un* AnHMfean - 
AuatraBan Six-Mam CtmCcnge Cup S aria e: 1. 
S: Francis IX fT Btacknltor. US]: 2, Irene (P 
Petteraen. Swot 

NORDIC SKIING 

FREfSTWTZ-AN-OEH-ORAU, Austria: World 
Cup mwa biathlon ovant 20tan: 1, A 
t'xr vn ov (USSR) Site 31 4«ec (no nttNd 
targets); Z A Sohmisch (EG1 5338.8 (U Wortd 
Cup lenders: 1. P Angorar [WGl 7T poWta: Z 
Anano* 6t; 3. V Medvetsev (USSR] 5§T 


SQUASH RACKETS 




HOCKEY 

REPRESENTATIVE MATCH: Oxford Umvoraity 

t. Royal Navy 3. 

BASKETBALL 


RUGBY UNION 

REPRESENTATIVE MATCHES: Eaaex 20. 
Putflc School Wandararo B; Oxford Unfva reO y 
12, Combined London OB 20. 

SCHOOLS: oaicenhead 14. wwrea OS ft 
Bishop Vesa/s 38, North Leamington ft 
Steam 9, Emanuel 13; Gunerabury 1ft St 
BanedWa, Eaton 22; Km Edwd 1ft 
HlmXngnam 02, Ktog Edward vL Camp MB 3; 
St John's. Southaea 58. Bey House ft 
WymoNdtem 26, NORCAT ft 

SNOOKER 

BRISTOL: Tody CoHmU CngfUfi cfiamptot- 
■No: Thkd round: T Knowles M R Bates 9-4; M 
HMW bt O Chalmers fl-t: J Soancer M P 
Houtthan 9-5. Fourth round: J Vkgo loads J 
Pwrott 54: W Thame leads 0 Reynolds 5-3; S 
Oevts leads 0 Martin 7-1; T Mao laeda M 
WBdmma/i 5-3. 


SOFTBALL 

AUCKLAND: Woman's wortd champfcmaMp: 
Chinese Taipei 2. Puerto Rico l; Italy ft 
zmotima t: USA Z Australia t; China 5. 
Japan 1; New Zeeland 1. Canada ft 
Netherlands 7, Indonesia 1; Puerto Rico 1. 
Canada 0. Standlna; New Zaatand iflpts, 
USA IB. China 14. ^rmda 1ft Austreto 10, 
Puerto RMo 1ft Chinese TolpeiB, J*pmn 6. My 
ft Netherlands 4, Indonesia 2. Zhnoalme ft 


aroUt lotinMH 
Mrican unless 
HBMoccNfift 
Brtdete 137: I 
a. 7ft 141: W 
89. 73. 143: B 





LOS ANCELES: ExNUtton MeHlNec I Lend 
(Cz) M Y Noah (Frt 6-4, 93. Weroerc Q Se&eOM 
(Arg) M A White (U^. 63 7-6. 


ICE HOCKEY 

NORTH AMERICA: Na tio na l Lertpw (NHL* 
Buffalo Sahras ft Winnipeg Jots i New Yom 
Rangers 4, Toronto Maple Leafs Z pat ron Re d 
. Wtegs ft Boston Brutes 5 (ovarttifek Mmwmri 
Conaolens 3. Chicago Stack Hawks 3 


Prague *8. 

UNITED STATES: NaMona! A aaoctaUu n (MBAb 
Adarea Hawks 131 . Ookion Su*e Wsrnars 10ft 
Cntfort PBflSfte 107. Covelend Ca.-etars 104; 1 
FnaedeWua TSero 118. Phoenix Sof 111; 
Boston Co»C3 110. Los Arndes Lakers 3ft 
Los Angate* Cfaopen i3t. Dal as Maeancka 
118: Denver Nuggets 137, New Jersey Nats 

IS L ip anfl NATIONAL LEAGUE: Rret 
Eater BradUMH PVotoa 103 
102 
98 
105 
liars 



nden 

rtsmotflh t23 


topEAN CUM; (Mao) Final graop: 
ISllL Umoges (Frt 188: 3 


US&Ht aa. no* mh<o o< . 

AN CUR (Women) OoarteMteai 
Stads RsflCaa VanaBes 75. agon 


tawtanot PlttsOurgh Pengdit* 7. Edmonton . 
Oflers 4; Calgary Ftemes ft New Jersey Darts 


SNOW REPORTS 


Chamo nix 
Counftsvari 
Fide 
Las Arts 

Lea Manukas 

MOrtMl 

SWITZERLAND 

Adebodan 

Champarv 

Laysln 

Grans Montana 
SaasJFea 
St Moritz 
Vertier 
iZarmon 


SQUASH RACKETS 

Young players 
flourishing 
even in failure 

By Colin McQuillan 
In yesterday's semi-finals of ihe 
Blue Stratos British under-23 Open 
championships, at Marlow, two 
English losers, LisaOpic and Robert j 
Owen, flourished even in failure as 
they broke free from their respective 
negative altitudes. 

Miss Opic. once by Car the 
paramount English player, has 
struggled for two years. 10 escape the 
distracting grip of her personal ogre. 
She lost what had become a crucial 
encounter 8-10 to 2-9, 1-9 to Lucy 
Soulier, the 18 years old national 
champion, but resisted temptation 
to berate tire rest of the world. 

Owen was once as promising on 
the junior front as Miss Sautter, but 
for years spent his best competitive 
efforts against a succession of 
referees and. in consequence, 
against himselC Yesterday he faced 
ihe wonderfully skilled Rodney 
Martin, of Australia in a match of 
supreme quality and humour. 

The 20 year-old Warwickshire 
player lost 9-4. 5-9. 9-6. 4-9. 4-9 to 
Martin, but might have won in 
either of the last two games had he 
maintained his earlier sense of 
adventure in the from court. As if to 
demonstrate a new equanimity. 
Owen even conceded his own drop- 
shot at Match ball when everyone in 
the arena, including John Robinson, 
the referee saw it as clearly above 
ibe tin. 

W omen* » a em l-fl oaL L Scutar (Gtouc) M L 
Opte (Nona) 108. 9-2. 9-1. Men's xer nl - t nrte: 

H Martin (Aus) H R Owen (Warwicks) 4-9. M. 
6-9- 9-4, 9-4. 


KUALA UMPUt Aten Man's CbanttMt- 
OMpK Fourth rotate: (tenor Zunan (Fak b 
Fafchv ai fKimai!) 9-3, 9-1, 9-0: Umar Hfeyai 
rtak b M Danmala (bid) 90. 9-8, 8-9, 0-4; A 
Ntyak (trap b S Mteitem (Mai) 9-6 9-0, 9-0; P 
JJBHJ R ChMrj (Mai) is. 94L 941: Z Abidbi 
(Sort D ion (UaQ 9-0, 9-1. 9-3; a Tay (Sbio) bt 
SI Cfxng (Mat) 4-9. 3-9. 9-1. 9-5. 9-ft- JanteMr 
Khan (Pak) bt L Lou (MaD 04. so, 9-t 
Mlrzaman Oui (Ptet) bi J Ng (Mag 9-7, 9ft, 9ft. 


Ryder Cup 
back to 
Belfry in 
1989 

By Mitchell Platts 
A new four-year . agreement 
between BdTs Scotch and the 
Professional Golfers’ Association, 
wonh £600,000 in total, win include 
talcing the Ryder Cup back to The 
Belfry in 1989. The sponsorship not 
only coven .the next two Ryder 
Cups but it will also take in the PGA 
Cup matches at KnowQwood, Lake 
Forest, Illinois, from September 17 
to 19 this year and at the GTencaglcs 
Hotel from July 20 to 22 in 1988. 

Europe won the Ryder Cup at 
The Belfry last September when the 
United Stales lost the biennial 
match for the first time since L9S7. 

Tony Jacklw, the winning captain 
who has already been reappointed 
for the nest Ryder Cup at the Jack 
Nicklaus M airfield Village course in 
Colombia, Ohio, from September 
25 to 27, said: “I am delighted about 
Bell’s continuing sponsorship and 
ibe return to The Belfry. 

“I might not still be the captain in 
1989 but I believe that The Bdfiy is 
the best venue available in our 
country for (he match. 

“My main concern, of course, is 
to defend successfully the Ryder 
Cup in 1987. I have never been to 
M airfield Village so I will be going 
there prim- to the match in order to 
have an in depth look at the course. 
There is little doubt that the greens 
will be prepared to putt e x t r e m ely 
fast - probably faster than most of 
our players have ever encountered. 

“As far as the make-up of the 
ream is oonqgmed I would be 
reluctant to go straight down the 
Order of Merit or accept anything 
less tha n last time when I selected 
three of the 12 players. I accept that 
this puts more pressure on me, and 
causes the inevitable flack, but if it 
gets the job done; as it did last time, 
then it cannot be too far wrong.” 

Colin Snape, the executive 
director of the PGA, said the they 
will be monitoring the success of the 
Ryder Cup next year with a view to 
iheir own crowd arrangements for 
the 1989 match on September 15- 
17. 

“The Americans intend to maire a 
limit of 2 1,000 spectators each day.” 
Snape explained. “We believe that 
we could get 40,000 each day at the 
Belfry so we must ensure that we set 
a fair price and get the facilities spot 
on so that we give the spectators full 
value for money." The Ryder Cup 
fluid, which was showing a £90,000 
deficit, now has a £50,000 surplus, 
following the success last September. 

Lyle with 
early 
leaders 

From John BaDantine 
Phoenix, Arizona 

Sandy Lyle, the Open champion, 
playing in the third and last 
tournament of his short early trip to 
America, won the Pro-Am here with 
a 65 and continued his fine form in 
the first round of the Phoenix Open 
by joining the early leaders with 
three birdies in his first nine holes. 

The Scot returns home to 
Sunningdale this weekend to attend 
and celebrate the birth of a second 
child to his wile, Christine. He has 
made a first-rate start to the year, 
and with $21,000 from the first two 
tournaments, he stands 18th on the 
current money list. 

On Wednesday he. added a 
modest $675 to this after sharing the 
Pro-Am top place with Bill GUsson, 
of Fresno. Jack Nicklaus, who says 
that he is striving to cure a life-time 
habit of lifting his head on the 
greens, had a 76. 

Yesterday on another glorious 
Western morning, with the tempera- 
ture quickly reaching 70 degrees, 
and with an enormous first-day 
crowd thrilling to the sight of the 
great Nicklaus returning to the field 
22 years after winning the tide, Lyle 
kept the accelerator of his formid- 
able juggernaut of a power game 
hard down. 

He all but started with an eagle at 
the long first, hitting a drive that 
went out of sight in the blue sky like 
a departing aircraft before smashing 
a three-iron into the centre of the 
green. His eagle attempt from about 
eight yards slipped a fraction by. 

Another drive of quite indecent 
length left him on the fringe at the 
fifth, and a chip to four feet gave 
him a second birdie. At the long 
seventh he gave himself little chance 
by pulling his drive into a grove of 
wild orange trees, the fruit of which 
is said hereabouts to be the world’s 
finest and most immediate laxative. 

A low iron 80 yards short of the 
green was followed by a poor pitch 
10 yards short. He nit a bold pun 
four feet past, but holed the return 
without a tremor. 

He missed the green sightly ax the 
short eighth, but chipped dead and 
got this third birdie at the ninth. 
Another huge drive put him 30 
yards ahead of his partners Bill 
Kratzert and Rex Caldwell, and his 
pitch to six feet gave him a chance 
which he gobbled up eagerly. 

MONEY WINNERS: 1, D Hammond SlOftOOO: 
z C Potto S91.2S4; 3. J Cook S84.B00; 4. M 
O’Meara SS&S70: 5. H Sutton 347.987; ft J 
Mudd 540.80ft 7. P Btackmar 539.790: 8. B 
Larger (WO) 53830ft 18, S Lyto (OB) S21.1 00. 


• --fe v 

• ^ \ 

• - - 


Ferguson: tite Scot who will not give anything away 

Key to possessing 
the world lies in 
possession game 


The belated realization by Charlie 
Nicholas that there Is more to being 
a celebrated footballer than collect- 
ing the money may help to make him 
a decisive fig ur e in the World Cop 
finals. Alex Ferguson, the Scotland 
manager, was at Villa Park on 
Wednesday to see Nicholas demon- 
strate the fana gh HoB end flair in 
AraenaTs Milk Cup draw which 
might have earned him a place in 
next Tuesday’s friendly against 
Israel in Tel Aviv. 

Nicholas is one of the few players 
in tfae game today whom, like Cooke 
or Jimmy Johnstone or Baxter of 
days gone by, it is worth watching 
irrespective of the teams involved. 
The cup.replay will rob Ferguson of 
the chance further to assess 
Nicholas 'in the choice of six- from 
nine which he most make among 
forwards for his final World Cop 
squid. With Cooiper, of Rangers, the 
one genuine winger, the choice Is in 
effect five from eight: Archibald, 
Dalglish, Mo Johnston (Celtic), 
McAtenitie, Nicholas, Sharp* 
Speedie arid' Stmrock, assuming 
Dalglish, who is one short of 100 
caps, wfents to be Included. 

I have got three matches, against 
Israel, Romania and England, in 
which to pranethe options.” Fergu- 
son said. “Ball control is an 
essential factor, not giving it away in 
Mexico’s difficult hot and altitude. 
t think ( already know my 
preferences but l am keeping an 
open mind”. 

Ferguson, pitched into the job by 
the sodden death of Jock Stein, has 
not - yet derided which - tactical 
system be will use In the formidable 
first round group with West 
Germany, Uruguay and Denmark, 
la their ' but 10 matches Scotland 
have used a winger, yet Ferguson 
concedes that this may. not be 
suitable in Mexico. He is keeping 
half an eye on Nevin at Cbetoea. 

Dalglish and Archibald present 
two of fie many complexities which 
confront hint. The form of Walsh - 
now a regular 'goal-scorer whom 
Bobby Robson can hardly unUmfe 
to ignore - and ‘Rash for Liverpool 
my oblige Dalglish, ’Scetinnd’s most 
lassledgeagle' player and ideally 
suited to Mexico, to leave himself 
permanently oa the bench, which 
must restrict his capacity to help 
Ferguson. Archibald Is regularly 
unavailable. 

A man with the game 
at his fingertips 

*T have talked to Archibald about 
the situation”, Ferguson says. 
“Speedie, Sharp and McAvennie are 
scoring consistently for their clubs 
in English football but Archibald, is 
playing regularly against man-fore- 
man marking in Spain with a slow 
bnfld^iip and be should have at his 
fingertips the kind of football we 
shall encounter in Mexico”. 

- . Ferguson fat conscious that raan- 
for-man marking, and perhaps even 
the scoring of a single extra goal, 
may be critical factors la advancing 
l to the second round. “Germany may 
be stuttering a bit at present, having 
tost to Portugal" be says, “bat past 
performances show that they will be 
dmable, mechanical and efficient 
and win probably reach the later 
stages. 

“Everyone wanted to avoid 
Denmark but orach depends on how 
they react to the circumstances of 
the World Cup. Elkjter and 
Landrap have played wefi in Italy. 
Uruguay, as we saw in their friendly 
with France, will probably be more 
than agressive. They can defend all 
day, they won’t concede much and 
they won the Sooth American Cup. 
Bat (hey won’t score many.” 

TABLE TENNIS 


Milk Cup regulation 
relaxed to give 
the cream to Robson 

By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent | 


One of Ferguson’s mala concerns 
is that Scotland, after the turmoils 
experienced In Argentina to 1978 by 
Ally MacLeod, on and off the Geld, 
will, be harshly judged by -both 
Mexican .and . home 'critics for. any 
indiscretion. “We have got to be 
perfect to our behaviour,” he admits. 

The absence of voluble dissenters 
such a Macari, GenmuU' and 
Harper, not to mention MacLeod’s 
own bizzare behaviour,' should make 
it easier thaa to 1978. On the 
arduous -trip to Australia for the 
gnafifying play-off before Christ- 
mas, which coaid have exposed! 
suspect temperaments, there was not 
a stogie problem off the pitch. 

• “Frankly, Australia surprised 
os”, Ferguson says, reflecting on the 
slightly . fortunate goalless draw. 
“After ail that talk of fitness and an 
aggressive attitude, they were just 
dogged. We knew the responsibility 
was on them to come at ns. They 
merely tried to make sure our good 
players dfaf net play and, once we’d 
weathered that, the game rather died 
to the second half. When ■ Scottish 
team are la belied with the tag of 
favourites, as they were to 1978, 
they told net to justify themselves. 
There’s 'more optimism now than 
some people think but, of tonne, we 
have got to raise oar game.” 

A man tom between 
dub and country 

Following Stefa b a difficult act 
Yet Fergnsota feels he has been 
helped by the modesty of the most 
famous personality in the history of 
management hi Scotland. “He never 
spoke of hb own success”, Ferguson 
says, “ami the ordinariness of hb 
fife style made it a pleasure to work 
as his assistant. He set standards 
for ns alL Hb | national] team 
qualified for two finals and that’s an 
achievement for a nation of only five 
million, however much the public 
may talk of whining ..the World 
Cup.” 

Ferguson’s position as national 
manager, he admits, b complicated 
by hb duties with Aberdeen, quite 
apart from the lack of regular 
contact with .the, national squad. 
“People may suppose that 1 will 
have favourites. Strachan, for 
example, b an *oM boy* from 
Aberdeen. But I picked the team for 
Scotland .first aiul Alex Ferguson 
second. It embarrasses me fearing 
people ont, such as Hansen, when I 
don’t have the time to build a 
re lation s hip , when the players don’t 
know me and it’s all *heBo’ and 
’cheerio’. 

“Maybe well be able to achieve 
that relationship to the period when 
we're preparfag to New Mexico 
before the cop, when well be just 
dawn the -road, from Northern 
Ireland and can -perhaps help each 
other a Wt" 

There is some reassurance in that 
Scotland have conceded only one 
goal ■ in their last six matches. 
Defence is their strength, with 
Ferguson's own central defenders. 
McLeisfa and . Miller, haring played 
together for six years. Yet the rub b 
that, in hb own winds, “possession 
b going to be rital”, and Hansen is a 
player who does not give the ball 
away. 

Maybe Fergnsou will use a 
sweeper, as he did against East 
Germany recently. Souness and Bett 
are possession players to midfield: 
Gough, of Dundee United, provides 
useful alternatives at full back and 
centre-back; Malpas is outstanding 
at left back; and Leighton b possibly 
the most reliable Scottish goal- 
keeper since Bill Brown 24 years 


The Football League bent their 
rules fora patriotic cause yesterday. 
By agreeing to postpone the Milk 
Clip quarter-final replay between 
Aston ViHa and ArsenaL they 
released the six international squad 


inside it- Originally »riigrfiife<t for 
next Wednesday, it will now be 
staged at Highbiuy on February 4. 

Jack Dunnett. the League presi- 
dent, and Graham Kelly, the 
secretary, relaxed the regulation 
which stipulates that Milk Cup 
replays must be held in the first 
available week: Anderson, Hodge, 
Stewart Robson, Sansom and 
Woodcock axe therefore available 
for England, who meet Egypt on 
Wednesday, and Nicholas for 
Scotland, who take on Israel on 
Tuesday. 

Their inclusion is still only 
provisional as both dubs must 
avoid draws in tomorrow’s FA Cup 
ties. Lee Walker, a League 
spokesman, said: “It is World Cup 
year and England's squad would 
have been decimated if the replay 
had gone ahead as planned. AD six 
players may yet be withdrawn but 
we have reduced the gamble for 
Bobby Robson”. 

England's manager, who has lost 
Bryan Robson. Reid and Francis 
through injury, could be without 
Stewart Robson anyway. After the 
I-l draw at Villa Park, Arsenal's 
young midfield player had a 
damaged ankle encased in ice and a 
stitch inserted in a head wound. He 
is considered doubtful for tomor- 
row's borne tie against Rotherham. 

The 1-1 draw in the Milk Cup 
quarter-final at Loftus Road ended 
Dixon's hopes of leading England's 
attack in Cairo. Next Wednesday he 
will be involved in a replay either at 
Stamford Bridge against Queen's 
Park Rangers or. should Chelsea be 
held by Liverpool in the FA Cup 
fourth round on Sunday, at AnfickL 

Dixon, who had one effort 
disallowed, could have settled the 
lie and his own fate in the dosing 
minute but he lifted his attempt 
over an unguarded net, “Chelsea 
pay my wages, so 1 will acept their 
decision.” he said yesterday. “1 will 
not ask them to let me go. It is up to 
them to release me”. 


Call for top 
talks on 


Speedie, Dixon's striking partner. ! 
was allowed by his dub to play for ; 
his country. Scotland, in the World 
Cup play-off against Australia in,; 
November and missed the League j 
fixture at Liverpool. But John 


up the confusion by insisting that 
“whatever happens, there will be no'i 
England for Dixon”. J 

England's other tall centre j 
forward, Hatelcy, is also about to be - 
withdrawn. Unless the power r- 
struggle at AC Milan is resolved * 
today. Bobby Robson will summon -j 
replacements for him and Wilkins. 
Since Davenport is the lone forward : 
on the official stand-by list, he is 
almost certain to be recalled from 1 
Bermuda where he is on tour with •! 
Nottingham Forest -■ 

Bryan Robson, England's captain, : 
is unlikely to be considered even j 
though he completed his first full | 
game for three months on Wednes- 
day njght- After finishing on the i d 
losing side for Manchester United's ] 
reserves, be said that be felt ”a bit;, 
stiff but that is only natural after ; 
such a long lay-off'. > 

“Some people said that I was I 
finished but 1 think that I have \ 
proved them wrong,” he added. “I j 
knew all along that the theory was j 
nonsense. 1 am fit but perhaps not ^ 
match-fit yeL" He and Ron : 
Atkinson, United’s manager, are to 
discuss whether he should play in J 
the FA Cup tie at Sunderland.! 
tomorrow. j 

Woods, of Norwich City, andi 
Beardsley, of Newcastle United, are j 
the only England representatives ; j 
certain to go to Egypt and the name 
of Fenwick can now also be written j 
down in ink. The Rangers captain : 
starts a two- match suspension on I 
Monday and thus misses the Milk j 
Cup replay against Chelsea even if it i 
is delayed until February 5. j 

To add to the complications. [ 
Speedie may have talked his way : 
out of that the tie as welL So often 1 
cautioned for dissent he begins his ; 
second suspension of the season (he ; 
served four last season) on February 
I. the day that Chelsea are to renew ; 
acquaintances with Leicester Gty. ; 

In their first meeting at the end of[j 
August, Speedie was sent off j 


Date switch 
leads to 


structure fire threat 


Philip Carter, the first division 
clubs' spokesman, has asked for a 
meeting with Graham Kelly, 
Football League Secretary, to 
discuss proposals on the game's 
reorganization. The League's man- 
agement committee have pencilled 
in an extraordinary general meeting 
for March 4. but Carter, the Everton 
chairman, feels that is insufficient 
time to put the League dubs* 
proposals into regulations for that 
meeting. 

Kelly sad: “At least we know 
precisely what is required and we 
can go back and discuss it with Mr 
Carter who has asked for a meeting 
-and we*U take from there." 

Carter and Kelly are agreed on a 
number of points, including more 
money from TV. automatic pro- 
motion and relegation from the 
Goto League, a reduction of gale 
levy from 4 per cent to 3 per cent, 
and a reduction in the Milk cup and 
FA Cup pools to 10 percent 

Kelly added: "We are also puffing 
proposals to the dubs to suspend 
the apprenticeship system and bring 
in the two year youth training 
scheme." The League secretary said 
there were a couple of items which 
had not yet been finalized, but 
added: “In the meantime ws will 
talk about the proposals which he 
has been putting forward. At the 
moment there is no compromise but 
we (rill discus it on March 4.” 

• Swansea City’s survival struggle 
took a new turn yesterday when a 
consortium of four ex-directors 
launched their scheme for a 
community-backed football dub. 

• Bournemouth are p r e p ared to 
hand over their Dean Court ground 
in exchange for a joint venture with 
Bounexnoulh Council for a new 
multi-purpose stadium in nearby 
Kings Park. 

• Halifax Town yesterday called 
off a four day visit to Guernsey 
which would have included a match 
against the local football association 
on Saturday. 


Police are investigating threats of I 
anon and violence against Oxford . 
United. They began after Oxford . 
had appealed successfully for the,j 
Full Members’ Cup final between. 
Chelsea and Manchester Gty to be., 
moved from March 1 to March 23 ; 
because Oxford insist on playing-: 
Manchester City in the league on ' 
March 1. i, 

A note wrapped around a brick 
was delivered to the Manor Road J 
ground warning that the club offices j 
would be “burned to the ground”. •< 
Further threats to smash windows at \ 
the dub and of violence at the. 
chairman Robert Maxwell's homei 
were made in Tape-recorded mess- 9 *"-• 
ages left on Oxford’s Ansafone. 

“We have probably upset a great J 
many Chelsea and Manchester City-i 
fans.” Brian Dalton, the dub's., 1 
managing director, said. “However, 
we would not have been doing our . 
best for Oxford United had we' 
accepted the original decision of the 
Football League management^ 
committee to caned our League' 
fixture away to Manchester City on ] 
March 1." ‘ 

Oxford claimed that the decision^ 
beached L eag u e. FA and Full} , 
Members' Cup rules and was taken* 
without consulting them. * 

• Bryan Robson cheered his dub’ * 
and country by playing his first fulTj 
game in three months on Wednes-, 
day. After a Central League oming 1 
at Barnsley he said: “That was just- 
what I needed. I am fix but not so 1 
sure I am match fit yet”. It is- * 
doubtful if he will play for 
Manchester United in the FA Cup 

at Sunderland tomorrow. 

• Coventry City have signed Jim 
Mclnally, aged 21, the Nottingham 1 
Forest utility player, for £80,000.. 
Yesterday he travelled from his 
home town of Glasgow and agreed^ 
subject to a medical examination, to 
sign a four-year contract. He is- 1 
likely to play against Oxford United^ 
tomorrow. 


Still leaves Dartford 


Douglas leads England into final 


pwdr good 2 

pwdr good 0 

t**r good -2 

pwor good -4 

pwdr good -2 

mgr coot! -5 

pndr good -i 

pwdr good 4 


SCOTLAND: CteragunK upper runs: rum 
comp ute , wkteanow cower, now mow on ten 
base; Made ram: runs complete, new anew 
an dm base; tower dopes : runs comp lete, 
mer snow on Brra base; vertical ram 10000: 
Mraada deer, tnton roam dear; snow level 
ajWOft. Ote o et iee: Upper tooc ram oamatow. 
tmtte mow cm. now mow on ton basK 
lowsr stopss: Binpta nursery anas, raw snow 
cn ten base; xertdo ram unOft MB nteda 
Cfear; main roads dear snow Iwte 1.500ft. 
atoms (meteads mm Upper nra runt 
ea u p te te. iw snow: lower teams: ruts 
oorams. tail narrow new snow; vsrScte runs 
ft 500ft M toads dear, mten toads cfesr, 
snow feml 1500ft. Lsofafc Upper runs: runs 
eenttote, Wtfs snow cover, new snow an • 
too in rnfdac nra runs comptets. sMs 
snow cover, nm anew on a ton Imsk towor 
stops* ample nuraary sns. new snow on a 
ton ossa: wtote mm 700a; no roads ctoar; 
mam reads dnr: snow fenrte 


Desmond Douglas helped Eng- 
land to reach the final of the 
Triumph Adler English open table 
tennis championships at Brighton 
yesterday then hit out at the team's 
newest recruit - a psychologist, “He 
will never sus me out,” said Douglas 
after leading his side to an 
unexpected 3-1 victory over Japan. 
And it’s just as well because I don’t 
believe in psychologists anyway. 

Team captain Donald Parker 
explained: “we used a £250 sports 
council grant to pay the expenses to 
a recent training centre and to hear 
of Dr Tony Morris, a senior le c t urer 
in psychology. 

“But be has not discussed 
anything with the players yet. He’s 
just studying them.” 

The En gland team needed no help 
yesterday as they dismissed the 
Japa n ese. Douglas was la spariding 
form, beating top seed for the 
singles tide Yosbihito Miyazaki 21- 
19.21-12. 

The 30-year-old left hander, who 
has em er ged from a disappointing 
season in time to begin the defence 
of his singles title today outplayed 


the Japanese for the third time in a 
week. 

ftlon 

FIRST ROUND (Winning team drag 
Seriteeriaad M Wteea 3-1. Tutor m a Holm 
21-7, 21-15; S Ronald tote to A Griffiths 18-21. 
15-21: Mier and Ronoto bt Heaton and 
. GrtftHM 21-14, 21-13. MBar bt Griffiths 21-11. 
. 21-18: Czechoslovakia bt FUaQd 3-0 France 
bt US 3-1; Canada m Norwa y Scr. W 
Germany bt Danmaift 3-1; Soviet Union bt 
Austria ML SECOND ROUND England bt 
Nattmtanda 3-1. D Douglas bt P Hatton 21-10, 
21-6: C Praan km to H van Sparse 21-11, 21 - 
10; -Praan bt Kakton 21-17, 22-20. England 
w.o. Hungary, eat. Csaebeatovalda bt Ireland 
3-1. M Orman M A Watali 21-12. 21-14; J Braun 
tost to C Sknfci 21-23, 12-21; J Pansky and 
Grman bt Wttaft and 1 Staten 21-10, 21-11; 
Oman bt Staten 21-11, 21-13; Sweden M 
SwftjQitan d 3-0. Japm M Canada 3-1: 
Eaten* hs. Hungary; Soetet UBkra bt 
S ao da nd 3-0. A Mtauioa bt D Hannah 21-10. 
2MB; B Roawtoerg bt J Bren 21-11, 21-18; V 

TT S in in in ■ m h to terfrn Biwi f Hiwkilfhaiili ■% ton 1 1 — , , , - 1 

antiuHVna m a uwumuiniivu oi nvmifl 
told Bros 21-14, 21-17- Yogoetetoa bt West 


QUARTER. FV4AL9: England 

Douglas tx ra Scheeta 2t-l5, 21 - 21 , 21-10; 
Praan bt M Anoarascn 19-21, 21-14. 21-13; 
Douglas and Praan bt von Schools aid 
Andarsaon 21-lB. 21-11, Pnteanrt bt P ran c e 3- 
k A Cooks bt F Fsreut 21-fa, 18-21, 23-20; 3 
Andrew B & Ptetett 21-10. 21-14; Coofei and 
Andraw bt P Btnxteaau and Partem 21-19, 21- 
Ifl. Jajraa bt Czac rtosto uaMa 341. Yaoo te av ia 
bt Serial (Man 3-2. 


SEMI FINALS: England bt Jspwi 3-1: Douglas 
bt Y UyuzaU 21-19. 21-12 Preen tost ot J 
MlyazaM and Nukazuka 21-10. 21-14; Praan be 
Miyazaki 21 - 9 , 21 . 11 . Yugoslavia bt England 
34k I Luputescu bt Andraw 21-14, 21-16; Z 
Pnmoracbt Cooke 22-20. 21 -ftLuputoscu and 
PrVnorac bt Andrew and Cooka 21-19, 21-12. 

BADMINTON 

HftYU: Japan Opart Man' s tente—t Third 
round: & gutter (QB) bt Em Yu (Aus) 15-4, 


round: & gutter (QB) bt Sza Yu (Aus) 15-4, 
16* I Fredertcsen (Eton) bt H rtfWtowiws 
(Japan) 15 - 5 , 15-0: P Pndufam (India) bt M 
toon (Dart 15-0. 150; 8 Bsddteey (OB) bt 
Ptonuras Ando) 15-fl, 15-10; Yana Yang 
tea) W H Arbi (tndo) 15-1Z. 15te; TCartaen 
bt N Yates (QB) 15-7. 5-15. 15-10; (Jam 


Non-League football 
By Panl Newman 

Dartford, who have lurched from 
one crisis to another in recent 
weeks, have suffered a further 
setback with the resignation of John 
Still, their manager. 

Still, who led the Kent dub to 
promotion from the Southern 
League two years ago and took them 
to third place in the Gola League 
Last season, felt he was unable to 
continue in his job after the 
boardroom upheavals and financial 
problems of the last two months. 

Three of his back room staff; 
George Dudley (assistant manager), 
Alan Carrington (coach) and Jimmy 
Paine (physiotherapist), have also 
left. 

Steve Wishart. the former youth 
team m a n ag er , has taken temporary 
control. The dub hope to appoint a 
permanent successor to Still, who 
plans to take a break from the game. 

Dartford's financial problems 
surfaced last month, w^en Brian 
| Alford, the chairman, resigned after 
failing to gain the foil support of his 
fellow directors when be suggested 
! financial cutbacks. However, he 
subsequently withdrew his resig- 
nation, formed a new board of 
directors and told Still to reduce the 
wage bill by 45 per cent. The entire 
first team was made available for 
transfer, although do players have 
yet been sold. 


Dartford have slipped down ihe ■ 
Gola League table in recent months ‘ 
and are now only one place above 
the relegation zone. In Still's Gnat ' 
match in charge last Saturday they 
lost 3-1 at home to South Bank 
(Drybroughs Northern League) in 
the second round of the FA Trophy. 

• Howard Kennedy has resigned 
as manager of Slough Town 
(Vauxhall Opel League) because of 
work commitments outside the 
game. Alan Davies, his assistant, 
has taken over until Ihe end of the 
season. Slough have also lost their . 
long-serving forward Mick Kiely, 
who has joined Hendon. 

• South Liverpool’s ailing finances 
have been helped by the sale of 
Peter BiHinge, a defender, to’. 
Everton for “a substantial four-fig- 
ure fee". The Multi-Part tragi 
dub, who also launched the' 
Football League careers of Jimmy' 
Case and John Aldridge, will receive, 
a further sum if Billinge makes ten 
first team appearances and a 
perccmate of any future transfer. 

• Peter Freenan is managing his. 
third Drybroughs Northern League . 
club in little more than three 
months. After his dismissal by Biylh 
Spartans in October, Feenan moved 
to Ryfaope CA but he has now 
joined Gretna. 

• Gerry Gow, the player-manager 
of Yeovil Town (Vauxhall Opel . 
League) has been given a new 16- 
monlh contract. 


tang (Indo) bt II Sktak (MaD 15-1% 15-11; 
Sugiarto (lndrt bt Xu Btao (Ch) 8 - 16 . 13-8. 
152. Quarter-finals: Fraaartaan bt Butter 
15-6, ib- 6; Ftedufcm bt Baddeter 152. 152: 
Yang Yang bt Oarteao 15-3, 15-1£ Sugtanobc 

I Cfim Muf ( 


WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS 


Larson (Dan) bt K 
Steng Ytel (cw u 


11-4,11 . 
11-fl, 11-0; H 
11-7. 11-2: K 

. .11-8,11-7; 

Zhang Ytel (Qt) (*□ Lerteoratak. fted) 11-8. 

C Mrauisn (Sew) bt K Jbmte (Jeti) 
M 1 ; 11-6; HIM /tort (Oft WE Uftrf 

O"»»te«oaito O Ungwte bt 
Kfada Uapl 11 - 4 , n-7: wu Jtonqb 1 

”“*■ 2-1 *. 11-4; Larsen bt Zhang YuS 11-7. | 

11 .-^tianA totogbtMaoramon11-3.11-1. 


M0LK CUR: Fifth round: Aston Vila 1 ■ Arsenal 
I 1; Oxford 3, Portsmouth 1: Queen's Park 
1. Chelsea 1. 

rnouni ROVER TROPHY!: nort h e rn — el fwt 
Chester D, Wigan Z Soatham section: Derby 

0, GWnghamaWohwt hau ipt u i 1 , Torquay 1 . 
CSfTRAL LEAGUE: Fltst dtteelon: Barnsley Z 
Manchester United i; BteddMm v Leicester, 
postpone* NeMCaMe 2. Liverpool 2; 
Nofttegfam Forest 1, Leeds Z Sheffield United 

1. West a o m wteh 2* Second dhnefan; 
Doncaster 2, Preston aj Grimsby Z ScunOwpe 
1. 

FOOTBALL COMBMATtOf): UBenl 6. Crystal 
Pteace 1 . Pactponad: Brighton v West Ham. 
IRISH LEAGUE: OuSSdtoS 4. Otstteery 1. 
VAUXHALL -OPEL LEAOUE: Second dMetoo 


aetittE Postponed: PeteratteM » C anto ertoy . 
RBTT SEMOR CU>!: Second round: Wemng % 
FtaherO. 

SOUTHERN L£AQU& Wdtand dMetonT 
Leicester United 0, US Rugby 1 . ** 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
FIR8T DIVISION: Katefe 8, Wittes 15. 

SftCONO DtVtStOtb Borrow 48, Wort tortm 

1 8; Roehdals Hornets 24, S&efflakl Eagles 4>^ < 
RUGBY UNION .1 

CLUB HATCHES: AberHwy v PwtertlL; 

fiSSSSh. lKBE ^ 0— 

HOSPITALS cup: Flat ram* Kite's Cetera' 
ft . St Banhotauwa'a 13; StGaorga’a 0, London 


- i i 







d to 

Mo 


!Wi 


TS riTT 


!> !); 


for new sponsor 


By Keith Macldin 


Hie Rugby League is looking for 
new . sponsor'- after yesterday’s 
unexpected announcement that 
Matthew . Brown Brewery, of 
Blackburn, the. makers of Slalom 


we wish the game and our many 
friends in it a successful future”. 

Rugby League officials took the 
announcement on the chin, and Joe 
Seddon, the chairman of the League, 


1 1 Ph » T « • • i > l uw»> — ■ -5-TT* > v FTM » r t »i .1 1 » «.-* J 


die championship and premiership 
this The sponsorship, which 
has produced £500,000 in box years 
will end in May after the 
premiership final, However, there is 
a small consolation for the League: 
The brewery win spon sor- the 
reserve . team 1 competition, the 
Rugby League Alliance, for £1 5,000, 
spread over three years. 

The news . surprised people 
through out the ga m e since only a 
handful of officials were aware that 
Matthew. .Brown, who recently 
fought oft* a bitterly contested 
takeover freon Scottish & New- 
castle, .were contemplating pulling 
out. Miles' Eastwood^, the sales and 
marketing director of the brewery, 
said: “We~bave had six years of a 
marvellous sponsorship which has 
been, and indeed still is, extremely 
successful. 

“The brand name of Slalom lager 
has become widely known, and we 
have made. many friends in Rygby 
League!, bat following the successful 
conclusion of our takeover bartie, 
we fed~il is- now time -to change 
direction and spread . oulselves 
nationally m our marketing. We 
believe that Rugby League, with its 
wholesome family appeal, serves as 
a model for' many other sports, and 


HOCKEY 


Goodwin is 


ever sponsors of the championship 
and premiership and it has proved 
to be a - highly successful and 
imaginative operation of great 
benefit to both the League and the 
company- We fully appreciate their 
reasons for not taking up a' third 
three-year contract, and their 
current - need to seek alternative 
a teas, of promotional . mvpstmen l 
“H owever, the principle of 
sponsorship of the nine months long 
League and Premiership campaign 
is now well established and we look 
forward to welcoming soon a new 
name". During this final season 
Slalom lager will put £95,000 .into 
the game. ' with £30.000 bd 
handed over in prize money to ti 
winners, and die remainder ba 
invested to meet-the cost of gran 
safety measures. 

• Lea Huckfidd. the Eero MP fo 
Merseyside East, whose constitu 
ency includes Wigan, has written to 
Richard Tracey,- Minister of 

warning him of effects far c 

Wigan which may -come from 
Wigan's signing of the South 
Africans. Ray Mordt and Ro 
Louw. Mr Hnckfield says M 
and Louw came to England bee 
of the successful effect of inter 
national sporting bans 




Ui iTT 


for Allen 

By Joyce Whitehead 

There is one change in the 
women’s England B squad selected 
earlier tins month from which the 
last five players of the En gland 
senior pasty will be chosen in 
February. . Mary .Allen (Warwick- 
shire) has withdrawn and her -place 


fmMmm 


SBiiM 






in 









Bullets pull 
out of 
Masters 

By Nicholas Harling 

Birmingham Bullets; whose 
coach. Art Ross, is appealing against 
a two-match ban, face further 
disciplinary action from the English 
Basket Ball Association after their 
withdrawal from. the British Masters 
Tournament- at the quarter-final 
stage. . - 

Birmingham have written to the 
EBBA secretary, Mel Welch, to tell ! 
him of • their decision, which 
amounts. to' a protest at the way the i 
toumamenr is being run. What has 
upset the .Midlands chib is that 
Rhondda, the Welsh dub, have 
been given a bye. as? far as the 
quarter-finals, having been beaten 
oy Birmingham in' the qualifying 
group. 

“We find this an incredible 
decision." Bemie Gallagher, the 
Birmingham director, said. “We 
finish top of a group, yet a team 
which finishes below us godcs 
through with a bye." All the 
Carisbtrg National League teams 
were told they were obliged to enter 
the Masters event, even though, in 
their eyes, it is inconsequential 

“We considered pulling out 
before but now we have written to 
the EBBA saying we will not have 
any participation in . the Bririth 
Masters from now on," Gallagher 
said. It has cost us £1.500 to go 
through the qualifying rounds and if 
we reach the final stages it win cost 
- us another £7.500. The competition 
has got no credibility, no television 
arid ho prize money. We struggled 
to gel 400 people here for a local 
derby with' Sandwell then we had 
the expenses of getting to Wales to 
play Rhondda and Swindon.” 
Gallagher says that Birmingham 
would have had to keep on their two 
American players until April had 
they reached the final stages. 

Welsh said: “The National 
T management committee will 
have to consider what action to 
take." 


BOBSLEIGHING 


Phipps’s fastest time 

From Chris Moore, Igjs 

One of the impressive monopolies whether he can compete in today's 
looks like being maintained in this final practice, 
neekeod's European bobsleigh Detief Richter was fastest on both 

'Championships four man events yesterday's two taufs to clinch his 
here. Between then the Swiss and place in the East German team 
the East Germans have won 20 of alongside Wolfgang Hoppe and 
the last 21 medals at stake In Bernhard Lehmana- But PtcMerand 
European finer man ampetitiea Ins Swiss team mates Hans 
since 1978. HUiebrand and Erich Scharer have 

< The Austrians on their own track been hot on their heels, 
here, had held high hopes of at least Britain’s Nick Phipps and his 
P^hMtkfinnelliB«eekaiiL Allied Steel crew of Bob Thome, 
But ft to be seen whether Keith Tower and Alan Cearns 

their top- driver, Peter Kienast, is docked his fastest ever start time in 
able to race tomorrow after an practice of 5-34 seconds on his final 
■afortmnte mash in practice. A run yesterday and finished with the 
doctor will decide this .morning ninth best time of 54-34sec- 


IN BRIEF 

Bond evens the score 


. Perth, (Reuter) - Australia's main 
; candidate to defend yachting's 
. premier trophy, the Amenta’s Cup. 
: have raced together for ibe first 
time. Tbe unofficial two race series 
.pitied’ the syndicate of multi- 
millionaire - Alan Bond, the cup 
holder, against the Taskforce '87 
j syndicate of another tycoon, Kevin 
Parry, 

In . tho first race on the 24- 
nautical-mile America's Cup course 
off Path on January. 21, Taskforce's 
. Kookaburra I stormed home 43 
. seconds ahead of. Bond’s cup-win- 
ning Australia H, with Kookaburra 
j ir 20 . seconds ahead of Bond's 
. Australia HL Bat in yesterday's 
second race Australia III won by 
two minutes. - • 

OLYMPIC GAMES: A Soviet 
. member of tbe International 
- Olympic committee indicated yes- 
terday that the Soviets plan to send 
. a team to South Korea for the 1988 
summer Olympic games in Seoul 
even though they would have 
preferred a differ ent venue. 

Konstantin Andrianov, answer- 
ing questions from readers in the 
newspaper Soveitskaya Jtassiya, 
■stopped short of saying outright that 
a Soviet team would compete. 
SKIING: Britain’s Martin Bell aged 
21, who has shown outstanding 

fbnn on tbe Worid Cup’ ski ctrant 


this season has now bettered his 
warring position. Bell came tenth in 
the World Cup downhill in Val 
Gardena on Dec 14 and was only 
1.8 seconds behind the over- 
all winner Peter W im s b e i ger, of 
Austria. 

He was seeded No 80 and has 
now improved his position to 30 on 
the second seed list. 

• Mtsftve. (Reuter) - Heavy 
snow falls yesterday farad .World 
Cup Alpine siding officials to re- 
arrange their Meg£ve programme, 
switching a women's . super-giant 
slalom scheduled for tomorrow to 
Sunday and postponing today’s 
downhill until tomorrow, 

- Coach Georg Znfcnitzer said the 
downhill should be tbe priority and 
that tbe slalom should make way for 
it if necessary. 

CYCLING: " Robert Millar,, who 
vowed he would never again , ride 
tiie Tour of Spain after home riders 
ganged up to deny him victory last 
year. wtD finally be going back for 
revenge. 

fa Paris (AFP) - A record entry of 
200 riders: iir 20' teams of ten, trill 
be at the start of this yearis 4,100km 
Tour de Fiance cycling race, from 
July 4 to 27. The entry, is 20 riders 
(or two teams) tip on last year. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


,k‘ K "*^4i7-Mirtm««t« | S • • 
'-LviTMiddritlw 
* Bronfiard v Doncaster (7.45) 


Scunthorpe v Southend < 
StoekpertvPrwston " • 

OTHER SPORT 

ATHLETICS Part Aswram* Ntoenal Moor 


vTramw* 


SQUASH RACKETS: BUI Strata British USS. 

Opon (Oasis Oub, mrtori-: 


Tophams 




RACING: PIPE AND PITMAN LOOK BOOKED FOR DOUBLES AT WINCANTON 




tcitake 

command 

: • : ‘By Mandarin . 

>_ XMicbael Phillips) 

There. ts no more open race 
today ■'■than - ihe grade two 
Rossington^ Main. -Novices. 
Hurdle: 1 at ; Doncaster,, which 
with. £6,-250 added to the stakes 
h as-attracted a field to match 
the bait.- 1 believe that - at least' 
nine. <pf:.thc 15 runners are jn 
with a 1 chance, but none more so 
than Tophams Taverns, whose 
form overall has the solid look.' 

Beginning at Market Rasen 
on the first day of the season, 
Topham’s Taverns won races 
confined to novices.. . before, 
graduating into handicap ^com- 
pany. In -this .lie has run well ' 
against ; tfte likes of Cbirysaor 
and -Taelos, who- recently ran 
with Credit in the Irish Sweeps 
Hurdle at Leopard stown. ' 

Tophams Taverns also per- 
form ediadequaiely eriough-for a 
comparative beginner • m' the 
Fighting Fifth Hurdle at t'Jew- 
castle in. November to suggest' 
thatf-he can hold his own -in ' 
today's race.. which his trainer, 
George Moore, sees as ah ideal 1 
stepping-stone , en route ' to 
Cheltenham, and a crack at the 
Waterford Crystal Supreme 
Novices Hurdle. 

Nevertheless, tough oppo- 
sition can be expected from 
Honeygrove Banker, Rule of the 
Sea, Dan the Millar, II Castag- 
no. Yank Brown. Inset Lady, 
and Mrs Muck. Monica Dickin- 
son has set a poser by deciding 
to run both Dan the Miliar and 
Yank Brown. 1 just prefer the 
latter. 

My feeling, however, is that 
Donald ■ McCain's unbeaten 
five-year • old. Honeygrove 




1 * 5 ?? ’*^ * 


Cybrandian,Peter Easterby’s Gold Cup hope, is back in action at Doncaster today after a 14 months lay-off. 


Banker, :coukf turn out to.be a 
greater -threat ;io £' Tophams 
T a verns fol lowing those ■ em- 
-phastic victories; at Uttoxeier 
arid Haydock. - ' . ' i - _• 

■>. Rule of the Sea;who' has won 
'his last, tfujee- raeps, also comes 
into, .the reckoning/ biit T fancy - 
that David Hodgson believes 
that he can at least beat Rule of 
the Sea with II Caslagno. who 
landed quite a gamble in good 
style at Canerick last Saturday 
when, on his racecourse debut, 
he won by five lengths having 
been backed down to 7-1 from 
25-1 to do so. Hodgson 
certainly has a line on Rule of 
the Sea through II Castagno's 
galloping companion. Chance 
in a Million, who was runner-up 
to Rule of the Sea at Newcastle. 

1 find it interesting that 
Hodgson has dropped II Cas- 
tagno in at the deep end. instead ' 


of opting for an easier touch in 
the first race at Ayr. 

Inset Lady, 12 lengths winner 
at Kempton in November, and 
the recent easy Cheltenham 
scorer Mrs Muck, are others to 
bear in mind but on balance I 
still prefer Tophams Taverns. 

After .14 months' absence 
caused by leg injury, Cybran- 
dian makes his belated seasonal 
debut in the Bamby Moor 
Handicap Chase. Good horse 
that Peter Easterby's eight-year- 
old is when' he is on song, he 
will excel if he gives 321b to 
Graham Bradley's mount. 
Premier Charlie, who did well 
to beat Bright Oasis and 
Burranpour over today's course 
and distance at Utloxeter in 
December. At Wincanton it 
should pay to follow those in- 
form trainers Jenny Pitman and 
Martin Pipe again. Macoliver, 


who won by 15 Lengths on his 
previous visit to the pop ular 
Somerset course, can instigate a 
double for Mrs Pitman by 
winning the Racing in Wessex 
Handicap Chase at the expense 
of Royscar, a double to be 
completed half an hour later by 
I'm a Dealer in the Potters 
Novices' Handicap Hurdle. My 
selection has run well twice 
already this month, initiallv 
behind Pike's Peak at Chelten- 
ham, and then again behind 
Tickite Boo at Ascol 

Pipe saddles two fancied 
runners - Honey man and 
Ninattash for the Sculptors 
Hurdle, but I believe his best 
chance of getting among the 
money today rests with Silver 
Aee (2.13) and Rainbow Lady 
(2.45). 

] expect the finish of the 
Sculptors Hurdle to be domi- 


nated by Fort Rupert, a recent 
winner over the course and 
distance whose form got a 
timely boost at Huntingdon 
yesterday when Kjtto was 
successful again, and Wide Boy. 
On the Flat. Wide Boy was the 
sharper, and that could still be 
the case. He certainly did 
nolhing wrong when he won his 
only hurdle race at Newbury in 
the autumn. 

Today's nap is entrusted to 
the recent course and distance 
winner The County Stone, who 
should be able to win the 
Craftsman Handicap Chase 
even with a penalty. Before 
beating Bickleigh Bridge by six 
lengths, here 15 days ago. "The 
County Stone had run really 
well at Cheltenham when 
runner-up to Rveman. who has 
won again twice in the mean- 
time. 


SPORT 


Versatile 
Canio 
graduates 
in style 

Canio. a fluent scorer on the Flat 
and over hurdles in the past, 
graduated to success over the bigger 
jumps with a smooth ten lengths 
victory over Van ter Boy m the 
Baron Blakeney novices chase at 
Wincanton yesterday. 

Only five of the 15 starters 
completed the course and tc biggest 
threat to Canio came at the sixth 
from home, where the leader 
Torsidc fell in front of Canio and 
brought him virtually to a stop. Bui 
Canio is a very dever and athletic 
jumper and skilfully kept himself 
out of trouble. 

The winning owner. David 
Ladhams. said. “Canio has taken to 
fences like a duck to water, but if he 
goes back to Cheltenham in March 
it will be for the Coral Golden 
Hurdle which he won two years ago 

General Option, a 33-1 chance in 
the Fresh Start Novices" Hurdle, lnsi 
his rider at the second flight, did a 
circuit with the rest of the runners 
until the final bend, which he 
completely failed to negotiate He 
cleared the perimeter hawthorn 
hedge, landed ten feci lower on the 
road, and the next report came from 
the village ofCorfe. two miles awav. 
when an old lady rang the police to 
report a loose racehorse. General 
Option was eventually returned 
safely to the stable unscathed. 

The race wasmwon by Into Song 
who was sent straight into the lead 
from the start by John White m 
make u a true lest of stamina. These 
tactics reduced it to a two-horse race 
threequarter* of a mile from home, 
and although Into Song was joined 
by the favourite. Cannes Clown at 
the second last, she had the resenes 
to pull away again and win by four 
lengths. 

Henderson, who trains Into Song 
for his sister-in-law. .lane Sloan, 
said: “Into Song galloped and jumps 
and was getting a hn of weight from 
the favourite. She's always shown us 
enough to suggest that she could u in 
a race, and will eventually he 
retained for breeding". 



Yesterday's results 
Huntingdon Taunton 

1X45 f2m 41 cfitl. ECHO SOUNDER <H Da was. OoMg; soft 
15^1. 2. Troop tt» Colour (P Scudamore. 8-1 j: 150 (2m if taflat 1 INTO 
3. Swift Retort (S Snerwood. 25-1) ALSO 2. Cewkw Clown (P y 
RAN. 7-4 fey Mantles Key (D. 8 Repent 10 IfetaNo |G Charles -Joni 
Atekl (5tm 12 Verona Magic (pu). 25 John 7-2 Ton (4th) 14 9rigad 
WeUum 4th). JofliHa s Double (0. Nemo Kybc Gin tStni. 25 Kmgsrofl Lain 
(6th). My Name Is Nobody (f). li ran NR Devils Pay (pu). Genera) < 
Rows Boy 71 2^ is. ho. T Forster u 0tM N tarty A Man Top 
wamaoe TOTE £2.40: £1 80. £1 10. £3.20 Flying Frea (11 Mbs Bath 
■OF £4 bo CSF nr 20 Straight Member 41 is. II 

. 115 (2ni4t Mail. WOOOGATE )H Davtes. * 40 

-5-4 lari' 21 Attfld (S Smti 'Ecdaa. il-2j. 3. Aldo ^*310 CSF £8 89 
Kmfl (P Double. B-U ALSO RAN- 6 Donna 2h(2m If hdte] 1.TURUU 
Fanoa (4th). 10 Royal Insight. 1 1 WUwl Uncle 1). 2 Gwtai Entwprlser 
{5(h). 12 Forever Smguw (pul. The Capo (J Frost 9-2] ALSO 
FwrfgHa. 1« Aims (toh|. 20 Wtfmer Sends. 25 Caltomen UnK. 4 Kin 
Camay Court Moonuqrcmp. 33 Be Rsutote Danedancer (4th) 8 Don; 
{pu). BhiOflens Wood. Luc*™ ludno. -Russel Shahdareba 14 Members 
Rrt. Write The Music. Lb Marsh (pul. Room ipu) Holme Code 


Marsh (pu). 


Britain’s longest-serving clerk of 
the course. Kji Patterson, will retire 
on Easter Monday, March 31, after 
exactly 40 years service at Carlisle. 
Patterson's first day at the 
Cumbrian course was Easter 
Mond3y, 1946. He will remain as a 
director of the Race company and is 
succeeded by Major Tim Riley as 
clerk of tbe course, 
fa Holsten. who sponsor the Si 
Leger. ’ are increasing their cash 
contribution to racing in 1986 by 
£14.000 to £163.000. 


NMMfttar Deotayfl. Quinn West Flyer 21 ran 
a.8L5).4l.ny T Forster at Wantage TOm 
£2-80. £150. £2.10. £4 30 DF BOO CSF 
£1113 

1_45 (2m 41 chl-1, MAD OF MOYOOE |Q 
McOourt 7-2). 2. DCBWM (Q WUams. 20-1). 3. 
Official Draaa (R Dunwoody. 8-1) ALSO RAN- 
2 lav Lord Laurence (ft. 7-2 Turtuna (0. 8 Angel 
Bank TO. Plash (f). i 6 Gton to Gian (Q. 25 
HopatU Chi mas (4th). 33 Agfrmy (t) 10 ran 
NR. Ravoosiodge a. 20. ii J Webber ai 
Banbury TOTE £6.00: £2.00. £350. £2.30 OF 
£3930 CSF EBA46 

2.15 (2m 100yd m 1. CAPTAIN DAWN (E 
Murphy. 4-5 lav). 2. Aichera Prince (M Bcslay 
5-lk 2. Stent Echo (M Jenkins. 3-2) ALSO 
RAN 8 Glennie (60D. 9 Mltamsa (ethj. 
Patobnaie (1). 33 Brahms And Lmn m. Match 
Master (5tto>. 8 ran. NR Nero Wolf in. IE 41 
3L 21 J aftard a*. Ftadon TOTE Ct TO. d to 
£1 40. £1 80 DF £470 CSF £854 
2.45 (2m <t txfla) I. KITTOJMrJ Bosley. 2-1 
lav). 2. Joint Sovwiilanly (M Dwyer. 100-30L 3. 
Pradpta Mass (M Bosley. 14-1) ALSO RAN 
7-2 Ogden You. 9-2 RambSng Wind (4th). 13-2 
Sasaanoco. 25 hopeha Kytw (5th). 33 Captain 
Jerry (Bthi Oarenca Hope (pu). Last 
Extravagance, PsfroquSL Quns Wane (pu). 
Peflorea(pu|. RahiB>(pu). SamtMato(I) 15 ran. 
3L 1’* 1‘Vl. 121. 71. F Winter at Umtwn 
TOTE £350; £1.80. £2.30. £340 DP E510. 
CSF- £10.07 

115 (3m 100yd ch) 1. CELTIC SLAVE (R 
Dunwoody. 7-4 lav), 2. Wtos Words (K 
Mooney. »-lt: X Tor Knight (P Barton. 8-1). 
ALSO RAN- 3 Orarsway (5th). 5 Ivory Crest 
(4th). 8 Flying Mistress, 14 Cole Ponar (fj. IB 
Cionssn King (pu), Qreontank Park (6DD. 33 
B r oughton Led (ft. Mount Fsddans (pu). 11 ran. 
NR P^r Exoness. SL BL 1 Vtl 12k X T Forsrai 
at Wantage TOTE £2 30: £1.60. £350. £1.80. 
DF £13.« CSF- £37 37 Treast £229 45. 

3.45 (3m htflei 1. JENNIE PAT(P Tuck. 5-1). 2. 
totandor (J Lovejoy. ID-1); 3. North Wool (G 
Moore. 7-1): 4. Outlawry (P Scudamore. 13-2) 
ALSO RAN: 8-2 lav Mr Gregory. 6 Free Chflco. 

10 Rare Pleasure (pu). Budsiey. Mttonl (pu). 

11 Watte (5th). 12 castle Official (6th). 14 High 
Bam (pu). 20 Impajtum. 33 Tarbotton IpuL 
Praaux (pu). Waterhsad (pu). Sweetheart (pu). 
Dtolda (pu) Our Bare Boy. Pass Ashore. 21 
ran Nh. l a 3i. iv-i fa. G Richards a) 
Graystoka TOTE. E6.9& El. 90. E2.60, £4.00. 
£220 DP £45420 CSF:- Ml 10. Trlcast 
E343 <3 PlacepotE30 00. 


Today’s course 
specialists 




TRAINERS: Mrs M Dickinson 18 wkmers from 
45 rumen. 40 0%, O Brennan 5 bom 18. 
275%: Q Ridianf9 7 tropi 32. 21 9% 

JOCKEYS: R Eamshaw 8 winners from 30 
rides. 26.7%; G Bradley 5 from 25. 20.0%. P 
Scudamore 9 bom 82. 145V 
WINCANTON 

TRADERS: Mrs J Pitmen 12 winners bom 56 
rumere, 215% N Oasetee 8 bom 44. HL2V J 
Thome 15 from 95 f 14.7% 

JOCKEYS: B de Heat 14 winners Iron 89 
rides. 20 3% K Mooney 18 from 104, 17 3% 
PttiSp Hobbs 5 Iron 48. 10 4V 
AYR 

TRABKRS: M H Easterty 28 winners from ill 
runners. 252%; M Lam ben 8 from 44, 18 2%: 
G Richards 48 from 283. 18 9% 


1-30 (2m if ndM 1 INTO SONG ul White 7 ?i 
2. CewlM Clown (P Hedy il-fl lav) 3 
ItaguMe (G Chartaa-Jonee 9-1 1 ALSO RAN 
7-2 Tors (4thl 14 sngatter Slake Redgrave 
Gin (Stfii. 25 Kmgsmai Lake 33 Anvrkf a HB (fl 
Omni s Pay (pul. General Option (I). Grey Cou 
(Olh) N tarty A Man Top Pryiu Fedora (pul. 
F 1 ring Free (ft Mbs Battnacree 16 ran NR 
Straight Member 41 19. 11.31 7i NHenoarson 
at Lambotan TOTE £4 40 El 70 El SO E2 10 
DF £3 10 CSF £889 

25 (2m tlhdte) i.TIARUMiAChambartevi. IG- 
1) 2 GeOn Enterprise |T Wal 14-1 1 3 TeH 
(J Frost 9-2] ALSO RAN 100-30 fav 
Cak toman UnK. 4 KimBri Lee* |5tti). 5 
Danedancer (4th) 8 Dona Perfect* i6thi 12 
Shahdareba 14 Members wish (put 20 Cedar 
Room (pu) Holme Code (pul it ran NR 
Topsod 2L sh hd. hd. a. 101 a Chembertoe* at 
Swindon TOTE £1070. £210 £7 30 El 90 
OF 1st or 2nd with any other £280 CSF 
£199 15 No bid 

250 (3m if ch| 1 CANIO (8 Powell 4-1) 2 
Venter Bey (J Hurst 33- U. 3 Gfided Gamble 
rn MBman. 50-11 ALSO RAN 2-1 lav Kevr 
Evans (11. 5-2 Torwce (fj. 6 Camebefie (reft 12 
Harlow MU [Sthl. Oueensway Boy (ft. 33 
Bannock Prmce (ur). Coflno (bdl Shebboar 
(irrj. 50 Asirai Master (fl Conn The Cobobr 
Ipu] Noxai (pu). Western Border (4tni 15 ian 
iG 81. tfan. 161 H Hodges a 1 Lang pen TOTE 
£4 70: £220. £4 20. £2o id OF £102 10 CSF 
£112.65 

35 (2m If ruflel 1 HOME COUNTY |C 
Brown. 5-1). 2 Toto trader (C Cox 14-1). 3 Mr 
McGae (J Whlta 7-1) ALSO RAN 4£ lav 
Waikiki (4th). 1 3-2 Jay Jays Princess 18 
Aushf*a» 20 Ekayue. Meiosa G«0. 25 
Members Only Rowlands Lad (5ml 33 
Debbies Pnnce (6»h) Tudor Men. Douramo 5 
ucht (WR) Levantine Rosa, uoiwig Eyes (PU) 
FVish Model (PUL Pardts Review 17 ran Nh 
2U 101 2 1 V. 3 D Bsworth at Whitshury 
TOTE- £5 80. £2 10 £240 £280 DF £4810 
CSF £74 91 

350 (2m It cn) 1 ATATAHO |C Gray 7-2) 2 
Tudor Road (9 Powea 100-30). 3 Fbe Dri8 iC 
Cox. 5-1 ALSO HAN 6-4 tav BicMagn Bridge 
MinL 33 Lesehic 15th). Capwste <pu) 66 
Stemdge Vaitay (pu) 7 ran NR Carina S. 25* 
T'-al S Patt emor a at Somerton TOTE £330. 
£2 10. £190 DF £720 CSF £14 00 

45 (2m If hOM) 1 MIGHTY STEEL (A WD0Q 
5-2 la v) 2. Rutin Maolc (C Price. 10-1). 3 Mms 


Metre (P Comgan. 25- 11 ALSO RAN 4 Ou 
White Hart 1-2 Carado |80i). 7 Baiywesi 1 4th) 


Caiman. Bulandehar (ouV Sautlngo Song 15 
ran NR Brooks Law 71.41. 141.20) 71 NLee 
Judson at Slndon TOTE: £3 70: £1 SO £2 90 
£450 DF £15 30 CSF £2839 Tncast 
£48759 

Placepot £128 45 


fa Tim Forster, who saddled three 
winners at Huntingdon yesterday - 
Echo Sounder. Woodgaie and CVitic 
Slave - is still undecided whether 10 
lei his high class, but icmpcnamemal 
chaser Drumadouney lake on ihe 
Gold Cup favourite Dawn Run in 
the Holsten Distributors chase at 
Cheltenham tomorrow. Drumadow- 
ne>. who won four races off the reel 
before finishing fourth in Usi year's 
Gold Cup. pulled up on his seasonal 
debut at Lingfield and Forster said 
“I just do not know whether lo run 
him or not- I'll discuss plans with 
the owner overnight." 

fa With his two stable jockeys 
Anthony Webber and George 
Memagh boih recovering from falls, 
the Banbury trainer John Webber 
called on the services of his former 
number one jockey Graham 
McCourt for Maid of Moyode in the 
Wyton Novices Chase at Hunting- 
don yesterday. He proved a first 
class deputy, bringing the marc 
home an eight lengths winner 



















SPORT /LAW T HE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 241986 


BOXING; ARCH RIVALS SQUARING UP IN PROMOTIONAL WRANGLE CRICKET 


Legal in-fi g h ti ng 
could block 
Graham and let 
Sibson in 

By Srik dinar Sen Boxing Correspondent 

A legal wrangle that could Carlo. That bout could put 
break out between Frank Sibson back among the top four 
W jf TCn ' t ° e ^‘ on ^ on promoter, world contenders Warren be- 
B- J- Eastwood, the lieved, and before too long the 
manager of Hera! Gresham, Leicester boxer could be facing 
could not only stop Graham's Marvin Hagler again. 






challenge for Ayub Kalule's 
European middleweight cham- 


Sibson, who "exploded back 


pionship on February 5 at on l< > the scene" after ' 14 
Sheffield but also force Kalulc months of inactivity with a 
to put bis title up against Tony second round knockout of Juan 
Sibson, of Leicester, Graham's Elizondo, of Mexico, at Ale- 
arch -rival. xandra Pavilion, on Wednesday 

Warren claimed yesterday FJi"* . h * was 
that be had a contract for forward 10 chaUcngmg Ha ^ a ‘ 
Sibson to defend his Common- “He spanked me when 1 was a 
wealth title against KaJule at boy" he said. "Now I am a man 
Monte Carlo on February 26 who has seen a lot. I have 
which blocked all other contests educated mvself". 
within 28 days of the bout. 

Warren said that even the Sibson claimed that his 
European Boxing Union would positive showing against Elizon- 
not be able to carry out their do. who was not exactly the 
threat to strip Kalule of his title over sun Crystal Palace, was his 
for not meeting Graham at best for two years. “When I saw 
Sheffield on February 5. him going down the second 

"If the High Court stops the “f. hira t to f 1 

o. p- - , - .7 . v'T. . up because I did not want to hit 

Sheffield fight, a is not Kalule s it 

fault, is iir Warren said “I shall hlm l *** ul . s,bso “ K “ d - , If ^ 
seek and injunction if Eastwood 

tries to go ahead with that fight mme between him and Hagler. 




sfc!tt 


Colombo (Reuter) - Wicket- 
keeper Steve Rhodes hit his second 
SO of the match y esterday to enable 
England B to dedaze their second 
innings at 121 ibr five and Sri Lanka 
240 to win on the final day of their 
four-day match which ended in a 
draw with Sri Lanka seining 101 for 
four. 

Rhodes struck six fours, and a six 
in an attractive innings of 57 as the 
touring team, who resumed at 16 for 
one. added I OS in 145 mnuucs- 
When Nicholas declared shortly 
after lunch, Sri Laolca.werc left with 
145 minutes and 20 mandatory 
overs to reach their victory target. 

Wflf Slade and the nightwateb- 
aum Rhodes added 31 yearrday 
before Slack departed caught behind 
by the wicketkeeper de Alwis off 
Aguiia Rnnatunga for 2 1 . 

Chris Smith was bowled by 
Warns weera lor two and Axhey was 
run out for six but Rhodes, who hit 
a car eer best of 77 not out in the first 
inning, scored freely 

Left-arm spinner Cook took four 
wickets to give England a chance of 
victory but an unfinished fifth- 
wicket stand of 58 between 
Ratnayakr (42) nd Gunisinghc (21) 


Graham: his next contest could be in court 


They can only hold the fight if I 


Terry Marsh, who gave the 


Sm^Po°„- My ‘ Wi “ un *id'est display of his career to 
g.ve them permission . relain ^ ligtl _ wdl( . r _ 

If Warren succeeds in block- weight title against Tex Nkalan- 
ing Graham's challenge both kete. of France, confirmed 
Sibson's Commonwealth title yesterday that he had in fact 
and Kalule's European crown damaged his hand in the fourth 
could be at stake at Monte round and that had forced him 


VOLLEYBALL 


10 change from a stand-up boxer 
into an in-figher. He had to stay 
close to Nkalankete to keep 
dear of his swings. 

"The big finger knuckle has 
been pushed back" Marsh said. 
"When I felt the pain I 
immediately thought I had 
fractured my knuckle as I did in 
Monte Carlo. But it wasn't 
thaL" He will wait for the 
doctor's verdict before he takes 
up his commitments to box in 
the United States. 

The Tilbury fireman, who 
had weals all over his lace and a 
cut over his left eye to show for 


his endeavours, said he was : 
ready for duty, be it to save a 
cat up a tree or a family trapped 
down a basement “1 can always 
gauge a fight from how I feel the 
next day" he said. “I'm ready lo- 
go back in the gym right now". 

Witt heads squad 

Olympic champion Katarina Wot 
will lead an Eastern German squad 
of eight at the European figure 
skating championships beginning in 
Copenhagen odd Monday. Con- 
stance Gensei will join the 20- year- 
old reigning European champion in 
the women's event while Falko 
Kirsten and Nils Koepp contest the 
men's title. 


N Zealand The lure of 
win in one-day 
tight finish spectacles 


BADMINTON 


Polonia pole-axed New sponsor found 


By Paul 

The biggest upset of the season 
saw Polonia. the national league 
champions, crash out of the Royal 
Bank Cup at the quarter-final stage 
to Radio Trent Rockets, of the 
second division. 

Unbeaten in the league and 
parading a clutch of England 
internationals, the Poles from West 
London looked the hottest of 
favourites until play began. The 
Nottingham side, with home 
advantage and under the gaze of 
cameras from Central Television, 
took the first set 15-11 and the 
second 15-10. 

h looked in the third set as 
(hough Polonia had woken up. 
Intense pressure caused the Rockets' 
blocking and back-court play to 
become ragged and Polonia took 
that set 15-3. Yet Polonia were not 
able to press their advantage in the 
fourth set. even though Rockets' 
centre blocker. Paul Lamb, had to 
be carried off after twisting his 
ankle. Rockets' blocking came back 
to life and they carried the match 
15-1 1. 

As a reward, the second division 
side meet Capital City Brixton in 


Court of Appeal 


Harrison 

the semi-finals on February 15. 
Capital City had an expected 3-0 
victory over Bracknell, also of the 
second division. 

In another quaner-SnaJ match 
last . weekend Redwood Lodge, of 
Bristol, wont to Leeds and won 3-2, 
a week after losing 3-0 there in the 
l e ague. The difference was UcaJ 
Ashman. Contained the week 
before, be was rampant on Saturday. 
Leeds, enjoying a successful season 
in the league, have new sponsorship 
from the Oragonara Hotel in Leeds 
to console them. The deal, over 
three years, includes reduced rates 
for visiting teams staying at the 
hoteL 

Redwood Lodge now meet 
Speedwell Rucanor in the semi- 
final Speedwell beat Newcastle 
(Staffs) 3-0 in Newcastle-under- 
Lyme on Saturday. 

Royal opening 

Prince Andrew will open the 
National Badminton Centre at 
Milton Keynes on Saturday. April 
11 


By Richard Eaton 


The Badminton Association of 
England pulled off an outstanding 
promotional coup yesterday ' by 
announcing sponsorship from Car- 
Isberg the Danish brewery company, 
little more than a week before I the 
national championships are due to 
start. 

The size of the sponsorship, 
which is not being revealed, is 
probably large enough to cover the 
costs of running the event. Money 
will not. however, ax first go towards 
increased prizes which will remain 
this year at £5.025. but instead 
Caribcrg will attempt to reduce the 
£25,000 costs the BA of E was 
prepared to pay out of its own 
funds. 

It was less than three weeks ago 
that five leading professionals, who 
had signed ibr the promotions and 
management company Walker 
International, created a stir by 
deciding not to play in the event, 
preferring to concentrate on the 
international circuit Some of them 
bad critical *ords for the low-key 
image and modest rewards which 
the event had been allowed to 
acquire during the last five years. 


These have now in large part been 
answered- First, the BA of E 
announced the acquisition of 
Channel 4 television coverage, that 
helped to persuade four of the five 
to play after aQ, and they have now 
signed up a sponsor who ‘ they 
apparently hope will be invovled in 
a long relationship with the sport 
The implications asre considerable, 
not merely for the survival and 
credibility of the event, but for the 
future development of the game. 
Perhaps conflict may be kept to a 
minimum after alL 
This year the event has only three.! 
notable absentees: Nora Perry, the 
world doubles champion who still 
prefers to devote herself to her 
international itinerary. Martin Dew. 
the European doubles champion 
who now lives In Copenhagen, ankd 
Dipak Tailor, the Thomas Cup hero 
who is Dew's current partner. 

SEHHNQS: Han’s ataghv. 1. S.Btddatoy 
(Susan). 2. N YUn (Kant): 3, equal S Bolter 
(Warwidcshke) and D Hafl JEaaax), Women** 
angles: 1. H Treks (Hsn&f F EflMt (Swreyfc 
3. equal a Oowera (Sussex) and C day (Isles). 
HOT Doubles: 1, A Good* (Harts) * N Tier 
(Kama). Woman's Anblaa: 1, K Beckman 
Pwn ^S MiaB (Lancs). SRxed Podbles: 1. 


win in 
tight finish 

Melbourne. (Reuter) - A dashing 
67 from Martin Crowe, who was 
weD supported by consistent batting 
from his colleagues, gave New 
Zealand a thrilling five- wicket 
victory with one ball to spare in the 
World Series Cup one-day match 
against India here yesterday. 

New Zeiand, set a formidable 239 
to win the day- night match at the 
Melbourne Cricket Ground, started 
their run-chase in fine style when 
Wright and Edgar added 49 in Tewer 
than 14 overs. 

- India's innings of 238 was 
founded on a patient 74 from 
Arm ana th who was backed up by 
Vengsarkar with 43 and Kapil Dev 
-who hit 47. Sharma made an 
invaluable 20. 16 runs coming off 
Hadlee's last over. 

raw 

KSrSdmticandcChotMd 9 

RShWrlHi-wbKadkw S 

M Amamafli e and bBnrawefl 74 

DVongnrkwbBraeoMd 43 

M Azharuddh run ■* w 

TCapI Dav c Brrcmnl b CftatBak! 47 

AtMntocWHdMbChatMd 7 

C Sharma 

R Bfnny & ChatEaU .11 

tK Mora not out — 1 

Extras (b 2. 1 . 3, w 3) ■ 

Totalpwku) J238 

S Yadav dd not baL 

FAU. OF WICKETS: 1-15. 2-16, 3-90, 4-1 IS, 
5-182, 6-205, 7-205, 8-220. 

BOWLINS: Hadtea. 10-1-52-1: ChatfWd, 
10-2-28-4; Corny 7-0-38-0: Bncowafl. 
10-0-53-2; Boock. 8-0-51-0: CKn. 
5-0-13-0. NEW ZEALAND 

JG WNgbtstMorabAmamath 39 

BA Edgar c Vengsarkar bSIwatrt JO 

MD Crow* cStestribKapfl Dev 87 

JF Retd run out 35 

J J Cron* b Kapd Dev 30 

■JV Coney not out er 

R J Hadlee not out. - 1 ' 

Extrasp 1,l-b7, w2) 10 


From Ivo Tennant, 

Johannesburg 

In South Africa, as elsewhere, 
one-day cricket is all the rage. For 
the first of the SO overs-a-side 
maiehes against the breakaway 
Australians. 22,000 tickets have 
already been sold. By contrast the 
aggregate figures Ibr five days of the 
final Test' was only 38.000. So it 
can easily be gleaned why there are 
as many as six one-day fixtures. The 
form of the Australians would 
appear not to matter. The spectacle 
is the thing, and there will no doubt 
be more on view than merely cricket 
in pyjamas. The contest at the 
Wanderers today is the only one of 
the six to be played as a day-night 
match. 

Hughes, stunned by the ausira- 
lians’ submissive display on Tues- 
day and his own ‘king pair” was 
generous in defeat. He has 
impressed South Africans with his 
pleasant demeanour and with bis 
exciting strokcplay. For the match 
today his side are troubled again by 
injuries. Hogg and Yallop are 
unlikely to piny. Rather than go for 
an all-pace a track, as was the case in 
the five-day match, the Australians 
will probably play Faulkner and 
Hogan, both of whom can make 
runs. La the absence of Pollock. 
McKenzie's reward for his inning s 
of 72 and 1 10 will most likely be a 
move up the order. 


Total (5 wkta, 49.5 Ovora) .239 

J G Braanwtf. E B M M e O wsnay . S L Boock. 

E J ChBtfMdddnotbaL 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-49. 2-112. 3-178, 

4- 185.5-235. 

BOWLING: Kapl On. 10-1-38-2; Btren. 
54-1-31-0; Sham*. 10-0-57-0: Aiwmth, 

5- 0-28-1: Shutt. 10-0-30-1: Yadov, 
8-0-51-0. 

STANDINGS p w D L Pte 

Auatrafla . 8 4 119 

Ns wZaatend 8 2 13 5 

India 6 2 0 4 4 

Naxt mulch: Tomorrow: New Zealand v Inda 
(Adelaide). 


77 (wicket kaepeO- H A Page. C G J P Van ZjU 
j\ ■ 12th man: L Barnard. 

-10 aueWaiMi ffromt K 4 Hughe* leapt), 4 
— ~ Dyson. S Smith. G Shtapand, M D Tnyfar. G 
■239 Yaflop. 8 Rbren Mcfcar keeper). P N Fariknar. 
lock. T M Alderman. C G Racha man n. R Hogg. M 0 
H a wman. R McCurty, T Hogan. JMagura. TV 


Dyson. S Smau G support, M D Taylor. Q 
Yaflop, 8 Rbcon Nteknr keeper). P N FauBotnr. 
T M AMerman. C G Racham an n. R Hoag. M 0 
H a ||w ian.R McCurty, T Hogan. JMagura. TV 

• SYDNEY (Reuier) - Bill 
Hayden, the Australian Foreign 
Minister, accused South Africa of 
trying to destroy sport in Australia 
by offering funds to rebel teams. Mr 
Hayden said that Pretoria had 
admitted a was indirectly funding 
the current South African tour by a 
rebel Australian cricket team. 


Law Report January 24 1986 


Queen’s Bench Division 


Circuitous procedure over wards in care Asbestos death claim 


In re M (a Minor) 


Before Lord Justice Fox and Sir his placement at the Kingswood 


that it was in the boy's interest that If the juvenile court, or the crown If. however, the local authority 


Roualeyn Cumming-Brucc 
(Judgment delivered January 22] 


Special Unh. Bristol, should be 
continued for a further two months 


Where a ward or coun had been until he reached the age of 16. but mailer. If the juvenile court oi 
placed in the care of a local also that the necessary criteria crown court authorized transfer, the 
authority, by an order or the High existed to authorize such a course. local authority should then apply to 
Court, the local authority was not However, the legislation referred the High Court for directions 
under a duty to seek directions from io constituted the juvenile court as It was not necessary in such a case 
ihc High Court before applying to the only forum with jurisdiction to for directions to be obtained from 


court on appeal, held that transfer to agreed with the view expressed by 
secure accommodation was not the review panel to the effect that 
authorized that was the end of the the criteria no longer applied, or 
mailer. If the juvenile court or that continued placement in secure 
crown court authorized transfer, the accommodation was no longer 
local authority should then apply to appropriate, it should forthwith 


not statute-barred 


the High Court for directions apply to the High Court for further 
It was not necessary in such a case directions, 
for directions to be obtained from The statutory forum for deciding 


the juvenile court for an order decide ihaL the criteria applied. The the wardship judge before the local whether the criteria set out in 
authorizing the local authority io judge expressed the view that in the authority applied to the juvenile section 21 A of the 1980 Act applied 
place or keep the child in secure statutory context, the local authority court. Only if the facts were such in respect of the child was the 


accommodation. . to whom care of a ward had been that the local authority was juvenile court and the crown court 

The Court of Appeal, in a .entrusted by the coun had to uncertain whether to make an initial on appeal, 
reserved judgment, so stated in exercise its powers "subject to any application to the juvenile court It was anomalous that in the case 
dismissing on appeal b> Lambeth directions given by the court." so should the local authority apply to of a ward of court the High Court 

I ondon Borough Council from an that all major decisions relating to the High Court for directions had not been given the power to 

order of Mr Justice Sheldon (A/ v ^ c hiid remained the response whether to apply to the juvenile decide the same question. Unless 

l-jnitvih London BorouRh Council btlitv of the High Court. court. and until the Act was amended, the 

f Vo 2J (The halt's. December 20, H e held that the High Court, In the instant case, however, the ward was subject to a circuitous 


to whom care of a ward had been 


authority 


He held that the High Court. In the instant case, however, the ward was subject to a circuitous 
l°S4; (19S5) 6 FLR 371)). who on having the right and duty to initial application to the juvenile procedure which might involve the 
an application by the Official consider whether the criteria existed coun had been made, authority for High Court upon an application for 
Solicitor, had directed, inter alia, to justify the ward's retention in placing the child in secure accom- directions having to consider the 
that the minor U) until his sixteenth secure accommodation, could dis- modation for a second period had very questions which had then to go 
birthday remain in the care of close its conclusions and direct that been given by the juvenile conn, lor decision to the juvenile court. 


Lambeth and (2) thereafter and fi, C v be made available to the 
until further order be committed to juvenile court, 
the care of Liverpool C'itv Council. He accepted that the weight the 
Mrs Barbara Calvert. QC and juvenile court attached to the High 
Miss Barbara Siomnicka for Lam- Court’s views and how they 
h**lh: Mr Nicholas Medawar. QC conducted their proceedings were 
and Mr H. W. Turcan for the largely matters for them, but said 
fiflicial Solicitor Miss Caroline they might well regard the 
Hodger for Liverpool; Miss Gail conclusions of the High Court as 
. .ii rodus Tar the mother. helpful in deciding whether criteria 

SIR ROUALEYN CUM MING- existed la justify 1 the further 
BRUCE, delivering the judgment of retention of the child in secure 


xhev be made available to the and there was only a problem for the Their Lordships agreed with 
juvenile coun. local authority because the persons those judges who had expressed 

He accepted that the weight the appointed to review the continued dismay that the legislature had 

juvenile court attached to the High appropriateness of the placement probably by inadvertence exposed 

Court's views and how they had advised that it was not the children concerned to such a 

conducted their proceedings were a p propriate. multiplicity of proceedings. The 

largely matters for them, but said* If the local authority, during the sooner it was corrected the better. 


appropriateness of the placement probably by inadvertence exposed 
had advised that it was not the children concerned to such a 
a p propriate. multiplicity of proceedings. The 


they ’ might wdl regard the currency of a direction or the High However on the leeislation now 
conclusions of the High Court as Court directing the foal authority Qn ^ book^bc juvenile 

helpful in deciding whether criteria lo keep the child in _ secure coun ^ ^ ^ appeal 

existed to justify 1 the further accommodation, thought that the bad jurisdiction to decide 

retention of the child in secure child should be transferred out of whether the criteria existed. 


the court, said that the appeal raised 
iv Main questions of procedure when 
a w ard of coun was the subject of an 


accommodation. 


secure accommodation as a result of 


There had been a difference of advice given by a review panel, it Where leave had been sought 
judicial opinion on the question was the duty of the local authority to from the High Coun for the local 


order made under section 21 A of the . whether an application far leave to apply at once to the High Court for autbority 


Arnold v Central Electricity 
Generating Board 
Before Mr Michael Ogden. QC 
[J udgraent delivered January 23] 

Section 2A(1) of the Limitation 
Act 1939 (inserted by section 1 of 
the Limitation Act 1975) included 
within its ambit actions brought 
against local authorities, notwith- 
sanding that they might have 
accrued rights of limitation under 
previous Limitation Acta. 

Mr Michad Ogden, QC sitting as 
a deputy judge of the Queen's Bench 
Division, so held in deciding a 
preliminary issue in. favour of the 
plaintiff Mrs Emma May Arnold, 
claiming as administrator, of the 
estate of Albert Edward Arnold, 
deceased, against the defendants, 
the Central Elect ri city Generating 
Board, that her claim was not statute 
barred. 

Mr John Foy ibr the plaintiff; Mr 
Anthony NichoU for the defendants. 

HIS LORDSHIP said that the 
deceased had been employed by the 
defendants* predecessors in title as a 
boiler cleaner between April 1938 
and April 1943, during which time 
he.had been exposed to asbestos. He 
had died of mesothelioma In' May 
1982. 

Under the provisions of section 
21 of the 1939 Act actions against 
local authorities in respect of their 


defaults were barred after a period 
of one year. By 1944. therefore, the 
plaintiff's cause of action was 
undoubtedly statute-barred. 

The question was whether 
subsequent Limitation Acts oper- 
ated so as to deprive the defendants 
of their accrued rights. The special 
protection afforded to local auth- 
orities by section 21 was removed, 
prior to 1975. 

Because of the provisions of 
paragraph 9 of Schedule 2 to the 
Limitation Act 1980 it was 
necessary to consider whether the 
plaintiffs action had become barred 
prior to the 1 980 Act. 

The relevant Act was the 
Limitation Act 1975, which 
amended section 2 of the 1939 Act 
by inserting section 2A, which 
modified the limitation period in 
respect of certain actions. That 
section began: "(1) This section 
applies to any action. . 

There was no reason why section 
2AG> should -be interpreted so as 
not to apply to actions involving 
local authorities including those 
which prior to 1975, if not 1963. had 
accrued rights. There was no reason 
not to give the section the wide 
interpretation which it seemed to 
call for. The plaintiff's claim was 
accordingly not statute-barred. 

Solicitors: Lawfond & Co; God- 
frey Diggines & McKay, Birming- 
ham. 


Child Care Act 1 980. as amended by 
paragraph 50 or Schedule 2 to 
the 1 lealth and Social Services and 
Sor:*i Security Adjudications Act 
!»&:. pursuant to the Secure 
Accommodation (No 2) Regulations 
(SI 19S3 No ISOS). 

The particular problem that Mr- 
.lustier Sheldon had to consider, on 
December 1 7. 1984. arose from the 
fact that the persons appointed 
under regulation If* to review the 
continued appropriateness of the 
placement oi the minor had by a 
majority rejected the advice of 
everyone concerned with the case, 
including the Official Solicitor and 
the psychiatrist whose advice had 
been sought. 

Upon an application Tor direc- 
tions. the judge directed the local 
juihontv to apply to the juvenile 
court for a further authority that the 
Malutorv criteria continued to apply 
io the child. Authority was obtained 
ibr his continued placement for a 
f.mher six months, ending on June 
i~. 19S5. . r .. 

Once again upon review or his 
case there was unanimity among 
cvervone concerned with the boy. 


apply to the juvenile court was farther directions. It could not take application to the juvenile court, 
necessary whenever the child in the step of terminating the clearly the juvenile court had the 
question was a ward of court who placement without further direo- right and duty to satisfy- itself that 
had been entrusted to the care of a lions from the High Court. leave of the High Court had been 


Corroboration not needed 


local authority pursuant to section Likewise, h was the of duty or the sought and granted. 

7(2j of the Family Law Reform .Act local authority to apply to the High The High Court was clearly 
1969. Court for further directions as to the entitled to include in its directions 

In his judgment now under future of the child after the existing guidance to the local authority as to 


appeal. Mr Justice Sheldon held that directions terminated 
the High Court should not give Regulation 17 o 


the material to be submitted to the 

the High Court should not give Regulaiioa 17 of the 1983 juvenile court, Bui their Lordships' 
leave to apply to the juvenile coun Regulations confined itself to respectfully differed from Mr 
unless it was satisfied that the specifying the function of the Justice Sheldon where he held that 
criteria had been established, and he persons appointed 1 17(11) and to the juvenile court would find it 
gave it as his opinion that those stating whose views they should helpful to know the High Court's 
facts and findings should be recited ascertain and take into* account finding on the very questions which 
in the order ofthe court which could (|7(2ti. the juvenile court alone had 

then be placed before the juvenile By regulation 17(3) the local ’jurisdiction to decide. 

*»un. authority was under a duty, if It. was appreciated that Mr Justioc 


then be placed before the juvenile 
court. 


Mre Justice Heijbron had ex- practicable, to inform ail those Sbcldoo was careful to emphasise 
pressed a different view- see In r e K whose views were required to be ihat the weight that the juvenile 
f a Minor) (The Times. December token into account under paragraph court attached to the findings ofthe 
20. 1984; ( 19S5) 6 FLR 357. 367). «2y or the outcome of the review. It High Court was largely a matter for 

In the usual case in which the was implicit in the regulation that them. The weigh! that they attached 
facts and opinions of relevant adults Uie persons appointed to carry out i Q any material before them was 
constituted a dear prima facie cue ihc review had to communicate entirely for them, but it was doubted 
for application with a reasonable their views on the matters about whether they as an independent 
prospect of success, their Lordships which they had to be satisfied. statutory forum ought to be 

were dear that the reasoning and the Save for the duty to Inform others influenced by the view of another 
procedure proposed by Mrs Justice in regulation 17(3) the Regulations tribunal, however august. 

Hcilbron was correct! were silent about the duty of the ______ __ llU - 

Tin- annlinlinn In ihr iuvenite •x.itinritv F W those reasons II would ID 


Regina v OUtieye 
. The evidence of a complainant in 
a ease of rape affecting an aider and 
abettor was not always subject to the 
general rule on corroboration. 

The Court of Appeal (Criminal 
Division) (Lord Justice Watkins. 
Mr Justice Farquharsou and Sir 
Ralph Kilner Brown) so bdd on 
January 20 when dismissing an 
appeal by Jimmy OUtieye against his 
conviction at the Central Criminal 
Court- (Judge Herrod, QC and a 
jury) of aiding and abetting rape. 

LORD JUSTICE WATKINS said 
that the appellant complained that 
the trial judge had not directed the 
jury that the complainant's evidence 
affecting him required to be 
corroborated. 


The purpose of corroboration was 
to confirm or support evidence 
which was believable, and thus 
fortify the jury in accepting the 
complainant as a reliable and 
trustworthy witness. 

In the present case, where the 
evidence against the principal 
offender was corroborated, the jury 
must have accepted the complain- 
ant's evidence when convicting him 
of attempting to rape her, otherwise 
they woud have had to acquit him 
and consequently the appellant. 

In such circumstances ft would be 
absurd to re-apply the corroboration 
rule to a complainant's evidence 
affecting the aider and abettor to 
establish what had already been 
proven, namely that she was a 
reliable and truthful witness. 


No contributory fault 


even-one concerned with the boy. The application to the juvenile local authorin' after learning the 

personally or professionally, but tite court was a necessary preliminary io views communicated by the review- «?viSrL» 


persons appointed proposed his 
immediate release from secure 
accommodation. 

In that situation it was the 
Official Solicitor who applied to the 
judge for further directions on May 


a decision to place the child in um persons. ^ 

secure accommodation. xVhere a child was a ward of court Buttings of the High Court on the 

Where the local authority was the local authority could not take raa * ieT * wrttun w exclusive 
satisfied that a prints facie case any step inconsistent with the .competence of the juvenile court 
existed for such a placement, il court’s current direction without under section ^ l A. • 

could and should apply to the applying lo the High Court Ibr Solicitors Mr Richard J. M. 

1US5. The evidence before the juvenile court for authorization qn further directions. The local auth- Melkw. Lambeth; Official Solicitor. - 


Boots Co pic v Lees-CoQSer 
Where an industrial tribunal had 
concluded on the evidence before it 
that there was no ha«Hc for a 
reduction In the compensatory 
award under section 74(o) of the 
Employment Protection (Consoli- 


wheiher it was just to order 
reinstatement under section 69(5) of 
the ACT. 

The Employment Appeal Tri- 
bunal (Mr justice Hutchinson, Mr 
G. A. Drain and Miss A. P. Vale) so 
held on January 22 in dismissing an 
appeal by Boots Co pic against a 


mdse was overwhelming and left 
him in no doubt wtuum cr not only 


the ground that the statutory criteria only was not bound to accept the Mr W. [. Murray. Liverpool; Hodge 
existed in ihc case ofthe child- advice of the review pan dL Jones & .Alien, Camden. 


SSSi, i 97 ,? of decision of a Nottingham industrial 

contributory fault by the employee, tribunal on July 1 5. 1985 who made 

“Jff t 11 1 ? an SSuS of rehSuluSent toMr 

feui, ‘^£v of Eric Lew-Collier for his unfair 
contributory fault in deciding dismissal. 




Rhodes and Cook in 
the limelight 
as match fades out 


ensured the draw. Play was called 
off with 10 overs remaining. 

Cook, who took six for 69 in Sri 
Lanca's first innings, struck with the 
total at 31 when he had von Haght 
caught for 1 1. 

ENGLAND K Rrat tarings: 363 1 
- - ■ Second tarings 

M Maxcn b Airotoan — 4 

w Stacked* AMs & A Harauiga — 21 

IS Rhtxtes e A Rarubrngm b WBrrwittMra _ 87 
C Saflh b W m naweam 2 

WAtfuy run out — , ■ — 8 

KBamannatout : 18 

DPrtngtonotou 9 

Extras (M) 5. w 1) ■ 6 

Total (4 nkta dac) 121 

FAU. OF WICKETS: 1-12. 2-47, 3-66. 
BOWLING R’Ramswfca 64-11-Ov KAmatean. 
7-1-22-1: Aifuna Rarmungs 8-1-22-1; D 
AnurasH 5-1 -12-0. 

SRI LANKA- Hrat tarings: 241 
Sscond tarings 

M »on Hagt c Tramtaa b Code 11 

DRanaungbCook — — — 26 

A Rsnaimga nAtfiey bCook 0 

A Samaraaakara c ABaoy b Cook 8 

A&jmdnalianotout 21 

R Radnsywa net out 42 

Extras (b A Hi l.nbl) s 6 

Total (4 wfctt) 111 

FALL OF WICKETS; 1-31, 2-31 , 3-41 , 4-53. 
BOWUNG: Annaw 7-2-1 7-ft Pringto 8-2-27-0: 
Cook 17-7-28-4; T Tremtett 11-6-15-0; Barnett 
3-1-15-0: Smith 1 -0-4-0: Atfiay 1-1 4ML 


Rolls-Royce and Bentley 


ATTENTION 
ROLLS ROYCE 
OWNERS 

Journalist researching the subject wishes to learn from 
Rods Ftoyce owners who are dissatisfied with their cars or 
servicing. 

AD replies will be treatechln confidence. 

The Editor 

London Week 
43 Oxford Street, 

London W1R 1RD 


ROLLS ROYCE - 

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HfflSOVBe(aHE.RpgertAkM*ta AkOBCUSOOOiH.. . .#■ EMJ 
BS TO JM3UAR 40- SacorttneaMn LaoSw SnnltdOOa..,., J.. £M4 
S3 (Y) DAfULEn Double Sbc Faw»l*n/lw, Ak ESR . CIV 

81 (X] xjs IE. R xng greeiVbenja. Me 29000m . ....... I.'f.ElU 

8200 XJT2HE.S&KA/C(U<<y ESR. ABovti 33fl00m. . fc.. 

82 (Y] JAGUAR Oie*iul/dDe3l*i. Leo9« ,;SM 

CAU ANDREW JARVIS QN ' • / ; 
0734 585011 MON-SAT^ ^ 

(AGUM&’y*?/ VBS8Mf8HS*AGENT JAC* 


....E23J995 
... C19S8S 
... CIS/95 

£22995 

...mass 

....C22J8S 

.... UU« 
.... E21395 
.... CZL995 

08595 

.....03535 

CIOASS 

.... 00595 

CU5S5 

rt7^H 

. 06.495 

CUW9S 

C1MB5 

09585 
" . . 03595 
■ i*. CB595 
. XMJtOS 
.... 01595 
1 >.01560 
?. ,'c,E7595 
. . ..£8595 


DAIMLER 4.2 
VANDEN PLAS 

sen m auto 

Red 1983 Y rag VGC, 
law mileage £13,995. 

Tel 0920 821 360 eves 
or 07072 71111 day. 


MARK 10 JAGUAR. 1964. Doric 
metallic vim. alaolato Aewroom 
condition- £4500. Soumond oa San 



HMdtinr Wear Newbury) 7*0. 


JAGUAR 4J SOVER1EGH 
iramacuaUe camuunn mrongnoat. -w 
»«. low mlMagr. Prlrate aahi. 

£i5-2oo. oi _nai neoo io> 
Heoncburcli B6TU (cVn/WkmdQI. 


AJZ XJS. Auto. Dec *78. Damask Red. 
elocoic s/ roof, stereo radio, all ofiq- 
InaL ejee eond_ £2.700. 01-4S& 
36H7. 


LEX MEAD, Owlm sr o ni . uroenUy 
reoulre Jaouara/Dainders wlui loiv 
"®“^o°cUnger S y«r» owl Tel: John 
Crime. 0246 56 1 85 . 

JAGUAR / DAIMLER, 1981-1986. 
choice' of <5. wnole nuw. £6,950 la 
£17XWa ESI 19 yrv PXi - Tel: OI- 


DAIMLER SOVEREIGN 1983 I 
air can. 1 owner. FSH. £ 9 . 995 . 
S720iam. 


VW and Audi 


OUATTRO CENTRE 

Rteii nadtte anlbMi tar taaoMSGi 
ddteKy. 

Mm kr ode fa MMag nm can: 
tS88 C ig. «n» 200 Qraflra. Zenaafl SB- 
nr MS air cmaL itac iMx. 8 ttn rari 
nun. 1965 C ng AuG Ami QaateD. 
Tanafle rafl. not bBs BtC. EEUSB. 
ttBS C MB BO EL 1 J TBaa lai. £7575. 
1®e C res. AnS M Qaataa BrapUte m 
rad. SKLS7S. 

TeL 0203 56325 
Open Sun. 10-4 


8CUOCCOCL 1984. 30,000 mla. 1 


GOLF GTI 1984 A Rojl 18.000 ntia. 
Stiver. £0.498. 01-94?Soa8. 



VW OOLF QLi ConvcrtiU* 1982 
model. G speed, red. i owner. 
evc« lent condition, taxed. MOT 
£4 .480. 021-707 5906. 


owner. 10.000 moos Mack, very good 
co n di tion. £3.600 ODD. Onr 370 
SS99. STS 1462. Ev« 8766949. 



AUDI OUATTRO COUPE. Od 84. 
14^00 mla. Man RML a.-roof. Goon 

SSSSSSurS. 4 * 80 - 


BOlf G TI O anver m ae. ah «mm. July 
CT.TBp. wuauaion. 
Ol -947S046. dvea / wuol. 
CONVENT! 8 L£ GOLFS CT 15 & Autoa 
fawned dd. Colour choice. 0682 
872182. 

1936 GOLF GTS dotes of col oun from 
C1J9S. Other modal* avaOoMe. Tel: 
102 51061 4441. rn. 

NEW tS'lT'a from mock, oood dtac oan cr 
D-A.C. <08031 667417. (07601 

21079. 


lans-i. 




















! 




• riT i 


■ ’■■.* 


■ - 

■—i i 

. '-re 


1 • ' •■'r.K. 




Motoring by Clifford Webb 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY OA t Q 35 25 

CAR B UYERS’ GUIDE ® Trade 01-837 2916 Private 01-8373333 or 3311 
‘ " ’ -‘V'C. " Mercedes Benz ■ ■■ ' • 


— ^ 


• 7. 


Porsche Cars Great Britain, goes 
front strength to strength.' Except ' 
for a minor hiccup in 1984 caused 
by tbe two-month ' West German 
metal . workers' strike. . 'ft has 
increased sales annually for the past 
eight years. Last year was the 
busiest 'and most important since 
the British offshoot was formed 20 
yearsago.. 

It moved to a new £1 1 million 
headquarters and impart centre at 
Reading next to Junction 12 on the 
M4, sold a record 3.438 cars and 
introduced significant ~ changes 
across the whole model Tange. 

' Porsche enthusiasts were under- 
standably excited by the new 152 
mph 944 turbo, but they positively, 
drooled oyer the 911 turbo with 
sports equipment.- It was the fastest 
and raos t exp ensive Porsche sold m ■ 
Britain, with a top speed of 171 
mph and cost a cool £73,935. But in* 
my view by for the most significant 
new model for Porsche's confined 
growth. was the new 924S, the 
"baby" of the range. 

Surprisingly, the 924 is not the 
biggest seller, Thai position is held 
by the more expensive 944. But the 
924 is the Porsche that weans 
buyers away from other makes. 
Some 75 per cent of 924 sales are 
captured from the competition and 
about a third of those buyers' 
progress to a 944 when (hey 
change cars. A remarkable two 
thirds of .Porsche owners buy 
another Porsche. 

Last year two significant develop- 
ments took place with the arrival of 
the dcw 924S. It came of age at last 
by acquiring a real Porsche engine 
instead of a modified Audi unit - 
the car itself is still assembled by 
Audi at Neckaxsuhn - and its UK 
price shot up by an alarming £2,726 
to £14,984.. 

Porsche acknowledged that such 
a substantial price hike for its 
cheapest car Was a gamble. Many 
of the competition, notably the 
Japanese, are poshing aggressively 
into traditional Porsche territory 
with rcheaper high-performance 
models. Will the price gap be too 


the cheapest Porsche 


large?. WiH the 924 no longer win . 
converts?. 

Porsche, says there is no evidence- 
of sales resistance yet, but concedes 
that it is too early to reach any 
meaningful conclusions. . 

In' the meantime I' have been 
sampling the new 924 and must say 
immediately that, in addition to the 
extra performance from- the slightly 
de-tuned version of the 944 23 litre . 
four-cylinder engine, changes to the 
suspension and wider tyres have 
.made a significant improvement m 
handling. Its jpredecessor would 
understeer when driven hard. The 
new one turns into sharp comers as 
if On rails and stilt keeps plenty of 
rubber in contact with the road. 

Straight-line steering at .speed 
also seems to be that bit more 
arruwiflte necessa r y to handle a top 
speed of bver l30 mph- Its ability to 
shrug off gale-force side winds was 
particularly impressive, as was the 
improved quietness. 



Steal 



341 FINCHLEY ROAD. . " >ALtb • sthvitc miml/ rMnt.o 

A HAMPSI L-AO lONDCN NW3 OE-T 01-4351133 01-3284721 


SERVICE AND PARTS 


Porsche 924S: Improved performance and handling 


Vital statistics: 

Model: Porsche 924S. 

Price: £14.984. 

Engine: 2479 cc four cyindar. 
Performance: 0-62 mph, 8.5 secs;~m&x 
speed 133 mph. 

Official consumption: urban, 23 mpg; 
56 mph, 46.3 mpg; 75 mph, 34.9 mpg. 
Length: 13.8 feet 
Insurance: group 8. 

But most surprising of all was the 
amount of grip and stable-handling 
available on roads recently affected 
by ice and snow. Thai must be a 
d irect result of the excellent weight 
distribution obtained by mounting 
the five-speed gearbox between the 
independently-sprung rear wheels 
and driving them via a transaxle 
system. 

It has to be accepted that the 
924S is really a two-seater sports car 
with minuscule rear seats. They 
really are impossible for adults and 
only marginally acceptable for 
growing children. The hatchback 
luggage space is rather shallow, but 
because the rear screen is markedly 



Toyota Celica: offers more for less money 


. bowshaped it will take surprisingly 
large packages. A roller-blind cover 
can be pulled into position to cover 
the contents from prying eyes. 

Toyota “Porsche” 

One of the leading: rivals of Jhe 
Porsche 924S must be Toyota's all 
new Celica 2+2. It is certainly one 
of the handsomest coupes around 
today, and an outstanding example 
of how- to harness a powerful engine 
to front-wheel drive without the 
h andling problems normally asso- 
ciated with that layout. 

- The Celica is a blgger car - about 
seven inches longer than the 
Porsche - and much more fully 
e qu ipped. At £11,999 it shows a 
saving of nearly £3,000 over the 
rather sparsely equipped German 
car (no central locking!). How's this 
for a lineup of standard, fitments - 
electric sunroof electric windows 
and mirrors, central locking, remote 
control tailgate and fuel flap 
releases, air conditioning, dash- 
board fhuh monitoring system, rear 
wiper, radio-cassette player with 
four speakers, electric aerial, height, 
rake and fore and aft adjustment for 
the driver's seat, and a steering 
wheel adjusting for height and 
reach? 

Gilding the lily does not compen- 
sate for shortcomings on the road. 
The old rear-wheel drive Celica 
would still have been disastrously 
short of Porsche appeal Not so the 
newcomer. It does have some 
minor faults, but as a package I 
believe it to be the most refined and 
European Toyota to reach these 
shores. 

The two-litre, fuel injected 16- 
valve alloy-head engine has already 
made a big impression on keen 
drivers in the Corolla GT and the 
sensational little MR2 sports car. It 
produces a robust 147 bhp that 
helps it to come within an ace of the. 
924*5 8.5 second time from 0-62 
mph.- 


The all-round disc brakes are 
powerful and light to operate, and, 
combined with Toyota's latest anti- 
dive, anti-lift geometry, do their 
work without fuss. 

But by for the most impressive ; 
aspect is the total absence of the 
confidence-shattering torque steer 
which so often accompanies -fierce 
acceleration in a powerful front- 
wheel drive car, and throws: it 
momentarily offline. 

The reasons are somewhat 
complex, but in brief the Japanese 
engineers appear to have solved the 
problem by using very stiff equal 
length drive shafts, much tougher 
engine mounts and reinforced 
suspension joints. 

The ride is good on the whole, 
although it does become a bit 
choppy on worn suburban roads. 


Vital statistics: 

Model: Toyota 2.0 GT. 

Price: £11 ,999. 

Engine: 1998 cc. fuel injected four- 
cyflnder. 

Performance: 0-60 mph 8.7 secs; max 
speed 131 mph. 

Official consumption: urban. 28.8 mpg; 
58 mph, 47.9 mpg; 75 mph, 37.6 mpg. 
Length: U.3 feet. 

Insurance: Group 7. 

My chief complaint against the 
Celica is the power-steering. It is < 
just that fraction too light and too l 
direct for my taste, although by the 
end of a week I was beginning to 
come to terms with it. Perhaps if I 
had not switched straight from the 
rock-steady steering of the 924 I 
would not have noticed it at alL 

The rear seats are restricted but 
not as badly as those in the Porsche. 
Boot space is much deeper and 
more accommodating. 

As a driving machine, pun: and 
simple, I prefer file Porsche, but for 
everyday transport and heavily- 
loaded weekend golf trips I would 
have to settle for the Celica. Overall 
it offers more for less money. 


EQYgi 

a 

B 



Je.Bfi 


velour. 59, 




IBB 


Sales: Mayfair 01-493 7705/ChalBM 01-352 7392 
Services Parts: Wandsworth 01-8709811 


280 SE. 2,000 miles. 
Astral Silver, stereo 
£18,950 
Daimler VI 2. Coupd 
1978, Whrte/Red, 
39,000 miles, GM auto 
gearbox. Ziebart from 
new, 1 owner. Superb 
example £5,250 
0909473202/485809. 


380 SL (S4 A) 

In t e rior. Auto Gratae. 


£22.975 
0253 42208 


ISO I 84 BDver talue /Cream. aula. 

bSk uluHi k- ■ roof /window*/ 

aerUl/tocfctno. stereo. 31.000 mOc*. 
£10.780. Tel: 061 723 3983. 


230E. Auto, 1984. ivory /L tan. laooo 
mtlee. as new, FSH. many extras. 
£10480 entt. (09781 360796. 


2x190 E 

bottiCrca 

_N«V BS. Back A Red. 
Electric windows & Buimnf 
automatic, black leaUier 
Interior ABS. pas. b.ooo + 7,ooa 
miles, as new 

£14,650 each 

Godainang 2408T 


MERCEDES 2BQCE 

1983 Cbamoaone met. velour, at- 
lays Unto. cor. c/c. Mercedes. Main- 
tained. 48.000 mb. Avan, end Jan. 
£1 1 -200. 

Tel: daytime 01-841 9973, 
eves Efiham 35835 


500 SEL 

B4A 16X00 miles, all usual extra, 
unmarked. Enver Blue / velour. 

Quick private sale £23X00. 


TEL 821 5748/491 7729 0. 


0 


SIMPSON'S GARAGES (BEXLEY) LTD 


V^^V/ aM^MmDtnariMklMMtar.MaK.ljmataZSAOJDa 

\ / 230 (A) A*tn4 iterates* tat, »Oovx,r»ei»*.tat» 12£Q<U0 

B»8a«i(V)r i—mw. mi *»■■■ — — ■ Aft ajls. nc zuB&oa 
2H SL 14 HU AsM Ohm: gray tMh. rear test, crtrfss, afiBjpt, 7,810 nOet H . W M8 

IM E 15 (C) *»nl dnr. Mm Oft. (toe nmt ms. IBM taOn IZWLDfl 

M-flBia aim am tyMGfllanlt Mg* MkirF.5A.29jeSBflK 3 W35J» 


QKWaBy appointed ira pusAgar car dtnltnr 
Ktnf x brant puts stnckbt (mechanical and body panels) 
Tel 01-303 1161 




in E. Aria. agnE mL a/e. (he tend. 
SpstUtt la In ton can RHD/UO 


Mm Pored* 811 TMs Star, itek 

lOttK. 

New Rama Espacc 738 TSE. 6-ipred. 

IM Om, erne arina. EHUS5 

Ms Rom stalk* ■ isaa. mat, hm 

Ude. mil not ismm. C22J5B 
Mi Ravca Stellas R 1971. C tampig ne. 
bmn bids, 1 lady man. 2 SAnm. 
f «wa 

5M SEL (TJ. Lspk Mas, guy write. nr, 
ata, rise sms. IIJOOb 01,758 
190 Js*®ar 43. Mri Ota. Has Wds, nr, 
57JB8m.10Mmr.fS.7B5 


l i.'lil l ir;rlU«.k„ 


MERCEDES 450 SL 
S. Blue mat. 40.000 FSH. leattier 
RC stereo, alloy wlatli. CC 
£13.400041.0. 

091 47B1196(W> 

091 407 1479 levee) 


MERCEDES 
IN THE MIDLANDS 

(84) 380 SE. emas £16535. (82) Y 
280 SL 29JD00 mis. Extras. £13,995. 
(80) 350 SL Low mb. £13.995. (81) 
240 TO. Extras. 37.000 mis. £7,995. 
USUAL DEALER FACILITIES 

THE MOTOR HOUSE, 

CANNOCK (D543S) 2239. 

Open 7 days 


1983 auto, 29,000 miles, h/s 
ton. ciutee. aJjs. h.l.w.w„ 
metallic sflrer, blue leather, 
personal reg, £ 18 . 000 . 

TaL- Ipswich 0473 57671 


380 SE March 85 

Nautlc Blue, air con. am. sunroof, 
taxed, faultless. £ 1 9 . 700 . 

TeL 0937 62992. 


280 CE 1979 V RECL Senior partner's 
Immaculate metallic red car will, all 
M.B. extras, including A.C. Full 
service history. £4.800 ono. 01-940 
700! CSun/eveaX. St Alfaom 0727 
57190 lomcex 



380 SE 82 POnMUiUc ooKL brown 
velour. 02 jOOO miles, e/wtndows. 
a nerve, sunroof, c rui se control, 


1883 300 D. 18.000 tub. LHD. 19Q..SL3 tO vgws Cmwonh. Dcllvety 
manual. « new. £7.900. T«4l 061 

duuuviB extras. £23.900. Tel: <0780) 702573 

(HL (0733) 68247(B). 

280TE 1082 Y 37.000 mis. whlte/ten ARMOURED MERCEDES 280 CE. 


Interior, air end. stereo radio caas. 
£9.700. Td (0630) 41 1478. 


Rolls-Royce 
and Bentley 
Authorised ■ 
Dealers 


WEYBRffiGE 


AUTOMOBILES 





MM Bota-Savca Aver SpUt- 
FlBMMd OetavsH Mge. brioe Me. 
Hped dark broarn. wMrwStna, 
1 owner. 1 1 OOOndtea__.«46JM 
1981 RoAS-Royce SSesr Sbadeev 
8. Fbdoed tanmam msoaota Mde 
nm taL I owner. 24.700 

nta 04,350 

1973 (T) Sols Boyne SJher Sha- 
dow IL FtatOed la beow tanwa 
as mm utsw . — s — £21 JOB 
AX ear vttkfcs ere Rofetan 
warrmted. 

wneftea tram la j s n ne ty >906. 
the RaDsRoyce and Agar frm- 
chlns of Let MemL WOWF. «S 

*e DwUsS nde the name sf Woe- 







■ TVF8 4Z 2+2 1970 powder bbte. 
reoalar amen deny qm «Bi »Tvl“ 
MW Voc.T5.7SO OM 0823 


™ajPH STAfl 1S7S- Royal Bloa. 
UAB mass. 0 / drive, n A bum. 
Jamdese performer. X& 66 O. 

oaasiiaas, 



STANMORE 
01-951 1300 


WOODFIEU) HOUSE, - 
HONEYPOT LANE, 
STANMORE. MIDDX 

eteiia.iac8Dltea» s ea » .4j00tiSes C11J 
■4 (A) 32H 4-dr 
l a dMa wBA lt, 

Minaaa* 







Mr. Opd, be peek. m. 
B.’VMOOmBn -*1M» 




01-959 6961 


BWW Mto. Ayte. sfacWc mg. 

Blase eonerf, 82^)00 mflw SUM 

as ua M Ms AieSo. etodrie «ooLTR)C 

w £bam em.MOBtata -tUASB 

w (8) BM Ama. BMiama. sumwl UDO 


16-18 HAI£ LANE, 
MMi HILL. NW7 


Aida. PoWt snttt 
K laJuUaBStle. ta JSOO 


■ Safari- sursnot 5 mesa, 
conmion. 22.000 nles 


LONDON AND 
HERTFORDSHIRE'S 
LEADING 
BMW DEALER 


O Holland Park# 

Where service comes naturally 


LONDON'S NEW BMW DEALERSHIP 

IS C 318 4 dr man. Potarts. sun roof, alloy wtwels. 5 
spaad. atarao. ata 4^XX) mflos. EB.895 . 

TO Y 318 auto. Btacfc, sun roof, stereo, 31.000 mflaa. 

paaox 

*84 A 3181 man. Rad, sun roof, atarao, 22,000 mflaa. 
£7,786. 

■84 a 32M auto. Hanna, cun roof, powar staaring. 
stereo. 1 UUDmlta.CU 8 B. 

*85 C 3263 4dr man. Dotphln, sun roof, cflack. atarao, 
•to. 4,000 mBas.E10.7S0. 



Coupe LHD 1980- Metallic Saver. 
Sunroof, lc. c om puter Anti draft. 
2Biiiiit armour gluing, 90 s proof 
cabin. PA System with many tgedd 
armoury mods. Any reasonable 
off er. 06 38 32923. 

MERCEDES 28QSE 1981 Auto Astral 
silver, bhw valour, electric windows, 
s/roof, headlamp wash wipe, rear 
headrests, radio cassette. aOoy 
wheels, exic condition £9.750. Tel 
041 942B971/041 962 7070 turtcc). 


MERCEDES 200 T B rag auto donel 
red/ blecfc doth. Fully unlctd 6 , 
valeted. Radio nadUL 30.000 mis. 

Exp^ l condition. £8.990. Id 1 980 MERCEDES 400 SLC. Regularly 
■0939) 426616 Swanage. I serviced. imwra,iiii« conmtlofi. 

■ White, leather mL A.CL sun-roof, 
tinted w/a. etc. C9.7Sa TeL- 01-341 
1122/1133. 


MERCEDES 450 SLC. Aug *78. While 
with tan IM. Low mileage. £ 13 . 000 . 
01-200 7626 or 0442 834274 

wkendslT). 

350SL 1980. 2 owners. 36.000 miles, 
mdse, leather, absolutely superb. 
£13.960. 04917 622 (T). 

TAXED FREE Mercedes for export In 
dock, new A used LHD. Farnfaoroudi 
Kent 62397 m. 

360 SL 1979. Sliver Blue. FSH. 6IL000 
mllee. £11.000. 01-679 6777 office, 
a 1-668 5070 Chonxej 

350 SL *79 rv) h/s lop. metallic red. 
stmerfa condition. 50.000 miles. 
£11 .996. Tel; DarVord 3461 95- 



Porsche 


General 


*86 C 3301 4dr man. Datpliln, sun roof, e/lock, starao, 
alloys eto. 4,000 mBra. E10.7S& 

'82T saw man. stvsr sun roof, Isstfisr. trim, stsrea, 

32.000 miss. 88^86. 

*88'C 8201 auta Polaris, sun roof, stereo, alloys ate. 

8.000 ntSsa. £11 JM5. 

*82 X 6281 auto SE. Sapphire, ful SE spec plus stereo. 

28.000 mUes. 88,486. 

■S4 B 0281 auto SE. SBwsr, IW SE spec plus spaders, 
stereo. 26.000 miss. .£ 12 , 886 . 

WCM 6311 man. White, sun roof, stereo, etc. 2.000 
mBss.ei8£05. 

*82 Y 835 CSi auta Hanna, hill *83 spec plus leather sir 
COfl. stereo, 48.000 mHss. E13£85. 

•82 Y 83S C« auto. Btock. ful -B3 Mtec. leather sports 

seats, sisraa 21 ,000 mass. E 16 JM 6 L 

■85 c 836 CM auto. Black, beige leather. fuS spec, plus 

air oond. stereo etc- 4.500 mflBS.t28.785- 

■86 C 7321 HOD SE. Bronze, lufl SE spec plus speed 

hoU. etc, 5^00 mfles. £18^96. 

■85 B 7351 auto SE, Coemos blue, lul SE spec, 9,000 
mDes. 820^85. 

Open 10am-l pm Similar 


911 Carrera 
Sport Coupe 
19B3A 35,000 mfles, Guanta 
Red, Full A^.N. Service 
htatory, ExcoOent condition 

£21,000 

Milton Keynes (0908) 
584499/585029/582071 



Porsche 928 S2 Auto 

Sun roof air cond full leather 
trim. KRn rad metallic 1984 A 
reg. FSH 19.500 miles vgc. 
£28,500. 

Tri 0920 821 380 eves or 
0707271111 (day). 



% 2 FIRST 

EVERYTIME 


1983 A 

PORSCHE 944 

Guards Red. 1 Elderly lady 
owner. 27,000 miles. As new 
£13,995. 




04893 5851 home 


1-2-U- HoiMnc ?a-k Avcnufi 

KcPsn;:!cn. Londor 4'JE 


01-221 8575 


First Front® 

Appraved Used BMWs 

NEW BMW t AVAILABLE FOR 1.2 or S YEAR CONTRACT 
HRE WTN FULL MAWTENAHCE 


924 LUX 

1983 Y Ren 39X100 mne. i owner. 
Ouand Rrd. PJ3AL sunroof, al- 
loys. fun service hUny. Bdudani 
sale, excellent condition, view 
London. 

£8,750 O.D.O. 

0902 330024 


1984 944 


PORSCHE SII BrfB. Carrera Cabri- 
olet. full I unifier interior and trim. 
ti m ed windows. Mack, unma n dale 
Condi tlan. low mileage. £26.999 ono. 
Pintle conta c t Mix Klyira 01-205 
2498 1 day tune only). 


924 LUX 

1983 Y. Guard* Red. black pin- 
stripe. sunroof, para. 206/60 tyres, 
alarm, coui cassette holder. Pioneer 
rad/ cas. Prtvata sole 36.000 mb. 

£10,450 

Tel (07S9J 67219 


Saab 



SAAB TURBO 1SS 8 re*- black, 
■earner seats. 18 months warranty. 
22.000 miles. £10,260. ODD. Tel 
home 021-329-2219. work 021-643- 
Olll. 


SAAB 800 cu Oct 83. A reg. 26,000 
miles, slate Mue.Aerro cassette, 
sunroof etc. £6.760 ono. 0630 
415460. 



1737+VAT 

BMW 739 Auto gi47.tSi.VAT 

CHARGED MONTHLY. WEEKLY, FIGURES SHOWN 


01-5826000 


8 REG 844 Lux. auto. 20000 tide, 
guards red. s/r. fun AJA .Ser vice 
history. £14.950. (0630) 46573 

lomcd I065E) 263679 Ifvcu, 


General 


BMW M635 CSi 
Coupe 

Manuel • air ‘cond rear head- 
rests, Ml sports, leather-trim. - 
bronze, August 198S C reg, 
vgc 6,000 miles fsh £25,500. 
Tat 0920 *21860 eves 
or 07072 71111 (day) 



1883 A BMW 7361 AS&. Air Cond. 
one. ESn. r /atm 6 mere. C133W6. 
092623821 an. 

NEW BMW- a. AD mod eta t o under, 
tore* discounts. TaL 022779 3010. 


Motors wanted 


844 LUX May 1983 21.000 miles. 
Aln&sr white, leather sports teas. 
PDM. Loddne wtwdnuls. wide lyres, 
rear valance. C12^&a Ol 436 0BS4. 


MAY 80 *71 SC. Sport Tarn. 
■nenervB Una. ralton maintained, 
fan srac. 48.000 miles only, superb. 
£12.960. Tel: 082072-3*41. 


iTiis 




380 SLC 1981 (W) 

Air con, elec sun roof, stereo. 
. full beige hide, service history, 
thistle green; £15,850. 

944 LuXAutp 1984 

(B) 1 owner, s/roof, pdm, ste- 
reo. &JD0D rrts, beige berber, 
trim alpine white; E14JB50. - 
Tet Motor -Way Sports Cars. 
Canterbury- 


WANTED msglhr of *tarl*rs. oner. 
names, dynsmoe. new or auslUy 
rebufU. Send details & pncee to: box 
Mb 1.729 KL The TUna> CO- 


' .' f '■ •te Tbff' 



RANGE ROVER HIRE 

AH new model 
Pi Vogue's available 
. .from £100 per day . 

Tet (0483) 277874 (office hews) 
(0903) 812267 (24 In) (T)- 


ROLLS ROYC8 Silver «A tt won 
chauffeur (far hme awtane. Tel: 
LouoneU. Kent 04747 7816. 


Registration 

numbers 


32 GLL S.on!^a eneni 

ram new, Cxecttcnt aHUUmJMpT. 






Personal Imports 

Sava £££*s on most makes - 
AB ears - RJ-i.D, factory built. 
UK specifications. Please in- 
sist on genutna detailed, 
written quotes. 

For free brochure please call 

Sheen Enterprises 
01-248 2025 
open 7 days. 


A RE a VOLVO 280 GLE Eetata. auto. 
68.000 mis. £6.000 ojls. Teh 0604 
22111 . 


VOLVO 740 O L, 1088. Under aueran- 
tee voc. Many axtraa. C7.10O. TeL- 
Ol -076 OSBB fo« or B4S 3692 OU. 


FERRARI 308 GTB fW) Red/mamMUa 
hide. Rocent spray /new clutch. Mint. 
£18.976. Tet 01-396 7616. 


32-T-rOMfS a sc-CK-sv.w-jr 


NEW CITROEN CX MODELS 

CX 20 RE saloon 
CX 20 Safari srith air con. 
CX 25 TBS Safari Auto 
CX 25 GT1 Auto, Saloon 


NEW CITROEN BX MODELS 
SPECIAL DEALS THIS 
MONTH MOST MODELS 
INSTOCK 

INCLUDING BX ESTATES 

1935 CX GT Tarim, hUck. etec- 
Me snreri. 12.000 mk £8,995 


Cttrogn’s No 1 Dealer 
01-749 6091 



300X2 2x2 AUTO 

Blur / Blade Terse- June '86. 
8.000 mis. cruise control . 

Reluctant sale owner anUprallna at 
new. 

£1 0.900 
0425 53932 . 


Montego BG/88C 2JKL Choice of ID 
from £6,795. 

Maotago B5/BSC 2J) HLG. Cholca of 5 
from E8/I95. 

Rower S5/8SC 2JJS Choice from 
0450. 

Rower B5/BGC ZflS Choice from 
KBfiSQ. 

Rower B5/88C 2.6 Vindem Ptas. 
ChoKe from £1(L250. 

Raver B5/88C 3J Vandem Pbs auto. 
Choicaof 5£1^95a 
Rover 1985 Vitesee. Manual 
Moonracer. 7,000 rates £11 JW. 
Rover B5/88C Vandem Plus ER. 
Choice from £12,460. 

START1NS 
Ashton Hall Rd 
Birmingham 
021 3260833 
Ashton Rd North 
Birmingham 
0213592011 


H.W.M. 

offer 

Aston Martins 

VOLANTE 


1983 Silver 
1980 Blue 
1979 Blue 


£39,880 

CS2.9EO 

£24^50 


VANTAGE 

1961 model Blue £28^80 

HW MOTORS LTD 

Axton Mvttn Dtetrflxitore 
Wafttm-on-Thtenea 220404 


SINCLAIR 
C5 CLEARANCE 

NEW/UNUSED 

Originally £385 now only El 20. 
ideal children's garden toy. 
LAST 50 AVAILABLE 
Tefc Aughton Green 
(0695) 422203 Of 421904 (D 



RENAULT 5 , 

Mid Engine Turbo 2 ? 

210 DHB. Brand new, 
mites. Blaupunkt New Yoric 
stereo. AB extras. 

Coat £13,000 
wfli take £11^00 
TaL 0280 815254 t 


DISABLED PRTVmya CAR neon 


1 . 6 L. 9 dr. e umm a iir . wntte - iw rea- 
Ft* -86. 6.700 rota ttyd e^ole. 
elec. wheeKhetr wnfatel JgJHSRSJR 
fllrfvliw jQftdon. ' J& 2 GO- 
(02468B)&7A. ■ - - 


■ ■■ 








FORDORANADA 2-81 Grea oxecuBve. 
86 C ree. Mineral Blue, gw jaBwr. 
Mr wwii. 9.000 miles. £9,990 or 
P/ex. Td 0785 7B788 ITT 
LOTUS E*P*IT 1 960, 6.000 mis only . 

Canntxat (08436)2230. Open T days 
FERRAJD 308 OTte QV. B reg 

atW/W Mu* leethcr. 10.000 
mtlee wm» htafan y .1 wmer, ma t. 
£26.960. 01 -328 8333 (T). . 
AMBRICAM Motor Homre wjW. 

mid. repaired, eu viced, • hW- 
: TnvdwgrtdMHjreanii, 'Wolrer- 
bampuaio9027S44Ta. . 


















































































26 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 24 1 $86 


A time for Bowers. 
Interflora 

More than words rati say' 





EATH8 


<PUofcnum3lliwa 



.—w01-2nB1„. 

* ssamss 

pubUrattonJ n? tauiuSS?*- ,££ 

rasmaBUffiBi 
JK J*nw& 
saSB-SSt b, < a JSS? 9 ASSESS 

5JJJ2J***- Every cn dmvo ar win be 

2S2T •*?**» t advertisement an 
£SS. but cannot be 

wnwiieMRenknaiv advised to 
MJWv Dtetnsdvn as to the 

ItUormauon contained In 

Mveruaements. or to seek 
ptwtoetonal advice, before entering 

,W£Hny_gxTCTIIttneTiI 


tN RIGHTEOUSNESS tiiatt thou be 
^^ttshed: mous than be for from 
am CMon. baiifli 54 14. 


BIRTHS 

AR5CQTT on January 22nd In 
Edinburgh 10 Hillary ine Croluml 
and Lawrence, a daughter iHannab 
Janei. 

MVAHT on January 20 ai North 
Wing Hospital. BcdfonL to EUzabem 
and Nigel a son Sam iSaiauel 
Alexander Henry 1 0 brother for 
Norman. Susie. Louise and Jonathan. 

CASTLE on Januroi' 1 9th 10 Saliy-Ann 
inn Graver! and Howard - a dough 
Irr Laura Philippa 

COME. - On IBlh January 1906 lo 
Katherine and Hugh, a daughter. 
Elisabeth Honor. 

COX on January 20th ai St. 
Bartholomew's Hospital. 10 Kate (Nee 
MacKenzte) and Chrlalopner. 
daughter. 

EDWARDES-KCR. On January 16. to 
Gillian imt Burgess) and Gordon - a 
son iPatncft Donald) a brother for 
Douglas. 

GIBBS - On January 19th M Uve 
Middlesex Hospital, to Judith tn*c 
Sollaal and Jeremy - a daughter, 
stslex for Sarah. 

JOHNSON on January 22nd to 
Virginia and Simon, a daughter. 
Maudte AlMa. a aster for Max. 

LATHAM - On January 20lh. 1986. lo 
Christian (nee Scorn and Antony - a 
daughter. Helen Ann. 

MAKIM On January 22nd in Sydney 
lo Jane into Fogibonl and Alex, a 
daughter. 

MOSELEY. - On January 22nd to 
Jessica and William. a son 

PI KNOCK on January 20th lo Kounfca 
into Cruen) and Douglas a son Max 
Denham. 

ROPER - On January I7th In Sydney 
to Amaryllis lore Reynolds) and 
Simon, a son Wiuum Arthur aovts). 

ROSS. - On January 19. 1986. to 
Simone into BargecU and Howard - a 
son 1 Jonathan baaci. 

RUSHTON on January 2OU1 at 
Tiverton Hondlal 10 NcU and Chris 
into Barry) a daughter Eve Hannah, 
a sister for Timothy and Anthony. 

THOMPSON. - On January 23. at St 
Thomas* Hospital. London, to Diana 
nice Jewut] and David - a son tJamos 
Thomas). 

WOODMAN. - On January 22nd lo 
Jane tnec TUlouan) and Nicholas, a 
daughter (Lucy Jane), a sister for 
Kane. 

WRIGHT On January 21st 1986. lo 
Leslie and Cynthia - a girl (Samantha 
EUzabeUu Humana Wellington 
HospilaL St John's Wood. London. 

MI8YWEDMNG 

TILLEY - BOUSFIELD. On January 24 
1906 at sl Helen's Church. Wdtoit. 
Captain Douglas Tilley m.C. RA to 
Mary Bousfleld now at Springfield 
House. Butmer. York. 


DEATHS 

BARNES. - On January 25. 


peacefully 
y. Phyllis 


Lily 4UIU JWIU 

Funeral at 
rch an Tuesday 
pm. Memorial 


home with her family. Phyllis 
Louise. 1 nee Bax Chambers), aged 87. 
dearly loved wife of Fran 
mother of Hugh and Sana, also be- 
loved grandmother of Phi Up. Louise. 
Jonathan. Caroline. Alexander. Jane 
and WUUam. and great grandmother 
of Robert Service on Thursday. 
January 30. al St Andrews. East- 
bourne. at loom, follow ml by burial 
ai Fine Parish Church al 11.50am 
Flowers lo Koine & Son Ltd. East 
bourne. 

BATHO an 21st January al CoxhlU 
Manor Nursing Home after a short 
Illness. Doctor Edith Batho aged 90. 
Fellow of LTnlrerslly College London 
and formerly principal of Royal 
H010 way College. Much lev 
of Kathleen Mahoney and much 
loved aunt of Felicity and John 
Sharwood-Smim. Fu 
Ch obtain Parish Church 
28th January at 2 pm, 
senicr lo be announced 
Flowers tram family only otherwise 
any donottora lo Mount Vornon 
Scanner Appeal. 
BERESFORD-PEIRSE. - Francis 
Campbell dc la Poer. on January 
nth. 1986. aged 74 
BLACXMORE on 22nd January al 
Berkeley Nursing Home. Oevcdon. 
Bessie Honor, widow of Bernard and 
beloved mother of Sidney Funeral 
senior al SL Mary the Virgin. Yanon 
at 2pm Wednesday 29 th January 
(□Hawed by ctcinallan at Weston' 
Super-More. Flowers lo L. Bennett * 
Son. Funeral Directors. 9 Quean's. 
Road. Clevedon. Avon. 

BOROEWtCH on 3isi January peoco- 
luBv In MspUM. John Bordewtm 
mvo of Brtghioo. and beloved 
husband of Georg*) and CUher 
John. Cremation al The Downs 
Crematorium on Monday . 27Ui 
January at 5pm. Cut flowers only 
may be sen! to. 29 CpBeoo Place. 
Brighton. 

BREWER On Monday. SOUi January 
1986. suddenly al homo. Ehzaneth 

■ Betty L wife of the laic Dr. H. F 
Brewer and mother of David and 
Meewenno- Funeral private Please, 
no led era. 

B ROM MAGE, peacefully on 17lh 
.lanoaiy at Sydney Herlvel House. 
Alderney. Channel Islands. Dr Edith, 

Marie Brommago. aged 85, widow of 

Joseph Charles and devoted staler of 

Daisy Ford and Barbara Carr 
BULKY - Peacefully In hosplul on 
January i«n. Okie Margmia aged 
nef HUM amiuhiM of uw laic Ernest 
Charles Buies' and dew ststrr. aunt 
and grrsi aunl. Cremation has taken 
place 

BUR HOUGH, .on Old January, i960 
suddenly al Ida home. Froakluvne. 
Colston. Devon. Ben George iMoxi. 
hetovrd husband nf Margaret. 
Tvmeral srrvKe at The E-cler and 
Devon cremauwtum on Tuesday 
.luiiiars'JHkdf.n Family flowers 
ratty piraar. donation* U desired lo 
Barnsley Educational Trusl CO 
Uovds Rank. sewn. Devon En- 
guliiee S J RKiUuds A Son Tel 
•Catylan) 62353 
CHILTON, peaceful!! on January 
llllh. 1986. hi Ton budge. Elizabeth 

■ Belts') Manners, aged 94. widow of] 
v Ire-Admiral I G G. 0.1: son. CJB 
farmeTU' widow of Ural Manael 
Bowls'. R-N. Loving mother 

Rrggse. awrawlhn d Dick, the 

Dents and Pal Grandmother and sn- 
ipe. Funeral al Holy Tri nity . 
Rronuuon. on Monday. January 27th 
al I 50pm. Family Bourn only LO J. 
H Kenyon Lid. 74 Rochester Row. 
SW1P1JU Trirphonr 01-834 
4624 No letters please 

CLEGG. SIR ALEC CLEGG. bOkUMV. 
Tadr aster. North Yorkshire. For- 
merly ChKf Educonon Otflrer. Wsm 
R iding of Yorkshire. Loving husband 
nt Jessie and fattier of Andrew. John 
and Peter Peacefully on 2«h 
.lanuniy. 1906 Burial sendee 
Saxton Church on Saturday. 23 
January- al 2 am- Family flowers 
■mis'. Donations l( so destrrd to The 
Parkinsons Disrate Society, at 36 
Portland Place. London. WIN 30G. 
COEN. On January 20m. Joseph 
V rrney. aged 76. Hire a snort Uinra. 
runmi service an w rancsdayWlh 
.lanuors' at St Mary's cooimic 
cemetery. Ketwl Green. Harrow Rd. 
NWioat 11 30 am 
COLE peacefully after Increasing 
weakness. Lrebe WUUam. aged 78 
years BaMvedofJUl.hta wile and his 
sens Rowland and Denis, also Ids 
stepson. Mervvn and Aten Saunders 
and IMS 12 grand ch ildren. For 21 
sears Financial Directorof Ba bcock 
& wucox mtrnudkmal. Pm ate crcm- 

SSSJ'SnSSSJiSJ* fl5Si°SutSS 

Rrfmmcd Church SoNW U»va 
Albans. Hill s an Thursday SOB 
January at 2pm. No imksis. do- 
nations IT desired to Meoil. Stroke 
amicnrat Association. Tavistock 

House. North. Tavloock Sauare. 
London. 

DAVIES. - Monksfown. Co Dublin. 
January 22nd. 1986. tai her 92nd 
vrarpracefliHy al Canrsfort Nursing 
Hon»e.aSb gt» iBettyi wid ow oT£ 
S P Davies. Deep* twnjtied by her 
^■ m te i Hope. brother Charles 
■Canada), cousin Marforte. relatives 

and a large circle of fDends. Very 
5^ literal of the Grant fl unlty. Fir 
neral tnm Oumns_FUneTal Home. 28 
daaQiule Real. Dun Lsoelujre. to 
Oamnin crematorium on Friday 
^KErifMyihaiSpm. 

DRCWETT. - On January 21sl. after a 
nSShKcss bomewWhjjreei dton to/. 

Otlve HMv sued 74. wife of the lair 
«iori aSm. mother of Jenny. 
eramhnotheTto NoeL Aunt OUvc 10 
mebavsTFunwal service at St Peter's 
Cztarcn Haanmeraiitn. at 1 1 am on 
jSiSt ggiSSwad W burial at Old 
Basham. Sttessx at 3pm. Flowers in 
Barnas and sems. 1 1 2 Dev anport Rd. 
VVI2. «r dos umo ns lo Mcnrao 123. 
GoMsra Lane. ECl ■ 

MB 
the . 

K-Sta^uanral service 01 GoMors 
Groci u a ma t o rf u ffl. Monday. Jan 
27th. at 12-gop m - 

CRAHAWL EUaabeth wife to 
aSE5&mr S *mc<*uny si home 22hd. 
January 1986. 

IMmSID* on Ja nnarv Sind 1986 
neactovinv >1 Freeland House. 

! frowmS: OidWV, Margaret Edmi in 
: her Otoh yesr _- Bateved ApntofHqye. 
tnary and Join- Funeral service at 
All Saints attach. Wokingham on 
Thursday. January 3081 at 10.46 
am Family fl o wers only please. , 
Donations ir.Gw byd to An BamnJ 
. Chorch. WBPtntdtam- 


DEATHS 

1BUTHIUE ALEXANDER GORDON 


Georgina and Caroline. Funeral 
service ai SL Andrew*# United Re- 
formed Church- DanfOnL 1.30 pm. 
. Tuesday 28tfa January, followed by 
Prtvate f re n u Hon . Mamarial s erv ice 
at Farnbxpiam Parish Church al 
P.m. on Wednesday 26di February. 
HENDRY. - On January 22. 1986, 
peacefully at Porter mnrmary. 

Andrew Gabon, aged 78. to Kerne). 
House. KXrmetna. Dearly loved 

tnraumd to Jane, dev Wtar 
Michael. John and David, and _ 
m uch towed grandteltv-. Funeral 
service in the Cathedral Church to St 
PauL High a. Dundee, on Tuesday. 
January 26. at 11am. Intenneni 
tberesner at Eastern Cemetery al 
1I.30BRL Family flowers only 
ple as e, but donations in Ueu may. 
desired, be sent in Concur Research. 
IUTCHINSON on !9Ul 
hospital iRu a short 

brother to Betty Reach 

Motile Burred. Funeral at the 
Lambeth Cr emato rium, al 1 1 a.m. on 
Wednesday 29th January. 

MARKJE. - Suddenly in Ijondon on 
17th January 1986. Pamela. 

44. Dauohter to Allred and 

Marie. West Wickham. Kern, and 
sister to Marten. Janet and John. 
Funeral service at BorKenham 

Crematorium. Omars EM Road. 
Beckenham. 27th January ai 
1.40pm. Family flowers only. 
Donations If wished 10 aieyne 
Hospital for Mentally Handicapcd 
ChOdren. Woodland Way, West 
Wickham. Kent BBS 9LT. 

PERHAM on Uanuary 22nd on her 
noth bmnday. peacefully at heme. 
Violet MargraL beloved wife f 
Leonard and mother to Jenny and 
Celia. Service at ythe Park crema- 
torium. Aidraahot on Tuesday 28th 
January al 12 JO pm. Family flowers 
only, donations in lieu to Uie 

Artlultus and Rheumatism Council 
For RoMurch. 41 Eagle Street 
London WC1 R AAR 
POWELL. - On 2 1 it Janu 

Pour's Hospital. Chertsey. _ 

86. much loved falher of Ymnr 
agndfanier of Richard and 
Ou-bMopher and son In law of Faina. 
Service on Monday. 27 January al 
Woking Crematorium at 1.30pm 
Flowers to Surrey. Funeral Services 
3 Pyrford Rd. West ByfleeL 
RICHARDS On 21st January 1966 al 


Richards, and dear 

jn Funeral. Tuesday 

28th January, service 2.50pm in 


SACKMAN.- On 21st January. 1986. 

peacefully after a short Illness. 

Bern a rd, beloved husband to Mamie 
and father of Simon. 

3 CHIPPER, BRIGITTE, peacefully on 
Tuesday. January 2 1st in hospital. 
Deeply mourned by O. Burchard and 

all hear friends. Funeral service win 

be held al Mortlak# Crematorium. 

Cliirore avo. London SW14. an 
Tuesday. 28th January at 11.00 am 
SEAMAN. - Lewis Charles Bernard 
on January 21 . peacefully In his sleep 
al SI Peters Hospital. Chertsey. Be- 
loved husband to Frances and loving 
father of John. Richard and Mary 

Funeral service at 3pm. Tuesday. 
January 2B. al Woking Crema- 
torium. No flowere by regueoL 
STAPUEFORTH. - On January 22 In 
bar 82nd vear. Ada Urania 
Northootc. al Dorset county Hospital. 
Dorchester, to Little Cron. Uplyme. 
Lyme Roots. Darting mother of Mary 
and Ann. grandnioUio- and great 
grandmother. Funeral servlc at St 
Peter and St Paul. Uplyme. on 
Wednesday. January 29. at 2pm, 
loQowed by Interment. 

TIP PI NS Suddenly on 19th January 
1986 at home. Osorae aged 80 
Requiem mam. at St r^fehael and St 
Martins R. C Church. Bath Rd 
Hounslow on Wednesday 29th 
January al 9am followed by 
committal at Han worth crematorium 
Enquiries to Barton + San Hounslow 
TeL 01.67 00118- 
WADSTED. - Born in Copenhagen 
Bengt WadMed. CBE. formerly to 
Stockholm at IDs country home In 

Lynnes Denmark an January 11. 

1986. In his eighty -eighth year. Be- 

loved husband to Edith, lather to 
Jens. Peter. Anders and Mkc Blow 

Barani whose leva and geotoostty 

win always be remembered by them. 

his daughters- In- law. tun 

children and great 

Cremation has taken 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 

B1RKIN - A memorial sendee wtu be 
held for Air Commodore J. M. BUrfcin 
al St Clement Danas. The Strand 
Frid ay. Feb ruary 2 1st at 12 noon. 

DAVE N TRY.- a memorial service for 
Robert Oliver Viscount Daventry win 
be held at noon on Thursday. 20 
February, al St Margaret's Church, 
Westminster. 

FIELD. - A memorial sendee for David 
and Sally Field, win be beM at John 
the Baptist Church. Little Mmenden, 
Buckinghamshire an Friday 
February 21BL al 2.30 p JIL 
ETERS. - A service of Uianksotvlng 
for the life to Eric Conrad Peters vice 
president to the AH England Li 
Tennis Club, win be held . 
Wednesday. February i2tn. at 
llJOsnu ai St James Church. 197 
Piccadilly Wl. 


IN MEMORIAM 

BOARDMAN. m loving re m e m b ran ce 
of my mother Bertha, who dtad on 24 
January 1986. and to my falher 
Harry .died lOAprU 1965. Always-M 


FORTHCOMING EVENTS 


JAMES ROGERS win be showing (by 
tastei) a range to Intarating wtne 
bargains al Uie Barnes Wine Shop. 
Barnes High Street, tomorrow. 
Saturday 2Sm January from 11 a.ra. 

NEW EVENT. THE BLUES BALL Bat 
a Feb The HurUngham Club Ldn 
SW6. Boogie Bros Blues Band + 
ethers. Tkts £20 Inc boL wine small 
cab etc. RlngOl 7367402. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


HETTIC MAY BRACE - Deceased - 

Win any person claiming to be related 

lo or Having any interest In the Estate 
to Hettie May Brace Deceased late to 

107 Hornsey Lane. London N6. who 

died on the 8th day to June 198a 

please contact Messrs Caiman Coyle 

to O Camden P as s ag e. Mlnoten. 
London. N1 8EA. soUCUOTS HI the 

AftnUntstralors to her Estate within 

21 days to the dale esxeof s ta ting me 

nature of Utetr i mp re st and datra. 


SOVIET _ PRISONER OF 

CONSCIENCE Roald ZcUchcnok b 
vrtously 111 and his wife is Mind. On 
KQB Irumned-up charoea be tun been 
renlonred lo 3 years In an Arctic 
Circle Labour Camp - although e 
the prison doctors warned that 

cannot survive u. If you care, contact 

Council for CLA-R.E~ 37b New 
Cavendish St.. London Wl M 8JR. 
PER SO NS/ COUPLE required to look 
alter rural property in Southern 
France near Montpelier. Accommo- 
dation provided for mtnnnal 
maintenance duller Contract term 
are year. Ideal s ituati on fi 
author, artist Application hi wrtm 
Mrs Brown, scmley stu 


URGENTLY REOUIRED - sponsors to 
Invest In career to ambitious. 
promouDM ractno driver aSi after 
successful first sea s o n to racing. 
Many promotional aopwtumttea. 


CHRISTMAS DISAPPOINTING. DM 

Uie drinking tabus to a loved one 

mar the festive season? Effective * 

recog n ised treatment for this mesas k 

available ui beautiful surroundings. 

Act nowi For mustrotod prospective. 

coaiaa Clouds How. fist Knayie. 
Wills SP 3 6BC. 0747 83SS7. 
AUTHORS: A unique A compre- 

hensive service to pal you Into prtnL 
Forget all Bmm Grustranons. Write: 
Thomas PubUaMng Literary Services. 

188 Dock Rd. TObiny. Essex. 03702 

79103. 

PAUL YOU ARE MY KEEPER - but 
Otis time 1 have made a bruuonl csui 
and you have taken a fine chancel 
Good Luck on tour - Love AH. 


In llie Communities of 


L'ARCHE 


! Oh A Mr Mrt an Mir staraf «tt 
. . 1 aba ban aaaiai bwUcaps. Wl 
praiW* bames (Tor Us 1 saemaiy) hi irtf- 


pH. Fns bosblsl E sENr ristafls ftooi Nn. 
|KL L IMBt LIMN UL 14 laatea Hd. 
SoffoE NR34 SNH 
tpbeai B5B2 71B32D 


Let your care 
for animals 
liveon 

5 — ^ by remembning 
thePOSA 

fl* *\X in your 



WmnfortiutMfaio: 

Pooplo's Dispensary I 

tor Side Animals 
OemTT.POS* House 
^OuUi jtatL DortJnu Surer RH43LB 



PERSONAL COLUMNS 

® Trade 01-837 2104 and 01-278 9232 Private 01-8373333 or33U 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


USA summer 

— 60.000 
j etc. or C&-9B Rom 
■ End SL Oxford. 

MARLS OttO MOTORMAJHIA 1/6 to 
prtxe worth CTLOOO for "Hlteni. T 
04- and -he w or ld's 23". Ptwnr 
086889098. 

ROYAL ASCOT BOX WANTED. For 
ftrat or second day; urgent raaidre. 
mem fbr Cily nrnvTeleahone 01431 
712a 

FRANCE. We want to Bve there. 
ATCBB a c t plus fanny. Keen, adapt- 
■tie. 0947-87604. 

GRATEFUL THANKS to St Jade. BVM 
and all the Saints for help received. 
RJM. 


urgently needs e atry 
MUSIIKSI. Box 2914 11 h 

ST VALENTINES DAY ... Say It with 
fireworks! see Tlraee Set vices 
Column today. 

"PROFESSOR HIGGINS.** Have erne 


HOLIDAYS AND VILLAS 


NEW LOW FARES 
WORLDWIDE 

ABIDJAN _ BOMBAY 


KLUMPUR 

BANGKOK 


KARA CM 

SINGAPORE 

CAIRO 

OTANE 

DAMASCUS SEOUL 
BAHRAIN TOKYO 

SKYLORD TRAVEL LTD 
2 P enman ameeL Loudon. Wl 
Tat 01-489 3821/ 

AIRLINE I 


Pence offering. - Etixa. 

BONHAMS MONTPELIER modern 


HOLIDAYS AND VILLAS 


TRAILFINDERS 

WORLDWIDE LOW COST 
FUGHTS. 

THE BEST - AND WE CAN 

prove rr. 

168JXW totems since 1970 
AROUND THE WORLOFROME765 
o/w nn 

SYDNE Y £392 £64! 

PERTH _ £371 £582 

AUCKLAND £409 £770 

EI9B. 


BALI £314 £881 

HONGKONG £257 £474 

DELHI /BOMBAY £280 £598 
COLOMBO £241 £420 

CAIRO £160 £270 

NAIROBI £231 £588 

JO*BURG £308 £479 

LIMA £283 £484 

LOS ANGELES £107 £326 

NEW YORK £129 £288 

GENEVA £78 £89 

42-48 EARLS COURT ROAD 
LONDON W86EJ 
EUROm/USA FUGHTS 
01-937 8400 
LONG HAUL FLIGHTS 
01-603 1818 
lst/BUEHMESS CLASS 
01-938 3444 

GOVERNMENT LICENSED/ 

BONDED 

ABTA IATA ATOL I486 


“WE'RE NO 1 ** 

“1st CLASS” 
••EXECUTIVE CLASS** 
“TOURIST CLASS** 
-AROUND THE WORLD* 
•BOOK, NOW FOR 86* 

SYDNEY - MELBOURNE 1 

PERTH “ BRISBANE" 

HOBART “ ADELAIDE' 

xrarea ** south Africa- 

AUCKLAND - WELLINGTON 1 

FUJI ** PORT MORESBY * 

Bangkok “ tokyo 1 

SNGAFORE “ MANILA 1 

DUBAI “ BAHRAIN" 

MIDDLE EAST ** NAIROBI' 

LUSAKA " URARE* 

TORONTO “ VANCOUVER 1 

UK ANGELES " MIAMI 1 

SEATTLE “ S RLANOSCTJ" 

IRA- USA “USA 1 

SUN WORLD TRAVEL 

(£0^1969) 

59 South St Epsom. Surrey 
(03727) 27538/25530/27109/ 

41 769/24832/26097 
Telex 24667 


LAST MINUTE/ 
ADVANCE BOOKING 
WINTER SUN BARGAINS 


Abo dm March. April ft through- 
out the year Inc. apt or hotel ft 
lllgnb from Gatwick and Man- 
chester (aUHect to aupne ft avaUL 
Summer '86 brochure avaltebte 
now. 

VENTURA HOLIDAYS 

Tel. Sheffield (07421 331 lOO 
Manchester 1061)834 6033 
London (01)280 1385 
ATOL 2054 


BOMBAY 
Non-Stop 3 Weekly 



UP, UP & AWAY 



01-402 9217/18/19, 

Wl Saturday lO.CO.13J 


AIR TICKET SPECIALIST 

New York £249 Jotiurs £468 
Los Aug £339 Nairobi £380 
Sydney £788 Bangcock £339 
Auckland £886 Toronto £349 

DART AIR 


tswi 

I T144 is Itnos) 


DREAM FUGHTS 

O/W RTN 
SYDNE Y £410 £615 

P ER T H £378 £848 

AUCKLAND £410 £740 

BANGKOK £198 £325 

LOS ANGELES £198 £328 

NEW YORK £157 £248 

DREAM HOUDAVS 

PHONE 01 -684 7371 


AIRFARE SPECIALISTS 

O/w Return 
Sydney £428 £645 

Auckland £420 £774 

Bangkok £208 330 

Jotiurg £264 £470 

Lea Anode# £177 £380 

LONDON FLIGHT CENTRE 
131 E&rb Court Road. SWS 
Phone: (01 > 370 6332 


LOW COST FLIGHTS. Mod European 
dtoUndMana. Call Valexandar 01-402 
0082. ABTA. ATOL 1960. 


LANZAROTE. MALDIVES Holiday 
Wands 01-836 4385. ATOL 2061. 


CHEAP FUGHTS WORLDWIDE. 
Haymarket Travel OI 930 1366. 


MALAGA, TENERIFE, LANZAROTE. 
01-441 1 1 1 1 TYaveiwtM. ATOL 1788. 


Iasi. FUgttibooheri. 01 -387 9ie 


Uttirm £99. Motor TraveL 01-486 
9287. LATA. 


CHEAP FARES worldwide. Pan 
01-439 2944. 


lowest fares 

WORLDWIDE 

Frankfurt C99Calro £205 
Paris £69 Nairobi £389 
Rome £99 JObUTO £435 
Milan £88 H Kong £*9fi 
Athens £109 Toronto £249 
Malaga £8S N York £275 
Faro £89 LA/SF £345 

Cen.Zur £79 Syd/Me! £699 
Vienna £129 Dtieit £548 
L Palmas £119 TAvIv £169 

SUN & SAND TRAVEL LTD 

_ 21. Swallow SL. London, w. l 
TeL 01-437 0537 01-734 9603 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

■trade return 

JO'BURG/HAR £300 £466 

NAIROBI £220 £325 

CAIRO £130 £200 

KHARTOUM £188 £275 

LAGOS £220 £320 

DELHI— BOM £225 £330 

BANGKOK £186 £320 

DOULA £— £420 

and many more 
AFRO— ASIAN TRAVEL LTD. 

162/168 Regent SL London W.l . 

01-437 S255/6/7/8 

Late + group bookings welcome 
Amos /vua/ timers 


BARGAIN AIR FARES 

New York £147 o/w £260 rtn 
L A n g el es £180 o/w £345 nn 

Toronto £183 o/w £288 rtn 

Jotiurg £264 o/w £468 nn 

Sydney £399 O/w £670 rtn 

Auckland £405 o/w £780 nn 
Delhi £230 o/w £378 rtn 

Cairo £140 o/w £218 rm 

Bangkok £210 O/w £350 nn 

TelAvtv £99 o/w £169 rtn 

Many otiser bargains 

DECKERS TRAVEL 
Tel: 01-370 6237 


THE REST VILLAS are In the Painter 
■teParMr BUM Book. Available hi 
Algarve. Mantetia. South to France. 
luiLA- and West Indies. Mod nave 


ALGARVE. Luxury villa nr Laooa. 
Penina golf 25 Rdns. 3 dble rooms 
with both. Sp a cio u s ttvmg/dtntng 
room leads to run lengtb south ana 

sea (anno terrace, mature ganlen. 

Swimming pool Midd s ervice. 0483 

228230. 


£30 

Mar. Km to son. hotels by sandy 
Ls. Itimk, windsurf. 

flee chHd place. Book 

direct Lau Tours. 01-441 0122. 
24 hr. 


COST CUTTERS on ftighb/lmb to 
Europe- CSA and an destiaatfons. 
Dtptamsf TnveL 01-730 2201. 

ABTA. IATA. ATOL 1358. 


WINTER, SPRING or SUMMER In 
■be lovelier parts to Raty. With Made 
to Italy. 47 Shepherds Hash Oreen. 
Laadon. IV 12 BPS. Tel 01-749 7449 
124 hr FREE b ro chure service). 
TUNISIA for tbol p erfect holiday with 
sunny days ft rarefras nigius. I d eal 
lor Jan/r«b. Cau Tu n is ian Travel 
Bureau. 01-3734411. 

THE AIR TRAVEL ADVISORY Bn- 
reau. One can keens the air Cue 
mail. 01-636 8000 to Manchester 
<061 1 832 2000. 

CANARIES, SPAIN, PORTUGAL. 

rugnts from ktoR UK airports. Many 
special offers. Faldor 01-471 
7 ATOL 1640 ACC/Vtsa. 

LOW FARES WORLDWIDE. USA. S. 
America^ Mid ana Fkr Ebsl S Africa. 
Trayvate. os Margaret street, wi. 
Oi -880 2928 rvtaa accented). 

GO MG ABROAD? Alrey ft Wheeler 


January 

LATIN AM BOCA. Low cost Otohb S-0- 
Rte£604. Lhns£4T8 rtn. Abosmiin 
holiday teumori. JLA 01-747 


TA»a TIME OFF to Paris. Amsterdam. 
JHe Hague . Brussels. Bruges. 

USA, CANADA. Rtn fib. NY £269. 
Toronto £249. Miami £366. LA 
£368. Special o/w Sydney £450 & 
others. North American Travel Club. 
30 SackvtDe SL Wl , OI -734 8100. 
REA! ANDALUSIA convwted toe m 
pretty mountain vfHags. sips 6-7. 
dally maid, own pdn + pool 8 mb 
MarncUa. from £160 pw. Tel: Worms 
HU (062784)472. 


FOR SALE 


RESISTA CARPETS 
SALE NOW ON 

Massive stored to wool btended 
Berbers from £3.93sqyti + VAT. 
+ Many Bargains In room sizes In 
qtiamiea. 

RESISTA CARPETS 

28GNew Kings Rd. 

Parson Orson. 

SW6. 

Tel: 01-731 2688 
Free estimate - Expen IHtlng 


SNOOKER TABLE, superb 6» X 3ft 
slate bad. con vert! lo an aiegem dark 
mahogany dtating table and b a 
marveOous Man to furniture in to 
own right. Complete wttb cuts, 
snooker balls, pool ball sat etc etc. 
Must be seen to be apwieclazed- 
£1,200 Tel days 0628 3282a eves 


SALE ENDS SAT. Final reductions TV 
ft videos at T 

SLSWl. 730< 


BRIGHTS OF NETTLEBED. Off or 
WUUam xubnan furniture at 1984 
prioea durtng January. 20% off selec- 
ted oak tables ft dr sate fa. numerous 
mahogany lattice A clwtira at are 
Increase prkxa. Neltiebeil 10491) 
641118. Bournemouth (020 to 

293580. Topah am (0392871 7443. 
Berkeley Okxv (0453) 810982. 
FINEST quality wool carpels. At tr 
prtcee and under, also avatiahle io<ra 

extra. Large room size rsmnaJ ‘ 

under half ntomal price. Dane _ 
carpets 01-406 0433. Late ntghl 
shapplna Thors. 

BAUME ft MERCIER. Now b the time 

to buy. Our sale to aatected wuain. 

many at half p ri ce , must end soon. 
Can hi today- Haume ft Merder ax 
David Morels. 38 ContiuU SL W I . OI - 
4938182. 

THE TIMER. Original tenua 1848- 
1988. Other mas avaA Hand bound 
ready for presentation - A 
“Sundays" £ 12.50 tncL Remem 
WhenTOl -688 632X 
CATS. STARLIGHT EXPRESS. We 
hove tickets for these and aD theatre 
and snorts. Tel: 631 3719. 637 1716. 
All malar credit cards. 

CATS, STARLIGHT EXPRESS 
Oevent Gdn. + an other sold out 
events. Obteteabtea Ud. 01-839 
063. 

T ICKE TS FOR ANY EVENT. Cate. 
StertWht Express. 42nd SL All 
theatre and apart*. 821 6616. visa ft 


SIS' 


BARGAIN FLIGHTS to Europe * 
Worldwide. Cofden Sands Travel. OI 
439 8737. 


. ATOL 2047. 

Diamond TnvoL Oi-SBl 46*I 
Horsham 68641. ATOL 1783. 
EVERYTHING YOU WANT, skier or 
not. good, value, catered camw fbr 

Uauvidirsls or parties. 0892646184. 

rve. Csnarie 

.'..Swlteerbmd. 

l7.ATOL.Am>. 


SKI TOTAL 1F8 Fab Otar* tr. C1BO 
HiB ay. H/tem. Mar. Easter vacs. 

409330231113. 


LOW FARES 

To America. HZ. & Auatrala. We 
can also book car mra. travel 
Iraiyance. loeai tours l hotels. 

TrJ; 01-9302556 
HERM 19 TRAVEL 
35 WhftobftD, SW1 
ABTA3483X 


TWO PIRRMJJ CALENDERS 88 ft 86 
Limite d, ed Uteste., tantacutate. Bate 
Oiler. £200 His. Rlug 10962)588479 

GUERNSEY GEAR Ouernseya and 
Cardigans by le TrtooMur. Low 
prlcsa. Cal bradi. Quer ns ay Goar (TV. 
UOmekL St 108261 3764. 

FAMOUS PSOPtS atoned toiotee. 
teUera purc has ed- QiunMD. Royally 
etc. Tel: 0202-697389. 

FRRME/FRBZatS/COOKERS etc. 
Can you buy cheaper. BAS Ltd. oi- 
229 1947/8468. 

OISCURIO: REC ORD. TAPE ft CD 
Sale now on. All slock dteeoumed. 9 
SiMpfterdStraaL Wl. 

OLD YORK PAVING STOWE. All rec- 
tangular. excellent condition. Tel 
06 2 8833731 fT). 

FEMALE stranded mink Jacket 30bis 
* no. £875. C an adi a n sable coats, 
kSoO. 01-624 3091. 

SEATFMDEKS. Any even! Inc Cate. 
Oevent Garden. Starltghl exp. 01-828 
1678. Malar credit cards. 

VALENTINE ROSE DaRWed note Feb 
14th £3.98 Chaqne/cr card. Date T. 
Rose Oente. St Andrews. Guernsey. 

PIANO. Small ma ho ga ny unrmtiL vat 
class oond. Tuned. £395. Can 
arrange delivery. OI -463 0148 m. 


4 


MARKSON’S 
PIANO SALE 
IS NOT ON! 


With prices cheaper than moat to 
our emnpetltere' aala prices- who 
needs a Sate? 10tn to wnghte 
and gr a n da to choose dram. Take 
advantage of our unique hire with 
op tio n to purchase plan from only 

£16 par month. 

MARKSON PIANOS 

Anaey bowl NWi.Td«tote ana 
Aiteterr Ptan. SCI A T* OI 484 481 T 


WINTER SPORTS 


Picnics, Barti-c-ques &. Panics 

XXX FUn on nw stapes 
with 8X3 WHIZZ 
Catered Chalet parUes 
Feb 1st -tody £179 

FeblBUl only £199 

The UP French and Swiss Rasottti 
ANO MASSES OF 8NOWI 
Fantastic d is co u nts fto gro up s tek- 


chatet parties fto tingles, couples 


HOTLINE 
FsO 1 ft 8 only £1891 

ATOL 1820 
RUG 01-370 0999 


SKI WEST STANDBY 
HOTLINE 

Instant boo kin g* wim Access ft 
Baroayeard by gbone. Owlet par- 
ties In Vender, ex Anton. MearM. 
Oourcticvei and Val dTserc. 

Meepercoach Ab- 
25 Jan ■ £129 £169 

I Feb £139 £179 

Ateo s/c bargains firom £691 
SKI WEST 
0373 864811 

ABTA 


BEST RUN FOR YOUR 
MONEY IN ANDORRA 

LUXURY STAFFED APART- 
MENTS with heated swimming' 
pooL Bargain often ■ l week 28 
Jan ft 1st Feb M £139. Atr/ctekt 

Inc of 3 meeds a day. wKb isulmflsd 

wtne to dinner, long Jeannte Dal- 
salL 

SKI BEACH VILLAS 
(0223)311113 

ATOL38IB ABTA 141 fix 

Access /Varday card 


SKI HOLIDAYS FROM £99 
BY AIR FROM MANCHESTER 
A GATWICK 

Free Video & five exercise leaflet 
FREEDOM HOUDAYS 
01-741 4686. 061-2360019 

0 ATOL 432 IATA AITO 


★ ★. *FAMILY BARGAINS!. 

HALF TERM WEEK 
FEB 15m Iwfe catered chalets 
Children under 12 ... h prical 
plus families to 6 one FREE SM 
pass! 

Ring: SKI WHIZZ 
01-3700236 


SKI BLADON LINES 

CHALET BARGAINS 
From £179 

8/C £109 

Teb 01-78S 2200 


SKI BONNE NEIGE 

Offer catered Qaldi In Mc Hb e l ft 
Courchevel from £140 b/b 1 wk. 
£230 2 wks Ind Hard, great food. 
unTtd wins ft ext en s i ve guiding. 
BOOK NOW 

RING 01-733 2333 (OFFICE) 
01-737 3861 CMHRSV 


SKI SKI SKI wttb John Morgan travel. 
Fantastic chalets. B ft B. s/c. Prices 
from £119 pg Jan departures Inc 
fUghUtramfer. Rina now for details. 
01-499 1911 or (0730)68621 or aee 
your travel agenL 


FANTASTIC SKI BARGAINS from 
£48 dp pw for super o/c apta In 
La Fttow at discount 

, jhout tna 

Weft 


SKI LES 

VsrWer ftMogere 0- £130 s/c toe 
(tight Exclnsfve holidays Ito 
dtecnntng skiers. 01-6023086. 

LAST CHANCE Fab ft March walling 
for you m our AiMrten fannhowe. 
Ski Seeltuch. fhntergtemm. SM Tai. 
01-4868865. 

SKI V1RBIER Crane Montana. 
Oiamontx. a/e chalets ft ante team 
£30 p.p. P-W- 01-486 8865 

wk'ends/rvos. (07357) 2084, 

TOY ST VINCBinr (French Alps) Dam 
£89 tod accom. Come Snowspara 
106223677071. 

Feb 22. 1 wk. n&R chatet - only. 
(0223) 321560. 

SKI QButSUIUE. February half 
tmo. a ft b_ £199 luxury coach. 
Madtson. 0902 48200. 

BUS OFF |p vertder bow. Bargain to 
the season. £70p.w. s/c enhtin to' 
fllghL SJ-A. 01-602 3086. 

SKI VEMHR. Superb snow. Lux fesd-i 
alp 6. Feb. March. Avan 01-560 
3448/(024027) 200- 

SKI FUGHTS dattv to Ganava. Zurich. 
Munich ale. h-ont £69. SKI WEST. 
0373864811. 


CAR BUYERS' GUIDE 

S Trade 01-837 2916 - 

Private 01-8373333 or33U 


also on page 25 


VOLVO 240 GLT ESTATE 
1984,21 ,800 mOM 

SHvsr. Utedc laaFw kuarior. tow bar. 
dog guard, stares, roof. Prtvate pm. 
SaSctorowngr. 

£7,000 OJLO. 

Tefc 01-828 4648 eves 
01 *242 6041 Office hours 


RANGE ROVER 
VOGUE AUTO 

BhM 1989 5 door mg. VGC 12.000 
■Mas RSK Tow bar tide stripe*. 
Fid mud Saps £14,995. 

Tat 0920821389 avaa 
or 07B72 71111 (day) 


1966 ESPRIT 
TURBO 

mgtaffle BhM. Fid Magnofia 
Nde. Under 500 mfle*. 
£19350 

Pater Smith Sports Cara Ltd. 

0283 813593 


PEUGEOT 305 CL. Red. ManuaL 
Sedan. *V" Reg 1979. Good condition. 
Vary low xnfteaoe 133XWOI- Movtag 
ovoreeas. muti sad. £750. TeL 01- 
584 5120. 


TOYOTA SUPRA 2JH auto April B4. 
dark mat bine, air con reidsc a usual 
extra. 21 jOCO m. £&A50 rash. 
Srta/ W. SMBdtenfti 0734 862056 or 
0676 32829. 



TAKE THE PROFIT 

On tub r m ear lmastfnM. PlMast im- 
port. Vou Edn On pmffi. n do At work 
BW¥0 

Mycar 

0895 33990/71 M 1/2 


Discounts 



Al makes. Best prices 
Barry HalUday 
0992 59021 
Aotosonh |UX) LM Henfarti 


RENAULT B TURBO 2 1988 <MDL> 8 
to. 10.500 mis. red. ftnnurtoate 
£8.998. Fto lest ‘fMght Tel (09041 
25990 (York). No time wasters 


FORD BSCORT CABRIOLET 13L 
Nimbus Grey. May 88. extended 
warranty. £7.900 ono. Tel 01-891 
5775. 


VOLVO 780 TURBO *85 C. 5.300 ml*. 
Stiver natnt. black leather hu. as now. 
£12^00. Phone (0268) 682215 work 
or 1037461 891 1 0 area. 


SERVICES 


ST VALENTINES DAY . . . Soy U vsrtlb 
n i CH UMfcti Delight your VatenUne 
with an Initialled 8ft heart set tn ptnk 
and white fire w orks. 


available. Pyrotechnics UhttmJted 
741 9687. * 

FRIENDSHIP, Love or Marrus*. 
Dateline, all ages, trial Dateline 
Dept fTST) 23 Ablnpdon Road. 
London W9. TH 01-938 1011. 

YOUR CINE HUMS Converted lo 
video up- - Any 
Movies. 01-340! 

CALIBRE CVs. Professionally written 
and produced naricutum vitae 
documents. Details: OI -880 2969. 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


Private education. 

presented. Widely trav- 

tdled. Sound bushm knowledge. 

Used to dealing to director level. 

Seeks petition as pri vate aide. Faull- 

tess refCrenceo. Apply Box No 1703 R 


VERSATILE 


taming. Sec tidily Free to travel. 
Seeks interesting lucrative poet Dan. 
Boy No 1513R. 

PRE UNIVERSITY art 18 was an au 
pair to Parte, now seeks work South 
coast to Francs im to 6 mths. (0926) 
22495. 


MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 


BECH STEIN ' MODEL L satin 
r (977 as new £6.500. 
modal *L' delux. Utah gtass 
mahogany lyr old unused ban™*" 
£8 , soo siebrway model -cr t 


1935 6ft 61ns. walnuL 
Queen Anna legs, v.g-e. £2.960. 
bbeMermwer 6 ft tons walnut c. 
1905. restrimg. new Ptos. v.gtc. 
£1,650. ibadt tot tons, rosewood. 88 
note. C. 1910 v.gx. £1.460. New 
Orman pianos various flntehea. 
£995. Loive RkcOan second hand 
i for sale & wanted. 


■iprltous ft grands < 
021 643 7644 IT). 


FEB SKI BARGAINS 
Catered Chalets from 

I Feb £160 . 

I Fib £219 

IS Feb £239 

McribeL Vortrier. Vsl tflsec £T«ncs 
Also spbuncaa from £*9 

SKI MAC G 
01 - 351-5446 
ATOL 


HEAVY SNOWFALLS! 
SKI BARGAINS 

ChaM parties from El 29 
Saff catarkig ftam £89 
Lata booMigs - Pay. by cradR 
Coiact UckstsuQirtwfck. 

SKI MacG 
Tab 01-351 5446 
Half tanri *tffl avaBaMe 

ATOL1337B 


card. 


BEST RUN FOR YOUR 
MONEY 
Staffed Chalet Bargains Andorra 
- 25 Jan El 58. Air / Chalet ind of 
3 meals a day with unUmUBd wine 
at dinner. 

Marfbel-staffed chalots fbr 
drivers -Feb. 1st 8th & 16th E110 
inc. of channel fany crossing & 3 
meals a day. With wine at dinner. 
SKI BEACH VILLAS 
(0223)311113 
AT0LU1B ABTA 141 5X 

A nr- ss s/n s rrtsyc s rti 


U JL HOLIDAYS 



AUWQUSMl 

of Holiday, 

•Pod TroJ Ridhg. ■ Improre Your Ratn^ 

• leant to Wo •Horse Drawn Canruyi i 

NORTHUMBIBW HORSE HOLIDAYS I 

Co. Durham 


Tel: (02071 2 

OR CONTACT YOU* 


LOCAL TRAVEL AGENT I 


SPRING SALMON 
FISHING 

DtlliMi to W hy.ftt wgtit to Hres Tpssd 
toTiy 

TWEED Ngor Kgfto - TVso Rbd Boat 

lOth-lSth Fotnisry 198S 
MWi-lSth March 1986 
2881 ApnL24fliMsy 1986 
2B()v31st May 1986 
TWEED Hear Kahta- Tteo Hod Beat 
26tt>-31st May 1988 
2nd- 14th Maf 1986 
TAY Ngar Partii - Sts Rod Boat 
l7tn-22nd February 1986 
21st-26tii Aprl 1986 
TAY Nggr Pgrfli - FlM Rod Baal 
M Fsbnioy - 15tfi Manh 1986 
Other fishing etoo avsfiable on other 
rhars kxkidlng rivers Spay end Dae. 
Fbr ftinher InfamwBoo ' 

TC Tel 01-629 


Writers' Monthly - FREE! 

Yea, here's your ctanos tony Writers Monthly absolutely free. 

It’s the only ma®*ztea for mflers. In every bnw you'll fin* Tip* from top 
writers: Inst/uction on fmfaovb^ techniques; rrow markets for your work; 
news; Interviews; competitions; and a writers' book dub. 

If you're In any way Interested In writing then Writers Monthly, it just the 
right magazine lor you. 

For a fret copy of th* West bsuft write it« (No stamp needed). 

• • WRITERS* MONTHLY FREEPOST WB5, .... 

Mgh Rood, London FB2 8BX 


BROtSMEAD Doudoir grand piano. 
Plays woIL Rosewood case. Move 
force* sale. £750 Ono. TeL- 01-900 
1019. 

PIANOS: H. LANE ft SONS. New and 
reconditioned. Quality to re a s o n able 
prices. 326 Brttodan Road. & 
OtiVdML 01-688 361 3. 

W ELMAR UPRIGHT PIANO 7 years 
•ML mahogany. Bush overstrung. 
£1.160. TeT. Ascot 10990) 24226. 



p* vp va> R5ioiiii puNcrs 

SALE 

CALL POE FREE CATALOGUE 

91-2*7 7971 

MA HKJHIATE Hr) All M»S 


LEGAL SERVICES 


UK VIS A / NadonaUIy ma tiers. Tarto 
Lyons. Solkdtars. 82,/ 54 High 
Hoiborn. London WC1. Oi -242 goal. 


TOYOTA SPACE CRUISER. Auto- 
matic. cancelled order, delivery mile- 
age only, saw £1000 on cotn new. 
m I -772-691 6. Cotes to Birmingham. 

SUBARU SUBARU SUBARU. New 
•as 4WD BAH Motors. London's 
Main AgenL 01-0486671. 


RENTALS 


KfllGHTSBRIDGE 
MEWS HOUSE 

Spacious reaBy hrarious mews 
bouse Mth garage In one of the 
most prestigious quiet mews a 
London between Hyde Park and 
Harrods. 

Substantial Companies/ 
Embassies only 

LONG LET. £658 P.W- 

Buchanans 

Letting & Mtiii.niemeu! 

01 - 351 7767 


Period Cottage 


Unfa 


decorated. 3 


i. fltied kitchen. 


Interior 
be d. 3 

■wimmtaio boolT N rwiidsw Si 

Ascot. Easy access. M28/M4. SO 

mina u London. £900 pan. 
Include# garden and pad 


maintenance. 


0344 886223 


IDEAL FOR VISITORS- «nn 
Keratngten. Luxury flat for a, Mild 
•enter. Lift. Teteghone. OteurTV CM. 
etc 884 2414 or 786 4281. 


SERVICE APARTMBMTS, Cheteea. 
Wdldud rtsteuniili. lale-nlotil 
snopobig. FvrnUhed inidto ft l bad 
Oats cram C1BO pw min 1 month 


HAMPSTEAD HEATH BORDERS. 

V/ modem. p/D luxury flat. 2 (ante 
■tide twri. 2 halite. 1 m-eillr. terae 
lounge /timing room, roily silted lux 


Tel 209 1995. 


, Oral time ML £280 pw. 


CHELSEA, Knlfltltsbfldse. BeWavla. 

PbnUoo. WesunbnteT Luxury ho us e s 

and flats available tor long or toien 
lets, mease rlna (or current Usl 
C ootes. 69 Buddnghaia Paiaca Road. 
8W1. 01 -828 8251. 


FLAT SHARING 


AVAILABLE tor 6 mlhi.Mte, large 
dbte room In luxury flat. W14 area, 
prof tingle gn. nan-smoker . 2 &*. 
£220pm Inc. Ring: 01-221 1819 
(S.306gnu 602 B»43 (WML 
FLATMATES SELECTIVE SHARING. 
Wen csinMIstwd Introductory sa-vlce. 
Please idepbone tor apt 01-889 
6491. 313 Brompum Rd. SW3. 

EUNSURY/FELTHAM. N/s person to 
Oh. bee awn bedroom, use of faunae, 
din big roam, bathroom, kit. tain. CH. 
£120 pte.m. Inc. Sunbury 784316. 
TOOTING SEC, 2 mins Tube, room In 
large hmlly house for girl. £40 p.w. 
with baby-sitting). Tel. 672 


69<5a 


house 


EAST DULWICH room to 
dona to city and Weal End. . 
bid + use of ear. 299 1 129 anytime 
tnr.s. Bedsit in DaL mbi cooking lac. 
D/s F. Rtf. £80 p.CJn. cud. 748 
1866 after 7 pjn. crtoiun. 

EZ. Close BeOinal Green. O/r. 20s. 
extr av rL £60 pw excL Tel 981 1008 
after 7 pm. 

W2 MEWS. 2 charming girls 
room. £3Spw each. Tel: 262 


3757 


TULSE HILL. 4th prof. 264- lo share 
hse. O/R. N/& £20 pw. eted. 01-674 
5243 eve. 

FULHAM, 3rd prof, mature F. n/a. 
■bare comfortable hoe. o/r. £180 
D.c.ra. IncL Tel: 388 0416. 

Wl o/r suit prof person. £80 pw. bud. 
Please tetephone 437 4880 after 9JSO 
am today. 

W8. carl wanted to share attractive 
Dirt. O/R. £88 p.w. excL to tells. 221 
8421. 

PARSONS GREEN, comfortable bright 
room, own palia/tv/phone £55 pw 
esc. Howl Dove 01-491 4014. 

CLAP HAM. 2 share Urge twin 
bedroom, cam f flaL Mira lube. £30 
excL Alter 6. 7336249. 

OVAL. Prto N/S F. mid 20s tor 
Otoshare. £145 pan excL 01-953 
1 600 tea 659 (day). 736 3662 (eve). 

B.W.18. O/r tn shr. hse. All toes. £36 
w. Prto. peri. 234. 677 5713. 

PIMLICO. 2 parsons for luxury t bed. 
balcony IM- £i26p.w. oi -228 71S8. 

8W11. Prto girt 22+ to share juom m 
pretty flaL SuD pw IncL 622 7047. 

PROF F.io share OslfaSW6 £210 pern 
ex day 637 3873 eves 731 6318. 


ST JOHNS WOOD 500yds American 

School to London, bnmsculate con- 

dition. Unfum. 3 bdnra. 2 dWc. I 
single, bufll ln wardrobes, baitvm. 
clknn. 29R Mt/b'fBH rm. 2 intercom 
recaps. San x 16ft cor pkg. £338ow 
499 9951 W.end /eves 870 *703 m 
CHELSEA 2nd.'3rd floor malsonene 

with private roof kit. dble recap. 

ropro furn. bu/b'iaw rm. sti 
appliances. 2 beds with bum bi ward- 

robo. bath. £200 pw. 493 2091 ft 

eves 8704703 m. 

WANTED for by daughter Swiss 
student Monleesort nke room. 
Hampstead area. Mrs Ellen surer. 12 
Kernudy. CH12Q6. Oerarra. Tel 
22/462185. Stall m at Cumberland 
Hotel. Jan 3 1st to Feb 5th. 
BATTERSEA PARK SW11. inmsc 2 

dble. l single bdrm flaL new kitchen 


GEORGE KNIGHT 

A PARTNERS 

The Letting Agents 


SOUTH KEHSIHSTOH 

An gxcglton) Orel floor Itat In a 
brand rarefy buR block and toa- 
wag Kb own 30ft terrace and a 
garage spsca. H hag two doubte 
: bedrooms. Owing mom. tiMng/haB. 
luty aquippad kUcnon and two 
ballroo ms . bsdinlfvRy fumisfiod 8 1 
is avsSsbfa now to £400 a wsek. 


589-2133 


CYGNET HOUSE, SW3 

Bngtt. spacious one badroom Flat in 
mil mwnainad btack on 4th Hr. Ora 
reception, totfiroom with shower, 
kitchen. £160 per weA. 

CheSsra office 01-519 5211 


S.W.l. 

Luxurious lolly serviced self contained 
I bedroom flaL FuHw lined. Jusi com- 
pkidy radccocavd. Small priiaic ju- 
dea. Colour T.V. Daih Maid Service. 
Lmcn.GH- LighB. Hi water nc. 

.kLL INCLUDED 

Suitable for professional male DSOpw. 
Available now for 3 w 12 mondtt. 
Telephone an<nlme (private number) 
834 4874 


SUPERIOR FLATS AND HOUSES 
available and required tor diplomat*, 
executives Long and short leii In all 
areas. Unfriend ft Co . «8 Albermatlc 
Street, Wl. TW: 499 8334. 


PUTNEY - caianutno newly ftp: mail. 
2 bed. 2 rec. ftbra wl OCH^ouJi 
60ft gdn.. 5 mins. bua TUbe. BR. Co 
In. £120 p.w. Avail mid Feb. 768 
4270 


EDUCATIONAL COURSES 


BONHAMS KNIGHTS BRIDGE. 6 wk 
fun time “Artists ai Work" course. 
Starts 28 AprlL Lectures ft studio 
visits lo leading artiste ft craftsmen. 
Apply PrbKtpalBed 0667. 


ANTIQUES AND 
LLECTAI 


CO 


fABLES 


WYHFORD DEWHURST. Wrota by 

ihJa artist wanted. The Fosse Gallery. 

The Square. Staw-on-Uio-Wald. 
CkMicestentdrs. Tel: OotewoM* 0451 
313ig. 

MINTON JARDINERE m perfect can. 
CDUon. art nouveau £700. Tel: 01- 
4720725. 


FOOD AND WINE 


DECAFFEINATED TEA. Probably me 
nrat quality decanebiated lea- Write 
to St James's Teas Lid. Dept T. sir 



LOCK 
INTO 
BIGGER 
SALESIN 
THE TIMES 

To advertiseyoiir car, holiday borne or property for sale in 
The Tunes Classified . fill in your advertisement in the space 
below, i Loiter messages can be attached separately). 

Rales are: | £4XX) per line (approximately 4 words, mmimum 
3 lines). £23X0 per centimetre full disphiy Plus 15% VAT. 

Prior to your advertisement appearing we wiD contact you with 
the oost and confirm the dale of mseroon. 

PAY NO POSTAGE. Send to Tbe Times Classified Dept.. 
Freepost. London WC1 4BR. Or phoneOl-837 331 1/3331 
Advertisement 


Name 

Additsc. 


Daytime Telephone:, 
l AC CESS) 


JVISAI' 


Access or Bard^ycatd. please quoteyoufnumb« 


.-.ly t - 1.' 


685021. 

AMBUCAN EXECUTIVES seek 
luxury flats or houses up to £500 
p.w. Usual fees required. RilOiw Kay 
ft Lewis. Smith of the Park. Chetsra 
office 352 811 1 or North to ms Park. 
Regent's Park office 722 5135. 

SOUTH BUCKS. NT M25, Ml. M40. 1 
mL mot Him. S.'C o 

unfum. 2 rsceps. - 

bam. Ope. kept gdn. £355 pern. 
(02404)2148. 

RENTALS On 22nd ft 23rd January Si 
JMtm Wood, furn rial In quiet road. 3 
bedrooms, living rm. new kti/dbier. 
barium. shower/doakna. CH. 
£230ow. 0454^14329. 

KENSmOTON. W8, off Church 
Street House With 2 reception and 2 
bedrooms. 2 bathrooms. £260 pw. 
Available tar 2 years. Com pany let. 
01-938 1448. 

ST JOHN'S WOOD, Abbey Rd. new 
luxury. Clal dble bedroom, large 
reception, kitchen ft b a throom. 
Mtapbooe. TV. w/m. CH £150 p.w. 
01-7278030 (T). 

BELGRAVIA. Newly furnished flat In 
block. 3 beds, dble rraeg. ktt ft 2 
baths. CH.'CHW. Oft ft porter, car 
apace. £700 pw. Oo lot King Wood 
7306191. 

OUEENSGATE Large 1 bed ton with 
balcony 1st floor CH. Hfl. porter 
Co.hoUday let. £155 p.w. tod Ot- 
722 1532. 

MAIDA VALE (Suiherland A ve». 
Seven new modern furnished flats 
far telling to one or mare companies. 
£H5-£ieapw. ret ooa 6724. 

URGENTLY REOUIRED. - First doss 
pro Dentes for long Compaiw lets 1 
Central Lundcm. Usual tea. Sturgis i 
Son 01-2447441. 

AMERICAN SPCCtALWTS. We are 
currently seeking good quality rental 
occora to Centra) London for waning 
company tenants. 38S 4000 (T) 

REGENTS PARK, beautifully 
appointed mod flal to new dev 2 dble, 
beds, recep. tJ. kjL parking Qo leteH 
only. £1 BO p-w. 224 7353 m. 1 

US CORPORATION seeks fUnUshed 
properties In Cent ft Sw London 
arms. £l80-£800pw. Cabban ft 
Opaelee (Estate Agbig Oi -589 5481. 

WEST KESL A selection to charming 
F/F 1-4 bad ants ft townhouses in 
■nacpiUtewnt Mock-. £l00-£400 pw 
tod. 675 1895m. 

RENTING OR LETTING a flat or house 
to central SW. SE London ftnm 
£1 OCX £400 pw. Short or Ion - 
lets. HLT Letting Agents 6270: 

HAMPSTEAD VILLAGE Newly 
convened self canbdnod open Pten 1 
bedroomed garden level flal tor afrafle 
person. £1 lOpw. 794 3638 eves. 

SOUTH KENSINGTON. 2 bed flat 
fully equipped. Cl 90 pw. Co let 
- 01-684 6530. <W) 606 4433 X 


Oil 0) 
2764. 


WS WINCHESTER CRT. vicarage CL 
Excellent 1 dble bedrtn flaL brand 
new rmUure. £14Spw <02931 
27866 x 459- 
SUPEflS GEORGIAN HSE. 4 beds. 3 
rec. 3 bam. fully furn. vie ws to rt var. 
walking distance to City £375 gw 
ELA. Shaw ft Ptnra. 014037280. 


WANTED 


BALDWIN ANTIOUES require roll tog 
A pedestal desks, bookcases, tables. 
Chairs, large wardrobes, chests, 
pictures ft similar Items. 01-586 0140 
or 01-228 2716 day or night. 

WANTED I n laid Vtcfortan and 
Edwardian famtture pedestal desks: 
dining tebtea and bookcases. 01-641 
1848 anytime m. 

ANY JEWELUatY, Gold. Uamaads. 
— “By warned. Teb 01-405 8538 


sr B 


HOLIDAY FLATS SERVICES. Ptek 
and diooae from 1-5 star apte. central 
London. Immediate /advnuc* rescr- 
tatfons. -T h: 9352412. 


F.W. GAPP (Management Services) 
Ud require propertlm to Cenlrol. 
South and west London areas lor 
wilUng appllC M lB. Tel: OI -221 8838. 


SPECIAL OFFER. Kitiflht&brldje £300 
pw. (normally £350). immaculate top 
■nudity l bed serviced naL TV 
Ayleeford ft Co. 361 2383. 


SPACIOUS 1 BEDROOM. CH. flal. 
recep. £85 pw. others loo 627 2610. 
Homeiocaiora. HU 8 pm. 

WEST HAMPSTEAD luxurtoun 2 
rooms in fteL 1 £6apw other £86pw. 
TeL' OI -864 3634. 

VACANT! large 2 bed gdn. flat. c.h. 
phone, handy tube. £98 p.w. Others. 
627 2610. Kometocalors. 
KENSINGTON WS Charming town 
house £400 pw or oilers invited lor 
quick tat Tel 727 7897 (24 hours) 
HOLLAND PIC. Charming sroatt fLU to 
pretty Vkt Use. Sngt/caluXc. 
El 18pw. 373 0667/221 0222. 
ELEGANT. 3 bed cotlaga. CH. recep. 

S x Itids O.K.. £104 pw. Others 627 
lO. Hofnetarators. 

RLW.1. Lug 2 bed rum flat to private 


9087. 

HHSHGATE. Exc 1 bed 9.'r fbd avaU 
8th Fab. £i 10 p.w. Nigel Holder 883 
3265. 

S KENSINGTON. Attractive nucleus 
fully equipped 1 bed flat. £175 pw 
733 6771 alter 6pm. 

QUIET mews house, cnriira 8W3. 
suitable tingle person. Available now. 
£250 pw. 221-8404. 

EAUNG W13 3 bedroom house, gas 
central heating. 2 reception, cknc 
Tube. £540 pem 0226 836 1 77. 

W4_ Lux 2 tad garden flal 6 mins M. 
£163 p.W. 01-9466192 

FEND MAN RD/OVAL. Lux 1 bed Hi 
bath sit patio CH £96pw 231 0067. 

3SS 4800. 388 4000, 385 4000-TtK 
number lo remember when seeking 
the best rental properties to Central A.- 
SW London ElSOpw / £2000pw. iTi 

AT LASTI Hometocaiors Rental 
Accom. PubUshera carry iKunes. 
flats, bedsits, shares. All areas, sites, 
prices. 627 2610. 7 days 

KENSINGTON W8 Off Church Street 
Hse with 2 recep + 2 bedrma. 2 
baRirms £260 pw Available for 2 
ywirs. CO tat <088 388) 2346. 

WE LET FLATS and house*; We un- 
■amity require your psMrura to W. 
SW ft NW London. Davis. Wootfe ft 
CO. 402 7381. 

MARBLE ARCH lux furn flat 2 dble 
beds, recep. kit ft balh. weekly 
cleaner. £260 pw. 936 2781 ITX 

Wl - 7th floor targe lux studio aU mod 
cons, close to tube. £120 p.w. Co lei 
only 244 7363 IT). 

PARK WEST. W2. Selection to lux 
flats avail short /tong stay. TeL Ol- 
491 7545. Rufus Raven. 

COUPLE, clean resranslMe non- 
smokers. care for W14 hse/gdn. £60 
pw + bUIS 603 3079. 

ST JOHN'S WOOD 3 bed. 2 balh - l 
sn-sulte. kIL rar narktog space, lum. 
£260 pw MHA 883-1411. 

CENTRAL LETS. Quality flats, bonnes, 
short Tom term. £150 £2,000 p.w. 
01-491 7543. Rufus Roven. 

PIMLICO. Elegant recep. dble be drm. 

• bednn. k ft b. CH. col TV. 
.01-834 9723. 

EPSOM. Sy. 4 bad. 2 balh exec type 
dot toe. eft. dble gge. ElSOpw. \ A 
Ctias. 643 2883. 

HYDE PARK, W2. Executive 1 bed flal 
m prime block. Short or tong let. 
£250 pw. WTP (01)935 9612. 


SHORT LETS 


LUXURY SERVICED FLATS central 
London from £300 pw Ring Town 
House Apts OI -373 3433. 

SERVICED APARTMENTS In 
Kensington. Col TV. 24 hr swbd. 
tstax. Comn^iara Apb. 3736306. 

ST JAMES'S PALACE SW1 Very 

smart 2 bed s , * ~ 

Maid IncL 573 1 


SEASONAL SALE 


REDMAN AND HALES LTD 

jpmdaa is tae ha di «*d yahtad wM m at am— y Rood «i<i hroias. 

JANUARY SALE 

in viedf Be is ionduajH R am namnd OMIRY mi m*. br rim ***** m m 

Hack. Vo* Trader, 7B& Jonor t* Sstetby. Id Fsbnar nddKn. 

THE STREET HATFIELD PEVEREL Nr CHELMSFORD' 
ESSEX. Tefc Chetansford 0245 380322. 

U. spotig tan Tm Wi firaSpa. VM 238. teafen. Tbm 3M BasSpn. , 

Fb3Tti9H*6pa,SM ' * ' 


ii CLASSIFIED 



THE TIMES 


01-8373311 

01-8373333 


WM 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


also on page 27 


CINEMAS 


SCREEN AT THE ELECTRIC 229 
3694. The Powcn/Prasberw 
Tectudeotar Maaterptecs BdLACat 
NARCISSUS" iPOX Superb new 
print. 2.65. 4^0. 7.00. 9.00. SMI* 
bookable. 


SCREEN ON RAKER ST. 935 2772. , 
MY BEAUTIFUL LAUH- 
DERErre am. 3.00 . b.oo. 7joc. 

CO ' ^ii^R TO' BREZHNEV (in 
2A6. 4.40. 6.66. 8.50. + Sat 11.10. 


SCREEN ON ISUNOTON OflEEN, 

226 3820. 

H. P. LovecrafTs “ RJE- ANIMATOR" 
■complete uncut vextioa) 3.15. 6.00. 
7.00. 9.00. Frl/sat 1 1.18. 


CREEN ON THE HI LL 4 38 
ilqija 


EXHIBITIONS 


RULE BRITANNIA Exh lb t H o n o f 40 0 
■ mmn of Marine art to aid of the RbOJ 
from the 7tb-g9!ft January ograln; 
9.00-0 JO MOteCaL 2^F&3d 

Sundays. AOntadM free. SorhrtJV'*. 
34-36 New Bond Street London. Wl . 
Tab COU 493 8080. 


ART GALLERIES 


ART GALLERIES 


ANTHONY D*OPPAY 9 ft 23 Derlng 
ranwi aALLHiY AJfrrrars 

US te l p t ll W 4W41QO. I— 


BARBICAN ART OALLBtY. Barbu 
UnH1 


■tyW. Adm £2 
admits to Ka-'- 


, to ___ 
LSI. TM m _ 

bltton to * antlane ^roSoS" 
Barbican Cancounr Canary, iv 
Sal 10am-7.15am. Sun ft- B H 
~ 1-7.1 Spur Port to TOM: Ti 

i in J a p a n Today, a fnrtli al 
t r adi ti o n al Japanese cuKuttc in I 

Barblran Centre Including ntms a 

foyer exhibitions - 


BRITISH LIBRARY. « Ruwill a. 
HWC1 MIRROR Of THE tMORlXte 


■ Mcmday Friday lO- 


MNC ST SALLCtUES, 17 

issssksr t - m ^~ 

raftMtra by HHCL 

Until ae Jan. da&y 106. BON 10-1 . 


PARKIN Q ALLUII. 11 — I 

MMRnSWL»-2H 81441 1 


106 taetton 

1.45 pm). Adml 

ttoOklng 01-741 1 


Thrauntn 630. I 


limy 7 1 













THE TIMES FRIDAY JANUARY 24 1 986 


Today’s television and radio programmes 


27 



Summaries by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 



BBC 1 


(LOG Cttftx AM. News headlines, 
weather, travel and sports 
bulletins. 

6.50 Breakfast Thro with Nick 
Ross and Debbie Greenwood. 
Weather at 6-55, 7.25, 7J55, - 
A25 and &5% regional news, 
weather and traffic at 6X7, 
7Jff, 7J5T and 0X7; national 
and international news at 7.00, 
7 X0, 8.00, &30 and 9X0; sport 
at 7.20 and 8X0; Lynn Faulds' 
Wood's consumer report at 
8,15; and a review of the . 
morning newspapers at 8X7. 
Plus, ways to Improve Britain's 
footbafl Image; shopping 
advice; gardening hints; and 
pop music news. 

020 Ceefax 10X0 Play School, 
presented by Elizabeth Watts 
with guest. Ben Thomas 1050 
Ceefax. 

1220 News After Noon with Richard 
Whitmore and Moira Stuart 
deludes newe headlines with 
subtitles 1255 Regional news. 
The weather details come 
from Ian McCaskHL 

1.00 Pebble MBI at One, presented 
by Bob Langley, Marian Foster 
and Josephine Buchan. This 
afternoon Peter Sea brook has 
winter gardening advice. 1.45 
King RoOo (r). 150 Bric-a-Brac 
presented by Brian Cant (r). 
2X0 Ceefax. 352 Regional 
news. 

355 Northern Ireland Section 

SpeaaL David Dimbteby with a 

round-up of the results known 
so tar; Peter Snow analyses 
them with the assistance of 
the BBC computer and Sir 
Robin Day gauges reactions 
from Westminster. Belfast and 
Dublin. 

555 Fax] BSI Oddie, Wendy 
Leavssiey and BiHy Butter 
answer viewers' questions on 
almost any subject 

650 News with Sue Lawley and 
Nicholas Witched, Weather. 

6.35 London Phis. 

7X0 Wogan. Terni's guests tonighl 
include jaty Cooper and deaf 
xylophonist Evelyn Glennie. 
Helping Terry with a haggis- 
tasting are actors Ross 
Davidson and John Gordon 
Sinclair. Music is provided by 
Elvis Costed o. 

7.35 Blank sty Blank. Las Dawson's 
panel this week consists of 
Bany Cryer, Georgia Brown, 
Bobby Knutt, Sarah Payne. 

Keith Harris and Dinah 
Sheridan (Ceefax). 

8.10 Dynasty Ik The Coibys. A new 
series begins and the action 
moves to the West Coast 
Jason Colby (Charlton Heston) 
gives a press conference on 
the successful outcome of his 
deal with Blake Carrington, but 
« Inwardly worried by his 
sister's (Barbara Stanwyck) 
elevation of he nephew, Jeff, 
to equal partner in the Colby 
conglomerate. Jeff, though, 
has Fallon on his mind, while 
his mother (Katherine Ross) 
prepares herself for a meeting 
with her estranged son 
(Ceefax). 

9.00 News with JohrrHumphrys * 
and Andrew Harvey. Weather. 

950 Lovejoy. The freewheeling 
antiques dealer is helping a 
young woman in her search 
for a pair of Meissen figures 
whan he cornea across 
evidenoe of a double-cross 
(see Choice). 

10.25 Victoria Wood -As Seen on 
TV. Unusual and entertaining 
comedy sketches and songs 
by the talented comedienne 
and her guests. Julie Walters, 
Celia Imre, Duncan Preston 
and Susie Blake (r). 

10.55 FHikA Whale for the KOfing 
(1981) starring Peter Strauss, 
Richard Wkhnark and Dee 
Wallace. When on a sailing 
holiday off Newfoundland with 
his family, a storm forces 
Charles Landon to shelter in a 
fishing village. There, he 
becomes involved in a struggle 
to save the Gfe of a whale 
trapped In a lagoon by the 
same storm. Directed by 
Richard T. Heffron. 

1.15 Weather. 


^xv-am 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 

presented by Anne Diamond 
and Nick Owen. News with 
Gordon Honeycombs at S.17, 
650, 7X0. 750, 8X0, 850 and 
9X0; exercises at 650 and 
9.17; Nigel Dempster's gossip 
column at 8.17; Jimmy 
Greaves's television highlights 
at 854; from TV-am’s first two 
years at 8.45; an item on child 
musicians at 9.04; and woman 
of the week at 0 . 12 . 


ITV/ LONDON. 


9.25 Thames news headlines. 

950 For Schools: the woods in 
spring. 9X7 The year of the 
Armistice. 10.09 Maths: 
Following rules to make 
patterns. 10X8 Fires and 
flames and how to put them 
out 10.48 English: Mummy's 
Tomb, by Andrew Ntekoids. 

11.15 The growing and 
harvesting of bananas. 1157 
How different animals keep 
themselves dean. 11X4 Uses 
of computers. 

12X0 Benny. Adventures of a dog 
(r). 12.10 Rainbow. Learning 
about feet with the help of 
puppets (Oracfe). 

1250 Here to Stay. In the fourth 
programme of his series on 
minority communities in 
Britain, Trevor Hyett talks to 8 
group from London's Greek 
Cypriot cornmiatity. 

1X0 News at One with Carol 

Barnes. 150 Thames news. 

150 FBm: Take My Life* (1947) 
starring Hugh WHBams. 
Murder mystery about the 
death of a violinist in an opera 
orchestra after she was seen 
by a temperamental efiva 
talking to the diva's husband. 
Directed by Ronald Neame. 

3X0 Mr and Mrs. Quiz game for 
married couples, presented by 
Derek Batey. 355 Thames 
news headlines. 3.30 Sons 
and Daughters. 

4.00 Rainbow. A repeat of the 
programme shown at 12.10. 

4.15 The Telebugs. Cartoon 
series. 455 Woridwtea. 
Computer geography contest 
presented by David Jensen 
(Oracle). 

450 Ulster By-Efecdons Report 
4.51 The Best of Behind the 
Bike Sheds. 5.15 
Blockbusters. 

5.45 News with Alastalr Stewart 
indudes an analysis of the 
latest results from the by- 
elections In Ulster. 

6.00 The 6 O'clock Show. 

7.00 Albion Market Carol proves 
the power of mind over matter 
(Oracle). 

7.30 Murder, She Wrote: Murder 
Takes the Bus. When her car 
breaks down, thriller writer 
Jessica Fletcher and her 
passenger. Sheriff Tupper, 
take the bus. Unbeknown to 
them there is a killer among 
their fellow travellers. 

8.30 Constant Hot Water. Comedy 
series about two rival seaside 
.boarding house, landladies 
(Oracle). 

9.00 The Gentle Touch. A young 
plain clothes detective 
constable is seconded to the 
Sevan Dials station and 
Immediately puts his 
colleagues' backs up by an 
endless stream of practical 
jokes (r) (Oracle). 

10.00 News at Ten Includes Alastair 
Burnet reporting from Ulster 
on the last results of the by- 
elections. 

10.30 The London Programme. John 
Taylor reports on the increase 
In doorstep criminals who trick 
their way In to old people's 
homes. Followed by LWT 
news headlines. 

11.00 South of Watford. Hugh Laurie 
visits spectacular gravehead 
tributes to the dead. 

1150 Special Squad. The policemen 
are convinced someone is 
waging a vendetta against 
them. 

12.25 New from London. The 
Explorers in concert 

1.20 Night Thoughts. 


Tom Courtenay: Bitty Liar, 
Channel 4, 11.30pm 


• Goya is the subject of tonight'! 
THREE PAINTERS essay by Sir 
Lawrence (Sowing (BBC 2, 9.35pm). 
it is as much an impertinence as an 
irrelevance to say that Sir Lawrence 
has omitted nothing about the artist 
that really matters, out t fee! I must 
make the point because it is 
precisely the att-encompassing 
nature of Christopher Burs tails 
series - the character of the painter 
Is inextricably bound together with 
the character of the paintings - that 
leaves us feeling replete if our 
appetite tor artistic enlightenment 
extends beyond merely wanting to 
understand the mystical process 
that begins when paint is put on 
canvas. I shall, for example, never 
be able to look at Goya's portrait of 
the haughty Duchess of Osuna 
again without heeding Sir 
Lawrence's advice about not 
regarding her In too dignified a light 
because, in reality, she once came 


CHOICh ... 


to blows with another duchess for 
the attentions of a matador. And 
through Sir Lawrence's eyes we can 
fully appreciate the self-sufficiency 
of the dog dozing in the lap or the 
lady shaded by a green parasol. 

• THE STING (BBC 1.9.30pm), Ian 
La Frenals's second contribution to 
the i~o veiOY comedies . has an 
improbability about it that is quite 
breathtaking. And therein ties its 
high entertainment content I don't 
know what antiques dealers and 
auctioneers think about the 
underhand practices that underpin 
the fun and games In these stories, 
but if they have any sense, they will 
Just lay back and chuckle because it 
is absolutely impossible to take 
anything in Lovejoy seriously. 

"There is nothing wrong with good. 


honest forging," someone says In 
tonight's episode. If I thought there 
was a documentary element in 
Lovejoy. I would probably deplore 
such a sentimenL But In the context 
of this most diverting series, it 
passes lor something very like 
common sense. 

• Radio choice: John Lill's an- 
Beethoven piano sonata recital, 
including the Appassionata and the 
Hammerklavier (Radio 3, 7.30pm 
and 8.35) . . . And there is another 
chance (Radio 4, 9.05am) to hear 
Maureen Lipman's choice of 
DESERT ISLAND DISCS. I like the 
relaxed and affable way Michael 
Parkinson is doing Roy Plomley's 
old job. If those tut-tutters who 
initially disapproved of his selection 
haven t yet been won over to his 
side. I suspect it is because they just 
haven't given him a proper hearing. 

Peter DavaUe 


BBC -2 


9.00 Ceefax. 

955 Daytime on Two: French 
conversation for beginners. 
952 Part three of The Boy 
from Space. 10.15 Maths: 
symmetry. 1058 The second 
pan of the historical drama, 
The Silver Buckle. 11.00 
Behind the scenes of a 
hospital hi Scotland. 1152 
Stevenage - the first 40 years. 

11.44 The disabled at work. 

12X5 The third programme in the 
series about the capabilities of 
micros. 12.35 Computers in 
education (ends at 1.00). 1.10 
Why atoms join together as 
motecuJes. 153 The East and 
West ideologies. 2X0 The 
friendship of three girls suffers 
when one of them begins 
dating a boy. 250 Engttsh; 
communicsting orders and 
Instructions. 250 Ceefax. 

355 Count Me In. Antony Johns 
tries gymnastics. 4.10 
HeethcMf - The Cat Cartoon 
series fr). 4.15 Jacks no ry. Part 
five of The Iron Man, by Ted 
Hughes. 450 Secrets Out 
Odd hobbles quiz. 

4.55 Newsround Extra. Children in 
Northern Ireland talk about 
their future. 

5.10 Grange HU (Ceefax). 

555 News summary with subtitles. 
Weather. 

5.40 Film: The Men Who Could 
Work Miracles* (1 936) starring 
Roland Young and Ralph 
Richardson. A shy draper's 
assistant is chosen by a group 
of Heaven -domicilBd beings to 
be the recipient of the power 
to work miracles. Directed try 
Lottiar Mend as. 

7.00 Rfflcro Live. This week's 
edition Includes a visit to a 
garden centra that uses a 
database to help their 
customers find the plants they 
need. 

7.30 Ebony. Among the rtems is an 
examination of the reasons 
behind the refusal to allow the 
anti-semitic Fare Khan into this 
country. 

8.00 Travellers In Time. The story 
or Captain Irving Johnson and 
his 1 1,000 miles voyage from 
Hamburg to Chile via Cape 
Horn made in 1 929 (r). 

8.30 Gardeners* World tests a 
range of heating systems for 
seed germination. 

9.00 Tom O'Connor. The 
entertainer takes a look at 
sales and shops- 

955 Three Painter*. Sir Lawrence 
Gowing explores paintings by 
Goya (see Choice). 

10.15 DM You See . . . ? Ludovic 
Kennedy Is joined by Andrei 
Konchalovsky, Johnny Speight 
and Victoria Wood. Tha 
programmes reviewed are 
Comrades, Comrade Dad, and 
Josephine Baker. 

11.00 Newanight 11.45 Weather. 

11.50 FBm: Morgan - A Suitable 
Case for Treatment* (1966) 
starring David Warner. The 
story of artist and social misfit, 
Morgan Deft, and the efforts of 
his wife (Vanessa Redgrave) 
to get him to lead a normal life. 
Directed by Karel Relsz. Ends 
at 1.30. 


channel^; 


250 A Question of Economics. 

The first of a two-part 
examination of the pros and 
cons of the privatization of 
medicine (r). 

3.00 Dance Matinee, Introduced by 
Ben Kingsley. Two bailers 
from leading choreographers 
and dance companies In 
Britain today. Ghost Dances, 
created by Christopher Bruce 
for the Ballet Rambert In 1982, 
takes its theme and its music 
from South America. The 
music Is played by Incantation 
on pan-pipes, reed flute end 
guitars; Troy Game, created 
by Robert North in 1974 for the 
London Contemporary Dance 
Theatre, is an energetic work 
for six male dancers (r). 

450 Countdown. Yesterday's 
winner is challenged by 
Leonard Cook of Retford. 

5X0 I Dream of Jeannie. 

Unbeknown to Jeannie she 
leaves Tony only a few inches 
tall when she goes shopping, 
and the hapless Tony is 
threatened by a caL 

550 The Tube, presented by Jools 
Holland. Paula Yates and 
Muriel Gray. Performing live 
this evening are The Damned, 
Del Fuegos, Propaganda and 
Midge Ure; on video are Tha 
Housemartins and Wet, Wet, 
WeL 

7.00 Channel Four news with Peter 
Sissons. Weather. 

750 Right to Reply. Sir Geoffrey 
Chandler accuses Jane 
Gabriel's series, Greece - the 
Hidden War, of being a 
perversion of history. 

8X0 What the Papers Say. Angela 
Gordon, editor of The Times 
diary, casts her critical eye 
over how the Press has been 
treating the week's news. 

8.15 A Week in Potttics, introduced 
by Peter Jay. Live from Ulster, 
Protestant reaction to the by- 
election results. 

9.00 Athletics. Jim Rosenthal 
presents the action from RAF 
Costard, the venue ot the 
Pear! Assurance AAA/WAAA 
Indoor Championships. The 
commentators are Alan Parry 
and Peter Matthew. 

9.30 How Does Your Garden 
Grow? The first of a new 
series, first shown on Ulster 
Television, examining some of 
the picturesque private 
gardens of Northern Ireland. 
Tonight's programme comes 
from the Craigavon garden of 
rhododendron enthusiasts 
Raymond and Maureen Hunter. 

10.00 Cheers. As a taster for the 
start of next week's new 
series, a repeat of the final 
programme of the last series 
in which Frasier proposes to 
Diane (Oracle). 

1050 From the Horse’s Mouth. The 
second and final film about tha 
method of drug and alcohol 
addiction treatment known as 
the Minnesota Model (Oracle). 

1150 Film: Bitty Uart* (1963) 

starring Tom Courtenay as the 
young man who takes refuge 
from his complicated world in 
a series of fantasies. Directed 
by John Schlesinger. 

1.15 Close. 


c 


Radio 4 


3 


On long wave, t also VHF stereo. 

555 Shipping. 6X0 News Briefing; 
Weather. 6.10 Farming. 655 
Prayer.t 

650 Today. Ind 650, 750, B.30 News. 
645 Business News. 6.55, 756 
Weather. 7.00, 8.00 News. 755, 
855 Sport 7.45 Thought lor the 
Day. 855 Yesterday in 
Parliament 8.50 Your Letters. 
657 Weather. Travel. 

9X0 News. 

9.05 Desert Island Discs. Michael 
Parianson talks to Maureen 
Lipman (rj.t 

9.45 The Armada Revenged. Fourth of 
six talks on Spain by Ray 
Gosling. Today: No Curry in 
Catalonia Iri. 

10.00 News: International Assignment 

10.30 Morning Story: Lizzie by Val 

Lawrence. Read by Peter 
Wickham. 

10.45 Dally Service (New Every 
Momma, page 1).t 

11.00 News; Travel: PHare ol Society. 
Hugo Young examines the Bar, 
pillar ol the legal sysyam. In tha 
first ol six programmes about 
leading Institutions (ri- 
ll. 48 Natural Selection. The duck-billed 

platypus. With Professor Mike 
Stoddart 

12X0 News: The Food Programme, 
with Derek Cooper. Today: 
appealing to the women. 

12.27 In One Ear. Comedy.f 12.55 
Weather. 

1.00 The World at One: News. 

1.40 The Archers. 155 Shipping. 

2X0 News: Woman's Hour from 

Manchester. Indudes an 
interview with Lord and Lady 
Monks wen. 

3.00 News; The Screech Owls by 
Balzac (final e pis ode). f 

4.00 News. 

4X5 Frank Muir Goes 

Into . . . Pretension. With Alfred 
Marks (r). 

450 Kaleidoscope. Last night's 
edition, repeated. Indudes 
comment on the film Dreamchild; 
and the Scottish Opera 
production of II trov a t o ra tr)_ 


PM: News magazine. 550 
5.5S Weather. 


5.00 


6X0 News; Financial Report 

6.30 Going Places. COva Jacobs and 
his team monitor the world of 
travel and transport 

7X0 News. 

7X5 The Archers. 

750 Pick of the Week. TV and radio 
extracts presented by Margaret 
Howard t 

850 Law In Action. With Joshua 
Rozanberg. 

8.45 Any Questions? Sir Denis 
Forman, Michael Winner. Lord 
Marsh and Dame Judith Han 
tackle issues raised by the 
audience in Quom. 
Leicestershire. 

9.30 Letter from America by Alistair 
Coooke. 

9.45 Kaleidoscope. Indudes comment 
on the Medieval Players' tour. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: Wind. Sana 
and Stars by Arrtione de Saint- 
Exupery (5L Reader. John 
Bennett 10.29 Weather. 

1050 The Wor« Tonight 

11X0 Today fri Parliament 

11.15 The Financial World Tonight. 

1150 Week Ending. Satirical view of 

the week's news.t 

12X0 News: Weather. 1253 Shipping. 
VHF (available In England and S 
Wales only) as above except 
555-8. 00am Weather. Travel. 

11.00-12.00 For Schools. 155- 
3.00pm For Schools. 3.00-5.00 
Ulster By-Election Special. 
Seamus McKee and the BBC 
Radio Ulster news team with the 
latest results and analysis. 550- 
555 PM (continued]. 1250- 
1.10am Schools Night-Time 
Broadcasting: Deutscher Dub. 


c 


Radio 3 


3 


655 Weather. 7.00 News. 

7.05 Morning Concert: Berlioz's 

overture Beatrice and Benedict 
(SNO): Grieg's Peer Gym suite 
No 1 (Berlin PO); Lutosiawski's 
Paganini Variations (Argerich and 
Freire, pianos): Stravinsky's 
Violin Concerto (Perlman with the 
Boston SOM 6.00 News. 

6X5 Morning Concert (ccntd): 


Schubert's Fantasia in F minor. 
DS40 (Eachenbedh and Frantz, 
pianos): S&eflus's Symphony No 
5 (Phflharmonla).t 9.00 News. 

9X5 This Week's Composer 

Cha brier. L'&e haureuse: Toutas 
tas Hours (Lapf ante, tenor and 
Lachance, piano); Aubada: 
Banabile: Caprice: Fauiflei 
d 'album; Ronde champs tro 
(Casadesus, piano): songs 
including VHaneBe des pa tits 
canards, and Lea cigalas 
(Cuenod, tenor Parsons, piano): 
Bouree tents sque (Ousset 
piano); Ode a la musique 
(Mieheau, soprano: Chorale 
Elisabeth Brasseur and Paris 
Conservatoire Orchestra).) 

10.00 French Oboe Music: Sara 
Watkins [oboe) and Martin Isepp 
(piano). Poulenc's Otx>« Sonata: 
Iben's Escala No 2; Dutifleux's 
Oboe Son eta. t 

1050 Langham Chamber Orchestra 
(under Jiri Starek). Boar's 
Serenade In E minor. Op 20; 
Janscek's Sutie lor Strings; 
Holst's St Paul's Suite.! 

1150 Plano recital: Ian Brown piays 
Beethoven's Sonata in E flat, Op 
81 a: Copland's Variations: 
Rachmaninov's Four StucHes- 
tableaux. Op 39. Nos 1, 2, 5, and 
9.T 

12.16 BBC Philharmonic [under Rosen), 
with Maurice torque (oboe). Part 
one. Dvorak's Scherzo 
caprl cdoso: Martino's Symphony 
No 6.t 1X0 News. 

1X5 Musical Times Past: presented 
by Fritz Spiegl.t 

150 Concert: part two Strauss's Oboe 
Concerto: Roussel's Bacchus 
and Ariadne: suite No 2.f 

2.05 Turkish Classical Music. 
Traditional Instnjmemal 
Ensemble play Taksim (Mansur 
Ney solo and Ud solo) and 
Peshrev (Instrumental 
Ensemble). t 

250 Borodin String Ouartet B 

Borodin's Siring Quartet No 1 in 
A. Interval reading at 3.1 0- At 
9.15. Tchaikovsky's String 
Ouartet No 2 In F. Op 22.1 

4.00 Chroel Evensong: from St 
Michael's College, Tenbury 
Wefls.t 455 News. 

5.00 Mainly for Pleasure. A musical 
journey down the Thames with 
Rodney Stetfbrd.f 

6.30 Music for Guitar Costas CotsioKs 
plays Bach's Lute Suita No3; and 
Leo Brouwer's Tres baladas del 
Decameron Negro (from the 1985 
Esztergom International Guitar 
Festival).! 

7X5 Mozart The ECO under Britten 
play the Symphony No 25.T 

7.30 Beethoven: Part one John Llll 
(piano) plays the Sonata m E fiat 
Op 27 No l; and trie Sonata in F 
minor. Op 57. t 

8.15 Stariii Corridors: an anthology ol 
verse about space and space 
travel, compiled by Alan Bold. 

The readers: Nigel Graham. 
Richard Denington and Patricia 
Gallimore. 

9.35 Beethoven recital: Sonata in B 
flat Op 106 (Hammerklavter).T 

950 Britten and Holst Patricia Taytar 
(mezzo), Wynford Evans (tenor), 
Stephen Varcoe (baritone). 
Christopher Bowers-Broadbent 
(organ and piano), with BBC 
Singers and Orchestra of St 
John's Smith Square (under 


Lubbock). Britton's Cantata 
Misericordtum, Op 69: and 
Hotel's A Cnoral Fantasia. Op 
51 .1 

10.15 New Premises: another edition of 
Stephen Games's arts 
magazine. f 

11.00 Emil QKels: piano recordings. 

Schumann's Vlar Nachstucke. Op 
23; and Chopin's Sonata No 3 m 
B minor. Op 56.f 

1157 News. 12.00 Ctosedown. 


c 


Radio 2 


News on the hour (except 8X0 and 
9.00pm). Headlines 550am, 650, 750 
and 8.30. Sports Desk 1.05pm, 2X2, 
3X2, 4.02, 5.05, 6X2, 6.45 (mf) only. 
955. 

4.00am Colin Berry, t 6.00 Ray Moora.t 
8X5 Ken Bruce.t 1050 Jimmy Young. 
Plus legal problems answered by BiU 
Thomas. 1.05pm David Jacobs r 2X0 
Gloria Hunniford goes behind the 
scenes to discover what makes 
London's Ritz so special. 4.00 David 
Hamilton. 1 6.00 John Dunn. 1 7.30 Friday 
Night is Music Night with Maryena and 
Vernon Mklgley, and Cantabria. includes 
8-20-8.40 Interval: Gwen Grindley's 
musical pilgrimage around Canterbury .t 
950 The Organist Entertains with Nigel 
Ogden.t 955 Sports Desk. 10.00 
Mooney's Monday Magazine with Pat 
Mooney. 1050 John Brecknock Sings. 
11X0 Stuart Hall (stereo on midnight). 
1.00am Jean Chaflis presents Nigh aide, t 

3.00-4.00 A Little Night Music.) 


Radio 1 


3 


News on the half hour from 6.30am until 
'950pm and at 12 midnight 
6.00am Adrian John. 7.30 Mike Read. 
950 Simon Bates. 12.30pm NewsDast 
(Frank Panridge). 12.45 Gary Davies. 
3X0 Paul Jordan. 550 Bruno Brookes. 
750 Andy Peebles. 10X0-12X0 The 
Fndsy Rock Show with Tommy Vance.t 
VHF Radios 1 and 2: 4.00am. as Radio 
2. 10.00pm, as Radio 1. 12.00-4.00am, 
as Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 


B.DO Newsdesk. 7X0 Newc 7X9 Twenty-Four 
Hours. 7X0 Juks Box Jury. 7.45 Merchant 
Navy Programme. 8.00 News. 8.09 Reflections. 

8.15 Sound of Strings. B JO Music New. 9X0 
News 9X9 Review ol British Press. 9.15 World 
Today. 9X0 financial News. MO Lost. Ahead. 
9-40 Poets on Music. 10X0 News. 10X1 Sing 
GospeL 10.15 Merchant Navy Programme. 
11X0 News. 11X9 News About Britain. 11.15 
bi The Meant*™. 11.25 Loner from Northern 
Ireland. 1150 Martian. 12.00 Radio NcwsreeL 

12.15 Jazz For The Asking. 12.46 Sports 
Roundup 1X0 News 1.09 Twemy Four Hours. 
1.30 Jonn Peel 2.00 News. 2.01 Outlook 2-45 
LeiterfoK. 3X0 Hadio Newireei. 3.15 Las 
Mserablei. 4X0 News. 4.09 Commentary. 4.15 
Soance In Action. 4.45 The World Today. 5.00 
News. 5.09 A Lenar from Northern Ireland. 

5.15 Sarah and Company. B.00 News. 8.09 
Twenty -Four Hours. 9.15 Muse Now. 9X5 
Foreign Affairs. 10X0 Nows. 10.09 World 
Today. 1055 Letter from Northern Ireland. 
10X0 Financial News. 10.40 Reflections. 10.45 
Spans Roundup. 11.00 News. 11X9 
Commentary. 11.15 From The WeeUes. 1150 
Talking About Music 12X0 News. 12X9 News 
about Britain. 12.15 Radio Newsreel 1250 
About Britain. 12.45 Recording Ot Week. 1X0 
Nows. 1X1 Outlook, ixo Stag Gospel. 1.45 
Lanertioy. 2X0 News. 2X9 Review ol British 
Press, z.15 Network UK. 2X0 People And 
Pomes. 3X0 Newe. 3X9 News About Briuen. 

3.15 World Today. 350 Ouote. Unquote. 4.00 
Newedesk. 450 Than Trad. 5.45 The World 
Today. 

All film in GMT 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1: 1053kHz/2B5m; 1089kHz/275m; Radio 2: 693kHz/433m; 909kHz/330m; Radio 3: 1215kHz/247m: VHF -90-92.5; Radio 4: 
200kHz 1500m: VHF -92-95; LBC 1 1 52kHz/261 m; VHF 97.3: Capital: 1548kHz/194m: VHF 95.8; BBC Radio London 1 45BkHz/206m: VHF 94.9; World 
Service MF 648kHz/463m. 


RRP1 Wales: 555-6.00 Wales 
w 1 Today. 6X5-7.00 Sportfoho. 


1.15-1.20 News. Scotland: 6.35-7.00 
Reporting Scotland. 10X5-10.55 Left, 
Right and Centra. Northern Ireland: 
7l.30am12.3Cpm Northern Ireland 
□action Special. 1.00-555 Northern 
Ireland Election Special. 5.35-540 
Today’s Sport. 5-40-6.00 Inside Ulster. 
8.35-7X0 Northern Iretand Election 
Special. 1.15-1X0 News and weather. 
England: 12X0-12. 30pnr North-East 
only. The Allotment Show. 6X5-7.00 
Regional news magazine. 


ANGLIA As London except 

12X0pnt-1X0 Search for 


Wealth. IXO News. 1.30-3.30 Film: 
Kidnapped (Michael Caine). 6X0-7.00 
About Anglia. 10.30 Cross Question. 

11.10 FftruBunny Lake is Missing’ 
1.10am Gospel at the Bygones Bam, 
Closedown. 


PH 5 MNP I As London except 
UMAIMNcL -i2.30pm-i.00 Search 


lor Wealth. 1X0 News. 1X0 Mr 6 Mrs. 

2.00 Arcade. 2.30 Hotel. 3.30-4.10 
Glenroe. 6X0 Channel Report. 6X0-7.00 
That's What You Think! 7X0-6.30 Fall 
Guy . 10X0 What's On Where. 10X5 
Moviemakers. 11.10 Film: Study in 
Terror. 12.50am Closedown. 


CENTRAL London except: 
UCIX 1 12XQpm-1X0 Search 


tor Wealth. 1X0 News. 1.30-3X0 Film: 
The Stick-up (David Soul). 6.00-7X0 


Knight Ric 
Central Weekend. 12-00 Film: Eating 
Raoul. 1.40am Closedown. 






HTV WF*5T As London except 
mvwcoi 12X0pm-1X0 Search 


for Wealth. 1X0 News. 1X0-3X0 Rim: 
Calllomla Gold Rush. 6.00 News. 6X0- 

7.00 Good Neighbour Snow. 7 .30-8.30 
Knight Rider. 10X0 Your Say. 10.45 The 
Year Was ... 1964. 11.15 Film: A Distant 
Scream. 12.40am Closedown. 


HTV WALES: 

12.00 Schools. 6X0pm-7X0 Wales At 
Six. 10X0-11.00 Survival of the Fittest. 

11.00-12X5am Film: A Distant Scream. 


cap Starts: 1.00pm Countdown. 1X0 
Family Tare. 2X0 Taro Nodyn. 
2.20 Stori Sbri. 2X5 Opotwg. 2.55 
Interval. 3.05 Rim: Fire Over England". 

4.50 Y Corachod. 5.00 Mica. 5X0 The 
Tube. 7.00 Newyddion SaiUi. 7.30 Pobol 
Y Cwm. 8.00 Caryl. 8X0 Fei na Mae! 

8.15 Film: IH Fares the Land. 10.40 
Athletics. 11.10 Ghosts in the Machine. 
1205am Week in PoTrtics. 1250 
Closedown. 


YORKSHIRE 


Search for Wealth. 1X0 News. 1X5 Help 
Yourself. 1X0 Film: Tread Softly'. 255 
Home Cookery. 3.00-3X0 Wish You 
Were Here. .? 6.00-6.30 Calendar. 
6X0-7.00 DffTrent Strokes. 7.30-8.30 
Fan Guy. 10.30 Rim; Black Carrion. 

1200 That's Hollywood. I230om 
Closedown. 


SCOTTISH As London except 

1 1 tan 12.30 pm- 1X0 Search 

for Wealth. 1X0 News. 1.30 Country 
Practice. 2X0-4.00 On the Market 6.00 
News and Scotland Today. 6X0-7.00 
Report 7.30-8X0 Shindig. 10.30 Ways 
and Means. 11.00 Late Gill. 11.05 Tha 
Master. 1206am Wanted - Dead or 
Alive. 1235 Closedown. 


TVS As London except 12X0 pm- 1.00 
** Search for Wealth. 1X0 News. 


I. 30 Mr and Mrs. 200 Arcade. 2X0 
Hotel. 3.30-4.00 Glenroe. 6X0 Coast to 
Coast. 6XO-7XO That's What You Think! 
7X0-8X0 Fait Guy. 10X0 Facing South. 

II. 10 FBm: Study In Terror. 12X0*m 
Company, Closedown. 


BORDER *5 London «cepc 

12.30pre-1.00 Search tor 


Wealth. 1.20 New. 1X0 Wish You Were 
Here . . .? 2.00 Rim: Genevieve' (John 
Gregson). 3.30-4.00 Young Doctors. 
6X0-7.00 Funny You Should Say That! 
10X0 Border Live. 11X0 Sweeney. 
12X0em News. Closedown. 


TYNE TEES ** London except 
i Tree i cco i2XOpm-1.00 Search 


tor Wealth. 1.20 News. 1X0 Farm Aid. 
3X0 Cartoon. 3.25-3X0 News. 6X0 
Northern Ufa. 6X0-7.00 What Would 
You Do? 7XO-8 JO Fall Guy. 10X2 Extra 
TimB. 11.00 FBm: Grip of the Strangler 
(Boris Karloff). 12X0am Three's 
Company. Closedown. 


GRAMPIAN As London except 

12X0pm-1 .00 Search 
lor Wealin. ixo News. 1X0 Profiles ft 
Rock. 2X0 Yellow Rose. 3.00-3.30 Mr 
and Mrs. 6.00-7.00 North Tonight. 7X0- 

8.30 Knight Rider. 10.30 Crossfire. 11.00 
Rim: TroOonberg Terror. 12X0am News, 
Closedown. 


TSW As London except 12X0am~ 

* 1.00 Search lor Wealth. 1X0 
News. 1X0 FBm: Kidnapped (Michael 
Caine). 3X5-4.00 Youna Doctors 6.00- 
7X0 What's Ahead. 7X&-8.30 Magnum. 
10X2 Rim: The Big Red One (Lee 
Marvin). 12X0am Postscript, 
Closedown. 


ULSTER As London except 12X0- 

1.00 Search for Wealth. 

1 XO By-Elections. 200 Little House on 
Che Prairie. 3.00 Mr and Mrs. 3X0-4.00 
Personal View. 6.00-7.00 By-Elections. 
7.30-8.30 Knight Rider. 10.30 Y/itness. 

10.35 Falcon Crest. 11X0 Barney Miller. 

11.55 Show Express. 12X0am News, 
Closedown. 


GRANADA ^i£ ndo ?2J''»P t . 

12XOpm-1XO That s 


HoDywood. 1 X0 Granada Reports. 1 .30 
Film: On ihe Fiddle (Sean Connery). 3.15 
Man Makes a Desert. 3X5 Granada 
Reports. 3X0-4.00 Young Doctors. 6.00 
Granada Reports. 6.30-7.00 Cosb 


Show. 7.30-8X0 Knight Rider. 10.&) 
Film: The Virgin and the Gypsy (Vanessa 
Redgrave). 1.15am Closedown. 


WHAT THE S 1 MBOLS M EAN 
t Stereo * Black and wttile. m Repeat 



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’BJKLUANTLV FUNNY* Qb» 


01-74! 9999 OT Sola 01^30- 
L VC» S4on- Ftl «1 8pm. JUM M»1 
24&m. 6*u6pm * B^JSwn. 

~***PANY 


WestSL 

1171/ 



Wife BEGINS AT FORTY 

A Oelfatitfiil new eenwdy • 

Set eves nia out until aaa at March. 


ALOWYCH TH 01-836 6404 -0641 

CC 379 0233- Mon-Sal 7.30. Mats Wed 

i 

THEATRE*. Jack Tinker D Midi. 

BONNIE JOSS 

LANGFORD ACKLAND 
Two Dazzlins Performance’. DTel 

In 

X M. BARRIE'S 

PETER PAN Tnc Musical 

Oroun Sales 01-930 61 23__ 
OC24hr« Inc Sun 01-741 9999 


THE cc 437 ZS&3/4 

tM2 4o'ra fc. ‘ 
PENELOPE KEITH 

MARK KINGSTON 

THE DRAGON'S TAIL 

"Funny & enMtr ftnl nc" CUV Umlte 
A new play by Doualos WatWratm 
Directed by Michael Rudntan 
Ew M«n-Prl TZOThur* MM 3.00 Sals 
E.oaaie Group Sake. 01-930 6 123 


APOLLO VICTORIA S& BOB S665 
a~6JO 6262 OTP Sales 930 6123 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

ANDRBWI^§’W|1BEI» 
LyrJcs by RICHARD fai n G OE 
Directed HZ TREVOR NUNN 

Eves 7.49 Mat Tue & Sat 3.QD 



ASTORtA THEATRE BpK Of f. - CC A 

Groups 01-734 4287 /«37 6772 

THE OUTSTANDING 

RlLiSICAL 
LENNON 

thct ^om3^w|t i«vEpoke n* 

wiiH A SfH«vo»iE E a3e^J? the 
EM 9 b _ 

Additional mal Sim ai 4.00. Etas Tues 
io «-■ 8-00 Mats Sat * Sunday 4.00. 


BARBICAN OS -628 8796. 638 8891 rc 

oSon-eun lOam-Spmt. 
ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 
COMPANY 
BARMCAN THEATRE ton'! 7.3a 

& 7 SO THE METOTY 

WIVES OF WINDSOR. AS YOU LIKE 

rr “speBWndino Times, returns 3Z 

v53c PIT wn't * iMnor 7 30 

PHILISTINES by Matirn Oorto In a 

Siw vmS. uy Bator «»i» 

melons by Bernard PMhewnw r*- 
SmS J ratfs ot; pull repot 


CfJSIECY S 030 £578 CC 839 : 43S. 

CAMILLE 


COTTESLOC -S' 9» 2262 CC 

INaUonu! Tliralrp'l snub _ a l 

ORCHARD by CbeWuw. 


CRITERION. S. 930 3216. CC 379 

6666/379 6433/741 9999. Groups 
836 3962. Evys. 8.00 irat. Tbura. 2.30. 
Sal. S.30UU1 8.30. _ 

"BRITISH FARCE AT riS BEST* 

D Mari 

Ttw Theatre of 
BERNARD 

CRIBBINS 




SSf 

RUN FOR YOUR WIFE! 


DOMINION THEATRE HMf 

HOTUNES Ol -680 B845 BOX Office Ol - 
636 B638/9 or 01-680 9662/3 First 
Call 2a hr 7 Da* cc Booking 01-836 
2428. OTP sates si 6 123 


DAVE I 

TIME 

THE MUSICAL 

CLIFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAR* 

THE PORTRAYAL OPAKASK* BY 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 


DONMAR WAREHOUSE 240 B2SO 
CC 379 6563. 6433. TU IB Feu Motl- 
Frt Bmp, erttjepm sarnn. 

HutI T ruck Theatre Go In 
BOUNCERS by John Corner _ 
"Like a huleoiiatv fumy SotunteV 
RnBM Favor" T. Out 


DRURY LANE THEATRE ROYAL OJ 

8368108. 01-240 9066/7 
24- hour 7-Ssy cc bookings FlrM Cell 
01-240 7200 
DAVID MERRICK'S 

42ND STREET 
WINNER OF ALL THE BEST 

MUSICAL AWARDS FOR 1984 

BEST MUSICAL 

Standard Drama Award 
BEST MUSICAL 
Laurence Olivier Award 

BEST MUSICAL 

PtayiA Players 
London Theatre Crimes Award 
Evpi 8.00. Mats Wed 3.00. San 6.00 & 
8.30. Group Saiea Ol -930 6123. 

- IMS. 


DUCHESS WCZ 836 8243 CC £40 
7EOO f24hrs 7 dayal. Opens Feb 7. 
Mon-Fll 8. Sets 5 Or 8.30. Wed Mar 3. 

GEORGE COLE 

A MONTH OF SUNDAYS 
byBobLartwy 


DUKE QF YORKS 836 6122 CC 836 

9837/741 9999 CD 930 6 123. FIRST 

CALL 24hr 7 day 66 240.7200 E%»8 

WINNING COMEDY HIT 

STEPPING OUT 

-TRIUMPH OH TAP- EyrSM 
The HU Comedy iw Wehwd Harm 


Evp* B. Frt. Sal 6 4t 8.40 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Laurence Olivier Awards 1984 

UP AND UNDER 

By John Qotfbrr 

*A WONDERFUL COMEDY* 9 Times. 
"9blendML** D TeL “One of Uw (umUesl 

Obs. "Eadiemeni and hilarity . . . 
Mina tee audience Id dap and 

S TeL “A JOY“, S Exp. 


GARRICK S 01-836 4601 CC 579 
6433 A cc 24 hr *7 day 240 7200. Grp 
Sales 930 6123. Evas 8.0. Wad mat 
3j0. Sat 6.0 and 8 0. 

NO SEX, PLEASE - 
WE'RE BRITISH 


GLOBE CC 01-457 1692. 

Firs Call 24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200. 

raff “* 

Society of Wns End Theatre Award V5 
DAISY PITLLS IT OFF 

by Denise Detmn 
Directed by nnvlri Gllmorr 
Eves H-O Mate Wed 3.0 & Sat 4 .0 
Croup Sales *>30 61 23 
-THIS. IS AW ABSOLUTE HOOT & A 
- SCREAM" Sunday Tunes 
LAST 4 WEEKS-MUST END IB FEB 


KINGS HEAD 01-226 1916 AGNES 
8ERKELLE “Full of Magical 


LONDON PALLADIUM. 01-457 
7373. CC Hotline 437 20SB. Dally 2 30 

icxcctH Fill & 7.30. Party Rates avail- 

able 

"A terr i fic trsdm«ul Pants 1 * The 
Star 

DES O'CONNOR 

"is devastating" The Si tu- 
rn CINDERELLA 
PAUL NICHOLAS 

"Undeniably a Hhhy Prises Cfiarm- 
Ing-DMaU. 

•eduction la en 
Dally MeU 

H sssls wins 

ipmuftaus applause Dally Telegraph 
■WlUa tha sud— 

. . . a'woadarfuL 


"and tha JXnreducfion 
enchantment Dally Mal 


GLOBE 437 1692 First Call 24 hr T 

days cc 240 7200. Qraup Bales 950 

61 ^DRE^U^VDV 

D e a ls Lawson, Jan F unds 

floaold Holgeta. John Bssss 

Lend Me a Tenor 

A COMEDY BY KEN LUDWIG 
Directed by David Gilmore 
'Eves 8.00. Mate Wed 3.00. Sat 4.C 
Prevs from Fvh 21 
First Nlghl March Oat 7 OO 


ORBBVWtCH THEATRE Ol -833 7765. 


unconnnv memorable ... an aston- 
ishing performance" D. Trl. 
“Awesome . . . Garlands for Judy" 
Su n day Express. 


HAMPSTEAD 722 9301 Eves 8, S 

Mate 4JWTTHE LIGHT ROUGH, 
New Cosrv v- v Oy wire Thompson. 


YORK 

“One sftfas more sophlstlealad 

” I of rsend win ... thoi 
- ‘ f thrluo D. TeL 
iSLADE'a 

FATAL ATTR-ACTION 

Directed by David GStmora _ 
Evgs 7 30 Mate Weds 2-30. Sul 3.O. 


HER MAJESTY'S 9Z0 4020-930 

6606 CCHotnne 741 9999 First Call 24- 
hr day cc beaMnqa 240 7200 Croup 
930 6123 “A amsdarfill 

Dur 

DONALD SIN DEN tn 
THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL 

“A stunning adaptation ... an evenJpq 

of . . . theatre magic- D Tel "Superb 
oftmic pcTfomumccs" FT- The spee- 
tacuLarty. longue- nv-cme melodrama' 
Mail On Bun, 

Lvql 7X0. Mate Wed & Sal ai 3 o. 



LONDON PALLADfUKt 

L^ CAGE AUX FOLLES 

Tctsphone credit card bookings new 

accepted on 01-734 9923. Finn Call 
24W 7day OC Booklnm 240 7200. 
Baa pfnea now oemn tor parDonal 


GTra sales 01-930 61 73 
Prstjttwsfpom April VS. 
Firn NN» May 7 


a. 

■ avaflaMe at tha door*. 


LYRIC HAMMERSMITH 01741 2311 
Sal U Wed 2.30 & 7 JO 

DRACULA 

ANCES- Time Out . 

Spaolaf ratas for efaBibM 
LYRIC STUDIO Eves Bern. BALLS ft 
CHAINS. Lalecomers win not oe 
admitted 


LYRIC THEATRE Shaftesbury Ave 

WI. 01-457 3686 '7 01-434 1060 
cc 01-434 1560 01-734 8166-7. First 

f-nri P4_hr 7 day cc 


tsa- 


BURRIDGE 
k WARING in 


GIG! 

lorn. 

I turnuttuoua 

applmiea” DPlly Exsras 
EitB 7.30 Sate 5.0* 8.15 
Weds Mats 3 O 

Party Role reductions 734 5166 


LYTTELTON •&* 928 2252 CC 

(National Theatre's proscenium 
sraori. Toni 7.46. Tomor 2.16 ilow 

Pa F F ISriS,V5 £ 

Shaw. 


MAYFAIR S CC 01-629 3036. 741 

9999. Mon-Thu B. Frl Sul 5 40 h 8.10. 

. RICHARD T ODD 

ERIC LANDER ANNETTE ANDRE 

THE BUSINESS OF MURDER 
The Hit Thriller by Rlch»d_Ho»»s 

■The nest thriller lor ye^rs s ffir. "An 

unadaihcd winner" Si ' A Ihrlller 

teal achieves n all Sensalional" Tfrnes. 

■'The mnst lnocniou«. mystery to have 

.wimitwi in a accede' ° Mail. 

0REA-T VEAR 

oven 2 xoo performances 


NATICSAL THEATRE. Sa cirri Buna 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMPANY 
Bee SEPARATE ENTRIES 

UNDEfe °^& Lo y rTTElT0N/ 
etc cell iml cheap scud day of pert all 


NEW LONDON On-TY UMWC2 Ol 

403 0072 CC 01 379 64j»» Erts 7.4fi 

VVEB BER/ 

T.S.EUOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY T^BOX OFRCC FOR 

Group Bookfrios Ol 405 1367 or Ol 
930 5123. Foual awUeaUoiu npw 
betno accepted unRJ Atiptm 30. 


OLD VIC OW 7616 CC 261 1B21 

LAST 3 PERFS Toni 7.30. Tomor 4 0 

BEAUTY &'THE BEAST 
The Ckuac Fairy Slory adapted for Uir 
9Bge Dy Louise Page 
Sootdol rataa for chOdrsn 
~l WOULD URGE EVERYONE TO 
GD~ Sundard. 

MUST END TOMORROW! 


OLD VIC92B76L6CC261 1821 
Preview Tue at 7.30 Opens Wed al 
7.O. Sub eves 7.30. Sals 4.0 ft 7.4S 

PRIDE & PREJUDICE 

A ploy adapted from Jane Austen's 

PE?ER D * vM ’ 

£ ALLIS 

JAMES TESSA 

WARWICK PEAKE-JONES 

IAN IRENE 

QELDCR SUTCLIFFE 

> UL^fi^MpST eSLr^yable _ 


nuw 

PownaD 

PAUUNE 

YATES 


»3®;_ 

SINCE NICHOLAS NICKLEBY" Tms 




OLIVIER -s' 928 2252 OC (Natlanal 
Theatre's open slapei. Toni Mon 
7.16. Tomor 2.00 How price mail ft 
7.15. then Feb 12 la 17 PRAVDA - 
A Fleet Street Comedy, by Howard 
Brcnton and David Hare. 


PALACE THEATRE 437 6834 CC 437 
8327. 379 6433 Grp Sales 930 61 £3. 

THE MUSICAL SENSATION 
LES MISERABLES 
-IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET - STEAL OXET Sid 

Eves 7 JO Mau Tllu ft Sal 2.30. 
Latecomers no! admitted 

unin tee Inlerval 

BEAT THE TOUTS EY ENQUIRING 
FOR RETURNS AT THE BOX OFFICE 


PRINCE OF WALES 01-930 8681 2 

CC Ho Ulne Ot -930 G844/6. 6. Group 

Sales 01-930 6123. K Prowse 01-741 
9999. First Call 24 hr 7 day CC 
BooktRM 240 7200. 01-379 6433. 
E\«s 7.30. Mal Thur ft Sat a: 3.00. 

-One of me yre-d-areal Musicals' 3 

Tunes. , „ 

The National Theahe of Great 

DrUaIn Award Wlnnlr* 

GUYS AND DOLLS 

NORMAS 1 R&ksiiliGTON 
CLARKE PETERS 

BETSY BRANTLEY 

DAVID MEALY 

■Wonderful Entertainment' 3 Tel 'A 
CLASSI C of Its kind' D Tel. 
■DYNAMITE" □ Mall. 

Now Booking until April 26. 


ROYAL COURT S CC 730 1746 

OPERA FACTORY - LONDON 
SIKFONIETTA- Eve* 8.0. LAST 
TWO PERFS Toni HaB*a Angela t» 
Nigel Osborne & David Freeman 
Tomorrow La Collate. Francesco 
Cavalli 


ROYAL COURT UPSTAIRS. T» 
2564 OURSELVES ALONE by Anne 
Devlin. Eves 7.30. Sal MaU 3.30. 
Musi end Feb 8. 


— 4ARL1E AND THE 
CHOCOLATE FACTORY 
by Roald Dahl 
New Mink Production of . 
‘Boot Laved Children's book . 


PHOENIX 636 2294 cc 240 9661 or 
741 9999 Eve* B Mal Thu 3 Sal 6 L 
B.SO. rim Can 24 hr 7 day cr 240 
7200. 

BEST MUSICAL OF IMS 
Standard Drama Awards 

MARTIN SHAW 

**IS JUST ^AMAZING^THE PERF- 
ORMANCE IS A LAHOfHARK" D Exp 

ARE YOU LONESOME 
TONIGHT? 

A«dga!^^^TH,S 

'Tr*S MAGNIFICENT*’ Obaervar 


PICCADILLY THEATRE 437 4906. 

734 9635 C C J79 6566.7741 9999. 
Group Salm 636 3962 / 930 6 1 23. 
"A brilUont new mualcal" BBC 

DAMD FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY! 

"TREMENDOUS SPECTACLE** Gdn. 

“ ,«=. 3 OO. Mate Sul 6.00. l»'rd 3.00 


PRINCE EDWARD. Tel Oi -437 6077 S 

EVTTA 

. C»7S B43. Mali Thun ft Sal al 3.O. 
Hotline 43« 849V. 379 6433. 741 

from i -i may 

CHESS 

w/asasm 

tcOMWnjp 01-833 346* 

Croup BhlS 01 -930 6123 


Until Feh 16. Tlejiets £2.76- E6 Same lv 

e lar Cntidrcn. JEANNE - 

steal, 

7.30pm. pretift 


price (call lor CMUran. JEAN* 
Musical, 22 Feb-6 April. 

I si Nish Hi price. 


SAVOY. Box Otrice 01-856 888S 

Credit Cants Ol -379 62 1 9 . S36 0479 

E ^ 6 V^^k 6 V^D a5Q - 

maumsua 

STE cS^ NlE rADoicx 

NUCHAEL COCHRANE 
COLETTE TIMOTHY 

QLEESON CARLTON 

NOISES OFF 

MICHAEL FRAYN'S COMEDY IS 
THE FUNNIEST PLAY I HAVE EVER 
SEMV IN THE WEST-END ■■Tlnjee. 
□irertrd by MICHAEL BLAKEMORE 


SHAFTESBURY THEATRE OF 
COMEDY 379 5399 CC 741 9999. Grp 
Sales 930 6123. Cigs 8-0. Sal 6.30 ft 
B 30. 

THEATRE OF COMEDY COMPANY 
JOHN DANIEL 

THAW MASSEY 

NERYS HUGHES 
and ALFRED MARKS 

TWO INTO ONE 

Written ft'Otrected by 

“Hilarious praeUxlfin^F.T. '-Comic 
« lineal. “ST 
' WEEKS II 


STRAND WCZ 01-836 2*60 4143, 

6190. Monday-Frtday Etg» 8.0 

Mate Wed 2.30. Sal 5.30 ft 8 30 
DAVID JASON 
*"A NATURAL COMIC, 

A JOY TO BEHOLD" Standard 
"GENUINELY FUNNY' r Fln Ttmes 
RICHARD L77MDA 

VERNON BELLINGHAM 

LOOK. NO HANS! 

“John ChaHnui ft Michael 
PartweeS comedy la obviously 
da stin ad for a Iona stay- It pasaas 
tha time aa p l aae an rlv aa a leva Gin 
and Toroe" Sunday Tfanaa 
Directed by NSca Ockrent 


THEATRE OF COMEDY COMPANY 
■The very be*« of Britain 1 * 
comic latent" D. Mall 
TWO INTO ONE 
set ShaflesSury Theatre 

WIFE BEGINS AT FORTY 

nee Ambassadors Theatrr 

RUN FOR YOU WIFE 

see Ol tenon Theatre 

A MONTH OF SUNDAYS 

see Ductless Theatre 
Four hll comedies 


VAUDEVILLE 836 9907. 5645 

First call 240 7200 124 hrsi 


CCFl! 

flW 


JANE CADEU 

ASHER 

MARCIA WARREN 
NOEL COWARD’S 

BLITHE SPIRIT 

Reduced price previews. Eves 7.30 
Wed mal 2.30. Salt 5.0 ft 8.16 

'Opens Jan 30. Tpm >. 


VICTORIA PALACE 01-834 1317 

THIS WEEK AND UNTIL FEB 1 

No public performances 

NORMAL P^FOhnflASc?3 OF 

MICHAEL CRAWFORD in 

BARNUM 

recommence Monday Feb 3 
Evns 7 30. Mats' Sat an*v 2 43 

BOX OFFICE OPEN MON-SAT. 
9AM-9PM. FOR CURRENT 
BOOKING PERIOD FEB 3 TO APRIL 
28 Box omc* ako open Sundays 

Hum 7pm lor credit cord telephone 

boo Kings only 


OuEEiVS 01-734 1166. 734 1167. 

734 0291. 734 0120. 439 3849. 439 

4051 First Call CC 24 hr 2*0 7200. 

Grp Sales 930 6X23- Eves 8pm. Wed & 
Sat Mata 3mn. 

MAGGIE EDWARD 

SMITH FOX 

“GIVE BRAVURA PERFORMANCES 
IN TH^ Sharp^^ABDONIC, 

ELEGANT COMEbY** S. Tms 

INTERPRETERS 

A new Play by Ronald Harwood 
Directed by Peter vain . 


SHAFTESBURY 379 6399 OC 74 
9999 

Firs! Call 24hr 7 da v cc 2*0 7200. 

Grp Soles 930 6123 

ROWAN ATKINSON 

THE SEW REVUE 
OPENS 7 MARCH 
Red price pm- BUi and 6ui March 


ST MARTINS. 836 1443. Special CC 
No 379 6433. Eves 8.0. Tim 2.45. Sal 
0.0 ft 8 . 0 . 

34ih tear of.^aiha Christie's 
THE MOUSETRAP 


STRATFORD-UPON-AVON Rdval 
SnahrsDoara Theatre i0789) 296623 

or Timrtm aster OJ.-J79 6433. 

COM?A°^ W1AK£SPfiAM 
NICHOLAS NICKLEBY 
Seals available soma pens Unit] 8th 

February. “You will never forpet me 

ejcpenence'* S Times. For special 
m«al.'a*ealre„«leah and hole! 
supovrr rmp 07 B9 67262. 


WYNSHAM’B 5 836 3028 CC 379 
6565 '379 6433.741 9999. Grps 930 
6123 836 3962. Eve* 8.0 Wed Mal 
3.0 Sat 5.0 ft 8 15 

SUE TOU7V6 END'S 

THE SECRET DIARY OF 

ADRLAN MOLE 

AGED 13>, 

MinJc ft Ls-ncs oy 

KEN HOWARD ft ALAN BLAIKLEY 
"U V ELY.SP A RKIBH HUMOUR/'Cd n 
COMPULSIVELY ENTERTAINING' 

SE»"HILARIOWOdn 

LONDON RUN ENDS 22 FEB 
PRIOR TO NATIONAL TOUR 


WYNDHAnrS S 836 3028 cc 379 
6E6S'S79 6433. Grouro 836 3962. 
REDUCED PRICE PREVIEWS Iran. 
26 Feb. Onena 3 Mar 7pm Men IO Frl 
8pm. Wed mou 3pm. Saw 6 ft 830. 
CAFE PUCCINI 
by ROBIN RAY 

bavd an the HA- ft nnelr pf 

GUACOMO PUCCINI 


YOUNG VIC 928.6363. L*« 3 ports 

— Tamar AAhtu- 


Today Sam ft 7 30, Tamar Arthu 

Mni«*«THE CRUCIBLE. . "N«3 

Wtinahr ittsl ttans** FT 
"ThrUOrtaly, finalnaiy aBva" 
C Limits. v Xmhh Bmtmm thinaa 
they have dona 1 ’ P.TeL OC 3W 

’OLfria Vic STUDIO. 99 
TU Feb 1 Eves 7 45 JOE JbRTOflFfi 
Funeral Gamas Ik GoriSa ht tha 


CINEMAS 


ABC SHAFTESBURY AVE WI Sun 

Jan 26 al 2.30 one show onlv or 
M, atari Qmlno-j HEAVEN'S GATE 
1181 lull version TOmra stereo 
"Perhaps Uic moot ordinal and tm 

atnxtauve lazpe scale mm America 

has produced since the war" N 

Andrews F Times. Ticket* 
Li. SO 4. SO Book now hr 
Access Visa 836 86C6. 


ACADEMY 1. 437 2981. REUBEN. 
REUBEN 1161 bi Z 30 'not Sunt. 4 JO. 
6,40 ft B 60. LAST WEEKS. 
ACADEMY 2. 437 5129. lUdyL* 
PUteloiuU naly beaunful FORGET 
VENICE <18>. Prow 2.00. 4.10. 6.20. 
8J5. Sum i ai 4 10. 6 JO. 8 35. 
ACADEMY 3. 437 B819. THE 
WANDERER (La Grand Maaidnw 
■PGV Prop*. 4.0o. 6.10, 820. 


CAMDEN PLAZA 485 2443 lOpp 
Camdm Town Tube' Peter 
GreenaMV's A ZED B> TWO 
NOUGHTS 1151. Film at 1.46. 4 OO. 
6 20.8.46. 


CHELSEA CINEMA ZSL 3742 Kings 
Road tnearcs! Tuee Sloonr Sql 
2Jleliel.De* rile'* DEATH IN A 
FRENCH GARDEN H8' Film ol 1 OO 

3.00 5.00 7 OO 9.C4. Seals Bookable 

lor Iasi eve pert 


CURZON MAYFAIR. Cur«m StreeL 

499 3737. Coral Bowne. Ian Holme 

m Dennis Poiter*s DREAMCHILD 
iPCi. Film M 2.00 inot Sun.'. 4.10. 
6.20 ft 8 40. 


CURZON WEST END. Shallesburv 

Avenue. WI. 439 4805 Glenda 
jjjinouev in TURTLE 

ln sW£l¥ 


“ATE ClfraMA. NotUng HJU Gale. 727 


rV- - ■ mi. oL, 1 >X fl-JU. 

£ L nJghi Wed. Thurs. Fn. 

S? 1 I 11 ®.- Adtancvd Dooijng, no 

rngnmertfiip rrquirM. 


LEICESTER SQUARE THEATRE 930 

6111 -Enqi ■ 829 1759 i24 hour 

Accew _>.j4a Bookte9«j. ROCKY IV 
I PCI ril . Chrim Sep proas dally 12.66. 
i.59- 6.10. B 50. Lair Night Show 
Mghib- 1 1 45pm. All Proas Bookable 
In Advance. 


WJSJplf i CINEMA 379 3014 836 
. SI Marlin's Lane WC2 
vVriwsier Sq Tube' Win lam Hurl In 
“S® OF THE SPIDER WOMAN 
1 1 p'F Um it .1-26. 3 45. d.IO. 8.40. 
L-ATT SH OU ’ 11.1 Bom Sals inly. Lie 
aar. s «EATS BOOKABLE — 


’■yr Eve 


MINEMA KNIQHTSBRIDGE- 235" 
COLONEL REDL I1R 
7^5®- S30. ISO Mu* End Thurs. 
* r «n 2* Paul Scholfleid ln 


e M^ k< W* WMS. W 

and \ Isa telephone DooMnia 
welcome. 


°gEQN LEICESTER SQUARE (930 
SSill 930 4250.4269. A 

g*° R y-» LINE '7*0 ln TMifti Sep 
9b«n Dmriy 1.30. 4.40. 
8-00. AH progs Bookable n advance. 

accct and visa phone twounos. 

welcome. Credit Hoi Une 839 :9297 

EZ .00 K«u avail- 
able Monday an pern. 


SILVERADO fPC) Siu BT oo i Doon 

M«l Daily 1 .45. a.i^T^lpedur^ 

prices for under 16s. htuecnl card 

hoi cem. UB40 hautti. OdS. 


also on page 26 


I 











































FRIDAY JANUARY 24 1986 


THE TIMES 


* **** * 


Three Britons die in Delhi hotel inferno 


By Our Foreign Staff 

A fire swept through the 
lower floors of a Delhi luxury 
hotel yesterday killing 3S 
people, including three Britons 
and two foreign diplomats. 

Police said at least 4S people 
injured in the early-mor- 
ning blaze, many of them guests 
who escaped from the 10-storey 
building in their nightclothes, 
some by sliding down knotted 
sheets. 

Two of the British victims 
were engineers employed by the 
Manchester-based company, 
A 1 1 o it and Lomax, who were on 
a two-week business trip io 
India. They were indentified as 
John Mcdland, aged 42, mar- 
ried, from Wilmslow, Cheshire, 
and Thomas Pinkey, aged 36, 
father of three, from Sale, 
Greater Manchester. 

Mr David Compston, a 
director of the firm, who 
confirmed the inden titles, said: 
"Both were senior members of 
staff and were very popular. 
Everyone here is horrified.” 

The third Briton killed was 
Michael Woolgar. aged 33. a 
.business executive, from Strat- 
ton. near Burton-on-Trent, 
Staffordshire. He was married 
with an 1 8-month-old son and 
worked for rubber manufac- 
turers BTR Silvertown Ltd. He 
was on an IS-day sales trip to 
India and was due back in 
Britain next Tuesday. 

A British High Commission 
spokesman in Delhi said a 
further 10 Britons escaped the 
blaze. 

Delhi police said 17 of the 22 
foreign victims had been 
identified, including the three 
Britons, two Australians, a 
Japanese, a Bulgarian, a Rus- 
sian. an American, an Iraqi and 
diplomats for West Germany 
and Argentina. 

The fire broke out after 
midnight in the basement 
banquet hall of the Siddharth 
Continental hotel and gutted 
the three lower floors, sending 
black smoke pouring through 
lift shafts and ventilators. It 
spread quickly and was brought 
. under control after more than 
six hours by 230 firefighters and 
65 fire engines. 

The Delhi police chief. Mr 
Ucd Marwah. said arson was 
suspected. The investigation 
was handed over to an ami-ter- 
rorisl cell set up in the capital 
recently, chiefly aimed against 
Sikh militants. There was no 
immediate arrest. 

Police are also investigating 
reports by survivors that the 
hotel's sprinkler system and fire 
alarm did not work. There were 
at least 185 guests sleeping in 


Today’s events 


New exhibition 
The Photographic An: satellite 
exhibition: Assembly Rooms. 

George Street. Edinburgh: Mon to 
Sat 11 to 10pm. Sun 12 to 10pm 
(ends Feb 8j. 

Music 

Concert by Capricorn; Theatre, 
Liverpool University, 7.30. 

Concert by the Coull String 

8 u artel. Newton Abbot Community 
entre. 8. 

Concert by the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra. Great Hall, 
Exeter University, 7.30. 

Concert by the Bournemouth 
Sinfbnietta; Guildhall, Southamp- 
ton. 8. 

Talks, lectures 
Wild knitting, by Shirley Came- 



Knotted sheets illustrate the guests' escape route. Right, the Thompson family who survived, ... 

njured s. £ ‘Chaos, panic and smoke everywhere’ 

i»mon and wen 7 IT ■ 


their rooms when the fire 
started. The injured also in- 
cluded eight firemen and seven 
policemen. 

Fire officials said bodies were 
found right up to the top floor 
of the four-year-old hoteL Two 
people were burnt to death and 
the rest suffocated. 

The two diplomats among 
the dead were Juan Javier 
Rjnaldini, minister at the 
Argentine Embassy, and Gun- 
ther Gerlack of West Germany 
who had just arrived in India. 

Frau Gerlack was also found 
dead, and the wife of the 
Argentine diplomat is in critical 
condition in hospital. 


rotu Lecture Theatre. Castle Mu- 
seum. Nottingham. 2.30. 

Classical Rome and pre industrial 
London, by Prof Keith Hopkins, 
Library Seminar Room. 2.15; 
Striped apples and pet fish: how 
fuzzy concepts combine, by Dr J 
Hampton. Astley Clarke Building, 
2.15: Discipline and the growing 
child, by Prof Martin Herbert, 
Vaughan College, 7; Leicester 1 
University. 

William Barnes in Dorchester, by 
Dr Alan Chedzoy. Dorset County 
Museum, Dorchester, 7.30. 

General 

Book Fair. Dolphin and Anchor 
Hotel. West Street. Chichester, 2 to 
8, tomorrow 10 to 5. 

The World of Watercolours and 
Drawings lair. Park Lane HoteL 
Piccadilly, London, today and 
tomorrow 11 to 8, Sun 1 1 to 7 (ends 
Sun). 


A British survivor described 
yesterday how he fought 
through dense smoke with his 
wife and two-year-old daughter 
to reach a fire escape and 
scramble to safety. 

“I was awake and heard 
shouting from other guests and 
saw smoke coming through the 
door,” Mr Brian Thompson, 
aged 32, from Liverpool, said. 
He was staying on the eighth 
floor of the hotel with his 
pregnant wife, Xartini, and 
daughter, Canya. 

“We wrapped wet towels 


around our heads and ran 
towards the fire exit. There was 
chaos, and panic with smoke 
everywhere. We coold see 
flames oat of the window. 

“We found our way to the' 
exit and the staff were very 
good ushering people down. 
The fire engines seemed to tab 
ages to get there 1 ", said Mr 
Thompson who had stepped in 
Delhi on his way from Afghan- 
istan to Thailand. 

Another survivor. British 
company executive Mr D. C. 


Bessey, told the 1 Press Trust of 
India: “I wrapped a wet towel 
round my head and groped my 
way through dark corridors to 
reach the fire escape. ” 

British businessman . George 
Allen, said he escaped' suffo- 
cation because he and three 
colleagues had prised open 
locked windows with spanners 
a few days earlier. 

! “We were- sleeping and 
suddenly woke np after smell- 
ing smoke ... we ran and ran 
and finally came out of the 
hotel”, one foreign-conpie said. 


Peres steps 
up pressure 
on Husain to 
drop PLO 

Continued frompagel ' 

Yesterday he had talks with 
opposition leaders, MPs and Mr 
Leon Britttut, .the Secretary for. 
Trade and -Industry, and was 
entertained' to; lunch at 'The-. 
Times. -■ 

: According to Israeli sources 
King Husain, who held talks in 
London with Mr Muiphy and , 
M» .Thatcher, immediately; 
before- . Mr . Peres's . arrival 
intends to give- Mr Arafat one 
list chance to acoept.the three 
conditions which' 'he laid' down 
for PLO representation in a 
joint ' ‘ Jordinian-Palestinian 
delegation for direct talks with 
Israeli. , . 

These " ' conditions : are 
intended .to provided : the 
Jordanian monarch- .with 'firm 
guarantees that the PLO would 
be committed to negotiating a 
peaceful settlement of the Arab- 
Israeli problem on .the basis of 
UN Security Council resolution 
242. 

The Israelis are virtually 
certain Mr Arafat will not 
accept. The king will then try to 
find alternative Palestinians to 
join his team, possibly from 
among West Bank leaders or 
Palestinian members of the 
Jordanian Pariiameni. 

The Israelis are being careful 
not to identify which Palesti- 
nians they would find accept- 
able. Although not prepared to 
accept PLO members, they 
would not reject Palestinians 
with dose links to ihe'PLO. 

In his speech to the Royal 
Institute of International Affairs 
on Wednesday Mr Peres delib- 
erately -7 made a .number - of 
conciliatory references towards 
the Palestinians. 

Reiterating Israel’s commit- 
ment to grant full autonomy to 
the people -of the West Bank 
and Gaza, he .said an accord 
jvould “facilita Palstintan self- 
expression." - 

.Mr Peres and Mr Murphy 
have now reached the point of 
discussing the fine detail of 
what shape direct talks between 
Israel and' a Jordanian-Palesti- 
niari delegation might take, .as 
well as the ..format of -an 
international conference to set 
the talks in motion.' 

Mrs Thatcher has accepted 
an invitation u> go to Israel 
although no dates have yet been 
fixed. She will be the first prime 
minister to visit the Jewish stale 
while in office. . 

Leading article, page 13 
Tough budget, page 7 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 16,952 


Exhibitions in progress 

From A1 to Medway: photographs 
by Paul Graham; Ramsgate Library 
Gallery, Guildford Lawn; Mon to 
Wed 9.30 to 6. Thurs to Sat 9.30 to 
5. Fri 9.30 to 8. closed Sun lends 
Feb 12). 

Pollok Park Local Plan; Burrell 
Collection (ends Feb 2); The Age of 
Oa- k (ends Jan 30% Burrell 
Collection. Pofiok Country Park, 
Glasgow, Mon to Sat 10 to 5, Sun 2 
to 5. 

Paintings and watercolours by 
Philip Wilson Steen Fitzwilliara 
Museum, Trumpington St, Cam- 
bridge; Tues to Sit 10 to 2 and 2 to 
5 . Sun 2.15 to 5, closed Mon (ends 
March 31). 

Roads 

I Wain and West: M& Only one 
lane available southbound between 
junctions 25 and 26 (Taunton and 
Wellington); hard shoulder and 
inside lane dosed. A361: Tempor- 
ary lights on Bra union Rd and 
Newport Rd, Barnstaple. A499: 
Roadworks on the Caernarfon to 
Pwllheli road between LJanwnda 
and Gtyullifbn, Gwynedd. 

The North: Ml: Various lane 
closures for bridge repairs at 
junction 32. South Yorkshire- A6& 
Resurfacing between Mount Plea- 
sant Farm and Greta Brid g e, Co- 
Durham; temporary fights. Al: Both 
outside lanes closed on Agricola 
Bridge (Catterick bypass); widening 
on central reservation. 

Scotland: ATL Single line traffic 
and temporary lights (24 hours) 
between junction 3 of the M74 
( Larfchall interchange) and Barrion 
Bridge on the A71, Lanarkshire. A7: 
Single line traffic between 8am and 
4pm six miles N to Stow. 


Anniversaries 


Births: Sir John Vanbrugh, 
dramatist and architect of Blenheim 
Palace, London, 1664; WHliiun 
Congreve, dramatist, Bardsey, York- 
shire, 1670; Frederick H (the Great), 
King of Prussia 1740-86. Berlin, 
1712; Piem- Augustin da Beaumar- 
chais, dramatist, Paris. 1732; 
Charles James Fine, statesman, 
London, 1749; Sir Edwin Chadwick, 
social reformer, Longagbt, Man- 
chester, 1800. , 

Deaths: Lord Randolph Chnr- 
c hfll, statesman, London. 1895; 


1920; Sir Winston CbnrduH, prime 
minister 194045. 1951-55, London 
1965. 


Food prices 


Top films 


Weather 


Supplies of excellent quality fish 
should be available everywhere this 
week due to improved, weather 
conditions. Herring, mackerel, 
sprats and sardines are particularly 
good in the south, lemon soles 
better in the north and Midlands. 
Nationally, cod steaks or fillets are 
the best buy. The average price of 
large cod fillets stable at £1.73 a lb, 
haddock fillets are up 2p to £1.77, 
coley 9 Ip, whiting £1.31. plaice 
down 3p to £1.91 and fresh 
mackerel 63p a lb. Smoked 
mackerel is unchanged at 99p, but 
kippers are up slightly at 97p. 

Home produced lamb prices 
continued their upward trend and 
all cuts are up by a penny or two a 
lb. Whole leg ranges from £1.50 to 
£1.94 a lb, lom chops £1.68 to £2. 10. 
middle neck 68p to £1 and whole 
shoulder 88p to £1.20 a lb. New 
Zealand Iamb leg is down slightly to 
an average of £1.42 a lb. loin' chops 
range from £1.20 to £1.60, best end 
chop 99p to £1-58. and shoulder aT 
59p to 94p a lb is better value; 

Poultry is tbe best buy- at most 
supermarkets and shops this week. 
Bejam- Shoppers Paradise, Sains- 
bury, Fmefare and Tesco all have 
-frozen chickens on offer from 43p to 
49p a lb, and Safeway has poussin 
for 99p each. Other good meat buys : 
include: Asda New Zealand leg of ; 
lamb £1.09, biasing steak £139; 
Dewfaurst and Baxter New Zealand . 
sides of lamb £10.99 each, whole 
shoulders 59p a lb. Bqjam New 
Zealand kg of lamb 99p a lb, and. . 
pork chops at 95p a lb, Tesco 
boneless-rolled shoulder of pork 96p 
alb. 

Marmalade oranges are widely 
available now at 25p -to 40p a lb. 
These bitter oranges, not suitable for 
eating raw, have asbort' season, and 
this year’s - drop is very good. 
Clementines are the best soft citrus 
buy. Avocado, supplies have ■ in- 
creased and this has brought the 
price down. Conference and Contice. 
pears, at 28p to . 4Sp -a :1b, are 
excellent. Other good buys are Cape 
plums. Ruby Nels. Kctartones and 
Ga viotas 75-95p a lb. Potatoes 7p to 
15p a lb, Brussels sprouts 18p to 32p. 
a lb. prifflo cabbage 10p to 20p a lb. 
sod mushrooms 30p to . 55p half 
pound are all good buys. 

The bat salad ingredients are 
tomatoes 34-55p a lb, excellent 
celery 30p to 43p a head, cucumber 
45p to 68p. and raw beetroot LSp to" 
20pa to, cooked 28p to 35p alb. 


The top box-offlee flow in London: 


1 m A Chorus Lina 

2 (2) Back to Jhe Future 

3 (-) Kbs of kwSddar Woman 
4.-M Death Wish 3 ' 

5: (3) Year. of tha Dragon - 
6 (4) Defence oftha Realm 
7. (6) Latter to Brezhnev 

8 H Re-Animator 

9 ffl) Plenty 

10. (7) My Beautiful Laundretto - 
The top fltam In the province*: •’ 

1 Back to the Future 

2 Prtzzi’a Honour • 

3 Plenty 

4 Latter to Brezhnev 
5. Supergrass 

Camp0ad bf Soma n kJ t rnn tMa n*/ 


Top video rentals . 


1- (l).Ghostbusters . . . 

2 '(2) Grandma 

3 13) Beverty HNs Cop - 
.■*: iBl Nev er en dl hflStory 

5 (4) The Terminator . 

6 (5) Runaway 

7 (7) The; Last Starflghter 

8 (6) Water 

9 (9) Amadeus 

10 (11) The. Kfflng Raids 
SuppBad by Waiw Susftam • 


A deep depression will 
become established with its 
centre near. Denmark giving 
a strong flow over the 
country. 


6 am to midnight 


London, SE, -central S^Nw. central N 
England, M Mto nd a, Channel litandK 
Sunny intervals wfth scattered showers, 
soma heavy with enow . or sleet in 
places: winds NorNW fresh to strong 
cold, max temp 5CM1F). " 

East Angfta, E, NE England, Boidere, 
Ednburgh, Dundee : Sunny, tntnrveta 
with showers of snow or ileet heavy 
and protonged at times, espedafly near 
coasts; winds N. fresh to strong, local/ 
gale: max temp 4C (39F). . 

SW England, S Wales: Sunny 
Intervals with showers, heavy at times; 
winds NW, fresh to strong locafly gale at 
first; max tamp 7C (46F). 

N Wales. Lake District, Me of Man, 
SW Scotland, - Glasgow, Argyll, 
Northern Ireland: Sunny intervals with 
showers of snow or stoat heavy and 
protongad at tones aspacUfy in 
exposed coastel orhilty anas; winds 
strong to gale; max tamp 5C (41 n. 

Ab erd een, Central t fi e fth uida, Moray 
Firth, NE, NW Scodsnd. Ortmey, 
SheSanda: Mainly cloudy wilb showers 
or longer outbreaks of snow or sleet, 
heavy at tones , with drifting- In places: 
winds N. strong to e ale, tocufly storm at 
first max temp 3C (37F). 

Outlook for tomorrow and Sunday: 
Sunny intervals and snow - showers. 


Parliament today, ; - 


'Commons (9.30): -Obscene -Public 
cations (Proiec^on'or.ChDdren-EK;) 
(Amendment) BUI, second reading: : 


Yesterday 


SNOW REPORTS 



the dead zone 


rr> t?yr..- 


London 


Ysatarday: Tanp: mm 8 am to 8 


The solution of 
yesterday’s 
fluffing puzzle, 

No 16,951 
will appear cm 
Monday, Feb 3 


sunehtoB N swe m i t upon 


Pyla i$ In the "dead zone" 
but it should have come back 
I to life years ago. It does, after 
an, boast a population ol 
1J200, two schools, two 
churches, a mosque and a 
once-a-month meeting 

between the Greet mayor ana 
the Turkish mukhtar. It ts the 
only village in Cyprus w here - 
through a geographical freak 
of the 1974 Turkish invasion - 
Ortek and Turkish Cypriots 
stfil live together. 

: jfi should be a ^owpiece 
^hamlet, a mode) mixed com- 
munity for the new federal 
Cyprus .about -which., both 
..Resident Kyprianou and Mr 

Denktas, the Turkish leader, 
speak so interminably. But it 
is not 

- True, the Greek Cypriote 

indulge , in a little Illegal 
gambling in the Turkish 
Cypriot coffee shop because 
the Greek Cypriot police m 
plain clothes, are not allowed 
-into Turkish houses and 
treatise the Tudrish-Cypriot 
police in plain clothes are not 
allowed to «uicst Greeks in 
Pyla. True, the moustachioed 
figure of Pedros . R^ifiou 
walks, across from his Greek 
restaurant' to shop, at Naycr 
Celabi’s Turkish grocery store 
where the whtskfey imported 
from the Turkish Cypriot side 
■ of. the ceasefire line is £6 
cheaper -.than, the scotch 
brought . from . the Greek 
Cypnot port of La m aca. 

Costas Medites. the precise 
Greek 1 Mayor; and Mustafa 
Mehmct, the Turkish muk- 
htar, declare that they arc 
friends. And down upon their 
little village from his wooden 
eyrie on the roof, of Pedros' 
draughty cafe stares a young 
Swedish Army sergpuit of the 
United Nations,, which “polic- 
es” - if such a word has any 
meaning in Pyla - the lives of 
the 800 ’-Greek Cypriote and 
400 Turkish Cypriots who live 
there. : . . ’ 

v PyJa’s recent. hKtory a 
‘ simple one. When ihc Ttxrkish 
Army! mapped out. its Attxla 
Lihe at the end of Its invasion 
4)f Cyprus,: its forward troops 
stood on a little bluff abqye, 
Pyla's ruined castle while the 
reireating Greeks dung to the 
barley fidds on the other side 
of town.- So, when ' the UN 

moved into the ceasefire line 


betwetn the two 
found; "Pyla stiU ^ 

populhtkm still 
together; just as it had 
the pre-war y cars, fieiagiff tbe 
“dead zqne^-iwjti>ej k :Grtefc 
nor Turics exmid Jay 
it which ?»-why r Pyia ^ 

town haD, -no court, no traffic 
police .’ '}■/.'■ ■ ' ' • 

Bui appearances cah : - be 

deceptive, if - .Mr.- Medito* 

speaks- coevally jabout hk 
Turkish neighbentrs; yait:doiCt 
haw to question him ftfr lohj 
before his mood changts.fThc 
Turks, he mminmces, " ^ 
pay their taxes. “We have' «. 
pay for tbe electricity and dy> 
water and the ruWeJt .colfec- 
tion but they .don’t pay 
anjihing. whytiot?”: .^ : • 

, Across ihc sqttire >at ^ Nayer 
Celabi’s grocery store, her 
husband RifeCwho drives tfe 
Turkish bus to Famagnsta, 
supplies his own answer. 
“Before 1974- aff bf ns Turio 
were harassed andJntiinidatcd 
by the Greeks: Their young 
men bad guns and stopped us 
at road blocks. Then they took 
over our cooperative -and took 
our savings If the . Turkish! 
Army was not n the. hill above 
us, we would leave today. N«x 
we. .don’t pay taxes - we 
when there’s a setUemeht: 
-Maybe my son wfll' have to: 
pay one day. Maybe- bis 
grandson will ' pay for cluf- ' 
tricity. Not me.” . 

.-. Qttier economic . factors, 
govern Pyla. Its unique pos- 
ition allows, smugglers to" 
move cheap goods -r drinks, 
packaged foods, sports clotiajs,-. 
fruits arid vegetables - through 1 
the: Turkish Army lines, intb : 
P>1a . and; .then-, down the . 
narrow Larnaca road. 

. One hundred yards down 
the lane to Laraaca. : EFdittc l 
Alnar is teaching. 29 Turkish 
primary schqoknildren. in- a 
littlfe stone classroom- whit* 
has a Turkish flagon its roo£( 
He has s no- problems .with fef 
■GreekSr he says.. -But on thei 
classroom- cwalls . qjc- stem-; 
portraits: of KiSmal-.Atatilrfc, 
and' an cfld .Exhortation from- 

die founder of the modero 
mainland Turkish r State. - “A - 
.Turk's first duty is to defend 
his nation”, it saysi-.Which js 
'not fikdy. to induce anyone to ‘ 
pay.histelephonc bill. • . 

Rib^rtFIsS 





SanitoMB 

■ .1 - 7 Jim . 

■OMIMttE 

Sun Mia: 

435 pm 

732 am 

Ful Mock January 28 . 

127 pm"^“ - 

■ 

Lighting-uptime